University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1903

Page 1 of 306

 

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1903 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 306 of the 1903 volume:

Hawes Hats. Gents' Furnishings. The Fecheimer Fishel Co.’s CLOTHING. 112 Clayton St., Athens, Ga.EISEMAN BROS. Atlanta, Ga., 11, 13, 15, 17 Whitehall St. Clothiers of Men, Youths and Boys Clothiers of Men, Youths and Boys, and manufacturers of our own clothing:—a statement with a three-fold meaning:. First, that we can furnish everything: from head to foot. Second, that in manufacturing our own garments we know exactly what is inside as well as out. Third, that we save you manufacturer's profit. Three reasons why this ought to be your store. Your every want supplied by mail. —Write us. Entire Building, Six Floors and Basement. Clothing Furnishings, Hats Shoes Trunks, Bags TailoringClothing! E. H. Dorsey, ? « % '- The Best. _T oxTTTcr? The .'Latest. X -“-XX MIL X v 9 Hats ! BAXTER 9 FURNISHER. Satisfaction The Smartest. 115 Clayton St., Athens, Ga. Guaranteed. Athens Electric Railway Co. ELECTRIC POWER --FOR -- Lights, Motors, Fans and Heating. C. D. FLANIGEN, Gen. Mgr., Athens, Ga. Cor. Clayton St. and College Ave.the new Interchangeable Mileage Tickets OVER THE SEABOAR D AIR LINE RAILWAY Are on sale now by any Agent of the System at --$25-00 PER 1.000 MILES- AND ARE GOOD OVER 15,000 COVERING THE FOLLOWING ROADS: Atlanta, Knoxville and Northern Railway. Atlanta and West Point Railroad. Western Railway of Alabama. Atlantic Coast Line. Louisville and Nashville Railroad. Louisville, Henderson and St. Ix uis Railroad. Nashville, Chattanooga and St. Louis Railroad, Northwestern Railway of South Carolina, Baltimore Steam Packet Company, . Plant System, IVI ILES. Brunswick and Birmingham Railroad. Richmond. Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad, Charleston and Western Carolina Railway, Washington Southern Railway. Chesapeake Steamship Company, Seaboard Air Line Railway, Columbia. Newberry and Laurens Railroad, Georgia Railroad, Western and Atlantic Railroad. C. For further information relative to schedules reservations of sleeper accommodations, etc., apply to Wm- H. FULTON. V . T. A., i2 Kimball House, Atlanta, Ga. EOWARO F. COST, Traffic Manager, Portsmouth, Va. I. H. VON DOHTEN T. P. A.. Equitable Building, Atlanta, Ga. B CLEMENTS- ir.iv. Pass. Agt., ,2 Kimball House, Atlanta, Ga. C. B. WALKER. Depot Ticket Agent. Union Station. Atlanta, Ga. CHARLES B RYAN. Genera! Passenger Agent, Portsmouth. V . W. E. CHRISTIAN. Assistant General Passenger Agent, Atlanta. Ga.EPPES-WILKINS CO. Wholetalt and Retail Grocers, CORNER BROAD AND THOMAS STS , ATHENS, GA. ESTABLISHED 1H73. T. C. BLIGH, Importer and Jobber of Glass, China, Earthenware, Chandeliers, Lamps, House Furnishing Goods, Etc. 809 Broad St., Augusta, Georgia. C. W. MOTES ARTISTIC- Pboto r pber College Avenue, Athens, Ga. Every style of First Class Work from the smallest to life size Portrait . College Work a specialty. The leading Photographer for a quarter of a century in Atlanta. 185$. 1905. Sueif 'Cobb Jnstitute« Athens, i a. For Catalogues and Information, apply to M. A. LIPSCOMB, Principal.,444444444444444444444444444444 . TAYLOR SHOE CO., 519 Cherry Street. Macon, Georgia. An Elegant Line of Stylish Shoes for Summer Wear. Oxfords ex Specialty. There I no PURIiR Beer on the M« rket than ACHE! W hivi modern machinery .nil appliance, of the noil up-to-date pattern for (he brewlnx and bottling of beer and no Brewer u»e tetter ro.terl.l than we do, for we u»e the blrhett quality hat money can buy. We pride ounelve. on the excellent quality of our bottle beer . American Queen and RKD KAGI.H.ai there been have plenty of a»e and every other requltlte that xoe to make up the hlfth.ai type of bottle beer. Acme Brewing Co., MACON, GA. 4444444 4 444444 44444444 444 4-44 » Men’s Wear. Catering to a critical class, every tarn of fashion is anticipated here. Mail orders receive special attention. Always First with the Newest. John Cm Ends Com, MACON, GEORGIA.You make no mistake H when you call at the Athens Athens Dispensary f Dispensary For Augusta Brewing Co.’s PIL9E- I J NER and BELLE OF GEORGIA Ex- p port Beer. For Augusta Brewing Co.’s PILSE-NER and BELLE OF GEORGIA Export Beer. Don’t Ask The Man But “Ask The Owl” And lie will tell you that his namesake, “THE ltO AL OWL FLOt R.’’ is Absolutely the purest and best Flour ever made of soft winter wheat. It has stood at the head of the list of Fancy Patent Flours for the past five years and WE propose to keep it there. We only sell the dealers, but if your grocer can not or will not let you have it, (because lie wants to work off some sticky or hard stock) Drop us a line and we will tell you where you can get it. S. R. laques Tinsley Co., macon, ga. Wholesale Distributors for Georgia, Florida, and Alabama.A. H. FETTING Manufacturer of GREER LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY. 14, 16 CSL 18 St. Paul St. Baltimore, Md. Memorandum package sent to any Fraternity member through the secretary of his Chapter. Special designs and estimates furnished on class pins, medals, rings, etc. Baseball and Athletic Goods Whitley Exerciser. Kitchen Hardware. ANDERSON HARDWARE CO.. Atlanta, Ga.Vo I. XVI. Published by the Students of the University of Georgia C ENf 'A UNIVf-. rtb;TY ATH£, S. I If ? A F- i O: t. OR C. I A Ceokgia • .X F y 1 f j 3 C. M. 8tr h»n. Architect. IGilt of Ckokok Po-ticr P ahoi v of New York THE NEW FIRE-PROOF LIBRARY IHJCKXOIOX y x95 Harai.-on Rlkckijcy Architect GENERA! LIBRARY tJ N IV E RS IT V OF G- .'JRCIA ATHENS. CeortGiADEDICATION This volume of the Pandora is dedicated to Prof. D. C. Barrow, Whom every student places first on his list of friends. seenCALENDAR September 15-17. Monday to Wednesday: September 17, Wednesday: November ay, Thursday:' December 23, Tuesday’: 1902 Examinations for Entrance. Session Opens. National Thanksgiving Day. Christinas Recess begins. 1903 IANUARV 5, Monday: axuary 19. Monday: AXUARY 29-31. Thursday to Saturday: ‘ebkuakv 2. Monday: February 19. Thursday: February 22, Sunday: February 23, Monday: March 9. Monday: March i6. Monday: May 2, Saturday: May 9. Saturday: May 16, Saturday: May 23, Saturday: May 25, Monday: Just n, Thursday : Junk 13, Saturday: I use ii-i 3. Thursday to Saturday: use 14. Sunday: USE 15, Monday: us : t6, Tuesday: June Wedne day: July t. Monday: September 14-16. Monday to Wednesday: September 17, Wednesday: Exercises resumed. Birthday of R. E Lee. Examinations for entrance half-advanced. Second term begins. 103rd Anniversary of the Dcmosthenian Society. Washington Birthday; 81st Anniversary of the Ph Kappa Society. Junior and Senior essays due. Competitive Senior Speaking. Competitive Junior Speaking. Senior Competitive Debates. Junior Competitive Delate . Sophomore Competitive Delate . Freshman Competitive Debate . Final Examinaticns begin. Board of Trustees meet in Annual Session in Athens, ti a. m.. Sophomore Declamations. 4 i». m.. Junior orations; Delivery of Sophomore Prizes 6 p. m. . Prize Drill of the Corps of Cadets. 8 p. m., Champion Debate. Examinations for Entrance, it a. m , Baccalaureate Sermon. 11 a. si.. Oration before the Literary Societies. 10 a. m.. Meeting of the Alumni Society. 12 M., Oration before the Alumni. 4 p. si.. Orations by representatives of Undergrade ate Departments of the University Organization. 4 p. si.. Senior and law Class Orations. Commencement Day. 11 a. m. , Baccalaureate Address. Closing Exercises. Summer Vacation begin . Summer School begins Examinations for Entrance. 103rd Session opens. The General Faculty of the University meets every Tuesday during the session, at 4:3© p. si. The Literary Societies meet Saturday mornings at" 10:30. The College Y. M. C. A. meets Friday nights at 8 30. The Engineering Society meets fortnightly, on Wednesday night , at S:oo. The Athletic Association meets on call of the President. The Literary Club meets the first Friday night of each month. The Pres Club meets the first week in October, January and April, and bi-monthly. The Greek letter fraternities meet, as a rule, on Saturday night. 0lOlst Commencement Sophomore Declalmers Marion Monk, Wallace Miller, Jack Bower, Herbert Reynolds, I'ort Scott, Anderson King, Burney Dobbs, Ralph Meldrim, Alvin Goluckc, Max Michael. Junior Orators Cain Dorsey, Wclborn Reynolds, Robert Moran, Henry Jones, Marion Smith. Glenn Lcgwen, Joseph Manley. Owen Cheney. Senior Orator Frank Barrett. Madison Bell. Law Speakers Henry M. Fletcher- Department Representatives Franklin College, State College, Law School. Ga. Tech., • State Normal, Dahloncga, Ira Williams, Jack McCartney, Dexter Blount, Don Towers, Miss Laura Smith, J. D. Bowers. Champion Debaters PHI KAI’l’A. OK MOST I IKS" I AN. Alvin Golucke, Jas. K. Jordan, Claude Bond. W. T. Sicbles. Tills Is the first time a lady has ever spoken from the University stupe. I02d Commencement Commencement Programme Satuuday, Junk 13m— 11 a. m.—Sophomore Declamations. 4 p. m.—Junior Orations. Delivery of Sophomore Prir.es. 6 p. m.—Prize Drill. 5 p. m.—Champion Debate. Sunday, Junk 14m— 11 a. m.—Baccalaureate Sermon. Monday, Junk 151-11— 11 a. in.—Address before Literary Societies. 4 p. 111.—I niversity Celebration by Representatives of each branch. 10.30 p. in.—Cotillion Hop. Tuesday, Junk i6tii— 9 a. :n.—Meeting Alumni Society. 12 in.—Address before Aluinni Society. 4 p. m.—Senior and Law Class Exercises. 10.30 p. m.—Law Class Hop. Wednesday. June 171 11— 11 a. m.—Haccaloureate Address. Delivery of Diplomas. 10.30 p. m.—Senior Class Hop.r This volume of Pandora marks a new era in the life of our College Annual. Published no longer by a restricted class but edited and managed by the entire student body, it will without doubt in the future fulfill its broadest purpose—to present a picture of college life as it is, and to serve as a memento of the lasting friendships formed in and about the University of Georgia. The editors present this volume for your inspection with the hope that it will meet with your approval. They have done their best and have no apologies to make. 8IN MEMOR1AM CHARLES MATCHET JOHHS, A.B.. Bishop. Ca. Class of 1903. Died April I2lh, 1903.EDITORS OF PANDORA ■Editorsdn-Chlef. G. Dbxtkk Blount, K A Kkamrton E. Ellis, ❖AO Business Managc'S. Claudk W. Bond, ? N J. Bf.nton High. dissociate Editors. Marion M. Smitji, 5 A E Hugh McD. Scott, X t K. Prbston Brooks. A T Q Marvin M. Dickinson. K $ William G. England, X Y Sionbv J. Nix, U. I . L.GOVERNMENT Hi Excellency, Gov J. M. TERRELL, Atlanta. Ex-Officio. G. F. GOBER, Marietta, from the State at Large.............................Term Expire Sept. ist, 1907 CLARK HOWELL, Atlanta, from the State at Large.............................. Term Expire Sept. ist, 1909 W. E. SIMMONS. Lawrcnceville. from the State at Larpe........................Term Expire Sept. ist, 1903 HAMILTON McWHORTER, Athens, from the State at I.arpe...................Term Expire Sept. 1st, 1905 S. B. ADAMS. Savannah, First Congressional District..........................Term Expires Sept. 1st. 1 05 B. B. BOWER, Jr., Bainhridge, Second Congressional District .................Term Expire Sept, ist, 1905 W If. FISH, Americus, Third Congressional District...........................Term Expire Sept. 1st, 190a HENRY PERSON'S, Talbotton, Fourth Congressional District.....................Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1903 H. D. McDANlEL, Monroe, Chairman, Fifth Congressional District............ Term Expire Sept. i«t, 1903 A. O. BACON. Macon. Sixth Congressional District............................ Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1909 D. B. HAMILTON, Rome, Seventh Congressional District.......................Term Expire Sept. 1st, 1909 H. T. LEWIS. Grcenslwro, Eighth Congressional District.......................Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1903 N. I,. HUTCHINS. Lawrenceville, Ninth Congressional District................ Term Expire Sept. 1st. 1907 E. H. CALLA WAS’, Augusta, Tenth Congressional District....................Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1907 II. G. TURNER, Quitman, Eleventh Congressional District......................Term Expires Sept, ist, 1906 A. L. HULL, Athens, Resident Trustee.........................................Term Expires Sept, ist, 1909 HOWELL COBB, Athens, Resident Trustee........................................Term Expire Sept, ist, 1907 N. E. HARRIS. Macon, President of Board of Trustees of School of Technology...................Ex-Officio. F. G. DuBIGNON, Savannah, President of Board of Commissioners Georgia Normal and Industrial College........................................................................... Ex-Officio P. W. MELD RIM Savannah, President of Board of Commissioners Industrial College for Colored Youths................................................................... Ex-Officio H. D. McDANlEL................................................................................. Chairman A. L. HULI.......................................................................Secretary and Treasurer Prudential Committee—Messrs. Cobb, Hull and Hutchins. Finance Committee—Messrs. Hull. Hutchins and Lewis. Property Committee—Messrs. Cobb. Harris and Hamilton. Committee on Honorary Degrees—Messrs, bacon, Turner and the Chancellor. Committee on Agriculture—Messrs. Gobcr, Simmons and Persons. Committee on Brown Fund—Messrs. McWhorter, Callaway and Person . 12FACULTY W. B. HILL. A.M., LL.D., Clianccllor. H. C. WHITE. B.Sc., Ph D., F. t. S.. President and Professor of Chemistry. I). C. BARROW, Jr., C. and M.E., Professor of .Mathematics. W. H. BOCOCK, A.M., Professor of Ancient Languages. J. P. CAMPBELL, A. Pit. D., Professor of Biology. C. M. STRAHAX, C. and M.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. j. h. t. McPherson, a. b., ph. d., Professor of History and Political Science. C. M. SNELLING. A. M.. Professor of Mathematics. W. D. HOOPER. A. M., Professor of Latin. JOHN MORRIS, A. M.. Professor of English language and German. T. LUSTRAT, Bach, es Lett.. (University of France) Professor of Romance languages. A. H. PATTERSON. A. B.. A. M.. Professor of Phvsics and Astronomy. R. E. PARK. A. M.. Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. U. H. D WENPORT. B. S.. Instructor in Physics. E. L. GRIGGS (Gkadcate V.M.I.), Instructor in Drawing and Commandant of Cadets. J. M. JOHNSON, B.S., Ac., M.S., Ac., Instructor in Agriculture. C. J. MOORE, B. S., I’ll. D., Instructor in Chemistry. J. M. STEPHENSON, A. B., Tutor in Rhetoric and English Literature. W. O. PAYNE, A. M.. Tutor in History and Political .Science. W. I). HOYT, A. B„ Tutor in Biology. R. L. McWHORTER, A. B.. Tutor in I-atin and Greek. J. F. HART. Jk.. Fellow in Agriculture. • G. G. BOND. A. M.. S| ecial Lecturer in Psychology, I.ogic and Pedagogy. MISS SAR H A. FRIERSON, Librarian. W. O. PAYNE. A. M., Assistant Librarian. PROF. J. P. CAMPBELL. Secretary of Faculty. PROF. C. M. SNELLING, Registrar. LAW FACULTY WALTER BARNARD HILL. A. M., B. L.. Chancellor, and Lecturer on the Science and History of Law. Federal I .aw, and Legal Ethics. HOWELL COBB. A. M.. B. L.. Professor of Law. SYI.VANUS MORRIS. A. M.. B. L.. Professor of Law. JOHN D. MELL. A. B.. B. I... Professor of Parliamentary Law. SAMUEL C. BENEDICT. M. D.. Professor of Medical Turisprudcrtce. j. h. t. McPherson, a. b..‘ p». d., lecturer on Roman Law. 13SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS O. J. Frankmx....................................................................... President. W. A. Worsiiam, Jr............................................................. Vice-President. (». W. L.egwin....................................................................... Historian M. M. Dickinson ............................................................. Captain Football. II. M. Scott................................................................ Manager Football. V. R. Coile..................................................................Captain Baseball. E. R. Jkkger................................................................. Manager Baseball. D. H. DuPree......................................................................... Captain Track. IIuxlby Abrott................................................................. Manager Track. Duke Krknson ...................................................................... Chaplain. Robert Moran..............................................................................Poet. 14HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF 1903 What bools it that all the Faculty lias said, confidentially of course, "You arc the lxrst class in College"? Other classes tell us that certain Professors have whispered to them a similar remark. We appreciate the good will of the Faculty, but we do not give the above remark for historical data. No, by our deeds you shall know us! What have we accomplished? Look at us in Athletics. When in the history of the University has one class ever before given to baseball more men or better ones than Dickinson, Mc-Calla. McMullin, McWhorter. Ridley, and Walker? View us in football. Where is a longer list from one class than Harrow, T., Baxter, Heaver, Calhoun, Clay, Dickinson. Dorsey, Monahan. Ridley. Russell. Smith, Turner, W. R.. and Worsham? Baxter (record breaker), Code (record breaker). Harrow. Monahan. Dorsey. Manley, and Ridley arc reminders of what we have been on the track. We have furnished two champion debaters and two representatives to the State Oratorical Contest, as well as our share of writers and editors for The Georgian and Red and Black. Two Anniversarians for Phi Kappa have been furnished by the class of 1903. We all remember, when we were Freshmen, the first day we entered the old Chapel and saw what a big thing the Freshman class really was, and how then we took delight in pinning such placards on the backs of our fellows as "I am a Freshman; kick me"; how it came about that a certain Professor received from us the appellation of "Peduncle"; Itow we climbed the tower as high as any Freshman had ever gone, and other pranks that Freshmen take delight in. We have done all these things, and more. We are tempted to go still further and say what we arc going to do. but this is our brother prophet’s duty. HISTORIAN. tef CHJtPELIIvni.by AllltOTT, iJ. S., I . K., K A. Athens. Ga. Entered Junior; Member Engineering Society; Junior Editor "Engineering Annual" '0'»: Editor-In-Chief ’03: Editor-In-Chief •'Georgian": Manager Class 'lYack Team: Member Scroll and Pen. Ions Camimieu. Avery, B. I-., A T A Pcnsacoi-v, Fl-A. Entered Senior law; Member Georgia Law Debating Society: Member Athe-mrtim Histrionic Club. 18 Thomas A. Bakkow, A. B., I)., K A Pkliiam. Ga. Entered January '00: N. P. K.: Wire-grass Club: Junior Debater; Substitute •Ol and ’02 Foot Rail Teams: Captain ’02 Foot Ball ••Scrubs": Member Track Team '02 and ’03: Sergeant Corps Cadets ’02 and 03: Vice-President and President of Dcmosthenlan. ■Julian Fitzsimmons ISaxtrh, EIcc. 1 ,K., UE. Atlanta. Ga. Entered Freshman; End on Football Team '00, '01 am! '02; Member Track Team '00. 01 and '02: Captain of Track Team '03: Member of Sphinx; Member of Casque and Gauntlet: Member Mandolin and Guitar Club; Business Manager Thallans: Corporal. Sergeant. Captain Corps Cadets: Winner of Drill Modal '01. Sandv Bbavkk, A. B„ I . K. AtoesTA, Ga Entered Freshman: Treasurer Freshman Class: 'Varsity Baseball Team '00. '01. '02. '03; Captain '»2; l.eft Guard 'Varsity Football Team '01. '02: President Athletic Association; President and Vice-President of Phi Kappa Society; Master of Ceremonies Phi Kappa Anniversary '02: Master of Coremon.es Impromptu Debate '03; Member Advisory Board: Honor Board: Sphinx; First Corporal. First Sergeant. Captain Company A. University Battalion. lit GKOitcjK Dkxtkh Utah t. ». I h.. B. I... I». K.. K A Baknksyiixk. Ga. Entered Junior J.aw; Commencement Speaker 02. '03; 'Varsity Base Ball '02; 'varsity Track Team '02. 03; Law Class Hop Committee '02. ’03? Impromptu Debater ’03: Member Casque and Gauntlet: Member Tlmlians: Member Georgia Law Debating Society; President and Vice President Phi Kappa: Member Advisory Board: 1-Mltor-in Chief Panikha.Clauds Wilson Honi , A. I . K.. ? N. Cason. Ga. Entered Sophomore; Sophomore Speaker; Winner Sophomore Debater’s Medal ’01: Member Advisory Board ’02; Literary Club '02: Editor-In-Chief "Red and Black” '03; Member Athletic Council '03; Business Manager '03 PaNikhca. Vice-President and President Phi Kappa '03. Minor Boyd, A. B., I . K., 5 A E. An .a NT a. Ga. Entere l Kreahman; Member Sphinx; Member Casque and Gauntlet: Member Thnlians; Cotillion Hop Committee '01. ■02: Advisory Board ’02. '03; Manager '03 Base Ball 'I'oam; Corporal. Sergeant, Captain. Corps Cadets; Athletic Council. Sontor Hop Committee ’03. 20 Robert Preston Hrooks, A. B., D.. ATQ. MlLLKIHJKVUXE, Ga. Winner Kusscll Prize Monogram In Psychology; Executive Committee Wlregrass Club: l-eader Mandolin and Guitar Club: "Georgian" Editor: Pax-doiia Editor ’03: Scroll and Pen: Casque nnd Gauntlet: Thalian: Champion (Doubles) in Tennis: Pan-Hellenic Hop Committee: Repnsontatlve Fraternity 18th Congress at Chicago. Dkwald Anski.m Cohen, B. S., 1 K. Atlanta, Ga. Entered Freshman Class; Corporal Corps cadets: Sergeant Major Corps Cadets; Adjutant Corps Cadets; Mgr. Soph. Relay Team: Associate Editor '02 Pamkika; Athletic Editor "Red and Black" Spring Term and Fall Term ’02; 1st Vice-President Phi Kappa; Member University Orchestra: Secretary Senior Class. Doyj.b Camphbi.i., A. B. (University of Georgia), B. L., P. K.. f. P. L. Month'KI.ix), Ga. Entered Senior I.aw Class 02. Wvi.ip. Owen Chunky, A. B., D., U. 1». L. Baihiistown, Ga. Entered Freshman; Secretary. Vice-President. Parliamentarian and President Demons; henian; Junior Orator: Historian. Poet. Class of '03; Sergeant. Second Lieu, tenant Corps Cadets; Secretary Literary Club. 21Alexander Johnson Coogi.br''- B. L. D., K Z. Rivkriiale. Ga. Entered Junior Law; President and Secretary of Demosthenlan; Manager J w Class Base Ball Team. WILLIAMS RL’TIIRItKORD CoiLK, A. B., D. WiXTERViue. Ga. Ti Cam Dawson Dorsey, ii. S.. 1 . K.. 5 A E. Atlanta. Ga.George I.re Kciioi.s, 1J. S., D., U. P L Ii . Ga. Entered Freshman; President Demos-tbonlan ’03. Tames Lemuel Dowling, B. L , D., r. I . I.. Rcackshkaii. Ga. Entered Junior Law Class '01: Pros!-dent. Vice- President. Sec-ctary and 'lYoasnrer IXmosthenian Society: Im- promptu Debater: Associate Editor "Red and Black": Member Georgia Law Debiting Society: Member Wire Grass Club. Dan Hughes Dupree, B. S., D.. 5 N. Danvii.i.k, Ga. Entered Freshman: X. P. K.; Corpora! Corps Cadets; Assistant Business Manager "Red and Black"; Sophomore Hop Committee; Sergeant Corps Cadets; Business Manager "Red and Black"; Pan-Hellenic Hop Committee '02; Vice-President Demos thonian: First Lieutenant Corps Cadets; Business Managor "Georgian”: Treasurer Senior Class: Senior Hop Committee.Frampton E it roll Ellis, li. P. K., ♦ A ©. Atlanta, Ga. Exchange Editor "Red and Mack"; President Moot Parliament: Editor "Georgian” '01. ’02. 'OS; Member Advisory Committee: P. K. Impromptu Debater; Member Seroll and Pen; President Georgia l.aw Debating Society; Chairman Senior Lew Hop Committee; I-.-eeldcnt Unlveralt" Literary Club: Editor-In-Chief Paxuoha. Gkokgk Hkuck Franklin, A. li., D., U. 1 L. Aiiahkllk. Ga. Entered Freshman: Corporal Corps Cadets: Junior Historian; Vice-Presi- dent Literary Club; Secretary Phi Kappa: President Phi Kappa: Charter Member and Secretary of Scroll and Pen; I-ocal Editor "Red and Pluck.” Russell Gould, A. H. (L'niv. of Ga.) B. S. (E. E ), D. Sax Axtoxio, Texas. Junior Editor '01 "Engineering Annual”: Assistant In Physics and Electrical Engineering '02: Senior Editor ’03 “Engineering Annual.” 24WilmamAlbxaxder Hai.i.owbs, Jr. B. I-., P K., K A. Jacksonville, Fla. Vico President Thali ns '03; Business Manager Mandolin and Guitar Club '03; Pan-Hellenic Representative. '03; Assist-ant Business Manager Football Team '02; Member Casque and Gauntlet; Member University Orchestra; Member "The Colonels." Oscau Jason Franklin', A. B., D., U. P. L. Adaiieixb, ga. Entered Freshman: Corporal Corps Cadets; Member Advisory Board: Member Phi Kappa Council; v’ice President Phi Kappa; President Phi Kappa; President Senior Class. 23 George Cutiibert IIkyward, Jr., ». L., P. K„ K A. Savannah. Ga. Manager Foot Ball Team '02; President of Phi Kappa; Menjber Athletic Council: Law Hop Committee ’03.James Wood Hitch, B. I,., 1 K., K A. Waycroms. Ca. Entered Senior I.aw; Member Georgia Low Debating Society. Joseph Bkntox High. ' B. S. (C. E.). 1 . K. M.Mtlsox, G. . Entered Freshman: Cori oral Corps Cadets ‘01: Sergeant ’ 2; Vice-President Engineering Society '02: President Engineering Society '03; Member Omar Khayyam Club; Member Athen.rum His. trlonlc Club: Business Manager Paxiioka •03. 2d Thomas I.eo IIidsov, B. S. (C. E.). D.. U. 1 L. Gai.xkhvii.lk. Ga. Entered Sophomore; Secretary of Class In ‘02: Treasurer Demosthenlao Society '03; Treasurer Engineering So. clcty '02; Reprcsentalivo to Toronto '02; I .oca I Editor "Red and Black" ’03; Sergeant Corps Cadets ‘02; First Lieutenant Company A. Corps Cadets '03; Member Omar Khayyam Club; Impromptu Debater: Member Athenwum Histrionic Club; State College Speaker '03.Wii.i.iam An dk it son Jackson, B. S. (C. E ), D. Athens, Qa. Entered Freshman: Member Engineering Society; Sergeant. Lieutenant. Corps Cadets. John Caki.ton Jssteh. A.H., 1 K Athens. Ga. 27 Rick Winfiri.d Jonbs, A. B. (Georgetown), B. L., 1 . K., 5 A E. AI.CXAMMIIA. Va. KntereJ Senior Law Class ‘02: Impromptu Debater: Hop Committee: Member Athemrum Histrionic Club: Member of The Colonels.” WlLI.IAM Henry Jones, B. S., P. K., 5 A E. Macon. Ga. Kdwaud Postei.i. King, Jr., B. L., P. K.. 4 A 0. ‘ Atlanta. Ga. Entered Senior Iaw ; Member Tha-Hans; President Athemonm Histrionic Clnb; Charter Member ‘The Colonels": Athletic Editor "Red and Black" two ;erms. Chaui.ks Ross Lawlbr, A. B., I)., U. P. L. Tallapoosa, 3a. Entered Freshman; Corporal and Sergeant Corps Cadets: Editor "Georgian": Editor "Red and Black”: Vice-President 28 and President Demonsthcrian.Glrxn Wai.kkr Lkc.wrn, A. P. K.. nO. Ckavvvokdvillk. Ga. Entered Freshman; President Freshman Class; Secretary Phi Kappa: Clyde Shropshire Speaker; Sophomore Declaimed Junior Orator; Phi Kappa An-niversarlan; Associate E litor "Red and Black” '01; buitor-ln-Chlef "Red and Black” 01: Uilitor ‘'Georgian' '02. '03; Member Sphinx; Member Casque and Gauntlet; Representative Oratorical Contest '00: President State Oratorical Association '00; Sophomore Hop Committee; Junior Hop Committee; Ser. gcant Corps Cadets. Andrew Jacksox Lyndon, B.S., D-. K A. ATIIEXS. Ga. Entered Freshman: Sophomore Hop Committee '01; Manager Track Team '02; Member Casque and Gauntlet; Member N. P. K. 29 Walter Sherman Mask, A. B., I). Athens, Ga. Entered Freshman.Edgar William Martin. A. B., P. K. CRAWFORD. G. . Joseph Parson Manley, A. It.. D. Griffin. Ga. Entered Sophomore; Sophomore Speaker; Vice-President and Treasurer Demosthenian; Manager Junior Class Track Team; Junior Orator; Winner of Half Mile Run '02: Relay Class Team '01. ’02. '03; Winner Junior Debater's Medal; Sergeant Corps Cadets: Representative at S. I. A. A. Meet In Nashville '02; Captain Senior Track Team; Second Lieutenant Company C; Winner of Half Mile Run '03; Representative at S. I. A. A. Meet in Atlanta '03; Franklin College Speaker ’03. Hugh James MacIntyre, Grad. V. M. I., It. L..' P K.. 5 A E. TltOMASVILl.K, Ga. Entered Senior Law Class: President Georgia l-aw Debating Society; Hop Committee: Member Athenaeum His- trlonle Club. 30AltCII IIIA 1.1 Thompson McIntyre. A. B.,l K. TllOMASVIl.LE, GA. Entered Freshman. Robert James Moran, A. Ji., 1 . K. Atlanta. Ga. Entered Freshman: Editor of "Georgian" '0?.: Exchange Eilltor "Red and Black" '03: President Press Club: Vice-President Press Club; Vice President Literary Club: Corresponding Secretary. Recording Secretary. Vice-President Phi Kappa: Junior Orator: Correspondent "Constitution": Member Junior Relay ’team: Mcmlier Program Committee Literary Club and Scroll and Pen. 31 John Oliver Nkxvk,-l. li- L.. P. K., U. P. L. Villa Rica. Ga. Entered Junior Law Class ’01.Sidney Johnston Nix, A. 15. (L'niv. of Ga.), 15. I,., D., U. 1 . L. Harmony Grove. Ga. Entered Junior Law Class ’02; President Y. M. C. A.; Right Guard 'Varsity Foot Ball Team '0I.’02; Track Team; Member Athonn-um Histrionic Club: Member Omar Khayyam Club; Master Ceremonies Demosthenlan Anniversary; Editor '03 Pandora. Hugh McDaniel Scott, A. 15.,P K.t X t . Atlanta. Ga. Entere l Freshman; X. P. K.: Manager Sophomore Foot Ball Team '00; Secretary Athletic Association '01; Assistant Manager 'Varsity Foot Ball Team '01; Advisory Board '01. '02. '03; Athletic Council '01. '02. '03; Winner Junior Debater’s Medal '02; Chairman Junior Hop Committee 02; Associate Editor “Rod and Black" '02; Associate Editor '03 Pandora ; Manager Senior Foot Ball Team '02; Chairman Cotillion Committee 'o2. '03; Senior Hop Committee '03; •'resident A. A. '03; Senior Speaker; President Phi Kappa '03. VVklrokx Meyers Reynolds, A. 15 P. K., K A. Marietta, Ga. Entered Sophomore: Junior Orator; President and Vice-President Phi Kappa; First Alternate in Georgia-North Carolina Debate; Associate Editor "Red and Black."Marion Hoke Smith, Elec., P. K.. 5[A E. Atlanta, Ga. Champion Debater '01; Junior Speak, ••r; 'Varsity Foot Ball Team '01. '02: Rtlilor Pandora; Editor "Georgian": Member Sphinx; Scroll and Pen. Lucius Euc.rnk Tate, A. B. (Univ. of Ga.), B. L., D., A T A. Tatk, Ga. Entered Senior Law; President Senior 33 Law Class.Iambs Wadb Talhkrt, B. L.. D.t K Brixson. Ga. Entered Junior Law Cla.v- '01: Secretary Junior Law Class. Treasurer Senior Law Class: President Demos-thenlnn Society. William Randolph Turner, A. B., P. K-. ♦AO. Banxksviixc. Ga. Entered Junior: Full Hack ’Varsity Foot Ball Team '01. 02; Business Manager "Red and Black ”: Pan-Hellenlc Hop Committee; Member Casque and Gauntlet: Member Sphinx. William Archer Worsham, Jr., B. S., D., 5 N. Fomytii. Ga. Entered Sophomore Class; Sergeant Corps Cadets: Second lieutenant Corps Cadets; Vice President Senior Class: Member 'Varsity Foot Ball Team ’02.BlLMNGTON SaNDKKS WaLKRK, Jk., A. P. K., 3 A E. Moxkoe, Ga. Lbkoy Penn Young, A. 1J., P. K. Woopviixk. Ga. Entered Freshman. 35 GENERAL LIBRARY Univeksity of Georgia ATHENS. CEONSIA Edward Rkmington Iergkr, A.U , P. K.. K A. TllOMASVifj.tr, Ga. Bnlercd Sophomore. Vice-President Phi Kappa: Treasurer Phi Kappa: President Wiregrass Club: Manager Senior Baseball Team; Senior Hop Committee: Appointed on Insurance Trip to Now York; Member A(hcn«um Histrionic Club.Marvin McDowell Dickinson, B. S.. D., K 5. LAGRANGE, GA. Colquitt Crisp Finley, B. L., D. FAIR MOUNT, GA. Rorrkt Holt Harris, B. L . D. FAIRY, GA. Augustus Longstrkrt Hull, Elec., D., 5 A E. ATHENS, GA. Smii.ie Skaiirook Johnson, Jr., B. S.. 1 . K., X Y. ETOWAH, GA. Harold Wayne Kktron, B. L., D CLARKESVILI.K, GA. Howard Malcolm Kilpatrick, Elec., K A. WHITE PLAINS, GA. George Kirkland, Jr., B. L., D. SUMMBRTOWN, GA. 30 Campiikll McDonald Krknson, A. B., P.K..KA. SAVANNAH, GA- John Henry Manaiian, A. B.. P. K , 5 N. SAVANNAH, GA. Joseph Melton McDonald, B. S.. D. CONYERS. GA. Francis Pkrcival McIntire, B. L. P. K., S E. SAVANNAH,GA.Eugene Wokford Ragsdale, A. B., B. L., D., U. I . L DAI.LAS. GA. Ronald Augustine Ransom, B. L.. P. K.. SAE. ATLANTA. GA. Frank Morris Ridley, )k.. Klee. I . K., X ❖. LAGRANGE, GA . Herman Holst Swift. A. B., B. L., 1 . K., B © TT. COLUMBUS, GA. Henry Hamilton Taylor, B. L. KEY WEST, FLA. Lewis Jasper Thompson. A. B , D. CHARLTON, ALA. Robert Eggleston White, A.B., D. BUTLER, GA. William DkLaukky Worsley, 11. L„ K Y. COLUMBUS, GA. 37JUNIOR CLASSJUNIOR CLA55 OFFICERS Lee Worsham Wallace Mili.f.k . W. Xl'NNALLV ... J. Bower......... F. Anderson...... M. I.. Richter. Jr Quigc Fletcher . BOSCO ClJtVKI.AND Bill Reid........ ...................... President. ................. Vice-President. ...................... Historian. Capt. and Mgr. Baseball Team. ............... Captain Football. ............... Manager Football. ............... Captain Track. ............... Manager Track. ........................Chaplain.JUNIOR CLASS Frank Burner Anderson. F P. L.. Thomas Rufus Aycock............. Don Roland Bower, K A .......... Jack Dickinson Bower, K A ------- Gordon Cubbedge Carson. K A .. Isaac Wavnc Chandler, I'. P. L.. J. Cohen Chandler, U. P. I...... Jesse Franklin Cleveland........ Wistcr Weyman Cook. C. P. L..._. Joseph Fllis Craigmilcs......... Samuel James Crowe, X ... Burney S| ringer Dobbs, A T 0 Abraham Falk, Jr................ Lamar Flowers................... Alvin Gordon Golucke............ Otto Tauber Harper, V. P. I----- Herman Hirscli Harris........... Joseph Lumpkin Hull. - A E .. . Hiram Anderson King............. John Christian Koch. K E........ Daniel Lott. A 0 ......... Paul I.ovcjoy. 5 N ............. Ralph Meldrim. X ............ Max Michael .................... Wallace Miller. K A............. Winship Xunnally. X t ........ Douglasville. ........ Monroe. ---- Uainbridge. .... Uainbridge. ..... Savannah. ........ Planter. ........ Planter. . Wartracc, Tenn. ........ Bishop. ... Thomasville. ........ Atlanta. ...... Marietta. Charleston. S. C. .......Doravillc. .. Crawfordville. ....... Americus. ....... Eastman. .........Athens. .......Red Hill. ----, Tallapoosa. ..... Waycross. ......... Athens. ..... Savannah. ......... Athens. ...... Macon. .......... tlanta. 41Junior Class—Continued Gifford Rylamlcr Oliver, U. P. L............................................................... Plains. Robert Edgar Ozier........................................................................ Montezuma. Warren Bowers Parks. 4 A 0.................................................................... Dawson. Willis Eugene Ragan. X t ................................................................... Atlanta. Marcellus Rambo, AT!) ........................................................................Marietta. William Lovelace Reid ................................................................... Craw ford ville. Herbert I.indlcy Reynolds. K A .............................................................. Marietta. Martin Luther Richter. ❖ A 0.................................................................. Madison. William Otis Roberts, L P. 1.............................................................. Yatesvillc. Henry Port Scott. Jr. X ❖..................................................................... Atlanta. James Simeon Smith............................................................................ Acworth. Charles Groover Strickland ................................................................. aldosta. Aldon Fenton Thompson......................................................................... Conyers. Evan Lyde Wilkins.............................................................................. Athens. Robert White Woo ls ........................................................................... Athens. Ernest Lee Worsham. 5 N....................................................................... Forsyth. Hubert Leonidas Worsham, 5 N.................................................................. Forsyth. Elective Juniors Frank Raymond Gark, X ❖ ...................................................................... Augusta. Lamar Hill, KA ...............................................................................Atlanta. Roy Jackson. K 5 ........................................................................... Lafayette. Samuel Randolph Jaques. 5 A E .................................................................. Macon. George Hill Wade................................................................................. Rome. 42HISTORY OF THE JUNIOR CLASS To record truly tire history of such a class as 1904 would lake one of much more ability and strength of thought than I, but. as the task is for me to do. 1 will endeavor to tell plainly and sincerely our remarkable history from the time we were Freshmen. Entering College, ninety-three strong, in the year 1900. we acquitted ourselves well. and. according to the Historian of 1901, had the true spirit of the verdant Freshman. During that year and also our Sophomore year we always did our part and often more in every phase of College life, and we have gradually risen until now we arc at the end of our Junior year. We began the year of 1902-1903 as Juniors—upper classmen, in fact—and our deeds for the year have certainly upheld the Itonor and dignity of that title. In Athletics we have upheld otir colors proudly, furnishing our full quota in football, baseball, and on the track. In Oratory and the work of the Literary Societies we have been among the foremost, often outwitting our fellows, many of whom were our superiors in years and experience. To narrate our many achievements in other phases of College life, neither time nor space permits, but what remains to be said will be devoted to an explanation of the cause of our past success. It is undoubtedly our undaunted class spirit and patriotism, and yet csjK-cially bearing in mind our duty to our University and our community. For nothing can succeed without spirit, since from spirit springs work, from work deeds, and this is what has made the jwges of our history fair and clear. In February we held our Annual Class Banquet. It was a most enjoyable occasion for all, and from that night on the ties that bind us were strengthened and made more secure than ever before. Many toasts were rcs| ondcd to. and each one of us came away a more loyal member of 1904 than when we went. Now, as the year closes and our work has been done, we may with pride look back upon onr record, and in the fall of 1903 begin our Senior year, a class whose jxast history is a most worthy one. and with prospects for a great atid even more glorious future. HISTORIAN. 43UNIVERSITY FARMSOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS William J. Cranstoln .. William G. England Harry Moore Eugene Talmadge Lucies Bower Wkyman Harmon Manager Football. Keith Conway Dave Atkinson Jones Yow George Sibley John Henry Poole SOPHOMORE CL,ASS Benjamin Hand Askew, '» A 0 ............ David Scarlett Atkinson, AT ft .......... Austin Hill Barnett, S A E .............. Eugene Marcus Baynes..................... Tames Austin Bell. Jr., t A 0 ......... Otlio Benton............................. Morris Henry Bernstein................... Oliver Hazard Bartow Bloodworth, Jr., K A I ucian Conway Bower, K A................ John Fletcher Brooks, A T ft............. Harvey Franklin Bray .................... Walter Breckenridge Brigham ............. Carlton Parks Brooks. A T ft............. John Andrew Brown........................ Robert Eldridgc Brumby .................. Charles Augustus Buise................... Frank Leverett Bullard. ❖ A 0 -.......... Joseph Patrick Burke..................... Mac Hazclhurst Burroughs. AT ft ......... Rolicrt Mercer Cheyney. A T ft .......... George Lucas Cli fton.................... Edwin Newton Cobh........................ Richard Beardsley Combs.................. John Alexander Copeland. K S ............ William Johnston Cranstoun, X 4 ........ Robert McCav Dcaring. X t ............. William Gayle England, X Y............... John Rutherford Fawcett.................. Joseph Knox Fclker. AO ................ ----Milford. . Brunswick. ____ Celeste. Shady Dale. . Gainesville. Donalsonville. .. Savannah. ...» Forsyth. . Cambridge. ..... Temple. .. Pocataligo. ---- Augusta. Millcdgcvillc. .....Athens. .... Marietta. ....... Tilda. . ... Machcn. ..... Sharon. ,. Brunswick. ..... Athens. ..... Athens. ..... Athens. .. Adairsville. ...... Rome. ____ Augusta. ... Savannah. .. Cellar town. ... Savannah. ____ Monroe. 47Sophomore Class—Continued Jcre Wickliffc Goldsmith, X ----- George Haines. Jr................ Wesley Tumell Hanson. K S ....... Paul Telford Harbor, K S ........ John Jasper Harber, - A E ....... Weynian Potter Harmon. 4 A © .. Roderick Henry Hill, S A E ...... Edward Sylvanus Hitch. K A ...... Joseph Kogan Hodgson. A T Q Preston Werner Holtzcndorff...... Clifford Massey James............ Byron Sebastian Keith............ Henry Rupert Keller.............. Rol ort Harold Kendrick.......... James Moore Kendrick............. Paul Jones King. K i ............ Edgeworth Eve Eampkin. i A E . John Richard I.oe................ Alfred I.ucignani................ Jacob Wailes Lewis, X 4 ........ Robert Knox Malone............... Dudley Howard McDowell. X t .. Waldo Emerson Marion............. Lewis Dugas McCleskcv, X t . . Walter Octavius Mnrshbnrn. 4 A 0 Harvey Wilson Moore, i A E ------ Ro! cr: Scott Newcomb............ Herbert Xix ..................... Romainc Reuben Nunn ............. Rufus England O'Farrell.......... Walter Watts Patterson. ATI) .. Joel Branham Peniston. X t --- Paul Perkinson................... Paul Wood Plunkett. - A E .... ........ Atlanta. ....... Augusta. .. Social Circle. Harmony Grove. Harmony Grove. x.... Savannah. ... Washington. ..... Waycross. .......... Athens. Crystal Springs. .. . Douglasville. ... Pendergrass. .......Mcinhard. ......... Sharon. ......... Sharon. .. Summerville. .......... Athens. ....... Bluffton. Key West. Fla. ... Greensboro. .....Villa Rica. ........ Blakely. ---- Gainesville. ........ Atlanta. .... Bartlesville. .........Augusta. ..... Savannah. Harmony Grove. ..' Millcdgcville. .........Atlanta. ..... Columbus. ........... Rome. ---- Woodstock. ....... Augusta. 48(Sophomore Class—Continued John Ilcnry Poole................................................................................ Alpharetta. Charles Patrick Pratt A T Q......................................................................... Atlanta. Dudley Walter Reynolds. K A .................................................................. Marietta. Horace Honor Ritchie.............................................................................Grove Level. Frank Shepherd Roberts.............................................................................. Atlanta. George Royal Sibley. K A ........................................................................... Augusta. Charles Emory Smith............................................................................. Clarksljoro. William Clyde Smith.............................................................................. Shady Dale. James Edward Tabor, A T 0 ......................................................................... Elherton. Eugene Thomas Tahnadge. i. N ....................................................................Forsyth. Howard Tate, 5 N ...................................................................................... Jasper. Harold Waldhattcr Telford....................................................................... Gainesville. George McAlister Telford.......................................................................... Mavsvillc. Albert Edward Thornton, X $ ........................................................................ Atlanta. William Crockett Twitty , S A E ..................................................................... Pelham. Charles Usher ................................................................................ Springfield. Sheddic Usher .................................................................................. Springfield. Edwin Herbert Vonderaw, K E.................................................................... Athens. Herman Harvey Wilburn............................................................................ Monticello. William Worth Williams...........................................................................Villa Rica. Daniel Walter Yarbrough........................................................................... Yarbrough. Jones Dullignon Yow 2 A E.......................................................................... Toccoa. ELECT WE SOPHOMORES. Victor Hugo Allen, 4 A 0 ........................................................................... Buford. Hinton James Baker, X t .......................................................................... Augusta. Henry Leonard Bcllingrath........................................................................... Atlanta. Edwin Williams Carson. K A......................................................................... Savannah. Keith Conway........................................................................................ Athens. Thomas William Cozart. 5 A E .................................................................... W ashington. Leon Abraham Hargraves............................................................................... Tifton. John Allen Johnston................................................................................. Augusta. Frederic Ragsdale McMillin. t A 0 ................................................................ Augusta. William Ernest DeLa Perricrc....................................................................... Hoschton. Thomas Preston Tribble.................................................................................... C uba. Edmund Wevman Strother. 5 A E ................................................................... ( olumbus. Henry Allison Wartman.............................................................................Citra, Fla. 9C'axiilkx Hall. Dokmitokv. Atii«v HISTORY OF THE The record of tin. Class of 1905 is otic of which every manlier may well feel proud. Its deals show that it is a class of men. instead of boys; men who arc enterprising and energetic: men wl»o have long since put aside the freaks and whims of chitdhood. and have entirely overcome the weaknesses of blissful youth; in short, men of honor, dignity, and originality in thought. In dealing with the odious Freshman the Sophomores have made themselves more than conquerors. Acting with unusual discretion, in no way have they fallen short in the diligent discharge of every duty when it came to acquainting the youngsters with the ways ami customs of College life, and csjiccially conducting them into the l aths which time-honored custom would have them travel. In return for their efficient services a handsome reward of fifteen Freshman scalj s was received. And in memory of the indomitable will of the Sophomores and their persistency in thoroughly completing every undertaking. the Freshmen Class unanimously united in putting a gate to one of their own rooms instead of the door, which suddenly disapjtcarcd the night of the Sophomore Banquet. On the Athletic field "05 has made herself conspicuous. SOPHOMORE CLASS Doth touchdowns against Auburn were made by a Sophomore. and a Sophomore is the star of the Baseball Team. One of the best records made on Field Day was made by a 05 man. Some classes may have more men in athletics, but none have better men. In the Classroom '05’s record is unexcelled. Instead of detesting the presence of Gardiner and Wells, as has been the custom of all other classes, almost every Sophomore finds in their company a | cculiar fascination, which can lie understood only by those who have met with pleasant disappointment in undertaking a seemingly difficult task which proved otherwise. Through the pen of Horace a portion of the class has drunk freely from the fountain of the Muses, while the rest have spent long and lalxirious hours in trying to prove Davvy’s little set of formulas nothing more than a “cinch.” None can deny that tl»e Sophomore Class "stands in" with the Faculty, even if one Professor did say lie intended to throw three-fourths of the class. Only to notice the number of Sophomores that are regular attendants at the Chancellor Saturday morning receptions will show the preference they are given. The real light in which the class i looked upon by the Faculty was well shownHistory of tHe Sophomore Class—Continued when a certain Professor said that the example of the Sophomore Class ought to be followed by every class in College. In debate and other literary lines the talent and genius of the Sophomores arc important factors. When logic anti powers of | ersuasion arc called U|X ii for a victory the response comes from the ranks of ’05. When an article in one of the College publications stands beyond criticism ami would do credit to a graduate, every one knows from what class it comes. Though the power of oratory in some of the members of tl»c class i- not generally known, it bids fair to Ixjcomc famous at commencement. While many have fallen by the wayside in the past two years their places have been tilled by new men. With the achievements of the past as encouragement, and the brilliant prospects for a grand and glorious success in the future. '05 is expected to become one of the famous graduating classes in the history of the I’Diversity. HISTORIAN. n 52FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS Cl.ARF.NXE BEU... James J. Ragan--- Fred Wai.kkr .... Ralph Colmek----- Vase McWhorter . Hvgii Fitzgerald . Evcknf. F. Brigham Charles Cole..... Herman Haas L.ester Rich .... Dan Byrd ........ Charles Blair --- ...........• President. ......Vice-President. ............. Secretary. ............. Treasurer. ------Captain Baseball. ... Manager Baseball. Captain Track Team. Manager Track Team. .... Captain Football. ... Manager Football. ............. Historian. .............. Chaplain.FRESHMAN CLASS Cornelius Raines Ashley, A T Q C larence Bell, X Y ................. Simeon Bell, ❖AO .................... Arinand Victor Berg.................. Carl Sjjcncer Blair.................. Cecil Williams Brannon, X Y ......... Jesse Ewell Brannen, U. I . L........ Eugene Foster Brigham................ William Chaunecy Brinson. U. P. I.... Harry King Brooks, U. P. I........... I.cc Pierce Butler .................. Daniel Madison Byrd. ❖AO ............ William Graves Cartledgc ............ Wilbur Reed Clements, K ? ........... Alexander Stephens Clay, X ❖......... Colquitt Carter Cole ................ Archie Toombs Colley, 5 A E ......... Ralph Sidney Collier. I ". P. 1...... Ezekiel Wimbcrlcy Coney. ❖AO Henry Ewing Dean, SAE ............... Erastus Roy Dorsey, 5 A E ........... William Leonard Erwin................ Julius Maurice Extrowich, U. P. L... Charles Napoleon Fcidelson .......... George Walton Eelker. Tr.. X ❖ ...... John P,. Felder. Jr., 5 A E ......... Henry Edward Fisher, Jr., A T Q Hugh Benton Fitzgerald, K 5 ...... .... Valdosta. ..... Atlanta. .. Waynesboro ___ Savannah. ........ Trion. ... Statcsl oro. ... Statesboro. ....' Augusta. . Wrightsvillc. .. Washington. Pittsfield. Mass. . Lawrenccville. ___ Jefferson. .... Eastman. .... Marietta. . Spring Place. .. Washington. ........ Comer. . Hawkinsville. ......... Rome. ..... Atlanta. ..... Athens. ... Brunswick. .... Savannah. ..... Monroe. ...... mcricus. .....‘Atlanta. ..... Omaha. 56Freshman Class—Continued John Edward Fitzgerald. 5 N ............................................................................ Atlanta. Isaac Fleishman, U. P. 1................................................................................ Atlanta. Edward Xorval For won. 5 A E ..................................................................... W ashington. Thomas Rice Gentry, X Y................................................................................. Atlanta. Flyman Ginsburg......................................................................................... Cochran. Jesse Glenn Giles...................................................................................... Kennesaw. George Toombs Groover. A T R ....................................................................... Statcsl oro. Garnett Andrews Green, A T R ........................................................................ Washington. Earl Griffeth. U. P. 1................................................................................ P»ogart. Owen Tucker Griffin. U. P. L............................................................................. Oxford. Herman Joseph Haas...................................................................................... Atlanta. John Hutchinson Hester, ATR ............................................................................. Albany. Eugene Pringle Hoke ..................................................................................... Athens. John Chapman Houston. A T R ...................................................................... Lawrcnccville. Harry I.oc Johnson ....................................................................................... Comer. Lloyd Edgar Jones. ATR ............................................................................... V aldosta. Golden McTlean Knight. 5 A E ............................................................................ Monroe. Clifton Henry Knox ...................................................................................... Martin. Harry Hell Laurins .................................................................................... Monroe. Isaac Clarence I-evy ................................................................................... Augusta. William Samuel Llovd............................................................................... Fayetteville. John Cleveland Maddox, X Y ............................................................................. Atlanta. Waller Edwin McDougald. 1’. P. I..................................................................... Statesboro. James Vason McWhorter................................................................................. Woodvillc. Richard Mershon Millikcn. I'. P. L........................................................................Jessup. Arthur Coleman Mobley. A 0 .............................................................................. Monroe. Edward I-ane Moore ............................•'..................................................... Grovcland. William Thomas Moore.................................................................................. Groveland. William Thomas Mvddleton. ATR ........................................................................ Valdosta. Flovd Winters Xorthcutt. A TR ......................................................................... Marietta. Thomas Penn. Jr...................................................................................... Monticcllo. James Thomas Persons ................................................................................ Monticcllo. 50Freshman Class—Continued John Archer Parks................. Hoyt Andrew Pitner ............... Henrv Lewis Pope ................. William Craiulcl Quillian......... James Jackson Ragan, X $ ......... Lester Jerome Rich ............... Frederic Augustus Roberts. 5 N Arthur Neal Robinson ............. James Mitchell Ross. 5 A E ------- John Taylor Simpson. I'. P. I..... George Barker Smith. K 5 ......... Henry Mason Smith. I’. P. L....... Samuel I-anc Smoak ............... Peter Jacob Strickland. 1.’. P. L- Robert O'Neal Suddath............. rthur Richard Sullivan........... Dallas Norman Thompson. U. P. 1. James Shepherd Tlnveatt, X William Guy Tilley. V. P. I....... Nevin Scott Tolleson, K t ...... James Roc Turner.................. Frederic Townsend Walker. K A .. Charles Patric Ward .............. Rholic Jett Ward. U. P. 1......... Jesse Davis Weston. ❖A 0.......... Emory Clifford Watkins............ John Coley Wersbrook, $ A 0 .... Marvin Lee Willingham. U. P. I... Richard Navie Williamson.......... Van Wilhite ...................... John Singleton Walker, 5 N........ . Hartwell. ........ Athens. ........ Athens. ............ Arp. ...... Atlanta. .........Atlanta. ..... Eastman. ...... Atlanta. ..... Elberton. ... .. Norcross. ........ Hattie. .. Douglasvillc. ....... Athens. ....... Stilson. ..... Gillsvillc. .......... Rome. ........... I la. .... Columbus. ..... Doravillc. ... Monticcllo. ...... Osouda. ..... Augusta. ..... Elberton. Lost Mountain. ...... Albany. ....... Ellijav. .. Montezuma. .. Hogansville. ..... Eastman. ...... Winder. .... Waycross. 57IlMUMk 1 imxo Mali, Atiiim HISTORY OF THE As a rule, the Historian of the Freshman Class is at a disadvantage, when comjxircd to the Historians of the other classes. His material is less voluminous, for the records and achievements of the inexperienced Freshman arc confined to the compass of a single year, while every other class Historian has at least two years of history from which to select his material. lint the strenuous record of the class of '06 makes tiic task of the writer easy, for there i ample material from which to write a long and interesting history. If this sketch proves uninteresting it is not due to the lack of good material, but rather to the want of skill to mould it into proper and attractive form. To deal with the future of our class would Ik- rather the work of a prophet, hut our past justifies the statement that "eye hath not seen, nor ear heard” what things are to he achieved by us in the distant and uncertain future. From the memorable time when the campus first echoed with our feeble, discordant and ill-timed class yells, to the never-to-be-forgotten present when an approaching vista of final examinations almost makes our hearts, though stout and brave, quake with fear and trembling, our record has been a chequered one. Poorly equipped, and yet more poorly disciplined for the time- FRESHMAN CLASS honored custom of a scrimmage between the Soplto-morc and Freshman cla $cs, we nevertheless entered tin-inevitable conflict with tl»c zeal and enthusiasm bom only of dcs| cration. Through sundry and fearful days, and still more fearful nights, we haunted not the weary steps of the Sophs, except when, unawares, some I (dated Freshman hap| cned to mistake some deceptive Sopho-more for a lonely and sympathizing classmate. Hut, trained in the "stern sclwol of experience", we soon gathered and marshalled our scattered forces and began the uphill struggle of successfully resisting the Sophomores: and. ere many College days had passed, the erstwhile fleeing Freshman assumed a name and role worthy his Incoming and honorably acquired dignity. Undaunted, undisturlied. serene in mind and cheerful in spirit, we made our class banquet a "howling" success, despite the untiring efforts of the baffled Sophomores to assail, by might and strategy, ottr happy feasting place. Not satisfied with a defensive victory, our class, on tl»c afternoon of the Sophomore banquet, gave bruised .imb. . weary bodies, and dejected spirits to "the once triumphant Sophomores", when they met us in that "battle regal" before the Library Ihtilding. Thus, through trials and tribulations, ottr acquired rights became recognized, and due respect was given us History of the Freshman Class—Continued in College circles. I nmolcstcd and impevsecuteo. we now pursue the quiet and uneventful life of the student. Kvery ] hase of the College student's life has been indulged in by members of our class. The Lucy Cobb Goats have felt the gentle stroke of the Freshman's artistic brush, and every bewitching smile and winsome look from the Lucy Cobb girls have seemed to sav, "The Freshmen; aren't they cute?" To all the athletic sj orts wc have contributed a goodly number. The "'Varsity" football team acquired its brawn and skill by coming in contact with lusty and sturdy Freshmen on Hcrtv Field. In baseball, our class lias furnished material deemed worthy to don the College "G." The fact that wc won second place in the contest for the pennant on the diamond betokens bright visions for the future to the enthusiastic lover of baseliall. In the Classroom wc have reached a high standard of excellence. Gratifying commendation of our faithful work has been daily proclaimed from the lips of our preceptors. and wc are proud of the fact that wc have dem- onstrated to the world that the lonely and oppressed Freshman can modestly assume the role and dignity of the scholar. Obedient to discipline, faithful to our l ooks, we have devoted our best efforts to literary pursuits. The members of our class have become universally known for their gentlemanly hearing, their genuine College courtesy, and their devotion to manly .and commendable endeavors. Our first year has l ccii a great and happy one. We have done well in all that wc have undertaken, and the little “Freshness" that has characterized our class is fast disappearing, for soon our mantle is to fall on the shoulders of others. Fcllow-C lassmcn. let us go forward to improve even on our past record. The Historian expresses the ho| c that every member of "iqo6" will do bis best to uphold our past history, and this will bring with it the assured promise of great good to Ik done to our Alma Mater, our State and our posterity. HISTORIAN.SENIOR. LAW CLASS SENIOR LAW CLASS OFFICERS L. E. Tate President H. V. Ketrok G. D. Blount George Kirkland H. H. Swift SENIOR LAW CLASS HISTORY It is generally supposed that a Historian, imbued with an abundance of that indefinable thing called "Class Spirit," will be pardoned if in recounting the achievements and superiority of his class he should perchance stretch the bounds of truth a little. Fulsome flattery and some exaggeration arc allowable in certain cases, but, as any one conversant with the last two years of College life here in Athens knows, the present Historian has no need of such methods: nor does he solicit any leniency from would-be sympathizers, because the Law Class of 1903 ha' more than its quota of College honors to make its history resplendent with success. From the grav-haired Kirkland with his venerable dignity to the merry laugh of that dear boy. Infant Talbert, every memkr of this class is in all respects a man. and one whose influence has been felt throughout the whole range of College activity. We have the distinction and advantage over our predecessors in lieing the first class in the history of the I’nivcrsitv to have completed a two years’ law course. With this addition of breadth ami depth we hope to have learned more law and become better developed than the lawyers of former years. This collection of Georgia's future statesmen first assembled on the campus in the fall of 1901. There were various types, from the city-bred sport to the unkempt son of the soil a heterogeneous mass representing all sec- tions of the State, with a sprinkling of two or three from other States. Some have been toned down, and others smoothed off under the soothing influence of Judge Cobb's lectures on slavery and Prof. Morris's dissertations on " hen 1 Was a Railroad Lawyer", until now. as the year draws to a close aiyl the sparrows seem to sing of nothing but diplomas, each one is well qualified to Ik a genuine (ieorgia Colonel. Classroom work alone has not attracted all our attention. Throughout our stay we have had our share of representatives in every phase of College life. In literary achievements, in oratorical efforts, in journalistic work, and on the athletic field the Class of 1903 has contributed as much ami more than any other class in College. Its men have l»ccn the leading spirits in every movement for the advancement of the t'niver-ity. Sj»acc would not forbid an enumeration of the various College ltonors and distinctions they have won, for they arc as the sands of the seashore in their number. Our sojourn in thcns has been pleasant to all of us. Towards our instructors, our fellow-students, and the jKoplc of the city we have the kindest feelings of regard and Iks: wishes. We can only hojK that in the future our lives will be set in such pleasant surroundings. With good-will to all ami ill-will to none we bid a sad ami fond farewell. HISTORIAN. 63McoaiCminir, Aiiiim (filfi of the City of AiWm to the I'nlreniiy Krected tS;«)JUNIOR LAW CLASS JUNIOR LAW CLASS OFFICERS G. D. Perdue .... W. M. Jackson .. W. H. Cargill... R. M. Burt R. D. Smith John B. Gamble . JUNIOR LAW CLASS Robert Ashford .................................................................................. W'atkinsvillc. Marmaduke Hamilton Blackshcar, .B., A TO .............................................................. Dublin. Reynold Marvin Hurt.............................................................................. l’alatka, Fla. Walter Hurt Cargill. X ❖ ............................................................................. Columbus. Thomas Whipple Connallv, X t ........................................................................ Atlanta. James Bonner Gamble................................................................................... Columbus. Lucicn Prichard Goodrich. A.13......................................................................... Griffin. Edgar Ross Gunn, B.L.................................................................................... Oxford. Isaac Stiles Hopkins. A.13., $ A 0 ..................................................................... Athens. Isaac Sidney Peebles, 5 N ...............................................................................Gibson. Graham Daniel Perdue. A.B.......................................................................... Greenesboro. James Virgil Pool...................................................................................... Cumming. John Rourke. Jr....................................................................................... Savannah. Walter Barnett Shaw ..................................................................................Lafayette. Roblcv Dunglison Smith. Jr., 5 N .................................................................... Knoxville. Walter Marion Jackson. Jr.. S A E ..................................................................... Augusta.AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT One Year Course in Agriculture Chester Morris Clark, Jr, ♦ t 0......................... Thomas John Baxter ..................................... Bascom Leonard Hill, Jr.................................. Benjamin Harvey Him............................. William Carver Janes, ❖A ©.............................. Willard Edwin McRee..................................... Benjamin Hili. Parham .................................. Malcolm Cameron Sylvester .............................. Winter School of Agriculture William Joynrs Baldwin ................................. Benjamin Henry Barrow, X ............................... Luther Brock ........................................... Egiiert Trlsord Burns................................... James Leslie Giles ..................................... Henry Armstrong Haynes.................................. Paul Land .............................................. Titus Land ............................................. Levi James Reynolds..................................... Arthur Chester Vlatch .................................. I .............. Alb my. .......... Blackslicar. ............... Dawson. ............:. Dawson. ................Dawson. ................Dawson. :.......Warm Springs. North Bridgeton, Maine. ...... Midland. ..........Athens. .... Clarksboro. ......Jefferson. .....Kennesaw. .... WintCTville. ..... Columbus. ..... Columbus. Hagerstown. Md. .......'■. Trion. 08SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON FRATERNITYSIGMA ALPHA EPSILON FRATERNITY Founded at the University of JUabama 1856. Georgia Beta Chapter Established 1866. Colors: Royal Purple and Old Gold FRATRES IX t'RBE. Howell C. Erwin. John Gerdine, E. 13. Mcll, J. D. Mell; James Hodgson, Roltcrt Hodgson, H. Stovall, C. A. Scudder, A. L. Hull, T. S. Mell, A. L. Mitchell, W. W. Thomas. E. C. Epson. A. F. Latimer, C. H. Pliinizv, , FRATER IX FACTLTATE. A. H. Patterson. SEXIOR I.AW CLASS. R. W. Jones, Clayton Jones, F. P. Mclntire. J. W. Walters. Jr. R. A. Ransom, H. J. MacIntyre. J. F. Baxter. Minor Boyd, •Left Collet; - CLASS OF 1903. A. L. Hull. Jr., C. D. Dorsey. 13. S. Walker, W. H . Jones. M. H. Smith, W M. Jackson. Jr. 71Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity — Continued A. H. Barnett. R. H. Hil!, A. T. Colley. J. B. Felder, Jr., CLASS OF 1904. S. R. Jaques, Jr. Joseph L. Hull. CLASS OF 1905. H. W. Moore, T. W. Cozart, P. W. Plunkett, J. J. Harbcn, CLASS OF 1906. E. N. Fortson, Jr., E. R. Dorsey, J. M. Ross, A. R. Sullivan, Jr., ELECTIVE. E. VV. Strother. E. E. Lampkin. W. C. Twitty, J. D. Yow. G. M. Knigl.t, H. E. Dean. •Left College.SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON FRATERNITY DIRECTORY Province Jtlpha Harvard University (Mass. Gamma). Cambridge. Mass. University of Maine (Maine Alpha). Orono. Me. Boston University (Mass. Beta-Epsilon). Boston. Mass. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Mass. Iota-Tau). Boston. Mas . Province Cornell University (N. Y. Alpha). Ithaca. N. Y. Columbia University (N. Y. Mu). New York City. St. Stephen's College N. Y. Slgma-Phl). Annandale- on-Hudson, N. Y. Allegheny College (Pa. Omega). Meadvllle. Pa. Dickinson College (Pa. Slgma-Phl). Carlisle. Pa. Province University of Virginia (Va. Omlcron). Charlottesville. Va. Washington and l.ec University (Va. Sigma). Lexington. Va. University of North Carolina (N. C. XI), Chapel Hill. K. C. Province University of Michigan t Mich. Iota-Beta). Ann Arbor. Mich. Adrinn College (Mich. Alpha). Adrian. Mich. Ml. Union College (Ohio Sigma). Alliance. Ohio. Ohio Wesleyan University (Ohio Delta). Delaware. Ohio. University of Cincinnati Ohio Epsilon), Cincinnati. Ohio. 73 Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Mass. Delta). Worcester, Mass. Bela Pennsylvania State College (Pa. Alpha-Zeta), State College. Pa. Uucknell University (Pa. Zeta), l ewlsburg. Pa. Gettysburg College (Pa. Delta), Gettysburg. Pa. University of Pennsylvania (Pa. Theta). Philadelphia. Pa. Comma Davidson College (N. C. Theta), Davidson, X. C. Wofford College (S, C. Gamma), Spartanburg. S. C. UNIVERSITY OK GEORGIA (Ga. Beta). Athens. Ga. Emory College (Ga. Epsilon). Oxford. Ga. Georgia School of Technoogy (Ga. Phi). Atlanta. Ga. Delta Ohio State University lOhlo Theta). Columbus. Ohio. Franklin College (Ind. Alpha), Franklin. Ind. Purdue University (Ind. Beta). West I-afayctte. Ind. Northwestern University (111. Psi-Omega), Evanston. 111. University of Illinois (111. Beta). Champaign. 111.Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity Directory—Continued Province Epsilon Central University (Ky. Kappa). Richmond. Ky. Bethel University (Ky. Iota), Russellville. Ky. Kentucky State College (Ky. Epsilon). Lexington. Ky. Southwestern Presbyterian University (Tenn. Zota). Clarksville. Tenn. Cumberland University (Tenn. I-ambda). Lebanon. Tenn. Vanderbilt University (Tenn. Nu). Nashville. Tenn. Province Zota University of Missouri (Mo. Alpha). Columbia. Mo. University of Nebraska (Neb. Lambda-Pi). Lincoln, Neb. University of Tennessee (Tenn. Kappa). Knoxville. Tenn. University of the South (Tenn. Omega). Sewanee. Tenn. Southwestern Baptist University fTeno. Eta). Jackson. Tenn. University of Alabama (Ala. Mu), University. Ala. Southern University (Ala. Iota). Greensboro. Ala. Alabama Polytechnic Institute (Ala. Alpha-Mu), Auburn. Ala. Washington University (Mo. Beta), St Louis, Mo. University of Arkansas (Ark. Alpha-Upsllon), Fayetteville. Ark. Province Eta University of Colorado (Col. Chi). Boulder. Col. Inland Stanford. Jr.. University (Cal. Alpha). Palo Alto. Denver University (Col. Zota). Denver. Col. Cal. University of California (Cal. Beta), Berkeley. Cal. Province Theta Louisiana State University (La. Epsilon). Baton Rouge, University of Mississippi (Miss. Gamma), Jackson. 1- - Miss Tulane Universi .y (La. Tau-Upsllon), New Orleans. La. University of Texas (Texas Rho). Austin. Texas. Boston. Mass. Savannah. Ga. Jackson. Miss. Now Orleans. La Denver. Col. New York City. Alliance. Ohio. Kansas City. Mo. Washington. D. C. Wilmington. N. C. Alumni Associations Pittsburg. Pa. Cincinnati. Ohio. Knoxville. Tenn. Worcester. Mass. Louisville. Ky. San Francisco, Cal. Atlanta. Oa. Chicago. III. Detroit. Mich. St Ix uis. Mo. Macon. Ga. Augusta. Ga. Chattanooga. Tenn. Cleveland. Ohio. Birmingham. Ala. Greenville. S. C. 74CHI PHI FRATERNITYCHI PHI FRATERNITYCHI PHI FRATERNITY Founded at Princeton University 1824. Eta Chapter Established 1867 FRATRES IN IK BE. Billups Phinizv, F. B. Stanley, J. H. Rucker, C. B. Griffcth, George T. Hodgson. Yancey Harris, F. A. L.ipscomb, F. T. Ocaring, M. A. Nicholson. FRATRES IN l-'ACULTATE Walter B. Hill, D. C. Barrow, H. C. White. JUNIOR LAW CLASS. T. W. Connally, W. H. Cargill. CLASS OF 1903 F. M. Ridley, Jr . H. M. Scott. CLASS OF 1904. F. R. Clarke, Jr.. W. E. Ragan, Jr., H. F. Scott, Jr., S. J. Crowe, W. Nunnally, Ralph Meldriin. CLASS OF 1905. H. J. Baker, R. M. Dearing, W. J. Cranstoun, J. W. Goldsmith, Jr.. A. E. Thornton. Jr. Duga McCleskcy. CLASS OF 1906. •A. S. Clay, Jr.. G. W. Fclkcr. I. J. Ragan, C. Tlnveatt, J. S. Thwcatt. •Left College. 77CHI PHI FRATERNITY Roll of Jtctive Chapters Alpha. University of Virginia. Charlottesville. Vn. Beta. .Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston. Mass. Gamma. Emory College. Oxford. Ga. Delta. Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J. Epsilon Hampden-Sidney College, Hampden-SIdney. Va. Zeta. Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa. ETA, XJmvknsity or Gkokcia, Athens, Ga. Theta. Rensselaer-Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N. Y. Iota. Ohio State College, Columbus, Ohio. lambda. University of California, Berkeley, CaL Mu, Stephens Institute of Technology, Hoboken. N. J. Nil, University of Texas, Austin. Tex. XI, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Omicron. Shellield Scientific School, Yale College, New Haven, Corn. Rho, I-afayctte College, Easton, Pa. Sigma, Wofford College, Spartanburg, S. C. Phi, Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. Psi, I-ehigh University, South Bethlehem. Pa 76RAPP A ALPHA FRATERNITYKAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITY KAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITY Founded 1865. Gamma Cl.apter Established 1868 FRATRES IN VRBE. D. Q. Abbott, Chas. W. DuBose, Chas. N. Hodgson, I. D. Moss, j. Audley Morton, E. R. Kinnebrcw, Ravaud Benedict, Dr. J. C. Bloomfield, Robt. Toombs DuBosc, Ed. R. Hodgson, John V. Morton, W. M. Rowland, A. R. Nicholson, John W. Welch, Judge A. J. Cobb, Thos. F. Green, Marry Hodgson, Jos. W. Morton. Fred S. Morton, R. S. Rowland, E. B. Smith, E. J. Bondurant, Benj. F. Hardeman, Floyd Foster. FRATRES I. i'ACULTATE. Dr. S. C. Benedict, I’rof. S. Morris, Prof. Marion DuBose, Prof. C. M. Strahan. SENIOR LAW CLASS. G. D. Blount, W. A. Hallowcs, G. C. Hcvward. Jr., J. W. Hitch. CL SS OF 1903. Hunlcy Abbott, T. . Barrow, A. J. Lyndon, E. R. Jcrgcr, W. M. Reynolds. C. M. Krcnson, CLASS OF 1904. J. D. Bower, I). R. Bower, H. L. Reynolds, Wallace Miller, G. C. Carson. I.amar Hill. Cl .ASS OF 1905. O. H. B. Bloodwortb, Jr., C. G. Scarbrough, D. W. Reynolds, G. R. Sibley, E. S. Hitch, E. W. Carson, CLASS OF 1906. F. T. Walker.. 81 •Left College.KAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITY ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS Alpha. Washington and l.ce University. l-cxlngton. Va. GAMMA. Umvkkxitt or Gowum, Atiiexk. Ga. Delta. Wofford College. Spartanburg. S. C. Epsilon. Emory College. Oxford. Ga. Zota. Randolph-Macon College. Ashland. Va. Eta. Richmond College. Richmond. Va. Theta. Kentucky State College. Lexington. Ky. Kappa. Mercer University. Macon. Ga. lambda. University of Virginia. Charlottesville. Va. Nu. Agricultural and Mechanical College. Auburn. Ala. XI. Southwestern University. Georgetown. Texas. Omicron. University of Texas. Austin. Texas. HI. University of Tennessee. Knoxville. Tenn. Slgntn. Davidson College. Mecklenburg Co.. X. C. Upsllon. University of North Carolina. Chattel Hill. N. C. Hhl, Southern University. Greensboro. Ala. Chi, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. Psl, Tulane University. New Orleans, La. Omega. Centre College. Danville. Ky. Alpha-Alpha. University of the South. Sewanec. Tenn. Alpha-Beta. University of Alabama. University, Ala. Alpha-Gamma. l uilslana State University, Baton Rouge, La. Alpha-Delta, William Jewell College. Liberty. Mo. Alpha-Epsilon. Southwestern Presbyterian University. Clarksville. Tenn. Alplia-Zeta. William and Mary College. Williamsburg. Va. Alpha-Eta. Westminster College. Fulton. Mo. Alpha-Theta. Kentucky University. Lexington. Ky. Alpha-Iota. Centenary College. Jackron. I .a. Alpha-Kappa. Missouri State University. Columbia. Mo. Alpha-Lambda. Johns Hopkins University. Baltimore. Md. Alpha-Mu. Mlllsaps College. Jackson. Miss. Alpha-Xu. Columbian -University. Washington. D. C. Alpha-Xi. University of California. Berkeley. Cal. Alpha-Omlcron. University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. Alpha-Pi, Lcland Stanford. Jr.. University. Stanford. California. Alpha-ltho. University of West Virginia, Morgantown. W. Va. Alpha-Sigma, Georgia School of Technology. Atlanta. Ga. Apha-Tau. Hnmpden-Sldncy College. Hampden-SIdney. Va. Alpha-Upsllon, University of Mississippi University, Miss. Alumni Chapters Norfolk. Va. Macon. Ga. Lexington. Ky. Jackson, Miss. Montgomery, Ala. Alexandria. La. Richmond. Va. Mobile. Ala. Petersburg. Va. Atlanta. Ga. Chattanooga. Tenn. New York City. Dallas. Tex. Talladega. Ala. Staunton, Va. San Francisco, Cal. Raleigh. N. C. Franklin. La. St. Louis Mo. Augusta. Ga. Hampton. Va. Jacksonville, Fla. Meridian Miss. The Order of Kappa Alpha Fraternity was founded at Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va., in 188d. 82PHI DELTA THETA FRATERNITYPH1 DELTA THETA FRATERNITYPHI DELTA THETA FRATERNITY Organized at Miami University 1848. Georgia Jilpha Chapter Established 1871 E. K. Lumpkin, FRATRES IX I'KBE. S. J. Tribble, C. G. Chandler, T. W. Reid, J. W. Camak, D. I). Quillian, J. B. S. Cobb, E. B. Cohen. Fred J. Orr, E. H. Dorsey, E. I. Smith, J. J. Strickland, J. T. Davis, loci T. Daves. I-RATER IX FAC I’LT ATE. Prof. U. H. Davenport. SENIOR LAW CLASS. F. E. Ellis, E. P. King, Jr. JUNIOR LAW CLASS. I. S. Hopkins, Jr. CLASS OF 1903. G. W. Legwen, W. R. Turner. M. L. CLASS OF 1904. Richter, Jr., W. B. Parks, Daniel Lott. B. H. Askew, CLASS OF 1905. F. L. Bullard, W. P. Harmon, ♦F. R. McMillan, •J. A. Bell, Jr., •V. H. Allen, W. C. Marshburn. C. M. Clarke, Jr. Simeon Bell. Jr., CLASS OF 1906. A. C. Mobley, J. C. Westbrooks, W. C. Jones. -E. W. Coney, J. D. Weston, D. M. Byrd, •Left College. PHI DELTA THETA FRATERNITY ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS Alpha Province Maine Alpha. Colby College, Watervllle. Mo. New Hampshire Alpha, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N, H. Vermont Alpha, University of Vermont. Burlington. Vt. Massachusetts Alpha. Williams College. Williamstown, Mass. Massachusetts Beta. Amherst College. Amherst. Mass. Rhode Island Alpha. Brown University, Providence, R. I. New York Alpha, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. V. New York Beta. Union University. Schenectady, N. Y. New York Delta. Columbia University. New York. N. Y. New York Epsilon, Syracuse University. Syracuse, N. Y. . Beta Virginia Beta, University of Virginia. Charlottesville, Va. Virginia Gamma. Randolph-Macon College, Ashland. Va. Virginia Zeta, Washington and Lee Unlv., Lexington, Va. North Carolina Beta, University of North Carolina, Chapel HID. N. C. Gamm Pennsylvania Alpha, Lafayette College. Easton. Pa. Pennsylvania Beta. Pennsylvania College. Gettysburg. Pa. Pennsylvania Gamma. Washington and Jefferson College. Washington. Pa. Pennsylvania Delta. Alleghany College, eicadviltc. Pa. Pennsylvania Epsilon. Dickinson College. Carlisle. Pa. Pennsylvania Zetn, University of Pennsylvania. Phila delphla. Pa. Pennsylvania Eta. Lehigh University, South Bethlehem. Pa. Quebec Alpha. Toronto. Canada. Province Kentucky Alpha-Delta. Central College. Danville, Ky. Tennessee Alpha. Vanderbilt University, Nashville. Tenn. Tennesee Beta, University of the South. Sewanee. Tenn. Kentucky Epsilon. Kentucky State College, l-exlngton. Ky. a Province GEORGIA ALPHA. Uxivbrkity or Okoiioia, Atiikxk, Georgia Gamma. Mercer University. Macon, via. Ga. Alabama Alpha. University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Georgia Delta. Georgia School of Technology. Atlanta. Ala. On. Alabama Beta. .Vabama Polytechnic Institute. Auburn, Georgia Beta. Emory College. Oxford. Ga. Ala. Delta Province Ohio Alpha, Miami University. Oxford. Ohio. Ohio Eta. Case School of Applied Science. Cleveland Ohio Beta. Ohio Wesleyan University. Delaware. O. Ohio. Ohio Gama. Ohio University. Athens. O. Ohio Theta. University of Cincinnati. Cincinnati. O. Ohio Zeta. Ohio State University, Columbus, O. Michigan Alpha. University of Michigan. Ann Arbor. Mich. R6PHi Delta THeta Fraternity—Continued Epsilon Province Indiana Alpha. Indiana University. Bloomington. Ind. Indiana Beta. Wabash College. Crawfordaville. Ind. Indiana Gamma. Butler College. University of Indianapolis, Irvington, Ind. Zeta Province Illinois Alpha. Northwestern University. Evanston. 111. Illinois Beta. University of Chicago. Chicago. III. Illinois Delta. Knox College. Galesburg. 111. Illinois eta. Lombard University. Galesburg. 111. Illinois Eta. University of Illinois. Champaign. III. Wisconsin Alpha. University of Wisconsin. Madison. Wit. Minnesota Alpha. University of Minnesota. Minneapolis, Mina. Theta Province Mississippi Alpha. University of Mississippi, University. Miss. Louisiana Alpha. Tulane University of Ivoulslana. New Orleans, I.a. Eta Province Indiana Delta. Flanklln College, Franklin. Ind. Indiana Epsilon. Hanover College, Hanover. Ind. Indiana eta. DePauw University. Grecneastle. Ind. Indiana Theia. Purdue University, West Lafayette. Ind. lown Alpha. Iowa Wesleyan University. Mount Pleasant, Iowa. Iowa Beta. University of Iowa. Iowa City. Iowa. Missouri Alpha. University of Missouri. Columbia. Mo. Missouri Beta. Westminster College. Fulton. Mo. Missouri Gamma, Washington University, St Louis. Mo. Kansas Alpha. University of Kansas. Lawrence. Kansas. Nebraska Alpha. University of Nebraska. Lincoln. Neb. Colorado Alpha. University of Colorado, Boulder. Col. Texas Beta. University of Texas. Austin. Texas. Texas Gamma. Southwestern University. Georgetown. Texas. California Beta, Leland Stanford. Jr., University, Stanford University, Cal. California Alpha. University California. Berkeley. Cal. Washington Alpha, University of Washington, Seattle, Washingto JHumni Clubs Boston. Mass. Providence. R. I. New York. N. Y. Baltimore. Md. Pittsburg. Pa. Philadelphia. Pa. Washington. D. C. Richmond. Vn. I ouisvillc. Ky. Harvard University. Schenectady. N. Y. Syracuse, N. Y. Portland. Ore. Toledo, Ohio. Annual Alumni Day, Makcii 15th. Nashville. Tenn. Columbus. Ga. Atlanta. Ga. Macon. Ga. Montgomery. Ala. Selma. Ala. Birmingham. Ala. Mobile. Ala. New Orleans. La. Cincinnati. Ohio. Meridian. Miss. Omaha. Neb. Oklahoma City. Okla. Akron. Ohio. Cleveland. Ohio. Colubmus. Ohio. Athens. Ohio. Detroit. Mich. Franklin. Ind. Indianapolis. Ind. Chicago. III. Galesburg. III. 1-aCrosse. Win. Menesha. wi . Peoria. III. Crawfordvllle. Ind. Milwaukee. WIs. Minneapolis and St Paul. Minn. Kansas City, Mo. St Ixmls. Mo. Denver. Col. Austin. Texas. Salt l.ake City. Utah. San Francisco. Cal. l.ox Angeles. Cal. Spokane. Wash. Bloomington. III. Seattle. Wash. ' Hamilton. Ohio. S7ALPHA TAV OMEGA FRATERNITYALPHA TAU OMEGA FRATERNITY Founded in the Virginia Military Institute IS6S. Georgia Alpha Beta Founded 1878 FRATRES IN URBE. Hon. H. H. C.arlton, James Barrow, Jesse Cobb, John D. Stelling, G. F. Stephenson. FRATRES IN FACULTATE. Prof. G. G. Bond, Prof. E. C. Branson. J. E. Taber. J. F. Brooks, C. R. Ashley, Jr.. G. A. Green, JUNIOR LAW CLASS. M. H. Blackshcar. CLASS OF 1903. R. P. Brooks, J. H. McCalla. CLASS OF 1904. M. Ranibo, B. S. Dobbs. CLASS OF 1905. J. L. Hodgson, M. H. Burroughs, D. S. Atkinson. W. W. Patterson, CLASS OF 1906. H. E. Fisher, Jr., W. H. Myddlcton, J. H. Hester, L. E. Jones, J. C. Houston. C. W. Brumby, R. M. Chenev, C. P. Pratt. ' G. T. Grover, F. W. Northeutt, 89 •Left College.ALPHA TAU OMEGA FRATERNITY ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS Province Alabama Alpha Epsilon, Agricultural and Mechanical College. Auburn. Alabama Beta Beta. Southern University. Greensboro. Alabama Beta Delta. University of Alabama. Tuscaloosa. Georgia Alpha Theta. Emory College. Oxford. Province Illinois Gamma Zeta. University of Illinois. Champaign. Indiana Gamma Gamma. Polytechnic Institute. Michigan Alpha Mu. Adrian College. Adrian. Province III North Carolina Alpha Delta. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. North Carolina Xi, Trinity College. Durham. Pennsylvania Alpha Iota. Muhlonburg College. Allentown. Pennsylvania Alpha PI, Washington and Jefferson College. Province Ohio Alpha Nu. Mount Union College. Alliance. Ohio Alpha Psl. Wlttonburg College, Springfield. Ohio Beta Eta. Wesleyan University. Delaware. Ohio Beta Mu. Wooster University. Wooster. Ohio Beta Omega. State University. Columbus. Ohio Gamma Kappa. Western Reserve University. Cleveland. GEORGIA ALPHA BETA, Uxivkksjty » Groitci.v. Athens. Georgia Alpha Zeta. Mercer University. Macon. Georgia Beta Iota. School of Technology. Atlanta. South Carolina Beta XI, College of Charleston. II Michigan Beta Kappa. Hillsdale College. Hillsdale. Michigan Beta Omlcron. Albion College. Albion. Nebraska Gamma Theta, University of Nebraska. Pennsylvania Alpha Upsllon. Pennsylvania College. Gettysburg. Pennsylvania Tau. University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia. Virginia Delta. University of Virginia. Charlottesville. IV Tennessee Alpha Tau. Southwestern Presbyterian University. Clarksville. Tennessee Beta Pi. Vanderbilt University. Nashville. Tennessee Beta Tau. Southwestern Baptist University. Jackson. Tennessee Lambda Cumberland College. I banon. Tennessee Omega University of the South Scwanee. Tennessee Pi. University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 00AlpHa Tau Omega Fraternity—Continued Province V Maine Beta Upsllon University of Maine. Orono. Maine Gamma Alpha. Colby College. Watcrvllle. Massachusetts Gamma Beta. Tuft's College. New York Alpha OmiCion, St. Lawrence University. Canton. New York Alpha lambda. Columbia University. New York Now York Beta Theta. Cornell University, Ithaca. IthorJe Island Gamma De'ta. Brown University, Providence. Vermont Beta Zeta. University of Vermont, Burlington. Province V1 I-onlsinna Beta Epsilon. Tnlanc University. Now Or- Texas Gamma Eta, University of Texas. Austin, leans. City and State Alumni Associations Augusta. Ga.. Alumni Association. Allentown Alumni Association. Allentown. Pa. Boston Alumni Association. Birmingham Alumni Association. Chicago Alumni Association. Cleveland Alumni Association. Dayton Alumni Association. Dayton, O. District of Columbia Alumni Association. Washington D. C. Dallas Alumni Association. Georgia Alumni Association. Atlanta, Ga. Louisville Alumni Association. Louisville. Ky. New Y’ork Alumi Association. New Y’ork City. Tennessee Alumni Association. Nashville. Texas Alumni Association. Dallas. Texas. 01SIGMA NU FRATERNITYSIGMA NU FRATERNITY Founded at Virginia Military Institute tS69- Nu Chapter Established SSI Colors: Black, White and Old Gold FRATRES IN TRUE. FRATER IN FACULTATE. Prof. C. M. Snclling. SENIOR LAW CLASS. G. L. Patterson, JUNIOR LAW CLASS. I. S. Peebles, R. D. Smith, Jr. T. J. Shackelford, G. H. Williamson, A. C. Fears, F. C. Shackelford. C. W. Bond, CLASS OF 1903-D. H. DuPree, J. H. Monahan, CLASS OF 1904. W. A. Worsham. Paul Love joy. E. L. Worsham, H. L. Worsham. CLASS Oh' 1905. Howard Tate, E. T. Talmadge. CLASS OF 1906. J. S. Walker, J. E. Fitzgerald, F. F. A. Roberts. 03 •I.eft College.Sigma N i Chapter List First Division Beta. 1870. University of Virginia. Charlottesville, Va Epsilon. 1883, Bethany College. Bethany. W. Va. Psl. 1888. University ot North Carolina. Chapel Hill N. C. Second Division Theta. 1S74, University of Alabama. Ala. Beta Phi. 1888. Tnlane University. New Orleans. La. Phi, ISS7. Louisiana Slate University. Baton Bouge, La. Ueta The,a- 1S90- Alabama Polytechnic Institute. Auburn. Ala. Iota. Howard College. East Lake, Ala. Upsilon. 18St . University of Texas. Austin. Third Division Zeta, 1S83. Central University. Richmond. Ky. Omlcron. 1884, Bethel College. Russellville. Ky. Sigma. 1880. Vanderbilt University. Nashville. Tenn. Fourth Division Rho. 1S86. Missouri State University, Columbia. Mo. Beta Lambda. Central College. Fayette, Mo. Beta Mu. State University of Iowa. Iowa City. Iowa. Beta XI. 1801, William Jewell College, Liberty. Mo. Nu. 1SS4. University of Kansas, Lawrence. Kan. Fifth Division Pi. 1SS4. Lehigh University. South Bethlehem. Pa. Beta Rho, (Sub rosa) Sixth Division Eta. Mercer University. Macon. Ga. M. U. University of Georgia. Athens. Ga. Kappa. North Georgia College, Dahloncga. Ga. Xi. Emory College. Oxford. Ga. Gamma Alpha. Georgia School of Technology. Atlanta, Ga. , l.nmbda. 1882. Washington and Lee University. L«x-ington. Va. Beta Tau. 1895, North Carolina A. and M.. Raleigh. N. C. 94Sigjma Nu Fraternity—Continued Seventh Division Beta Beta, De Pauw University. Orecncaatle. In l. Beta Zetn. Purdue University, J-aKaycttc. Ind. Beta Upsiton. Rose Polytechnic Institute. Terre Haute. Ind. Gamma Gamma. Albion College. Albion. Mich. Beta Iota. Mount Union College. Alliance. O. Beta Xu. University of Ohio. Columbus. 0. Delta Theta. Lombard Unlrcrswy. Galesburg. III. Beta PI. University of Chicago. Chicago. III. Beta Eta. University of Indiana. Bloomington. Ind. Eighth Division Beta Chi. Leland Stanford University. Stanford. Cal. Beta Psi. University of California. Barkcley, Cal. Gamma Chi. University of Washington. Seattle. Wash. Jtlumni Organizations Texas Alumni Association Louisiana Alumni Association Missouri Alumni Association Seventh Division Association Alabama Alumni Association Iowa Alumni Association Sixth Division Association Pittsburg Alumni Association Philadelphia Alumni Association New York Alumni Association Atlanta Alumni Chapter Kansas City Alumni Chapter Birmingham Alumni Chapter 9oCHI PSI FRATERNITYCHI PSI FRATERNITY Founded at Union College In 1841. Jtlpha Delta F.stablished May j. 1890 FRATER IN URBE. W. B. Burnett. FRATER IN FACULTATE. W. D. Hoyt. CLASS OF 1903. S. S. Johnson. CLASS OF 1905. J. L. Lewis, W. G. England, I). H. McDowell, J. B. Fenniston. CLASS OF 1906. C. W. Brannen, Clarence Bell, T. R. Gentry, J. C. Maddox. 97CHI PSI FRATERNITY Roll of Jlctive Chapters Pi. Union College. Schenectady. New York. Theta. William College. Wllliamxtown. Massachusetts. Mu. Middlebury College. Middlcbury. Vermont. Alpha. Wesleyan University. Middletown. Connecticut. Phi. Hamilton College. Clinton. New York Epsilon, University of Michigan. Ann Arbor. Michigan. Chi. Amherst College. Amherst. Massachusetts. Psi. Cornell University, Ithaca. New York. Tail, Wofford College. Spartanburg. South Carolina. Nu, University of Minnesota. Minneapolis. Minnesota, lota. University of Wisconsin. Madison. .Visconsin Rho. Rutgers College. Now Brunswick. New Jersey. XI. Stcver.s Institute of Technology. Hoboken. New Jersey. ALPHA DELTA. University of Georgia, Athens. Georgia. Beta Della. Lehigh University. South Bethlehem. Pa. Gamma Delta. Stanford University. Stanford. California. Delta Delta. University of California. Berkeley, California. Epsilon Delta. University of Chicago. Chicago. Illinois. »8KAPPA SIGMA FRATERNITYKAPPA SIGMA FRATERNITYKAPPA SIGMA FRATERNITY SENIOR LAW CLASS O. I. Coogler, J. W. Talbert. JUNIOR LAW CLASS W. B. Shaw. CLASS OF 1903. M. M. Dickinson. CLASS OF 1904. Roy Jackson, J. C. Koch, H. Q. Fletcher. CLASS OF 1905. E. H. Yondcrau, W. T. Hanson, J. A. Copeland, P. T. •J. P. King. CLASS OF 1906. G. B. Smith, H. B Fitzgerald, N. S. Tolleson, W. R 101 Harber, . Clements. Left College.KAPPA SIGMA FRATERNITY ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. District 1 Psi. University of Maine. Orono Me. Alpha-Rho. Bowdoln College, Brunswick. Me. Alpha-Lambda. University of Vermont. Burlington. Vt. District II Alpha-Kappa. Cornell University. Ithaca. X. Y. Pi. Swanlimore College. Swarthmorc. Pa. Alphn-Delta. Pennsylvania State College. Stato College. Pa. Alphi-Epxllon. University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia. Pa. Alpha Phi. lluckntll University. I-ewlslmig. Pa. District III Zeta. University of Virginia. Charlottesvlil?. Va. Eta. Randolph-Macon College. Ashland. Va Xu. William and Mary College Williamsburg, Va. Upsllon. Hampdcn-SIdncy College. Hampden-Sldney, Va. District IV Apha-Nu. Wofford College. Spartanburg. S. C. Alpha Xu. Mercer University. Macon. Ga. Alpha-Tau. Georgia Sch x l of Technology. Atlanta. Ga. District V Theta. Cumberland University. !.©banon. Tcnn. Kanpa. Vanderbilt University. Nashville, Tcnn. Lambda. University of Tennessee. Knoxville. Tenn. Phi. Southwestern Presbyterian University. Clarksville. Tenn. 102 Beta-Alpha. Brown University. Providence. H. I. Alpha-Kappa. Cornell Unlversl'v. Ithaca. X. V. Beta-Kappa. New Hampshire College. Durham. X. H. Beta-Delta. Washington and Jefferson College. Washington. Pa Beta-Iota. Lehigh Unlvoraily. South Bethlehem. Pa. Beta-Pi. Dickinson College. Carlisle. Pa Alpha-Alpha. University of Maryland Baltimore. Md. Alpha-Eta, Columbian University, Washington. D. C. Beta-Beta. Richmond College, Richmond Va. Delta. Davidson College. Davidson, X. C. Eta-Prime. Trinity College. Durnam. X. C. Alpha-Mu. Unlierslty of North Carolina. Chapel Hill, X. C. Bota-Laml-da. UxivimxitV or Gkokoia. Athens. Ga. Beta University of Alabama, University Ala. Beta-Eta. Alabama Polytechnic Institute. Auburn. Ala. Orccca. University of the South. Sewaneo. Tenn. Al'dia-Theta. Southwestern Baptirt University. Jackson. Tenn. Alpha-Xi. Bethel College. Russellville. Ky. Beta-Xu. Kentucky State College. Ixtxington. Ky.Kappa Sigma Fraternity—Continued District VI Alpha-Upsllon. Mlllsaps College. Jackson, Mina. Gamma. taulslana State University. Baton Rouge, La. Epsilon. Centenary College. Jackson, La. District VU XI. University of Arkansas. Fayetteville. Ark. Alpha-Omega. William Jewell College. Liberty. Mo. Beta-Sigma. Washington University. SL I-ouls. -Mo. District VIII Alpha-Sigma. Ohio State University. Columbus. Ohio. Chi. Purdue University. Lafayette. Ind. Alpha-Pi. Wabash College. Crawfordsvllle. Ind. Beta-Theta. University of Indiana. Bloomington. Ind. Beta-Rho. University of Iowa. Iowa City. Iowa. District IX Sigma. Tulanc University. New Orleans. I.a. Iota. Southwestern University. Georgetown. Texas. Tau. University of Texas. Austin. Texas. Beta-Gamma. Missouri Stale University. Columbia. Mo. Alpha-Psl. University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Neb. Beta-Tau. Baker University. Baldwin. Kansas. Bcta-Omicron. University of Denver, Denver. Col. Apha-Gaminn. University of Illinois. Champaign. III. Alpha-Chi. Lake Forest University. I-nkc Forest. 111. Beta-Epsilon. University of Wisconsin. Madison. WIs. Beta-Mn. University of Minnesota. Minneapolis, Minn. Alpha-Zeta. University of Michigan. Ann Arbor. Mich. Bota-Zcta. I.cland Stanford. Jr.. University. Stanford University. Cal. Beta-XI. University of California. Berkeley. Alumni Associations Philadelphia. Pa. Yazoo City. Miss. Chicago. III. Boston. Mass. New York City. New Orleans. La. Buffalo. N. Y. Memphis. Tcnn. Pine Bluff, Ark. Indianapolis. Ind. Richmond. Va. Louisville. Ky. Chihuahua. Mexico. St I-ouls, Mo. Ruston. I.a. Nashville. Tcnn. Pittsburg. Pa. Atlanta. Ga. 103U. P. IU. P. L SENIOR LAW CLASS. Dovlc Campbell, J. L. Dowling, J. O. Newell, S. J. Nix, E. W. Ragsdale. CLASS OF 1903. W. 0. Cheney, G. B. Franklin, C. M. Johns, T. L. Hudson, G. L. Echols, O. J. Franklin, Russell Gould, C. A. Keith, C. R. Lawler, R. E. White. CLASS OF 190.4. F. H. Anderson, I. W. Chandler, C. R. Oliver, J. C. Chandler, W. W. Cook, O. T. Harper, W. O. Roberts, CLASS OF 1905. H. F. Bray. J. F. Brooks, C. M. James, B. S. Keith, R. H. Kendrick, D. H. Nix, II. B. Ritchie, G. M. Telford, S. Usher, C. Usher. CLASS OF 1906. J. E. Brannon, W. C. Brinson, J. M. Extrowich, I. H. Fleishman R. S. Collier, Earl Griffeth, R. M. Millikin. H. M. Smith, P. J. Strickland, W. G. Tilly, D. N. Thompson, J. G. Simpson, R. J. Ward, O. T. Griffin. 10oSouse Hah.COMMENCEMENT108 Tubsday, Junk 9th, 10:00 r. m. COMMITTEE: S. K. JAQ.UB8, 5 A E W. A. IIali.owhs, K A. W. O. Maksiiburn. ❖ A ©. E. T. Tai.madgk, 5 N. D. H. McDowki'l, X Y R.. P. Brooks, AT!! H. Q. Fletcher, K i. W. J. Cranstoun, X 4 .109 SOPHOMORE HOP Thursday, Junk iitii, io:oo p. m. COMMITTEE. Gkorge Sirlky, Will England, Wbyman Harmon Albert Thornton, Howard TatkJUNIOR HOP Friday, June I2TH, io: oo p. m COMMITTEE. Roland Bower, Ralph Mf.ldkim, Martin Riciitkk, Qltgo Fletcher, Jack Bower. no3 LAW HOP .... Tuesday, Junk i6tic, io: oo i . m. COMMITTEE. F. E. Elms, G. D. Blount, R. W. Jones, G. C. Heyward, Jr. « 112Wrdnksday, Junk 17m, 10:001 . m. COMMITTEE: Will Turner, Edward Jcrgcr, Hugh Scott, Dan Dupree.TOOMBS OJtK 1H TOOMBS OAK I. Old tree, a son of yesterday art thou. A stately monarch once wert thou.—but now Tito’ thrice one hundred years thou’st held thy place, Thy day is near, thy death draws on apace. II. Think not thy life is spared thee, aged oak. For aught that thou hast been. The axeman's stroke Ixmg since thy knell had sounded, had not he Whose name lliou bcarcst, lengthened life tor thee. III. Thy fate is sad. thy death for aye will l e, Wltile he will live alway in memory. He can not die, but thou, thou soulless born. When thou shalt come to die—oblivion. —Sth.es Hopkins.■ I ■THE SPHINXTHE SPHINX ...r. p. . D. S. 15. ...P. H. ...K. S. X. X. X. MEMBERS: HONORARY MEMBERS: Prof. A. H. Patterson, ( 0 Prof. W. D. Hooper. ( 2) A—H. Brown. J—W. S. Cothran. C. D. Dorsey, (36) Sanders Walker. (38) P— G. Butler. K—W. Spain. Sandy Beaver, (39) Glenn W. Legwen, (40) C—O. S. Sibley. L—J. T. Dorsey. M. M. Dickinson, (34) Randolph Jaques, (42) D—D. E. Dougherty. M—F. R. Mitchell. Ralph Meldrim, (43) Marion Smith, (44) E—W. H. Harris. X—H. Dodd. Wallace Miller, (45) Minor Boyd, (46) F—H. Bacon. 0—C. H. Black. W. R. Turner, (47) J. F. Baxter, (48) G—M. P. Hall. I»—W. R. Tichenor. Harold Kctron (49) F. R. Ridley, (4i) H—F. K. Boland. Q—G. T. Jackson. Longstrcct Hull, (27) I—H. G. Colvin. R—Chancellor W. B. Hill. 117 OFFICERS: C. D. Dorsey.............. Sanders Wai.khr..................... Sandy Heaver....................... Gi.en’n V. Lrcwen ................ M. M. Dickinson.................... ■Monalian. Barrow, T. Barrow, B. Lyndon. Scott. DuPree. N. P. K. 119 N. P. K Thomas Augustinf. Harrow. Benjamin Henry Harrow, John Henry Monaiian. Andrew Jackson Lyndon, Daniel. Hughes DuPrbe, Hugh McDaniel. Scott.CASQUE AND GAUNTLETTHE CASQUE AND GAUNTLET Canon Hallowvs Hull Lyndon H. Jones Baxter Blount Brooks Boyd Dorsey Mclntire Jaques Cargill Leg wen Swift Turner OFFICERS Blount, King Ji. Boyd, IV. IV. Hallowes, IV. E. H. Jones, Treas.7 D’s Sibley.« •,; r MoCIc'ky. Harmon. England. Plunkett. Baker. Cranttoun.THJtUJtMSTHALIAN PROGRAM Count von Getzi..........................Clarence Bell. A roving. jolly nobleman. Duke de Finneginski......................... "cd King. Marquis de Blimbeau.....................Sandy Beaver. Companions of von Getzi. Prince Louis.....................................Dexter Blount. Heir to the throne of Poincru. Rudolph Getdns .........................Rotnaine Xnnn. Chancellor of the Kingdom. Jean Myerstein........................Marvin Dickin on. The old I .andtord. Herman ..................................Julian Baxter. A soldier. Fritz Blander......................................Will England. Cast of Characters A young villager. Messenger .......................................J0,lCS Yow Attendant ........................................Minor Boyd. Countess de Montainc.....................I-amar Hill. Beloved by Prince Louis and von Getzi. Countess von Muckclhcim.....................Tom Barrow. Frida von Muckclhcim...............Sanders Walker. The Countess' daughter. Kate Myerstein .............................Roy Dorsey. The Landlord's daughter. Scene—Xeuberg, the capital city of the Kingdom of Poiucnt.THE THALIANS OFFICERS: Walter Jackson............................ President. Will Halix ves.......................Vice-President. Julian Ranter......................Business Manager. Minor Boyd, Julian Baxter, Dexter Blount, Tom Barrow, Sandy Beaver, Preston Brooks, Carlton Brooks. Roy Dorsey, Tamar Hill. MEMBERS: Lloyd Jones, William England, Randolph Jaques, N'ed King, Wallace Miller, William Myddlcton, Clarence Bell, Romainc Nunn, 127 OMAR KHAYYAM CLUB High. Goodrich. Hudson. 123OMAR KHAYYAM CLUB Motto. Come, fill the Cup. and in the fire of Spring. Your Winter-garment of Repentance fiing: The Bird of Time has but a little way To flutter—and the Bird is on the Wing. MEMBERS. Barham Gur....................Benton High. Ramazan................I-eo Hudson. Khwajah ...................Luke Tate. Kaikobad .................W. O. Payne. Kustum ...................Sidney Nix. Jamshyd..............Lucicn Goodrich. '" ' • • r ----------_ A ■ ' )SCROLL JtND PENSCROLL AND PEN OFFICERS: Wallace Miller .......................President. George Franklin ......................Secretary. Walter Siiaw .........................Treasurer. PROGRAM AND SCHEDULE COMMITTEE: Welborn Reynolds, Hi nley Abbott, Robert Moran. MEMBERS: Preston Brooks, Frampton Ellis. Marion Smith, Wallace Miller, Glenn Lcgwen, George Franklin, Welborn Reynolds; Frank Anderson, Joe Hull, Lncicn Goodrich, Hunley Abbott, Robert Moran, ■ Walter Shaw. HONORARY MEMBERS: Chancellor W. B. Hill, Prof. John Morris. 131THE COLONELS Minor Boyd, E. P. King, I'. E. Ellis, J. C. Avery, John Rourke, R. W. Jones, W. 11. Jones, F. I . Mclntirc, K. A. Ransom, H. F. Scott, W. A. Hallowes, M. H. Smith. W. It. Turner, W. P. Harmon, S. R, Jaques.THE ENGINEERING SOCIETY The Exponent of Pure and Applied Science at the University. Publishers "Enninevrlng Annual” J. 1). High, President E. I.. Worriiam, S«c..Tmm. Wallace Miller, Vfce.Pres, Meets fortnightly in the Physics Lecture Room. These meetings are devoted to the discussion of scientific topics and lectures by prominent men in the scientific world. OFFICERS: J. B. High ..................................President. Wali.ack Miurk..........................Vice-President. E. L. Worsham .................Secretary and Treasurer. MEMBERS: CLASS OF 1903. Hunlcy Abbott, A. L. Hull, Jr., J. F. Baxter, J. B. High.' Russell Gould. V. A. Jackson, T. L. Hudson, W. M. Jackson. CLASS OF I9°4- Lamar Flowers, Wallace Miller, Jos. L. Hall, M. L. Richter, Jr., Anderson King. Marccllus Rambo, John C. Koch, E. I-ee Worsham, Paul Ixjvejoy, William Reid. CLASS OF 9°5 • A. IL Barnett, D. H. McDowell. Hinton Baker, Edgeworth Lampkin. Ben Barrow, Alfred Lucignani, Edwin Cobb, R. S. Newcomb. Robert Cheney, George Telford. 133COBB COUNTY CLUB OFFICERS: Wei.born Reynolds ...................President. R. E. Brumby....................Vice-President. MEMBERS: NVclboni Reynolds, F. V. Northcutt, R. E. Brumby, R. J. Ward, Marcellus Rambo, A. S. Gay, Jr., Giles, B. S. Dobbs, Dudley Reynolds, Sim Smith. Herbert Reynolds, 134 -aaosv OFFICERS: G. D. Blount ......................President. T. W. Con ally............... 'icc-Prcsidcnt. W. F.. Ragan. Jr.......Secretary and Treasurer. MEMBERS: T. W. Conally, G. D. Blount, W. M. Reynolds, O. T. Griffin, E. C. Watkins, E. R. Gunn, I. S. Hopkins. Jr., W. E. Ragan. Jr., R. H. Kendrick, V. H. Allen, A. S. Clay, R. H. Harris, L. E. Tate, Daniel Ixttt, W. B. Parks, S. J. Crowe, J. H. Hitch, Hu nicy Abbott. W. H. Cargill, Winship N'unnally, M. H. Blackshear.FIRST TERM. S. J. Nix...................... . ..President. C. R. Oliver.....................Vice-Prcsidcnt. T. L. Hudson.......... Secretary and Treasurer. "V SECOND TERM. C. R. Oliver .........................President. F. P. Roberts....................Vice-President. W. W. Williams.........Secretary and Treasurer. Meets every Friday night at 7 130. 136WIRE-GRASS CLUB OFFICERS. E. R. Jkkgkk.......... President. R. I . Biiooks................Vice President. A. T. McIntykk_______Secretary and Treasurer. MEMBERS. J. W. Hitch, T. A. Barrow. C. G. Strickland, J. E. Craigmiles, R. P. Brooks, B. H. Askew, C. M. Clark, Jr. J. F. Brooks, A. T. M Inlyre, Jack Bower. Roland Bower, Lucicn Bower. D. H. McDowell, Otho Benton, Daniel I-ott, W. H. Myddelton, C. R. Ashley, Jr. E. R. Jerger. 137MJtMDOLIM JtfiD CUITJtR CLUBMANDOLIN AND GUITAR CLUB OFFICERS. R. P. Brooks............................Leader. V. A. Hai.i.owes............Business Manager. MEMBERS: R. P. Brooks, A. V. Berg, W. M. Jackson, Jr., Carlton Jester, S. R. Jaques, W. A. Hallowes, C. P. Brooks, A. E. Thornton, T. W. Cozart, J. D. Yew, R. H. Hill. 139 ESS-Q y.y 4 C' ‘ " Ixiiiiuii it PRESS CLUB « OFFICERS. Robert Mo RAN' .... Hubert Worsham . . . Otjio Benton . Secretary and Treasurer. MEMBERS: J. Fawcett. R. Bower, L. Bower, Fort Scott. Rufus O’Fnrrell, Will Worsham, Harvey Moore, Sidney Nix, Romaine Nunn. « Hubert Worsham, Lee Worsham. M. Blackshear. 140THE MAY QUEEN The Goddess of Springtime, by winds wafted down. Has decked your fair throne with her flowers; She sits on the hillside to weave you a crown And hides in the jessamine bowers. Oh, the hyacinth grows by the side of the rose. In the fields where the butterflies play, A nd the violet sighs for a glance from your eyes—■ My sweetheart, the Queen of the May. The streamlet is dashing and dancing in joy. And the winds whisper love to the trees 'I he red poppies blush, as yielding and coy, They bend to the kiss of the bees. The lily’s sole prayer is to garnish your hair. As she dreams of her love through the day, And the mocking-bird swings in the tree-top and sings For my sweetheart, the Queen of the May. The Springtime will vanish, clouds gather above. The singer and song will depart, But I’ll build you a throne in the Garden of Love And crown you the Queen of my-Heart. In some happy isle that is warmed by your smile, My tribute and homage to pay. By the deep mystic streams will I tell you my dreams. My sweetheart, the Queen of the May. —Frampton E. Ellis. HiPI OMICRON GAMMA SOPHMORES. OFFICERS. Albert Tiiorn’ton .......................President. lux.f.wortH Lamkin ................ ’icc President. Frederick McMilun........................Secretary. Keith Coxway.............................Treasurer. MEMBERS: Hinton Baker. Edgeworth Lamkin, William England, George Sibley, Keith Comvay. Dugas McClcskcy. Harvey Moore, Thomas Cozart, William Cranstoun, Jones Yow, Wickliffc Goldsmith, Frederick McMillin, William Nichols, Dudley McDowell, Albert Thornton. t. - 112M. O. R. CLUB OFFICERS. Hugh Fitzgerald. . .L.H.D. (Lord High Driver). J. E. Fitzgerald. .H.Ii.P. (High Booze Protector.) MEMBERS: Clarence Bell, A. H. Sullivan, John Maddox, C. R. Ashley. Hugh Fitzgerald. J. F.. Fitzgerald. M3BATTALION OFFICERS . r»- Commandant, Lieut.-Col E. L. Griggs, (Graduate I). M. I.) COMPANY A. Captain, Sandy Heaver. ist Lieutenant, T. L. Hudson. 2nd Lieutenant, W. A. Worsham. ist Sergeant, Ralph Meldrim. 2nd Sergeant, Quigg Fletcher. 3rd Sergeant, Martin Richter. 4th Sergeant, Gordon Carson. 5th Sergeant, R. V. Woods. ist Corporal, Rufus O’Farrell. 2nd Corporal. Dugas McClcskey. 3rd Corporal, W. J. Cranstoun. 4th Corporal, J. A. Copeland. 5th Corporal, F. S. Roberts. COMPANY B. Captain, Minor Boyd, ist Lieutenant, W. A. Jackson. 2nd Lieutenant, W. O. Cheney, ist Sergeant, H. F. Scott. 2nd Sergeant. Paul Lovejoy. 3rd Sergeant. Abraham Falk. 4th Sergeant, Anderson King. 5th Sergeant, L. Flowers, ist Corporal. Frank Bullard. 2nd Corporal, D. S Atkinson. 3rd Corporal, George Clifton. 4th Corporal, J. Du. B. Yow. 5th Corporal, George Sibley. 6th Corporal, C. M. James. COMPANY C. Capt. J. F. Baxter, ist Lieutenant. 2nd Lieutenant, ist Sergeant. 2nd W.O. Roberts. 3rd W. W. Cook. 4th Jos. L. Hull, eth M. Rambo. ist Corporal, D. II. McDowell 2nd Corporal, W. T. Hanson. 3rd Corporal, A. E. Thornton. 4th Corporal, C. E. Smith. 5th Corporal. W. G. England. 144UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA First Violins: Paul Lovejoy. M.ix Michael. Will Hallowcs, Cnrleton Jester. Cornets: Rob Dottcry. Henry Elliott. Hass Violin: George Hines. Trombone : I. N. Hosey. First Clarinet: Dewald Cohen. Drums: Joe Morton. 145 KINDERGARTEN CLUB. MEMBERS: T. Whipple Connally, Willie Erwin, Harry Lee Johnson, Clarence Levy, Roy Dorsey, Erwin Vondcrau. (Want-e l to lx- President.) Fatly Strickland, Oliver Bloodworth. Tom Gentry, Pewee Dobbs De Kohrrt Ecglestox White 1415 Nurse.BLOOMER BRIGADE. Motto: "To Outshine Others." OFFICERS: Colossal Rourke .......................President. Dutch Jaquhs..................... Vice President. MEMBERS: Baxter, Yow, Krenson, Rourke, Jaqttes, Conway, Ransom, Jones ("Hooks”). 147ATHENAEUM HISTRIONIC CLUB Realizing the ignorance of the local | opulaco of many of the most noted incidents in the lives of famous American jKTsonages. a numl er of well-known characters assembled at the .Ithenaeiwi for the pur| ose of forming an organization to set lwfore the public scenes taken from the lives of the famous American jK-rsonages aforementioned. With this end in view, they selected members and assigned parts to them, considering only the natural qual- ifications and the histrionic ability of the said members. Mr. Ned King was elected President, and Mr. Thomas Whipple Connallv. Secretary and Treasurer. As a result of their ardent lal ors, the following dramatis personae is hereby set before the public. We trust that it will meet with the unqualified approbation of all true lovers of dramatic art. DRAMATIS PERSONS SIMON SIM PI.K. Simon Simple ...................Mr. Ed. Jerger. Pa Simple ......................Mr. Edwin Cobb. Mrs. Simple .................Miss Gussie Ransom. Mose............................Mr. Ik-o Hudson. BUSTER BROWN. Buster Brown...............Mr. F. Pcrcival Mclntirc. Mrs. Brown.....................Mr. Hugh M. Scott. Tige ............................(Position resigned.) HR UNCLE PIKE OF PIKE COUNTY. Uncle Pike................Mr. Graham I). Perdue. Mrs. Pike................ Mr. Revand Benedict. TH !•: TEASERS. Bobby Teaser...............Mr. Keith Conway. Marjorie................Mr. M. Luther Richter. The Baby...................Mr. .1. C. Avery. Jr.Demostbenian Historic Club Continued U.PIIOXSE AND GASTON IN THENS. Alphonse ................Mr. T. Whipple Connally. Gaston ............................Mr- Tom Kourkc. Leon ..............................Mr. Nc l King. THE KATZENJ MMERS. Mrs. Katzcnjaminer.....Mr. Hugh J. McIntyre. Uncle Heine...............Mr. Roland Bower. The Captain............Mr. Chas. G. Strickland. Hans .....................Mr. Randolph Jaques. Fritz.................Mr. Jerc W. Goldsmith. A HAPPY HOOLIGAN EPISODE. Happy Hooligan...........Mr. Archie T. McIntyre. Gloomy Gus.....................Mr. Herman Swift. Widow Smith....................Mr. Benton High. Policeman...................Mr. R. Windy Jones. FOXY GRANDPA. Foxy Grandpa..................Mr. F. Erroll Ellis. Grandsons................Mr. Longstreet Hull and Mr. William R. Turner. JIM DUMPS. Jim Dumps...............Mr. W. Hurt Cargill (Ik-fore breakfast). Sunny Jim...............Mr. Walter H. Cargill (after breakfast). THE l.OYE OF LULU AND LEANDER. J-eander ...............Mr. Winship Nunnally. Lulu...............Mr. V. Eugene Ragan. Jr. • • Stipe...................Mr. Henry Fort Scott. Mr. Sidney J. Nix is a member, but lias resigned from the |)osition to which he was elected. 140LOVERS CLUB Motto: Veni, Vidi, I'"ictus list. Victok Allen Chief Lover. Jfthens Maidens Avery, Heyward, Heaver, High, Carson. G., Miller. Summer Girls Lyndon (not “Baby” now). Mcldrim (Pete), Smith, Jones (Hooks), Jackson (Little Walter). Rotirke (Overcoat). Commencement Belles Jaques, Turner, Walker, McCleskcy, Baxter, Krcnson (Duke). L. C. !. $ Baker, Hull, Carson, E., Bower, J., Richter (Puss). Abbott. HONORARY MEMBERS: Blount and Ellis. 150EGO CLUB (X'o officers could l c elected, because every member voted for himself.) MEMBERS Windy Jones, ? ? Bower, Here We Are Cohen, Seme Dearing, Socrates Lawler, Colossal Rourkc, Simple Harmon, Don’t Cher Know Averv, J Am Marshburn. Puss Swift. 1S1RICHMOND ACADEMY CLUB OFFICERS: W.M.ri-k Jackson ...........................President. S. Beaver .......................... 'ice President. H. Moork ...................................Secretary. E. F. Brigham ..............................Treasurer. MEMBERS: W. B. Brigham, George Haines. George Sibley, I. C. Levy, • Paul Plunkett, Fred Walker, Harvey Moore. E. F. Brigham, Sandy Beaver, Fred McMillan. John Johnson, Hinton Baker, Harvey Moore. Ouglas McClcskey, Sandy Beaver, 162TO THE- UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA AIR Georgia.—ami wo love that name to call In heated strife or sport or banquet hall,— We pledge a nobler purpose than the youth Of Sparta, when lie left his home to fight For Greece, as we to fight for Truth. The bow thou gavest. with its string of might Spun from a lock of thy bright hair. The shield of tbv indomitable will, we bear: And on what fields we fight, what foes we meet. (It matters not so thy directing power Guide and sustain us in each trying hour). Each well-directed blow, each shout shall be For Love, for Right, for Liberty and thee. —Lixikn Goookicii. 153DEMOSTHEM1AN PRESIDENTSHISTORY OF DEMOSTHENIAN LITERARY SOCIETY The history of a Literary Society can ! csi Ik- secured through a study of the lives of the men who have received their young manhood's training within its walls. Especially is this true of Demosthcuian. If one had access to the Secretary's ltooks and would take note of the names recorded therein, distinguished characters in Statesmanship, in Science and in Religion would he recalled. This Society was founded in iSot ; hut the name Dcm-ostheninn was not given it until 1824. when the present hall was erected. I'pon the birth of Phi Kappa the most intense rivalrv arose, and interest and enthusiasm were not at all lacking. Oratorical and debating contests became the all-absorbing interest of the student body. Originally the Library of the Society was kept in the Society Hall: and on one occasion, after a debate l etwccn the two Societies. Phi Kappa's representatives secreted themselves and took away from the Chajxrl a little volume belonging to Demosthcuian. Immediately upon the next meeting a committee was appointed to re])ort to Phi Kappa and bring away the volume. So intense was the rivalry that Phi Kappa felt insulted by the demands of the committee. of which that great Georgian. V. Y. Atkinson, was chairman and leader. Trouble ensued, the hall was turned 157History of Demosthenian Literary Society—Continued into a Coney Island pugilistic arena, orator- became athletes. But after several minutes of lighting and loud talking, a member of the Faculty who had acted as referee declared Demosthenian victor, and C Itairman Atkinson returned to Demosthenian winner in mortal combat with the book under his arm. Chairman Atkinson afterwards became Governor Atkinson, and while he was (lov-ernor and Billy Kent captain of the Georgia football team and President of Demosthenian, M r. Kent said: "Governor. I am captain of the Georgia football team and President of the Demosthenian I.itcrarv Society. I come to vou as a committee of one to request your photo 158 graph.” And. do you know, the likeness of the greatest Governor of a quarter of a century to-day adorns Detnos-tltcnian's walls. The Society stands on a firm foundation. She is doing business under a revised constitution. To talk of her past is to predict her future. Let us entrust her to safe guides that her future may be as interesting and glorious a her past, and her great work of training the young minds of Georgia l e always an honor to the University and instrumental in achieving the highest purposes of mankind. LEM DOWNING.GALATEA Ol'TH, would’st thou have thy high ideals oi life. Those perfect dreams of Duty, I.ovc and Right. To live and. like a visible being in thy sigln. Attend and cheer thee through this mortal strife? Then shaj c thy visions true in every part, Pvgmalion-likc attend with ceaseless care Each slight detail, till every feature tltere Conforms to all the yearnings of thy heart. Thus can'st thou form a model more sublime Than life with all its troubles e’er can give. Then should’st thou, worshipping what thou deemest divine. Invoke the Powers to make thine Image live. So wilt thy life its highest aim pursue. And, dreaming what is Truth, conform to what is true. —Luciex Goodrich. 159« - PHI KAPPA presidentsHISTORY OF Phi Kapjw Society was foundc l in 1820. The four main factors in the founding of the Society were William Crablte. J. H. Lumpkin. F. Mason and Henry Mason. These mcnwcrcmcmbcrsof the Demosthenian Society.blit owing to lack of interest in that body they resolved to witlnlraw and form a new Society, hoping hy rivalry between the two Societies to renew interest in debating and oratory. Many friends joined them, and in 1820 they founded Phi Kappa Literary and Debating Society. In many respects it resembled a modern fraternity, as it had secrets known only to its members. At first even the place where it held its meetings was a profound secret. Only this was imparted to the public: "The object of our organization is the mental and moral elevation of its members, and this is to Ik- secured by social contact, and competitive exercises in oratory." Front the day of its origin Phi Kappa has played her part in the advancement of intellectuality at the University. At first it was looked upon by it older rival a - a mere student clique, but it took only a few years to live down this unfavorable reputation, and after the first two years it steadily grew in strength and popularity. In the year 1825 it was enabled to erect a wooden building on the spot where the brick one now stands. Six years afterwards Alex. H. Stqdicu was the chief factor in achieving the erection of a brick building for Phi Kappa. This building is the one in which Phi Kappa now holds her meetings. From 1832 until the time of the Civil War 10 PHI KAPPA 1 ‘hi Knpjta enjoyed smooth sailing. Then came the break, from which it has only recently recovered. It is said that John C. Calhoun presided over one of I’hi Kappa’s meetings, being at that time an honorary member. In 1838 John Milledgc. V. . 1 . Whitehead and Howell Cobh paid $2,000. the remaining debt on the brick hall. A certain gentleman was elected an honorary member of I’lii Kappa. His reply to the invitation was greeted with hearty applause. He was unable to accept the invitation as honorary member, as he was already a memlser of Dcmosthcnian. "Hut.” he replied, “as a candid man. I must confess that the Phi Kappa is much superior to the Dcmosthcnian as a trainer for oratory." The ivil War put an end to the Society’s pros| crou-career. On April 25. 1861. the entire Senior Class left College for the war. thirteen out of this number being Phi Kappas. In six months' time there were only twelve men in College, four of these being Phi Kappas. Then it was that Phi Kappa meetings ceased, and the doors of the hall were closed for the first time in its history. The next meeting of Phi Kappa was held September 30. 1864. For about ten years Phi Kappa enjoyed the prosjierous times she had enjoyed before the war. After a few years a new generation came to College with new ideas. The College broadened into the University. Several new courses were introduced into the University, together with the military system. Consequently the atten- IHistory of Phi Kappa—Continued r tion of the greater part of the student body was called to other lines of advancement. During the next twenty years Phi Kappa Society was almost at a standstill, and three years passed during which time she only had thirty meetings. This lack of interest was also noticed in the Detnothenian Society. The Trustees were compelled to take a step to save the Societies. So they met and | assed an act forbidding any student to appear in the public debates or to contest for Sophomore or Junior sj eakcrs places unless they were in good standing with the society to which they belonged. This step taken on the part of the Trustees did much toward adding interest to the Societies. For the past five scars Phi Kappa has witnessed tin; golden age of hci history. Out of the twelve North Carolina debates, eight of them have hecen furnished by Phi Kap|». She has also furnished four of the contestants in the interstate oratorical contests. The past year witnessed the development of an admirable feature in the way of debating l etwecn the Societies. This was an impromptu debate which was held on March 13, 1903. In this the Hti Kappa Society won. Let every loyal Phi Kappa alumnus pray for the continuance of Plti Kappa's pros IKTous career, and let her add new laurels to the glorious history of her past. E. T. TA1.MADGE. I ANNIVERSARIANS DEMOSTHF.NIJiH PHI K-APPJi G. D. Pkhijih G. W. I.ROWEX 1C3PRESIDENTS OF GEORGIA LAW DEBATING SOCIETY II. J. McIxtyuk.GEORGIA LAW DEBATING SOCIETY The debating society is an important feature in tin law course. It strengthens the course not only by furnishing to the students cp| ortunitics to acquire the readiness and grace of an accomplished S] eakcr. hut also in serving to impress the more deeply upon his mind the principles taught in the class-room. The discussion of legal principles. involving their application to concrete cases, their illustration by numerous examples and their substantiation by the citation of recognized authorities, can not fail to implant deeply in the mind the principles culled from the text-book. The greatest 1 cnetit of the debating society. however, consists in the experience and training tlie law student acquires through its instrumentality. The young lawyer, entering u] on the practice of his profession. must Ik able to think quickly and logically, ami speak with vigor and perspicacity. 11c can not hope to be a successful office lawyer until he has first made his mark in open court. This he cannot do. however, until he has first overcome the embarrassment and inexperience that usually accompany and handicap the earliest efforts of the young practitioner. This the law debating society enables him to do by providing him at-first-hand many excellent oportunities for acquiring experience and training. Its proceedings and debates, conducted with ability, learning and industry, bringing into active conflict the mind of the ablest and most industrious students, cannot fail to prepare him in some small measure for the lierformance of the arduous duties that await hint. Realizing the advantages to Ik- derived from a law debating society, properly organized and conducted, the two classes of the Law Department met during the early part of the present year with a view to the organization of such a society. A committee was ap| ointcd to draft a constitution that would make suitable provision for the conduct of the debates, selection of questions tor debate, the anointment of debaters and judges, and the manner of rendering decisions, and for such other proceedings as are necessarily incident to such a society. At a subsc- 1«Georgia Law Debating Society—Continued qucnt meeting of the I-aw classes a constitution was rc-l ortcd ami adopted, and under it the Georgia 1-aw Dc-1 citing Society successfully launched. The Society has more than attained the objects for which it was organize). The interest and enthusia-m manifested by its members in its proceedings and debates has resulted in the production of some excellent debates—debates conducted with ability and learning. intcrs|KTscd with bright sallies of wit and humor, and accouqianied by many eloquent sjxrcches. that have contributed much to the enjoyment and profit of all. It has served, moreover, to bring together and throw in intimate contact with each other the members of both classes in a manner that can but ojHrrate to the great benefit of al!—an advantage possessed by :ic other institution of similar character in the University. Prominent lawyers in the State have appeared before the Society at different times and delivered addresses upon subjects of interest. Great profit and enjoyment have l ccn derived from these lectures, serving, as they do. to throw light u| on subjects that can Ik touched but lightly, it at all. in the classroom, and disclosing for us many of the pitfalls and marcs that await the uninitiated practitioner The Society has a bright future before it. The frictions that clogged its proceedings during its first year will soon wear away, and its course will be smooth and unrnfilcd. The time is not far distant when, should the same success that has attended the course of the Society in the past continue to he won and enhanced by it in the future, its members will be able to point with pride and affection to the long list of the Society's mcuilwrs whose names stand high upon the scroll of fame that records the deeds of Georgia’s most illustrious lawyers. W1NTTEI.D JONES. 1061 BE1MTESIMPROMPTU DEBJtETRSIMPROMPTU DEBATE PROGRAM. March 23. 1903. Master of Ceremonies. Sandy Beaver. Question: Resolved. That intercollegiate athletics arc conducive to intellectuality. Affirmative. Demos-tubman (». I.. Patterson, T. L. Hudson, J. L. Dowling, W. B. Shaw. M. H. Blackshcar, I. S. Hopkins, Jr. Negative. Pm Kappa. G. D. Blount, R. V. Jones, W. M. Reynolds, F. E. Ellis, A. G. Colucke, L. P. Goodrich. JUDGES. Prop. John Morris, Prof. C. M. Shelling. Dr. V. P. I X)Vejoy. NEGATIVE WON! 160170 FOOTBALL «FOOTBALL TEAM 1902F. M. RIDLEY. Capt. '02 174 IVJtLLJtBE MILLER. Mgr. 'OSVARSITY FOOTBALL TEAM G. C. Heywakd...........................Manager. F. M. Rioi.ky............................Captain. W. A. Rf.yxoijis...........................Coach. I.ine Up H. Kctron ................................Center. M. Willingham...............................Right Guard. .■ . Beaver..................................Left Guard. Marion Smith................................Right Tackle. F. P. McIntyre...............................Left Tackle. J. F. Baxter...........................Right End. F. M. Ridley (Captain)..................Left End. J. Monahan...........................Quarterback. M. Dickinson ................................Left Halfback. W. Harmon ..................................Right Halfback. W. R. Turner............................Fullback. Substitutes J. Bower, J. Barrow. S. Nix. W. A. Worsliaw and Victor Allen. Record of Carnes Oct. it Georgia.... Oct. iS Georgia 0 Oct. 25 Georgia —Alabama . .. Nov. 7 Georgia ... 27—Davidson .. Nov. 11 Georgia .... 11 Nov. 27 Georgia .... . .. 12—Auburn .... 5 Played seven, won five, lost two. 175THE ANNUAL ECLIPSE 170 April 3. April 10. April 22. April 24. April 27. VARSITY BASEBALL TEAM MinOK Boyi», Manngcr. M a it vi N Dickinson. Captain. W. A. Rkynoi.dn. Couch. LINE UP. Dickinson . I. Bower 1 Middleton Beaver..... Anderson.. . Fleischman . Ilarmon.... McCalla..... JlUjllCS... Walker..... .........Catcher. ..............Pitcher . ............ 1st Base 2nd Base and Pitcher. ...........Short Stop. .............3rd Base. ........... Left Field. ......... Center Field. .........Right Field. SUBSTITUTE f- Clarke. Twit tv. Bower. R. Ashley, Kendrick RECORD OF GAMES. Georgia 4. Davidson 3. at Athens, Ga. Georgia S. Clcmson 13, ai Athens. Ga. Georgia9. Wake Forest o. at Athens. Ga. Georgia 8, Auburn 2, at Alliens. Ga. Georgia 3, Tech 3, at Atlanta, Ga. May 3 Georgia 5. Trinity 4. at Athens, Ga. May 7. Georgia 11. Vanderbilt 12, at Athens, Ga May S. Georgia 10. Mercer 4. at Macon, Ga. May 9. Georgia 7. Mercer 6, at Macon. Ga. May 12. Georgia 4, Tech if, at Athens, Ga.VARSITY BASEBALL TEAMTYPES » y.S WtlYCOMB■■■’VARSITY TRACK TEAM Jos. L. HtU. 1. Anderson.- Broad jump. High jump. 2. Baxter (Captain).—ioo-yard dash, 220-yard dash, 44-yard dash. 3. Barkow.—Mile run. 4. Bi.ouxt.—High jump. Broad jump. 4. Bower, J.—Pole vault. High jump. 5. Con.E.—Hammer throw. Shot put. Manager 0. Hearing—120 hurdle, 220 hurdle, high jump, pole vault. 7. Exgi.axd.—440-yard dash. 8. Harmon.—220-yard dash, shot put. broad jump 9. Harper.—Mile run. 10. Mani.f.v.—Half-mile run. 182‘VARSITY TRACK TEAMANNUAL FIELD DAY PROGRAM s CRkGG OBG□ f DOOO. .1 one nACU First Second HI Record) Col. Record Holder Baxter, Dearlng, Ander-on, I.ee. Wntkip . . HAMMER THROW, 16 LBS. . . Baxter • " 7-5 to sec. Johnson ’o i Coile, Nix, Ritchie, Griffin, Strother, Hopkins . POLE VAULT . Coile • • • • ioo-4 too ft. 4 in. Coile ’03 Dcaring, Dorsey, Bower 220 YAROS OASH . Bower Hearing 0s 1-3 in ft. Hearing ’.,5 BROAD JUMP Harmon 24 a-S 22 5-5 sec. H 0 Cox ’00 440 YAROS OASH Anderson •99 -3 2o ft. 4 in. Weaver '99 Anderson. England, Bullard, Ward .... SHOT PUT England 53 2-5 5 sec- Anderson’o4 Coile, Ritchie, Griffin, Strother, Hopkins . 120 YOS. HURDLE RACE Harmon 35-6 56 ft. 4 1-2 F. Price '9; Hearing, Fawcett, Blount 184 Blount 16 1-5 16 1 2 Dearing ’05ANNUAL FIELD DAY PROGRAM MILE RUN Holtzcndorf, Harper, Ward, Robert . Bartow, T., Xunr ally, Hitch. Janie- Flr»« fecond Harper Barrow HI6H JUMP Bower. J., Hearing, Blount All tied 220 YOS. HURDLE RACE Gentry, Dearing, Fawcett, Blount. Anderson . Dearing Blount HALF MILE RUN England, Manley. Hill, Reagan, Fawcett. Janie 50-Y0S. THREE LE66ED RACE _ Manley Ragan Open to all Blount Hearing RELAY RACE Soph Hi Record Col. Record 5-9 4 « ■ 43 «c. 5- 5 S «-2 27 1-5 27 4 5 ec. 2 4 t-2 2 m. 9 J-5 . 7 t-a 6 »ec. IS5 Holder Colquitt '9$ Blount 'oj Black Marshal ’99 Barrow’ i Ferrell '90 Fresh., Soph.. Junior , Seniors. Law Seniors . . . 3 m 4: 3.; 5.Class’ 99-’03FIELD DAYGEORGIA-EMORY TRACK TEAM too-Yard Hash.—Raster (Ga.), ist; Harmon (Ga.). 2nd: Anderson (Emory), 3rd. Time. 10 2-5 see. Hammer Throw.—Coilc (Ga.). 1st: Rishop (Emory). 2nd: Ritchie (Ga.). 3rd. Distance. 92 ft. 2 ins. 220- Yard Dash.—Harmon (Ga.). 1st: Rax ter (Ga.). 2nd: England (Ga.). 3rd. Time. 24 2-5 sec. Shot Put.—Rishop (Emory) 1st: Xix (Ga.). 2nd: Harmon (Ga.). 3rd. Distance. 120-Yard Hurdle.'—Hearing (Ga.). 1st: Royd (Emory). 2nd. Time. 162-5 scc- Mile Run.—Henty (Emory). 1st: Murray (Emory). 2nd: Barrow (Ga.). 3rd. Time, 5 mins. Pole Vault.—Hearing (Ga.). 1 st: Rower (Ga.) and Crovatt (Emory). 2nd. Height, 10 (t. Broad Jump.—Itlount (Ga.), is:: Henty (Emory). 2nd; Royd (Emory). 3rd. Distance. 19 ft. 8 -i ins. Half-Mile Run.—Murray (Emory). 1st: Manley (Ga.). 2nd: Crovatt (Emory). 3rd. Time. 2 in 4 1-5 -ice. High Jump.—Henty (Emory), 1st: Dcaring (Ga.). 2nd: Rlotmt and Anderson (Ga.). 3rd. Height. 5 ft. 4 ,,s-220-Yard Hurdle.- —Royd (Emory). 1st: Hearing ((ia.). 2nd. Time. 284-5 see. .. 440-Yard Hash.—Raster (Ga.). ist: Anderson ( 2nd. Time. 52 sec. Scokk.—Georgia. 62 1!—Emory, A2 ’ Held at Athens, (ia.. May 2, i9°3- 187GEORGIA-TECH DUAL MEET too Yard Dash..—Baxter (Ga.). ist: Harmon (Ga.), 2nd: Inglis (Tech.). 3rd. Time. 103-5 scc-Hammer Throw.—Cowan (Tech.). 1st: Code (Ga.), 2nd: McWhorter (Ga.), 3rd. Distance. 103 ft. 220-Yard Dash.—Baxter (Ga.). i-t: Harmon (Ga.). 2nd; Moore (Tech.), 3rd. Time. 232-5 sec. 120-Yard 11 unite.—Hearing (Ga.). 1st and 2nd: Griffith 1 Tech.), 3rd. Time. irt 3-5. Shot Put.—Cowan (Tech.), 1st: Moore (Tech.). 2nd: Harmon (Ga.). 3rd. Distance. 32 ft. 10 in. Broad Jump.—Anderson (Ga.), 1st: Blount (Ga.). 2nd: Hannon (Ga.), 3rd. Distance. 19 ft. 1-3 in. Pole Vault.'—Bower and Hearing (Ga.), 1st: Cowan (Tech.), 3rd. Height, 9 ft. 6 in. Mile Run.—Collier (Tech.), 1 st: Walker (Tech.). 2nd: Barrow (Ga.). 3rd. Time. 5 min. 8 sec. High jump.—Cowan (Tech.), ist: Thrash (Tech.). 2nd: Hearing (Ga.), 3rd. Heigh:. 5 ft. 6 in. Half-Mile Run.—Blackford (Tech.), ist: Daves (Tech.). 2nd: Manley (Ga.). 3rd. Time. 2 min. 8 sec. 220-Yard Hurdle.'—Hearing (Ga.). i t: Harmon (Ga.). 2nd: Dorsey (Ga.). 3rd. Time. 27 1-5 sec. 440-Yard Dash.—Anderson (Ga.). ist: Baxter (Ga.). 2nd: England (Ga.). 3rd. Time. 51 sec. Scxke.—Georgia. 67: Tech.. 41. » I8S GEORGIA WON!S. I. A. A. TRACK MEET Hc! l at Atlanta. Ga.. May 9. 1903. Georgia won second place. Vanderbilt first. too-Yard Dash.—Smart (Valid.). 1st: Hamilton (Vatul.), 2nd: Baxter (Ga.). 3rd. Time. 102-5 sec. Hammer Throw.—Parrish (Texas). 1st; Coilc (Ga.). 2nd: Cowall (Tech.). 3rd. Distance. 114 ft. ioV4 ins. 220-Yard Dash.—Smart (Yand.). 1st: 1’axtcr (Ga.). 2nd: P.lack (Yand.). 3rd. Time, 234-5 sec. 120-Yard Hurdle.—Dearing (Ga.). 1st: ndcrson (Vand.). 2nd: Hamilton (Yand.). 3rd. Time. 16 3-5 sec. 440-Yard Dash.—Black (Vand.), 1st: Smart (Vand.). 2nd: England (Ga.). 3rd. Time. 55 see. Shot Put.—Marshall (Texas). 1st: Sibley (Vand.). 2nd: I-ay (Auburn). 3rd. Distance. 36 ft. 6 ins. 220-Yard Hurdle.—Dearing (Ga.), 1st: Anderson (Vand.), 2nd: Hamilton (Vand.), 3rd. Time. 27 4-5 sec. High Jump.—Cowan (Tech.). 1st: Anderson (Yand.), 2nd: mount (Ga.). 3rd. Height, 5 ft. cf ins. Half-Mile Run.—Jones (Yand.), 1st: i Hack ford (Tech.), 2nd: Slmddcmangen (Texas), 3rd. Time. 2 min. 14 1-5 see. Broad Jump.—Hamilton (Vand.), 1st: Blount (Ga.). 2nd: Palmer (Texas). 3rd. Distance. 20 ft. $l j in. Mile Hun.—Belton (Tcnn.). 1st: Smith (Ala.). 2nd: Collier (Tech.), 3rd. Time. 5 min. 64-5 sec. Pole vault called on account of darkness and points evenly divided lie tween Bower (Ga.). McConnell (Tech ) ami Pcrrow (Trinity). Totai-s.—Vanderbilt. 46: Georgia, 25: Tech., it: Texas. 12: Tennessee. 5: Alabama. 3: Trinity. 3: Auburn. 1: Clcmson, o. 189WEARERS OF THE ’VARSITY G Mon Entitled to Wear G FOOTBALL TEAM. SQL ARK G. Ridley, F. Nix, S. Harmon. Dorsey, C. Smith, M. Mclntirc, F. Dickinson, M. Willingham. Ketron. Baxter. J. Barrow, T. Turner, W. Allen. V. miller. Bower, J. Monahan, J 01 Icy wood. Jieavcr. $. Dickinson. M. McCalla. ♦Boyd. Ridley, F. BASEBALL Tl M, OCTAGONAL G. Walker. S. Bower. R. Myddelton. Beaver, S. Bower, J. Jaques, R. Blount. I). Fleischman. Anderson, F. Blackshear. S. Harmon. Nix. S. Manley. J. Lyndon, A. Dorsey. C. TR U K TEAM, ROUND G. Blount, D. Griffin. Barrow. 'I . Harmon. Ritchie. England, VV. Baxter. J. Hearing. Anderson. F. McWhorter. Coile, W. Harper. •Hull. J. 190 Managers only entitled to "G" on cap.TENNISBerg. Brooks, P. Cheney, W. O. Dobbs. Tones. W. H. Blount. Scott. H. M. Bell. C L-awlcr. •‘.rooks. C. Franklin. C'.. 15. Smith. M. H. Askew. Abbott. Brumby. Marshburn. Blackshcar. Baxter. faques. Dorsey. Jaques. Bower. ) Cheney, W. O. $ Brooks. C. i Brooks, P. ) 6:3— 6 ». 6:2—64. i Blount, j 6:3—7:5. t Scott. II. M. { 3 »—8:6—613. ) 6:0—6:0. Franklin. C. B. 6:0—6:0. ( Abl)Ott. ' 6:0—6:0. [ Brumby. ' 6:1—9:7. Jaques. ' 6:0—9:7. ) Bower. 6:3—10:8. !1aquf.s—Champion. 6:2—6:2. Brooks, 1 6:1—6:1. Blount. 6 :o—6 :o. Brooks, C. 6:3—4 —7 o- Brumby. 6:1—2:6—6:t. Jaques. 6:2—6:3. TENNIS CLUB Score in Tennis Tournament (SINGLES V. OF GN.) Brooks C. 6»-8:6. | Brooks, P. ( 6-.3-6:3. Jaques. 57—6:2—6:3. Jaques. f 4:6—6 :i—6 R. B. BROOKS, • C. D. DORSEY. B. H. ASKEW, Committee.RESULT IN TENNIS TOURNAMENT (Doubles) U. OF GA M. L. Kk-iitkr, Jr.. Manager. Jaques-Dorscy Lawler-Franklin. Blount-AbltoU r r K»ks Bros. Scott-Brumby Bcrj;-Black shear. Bell-Askew « . Smith. M.H.-Hull. A.L. I Jaqucs-Dorscy 7 5 : 1 llrooks Bros. ( 2-6-6: i-6 : 2 Bergf-Blackshcar. 6: 2-3 : 6-7 : 5 Smith-Hull, j 3: 6-6: 4-6: 4 1 ( Brooks Bros. ’ 6:4.6:, j ( Smith-Hull. 6 : o.0: 8 Brooks Bros. S : 6-S : 6 J Tennis Champions-Doubles C. D. DORSEY. B. H. ASKEW. R. I . BROOKS. Committee. J. F. Brook-. K. I . Brook-.ATHLETIC COUNCIL First Term Sandy Beaver ...............................President. Hkxkv Lamar ............................... Secretary. Hrr.11 Scott ..........................Vice-President. Wam.ace Mim.gr..............................Treasurer. Frank Miller................................Treasurer. Frank Ridley........................Captain Football. CiKorck Hrvward.....................Manager Football. Marvin Dickinson ...................Captain Bascl ail. Minor Boyd..........................Manager Baseball. Julian Baxter............................Captain Track Team. Joseph T. Hum............................Manager Track Team. Martin Riciitkr.....................Manager Tennis. A. H. Patterson ............................Professor. .1. C. Cam them.............................Professor. Jr due Howei.i. Cord..........................Trustee. F- H. I )RSF.y.....................Resident Member. .1 Umax I.axr .................Non-Resident Member Second Term H rc.il Scott........................... President. Frank Anderson......................Vice-President. Max Michagi..............................Treasurer. Martin Riciitkr..........................Secretary. Harold Kktron ....................Captain Football. Wallace Miller....................Manager Football Marvin Dickinson .................Captain Baseball. Minor Boyd........................Manager Baseball. Julian Baxter................C aptain Track Team. Joe Hum......................Manager Track Team. Martin Riciitkr...................Manager Tennis. A. H. Patterson..........................Professor. J. C Camprkli...........................Professor. Judge Howell Coin:.........................Trustee. F.. II. Dorsey...................Resident Member. Julian Lane..................Non-Resident Member. Jidulsory Minor Boyd, i A E James McCalla. A T Q Hugh Scott, X ❖ Will England, X Y Dexter Blount, K A I-cc Worsham. 5 N Board Frainpton Ellis, A 0 Oscar Cooglcr, K $ O. J. Franklin, I'. P. I.. Sandy Beaver, Independent. Prof. A. H. Patterson, Faculty. 191 •«3PANDORA. Editors of PANDORA from 1880 to the Present Time Voi.t'MK i. 1SS6—Editor-in.Chief. G. N. Wilton. K A. Business Manager. XX B. Cook. A T Q. Associate Editors, W. E. Wooten. 4 A E: McDaniel, X ♦: C P. Rice, X ♦; C. II. Wilson. K A; W. A. Speer. «!• A 0; F. F. Stone. ♦ A 0; R. I). Mender, A TO; M. II. Bond. A T A; W. S. Upshaw, A T A; l . S. Move. t T A; I . I.. Wade. «1 T A; A. W Wade. 5 N ; W. (i. Brown. 4 N. You ur II. 1SS7—Kditor-in-Chief, C. I . Rice, X ♦• Business Manager. J. W. Daniel, K A; Associate Editors. T. W. Reed. ♦AO; G. Waters. ♦ I" A: W. J. Slmw. 4 N: II. K. Milner, A T 0: A. I.. Franklin. A T A. Voi.t’MK III. iSikS—Kditor-in-Chief. Albert Howell. K. A. Business Manager. A. W. Griggs. A T A-Assoc in te Editors. W. I.. Moore. ? A ;; T. 1{. Crawford. A T 0: F W. Coile, 4 N; l.ucicn I,. Knight. X ♦ ; W. M. Glii". A T A You MR IN', 1S90— Editor-in-Chief. John D l.ialc. 4 A E. Business Manager. W. K.Whcatford. 5 N. Associate Editors. 1' E. Callaway. K A; S. J. Tribble. ♦ A ©• I. C. Crawford. 4 N: W. 1) Ellis. X$: t Stallings. A T A ; W. X. Smith. X Y ;R. A Cohen. X ♦. N’oi.t’MR V. 1S9;—Editors-in-Chief, J. F. I.ewis, X ♦: J - L. Brown. A T 0. Business Manager. NY. E. Crig-tie. 4 N : NY. T. Kelly, A TO; Associate Editors. 1. C. Kimball. ? A E: Rov Dallas, ♦AO; J. R. I.an'c. 4 A E: E. W. Frey, X Y. Voi.fMK Y|, 1S93—Editor-in-Chief, Harry Hudson. K A. Business Manager, F. G. Barfield, 4 A E. Associate Editors. C. R Nisbet. X ♦ : N. B. Stewart, A T0;A. O. Halsey. 4 N: II. A. Alexander; E. G. Cabanist, ♦ A 0; F. G. Johnson. A TO; Eugene Dodd. X Y. Vou’mk Yll. 1S94 — Editors-in-Chief, C. R. Tidwell. A T 0. Noel Moore. 4 A E. Business Managers. Paul 1«. Fleming. X £: John D. Stelling. A T 0 Associate Editors. L. D. Fricks. 4 N: W. 1 . Harbin. X 0: H Brown, K A: George Beckett. ♦AO. Yota MK YIH. 1S95—Editor-in-Chief W. A. Harris, X ♦, Business Manager. J. J. Gibson, A T 0. Associate Editors, II. II. Steiner. 4 A E; J ■ NX. Morton, K A; XV. XV. Chandler, A T 0; XX. I.. Kemp 4 N; |. T. Dunlap ♦A 0; II. X Black. X V : J. G. Smith. Non-Fraternity. 197Volumk [X, 1S96—Editor-in-Chicf, Pliny Hall, K A. Business Manager, J. G. Pitman, t AO Associate Editors, M. M. Lockhart, S A £; J. B. Connelly. X l ; Fred Morris. $ N ; C. H." Holden. A T fi; A. V. Black, X ♦: T. A. Neal; R B. Nnllcy. Voi.imk X, liiryj—Editor-in-Chicf, II. G. Colvin. 5 A E. Business Manager, R. E. Brown, A T fl Associate Editors, F. L. Flemming. X ♦; 1. V. Spain. K A; Harry Dodd. X ♦: P. S. Smith, «t A 0; A. L. Tidwell, A T Q; II. Lovcjoy, i N; V. B. Kent; J. V. Hendricks. N'oi.umk XI. 1S9S—F.ditors-in-Chicf, Harry Dodd. X : Hugh White. S N. Business Manager, J. C. McMichael, K A. Associate Editors, C. II. Black, X K. E. Pomeroy. 5 A E: C. Westbrook. A T Q: |. T. Dorsey, $ A 0: H." R. Perkins, A T Q.‘ Voi.cmk XII, 1899—Editors-in-Chief, Garrard Glenn. - A E: A. P. Adams, X t . Busine.vs Manager. P. E. Johnson. X ♦. Associate Editors, f. B. McCurry, K A; W. S. Blun. AT Q: F. E. Broadnax, A T Q; W. PL Watkins, 2 N: D. G. Iicidt; J. V. Mason. Vo I. IMF. XIII, 1900—Editors-in-Chief, Archibald Blackshear, K A; Fair Dodd, X Y. Business Manager, I”. K. Broadnax, A T 0. Associate Editors, F. F. Calhoun, x ♦: E. F. Shannon, Y A 0; F. G. Tupper, - A E; J. F. Gardner, - i.; William Davis: K. H. Hamby. Voi.vmk XIV, 1901—Editors-in-Chief, F.. P. Shannon. A 0: J. D. McCartney. - A E. Business Manager, Jack Banks. X Y. Associate Editors. F. A. Williams, 2: N; V. II. Bullard. A. T 0: R. G. Stephens. K A: I. M. Putman, K 2:: V. D. Hoyt, X 'J ; James L. Sibley. Voixmk XV. 1002—Editors-in-Chief. Frank H. Barrett, 5 A E : Sterling H. Blackshear, XY Business Managers, J. K. Jordan. A T ft; M. V. Lewis. X Y; Associate Editors, J. D. Russell, T A 0: I. S. Peebles. 5 N ; M. S. Johnson, K A; H. M. Fletcher, K S; Donald Cohen. Yoi.umk XVI. 1903—Editors-in-Chief, G. Dexter Blount. K A: Frampton E. Ivllis. ♦AG Business Managers, J. Benton High,Claude W. Bond. $ N Associate Editors. Marion H. Smith, 5 A E: Hugh M. Scott. X $: Preston Brooks, A TO: W. G. England, K Y ; Marvin M. Dickinson, K : Sidnev I Nix. U. P. L. 13EDITORS FIRST TERM. Claude W. Bond........................Editor-m-Chicf. Wili.tam R. Turner................Business Manager. Hugh M. Scott......................Associate E litor. Dew am) A. Cohen .................Athletic Editor. Camprrll M. Kkensox ................I ocal Editor. Charles A. Lawler...................Exchange Editor. Jack I . Bower............Assistant Business Mgr. SECOND term. H. Eort Scott......................Editor-in-Chief. Jack D Bower....................Business Manager. James L. Dowling..................Associate Editor. E. r. King, Jr...................Athletic Editor. f.EO Hudson ..........................Local Editor. Erwin H. Vandereau.................Exchange Editor. Eugene T. Tai.madgk.............Asst Business Mgr. THIRD TERM. L. P. Goodrich....................Editor-in-Chief. J. W. Goldsmith ..............Business Manager. V. M. Reynoi.us ...............Associate E litor. E. P. King .......................Athletic Editor. G. B. Franklin ...................Local Editor. Robert Moran.....................Exchange Editor. H. W. Moore.................Asst. Business Mgr. mr't i THC RCO AND BLACK mmm ■■i — 1 The Red and Black. mrri«tin a uvkm. »n« » ♦«• ?• t » - GEORGIA 12; 1 AUBURN 5.The Point of View of a I.ucy Cobb Girl, at the Baseball Game with Auburn.' When Dickinson made a punt a triri was heard to exclaim: “Oh! he didn't half try to hit it! Some of the girls were commenting on the players. Auburn's sub-pitcher was warming up and one of the girls was heard to say: “That pitcher is left-handed, you know he can't pitch." 201e @ editors OF THE GEORGIAN 1903 (il.KXX W. I .EGWEN. FkaMITON K. ELLIS. Huxi.ky Abbott. Marion H. Smith. Preston I!rooks. Robert J. Moran. John Kocii. Business Manager H. Fort Scott. Assistant J. Knox Felker. UUQJJi © AGEORGIAN EDITORS Koch Moran. Brooks. Dupree. Ellis. Legwen. Smith. Abbott. 203ENGINEERING ANNUAL EDITORS Paul Lovejoy, Bus. Mgr. D. H. McDowell. Soph. Editor. Keith Conway. Asst. Bus. Mgr Jos. I.. Hull, Junior Editor. Ilunlcy Abbott. Editor-in-Chicf. Russell Gould. Senior Editor. 204LITERARY DEPARTMENT 205 iTHALATTA "Thalatta," cried the Greeks; the ocean far Sparkled and gleamed beneath their weary eyes. “Thalatta”: and the desert sands and skies Were dark with thoughts of famines and of war. With eager steps and hearts as light as air. They embark. The oar each one tries. But tempests come, and human strength defies, Till desert sands and skies arc deemed most fair. The student, ere he leaves his college walls. Sees Life’s wide ocean tempting in his view, And hails with gladness every promise new; And goes without a sigh from out the halls. But when the tempes - toss the main He sighs for college days again. —Luciex Goodrich. 206THE SPOT ON SPOTLESS TOWN A Farce in Two Acts. Time, A. D. 1903. Place—S]xx!ess Town. “Out damned spot."—Macbeth. DRAMATIS PERSONAE. The Mayor ot' S| otloss Town.........Rant, a Solicitor. Bombast, an editor...................Tom J Swallowski. a rcstaurantcur...... .Dick Pinchem, a | oliccman..............Harry ) Sophomores, Freshmen. policemen, merchants, etc. Act I. Scene 1.—A public street iit Spotless Toxen. inter a crowd of Sophomores. First Sophomore. I hear that soon, in fact, within an hour, The Freshmen will assemble at yon Inn To banquet and to drink. Second Sophomore. Alack, ‘tis true, And for the love we bear them it is plain That we must end this feast, for if they eat The vile concoctions that will there be served 1 fear dis] cpsia will their tempers sjioil. First Sophomore. Tis true, 'tis true. Our duty now is clear. Attend ye. Sophomores to what I say: Upon the love you bear your native State. I charge ye, take good heed no Freshman here By art or cunning enters to this spread. Iinter several Sophomores, dragging a Freshman. First Sophomore. What have ye there? Third Sophomore. A Freshman whom we caught Attempting, 'spite of our decrees and laws. To enter yonder hostel. What's your will ? Freshman (struggling). Ye pompous fools and cowards. knaves. Your numbers ami yourselves do I defy And could 1 for a moment free myself I'd lay the best of you u| on his l ack. F.nter Pinchem. waving a club. Finehem. Rebellion, riot, murder, death I see. Ye villians that do break the law and ] eacc Surrender up the person you have seized. Or 1.minion of the Law will work my will iqion you. First Sophomore. Who. I pray, arc you ? Pinchem. dramatically. I am the ruler of this mighty land. I hold the Saxon freedom in my hand. The Russian ( zar has no such jiower a mine And even Roosevelt is not in my line. The Constitution and the Law to me Are out of date, in fact, have ceased to be. The Code of Georgia is to me a song What docs not please my fancy—that is wrong. Freshman. A fig. you fool, for what you think you arc. The thief you chase to me seems better far Than you yourself: so take this word from me. 207THe Spot on Spotless Town— Continued I'd rather die in bondage than Ik free By help of thine. If my escajie be made I much prefer it be without your aid. The lion, though at last lie's brought to bay, Would scorn the jackal's help. Kind sir. (iood Day. {Exeunt oinnes.) Scene 2. Before the Inn of Spotless Town. Enter Freshmen, on the balcony of the inn. Sophomores. in the street beneath. Freshmen, in chorus: We Freshmen live in Sjiotless Town nd arc the best in cap and gown. No test l ook have we need to cram We spot each teacher on exam. First Sophomore. Ala-, it seems that wc have met defeat. The Freshmen have, despite our utmost toil. Made good their entrance 'o the Inn and soon Will se: them down to eat. We must, post haste. Devise some scheme to mar this banquet scene. Or else, swelled up by pride, they will licgin To think they own the college and the town. First Frc linuin (from the balcony). Ha. ha. i e lordly Sophomores, methiuks That we have rulibcd it in you once for all. Your threats were idle boastings and it now Behooves you to go backward and sit down. First Sophomore. Vengeance 1 Second Sophomore. Ye t’.ods! must this thing still go on ? Third Sophomore. I have an idea, mark vc well niv words. l.et one of you make haste to yonder store And with our common fund buy three -core eggs. With these. I'll warrant you, we'll rout our foes. First Sophomore, (iadzooks. the idea's good. I 11 hie me hence But will return like Mars, armed ior the fray. • ‘ (Exit.) Freshman. Why stand ye there all silent like whipped curs ? Re-enter First Sophomore, with basket of eggs. First Sophomore. Here, arm yourselves and when I -limit "Revenge" l.et each man hurl one at the hated foe. Alarum. The Sophomores throw the eggs which bespatter the Freshmen and the Inn. The Sophomores retreat across the street with shouts of triumph. Enter I'inchcm and three other policemen. Pinehem. (weeping.) And this is the Inn of Sjiotlcss Town, A famous Inn. of great renown. But egg-bespattered I must allow It's grown to be ln(n)famons note. Sophomores, across the street. Trip 'em up Bosco. Kat 'em alive. Sophomore. Sophomore. Nineteen five. Pinehem (aside). Ah. ha. What's that? Methiuks I smell a rat.THe Spot on Spotl (Loudly). Traitors and villians I command you cease. Already have you marred the spotless front Of yon ler hostel, once our city’s pride. nd now. you thieves, off-scouring of the State, You howl and curse and scream out damned oaths That fright the ladies as they sweetly sleep. Dis| ersc, or I will shoot into the crowd. An egg is throten which breaks al Pinch,'in’s feel and bespatters his clothes. First Sophomore. A s|x t on the spotter of Spotless Town. Pineheni (frothing at the mouth and tearing a pistol) : () cursed devil! Could 1 rightly guess Which one of you has done this dastard deed I'd blow his brains out. Follow me sweet friends. (Foilotocd by two policemen he rushes across the street, seises Tom. Dick and Harry and amid shouts and groans, carries them to the dungeon of Spotless Toun.) Act II. The f olloti-ing day. Seem t. lief ore the court house of Spotless Town. Enter Swallowski and set-era! merchants. Swallowski. (iood friends, dids’t see how in this morning’s Flag. Bombast, the editor, abused and Hayed The students First Merchant. Yes. 1 liked all that lie said; He called the-.. “Elephantine asses, rogues." Town —Continued Said they were for the most part sent to school Because they were too mean to keep at home. Swalloteski. Yes. yes, all that ami much more too. He usd, " hey loaf atom the city streets and stores insult the ladies that are passing by, Shout, curse and fight, ami stop the merchant’s trade.’ First Merchant. What thought you of the statement that lie made. That fifty townsmen, eight professors—all, Hail told him they agreed with what he wrote? Second Merchant. Os. that's a bluff as you yourselves do know. It was a pretty lie—a trick o’ the trade. You merchants know the toys arc gentlemen. They buy your wares and mostly pay their bills. So let them have their little college pranks— Think you that it tohooves a hungry flee That sucks the life Wood from a yellow cur To curse live dog because lie’s not quite clean? Enter Bombast. Bombast (excitedly). Dear friends, sweet friends, I fear I am undone. You know that in this morning’s Flag I said I had the names of fifty merchants who Approved the words I wrote, ft was not true. Now have the students come—the cunning.toasts— And asked me for those names. Swalloteski. What will you dorTHe Spot on Spotless Town—Continued Bombas!. Ju-t this. l.ct each one here say lie ap-proves Ami I'll pretend you said so yesterday. If you do this, right gladly will I give To each a free subscription to the Flag, Free ticket to the opera and nutch more. Second Merchant. Hut if we don't? Bombast. Why then beware of me. !‘!1 call you rascals, thieves, and cheaters, too, And mar your characters la-fore the world. Suvllowski. Then I’ll approve your words. First Merchant. And so will I. Second Merchant. You can not make me aid your crafty ends; I'm with the students for they arc my friends. {Exit Bombast.) Iinter a Student. Student. Attend ye. Swallowski I just have heard That you endorsed ali that this Horn bast says. Xow 'tis well known you earn your daily bread By selling to the students, yet with joy You call them rogues and rascals. ‘Tis not well. And so the students Sent me here to say That if you do not sign a statement here That you do not agree with Bombast's views They'll trade no more with you. What say'st thou now ? Second Merchant. I'll sign it. 'J'hird Merchant. So will I. Fourth Merchant. And I. Fifth Merchant. And I. Swallemvki. My ducats! Oh my free subscription! Woe! Alack mv bread is buttered on both sides. So this solution must I reach— Agree yet disagree with each. {Exeunt omnes.) Scene 3. The Court Room of Spotless Tenon. The Mayor and officials, rising. We are the rulers of Spotless Town The mountains tremble when we frown. X’o spots ti| on our fame you see— It's black already as it can be. .Mayor. I call for order in the court, lie still. Call in the culprits. Colonel Kant, I Iteg. I feel a trifle bad today and hojjc To take my spite on those within my power. Rant. What ho. the prisoners. Pinchem bring them here. Fitter six policemen leading Tom. Dick and Harry chained. Policemen, dancing and singing. We are the cops of Spotless Town. We'll hold you tip or knock you down. To think we walk our Iteats is jest. For we are dcad-lteats, so we rest. Mayor. What crime have these committed. State the case. Pinchem. Your Honor it was 1 who brought them in. They cursed and swore u| on the public streets; Engaged in arson, riot, theft, and fr.v.-d. 210THe Spot on Spotless Town—Continued But chief of all they did with evil hearts Throw eggs at me. a servant of the law. Mayor. O temporal O mores! They so young And yet, withal, to do such heinous deeds. What say you, villians, arc you guilty? Si cak Tow, Dick owl Harry. Sir, we arc innocent as new born Kibes. Mayor. So perjury you'd add to other crimes. Proceed, dear Colonel Rant: take up the case. Call up the witnesses and do all things That 1 may fine them under form of law. Rant. Call up the students who are witnesses. Enter several students, who arc morn. Rant. Were you all present when these prisoners were seized, arrested, and then brought to jail ? Students. We were. Rant. Were they the ones who threw the eggs? Students. Indeed they were not. We will swear to that. Rant. Was any cursing done upon the streets. Or anv threat of violence there made? Students. I.oud threats and awful curses: both we heard. Rant. From whom? Take heed ye speak the truth alone. Students. From Pinchem here. He loudly cursed and swore. ’Twas lie who woke the ladies from their sleep. Mayor. Do not assail the minions of the law Or I will fine you for contempt of court. Rant. Retire now. Kind clerk, call Sambo here. Enter a ragged negro lx y who is steam Rant. Sambo, my honest lad. now tell the court If these arc those who cursed and threw the eggs. 6 who. Dev sholcy is. Rant. How do you know? Did'st sec them do the deed ? Sambo. No. boss, I was not at the place, but still, I know them is the ones what threw the eggs. Rant. How ? Samba. Why once when on the campus I did sneak To try to steal a coat or pair of shoes. They ran me off with rocks and so I know They threw the eggs; leastways they're mean enough. Rant. Your Honor, here we rest our case with you. Mayor. I know 'tis right that I should now allow The prisoners to have their lawyer speak, lint since my mind already is made up That they are guilty I will not do so. (Aside.) Resides I fear my dinner will get cold. Rant. Most gracious, grave, astute, and learned judge. This ease is simple so my speech is short. My argument is this. All S| otless Town Doth live upon the students; that is plain. The merchants, tailors, doctors, grocers—all Do reap a harvest rich from these young men. The city too should get its share of spoil. We soon will build a handsome court house here And 'tis but just the nudents help to pay. The town-ship's coffers arc not Hushed with coin 211THe Spot on Spotless Town—Continued And so 1 beg you in the name of I -aw To fine them just as heavy as you can. Mayor. O. Colonel Rant, your words arc wise and true. In logic you beat Webster—Plato too. Tis just these students should help S|x tless Town To build a court house that will keep them down. I’ll name a sum I think that’s in their reach And line the scoundrels fifty dollars each. h. thus may justice rise on spotless wings If. in our jjockcts. cash she freely flings. Exeunt Students, singing. There is no spot of what is fair. Or right, or just, or honest, here. And so. O, Athens, this renown I-cads men to call thee Spotless Total. (curtain.) —Ellis, 03. mTHE GEORGIA GIRE II. Then let us give a loud hurrah Her cherished name to greet— Her -mile has led to victory, Consoled us in defeat. Her image oft has spurred us on When foes would drive us back— So here's a health to the Georgia Girl Who waves the Red and Black! We've cheered old Georgia’s sturdy sons, We've sung their endless praise, And laurel wreaths we wove for those Who walked the victor's ways. We've honored those who won us fame On platform, field or track— But here's a health to the Georgia Girl Who waves the Red and Black! III. Oh. rich are Georgia's fertile fields And fair arc Georgia’s waters. nd brave arc Georgia's loyal sons— But bc t are Georgia’s daughters. Full well we love our native land, N’o virtue does site lack, But her brightest star is the Georgia Girl Who waves the Red and Black. 213NONSENSE RHYMES A rosy-checked youngster named Tate Looked askance at the food on his plate; Ti$ said his compaction Caused this circums| cctio», nd that nothing to hurt it lie ate. A fastidious dresser named Jaques Said. "By Jove, my heart really aques To see men with riches Wear light-legged bridles When bloomers a good tailor maques.” A Herculean center named Ket Swore Habersham County was wet. For behind every hill Is an illicit still— Which vastly pleased Ket you can bet. A misguided but scholarly brat Studied hard for four years under Pat; He learned nothing of stars Nor of physics or cars, But religion—he surely knew that. Said the self-assured Sopliomore Bower. "He’s a fool who goes out in a shower; But much to our pain He was seen in the rain In less than the half of an hour. 214Nonsense Rhymes—Continued An artful young Schemer named Scott Said. "1 like an election that's hot, I adore | olitic$ And am up to all tricks— Just behold the rich spoils I have got." There's a Club here called "Anthenacum." And its members, you really should sec 'em; They seek not for knowledge, Shoot pool and cut college. 15m the faculty never can tree ’em. A jovial tutor named Steve Once induced the trustee' to believe 1 le was fitted to teach— I tut he's quit that to preach. And few are the students who grieve. A gigantic nrst-baseman named I Waver Said. "In truth 1 am not a deceiver. I think I am great Hut I here and now state. Of that fact I'm the firmest believer. A remarkable linguist named Jones Oft assumes oratorical tones, l ie has great capacity For continued loquacity, Though each hearer in agony groans. 215THE, TRAVELS With Apologies There was otv clad all in red and black who stood within the shadows of the world and blew, so faint, so soft, upon a | i| c. Thin and clear he ble w the reed, and the name of the pii er was Wisdom. Then lo. Of a sudden c a in c forth a Being. Like one in a dream he came, his sig lit half blinded, ami his breath lluttering upon his lips. And he who thus catnc forth into the shadows of a college life was a Freshman. Before his face there lay the twilight of the world of college, ye: could he not stay himself 216 OF A STUDENT to Howard Pyle from coming forth from the Paradise of Idleness, for the piercing sound of that shrill piping drew him thence as though it were by a silver string tied to his heart. And so lie came out into the shadows like one blinded and only half awake. "Come.” said the voice of the pipe, "Come, for I await thee. Come, descend into the cool shadows »nd let me lead thee out into the meadows of asphodel, cor I am Wisdom, and I shall be with thee to the end." Vow Wisdom was clad all in a raiment pied of red and hlack; and the color of the red stood for terror, and the color of the black, it stood for solemnity. So they met in the old grand Hall of Georgia, and one was of the mind and the other of the flesh. Once upon a day Wisdom and the being came to a wide and dewy place where poppies bloomed. The past marches of the living had led him out from the fair fields of the Freshman's joys, and now led him into the new fields—the Sophomore. Now by this time the sun had waxed Itot. so that the birds hardly sang among the leaves and the shady places spread a pleasant coolness. And as the Sophomore walked thoughtfully beside the shining streams of Knowledge, amid the tall damp grasses, pondering the while ui on what further journeying might lie lievond. lo. there came the sound of one playing u|xm silver strings. Thither drew the Sophomore. and saw there one who sat in the shadows of the grass, who struck the quivering chords of a hollow lute. And her smiling face as as shallow and as vacant as theTHe Travels of a empty hue. Ami the name of the one who sat there playing was Pleasure. Then as the Sopltomorc lingered in that place, there suddenly came one as tliough out of the sunlight and stood beside him. Hut, !o. he could not see her but he knew this lscing was there. And whence she came the Sophomore knew not. vet she brought with her a radiance tltat only till now he had well-nigh forgotten. And on her coming his heart dissolved into a divine and luminous joy: for she was a great enchantress, and her name was Ix ve. So these two creatures stood together and the earth ami the sky melted into one golden pool of joy. "Surely," said the Sophomore unto himself, "this is why I came hither into this college world." And so he stood wrapped with happiness. Hut ever as the Sophomore and Love stood together, there sounded the ringing of those trembling strings that Pleasure struck; and ever through all there pierced the faint, thin piping of that other player —Wisdom. The thrilling Sophomore whispered, tremblingly, "Oh. who art thou bright and winged l cing?" And she answered. “I am I.ove and those meadows are mv abiding place.” Now after these pleasant meadow-!aml$. there came other places wherein the soul must travel. Some of these were hard and rugged and covered over with hard sharp stones, and others led unto lofty altitudes whereunto the l cing must climb with utter striving and endeavor, but which, achieved, lo. great sjwtces and wide lay spread Ik - Student-Continued fore him, as it were a pros| cct of infinitude. This being was no longer a Sophomore, but is now a Junior. Then were the great and solemn forests, and hollow beautiful valleys wherein he might pause to rest himself awhile and. lo, anon—climbing high, anon—descending low, the Junior continued his journey he knew not whither. Now, after a groat while of this traveling, there lay be fore him a dark and dreadful valley, ami this was the valley of the Shadow of Shadows—the valley of Mathematics. And the Junior would fain have avoided this valley, but vet he could no:, for thitherward lay his path, and there was no other. Then he cried out to Wisdom and said. “Must 1 pass through this valley of dreadful shadows? And canst thou not save me from this?" Hut Wisdom spake not. but only piped, and he saw that there was no answer from him to be given. So he entered the valley, and so great was the darkness that appeared to him that he had entirely lost his way. Yet did lie still toil along the beaten path where so many others had traveled before he had come thither. Then from a narrow way there came behind him one all clad in black, and that was Grief. And Grief offered him a cup. and said: “Drink of this." And the Junior said: “Alas. I am not athirst for that drink.” But Grief Only said: "Drink of this." and there was no escape. And so the Junior took the cup and drank. And the bitterness of the draught entered into his very heart, so that 217THe Travels of a lie nearly fainted from the sickness of it, and had to sit ujx n the way for a long time. And ever Wisdom piped, and he sat and listened, weeping to his piping. And so, at last, the weary being reached nearly to the end of that dreadful valley, and he continually cried to himself: “Oh, that I could reach the end of this.'' Then the end wa there for he was now a Senior. 11c traveled and lo. before him was a great door as if a sheepskin ha«l barred the way. and four flat steps of stone, led upward to the door, on these steps was written: “Mathematics. History. Languages, Science.” “Alas." cried the fainting Senior, “Whither now shall I go? For I can not go forward, neither can 1 return the way whence I came.” Then spake Wisdom for tlie first time for all that journey: "Am not I thy traveling companion? I.o. now 1 will give thee aid.” Then he reached forth his hand and grasj cd the door and wrestled with it to oj en it. and it strove to resist him. and still he wrestled with it until, at last, he wrenched it violently open. Tlien— Oh wonder. There gushed forth a great and Student—Continued blinding light of that same radiant paradise that he had quitted so long ago to enter into the shadows of this new world. And to his ears came the myriad sounds of multitudinous voices of all tliosc beings who had entered therein before his coming. And «o they rejoiced with great drinking of wines, and with great welcomes, at the Alumni banquet, and bade him enter, for that his travels had ended. And Wisdom said to the traveller: "Am not I thy friend? Lo. Thou hast traveled with me long and far, and now thy journey is ended. Only now thou takest with thee into thy worldly home tiic seeds of college things which shall some times burst forth into the perfect fruit of worldly achievements. Except for this journey. where wouldst thou have gathered those «ecds? Behold me. oh student. I am Wisdom—I am your friend—I am Israfed." Then the student looked up into the face of his travelling companion, and lo, his face was the face of a dark and beautiful angel which be l chcld. nd around his head and upon his solemn brow there hung the circle of the halo, and that halo was the halo of the dawning day. Leo Hudson. 218THE. STORY OF A MODERN HORATIUS IN THE LINE Being A Lay Made About the Year of University CVIII II. Before his valiant baud set out One parting cheer was given: "Go forth, go forth, brave Aulninntes; Go forth, beloved of Heaven; Cio, and return in glory To this, your native land; And hang upon your walls the flag Ye tear from Georgia's hand.” I. The Captain of the Auburn host By the nine Gods lie swore. That the fame of Alabama Should suffer wrong no more. By the nine Gods lie swore it. And named a trysting day And bade his men to practise well From rise of sun till darkness fell I'pon their proud array. III. . And now hath every city Sent up her talc of men; The grand-stand held six thousand. The grounds held hundreds ten. U] on the field of Piedmont Is met the great array, A proud man was Captain Ridley ’ I'l on Thanksgiving Day. 210THe Modern Horatius in the Line—Continued IV. The Georgia team stood cool and calm And looked upon their foes. Wliilc great wild yells of victory From all the grand-stand rose. And plainly and more plainly. Above the surging line, Now might ye sec the pennants Of six thousand Georgians shine. V. But the coach’s heart was firm, And the Captain's speech was low. And darkly looked he at the crowd, And darkly at the foe. "Their backs will work great havoc, For my men are sore and lame, And if they once may break our line What hope to win the game?” VI. Then out spake Harold Ketron, A man to danger steeled: "Fach player here must, once at least, Be carried from the field. And how can man fall better Than bucking men of weight. For the honor of his college. And the glory of his State ? VII. “Line up the team, brave Captain, With all the speed ye may; I, with two more to help me, The center line will play. For thus a whole eleven May well be stopped by three, Now who will stand on either ban And keep the line with n c?’’ 220A Modern Horatius in the Line—Continued VIII. Then out spake Sandy Beaver An Augustain, proud was lie: “l.o, I will stand at thy right hand, And keep the line with thee.’ And out sj okc Freshman Willingham; Of rural blood was lie: 'I will abide on thy left side, And keep the line with thee." IX. I hit now no sound of shouting Was heard among the foes. A low and muffled murmur From all the grand-stand rose. Three feet from Georgia’s steady line Malted the Auburn array. At last the signal's given And Auburn starts the play. X. Then with a crash like thundci, Down came the Auburn team, Hut like a dam the Georgia men Lay right across the stream. The wearers of the Blue and Gold Used strength an I tactics fine. But never on Thanksgiving I Jay-Broke they the Georgia line. 221The Modern Horatius in the Line—Continued XI. Then none were for a party; And all were for the State; The swift ends helped the tackles. Tackles helped the center great The backs were swift in action. And the quarter licet and fast, The brave line oft charged forward To check the rushing mass. XII. Nrow twice the long sought Auburn goal The steady Georgians gain— The grand-stand rose like sonic mad sea !3cat on by wind and rain. Hurrah! the game is over. Ho' students, cheer your best, I'or pride holds fast each Georgia heart, Sad is each Auburn breast. XIII. But oft in nights of winter When the cold north winds blow. And we sit in meditation Of the days of long ago. We ll speak of college lays and deeds, And then with hearts aflame. We’ll tell again how Georgia v.on That great Thanksgiving game. —J. D. B.ON PROBATION (After Browning He turned the pages of the lxx k. One moment’s space in thought lie took — 1 Jrief time—yet all my world stood still In Iiojk, yet fear, to know his will. With three long months in the balance: no! So small the word, vet weightier ihav Thau king's decree or papal vow. I'd ho|icd. and hoping was for nauglu; I'd strived, and striving only brought Save that alone, which striving sought My Rise? The answer sj okci»—Low. —Warkkkn P,. Parks. INCONSTANCY She tells the pctaled points of Fite With certain count—"He loves m- — lie loves me not—lie loved me—oh! One | etal more. You can't be Right. False rtow'r, he told me so Just Yesterday. Fie! voiceless prate She did not know one petal lay Where it had fallen hut to-day. a 23 —Wakkken D. Pakks.GIRL: What arc those goats doing? STl DENT : They are not goats. They are Captain Ket-• ron and his squad of football players practicing for next fall. 224 T lie Sunday morning breakfast of the student.A TRINITY i. The Master wrought from soulles' dcR'ri sam!s Three crystal vases rich and rare gleam with mingle l pearl and ruby binds, All marvelously fair. 2. Full lK-autiful were the : an art divine. With hojies that here its toil might c.atc, Had shaped them that forever they might shine Its crowning master-piece. 3- Alike they seemed to clouded human sight And yet they differed each from each As do the rushing billows, crested, white, Upon San I’abloa’s beach. 4- One lacked the lasting element of Soul. Another lacked the gift of Mind, The third lacked Strength, in neither were the whole Great Trinity combined. 5- Then on a pedestal the Master laid Each crystal vase, stilled Nature’s strife, And on the violin of Fate he played The Symphony of Life. 6. First fell upon the pcrfumc-Iadencd air A fairy prelude, wond’rous sweet. With children’s laughter ringing free and clear, And dance of Ixiby feet. 7- When. lo. there floated from each crystal throat The cadence oi a Summer sea That seemed to voice a sympathetic note Of kindred melody. 3. The magic music, changing, softly passed To song of Springtime and of love, And then it sang of strife and toil, and last Of wisdom, throned above. 225A Trinity 9- l'.nt when, as in Hespe rides. the sj cll Of love was felt, all hitter sweet. A tall fair vase with discord rang and fell Beneath the Master’s feet. 10. And then as patient toiling hope, and care Were pictured by that mystic sound Another crystal, sighing with despair. Fell shattered to the ground. 11. At last an anthem told of thoughts that led To portals of the dawning day— The sole remaining vessel shrieked and sped To where its fellows lay. -Continued 12. The Master wept, and weeping gathered there _ ' The glistening fragments: lo, with them He wrought a crystal vase more wondrous fair Than night's gold diadem. x3- Again the violin of Fate was brought To play the Symphony of Life. It sang the song of love, the song of tl»ought. And last the song of strife. 14- Hut though it murmured low or shrieked aloud, Or told of joy or grief to he, « The vase with that great Trinity endowed Echoed in harmony. —Framptox E. Ei.i.is. •226TO MY LOVE How weary drags the murky nig.t. How fraught with sorrow wears the day, Since thou, my love, my sole delight Hast gone thy solitary way. Since thou has sought thy endless rest, How oft. my love, in fancy free, My lips to thine in rapture press’t, I sit and dream, and dream of thee. And often comes the incense faint Of thy sweet breath, to ease my woe And builds with fancy's airy paint Fond pictures of the long ago. Perchance some day I too shall sleep And find sonic gentle hand to wipe The tears for thee, for thee 1 weep. My pungent, nut-brown, meerschaum pipe. —C. D. R. WHEN LOVE CHEERED When days were dark, all gloom, sweetheart, for me. And joys swamped by a flooding tide of tears. There was no light save of thv own sweet face, Thy faith one isle within the sea of fears. And now when light has dawned, its radiance seems Drawn from the heavenly smile you beam on me— The dark forever gone and in its place A glorious paradise on earth with thee. — V. Ik Parks. 227FRESHMEN AS SEEN Since man's evolution from "the wild state." lie has suffered most dianicful outrages at the hands of some of his fellow-beings, commonly known as scientists. He has actually seen himself classified with a species of animals that stand beyond any theory of evolution, on account of possessing traits of every known living creature, from the highest to the lowest tyjH . This class of animals is always found in some college town, and i- l est known to the public as "the Freshman." Who these beasts are. no one knows. What they are. none can do more than conjecture: and where they come from, is a matter of mere speculation. However. they are short-lived, living usually aliout nine months, and from all indications sjrcud their short lives in a ir.etair.orphislic state. Some think they l e!ong to the man kingdom, regardless of many peculiarities that go to prove otherwise. In that the hair of some of them grows vertically, they greatly resemble brutes and Africans. In Ireing very great barkers and WH C ? 2 BY A SOPHOMORE, little biters. they show traces of the canine family, while very striking assininc qualities arc exhibited in their braving propensities. It seeius that the most reasonable conjecture as to their origin is that they arc hybrids between some peculiar species of the canine and assininc families. Only one trait in common with man do they jtosscss—the habit of wearing clothes. While these Freshmen are odious in the extreme, they arc indisi cnsab!e to the success oi a college. But. like the Irishman's horse that died before getting used to living without food, a college with nothing but Freshmen would soon see its finish. t the I "niversity this set of beasts i almost always very conspicuous, and es| ccially so in the case of the present class. All Freshmen show some verdant qualities, but of all the "green" Ixrings that have ever been known the "Rix. Rax. Rix!" fellows cap the climax. For the first time in the history of the University have fines been imposed by this crowd tqxm those who fail to attend class meetings: and. to the astonishment of every other college l oy, some of them arc actually simple enough to pay their fines. May they ever flourish as living examples of that which is to ! c guarded against by all civilized jieople. 28SOPHOMORES AS S “Hello, Freshic: back to the nursery!” “Look at the Freshman!" etc. These were the cries that greeted the authors of these expressions, really were. They consisted princqially of cigarette, month, badges of various descriptions, and were l earing for the first time the fascinating and awe-inspiring title of Sophomore. In short, they were the “men” that had been there before; the “Johnnie Wise," who. in the limited period of nine months, had mastered every phase of human knowledge. from the Copemican theory to the art of chewing a little tobacco without getting very sick; itt other words, the "more verdant Freshmen left over from last year.” During the few days that intervened between the arrival of the students and the formal opening of college, the "young” and "ignorant" Freshman was horror-stricken by hair-raising and blood-curding accounts of the punishment f men that, resolving to imbibe deeper into the crystal waters of knowledge. had arrived for the first time at its fountain head, the University. It was quite difficult, at first, to ascertain what the portions of portable anatomy, the EEN BY A FRESHMAN they were to receive at the hands of the 1 lurculcan Sophomores. One night about forty of the latter even went so far as to catch two of the.se miserable little representatives of '06 and, with a reckless bravado and Napoleonic fearlessness, compelled them to “run the gauntlet”: then, remembering their motto, that "Discretion is the lx ttcr part of valor." hastily dispersed, fearing that the younger boys might decide to resent this gallant onslaught. Whenever a word battle would occur, the Sophomore-would always bear away the laurel of victory. Especially was this true when they were under the leadership of a noted hot-air commander, who takes his official title from a famous Philippine chieftain, who bears a remarkable physical likeness to him, and who has many of his characteristics. In the meantime, the younger had held a meeting undisturbed, elected their officers and made their preparations for a trip over the city by night, expecting to meet with serious opposition. They formed at an appointed place, marched to the campus, and met the enemy, who lied at the first fire, leaving them masters of the situation, a clear case of “Vcni. Yidi. Yici.” In vain they looked for the fierce Talmadgc. the dauntless Aggie, the irresistible Atkinson, the dare-devil Kugland. the unapproachable Marshburn and the daring Bower, but they had "folded their tents like the Arab and silently stolen away.” One sunny day they rallied, mustered their courage and 229Sophomore as Seen by a Freshman—Continued made a vain attempt to break up a class-meeting, only avoiding total annihilation by the timely arrival of a member of the faculty. Resolving to make one more des|X'rate attempt to regain a l art of their lost reputation, they made extensive plans for breaking up the annual banquet of the Freshman class. Hut, with a small struggle and a few disguises, the meml ers of the latter class were able to keep their ap|X)intmcnts, without an exception, and. while enjoying the feast of eloquence and other more substantial effects, were entertained by the disgruntled exclamations that came to them from the outwitted lookers-on in the street below. When the time came for the Sophomore celebration the Naughty Six ('lass did no: wish to disperse those memorial exercises, for such indeed they were: but simply to teach sonic of them a lesson in patience. So they gave three of the memlxTS of that august body, including their acknowledged leader, of shoc-shinc fame, a delightful walk, which lasted until the holy hour of midnight, when these unfortunates were glad to retire to the lutsks, with a "Never again" upon their ashen lips. Having suffered disastrous defeats upon the field of I Kittle, these living hard-luck stories turned to athletics as a last resort. It seems that "fortune favors the brave.” for in both the cla-hes of the gridiron and-the contests on the diamond the Sophomore emblem went down in defeat. ”1 hev succeeded in winning the running events, which is |Krfcctlv natural when you take into consideration the ability and the inclination of the Sophomore to run at every provocation. This class enjoys the distinction of 1 icing defeated by Ixith its predecessors and successors, for scarcely had the deep tones of "Hey Reuben, Rah!" died on their cars before the crash of ’Rix. Rax. Rix!" struck terror to their hearts. 230MIZPAH The parting of our ways at last so near; The delta of the stream whereon we glide; The unseen shedding of a parting tear, The mute farewell till on the other side. Accept from me this Mizpah-token gift, While Fortune holds the chalice of the years, To let us sip our portions, bitter-sweet. With friendship’s smiles or parting's saddest tears. 231 —Luciex Goodrich.WHAT THE POSTMAN MIGHT HAVE READ A COLLEGE ROMANCE Exhibit A. (John Haskell to Margaret Edwards.) University of Georgia, September 26. 1902. Dkak Miss Edwards: How much I appreciate your consenting to corrcs| oml with me 1 can not. even in the slightest degree, express. I really felt a great deal of embarrassment in asking you to write, as we had merely gone through the "informality" of an Institute introduction. My only defense is this— that circumstances alter cases, ami that when they coop you girls up and never let you see a boy. then we are at liberty to use any means we can to meet you. Of course 1 remember meeting your room-mate. Miss Helen Andrews. She was walking with you when 1 was introduced (at long distance), and you know I could never forget anything with which you were connected. Yes. I think she is rather good looking, but I never eared for such decided blondes—brunettes are more to unliking. I will send the Fraternity pin up to-morrow. You don’t know how happy it made me when you promised to wear it "for my sake." and not because it represented the best fraternity in the State. Hoping to see you at ’cS|kts on Sunday, I remain. Your friend. John Haskkli.. Exhibit B. (Margaret Edwards to John Haskell.) L.. C. I.. Saturday Night. Mv Dkau Mr. Haskki.i.: The Frat. pin and the candy were received this morning. It was so sweet in you to send it. 'Hie pin is K. G. I have it on now. and as for the candy—well, my roommate and I have just finished the last scrap. I am really foolish about the pin. and will wear it whenever I get a chance, but you know it’s twenty-five demerits to be caught with one, so you must not get mad if you don’t always see it on me. By the way. Helen (she’s my room-mate, you remember) knows your sister. They were at Cumberland Island together last ummcr and. Helen says, were real good churns. She. Helen I mean, has up a "ease" with Harry Jervv. Do you know him. He is a Sophomore. 1 think. Helen says he is a grand dancer, and I am just ‘lying to meet him. 1 was crazy to S| eak to you in the cafe this afternoon.WHat the Postman Mig'h but Miss De Merit was looking right at me so I couldn't. Let me hear from you soon. Yours very sincerely. Makcakkt Eowariis. Exhibit C. (John Haskell to Margaret Edwards.) I'nivcrsity of Georgia. October 15. 1902. My Dkak Makcakkt: I haven’t heard from you in over a week. What in the name of goodness is the matter? If I have offended you in any way. please let me know and I will apologize or explain, as the case may Ik. Yon didn't think I saw you flirting with that fellow Jervv at Vespers Sunday, but I did. Why do you persist in going on so when you know I can't tolerate him? Of course you will say that all of the other fellows like him. but that has nothing to do with the matter. believe he is a sneak and a coward and if I were the coach I'd fire hint from the team l cfore lie gets a chance to give the signals away. However, dear. I will not quarrel with you. ami if you say you care for me I will believe you and let Jervv and the rest go to the D—I if they want to. Write soon, and be sure to smile at me on Sunday. By the way. how about that photograph you have been promising me for so long? I'm beginning to believe that t Have Read—Continued von don't want to send it. H you only knew how much I want it you would send it out of pity—if for no other reason. Yours as ever, John. Exiiii-.it IX (Margaret Edwards to Joint Haskell.) L.-C. I., Monday. Mv Deakkst John : Why didn't you come to Vespers yesterday? 1 dressed up in mv finest and saved my sweetest smile for you. but you evidently did not think enough of me to come for it. Now you must he real good and not miss another Sunday and 1 will forgive you. Mr. Jervv was there, sitting on tltc front row as usual, but I did not even speak to him— so there! Susie Burbank's brother told Iter that the coach is going to let you play in the Auburn game Thanksgiving Day. I was so proud of you that I just hugged Sue when she told me. I knew all along, though, that you could get the place if you tried. John, dear, please don't ask me for that picture again. In the first place 1 have none ami then besides 1 have a special reason for not wanting you to have one now. 1 can't explain this time but 1 will some day and then you will understand. With lots of love, Yours. Marcakkt. P. S.—Don't forget to come to Ycsjiers Sunday. M.WHat the Postman Might Exhibit E. (Jolm Haskell to Margaret Edwards.) University of Georgia. November u. igos. Dkarfst : ! can scarcely 1 elievc that in less than two weeks I ant to see you and talk to you. It seems strange, doesn't it. that I love you. although I have never heard the sound of vour voice or l een with you alone—even for a moment. And yet after all it is not so strange. I see you often, even though from a distance, and your letters, though they seem ages apart, arc frequent enough to make me certain that you love me. You may rest assured that I will be at the train on Friday week, and if you have no objection will ride down as far as Union Point with you. I can hardly wait for the time to come. The very thought of sitting bv your side and talking to you give- me such pleasure that—but I must try to wait till I see you before I tell you all that I think. lie sure to get to Atlanta in time for the Auburn game, as I want you to wear our colors. It will certainly help me to do my best if I know the dearest, sweetest girl in the world is cheering me on. Hoping to sec you on the twenty-first and to tell you what I have so often written—how much I love you—I remain Yours devotedly. John. Have Read-Continued Exhibit E. (John Haskell to his Sister.) University of Georgia. November 14. 1902. Mv Dear Sister: You could not imagine, if you tried, what a monumental ass 1 have made of myself, or what an awful mess 1 have gotten into. You remember 1 wrote you that I was in love with a beautiful brunette named Margaret Edwards and that her room-mate, Helen Andrews is a decided blonde. Well, you see. I met them by the Institute introduction—that is from across the street—and never had a chance to talk to them. Now what do you think I did: When 1 was introduced to them. I got the two girls mixed and have just found out to-day that Miss Andrews is the brunette and Miss Edwards is the blonde! What in the name oi goodness am I to do? 1 really like Miss Andrews and here for the past two months I have been making the most de-| erate love to Miss Edwards. Hut by far the worse jiart of it is this— Miss Edwards, through our letters, has fallen in love with MIC. The only thing I can see to do is to write her a letter and tel! her I am afraid I acted somewhat too hastily in saying I loved her. I really want to let her down as easy as possible. If you have any good advice send it at once to your afflicted brother, » John . 231WHat the Postman Might Have Read—Continued Exhibit G. (John Haskell to Margaret Edwards.) University of Georgia, November 14. 1902. My Dear Miss Edwards: You will probably be surprised at receiving a letter such as this from me. es|xciallv as it follows one of so different a nature. Hut I have lnsen thinking over the matter for some time and have come to the conclusion that you and 1 arc mistaken in believing that we care for each other— at least so far as love is concerned. Do you realize that in fact we do not even know each other? A few letters and a little romance have put the idea in our brains, not in our hearts, and 1 am sure that the sooner we dispel the illusion the better it will lx- for us both. 1 sincerely hope you do not think I would intentionally wound your feelings, but I see where we have let our fancies mislead us and know you will agree with me in thinking it better to stop before we go too far. I regret very much to say that the coach has increased the hours for practice and that therefore I can not get to sec you at the train on the twenty-first. Hoping to really meet you at some future time and that we may then be the best of friends. I remain Yours very truly, John Haskf.i.i.. Exhibit H. (Margaret Edwards to John Haskell.) L. C. I.. November 15. 1902. Dear Mr. Haskf.i.i.: I received your note this morning and will answer it at once. That I was surprised at its contents I hardly need state, but 1 agree with you fully iit thinking it l est to drop our correspondence atid. what seems to have been merely a source of amusement to you—our friendly relations. Had 1 known your true character you may rest assured that they would both have ceased long ago. As soon as I can get a messenger 1 will return your Fraternity pin and letters as the first is no longer of use to me and the second serves only to take up valuable space in niv desk. Of course I shall not expect to sec you at the train. I wouldn’t for worlds keep you from your much needed practice and then too. Mr. Jcrvv ha asked to accompany me so your place will lx well filled. Thanking you for your kindness in telling me your thoughts so frankly and assuring you that your letter was read with feelings of unmixed pleasure. 1 am. Yours very sincerely, Margaret IX Edwards. 21oWhat the Postman MigHt Exhibit I. (Received l v John Haskell. November 21, at 3:30 p. in.) L. C I., Friday morning. Dkak Mr. Haskkli.: You will doubtless l c very much surprise ! at receiving another letter from me, but as you said, circumstances alter cases, and I now feel that I owe you an explanation —one that I would have made before but for the rudeness of your last letter. Your sister, who is a friend of mine, has forwarded to me a letter which you wrote her on Friday. In it you said that you had gotten Miss fiduurds and Miss Andreas mixed and that it was really Miss Andrews, the brunette, with whom you were in love. That statement is the cause of this explanation and I now forgive you as f see it was only a kind attempt on your part to "let me down easy.” The truth of the matter is simply this: I. who have been writing to you for so long, am in reality Helen Andrews and not Margaret Edwards. When you were introduced to us you got us mixed. We soon found that out for in your first letter, addressed to Margaret, you spoke of ''her beautiful brown eyes." Now as Margaret has light blue eyes she knew the letter was meant for me and 1 answered it, using her name for a joke. So the thing went on and you continued to write to me as Margaret Edwards and I to reply over her name. I intended to explain the matter as soon as I saw you but 2-W Have Read—Continued your finding out that Margaret was a blonde and thinking that you had been making love to her. upset it all. I hope this explanation is clear enough—at least it is as plain as I can make it. I am very sorry that you can not go down on the four o'clock train this afternoon as 1 have written to Mr. Jcrvy asking hint not to come and I am afraid I will be awfully lonely. Sincerely .yours, IIrlkx Andrews, (alias) Makraket Edwards. P. S.—Margaret sends her love and says that even if you don't like blue eyes, still site is going to set her cap for you. Helen. Exhibit J. (Note found by John’s room-mate Nov. 21, at 5 p. in.) Dear Bill—I leave for L'nion Point on tlic four o'clock train. Have just found out tliat Helen Andrews is really my brown-eyed beauty and that she has been writing all the time under the name of Margaret Edwards. Borrowed your suit-case, frat-pin. and the ten dollars I had of yours. Tell the Chancellor that inv uncle, grandmother, or somebody is dead and that they telegraphed me to com home. Will appreciate it greatly. Yours in haste. John. —Ellis 03. (The End.)MOTHER. GOOSE RHYMES For College Men I. A Freshman smart Has lost his heart And don't know where to find it: He let it stray Commencement JJay Vith a Miss who would not mind it. : i. Now Fresh, so smart Just mind our heart I'nless you wish to grieve it For my dear boy With maiden coy Is never a place to leave it. Sing a song of syrup (eat it if you can), Four and twenty biscuits baked in a pan. When the pan was opened, bread began to flee. Where they all have gone to, ask of Reynolds, D. Sec-saw, don't tell Paw, I sold inv books against the law, With the money I did buy Cigarettes upon the sly. 1 had a little pony whose name was Livy-Jack, I loaned him to an "honor-man" who said he'd bring him back. He made me get a “goose-egg,” while he shot him tor a "to,” And I'll not lend my Jack again for all your “honor-men." A poor little laddie once sent to his daddy To trv to get some fin. His father said "Pshaw." and so did his maw. Now don’t you think that was a sin? 237Mother Goose Rhymes -Continued There was a young man had a cheque. He dallied with fortune—her beque Lc l him into mishaps I 'or he gambled on craps And got it right square in the neque "Baby'’ and "Poppy" were two pretty men They lay in bed 'til the clock struck teii, When up jumped "I5al y" and looked at the sk "My gracious, 'Poppy.' the sun's mighty high. I will clean up the bottles and bag While you get over that terrible jag.” Hey didlc didlc Jack Bower and Myddle- Ton. Frank's ball jumped over the fence. The Georgia liovs laughed to see such sport. Ran away with the Tech student's pence.UNCERTAIN MAXIMS OF HAFIZ A'ot by Rudyard Kipling. I If the algebra problem be long, or the Latin is hard to translate, And voitr brain is likely to burst with pain and the hour is late, My son. use a key or a jack if one can l c found on your shelves Nor carp upon honor or right—for the faculty use them, themselves. II. If he say he is young and unskillful, but will play thee for shekels of gold: Take heed, mv son. and flee from him. lest you be the kid to lx1 sold. III. I li‘ter we not for bursaii? So when the mind is vext. The pain of a single deficient is drowned in the pain of the next. A IV. As the thriftless gold of the babul, so is the gold that we spend Oil a game of pool, or a "show-down." or the cash that we lend to a friend. V. If he has told thee he gambled, remember thv lips arc scaled. And the Hrnnd of the Dog is upon him. by whom is the secret revealed. If he walked on the streets, being drunken, deny it is true to the end. Tor some day in that fix he may see you. and you'll rest in need of a friend. If the faculty think to exjicl him. and a lie of the blackest can clear. Lie. while thy lips can move, or a man is alive to hear. 2 9Uncertain Maxims of Hafiz—Continued VI. The ways of a man with a maid be strange, vet simple and tame To the ways of a man with a teacher, when lie is bootlicking the same. VII. If an Athens maiden shall work thee for candy, theatres, and more, And tell thee that no other student has she ever loved dearly before— I.et out! She knows you're a Freshman and decidedly lacking in love. VIII. If he say, “Lend me five," and promise it will on the mor- row be paid. And assert that his check is now coming, my son, be thou nowise afraid. In vain in the sight of the Bird is the net of the Fowler displayed. IX. If He greet you with smites and a welcome, at His office in old Science Hall, And say that He’s happy to sec you, and hopes that some day you will call, Take heed for He doubtless about you is engaged in some speculation, And the next time He smiles with such grace, it’s either ■'Good-bye” or "Probation.’' My son. if I. Hafiz, thy father, take hold of thy knees in my pain, And ask you to write for the Georgian, or Pandora—I know you'll refrain, For your hours of leisure arc sweet, and you wear not the Editor's chain.LETTERS FROM The most interesting customs in these clays of advance and progress arc tliosc which have fallen into disuse, and all records which are relies of the past arc esteemed and honored, both on account of their age and the stories that they tell. mong the many interesting customs of the Literary Socictie' of the University. that one practised in the long ago. the election of honorary members, stands foremost. It has a page to itself, it has a history of its own. and this page, this history, for the first time in many years is now opened to the eyes of University readers. Here there arc letters from the most famous men of Georgia who have graduated from the University, and going out from her walls have made great names for themselves in the State, performing immense services to their people and consequently increasing the fame and the glory of their lma Mater: here arc letters from honorary members accepting the membership offered them and pledging themselves to aid the societies in wliatcver way they were able, from such men as Washington Irving. Paul Haynes. Governor Pickens. President Van Buren. Henry ( lay. Richard Malcolm Johnston. Gilmore Sims, and W. I.. Vaneev. These and many others, unfortunately lost, accepted membership in Dcinosthenian. and their letters still exist. In 1839 Washington Irving was offered membership in Dcinosthenian and accepted in a pleasing letter. No introduction is needed for this far-famed and well known author, the creator of Rip Van Winkle. 24 FAMOUS MEN New York, March 23d, 1S39. ' ENTi.F.MKx—-1 have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter informing me of my election as honorary member of Dcinostltcnian Society. 1 lx-g you to assure the Society of the very grateful feelings with which I receive this flattering mark o'f their good opinion, and to accept on your own pan my sincere thanks for the very kind expressions with which you have accompanied the intelligence. Very respectfully gentlemen. Your V. servant; Washington Irvixc. Robert Toombs, a member of the Phi Kappa Literary Society, writes in the following manner to the Demos-thenian Society in reply to an invitation to deliver the literary address at the next commencement: Washington. Ga„ Feb. 7. 1870. I)e k StK—Your favor of the 22 l instant, informing nte of my election by the Dcinostltcnian Society as the "Literary Orator" for next commencement has beet! duly received. 1 would accept the appointment with great pleasure, but there i a considerable probability that my engagements may take me out of the State at that time, hence as there should Ik- no uncertainty in a matter so interesting to the Society, 1 am compelled on their account solely to decline it. Please return my sinccrcst thanks to the Society for their honor ami many other evidences of good will which it has hitherto shown me. and assure it of my unabated interest in its prosperity and its welfare. Please accept yourself my thanks for the kind manner in which you have communicated to me the wishes of the Society. I am very respectfully and truly vonrs. R. Toomiis. ILetters From Famous Men—Continued A letter was received from General Lee accepting mem-bership in the same Society, but unfortunately the letter of this great leader of the Lost Cause has been lost or lest roved. Besides this letter of General Lee, letters were received from O'Hara, author of the "Bivouac of the Dead.” from John Calhoun, from Jefferson Davis, and Alexander Stephens. These have also been lost or mislaid. In the societies in these days politic played an important part. Naturally under such circumstances the minds of the students turned to politics of a broader kind, leading them to offer meml crship in their societies to men high in political life. This is best illustrated by two letters from Presidents of the United States. Andrew Johnson and Martin Vail IJnrcn. accepting membership. Washington City. June 4. i860. Mr. H. W’kli s—Your letter of the 29th instant, informing me of my election as an honorary member of Demos-thenian Society of the University of Georgia, has been received and in accepting the membership. I tend you my most sincere thanks for the honor conferred. Accept assurances of regard, etc. Axdkf.w Johnson. Washington. May 6. 1839. Gkntf.mf.x—I have received your letter of the------ April informing me of my election as an honorary member of Dcmosthenian Society. Be pleased to convey to the members of the Society my thanks for the lionor conferred bv them, with Inrst wishes for the success of their institution and for their own welfare. Accept for yourselves assurances of the reflect with which 1 am. gentlemen, your obedient servant. M. Van TU rkx. The only record of Alexander Stephens, outside of the minutes, is found in a letter to the Dcmosthenian Society concerning the I-'orensic lel atc. The letter is written by a committee from Phi Kappa, of which Stephens was one. In the early history of the two societies there was a great deal of rivalry l etwccn them and relations were of the ultra formal kind. There was a lioundary line between the two societies, made by a treaty between the two societies. and no member of eillter society could cross this line while either society was itolding a meeting. A manlier of Dcmosthenian broke this rule and on being icportcd to Phi Kappa wrote a personal letter to the society, alleging that he was the victim of spite, since his reporter was a personal enemy. An extract from Phi Kapjia's indignant letter to Dcmosthenian regarding this letter is as follows: "1. It was an insult upon the whole body to whom it was addressed. "2. A departure from established custom and a total disregard for the general spirit of the treaty which is to preserve order. | eacc and friendship between the two societies. "3. lie charges the | crson who reported him of having done it through a revengeful spirit of retaliation, or calumny, or defamation." There is no doubt of the fact that Ben Hill was a Dcmosthenian and also a very loyal one. interested always in its welfare. We have in the old IVmosthenian records letter after letter from him on different subjects, and of course many others are lost. One of them is as follows: LaGrange. Ga.. July ti. 1857. Df.ar Sir—I have received your letter of the 29th here in lieltalf of the Dcmosthenian Societv. It was received here when I was absent or it would have 242Letters From Famous Men-Continued been answered sooner. Retaining to ibis day a deep feeling in all that concerns our good old Deinostlicnian. and feeling that her calls on her honorary members ought to he regarded. I accept the position of honorary president at the ensuing commencement the 5th of August. I’lease tender to the Society my heartfelt wishes for its continued prosperity. Yours very truly. IV H. Him.. The interest that the whole world felt in the meteoric career of that great young American statesman, whose advice in American affairs was always timely. Henry Clay, was shared hv the University, in so far that he was tendered honorary mcinl crship in Demostheniau. His letter in acceptance is as follows: Washington. March 30. 183$. Gkvti.kmkn—I have received your honor of the 17th instant, communicating my apjioimiiieiit as an honorary member of the Demostheniau Society of Franklin College. I request you to assure the Society that I am highly sensible of the distinguished honor it lias conferred upon me ami that I accept the ap] ointiiicnt with the greatest pleasure. I do not know that 1 can do anything to contribute to its success, more than to tender, as I do most sincerely, my fervent wishes for its prosperity ami for the welfare and fame of its individual members. I am. gentlemen, with great resjicct. your friend and olicdicnt servant. H. Ci- v. The students' appreciation of poetry finds expression in the bestowal of a similar honor ujion William Cullen P.rv- ant. t the time lie was made an honorary incmlier of the society, lie was at the height of his fame, his great poem "Thanatopsis" having gained for him a national reputation and a | coplc's love. In fitting terms lie accepted the membership proffered him by old Doiuosthenian. Frequently communications were received from the faculty in regard to certain matters, in which the professors had a hand. Generally these communications referred to commencement speakers, the faculty generally nominating a number of men for jiositions, and the society choosing from among them. Two of these letters are still extant, one from John I-eCoiitc, the famous Georgia scientist, and another from Professor McCoy, whose history is even more interesting. He was the Professor of Mathematics and was always interested in mathematical problems, csjiecially iho-c concerning and dealing with comjiound interest. So when he died lie left to the University the sum of $20,000 tinder tlu-sc conditions; it was to be invested in Stale bonds and was not to be touched until twenty years after the death of his grandchildren: during this time the interest was to be coiii|X)unded and invested in lxmds. He calculated that one hundred years at least would pass away before the sum would become available, bv which time it would have reached a total of one million dollars. Richard Malcolm Johnston, at one time a member of the University faculty, won the respect and lovo of all the students. They admired him both as a man and as a writer. While still a member of the faculty he was ten- 213Letters from Famous Men—Continued tiered honorary membership, to which he thus responded: Scptcml cr 9, 1842. Gentlemen—1 received yesterday through you, acting as the organ of the Dcmosthcnian Society, an invitation to a membership in that highly respectable body. Satisfied as I am of the utility and laudahility of such an institution. I can not fail to recognize and appreciate the honor conferred. or refuse the proffered invitation. Von will please present to the Society my sincere acknowledgment and for yourself accept a-surances of my high consideration. Yours. R. M. Johnston. William Gilmore Sims, the greatest Southern novelist, was also invited to enter the band of Demostltcnians and thus replies: Wood Sandy. S. C., March 27. GKXTi.EMEN—While it gives n»c unfeigned pleasure to acknowledge your complimentary letter and the intention conferred upon me by the institution which you represent, it gives me more pride to believe that 1 am considered in any way worthy of the honor of representing the literature of our common country. I.et me add tliat this pride and pleasure is ncR a little heightened to my mind when the compliment emanates from our own Southern region, where, perhaps, it has been our misfortune hitherto, to have too greatly neglected the high moral interest. blige me. gentlemen, by saying to your fellow members that I receive with due sentiment '.he honor they have been pleased to confer, and 1 shall not forget—ay, indeed. I have always striven to remember how completely identi- cal arc the feeling and interest of our .-isier States. Hold me. therefore, always ready to co-operate with you in doing the best we can to promote the cause of art. literature. and a common taste in both. With sentiments of true consideration, believe me gentlemen. your most obedient and obliged friend and servant, W. Gilmore Sims. Further on among the old letters we find one from Henry R. Jackson, author of the "Old Red Hills of Georgia." His family is now represented in many sections of the State: Savannah. October 19. 1847. Gentlemen—Your flattering communication of the 19th instant has been on hand for several days, during which time I have had the subjects to which it refers under serious consideration. It has not been wiibou: heavy misgivings as to mv ability even to approach the high standard of excellence which has distinguished the annual orations pronounced of late l cforc the two societies of your 1 'Diversity that 1 accept the highly honorable appointment which the Dcmosthcnian Society has been pleased to confer u|x n me. Rc kind enough to extend to the members my sincere thanks for the honor conferred. The University boys greatly admired Hon. W. L. Yancey. the greatest Alabama orator, considered the equal of Hill and of Toombs. Not only was he elected an honorary mcmlier of Dcmosthcnian but the Society also honoredLetters from Famous Men Continued him by several invitations to deliver addresses. rc-S|K nsc to one of these is before us: Montgomery. Ala.. Sept. 3. 1S60. 1)k. r Sir—I received by yesterday’s mail yours of the 10th instant informing me that I had been elected to deliver the address before the two societies at the commencement in Jnlv next. 1 feel deeply sensible of the honor that the Demosthenian Society lias conferred ti|x n me by this election, but I am obliged to decline it. My engagements are of such a character as to prevent due preparation for such an event. Very rcsjiectfully. W. I- Yancey. These and many other letters from famous men of Geor- gia and other States show plainly the thoughts and feeling of the University students in the first half of the past century. In late years the custom of conferring honorary memberships has fallen into disuse. Any discussion of the value of such a custom is a waste of time, but this much is certainly true. All letters from prominent men, received by a society should be preserved for the benefit of the future, and the preservation of complete records. Thus of late Phi Kappa has received a number of letters which should Ik- preserved, but arc probably already destroyed. Robert Moran.PROCLAMATION Inasmuch as a suite of anarchy now exists in the city of A-H-XS. engendered by a body of cutthroats and ruffians. otherwise known as the students of the University of Georgia, situate ! therein, and inasmuch as the said state of anarchy has for some time existed and continues to exist, notwithstanding the heroic efforts of the mayor and policemen of said town to suppress it. be it hereby provider!. that tiic following rules and regulations for the government of the aforementioned cutthroats am! ruffians ! e prescribed. 15c it further provided, that, if necessary. the enforcement of the following rules and regulations shall be secured l v calling out of the State Militia: and that, in the event of its incomjictcncy to enforce them, the State legislature be requested to jKtition the President of the United States to send the Federal army therefor. Rft.i: I.—The mere assemblage of three or more students of said institution on the streets of said town, or in any part thereof, shall constitute a riot. The offenders shall he deemed guilty of aggravated misdemeanors, and punished l»v confinement in jail for a year Rvi.e II.—Any conversation alx vc a whisper, any singing or noise of any sort whatsoever, carried on by said assemblage of students, shall constitute a felony, punishable by imprisonment for life. Rct.t-: III.—Xo student shall l e allowed to enter any store, or other place of business in said town, unless he has first filed with the mayor thereof a written application requesting such privilege and is attended by two policemen. Rui.e IV.—It shall ! c the duty of each and every student upon approacli of a policeman to kneel anti remove his hat until said policeman has passed. The said duty is also enjoined on said students in respect to the editor of the newspaper in said town. who. by 1ms distinguished services in behalf of said policemen, is entitled to the same resjK ct shown them. Ri'I.k Y.—Xo student shall Ik allowed on any street of said town after dark. Rl'i.F VI.—The privilege of "habeas corpus” is hereby suspended: and a | olicemau may on any occasion, without any charge whatsoever, arrest any student. Rui.k VII.—When on trial for the violation of any of the above regulations the offender shall not be allowed the benefit of counsel, nor shall the testimony of any student or number of students adduced in his behalf Ik held sufficient to im|Kach the testimony of a single opposing negro witness. Xo provision of any constitution, nor any rule of law. shall he recognized in trial of such offender in the Mayor's Court. Rci.e VIII.—The fact of being a student shall Ik prima facie evidence of guilt. Mayor of Sron.KSS ( ?) Town. 246THE LOST PLEIAD 1. Gone from the field of Night: Kleotra. loveliest of the train, No longer cheers the shepherd's pensive sight, No longer gems Orion’s belt of light: Gone like a watch-fire from the nightly plain. III. When from Affection's skies One star, j erehance, is gone. Not all the host supplies The light that with it dies, Orion’s belt is torn. —Lucif.n G x)t)Ricn. ’ll The heavens still are bright With Night’s innumerable train. But from the watcher's sight lias passed a glorious light That will not shine again. 247THE SHOOTING GALLERY '.The editors trust that these knocks will Ik taken in the spirit in which they arc sent. To any displeased they refer to their fighting committee, Messrs. Connelly and Willie Erwin.) X'o care of justice, no rule of reason. Did thenceforth ever enter in his mind.—The Mayor. Why did my parents send me to the schools?—Clay A kind of refreshing sleep is fall’ll upon him. — Ellis. Such whose sole bliss is eating: who can give But that one brutal reason why they live.—Turner. Beautiful as sweet! And young as beautiful.—Ray Dorsey. I'll fight till from my bones my flesh be hack’d.—Kctron. So for a good old gentlemanly vice I think I must take up with avarice.—Felkcr. Deep versed in books and shallow in himself.—Wclborn Reynolds. Fools, to talking ever prone, Are sure to make their follies known.—G. B. Franklin. wkward. embarrassed, stiff without the skill Of moving gracefully, or standing still, One leg. as if suspicious of his brother Desirous seems to run away from t'other.—Suddeth. My tender youth was never yet attaint With any passion of inflaming love.—Felder. Harmony, with cv'rv grace. Flays in the fair proportions of his face.—Fcach-blow Tate. 1 will go wash.—Archie McIntyre. He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument.—R. W. Jones. 2 iSTHe Shooting Gallery—Continued The puny school boy and his early lay Men pardon, if his follies pass away: I Jut who forgives the senior's ceaseless verse hose hairs grow hoary a his rhymes grow worse.— Hunlcv Abbott. Anger would indite Such awful stuff as 1 or Shadwell write.—Fort Scott. Witty as Horatius Flaccus, As great a Jacobin as Gracchus, Short, though not as fat, as Bacchus, Riding on a little jackass.—Cam Dorsey. Now he exacts of all. wastes in delight. Riots in pleasure, and neglects the law.—Frank Mclntire. What says my counsel, learned in the law?—Kendricks. Your dainty speeches have the curse To plead bad causes down to worse.—Blount. Intent he scent'd. And pond'ring future things of wondrous weight.—Myd-dlcton. A fool must follow his natural bent.—Bullard. Is’t not enough the blockhead scarce can read, But must he wisely look, and gravely plead?—Swift. Th' unwieldy elephant, To make them mirth used all his might, and wreathed His lithe proboscis.—King presiding over Historic Society. He turned his notes both evensong and morn.—Lloyd Jones. I-aughing at so vain and fond a task, Will strip thy heavy noddle of its mask.—Cooglcr. A race Of proud lined loiterers, that never sow, Nor put a plant in earth, nor tise a plough.—The Bowers. And on the stone Say simply: he was tired.—R. W. Jones. Sixty years have spread Their grey experience o’er thy hoary head.—White. All the courses of my life do show I am not in the roll of common men.—Heyward. His absence from his mother oft lie'll mourn, And, with his eyes, look wishes to return.—Sim Bell. Met bought it was the sound Of riot and ill-managed merriment. —Members Athenaeum Histrionic Society. In all thy humors, whether grave or mellow, Thou'rt such a testy, touchy, pleasant fellow.—Hugh Scott. Music do I hear? Ha! Ha! keep time. How sour sweet music is. When time is broke, and no proportion kept.—University Orchestra. 249THe Shooting Gallery—Continued A neat little, sweet Little, walk up the street Little dude.1—Richter. Alone of all my sons is he Who stands continu’d in full stupidity.—Blair. Old as I am, for ladies’ love unfit. 'Hie jxnv’r of beauty I remember yet.— Perdue. Yes. every j oet is a fool.—High. Ruddy his lip?, and fresh and fair his hue: Some sprinkled freckles on his face were seen. Whose dusk set off the whiteness of the skin.—Jaques. Studious lie sate, with all his books around Sinking from thought to thought, a vast profound. —Legwen. Under the shadow of friendly boughs They sit carousing.—lawyers on April 2nd. When the father is too fondly kind. Such seed lie sows, such harvest shall lie find.—Maddox. That man who hath a tongue is no man, If with his tongue he can not win a woman.—Hearing. And regally they spat and smoked Ami fonrsomely they lied.—Athenaeum Members. The faculty loved him and held him so dear Thev asked him to repeat his sad Senior year.—Jackson. 250 A strutting player, whose conceit Lies in his homestring, and doth think it rich To hear the wooden dialogue.—Baxter. Then to the spicy nut brown ale.—M. H. Smith. Oh popular applause! W hat heart of man Is proof against thy swect,seducingcharms.—Jack Bower. In arguing, too. the pardon owned his skill. Kor, e’en though vanquish’d, he could argue still. —Gamble. Employ your ciiicfest thoughts To courtship, and such fair ostents of love.—Knight. My graudsire loved thee well: Many a time he danced thee on his knee.—College Widow. Who. too deep for his hearers, still went on refining. And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining. —Polly Mac lecturing to Lawyers. And ’tis remarkable that they Talk most that have the least to say.—Weston. I left no calling for this idle trade. Xo duty broke, no father disobey'd.—Connally. A bard here dwelt, more fat than bard beseems. —Hopkins. We trepann'd the State, and faced it down With plots and projects of our own.—Lee Worsham.The Shooting Gallery—Continued I have bought (ioldcn opinions from all sorts of peO) lc.—Miller. The midnight clock attests my fervent prav’rs. The rising sun my orisons declares.—Sidney Nix. ()f praise a mere glutton, lie swallow'd what came. And the puff of a dunce he mistook it for fame; Till, his relish grown callous, almost to disease. Who pepper'd the highest was surest to please.—Beaver. At every word a reputation dies.—Faculty Meeting. The age of virtuous politics is past.—Advisory Board. The season when to come, and when to go. To sing, or cease to sing, we never know.—Harmon. In the spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love.—Avery. Who think too little, and who talk too much.— Brigham. Flirt—flirt—flirt!—L. C. I’s. I feel no care of coin.—The average student. And when a lady’s in the case. You know all other things give place.—Allen. One whom the music of his own vain tongue Doth ravish like enchanting harmony.—Marshburn. This sanguine coward, this bed-presser, this horse back-breaker. this huge hill of flesh.—King.THE When first I readied this city I was a modest lad And 1 thought to stare ami "rubber" Was something very had; But I saw the Freshmen staring As the "Lucies" passed them by And 1 heard a fellow murmur With a laugh and half a sigh— I don't know how 1 got it But I've got the "Lucy Craze.” I don’t know how they did it. But they've got me in a daze, From the largest to the smallest Tltcv have got me on the string; Of all the guys you ever saw I am the “softest thing.” 2. Next day a reverend Senior, Who should have better sense, Asked me if I would lend him The sum of fifteen cents For the "IAides" they were on the car And that's where he would be But he was down without a cent And then explained to me— CRAZE I don't know how I got it, Dm I've got the "Lucy Craze,” I don't know how they did it But they've got me in a daze. Front the largest to the smallest They have got me on tl.e string: Of all the guys you ever saw I am the "softest thing.” 3- It wasn't three weeks later When I had the symptoms too; When I'd hang about the corner The Lucies tor to view, And when the Lucies entered The Cafe for a drink I'd get so very thirsty That I was forced to think— I don't know how I got it. But I've got the "Lucy Craze." 1 don't know how they did it. But they've got me in a daze, From the largest to the smallest They have got me on the string; Of all the guys you ever saw I am the “softest thing.”THE DREAM CHILD Do vc scoff at the dreamer of dreams And ] oiiit to the time to awake? Then ye scoff when the Evening Star lieams Or the mocking-bird sings by the lake. For what is a dream save a light To how us the beauties ancar. Or a mystical sound in the night To hire a lost soul to its sphere? 2. Do ye pity the Dream-Child and say In the fight with the Real he will fall; He will faint in the heat of the day When the voices of Duty shall cajl ? Where got ye your knowledge of life— Front Nature? Who taught ye the plan Of Cod was that sorrow and strife Were the end of the world ami of man ? 3- I!ut what if the Dream-Child be right, I f sorrow be naught that it seems. And what if Eternal delight Be just a fruition of dreams? Do ye think that the Soul that is scared By striving and toiling in this Is the one that our God holds prepared For a region of lieauty and bliss? —F. i. Et.us. 2o3HASH (Scnr i a la University, with Pandora Sauce.) "Bosco" says his trunk is a poker trunk because it holds four trays. Freshman—“Say, can't we go without Carson? Where is he?” Junior—"He's writing to his father." Freshman—“Oh, then we won't wait for him. He must be broke.” IN CAN 1)1.ER IIAI.U High (to Blair)—“I'll cut out your lights if you don t pay up by tomorrow night!” (What—murder? Oh. no, he is speaking of electric lights.) :si Prof. Patterson wondered why everybody looked at Mr. Dorsey when he began talking about "little eccentric cams." Blue’s the color of the jay So the naturalists say; But most of those that I have seen Were not blue, but rather green. Ordinary mortals go to Dr. Benedict to get well: students go there to get sick. Mathew had burned the grass off the campus and Freshman Ragan. (Kissing, said: “Mathew, that gras is just the color of your face.” "Yes. sah." said Mathew obsequiously, "but slat don't matter. In about three weeks it will be just the color of your face.” Baxter (in chemistry)—"I would like to take a barrel of carlmnic acid gas with me when I die." Beaver—"Why?" Baxter—“They sav nothing burns in it.” Say. wouldn't an elevator put In Science Hall Ik- wise, Because in going to “Protv's" room It’s hard to make a rise. A girl once said of Lucicu Bower that she stood him as long as she could and then sat dou-n on him.HasH— Continued Girl (slewing photo of herself)—"I fear this picture flatters me.” Newell—” Impossible.” Blair, noticing at the bottom of a .-core-card “The University Press" wanted to know if that was the pressing club he was connected with. Blair need never exjKrct a rise in Electricity or Engineering. Prof. Stephenson—"How long is an iambic foot?" Valdosta Jones—"Twelve inches, sir." A M UK MAN AND IMS ROCKS. Once a merman lived on a sandv stretch at the bottom of the sea. He was as jxx r as he could be and lived in a sea-weed hut. One day he came into ] osscssion of some beautiful Rocks and placed them all about his hut. Soon afterwards some Sponges came floating along and located on the merman's Rocks. The merman was delighted with them at first, but soon they increased so in number and size that they were very much in the way and caused the merman no end of trouble. Moral—"Sponges" usually hang around the man who has the rocks. "ITrick MeCalla says his hall playing ability is not "red-heditary.” l unnv Old Gentleman (to engineering students surveying on the campus)—-"What arc you building, my little men?” High—"Air castles.” Franklin got off a bright thing the other night—it was an electric car. Man may scorn his "better rib," Bo stt] erior if you can. Fact remains, and ’tis no "fib." She is double w-o-man. A student, somewhat intoxicated, leaning against a lamp | ost as a funeral procession was passing by. was asked who was dead. "I can't exactly say." lie replied, “but I presume it is the gentleman riding in the hearse.” Jack 1 lower, talking the other day gave himself away in this manner: “Now let me illustrate the jxjint. One day a celebrated youth, a well-known college boy, was walking down the street when 1 met a girl—" Then the crowd laughed. Professor—"What is a strait?” Maddox, (absently)—“That which beats three of a kind.” Bill ‘Recti—“What is the object of the ‘Lenten Season ?" Roscoc—"To save and economize to buy a New Easter suit.” Brinson (on returning to college after Xmas, and seeing Prof. Patterson's desk)—"Yes. 1 remember that table when it was no higher than a stool.” the: wise: student Tlicrc was a student in this town, And he was wondrous wise; He had a nose, he had a mouth. And also had some eyes. He had two arms, he had two legs. And he was very fat; He wore some clothes, like any one, And also wore a liat. He wore his whiskers on his face. His hair upon his head; And when he wished to go to sleep He always went to bed. He had two hands, lie had two feet, He smoked a good cigar; And when Ik wished to go Prince Street, He always took a car. He had some corns u| on his feet. And when he walked they hurt; And when he failed to wash himself, Why, he was smeared with dirt. He used his teeth to chew his food. And drank right down his neck; And if lie hadn't been so good, He might have been a wreck. He paid for everything he got He couldn't buy on tick— And when he wasn't feeling well. Why. he was often sick. He always listened with his ears, And talked most with his mouth; And when he wasn't going North, Quite often he went South. The moral of this talc is this (I'll tell it in a rhyme) : 1 simply wrote these verses here Uecause I had the time. 257THE KNOCKERS I found this letter addressed to me in the postofficc: "Sir: Your presence is desired at the midnight hour at the pavilion in the old city park to receive instructions for the betterment of the 1 diversity and the riddance of some of its worst affliction. Kail not. on penalty of death. "SoCIKTY OF THE KnOCKKRS." Desiring to gratify the curiosity that such a threat produced. 1 complied with its terms. The night was dark and dreary, and a wind blew which seemed to moan of things spiritual and mysterious. When I reached the pavilion, a few moments before the ap| ointed hour, no human being was in sight. The bullfrogs in the pond were chanting with the crickets on the bank. These, with the other noises, made the night hideous. As the clock struck twelve there arose from all sides of the pavilion figures clothed in sheets and white caps. They surrounded me, standing in the center of the floor, and si-icntly approached, making gestures all the while to each other. The wind died down and was followed by an awful stillness. By order of the leader candles were lighted ami placed in the center of the stage. Then, turning to me, he said: “Mv name is Regulator. Hear well what is spoken tonight. You arc in the presence of the High Society of the Knockers, whose commands arc strictest law with the University faculty. You arc admitted to our council to-night that you might convey to others the results of our deliberations. Mark you. sit in silence and listen. One word from you. and you will be cast into the lake 2SSThe Knockers Continued to take up your habitation with bullfrogs and snakes." I sat in fear and trembling throughout the deliberations. The Regulator stepped forward and poured some dark powder on the candles, which caused a slight explosion, followed by a strange bluish llamc and a very pungent odor. The Knockers sitting around began to chant an ethereal dirge, accompanying their words with fiendish gestures. The Regulator administered more powder, and yet a third time more. Soon all the Knockers had the appearance of being under the influence of the drug and anxious to unburden their minds of important things they had to say. The Regulator then arose and addressed the meeting as follows: "Speak out, noble 'spirits, and let your hearts pour forth messages and make known what cures should be wrought in the body collegiate.'’ The first Knocker lighted his candle and spake as follows : "Most divine Regulator. I offer to thee a prayer of thanks. By your wise counseling and midnight hours with the powers that l c the University has been rid of divers and sundry grievances. Dillapickle and voting Cay, and Westbrooks and Forston, have been sent to the realms of outer darkness whence no man returns. In behalf of the students, 'tis thanks I give thee." The second Knocker lighted his candle and spake tluis- Iv: "Most circumspect Regulator, this University is in-tested with a breed of politicians, who seek by improper methods and the trading of various votes, without regard to fitness for office or decency to control college honors. By them the high prerogative of free suffrage which should permeate the student body is contaminated, and the Advisory Board has been made an instrument of injustice. Rid us. we pray thee, of Croker Scott. Tweed Franklin, Platt Worsham and others of this type. Rid us of them.” Then tltc third Knocker lightest his candle and said: "Most worshipful Regulator, the midnight hours, and even the days, have been disturbed ofuimes recently by souk senseless youths, who, knowing not that silence is golden, have banded themselves together on the street corners and up and down the highways and tried to sing. There arc among others Valdosta Jones. Dennis Brooks and his brother, Billy Myddlcton, Rannv Jaques and Judge Miller’s son. whose untutored voices together arc as the braying of many asses. Rid us. we pray thee, of the assumption which prompts them to think they can sing." When the fourth Knocker lighted his candle and spake: "Most modest Regulator, among all the enthusiastic and congenial students in this city there arc some whose conceit is as the red in McCalla’s hair for its abundance. Of all men most to be censured, the men of unbounded importance in his own estimation stands 259The KnocKers first. I would call to vour mind a few of the most seriously afflicted who need immediate correction. There arc Simple Harmon. Jack Bower and littic Fawcett. Windy Jones, Mr. Mar-hburn and Hearing. These are in the last stages. Rid them, we pray tliee. of themselves and us of them, and teach them that they arc only ordinary mortals." Then the fifth Knocker lighted his candle and spoke: “Most orderly Regulator, there are among the student body certain ones who would tain be great wearers of sporty clothes, but who. in ignorance of their assinine appearance, can not see that they arc offensive to the sight of soi cr-mimlcd students. Rid us. wc pray thee, of such bloomers and dinky-tailed coats as Rourkc. Jacques. Baxter and Yaw clothe themselves in. Rid u of them." Then the sixth Knocker lighted his caudle and spoke: “Most powerful Regulator, hear me. I speak in the interests of the whole student Imdy. My grievance is second to none in its need of correction. In the town of Athens there is one named Holder, who as editor of a certain paper, for reasons of | crsonal aggrandizement and fame, whether able or unable, has made unjust assaults u|x n the character of the students of the University. As an enemy in disguise his conduct calls for the severest punishment. Rut thy ban upon such a loathsome animal and rid us of him. wc pray thee." 260 —Continued Then the seventh Knocker lighted his candle and spoke: "Most just Regulator, lend me your ears and grant my humble petition. That a city of the size and int|K rtancc of Athens should retain in its employ officers who curse students on the streets and lock them up without ju-t cause, giving credit to the oath of a street negro in preference, is a shame upon the record of municipal government. Turn your hose, we pray thee, on them, and cleanse the city of such incompetent officials.” Then the eighth Knocker lighted his candle and spoke: "Most | eaccful Regulator. I s|H ak in the interest of order. Demosthenes and Cicero never were more persistent in their orations than certain presumptions youths named Gamble, Reynolds. W. Mount. Windy Jones and Ellis, who. by their constant harrangucs have made themselves disagreeably conspicuous on various occa ions. Thinking that they can speak, they l»awl forth at every opportunity, to the great weariness of their hearers. Strike dumb their tongues, O most belcrved Regulator, and rid us of their incessant flow of gas." Then the ninth Knocker lighted his candle and sj okc: "Most divine Regulator, have others in mind who need an administration of your rod of correction, but the hour is late and I believe in leniency. Those whom I mention will Ik given another chance to improve. 1 ask you to put on probation Bcllingrath. Blair. Falk, Walter Jack-son. Lamar Hill and Chit Clarke. Their freshness is a sore affliction unto me. Be merciful. I pray thee, andThe Knockers—Continued place not thy vengeance on these to-night.” “Noble spirits,” said the Regulator, “you have spoken well. Let your souls rest until our next meeting, tty the power within me vested I'll look into these eases carefully and render punishment where punishment is due.” The meeting adjourned. 261 m 4Departments of the University of GeorgiaDEPARTMENT REPRESENTATIVES COMMENCEMENT 1903 J. I . Manley, Franklin College. 264 John- B. Gamble Law School.UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA ATHENS, GA. The University of Georgia, as the phrase is used in the Constitution of the State, means the collective organization. composed of Franklin College, the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, the Graduate Schools, and the Law School, at Athens: the North Georgia Agricultural College, at Dahloncga.: the Medical College. at Augusta: the School of Technology, at Atlanta; the Normal and Industrial College, at Millcdgcvillc; the State Normal School, at Athens, and the Industrial College, at Savannah. In its narrow significance, the phrase means the parent institution at Athens. It is in this sense that the term is used in this article. Franklin College is the college of lilieral arts, with a four years' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts: the State College is the co-ordinate branch of the University upon the foundation of the Morrill fund. Its curriculum places the emphasis on the Sciences and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science. Trof. D. C. Barrow is Dean of Franklin College, and Dr. H. C. White. President of the State College. Prof. Sylvanus Morris is Dean of the Law School. The University was chartered in 1785. and is the oldest State university in the Union. It was organized for college work in 1801, and issued its first diplomas and celebrated its first commencement in 1804. This commencement was held under a bush arbor. Pandora published several years ago a very interesting account of this first celebration. Next year will be the centennial of the occa- W. B. Him., A- M., LL. D. Chancellor. 265University of Georgia—Continued sion. and it is proposed to celebrate it by a similar occasion. All the alumni will be asked to reunite on the old campus; meeting under a roof of bushes and leaves, we shall have a vivid realization of the faith and courage of our forefathers who planted this University here when the ground was the "forest primeval.” The mention of the bush arbor recalls a unique suggestion which has been made for a reunion of the class of 1879. The feeling of comradeship and loyalty among the alumni of the University has always been one of the strong points in the character and life of the institution. This feeling has suggested to one of the leading members of that class that the ordinary reunion in which the class meets as a whole but once is not satisfactory. During the commencement, the members of the class are quartered in the various homes and hotels in Athens, and arc thrown together only occasionally. If they bring their wives and children with them, there is little opportunity for them to meet. For the betterment of these disadvantages, the proposition is to establish a class-camp, to secure a tent and have each member of the class to bring his family and for these families to dwell together in picnic fashion during the reunion. This would afford full opportunity for real fellowship and for the keenest social pleasure. During the present year new opportunities for development to the University have become possible. The General Assembly has adopter! the policy of maintenance of the University by a liberal appropriation. This has enabled the Trustees to create the chair of Philosopny and Education, to which Prof. T. F. NVoofter has been elected; to create an instructorship in the Department of Rhetoric and English Literature, to which Prof. S. V. Sanford has been chosen: to provide for the development of the Department of Agriculture, and also-to establish a scries of Farmers' Institutes throughout the State; and to provide (in connection with the liberality of a friend of the University) for the apjioiiitment of an agent in the State, for which work President J. S. Stewart has been selected. The provision of the General Assembly for “maintenance" lias also enabled the trustees to use certain college funds that heretofore have been required for that purpose, but which the I "niversity is free to use for any other necessary object in the erection of an annex to the present library building which will furnish room needed for academic work and will permit New College to be reconverted into its former use as a dormitory, supplying accommodations for seventy-six men. The New Library, the gift of Mr. George Foster Peabody “brings hoj c with it and forward looking thoughts.” An ample, commodious, well-lighted ami inviting library will greatly stimulate the intellectual life of the institution. Mr. Peabody prophecies that in a few years the University will have a thousand students. This article could not find a more felicitous conclusion than to leave with the reader this optimistic vision of the future.GEORGIA’S TRAINING On a green lull not far away from the classic precincts of the University o f Georgia. has grown up in these latter years a noble and flourishing i n s t it u t i o n known as the State Normal School. Its history is scanned by less than a brief decade. A few short years ago and Rock College stood lonely on its barren hilltop; to-day. around the old college as a nucleus, cluster the various buildings of the State Normal, its halls crowded with hundreds of eager students. The rapid growth of the school has been like that of the proverbial youngster who habitually outgrows his old clothes ere a fond mamma can get the new ones ready; just so the Normal outgrows its quarters long before a doting but overburdened Legislature can make the needful appropriations for new buildings and the result is a sad overcrowding of dormitories and class rooms and the turning away of would-be students with the sentence, “There is no room for you here.” This congested condition will be somewhat relieved another year, however, by £. C. Hkankox, President. SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS two new buildings. The Winnie Davis Memorial Hall and the Practice School, both gilts made in recognition of the great work the Normal is doing for education in the State. The Winnie Davis Memorial Hall is designed as a home for sixty daughters of Confederate Veterans, while they arc getting that training at the Normal that shall equip them for their work as teachers. Surely the Georgia Daughters of the Confederacy have reared in this building a fitting and beautiful memorial to that best loved daughter of the l.ost Cause, Winnie Davis, who will live again in lives trained here to efficient service The new Practice School building, to be opened at the beginning of the next session, is very nearly the ideal school building, ideally equipped with books, pictures and statuary, with gymnasium and playrooms and bowling alley, with kitchen ami worksltop and museum, with everything, in short, that the enlightened educational thought of the day would have enrich the school life of the child. Should you ask where the money for all this comes from the answer is that if in this materialistic Twentieth Century, we no longer believe in fairy godmothers, then we must believe that the spirit of the fain-godmother of the dear old tales has found a blessed reincarnation in a certain great hearted philanthropist who shakes his money bags and makes beautiful dreams turn into happy realities. From the very fact, however, that the Practice Scliool is so nearly the ideal school, the objection has arisen that the Normal student who gets her teacher training under 297Georgia’s Training School for Teachers—Continued Thi St at, Sc ooi, Aiikm the favorable conditions that prevail here will be utterly unprepared to work under the wretched conditions that await her in the country schools of the State. In answer it may be said that the aim of the Normal is not to prepare the teacher to work under wretched conditions: but, rather, to fill her with a noble discontent and a dauntless energy that will lift her school, whatever and wherever it may Ik-, nearer and nearer to an approximation of her ideal. For the Normal has faith in the practicality of the ideal. It liclicves if it can but inspire its students with a robust confidence in the possibilities and potentialities Of the New Education they will go forth gladly to serve in lowliest places if so they may hasten the coming of the day when its principles shall prevail. And what is this New Education that fills its converts with such self-forgetful zeal? The New Education is the way of joyous living. Its end is not book learning but life, not knowledge but efficiency, not scholarship but service. With this changed view of education there has cotne the call for teachers of a wider and different preparation. It is no longer sufficient that the teacher of little children be "a lady” and know "the three R$." To these (pialifica-tiotts she must now add manual training, nature study, sewing, cooking, hygiene, psychology, child study and a host of other things undreamed of in the philosophy of her predecessor of even ten years ago. These new additions to the curriculum have in the main a directly practical value: for the New Education demands that the work of the school shall touch at as many joints as possible and be helpfully related to the life of the community. The call, therefore, upon the Twentieth ( entury teacher is to give her pupils that knowledge that will make them useful members of society. I’.nt with all the -tress that the New Education lays upon the utilitarian, it takes account no less of ideal values; for it sees very clearly that wonder, reverence and imagination arc but "the higher practicalities" and increasingly needed in our modern civilization. Thus, for instance, the teacher, in her nature study work, while she'strives to give the child that instruction in practical agriculture that will help him when he goes forth from the school to make Georgia’s Training School l wo stalks of com prow where but one prow l cforc. must strive no less to give him the seeing eye and the understanding heart tliat lie may conic into a loving appreciation of that nature world that enfolds this little human life of ours with such glory of sunrise and sunset and such unshakable great procession of stars. For a like reason the New Education places more rather than less stress on what arc sometimes called ‘‘the culture studies" and requires that the teacher possess the open sesame into the treasure houses of history and literature that she may bring their precious stores to the child and lead him as quickly a may be into the richness and fullness of his human inheritance. m for Teachers—Continued Hut where is the teacher who is able to do all this? Where is that paragon that can fulfill all the requirements of the New Education ? Perhaps she .is not yet, but the (jeorgia State Normal is engaged upon her manufacture. In the meantime it sends forths its graduate.-, if not clad in tlic full panoply of the New Education, at least imbued with its spirit. Long ago. in the days of good King Arthur, in that '■fair beginning of a time," the youth knelt lieforc the King and swore the oath of the great Round Table, "to break the heathen and uphold tlvc Christ." then the King administered the assoladc and the youth rose, knighted from kneeling, eager at once to ride abroad, confident that upon this quest God would send him many a brave adventure. Still today the students of the Normal take in spirit the oath of the Round Table, "to break the heathen and uphold the Christ," to scatter the hosts of ignorance and make His paths straight and the quest they go forth upon is to seek the children that sit in darkness and bring them into the joy of a life of full, free and efficient service.AGRICULTURAL HALL AT ATHENS. GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY ATLANTA, GA. The School of Technology in Atlanta is a vigorous branch of the University of Georgia, and receives $45,000 per annum from the State for maintenance. It is c juip] cd fully in the departments of— Mechanical Engineering ; Electrical Engineering ; Civil Engineering: Textile Engineering: E n g i n c e r i ng Chemistry. The work in every department consists in a thorough course in theory by recitations supplemented by practical exercises by the student in Shops, Mill. Lalioratory and Held Work. That the School is accomplishing its aims is evidenced 271 by the fact that 90 per cent of its graduates arc engaged in mechanical pursuits for which they were trained and in which they received their diplomas. Some of them have made enviable reputations among the Engineers of the country, and many are at the head of various manufacturing enterprises in the State. The cost in fees to Georgia boys in attendance is as follows : From counties having not over six representatives, $20.00 j er year. For the surplus of six from any county. $45.00 per year. For students not in the State, $120.00 per year. Hoard, including laundry, fuel and lights, is offered at the school dormitories for S13.50 per month in furnished rooms. Graduates of literary colleges may take courses in tl»e school in engineering subjects and arc given credit for work passed up while in College. As they arc excused from much class-room work they progress rapidly in Draughting. Sho| -work and I .aboratories. The school publishes annually a fully illustrated Catalogue which sets forth in full all of the facilities, equipment, courses, etc., relating to the Institution. During the present year the enrollment of students has licen 4S1, and the Faculty, including instructors and foremen, numbers 40- Lyman IIall, President.Georgia School of Technology-Continued. There arc five classes viz.: Sub-Apprentice, Apprentice. Junior. Middle and Senior. The requirements in the Fall term for admission to the Sub-Apprentice is Arithmetic Complete (written examination). For the Apprentice class applicants are examined in the fall in Algebra (Elements Complete), Geometry (Plane and to the Sphere in Solid). English Grammar. For Physical Culture there is a well-equipped gymnasium in which students receive compulsory instruction during the Apprentice year, under the School Physician, who has made a specialty of the physical training of young men. During the year Senior students in the various courses take trips to manufacturing plants in this and other States with professors for purposes of observation and in- struction. The trips this year will be made to Birmingham, Augusta and Columbia. As a factor in the material advancement of this State and section, the School of Technology is bearing an important part. Its present work will have its fulfillment and completion in the achievements its graduates will place to their credit in the future. The South and Georgia particularly offers abundant opportunity and fields of labor and development to tliousands of young men who know how to do things skilfully, scientificallv and quickly with trained hands ami minds. Such young men are the output from this Institution, and were its enrollment 5.000 instead of 500 much more rapid would be our ad vance to the wealth, importance, influence and power which awaits our section. Georgia Technological School, Atlanta, Ga. 272NORTH GEORGIA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE DAHLONECA, GEORGIA This college owes its origin to the act of Congress of July 2. 1862, entitled "an act donating public lands to several States and territories which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and mechanical arts.'' The college having been incorj oratcd i n 1871 received from the United States government. in pursuance of an act of Congress passed in that year through the etTorts of Con- Jos. S. Stkwakt. gressman W. P. Price, a donation of a building at Dablonega, Ga., known as United States Branch Mint with ten acres of land connected therewith. A contract was then made with the University of Georgia by which this institution became a department of the University, the title of the above propertv being conveyed to the trustees of the I .‘niversity on the condition S| ccificd in the donation. The College has forty acres of beautifully situated and valuable land now used for military exercises and agricultural experiments. The College has two large brick recitation and laboratory buildings and dormitories for girls and boys, and a number of cottages which are rented to students who wish to do their own work. This institution was the first school for higher education established in North Georgia, and the men of today 273 M AIK PvIlUIXO S.C. A C.. Dahioxir North Georgia Agricultural College—Continued ■who arc most influential in State and county affairs in North Georgia received their preparation here. Over two thousand students have registered since the college was opened. The College is coeducational, though the male students largely predominate over the females. This year two hundred and forty students have been registered from seventy counties, two hundred and fifteen of whom are voting men and twenty-five arc young ladies. One of the marked features of the institution is the military department, which is required of all male students. This is under the command of Major J. F. C. Til-son, Fourth Infantry, U. S. Army. It is recognized by the War Department as the leading military school in the State. The College offers two years Sub-Freshman work preparatory to the regular college classes, and offers Hachclor of Arts course. Bachelor of Agriculture course, Bachelor of Pedagogy course, and Bachelor of Business Science course. From one to three hours per week is required in agri- culture of all those taking a scientific course. A student has the choice of courses but must take the regular work in that course. The Bachelor of Pedagogy course is designed for those who exjiect to make teaching a profession and who wish to prepare for superintendents and principalships of schools. Tlie Bachelor of Business Science course is designed for those who wish a more thorough preparation for life than is offered in private business schools. It combines the essentials of a college course with a thorough practice in all branches of business science. This course has grown in popularity since it was organized five years ago. ninety students Iwing enrolled in this course for the present year. The College has a faculty of nine men and two women, specially prepared for their several departments. Last year the College won the Graves Medal for oratory in the contest with Emory, Mercer. Technological School, and the University. Tlie College is growing in favor and in the character of the work done, and has a bright future of usefulness before it. 274GEORGIA NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE MILLEDGEVILLE, GA The Georgia Normal and Industrial College at Mil-Icdgevillc consists of four thoroughly organized schools o r departments united under one head. The first of these, one of the two principal branches for which the college was designed, is the Nor in a I School. The second is the Business or Industrial School. The third is the School of Domestic Science. The fourth is the Collegiate Depart-ment supplementary to the other three. A fifth department has been recently added though not as yet fully organized. This is the department of Gardening and Floriculture and it is hoped in time to open to the women of Georgia new avenues of profitable labor in the direction of this and kindred pursuits. The two main objects for which the College was founded were Normal and Industrial training. i. HAKKIS CHAPPELL, A.M., Pll.D.. Prtrident. The preparation of teachers for the public schools of Georgia is therefore a leading feature of the work of this College. Through the education and training of teachers. this school aims to equip girls for life work, and also through them to reach the great masses of Georgia people. to educate, refine, ennoble, uplift. The course is substantially that recommended by the committee on Normal Schools reporting to the National Educational Association at the Los Angeles meeting. It is thus aligned with the best Normal Schools of this country. First of all great stress is placed on scholarship as a teacher's equipment, and the course extends throughout the four ordinary college years. In this it probably excel- the average Southern normal school, for the work of nearly all normal schools is lacking in scholarship. Stress is also placed on scientific method, that is. method based on a knowledge of the being to be educated. Merc is where the strictly professional work begins. The work covers educational psychology, child study, and his- 275Georgia Normal and Industrial College— Cont nued torv of education, then principles and methods of teaching based on all that goes before. The girls are next required during their Senior year to give expression to these theories, to put into practice their methods in a Model School which is an adjunct of the Normal School. This model School covers the public school work and serves as a practice field and as a model to study. The methods studied and practiced include not only met I tods of teaching the common school branches but also nature study, basket making, weaving, earthboard construction, drawing, color work, modeling, domestic science including sewing, physical training, physiology, etc. Nature study as here presented has in view not only the quickening of the intellect but also the enriching of the life of the individual, the school and the whole community. Rural conditions in Georgia arc fully considered. Country life is to be more and more enjoyed as capacitie-to enjoy arc increased, and thus the movement from country to city is gradually checked. The aesthetic and the useful sides of all nature arc both kept in view. In the Model School and with the pupil teachers, little looms arc often at work weaving the fabrics: raffia and reed lend themselves to the baskets. And it is indeed quite interesting to note the enthusiasm of Ixjth the primary tots and the dignified Seniors in this handiwork. illows. grasses, shucks, bamboo, lark, and what not all contribute through the finger- to the brain, and when transformed into all sorts of beautiful and useful objects contribute also to the “bread and butter" side of education. And so we might enlarge upon many features did space permit. , The work of the Husincss Department has been a signal success, 'rite President knows personally one hundred young women in this department alone who arc today earning their bread by the professions which they learned in this Institution, either as stenographers, bookkeepers or as heads of forewomen of dress-making establishments. not only in Georgia alone but in the Caroliuas. This represents an earning capacity of S-o,ooo per year at its lowest valuation. Fifty thousand dollars per year in honest labor and contented industry is good interest on the S25.000 per year the State appropriates for this Institution. 276Georgia Normal and Industrial College—Continued Instruction in cooking lias been a part of the training in tile Georgia Normal and Industrial College since its organization more than ten years ago. The course now includes cooking, household economics, marketing, sanitary science, and the general and special normal training. The general course of one year is compulsory upon all candidates for a diploma and is taken in the Junior year. It deals more especially with the "what,” the "how” of the "why” of healthful and economic food, and centers around the wise planning, the proper preparation, and the attractive serving of meals. It is made practical by the actual serving of meals by the girls in the dining room connected with the department. Much the same work is done bv the large and enthusiastic housekeeper's class from the ladies of the town itself and this scientific and economic treatment of the food question is leading the community. The general normal training is given in the Senior year to all of the girls preparing to teach. In this, the girls arc taught to apply their previously gained knowledge of Physiology. Chemistry, Physics, Sanitation and proper fowl preparation, to the planning of simple experiments and suggestions, by means of which some practical knowledge of these same subjects may be brought home to tin country and village communities in which they will teach, and thus the standard of living in these communities be improved. The special normal training has for its object the fitting of special teachers of cooking, and consists of a two and. in some eases a three years' course. In addition to the regular training which other teachers receive, there is special consideration of Domestic Science subjects from the teacher's standpoint, and the girls taking it have practice teaching in giving cooking lessons to a class of sixteen little girls. At the close of their course these little girls prepare and serve a luncheon to their mothers and friends, all being done under the supervision of the special normal pupils. The aim of all tire work of the department is to make better, happier, and more intelligent homemakers, and to tender the every day living in Georgia homes better balanced and more wholesome and attractive. The collegiate course is of course a necessary complement to the Normal and Industrial Departments. Its aim 277Georgia Normal and Industrial College—Continued is to make the teachers and business women who go out from this College cultured, as well as professionally efficient. The course is not equal to the college requirements of Vassar, or Wellesley or college of such grade, but it is sound, thorough and adapted to the present needs of Georgia. I have given but a brief and unsatisfactory summing up of the work done in the Georgia Normal and Industrial College, but it is sufficient, I think, to show that Georgia is putting forth efforts for the educational upbuilding of her people which must, in the near future, bring forth fruit an hundred fold. 78THANKS To those who by their artistic and literary ability have aided the board of Editors and made po sible the publishing of this volume of the PANDORA our heartiest thanks and appreciation arc given. To the following is due especial credit: Mr. Pierre N. Holst. Mr. Murray bartuini. Mr. H. Olin Jones, Mr. J. Wideman Lee, Jr.. Mr. Andrew Calhoun, Mr. Marshall Lane, Mr. William baldwin, Mr. Hermann Harris. Mr. Robert Newcomb. Mr. Oliver Woodworth. Mr. Hinton, baker. Mr. Romainc Nunn. Mr. Roy Dorsey. Mr. Renton High, Mr. Lucicn Goodrich. Mr. Warren Parks, Mr. Hunlv Abbott. Mr. Jack Bower, Mr. Stiles Hopkins, Mr. Robert J. Moran, Mr. J«eo Hudson. Mr. Ned King. Mr. Clarence bell, Mr. Wingfield Jones, Mr. Wesley Han-lon. Miss Lucy Woodall, Miss Hart Wylie. Miss Mary Merritt, Miss Mattie Hatcher and Miss Susie Fort. The business managers also desire to thank the following for their aid in securing advertisements: Mr. Marion H. Smith. Mr. W. H. Jones. Mr. Gordon Carson and Mr. F.ugcnc Brigham. 280L ENVOY The fair Pandora in the days of old, Inquisitive, and led by woman's will. Let loose upon the earth, as we are told, The spirits both of good and ill. No blame was hers, so we who give you praise Hope that you will forgive the friendly knocks, That fly out with the good things when we raise The worn-out lid of old Pandora’s Box. 281Those Who Have Aided Us ATLANTA :— Piedmont Hotel Co. Seaboard Air Line Railway. Fiseman Pros. Lamar • Rankin. Anderson Hardware Co. I. P. Stevens. Hon. Hoke Smith. Maier Berkelc. Hawkcs. Moore Sons. M ACON :— Jno. C. Fads Co. F. F.. Veltre. S. R. Jaques Tinsley Co. Acme Crewing Company. Taylor Shoe Company. I-amar • Lamar. Phillips Jones. Mallory H. Taylor. AUGUSTA:— Augusta Brewing Company. T. C. Bligh. J. Willie Levy. Richmond Academy. H. J. Porter Co. ATHENS:— Head McMahan. E. H. Dorsey. Athens Street Railway. C. W. Motes. Lucy Cobb Institute. F. piK's. Wilkins Co. D. W. McGregor. W. H. O’Farrell. Athens Coal Coke Co. Turner Hodgson. Dr. Ryder. J. K. Davis. NEW YORK CITY:— Chas. Stern Co. Hinds Noble. Crooks Brothers. L. E. Waterman Co. Stephen l-ane l-'olgcr. SAVANNAH :— Merchants National Bank. B. H. Levy Bro. BALTIMORE. MD.:— A. H. Fetting. COLUMBUS. O.:— The M. C. Lillcv Co....Piedmont Hotel... The Students of the University and their parents are invited to make it headquarters when in Atlanta.DAV1S0N-PAX0N STOKES CO. Store of Many Departments. 57 to 61 Whitehall St., Atlanta, Ga. College Men Who wear our clothes get a high mark for looks as well as brains. B.H. LEVY BRO. Savannah, Ga. “Outfitters to College Men." J. WILLIE LEVY, - HIGH ART - CLOTHING. Fit any Size Man. To the Ladies: We carry a large line of Walking and Tailor made Suits, Ready-to-wear Hats, Neckwear and Shirtwaists. A full line of Hoys' and Children’s Suits and Hats. J. WILLIE LEVY, S44 Broad St., Augusta, Ga.Enoch, a Sequel to the Baby in Eden and 5ince Cain after he had slain Abel, went to live in the land of Nod, which sacred historians tell us, was on the east side of Eden. And there lie built the first city, and. with all of a parent’s fond foolishness and foolish fondness, he named it after his first born—Enoch. And then truly Cain’s troubles as a father l egan; for no doubt Enoch’s baby ills and childish sicknesses brought ns much mental woe to his father as they did physical pain to himself; and, although Cain and his wife lived in the land of the Nod itself, sleep was often very hard to get therein, and Enoch’s attempts to express his views by emphatic vocal efforts at just any old time must often have caused the old folvcs to wearily ask: "What's in a name? A nap in any other land would be ns sweet.” And then Cain would wearily rouse himself to walk the Hoor with his weeping, wriggling heir, while the lady of the house would try all of grandmother Eve’s remedies on her grandchild and sigh for others then unpatented; and Eden would seem farther away each moment. And from then till now a cry has rung through the ages, increasing ns it comes nearer home to us—the wail of babyhood in distress. Thousands of homes arc daily and nightly echoing with it in overv country; thousands of parents ore daily and nightly startled by it, and thousands are seeking tho remedy which will bring help and comfort, health and security. As long as the world lasts, ns long as its imputation increases, and until knowledge of the sure s| coific which exists for babv troubles is wide-spread, so long will this cry continue to be heard and so long will parents suffer through the suffering of their children. “A little knowledge” is sometimes a dangerous thing, but in these cases it is the lack of that little knowledge that constitutes the danger of the situation; and it is that small amount of necessary knowledge that causes so much needless pain. We can sympathize with Enoch, we can pity him and his father and mother. We wish they had waited a few thousand years to live, when they could have so easily found a cure for the bad colds from which ho must have suflcred in those days of unimproved architecture. And then wo wish wo had known him during the time he was cutting his teeth and was nervous and irritable and sensitive to all the influences surrounding him; and Cainprobably thought there were more influences to the square inch in Nod than in any other land he had ever found. We would havo given him a remedy that would have soothed and quieted him and carried him safely through the attacks ofcholera-infantum and colic he was often bewailing, and would have landed him, healthy, hearty and happy, on childhood’s happy shore, where baby ills are all forgot and baby troublos o’er. It’s easy enough to sing: Take up the baby’s burden, And make its troubles less; Soothe out its little aches and pains And calm its fretfulness. But if you arc going to do this with least trouble to yourself and least danger to the baby; if you wish as o standby only a remedy which has been tried time and time again, and always successfully; if you wish a medicine that will soothe without stupefying and relieve without being injurious, Then take the bottle off the shelf And to the baby give, And let it help its littlo self To Pitt’s Carminative. LAMAR fc RANKIN DRUG CO., Atlanta, Ga. Frank F. Veetre, TAILOR, 356 Second Street, PHONE 68 6. MACON, GAAn automobile i» one ol the good things that none of us cares to pu»h along. The most pronounced time-saver of The Twentieth Century Is a perfect fountain pen Waterman's kfrnj fountain ‘Pen •s the best. For busy. Progressive people its vahie can not be over estimated. Your preferred gold pen with ink bottle combined: ready lor immediate use on all occasions, whether traveling, soliciting, re porting oral the desk. For sale everywhere. COMPLETE CATALOCUE FURNISHED. L. E. Waterman Co., Largest Fcantala T a Maasfactarer la the W.rld. 173 Broadway, Ntw York. ESTABLISHED 1892. STEPHEN LANE FOLOER. Watches, Diamonds, Jewelry. Club and College Pins and Kings. Gold and Silver Medals. 180 BROADWAY NtW YORK ESTABLISHED 1783. Academy of Richmond County. AUGUSTA, GA. COL. C. H. WITHROW, Principal. 1870 A. K. HAWKES 1903 MANUFACTURING OPTICIAN. FACTS NOT FANCIES. THIRTY-TWO year of uninterrupted success and progress. The first exclusive Optical house established in the South, and the first in recognized Optical improvements up to date. The vast amount of our business, coming from all parts of the United States, indicates the merit of our goods and the extent of their reputation. 14 Whitehall, on the Viaduct. H. J. LAMAR Pres. H. J. LAMAR. JR . V.Pcs. Mgr LAMAR LAMAR, Wholesa'e and Retail Druggists. Agency Maillard’s Candy. Imported Cigars. 6oc., 8oc., $i per lb. 15c., 35c., 35c. each. Second and Mulberry Sis., Macon, Ga. Athens Coal and Coke Company. DEALERS IN Wholesale and Retail Coal, Coke and Wood. Exclusive Agent for Red Ash and lcllico Coal. Yard : Seaboard Depot and College Are. Office, Clayton St., Next to Scudder’s. Presents have a better effect than absence in making the modern maiden’s heart grow fonder.A love ulc: Candy, more candy; theatre, more theatre; books, dances, engagement, marriage, divorce. JNO. L. MOORE SONS Successors to KelUm Moore Cf Ci SCIENTIFIC OPTICIANS , Are doing a class of eye work that is practically beyond competition. They have had years of experience in optical manufacturing. and each employee is a Specialist- Prudential Building, 42 N. Broad Street. ATLANTA, GA. Three Stores ! TURNER ( HODGSON. The Fastidious Mari Dry Goods and kShoes. GHflS. STERN GO. Clothiers, Hatters, Furnishers jZ? jz? SUITS MJIDE TO ORDER. FIT GUJIRJtNTEED. 113 Clayton St., Athena, Ga. I.ikes to know that the few pieces of jewelry, which fashion decrees he shall wear, are in perfect taste. Our •'lone suit” is to furnish those jewelry wearables which are absolutely correct in style and workmanship. SIGNET RINGS bear an Individuality which few pieces of jewelry possess. The handsomely engraved monogram may be simply for ornamentation, or reversed to use as a seal. We hare a choice selection of Signet Rings, hand-carved and plain, in the polished. Rose and Roman finish. Maier (Si BerRele, 31 Whitehall St., Atlanta, Ca. » handiomoly ttlu itrated catalogue tor our out-of-town cuMtomori. It it a wise man who is not afraid to show his ignorance.A Pailor—Ttii; Place Where Ladle Deceive Their Gurus. College men know and the New Haven Union says, apropos of term-end with its good-bys : ‘‘The question of What in the world to give a friend at parting seems to have been solved by the publication of Songs of all the Colleges which is alike suitable for the collegian of the past, for the student of the present, and for the boy (orgirl) with hopes; also for the music-loving sister, and a fellow’s best girl.” "AH the NKW tongs, all the Ot.D songs, and Ike songs popular at all Ik colleges', "a welcome gift in any kome anywhere," AT ALL BOOK STORES AND MUSIC DEALERS Postpaid si.so. or sent on approval by the publishers, Si. so Postpaid. HINDS NOBLE NEW YORK CITY Dictionaries. Translations, Students' Aids—Schoolbooks of all publishers at one store. INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY motive evening enter- Competition In Love Ii The Life Of The Candr Man’s Trade.Absinthe make the heart prow fonder. Hoke Smith and H. C. Peeples, LA WYERS. PETERS BUILDING. Atlanta, , , • Georgia. No. 1649. Chartered 1866. i ---the— Merchants’ National Bank OF SAVANNAH. CAPITAL $500,000. SURPLUS $100,000. UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY. J. A. G. CARSON, President. BIERNE GORDON. Vice-President. NV. M. DAVANT. Cashier. Accounts of banks and bankers, merchants and corpc rations received upon the most favorable terms consist, ent with safe and conservative banking. An automobile is one of the good thing me mmole storu 111 Briei! Good Clothing, Shoes, Hats and Furnish-ngs at the fairest prices. “Your money back’’ says so. OUTFITTERS H. J. PORTER CO., MEN d, boys. Augusta, Ga. DR. C. A. RYDER, Manager, C. A. CONSTANTINE. Sec’y. Classic City Dental Rooms. Best Equipped Dental Office in Athens. McDowell Building. Special Rates to Students. GENTS’ FURNISHINGS, THE BEST. PRICES THE FAIREST. PHILLIPS AND JONES. CHERRY STREET, MACON, GA. that none of us cares to push along.Presents liave a better effect than absence in making the modern maiden's heart grof wonder Fine Printing Pictures, Framing, Wall Paper, Photo Supplies. —Jill at Most Treasonable Prices GOOD STATIONERY In Endless Vatricy BOOKS GALORE, G. W. Me G R E G 0 R BooK Store, Athens, Georgia. J. K. DAVI5 Electrical Contractor Electrical and Telephone Supplies. Cor. Clayton St., and College Ave. Athens, Ga- A. H. O’FARRELL WHOI.E3ALK AND RKTAIL Handling the best grades only. Satisfaction guaranteed. Lowest prices. Office--. Cor. Hroad and .Spring S«». Yards: Central R. R. Next to Webb end Crawford. Phone 'a 14. ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦444 44- BROOKS BROTHERS Fine Clothing and Furnishing Goods. Broadway, Cor. 22nd Street, NEW YORK. Suits and Overcoats In the latest styles and newest fabrics ready made or to measure, from the medium to the highest priced. Rainproof O'ergarmcnt . Equipment for Riding, Polo or the Hunt. Ramie loose mesh fibre underwear specially adapted for summer wear. Trunks, Valises, Luncheon Baskets, etc. SPECIAL ATTENTION TO MAIL ORDERS Illustrated Catalogue on request. . A love tale: Candy, more candy, theatre, more theatre, books, dances, engagement, marriage, divorce.It Is a Wise Man Who i‘ Not Afraid to Show His Ignorance. SOUTHERN COLLEGES Nearly all of those, which issue handsomely engraved Anniversary and Commencement Invitations, arc having them done by a Southern firm who arc doing very artistic work. We refer to J. 1 . STEVENS, of ATLANTA, GA. This house has a magnificently equipped plant for the production of high-grade steel and copper plate engraving, and invitation committees would do well to obtain their prices and samples l»cforc placing their orders. The University Summer School for Teachers Athens, Ga. Apply to E. C. BRANSON, A. M. PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS WHENEVER YOU’RE OUT TO BUY WE PRINTED THIS BOOK FOOTE (El DAVI ES CO. nd Ih. Allied Arta 05 E. Alabama Straat, Atlanta. Ga. A Parlor—The Place Where Ladies Deceive Their Gue»t  SEND YOUR ORDERTOTHE itilc ffitu umakwiiu Co. 507-515 WASHINGTON 5T. BUFFALO,N.Y. The engravings in this book tvere made by the Electric City Engraving Company, Mo. 507-515 Washington Street. Buffalo, M. Y. Largest engraving house for College plates in the States. Write for Prices and Samples. Our work is endorsed by over 200 business managers of College Jfnnuals.


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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1899 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1901 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1902 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1904 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1906 Edition, Page 1

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