University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1918

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 274 of the 1918 volume:

wmmmmmmmmmmmmmm—mmmmmm 'Co gou Hopal J ons of Georgia llDIjo plebgc pour life anb honor Co sustain Ijumanitp, tlDfjo bear tfje starrp banner J ar beponb tfje sea, UDbo inscribe tuitfj beebs of balor Cbe page of memorp, DDIjo fjalloto pour Hlma Kiater UDitfj sucb fibelitp, Cijis bolume of Pan ora is affectionatclp bebicateb.PANDORA ★ fl Contents Dedication Agriculture Staff Fraternities Foreword Military Department Campus Views Literary Societies T rustees Y. M. C. A. Faculty Publications Seniors Clubs Lawyers Athletics Pharmacists Fun and Fiction Juniors Conclusion Sophomores Advertisements Freshmen Jforetoorb THE editors of 1918 Pandora present this volume hoping that it will meet with the approval of the student body. The interruption, incident to the war, of the normal life of the university has caused us to make changes that we trust are in the temper of the times now upon us. This is the war issue. May God grant that the next and all succeeding issues be in commemoration of peace and the arts of peace.David Crbxsiiaw Harrow, LL.D. Chancellor of the University7 An’DBKW MacNairn Soui.k, B.S.A.,Sc.I).,F.R.S.A.,LL.D. President of the State College of Agriculture aiul Mechanical Arts and Dean of the College of AgriculturePANDORA Seniors in Service Seniors who felt it their duty to answer our Country’s call, to help win this gigantic Struggle, and left college too early in the year to graduate. We are proud of these men and shall always consider them members of the Class of Nineteen and Eighteen. Abner Wellborn Calhoun . . . Arts....................................Atlanta Glover Frank I)odd..........Agriculture..........................................Kingston Robert Loy Etheridge........Agriculture............................................Auburn Vann Groover.......................Arts...........................................Quitman Charles Adolphus Haioler . . . Electrical Engineering . . . Abbeville, S. C. Walter Edward Neville .... Agriculture......................................... Rabun Gap Vernon Sammons..................Science........................................Loganvillo William Joe Tidweli...Civil Engineering .... Powder Springs Lucius Holmes Tippett . ... Arts......................................Baxley Daniel Kelley Young . ... Agriculture...............................Ty Ty 'St.The University Trustees His Excellency, Governor Hugh M. Doksky. Ex-Odicio, Atlanta. George F. Goiieic, Marietta, from the State at Large. Hunky 1). McDaniel, Monroe, from the State at Large. W11.1.1aM 10. Simmons, Lawrcnccvillc, from the State at Large. Hamilton McWnoaTK.it, Athens, from the State at Large. Samuel B. Adams, Savannah, 1st Congressional District. BtitoX B. Bower, Bain bridge, 2ml Congressional District. J. 10. II.wks, Monte .uina, Srd Congressional District. KXky It. Goetchjus, Columbus, 4th Congressional District. lakk I low ell, Atlanta, 5th Congressional District. Loyd Cleveland, Gridin, 6th Congressional District. Josei II 10. Brown, Barncsvillc, 7th Congressional District. Andrew J. Conn, Athens, 8th Congressional District. Howard Thompson, Gainesville, 9th Congressional District. Bowdke Phinizy, Augusta, 10th Congressional District. John V. Bennett, Waycross, 11th Congressional District. Dudley M. Huohes, Danville, 12th Congressional District. Hugh J. Rowe, Athens,.Resident Trustee. Harry Hodgson, Athens, Resident Trustee. George Foster Peabody, New York, Life Trustee, by Special Act of the General Assembly. Nat M. Harris, Atlanta, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the School of Technology, Ex-Odicio. Theodore E. Atkinson, Newnan, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Georgia Normal and Industrial College, Ex-Ollicio. Peter W. Meldrim, Savannah, President of the Board of Commissioners of the Industrial College for Colored Youths, Ex-Officio. W. B. McCaxts, Winder, President of the Board of Trustees of the North Georgia Agricultural College, Ex-Odicio. B. S. Miller, Columbus, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the State Normal School, Ex-Officio. James J. Conner, Cartersville, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the College of Agricul ture, Ex-Odicio. Enoch H. Callaway, Augusta, President of the Board of Directors of the Medical College. Ex-Officio. William E. Thomas, Valdosta, President of the Board of Trustees of the South Georgia Nor-, mal College, Ex-Odicio. Henry D. McDaniel Thomas W. Reed . v: . . . . Chairman Secretary and Treasurer PANDORA ★ The University Faculty David Crenshaw Barrow, LL.D. Chancellor Ika W. Arthur, B.S.A. Instructor in Animal Husbandry Thomas Prather Atkinson, A.B. Instructor in lloman Languages James Beitiiold Berry, B.S.F., M.S. Professor of Plant Pathology and Forestry Homer Van Valkenburgh Bi.ack, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Chemistry Robert E. Blackburn, B.S.A. Adjunct Professor in Horticulture Willis Henry Bocock, A.M., LL.D. Dean of the Graduate School, and Millcdyc Professor of Ancient Languages Walter Clinton Burkhart, D.V.M. Instructor in Veterinary Medicine Robert Preston Brooks, Ph.D. DeJlcnne Professor of Georgia History Duncan Burnet Librarian William Mills Burson, D.V.M. Professor of Veterinary Science John Pendleton Campbell, Ph.D. Professor of Biology Andrew Jackson Cobb, A.B., B.L. Lecturer on Constitutional Late and Legal Procedure William Oi.in Collins, B.S.A. Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry Ueoiioe Arthur Crabb, B.S.A. Junior Professor of Agronomy, in Charge of Soils •William Alexander Cunningham, B.L. - Instructor in Physical Education Uriah Hakrold Davenport, B.S. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 1 ii the Government Service.PANDORA • Wii.ua m S. Dii.TS, B.S. Instructor in Poultry Husbandry Howakd Douoi.as Dozier, A.M. Adjunct Professor of Economics Marion Dbkhi.i.e Du Bosk, A.M. Adjunct Professor of Her manic Lanyuayes •Austin Southwick Howards, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychology John Richard Fain, B.S. Professor of Ayronomy Ci.audk Russell Fountain, Pli.D. Adjunct Professor of Physics Ozias Talcott Goodwin, B.S.A. Adjunct Professor of Dairy Husbandry Thomas Fitzgerald Green, B.L. Professor of Law Ernest Lee Griggs, (Graduate V. M. I.) Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing Leroy Collier Hart, B.S.E.E., A.E. Professor of Agricultural Engineering Cornelius Jacob Heatwole, A.M. Professor of Education Linvili.k Laukentixe Hbndren, Pli.D. Professor of Physics and Astronomy William Davis Hooper, A.M. Professor of Latin Ernest Lee Jackson, M.S. Instructor in Chemistry Milton Preston Jakxagix, B.S.A. Professor of Animal Husbandry Joseph Lustrat, Bach, os Lett. Professor of Romance Lanyuayes •Thomas Hubbard McHatton, Sc.D. Professor of Horticulture. John Hanson Thomas McPherson, Ph.D. Professor of History and Political Science Robert Ligox McWhorter, A.M. Adjunct Professor of Latin and Creek In the Government Service. Henry Towns Maddux, A.B., B.S.A. Editor, College of Agriculture John Morris, A.M. Professor of Germanic Languages Sylvanus Morris, B.L.. LL.D. Dean of the Late Department, and Professor of Late •Howard Washington Odum, Ph.D. Professor of Educational Sociology and Rural Education Robert Emory Park, A.M., Litt.D. Professor of English William Oscar Payne, A.M. Associate Professor of History and Political Science •Earl Ewart Peacock, M.B.A. Instructor in Accounting and Industry Robert Spencer Pond, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor of Mathematics Loy Edmund Rast, B.S. Junior Professor of Agronomy, in Charge of Cotton Industry John Moore Reads, Ph.D. Professor of Botany Thomas Walter Reed, A.M. Registrar Steadman Vincent Sanford, A.B., Litt.D. Professor of English Language Julius Eugene Severin', D.V.M. Instructor in Veterinary Medicine La Fayette Miles Siieffer. B.S. Junior Professor of Vocational Education William Arthur Shelton, A.M. Associate Professor of Applied Economies Charles Mercer Snelling, A.M., Sc.D. President of Franklin College. Dean of the University, and Professor of Mathematics Roswell P. Stephens, A.M. Associate Professor of Mathematics „ Joseph Spencer Stewart, Ped.D. Professor of Secondary Education Charles Morton Strahan, C. and M.E., Sc.D. Professor of Civil Engineering In the Government Service.PANDORA L Henry Perkins Stuckey, BS. Professor of Horticulture Percy Edward Truth, Lieut. Col. (Rot.) U. S. A. Professor of Militari Science and Tactics R003BVEI.T PRUYN WALKER, M.A. Adjunct Professor of English Eari. George Wki.ch, B.S.A.E. Adjunct Professor of Agricultural Engineering John Taylor Vheeler, B.S. Professor of Vocational Education Henry Clay White, Ph D., Sc.D., D.C.L., LL.D. Professor of Chemistry, and Terrell Professor of Agricultural Chemistry •George Livingston Williams, A.M. Adjunct Professor of Finance Robert Gumming Wilson, PIi.G. Professor of Pharmacy James Herbert Wood, B.S.A. Adjunct Professor of Poultry Husbandry Thomas Jackson Woofter, A.M., Ph.D. Dean of the School of Education, Professor of Philosophy and Education William Archer Worsham, Jr., A.M. Professor of Agricultural Chemistry Jambs William Cantrell, A B. Tutor in Physics Bryce M. Gilbert Tutor in Pharmacy Hal Hulsey, A.B. Tutor in English •Clarence Naaman Keyser, B.S. Tutor in Horticulture John Ellis Mundy Fellow in Psychology Dennis David Still, B.S.A. Tutor in Agronomy Cecil Norton Wilder, B.S.A. Tutor in Agricultural Chemistry •In the Government Service.PANDORA ★ From the Class of ’18 Oh, sweet and solemn hour of our parting, Leaving unable to answer the heart’s desire; Yet the kindred lire which is ever descending, Down through loyalty of father and gramlsirc, Is the consolation that you will forever Ik' The same old beacon light to Georgia sons, And cause them to carry your great message free, Ami men to know you’re from the center of the South’s Culture. In your halls, for a moment to stand is to love, This love no sooner into loyalty’s great current runs; And loyalty in the domain of tender memory’s love Will make you proud you’re Georgia’s son. Not one leaf of your laurels will wither by time, Patriotism of your sons will never, never grow stale; They, like yourself, will stand in honors’ clime, And by their lives your crowned fame ever hail. G. II. Wkstbrook, ’18.PANDORA ★ Senior Class History or long since, some one was prowling around in one of the secluded corners of the library, not looking for a hook hut reviewing some bulletins, pamphlets, etc., among which he found a University Catalogue of the year 1914 1915. The above mentioned idle person through curiosity turned to the roll of the Freshman Class. In going down the list of names he scarcely found any names which designate Seniors who perambulate the campus today. Being somewhat amazed he turned to a nearby student and asked, “When did Ids class graduate? Certainly not before this year, and these men are not Seniors now.” Going down the list of over two hundred names he found only thirty-five that sounded reallv familiar. So it was. we entered four years ago over two hundred strong and all of this number, except thirty-five, have fallen by the road-side, while about fifteen have been added to our roll. It has not been altogether the law of the survival of the fittest that has thinned our ranks. Some of them went by this route. Some of them married, some entered business, some heard the call back to the farm, hut more of them, which is within keeping with true Georgia Spirit, heard the call to arms, and these have already given the Class of 'IS a representation in this momentous struggle which would do credit to any class. Lack of space prevents the detailed enumeration of the Class of ‘IS in college activities. From facts and records it can he said that our class has upheld its standards in athletics and in oratory, debating and classroom work, for it exceeds the ordinary class. As to the nationalities in the Class of 'IS. “No Greeks work here.” Every member of the class is a thoroughbred gentile and practically all of them were horn and raised in the sunny climes of Georgia. We arc not proud of this fact however. hut we mention it because it rarely ever happens that there is a class which is not represented by foreign constituents. Our class has another unique characteristic. We entered college just as the warring nations entered the battlefield, so our class can justly be called the first war class at the University and we sincerely hope the only war class. In making our departure we wish to express our thanks to the people of the Classic City and to the Faculty of the University who have been so faithful and earnest in working for our interest, so that we might be able to live better, more helpful and more efficient lives. Historian. VO. R. Ellars S. S. Bennett Alfred Blalock P. G. Slack . R. E. L. Spence W. Scott . Senior Class Officers ....................................................President ..............................................Ficc-P resident ......................................Secretory and Treasurer ................................................ Historian ...................................................... Poet ...................................................Chaplain C'uktis Pktkk Bakkk, A.B. Hartwell, Gn. Demosthenian; Freshman Debater; Junior Orator. ” Here's to the pilot who has weathered the storm.” We don’t know what R. F. D. Baker lives on, but any way he lives up in the hills of Hart County—yes, so far up in the hills that the owls are afraid of the chiekens. However, lie is not so far back ill the sticks that his breath smells like con I wood. Baker looked in the Q Itoom one day and thought that they were playing marbles on the tables and punching them with a stick. He was a shark in his home settlement at the marble game, where they play with hickory nuts. So he thought that he could surely play a great game on the smooth, level table. Baker’s mind is inclined towards law and we are sure that he will make a lawyer that will do credit to the county precinct in which he lives. Jbssf. Jamf.s Bkxkoicd, B.S.Ag. Demosthenian; Agricultural Club; Campus Club; Cotton School Debater; Alpha Zeta; Agricultural Quarterly Stall'. "In friendship early was taught to believe.” “J. J.” is another man who is more familiar with the word “whoa” than “halt,” when you mean stop. There never was a “Georgia” man who enjoyed playing “Glory” more on his horn than Benford. He has blown “Glory” at nearly all of the Georgia games during the last four years, and enjoys it more every day. It is said that he is the greatest originator of col lege •slang in school and it is he who first thought about “Hold them in the road.” “J. J.” is a good, clever scout. PANDORA Staxi.ky Si'kxckk Bkxxkt, A.B. Quitman, Ga. Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa; Glee Club; Gridiron Club; Nice-President Senior Class. "Singing and dancing alone will not advance one in the world." “Spink” is one of those who jumped from a Sophomore to a Senior, and so we must excuse any deficiency. He doesn’t wear a derby or use a cane, but with ladies he is one “bearcat.” From the very start “Spink” has been one of the college “contingent.” He has made an ardent success as a “pompadour” trainer, and sports it to the full extent. His dew-drop eyes almost elected him to the Sorority, but considering the deep and sonorous voice, he was “balled” on the last ballot. On the whole, “Spink” passes inspection with about the same mark lie gets in Greek. Congratulations, Quitman. J. M. Bkxi.ky, B.S.Ag. Moreland, Ga. Dcmosthenian; Agricultural Club; Lieutenant; Agricultural Quarterly Stall'; Campus Club. “ Adam was a gardener. ” “Spot” made himself famous by defeating “ Zeta Chi” Camp in a ten-round bout two years ago in front of Candler Hall. The only light used was one suspended from a lirst-lloor window. The ring was not roped oil' but was drawn with a stick. The bout came at high midnight. The spectators were garlied in all sorts of apparel. Some wore bath robes, some were half dressed and some otherwise. It was here also that “Spot” proved that he would stand for right and justice. He has been a staunch G. O. I , ever since he entered school and he delighted in seeing them go over the top always to victory. We are expecting to see Bexley teach the folks back home up-to-date methods of farming. yi Alfred Blalock, A.B. .loncslxtro, Ga. Sigma Chi; Demosthenian; Member of Junior Cabinet; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Impromptu Debater, MS; Gridiron Club; Associate Editor of Pandora. “ In ajj able and coart conn { cat Inna a, IVhat marc coaid mortal wish?’' We have our runts, sharks, hot air artists and bone heads in our class, but Alfred is the baby of the class. He is the youngest Senior in college. Alfred is somewhat of a tennis shark, and with a few more years of practice and experience, he may be a second Wilding. He intends to enter the medical profession and leaves for Johns Hopkins’ next year. Up there he will undergo another grind which will lit him either to kill or cure. Luck to you Alfred, and may it be the latter that you are fitted for. James Richard Bowden , A.B. Thomson, Ga. I’hi Delta Theta; Phi Kappa; Impromptu Debater. M7; Junior Cabinet; Sophomore Declamation; Sophomore Debate; President Junior Class; Associate Editor Pandora. “None bat himself can be his parallel Here is one of the few good things which has blown in from the home of "‘The Jeffersonian,” the company consisting of Bowden, West and Mobley. The subject of discussion has never been seen with his tie awry or hair rumpled. That eternal smile is also one of his distinguishing characteristics. “Dick’s” numerous worries don’t bother him any, and he turns them aside with a laugh. He was President of our class during its Junior year, and he made an unusually efficient one, presiding at all the meetings called during his reign. When Richard entered Georgia, he liegan with a rush in his studies, and it was thought for about three days that he was going to beat “Shark” West out of first honor. Mr. Bowden’s favorite occupation is driving his “Bix Six” Buick up and down Hearing Street, using the knowledge which he gained in the quartermaster’s course in surveying the “ Parks.” “Dick” had a successful college career and we hope that his good work will be continued throughout life. ,m William Kagi.k Bkoach, B.S.A. Athens, Ga. Agricultural Club. “The life of the husbandman—a life fed by the beauty of the earth and sweetened by the air of heaven.” Broach has been with us only in the last act ami last scene, therefore, he has not had an opportunity to show what he really can ilo in college. He is County Demonstrator for Clarke County, and taking his Senior work at the same time, which speaks well of him as a worker, or else he is showing up other demonstrators. Broach came here from the wilds of Dahlonega to get his finishing touch in scientific farming, which proves conclusively that the State College of Agriculture is the best place to become proficient in that art which is as old as man and which will last as long as time. John Lawkbxce Bkowx, A.B. Fort Valley, Ga. Chi Phi; Phi Kappa; Gridiron Club; Phi Beta Kappa “lie might have proved a useful adjunct if not an ornament to society. A Georgia Peach fresh from Fort Valley whose winning ways, coy manners and captivating smiles have a marvelous effect in winning the hearts of the fairer sex. Complacency and manly sweetness are his strong characteristics. He was once loud of Botany but his fancies later turned elsewhere. He has decided to preserve his beauty by the creosote process.Henry Thomas Burks, B.S. Maysvillo, Ga. Demosthenian. “Henry” “When I teas sick, you gave me bitter pills.” Since Henry lias been away two years he probably ought to be introduced to those who have joined our ranks during his leave. But as the old slogan goes, “A Georgia man needs no introduction," so it will l e omitted here. Henry’s mind has always been turned towards , his medical profession and while at "Georgia" he was prone to run all discussion into some phase of medicine and would invariably talk of his "ology" courses, no matter how much he bored his listeners. He says he prefers a country practice, where he can live close to Nature and enjoy the freedom offered to a tiller of the soil. With his interest in his life’s work he should make a good M.I). and we hope that his remedies, like most doctors, will not l e worse than the disease. Arthur Stewart Bussey, B.S.A. Waverly Hall, Ga. Agricultural Club; Captain Company "A;" Business Manager Pandora; Campus Club. “Tomorrow, to fresh woods, and pastures new.” Bussey has always been handy at class meetings, mass meetings and other gatherings in the Chapel to furnish us with a few good (?) selections on the Chapel Pipe Organ. His trembling strains have often started the "Ga." spirit to rise. Bussey is terribly worried because he thinks that in spite of his detestable love for teaching, he will always Ik a school teacher, ami never reap the benefits of his Agricultural Course. We hope that you will win in your choice for a livelihood and go back to South Georgia and raise an abundance of peanuts so that we can be assured of plenty of post toasties.  » ...................3Taaiar i 3 WfP J. W. Caxtrbll, B.S. Katonton, Ga. Dcmosthcnian. “Oh, for one hour of blind old Dandolo, The Octogenarian chief; Byzantium conquering foe." Coming from Young Harris, Cantrell joined our class in the Senior year. We are not so well acquainted with him, but as Physics Instructor, we understand the Freshmen have sworn vengeance on him. His chief delight is ransacking the library for dusty, worm-eaten Latin books. This appears a trille suspicious, but still, harmless, we think. We have hoard that hair tonic has been used with poor results. Well, good luck, dear Prof. ‘ Ago before beauty, ' ’ as we pass on. Kichard Winx Courts, Jr., A.B. Atlanta, Ga. “Dick" Phi Kappa; Chi Phi; Major First Battalion; Sophomore Debater; Champion Debater; Inter-Collegiate Debater; Debating Council; Impromptu Debater; President Phi Kappa; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Member of Junior Cabinet; Senior Pound Table; Gridiron Club; Sphinx and Phi Botta Kappa. “If you have no yull, work." Bat talion ’tention! Everybody recognizes this command, and without thinking, comes to attention. “Dick” has more friends in the military department than an ordinary major. He would do credit to any military organization. Since coming to the University, Dick has had only to continue a record that he made iu High School. He has taken advantage of his pull and reputation which, coupled with his hard work, have won him a college record that any of us would Ik' proud of. The only time he couldn't “hold 'em in the road” was in his “coaching in debating,” and control of politics. “Dick” is a practical man and wo expect to hear from him in later life.Txsjxxxnr ntn Sam Craig, B.S.A. Lawrenceville, On. Member of Agricultural Club; Cotton School Debate; Agricultural Quarterly Staff; Campus Club. “ When tillage begins, other arts follow.’’ “Solemn Sam,’' a man with so much to say that he says nothing. 11 is jokes are comical and penetrating on account of their dryness. His facial expression, under ordinary conditions of temperature and pressure, is insoluble in all substances. “Sam’s” conception of real life is to have a good farm and a cultured housekeeper. Some think that “Sam” is too bashful to acquire the latter, but they are all wrong. Robert Brace Crawford, Civil Eng. Kansas City, Mo. Chi Psi; Sine and Tangent; Lieutenant Company “E;” Phi Betta Kappa. “Ah! What would the world be to us if the children were no more ” r‘01d Brace!” the ear-biting specialist; the boy from Missouri, who has to lx? shown. Hail! thou genius from the West, who takes to queer and complicated mathematics and intricate physics as the Athens’ girls take to dancing and ice cream. No one, to look upon thee, would ever assign thee to the demesne of high thought and deep study. But so it is. This lad, marvelously ingenious at making himself a companionable pest and a merry lx re, conceals that within his laughing exterior which may well cause the profs to quake. “Brace” is a scholar, but no pedant; a society bug, but not a light-headed jumping jack; best of all, he hath a sound, kindly heart to match a sound, keen head. Otto Raymond Kixars, A.B. Fitzgerald, On. Dcinostheninn; Sophomore Debater; Sophomore Declnimer; Winner of .lunior Orator’s Prize; Impromptu Debater; President Demosthenian; President Senior Class; Anniversarian; Michenl Scholarship; Member of Junior Cabinet; Senior Round Table; Gridiron Club and Sphinx; Phi Beta Kappa. “Friendly, generous, good natured.” Otto is not lazy but he has absolute faith in the sleep and rest cure for all ailments. This bunch of handsomeness never worries over spilt milk or over that which is going to be spilt. Otto comes from the sunny climes of Ben Hill County and feels at home when lu feels sand beneath his feet. His only bad habit is burning up time on the hay, which many of us like to do. However, lie has made everything in college from the “Zeta Chi’s” down. Robert L. Foreman, Jr., A.B. Atlanta, Ga. Chi Phi; Phi Kappa; Freshman Debater; Sophomore Debater; Winner Sophomore Declamation Cup; Anniversarian, MS; Debating Council; Member Gridiron Club and Senior Round Table; Sphinx. “He mouths a sentcnee as a ear mouths a bone.” This silver tongued “Atlanta boy” has many times backed otV the board competitors of high rank in oratory and carried away the laurels of victory. He is considered one of our most polished speakers and we anticipate that “Trot” will hand down some orations that will be spoken in schools for generations to come. “Trot’s” diverging smile and good natured disposition have won for him many friends while at the University. He is, using college slang, what we call a darn good fellow. s vJ ----- run Ray Carter Harris, B.S.A. Wrens, Ga. President Agricultural Club; Adjutant First Battalion; Cotton School Debater; Campus Club. “He that by the plough would thrive, Himself must cither hold or drive.” This is quite a different type from his brother, “Runt,” with whom we are all acquainted. Ray lacks the mixing ability of his brother, which prevents him from being a politician. He likes to hear the cracking of the earth’s crust with a tractor, and has consequently made the Agricultural Farm his headquarters since coming to the University, not even going home during the summer months. He is nearly as proud of his military office as his Co-Adjutant, Parsons. It was his ambition to sit in the Commandant s office during one whole drill period, but he never reached it. The Colonel said, “You must stay with your battalion.” Thomas Harkold, B.S. Americas, Ga. Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Kappa; Gridiron Club; Captain Company “I).” . ‘ Consistency is a jewel.” Gentlemen, your particular attention is called to this, Thomas Harrold. “Tom” hailed from Americus and he is as honest as the clays are long. He has never lieen known to have the blues and his smiles and happy greetings are ever there. “Tom” is noted for his earnest desire to become more closely and permanently united with Prof. E. Piuribus Unum, with whose company lie is loath to part. When it comes to talk, lie is like the brook, he “runs on forever.' His ambitions are centered around medicine, but he will probably join the army after getting his dip. “Tom” is a good student, and in every way he has pr.oven himself to be a nice fellow. James Madden Hatched, A.B. Columbus, Ga. Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa; Inter-Collegiate Debate; Sophomore Dcclnimer; Champion Debater; Basketball Team; Member of Junior Cabinet; Senior Hound Table; Sphinx; Phi Beta Kappa. ‘ ‘ But if it be a sin to covet honor, I am the most offending soul alive.” No! This school is not co-ed., and besides this is not a girl even if her name is “ Massie” ami she has many feminine characteristics. As a proof of her unpopularity, she says she’s never been kissed. “Massie” has specialized in l oot licking for four years and is now accomplished enough in this art to fool a few of the simpler ones, such ns the French Department. The only reason why “Bill” has not been elected the biggest tight wad in school for live years, is because he has not been here but four. He has a mathematical formula for every quarter of a cent that he has spent since he came to college. “Bill” has nlwnvs had his eye on a Phi Bette Kappa key, which is the highest star in any college. “Bill” leaves many friends here and carries their best wishes for a successful life. Thomas Scott Holland, A.B. Forsyth, Ga. Deinosthcnian; Sophomore Dcclnimer; Sergeant; Member of Junior Cabinet ami Senior Round Table. “A woman is a woman, but a good cigar is a smoke.” “Scott” early adopted the slogan, “Some may loaf ami some may falter, but I work on forever,” which has made him stand on the top rounds of the class scholarship ladder. Whether “Scott” likes the girls or his cigar better, is a toss, but we are inclined to think the latter is predominant. “Scott” has never had a liking for sciences but has been death on languages.Ei.mek Wai.tkk Jones Athens, Ga. Lnuuln Chi Alpha; Phi Kappa; Member of Junior Cabinet. “Learn to write well or not at all.” “Elmer” is a thorough preacher’s son. Before he entered the University he knew nothing of profanity. But now he knows all the bad words used by college men and can utter such quelling oaths as “Heck’’ and “By Gravy” without blushing or hurting his conscience. He wouldn’t dare to tell a joke in a mixed audience, but when he is in a crowd of boys, he doesn't hesitate to tell such vulgar jokes as “Little Boy Blue.” He considers this one of his most vulgar jokes. “Elmer” is going to be a newspaper reporter and judging from his present ability, in a few years he will Ik very skillful, and will be able to write attractive head lines for his county shoot. Dewey Knight, A.B. Nashville, Ga. Demosthenian; Sophomore Reclaimer; Sophomore Debater; Champion Debater; Inter-Collegiate Debater; Lieutenant; Impromptu Debater: Debating Council; Member of Junior Cabinet and Senior Bound Table. “.-I man well made with a (food determination.” Another man who feels at home when he hears the lowing of cows and the barking of dogs. “Dewey” has taken an active part in all college activities. He is one of the few who have entertained the empty Chapel seats trying for the various speakers’ places. “ Dewey” has read everything in the library that the other students have not. French is his hobby. Ho likes French Invause, when he reads it, it sounds so much like cracking acorns.MW fun Wuxi am Rkvii.i.k Maixoky, A.B. Athens, Ga. 4 Chi Psi; Phi Kappa; Lieutenant Company “D. ” “Smile! Damn you, smile!” Happy ho who desires little. No great ambition, no bitter repulse. With even step, though perchance, not with musing gait, “Bill” has sauntered through college, with no great honors and no great reverses; with many friends, and no enemies. A kindly heart and an unassuming mind, “Bill” presents to everyone. Ilis only failings, perhaps, are a tinge of laziness and a rather stronger proclivity for gossipy talk and whispered secrets. But these foibles only make him more lovable. He is a boy of high ideals and a face set from the sod. We wish him well. Wuxi am Eaki. Marks, B.S. Augusta, Ga. Chi Psi; Phi Kappa; Lieutenant Company “K.” “Prudence, yes! Uni pry is larking. A happy nut who takes nothing seriously. His perpetual good humor may be understood by his motto: “Just as you say, not as I care.” “Karl’s” chief passions are chew- ing gum, picture shows, red ties and white shoes, so John Strother says. He came among us as a modest youth, but he leaves us as a heart-breaker. At the art of Terpsichore, he has become a recent authority. “Karl” has the honor of holding a commission in the Chi Psi Military Department, being an unusually popular orticer, because he hates to drill more than number three in the rear rank. College has helped this man in many ways besides teaching him to part his hair in the midtile. Kverybody is sorry that “Karl's” three-year visit here is ended, and we wish him every success in the'military studies which lie has already begun.mf? Mack Matthews, A.B. Dallas, («a. Demostheuian; Lieutenant Company “C;” Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Junior Orator; Debating Council; Senior Hound Table; Gridiron Club; President of Demostheuian; Kditor-in-Chicf of Pandora. “That load becomes light which is cheerfully borne.'' This is the man with the smile from ear to ear, who loves to study. “Pipe” those cheeks, the emblem of sincerity and purity. We find in “Mack” a well rounded college man. He has never been known to miss Beanery, Vesper, Promotion Committee, Demostheuian, drill, debate try-outs, chapel, gymnasium, or a class. As this is our Editor-in-Chicf, we can say nothing detrimental to his character. “Matty” has as many good points as a paper of pins, and it is chiefly due to his faithfulness and continued hard work that we have published this annual. We can foresee a successful future for “Mack,” either as a botanist, journalist or military man. Hodges Timmkkmax Moblev, A.B. Thomson, Go. Sigma Nu; Demostheuian; Captain of Track Team. A man he seems, of cheerful yesterdays and confident tomorrows.” “Choke’s” abbreviated name is Hodges Timmerman but it is never used on account of lack of euphony. He is the fastest man in college, that is, on his feet. The mighty Strap-per is the only man who has been able to outpace him. It was neck and neck, nose and nose, then Strapper stuck his tongue out and won by a hair’s breadth. “ H. T.” didn’t find out that crip courses were offered in the crip-building until last year. He immediately moved his artillery over there and has been using it for a target range ever since. He says that he is going back to Thomson and sell merchandise. If he is as good a business man as he is a college man, success is his. wmmm i William Wells McManus, B.8.C. Smithville, Gn. Sigma Nu; Phi Kappa. “ 1 never knew so young a body, so old a head.” It in strange how some boys can spread the sweet essence of hot air and never tire, but it is still stranger how a fellow can always keep his mouth closed ami look after his own business as “Mac” has during his sojourn in this vicinity. It has always been his rule to keep his tongue bridled except when called on in classes. “Mac” is one of the fish of the Commerce School. He knows where the economic profs, have eighty odd hooks on reserve for him to rend but, like the rest of the commerce boys, he is going to wait until the Academic Building falls in before reading them. Wesley Port Nall, A.B. Luthersville, Gn. Pi Kappa Phi; Demostheninn “ 7e says a thousand things—but never says adieu.” We often wondered what “Fort” did to pass away his leisure hours, but it was all solved when one day some one walked in his room and found him giving “Old Solitary” a drubbing. “Fort” is now almost perfect in this exciting game and can beat “Old Sol” and eat peanuts on the side. This is not the only game that he excels in, however, for when it comes to checkers, the old-timers, who sit on cracker boxes in the settlement store, have to get up early to beat him. He is the undisputed champion in these precincts. “ Fort” has been a good, loyal student, and we are sure that he will make good elsewhere.Robert Lowry XicolSON, Jr., A.B. Atlanta, Gn. Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa. ' It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves. ” “Lowry's” sweet, child-like disposition charms everyone. His rare keenness of intellect discerns the truth in everything and his generous nature pours this wisdom forth upon his college-mates, giving them a broader and more sympathetic view of life. But “Lowry” is not an unique human being as one might imagine. The secret of his wisdom is in his extraordinary advantages. His whole life lie has spent as a disciple of Perrin, all of whose divine truths and charitable deeds “Lowry” has remembered. This is my explanation, patient friends, why “Lowry” is wiser than is necessary. Bertram Godwin Oberry, A.B. Willacoochee, Gn. Sigma Xu; Phi Kappa; Baseball Manager; Gridiron Club; Phi Beta Kappa. “I've done my duty. Who dares do more?" “B. G.,” affectionately known as “Toby,” has been with us only three years, but has become rather popular in our class. “Toby” has posed as a “shark” in all his classes, but the “camouflage” wouldn't work in Chemistry, and his comment on the subject won’t do to print. As business manager of the Baseball team, he lias been a “roaring” success, and we predict a commercial success for him. rather than one in metalurgical research. “Toby” doesn’t wear a derby nor a moustache, but is a good all-round chap. Luck to you, “Toby.”P A N DO R A Inman Padgett, A.B. Reidsville, On. Pi Kappa Phi; Pemosthenian; Junior Orator; Champion Debater; Debating Council; Lieutenant; Member of Junior Cabinet; Senior Round Table; Gridiron Club; Inter-Collegiate Debate. “Iliif hair is of a good color; ait excellent color.’' “I” hails from the precinct of Reidsville, the town he made famous by playing on the “Old College Nine.” “I” led a quiet life for three years, until he made his noted trip to Winder. Ever since he has been completely wrapped up in society, and only goes to all the dances. He says he missed a lot l efore he found out where he stood and now his conception of pleasure is entirely changed from what it was when lie entered the University. “1“ is a good, jolly fellow, and numbers his friends by his acquaintances. Calvin McCluno Parsons, A.B. Duluth, Ga. Demosthenian; Adjutant and Captain. “ The only tray to have a friend is to be one.” Only a few of the closest observers could guess why “Parsons” is called preacher. It is not only because ho was named for John Calvin, but because he has so many traits and peculiarities of a real preacher. If he were to have a frock tail coat and a celluloid collar, he would Ik a real minister and could make the shingles tremble with his delicate voice. “Preacher” is a curiosity until you know him and after that he is a greater curiosity. He thought at one time that he would become a doctor but Dr. White convinced him conclusively that the ministry is his calling, therefore, “Preacher” dropped his Chemistry .'19 and 40. “Preacher” is a reliable, conservative fellow and should make good in the world.John Edgar Patterson , B.S.C. Fitzgerald, Ga. Pi Kappa Phi; Phi Kappa; Sophomore Deelaimer; Champion Table; Gridiron Club. ator; “Crazed with ambition or crossed in hopeless love.” Senior Round When “Pat” was a member of the bloody three, we had little hope for him H wl «n Prof. Park began to move him around like he was a billiard ball, and succeeded in breaking up the noted trio. “Pat” began coming to the front. Brutus had no ambition compared with “Pat’s.” “Pat” only gets one pink, sweet smelling letter per day. The longer “Pat” stays here the more friends he makes. Good luck to you and may success l e yours. Edwin Jonathan Perky, Jr., B.S.C. Bainbridge, Ga. Sigma Xu; Phi Kappa; First Lieutenant Company “A”; Gridiron Club. “As idle as a painted ship upon a painted ocean.” It doesn’t matter how sound asleep “Ed” is or what he is working on or in how low a voice you speak, he can always hear you when you speak of Packards and Fords. “ Efl’ has always wanted a labor saving device akin to the slide rule with which he could ngurc out exactly how much studying to do to make a pass without wasting any surplus energy. “Kd’s” thoughts are turned to the business world and some day we expect to see him a leader of industry or a trust magnate.Arthur Pew, A.B. Atlanta, Ga. Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa; Football Team; Basketball Team; Thalians; Sophomore Declaimer. 11 Without rivals tliou lovest alone tin self and thine.” Here is the greatest indoor football player, the most artful grafter and (to the surprise of many) the most passionate lover of all the ugly red-heads in college. No wonder, with these mastered talents, “Pew” wears a seventeen collar and makes regular trips to Atlanta. We warn you that “Artful Artie” is a politician too, but he is not dangerous otherwise. “Pew” has made “Ga.” a good man in both football and basketball and will be missed very much when the respective seasons open again next year. James Carlisle Phillips, A.B. Augusta, Ga. Demosthenian. “ Those who are pleased themselves must always be pleased.” “J. C.” has been with us only three years but he has spent most of that time in Terrell Hall, where some catch up with their sleep, some are exposed to Chemistry, and some actually study Chemistry. “Crock” has been one among the latter class and has taken all of the Chemistry courses from organic up to that which hasn’t any organ at all. He has a liking for all tile other sciences too, and some day we are expecting him to explain fully to us and all the world, all about the fourth dimension. “Crock” is a deserving fellow and has made many friends while in college.IltVIN PlIINIZY, A.B. Augusta, Gn. Chi I‘si; Phi Kappa; Senior Round Table; Lieutenant-Colonel of Cadets; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Phi Beta Kappa. “ speak with eminent force." Czar Phinizy! The proudest Corporal in College. Ah! proud imitator of Mark Antony, college lias indeed wrought wonders in thee, and come near to wrecking thy once stoic life. Strange compound of ingredients, how little thy contemporaries understand thee. Thou art bashful and they dub thee snobbist; timid, and they murmur at thy proud, staid mien. “Many a gem ot purest ray serene”—however, enough of this. This believer in the divine right of kings, this military autocrat, has lately become no mild wooer of the fair sex, but an ardent devotee at their shrine. Shame on you, Colonel, and all your good resolutions of yesterday. Ah! so the world goes. Only the brave deserve the fair. Nor is this graceful dancer averse to his books, as are so many adepts at the Terpsichorean art, but knoweth well how to combine study and devotion and hence acquireth high marks with no small amount of glee. Francis E. Price, B.S. Grilliii, Ga. Kappa Sigma; Phi Kappa; Thalians; Gridiron Club; Secretary and Treasurer Cotillion Club. "Good bye proud world, I'm going home." “Francis” is one of the jolly good fellows whom everybody enjoys associating with. It was due to his politic bearing that the Cotillion Club had such a good year. French seems to be his hobby, and it was rumored that Bowden owed his pass to the secret coaching he received from Price. Besides being a charter member of the grafters club, Francis is also to be found among those unfortunate boys who say, “Love is a secret no man knows 'til it within his bosom grows.”Theodore Frederick Roesel, Jr., B.S.A. Augusta, Ga. Agricultural Club; President Agricultural Club. ‘ ‘ When tillage begins, other arts follow. The farmers therefore arc the founders of human civilization.” “Von” Roesel has been here longer than most of us, ami from experience, he is on to wire pulling and Candler Hall polities which only many of us are well acquainted with. It has been rumored that since coming to the University lie has had as many different girls as there are varieties of Quereus trees in the State of Georgia. Perhaps it. is good philosophy to always search for something better than what you already have. Roesel is a practical man and should win fame by inventing a process to extricate the l oll weevil. Alfred Witherspoon Scott, B.S. Atlanta, Ga. “Scotty” Phi Delta Theta; Phi Kappa; Junior Cabinet; President Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, ’18; Basketball Team, ’1(5, '17, ’18; Captain, Coach and Manager Basketball Team, ’18. “And thou art long and lank and brown, As is the ribbed sea sand.” Behold here a youth of great promise, so the “Lucies” say. When standing naturally, he is six feet eight and he can stretch two feet by standing on his tip-toes. He actually has to look down to see the basketball hoop, and by the way, “Scott” was just center, coach, manager, signal caller, captain and chief goal (linger on the Basketlmll Team. “Alfred” bids fair to be a great chemist, and he has had nearly as much chemistry as Homer Van Valkenburg Black. “Scott” was king of the “Hot Dog Gang” this year, and they say he made a good one. His chief cuss word is “Shucks,” but it was reported that he said “Doggone” once when he shot a goal from the center of the field, but in so doing, he touched the hoop. Everybody likes “Alfred,” and we trust that the cold world will make for him a warm and sheltered spot.Francis Baciimans Sbi.lars, B.S.C.K. Savannah, Ga. Engineering Society; Sine ami Tangent. “A winged and wandering sound.” “Sellars” came to the University with a hammer which he already knew how to use and has been improving ever since. He values his time so highly that he thinks the professors ought to pay him while he studies. “Sellars’ ” greatest stunt is multiplying numbers quicker on paper than Dr. Fountain can with his slide rule. He is a speed demon in getting up work and has always enrried several extra studies. He always goes to a movie to round out his Beanery supper. .Ions Wai.tek Siikppard, A.B. Daisy, Gn. I’hi Kappa; Impromptu Debater, MS; Debating Council; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Lieutenant. “GA, for a forty parson power.” “Slug” This charming son of South Georgia was captured on the cow-path leading to Daisy and was dragged to Athens. In four years he has developed from a shy, bashful youth into a mail of brawn and nerve. He can eat more railroad iron and spikes than anybody in his class. Oh, how he dislikes to Ik kidded. A lover of good jokes on every one but himself. He has simply lost all hope that he will ever possess a beard, but always shaves for the exercise. Says he is not wooden, just doesn’t think fast. But “Shop” is improving on all sides and broadening in a vertical direction. “John has our best wishes in his study for the ministry.Louis Ikvixo Skinner, BS.Ag. Augusta, Gn. Agricultural Club; Major Second Battalion; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Agricultural Quarterly Stall'; President Agricultural Club; Alpha Zcta. “Something is rotten in the Hall of Denmark." “ L. I.’’—Long Island—came into prominence when he frightened all the girls away at a Sunday School reception by telling the ladies what his name is. His name being so uncommon they thought he was a secret service man who could tell their ages for Freshmen who judged girls’ ages like horses—by the teeth. Having smoothed out his indenture, “ L. I. ’ determined to leave the Indies alone and win fame in the grafters’ realm. He succeeded, and now holds a full membership in the Royal Grafters’ Association. When he became queen of Denmark he obtained full title and is now admitted to the grafters’ banquet. “Louis’’ is what we call a good student and has always stood for what is right. Wii.i.iam Sai.tkk Sizkic, B.S.C.K. Athens, Gn. First Lieutenant Company “F;“ Sine and Tangent. “Horn for success he seems.’’ “Bill” was one of the members of the famous engineering class compost'd of “Cue Ball” Davis, “Wally-doo” Soule, Sellars, etc., whose delight during first-term was drawing contours for Prof. Stratum's Mil. Sc. 2 class. “Bill” was a little late in getting his derby and cane but was among the first of the Seniors to try to camouflage his upper lip. ’Twas a feeble success. Upon the opening of the third training camp. “Bill” left us to go into service and we who know “Bill” are sure that he will make a success in any branch lie may enter. Luck to you, “Bill!” We may further mention that “Bill” was employed by the American State Bank to identify all the boys who tried to pass worthless checks on that bank. y Francis Goddard Slack, B.S. Gainesville, Gn. Demosthenian; President Athletic Association; Track Team. “A progeny of learning.” “Francis” belongs to the fleet-footed class, not because he is an excellent long distance runner, but because he has traveled the student’s path in college, that is mapped out for four years, in three. “Francis” says this is obliged to be his last year, for after he finishes his present physics course there will l e none left for him next year. “Francis” is a typical ladies’ man. It is marvelous how they fall for him, unless they are lured by that enticing pompadour. “Francis” is small, but it is because he has shed oft' all of the superfluous flesh and there is nothing left but brain and true metal. “Francis” has won a warm place in the hearts of his fellow students and they all wish him well in the battle of life. Judge Clifford Sorrells, B.S.A. Monroe, Gn. » Agricultural Club; Editor-in-Chief Agricultural Quarterly; Cotton School Debater; Alpha Zeta. “Let VS never forget that the cultivation of the earth is the most important labor of man.” A cpiiet, gentle, unassuming lad who expresses himself only on rare occasions and then ho makes it brief. “ J. C.” is one among the few, who has really put on a serious look and a dignified expression since he has reached the stage of seniority. It has often been a question of discussion whether “J. C.” or his roommate, Sam Craig, is the quieter. We don’t know what “ J. C.” is going to do but he has some characteristics of a good school teacher.PANDORA Robert Edward Lre Spence, Jr., A.B. Albany, Ga. “Boh” Alpha Tan Omega; Phi Kappa; Freshman Debater; Sophomore Declamation; Sophomore Debater; President Phi Kappa; Lieutenant Company “C;” Senior Round Table; Impromptu Debater, ’18; Thalinns; Gridiron Club. “Good and handsome enough.” Here is the RKL article, which has assumed the form portrayed above. But really, we don’t always call him Robert Edward Lee, but just “Bob” when in a hurry. He has had an unusually hard career in college, because of trying to keep from lowering the standards 9 set by Heiseman Owens and Brigadeer Edwin Sternes, the boys from his home town. But please pardon the unjust comparison, “Bob.” The characters which mark a true gentleman are found in him. He has been weighed and never been found wanting. Although just joining the Senior Class this year, a representative college man is found in Spence, and success has been his in every endeavor. Augustus Hartsfield Stevens, A.B. Carlton, Ga. Sigma Chi; Phi Kappa; Gridiron Club; Financial Manager of Baseball Team; Adjutant Second Battalion. “I am sick of time and desire to rest.'’ The physiognomy presented here is that of a quiet, modest sort of chap to those who know him best, even if he is called “ Red-Eyed Pete, from Ginger Lake, Arizona,” by others. By some, he is known ns “Speedy Gus,” and he is often heard saying, “What’s your hurry? Let’s rest awhile.” The favorite pastime of “Gus” is addressing letters to Shorter College. His record here is a dandy one, but it should l e, as he came from the land which George Whitehead made famous. His rod hair shows his artistic temperament, but his hair is so red that he had to quit the beef business for fear the angus herd would turn red. “Major” Stevens (pipe the title of Major, which he gained in his short sojourn at G. M. C.) is quite a shark in Math., having had every course of it offered here. “Gus” is taking the Radio Course ami we predict lie will make the U. S. a good man. VJohn Law Stevens, B.S.Ag. Valdosta, Ga. S. A. E.; Agricultural Club. “Nothing is more useful than silence.” John Law, otherwise known ns “Cap,” may be seen every Jay heading towards Ag. Hall, lie is one of the boys who has climbed the till to King Andy's building for four years without being physically disabled for further service in life. Beyond the fact of being a little lazy, John Law is all O. K., and has made many friends in college. Overlooking all possible accidents, we predict that John Law will some day become an expert farm demonstrator in and around Valdosta. Come up here. Beck! Samuki. Gaines Stoky, A.B. Waynesboro, (in. Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Kappa. “On with the dance; let jog he uneonfined.” We must confess that “Sam” has been a puzzle to us. As Freshmen we were not all so sure about his ability or latent powers, but since then “Sam” has certainly “conic out.” He has become a regular “shark,” botany specialist, and exponent of Blackstone. Now, as an advocate of the Terpsichorenn art. “Sam" has been lately taking an important part, goes to all the dances, and shows the ladies a time. As a lawyer, we predict a success for “Sam" in Waynesboro, and the surrounding country. Jons Richard Strother, B.S.E. Woodbury, Ga. Chi I 8i; Phi Kappa; Captain Company “ E.” "Then he trill tall:—good gods. In nr he trill talk'.’' Old Eill Shakespeare imiHt have forenoon his iinngc when ho wrote nl out that individual who had “A loan and hungry look.” The most artistic of one hundred varieties. Authority on all subjects, played with Bacon in his boyhood days, and knows Darwin especially well. Says he was l orii to Ik great, but the world is t»eating him out of his just dues. Is quite military. It is too bad that Napoleon did not hove the Inuielit of his services. “John” thinks that his calling is along a military line, but will study law because he has a set of law books that must lie used. “John's” greatest diflicultv in college was lioarding with I’rof. bust rat long enough to pass up French. But even if “John” is a victim of circumstances, we all like him and foresee for him a successful future. Fakkisii Furman Tai.i.ey, B.S. Macon, Ga. Phi Kappa; Business Manager of Georgian. Lct there be no more ” ‘‘Funny Finance.'’ Fire! Fire! Fire! Clear the way! Here comes “Talley.” His hair is the admiration and wonder of all who see it. Since entering the University he has had the places of Assistant in Zoology and Instructor in Dancing at the Normal School. He also takes away the honor of having been the l est business manager that the Georgian has ever had with the exception of Westbrook. “Farrish” made application for Assistant to Nick, but he was turned down, and “Chemistry” Bond taken. Vi V.John T. Taylor Americus, Ga. Phi Kappa; Phi Delta Theta. “Here I stand, I cannot do otherwise.” “John’ hails from the proud City of Americas, and like most of his fellow-townsmen, is very fond of the ladies. In fact, if “John” could have been convinced that studying was half as important ns dating, why, he would have a Phi Beta Kappa Key instead of a broken heart. And furthermore, if “John” had taken ns much interest in his day elasses ns in the night ones, he would have no doubt been a better student. He is patriotic in his attitude towards German but we think that Chemistry is his choice, for he took the same course two years. “John” is a fine fellow and we hope he will soon settle his love affairs and turn his talents in other directions. Emmet Vickery Wiiei.ciikl, B.S.A. Douglas, Gn. Alpha Tau Omega; Agricultural Club. ‘‘ IIis eares arc now all ended." “Emmet” is a lover of “Saturday Evening Post” stories and reads them as regularly ns most boys go to the Beanery. To make a long story short, this is the way he whiles away his rainy afternoons when he can’t work in outdoor labs, in the Ag. department. “Emmet” originally came from dismal Douglas but lie was first sent to distant Dahlonega and tamed before coining here. We arc expecting “Emmet” to put up a cantaloupe factory in South Georgia and furnish us with “Pink Queens” and “Yellow Meats” for years yet to come.  Chi P i; Phi Kappa; Junior Cabinet; Gridiron Club; Senior Round Table- Sphinx- Phi Betta Kappa. ’ 1 “True as the needle to the tolc Or os the dial to the sun.” Here Is our fountain of wisdom. Can tell you anything. This intellectual phenomenon is “alive on the inside.” He has digested every book in the library, and can recite whole volumes of poetry. It is said that he can quote more pages of Webster’s International than any other man alive. But we couldn’t knock on “Old Roger” if we tried. The only thing we have Against him is that he is from Tom Watson’s town, and he even denies that. “Roger” divides his time between the gymnasium and the library. Wo find in him a steady, loyal character that makes him a true and valuable friend to all. “He is the guy both for and nigh That con go in classroom and always come out dry.” Fkaxcis Eldox Wilhoit, B.S. Commerce, Warrenton, Ga. Sigma Xu; Phi Kappa; President of Cotillion Club; Gridiron Club. “The surest way to hit a woman’s heart is to take aim kneeling.” “Frankie,” letter known in musical circles as the “Boy Baritone,” the King of Warblers, Billiards and the Cotillion Club. A sunny, smiling, trusting sort of cuss. Born in luck, reared on good fortune, and boosted by l oot lick. Many think him to l e a gentle lad who never knew a harsher tone than a fiute note, but we know him better than that. He was wrongfully put on “Sister Susie's Sewing Circle,” and the “Bloomer Girls’ Basketball Team.” “Frank” is the sort of boy who adds joy and sunshine to life. In fact, he is the best kind of fellow any way you take him. VnTTJ William Wimberly Wilson, B.S.C. Fitzgerald, Ga. Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Kappa; Captain Company “C;” Manager Glee Club; Gridiron Club. “7 am not in the roll of common men. Last, but not least! This is the subject we have been wanting to reach ever since we tackled the lirst man. Not that he is a favorite fruit or a good punch block, but because it is such a good feeling to know that the last one has been reached and dealt, with. lie has not said himself, but circumstantial evidence proves that Woodrow thinks a whole lot of himself, and said person always put plenty of confidence in said Woodrow. He does not think more of himself than everything else, but less of everything else than himself. It is an excellent thing to have absolute confidence in one’s self. Woodrow has taken many courses in the crip building, which we believe have fitted him to always protect his pocketbook Give us “live,” Woodrow, and depart with our heartiest good wishes. Senior Law Class History jf| ERE’S twenty-three for you—twenty-three of as amhitious and loyal barris-ters as ever opened a code or copied from a form book. Count them for C yourself, and as you look over the roster of the Senior Law Class of ’Eighteen you will find them coming from all walks and stations of life and assembling to struggle together, jointly and severally, in the pursuit of professional knowledge. When we began our study of Blackstone and other intrinsics in the hall ot ’Sixteen we were considerably more in number than we are now—on the eve of the final Wednesday. Hut the wear of time and the call of the Colors have left their mark on our roll until today we have dwindled to a margin of one score and three. During the two years we have contributed our share of men to fight the fight of freedom’s cause. But two years has not been the limit to the college career of the majority of our class. Full two-thirds of the number either have college degrees or have spent one or more years in preliminary training. This fact, more than any other one factor, accounts for the high efficiency attained by the class. That our hunch is ever up and at ’em. the records will hear evidence. In every walk of college life, literary, military, debating, journalistic, oratorical, athletic, social and otherwise, you will find our men well represented and close to the top. Aside from the above named, there are many other honors, characteristics, virtues and accomplishments which we would like to mention. Our space, however, is limited; our words, no doubt, more limited still. Democracy and altruism have been watchwords of our two years’ work in harness together. Wherever you may meet one of the favored few you will always find him ready to give a word of cheer and lend a helping hand. A jollier, cleaner or a more agreeable bunch you will rarely find assembled in lots of twenty-three or more (if we do say it ourselves). Watch for us! We will be meeting again—at the bar, in the forum, on the farm, in the J. P.’s chair, or perhaps on a high, a higher, or a Supreme Bench. Histokiax.Senior Law Class Officers Dennis Penny W. B. Jones L. B. West . J. E. Mundy . . . . President . . Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer . . . . HistorianCl. A I'D Bkowx Bakicbtt, LL B. Gainesville, Gn. Si um Alpha K| silon; Phi Kappa; President .Jeffersonian Law Society; Captain Company 1 ‘ P. ’’ “It teas not hard for us to 1 Barrett.’ " “Claud’’ is another front seat artist, but he is only a silent member. He leads the class—at. roll call. Barrett claims that he came over to Athens on the G. M . bat Dame Humor has it different. It says that he came over tied to an apple wagon. We think ourselves that we prefer the latter means of mobilization. He comes from tlie so-called 4 Queen City of the Mountains’’ where the mercury hovers around zero every night. But the climate has had nothing to do with his disposition, which is always sunny and cheerful. His heart too, is warm. If he ever had an enemy or foe we haven’t met him yet. “Claud’’ has the ear-marks of making a good lawyer. Wii.i.iam Oswald Bozkmax, LL.B. Ashburn, Ga. Lambn Chi Alpha; Demosthenian; President .Jeffersonian Law Society. “J have loved justice and hated iniquity.” Greet him with a smile. Tis but reciprocity; for that is how he greets you. Having succeeded in getting a good plow-bov to take his place at home, “ W. O.’’ came to us two years ago to seek a little “laming’’ in the legal profession. He wanted to learn how to lew on his neighbor’s potato crop. Since that time he has succeeded admirably well. He can sit on the front row and camouflage with as wise and owl-like look as the next one. During the past year “ W. O.’s.’’ chief occupation has been sporting a derby, carrying a cane, copying form-books, painting vesper signs, marking chapel absences, (a big job itself) and smiling and gaining the friendship of all with whom he comes in contact. He should be commissioned an N. P. at once. Wii.mam Oscar Coopf.r, .lie., LL.B. Lawrenecville, Gn. Member of Demosthenian; Jeffersonian. “The gladsome light of jurisprudence.” Sniff! Sniff! Sniff! A sudden cloud of hair tonic gas causes us to reach for our gas masks. Yes, tis she, the fair Olivia. A perfect blonde and beautious to look upon. Several venrs ago the said “ W. O.” took a cotton grading course with the shorthorns here which stands him well in picking out a cotton shirt which looks almost like silk. Several years later he came back and started with us the study of res justae, habeas corpus, et cetera. Since then we have lx en very pleasantly associated with the hcre-in-hoforc-mentioned. She divides her time In'tween rooming with “Sister Sellars.” looking at the show windows, tonicing her hair and paying visits to the law department. “W. O.” will enter a partnership with his Uncle, John It., at Macon. May good luck Ih yours. John Thomas Coyi.k, LL.B. Moultrie, Gn. Jeffersonian; Demosthenian. "Drink deep from the fountain of soda, it trill fill you icith yas.” “John” has jerked in every soda fountain in Athens. It must In for an advertising scheme for they never keep him long. Ilis choice line of dope, however, doesn't always work with the law faculty. On several occasions they have called for something uncnrbomttod and without gas. “John’s” hobby is Common Law Pleading and in this course he has received several encores. “J. T.” is a good debater too, he debates whether or not he will go to class. No one has ever boon able to find out where “John” rooms or his most notorious place of abode. Most frequently, however, he is seen standing liefore a mirror in some “sodio fountin” brushing back his flowing tresses. “John Thomas" is a good, friendly old chap, liked by all with whom he comes in contact. He will make a success at something we know, it may In law. PANDORA ★ ......................... i limi«="■■■■■'■ TT3 tTffp Georoe Washington Park as, LL.B. Albany, Gn. Pi Epsilon Phi; Jeffersonian; Demosthenian. “Let every eye negotiate for itself and trust no agent.” What’s in a name? Huh! Would this George have denied the charge if he had been accused of chopping down a choice cherry tree? Huh? We let you decide for yourself. Huh? This specimen of ours is built rather on the style of an underslung automobile, in that it has its center of gravity very close to the ground. But in the classroom, in study and in class record “George” is always three speeds forward with no reverse and the throttle wide open at that. About the only fault we can (ind with “Fracus” is that he sits on his feet during classes and perches on the piano during all thc musical comedies. “George’s” friendly disposition has won him many friends and it will continue to win him more if he keeps it up. He will make any peanut or banana corporation a good legal advisor. Wii,i,iam Benjamin Jones, LL.B. Greenville, Ga. Jeffersonian Law Society; Demosthenian. “Your own property is concerned when your neighbor’s house is on fire.” “Bill” hails from the county which has produced so many governors, senators, ami other distinguished personages. He comes from Greenville, the town where said county sits. Whether the name of the town had any bearing on “ W. B’s.” characteristics when he entered this grand old institution or not, we are not prepared to say, at any rate about the first thing “Bill” did when he came here was to subscribe liberally to Bob McWhorter’s monument fund. “Jones” has a very keen ear for lire alarms and no matter what time of the night the alarm may l c given he always hies himself forth, however thinly clad, and reaches the fire at least fifteen minutes before our extinguished fire company gets there. He has never missed a fire during his four years’ sojourn. After graduation “W. B.” will enter as the junior partner in his father’s firm. Hero’s with you, “Bill,” may you uphold the standard of old Meriwether.PANDORA i 1 ■1 ■■■ ■ ■■■ ' ■■■■ timj.rry I 11 1 uni • Ken non Mott, Jr., LL.B. Atlanta, Ga. I’i Kappa Phi; Phi Kappa; Baseball and Basketball Teams 1018. ‘‘The world knows only two, that's Home and I.” Here’s another one of the “ Lanta boys.” He’s the lx 8t in the class on this front seat camouflage. Often, when besieged by the enemies’ lire, he tries to .«tngc a come-back, gets all excited, points his linger and can say “huh” and “yell” as brazenly ns the next one. • “Kennon” is a great social bug. Ask him. But after all lie has made a very good student. Like his predecessor from Marist, “Muck,” Kennon has made a star scrappy little guard on our basketball team. He has also made our baseball team. He is one of the youngest lawyers (?) our machine has ground forth. May his success lx? unlimited. John Ei.i.is Mundy, A.B., LL.B. .Jonesboro, Gn. Demosthenian; Gridiron Club; Editor-in-Chief of Bed and Black; Georgian Board; Campus Club. “ lie hag-gone from us full of years and full of honor.” Your careful attention is invited to a perusal of the features presented here. We find none other than “Knt,” one of the charter members of this institution and the most familiar sight on the campus. He has been here almost as long as I)r. White has, but he leaves ns one of the most “popularest” men in college. His popularity has come largely from his good nature and willingness to do anybody a favor. Since the memory of man runneth not to the contrary he has been voted the wittiest man in college. Demosthenian meetings are especially favored with his wit. “Ellis” made an almost unrivaled Kditor-in-Chief of the lted and Black, and we still appreciate “Kat’s Korner” in it. His help has also meant a great deal to Pandoras. He has a heart as big as a watermelon and feet even larger. We don ’t know where he is going to hang his shingle, but you can bet your boots on “Knt.” 7% Jamks Edoaic McLean, LL.B. Dougins, Gn. Sigma Alpha Epsilon; I’lii Kappa. “Whatever advice you give, be short.” Wo have with us toilay James McLean, delegate from the County of Coffee, at large, lie reminds us of the fellow who blows a l orrowed instrument in a brass band—he never toots his own horn. According to the old maxim of Pluto or some other of the restaurant owners. “Whosoever tooteth not his own horn, his horn shall not be tooted.” But ere we part we must blow yet a few strains on “Jim's” horn. “Mae” always thinks twice l efore he says anything, and then he says it in a whisper. Rumor has it, however, that he once consumed a hottle of Bevo and l ecamo so jubilant that he almost engaged in conversation with some one. If silence is golden, “Jim” ought to l e a regular mint. He is another one of those mushroom lieutenants—growing from a private citizen to a lieutenant in but a single night. “Jim” doesn’t like the job much though, because he has to talk when giving commands. Silence is a virtue, however, and not a failing. A lot of us might l»e as popular as “Jim” if we didn’t talk so blooming much. And now, good people of Douglas, why use a mail order house to get a good lawyer when you can get a man of this calibre right here at home. Winfield Robison Nisbkt, LL.B. Milledgeville, Ga. Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Kappa. “A library is but the soul's burial ( round. It is the land of shadows." Here’s one from Milledgeville. Nuf sed. “Peaficld” is just an ordinary victim like the rest of us. He is somewhat more invincible than we, however. If he ever goes to France he need not worry about a gas mask for he has roomed with John Strother for quite a spell. “Winfield” is the grand keeper of the sacred Iwioks in the law library, and knows where to locate a few of the “Ga.” reports, sometimes. He is often seen gliding about Athens in a Studchaker. We think lie's trying to keep pace with “Van.” but “Van” has had more experience. Like Cooper, Nisbet intends to practice law in Macon. Let the Central City bar sit up and take notice. We are glad to have known you for three years and hope that your acquaintance will not end hei yJohn Asiii.ky Osiiukx, LL.B. Watkinsville, Ga. Pi Kappa Phi; Phi Kappa. “ ? is only fantastical that is not in fashion. Sjrc8 right! This rumbling noise ami gorgeous streak of bright eolor is nothing more than cutie ushering in spring with his stovepipe lined with pink satin, light green suit trimmed in Persian braid, red cravat, white shoes, green socks to match suit. These glad rags always make you want to fan even if it is liefore winter has broken. “.J. A.” is not only noticed by his “Joseph’s Coat" togs but also in the Terpsichorean art. It is here that he has no parallel and few rivals. “Osburn” has studied his law consistently and despite outside activities is always present when the Hcgent of the Lnw Department calls the roll. Me should make a mark in the legal world. Dexxis Pkxxv, LL.B. Vienna, Ga. Jeffersonian Law Society; Demosthenian; President Senior Law Glass; President Demos-thenian; Campus Club; Gridiron Club. “Let justice be done, though the heavens may fall. ' All hail the King of Candler Hall hot air sessions! This embryo lawyer has started more after-supper gatherings on the steps of the Freshman den than any other man during our memory. Me has a line that flows loud and fluent, which is characteristic of a two-by-four lawyer located at some settlement cross-roads. Me has taken a great interest in his law-work and if we over become large-acred men instead of poor devils, with a mortgaged allowance of pocket money, we will l e willing to use him as our law advisor, to help him out in his law practice, if not for our own advantage. “Penny” is a good fellow and has made a bunch of friends during his sojourn among our hallowed walls.nm Richakd Brevakd Russell, Jr., LL.B. Winder, Gn. S. A. E.; Phi Kappa; Jefferson inn Law Society; Gridiron Club. ‘‘I never lake a nop after dinner, but when I’ve had a bad night then the nap takes me.” Tho distinctions and honors of our class are unlimited. Aside from other outstanding features we have a “Dick Russell’’ in our flock. “Dick” hails from Russell Station, which is one of the suburbs of Winder, Ga. “Richard” came over three years ago but owing to sickness had to drop out a year. Since then, what time he does not spend in waiting for a Seaboard train to tako him to or from Russell, Ga., ho spends with us. When Mr. Nix brings out his absence blanks he is one of the most paramount students we have. ‘ Dick ’ ’ reads the book through occasionally and always knocks up the weight to the seventy-five mark or better, which is going quite some, wo thank you. The friendly, unassuming fellow that he is, has made “Dick” one of the most popular men we have in the class. We predict for him a bright future in his practice with his father. Robert Ellis Shiver, LL.B. Quitman, Ga. Kappa Alpha; Glee Club; Phi Kappa. “ They go wild, simply wild, over me.” First of all, wo would like to congratulate “Bob” on coming to college, after a few long months at Mercer. But everyone is apt to make mistakes, therefore, we can forgive him. This handsome personage since migrating to Athens has divided his time between excusing absences and going to dances. “Shiver” slings a healthy line, too, after the smoke of battle has cleared away. No one can put in more idle words than can this one. Daine Rumor told that “Bob” once had a serious thought. May your jolly, cheerful disposition win for you a place in the hearts of others even as it has in ours.rr:...........= » ■— - ■■■■... ■ fflTi James William Smith, A.B., LL.B. DoSoto, Ga. Jeffersonian; Demosthenian. “An honest man’s word is as good as his bond.” From out of the wilds and jungles of South Georgia this strange biped comes to our threshold. The first time we caught a glimpse of “J. W.’ ’ was when he played center for Newberry College against Georgia. “Smith" has the distinction of being able to write more words to the cubic centimeter on the back of a postage stamp or a cigarette leaf than any other person in captivity. In the immortal words of “ W. O.," his room and street mate, “I M-K-A-N, he’s got it there." “Smith" has done excellent work since entering the University, winning the Freshman Lawyers’ Prize last year. His success at the bar, we feel assured of. (For further reference, see next write-up.) Will Oscar Smith, LL.B. Klberton, Ga. Jeffersonian; Phi Kappa. “The mildest manners and the gentlest heart.” Hero’s another one of them Smiths. I mean W. O. Smith. I mean, er—I mean he’s sometimes familiarly known as “Smith, II. O." (But his name is not Hoke.) “ W. O." hails from Klberton, Georgia. I mean, er—he hauls his guano out from that railroad center. After sojourning with us for three years, however, “Smith" has been urbanized and he can now tell-a-phonc from a fire-alarm box as well as anybody. “W. O." is not complete without “J. W.," tho aforesaid Smith, and one rarely sees the one without the other. There, you have the long and the short of the Smithies. “ W. O." is about as far North and South ns “J. W." is East and West. The firm of .Smith Smith has headquarters in the Athens Hotel. “Will Oscar" is a good judge of a Ford, and on one notorious occasion was heard to remark about one tin-lizzie, “Gentlemen, I M-K-A-N, this is a traveling piece of property." “Smith" is one of the most conscientious students and is as fine a fellow as wo have anywhere, and can copy as many of Judge Gober’s forms as the next one. pandora ★ John Ckkw Sui.i.ivan, A.B., LL.B. Covington, Ga. Jeffersonian Law Society; Demosthenian. “The law: II has honored ns, may ire honor it.’’ This chattel was stopped “in transitu” as it was on its way hack to the University of Chicago last September, and made a fixture of our class. Since then, Sullivan has bent himself to hard, consistent labor and has made things hum for the “cum laude” aspirants. As evidence of the fact that “J. C's.” popularity is not confined to his college and law school associates we might offer the testimony that “Sullie” often gets huge boxes of beautiful smiling lilacs and other precious treasures. He and Bill Jones visit the post oflice expectantly about six times per diem. This pair, in truth, are almost inseparable and Sullivan has to go with “Bill" to all the fires, and to Demosthenian, and to “Nick's” place, but we have already written up “Bill” and will have to confine ourselves to “Sunset” Sullivan, who, with four years at Davidson, a year at Chicago, and with Georgia putting on the finishing touches, should Ih» a polished product when he leaves us. 11 is good nature and jolly, though practical, sincerity have won for him the high esteem of all the twenty-three. Our only regret is that his stay with ns has been so short. Tiikodork Titus, Jr., LL.B. Thomasville, Ga. Jeffersonian Law Society; Demosthenian. “.•I noble man is led by a woman’s yen tie tcords.’’ Theodore Titus, Jr., none knew him but to like him, none liked him but to praise. These words might also fit Woodrow Wilson or a few other minor persons we come across now and then, but they are none too good for “Titus.” While here he has been up and going— always. “Never putting off until the morrow what can be done today,” has seemed to be his motto; and consequently, many months ago he fell an easy victim to this heartless wretch, Daniel Cupidus. With an early start and a head full of sense we cannot but hope for ami expect that “THEY will live happily ever after.”PANDORA Wii.mam Soi’TiiWKiila Tyson, LL.B. Darien, Gn. Dcmosthcninn; Lambda Chi Alpha. ‘‘ 11'hat narrow innocence it is for one to be good onlg according to late.” Like tho majority of our class, here’s another left over product of the academic department. No one has ever learned how “Bill” wends his silent way over the intervening distance from Darien to Athens, Gn. ’Tig said he starts out in a Ford; catches the steam cars; goes a little way by ferry; catches a lioat and finally reaches Savannah, Ga., from whence he comes to Athens by rail. He lives in the Creole town of Darien, one of the oldest settled towns in the State. “Bill” is one of the steadiest, most conscientious students we have, and his work has not been in vain. Hard luck overtook “Bill” during the last few months and he was laid up for about a month with pneumonia which left him with a lot of back work to get up when he came back. “Tyson” has stuck to it though, like a man, and has made good. A lictter fellow than “Bill” never looked inside a form l»ook. We expect to hear of things humming down around Darien soon. Wii.mam Pattilix» VanVai.kknuuho, LL.B. Atlanta, Gn. Kappa Sigma; I’lii Kappa. 4‘That Mormon is like a bed of rose petals to me.” Hail! The King of Abstracters! To hear him tell it “Van” knows more about abstracting than old man Abstract does himself. Often-times. indeed, he even gives Mr. Greeii a few valuable pointers. “Van” never allows anything to interfere with his classroom work. Not even darkness can phase him; for then he will pull out a match and strike it. As a sideline to his law and abstract profession, “ W. I’.” will no doubt enter the automobile field. His experience driving various and sundry cars during the last four years will no doubt prove valuable to him in this line. “Van's” Inst two years here are prima facie evidence that he may practice law some day. George Ham. Westbrook, B.S.Kd., LL.B I In. On. Sophomore Declaimcr; Impromptu Debater; President of Demosthenian; President of Junior Law Class; Editor-in-Chief Georgian; Captain Baseball Team, '18; Gridiron Club. “ J to myself am dearer than a friend. ’’ We don’t delve in ancient history but this soon-to-be lawyer was present on that inemot-able arbor day when the old locust tree was planted which died years ago with old age. Up till this year “West” has a clean record against our noted rivals of which any “Ga.” athlete should lie proud. We see no reason why this record should not bo extended through this season also. “Creek” also probes with varying successes, into the mysterious realms of rhythmic verse. He spends the rest of his time looking wise, collecting, pressing and getting out score cards. We can not dwell longer on this long drawn out college history. He will tell you the rest himself. “Westbrook” will make a good financial expert. Linton Burnside West, A.B., LL.B. Cuthbcrt, Ga. Phi Delta Theta; Phi Kappa; President Jeffersonian; Inter-Collegiate Debater; Gridiron Club; Business Manager Pandora. “ care not for the stars that shine. I'll take a boot-lick for mine. ’ ’ Georgia, Randolph County: Personally appeared before me, the undersigned, Linton Burnside West, who, being duly sworn, on oath says, that he entered the University of Georgia soon after the last load of brick had been hauled from Augusta and has been a student there from time to time ever since; that he made a fairly good law student whenever he would “read the book;” that he was liked by all his associates; that he didn’t clean-up more than several thousand dollars on this year’s Pandora; and that he would make any district G. M., a good .1. P. Linton B. West. Sworn to and subscribed Indore me this the 19th day of June, 1918. « Jonathan Hayseed, N. P., “VERY GOOD MR. WEST.” II. C. Ga. ■■■■Jerome Palmer Williams, LL.B. Swainhboro, Ga. Sigma Xu; Jeffersonian; Phi Kappa; President Jeffersonian Law Society. “A good judge decides fairly, preferring equity to strict law. The above likeness is none other than “Jupiter Pluvius” Williams, the “Gentleman from Emanuel.” Realizing that the mining engineering course at the X. G. A. C. was not deep enough, “J. P ’ decided to dig into the mysteries of the legal profession. Here for the past two years he has faithfully separated the metal from the dross and is now about to go out as a finished product. “J. P.” is of that quiet, unassuming nature, having nothing to say until inspired, then ho bursts forth with brilliant and violent epithets. Aside from growing a voluminous and extensive pompadour, “Williams” one great ambition is to represent annually the cause of the good people of Emanuel in the lobby of the Kimball House. To you and yours, “J. 1 ,” wo wish the best of luck. Thus ends the scripture lesson for today on lawyers. siPANDORA ★ The Childless Dead With funeral «lrum mul with ol scquinl horn Ye hil«lless dead, we come to crown your hair. Ye beautiful, ye youthful, whoever born, Inheritors of high fraternity, Hear ye our trumpet's sombre, solemn blare. Across these fuscous fields where ye were shorn Of love, and unfulfilled paternity, Processional we pass, in endless round, Our seeds of asphodel silently sowing, That always may your mournful resting-ground Klysian bloom: for your eternity. Long years shall we commemorate your going In songs of peace the which thru you we found, () childless sons of bold maternity. Ye sonless sons, ye thought ye died in vain,— Like sacrificial sheep laid on the fire, Or like young blossoms felled with heavy rain,— Your beauty lost forever on the earth; Yet men are building on your funeral pyre Their temple—which shall rise above the plain As tragic sorrow towers over mirth. Because ye gave your lives, your unborn heirs, Immortal fathers, we shall 1k your boys, Shall follow in your priesthood down the years, And those were worthless shall come into worth. Through you our spirits gain at last poise To stand beyond our world of selfish tears. O childless dead, ye bring us deathless birth. M. W. Vaughn, J8 "With the Colors in France.'Senior Pharmacy Class History ;|W HE history of the “pill rolling” class is comparatively short and uneventful. J The class being so small it might he thought by some that we might not have much work to do, and by a mutual agreement, cut classes when it was not convenient to go. But it was quite the contrary. The small number made it easy for I)r. Wilson to find us and he could draw us close to him and consequently kept us constantly at work. It was never a question of who would be called on, but who would he called on the greatest number of times during one recitation. Dr. Wilson has been anxious for our class to make the best showing at the State Board. So he drilled us daily in order that all the work in our courses could be covered thoroughly. Already, many calls have come into the University for graduates in our class and the pharmacy department. Too bad that all the places can’t be filled. This goes to show that our department is thorough and that “Georgia Pharmacists’’ have lived up to the reputation of the school and institution. There was some difficulty in electing officers in our class, which marks the only event of the year outside of hard work. Each man voted for the other until wo decided to elect by the flip of the coin. Gilbert was the lucky man, he then declared Allen the holder of all other offices in the class. We regret to leave the University and shall always carry the old Georgia Spirit with us through life. It will be our endeavor to sustain the standard of our institution. Historian.Senior Pharmacy Class Officers Harold Clair Gilbert...........................................President David Rufus Allen’........................................Vice-President David Rufus Allen Harold Clair Gilbert Pavo, Ga. Washington, Ga. These two pill rollers compose the entire Senior Pharmacy Class. There being no other pharmaceutical students they have had plenty of practice preparing dover powders and baby ease for the large Freshman Class and are now prepared to enter their profession as skilled workmen.The Death of a Soldier I Alas, alas, alone he dies, Alone in darkness all lie lies, Alone upon a bloody field, Alone upon a battlefield. A hero there with unknown name, A hero there with unsung fame; Without the life to tell his story, Without the life to reap his glory. II Ah, noble spirit that could not yield. Ah, cursed piece of welded steel, Were you combined to take away The dearest price that man can pay ? Oh! God we cannot understand What molds the destinies of man; Thy laws are made and then let be. We shape our lives as best we see. III Somewhere, in some sequestered place, Somewhere, there is a pious face That mourns because this youth has fought. That mourns his death, untimely wrought. All mangled, bleeding, there, he holds A dirty cloth with tattered folds, A cloth he bore amid the strife, A cloth for which he gave his life. IV He sees that cloth ns there he dies, Beneath the faded twilight skies; And of a sudden there lichohls Life's vision caught within its folds— That he who greatest fame deserves, Is he who best and soonest serves. He gasps, “My flag, I ever served thee true, I die to serve Red, White, and Blue.”V ohmPANDORA ★ History of the Class of ’19 iy EGISTEKING for the third time as students of our beloved “Alma Mater,” 111 the members of the class of nineteen nineteen came back with the determina-tion to bear the responsible duties of Juniors as has never been borne by any similar multitude. Our joyous days as Freshmen and Sophomores are over and now we are look-g forward to that bright June day in nineteen nineteen when the faithful will be handed their diplomas. It was a, wonderful life, to live that life of being a Freshman, having your hair cut. being barred from all college social activities and looked down on bv those who proudly wore the derby and carried the cane. And that other beautiful time when we were the ones who did the hair cutting stunt in a manner that made our name immortal. But now for the first time we have almost gone through a year as real college men striving with utmost diligence to lead Freshmen and Sophomores in good clean paths and trying to teach them what it is to be a “Georgia Man.” Our Chancellor gave us a little song when we came and most have tried to profit by it. A large number of our class have joined the Colors and are doing their bit towards making things interesting across “the pond.” Our best wishes go out to them in their undertaking to make the world safe for democracy. This is a class that is represented in every phase of college life. Athletics, literary societies and glee club having great participants from our class. A movement was started in our class to purchase Thrift Stamps and make them as a present to the University, this movement was first taken hold of by our class and now we have a goodly number of stamps bought by the dimes taken up every Thursday morning in Chapel. This is how our class stands behind the Government in trying to destroy autocracy and put America where she should be. And now the time has almost arrived when we throw off our actions and deeds as underclassmen and take up the derby and cane with the ambition to make our Country, State and Alma Mater a creditable aggregation of representatives. Clement M. Eyler.Junior Class Officers I). P. WlIRLCIIEl.....................................................................President JO. B. Ax menu's.................................................................Vice-President • P Zaciiky........................................................Secretary and Treasurer C. M. Eyi.kr..........................................................................Historian Junior Class Roll Abney, John William . Commerce Athens Amis, William Dean . Agriculture Athens Anderson, Richard Meriwether Art. , Irregular Athens Andrews, Ernest Edward . Arts Toccoa Archer, Hartwell Dewey . Agriculture Sparta Atkinson, John Pepper Education Greenville Baker, Richard Thomas Education Danielsville Bennett, Frederick William Agriculture Jefferson Brock, Benjamin . Arts Carrollton Brown, Elijah Alexander, Jr. Arts Atlanta Brown, Louis Leonard, Jr. Arts Ft. Valley Candler, Charles Murpiiry, Jr. Arts Decatur Cannon, Charles Egbert . Arts Conyers Cleckler, John Seaborn . Agriculture Palmetto Cown, John Almand . Agriculture Logan villo Cox, Arthur Hodgson . Arts Athens Cutler, Max .... Science Athens Dallas, William McKenzie Arts Thomaston Dickerson, Robert Glenn, Jr. Education Homerville Dickson, Roger Williams . Science Fitzgerald Dooly, Weyman Isaac, Jr. Com merce Watkinsville Ei.rod, Julius Mitchell Agriculture Jefferson Etheredge, John Agriculture Ty Ty Eyler, Clement Manly Commerce Savannah Franklin, Robert Stewart Arts Adairsvillo Garrett, Fred Charles Agriculture Columbus Gay, James Gaston Arts Atlanta Gheesling, William Cornelius Arts Norwood Gilbert, Eugene Thomas . Civil Eng. Washington Hadley, Evan Worthe . Forestry Thomasvillo Hastings, Harry Stanley . Agriculture Decatur Hey man, Herman . Arts Atlanta •Holcombe, Li-oyd Lionel . Science Bremen Hooper, William Davis, Jr. A rts Athens Hopper, Lehman Edgar . Agriculture Rabun Gap DeceasedHulme, Garland Francis . Ingram, Charles Benton . Jackson, Felix Walton King, Alexander Campbell, Jr Lanier, George Wilson . Lasseter, Edward Hinton . Monport, Felix Reid . Moore, Joe Hewell McDonald, John Carlyle . McWhirter, George Harold Neibling, Thomas Meintzer Newman, James Boykin . Nicolson, Robert Lowry . Owens, Felton Edwards . Owens, William Gladstone Price, Francis Edward Pound, Merritt Bloodworth Riley, Lowrey Harris . Sellers, Francis Bachman . Solomon, Henry Doyle . Soule, Edward Porter . Spence, Samuel Bennet Stokes, William Arthur . Thornton, Alered Melba . Thornton, Harry Gairdner . Wang, Shan Chuan Welch, Alva Curtis Whelchel, David Pinckney Whelchel, Emmet Vickery Whitaker, Lee Glanton Whitehead, Waiter Jo . . Wingate, William Gordon . Woodard, Otis .... Zachry, Wallace Preston . Science Agriculture Arts A rts Civil Eng. A rts Arts Vet. Med. Science A rts Civil Eng. Commerce Arts Science Agriculture Science Arts Civil Eng. Civil Eng. Arts Civil Eng. Science A rts Agriculture Commerce Agriculture Agriculture Science Agriculture Agriculture Arts Agriculture Agriculture A rts Athens Barney Gainesville Atlanta Athens Cordelo Greensboro Carlton Douglas Comer Augusta McDonough Atlanta Albany Canon Experiment Athens Butler Savannah Jeffersonville Athens Camilla Atlanta Fayetteville Elberton Tsing Hua College, Pekin, China Thomasvillo Gainesville Douglas Harlem Carlton Camilla Dexter AtlantaJunior Law Class History wmi rnese words?, " 1111s is u nine cuiiegu mu more are muav umwng 10 love her. ' Likewise the Law Class of 1919 is a very small thing hut there are these among us who have thought a great deal of it. When Dr. Morris came down on the first day of registration, last Fall, he was no doubt wondering as to the prospects of a Junior Law Class. The second day he was still wondering, and the third and the fourth. Whether, on the first day of classes, he wondered at the material or at the numbers or at both, the insignificant members know well ere this. Todav there is a war. and for this reason the country will doubtless feel an immense shortage of forensic material, which might have come from the Law Class of 15)19. We have studied “some.” But we can hardly say that we have been as serious and as earnest and as pensive throughout the year, as our able Dr. Morris was on that first morning in Blaekstonc, when he began with “Law. in its most general and comprehensive sense signifies a rule of action!” Indeed, many have felt “Not to enjoy one’s youth when one is young is to imitate the miser who starves beside his treasures.”Junior Law Dewey Kxigiit.................... S. G. Story..................... C. P. Baker....................... W. L. Cranford .................. Philip Cohen...................... Class Officers ...................................Presidcn t ..........................Vice-President ....................Secretary and Treasurer ..................................Historian .................................Cha i la in ■■■■I ■MBJunior Law Class Roll Atkinson, John Pepper......................................................Greenville Breed, Harry Monroe..........................................................LnGrangc Carlisle, William Thompson................................................Gainesville Clare, Barry Lynwood.......................................................Fitzgerald Cobb, Howeli...................................................................Athens Cohen, Philip..................................................................Athens Courts, Richard Winn, Jr......................................................Atlanta an ford, James Varneboe....................................................Valdosta nford. West Lemuel.......................................................Valdosta DeJarnette, Henry Rf.id, Jr..................................................Eatonton Durrence, Henry.................................................................Daisy Few, Samuel Warren.........................................................Appalachce Griffin, William Herschei........................................................Rome Hall, Miles Lewis..........................................................Greensboro Kassewitz, Samuel..........................................................Fitzgerald Kemp, William Rowan.............................................................Nunez Knight, Dewey...............................................................Nashville Lippitt, Alfonso Linton........................................................Albany McMicbabl, Edward Howard..................................................Buena Vista McWhite, George Washington, Jr...........................................Norman Park Mercer, George Walter........................................................Savannah Miller, William Dews.........................................................Waycross Mitchell, John Chester.........................................................Dalton Nevin, Mitchell Albert........................................................Atlanta Pearce, Fred Marion..........................................................Waycross Powell, John Harrell..........................................................Quitman Shiver, Wallace Beverly.......................................................Quitman Talmage, Allen Hill............................................................Athens Thomas, Alexander Amf.en.....................................................Savannah Vinson, Fleming George.......................................................Savannah Watkins, Rotcher Harris............................................Wake Forest, N. C. WfF.it, Augustus Lythgoe.......................................................AthensJunior Pharmacy Class Officers W. I). Vinson R. M. Hailey . . A. B. DkLoach . . L. D. Robkktson . . . President . Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer . Historian mammmmmJunior Pharmacy Class History “VYfV came here on tin seventeenth (lav of April, nineteen hundred and seven-teen to take up our work and see how many of us would he lucky enough to be ‘‘pill rollers”. Dr. Wilson started on us as soon as he found out how green we looked, and we thought a German gun had “cut” loose, lie seemed to never give out of questions, which we thought were shells, because he shot us all to pieces. Two of our members were mistaken for Freshmen and so they parted with their beautiful locks. We have been shot to pieces, as there are only six out of fifteen left, some acknowledging defeat, others were called home. But we are proud of ourselves because we have stood the foe off so far. but our ammunition is getting low and some of us may have to give up yet. but we will never give up as long as we have a chance. We thank our Professors, one and all. for the kindness they have shown us hv shooting us when we were least prepared. Historian. Junior Pharmacy Class Roll A. B. DkLoach............................................. C. P. Dixnard............................................... It. M. Haii.ky............................................ B. G. Hamptox............................................. W. Mouius................................................. P. K. OSTKUMAN ............................................. C. It. PlKKCK............................................. I). Rorkktsox............................................... A. G. SlIOCKI.KY.......................................... V. I). Vinson ............................................. . Leah Pine View-Hart well . Colbert . Rome St. George . C'oleman Gofkee Appalacliee . MaconSophomore Class History Wednesday at eight o'clock. September 18, 1917, the bugle sounded “Scis-sors and Shears,” and the veteran band of Sophomores assembled on the historic campus for a bloody night of revenge and pompadours, but we found that we were without a leader, since our patriotic President, Jim Reynolds, had answered the call of the “Colors.” Vet. undaunted by this misfortune, we immediately elected “Old Hickory” Duncan, who had won his reputation bv his fisty-skull duels with Freshmen, to the presidential chair, and the good work went on. Never before in the history of this great University has a Sophomore Class made such a scalping success. With “Freshman” our watchword, and “Hair" our motto, we razed their priceless pomps and escorted the unruly buccaneers to the cemetery of “Paradise l ost,” and there the Stygian Oconee murmured into then-ears. “Obedience to Upper Classmen.” If time and space would permit, an individual biography of each member of this grand class should be written, so that in future years, when each member lias reached the zenith of his life, we might be able to look back and find even now. indications of their greatness. In fact, in every phase of college activity, our members uphold the reputation of their class—we have mental kings and physical brutes. Sophomores we are, and proud of the fact. We fought our wav to eminence in the eyes of upper classmen and we defended the traditions of our Alma Mater from the onslaught of over three hundred husky, green Freshmen. The conflict reached such a crisis that our welfaring Seniors called a special meeting and waved the flag of truce for the subdued Freshmen. We lost the Push Ball game but we put pulverized “pep” into the game—a new method of warfare. Yet, amid all these glories, conquests and experiences, we have missed the members who answered their Country’s call, but when the clash of war ceases and the battle smoke clears away from the ashes of Berlin, there will be representatives of this class in that victorious army or along those battered roads that lead into the heart of defeated Germany, or in those shattered and shell-torn fields of France, mounds and crosses will commemorate this same “Class of 1920.” Raymond W. Martin.Sophomore Class Officers A. F. Duncan C. W. Slack Frank Harwell R. W. Martin J. II. Davis . . . . . President . . Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer , . . . Historian ....................Poet Sophomore Class Roll Adams, C. L Dkkxel, R. .1 Alexander, W. . . .... Thomasville Ebbriiart, J. P Allen, T. 1 . . . . Millcdf'cvillr Edwards, R. L Anderson, R. L. . . . Macon Eskew, W. R .... Toccoa Arnold, W. G Estes, G. I’., Jr . . . Gainesville Barrett, C. P . . . . Milledgeville Evans, J. J Beck, W. H Fowler, R. W . . . . Marietta Bbxkord, A. T Fudge, J. C Bkknstkin, A. B. . . . Savannah Garrison, II. L . . . . Gillsville Bkthune, L. K Gibson, S. B Bilks, H. G Goldsmith, W. S., Jr. . . .... Atlanta Bond, 1). B Hargis, H. W., Jr .Hamlet, X. C. Boone, W. S Harrold, P. W Boston, W. 8 Harwell, Frank, Jr.. . . . . . LaGrange Bowen, U. S Hay, R. L Hill, R. M Braxxex, H. 8 Hodgson, C. W .... Athens Bright, 0. K Hodgson, P. C .... Athens Brooks, E. G Hodgson, P. A Buck n ell, H., Jr. . . Atlanta Hodgson, W. A Burpee, C. M Hoscii, II. C Calhoun, J. H Atlanta Ho WALD, G. A Howell, S. C Cantrell, T. L Hunter, R. N Carswell, K. S , Chattanooga, Tenn. Jackson, Z. W Clark, M. W Jenkins, A. C .... Yidalia Colburn, W. C Chattanooga, Tenn. Kennedy, H. T Collins Golem an, W. X. . . . Kennedy, R. L Conyers, J. L Kennedy, J. II Macon Cranford, J. V. . . . Kixxard, G. P .... Ncwnan Davis, J. H Knight, J. A Davis, L. 8 Koxtz, J. T Dickinson, (J. W. . . . . . . Union Point Krikrohm, G. A . . . Argentina Dillard, 0. .1 Lanier, L. R Metter Dodson, V. A„ Jr. . . Americas Lee, V. A Drake, J. B Levy, M. M PANDORA Rigsby, W. B Augusta Loop be, H. S Roberts, 0. B. . . . Douglasvillc Lyon, H. C .... Clarkcsvillc Russell, W. L. U.. Turin Mack am., F. S Savannah Sattbrimbld, C. II. . Adairsvillc Martin, R. W Ncwnnn Sbwbli, R Mature, J. A . . . Waverly Hall SlIEI.NUT, J. B. . . . Matson, T. I) Atlanta Sheppard, W. M. . . Mkadkks, J. A Gillavillo Sherman, J. II. . . . Mealing, H. G. ... Augusta Siem, A. M Savannah Singleton, L. 1). . . Gainesville Moore, W. L., Jr.. . . Atlanta Slack, C. W Morris, S. M Spears, II. W Madisou Moseley, 0. It .... Greensboro Stuckey, R. II. . . . McCord, J. A., Jr. . . Atlanta Summerour, C. W. . McCoy, J. C Talmaoe, J. 10. . . . McWhorter, JO. A. . . Tisinoee, II. II. . . Nelson, J. A., Jr.. . . Savannah Vansant, It. L. . . Atlanta Nowell, J. M., Jr. . . Veal, E. W Nowei.l, It. L., Jr. . . Monroe Weathers, I) Glcnville O’Callaghan, It. I). . Athens Wei.den, T. J Ore, II. C West, F. B., Jr.. . . Wheatley, C. II. . . Amcrieus Patrick, J. B Wire, A. L Pendergrass, A. W. . . Jefferson Wight, W. C. ... PlIILI’OT, T. M. ... Woodrukp, II. 10. . . Pope, C. H Wooten, V Weight, S. R. ... Reese, P. C Fairbnrn Young, J. 11 Ridgway, L PANDORA ★ Sophomore I am monarch of all I survey, None but Klysian thoughts are mine. I have no troubles to enchant my days; I suppose that I’m divine. There is no work, the days go ’round, To rise on some nobler shore, Ami bring me to fame’s greater crown, To be great for evermore. None so charming as my great face, I walk the campus with dignity; And the world is such a small place, That you’d think me from Germany. Should I from the campus depart, ’Twould leave all hearts disconsolate, 'Twould pluck the fairest, sweetest part, And leave the old campus desolate. I am a Soph, Freshmen are small, When I drop around their way; And .Joshua’s word would surely fall, Where mine are heeded every day.nzFreshman Class History YYJV I' behold of Georgia. “The fairest of the Southland,” opening wide her J IPy arms to us. and we came, l-'rom North and South, from East and West. we Hocked to the standard of the Bed and Black—the largest Freshman Class in the history of the University. Our first few days were rough and stormy hut filled with surprise and delight, .ong will we remember the trip to the State Normal and Lucy Cobh on that event-uI Freshman’s Night. Nor will we forget our visit to the Strand and Elite Theatres—a warm reception was awaiting us at both. The first week over, we settled down to work. work, work—that eternal grind, that curse of the human race—study plagued us from morn till night. But we met the enemy face to face and labored like Trojans. And who will say we have failed? We have taken our places in the literary societies, we have taken our part in the college athletics, and we have held our own in the classroom till now we are imbued through and through with the grand old “Georgia Spirit.” Failed? No. Wo are with you and will remain till the end. The 1017-18 Freshmen have inaugurated a new contest, in the spirit of rivalry, between the two literary societies in the form of a Freshman Impromptu Debate. Such interest was manifested in this contest this year that over twenty men tried out in both societies. Also much interest was shown in the regular Freshman Debate, which was very hotly contested. They told us that we were fresh—and we denied it not. They told us that we were green—and we endured it. They accused us of being unsophisticated—and we let them rave on. And why? Because we knew there was a great day a-com-ing, a day of reckoning, when we would pay off our old scores. The great day came. We lined our men up on Sanford Field and shot them head-long at our old-time enemies—the Sophs. Bruises didn't count, clothes were no object. Sophs and Soph's wool were all we wanted, and that we surely got. coming out of the game victors by a score of 5 to 0. After this, well might we say. “We came, we saw, we conquered.” IT ISTOKI AX.Freshman Class Officers Geokok W. Daniels...................................................................President K. 0. Wimberly.................................................................Vice-President A. I. Hknnktt..................................................... Secretary and Treasurer W. O. Rudolph........................................................................Chaplain Ho yd C. Moss Historian PANDORA 7 Freshman Class Roll Adams, B. C Burtciiaell, J. G. . . . . . . East Point A I, DEN', A. F Butler, M. R Ai.d man, F. L Cagle, C. E Anderson, S. V .... Statesboro Caldwell, H. W. . . . Atlanta Anderson, W. I)., Jr. . Macon Caldwell, J. B Arnold, A. J., Jr. . . Carson, J. P Atkinson, J. L. . . . Ci.eaveland, T. F. . . . Avary, A., Jr Atlanta Clifton, W. If Bag ley, T. B Cobb, W. F Baii.ey, C. B Cochran, F. M Bailey, J. M Lnurcnceburg, Ky. Cole, J. P Ball, W. C . . . . Thomasville Coleman, R. B . . . Bainbriilge Barksdale, J. L., Jr.. . Augusta Con well, E. B Barrett, D Athens Cox, H. B Barrett, P. T .... Commerce Craig, V. G . . Lawrenccville Bearden, C. S Buckhead Crane, J. R Bell, A. F., Jr Hartwell Crane, W. M Bell, J. P . . . . Washington Crouch, J. M Bennett, A. I Camilla Culhert, J. T . . . Lake Park Bennett, P. H Quitman Dadisman, H. 1) Jefferson Berman, J. E Camilla Daniel, G. C Bishop, J. H . . . Watkinsville d’ANTIGNAC, J. M. K. . . . . . Sunny Side Blalock. I). S . . . . Fayetteville Bohannon, C. R Lithonia Daughtry, H. L., Jr. . . Bowen, J. A Daves, J. T., Jr Bowie, J. C Davidson, W. If . . . Fort Valley Boyd, I) Davis, A. G Bradberry, P. B. . . . Athens Davis, F. L., Jr Bradley. W Davis, T. F Branch, T. C Davis, T. J., 2nd. . . . .... Savannah Brice, H. T Davis, W. J Meigs • Brodnax, C. E. . . . Dennis, C. J., Jr. . . . . . . Suffolk. Va. Brunson, C. K DesPortes, R. S Buchwald, Ben . . . Athens Dishro, W. B., Jr. . . . Atlanta Buck, F. B., Jr . . Bessemer, Ala. Dixon, J. M Buie, W. I) Nashville Dorman, H. P Cottonwood, AlaPANDORA a Duncan, A. F Dunn, T Edwards, E. A ..... Oxford Edwards, T Elliott, J. L Ewing, 0. B , . . . Greensboro Farlinqer, D. F Faulkner, D. G. ... Rovston Field, j. S Fitzpatrick, II. V. . . Forehand, H. B .... Sylvester Fort, L. II Gaissert, I. F Madison Gaston, J. H .... Greenville Geisb, J. F G ELDERS, S. F Goettinger, Carl . . . Atlanta Griffin, H. D Griffin, L. A Gibson Griffin, W. H Griffith, A. E., Jr. . . . Athens Groover, .J. C Groover, T. D Guthman, Sam, Jr. . . , Hagler, J. C., Jr. . . . Augusta Haisfield, H. B Griffin Hall. M. L Hancock. R. II Hargis, R. R IIargrettb, W. T., Jr. . . Tifton Hatcher, C. C., Jr. . . . Heaton, W. D , . . . Tallapoosa IIendrbn, W. M . . . Elkin, N. C. Herrington, P. G. . . . Atlanta II BY man, C. S Hickey, R. L......................Atlanta Hicks, C. L........................Dublin Hiohsmith, E. W....................Baxley IiiRSCH, B.........................Athens Holloway, K. E....................Barwick Holliday, T. C..................Jefferson Holt, J. H..................Lawrenceville Howell, H. C......................Atlanta Hubert, M. A.......................Athens HUCKABEE, H. I....................Ashhurn Huddleston, F. W...................Senoia Hughes, L. II......................Oakwoo Hunter, B. E......................Atlanta Johnson, I)......................Garfield .Johnson, H. S.....................Bowman Johnson, M. L....................Garfield Johnson, T. M...............Orchard Hill Jolly, H. D......................Kingston Jones, J., .Jr....................Atlanta Jordan, L. M.......................Athens Kickliohter, H. I .............Glennvillc Kickligiiter, L. P.............Glennvillc King, A..............................Rome King, M. C............Copper Hill, Tcnn. King, R. I)..........................Rome Kingkky, M. L......................Summit Lacey, IC. It........Mission Ridge, Tcnn. Lane, R. L........................Ililtoa Lbvie, A. T.....................Montezuma Lewis, S. L.......................Atlanta Lott, C...........................Douglas Lumpkin, B. C......................Athens Lumpkin, .J. H...................Americas Maddux, F. W.....................Colloden Malone, G. K.................Sandersvillc Mann, J. W..........................Lyons Martin, E. A..................Adairsvillo Maxey, H. A.............................W iiderMiddlebkooks, W. T. Starieville Miller, R. 1) Milstkad, B. H. . . . Athens Mims, J. W Mikaglta, E Macon Mize, P. K Moore, H. I) Moore, M. W Morrison, A. A. . . . Morton, A. L Athens Moskovitz, A. I. . . . Moss, B. C , . . . . . Toccoa Moss, T. S Murray, W. T. . . . Albany McC AND LESS, E. X. . McDonald, D. B. . . Quitman McEntirb, W. II. . . Cavncsville McGkhee, J. 0. . . . McGowan, Sam . . . . Kingston McLaury, E McLkllan, J. M. . . Dalton McLemore, I. 0. . . . Iliggston McMillan, K. I). . . McMukbay, W. M. . . Lavonia McNeal, H. M. ... Pearson McPherson, X. (!. . . Nall, C. W .... Luthersvillc Neel, P. D .... Cartersville Nelms, W. P Commerce Norris, J. G Nowell, H. 11 Monroe O’Neal, B. 1 , Jk. . . Macon O’Neal, E. W Jackson Osiiorn, M. A Overstreet, J. IS. . . . Baxley Owens, J. S Parham, C. L .... Odessndale Park, 11. E Sylvester Peacock, W. 11 Petty, .1. B PlRKLE, E. L Pope, B. 11 Popper, S., Jr Macon Proctor, E. I) Pugh, E. W Purvis, C. L Quarteicman, K. A. . . Winder Quilliax, I). I) Redwine, J. E., Jr. . . .... Gainesville Rice, W. B Richardson, H. S. . . . . . . Ilawkinsvillo Riodon, II Roberts, 1). 1) Macon Rodgers, I). S . . . . McDonough Rose, P. D Ross, J. E Rudolph, M. 0 Ryals, P 8aye, R. T Schroder, W. C. ... Scott, J. P Shook, J. R San Antonio, Tex. Short, R. W Sibley, W. II . . . Union Point Simpson, B. F Simms, J. II Singer, L Smith, L. M , Atlanta Smith, T. N Smith, W. 1) V Smith, W. IT.....................Jefferson Soule, R. M.........................Athens Sperling, H....................Waynesl oro Spicer, J. P......................Savannah Sterne, E., Jr......................Albany STKVER80K, R. R.........Little Rock, Ark. Stokes, T. L., Jr..................Atlanta Strickland, G. M...................Concord Sutker, X.........................Savannah Swann, J. S...........................Pike Talcott, A. W.......................Athens Torrance, C. C.....................Atlanta Tiiapnell, L. R.....................Metter Trotti, L. J.......................Atlanta Troutman, J. F..................Ft. Valley Tucker, I). D..........Williamston, S. C. Vbai.E, J. K..................Watkinsville Vickery, E. II......................Toccoa Wallis, A. 11.................Fayetteville Watkins, J. S...................Inckson Watson, J. 1)....................Dallas Whblchbl, ir. C.................Douglas West, J. II.................Union Point Westbrook, L....................Oakwood Whatley, C. E..................Reynolds White, H. E..................Flovilla Wiley, ir. B................Eastanollee Wilder, L. B....................Pelham Wilkes, J.........................Lyons Wilkins, J. .1....................Athcm Williams, R. B.....................Dubj Wimberley, E. C...................Lyons Wingfield, P. B..................Athens Wise, J. W.................Goggansvillc Wood, R. II.....................Jackson Woodall, J. I).................Woodland Woods, C. F......................Howard s ■v VPANDORA ★ The Brave Americans I With flashing eyes ami throbbing heart They hee l tlieir dread command; “Over the top” and ofl' they start To venture “No Man's Land.” The shades of night are settled fast, Upon the sanguine field, Loud roars the mighty German blast, And fills the air with steel. II 'Mill fire and smoke and stifling gas, Their orders they obey, To sei .e the deadly German pass Before the dawn of day. They know no guide nor trodden path. These brave Americans; Tho ’ few in number, strong in faith, They fear no German guns. III The lurid light of the cannon shell Reveals their rugged line; Dead and dying, those who fell Are left in the night behind. On, on advancing to the fight, With manhood’s might at test, They pass that shell-illumined night To Fate’s eternal rest. IV The frightful battle din moves on, When o 'er the blasted sod Tho shadows fade with rising dawn, Into the light of God. Upon the silent battle ground The lifeless bodies lay, Without a motion, breath, or sound, Beneath the cloudless day. V Great grief, it is too deep for tears, That some must fated l c, And die while in their early years, To save humanity! An angel sees from out the sky The work that has been done, And, looking down with tearful eye, She blesses each fallen one. VI But nations climb to heights of glory, On bodies of its slain; So has Almighty planned the story, That man must suffer pain. These heroes fell at God's behest, Passed into Eternity, And ever with solemn sadness rest On the page of memory. GEORGIA STATE COLLEGE of AGRICULTURE AN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION ’WITH A STATE FOR ITS CAMPUS HONOR ROLL One of the favorite haunts of agricultural students is the greenhouse and no one is found there oftener than Mr. Whelchel. The greenhouse is very valuable for student instruction and experimental work. “II stands for hug” but also for Ben ford, the young man so pleasingly posed. Mr. Hen ford will teach vocational agriculture next year. In the next ten years (leorgia will need 100 teachers like Mr. Ben ford and there will he an annual appropriation of $385,000 for the work.Ladies and gentlemen, please allow me to introduce Mr. Louis 1. Skinner in the act of examining tomato plants in the large concrete hotbeds of the College. To his college chums it is not Mr. Skinner, but Major Skinner, of the Cadet Corps. He says he hopes to be examining daisies in France soon. Mr. .1. ('. Sorrells is surveying the formal garden just west of the Veterinary Hospital. As a part of their work this year the Seniors surveyed a mile and a half of road along the winding Oconee. The road is now being constructed.A great military man is Captain A. S. Bussey and one who lets no detail escape even though he need use the microscope to detect it. He is at work in the Farm Crops’ Laboratory. Mr. Samuel Craig is seen running a new tractor bought by a Clarke County farmer to aid ‘‘in the Spring Drive.” (Oh. no, Mr. Craig, those shirt sleeves are just camouflage. You can’t make us believe you are ready for work.) V Along with his Senior work this year. Mr. Hay Harris has done some very valuable work in testing cows for advanced registry. Last Summer, during vacation, he assumed charge of the Co-Operative Creamery at the College. Mr. T. F. Koesel sees in (ieorgia a dairy State of no mean conse- |iienee. lie thoroughly enjoys an argument. Today he says the Holstein is the best dairy cow and yesterday it was the .Jersey.Mr. J. M. Bexley and Mr. John Law Stevens are examining soil samples taken in a field of alfalfa on tile College farm. They report the soil a ‘‘Cecil clay loam.” 'Pile County Agent of Clarke in his official ear. Mr. W. 10. Broach directed demonstration work in this county during the year and still found time to take the part of the Senior work which he required for graduation.Col. Trippe: “Mr. Wang, what is the weight of a clay’s allowance of grain for a mule?” Wang: “From eight to ten pounds.” Col. Trippe: "That was a pretty close guess Mr. Wang, hut you missed it. It is not eight to ten pounds, it is nine pounds.” Col. Trippe: “Mr. Cutler, why didn't you wear your uniform this morning?" Cutler: “I have a stye on my eye and couldn’t wear it." Col. Trippe (after having asked Berman a question): “Mr. Berman, have you got your book open?” Berman: “No, sir." Col. Trippe: “You ought to have had. Then you probably would have made a better mark.” Col. Trippe: “How do soldiers sleep on a train?" “Bed” Pound: “With their eyes closed.” Col. Trippe (to Color Sergeant Wheatly) : “Sergeant Wheatly. why don’t these flags stand out straight?" Wheatly: “The wind is not blowing Colonel." Col. Trippe: “They stand out in the book and the wind is not blowing there." Wheatly (to himself): “I’m off.” ■■■Mi ■VJ PANDORA Pan-Hellenic Council L. B. NVest, 1» A 0 . R. B. Crawford, XV . SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON J. K. McLean R. B. Russell, Jr. CIII PHI .1. L. Brown, Jk. R. NV. Courts, Jr. PHI DELTA THETA NV. G. Arnold L. B. West KAPPA ALPHA S. S. Ben net, Jk. NV. 1). Hooper SIGMA CHI A. H. Stevens NV. A. Stoke8, Jk. ALPHA TAU OMEGA R. NV. Dickson R. E. L. Spence, Jk. ....................President . . . . Secretory-Treasurer SIGMA XU E. J. Perky, Jk. F. E. Wilhoit DELTA TAU DELTA Benjamin Brock J. A. Nelson, Jk. CHI PSI R. B. Crawford NV. R. Mai.loky KAPPA SIGMA F. E. Price NV. P. Van Valkbnburg PI KAPPA PHI Ken non Mott, Jk. P. C. Reese LAMBDA CHI ALPHA NV. I. Dooly C. M. Eyi.ekSigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity Founded at the University of Alabama 1856 Beta Chapter Established 1866 Counts: llo jul Purple ami Old Cold SENIORS C. B. Barrktt T. Harkold J. E. McLean J. V. Cranford W. L. Cranford A. L. Limrr W. W. Alexander E. S. Carswell W. T. Carlyle W. C. Colburn J. A. Arnold T. Davis K. Goldsmith S. B. Ham R. Hancock C. C. Hatcher R. Hickey A. Kino .JUNIORS SOPHOMORES FRESHMEN R. B. Russell .J. L. Stevens W. w. Wilson E. H. McMichakl G. W. Mercer W. A. Dodson W. S. Goldsmith F. W. Harroi.d R. L. Nowell I). Kino P. S. Mackall H. H. Nowell F. I). Rose L. Smith R. R. StevesoN C. C. TorranceChi Phi Fraternity Founded at Princeton University 1854 Eta Chapter Established 1867 COLORS: Scarlet and lilac. SENIORS J. L. Brows R. W. Courts, Jr. JUNIORS L. L. Brown, Jr. E. A. Brown, Jr. J. G. Gay SOPHOMORES W. S. Boston H. Bucknell H. W. Caldwell FRESHMEN C. J. Dennis L. D. Hand H. C. Howell S. L. Lewis J G. Norris R. L. Foreman, Jr. A. C. King, Jr. W. L. Moore, Jr. M. A. Nevin J. H. Calhoun L. M. Jordan C. H. Pope Jno. Owens, Jr. J. H. Park W. H. Sibley J. J. Wilkins, Jr. VPhi Delta Theta Fraternity Founded at Miami University in 1848 Georgia Alpha Chapter Established 1871 Coi mS: Blue and White SENIORS J. R. Bowden Van Groover Ai.fkkd Scott JUNIORS H. R. DeJarnette II. Hardy J. M. Nowell SOPHOMORES R. L. Anderson W. G. Arnold W. H. Beck FRESHMEN Fred Allman H. T. Brice J. M. Crouch Frank Nelms B. P. O’Neal, Jr. Earl Park J. T. Taylor L. B. West J. II. Powell II. I). Solomon W. P. Zaciiry J. H. Lumpkin J. A. McCord J. E. Talmage J. E. Red wine John Shook Donald Taylor J. F. Troutman H. E. WhiteKappa Alpha Fraternity Founded at Washington and Lee 18155 Gamma Chapter Established 1872 Counts: Crimson and Cold. S. S. BeNNET, .Ik. J. M. Hatcher C. M. Candler, Jr. F. W. Jackson W. 1). Hooper, Jr. I). Boyd, Jr. F. Harwell, Jr. H. C. Hoscii Jenkins A. P. Bennet W. Bradley J. P. Carson J. P. Cole T. J. Davis It. S. DesPoktes A. E. Griffith SENIORS JUNIORS SOPHOMORES FRESHMEX A. Pew, Jr. R. E. Shivar R. L. NI COLSON M. B. Pound W. P. Shivar J. A. Knight J. T. Kontz, Jr. F. B. West, Jr. J. H. Young W. T. Hakgrett B. E. Hunter T. M. Johnson D. B. McDonald W. It. Palmer W. D. Smith J. P. Spicerr eSm- JL Sigma Chi Fraternity Founded nt Miami University 1855 Delta Chapter Established 1872 Counts: Blue and Cold Alfred Bi.ai.ock SENIORS A. If. Stkvkns 11. M. Bkekd L. S. Davis 11. S. Hastings JUNIORS W. 1). Mll.I.ER E. D. Park W. A. Stokes Clifford Camp J. I . Eberiiardt SOPHOMORES J. B. Shki.nutt G. M. Strickland J. L. Barkesdai.f. A. F. Bki.i. I). S. Bl.AI.OCK W. I). Buif. W. P. Cong don H. L. Daughtry FRESHM EX P. G. Herrington E. M. McCanless E. M. McLaurie I. 0. McLemore N. C. McPherson Julian Ross R. R. Gunn Q. M. C. F. G. ReidFounded at V. M. I. 1805 Alpha Beta Chapter Established 1S78 Colors: Sky HUic and Old Gold SENIORS R. E. L. Spence E. V. Whelchel S. G. Story JUNIORS C. E. Cannon H. G. Thornton R. W. Dickson F. G. Vinson .T. L. Medlin W. J. Whitehead S. B. Spence SOPHOMORES T. P. Allen R. N. Hunter W. S. Boone T. D. Matson FRESHMEN A. I. Bennett H. S. Rich arc son R. B. Coleman T. N. Smith B. T. Milstead E. Sterne, Jr. W. R. Moore T. L. Stokes W. T. Murray H. C. Whelchel pHOTOS Fir ; i UI-JM-InKMv -I UmcmMiN PANDORA ★ Sigma Nu Fraternity Founded at V. M. I. 1869 Mu Chapter Established 1881 COLORS: Black, White and Old (laid SENIORS W. W. McManus H. T. Mobley B. G. O'Berry E. J. Perry, Jr. F. E. WlLIIOIT J. 1 . Williams JUNIOR J). P. WlIELCIIEL SOPHOMORES R. L. Kennedy V. Wooten FRESHMEN F. B. Buck G. K. Malone W. Mims B. I. Morris J. I). Woodall S. R. Wrioiit W. B. Rice L. R. Trapnbll J. A. Ward, Jr. R. B. WilliamsPANDORA v0 | NS, PANDORA Delta Tau Delta Fraternity Founded February, 1859 Beta Delta Chapter Established 1882 J. H. Byron JUNIOR Benj. Brock SOPHOMORES G. P. Kinnard R. S. Davis .r. A. Nelson, Jr. J. C. Fudge T. M. Philpot, Jr, W. I). Heaton, Jk. C. E. Brodnax FRESHMEN W. D. Jackson H. T. Cason M. C. Kino J. M. Dixon H. G. Mealing D. F. Farlinqer K. A. Quarterman J. S. Field It. W. Short .7. M. Hall, Jr. L. J. Trotti mmmavotV m yr .OH] VHOQN V dPANDORA Chi Psi Fraternity Founded at Union College 1841 Alpha Alpha Delta Established 1890 Colors: Jtoyal Purple and Old Cold R. B. Crawford W. E. Marks W. R. Mallory SENIORS Irvine Piiinizy J. R. Strother R. H. West W. I). Amis J. P. Atkinson JUNIORS E. P. Soule J. J. Evans C. W. Hodgson R. M. Hill SOPHOMORES W. B. Rigsby J. If. Siierman C. II. Wheatley J. L. Atkinson J. T. Daves J. H. Gaston J. C. Haglf.r FRESHMEN K. K. Lacey J. 0. McGhee R. M. Soule Kappa Sigma Fraternity Founded at the University of Virginia 1869 Beta Lambda Chapter Established 1901 Colors : Scarlet, Emerald and White SENIORS Francis Edward Price W. p. Van Valkf.nburo JUNIORS It. M. Hailey 0. F. Holme W. Lanier SOPHOMORES (’. L. Adams O. E. Bright W. H. Clifton J. L. Conyers J. II. Crane W. li Disnito FRESHMEN W. 1 . Anderson, Jr. I). Boyd W. J. Davis T. G. Lummus F. C. Wright F. U. Palfrey C. H. Satterfield J. Jones, Jr. C. L. Ia»tt M. W. Moore R. 1). O'Callagiian A. L. Wier T. S. Moss P.. H. Pope I). 1). Quillan W. H. Smith Founded nt College of Charleston 1904 Georgia LamMa Chapter Founded at U. of Ga. 1915 Colors: Gold and White Flower: lied Hose E. II. Lassktkr K. Mott W. F. Nall SENIORS J. A. Osborne I. Padgett J. E. Patterson B. C. Clark W. H. Griffix W. R. Kemp G. II. McWhirter JUNIORS J. C. Mitchell P. C. Reese W. I). Vinson W. C. Ball W. N. Coleman SOPHOMORES L. F. Duncan W. N. Ho WALD Monroe Butler E. W. High smith J. E. Overstreet FRESHMEN C. L. Parham R. H. Wood Jl mmmmmi Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity Founded at Boston University 1909 Nu Chapter Established 1915 Coi.ons: Purple, Green and Gold W. O. Bozeman E. W. Jones J. W. Abney C. P. Dexxard W. I. Dooly, Jr. C. M. Eyler It. S. Franklin M. W. Clarke F. L. Davis, Jr. It. L. Hay H. T. Kennedy H. B. Forehand J. M. McLellax A. A. Morrison W. II. Peacock SENIORS JUNIORS SOPHOMORES FRESHMEN F. O. Miller W. S. Tyson M. VV. Hill F. M. Pearce A. A. Thomas It. H. Watkins A. C. Welch It. W. Martin A. M. Si km It. L. Vansant E. W. Puoh C. B. Stone J. E. Veale P. B. Wingfield IPANDORA ★ if £ 1 Phi Epsilon Pi Fraternity Pounded at the City College of New York 1902 Mu Chapter Established 1915 Counts: Purple and Old Cold SENIOR G. W. Parkas PlIII.II COHEN Herman Hey man JUNIORS Sam Kassewitz SOPHOMORE Simon Morris John K. Kisemax Carl Goettinokk Stewart F. G elders FRESHMEN Sam Guthman Charles Hbyman T. Bertram HirshPANDORA PANDORA ★ The Drunken Catfish Ball WHAT COULD HAVE BEEN The proffered wine was ruthlessly refused, The generous donor was sadly abused. What noble services it could have rendered, If to the Bed Cross it had been tendered, Or if to the hospitals it had been ceded! For convalescents nothing is more needed. The Government was pleading for such wine, The Allies’ sick soldiers said, “It’s line;” Or still, if sold can you conceive what joys Its profits would have brought to needy boys? When you poured out that gift useful, august, O shame! you dishonored your public trust. WHAT WAS The guests assembled down at Pelham, near the Flint; Old Bacchus did his banquet palace rent. He called in all his attendants to aid, For this was to be the best feast ever laid. The grand catlishes, as honor guests were there. In droves the suckers all forgot their care, And to the banquet hall they went in glee. The eels did hear about the jubilee, And said they wouldn’t miss it for their lives. The silversides in haste forgot their wives. The noble perches brought with them the minnows For to partake from Bacchus of his dinners. The eminent tadpoles, though not invited, Yet at the revelry seemed quite delighted. Still others, far-famed, noble guests, forsooth, Enjoyed themselves as if in early youth. No greater ball was ever held before. The feast was one of dance and drink galore. The guests, including Bacchus, all got drunk. And drank, and drank again till all had sunk. G. H. McWhirtkkP. K. Truth, Lieutkn. nt-Coix)nki, (Retired) Professor of Military Science and Tactics Commandant of Cadets URegimental Officers Ik vine Piiinizy.....................................Lieu ten an t-Colon cl C. M. Parsons.....................................Captain and Adjutant Miss Nina Scuddbr..............................................Sponsor First Battalion Richard W. Courts..........................................................Major Roy C. Harris...........................................................Adjutant Miss Margaret Wilkinson..................................................Sponsor Second Battalion Louis I. Skinner A. H. Stevens . Miss Julia Okr . . Major Adjutant Sponsor m PANDORA The Band Roll “Fkss" Dottery...........................................................Director J. J. Bbnfokd..................................................Principal Musician J. J. McCord...........................................................Drum Major C. W. Slack.................................................................First Sergeant P. E. WlLHOlT............................................................Sergeant CORPORALS C. Camp R. I). Miller J. J. Evans J. I). Woodall PRIVATES P. Bennett C. R. Bohannon P. Cohen J. T. Coyle R. L. Kennedy X. G. Long F. Nelms K. W. Pugh R. Save L. M. Smith L. R. Tkapnbll A. H. Wallis J. 1). Williams Qem Company “A” Roll A. S. Bussey . E. J. Perky . J. W. Sheppakd W. D. Hooper, Jk. . . . Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . First Sergeant W. H. Beck SERGEANTS R. W. Dickson S. S. Bennett A. M. Thoknton W. S. Boone CORPORALS F. W. Jackson J. H. Calhoun J. T. Kontz A. W. Dodson W. B. Rigsby II. C. Hoscii C. 11. Sattekkield PRIVATES R. L. Anderson W. I). Anderson H. D. Akchkk I). B. Bond I). Boyd T. C. Branch C. E. Broadnax T. L. Cantrell E. B. Con well V. G. Craio T. P. Davis R. G. Dickerson E. A. Edwards W. R, Eskew H. V. Fitzpatrick I. P. Gaissekt S. I). Gillespie J. C. Groover W. T. Harorett R. L. Hickey C. L. Hicks E. W. Hioiismitii K. E. Holloway T. I). Matson J. C. McCoy W. H. McEntyre C. W. Nall J. W. Overstreet G. J. Pahno C. L. Parham J. H. Park A. Pew M. O. Rudolph P. O. Saunders R. M. Soule J. P. Troutman J. S. Watkins L. Westbrook H. C. Whelchel L. G. Whitaker S. R. WrightCompany “B” Roll 1). P. WllELClIKL P. E. Price . J. M. Bexley . W. I). H EATON' . . . . Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . First Sergeant L. S. Davis J. M. Moore R. I). O’Callaghan J. B. Patrick O. B. Roberts H. W Spears SERGEANTS CORPORALS M. B. Pound E. V. WlIELCHEL R. R. Stevenson A. L. Ware J. H. Young PRIVATES A. AvarY P. T. Barksdale J. G. Burtchaell M. A. Butler J. P. Carson W. M. Crane J. R. Crane II. L. Daughtry J. T. Daves F. L. Davis R. J. Drexbl E. T. Gilbert W. S. Goldsmith L. A. Griffin A. E. Griffktii T. D. Groover C. C. Hatcher R. H. Hancock M. A. Hubert R. R. Hargis Z. W. Jackson S. L. Lewis G. K. Mauine J. W. Mann H. D. Moore J. B. Newman F. D. Neal II. C. Orr J. S. Owens V. B. Rice II. Rigdon D. S. Rogers W. II. Russell II. L. Saunders J. P. Spicer T. L. Stokes II. Sperling J. F. Scott F. W. Veai.e J. E. Vbale W. D. Weathers J. H. West C. E. Whatley R. II. Wood VCompany “C” Roll w. W. Wilson....................................................................Captain I. Padgett........................................................................First Lieutenant M. Matthews...........................................................Second Lieutenant J. C. McDonald........................................................First Sergeant B. Brock SKRGKANTS 11. S. Hastings L. L. Brown W. G. Owens W. S. Boston CORPORALS J. G. Gay W. N. Coleman P. A. Hodgson W. li. Colburn L. M. Jordan G. C. Daniels F. S. Mackall MPRIVATES W. G. Arnold C. B. Ingram T. B. Baolby I). Johnson W. Bradley G. I . Kinxakd L. K. Bethune A. T. Lkvie B. Buch wai.d E. M. McCaxless II. S. Brannex I. 0. McLemork U. S. Bowen W. R. Moore A. B. BERNSTEIN W. T. Middlkbrooks W. C’ONGDOX E. A. McWhorter G. T. Culiireath R. W. Martin M. W. Clark M. A. Nevin W. I. Dooly S. Popper L. F. Duncan H. E. Park, Jr. W. II. Davidson A. Park W. J. Davis K. A. QUARTERS!AN J. S. Field W. H. Smith, Jr. II. D. Griffin N. SUTKBR H. L. Guthmax E. N. Smith II. L. Garrison L. D. Singleton R. M. Hill C. W. Summbrour R. L. Hay I . B. Wingfield H. C. Howell V Company “D” Roll T. Hakkold.......................................................................Captain 1). Knight.........................................................................First Lieutenant W. M. Mallory..........................................................Second Lieutenant C. M. Candler, Jk.......................................................First Sergeant SERGEANTS A. COX A. L. Nicholson T. M. N EIBLINO CORPORALS 0. E. Bright T. Harwell E. 1). Carswell M. M. Levy J. L. Conyers J. H. Sherman G. V. Dickenson II. D. Solomon PRIVATES S. V. Anderson J. M. McClellan P. W. Ben NUTT E. A. Martin J. B. Bell If. J. Mealing I). Boyd M. W. Moore C. S. Bearden E. L. PlRKLE F. T. Cason I). I). Quillian G. M. Crouch H. B. Raines W. P. Cobb P. D. Rose II. B. Cox H. S. Richardson W. L. Chapel J. E. Redwine J. B. Drake R. H. Stuckey C. J. Dennis L. Singer S. F. GELDERS C. E. Torrance C. Goettingkr F. J. Vaughn J. C. Haoler A. G. Watson L. I). Hand S. C. Wang S. C. Howell J. J. Wilkins H. I). Jolly . II. E. White J. H. Kenny L. B. Wilder L. P. Kicklioiitek E. C. Wimberly R. L. Lacy C. L. Wood R. L. Lane  ? Company “E” Roll J. R. Strother . R. B. P. Crawford E. W. Marks . J. W. Abney . . Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . First Sergeant E. W. Hadley SERGEANTS A. C. Kino H. Heyman W. A. Stokes L. L. Holcomb C. V. Hodgson G. H. McWhirtkr R. L. Nowell J. A. Nelson CORPORALS P. C. Reese J. B. Siiellnut A. C. Welch PANDORA PRIVATES A. J. Arnold C. B. Bailey J. M. Bailey It. T. Baker A. I. Bennett J. E. Berman I). S. Blalock W. I). Buie J. H. Byram II. W. Caldwell J. S. Cleckler J. H. Davis G. J. Dillard W. B. Disbro J. K. (1 ’Antignac J. P. Kberhardt T. Edwards J. K. Eiseman C. S. Heyman L. II. Hughes W. I). Jackson J. Jones J. A. Knight E. H. Lasseter B. I. Morris B. C. Moss T. S. Moss .1. O. McGhee S. McGowan M. C. McPherson E. W. O’Neil B. II. Pope R. W. Ray P. Rubin J. II. Sims T. N. Smith L. S. Trotti E. H. Vickery C. E. Waring P. B. WestCompany “F” Roll C. B. Barrett.................................................................Captain R. E. L. Spen’CE................................................................First Lieutenant J. B. McLain........................................................Second Lieutenant W. J. Whitehead......................................................First Sergeant SERGEANTS H. B. Bucknell F. W. Harkold L. H. Riley W. I . Zachry C. L. Adams E. E. Andrews W. C. Ball E. A. Brown CORPORALS A. M. Si km J. E. Talmadoe II. G. Thornton PRIVATES G. M. Adams J B. IIirsch F. L. Allman T. M. Johnson W. W. Alexander H. S. Johnson A. T. Benkord H. P. Kicklkjhtkr C. Barrett R. I). Kino I . B. Bradberry I). B. McDonald F. B. Buck W. M. McMurray J. H. Bishop A. Moskovitz C. E. Brunson W. L. Moore T. P. Cleveland W. T. Murray J. B. Caldwell B. II. Ml INSTEAD J. P. Cole E. Miraolia Ted Dunn J. G. Norris I. J. Davis B. P. O'Neal H. G. Dasher E. P. Proctor R. L. Dbspoktks J. B. Petty J. L. Elliot W. II. Peacock L. G. Pi elds D. I). Roberts L. H. Fort J. E. Ross W. C. Ghkkslino G. M. Strickland J. H. Gaston W. I). Smith If. B. Hals field J. S. Swann J. H. Holt E. Sterne L. E. Hopper J Quartermaster Company Roll Robert R. Gunn.....................................................................Captain G. P. Dodd...........................................................................First Lieutenant E. D. Alexander..........................................................Second Lieutenant W. P. Tabor................................................................First Sergeant H. L. Hardy W. A. Hodgson F. C. Garrett Van Groover E. M. Barnes J. H. Bowden R. R. Childs L. B. Collins P. M. Copeland W. G. Cornett J. A. Cowx P. M. Cochran A. H. Davison II. L. Edwards .1. M. Elrod R. L. Etheridge I). T. Faulkner L. M. Gardner SERGEANTS J. H. Long CORPORALS C. W. Johnson J. G. Lumpkin VERNON SA M MON S PRIVATES H. S. Garland O. T. Goodwin W. I). Hasty II. B. Higginbotham W. B. Hipkins W. J. HUSON E. M. Hutcheson h . r. Hutcheson W. II. Johnson J. C. Johnson II. N. Kemp C. N. Keyser L. R. Lanier V. A. Lee M. M. Reid O. Woodward L. II. Tippett I). K. Young F. L. Martin J. A. Meadows E. G. McKenzie T. II. McKenzie C. B. Nickolsox Elmo Ragsdale F. G. Reid E. G. Rodgers W. R. Stillwell C. B. Stone E. L. Strickland Roy Ward A. Woodard II. F. Wynne v: Demosthenian History HE past in the memory is ever linked with the present. Turn where we may, the shadow of the past obtrudes across our path. Demosthenian Hall, with its simple gray exterior, sepia re windows and oval doors is one of these shadows. Around it cling and cluster the memories of over a century. Within its debating chamber the glittering array of orators and statesmen that line the wall; the cased emblem representing Demosthenes by the sea, toiling to the mortuary of himself; even the broken gavel from Toombs oak. which is useless, upon the desk; all unite to preserve the tradition of the past. The beginning of all these memories can be traced to the Junior Class of 1803, who formally organized the Demosthenian Society in February of the year ; though the seed had been sown in 1801, the year when the Cniversity opened the portals and to which Demosthenian rightly traces her origin. The best records show that the society was founded in 1801. but perfected in 1803, the present building being erected in 1824 and the name. Demosthenian, formally given to the society. Since then Demosthenian has gathered much glory to herself. ictorv more often than defeat has perched upon her banners. It would be useless in this brief sketch to trace through the windings of a century the important part Demosthenian has played in the Cniversity life, or the influence she has exerted over many noble sons of Georgia. The records still live, investigate and find out for yourself. Fellow Demosthenians. the past has been grand, the future—Ah. the future!— it lies in our hands. Demosthenian in distant years will also be judged by you and I, therefore, let us take care that we lower not her traditions. E. A. McWhoktek, Historian.Demosthenian Presidents Mack Matthkws....................................................First Term O. R. Ellars....................................................Second Term Dennis Penny.....................................................Third TermPANDORA Phi Kappa History HK history projjer of Phi K)ij)|»i begins with the founding of the society on February 22, 1820, though connected recorded history begins some ten years later. For some time prior to the founding of Phi Kappa dissension was brooding among the Demosthenians; it finally fomented into a split of the membership into two irreconcilable factions; the outcome of this status of alfairs was the founding of the new society. At first, the new organization was termed as a student clique and a “Rebel Bunch,” who needed only the course of time to bring them back into the mother society. But Phi Kappa soon outgrew this adverse criticism and came to compete with Demosthenian on an equal footing. This was the logical result to follow when we consider the aim of the founders: that is, by social contact and competitive exercises, to gain that mental and moral elevation of the mind, which the early orator would have called “Xumquam non piratus.” Now. if through the power of some modern invention the grand old walls of Phi Kappa could be made to sound forth again the voices which have echoed and re-echoed throughout the hall, we would hear Alexander Stevens engaged in debate on Government Policies and it was due to the never tiring efforts of this man that the present structure adorns the campus. Again we would hear the voices of Howell Cobb. Henry W. Gradv, .fudge Colquitt. Ben Hill. T. R. R. Cobb, and many others whose voices have electrified the Forensic Arena of the State, whose impassioned oratory has swayed the multitudes, and whose statesmanship qualities have not only shaped the destiny of the State, but also have had an equal share in shaping the destiny of the nation. Oh, thou Alma Mater of many men, Whose memories linger cherished sweet, The saeredness lies embedded deep, Of thy walls, thou grand Phi Kappa Hall. Of thy honored they are upon the wall, Of thy worthy they are on the roll;Phi Kappa Presidents It. W. Courts, Jr................................ R. E. L. Spence, Jr. . .......................... R. L. Foreman, Jr................................ . First Term Second Term . Third Term Jeffersonian Law Society W. 0. Bozeman L. B. West . C. B. Bakkett J. I . Williams . President First Term President Second Term President Third Term President Fourth Term ViAgricultural Club Presidents Roy C. Harris.............................................Firnt Term T. P. Roesel, Jr.........................................Second Term L. I. Skinner.............................................Third Term V: Debating Council Dewey Knight . . John W. Sheppard . DEMOST11K NIA N Dewey Knight Inman Padgett Mack Matthews . . . . Chairman . . . . Secretary PHI KAPPA It. W. Courts, Jr. R. L. Foreman, Jr. J. V. SheppardAnniversarians C. Murphey Candler, Jr.....................................................Demosthenian “For What Are We Fighting?’' Rorkkt L. Foreman, Jr....................................................Phi Kappa “The South After the War.”Virginia Intercollegiate Debate Subject: Resolved, That the Government of the United States should conscript every resident who is not engaged in military duty for such other service during the war as it shall deem them best fitted to perform. Inman Padgett J. Madden HatchesLouisiana Intercollegiate Debate Subject: Resolved, That all corporations engaged in interstate commerce should bo re- quired to operate under Federal charters, constitutionally granted. C. Murphey Candler, Jr. Dewey Knight ■v " y .Champion Debate Shbjrct: Resolved, That the government of the United States should continue to main- tain control over the railroads after the war. Al'PIKMATIVB..................................................Dkmosthkxiax Negative..........................................................Pm Kappa DKMOST11 EX IA X PHI KAPPA C. M. Caxdi.er, Jk. K. A. Browx W. M. Dallas W. P. Zaciiry if Impromptu Debaters I) KMOST HI3NI AN Alfred Blaixjck C. M. Caxdler, Jr. O. R. Ki.lars Dkwey Knight W. I). Miller J. C. Sullivan PHI KAPPA R. W. Courts, Jr. R. L. Foreman, Jr. W. D. Hooper, Jr. J. W. Sheppard R. E. L. Spence, Jr. W. P. Zaciiry ■v? Junior Orators W. I). Hooper, Jr. W. Arthur Stokes, Jr. Wallace I . ZachryJ Sophomore Declaimers O. E. Bright A. B. Bernstein F. W. Hariiold N. G. Long M. M. Levy Simon Morris E. A. McWhorter R. I). O’Callaghan W. B. Rigsby II. II. Tysingrr ALTERNATE W. W. Alexander Sophomore Debate Subject: Resolved, That it is unwise to actively use Japanese troops in the present war. Affirmative..................................................Phi Kappa Negative..............1.................................Demostiienian DEMOSTIIENIAN O. E. Bright N. G. Long W. D. Weathers Phi Kappa Won PHI KAPPA F. C. IIakrold R. D. O'Callaghan H. C. Young Annual Freslnnan Debate Sudjkct: Resolved, That the age limit of conscription in the United States should be lowered to nineteen. Affirmative.......................................................Dbmosthkxian Negative ..........................................‘..................Pm Kappa PHI KAPPA J. P. CARSON S. P. Geldkks E. 0. Wimberly Dcniosthcnian won DEMOSTHENIAX E. W. Higiismitii Boyd C. Moss Julian E. Ross  Freshman Impromptu Debate SUBJECT: Resolved, That the conscripted negro should be trained in the North. Demosthenian . Phi Kappa PHI KAPPA J. E. Berman J. P. Carson S. P. Gei.ders Leon Singer E. C. WlMBERI.Y ■Negative won Not in picture. DEMOSTIIEN IAN 11. P. Dorman I. F. Gaissert E. W. 11IGIISM IT11 Boyd C. Moss G. J. P. hno Affirmative Negative .Cotton School Debate Subject: Resolved, That the share system of tenantry is better than the lease system, both for landlord and for tenant in the South. AFFIRMATIVE J. J. Bknkokd Sam Craig NEGATIVE H. S. Looper Arthur Park Affirmative wonQuo Vades? Commencement is a word that bids us pause And muse upon the years that lie In'fore And lie behind us. And methinks ’tis now, Strong-limb’d and full of strength and pride of Youth, Our Life-tide hovers ’twixt its flow and ebb, As pause the chimney-sweeps, or down they dart. To glimpse the haven where they fain would rest. ’Tis now we must decide upon our part, Our line of service and our destiny; In this bright hour, when ’round ns gather friends To bid God-speed upon the road we choose, We must select from all the pathways of the race The path our feet shall press, or, leaving all, Strike forth across the dim, uncharted plain To find our destiny in unknown fields. Among us, some have been, indeed, full long Anointed with the oil of leadership; No doubt they still shall lead in other spheres— Shall sound the clarion-call that bids the sex To rise in might, and by united voice Demand and take the ballot ’s privilege. These too, mayhap, in Doctor’s gown may teach The coining generation to l o bold— Leave impress on the minds of little ones Who turn to him for guidance and for light; May rear his monument in hearts of men. Still, after all, not all may wield the sword Of leadership. The many follow on, To reach the Crown of Service in the stops Of those who lead. No soul can dare To say that she who bears the toil Of sober mediocrity shall have reward Less noble than the wreath the victor wears. To those who from our halls today Go forth to shadows of obscurity, I bend the knee and give them praise; Their names may be forgotten, but their work lie-echoed in the hearts of many more Shall leaven this dull lump of human clay. So, all may serve. Think not of your reward, Nor of the destiny that lies before; But do your task, in ev’ry case, and know Your privilege is by your life to pay At least a portion of the debt you owe For all the blessings that have come to you Within these walls. You shall not dare think Your debt is ever paid. I pray you each To serve with all your might the commonwealth; And, serving, leave your fame to lie with Him Whose “Fiat hoc’’ is final. Nothing fear, You will have justice; nor could you ask more. I bid you all “Fare-well,” and to you each Extend that ancient Saxon wish that God “Be with you each until we meet again!” January 6th, 1917. li. M. Anderson.The Young Men’s Christian Association Motto: Spirit, Mind and Body" CABINET OFFICERS Alfred W. Scott ........................................................President C. M'Jitrhkv Candler, Jr...........................................Vice-President VALLACE I . ZaCHRY.....................................................Treasurer . W. Sheppard........................................................Secretary Marry Kino................................................................General Secretary Chancellor Harrow..............................................Honorary President Alfred Blalock . E. A. McWhorter Louis I. Skinner Irvine Phinizy . .1. B. Sheenutt . Mack Matthews H. S. Hastings . R. W. Courts, Jr. A. C. Welch . COM MITT EE CM AIRM JON ..................... . . Sunday-school Bible Study . . . Missions ...............................................Extensions ..................................Fraternity Bible Study .............................................Boys ’ Work ..............................................Self Help ................................................Social ....................................Freshman Promotion ...............................................Devotional BOARD OF DIRECTORS John White Morton .... I)r. R. I . Stephens........... Chancellor D. C. Barrow Prof. J. R. Pain E. R. Hodgson, Jr. - Harry Kino Frank Lipscomu Prof. R. E. Park Alfred W. Scott W. P. Zachry President TreasurerCMCAiVft KK t»r tuwsow AWOCOTl' SPIRIT AJN.4t.0CX HSJtSiTIK } A SWfnMD RWCOUMTS ■KUMICR MRiirntc s JRSWCti.WT PANDORA Y. M. C. J. W. Abney C. L. Adams W. W. Alexander Fred Allman R. L. Anderson R. T. Baker W. H. Beck J. P. Bill F. W. Bennett Alfred Blalock J. A. Bowen W. S. Boston W. 0. Bozeman O. E. Bright L. L. Brown, Jr. J. G. Burtchell C'. M. Candler J. S. Clecki.br W. O. Cooper H. B. Cox J. H. Davis W. B. Disbro W. I. Dooley A. Promotion Committee 0. R. Ellars E. A. Overstreet II. V. Fitzpatrick I. Padgett J. P. Franklin G. J. Paiino J. G. Gay Arthur Park F. Harwell C. M. Parsons H. S. Hastings J. E. Patterson E. W. Hiohsmitii R. W. Bay H. C. Hosch L. H. Riley . W. Jackson T. A. Roesel W. B. Jones A. W. Scott J. Kontz J. B. Shei.nutt A. T. Levie J. W. Sheppard X. G. Long L. I. Skinner John McClellan J. H. Sims Sam McGowan I). Solomon T. 0. McLemoke C. W. SUMMEROUR X. C. McPherson T. P. Stokes E. A. McWhorter F. J. Vaughan Mack Matthews J. H. West A. A. Morrison L. Westbrook J. H. Moore L. G. Whittaker H. C. Ore E. C. Wimberly W. P. Zachry P A IM DO R A Y. M. C. A. Extension Workers R. T. Baker W. 0. Bozeman G. C. Daniels J. H. Davis C. M. Eylkr H. V. Fitzpatrick R. L. Hay . W. Jackson W. B. Jones E. A. McWhorter Arthur Park R. W. Ray J. B. SlIELLNUT L. I. Skinner A. W. Stokes A. M. Thornton F. J. Vaughan A. C. Welch W. P. Zaciiry V Georgia Blue Ridge Delegation E. A. McWhorter L. I. Skinner I). II. Mac ill J. W. 8hf.ppard C. II. Satterfield W. I . Zaciiry ■■■How the Y. M. C. A. Helped Make Camp a Success (7ft UK Cniversity Y. M. ('. A. at Camp Stephens served the Cadets in every lUL ]M)ssihle way. The big tent was up and the equipment all ready when the students arrived, and within a very few minutes the eadets were making use of it. A new Yictrola furnished music throughout the week of the camp; newspapers, magazines, and books were on hand for free use; checkers, carroms and baseball entertained those assembling at the tent when otf duty: stationery, envelopes, pens and ink were furnished free, and about two thousand letters were written in the tent, which also housed the camp postotliee and provided free mail service three times daily. All this service cost the cadets nothing, and was given alike to members and non-members of the Y. M. C. A. Our only remuneration was the privilege of serving, and that is more than enough.The University Y. M. C. A. E University V. M. (’. A. is an organization separate and distinct from the University proper. Its members are brought in of their own accord and its maintenance depends on the voluntary contributions of the students, faculty, friends, alumme and parents of the institution. The purpose of the Y. M. C. A. is to create a clean and wholesome atmosphere among the students, to instill in them the principle of service and helpfulness and to help them in the cultivation of their spirits, minds and bodies. C" It is non-dcnominational. All sects and classes are equally welcome to participate in its workings and all are equally urged to become members of the organization. Throughout the entire scholastic year the Association maintains Bible study classes in all of the churches of Athens. There is also an organized Volunteer Band who go to various convict camps teaching the inmates, also to suburban Sunday Schools organizing them more efficiently. These men also visit the infirmary of the University doing everything in their power to make the time pass oir quickly for the sick. There are held on Thursday nights the weekly meeting of the Association, while during the week a vesper service is held every night led bv ministers, laymen or students. The finance of the Association is controlled and regulated among the students by the Promotion Committee, which turns the money collected over to the Advisory Board, composed of members of the Faculty. It is then disposed of by them in such a way as to meet the necessary expenses of the organization. At the annual military encampment of the University Cadet Corps the Y. M. C. A. has an extra tent for its use. Here writing material, music and all necessities of camp life are furnished the students free of charge and everything is done to help them in every way. The Y. M. C. A. is the only religious organization in the University. On it, therefore, depends the status of the Christian influence in the institution. The co-operation of the students and parents is earnestly solicited and the result of the work put forth by the Association depends upon this co-operation. V PANDORA m GEORGIAN FEBRUARY 19 18 VMAinCXM NUHtlh 2 e org ia ggrte ultural Quarterly «w r»» January dumber 1918 ■■■ PANDORA Pandora Boards Since 1886 Volume I, 1886.—Editor-in-Chief, G. X. Wilson, K A. Business Manager, W. B. Cook, A T 12. Associate Editors, W. E. Wooten, X A E; McDaniel, X I ; C. P. Bice X ‘I ; C. II. Wilson, K A; W. A. Speer, I A (-); P. P. Stone, «I» A 0; It. I). Meador, A T 12; M. B. Bond, A T A; W. S. Upslmw, A T A; It. S. Moye, I» T A; P. L. Wade, «I T A; A. W. Wade, X X; W. C. Brown, X Volume IT, 1887.—Editor-in-Chief, G. P. Bice, X I . Business Manager, J. W. Daniel, K A. Associate Editors, T. W. Beed, I A (-); G. Waters, I T A; W. J. Shaw, X X; H. P Milner, A T 12: A. L. Franklin, A T A. Volume III, 1888.—Editor-in-Chief, Albert Howell, K A. Business Manager, A. W. Griggs, A T A. Associate Editors, W. L. Moore, X A E; T. It. Crawford, A T 12; P. W. Code, X X; Lucien L. Knight, X I ; W. M. Glass, A T A. Yoi.UMK IY, 1800.'—Editor-in-Chief, John 1). Little, X A E. Business Manager, W. K. Wheatford, X X. Associate Editors, P. E. Callaway, K A; S- Tribble, I A 0; J. C. ('raw-ford, X X: W. W. Ellis, X I ; W. L. Stallings, A T A; W. X. Smith, X MS E. A. Cohen, X I». Yoi.UMK Y, 1802.—Editors-in-Chief, J. P. Lewis, X I ; L. L. Brown, A T 12. Business Managers, W. E. Christie, X X; W. T. Kelly, A T A. Associate Editors, J. C. Kimball, X A E; ltoy Dallas, I A 0; J. It. Lane, E A X; E. W. Prey, X ML Yoi.umk YI, 1808.—Editor-in-Chief, Harry Hodgson, K A. Business Manager, P. G. Barfield, X A E- Associate Editors, C. It. Xisbet, X «I ; X. B. Stewart, A T 12; A. O. Halsey, X X; H. A. Alexander, E. G. Cabaniss, I A 0; F. G. Johnson, A T A; Eugene Dodd, X ML Yoi.umk VII, 1804.—Editors-in-Chief, C. It. Tidwell, A T A; Xoel Moore, X A E- Business Managers, Paul L. Fleming, X John I). Stelling, A T 12- Associate Editors, L. I). Prick, X X; W. P. Harbin, X M'; H. Brown, K A; George Beckett, «I A 0- Yoi.umk VIII, 1805.—Editor-in-Chief, W. A. Harris, X I - Business Manager, J. J. Gibson, A T A- Associate Editors, II. H. Steiner, X A E; J. W. Morton, K A; W. W. Chamller, A T 12; W. L. Kemp, X X; J. T. Dunlap, I A 0; H. V. Black, XV; J. G. Smith, Non-Fraternity. Volume IX, 1806.—Editor-in-Chief, Pliny Hall, K A. Business Manager, J. G. Pitman, I A 0- Associate Editors, M. M. Lockhart, X A E; J. B. Connelly, X I ; Fred Morris, X X; C. H. Holden, A T A; II. V. Black, X MS T. A. Neal; It. B. Nally. Volume X, 1807.—Editor-in-Chief, H. G. Colvin, X A E. Business Manager, It. E. Brown, A T 12- Associate Editors, P. L. Fleming, X «h; J- W. Spain, K A; Harry Dodd, X MS P. S. Smith, I A 0; A. L. Tidwell, A T A; H. Love joy, X X; W. B. Kent; J. W. Hendricks. Volume XI, 1808.—Editors-in-Chief, Harry Dodd, X US Hugh White, X X. Business Manager, J. C. McMichael, K A- Associate Editors, C. H. Black, X I ; B. E. Pomeroy, 'X A E; C. Westbrook, A T A; J. T. Dorsey, «I» A 0; H. B. Perkins, A T 12- Volume XII, 1800.—Editors-in-Chief, Garrard Glenn, X A E; A. P. Adams, X I . Business Manager, P. E. Johnson, X ML Associate Editors, J. B. McCurry, K A; W. S. Blun, A T 12; F. E. Broadnax, A T 12; W. E. Watkins, X X; D. G. Hcidt; J. W. Mason. mmmVolumk XIII, 1900.—Editors-in-Chief, Archibald Blnckshear, K A; Fair Dodd, X ML Business Manager, F. E. Broadnax, A T 12. Associate Editors, F. P. Calhoun, X I»; E. I'. Shannon, «1 A B; F. G. Tapper, X A K; J. I’. Gardner, X X; William Davis; E. II. Ilamby. Voi.umk XIV, 1901.—Editors-in-Chicf, E. P. Shannon, «I» A 0; J. I). McCartney, X A E. Business Manager, Jack Banks, X V- Associate Editors, P. A. Williams, X X; V. H. Bullard, A T 12: It. G. Stephens, K A; I. M. Putnam, K X: W. I). Hoyt, X V; James L. Sibley. Voi.umk XV, 1902.—Editors-in-Chief, Frank H. Barrett, X A E; Sterling H. Blackshear, X I . Business Managers, J. K. Jordan, A T 12: M. W. Lewis, X 'I'. Associate Editors, C. I). Bussell, I A (-); I. S. Peebles, X X; M. S. Johnson, K A: H. M. Fletcher, K X: Down Id Cohen. Voi.umk XVI, 190J.—Editors-in-Chief, G. Dexter Blount, K A; Frnmpton E. Ellis, «|» A B. Business Managers, J. Benton, High; Claude W. Boyd, X X. Associate Editors, Marion H. Smith, X A E: Hugh M. Scott, X I ; Preston Brooks, A T 12; W. G. England, X M ; Marvin M. Dickinson, K X; Sidney J. Nix, U I L. Voi.umk XVII, 1904.—Editors-in-Chief, L. P. Goodrich, X X; I. S. Hopkins, Jr.. I A B. Business Managers, II. M. Blackshear, A T 12; G. W. Nunnally, X I ; J. B. Gamble. Associate Editors, J. I). Bower, K A; Roderick Hill, X A E; Wailos Lewis, X 'F; W. B. Shaw, K X; W. O. Roberts, U P L; R. N. Burt. Voi.umk XVIII, 1905.—Editors-in-Chief, A. L. Hardy, K X: V. B. Moore, X I . Business Managers, Roderick Hill, X A E; C. P. Pratt, A T 12. Associate Editors, H. W. Telford, U I L; T. G. Stokes; A. II. Carmichael, X M ; W. O. Marshburn, I A B; J. C. Upshaw, X N; Art Editor, O. H. B. Bloodworth, Jr., K. A. Voi.umk XTX, 190(5.—Editors-in-Chicf, W. O. Marshburn, I A B; Lansing B. Lee, X A E. Managing Editor, 11. L. Covington, K A. Assistant Managing Editor, J. H. Bradberry, U P L. Art Editor, J. G. Mays, X ML Associate Editors, R. S. Parker, X I ; G. A. Green, A T 12; W. B. Hamblcton, X N; E. It. Lambert, K X; J. R. Turner. VOLUME XX, 1907.—Editors-in-Chief, Phil W. Davis, Jr., I A B; J. K. MacDonald, X ML Business Manager, T. E. Scott. Art Editor, W. A. Griffith, K A. Assistant Business Manager, II. M. Wilson, X N. Associate Editors, W. T. McCaffrey, Iv X; W. G. Brantley, Jr., X A E; J. H. Neisler, U P L; R. S. Parker, X I ; T. S. Winn, A T 12. Volume XXI, 190S.—Editors-in-Chicf, S. O. Smith, «I A B: W. C. Henson. Business Manager, It. P. King, X A E. Assistant Business Manager, 1). L. Rogers. Art Editor, II. G. Cannon, A T 12. Associate Editors, J. B. Harris, X I ; S. E. Morton, K X; C. C. Brooks, X N; Lanier Branson, X M'; Roy Strickland, K A; G. W. Glausier, II K A. Volume XXII, 1909.—Editors-in-Chief, W. H. Johnson, K A; James Montgomery, X ML Business Manager, D. L. Rogers. Art Editor, J. B. Weir, Jr., K X; R. F. Revson. Associate Editors, .1. M. Walker, X A E; E. M. Brown, X I ; W. It. Holmes, I A B; Frank Clark, Jr., A T 12; C. C. Brooks, X N; C. F. Pekor, U PL; O. P. Beall. Voi.umk XXIII, 1910.—Editors-in-Chief, II. Abit Nix; John Moore Walker, X A E. Business Manager, It. L. Campbell. Art Editor, Hugh King Allen, X N. Associate Editors, Eugene S. Taylor, K X: Hughes Spalding, X I ; O. M. Gresham, A T 12; Aubrey Matthews, X X; Robert Gumming; Henry Newman, X M ; Fred Allen, ] A B; Robert P. White, K A; Corbin C. Small, II K A.Volume XXIV, 1911.—Editors-in-Chief, Evans V. Iloath, A T 0; Arthur K. Maddox. Associate Editors, George C. Blanton; Hope P. Brock; .1. L. Deadwyler, I X; .1. H. Foster; Malvern Hill, X X; W. S. .Jones, X X; Henry Newman, X 'F; W. J. Northen, dr., I A 0 Howell B. Peacock, K A; II. I). Russell; C. S. Small, II K A; O. A. B. Sparks, X A E; Boykin C. Wright, X I . Business Manager, Howell Brooke. Assistant Business Manager, E. V. Carter, I A B. Volume XXV, 1912.—Editor-in-Chief, Marion B. Folsom, X N. Associate Editors, R. II. Childs; Thomas X. Powell, 1» A 0. Art Editor, Janies B. Wright. Business Manager, H. I). Russell. Assistant Business Manager, II. 8. Langston. Volume XXVI, 191 J.—Editor-in-Chief, Robert Hill Freeman, 1 A 0. Associate Editors, James M. Lynch, A T 12; 8. Turner Brewton. Business Manager, 1). A. Russell, X X; Advertising Manager, Henry II. West, A T A. Art Editor, Edgar L. Pennington. Volume XXVII, 1914.—Editor-in-Chief, David Knox MeKnmy. Associate Editors, John . Wade, X X; Edgar It. Pund, A T A. Business Manager, Henry D. Russell. Art Editor, Aaron B. Bernd. Volume XXVIII, 1915.—Editor-in-Chief, George Stevens Whitehead. Associate Editors, Thomas S. Candler; Louis Lester, I A 0. Business Managers, William H. Key; I). K. Me-Kamy. Art Editor, Ross W. Coker, X X. Volume XXIX, 191 .—Editor-in-Chief, Robert Callaway, A T Q. Associate Editors, William Henry Quartcrman, Jr., A T A; Benjamin II. Robinson. Business Managers, Frank A. Holden, I A 0; Joel B. Mallet, A T «. Art Editor, W. A. Griffin, X X. Volume XXX, 1917.—Editor-in-Chief, John Huland Carmical. Associate Editors, William Osmond White, X X; Francis Otey McClellan, X V- Business Managers, Xeil L. Gillis, Jr.; J. William Powell, «I A 0; Gilbert Xanier Cheves. Art Editor, Charles M. Tanner, Jr., A T A. VOLUME XXXI, 1918.—Editor-in-Chief, Mack Matthews. Associate Editors, Alfred Blalock, X X; J. R. Bowden, I A 0- Business Managers, A. 8. Bussey; L. B. West, I A 0-Art Editor, Chester W. Slack.THE GEORGIAN fidU Georgian Board G. II. Westbrook..................................................Editor-in-chief O. E. Bright.................................................• . Associate Editor A. B. Bernstein-.................................................Associate Editor Stewart P. Gelders.......................................... . Associate Editor J. E. Muxdy......................................................Associate Editor BUSINESS DEI»ARTMENT A. B. Bernstein..................................................Business Manager Ken non Mott . J. H. Davis . Assistant Business Manager . . Circulation ManagerGeorgia Agricultural Quarterly Staff J. C. SOKKELLS . L. I. Skinner . . W. D. Owens . . Sam Craio Edit or-in-Chief Associate Editor Associate Editor .Exchange Editor J. J. Bexpokd J. M. Bexley . H. S. Hastings BUSIN ESS D EI ’A RTM EN T . .• Business Manager ..........................v Assistant Business Manager .............................Assistant Business ManagerPhi Beta Kappa Dr. J. II. T. McPherson'...............................................President CHARTER MEMBERS Dr. J. H. T. McPherson Dr. J. P. Cambell Dr. R. P. Stephens Dr. L. R. Gbisslek FOUNDATION D. C. Harrow W. II. Bocock L. L. IIendren W. I). Hooper R. E. Park M EMBERS J. Lustrat C. M. Snellino II. C. White T. J. Woo ITER John Morris ACTIVE MEMBERS J. L. Brown R. W. Courts R B. P. Crawford 0. R. Ellars J. M. Hatcher B. G. Oberry Irvine Phinizy R. II. WestSphinx R. W. Courts 0. R. Ellars R. L. Forkmax ACTIVE MEMBERS J. M. R. H. Hatcher West Dr. Woofter FACULTY M EMBERS Prof. II. A. Nix Chaxcf.li.OR Barrow Prof. S. V. SanfordPANDORA ★ V Alpha Zeta FACULTY MEMBERS A. M. Soule, Honorary Prop. W. 0. Collins Prof. G. A. Chaim Prof. 0. T. Goodwin active MEMBERS J. J. Ben ford F. W. Bennett W. G. Owens L. I. Skinner Prof. Elmer Ragsdale Prop. L. E. Rast .1. C. Sorrells A. M. Thornton A. C. Welch alpha ZETA ROLL Townsend..........................................................Ohio College of Agriculture Morrill...................................................Pennsylvania College of Agriculture Morrow........................................................Illinois College of Agriculture Cornell..................................................New York College of Agriculture Kkdzik........................................................Michigan College of Agriculture Granite...............................................New Hampshire College of Agriculture Nebraska......................................................Nebraska College of Agriculture North Carolina.........................................North Carolina College of Agriculture LaGrakoe.....................................................Minnesota College of Agriculture Green Mountain.................................................Vermont College of Agriculture Wilson............................................................Iowa College of Agriculture Babcock......................................................Wisconsin College of Agriculture Centennial....................................................Colorado College of Agriculture Maine............................................................Maine College of Agriculture Missouri......................................................Missouri College of Agriculture Elliott.....................................................Washington College of Agriculture California................................................. California College of Agriculture Purdue.........................................................Indiana College of Agriculture Kansas..........................................................Kansas College of Agriculture ' Dakota.................................................North Dakota College of Agriculture Scovf.ll......................................................Kentucky College of Agriculture Morgan.......................................................Tennessee College of Agriculture Georgia........................................................Georgia College of AgricultureDR, A M.SOULE PROr.L E RAST PROF GA.CR ABB PROF.O.T.GOOOWIN JJ8ENF0RD FW BENNETT W.O.COLIINS W.GOWENS A.M.THORNTON L I.SKINNER A.C WELCH J.C 30RRCLLS Vpandora ★ r Roger II. West Senior Round Table MEMBERS Prof. R. E. Park, Honorary Secretary R. W. Courts, Jr. O. R. Ellaks R. L. Foreman, Jr. J. M. Hatcher T. S. Holland Dewey Knight Mack Matthews Inman Padgett J. E. Patterson Irvine Phinizy R. E. L. Spence, Jr. R. H. West ROLL OF THE CHAPTERS OF SIGMA UPSILON Sophkrim, University of the South Calumet, Vanderbilt University Osiris, Randolph-Macon College Senior Round Table, University of Georgia Odd Number Club, Univ. of No. Carolina Boar’s Head Club, Transylvania University Scribblers, University of Mississippi Kit Kat, Milsaps College Scarabs, University of Texas Scribbs, University of South Carolina Coffee House, Emory University Fortnightly Club, Trinity College Attic, University of Alabama Grub Street, University of Washington Gordon Hope, College of William and Mary Blue Pencil, Davidson College Sphinx, Hampden-Sidney College Ye Tabard Inn, University of Oregon M EMBERS Prop. R. E. .T. W. Aiiney L. L. Brown, Jr. C. M. Candler, Jr. W. M. Dallas C. M. Eylkr Herman Hey Man- Park, Honorary V. 1). Hooper, Jr. W. I). Miller G. H. McWhirter J. C. McDonald W. J. Whitehead W. P. ZachryW. D. Miller . Sam Kassewitz . Miss Mary Lyndon OFFICERS 19171918 President Itusiurns Monager . . Directress MEMBERS O. E. Bright Reid deJaiinette F. V. Harrold J. M. Hatcher Eastman Hunter Sam Kasskwitz Bryant Lumpkin W. I). Miller Simon Morris E. E. McCaxdless R. D. O’Callaghan Arthur Few F. E. Price R. E. L. Spence t PANDORA ★ GRIDIRON CLUBPANDORA ft Gridiron Club Roll S. S. Bennett Ai.frkd Blalock .1. R. Bowden J. L. Brown L. L. Brown C. M. Candler lb W. Courts J. V. Cranford L. S. Davis r. G. Dickerson O. R. Ellars R. L. Foreman Thomas Harrold W. D. Hooper Mack Matthews K. Mott J. E. Mundy J. E. McLean H. A. Nix B. G. Oberry Inman Padgett .1. E. Patterson W. O. Payne Dinnis Penny E. J. Perry F. E. Price R. B. Russell C. H. Satterfield R. E. L. Spence A. H. Stevens R. H. West L. B. West G. H. Westbrook F. E. WlI.HOIT W. W. Wilson D. P. Welch el W. P. Zachry W. J. Whitehead Freshman Club TAU SIGMA CIAIH OFFICERS II. ‘ W. Sboiit . . Secretary-Treasurer . T. Cobb . MEMBERS Allman DesPortes Johnson O’Neal Avaky - Disisro Jones Peacock Barksdale Eiseman Lacey Popper Barrett Farlinoer Malone Pugh Bennett Field Milstead Quarterman Herman Gaissert Moore Redwinb Blalock GELDER8 Morris Rice Boyd COETTI NGER Morrison Richardson Bradley Griffin Moskovitz Ross Broadnax Grifmth McCanless Rudolph Buie Groover McDonald Smith Butler Gutiiam Me Entire Soule Carson Hauler McGehee Spicer CONGDOK Hargett McLemore Trai»n ell Crouch Herrington McLaury Trotti Daniel Hey man McMillan Troutman Daves Hicks McPherson Wingfield Davis Jackson Nelms and Others G. M. C. Club J. P. Atkinson Charlie Barrett Alfred Blalock I). S. Blalock Dan Buie Clifford Camp Philip Cohen Arthur Cox G. C. Daniels Reid DkJarnettb Ii. S. Franklin C. L. Hicks Louis Jordan Max McCanless W. R. Nisbet Ii. L. Nowell C. M. Parsons F. E. Price M. O. Rudolph J. B. Shklnutt Frank Simpson R. E. L. Spence A. II. Stevens F. F. Talley Frank WilhoitDORA ★ Governing Board of the Students’ Loan Fund OFFICERS W. I . Zachry.................................................................Chairman J. E. Patterson’.........................................................Vice-Chairman J. B. Siielnutt, Jr.................................................. . . Secretary Chancellor I). C. Barrow...............................................Faculty Adviser Chancellor Barrow MEMBERS J. B. Siielnutt, Jr, W. 0. Bozeman L. I. Skinner G. C. Daniels W. A. Stjkes I). Knight L. J. Trotti It. I). 0’Callaghan W. P. Zachry .J. E. Patterson A student movement to help worthy students who are in need.OFFICERS F. E. WlLHOIT............................ Clifford Camp............................ F. E. Price.............................. . President Vice-President . Treasurer MEMBERS SIGMA CHI PI KAPPA PHI J. A. Osborne DELTA TAU DELTA J. A. Nelson Alfred Blalock CHI PS I W. E. Marks SIGMA NU J. D. Woodall KAPPA SIGMA R. D. 0’Callaghan PHI DELTA THETA L. B. West ALPHA TAU OMEGA R. W. Dickson LAMBDA CHI ALPHA E. W. JonesGeorgia Botanical Society Motto: “Remember to understand.” HONORARY MEMBERS Prof. J. R. Fain FACULTY MEMBERS Dr. J. M. Read H. W. Harvey C. L. Veatcii H. T. Maddux ACTIVE MEMBERS F. C. Ward . F. W. Bennett C. W. Sum mkrouk C. B. Ingram A. M. Thornton C. W. Mobley J. F. Vaughan T. F. Roesel S. C. Wang L. I. Skinner J. C. Sorrells HONOR ROLL A. C. Welch E. I). Alexander F. U. Palfrey E. M. Braxton J. M. Purdom J. T. Coffee G. M. Scheer J. M. Elrod W. D. Hillis Paul Tabor The Georgia Botanical Society was organized February 18th, 1915, with an initial membership of twenty-four, including fourteen charter members. The Presidents were :W. G. Webb, 1914-’15; N. P. Bassett, 1915-’16; G. M. Scheer, 1010-’17; L. I. Skinner, 1917-T8. The tots membership now numbers thirty-seven. Novices are chosen by election. Those eligible are well rounded students of generally good scholarship who show special interest and proficiency in botanical work and studies. Novices satisfactorily completing a small problem assigned become full members and wear the badge of the society, which is a gold leaf of the over'eup oak.PANDORA ★ Football Team ★ Tux ii Captain ★ Germany Ci nain Elect ★ Cunningham Conch ★ Henderson Auittant Crutch ★ Beasley ★ COLKMAN ★ Donnelly ★ Ferguson ★ Fox ★ Hutchinson ★ Neville ★ Paine ★ Reynolds ★ Reynolds ★ Rigdon ★ Tate ★ Wingate Football Team Prof. S. V. Sanford.........................Faculty Chairman of Athletics T. A. Thrash............. W. W. Garmany .... W. A. Cunningham . . J. G. IIbndkrson .... T. R. Beasley J. S. Coleman Whitey Davis W. P. Donnelly J. F. Frrouson L. ,J. Fox O. 1). Hall •A. G. Hutchinson E. H. McMichael M. W. Moore No v in U. S. service. . . . Captain . Captain Fleet . . . Coach . Assistant Coach • V. E. Neville L. A. Paine R. R. Petree Arthur Pew Jim Reynolds 0. G. Reynolds •John Higdon K. B. Tate H. L. WingateReview of the Athletic Season ’17-’18 at the University of Georgia HB old familiar thud of the football was not heard on Sanford Field this Fall, and its absence caused many a heartache to the sport loving fans of Georgia. At the start of the year it was officially announced that no valiant team of eleven stalwart warriors would he produced this year as in days of old, and so the large Freshman Class was deprived of that inexpressible thrill that comes only when a Freshman sees for the first time a Red and Black eleven in action, battling heart and soul for their Alma Mater. However, the war has been a respecter neither of persons nor of athletics, for it drew away practically every man of our 191(5 eleven, and so disarranged schedules of classes that it left no time for football practices. With the extra military drill going on in the University and the conllicting classes and laboratories in the afternoon. it was impossible to get sufficient time for practice. Add to these facts the enormous cost of football equipment, coaches, trips and schedules, and we see further reasons why it was a wise step to forego football for this season. Probably no higher tribute could he paid to football heroes of 191(5 than to point out the extremely large | crcentage of them who have gone into the service. As we glance down the list of the players we are struck by the fact that almost to a man the Georgia 191(5 Football Team is now on the firing line. Coach Alex. Cunningham. Coaches Henderson and Paddock, Captain Thrash, Petrie. Wingate, Higdon. Tate, Coleman, Reynolds, ().. Reynolds, J., Dezzcndorf, Me Laws, Hutchinson. Hall, Fox. Paine. McConnell. Donnelly, and Managers White, Hyman, and Sims—all are now serving in the forces of Uncle Sam, with all the willingness and vigor that they served Georgia. Many of them are proving to be admirable officers, and the training and discipline they received on Sanford Field has doubtless stood them in good stead. Such a record by last year’s football men more than compensates for the absence of football this year. A college cannot but be proud of its sons who have re-sponded so readily to their country's call. And though we missed football this year, yet we gave it up gladly to enlarge our military activities and as a further step toward economizing expenses. tm 1 BASRET-BALLPANDORA ★ Basketball -gfeOIt the second year in succession the quintet Hr representing Georgia won the Southern Championship in basketball. In reviewing the basketball season one must give an unstinted amount of praise to the five players composing this year’s team, for it was only as a result of their remarkable perseverance and steadfastness that the championship was won. The University is proud of their unquestioned ability but prouder of their indomitable spirit. They battled with the worthiest foes of the Southland and bravely fought their way through all opposition until they were declared undisputed champions. Filtering games with the odds against them, their spirit—that old Georgia fighting spirit of grim determination and courage—carried them on beyond all obstacles until they came out victorious. Xo finer bunch of men ever represented an institution than those five players. Captain Scott. Forward Cox, Forward Pound. Guard Pew. and C.m t. Scott Guard Mott. They are all men of the highest in- tegrity of character, and they were most loyal and faithful to the team. They started off the season with but small chance of duplicating the great record made by last year’s team, but steady practice and good coaching improved their team work steadily until they were able to down the mighty A. A. ('. twice, achieving this feat for the second time in history. The Atlanta Athletic Club was played in Atlanta in the second game of the season, and that game will long be remembered as one of the fastest and most fiercely fought contests ever seen in the South. Georgia emerged victorious, and later in the season defeated their rivals again on the Athens’ court after a sensational up-hill fight all the way. In spite of the tremendous nervous strain and tension with the score tied at the end of the game, the men held their heads wonderfully and in the extra five minutes of play completely routed Atlanta. Their victory was testimony enough as to their ability and nerve. Two games were won from Mercer, and one from Washington and i.ce. while the only defeat of the season was at the hands of North Carolina, when the team was crippled by injuries. In Captain Alfred Scott the team had a most capable leader, whose splendid ability, both as captain and coach, was demonstrated by the excellent record of the Georgia team. Undoubtedly the South’s greatest basketball performer himself, he succeeded in getting remarkable results from his players. Mott proved himself to he the best guard seen in action this year, and Pew as his running-mate, was almost equally as good. Cox and Pound, though both light men, fitted admirably into the team work and contributed their full share toward the success of the team. Xor can we close without some word of commendation for the scrubs who are so largely responsible for the showing of the Varsity. Hatcher, Anderson. Mercer. Smith, and Short are all men of fine ability, and with the last four coming hack next voar. the prospects already look rosy for 1910.Basketball Scores ’18 Georgia, 122; Southeastern Christian College, 2. Georgia, 32; Atlanta Athletic Club 27. Georgia, 24; Mercer 15. Georgia, 27; North Carolina 36. Georgia, 33; Washington and Lee 32. Georgia, 74; Mercer, 9. Georgia, 30; Atlanta Athletic Club, 23. 342 144 Atlanta Athletic Club,Southern Champions Basketball Team T8 A i.Kited w. Scott Arthur Cox ) M. B. Pound ] ‘ A I.eked W. Scott Kexxox Mott ) Arthur Pew J. M. Hatcher . . Captain and Coach . . . Forwards . . . . Center . . . Guards . . . . Utility S  jg]Baseball Team Colby............................................................................Coach Westbrco.c.....................................................................Captain Westbrook......................................................................Pitcher Davis......................................................................Third Base Cranford.....................................................................Shortstop Satterfield................................................................Ccntcrficld Piiilpot.......................................................................Pitcher Simpson........................................................................Catcher Harokktt...................................................................First Base Pound....................................................... Second Base Mott..............................................................................Left field Moore..........................................................................Pitcher Holloway.......................................................................Pitcher Duncan.....................................................................Bight field Kennedy........................................................................Utility Short..........................................................................Utility mmmBaseball IIILK it is too early in the season to make f any summary of baseball, yet there is no reason why we should not have a good season. Glenn Colby, former player on the 08 Team, was secured to coach the team, and he started the men off early in good practices. An excellent schedule has been arranged for the team which includes games with every formidable nine in the South. An especial feature of the 1018 season is the four-cornered race between Georgia, Auburn, Mercer, and Tech, and competition has a I read v been keen. C'APT. WKSTHHOOK 111 fortune struck the baseball team several severe blows at the very start of the season. .Just as the line-up was about settled the team lost the services of both the second baseman and shortstop, when Hancock left school and Mize joined the . The loss of these regulars disrupted the in-and a new combination found it difficult to obtain a smooth team work. As a result of several costly errors, three Auburn games, the Davidson game, and two Mercer games were lost, due chiefly to the shattered infield line-up. However, as the season progresses, the infield should round into shape and the team play a very creditable brand of ball. The line-up at present is: Simpson, catcher, with Whclehel and Simms, reserves; Philpot. Camp, Holloway, and Captain Westbrook, pitchers, with Veale and Lewis as reserves; llargrett, first base; Pound, second base; Cranford, shortstop; Whiter Davis, third base; Mott, left field; Satterfield, centerfield. and Duncan, right field.Baseball Schedule ’18 Mar. 25—Oglethorpe in Athens « 29—Auburn Athens ii 30—Auburn in Athens April 1 — Davidson Athens ii (5—North Carolina in Athens “ 9—Trinity Athens “ 10—Trinity Athens a 12—Mercer Athens “ 13—Mercer Athens a 1!)—Mercer Macon t 20—Mercer Macon ii 21)—Vanderbilt Athens « 30—Vanderbilt Athens May 3—Auburn Auburn a 1—Auburn in Auburn 10—Tech Athens « 11—Tech in Athens 17—Tech Atlanta . • 18—Tech Atlanta 2(1 S usual, the pushball contest was the principal athletic event of the Winter months. The Freshmen won again over the Sophomores, hut the light was the bitterest ever staged around a pushball on Sanford Field, and it took almost superhuman effort on the part of the Freshmen to roll the hall across for a touchdown. The game was well managed this year and the sides were more cvenlv matched than is usually the case. In a summary of the athletics we are often too likely to overlook the work done by the team managers. These men rarely ever get into the public notice and yet they give their constant service to the team. All four of the managers this year arc men of fine character who are very popular among the student body. A. 11. Stevens and B. (5. Oberry. managers of baseball: Alfred Scott, manager of basketball. and Doc Whelchel, manager of track, have all done their full quota toward helping our athletics this year. In spite of the absence of football, we can look back upon a year not without its athletic merits. We have put forth creditable teams in basketball and baseball, and in so doing, have not interfered at all with the comprehensive military activities of the University. Our representatives have all played honorably and fairly and they have each one exemplified the Georgia Spirit. Our athletic record for the future will be bright enough if every athletic team that plays for Georgia can become imbued with the spirit of those five basketball players when they won their last game of the season by the most superb exhibition of nerve and determination ever seen on a college floor. Wallace 1 . Zaciiry.Georgia Boys Under the Flag $51 peace and war the University of (ieorgia has always dedicated itself to the Jfj service of the Republic. The genius of its sons has contributed in no small measure to the advancement of the country in every line of civic endeavor. Their blood has consecrated the soil of the New World in every war waged by the nation since the first class was graduated here. Beneath the Stars and Stripes in Mexico they added lustre to the record of the American army; beneath the Stars and Bars of the Confederacy they illustrated the unequalled valor of Southern manhood and wove around the jacket of gray the fadeless glories of immortality. In the war against Spain they sealed their devotion to the re-united country, and now, when the peace and civilization of the world are at stake, they are rallying with alacrity to the call of their government and rallying with patriotic enthusiasm beneath the folds of Old Glory. The feature of Commencement exercises this year will he the unfurling of the Service Flag of the University. The completion of the work of registering the Georgia men in service will not come in time for the exact number to be published in the Pandora, but already more than one thousand one hundred stars have been placed upon the flag. Of that number fully seven hundred represent commissioned officers of the army and navy, and of the remaining number a large majority are non-commissioned officers. 'Phe University of Georgia sends them forth with pride and with confidence. They are true and loyal, faithful and determined. They will measure up to the highest and best traditions of their ancestors. They will honor the institution that has given them inspiration to better and nobler deeds. They will make the supreme sacrifice or return as victors. They will not come back until success has crowned their efforts and the world has been made safe from all that Prussianism represents.pandora The Honor System at the University P last Georgia has an honor system. The movement to re-establish the old honor system, for which Georgia was famous, began at the first of the college year, and has met with remarkable success. The movement took the shape of an honor league among the students of the University. Although the purpose of this league is to exterminate all cheating at the University, it is purely a voluntary organization. Any student becomes a member by signing the following pledge: a ■ I 7 1. I agree to Ik honest in nil my work at the University of Georgia whether in recitation or examination. 2. I am willing to have any dishonesty on my part reported and will hold blameless the members of the league who report me. If I am reported by any member of this league, I will abide by the decision of the governing board of this league (two Seniors, one .luuior, one Sophomore, one Freshman). 4. I agree to report any dishonesty I see on the part of any other member of the honor league. 5. I will not be influenced by political, fraternal, or any other ties in voting for the members of the governing board of this league. The honor league movement gained considerable impetus during the year and many students have become members. Bv the first of April over a hundred and twenty-five men had joined the league, and it has now become a permanent organization in the University. Although the league is controlled purely by students, it has the sympathy of the Faculty. Dishonesty in the classroom and on examinations decreased strikingly during the latter part of the year, showing that the league, which went into force with the election of the governing hoard in February, has had a marked effect. Every red-blooded man in the University should put himself squarely behind this movement. The members of the honor league are fighting against wrong just as clearly here at the University as are the United States soldiers in Europe, i et us put all of next year’s Freshmen Class behind this movement, and once more make Georgia renowned for her high standard of honor. BBSHPANDORA ★ Who’s Who at Georgia Most Popular Student—Somewhere in France, although Scott, helehel and Mundy received most of the scattering votes. Most Popular (?) Professor—Can’t get personal, but the French, Physics and Chemistry departments were not forgotten. Hal Hulsey received some votes but is classified as a tutor. Proudest Corporal—Phinizy, and “Baron” Sheppard ruled out on account of professionalism. Frank Harrold was next choice. Biggest Boot-i.icker—Hatcher wins out but Mott gives him a close race. Biggest Loafer—“Pcckerwood” Bond won easily and was named by some as all Southern. Drake and Bill Ball brought up the rear. Many were nominated. 1 Biggest Liar—John Strother gets the dog. Biggest Later—Geldcrs gets the cabbage and beans. Holiest Freshman—Pugh, Moore and Congdon in rapid succession. Most Conceited—1st. “Woodrow” Wilson; 2nd, Phinizy; 3rd. Mott. (All others ruled out on account of poor showing.) Handsomest Man—Courts, Whelchel, Woodall, in order named. Biggest Sport—Osborne. (Did you lose your vote here?) Most Desperate Lover—Patterson and “Bed” Cranford arc most inflicted with this disease. Hardest Boner—Roger West wins easily. (Few competitors.) Wittiest Man—This was ceded to “Kat” Mundy. Best Athlete—Capts. Scott and Westbrook divide the honor, whereas Pew, Harvey Griffin, and Davis get votes. Strongest Man—Westbrook and Pew polled the heaviest vote. Biggest Hot-Air Artist—Lawyers and Candler Ilellians ruled out. leaving it to John Strother. Best Writer—Zachry gets the pen, Mundy runs a good second. Laziest Man—Duncan. Biggest Freshman (all classes included)—So many competitors couldn’t put all names on tally sheet. Colburn won out. Most Popular Occupation—Shooting bull, pool, craps and professors in order named. Biggest Grafter—Westbrook, Skinner and Talley, in one, two, three order. Biggest Nuisance—Pugh, “Sallie” Hall, and “Sug” Malone. Hardest Loser—Talley, Padgett, Hatcher.PANDORA Best Singer—Daniels and Kasscwitz arc the l)est song birds. (“Bo” Hugh Davis and Frank Harwell vote for themselves.) Most Bashful—Bennett first, McClelland second. Biggest Sissy—Olivia Cooper (of the I-ate-a-lmtc-apie sorority). Biggest Freak—Straw Nall and “Fussy Finance” run neck and neck. Best Lawyer—Linton West cops with heated competition. Sullivan second. Worst Knocker—Alexander wields the pile driver, Sanford the sledge hammer, and “Penny” the wax mawl. Most Solemn Man—“Sphinx” Bell. Best Poet—“Poet” Ivy. Biggest Tight Wai — Hatcher was the unanimous choice. Sweetest Boy—Frank Harwell was first. (Only members of the sorority were eligible.) Loudest Man—Penny, Bussey, Lewis, as they are named. Biggest Bunt—Brunson first, Alexander second. Most Practical Man—Newman beats Dick Courts by a close margin. Biggest Fish—Talley and members of the I. 0. l Club. Biggest Ladies’ Man—Taylor first, Shiver second. (Watch the lawyers, many voted for themselves.) Best Orator—Ellars wins the sign l oard medal. Foreman runs an excellent race. Most Brilliant Man—Ellars, Stevens and Crawford take the prize. Best Pool Shot—Sheppard spotted Washpot fifteen and then heat. Luckiest Man—Cohen lucks out here. Biggest Country-Man—Freshman Westbrook and Jim Atkinson tie for first place. Man Worth Most to the University—Alfred Scott. Biggest Burden to the University—Co-op. ■I VExclusive Club (A SOCIKTY OF Ml’Tl'AL ADMIRATION.) This well known club has as many presidents as there arc members. At the election of olliccrs one hundred and ten ballots were cast and invariably each man voted for himself for president. No ollicers could he elected until “Bo” Davis and Frankie Harwell framed up to exchange votes on chaplain and sergeant-at-arms. “Bo” agreed to vote for Frankie for chaplain if Frankie in return would vote for “Bo” for sergeant-at-arms. This club meets (one another) on the streets. Only one meeting has been held and the following by-laws, matters, etc., were passed: (I Am Attractive) Davis, Sergcant-at-Arms. (Girls Notice Me) Harwell, Chaplain. “Primus T.” Griffin. “Follow Me” Eyler. “Above the Average" Wilson. “Extraordinary” Pugh. “Individual” Phinizy. “Give Me the Road” Harrold. “Red” Owens. “Coach” Courts. “Bill” Beck. (Affiliates could not he published because the list was too long.) PRFAMBUS COX ST IT FT I ON Act 1.—All members must carry their heads as high as possible not to walk on their tip toes. COLORS Vanity Green and Egotistic Blue. MOTTO "Hfe live exulted among men. Let the common herd loncli as not. Nobody but me Nobody but me Boomer-rah. boomcr-rah, Whiff and biff. Wheeze and sneeze, There's no use talking We are the cheese. Ego Ego Ego. Me Me Me C. of G. IT. of G. MEMBERSThese Make Us Sleepy ‘''Sow. young gentlemen. I hope that you all see my position in this matter “Supply ami demand, young gentlemen." “Gentlemen, the absentees seem to he Messrs.-----" “Thafo isn't it so?" “Virtually so and so to speak.” “Beware of zc test and take zc notes, 1 will squize you next time." “When I was attorney for the Richmond and Danville." “The hook is absolutely silent on this subject.” “Rntz-s x szc, say it.” “All right gentlemen, this is new to all of us. Suppose you take it up, Mr. Jones.” “You have mumps. I'll have to operate.” “Sail on, 0 ship of State.” “1 don't have to hold this job. I can do something else." “Er—Obviously this is clear to all.” “All right, gentlemen, let's go—one, two, three, four.” “Take the next chapter, and I will meet you three weeks from today." “If you have heard it once, hold up one linger; twice, hold up two." “In the immortal words of Edgar Allen Roe.” “One-two, sing.” “The line of defense is where, why, what and when?” “Now, young gentlemen, the line of demarcation is—” “I haven't prepared much for this evening.” “As I take it, young gentlemen, this is the philosophy of life." “I stayed awake all last night thinking about that.” ■PANDORA Foot Prints on the Sand of Time Ai'Oi st 31: Pressing club agents mid grafters, constituting a plague to man- kind worse than the bubonic and the boll weevil, arrive in the city ready for the parasitic onslaught. Skptkmbku 10: First act of “Barbarism” committed. Freshman Wood was the victim. Skptkmbku 17: Prof. Park, on inspecting rooms of Freshmen in dormitories, find their rooms papered with High School diplomas, correspondence school certificates, memory school vouchers, etc. Sbptkmbku IS: Freshman Hughes light bulb burns out and he goes to “Chan- cellor” Short for new wick and kerosene. Skptkmbku 19: Duncan and Wimberly, selected pugilists from their respective classes, entertain on the spot of the old Locust tree before a large crowd. Skptkmbku 19: “Pink” Snelling leaves for Harvard and “Beanery” boa advances two dollars per month. Skptkmbku 22: Freshmen rush pawn shops trying to soak their combs and hair brushes. Skptkmbku 22 (Saturday night): Freshmen visit Normal School and smear paint and patriotism on Dean Kitchic. Skptkmbku 23 (Sunday): Freshmen go to Sunday School and occupy Bald- head Corner. Skptkmbku 2d: Westbrook advertises extensively with placards, such as, “1 beat rugs, “Washerwomen Agency, sec me before joining anything else,” etc. Skptkmbku 25: Kuhen and Sutkcr visit the erebus of the dead. Skptkmbku 20: Great quantities of pink lemonade, ice cream and syllabub consumed at literary societies. Freshmen refuse to eat the cones, thinking that they are made of pasteboard. Skptkmbku 28: Great drive started to raise funds to rebuild “Shack Number Nine.” Freshmen contribute liberally. Octobku 9: (’. C.’s hold first initiation. Ostcrman being the neophyte. Octobku 12: Freshmen get their brass knocks, razors and billies to stop the onslaught of the Sophs. Octobku 13: Seniors, “Chancellor Westbrook and “Dean” Ilarrold get a holi- day to calm the disturbed underclassmen. Octobku 18: Courts makes the Grafters’ Association and starts his “coach- ing in debating.” Octobku 19: Shelton calls the roll to empty seats and gives the absentees a zero. Octobku 21: Five Freshmen in the salt house. Novkmbku 7: Col. Phinizy gets the only Chi Psi Freshman without office ap- pointed corporal and assigns him to a squad of Sophomore and Junior privates. Novkmbku 16: Non-frat man gets on library staff. Novkmbku 17: Chi Phi dance and Candler Hall night shirt parade. Novkmbku 19: Ellars tries for Thalians his fifth time, breaking his own record of four times. Novkmbku 24: Everybody goes to see “Billy” Sunday preach. Dkckmbku 3: After Thanksgiving Holidays. Chapel scats go to $2.50. Mon- itors get two chocolate milks instead of one for not marking absences.PANDORA ★ December 16: Freshman Lewis studies (ireek until fcur o’clock A. M. for exam and sleeps ’till twelve next day and exam is over. December 15): Co-op takes stock 98th time since school opened. January 15: “Judge” Gheesling quits beanery. Dividends declared next month. January 16: “Lija” Brown breaks bis watch and carries bis alarm clock to classes in order not to alter bis schedule. January 18: I)r. Stephens dresses hastily and gets coat and pants to match. January 20: “Bo" Davis and Frank Harwell heroically offer their service to Denmark Hall. January 26: Frank Harwell goes to Costa’s to meet the girl wearing the red rose, who never showed up. February 1: Col. Snclling in a lengthy speech announces that only 33 doors and locks bad been broken at Beanery. February 2: Prof. Dozier arrives and takes the crip out of commerce school. February 8: Brock and Conyers have a game of club list at Nick’s place. February 10: Infirmary windows bulge out—Mumps. February 12: Pushball game. Every Freshman starred, according to his own statement February 16: Georgia beats A. A. C. and Tech. Psychology plays no part. February 21: The usual out-of-town crowd is present at Annivcrsarian exercises. February 25: Baseball practice starts. McCoy goes out for “pitch” and solves the great problem. March 1: Tysinger divorces “Kangaroo” Dallas. Jealousy the reason. March 2: Dr. Stephens forgets to go to class. First time in the history of the University. March 3: Fort Nall fails to get first on Constitution at “V” building. Paper didn’t come. March 1: Fort Fields seen without Fields Fort. Fort Fields was in the Infirmary. March 1: Staff Photographer Sheppard’s kodak mysteriously disappears from the Beanery. “Shop” goes into hysterics and takes out a search warrant. March 5: “.Miss Co-op” seen flirting with “Sug” Adams. March 7: Col. Snelling passes up the Crown of Denmark to all Seniors and places the glowing wreath on Zachry and Stokes to guard the sacred bull. March 10: “Lieutenant-Colonel” Sheppard cuts drill to shine his “swabre.” March 11: Senior Ags. run an extensive experiment in chemistry lab. March 12: Cooper writes himself up in the Banner and sends John K. a copy. March 14: Osborne comes to class without taking his hair tonic and toilet water. March 16: Harry King goes sight-seeing and passes the Y. M. C. A. building. March 23: Col. Snclling goes to Washington. Beanery boys get bacon and eggs- March 26: Gilbert has his head shaved and is mistaken bv a Freshman for Dr. Fountain. April 15: Pandora goes to press. Editors each have a padded cell swept out ready to occupy it.PANDORA Bicycle Enthusiasts Enjoy Great Feat Vi RACES OX IIERTY FIELD PROVE VERY EXCITING. MATHEMATICAL PRECISION AND MECHANICAL CERTAINTY PROVE FACTOR (Special to Pandora) Very exciting indeed was the bicycle race held on llcrtv Field this afternoon—Douglas Chaplin and Charlie Fairbanks. Both contestants were on lC scene on time to the second and the race was on immediately. Charlie Fairbanks was equipped with a wire basket, a slide rule and an equilibrium; Douglas Chaplin was equipped with logarithms and graph sheets, and a light pair of trousers which were calculated to give him the advantage. Roth used numerous and varied formulas. Fairbanks used the formula consisting of the letters F. W. P, I). T, and 0. F, friction; Y, wobble of wheel; l perspiration; I), distance per second per second per second; T, time and (I. ground covered. Chaplin, on the other hand, used a formula consisting of letters Y, S, 1C. P, and Pie. Y, force of wind; S, sweat; E, experience; P, puncture and Pie, PIE. For a long time it looked as if the race would he a tie. Fairbanks used every mechanical advantage available and sent his machine forward with great centrifugal force, forging three centimeters ahead of Chaplin. In the last lap, however, Fairbanks' attention was detracted by the attraction of gravitation and Chaplin raised his speed to the third power and won the race by a fraction of a second. “Bunco” Durnctt and “Beater" Brown were also scheduled to race but these gentlemen did not show up until an hour after the race. There will he another race tomorrow. The above cuts show a picture of the winner and the loser.Jokes Prof. Hulsey (in English): “Mr. Moore, what is climax?” Freshman Moore: “Climax is good chewing tobacco.” Owens (in Military Science): “Mr. Palmer, how would infantry stop a cavalry charge?” Palmer: “Put plenty of hav in front of horses.” M. S. Instructor: “How is a good way to test a man's ability in finding his way at night?” Brunson: “Take him snipe hunting.” M. S. Instructor: “When arc night watches made (meaning under what conditions) ?” Freshman: “They are made early in the morning.” Prof. Xix: “Mr. Price, don’t walk on your tip-toes like that. It makes me think of home with the baby asleep.” Freshman to Librarian: “I want to get a hook please.” Librarian: “What kind of a book?” Freshman: “Oh, just anything to take mv mind off of that pushball game tomorrow.” (And the Librarian gave him Gray’s “Elegy.”) Freshman: “Prof. Walker, I'd like to get off my absences, please.” Prof. Walker: “You haven't any absences.” Freshman: “I'm due to have two for I cut beanery twice.” Bexley: “Some of those countrymen in my company make me laugh.” Demosthenian Secretary (in open house debate): “Any more A’s?” Shelnutt: “Mr. President, I'd like to speak on the side of the Aye’s.” Registrar Heed: “Are you going to join the Co-operative Association?” Freshman Connell: “No, sir. The last thing that my mother told me when I left home was not to join anything.” Freshman Huddleston: “Gaissert, what fraternity do you belong to?” Gaisscrt: “Demosthenian.” Col. Snelling (receiving hoard) : “Any extras, Mr. Bowen?” Bowen: “I don’t think I ate any more than usual. Colonel. I had two bowls of post-toasties one morning, is all.”P A NDORA Brunson (to floor-walker): “Say. haven’t you got a gravy barrel clown here?” Floor-walker: “No, why do you ask that?” Brunson: “They have so much of it I thought that they had it shipped here. Town-man (to Freshman Huddleston): “Where are you from?” Huddleston (wearing his Freshman cap): “I'm from Philadelphia, don’t you see the ‘F’ on my cap?” Freshman and “Pcckerwood” Bond— Freshman: “Why did you leave Clemson after staying there two years?” Pcckcnvood: “They raised the curriculum and I couldn’t register Freshman again.” Freshman: “What year is this for you here and what class are you in?” Pcckcrwood: “This is my third year here and I registered Sophomore.” Freshman: “In what course arc you going to graduate?” Peckerwood: “In a course of time.” Prof. Cambell: “What is chief cause of hunger?” Freshman: “It is caused by imagination.” Moore: “When is a corporation sold?” Lippctt (sleeping): “A corporation has no soul.” ■v vThings We Would Like to See lied Owens wearing a hat. Talley buy somebody a drink. “Peckcrwood” Bond at work. Bill Jones without Sullivan. Library open on time. Fried chicken at the beanery. Kllars make the Thalians. Osborne with a conservative suit of clothes. Cooper without his hair tonic and talcum powder. Sheppard shoot a game of pool. Bussey converse on some other subject than “My Company.” Elevators in Old College. Dr. Hendren with a new hat. An Oriental dancing show without Hal Hulsey's presence. Holland without a cigar. “Bo” Hugh Davis without Frank Harwell. Prof. Strahan without a pipe. Bogcr West get shot one time. Sam Lewis when he is not grinning. “Laura” Brown look like a hoy. “Mattie” Hatcher put on a masculine appearance. As many as twelve Seniors at Chapel. A fire in Athens with less than a hundred per cent, attendance of “Ga" students. Boxing match between Tisinger and “Straw" Nall. Dick Bussell leading the singing exercises at vesper. “Toby” Whitehead take a hath. John Strother silent for five minutes. Miss Co-op get married. Lint West on the hack row in Sylvie’s classroom. John Coyle come to class on time. W. (). Smith answer a question without saying “I mean." Somebody go to Infirmary without being told they would have to he oper-on. Westbrook without a pressing hill. Eylcr without his bugle. “Doc” Whelchcl when he hasn’t a new joke to tell. A regular course given in the “crip” building. Candler Hall turn out to vesper. Sylvie Morris cut a class. Profs. Bocock and Hooper miss Chapel. “Hcisman” Owens. Joe Bowen and George Kstcs join a fraternity. Hear “Kat” Mundy make a serious expression. Politics get out of the Y. M. C. A.PANDORA Senior Ambitions Bknford—To be able to chew a piece of tobacco as big as a bundle of fodder. Bennett—To take a course in conversational French at Lucy Cobb. Bexley—To throw a hand grenade and stand over it and watch the explosion. Blalock—To take a girl to the Colonial and sit on the front row. Bowden—To be a sport. Brown—To look tender like a girl. Bussey—To he mistaken for a military man. Courts—To be considered an important student. Ckaio—To get back on the farm. Crawford—To bite somebody’s ear. Harris—To look like a Senior. Harrolij—To be called the “daddy” of the honor system. Hatch hr—To have a bank account. Holland—To grow a mustache. Jones—To learn to curse proper. Knight—To be floor-walker at the beanery. Mallory—To be a radio shark. Nall—To be able to read a newspaper and eat peanuts at same time. Oberry—To get his chemistry mark raised. Padgett—To get his picture in the Pandora more than anyone else. Patterson—To get married. Perry—To have a Packard big enough to live in. Pew—To find his glasses. V Phinizy—To be Kaiser. Price—To get a diploma. Sheppard—To be a regular photographer. Skinner—To be King of Denmark instead of “Queen.” Story—To be a society bug. Strother—To be mistaken for a lawyer. Talley—To be at the head of Grafters' Association. Taylor—To be a German shark. West—To make 105 in at least one subject. Wilhoit—To major in Spanish. Wilson—To sound like a regular officer in giving commands. Cooper—To be written up in the newspapers. Parkas—To be able to put his feet behind his head when he sits down. Jones—To he made a member of a fire department. Mott—To be noticed. Osborne—To get credit for opening up the Spring season. Penny—To be able to lead more than one bull session at a time. Sullivan—To have his girl send him three bushels of lilacs. Shiver—To break every girl’s heart he meets. West—To get a boot-lick with every member of the law faculty. Westbrook—To make the Sphinx. Williams—To grow a better mustache than Holland. V FATHER WAS RIGHT APQLOglES T© GOLDBERG VOUR TlMF. AND A0m y y F ATHC.RS AN OLD MOSS-BACK Mt OONT KNOW waAT COLLtSC Lift 0 . 1 NUGmT AS Wtuu SHOOT POOL A OAy AD Wf FAR t Z'' X H. F. The ,ong and the Short of It .1 'I'hrilling “Mellow Drama’' PROLU.DE (Enter Salt camouflaged as stork) Nall—I am Ion ;. I am tall. I am above the common herd. I can stand in front of the Hollman Pudding and see the Infirmary. I repeat, J am tall, I am Nall. (Enter Ty disguised as duck) Ty—I am Ty, the little guy. I am so short I make n shadow. I step twice in the same place every time I take step. I am Ty, I am not high. Act 1—Sckxk 1 Place—Campus. Time—Government time. (Enter the Above) Ty—Ila! What have we here? It appears to be a couple of bean stalks emerging from Mother Earth. Perhaps it is a wireless aerial. Hut hark! It moves. Is there a chance that it may he human ? Nall—What is that dark speck I see down yonder in the distance? Is it a vegetable or is it a cabbage? It is neither, it moves. It is an animal of some description. It must be an amoeba. (He bends over ami gets lots and lots closer.) Yet, hold! It has the form of a human. It is human. (Addressing Tv): Little Shrimp, who arc you? Ty—I am Ty, the little guy. What manner of well-rope is this that has the audacity to ask? Nall—I am Nall. I am Tall. I am altitude itself. Food and drink go further with me than with any one else. I am not troubled with atmospheric pressure. The fowls of the air covet my abode. Climb me to my heights if thou wouldst see the joys of living. Ty—Joys? Hah! Do you call that living? You are :i regular Joy Killer. You even have to duck when you go under a trolley wire to keep from getting electrocuted. I am the guy that lives. I do not have to buy very much clothing. I can walk under pool tables instead of having to walk around them. I am so small that the faculty can’t see me to shoot me. I wouldn't Ih tall for anything. Nall—And I wouldn’t be short for anything. Ty—Well, have it your way. 1 ’m for being short myself. Kneel down and let’s shake hands on it. Come on, let’s get a nickel’s worth of bananas. Finis (CURTAIN)Conclusion Our book is completed. We now stop for a moment to think over the mam-hours of consistent work required to compile it. We have tried faithfully to make this Pandora keep pace with former ones and also to make it in keeping with the spirit of the time when published. In the making of the book, we have undoubtedly made some mistakes, and in looking through it find that it is far from perfect. We hope that you appreciate our efforts and are satisfied with their outcome. As to the contents, everything is said in a jovial manner and should not be taken seriously for they were not intended to he. We wish to call your attention to our advertisers. They are worthy of vour consideration and have meant much materially to Pandora. It is also our desire to take this opportunity to express our gratitude to those who have worked with us. Our relations with them have been filled with pleasure and have germinated lasting friendship. Their aid has been invaluable to this hook. Among these we particularly wish to thank Professor Park, to whom we owe many suggestions and whose co-operation we had at all times. For art contributions we wish to thank Messrs. Carson. Sellars. Riley. Kribohn De la Vega and Griffin. For literary contributions we wish to thank Messrs. Jim Park, J. E. Mundy, G. H. Westbrook, Malcolm Vaughn, R. M. Anderson, G. H. McWhirter, W. P. Zachry, Roger West, and others. For stenographic work we wish to thank F. E. Owens. Dennis Penny, Dan Buie, and others. To Mr. T. S. Smith, of the Blosscr-Williams Company, we owe much of the topographical make-up of the book. He gave us his earnest assistance in our work and took personal interest in it. Thus the thirty-first volume of Pandora of the I’niversity of Georgia endeth. Board of Editors.—CLI . L. (MUSIC SHOP) | Pianos, Player Pianos, Organs, Talking Machines j Small Goods and Trimmings. Century Edition wet. Music. McKinley Edition ioct. Music. STANDARD, CLASSICAL AND i i i POPULAR SHEET MUSIC. ! I METHODS FOR ALL INSTRUMENTS. j The Most Complete Music Store in the South, i I ) ♦ PHONE 801 J. P. O. BOX 518. 255 LUMPKIN STREET ATHENS GEORGIAr—---------------------------------------------------------------------» ; Start a Bank Account Now | ; with the Atlanta National [ YOU KNOW that the Atlanta National is the Oldest [ National Bank in the Cotton States and the largest bank I in this section. iYOU KNOW that it has an unapproachable record for constructive service right here in Georgia. I YOU KNOW that it has always been an important factor j in the promotion and development of worthy enterprises. ! YOU KNOW that thousands of business and professional J men have long regarded this hank as their sure helper i and business counselor. 1 —The same opportunities are open to you, if you make I this YOUR bank. ! • ATLANTA NATIONAL BANK j ! ATLANTA, GEORCIA I 1 The Student’s Friend » An Automatic Gas Water Heater Baths at all hours i ATHENS GAS LIGHT FUEL CO. I t ----------------------------------------------------- I j After Drill and after Classes come to Headquarters | M. W. CIGAR COMPANY ; Phone 539 194 Clayton Street CIGARS - CIGARETTES - PIPES - TOBACCO - SODA I j ! Get the latest magazines and returns from all the games here. ! -------------------------------------------------------. I Ice Cream Cigarettes j Soda Cigars ; COSTA’S The Finest Soda and Ice Cream j Fount in Georgia Delicious Fruits Phone 697 ATHENS, GA. Norris' j Candies ! i COLLEGE STATIONERY E. H. DORSEY of all sorts Tablets, Boxed Stationery, Envelopes, Pound Papers “For Quality ’ ATHENS, GA. in the well-known Every article that bears this label “TUBEROSE” and conforms to the traditions and ideals of “ALPINE FLAX” a business policy that has been devel- BRANDS oped and maintained through twenty-five years. At the It is to clothing what the word CO-OP “Sterling” is to silver. Made by Montag Bros., Atlanta ■4American Book Company Publishers of the Best Text Books For Schools and Colleges Southern Department 2.4 N. Forsyth St. Atlanta, Ga. A. I. Branham Manager J. E. McRee Atlanta, Ga. Traveling Representatives H. W. Fair Columbia, S. C. Correspondence with Teachers and School Officials Cordially Invitedr- | GEORGIAN HOTEL | J “Finest Hotel in Georgia” ! Absolutely Fireproof I M. P. O’CALLAGHAN, Manager ATHENS, GEORGIA I j ♦ » « » • I I • » ! j | HILLEY JONES COMPANY s j I INCORPORATED ! BARBERS I f | The only Barber Business in the South that is doing business under a “charter,” which insures you against any unsanitary conditions and guarantees the very best service. Two Shops of Highest Efficiency Southern Mutual Building 288 JACKSON STREET • i i i • Besides ; RUBBER STAMPS j we make lots of STENCILS, SEALS j (CHECKS METAL PLATES (BADGES j “Call on” us when you need anything j in this line. | ‘•Promptly” -a “ Properly’Your Store and Ours This store belongs to us, but it’s no good to us unless it’s your store, too. To be your store it must contain the clothes you want to wear; it must be arranged for your comfort and do business in a way satisfactory to you, having and holding your confidence. Lots of men—more every year—find that our store is their store. If it isn’t already your store, come in and let us make it so. Wingfield Chamberlain Reed The Shop of Quality -4f j Q ROOM I Appreciates your patronage Meet your friends here Twelve Carom and Pocket Billiard Tables SODA, CIGARS, CIGARETTES Finest equipment in northeast Georgia COLLEGE AVENUE JOHN R. WHITE, l‘resident JOHN WHITE MORTON, Cashier A. S. PARKER, Assistant Cashier THE j NATIONAL BANK | OF ATHENS ! ATHENS, GA. DIRECTORS JOHN R. WHITE R. E. MORTON M. R. WELCH C. H. PHINIZY C, M. SNELLING W. T. BRYAN JOHN W. WELCH W. T. BRADSHAW JOHN WHITE MORTON DELMAR’S LUNCH W. L. HARDMAN, W. A. IVY, Proprietors The Best Things to Eat With Prompt and Courteous Service “This Day” Phone 317 146 Clayton St. ATHENS, GA. GEORGIA NATIONAL BANK ATHENS, GA. Efficiency Service Protection OFFICERS JOHN J. WILKINS. President M. G. NICHOLSON, Pice-president J. WARREN SMITH. Pice-president W. P. BROOKS, Cashier J. C. McCLAIN, Assistant Cashier P. T. BETTS, Assistant Cashier E. L. WILKINS, Asst. Cashier S. W. URSURY, Asst. Cashierr THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. Athens. Gecrcia Forty-six o®ccrs and teacher , ten building , seventeen departments of instruction. Tlie home-life courses are among the strongest in the South. Domestic Aits and Sciences, Manual Arts. Agriculture and School Gardening. Instrumental and Vocal Music. Physical Culture. Education for eftciency ami happiness in the home. Write for Catalogue. JrJtt: M. Pot no. President. !  the McGregor BERNSTEIN BROS. COMPANY Furnished most of the Club Houses STATIONERS OFFICE and PRINTERS SCHOOL BINDERS SUPPLIES and Students’ Rooms VICTOR TALKING MACHINES 321 Clayton St. and RECORDS ATHENS, GA. Broad Street Electrical Appliances There are over 3,000 different practical uses for electricity. How many are you taking advantage of? Are you sure you are not overlooking something that will save you hours of labor and dollars of expense. Call at our office and let us demonstrate to you a few of these appliances. ATHENS RAILWAY ELECTRIC COMPANY HANCOCK AND COLLEGE STREETS THE i HOTEL LANIER ATHENS HERALD ATHENS, GA. ♦ I 1 The Athens Herald carries Associated Press dispatches, is a member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations, the Gilt Edge List, and guarantees advertisers the largest circulation of any Athens Newspaper. Circulation figures proved and audited each year. The Macon home for all University hoys and ! their friends ! 1 •4 | THE ATHENS HERALD ATHENS, GA. T. W. HOOKS, Proprietor E. W. CARROLL, Editor and Manager MACON, GA. Daily Sunday Afternoon Morning THE JOS. N. NEEL CO. MACON, GA. AUGUSTA HERALD AUGUSTA, GA. : 1 Augusta’s most widely circulated newspaper. The afternoon paper is the paper of the home everywhere. t 1 1 We are proud of the reputation j that we have won in the Clothing Business THE AUGUSTA HERALD AUGUSTA, GA. J. C. HARRISON, Business Manager BOWDRE PHINIZY, President : i ! iHOTEL MAJESTIC J. LEE BARNES, Proprietor ATLANTA, GEORGIA The Atlanta Home of the University Boys and Their Friends Special Rates to Parties » » RIVERSIDE I Georgia's Best Equipped Prep. School i Individual attention in class-room work i Modern instruction in military matters i New 840,000 Dormitory ready September, 1918 | New Gymnasium, with special attention to every cadet i i | Improvement guaranteed J I I [ Expenses moderate [ j Write for catalog ! | SANDY BEAVER (1903) President j ! GAINESVILLE GEORGIA ! 4"-T I i r—— The patronage of its customers is appreciated by this institution, where officers and employees endeavor to give personal attention to the business of each individual. | AMERICAN j STATE BANK ! OFFICERS: JNO. J. WILKINS, President W. C. JORDAN, Vice-President ; HOWELL C. ERWIN, Vice-President j R. W. SIZER, Cashier ! i ____________________ i j i A NEW HOTEL WITH ALL | MODERN CONVENIENCES THE PRINCETON Notice to Contractors ! and Builders I Before buying get our price on Cer- { tain-Tecd Roofing and Wall Board, Ce- { ment, Lime Plaster, Electric Light Wir- | ing and Fixtures, Mantels, Grates, Tile. J I I Face Brick and Fire Brick ATHENS ENGINEERING j COMPANY ATHENS, GA. j I _____________ t i » j DORSEY j FURNITURE j COMPANY GAINESVILLE, GA. Hot and Cold Running Water Electric Elevator Greeter Clerks: J. A. HOBBS, A. B. WHITE. Proprietor Chief Clerk i I j Quality Furniture | Victrolas and ! ♦ Records j ; ♦ ATHENS, GA. JWe Cater Especially to College Men “SOCIETY BRAND” CLOTHES In styles that help define a good physique “NETTLETON” and “FLORSHEIM” SHOES Superior qualities, coupled with style—a combination that will give you the utmost satisfaction HATS AND FURNISHINGS In keeping with our Clothes and Shoes R. S. THORPE SONS Style Headquarters 566-70 Cherry Street MACON, GEORGIA THE KIMBALL HOUSE ATLANTA, GEORGIA “The Old Reliable" The Kimball House with its central location, in the heart of the Business and Shopping District, offers a pleasant place for you to stop, First-class Cafe in Connection EUROPEAN PLAN L. J. HINKLER Proprietor and Manager C. L. HINKLER Assistant Manager ! • THE t i Try KING-HODGSON COMPANY THORNTON’S j Fancy Groceries I Light Lunches, Sodas | Everything for the table and Ice Cream Quality and Purity Our Motto I j HOLMAN BUILDING 151 CLAYTON STREET J ♦ Compliments of THE STRAND and ELITE THEATERS DR. K. L. HAUGHEY OPTOMETRIST Investigate our optical service. Thorough, accurate examinations, with no inconvenience. No clumsy trial framed to irritate. We grind our lenses. HAUGHEY HAUGHEY 156 College Avenue ATHENS, GEORGIA PALMER’S DRUG STORES Every possible courtesy of modern merchandising is extended PALMERS CUSTOMERS H. R. PALMER SONS “The Good Drug Stores" ■ADots represent students from counties The State University sheds its light ail through the state. Founded in 1785. Over 8000 graduates. ENLIST YOUR SON among the 800 preparing to serve the State. They come from nearly every county. Agriculture, Law, Pharmacy, Education, Journalism, Commerce, Engineering, Forestry, Veterinary Medicine, Pre-Medical, Military, Bachelor oj Arts, of Science and Graduate Courses. Tuition free except Law and Pharmacy. Board and room $15. ITrite for Bulletins to D. C. BARROW ATHENS, CA,■ University of Georgia SUMMER SCHOOL Ideal training in all branches of study offered to teachers or those contemplating teaching. Also courses preparatory to entering college. Make up your deficiency this summer. FOR PARTICULARS AND CATALOGUE WRITE: UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA ATHENS, GEORGIA '•4TRAIN FOR A BUSINESS CAREER It is no longer wise to trust to luck for your business success. No matter how well equipped you may be for your special line, some other man will tell you how much money you shall have out of your work unless you have good business ability. We can help you develop that ability. Have you heard of the splendid reputation the Georgia-Alabama Business College, Macon, Ga., has made for thoroughness? Do you know how many of its graduates have gone to the top in money-earning power in the South? Write us. Write J. R. Bowden, Thomson, Ga., for a letter of' introduction. EUGENE ANDERSON, President Macon, Georgiar———— —————— ——— » ♦ 1 This Space i kil IIIIIUIhIH i!i Ii: iihlliiilMi-ii'i.iiH ( i Reserved for the ! • » d ATHENS ICE » WHITE PRESSING j COMPANY COMPANY Phone 521 Coal and Ice i d Phone 686 i i i i d ! 173 BROAD STREET I j W. L. HANCOCK Lowry National Service Pleases COAL COMPANY Try It . High-grade DOMESTIC COAL Full Weight, Prompt Service THE LOWRY NATIONAL RANK ■of ATLANTA Phone 707 ATHENS, GA. Resources over SI 1,000,000I The Best in Flowers— ; Dixie’s Finest Flower Shop ; I Commencement Bouquets ! i DAHL’S, Florist I VIOLETS, ROSES, CARNATIONS Atlanta s Leading Florist Out of Town Orders Expressed Promptly 103 PEACHTREE STREET Opposite Piedmont Hotel WESLEYAN COLLEGE MACON, GEORGIA ; An “A” grade college for women of the same rank as the ! best colleges for men in the South. Its A.B. and B.S. degrees given full credit by the great northern universities. ; The literary curriculum broad and thorough, comprising ! courses in the Languages, Mathematics, Science, Philosophy, History and Economics, Pedagogy, the Bible and Home Economics. The departments of Music, Art and Oratory maintained at the highest point of excellence. ; Modern gymnasium, beautiful swimming pool, tennis courts, and ample-campus for outdoor athletics. Climate delightful all the school year, health record practically perfect. ; Equipment in every department adequate and up-to-date. ; Write for catalogue C. R. JENKINS, D.D., President ATLANTIC ICE COAL CORPORATION ATHENS, GA. 4 DEALERS IN ICE and COAL! Let Us Feed Your I KODAK I I on Fresh Films • v • A Full Stock of FILMS, CAMERAS and PHOTO SUPPLIES Kodak Finishing Call or Write for Catalogue Frederick J. Ball College Avenue Telephone 1313 Athens, Ga.♦ Blosser-'Williams Co. MAKERS OF Illustrated Catalogs Booklets and Folders OUR QUALIFICATIONS FIT ONLY WITH THiE BETTER COLLEGE ANNUALS AND CATALOGS 63 North Pryor Street. Atlanta. Georgia


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