University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1912

Page 1 of 326

 

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1912 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1912 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1912 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1912 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1912 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1912 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1912 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1912 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1912 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1912 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1912 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1912 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1912 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 326 of the 1912 volume:

WINGFIELD’S is to Suits as STERLING is to Silver IT STANDS FOR EVERYTHING that you should demand in a Suit---PERFECT fit, choicest materials, durability, and superior tailoring. When you buy a WINGFIELD suit that is your absolute guarantee of complete satisfaction. And all the clothes we handle are of the same standard of excellence. Be sure to drop in and inspect our line of the newest models and more conservative styles. WINGFIELD’S “The Shop of Quality” ATHENS Was founded by the people 126 years ago “to place the youth under the forming hand of society, that by instruction they may be moulded to the love of virtue and good order ” IT OFFERS THE YOUNG MEN OF THE STATE THE BEST ADVANTAGES IN ALL ITS HISTORY AND INVITES THEM TO STUDY IN THEIR UNIVERSITY 1. BECAUSE it is probably the best equipped educational institution in the South Atlantic States. 2. BECAUSE it is the cheapest institution in the south. The rich can get nothing better; the poor can secure the best. Thus the State equalizes opportunities regardless of class or sect. 2. BECAUSE of the great number of courses open to them for special study, classical, scientific, technical and professional. 4. BECAUSE of the many positions open to our graduates. •" . BECAUSE it is the oldest State college in America. ( . BECAUSE it is a growing and prosperous institution. It has a national reputation, and its diploma does not have to Ik defended, but adds strength to the possessor. 7. BECAUSE it stands for liberal culture, freedom of thought, thoroughness of scholarship and soundness of character. 8. BECAUSE of the opportunity for v. holesome physical development. 9. BECAUSE of the social advantages derived from life in a university town. 10. BECAUSE of the opportunities for research, for debates. 11. BECAUSE it is a permanent institution. 12. Georgia needs the best service her young men can give. Georgia calls upon her sons to prepare for leadership. Her university was built for them and stands ready to help them. 1,086 Students enrolled at Athens this year; 4,396 students enrolled this year in the University system. Send for bulletins decribing the Law, Pharmacy, Engineering, Education, Agriculture, Literary and Scientific Courses, to THE UNIVERSITY, Athens, Ga.fir GA. LEADS IN ATHLETICS! We Lead in Tailoring Fit and Quality Guaranteed All Wool Union Made Suits and Overcoats made to your Measure. Complete line of Newest Patterns to select from 1) ) I in » » » m m |jj m » I ») }) )) ) NATIONAL WOOLEN MILLS E. H. JESTER. Mgr. 145 Clayton St. ATHENS. GA. YOUNG MEN Have their own ideas about their Clothes. It’s a pleasure to us to give you what you want. We make the Clothes we sell and give you what you ask for. We save you one profit and you will see the difference if you will see our prices. HEAD McMAHAN i ) )) )) )) » )) » » Young Men’s Clothes Requirements If YOU are a GOOD dresser, we need not tell you that this is the “ Young Mens's Clothes Shop." WE sell Stein-Bloch Co s Clothes; made in the latest fashionable models, as well as conservative styles. Here you will find garments that are cut with a snap and dash and graceful hang that appeals to every youg man. Furnishing to go with the Clothes E. H. DORSEY1912PC I I [fcBUMTo the Alumni liy Edgar L. Pennington. To those who from these hallowed walls away Have turned their steps, to crowd the busy mart, Speed forth the kingdom, touch the man and heart, Or gild the desert with benignant ray: Dark seems the road. The swimmer tempts the bay, And angry billows fast against him dart; Yet, striving on. he cleaves the tide apart;— So may we e’er behold the promised day. It takes the clouds that deck the eastern skies. To lend the mellow dawn its richest hue, To add gay luster to the sun at rise. Fresh-clothe him on his errand, and endue With brilliance. These o’ereome, the glowing light Mounts boldly up the zenith clear and bright.Editors of Pandora Volume XXV, 1912 Editor-in-Chicf Marion B. Folsom, 2 N Associate Editors Art Editor James B. Wright, Jr. Business Manager II. D. Russell Assistant Business Manager H. Stanley LangstonNEff ON P FOLSOM H. P ffUSSFL L EPITOff W CH FF BUSINESS MFNFOEff U'FMES P yy f GHT H- S. L Ef YOS TON FtffT FP TPff FSST. PUS NO f.Our Alumni By T. W. Reed. The greatest service a parent can perform lies in the training of the child in such manner that through his life the advance of civilization may be made more certain, more rapid, more satisfactory. The child, so trained, falls far short of his duty and his privileges, if. after the years of manhood have arrived, he fails to render loving homage to that parent in word and deed and spirit. The greatest service a University can render to the state and to civilization is the preparation of her sons for the great battles of life, the training of their minds, the broadening of their views, the disciplining of their wills, the elevating of their ideals, the ennobling of their ambitions, the rounding out of their characters. The graduate falls far short of his duty and his privileges, if. after having received these benefits, he forgets the hand that guided him and the spirit that inspired him and the service that equipped him for his life-work, and fails to repay in active and grateful service the generous and effective assistance rendered him in his days of struggle. Measured by this standard the University of Georgia boasts a record of service that is full of glory, and her sons, in recognition of that service, have measured up and still are measuring up to their full duty of filial affection. In the pulpit, at the bar. at the bedside of the sick, in the school-room and in college halls, in the legislative assemblies of state and nation, in the great business marts, in the fertile fields, at home and abroad, in every sphere of life they have illustrated the strength and virtue, the culture and refinement, the determination and progress, the patriotism and unselfishness, the devotion to duty and fidelity to truth and honor for which their Alma Mater has ever stood. One may very largely call the roll of Georgia's illustrious sons from the alumni register of the University of Georgia, and closer investigation would reveal hundreds, yea thousands, who. though not enveloped in the limelight of public notice, have nevertheless in their less conspicuous fields of labor returned to the state and to humanity, in successful and unselfish service, full and ample payment for all they received in the years of study and training in the halls of the University. In lofty and noble living, in faithful and unselfish service to state and country, in adding to the best that is in civilization, in efforts to uplift humanity, in the struggle to make the world better, in the achievements so splendidly made in every honorable field of human endeavor, the alumni of the University have rendered their Alma Mater the greatest service possible for them to have performed.The University of Georgia welcomes at all times the generous financial assistance of its alumni, welcomes every effort they make to enlarge its facilities and secure to it advantages that money alone can give, welcomes the vigorous, enthusiastic college spirit that arouses the interest of the people in the work that is being done hen , welcomes the broad acres and the magnificent buildings that have come from the loyal hearts of her faithful sons to enable her to give to the present generation and to generations yet to come advantages she could not give to those who have already gone forth from her halls, but above all these she prizes the upright, cultured, shining liv« s that illustrate the true value of her loving can and faithful work and pointing to these, she may well exclaim, like the mother of the Gracchi, “these arc my jewels.” Hut. along with lives of faithful service and high ideals goes an abiding interest in the material welfare of those who have extended a helping hand in time of struggle. The true son attends to every material want of his parents, not as a duty hut as an act of filial affection. So do the alumni of the University of Georgia count it not only a duty and a privilege to contribute in money, in time, and in effort to the material advancement of the University, but also an opportunity to show their real love and affection for the institution whose care and training were responsible in largest measure for their success in life. The past twelve years have ! een years of special activity along this line among the alumni of this institution. The administration of Chancellor Ilill witnessed remarkable interest on the part of the alumni, tin rallying of tin; University cohorts around the standards of the institution in the great battle for the advancement of the cause of higher education in Georgia. Thc administration of Chancellor Barrow has witnessed a steady increase in this feeling of interest and a great addition to the forces that are making the University one of the greatest educational institutions in the entire country. The Georgia alumnus of to-day delights to stand shoulder to shoulder with the great Georgian and great educator who presides over this venerable institution of learning and to give freely of his time and money and effort whenever the best interests of that institution demand the service. The alumni of Georgia, several years since, realizing the need for more generous financial support, raised an endowment fund of nearly fifty thousand dollars and decided to invest it in an alumni Y. M. C. A. building on the campus, where students might get the best gymnasium training, where they might he placed under tin most careful moral supervision, where college organizations might make their headquarters, where visiting alumni might go as they would to their own homes, where the alumni of the institution might hold their ralliesALUMNI HALLand keep alive and burning the spirit of the University. Subsequent gifts of the alumni and friends of the institution have swelled this sum to larger figures and the magnifieent building, when eomplcted. will cost, not fifty thousand dollars, but more than double that amount. When the plan for the enlargement of the Campus was evolved, the alumni eame forward generously with their contributions, and. aided by the City of Athens and other friends, have given to tin 1 Diversity a campus of nearly one thousand acres, a princely domain upon which in the future millions of dollars will be spent in erecting a plant, the superior of which w.ill not la found in the United States. For the improvement of athletics, the alumni have contributed nearly all the money with which the present magnificent ball grounds were secured. For the improvement of scholarship they have offered handsome prizes as incentives to closer and more effective study. For the assistance of worthy young men in their efforts to secure an education they have offered scholarships. For providing la tter facilities for the students they have added hooks to tin library and equipment to the departments. It is not difficult now to enlist their aid. for they arc alive with enthusiasm and realize the good that is being done in every field of activity by the University. The aroused interest of the alumni is making itself felt in state legislation, not as a lobby, but as a convincing force that is moulding public opinion. Largely through their efforts the state has been brought to see tin immense advantages flowing from ample and adequate appropriations, and the support of the institution by the state is more liberal than it has ever been. The University of Georgia, with all its glorious record, does not consist of historic old buildings or magnificent new structures; does not consist of library or laboratory or any other material equipment ; does not consist of endowment funds or financial balance sheets. The alumni, the men who are turned out as the product of the institution, the lives they live, the contributions of a lasting kind they make to civilization—these constitute the University, and in them Georgia is richer far than the famed mines of Golconda or the fabled treasures of all the ages.Government of the University of Georgia The government of the University of Georgia, by Act of the General Assembly, approved August 23. 1889. is vested in a Hoard of Trustees appointed by the Governor for a term of eight years, and confirmed by the Senate. The Hoard consists of one member from each Congressional District of the State, four from the State at large, and two from the city of Athens. The Governor of Georgia, the Chairman of the Hoard of Trustees of the North Georgia Agricultural College. the Chairman of tin Hoard of Trustees of the School of Technology, the Chairman of the Hoard of Directors of the Georgia Normal and Industrial College. the President of the Commissioners of the Industrial College for Colored Youths, the Chairman of the Hoard of Trustees of the College of Agriculture, the Chairman of the Hoard of Trustees of the State Normal School, arc ex-officio members of the Hoard. The immediate control and management of each of the departments of the University situated elsewhere than at Athens is entrusted (subject to general control by the University Trustees) to a “Local Hoard” or “Commission,” of which the numl cr of mcml crs. mode of appointment and terms of office vary. The University Trustees meet in stated session on the Thursday preceding the Commencement Sunday, and at .other times, at their pleasure. The present organization of the Hoard is as follows: IIIS EXCELLENCY, GOV. JOSEPH M. BROWN, Atlanta, ex-officio. GEORGE P. GOHER. Marietta. From the State at Large Term Expires August 13, 1015. CLARK HOWELL. Atlanta, From the State at Large WILLIAM E. SIMMONS. Lawrenceville, From the State at Large HAMILTON McWIIORTER. Athens, From the State at Large SAMUEL H. ADAMS. Savannah. 1st Congressional District BYRON H. BOWER. Bainbridge, 2nd Congressional District DUDLEY M. HUGHES. Danville, 3rd Congressional District HENRY R. GOETCIIIUS. Columbus, 4th Congressional District HENRY 1). McDANIEL. Monroe. 5th Congressional District AUGUSTUS O. BACON, Macon, 6th Congressional District Term Expires August 13, 1917. Term Expires August 13, 1911. Term Expires August 13, 1911. Term Expires August 13, 1913. Term Expires August 13. 1913. Term Expires August 13. 1913. Term Expires August 13. 1913. Term Expires August 13, 1911. Term Expires August 13. 1917.J. LINDSAY JOHNSON. Rome, 7th Congressional District JOHN T. NEWTON. Madison, 8th Congressional District HOWARD THOMPSON. Gainesville, 9th Congressional District BOW DR K PIIINIZY. Augusta. 10th Congressional District JOHN W. BENNETT, Waycrews, 11 tli Congressional District JAMES WHITE. Athens, Resident Trustee HARRY HODGSON. Athens. Resident Trustee GEORGE FOSTER PEABODY. New York. Life Trustee, By special act of the General Assembly. NATHANIEL E. HARRIS. Macon, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the School of Technology. Ex-officio. THEODORE E. ATKINSON. Ncwnan. Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Georgia Normal and Industrial College. Ex-officio. PETER W. MELDRIM. Savannah. President of the Board of Commissioners of the Industrial College for Colored Youths. Ex-officio. W. B. McCANTS. Winder. President of the Board of Trustees of the North Georgia Agricultural College. Ex-officio. THOMAS J. SHACKELFORD. Athens. Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the State Normal School. Ex-officio. JAMES J. CONNER. Cartersvillc, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the College of Agriculture. Ex-officio. ENOCH II. CALLAWAY, Augusta, President of the Board of Directors of the Medical College. Ex-officio. HENRY I). McDANIEL................................................Chairman. THOMAS W. REED.....................................Secretary and Treasurer. The following appointments were made hv the Governor after the adjournment of the Legislature, and have not been confirmed by the Senate: JOSEPH E. POTTLE. Millcdgcville, From the State at Large. J. II. McGEIIEE, Talbot ton, 4th Congressional District. JOHN A. COBB, Americus. 12th Congressional District. Term Expires August 13, 1917. Term Expires August 13, 1911. Term Expires August 13, 1915. Term Expires August 13. 1915. Term Expires August 13. 1915. Term Expires August 13, 1915. Term Expires August 13, 1917.Hn Memortam Miss Sanih A. Frierson. over loyal lo the I’ni versify, the devoted friend of each student, died peaecfully on Sunday. March tenth, full of honor, happy in the love of all who knew her. Miss Frierson was made librarian of the Fnivcrsitv in 1888. She entered upon her duties without previous training, hut she was so willing, so faithful, so obliging, that she was efficient from the first. Her knowledge of the library became so thorough that she could on a moment’s notice find any hook called for. and thus meet the demands of her position. When the new building was opened and the organization of the library was changed so as to make the service accord with the modern system, it was found that Miss Frierson was so familiar with the books that her sendees were too valuable to be dispensed with. As the weight of veal’s liore down, her faithful spirit strove, and successfully strove, to maintain her usefulness, though the effort was telling on her health and strength. The authorities of the Carnegie Foundation, being informed of the eireuinstances, decided to place her on the roll of acceptable college workers, grown old in the service. When she was thus relieved there were three duties, if duty is the word, which Miss Frierson did not surrender: first, the care of her loved flowers on the campus; second, serving as chaperone at student entertainments; third, certain commencement courtesies, as pinning on I'nivcrsity colors, tying the diplomas with ribbon, looking after the comfort of visitors, sitting with Seniors on graduation day. in which she took pleasure. It is pleasant to remember a life so full of kindness to others, coming to a graceful and honored close, keeping parts of the life-work which are bright and brightening and laying aside those which are dull and beclouding. She. herself, in life, had evidence of the universal esteem in which she was held by the concord of approval which greeted the recognition of services at the time of her retirement from active duty. It was a rare experience. Those of us who survive her were made happy by the evidence of appreciation and loss. I will not say sorrow, which flooded in. making the service of laying this lady to rest more impressive than the costly obsequies of the rich and the renowned. Over the loyal heart we pinned old “Georgia’s” colors; we buried the smiting harshness of the grave under Georgia flowers; and from over the wide state—yes, and from far beyond her borders, thousands of Georgia hearts echoed the prayer. “God keep thee, kindly friend. God keep thee well.” "What more? What need for more? 1). C. Harrow.VThe University Faculty DAVID CRENSHAW BARROW, LL.D., Chancellor. ALFRED AKERMAN, A.B., M.F., Professor of Forestry. JOSEPH ALEXANDER ATKINS, (graduate U. S. M. A.), First Lieutenant 16th U. S. Infantry, Commandant of Cadets. SAMUEL CALDWELL BENEDICT, M.D., Dean of the School of Pharmacy, and Professor of Materia Mcdiea. HOMER VAN VALKENBURGII BLACK, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. JAMES CAMAK BLOOMFIELD, M.D., Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. WILLIS HENRY BOCOCK, A.M., LL.D., Dean of the Graduate School, and Millcdgc Professor of Ancient Languages. ROBERT PRESTON BROOKS, B.A. (Oxon), Adjunct Professor of Georgia History and Sociology. DUNCAN BURNET, Librarian. WILLIAM MILLS BURSON, D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Science. JOHN PENDLETON CAMPBELL, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. ANDREW JACKSON COBB, A.B., B.L., Lecturer on Constitutional Law and Legal Procedure. URIAH IIARROLD DAVENPORT, B.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. robert j. ii. Deloach, a. m., Professor of Cotton Industry. MARION DERELLE DuBOSE, A.M.. Adjunct Professor of English Language and Teutonic Philology. JOHN RICHARD FAIN, B.S., Professor of Agronomy. THOMAS FITZGERALD GREEN, B.L., Professor of Law. ERNEST LEE GRIGGS, (graduate V. M. I.), Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. •Absent on leave.ygssiP || LEROY COLLIER ITART, B.S.E.E, Professor of Farm Science. LINVILLE LAURENTINE IIENDREN, Ph D., Professor of Physics and Astronomy. WILLIAM DAVIS HOOPER. A.M.. Professor of Latin. MILTON PRESTON JARXAGIN, B.S, Professor of Animal Husbandry. JOHN CHRISTIAN KOCII. B. S. C. E„ Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering. JOSEPH LUSTRAT, Bach, es Lett., Professor of Romance Languages. THOMAS HUBBARD McTIATTON, Se.I)., Professor of Horticulture. JOHN HANSON THOMAS McPHERSON, Ph.D. Professor of History and Political Science, and Lecturer on Roman Law. ROBERT LIGON McWIIORTER, A.M., Adjunct Professor of Latin and Greek. ERALBERT TALMADGE MILLER, B.S.C.E., Instructor in Physics. JOHN MORRIS, A.M., Professor of English Language and Teutonic Philology. SYLVAN US MORRIS, A.M., B.L., Dean of the Law Department, and Professor of Law. ROBERT M. MURPIIEY, Instructor in Animal Husbandry. ROBERT EMORY PARK. A.M., Litt.D, Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. WILLIAM OSCAR PAYNE, A.M., Associate Professor of History and Political Science. ROBERT SPENCER POND. Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. JOHN MOORE READE, Ph.D, Professor of Botany. HENRY IIIRO ROTIIE, D.V.M, Instructor in Veterinary Science. SANDFORD MEDDICK SALYER. A.B, Adjunct Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. •Absent on leave.STEADMAN VINCENT SANFORD, A.B.. .Junior Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. CHARLES MERCER SNELLING, A.M., Sc.D., Dean of the University, and Professor of Mathematies. ANDREW McNAIRN SOULE, B.S.A., Sc.D., President of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, and Dean of the College of Agriculture. ROSWELL POWELL STEPHENS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. JOSEPH SPENCER STEWART, A.M., Professor of Secondary Education. CHARLES MORTON STRATI AN, C. and M.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. CORNELIUS AUGUSTUS WELLS, M S.. Instructor in Chemistry. HENRY CLAY WHITE, Ph.D., Sc.D., D.C.L., LL.D., Professor of Chemistry, and Terrell Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. ROBERT CUMMING WILSON, Ph.G., Professor of Pharmacy. TIIOMAS JACKSON WOOFTER, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Education, and Superintendent of the Summer School. WILLIAM ARCHER WORSHAM. Jr., A. M., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. WILLIAM TELFORD TURK, A.B., Tutor in Romance Languages. HOSE A ABIT NIX, A.B., Tutor in Rhetoric and English Literature. CHESTER HORACE McLEMORE, B.S., Tutor in Animal Husbandry. HOWELL BENAJAII PEACOCK, B.S., Tutor in Philosophy and Education. Student Assistants. W. L. SAVELL, Chemistry and Physics. C. D. FLANIGEN, Jr., Civil Engineering. R. T. GOODWYN. Civil Engineering. P. L. HUDSON, Biology.fSmllrgmym When Freedom Comes A SONNET Pandora, fair, now seek no more to get The wanton sprites back to your box. Why haste You so to capture them,—who sighed to taste Sweet liberty, who moaned and made loud fret That you, so young and beautiful, were set To guard the box,—the prison that encased The wily thing? You swore it were a waste Of all your youth. Now have they ’scaped and yet You wildly strive to get them back again. ’Tis so. Oft have we made a murmuring cry Against the ties that bind our youth, and keep Quite down the Haunting and the gaudy flags we fain Would float.—Today the lid is loosed. Now fly The years.—Our care is gone, and freed, we weep. —.John I). Wade.Senior Class History The purpose of this little sketch shall not he to hury the Class of 1912, nor to praise it. but if the latter purpose he over-stepped it should lx a boast of the training we have received, the class of work done and the effort towards the realization of the highest ideals. Since we took the first breath of “Georgia” atmosphere four years ago. tin-great goal ever before our eyes has been an effort to attain that knowldge by which we might know ourselves. The four years spent in college is something which should not 1h regarded lightly, but should he looked upon as a period of our lives in which we received such training as developed us from embryological Freshmen into men capable of serving in a notable and honorable manner their State, their Nation and their God. Tis true the experience sought by this class has been found in the various spheres of collegiate training, some specialized and some generalized, but as a unit the class has received an education which will reflect credit and honor of the highest type upon its individuals and upon its Alma Mater. The lofty ideals cherished by this great University have served as a creed for every one of us. and evidences of this fact may be seen in the precedents established by us tending toward a Greater University in all its phases. We have reverenced and preserved the thoughts, principles, and traditions of the Old South, but in this generation of college men we hope to emerge into a new era and establish principles of the New South, forcing the recognition of this land of ours as the pride of the Nation. Historian. JOSEPH H. KOSS. Senior Class Officers JOSKI'H II. KoSsS. Ciias. Joel.____ Paui, 1 j. Hudson II. S. Langston. C. II. Stone W. M. Lucas ... ................President ..........Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer. ...............Historian. ChaplainW. WRKJHT ABBOTT, JR., ••Wrluht." A.It. I’lil Kappa. LOUISVILLE. GA. "Thy modesty Is a candle to thy merit.' KDW'AKI) T. AXDKRSOX, "Kl).“ A.It. Chi I’hl. Phi Kappa. DAXItURG. GA. •Then West ward-ho! Grace ami good disposition 'tend your ladyship." WALTER (i. A CRICK, "Daddy." B.S. Alt. Dcniostheiilaii. RES AC A. GA. "Then with unwearied hand. Disdaining little delicacies, selrnl The plow, and greatly Independent lived.I)AXA ’. BEI SKH, ••IJiihii." A.it. Kappa SlgllUI. I'lll K.ippa MoNTGOMKltY. ALA. ICiglit faithful, true lie whs in deedc ami word: Itm of Ids ehcere did seemc too xolcmne itad.'' THOMAS S. BRAND, "Flsli.” A.It. Kappa Sigma. l lil Kappa AUGUSTA, GA. •My only liooks Were woman's looks. It.S. Sigma ('III. Doniosthcnlnii. STATKSItOItO. fin. Nothing endures but personal qualities. f) I- I’Al'li S. ItLANCIIAKI), ••I’niil.” A.It. Kappa Alpha. I’hl I up pip OOM'.MBUS. SA. "It iloes not pay to woriy. Things arc bound to happen anyway.' iiix vi i . brown, "ITenrlier." A.It. I'lil Delta Theta. I'hl Kappa. SIIAROK. »A. •In the very .May-morn of Ills yotlth. Klpe for exploits ami mighty enterprises. 'y •s i t? wV.'j i. It. MAVIS BRINSON, Plirw It.S. Ag. Delta Tail Delta. DemoSthenlnn. STII.LMOHK. OA. "Shall I not take mine ease' ” HOHS R. ('HIM)S, "('IiIIiiiim.” K.s. Air. Itoinostlionlaii. KOINI) OAK. «A. 'And nay wlilili urnln will jjrow, mid wlili'li will not." I,ICON II. -OYIXiiTOX, ••lluhblc .” A.It. 1 1 K:i|i| n Al|ilin. Dmiosllionlnn. t'AKTKKSVII LB. HA. ”TIh i|iiroii Ixdiiu nliscnt. ‘TIs ii ini-dfnl lltnoHH Unit we mljotim This I'oiirt.” YIIU.IL K. DUKDKX, "Kiinl." A.It. iK'inostlicnlnn. OltAY.MoNT. GA. •With loads of learned lumber In Ids llOJlll." 'iii l’hi. nil Kiipp.i MON'ROB. GA. lit Ik :i Kivu I. sweet silence. imholas flamokx "IIoiikIiik" ll.S.I'.K. riil K.ippii. ATIIBNS. GA. Who not needs. shall never Inek a friend. MAKION II. FOLSOM. ••Btiblicr.” A.15. SIkiii.i Nil. I ’III Kappa MeRAB. GA. •‘There Is :i «lfi beyond I lie reach of Art, of IipIiik eloquently silent.” It.S. Ar. Ix-ninstln-nhin. ATIIKXS. fSA. '•Iii'Iro IiIiii not by oiitwnnl bounty I.onks ilo not iIn- niliiil portray.” ('AXIXiKli M. «IXX "Citndlfr." It.S. Itomostlionhm. ItOYSTOX. CA. show Tln-lcs nrr praisoil. not Hint nbutnul In Ini-Rciiess. but «li exactly romul."I'AUIi L. HUDSON, "I )««■.” It.S. L’liI Kitppn. HAST POINT, OA. And Kindly wnuldc lie lCiirne mid Kindly lOrlKS,!’ (O.WV.W V. HUXTl "('oolpi.” It.S. PI Kuppn Alplni. Penn ATI-A 'I-A.-CA- StnuiKe t« I lie world, lie .w look." - KOIiKKT ). IIUTCHKSON, rtKob.” 15.S. Air. I'lli K: 11 I :l. ATLANTA. HA. ‘Nljrlit after night. Il« sat. ami hlciircil his eyes with hooks.' 1 CHARI.KS JOKL, •■C’liurlle.” A.H. Phi Kappa. ATIIKNK. !A. ‘Silent mnl soft and slow.' •IOSIAII TATTNALL KOI.LOCK, •Tat.” It.S. I’or. ICnir. Phi Kappa. ATLANTA. CA. ‘Conic hither from the furrow, anil he merry. 5 m , JH t • y ' • kfl • .1  Iim KOIlKItT A. I.AI HI), "Dor.” It.S.C.B. Slirmn Nil. Iiemosthpuluu. SAVANNAH. CA. 1 iim in t in the roll of pommoii 1111 11. II. STAXLKY LAXCiSTOX, "Stnnlry.” It.S. iHMIlOXlllPIllnil. .MONItOK. CA. "( . ulifhliuifule. (’«iso from iliy enamoured tale:" HOY !•:. LAX H AM. "Itoy." A.It. SIkiiiii (Mil. I’lii Kap| ii. 1(0.M10. CA. "Lofty anil sour to them that lined him not: Kill, to those men that sought him. sweet as summer." WALTKIi M. LUCAS, "Little Luke.” I!.S.( '.K. I «‘IIK»M( llOlllll II. WAVKKLY HALL. (iA. nn their own merits modest men lire ■III ml ." CIIAItLKS M. MoCLEAX, "lloke.” S|M elal. Simon Alplin Kpsilon. I'll! K:i|i| :i SAVANNAH. L . "Snnir in tones of deep emotion. Souks of love anil souks of IoiikIiik." WALTKK AZMRlt MANX, "Axle." A.It. Ileiiiostlienimi. MILNKlt. CA. •Wliut men ns tills passlonnte illseonrse. This |M rotlon wltli sueli elreiimstaneeVCHARLES E. MARTIN, "dmiiem." A.IS. Kappa Slgnm. Di-iiioMtlicnlnii. ('I'LLODBK. CA. "I'll iiinko me glorious liy my |kmi. Vital f'lllliiliv ItV lill W vv ill'll ' WILLIAM Kl. » MKAIIOW •others limy prnlso what they like: ISnr 1. from tin I milks of tin- riiiniln r Missouri, praise nothing.” HAROLD D. MEYER, "Kougr." a.it. rid Kuppn. Al■«l'STA. CA, Sir. your wit ambles woll; It goes easilyf V IIEKT .MICHAEL, ••Bert.” A.It. I'lil Knppn. ATIIKNS. OA. A mini In- seemed of cheerful yesterdays Ami 1'iiiiiiiK‘iit tomorrows. ’ A.It. Delta Tnu Delta. Demostlienlan ('OKINTH. OA. In each elieek appears a pretty illmple. WILLIAM HAM I MULLINS, ••FroiCKlc." A.It. Demostlienlan. PEXFIELI . OA. Studious of ease and fond of humlde I Id n KS.”('IIAKLKS h. nkwsom, “Slink .” A.It. Demosthoniau. KATONTON. GA. "The applause! delight! IIm wonder of our iirc! .May Shakespere rise." WILLIAM PEHRIX XICOLSOX, .lr.. “Nick.” A.It. Kappa Alpha. I’lil Kappa. ATLANTA. GA. “So faithful in love, and no dauntless in war. There was never a knight like Young I.oehlnva r.” (JEOlUilO TRAYLOR XOHTIIEX, "Traylor.” A.It. Pill Delta Theta. Phi Kappa. ATLANTA. GA. ‘Importune him for moneys; he not eas'd With slight denial; nor then sllcneed." C 'Q .r.LX.  MAKVIN IIAXKS 1‘HHHV. "Marvin.” A.It. Kappa Sluma. l'lii Knppn. MACH 10X. C.A. "II Ui'lltlO ltOIIK‘0. If (lion ilnst love, pronounce U ftilllifully JOHN KOKKRT RADFORD, .JR, A.It. I’lil Knppn. MONItOE. OA. Discretion of speech is more (linn eloquence." WILLIAM AIITIIVK RKII), "Ike.” It.S. l’lii Knppn. COLLEGE 1'AltK. GA. "He wrote for clivers papers, wliloli, as everybody knows. Is worse than serving in a shop or searing off the crows." .IOSKP1I H. KOSS, •Moo.” A.It. Dciiiustheiihiii. UIM NSWK’K. ;a. •Whence Ik thy Icarnini;? o'er hooks consumed tIn il:iIli thy toil inlilniKlit oil?" IIKXKY I). IUSSKIX, “l»lok.” A.It. DoiiiosthOiiliiii. MoDoNOl'GII. GA. old politicians show on wisdom past: And tot tors on in business to the last KKIIAKI) HOW IK SAXON SVI.VANIA. GA. TIs not for Mortals always to ho Idest.AUGUSTUS O. HA CON SHARKS, "Ox.” I!.S. Slums Alplia Kpsllon. Pill Kappa. MACON, «A. •Would not vp shatter it to lilts,- anil then Ueniould it nearer to tin llparfs desire?" CHARLKS II. STOXK, '"C'ljtnrelte Tpnor.” A.It. llpmostliPiiiaii. ATI I IONS. GA. "Too proud and too sensitive to In happy.' KKXJAMIX T. STOVALL, ••llrn.” It.s. leninsthenlan. LA VOX I A. GA. . "Such men as ho lip never at heart's ease.' ' ■  k. it. sti mi A.It. Tlictu Deltn Clil. l einostlieiil:in. MIIHU.KTON. ;a. "Art for Art's soke." JOIIX ItAliPII TIIIIIKTS, "Itnlpli.” It.S. Demos! Iioii l;i ii. ATI I UN’S. SA. "Miiii.v men resent hie yl.-iss. smooth. pul-IhIiimI .iinl ilull so Inns: sis iinliroken then slmrp: every splinter prleks." S’.OTT II. Tl IS;!AW. “Srotl.” It.S. Ilpliiisstlieiiiiin. IIOSCIITON. CA. ••Ami some lo |iiiieloiis vessels were.' m: Tox ii. wAi rox, "Duek." A.It. K;i|)| n Sicilia. I ’ll I K:i| |»:i. HAMILTON. «A. "In a Inekless moment lie illsrovorinl men Ulse (n I1I1H1 position Him a really pen." .1Aaiios 11a.mii rox v. m- ••Hump.” It.S. Deniosllienlaii. Dri.rrn, ha. Knowledge Is the knowing (lint we ean not know." AXDKIOW l,. WIOST, "Mush.” It.S. Delta Tail Delta. I ’It I Kappa. ATHENS. !A.ItOHKKT FHKI) WHKLCMKL, "Krnl,” B.S. Aif. I cino l lion in ii. Ml'ltltAY VILLK. CA. "(•oil lilosx you. I linve notlilnt; (o toll, sir.' THOMAS JACKSON WOOFTER, Jr., •Mnok.” A.It. ('Ill nil. Phi Kappa. ATI IK NS. CA. “Itoxiilc. Iio wax a shrewd Philosopher, And had road every text and kIosx.” KKNYOX 1$. ZAHXER, “Kenyon.” A.It. Delta Tan l elta. Deniosthenlan. ATLANTA. CA. •lie would not. with a peremptory tone Assort the nose upon Ids fare his own."The Swan Song of Rex Ego O Chemistry! Thou art the bane of life. To catch the unsuspecting and to cost Poor Juniors dips in thine unequal strife. O Homer! IIow couldst thou lx so Black, to vent On unsuspecting men thy wicked wit, When none have strength or courage to prevent Thy cutting satire that causes laughter loud. Be White, 0 Black, and give us all a rise, We’ve worked like slaves to learn thy cursed stuff; We’ve seen thee laugh when some poor Junior died. Then shoot another; consign me then to Wells Whose cooling depths of li d) will hide My biting grief. Ring out. 0 tolling hells, For shot I am ; my dip is lost. Good-bye. E. I. Ransom.‘All, give me space,” I sighed. But they gave it not, and the glorious doings of tile great men. who for three years have added life to the I’niversity of Georgia, must be shortened and condensed into this ignoble space allotted to the historian. Nevertheless “a candle cannot be hid under a bushel,” so with the light that radiates from the Class of ’13. its glories are known, want of space cannot condense them. Fame, you have heard, has been lost. This is not true. It has been won. and won by men who keep it. Look at every phase of college life and there you see men who wear the insignia “ '13 ” as leaders. In class work, oratory, literary lines, athletics, and social and other organizations—everywhere are they found, men—and each a noble freeman, both well and young and—wright. Historian. ItOHKRT HIM KRKK.M.W Junior Class Officers Robert Him. Freeman ............................................President. Benjamin Isaac Seoai.i.....................................Vice-President. Cornelius Howard Johnson..........................Secretary and Treasurer. James B. Wright.................................................Historian. Elmer Inglesby Ransom ...........................................,.... Poet. Joseph Yampolsky ................................................Chaplain.Junior Class Roll Adams, Otis Ilill ..................................................Covington. Atkinsson, Harwell Alexander .........................................Wavcrly. Awtrcy, Alonzo Freeman ..............................................LaGrangc. Ballard, Robert Lee....................................................Athens. Bennett. William Taplev ...............................................Maxeys. Bivins, Blake Blackshear ............................................Grovania. Blackmar, Dana, Jr...................................................Columbus. Blanchard, George Carswell ............................................ Leah. Bloch, Charles Julian ..................................................Macon. Boswell. Luther Iloyt ...............................................Penfield. Both well, Warren ....................................................Augusta. Bowen. James Young...................................................Crawford. Boyett, William Jack ..................................................Morris. Brewton, Simon Turner.................................................Claxton. Burch, James Butolph..............................................Thomasville. Calhoun, William Davitte .................................................Rock mart. Calloway. Enoch .....................................................LaGrangc. Campbell. William Edward..............................................Atlanta. Carter, Frank ........................................................Atlanta. Caverlv. Charles Edward ..............................................Atlanta. Chappell. Bentley Hart...............................................Columbus. Clark. Edward Percival.................................................Athens. Cooper, James Leroy ................................................ Augusta. Conklin, Hugh William ................................................Atlanta. Cowan, Zachary Stuart ................................................Atlanta. Crane. Herman Averill................................................Savannah. Davidson, Rufus Benjamin...........................................Shady Dale. Duncan, William Calloway, .......................................Douglasville. Dunlap. Edgar Brown ..............................................Gainesville. Fitzpatrick. Mark William .....................................Jeffersonville. Floyd. Edward Ix?e ....................................................Chipley. Fluker, Lamar Jewel ...............................................Union Point. Freeman, Robert Hill ...................................................Newnan. Garrison. Frank Davis ................................................Cornelia. Gibson. James Owen ...................................................Moultrie. Goodwyn, Richard Tuggle, Jr.............................................Athens. Gordon, Ambrose ......................................................Savannah. Hale, Grady Long ........................................................Social Circle. Harmon, Howard Banks ..............................................Gainesville. Ilogan, Claude Hollis ..............................................Carrollton. Howard, Henry Grady..................................................Lexington. Howard, Robert Powell . ..........................................Barnesville. Hurst, William Herbert ..................................................Social Circle. Ingram, Wales Bryan ..................................................Reynolds. Jackson. Earnest Lee ...................................................Athens. Johnson, Cornelius Howard, Jr..........................................Atlanta. Johnson. James Guyton ................................................Garfield. Johnson, Milcy Kimball ...............................................Garfield. Johnston. David White .................................................Atlanta. Jones, Thomas Fred ..................................................Mansfield. Jordan, Erasmus Glover..............................................Monticello. Kelley, Henry Grady ................................................Monticello. Knight, William Alexander ..............................................Dublin. Koplin, Louis .........................................................Atlanta. Liddell, Julian Gordon ................................................Atlanta. Lindsay, Jack Watson ................................................ Savannah. Marks, Carroll Bernard ...............................................Savannah. Moise, Theodore Sidney, Jr............................................Savannah. Morgenstern, Edward ...................................................Atlanta. McCarty, Edwin Forrest ................................................Atlanta. McCoy, Frank Lee, Jr...............................................Gainesville. McCrary, Carl Cecil ...................................................Royston. MeLarty, Hiram Ray ...............................................Douglasvillc. Neel, Joseph N., Jr......................................................Macon.Noble, George Henry ...................................................Atlanta. Owens, William Duncan ................................................Savannah. Padgett, Grady ....................................•................Reidsvillc. Peacock, David Roscoe .................................................Eastman. Pringle, James Copeland ...........................................Thomasvillc. Ransom, Elmer Inglesby.................................................Augusta. Robinson, Julian Lowe..................................................Atlanta. Sancken, George Albert ................................................Augusta. Segall, Benjamin Isaac ................................................Collins. Slade, John Rhodes ...................................................Columbus. Small, Artie Ilarcourt ..................................................Macon. Smith, William Henry ..............................................Gainesville. Stephens, Robert Tate ...................................................Elbert on. Strickland, Deicer Solomon .............................................Athens. Watson, Luther Stephens ............................................Loganvillc. Wiley, Samuel Harris....................................................Sparta. Williams, George Livingston .....................................Lawrenccvillc. Williams, John Benjamin............................................Port Valley. Wilson, Wilbe Radford ..................................................Athens. Woodruff, Joseph Grady..................................................Winder. Wright, James Bones ...................................................Augusta. Yampolsky. Joseph .....................................................Atlanta. York, Gus................!..............................................Quartz.A Toast To the Maid who rejoices whene’er we rejoice— And shares every sorrow and pain— To the fairest of the thousands, the 'Varsity’s choice— Drink, boys, to Miss Athens again.The Leap Year Club Requirements for Membership : For membership in this organization, one must have had at least thirteen proposals for marriage since January 1. 1912, distributed as follows: four from the belles of Athens; three from Imey Cobb Institute; two from State Normal School; two from Brenau College; and two from the State at large. I. Members duly qualified: Dr. R. I Stephens. Prof. S. M. Salyer. Dr. II. A. Nix (Telegram Specialty.) A. K. Maddox. II. Candidates for Membership: Prof. W. Oscar Payne. Chas. T. Estes. Frank Phillips. “Punk” Malone. III. Ruled out for flirting: William Telford Turk. George Northen. “Shake” Newsome. Yampolsky. “Emp” Peacock. “Feets” Freeman. Miles Hamilton. “Bob” Raiford. Marion Allen. “Runt” Durden.History of the Class of 1914 Greek professors could tell us that the word Sophomore is derived from two Hellenic words. amfu-. andthe former meaning ‘clever.’ and the latter ‘foolish.’ This name. then, was intended to designate a class of lx ings half wise, and half stupid; hut it will certainly he conceded hv all that the present Sophomore (’lass deserves the first epithet more than it does the other. When men Freshmen, we gave promise of our exceeding ability by abolishing the system of lower class hostilities so dreaded by the Faculty and people of Athens. In the place of the old hair-cutting, we substituted the wearing of Red Caps by Freshmen: and instead of the barbarous banquet rushes of the olden days, we instituted the game of Push-hall. This introduction of new methods and ideas in itself, is sufficient to show our pacific policy toward the people of Athens, and our progressive policy in regard to the I'niversity. It is needless to say that we have in every case been victorious over our opponents. The Juniors of tin past year will sadly acknowledge their defeat in the last of the banquet “scraps’ in 1911 ; and the Freshmen will also sorrowfully tell you how they were conquered in the first of tin push-ball games in 1912. Of all that, it would Ik useless to speak. In athletic matters, we have been among the foremost. In our Freshman year, we furnished three men to the Varsity football squad, and equally as many to the baseball team. Of these, one man made the all-southern for both teams. During the past year we have upheld our reputation on lx th gridiron and diamond, and our work needs no eulogy. In speaking, we have also won many palms. Although we have not had sufficient opportunity to show what our speakers are capable of. yet they have thus far maintained the record of their predecessors, and in the coming years will easily establish a higher standard. In literary lines and in class-room work, we have also kept among the topmost. Likewise, we have furnished a number for the Tlmlians, and for the Glee and Mandolin Clubs. In every line we have been represented. In every organization of the University, members of our class may Ik found. And in the two years which we have yet before us. we expect to make the Class of 1914 more famous than any other,-and the University of Georgia recognized as the leader of Southern schools and colleges. Historian.J. I. WOOD. Sophomore Class Officers J. I. Wood .... M. C. Overton . A. B. Bernd .. A. B. Bernd ... M. P. Nunez ..  Sophomore Class Roll Arnett, William Luther................................................Odessa. Asbury, Thomas Lync............................................Crawfordville. Austin, Won Tin .......................................................China. Hailey, Ernest Aubrey ..............................................Valdosta. Baker. Cullen ......................................................Hartwell. Barrett. George Barnes...............................................Augusta. Bazcmore. Ilenry Franklin ..........................................Sylvania. Benson. Enoch Blassingamc ..........................................Hartwell. Bernd, Aaron Blum......................................................Macon. Booth. John Lamar ....................................................Athens. Bowden, David Timon................................................McDonough. Brinson. John Farmer .................................................Milieu. Brown, Charles McDonald .............................................Atlanta. Buchwald, Charles ....................................................Athens. Busha, George Henry...................................................Toccoa. Bussey, Leland Stanford ............................................Cuthbort. Callaway. Albert Victor..............................................Atlanta. Cheney, Frank W.......................................................Athens. Chesser, Joseph Riley.................................................Auburn. Coleman. Edward Thaddcus. Jr........................................Graymont. Conyers. James Bennett .........................................Cartersville. Cooj»er. Benjamin Lamar ........................................Douglasville. Cooper, Freddie Valdi ............................................ Sylvania. Corley, Otis Herman ..................................................Athens. Culpepper, Clarence Boo .( r ...................................Luthcrsvillc. Cumming, Forest .....................................................Griffin. Davis, Jefferson Irwin .............................................(Quitman. DcLoache, Earl Tyler..................................................Millen. Dillard. Edward Carleton .......................................Arnoldsville. Durdon, Carl Ernest.................................................Graymont. English. Louis Caple...............................................Warrenton. Fisher, Sam Boyce................................................... Lavonia. Fletcher, Bob Jake.................................................Parrott. Flournoy, Walker Reynolds.........................................Columbus. Foley, Charles Burras.............................................Columbus. Funkcnstcin, Casper Ira ...........................................Athens. Ginn, Tcnnie Rucker................................................Royston. Gray, Claude Luke..................................................Appling. Gunn. Robert Russell.........................................Crawfordville. I Inins. John Thomas ..............................................Augusta. Hammond, Robert Lee................................................Jackson. Hardaway. William W................................................Thomson. Harp, Sam Bentley.................................................Reynolds. Basel ton, Fred.....................................................Athens. Hitchcock. William Edgar ..............;............................Dallas. Hodgson, Hugh Leslie................................................Athens. Ilolden, Frank Alexander .....................................Crawfordville. Holder, Goley .....................................................Augusta. Howard, George Turner..............................................Augusta. Howard, Julian Cooper ............................................Valdosta. Hunter, George Lewis Cope.........................................Savannah. Hutton, Malcolm Maclean ...........................................Savannah. Johnson, James Augustus.............................................Barwick. Jordan, Fred Capers .............................................Monticcllo. Kicve, Jay Weiss.....................................................Albany. Knight, Robert William ........................................Cartersvillc. Levic, Walter Hill ...............................................Montezuma. Lowry, Doc Ehvood ................................................... Rome. Loyd, DeWitt Wilson ................................................Newborn. Lufburrow, Burley Mathew........................................... Oliver. Malone, Eddie Clyde .............................................Monticcllo. Martin, Clarence Blwood ............................................Blakely. Merry, Pierce ......................................................Augusta. Michael, Leroy ......................................................Athens. Middlebrooks, Chauncey Vance ...................................... Atlanta. Minehan, James Richard............................................Brunswick. flAO C '1 ' aw wv Moise, Francis Marion .................................................Atlanta. Moreno, Benjamin Curry .......................................Key West, Fla. Moss, John Ilill .......................................................Athens. Myers. Joe .............................................................Athens. McGchee, Henry Martin ...............................................Talbotton. McKamy, David Knox .....................................................Dalton. McWhorter, Robert Ligon.................................................Athens. Nanney. William Clyde................................................Brunswick. Nunez, Mosco Fernando...............................................Swainsboro. O’Kelley, Edward Barbara ..........................................Gainesville. Overton. Macon Caldwell, Jr...............................................Union Point. Palmer, Sam Warren. Jr..................................................Milieu. Parham, Virgil Swanson..............................................Odessadale. Patman, Everettc .......................................................Athens. Patterson. Russell Hugo.................................................Athens. Peacock, Erie Ewart................................................Barncsvillc. Phillips. Fitzroy Donald..............................................Meredith. Fla. Phillips, George Clarence .........................................Thomasvillc. Phillips, Joseph Monroe............................................Thomasvillc. Phillips, Mathew Perry.......................................Jacksonville, Fla. Pierce, Lewis Edward..........................................Key West, Fla. Pitts. Henry McDaniel..................................................Calhoun. Plaster, Daniel Liddell................................................Atlanta. Pope, Cadesman..........................................................Athens Pope, Gwinn Nixon ......................................................Albany. Popper, Joseph W.........................................................Macon. Powell, Joseph Spencer................................................Sylvania. Preston. William Gordon ..............................................Flovilla. Price, Otis Grady...................................................Swainsboro. Proctor, Lannie Groover...............................................Brooklet. Pugh, John D...........................................................Hamburg, Ark. Pund. Edgar Rudolf.....................................................Augusta. Redd, Marion Woodville................................................Columbus. Riley, Howard Wade.........................................................Fort Valley. Roland, Arthur Gray...................................................Crawford. C- - N JV 'V ' ?’ '- - • a» .'jul Rowland. Hampton .......................................................Athens. Schwab. Richard Newelt.................................................Atlanta. Short, Robert Dunham....................................................Athens. Sinclair. John Henning.......................................Jacksonville, Fla. Slade, William .......................................................Columbus. Stovall, Wallace Oliver............................................Gainesville. Summerour, Guy .........................................................Duluth. Sweat, Lonnie Ernest.................................................Patterson. Symmcs. Thomas Davenport.............................................Brunswick. Tabor. Paul ......................................................Danielsville. Thomasson. James Toombs.............................................Carrollton. Tapper. Thomas Egleston................................................Atlanta. Twitty, Ewart Gladstone ................................................Pelham. Tye, John Lewis, Jr....................................................Atlanta. Vaughan. Harry James...................................................Atlanta. Victor, Victor.........................................................Atlanta. Von Sprcckcn, Theodore M...............................................Augusta. Wade, John Donald...............................................Marsliallville. Walker. Carl Bridges..................................................Shellman. Waters, Audley Alexander............................................Woodcliffc. Watkins. Rush in.......................................................Metcalf. Westbrook, Edison Collins..........................................Gainesville. Whelchel. Hoyt Henry ....................................................Comer. Williams. J. Mason ....................................................Madison. Wimberly, Olin John......................................................Macon. Winccoff, Albert Fleming...............................................Atlanta. Winter, Alphonse Anderson ...........................................Brunswick. Wood, Jared Irwin ....................................................Savannah. 55 IWj: : iJW-WW Bernd's Seeing Georgia Scene: University Campus. Time: Comnicuccincnt week. Characters: Guide and Commenccinciit visitors. All ready, ladies and gentlemen. See the Campus, now. Here’s your only elmnec to see the starting point of the greatness of tin state in all its mystic glory. Right this way to get a perfect knowledge of tin only real Campus in existence. Just before you. ladies and gentlemen, you see the gateway of tin Garden of Learning. If you will notice, you will see that it is modeled after tin seal of the state, the three pillars. Wisdom. Justice, and Moderation, supporting tin eross-picco, Constitution. This gateway is symbolical of tin departments of tin I'niversity. too. You see there is Wisdom from the Academic students,—yes’m. they need a little of it; and there is Justice for the Lawyers,—a little of that won’t do tin State any harm; and there is Moderation for the poor Ags.. so they won’t put too much milk in the water. Ma’am? Oh. where does Constitution come in? Well. I—er—I guess the Pharmacists will take can of that. To your right you now see the wonderful Academic Building, surrounded with its aura of Red Caps. This is the birthplace of greatness, the spot where awful knowledge is instilled into the wondering minds of the astonished Freshmen. I wish especially to call your attention to the delightful way in which the porches extend out over the stairways in front. This one circumstance has given rise to much of the betting spirit that is in the college. Whenever a group of hoys see a professor about to descend, they make up wagers as to whether he will duck in time, or have his head humped on the projection. It has been worked out by one of the most complicated processes of Solid Anatomy that more heads have been humped on these steps in the past ten yea 1 8 than there have been hiscuit-and-syrup eaters in the Beanery. If you glance behind tin building, you will see LeConte Nall and Moore College, properly enough tucked away in the background. The first named is tin Biological Hall. It has l»ccn estimated by competent authoritiv that there are at present more hugs in this building than can In found in the University Dormitories and the State Asylum at Milledgcville put together. Moore College is chiefly useful as a convenient place for football and baseball scores and class numbers. It has other minor offices, not important enough to speak of, however. We now stand before the imposing ediHcc known as the Demosthcnian Hall. This is one of the most literary buildings on the Campus. In addition to being the home of the disciples of Demosthenes, it has the distinction of containing within its walls the College Book Store, known to tin vulgar as the “Extortion Hole.” It is said that last year a Freshman entered this den of vice with a complete edition of the 11)11 Encyclopaedia Brittaniea. India paper and Morocco covered complete—and came out remunerated with the magnificent sum of— fifteen cents.We now approach the Chapel, the building which for eighty years lias hold its saintly course among the more mundane structures on the Campus. It has the peculiar reputation of being the coldest building in the State, only being warmed when certain of the professors come over to Mass Meetings and heat it up a little with their superfluous energy.—as it were. In the background you may see Candler Hall, which, together with New College on our left, formed once the chief arenas for the Frcsh.-Soph. scraps. It had been previously recognised that there was a goodly number of pigs. bugs, and other living beings in these two buildings, but nevertheless, the world was quite amazed one cold wintry morning of the past season to wake up and find two goats added to the menagerie. The mystery is not yet fully explained. The wide plain which now stretches before your view is none other than the famous Ilcrty Field, so called from the numerous hurts received thereon in the days of old. Tis here that Major shines forth in all bis glory, surrounded by his satellites in tan. And ’tis here that bonfires arc built and celebrations conducted after all our numerous victories. If you will throw your gaze just across the field, I will promise that it will not be wasted. For there you will see Denmark Hall, famous in poetry, prose, and stomachs. It was tucked away off in that corner so that no one would steal it.—although it has been maliciously remarked by some of the enemies of that institution that “the Beanery is quite strong enough to take care of itself.’’ This edifice is noted for its magnificent scenery; it contains so many gorges. Now. everyone will please hold bis breath and take off bis hat. Sh-h-h-Don’t make a sound; I shall have to speak in a whisper—for we are approaching Old College, the domicile of Juniors and Seniors. Ma’am? No. Ma’am, those are not statues in front. They are only Freshmen, waiting in the hope of beholding one of the mighty men of intellect when he comes out. I should like to stay awhile and show you what one looks like, but time is pressing and besides, they usually appear only at night, in order that their brilliance may show off the more. We now turn to the Peabody Library. This edifice is reputed to contain more books-that-you-don ’t-want and fewer books-that-you-do-want than any similar structure in the Union. Its chiefest glory lies in the fact that it is certain not to have the particular magazine reference that you want. Why. the only one of great Cotter’s work to be found here is Cotter’s “Saturday Night.” We now approach Terrell llall. the resort of Pill-rollers, and such like. This is one of our newest buildings, so it has not yet succeeded in making a reputation. as so many of our other buildings have. It is. however, quite large for its age. and great deeds are expected from it. Phi Kappa Hall now takes our attention. It is another work of the Old Masters, and is quite fitted for its office, as the resort of many of the Old Fogies of the University. This ends our tour, ladies and gentlemen. All walk up and pay Xenophon, the cashier. Next trip at five o’clock. A. B. Bernd.Freshman Class History On the 18th of September. 1911. the Class of 1915 began their brilliant career by purchasing little red crowns as a symbol of class unity. Many came with long, flowing hair as an insult to the Sophomores but. though it made the class of ’14 green with rage, their shears were too dull or their hands were too weak. Evidently, they were afraid to organize an active Tonxorial Club. With caps on one side to expose their harks, the Freshman taunted their book-worm enemies to come out and take some evereisc for their halth. Failing to succeed in enticing their barbers to get busy, they were kept from turning hair butchers for the Sophomores by the influence of the Faculty, only. Of course the Sophomores tried to poke fun at the Freshman Symbol, but they dared to go no further. No wonder the Sophomores agreed to red caps and push-ball in the latter part of their Freshman year, for they knew they would need some excuse for letting the Class of 1915 alone. This class is by far the largest in the history of the I'niversity. It is strongest. not only in numbers, but also in the maintenance of high records. As for strength, nothing more need be said than that the Sophomores let them scrupulously alone. On the athletic field, the Freshmen have been very prominent. They furnished several of tin best football and baseball men. And had there been a track team there is no doubt but that they would have taken off many of the honors, for many of their men came hen with high records. In fact, some begged to have a t rack-meet. As for class records.—let them show for themselves. In fact, the professors have already said that it is the best Freshman class that has been here in many years. The delinquent fist is remarkably low. Not. only is this true, but tin spirit of the class is on a much higher plane. A boot-1 ieker is a scorned being. Start up something that is well worth doing and you have a large crowd of eager helpers, but let some one try to put out a scheme that looks rather dark, though it may Ik? intended for sport only, then you will see how few are the men who support such doings. Xo other class has had so many men to stand as firm for the honor system. In fact, the success of this system has been assured by their determined support. Quite well can they claim the honor of securely establishing it in this University, and through this movement against cheating, they have started the great work of setting purer and higher standards among the students of the University of Georgia. With such a start as this in their first year, there is every reason to believe that the class of ’15 will be one of which the University and the Empire State of the South will be justly proud. Historian.K. S. MALONE. Freshman Class Officers ..... President Vice-President .....Secretary. ... .Treasurer, .....Historian. .....Chaplain. K. S. Mai.onk W. K. McLean G. G A It NEK I'KNEIiFRESHMAN CLASSFreshman Class Roll Abbott, Phillips ................................................Louisville. Abney, Howard Tcasley ...............................................Athens. Abrams. David Moses...................................................Macon. Acrec. Lacy S...................................................... Resaca. Adair, Chester Price ...........................................Gainesville. Adair, Shields Brownfield ...........................................Bowman. Adcrhold, William Burton ..........................................Commerce. Akerman. Hugh ..................................................Cartersvile. Allen, Walter G......................................................Sparta. Barnett, Kdward Augustus ........................................Washington. Bassett. Noble Paul ....................................................Port Valley. Bassett, Raephiel Pbillipps.............................................Port Valley. Baxter. Andrew Harvey...............................................Atlanta. Birch, George Snyder, Jr..............................................Macon. Blumenthal, Elliott ...............................................Savannah. Boorstin, Mcndlc ....................................................Monroe. Branson, Phil .......................................................Athens. Breedlove, Richard Edward ..........................................Campton. Brown, Harry E.......................................................Dallas. Broyles. Edwin Nash.................................................Atlanta. Bunn, W. C. Jr....................................................Cedartown. Burford. Ashton ..................................................Brunswick. Burns, William Arnold .............................................Commerce. Burrage. Clarence Hill ........................................Saluda, N. C. Carlton, Henry Grady ................................................Monroe. Carmichael, Bert Kinard ........................................... Jackson. Carter, Erskinc Lee ................................................Lumpkin. Chandler, Boyd W......................................................Comer. Chandler, Parish Carter Tate.......................................Commerce. ('handler, Obic Otis Ashmore.......................................Commerce. Cocke, Egbert Erie..............'................................... Dawson. Cohen, Edward Myer...................................................Athens. Coker. Ross W..........................................................Rome. Cooley, John J.....................................................Savannah. Cooper, Earnest Brown ..........................................Thomasville. Crafts. Arthur Gibbes ...............................................Dublin. Crump, Stephen Alexander. Jr..........................................Macon. Curtis, William Neel .............................................Mansfield. Curtis. Walter Wells, Jr...........................................Columbus. David, Roy Cornelius ..........................................Danielsville. Davis, Charles Barney..............................................Tennille. Davis, Joe Boyd....................................................LaGrange. Dickson, Gordon Eugene ...........................................McDonough. Dillard, William Reese ..........................................Washington.Dobbs, Herbert Clifton ...............................................Marietta. Dozier, Laurens Gilmer ................................................Thomson. Durden, Walter Bonic ................................................Grayniont. Dyson, Oliver Sneed ................................................Washington. Edwards, John Prior.....................................................Monroe. Edwards. Maync Reid ................................................Greenville. Erwin, Julian ..........................................................Athens. Pelker, Daniel Burke ...................................................Monroe. Flanigen, Barrington Lockhart ..........................................Athens. Flemister, Ilarvey Clark ............................................Mansfield. Florence, Mason ..............................................Powder Springs. Fort, William Ray ......................................................Morrow. Francis, Montgomery Lyle ..............................................Atlanta. Franklin, Marvin Augustus ..............................................Athens. Freeman, Thomas Cleveland.............................................Commerce. Garner, Charles Gordon............................................Grainte Hill. Gillis, James Lester..................................................Soperton. Gillis, Neil Homer ...............................................•....Covena. Graham, Paul ............................................................McRae. Griffith, Robert Jenkins................................................Athens. Griner, Joe Lovett....................................................Sylvania. Groover, Frank Cornelius...............................................Gumming. Gunn. John McKenzie ..................................................Cuthbert. Harbor, Robert Berner ................................................Commerce. Hardin, Edward John ..........................................Greenville, S. C. Harrell, Joseph E..................................................Gainesville. Hart, John Collier, Jr............................................Union Point. Hastings, William Raymond............................................ Atlanta. Hatcher, Frank Marion .................................................Thomson. Ilathorn, Dewitt Donald ...............................................Atlanta. Hawes, Richard Ellington ..............................................Thomson. Head, Broadus John ................................................Gainesville. Head, Ralph ....................................................... Tallapoosa. Headley, Clmuncey Green ................................................Boston. Henderson, John Ratia ............................................Cartersvillc. Hendricks, Terric Nichols............................................Nashville. Hobson, William Grasty .......................................Rutherford, N. J. Holder, John Methvin ..................................................Camilla. Hood, Burke ..........................................................Cuthbert. Houser, Wesley ...................................................Fort Valley. Howard, William Linton ................................................Thomson. Howell, Clark, Jr......................................................Atlanta. Hull, Dudley Cowan ...................................................Savannah. Jacobson, Charles Wells...............................................Tennille. Jenkins, Walter Thomas................................................Valdosta. Jones, Guy Rudolph ................................................. Norcross. Jones, Percival Connolly ..............................................Herndon. ' r Kelley, "William Arlington .........................................Commerce. Kemp, James Frank.......................................................Meigs. Lane, Louis Alexander................................................LaGrange. Leonard, Russell S........................................... • ■ • .Talbotton. Lew, Timothy Tingfang.........................................Wenchow, China. Lewis, "William Thompson ..............................................Columbus. Ling. Ren .............................................................Athens. Little, Bird ............................................................Duluth. Lord. Herman GrifTeth..................................................Commerce. Lovett, Lin wood Rates .............................................Sylvania. Lumpkin. John Gerdine ...................................................Athens. Malone, Kirby Smith ..............................................Monticcllo. Manor, Malcolm MacGregor ..........................................Warrenton. Martin, Alfred Marshall .............................................Augusta. Martin, Louis Key ....................................................Athens. Martin. Milward Wyatt ...............................................Decatur. Mathews, Harold Henry ..................................................Comer. Maxwell, Thomas Allen...................................................Augusta. Meek. Robert Gaines ...................................................Dallas. Miller, Frank Oliver ..................................................Athens. Mitchell, Hubbard Garland ...........................................Kirkwood. Mitchell, Stephens ..................................................Atlanta. Mitchell. William Grant................................................Social Circle. Moon. Erastus Franklin ...............................................Monroe. Morgan, John Guy .................................................Starrsville. McConnell, Bright....................................................Commerce. McDaniel. Charles Baldwin, .Jr.......................................Atlanta. MacDonncll. Alan Morris .. .........................................Savannah. McGowan, Henri Charbonnicr..............................................Augusta. McLain, William Kenneth ..............................................Dawson. McWhorter, Ellsworth...............................................Blackshcar. Nathan, Joseph ........................................................Savannah. Neville, George ...................................................Rabun Gap. Olmstead, Ogden John .................................................. Willie. Orr, Robert Craig, Jr....................................................Athens. Overstreet, Edward K., .Jr.............................................Sylvania. Owens. Justus Erwin ....................................................Canon. Pace, Earle Jackson ...................................................Dawson. Pace, Harvey Burgess .................................................Pensacola, Fla. Parrish, Guy A.............................................................Adel. Patton. Thomas Venable .............................................LaFayette. Pedrick, Scott II.......................................................Quitman. Price, James Harold.....................................................Jcsup. Pi.’ice, William Pinckney ........................................Farmington. Ragsdale, Elmo .....................................................Cornelia. Rawson, Clarence Weaver................................................Athens. Rawson, William Allen ...............................................Atlanta. Ray, James Morgan ..................................................Maysville.Rodman. "William Morris............................................. Jackson. Rood. Albon Williams .................................................Athens. Roy, Ygnacio Domingo...................................................Tampa. Fla. Richards. Harry Brown ...............................................Calhoun. Richey, Hubert Guy..................................................Commerce. Rountree, Hugh Jordan ................................................McLeod. Rountree, Ridge ....................................................Cobbtown. Rountree, Roy Lee ....................................................Summit. Rubinstein. Douglas II................................................Athens. Sams, Augustine .....................................................Decatur. Sanders, Arthur Newton ................................................Comer. Seabrook, Edward Marion ............................................Columbus. Shaw, J. II.....................................................Cartersville. Shirley, Carlos Vivian ...........................................Alpharetta. Smith, Benpamin Harper..............................................Hiltonia. Smith, Charles Richter ..............................................Concord. Sparks, Willis B., Jr..................................................Macon. Stanley, Benjamin C....................................................James. Stewart, Joseph C............................;........................Athens. Strickland, Willis Howard .............................................Comer. Sweet, Charles B....................................................Cornelia. Thomas, Joseph Harold ................................................Baxley. Thompson, Henry Robert ............................................Bethlehem. Timberlake, Lewis Humph .......................................Marshallvillc. Tolbert, Claude ...................................................Nicholson. Tomlinson. Clarence Summers.....................................Jacksonville, Fla. Turner, William David .................................................Jcsup. Walker, Julian West..................................................Screven. Wallace, Earl Clayton .............................................Brunswick. Wallace, Stephen Bailey.........................................Locust Grove. Ward, Alonzo Green .................................................Villanow. Ward, Charles Douglas ..............................................Villanow. Ward, Frank Crawley .................................................Lumpkin. Ware, Garnett...................................................Danielsville. Warren, Early Erastus ................................................Dexter. Watson, Ilermon Hooper ...............................................Dallas. Weatherly, Eugene.....................................................Athens. Webb, William G.......................................................Athens. West Henry Haynes ....................................................Athens. West, Linton Burnside...............................................Cuthbert. Wilder, Cleo I).....................................................Americus. Williams, Dutch Eberlmrt .............................................Athens. Wilson, James Edgar .................................................Thomson. Wise, Basil Augustus ..................................................Macon. Wood, James Raiford ................................................Savannah. Woodall, James Fletcher.............................................Woodland. Wright, Homer, Jr.................................................Grantvillc.Some Call It Rot A large room and a black-board, Some desks, the chapel bell. A professor and a student. And a room where the high-brows dwell. Lots of stuff about work and study, But with minds on the baseball lot— Some call it education, And others call it rot. A haze in the student’s think-tank, The infinite utter blank, The lovely games in the pool-room, And the check on father’s bank; And all over campus and city The tune of the turkey-trot— Some of us call it wisdom, And others call it rot. Like tens to a flunking Freshman When the Dean is hot behind, Come honors to us as athletes Or something not work of the mind; And dreams of my ships of money As I snooze on my downy cot— Some of us call it learning, And others call it rot. A private cutting on drill day, The major balling him out, The Seniors doing their loafing, Or walking the Millcdge route, And others who, humble and nameless, Are boning (well I guess not!) Some call it education And others call it rot.tswsiP Encyclopaedia Georgianesis The editors of the 1!)12 edition desire to annouiiee their most recent acquisitions to the staff of contributors. The mere names of these men are self-explanatory. They are specialists and acknowledged experts in their several departments. The articles which they will furnish to the Encyclopedia are indicated after their respective names: W. W. Abbott—“The Government of Monasteries.” R. S. Farmer—'“Agriculture.” “Red” Fisher—“The Class Pisces.” F. C. Jordan—“Baptism.” R. A. Laird—“Scotch Nobility.” W. A. Mann—“The Genus Homo.” “Rouge-et-Noir” Meyer—“Quicksand and Mud.” Sidney Moisc—“Rest.” Traylor Northen—‘ ‘ Cook-Perry Cont roversy. ’ ’ Elmer Ransom—“Pirates.” “Kid” Wilder—“Back to the Jungles.” ‘ ‘ Jabcz ’ ’ Wright—‘ J ust ice. ’ ’ Paul Hudson—“The Dutch in New York.” Charlie Joel—“The Minor Prophets.” E. R. Stump—“Improved Methods in Forestry.” R. R. Childs—“Infantile Paralysis.” A. 0. B. Sparks—“Electrical Phenomena.” II. A. Crane—“The Fishing Industry.” II. J. Campbell—“Exploration of the Sahara.” R. R. Gunn—“Military Science.” C. L. Hale—“U. S. Weather Bureau.” G. M. Pope—“Roman Catholicism.” •I. W. Popper—“The Evolution of the Home.” J. I. Wood—“Conservation of Timber bands.” In addition to the above we are bidding on Judge Lynch’s exhaustive treatise on “The Cowritten Law.” Messrs. Brown and Scarlett, assisted by Drs. White and Black, are preparing for us a scientific analysis of color. Subscriptions to the Encyclopedia Ocoryiacnsis should 1m- in tin? hands of Messrs. Chappell and Dunlap, together with cash deposit, by the twenty-third of June.The Law Department This part of the University has developed steadily in the quantity and quality of its work until it ranks alongside of the best in the South. Since its organization, at least 1.000 men have graduated from it. many of whom have achieved distinction as practitioners. Supreme Court judges. Superior and County Court judges; numbers have been factors in our State Legislature in framing and shaping our laws, and not a few have been found in Congress both in the lower and upper houses of that body. Judged by its fruits, that is. the men that have received instruction in legal lore, no other institution has sent out as many able and learned lawyers, that is, no institution in the Southern States. The instructors here give their entire time, and the same entrance requirements as those in any other part of the University. It has the advantage over most of the Law Schools, of its easy access to the libraries and also activities of the entire University. This gives to the student of law here a wider acquaintance than he would have at the other schools. These arc invaluable assets, for the man of one book is dangerous because of his ignorance, and the man of limited acquaintance, in his student days, is narrow by virtue of his exclusiveness. It has attracted students from other states because of these advantages and will continue to grow on account of the first-class service it renders to all who take advantage of its instruction.History of Senior Law Class We came, we saw—whether or not we conquered is yet a contingency, the happening or not happening of which may “defeat, strengthen or complete our title” to a diploma. Were History a record of things left undone, the history of the Law Class of 1012 would till volumes. Since our duty is to record what impress our class has made on the history of the University, our task is simple. We only wish we had the divine gift of peering into the future and recording the glorious history which is sure to illumine the golden leaves of the Hook of Life. As Juniors, we had barely become accustomed to our surroundings, before we felt prepared to handle the most difficult ease in the country. We could have given old Blackstone “Cards and Spades” and then heat him. What we didn’t know then was not worth knowing. Of a sudden, we had prematurely developed into brilliant young jurists. The year grew on. Then we encountered several things we did not know. When we emerged from Criminal Law. there remained in our minds a reasonable doubt that we might be omniscient. We began to realize that it might not even be amiss to review the dusty old volumes we had already east aside. We began to see light. Our Senior year opened with a less egotistic, but more resolute and determined bunch of lawyers. In Common Law Pleading—always the bug-bear of other classes—not a single man failed.—a record which probably stands without precedent in the Law Department. Our road has been rocky, and at times unpleasant. But we journeyed on. crossed seemingly nnsurmountable barriers, and as this History is written, we stand at the Legal Door, knocking for admission. The Law Class of Nineteen-Twelve has been somewhat smaller than its immediate predecessors, but we have profited by a closer union and a more intimate relationship. We lay no claim to brilliance; but we have worked always with a steadiness of purpose and a determination to do our duty. We have given our share to the athletic teams. We have furnished an Kditor-in-Chief of the Red and Black and the Georgian. One of the Associate Editors of the Random is a memlwr of our class. We have contributed several Presidents of the Literary Societies. In oratorical contests, in music circles, in almost every form of college activity will be found represen tat ievs of the Law Class of Nineteen-twelve. After all, we are here not to make history but to prepare to make history. Our history shall be written in the lives of each member of the class. The future holds much in store for us. The goal of our ambitions looms nearer. We shall Ik heard from in the years to come. Historian’.THOMAS X. POM'IOLL. Senior Law Class Officers . Powell Ryan Secretary and Treasurer. ft it. M. L. Troutman................................................Chaplain.•C- JU-WWiL WIIJJA.M Sl»KX T5It COXXKIIAT, "Kill." ItX. ('Ill rill. IMil Kappa. SAVANNAH. GA. “Among them, hut not of tlicin." KOSS ADDISON ( HIOKK.MOKK, "Creek." It.I.. I‘hi Kii|ipn. Sigma Alpha Kpsllou. GEORG KTOWX. KV. "He eon Id souks make, and well.” ('AltL I’OSTEK CKOSSLKV, "Curl.” It.I,. Hcmostlicuian. ATI I IONS. GA. "Full of wise saws and modern Instances.1a— w LOYICK (SEOItGK FOItTSON, "Fortson.” It.I,, l’lil Kappa. Alpha Tail Oniogn. KLHKKTON. GA. •Zeal moved thcc; To please thy gods thou didst It." WI.MIlHItLY l»OWKM, MoLEOI), “Mao.” B.L. l hl Kappa. ABBKVILLE. GA. "Thou ho will talk good gods, how ho will talk." JOHN .MILTON MOKKOW, “Morro.” It.I.. Peniost lion Ian. ATHENS. ttA. •And tlion art long, and lank, and brown. As Is the rlldiod sea-sand." JOHN THOMAS MURRAY, "Murry." It.I,. Dpmostliciilnn. DAXIKLSVILLK. OA. Soft blows tin- wind licit limit lies from licit blue sky." HKXRY A M: A IHCR XKXVMAX, “•I imIko.” A.It.. It. 1 . Dpinostlioiilnn. t'lil INI. Tlu-ln I.niiibdii I lii (Logiil). ATLANTA. OA. 'Lolly it is siiiis- I saw liiin. Itnt time hath nothing blurVI tliosp llliort of favor Wlih-h In- won-," FRANK VICTOR PARA DISK, "Freil." ILL. liciiiostliPiiian. AMITY. OA. 'If sin- undervalue mo. What care I bow fair slip bp?"  FRANK THOMAS PHILLIPS, ••Solicitor.” II. I.. Dcmosthenlnii. ST. MAUYS. OA. •Tin sweetest hours that I over s|h iii1 All s|H ut among tin lassies. Oh." THOMAS XIMMOXS POWKLL, "Tom." It,I,. I'lil Kappa. I'lil I elti« Tlicla. Theta Laminin I Mil (Legal). NKWXAN, OA. •Hold of your worthiness, we single you As our host moving fair solicitor." JO FIX ZRIGLRK RYAX, "Z Ik.” ILL. Sigma Xu. Phi Kappa. SAVANNAH, OA. "He sang the holil anthem of Krill go hraugh."KUGKKK III LI. IA Kl SPALDIXfi, “llilllttrd.” B.L. ('hi Pul. I’lil Kiiiiimi. Thetu I.millhIh I'lii I Ismail. ATLANTA.' CA. I!0 nut the first by whom the new nro trleil. Nor yet the hist tn Iny the old nshle. ' KKl MIvX M.IIAXIIvl. ’ ••Beub.” ILL. Iieinosthenimi. I.OCAXVII.LK. CA. •I.ove nil. trust ;i few Ho wroiiK tn iiniie." .IOSF.IMI Nl'fiKXK V.AKKLA. •Mop.” It.I.. I'lii Kii|i|i:i. Tlietn l.mnhihi Phi (Lejtfill, TAMPA. KLA. I relehrato niywlf. mill slim myself. Anil wlint I nssiiiiie you slinll assume. £Happenings on the Campus Judge (Presiding at a meeting of Jeffersonian Law Society)—“Mr. Sheriff, call a list of the jurors, please. Sheriff (calling list)—“Singleton. Tolnas. Mann. Newsome--’ Newsome (interrupting)—“I decline to serve, your honor.” .Judge—“You’ll have to give some better reason than that, Mr. Newsome.” Newsome—“1 am related to the defendant, your honor.” .Judge—“I understand from the indictment before me, Mr. Newsome, that the defendant in this case is a negro.” ------o- Fresiiman—“They say it took five men five hours to blow up that pushball in Atlanta. Sophomore—“They should have brought it over here to blow up. Prof. Sanford could do it in fifteen minutes.” One night, when the Astronomy class was on top of Moore College, looking at the heaven. “Doc” Paul Hudson asked if that (pointing at the water-tower) was the big dipper. “Yes. indeed.” answered “Scdtchkv” Ross, “and yonder,” indicating the Agricultural College, “is the Milky Way.” J)R. White (in Chemistry class)—“Mr. Covington! Mr. Covington, what, is C,,IInO,?” Covington—“Well. Doctor, I’m not certain, but I think it’s a forward pass from full-back to left end.” There was a boy at U. Ga. And he was wondrous wise, He thought he’d grow in one short week A moustache, full-grown size. And when he found it would not grow, With all his might and main, lb- seized the razor and tin shears And cut it off again.4®i i ' . f.' ?v'c" ‘ fTJr C-=? J. The William Jennings Bryan Club Organization at tiik I Diversity of Georgia completed in the year 1932. (Owing to the fact that every member ran for office and that every one voted for himself, the election is still in douht.) Ch arter Mem hers. Augustus Octavius Bacon Sparks. Joseph Light foot Dead wylcr. Harold Dicdrich Meyer. Chas. hoTair Estes. Charlie Defeated Brown. Joseph Enough Varela. Went Wrong Abbott. Ego T. Anderson. Busted Bubbles Covington. Too Slow Moise. yJA Wake! Wake! Wake ! (the annual parody.) Wake, wake, wake, From thy peaceful dreams. But gee! IIow I would that my ears were deafened To the bell that is calling me. Oh well for the gay lighted hall That lyres with its dancing throng; Oh well for the midnight feast That can never last too long. And the hastening hours sail on To the dreaded break of day; But. Oh, for the time to study that French And to finish that blanked assay. Wake, wake, wake. At the call of that hell. Oh. gee! But the opportune time for study and such Has never yet conic to me. C. II. Stone. History of Junior Law Class In Septcmlxn . 1911. there came into existence at the University of Georgia a class, which, if we he allowed the privilege of being our own judges, we may candidly say is the greatest class that has ever honored the University by its presence. After several months of strenuous studying and diligent application, this class, through tin efforts of the faculty of the Law School, is no longer a diamond in the rough, qnasi. but a gem made up as it is of sons of the law by direct descent; at least several sons following the profession of their fathers; the sons of politicians, the sons of toil, el coin'd. It is indeed a representative body. In number we outstrip all former classes, enjoying the distinguished honor of being the largest class in the history of the law school. This is due. no doubt, to the unusual allurement of the study of law and the practically unlimited field that is open to a graduate. Modesty prevents any lengthy discussion as to our social prestige; being advocates of “justice,” we are forced to make the reserved statement that our position in the social world strikingly resembles that of the hub in its relation to the mechanism of the wheel. It has been voted unanimously by the class, that never before in the history of the University has such a magnificent body of young men been collected in one class, who are in personal appearance so handsome, in influence so weighty, in brain, as in intellectual force, so far above the average—but here again modesty prevents my telling all. Historian.Junior Law Class Officers Wilmam II. Lumpkin, Jr...........................................President. II. L. Rogers...............................................Vice-President. A. K. Maddox.....................................Secretary and Treasurer. Mark W. Caublk................................................. Historian. Junior Law Class Roll Allen, Marion Hendricks......................................Millcdgcvillc. Anderson, Edward Thomas............................................Danburg. Belscr, Dana Collins.....................................Montgomery, Ala. Blanchard. George Carswell ........................................Thomson. Bray, Aubrey Oliver................................................Norwood. Camp, Lindlcy Wayland..............1..............................Marietta. Cauble, Mark Waverley .............................................Atlanta. ! Cheney, Pat Moll, B.S................................................Valdosta. Cowart, John Martin ................................................Arlington. Cunningham, William Alexander .........................................Athens. Deen, DeWitt Talmadge ...............................................Waycross. Dick, Samuel Kenney, B.S..............................................Atlanta. Duke, Robert DeWitt.................................................. Newborn. Durden, Carl Earnest.................................................Graymont. Gray, Joseph Francis. .Jr..........................................Savannah. Gunnols, Charles William ............................................Bronwood. Hamilton, Ililes.........................................................Rome. Harris, Earl James..................................................Bethlehem. Hutchens, Harold Charles.................................................Rome. Johnston. Richard Hutchins. A.B........................................Walden. Killingsworth, Emmett Clifton ...................................Fort Gaines. Lumpkin, William Henry, Jr.......................................Cartersville. Lynch. James Montgomery........................................Florence, S. 0. McKenzie, Horace Cantrell ............................................Atlanta. Maddox, Arthur Kennedy, A.B.......................................... Gridin. Mann, William Azmcr ...................................................Milner. Middlebrooks, Junius Ralph ..........................................Mayfield. Mills, Lewis Archibald, .Jr..........................................Savannah. Minclian, Ralph Joseph..............................................Brunswick. Morris, John Brazie .................................................Hartwell. Newsome, Charles Henderson .........................................Eaton ton. Nicholson, Robert Marion ........................................Watkinsvillo. Oliver, John Wesley....................................................Plains. Perry, Marvin Banks ...................................................Machen. Raiford, Robert Sheldon ..............................................Atlanta. Rogers, Henry Levy ................................................Rcidsvillo. Russell, David Augustine...........................................Carrollton. Scarlett, Frank Muir................................................Brunswick. Singleton, Gordon Grady ............................................Shell man. Singleton, Henry Tucker................................................Edison. Skelton, Parke ......................................................Hartwell. Strickland. Deicer Solomon ............................................Athens. Thomas, William Milton ............................................'...Athens. Tolnas, Olaf Johann, A.B............................................Brunswick. Trimble, Richard Brogden, B.Pil...................................Adairsville. VanDuzcr, Albert Hodges, B.S.........................................Elbcrton. Wallace, Roy Williams, B.S...........................................Rutledge. Whitaker, Eugene Hamilton ......................................... Valdosta.Book Reviews (The following publications arc on sale at the Students’ Cooperative Book Store.) “ U7 i Shall Sot Sing Sext Season for the Metropolitan Opera Company, ' By James Montgomery Lynch. In this treatise, the author answers a question which many of his friends and a host of newspaper representatives have propounded. “The Theory and Practice of Politics." In this compendium, Messrs. Russell. Brown. Sparks, and Deadwyler unite their efforts in reducing an abtruse and vague subject to clear-cut scientific principles. Coming from such a source, the book should carry weight. “Money." by James A. Johnson. Guaranteed to give you a handsome Fifth Avenue residence in a month. Read fully his history and his tutors of this line. “Reminiscences of Famous Actors " By the Thalians of the University of Georgia. On opening tins volume, the critic sustained quite a surprise, for he found it to consist of a series of autobiographies, in which each of the players gave his own horn a “toot.” “I Yampolskyliyhti." Grand Opera in Five Acts. Music by Signor Louis Koplin. Mils. Doc.; Libretto by Charles II. Stone. In criticising this elaborate composition. Omar Weems, the distinguished musical authority, said: “The work is almost as good as if I had done it myself—I fear, however, that we shall not hear it often.” “The Fashion Hook," By Augustus Octavius Sparks. To the man who swears his love to style, drink deep of this cup and be a sport. An inspiration of tin fair sex. “Athletics at Oeoryia," By Ross Creek more. In this publication, the author explains how to make every team in college. IIis superb physique is his main advertisement, and his experience is unlimited. Read carefully and thereby make a “G” in two weeks. “Military Promotions." By First Lieutenant and Adjutant R. S. Farmer. An excellent thesis on the value of boot-licking. Every soldier or would-be soldier, who aspires to military glory, should read this book. “My Method of Beauty," By Burrage. To appreciate this book one should see the author. Would that his picture took the place of these words! Venus would fade into insignificance and the two-by-four drug stores would go out of business. No doubt this book will have a wide circulation. “Fifteen Undecisive Battles of the World " By Scott II. Titshaw. The author here recounts the details of all the scraps, class against class, and boy against boy, that he has witnessed during his sojourn here. The narration is vivid and shows a surprising accuracy of detail.History of Senior Pharmacy Class To have attained the pantheistic ideals that have been the beacon light of our every effort during the past two .veal's we could well say with Horace, “ mih i Ddphica lauro ciiiyc vole ns containbut we were not all geniuses and being “poor weak mortals after all.” only accomplished a small part of that which we endeavored to achieve. Our fullest and greatest expectations have not been realized and our ambition has not been satiated, but this present unrest and unsatisfaetion is pregnant with energy and enthusiasm that in future years will blossom and ripen into success. As the harbinger of spring sweetly calls to us from the perfumed blossoms of the trees, it vibrates the strings of memory which in “fond recollections’ turns back the pages of the years and focuses upon the sixteen manly youths, who, as the leaves assumed their mellow hues in the autumn of 1910. entered upon their collegiate course as pharmaceutical students, advancing in steady array through the fusilade of examinations. Some have fallen by the wayside and others for “various and sundry” reasons, have deserted the ranks, but the invincible and now immortal seven have marched onward until now. scarred by the vicissitudes of Fate and the “Profs.” we stand firm of hand and steady of gaze to take our well deserved diplomas and with our enviable past go out. with the same determination as we entered, to achieve a meritorous success, and to conquer the foes that may beset our path of Life. Although our achievements have been great, and our prospects greater, our ambition looms ahead as a bright and shining star to which we shall always strive, holding fast our ideals, and. undaunted and unafraid, storm the citadels of Life, to take that success that is surely ours. Historian .M. PAKKKKSON. Senior Pharmacy Class Officers • (j. M. Parkbrson.............................................President. Tom Clark, Jr...........................................Vice-President. A. M. Swift..................................................Historian. AV. C. ITarpbr.................................Secretary and Treasurer. N. S. Arthur.................................................... Poet. T. P. Coilb...................................................Chaplain.XKLSOX S. ARTHUR, "King." IMl.C. 1 tCIllost Ill'll ia II. ATHBNS. OA. When I wu sick you gave hitter pills. THOMAS CLARK, JR. "Tom." I'h.O. .IAOKSONVILLK. FLA. Half our knowledge we must snatch, not take." l'li.G. l emosthonian. WlXTKItVILTjK, 5A. 'Anil show me samples of a tlmnsanil names. Telling iheir strange ami vigorous faculties."  JOHN III MON WOO I HOCIv, “Cn| ’n.M I’li.lS. Sljjma Nu. lii'iiiDslIioiiliin. KHlilSTKK. ISA. ■Throw physic to the 1ok«S I'll none of It.History of the Junior Pharmacy Class The Junior Pharmacy Class has come, but not gone. We came into existence on the twenty-first day of September, nineteen hundred ami eleven. While we are still young, we have made a lot of history, yet no attempt shall be made to recount in detail our doings, undoings, nor misdoings since we united hands and hearts for the purpose of fight with our antagonist, iynorancc. But poorly equipped to give battle, when we first marched on the campus, we sanguincly prophesied yood concerning the ultimate end. When our class met for the first time, in Terrell Hall, last September, there were only eight aspiring youths who were willing to devote two years of application to study, hard work, and high energy, toward preparing themselves for benefiting mankind and relieving suffering humanity. We have shot and been shot, but owing to the kindness of fickle Dame Fortune, and the burning of much midnight oil we have come out victorious. Owing to the constant bombardment of adroit professors, two of our number fell by the wayside, bid we, not to be outdone by our sworn enemy (our Professors of deep erudition)—with reenforcemcnt, came back, and came back to stay,—until our benign Professors will have happily compromised, and each of us shall have received his Ph.G. We have no athletic stars in our class; though each one of us is an enthusiastic supporter of the athletic activities, and ever loyal to the Fniversity. with Georgia as our adopted middle name. In the class-room our men. with indomitable will, in the face of innumerable difficulties, have shown the ncvcr-yivc-up spirit. We can boast of a class full of energy and enthusiasm; men who are willing to work, in order to merit and attain the coveted seat of fame and honor. In closing this brief account, it is unnecessary to state that of course the greater part of our history is yet to be made, and to be indelibly written on the face of time. Were I an artist. I could relate in glowing language the virtues and deeds of my fellows from the time we entered the field of action.—or if I were but more skilled in the art of writing. I would invest my narration with greater warmth, and. with the eloquence of our Father Ames, give to you a more detailed account of the events and modest achievements of our flourishing class of Nineteen Hundred and Eleven. Suffice it to say, that we are striving with our might and main, to do those things which should be done, and we—the prospective Class of Nineteen Hundred and Thirteen shall accomplish great things before we are called to the Great Beyond. Historian..1. K. MOOKK. Junior Pharmacy Class Officers J. E. Moork ...................................................President. A. L. Norman ............................................Vice-President. .J. R. Push .......................................Secretary and Treasurer. J. R. Push ..........:.........................................Historian. J. W. Smith ........................................................Poet. II. G. Parrish .................................................Chaplain. Class Roll Austin. R.........................................................Newnan. Hutterly, R. E.............................................Wrightsvillc. Hush, J. R.......................................................Eastman. Normair, A. L...............................................Norman Park. Moore, J. E......................................................Atlanta. Orr, W. A.....................................................Washington. Parrish, H. Q...................................................Brooklet. Smith, J. W....................................................Abbeville.“Mary'Pity Women!” (Apologies to Kipling.) You call yourself a woman For all of that you wear, Pillows in your bosom And rodents in your hair; You say you do not care To fool the men—o-ho, You needn’t trouble there, Ah, Qawd. you bet they know. You say you look belter to make yourself over, And thereby would rapture some innocent lover. What's the use complaining, when the mother that bore you (Mary pity women!) did the same before you. There aren’t no false complexion What can stand the test Of studious inspection, And still look like the best; lint still you’ll up and race To fret your little paint. Then try to make your face Look like what it ain’t. When a man is wary, naught like that can fool 'im, Xo decorated spinster can ever hope to rule 'im; Xo list to hunt exceptions—you'll never, never strike 'cr, (Mary pity women!) when all the rest are like ’cr. 1 like to treat ’em fair. I do, that’s why I’m pore, I’d starve—what do they care? They’d still he wanting more. They would and that is shore! Hut I fall too. you know. Can’t stave off Cupid’s bow, Ah. Gawd, I love ’em so. So what’s the use of reason. when the mother that bore cr, (Mary pity women!) was covetous before 'cr Sleep on love's promises, you'll wake to your sorrow, (Mary pity women!) it’s toil for you to-morrow. A. A. Raylk, .OXK-YKAR AGRICI'I N’RAL CLASSHistory of the One-Year Agricultural Class 1911-1912 The One-year Agricultural (’lass began in 1906. At its l eginning it was only a three months course, but seeing the great benefits derived from this it was decided in 1908 to make it a one-year course. The purpose of the course is to provide suitable instruction in agriculture for those who can only remain at college for one year. Members of the class are represented in all activities at the I’niversity. One of the mainstays of the ’Varsity football team is from this class. In the military line we also received beneficial training. Those wishing to cultivate their oratorical talents have the advantage of the literary societies and the Agricultural Club. In only a few more years this class will have on its roll a greater number of men than any class at the I’nivcrsity. 'Pile people of this state, and of other states, are just beginning to recognize the great opportunities offered by this course. Other states have already recognized its value. This is illustrated by the representatives who come from North. Mast, South, ami West. The states represented in the 11)12 Class are (icorgia. South Carolina. New York, and Florida. There are a great number of men who come to take this course and are inspired to higher ideals. This is clearly shown by the large majority every year taking the four-year course. Those that are unable to take tin full course go home better equipped for their life work, and with an unquenchable desire to make two blades of grass grow where only one grew before. Historian. One-Year Agricultural Class Roll A. L. DeLaPkrribrb .........................................President. M. A. N. Patten.......................................Vice-President. W. E. Callender, .Jr..........................Secretary and Treasurer. J. T. Zbioler ..............................................Historian. C. C. Rampley .................................................. Olin Todd ..................:................................Chaplain.• 7 ?rirc y' rc 5 •« OO WV.Lj;l.KJ. Alford, Columbus Augusta. Bamesf Edwin Davis. Barrow, Hugh. Blackwell, James Harmon. Blalock, Cicero Herschcll. Busbcc, Hubert II. Cooper, Bennett Duvall. Cutler, John Melton, Jr. Daniel, Earnest Fletcher. DelaPcrricrc, Homer Clarence. El linger, A. Ij. Fears, Grady Frank. Fenn, Lewis. Hattaway, W. B. Iligginson, W. L. lline, II. J. Holliday, Paul L. Houser, W. W. Houston, William F. Ivey, Vivian McIIatton. Jackson, It. It. Jones, Cecil Scabrori. Little, William Harbor. Martin, C. J. Moorhead, Orian Alexander. Morgan, Ilenry Grady. Nash, Davis Acton. Nickerson, T. II. Pirkle, J. P. Ray, Andrew L. Roof, M. V. Rogers, Roy. Rushin, Walter Clifford. Smith, Lafayette. Strange, II. II. Strickland, Ilenry. Summers, W. Young. Surrcncy, Terrell B. . Thomas, Joel. Vcaeh, James Madison. White, A. V. Williams, Larry Emmett.College Calendar Sept. 15. Kd Anderson enters niee for Senior President. Sept. 20. College opens. Freshmen buy Red Caps. Sept. 21. Chapel seats put on sale. Sept. 28. “Shake” Newsom initiates two Neophites into Zcta Chi. Sept. 80. Perrin Nieolson begins boot-licking. Oet. 1. Titslmw outlines his program of daily work for the year. Oct. 5. George Northen grafts off of Y. M. C. A. hampiet. Oet. 7. “Red” Mann withdraws from Senior Class President raee. Oct. 10. “Chasem” Martin develops into Sporting Writer for Athens Rainier. Oet. 15. “Pete” Brock shoots “Runt” Durden. Oct. 25. “Skippy” Conyers mistaken for “Ox” Sparks. Nov. 1. “Piggy” Burragc goes Snipe-hunting. Nov. 2. “Piggy” Burragc goes Snipe-hunting again. Nov. 4. Lloyd Brown takes supper with Dr. White. Nov. 10. Crcckmorc stops football practice on account of health. Georgia’s prospects drop immediately. Nov. 15. Senior Canes arrive. Nov. 18. Roy Lanham stays awake in Industrial Chemistry. Dee. 8. Molhv go« s to Madame Sherry. Dee. 10. Dr. White dismisses Senior Chemistry one minute before the boll rings. Dec. 18. Microscope appears. Dec. 15. Wright Abbott swipes George Northen’s Greek Jack. Northen flunked. Dee. 20. Perrin Nieolson finds that the Microscope was printed—on a printing press. •Ian. 10. Kd Anderson and Stanley Langston seen without their canes. •Jan. 15. “Grouch” Meadow shoots Prof. Lustrat. “Bubbles” bursts out in laughter. •Jan. 18. “Kid” Brannon fails to make 08 in German. •Jan. 22. “First Lieutenant and Adjutant” R. S. Farmer wears civilian clothes. •Jan. 24. I). A. M. Abrams runs for President of Phi Kappa. •Tan. 28. Newman and Spalding appear at class on time. Silvcy, due to shock. excUses class. Jan. 80. Flanigcn seen to-day without Brand. Feb. 1. Bob Laird, after having tried for three months to grow a mustache, gives up in despair. Feb. 10. Jack Woofter issues the College Spirit. Feb. 12. Bob Raiford sober. Feb. 15. Potato Club organized. Lloyd Brown elected President.Jags! telip mm j® A, w% 5■f t aa Pcb. Mar. Mur. Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar. 20. 7. 10. 15. 17. 20. 99 Apr. 2. Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr. i). 7. 10. 12. Apr. 15. York explains to Sanford the use of Soap. L. («. Dozier carries Prof. Pond a bowl of Mowers. (.Just before exams.) Burrage’s portrait gets a place in the Senior Philosophy room. Phillips tells Prof. Green where to find the law. Prof. Salyer leaves Old College. The Bunny Club organizes. Lloyd Brown elected President. Tap Bennett attempts to exchange a 1911 Lincoln penny at M. W. for fifteen dollars in greenbacks. Bob Gunn. Scopcc Nunez. Burrage. and Abrams looked up during visit of Legislative Committee lest tin latter be unfavorably impressed. “Judge” Lyneh refuses to assist Madame Nordica. New pool-room opens. “Peanuts" William borrows a dollar. Many cuts registered. Silvey fails to shoot Fortson. Prof. Sanford calls a meeting of the Athletic Association. Brown and Lumpkin confer. “ Rabbit ” Middlcbrooks comes back to Law class. Prof. Morris asks someone to introduce the gentleman who had just entered. Glimses Into the Class-Room Prof. Brock—In the long-run. Mr. Estes, what determines the cost of production ? Estes—Clarke’s Law. eh. to be sure. Dr. Ilendren—“Mr. Wooftcr, does the length of the solar day vary by any great amount?” Jack Wooftcr—“No. sir. except on the occasion when Joshua made the sun stand still.” Dr. White—“Mr. Meadow, now Mr. Meadow, what kind of land contains sand?” Meadow (after guessing awhile)—“I don’t know. Doctor.” Dr. White—“Whv. sandy land, of course. Mr. Meadow.” Col. Snclling—“Gentlemen. I assure .Von that the study we arc about to begin. Calculus, is the poetry of mathematics.” Walter Hill—“Well, if that’s the case, boys. 1 reckon Sophomore Algebra must be Allegory.”WHO'S WHO ?Who’s Who at Georgia (The following are the results of an actual vote taken by the student body.) The .Most Popular Professor.............................Prof. S. V. Sanford. The Most Popular Student ......................................A. K. Maddox. The Best Known Athlete........................................Boh McWhorter. The Most Intellectual ......................................C. II. Newsome. The Hardest “Boner”...........................................“Runt” Durden. The Best Looking Man.........II. Spalding. Marion Allen. Jack Lindsay (Tied.) Strongest Man..................................................Timon Bowden. Laziest Man ................................................Ross Creekmore. Biggest Freshman (all classes included).................“Bob” Laird (Senior). Biggest Boot-lieker ....................................................Perrin Xicolson. Ugliest Man ................................................ “Snipe” Burrage. Most Solemn Man.................................................Paul Felkcr. Biggest Sport...............................................Hilliard Spalding. Most Desperate Lover....................................................Ililes Hamilton. Biggest Ladies’ Mail .......................................Homer Thompson. Biggest Hot-air Artist ................................................Charlie Estes. Biggest “Bone-head”...........................................“Punk” Malone. Best. Poet....................................J.............James B. Wright. Best Writer................j...............................Joseph E. Varela. Best Orator....................................................James M. Lynch. Most Conceited Man ........................................................Sam Dick. Biggest Politician ......................................... “Dick” Russell. Most popular College (Georgia excluded)............................Vanderbilt.SIGMA ALPHA KI’SI LON FRATERNITYSigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity Founded at the University of Alabama. March 0. Beta Chapter established at the University of Georgia January 15, 18( t . Colors: Royal Purple and Old Gold. Chapter Roi.l. A. F. Awtry. Malcolm Ilutton. E. 1). Barnes. A. J. Ives. Edward Barnett. Gcrdine Lumpkin. W. C. Bunn. Charles Maclean. Enoch Calloway. James Maddox. Mark Cauble. It. C. Maddox. Ross Crcekmore. A. M. Martin. Joseph Cutler. Pierce Merry. Iirving Denmark. J. X. Xeel. Edgar B. Dunlap. Ilenry Nicholson. C. A. Eager. Nevin Patton. Julian Erwin. Gwinn Pope. Montgomery Francis. Tom Scott. Ambrose Gordon. A. O. B. Sparks. Miles Hamilton. W. B. Sparks, Jr. W. B. Ilattaway. Thomas E. Tupper. J)udley Hull. Clair Tomlinson. G. L. C. Hunter. Basil Wise. •Not in Picture.Chi Phi Fraternity Founded at Princeton I'niversity. 1S24, Eta Chapter established 18(57 CoiiORS: Scarlet and lilac. Chapter Ror.r. P. M. Felker E. T.Anderson Clark Howell. Jr G. B. Barrett. X. P. Bassett J. W. Lindsay Warren Both well II. C. McGowan It. L. McWhorter W. E. Campbell, Jr W. S. Connerat. S. Moise, Jr 1. L. Robinson 1). B. FelkerKAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITYKappa Alpha Fraternity Founded 1865. at Washington and Jam ('Diversity Gamma Chapter established 18(58. Chapter Rom,. Enoch B. Henson. Jr. G. S. Burch. Paul Blanchard. Dana Blaekmar. Jr. Charles E. Cavcrly, Jr. Bentley Chappell. Gordon E. Dixon. Janies A. Etheridge. Charles B. Foley. Robert J. Griffith. Robert W. Knight. W. II. Immpkin. Ji E. F. McCarty. W. P. Nieolson J. C. Pringle. Marion W. Redd. Marion Seabrook. J. Rhodes Slade. R. B. Trimble. Carl Thompson. Homer Thompson1 111 DKLTA THETA FRATERNITYOft-’WV.-gKKf. Phi Delta Theta Fraternity Founded at .Miami. 1848. Colors: Blue and While. Chapter Roll. Lloyd Brown. Frank 'Carter. Ilerb'ert Dobbs. Bill Duncan. Hill Freeman. William Gunnels. Frank Holden. Burke Hood. Henry Howard. Wesley Houser. W. W. Houser. William Hurst. Fred Jordan. Alex. Knight. W. K. Meadow. ('Imuncey .M iddlchrooks. Frank McCoy. Hcnneth McLain. George T. Nortbeii. T. X. Powell. AI bon Reed. George Saneken. Henry Smith. Joe Stewart. Wallace Stovall. Linton West. Olin Wimberly.y ALPHA TAi; OMEGA FRATERNITYSImfi, Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity v Founded at Virginia Military Institute 1S( f . Georgia Alpha Beta Chapter established 1878. Colors : Sky Him ami Old (laid. Chapter Roll. .Marion II. Allen. Harwell Atkinson. Shirley C. Boykin. Ashton Burford. Bindley W. Camp. Earle E. Cocke. Boviek G. Fortson. Russell S. Leonard. James M. Veach. Eugene II. Whitaker. S. Fleming Winecoff. J. Irwin Wood. James R. Wood. James M. Lynch. .Maicomb .M. .Maner. Henry M. MeGehcc. W. Duncan Owens. Frank M. Scarlett, Jr Parke Skelton. John L. Tye, Jr. Ewart G. Twit tv. SIGMA XT FRATERNITYSigma Nu Fraternity Founded at Virginia Military Institute 1869. Mu Chapter established 1881. Coi.oks: Black, While and Old ( old. A. Alford J. L. Parrish. T. X. Patton. K. E. Peacock. X. A. Peacock. C. B. Bedingficld. L. S. Bussey. V. I). Calhoun. J. I. Davis. L. C. English.' T. J. Ely M. B. Folsom. J. F. Gray. Jr J. E. Harrell. Ii. 8. Raiford. A. A. Raylc, Jill. W. Riley. A. G. Roland. J. ' . Ryan. R. A. Laird. 1). E. Lowry. J. R. Minnehau E. C. Malone. John Morris. J. 1). Wade. II. II. Whclchel D. E. Williams. •Xot in Picture.(•Ill I’SI FRATERNITYChi Psi Fraternity Founded at Union College 1841. Alpha Delta established 1890. Colors: Royal Purple and ( old. Chapter Roll Dr. II. V. Black, II. L. Hodgson G. II. Noble. B. K. Carmichael. Frank Cheney S. AV. Palmer E. II. Spalding. II. Thompson. Phil Branson. (Pledged.) X. H. Dillard C. E. Durden, KAPPA SIGMA FRATERNITYKappa Sigma Fraternity Founded at t In I'Diversity of Virginia 1867 Established at I’liivcrsity of Georgia IDOL Counts: lied. While, and Emerald. . Cii.M’TKK Rom.. Dana C. Reiser. Cluis. W. Ilium, Jr. I). Timon Bowden. Tom S. Brand, Jr. J. Bennett Conyers. E. Brown Cooper. II. Averill Crane. Joe L. Dcadwyler. Lovett Griner. Cecil Jones. Bates Lovett. Kirby S. Malone. Chas. E. Martin. Ralph J. Minchan. •Not in Picture. B. Curry Moreno. John Hill Moss. Addison L. Norman. David F. Paddock. Marvin B. Perry. F. Donald Phillips. Louis E. Pierce. Pinckney Price. William Slade. Artie IT. Small. Benton II. Walton. Cleo I). Wilder. Dr. (). II. Johnson. Prof. J. C. Koch.PI KAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITY Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity Founded at tin I’niversity of Virginia 1868. Alpha Mu Chapter founded at the Fniversity of Georgia 1908. Ciiai’TKii Roll. A. II. Akcrman. R. R. Jackson. L. II. Covington. J. 0. Liddell. A. V. Callaway. II. G. Mitchell. A. L. DcLaPerriere. J. I , Pirklc. II. C. DcLaPerrierc. V. 1). Roy. R. P. Howard. J. II. Shaw. C. W. Hunter, Jr. C. X. Thaxton. J. M. Holder. II. J. Vaughn 1). W. Johnson, Jr. IfSIGMA ('III FRATBRNITYSigma Chi Fraternity Founded at Miami University 1856. Delta Chapter established at University of Georgia 1872, Delta Chapter reestablished 1910. Asbury, T. L. Bivins, B. B. Bra mien. Cliff. Chapter Roi.n. Ban ham, R. E. Lufburrow, B. M. Martin, M. W. Burns, W. A. Marshburn, J. II. Chandler, B. W. MeConnell, B. M. Conklin, II. W. McDaniel, C. B. Cowan, 1 II. S. Miller, E. T. Fitzpatrick, M. W. Nix. II. A. Gunn, R. R. Roane, .J. F. Gunn, J. MeK. Richey, II. G. Hardin, E. J. Russell. 1). A. Hastings, W. R. Stevens, R. T. Hitchcock, W. E. Wilson, W. R.DELTA TAU DELTA FRATERNITY Delta Tau Delta Fraternity Beta Chapter established 1882. Reestablished 1911 Colors: Purple, While au l Old Cold. Flower: Pansy. CHAPTER Roi.I E. G. Jordan. T. I. Miller. A. S. Mitchell B. Ij. Brinson. .Jr. 10. L. Carter, Jr. M. B. Cooper. J. L. Cooper. J. M. Cowart 10. F. Daniel. 10. K. Overstreet, Jr 10. R. Bnnd. L. O. Sheffield R. I). Short. I). T. Droii. II. S. Durden. A. M. Ellinger. B. Ij. Flanigen. II. B. Harmon K. B. Zalmer TIIKTA LAMBDA 1 111 PRATKKNITV (LEGAL)it J' • C Theta Lambda Phi Fraternity (Legal) Eleeklev Senate established 1004, James Maddox, Marion II. Allen W. S. Conncrnt William Gunnells. Thomas N. Powell William IT. Lumpkin James M. Lynch. K. Hilliard Spalding. Richard Trimble. Joseph E. Varela. FIT Z - SOPHOMORE. MAC - JUNIOR VON-SENIORSPHINX A •' ' J ---- Sphinx Officers. II. A. Nix. I . I . Alex. MacDonell, K. S. K. T. Miller, I . II. A. K. Maddox, I). S. B. Cliff Bran lien, • • • Members. Cliff Braiinen. (125). Ij. I). Brown, (126). Alex. MaeDonell, (114). A. K. Maddox, (123). W. A. Mann, (128). E. T. Miller, (110). II. A. Nix, (108). George Xorthen, (127). George Woodruff, (115)). •Not in picture.SENIOR ROUND TABLESenior Round Table Faculty Mem hers. Chancellor Barrow Prof. S. M. Salyer. Active Members. (74) Marion B.. Folsom. (75) James M. Lynch. (76) William A. Mann (77) Charles E. (78) Harold J). Meyer. (79) Bert Michael Martin Northen (80) George T (81) Charles II. Stone. (82) A. O. B. Sparks. (83) Benton II. Walton. (81) T. J. W potter. Jr. MS-JO: : C ' V. 4 W-xV.' kK?. The Gridiron Club Members. II. A. Nix. Henry Newman. Ililliard Spalding. Dr. M. L. Troutman. A. K. Maddox. George T. Northen. Harold 1). Meyer. James M. Lynch. M. B. Perry. Marion B. Folsom. E. T. Anderson. V. E. Durden. C. E. Martin. Clift Brannon. B. II. Walton. L. I). Brown. W. K. Meadow. T. N. Powell. W. II. Lumpkin. W. P. Nicolson, Jr. M. II. Allen. T. J. Wooftcr, Jr. Bert Michael. II. B. Peacock. •TIIALIANS. DRAMATIC CU B OF THE UNIVERSITY OK GEORGIAScene in “At Geokcia."M 1 V; y' ' . r $ jrOvi f’stJ.KT. TKalians, Dramatic Club of the University of Ga. Officers. Perrin Nicolson, President. George T. Northen, Vice-President. James M. Lynch. Jiusiness Manager. Harold I). Meyer. Publicity Manager. Miss Mary I). Lyndon, Directress. C. E. Caverly, Jr. Spencer Connerat. Edgar H. Dunlap. Clark Howell, Jr. G. C. Hunter. II. G. Howard. C. W. Jacobson. James M. Lynch. Harold D. Meyer. Members. Charles Maclean. Edwin McCarty. George T. Northen. Perrin Nicolson. Howell H. Peacock. Allion W. Reed. J. Rhodes Slade. Victor Victor. J. Mason Williams. JUNIOR CABINETJunior Cabinet Active Members. Frank Carter, (54) Zaeli Cowan, (55). Ed Dunlap. (50). Ilill Freeman, (57) Frank Garrison. (58). E. L. Jackson, (59). T. S. Moise, (60). Edward Morgenstern, (61) E. I. Hansom, (62). Henry Smith, (63). George Williams, (64). James B. Wright, (65)GLKK AND MANDOLIN ('1.11$Glee and Mandolin Club Officers. Clias. T. Estes. Manager. Clias. M. Maclean, SI age Manager. . Joseph E. Varela. President. R. K. Haughey, Director. J. Rhodes Slade. Leader Mandolin Club. Janies M. Lynch. Leader (Her ('tub. First Tenors. (J. L. C. Hunter. Y. I). Roy. Xevin Fatten. Fierce Merry. Montgomery Francis. Second Tenors. Joseph L. Deadxvyler. Richard X. Schwab. Jack Sinclair. E. G. Twitty. Baritones. Ross Creckinorc. Jack Cutler. Roy Lanhani. Gordon Singleton. Joseph K. Varela. Hasses. Charles Maclean. Janies M. Lynch. Ilenry Singleton. II. S. Langston. Wills Wilson. Fianist—Louis Koplin. Whistling Soloist—J. W. Kieve. First Mandolins. J. Rhodes Slade. Charles Foley. Fhil Branson. Jack Lindsay. Fdwin McCarty. Edwin X. Broyles. Guitars. Bentley II. Chappell. James C. Fringlc. Second Mandolins. Enoch Benson. J. Irwin Wood. Charles T. Estes. Henri McGowan. Marion Seahrook.G. L. G. Hunter. .M. L. Francis. K. A. Creckmoro. C. M. Maclean.Pin Kappa. Harold 1). Meyer. George T. Xorlhen. Joseph K. Varela. Debaters League Dkmostiiknian. II. I). Russell. W. A. Maim. Charles K. Martin.DIE DEl'TSCII E GHSKU.SCIIAFT. t‘oJuuwiii.rJ[')7rr . y J. 01 ' ■ ■ " .• ■ " ■ J5T Pv vO. '«rc Die deutsche Gesellschaft Roll V. G. Acrcc.® B. A. Bailey. Jj. H. Baunnnas.® A. B. Benul. S. T. Brcwton.® --- Hammond.® II. L. Hodgson.® I . L. Hudson. C. Joel. A. K. Kay.® C. II. Newsome. W. P. Nicolson, Jr.® G. Padgett. M. B. Perry.® J. R. Radford, Jr.’ B. I;. Brinson.' R. R. Childs. V. B. Durden. AI. B. Folsom. T. Geisz.® C. L. Kay.® R. B. Kay.® W. 1). Alolby.® Prof. Alorris.® E. Alorgenstern. A. A. Rayle, Jr. W. A. Reid.® J. II. Ross. B. I. Segal 1. Win. Slade.® R. O. Suddath.' Air. Starick.® V. Victor. R. P. Welchel.® K. B. Zahner. •Not in Picture.PRESIDENTS OF AGRICULTURAL CLUB.Not News But Views Official Okoan of tiib National I. k-Slin ;kks Association. Pcklisiied by tub Georgia Goose-Quill ClIAl TK|{. 'h Icf Scribe—Wright. Associate Scribe—The Other Wrights. Local Scribe—Engl ish. Adverlisiny Extortioner—Moore. Assist a n I Extort ioiicr—Creek- A lore. Circula I ion Mandycr— Ifeid. .JINK. 1012. Contents. 1. Little Flashes, by Sparks. 2. Getting Busted, by Hubbles. 3. Why I Am a Man, by Mann. 4. Getting There, by Swift tO Walker. 5. Cattle Grazing, by Meadow. (i. Two Grand Colors, by Redd and Stack. 7. I'p from Slavery, by Freeman. 8. Giving Good Weights, by Overton. 0. Poultry Raising, by Hatcher. 10. When the Wind Blows, by Hall away. 11. The Art of Sleeping, by Dozier. 12. The Remains, by Stump. 13. In De Winter Time, by Summers. 14. Seeing Georgia, by ltaylc. lf . Before and After, by Xcwman. lt . A Dairyman’s Chorus, by Froyyie. 17. Knocks, by Wood. 18. To the Yellow and White, by Brown. 10. Staying Qualities, by Ware. 20. When the Sun Shines Hot. by Knight. 21. Vanity Fair, by Seacock.GEORGIA MILITARY ACADEMY CLUBGeorgia Military Academy Club Moreno. W. K. Meadow C. Blum Bert Carmichael. Brown Cooper. C. E. Durden Phillips. W. A. Reid J. I. Wood Frank HoldenCORDON INSTITI’TK CLI'IJGordon Institute Club Roll Camp. - Collins. — Fisher. M. W. Fitzpatrick. C. M. Ginn. It. P. Howard. W. A. Knight. G. Lumpkin. J. R. Minnchan. C. Middlebrooks. R. L. McWhorter. II. H. Pace. K. K J. L. L. C, !. Peacock. Robinson. Sheffield. R. I). Short. F. M. Scarlett. A. L. West.STOXK MOUNTAIN C’l.l’liCl V wV.'j K Stone Mountain Club, 191 1-12 10. Hood. Burki . 20. Howard. II. (J Baxter, llarvev. Blaekmar. Dana, Bowen. J. V. Brand. T. S. Bunn. W. C. Bush. W. It. Carter. F. F. Clark. Tom. Cohen. Ed. Dick. S. K. Dixon. Gordon. Dunlap. E. B. Felker. Paul. Felker. Dan. Foley. Charlie. Harbor. Berner. Houser. William Houser. Wesley. 21. Johnson. C. II 22. .Malone. K. S. 24. Mai tin. A. M 25. Morgan. Guy. 2(i. Palmer. Sam. 28. Pope. (I. X. 2.0. Price. Pinckney. 80. Hadl’ord. J. K. 21. Uiehards. Dock. 22. Xaneken. George. 22. Sea brook. E. M. 24. Tomlinson. Claire 25. Twit tv. Ewert. 2(5. Wilder. C. I). 27. Woodruff, K id.f V f f f f ® f Mr If F „r Jf f 5ry % f ff f f f %r LOCUST GROVE INSTITUTE CLUBC. - ? h--±-LZ vt I Locust Grove Institute Roll W. L. Arnett. R, L. Ballard. D. T. Bowden. J. B. Conyers. J. L. 0 ill is. N. IT. Gill is. J. McK. Gunn. S. B. Wallace. W. G. Preston. J. W. Smith. Joe Moore. Ray FordFKKSH.MAN CLtli. wtom m ifry' .. C • '''"to _ Cl W WV-.-a k Tau Sigma Club Roll, “1915 10. A. Harnett. V I’. Bassett. R. I . Bassett. A. II. Baxter. IMiil Branson. Iv N. Broyles. W. C. Bond. Jr. W. A. Burns. A. Iturford. B. K. Carmieliael. It. V. Chandler. Iv Iv Cocke. R. W. Coker. Brown Cooper. S. A. (•rump. W. K. Dillard. 11. C. Dobbs. •Ialien lOrwin. I). It. Fclker. .M. L. Francis. It. J. Griffith. .1. M. Gunn. Iv J. Ilardin. J. Iv Harrell. W. R. Hastings. W. Houser. Clark Howell. It. Hood. I). C. Hull. W. J. Jenkins. It. S. Leonard. J. G. Lumpkin. K. S. .Malone. .M. W. Martin. It. M. McConnell. II. C. McGowan. W. K. McLain. 10. K. Overstreet. W. P. Price. W. A. Itawson. A. W. Reed. J. F. Roane. 10. M. Seahrook. J. C. Stewart. L. R. Timherlake. L. It. West. It. A. Wise. J. R. Wood. M. M. Maynard.Want Ads Wanted, To know why Yampolsky did not make the Glee Club.—“X.” Wanted, To know Dr. White’s method of correcting examination papers. —Chemistry Classes. Wanted, To know why Chappell and Dunlap left the Dormitory. —Occupants of Old College. Wanted. To know who made a greater killing with the ladies in Augusta, McLain or Yampolsky.—Whole Battalion. Wanted, To he an athlete.—Creekmore. Wanted, Cadet-Major.—First-Lieutenant and Adjutant Farmer. Wanted. A candidate’s cigar.—Meadow. Wanted, To be noticed.—William Perrin Xieolson. -Jr. Wanted, To be able to shoot Bocock.—Wright Abbott. Wanted, To know a way in which to study twenty-five hours a day. The Iasi pair of shoes T ordered from the factory—too small.—Yampolsky. The right to exhibit my latest painting.—James Wright. Treatise on Love-Making.—George T. Northern. All my German Exercises.—Kid Brannon. Athletic Association of I'niversitv of Georgia.—Chascm Martin. Royal Tailor Clothes—A. 0. B. Sparks. Copies of “College Spirit.”—Jack Woofter. dr. My Commentaries on Law.—Fortson. My Speeches made in Demosthenian.—Scott Titslmw. Inexhaust able Gas-plant.—Charles Estes. Volume XCV of my poems.—J. E. Varela. Ilandy Lateral Translations of the Classic's.—Names too numerous. —Scott Titslmw. Wanted, Pupils to he taught feminine traits.—Ed Anderson. Wanted, A political office of some description. —Augustus Octavius Bacon Sparks.- m A Fairy Tale Once upon a time, there lived an old Abbott, who sought in vain over Ilill and .Meadow, through Reid and Meyer for a Hunter who had gone in a Xorth-ern-lv direction toward a little village called Laird. “Where are you going.” asked a Farmer, who sat near by on a Stump. “To seek a villain.” he cried, “lie has been firing on my Peacock and I have seen the Sparks from the West, for Ware.” “But he has killed my fine bird and I must have revenge.” “Lynch him. Brand him! He is too Gay for this world." And so it happened that while walking with the Farmer, the Abbott heard a Russell in the bushes. “Great Scott.” he said, and jumped back. Before he could say another word the Miller had seized a Stone and knocked him to Paradise(?). H. D. MEYER. The Voice in the Mist Twas the silent hour of midnight. The air was damp and chill. Through the heavy mist A soft breeze kissed A rose on my window-sill. A rose she had plucked from tin garden With its sweetness enriched by the dew. And she whispered clear As I lingered near “ Tis my love, my love for you.” Then past the open casement On the wings of the night borne through. A voice from the mist My cheeks softly kissed “ ’Tis my love, my love for you.” The voice then vanished forever, The misty veil Hew away. The night-wind sighed Then gently died. And sin is mine to-day. Charles II. Stone.CAM ITS SCKNK.y‘ v .„, A .-V 7’U.,! iARy «■ '' W 1 HE WHO FIGHTS ANORUNS AWAY WILL LIVE TO FIGHT ANOTHER DAY1COM MISSION KI) OKFIC K IIS.Roster of Commissioned Officers Lieut. J. A. Atkins. Commandant. Cadet Staff. Cadet Major. Walter Savelle. Cadet Adjutant, R. S. Fanner. Cadet Quartermaster. B. L. Brinson. Cadet Sergeant Major, B. II. Chappell. Cadet Quartermaster Sergeant, C. C. McCrary. Cadet Color Sergeant, I). R. Peacock. Cadet Color Sergeant. Cadet Drum Major, A. W. Lindsay. Cadet Captains. Company “A ’Bert Michael. Company “B.” E. T. Anderson. Company “C,” W. K. Meadow. Company “D,” C. E. Martin. Company “ E.” J. B. Woodcock. Company “F,” W. P. Nicolson, .Jr. Artillery. Roy Lnnham. Cadet First Lieutenants. Company “A.” T. I. Miller. Company “B.” V. E. Durden. Company “C.” II. S. Langston. Company “D.” Tom Clark. Company “E,” C. T. Estes. Company “F,” B. F. Stovall. Artillery. II. Spalding. Cadet Second Li hi-ten ants. Company “A.” E. F. McCarty. Company “B,” E. Cowan. Company “C.” J. L. Robinson. Company '‘I).” Warren Both well. Com pan v “B.” J. G. Liddell. Company “F,” M. B. Cooper. K, T. Goodwyn.COMPANY “A”ixYcircooCOMPANY ruir COMPANY “D"COMPANY “K”COMPANY “KFreshman Letter Athens, the fourth. Dear Sam :— i rcxccvcd yore letter lass saterdy nite and too oclock on sundy morning, i rote you a letter lass week hut you never got it. in tile furst place, it was rote in had ink; in the sekund place it was derecked rong; in the tliurd place, i didn’t have no stamp; and in the forth place i never rote no letter in the furst place, i got a letter from my filly at loosv kob yestiddy she sed that she jest rote to tell me when her burthdy was. and now i am lookin out fer the future but she is lookin out for the prezent. i like the athens gurls very mutch hut some of them is very loud, i no too what wares brass bands around their wastes, the loosy kob gurls do not ware caps and gownds like the Shorter collidge gals do, but some of them wares shorter dresses, when i get a junycr, i am going ter get in that cortilyon kommitty. it is a “sintch.” warren botli-wcll went to erguster lass week and spent a week and all his money. 1 felt erguster wind yestiddy. i herd a joak on cragg orr, he wore his pants so short till somebody ast him what made him do so. They found out that his gurl at loosy kob had gone back on him and he was warm his pants at half mast, classes are so erly now that i have to go before my brekfast is half pass ate. there is a good singer in collidge now that sings hcaritonc. his name is singleton, say, victor victor went to atlanter the other day on a coon excursion; he went on a sekund rate ticket but In says that they treated him white, and that he had a furst rate time. “Rip” Radford and Charley .Maclean has muxtaschcs long enough to pull, i went to palmers drug store today (you no i have a bill there—a big one) and when the clurk ast me what i wanted, i sed: “i camphor some camphor, Cam.” he didn’t laflf, but i herd a moth ball, you no george hunter that servanner dood. he has a gurl at Agnis seott what is like a poleesman. gess why. i bet you will say, cause she loves a dead-beet; that aint rite, rite your pal soon, poee skrip, goodby. Frksiiik.” YourSonnet on the Goats Ye steady sentinels, who for eons past. Have guarded well the gates to Lucy’s halls. Who. through Fortuna's cruel ire. at last. Have passed into dceay. as befalls All men and things. What Vandal hand has brought you to the dust ! What cruel Fate encompassed your defeat ? That ye should go. as puny mortals must. I'nto Gehenna's eternal, dark retreat; And time no solace brings. For what poor prototypes can till your place. Though decorated with a million daubs of paint ? What base pretenders could your pedestals grace? Ah. Gentle Muse, give ear to my complaint! A. A. Rayms. Jr.University Music Stand 1. “Dream of Heaven.” by Paradise. 2. “Two Little Lovc-bccs,” by Chapell and Dunlap. 3. “Day-dreams.” by Knight. 4. “The Druid’s Prayer,” by Molbv. 5. “They Gotta Quit Kickin’ my Dawg Aroun’,” by »J. Lust rat. 6. “Where the Sun Sets,” by West. 7. “IIow I Love a Pretty Face.” Words by Little Lucas. Music by Burrage. 8. “Oh, You Beautiful Doll,” by Conway Hunter. 9. “I’m Bugs About You,” by “Proty.” 10. “My Hero,” by Sam Dick. 11. “After the Ball,” by Brannen. 12. “Meditation,” by “Peanuts.” 13. “Mister Movin’ Man, Don’t Touch my Baby Grand.” by Koplin. 14. “I Love You, I Love You. 1 Love You!”, by Raiford. 15. “It’s a Grand Old Flag,” by Savellc. 16. “Carbolic Acid Rag.” by Dr. White. 17. “On the Dear Old Farm,” by Davis. 18. “Roll dem Bones,” by Hood. 19. “Base-ball Rag,” by Spalding. I lv Editors Pandora from 1 886 to the Present Time I w. m Volume I. 188G.—Editor-in-Chief. G. X. Wilson. K A. Business Manager. W. B. Cook. A T 12. Associate Editors, W. E. Wooten. 2 A E; McDaniel. X «I»; C. F. Rice. X ‘l : C. II. Wilson. K A: W. A. Speer. «l A (- ; F. F. Stone. I A (•); R. I). Mender. A T 12: M. B. Bond. A T A; W. S. Updiaw. A T A; R. S. Move, «I P A; P. L. Wade, «l r A; A. W. Wade. 2 N; W. C. Brown, 2 X. Volume 11. 1887.—Kditor-in-CIlief. G. F. Rice. X «I . J. W. Daniel. K . Asso-eiate Editors. T. W. Reed. «l A (•); (I. Waters. I P A: W. .J. Shaw. A X; II. K. Milner. A T 12; A. L. Franklin. A T A. Volume III. 1888.—Editor-in-CJlief. Albert Howell. K A. Bnsine;; Man igcr. A. W. Griggs. A T A. Associate Editors. W. L. Moore. A E; T. R. Crawford. A T 12; F. W. Code, 2 X; Lueien L. Knight, X l : W. M. Glass. A T A. Volume IV. 181)0.—Editor-in-chief. John I). Kittle. A A E. Business Manager, W. K. Wheat ford, X. Associate Editors. F. E. Callaway. K A; S. J. Tribble. «I A (•): J. C. Crawford, - X; W. W. Ellis. X l»; W. L. Stallings. AT A; W. X. Smith, X E. A. Cohen, X I . Volume V. 181)2.—Editors-in-Chief. .T. F. Lewis. X «! ; L. L. Brown. A T 12. Business Managers. W. E. Cristie, 2 X; W. T. Kelly, A T 12. Associate Editors, -I. C. Kimball, 2 A E; Roy Dallas. «I» A ( ); J. R. Lane, 2 A E; E. W. Frey. X Volume VI. 1898.—Editor-in-Chief, Harry Hodgson. K A. Business Manager. F. G. Barfield. 2 A E. Associate Editors. C. R. Xisbet, X «I : X. B. Stewart. A T 12; A. O. Halsey. 2 X; II. A. Alexander; E. G. Cahaniss. «l» A (•); F. G. Johnson. A T 12; Eugene Dodd, X 4l Volume VII. 181)4.—Editors-in-Chief, (’. R. Tidwell. A 'I' 12; Xoel Moore. S A E. Business Managers. Paul L. Fleming. X 4 ; John I). Stelling. A T 12. Associate Editors. L. I). Frick, S X; W. I . Harbin, X 4 : II. Brown. K A; George Beckett. l A (•). Volume VIII. 1895.—Editors-in-Chief. W. A. Harris. X «I . Business Manager. J. J. Gibson. A T 12. Associate Editors. II. II. Steiner, A E; J. W. Morton. K A; W. W. Chamller. A T 12; W. L. Kemp, 2 X;J.T. Dunlap. I» A 0; II. V. Black. X 4'; J. G. Smith. Xon-Fraternity. Volume IX. 189G.—Editor-in-Chief. Pliny Hall. K A. Business Manager. J. G. Pitman. J A (•). Associate Editors, M. M. Lockhart. 2 A E; J. B. Connellv, X I ; Fred Morris, 2 X; C. II. Holden, A T 12; II. V. Black, X ; T. A. Xcal; R. B. Xally. Volume X. 1897.—Editor-in-Chief, II. G. Colvin. 2 A E. Business Manager, li. E. Brown. A T 12. Associate Editors, F. L. Fleming. X l ; J. W. Spain. K A; Harry Dodd. X 4'; P. S. Smith. l A (•); A. L. Tidwell. A T 12; II. Lovejoy. 2 X ; W. B. Kent; J. W. Hendricks.Volume XI. 1898.—Kditors-in-Chief. Harry Dodd. X 'I'; Hugh White, 2 N. Business Manager. J. C. MeMichael. K A. Associate Kditors. C. II. Black. X K. 10. Pomeroy, 2 A 10; C. Westbrook, A T 12; -I. T. Dorsey. «I A G; II. R. Perkins, A T 12. Volume XII. 189 ).—Kditors-in-Chief. Garrard Glenn. 2 A 10: A. I . Adams. X «l». Business .Mnnagcr, P. 10. Johnson. X 'I'. Associate Kditors. .J. B. McCurry. K A; W. S. Blun, A T 12; K. 10. Brodmix. A T 12; W. 10. Watkins. 1 N; I). G. Ilcidt; J. W. .Mason. Voi.i’ME XIII. 1900.—Kditors-in-Chicf. Archibald Blaekshear. K A; Fair Dodd, X Business Manager. P. 10. Broduax. A T 12. Associate Kditors. F. P. Calhoun. X 1 ; K. P. Shannon. ! A 0; F. G. Tuppcr, 2 A 10; J. P. Gardner. 2 N; William Davis; 10. II. Ilamhy. Volume XIV. 1901.—Kditors-in-Chief. 10. P. Shannon, l AW; .J. 1). McCartney. 2 A K. Business Manager. Jack Banks. X 'k. Associate Kditors. P. A. Williams, 2 N; V. II. Bullard. A T 12; K. G. Stephens. K A; I. M. Putnam, K 2; W. I). Iloyt, X '!'; James L. Sibley. Volume XV, 1902.—Kditors-in-Chicf, Frank II. Barrett. 2 A E; Sterling II. Blaekshear. X ! . Business Managers, J. K. Jordan. A T 12: M. W. Lewis. X 4 . Associate Kditors. C. 1). Russell. I A •); I. S. Peebles. 2 N; M. S. Johnson, K A; 11. M. Fletcher. K 2; Dcwald Cohen. Volume XVI. 19CJ.—Kditors-in-Chief. G. Dexter Blount. K A; Frampton 10. 1 011 is. I A (•). Busines s Managei s. J. Benton High. Claude W. Bond. 2 N. Associate Kditors. Marion II. Smith, 2 A 10; Hugh M. Scott. X l : Preston Brooks, A T 12; W. G. lOngland, X Marvin M. Dickinson,K 2; Sidney J. Xix. I . P. L. Volume XVII. 1904.—Kditors-in-Chief, L. P. Goodrich. 2 N; I. S. Hopkins. Jr., l A (-). Business Managers, II. M. Blaekshear. A T 12; G. W. Xunnallv. X ! ; J. B. Gamble. Associate Kditors. J. I). Bower. K A; Roderick Hill. 2 A 10; Wailes Lewis. X 4'; W. B. Shaw. K 2: W. O. Roberts, F. P. L.; R. X. Burt. Ind. Volume XVIII. 1905.—Kditors-in-Chief. A. L. Hardy. K 2; V’. B. Moore, X ! . Business Managers. Roderick Hill. 2 A E; C. P. Pratt. A T 12. Associate KdLorc;. II. W. Telford. F. P. L.; T. G. Stokes, Ind.; A. II. Carmichael. X ❖; W. (). Mar.di- burn. I A (-); -I. C. Fpshaw, 2 N. Art Kditor. (). II. B. Bloodworth. Jr.. K A. Volume XIX. 1906.—Kditors-in-Chief. W. (). Marshhurn, «! A (■); Lansing B. Lee. 2 A 10. Managing Kditor. II. L. Covington. K A. Assistant Managing Kditor. J. II. Bradhcrry. F. P. L.; Art Kditor. J. G. Mays, X 4'. Associate Kditors, R. S. Parker, X I»; G. A. Green, A T 12; W. B. Humbleton, 2 N; E. R. Lambert, K 2; J. R. Turner. Ind. Volume XX. 1907.—Kditors-in-Chief. Phil W. Davis. Jr.. I» A 0; J. K. MacDonald. X 4'. Business Manager. T. K. Scott. Art Kditor. W. II. Griffith. K A. Assistant Business Manager. II. M. Wilson, 2 N. Associate Kditors, W. G. Brant- lev. Jr., 2 A 10; W. T. McCaffrey, K 2; J. II. Xeisler, U. P. L.; R, S. Parker. X l ; T. S. Winn, A T 12.Voi.r.MK XXI. 1008.—Editors-in-Chief, S. (). Smith. I A 0; W. C. Henson, lousiness Manager. R. I . King, 2 A B. Assistant Business Manager. I). L. Rogers. Art Editor. II. G. Cannon, A T 12. Associate Editors, J. B. Harris. X 1 ; S. E. Morton, K ; C. C. Brooks, 2 N; Lanier Branson, X 'k; Roy Strickland, K A; G. V. Glausier, 1 K A. Voi.r.MK XXII. 1909.—Editors-in-Chief, W. H. Johnson, K A; James Montgomery, X »k. Business Manager. 1). L. Rogers. Art Editors, -I. B. Wier. Jr., K 2; R. F. Rcvson. Associate Editors, J. M. Walker, 2 A E; E. M. Brown, X t ; W. R. Holmes. 1 A (•); Frank Clark, Jr., A T 12; C. C. Brooks, 2 N; C. F. Pekor, l P. L.; O. P. Beall. Voi.i mk XXIII. 1910.—Editors-in-Chief, II. Abit Xix; John Moore Walker. S A K. Business Manager. R. L. Campbell. Art Editor, Hugh King Allen, 1 N. Associate Editors. Eugene S. Taylor. K 2; Hughes Spalding. X «l»; O. M. Gresham. A T 12; Aubrey Matthews. IJ. P. L.; Robert Cumming; Henry Xewman, X k; Fred Allen. I A (•); Robert P. White, K A; Corbin C. Small. II K A. Voi.i mk XXIV, 1911.—Editors-in-Chief. Evans V. Heath. A T 12; Arthur K. Maddox. Associate Editors, George G. Blanton; Pope F. Brock; J. L. Deadwyler. K J. II. Foster; .Malvern Hill, S N; W. S. Jones, S X; Henry Xewman. X »k; W. J. Xorthen. Jr., I» A (■); Howell B. Peacock, K A; II. I). Russell; C. S. Small, I K A; A. (). B. Sparks, S AE; B. C. Wright. X I . Business Manager, Howell Brooke. Assistant Business Manager, E. V'. Carter. Voi.imk XXV. 1912,—Editor-in-Chief. Marion B. Folsom. S N. Associate Editors, R. R. Childs; Thomas X. Powell, I A (•). Art Editor, James B. Wright. Business Manager. II. I). Russell. Assistant Business Manager. II. Stanley Langston.' Jiol) McWhorter doing tile Grizzly Hear thru the Yellow Jackets’ NestGEORGIAN' HOARD. Board of Editors of The Georgian FIRST TERM. ' •Joseph IS. Varela. Editor-in-Chief. Associate Editor--. Charles II. Stone. T. .1. Woof ter, .Jr. .1. B. Wright. -Jr. B. II. Walton. IS. I. Ransom. Charles T. ISstes, Easiness Manager. Edgar B. Dunlap. Assistant liutiness Manager. J. W. Popper. Circulation Manager. SECOND TERM. Benton II. Walton, Editor-in-Chicf. Associate Editors. Charles II. Stone. T. .1. Woof ter, .Jr. .J. B. Wright. .Jr. IS. I. Ransom. A. B. Bcrnd. Charles T. Estes, Easiness Manager. Edgar B. Dunlap. Assistant Easiness Manager. .J, W. Popper. Circulation Manager. 93-«3First Term. Second Term.Red and Black Staff First Term. Perrin Xicolson. Editor-in-Chie f. Kenyon B. Zahner. Easiness Manager. James’M. Lynch. Associate Editor. Edgar B. Dunlap. Athletic Editor. Robert S. Raiford. Social Editor. Bentley Chappell. Exchange Editor. Henry West. Assistant Easiness Manager. E. Glover Jordan, Circulation Manager. Second Term. James M. Lynch. Editor-in-Chief. Kenyon B. Zaliner. Easiness Manager. Edgar B. Dunlap. 'Associate Editor. Bentley Chappell, Athletic Editor. Frank Scarlett. Social Editor. John 1). Wade,' Exchange Editor. Ilenry West. Assistant Easiness Manager. Howard Riley. Circulation Manager.EDITORS OF AGRICULTURAL QUARTERLY.PRESIDENTS OF DEMOSTHENIAX SOCIETY.History of Demosthenian Society The history of the Demosthenian Literary Society is closely interlined with that of the I’niversity and of tin State. Almost every branch of public life has been adorned by men who were once her members, and it is in their lives that her history is revealed in grander terms than could all the historians paint. Many of Georgia’s foremost men frankly acknowledge that it was within her walls that they first learned how to think and express themselves accurately. For more than a century—a space of time which has seen Athens, the great I'niversity of which she is such an integral part, and the State grow greater and greater—she has ever struggled for her noble ideal—to prepare her members for the struggle of life, to cultivate an ease and grace of expressing one’s self in public, and to give valuable practice in this art. The most authentic records show that though really founded in 1801. tin-year in which the I'niversity was organized, the first formal program was rendered on the twenty-third of February 1803, at which time the question. ‘‘Is a monarchal government preferable to a republic?” was discussed. For twenty years the meetings were held in the old Grammar School room, and then the society, by levying on her members and by contributions, built the hall which is still standing, and within which the eloquence of some of the South's most illustrious orators has resounded. Around this simple grey hall, has been woven a thread of legends too strong for even the hand of time to erase, and to-day it stands dedicated to the noble cultivation of untrammeled thought and unimpeded speech. The past year has been a most successful one from every point of view. More interest has been manifested by her members than for years past, and the result of this new inspired zeal is seen in her many glorious victories. All seem to have realized that from such work is derived more useful knowledge than from any other phase of college life. It would be idle to even attempt to enumerate her many victories in the past, and it will suffice to say that she has always won even more than her share of the laurels, and has been creditably represented by her members on many occasions. Let us hope that her future may be even brighter than her past, and that she may ever struggle for her noble ideals, and fulfill her part in the training of the minds of the young men of Georgia. Virgil K. Dijkdkn.PRESIDENTS OF Pill KAPPA SOCIETY.fMfescvi History of Phi Kappa Of all tlu various activities of college life there is none that is of more benefit than tile constant practice in debate offered bv the literary societies. Realizing the value of that training, derived when intellect is matched against intellect in debate, as well as the great advantage of learning to express one’s thoughts in a clear and concise manner which is fostered by oration and dcclama-tir n. 1:11 February 12th. 1820, a few students of the I’nivorsity of Georgia foimcd what is known as the Phi Kappa Literaiy Society. Phi Kappa's growth was remaikable from the til's!. Her meetings were full of interest and her exeicises; of much benefit to all. Time went on, and a few years after her oiigin the society had a building of its own. In 1831 the old building was tom down and the building that the society now occupies was elected. In 1861. Phi Kappa, due to the war. was obliged to come to a standstill, but a few months after the war the society opened it doors once more, and for some time Phi Kappa enjoyed much prosperity. From this time, the Society has always been progressive, although at times she has suffered from lack of interest and for years it seemed that both societies would cease to exist. However, she gradually gained the interest of her members and lias grown from strength to strength, year by year, always upholding her purpose, that is. “the mental and moral elevation of its members.” Among her members Phi Kappa numbers men in every line of activity. Her sons have been prominent in affairs, pertaining both to state and nation. Within her walls have resounded the matchless words of Henry W. Grady, Alexander II. Stephens, and hundreds of others who have gone forth to reflect credit on their Alma .Mater, on Phi Kappa, and on themselves. She has trained men to fight the battle of life with success in a fair and clean manner, and her members in all parts of the state and nation are. because of their splendid work in the halls of Phi Kappa, of much benefit to their fellowmcn. In the last few years the society has enjoyed a season of great success. Her meetings have been enjoyable and much consistent work has been done. Her prosperity has not been confined to her private meetings, but also in the various contests with Dcmosthenian has she been successful. For the last two years, at least ninety per cent, of the honors in the line of oratory and debate belongs to us. and judging from the hard, earnest work done by Phi Kappa this year, we will in no way bring discredit on tin good name of the society. m Let us all join in keeping up the good work of I’hi Kappa. Let every member come to every meeting and let us make next year even brighter than the present. Phi Kappa stands at the service of all. The work done within her walls will he of great value in the battle of life. The present year has in every way been a success. Each meeting has been well attended, and the majority of those present have always joined in the discussions. Let the good work continue, and may the Historian of 1913 he able to write that the year 1912-11)13 was even more successful than the present one. Iua Fiixkexstki.v Historian. “Dick" Russell, (in a Dcmosthcnian debate).—“We know the tricks of dirty politics.” Still, small voice from rear of room.—“You ought to know, Dick, if anybody knows.” Pur rage (on sentinel duty)—“Halt! Who’s there?” Voice—“Devil on Wheels.” Burrage—“Dismount, Devil, advance to l e recognized.’ ------o------ Xicolson, to a Passer-by- - 1 The cream of the t'niversity goes to Johns Hopkins.” I’asser-by—‘ ‘ Who are they ? ’’ Xicolson—“Why, Estes, Joel. .Michael, and myself.” Passer-by (to himself)—“Oh, but the cream is sour.” ------ ----- Professor—“Give the meaning of Veterinary Surgeon.” One-Year Ag.—“A doctor for old soldiers.” ------o------ Prof. Payne—“Who was the King of Prussia at this time. Mr. Meyer?” Meyer—“Catherine.”Harold 1). Meyer. Edgar B. Dunlap. Georgia-Vanderbilt Debate Resolved, That corporations doing an interstate commerce business should In chartered and regulated by a national commission. AKFIRMATIVE, GEORGIA. Harold I). Moyer. Edgar B. Dunlap. Vanderbilt won. X EG ATI VK , V. NDKRiUI .T. J. F. Middleton. W. II. Morgan. L—Georgia-Virginia Debate lit solved. That corporations doing an interstate commerce business should lie chartered and regulated by a national commission. A KFI KM ATI VK, VIRGINIA. Georgia won. Negative, Georgia. George T. Northcn. V. A. .Mann.Bentley II. Chappell. George T. Northkx. Demosthenian and Phi Kappa Anniversarian Exercises February Twenty-first, Nineteen-twelve Demosthenian. Oration: HroUurhood of Man. Bentley II. Chappell. Bin Kappa, Oration: Relation of Government to the Masses. George T. Northen.Junior Orators Frank Carter. K. Morgenstern. E. II. Dunlap. B. II. Chappell. M. W. Fitzpatrick. II. II. Freeman.i.MiMiourrr DEBATERS. 'c: • .-+ jT C — ' • -r - ,-_ i_ , Ow UO. V Impromptu Debaters Resolved. That the President of the United States should he elected every eight years and should be ineligible for re-election. Affirmative, Phi Kappa. Alex. MacDoncll. W. W. Abbott. 11. I). Meyer. George T. Northen. James .M. Lynch. Edgar II. Dunlap. Negative, Demosthenian. C. E. Martin. W. A. Mann. II. D. Russell. A. K. Maddox. II. L. Rogers. C. II. Newsome. Demosthenian won the decision. a«9-I4Joseph E. Varela. W. A. Mann. Champion Debate Resolved. That tin 1 Tnited States should establish a central bank. Pm Kappa. Demosthenian. Wright W. Abbott. Charles E. Martin. Joseph E. Varela. W. A. Mann. Phi Kappa won.Sophomore Debate Itcsolv(d. That the Judges of Superior Courts should Ik appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. Affirmative. I’m Kappa. Ini Funkenstein. U roy Michael. Victor Victor. XE0.VT1 VK, DkMOSTHKNIAN. Forrest Cummin". J. B. Conyers. W. II. Levic. 1 ’hi Kappa won.Freshman Debaters 1 111 KAPPA. 1)10 MO ST I IPX TAX.Freshman Debate Resolved, That the Commission form of government of incorporated cities is preferable to the prevailing form of municipal government. Affirmative, Phi Kappa. Clark Howell, Jr. Ed Hardin. Henry AVest. X EG ATI VE, DeMOSTI IKNIA X. Stephen Mitchell. C. B. Sweat. T. N. Hendricks. Negative won.f f € r ff f 1 f f f : • • • %3» John Booth. J. B. Conyers. Ira Punkcnstein. I). K. MeKnmy. Sophomore Declaimers F. M. JIoi.se. K. h. McWhorter. Leroy Michael. Victor Victor.Young Men’s Christian Association University of Georgia Officers. Zach S. Cowan, . Walter 1). Mol by, J. II. Ware, . . . C. B. Walker, . . T. J. Collins, . . . R. O. Hutcheson, .........President. .........General Secretary. .........Vice-President. .........Treasurer. .........Secretary. .........Cor. Secretary. Advisory Hoard. David C. Harrow, LL.D. John White Morton, B.A. R. P. Stephens, Pli.D. J. R. Pain, B.S. Rev. Troy Beatty. E. R. Hodgson, Jr. R. E. Park, Litt.D. W. I). Molby, B.A. Z. S. Cowan, ’13. C. B. Walker, ’14. Chairmen of Committees. Bible Study—B. F. Stovall. Membership—W. C. Duncan. Social—Frank Carter. Mission Study—J. II. Ware. Finance—C. B. Walker. li clip ions Mertinys—T. J. Collins.The Young Men’s Christian Association It was a wise student who said that he regarded a full rounded college experience as made up of chiefly three things, and of equal importance, namely, the mental training of consistent class work, tin development of friendships, and the building of high character. There is one organization in the University whose sole aim is the promotion of these, taken together. The Young Men’s Christian Association has a tremendous mission to fill. Its work is to try to get men to live up to their best in every way. Its effort is directed chiefly along the line of Bible Study, Mission Study, and a study of social problems, and in weekly religious meetings. These features are the machinery necessary as a foundation of other work. Perhaps the largest work of the Association is the personal endeavor of the General Secretary. The Y. M. C. A. has been a large influence for Bible Study, for church going, and for Christian living. Through voluntary courses offered in “The Life of Christ.” “The Uplift of China,” and “Introducing Men to Christ.” men have Ix'en greatly helped. The enrollment in these different classes has been about 175. Two series of lectures of three each were given on “Sexology.” by Dr. J. P. Campbell, and “College Temptations,” by Mr. 10. C. Mercer, of New York. The Association conducted “College Night” very successfully as the opening event of the year. It promoted a very pleasant “Football Banquet” to the Varsity team. Handsome souvenirs were given each man wearing a “0.” Twelve men attended the State Students’ Missionary Convention in Mil-lcdgcville in November. Four men were delegates to the Blue Ridge Conference last year. A great service was rendered in personal ways, ministering to the sick, visiting men in their rooms, encouraging better dormitory life, and upholding the ideals of honor, of scholarship, trustworthiness, cleanliness of speech and life. The Y. M. C. A. Hall will furnish facilities for much broader and more complete work. The gymnasium and pool are now ready for use. The association is gaining ground. It enjoys the good-will of all. Let this grow into hearty cooperation and the Y. M. C. A. will come into its own in the University of Georgia. It is worthy of this active interest and help. The Association has expended $750.00 this year, in addition to the $500.00 appropriated by the Trustees. In addition to this the Y. M. C. A. gives fifty dollars toward the support of a student mission in Naples, Italy. The business of the Association is administered by an Advisory Board, composed of Chancellor Barrow, l)r. R. P. Stephens, Prof. R. 10. Park. Prof. J. R. Fain. Rev. Troy Beatty, Mr. J. V. Morton. Mr. 10. R. Hodgson and three student members. Z. S. Cowan. rs Wearers of the 1911-1912 Dana Reiser—Baseball. Cliff Brannon—Baseball. Tinion Bowden—Baseball and Football. C. B. Bedinglield—Baseball. Frank Carter—Tennis and Basketball. It. R. Childs—Football. L. II. Covington—Baseball and Football. Ross Creek more—Basketball. Hugh Conklin—Football. ---DeLa Berrien.—Foot ball. .J ulian Erwin—Baseball. Paul Felker—Baseball. G. Goldin—Basketball. It. T. Goodwyn—Tennis. Rucker Ginn—Baseball. Joe Harrell—Football. Ed Hitchcock—Baseball. II. Hutchens—Baseball. W. M. Lucas—Football. A. K. Maddox—Football. K. S. .Malone—Football. It. L. McWhorter—Baseball and Football. J. It. Minnehan—Football. J. L. Parrish—Football. I). R. Peacock—Football and Baseball. ---Pina—Basketball. T. N. Powell—Football. II. W. Riley—Baseball. George Sanekcn—Football. C. Thompson—Baseball. II. Thompson—Baseball and Football. Reuben Tuck—Track and Football. E. G. Twitty—Baseball. C. Wilder—Baseball. George Woodruff—Baseball and Football. Gus Yorke—Football.ATHLETICSFOOTBALL TKAM, .1911.Varsity Football Team 1911 George WoodrutT L. I). Drown.... AV. A. Cunningham.... Frank Anderson...... Captain. Manager. .....Head Coach. ..Assistant ('ouch. ----DcLaPerriore L. II. Covington... J. 15. Conyers.... I). R. Peacock.... AY. M. Lucas...... (Jus York......... A. K. Maddox...... AV. L. Arncttc---- J. I. Wood........ J. B. Harrell..... It. It. Childs.... .........Center. ..Right Guard. ...Left Guard. ..Right Tackle. ...Left Tackle. T. N. Po " J. L. Parrish. Hugh Conklin George AVoodrulT G. A. Saneken It. L. McWhorter Charles Maclean I). T. Bowden S. A. Crump K. S. Malone J. R. Minnehan Right Bnd. .Left Bnd. .Quarterback. | Right Halfback. I Left Halfback. I .......Fullback. i SEASON’S SCORE Georgia. 51 ....................Alabama Prcshvtci inn College. 0 Georgia. 39 ....................University of South Carolina, 0 Georgia. 11 ....................University of Alabama. 3 Georgia. 12 ....................Sowancc, 3 Georgia, 8 ....................Mercer, 5 Georgia, 0 ....................Vanderbilt, 1(5 Georgia. 23 ....................Clcmson, 0 Georgia, 5 ....................Tech, 0 Georgia, 0 ....................Auburn, 0 Georgia, 149 Opponents, 27Football Season of 1911 Coach W. A. Cunningham. When the team reported for practice on Monday. September lltli. there was found to be an abundance of new material that showed prominence. In fact, there was such a largo number of candidates that it was found impossible to take the time to develop tin raw material, so that the problem was solved by selecting the best of tin new men who had had experience and these, with the Varsity and Scrubs of tin previous years, formed the squad. Large in number, but lacking in experience, which brings up the most difficult problem of coaching a football team, the men have to Ik taught the game from the very beginning, and this takes time that is needed in other work. The boys went to work with determination, and the rivalry for positions was keen. In fact, it was a most difficult undertaking to get the best man for a place. The old men had first call, and the new men had to show that they were better in order to win recognition. With the team in this process of development, the first game was played at Athens with the Alabama Presbyterian College team. Forty-four men were used in this game; often an entire new squad would replace the one then playing. The game resulted in a victory by a score of 51 to 0. An amusing, as well as skilfully executed play of the game, was McWhorter ’s receiving a forward pass in the second play of the game and going ninety yards for a touch-down. “Big Joe” Harrell played havoc with the opponents’ line and showed up splendidly. DcLaPerrierc got into the game and showed that he was going to make someone hustle to keep him off the regular squad. Parrish, the old 1000 end. was back, and his playing in this game showed him to he a great end. Conyers, a big hefty guard, showed splendidly, as did Arnette. a giant tackle. Powell, the old star from Auburn, was wearing the Bed and Black for the first time, and his playing was but in keeping with the good reports that had preceded his coining to Georgia. Kirby Malone was playing his first game. Minnchan. the fastest starting full-back that ever wore a Georgia uniform, played havoc with the opponents’ line. This covers the first impression these men made on their first appearance, and from this showing they were taken on the squad, which was then picked for the season. The following old men were on hand: Tuck. Conklin. Bowden. Lucas. Peacock. Covington. Maddox. Childs. Wood. McLain. Sancken. York. McWhorter, and Captain Woodruff. Camp won a place on the squad about the middle of the season by his splendid work on the scrubs. The following Saturday witnessed the first real workout of the squad. The team got together in splendid shape, and swept South Carolina off the field to the tune of 39 to 0. A peculiar feature developed in this game; in the scoring of touch-downs, it was noticed that they were the results of long runs; when theteam pot. down to the ten-yard line, scoring became almost impossible. This gave the coaches a great deal of worry, and caused a whole lot of hard thinking. And it was not until the middle of the season that it l eoame apparent that the defense was stronger than the offense, and the entire work became centered on the one idea of developing the defense, and relying on a few long runs to win the games. Alabama was played at Birmingham, and Georgia had the hardest.game of tin season, only winning by a score of 11 to .'1. This team was the hardest to down in the entire Southern field last season. The way they fought was but a fitting tribute to the efforts of their splendid coach. In this game Captain Woodruff played his first time, and only because of his presence and ability to direct the team was victory gained. Quarter-backs may come and quarter-backs may go, but T would rather have that little bunch of nerve leading my team than any man T have ever seen. Sewanco came next on the schedule, and the game was played in Athens. It created great interest throughout the state. Never before had such a crowd assembled in Athens to witness any athletic contest: the conditions were favorable for the splendid struggle that followed. Georgia finally downed Sewanee by the score of 12 to 3, Bob McWhorter making two splendid runs for touch-downs, ably assisted by his team-mates; this victory was made possible by the splendid exertions of this great player. With Morrison, of Vanderbilt, he was the most feared man in the South, and now. with the passing of Morrison, he remains to-day the one man feared in Southern Football. Tom Powell was playing ouartcr-back in this game, and how he played! His work was splendid, but T have something more to say about him later where his best effort was put forth, and where credit is due. Next came Mercer, placed between Sewanee and Vanderbilt on the schedule to give the team an easy game. Instead they brought to Athens the biggest team Georgia played during the entire season, and with a heavy, wet field in their favor, they made Georgia get up and hustle in order to win. This game caused a great stir in athletics and Georgia had to share the blame, when it was not due. and she only maintained a dignified silence, stating to the public, “Mercer had a good team, and we were glad to win.” Vanderbilt was the next game to be played, and with it went the S. T. A. A. championship; Vanderbilt and Georgia were the only two undefeated teams in the South. Georgia must enter the game in the worst condition of the season: Caotain "Woodruff was out. possibly for the season; Parrish had had his knee twisted and could not play: Minnehan had received such injuries that his playing in the game was impossible; and Covington's shoulder had been worked on so severely that he was forced to lay off for three weeks. The little score of 8 to 5 of the preceding Saturday was dearly bought, and with it went all hopes of downing Vanderbilt. Vanderbilt defeated Georgia lfi to ft. but they knew that they had been against a team. Georgia played with a never-sav-die spirit, and at the end.when Parrish had gone in. seven straight forward-passes were worked successfully. and Vanderbilt only recovered the ball, when five yards away, the time was called. In this game the one redeeming feature was the discovery e»f Dutch Sane ken. The first big game he had ever played in. and the bigge st of the season, he went into it and played a remarkable game. This was a great source of pleasure to me. for 1 had hoped that he woulel show the form that I had expected of him. “Dutch” is a little bunch e f nerve, and. while the smallest man e n the team, he is one of the be st. Just watch him next season! Another player who showed his worth in this game was old Timon Bowden—always doing his ln st and giving his best for Georgia, he had been handicapped during the early season by meeting with a severe accident; hut in this game he came into his own and his playing was the one feature from the Georgia standpoint. The following Thursday Georgia journeyed to Augusta and played Clemson. For six years previous Georgia had never been able to score on Clemson. They had won some games, hut by the drop-kick route; now they were determined to score and show the good people of Augusta how Georgia could play. After making three touch-downs in rapid succession, the team was ordered to quit doing offensive work and to punt whenever they received the ball. But “ Big Joe” Harrell just could not resist going through and performing his regular stunt of blocking punts, and Maddox, always there and at all times ready, picked it up and made it 23 to 0. This was the game in which Malone proved to he a star. According to the style of game outlined, his heavy line bucking was called on to batter down the Clemson defense; and he did it. He had to be removed from the game in order to play it out. for if he had remained, there would not have been any Clemson men left. Arnett deserves praise for a play that hut few people noticed, yet his splendid effort prevented a touchdown. By a splendid return of a punt the Clemson captain cleared the entire field and Sancken was swamped bv several Clemson men. leaving a clear field, when Arnett threw himself into a long diving tackle and brought the fast-running Bissell down. Sancken kept up his good work, and as Augusta is his home, his good playing there was gratifying to all his friends. The team was now coming down the home-stretch, and. with the men in good shape, the prospect looked rosy for winning the Tech game. But they had reckoned without taking notice of the great development of the Tech team Those who went to Atlanta to see Tech play Sewanec were struck with the fact that Tech had a good team, a great team in fact, and that next Saturday’s game would test the Georgia team to a limit. The game was won five to nothing by Georgia, but O. what a game! Never l cforo had the South witnessed such a clean, hard-fought game. Kacli play well executed, and each point well contested. In fact, during my experience as a coach and player T have never seen such a game. The excitement was intense, and the crowd—well there were some 15.000 people there and had there been room for 5.000 more, they would have been there. The hands were playing, and the rooters yelling. ’Twas a great day for old Georgia to triumph, and the well-earned victory was a source of pleasure to all the Georgia sympathizers.Bob McWhorter ran 65 yards and “nary” one of the Tech players could catch him; the greatest run this great player has ever made and one to he remembered and told around tin table where Georgia men meet to talk about this great victory. Capain Woodruff played his last game for old Georgia. Going into the game knowing full well that a slight wrench of his side would ruin him forever. In was determined to give his best for Georgia. To his magnificent generalship and power of leadership we owe our victory. Powell’s punting was tin feature of this game. The papers had backed the Tech punter and discounted Georgia. In fact they had looked upon their supposed superiority in this line to win the game for them. They had reckoned without one Tom Powell. Time and time again when the goal was threatened, his punting was relied on to save the game. Not once did he fail; to this one man belongs the credit of keeping the goal-line uncrossed. Minnehan made one play in this game that will always be remembered, lie is the fastest-charging full-back in the South to-day, and it was only his work on the defense that worried me. Tech tried a forward-pass, and their fast man. Gorce. caught it on the fly and started up the field, but lie did little more than start. Minnehan had solved the play, and was right on top of the Tech man when he caught the ball. DcLaPcrrierc. one of the few new men to make the team, did so .just because he was so good that he had to have a place. He is a star right now. and his future at Georgia is filled with promise. Conklin, that hard-hitting, fearless tackier, saved the day at Tech. It happened in this way: Parrish was hurt in the first two minutes of play. Conklin being called on to fill up the gap; and he filled it with Tech men whenever they tried to run his end. The season was now over from a Georgia standpoint, although Auburn was still to be played. The game took place at Savannah, and Auburn, with her best line-up in the field, was only able to make the score 0 and 0. 'Phis game was important in that it meant a loss to Georgia that cannot be remedied, for when the final whistle sounded. Arthur Maddox had played his last game for Georgia. For four long years he had given his best to Georgia, and then has never been a harder worker and more consistent plover than In . A splendid fellow in every respect, a leader of his class and of tin student body, his record in college is a source of pride to all who know him. our all-southern light tackle. I do not want to speak of losing Lucas for next year. Tn fact. I am not going to think about such a lass until next season, for there is a small hope remaining that he will be back with us. Lucas does not say much, but his good deeds speak of work well done. lie does not get the credit his playing warrants, but T take pleasure in stating to the student-hodv that he is one of our best players, and his place on the team cannot be filled. We need him back, and must have him. Covington has more good football sense than any other man on the team. After the students have wondered how such a little man could play centre on such a heavy team, the answer is simply brains. For two seasons his passing has been perfect, and for studying out the plays of the opposing side he has no jttjs ipeuttz.: Zi S □ % ©);£ • Twisting tbe Tigers tail rfV.'jt k equal on tin squad. If lu returns, there is a place oil the squad for him. 'Puck "ill finish his law course this year, and we cannot hope to have this sterling player return next year; he has worked hard and has given his liest at all times for Georgia. York, the man that saved tin day against Tech two years ago. was unable to give his time to football this season, and consequently, could never get in shape to play. Ye had to call on him during the middle of the season when we needed a man. and when we called for York, we called for one who is a man in every sense of the word. I only wish that there were more like him. Last of all. and so because I need more space to speak of his virtues, is our next year’s captain. Two years ago there was a great big man playing on tin varsity in a half-hearted manner, and making but little success at the game. 11 is room-mate was a star on the team, and his influence was evident when Peacock returned to college determined to do his liest. From a poor player to a star and all-Southein guard and Captain of Georgia football team, has keen the rise of I). R. Peacock, made possible by his hard work and tireless energy. He will make us a good captain next year, and a fitting tribute to his own splendid efforts will he tin knowledge of being the captain of Georgia's best team. I have been asked to select an all-Southern team, but have deferred doing so until now. It is easily named, when I take eleven of my men of the team of 1911 and write them down under the name of “The All-Southern Team.’’ Take off your hats to them, for they are the best ever. BASEBALL TEAM, 1912 ;___ Varsity Baseball Team Manager B. II. Walton. Cl iff Brannen..................Captain. Frank B. Anderson...............Coach. B. II. Walton..................Manager. Cliff Brannon. Second Base and Pitcher. C. Thompson. Pitcher. II. Thompson. Catcher and Short Stop. II. Hutchens, First Base. E. G. Twittv, Right Field. II. W. Riley, Short Stop. L. II. Covington, Third Base. Rucker Ginn. Ijcft Field. Robert McWhorter, Center Field. C. B. Bedingfield, Pitcher. Cleo Wilder, Pitcher. Timon Bowden. Catcher. 1). R. Peacock, 1 Julian Erwin, V Substitutes. Ed Hitchcock, |Grand-Stand at Sanford Field.Sanford Field Three yours ago Prof. Sanford realized that llcrty Field would no longer accommodate the athletic teams, and that the I Diversity must have a new field. With an impoverished Athletic Association behind him. it seemed impossible to make any move toward securing a better field. Every one offered advice, why this move would be impossible and impracticable. But undaunted by this adverse criticism, he gathered his friends and the friends of the University together and told them of his plans. Only Mr. Hugh (Joidin and Mr. Ed Dorsey thought the scheme possible. Nevertheless, he went to work and picked out the present location, which at that time was a ravine with a small-sized river running through it. It is needless to trace the difficulties that beset, these gentlemen in their work. Trials only made them work the harder, and as their final resort. Prof. Sanford and Mr. (Jordon made a tour of the state and solicited the aid of the alumni to help build this field. The alumni came to the rescue and the work was commenced. The hills were dug down and the ravine filled up. and a field covering several acres was prepared. Most men would have been satisfied with their work and quit. Not so with these gentlemen, for what they had already accomplished was only the beginning. To-day Georgia has the best athletic field in the South. A strong fence, ten feet high, surrounds the park. A large grand-stand, which will hold about a thousand people, stands back of home base, and on either side there are concrete bleachers which will easily accommodate a thousand more. The field is covered with Bermuda grass and is perfectly level, affording a splendid field for football and the best baseball diamond in the South, turtle-backed, and a grass infield. Prof. Sanford refused to allow the field to be named after him. but he reckoned without the appreciation of everyone who gave him credit, and as a small tiibutc to his great work named the park. Sanford Field. To Mr. Hugh Gordon and Mr. Ed Dorsey belongs great credit. In all matters they gave their assistance, and. what was more valuable, their time and money. To these alumni and loyal supporters belong the thanks of every student of the University. To the alumni who gave the money to make this field possible for the prcs nt student body, belong the thanks of every true and loyal supporter. It is now up to the students to come out and participate in athletics so as to give the University a team that will take the field and hold their own against ail comers. In the name of the entire student-body, the Pandora extends to Prof. Sanford, Mr. Gordon, and Mr. Dorsey, and other alumni, their thanks. r-a lwwiVm'' mmm. a o yfc.-j k ri. The Season’s Score Georgia 8 () Georgia 5 ; 1 Georgia ( 3 Georgia a 1 Georgia 1 Auburn 0 Georgia 7 0 Georgia • 2 Georgia 0 1 Georgia a 2 Georgia 3 ‘) Georgia 10 3 Georgia 9 Trinity 1 Georgia 12 Trinity 0 Georgia 0 2 Georgia 1 5 Georgia 5 ( Georgia 5 2 Georgia 2 N. C. A. M. 0 Georgia 7 7 Georgia 3 0 Georgia (i Tech 4 . Georgia 0 Tech 4 Georgia 4 Tech 2 2 (12 innings.) 1 (11 innings.) -•fXSophomore Com mittee. ]). T. Bowden. J. B. Conyers. Ed Hitchcock. ------Johnson. It. L. McWhorter. Ekeshman Com m ittee. J. E. Ilarrcll. W. C. Bunn, Jr. K. S. Malone. E. K. Overstreet. J. W. Walker.TENNISTENNIS Tk.VM OF I'NIVERSITY OF GEORGIA AT S. I. T. A. Atlanta, Ga., .May 6th, 7th. and 8th. Tom Brand. ---- Cohen. Frank Carter. R. T. Goodwyn. Hoy Lanham.Athletic Association of the University of Georgia Charles E. Martin. C. IT. Newsome. Board of Directors. M. G. Michael. Chairman. Hugh II. Gordon, Secretary. E. II. Dorsey. Treasurer. Prof. S. V. Sanford. Athletic Director. Members. Prof. V. I). Hooper. Col. C. M. Snell mg. Prof. II. V. Black. Chancellor I). C. Barrow. Prof. John Morris. I)r. A. M. Soule. T. S. Moll. B. P. Hardeman. Officers. First Term. Second Term. Chas. E. Martin. President. C. II. Newsome, President. Marion B. Folsom. Vice-President. T. I. Miller. Vice-President. Roy Lanham, Secretary. J. L. Parrish, Secretary.a4I i6That Mystic Thing Called Love” y I have heard the poets ask it— Heard them vainly try to tell, Of that mystic thing called loving And its ever mystic spell. Hut each vain attempt was fruitless— Though the words were rare and sweet— Then the poets gave up hoping And kind Love smiled on defeat. I have heard the lovers ask it— Heard them ask tin birds and flow’rs; Heard them singing from the poets Making Time forget the hours. Hut while seeking, seeking vainly They some happiness will find. And like poets they shall know not, That to lovers Love is blind. I have heard all Nature ask it— Heard the whisp’rings of the trees; Heard reflections in the waters Softly ask the cooling breeze. And I heard the moonbeams ask it— Of the stars as they fell past; Heard the daylight ask the shadows As the sunset faded fast. I have heard—have heard Love ask it— And all innocent the while, I’ntil—until—Love's eyes upturned And met mine with a smile. It would seem now I could tell it, Since fair Love has smiled on me, But as Love is blind to lovers— Love's a thing I’ll never see. J. B. Wright, Jr.UNIVERSITY GERMAN CLl BUniversity German Club A. 0. B. Sparks.....................President I). C. (falser.................Vice-President I’. S. Blanchard.. . .Secretary and Treasurer Cotii.uon Com mittke II. A. Newman. X .M. Maclean. 2 A K. David Johnson. II K A Will. - Wilson. 2 X. A. Ij. West; A T A. C. T. Estes. Ilomer Thompson. K A W. K. Meadow, t A H. J. I. Wood, A Tit. K. S. Kaiford, 2 N.CoMMITTKI-:. M. W. Cauble, 2 A E. Spencer Connerat, X «I». Ethvin McCarty, K A. W. K. Meadow, «l» A 0. M. II. Allen, A T n. .1.1. Davis, S N. 11 illiard Spalding. X Tom Brand, K 2. II. Hines, ll K A. Clift Brannon, S X. A. L. West. A T A.COMMITTKF.. Ed Anderson, W. K. Meadow, W. 1 . Nieolson, Jr.□ n_n □IB3 Committer. J. Rhodes Slade, Kill Freeman, George Sancken.0 Com mitteb. Jim Maddox, II. A. Newman, T. N. Powell.Com m ittkk. Tom Brand, W. P. Nicolson, .Jr., W. K. Meadow. CAMPUS SCENE SCENE ON THE OCONEE RIVEREDITORS OF MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF PANDORA.g: , y@ife : ' ( ’l’ . . , C ■W ■ ——;r»axf— The Faculty of Medicine WILLIAM II. DOUGHTY. .IK.. A.It.. M.D.. Demi. THOMAS R. WRIGHT. M.D.. Professor of Principles and Practice of Snidery and Clinical Surgerv. WILLIAM H. DOUGHTY. .JR.. A.B.. M.D.. Professor of Operative Surgery and Surgical Pathology. GEORGE A. WILCOX. MI).. Professor of .Medical and Surgical Diseases of Women. JAMES M. HULL. M.D.. Professor of Opthalmologv. Otology, and Laryngology. THOMAS I). COLEMAN. A.M.. M.I).. Professor of Principles and Practice of Medicine. JOSEPH EVE ALLEN. M.D.. Professor of Obstetrics. THEODORE E. OERTEL. M.D.. Professor of Tropical Medicine. EUGENE E. MURPIIEY. M.I).. Professor of Clinical Medicine. W. HARRY GOODRICH. A.It.. M.I).. Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery and Venereal Diseases. NOEL M. MOORE. M.S.. M.I)..' Professor of Clinical Medicine and Pediatrics. CHARLES W. CRANE. M.D.. Professor of Applied Anatomy. WILLIAM C. KELLOGG. A.B.. M.D.. Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine. WILLIAM C. LYLE. M.I).. Professor of Special Therapeutics. Proctor of the Faculty. WILLIAM R. HOUSTON. A.M.. M.D.. Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine. HENRY M. MICHEL. M.I).. Professor of Orthopedic and Minor Surgery. CHARLES J. MONTGOMERY. B.S.. M.D.. Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. Hygiene, and Dietetics. JOHN WINTHROP DOW. A.M.. Professor of Chemistry. WILLIAM A. MULHERTN, A.M.. M.D.. Professor of Pediatrics. PERLY P. COMEY. M.D.. Professor of Materia Medico and Therapeutics. WILLIAM I). CUTTER. A.It.. M.D.. Professor of Physiology. CARROLL I). PARTRIDGE. It.S.. M.D.. Professor of Histology. Pathology. Bacteriology and Clinical Microscopy. HUGH X. PAGE. JR.. M l).. Professor of Anatomy.SSIRi Adjunct Faculty GEORGIA A. TRAYLOR, B.S., M.1)., Associate Professor of Anatomy. ALBERT A. DAVIDSON. M.D., Assistant to the Chair of Physiology. CHARLES I. BRYANS, M.D.. Assistant to the Chair of Gynecology. W. WHATLEY BATTKY. M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. MOSES S. LEVY. M.d!, Assistant in Medicine. GUY T. BERNARD. M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. JOHN A. JOHNSTON, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. HINTON J. BAKER, M.D., Assistant in Medicine and Pathology. KING W. MILLIGAN, M.D., Assistant in Chemistry. ASBURY HULL, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. JOHN C. WRIGHT, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Medicine. CHARLES B. PATTERSON, M.l)., Instructor in Pharmacy. EVERARD A. WILCOX. A.M., M.l)., Lecturer on Physical Diagnosis. LEO REICH. M.l).. Lecturer on Dermatology. JAMES R. LITTLETON. M.l).. Demonstrator of Morbid Anatomy. JOHN M. CALDWELL. M.D.. Assistant in Obstetrics. HENRY BROOKS. M.D.. Assistant in Materia Mcdica and Therapeutics. GEORGE T. IIORNE, M.D.. Assistant in Surgery. ANDREW .J. KILPATRICK, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. A. A. WALDON, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. W. HENRY SHAW, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 11 ON. ARCHIBALD BLACKS 11 ICAR, L.L.B., A.B. Lecturer on State Medicine.1 •''?’ £_ . • ■---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ■ $w lifttlA’W The Medical College of Georgia (The Medical Department of the University of Georgia.) A RETROSPECT AXI) A FORECAST. By Joskimi Evk Ai.i.kx. M.D., Augusta. Georgia. The history of the Medical College of Georgia dates hack to the early days of the Republic. In 1828 when the institution was founded Georgia was almost on the confines of civilization. The country was sparsely settled and undeveloped and the pioneer and the woodman were still battling with the primeval forest. It was the day of the stage coach and the post-horse, and communication was slow, difficult, and attended with many inconveniences. Owing to the laxity of the laws regulating medical practice, and the absence of any law governing medical education, medical schools, so-called, really diploma mills, sprang up at every cross-road, and the country was full of quacks and poorly qualified practitioners. Thorough medical instruction could only be had in Philadelphia, which was then tin medical center of tin Western Continent, or by going abroad. To give students proper medical training without necessitating a long and expensive journey from home, which many of them could not afford, the Medical College of Georgia was founded. It was first chartered as a Medical Academy and had the right to grant the degree of Bachelor of Medicine, and the course given was intended to supplement the instruction that the student received in the office of his preceptor during tin period of apprenticeship which the custom of the day required. In 182!) the name “Medical Academy of Georgia” was changed by act of the? legislature to tin “Medical Institute of Georgia” and the trustees of the school were empowered to confer the degree of Doctor of Medicine. By an act passed December 20th. 1833. this institution became the “Medical College of Georgia.” In 1873 the Medical College of Georgia was nominally made the Medical Department of the University of Georgia. This union was strengthened and this college became an integral part of the University system by legislative action in 1911. »$;•» 7It was indeed an herculean undertaking that confronted the first faculty of this college, and it is amazing what they accomplished. They established in a small town of 15,000 inhabitants, in a remote part of the country, a medical school which soon became famous throughout the length and breadth of the land, and students thronged its halls from every section, attracted by the reputation of its professors. In addition to conducting a high grade medical school, the professors of this institution instructed a much larger audience by publishing a medical journal (The Southern Medical and Surgical Journal), which was one of the best exponents of the science of its time, and largely moulded and directed contemporary professional opinion. These men were conscientious and earnest seekers after truth, painstaking in the discharge of every duty, and devoted to the interests of their pupils and the advancement of their noble calling. They were always first in the councils of their brethren, and several of them attained international reputation, were elected to membership in some of the highest learned societies of Europe, and had other foreign honors conferred upon them. This college furnished two presidents to the American Medical Association, the highest and most representative body of physicians in America. (Profs. Paul P. Eve and Henry P. Campbell.) The teachers and pupils of the Medical College of Georgia by original study and research made many important contributions to scientific knowledge, and did much for the cause of humanity. The following is a list of these contributions: The first operation for Resection of Ribs and Excision of Diseased Lung Tissue (Anthony). The Diagnostic Sign of Dislocation of the Shoulder Joint (Dugas). Surgical Anaesthesia (Crawford AV. Long, who was at one time a student, although not a graduate of this college). The Excito Secretory System of Nerves (Campbell). The first operation for A'aginal Hystorectomy (Paul P. Eve). The treatment of Penetrating Wounds of the Abdomen by Laparotomy (L. A. Dugas). Clean Surgery before Listcrism (L. A. Dugas). Method of rtcrino Replacement by the Genu-Pectoral Position (Campbell). Use of Quinine in Malaria (Pord). Normal Ovariotomy (Robert Rattey. who was a student, but not a graduate of this school). The Treatment of Urethral Structure by the Multiple AVedge Principle (John S. Coleman). This college has always stood for the highest ideals of our profession, and was the first to advocate raising the standard of medical education in this country. Gk __ -I fW ' y‘" • CxS J. In 1835 Ilu faculty of this college addressed a circular letter to all the mdc-ical colleges in the United States urging upon them the propriety of a convention to consider the subject of reform in medical teaching and to adopt some plan by which that great and desirable object could Ik' accomplished. The times, however, were not ripe for such innovation and this appeal fell upon deaf ears and met with no response. It was in 1S47. twelve years after, that the University of Pennsylvania lengthened its course to five months, and has since unjustly claimed priority in the movement for higher medical education. The first sessions of this college were of seven months duration, and for five years after it became a college its professors lectured to almost empty benches in the effort to maintain a six months course, when in all other colleges the term was only four months. The Medical College of Georgia was the first American college to insist on a six months course of instruction and urged the other institutions of the country to do likewise. It took these colleges just a quarter of a century to adopt the reform measures advocated and enforced by the Medical College of Gorgia in 1835. This college has always represented all that is best in medical culture and ethics. When we review its history and inquire how so much was accomplished in the face of apparently insuperable difficulties, the answer is to he found in the men who then constituted its faculty. Truly “there were giants in those days.” Men of indomitable will, tireless energy, determined purpose, and lofty ambitions. Men who were patient workers and sought truth for her own sake, and freely gave the fruits of their labors for the benefit of mankind. With no sordid or selfish aim they wrought, and their good deeds live after them. Their most enduring monument is the honorable record of the many pupils who sat at their feet and learned wisdom from their lips. When the college moves into its new quarters, which it is hoped will he before the opening of the next session, its faculty will la able to give a course of theoretical and practical instruction that will he unexcelled by any institution in the country, and then the Medical Department of the University of Georgia will again become what it was in ante-bellum days, the medical center of the South. Brilliant as has been the career of the Medical College of Georgia in the past, the future holds out the promise of far greater things yet to come. ISSfe . % C jr »-Kr.‘ KKt. Senior Class Officers C. C. Frederick, President. B. W. Greene, Vice-President. K. M. Townsend. Secretary. B. L. Helton. Treasurer. Ford "Ware. Historian. V. L. IIarvbry. Chaplain. S. Lichtenstein, Poet. Senior Class Poem With joyous soul we reach the goal For which our hearts were yearning. And pause with retrospective glance. But—there is no returning. Bathed in the glow of roseate dawn. The promise of life’s morning. Our paths were fairer than we knew And rich in their adorning. Youth’s skies were blue, hope’s bird song true. Love’s roses blossomed sweetly; Life’s rills were clear, peace gave good cheer. And joy came to us fleetly. “The house of wisdom” once seemed drear With rules and precepts given. Seems to us now most wondrous drear. While tcndcrest ties are riven. We peer askance, ere on we march. And mark life’s path diverging. For we must part and choose a course That Time and Fate are urging. Shrinking, we pause almost dismayed. Life’s summons sounds alarming: But hope and duty come to aid Against al dangers arming. We seem to hear. Be True. Be Brave; To every trust be loyal; So shall you wear the victor’s crown ‘And win life’s battle royal..'Tv - y n » y .'j i Senior Class History Kvcry class should feel proud of the history it has made while in college. The class of 1912 should feel especially proud of its history, for. so far. we have been successful in every undertaking. As under-classmen, we furnished some of the best football men known in the history of tin college. We also feel that our class work has Iwen above the average. During our junior year we stood five of tin examinations with the Seniors and held our own in all five of these examinations. In October. 1908, there wer 88 men enrolled in our class; of this original number, only 21 are with us now; so true to I)r. Oertel’s prophecy, several have ••fallen by the wayside.” The Senior class boasts of being the largest class in college; indeed, a most unusual occurrence. There are now forty-two men in the class, several of them coming to us during of Senior year from Charleston and Atlanta colleges. Now that the close of school is so near, we are hard at work preparing for the final examinations and the dreaded State Board. I believe that every man graduating on May 15th will do his l cst to uphold the high standard of our noble profession, and by unfaltering duty la of service to all mankind. Historian. MARVIN AI Ail X ACItEE, "Fnllicr." KKSAfA. «A. Entered Kroshiniiu. Vlro-l'n'Kitlcnl of flu Frcshimiii Class. President of the Junior Class. "Ills looks lo argue lihn replete with modesty." (A Iduslilug Ituil of Inuoccnrei. AX DREW BENJAMIN ALBRITTON, "llrll .” ItntltANK. KI.A. Entered Junior. Never could understand tlir rvnt'tion of degeneration. "There Is it majesty iiutl :t mystery In Ills mi tint , take liim us yon will." HOMER IjI'MI’KIX BARKER, •Tost House Molly.” fill Zola fill. Koopvillf. (ill. Mciuhor of flnss Honor Hoard. Ti-e-President of Sophomore flnss. Koprcsonta-live speaker nt ITiIvcrsIty Commencement. IlMI. Iiitoriii' ut Contagious liist'iisi' llos-idtnl. mil. Inlorno nt Liimnr Hospital. Member of the "Mysterious Seven.” Member of (Sloe filth. "I hold It ever Hint knowledge uml virtue nre endowments greater tluiii noble ness mill riches."CLAl'DK IIKAXTLKY ISKOOKIXS. “Pel .” MI I.I.1CI CH VI I.LK. OA. KiUcwl Freshman. Secret iiry of the Sophomore Fill . "It Ik not «ood tliiit man slioulil lie alone." 1IKXRV KIKiAH BUNCH, JR., "Hen r.v.” (’hi JCotn Chi. SI’AKTANIM'RG. S. C. Filtered Fresl.hi. l-'oot Ini 11 ’IK 00. anil 'It . Assistant Manager of the Football Team '(Hi. Interne at City Hospital. "Why man. he ilotli bestride the narrow world like a colossus.” LEO HUCCIXS DuBOSE, "I.ro.” BISIIOPVII.I.R, S. C. Filtered Senior from Charleston. A hard student of scoliosis. “Mlicit learning doth make thee mad."(;kok ;i: michaix ihxnk Came ii ns our Senior year from Atlanta. "Measure yon IicIkIX l y tin shade II east. ' csakxktt i.f.i-: fdwahds, ••Spider.” I’lil Zola (Mil. ’KA VKOHI VIIXK. OA. Filtered l-'ivshniait. Footha 11 ’00 ami 10. Meutlier of ;iis I’lnli. "A ran....niponnd of oddity, frolic and fun. Who relished in a Joke and rejoiced in a l»nn." JOHN CAl.MOrX KliKX "Mis llrlcn.” ItlSIIOI’VIIXK. S. (’. Knlensl Senior of Clee riuh. from ICalliinon . Member ’•There’s nothing temple." Y?l V ' ■ • y ' .. c ’ ' •?•• iTB-We arkW. ('ROLKV .MASOX FAKXF.LL, "Nell." l.AKK (MTV. IXA. ( 111110 In 11s our Senior year from Charleston. “Kun If you like, lull don’t «et out of lirentli. Work if you will. Iiut don’t lie worked to deutli." ClfAIiLKS ’. FHFDFKICK, •’ Frnl." Alpha Kappa Kappa. WKI.I.SToN. CA. Kntered in full ’OS. Football ’OS. ’00. and 10. Memiier Class Honor Ilonrd. Secretary Junior Class. I’resident of Senior Class. .Member of the "Mysterious Seven." Associate Kdltor of Medleal Department of "I’andom" 1011. Kditor-lu-Cliirf of Medical Department of ’’I’lindorn" 1012. Interne at l.amar Hospital. Memiier of (Jleo Club. •• Messed with each talent, and each art to please, And born to write, converse and live with ease." OKOVKIt CIiKVKIiAXI) GAMBRHLL, • Zoe.” IIOXKA I’ATII. S. C. Kntered Senior from Charleston. "Yet a little sleep, yet a little slumber."BEX JAM IX WALTER OREEXE, "Julie.” Alpha Kappa Kappa. OKAY. GA. Kiitpml Krcslimnn. Member of Class Honor Koanl. Member of Athletic Council. Vice-President of tin- Senior Class. "II is business Hint lie loves; lie rises betimes ami lo it with delight.” WILLOW IIIIY UN WOOD HARVEY, "Sis.” KLLABKLLK. OA. Kntered .lunior from Atlanta. Chaplain of Senior Class. Member of Glee Club. "No man Is born without ambitions desires." BERNARD LAMAR HELTON, “Skelton." Alpha Kappa Kappa. 'TOOMSBOltO. GA. Kntcred Freshman. Treasurer of Senior Class. "Kvery man has his faults, and honesty Is his." •yO v J - iJW nV. jtkKi.sgfe®?Ci S' • C WILLIAM (JOKDON KEIIRIXGTOX, "Pmw," Chi JSeta Clil. Xt’XKK. G. . Filtered Freshman. “Tlioy say best moil are moulded out of fnults. Anil, for tlic most. Iiooomo iiiik'Ii more the I letter For belli k a little hail." JOSEPH HASKELL IICDSOX, • -TIko." ciii Xota chi. AUGUSTA. OA. Entered Freshman. Member of ('lass Honor Ilonril. Valedictorian Senior Clnss. ”1 dare to do all that may become a man; Who dan s do more Is none." WILLIAM TOMLIXSOX LAXIEIt, "Weary.” Alpha Kappa Kappa. MIAMI. FLA. Filtered Freshman. He Is a very accom-pllshod uentlenian. "That eholr Invisible, whose music Is the Kindness of the school."SA M I K L LICIITKXSTKIN "Lltcb.” AICISTA. ;a. Kntered Freshman. Member of Ole© Club. Ills hoiiI reveals its streiiKtli ami at ©very demand." • Ami still his toiigut1 runs on). fullness “Itaby." • Kappa Fsl. HKADLANI), ALA. ('nine to ns our Senior year from Itlrm Instill in. A fair representative from Ala bama. Life Is of little value unless it lie eousee rated to duty." VII,L11) WASHINGTON MEADOWS, "Sport." I'll! Clil. Matured Junior from Atlanta. Member of (Sloe ('lul». •Costly thy hnhlt as thy purse enn buy. lint not expressed In fnney; rleh not uaudy For the apparel oft proelnlms the man." -gl Iks, civ. 1 ISAAC OlSIiKV, "I key.” IIA1CTSVI I.I.K. S. C. 11 me in us our Senior year from Charles .Men of few words lire the best men. Kntcred Freshman. Memlier of Class Honor Hoard. Historian Junior Class. Member of the ".Mysterious Seven.” ’Charity lie ((I us at home." (A dollar Is worth a hundred cents) AIHM,. (!A. Kntered Sophomore from Atlanta. •oh. blessed with a temper whose unclouded ray. Can make tomorrow more oheerful than today."CLAUDE LEE PKXXIXRTOX, ".Minnie." Clil SSetn Clil. MATTIIKWX. SA. Kiitemi Freshman. Chaplain of Sopho more Class. Sulutatorlnn of Senior Class. I have immortal IoiikIiikh In in©. MARK A lit Ik- lournliiK is n (ImiKvruus thlnjj. nil 3Com nil. ci.kxpai.ic. ;a. Filtered Freshman "07. Football ’07. 08. anil 10. Lost a year on neeoiiut of njtc |Youn«ster). lie's marries I now. •'Self trust is the essence of heroism."1 . ARTHUR RROWX KI0V )M S. "Sklnnry." ItAlXllltIDGK. «A. Entered Junior from lticmiiiKli:im. walks with so inin-li jrrncc. "Dream on, dear boy.” JAMKS ROSCOE SAMS, Chi Zeta Chi. NKWIIOIIN, ;a, Kii 10red Freshman. Ills nets arc modest and his words discreet.” KUCiKXK FA KM KR SAXFORI), "Beck.” ItKKMKN. CA. Chine to ns our Senior year. I am papa's man. Member of Glee Club. "Ills liberal taste and wise tfCntleiiCSS y earth's melodics a silver tune."MAXXIXCj K. SIIAW •■ruihiiiiK." NASH VI LI,K. OA. Kulonil Junior from Atlanta. I hare some very desirable r« :iI estate for sale. "IToerastlnutlon is the thief of time." PAUL AXDKIiSON SIIUMAN stilsox. ;a. Filtered Freshmnii. Liked Ills own eom-puny best of all. "No storm ever ruffled tile eurreut of Ills life” JOHN' MRLL SMITH, ••Bijou.” MONKOK. GA. Filtered Freshman. Meinhcr of Class Honor Hoard. "Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look.IMt'h JAMKS SMITH, "r j." MONItOK. «A. Kntered Kreshnmn. .Will In a surgeon In the lulled States Army. • I pI those love now who have never loved liefore." i:(;m:ur mkkkidy towxskxd, ••Kir.” riil Zetn lil. Til,TON, ( A. Kntered I'reslnnmi. 'Iniiiluln Junior Class. Kwwl.-iry Senlnr Slass. .Member "M.vsterl-oils Sex 1 11." "Hi Is one of I hose who enniiol bill he earliest; whom niilim herself has up-pointed to lie sincere." DcIiAMAK TUKXKR, I.." Alpha Kappa Kappa. TKNXIM.K. GA. Kutered l-'reslimiiii. I’resldent of Fresh-man t’lass. "Great minds are plea sis I in doing good."c tJXftfr. JOHN KING GARXKTT Tl'TKX, "Tute.” I’INKI.ANI). S. C. Filtered Freshman. lit will practice In South America. ••A soul of power; ii well of llft.v thoughts." FORD WARK, "Swear.” Alpha Kappa Kappa. WKIGHTSVILLK. C5A. Filtered Freshman. Historian Senior class. Treasurer of Sophomore Class. Art Killtor Meillenl Department "I'antlora” 10] 1 ami I'.M'J. Mcnilier of "Mysterious Seven.” "In learning not vain. In wisdom not severe. In greatness easy, and In wit sincere. ' WILMS UK UMAX WATSON, ••Wat.” Alpha Kappa Kappa. TIPTON. DA. Filtered Preshinnii. Vice-President Junior Class. Member of "Mysterious Seven.” Will practice In Florida. "lie Is a man. take him all In all.”Kntcrcri I-'rvxliimin. Historian of Kresli-man riass. Mcmhcr of "Mysterious Seven." "The ladles call him swwl, The stairs as In I rumlw tluiiii Muk Itlw fixil ' •IA.MRS HAMILTON WHITESIDE, he (reads them kiss his feet." "NIihi:k.v.m Alpha Kappa Kappa. AICISTA. CA. Puzzles Why is it that Dr. Doughty says. “If the books do not agree with me they are wrong?” Why is I)r. Houston such an authority on carcinoma of the stomach? Why did Dr. E. Wilcox hold clinic on a smallpox patient? Why do the students of this college have nightmares about building funds, and sec hobgoblins in the form of the American dollar? Why do Hudson and Marker try to get “Gay”? Why is Dr. Mulhcrin so fond of pediatrics? Why does Pennington part his hair in the middle? Why Meadows docs not wear a ring? Why does Prof. Dow waste fifteen minutes explaining to the Sophomore class how to save three? Also, why does he raise the skirts of his overcoat, when he ascends the college steps? Why is it that Dr. Moore so seldom “feels warranted”? “ My the bye” why does Ilinev Michel mention so many things “in passing”? What is the etiology of “Muddy” Traylor’s modesty? Where did Dr. Montgomery acquire the lung power which enables him to deliver such lengthy, rapid-fire lectures “and so forth and so on”? Why are Fryer and Montgomery of the Sophomore class so fond of Dr. As- . bury Hull? Why does Dr. Partridge wear such radiant socks? Did Prof. Dow learn anything about “Muckerism” “while studying at liar- How did the cow get into the physiology lecture room? Why is it that more of us are not gifted with Chesterfieldian manners and military bearing, such as Dr. Fargo’s? wiiv does Dr. Page show so much affection for the Sophomore class? vard”?College Calendar Sept. 18. Sept. 19. Sept. 20. Sept. 22. Sept. 28. Sept. 80. Oct. 1. Oct. 9. Oct. 10. Oct. 18. Oct. 19. Nov. 1. Nov. 4. Nov. ( . Nov. 8. Nov. 10. Nov. 11. Nov. 1(». Nov. 20. Xov. 23. Dec. 20. Jan. 8. Jan. 12. Jan. 14. Jan. 20. Feb. 28. Feb. 29. Mar. 2. Mar. 8. Mar. 17. Mar. 21. Mar. 25. Opening Day. Freslis and Flunked begin Fxams. Dean confers with Barker. A new “Page” is added to the Faculty Roll. The Freshmen pay their initiation fee to join the Gobblers. The Charleston brigade arrives. Pennington begins leetioneering. Whiteside outlines the heart on the right side. Five Sophs begin visiting l)r. Goodrich. W. 1). arrives and the boys say he’s a “Cutter.” Seniors get canes. Dr. Milligan is looking melancholy. Sams forgot to wear his collar. Georgia-Carolina Fair opens. Dr. Doughty gives a lecture on the man who cuts. Gcorgia-Clemson game. Bunch is unable to attend classes. Greene gets mad at bis roommate and gives him a copy of Oertel’s M icroscopy. Roberts and Silver do the “Reno” act. Wallace wears a new hat. The Paul Jones Club celebrates. Teddy gives Perkins a lecture in the operating room. Meadows answers a question for Billy’ell. Iliney caused several Seniors to wake up. Prof. Lyle made a speech to the Sophs and “practically” showed them up. Prof. Doughty runs up to Chicago on business connected with the College. Overby finds a “jit” and buys peanuts. A cow follows Walker and Payne into Dr. Kellogg’s lecture room. Wilson shoots a “Partridge” against the laws of Georgia. Dunne seen at Prof. Houston’s lecture. Jelks and Verdery enter the “Arena.” P. J. Smith is called the undertaker.JI NIOR CLASS IMCTl'HK.Junior Class Officers Ofkickks. R. A. Barnett............President. C. G. Anderson...........Vice-President. T. L. Holcombe...........Secretary and Treasurer. C. B. Lord...............Historian. Class Colors—Orange and Black. Class Flow hr—Chrysanthemum. CLASS ROLL. C. G. R, A. A. s. T. Z. K. E. I. 1). R. B. W. B w. J, c. w O. E. T. L. W. G E. II. S. P. II. M Anderson. Barnett. Blanchard. Cason. Downing. Durham. Durham. Du Vail. Hall. Harper. Herndon. Holcombe. Hunter. Hutchins. Hutcherson. Johnson. C. B. Lord. II. Mella. J. E. Mercer. J. Morris. A. E. Mulford. J. K. McClintic. II. A. McEIroy. J. W. PafTord. W. A. Post. W. II. Roberts. E. 0. Scharnitxky C. G. Scruggs. I). M. Silver. J. E. Taylor. J. E. Wallace. G. A. Ward.Junior Class History Early in October of 1900, when the beautiful days and gentle breezes of autumn began to gather the leaves from the different trees and place them in a drift in some lonely corner; when the robins began to leave the colder climates of the North, to seek a new home in the Sunny South—there were gathered from the different states of the Union to the Medical Department of the University of Georgia, about .'14 men who wore to compose the class of 1913. We came as wise men with utopian ideas in regard to the science and practice of medicine, but we had not been here long before we realized that “things were not what they seemed” and that the struggle of the four years to come was a hard one. The class lost a few of its men the first year, but others came at the beginning of the second year from nearby colleges and kept up the original number. We plunged into the work of the second year with great zeal. As we advanced in our work the more we realized what a struggle it was to master the healing art. Our Junior year is now nearing its end. and we feel that we are nearing the attainment of our ambitions. As a class it has been our endeavor to uphold the standards of the medical profession and the institution where we are being trained to become the future guardians of health of the South.Shake, shake, shake on this lock-up door of mine.—Watson. Did I ever tell you about my auto?—Turner. A man of variegated hosiery.—Tuten. Lost: A receipt for initiation fee to Gobblers.—Gibson. The soul of this man is his clothes.—Meadows. All practically green men.—The Freshmen. Who shall decide when doctors disagree?—Faculty Meeting. I am resolved to grow fat.—Reynolds. I am declined in the vale of years.—Father Aeree. Wo fail! But screw our courage to the sticking place and we will not fail.— Senior Class. A razor would he very acceptable.—Hunter. Chicago. III. Feb. 28th. 1J)12. 10 A. M. Miss I)-----. Forgot tobacco. Send by first express. Dr. Doughty. Tlic “Klub Klan ”—Michel. Murphy, and Page. A face like a benediction.—Shaw. Go some of you and fetch a looking glass.—Newsom. Too gentle for his own good.—Lanier. Not dignified; just dull.—Sams. Wise in his own conceit.—Dunne. Like a sponge he takes it in.—Parrish. Poor boy! He’s but the shadow of his former self.—Bunch. An example of unheeded hot air.—Perkins.SOPHOMORE CLASS IMCTI RK.Sophomore Class Roll Officers. X. L: Kirkland............President. J. L. Nevil...............Vice-President. Ij. 0. McAfee...............Secretary and Treasurer. P. I j. Ware...............Historian. .1. R. Fowler..............Chaplain. Class Colors—Blue and White. Class Flower—White carnation. Class Roll. J. C. Bonner. J. A. Johnson. T. P. Brown. X. Ij. Kirkland. J. II. Butler. E. K. Lazenbv. J. G. Carter. Ij. C. McAfee. 1). C. Colson. R. C. Montgomery. J. W. Durden. .1. Ij. Nevil. Phil Edmundson. 10. T. Newsom. G. C. Fishburne. J. W. Payne. J. R. Fowler. 10. M. Walker. E. Fryer. F. Ij. Ware. W. A. Ilagins. T. S. Wilson. E. J. Ilall. Ij. T. Waters.Sophomore Class History The class of ’14 began the second lap of their course on Sept. 18, 1911, considerably thinned in number. An epidemic of final examinations in April, 1911. had removed many of our fellows from our ranks. Some of us who returned were still suffering from the severe fall we had taken on that occasion, and all had lost much of the freshness of the previous year. We returned sadder but wiser men. Sadder because we were “down” in one branch, but wiser because of much study during vacation. During the winter we have borne our full part in breaking the glass in the front door of the college building. We have missed no opportunity to protest against everything generally. During the year we have dccvloped several expert “Jersey lasso artists” in our class. On our semi-final examinations in January our class had the highest percentage of men to get “clean sheets” of any class in college. Our men are preparing for various lines of work in the medical world. One is to do research and missionary work in the wilds of Africa, and another is to work in the cinchona farms of Peru. There are other ambitious ones in the class, varying all the way from “pill dispensers” to “eminent surgeons. ’ Historian.Tales Out of School I)r. Parrish : 1 want to purchase an ounce of cocaine. Druggist: Doctor, arc you aware of the fact that this will cost you about ten dollars? Dr. Parrish: No. I’ll be going. I thought it cost about like salts. -------o------ I)r. Cuttkr: Into how many classes may protoplasmic substances be divided ? Mr. Jelks: Two. I think. Doctor, man and woman. • ------o I)r. Mulherin: What is the rachitic rosary! Mr. Greene: It is an eruption appearing on the abdomen. -------o------ Dr. Michel: Where does tuberculosis of the hip joint first manifest itself? Mr. Harvey: In the sacro-iliac synchrondrosis. -------o------ Prof. Dyle: Have you ever taken electro-therapeutics! Mr. Kllex: No, sir. I 'vc been exposed to it several times, but never took it. Dr. Battey: Of what artery is the femoral a branch? Mr. Williams: I think it is a branch of Poupart’s ligament. ------o------ Prof. Goodrich : What is the cause of alkaline cystitis? Mr. Barker: It is due to the presence of chromogenie bacteria. Dr. Houston (to class): I fear some of you all’s brain cells will explode some day, and crack your skull. Mr. Pennington: I hope that won’t he me. Prof. Houston: You are in no danger whatever. Mr. Pennington. ■ o Prof. Traylor: What muscles does the median nerve supply! Mr. Meadows: The gracilis. Prof. Doughty: What arc the remote dangers of a depressed fracture of the skull! Mr. Dunne (without hesitation): Puerperal eclampsia. Prof. Traylor: What is synovitisf Mr. Anderson: It is an inflammation of a sinus.FRESHMAN CLASS PICTFRE.Freshman Class Roll Officers. L. X. Todd...............President. A. II. Divine............Vice-President. I). Y. Roshorough.........Secretary and Treasurer. J. R. Lewis. Jr..........Historian. Class Colors—Red and White. Class Flower—American Beauty rose. Class Roll. W. II. Bennett. I). Y. Rosbormigh. K. A. Carroll. L. X. Todd. A. II. Drane. W. C. Verdorv. W. A. Gibson, Jr. W. B. Watts. Jr. A. A. Jelks. R. 1). Wells. W. G. Jenkins. J. A. White. J. R. Lewis, Jr. S. S. Youinans.Freshman Class History On the morning of September 18. 1911, with the prospects of a beautiful day ahead, there gathered on the campus of the Medical College of Georgia twenty young men fresh from behind the plows and from college. These twenty were to be the outcast, the lowest form of human lift—in other words, freshmen. Of course everything was new to us. and little did we dream that a preliminary examination was to be given us because we were lacking in one-quarter of a unit. Hut such was the case, and some of us came to realize the difficulties that were to confront us before we were the possessors of that elusive M.I). In a remarkably short time we were settled down to work, trying to remember that the stemo-eleido-mastoid does not arise from the oscalcis, that NT«0 and NyOo arc not the same though they do look alike, and many more things that we were told that we would have to remember before we could ever become Sophomores. By determination and hard work we so far mastered our studies as to make a good showing in the semi-final examinations, and returned after the holidays with the resolution that we would finish the year as well as it had been begun. The spring days are now with us. and with them has come that indescribable feeling, which the upper classmen have told us is caused bv approach of the dreaded “finals.” Hut our resolutions have l een adhered to. and we hope that next year we will, to a man. find ourselves in the place that the Sophomores are leaving vacant for us. Historian.Glee Club Director. Prof. 0. I). Partridge. Officers. Linn Harvey.................President. Eugene Sanford.............Treasurer. John Ellen..................Vice-President. Sam Lichtenstein...........Pianist. Members. Homer Barker. John Ellen. Linn Harvey. Garnett Edwards. Cleveland Frederick. Sam Lichtenstein. William Meadows. Eugene Sanford.('Ill ZKTA CHI FRATBKNITV.'"v m nw --'✓ s '5C 'J5 ' ____________________a » j. yu. Chi Zeta Chi Fraternity—Alpha Chapter Fraternity founded at the Medical Department of the I'niversity of Georgia, October the fourteenth, 1903. Flower—White carnation. Colors—Royal purple and old gold. Chapter Roll. II. L. Barker. J. A. Johnson. W. II. Bennett. J. K. McClintic. II. E. Bunch. Jr. J. I a Nevil. T. Z. Cason. F. T. Newsom. I). C. Colson. C. L. Pennington. E. E. Downing. W. A. Post. A. II. Drane. A. B. Prince. G. L. Edwards. W. II. Roberts. J. R. Fowler. D. Y. Rosborough. W. A. Gibson. J. R. Sams. W. A. Ilagins. C. G. Scruggs. C. W. Harper. E. M. Townsend. W. G. Herrington. W. C. Verderv. J. II. Hudson. F. L. Ware. S. F. Hutcherson. Fratres in Facultate. J. E. Allen, M.D. W. W. Battey, Jr., M.D. G. T. Bernard. M.D. C. W. Crane, M.D. P. P. Comey, M.D. T. I). Coleman. M.D. W. I). Cutter, M.D. W. II. Doughty, Jr., M.D. L. W. Fargo, M.D. W. II. Goodrich. M.D. G. T. Home, M.D. W. R. Houston, M.D. W. C. Kellogg. M.D. M. S. Levy, M.D. W. A. Mulherin. M.D. E. E. Murphey, M.D. T. E. Oertel. M.D. C. I). Partridge. M.D. G. A. Travlor, M.D. J. C. Wright. M.D.Alpha Kappa Kappa Fraternity ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER fraternity founded at tin Medical Department of Dartmouth College. Hanover. New Hampshire, September 2f). 1888. Alpha Gamma founded January 25. 1JKM. Flower—American Beauty rose. Coi-ors—Green and White. Chapter Roi.l. J. K. I. R. C. C. B. B. B. W. A. X. W. II. A. I). B. C. C. W. J. L. G. A. L. t: Butler. Carroll. Durham. Durham. Fishburne. Frederick. Greene. Hall. Helton. Hunter. Jelks. Kirkland. Lanier. L. C. McAfee. H. Mella. J. E. Mercer. X. Overby. •J. K. Taylor. L. X. Todd. I). L. Turner, Jr, K. M. Walker. F. A. Ware. L. T. Waters. W. If. Watson. W. B. Watts. -I. II. Whiteside. T. S. Wilson. Fkatkks in F. cri r. TK. II. J. Baker, M.D. C. I. Bryans, M.D. J. M. Caldwell, M.D. A. A. Davidson. M.D. •I. II. Honan, M.D. J. M. Hull, M.D. Asbury Hull. M.D. •I. A. Johnston, M.D. A. J. Kilpatrick, M.D. W. C. Lyle. M.D. K. W. Milligan, M.D. K. A. Wilcox, M.D. • TUB NO NAMB CU B.Roll of No Name Club William II. Doughty, Jr., A.B.. M.I). William C. Kellogg, A.B., .M.I). Eugene E. Murphey, M.I). Joseph E. Allen, M.I). William C. Lyle, M.I). Noel M. Moore, M.S., M.I). Thomas I). Coleman, A.M.. M.I). Henry M. Michael, M.I). John J. Lee, M.I).. ’07. Guy T. Bernard. M.I)., ’07. Asbury Hull, M.I)., ’07. J. Monroe Dieks, M.I).. ’07. (Deceased). John C. Wright. M.D.. ’OS. Dallas X. Thompson. M.I).. ’OS. Gordon Burns. .M.I)., ’08. Charlie I'slier, M.I).. ’08. William J. Cranston. M.D.. ’08. Mason Smith. M.I)., ’08. King W. Milligan, Pli.G., M.I). Tom R. A.vcock. M.D., ’00. Henry S. Gchrkcn, M.I).. 09. Ralph Freeman. M.D.. ’09. George L. Carpenter. M.I)., ’09. Initiates. Robert B. Durham, '18. Isaiah I). Durham. ’13. T. Z. Cason, ’13. Fain S. Hutcherson, ’13. Members. Ilcber J. Morton, M.D.. ’09. Shcddie I’sher. M.D.. A.B. Cleveland Thompson. M.I).. ’09. Luther II. Shellhouse. M.I).. ’10. William A. Gantt. Jr., M.D.. ’10. Albert B. Martin. M.I)., ’10. William II. Whittendale. IMi.G.. M. Vance C. Powers. M.I)., ’10. Kilpatrick Cross. M.D.. ’10. Clarence G. Cox. M.I).. 10. Jack G. Standifer. M.I).. ’ll. Eugene F. Griffith. M.I).. ’ll. Earnest B. Save. M.I).. ’ll. William W. Brown. M.D.. ’ll. Delon L. Murray. M.D., ’ll. Lee W. Verderv. M.I).. ’ll. Ford Ware. To he M.I). ’12. Homer L. Barker, Egbert M. Townsend, “ “ Charles C. Frederick. Nicholas Overby, James II. Whiteside. Willis II. Watson. Joseph E. Mercer. ’13. Joseph E. Taylor. ’13. Earnest E. Downing. ’13. ’10.The End The year 1012 marks a change in the mode of election of the Editors of the Pandora, and hence a change in the character of the Book. The Editors of the 1012 Pandora have striven as much as possible to change the make-up of the book, in order to present a better picture of college life at “Georgia.” We have put in those things which we thought would add to this picture, and which in future years would bring back memories of days spent at “Old Georgia.” We hope that our task has been a success, but this is for our readers to decide. We have continued the representation of the Medical Department at Augusta. which we hope will meet with the approval of both institutions. We desire here to extend our heartiest thanks to Prof. Hooper, who has had entire charge of reading the proofs for us, to Prof. Park, who has given us much good advice and assistance, and also to Mr. Reed. The aid from these and others of the faculty has been invaluable. Of the students we wish to thank A. A. Rayle, Russell, Stone, Meyer, and Bcrnd for their contributions, and every other one who has helped us in the least way. Of the Alumni, we especially wish to express our appreciation to E. L. Pennington. Ml, and Stallings. The Editors.The Atlanta Law School FACULTY PROFESSORS. HAMILTON DOUGLAS. Pli.M.. LL.It.. Doan. Professor Elementary L:nv. Wills anil Partnership. HOOPER ALEXANDER. A.II.. Professor of Constitutional Law. Corporations ami Agency. VICTOR L. SMITH. IMi.lt.. LL.It.. Professor of Ploailln« anil Practice and Commercial Law. 10. MARVIN r.NDRRWOOI). A.It.. LL.It.. Professor of Evidence. Torts anil I0«|ulty Jurisprudence. CHARLES I). McKINNEY. A.It.. It.LItt.. LL.It.. Professor of Realty. Sales ami Doniestle Relations. CHARLES It. REYNOLDS. A.It.. LL.It.. Professor Directing Seliool of Praetlee. ROBERT C. ALSTON. A.It.. LL.It.. Professor of Carriers anil Interstate Coimneree Law. .1 AMES D. KILPATRICK. A.M.. LL.It.. Professor of Criminal Law ami Contracts. EDWARD P. PI RNS. A.It.. LL.It.. Secretary. Professor of the Matheinatles of Annuities ami Insurance. INST Rl'CTOKS. HAMILTON DOCHLAS. JR.. It.S.. LL.It.. School of Practice MRS. WILLIAM CLAEIt SPIKKR. It.S.. M.O.. Oratory, Dcltatlng ami Public Speaking. LECTURERS. HON. ItEVKRLY I . EVANS. A.M.. Presiding Justice Supreme Court. HON. JOSEPH HENRY LUMPKIN. A.It.. Associate Justice Supreme Court. IION. MARCl’S W. ItECK. A.It.. LL.It.. Associate Just lei- Supreme Court. IION BENJAMIN HARVEY HILL. A.It.. LL.It.. Chief Judge Court of Appeals. HON. RICHARD BREVARD RI'SSELL. A.It.. Ph.lt.. LL.It.. Associate Judge Court of Appeals. HON. ARTHUR CRAY POWELL. LL.It.. Associate .1 ml go Court of Appeals. HON. WILLIAM T. NEWMAN. .1 mlgo s. District Court. IION. WILLIAM I). ELLIS. Judge Superior Court. Fulton County. HON GEORGE HILLYER. A.M.. Member Georgia Railway Commission. HON. JOHN S. CANDLER. A.M.. Ex Assoelnte Justice Supreme Court. HON. JOHN L. HOPKINS. Ex-Judge Superior Court. HON. THOMAS EWINO. JR.. A.M.. LL.It.. of the New York Bar. JAMES II. GILBERT. A.B.. LL.It. HON. GEORGE WESTMORELAND. WILLIAM PERRIN NICOLSON. M.D.. sanders McDaniel, a.h.. JAMES HENRY PORTER. A.It.. LL.It., WILLIAM W. GAINES. B.S.. LL.It..P RINTING ITH our new and improved machinery we are now prepared to handle your orders with neatness and dispatch. Our prices on Printing, Binding, Ruling, etc., are as low as any first-class house in the country. This issue of the Pandora is a specimen of our wort the McGregor company Printers, Stationers, Binders 321 Clayton Street ATHENS, GEORGIAA I X A A A I A X X I 1 A I I X .1. X I A 1 t !, I I x x ,1, : i ! X t » Y .i, A ,1 ! .1. X I X X ! .1. !, X x x X X X I X .1. I 1 .1. X x x x X : i x x x x x t : x i X A .t. X A x X X ®je £§ tate J ormal ikfjool ATHENS, GEORGIA Named by the U.S. Commissioner of Education as being among the best fifteen State Normal Schools in the United States. Forty-six officers and teachers. Ten buildings. Seventeen departments of instruction. The Home-Life courses are among the strongest in the South: Domestic Arts and Sciences, Manual Arts, Agriculture and School Gardening, Instrumental Music, Physical Culture. Education for service in the school-room. Education for fitness and happiness in the home. [Session after Christmas resumed January 4th. Special courses for teachers preparing for the annual state examinations in June. Applicants will need to apply at once. Write for Catalogue. E. C. BRANSON, President x : : : : : A x A i: i. X X I x : X ! x i. X A A V X I X X I. A A i 1 X A A x A I A x A A x i, A .1. i i, A x i A i A A x A A X X t. A A X i. A .1. x A A A A X X X A X A(GORDON INSTITUTE — BARNES V1LLE, GEORGIA —- 15he Oldest; Uhe Largest; Uhe 'Best Ranks in Class A by U. S. War Department The Strongest Faculty and Best Equipped School in the South Now in its Sixtieth Year Classical, English, Technical, Business and other Courses. All boys under strict military discipline in charge of active officers detailed from U. S. War Department. We have no shams, we tolerate none. Finest climate; 900 feet above sea level; no malaria, no typhoid. The summer climate of Atlanta, the winter climate of Augusta. Board in best families, with a mother's refining influence and care; or in dormitory in charge of matron and teachers, as parent may prefer. The most complete athletic department in the South; football, baseball and track teams; all champions in their class. Patronized by the best families of Georgia and adjacent states for three generations. Your boy’s associates will be the best. Many of the men who are making the history of the United States and of Georgia and other Southern states are Gordon graduates. Duncan U. Fletcher, United States senator from Florida; Congressman T. W. Hardwick, of Georgia; Judge U. V. Whipple, of the Cordcle circuit, and hundreds of other great and noble men in public, professional and private life were educated at Gordon. Uotal expenses per year, about £200,00. Write today for free catalogue, telling botes. fjERE M. POUND, President I B ARNES VILLE, GEORGIA Lillcy Uniforms —ARE— n j t • __ n _. _ 1 • i V V. - J They are highly attractive in appearance and superior in point of style to other makes of Uniforms for colleges. University of Georgia students will find Lilly Uniforms unequalled for wearing qualities and built to keep rheir shape and look neat, and new, and highly attractive in their appearance; the hard test of daily college wear. We put the best quality of materials into Lilley College Unijorms and employ skilled Uniform Tailors to make them up for you. And we insure perfect, lasting satisfaction through our exclusive method of inside construction of the Uniform and guarantee this extreme durability and absolutely protect the student purchaser through this binding guarantee of satisfactory service of your Lilley Unijorm. m£ M. C. Lilley Co. COLUMBUS, OHIO.== E. H. DORSEY, Local Representative, ATHENS, GEORGIA Electric Debtees for the Home Electric Coffee Percolator —Produces the host coffee the quickest and the easiest. Electric Toaster—Make toast almost instantly on the table at trivial cost. Electric Water Heater—Heats to a boiling point in a few minutes for the dining table, the quick lunch or the sick room. Warms baby’s milk in loss than throe minutes. Electric Hair Curler—An instrument which adds greatly to convenience at the dressing table. Electric Shaving Cup—Heats water for shaving almost instantly. Any man will appreciate it. Electric Vacuum Cleaner—Has robbed house cleaning of its toil and disorder. Electric Flat Iron—Its labor-saving capacity has placed hundreds of thousands in use during the last few years. Electric Sewing Machine Motor—Doubles the capacity of the sewing machine and conserves woman’s health. Electric Washing Machine—Pays for itself in a few months by saving the laundress’ wages. Electric Fan—Circulates cool air in summer; warm air in winter. Dries hair and laundry, chases flies and assists the efficiency of the house heating plant. To make the list complete would tire your patience. Athens 'Rctilbvay Electric Company. : : : : : : V : :i BOYS! BOYS!! BOYS!!! Have you ever stopped to think? What am I going to do when I finish at the University ? Unless you are studying Law, Medicine, or some special work that fits you for a life of usefulness, what are you really and truly going to do? Let us suggest a plan. When you return to resume your work in September, arrange to spend your leisure time here in taking a course of Business training, one, two, or three hours a day for a few months will accomplish wonders. It will not cost much and will be the means of getting the preparation required to meet the demands of the Business World. Payments—We will arrange to let you make a small payment monthly if you wish, until course is paid for. We pledge you our best service. ATHENS BUSINESS COLLEGE ATHENS, GEORGIA  L, G. SMITH TYPEWRITER COMPANY STANDARD FOLDING TYPEWRITERS 1 ui Edison Business Phonograph H. M. ASHE CO., a x-m. •;. x : : I. s. : : : : : : :• :. : : s A : M. f L W, i gif A A 1 ; 1 t t t — c 0.— a .1. 2 .». A A CLAYTON STREET ? 1 • A A A 2 x 2 X A A A PHONE 539 W ;V vdjs| A A x t t x x Y A place the x x A A A A College Boys A A A A A A Like A. C. BRISCOE President of the Southern Shorthand and Business University. The college of 46 years’ Standing. 4 It’s more like home.” : : : : t t : : : .1. : ! :. : V : t : : : x : V : : : 1. : : :. : :, : : : : : ? : : 2 : - |HMiDependable Photographs WORTH WHILE THAT KIND Pictures Frames Made to Order BOWDEN’S STUDIO 164 CLAYTON STREET ESTABLISHED 1861 ®f)e Hotoip Rational panfe OF ATLANTA, GA. Capital,......§1,000,000.00 Surplus and Profits, - §1,000,000.00 THE LARGEST IN GEORGIA Under Supervision of the United States Government, Banking in all its Departments, Letters of Credit and Travelers Checks, available in all parts of the World, Interest paid and Compounded Semi-Annually in our SAVINGS DEPARTMENT BANKING BY MAIL t t V I, t i, t i i t V I I t V | i : ••• T x | x .1. ! :TYPEWRITERS All Makes Factory Rebuilt Guaranteed for 12 Months GOOD MACHINES 43 N. Pryor Street Rented, S5-U0 for 3 Months ? X Get our Special Price List of Bargains V before paying $100.00 for a !j! Writing Machine. •{ American Writing Machine Company £ ATLANTA, GA. ? The Atlanta National Bank ATLANTA, GEORGIA Capital,............$1,000,000.00 Surplus and Undivided Profits, 1,150,000.00 Deposits,.............. 6,500,000.00 OFFICERS: CHAS. E. CURRIER. President F. E. BLOCK. Vice-President JAMES S. FL0Y0. Vice-President GEO. R. DONOVAN. Cashier J. S. KENNEDY. Assistant Cashier J. 0. LEITNER. Assistant Cashier We Solicit Your Account • • • V • • v • • • •• • • • • ♦ • • Hangliey's Orchestra f f THU. E. jflobing | F OR: BALLS, RECEPTIONS, ETC. TELEPHONE 1006 » • • • •••••••« MANUFACTURER OF Badges, Pins, Costumes, Etc. ? i Your Patronage will be Appreciated. ATLANTA, - GEORGIA | ► ♦♦ •• •♦ •• •♦ •• •• »• •• ♦ •• •♦ •• • »• •• ♦♦ •• •♦ •• •♦ ♦• •• ♦♦••• •♦ ♦• •♦ ♦• •• ♦► • »| A A A FRANK PRINU JOHN GEISZ ‘I BELL PHONE 3308 X X j: JNO. L, MOORE SONS Geisz Company £ TAILORS :SPECIALTIES ARE: | Kryptok, Luxfel and Amber Spectacles and Eye Glasses Atlanta National Bank Building ATLANTA ❖ Georgia x atcanta. 42 N. Broad St.. Prudential Building GEORGIA r Winibtv ity of Georgia MEDICAL COLLEGE AUGUSTA, GEORGIA W. II. DOUGHTY. .Ir.. 51. I .. Drnn L. W. KAIMiO. 1. ! .. W. C. I.VI.K. M. I - Vic«-I cnn The 81st Annual Session of this College begins September H . Four years graded eourse of eighteen months eaeli. Didactic and recitation system of instruction. Full time teachers in primary branches. Well equipped laboratories. New College Buildings. Ample facilities for clinical teaching. Three large Hospitals, and (htl-Palienl Clinic and Dispensary under ■'-elusive Control of the Faculty. Fourteen t’nits required for admission. For further information, address THE REG ST R A R MEDICAL COLLEGE, AUGUSTA, GA. in ) » » If You Want a “Balanced” Suit ) So to speak, one in which there isn’t a surplus of one characteristic and a deficit of another, you’ll want one of ours. We’ve given every detail a full quota of consideration-the goods, the style, the making, are a top notch; the values are more than good. WINGFIELDS “THE SHOP OF QUALITY” ATHENS, GA. )  (H at at at at at at at at at at at at at I!! 1 at at at at at i at at at at ta I at at at at at at at at at at at at ta at at at «t Citizens Bank , Trust Company Capital $100,000 0 Surplus 50,000:M ATHENS GEORGIA Toric or deep curved Lenses So-Easy Eye Glass Mountings Sliur-On EyeGlass Mountings ta at { «( (' at ta la at ta at ta And every other known Eye Glass Mounting is kept in our stock at all times. Our facilities, careful adjustment, and courteous attention have made us the leading Opticians of the South. We can duplicate any broken glass, send us the pieces. Walter Ballard Optical Co. 85 Peachtree St. ATLANTA, GA.Our motto: “a square deal flIMller jfurniturc Company The Auditorium Building ATHENS, GA. WE CARRY EVERYTHING FOR THE STUDENT’S HOME OR OFFICE A Complete Line of Trunks AND OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT ( HI -Cotrell Leonard- ALBANY, N. Y. --MAKERS OF-- CAPS, GOWNS and HOODS To the American Colleges and Universities. From the Atlantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a Specialty. Correct Hoods for all Degrees. Rich Gowns for Faculty use, for Pulpit and Bench BULLETIN, SAMPLES, ETC. ON REQUEST m D) )d » ID III III II! Ill III III III III )» ID )» III ID ill ID ))) .1IT IS SAID No two lines can be drawn perfectly parallel That’s the Reason in Shoedom W IIY Florslteim Worihmore Shapes are so hard to imitate $3.50 to $7.00 McCardle Shoe Co. 101 PEACHTREE ATLANTA, - - GEORGIA Webb Crawford Co. Wholesale Grocers ATHENS, GEORGIA Office and Warehouse: CENTRAL R. R. TRACKS MARTIN BROS. Repair Shoes and Harness on Short Notice CUSTOM MADE HARNESS Phone 621 455 Clayton Street The Fourth National Bank OF ATLANTA ATLANTA, GEORGIA Capital, $600,000.00 Surplus, $780,000.00 A Designated Depository of the United States. State of Georgia, County of Fulton and the City of Atlanta. OFFICERS J. W. English, Pres. Jno. K. Ottley, V.-Pres. (’has. I. Ryan, Cashier. Win. T. Pekerson, Asst. Cashier. Jas. M. Thomas. Asst. Cashier. DIRECTORS E. C. Peters Albert Steiner Jos. Hirsch J. R. Hopkins J. VV. English, Jr. Jno. J. Woodside J. I). Robinson Jas. W. Englisli Jno. K. Ottley Dan. B. Harris Chas. A. Wlckersham Chas. I Ryan Jas. M. Thomas Harry I,. English Geo. W. Parrott Clyde L. King I). N. McCullough EUGENE V. HAYNES, President W. A. HATGOOO J. E. STEWART x x x x x X"X"X x x JAS. I. H0SF0R0. Sec'y Trees. Cugene V. I apnes Co. JFiue Jefuclru, lllatclu's, Hiamnnbs RICH CUT GLASS ART GOODS AND SILVERWARE 37 WHITEHALL STREET BELL PHONE 112 ATLANTA, GEORGIA •XM X,v,XM X X,vv XMX, i' X'v,X''XMX''VV X v XMXMX XMXMXMXMXMX, XMX XM x : x-x x Clothes for Young Men There’s something about the YOUNG MEN’S CLOTHES that we carry that you will find different and unusual. Styles are always smart—they are extreme or conservative as you prefer, but they all have the distinctive style that young men care for—but seldom find in Ready-to-wear Suits. Muse Hats are from the best makers—Furnishings are the correct thing, and MUSE Shoes the BEST ON EARTH. •x x x x x GEO. MUSE CLOTHING CO., Atlanta, Ga,Sodas, Candies==The Best of Everything ===== at ■ COSTA’S CIGARS, FLOWERS Southern Mutual Bldg. To have your Clothes look neat you should do as the college sports have always done patronize the........ Red : Black Pressing Co. Sanges Hotel Building Phone 88 ATHENS, - - GEORGIA Georgians Let your next pair be made in Georgia Red Seal Shoes Give Style, Comfort, Service. Sold Everywhere. ===== MADE BY= J. K. ORR SHOE CO. ATLANTA ATHENS SHOE CO. LOCAL REPRESENTATIVE 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 — DON’T FAIL TO VISIT HERNDON’S Barber Shop When in Atlanta, for the best of everything in the Tonsorial Art. We solicit your patronage and if you give us a trial we guarantee to do the rest to your satisfaction. 14 Artists always ready to serve you. Don’t forget 66 Peachtree Street. — 1 1 1 1 1 1 U 1 1 1 SOONER OR LATER YOU WILL BUY A DE LAVAL FIRST IN 1 878-FIRST EVER SINCE DE LAVAL Are used exclusively by 98 per cent of the world’s creameries. Tun yuan hk« I lion won n iloxon dlflTeri'nt uuikus of urunuiury or factory separators In use. Toilu.v over US |mm- eont. of the world's eroumerles ■• • l K I.AYAI, separators exclusively. It menus :i illtroroiKv of several thousand ilol liirs ii your wliotlior n l»K I.AVAI. or some other •mike of separator Is used In n ereainery. Kxnetly I lie sunie ililTi-renee exist, oil n smaller sonle, in the use of farm separators. Owing to the fuel, however. Unit most fur in users lo not keep iis neeiirnte rinunl ns the eminieryiinin. they do not nppreelate Just what the dllferenoo between n good ninl :i poor sepnrntor ine.-ins to them In dollars and runts. Now. If you wen in need of legal ml vice, yon would go to a lawyer. If you were slrk you would eonsult a doetor. If you had the toothaehc you would rail on a dentist. Why? Hera use these men are all s|»ee|alls!s in tlielr line, and you rely upon their judgment and skill. When It eomes to buying a separator why not profit by the experlem e of the erenmcryman ? Ills expert... dualities him to advise you cor n etly. lie knows wlileli separator will give yon the best service and he the most ceouomloal for you to Imy. That’s why of the world’s ereamerles use the UK I.AYAI. exeluslvely. Then ran Is no heller reeommeiidatloii for the UK I.AYAI. than the faet that the men who make tin separation of milk a business use the l»K I.AYAI. to the praetleal exclusion of all other makes of separators. THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 164 Broadway. New York. JSfetv young Men's styles in Smart Spring Clothes Chas. Stem Company, ATHgeorg.a You who are particular as to the little niceties of dress and general appearance will find exactly what you are looking for In the new “Schloss-Haltlniore" models for Spring and Summer. They are designed especially for you: superior in style, fit and attractiveness to anything else you can buy; and they are moderately priced. SCHLOSS BROS. CO. BALTIMORE AND NEW YORK “Correct Clothes for Gentlemen’’ These famous "Sell loss-Balt I more" models are worn by thousands of the best dressed men at the great northern universities like Harvard. Yale, Pennsylvania and Princeton. They are designed by a young man.—a famous Fifth Avenue Custom Tailor, and made with a master's skill. There are hundreds or styles and patterns to choose from,—distinction, class and smartness to all. Remember the name: ,,Schloss-Baltimore." and see them at your first opportunity. Sold In Athens by theSALE’S STUDIO j DYER BUILDING AUGUSTA., GA. For High-Grade Photography, go to SALE’S STUDIO. Mr. Sale’s work stands among the best, and at reasonable prices. College and School work, including Class Pictures, Fraternity Pictures, etc., a Specialty. Enlargements and the highest class Portrait Work. YOU have ii. Unfasten your collar an«l tie—open the neckband ofvour hirt and there it is, right where the collar button ha been pinching and dragging in. You have It, vslkss you arc wcaringtP'-It's a simple little pocket in the xeck-band which prevents the front collar button from touching the neck. You will appreciate this patented feature exclusive to Kauti.kvs Shirts. See the new Spring and Summer Styles at with THE NEW PATENT YOUR OEALERS Also PA UTI.ESS Night Shirt and Pajama —the Co y-doi y kind WHEN IN AUGUSTA MAKE! YOUR HEADQUARTERS AT WHITE’S Everything for Men, including Clothing, Shoes, Haberdashery, Etc. Also everything for your Best Girl.  The lies! Drink in the World i t i i t I I I LET THE I J i I Bernstein Boys | Furnish your Room j and Club Houses | When von return to College, j !-------------------t j 41 LIFETIME FURNITURE” j | BERNSTEIN BROS. | BROAD STREET j tng ftarbtoare ! Company j 53 Peachtree St. Atlanta, Ga. ! ONE BLOCK OF FIVE POINTS j - HEADQUARTERS FOR ■ | “The Very Best” | Sporting Goods j | That of “Reach” Quality j ' Mail Orders Promptly Filled -------------------------------------1 { j Agnes j entt (En liege j jDcratur, (Georgia ! Catalog ou application | 3f. 3d. Games. 3D. ®.tXXA. j Pmihrut jTHE ATLANTA DENTAL COLLEGE At the Corner of Edgewood Ave. and Ivey Street Occupies a newly erected building put up expressly for this school eight years ago. The building is modern in construction and appointment and has the largest floor space and the largest equipment of any school devoted to teaching dentistry in the State. The college is located close in and surrounded with good homes for students, and convenient to operatory practice. THE ATLANTA DENTAL COLLEGE is the only dental school in the State that does not admit negroes in its operatory and does not require its students to work for them. THE ATLANTA DENTAL COLLEGE is the only school in the State that has graduates in the U. S. army dental corps—only two from the South and both from this school. THE ATLANTA DENTAL COLLEGE is the only school of dentistry in the State that has an annual attendance of over 200= practically doubling other Southern competitors—WHY IS IT? THE ATLANTA DENTAL COLLEGE is a School of Dentistry, by Dentists, for Dentist —largest school in the State—leading school of the South. Features: Large New College Building, Complete New Library, New Practical Porcelain Department, Heavy Operatory Clinic, Exclusively White Patients, Monthly Examinations and Daily Recitations, Experienced Teachers and Demonstrators. ( 4 WRITE FOR SOUVENIR CATALOGUE ANO FURTHER PARTICULARS TO WILLIAM CRENSHAW, D.D.S., DEAN. P. O. 942 ATLANTA, GA.OOQ o a a th Electric City Engraving Co. B UFFALO, N.Y. ------to------ G WE MADE THE ENGRAVINGS FOR THIS BOOK.r I i - . . _ ! L. A. WHIPPLE ) ) ! 1 Georgia Vitrified Brick j I | (U. of Ga. 98) ( i ') ) » Clay Go. I ATTORNEY IS » J) i AT LAW High Grade Vitrified j| Material )) HAWKINSVILLE jj Works at CAMPANIA J GEORGIA N jo j (irnrrul Practice Notary in Office I i — 1 » H t) GENERAL OFFICES, jj Augusta, - Georgia jj jj 1 I have all the latest im- Jjj proved Goodyear Machinery I also repair everything that’s made of Leather. MAX M. HUBERT Phone No. 1010 120 Clayton St. )}} —J fit (f 111 ))) » « ») « Hi » ftbelHewGasb Sboe Store Formerly MALLORY’S { Popular priced Shoes j; that look as well and wear as well as those higher priced. 465 Broad Street ATHENS, GEORGIA$ A I Z A .1. s I A : i : : X i i x a x Y A : x x s A. V. CLIFTON PORTRAIT . . j • Photographer 128 COLLEGE AVENUE STUDIO PHONE RESIDENCE PHONE 443-2 859-J THE ATLANTA JOURNAL your paper Be sure to have it follow you The Journal covers Dixie like the dewEmpire State Chemical Company (INCORPORATED) FERTILIZERS E. R. HODGSON. Praildanf. U. ol Ga. Clan 'SS. E. R. H00GT0N. Jr.. Vlca-Praiidenf, U. of Ga. Class '92. HARRY HOOGSON. S«c . Trias.. U. of Ga. Class '93. ATHENS. GEORGIA LATEST SPRING IDEAS IN FOOTWEAR For Men, Women and Children We would like to call your attention to our line of Shoes for Spring, as it is one of the most complete ever shown in this city. Having taken great pains in selecting this stock we feel sure we can give you just what you are looking for in shoes. No matter what kind of style or leather you want, we have it. Athens Shoe Company SIGN OF THE SHOE 259 Clayton Street. Athens, Georgia J( ( ( ( ( ( ( Q-ROOM Most Up-to-date Equipment for Pool and Billiards—Clean, Comfortable Soda Fount in Connection COSTA’S DRINKS, CIGARS Q-ROOM COLLEGE AVENUE ATHENS, GEORGIA h I) j | j ) ) ii i! )) )) )» ))) )» i ONE FOURTH Wear made - to - order CLOTHES TAILORED BY International Tailoring Go. The largest Tailoring concern in the world CHICAGO NEW YORK  I-I 


Suggestions in the University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) collection:

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1909 Edition, Page 1

1909

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1910 Edition, Page 1

1910

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1911 Edition, Page 1

1911

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1913 Edition, Page 1

1913

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1914 Edition, Page 1

1914

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1915 Edition, Page 1

1915

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.