University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1914

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1914 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 312 of the 1914 volume:

Stratum In appreciation of the splendid originality of his work, of the broad field of his usefulness in the state and his unswerving and ever faithful love for our Alma Mater, this book is respectfully dedicated to (Eltarlefl iflortun trahan, Be. ZD. 11 nnV3ln fflpmoriam ffiUltam Cuther ArnrtI Odessa, Ga. Born March 1, 1887, Died May 18, 1913. “ ffiill tirrb. lje sleeps. nnb life’s poor play is oner."3Jtt iHrmnriam Sartmut (Quinton Aurra Greenville, Gn. Born August 8, 1890, Died October 8, 1913. (Sob’a finrirr tmtrljrb him. aub ljr alrpl.”Trustees His Excellency, Gov. John M. Slaton, Ex officio..............................Atlanta George F. Gober, Marietta; From the State at Large; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1915 HENRY D. McDaniel, Monroe; From the State at Large; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1917 William E. Simmons, Lawrenceville; From the State at Large; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1919 Hamilton McWhorter, Athens; From the State at Large; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1921 SAMUEL B. Adams, Savannah; 1 $t Congressional District; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1921 Byron B. Bower, Bainbridge; 2nd Congressional District; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1921 J. E. Hayes, Montezuma; 3rd Congressional District; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1921 Henry R. Goetchius, Columbus; 4th Congressional District; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1919 Clark Howell, Atlanta; 5th Congressional District; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1919 Robert T. Daniel, Griffin; 6th Congressional District; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1919 J. LlNDSAY Johnson, Rome; 7th Congressional District; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1917 JOHN T. Newton, Madison; 8th Congressional District; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1919 HOWARD Thompson, Gainesville; 9th Congressional District; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1915 BOWDRE PHINIZY, Augusta; 10th Congressional District; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1915 JOHN W. Bennett, Waycross; llth Congressional District; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1915 DUDLEY M. Hughes, Danville; 12th Congressional District; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1919 James White, Athens; Resident Trustee; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1915 Harry Hodgson, Athens; Resident Trustee; Term Expires Aug. 13, 1917 GEORGE Foster Peabody, New York; Life Trustee. By special act of the General Assembly NATHANIEL E. Harris. Macon; Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the School of Technology. Ex officio. Theodore E. Atkinson, Newnan; Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Georgia Normal and Industrial College. Ex officio PETER W. Mf.ldrim, Savannah; President of the Board of Commissioners of the Industrial College for Colored Youths. Ex officio ir__r • si BtUfiLiKsi J_ U 1 Whrfnv ; vi .. {• • • • ' i rj y ) !1 i;! '. L‘‘ ‘ a 'XS'L' ■ W. B. McCants, Winder; President of the Board of Trustees of the North Georgia Agricultural College. Ex officio B. S. Miller, Columbus; Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the State Normal School. Ex officio James J. Conner, Cartersville; Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the College of Agriculture. Ex officio Enoch H. Callaway, Augusta; President of the Board of Directors of the Medical College. Ex officio Henry D. McDaniel.............................................Chairman Thomas W. Reed...................................Secretary and Treasurer DTo the University O thou whose works and words must sure abide Through Time, and past, into Eternity, Because ’tis not with gold nor ivory Nor jewels that thou strivest, nor dream-eyed Poesy, nor Science, the shimmering bride Of Truth, but with the souls of men who flee Up from the dark to gather life to thee, And all their sorrows in thy love confide! Forget not, thou, nor give thine to forget That ye have but begun, that this is now, Though fair it seems, darkness; and yours the boon Of seeing pass aloft the violet Stillness of the night, roseate Morn, her brow Twined with pearls, heralding the flambent noon!Faculty David Crenshaw Barrow, LL.D. Chancellor Alfred Akerman, A.B.. M.F. Professor of Forestry Peuben Winfield Allen, M.S. Instructor in Chemistry Samuel Caldwell Benedict, M.D. Dean of the School of Pharmacy, and Professor of Materia Medico Homer Van Valkenburch Black, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Chemistry James Camak Bloomfield, M.D. Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence Willis Henry Bocock, A.M., LL.D. Dean of the Graduate School, and Milledgc Professor of Ancient Languages Robert Preston Brooks, Ph.d. Associate Professor of Georgia History and Sociology Duncan Burnet Librarian William Mills Burson, D.V.M. Professor of Veterinary Science John Pendleton Campbell, Ph.D. Professor of Biology Andrew Jackson Cobb, A.B., B.L. Lecturer on Constitutional Lan and Legal Procedure Roy Emerson Curtis, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Applied Economics Uriah Harrold Davenport, B.S. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering Marion Derelle DuBose, A.M. Adjunct Professor of English Language and Teutonic Philology John Richard Fain, B.S. Professor of Agronomy Claude Russell Fountain, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor of Physics Ludwig Reinhold Geissler, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychology Ozias Talcott Goodwin, B.S. Instructor in Animal HusbandryThomas Fitzgerald Green, B.L. Professor of Law Ernest Lee Griggs (Graduate V. M. I.) Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing Leroy Collier Hart. B.S.E.E. Professor of Farm Mechanics Linville Laurentine Hendren. Ph.D. Professor of Physics and Astronomy William Davis Hooper. A.M. Professor of Latin Milton Preston Jarnagin. B.S. Professor of Animal Husbandry William Richard Kendrick First Lieutenant. 17th U. S. Infantry Commandant of Cadets Joseph Lustrat. Bach, es Lett. Professor of Romance Languages Thomas Hubbard McHatton, Sc.D. Professor of Horticulture John Hanson Thomas McPherson, Ph.D. Professor of History and Political Science, and Lecturer on Roman Law Robert Ligon McWhorter. A.M. Adjunct Professor of Latin and Crecl( John Morris, A.M. Professor of Germanic Languages Sylvanus Morris, A.M., B.L. Dean of the Law Department, and Professor of Law Howard W. Odum, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Educational Sociology and Rural Economics Robert Emory Park, A.M., Litt.D. Professor of English William Oscar Payne, A.M. Associate Professor of History and Political Science Howell Benajah Peacock, B.S. instructor in Physical Education Robert Spencer Pond, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor of Mathematics Loy Edmund Rast. B.S. Adjunct Professor of Agronomy, in charge of Cotton Industry John Moore Reade. Ph.D. Professor of Botany Thomas Walter Reed, A.M. Registrar Henry Hiro Rothe, D.V.M. Adjunct Professor of Veterinary Science Sanford Meddick Salyer, A.B. Adjunct Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature Steadman Vincent Sanford, A.B. Professor of English Language Charles Mercer Snelling, A.M., Sc.D. President of Franklin College Dean of the University, and Professor of Mathematics Andrew MacNairn Soule, B.S.A., Sc.D. President of the Stale College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, and Dean of the College of Agriculture Roswell Powell Stephens, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Mathematics Joseph Spencer Stewart, Ped.D. Professor of Secondary Education Charles Morton Strahan. C. and M.E., Sc.D. Professor of Civil Engineering William Telford Turk, A.M. instructor in Romance Languages Henry Clay White, Ph.D., Sc.D., D.C.L., LL.D. Professor of Chemistry, and Terrell Professor of Agricultural Chemistry Charles Anderson Whittle, A.B. Editor-Librarian, College of Agriculture Robert Cumming Wilson, Ph.G. Professor of Pharmacy Thomas Jackson Woofter. A.M., Ph.D. Dean of the School of Education, Professor of Philosophy and Education, and Superin- intendent of the Summer School William Archer Worsham, Jr., A.M. Professor of Agricultural Chemistry Edgar Duskin Kenyon Tutor in Rhetoric and English Literature David Robert Cumming, A.M. Tutor in Mathematics Robert Edwin Blackburn, B.S.A. Tutor in HorticultureE. C. Westbrock Officers of the Senior Class E. C. WESTROOK.........................................................President Bob Jake Fletcher.................................................Vice-President Fred Jordan............................................................Secretary George Barrett....................................................... Historian Joe Myers...............................................................ChaplainHistory of the Senior Class N September 1910, our class came in like a roaring lion. Scorning the Sophs, evading the professors, adoring the Lucies, and enjoying ourselves was the menu for the first year. During this adolescent period we pulled off the most grandest (a la Shaky Spear) banquet in the history of the dear old college; and having accomplished this feat, crowned it with the unselfish renunciation of that time-worn tradition. With some of its loudest members missing, the class rolled into the Sophomeric era slightly chastened, a little subdued and slightly vain. As a good starter for the newly inaugurated pushball games, we mopped up the earth with the newcomers. A high seriousness of earnest purpose now began to mount on our dead selves. We learned to pass with the minimum amount of work. An occasional girl, too old or too young for true, sure ’nough "sasiety”, deigned to give us a passing recognition; and we became proficient in pool—to a degree. Having now reached the Junior period of growth, we found ourselves possessed with the rather doubtful dignity of upper classmen. In this age we usually donned our first derby and began to parade up and down the Avenue. Lots of us ran around and freed ourselves from pest-like conditions. To solemnize this glorious year the sun consented to rise and set each day. We had arrived. In some ways the Senior year is the saddest of the four; yet in many, it is also the happiest of our college life. Comparative ease in daily tasks, leisure for outside endeavor, moments for many enjoyments and a certain amount of respect, all tended to happiness; while the thought of leaving our happy, sheltered home and of venturing forth upon the pond or sea of life’s work made us THINK. 1 he day of our graduation arrives. It is an epitome of the last year. Fond, hasty, heartbreaking farewells to dear friends, hasty adieus to professors, and a last, sob-broken look upon the campus—and all is over. "This day is ours as many more shall be." Historian.jfr j fn r1 i v o s LJ vi L Ji i|i i i ji iBAR 1:1‘‘.S' 1 Senior Academic Thcmas Lyne Asbury. B.S.A. Crawfordville. Ga. Member of Agricultural Club: Sigma Chi. “Taught or untaught, the dunce is still the ;arrc." Won Ting Austin. B.S.A. Canton. China Member of Agricultural Club. "If ;o Joes tic hest his circumstance allots. loes well; acts nobly; angels could do no more." Ernest Aubrey Bailey. A.B. Valdosta. Ga. Member of Demoslheman Society. “fVith blinded eyesight poring over mis-crablc boo s." Georce Barnes Barrett, A.B. Augusta, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Chi Phi. "IVhcnce, glaring oft with many a broaden'd orb, he frights the nations." Enoch Blassincame Benson, A. B. Hartwell, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Kappa Alpha. "Denson and Blac mar, one and inseparable, norv and forever.” Aaron Blum Bernd, A.B. Macon, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. "Is it the larlf that sings so out of tune, straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps? " Dana B. BlaCkmar. B.S. Columbus. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Kappa Alpha. "Benson and Blaclfmar, one and insepa-arble, nou and forever." Chari.es McDonald Brown. A.B. Atlanta, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Chi Phi. " Tis but a freclfle.—never mind it." Clarence Avery Bryant. B. S. A. Royston, Ga. Member of Demojlhenian Society. 'His corn and cattle ft cre his only care. And his supreme delight a county fair."James Ycunc Bowen. A.B. Crawford. Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society. "Zooks. sir; flesh and blotxl, Thai's all I'm made of.” Charles Buchwald, B.S.A. Alhen . Ga. Member of Agricultural Club. "With volleys of eternal babble. And clamour more unanswerable.” Frank V. Cheney, B.S.. C.E. Athens. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Chi Psi. ”You may relish him more in ihe soldier lhan in ihe scholar.”James Bennett Conyers. A.B. Cartersville. Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society; Kappa Sigma. "Lei ihe bass of Heaven’s Jeep organ blov ." Otis Herman Ccrley. B.S.A. Athens, Ga. Member of Agricullural Club; Pi Kappa Alpha. “Not lo ij) head, bul lo ihy arm alone. Ascribe tve all." Thcmas Jefferson Coli.ins, A.B. Jackson. Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society. "5o light a fool n'ill ne'er wear oul ihc everlasting flint." Arthur Gibbes Crafts, A.B. Macon, Ga. Member of Demosthenian Sociely. "Length without breadth is not good measure. Jefferson Irwin Davis, B.S.A. Quitman, Ga. Member of Agricultural Club; Sigma Nu. "Ambition is no cure for love." Edward Carleton Dillard, B.S.A. Arnoldjville, Ga. Member of Agricultural Club. As some to church repair. Not for the doctrine, but the music there.'Samuel Boyce Fisher. B.S.. C.E. Lavonia. Ga. Member of Demosthenian Sociely. "Ponder thy radiant hair.’’ Bob Jake Fletcher, B.S., C.E. Parrott, Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society. "A great sxveel silence." Mason J. Florence. A.B. Powder Springs, Ga. Member of Demosthenian Sociely. "In every ran$ of great or small, 'Tis industry supports us all."Tinnie Rucker Ginn, B.S. Roy ton. Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society. “ll's easier lo slide than to climb." Claude Luke Gray. B.S. Augusta. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Pi Kappa Alpha. 'Hope springs eternal in the human breast." .All JQ "■-■i 'i » illy 1,1 i t t r Casper Ira Funkenstein. A.B. Athens, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. "For me, I ihinlf I spealr as I n as taught.'William W. Hardaway, A.B. Thomson, Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society. "Lillie but loud." William Edcar Hitchcock, A.B. Dallas. Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society; Sigma Chi. 'Con (here be so fair a creature Formed of common clay? Goley Holder. B.S.. C.E. Augusta, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. 'My tongue ivilhin my lips I rein. For n ho tal s much, must tall( in vain."ij Frank Alexander Holden. A.B. Athens, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Phi Delta Theta. ‘All the Latin I construe is “amo", I love.' Julian Cooper Howard, B.S. Valdosta, Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society. Direct not him nhose xvay himself »ill choose, 7 is breath thou laclf'sl, and that breath 'Drill ihou lose.” James Aucustus Johnston, B.S.A. Brunswick. Ga. Member of Agricultural Club. "By the Lord, lads. I'm glad you hove the money." D Fred Capers Jordan. A.B. Monlicello. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Phi Deha Theta. "Ye Cods! but he is rvondrous fair.” Dewitt Wilson Loyd, B.S.A. Newborn. Ga. Member of Agricultural Club. "The field To labor calls us, non toilh sxveal imposed" Burley Matthew Lufburrow. B5„ F.E. Oliver. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. "Wherefore should I care? "Ufl'tiii Henry Towns Maddox. A.B. Culloden, Ga. Member of Demosthenian Socicly. "As if man tvere createJ to no use But only to shon his teeth." Clarence Ellwocd Martin, B.S.A. Blakely, Ga. Member of Agricultural Club. "Be merry; end employ your chief esl thoughts to courtship." Tiicmas Allan Maxwell. A.B. Augutta, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. "So sound he slept that nought might him ao al(c." UlUul Pierce Merry, B.S. Augusta. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Ep-lilon. "Thy beauty,—not a fault is there." Leroy Michael. B.S. Athens. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. 'Hum! Thou art a soldier.' Chauncey V. Middlebrooks. B.S.. C.E. Atlanta. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Phi Delta Theta. "He shouts occasionally surface indications of intellect" Charles B. McDaniel, Jr.. A.B. Atlanla. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Sigma Chi. ‘7 n") qu'un Franqaii Je plus.” Francis Marion Moise. A.B. Atlanla. Ga. Member of Demojlhenian Society. "He's a rare linguist.’' Joseph Myers, A.B. Athenj. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. ”HoX» does lh honor? Lei me licl( ihy shoe.” 0Jchn Edward McDonald, B.S. Culhbert, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Phi Deha Theta. "Let's to billiards." David Knox McKamy, B.S. Dalton, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. ”You'd scarce expect one of my age. To spcalf in public on the stage." Rcbf.rt Ligon McWhorter. A.B. Athens, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa, Chi Phi. "Is this the face that slopped a thousand clocks? "Member of Agricultural Club. "He studiously surveyed his generous vines.’’ Edward Barbara O'Kelley. B.S.A. Gainesville. Ga. Member of Agricultural Club. 'The fruit that can fall without shading Indeed is loo good for me." Evereite Pattman. B.S.A. Athens. Ga. Member of Agricultural Club. "A cal may look at a k,n8-'' Russell Huco Patterscn, B.S. Athens. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa 7 ateolfe one day and found myself ,’amous Erle Ewart Peacock, A.B. Barnesville, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Sigma Nu. "Bui riches purchased wisdom yet for none. Henry McDaniel Pitts, A.B. Calhoun, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. "What's to become of my despised time?Lennie Groover Proctor. BS.A. Farmington. Ga. Member of Agricultural Club; Pi Kappa Alpha. "A man voulJ be great and he as ed of his soul, I prithee xohat shall I Jo to be great? " Edcar Rudolf Pund, A.B. Augusta, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa, Della Tau Delta. " have caught An everlasting cold; I have lost my voice Most irrecoverably." Richard Newell Schwab. B.S. Atlanta, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. "All his reverent nn't lies in his xvarJrobe.' 1 till 1 11 •11 It II Member of Phi Kappa; Delta au Delta. "Might not a child of good discretion Be leader to an arm))? " Guy Summerour, B.S. Duluth, Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society. "He is so quiet, that he seems to sleep The tempest out. as dormice do in on'nfer.' Paul Tabor, B.S.A. Danieljville. Ga. Member of Agricultural Club. "Honors come by diligence; riches spring from economy." OJohn Donald Wade, A.B. Marshallville, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Sigmu Nu. IVhen I xvas young, I gave my mind And plied myself lo fruitless poetry.'' Edison Collins Westbrook. B.S.A. Gainesville. Ga. Member of Agricultural Club. "He sxvore that he vtould never leave those old red hills and stones." Theodore Markwalter Von Sprecken. B.S.. C.E. Augusta, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. "You should not take a fcllorv eight years old And make him sxvcar lo never fci'ss the girls." M IComer, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Sigma Nu. "To-morroxo. lo-morron . nol lo-day. Hear ihe lazy people say.'’ Olin J. Wimberley. B.S.A. Macon. Ga. Member of Agricultural Club; Phi Della ’1 hela. "A lion among ladies is a most dangerous ll.ing." Alphonse Anderson Winter. B.S.. C.E. Brunswick, Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society. 'Tis biller cold and I am sicl( al heart." i I tArturo Diaz. B.S.. C.E. Rio Piedras. Puerto Rico. Member of Demoslhenian Society. "Cad, he's an engineer." Robert O. Suddeth. B.S.A. Athens. Ga. "Void of college honors, offices, or obligations.” Thomas Davenport Symmes. B.S.. C.E. Brunswick, Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society. "Ye've naught to do but marl and tell Your neighbor's faults and follies."  Graduate Students (i Li.oyd Worrall. B.S. Ac., M. S. Ac. Barberton, Transvaal. South Africa. Edwin P. Clark, A.B., A.M. Hephzibah, Ga.m J,,in Auf Wiedersehen By Richard N. Schwas, ’14. O college dear, we leave too soon thy ancient, ivied walls. When fragrant hangs June’s balmy breath around thy hallowed halls, A smothered sob, a tear mayhap, a glance, then all is o’er. The sunbeam hours, the starlit dreams, seem gone forever more. We gaze into the future, but one glimpse to gain of thee. See! strife and turmoil mingle to a white-capped seething sea. Vermilion streaks across the purple canopy of night.— At last, tis there, far distant, soft a haze of glow-worm light. We sit in the flickering firelight, in a flood of revery, Fond mem’ries cling like twining smoke and bear us back to thee. A bell clangs quiv’ring on the wind, tis chapel summons sure. Heads bend once more to the sweet old face, and the whispered prayer, and pure. Oh I the summer night is here again, old chums with ne'er a scar, A snatch of song, a laugh, a light, the twang of an old guitar. The breeze wafts perfume long the mead from ghost magnolia trees. The heart beats light and the body sways in a world of harmonies. A brilliant sun. the rainbow leaves, the flaunting banners vie. A thunder shatters ’gainst the hill and greets the frosty sky. A bloody west, then star-sown dark, still victory hovers there. I’hc silhouetted phantoms leap in the bon-fire's lurid glare. And still the treasured visions rise, a book, a jolly face; The cards, the chips and the painted lips their harshness e’en erase. Ha. ha. the joker’s merry jest, the clasp of a friendly hand, A toast, a toast, that warms the soul, for the jolly, jostling band. Madly the dancers swing and sway, wild with a fierce delight. The scarlet costumes flash and flare in a cloud of blazing light. The strident music louder shrieks, then cymbals crash and roar! — The tear-blurred eyes in embers cold seek again for the days of yore. So. college dear, we leave too soon thy ancient, ivied walls. Where fragrant hangs June’s balmy breath around thy hallowed halls: We whisper soft “auf Wiedersehen", ah, rest on that fond spot. Where old magnolia incense laves the land of ne’er forgot. ,iOV.O SQUNHE ttfcVlVUKS WfcMXS XO VA OV-fc S-W FW I w POviW Vco KKOW. AM tWV£Y EK OF v “WE X b W XM OWS fcAMA E. AGO X I TMAT X HNNF. ANMAVTEO I 1H S DtV WE ( Jc SSHi- History of Senior Law Class WO years of being "shot” by an expert faculty is enough to make history of any class; and when we look around us and see how deadly has been their aim. we feel that surely we should be congratulated on being able to present a history during our collegiate life. Sixty-six of us came, a host eager to learn the law and be away to greater conquests. We are now reduced to two-thirds that number, and those of us who have not fallen by the way are beginning to see that there are some points of law not to be grasped in a moment. However, we feel proud of our class. Is it not the largest that has been "turned loose on the state" in a number of years, and have we not heard our Professors, alter a specially good recitation, say that ours is the best class that has ever gone out from the Uni ersity? I hey may ha e said the same thing to other classes, but they have said it to us last, and so therefore it must be true. We ourselves think so too, and that makes it true. For "as a man thinketh, so is he". The reasons for this opinion are too many for this brief sketch and only a few can be given. Most important, the class has a splendid class room record. It has by its constant use kept the binders busy rebinding books, and it points with pride to the fact that very few of its lost members left college by the "flunk-out" route. More than fifty per cent, of its enrollment are college graduates, and the whole body is made up of men who will some day be powers in their communities, if not justices of the peace. It has at least two "geniuses" and several others not far short of that, who have served faithfully in patiently taking as their part the wrath and sarcasm of our superiors. In other lines of college activity, it has not been less prominent. It has given the University some of her most famous athletes, her most polished society men, and her most wily politicians. It has given her an Editor-in-Chief of the "Georgian", and Editor-in-Chief of the "Red and Black", a captain of the football team, a manager of the baseball team, two intercollegiate debaters, and as one of its distinguished members has said, is capping the climax of its history by ending its career with the presidencies of both societies and both social clubs in its possession. What more need be said? We go from the University after two years of work heavier than has been borne by any preceding class, and it shall be our ambition to show that the efforts spent on us have not been spent in vain; and we shall strive to make our future as bright as is our past. So that no future Law class shall say, "Ours is the best class that ever graduated from the University of Georgia." E. W. LEARD, Historian. 0m m KIM D r—t. Yt r .OUBHH J -M-S U j| I I I I | i1!1. 'iki Officers of the Senior Law Class V. K. Meadow.........................................................President J. P. Edwards.....................................................Vice-President E. W. LEARD...................................................Historian and Poet Bob Gunn and Alan MacDonell..................................... ... ChaplainsErnie Adamson, B.L. Carrollton, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Sigma Chi. "He lall(S as if he had traveled all the prince's courts of Christendom." Willis Moses Avera. B.L. Odessa, Ga. Member of Dcmosthenian Sociely. "Come on, sir, I will lay the laxv to you.’ Senior Lawyers Vircil Emory Adams, B.L. Marietta, Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society. "A la ycr's mule, of a slorv pace, mill both suit my disposition and business."Ulrich J. Bennett. B.L. Maxeys. Ga. Member of Demosthenian, Sigma Chi. “He carries his face in a ruff,—monstrous steady, for fear of breaking." John Lamar Booth. B.L. Athens. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. "Man was made to talk-" Luther Hoyt Boswell. B.L. Greensboro. Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society. “Necessity l nows no law. 1 £non some lawyers of the name."Simon Turner Brewton, B.S.. B.L. Claxton, Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society. "Ef anything's foolisher and more ’diclflus than Militcrry glory, it is Milishy glory.” Walter H. Burt. B.L. Buena Vista. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Alpha Tau Omega. "The first thing n e do, Id’s l(ill all the la n ycrs.” Samuel Adams Cann. B.L. Savannah, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. ’ Th: normal instincts of mankind is not to n orl(.”!r vj A ;••• • • !1 1!‘ Frank Carter. B.S.. B.L. Atlanta. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Phi Delta Theta. "A politician is the devil's quilted anvil.” Bentley Hart Chappell. B.L. Columbus. Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society; Kappa Alpha. "Tie sex is ever to a soldier Ifind." Isaac Perry Cccke. B.L. Dawson, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Alpha Tau Omega. " Tis belter to be fortunate than vise. 'John Martin Cowart. B.L. Arlington. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Della I au Della. "IVhat a strange creature." David Robert Cumming, A.B., A.M., B.L. Griffin, Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Sociely. "IVill hear some of my court wisdom?" Carlton Carlisle Davis. B.L. . Covington. Ga. Member of Demojlhenian Sociely. "Honored and blessed be the evergreen pine."T J V John Prior Edwards. B.L. Monroe, Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society. "Let gentleness my strong enforcement be." Walker Reynolds Flournoy, B.L. Columbus. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. Kappa Alpha. "My hair is white, but not with years." Huch Nelson Fuller, B.S., B.L. Atlanta. Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society. The Wall flower,—the Wall flower. How beautifully it blooms." Hugh Mitchell Gannon. B.L. SavannaY Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. "For loo much rcsl itself becomes a pain. Robert Russell Gunn. B.L. Crawfordville, Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society; Sigma Chi. “Let's see rvhal the urchin's fit for.’’ Edcar D. Kenyon. A.B.. B.L. Bullochville. Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society. "I'm great on sagacity."Allen Napoleon Kieffer. A.B., B.L. Springfield, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. "Imagination rules the world." Jay Weiss Kieve. B.L. Albany, Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Sociely. ‘Helpless as spilled beans on a dresser. Emil Watson Leard. A.B.. B.L. Harlwell, Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Sociely. "All things here are out of joint." • i i « iWill Kinc Meadow. A.B., B.L. F.lberton, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Phi Delta Theta. "Dills! Dills! Dills! Hors can a man name his son William? " Francis Hamilton Miller, B.L. Augusta, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. As noiseless as a pair of empty slippers.' John Edward McDonald, B.S., B.L. Culhbert, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Phi Delta Theta. "Lei's to billiarJs." Walter Felix McDaniel, B.L. Reynold . Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society. "Art thou a magistrate? " Walter Raleigh McDonald. B.L. Augusta, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. "A happy soul, that all the rvay. To heaven hath a summer's Jay." Kl m r rv, —' — u ..vTi iiii i i! SSET! rl'W'.i-'. '! Olin Stephen Pace, B.L. Dawson. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa, Sigma Nu "Thou art fairer than the evening air. Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars." Cmari.es Orville Parker. B.L. Way cross. Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Sigma Chi. “Lillie chimney o ever casl most smol(C. David Roscce Peacock. B.S., B.L. Eastman, Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society. “ am monarch of all I survey." Ldcar Lecare Pennington, A.B.. B.L. Madison, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa. "Listen lo IVilliam W. Shakespeare.''Henry Dozier Russell. A.B.. B.L. McDonough. Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society. "Come, you and I ore friends.” Francis Walker Salley, B.L. Augusta. Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society. "Of all ihe girls lhal are so smart. There's none lilfc pretty Sally." Ivey Washington Rountree. B.L. MeLcod, Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society. This man by his apparel. Some men would judge a politician."Aucustus Octavius Bacon Sparks. B.S., B.L. Macon, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. "An English lailor, crazed i" ihe brain, IVilh the study of nett) fashions." Clarence Rowland Vaughn. B.L. Conyers. Ga. Member of Demoslhenian Society. "We shall not see his Ufa again." Edward Lowe Semple. B.L. Key West. Fla. Member of Phi Kappa; Kappa Sigma. "Even Ifcbbidge-heads hez rights." 0Atlanta, Ca. Member of Phi Kappa. "I am persuaded that every thing advances by an unchangeable larv through the eternal CONSTITUTION."fYY G® D S ht i • till ■lli'i'.' The Truth About the Law Class of 1914 FACTS—NOT HYPOTHESES PREAMBLE: From time immemorial, yea verily from the time when the memory of man runneth not to the contrary, class historians have been the most profound liars in ail college communities. The class history is well known. It is the obituary of the class, and like other obituaries, often leaves the reader in a dense state of ignorance as to the subject. Wc do not advocate the abolition of this sacred institution. It is all well and good in its place. I he purpose of this article is to give you the ‘inside dope” on the individual members of our class. In short, we belie e we have a great, glorious, and good class, and we are proud of our record here, and hence we are not ashamed to let the people know the truth about some of our shortcomings, some of our experiences, and some of our foolish sayings and doings. Seiah. CJ jaf ■ H H ERNIE ADAMSON Adamson, or "Ernie" as he is sometimes called, joined the merry chase for a diploma last year some weeks after the starter's pistol had fired. Nevertheless, he has heard numerous shots since that time, some of which were directed at him. Since entering the Law School, Adamson has made the acquaintance of Mr. Morris, become possessed of several law books, attended most of the shows at the Colonial, and has shown remarkable proficiency in attending two classes at once. He is a member of the "Manifold Club". Victor is his partner in this organization. WILLIAM KINC MEADOW Escaped from a circus menagerie some time after the "War Between the States", and has been a student at the University ever since. But withal. Bill is a youth in years. He is a remarkably intelligent person, being able to actually read and write a little; is able to distinguish between arson and forgery; corporeal hereditaments and nuisances; professors and janitors; and between John Edwards and an Egyptian mummy. He was prominent in military circles, having risen from private of the worst and most verdant description to Cadet Major. War clouds on the Mexican border induced him to hastily withdraw from the service this year in favor of Chappell. Bentley can run faster of the two. But this is no indication that Bill is not possessed of most wonderful nerve. On the contrary, he is composed chiefly of that element. To bear out his reputation for courageousness and valor, he roomed with Sparks, sat on the front row in class, raved at baseball umpires in the manner of a militant suffragette before the House of Parliament, went to church on Sunday mornings, undertook to serve as President of his class, took a meal at the "Beanery", rode on the Gainesville Midland Railway once, often ridiculed "Boss" Russell, and will probably practice law with "Evergreen" Davis. "BOSS DICK" It will be hard for us to sum up in a few words all that we feel concerning Russell. He has been at the University from a time when the memory of man (or woman) runneth not to the contrary, and hath become a fixture on the campus and one of the necessary appurtenances to Sanford Field. While at the University Dick took exercise at the "Beanery." was King of Grafldom. a wonderful ape at all athletic contests, was possessed sui juris of an inestimable supply of Bull, and was one of the most popular malefactors who has ever graced (?) the campus. As "boss" his jurisdiction extended to the Freshmen by authority of statute, and through the exercise of his reserve power his chancery jurisdiction was extended to all other classes and to the faculty. During his long term here he has become partly civilized — learning to wear a collar on occnrions of State and at church.—smoked once, learned to wear greenglasses. and has attended classes even on holidays. He leaves college as the Grand Chancellor-Commander of the local chapter. National Federation of Bootlicks. We predict for the peculiar creature much popularity among the "court attending" niggers of McDonough. Georgia—also a fighting chance for Justice of the Peace at the place aforesaid. F.DGAR LEGARE PENNINGTON A genius and hence doomed to either the poor house or the penitentiary. Well versed in all literary spheres, and will soon give to the world his theory as to the author of Shakespearian plays. He will also publish an article showing how the "Tango" and other like contortions were originated by the Adamites and Pre-Adamites, and,—if there was anything back of them, by them. He speaks various languages, to wit, Anglo-Saxon, Hebrew. Latin, Greek, Dago and United Slates. He has never become acquainted with the rudiments of the English or profane languages. While here Edgar never learned to chew, nor did he smoke, nor drink, nor did he inflict his presence upon any fair one. He was studious at all times, and utilized his spare moments in composing mouth organ music and love ballads. VICTOR VICTOR This rare intellectual gem has been belter known among us as "The Walking Encyclopedia of Universal Knowledge," being little less well versed in the highest and most useless arts than is Pennington. During his sojourn at the University, Victor performed many remarkable feats, the most remarkable by far being his arrival in class on time on the morning of January 8th, in the year of our Lord One I housand Nine Hundred and Fourteen. Mr. Morris and the class marveled exceedingly, and it was declared by the "powers that be" that in the event such an unbelievable thing should again occur, a holiday would be declared. We have never had the holiday. While in Athens. Victor was a member of the Standard Pressing Club, and also a member of the National Federation of Bootlicks. We predict for him a great success as a vaudeville actor. CINCINNATUS RUBENSTEIN VAUGHN The "Conyers Beauty"—a dainty little creature of a most "AMY-able disposition. "Rube" avers on oath that he it from "Conyers. Georgia, on the main line of the Georgia Railroad from Atlanta to Augusta." Just to take a slant at him you would suppose that Conyers is "NEAR" said Georgia Railroad, but we always took his word for it. He always went to all the circuses, ate peanuts, associated with Davis and Russell, and other crimes and misdemeanors here and there, now and then, with malice aforethought committed against the peace, dignity and good order of the State and the citizens thereof. He was accustomed, when undisturbed by pins, to abide in blissful slumber each day between the hours of twelve and one. CHARLES ORVILLE PARKER About the worst thing we can say is that Charlie is from South Georgia, and that he associates with Bob Gunn. He hails from that section of the "Empire State" known as the "Wiregrass” region. However, he does not look so very "grassy". Gabe Cowart has been leading him out—or probably misleading him—and he has a chance. He is renowned for his superb beauty, his gross ignorance, his ravenous appetite and his charming voice. He will leave the University this year we suppose, and ought to have a fair knowledge of where the law can be found if. unhappily, he has not been with Adamson too much. WALTER FELIX McDANIEL Another animal of prehistoric times from South Georgia—almost as bad as Charlie Parker. He is quiet and unassuming; in fact, almost too quiet at times when called upon in class. He almost always remains behind the goal posts in class room, but comes to the front and does spectacular work. His connection with a popular hotel has given him a wide acquaintance among traveling salesmen and "Show" people. Give him a soap box. a Code of Georgia and the necessary crossing of the roads, and he will make an admirable success in the field of law somewhere in the woods of Georgia. § m Kl 5) a infer v.yV‘tT'. "'m 'T • • -RED WING” SEMPLE A mosl peculiar specimen of humanity—we suppoie it it humanity—from the Everglades of Florida. He was brought here last year by process of extradition, and has served his sentence well. His association with the Indians of Southern Florida has evidently made a deep impression upon him. for he still insists at times upon wearing red plumes as headgear. But he is not unlike other students. He runs around on two legs, eats food and drinks water. Since being in the "Classic" city he has learned to ride on street cars and has become very accomplished with the cue. He was occasionally observed in the class room, and always had a seal of honor near Bill Avera in the "Bootlick’ row. Eddie gave much promise of becoming a regular gambler when he first came to college, actually betting and winning two bits on a Tech. game, but since that time he has reformed and his worst offenses at present are smoking "Threefors" and cutting Sunday school classes. "CIRCUS- SALLEY Formerly a resident of Augusta—now of College Avenue. A marvelous theatrical product he is in many ways, and in many other ways not unlike the apes and gorillas of darkest Africa. A great many of our boys operated private "grafts", but Frank feloniously and maliciously maintained a public nuisance on College Avenue, to wit: the Classic I healer, much to the detriment of the public in general. His extreme timidity in the presence of femmes soles is indeed painful, but the case with which he bore up under a fire of questions in class room did much to cause us to overlook his shortcomings. He is eminently well fitted to become a dog and pony trainer with Barnum Bailey, or the stage manager for just any kind of vaudeville company. WALKER REYNOLDS FLOURNOY Hair, white; complexion, fair; feet. LARGE; brain, cloudy; eyes, faded blue; habits, fairly good; nerve, absolutely unlimited. The above is a description of Walker Reynolds, clearly, fully, plainly and distinctly set forth—without superfluous allegations of matters of an irrelevant or immaterial nature. He is an author of nole. -limiled note, however. He has written during his college career the following; "The Intricacies of Common Law Pleading Simplified." "Who Can be Found By the 1 erms of a Void Contract." "Equity and Its Application in Africa and New England." "Form Book Practice in Georgia and Its Advantages." All of these books may be found in manuscript form in the boiler room under the Academic building.—absolutely unreadable and equally incombustible. As a student. "Blondie" took football and basket-ball as majors, street walking as a minor, and law as an incidental. Unless the General Assembly passes a law forbidding impositions upon helpless clients, he will enter the practice with his Code, the Form Book, his unlimited nerve and congenial habits. BURT One of the "Freshman" members of the class. We do not mean that he is possessed of those propensities common to Freshmen, but that he is of the Kenyon-Bennelt-Taylor-Burt aggregation, with which crowd we have been afflicted only one year. Burt is one of these "long. tall, and rangy guys", with a face composed chiefly of nose. He is rather quiet, but when he speaks he roars as Zeus speaking from Olympus. Whatever may be his knowledge of law. which appears to be vast even at this time, he will be able to frighten the ordinary jury into rendering a verdict iiv his favor. Much discomfort was created among the peaceful citizens of Buena Vista—his home town—when it was rumored that he would return there and practice law. but this agitation has now been allayed for Burt has decided to accept the Presidency of the Atlanta School of Law. As a professor ? ? ? ) ? JAMES WILSON YOUNG The rosy-cheeked son of the Blue Ridge. Tried to get to Athens two years ago via the Gainesville Midland, but found it more advantageous to walk. Has read more cases than the entire class saiii 4fis combined and knows less about them than Hugh Gannon, which is "nuf sed“. He conducted himself well all through his college course until near the end. when he failed to leave "Lucas Terrace" when Bentley Chappell and Flournoy moved in. He always applied himself diligently to his work—never leaving his room at night but on two occasions—once to get his laundry and one time to see a Freshman parade. He leaves college with his large eyes, his bushy hair, some sweet (?) memories of Common Law Pleading and Equity. He will practice law in a grocery store some hundred or more miles from a railroad where he will probably meet with some success because of a lack of serious opposition. JAY WEISS KIEVE You’ll have to admit that Jay Weiss Kieve is the most dickens of a name. Bui then the name hasn’t got anything on Kieve. Kieve can help run a picture show, go to law school, and whistle like a mockingbird. At class he sits up on the port side of the altar. He used to sit on the other side, but had to move over on account of the knot hole in the platform. Kieve has had several great honors while here, among them being Frank Salley's assistant and Sheriff of Moot Court. EMIL WATSON LEARD s. c J Leard plays chess, the violin and the deuce. He has an A.B. degree from Mercer, a medal which he won at Hartwell, and the oldest man in college for a roommate. Leard sings in the Methodist choir, tries for inter-collegiate debates and on the whole manages to spend the lime very pleasantly without spending it all in search of the law. It is rumored that Leard is in love, and in fact, some say that he is the guy that pul heart in Hartwell, but from good authority, we understand that Bowman. Ga.. is the favored (?) town. WALTER RALEICH McDONALD W. R. McDonald, law student, lover, business man. and hot-air artist. Between "Old Man” Adams and Olin Wimberly. Me gets led a merry chase. "Old Man" tries to get Me to bed by 9 o'clock and Olin tries to keep him up till six. When it was suggested that we study a $13 book on Real Property. Me had great fils of glee. You see. Me sells the books. And Me is some lover, too, making frequent unnecessary trips to Augusta, and occasionally getting in the hospital. But then all is fair.— etc. Me is also a member of the Ten O’clock Club, rooms in the Ben Franklin Annex, and on the whole is quite a famous man. His twenty-first birthday parly will go down in history. JOHN EDWARD McDONALD "Jay Bird" McDonald first matriculated at Georgia away back about the time that they used to have to run the Indians out of the Chapel every morning in order to have the exercises. But he decided to wait a while and pick out the best class possible with which to get his B.L. degree. Jay Bird has been taking all the law course and about seven-eighths of the Academic, and vet has had time to join in the festivities around the Q Room occasionally. Jay Bird knows most of the buildings on the campus by name, and has been all over the Law department, with the possible exception of the Library. Jay Bird may not be a very dignified name for an Attorney and Counsellor at Law. but then all attorneys can’t be dignified, you know. FRANCIS HAMILTON MILLER “Hamp" Miller looks like a lineal descendant of the Sphinx related in the ’steenth degree as calculated by the civil law. Hamp is certainly a tranquil member. He is so peaceful that with a slight stretch of the imagination, you can see doves of peace hovering about him. Hamp is as regular as— well, nearly as regular as Dr. Morris. He moves by schedule, and is always on lime. Hamp is a very temperate boy, his worst and most vicious habit being that obnoxious and contemptible custom of going to Augusta on slight provocation. EUGENE S. TAYLOR ’Gene Taylor is another member of the Grandfather’s Club. When he first infested the Campus is yet a query. If you ever heard anything about law being dry. you just w-ant to see ’Gene I aylor atclast. How a man with both Junior and Senior work, and the cold, hard, cruel world staring him in the face can laugh so much it a mystery, but from 9 o'clock to 10 o'clock every morning 'Gene laughs most heartily. It matters not what the joke—the ore about the ancient English knight with the sheet iron nightshirt and the washpot over his head'—or the or.e about the Neutralizing Cordial—'Gene will render a most mirthful display of laughter at any of them. 'Gene will make a good lawyer, unless some member of the bar springs a joke, and then 'Gene will have to dismiss his case to laugh. DAVID ROSCOE PEACOCK "Emp", as you know, was Captain of last years football team: however, we expect him to get his diploma. "Emp" has had grievous obstacles to overcome. "Bish" Brewton and Carter have been in his class for 5 years. And "Bish" has been leading him a merry chase down 1-over's Lane. too. So between "Bish", and Dr. Morris, and the football team, and the Standard Pressing Club. "Emp" has done well to survive. Peacock has many college honors. He was President of his Freshman Class (the Class of ’13). Sheriff of Jeffersonian, and Floor Walker at the Beanery. OLIN STEPHEN PACE Steve Pace had no opposition for Junior President, per quod he was elected unanimously. For a while this year vve feared we’d lose Steve. It looked very much like he was contemplating the Third Title, Chapter I, Article I. Section I. of the Civil Code of Georgia, but Steve is still with us contrary to our expectations. He is an ardent member of the "Ten O'clock Club”, hikes for Brenau on slight provocation and a dollar or two. and at odd times may be found in the Library trying in vain to keep up with Mr. Green's numerous cases. Pace had rather gel up in the Library with his collar and coal off. whistle and kick over chairs and read the head notes of a lot of cases, than to be picking the proverbial harp. SIMON TURNER BREWTON "Bish" Brewton exemplifies, by his life, the great principle enunciated by Abraham Lincoln, as follows, to wit: "With malice to none, with charily for all." His besetting sin is the unbounded pride which he takes in his own good looks. It is probable that this arises from his extensive acquaintance with the fair sex and his ability to see the false flattery used by said fair sex. It has been intimated that he is somewhat of a bool-licker. but as he confines his efforts to attempts to increase his popularity with the aforesaid fair sex by lending aid to other members of the family, the class, as a whole, has not classified him as one of the smooth-tongued men. ULRIC J. BENNETT Ulric J. Bennett is a noble example of that great class of men who spoil a good farmer when they enter the legal profession. As manager of a farm in and about Maxeys. Ga.. he could possibly have earned a livelihood and risen to the rank of J. P.. thereby satisfying his double ambition of supporting himself and winning renown in the legal profession, but as a lawyer, we doubt that he will ever accomplish either. DAVID ROBERT CUMMING No. Cumming, D.R.. isn't hanging on until he qualifies for a place as a Carnegie Fund Beneficiary. It is true that he has only a short time longer to serve. His sole object in remaining in the University thus long is to permit the first idea with which he came in contact to penetrate his ivory dome. The serious expression worn by him is not a sign of deep thinking, but is only the sham behind which he conceals his ignorance. Some go so far as to intimate that he is "conscientiously" opposed to knowing anything. JOHN PRIOR EDWARDS The only thing legal about "J. P." Edwards is his initials. It has been said that the initials in question were given him in order that he might have a natural advantage over the other members of his i i lililLLl profession. No, the wild look, the hair standing on end, these are not signs of reversion to the original type, but only the effect of his childhood environment. He hails from the town of jungles, panthers, tigers and giraffes. Rumor has it that he once saw a train before he came to Athens. But he is not altogether devoid of intelligence. In fact, we believe that when he dies, his epitaph may be truly written: J. P. Edwards. J. P. CARLTON CARLISLE DAVIS At the mention of the above name we invariably exclaim: "How long. O Catiline, wilt thou abuse our patience? How long will Providence spare thee and permit us to suffer? ’’ "Evergreen" best expresses all that there is to him. Winter, fall, summer and baseball season always find him the same ever verdant one. He won the distinction of being the biggest Freshman in college last year, and ran an excellent race this year. An excellent example of sound judgment on the part of the common people. While at the University, Davis was seen at class on one or two occasions. He acted as the National Board of Censorship at all picture shews, and was an unmovable fixture at Post' Place. He liked every man in college with the exception of Vaughn and Middlebrooks,—he simply loved them. We predict the gallows, the insane asylum, or the Federal Prison for him at an early date. IVEY WASHINGTON ROUNTREE Even like unto the father of his country, whose name he bears, he could not—but then, he never cut down a cherry tree. Like Teddy Roosevelt he stirred politics with a big slick, and he may be President some of these days. Davis declares that Abe Lincoln was President of this country once,—why not Rountree? While in the University. Rountree devoted considerable lime in making investigation concerning matters of legal and illegal nature. The remainder of his time was spent in asking questions which were calculated to convey the idea that he knew something. Otherwise he ATE. talked, looked and almost acted like a human being. In the court room he is calculated to cause considerable comment among the "Niggers." as will Russell. We predict much success for him because of the fact that he is a Progressive. and is from South Georgia. GUS SPARKS A gentleman who defamed his worthy name by entering the ranks of journalism, and was. as a certain noted authority has put it: "Of utterly depraved and abandoned mind, an enemy to the race and to civilization." Bill Meadow, his roommate by misfortune, construed the above to mean he (Bill) was both the race and civilization. Augustus invariably reported to class late, but that same gentleness of spirit and fluency of speech that won for him a place among the "Kings of Suffragettes", was sufficient to make good his every shortcoming or latecoming. as it is in this case. He was a bona fide holder of a corn cob pipe (of some considerable strength), which pipe he often negotiated to Bill; a person sui juris (probably); one non compos mentis (possibly); a moderate grafter; an exponent of temperance; and one of the few creatures of God’s creation who believes that Macon is a city. WILLIS MOSES AVERA Bill Avery insists that he has never given Blackstone any serious consideration. We believe Bill to be a truthful Boy. So does Mr. Morris. Bill sits on the front seat in all his classes, is always present at the meeting of the "Ten O’clock Club," which meets at Pots’ Place every morning. He rarely studies later than 3 o’clock A. M. Several limes Bill has been known to answer a question correctly and is found in the Law Library on rare occasions. Each Professor insists on pronouncing Avera different, hence Bill will answer to either-A-very. Av-e'ra, or Av-e-ra'. VIRGIL EMORY ADAMS "Old Man" Adams is a great old scout. He is a consistent worker, a debater of no mean ability, and a Sunday School enthusiast. He has never cracked a text-book on Sunday, but has been heard toOHS .i i|» » i ,i i cuss on three separate and distinct occasions, and on one occasion, attended the Oriental Show in company with W. R. McDonald and Adamson, which was a pretty bad stunt for an old man to do. It has been predicted that he will some day be Postmaster. Preacher. Poet, and Justice of the Peace in Marietta. Ga. Three cheers and a chew of tobacco for "Old Man" Adams. JOHN LAMAR BOOTH John is a native of the Classic City, and also has an inexhaustible supply of questions on old Exams. Hence, he is the most popular man in the class just before an Examination. He wears glasses, eats with a knife and fork, and is otherwise very much like other human beings. He knows more about mules than any other 7 men in the class, but nevertheless can drive his automobile as well as a mule trade. At the present writing, no member of the class has yet seen John drinking out of the same cup with any member of the faculty; however, we predict that he will pull down the much coveted diploma entitling him to "plead and practice law" in the courts of Georgia. I LUTHER HOYT BOSWELL So far as we know. Hoyt possesses none of the vices of a gentleman; but notwithstanding this fact, he is. However he rooms with Dick Russell, reads the "Sunday American , ' The Ginger Jar. "Snappy Stories", besides "Shipman's Common Law Pleading." and other light literature. Hoyt is an enthusiastic member of the "Ten O'clock Club." frequently entertains at Cue Parlies, and on the whole, has managed to spend his time and incidentally some money very pleasantly while waiting for a dip. WILLIAM LeGRAND BRYAN. A.B. “fly Cos i" We pray for inspiration as we attempt to tell you of Wm. L. Bryan. To appreciate the man. you must do more than merely turn the pages of this book to find his picture and gaze into those sparkling eyes. The "Secretary" is not really 74 years old as many suppose, but only 47. He has graduated from Emory College and (aught school in every County from Jesup to Rockmarl. He is so punctual that it is painful. He has never been absent from a class in the whole two years. No. not even tardy—refuses to answer "Here", but insists on responding to roll call very politely, to wit: "Present ". Secretary eats one meal a day, and drinks that out of a milk bottle, wears his hair polar bear style, and has never been shot (nor even half shot). In fact Bryan is always perfectly peaceful, presumably present, and painfully precise. SAMUEL ADAMS CANN Sam Cann is a carefree, congenial, ball-headed old boy. On January 8th and March Nth he got to Mr. Morris’ class on time. All the other days he walked in calmly after roll call and requested sheepishly. "Mark Cann present, please, sir". Bob Gunn said that when Mr. Morris addressed the Y. M. C. A., he couldn't listen to the lecture for fear Cann would come in and ask to be marked present. Sam has been to Europe. If you don't brlieve it. ask Sparks. Sam’s greatest college honors are as follows: Member of the Piedmont l-oolball learn; Member " 1 en O'oclock Club", and Chef de Cuisine de la Cafe Pulaski. Sam's O. K., and he’s strong for Herpicide. FRANK CARTER Frank is Ed's brother. He eats nearly as much as Ed. gels put out of basket-ball games more, and is ex-manager of the baseball team. Frank is a great lover, but says that he believes that variety is the spice of life. Carter and Steve Pace can get in the library and think they are reading cases and make more fuss than a sheet iron band. A dollar has no more chance around Carter than that proverbial celluloid dog chasing the asbestos cat through the hottest part of Hades. BENTLEY HART CHAPPELL "Chap" spends his time as follows: One-third drawing up his papers neatly, one-third drilling, and the other third in looking over his papers to see if he has made any mistakes. Bentley is Cadet ■pul11 q ’ . M n TO lK. y) D 0 ' SStoati3dt .frji ri iii I t 1,1 i i .1 i i Major (Sh-jh, Bish Brewlon is too), plays on a guitar, occasionally entertains at billiards, has a record of every case he has read this year, and doesn’t know any more about Bankruptcy than Meadow. ISAAC PERRY COCKE Bet you can’t guess why he is named Isaac. Perry Cocke entered the University in 1908. However, he hasn't been here continuously ever since, like some people I know. Perry is quite a clubman. He belongs to the "Manifold Club", the "Ten O’clock Club", the "Midnight Owls", and the S. P. C. S. (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Students). Perry is kinder hard to describe, but you have seen these fellows that were always present when anything happened, haven't you? Well, Perry has been there every time anything has happened since he has been here. Like Bob Gunn and Bob Raiford. you know. JOHN MARTIN COWART “Gas" Cowart is the hottest sport in the Law Class. "Evergreen" Davis not excepted. Whenever they start to do anything over at Brenau, they send over and consult Gas. and he alwavs has to go over to inspect the proposition first hand. Pace and Gunn usually go. too, but Gas is a good-natured fellow and doesn't get mad. Gas would die if he couldn't prop his feet up on the stove in Mr. Morris’ class room. Gas says that he may not be so much for speed, but when it comes to endurance, he is the Three Year King. WALTER ERLE DALEY Erie Daley lives in Atlanta. But that’s nothing; Hugh Fuller does. too. But then Daley has a mustache. When Erie starts to tell Mr. Morris some startling fact, for example, that there are two kinds of chairs, to wit: straight chairs and rocking chairs, he leans back in his seal, hangs his thumb in the arm-hole of his vest and begins like he was going to deliver a Fourth of July Oration on the "Blood Bought Heritage of the Constitution", but ere he has finished you are firmly convinced that there really is such a classification of chairs as he suggested. And if he doesn't convince you. you at least believe that he's in earnest. The reason that they call him Daley is because he is not (daily). HUCH NELSON FULLER Hugh Fuller lives in Atlanta. But that’s nothing; Erie Daley does. too. But Fuller has been "Bone" at Emory and "Vice-Borie" at Harvard, but he couldn’t even cel nominated for "Borie" over here. Nevertheless. Fuller is on the job. and he has an office in the Government building, too. Here he reads "Life", keeps his razor, etc., smokes Judge Cornett’s tobacco, and generally makes himrelf a nuisance, no doubt. He is supposed to be a Government official of some kind, but nobody knows what Hugh’s official capacity is. Maybe he’s Government Chicken Inspector. vo HUGH MITCHELL GANNON "Hank" Gannon is a long-leered old hoy that wears specks, loves to have a good lime, and rooms with MacHutlon. "Hank" and W. R. McDonald delight in canvassing the city for advertisements for the "Red and Black", and they say that Gannon’s spiel is irresistible. Hugh is a desperate lover, a horrible singer, and a pseudo-lawyer of no mean ability. ROBERT RUSSELL GUNN There’s no vre to say anythirse about Bob Gun. Of course, you know Bob Gvn. If you don’t, you may he sure that he knows you. Bob is president of the German Club, and is otherwise the social leader of the University. If Bob can just gel to Brenau. he is happy. In fact Bob knows every student at Lucy Cobb. Brenau. Agnes Scott, Wesleyan, and the Crawfordville High School. The number of girls Bob knows is greater than the number of Georgia boys that ’’Ike" knows. And the fvrnv r»r« '•bout the whole thing is that Bob has actually been at work this year, and on lop of it all. he lives in Crawfordville. where he says he is going to be a corporation lawyer.ALLEN NAPOLEON KIEFER "Keef" had ralhcr pm a piece of paper on somebody's coal tail than be Chancellor of ihe University, or Dean of the Law School. It has been said that he is the biggest Freshman in the Law Class. • Kecf says that he doesn’t think Evergreen Davis is a married woman nor an infant, but when it comes to this non compos mentis business, he doesn't want to take any oaths. "Kecf" has an A.B. degree which he obtained over in Newberry, S. C.. a very cheerful disposition, and a face that would stop a Big Ben Alarm Clock, as well as a very unusual flow of big words, and Rubenstein Vaughn for a roommate. In spite of all these disadvantages, together with the fact that such a small man has to drag around such a name as you see written abo e, he has made a very good record, and we predict that some day he will be a Justice Court Solicitor, if he works hard. I EDGAR L. KENYON If there is anything that you want to know about, from the amount of snow fall at Dahlonega to the temperature of the shoot-lhe-chules at Watm Springs, ask Ed Kenyon. He's an Emory boy. But Fid is hardly a boy—he’s most an old man. Ed is Professor of Public Speaking, a member of the Jeffersonian Law Debating Society, and also a member of the Red and Black Pressing Club. When we had the spring holidays. Ed. "Old Man" Adams, "Secretary ” Bryan, "Fes" Cummings, and Ulric Bennett went up to Atlanta to celebrate. Ed led this gay and giddy crowd of striplings. They bought chewing gum. chocolate milks, pop-corn, went to the movies, and had a big time in general. Bennett says that he isn’t going off with Kenyon any more, because he kept on telling the soda jerker not to put too much chocolate in the chocolate milks, as he didn't want to have to take anybody home. But Ed is some lawyer. Bob Gunn exclaimed at Jeffersonian the night that Ed demurred a certain petition out of court. "Good gosh, fellows. I'm going to get 40 counties away from that man when I start to practice law." History of the Senior Pharmacy Class '“["’HOUGH rather small in numbers, our class is not behind previous classes in other particulars. We may well feel proud of the record we have made since entering in the Fall of 1912. In September of that year, we began our official career in Athens and it is with a feeling of sadness that we now draw to the close of our college course. The struggle has been ceaseless and hard; but all now stand triumphant on the verge of the goal toward which we have been toiling through a maze of Chemistry, pills and powders. We have been well represented in all the activities of college life, have furnished our representatives to the baseball team, to the Italians, in the speaking contests, and on the rooters’ bench at all the games. We go forth, our dips under our arms, with the determination to make a success and to be of service to the state and to our Alma Mater, so that the Class of 1914 may ever have a bright page in the records of the University. H islorian. J. F. Hammett Officers of the Senior Pharmacy Class J. F. Hammett M. E. Freeman R. W. Murray George Harrison J. P. Wingate . President Vice-President Secretary H islorian Chaplainm Murray Elton Freeman, Ph.G. Doerun. Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society. "I go lo mix the ponders. Thai send my friends helon.” Frank Dorsey Gray, Ph.G. Appling, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Pi Kappa Alpha. ” IV hen lalfen. To he toell shaken." Gecrce L. Harrison. Ph.G. Atlanta, Ga. Member of Phi Kappa; Kappa Alpha. On ihcir onn merits modesI men are dumb.” Robert Walker Murray. Ph.G. Lumber City, Ga. Member of Demosthenian Society "He o ill shoot pills." H. D. Williams. A.B. Marietta. Ga. Member of Demojlbenian Society. "The dimple that thy chin contains has beaut}) in its round." James P. Wincate, Ph.G. Athens. Ga. Member of Demostbenian Society. ’So modern 'polhecaries Prescribe, apply, and call their masters fools.' liol lull y ft a] List of Old Graduates RECENTLY the University has conferred diplomas on several of the men who were forced to leave her halls to take up arms in defense of their state. Many of them were unable to return after the close of the war. and it is but fitting that they should now receive this recognition of the appreciation of the University and of the State, for their unselfish sacrifices in the times of need. In placing their names on the roll of her distinguished Alumni, the University honors herself and pays a fitting tribute to some of her most loyal sons. The sixteen who have so far received their diplomas, are: ATKISSON, George Baber. Maxeys, Ga. Matriculated 1861. Private in Troup Artillery, C. S. Army. Disabled in Battle, Sharpsburg, Md. Entered for A.B. BRISCOE, Matthew P., Athens, Ga. Matriculated 1863. Junior in A.B. course. Belcher, John Hampden. Benton, La. Matriculated 1861. Adj. 1st. S. C. Cav., C. S. Army. Senior in A.B. course. Belcher. James Norwood, Calhoun Falls. S. C. Matriculated 1864. 1st S. C. Cav., C. S. A. BELCHER, Henry Clay. Dalton, Ga. Matriculated 1863. Private C. S. Cav. Harris, Gideon Dowse, Columbus, Miss. Matriculated 1864. Q. Sergt. 6th Miss. Cav. HlLLYER, HENRY. Atlanta, Ga. Matriculated 1861-5. Private 9th Ga. State Troops. Jackson, James Marion. LaFayette, Ga. Matriculated 1862. Capt. in 11th Ga. Regt., C. S. A. LlPPMAN, Lawrence. Savannah. Ga. Matriculated 1862. Middlebrooks, William M.. Atlanta, Ga. Matriculated 1862. Capt. 19th Ga. Regt., C. S. Army. Stoddard, John I., Iakoma Park, Washington. D. C. Matriculated 1864. Capt. and A. D. D., C. S. A. Joined Co. B., Ga. “Hussars.” Thomas, James Dudley, Rome, Ga. Matriculated 1863. Dental Surgeon. Private Troup Artillery. C. S. A. Rt. Rev. Weed, Edwin Gardener, Jacksonville, Fla. Episcopal Bishop. Signal Corps, C. S. A. Weed, John, New York, Matriculated 1864. White, John Richard, Whitehall, Ga. Matriculated 1864. Wright. Edwin Leigh Smyrna, Atlanta, Ga. Matriculated 1864. Capt. in C. S. A.; Col. 4th Regt. Ga. State Guard.Jt ga iflirihyjt I ' i l 11 |BkI ’ The Iconoclasts A TRAGEDY OF BLOOD. WITH MUSIC I Bp Aaron B. Bernd Dramatis Personae: Noblemen of the House on Quince Henry H. Pest Stephens Catchell Terria Fendrix. Catchell's Mistress Shade of Slam Wildly Chorus of Members of the Jolly Knockers Club. Including Walter B. Still, E. J. Hardened. Evergreen Maybes, John Workhard, and others. Scene: Deception room of the house on Quince. Picture of Wildly occupying prominent position on the wall. SCENE 1.—Afternoon Enter Chorus of Jolly Knockers' Club (Music: "The Anvil Chorus") CHORUS: Oh, we’re the jolly members of the J. K. C. With our trusty little hammers by our sides; And we knock the college alphabet from A to Z. So to ward off college honors from our hides. Some folks call us politicians, but we never give a rap Who it is that heads the college sheepish flock; For we’re happy when we sit around and tap, tap, tap, Yes, we’re happy when we sil around and knock. Refrain Oh, it’s knock, knock, knock,— It’s the reason that we all came down to college: Just to sit around, and watch the game, and give a little shoe . Not to gain a lot of useless nonsense knowledge. Enter Pest and Catchell PEST: My name is Henry Pest, as I’m sure that you have heard, I’m the guy that put the “Fie” in my society; And in all this roost of knockers, I’m the ruling knocker bird. As I hold my place with conscience and sobriety.T lj l|i 11 i]i 1115 CATCHELL: And Catchell is my name, and I always do catch hell, Is it my fault that I belong to Lcmon-thenian? But my patron saint. Slam Wildly, watches me and watches well. As I hurl invectives forth quite Catilinean. ALL: Refrain (Hesitation Waltz by Pest and Catchell; then exeunt Chorus.) PEST: Stephens, dost know that by th’ almighty Shake It was decreed that unto us should fall This term, to be the Editor-in-Chief Of our weakly weekly. Bled and Raclf? Catchell: Ay, well I know it, and I'd vouch it too. That thou already hast determined That thou shalt fill that nugatory job. PEST: Why, Catchell, marry, thou dost do me wrong— No covetous eye upon it have I cast; But still, I think that ’twould be most unfair For one of us twain not to get the spoils,— Since tis decreed that in our sacred bunch This office most unworthily should fall.— The only way in which we can decide Which of us two shall gain the worthless job. Will be to cast the dice to-night at twelve. And unto him who throws the higher score. Shall go the job. and all its goodly lore. Catchell: Agreed! We'll meet— PEST: We’ll meet to-night at twelve. (Exit.) CATCHELL: To-night at twelve within this very room. (Catchell kneels before the picture of Slam Wildly, and sings.) (Soft music, pink lights,—“The Maiden's Prayer.") CATCHELL.: Slam, to thee 1 raise my invocation. Slam, to thee, my reverence I raise. Slam, be by me in this situation. Help me. Slam, to whom I ow» all praise.'V'XV'. urn SETHIS 1 ,•,,, ,,,. (Here the dumb-shoxv. Calchcll, from impossible nooks and corners, draws forth copies of the various college publications of all l(inds, and heaping them in a promiscuous pile in center stage, sets fire to them, chanting—) (Music—’’The Curse of an Aching Heart.") CATCHELL: I rash, I say, and naught but trash is in them. Trash I say. and give them to the fire. Naught but politics has made them. Politics will soon have slayed them,— Trash, I say, in my Slam Wildish ire. Enter the Shade of Slam IVildly. CATCHELL: Wh—wh—wh—what sh—sh—shade is th—th—this? Shade of Wildly: My hair, sir, is a most auroral shade. My face, sir, is a lighter shade of yellow. For many months my spirit hath been flayed In Sparta, than which there is no place heller. Knock 1 do. and knock I must, I guess my punishment is just. I've come in answer to the prayer you prayed. CATCHELL: You know the trouble. Slam, You know, too, what I want. You’ll tell me what to do. If you’re any sort of haunt. Shade OF Wildly: Load the dice, I say to you. Load them, I repeat. They’ll do what they may to you. Still you’ll have them beat. Enter Tenia Fcndrix FENDRIX: I have been told, your lordship, by Sir Pest, I hat you will cast the die to-night at twelve Jn order to decide which of you two Will guide the Bled and Rack through next term’s storms. Is’t right? i (Vanishes Ccntly.) ji gasp's [ 11 iff CaTCHELL: It is, and I have made a plan. FENDRIX: The dice—why not get loaded ones and win? CaTCHELL: I will, and hereby give 1 you the task Of getting them for me— FENDRIX: Oh. gladly sir. Will I do anything your lordship asks. (She l(isscs C ate hell.) CaTCHELL: But hush, no more, the members of our club. The Jolly Knockers, are approaching here. Enter Members of the J. K. C. 77icp sing to the tunc “Alma Mater." CHORUS: The Mandolin Club is a terrible thing. Bam, bam, bam! The Glee Club ne'er yet had a member could sing, Bam, bam, bam! The Thalians, oh, what a brain-racicing bunch. And dear little Georgie got his on a hunch. Bam. bam. bam! Last year’s football team made a terrible row. Bam, bam, bam! But now it’s all over, we can't figure how. Bam, bam, bam! The baseball team, oh, what a box of sick pills, It’s enough to give any man fever and chills, Bam, bam. bam! CURTAIN. Scene 2.—Evening Enter Pest PEST: My dice I’ve loaded, now to see the sport. How hard twill be to see him take his fate. I loaded them to throw an easy twelve. And he will ne’er suspect. Enter CatchcllCatch ELL (Aside): On Tenia’s word. I fixed the dice to roll an easy eleven,— Pest ne’er can beat it. and he will not think That anyone should load for less than twelve. (To Pest): How now, let’s to the game and get it o’er. Enter Chorus of J. K. C. Chorus: To the game, to the game, it strikes twelve by the clock. To the victor belong the spoils, and unto us the knock. Calchcll rolls the dice. CHORUS: Eleven! Pest, the number’s hard to beat. PEST (Aside, teeth clenched): Yes, but I’ll do it, if I have to cheat! Pest rolls the dice. CHORUS: Twelve! Ay, in Denmark something’s rotten, I’ll bet those bones were not of cotton! CATCHELL: Wh—wh—wh—wh—what in h—h—h—h— (Stutters to death) CHORUS: What have you done? Oh. wild and woolly Pest. You’ve killed him. Saint Slam Wildly’s ery best. Enter Terria Eendrix FENDRIX: What’s this? Sir Stephens dead? Whose was the deed? CHORUS: ’Twas Pest’s, who caused it by his sordid greed. FENDRIX: Die! (Slabs Pest.) And now, sith that I can not live Without my lover, I my life will give. (Stabs self.) (Soft music, purple lights with green poll(a dots. “The Dead March" from “Saul.") CHORUS: All this but seems to be quite dubbish. But ’tis good rid of worthless rubbish. Bam. bam, bam! SLOW AND GENTLE CURTAIN.. I sYVWYOrNDERSTANDING this to be the usual misnomer applied to a brief account of the general spirit and trend of action of the class the task is undertaken with much less hesitancy than were the writer expected even to outline its accomplishments or to allot the just and deserved praise to each of its members. For the latter task though it would take an author surpassing in capacity many of those of fame, still this is unnecessary for it speaks openly for itself. After putting it over the Freshman in a pushball contest, holding a most delightful and successful banquet, then winning the championship in an all-round athletic contest and grinding through the final ’exams”, the class of fifteen returned in the fall of 1913 to begin their career as upperclassmen and determined to make the first year a successful one. The question now is does this class—the class which entered as the first one under the red-cap system and of its own accord fought its up-hill battle to such wonderful underclassman success besides surpassing all previous ones in number—does not this same class show the same proportionate brilliancy as Juniors? As a matter of fact it equals any Junior class in the furnishing of men for the college athletics. In oratory and debating it has its notables, while in scholarship and literature it has been very well represented. Unselfish has the class been in offering its talent for the use of its Alma Mater, but by far its greatest benefit to the college has been by way of the class as a whole which has always been busy uplifting and helping the realization of the University ideals and has always put its strong hand to the helm when Georgia spirit among the underclassmen seemed to be on the wane. In fact its fame is capable of emitting its own radiancy. The college man undoubtedly doesn’t reach a full appreciation until he enters the upperclassman years. Here we are freer in our choice of courses and consequently are scattered and divided but the bond of unison of the class of fifteen is eternally indissoluble. Historian.Steve Crump J. E. Owens . C. M. Davis George Whitehead B. H. Smith Junior Class OFFICERS President Vice-President Secretary; Historian . ChaplainMEMBERS Abbct. Phillips..................... Abelson. Isadcre.................... Abney, Howard Teasley ... Allen. Georce Dickinson ... Bassett, Noble Paul................. Birch. Georce Snider, Jr............ Blumenthal. Elliott .... Boorstin, Mendle.................... Broyles, Edwin Nash................. Burfcrd. Ashton .................... Burckhardt. John Georce .... Burrage. Clarence Hill.............. Callaway. Albert Victor . Chandler, Farisii Carter Tate . Claussen. John Christian Henry . Cccke, Ecbert Erle.................. Coker. Ross Wilson.................. Crocker. Clarence Newell . . . . David, Roy Cornelius................ Davis. Charles Barney............... Davis. Charles Milton............... Davis. Joel Joseph.................. Dozier. Laurens Gilmer.............. Fcrt. William Ray................... Franklin, Marvin Aucustus . Gillis. Neil Lee.................... Griffith. Robert Jenkins . . . . Gunn. John McKenzie................. Hains. John Thcmas.................. Hardin. Edward John................. Hastings. William Raymond . . . . Head, Broadus Jennings . . . . Hirshberc. Julian Rich.............. Hodgson, Hugh Leslie................ Howard. William Linton . . . . Howell. Clark, Jr................... Hulsey. Hal......................... Hutton. Malcolm M................... Jacobson. Charles Wells . . . . Jenkins, Walter Thomas . . . . Jones, Guy Randolph................. Jones, Percival Connally . Lester. Louis....................... Little. Bird........................ Martin, Milward Wyatt............... Mathews, Harcld Henry . . . . Miller. Frank Oliver................ Miller. Stephens Grady.............. Arls Irreg. Art . . . . Arls . . . Science Agriculture Agriculture Arls . . Arls . . . Arls . Science Arls . . . . Foreslry Science Agricullure Civil Eng. Education Education . Civil Eng. Arls . . . . Agriculture Arls . . . Agriculture Irreg. Arts . . . Agriculture Arts . . . Arls Irreg. Science Agricullure . Arls . . . Arts . . Agricullure Agriculture Arls . . . Science Arts . . . Arts . . . Arts . . . Arch. Eng. Arts . . . Arts . . . Agriculture . Agriculture . Arts . . . Agriculture Arls . . Arts . . . Civil Eng. Arls . . . Louisville Atlanta . Athens Brunswick Ft. Valley . Macon Savannah Covington . Atlanta Brunswick . Atlanta Demoiest Atlanta Commerce . Augusta Dawson . Rome Atlanta Danielsville . Tennille . Atlanta . Tifton Thomson Morrow . Athens . Covena Athens . Culhberl Augusta Gainesville . Atlanta Gainesville . Atlanta Athens T homson Atlanta . Atlanta Savannah . Tennille . Valdosta . Norcross Midville . Atlanta . Duluth Decatur . Comer . Athens . ChoestoeMitchell. Stephens............... Moon. Erastus Franklin Moss. John Hill.................. McConnell. Bright .... McGowan. Henri Charbonnier . McLain, William Kenneth . Nathan. Joseph................ Overstreet. Edward Kinchley Owens. Justus Erwin . . . Pedrick. Scott Hicks. . . . Phillips. Matthew Perry . . Ragsdale. Elmo................ Redman, William Morris Riley. Howard Wade .... Seabrcok, Edward Marion. Jr. . Smith. Benjamin Harper Smith. Charles Richter . Sparks. Willis Breazal . . . Stanley, William Kinnebrew . Timberlake. Lewis Rumph . . Tolbert. Claud Thomas . Walker. Julian West Wallace. Stephen Bailey . . Walter. Gaines Winningiiam . Ward. Charles Dcuclas . . . Ward. Frank Crawley . Weatherly. Eucene .... Webb, William Gibson . Wesley. Robert Wright West. Linton Burnside . . . Whitehead. Gecrce Stevens Wilson. James Edcar .... Winn. Courtland Simmons . Wood. James Raiford . . Woodall. James Fletcher . Wricht. Homer. Jr............. Arts Atlanta Arts . . Monroe Agriculture Irreg. Athens Agriculture . Commerce Electrical Eng. Augusta Arts Dawson Arts Irreg . . Jesup Arts Sylvania Science Agriculture Quitman Civil Eng. Irreg. Jacksonville. Fla. Agriculture Arts Arts .... Ft. Valley Arts Arts Hilltonia Arts Commerce . . . . Macon Agriculture .... Quitman Sience Irreg. Marshallville Arls Nicholson Arts Arts Locust Grove Arts Science .... Villanow Agriculture .... Lumpkin Arls Athens Arts Arts Lumber City Arts Cuthberl Arls Science .... Thomson Forestry Arts Agriculture . . . . Woodland Agriculture GrantvilleHistory of the Junior Law Class HE law class of 1915 is not perfect by any means. The ones before it were not perfect, and those to come will not be. However, there are among us a few who might be termed hard workers; deemed by the less fortunate as “very smart" or “very bright”; there are some whose intellectual lamps shine with the splendor of a rising sun; some whose lamps are shaded with the dimness of a clouded sun; some who attend class regularly; some who attend occasionally. We are all happy in our new work and shall continue so, because we have that unity of co-operation and that strength of refinement which is the virtue of a sound purpose. We have made mistakes just as all men do. and we have been found fault with; but we have fought with the courage of a victor and victory shall be ours in June, 1915. “It was our fault and our very great fault—and now we must turn it to use; We have forty-million reasons for failure, but not a single excuse! So the more we work and the less we talk the better results we shall get— We have had an Imperial lesson; it may make us an Empire yet."R. B. Wivcatf. Junior Law Class OFFICERS R. B. Wingate.......................................................President J. H. McLean...................................................Vice-President R. B. Davidson......................................................Secretary Henry Howard.................................................... • Historian D. Plaster ..............................................................Poet G. PlGUE.............................................................ChaplainMEMBERS Adams. Otis Hill ...................................................................Covington Anderson, C. C..........................................................................Wrens Atkinson. William Yates................................................................Newnan Barrett. Clifton Olen.............................................................Barncsville Bond. Hamilton Hickman ..........................................................Danielsville Brouchton, Leonard Gaston.....................................................London. England Camp, Albert Sidney ... Newnan Candler, Thomas Slaughter.........................................................Blairsville Clary, Horace Euland..................................................................Atlanta Cotton, David Lee....................................................................Hamilton Crandall. Fred Robert.................................................................Atlanta Davidson. Rufus Benjamin .........................................................Shady Dale Denham. William B.....................................................................Augusta Gaston, Grady Hill................................................................Gainesville Hawkins, Harry McClesky..............................................................Americus Houser. Wesley ..................................................................Ft. Valley Howard. Henry Grady.................................................................Lexington Huddleston, Gus Alvin..................................................................Senoia Jenkins, Covington Drane.............................................................Columbus Key. William Hicks ................................................................Monticello Link. Ben.............................................................................Athens Lynch, Arthur Joseph.................................................................Columbus Moses, Emmett Tupper................................................. .................Uvalda McKamy. David Knox.....................................................................Dalton McLean, John Hubert...................................................................Douglas Norman. Earle Van Ness.............................................................Washington Peacock, Howell Benajah..............................................................Columbus Picue, Charles Louis Hill............................................................Brooklet Pinkussohn. Lewis A...................................................................Atlanta Plaster, Daniel L.....................................................................Atlanta Rand, James Hall . Athens Reed. Albon Williams.................................................................Athens Sams, Augustine......................................................................Decatur Spence, Nathaniel Cornelius...........................................................Atlanta Swanson. William Theodore.........................................................Blairsville Taylor, Eucene Stoddard Summerville Tillinchast, Arthur Gideon ...........................................................Atlanta Tindal, William McDaniel....................................................Greenville, S. C. Turner. William David...................................................................Jesup Underwood. Sidney Johnston.........................................................Blue Ridge Weathers, Edward Grady.............................................................Glennville Weinkle, Jacob D Albert..............................................................Valdosta Williams, Ferris Markley ...................................................Greenville, S. C. Wincate. Rosier Bunyan.................................................................Athens LAW SPECIALS MacDonell, Alan Morris McDoucald. Alexander Savannah AtlantaR. R. Gecrce Junior Pharmacy Class OFFICERS R. R. George.....................................................................President D. C. Lee.................................................................Vice-President W. H. Owen......................................................................Secretary) J. HOROVITZ Historian MEMBERS Aaron, Eucene Carson.................................................................Lyons Barrow, Willis Erasmus ...........................................................Reynolds Barrow, William Gantt.............................................................Reynolds Busbee, Hubert H...............................................................Hogansville Georce. Roy Robert ............................................................Gainesville Hawkes, James L................................................................Winterville Horovitz, Isidore . . . . '................................................Savannah Jenkins, Julius ..............................................................Wrightsville Johnson, Clifford..............................................................Hogansville Johnson, Max Welton................................................................Thomson Kelley, Thomas Jefferson ...........................................................Athens Lee, Daniel Carr..................................................................Brooklet McMillan, William Vernon, Jr.......................................................Atlanta Owen. Wayland Hoyt..................................................................Athens SlDBURY, HALLJE WlLL........................................................Ashton. N. C.History of the Junior Pharmacy Class THE 1915 Junior Pharmacy Class has accomplished under the guidance of the Faculty a record of which none of the preceding classes can boast. Even though we are only 8 in number, yet with each conscientiously and earnestly striving to succeed, we have attained a great deal as the result of our efforts. In reviewing the year’s work during which we have rolled many pills and made mucilages (some of which were very sticky), we were often handicapped by problems of great difficulty, but being determined in our efforts and endowed with the “Georgia Spirit ’, we never forsook our duties until the goal of success was reached. Although the youngest department at the University, we are not only to be commended for our work in the class room, but taking into consideration our numbers, the manner in which we contributed to the band, football, baseball, and many other phases of literary and athletic activity. During the course of the year, not only have we been taught to be exact and to exercise care in all of our undertakings, but we have also been taught “Et docere et rerum exquirere causas”. Having satisfied ourselves that we have completed a most successful year, predicting a bright future, and having as our motto "Alta Petens”, we leave behind us a record that is yet to be surpassed by those who will succeed us. Historian.Sophomore Class OFFICERS Chas. Thompson...................... Hollis Lanier........................ John Nicholson...................... Bob Calloway ....................... President Vice-President Historian Chaplain History of the Sophomore Class T becomes the duty of the historian of a class to try to portray the good traits and to omit the bad traits of his class. As historian of the Class of 1916. my task is easy. There are so many good traits that the only difficulty is to select from them those which should be set forth; the bad ones on the other hand are so few that it is no trouble to omit them. The Class of 1916 arrived in Athens in September, 1913, full of vigor and hope, and with a larger enrollment than that of any previous class. During our Freshman year we acted very much as other Freshmen, painted thewaSP town, wore red caps, bought chapel scats, built bon hres, etc., and in general made a good record in all branches of college activities. When our Sophomore year began we celebrated it in “tonsorial" style by cutting the raven locks of “hreshic”. Many a new man had to give up his treasured hair to our fast flying clippers. In other branches we continued the good work of the year before. In speaking contests, in scholarship, in athletics, we are the equal, if not the superior of any preceding class and it is with a most excellent record behind us that we enter upon the new duties that we are to fulfill as upper classmen. Ever among the leaders in college spirit, and with the love and glory of our institution in our hearts, we go forth with the determination to do our best in the new field that opens before us. Historian. MEMBERS Aderhold, William Burton.............. Allen, Charles Wesley................. Allen. Henry Dawson, Jr............... Andrews, Acnew........................ Andrews, Huch Ector................... Armistead. Arthur Samuel.............. Arnold, Harry Maxwell................. Atkins, Laurence Comer................ Banks, Barham Donald.................. Barlow, William Wallace............... Baxter. Andrew Harvey................. Belser. Richard Jefferson............. Bennett, Ernest Kontz................. Bond, Farrar Washington............... Branson. Phil......................... Brinson, Remer Young.................. Brooks. Clive......................... Brown. Harry Emerson.................. Brown, Herman Judson.................. Brown. Harry Lowrance................. Brown, Henry Warren................... Buffington, Herbert E................. Burns. William Arnold................. Bush. Newton Gale.................... Buiterly, John Joseph................. Calhoun, Herbert Ong.................. Callaway, Robert Lee. Jr.............. Camp. Lamar Perkerscn................. Campbell. William Theodore . . . . Clements. Horace McCall............... Collins. Morris William Hallowell . . Collins. William Olin................. Cczart. Alfred Martin................. Education . Arts .... Science Science Irreg. Agriculture Arli . . . Science Arls . . . Arli . . . Agriculture Civil Eng. Science Irreg. Arli . . . Arli . . . Commerce Irreg. Civil Eng. . Science Arli . . . Agriculture . Agriculture Science Arli . . . Agriculture Agriculture Aril Arli . . . Arli . . . Arli . . . Agriculture Civ il Eng. Agriculture Agriculture Science Commerce . . Shellman . Millcdgeville . . Cuthber! . Millcdgeville . . Atlanta . . Monroe Gainesville . . Grantville . . Cochran . . Atlanta . . Atlanta Waycrois Alheni Atheni . . Stillmore . . Royslon . . . Dallas . . Elberton Flowery Branch . . Atlanta . . Gillsville . . Commerce . Barnesville . Wrightsville . Atlanta Atheni . . . Dallas . . Atlanta . Buena Vista . . Atlanta . Douglasville . . Augusta fPJ u jr i UJ TD I n iil liffift Crump, Stephen Alexander. Jr..............Art Daniel, Jackson Lee........................Art Davis, Joseph Shelton, Jr..................Art Dennis. Joseph Littleton. Jr...............Agriculture Macon Millen Albany Atlanta Dimmock, Avary Miller.......................Agriculture..............................Atlanta Dolcater. John Henry........................Science Irreg...........................Columbus Dorsey. Edward Hill.........................Science...................................Athen» Doughty. Rocer Gamble.......................Science..................................Augusta English, Louis Caple . Fales, Ira ... Farmer. Lewis Turner Firor. Georce Henry Folsom. Leon Lamar . Fox, Lawrence James . Frye. Henry Lee . . . Civil Eng...............................Warrenlon • Arts.....................................Douglas • Arts..................................Louisville . Agriculture................................Athens • Arts.......................................McRae • Arts.....................................Atlanta . . Agriculture..........................Clarkesville Garmany. Wirt Winters........................Science Irreg.............................LaFayetle Goldsmith. Carl..............................Art ........................................Atlanta Gowa.n. Charles, Lee.....................Agriculture Irreg............................Athens Greenfield. Paul Faver....................Arts........................................Atlanta Gresham. Wilder Quinton...................Science Irreg..................................Rome Griffin, William Abbott......................Arts.......................................Valdosta Grubbs. Harry Lee............................Civil Eng. Irreg.............................Jesup Gurley, Blake ...............................Art .....................................Loganville Hammond. Robert Lee..........................Arts........................................Jackson Harris. Richard Foster.......................Art ...........................................Rome Harris. William Norris.......................Science........................................Rome Hasty, William Dozier........................Agriculture.............................Chickamauga Henderson. John Greene.......................Civil Eng....................................Ocilla Hendricks, Terrie Nichols...................Arts......................................Nashville . Agriculture................................Toccoa . Arts.......................................Girard Arts....................................Savannah . Science.....................................Macon . Arts Irreg................................Atlanta . Arls . Cuthberl . Commerce....................... . . Gainesville . Commerce Ire?..............................Dawson . Arts......................................Atlanta Arls......................................Athens Lanier. Ben Hollis...........................Science .............................Americus Lanier. Fleetwcod............................Agriculture..................................Athens Loncino, James Charles.......................Arts .......................................Fairbum Malone. Kirby Smith....................... Marshburn, Robert Jordan .... Martin, Louis Key...................... Metcalf. Alston Mitchell .... Miller. William Paul................... Moon, Steve Clay .......................... Hill. Pope Russell.............. Hillis. William Douchty Holleman. Oscar Eugene . . . Holmes, Champ Holt.............. Holtzendorff. Preston Br:cks. Jr. Hood, Burke..................... Hosch. Ralph Belk............... Jennincs, Henry Smith .... Jones, Bolling Henry. Jr. . . . Kytle. Hansel Curtino .... Agriculture................................Monticello Arts......................................Barnesville Arls...........................................Athens Forestry.......................................Athens Agriculture..................................Columbus Agriculture....................................Athens Morgan, John Guy.....................................Agriculture Mansfield •m McCaskill, Allen Robert.......................Agriculture...............................Bainbridge McDoucall, William Lowndes....................Arts.........................................Atlanta McWhorter, Georce Ellsworth .... Agriculture.............................................Brunswick Nall, C. C., Jr...............................Arts.....................................Lutherville Nash. Davis Acton.............................Agriculture................................Philomath Newton, Henry Edcar...........................Civil Eng..............................Gabbettsville Newton, John Thompson.........................Educ. Irreg.................................LaGrange Nicholson, John Walter........................Agriculture...................................Athens Paddock, David Fleming........................Agriculture.........................Brooklyn. N. Y. Parrish, Guy Ashley...........................Science ........................................Adel Peacock. Albert Byron ........................Science.....................................Columbus Peacock. Thomas Gerald........................Arts.....................................Barnesville Perry, John Iverson...........................Science......................................Atlanta PESS1N. LOUIS.................................Forestry............................New York, N. Y. Powell. Henry Asbury..........................Arts ... Fitzgerald Powell. John William..........................Arts..........................................Newnan Price, William Pinckney.......................Science.......................................Athens Purcell, Jones................................Agriculture..................................Lavonia Purdom. John Mason, Jr........................Agriculture...............................Blackshear Quarterman, William Henry. Jr.................Arts..........................................Winder Ramsay, Thomas Clyde..........................Arts..........................................Toccoa Rawson. Clarence Weaver.......................Science.......................................Athens Rawson, William Allen.........................Arts Irreg...................................Atlanta Ray, James Morgan.............................Science Irreg...............................Commerce Ray, James Wilmer.............................Arts..........................................Monroe Richbourc. William Alison.....................Arts.................................Liberty, S. C. Roberts. Madison Hines........................Science................................Milledgeville Rutherford, William Fred............... Scott, Milton Candler.................. Segall, Max Leon....................... Slade, Richard Williams, Jr............ Smith, Herman Walton................... Smith, LaFayette Richmond .... Smith, Theodore Hammond................ Sorrells, William Holman............... Stewart. Joseph Spencer. Jr............ Tanner. Charles Mabry, Jr.............. Tate, Edmund Brewer.......................Science Torbett. Ralph Sommerkamp.................Arts Agriculture.............................Union Point Arts........................................Decatur Arts.....................................Mt. Vernon Civil F.ng................................Columbus Civil Eng.................................Thomson Agriculture.................................Clayton Science.....................................Atlanta Agriculture..................................Athens Science......................................Athens Arts....................................Carrollton . Elberton ...............................Columbus Vann, Harry Adoniram...........................Arts..........................................Boston Veatch, Curry LaFayette........................Agriculture ...................................Trion Walker. Pierre Gautier.........................Agriculture..................................Madison Wash, William Robert...........................Elec. Eng....................................Atlanta Watson, William Mobley.........................Science ................................Hawkinsville West, Henry Haynes.............................Science Irreg.................................Athens Wilder. Cecil Norton...........................Agriculture...................................Pelham WlLEY, HENRY GtBBS.............................Agriculture..............................Eastanollee Wcodward, Charles William......................Arts.........................................JacksonThe Soph’more Calls (Wilh apologies to Tennyson and Junior law Weinkle.) The Soph'more calls in Freshman halls And dormitories old in error. The Freshman quakes, his weak knee shakes. And the wild pompadour leaps in terror. Snip, scissors, snip—set the cute curlies flying! Snip, scissors; protest Freshie; lying, crying, sighing. O hark I O hear! How sharp and sere. And sharker, seercr. keener slicing! On blor.d and black, with crunch and whack, The barber shears the locks unsplicing. Snip, let us see the top-knot whiskers flying. Snip, scissors; protest Freshie; lying, crying, sighing. O kid. they rip. they clip, and zip. From chapter house to old New College; Our clippers roam from dome to dome. With zeal that speaks experience’s knowledge. Snip, scissors, snip—set the cute curlies flying! Snip, scissors; protest Freshie; lying, crying, sighing. V. Victor.History of the Freshman Class N writing the history of a class it is customary to enumerate all the advantages that it has over the other classes in college. I shall try to record in the history of this class some of the reasons why we Freshman should feel proud of our class. On September 17, 1913, the Class of 1917 began its career at the University of Georgia. They were given a warm welcome by the Sophomores and were not given time to become well acquainted with their surroundings before being introduced to all the hardships of Freshmen. Soon they knew what scissors and paddles could do. It did not take them long to organize into a strong class and to avenge their wrongs however. The old saying, “He who laughs last, laughs best.” has finally come true. 1 he Freshmen, tormented in the first part of the year by the Sophomores, have more than repaid their tormenters by defeating them in the annual pushball game. By defeating the Sophomores in pushball and holding the first Freshman banquet ever held without interruption, the Class of ’ 17 has accomplished something which no Freshman class before it has ever succeeded in doing and has gained a name imperishable in the history of the University. Of the Class of ’17, their professors say—without reserve—that this is the best class they have ever seen at the University. Their records alone stand as a proof of this. They have been well represented in athletics, having men both on the football and the baseball teams. They have made an equally good record in other branches of athletics. With this excellent beginning the Class of '17 promises to make a record of which the University of the Empire State of the South may be justly proud. Historian.Freshman Class OFFICERS T. M. Murphy Tom Thrash C. R. Fawcett President Vice-President HistorianVffti ]l III 1 1 1 11 • 1 •{ MEMBERS Alexander. Emory DeWitt.....................Agriculture..............................LaFayette Ammons. Robert M.........................Science...................................LaGrange Amster, Walter Howard.......................Arts.......................................Atlanta Andrews. John Partlow.......................Elec. Eng.........................Greenwood. S. C. .....................Valdosta ................ . Nashville ......................Atlanta ......................Atlanta ......................Madison ......................Madison ......................Atlanta ......................Atlanta Bennett, William Herbert....................Medicine.....................................Avera .....................Rockmart ......................Atlanta .................... Savannah ......................Augusta ......................Thomson ......................Atlanta . Newport News, Va. .....................Elberlon ...................Louisville Ashley. John Gordon......................Science Avera. Harmon Quinton....................Arts . . Baker. Ernest Battle.....................Commerce Baker. William Pope......................Medicine . . Baldwin. Carter Shepherd.................Arts . . Baldwin. Georce Feacin...................Arts . . Barnes. Paul.............................Science Irreg. Beall, Arthur Charles ...................Agric. Irreg. Bidez, Ernest Bass.........................Science Black. Eucene Robert. Jr...................Arts . . Blumenthal. Isadore........................Forestry Boardman, Alonzo Plumb.....................Science . Boyd. John Stovall.........................Arts . Brady. James Esmonde.......................Science Braxton, Elliott Meese......................Agriculture Brown. Edcar Chandler......................Agriculture Brown. James Franklin, Jr..................Arts Brown, Walter Scott..........................Agriculture........................Mountain Scene Buck wald, Nathan............................Civil Eng...................................Athens Burdett, J. R. Jr............................Commerce Irreg............................Tennille Carey. William Curtis........................Agriculture ..............................Bostwick Carmical. John Huland........................Arts.................................College Park Carter. Robert Kelso.........................Science .....................................Meigs Case, Charles William........................Civil Eng...................................Athens Clements. James Rudolph......................Science....................................Eastman Clyatt. Arthur Buren.........................Science .................................Nashville Coffee. John T...............................Agriculture ...............................Eastman Coleman. John Scott..........................Science....................................Augusta Colquitt. Hopson Felix.......................Science .................................Lexington Cothran. James Sproull.......................Science Irreg.....................Abbeville. S. C. Cox. Gecrce Robinson.........................Science.....................................Monroe Crews. Ncrman Clyde..........................Civil Eng. Irreg............................Athens CubBEDCE. Beafort Barnweli...................Science ..................................Savannah Curtis. William Neel............................ Agriculture.............................Athens David. Jchn Conincham........................Science....................................Decatur David. Frank Columbus........................Agriculture ..............................Columbus Davidson. Francis Florence Delkin. Frederick Ladd . DeLaperriere, Arthur Leon Drexel. Eugene Paul . . Dunn, Henry Mitchell . . Agriculture..............................Shady Dale Arts.........................................Atlanta Agriculture ................................Hoschton Agriculture...................................Tifton Arts........................................Savannah . ii iii Dunn. Thomas Eugene . . Dusenbury. John Calhoun . Ellis. Roland. Jr.......... Evans. Beverly Daniel. Jr. . Everett. John Estes . . . Fawcett. Alexander Robert Fields. Dozier Nelson . . Fort. Frank Leslie . Foster, Joseph Douclas Foy, Inman Murphy . Fraser. Ames Harvel . Gary. Martin Witherspoon Georce. Edward Tarply . Garrard. William Thomas, Jr. Gillespie. Henry Thomas Gljsson, Percy Warren . Goldsmith. Lauren . . Hall. Orville Duane . . . Harbin. Robert Maxwell . Harper. Charles Henry. Jr. . Harrington. Archibald Orme Harris. Roy Vincent . . Harrison. Miller Thurman Harvey. Harlow Williamson Hatch. James Milo . . . Hathorn. DeWitt Donald Hodges. Kenneth Bryant . Holland. Robert Norris . Hollincsworth, Ernest . Hudson, John Franklin . Hutson. Roy DeWitt . . Jewett, Howard Cassitt . Johnston. Jack Allen . . Jones. Thomas Benjamin Jones. William Clyde . . Kemp. Georce Guy . . Kemp, Hoyle Newton Kirkland. Thomas Presly . Kluch, Walter G. . . . Koch, Charles Aucust. Jr. . Kravitch, Aaron . . . Lamb. Lowry Harris, Jr. . Lanier. George Wilson . Lasseter, Horace Shelby Lenhardt. James Blanton . Levington. Henry . . . Levy, Irvine Morris . Liles. Brian............... Lccan. Harry Brown Lowrey, James Allen, Jr. . Arts . . Agriculture Arts ArU . . Agricullure ArU . . ArU . . ArU . . ArU . . Agriculture Arts . . Science Agricullure . Science . Science Irrcg. Science Irreg. ArU . . , Agriculture ArU . . . Arts . . . Civil Eng. ArU . . Science Agricullure ArU . . . Science Irreg. ArU . . . ArU Irreg. . ArU . . Civil Eng. Education Agriculture Agric. Irreg. Commerce Agriculture Agriculture . Agriculture . Science Irreg. Agriculture Agriculture Arts Irreg. . Science . Science Agriculture Agriculture Medicine Science Agricullure Agricul. Irreg. ArU . . . Cuthbert . . Savannah Macon Atlanta . . Bullards . Savannah McDonough . . Morrow Roswell Statesboro . . Atlanta Augusta Morrow Millcdgeville Maysville . Palatka. Fla. . . Atlanta Carnesville Calhoun . . Zebulon . West Point . . . Wren. Zebulon Athens Augusta Atlanta Albany Marietta Athens . . Macon . . Bremen Macon Franklin. N. C. . . Valdosla . . Mansfield Marietta Powder Springs Douglas Toccoa . New York . . Savannah Summerville . . Athens Athens . Carnesville Savannah Athens Toccoa Rome . . Dawson Lufburrow. Thomas Watson...................Science...................................Oliver Maddox. Henry Aldine.......................Science Irreg............................Jackson Marceson. Robert Morrison..................Science...................................Atlanta MaRSHBURN, N. E.. Jr.......................Arts....................................LaGrange Michael, David.............................Arts......................................Athens Miller. Charles Cox........................Agriculture.............................Richland Milstead. Andrew Jackson...................Science.........................Tallassec, Ala. Mocre. Marvin Pink.........................Arts.....................................Carlton Morris. Lawrence White.....................Science .................................Thomson Moss. Rufus Lafayette......................Agriculture...............................Athens Moultrie. Luther Gwaltney..................Arts .... Rome Mundy, John Ellis..........................Arts...................................Jonesboro Murphy, Edwin LeCount......................Arts....................................Waycross Murphy. Thomas Meyer.......................Arts.....................................Atlanta McClellan. Francis Otey....................Arts......................................Athens McDougaLD. Donald OutlanD..................Arts .................................Statesboro McGehee. Allen Clements....................Science ................................Columbus MacIntyre. William Fraser..................Agriculture..........................Tbomasville McLaws, Lafayette..........................Arts....................................Savannah McWhorter. Howard Hart ....................Science...................................Athens Neal. Bernard Neeson.......................Science..................................Atlanta Nunnally. John Elam........................Science...................................Monroe O'Kelley, Thomas Landrum...................Arts................................Danielsville Oliver. John Edwin.........................Arts.....................................Atlanta O'Neal. Alan Smith.........................Arts Irreg............................Blackshear Orme. Charles Dickerson ...................Arts.....................................Atlanta Osborne, Derry Bellum. Jr..................Science..................................Atlanta Paine, Leon Alexander......................Science . Valdosta Patman. Louis..............................Arts......................................Athens Parker. Clyde Lee..........................Agriculture..............................Royston Parrish. Henry Homer.......................Agriculture..............................Quitman Pearlman, Julius...........................Science Irreg...................Key West. Fla. Penny, Leonard Dennis......................Arts. Irreg...............................Vienna PeTREE. Russell Ra.no......................Agriculture.....................Powder Springs Philips, Vernon Philip.....................Arts..................................Springvale PlNCKHARD, Edward Swanson..................Science.................................LaGrange Quattlebaum. Julian Killen.................Arts..................................Statesboro Rf.id, Marion McKenzie ....................Arts...................................Montezuma Reynolds. Heman Perry......................Arts .................................Waynesboro Robison. Thomas Elwood.....................Science Irreg............................Jackson Rogers, Dallas Vance.......................Arts....................................Rochelle Rogers, Walter McDowell....................Arts......................................Baxley Rothschild, Maurice Dorn...................Commerce................................Columbus Sanford. Shelton Palmer....................Arts......................................Athens Saye. Georce Paul..........................Agriculture....................................T ate Scott. Roy.................................Science ................................Columbus Seacraves. Carl............................Arts........................................Hull Sealy. James Robert........................Agriculture...............................Edison Selig. Albert Steiner......................Science..................................Atlanta Shippen. Frank Truman......................Forestry..................................ElhjaySims. Roff, Jr............................. Arts .........................................Atlanta Sizer. William Salter.........................Science......................................Athens Skelton, Emmett Arnold........................Agriculiure................................Hariwell Slappey. GeoRCE HlLEY.........................Arts..................................Marshallville Smith. Green Ralph............................Commerce.....................................Winder Smith. John Roy ..............................Commerce.....................................Winder Smith. Thomas Jefferson.......................Arts .........................................McRae Sparks. Francis Linton........................Aris.........................................Athens Stapler. Walter Stevens.......................Science Irreg.................................Macon Steed, William Walter.........................Science Irreg................................Butler Sturdivant. Edwin Robinson....................Science..................................Carrollton SULLIVAN, Fred Paul...........................Agriculture................................Culloden Tabor, Willard Parker.........................Arts...................................Danielsville Thompson, Charles Eucene......................Commerce....................................Atlanta Thompson, Calvin Hall.........................Science..................................Greensboro Thorn, Howard Parker .........................Science.....................................Atlanta Thrash, Thomas Atkinson.......................Arts.....................................Greenville Towns. GeoRCE Thomas..........................Agriculture...........................Holguin, Cuba Tucker, Warren Hubert.........................Agriculture..................................Ocilla Tupper. Maxwell Overton.......................Science.....................................Atlanta Turner. Paul Charles..........................Science...................................McDonough Upshaw. Daniel Hess...........................Agriculture .................................Monroe Walker. Ralph.................................Science...................................Ellaville Wallace. Earl Clayton.........................Science...................................Brunswick Watson, Forrest Francis.......................Science.....................................Atlanta Watson. Oscar David...........................Agriculture..............................Loganville Watson, Reddinc Pate..........................Science ...............................Hawkinsville Westbrook. Austin Sequard.....................Science....................................Commerce Westbrook. George Hall........................Science....................................Commerce WllELCHEL, WlLUAM PlNCKNEY....................Arts....................................Gainesville White. William Osmonde........................Arts.......................................Savannah V|ER. WlLLIAM Alex...........................Science......................................Athens Willet. Hugh Miller. Jr.......................Science.....................................Atlanta Williams, Mose McConnell......................Arts.........................................Auburn Williford, John Aubrey........................Science....................................Commerce Wilson, Shelton Elliott, Jr...................Medicine...................................Savannah Wingate. Harry Lynnwood.......................Agriculture.................................Camilla Wingate. William Gordon.......................Agriculture.................................Camilla Wricht, Peter Burum...........................Medicine....................................AugustaHistory of the One-Year Class in Agriculture HEN in the course of college events it becomes necessary for a class to complete four years work in one, that class must be composed of exceptional men. The fact that its membership is small furnishes conclusive proof that the work is difficult and worthy of the efforts of our best men. The Class of ’ 1 3 was much larger than that of ’14, but only a small per cent, of the former were capable of earning a diploma from the professors. This year has been, for us, a year of work crowned at the last with success. We devoted our minds to our work, but as a bird flies against the wind, we also worked against many difficulties. Now we are conquerors of the “One Year Course in Agriculture” and are able to improve the soil, increase its yields, and multiply the value of its products. We regret to leave our Alma Mater, after so short a stay and were it not for the fact that we realize, “ I ime and opportunity wait for no man”, we would bask in the sunlight of knowledge four full years. We have, however, spent a most profitable year and shall always remember the teachings of our text books, the advice of our professors, and the friendship of our comrades. Historian. One Year Agriculture Class L. M. Murray W. H. Hosch W. L. Bradbury R. L. Waters . OFFICERS President Vice-President Secretary Historian MEMBERS G. B. Adams, Godfreys. Ga. W. C. Adams. Mansfield. Ga. W. L. Bradbury, Athens. Ga. L. H. Booker, Washington. Ga. W. H. Hosch, Hoschton. Ga. F. C. House. Gillsville, Ga. H. L. Holden, Athens. Ga. F. E. Martin. Blakely, Ga. L. M. Murray, Newnan. Ga. I. L. Newscm. Eatonton. Ga. R. W. Partee. Rome. Ga. T. F. RoeseL. Augusta. Ga. R. L. Waters, Brooklet. Ga. J. E. Whatley. Reynolds. Ga. B. F. Gaines. Harlville, Ga.fey  yii • •; i .• Agri—culture % "The object 1 have in view is not to teach materialism. Far from it, but through applied education to institute an agricultural and industrial renaissance which will insure the largest amount of pleasure, success, comfort and achievement to the greater number. "Poets, scholars, artisans, sculptors, all have drawn their inspiration, their beauty of thought and expression, and their finest conceptions of life from Nature. Any one who favors scientific research, represents development and culture in the highest sense of that word’s application to our modern life. His creed is to teach men how best to earn a living, how to use what they have conservatively and effectively, to be patriotic, contented with their lot, and thus add to the permanency of civilization"—President Andrew M. Soule. What’s What College of Agriculture reorganized 1907-08. Increase in attendance from about nil in 1906. to 468 in 1914. During past seven years 1828 persons have been instructed at the College. Staff now composed of 48 live ones. Extension-Demonstration wing had nearly 25.0C0 Georgians doing it as per instructions, in 1913 14. Practically every reading farmer in the state was reached with a column or more agricultural information each week during school session, by use of about 200 papers. Right around 10,000 corn club boys have again been enrolled. Near 4.000 girls have been enlisted in girls' work this year. Over 10.000 Georgia farmers are doing demonstration or co-operative work under direction of College. One hundred and six corn club boys used scholarships to short course, also 26 canning club girls. College is cultivating about 350 acres of poor land and making a handsome profit. College started eight years ago with nothing. Now has an outfit valued at $400,000. People of stale are glad to slake their money on the College. More than $65,000 was raised among the people of Georgia for the College to use in extension-demonstration work last year. The Extension Department held 949 meetings in 148 counties that were attended by 218,063 people in 1913. Extension Schools were attended by 4.710 people; 109 farmers' institutes were attended by 31.778 people, and miscellaneous meetings were attended by over I2.0C0 people in 1913. Boys’ Corn Club meetings. 643 in number, we-e attended by 83.792 people, and 137 canning clubs were attended by 10.274 people in 1913.The 14 Crop Nf rinc Maturity OVA If!? 4fl' What Agricultural Graduates are Doing 1909 Chastain, T. G.. Athens. Ga., Agricullural Agent for Central of Georgia Railroad. Dobbs, W. F., Athens. Ga., Agent for American Coal Products Company. GlUES, J. K., Athens, Ga., Assistant Stale Agent for Farmers' Co-operative Demonstration Work. Nixon, R. L., Washington. D. C.. Department of Markets. Starr, D. S., Trimble. Ga.. Cotton Breeding Work for H. G. blastings Seed Co. 1910 Ball, W. F., Fitzgerald, Ga., Operating a l.aundry. FlIZPATRlCK, T. M.. Jefferson, Ga., Farm Demonstrator for Jackson Co. GlBSON, W. M., Augusta. Ga., Head of Manufacturing Plant. Harbcr, T. A., Commerce. Ga.. In Automobile Business. Sell, E. S., Athens. Ga.. Editor and Professor at State Normal School. Starr, S. H., Brunswick. Tenn.. Superintendent of Bolton College. 1911 BaKER, EuCENE. Monroe. Ga., Professor of Agriculture at Fifth District A. M. School. MlLLER, J. H.. Waihington, D. C.. U. S. Department of Agriculture. McLemore. C. H.. Spring Station, Ky.. Manager of Slock Farm. Rast, L. E., Athens. Ga.. in charge of Cotton Industry Department, Stale College of Agriculture. Whatley. W. F.. Helena. Ga., Farming in Telfair County. RtCE. G. E., Atlanta. Ga., German Kali Company. 1912 ACREE, W. G., Madison. Ga.. Superintendent of Eighth District A. M. School. Brinson, B. L.. Slillmore, Ga., Farming in Bulloch County. CltlLDS, R. R., Athens. Ga., In charge of Plat Work in South Georgia. Gay, M. C.. Clarkesvillc. Ga.. Superintendent of Ninth District A. M. School. HUTCHESON, R. O., Farmington, Ga.. Farming in Oconee County. KcllOCK, J. T., Charleston, S. C.. Working with Tuxbury Lumber Company. WHELCHEL, R. F.. Granite Hill. Ga.. Professor of Agriculture at Tenth District A. M. School. 1913 Ballard. R. L., Ashburn, Ga., Farm Demonstrator and Farming in Turner County. Bennett, w. T., Savannah, Ga.. Assistant Agricullural Agent for Central of Georgia Railroad. BoYETT, W. J., Morris Station, Ga., Farm Demonstrator for Randolph and Quitman Counties. Garrison. F. D.. Clarkesville. Ga., Professor of Agriculture at Ninth District A. M. School, and Farm Demonstrator for Habersham County. Howard, R. P., Baywood. La.. Teaching in Bajwood. La. Liddell, J. G., Athens. Ga.. With Bondurant Hardware Company. WaTSON, L. S., Athens, Ga., In charge of Plat Work in North Georgia. Williams. J. B., Fort Valley. Ga.. Farming in Houston County. Wilson, W. R., Granite Hill. Ga., Teaching at Tenth District A. M. School. WOODRUFF, J. G., Dahlonega, Ga., Professor of Agriculture at N. G. A. C. Worrell. Lloyd, Athens. Ga., Taking Post-graduate Work in Agriculture. YoUNC. J. L., Chicago. III., Doing Investigational Work in the U. S. for the Chinese Government.Wood PathBack to the Farm As commencement comes near it becomes one of the favorite occupations to gather in groups and discuss what the different boys intend doing for the next year. In one of these groups the following conversation was overheard among the Ag. students whom the State is training to go back to the farm and develop her resources. WESTBROOK—“Speaking of something grand—Now ain’t King Andy it? Just think what grand things he has done for the Ag. College and through it for the State. He has all the farmers and all the legislators eating out of his hand. Just wait till I get to be Assistant Professor of cotton -“ Dave Bryant—“King Andy sure is a bird and he sticks to us Ag. fellows too. He’s done told me that I'm going to get one of those three thousand-dollar jobs he’s going to ha e Congress create, and-” Tubby Loyd—“Aw, Dave, you don’t know they’re going to create those jobs. You ought to do like me and get on the good side of one of the Profs. I’ve been after them for four years and I nearly got 'em where I want 'em, and -’’ Skinny Asbury—“Shucks! you don’t know what good living is. Just come down about Crawfordville next year and see how me and my Frau are getting on. She’s got all sorts of money, and I’m-“ E. C. W.—"Yes. but ---------“ PAUL Tabor—-“Old Dr. Reade was after me just yesterday -’’ Nanney—“Pete, you better not cut me out. Here I been bootlicking him all year and if you come butting --’’ “Pop" SUDDETH—“You boy’s don’t know what living is. Me and the girl— You know that baby of mine weighs ------’’ Farmer Davis—“My dad’s got plenty of money and I’m the only child --” Olin WlMBERLEY—“You know what I’m going to do?" SKINNY—“No. what? Go to Milledgeville? ” OLIN—“I’m going to be Chancellor and then they can use the infirmary when ever they get ready. It’s a disgrace-“ CORLEY—"Sh-h-h-h! Not so loud. When I get to be a big league pitcher-’’ E. C. DlLLARD—“Huh. old lady; you’ll never get out of the bushes. I’m going to be a missionary. I here is more money in that." Proctor—“Cut it. You’ll never get away from Athens. If you do I’ll put it in my paper and ----“ Patman—“Ha. ha! Proctor you are so funny. I’m going to-” O’KELLEY—"Well now, speaking of papers. The Ag. Quarterly is going to help me get a place as Assistant in -” Skinny Asbury—“This is a h - - I! of a bunch. How many of you are going to be farmers anyway? I thought that was what you came up here for.” Silence—Silence—and more silence. Finally: AUSTIN—"I go farm. 1 study how farm Ag. College ---“ All—"Shh-hh-h-h! Don’t let anybody hear you. We’ll be disgraced. What if the legislature knew any of us was going back to farming. What’s the use of an education if you are going to farm, anyway? ’’M----- I fir ( ( College Museum “Ladies and Gentlemen, the show is about to begin. You could not well expect to go in without paying, but you may pay without going in. I can say no fairer than that." “Just to the right, ladies and gentlemen, you will see the original and only animal of his kind ever in captivity. We call him Plaster. It took several years to round him up, and he escaped once and was gone a full year. All efforts to tame him have failed. Even the great animal tamer, Mr. Morris Silvy, is said to have given up. “In the next cage you will see one of the rarest birds ever exhibited. He is said to be a specimen of the almost extinct species of ‘snipe-hunters’; he isn’t quite as lively this year as usual due to his former owner having left the show last year, Mr. Ransom you know. But ‘Piggy’, as we call him, is certain to come around under the guidance of his new German trainer. "Across the way is a very strange creature. His chief charm is in his unusual appearance. Entirely harmless, he is a great friend of the children and causes them much amusement by his funny antics. We call him Slappcy on account of the way he knocks at the flies. "Next are the ‘heavenly twins’, Mitchell and Hill. There were three in the collection last year; but Sam W. raised so much disturbance and annoyed the other animals so much that we had to let him go. The remaining two are not quite as bad, but we can hardly stand them. “Farther on is an animal that we hardly know how to classify. He doesn’t come under any species that we have ever dealt with. He has been under I amcr Silvy’s care for the Jast two years and, ‘Gunn’, as he has been r.ick-named, will be presented to the Georgia Bar next June. It is hoped that they will accept him as he is certainly a rare specimen and they already have a large collection to which he will undoubtedly add much. "When we pass to the next platform we will see the two musical freaks of the century, whose performances are fast making them famous. As you see they are very much alike in stature as in disposition. Pennington and ‘Lizzie, Sweet-boy. Dozier’, Fields are indeed very congenial. We are very fortunate in having two such geniuses. "There are a number of other wierd and fantastic animals in this great collection, including Jacobson, the German acrobat; Collins, whose fiery dome is only surpassed by his strong supports; Victor, the author of the constitution; Crafts, who hugged the dean, and many others as freaky."•««Phi Beta Kappa SIE University of Georgia is fast coming to be recognized among the great universities of the country, and many events have occurred which have meant much for Georgia and which have shown the rapid strides which she is making toward a place among the leading Universities. But no single event, not even the recent meeting of the scientists, has ever done more to bring the University of Georgia before the country in a favorable light than the placing of a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. In 1 776, at William and Mary College in Virginia, a little group of men banded themselves together into a society which they called Phi Beta Kappa. Out of this group grew what is to-day the greatest honorary fraternity in the world. This mother chapter was not destined to long life; but before its death it granted to Elisha Parmele charters for chapters at Harvard and Yale, and it is to the chapter at Harvard that the credit is due for keeping alive an institution that should bind together chosen students in the various states for the promotion of “literature, morality and fraternity." The society was at first loath to grant new charters and it was some years before any new chapters were established. Finally, however, there was a change of policy and ever since it has granted charters to such institutions as have advanced enough to be recognized among the leaders. The society was founded on literary principles; but in contrast with most other undergraduate societies of literary or intellectual nature. Phi Beta Kappa is not confined to interests of a single character—a particulai field or a single subject; but stands for a broad interest in intellectual and scholarly pursuits of every kind. And this interest attempts to be impartial by recognizing merit and, in a truly democratic spirit, subordinates personal consideration to those of ability and achievements. While it is the father of the modern Greek letter organization, yet it very soon rose above rivalry with other orders and became more an honorary order. Only those men whose attainments in scholarship have stamped them as leaders in literary fields are admitted to membership and among these have been many of the foremost men of the country. In every phase of life Phi Beta Kappa men stand out pre-eminent and among the wearers of the golden Key have been six Presidents of the United States. The University of Georgia is indeed proud to be admitted into the fold of this great order, and those students who have been chosen are indeed to be congratulated on attaining this greatest honor at Georgia as at all places. The coming of the order means much to the University, and it is but fitting that an order founded in a typical Southern college, the leader of the old South, should be represented in the leading college of the greatest state of the New South. It is to be hoped that the chapter which is launched here this year will maintain the high ideals of the founders and keep alive always the ideals and the principles for which their order was established.vrVH 1 1 III i i i 1 I 1 1 1 • 1 • Phi Beta Kappa CHARTF.R MEMBERS Dr. McPherson Dr. Campbell Dr. Stephens Prof. Geissler. Prcf. Salyer FOUNDATION MEMBERS Chancellor Barrow Prof. Bccock Prof. Hendren Prof. Hooper Prof. Lustrat Prcf. John Morris Prof. Park Dr. White Dr. Woofter Col. Snelling ALUMNI MEMBERS J. T. White. "69, Ailania A. R. Lawton. 77, Savannah. A. L. McRae. '81. Rolla, Mo. T. S. MelL, '78. Athens Elijah A. Brown. 79. Ailania. C. D. Willcox. '80. West Point. N. Y. Mark Cooper Pope, '81. Washington B. J. Conyers. '84. Ailania E. M. Mitchell. '85. Atlanta Robt. L. Foreman. '87. Atlanta. Victor L. Smith, '88. Atlanta E. J. Bondurant, "88. Athens Arthur Heyman. '88. Atlanta T. W. Reed. '88. Athens Preston S. Arkwright. '90. Atlanta J. N. Holder. '90, Jefferson Marion Hull, '91. Atlanta S. B. Yow, '94, Lavonia W. A. Harris. '95. Macon G. H. Boccs. '96. Atlanta F. S. Jones. '96. Bainbridge Geo. T. Jackson. “97. Augusta Walter S. Cochran, '97, Rome U. H. Davenport. '98. Athens C. C. Harrold. '98. Macon Deupree Hunnicut.-. '93. Athens Lee Morris, '99. Athens O. L. Keith. 02. Columbia. S. C. W. O. Cheney. '03. Atlanta H. L. J. Williams. ’07. Sewanee, Tenn. J. B. Harris. ’08. Macon G. O. Whelchel, ’08. Atlanta O. P. Beall, "09. Macon Jerome Michael. 09. Athens H. A. Nix. '10. Athens G. L. KELLY, 'll, Milledgeville M. B. Folsom, '12. Harvard L. D. Brown. '12. Sharon V. E. Durden. '12. Graymont E. L. Jackson. '13. Marietta G. L. Williams. '13. Jackson R. H. Freeman, '13. Columbia University ACTIVE MEMBERS E A. Bailey. 14. Valdosta D. K. McKamy, '14. Dalton H. H. Whelchel. '14. Comer R N. Schwab. '14. Atlanta J. S. Myers. ’14. Athens F C. Jordan, '14. MonticelloFlunk-Out Club (Organized ju t after the first report went out.) Motto: "A’c ver A gain" OFFICERS Curtis..............................................................................Chief Executioner Prof. Woofter and Dr. White..................................................................Auiitanh Joe Meyers ..........................................................................Head Bootlicker Bailey .....................................................................................Chaplain MEMBERS "Economics" Bernd "Chemistry Shark” Harden “A+ or Nothing” Whitehead "Dr. Whitey” Whelchel "Lccical" McKamy "Major" Secal "Star Gazer" Von Sprecken "Gloomy" Bailey “Germany John" Wade "Glee Club" Schwab "Try 'em all” Jordan jf „ I 1)1 1 I I 4r Pan-Hellenic Council A. O. B. Sparks, X A K S. A. Cann, - A K E. M. Seabrcok, K A B. H. Chappell. K A Louis Lester, ‘I A O F. C. Jordan, «I» A O I. P. Cocke. A T ) Ashton Burford. A T ft O. S. Pace, 2 X Rcss Coker, X X MEMBERS F. V. Cheney, X H. L. Hodcson, X M' Pinckney Price, K X Fleetwood Lanier, K 2 L. G. Proctor. II K A P. Wright. II K A John Gunn. X X E. J. Hardin. X X Stephens Mitchell, A T A R. D. Short, A T ASicma Alpha Epsilon Sigma Alpha Epsilon Founded at the University of Alabama, 1 856 Beta Chapter established 1867 Colors: Royal Purple and Old Cold H. M. Arnold P. Andrews C. O. Barrett J. Brown A, Boardman S. A. Cann S. A. Crump W. T. Campbell J. S. Danis R. J. de Graffenried R. Doughty H. M. Gannon M. W. Gary L. Goldsmith M. M. Hutton H. M. Hawkins B. H. Lanier J. Milstead W. F. McIntyre P. Merry P. T. Moses E. Nunnally J. M. Ray M. Reid H. Reynolds M. C. Scott A. O. B. Sparks W. B. Sparks M. O. TupperChi Phi R. M. Ammons G. B. Barrett N. P. Bassett R. P. Bassett E. R. Black. Jr. C. M. Brown H. W. Brown E. N. Broyles Founded at Princeton University, 1 824 Eta Chapter established 1867 COLORS: Scarlet and Blue J. S. Coleman W. B. Denham H. M. Dunn Roland Ellis. Jr. W. T. Gilbert H. B. Hodges R. N. Holland Clark Howell, Jr. Alan MacDonell R. L. McWhorter H. H. McWhorter C. D. Orme J. E. Oliver V. A. Rawson T. H. SmithPhillips Abbott V. AtcHINSON E. B. Benson G. S. Birch Dana Blackmar E. M. Braxton B. H. Chappell Kappa Alpha hounded at Washington and Lee, 1865 Gamma Chapter established 1868 H. B. Peacock M. H. Roberts E. M. Seabrook L. P. Shippen R. Sims H. P. Thorne r. F. Watson H. M. Willet, Jr. J. M. Cozart W. R. Flournoy R. J. Griffith A. O. Harrington G. L. Harrison R. B. Hosch J. W. Nicholson J. C. O’Farrell A. B. PeacockPm Delta ThetaPhi Delta Theta Founded at Miami. 1848 Georgia Alpha Chapter established 1871 Colors: Blue and White F. A. Holden E. Hollingsworth C. H. Holmes B. Hood W. Houser H. G. Howard j. A. Johnson F. C. Jordan L. Lester R. J. Marshburn W. K. Meadow C. V. Middleerooks J. E. McDonald W. K. McLain E. V. Norman J. W. Powell A. W. Reed J. S. Stewart. Jr. P. G. Walker L. B. West O. J. WlMBERLEY H. D. Allen H. E. Andrews J. G. Ashley B. D. Banks W. L. Bryan v. H. Burt A. Burford H. C. Brown Alpha Tau Omega Founded at V. M. I.. 1865 Georgia Alpha Beta established 1878 COLORS: Sift Blue and Old Cold J. G. Henderson J. B. Lenhardt W. B. Jenkins R. M. Margeson J. H. McLean J. W. Roddenbery E. A. Skelton J. R. Wood F. R. Crandall I. P. Cocke E. E. Cocke ' R. L. Callaway j. S. Cothran B. D. Evans, Jr. J. F. Hudson rSicm NuSigma Nu Founded at V. M. I., 1869 Mu Chapter established 1881 CcLCRS: Blac!(, While and Old Cold L. G. Broughton. Jr. R. W. Coker W. E. Daley J. I. Davis T. E. Dunn L. C. English L. L. Folsom J. M. Hatch H. S. Jennings O. S. Pace T. G. Peacock E. E. Peacock V. P. Phillips H. W. Riley T. J. Smith E. B. Tate W. M. Tindall D. H. Upshaw J. D. Wade R. P. Watson W. M. Watson W. O. White H. H. WhelchelChi Psi  ui -i Chi Psi Pounded at Union College, 1841 Alpha Delta established 1890 COLORS: Royal Purple and Cold Bond Brady Branson . Cheney S. Y. Coleman (Class L. 1900) D. W. B. Hill J. H. L. Hodgson S. F. O. McClellan G. Moultrie B. Osborne I. Perry P. SanfordT. S. Brand R. J. Belser E. B. Baker V. P. Baker J. B. Conyers A. M. Dimmock J. C. Daniel W. R. Dortch Kappa Sigma Founded Uni ersily of Virginia, 1869 Beta Lambda Chapter established 1901 ' COLORS: Scarlet. Emerald and White W. G. Kleigh K. Fleetwood Lamer W. G. W. Lanier D. L. H. Lamb E. B. Liles R. J. H. Moss F. R. L. Moss E. W. S. Malonf. P. Price F. Paddock L. Semple W. Slade P. Sullivan S. Taylor A. WlERA. V. Calloway O. H. Corley A. L. Df.Laperriere J. H. Dolcater Ceorce Firor A. Frazer H. L. Grubbs R. R. Grubbs Pi Kappa Alpha hounded University of Virginia, 1868 Alpha Mu Chapter established 1908 COLORS: Garnet and Old Cold Flower: Lify of the Valley C. L. Gray F. D. Gray C. H. Harper G. H. Hulme J. G. Liddell (Class of 1913) D. A. Nash W. H. Owens L. G. Proctor Roy Smith Ralph Smith W. K. Stanley J. A. Williford P. B. Wright J. S. WilsonE. Adamson T. L. Asbury E. K. Bennettt U. J. Bennett A. T. Brewer W. A. Burns H. O. Calhoun H. W. Conklin I. M. For Sigma Chi Founded at Miami, 1855 Delta Chapter established 1872 Colors: Blue and Cold W. A. Griffin J. M. Gunn R. R. Gunn E. J. Hardin W. R. Hastings W. E. Hitchcock T. B. Jones M. W. Martin W. P. Miller B. McConnell C. B. McDaniel W. L. McDoucall D. O. McDougald L. A. Paine C. O. Parker J. K. Quattlebaum E. Sturdivant T. A. Thrasht Delta Tau Delta Delta Tau Delta hounded at Bethany College, West Virginia, 1859 Beta Delta Chapter established 1882 COLORS: I'urplc, White and Cold R. Y. Brinson J. C. H. Claussen J. M. Cowart F. C. David H. Hulsey D. C. Lee L. Me Laws S. Mitchell E. K. Overstreet, Jr. E. R. Pund W. H. Quarterman, Jr. T. E. Robison R. D. Short N. C. Spence C. M. Tanner. Jr. G. T. Towns W. R. Wash H. H. West n -TVV A. ai?? 11 l ii| 1 Lil The True Legend of the Toombs’ Oak T was the day before graduation, in the late eighteen-twenties. Bob Toombs, known to friends and more familiar acquaintances as "Robert," sat in a brown study. "Quc fairc ” he mused, having been forced to take the Greek-or-twenty-one course, and thereby gleaning a great deal of f rench pool, and so forth. "It’s awful," he continued, "to be burdened with so common a name as ‘Bob.’ Why in years to come, the college will be overrun with Bobs. There’s Bob I routman, and Bob McWhorter, and Bob Stevens, and Bob Griffith, and Bob Laird, and Bob Raiford, and great Rah-raw Gunn himself. Why, a bushel of ’em will bob up every year," he continued, thoughtlessly falling into the Pen-ningtonian style. "And not content with that, there’ll be such permutations and combinations as Bob Jake Fletcher, and Jim Bob Burch! Why, 1 can’t conceal my disgust at such treatment of my noble name! I’ve got to make it famous.—’’ And the poor fellow’s voice was filled with tears, much as C. R. Smith talks. “I’ve got to do something," he murmured to himself, "or some of those Bobs to come will outshine me. Quc fairc? ’’ And he again lapsed into a Victor-like revery. Suddenly his face lit up. And although some have since tried to deny it. still I think he looked at that instant almost as handsome as Clark Howell on a rainy day. ’Tve got it,” he shouted to himself. And running to the telephone he picked up the receiver, as nervous as Charlie McDaniel just before French exam. "Seven-eleven," he muttered sweetly into the phone, knowing of course trial Skippy would answer that number. "Hello, is Mr. Conyers in?— Oh, is that you, Skip? Say, this is Bob Toombs, ------- Eh? Yes, same old Bob------- Oh, I’ve got it in my pocket right now; pay you next time I see you. ----- "Say, Skip! I saw on the board at Poss’ Place that you are some sort of weather prophet, so I thought you’d be able to help me out on a little scheme.---- If you’re any sort of an oracle at all, Skip." he continued, "you can tell me where the Class of 1908 is going to place that sundial. --- What?-------Oh, it’s just a little scheme I’m working out.-----All right, be sure to let me know.------ in ten minutes?-----Good. Good-bye." One would have thought that young Toombs was on the eve of an exam, in Soph. Math., from the nervous manner in which he paced the floor for the next ten minutes. When the telephone did finally ring, he jumped for it, just as Ruck goes after those long left-field flies. "Yes, this is Bob.---Where?--------Oh, in front of the Chapel. That old shack? Right where the oak tree is now?----All right, much obliged, Skip.----- What?------- Oh. sure. I’ll let you send after my trunk.---- To-morrow morning. New Georgia depot. (It was new then.)------ Good-bve."Down went the receiver, but only for a few moments. Then up again, and Toombs called for the very odd number, “Old seventy-six.” “Hello,” he said, “is this you, Edgar,”—for he recognized that intellectual drawl at once (Yes, Edgar had just started college at that time; hadn't been here but twentv years.)—“Edgar, this is Bob Toombs. I want to ask you a big favor, but I feel sure you'll do it for me.------You’ll be at Commencement exercises in the morning, won’t you?------ Weil. I want you to get up and start speaking about eleven o’clock, won’t you?------ Yes, but stand up on the scat, and give them a little talk on Shakespeare,— Why? Oh. it’s just a little scheme of mine.-------- Yes, talk as long as you want, the longer the bettor.---- "No, 1 won’t tell you.-----I can’t.------Well, if yoa insist. I’ll do so. But you’ll promise first that you’ll do it for me. won’t you?-----All right, here’s the reason: "I’ll have a drygoods box out under the oak tree, and as soon as the crowd starts coming out, I'm going to start making them a speech. You see. it wouldn’t be any use to do it after exercises are over, as 1 wouldn’t get any newspaper write-ups for it,”— lapsing into a George Harrisonian mannerism.— “What?----------- Oh, why do I want you to speak?------ Well, you’ve promised to do it. haven’t you?------- Good. Then I’ll tell you.------I want you to start speaking in order to run them out of the Chapel, so they'll listen to me.----- What? Oh, good-bye.” And laughing at his own little joke, just like Red Collins, he banged down the receiver. Gentle reader, you know the rest. Pennington must have spoken, because tradition says that “fighting Bob” got a great deal of newspaper criticism from Charlie Martin (Gus Sparks had lost his job then) for his little stunt, and the Class of 1908 did put up that sundial, you know. tLMVAVaI 11 1 11 1 1 ij List of Clubs If THE SPHINX SENIOR ROUND TABLE (Sigma Upsilon) JUNIOR CABINET GRIDIRON CLUB THALIANS GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUB GERMAN CLUB SINE AND TANGENT G. M. A. CLUB RIVERSIDE CLUB i l m ID Sphinx OFFICERS Edcar L. Penmnctcn. P. P. Bentley Chappell. K. S. D. R. Peacock, P. H. Ira Funkenstein, Robert L. McWhorter. D. S. B. MEMBERS (146) Russell Patterson (131) D. R. Peacock (117) Edcar L. Pennincton (147) Victor Victor (148) Hoyt W. Whelchel Not in piclure. (145) Aaron B. Bernd (143) Frank Carter (141) Bentley Chappell (142) C. Ira Funkenstein (144) T. Rucker Ginn (135) Robert L. McWhcrterSenior Round Table A. G. Crafts W. R. Fort E. J. Hardin T. N. Hendricks Junior Cabinet Club H. L. Hcdcson Clark Howell M. W. Martin Stephens Mitchell L. A. Pinkusschn C. R. Smith H. H. West G. S. Whitehead J. Raifcrd WcooBeanery Honor Roll Motto: "Don't push; don't pull; hut grab li e Hell" (The following member of the dip-getters association, having spent from 4 to 15 years in deadly and effective service at this great institution, are hereby placed on this Honor Roll so that "he who runs may read".) H. D. Russell. Six years spent as the HEAD grafter D. W. Loyd. First in; busiest; last out S. T. Brewton. Five years made him able to stand a soldier’s life C. E. Martin. He’s a lover; but not at the Beanery E. B. O'Kelley. He has a lean and hungry look that 4 years hasn’t cured E. C. Westbrook. Never fails or hesitates T. J. CcLLINS. Prevents the Beanery from declaring a dividend C. A. Bryant. Gets fuel for an inexhaustible supply of Hot Air F. dcar LecaRE Pen.NINCTON. 15 years without missing a meal D. K. McKaMY. Last and least 4 . i 11 i _ 111 i i i 111 Gridiron Club B. L. Chappell H. G. Howard N W. K. Meadow E. L. Pennincton - A. O. B. Sparks " Frank Carter D. R. Peacock H. D. Russell Georce Harrison T. R. Ginn R. L. McWhorter A. B. Bernd J. D. Wade F. C. Jordan S A. Cann G. B. Barrett F. A. Holden D. K. McKamy Russell Patterson O. S. Pace Turner Brewton Enoch Benson R. P. Bassett C. M. Brown J. 1. Davis H. H. Whelchel Pierce Merry Walker Flournoy H. N. Fuller Victor Victor F. M. Moise R. R. Gunn Dana Blackmar'» 3Thalians IMM IMIM3W? u-i jjjj jJj-ij. Thalians OFFICERS George L. Harrison......................... Clark Howell............................... Lewis A. Pinkussohn........................ Albon W. Reed.............................. Miss Mary D. Lyndon ) Miss Carolyn Cobb ) MEMBERS J. B. Conyers Clark Howell B. B. Cubbedce C. V. Jacobson G. L. Harrison W. T. Jenkins J. R. Hirschberg C. A. Koch. Jr. H. C. Howard C. B. McDaniel Howell Peacock . . President Jk Vice-PrcsiJent jk,) Manager 0 Publicity Manager . . Directresses If L. A. Pinkussohn A. W. Reed Joe Stewart Victor Victor F. F. WatsonWHAT ARE YOU GONNA DO WITH IT? No Copyright. 1914, by J.RAirordWood. A TO LOOK y OVER THE V BIG CITIES LANDSEE MY FATHER- 'AS A CHILD, I N ALWAYS CHERISHED AN AMBITION TO PAINT THE v WATER-TOWER J maybe WHEN I GET TO I THE TOP I’LL BE ABlSrfsS? S0PH5. £ » ploughing IN THE he Might' be Reading in my LETTER Sv H ow- FIELDS BACK i ON ouR FARM IN RiSTlTUSK FLORIDA- THERE NOW I’VE GOT IT; I RIGHT AT [THE TOP SEARCH S, ME 'when You ARE UP SO HIGH EVERYTHING »S ' SO STILL THAT NOTHING MEANS ' ANYTHING. ' WHAT ARE YOU GONNA DO . WITH IT •GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUB Gi.ee and Mandolin ClubGlee and Mandolin Club OFFICERS R. N. Schwab Dana Blackmar E. J. Hardin E. L. Pennington . . President Manager Assistant Manager . . . Pianist W. T. Campbell D. D. Hathorne N. P. Bassett E. E. Peacock Ross Coker H. S. Jennings F. Bond G. Bond E. B. Benson GLEE CLUB J. B. Conyers. Leader J. R. Hirshberc R. N. Schwab Pierce Merry L. B. West Champ Holmes MANDOLIN CLUB E. B. Benson. Leader Phil Branson T. H. Smith C. D. Orme David Michael H. C. McGowan F. P. Sullivan J. B. Conyers F.. S. Pinckard A. B. Peacock M. V. Martin F.d Broyles Bentley v-iiappellAnnual Parody Break, break, break. On ihe dancing dame, you nut! And I hear all my friends low mutler, "He can't even lurkey-lrol." O well for the Freshman scarce known. As he sits with a stick by the wall; O well for the Senior deft, As he prances where others would fall. And the low dipping pairs go on. To the seats for a moments rest; But O if I could only hesitate. Or tango, or one-step, at best. Break, break, break. On the whirling dame. O dear! But I guess if I could gel on to these steps There'd be new ones again next year. J. R. Wood. To Fred Jordan, Bob McWhorter, Enoch Benson, and Others who are fond of displaying their beauty in the photographers' windows Fellows, your pictures are to me Like those Hadean barks of yore. That fiercely o’er the Stygian sea. The nauseated spirits bore. To the Plutonic shore. On peaceful seas long wont to roam. Your plastered hair, your staring face. Your posed air. has brought me home To the picture maker’s grace. And the magic of a comb. Lo. in yon photographic niche. How Phoebus-like I see you stand. Retouched by Ball's or Bowden’s hand; Apollos.—in the regions which Are photo-land. The German Club R. R. Gunn J. R. Wood . . . J. I. Davis .... OFFICERS . . . . . . . . President Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer John Gunn. - X E. R. Pund. A T A Huch Andrews, A T 0 Wesley Housf.r. A 0 MEMBERS R. L. McWhorter. X «I» Pinkney Price. K X Huch Hodcson, X Ross Coker. X X Dana Blackmar, K A Hollis Lanier. X A E Harry Grubbs. 11 K A FW CHENEY CV M1DDLEBR00KS TM VON PRECHEN |f ]| A DIAZ M P PHI LI PS CcLORS: Silver and Blaclf F. W. Cheney A. Diaz S. B. Fisher Sine and Tangent C. V. Middlebrcoks M. P. Phillips C. Pope R. D. Short T. M. Von SpreckenFreshman Letter Dear Sam: i seen a feller reading a magazine tuther day an i up an scz. mister whut ez this er new magazine? an he sez it ez the gorjun, an i sez, du mister hurst git it out ez a supplement. An he mutters sumthing erbout bonehead an strides off. So i asks mr Squab, who shore is a ralely sporty guy, whut it is. an he sez it thur pray me are college paper uv the south, an so i hink$ that he muss run it an i asts if he du. an he sez why yas i has sumthing to do with its permulergashun. An i asts where du you git your plots from and he sez "well ther All story and ther McCall magizir.e hez sum good plots.” an then a young feller, named Barrett, who suffers sum thing turrible with his eyes, scz "the movin picter shows furnish a deal of inspirashun. So i goes to the demisthenian hall, an Neander Hendriz up an sez. "Mr presdint, the gorjun bore is financial defunct an wants $50 in coin uv the realm. An then mr Hill sez, "Mr presdint mebbee the gawjun bore wants to hev a seven course dinner like they done last year." an he asts if anybudy wuz eligible frum demisthenian, an Hendriz sez. mr presidint i has 52 units an i has been iligibel 3 yeres an ez i expect too take law. i ixpect to be illected befor i leave college, an gentlemen i aint eat no ham fur 3 yeres nuther. So the sassiety votes that the coin be spent on er reel of movin picter hllum mr Squabs beuty poses ensted. and we all ad-jurned. En ez i went by chappel i seen gus Sparks talking to Jon Weighed cn he sez "Jon this sho will hep me to the Spinx, en Jon sez. "Dont mention it Now whut did they mean? Yores Steve.Young Men’s Christian Association Geo. B. Birch . R. B. Wincate, Jr S. B. Wallace . Paul Tabor . . R. M. Guess CABINET OFFICERS . . President Vice-President . . . Treasurer Recording Secretary Ceneral Secretary E. A. Bailey T. J. Collins B. J. Fletcher A. B. Peacock H. L. Brown B. H. Smith C. B. Davis S. B. Wallace COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN . . Bible Study Mission Study . . . Devotional . . . . Social . . M ember ship Extension IVorl( Church Relationship . . . Finance ADVISORY BOARD Jno. White Mcrton Dr. R. P. Stephens Chancellor D. C. Barrow Prof. R. E. Park Prof. J. R. Fain G. S. Birch. Jr. E. R. Hodcson. Jr. S. B. Wallace R. M. Guess President Treasurer Motto: ”Spirit. Mind, Body" PURPOSE: To lead men into the Christian life and to train Christian men for serviceLittle Reveries Ross Coker lay prostrate on his bed of sickness. In the room was his beloved roommate, “Farmer D vis", erasing the dirt from a white vest so as to wear it to the next cotillion. “Parmer” had just stuffed enough of the last Ag. Quarterly into his number eleven pumps o keep his feet from making too intimate contact with the pavement. Presently Ross looked up. "Old lady," he said, in those persuasive tones that we of the Glee Club and the Baptist congregation know too well; “here I’ve been drawing these owls, chickens, humming-birds, and that big heifer for the Pandora these many years. What do they mean? ” “I can’t let you in free this time: somebody might catch up with me." was all the answer he got, as “Farmer” sewed on another button. The combined ingenuity of Messrs. Howard and Harris had just succeeded in defeating Emil Leard at chess. “I don’t mind your beating me so much,” said the discomfited one, “if you didn’t brag on it so much. I believe in generosity on the part of an opponent.” At this terrible and unanswerable indictment, the two malefactors hung their heads in shame, and the martyr sought consolation,—Paganini-like in his violin. The first soft rays of the benignant sun shone on the tranquil face of the gentle Chauncey Middlebrooks. Think not, O gentle reader, that he was asleep. Since the purple hues from the East had suffused his countenance, he was awake to all the tribulations and responsibilities that a busy life affords. But when Old Sol urged our hero to more pronounced exertion, he leaned over, pulled a bunch of hairs from the head of his drowsy roommate, administered the weighty kick which only Chauncey’s foot knows how to give, and then vented the following choice and expressive sentiment:—“Louis, you’ll come back, and take me to ride over the hills, just for old time’s sake, won’t you?” “I don’t know.” Burrage and McKamy were having one of those heart to heart talks that only the perfectly congenial can enjoy. Their souls met in sweet communion: and truly it was an ideal picture. Presently Kieffer appeared on the scene. "By the way, boys," he said, after standing before them long enough to recognize their admiring glances; “They are taking post-card pictures in a little tent down on Thomas St. Let’s go down and have a group likeness struck off." “Suits me,” said McKamy. But Burrage had a deliberative, business head; and, as usual, he showed it. “I’d like to go all right, but I think we should look into the copyright regulations first." h- .. .. . _T TT " _ ( s.- l i • til | B; j •• ‘’li I I i i i i i 4 O Aaron Bernd was writing copy by the ream for the Pandora, in the hopes of getting a small fractional part accepted. “Darn this false modesty.’’ he said. “Here I’m doing all this writing and I’m scared I’d be criticised if 1 put anything in about myself. I ought to have some mention, too. Think of how interesting my name would be to posterity. 1 must get some one to write me up, even if it costs a malted milk.’’ So saying he donned his hat and strode out. © r t A Commencement Tragedy Dramatis Personae: John Gunnshy Pierce Merryboy Eucenia Uptodate PLACE: A well screened alcove in auditorium. Time: Near close of Mask Ball. .................Students A fair Commencement Visitor Act 1 — (John and Eugenia enter, talking rapidly, and sit down on a bench close together.) JOHN (passionately) : “Oh. Eugenia, how wonderful it is to be here, away from the madding crowd,—alone with you.“ Eugenia (sweetly) : “It is nice to be in here, we girls get so tired of being bumped into people.” John (hopefully) : “Does your good impression of the Georgia boys still last, dear?" EUGENIA (encouragingly): “Georgia boys are all dears, Johnnie—I’m just crazy about them.” JOHN (seizing her hand) : "And we are all so wild about you, Genia. You’re simply divine—Oh, you are so, so beautiful!" EuCENIA (resignedly): “Do you really think so? " John (excitedly): "Yes. dear. I’ve loved you from the moment I met you— yesterday morning—and my love has grown every moment since----------” EUGENIA (smiling as she looks away): “How romantic." JOHN: "Don’t you think you could learn to care-” Eugenia (withdrawing her hand and interrupting tragically as she sees Pierce standing near the door) : "Will you swear that I am the first girl you ever told that you loved her? " JOHN (tenderly): “Yes darling! I’d swear it." Eugenia (with deep scorn as she rises): "I thought so!" (walking quickly towards the door) "Oh, Mr. Merryboy.” PlERCE (turning around) : "Yes.” Eugenia (with pleading eyes): “Did you call me? " PlERCE (catching on immediately) : "Yes. isn’t this my dance? ’’ Eugenia (with relief) : "That’s so, it is." (She takes his arm and as they walk off says, rather loudly, so as to be well understood in the alcove.) “I’m so glad you came along, Mr. Merryboy, one can get so bored, even at commencement.” n J. R. W.History of Demosthenian 03, Wm. Rutherford, then a student of the U. of Ga., left us, under date of February 5th, the first record of Demosthenian. He says: “This day have we, the students of the Junior class, begun by general consultation the establishment of a society for the purpose o! extemporizing or extemporaneous speaking." On February 14, committees met to draft a constitution and having done this the students convened for the first time for the transaction of business on the 19th of February, and having elected officers met again on the 23d to discuss the first subject: "Is a Monarchial Government preferable to a Republic? ” Though formally organized in 1803, Demosthenian found its first beginning in 1801, for the reason that debating societies were instituted at that time. The name Demosthenian was not applied to it however, until 1824. For the first several years meetings were held in various college lecture rooms until the building now occupied by the society was constructed. f or more than a hundred years Demosthenian has stood the ravages of time, the criticism of its enemies, the chagrin of defeat, and the exultation of victory, ever growing stronger and never losing sight of the purpose for which it was founded,—to fit its members for the varied duties of life, to cultivate a correct mode of speaking and to qualify them by practice to express their opinions in public in a correct manner. 1 he future holds much in store for Demosthenian and it should be the duty of every loyal Demosthenian to lend his hearty co-operation in making each succeeding year the banner year for Demosthenian. T. N. Hendricks, Historian.History of the Phi Kappa N the strenuous life of to-day the one who succeeds must not only be able to think well, but must also be able to express promptly and perfectly his thoughts. The well rounded education should certainly include constant practice and training in the Art of Speaking Well, and there is no better place for this training than in a congenial group of students, such as we have at Phi Kappa. Phi Kappa was founded on the 22nd of hebruary. 1820, by a small band of students who withdrew from the Demosther.ian society. It is said that at first Phi Kappa was intended to be a secret fraternity and for a short time the meetings were held in the belfry of the chapel. The newly created society at first had to struggle incessantly for its mere existence, and it was years before it was able, through high ideals and constancy of purpose, to erect a hall of its own. and place itself on an equal footing with its rival. In 1832, the building which the society now uses was erected, by means of a subscription started by Alexander Stephens. Immediately the society entered upon a period of great success. This prosperity continued until the opening of the war between the stales, when Phi Kappa was forced to temporarily close her doors, nearly all of her members having joined the Southern forces. Soon after close of hostilities the society was reorganized and e en more interest was shown in its work than before. This great interest lasted for over ten years, but upon the enlargement of the University the interest became so small that it became necessary for the trustees to act in their behalf. An act was passed forbidding students to participate in any contests unless they were in good standing with the society to which they belonged. 1 he interest of the students was once more aroused toward the work of the Literary Societies, and since then it has remained great. Phi Kappa stands for the best things of the University. She supports steadfastly and unselfishly the publications, the literary and honorary clubs. Excellence in her lines of endeavor is now looked upon as the highest honor in college, and efforts toward this excellence are increasing steadily. May the glory of our great university become more and more linked with the name of our noble society. May she continue in the future as she has done in the past, to do her full share, and more, toward the pi ogress of the South’s Empire state. J. R. Wood, Historian.Jeffersonian PresidentsAgricultural Club PresidentsBook Reviews “The Sin OF Loafing"—By Whitehead and Bailey—A powerful treatise on this predominant curse of a college boy. 7 he authors have drawn from their extensive personal experience gained during their college career. Both have since reformed, and to-day stand as examples to the unwary. "98th Volume of Pennington’s Puns"—With a complimentary sketch of the author, by the author himself. Guaranteed to run any man crazy who reads more than a fourth. Volume ninety-nine will appear within a few days. “The Joys of Married Life."—By Suddeth and Wingate—The finest thing of its kind ever written, ar.d one of the strongest arguments for Woman’s Suffrage. The authors are rather new at the business, but their work is most interesting. Don’t fail to try it. (The book, not the subject.) “POETRY AND Law.”—By Weinkle and I illinghast—Two of the foremost poets of the day have summoned their muses to aid in the preparation of this most sad and mournful appeal for a resuscitation of the "Ccorcian", in order that they may have some place other than the waste basket for their many effusions. “When Wooten Hits the Pill."—By Ruck Ginn.—A description of one of the most exciting experiences of the author’s life, during which the author himself played the part of the hero. A number of testimonials from Wooten and others as to the author’s ability. You should not miss it. though the author did. Bound in crepe. . “Our Beauty Secrets.”—By "Beans” Barrett, Plaster, and Burrage— Never before have these three famous beauties united to give their secrets in one volume. No one who desires to be like these can afford to miss this rare opportunity. Plaster edits the body of the book; but Barrett contributes articles on “ The Attractiveness of Horn Specks,” and Burrage on "The Vanishing Chin.” "How TO BE A NUISANCE.”—By Victor, with Jacobson assisting.—1 hese two popular gentlemen who came out victorious in the recent election, have united to give the public the benefit of their experience. A picture of the author appears on every other page as do some of his writings, clipped from the Atlanta Journal. Highly entertaining."The Preparation of Hot Air."—By Gaston—The author tells in this volume the secret which has enabled him to supplant the trust once presided over by Victor. The description is especially fine and the truly wonderful way in which this valuable production is produced is graphically told. Testimonials from the law department as to the saving of fuel. Very valuable for farmers. "French—My Methods of Learning It."—By C. B. McDaniel.—For the last two years the author has made a most unusual record in this difficult language. Few have ever made such progress with the expenditure of so little energy. Any one who desires to emulate this leading linguist should not fail to get this little volume. A graphic description of the author’s feeling on the eve of examination. Illustrated with several pictures of Ro er in characteristic pose.Intercollegiate Debaters D. K. McKamy C. W. Jacobson GEORGIA vs. SOUTH CAROLINA Resolved, That the United States should cease to maintain a position as one of the three leading naval powers. A ffirmative—Georgia. Negative—South Carolina. Georgia Won.Intercollegiate Debaters Victor Victor L. A. Pinkussohn GEORGIA vs. VIRGINIA Resolved, That the United States should cease to maintain a position as one of the three leading naval powers. A ffirmalive—Virginia. Negative—Georgia. Georgia Won.Georgia s Record in Intercollegiate Debates 1901 Georgia:North Carolina Georgia :Tulane I ulane won Georgia won 1902 1909 Georgia :North Carolina Georgia:North Carolina Georgia won Georgia won Georgia: Vanderbilt • v J4 Georgia won Georgia :North Carolina Georgia won 1910 Georgia :North Carolina 1905 North Carolina won Georgia :North Carolina Georgia: Vanderbilt Georgia won Vanderbilt won Georgia :Scwanee Georgia: Virginia Georgia won Georgia won 1906 191 1 Georgia :North Carolina Georgia :North Carolina North Carolina won North Carolina won Georgia :Scwance Georgia :Tu!anc Georgia won Georgia won Georgia : Washington Lee 1912 Georgia won Georgia: Vanderbilt 1907 Vanderbilt won Georgia: North Carolina Georgia: Virginia North Carolina won Georgia won Georgia rTulane 1913 Georgia won Georgia-.Washington Lee Georgia : Washington Lee Georgia won Washington Lee won Georgia :1 ulane Tulane won 1908 Georgia :North Carolina 1914 North Carolina won Georgia :Soulh Carolina Georgia : Washington Lee Georgia won Georgia won Georgia: Virginia Georgia:Washington Lee Georgia won Georgia won Anniversarians Clark Hcwell. Jr. J. B. C:nyers Phi Kappa—Clark Howell, Jr. DemosTHENIAN—J. B. Conyers.£T feWV-,:IT1 I fUr!JLf A r u , , ,, ..hi i l-, LTZnJ I cjBiiiii 4HS • i •»• '»»3 Champion Debate C. C. Davis B. E. Adams Resolved, That for the United States to give the Philippines their independence would be to the best interests of both countries. C. B. McDaniel, Jr. R. H. Patterson A ffirmative—Dcmosthenian. Negative—Phi Kappa. Df.mosthenian Won.aJunior Orators uvMendel Bocrstin M. A. Franklin Junior Orators Clark Howell W. T. Jenkins H. H. West Raifcrd Wood Julian Walker Nol in picture.Sophomore Declaimed E. K. Bennett P. R. Hill L. Me Laws C. C. Nall V. H. Quarterman T. C. Ramsay V. H. Sorrells C. M. Tanner E. B. Tate V. D. Hasty C L. Veatch ! I. O. Calhoun Not in picture.Sophomcre DebatersSophomore Debaters Sub ject: Resolved that Federal legislation is the best method for solving the divorce problem. W. ) I. Quart erm an PHI KAPPA (Affirmative) M. C. Scott C. M. Tanner P. R. Hill DEMOSTHENIAN (Negative) C. C. Nall T. C. Ramsay V. Q. Gresham ♦Not in picture.Freshman DebatersFreshman Debaters SUBJECT: Resolved that the annexation of Mexico by the United States would be for the best C. C. Miller of both countries. DEMOSTHENIAN T. M. Murphy G. T. Towns PHI KAPPA I. M. Levy A. R. Fawcett J. R. SeeiyCotton School Debaters E. C. Westsftok W. H. Sorrells Rcsci.cJ, That t'e Boll Weevil will be a benefit to the State of Georgia. E. B. O’Kellev C. L. VeatchAward of Prizes 7he Ready Writer's Medal. D. A. Russell. The IVillcox Prizes. French: M. K. JOHNSON. German: E. L. JaCKSON. The Freshman Prize. R. L. Callaway. Jr. The IV. L. Bryan Prize. O. J. TolnaS. The Horace Russell Prize in Psychology. T. T. Lew. The Walter B. Hill Prize in Ethics. B. I. SecaLL. The Cadet Prize. J. W. Nicholson. The R. E. Parlf. Jr.t Prize. C. Ira FUNKENSTEIN. The L. H. Charhonnier Prize. B. I. SecaLL. The Trustees Prize in Agriculture. R. L. BULLARD. The Debaters' Medals. Freshman Class: W. H. Sorrells, R. W. WESLEY, H. G. WiLEY; Sophomore Class: E. J. Hardin. L. A. Pinkussohn, H. H. West.JJattftnra C rorgia Srft and Stark Agricultural (Thurtcrlg tugiurrrtug Annual  Editors Pandora, I 886 to the Present Time Volume I, 1886.—Editor-in-Chief. G. N. Wilson, K A. Business Manager, B. Cook, A T ft. Associate Editors, W. E. Wooten, 2- A E; McDaniel, . I ; C. F. Rice, X 1 ; C. H. Wilson. K A; W. A. Speer, l A (-); F. F. Stone. l A 0; R D. Meador, A TQ; M. B. Bond, A T A; W. S. Upshaw, A T A; R. S. Moye, r A; P. L. Wade. l T A; A. W. Wade. 2 N; W. C. Brown, S N. Volume II, 1887.—Editor-in-Chief, G. F. Rice. X l . Business Manager. J- W. Daniel, K A. Associate Editors: T. W. Reed, 1 A 0; G. Waters, «I I’ A; W. J. Shaw, S X; H. F. Milner. A T ft; A. L. Franklin, A T A. VOLUME III, 1888.—Editor-in-Chief. Albert Howell, K A. Business Manager, A. W. Griggs, A T A. Associate Editors: W. L. Moore, 2- A K; T. R. Crawford, A T ft; F. W. Coile, i N; Lucien L. Knight. X I ; W. M. Glass, A T A. VOLUME IV, 1890.—Editor-in-Chief, John D. Little, i A E. Business Manager, W. K. Wheatford, i N. Associate Editors: F. E. Callaway. K A ; S. J. Tribble, T A 0; J. C. Crawford, 2 N; W. W. Ellis, X l ; W. L. Stallings, A T A; W. N. Smith, X 'I'; E. A. Cohen, X 1 . VOLUME V, 1892.—Editors-in-Chief, J. F. Lewis, X «I ; L. L. Brown, A T ft. Business Managers: W. E. Christie. 1 N; W. T. Kelly, A T A. Associate Editors: J. C. Kimball, S A K; Roy Dallas. l A ( ); J. R. Lane, 1 A K; E. W. Frey, X 'J'. VOLUME VI, 1893.—Editor-in-Chief, Harry Hodgson, K A. Business Manager, F. G. Barfield. S A E. Associate Editors, C. R. Nisbet, X 1 ; N. B. Stewart. A T ft; A. O. Halsey. S N; H. A. Alexander; E. G. Cabaniss, «I A 0; F. G. Johnson, A T A; Eugene Dodd, X 't . VOLUME VII, 1894.—Editors-in-Chief, C. R. Tidwell, A T A; Noel Moore. A A K. Business Managers, Paul L. Fleming, X I ; John D. Stelling. A T ft. Associate Editors, L. D. brick, S N; W. P. Harbin, X H. Brown. K A; George Beckett, I A 0. VOLUME VIII, 1893.—Editor-in-Chief, W. A. Harris, X I . Business Manager, J. J. Gibson. A T A. Associate Editors, H. H. Steiner, 2 A K; J. W. Morton. K A; W. W. Chandler, A T ft; W. L. Kemp, i N; J. T. Dunlap, l A 0; H. V. Black, X ♦; J. G. Smith. Non-Fraternity. VOLUME IX, 1896.—Editor-in-Chief. Pliny Hall, K A. Business Manager, J. G. Pitman. «l A 0. Associate Editors, M. M. Lockhart, S A E; J. B. Connelly, X |»; Fred Morris, . N; C. H. Holden. A T A; H. V. Black, X 'I'; T. A. Neal; R. B. Nally. VOLUME X, 1897.—Editor-in-Chief, H. G. Colvin, i A K. Business Manager, R. E. Brown, a T ft. Associate Editors, F. L. Fleming, X ! ; J. W. Spain, K A; I uHarry Dodd, X P. S. Smith. «l A 0; A. L. I idwcll. A T A; H. Lovejoy, A N; W. B. Kent; J. W. Hendricks. VOLUME XI, 1898.—Editors-in-Chief, Harry Dodd. X 'J ; Hugh White, A N. Business Hanager, J. C. McMichael. K A. Associate Editors. C. H. Black, X «I ; E. E. Pomeroy, A A K; C. Westbrook, A T A; J. I . Dorsey. «l A (-); H. R. Perkins, A T 12. VOLUME XII, 1899.—Editors-in-Chief, Garrard Glenn, A A K; A. P. Adams. X I . Business Manager, P. E. Johnson, X 'K Associate Editors, J. B. McCurry, K A; W. S. Blun, A T 12; F. E. Brodnax, A T 12; W. E. Watkins. A N; D. G. Hcidt, J. W. Mason. VOLUME XIII, 1900.—Editors-in-Chief, Archibald Blackshear, K A; Fair Dodd, X Business Manager. F. E. Brodnax. A T 12. Associate Editors, F. P. Calhoun. X 1 ; E. P. Shannon, I A ( ); F. G. 1 upper, A A K; J. P. Gardner, A N; William Davis; E. H. Hamby. Volume XIV, 1901.—Editors-in-Chief, E. P. Shannon. «l A ( ); J. D. McCartney. A A K. Business Manager. Jack Banks, X 4'. Associate Editors, P. A. Williams. A X; V. H. Bullard, A T 12; R. G. Stephens, K A; I. M. Putnam, K A; W. D. Hoyt, X 4 ; James L. Sibley. Volume XV, 1902.—Editors-in-Chief, Frank H. Barrett, A A K; Sterling H. Blackshear, X I . Business Managers. J. K. Jordan, A T 12; M. W. Lewis, X 4'. Associate Editors, C. D. Russell, l A • ; I. S. Peebles. A X; M. S. Johnson, K A; H. M. Fletcher, K A; Dewald Cohen. VOLUME XVI, 1903.—Editors-in-Chief, G. Dexter Blount. K A; Frampton E. Ellis, (•) A 4 . Business Managers, J. Benton High, Claude W. Bond. A X. Associate Editors, Marion H. Smith, A A E; Hugh M. Scott. X l ; Preston Brooks, A T 12; W. G. England, X 'I'; Marvin M. Dickinson. K A; Sidney J. Nix. U P L. VOLUME XVII, 1904.—Editors-in-Chief, L. P. Goodrich, A X; I. S. Hopkins. Jr., 4 A ( ). Business Managers, H. M. Blackshear. A 1 12; G. W. Nunnally, X l ; J. B. Gamble. Associate Editors, J. D. Bower. K A; Roderick Hill. A A K; Wailes Lewis, X 4 ; W. B. Shaw. K A; W. O. Roberts, U P L; R. N. Burt. VOLUME XVIII, 1905.—Editors-in-Chief, A. L. Hardy, K A; V. B. Moore. X l . Business Managers, Roderick Hill. A A E; C. P. Pratt. A T f . Associate Editors. H. W. Telford. U P L; T. G. Stokes. A. H. Carmichael, X 4 ; W. O. Marshburn, l A (•); J. C. Upshaw, A X. Art Editor, O. H. B. Bloodworth, Jr., K A. VOLUME XIX, 1906.—Editors-in-Chicf, W. O. Marshburn. I A C-); Lansing B. Lee, A A K. Managing Editor, H. L. Covington, K A. Assistant Managing Editor. J. H. Bradbcrry, U P L; Art Editor, J. G. Mays, X 4 . Associate Editors, R. S. Parker. X I ; G. A. Green, A T O; W. B. Hamblcton, A X; E. R. Lambert, K A; J. R. Turner.r rv W 7 Volume XX. 1907.—Editors-in-Chief, Phil W. Davis, Jr.. I»A0; J. K. MacDonald. X 'J'. Business Manager. T. E. Scott. Art Editor. W. H. Griffith, K A. Assistant Business Manager, H. M. Wilson, 2 N. Associate Editors, W. T. McCaffrey, K W. G. Brantley, Jr., 2 A K; J. H. Ncisler, U P L; R. S. Parker. X I ; T. S. Winn. A T 12. VOLUME XXI, 1908.—Editors-in-Chief, S. O. Smith, ‘l» A 0; W. C. Henson. Business Manager, R. P. King, S A E. Assistant Business Manager, D. L. Rogers. Art Editor, H. G. Cannon, A T 12. Associate Editors, J. B. Harris. X l ; S. E. Morton. K C. C. Brooks, N; Lanier Branson, X 'I'; Roy Strickland, K A; G. W. Glausier, II K A. VOLUME XXII, 1909.—Editors-in-Chief, W. H. Johnson, K A; James Montgomery, X 'K Business Manager, D. L. Rogers. Art Editor. J. B. Wier, Jr., K S; R. F. Revson. Associate Editors, J. M. Walker, i A E; E. M. Brown, X ‘I ; W. R. Holmes, I A 0; Frank Clark. Jr., A T 12; C. C. Brooks, N; C. F. Pekor, U P L; O. P. Beall. VOLUME XXIII. 1910.—Editors-in-Chief, H. Abit Nix; John Moore Walker. A E. Business Manager, R. L. Campbell. Art Editor, Hugh King Allen. S N. Associate Editors, Eugene S. Taylor, K S; Hughes Spalding, X I ; O. M. Gresham, A T 12; Aubrey Matthews, 2 X; Robert Cumming; Henry Newman, X 'V; Fred Allen, I» A 0; Robert P. White, K A; Corbin C. Small, II K A. VOLUME XXIV, 191 I.—Editors-in-Chief, Evans V. Heath. A T 12; Arthur K. Maddox. Associate Editors, George C. Blanton; Pope F. Brock; J. L. Deadwyler. K 2; J. H. Foster; Malvern Hill, 2 N; W. S. Jones, 1 X; Henry Newman, X 'I'; W. J. Northen. Jr., I A 0; Howell B. Peacock, K A; H. D. Russell; C. S. Small, II K A; A. O. B. Sparks, A A E; Boykin C. Wright, X ! . Business Manager, Howell Brooke. Assistant Business Manager, E. V. Carter, I A 0. VOLUME XXV, 1912.—Editor-in-Chief, Marion B. Folsom. S N. Associate Editors, R. R. Chields; Thomas N. Powell. I A 0. Art Editor. James B. Wright. Business Manager, H. D. Russell. Assistant Business Manager, H. S. Langston. VOLUME XXVI, 1913.—Editor-in-Chief, Robert Hill Freeman, I A 0; Associate Editors. James M. Lynch, A T 12; S. Turner Brewton. Business Manager. D. A. Russell. X; Advertising Manager, Henry H. West, A T A. Art Editor, Edgar L. Pennington. VOLUME XXVII, 1914.—Editor-in-Chief, David Knox McKamy; Associate Editors. John D. Wade, N; Edgar R. Pund, A T A; Business Manager, Henry D. Russell; Art Editor, Aaron B. Bernd., ' AVn3 sfc Vliil I I • • I I I I M ill AO.OSTOH. YOOHSEEf 10 THE EAMG yy 3Ut r j js APS. AEE N THE RES V were7, r Ov . to; ' throw we UP ft. OGAHet ' V« E e S SHEV. v vt% US K«0 Wv .H.T V» EXPEXTEO 0 fO - .OW MEXICO «» ST EE xciv OS- A f OVN YOURS V'C- J SHOOT M PO'KT N OEO PACE Tvnntx-, COPT ROYS ARE REQUEY TO ftV?EEP UO A«. _ HURRY OX W PV OAT GUYS HVOG ViYrc. WWO'is PER PRESS- WWtH AMO WRfcM OOEG HE. tXPECT H «W . ECF RACVS 7 AMV INPCP- HAT 0M vasv. SE FOlKO 3Bux UP.lHtK, OvER 9ocvm K BACa Op a DRUG STOHE E T TO The Hwjer V0U RE tULCHE SOP.eVuv.GO MHAT T nE ? PEEASE OOK’T IAEA wvtna The operator She haS a REGOEAR got. „ .Gecrcian BoardGeorgian Board BOARD OF EDITORS FIRST TERM John D. Wade, ’14 ASSOCIATE EDITORS Victor Victor. '14 Milward W. Martin. ’15 Richard N. Schwab. 14 L. A. Pinkussohn. '15 Gecrce B. Barrett. ’14 A. O. B. Sparks. 14 Raymond Hastincs. Manager SECOND TERM Victor Victor. ’14 ASSOCIATE EDITORS Richard N. Schwab. '14 L. A. Pinkussohn, 15 Gecrce B. Barrett. '14 A. O. B. Sparks. 14 Milward V. Martin. '15 Terrie N. Hendricks. 15 Raymond Hastings, ManagerRed and Black Staff FIRST TERM F. A. Holden........................................ Ashton Burford...................................... Ray Fort ........................................... Raymond Hastincs.................................... Phillips Abbott..................................... Edilor-in-Chief Associate Editor Athletic Editor . Social Editor Exchange Edito- BUSINESS DEPARTMENT Perry Cccke............................................................................................Business Manager BURKE Hood......................................................................Assistant Business Manager L. L. Fclsom..............................................................................Circulation Manager G. SlapPEY.................................................................... Assistant Circulation ManagerRed and Black Staff SECOND TERM Ashton Blrfcrd................................... Ray Fcrt......................................... Raymond Hastincs................................. W. H. Quartermas................................. T. J. Smith...................................... Editor-in-Chicf Associate Editor Athletic Editor Social Editor Exchange Editor BUSINESS DEPARTMENT W. R. McDonald ) H. M. Cannon T. E. Hollincswcrth, Jr......................... W. M. Rocers.................................... . . . Business Managers Circulation Manager Assistant Circulation Manager PAUL TABOP E.B. O’l ELLEr Agricultural Quarterly StaffAgricultural Quarterly Staff E. B. O’Kelley Paul Tabor E. Ragsdale H. L. Brown J. F. Wocdall . E. C. Westbrcok W. R. Hastincs . . . Editor-in-Chief . . . A Module Editor . . . Aisociate Editor . . Associate Editor . . . Associate Editor . . . Business Manager Assistant Business ManagerChorus of Sparks, Russell, Meadow and Pennington (We’ll let Brewlon and Howard sing this next year.) Six. six, six. Are the years in this place we have spent; Oh, we'll never be able to utter, "We came, we saw and we went.’ O well for the one year Ag.. That he leaves at the end of a year! O well for the corn-club boy That he stays but a fortnight here. And the four-year men go on To their durned degrees in June,— But O for a sight of our own degrees, Or a thought we could gel it soon. Six, six, six. Arc the years in this place we have spent. But the tender touch of the sweet sheep-skin, For us, sure, was never meant.they know him. Jim Ray, who has an enviable record in Chemistry—and AFTER Chemistry—came third with nine votes. We hate for Sprog’s folks to hear about it. but he beat Hendricks and Mitchell out for the biggest liar’s place, by a good vote. It may be largely due to the fact that he rooms with Olin Wimberley, who came out equally victorious in the loafer’s ballot. Even Callaway and Denham were far outstripped by Olin. Of course there’ll be no dissension when We tell you that Skippy Conyers captured the biggest eater’s place, even over Fatty Bowen, who made a very poor showing, batty was even beaten out by Logan and Chubby Ward and Von Sprecken, proving conclusively that it’s quantity that counts, and not quality. Speaking of beauty, Jake’s oft repeated eulogy of the “tall, handsome blond" has at last had its effect. No, don’t be alarmed; nobody voted for Jake except one man, who wrote in parenthesis by his vote "Hurt conscience equals one dope.” But a tall, handsome blond did get it, this time Ed Hitchcock, against whom Howell Peacock and Fred Jordan made close races. How are the mighty fallen, since the days of Lindsay, Hutchens, and Monte Allen! "Piggy", or "Snipe". Burrage, have it as you will, sewed up the other side of the vanity box, with Plaster and Beans Barrett keeping well up in the race. We wish to take advantage of this space to offer Mr. Barrett our consolations on not winning out. When it came to conceit, Erie Daley walked away with the place, Barrett running second, and Major Chappell third. Cubbedge, Merry, and MacDonell headed the list of college sports, while Barnes beat out Gunn for ladies’ man by five votes. Cubbedge came a poor third. Ed Dorsey, famed of old, beat all entrants as most desperate lover, while J. C. Howard ("There’s a girl in the heart of Milledgeville") came second, and Farmer Davis won third place. Whitehead was long first on the hardest boner, with Aubrey Bailey a poor second. Which brings to mind the fact that the largest number of votes any man got for biggest bonehcad was nine, and Eva McWhorter captured it. Roy Davis and Erie Peacock made pretty good races, but all the votes were so scattered, it would be impossible to name even a fraction of the entrants. Edgar Pennington, who evidently "politicked" for the place, won out for the wittiest. If the ballot had read "most comical”, the result might not seem like a paradox. Bill Turner came a close second, and Meadow a poor third. Emp Peacock bulldozed enough men into voting for him for the strongest man, to win the place, while Howell Peacock and Bob McWhorter followed close after. The laziest, of course, was Bowen, with Denham and Callaway close after. Red Collins, in the most exciting race on the ticket, beat Evergreen Davis out for biggest f reshman by one vote. Bolling Jones came a poor third. Sparks (what’s in a name?) is regarded as the man with brightest prospects for the future, since Moon was excluded from the race. Ray polled a few. Dick Russell, however, came second with McKamy following third lead. r n n frT rv J u J LrS r V J Since the passing of Shake and Dunlap, Henry West is hereby named biggest politician. Dick Russell, all protestations to the contrary, coming a close second. I ho fact that Proctor won third place proves that a big politician is not necessarily successful. Auburn polled a long lead for most popular college, Virginia and Vandy making much poorer showings. G. N. I. C. was rather popular among certain men who passed the Christmas holidays in Royston. Pool shooting fills the niche of most-liked occupation, while loafing and cutting classes polled good votes. We noticed that no one voted for studying. “Glory,’' of course, is our most popular song, beating out "Alma Mater" by eight votes. “Too Much Mustard” brought up the third, showing the plebeian trend of some of our classmates. All this happened before the Senior agitation for "Gaudeamus Igitur.” Jack Johnson came a long first for biggest grafter. Sparks and Russell making poor showings against this master of industry. Bill Hardaway, who is a self-made man. won out for the luckiest, while Russell Patterson, with honors thrust upon him, came second. Eric Cocke (Perry’s little brother) bringing up third. Stephens Mitchell, of course, came long first for worst knocker, Torbett and Walter Hill following a good distance behind. And since we’re saying bad things about people, we might as well tell you at once-that Skippy Conyers was named best singer. Skipp’s mouth is evidently his big feature. Roddenberry and Coker came some distance after. Fields, variously designated as "Dozier," "Lucile." “Lizzie," et cetera, was elected most bashful, beating out Holder and Red Collins, of Algena fame, by four votes. Cozart came in for his share, leading the biggest baby ticket, and beating out Griffin by one vote. Doughty ran a poor third. Evergreen Davis again entered the limelight as biggest freak. Slappey running second, and Stephens Mitchell third. Jacobson headed the nuisance list; despite Victor’s hard work to win the place, Jake beat him out by eleven votes; and Pennington came two-votes behind that. And although Gaston was fearful of results, he really got elected as biggest hot-air artist, beating Victor by two votes, and Dave Bryant by ten. We will now proceed to say some nice things about somebody, and pray don’t take it as a joke, no matter how ludicrous results may seem. Henry Howard came along first as best actor. Harrison and Victor, despite their advertising, coming far behind. Dick Russell sewed up with best lawyer. When it comes to orating. Ira Funkenstein came a good first, with Victor second, and Harrison third. Bernd managed to friss Pennington out of best writer’s place by three votes, and again Victor put up a good show at third.. Wade was named best poet, Pennington coming second, and Bernd third. Wearers of theifc(j Delaperriere—Football. 2 stars McKinnon—Football, I star Conyers—Football. 2 stars 1 hrash—Football, I star Malone—Football, 3 stars; Track, I star Turner—Football. I star Henderson—Football. 2 stars; Baseball, 2 stars Conklin—Football, 4 stars Logan—Football, I star Smith—Football, I star Hitchcock—Football, 2 stars; Baseball. 2 stars SlDBERRY—Football, I star Paddock—Football, 2 stars; Track. 1 star Dorsey—Football. 2 stars Broyles—Football. 2 stars Thompson—Football. 2 stars McWhorter—Football 4 stars: Baseball. 4 stars CRUMP—Football. I star; Basket-ball. I star; Track. I star. Powell—Football. 2 stars Flournoy—Football. I star CORLEY—Baseball, 2 stars Harrison—Baseball, 2 stars Clements—Baseball. 2 stars Holden—Baseball. I star BROWN—Baseball, I star Ginn—Baseball, 4 stars Torbet-—Baseball, I star Fox—Baseball. 1 star Brand—Basket-ball. 4 stars; Tennis. 3 stars Carter—Basket-ball. 4 stars; Tennis. 4 stars Peacock—Basket-ball. 2 stars Rawso.N—Basket-ball, I star Lester—Basket-ball, I star HtLL—Track. I star Dillard—Track, I star Jenkins—Track. I star A star represents one year’s work on the team. Athletics 1913-’14 By Coach W. A. Cunningham N many respects the athletic season of 1913-14 was the most successful in Georgia’s history. All branches of athletics received attention, football, baseball, basket-ball, track and pushball, being the most popular. The teams were uniformly successful and consequently made money. In point of numbers those participating in athletics would compare favorably with that of any college of the same enrollment, n football, besides the Varsity team, there were a large scrub team and five Freshman teams. The basket-ball squad numbered twelve men and there were several scrub teams. The class track meet was the means of bringing out over a hundred men. The actual track squad was composed of twenty men. The entire Freshman and Sophomore classes engaged in pushball, while in baseball there were seventy-five candidates. This shows that over five hundred men engaged in athletics during the season. Besides being beneficial to the participants, this splendid interest accounted in a large measure for the success of the teams. The Championship of the S. I. A. A. was won in basket-ball and baseball, while Georgia finished second in football. In all instances there was some dispute, it being a peculiar fact that the absolute claim was marred by defeats in the last game or series; Football, to Auburn; Baseball, to lech.; and Basket-ball to Columbus. At many colleges they specialize in one branch of athletics but none can show the success of Georgia in all branches of athletics. I he baseball season was interesting and especially noteworthy because of the terrific hitting of the entire Georgia team, nine men out of the squad of twelve hitting above three hundred. At the start of the season there were on hand but five regulars of the season of 1912, namely, Ginn, Hutchens, Covington, Bowden and McWhorter. Bowden hurt his arm early in the season and could never give his best services. Hutchens was moved from first base and converted into a catcher, which change was most fortunate as he became the best catcher Georgia ever had; and I doubt that S. I. A. A. ever saw his equal. His splendid work with the pitchers carried them over many rough places, besides he was deadly in cutting down would-be base stealers; truly a wonderful catcher and to him goes the lion share of the credit for the team’s showing. Corley, Morris and Hitchcock performed on the slab with such success that Morris and Corley were chosen on the "All-Southern” team. All three pitchers had a no-hit game to their credit, with Morris also pitching two one-hit games. Considering that it was their first season in college ball they did wonderfully well. 1 he infield was composed entirely of new men with the exception of third base where was stationed Covington. Covington was cool-headed at all times, a splendid fielder, a good hitter. His presence tended to keep the green infield from going up in the air in exciting moments. It?" ■ y 1——y L _v -« j i • • • i ip Henderson proved himself a splendid first baseman, and one of the best hitters on the team, besides being able to keep his fellow players from making errors by his splendid fielding ability. He hit in the clean-up position and could always be counted on. Clements played short with splendid success, a good fielder, a fast base runner, and a three hundred hitter. Ginn had the most successful season of his career at Georgia. He was next to the best hitter in batting average, the leading base runner and made the most runs for the team. After the season he was elected Captain for the following year, a fitting tribute to his splendid work. McWhorter had a successful season which should be gratifying to himself and to his numerous admirers. Erwin showed signs of becoming a great outfielder and it is a big disappointment that he dropped out of college. He was always a fast fielder, a good hitter, and had an excellent throwing arm. Brown and Holden filled in when any regular was out of the game. Holden’s presence at third made Covington’s absence hardly noticeable. Brown did good work at pinch hitting. It was regrettable that we lost the services of Bowden during the most of the season. A bad throwing arm kept him from filling any regular position. But notwithstanding that he was the team’s leading batsman, Bowden was the most natural ball player on the team and I predict much for him. The western trip which took the team to Tennessee, Ohio, and Michigan was most enjoyable and successful, the team winning the majority of the games played. The basket-ball team won the championship of the S. I. A. A., and of the entire South. I doubt that their equal has ever represented a Southern institution. Capt. Brand was an able leader and played at center, the most important cog in the team’s play. Peacock and Lester were great forwards and could always be counted on to score enough points to beat their opponents. Peacock was the star of the team, at all times his play was perfect. He could be relied upon at all times to pull his team out of tight places by his wonderful goal shooting. Carter and Rawson were the guards, at which their work was of special interest. They were never outplayed. Mr. Howell Peacock directed the team in a splendid manner. The team work and splendid condition of the men speaks of his ability as a coach. At this sport he is the best coach in the South. The track team were handicapped by having no one to direct their training and by the short training periods. Consequently they could not hope to win meets and make records. Capt. Paddock deserves credit for keeping the team at work. Hill was a point winner in the meet at New Orleans in the high jump. He promises to do even better the coming season for he has great ability and natural form. The pushball contest was won by the Freshman after an hour of bloody strife. For the honor of their class they stood the loss of clothes and bravely stood sore and strained muscles. The large crowd present made it certain that the winning class would have an excellent banquet. This game offers a safe and sane method of settling the class differences, and has completely taken the place of the old scraps. The football team proved to be one of the best in the South, only one game being lost and that to Auburn. This Auburn game comes as an anti-climax to the season, theT ech. game being all-important. The men work for that game after which there is such a falling off of interest, that even the prospective championship can not stir the men to their best efforts. This is not to detract from the splendid work of the Auburn team, for they are deservedly champions. 1 wish to take this opportunity of calling attention to the splendid feeling existing between these institutions. These games are hard fought; but absolutely free from all unnecessary roughness. Georgia pulls for Auburn and Auburn pulls for Georgia and when they meet it is “May the best team win.” At the start of the season the football prospects were bad. Only three regulars were on hand, with the new material of poor quality. It was then that the greatest example of college loyalty was evidenced in the return of veterans of former years. I hey gave up their work to return and help Georgia in the time of need. These men deserve much credit for the service they rendered to the Red and Black. The first games were won in easy fashion. A. P. I. was defeated by the largest score made by any team last year. Dahlonega was defeated by a large score but with disastrous results to Georgia. Crump, Carey and Dorsey received injuries that kept them out of the game for several weeks. Then came the Alabama game which was generally looked at as the hardest on the schedule. I he terrific bucking of Billy Powell tore their line to pieces and a twenty to nothing victory was the result. This game demonstrated that Powell was well able to take care of the full back position. Next came Virginia, the heralded champions of the South Atlantic division. This team had scored more than fifty points against every team played and defeated Vanderbilt 34 to 0. Everyone expected Georgia to meet bitter defeat, which belief was strengthened when they saw the heavy Virginia team. Against heavy odds, the Georgia boys gave battle. They fought from start to finish and gave Virginia the hardest fight of the season. Virginia could not cross the Georgia line by straight football and their two touchdowns resulted from forward passes, both of which should have been intercepted had not the backs been asleep for the moment. Georgia scored from a pretty forward pass from Thompson to Logan. Capt. McWhorter played the best game of the season against Virginia. Henderson had to retire from the game and was lost to the team until the middle of November. Had the team received the benefits of his punts, there is no doubt that the result would have been different. The scene then shifted to Athens with N. C. as the attraction. Georgia had never won a football contest from them. The game was exciting, both teams could seemingly gain at will and often the ball would be carried 50 or 60 yards before the defensive team could stop the assault. Georgia had the better of the first half; but in the second N. C. began to use the Princeton shift and swept down to the goal posts before losing the ball. Broyles' punting saved the day for Georgia. N. C. made one touchdown which was later equalled by Capt. McWhorter, who ran the length of the field in returning a punt for a touchdown. The final score was Georgia, 19; North Carolina. 6. Broyles was the star of this game. His offensive work was very good and his punting was the best seen at Georgia in many years. D Clemson came next in the schedule. This game had not been planned as carefully as had the others, with the result that the team was far from being in proper shape. C lemson outplayed Georgia all during the first half, and it was not until the last quarter that Georgia began to play. 1 hen she scored two touchdowns and a victory. The team was overconfident and sluggish. Miserable fumbling of the backs prevented any consistent gains. To the head work of Paddock is due the credit of this victory. Besides using splendid hcadwork. Paddock’s individual playing was spectacular. Paddock did almost all the gaining for Georgia. • f Next came the Tech. game, the game of all games. To win means a successful season at Georgia. 1 ech. had a good team, which had been uniformly successful throughout the season: a team equally as heavy and fast as Georgia’s which made it apparent that victory would go to the team that showed the most spirit. Several of the alumni came to Athens to help prepare the team; of especial help was the work of Mr. Hatton Lovejoy, the best fullback Georgia ever had. To develop college spirit Mr. Lovejoy and Mr. Ketron are in a class by themselves. Georgia went into this game to win and before anybody realized it they had scored two touchdowns. Then the game settled down to an even basis. The Georgia boys knew that they must contest with Auburn for the championship, and so held themselves in reserve. Cjump and Paddock added two touchdows but were called back. The individual star of this game was Steve Crump, whose brilliant playing will ever be remembered. He entered the game unknown and unheralded; he left with his name on everyone’s lips. On offense he could not be stopped: while on defense his tackling was fierce and sure. Paddock’s work was again spectacular, and of the class which made him the unanimous choice for All-Southern quarter. Some Tech, man had said that one of Georgia’s tackles was lacking in nerve. This same player left the kickoff with tears streaming down his cheeks. He made the first tackle of the game. When Tech, came around his end he tore through and tackled so hard that the runner dropped the ball. Tyjn was on it in a flash. All through that game he was playing as he never played before, earning for himself an All-Southern place. The Auburn game was the last on the schedule and with it went the championship. If we could not win it we are glad to see Auburn win it. The men had slipped in training, with the result that they were not in the best of shape. Still the defeat left no sting as they had done the best they could. With three cheers for Auburn the team of 1914 left the field without doubt the best bunch of fellows ever collected under any college banner. 1 hated to see the curtain fall, for the team was the best that 1 ever handled. They were always ready to do their duty, strong, brave men, in defeat as in victory. Manager Davis was the best team manager that Georgia ever had and was very popular with both boys and coaches. Charley Brown handled the financial end so well that Georgia finished with more money than she ever made before. It will be a long time before we have two such managers again.To give praise to one of the men, is to but reflect credit to all. The men soon found the Georgia spirit and played like veterans. Conklin deserves special mention. He returned to college with the one idea that he could help Georgia in time of need. An unfortunate injury prevented him from playing at top form; but notwithstanding, he was in every game, giving his best, never seeking personal praise. For pure unselfishness and love for his Alma Mater he has won a place in Georgia’s hall of fame. Captain McWhorter has played his last game for Georgia. For four years he gave Georgia his best, the reputation he has made is deserved. With wonderful natural ability, splendid control of himself, adherence to duty and team play, he has made a name in the athletic history of Georgia which will bear the closest scrutiny and ever be a model for those who follow. Paddock was chosen captain as a fitting tribute for his splendid work. He was chosen All-Southern quarterback by every football expert who saw his work. His team mates would follow him anywhere. Often I have seen them take punishment to protect him. Malone was one of the best guards in the South. Not only on defense was he a star; but he could be brought back and used as a full back. In the Clemson game he made victory possible by his line-bucking. His work was never appreciated as it should have been, so I take pleasure in calling attention to the fact that he was one of the best guards we ever had. Delaperriere was a good center, his passing was accurate and properly timed. He was especially good on backing up the line. Henderson was the same consistent player as of old. Besides he has developed into a punter of ability. His loss in the Virginia game was a great blow to the team, which slumped during his absence. Logan was the man to receive the forward passes, how he succeeded is well known. Scores against Virginia and Auburn were made possible by his efforts. Thompson ought to be one of the best backs in the South next year. He has found himself and this should give him the confidence that he needs. Let us hope that another year will find Georgia reaching after still higher honors. Let not the banner season of 1913-14 mark the highest point of athletic efficiency. The Red and Black must continue to advance and while the prospects of another year are not so bright, the spirit is still here which will go a long way toward making a successful year.J. J. Davis C. M. Brown Football Team Conklin and Hitcmccck ............................ Turner ........................................... Mai.one........................................... Delaperriere and McKinnon......................... Conyers and Thrash................................ Hendf.rson............................. • . Lccan and Smith................................... Paddock. Flourncy and Dorsey...................... McWhorter......................................... Thompson and Broyles.............................. Powell, Crump and Sidberry J. J. Davis............. ......................... C. M. Br wn....................................... Right End . Right Tackle Right Guard . . Center Left Guard . Left Tackle . . Left End Quarterback . . Right Half . . Left Half . . Full Back Team Manager Financial Manager A . FOOTBALL RECORD October 4—Georgia. 108 A. P. C.. 0. October 1 1 —Georgia. 51 Dahloncga, 0. October 1 8—Georgia. 20 Alabama. 0. October 25—Georgia. 6 Virginia. 1 3. November 1—Georgia. 19 North Carolina, 6. November 6—Georgia, 18 Clemson, 1 5. November 1 5—Georgia. 14 Tech., 0. November 22—Georgia. 7 Auburn. 21.CHVV.O I WIU SHWt vVuh. A . n . kn% wae «awo ►NO w»vv OW ' lAONIVKCHtC-L »uO 1 WO ChOkS V t . y H VttA.tK 4- The Rescue Fiend Heisman had cleverly designed a defense and his eleven confederates were carefully drilled. "McWhorter shall not pass to-day! " and each man quivered to the quick. Thus he stood in the play with his smoke-wagon in hand. Nothing was possible now for his brain never fails him and he cackled a "Ha, ha! Ah! but back in the dark of the depths of the plot crumped a crump. As the villain stood with his back to all else, a trusty foot stole forth to the cliff’s edge. He seized the chee-ild of I 4 to 0., and hurled a cord to an upper ledge where perched a starving whippinpoof. The bird, mistaking the twine for a worm, pulled viciously to hold it. Thereby our hero descended the line to safety with the score of 1 4 to 0. Bah! the cur-r-rs-s-ses of the foiled. History has repeated itself and the curtain falls rapidly upon our villain’s bean. jl 1' ' ' , 71 • III t (Slow music, professor.)1. Delaperriere 2. McKinnon 3. SlDBERRY 4. Broyles 5. Peacock, Asst. Coach 6. Turner 8. McConnell Football Squad 9. Thrash 16. Davis, Manager 23. Powell 10. Conyers 1 . Henderson 24. Owens II. Cunnincham, Coach 18. Paddock 25. Dorsey 12. Malone 19. Conklin 26. Crump 13. T HOMPSON 20. Ketron. Asst. Coach 27. Locan 14. Hitchcock 21. Carey 28. Flournoy 15. McWhorter. Capl. 22. Smith R. L. McWhorter T. Rucker Ginn T. Rucker Ginn hails from the famous city of Royston, Georgia, where he received his early education and initiation into the mysteries and intricacies of baseball. He was next found at Riverside Academy where history tells he was noted as a football player and baseball player. After graduating from this institution he became a full-fledged Freshman at the University of Georgia. His reputation as an athlete preceded him. so he was looked on as a sure candidate for baseball honors. A bad start was his luck, but in the gloomiest moment a home run set him along the road to fame. He has been noted as a speedy runner, a sure fielder and clever batter. Last season he led the team in hitting, base running and making runs, consequently was honored by being elected captain of the team of 1914. Besides his athletic prowess, his popularity among his classmates is attested in his being the president of his class for the Junior year. Robert McWhorter, otherwise known as ‘’Bob”, has been a sojourner in our midst for the last four years, during which time he has made the McWhorter family famous by his deeds on the athletic field. His elementary school training was received at Athens, from which place he departed and arrived at Barnesville at quite a tender age. He toddled on the athletic field and soon made his presence known. He was next heard from as being a member of the football team of the University of Georgia. One day in October several years ago, in a game against I ennessee he slipped around end for a long run and touch down, which event gained him considerable reputation. Since then he has been trying to live up 10 this reputation in which he has succeeded very well. As both a football and baseball performer he ranks with the best. Has been chosen on several All-Southern selections, and if history is correct, some writer up East placed him on an “All-American". Bob has made good as a student and is popular with his fellow students.Baseball Record March 27 March 28 March 31 April 1 April 3 April 4 April 4 April 8 April 9 April 13 April 13 April 16 April 20 April 21 April 27 April 28 April 30 May 1 May 2 May 4 May 5 May 8 May 9 May 15 May 16 Georgia........... 3 Clemson........... Georgia........... 7 Clemson........... Georgia...........10 West Va. Wesleyan Georgia........... 7 West Va. Wesleyan Georgia...........10 Auburn ........... Georgia........... 6 Auburn ........... Georgia...........11 Auburn ........... Georgia........... 0 Michigan.......... Georgia........... 7 Michigan.......... Georgia........... 2 Illinois.......... Georgia........... 8 Vanderbilt........ Georgia........... 8 Vanderbilt........ Georgia........... 3 Alabama .......... Georgia........... 7 Alabama .......... Georgia........... 4 Maryland A. M Georgia........... 4 V. M. I........... Georgia........... 1 N. C. A. M. . . Georgia........... 7 N. C. A. M. . . Georgia........... 4 Trinity .......... Georgia...........II Alabama .......... Georgia........... 7 Alabama .......... Georgia........... 4 Tech.............. Georgia........... 3 Tech.............. Georgia........... 9 Tech.............. Georgia........... 1 Tech..............Baseball Team Torbett ) Armistead j Corley Hitchcock Fox Henderson Harrison Clements Holden . . Owens ) Brown j ' McWhorter Ginn . . Catchers . Pilchers Firs! Base Second Base . Shorlslop Third Base Right Field Center Field Left Field Joe Bean .... T. Rucker Ginn Russell H. Patterson Hoyt H. Whelchel . . . Coach Captain . Manager Financial Manager Basket-Ball Team Peacock ...... Right Forward Lester Left Forward Brand Center Rawson . Right Guard Carter Left Guard Crump and Brown . . . . Substitutes RECORDS Georgia 47 Athens Y. M. C. A.. . . . . .20 Georgia 80 Auburn . . 16 Georgia 37 Atlanta Athletic Club . . . .28 Georgia .46 Savannah Athletic Club . ...25 Georgia 41 Vanderbilt . . .32 Georgia 39 Columbus .50 Georgia 38 Tech ... S Georgia 37 Columbus . . .39 Georgia 29 Tech ...24 Georgia 46 Auburn . 15nmRoll of Commissioned Officers FIRST BATTALION B. H. Chappell......................Major J. H. Moss . Regimental Quartermaster C. Pope .... Regimental Adjutant Leroy Michael .... Captain Co. A R. H. Patterson .... Captain Co. D F. W. Cheney .... Captain Co. C J. Myers..................1st Lieut. Co. A J. T. Hains...............1st Lieut. Co. B J. I. Davis...............1st Lieut. Co. C SECOND BATTALION S. T. Brewton .... F. M. Moise............. H. H. Whelchel . . . . T. J. Collins.......... R. D. Short............. J. B. Conyers .... R. P. Bassett .... E. Blumenthal .... J. E. Owens .... . . . Major . . Adjutant Captain Co. D Captain Co. E Coplain Co. F Captain Battery 1st Lieut. Co. D 1st Lieut. Co. E 1st Lieut. Co. F44 n n ft r n n u o cm ZUm m .-i.nuy iiiiniiinTkii■ rf •(IttYfl 1 jwim iji •qquuuLwis Company U- "E” CompanyG. M. A. ClubF. R. Crandall I. M. Foy F. A. Holden H. Holden E. V. Leard G. M. A. Club J. H. McLean A. S. Selic C. M. Tanner G. Towns J. R. Wood R. M. Marceson V. K. Meadow L. McLaws U. McLaws D. K. McKamy 0 -V W Riverside ClubL. C. Atkins J- P. Andrews W. Denham R- R. Georce Riverside Club W. T. Garrard. Jr. T. R. Ginn C. H. Harper R- B. Hosch McIntyre J. Roberts M. Reid H. W. SidberryA Dream (With apologies to Yam) The other night I dreamed: That Victor got his constitution passed; That Proctor was elected to the PANDORA Board; That Pennington failed to pull a pun for a whole hour; That Prof. Geissler failed to knock the South during a recitation; That Sylvie cut a class and Bill Denham went to one; That Burrage, Plaster and “Beans” Barrett tied for the handsomest man; That Red Collins made a speaker’s place; That Bob Gunn reformed the German club; 1 hat the Georgian got out two consecutive issues; That Dorsey and Broyles were put on the scrubs; That Slappey was appointed U. S. Senator: That Weinkle and Tillinghast had stopped writing poetry; That Suddeth got a diploma; That Pessin whispered in Crafts’ ear; That Mitchell and West got on the Ceorgian board; That Olin Wimberley stayed in a class the whole period; That Bailey and Whitehead loafed at the Q room; That Russell Patterson had lost his luck; That Stanley got in society; That the “Southern Chevaliers” were no longer musical; That Sanford built his Stadium; T hat Cadet Pope put his picture in the Pandora; That Hoyt Whelchel made 100 in Chemistry and Bernd passed Economics; That Dave Bryant and E. C. Westbrook went back to the farm; That Kid Riley and Major Short tore their breeches stepping off the sidewalk; That the Cliques got beat; That Rover was sick; That the author would never cat a big supper again.ivMl m D - u l ist i ihrA To the Belles (No that Poe fellow never even saw this) Hear the laughter of the belles College belles. What a world of gayety their sparkling eye foretells. See their fairy features twinkle In the shaded ballroom light. How our hearts with joy they sprinkle As their slippers seem to tinkle Through the merry, cheery night, Keeping time, time, lime. In a hesitating rhyme. And the dip-slip-gripping Terpsicorean spirit swells In the bosom of the belles College belles. 'Mid the laughing and the chaffing of the belles. See the charming, swarming belles Merry belles. But which will share our happiness— tis love alone foretells! In the sun's frank, cheery light. Or the fairy, airy night, From their wholesome presence floats. Oh, what a tune. O’er the mellow, yellow notes, In their speech and elfin laughter, Cupid gloats, 'Neath the moon. Up from out the heart's deep well How the palpitating of love’s lurbulency swells— How it yells, As it dwells On their beauty! Now it tells How the recklessness impels. To the wedding, to the ringing. Of the Belles. Belles. Belles. Of the sweetest, neatest belles. Belles, Belles. Belles— The entrancing and the dancing college belles. J. R. Wood.PAN-HELLENIC Independent Order of Wild Bores Founded in 22 D. C. by Ever Lasting Pennington Coat OF-ArMS: Grace and DU Rampant ROLL OF ACTIVE MEMBERS Ever Lasting Pennington Verbosity Victor Gas Blower Barrett Copious Buchwald Tattoo J. Collins Chauncey Verity Middlebrooks Henry Dozinc Russell Trouble Maker von Sprecken Educated C. Westbrook Jelly Y. Bowen J. Bass Conyers Eternal Adamson Burleich Molecule Lufburrow John Loncwinded Booth I. Politician Cocke Well Elated Daley Rant Rambler Gunn Jay Whistling Kieve Copoius Carlyle Davis ' S ELIGIBLE FOR MEMBERSHIP NEXT YEAR Charles Wearisome Jacobson Theo Hilarity Smith Tenacious Nauseatinc Hendricks Considerable Howell Billiards Hood Serenity Mitchell John Hell Moss Henry Humanity West Pulchritude Barnes Champ Holler Holmes C««t4n t -fell OpM' Clatir . “vNRij jov r t A p! .. "Ft e vLman: If I wore, r A cof X Tf iK»viOn! IftSeptember 19—Victor confers with the Dean. September 20—Suddeth registers for the twelfth time. Ag. Faculty weeps. September 21—Selig applies for board at the Senior Round Table. September 28—Coach Cunningham decides to award “GY’ on merit; Dorsey and Broyles join the scrubs. October 2—Prof. Park advises Burkhardt to read good literature. Burk subscribes to the ‘Red and Black”. October 5—Calvin George goes to Mercer; Gus Sparks stops eating ham. October 7—The Ag. Club gives reception to new students; Farmer Davis and Martin eat three plates each. October 8—The Irish Club formed; Nanney given onc-half membership. October 15—Try-out for Glee Club held at K. A. House; Athens paper says, “No new men need apply.” October 19—1 he Horticultural Club meets; Chandler elected president by one majority. October 24—Col. Kendricks orders Capt. Michael not to give commands in Yiddish. October 25—Henry West tells Pennington that he does not believe in carrying politics into honorary clubs. October 29—Ag. Club gets a mascot; Miss Suddeth arrives. November 1—October issue of the “Georgian” appears; Freshmen ask who started the new magazine. November 3—First rehearsal of the Glee Club; Harmony flies before fearful odds. November 5—Conyers explains cotton industry to Dr. Curtis. November 6—First half-term ends; Broyles, Howell. Holland, and Bassett make A-plus in Chemistry. November 15—Dcmosthenian declines to be levied on for literary banquets at the Georgian Hotel. November 18—“Georgian” Board promises the next vacancy to three men. November 20—Regimental Quartermaster Moss appears in citizen’s clothes; Poss refuses him credit. November 25—Dr. Fountain discovers that a supposed eclipse is only a dead rat in the telescope. November 29-—Slappey sees bronze bust of Homer in the library, and says that he never knew that the Indian race had produced any great men. December I—Dave Bryant introduces a “hubbing” to escape a zero. Asbury gesticulates. December 2—Rumors of a vacancy on the “Georgian” board. Hendricks says "hope deferred maketh the heart sick.”December 3—Date of Thalian play announced. Price of rotten eggs goes to fifty cents a dozen. December 6—L. G. Proctor adopts the Ag. Club. December 12—Horace Clements nearly breaks up a game of basket-ball at Lucy Cobb; one of the players refuses to play unless he be admitted. December 20—Parents get invitations from the Dean to retain certain future presidents after Christmas. January 6—Forty-three "canners” arrive; the “cutters” take notice. January 9—Dave Bryant introduces the Hereford cow as the choicest specimen of the bovine aristocracy. January 10—Gov. Slaton speaks. Photographer spoils five dollars worth of films. January 15—Students’ Supply Store declares dividends; financial panic averted. January 18—Hastings canvasses Athens merchants in the interests of sweet charity. January 30—Prof. Proctor appears with cane. February 2—Field-Marshal Jacobson is given a post of honor in the rear rank. February 3—Anniversarian contest; Red Collins fails to try. February 4—Demosthenian debate Federal control of divorce; judges decide that marriage is a failure. February 6-1 I—New vaudeville in town; Wimberley cuts college. February 7—Hendricks goes to Dr. Proctor; is elected to the “Georgian" board; Mitchell says it is the unkindest cut of all. February 9—Consternation in the ranks of the clique; Ed Dunlap and Bob McWhorter seen talking together. February 10—Student finds book he wanted in the library; end of the world predicted in the near future. March 27—Red Collins does missionary work with Algcna. March 30—W. R. McDonald stopped from umpiring ball game because of prejudice in favor of Senior lawyers. April I—Schwab admits that he is a wise man. April 3—Anvil chorus meets on Jackson St.; Evergreen Davis later refuses to come out from under Meadow’s bed. April 4—All Senior lawyers agree that they will graduate; prospects bright for civil war. April 10—Orders cancelled for several caps and gowns. April I 1—Pandora goes to press; Editors take a rest. Later insert. June 18—Victor and Michael graduate; the Country is saved.™M 1 1 ll « 1 It 11 III B - ♦ • A1 There was a man in our town. Who wa not famed for knowledge. He made ihe Freshman pushball learn, His firs year in ihe college. He started in the pushball game. As gentle as Apollcr, But found it was too hot for him, So off he took his collar. His coat soon followed suit, and then Away he threw his vest; His shirt was soon torn off his back,-He felt almost undressed. His trousers legs got in his way. So off he pulled his pants,— He looked just like a chorus man, In Gertrude Hoffman's dance. But. gentle reader, I presume You’re modest as you're gentle; It would not do to tell in words How this guy did dismantle. For if I wrote the very truth To publish in Pandora, You’d read it, and I know that it Would get your sweet Angora. ! i ill AMI ill • 9 11 | Rjgd 3lil 1 II I I i 1S What They Want for Graduation Evergreen Davis Victor Victor . Beans Barrett R. E. Curtis . Jack Johnson Pierce Merry . Leroy Michael Charlie McDaniel Bob McWhorter W. G. Preston John Wade . Edcar L. Pennincton L. G. Proctor . George Harrison Rucker Ginn J. C. Howard . Aaron Bernd . Red Collins T. D. Symmes The Georgian Board Dick Russell Red Collins. . The Faculty . .......................................A clean collar Some medicine for my constitution ............................A framed picture of myself ..........................................Some hair oil . . . . A new Extortion Hole or its equal .....................A vanity box and a looking glass .......................................Another uniform .....................................A diploma Nothing but to beat the clique once ............................................ A shave . . . A hammer and an opportunity to use it . . . . A leave of absence from the Univ. .....................A place on the Pandora Board .....................A front page story of myself ................................I o learn how to sing .................T o learn how to write love letters ....................One set of Taussig’s Economics ...........................To make a speaker’s place ...............................To reform the world ....................To get out at least one issue ...........................To sell all the Pandoras ...............................To sec Algena again 1 o have Suddeth, Victor and Pennington graduate Why The Pandora Has Prospered (Victor bribed the Board to publish this.) McKamy and Bernd were counting Pandora ballot votes. Adamson butted in. Adamson picked up a ballot and looked it over. McKamy objected that the honor of the Board was at stake if an outsider were allowed to view the secret slanders, which, the ballot-slips promised, would not be disclosed. Adamson: "Rats! 1 he honor of the Pandora board could be bought for three cents.’’ BERND (Seizing the opportunity) : "Mac, tell Dick Russell to send him a bill.’’ Bill Campbell: Admitted for growing most hair on the least area. BILL Turner: Admitted for having least backing to the largest moustache. Victor Victor: Admitted for raising greatest amount of moustache in nine months. W. R. McDonald: Admitted for ability to shave in the dark without cutting one moustache hair. Oscar E. HollemaN: Admitted for shaving his off. Ivey W. Rountree: Admitted for ability to talk most with hair on his face. CltAUNCEY MlDDLEBRCOKS: Admitted for having the nerve to Iry. AUCUSTUS O. B. SpaRKS: Admilted for most consistent effort under adverse circumstances. HENRY H. WhelCHEL: Admitted for greatest ability to conceal his moustache (?). Jos. S. MYERS: Admitted for greatest number of attempts in nine months. J. D. WeinklE: Admitted for growing greatest amount of shapeless fuzz. Olin Steve Pace: Admitted for serious attempt to spoil his beauty. Lewis A. PlNKUSSOHN: Admitted for possessing greatest area for moustache cultivation. W. Erle Daley: Admitted for condescending to make the attempt. COURTLAND S. WlNN: Admitted for growing the least noticeable moustache in the greatest possible lime. W. T. JENKINS: Admitted for growing a moustache as thick as.his eyebrows. Gene 'Iaylor: Admitted for greatest resemblance to a porcupine. THOSE WHO TRIED FOR ADMISSION WERE AS FOLLOWS: R. N. Schwab: Admitted for missing the opportunity. Jack A. Johnson: Ruled out for professionalism. Edgar L. PENNINCTON: (We just couldn’t leave him out.) Dr. WHITE: “Mr. Gillis, if water is evaporated and then steam is condensed, what will we get? ” GiLLJS: "Petroleum, sir." Bill Turner: “That Hammond boy is the laziest boy I ever saw." Red COLLINS: "What’s the matter with him? " Bill: “He stood out in the snow three hours too lazy to freeze and then went to bed and stayed awake three more, too lazy to go to sleep.” PROF. GeISSLER: “There is seven times as much crime in the South as there is in Germany.” JACOBSON: "But Prof., we have so many chinks, niggers and Germans over here.” PROF. GEISSLER: “Which do you come under, Mr. Jacobson? ”s H ANS SHAKING STUDENT: “I spent three hours on this lesson last night. Professor.” Dr. CURTIS: ‘ How, had it under your pillow? CHANCELLOR (on seeing two Sphinx initiates on exhibition) : “There ’re the two S’s; where’s the A?” Dr. CAMPBELL: “And if WC call the forward end of the grasshopper, the anterior, Mr. Howard, what do we call the rear end?’’ Crip Howard: "The back-teria, I reckon Dr. McPherson: "And what was the South Carolina Exposition, Mr. Webb? " WEBB: "Oh, it was a large fair, (or the purpose of displaying products, and so on.” STUDENT: "But in defining a chair. Professor, wouldn't you have to limit your definition to an article of furniture having seating capacity for only one person? Dr. WoofTER: "Yes. for if there were room for two, wed call it a set-two, wouldn't we?Deutsch German five! My Marion, When we were first acquent It seemed to me you were a crip. That you were heaven sent. But soon I grew much wiser,— Since then no peace for me, L'Arabbiala came apace. 0 Marion Du B! German six! O woe! John, He look my breath away with Cermelshausen, Das Edle Blul, And lastly Immensee. Karl Heinrich quite exhausts me. 1 know what I must do: I must have drink, I must have food,— A ginger-snap—Zu-Zu! The world is too much with us. late and soon Talking and talking, we lay waste our powers: But what of this for comfort on an afternoon That calls to sleep! To sit at tables strewn With books in jingo tongues, like one who cowers Before adversity. A chi this Cid glowers At me like a capsule, and I am a-swoon Before Das Kalle Her:, Mon Dieul 1 d be Once more a Freshman stuffed with monstrous lies! The bliss of swearing in my native tongue, Would far outweigh the horrors of Math. Three. Make English One. seem part of Paradise, And bugle call a note by angels sung! True no wise thoughts are born that are not ours,— y dY A- - mJ LI, rZ=d Lw """'T LLT’Lyj ill 1.1 The Crafty Cuddler There lived a man with love to broad. For all the human race, That every one he interviewed He thought he must embrace. O! wondrous strange my tale may seem. But, list, and do not doubt, you. For every time you speak to him He throws his arms about you. But still more strange my tale may seem. Ere I have made an end. One day this avOpoiro« . Accosted by a friend. Just carelessly, at was his wont, To show his happy heart, Laid clinging arms, and then he looked And gave a mighty start. O 'twas a friend, all right, you know; Let no one say ‘twas not. But still when "Shorty" saw his face. He felt like he would drop. For though his love for human kind, Was ever warm and keen. He didn't think it justified His hugging of the Dean!L’Envoi No. II (Forgive me. Rudyard. old boy!) When our Iasi class is attended. And the dips are rolled up and lied; When the fiercest quizzes are over And the fear of flunking has died; We shall work. and. faith! we shall have to. Dig hard for a life or two. Till the earth that owes us a living. Shall render to us our due. And they that don’t jump will be starving. They will sit in a drug store chair, They will beat the whole town at checkers, And tell when the weather is fair. They will have their degree to speak of,— A.B., B.L., and all; — They will hang out a legal shingle. And never a client will call. And only our parents will praise us. And only the village will blame; And nobody works for money. And nobody works for fame. But each for the joy of resting. And each in his separate place. Shall pose as the sage of the country. And the smartest one of his race. E. L.Questions in Pandora’s Box Q.—My complexion was spoiled by my painting up for the Senior parade. Can you please tell me how to remodel it?—Pierce Merry. A.—While peroxide is an excellent aid to blonds, we advise you to leave it spoiled for the good of the community. Q.—I have been a resident of Athens for six years. Can you please tell me how to get away?—Dicl( Russell. A.—We think the Seaboard vestibule is the fastest train leaving the city. Q.—I am troubled with overpowering insomnia. Do you know any remedy for this disease?—Hoyt H. IVhclchcl. A.—Get up. Q.—Can you please refer me to a good method of learning to speak in public? —Chas. IV. Jacobson. A.—We think that a course with Prof. Sanford or George Harrison would help. Q.—Because I foolishly painted my face for the Senior parade. I have a fever blister on my upper lip. What can I do for it?—Freddie Roy Jordan. A.—Either grow a mustache or cut off the lip. Q.—I have trouble with my carburetor. Can you tell me what to do for it? —Chas. B. McDaniel. A.—Why not cuss it out in French? Q.—Can you please cite me a good authority on games of chance?—Walter Amster. A.—Hoyle or Ernie Adamson. Q.—Can you tell me any way to make my car as famous as the “Speedwell Six” ?—John Wade. A.—Take Beans Barrett to Barnett Shoals, ar.d push him in the river. Q.—Can you please tell me a manner of removing freckles?—T. J. Collins. A.—Tattoo, like Algena. Q.—Can you please tell me the easiest way of getting thru college?—H. M. Pitts. A.—You might try an automobile. L. Q.—Can you please tell me who composed the ‘‘Harmony of the Sneeze” ?—Hugh Hodgson. A.—It was set to music by Edgar Pennington. j to01 Q.—I am a young man just leaving law school. Can you tell me the best way to get in with the criminals?—W. R. McDonald. A.—You might go to South Carolina. Q.—How can a man become famous at Georgia?—Ccorgc Slappcy. A.—Either graft or wear tortoise-shell glasses a la Barrett. PROF. McPherson: “Mr. Gillis who was the second president of the U. S.?’ Neal Gillis: "David Loyd Garrison, sir." Sylvie (1 o Hamp Bond who has his feet on the desk) : "Mr. Bond, what is law? " HamP: "I don’t know, sir." Sylvie: "If you would put your feet on the floor you would have your brains nearer a support and maybe you could answer." Dick Russell: "Roy, what course are you taking now? " Roy SMITH: "I have just started a correspondence course with the Dean." Aaron Bernd (to John Wade) : "John, what are Ed. Broyles, Clark Howell, Charlie Brown and Bassett doing in Dr. White’s office?" JOHN: "Having a family reunion, I think. ’’ 1 he following is a sample of a news item from the Red and Blacl : Gus Sparks: "Why docs the Beanery remind you of sunny Spain? DlCK Russell: "Because there are so many bull fights there." Dr. GEISSLER: "Do you know any one taking experimental Psychology who’s coming back and could be my assistant, Mr. Myers? Joe MYERS: "What about Hendricks, Professor?" Dr. G.—"I said I wanted an assistant.” Junior Lawyer: "Where are you from, boy? Plaster: "Atlanta, sir." J. L.: "Grant Park. I suppose, eh?" SKINNY Asbury: "Captain, did you know that George Harrison stole home in the Tech, game? Captain Rucker: "Good Lord! A lumber wagon? ” HoLLEMAN (picking up an Easter egg which a young lady has left on a seat) : "Miss, did you lay this egg here? "Deeds of Shakespeare all remind us, We can make our time well prized; And, departing, leave behind us Politics well organized. Oh, in Athens’ sunny clime. Where I have to spend my time, A-servin’ of 'is Majesty, the Dean, Of all the baseball men. The finest one I ken. Is our gentleman from Royston, Rucker Ginn. It is Ginn, Ginn, Ginn, You swift base-stealing runner, Rucker Ginn. Sure, you’re faster than McWhorter, And you’re fiercer than Huerta, You’re a better player than I am, Rucker Ginn. When commencement joys o’ercome us. There’s a thought which needs must grieve us; For we know, with lachrymation, Pennington is soon to leave us. AN EXCITING ADVENTURE.. There must have been a short circuit somewhere. 7 he lights were out all over Old College, and I wandered aimlessly on the lawn in front, gathering my scattered thoughts after the nerve racking experiences of the day. Suddenly I glanced up. From room twenty-three, there came a glow, a steady red glow, of bright—nay brilliant light. “The dormitory is on fire,” I thought. “God, Old College with its hundred years of tradition to be thus consumed by the ravishing flames! What, Oh, what, can I do? ” Then a thought struck me. “Lee,” 1 called, remembering that Hammond stayed in that room, “Lee, Lee, Lee.” my voice every minute becoming more agitated. It must have been ages before his sleepy head finally appeared in the window. “What in,—” he began; but I interrupted with, "Your room is on fire! I’ll send in an alarm at once! But he gave not the slightest sign of perturbation. “Go on back to your room," he dreamily muttered. “And, Red,” turning inward, toward where I imagined his roommate slept, “Red Collins, stick your head under the cover, so as to extinguish that unearthly glow.”To the “U. G.” Men We’ll Never Know Here is a toast I want to drink to the "U. G." men we'll never know— To the men who’re going to take our place when it’s time for us to go. I've wondered what kind of fellows they’ll be and I’ve wished I could take their hand, Just to whisper ”1 wish you well, old man," in a way they’d understand; I'd like to give them that cheering word I've longed at limes to hear. I'd like to give them an old hand clasp, as when a true friend is near. For I’ve felt the helping hand of friends and 1 wish I could hand it on To the "U. G." men who’ll some day take our place when we are gone. Will they see all the sad mistakes we’ve made and note all the battles lost? Will they ever guess of the tears these caused, or the heartaches which they cost? Will they gaze through the failures and fruitless toil to the underlying plan. And catch a glimpse of the real intent and the heart of the vanquished man? 1 dare to hope that they may pause some day as they toil as we have wrought And gain some strength for their weary tasks from the battles which we have fought. But we’ve only the endless task to leave with the cares for them to face, And never a cheering word may speak to the fellows who'll take our place. Then, here’s to your health. "U. G.’s” ! I drink as a bridegroom to his bride— We’ll leave our unfinished tasks to you. but God knows how we’ve tried, We’ve dreamed our dreams as all men do, but only a few come true. So my wish to-night is that Georgia’s dream may be realized by you. And we’ll meet some day in the great unknown—out in the realm of space; You'll know our clasp as we lake your hand and gaze in your tired face. Then all our failures will be success in the light of the new-found dawn— So I m drinking to you, "U. G.'s", who'll come when we are gone. L. G. Proctor, ’14.In closing its work, the Pandora Board of 1914 wishes to thank all those who have lent their aid toward making the book a success. We have no apology to make; but offer the book as it is. We have endeavored to make changes in the make-up of the Annual which we sincerely trust will meet with your approval. While we realize that it is far from perfect, yet we have put into it the best that we could and hope that our duty and trust have been discharged faithfully and well. We wish to thank especially Messrs. Wood, Coker, Owens, Davant, Stump, Wright and Stallings for their drawings, and Messrs. Pennington, Meadow, Kieffer, Mitchell and Schwab for literary contributions. Also we wish to express our appreciation of the many courtesies shown us by Prof. R. E. Park, Prof. W. D. Hooper, and Mr. W. C. Toland of Foote Davies. BOARD OF EDITORS.o TIME WILL TELL VTOUR eyes can tell you only what is on the surface. You have often seen in a shop window a garment which left you with the impression “It looks good for the money.” Perhaps you were tempted and swapped your dollars for the garment. Time told the true story. C. The story which time will tell of Wingfield’s clothes will be a story that justifies your judgment and not merely your impression, a story that will earn your good will for us. WINGFIELD’S The Shop of Quality ATHENS GEORGIAESTABLISHED 1868 Clothing Hats Shirts Shoes Neckwear Underwear Trunks Bags Leather Goods E have made the CLOTHES needs of YOUNG MEN not alone a study,but have qualified RESULTS in our buying the styles we have LEARN ED suit them best— But—there’s another feature the administration of our buying has taught—and that is, QUALITY-QUALITY that insures the GREATEST VALUE RETURNED TO YOU, for every dollar spent with us— Young Men will find every season’s style here in its season, and see them at their very BEST; and in the greatest variety and largest quantity. We want you to make this YOUR STORE; to know its possibilities for catering to you, to learn its advantages, and to feel that the spirit of cordiality welcomes you here. SIX ENTIRE FLOORS EIGHT BIG DEPARTMENTS Eiseman Bros •9 Inc. 11-13-15-17 Whitehall The South's Largest Clothing Store| Chas. Stern Co. FOUNDED 1867 A “from head-to-foot” man’s store, catering particularly to men’s and young men’s taste in fashionable clothing. Give men what they want, when they want it, and in the manner they want it. That's service. Any business man will agree to it. We are running this store on the above plan, to give young men, business men, and every one else real service and value in clothes and furnishings. Chas. Stern Co. The Home of Good Clothes 1 1 I » _______ _________________________I ♦ I » I » I ♦ ♦ I I I » I I I • I I • I I 1 I I WE sell Stein-Bloch Co.’s Clothes; made in the latest fashionable models, as well as conservative styles. Here you will find garments that are cut with a snap and dash and graceful hang that appeals to every young man. I I Furnishings to go with the Clothes I i 1 ■ : I E. H. DORSEY! i i LILLEY UNIFORMS Are Sterling Quality They are highly attractive in appearance and superior in point of style to other makes of uniforms for colleges. University of Georgia students will find Lilley Uniforms unequalled for wearing qualities. They are stanchly built, and stand the test of college wear. See our local representative, E. H. DORSEY, Athens, Ga. The M. C. Lilley Co m Columbus, OhioWe Make the Clothing We Sell And give you better garments in fit, workmanship and fabric than the merchant who buys them, and save you from $5.00 to $10.00 on a suit. | When in Augusta MAKE YOUR HEADQUARTERS AT WHITE’S Everything for Men, including Head McMahon i i S0,hi"f Shoes- ,Haber,dashcry’ ATHENS, GA. j Etc. Also everything for your ! Best Girl. i i WE ARE THE ORIGINAL No More $15 No Less TAILORS Our line comprises the leading fancy and staple Woolens. No extra charge for Double Breast Sack Coats, Extra Size or Extra Length Garments, ("uffs on Coats and Trousers, Half Lined Coats, Fancy Haps, Tunnel Belt Loops, Open Welt Seams on Trousers. National Woolen Mills 144 CLAYTON STREET E. H. JESTER, Manager I The J. Willie Levy Co. AUGUSTA GEORGIA w Ma Everything That Men, Women and Children Wear HEADQUARTERS FOR COLLEGE MENTHE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, Athens, Georgia Named by the U. S. Commissioner of Education as being among the best fifteen State Normal Schools in the United States. Forty-six officers and teachers, ten buildings, seventeen departments of instruction. The Home life courses are among the strong, est in the South. Domestic Arts and Sciences, Manual Arts, Agriculture and School Gardening, Instrumental and Vocal Music-Physical Culture. Education for efficiency and happiness in the home. Write for Catalogue. JERE M. POUND, President.University of Georgia MEDICAL DEPARTMENT AUGUSTA, GEORGIA v. II. DOUGHTY. Jr.. A.B.. M.D . Dean W. C. LYLE. M.D Vice-Dean W. 1). CUTTER. A. B.. M. D.. Secretary An Integral Part of Member Association of Rated ns Class "A" by the the University System American Medical Colleges Council on Medical Education EIGHTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 16. 1914 COURSE—Four years duration of thirty-six weeks each. Instruction is eminently practical throughout. Combined courses of six years lead-ins: to B.S. and M.D. Decrees. LABORATORY FACILITIES--thorough technical training in seven different and fully equipped laboratories. CLINICAL ADVANTACES-AU medical charities in the city under Contro of Faculty- Classes arc divided into small sections and students come into intimntc personal contact with patients in Hospitals and Clinics Every Senior student has a period of hospital residence. LIBRARY—A modern reference library is available for use of the students. BULLETINS will he sent upon application to Secretary. Georgia Military College MILLEDGEVILLE, GA. The Military School of the South Located in the old capitol building of Georgia. Modern j Barracks,well appointed and furnished with all conveniences, j Personal attention is given each student by instructors, j specialists in their line. Army officer detailed by United States Government gives military instruction. Daily drills j in the open air. Library, laboratories, and complete col- j legiate equipment. Location free from malaria; salubrious j climate, pure water, mild winters. Outdoor sports the en- j tire year. College athletics, baseball, football, basket-ball, j gymnasium and track coached by faculty athletic instructors. J FALL TERM OPENS SEPTEMBER FIRST ♦ Write for Handsome Catalogue COL. O R HORT ON. A B . President, j Containing Full Informa ion Milledgeville, Georgia I| BOYS! BOYS!! BOYS!!! ! ! | Have you ever stopped to think? | • What am I going to do when j j I finish at the University? j i | IF you expect to enter the iegal profession, you can carry J with you no more valuable asset than familiarity with | stenography. Numbers of our graduates have formed ! J very desirable connections through their knowledge of J | stenography. If you expect to enter the commercial world, i j you should equip yourself by taking our course in Book- ! j keeping and Banking. j j J Let us suggest a plan. When you return to resume your J ! work in September, arrange to spend your leisure time here ! ! in taking a course of Business training, one, two, or three j hours a day for a few months will accomplish wonders. It j I will not cost much and will be the means of getting the I j preparation required to meet the demands of the Business } World. | | J Cj Payments—We will arrange to let you make a small { i payment monthly if you wish, until course is paid for. i j ! We pledge you our best service. j | — | ATHENS BUSINESS COLLEGE I I ATHENS, GEORGIA j I II Hon. H. H. Revill, Reporter, Lawyer, Judge and Journalist, Says The Southern Shorthand and Business University, of Atlanta, Georgia, ! Is the Best School of Its Kind in the South JUDGE HENRY H. REVILL, whoso strong commendation of the Southern Shorthand and Business University we present below, i is one of the most prominent professional men of Georgia. Having been an official reporter in the Georgia Conns for over j twenty years, in charge of the Coweta Cir- uit, and, at the present time, | being one of the State’s most important judges, able law ers, well-j know n and talented journalists, coming in daily contact w ith report-[ ers, stenographers, lawyers, business and profes ional n en of every | kind and station, he is peculiarly fitter to render such an important J decision as that announced in his letter, that the Southern is “the best j school of its kind in the South ” No other evidence so convincing of superior merit could possibly j be produced as that contained in Judge ReviU’s letter. His testimony j is supreme, and the Southern feels greatly gratified that it can furnish j to prospective pupils such overwhelming evidence of its merits and | high standing. I Mr. A. C. BRISCOE, President, Greenville, Gn.. Nov. 12th, 1913. Southern Shorthand 5c Business University, Atlanta, Ga. My Dear Sir: It gives me pleasure to express my unqualified endorsement of your University. It was my good fortune to learn the stenographic art at your school, and to the training J received there is due a large meed of credit for whatever measure of success 1 have at-| tained in life. The system of shorthand taught by you is the simplest and most accurate, and the J method of instruction, the shortest and most thoroui h After twenty years of active experience as a court reporter, I unhesitatingly rccom-I mend it above all others, it is the system used by practically all the most accurate and | successful reporters. In addition to what I have stated, I might truly say that high above all the t other advantages of your school is the moral atmosphere that pervades your halls, j Christian teachers, well grounded in the Christian faith, and the influence of their | lives, render your college a fitting place for a boy or girl to study and learn lessens for t time and eternity. Yours is the best school of its kind in the South. Very trulv yours, HENRY H. REVILL, Judge City Court, Greenville. ADDRESS A. C. BRISCOE, President or L. W. ARNOLD, Vice-President lO.i, w. Mitchell Street, Atlanta, GeorgiaM Nlfft! 5) Lombard Iron Works and Supply Company AUGUSTA, GA. FOUNDRY, MACHINE, BOILER WORKS AND SUPPLY STORE CAST EVERY DAY. CAPACITY FOR 300 HANDS C. I, Erie and Ames Engines, Korling and Leader Injectors, Turbine Water Wheels. Etc. BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN Engine . Boiler . Steel Bridge . Roo i. T»nk», Tower and Building Construction. Complete Cotton. Saw. Gri t, Oil. Fertilizer, Gin. Press. Cane and Shingle Mill Outfit . Building. Bridge, Factory, Furnace and Railroad Castings. Railroad. Mill. Machinists'and Factory Supplies. Belting. Packing. Injectors. Fittings, Saws, File . Oiler . Etc. Sh ftlng. Pulley . Hanger and Boxes. Mill Suppli • and Tools. Wear International Made-to-Measure Clothes Guaranteed to be right. If they are not right. You have no right to take them. Largest Tailors in the World S. A. GINN’S SONS ROYSTON, GA. « I When You Want Shoes Think of Us ATHENS SHOE CO. 259 Clayton Street Phone 141 RED SEAL SHOE SHOP 601 Broad Street Phone 618 Wesleyan College MACON, GEORGIA THE oldest college on the American continent for the education of women. Class “A” of the M. E. Church, South. Wesleyan does four years of high class work with thoroughness unsurpassed by any institution of learning in the South. Especially strong are the courses in Languages, Literature, the Sciences, Mathematics, History, Ixonomics. Education, Philosophy and Bible. Excellent Departments of Music, Art and Oratory are Maintained. The Physical, Social and Religious Environment is Ideal. Address, C. R. JENKINS, D.D., Pres. i , ¥S 0 I ' A i)t Atlanta journal YOUR PAPER ge Sure to Have It Follow You The Journal Covers Dixie Like the Dew u THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION DAILY, SUNDAY TRI - WEEKLY “The Standard Southern Newspaper” Watches for Ladies and Gentlemen i In buying from us you will have a confidence in your purchase that is satisfying, and the guarantee of R. BRANDI' behind it, which means that no matter what the article, it will be found as represented R. BRANDT The Jeweler and Optician See Mr. Case, of Boston, Our Optician, About Your Eyes ! Citizens Ban j Trust Comp ik •any Al x © CAPITAL $50,000 Total Resources . . $200,000.00 ATHENS, GEORGIAWalter Ballard Optical Co. Will start you right when your eyes need help. If it is glasses we will supply them; if it is treatment we will so advise. Our stock is the most complete of any Optical House in the entire South. Ask anybody how we do business. w. 85 PEACHTREE STREET (Clock Sign) Atlanta, Georgia Choice Cut Flowers For Any Occasion Corsages and Bouquets a Specialty Roses, Carnations. Violets, Lilies, Orchids, Sweet Peas. All Colors. 105 Peachtree Street Opposite Piedmont Hotel ESTABLISHED 1893 | NAT KAISER CO., Inc. j Diamonds - Watches - Jewelry Class and College Pins J 21 Peachtree Street ATLANTA, GA. JA Progressive Bank in the Leading City of the Growing South Accounts of Young Business Men Who possess the valuable assets: willingness to work, and ability to earn, grow and succeed, are welcomed and will receive special consideration at the AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK ATLANTA, GEORGIA Capital and Surplus, $1,200,000.00 OFFICERS DIRECTORS WILLIAM L. TEE!..........President L. II. BECK R. F. MADDOX ROUT. F. MADDOX.....Vice-President B. M. BLOUNT G. A. Nlt-OLSON THOS. J. PEEPLES...........Cashier W. S. ELKIN W. L. PEEL JAS. P. WINDSOR..Assistant Cashier J. T. HOLLEMAN T. J. PEEPLES J. F. ALEXANDER .Assistant Cashier W. H. KISER B. L. WILLINGHAM United States, City, State and County Depository ESTABLISHED 1861 THE LOWRY NATIONAL BANK OF ATLANTA, GA. Capital, Surplus and Profits, $1,000,000.00 $1,000,000.00 Under Supervision of the United States Government, Banking in All Its Departments, Letters of Credit and Travelers Checks, Available in All Parts of the World, Interest Paid and Compounded Semi-Annually in Our SAVINGS DEPARTMENT BANKING BY MAIL J mmWm Dependable Photographs Phone THAT KIND Phone 1247 WORTH WHILE 1247 Picture Frames Made to Order KODAK FINISHING BOWDEN’S STUDIO 1281 COLLEGE AVE. Special Prices to Students — ON ALL_____ PHOTOGRAPHS AT FREDERICK J. BALL’S STUDIO SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 'r 4 P li v liT ' '.i,'. 1 ;T. Law Graduates WE CAN SUPPLY ANY LAW BOOK Published, including Complete Sets of GEORGIA REPORTS MICHIE’S GEORGIA DIGEST ENCYCLOPEDIAS Your Correspondence Solicited The Harrison Company 50 E. Hunter Street Atlanta, Georgia Students’ Law Books BOUGHT, SOLD and EXCHANGED i GEORGIA BOYS | - - ■ j Are n selected class of men from all over the State and should be considerate in all things. t Will you consider who has given you the Best Work, Service and Reliability in the past five years ? • THE RED BLACK PRESSING CO. 1 Phone No. 88 10- ROOM! i __—— Appreciates Your Patronage Meet Your Friends Here Twelve Carom and Pocket ! Billiard Tables j SODA, CIGARS, CIGARETTES j Finest Equipment in Northeast j Georgia COLLEGE AVENUE j m Ml -— i i JLLL 1 1 1 1 | 1 .A- A A - POSS’S PLACE Everything That Is the Best in Soda, Candy, Cigars, Tobacco A COMPLETE LINE OF PIPES Headquarters for Georgia Boys in Athens MEET ME AT POSS’S PLACE 157 College Ave. Telephone 1297 X j [ •.i CIGARr Foote --and-- Davies Company 0 the Casual Observer the strictly utilitarian lines of the building shown above suggest only a factory — that and nothing more. In reality it is the palace-home of the ideal, wherein the genii of the graphic arts combine the grayish mat- ter of the human mind with the multi- Atlanta Georgia Specialists in Educational Printing and the Theory and Practice of Graphic Arts colored substances of the material, in forms fit to address each soul, whether Psyche disport herself for its edification in the academic atmosphere of a cloistered alma mater or out on the breeze-swept campus of the old “University of Hard Knocks.” This page is a message for the illuminati, alumni or alumna?. Hear it! COSTA’S Sodas Candies The Best of Everything ! CIGARS FLOWERS SPECIAL AGENTS FOR I ! Southern Mutual Bldg. [TO GANDIES Athens, Georgia ! I I I Eugene V. Haynes Company Fine Jewelry, Watches, Diamonds, Rich Cut Glass, Art Goods and Silverware 37 Whitehall St. Atlanta, GeorgiaELECTRICITY is my servant; it docth my work. It cnnbleth me take mine ease. I can sleep in the morning. ♦ I hold its service in my hand. I I control it with my finger tips. | It maketh the coffee in the percolator. It toasteth the bread. J It heateth the water for my husband’s shave. I It cleancth my rugs and my carpets; the walls of my house and all of my furniture. J It washeth my clothes. J It ironeth my clothes. I It hcalf ih my rooms. It curleth my hair. My house would be incomplete without it. J Yea, tho I leave the house at nine in the morning to go on a shopping expo- J dition, Io, when I return at six p. m. the evening meal is cooked. My electric t firclcss cooker docth it. The clock attachment manageth the cooking. I By night it showeth me my way with its light. It kcepeth me from dark places and | [ bad bruises. [ I At night it warmeth the milk for the baby in the milk warmer. j Yea, tho I sit up of nights to read by its light I would not be without it at twice the j I price. iRefreshing, invigorating and cooiing —nature’s way of keeping coo! in summer. Has just the tang that makes you want more. J A real effervescing thirst quencher — it has body and a peculiar indescribable satisfying taste. B’.udwine is a wine among soft drinks, beady and spariding—not an insipid sweetened concoction—but a dnr.k with a character. . 5c AT FOUNTAINS — IN POTTLES 5c ! • t N_—™ •!• '' • -Ui ill! !Ui r A New World’s Record for Typewriter SPEED and ACCURACY Was Established by the UNDERWOOD Operated by Margaret B. Owen at the phenomenal rate of 125 net words a minute, it repeated in 1913, for the - - Eighth Consecutive Time its - - Record Breaking History At the International Contests, Winning the Thousand Dollar Silver Trophy Cup UNDERWOOD “The Machine You Will Eventually Buy” Underwood Typewriter Company (INCORPORATED) 52 North Broad St. Atlanta, Georgia BRANCHES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES”r:TTlMlg31 v V « ik-44l I Renting of Caps and Gowns to Graduating Classes a Specialty E. R. MOORE COMPANY MAKERS OF Collegiate Caps, Gowns and Hoods ORIGINATORS OF Moore’s Official High School Cap and Gown 4014-16 Broadway, CHICAGO. Annual Distributors of Caps and Gowns to the Graduating Classes at the University of Ceorgia i i [d ELMAR’S j Dairy Lunch! j RUN BY AN AMERICAN t f i 146 Clayton Street ATHENS, GA. Telephone 317 Best Eats in Town American Writing Machine Company Rebuilt Typewriters of AH Makes Atlanta Sales Office 48 NORTH PRYOR ST. | Ad1 i i • i 11 i B0 l|l I Ijl . ifr ♦ » I I I » ♦ I » I » » t I I ! I « ! I HERNDON’S i ■ - . ■ — I Atlanta is 32nd city in size. Our Shop is the largest, finest, most sanitary and best ventilated shop in the world. Don’t Jail to visit us for the best of everything in the Tonsorial Art. Twenty-four artists always ready to serve you. 66 PEACHTREE STREET Thf, Atlanta RESERVED IIV A FRIEND J. H. STONE G. E. STONE National Bank Capital $1,000,000.00 Surplus and Undivided Profits $1,150,000.00 Deposits $6,500,000.00 OFFICERS CHAS. F, CURRIER. President F. E. BLOCK. Vice-President JAMES S. FLOYD. Vice-President GEO. R. DONOVAN. Cashier J. S. KENNEDY, Assisttnt Cashier J. D. LEITNER. Assistant Cashier Books, Pamphlets, Folders Promptly Executed i i The E. D. Stone Press I i PRINTING | I Commercial Work Solicited Satisfaction Guaranteed 137 LUMPKIN STREET !_________________________! We Solicit Your Accounti : i ♦ ♦ i : i i ! « I I • ♦ I « t ♦ ♦ » ! » I i I ♦ » ♦ ♦ I YOU well dressed young men, j who are looking for the latest j things, will find it to your ad- j vantage to visit our Store. The | tariff law has made it possible for us i to offer some very fine foreign j clothes at reasonable prices, which j have formerly been sold by only a j few merchant tailors in large cities j at high prices. j Kahn Dreyfuss | has made and sent us some beautiful j fabrics, made in very stylish suits j for young men. They are young j men clothes builders. They are j made up in snappy models. They j will please you. i YVe will be glad to have you come j in at any time. Our service is the j kind you are looking for. i Chas. Stern Co. ifj — it answers every beverage requirement—vim, vigor, refreshment, wholesomeness. It will satisfy you. Demand the genuine by full name— Nicknames encourage substitution. THE COCA-COLA COMPANY Whenever you see an Arrow think of Coca-Cola. University Jeweler WATCH FOBS SOUVENIRS GEORGIA SEALS AND PINS Fraternity Jewelry a Specialty (£. A. Sruiitier Jrrorlrr. anb (Optician Attiftu, - - Georgia W  


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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1911 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1912 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1913 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1915 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.