University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1910

Page 1 of 308

 

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1910 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 308 of the 1910 volume:

  •v E.L. lHH»CH't ' - —PANDORA 1910 VOLUME XXIII. Published by the Students OF THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA ATHENS, GEORGIA.lKfs pi I'lolHn tbe name of ever? lo?al alumnus of tbe iriniversit? of (Seorgia since 1882 anb of tbe present stubent bob?, tbe ebitors of tbe 1910 panbora lov-ingl? bebicatc tbis volume to flniss Sarah Hbcltnc jfrterson, tban whom tbe "Universlt? bas never bab a more faithful servant or one who bas won a warmer place in tbe hearts of all whom sbe bas touebeb.VCbitorS of $anbora Volume XXIII, IOIO Editors-in-Ci i ikk: •John Moore Walker. A A E II. Abit Nix Art Editor: Ilujrh Kin«r Allen, A N Associatk Fred ( Allen. l» A (- Aubrey Matthews. F. I . H. Hughes Spalding. X l 0. Milledjre Gresham. A T Q 1). Kobe Editors: K. I While. K A Corbin C. Small. I K A Eugene S. Taylor. K A Henry A. Newman. X 'k I Cummin". Ih'SINKSS Manaukr : Komney H. Campbell. CUUoutar 1009-1910. SEPTEMBER 11.- Faculty moots. SEPTB.MBER 13-16.— Entrance examinations. SKPTBMBKR 15.-—Recitations begin in all departments. NOVEMBER 25.—National Thanksgiving Day. DECEMBER 23.—Christmas Recess begins at noon. JANUARY 4. — Recitations begin for second term. Cotton school begins second session. JANUARY 19.—Birthday of (Ion. Robert K. Lee. FEBRUARY ID. -One hundred and ninth anniversary of the Demosthen-ian Society. FEBRUARY 21.—Kxercises in commemoration of the founding of the Domosthenian and Phi Kappa Literary Societies. FKBRl’ARY 22.--Washington’s birthday: ninetieth anniversary of the founding of Phi Kappa. MARCH ID. Second Term ends. APRIL 27.—North Carolina Debate. APRIL ID. Freshman Debate. APRIL 22. Sophomore Debate. APRIL 23-30.—Cadets go to Gainesville for annual encampment. JUNK 7.—Board of Visitors meets. JUNK 10.—Board of Trustees meets. JUNK 9-11. — Bntrance examinations. COMMBNCB.MENT PROGRAM. JUNK 11.—8:30 p. m.. Sophomore declamation contest. JUNE 12.—11:00 a. m.. Baccalaureate Sermon. 8:30 p. m.. Y. M. C. A. Commencement sermon. JUNE 13. —10:30 a. m.. Under-graduate exercises. 4:00 p. m.. Military exercises and prize drill. 8:30 p. m.. Champion debate. JUNE 14.—10:00 a. m.. Business meeting of the Alumni Society. 12 m.. Oration before Alumni Society. 4:30 p. m.. Junior Orations: Delivery of Sophomore Cup. June 15.. WEDNESDAY.— Commencement Day. 10:00 a. m.. Senior and Law Orations. Valedictory. Iiaccalaureate address. Conferring of degrees. Summer vacation begins.(gobernment of UniberSitp of (Georgia Tin government of the Cniversity of Georgia. I»v Act of tin General Assembly, approved August 2:1. 1889. is vested in a Board of Trustees. appointed by the Governor for a term of eight years, and confirmed by tin Senate. The Board consists of one member from each Congressional District of the State, four from the State at large. and two from the city of Athens. The Governor and the Chairman of tin Board of Directors of the School of Technology, the Georgia Normal and Industrial College, and the Colored Industrial College are ex-oflieio members of the Board. The immediate control and management of each of tin departments of the Cniversity situated elsewhere than at Athens is entrusted (subject to general control by the Cniversity Trustees) to a “Local Board” or Commission.” the number of members, mode of appointment and terms of office of which vary. The Cniversity Trustees meet in stated annual session on the Thursday preceding the Commencement Sunday, and at other times at their pleasure. The present organization of tin Hoard is as follows: llis excellency. Gov. .Juskimi M. Bkowx. Atlanta. Ex-Ollieio. Gkokck F. Gobkk. Marietta. From the State at Large. C1..AKK HoWKlJ,, Atlanta. From the State at Large. Wim.iam E. Simmons. Lawrcncevillo. From the State at Large. Hamilton .McWiioktkk. Athens. From the State at Large. Sami kl B. Adams. Savannah. 1st Congressional District. Byuo.n B. Bowkk. Bainbridge. 2nd Congressional District. Dri i.kv M. llroiiKs. Danville. 2d Congressional District. IIkxky Fkksons. 'Pa I hot ton. 4th Congressional District. Term Expires Aug. 12. 1915. Term Expires Aug. 12. 1915. Term Expires Aug. 12. 1911. 'Perm Expires Aug. 12. 1912. Term Expires Aug. 12. 1912. Term Expires Aug. 12. 1912. Term Expires Aug. 12. 1912. 'Perm Expires Aug. 12. 1911. IIkxky I). McDanikl. Monroe. Chairman. 5th Congressional District. Term Expires Aug. 12. 1911.AucirxTirs O. Bacon. Macon, 6th Congressional District Term Kxpires Aug. Id. 101'). David B. Hamilton. Koine. 7th Congressional District. Term Kxpires Aug. id. PM 5. .John T. Xkwton. Penitington. 8th Congressional District. 'Perm Kxpires Aug. id. PM 1. Howard Thomi son, Gainesville. Oth Congressional District. 'Perm Kxpires Aug. id. PM 5. Bowdrkv Piiini .v. Augusta. 10th Congressional District. Term Kxpires Aug. id. PMo. John Y. Bknnktt. Wayemss. 11 Hi Congressional District. 'Perm Kxpires Aug. id. PM 5. Jamks Wiiitk. Alliens. Resident Trustee. 'Perm Kxpires Aug. Id. PMo. Harry Hodoson. Athens. Kesident Truste c. Term Kxpires Aug. id. 1017. Gkokok Fostkk I'kaim»i»y. New York. By Special Act of the (ieneral Assembly. Lite trustee . Xatiianiki, K. Harris. Macon. President Board of Trustee's ol‘ School ol Technology. Kx-()flieio. 1 Ion. Jamks M. Di'DRKK. .Montc .iinm. Presieleut Be»ard I Commissioners Georgia Normal and Industrial! College . Bx-Oflieio. Pktkr Y. Mki.drim. Savannah. President of Board of Commissioners Industrial College for Colored Youths. Kx-Oflicio. II. II. Pkkky. Gainesville. President Board of Trustees of North Ucorgiai Agricultural College. Kx-OHicio. Hknry I). McDaniki.. Chairninii. Thomas V. Kkkd. Simlary ami Tr asun r. Y Y Y I Y I Y i Y I T IV T IY I Y • Y Y. Y Y vi TQZi)t UntberSitp Jf acuity David Cuknxiiaw Harrow. (’. ami M. K.. LL.D. (’liana liar, Alfred Akkkman. A.B., M.F. Frofissor of Forestry. Joskimi Alexander Atkin's. 2d Lieutenant Kith t’. S. Infantry, Coin nuindant of ('mills. Samtel Caldwell Benedict. Ml).. Dean of ih('ollcyr (,f Fhnrniacy ami Frofissor of Mahria Medico. Homer Van Valkkniu’ro Black, A.B.. IMi.L)., Adjunct Frofissor of Chemistnj. James Camak Bloomfield. M.l).. Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. Wii.uk IIknry Bocock. A.M.. Mitt (dye Frofissor of Audi nl Lanyuaycs. Bokert Preston Brooks. 15.A.. (Oxon.). Adjunct Frofissor of (ieoryia History amt Sneioloyy. Dinoan BcRNETT. Librarian. John Pendleton Campbell. A.15.. IMi.l).. Frofissor of Hiotoyy. Andrew Jackson Cobb. A.15.. 15.L.. Lecturer on Conslilillioniil Laic and Leya! Frondure. Ikiaii Harroi.d Davenport, 15.S.. Adjunct Frofissor of Fhysics and Electrical Enijint erinij. ItoKKKT J. II. DeLoacii. A.M.. Frofissor of Cot ton Industry. Marion Debeu.k I)rBosk. A.15. A.M.. I nsl met or in Entjlisli Lanyuayi and Teutonic Fliiloloyy. John Uiciiard Fain. 15.S.. Frofissor of Erpi rinif ntal Ayronoiny. Thomas Fitzoerald Breen. 15.L.. Frofessor of Lair.Ernest Lee Okioos. (OrmRuite V. M. I.). Adjunct Professor of Civil Engine! ring and Draicing. Jamks Force Haut. Jr., B. S. K. K. Adjunct I’roftssor of Cur in Mechanics. Jonas Hite, M.S.. Din dor of Extension Work of Agricalt unit College. William Davis Hooper. A..M.. Professor of Lai in. Milton Preston Jahxagin. B.K.. Professor of Animal Husbandry). Joseph Lpstrat. Bach. ex Ijctt. Professor of Romance Languages. Thomas Ucbbard Me Hatton, Sc.I)., Adjunct Professor of Horticulture. John Hanson Tiiomas MoPiikrson. A.B.. Ph.D.. Professor of History and Political tide nee. and Lecturer in Roman Laic. Robert I,icon McWhorter. A.B.. A..M., Instructor in Latin and Creek. .John Morris. A.M.. I’rofcssor of English Language and Teutonic Philology. Sylvan i s Morris, A.M.. Dean of the Lair Department and Professor of Lair. V. I). Posey, A.B.. Instructor in Matin niaties. Robert Emory Park. Jr.. A.M.. Lilt.I).. Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature.. William Oscar Paynk. A.M.. Adjunct Professor of IIistorg and Political Science. .John Moore Readk. Pli.I).. Professor of Colony. Sanford Mkddick Salyer. A.B.. Instructor in Rhetoric and English Literal lire. Steadman Vincent Sanford. A.B.. Junior Professor of Rhetoric anil English Literature. Charles Mercer Snkllino. A.M. Dean of Franklin Collcgi and Professor of Mathematics.Roswell Powell Stephens. Pll.I).. Adjunct Professor of Mathematics. JosEIHI SpEXCEK STKWAKT. A.M.. Professor of Secondary Education. (-IIAKLES Moirrox Stkaiiax. C. 3111(1 M. K.. Professor of Cirit Enyinct riny. Andrew McXaikn Socle. B.S.A.. 'resident of the Stale College of Ayrieultare and Hit Mechanic Arts, and Dean of tin Col It ye of Ayrieult a re. John Shipley Tilley, A.M., Fellow in English. IIknky Clay Wiiith. Pli.I).. Sc .I).. D.C.L.. LL.l).. Professor of Chemistry and Terrell Professor of Ayrieult and Clu mistry. Rupert (Vm.mino Wilson. PIi.(J.. Instructor in Theoretical and Practical Pharmacy. Thomas .Jackson Woofter, A.M.. Pli.l).. Professor of Philosophy and Education and Superintendent of the Summer School. Cokxelics ArorsTCs Wells. M.S.. Petiole in Chemistry.Infllcinortam Ibowell Cobb a. no., b. x. 1842=1909Hn fflletnortam Hugustus Xongstueet IbuU a. nn. 1847-1909“Ho struggled t«» kiss lior. She struggled tin same To prevent him so bold and undaunted; But. as smitten bv lightning. lie beard her exclaim, “Avaunt, sir!" and he avaunled. But when he returned, with the fiendishest laugh. Showing clearly that he was affronted. And llueatencd by main force to carry her off. She cried “ Don’t!” and tin poor fellow donted. When he meekly approached, and sat down at her feet, Playing loudly as before he had ranted. That she would forgive him. and try to be sweet. And said, “Can’t you?" and the dear girl recanted. Tlun softly he whispered. “How could you do so? I certainly thought I was jilted; lint come thou with me. to tin1 parson we'll go; Say, wilt thou, my dear?" and she wilted.SENIOR CLASS HISTORY UK history of ;i class should lu» more than a mere recital of facts, however artistically embellished by the writer. Indeed, in thinking of the history of the Senior Class, thoughts of a serious nature arc called up. If we boast at all. it should be of the training we have received, of the honest work we have done, and the higher ideals which we have striven to realize. Four veal's of academic training is something that is not to be regarded lightly. Some of us have gained such experience through specialized activity as will serve immediate ends. We have all. however, received an education upon such broad and liberal lines as will make us eminently more lit as citizens upon whom must rest the cares and responsibilities of the State. The standard of scholarship which we have attained stands as evidence of the work we have done. We have worked earnestly and conscientiously, and we believe it is but a matter of time until such labor bears its fruits. It has 1)0011 said that the true University cherishes ideals. This could have hardly been better said than of the University of Georgia. There is a certain spirit, born of a glorious past and fostered by noble traditions, that seems to cling around the old institution. Here is preserved the spirit of the old South, and here has arisen the spirit of the new. From these walls have come those who when the crises have arisen have led us safely through the storm. If we look into the future, peradventure we might sec the devlopmcnt of a great state, and coming from these walls those who shall lead it on to tin realization of its highest ideals. In this great work the Class of 1910 stands ready to lend its aid. Through service to its State and through service to its Alma Mater it is prepared to answer the call. —Historian.Senior-Class Officers MaeDonclI. A. I .. . Lanham. II. L......... Steele. W. II.. Jr.. . . Garrard. William. Jr.. . Falk. Washington. Jr.. Allen. F.C............ Dick. S.K.,Jr......... President. ’ ice- President. See ret ary Treasurer. Poet. Historian.THOMAS WOOD ABBOTT, A.II.. I'.f.L.. Iioiuosthenlnn. ATLANTA. (iA. Kntored Sophomore: Junior »rntor: eshlent «.f Dfiuost 111 ■ n 1: 111 Literary i-lfiy. Thou li:is( it plt u IftiI l:n-k of wit." FBFI). AI.LKX, It.S.. (Mil Pelta Theta. IMil Kappa. IIKCNSWH'K. (iA. Kntorei! Sophomore: member Stone Mountain Club, Casque ami Cauntlet. I tout Iii ir ('lub. Crhllrou Club. Junior Cabinet; Assistant Munnirer of Traek Tt'jiin ISHIS.iKi. Cerinnu Club Kepreseu-lut!v«‘. Assoeiate 1-Ml tor Pandora. SoeiaI :iihI Associate Killtor lied mill Itlaek. Kdltordn-Cldef Ued anil Itlaek. "And now. full luillcs. one and nil. Milieu." FBI 'I). W. BALL. It. S. Air.. Pcmosthenlnn. i rr .cKKALi . :a. "I ilnre not be too busy with my prnises. They’re dangerous things to deal with."I)AVI 1 FIIAXCIS IIAHUOW, Chi I’lil. 1 ifiitosl lien Ian. ATHKNS. HA. Knteivd l' ivs!iiiiiln Srpt. 1!MC»; Crad-unto .1 iiin l'.ilO. A.It. :iml B.S. Ill Civil Miijrl n tt rl ii ir. "(I sllflHf. SWffl III SlllillV." JOHN' IIOL.MICS HOCOCK. A. It.. Kii| |i:i Alpliii. I'lii Kappa. ATHKNS. CA. Corp. mid 2nd Seri:. Corps Cadets: Class Itascliall Team: Circulation .Mur. lied and Itliick: Sophomore and Junior I lop Committees: Vlre-1’resident C.er-man Clnli: .Meinher Alpha Siunni I’lii: .1 un l«f i Ca Id lift: Itoatlnu Clnli: Cnx«|iie and (iaunllfl : Tlialians. "Since every Jafk I...ana a jrcnt If inn u : There Is many a uenllc person made a •lark." F. liAXIFK HKAXSOX, It.S.C.K.. Cl.I I»sl. I'll Kappa ATIIKNS. HA. Von Cassius Inis a Iran and Im look."IMCISCY MODISH DAVIS, A.It.. I’. l’.K.. Deiiiostlieiilan. HoWLlX'S KKKKN. KY.. Filtered Junior Class. "Ills virtue was silvern." SAMIKI, Ki: XY DICK, .IK., it s., cm iMii, riii Ksippii. MAKCMTTA. DA. Knter« d Freshman: Member Itoathm Club; Member ('usque mid Daunt lot: Member Alpha Slirma I’lii: Member Junior Cabinet: Manager Sophomore Football Team 'ns; Cotillion Club ’(is; .luiilor Hop Committee ’tut; Klee Club ’u.s. (r.i. i ); Froperty Maim tier Klee Club 'us.'tip; Cerimiu Club Itepreseutatlve 'IIH-MO; Co-CIliiplalli Senior Class '10. “Hear ami believe! Tliine own Importamo know." WASHINGTON FAlilv. .IIS.. A.It.. I’lil Kappa. SAVANNAH. !A. Freshman Debater: Sophomore ! baler: Sophomore Deebilmer: Corpt Co. D. Sergeant Co. A. 1st I,lout Oh Co. A.: Assoelate Kill tor (Jeorirlan 1 'tut: I-hlltor-ln-Chlef Cenrirlan ’OtC Ceor ian Verse Prize. 'Oil; Junior 1 inet. Senior Kouml Table. "He was a pretty poet too; anil il took him forward lirst Then alas, the muse forsook him."HKN1HOKSOX If. «. IjIjOWAV, H.S.. K:i| i :i Alpha. I'lii Kappa. 4oiins »n city. tbxx. Kutomt l''r« slnn:ui: Alpha Slmim I'lii; Carman Club (Vmmilt!«•« ; Cotillion Com-millf »: Crlillron Club; Alanaircr l'.M« I'oolIniII 'IVnIII. "Oh Mint i t( riinl want of pfitiv that vex as puhllf men."WILLIAM (SAItKAIll). IK.. B.S.. Clil fill, riil Knppu. SAVANNAH. ISA. Kntercil Sophomore; Alpha Sigma l lil: Clee ('lull 'os.'Oti.'K): Property Manager liliH1 Cluli "CISI.'IH; A t; 11 m 1411111 :iii (I (lllltur dull 'us.V.i.MO, Leader 'OS-IK : As.hu-«-11ie Ivliior (iiHiri:lnii: Senior Hop Coin-iiiltlee 10; 1 01 1 Senior (Miish 10. "Hi wiis it pretty poet too." WILLIAM Ml'ItlCAY ill SO. lt.S.A., fill Kuppn. ATfllTSTA. A. •'Ills yult Is us one hi special haste.' o. .millkihh; ;iu:sham It.S.C.K., Alpha Tilu Omega. I hl Ki W A Y N KS ISO ltd. (IA. "Why here Is love’s tame niadne MlttHXI) I . HALL. A.It.. honmsthonlan. LAFAYKTTK. CA. President Ymnitf Mon’s Christian As « H-i:illuli. IWW-’IO. "Woo lo (Ills editor! Woo I say!” THOMAS ALHKKT ll. Kltl'II, It. S. Atcrloiilturo. COMMKIK’K. CA. "His stiltiiii Is thus 111:1 ri»lCtisl. ' J. I . JON MS, It.S.. Plil Kn) | :i. ItOMK. «SA. Kntorod Fresh 111:111 Class In I'.kiT : Freshman Debater: Sophomore I I in - or: .Innlor Orator: Impromptu Debater: Champion I»ol.a tor: Proslilont I ’III Kappa 1.Horary Sooletjr: Sergeant ami l.loutommt Company D. "lie was a man more sinned against than sinning.”1li: l)KKS() LAMIA M, .J A.15.. I’lil Kappa. IIO.M!•:. C.A. Kntvml Sopli..in.nv: Sergeant (’ 1,Ini(.'iinnt o. : Secret arv. Trin ami I'reshleiit of I’hl Kappa; I’reslilent of Senior Class; Mcnilic: lor iCouml Table: Member l ella I N. ( Debate; Member of Sphinx. " . hails! (lion, rrut'l! been rontr seise Hairs less In sight. or any hair these."i ki sciiruz u i: r,. nr,itz. H.S.. I'lil Km i'humiu s. KiiIitinI Sophomore I’hiss, full I'.hiT : Sophomore Ihs-lainier: .lunlor orator; Vliv-I’roshlenl ami Member of Connell: I’lii K: | | :i I.. S.; Vlee- I’reshlenl Mils-i’oilnty flub: I’resident I'nlver-■dials I leiitxeher Verein : 11111»i 1111• 111 In . Imlrr "Iit' '10; Senior I’asebull S |iiiii) : MfinlMT Cerele l-’ru neats: Member Cni- « rslt I 'abaters’ I.« ;»irin . I speak with « i)iin iit furee." CIIAKLKS OYKItTON’ IjOWK. It.S., C.K., I’hl Kappa. S. A.K. AICISTA. OA. Seeretary Athletle Assm'latlon ItKlti; First Sergeant ami Captain Co. It.: Senior Hop i'oiiiinitti'o lino. "Wllilt a proper Itmly there was without brains to jruhle It." wwi rat mk’m;u, . . M KM I’ll IS. TKNN. Women ami men, ho strove alike to slum."IIOBKIIT HI VIN Md’M HI'], H.S.. Pill Kappa. I)l‘1.1'Til. (SA.. H.F.D. No. 2. You speak as If slie lo ei| smn« oilier. I lien." AMiXAXDHH It. MucDOXHLIj, A.IS.. Chi Pill. Pill Kappa. SAVANNAH, 5A. Freshman Jiehaler; Sophomore | e-elalmer: Cliamploii Debater: Impromplii Debater; Member of liebalers League; Kxchange IM11 or and P.uslness Malinger of Keil ami Hlack ; Historian of the Sophomore Class: Historian of the Junior Class; President of the Senior Class: Preshleut of Phi Kappa Society; President of the Honor Hoard; member of tln» Junior Cabinet: Senior Hound Table; Casque and Cauntlet; Hunting Club; Mandolin and C,altar Club; Chairman of Senior Hop Committee. “Now In his mouth he carries pleasing words.” hoy xka I, McMillan. H.S.. I'. P. L.. Deinostlienlan. ATLANTA. HA. Member Hits- Club ’OT-’OX; Mm Hand ,0T-’OS”nlJ-’10; Member Maid and Hultar Club ,07-,»X.,( !». HI; Mei Track Team. "Hold! thou curly pate!"✓ CIIAItLKS XAIMKIt, .MACON. GA. H.S.C.K.. K:i|»|»n Alpha. I’ll! Kappa. “For patio;;. not for Isilkluyr. Is my mouth."HK.NKY A. MIW.M.W, Chi INI. !icinoslIii iil:iii. ATLANTA. CA. Filtered Freshman: Member Alpha Slirnin I'lii: Member .limlor Cabinet ; Killlor. Associate IMItor. Kd-Itor-lii-Chlcf. !:«• ! mu) lil.uk: Member linn tin;; Chib: Associate Kdilor Pandora Member n ti|u« and Ciiiiiii- l« l : Member Senior Pound Table. "TIs I In- that e.a rly taints (lie female Solll. ) list riicl tl.e I'Vrs Ilf f:ilr (Mil I lift !• : to mil.” 11 OS I-:. A HIT IX. A.li.. I « iin.x( lii iil:iii. I'OMMHIWK. »A. Filtered Freshman : Historian Frcsli-111:111 Class: !«•»•-President Sophomore Class: President of .limlor ('hiss; Winner of Fn'slnnmi Scholarship Medal; First St'i'Ki'iinl Co. A. '11 ptn111 t'o. A. l'lilverslty Corps Cadets; Secretary. Critic. Treasurer. mol President of 1 icinosllicnlnn Society: Member of Dem-ostlii-nlmi Triliun:il; Winner of Sophomore Deleters Meilnl; lniproin|itu I el»:iter. ‘d!i- 10: Master of tVrenionles Freshman l ehate, ’Oil; Master of Ceremonies Champion Debate. ’Oil; Memlier of I nl ersitv I inhalers League; Treasurer V. M. C. a.: liuslness Mummer 'Hie ljeil am) lilaek. ’Oil; Treasurer Sli'ina Fpsllon; Peprescntat ivc to Slu-111:1 Fpsllon Convention. Si vanee. 'Oil; Kdltor-ln-Cldef of Famlora, I«»: .Memlier of Honor hoard: Mem her of Crlil-Irmi Cluh: Memher of .luiiior Cahlnet: Memlier of Senior K011111! Table: .Member of Delta Delta: Member of Sphinx. "Cry yon mercy sir. tls your nese. It showed like the trunk of a younjr elephant." KKANCIS X. IWVKSICII. AT1IKNS. CA. 15.S.. I’ll! Kappa. He was as fresh as In the m :tthc of May."..’IJJIUJ Ilf lie HI»A 0||., ll|.U.»A-4.H|.»K1II.H | -M if)|s.i.iA|ii | in’ :w.-so. wj«|Miir,| jojij,h n - ,in,,s,s • Y !|f ■ ».) IN, -jiiimxi.k •iiumljo.) . !«). M-'xj.i, -,| Ain:,III,o’, •ol S’ .;-"- M-iwjj. : j.i •V!) V»L V'l.LV •iiM'-M I'M ‘ S S| •JCOSAMM MXV1W M5IVIMVJI aa'.tiil|| .Vtil ll| )iii:i|. j iii v Klt.w ,a •Xll|l| ls JO J.W|MI. | :oi.MUl.-so » 1I.H|IV JO l|.MIII|.» )M|| OI||.t|V |KJ|,.| .Il|) JO MIUII.W.IIS JO |UK«|| ."ll JO J.hiiii.mii "'•'puis :iso. iiiim.i, ||i:«|.isi:j| JO j,inniiii|V ;«J0. HUB,.I .UB'I JO|l|.IS JO |II.I|I|S.I.I,| : Sll. .»X|J,| A 0|OI(. . 's,| ||%ISNil ,| O.IIMOII i" J«llll||a : JlltM.-VI.IS A.I|KII|IIJ.I|J|:||(, •v •«!., |iuoi|joa III •wjji.i,| -y,- J, '!»!« ',XK| ii| .su .ui • ! :| .on t|I|a I ••|I!|||Hl|IMIII|K.Ua.| |».M »|IIM 'V: m.)I. :ivii 'in.|i:.»i|inoik.xJ "S’SI "'I'll ii 'ihixvu |»| A tip .tl|| II" -U.HJ .».f pill,IX . l|. .. ‘III:|• I. 11 jsolll.li | jo |U.ip|S.»J(| |»lllt '|IM| |K.U,| .U|. 'lll!|JI»,ll« IUII||4 II, | ‘KIIUV |i« jii i:.»rlj,K; : | u|. a" I ii no,, u|nniu..| jo |ll.ip|K.U1| pllll |ll.tp|S.»J,|-.k | : K||I|III,J Jo i|joa, iiiim j.is Jo|oa, A" ‘o., |iui»|joa) Vf» ■ i».i,sao:i iiii|II.»I||xiiiii.|(| ••ji v M A V«l K SHKVf IMMSOrII. V. KKYXOLKS, JR.. A.lt.. K:i | | ;1 AI |»ll:l. Pill Kappa. MAKIF.TTA. ISA. Kntered .Inulor: Mouther of Kappa Alpha Fraternity: MciiiIht of Kumry rtnli: Kxehango Kdltor of lied and Itlnek: President of Collators Hoagne; Member of Senior Hound Table: .Mem-her of ( :ISI|IK and (laillltlot ; Member of Crldlron Club. "For a woman Is only a woman. Ilul a good elgar Is a smoko. ’ lODU AKI) .1. KOIIICSOX, It.S.C.K.. l’hl Kappa. Alpha Tan Onn 'ii. WIXDKH CA. Filtered Sophomore: Class Hasohall Tennis W-'IW; Captain Junior Class Foothall Toani: W'lnnor .lunlor Forest• ry Prize; Varsity Traok Toam 0s. 0!»: Varsity Foothall Toani ot : Asst. Manager Hasohall T'oam 'IK : I’rosldont Ath-lollo Assoolatloli: Slinlont .Momhor of Athlotlo Con noil. 1! I0. "Ills smile was as the springtime" KDW.AKI) SCOTT Sl',1,1,. H.S.A.. I loniost hon Inn. IIOSCIITON. CA. Filtered Freshman, Sergeant Co. I). President Agrlenli oral Sooloty. Asso-elnle Kill tor and Fdltor-ln-Chlof of the ceorgln Agricultural (Quarterly. "Now young no more, retired to views well known."MOSIvS SM'SKV, 15.S.. I’ll! Kappa. AICISTA. CA. Kiilmi! I'i-nstininii: Assistant Man-ajror Trunk T nhi ‘ov Assistant Itusi-iioss Afanauor » norj;lun ’IIS-'tut; iliinlncss Afit ii.-i k« » Coorjrlun '«!»-’Ill; Troaxuror KIoIiiiioihI Aoailoin.v 1 «il»: AIimiiIht of l-'ra non Is. ,v«ii hit too so von a oonsuror Of Into in all | 111ts." SILAS HUNKY ST.XHIt, It. S. A|T.. lUnnuxllionlnu. Knloro«l l' rn liniun; Corporal ami Color Sorttoant In Corps of ('allots; AVIn-nor of SophonioiT Soliolarslilp; Prosl- 1 onl of Aitrloulturnl Sooloty; MoiiiIkt of Slooo i. • AIA.NS| ||:i.|,t ,;A of Stout Mountain Clnii.4 "Ho wlsliisl frlouils to "’lion stilt i„. • Tilts KtVOO| ami so moot. Jlioujrht shall oaso I In fount lo his nr. It.S.C.K.. I oniostlionlan. Kappa SI; HAl'AYKTTK. CA. Kntorisl Sopliomoio; Sopliotuoiv olaiinor. Soo y Y. M. C. A.. Soryoant C. I.ioiiloiiiiiil Co. It.. Asst. I’.usli Alanajror Kn 'lnoorliii; Annual '«» .»; Malta cor Kntrhnvrliii: Annual ‘10; S anil Troasuror Soulor Class; Alain Traok Toam 11 ; Spoakor 'Tnlvor "hay" CoiniiKUUTinoiil, lUlo. "Ills fallings woi-o a era III of i.rt.tK. S. TAYMIlt, A.ffi.. Kappa Simula. 1 MmiiosI li« liI:i 11. simmi-miviu.k. •|n foiirlly Kreiieh shall all Ills phrases he." O' !-: VAN WV K, .lit., (Mil I’sl. I 'hi Kappa. ANDKKSO.N. S. C. Kntered Sophomore: Memher Corman (Mali: .Memher ( l lllloii Committee; .Memher Casque anil Cnuutlet; Member Senior Koiiml Malde; Winner D.A. II. Cup. lIKKi; Assoelale Kdltor Oeor-jrlan; Kdltor-in-Chlef (leorjrlnn. "When I was younjr. I cave my mind. Ami piled myself to fruitless poetry." joiin .moori: vAi.Ki-:it, A.I ... Slums Alpha Kpsiloii. 1 li 1 Kappa. MACON. (IA. "A little learning Is a dangerous tiling."ItOltKKT I . WIIITK, A.It.. Pill l :ipp:i. Kappa Alpha, wiiitkiiall. K11I T I Sophoinnro; I mini Major: I'roxhlont (i.M.A. Club: 'a pin 111 Junior ItilMOhrill Ton III: Cns |IIO nil l Sil lllit l l : MoiiiIkt of Itoutliu; Club: Ailjuiaiit Corps of I'ixlrlx: I :i 11 llollonl Hop-rosontntlvo; Assonlnto Kill I or HIIO I’siii- lorn Itonnl. "Costly Cliy habit ns tliy pnrso nn buy. Itnt not oxpross’il In fanoy; rloli. not trninly: For tin up pair I oft pr H liiliiis tin 111:111. JOHN DAVIS Vlljlil. ill. M, IS.S.. Kappa Alpha, I liI Kappa. ATLANTA. CA. Knl r l Soplionioro: Corpornl Co. C. 1st Sorgoaiil C ». C. Ciipt. Co. C. Corps of Cioh-ts: Asst. Miiuatfor io Footliall Ton in: .Monihor ' s Foot ha II Ton in; Chairman .Military ilo| Cnininltloo; MoiiiIkt Coating Cluh; Mcinbor Junior Cnlilnot. "Far linr TOiit ho from tho lull phulliiK trlbo."THE RIME OF THE ANCIENT BRIDGE PLAYER It is an ancient Bridge Player, Ami he stoppcth one of three. 4 By thy downcast face and furtive eye. Now wherefore stop’st thou me? The Bridge Hoorn doors are opened wide. And I am called within ; The guests are met, the tables set; May’st hear the merry din.’ He holds him with his shaking hand, ‘There was a game,’ quoth he. ‘Hold off! let go. and that right soon!’ Kftsoons his deck dropt In . The Player Guest here heat his breast, Yet lie cannot choose hut hear; And thus spake on that beaten man. That deep dyed Bridge Player. The bell was rung, the game begun. Merrily did we play From Table Head to Table Foot. AH on that woeful day. Some Lady lost up there, above. And she was mad, pardee! Then came she straight, and (oh. the fate!) Stopped right across from me. I “bridged” each time, from hand to hand; 1 had no power to say; The moment that my cards I knew, I saw that which then must I do; I passed the “make” alway. At length did fall a red Ten Spot : From partner’s hand it came. As it was now our only hope. We hailed it with acclaim. ‘God save thee, ancient Bridge Player! From the dame that was thy lot! What didst thou guard?’—with my ofT-eard I lost that red Ten Spot.Oil. 1 had done an awful thing. And il had worked her woe; It made her sick; I I tad lost the triek That up eould make her go! ‘Ah. wrete.li!' said she, ‘the triek to lose. That up ‘‘otihl make us go.' Down drop! her hope, the teal’s were near, ’Twas sad as sad eould he; And we did play only to say We lost not utterly! Trieks. tricks, everywhere. Xor one our hands eould take; Trieks. trieks. every when , The Odd we eould not make. A very “deuce’’ did win: 0 my, That ever this should he! Yea. two spot spades did run around And were not stopped hv me. Alone, alone, all. all alone. T sat and I played my card! And never a hint of pity shone In partner’s cold regard. The many cards, so beautiful! And they all ta’cn did lit ; And a thousand thousand doleful things Thought she; and so did 1. Farewell, farewell, but this I tell To thee, thou Player tall! He playeth well, who taketh well All trieks both great and small. lit playeth best, who ch onset h best 11 is partner in the strife; For this my tale tines say to all: Play never with your wife. Walter McClellanSHOOTING GALLERY There is so much had in the best of ns. and so much more in the rest of us, That it’s just as well for any of us to say what we please 'hout the rest of tis. Deep-versed in hooks hut shallow in himself.—Jno. M. Walker. IIis life was gentle and other things so mixed in him that all might ask what have we here.—A. R. MaoDonell. He came, he saw. he would have conquered, but---Dan McDougahl. 0 leiupora! 0 mores! Why was it sent among us.—Lucile “Crip’ Wisdom. The last of the Allens. Proud race of loiterers.—Fred Allen. The hoary-loeked sage from Koyston.—J. .J. Memory Payne. Two little hoys, in truth they meant no harm.—The .Aloises. After so many years, at last, we murmur 41 An revoir.”—Wallace Wright. Just let him he.—Van Wyek. The worst of his class, hopeless.—Wadley. An example of unheeded hot air.—J. P. Jones. Not dignified, just dull.—Gus Sparks. Here is a modest little hoy. His mamma’s pride, his papa’s joy.- Tom Abbot. Like a camp-follower, still he 1 ingel's. Like a sponge, lie takes it in.—Dan Redfearn. Though you call him thief or rascal, he was never known to take olfenee.— —W. Falk. How pleased is every palfrey elf. To talk about one thing—himself.—Turpin. A self-styled transcendent genius.—Boykin Wright. One of those who do good by stealth and blush to find it fame. —J. D. Willingham. Poor bov. He’s but the shadow of his former self.—Sam Dick. Wise in his own conceit.—W. LcOraw. Divinely tall and most divinely fair.—Henry Newman. More to be pitied than scorned.—Hawkins. His stars did not move to please him.—Blackshear. Solid as a rock with some parts solid hone.—Gumming. Too gentle for much use.—Laulinm. 0 Notoriety! O Notoriety! how many crimes have I committed in thy name? —Reynolds. An adept at unrivaled self-devotion.—“Ral” Miller. Let us stop at this.—K. S. Taylor.OMAR ON POKER (WITH Al'OUXMl-: TO CAROLYN WKU,S.) Como, deal tin Cards. I is but a Friendly Game; Perhaps you think tlu Limit rather Tamo. Hut you will change your Point of View no doubt When leaving by the door wherein you came! For often have 1 thought when Cards ran High If they should raise the Limit then that I Migh make a little Coin. Well, they did. And you may guess the Consequence,—Oh. my! I sometimes think that it is rather Tough To Raise a man who really has tin Stuff. To Raise and Raise and Raise him once again, And then at last for him to Call your Bluff! Four Kings I held once, so I Stood quite Pat; Another Guy drew one. Of course I sat And Bet him ’til 1 hml no more to Bet.— Alas! that Guy Four Aces him begat! Still I played on. nor counting Loss nor Gain. The Music of the Chips a Funeral Strain, I util at last the Game was over and I had to Walk home in the Pouring Rain. So deal the Cards, 'tis hut a Friendly Game To Pass Away the Time (‘tis all the same For Time is Money I have heard them say) And Win or Lose, he Game. Old Boy. he Game! —W. F., Jr.A HISTORY OF THE JUNIOR CLASS KKOKK going any further, let it Ik distinctly understood that tins title is a misnomer. A real history of the Class of Klcvcn would lx? impossible in a work that did not comprise several volumes as large ns this one, and even this number would not entirely do away with the necessity for condensation. We can. then, only glance at a few of those many events that have lightened the years work. In the first place, let us contrast the foundation of two very different organizations—the Masters and Hoys League and the Pyramid Club. These two societies are enough for any one class to contribute to tile University to make itself famous. Then let note lx made of the glorious days of the Freshman Hanquct of the Class of Id. Hut what has that to do with dignified Ip per-Classmen ? Hreathe it not here, lest the shock he too great. Hut a moment for the serious side. This year the .Junior Class has done much toward cementing within itself those friendships that make College life a pleasure and a benefit. She has held high place in every field of activity— scholarship, debate, oratory and athletics. With all this, site has maintained a quiet dignity that has accomplished the greatest thing that a Class can accomplish—an addition to tin Honor and Glory of our University. —HistorianW. S. .1 OX ICS. Officers of Junior Class. W. S. Jones................President. J. II. Powtcv. Jr..........Yiee-President. H. I). Tapper.............Secretary and Treasurer W. 0. Turpin, J r..........II istorian. E. U Pennington, . . . Poet. P. M. Kubenstein. . . . Chaplain.JUNIOR CLASS ROLL, 1910. Allen, R. W. ... Anderson. C. V. Anderson, I . R. Anderson, W. AV Arnold. R. S. ... Arrinoton. II. N. Baker. K........ Barrow. P. C. ... Bartlett, B. Ij. . Belser. I). C. ... BLANTON. G. G. . Brock, I . F.... Brock. S........ Brown. .J. K.... Cheney, I .M.. .Ik. Dallas. R. K. Dancy. W. G. ... Dbadwyi.kr. J. L. Forres. T. II... Fort, V. K..... Foster. J. II. Fraser. V. A. ... (iRIBKKTH. RoY . . . II ANSON. W. L. . . 1 I AIM . W. M.. Harris, K. V. ... Heard, T. V. ... I Ikjiit. G. L.. IIoRNK, I). A... Johnston, R. II. Jones. Y. S.... Kelly, G. L..... Kirhy. W. M. ... LkCraw. C. S. .. LkCraw. J. W. .. Lowrky. J. 11.. Jr Maddox, A. K. .. .MARSIIIU'RN. J. II. Martin, R. R. McBkmork. C. II. Miller. J. II... .... Thonuiston. ........Atlanta. .... Barnesville. ......Danlmrj:. ........Xcwnan. ...........Rome. ......Hartwell. .........Pelham. ..........Dallas. .....Columbus. ........Xetella. .... Gainesville. .....Carrollton. ......Marietta. ......Valdosta. .....La Grange. ........Atlanta. ......Klherton. .. College Park. ......Mt. Airy. .........Monroe. ......Augusta .........Bogart. .. .. Bai uesvillc. ..........Macon. .....Bethlehem. ......Danlmrg. ...........Rome. .........Boston. ........Walden. . .JefTersonvillo. ......Augusta. Brooklyn. X. V. ........Atlanta. ........Atlanta. ....... ugusta. ........Oriftin. .....Way cross. .....Carrollton. ... Mt. Vernon. .........Athens.Moise, K. W...............................................Savannah. Northbn, W. J.. Jk.......................................Atlanta. Osborne. G. (1.............................................Atlanta. Parrish. J. L...............................................Athens. Peacock. 11. B............................................Columbus. Pknninoton. R. L.......................................Madison. Pebiekkr, L. O............................................Svlvania. Piiii.mbs, F. T.................................................St. Marys. Powki.l, .J. It...........................................Svlvania. Itast, L. K................................................Pideock. ItiioDEs, W. B..........................................Louisville. Kick. G. K.........................................Flowery Branch. Riddell. II. K.............................................Atlanta. ItoiiKRTs. B. K...........................................LaGrangc. Rogers. II. S...............................................Athens. Kcbenstein, P. M............................................Athens. Slack, S. B...............................................LaGrange. Slaton. J. J...............................................Atlanta. Small. C. (•.................................................Maeon. Solomons. .1. M.. .Jr.....................................Savannah. Spalding. E. II............................................ tlanta. Stone. C. II................................................Athens. Thompson. I). F.............................................Winder. •Thompson. G. L..........................................Bethlehem. Thurman. .1.(1.........................................Barnesville. Tolnas. (). .1...........................................Brunswick. Troutman. It. B.............................................Athens. Tri’pER. K. I).............................................Atlanta. Turpin. W. C.................................................Maeon. Von Uasseln. B. W..............................Spaitaiiburj;, S. 0. Wadlev. B. I). T.......................................Bolingbroke. Watson. A. II...............................................Dallas. Webster, M. M..............................................Atlanta. Whatley. W. F...............................................Helena. WiiELCHKL. F. C.............................................Coiner. Witman, M. A.................................................Maeon. Wood. It. M..............................................Brunswick. Wright. B. 0.............................................. Augusta. •l r«,i»as«Nl.Ilnffllemortam (5u Xee Ubompson 1891-1909lnfllemorlam Milliam lEbwarb TRbobes 1889=1909ELEVENIAD. Sillin' last, great Muse, presumptuous man did dare, To sing Eleven's might and glory rare: Another year has eome and held his sway. Ploughed deeper furrows, giv’n a lock of gray; Commanded lack of plan and aim to flee. Bade seriousness the Junior’s lot to he; Left aspirations, restless hopes and feai s. And anxious thoughts and dreams of future years; Peer'd at the elements’ conflicting storm, And to the chaos said.—“Assume a form! Strive for a certain goal—a milepost too,— Know now thyself or know what thou shouidst do!” Tis so. hut while we on our courses wind. Let’s retrospective trace the steps behind. Stern and more grave the tenor of our ways. We still gain solace from those happiest days. Clio, 1 beg. the sacred hooks unfold. And guide the pen my feeble fingers hold. When Nineteen Seven’s Sol in heart did yearn No more, like Phaeton’s cart, our race to burn. And from the Maid’s dominions sped his way To when King Libra justly rules the day.— We first appeared upon this campus green— The greatest Freshman class that e’er was seen. Taught soon to exercise the arts of war. We won our crown—and that without a scar. The vengeful Sophomores, stung by defeat. At banquet time did make their woes complete: We sat at meat—tile ruddy cup did glow— And Nineteen Tens did gnash their teeth below. The water-tower which our hosts defied Awoke one morn with “ 'Levon’’ on his side. The Capricorni. under Lucy’s shod. Next morning saw their l eards were black and ml. Enough to say. But ’noath the class-room s roof. We learn’d of many a theorem the proof. Told how the little squares approach tin rings. And read of prismatoids—most horrid things! Spell’d o’er Darius and his children two. And pictured age and Pythian friendship true: Met bold Metonomy on battle-ground. And caused Trope’s coat of mail to loud resound; Saw how the western world .its.years did bear. Began to say. “Ja wold, mein Imher.djerr Some forth to draw, but all to driduigAyeiit. While corporals did say.—“Your a nil's-present!” Twas but a year—the mighty fight was done. We’d gained the ground—the Soph’more seats wort wonNext yuan wo came prepar’d to wield the rod On Freshmen verdant as the grass they trod. We thrash’d them sore amid their piteous moans And left them wounded, lost in sobs and groans. When .January eanie. our festal board With dainties rail and courses rich was stored. And when the tocsin told the close of day. We knew we would be victors of the fray. Bui lo! when academics were on hand. Prompt at the target practice we 1 id stand; And when the heat of battle wax’d most hot. We har’d our bosoms to the teachers’ shot. Great Analyt—the offspring of a dream— A nightmare dark and fierce it true did seem; 'I'lie wondrous truths of heat and light and sound Our Sophomorie omniums did astound; We read of Spenser and poetic fire. Poor Hamlet’s pains. Achilles’ vengeful ire. Three afternoons a week we felt quite sick. ( hopped spiders up and scanned o’er “Lydia, die.” So when the lightsome June our haunts did find. Another stepping-stone was left behind. This year we stood—the advocates of peace. For pugilistic combats never cease,— Forth to each combat ’twixl the classes bold. We count the scalps ami lose the lulls we hold. Ah! happy lot the -Juniors may enjoy. For ’Levon’s crown is pure from all alloy. Oil! Musa, in our hearts that pride instill. And let thy feeblest hard lay down his quill. K. L. Pkxxixutun. Class Poet.L’ALLEGRO CLUB. (Composed of those who do not begrudge an occasional smile and do not bow to tlu weight of centuries). Faculty Members. S. V. Sanford. S. Morris, M. 1). I)u Hose, J. Dust rat. Alijmni Members. Harrison Jones, Captain Rucker, Paul Palmer, Doctor Deas. Active M km hers. “Turp” Hanson. President. Kd. Von Hasscln, Vice-President. Tom Heard and Hoy. Treasurers. J. P. Jones. Orator. II. V. Reynolds. Scribe. J. M. Walker, Master of Experiments. (Those who could get no offices, but did not stop smiling on that account). E. D. Tupper. II. I). Meyer. II. S. Rogers. “Hillv” Fleet wood. John Fort. Hill Dancy. F. Pavesieh. (Withdrew Rccause of Reverses). Nix. of Commerce. Little Warren Moise. 'I’he Redoubtable Pennington. Mr. Hughes Spalding, (by 1908 Record). Taylor, of Georgian Board. President Galloway, of Athletic Association.HISTORY OF THE SOPHOMORE CLASS. CLIO. Goddess divine, inspire me as thou hast others, that I may picture in glowing terms the everlasting fame of tlie (’lass of '12. Surely, tin scholastic year just ended has been one of unparalleled success and progress for our class. As from the ignorant state of Fresh man hood through unceasing and unrelenting efforts, we reached the height of every Freshman's ambition—to be a Soph, now with a Herculean courage we have met and conquered the mighty Dragon—“Sophomore Math.'’—and have made one more step towards the goal of every college boy’s ambition. As it is the time honored duty of the Sophomores to initiate the green Fresides into the inner court of college life, we did our task in a manner worthy of praise. In all of the class rushes ait the opening of the term we were victorious. In looking after the tonsorial needs of the Fresides, wo also did our duty, and many a poor Freshman, when night arrived, found his curly locks, the pride of his heart, cut off and east to the winds. During the Banqueting Season, we continued our triumphal career. On the night of •January 25th. 15110, while the ignorant Freshmen were quietly sleeping, wo gathered in one of the large halls on Clayton Street, and partook of a feast, such as the Clods of Olympus were wont to enjoy. There amid the feasting, toasts to the welfare of our class, and our dear old I’nivorsity were given. The poor Fn shmen. awakened by tin pitiful cries of their friends, the Juniors, arrived on the scene after the Banquet was over and. picking up courage enough, stole timidly towards us. After several minutes the field was covered with the defeated, discouraged, and disabled Freshmen. But. lo. the story of the Freshman Banquet is quile different indeed. Not daring to have their Banquet within reach of the violent Sophs, they retreated to Watkinsville. Then they devoured their scanty repast, while their President was held in ignominious captivity by the victorious Sophs. In the class room we have made a record such as has been rarely equalled and. I dare say. never excelled. Many a gallant professor has succumbed lo the mortal wounds received from the studious Sophs. This part of our college life is one of our proudest accomplishments. In the field of athletics we have been well represented, having six men on the Varsity football team, and five on the baseball team, all of whom were stars in their respective positions. Our men held important places on the basketball and track teams also. Our class football team won the college championship by forfeiture, not one team daring to play us. Our baseball team has a bright outlook. and from present indications it will win laurels of victory for itself. In the Literary Societies, debates, and oratorical contests our men took prominent parts. Those who frequented those historic balls where Georgia's greatest men once spoke, remember quite well the outbursts of eloquence of men of our class. In the Sophomore Debate the constants on both sides entered with a determination to win, and both the winners and losers covered themselves with glory. Indeed, the record of our class is one which can be looked back on with pride and admiration, and one worthy of the emulation of future classes. I hSTOKtAN.II. I . Kl’SSKIiL. Officers of Sophomore-Class. II. I). Bussell..........President. II. I,. Covington. . . . Vice-President. B. L. Brinson, dr.. . . Secretary and Treasurer. V. Iv Durden...........Historian. V. K. Meadow. . . . Poet. Ii. Ci. Blanton..........Chaplain.SOPHOMORE CLASS ROLL, 1910. AimoxT. Wm. V.. Jk,......................................Louisville. Adams, Horace..................................................Macon. Ai.lex, K. W..........................................Millcrigovillc. Au.ex, G. C..................................................Lavonia. Ax person . K. T.............................................Danbury. Atkinson. B. A...............................................Waverly. Hec.(, s. J. M.................................................l avo. Bennett, W. T.................................................Maxeys. Blanchard, l S.............................................Columbus. Blanton. L. G................................................Zetella. Blitcii. J. G. Jr..............................•..........Statesboro. Brand. T. S..................................................Augusta. Brandon. I). L...........................................Tlmmasville. Brannen. Cuff...........................................»StatoslM ro. Brinson. B. L.. .Jr........................................Stillmore. Brown. L. I)..................................................Sharon. '«cii. R. F.................................................Kastman. Cai.lawa v. Brantley................................................ u usta. Childs. R. R..............................................Round Oak. Cocke, J. I , .Jr...........................................Leesburg. Cotter. Leon F.................................................McRae. Covi.nc.ton. L. II. ....................................Cartersville. ox ..................................................Gainesville. Crandall. F. G...............................................Atlanta. (J- M................................................Macon. Davenport. J. R............................................Warrailon. Di kden. If. S............................................Gravmoiit. Di’RDKN. . K.............................................Gray moot. Howards. G. C............................................Clarksville. Kstes. A. B...............................................Blaekshear. Kstes. C. T.. .Jr........................................Gainesville. Ktiiridoe. .J. A...............................................Macon. Farmer, R. S..............................................Louisvilh . h hLKER. I'. B................................................Monroe. I elker. Ball................................................Monroe. V I elder. I. II...........................................Ccdartown. Flanigkn, C. D.. Jr...........................................Athens. Fleetwood. K. M................................................Macon. Folsom. M. B...................................................McRae. (Uss' r- M.................................................... Oo,',,,x- • H..............................................Atlanta.Hamilton’. J. C.. Jit.......................................TennilLc. IIakdistv, I-'. H.........................................Statesboro. Hatch. H. ( .................................................Augusta. Hawkins. Harry M...............................,.............Americas I Ill'll • H.. J it.........................................Athens. Hogan, 1 II...................................................Agnes. Holley, X. K.............................................Ft. Caines. Hudson, 1 h..................................................Athens. Hitxtbr. C. r.. Jk.........................................Atlanta. IIitTCHBsoN, K. O............................................Atlanta. Jokl, Charlie.................................................Athens. .Johnson, K. W...........................................Gainesville. Killingswortii. K; 0.....................................Ft. Gaines. Koijajck, J. T...............................................Atlanta. Laird, K. A.................................................Savannah. Langston. II. S...............................................Monroe. Laniiam. R. K...................................................Rome. Laniku. Henry...............................................Amerieus. Landk, C. C..................................................Jackson. Litcas. W. M...........................................Waverlv Jlall. Lynch. J. M.................................................Florence. McCroky. W. M.................................................College Park. McKky. -J. DkWitte..........................................Valdosta. McWiioktkk. 11., Jk...........................................Athens. Maddox, S. R..................................................Dalton. Martin. 0. K................................................Oulloden. Meadow. W. King.............................................Klberton. Meyer. II. I)................................................Augusta. Michael, Heut.................................................Athens. Middlehrooks. J. R..........................................Mayfield. Miu.kk. T. 1.................................................Corinth. Minus, K. A.................................................Rhiffton. MoYB- A. L..................................................Cuthhert. Mulling. 0. C...............................................Cohhtown. Mullins, Wm. II.............................................IVnfield. Mann. W. A....................................................Milner. Xiciiouson. Y. i. I .. .Jr..................................Atlanta. Nortiici'tt. J. K...........................................Marietta. XoiiTiiKN. G. T..............................................Atlanta. N’ott. I. It.. J a.....................................(iainefivillc. l XXAI.I.V. W.J................................................Home. 0WK.VS, c. C...................................................Canon. I’aradisk. I '. V..............................................Amity. I’KACOCK, X. A..........................................liarneaville. I’khsoxs, If. K..........................................Talbot ton.Perry. M. It................................................Machen. Powell, T. 0..............................................Sylvania. Raikokd. R. S................................................Jesup. Ray. R. 0................................................Maysville. Reid. .1. M.. Jr.......................................Thomasville. Reid. W. A...........................................College Park. Rountree, I. V.............................................McLeod. Ross, .1. II.............................................Brunswick. Russell. II. I)..........................................McDonough. Salley. (). It.............................................Augusta. Saxon. R. It..............................................Sylvania. SciPLK, (I. W.. Jr.........................................Atlanta. Scott. J. I................................................Decatur. Scott, T. -I.. Jk...........................................Athens. Siiixolkr. C. F............................................Ashhurn. Slater. J. F..............................................Savannah. Smith. J. L.. .Ik...........................................Oliver. Smith. V. V............................................Attapulgus. Snead. .J. V........................................Locust Grove. Sparks. A. O. It.............................................Macon. Stovall. It. L.............................................La von i a. St’DDATii, I j. N........................................Maysville. Tibbetts. .J. R.............................................Athens. TnmETTs. R. Y.............................................Alliens. Titsiiaw. S. II.........................................Iloscliton. Trew. R. M..............................................Loganville. Twitty, J. II...............................................Pelham. Varela, .1. K..............................................Atlanta. Walton, It. II............................................Hamilton. Ware, ,). II................................................Duluth. Wake. S. II.................................................Duluth. Weeks, R. M............................................Stellaville. Weems. W. O...................................................Rome. West, A. L..................................................Athens. W11EECHel, R. F........................................Murravville. Whitley, A. It............................................Litlmnia. Williams, G. L.......................................Lawrenceville. Winciiestek. .1. R...........................................Macon. Woodcock. J. 1)...........................................Register. Wooetek, T. .1.. .Ik........................................Athens. Wright. .J. It. .Ik........................................Augusta. Wynne. M. F................................................Kastman. Zailnkk. K. It.............................................Atlanta.THE PUERIAD. “ Blow. blow, thou winter wind. Thou art not so unkind As man’s ingratitude.” —As You Lil,( It. Of boy’s ingratitude and master’s love. Paternal pride, uneouth rebellion stern. Sing, graeious Muse, transported now above. Let us a moral from this epie learn: That never ward shall ’gainst a guardian turn. But e’er obey his mandates good and true; And for his rider’s welfare ever yearn. And grant him all the tilings that be his due. For children must respect, as parents must subdue. When faint ing Sol his daily course did hold To slake his thirst behind the western hill. And cool November latent with the cold Made leaflets hazel and the breezes chill; Then went he forth, Tupperius huge of will. 'Pile president and lordling. stout and strong. Nor did this kind majestic ponder still Of insurrection or of pain and wrong. For he did go to lightsome tune a song. No sooner ’neath his feet the grass he trod. That grass now withered by th autumnal air. 'Phan raised his eyes above the classic sod. And gazed around to see his youth so fair. Kftsoons that boy he saw. young Lewis rare. Who taketh Pharmacy the more to farm; Who ’gan he on his master’s eyes to stare. Next seized that gallant chieftain by the arm: “Come with me,” sweetly said. Tupperius thought no harm. I pon the face of Ward law played a smile. Thai overspread and hid his savage leer. Nor reeks Tupperius of the hate and guile And malice in the heart of him so dear; Therefore, the president did have no fear That his ambitious bov had treach’rous aim: So followed after him with goodly cheer I Titil to Herty’s dressing room they came. Where lockers hold the vestments when there is a game.Quick ns the master reached tile eastern door. And said: “Waldorf , what brought,'st thou me to see?” Huge giants seized tin noble ruler poor. And roughlv held him hv the arms and knee; Whereat the ingrate hoy did get a key. I’nlocked a locker, scarcely four feet tall: Into this crowded hole with fiendish glee, Tilt demons smuggled the good chieftain small. Who to his child for aid full long and loud did call. Kncased in dungeon foul, that blessed form Did suffer outrage for bis protege; Though in his martyrdom lie raised a storm Of loud entreaties and for help did pray. Still that bad hoy did wear a visage gay Nor interceded for his master .just. Though thou has lost thy freedom for a day. Tupperius! honor wins, it will, it must! Such children must obey till mountains turn to dust. And now, 0 mournful willows, cease to wail. For right has triumphed and lie’s free once more; Let furies plot, but furies’ plans must fail Though loud they fight and rend the air and roar. O wretched hoy. go seek and find the door. The symbol of thy treachery and shame. And let thy penance to th’ empyrean soar, For thou wast thankh ss and of evil aim; Ingratitude must die. it hears an evil name. A TOAST. Drink to tin health of the coyest maid That ever winked an eye; Fill up the glass to the Georgia lass And drink to the maiden shy. —H. N. A.HISTORY OF THE‘FRESHMAN„CLASS. IVK us fads and nothin ; but farts.” is tin sharp injunction of our age to its historians. Therefore, the present recorder of events, instead of paint in ; picturesque scenes in which the wary Sophomore was ever outmatched, will quote that oft repeated line. “Truth is stranger than fiction.” and proceed with history. To take up my narrative in chronological order. 1 will first review those stormy days following the 13th of September. It. was during this period that the ever famous charitable organization was formed, known as The Freshman Tonsorial Club. It had for its object tin benign purpose of clipping Sophomores without any cost to their owners. It achieved unhoped for success, and was dissolved only when the supply of hair was exhausted. Next, let us look into the class mom. Some of our class-mates in this important phase of college life may feel justly proud of their achievements. Time has flown, and as the banquets are a thing of the past, let us view them impartially. The trouble was started when, “by an act of vandalism.” the class of 11)13 appropriated the edibles which the Sophomores had carefully hoarded for their feast. Some look hack on that ignoble theft with horror—they are Sophomores. After this, crushed in spirit, they repaired to a livery stable, where in this congenial atmosphere, they held a feast on aqua and I’needa Biscuit. Our banquet being planned, they learned of it nearly twenty-four hours ahead of time. yet. despite their efforts to the contrary, there were a hundred and twenty-six men to successfully evade them. In illustrious and useful men our class abounds. We have a Winchester to do our shooting; a Pope for our chaplain; and many Noble men descended from the famous house of York. And with a Peacock at our head we can afford to strut. In debates our class has not only surprised the upper classmen, but the English professors themselves. .More Freshmen tried for places on the debates than ever before and one of the professors in the English Department was heard to remark that deeper thought had been put into them than in those of any preceding Freshman class since he had been connected with tin Fniversity. In conclusion. 1 will say that if the same success attends the future career of the Class of 1913 as has that of the past, we may reasonably hope to mark an epoch in the history of Oeorgia. Historian.1). It. PR.ACOCK. Officers of Freshman-Class. I). R. Peacock. . . . President. Roy Cooper.................Vice-President. Zaeh S. Cowan. . . . Secretary and Treasurer. 10. I. Ransom..............Historian.FRESHMAN CLASS ROLL, 1910. Adaik. Shields Bloomfield.... Adams, Otis Hill............. Aiken. Wiley IIardweli....... Alford. Hi’oii Inman......... Allen. Marion IIendiun....... Andrews. Aonkw............... Armistkad. John Warren....... Asiu ry. Thomas Lyne......... Anvtkky. Alonzo Freeman...... Ballard, Robert Bee.......... Bivins. Blake Blackshire..... Blackmail Dana............... Blount. Joseph Gray.......... Boswell. William I Iron...... Both well. Warren............ Bowen. James Young........... Boyette, William Jack........ Brewton. Simon 'IYilner...... Brinson. Leslie.............. Bryant, Clarence Avery....... Bi rcii. James Bctolpii...... Burks. Peter DeMarkus. Jr.. .. Caldwell. Allen Fort......... Callaway. Hnocii............. Callaway. John D............. Callaway. Korert Frank....... Campbell. William Howard. ... Carter. Frank................ Conklen. IIcon............... Cooper, James LeRoy.......... Cooper, Marion Bcrnsiok...... Corley, Otis Herman.......... Co wan, Zachary Stuart....... Cox, John Benjamin........... Crane. Herman Averili........ Davidson. Rufus Benjamin. ... DeRenne, Wymberly W.......... Dickinson. Chatncey Rhodes. . Dcncan. William Callaway, .. Dr.NLAP. Kdoar Brown......... Fisher. Samuel Boyce......... ......Bowman. .....Covington. ......Newborn. ......Hartwell. ...Milledgoville. ......Cuthbert. ........Atlanta. .Crawtordville. .....LaG range. ... Forest Bark. ......Grovania. .....Columbus. ........Atlanta. ......IVnfield. ....... ngusta. .....(Crawford. .Morris Station. ........Ctaxton. .........Milieu. ......Rovston. .. .Tliomaxville. ...........Rome. .....Wayerosx. .....LaG range. .....Lexington. ........Atlanta. ........Atlanta. ........Atlanta. ........Atlanta. ......Augusta. ......Augusta. ........Athens. ........Atlanta. ... .Gainesville. .....Savannah. ...Shady Dale. .....Savannah. ..........Macon ... Douglasville ... .Gainesville. ......Lavonia.Fitzpatrick. Mark William. . FREEMAN, KOBKRT II ILL...... Frost. Kohkrt Cecil......... Garrison, Frank Davis....... Ginn, Stark F............... (iooPWYX. UlCIIAKD TuGGI.K, Jr (Jrav. Jamks Richard. Jr. ... IIai.k, Grady Long.......... Harmon. Howard Brooks. ... Hogan. Claude Hollis........ Howard. IIknry Grady........ Ingram, Walks Bryan......... IVKRSON. I). NIEL,.......... Jackson. Frnkst Lee......... Johnson, Cornelius Howard. Johnson, Jamks.............. Johnson, Wiley.............. Jordan. Krasmus Grovkr...... Kelly. IIknry Grady......... Kkrmn, Jamks Howard......... Knowi.ks. William Addison. . . Ham. Charlks Omar........... Hiddkll. JruAK Gordon....... Lindsay, Jack Watson........ IjOWKRY, William Lavada..... LUKRURROW. Burley Matiikw. Lumpkin. William Hbnry, ... Maddi x. Henry 'Towns....... Moisk, 'Thkodork Sidnky..... Mi lling. Otis Claude....... McCarty. Kdwyn Forrest. McCrary, Carl Ckcii......... McCurdy, Jamks Howard....... McClarty, Hiram Hay......... Nkwsom. Ciiarlks Hkndkrson, Xkwton. Walkkr Lawrknck, . Xohlk, Gkorgk Henry......... Xuxkz. Mosco Fernando....... O’Day, Lawrknck Cyrii....... Orr, Kohkrt Craig........... Darker. William Hyde........ Peacock. David Hoscof....... Persons, Harvey Franklin, .. Pope. Gwinn Nixon........... Porter, Kay Listor.......... ........West Lake ...........Xewnan. .........I lepzibah. ...........Baldwin. ..........Kovston. ............Athens. ...........Atlanta. .....Social Circle. .......Gainesville. .......Carrollton. .......Lexington. .........Hevnolds. ..........Savannah. ............Athens. ...........Atlanta. .........Garfield. .........Garfield. ........Monticello. ........Monticello. ......Fayetteville. .............Home. ............Dallas. ...........Atlanta. ..........Savannah. .........Lafayette. ............Oliver. ......Cartersville. .........Culloden. ..........Savannah. ..........Cobbtown. ...........Atlanta. ..........Hovston. .......TaIlap(M sa. ......Douglasville. .........Katonton. ...........Madison. ..........Atlanta. ......Swainsboro. Binghamton. X. V. ............Athens. .......Brunswick. ..........Fast man. .......Monticello. ........... Albany. ......Bridgeboro.Pottle, Kdwaiu) Hoi.and......... Pringle, Jamks Copeland......... Hansom, Ki.mkk Inglkshy......... Hayi.k, Jamks Thorpe............ Hidgknvay. Lemii.i. Moses....... Hokson. Garland Ferguson........ Hoiunson. Julian Ix we.......... Hose. Walter Hknky.............. SaNCKKN. GEORGE ALBERT.......... SCIIEUER. IjKK B................ Skki.tox. Park.................. Smith. George Albert............ Smith. William Henry............ Spencer. Jack Jacob............. Stkvkns. Hobkrt Tate............ Stkykkman. Sidney Vistok........ Stokes. Neil Augustyn........... Strickland. Dklckr Solloman. ... Strickland, Leonard Palmer...... Sl DDATII. AUBREY WlIKLCIIEI.... Summers. William Thomas......... Tahor, Travis Oliver............ Taylor, James Alison............ Toli.kson. Joseph Meade......... Walker. Ford Hudson............. Watson. Luther Stephens......... Wiley, Samuel Harris............ Williams, John Uknmamin......... Williamson. John Dickerson...... Williamson. Joseph Horert....... WII.linoham. Jitdson............ Willis, Leonard Warnrackkk...... Wll sox. Wilbk H................ Woodruff. Joseph Grady.......... York, Gus, ..................... You no, John Law................ ..........Blakeley. ......Tliomasville. ...........Augusta. ......Point Peter. ...........Hoyston. ............Winder. ...........Atlanta. .........Brunswick. ...........Augusta. ......Cartersville. ...........Hartwell. ......'riioinasvillc. ........Gainesville. 1 Augustine. Fla. ..........Flberton. ......Thomasville. ......Buena Yista. .........Buelianan. ............Claxtou. .........Maysville. ........Barnesville. ..........Flberton. ......Ball Ground. .........Monticello. .......Gainesville. .........Loganville. .............Sparta. ......Fort Valley. ............Bremen. ............Bremen. ...........Atlanta. .........Bainbridge. ...........Toledo. 0. .............Daeula. .............Quartz. .... (’anton, China.FRESHIE—NOT BY RUDYARD KIPLING. I. I went into a college, it was in my Kn liinaii year. The up|K r classmen sez to me. “No room for Freshmen here.’ Tlie .Juniors. lo my face, laughed and giggled fit to die. An’ ! thinks an’ thinks an’ thinks—an’ to myself, sez I: It’s Freshie this, an’ Freshie that, an’ “ Freshie go away”; Hut it’s “Dear old college mate” when my clieek comes in some day. When my cheek comes in some day. when my cheek comes in some day. O. it’s "Dear old college mate’’ when my check conn's in some day. II. I went out to a swell soiree, my dress suit swell to see. They gave a sordid Sophomore room hut ’adn’t none for me; They led me to tin homely girls. Ihe kind don't dance at halls. Hilt wln'ii it comes to fighting Sophs, they'll shove me in the stalls. For it’s Freshie this, an’ Freshie that, an’ "Freshie wait outside:” But it’s “ Freshman to the front” when the Sophomore wants his hide. The Sophomore wants his hide, my hoys, the Sophomore wants his hide. Oh. it’s “ Freshman to the front ” when the Sophomore wants his hide. III. You talk o’ caps o’ red for us. no privilege at all. Yet you should teach us how to do an’ not to let us fall. Don ’t he so grave am) dignified, hut prove it lo our face. Our tattered caps o’ blue, my friend, is not a Fresh’s disgrace. For it’s Freshie this, an’ Freshie that, an’ “Chuck him out. the hrute!” All’ it's Freshie hack to home when the 'lessors 'gin to shoot. An ’ if’s Freshie this, an’ Freshie that, an' anything you please; But Freshie ain't a bloomin' fool—you hot that Freshie sees! —Ki-mkk I. Kawson.LUMPKIN LAW SCHOOL LAW DEPARTMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA. As early as 1843 Joseph Henry Lumpkin, afterwards the presiding Judge and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Georgia, was elected as professor of law in the I’niverxitv of Georgia, hut no school of law was then organized. However. in 1851). at a regular meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Cuiversitv it was determined that tin Cniversity should he reorganized, and the plan then adopted provided fora law school “in which facilities for the best legal education would he afforded.” On December 1!). 1859. by Act of the General Assembly, the school was incorporated under the name of the “Lumpkin Law School.” and Joseph Henry Lumpkin. William Hope Hull, and Thomas K. R. Cobb, the first professors, were the incor pom tors. For some time tin' sessions wore held in tin old Roman Catholic church building on tin corner of Pulaski street and Prince avenue, Athens. Hon. A. O. Bacon was the first to receive a diploma from this school. With the exception of tin years of hostilities between the North and tin South, during which time the exercise's in the school were suspended, the Lumpkin Law School continued to grow and prosper, until 18117. when it came to an end. But in August of the same year the “Law Department of the Cni-verxity of Georgia” was organized, and this is tin name which the school has retained until this day. Cnder the new name the school continued to grow and prosper until about 1878. from which time until 1881. the interest seemed to wane and the attendance grew smaller, only one student graduating in 1881. About this time the Law Department seemed to take on new life. The number of students increased and a greater interest was manifested. In 1884 the Department was turned over to two young, enthusiastic, efficient lawyers whose every ambition was that tin Law Department should be a success. They wore not disappointed in their expectations and desires. Their successors have hceu equally successful in maintaining enthusiasm and a high standard of efficiency. In 1901 the course of study was increased from one to two years. This change was made with some hesitancy, hut the experience of the past few veal’s has proved the step to hi eminently wise. In the past few years valuable recognition has been given the Law Department. which has contributed greatly to its efficiency. Through the generosity of the widow of tin late Brantley A. Denmark, and mother of the late Thomas X. Denmark, the handsome law libraries of those loyal sons of the I’niversity have been donated to this Department. The libraries contain complete sets of the reports of tin Supreme Courts of the State and of the Fiiitcd States, digests, and many standard text-hooks. 1’nder the laws of the State the Georgia reports and all other public books arc furnished to the Department as soon as published. About 1902 the Georgia Law Debating Society was organized. This society has been superseded by the JelTei sonian Law Debating Society, where actual practice is afforded the students in weekly moot courts, presided over by some practicing attorney of the city of Athens.In 1002 a resolution was passed by the Faculty of the Pniverxity whereby every student transferring from the Academic Department to the Law Department was forced to secure a certificate from the authorities of the rniversity of good standing and efficiency. The Law Department has ceased to be a private enterprise and is made an integral part of the rniversity. The active professors are required to devote their entire time to their duties as instructors. In 1009 the entrance requirements were placed on the fourteen Carnegie unit basis. This signifies a material advancement in the standard of efficiency of the Georgia lawyer of the future. The course of study in the Department lias been continually broadened and extended for tin past two years, while the requirements for admission to the bar in this stab have remained the same since 1800. professors. Joseph Henry Lumpkin...................................1843-1807 William Hope Hull......................................1869-1807 Thomas K. R. Cobb......................................1859-1862 Benjamin II. Hill......................................18(17-1877 William L. Mitchell....................................1867-1882 Pope Barrow............................................1880-1884 George Dudlev Thomas...................................1880-1803 Andrew J. Cobb.........................................1884-1803 Walter B. Hill.........................................1800-1005 Howell Cobb............................................1800-1000 Svlvnnus Morris........................................1803- Thomas F. Green........................................1006-If(08 Andrew J. Cobh.........................................1908- Tliomax F. Green.......................................1000- M-XTPRKKS. K. I). Moon ..........................................1867-1873 R. M. Smith..........................................1873-1800 Patrick II. Mel I ....................................1873-1888 John Gerdine..........................................1880-1883 S. C. Benedict .......................................1883-1007 John I). Mel I........................................1804-1000 John II. T. McPherson.................................1804- Joincs C. Bloomfield..................................1908- These Professors and lecturers are too well known to the people of Georgia to call for comment. Suffice it to say that tin Department has been fortunate in having to mold the destiny of those men who are among the ablest lawyers, most eminent jurists, and most distinguished statesmen of the South. Tl»e Alumni of the Department have been and are tin leaders of their profession. They have figured prominently in all public affairs both Slate and Federal. History and experience have fully demonstrated the superior advantages afforded in a law school, when systematic work in every phase of the law is carried c»n. over the imperfect and interrupted courses afforded in the office of some lawyer. The ambitious student would not wish to study under a poor lawyer, and the efficient lawyer is too busy to devote sufficient time to the aspirant.m ;m:s si u ix ;, Officers of Senior Law-Class. II itches Spalding .... President. II. 0. llateher................Vice-President. Ij. S. Robeson................Secretary and Treasurer. (J. C. Spiders................Historian. J. T. 1 lois .e..................Chaplain. W. I). Martin.................Poet.HISTORY OF THE SENIOR LAW CLASS. OINTIA and severally realizing that, to accomplish anything worth while, we must ‘‘aim high and shoot promptly” and that the ultimate end and aim of life is to leave the world better than we found it ; the (-lass of 1SJ10. with this high object in view, assembled at Athens. September. 1 108. We have chosen this profession while strictly cognizant of the fact that eminence in our chosen life work is to In attained only by the most arduous toil and endeavor. Our class hails from the metropolis, the land of orange blossoms, the “old Palmetto State.” and from the foot-hills of the Appalachians to the sunny glades of South Georgia. representing not only a diversity of territory, but many of our most noted institutions of learning. In this hand of ardent students, hungering and thirsting for Blackstone. but far more for our “dear old Code.” are represented a diversity of persons ranging from the eitv “sport” and the college “dude.” to the sons of toil; from the beardless boy to the man who parts no hair, and from the genial lover of the maiden to the hardened misogynist. Much to our regret, three of our members, following the law of the “survival of the fittest.” fell by tin wayside and did not return the second year. This distinguished class has had its full share of college honors. On the gridiron, in basket-ball, on tin diamond, and on the track, her representatives have acquitted themselves with honor for (Jeorgia. In political rivalry, as would be expected, she carried off the laurels with a genials and wholesome spirit. In the field of literary work, the genius of the law class has contributed largely to the success of the Thalians; she has furnished an editor-in-chief of The Georgian: associate editors of both the Red and Black and Pandora; a majority of the presidents of both Demosthenian and Phi Kappa literary societies; and in oratory both inter-collegiate and inter-society debaters. Thus we see tin influence of the law class permeates and quickens the entire field of college activities. Historian .Iiruil KIX i AI.I.KX. H.S., IL1... Plil Kappa. TIlO.MASToX. CA. ‘uiCered ’Ml: Sinaia Nn. Tlietn Nil ■sllmi. (’«si|m mill Cnniitlel. Howell M» Krai, (Letfiili. Pyramid (’lull, rnciii (’lull. .l4 (T« r « iilnn l.aw Hebat-: ('lull. Pan-Hellenic Council. A li-Connell. Cotillion Cluli Kepresenla-«• 'IH-'IO, l cle;;ute Craud Chapter turn Nu Fraternity. Chicago: Pan-tlenlc I lop Kopiosontatlvo ’( !». Chair-m Senior l.aw P.aih|iM't. Social l-MI-■ of Hu lid and Pluck 10. Pandora •ird. Art Kdltor ’HI. Toastmaster nI »r Law l .aui|(iet. Pan-Hellenic Hop prcM ntatl e ’in. Meuilier (irldlron ill. For lie’s a Jolly jjood fellow, Wlileh no one ran deny.’ M. Al'TKKV. Morv ritiK, :a. II.1i., K.S.. Heiuosl lien Ian. "The hoy was tall, hut with n mincing air."IIIXTOX II. II. BLACKSIIKAK. K.A.. ILL.. Till K:i| | 1:1. Theta l.ainlxlil Plil i I. AIISISTA. ISA. l-hitereil Junior l.:iw, Member Delta I»«•!»j«. .MciiiIkt Vnrslty u:i»-« !l«». Win- ner I ' ! 11 Doubles Ton ills Toni'ii:i mt ii t «m. VIoe-ITes. Thallnns. Manager iSlee • ‘luh. Winner Sa.-Vanderbilt ' fl» Debate. Vanderbilt Debater H». Member of Sphinx. "lie (hell with self-;ipp!;iuse. Ills valor lolil." W. 14. KltWIX. ATIIKXS. ISA. I’.S.l K.. It.|„. Si 1:11111 Alpha Kpsllon. I'hi Kappa. “Shall I eomleinii. who must myself be liieil WILLIAM CLVDK rOKHIIA SYLVKSTKK. ISA. ILL.. I(eiuostheiilail. Solicitor (Jeneral ami Si oretar .lefTersonlan Law Debut Im: Soviet j I’reshleut of .lefTersonlan Law I»eln Society ‘in. "Where Ignorance Is bliss. tIs fol be wise."tOHKKT It. FOItltKSTKIt. I.KKSIM'IMI. CA. 'I Kappa Al|ili:i. Heniosthoiilan. • laborer is worthy of Ills hire.' IIHItBFUT (’UFI'Oltl) HATCH Kit. It.I... lMil Kappa. ai ;i sta. «:a. Iviitoml Freshman 'n7: Mi-iiiIht Varsity Football Team '« 7. 'UN. 'll! : Varsity Traek Team '(«!•. 1»: Captain of Traek Toain "Hi; Vliv-I’lwiiliMil Senior l«n v Class; Vliv-I’ri’s. Athletic Association; Vice-Pros. Kniory Club; Vln-I'rcsliliiil Acailomy of KIcIiiiioikI County l')nt»; t’lMvr l.eailcr in Itascha II 'iW-'ltl. "ills envious nature not a down coneeals itilt plainly shows tlu insolence lie feels." •I. T. IIOl’ZK. KOSWKI.I.. • A. It.I... Iienioslhealau. It seems 'tls n»y luek To In I' the way still."JOHN okovkk KKXNKDV. Ol.IVKK, CA. 1 icninst hcnlaii. Preshleut. VIce-l'resMenl. :iiul I :i r-Ihinieiitnrl.-m. I icumst hcninn : ('resilient. VIh,-I’ii,sI(Ii,iiI ami Solicitor tJeheml. .lotTersmilan Law |teLallng Soclclv. ami Clerk or I'.mki Moot Court. 1 ut there's a wrinkle In his hmw As «hs‘| as philosophy." WILLIAM I). MAI {TIN. COMMKIJCK. CA. H.L.. lHMimst heiilan. Meiulier .lelTcrsoiilan Law Delta tin;; Society. Class I'oet. •"rills gentleness shows him n m'lillenian." JOHN Sl'KNCI-: i li:ll. . D.L.. rill Kappa. IM Kappa Alph ATLANTA. UA. Howell { »hh I ’falei iilly; I’ati-I hmle Dance (’uniinlttec tien cinh ‘ir.i.'iti. "I'aii nothing please Ihce-:"PAN IHH r JAIJ . ATLANTA. SA. II.1„. Dciuostlu‘)il:iii. Siu'itiu Alpha Kpsilon. iiin 1 star! Thou prmlucrst twins whh'ly •!iIT t « iit rharauti'r." W. K. MrKLVKX. ll.L.. Dt’Iimstlli‘lil:ill. STILSON. OA. My !«• :! my leu! wImmk-o coiiiis this )»»III PA COSTA PATTILM). wauubnton. :a. Il.l.., Ihaimst hiMiIati. SIjrm:i Nil. "Still hi wunhl niim ami talk iis ldh-rs ilo." ;i:oit ;i : stakk ATLANTA. (SA. ILL.. Ilinnnstlit’iiInn. I'l Kappa AI|tli:i. ••Tin Ki'iillmii awaits tins . frWnul." I,. S. KOI ISON. SANUKItSVILLK. (!A. 11.1... l « iiiostlu iilnii. ITi slih nt Ih'limstliciilaii : ITOshliMit .lr(T« rsitnl:m Law I ichatln:; Surlily: SoiTolavv mill Tr» :ism-» r Atlilctlt Association : Secretary ami Treasurer of Senior Law Class; Knstuess Manager of Kill ami Ulnck: Captain of l'.MKi Law Knot ball Ton in. "rin too cli I lit Isli foolish for this worlil.' ii. i. hvm:i:. STATIIAM. ISA. li.L.. l i niostlii nlaii. Knll of wise saws ami nuxlcni Instam-es." ir ;ni:s si vm i . ATLANTA. CA. A.It.. lt.L.. hflllOSllHMiltlll. ’lil I'lil Fnili nilty: JTi j I-«li nl « f Sonlor L:i v fhiss; Killtor-lii- lil« f of tilt Cimrirliili r.HRt; MimiiImT of Tlifln I’lil Loir.il Priilrrnlty: iin«l !:i mi t l« t n ml Crlillroti t'lulis; l,:i v llo|i OumlttiH HUM; Asxo ••lull l-M I tor l':iml»r:i |!i|0. "This mail innii will iimmhI siiro.' c;. Sl lLLKItS. Hl’TLKIt. (JA. M.S.. H.L.. l»eiiio theiilnu. Knlered Junior 'lass ‘nT; Secretary. Vlir-l’riKliIiMil, ;in«l Solicitor t.onernl of the .1 ••fTorxoiilitu Law Helm I In;; Soel-fly: Parliamentarian. Historian. Vlee-President. ami President of Clio Demux-thcnlau Literary Siwlely: Winner of llie Heady Writer’s Medal 'Oil: Historian of the Senior Law I'lass; Impromptu Helm tor. and Secretary of tin liehat-era League ’In. "And all lie units whom he can make afraid." JOHN SIIIPLKY TI1XKY. fONYKKS. I A. M.A.. ILL.. l hl I let ta Theta. I»elta Helta. Theta l.amhda Phi. Senior Pound Table. 11 Innorary i. President of .Inninr haw t’liiss I’.HIP. “To think for what was formed this erealure man." YM. TIIOS. TOWXSK.NI . JASl'KIt. :a. It. I'll., ILL.. I lemost heiihin. .Meinher PI Kappa Alpha. Howell dil» Kraternltv: Vice-President Junior Law t’lass: .Member Pandora Hoard 'nU; Pliaiiiplon Helm ter 't ! : Parliamentarian Hcniosthcnlaii; President .lefTersonlan laiw Ilehatlny Society: .Meinher Hehat-ers’ League; Impromptu Hehater: Hep-roscnlntlve Law Hepartnieiit at t'oiii-ineiieemeiil. “Yes. hnl make no words oii’t: I was a limn seven years air »."•1C)K C'MKTON VKICKS. IIAIM.KM. r.A. 15.1... 1 lellKVSt Ill'll 111 II. Solicitor Cononil of .lofrersniil.-iu l,n v I li»ir Siwioty : l'uiiiiiliiciit;trl:ili of Iifiiiost lifiil.-m Soololy. “Ilf ill tors nil In- thinks with vlulonco.”IjOI'IS KO.MOXDSOX WISIXKI. Ct'MMIKH. ISA. Phi Kappa. Sigma Alplm Kpsllon. Cnsi|Ut nuil (5:11111111 1 : Law Hop Com mil Hi : Sigma Alpha Kindlon Itfpn-xnn tat I vi mi tin Cotillon Coiiniilttii : V|ci»-Proahlont AthlvtIt Association: Mcm-lu r of Stout Mountain Cltih; Member of PI Helm 1 1: Mi'iiiIht of Howell Cohli Legal Fraternity; Crldlroti Club. "My l»ounili n duty bids mi toll tin truth, In in mi It ll» s In nu to toll tin truth." WILLIAM WALLACli WKKJIIT. It AI Nil 1511 H5K, 5 A. 15.1... l hl Kappa. Kappa Alpha. Theta l.ii mbila rill. Kntt ri il Freshman. Corporal and Sergeant Corps of Cadots: Secretary ami Troasiiror .huilor l.aiv Class: Chairman Law Hop Commit !( ’ Coiiimi ui i iiu nt ‘10; Tlii’ta Lambda I'lil; Vice President 1 ‘III Kappa: Manager Law llootball Toil m "Oil. "Vot. yot. I loll ." AltTIH’lt SINCUCTO.V VOUK. CJtKKN VILI.K. ISA. It.I... Doiiiosthonlaii. Kiiiercd Junior Law: S« c’y. TriMsuror and Vloo-I’rosldont of .lorforsonliili Law Hclmtlng StN'Ioly; Secretary. Purlin nioiitarliiii. and Vice-President of |N iu osthonlaii. "Xow Is tin wlntor of our dlsooiitoul Mado glorious siinimi ra by this son of ork."( iiaiuji: (’iia. dm:r. COMMKIU'K. OA. It.I,., I U'liiost Ill'll hill. "Know I hen tliysi'lf." k. r. MAii i'ri:v. ji:: i ki;sox. :a. It.I,., 1 Icniost Ill'll i :i ii . '(’oitii . my I fiioinl. lls ;il l Mini hrow of mro." IM)V STIUCKLAXI). ATHKXS. ;a. Ii.li.. I t lii«»st)ii lil:iII. K:i|i|i:i Alpll.l. ••rniliM’sliuwlliur In intisiy in:itu rs "HISTORY OF THE JUNIOR LAW CLASS. ANY were flu lull's of tliait awful law faculty that reached the ears of thirty-five enthusiastic prospective .Junior lawyers on that bright day in September when college opened for the ! )()!)- 10 session. These tah s were scoffed at. and many were the sallies, as to what I “will do to that professor.” Now that is all changed, 'file youths are wise. They did nothing to the professors, and what the professors did to them will iill volumes. It was a hard fight, hut the persevering .Juniors won out. and now they are looking forward to the coming year when the class returns to run again the gauntlet of nine mouths wink with the faculty, hut the fact that at the end of that time, there is a “dip.” gives them extra strength for the strife. 'Pile Junior class was breaking all records in class attendance until an unfortunate week in the fall, when the lure of automobiles called many of them to Atlanta. The faculty never recovered from the number of absences on the rolls, and the present class sank into oblivion, so far as breaking records of any kind was concerned. Only two members of the class dropped by the way-side, and as the remainder of the class departs for home, tin meml ers look forward to the time when they can return to the 1‘niversity. and not 1h called “Freshman Lawyers.” IIistokia.n..1. I TOUT, Officers of the Junior Law-Class. J. I . Fort..................President. Millard Rewis....................Vice-President. Carl Slovens..................Secret airy and Treasurer. Walter Manirliain................Historian. K. V. Carter.................Poet. Roy McMillan..................Chaplain.JUNIOR LAW CLASS ROLL, 1910 Adams, C. 0......... Alsbrook. B. N...... Broach. -I. V....... BROOK. 1 Iowell..... Carter. K. V........ Cook. W B.......... CoRNKTT, V. C...... CoTTKR, K. B........ Dobbs. C. M......... Fort. J. B.......... Franklin, 0. W...... Hall. h. T.......... 11 rath. K. V....... Harris, S. B........ Hill. Malvern. Jr. .. .Jenkens. K. C...... Jonhs. J. B. ....... Ijanham. 11. I j.... Lumpkin, J. 11...... Lumspen. K. (5...... Manoiiam. V........ Marshall, T. O...... Morrow. J. M........ McMillan. R. N...... ()RR. (i. J......... Balm hr. J. I)...... Bhacock, A.......... Hewis. Millard ..... Wooers. J. T........ SlULEV, J. A........ Smith. U. II........ Stevens, Cari....... Wrkhit. Graham ----- ...........Savannah Spartanburg. S. (' .............Monroe. .........Alpharetta. ............Atlanta. .........Vnlilostji. ............Athens. .......Bai nexvillo. .. Bowder Springs. .......Mount Airy. .......Barnesville. ......San lei xville. ............Girard. ............ t liens. ...........Atlanta. ............Katonton. .............Koine. .............Koine. ..............Athens. ............Santee. ...........Augusta. ........Cedartown. ..............Athens. ...........Atlanta. .........Savannah. ...........Milieu. ......Barnesville. ...........Collins. .........Faeeville. .. . Milledgeville. .............Macon. .....Buena Vista. .............Koine.IN HADES WITH THE LAW CLASS OF 1910. Hy 111 • (! I! KS Sl’AljDINO. WAS I In fifteenth d;iy of J line in the veal of our Lord 1517-1 when I shuffled olT this mortal roil. As 1 had strutted more than my allolted time upon life's stage. I was not sorry to seek other adventures in the world of spirits. In the homes of mv poor relations joy and expectation reigned supreme. 1 didn’t rare. In fart, it was a matter of supreme indifference to me. 1 was away and hevond the scope and influence of such a boorish article as filthy lucre, (oh jov!). One thing, however. caused me considerable annoyance. It was the flood of crocodile tears that my sorrowing relatives showered upon my bier. I could rend their hearts, and therein saw nothing hut pleasure and gratification: whilst their distorted, faces, swollen eyes and intermittent sobs, recalled with great vividness the parable of the Pharisee and the Publican. Besides, their lachrymal effusions left a doleful mark upon my handsome casket, and spirits look with jealous eyes upon anything that desecrates the last r« sting place of their earthly prisons. My coffin was a perfect beauty. I had never seen its superior, either in workmanship or in design. The Moral tributes were magnificent and were the source of as much pride as my first pair of long trousers. I was in a happy frame of mind as. freed from my old and infirm body. 1 scampered about the house; now brushing gently, with a zephyr’s hand the cheek of some dear friend; and again twisting with a rheumatic pain the limb of some weeping kinsman. Every time one bent over my remains and muttered. “Don’t he look natural : lie was such a good old man.” I was sorely tempted to twist ail ear or pull out a tuft of hair: but happily I refrained, keeping in mind the dignitv and decorum with which a spirit should at all times conduct itself. As soon as my body had been consigned to mother earth, my soil it, no longer bound to tie material world, shot rapidly a wax from this orb and soared and Moated hither and thither in boundless space. Suddenly “those sweet, lo.v tones that seemed like an incantation” came softly to my ear. Then there was a sputter, a deafening clatter, a cloud of dustless dust, and a disembodied body rushed (piickly to my side. “Ilello. Spike!’ it said. “Dead at last, eh? The fellows have been waiting patiently for you. and you may bet they have a warm reception all planned.” “Why. hello. Crip.” I answered. “You look natural enough; but I notice your revered whiskers are singed. That looks bad. mighty bad.” He didn’t answer. Instead he east his eyes down sorrowfully and held his peace. I was embarassed. seeing that I had touched a tender spot, so continued— So all the old class is dead ? I never imagined I d be tin last.” “All excepting Autry. He’ll never die. Too tough! Ye have come to the conclusion that he’ll have to be shot on Judgment Day.” This said. Wisdom grinned pathetically. “What are you doing out here all by your self? It’s so cold and lonesome.” 1 remarked. “I have to stay out here—away from the rest—it’s my punishment, you know.”“Your punishment! Thais funny. What an you doing!” “Well, you see. it’s like this—I've got to wander about, hack and forth for a half-million years to collect my thoughts. When that is accomplished,” his face brightened perceptibly. “I 'll join tile rest of you in Hades.” “In Hades? Are they all there? I’m shocked. How terrible!” “Yes. indeed, they are all there (all excepting you. Autrey and me), and you ’ll be there soon enough.” Crip actually snickered in his glee. ‘This is no place for me.’ I muttered to myself, ‘(.’rip’s gone nutty. 1 must get away from him.’ but before I could move he recommenced: “Oh yes! you need not he surprised; the whole gang is there, and what’s more, they an all confined in one large compartment ---” “ Kxcuse me. but would you mind explaining why?” “Oh that’s easy. You see it was this way: Hvlce. and Kobeson. ably assisted by the master mind of G. ( Spinel's, (filtered into a conspiracy to politic His Serene Wickedness off his throne. Twas a good Ihing the authorities got wise in time, as these eminent demagogues had established quite a following among the ‘Think-mc-.Yots.’ ” “Ah! ha!” I exclaimed musingly. “But why do you say that I am bound thither also?” “I just know it. In fact, we have been drifting towards the entrance ever since we met. Mv! here we are now.” With this he screamed aloud in terror and fled as a streak of light along the way we had come. ‘Boor fellow.’ 1 mused, ‘lie can never collect his thoughts.’ The dismal cave was before me. As I approached nearer it assumed the general appearance of a huge mouth filled with sharpened tusk-like teeth. The surrounding space was alive with hurrying, living, intangible substances, which, like mvsolf. were being irresistibly carried by some great and all-powerful force into that dark and gloomy tunnel. A sense of utter helplessness overcame me as 1 dashed headlong into that writhing, seething maelstrom of human souls. For a minute all was heavy darkness, then I shot through a smaller hole and was thrown panting upon the hank of a dismal, evil-smelling river. Of a sudden a boat, flashing a brilliant light, loomed out of the darkness and grounded with a dull thud almost at my feet. A figure in the bow unhooked a lantern from the mast and sprang lightly to the earth. ‘What a peculiar gait that person has.’ 1 thought, as it started towards me. f was almost unnerved—there was something so familiar and uncanny in that walk. 'Pile next thing 1 knew a light was flashed in my face and someone shouted: “Why. hello. Hughes; glad to see you. When did you die?” “Well, I’ll he durned if it isn’t MacDougald! How are you. Mae. old hoy?” Then we shook hands and grinned at each other. “By the heard of the Prophet. Mac, what are you doing here paddling about on this river?" He was silent for a moment and then blushed deeply. He was always so modest, and I knew him so well, that 1 thought lie must have accomplished some wonderful undertaking. “You have heard of C’liaron?” “Yes.” I replied. “And the river Stvx?” I inclined my head as a sign of comprehension. “Well, when 1 came down here, I liked this boat and the fine ride acrossthe Styx, so I made friends with old Charon l»y telling him a few choice jokes that I learned on the road, and in that way became a kind of understudy to him.” "Hut where is old ‘(‘ha’ now? 1 have heard so much about him that I would like to see him. "Ob. he’s lost his job now.’’ "What? How’s that? Did you take it away from him? "No. Unit is. not exactly. You see. I taught 11 is Koval Wickedness from that great work entitled Strickland’s Principles of Kquity. whereby lie was enabled to punish recreant and stubborn souls like Ward and Fattilio. You know he couldn't do anything with them in the ordinary lawful way." "1 see. Then as a reward, you were given this position, and now poor Charon is out of a job." "Exactly! Hut come on. we must Is going." "What are you going to do to me?" I was getting anxious. Mae had changed so much that I was almost afraid of him. No wonder, though, if he bad digested Stricklands conglomerated masterpiece. "Nothing at all. I’m going to run you across here in my six-cylinder motor-boat and turn you over to McKIvecn lie is the official guide to the nether regions." I was going to ask more questions, but just then our journey came to an end and 1 was standing on the firm ground, shaking bands with the guide. He was just the same as ever, and when lu smiled he smiled all over. "How do von like it down here. Will ." "First rate. It could 1m lots worse." "No doubt." I said, "but it's so blooming dark." "Ah! that’s nothing. It’s not nearly so dark as Milledge Avenue when the moon is not shining." "There's something in that, but as long as those legal lights. Smith and Wright, live, dear old Athens will never suffer." "Quite true." lie replied, "but how about visiting the fellows?" "I’m on. There’s nothing I’d like Indter. Lead tlie way." We entered a great arch above which was written "I'niversitv Quarters. It consisted of many private apartments and I saw numberless names of eminent Georgians inscribed upon the doorways. At last we passed a large door with four burning letters upon it. I rubbed my eyes and lookwl again. The four letters spoiled the word "Zcke." Shaking my head. 1 moved on past the Faculty Room, to a huge door labelled "Law. 1 !110—Dangerous." McKIvecn drew the heavy bolts and we entered "I'll have to leave you here." and without more ado. 1 was turned over to the lender mercies of that jolly, convivial old spirit, Wallace Wright. "Have a drink?" be asked, offering me a five gallon jug. "Nay! nav!" I shouted aghast, "you know I never touch a drop." "Neither do I." he replied in an injured tone, "but 1 just keep a little on band for my friends." "I’ll accept your apology." 1 answered humbly. At these words Wallace winked at Forrester, and Forrester smacked bis lips. "Come on," ventured Wallace, "let’s go around and take a look at the boys." "All right, old man. but-----" I began, casting my eyes towards the jug. "are you sure that that is good stuff He broke into a loud laugh and pulled forth the stopper.'Flu laugh was answered from afar oil . 1 reoogni .ed il. even in its hideousness. ’Twas McClelland. Ho always did have a keen sense of smell. “Ah-a-a-a." 1 exclaimed. “Have another?” questioned my host. “Well, it’s pretty damp down here.’ In a few minutes we were upon our way towards tin further rceexses of tin spacious compartment where our fellow-classmates were confined. The first sad figure to meet my gaze was that of our lamented friend. Kennedy. “What’s he doing?" I asked, seeing him jnhtaring away unceasingly at two wooden posts “lie’s asking questions." “Of whom?’ “lie thinks those posts are professors.” “ It certainly is lucky to he a post.” I replied, as we walked on. “That fellow over there, down on his hands and knees, is Smith.” “Ilomer?” “Xaw. he’s married. That’s Joe.” “What’s he looking for?” “Blood-stains.” “Oh yes!” “But that funny-looking fellow over to our left, with flying hair and bent head, who is lu . and what is he doing?” I interrogated. “That’s .Martin, the Class Poet, and he’s writing poetry. Don't you remember his poem in the 1 ! 10 Pandora? It took the prize, you know." explained Wallace. “Yes indeed. I remember, but it must he awful to In a poet." We moved along further and came to a large tank. It smelled like a Blind Tiger. “In that." said Wallace." are Allen. .McClelland and Sibley. It is full of squirrel liquor, and is filled every day. Those boys have to keep il from running over under pain of being eon lined in the padded cell with Ford." “1 bet they never let her run over.” “They never have yet. and they’ve been here nearly fifteen years” At this point we came to a huge iron gate that effectually barred any further progress. “I’ll have to leave you here.” said Wallace. “What’s the matter?” I inquired. “Only the more dangerous and wicked of our classmates are confined within, and I am too refined to enter those gates.” “Well, how about me?” “Oh! you can stand it all right.” With this, he rattled the heavy iron tremendously. A growl emanated from within. I drew back in fear, but was reassured when Judge Townsend appeared. He was smiling cadaverously, and a streak of light from Hatcher’s fiery cell shone resplendentl.v upon his bald pate. “ Let me in. Pap.” I began. “Nothing doing." he mouthed. “1 want to talk about Free Trade with the Philippines.” I urged. Without more ado. he flung the gates wide and I entered, whilst Wallace sought consolation with his jug. “Come, let’s look ’em over." T commanded. JxeJuvtantlv he led me among the different colls.Iu tin first was Tilley. He was licnding over a corpse. examining it minutelv with a magnifving glass. ‘•Hello. Tilley!” “Ilev.” he answered. “What you doing?” ‘‘Looking for yellow spots.” he wailed. ‘‘How long does it take them to form?” “Six months.” he answered, without hesitation. “Poor fellow!” sighed Townsend. “They change the body every night and lie doesn't know the difference.” As we turned the comer, a great harking of dogs hurst upon the ear. “Ilolv smoke!” 1 exclaimed, “one of those growls sounds awfully familiar.” “It should he. for its Blackshrar.” “mackslioar!” “Sure. He is confined in a cage full of dogs, hut In growls and snaps at them with such vieiousness that thev are pretty well intimidated now..” “I’ll swear.” “Don’t do it.” he admonished.” you might get Weeks started. “I never thought of that.” At this moment we came upon Traylor, lie was locked in a death struggle with a terrible beast that somewhat resembled an octopus. “What on earth is the matter?” I exploded. “Nothing much.” “What is that horrible creature he is fighting?” “That’s nothing but an equitable title.” “Which do you think will master?” “Don’t ask foolish (juestions.” “ Kxeuse mo.” I muttered, humbly. “That man over there who is gesticulating and bowing to an imaginary audience is Forehand.” “ What’s he doingf ” “Oh. lie’s nominating Bryan for President.” “But Brvan’s a dead One.” “So is lie.” “And that man in front of von. who looks like a dentist, is Andrews.” continued the Judge. “Well, isn’t In a dentist?” “Nope.” “What’s he picking out of that fellow’s teeth, then?” “Why. that’s a client of his. who is insolvent, and he is picking the gold out of his teeth to collect his fee.” “Gracious! He must have Peek skinned.” “In some resjwets. but Ihcn. Peek, you know, squeeze a dollar until the eagle screams.” “ But. Townsend.” I said, “what is that monster over there that’s slapping and striking York with so much vim?” “That’s a slop myt in transitu." “It’s certainly giving York a drubbing.” “lit deserves it. lie comes from Terrell’s town.” Next we came to W« eks. He was clad in a striped suit and wielded with precision a ponderous sledge. “What’s old ‘Three Weeks’ doing.” I asked. “Nothing, but picking sermons out of stones.”“ Does In oil joy them ?" “Xo. hr spouts tliriu to his friends." Tin sight that now mrt my gaze almost unnerved mi . 1 could hardly tell whether it had ever hern a human Iwing or not. It had iiiiiutiicrahlc long. slender arms and legs that waved unceasingly in the breeze. while the whole was rapped hv a matted tuft of snow-white hair. “ Whv don't that thing stop?'' “It ran ’I." “Well, wluil is it?" “It’s llou .e in his inimitahle imitation of a eliost in aclion." “lie’s a fraud.” “I trust not." “Let that he as it may. hut what on earth is MuhalTy doing with that funnel stuck down (’handler's throat." “Oil. .Mahalfy is the doctor down here, and keeps all the hoys in good spirits.” “Yes. I know, hut how about the funnel and Chandler?" “lie’s giving him some glycerine." “Is that all?" “No. It also contains rock-candy and water." “What else?" “1 can't tell you. Ask Dargan. lie knows." “1 will, hut who is that guy with the mask on?" “That ’x no mask. That s his face. He is one of our very l est are players." My expression must have l ecn blank, for the .fudge spoke up impatiently: “Don’t you know Mr. Push-Along Krwin?" “Of course I know him." “What’s that you are m.v up the hill. Dill?” I shouted. “A barrel." lie replied. “What’s in it?" “Cooper. Ford and McGuire, and a few other tilings." “Well, push along. Mr. Krwin. push along." And he pushed along. At this juncture wo came to the last cell. Within it. I saw an enormous boot—at least six feet in length. Deside it squatted my old friend Robson. “What’s he doing here. Confined with a boot !" I commanded. “He's getting a ‘boot-lick.’ " replied Townsend. “Shame! shame! Whose boot is it?" I demanded severely. “I don’t know for a dead certainty, but it is said to have formerly belonged to one Professor Park." After this significant utterance I was stricken with dumb horror. I trembled from crown to toe as if seized with a sudden attack of the ague. My senses gradually deserted me. everything grew as black as ink. and I became insensible to all my surroundings excepting the dull rush of air in my ears. Finally even that ceased, and for a moment. I seemed to be perfectly still. Then of a sudden. 1 seemed to lie Hying through space and landed with a resounding thud in the middle of the floor. “Another nightmare?" complacently inquired my room-mate. “Worse than that." I replied. “1 have been dreaming about you." “Well, if you expect to graduate today, you’d better get a wiggle on yourself. and hustle to Chapel, for it’s eight-thirty now." “All right." I answered, and jumping into my clothing with a rapidity that would have put an Athens Fireman to shame. I was on my way.HISTORY OF THE SENIOR PHARMACY CLASS. T is not a question. “To live or not to live.’’ If you will let us administer physic of our own you will not have the unpleasant duty imposed upon you of deciding. To give you an example of the efficiency of the work let ns remind you of an annual encampment. 'Pile Chief Medicine Man. having been aroused by the lamentations of someone who was seeking aid at his tent, found upon examination that the patient was suffering from a bruise on top of the head which had lx en inflicted by a blow received during the dark hours of the night. After holding a consultation with the coworkers in the Hospital Corps he returned with a glass of water and two 'Putt's Pills which were forced down the sufferer’s throat in all haste. He recovered, of course, it being a maxim with them that Nature will inevitably take its course. Now. for sterner stuff: the class has seen wonderful progress in the school with which it has been associated. The result has been watched by many careful observers and others interested in educational advancement. We are beginning to be recognized, not as a subordinated branch of our great educational system, which view perhaps has not been altogether unjustly held by some but as one branch of the I'nivcrsitv which is extremely practical and iK'iiefieial to the common weal. Let us take this opportunity of speaking to our fellow-workers. Students, the responsibilities of our daily lives and the “cares that infest the day” will inevitably bring wrinkles to our brows, gray hairs to our heads, and sorrow to our hearts: but a sweet consolation, the remedy of remedies, will come to us in the form of a retrospective view of college days. You were there; we worked with you; it will delight you to have remembered these things. Historian.IJCMl’KL TK II I.KS W.VITIKS. Officers of the Senior Pharmacy-Class. Waters, h. T.. . . Lewis. W. E.f . . Patrick. J. K.. Kinjr. J. K., President. Vice-President. Secretary and Treasurer. 11 istoi'ian. "'ii.Msiin .WIIlt-MI) I 1119fl II IflU . ‘«| [I.UIIXII.MII.).. 'so. wu|,) jofiitir v: :ri'UAM. v.i XIVI XOS'lVXCMl X A'l'IM AXM'I'I ..•pnnoj «hi||. u.iik. i» |i.M| |„ 'SO. 0 1 1, 4«|UII| |KM. |U;.| 'Oi:|ll«H||s;ilu. (| | V! AS|V»I IDVO'I-MI HXHfUH „ UII i . K [III II ‘KIIMO.W MO).»U| 'KillJo, .. 'CO. IIOM.I. ||i:q.»Ki:jl . ||KJlt. .i.»i|IIM| - :« !. |«IK Ml. unw.l, ||i:«|| mis.| j.M|iii. | :. .»!• • osj |i:|. ilo.ii:iiuiii|,| U|JOo. : .................... "• i'i|.| V:» MSJN'VJIMV'I si.xvn }i:-Moo. .niMiio}!•JOHN llOltICUT KIX«. S11AI) Y l ALK. Pli.C.. I’lil K:ippn. Winner of Srlioliirslilp from Junior lo Senior Class: Sin-rotary of Junior Class; lllslorlali of Senior Class. "Ami all that Mils sii|H rlor knowlmlj:i-moan l Was lo olmlo I In weak ami liinom-nt.' w. k. u: vis. Ai crsTA. ;a. IMi. I’lil Kappa. "A Soolrli pliysloinii who hail Jnsl ht-ifan To solllo horo- a very liamlsoine man." MALCOLM J. LO. (i. MT. I I.KASANT, TKN.V IMi.ii.. 1 liI Kappa. I.enirili lull not will III. my frloml. I poor measure."-losi:IMI IVION.M0T11 I’ATIIICK. ST. CKniiCK. s. •. rii.C.. IMil Kappsi. Kntorod .1 tinIt»r Class January. UN Hi. Vire-l'reshlent of lho Coitrvla I’liarina-ropoolal Soelety uno term; Soorolnry ami Treasurer of Senior Class. "I Iren in on. iloar boy." IMOHCY KOSSIOIO. KATOXTOX. 5A. I’h.C.. Doiiiiisllionian. Bnlored I-'roshinmi Class 15.S. filtered Junior IMiannaoy Class Ms; J'resl-•Ion! of Junior I'harniaey Class: Vi« o-Presldent Ceoijrla IMiarniacopoi'laI So-ololy: Captain Sophomore Traek Ton in. "Will nono Ills talents ami Ills Iinmls employ V" LIOMLIX TIOMIM.KS WATKHS. ItlSOOKI.KT. CA. IMi.t;.. Deinoslhenlau. littered Junior Class September. UHlS. Vleo-President of Junior Class; Sei-’y and Treas. of the (ieor la I’harma-eopoelal Soelet.v two terms; President of Senior Class; Representative Speaker at ( oinineiieenieiit. "In liquid torrents whirled the mighty 1111011."THE EGO CLUB. [Evolved from (In master mind of Moise (Tattle Wanvn). | No officers could be elected because every member voted for himsell. M KM BEKS. “Chancellor” Moise. “Dean” Nix. “Intellectual” Walker. “ I am” Spalding. “Vanity” MaeDougald. “ A wav-wit li-you ” Reynolds. “Ego” Troutman. “Monumental'’ Newman. “Let-me-talk” Spillars. “ Listen-tome” Turpin. I-am-here” Dargan. “Colossal” Diek. “Asininity Hal” Miller. Hiu.K!) Orr for I'kofkssionamsm. “Mister” Morton Ilodgson. “Model” Redfearn. Boykin Cabell Wright Junior. “Little Warren’s” Brother. “President” Robinson of Tan Sigma. Yku,. , , • .1 c. Mr. Me. E(jo, Ego. Ego. v. of a.HISTORY OF THE JUNIOR PHARMACY CLASS. II K subject of the Pharmacy ('lass of 15) 11 is one which should Ik a source of inspiration even to one who has no ability so far as writing is concerned. As this is tin first year of tin existence of this class, its accomplish men ts are not so well and widely known as they will certainly he later. For our class is composed of men of whom the world will one day say. “These were men.” In veal's to come the professors at this institution will tell future students of our wonderful accomplishments, and they will listen with awe and wonder how it could all be true. They will say. “There were giants in those days.” In the month of September of the year nineteen hundred nine, on tie eighteenth day of the month, there assembled in the Pharmacy class room in Terrell Hall a little bunch of fellows, eight in number. They were there for the purpose of learning the noble science of preparing and dispensing healing medicines to an ungrateful public. It was a brave bunch, in spite of its size, and one determined to show its mettle. But sad to relate, one of our members seemed not to be able to follow the pace which we set in our work, and he dropped out before Christmas. Peace to his memory. 'Pile seven remaining members of the class Stuck gamely to their colors, and in spite of the well-aimed ammunition of shai p shoot ng professors, wo have succeeded in proving our supremacy. In society circles our class is in the foremost rank, its members being more popular with the beautiful girls of Athens than tile members of any other class in college. The 1-H1 Pharmacy class needs no puffing by any historian. Its deeds speak, and will speak, for themselves. Any words attempting to depict its worth would be pale and colorless. In the veal’s to come the Fnivcrsity will point with pride to the fact that it once had enrolled as students on its register the members of the illustrious Pharmacy Class of 1011.JUNIOR PHARMACY CLASS. G. T. Brooks.................President. II. Thompson...................Secretary and Treasurer. P. M. Rubinstein, . . . Historian and Poet. Binion. R.................................................Sparta. Bkooks, G. T.............................................Royston. R.wvls, J. G..........................................Bainbridge. Rubinstein. P. M..........................................Athens. Thompson, II...................................Spring City. Tenn. Thompson, T. C.................................Spring City, Tenn.RESIGNATION. .Sometimes when I'm tired and lonely. Footsore, weary, weak and faint. 1 am loath to he rebellions. Tempted much to make complaint. Tempted to lay down the burden. That has been assigned to me. Tempted to cut loose the shackles. Rend the bonds of slavery. It is then I look on others. Who have feelings like my own. Men like me. they are my brothers. They like me must stand alone. Fill the place that Owl has given. Pass along life’s common ways. And even though their hearts are riven. They must hope for better days. It is then that I take courage. As I watch them every day. I can feel my hope grow stronger. Gleams of faith light up the way. And instead of gloom and sadness. There is love and there is light. The day is crowned with joy and gladness, Glorious starbeams gild the night. Then I know a Hand is leading. Leading ever though unseen. And 1 know a Voice is pleading. And a Love comes in between. That would lift me in my weakness. And establish me in might. That would bless me in my meekness. That would heal me in my blight. Every day. we see in Nature. Traces of the hand of God. Hurling lightnings through the heavens, Lifting lilies from the sod. See his footprints in the valleys. On the hills, in every glade. Ilis breath in every breeze that dallies. Mis love in all that lie has ninth . And as we grope amidst Ilis glories, We would not ask to understand. Tis enough that in Ilis image. We were fashioned bv Ilis hand. And if in Ilis just chastisement. We must pass beneath the Rod, We must ‘ ’visement, “He still and know that I am God.” W. 1). .Martin, Class Poet. Senior Law. 1010. 18263232LAM A It J. riAKKK. ONE-YEAR CLASS IN AGRICULTURE. Class Officers. Lamar J. Fluker. . . . President. Hugh M. Bagiev. . . Vice-President. J. T. Wheeler. . . . Secretary and Treasurer. 0. 1). Walker, .... Historian. C. 0. Shelton.........Poet. Frank W. Brannan. . . Chaplain.ONE-YEAR AGRICULTURE CLASS ROLL, 1910. A DA 111, S. 15...... Baglev, Hugh M....... Bran n an, Frank AY... Cocke, S. M.......... Crocker, J. A........ Davis. Duncan........ DkLoach, Pratt ...... Fluker, Lamar •)..... Fin.wood. Paul I).... Garnet, AY. L........ Gokutikii. Walter ... Hillis, M. S......... K nox, S. AV......... Moss, .J. II......... Odom. .J. G.......... Settle, P. T......... Shelton, C. C........ Story. T. B.......... Sorrells, AV. II..... Tumlin, II. II....... Ti mlin, AV. C....... AValker, C. D........ AA'estbrook, R. J.... AYestiirook, E. C.... AV HEELER, J. T...... Veatcii, C. M........ .....Bowman. ......Atlanta. .... Moreland. ......Dawson. ......Boston. ...... Albany. . . .Statesboro. . I'nion Point. .......Tifton. Charlotte, Va. . Milledgcvillc. ......Girard. ......Duluth. . . . .Columbus. ......Girard. .....Xorcross. .Lincoln, Ala. .....Thomson. .......Athens. . . .Gainesville. .. . Gainesville. . .Tampa. Fla. .. .Gainesville. ... Gainesville. . .Oxford, Ala. ........Trion.THE REVERIES OF A HOME-SICK “AG.” The noises in the country Are the same to me as town. Though they may lie less in volume They correspond in sound. The roaring of the traffic As it speeds along your street, We have it in our rapids Where the creek and river meet. The humming of your street ear As it swings around the bend It’s the sauu at our saw-mills. It’s the same at Papa’s gin. Tito jangling of your train-hells. As the engine shifts a ear. Is repeated in our meadows And more musical by far. It's “music” in tin country Because Nature there abounds; It’s “noises” in your city “Civilization” makes the town.BOOK REVIEW. (Department conducted by Adam Knocker, dr.) The I referral ion of the lair, by Alshrook and Lanliam. eomedv in five acts. Never since tlu? days of Beaumont and Fletcher have two playwrights of such marked ability combined their talents in such an artistic way. There are some very thrilling episodes, among them the duel of the hero with Sir Ilerpicidc. and the battle with the Scissoi-s-armed legions. Hoc tic Principle II., by Washington Falk. .Jr.. B.L.D.. edited by •!. B. Wright and Win. Garrard. This work is an excellent treatise on the theory ot poetics. The matchless triolet “Helium Amoris” is taken as the standard, and the lyrics of Sapliho. Horace, and Wordsworth are criticised with relation thereto. Mr. J. 1 Jones, in reviewing this work, said: “If I had the money, I would send a copy of this hook to every morgue in the land.” The Oovcnnnnil of Denmark, by L. 10. Hast. This admirable work, coming from the facile pen of the Prince himself, has elicited favorable comment from several renowned authorities. Mr. P. F. Brock has , 1 ' author’s standpoint to he a good one. Need we say more? Lillie (Himpsis into the Hour Hu ml red, by Jacob Lowrey. This lx oklet is sold hv subscription. Tin photogravures are reproductions of the drawings of Messrs. K. N. McMillan and Ford Walker. Mr. Milton Dargan write : “ 1 was very much gratified to receive a complimentary copy of ‘Little Glimpse's.’ The chapter headed ‘Parisian Circles’ is excellent.” I)c Luxe edition. The Law of ('ompcnsalion, by I). II. Redfearn and V. II. Fraser. This abstruse subject is taken up from a business man’s point of view. The essay is especially recommended to Ralph Waldo ICmerson and R. B. Troutman, both of whom have given this question much reflection. Filial lies pert amt Fatherly Solicitude, by K. 1). Tuppcr. The subject of managing boys is dealt with at considerable length by President Tuppcr of the Master’s and Boys’ League. Among the practical illustrations and examples, we see the following headings: “How Horn Studied Foreign Languages.” “How Riddell Rebelled Against Moise. ” The book ends with a very pathetic account of the author’s own indignities at the hands of the refractory Wardlaw. Military Tactics, by T. M. Fitzpatrick. General Fitzpatrick has again come to Hie front by reason of this succinct volume. Major Gumming says: “With the exception of II. V. Reynold’s book—‘Polities’—this work on the arts of war is the best thing 1 have ever read.” A TOAST TO CANDLER HALL. Here’s to the peace of Candler Hall. To the echoes there unborn. To the old forgotten voices. King Silence on his throne. Here’s to his many courtiers all; To the Proctors of his reign ; To their big stick waved so strongly That derail’d the midnight train. And why so still in Candler Ilall? And why such peace, you say? “.Miller’s Mule” is not in school And the present “Jacks” don’t bray. Erwin Sibley. GREEK, GREEK, GREEK! Greek, Greek. Greek, No aorists more for me! And 1 would that 1 could waft them To the blue Aegaean Sea. 0 well for the Normal School lad That he shouts with his sisters at play! 0 well for the farmer boy That he rides in joy on the bay! Sigmatie, thematic or root. What matters the tense to them? Their only moods are English moods, And they don’t care a darn for the stem. Greek, Greek, Greek. But me for the English tongue! And Homer hereafter in Butcher ami Lang. Or Troy will remain unsung.SIGMA A LI [MIA KPS I LON FKATBRMTY.SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON FRATERNITY Founded ;it the Fniversity of Alabama, March f). 1850. Chapter (i«HH-«iia Beta Established January 15. 18(5(5. Colors—lioijal I’urph and Old (laid. ( IIAI»TKIt ioi.i,. A. F. Awtrev. (i. T. Brooks. K. Callaway. E. B. Dunlap. W. L. Erwin. O. W. Franklin. 11. M. 1 lawkins. W. A. Knowles. (1. X. Dope. J. 1. Scott. C. 0. Lowe. J. 11. Lumpkin. Daniel MacDoupdd. T. J. Scot I. J r. A. ). 15. Sparks. W. T. Suimucis. K. D. Tupper. W. C. Turpin. Jr. E. D. T. Wmlley. J. M. Walker. Jr. L. 1C. Wisdom. (I. Wrijrht.1' .. «S t . A uCHI PHI FRATERNITY. Founded sit Princeton Cniversitv. 1S24. Kta Chapter Established 1SG7. Colors- Smrh I ami Him . CllAPTKK Rol.l,. K. T. Anderson. 0. 0. Adams. II. X. Arrington. D. F. Barrow. W. Hot hwell. R. M. Hrown. J. K. Brown. H. Calloway. K. V. Cooksey. F. ('. Crandall. AY. K. Campbell. AW (I. Dancy. Milton Dargan. dr. S. K. Dick. V. II. Fraser. F. H. Fclkcr. H. Md). Felker. AVilliam Garrard. Jr. J. H. Gray, Jr. AW M. Kirby. Edward King. J. AW Lindsey. A. R. MaeDonell. E. AY. Moise. T. S. Moise. Hamilton McAVhorter. Jr. T. ( . Marshall. J. R. Xortheott. .J. R. Xortbentt. AY. E. Rhodes. J. L. Robinson. 11 lighten Spalding. H. ('. AYrigbt. T. J. AVoofter. Jr.K. !T. ALIM IA FUATI'.UNITV.KAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITY Founded 1 S( r . ;it Washington and Lee Cniveisify. Oiitmna Chapter Established IStiS. C. V. Anderson. V. W. Anderson. F. ('. Harrow. II. V. Blaekshear. Dana Blaekmar. I . S. Blanchard. J. I!. Borork. •I. A. Ethridge. J. (.!. Pringle. !!. V. Reynolds. E. Stokes. ( 'riiompson. T. II. 'riiompson. •J. II. Twitty. •I. 1). Willingham. •I. Willingham. R. P. White. W. W. Wright. ClIAPTKU Roi.l.. W. Newton. W. B. Xieolson. II. B. Peacock. II. II. Calloway. W. 11. Gritlin. E. W. Johnson. W. 11. Lumpkin. E. F. McCarty. C. II. Napier.PHI DKLTA TIIKTA KRATKRMTY.PHI DELTA THETA FRATERNITY. Founded at Miami 184S. Colors— Hue and White. Cii. i tkk Roll. II. D. Adams. F. C. Allen. Ij. 1). Brown. II. M. Bajdey. K. V. Carter. A. B. Cox. K. K. Dallas. W. C. Duncan. R. II. Freeman. V. II. Howard. M. W. McCrory. W. J. X or then, Jr. 0. F. Xorthen. 0. A. Sanckcn. S. B. Slack. K. M. Fleetwood. W. II. Smith. J. (I. Thurman. K. B. Troutman. R. M. Wood. J. R. 'Winchester. W. K. .Meadow.ALPHA TAT O.MKGA.ALPHA TAU OMEGA FRATERNITY. Founded at Virginia .Military Institute IS( " . Georgia Alpha Beta Established 1878. Colors-—87.7 L7 n a,,d Old Gold. ('lIAl'TKK Rol,!,. H. W. Allen. .M. II. Allen. (!. ('. Arnold. P . A. Atkinson. .1. I). Calloway. I. 1 . Cooks. (I. M. I honour. 0. M. Gresham. P. Head. T. (). Tahor. Jr. 1 . Skelton. (!. A. Smith. (i. F. Robinson. K. J. Robinson. Jr. K. R. Pottle. R. K. Persons. J. M. Lynch. E. V. Ileath.SIGMA NU FKATKRXITY.CHI l SI FKATBRXITY.CHI PSI FRATERNITY. Founded at I'nion College 1841. Alpha Delta Fstablished 1800. Cohn’S—liojjnl Purpli and (told. ClIAITKK K M,L. J. V. Annistead. F. L. Pranson. F. K. Davis. W. W. DeKenne. w. d. urn. (!. Ij. Might. d. 11. Low rev. II. A. Newman. II. fi. Noble. Cl. 0. Osborne. •I. I). Palmer. H. II. Spalding. d. J. Spencer. O e Van Wyrk. dr.KAPPA SIGMA FRATERNITY.KAPPA SIGMA FRATERNITY. Founded at the Cniverxity of Virgin in 1807. Established at Fniversity of Georgia 1901. Colors—linl, Whilt. and Emnald. Ciiapteu Hoi.i.. II. Inman Alford. M. Clyde Antrey. Dana Belser. II. Avril Crane. Joe j. Deadwyler. H. C. Frost. Edward M. Halt. ('lias. II. Krumrine. Swift It. Maddox. W. J. Xunnally. Jr. Win. II. Parker. Marvin B. Perry. Walter II. Hose. J. F. Slater. Win. II. Steele, Jr. Eugene S. Taylor. J. Meade Tolleson. J. Benson Wier, Jr.PI KAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITY Founded at tin Cniversitv of Virginia 180S. Alpha .Mil Chapter Founded at I’niverxity of Georgia 1908. CllAl’TKK RoUj. Ij. Brinson. R. F. Rureh. R. F. Calloway. W. 1). Davis. ('. R. Diekenson. P. P. Fleetwood. R. R. Forrester. R. C. Jenkins. J. S. .McClelland. (i. S. Peek. ( C. Small. R. J. Smith. W. T. Townsend C. I). Walker.l l L FRATERNITY. (Local).U. P. L. FRATERNITY. Founded at Fnivcrsitv of Georgia. (IjOCAIj). Colors— loyal Pur pit and Hack. Ciiaptkk Roll. AI)Im)11. T. AV. Bartlett. P. 1j. Brannen. C’lilT. Bivens. B. B. Brannon. F. AY. Cowan. V. S. Davis, P. M. Dobbs. M. C. Fielder. T. II. Fitzpatrick. W. AV. Fitzpatrick. T. J. Jones. AV. S. Domic. 0. C. Tnifburrow, 1). M. Mangum. AValter. Matthews. A. Miller, I). T. McMillan, Ii. Sibley. John. AVard. R. J. Wilson. J. R. 1 IIOWKLLCOBH L1CGAL FRATERNITY.HOWELL COBB LEGAL FRATERNITY. Honorary Mkmrkrs. .Judge Andrew J. Cobh. Co!. Titos. F. Green. .Mkmrkrs. Hugh K. Allen. H. K. Wisdom. W. T. Townsend. K. J. Ward. Krwiii Sibley. •J. I. McClelland. .John Sibley. Gminim Wright. •lolin T. Fort. Tom Marshall. O. V. Franklin. J. I). Palmer. K. V. Heath. M. Hill. Gus Orr. C. (). Adams.WIREGRASS GEORGIA. Take me l»aek to old South Georgia. Called “God’s country” bv the hoys Who are up at dear old “Georgia” Quito shut off from Wiregrass joys, rndei’ fire of their professors And their continual “Shot ” They are often heard bewailing. Justly, their unhappy lot. Old South Georgia, land of cotton, Of molasses, sugar cane. Take me where the pork is plenty, Where there is no fateful Imne On the bounteous crop of roast ng ears And the garden bountiful. Where the girls are all so pretty And the times are never dull. Take me where on moonlight evenings In the fall of every year “Corn-shuckiiigs” become so frequent Cane-grindings are everywhere; With a good old horse and buggy And a lady by your side You go spinning lliru the wiregrass On a pleasant evening ride. All these things make one start thinking Of the joyous times he's had Contrasted with “Georgia” troubles .Main's one feel extremely sad. So take me to the wiregrass And from there ne’er more to roam For that is the land of plenty And the place called “ Home, Sweet Home.” Jno. It. PowKMi, Jr.UNIVERSITY CHAPEL. JOKES Chop. Salykk: («lurtii«r the course of a lecture on Wordsworths Intima-tioiis «»f 1 nimoi't«ility)- “Mr. Callaway. what is tin mum of the poem we are studying? ’ ('all.wv.w.— I know it sir. it’s Wordsworth’s Imitations of Immorality." Qt'KKTiuxKu.—“Why is Hast like Hamlet?" IOnlioiitknkil- -“ Iteeause he is the I’rinee of Denmark.’ I'kuklkmDerive the equation of the curve of Homer Arrington’s nose.PANDORA WANT ADS. Wantkd.—Some He.rpicide.—II. L. Lanhani. Wanted.—More Hair. B. N. Alsbrook. Wanted.—An Otlice.—11. V. Reynolds. Wanted.—An Fncmy.—K. I . Ilall. Wanted.—A Medium for Hxprossion.—W. J. Northon, Jr. Wanted.—A Rise in Math.—A. R. MacDonell. Wanted.—A Boot lick:-—S. II. Titxhaw. Wanted.—A Moustache.—T. V. Heard and M. J. Witman. Wanted.—Peroxide.—II. I). Meyer. Wanted.—Boxing Gloves.—W. T. Bennett. Wanted.—Constructive Imagination.—I). R. Camming. Wanted.—A Master.—Fleetwood, Wanted.—Keeley Cure.—A Booze Grafter. (Address P. 0. Box 23.) For Sale. Foil Sale.—Hot Air.—J. 1 Jones. Foil Sale.—Miscellaneous Information.—I’. M. Davis. Fern Sale.—Discussions on any question.—J. W. LeCraw. Fou Sale.—My Latest Sonata. Op. 745, No. 2.—W. 0. Weems. For Sale.—My Latest Football Guide Book.—D. Iverson. Foil Sale.—Y. M. C. A. Information.—II. S. Rogers. For Sale.—Calendars.'—I). Redfearn. For Sale.—A Burden of Proof.—J. M. Walker. For Sale.—Not News But Views.—W. 0. Turpin.THE SPHINX. OmeKKS William L. Erwin,. Morton Hodgson. I). N. Kedfearn. E. V. Carter. K. S. Hi. I). S. IS. W. L. Erwin. M. S. Hodgson. I). II. Kedfearn. II. Lnnhain. Mkmhkks. E. V. Carter. • I. E. Lucas. E. M. ISrown. II. A. Nix. E. T. Miller. O. W. Franklin. •II. V. ISIaeksliear. Faci i.tv Mkmkkkks. Chancellor Harrow. Dean Knelling. Professor IIoo|)er. Professor Hark. I Vo lessor Du Hose Professor IS rooks. •Not in picture. mjA iv « !) (IXV H.l?)SY )CASQUE AND GAUNTLET. RoU,. Henry Newman. Dan MacDotigald. Alec. MacDonell. Ed. lirown. Ered Allen. .Jim Palmer. Jack Uncock. Louis Wisdom. () . • Van Wyck. Hob Troutman. Hughes Spalding. Milton Dargan. Ed. Wadlev. Hob White. John Thurman. Graham Wright. Lanier Hranson. II. V. Reynolds. Samuel Dick. Hugh Allen. Ralph Wood.SKXI'OR ROHM) T AI ILK.SENIOR ROUND TABLE. Professor Park. J. S. Tilley. I). K. Cummin . W. Falk. Jr. Henderson Lanliam. Aubrey .Mallhews. K. T. Miller. A. R. MaePonell. II. A. Newman. II. A hit Nix. II. V. Reynolds. 0. Van-Wvek.DICLTA DKI l DELTA DELTA. Founded in 190!) for the recognition of merit as evideneed by superior ability in scholarship. debating. and oratory. F. ri rv Mkmhkks. AV ill is Henry Boeoek. Sand ford .Meddiek Salyer. John Shipley Tilley. Sti'dknt Mkmiikks. Hinton Bloodworth Blaekshear. Vanderbilt Debate. !!)()!). Fralbert Talmadge Miller. Junior Orator’s Medal. 190!). llosea A Hit Nix. Fxeellenee in Scholarship. Edwin Warren Moise. Exeellenee iu Scholarship. Edgar Legate Bennington. Anniversarian. 1910. Dope Furman Broek. Anniversarian. 1910. Henderson Lovelaee Lanham. North Carolina Debate. 1910, William Conrad Turpin. North Carolina Debate. 1910, Evans Virgil Heath. Virginia Debate, 1910. Washington Falk. Jr. Virginia Debate, 1910. John Adam Sibley. Vanderbilt Debate. 1910.TUB THALFANS.Mkmiskks. Milton Daiyan. . . . President. Minton Blaekshear. . . . Vico-President. Howell IVneoek. . . . Manager. Mis-; Maiy Lindt n. . . Directin'. W. W. Anderson. J. 11. Uncork. K. M. Fleetwood. Iv T. Miller. Selin's Rogers. ('has. LeCraw. •I. II. Lowrey. Frwin Sibley. IL I . Troutman M. S. Hodgson.“DAVID GARRICK.” Presented by "Tiik Tiiauans. In Athens...............April 22. In Commerce.................April 2fi. In Gainesville..........April 27. Cast ok Cii ak. thus. David Garrick Mr. Injrol Stpiirc Cliivv Mr. Brown Mr. Jones Mr. Williams Mr. Thornton Milton Dargan. Jr. Thomas (a butler) Kralbert Miller. Mr. .Johnson George (another servant).. Charlie LeCraw. Miss Ada Injrot Miss A carnet a Brown t Qiwktkttk: Messrs. Blaekshcar, Darjran. LeCraw. and Hodgson.FRAGMENTS OF GREAT ORATIONS. Tin following little pieces were round in the ruins of an old lniil«lin$r. which evidently bore the inline “ lOt loeere et reruiii exquirere causas." None of the orations seem to he complete, as only a paragraph of each is extant — Z. Antiquarianus. A. 1). 2010). (EXTRACT T). “Yu call me 'Scrub.' and ye do well to call him ‘Scrub.' who for three long months has met upon the gridiron every shape of man or giant the broad empire of Georgia can furnish, and who has never yet whispered a complaint. If there 1m any among you who can say that ever in scrimmage or in practice game I was not a cheerful target for the team, let him stand forth and sav it like an Ananias. If there be any three among you who dare to meet me on Unbloody sand, let them know that I meet their like every day in Autumn." (EXTRACT II). ‘ How long. () Favcsich. will you abuse our patience? How long will this infernal bell-ringing of yours insolently display itself? Have the Sophomores posted nightly on tin campus produced no effect upon you? None the thronging together of all good Freshmen? None that well-chosen place of holding the banquet? None tin faces and countenances of the scrappers? Do you not feel that your guilt lies open? Is not your intention to drown our sleep now firmly bound in the minds of all ?’’ (EXTRACT III). The following speech is signed “ F. E. 1).”: Let no man dare when I am dead to charge me with aluminum. Let no man attaint my memory by believing that 1 could have engaged in any course but that of my utensils’ fame and reputation. I am going to my long home. My cooking pan is already neatly greased, tin stove is opened to receive it. and it is placed in the interior. Let no man write my epitaph. When aluminum takes its place among the wonders of the world, then, and not till then, let my epitaph be written."THE CABINET CLUB.THE CABINET CLUB. (2) (3) (4) (3) (6) (7) (14) (13) (Hi) (17) OS) 09) (20) (2S) (20) (30) (31) (32) (33) (34) (1) Prof. R. 15. Park. 1007- 08. 1 i. 15. Allen. (S) M. S. Hodgson. 15. M. Brown. (11) F. McWhorter. IT. G. Bailey. (10) V. B. Smith. J. P. Fort. (11) R. B. Scott. j. II. Fitzpatrick. (12) C. Z. Walker. 0. W. Franklin. (13) P. 15. Palmer. 1008- 00. F. C Allen. (21) A. R. .MacDonell. J. II. Boeoek. (22) Aubrey Matthews. F. j. Branson. (23) 11. A. Newman. L. Buttolph. (24) II. A. Nix. S. K. Dick. (23) J. I). Willingham. W. Falk. Jr. (20) T. S. Capers. (4. M. Gresham. (27) Ralph Ragan. 10()0- K . J. L. Dead wyler. Jr. W. S. Connerat. 15. L. Pennington. B. C. Wright. (1. H. Kollv. V. B. Holmes. W. ( Turpin. Jr. (85) Magnus Witnian. (8(5) Reiuler Dallis. (87) W. J. Xortlien. Jr. (88) F. 15. Davis. (80) 15. W. Moist . (40) W. S. Jones. (41) P. R. Anderson.. M. A. Clil'B.G. M. A. CLUB U. II. Galloway. .Jim Palmer. U. P. White. V. Davis. T. Forbes. K. K. Pottle. •J. I). Will’mi'liain. L. W. Willis. W. I . Meadow . Malcolm McOrorv. F. Awtrev. H. baboon. I. Keaile. K. ( Frost.STOXE MOI’XTAIX CM I . ISTONE MOUNTAIN CLUB 11. M. Ilawkins. K. I . Bowen. T. . Frank Carter. 1'. B. Dunlap. M. Paul Fclker. G. A. San ken. S. 1 II. Lanier. J. M. Lynch. .1. Tom Brand. A. B. Whitley. •1. J II. Arrington. President. IJ. B. Troiilman. Seci. and Treas. F. C. Allen. Henry Howard. S. K. Dirk. A. L. Move. A. Peacock. (!. X. Hope. Boykin Wright. .J. M. Xorllieutt. Dana Blackman. L. K. Wisdom. V. llarher. • B. Berry. I. Starr. I. McClelland. . Blitch.TAT SIGMA.TAU SIGMA CLUB. Hack row—Frost. Lumpkin, Dunlap. Fm man. Duncan. Crane, Cowon, Howard. Third row—Tabor. Knowles. Lindsey. Annistoad. Stokes. Callaway, Skelton, Noble. Autrev. Second row—Newton. MaeDou ald. Saneken. ('amphell. Robinson. McCarty. Wilson. Moise. First row—Carter. Willingham. Dope. Bothwcll. Pottle. Blaekxhar. Not in picture—Smith. Henry. Men not in picture who left college Calloway. .J. 1). Siimmcrs. Smith.HARAWA RAG. Pi.ack—T1m» Harawa. Timk—Any time lietween twelve in tin morning and twelve at night. Bovs are artistically placed all over 1 lie Cafe, with a row sitting down outside the windows. “Skelt" Dargan—“Mornin.’ Prof. Stewart." (Wheels about, makes an awful face at the soda jerker. and punches Ralph Wood in the hack). R. Wood “Look out. you old nut." (Gooses Skelt. who yells horribly, also pinching Wood on the arm). “Kerdie Allen walks in slowly: he has oil a stiff-bosomed shirt, a standing collar with a green neck-tic trying to climb it. a little cap on the back of his head, and a suit which looks as if it had l»eon slept in. “Kerdie —“Matclia for a dope." “Skelt"—“Sure. Kvcrv little girl are." “Nappy" Brown rushes in. swinging his little suit case, strides about, glances keenly at the clock, gulps down a chocolate milk, and hikes out for the athletic field. “Kerdie — Kleet. gimme a dope and ammonia, and make it strong. (To Dargan). Haven’t slept for five nights, haven't had anvthing to eat for six days---- » “Skelt"—“You look it. you sot----" “ Kerdie —“Who’s a sot ? If I was a grafter like you. you double-join tod, knock-kneed, over-grown heifer, (continues indefinitely). “Willie" Turpin, with his derby over one ear. walks up and fixes his eagle eve on Skelt. •‘Willie"—“Iloilo. Milt.v ! “Skelt"—Hello. Willie. Come what may! Ask me! Is dat a far!" “Willie"—“Pretty. Miltv. Cooehee Coo!" ( . C. Small and Grimes Dancy next appear. C. 0. Small “Got a cigarette?" “Skelt"—“Sun . Have vou?" C. C. S.—“No. Have you?" S. —“Sure. Have you?" C. C. S.—“Aw. gimme a cigarette." “Skelt"—“All ha! 1 have thee now. .Jack Dalton! Kiss me! Is that a far’!" Grimes Dancy gooses Skelt. who hits Kerdie Allen and breaks a glass on the counter. “Piggy" Tupper walks in—“Where’s my boy? Where’s my Mush? 1 bet you lie’s done gone and spent that fifteen cents I gave him yesterday. Hey, Mush, come here, my boy!" (Mush ‘comes here.’). In walks .John Moore Walker with great dignity, also with Dan Mae-Dougald. •I. M. Walker “Hello, gentlemen. Will you have something to drink?” Dan Mncl).—“Match you for it. John Moore." •I. M. Walker “No. we should not gamble. Speaking of gambling, the question of International Conciliation is one which ought to appeal to every free-born American citizen, and one which, taken from the standpoint of social ethics, ought to--’’ (ail infinitum). Tom Heard—“Du best cin hose maim. Herr Dargan. 1st die csel ein vogel . Nein. die esel ist Her Dargan. " | Curtain.] Performance is continuous, but it repeats itself frequently.PRESIDENTS OF AGRICULTURAL CLUB.Views at State College of Agriculture, ami on College farm.TO FOX COOK’S BUGLE. (Apologies to .Moore). 'Pile horn that once through Candler Hail The soul of music shed. Now hangs as mute on Candler Hail As if that soul wen fled. So sleeps the student in his bed. So nightly taps are o’er; And waking hoys with anger red Now hear that horn no more. No more to Oscar .Miller bright The horn of Candler swells; 'I'lie thought alone that comes at night Its tale of ruin tells. 'Pile student now so seldom wakes. The only throb he giv s Is when his heart indignant breaks To know that bugle lives. Impossibilities. To ask questions like Falk and lingers. To talk polities like eke Reynolds. To look as serious as Had MacDonell. To appear as kiddish as Tommy Abbot. To u :o as much herpicide as Lanhnm and Townsend. To appear as important as Ral Miller. To find a better class than 1010. To study harder than Percy Davis. To make money like Campbell and Red foam. To see Mize with his hair brushed. To pitch ball like Harbor.cbefs 'ibiwutCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS.ROSTER OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. Likit. •). A. Atkins. Commandant. K. M. Bkoww, Cadet Major. Cadkt Captains. Company “ A " Company B” . Company “0” Oompanv I)”. Artillery II. A. Nix. T. .M. Fitzpatrick. ( - ADI'T Fihst Bikitknants. K. I . Whitb. Adjutant. K. L. Camphki.i., (Quartermaster. Company “ A ’ Company “B” Company “C” . Company “D” Artillery Washington Falk. Fred W. Ball. B. T. Miller. Cadkt Kkco.vd I jIKP tenants. Company “ A “. Company “ B” Company “O’ . Company I) ” . W. II. Steele.CADI 'I' STAFF.Cadet Staff Roll. Likct. J. A. Atkins. Commandant. Cm lot Major................. Cadet Ad.julanl ............. Cadet Quartermaster.......... Cadet Sergeant Major......... Cadet Quartermaster Sergeant Cadet Color Sergeant ........ Cadet Color Sergeant ........ Cadet Drum Major............. .. K. M. Drown. .. . R. I White. R. L. Campbell. ....I. K. Drown. ... D. K. Droek. W. K. Whatley. .. R. R. Martin. R. W. Cooksey.(’AI)KT HAND.Members of Cadet Band -J. A. Atkins. I . S. A. Commandant, d. K. Dotteky. Director. ]{. Y. Cooksky. Drum Major. M. (' .Awlivy. Lanier Branson. Fred Crandall. Brad! baboon. M. MeCrory. J. s. MeKey. M. Nunez. L. S. Noble. (J. S. | »ek. Milton Durban, dr. M. 0. Goldin. V. M. llapp. R. N. .McMillan. Marshburne. A. Move. Percy Kossee. S. T. Smith. 0. J. Tolnax. K. V. Von Ilasseln. A. B. Ratos.«COMPANYCOLLEGE CALENDAR. Sept. Kith. Sept. ITtli. Sept. 22ml. Sept. 29th. OH. 10th. Nov. 27th. Nov. 291 li. Dev. Kith. D.v. 19th. •hill. ")tli. .Jim. Sth. Jan. Kith. .Jim. 22ml. Feb. Till. Feb. 9th. Fvh. ITtli. Mim h 2nd. .March -h l. .March 20th. Marc'll 2(ith. April 1st. April 2nd. April tith. April 11th. April Kith. April 22ml. May Kith. May Kith. May lath. ( allege opens. Seventy-two Frc'shnnii se e n in the harher shops. Professor Tilley and Lizzie Weems arrive . Weems signs up ;is Danev’s hoy. Topper is edevted president of Maste r‘s League . Spalding goes to New York. The rest of Spalding eonie s home. Ed. Hall goes on tin water-wagon. Payne looses his i ise in philosophy. First man “Oloomv" hits flunked in twe nty live years. Italpli Wood gets hack in college. Kggsseived for hreakfast at Denmark Hall. Mae'Done‘ll has his trouse is presse-d. W. Falk auctions his volume of poems, doc Brown has a thought. •Jim Payne falls in love. •John Moore Walken makes a speech with gesture's. Prof. Park would like for Mr. Bhickshcar to conn to see him. Dr. White steps up to Washington on business connected with the Fniversity. I V Holds gets mad at his room-mate and gives him a e-opy of W. Falk's poems. Father Lanhain is sohen . April fool day—Blaekshear looks very pleasant. Dargan make's a noise like a ine nagei ie . Sam Dick makes (L in Flench. Bed team takes a hath. Mr. Morton Hodgson talks on "Love at the N. W. C. A. convention. Prof. Hooper sings a solo in Chapel. Iverson goes into a trainee. Dancy’s hoy ge ts away from him. Moise talks with the Chancellor on mat tens concerning the Cni-versity. “Stump” Willingham shoots Prof. Payne . The shock breaks up the e lasx.AO HOH'riO.) H.LVJ.S VIOHOHDf'uiiLjUyrnmJiiEDITORS OF PANDORA FROM 1886 TO THE PRESENT TIME. Vom mk I. ISSfi.—Kditnr-tn-Chicf. (i. N. Wilson. K A. Business .Manager. V. B. Cook. A T 12. Associate Kditors. W. K. Wooten, A A E; McDaniel. X ‘I : C. F. Rico. X «l ; C. II. Wilson. K A; W. A. Speer. 1 A ■); F. F. Stone. l A (•): R. I). .Meatier. A T 12: M. B. Bond. A T A: W. S. F pshaw. A T A; R. S. .Move. «l T A: P. Jj. Wade, «l T A; A. W. Wade. 2 N: W. (1. Brown. 2 N. Vol.lTMK II. 1887.—Kditor-in-CIlief. 0. F. Riee. X ‘I . Business Manager. 1. W. Daniel. K A. Assoeiate Editors. T. W. Reed. l A (-); (». Waters. l» P A: W. .1. Shaw. A N; H. K. .Milner. A T 12: A. L. Franklin. A T A. Voi.l'MK III. 1888.—Kditor-iii-Chief. Albert Howell. K A. Business .Maunder. A. W. Griggs. A T A. Assoeiate Kditors. W. L. Moore. A A K; T. R. Crawford. A T 12; F. W. Code. A X; Lueicn Ij. Knight. X I : W. M. Glass, A T A. VoM'MK IV. 181)0.— Kditor-in-(ahief. .John I). Little. 2 A B. Business Manager. W. K. Wheat ford. N. Associate Kditors. F. K. Callaway. K A; S. J. Tribble. 1 A (-): J. C. Crawford, i N; W. W. Kl I is. X «l : W. L. Stallings, A T A; W. N. Smith. X 'k: K. A. Cohen. X I VoM’MK V. 1802.— Kditors-in-Chirf. .J. F. Lewis. X ‘I : L. L. Brown. A T 1L Business .Managers. W. E. Cristir. S N: W. T. Kelly. A T 12. Associate Editors. J. C. Kimball, i A K; Roy Dallas. l A ( ); .J. R. Lane, S A B; K. W. Frey. X k. VoM’MK VI. ISOU.—Kditor-in-CIlief. Harry Hodgson. K A. Business Manager. F. (!. Barfield. A A K. Associate Kditors. C. R. Xisbet. X l ; X. B. Stewart. A T 12: A. 0. Halsey. A N: II. A. Alexander: K. (L Cabaniss. I» A ( ): F. G. .Johnson. A T 12: Kugene Dodd. X »k. Voi.l’MK VII. 1804.- Editors-in-Chief. C. R. Tidwell. A T 12: Xoel Moore, S A B. Business Managers. Paul L. Fleming. X l ; .John I). Stelling. A T G. Associate Kditors. L. I). Fricks. A X: W. 1 . Harbin. X 12; II. Brown. K A; George Beckett. «l» A ( ). VoM’MK VI11. 1805.— Kditor-in-Chicf. W. A. Harris. X l». Business Manager, »L ]. (jlilison. A T 12. Associate Kditors. II. II. Steiner. 2: A K; »f. • Morton. K A : W. W. (’handler. A T 12: W. L. Kemp. A X; .J. T. Dunlap. A (•); II. V. Black. X 'k: .J. G. Smith. Xon-Fraternity. ou mk IX. 1800.— Kditor-in-Chicf. IMiny Hall. K A. Business Manager. L G. Pitman. «l A (-). Associate Editors. M. M. Lockhart. 1 A K: .). B. (’on-nelly. X l ; Fred Morris. X: C. H. Holden. A T 12; II. V. Black. X vk; T. A. Neal; R. B. Xallv. oi.pmk X. 1807.— Editor-in-Chief. II. G. Colvin. A A K. Business Manager. R-E. Brown. A T 12. Assoeiate Edilois. F. L. Fleming X «l : .J. W. Spain, K A: Harry Dodd. X ; P. S. Smith. «1 A (-); A. L. Tidwell. A T 12; II. Love joy. A X : W. B. Kent ; .J. W. Hendricks.Voi.rMK XF. ISOS.— Editors-in-Chief. Hurry Dodd. X 'I'; Hugh White. 2 X. Business Manager: J. C. MeMichael. K A. Asociate Editors. C. II. Black, X »k ; K. K. Pomeroy, 2 A E; C. Westbrook. A T 12: J. T. Dorsey. l A ( ); H. R. Perkins. A T 12. Voi.rMK XII, ISO!).— Editors-in-Chief. Garrard Glenn. A B: A. P. Adams. X I . Business Manager. P. E. Johnson. X »k. Associate Editors, J. B. MeCurry, K A; W. S. Bluii. A T 12: F. K. Brodnax. A T 12; W. K. Watkins. 2 X; I). G. Ileidt: •). W. Mason. Voi.rMK XIII. 11)00.—Editors-in-Chief. Arehihald Blaeksliear. K A; Fair Dodd, X 'k. Business Manager. F. E. Brodnax. A T 12. Associate Kditorx, F. P. Calhoun. X I ; K. P. Shannon. I A (•): F. G. Topper, I£ A E: J. I . Gardner. 2 X: William Davis; K. 11. Hamby. Vommk XIV. 1001.—Kditors-in-Chief. K. P. Shannon. l» A -): J. I). McCartney. 1 A E. Business Manager. Jack Banks. X »k. Associate Editors. P. A. Williams. S X: V. 11. Bullard. AT 12; R. («. Stephens. K A: I. M. Putman, K S: W. I). Hoyt. X 'k; James L. Sibley. Vdu mk XV. 1002.—Editors-in-Chief. Frank II. Barrett. 2- A E; Sterling II. Blaeksliear. X l . Business Managers. J. K. Jordan. A T 12; M. W. Lewis, X 'k. Associate Editors, C. 1). Bussell. «l A (-); 1. S. Peebles. X; M. S. Johnson. K A; II. M. Fletcher. K 2: Dewald Cohen. Voi.rMK XVI. 100J.- Editors-in-Chief. (1. Dexter Blount. K A; Frampton E. Ellis. 1 A (-). Business Managers. -I. Benton High. (Mamie W. Bond. A X. Associate Editors. Marion II. Smith. A A E: Hugh M. Scott. X '! ; Preston Brooks. A T 12; W. G. England. X 'k: Marvin M. Dickinson. K 2£; Sidney J. Xix. P. P. L. Voi.rMK XVII. 15)04.—Editors-in-Chief. L. P. Goodrich. S X: I. S. Hopkins. Jr.. ‘I A 0. Business Managers. II. M. Blaeksliear. A 1' 12: G. W. Xunnally. X !»;.!. B. Gamble. Associate Editors. J. I). Bower. K A; Roderick Hill, 2 A E; Wailes Lewis. X ; W. B. Shaw. K ; W. (). Roberts. I’. P. L.: R. X. Burt. hid. Voi.rMK XVIII. l!H)f . Kditors-in-Chief. A. L. Ihtrdy. K i: V. B. Moore. X ! . Business Managers. Roderick Hill. S A E; C. P. Pratt. A T 12. Associate Editors. II. W. 'Pelford. I'. P. L.: M G. Stokes. 1ml.: A. II. Carmichael. X »k: W. (). Marshhurn. 1 A - ; -1. C. C pshaw. i X: Art Editor. 0. 11. B. Blood worth. -I r.. K A. Voi.rMK XIX. 1 !) )( .— Kditors-in-Chief. W. (). Marshhurn. «l A (•): Lansing B. Lee. 2 A E. ManagingKditor.il. L. Covington. K A. Assistant Managing Editor. J. II. Bradberry. C. P. L.; Art Editor. J. G. Mays. X »k. Associate Editors. R. S. Parker. X «l ; G. A. Green. A T 12; W. B. llani-bleton. 2 X: E. R. Lambert. K i: .1. R. Turner, hid. Vom mk XX. 1 DOT. Editors-in-Chief. Phil W. Davis. Jr.. «l A 0: J. K. Mile-Donald. X Business Manager. T. E. Scott. Art Editor. W. 11. Griffith. K A. Assistant Business Manager. II. M. Wilson. X. Associate Editors. W. G. Brantley. Jr.. 2 A K: W. T. McCaffrey. K i: .1. II. Xeisler. C. P. L.; R. S. Parker. X «l ; T. S. Winn. A T 12.Voi.r.MK XXI. BIOS.—Kditors-in-Chief. S. 0. Smith. l A (-); W. C. Henson. Business Manager. K. I . King. i A K. Assistant Business Manager. I). L. Rogers. Art ICditor. II. 0. Cannon. A T 1}. Associate ICditors. .J. B. Harris. X I ; S. K. Morton. K A; C. C. Brooks. N; Lanier Bransiai, X 'k; Boy Strickland. K A : (». V. (tlausier. r K A. Voi.i’mk XXII. MM)!).—Kditors-in-Chicf. W. II. .Johnson. K A:.James .Montgomery. X 'k. Business Manager. I). L. Borers. Art ICditors, .J. It. Wier. Jr.. K -; B. F. Bovson. Associate I'ditors. J. .M. Walker. A 1C; 1C. M. Brown, X «I»: W. B. Holmes. l A (-); Frank Clark. Jr.. A T 12; C. C. Brooks, i N: C. F. IVkor. F. 1 . L.; 0. l Beall. Voia.MK XXIII. 11)10.—ICditnrs-in-Cliiof. II. A hit Nix; John Moore Walker. A A B. Business Manager. B. L. Camplvell; Art lCditor. Hugh King Allen. A N. Associate ICditors. lCugcuc S. Taylor. K Hughes Spalding. X l ; (). M. Gresham. A 'I' 12; Aubrey Matthews. F. B. L.; Bohert (dimming: Henry Newman. X ; Fred Allen. «l A 0; Bohert I . White. K A; Corbin C. Small. II K A.'CIHVOH XVIDMOM!)EDITORS OF GEORGIAN FIRST TERM. Emtoimx-Ciiikk: Washington Falk. Jr. Assistant Editors: Win. On mini. 11. L. Lanham. A. Mathews. E. L. Pennington. K. S. Taylor. Bcsinkss Manackk : Assistant Manackk : M. Sluskv. F. K. Davis. ('iKcriiATioN Ma.na(;kk : Harold Meyer. SECOND TERM. Editoimx-Ciiikf: 0. Van Wvek. Assistant Editors : Win. Garrard, Jr. A. Mathews. H. L. 1 anham. E. L. Pen nin jit on. llrsiNKss Manackk : M. Sluskv. Assist a nt M a n ackr F. E. Davis. ('ikci’katiun Manackk : E. S. Taylor.RED AND BLACK STAFF. SECOND TERM.RED AND BLACK BOARD. FIRST TERM. II. A. Newman...................................hditor in-( liiel. F 0 Allen......................................... Editor. Warren Moist?...................................Athletie Editor. It. B. Troutman.................................L »eal Editor. A. 0. B. Sparks................................Exchange Editor. .J. E. Deadwvler................................Business .Manager. Render Dallis...................................Circulation Manager. SECOND TERM. F ('. Allen.....................................Editor-in-Cliief. I,. Read w.vler.............................. jwist«til Kilitnr. W. C. Turpin. Jr................................Athletic Kditur. II. K. Allen..........................................Editor. K. L. l’eimin;;ton.............................Exchange Editor. I,. S. |{ol son.................................Ruainosx Manager. Paul Anderson ..................................Circulation Manager.L.E.RAST I BUSINESS MANAGER. R R CH LDSI ASST. BUS. MGR C.h.McLEMORE LOCAL EDITOR W.F WHATLEY ASST. BUS. MGRHISTORY OF THE PANDORA. AX DOHA,” tin gif! f Jill t In gods. blessed us for the first tiim with its presence :it tin hands of tIk Class of 188(». It had tin distinction of being the first of its kind published in Georgia, and the second in the South. Representatives from the fraternities—two from each— composed tin board of editors; nevertheless its dependence upon the student-body in general is recognized in the lines of its dedication: “To you. who have by your counsels, sought to make this thing succeed, aiding ns by kind suggestions, and explaining every need, would we dedicate this medley of our college jokes all new, as a token and expression of our gratitude to yon.” Besides the “medley of our college jokes.” the edition was marked by a few crude attempts at pen and ink art. and certain scanty productions in prose. In short, from one of its paper back covers to the other, our first annual was indeed of the humblest and most unpretentious proportions. However, a beginning was achieved—the gods bail better things in store. In 1887. the second attempt was marked by a volume of more encouraging parts. Il seems, from a more or less facetious bit of editorial comment that that somewhat unique order, “Zcta (’hi. first comes into prominence about this time. Contests at baseball, c roquet, checkers, and marbles also find a place in editorial notice. The Chronicle Book and dob Printing Company, of Augusta, published the Pandora for 18S8. which was a decided improvement over the two preceding issues. Instead of a cover of the paper-back persuasion, the present volume was neatly bound in cloth, with suitable lettering. 'Pile business end of the 88 publication, however, must have taken an unfortunate turn; for the class of 1.8811 had to be satisfied with the commendable if not inspiring task of liquidating a Pandora debt rather than of publishing a Pandora annual. On the bojird of editors for the ’IK) issue, it is gratifying to note a representation granted to the non-fraternity students. Prior to this time, it will be remembered, the board was made up exclusively from among the fraternity element. The class of ’!)! was jiIso the unfortunate recipient, so it would seem, of such another legacy of debt as that which was the burden of its predecessor of 1881). No publication, at least, was attempted. A decided change for the better, however, marks the Pandora for 1808. 'Phis volume was much larger than previous issues, and was characterized, further, by noteworthy improvement in the matter of mechanical make-up. It was rectangular in shape with an attractive cover-design of red and black. Many new features, such as tin including of class poems, and short sketches for tin Seniors, indicate the ambitious activity of the editors. The Thai inns, also here mentioned, gave their first performance on the evening of March 10, 1808. The German (’lid). The Boating Club. The Bon Ton Immigrant Club— which, composed of out-of-state students, numbered on its role representatives from South Carolina. Virginia. Kentucky. Mississippi. Alabama. New York, California, and Mexico—date their existence from this year. After this remarkable issue then have been only gradual changes marking the evolution of the Pandora. One bv one. new features have been added— and we may reasonably expect an annual for 1010 consistent with this ever-improving scale. It is both interesting and gratifying to note that the Pandorais for tin first time bo mg printed this year in Athens. The McGregor Company have undertaken this work, and hid fair to turn out a volume in nowise inferior hi matter of mechanical make-up to previous issues. Such then is tin brief account of a very long and tedious journey of development. We have seen the Pandora in its infancy, with its few pages, its paper binding, and its homely sketches. We see it now in a binding of leather, with numerous pages, with many and handsome illustrations. The years during which this change in our annual has been accomplished, have also witnessed an aggrandizement equally gratifying in our college. The destiny of each is that which the students of the past and of the future will have it. (The Editors wish to express their appreciation to .Mr. M. J. Witman for his able assistance in the preparation of the foregoing).§ocUUc4-HISTORY OF THE DEMOSTHENIAN LITERARY SOCIETY. X tli( early days of the history of our State, when Athens was not a city the I’niversity was founded. Soon after the establishment of the I'niversity. its founders, realizing the inestimable importance of an ability to speak to an intelligent citizen of tin state, organized the Demosthenian Literary Society. The records state that Demosthenian was founded in 1801. while the first debate was held on March 2d. 1802. Demosthenian was the only debuting society in the I'niversity till 1822, when the promoters of the society in order to create an interest in oratorical rivalry founded the Phi Kappa Literary Society. This amused sharp competition in debating. In several instances the debates became so heated that blows were passed; but from such contests orators went forth. The history of Demosthenian is la st revealed in the lives and history of its illustrious sons who in science, literature, oratory, and statesmanship adorn her fairest pages. Those who have gone out from tin walls of Demosthenian look back to her with tender recollections, and attribute their successes more to the inspiration and knowledge in the sharply contested debates held within her walls than to any other literary training in tin college course. Her annals are an inspiration to all live students of Georgia. Demosthenian has not only taken an active part in the literary work of the I’niversity. but has given freely to aid worthy causes in other departments of the institution, leaving her own tenements weather-ls-aten. time-worn, and in need of repair. Put we know that when the call becomes imperative, her loyal sons will rally to her support, and see that she is remodeled becomingly. To glance at her past means to predict her future. In champion debates, she has defeated her sister society successively, for almost a score of years. For the past years Demosthenian has been active in her work and has accomplished much, although the success could Ik increased and the future brightened by a hearty cooperation and active support of all her mcmlicrs. Let us go forth with a firm determination to make the future of Demosthenian brighter and more glorious than her past. If we but do our duty, there hangs before us the bright and eternal star of hope. G. C. Smirks.PRKSIDBNTS OF DKMOSTHKN!AN SOCIKTY.HISTORY OF THE PHI KAPPA LITERARY SOCIETY. T is a significant fact that through all tlu stages of racial development. oratory lias remained constantly a powerful weapon for good or for evil. Public utterances have roused great armies to battle and victory, they have destroyed cities and nations, and have changed thought, government ami religion. In short, then is very little hevond their pale. In our own country the tremendous effects of eloquence have been felt time and time again, and Southern men were among our earliest orators. Naturally the students of Franklin College were not content to lag behind the rest of the country in this regard, and so. in the first year of our last century, they instituted the Demos! hen inn Literary Society for the furtherance of the work. But healthy competition is a wonderful thing, and in a few years the young men began to appreciate the fact that debating and kindred activities would be put in a more flourishing condition if stimulated by rivalry. Accordingly, live men. V. R. Crabbc. 11. Y. Howard. S. Simmons. J. I). Watkins, and .John Rutherford, met February 12th. 1820. and founded tlu Phi Kappa Society. Mr. Howard was elected president. At the next meeting— the following Saturday—eleven members were admitted. From that time it began to grow rapidly in size and in enthusiasm. The first question debated in Phi Kappa was. “Which is more useful to his country, the warrior or the sage 7 This was decided in favor of tlu atlirmative. The problems discussed in those days were largely historical, but current polities were frequently brought up. What interesting affairs those ante-bellum debates must have been, with nullification. tariff, and slavery extension in a state of constant agitation! In 1820 Athens was a very small town. Red Men still roved through the neighboring for sts and the settler could be heard hewing tlu wood in the distance. The summer vacation of that year lasted less than a month, and in the minutes of .July the 2!)th. we read: “On account of the camp meeting there was no regular meeting of Society this evening and Society adjourned.” 'flu first mention of our sister society in the minutes hears tin date of August 18th. 1820. and is in the form of a resolution “that Society take measures to treat with the Demosthenians.” We are not able to ascertain why this was done. The rivalry must have been very keen for awhile, but good feeling always predominated. Discipline was enforced by means of a Phi Kappa tribunal. There is record of the expulsion of a member for perjury, and tlu trial of several persons because of drunkenness. It was moved and carried in 1820 that a member absent twice be arraigned. There were some stringent regulations with reference to l ehavior in the hall and some severe pnaltiex enacted. As best we can glean from accounts, however, excellent order was maintained. The war came, and Phi Kappa’s sons went off with willing hearts to fight for the South, but. the war over, they returned and renewed their mutual efforts for improvement. So has Phi Kappa stood, a power for tlu good and tlu Alma Mater of a galaxy of illustrious Georgians. Kouak L. Pknninuto.y. 3 f r r. .a VHENDERSON LANHAM JAS. PKBKIDEXTSOFPUI KAPPA SOCIETY.Junior Orators. I . M. Rubinstein. .1. Xorthen. Jr. S. I truck. R. JJ. Troutman. J. It. Powell. M. J. Witman. (nut in picture).IMPROMPTU DEBATERS. Dk.MOSTIIKNIAN. I’m Kaimw. II. Abit Nix. li. S. Robson. •I. R. Powell. (i. (’. Sjnllcrs. P. b Brock. V. T. Townseml. .1. P. .Jones. ( S. Loewenlicrz. .1. M. Walker. W. C. Turpin. I . Ii. Pennington. Alex. .MaeDonell.CLASS DEBATERS. FRESHMAN’ DEBATERS. SOIMIOMORE DEBATERS.FRESHMAN DEBATE. Subject: usolrtd. That Georgia should take State action encouraging foreign immigrants to settle within her landers. Affirmative—Phi Kappa: Edgar B. Dunlap. Frank Carter. IIill Freeman. Negative- Demosthenian: Zach S. Cowan. Samuel Wiley. Claude II. Hogan. SOPHOMORE DEBATE. Subject: He solved. That a Constitutional amendment should be secured whereby the Cnited States Senators should be elected by direct vote of the people. Affirmative—Demosthenian: C. E. .Martin. W. A. Mann. (J. ('. Edwards. Negative—Phi Kappa: II. I). Meyer. Geo. Xorthen. Screven Farmer.IIKXDKIISOX A. li.AXII.AM. W. Tl'lllMX, III. GEORGIA-NORTH CAROLINA DEBATE. It (solved. That all corpora lions doing an inter-state commerce business be required to take out a Federal charter under such conditions as Congress may prescribe, constitutionality granted. A k pi k m a t i vk—G c ) rg i a: Henderson A. Lanhani. William C. Turpin. Negative—North Carolina: F. N. Cox. C. K. McIntosh.IIINTOX IU. rKSm: K. .ioii siiu.ky. GEORG1A-VANDERBILT DEBATE. Asol rid. That in all Southern cities of between 2." .000 and 100.000 inhabitants the municipal authority be in general vested in a commission of not more than seven elected from the city at large. A mini ati vb—(ieorgia: Hinton Blaeksbear. John Sibley. Xkuativk—VanderbiM:WASHINGTON FALK. JK. I-]. V. ItICATII GEORGIA-VIRGINIA DEBATE. lh solved. That in all Southern cities of between 25.000 ami 100.000 inhabitants the municipal authority la in general vested in a commission of not mote than seven elected from the city at large. A phi km ati vi —Virginia : K. Denman, dr. M. L. Wallenstein. Xkoativk—Georgia: Washington Falk. E. V. Heath.W. T. TOWNSEND. 150 Y IvIN WUKIIIT. TIM)V J. MOmiOW. 4. I . .IONICS. CHAMPION DEBATE. Hesolvul, That it would subserve Hr best interest of the Eolith to remain solid in matters of national polities. Afkikmativk—Deinosthenian: Troy (i. Morrow. W. T. Townsend. Xkcjativk—Phi Kappa : Boykin Wright. J. P. Jones. Deinosthenian won.DEMOSTHENIAN AND PHI KAPPA ANNIVERSARY EXERCISES. Fkbiuwky 21. 11)10. Master of (Vmnonios. Domosthenian—.Millard I tow is. Oral ion: “Solid South.” l Frit man IlitorK. Master of Ceremonies. IMii Kappa Washington Falk. Jr. Oration: “ International Conciliation. KiHi.Mt l . I’knninctox.TECH 12—GEORGIA 6. Twelve to six was just the score, hoys, That was only half tin name. Twelve to six. ami not four touchdowns, As Tech so confidently claimed. .Many pounds their team outweighed us; Veterans big and tried ami strong. And our Georgia heroes met them Light, hut every whit as strong. Mist! The shrill and nervous whistle Keenly sets the warriors on. Robeson kicks, his line advancing. Glory hoys, look where it's gone. Look! It s fumbled Hatcher has it. Go on. Hatcher, down the field. Ah! lie's stumbled. Get up! Hurry! Oil, they're on him. he must yield. Buck it over for a touchdown! Five more yards and we will score! Heavens! See that surging scriinage---- We’d have scored with two feet more. Tech now has it. and by bucking Slowly works it toward our goal. Hold them. Georgia—block those mass pi Brace them. Bostwick! .Make them hold Look at Wilson! Nail him. Northcntt! Oh. lie’s missed. The field is clear. Go it. .Maddox! How lie’s flying. But the goal post is so near. Glory lwiys! He’s overhauled him. See them tumble in a heap. But a mass play takes it over. They kick goal: just hear them shriek! Rally. Georgia. You can hold them. Only through their weight they gain. Flay the game that you are able: Hit your Georgia stride again. Now we’re in their territory. ( tt sar! See that forward pass! Hatcher’s caught it at their goal post. Now then, Georgia, show your class..Maddox plunges—takes it over! Xeores a touchdown for our hoys! (I lory! Glory to Old Georgia! (’(Hue oil. rooters. Whore’s your noise? “Glory” blazes from the brasses. “Glory ” shriek a thousand throats. All creation’s noises double As through the posts the pigskin floats. The half is called and all the rooters Fall in line to march around. The Georgia band leads far more motel’s Than the Techs have on the ground. In the last, the Yellow Jackets Just traverse the gridiron once. And the Georgia warriors stiffen Making them resort to punts. As the darkness slowly gathers. Tech is soon to have the score. Hut it ends with all the glory On our Georgia hoys once more. Nail them, students, llail our heroes. They have won their leanrols well. Honor have they brought to Georgia, And with pride our lioxonis swell. G. L. Peck.FOOTBAL j TKA.M. •()!)FOOTBALL TEAM Ill'C11 lioSTWK'K K. V. Caktkk . Coulter................. Frank Dobson............ •I. E. Lucas............ W. M. Lucas............. Ctnnming................ Peacock................. Turk.................... Xorlheutt Slater . . Robeson Napier . Cox . . . Host wick Maddox . . . . Captain. . . . Manager. . . Coaches. . . . Center. Left (iiiard. Right Clnard. Left Tackle. Right Tackle. Right End. Left 1'iiiw. Quarter Hack. Halfback. Fullback. i ( S Franklin.................. Davis..................... Hatcher................... Danish.................... ) i r I )BASEBALL TEAM, MO.I-J. M. imOWN. Manager. Members of the Varsity Baseball Squad. J. Lucas. . . . F. I». Andkiusok. I-;. M. Bkown . . (’ateliers—Lucas. Thompson. First Base —Tabor. Second Base- Brooks. Short Stop—Bartlett. (’enter Field- Ginn. .... Captain. ..........Coach. .... Manager. 1 tellers—Brannon. Thompson McWhorter. Third Base—Cox. Right Field—Twitty. Walker. Left Field—Boggs. Felker.BASKET BALL TEAM. 11owell Peacock. Captain and Manager. Carter. Golden. Forbes. Reed. Fort. Brand.TRACK TEAM. Capt. of Track................II. C. Hatcher. Manager of Track.............. V. II. Steele. Asst. Manager Track...........Tom Brand. Field Day. SA'ITRDAV. ABRIL 9. 1!)1«. SHOT BI T. class. 1st. Hou .e. 34-4.......................Law. 2nd. Mi .e 33-8......................Senior. 3rd. Maddox 33.......................Junior. high jr.MB: 1st. Gridin 5.1....................Freshman. 2nd. Rev son 5.......................Senior. 3rd. Conklin 4.10..................Freshman. 440 VA1H) DASH: 1st. Revsen 55 sc.e..................Senior. 2nd. Garrard ........................Senior. 3rd. Ingram .......................Freshman. MILK RUN: 1st. Knhesmi 5 mill. 40 sec..........Senior. 2nd. Conklin.......................Freshman. I (Ml YARDS DASH : 1st. Kcvson lOlf, .Secs..............Senior. 2nd. Grinin .......................Freshman. 3rd. Laird .......................Sophomore. HALF MILK: 1st. Bai t 2 min. 5 sec............Freshman. 2nd. Woodruff .....................Freshman. 3rd. Garrard ........................Senior. FOLK VACLT: 1st. Hatcher 9ft........................Law. 2nd. Conklin S.O...................Freshman. BROAD JC.MB: 1st. Revson 19.4 ft..................Senior. 2nd. Thompson 1S.4 ft................Junior. 3rd. Laird 18 ft..................Sophomore. 220 YARD DASH: 1st. Revson 23 sec...................Senior. 2nd. Thompson. 20 see................Junior. 3rd. Hatcher ...........................Law. Noth—Hurdles not run. Seniors, victors—score............... 33 pts. Freshmen .............................24 pts. Juniors...............................( pts. AriUL 22. 1910.—Tech, Kmory and Georgia Meet, at Athens. Score: Tech 41. Georgia 41. Kmory 20.“"With apologies to Henley, and host wishes to a certain very efficient and popular member of the faculty. (1) Out of the sleep which eoverx me. Deep as the Pit from pole to pole, I wake and listen; yes. ’tis he Who's gushing forth a tlow of soul. (2) “In the sub-eonscious mortal mind. The germs of (lod-like being lie— ‘A loaf of bread, a jug of wine And thou’—what more lamenth the sky?” (») “By evolution, not by chance. We come from Wordsworth’s 'trailing cloud;" A tadpole and a pair of pants Rvolve a Mail—with head unbowed.” (4) “ A primrose by the river’s brim’ Delights the inner self in me— ‘A simple primrose was to him’— To me it means infinity.” (5) It matters not how true the hook. How charged with facts the written scroll; I pass them by without a look. And give to all a flow of soul.”CARTKR BROS.Twichell Howden Hudgins I Ilodgson ) Dawson, ,1. t Carter, I '. Patterson Fort, W. 0. j Babcock ) Dawson ) TENNIS TOURNAMENT IN SINGLES. Slack ) bye 1 t Slack ) Twichell ( o-a, 4-0, o-a 1 O-a-O-t J I Huggins Huggins ) ( 1 0 1-0-B 5-0-0-0 f ■ 1 Huggins Dawson, ,J. o-a, 0-2 j 01-0-4 ) Carter, E. Patterson ) 0-1-0-1 7-50-1 V Babcock 1 Babcock ■ 5-7, 0-7, 7 5 I i 7-2-7-5 J i Carter, K. V. St ubhefield 1 I O-O-S-O bye I Carter, K. V. i Carter K. V. 1 0-1, 0-4 J bve J SINGLES—S. I. T. A. JMO-’l] TENNIS TOURNAMENT IN DOUBLES. Babcock and Fuirclial I Dawson Bros. » Carter Bros. Patterson Iiowden Slack and Fort- ) bye Babcock andTwicholl ' 5-4, O S, o i ) Carter Bros. 1 S I, 0.4 » Huggins A’ Stub’lield f bye ) B. and F. (kilter Bros. 0-0, 6-1 4-0, 0-7-5 4-0, 0-0 v. l. i;k vl . i:. .1. 11( HIBSON. Athletic Association of the University of Georgia. (Incorporated 1907). Board of Directors. M. 0. Michael..................Chairman. Prof. .John Morris.............Secretary. K. II. Dorsey..................Treasurer. Prof. S. V. Sanford............ thlelic Director. Members. Prof. Y. I). Hooper. Col. (I. M. Knelling. Prof. If. V. Black. l)r. I). C. Barrow. T. S. MclI. 11. H. Gordon. B. F. Hardeman. Dr. A. M. Sonic. Officers. First Term. V. B. Krwin. II. (’. Hatcher. . . . 11. S. Robeson. . Second K. J. Robeson. . B. I '. Wisdom. J. It. Powell. . . . President. . Vice-President. Secretary. Perm. President. . Vice-President. Secretary.Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. Mokton S. Hodgson . Slu l nl Secretary. K. P. Hall.....................President. Sellars Rood’s.................Vice-President. II. A bit Nix..................Treasurer. Romney L. Campbell. . . Secretary.HISTORY OF THE Y. M. C. A. UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA. UK Collect Young Men’s Christian Association was organized at the Fniversity in the fall of 1S!K). Prior to this lime, a few religious-ly inclined students met every Friday night for a prayer service, and for closer and more helpful fellowship with each other. The Y. M. C. A. movement was. in fact, simply a hotter organization than this informal gathering of students. Religious services were now conducted Friday evenings; students were appointed leaders; and a regular fixed program was arranged for the meetings. Such. then, were the beginnings of the Y. M. ( A. movement among the students. 'Hie past has been marked by struggle and disappointment, but by constant effort and toil; the present witnesses a revitalization and a quickening; the future is bright with visions of increased and sustained usefulness, a future. —and that not far distant when that organization among the students of the Fuivorsity of Georgia, which enjoins, as its first purpose, a clean and wholesome spiritual life, shall also he in a position to offer facilities of the finest for the development, at the same time, of tin mental and physical. In short, there is soon to he erected on the campus, a Y. M. ( A. building, finished and equipped with an enviable completeness. Already $( " .()( 10.00 have been raised, mostly among the graduated sons of the Fniversity. toward the erection of this magnificent edifice, the “Alumni Mali” of the late Chancellor Hill’s vision for the ‘‘Greater Fniversity.” It will he situated just South of the present campus on a hillock known in Athens as ’ Lucas 11 ill; ” a more beautiful and commanding site for this elegant building could, in fact, with difficulty have been chosen. The designer's plan calls for gymnasium, swimming pool, baths, armory, athletic quarters, reception hall, and all further facilities for housing the College Y. M. C. A. Sufficient funds are now on hand for building the rear portion, which includes the gymnasium, baths, armory, etc. Work has begun here, and a part will be completed and made ready for occupancy by next fall. The front will he added as soon as the further necessary funds can be raised. The structure will eventually be completed—if the present hopes are fulfilled—at an approximate expense of $140,000.00; and will be the finest building on the grounds and without an equal of its kind on any campus in the South. 'Phis acquirement, then, means much for the Fniversity; it means much for every phase of Fniversity life; especially does it mean greater opportunity and enlarged usefulness for the Fniversity Y. M. C. A. Kquipped with the best gymnasium in the South, and in the finest building on the campus, the College Young Men’s Christian Association in this institution has indeed a glorious future ahead of it. If is our earnest hope that it may be abundantly blessed in the fulfilling of its mission of developing a nobler type of manhood among the students, and of helping to make of the Fniversity of Georgia that which it is destined, in our aspirations, to become—I lie greatest Fniversity in the South.ALl’MM HALL.OX WAY TO PHI KAPPA.University German Club. OmCKKS OK (Stilt MAN Cu'll. Milton Dar ran................President. J. II. Poeoek..................Vice-President. 10. 1). T. Wad lev............Sw. 'Proas. CoTIM.JnX ( o.M MITTKli. I j. 10. Wisdom S. A. 10. IJ. C. Wrijjht-— Chi Phi. II. II. (Jalloway—K. A. F. ('. Allon—Phi Dolta Thota. O. M. Croxhani—A. T. 0. It. N. Mo.M ill llujrli Alien—S. N. O. Van Wyc-k—Chi Psi. .1. F. Slater-K. S. •1. I . Jones— J. S. McClelland—1 K. A. an—t . P. li.MILITARY HOI . Coups ok Cadktk. Cniversitv of Georgia. Committkk.—A. P. .Jones, K. T. Miller, J. 1). Willingham.Co.mmittkk.—A. O. 15. Sparks. 'I'. •). Sroit. 11. M. Hawkins.JUNIOR HOP. Committee.—J. (1. Thurman. .1. L. Dead vy lor, W. (i. Dnucy.LAW 1101 . ('ojumittkk.—W. W. Wright, Hughes Spalding. L. H. Wisdom.SKXOK HOP. ( o.Mmirri'.i:, A. I . Ma I)onoH. Win. (iarrard. C. 0. Lowe.Committee. Boykin ( Wright—Chi Phi. .1. I). Palmer—Chi I’si. Daniel MaeDougaM. S. A. 10. K. P. White K. A. O. M. (Irexham—A. T. O. 10. S. Taylor—K. K. ,J. S. McClelland—1 K. A. li. K. Allen—Sigma Xu. F. C. Allen— phi Delta Theta. W. S. .Jones—C. ! . L.THE SPIRIT OF COMMENCEMENT. O spirit of commencement gay! We ask thy favor: For this Juno wo l eg thee grant the fullest moon That over shorn on lady fair. Wo bog thee for a rustling breeze to sigh and whisper thru the trees A soft melodious air. We pray for ladies young and sweet to glide and daneo on dainty foot— Young ladies sweet and dear. Whom we ran take beneath the trees and shining moon and rustling breeze And there our love deelare. 0 spirit of eommeiieement gay! We have invoked thee: Yet wo know that all the ancient myths could show No goddess like you there— We find you here with us to-day. attractive, modern, young and gay With beauty wondrous rare. You have no crown of beaten gold, yet crowned you are with fold on fold Of living golden hair. And mortal man who has a lieait with which he does not care to part Had bt st of you beware. Wm. (IAitit.Mtn. Jr.I). It. (TMMI i. W. II. STHKLK. t. i. mv.iwnticK.L. T. WATKI1H. W. T. TOWNSICNl . Dki»autmknt Kki kkskxtativks at Com mkxck.mk.vt. Franklin College..................................I). H. Gumming. State College......................................W. II. Steele. State College (Agriculture)....................T. M. Fitzpatrick. Law Department....................................W. T. Townsend. Pharmacy Department................................L. T. Waters. OCONCLUSION. •lust ii word, doar Follow Students, as to this volume of the Pandora. We set ourselves, from the first, ideals of excellence for this issue which we have striven to realize—with more or less consequent success—we now submit the fruit of our efforts to your .just and friendly criticism, realizing ourselves its many deficiencies, but, at the same time feeling “ Tis pleasant, sure, to see one’s name in print: A hook’s a hook, although there’s nothing in’t.” And now we come to tin sadness of the occasion: our little community is soon to break up: we must all part some to reunite next fall: some to go out into the world with its responsibilities and its life-work. At this moment of separation, then, good wishes and God-speeds arc in order, we join with the poet: “Ye who are blessings wheresoever ye dwell. Accept the wishes of a long farewell.” Tiik Koitoks. The editors wish to express their hearty appreciation to Professor Park and Professor Hooper for their invaluable aid; and also do they thank their friends over at McGregor’s Print-shop for their efficient work and long-suffering patience.ATLANTA LAW SCHOOL Faculty Professors HAMILTON DDCHI.AS. I'll. M.. LL. I .. Horn. HOOl’KK ALKXA.NOKK. A. It. VICToi: L. SMITH. I’li. It.. LL. It. k. m a it vin r.Nin:u vooi». a. r... ll. it. CIFAKLKS 0. McKINNKY. A. It.. It. Lit. LL. It. CIIAKLKS It. KKYNOl.DS. A. It.. LL. It. C M. OAXOLKIt. A. It. KOI5KKT . ALSTON. A. It.. LL. It. .1. O. KILI’ATKK'K. A. It.. LL. It. KWAKH I . It 1 It NS, A. It.. LL. It.. So.nlary. Lodurers I ION. HKYKItLY l». KVA NS. A. M. l!ON .1 os K I 11 IIKMtY Ll'.M I’K IN. A It. IIO.V. M A Iters Y. ItKCK. A. It.. LL. It. I ION. IIKN.IA.MIN 11A IS KY HILL. A. It.. L. L. It. IIO.N. It l ll A It l It It KVA It I» ltl»KLL. A. IS.. I It. IS.. LL. It. HON A ItTIHTt OltAY I'OWKI.L. IIO.N. WILLIAM T. NliW.MAN. IIO.N WILLIAM l». KI.LIS. IIO.N. OKOItOK 11 ILLY Kit. A. M. IION JOHN S. OANOLKK. A. M. HON. JOHN L. HOPKINS. .IA.MKS 11. OILItKKT. A. It.. LL. It. IION OKoitOK WKST.MOKKLANO. WILLIAM I'KKIN NICOLSO.N. M. 0. (MIAKLKS A. It KAO. LL. I . SANOKltS McHANIKL. A. It. Itl ltToN SMITH. A. It.. LL. It. JAMKS IIKNKY IMHtTKIt. A. It.. LL. It. WILLIAM W. CAINKS. It. S.. LL. It. Two Years Course. HOURS: 4 to 5:45 P. M. Toil IT KTIIK.lt INFOIt.MATKIN AOOKKSS HAMILTON DOUGLAS, Dean 117 GenJury KI 1£. ATLANTA,! 'H(f THE HARAWA COMPANY (College Avenue) DELICIOUS, HEALTHFUL DRINKS in Clean Glasses Pure Creams, Sherbets, Ices NUNNALLY’S Candies and Cut Flowers Choice Cigars, Cigarettes and Tobaccos PHONE 151 C. A. Scudder __________ ...Importer oj Novelties..- Athens, Georgia College Jewelery Fobs, Seals, Spoons, Etc. Ill Engraving and Fine Watch and Jewelry RepairingGENERAL MANAGER Draughon’s Practical Business College Atlanta, Ga., Macon, Ga. Montgomery, Ala., Knoxville, Tenn. Greenville, S. C. Somewhat Explanatory I have contracted to conduct as general manager for ten years, with an option for ten more years. Praughon’s Practical Business Colleges in Atlanta. Ga.. Macon. Ga.. Montgomery. Ala.. Knoxville. Tenn., and Greenville, S. C. I also reserve the right to establish other colleges under this name in other cities in the .Southeastern states. My colleges are uniformly equipped with Burroughs Adding and Listing Machines. Gammetcr Mul-tigraphs. Cabinet letter Film. Card Index Systems. Banking and Wholesale Fixtures and other modern office devices so that my business and stenographic specialists can give my students full and complete training in every modern office requirement. I am not satisfied with preparing young men and women in the ordinary way for ordinary positions; I want to give them the very latest and l est in actual business practice. and that is exactly what 1 am doing. If you have a good English education. and want to get ready for a high grade position with a reliable firm, you should write me at any of the offices mentioned above for full information as to rates of tuition, time to complete a coin's! , cost of board, etc. Be sure to give your age. the extent of your literary education, the course you wish to take, and the time you will probably enrol). Yours for success. S4r ia S. . y Zt t r '= Atlanta, Birmingham and Atlantic Railroad The Standard of Excellence in Passenger Service Double daily, electric lighted, vestibuled trains, operating electric fans during the summer months. Best equipment, quickest, most comfortable route between Atlanta and South Georgia, Brunswick and Florida. Pullman electric lighted sleepers on night trains between Atlanta and Thomasville. Close connections with all lines at Atlanta. WU I L General Passenger Agent . ri. Leahy, Atlanta, Georgia ( H_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 43A School of Dentistry, by Dentists, For Dentists largest School in the State Leading School in the South Features: Large New College Building, Complete New Library, New Practical Porcelain Department, Heavy Operatory Clinic, Exclusively White Patients, Monthly Examinations and Daily Recitations, Central Location. Experienced Teachers and Demonstrators. Write for Souvenir catalogue and further particulars to WILLIAM CRENSHAW,D.D.S.,Dean BOX 401 ATLANTA, GEORGIA You Will Certainly Find at “THE LITTLE CLOTHES SHOP” Cherry Street, Macon, Georgia The Best Clothes Made and Ready-to-Wear The “Classiest Selections South" ALBERT iMcKAY (( H (« ! « (i ( DR. E. G. GRIFFIN, DENTIST Specinl low prices for the best of Dental Work The Best of Mathrials used. All Work Guaranteed. Gas, Air and Local Anaesthetic for the painless extraction of teeth. Liberal discount allowed all Students. Offices: 51 2-51 3 Southern Mutual Building, Phone 964. ATHENS, GA.1) Iron Once with the We tinghouse Elecftric Iron and you’ll never return to the old-fashioned hot-stove method of ironing. It’s an iron that you can use in any room in the house where there is a lighting socket, and out on the porch even, when it is more comfortable there. Ask for one on free trial and send it back if you find you can get along without it. We keep it in repair as long as it is used on the circuits of our company. PRICE $3.00 Athens Eleciric 'Railtvay Company ))I ( ( The Atlanta Journal The Journal Covers Dixie Like the Dew JAMES R. GRAY, President and Editor The newspaper pace set by tlie .Journal in Atlanta is perhaps the fastest in the world. You only need to watch papers in other cities while you are there to see this statement verified. It frequently happens that the Journal has on sale throughout tin business section of Atlanta an extra detailing some important happening in New York before the swiftest New York paper has the news on the street. Three minutes after a baseball game is over in Memphis. New Orleans, or any other Southern league city, or three minutes after a college game is over in Atlanta, the Journal has a paper on the streets giving the score in detail and a description of every play made during the game. 'Pile Journal carries two pages of the liv« st and best written sporting news every week day. and a full section of sporting news on Sunday. The human interest “feature” stories in the Journal from day to day are copied all over the country. 'Pile Journal exclusively has the full day leased wire service of the Associated Press and the Journal is the only Southern paper with both day and night Associated Press service. The way the repertorial staff of the Journal handles local news is a topic of discussion and praise wherever newspaper men talk about tin South. You can get the Journal every day. either by ordering from our local agent, or writing direct to The Atlanta Journal, Ac"orgl ia « Fleming-Dearing Hardware Co. Imported and Domestic Cutlery Razors in Great Variety Pocket Knives Guns and Pistols Agricultual Implements If we have not what you want We Will Order It Write John B. Vaughan Athens, Ga. for song books for your religious work “Resurrected Songs” for church 35c per copy, round and shape notes “Vaughan’s Revival,” for Revival Meetings, 50c per copy “Windows of Heaven, No. 8” for Sunday School Our 1910 Book These books will be sent out for examination on receipt of stamps for postage Have you been pleased with our work in the past? Don’t forget us in the future New men, look us up We’ll treat you well. RED BLACK PRESSING CO. The Atlanta National Bank Atlanta, Ga. Capital - - -Surplus and undivided profits Deposits - - - $1,000,000.00 960,000.00 6,000,000.00 OFFICERS Chas. E. Currier, President Hugh T. Inman, V-President Geo. R. Donovan, Cashier James. S. Floyd, As£t. Cashr. We SOLICIT YOUR Account(p STRINGER'S SODA FOUNTAIN The Only Exclusive Soda Fount in the City Products and Candies Are the Best. Ask Brenau C iris. Gainesville, Stringer, Georgia Piedmont Drug Co. GAINESVILLE. GEORGIA Ice Cream Parlors Agents for Nunnally’s Candies Make 'Uhis Headquarters ) ) W. J. E. C. Palmour Hats, Shoes, Dress Goods, Millinery, Clothing, Men’s Furnishings, Ladies’ Suits. Most Up-toDate Store in North East Georgia GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA 1 he Place For the Georgia Cadets To Keep Cool Is at the ICE CREAM PARLORS of Cinciolo Bros. Fresh Home-Made Candy, Made Daily. We Will Show You Every Courtesy Possible. Agents Wiley’s Candies. CINCIOLO BROS. Gainesville, Georgia ssssJ(Cr W. M. STEPHENSON =PHOTOGRAPHER - Our Lense Is Like Love—Blind to Every Defect. Every Portrait Talks for Us, They Are Speaking Like-nessess. Specialties: High Grade Portraiture, Banquets, Receptions, Etc. 38 1-2 Whitehall Over Kutz ATLANTA, GEORGIA 8 showtoT Moor Floyd Brand Clothing WHICH COMBINE Fine Material With Skilled Workmanship Producing Up-to-Date Styles at Reasonable Prices MOOR FLOYD, ?lho0 ehs,anlI 62-64 W. Mitchell St. Atlanta, Georgia I R. D. Mitchell Son Wholesale and Retail Meats 37 South Main St. Phone 12 GAINESVILLE. GEORGIA GEO. LATHEM Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Beef, Mutton, Pork and Sausage 12-14 W. Spring St. Phone 47 Gainesville. Georgia. Ries Armmstrong Watches, Clocks, Diamonds, Jewelry and Silverware. Reliable GoodsOnly Telephone 836 3 1 5 Third Street Macon, Georgia. Fine Tailoring at Moderate Prices ED. A. CERF TAILORING Suits $20 to $60 No. 12 Whitehall St ATLANTA. GEORGIA BUD SMITH Everything good to eat and drink for the Athens boys GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA Sol J. Boley Sole Agent for the fa Celebrated “WALK OVER SHOES” $3.50 $4.00 and $5.00 All Styles. All Leathers 409 Broad St. X ) )) » in )» in in in in ») ni » ») ») D) ))) ))) ))) ))) I I 1)1 ))) ) )) ) )  — Jacob’s Pharmacy w Everything in the Drug Line at Cut Prices THE ILION CAFE P. Petropol, Proprietor Fine Fruits, All Kinds of Drinks Fine Candies and Cigars Cor. College and Broad. Phone 304 j We are Headquarters for high-grade vehicles and Custom made harness and harm implements Griffeth Implement Co. 448-456-464 Broad St., Athens, Ga. R. Brandt, InTophin Fine Stock—One Price NOTED FOR VERY FINE REPAIRING llrokcn 1-enies replaced in Kye (ilaiMittnc day. Any Prescription filled or llroken Lens Measured and Duplicated. Southern Mutual Building 223 Clayton St. Athens, Ga. Divide your Trade with WOOTTEN Book Store He Will Appreciate It Columbian National Life Insurance Company Operating under stringent laws of Massachusetts Life, Accident and Health Insurance Good Vacation Work for Students Alfred C. Newell Bro. Managers for Georgra 209 Candler Bldg. Atlanta, Ga. Juhlin Bros. Candy Co, Jno. L. Moore Sons’ Succssors to Garrow Candy Co. We fill Boxes SPECIALTIES ARE PURE FOOD CANDIES Kryptok, Luxfel and Amber Cocoanut Syrup a Specialty Spectacles and Eye Glasses HENRY JUHLIN. Mgr. 42 N. Broad St. Phone 153 143 College Ave. Prudential Bldg. Atlanta. Georgia YOU’LL RECEIVE A GENUINE GEORGIA WELCOME At The PIEDMONT HOTEL Atlanta’s leading fire-proof, strictly modern hotel—The Piedmont— is located right in the heart of things. The theatres, churches, office buildings and shopping center are convenient to the Piedmont. The service at this splendid hotel is unsurpassed. Cafes are unexcelled. 306 comfortable rooms—150 with baths. You will feel at home at the Piedmont and your patronage for a meal, a day or a week is courteously solicited. European Plan Exclusively Rate $ 1.50 Upward ■Sodas, Candies- -The Best of EVERYTHING =At Costa’s —Cigars, Flowers— Southern Mut. Bldg. When in Need of SPORTING GOODS Or Anything in the Hardware Line WRITE US FOR INFORMATION Kirkpatrick Hardware Company ATLANTA, GEORGIA  p=r=r . J. L. Crisler, Athens, Georgia Citizens Bank THE GREAT PHOTOGRAPHER Maker of all kinds of Photos, Post T rust Company Cards, Penny Pictures and High Class Work. Satisfaction Always Guaranteed Athens, Georgia 251 Yz BROAD STREET All work not satisfactory will be made over, provided you return the work received. Always present your trouble, if any, to me. Byron Mitchell °n'y "DEASON" PIace Wholesale and Retail All Kinds Fresh and Cured Meats In Town Phone 88 Gainesville, Georgia First Class Restaurant. Ice Cold Drinks. Cigars, Cigarettes and J. P. FEARS SON Agents for Feriidoll lira ml l’ure Food .floods Athens, Georgia Tobacco. Plenty of room, make this your head- quarters while here. U. R. WATERMAN IIAItKKDASlIKKV AXI) KXOl.t'SlVK MKIU'IIANT TA1I.OK1X0 Ih'ttcr tamils a ml licttcr ilta than anyone else for less money. At the popular prices. 41 Main Street. Calnosvllie. (5a. 27 Main Street. Gainesville. Ga. E. H. Dorsey Clothing, Hats, Furnishings A Stock With an Individuality About It That College Men Admire I 1 5 Clayton Street Athens, Georgia ) ) For Choice Hair Cuts and Up-to-Date Shaves Go to Barber Shop in Basement of Hotel Georgian Satisfaction Guaranteed. Especial Attention Given Students Frank Purcell, Mgr. Shoes That Hold Their Shape-Shoes That Never Stretch =Made by Johnson Murphy Try a Pair E. I. Smith Shoe Co. Sole AgentsMusic Publishers and Dealers SIIKKT Ml sir AX I) TKACIIHIt'S srPPLIBS Atlanta, Georgia G3 Peachtree Street “When words fail. Music speaks," Order some of our beautiful Music sent to your lady love. Delicious Coca-Cola Sold Everywhere The Atlanta Constitution Daily, Sunday, Weekly and Tri-Weekly The Paper of the State and For the South The Morning Constitution furnishes Georgia the news, its news service, market reports, society and sporting pages, are unexcelled. It dawns upon the State with the sunrise with every feature complete to the moment. It is the morning daily of the State. The Sunday edition is metropolitan in its size and subjects read by over 50,000 people, the best in our whole section. The Tri-Weekly edition; Monday, Wednesday, Friday, three times a week, covers from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, the greatest farming section in the world. This is the “Farmers’ Daily’" Subscribe for and read The Constitution as the great post-graduate course for your life, it is the university extension for the busy and successful man. Address all orders to The Constitution, GeorgiaGeorgia-Alabama Business College Incorporated Eugene Anderson. Pres. W. W. Merriman, Sec. Established 1890 Macon, Georgia A College that will Educate you and let you pay afterward. P ositions-Thou'.aSd former Students help us and will help you if you £■ Act Now. This is the man of whom the Wesleyan Christian Advocate wrote recently: “Mr. Eugene Anderson, President of the Georgia-Alabama Business College, at Macon, Ga., whose picture appears here, is one of the South’s most noted educators. Himself a man of splendid training and rare ability, he is making it his life-work to fit young men and women for successful business careers. Students from all over the United States, in fact, some from foreign countries, are trained in the commercial branches, at the Geor- President Ga.-Ala. College gia-Alabama Business College, while my, n . others who cannot go to Macon are Macon, Georgia. . . .. . , . taught by mail. Mr. Anderson is the originator of a plan by which qualified students secure employment for life. And frequently, while still at his school, they are enabled to earn more money than they pay for their course.” Mr. Anderson has also devised a plan for letting students, under certain conditions, pay for their training after going to work. EUGENE ANDERSON,COAL That Will Make Satisfied Customers is the Only Kind we Handle Prompt Delivery Full Weight Phone 707 W. L. Hancock Coal CompanyWhen in our city call on us for anything in our line. We will appreciate your trade. Pruitt-Barrett Hdw. Co. East Side of Square. Corner of Brad ford and Spring Streets GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA C. F. W. GUNTHER Baker Confectioner Maker of Home-Made Candies, Fresh Cakes, Macroons, and Kisses Always on Hand. A. G. SHARP, Pres. W, A. CARLISLE, Vice-Pres. W. H. SLACK, Sec. and Treas Gainesville Railway Power Co, Gainesville, Georgia RUNS A TWENTY MINUTE SCHEDURE FROM THE CAMP GROUND TO THE CITY. FARE 5 CENTS. )) BOYS, WE AGREE WITH YOU Oulnosvlllc's Kivntwt nil ruction Is our pretty Kiris. HI T VOC’I.I. At.ltKK WITH I S That the next greatest attraction our city nfTorils tlu College .Man Is the up-to-date line of ei.oTiiiNt:. siioks. fiats, and cknkkaj. Fl'KNISIllNOS at CASTLEBERRY BROS. A,1,| our store to your culling list when yon conn over. You can stay as long as you please mill take home with you anything we have at n most reasonable price. SAM IK 1. C. Dr.VI.AI'. I Teshleut, JACK .1. SIWI.DINi:. Vice-1'reshleilt. II. I'ltltHt. Cashier. SAMI KI. C Dt'NI.AI'. Jit.. Ass t. Cashier. JA.MKS A. It 1 1 » 1,1 11. Ass t Cashier. A. K. (SKItiKIt. Hook keeper. The Gainesville National Bank CAl'ITAl, stock $.10,000.00. Surplus anil t'nillvhlnl I'rollls, S'iS.tMMl.OO. DlltKCTOltS. A. .1. Mnnily. Saniitel C. Dunlap K. K. Klnihrough .1. J. Spalillng M. M. Ilam A. 'V. Calhoun It. M. Stallworth Jtrz. Toric or Deep Curved lenses, So-Easy Eye Glass mountings, Shur-On Eye Glass mountings, And every other known Eye Glass Mounting is kept in our stock at all times, Our facilities, careful adjustment, and Courteous attention have made us the Leading Opticians of the South. We can duplicate any broken glass, Send us the pieces. Walter Ballard Optical Co. 75 Peachtree Street, Atlanta, Georgia Muse Fashions For Young Men Dress, is to the man of average age, a “thing apart”— tis, to the College Youth, much of his “whole existence”, and we have learned that Young Men’s Dress, the country wide, is powerfully influenced by his preferences and prejudices. We plan extensively, to supply the needs of the College Men and Boys. We realize that he wants “Good Clothes of Good Style” and that he knows them when he sees them. That is why we wish to show him the “Best Made Clothes in America.” We are splendidly ready, with an array of Smart Styles, in distinctive patterns of fine texture, and tailoring unexcelled. Geo. Muse Clothing Company, 3-5-7 Whitehall Street, Atlanta. )) ) ) ) ) ) 1 —-» M DON'T FAIL TO VISIT Talmage Bros. Co. ) ) )) i i) HERNDON’S Barber Shop ) i si ii When in Atlanta, for the best of WHOLESALE l! everything in the 1 onsorial Art. We 1 ) solicit your patronage and if you give G R OCERS )] ) ) us a trial we guarantee to do the ) ) ) rest to your satisfaction. 14 Artists always ready to serve you. | DON'T FORGET 66 PEACH- ! { TREE STREET ATHENS, GEORGIA j j JACOB PHIN1ZY, President WILLIAM A. LATIMER. Vice-President Classy Footwear CHAS. G. GOODRICH. C«sh!er RUFUS H. B tOWN. Assistant Cathier for College Chaps i » » Georgia Railroad Bank AUGUSTA, GEORGIA llLf Sir A H College Ox- fords and Pumps embody all the features which give character to a shoe and place it in a ) i » i i 1 Capital and Surplus $700,000.00 class of its own. Every pair represents a perfect combination of style i Augusta’s Largest Banking and workmanship, comfort and economy. DO YOU House offers its superior fa- know this?. cilities to firms, corporations and individuals. tr£.wr.: $3.50, $4.00 4 PER CENT INTEREST PAID KNOTT AWTRY SHOE CO. IN SAVINGS DEPARTMENT "The Shoe and Stocking Shop 25 Whitehall St. ( I ( I III id I in Photograf Photo S hs and 'Upplies FREDERICK J. BALL College Avenue Athens, Georgia Webb Crawford PIANOS WHOLESALE GROCERS ATHENS, GA. Steinway, Knabe, Everett Hardman Fischer OTHER PIANOS S190.OO Upward. Easy terms on all. Phillips Crew Company, Atlanta, Georgia Office: 220 East Broad St. Warehouse: Central R. R. Tracks. )Phonic iuii 1 N. K. II. III DSON PHNTIST ■min woir. MirriiAi. in.ik;. ATI1KN.S, Ga. r I’honr 23S l»r. MAXIK T. SU.M.MKKI.IN PHNTIST SOS Son. Mill. Itld . AlliriiN. n. I lot HH l TO | I •. M . Phonic I 7‘J Dll. V. M. SLAUGHTER D)':ntist OI'KII C. A. Hcihmikii ATI I KNH. J A. The National Exchange Bank Augusta, Georgia OFFICERS Percy E. May. President Wm. K. Kitchen. Vice-President E. A. Pendleton - Cashier V. T. Wiggins. Asst. Cashier Designated Depository of the State of Georgia ACCOUNTS SOLICITED(2. ESTABLISHED 1681 ■T H E- Lowry National Bank Of Atlanta, Georgia Capital Surplus and Profits $800,000.00 800,000.00 THE LARGEST IN GEORGIA Under the Supervision of the United States Government Banking in All Its Departments Empire State Chemical Co. (INCORPORATED) ATHENS, G.A E. R. HODGSON, President E. R. HODGSON,Jr.,Vice-President HARRY HODGSON. Sec. Treas. Importers and Manufacturers of FERTILIZERS FOR ALL CROPS Merchant’s Bank Augusta, Georgia Albert S. Hatch, President Chas. T. Pund, Vice-Pres. E. E. Rosborough, Cashier Capital and Surplus $325,000.00 ACCOUNTS SOLICITED For Students SHOES, SOCKS. HANDKERCHIEFS, TIES, COLLARS, RIBBONS, SUIT CASES And ROOM FURNISHINGS Davison-Nicholson Co.  ((( SCHAUL MAY Are Diredt Importers of Diamonds We Can Save You 30 Per Cent, on All Purchases Atlanta Georgia) H. M. Ash Company Y. M. C. A. Bldg., Pryor St. Atlanta Georgia Southern Dealers for L. C. Smith Visible TYPEWRITERS IT IS SAID No two lines can be drawn perfectly parallel That’s the Reason in Shoedom WHY Florsheim and Worthmore Shapes are so hard to imitate $3.50 to $7.00 McCardle Shoe Co. 101 Peachtree Atlanta, Ga. Yes, Boys! Belle Mead Sweets Is the candy the girls all likj When in Atlanta drop in and get her a box. Good things to drink too SHIVERS CHOCOLATE SHOP 43 PEACHTREE ST. ATLANTA, GA. $30.00 up to $60.00 Not how cheap but how good A 11 . TAILORING Allen S DE LUXE We’ve Stood the Test Ground Floor Grant Biding The Fourth National Bank of Atlanta ATLANTA - GEORGIA CAPITAL SURPLUS. .$600,000 .$735,000 A Designated Depository of the United States, State of Georgia, County of Fulton and the City of Atlanta OFFICERS J. W. English, Pres. Jno. K. Ottlcy, V-Pres. Clias, I. Ryan, Cashier Win. T. Perkcrson, Asst Cashier Jas. M. Thomas, Asst. Cashier DIRECTORS K. C. Peters Jos. ilirsch J. W. English, Jr J. I). Robinson jno. K. Ottley Clias. A. Wickcrshain Jas. M Thomas Geo. V. Panott I). N. McCullough Albert Steiner J. R. Hopkins Jno. J Woodsitlc Jas. V. English Dan. It. Harris Chns. I. Ryan Harry E. English Clyde E. King Radius Jewelry Co. 83 Peachtree St. Atlanta, Georgia Importers of Radius Semi-Precious Stones and High Class Novelties We carry a complete Line of Watches ( II ('( III R. H. JEFFERSON KtadJ'il TAILORING e'.Vv T«m“ ALL WORK GUARANTEED Phones: Shop, 535 Ring; Residence, 535 2 Rings. )23 1-2 Jackson Street. The Lyric Beautiful “The Home of Polite Vaudeville." The Latest Motion pictures, changing every day. We will appreciate your patronage. College Avenue Dick Harris' Bsahtpr 139 College Avenue First-Class Barbers Your Patronage Solicited The best of exercise is to ride a BICYCLE We sell or rent them cheap. Visit us Athens Cycle Company 111 » ) ) ) FOR THE BEST SERVICE TO BE HAD IN A BARBER SHOP VISIT Bryant’s !phe Southern Mutual Building Polite Attention and Baths • I»KKI K III- I i«. Xatiianucl i •. si,a uoiitich i« I hi ra Hoiitiikiin MrrVAi. IVl.tXt. Qpy The Boys Friend Shop ALLEN M. PIERCE Men's Wear Classy Tailoring 16 Marietta Street (Union Barber Shop in Connection) Sporting Goods Cutup Supplies. Fishing Tackle. Base Ball and Tennis Goods. Guns and Aiinminition. Agricultural Implements Wc have the best assortment of improved implements in the State. Inquiries will receive prompt atention. PALMOUR HARDWARE CO., GAINESVILLE. GA. ) » ) ) ) )) ) ) )) Eugene V. Haynes Co. DIAMONDS and FINE GOLD JEWELRY 37 Whitehall Street Atlanta, Georgia u rt Underwood T ypewriter Means Originators of Visibility, First in Speed, First in Durability. Underwood Typewriter Company, 52 NORTH BROAD ST. ATLANTA, GEORGIA ( w If you are looking for the one soft drink, which is known as "The World s Favorite" call for COCA-COLA Delicious, Refreshing and Relieves Fatigue This is the Mark of Distinction and see that it is on the crown of every bottle We’re bottlers of Sodas, Lemon Soda, Chocolate Cream, Strawberry Soda, Ginger Ale Coca-Cola is our leader, Athletes the world over call for Coca-Cola Athens Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Athens, Ga. A. H. Fetting Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity Jewelry Memorandum Package sent to any Fraternity Member through the Secretary of the Chapter Special Designs and Estimates on Class Pins, Medals for Athletic Meets, Rings, et Cetera. 21 3 N. Liberty Street Baltimore, MarylandIf your gifts are purchased from MAIER BERKELE, INC. the recipients will know you wanted them to have the best. For twenty-five yea.rs we have been recognized as the largest and most reliable jewelers in the South Be sure to visit our double store when in Atlanta Write for Handsome Catalogue MAIER BERKELE, INC. .Jewelers and Silversmith 31-33 Whitehall St. Atlanta’ Georgia. B i )» )) ») Th.® Daafly=Mt©na©©iffl Stimday°M©imnimg The Meralld is Augusta's favorite hoxne ftJewsjpaper with the best and first news and the largest circulation. 5® jpe? cent, larger city h©nue circulation guaranteed t© IHIer ld advertisers th ,n is given by any other Augusta Hewspajper T. J. MEEOBJ. Em. Rfl$r. IBOWBRE PHTOMZY. Fires. THE AUGUSTA HERAL© AmgasS . The Regal Shoe In 1-4 Sizes College Low Cut Regal Styl es for Young Men at 6 Whitehall Street ATLANTA The Regal Shoe Store, L. J. Wing, Sales Agent Guarantee Trust and Banking Company Atlanta, ______x Georgia CAPITAL $500,000.00 Accounts of Banks, Business Houses and Individuals Solicited. Collections Handled Promptly Satisfactorily HIGH-CLASS TAILORING AT POPULAR PRICES Mr. F'ordon just returned from abroad where he imported a large stock of Imported Fabrics that are open for your inspection. Our specialty is making Suits for the Collegians. OUR LATEST DESIGN "The English Coat and Trousers." $20.00 to $40.00 FORDON, The Tailor 8-10 N. Pryor St. Kimball House GEORGIANS! Let Your Next Pair of Shoes Be Made in Georgia On Sale at EPTING’S 11 Iif Eppes-Wilkins Co. (INCORPORATED) WHOLESALE GROCERS ATHENS, GEORGIA j The Busy Bee Cafe 15 College Axenue Athens, Ga. Good things to eat. Polite Attention. Open day and night. Students always welcome. CHAS. KARRAS, Manager l» ))) )) I m » ))) h) CITIZENS BANK Augusta, Georgi 1a We Solicit Your Banking Business Large or small accounts given the same careful attention. 4% interest allowed on sav-ing accounts. Columbia T ailoring Co. 233 1 2 Broad St. Athens, Ga. Fine T ailoring And Artistic CLEANING and PRESSING. | ) ) » ) f )) ») W ) )) ) ) » » 1f ( ( “The Best High-Grade Military Uniform Made” LILLEY UNIFORM See our local representative E. H. Dorsey, Athens, Georgia. The M. C. Lilley Co, Largest Manufacturer of Uniforms and Equipments in the World. i Ie (({ VACATION TIME YOUNG .MEN. you arc preparing to enter actively into a profession of some kind. The effort, zeal ami determimKion which you have been putting forth are to lx complimented, hut in the preparation which you have received, thus far. you have not received this Business Training that is necessary to round out your 'education and make you thoroughly qualified to meet the requirements that the BUSINESS WORM) will make of you when you enter actively into your calling. You need special training, and your VACATION TIME offers the opportunity to receive just the training you need. We are especially prepared to give you the best of service and attention during tin summer months. We retain the same teachers, we give you the same instruction ami the same advantages. We have the soh right to teach the famous Byrne Systems of Practical Bookkeeping and Simplified Shorthand, and. therefore, we urge you while the opportunity presents itself to investigate our claims, and take advantage of the training that may mean to you just the stepping stones that you need to help von enter successfully into your chosen profession. Many of the Presidents of Railroads ami of other business enterprises started either as Bookkeepers or Stenographers, and today they know the requirements from the chair of the stenographer or bookkeeper up to the position as President of the Company. There is no such thing as failure; to tin j oiintj mm of today who are determined. who are ambitious and who will strive to win success, and prepares to meet the requirements, before it is too late, that business men will demand of them. A catalog and full information for the asking. Visitors welcome at all times. For particulars address the Athens Business College Athens, Ga. P. 0. Box No. 12 College Footwear for College Men The Boyden and Just Wright Shoes In a class hv themselves, we show styles in Footwear different from the ordinary. If they are correct they come from us. STUDENTS TRADE SOLICITED JOHNSON SHOE CO. 433 Broad St.Michael’s The Store good goods made popular.'’ . ATIIION’S. CiA. •John .1. Wilkins. Pres. T. P. Vincent, Vice-Pres. W. I». Ilrooks, Cashier. •I. ’. ('handler, Asst. Cashier. The Georgia National Bank 10 very tiling that’s lit to wear— of Athens 10 very thing to wear that tits. Capital $200,000.00 Surplus and Profits - $160,000.00 Our Specialties: Invites correspondence and the accounts of corporations, firms and individuals and offers to depositors College Penants. every facility their balances, bus- College Colors in Ribbons. luces and responsibility warrant. Promptness, Courtesy. Accuracy Decorations in Colors. and Safety Guaranteed. Decorations in Colors for College 1X V KSTKi A TIC .X 1X V1TKI Fra tern It Io6. DIRECTORS. V. A. Carlton. Physician and Surgeon. We Furnish l-'raI. Ilaills. H. C. Erwin, of Cobb Erwin, Atty’s. .1. A. Darwin. Ilifo Insurance. Michael’s Tims. P. Vincent, Pres. Athens Mfg. Co. J. N. Webb, of Webb Crawford, Wholesale Grocers. TO SUCCEED In kusinoss today you must bo Well Dressed. The average man of today cannot afford a new suit every week, but ho can afford to have them pressed to make them look like now. WE DO IT . i,so dyeixg axd 11.ATS CLKAXHD AXO RE-SIIA PED The White Pressing Company sm s MA DIO TO .AlEASt’ltE. 877 College Avo. Phono C8G. 'Printing that’s Different” 'o treat oarli piece of work cii-frusted to us in an individual uJiy. Xo matter how small, or jiotv little profit there is involved—it gets OUt I’EKSOX A L attention. T e Banner Job Office The University of Georgia WAS FOUNDED HY TUB PEOPLE 125 Y10A US A(iO "TO PLACE TUB YOUTH U NDKR THE FORMING HAND OF SOCIETY. THAT HY INSTRUCTION THEY MAY HK MOULDED TO THE LOVE OF VIRTUE AND GOOD ORDER." IT OFFERS THE YOUNG MEN OF THE STATE TIIE IIEST ADVANTAGES IN ALL ITS IIISTORV AND INVITES THEM TO STUDY IN TIIEIH UNIVERSITY. Nine hundred and fifty-five students enrolled at Athens this year, 1,0-" students enrolled (Ids year in the University system. Send for bulletins describing the Law, Pharmacy. Engineering. Literary and Scientific Courses, to The University Athens, Ga. Dorsey Funkenstein Largest Furniture Dealers in the South The Latest Creations of the Leading Furniture Makers of America. IT IS AN UNDISPUTED FACT THAT WE CARRY THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF FURNITURE IN THE SOUTH. OUR DESIGNS ARE THE LATEST. CONSTRUCTION THE REST. ITS ANYTHING IN THE FURNITURE LINE FROM THE KITCHEN TO THE PARLOR. GREAT LINE OF SUMMER GOODS. Dorsey Funkenstein CLAYTON STREET. - - ATHENS The Orr Drug Go. AGENTS FOR Atlanta Moral Co. Leave us vour orders for Flowers Cor. College anti Clayton AthensAthletic Cut Clothes The Kind that Keep You Young That is the kind you will find here in the most attractive styles and models. CJA11 the newest things produced in the clothing centre are those found here. Kahn, Dreyfus Co’s latent creation in Athletic Cut Clothes are here for your inspection. Neat nifty and up-to-dateness expressed in every model. For Sale Exclusively by Clias. Stern Co. Athens’ Greatest Clothing Store Athens, Ga.PIANOS and ORGANS Highest Grades Lowest Prices Easy Terms I TLIV jrA It ANTIilil) ALSO FULL LINE OF Violins, Guitars and Mandolins Cable Piano Co., Atlanta, Georgia LARGEST SOUTHERN MUSIC HOUSE New from Caver to Cover WEBSTER’S NEW INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY JUST ISSUED. Ed. in Chief, Dr. W. T. Harm, former U. S. Com. of Education. a General Information Practically Doubled. Divided Page: Important Words Above, Less Important Below. 0 Contains More Information of Interest to More People Than Any Otber Dictionary. 2700 PAGES. 6000 ILLUSTRATIONS. 400,000 WORDS AND PHRASES. GET THE BEST In Scholarship, Convenience, Authority, Utility. .rlto ur Cpectmcn Va c« to Ic. c. MEAR1A14 CO..P.UidK».S- ri«tfWU. «W | Von will do ns • tsrrr t nontt tvli pobltotloo. T y pewriters Rented Sold Exchanged American Writing Machine Company 48 N. Pryor St. Atlanta, Georgia Miller Furniture Company Athens, Georgia Wo make a specialty supplying students with substantial and harmonious furnishings. We carry a large and complete stock and will be pleased to make estimates. Our prices are right. “liHlestrueto trunks are only used by people of discriminating taste. We are exclusive agents for this section and invite your inspection. See our window displays. Ask our trunk salesman about—The Broad Guarantee—The Five-Year Insurance Policy—The •'Warning’! of prosecution to Baggage Smashers—The great reduction in weight—The Registration Number which insures against loss in transit— Finally—see the trunk—examine it —nottic its many exclusive features. Demonstrated every minute of the day in our trunkTill Place to I 'jit is V. M. IIA VI0S RESTAl’RAXT And also for Cold, Frosty, Tall Milkshakes, and other Cold Drinks. Tobacco. Cigars and Fancy Fruits. The Blue Front. No. S Spring Street. W. M. HAYES. Manager. Gainesville. Georgia. VISIT THIO FOR FIRST-CLASS HA 11 It E11 WORK. Hot and Cold Baths at all hours. Instantaneous Water Heater. Polite attention. Children’s Hair Chitting a Specialty. YOUNG DAVIS THE OLD RELIABLE Proprietor. IG2 Jackson Street, Next door to Firemen Hall. MARTIN BROS. REPAIR SHOES AND HARNESS ON SHORT NOTICE. Harness Cor Sale Phone G21 455 Clayton St. Always remember when in need of anything in the Drug line Norton’s is the Place to get them ami for (Jiiiek I tell very. Always glad to serve you. 165 CLAYTON STREET. Phone 710. Open day and night. Students’ Supply Store Drinwotliriilnn Hull HOOKS New unit Second-llntul t Niro tots mill Collect SuiMillcH GARDNER REDFEARN, Mgrs, M. Stern. Pres. II. A. Mi'll, fusilier. M. 5. Micliiii'l. Vice-Pros. IS. V. Harris. Asst. Cits liter. The Athens Savings Bank IIOKS A |(K(it I. A It COM 1 KHCIA I, HtSINKSS I’cr Out. Inlrrrst on Jt Hie. n Snv I me l»c-SikIiik Account .. |inrlnirnl mill 1'nyn Ol ItKCTOKS. .M. Stern. M. «. Midi set. W. T. ltrynn. J. A. Iluunlcntt. H. A. Mel I. T. S. M»'ll. l»«Mipris' linunlcutt. I,. F. Kilwnrils. Cniiltul unit I mll i lr l Profits. SIXU.0V0.00 11. It. llardfe. J. H. Elrod. .1. 1). Hardle. CALL ON Hardie Company Dealers in (•rain. Hay, Poultry. Eggs and Country Produce. Handle and Repair Harness. Phone 136. (« rt t u HIGHEST GRADE PHOTOS Special Rates to Students WESLEY HIRSHBURG PHOTOGRAPHER 34 1-2 Whitehall Street, Atlanta, Ga. In February, 1908, a special committee of students of the University of Georgia called on me in Atlanta and asked me to come to Athens and do their photograph work. I consented to do so and gave them rate. Ask these boys if my work is satisfactory ) It Doesn’t Matter Whether von me going to he a lawyer, doctor, merchant, hanker, or what-not. ’ von will need a good business train in :. SURE YOU WILL While you are getting it. you would just as well get the right kind, the t ood kind. Costs no more than the Ordinary Kind Tin place to get tin f ond kind is in one of my colleges indicated below. You'll find nioic about 'em « n another page in this issue of random. Bookkeeping, Banking, Etc. Shorthand, Typewriting, Etc. Write me at either place for new catalogue. AKTIIt'R (’. .MINTKK. Gen. Mgr. Draughon’s Practical Business College Atlanta, (la.. .Macon, (la.. Montgomery. Ala.. Knoxville. Teun.. Greenville. S. ( i L READ MY HEALTH TALKS every Sunday and my daily advertisement in the Atlanta Constitution They are full of interest aiul information to everyone. Wm. M. BAIRD Specialist My Imoklets on Diseases of Men. and my Health Kssavs. including my irtiele on brain and nerve exhaustion. will l e sent fret and sealed upon request. Those who wish to consult me may do so free of charge from S a. hi., to 1 l). m.. week davs. and from 10 to 1 on Sundays. DR. WM. M. BAIRD M Y South Broad Street. Corner Broad and Alabama Streets ) 164-166 Clayton Street Established 1890 FULLER PORTER Proprietors W. H. DAVIS Gainesville Steam Cigars and Tobacco. Soda Fount Billiards and Poo! Laundry Athens, Ga. Phone 146 Gainesville, Ga. 28 Bradford Street. Phone 1 18 Gainesville, Ga. Call on T. J. Newman Dealer in Call on us for Ladies’ and Gent’s Furnishings GEO. P. ESTES Gainesville, Ga. Staple and Fancy Groceries Produce Confectioneries, Etc. High-Grade Shoes Grocery Department in Rear ) i | J. H. Stone G. E. Stone Books, Pamphlets, Folders Promptly Executed The E. D. Stone Press PRINTING Commercial Work Solicited Satisfaction Guaranteed 137 Lumpkin St. Telephone 1 14-3 We can duplicate any broken glass Send us the pieces J. H. SPRATLING OPTICIAN Macon Georgia Careful Adjustment Courteous Attention j j I ) » ) ) » ) i i ) ) WATCHES, DIAMONDS JEWELRY Stephen Lane Folger Established 1892 Clubs and College Pins and Rings Gold and Silver Medals 180 Broadway NEW YORK T. J. Scott, Pres. W.W. Scott,V-Pres. George E. Scott, Sec’y Trcas. Talmage Hardware Co Established 1881 ATHLETIC GOODS 19 E. Clayton St. 10 and 12 Washington St. ATHENS GEORGIA ) i i ! -JInsure Against Fire and Lightning in the Of Liverpool England The Leading Fire Insurance Company in the World Cfl Losses Paid in Cash Without Discount CJ Agencies in all the Principal Cities and Towns. Southern Department, MfLToANNTDARG?NGM; Mgr.There is some class to our Bruiting The McGregor Booksellers Stationers P rinters 321 CLAYTON ST. Co. ATHENS. GA. This Issue of the Pandora was Printed by UsJ 7 v « With the Spirit of the Man r PHE “Hall of Fame” in the A world of art is inhabited by the fellows who can make their pictures life-like. The leader in every expert work is the man who can add the “extra touch” that lifts his efforts above the commonplace. And it’s the same with Men’s Clothes; it requires the artistically refined, mechanically perfect—and “then some”—the “extra touch.” WINGFIELD’S CLOTHES are cut on graceful, vigorous lines that have the bouyancy and spirit of the active man. The tailoring is a finished work The designer’s art is carried out to the last touch, his ideas prevailing from first to last; thus every garment is a perfect harmony of expert CIothes-Mak-ing. Edcrhcimcr, Stein Co. MAKERS WINGFIELD’S- “The Shop of Quality”  " — We Can Show You ) ) ) » ) actually the finest, smartest and the most authorative “Young Fellow” garments made. You will find them just what they are intended to be—refined clothes designed a wee bit out of the ordinary. Come. “Letus show you.” Head McMahan f « « ( vl Life Insurance Casualty Insurance Surety Bonds Georgia Life Insurance Co. Home Office: Macon, Ga. W. E. SMALL, President. L. A. SHEPHERD, Sec’y and Treas. Over One Half Million Dollars Surplus to Policy Holders $ 1 00,000 Deposit with Insurance Dept, in Georgia $ 1 00,000 Deposit with Insurance Dept, in Alabama A Larger Deposit for Protection of Policy Holders than any Southern Company. An old line Legal Reserve Gompany organized and operated under the Laws of Georgia, with an authorized Capital of $100,000. Active Agents Wanted in Every City and Town in the South. For Further Information Address AGENCY DEPARTMEMT  — — — Agnes Scott College ) (') ))) 1)1 FOR WOMEN If] Hi I ))) DECATUR, GOERGIA (Near Atlanta) ; , The College offers advantages 1) » jjj f equal to best colleges for men. n) ,)) )) The Agnes Scott Academy, i! | under separate faculty and gov- ernment, offers a four years’ course leading to Freshman j) class, For catalogue, address ! ! F. H. GAINES, President. SI III I )) ! tU=: I) A Business Asset T IFE INSURANCE is of importance to every young ■ . man. You intend to take a policy at some fut- 1 ure time. The best time is NOW. Premium rates are less for young men. This saving amounts to a considerable difference in the course of years. NOW, you are in good health and insurance can be secured easier than in after life. Ability to save is created, and confidence in self is established. Premium rates of the Empire Life are reduced by annual dividends—an advantage of a mutual company. Specific, liberal policies offer the insured every advantage consistent with conservative business methods. CJAn Empire Life policy is a safe, profitable investment and a valuable business asset for every man. C]The Empire Life Insurance Company is a conservative Southern company, managed by insurance experts of business ability who have made long strides forward in the conservation of Southern financial resources. CThe business of “life insurance” is a lucrative profession, and offers exceptional opportunities to reliable, energetic young men. flThe Empire Life will negotiate liberal contracts. Empire Life Insurance Co. Old Line Mutual Legal Reserve Home Offices Atlanta Georgia | New York Washington Richmond 1 ) ) ) ! !l Norfolk, Raleigh — — -AND All Points East ! )) I ! )) ) ) ) ) ) 1 ) ) 1 ) t 1 )) )) SEABOARD )) ) ) ! ) ) ) ! ( Birmingham, Memphis AND All Points West ! J II ))) )» ill III ))) m a a )) a Double Daily Pullman Service Complete Dining Car Service Our new improved schedules both East and West arc worth investigating C. D. WAYNE, Ass’t Gen’i Pass. Agt. J. Z. HOKE, Commercial Agent ATLANTA, GA. ATHENS. GA. )) » ;) V ) )) ) )) )) » )) )) )) EISEMAN BROS. Finer Grades of Young Men’s Suits are cut on Lines that finds ready favor with College Classes, and are true examples of the young man’s idea of Didtindtive College Clothes CJCoats with broad, natural shoulders, full cheated effcdts, two or three button models, long lapels—and body of coat following the natural contour, springing slightly over hips— Liberal Length Straight or Box back if preferred CJTrousers-medium peg—plain or wide turn-ups Striking or sedate patterns and shades—Price Range $1 5 to $35 QWhen in Atlanta make our Store your Mecca for Corredt Clothes, Hats, Shoes and Furnishings CjA full assortment of Pennants for all Southern Colleges tJMail orders solicited EISEMAN BROS. 11-13-15 Whitehall Street ATLANTA - - - GEORGIA Brenau College Conservatory Gainesville, Georgia. A High Grade Institute for Young Women Twenty-two buildings, forty-five Teachers and Officers, eighty Pianos, two Pipe Organs. Four hundred students from twenty-eight states, England, Panama, and Cuba. Elegant home surroundings. Splendid educational advantages. Most healthful location in the South, Summer School Begins June 24 Brenau Chautauqua July 4-31 A. W. VAN HOOSE, President Makers owings Rockers and Settees Special Rates to Fraternities Mission Furniture Offices and Rooms Furnished The Handicraft Company, 133 Clayton St Athens, Ga.NViislilitKlon. I». . 100S.10 K. St. N.W . ICIrlimoml. Vii„ 2fKi K. Kronri St. Norfolk. V ., 114 «r;tnl»y. St. l.ymlilMirtc. Vw., 7UJ Mulli St. KXrosiTlON I'lCI' .K 1KDAI.S. I’)ill:i(l«‘l| lii;i 1ST«! l’arls ISIS All:int:i 1 1 KS'I'A Itl.IS II Kl 1X1-;. Charlotte. N. "» W. Triuli SI llitrrKlMirtr. Pa.. -4 N. —ml SI. riltfthuri;. I .. «'»1 IVim. Av« . Itostoll. lll Ml.. 1--J lloylstoll. St. imposition rm .K mkoai.s. Ni v tirliMiix issl.l.sxS t lil«-jijro i.sski rimrl.yton P.MI2 .Iiiii lest own 11MI7 CHAS. M. STE1FF Factories and Lumber yards—Block of East LaFayette Avenue, Aiken and Lanvale Streets Grand and Upright MANUFACTURERS OF PIANOS Charlotte, N. C. HEART THROBS Words of Praise for the Artistic Steiff Piano Come from the Hearts of Great Artists. MADAME STARK STANLEY: “I am perfectly delighted with the Steiff piano, with which I have hitherto been unacquainted. It is a first-class instrument in every respect, possessing a fine, even scale all through, a splendid volume, a wonderful singing tone and a perfect action." DENIS CHABOT, pianist with Dresden Philharmonic Orchestra: "My introduction to your incomparable instrument was a pleasure I shall never forget. I have played many pianos, but for tone, lightness of action and volume, yours is unexcelled. I was so much pleased that I felt it my duty to give you your well-merited commendation voluntarily." SIGNOR CAMP1NAR1, the incomparable baritone. ‘‘A beautiful piano in every respect." MISS CLARKSON, Signor Campinari’s magnificent pianist: "1 have played on hundreds of instruments, but never on a finer one than this." MLLE. EMMA CALVE, Soprano. JOSE MARIA AGUGNA. Pianist. HERR FRANZ ME1SEL, Violinist "We are delighted with the piano, it meets every demand of an artist." JOS. H. CRAIGHILL: "1 have used the Steiff piano for many years in both concert work and teaching, and have always derived satisfaction from its use. It is, in my judgment, one of the best pianos on the market." MRS. A. D. GLASCOCK. State Vice-President of the National Federation of Musical Clubs: "I have found the Steiff piano for the Concert Stage and in the home more than satisfactory." HARRY J. ZEHM, Elizabeth college and Conservatory of Music for Women, Charlotte, N. C. "1 have known and used the Steiff piano for many years; we use it altogether in our Conservatory, for both teaching and practice, as well as for Concert work. "It is in my judgment, as perfect a piano as can be built."  


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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1906 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1907 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1909 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1911 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1912 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1913 Edition, Page 1

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