University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1902

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1902 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 262 of the 1902 volume:

1—————■rT-" —■ - --------------- Central of Georgia R»ailway. PERFECT PASSENGER AND THROUGH SLEEPING CAR SERVICE BETWEEN ALL PRINCIPAL POINTS 0 IN jILA'BAMA and GEORGIA. For further informotion apply to any Aeent of the Company, or to J. E. HUMPHREY, Agent, Athens, Ga. J. M. MALLORY, T. P. A., Macon, Ga. THEO. D. KLINE, W. A. WINBUUN, J. C. HAILE, F. J. ROBINSON, Gen’l. Superintendent. Traflic Manager. Gen’l Pass. Agent. Asst. God’1. Pius. Agt. SAVANNAH, GEORGIA.Geo. Muse Clothing Co Geo. Muse Clothing Co., Atlanta, Ga. Spring Styles ------------- Clothing, Furnishings, Hats Shoes. Yes, they are all in—the latest and best in Woolen Suits. And you won't have any trouble in finding your style and your fit. Clothing, young men, is one of the first things for which this store grew famous. Neckwear, Colored Shirts, New Hat Shapes. A style must be good to get in at Muse's. Muse's accepts nothing but the best.Published by the FRATERNITIES of the University of Georgia. June Tenth, Nineteen-TWo. Lews W VOLUME XV. PANDORAT Have you chicked, to be sure, volume is cut.. ,.-- and title page? Imperfect volumes delay return BOUND BY THE NATIONAL LIBRARY BINDERY CO. OF GA. MCollege Calendar fQr 1901-1902. September 16th, and 17th, Monday and Tuesday— Examinations for entrance. September 18th, Wednesday—Session Opens. November 28ih, Thursday—Thanksgiving Day. December 20th, Friday—Christmas Recess begins. January 7th, Tuesday—Exercises resumed. January 20th, Monday—Birthday of It. E. Lee. January 29lh and 30th, Wednesday and Thursday— Examinations for entrance half-advanced. January 31st, Friday—Second term begins. February 10th, Wednesday—Anniversary of the Do-mosthenian Society. February 22nd, Saturday—Washington’s Birthday; Anniversary of the Phi Kappa Society. February 24th, Monday—Junior and Senior Essays due. March 10th, Monday—Competitive Senior Speaking. March 17th, Monday—Competitive Junior Speaking. May 10th, Saturday—Junior Competitive Debates. May 17 th, Saturday—Sophomore Competitive Debates. May 2ilh,Saturday—Freshman Competitive Debates. May 24th, Saturday—Final Examinations. June 13th and 14th, Friday and Saturday—Examination for Entrance. June 15th,Sunday—11 a. m., Baccalaureate Sermon. June 18th, Wednesday—Commencement Day. June 30th, Monday—Summer School Begins. September 18th, Wednesday—101st Session Opens. eUniversity Centennial Commencement. SOPHOMORE. DECLAIMERS. B. S. Walkkk, John D. Wino, -M. S. Johnson, C. D. Dorsey, • Glenn W. I.eowkn. J. D. Manley, W. H. Jones, C. W. Bond, - ■ Monroe. . Atlanta. • Atlanta. Atlanta. Crawfordvilie. - Griffin. Macon. - Cowan. JUNIOR ORATORS. Kalpii A. Graves, E. W. Raosdalk, Wilson M. Hardy, Frank H. Barrett, K. E. Edwards, -Ira W. Williams, -Walter M. Jackson, M. W. Lewis, Hainbridge. • Dallas. Rome. Augusta. Sylvester. Villa Rica. Augusta. Atlanta. SENIOR ESSAYISTS AND ORATORS. J. D. McCartnby, .... Thomasville. We. M. Davis,...........................Macon. E. A. Duke, - - - . - - - Newton. W. C. Thomson',.......................Madison. LAW SPEAKERS. E. N. Calhoun, John P. DeHart. 101st Commencement. COMMENCEMENT PROGRAMME. Saturday, June 14th— 11 a. iu.—Sophomore Declamation . 4 p. m.—Junior Orations. Delivery of Sophomore Prizes. 6 p. m.—Prize Drill. 6 p. m.—Champion Debate. Sunday, June 15tii— 11 a. m.—Baccalaureate Sermon. Monday, June 16Tn— 11 a. ra.—Address before Literary Society by Hon. Edward S Shepherd of N. Y. City. 4 p. ra.—University Celebration by Representatives of cacli branch. 10.30 p. m.—Junior Class Hop. Tuesday, Junk 17tii— 9 a. m.—Meeting Alumni Society. 12 in.—Address before Alumni Society. 4 p. m.—Senior and Law Class Exercises. 10.30 p. m.—Law-Class Hop. Wednesday— 11a. m.—Baccalaureate Address. Delivery of Diplomas. 10.30 p. m.—Senior Class Hop. PREFACE. HT the beginning of the present session Pandora found herself in sore straits. She was weighted down by a debt of $830.00. But with the generous assistance of her friends and the University’s patriotic Alumni she has arisen from the mire of depression and now extends to the public her heartiest greetings. 1 s Editors of Pandora.Editor In Chief Pr )K.KE xi,eti.SA£, I [{ Editors. . Ct k lDP jseil Ae. f’li JPietd’ er.K.s. % 3-C CT), K. A. Is cFi-f ete .S-N, IQU'O C asipcssr x crs. Sles WLecafe.x. . JfeinjcsK.' osfd nATfi,.Trustees of the University of Georgia, His Excellency, Governor A. I) Candler, Atlanta, Kx-oflicio. G. F. Gorki:, MirlcUi....................From the Stnte-at Urge................Term expire September let, 1907 Clark Howkll, Atlanta......................From the Siatc-al-Urge................Term expires September 1st, 1907 Hamilton McWhorter, Lexington.............From the $tatc-at-Urge................Term expires September 1st, 1905 W. E. Simmons. LawrenccviUc.............From the State-al-largc...............Tcnn expires September 1st, 1901 Samuel B. Adams, Sivannah..................First Congressional District .........Term expires September 1st, 1905 B. B. Bower, Bainbridgc..................Second Congressional District..........Term expires September 1st, 1905 W. H. Fish, Aincricus...................Third Congressional District...........Term expires September 1st, 1905 Henry Persons, Talbotton...................Fourth Congressional District..........Term expires September 1st, 1903 II. D. McDaniel, Monroe...................Fifth Congressional District...........Term expires September 1st, 1903’ A. O. Bacon, Macon.........................Sixth Congressional District............Term expires September 1st, 1907 D. B. Hamilton, Borne....................Seventh Congressional District..........Term expires September 1st, 1907 H. T. Lewis, Greensboro..................Eighth Congressional District.........Term expires September,]st, 1903 X. L. Hutchins, Lawrenccvillc...........Ninth Congressional District............Term expires September 1st, 1907 E. II. Calloway, Augusta.................Tenth Congressional District............Term expires September 1st, 1907 H. G. Turner, Quitman......................Eleventh Cougrsssional District......Term expires September 1st, 1907 A. L. Hull. Athens.........................Resident Trustee........................Term expires September 1st, 1907 Howell Conn, Athens........................Resident Trustee.......................Term expires September 1st, 1907 N. E. Harris, Macon, President of Technological Board, Ex-otlicio. F. G. DuBionon, Savannah, President Board of Commissioners. Girls’ Industrial College, Ex-otlicio. P. W. Meldrim, Savannah, President Board of Commissioners,Colored Industrial College, Ex-officlo. 12The Academic Faculty, Walter Barnard Hill, A. M., B. L., Chancellor, tail Profeaaor of Melaphyalca and Klhlca Henry Clay Write. Pii. D., F. C. S., President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arte, and Professor of Chemlatry. David Crenshaw Barrow, A. M., C. And M. E., Deanot Franklin College, and Profeasor of Mathematics. John Pendleton Caupiiell, A. B., Pii. I)., Profeaaor ol Biology. Willis Henry Bocock, A. M., I’rofeaaor of Aactent Language . Charles Morton Strahan, C. and M. E., Professor of Civil Engineering. John Hanson Thomas McPherson, A. B., Pii. D., Profeaaor of lllatory and Political Science. Charles Mercer Snkllino, a M., Profeaaor of Matheniatlca. William Davis Hooper, A. M., Profeaaor of Latin. John Morris, A. M., Profeaaor of XLgllah language and Teutonic Philology. Joseph Lvstrat, Bacii. es Lett., Profe«nor of Romance Language . Law Walter Barnard IIill A. M , B. L., Chancellor, and lecturer on the Science and Hlatory of la , Federal Law. and Legal Kthtoa. Howell Cord, A. M., B. L., Profeaaor of Law. Sylvanub Morris, A. M., B. J,., Profeaaor of Law. Andrew Henry Patterson, A. M., Profeat »r of Physic and Astronomy. ITuoii Kesbit Starnes, A. B., Profeaaor of Agricnlture. Rorkrt Emory Park, A. B., A. M , Profeaaor of Rhetoric and Rngllah Literature. Charles Holmes Herty, Pii. B., Pii. D., Adjunct Profeasor of Chemlatry. Uriah IIarrold Davenport, B. S , 1 nil rue tor In Physics and Electrical Engineering. Ernest Lf.e Griggs (Graduate V. M. I.), Instructor In Engineering and Commandant ofCadeta. James Madison Stephenson, Jr., A. B., Tutor In Engllab. James Bolan Lawrence, A. B., Tutor In Ancient language . G. G. Bond, A. M., Lecturer In Paychology and Logic. William Oscar Payne, A. B., Tutor In lllatory and Aaaltlant Librarian. William Dana Hoyt, A. B., Laboratory Assistant In Biology. Miss Sarar A. Frierson, Librarian. Faculty. John D. Mkll, A. ])., B. L., Professor of Parliamentary Law. Samuel C. Benedict, M. ])., Profeaaor of Medical Jurisprudence. J. II. T. McPherson, A. B., Pn. D., Lrclureron Roman Law. 13Senior Class Officers G. F. Gober, Jk. . Roy D. Stubbs .. Morris Michael . L. P. Goodrich .. Russel Gould .. . W. P. Aiken R. J. Stephens .. . S. J. Nix...... M. S. Richardson Edgar Oliver .. . Norwood Oxford ............President. .. .. Vice-President. ............Historian. ........... Secretary. ............Treasurer. .. Captain Baseball .. Manager Baseball. .. Captain Football . Manager Football. Captain Relay Team. .................Poet. 16Senior Class, 1902. Frank II. Barrett, A. B. 'Ah-l'.A. :. Augusta. Georgia. Filtered Freshman Clam; Class Hum Kail Train. '90.-'« -'01-'02: Second Base Ball Team W-'Ol; Vice PrMdenl Phi Kappa: Champion Debater Phi Kappa ’W: Sophomore Declalntcr; Sophomore Hop Committee; Junior Orator; K«ll-tnrlal Staff Georgian '01; President Pres Club '01; Charter Member and Proalilent Caod; EcV.tor Georgian 'Ot-'Od, Rdltor In Chief '02 Pandora; Annlver-«arlnn Phi Kappa '02; Alternate State Oratorical Contest '02. Valedictorian of the Senior Class. Madison Bell. B. h l‘. A-A'. A. Atlanta. Georgia. President of Phi Kappa; Pi.eldent f Atlanta Club; Vice President Bmory Club: Law Class Speaker; Member law lb p Committee; Member Cu8(|Ue and Gauntlet. Sterling Hamilton Blackshear, A. B. - A.-.V. 1 . Athens. Georgia. Kntere.l l-'reshninn year; Captain Fm«h-man Base Ball Team; Substitute on Varsity Base Ball Team President Sophomore Claws; Captain Second Base Ball Team ' » : Center Field Varsity IktSe Ball Team ’ »; Corporal Corps Cadets; Sergeant Ooriiw Cadets. Winner Tennis Championship '01: Third Base on Varsity Base Ball Team 'o'.: Member Sphinx; Junior Hop Committee. AVI liner Tennlw Champlon-shlp '02: Co-Bdltor in CWcf of Pandora, 02.lid win Kuthven Camp, A. B. 'A. j.w. Deni. Atlanta. Georgia. Knlcretl Sophomore. 'W: Sergeant Corps Catlcti : Captain Claw May Team. Sophomore a nil Junior year ; Ks-chailKc Kdltor. laical K.l ‘tor, Killtor In Chief Real anil I’.lack; Member Cacti. Sidney S. Dean, A. B-tf'-A'--. A. Rome. Georgia. Klitcrcil Sophomore Claims of r. C. In Sep.. W, Sub-Quarter Vuraiiy K. 11. T. ’W. Sub Halfback ' » . Vamlty ' ’1; Ckua is.w IkiII. Foot Hall anil Track Team T S.'n2; Unirnex Manager mill Kdltor V. M. C. A. Ham! Hook; Member Citcil.; Cupt. flax K. It. T. 'UO: Member •Atlvleory lioinl ‘Ol-'tC: Member Athletic Council ’OI-MS: Cupt. V»r-xlty Truck Team 'Ol-'tK: itepresen-latlve anti winner two second place at S. I. A. A. Track Meet •«; Winner cIkIii tlrm an.I two second place on llcld day . Miguel dc Guerra, B. L. !’■ A-A. San Joan. Porto Kloo.John Alphonso Jenkins, IS. I.. '. A. Mont Jtna. Ccoij-Ih. I’n-s t. nt Mont I’.irllsmicnl: l iw Clasoi ISnsn- ItiiH Ten in. Junto Kollock Jordan, l S. T.'.l. D era. Sandertvlllc. (iforRia. ICut.-i Jiilllur Iil.-nt 'Vrnov- lli. nl.in Solely: liiifimsK Mn natter '14! I’liinlora. Cliumtiloii IX'lulrr 'VI. Mitchell King, A. ]), . '. Phi Kappa. Atlanta. Georgia. Hnii-x-il Cn'li'iii- September ’! : Vice I'reul.lciu aiiit Charter Momlier Cned: Chairman Sophomore Hop Committee: Sergeant (.'ori»i Cadet ; Chapln'n Junior Cla : Junior Hop Committee: l.«n-;il K.lltor Hod ami Black; Second 1 .lei. tenant, Co. A; Senior Hop Com. niltU-C.Henry .J«nu Hmuir, Jr.. I . S.. Macon. t.c rjjiji Soplm.norv 11o|i Committee: Chairman Junior Hop Conimliliv; CImI.’iimii .Si n i lio;t ........... Sub Varsity i . It. T -,i m •«!. Vmulty ’oi.'itt: Olna Han.. Itall Tram ' M-‘0|.-o»; Man.tKvr C Clu s Knot Hall Tram; Clan Relay l'-«m; Seem ant Hattnllon: VUv l‘re«| Ion; AihlrMi- Axxm'lallon three term : See. ret ary . ll»!rtU- A'j ,-latlon: Mmu»r ■ f Red an.I It lack: Member Caul. Sphinx, CM»(|ur ami (iauntlet. .1. 1 I.rwis, A. 15. . A- . V. t;rec»«boro. (jeorala. Knt.-rv.l Sophomore Cijx : Memiier of Caul. M. W. I.owig, A. Ji. 4 - h . T. Greensboro. UeontU. Kmrrul Sophomore fin ; Junior Clan Historian: Junior Orator; Bunlnea Manas:, r of 'OS Pandora; Charier Member of Cued and Casque and Gauntlet.Wilson M. linrily, A. It. '. h-±'. .1. K. Koine. tlcorgU. KiuitisI Sophomore Year: Class Foot Util mid Truck Team ; Substitute end Varsity Foot Hit 11 Team 'on-’Ol: Vnndty Tr.tek Team; Winner 13 yard Mu dlo Unco; Assistant Manager 't»i Foot Kail Team: Kdltor and Manager V. M. C. . Handbook ' M; Hujiln.-joc Manager Ceorgiun '01: Kdltor Georgian '01-'i»2: German Club'lO: Junior llop Committee; Sergeant Major and Adjutant C«rp Cadets; Junior Orator; North Carolina Debater "uj; Vie.- President and President Phi Kappa; President Y. M. «. A.: Member Cns |tie and flaunt let: Member and business Manager Thai-lans; Charter Member itnd President f'aed: Member and I . P. of Sphinx. James Force Hart, It. Aj». ’. A- . ». Athens, Georgia. Kntered Freshman Class; Winner Mile bun '01; President Phi Kappa; Corporal Corps CndelA i’inktts llapp. A. IA-ItitK'pt'ixIutil. Macon, Georgia. Kntered Freshman Class: Vlee President Freshman Class: Corporal University Cadets; Manager Sophomore Claes base ball Team: Sergeant of Cadets: Member Thalian Dramatic Club; Second Lieutenant of Cadets; Uepres?n-tative to Advisory board from In l«»-liendents: President Athletic Ass ', 11-tlon: Member University Orchestra. Kimlc limiter, It. L. I'. ! . Athenf, Georgia. I.« v flnsj I l«»p Commit tea. Waller Jackson, Jr., It. S. .1. .’. Augueta. Georgia. Kiil.-rcil Krodunnn Clnaa; Thallan ' •; Vico President and Business Mana« -r Thailand 01; President Thailand "tB: MximKrr nml lender Mandolin and Guitar ('IiiIi; V-ice President Glee Club ‘01; Vico President 1’. K.: Sojdin. more Deelalmer; Junior Orator; Mem-Ikt Orehosira.Daniel O’Connell Dougherty. .Tr , H. S. Detn. Atlanta. Georgia. Kt.torcd Senior year. 11. S. Course; ln-niT Mill Itnn "02. Krle M. DouaMson. 1$. L. '. A‘ A .I. ltalnlirldge, Georgia. w. (). Fleming, II. S. '. h-l X. Atlanta. Georgia. A«wd»ti Editor Hod anil Elack; I'ro l-■lent Thullans; Vice President Phi Kappa; Cotillion Commute.-; Manager «! Foot (tail Team. Entered Senior Claw; Senior Hop Committee: Associate E-Xtor Rod an l Htaok (Second Term): Editor In Chief It.-.! atut Rla»k (Third Term).,1 w- II. M. Fletcher, 15. L. '. A..A. 2. Jackson. Georgia. Associate Kdltor Pandora: President Sen lor ljw Cla»K; President Phi Kappa Literary Society; Speaker Commencement for Senior l«aw Clan : Memlrer C.-uarjiu nnil Gauntlet. Lucien Pritchard Goodrich, A. 15. '. A. Gridin, Georgia. Knicnil Sophomore Class; Treasurer or Junior Claw: Secretary of Senior Ola ! : North Carolina Deleter, ’01: President of I’tr; Kappa; Kdltor of Georgian ’Ol-’OS: Charter Member Omar Khayyam Club. Holhwcll Graham,Jr., A. ll.f.N-J.T.J a them. Georgia. Member and President Cacd.Noel I’onllniu Park. A. 11. 4'. A- . 4 Greensboro, Georgia. Kntcred Sophomore Y«'.ir: Chart, r M.m her : Vice President Card; Kim: Vice Pri'HlilMH I’lil Kappa: Assistant Business Manager Red and I'dack; Sophomore Declaimer; Sergeant Corin' Cadet ; Manager Track Team; Junior Hop Committee; .Member Athletic Council two lerim: Lieutenant Corps Cadets; Member Sphinx; P. II. of Sphinx; Senior Cl.u . I Safe- nail Tetro; Manager ltn«o Hall Team; Pan Hellenic Hop. Committee. Marion S. Uiclianlson. 1. 4 „ . A. Kappa. Atlanta. Georgia. Rniered Softhomoro Year: Vice President Phi Kappa; Secretary l.lternry Clue •01; Associate Kdltor ’til Pandora; I’.iet Junior Clnss; Sergeant Drum CotP« •01; Washington. D. C.. "01; President Pre».» Club •«: Sen-lor Kdltor Kn l-neerlug Annual C. F.xehnnge Kdltor Red and Black -02; Senior Hop Committee: Alternate X. C. Debate 02. President of Caed; Associate Kdltor cf Red and Black: Member ..f Sphinx: Manager Senior Foot Ball Team: i’res-Ident Emory Club. Janies Lnngslreet Siblcv, 11. S.. Independent, 4 . A. Athena, Georgia. .IoIiil D. X. McCartney, H. S.2. I.A ThoniMvIlle. ii«ori;U. Kntored Sept. 'S3; Editor In Chief 'm l »u. •lorn; Vico Problem l.lterary Club V-ill; Advluory lloxnl of Georgian • . ul; Editorial Staff Georgian 'nl-'CC. '. ;• til iirolliiH Debater '"I; Member I' i. l- «m»: Memlier ('jhiup mul Gauntlet; Hv|irwnlatlve State College at Co:n-meneement Kxorelac . W. I. MacIntyre, H. S- A. ThomasTlIle, Georgia. Entered Jtir or Year; Oa.-N. C Debater t«l; Hepre eitt tlv« of State Coll ie 'til Commencement; liii-dncv Manager of Georgian; I’realdcni of Oratorical A . aoclatlon; Senior Hop Committee; I’rcildent of l'li. Kapj a; Member Caague anil Gauntlet Club. ‘ I ft 2KoIhtI l.igon McWhorter. A. II '. A. s.Mulr1lli . Conrgla. Km.ie.l Sophomore Ye.it; IVesi.lent Ini K-i|i|i;i; Editor in Chief Knginoc'nu Annual, .James Frank Howard, 15. S. Deni. Atlanta. Ceorgln. Fdgar Oliver, A. 15. hem. Kliulmee, Florida. Entered Sophomore Class; Clyde Shropshire Orator: Winner Sophomore Debater Moil.il; Alternate to Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest; Ceiitcn.nil Orator for Franklin College; Champion Doliator: Substitute on Foot Ball Team; President of Demoatheiknn So. oloty; Demosthonlan Annlversarlan: Winner Sophomore Cup.Kobvrt Grier Stephen , A. Atl.inl . (iranril. Koy Davis Slul bs, it. S. Dent. Ka ton ton, fleorgl . Kntcred Soiiliomor-- Year; Secretary mid IMrlUiru'iunrlxn of DcimMthenljn: Secretary of Junior Cliw; Vlcv President of Sen:or Class; President of Dcmosthenlnn Society.William l at Aiken, A. 11., Hem. Non. Pennington, Georgia. Captain Senior Bate Ball Team. Kcubeu Lee Blackwell, Dem., 11. S. Dtp, Georgia. Entered Sophomore Year. Miles Willis Collier, 11. S., Dem. Xou. Comer. Gaorgia. Entered Sophomore Year. Joseph George Faust, A. 11. X. F. C., Lexington, Georgia. Entered Sophomore Class; Sopho.nore Declalmcr; Sergeant Corps Cadets; Secretary. Treasurer. Parliamentarian, Vice President and President Drnwa. thenlan Society. Goo. F. Gobcr, Jr., P. K., Non-Fraternity Club. Marietta. Georgia. Member Advisory Hoard; President Senior Claw . Russell Gould, A. R., San Antonio. Texa . Entered Fre hroan; Junior Editor of '00 Engineering Annual; Assistant In Physic and Electrical Engineering. Ralph Augustus Graves, A.B. M A'..4. Ralnbrldge, Georgia. President P. K.: Junior Speaker; Winner of Ready Writer ' Medal; President Literary Club: Entered Junior Year; Member of Caed; Left college Senior Year. Augustus Longstreet Hull, 11. S., Dem. S. A. F. Athena. Georgia. Var.«lty Base Hall Team 'OO-'Ol; Sub cn Varsity Foot Balt Team; Member of Sphinx; Captain Junior Bane Ball Team; left college Senior year. Oscar Lowell Keith, A. 15. Dem. Athena, Georgia. Freshman Hlstor.an; Corp of Cadets Captain Co. A. Sydney Johnston Nix, A. 11., Xon-Fmtemily Club, D., Harmony Grove. Georgia. Entered Sophomore Year; Sophomare Speaker; Secretary Sophomore CIjus; Secretary Demonthcnlan Society; Second Sergeant Co. B; Vice Prealdent Demosthcnlan Society: Winner In Shot-put 01: Business Manager Red and Black '01-'02: First Lieutenant Co. b: Captain Senior Foot Ball Team; Right Guard Varsity Foot Ball Team 'Cl: Prealdent Demosthenlan Society: President Y. M. C. A. Norwood Oxford, A. 11.. Nou-Fraurru-Ity Club, F. A. VIontleello. Georgia. Entered Sophomore Class; Cla n Poet: Sophomore Declalmcr; Member So Jho-more and Junior Fool Ball Team: Vies President Phi Kappa: Senior Ba e Ball Team. E. W. Ragsdale, A. B., Non-Fratcm-ity Club, Dent. Dallas, Georgia. Entered Freahmnn Year; Champion Debater; Sophomore Speaker: Mrmtvr Advisory Board; Historian Sophomore Class; Corporal Co. B. 'W-'OO; Junior Speaker; .Associate Editor Georgitn. 'OO-'Ol; Vice Prealdent Pros Club; Vice Prealdent Demosthenlan Society; First Sergeant Co. C; Prealdent Junior Cl.-uw; Captain Co. B. Corps Cade:a; President Demostheoian Society. Ira Wellington Williams, l .A'-A. H., Nou., Villa Ktea. Georgia. President Y. M. C. A.: Prealdent of P. K.; Prealdent of Oratorical Association; Sophomore Declalmer and Junior Speaker: Franklin College Speaker. 'OS. Morris Michael, A. B-0.A'. Athens. Georgia. Vice Prealdent of Sophomore Clasa; Mem-her of University Orchestra: Historian of Senior Claa .History of the Senior Class. • ♦|V| O class has made a more creditable rc-cord than that of 1902. During their journey through college they have drunk deep from the “Pierian Spring" of Freshman Botany, traversed the burning sands of Sophomore math, overcome the dangers of Senior conditions, and, at last, have reached the Ultima Thule of a student’s ambition—the time for graduation. To describe fully the career of this class would be to write the history of the University during this period. For during all this time they have not only upheld the reputation of their Alma Mater, but Itave, in no small degree, increased the floodtide of her fame. We point with pride to the fact that our class occupies a position in the esteem of the Faculty which reflects the highest credit upon every member of '02. Indeed, there is not a department in college which has not been advanced by their efforts. The following facts will attest how thoroughly this is true. The Senior class can truly boast of having nourished many orators in its bosom. Not only were the Sophomore speeches of ’oo the best ever delivered in the University chapel, but also we must feel proud of our four North Carolina debaters, who have twice carried the red and black to victory, two anniversarians, three champion debaters and the four speakers who have represented Franklin College and the State College at the celebration by the branch colleges of the University held in Athens during commencement. In literary and journalistic circles, we have furnished a President of the Literary Gub, six editors of The Georgian, two editors-in-chief of the Red and Black, nine editors of the Pandora, two editors-in-chief of the same, and seven presidents of the debating societies. In athletics ’02 has stood pre-eminent since the Freshman year. Its members have been represented on the baseball, football and track teams. This year we have the manager of the 32baseball team, captain of the track team and president of the Athletic Association. In regard to the college Y. M. C. A., its most active members are '02 men, and it was mainly through their efforts that its high efficiency was reached. The class of ’02 faces the future with its store-house of knowledge well supplied with those materials which will make the owners thereof shine rcsplcndcntly in all affairs of life, reflecting credit upon themselves and upon their Alma Mater. HISTORIAN. 33iJunior Class Officers F. M. Ridley...... J. M. McDonald, Jr., G. B. Franklin .... Leo. Hudson....... E. W. Martin...... I. S. Peebles,.... Henry McCalla .. . E. E. Dali.is..... C. D. Russell..... A. Calhoun ....... John Monahan .... Joe Mouley........ Robt. Moran....... ............President. .......Vice-President. .............Historian. ............Secretary. ..............Treasurer. ...................Poet. . .. Captain Baseball. . .. Manager Baseball. . .. Captain Football. . .. Manager Football. . Captain Track Team. Manager Track Team. ...............Chaplain. 36Roll of Junior Class Abbott, Huxley...................................................................Athens. JBeaver, Sandy Jr.,..............................................................Augusta Bond, Claude Wilson...............................................................Canon. Bunn, Charles Carden, Jr......................................................Cedartown. Barrow, Thomas Augustine.........................................................Pelham. Brooks, Robert Preston....................................................Millcdgcvillc. Baxter, Julian Fitzsimons.......................................................Atlanta. Barrow, Benjamin Henry...........................................................Athens. Benedict, Samuel Revand..........................................................Athens. Boyd, Minor.....................................................................Atlanta. Cohen, Dewald A.................................................................Atlanta. Cheney, W. Omer..............................................................Bairdstown. Coile, William Rutherford...................................................Winterville. Clay, Eugene Herbert...........................................................Marietta. Calhoun, Andrew.................................................................Atlanta. DuPree, Daniel Hughes..........................................................Danville. Dickinson, Marvin McDowku.....................................................La Grange. Dorsey, Cam Dawson..............................................................Atlanta. Drane, William Edgar........................................................Buena Vista. Dallis, Ernest Ellington.............................................Washington, D. C. 37Echols, George Lee............................................................ Florida. Franklin, Oscar Jason........................................................Excelsior. Franklin, George Bruce.............................................-.........Excelsior. Gross, Robert Frank............................................................Thomson. Guiniok, Ludlow.................................................................Dublin. Hudson, Thomas Leo.........................................................Gainesville. High, Joe Benson...............................................................Madison. Jackson, William Anderson.......................................................Athens. Jerger, Edward Remington...................................................Thomasville. Johns, Charles Machen...........................................................Bishop. Jester, John Carlton............................................................Athens. Jones, William Henry.............................................................Macon. Johnson, Smilie L., Jr.,........................................................Etowah. Kreuson, Campbell McDonald....................................................Savannah. Keith, Claud Alphonson........................................................Dry Pond. Lawler, Charles Ross........................................................Tallapoosa. Lyndon, Andrew Jackson, Jr.....................................................Athens.. Legwen, Glenn Walker.....................................................Crawfordville. Manley, Joseph Parson..........................................................Patrick. Mack, Walter Shorman............................................................Athens. Martin, Edgar William.........................................................Crawford. Moran, Robert James............................................................Atlanta. Monahan, John Henry.............................................................Athens. McCall a, James Henry..........................................................Conyers. McDonald, Joseph Melton........................................................Conyers. McWhorter, Charles Stakely.................................................. Woodville. 38McIntyre, Archibald Thompson . Newton, William Flemiller .. . Russell, Charles Dennison .... Ridley, Frank Morris.......... Stanton, Jordan Malcolm....... Scott, Hugh McDaniei.......... Smith, Marion Hoke............ Soloman, William Griffin, Jr.. . Turner, Wm. Randolph.......... Thornton, Alfred Austeli...... Worsham, Wm. Archer, Jr....... Walker, Bili.ington Landers. Jh Young, Leroy Penn.............. Thomasville. .. Madison. .. Savannah. . LaGrange. . .. Winder. . .. Atlanta. . .. Atlanta. . .. Macon. Bamesville. . .. Atlanta. .. Forsythe. .. Monroe. . Woodville. 39History of Junior Class, HE class of 1903 began its auspicious ca-rccr with the advent of the new Chancellor, and the beginning of a new era of prosperity. Never has a class passed through a more interesting and eventful period. We have seen the University spring into new life from the invigorating influence emanating from her recently-elected Chancellor; we have watched with solemn emotions the dying of the old century and welcomed with good resolves the birth of the new; we have seen the celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the Demosthenian Society, and participated in the University’s Centennial Commencement, where we saw her sons—all proud of their mother— mingling together in gladness and unison. We have also seen the purging of athletics and the revolutionizing of the general moral aspect; the erection of two handsome and much-needed buildings, and various other improvements. It has truly been an epoch-making period and one in which the class of naughty-threc has played a considerable part. The class of 1903 has always been a large class. In its Freshman year it was a record-breaker, and its early record has been well sustained through Sophomore and Junior years. While many, we regretfully admit, have fallen by the wayside, and two of our noblest and most beloved members have been caught in Death's cruel embrace and left us bowed with grief, still we have much to be thankful for in the valuable additions which have come to us. These we welcome. And in extending .to them this greeting, we congratulate them, too, upon having won the lasting esteem of their class and the entire University since they came into our midst. But the class of naughty-three lays very little stress on the number of its members. We prefer to record some of the deeds we have done, and let it be judged whether naughty-three has not been a potent factor in college life. On the forum and in the class-room our mem- 40bers have sustained throughout the past three years a very high degree of excellence. In oratory stand first our two representatives to the State Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest, Glenn Legwen and Sam Johnson. We have many other prominent orators and debaters. On the gridiron and the diamond naughty-thrcc has been equally conspicuous. In football we have furnished the captain for two years, besides such players as Dickinson, Beaver, Turner, Smith, Baxter, Monahan and Clay. On the baseball team we have been represented by Captains Beaver and Dickenson, and, besides, we see this year such men as Walker, McWhorter, McCalla and Calhoun among the most active spirits. It is doubtful whether any class of the University has ever had such a record. By the dignity and manliness of its members the class of naughty-thrcc has won the esteem of both the Faculty and the remainder of the student body. The praises of some of our members have already begun to be sung beyond the realm of college circles, while here arc heard impressions from various members of the Faculty, commending the Junior class as the best class in college. What does such a -record mean? Undeniably it means that as the class of 1903 is made up of the kind of material that wins the envy and admiration of its acquaintances in college life, in the actual battle of life its members will show the same spirit, activity and determination which have characterized them in their college days. And it may not be out of place to prophesy that in a few years the burdens of state will devolve upon the shoulders of the members of naughty-threc, as they have shown themselves strong and capable of assuming them. Our college course will soon be finished. Only once more will our class history appear in the annual of the University of Georgia. May we drink deep of the "Pierian Spring" during the next year, so that when the final history of our class sliall be written, it will record even more glorious deeds and honors than any preceding. Just as each succeeding year has afforded a more honorable and brilliant record than the preceding, so may the next year be even more replete with our achievements than this, and may our final history be a grand and fitting climax. HISTORIAN.Sophomore Class Officers, Alvin G. Golucke .. Ralph Meldrim .. .. Abraiiam Falk .... William O. Roberts Neyle Simkins .... Paul Lovejoy...... Chas. F. McLaughlin Henry F. Scott .... Jack D. Bower .... Martin L. Richter .. Jesse F. Cleveland .. Bill Reid......... .............President. .......Vice-President. ............ Secretary. .............Historian. . .. Captain Football. .. Manager Football. . .. Captain Baseball. . .. Manager Baseball . Captain Track Team. Manager Track Team. ...................Poet. .............Chaplain. 44Roll of Sophomore Class, Archer, Leonard Stephens A'. 1'.,.. Anderson, Walter Lester ,A‘. l .. Anderson, Frank Butler........... Aycock, Thomas Rufus............. Bascii, Evan Barrett............. Benton, Taney Oliver............. Bower, Dan Rowland, A’.A......... Bower, Jack Dickinson, A'. A..... Boswell, James Griffin........... Carson, Gordon Cubijkdge, A'. A., .. Craigmiles, Joseph Ellis......... Carter, Marvin Charles, A. T. if., . Chandler, Isaac Wayne............ Chandler, Johii Cohen............ Coile, James Sherwood............ Cleveland, Jesse Franklin........ Carlton, Calvin Fall............. Cook, Wister Weyman.............. Clarke, Frank Raymond, X. P% .. Davis, Elsie Hamilton, A". l , .... Dobbs, Burney Si-kiNGER.W. 7’. if., .. De La Parrierre, William Earnest Falk, Abraham M.,................ ......Guyton. .......Atlanta. . Douglasville. ......Monroe. .... Savannah. . .. Monticello. . .. Bainbridgc. . .. Bainbridgc. ......Pcnfield. .... Savannah. .. Thomasville. ..........Scott. ........Planter. ........Planter. . .. Wintcrville. Wartrace, Tenn. .........Scnoa. ......Bishop. ......Augusta. ..........Rome. ......Marietta .. .. Haschton. Charleston, S. C. 45Flowers, Lamar...........................................................Doranvillc. Fletcher, Henry Quicg, A'. -................................................Jackson. Golucke, Alvin Gordon.......................................... ......Crawfordvillc. Gordon, High Haralson, .V. ................................................Kirkwood. Hull, Jas. Lumpkin, 2'. A. A’...............................................Alliens. Hodgson, Walter Blensall, h. A„.............................................Alliens. Harris, Herman Hirsch.......................................................Eastman. Hodgson, Joe Laecan, A.T.U...................................................Athens. Jaques, Samuel Randolph,-. A. :..............................................Macon. Jette, Paul Eloridgk, X. 4 ................................................Savannah. Koch, John Christian, A1'................................................Tallapoosa. King, Hiram Anderson.......................................................Red Hill. Lang, Julian Wilbert........................................................Wavcrlv. Lovejov, Paul,-. .V.,.................'......................................Athens. Michael, Max.................................................................Athens. Meldrim, Ralph, .V. Savannah. Miller, Wallace, A. A.,.......................................................Macon. Monk, Marion Stinson, A. 2‘.................................................Atlanta. Maddox, Cone Morgan Aldrkd, . J. «..........................................Atlanta. McMillam, Daniel Bliss,J. t ...............................................Savannah. McLaughlin, Ciias. Franklin,-. .'........................................Greenville. Oliver Clifford Royalston....................................................Plains. Ozier, Robert Edgar.......................................................Montezuma. Payne, Roy Harris............................................................Tifton. Pool, John Henry.........................................................Alpharetta. Reid, Bill Lovely.....................................................Crawfordvillc. Rambo, Marckllus, A.T.U.....................................................Marietta Roberts, William Otis....................................................Yatcsville. Richter, Martin Lutiier,0. J. »..............................................Madison Reynolds, Hekbet Lindi.ey, A. A.,................................. ........Marietta. 46Rouertson, Arm and de Rossette, A. F.........................................Augusta. Scott, Henry Fort, -V. P................................................... Atlanta. Shaw, Walter Barnett, .. -.................................................Lafayette. Stephens, Alexander Hamilton,................................................Atlanta. Seirels, William Templek......................................................Gcrome. Strickland, Charles Grover..................................................Valdosta. Speer, Clarence Eliot........................................................Rayston. Smith, James Simi.on...........................................................Payne. Simkins, Neyle Harersiiam, ■. 1.............................................Savannah. Thompson. Ai.don Fenton......................................................Conyers. ToLrert, Mark Lafayette, -. V................................................Atlanta. Vinson, Johh Clifford,'A J. ( .............................................Montezuma. Vanderau, Edward Herbert,h’. 1................................................Athens. • Wriciit, Louis Moore,-. I. F ,.....................................................Rome. Woods, Roiikrt White..........................................................Athens. Wilkins, Evan Lyde............................................................Athens. Wade, George Hii.i............................................................Etowah. Worsham, Herbert Leonidas, -. A'............................................Forsythe. Welsh. George Vickers, A. T. P..............................................Marietta.History of the Class of '04, HEX the University of Georgia threw wide its doors for the beginning of its One Hundred and First session, among the classes most conspicuously identified with the re-organization of its working forces was the class of '04. This body of intellectual and enterprising boys, with the unity of effort, which lias characterized the class from the first, began from the beginning of the new session to take the initiative in all University undertakings. As our own needs had been either carelessly or judiciously overlooked in the beginning of our college career by the inferior upper class-men, we strongly felt the necessity of reviving the time-honored practice of holding the egotism and aspirations of new men to the confines of reality. Well did we use the dreaded paddle, and many were the Freshmen whose wings were clipped to fit the limited atmosphere in which they must begin to sail. These early exhibitions of wisdom, strength and unity on our part, the Freshmen say, proved to be the salvation of their class. They did organize at last, but after all, an organization of “cold feet" is not of that stuff which is required to take a would-be banquet toaster out into the country and give him his first lessons in Astronomy. At our annual banquet all toasts were responded to, and in grand style, but one of theirs, much to their discredit, was not answered. This is some evidence of the genial good nature and the unexampled solidity of outclass. In athletics our class spirit has stood out with no less prominence than in other fields of diversion. On both the gridiron and the diamond the power of our individual and combined strength has been felt. The class of ’04 joined with the Freshmen to form that eleven which so signally defeated the upper classmen. In baseball, though, on account of the extremely bad weather, she was not allowed to contest for the pennant with the boasting Juniors. To the 48’Varsity football and baseball teams she contributed men who fought bravely to regain Georgia’s former prestige, and whenever those teams needed any spiritual or pecuniary encouragement, her men have always come to the front with voice and pocket-book. With the above facts in mind, modesty indeed, will permit us to say that as a body our class is a success. But what the present Sophomore class has done individually is her highest claim to superiority. In the class-room her boys have shown themselves in every way fitted for the year's hard work. Their unequalled determination combined with their brilliant intellects have made a proud and heroic showing in a long protracted siege against the strongholds of Wells and Gardiner. The Odes of Horace and the Iliad of Homer have yielded their classical lore to them. The mental calibre and literary acumen of the average man of the class is so great that the Faculty's estimation of the competency of Sophomores has been greatly raised, and from now on until the arrival of a poorer class, a course in Shakespeare will be offered in the second year. But since we do not intend to re- 49 main Sophomores always, we predict that the Faculty (who has not considered this fact) will soon revert to their same old course of Shakespeare for Seniors. In debate and everything that requires any great skill or powers of persuasion, ’04 is a potent factor. Whenever analysis and argument is needed to carry a point, we arc always in evidence. In debate especially have we proved the equals if not the superiors of others. In the field of composition and public speaking we have attained such proficiency that there is manifested among the Trustees and the Faculty of the University a warm desire to substitute written speeches for declamation in the annual contest for the Sophomore cup. Amid all these glories and conquests some of our number have been vanquished, some have deserted in the face of difficulties while others have filled their places. Yet although the final test has not yet come, we arc well enough acquainted with the grit, the energy and the determination of the average man of our class to feel safe in predicting a glorious future for ’04. HISTORIAN. 5Fre:$Hmai( Freshman Class Officers Frank Hodgson .. .. Edgeworth Lampkix Eugene Sibley .... Robert Newcomb .. . Paul Harder ...... Harvey Moorf. .... Frank Hoyt ....... George Sibley .... Hinton Baker ..... William Cranstown Wickliffe Goldsmith Jones Yow......... .............President. .......Vice-President. .............Secretary. ..............Treasurer. .............Historian. ...................Poet. .. Manager Football. . .. Captain Football. . .. Manager Baseball. . .. Captain Baseball. Manager Track Team. . Captain Track Team.Roll of Freshman Class. Atkinson, David Scarlett, A. T. U...........................................Brunswick. Baker, Hinton James, X. ! .................................................. Augusta. •Bayhes, Eugene Marcus...........................................................Shady Dale. Benton, Otiio...........................................................Donalsonville. Bernestein, Morris Henry.....................................................Savannah. Bowen, Lucian Conway, h. A.,...............................................Bainhridgc. Bray................................................................................. Brown, John Andrew.............................................................Athens. Bullard.............................................................................. Burrows, Mack H., A. T. Q., Brunswick. Carson, Edwin Williams, A'. A................................................Savannah. Cheney, Robert M.,X T. Q.,.....................................................Athens. Clifton, George Lucas..........................................................Athens. Cobb, Edwin Newton.............................................................Athens. Conway, Keith..................................................................Athens. Combs, Richard Beardsley..................................................Adairsville. Cooper, John Hightower.........................................................Athens. Copeland, John Alexander, A'. 2 .,............................................. Rome. Cozart, Thomas William, -. A. ....................................'......Washington. Cranston, William Johnston, X. P.y...........................................Augusta. Diaz, Caesar.............................................................Havana. Cuba. England, William G., XV., ..................................................Cedartown. Erwin, Pope Barrow.......................................................Clarkesville. 53Evans, Cleveland, X. 4 .,.........................................Spartanburg, S. C. Fawcett, John Rutherford.....................................................Savannah. Fort, Tomlinson................................................................Athens. Goldsmith, J. Wickliffe,X. .....................................-............Atlanta. Hanson, Wesley Turn ell, X. ............................................Social Circle. Harder, Paul Talfourd, X. .............................................Harmony Grove. Hodgson, Frank B., X. A.,......................................................Athens. Hoyt, Francis.................................................................Atlanta. Hull, Henry Hope...............................................................Athens. James, Clifford M........................................................Douglasvillc. Johnston, John A..............................................................Augusta. Jones, Sidney C., '. A. F..................................................Waynesboro. Keith, Byron Sebastian.....................................................Dry Pond. Keller, Henry Rupert.........................................................Savannah. Lampkin, Edgeworth E., -. A. A'................................................Athens. Malone, Robert Knox......................................................Villa Rica. Marion, Waldo Emerson.....................................................Gainesville. Moore, Harvey Wilson,- A. ...................................................Augusta. McCalla.......................................................................Conyers. McClesky, Louis Dugas,.I . ...............................................Atlanta. McDowell, Dudley Howard, .V. 't ..............................................Blakely. McMillan, Frederick, J h., ...................................................Harlem. Newcomb, Robert Scott........................................................Savannah. Niciiolls, William Montgomery,-. .LA’.,......................................Waycross. Nunn, Romain Ruben......................................................Millcdgcvillc. Nix, Dilmiis Herbert...................................................Harmony Grove. O’Farrf.li., Rufus England.......................................................... Oliver, William Henry........................................................Savannah. Pemiston, Joel Branham, X. T,....................................................Rome. Richie, Horace B.......................................................Harmony Grove. Roberts, Frank Siiepard.......................................................Atlanta. 54Sibley, George Royal, A A.,................................................Augusta. Smith, Charles Emery............................................................... Smith, William Clyde............................................................... Strrickland, Oyer Clayton...................................................Stilson. Talmadge, Eugene T. -• A'.,................................................Forsythe. Telford, Georce.................................................................... Thornton, Albert E.. -V. 0.,................................................Atlanta. Turner, Frank.................................................................Macon. Usher, Charlie..........................................................Springfield. Usher, Sheddie..........................................................Springfield. •Williams.......................................................................... Wiliiorn, Herman Harvey..................................................Monticcllo. Woods, Albon Young...........................................................Athens. Yarbrough ......................................................................... Yow, Jones duBuiion,-• .................................................Avalon. ffak 55History of Freshman Class. JIF historian reluctantly attempts to write tile history of ‘05. Short space and a feeble pen will force him to leave unsaid many compliments due to the class, yet custom demands a short history, however imperfect it may be. Our history is really written in our work, in our progress, in the lives of our members, and such a short sketch as this can give hut scant justice to our record for the first year. We began our brilliant career in the middle of September. Nineteen Hundred ami One. with a class numbering seventy men. As is customary. the election of class officers was the first movement taken, and in this we showed the wise Sophomores that we could manage our own affairs after the election of officers, and we were desirous of proving our strength to the Sophomores, and consequently made a definite engagement to meet them on the battlefield. Oil the night of October 5th, the rival classes clashed together, and the ensuing battle was unprecedented in University history. For hours the conflict raged. For hours victory was held in the balance. Cut finally, the doughty Freshmen prevailed and relieved the insolent Sophomores of much of their self-esteem and importance. Notwithstanding the fact that the city "cops" kept a watchful eye on the high-reaching water-tower, our class put thereon its insignia in large red figures. Great was the surprise of the "cops" the next day on discovering that they had been outwitted by the green Freshmen, for every precaution had been taken to prevent the annual application of painter's colors. Our class is blessed with many artists, and their artistic work can be seen in all prominent places. Our specialty is fence decoration. We have the honor of re-painting the Lucy Cobb goats, after many classes had tried in vain. During shearing season we did admirably and captured some fine Sophomore scalps. The class banquet in March was quite a sue-Wc have some excellent men, who showed their nerve and quality in this year’s practice. In baseball we have a flattering record, having defeated the Seniors and contributed the star player on the ’Varsity team, besides a "sub.” The track is besprinkled with ’05 men, and. judging from the records they arc now making, a number of honors will be ours on annual field day. All in all. our record for the first year in college, has been a brilliant one. Our achievements in all phases of college life are a source of pride, and with the highest hopes and brightest prospects do wc close our career as Freshmen. Our first year's record gives promise of more brilliant deeds when we return for subsequent work in our beloved Alma Mater. May our class ever remain loyal to her lofty ideals, and may future historians chronicle her continued success. HISTORIAN . cess. Nothing prevented our enjoyment of the same save the kidnapping of one of our number. In the class-room 05 has made an enviable record. Some of the members of the Faculty have asserted that it is the best class in the history of the University. Wc hope to be worthy of this compliment in our higher classes, and from the progress that has been made, it is useless to say that wc will maintain our good reputation. In the Literary Societies ’05 holds a preeminent place, having some eloquent speakers, who take much interest in all matters connected with the societies. The time is approaching when ’05 will be called upon to gain a great victory in the oratorical contest, and wc predict that some of the highest honors will be bestowed upon our men. Besides mental train-ing, ’05 takes an active part in physical exercises. The football team for next season will be partly composed of men from our class. 57Agricultural Class of 1902. - Barnard, Hugh Yancey.........................................................Athens. Black, Collier Marshall....................................................The Rock. Cartey, Emmett Monroe..................................................Watkinsville. Daniel, James Emory..........................................................Bogart. Fullilove, Rolom Elder.................................................High Shoals. Gay, Augustus M.............................................................Newborn. Graham, Ennis................................................................Athens. Harrison, Thomas Burgess...............................................Gabbcttsvillc King, Albert..................................................................Kings. Loyd, Abram Luther..........................................................Newborn. Miliken, Richard Mershom......................................................Jesup. Rome, Winfield...............................................................BufoVd. Surrency, Harry Whaley........................................................Jesup. Simmons, James Walton......................................................Ben Hill. Suddetii, Robert O’Neai..................................................Gillsville. Stephens, John Fred..........................................................Yonley. White, Fred Lorinc........................................................Riverside. Watson, Marion Damon.........................................................Athens. Whitehead, Richard Pierce....................................................Athens. 5«4Junior Law Class Officers, R. H. Harris...... Colquitt Finley .. . J. L. Dowling..... H. W. Ketrox...... W. S. McGreevy .. . G. D. Blount, A. A.t .. R. A. Ransom, A-O. J. Coogler, A. 1 }.. Fannie Jenkins .. .. ..........President. .. Vice-President. ..........Secretary. ..........Historian. .............Poet. Captain Baseball Captain Football. Manager Football. .............Judge.Junior Law Class Roll. Bates, Benson Franklin.................................................. .. .. Dennis. Blount, Georce Dexter, A'. A.,..............................................Barncsvillc. Coogler, Oscar Johnson, A'. Rivcrdalc. Donalson, Erle Meldrim, A. A.,...............................................Bainbridge. Dowling, James Lemuel.............................................................Avant. Ellis, Frampton Erroli., J- 0.,.................................................Atlanta. Finley, Colquitt..............................................................Fainnount. Hallowes, William Alexander, A. A.,....................................Jacksonville, Fla. Hargreaves, Leon Abraham.........................................................Tifton. Harris, Robert Holt.....................................................Cohutto Springs. Hauser, Emile....................................................................Athens. Heywood, George Cutiibert, A. A ............................................Savannah. Jenkins, John Alpiionso.......................................................Montezuma. Johnson, Middleton Samuel, A. a.,............................................Atlanta. Ketron, Harold Wayne.......................................................Clarkcsville. Kirkland, George, Jr. ,......................................................Summertown. Lewis, Miles Walker.............................................................Atlanta. McQutin, William Irwin......................................................Thomasville. Martin, Ware Gaillard,-. A’., .................................................Leesburg. 6iMegreevy, William Seymour..............................................Naples, N. Y. Newell, John Oliver......................................................Villa Rica. Nix, Sidney Johnson...........................................• •• Harmony Grove. Patterson, GeorcV: Lowndes...................................................Cumming. Ragsdale, Eugene Wofford......................................................Dallas. Ransom, Ronald Augustine,A. K.t..............................................Atlanta. Swift, Herman Holst, It.'P.ll.,.............................................Columbus. Tolbert, James Wade, A, .....................................................Brinson. Taylor, Henry Hamilton...............................................Key West, Fla. Tolar, Samuel Worth, A'. A.,...............................................Brentwood.Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity Founded at the University of Alabama, 1856, Georgia Beta Chapter Established, 1866. Colors: R.oyal Purple and Old Gold. FRATRES IN URBE. • John Erwin, Jamks Hodgson, A. F. Latimer, A. L. Mitchell, Howell C. Erwin, Robert Hodgson, E. B. Mf.ll, C. H. Phinizy, John Gkrdine. A. L. Hoi.l, J. D. Mell, C. A. Scuddkr, •A. L. Hull, Jr., T. S. Mell, H. Stovall, W. W. Thomas. E. C. Upson. FRATRES IN FACULTATE. A. H. Patterson, H. N. Starnes. LAW CLASS. Ronald A. Ransom. CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWO. Prank Harvey Barrett, Jack D. McCartney, Wilson Moore Hardy, Sidney S. Dean, Ed. Y. Hill, Walter M. Jackson, Jr. U(t College. 67CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND THREE. Julian F. Baxter, Marion H. Smith, Henry Jones, Minor S. Boyd, Cam D. Dorsey, . Sanders Walker. CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FOUR. Joe Hull, Randolph Jaques, •Louis M. Wright, A. DrRosette Robertson. CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIVE. Tom Cozart, Jones DuB. Yow, Sidney C. Jones, Harvey W. Moore, Edgeworth E. Lampkin, William M. Nickols. Ull coin 68Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity Directory Province University of Maine (Maine Alpha), Orono, Me. Boston University (Mas . Beta-Epsilon), Boston, Mass. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Mass. Ioto-Tau), Boston, Mass. • Province Cornell University (X. Y. Alpha), Ithaca, X. Y. Columbia University (N. Y. Mu), New York City. St. Stephen’s College (X. Y. Sigma-Phi), Annaudalo-on-Hudson, X. Y. Allegheny College (Pft. Omega), Mcadvillc, Pa. Dickinson College (Pa. Sigma-Phi), Carlisle, Pa. Provinco University of Virginia (Va. Omicron), Charlottesville, Va. Washington and Lee University (Va. Sigma), Lexington, Va. University of North Carolina (X. C. Xi), Chapel Hill, N. C. Province University of Michigan (Mich. Iota-Beta), Ann Arbor, Mich. Adrian College .(Mich. Alpha),'Adrian. Mich. Mt. Union College (Ohio Sigma,) Alliance, Ohio. Ohio Wesleyan University (Ohio Delta), Delaware, Ohio. University of Cincinnati (Ohio Epsilon), Ciuciunatl, Ohio. Alpha. Harvard University (Mass. Gamma), Cambridge, Mass. Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Mass. Delta), Worcester, Mass. Beta. Pennsylvania State College (Pa. Alpha-Zeta), Slate Col’ lege, Pa. Buckncll University (Pa. Zeta), Lcwisburg, Pa. Gettysburg College (Pa. Della), Gettysburg, Pa. University of Pennsylvania (Pa. Theta), Philadelphia Pa. Gamma. Davidson College (N. C. Theta), Davidson, X. C. Wofford College (S. C. Gamma), Spartanburg, S. C. University of Georgia (Ga. Beta), Athens, Ga. Emory College (Ga. Epsilon), Oxford, Ga. Georgia School of Technology (Ga. Phi), Atlauta, Ga. Delta. Ohio Stato University (Ohio Theta), Columbus, Ohio. Franklin College (Ind. Alpha), Franklin, Iml. l’urduc University (Iud. Bets), West Iaifayettc, Ind. Northwestern University (III. Pei-Omega), Evanston, III. University of Illinois (111. Beta), Champaign, 111. 69Province Central University (Ky. Kappa), Richmond, Ky. Bethel University (Ky. lota), Russellville, Ky. Kentucky State College (Ky. Epsilon), Lexington, Ky. Southwestern Presbyterian University (Teun. .eta), Clarksville, Tcnu. Cumberland University (Tcnn. Lambda), Lebanon, Tenn. Vanderbilt University (Tenn. Xu), Nashville, Tcnn. Epsilon. University of Tennessee (Tcnn. Kappa), Knoxville, Teun. University of the South (Tenn. Omega), Sewauee, Teun. Southwestern Baptist University (Tcnn. Eta), Jackson, Tcnn. University of Alabama (Ala. Mu), University, Ala. Southern University (Ala. lota), Greensboro, Ala. Alabama Polytechnic Institute (Ala. Alpha-Mu), Auburn, Ala. Province Zeta. University of Missouri (Mo. Alpha), Columbia, Mo. University of Arkansas (Ark. Alpha-Upsilon), Fayettc- Washington University (Mo. Beta), St. I-ouis Mo. villc, Ark. University of Nebraska (Neb. Lambda-Pi), Lincoln,Neb. Province Eta. University of Colorado (Col. Chi), Boulder, Col. J.eland Stanford, Jr., University (Cal. Alpha), Palo Alto, Denver University (Col. Zctn), Denver, Col. Cal. Univorsiiy of California (Cal. Bela), Borkclcy, Cal. Province Theta. Louisiana State University (La. Epsilon), Baton ltougc, University of Mississippi (Miss. Gamma), University La. Miss. Tulane University (La. Tau-Upailon), New Orleans, La. University of Texas (Texas Bho), Austin, Texas. Boston, Mass. Savannah, Ga. Jncksou, Miss New Orleans, I-a. Denver, Col. Alumni Associations. New York City Alliance, Ohio Kansas City, Mo. Washington, D. C. Wilmington, N. C. Pittsburg, Pa. Cincinnati, Ohio Knoxville, Tenn. Worcester, Mass. Louisville Ky. San Francisco, Cal. Atlanta, Ga. Chicago, 111. Detroit, Mich. St. Louis, Mo, Macon, Ga. Augusta, Ga. Chattanooga, Tcnn. Cleveland, Ohio Birmingham, Ala. Greenville, S. C. 70Chi Phi Fraternity.Chi Phi Fraternity Founded at Princeton University. 1824. Eta Chapter Established, 1867. FRATR.ES IN URBE Billups Piiinizy, J. II. Ruckkr. Gfx). T. Hodoson, M. A. Nicholson, F. B. Stanley, C. B. Griffeth, Yancey Harris, FRATRES IN FACULTATE. Walter R. Hill, D. C. Rarrow, Jr., H. C. White. CLASS 1902. S. II. Blacksiiear, Jack Hart, Mitcuf.ll Kino. Marion II. Richardson. F. A. Lipscomb, F. T. Dealing. CLASS 1903. II. M. Scott, Frank Grom, E. Heuiif.ut Clay, Andrew Calhoun, Frank M. Ridlky, •Austell A. Thornton. CLASS 1904. •Ben Barrow, F. R. Clarke, Ralph Mkldrim, PaulJette. 11. H. Gordon. CLASS 1905. Albert E. Thorton, Duoas McClksky, Hinton J. Baker. Wickliffe Goldsmith, •Cleveland Evans. W. .1. Cranstoun. •Left College. 73Chi Phi Fraternity. ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. Alpha, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Beta, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. Gamma, Kmory College, Oxford, Ga. Delta, Rutgers College, New Brunswick, X. J. Epsilon, Hampdcn-Siduey College, Hanipdcn-Sidney, Va. Zcta, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa. ETA, Un'ivkiisity ok ck.otioia, Athkns, Ga. Theta, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Trov, X. V. Iota, Ohio State College, Col mibus, Ohio. Lambda, University of California, Berkeley, Cal. Mu, Stephens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, X. J. Xu, Univcrs.ty of Texas, Austin. Tex. Xi, Cornell University, Ithaca, X’. Y. ' Omicron, Sheffield Scientific School, Yale College, Xew Haven, Conn. Pi Dartmouth Co lege, Dartmouth, X. II. Rho. Lafayette College, Easton, Pa. Sigma, WofTord College, Spartanburg. S. C. Phi, Amherst College. Amherst, Mass. Psi, Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. 74Kappa Alpha Fraternity.Kappa Alpha Fraternity, FOUKDKD ISM. GAMMA OHAt'TKR, KSTAUMSIIKD I9CS. Fratres in Urbe. D. Q. Abbott Cii.ns. W. Dr Bosk Cii ns. X. Hodgson J. D. Moss J. Audlev Morton Dr. S. C. Benedict Dr. J. C. Bloomfield Robt. Toombs DuBose Ed. R. Hodgson John W. Morton A. R. Nicholson John V. Welch Madison Bell Judge A. J. Cobb Thos. F. Green Harry Hodgson Frf.d S. Morton K. S. Rowland E. B. Smith •E. M. Donaldson F. J. Bondurant Benj. F. Hardeman E. R. Kinneurew Jos. W. Morton W. M. Rowland Prof. C. M. Strahan Fratres in Facultatc. Prof. S. Morris Prop. C. H. Herty Law Class 1902. Law Class 1903. G. D. Blount W. A. Hallowes G. C. Heyward, Jr. M. S. Johnson S. W. Tolar Class 1902. Robt. G. Stephens •Ralph A. Graves Class 1903. Hunley Abbott C. M. Krenson T. A. Barrow A. J. Lyndon S. R. Benedict W. M. Reynolds E. R. Jekger W. G. Solomon, Jr. Class 1904. J. D. Bower H. L. Reynolds . D. R. Bower N. H. Simpkins G. C. Carson •W. L. Anderson Wallace Miller W. B. Hodgson Class 1905. L. C. Bower E. W. Carson •Frank Hodgson G. R. Sibley •Left College. 77Kappa Alpha Fraternity Roll of Active Chapters. Alpha. Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va. GAMMA, University of Georgia. Athens, Ga. Delta, Wofford College, Spartanburg. S. C. Epsilon, Emory College. Oxford. Ga. Zetn. Kandolph-Macon College, Ashland, Va. Eta, Richmond College, Richmond, Va. Theta, Kentucky Slate College. Lexington. Kv. Kappa. Mercer University, Macon, Ga. Lambda. University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Nu. Polytechnic Institute, A. M. College, Auburn. Ala. Xi. Southwestern University. Georgetown, Texas. Omicron, University of Texas, Austin, Texas. Pi, University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Tenn. Sigma. Davidson College. Mccklcnbcrg County, X. C. Upsilon. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. X. C. Phi. Southern University. Greensboro, Ala. Chi. Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. Psi, Tulanc University, New Orleans, La. Omega, Centre College, Danville, Ky. Alpha-Alpha. University of the South, Scwance, Tenn. Alpha-Gamma, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La. Alpha-Delta. William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. Alpha-Epsilon, Southwestern University, Clarksville, Tenn. Alpha-Zeta. William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Va. Alpha-Eta, Westminster College, Fulton, Mo. Alpha-Theta, Kentucky University, Lexington, Ky. Alpha-Iota Centenary College, Jackson, La.Alpha-Kappa. Missouri State University, Co-lumhia, Mo. Alpha-Lambda, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. M l. Alpha-Mu. Millsaps College, Jackson. Miss. Alpha-N'u. Columbian University. Washington, I). C. Alpha-Xi. University of California. Berkeley, Cal. Alpha-Omicron, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. Alpha-Pi, Lcland Stanford. Jr. University, Stanford University, Palo Alto, Cal. Alpha-Rho, University of West Virginia, Morgantown. W. Va. Alpha-Sigma. Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta. Ga. Alpha-Tan. Hampdcn-Sidncv College, Hamp-den-Sidnev, Va. Alpha-Upsilon, University of Mississippi, University, Miss. Alpha-Phi, Trinity College. Durham, N. C. Alumni Chapters. Norfolk. Va. Macon. Ga. Lexington, Kv. Jackson, Miss. Montgomery. Ala. Richmond. Va. Mobile, Ala. Petersburg. Va. Atlanta, Ga. Chattanooga. Tenn. Alexandria. La. Jacksonville, New York City. Dallas. Tex. Talladega, Ala. Staunton, Va. San Francisco, Cal. Fla. Meridian, Miss. Raleigh. N. C. Franklin, La. St. Louis. Mo. Augusta, Ga. Hampton, Va. 798o5- T 4 '3 i t £ life ilf f t i % ■t Phi Delta Theta Fraternity.Phi Delta Theta Fraternity. ORGANIZED AT MIAMI UNIVERSITY. 1848. GEORGIA ALPHA CHAPTER 1871. E. K. Lumpkin J. W. Camak Fred J. Orr G. W. Leg wen ♦D. B. McMillan Fratres in Urbc. S. J. Tribble D. D. Quillian E. H. Dorsey J. T. Davis C. G. Chandler J. B. S. Cobb E. I. Smith Joel T. Daves Fratres in Facilitate. U. H. Davenport Law Class. Framton E. Ellis, ’03 Class of 1902. E. R. Camp H. J. Lamar, Jr. Class of 1903. C. R. Russell Class of 1904. C. M .A. Maddox M .L. Richter Class of 1905. F. A. McMillin F. Bullard T. W. Reid J. J. Strickland E. B. Cohen W. R. Turner J. C. Vinson •Left College.Phi Delta Theta Fraternity, Roll of Active Chapters. Alpha Maine Alpha, Colby College, Watcrvillc, Me. New Hampshire Alpha, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H. Vermont Alpha, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt. Massachusetts Alpha, Williams College, Wil-liamstown, Mass. Massachusetts Beta, Amherst College, Am- Province. Iierst, Mass. Rhode Island, Alpha, Brown University, Providence, R. I. New York Alpha, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Michigan Alpha, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. Epsilon Province. Indiana Alpha-,Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. Indiana Beta, Wabash, Crawfordvillc, Ind. Indiana Gamma, Butler College, University of Indianapolis, Irvington, Ind. Indiana Delta, Franklin College, Franklin, Ind. Zeta Illinois Alpha, Northwestern University, Evanston, 111. Illinois Beta, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois Delta, Knox College, Galesburg, III. Illinois Zeta, Lombard University, Galesburg, Indiana Epsilon, Hanover College, Hanover, Ind. • Indiana Zeta, DePauw University, Grcencas-tle, Ind. Indiana Theta, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. Province. Illinois Eta. University of Illinois, Champaign, Wisconsin Alpha, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. Minnesota Alpha, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 84Iowa Alpha, Iowa Wesleyan University, Mount Pleasant, Iowa. Iowa Beta, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. Missouri Alpha. University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. Missouri Beta, Westminster College, Fulton. Mo. Missouri Gamma, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. Kansas Alpha, University of Kansas, Lawrence. Kansas. Nebraska Alpha, University of Nebraska. Lincoln, Neb. Eta Province. California Beta, Lcland Stanford, Jr. University, Stanford University, Cal. California Alpha, University of California. Berkeley, Cal. Washington Alpha. University of Washington. Seattle, Wash. New York Beta, Union University, Sclmccta-dy, N. Y. New York Delta, Columbia University, New York, N. Y. New York Epsilon, Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. Pennsylvania Alpha, Lafayette College, Easton, Pa. Pennsylvania Beta, Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg, Pa. Pennsylvania Gamma. Washington and Jefferson College, Washington, Pa. Pennsylvania Delta, Allegheny College. Mead-villc. Pa. Pennsylvania Epsilon, Dickinson College, Carlisle. Pa. Pennsylvania Zeta. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. Pennsylvania Eta. Lehigh University. South Bethlehem, Pa. Beta Province. Virginia Beta, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Virginia Gamma, Randplph-Macon College, Ashland, Va. Virginia Zeta, Washington and Lee University. Lexington, Va. North Carolina Beta, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. Kentucky Alpha, Centre College. Danville. Kv. Kentucky Delta. Centcal University, Richmond, Ky. Tennessee Alpha. Vanderbilt University, Nashville. Tenn. Tennessee Beta, University of the South, Sc-wancc. Tenn. 85Gamma Province. GEORGIA ALPHA, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. Georgia Beta, Emory College. Oxford. Ga. Georgia Gamma, Mercer University, Macon, Ga. Alabama Alpha, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Alabama Beta. Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, Ala. Delta Province. Ohio Alpha. Miami University, Oxford. Ohio. Ohio Beta, Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio. Ohio Gamma. Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. Ohio Zeta, Ohio State University, Columbus. Ohio. Ohio Eta, Case College of Applied Science, Cleveland, Ohio. Ohio Theta. University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati. Ohio. Boston, Mass. Pittsburg, Pa. Louisville, Ky. Detroit, Mich. Galesburg. 111. Kansas City, Mo. Salt Lake City, Utah. Atlanta. Ga. Mobile, Ala. Cincinnati, Ohio. Alumni Clubs. Annual Alumni Day, March 15x11. Providence. R. I. Philadelphia, Pa. Nashville, Tenn. Franklin, Ind. LaCrossc, Wis. St. Louis, Mo. San Francisco, Cal. Macon. Ga. Birmingham. Ala. Akron. Ohio. New York, N. Y. Washington, D. C. Columbus, Ga. Indianapolis, Ind. Milwaukee, Wis. Denver, Col. Los Angeles, Cal. Montgomery, Ala. New Orleans, La. Cleveland, Ohio. Spokane, Wash. Baltimore, Md. Richmond, Va. Athens, Ohio. Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn Chicago, 111. Austin. Tex. Selma, Ala. Akron, Ohio. Columbus, Ohio. 86Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity.Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity. Pounded In th« Virgin! Mjliury Inttitule. 1865. Georgia Alpha Bel . Founded 1878. Hon. 11. II. Carlton • Prof. E. C. Branson Fratres in Urbe. James Barrow Jesse Comb C. W. Brumby John D. Steeling G. F. Stephenson G. G. Bond Fratres in Faculate. James B. Lawrence J. M. Stephenson Class 1902. James K. Jordan Rout. Preston Brooks Class 1903. Ludlow L. Grinek James Henry McCalla Class 1904. C. F. Carlton Marvin C. Carter Joe L. Hodgson Makcellus Ram ho Geo. '. Welsh David S. Atkinson Class 1905. Mac. H. Burroughs Robt. M. Cheney W. P. Griner ‘Lewis F. McCalla Left College. 89Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity. Roll of Active Chapters. Province I. Alabama Alpha-Epsilon. Agricultural and Mechanical College. Auburn. Alabama Beta-Beta, Southern University. Greensboro. Alabama Beta-Delta, University of Alabama. Tuscaloosa. GEORGIA ALPHA-BETA. Uxivf.rsitv ok Georgia, Athens. Georgia Alpha-Theta, Emory College. Oxford. Georgia Alplia-Zcta, Mercer University, Macon Georgia Beta-Iota, School of Technology. Atlanta. Province II. California Gamma-Iota, University of California, Berkeley. Colorado Gamma-Lambda. University of Colorado, Boulder. Louisiana Beta-Epsilon, Ttilanc University, New Orleans. Texas Gamma-Eta. University of Texas, Austin. Province III. Illinois Gamma-Zeta. University cf Illinois, Champaign. Indiana Gamma-Gamma, Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute. Michigan Alpha-Mu, Adrian College. Adrian. Michigan Beta-Kappa, Hillsdale College, Hillsdale. Michigan Beta-Omicron, Albion College, Albion. Nebraska Gamma-Theta, University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Kansas Gamma-Mu, University of Kansas, Lawrence. 90Province IV. Maine Beta-Upsilon. University of Maine, Orono. Maine Gamma-Alpha, Colby College, Water-villc. Massachusetts Gamma-Beta, Tufts College, Rhode Island Gamma-Delta, Brown University, Providence. Vermont Beta-Zeta, University of Vermont, Burlington. Province V. Nc York Alpha-Oniicron, St. Lawrence University, Canton. New York Alpha-Lambda, Columbia University, New York. New York Beta-Theta. Cornell University, Ithaca. Pennsylvania Alpha-Iota, Muhlenberg College, Allentown. Pennsylvania Alpha-Upsilon, Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg. Minnesota Gamma-Mu, University of Minnesota. Minneapolis. Pennsylvania Alpha-Pi, Washington and Jefferson College, Washington. Pennsylvania Tau, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Province VI. North Carolina Alpha-Delta, University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill. North Carolina Xi, Trinity College, Durham. South Carolina Beta-Xi, College of Charleston, Charleston. Virginia Delta, University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Province VII. Ohio Alpha-Nn, Mt. Union College, Alliance. Ohio Alpha-Psi, Wittenberg College, Spring-field. Ohio Beta-Eta, Wesleyan University, Dcla- Ohio Beta-Mu. Wooster University, Wooster. Ohio Beta-Omega, State University, Columbus. Ohio Gamma-Kappa, Western Reserve University, Cleveland. ware. 91Province VIII. Tennessee Alpha-Tau, Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarksville. Tennessee Beta-Pi, .Vanderbilt University. Nashville. Tennessee Beta-Tau, Southwestern Baptist University, Jackson. Tennessee Lambda, Cumberland College, Lebanon. Tennessee Omega, University of the South, Sewancc. Tennessee Pi. University of Tennessee, Knoxville. City and State Alumni Associations. Allentown Alumni Association, Allentown. Pa. Augusta Alumni Association, Augusta. Ga. Birmingham Alumni Association, Montgomery, Ala. Boston Alumni Association, Wavcrly, Mass. Chicago Alumni Association. Chicago, 111. Cleveland Alumni Association, Cleveland, Ohio. Dallas Alumni Association. Dallas, Texas. Dayton, Alumni Association, Dayton, Ohio. District of Columbia Alumni Association, Washington, D. C. Georgia Alumni.Association, Atlanta, Ga. Louisville Alumni Association. Louisville, Ky. New York Alumni Association. New York City. Pittsburg Alumni Association, Pittsburg, Pa. Tennessee Alumni Association, Nashville, Tenu. Texas Alumni Association, Dallas, Tex. 92Sigma Nu Fraternity.Sigma Nu Fraternity. Founded Ml Virginia Military Intlllutc, 11 19. Nu Chapter Established, 1881. COLORS: BLACK. WHITE AND OLD 001.0. Fratres in Urbe. T. J. Siiacki.efokd G. H. Williamson A. C. Fears Frater in Facultate. C. M. Snellinc Senior Law Class. Ware G. Martin. A. B. Junior Law Class. George L. Patterson Class 1902. J. Marvin Starr W. Oliver Fleming Class 1903. W. Archer Worsham, Jr. John H. Monahan Claude W. Bond Class 1904. Paul Lovejoy Hubert L. Worsham B. Frank McLaughlin . Class 1905. ♦Harry W. Tolbert Eugene T. Talmadge ♦Left College. F. C. Shackelford Daniel H. DuPref. Marcus L. TolbertSigma Nu Fraternity, CHAPTER LIST. First Division. Beta, 1870, University of Virginia, Charlottes-villc, Va. Epsilon, 1883, Bethany College, Bethany, V. Va. Lambda, 1882, Washington and Lee, Lexington, Va. I'si, 1888. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. Second Division. Theta, 1874, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Phi. 1887, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. Beta Theta, 1890, Alabama Polytechnic Insti- tute, Auburn, Ala. Upsilon, 1886, University of Texas, Austin, Texas. Iota, Howard College, East Lake, Ala. Third Division. Omicron, 1884, Bethel College, Russellville, Tenn. Ky. Gamma lota, 1902, State College of Kentucky, Sigma, 1886, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Lexington. Fourth Division. Rho, 1886. Missouri State University, Columbia, Mo. Beta-Mu, 1893. State University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. Beta-Xi, 1894. Win. Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. Nu, 1888, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan. Gamma-Eta, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Col. 96Fifth Division. l i, 1884. Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. Beta-Sigma. 1898. University of Vermont, Burlington, Yt. Gamma-Delta, 1900. Stevens' Institute of Tech- nolog) , Hoboken, N. J. Gamma-Epsilon, 1900. La Fayette College. Easton, Pa. Gamma-Theta, 1902, Cornell University, Ithaca. N. Y. Sixth Division. MU, 1873. University of Georgia. Athens. Ga. Eta, 884. Mercer University, Macon. Ga. Xi, 1884, Emory College, Oxford, Ga. Gamma-Alpha, 1896, Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. Kappa, 18S1, North Georgia Agricultural College, Dahloncga, Ga. Seventh Division. Beta-Beta, 1890 DePauw University, Green- Beta-Iota. 1892, Mt. Union College, Alliance, castle, Ind. Beta-Zeta, 1891, Purdue University. Lafayette, Ind. Beta-Eta, 1892, University of Indiana, Bloomington, Ind. Beta-Upsilon, 1895, Rose Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute. Ind. Beta-Nu, 1891, Ohio State University, Columbus, O. Ohio. Gamma-Beta, Northwestern University, Evanston, 111. Gamma-Gamma, 1895, Albion College, Albion, Mich. Delta-Theta, 1891, Lombard University, Galesburg, III. Eighth Division. Bcta-Clii, 1891, Lcland Stanford, Jr. University, Gamma-Chi, 1896. University of Washington, Palo Alto, Cal. Beta-Psi, 1892, University of California, Berkeley, Cal. Seattle, Wash. Gamma-Zeta, 1900, University of Oregon, 97Alumni Organizations. Texas Alumni Association, Louisiana Alumni Association. Missouri Alumni Association, Seventh Division Alumni Association, Alabama Alumni Association, Iowa Alumni Association, Pittsburg Alumni Association. Philadelphia Alumni Association, New York Alumni Association, Atlanta Alumni Chapter. Kansas City Alumni Chapter, Birmingham Alumni Chapter, Sixth Division Alumni Association, Chicago Alum:.i Association. Columbus Alumni Association. Louisville Alumni Association, Northwest Alumni Association. Shelbyvillc, Kentucky, Alumni Association, Third Division Alumni Association. 98Chi Psi Fraternity. Founded at Union College, 1841. -L J- Founded May 3. 1890 Members in City. W. D. Hoyt W. B. Burkett, Roll of Members Senior Class. Junius Foul la in Lewis, Greensboro, Ga. Miles Walker Lewis, Greensboro, Ga. Noel Poullain Park, Greensboro, Ga. Junior Class. Charles Carden Bunn, Ccdartown, Ga. Smilie Seabrook Johnson, Etowab, Ga. W illiam Flewellyen Newton, Washington, D. C. Freshman Class. William Gayle England, Ccdartown, Ga. Dudley Howard McDowell, Blakely. Ga. Joel Branham Penniston, Rome, Ga. L«ft College.Chi Psi Fraternity. Pi, Union College, Schenectady, X. Y. Theta, Williams College, Wiiliamstown, Mass. Mu, Middlcbury College, Middlcbury, N't. Alpha, Wesleyan University, Middleton, Conn. Phi, Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y. Epsilon, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Midi. Chi, Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. Psi, Cornell University, Ithaca, X. Y. Tan ,Wofford College, Spartanburg. S. C. Xu, University of Minnesota. Minneapolis. Minn. Iota, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. R!k , Rutgers College, New Brunswick, X. J. Xi, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, X. J. ALPHA DELTA, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. Beta-Delta, Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. Gamma-Delta. Stanford University, Stanford, Cal. Delta-Delta, University of California. Berkeley, Cal. F.psilon-Dclta, University of Chicago, Chicago, III. New York City. Pittsburg, Pa. West Duluth. Minn. Atlanta, Ga. Alumni Associations. Boston, Mass. Chicago, 111. Detroit. Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. Schenectady, X. Y. Washington, D. C. St. Louis, Mo. Portland, Oregon. Des Moines, Iowa. Philadelphia, Pa. Minneapolis, Minn. Los Angeles, Cal. Kansas City, Mo.mm Kappa Sigma Fraternity.Kappa Sigma Fraternity. Founded at Onlrertltjr of Virginia In HOT. lie! Lambda Chapter R«t«blWhrd lMil. Law Class 1902. 0 Henry M. Fletcher Miguel de Guerra Law Class 1903. Oscar J. Coocler James V. Tolbert Class 1903. Marvin M. Dickinson Class 1904. Marion S. Monk Erwin H. Vondereau John C. Koch Walter B. Shaw Linton S. Archer Roy Jackson H. Quigg Fletcher Class 1905. John A. Coteland Paul T. Harber Wesley T. Hanson i°5Kappa Sigma Fraternity Roll of Active Chapters. District I. I'si, University of Maine. Orono, Me. Alpha-Kappa, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Alpha-Rho, liowdoin College, Brunswick. Me. Ret a-Kappa, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Alpha-Lambda, University of Vermont, Bur- Beta-Kappa, New Hampshire College, Dur- liugton, Vt. ham, N. H. Beta-Alpha, Brown University, Providence, R. I. District II. l’i, Swarthmorc College, Swarthniore, Pa. Alpha-Delta, Pennsylvania State College, State College, Pa. Alpha-Epsilon, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha-Phi, Buckncll University. Lcwislnirg, Beta-lota, Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. Alpha-Alpha, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. Alpha-Eta, Columbian University, Washington, D. C. Pa. Beta-Pi. Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa. Beta-Delta. Washington and Jefferson College. Washington, Pa. District III. Zeta. University of Virginia. Charlottesville, Va. Eta, Kandolph-Macon College. Ashland, Ya. Nn. William and Mary College. Williamsburg. Va. Upsilon, Hampden-Sidney College, Hampden Sidney, Va. Beta-Beta. Richmond College, Richmond, Va. Delta, Davidson College, Davidson, N. C. Eta-Prime, Trinity College, Durham, N. C. 106District IV. Alpha-Nu, Wofford College. Spartanburg. S. C. Alpha-Beta. Mercer University, Macon, Ga. Alpha-Tail, Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. Beta-Lambda, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. Beta, University of Alabama, University, Ala. Beta-Eta, Alabama Poyltcchnic Institute, Auburn, Ala. District V. Theta, Cumfiberland University, Lebanon. Trim. Kappa, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tcun. Lambda, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. Phi, Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarksville, Tenn. Omega. University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. Alpha-Theta, Southwestern Baptist University, Jackson, Tenn. Alpha-Xi, Bethel College, Russellville, Ky. Beta-Nu, Kentucky State College, Lexington, Ky. District VI. Alpha-Upsilon, Millsaps College, Jackson, Miss. Gamma, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La. Epsilon. Centenary College, Jackson, La. Sigma, Tulanc University, New Orleans, La. Iota, Southwestern University, Georgetown, Tex. Tau, University of Texas, Austin, Texas. District VII. Alpha-Omega, William Jcwclll College, Liberty, Mo. Beta-Gamma, Missouri S:n e University, Columbia, Mo. Alpha Psi, University of Nebraska, Linco'n, Neb. Beta-Omicron, University of Denver, University Park, Colo. 107District VIII. Chi, Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. Alpha-Pi, Wabash College, Crawiordvillc, In!. Beta-Theta, University of Indiana, Bloom ington, Ind. Alpha-Gamma, University of Illinois, Champaign, 111. District Alpha-Chi. Lake Forest University, Lake Forest. III. Beta-Epsilon. University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. Beta-Mu. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. IX. Beta-Xi, University of California, Berkeley, Beta-Zetn, Leland Stanford, Jr. University, Cal. Stanford University, Cal. Alumni Associations. Yazoo City, Miss. Philadelphia, Pa. Pittsburg, Pa. New York City. New Orleans, La. Chicago, III. Indianapolis, Ind. St. Louis, Mo. Pine Bluff. Ark. Chihuahua, Mexico. Ruston, La. Boston, Mass. Memphis, Tenn. Buffalo, N. Y. San Francisco, Cal— Tiifujir, Jurx 10th, 10.00 p. m. Committee. Hxnry Jonhs, 1. K. R. Herbert Clay, .V. Walter Hodgson, A'. A. W. R. Turner, 'A. J. L. L. Grinkr, A. T. il. Mark L. Tolbert, .V. Noel P. Park, V. Miguel dr Guerra, A, I. in i j 'W.Sophomore Hop. Tburtdly. JuM 12th 10.00 p. m. Committee. Conk Maddox, Fyur Scott, Xevle Simpkins, Frank McLaughlin.H34 Junior Hop. M rtd y. June 16th, 10.(0 p. n . Committee. C. M. Krf.nson, C. D. ItOSSKLL. Hrmi M. Scott, John Monahan.Cotillion Hop Tu«t Uy, June X7lh. 10.00 p. m. Committee. Minor Boyd, Chairman. Frank M. Ridley, Krvaud BenedictSENIOR HOP. W«4n«iJ»y, Jon 'J Committee. Henry J. Lamar, Jr., Mitcukll Kino, W. O. Flkmino, 116 W. I. MacIntirk, J, L. SIBLEY. CALENDAR. September. 22. College opens. Lucicn Bower strikes town and informs us of the greatness of Byron Bower. Gordon Bower and all the other Bowers. 24. Cam Dorsey, even at this stage of the game threatens the editor of The Pandora if lie is put in the Kindergarten Club. Cam’s dignity might be hurt then. Mike De Guerra arrives. The hearts of all the Athenian maids arc broken. 28. McClesky is mistaken for Aguinaldo in disguise. "Aggy” and Walter Jackson pass off as twins. 29. Roland Boner urges a Freshman to join Phi Kappa because said he: “Phi Kappa has three champion debaters. October. 5. Freshman and Sophomores put on war paint. Each tries to outrush the other. As a result the Presides advertise for hair restoratives, to. Cotillion dance. Grincr attends; lilac shirt, reel vest, blue necktie. This is the new style. 17. N'oel Park matches for ten cents’ worth of candy, and then spends, actually spends, not money, but an hour in pleading with the winner to let him off with a nickel’s worth. 1. Baxter gets on a morphine jag. Derry Robertson rushes'froni-----------House: pays a coon a dime to walk down town with him. and in tears, tells his troubles to the Chancellor. 10. Starr composes a love lyric, which he dc- 24. Blackshcar and Barrett canvas Faculty for money contributions. They receive much valuable advice. Sidney Dean tells a joke; Sid laughs. 28. Jim Sibley is elected as Independent Representative on Athletic Council. Jim is delighted until he finds that no such of-ficc exists. 30. Ethics vs. circus parade—circus parade wins. Manager attempts to hire Dinkey. Dinkey’s price. lights in reciting to all listeners. j6. Herbert Clay buys a toy pistol, and is arrested for shooting in city limits. Will Turner and Wilson Hardy are requested to leave the Beanery House. $8.00 will not pay for what they oat. 117i8. Prof. Bond assures the Junior Class that "so help him God Almighty, God being his helper, he would not lead one of 27. their young minds astray." 25. 'Hie cucklcburrs arc. at last, combed out December. 3. Oxford, Ridley, Ketron and McCartney 16. form a toe-headed club, and request that their pictures be put in The Pandora. For the sake of our readers we leave it out. 5. Walter Jackson shoots Polly Mac. Ten 19. minutes’ rough house 12. Frank Hoyt is displeased with the University. Everybody celebrates except Frank Hodgson, who used to eat dinner on him. January. 7. Exercises resumed. Candler Hall opened. 9. Herbert Clay's mouth takes possession. Studying interfered with. Freshman Bullon indulges in verbal pyrotechnics. 10. and tells us about the South rising, Phoenix-like from its ashes. Fletcher says he has always spoken a good word for the University, and he used his influ- 23. ence with the mighty legislators. February. 3. Georgian appears and Salamagundi fails to contain a joke on ---------- ------- McIntyre. 10. 6. Freshman banquet. Milk flows freely. 118 of Kctron's hair, and he says his shoes arc beginning to feel real comfortable. Keith ,,l ustsM in Polit. His eyes fill with tears. Solomon and Russell raise a rough house at show. They are nabbed. Result: A fiasco at police headquarters. Judge Foster gives some fatherly advice and each planks over 10 bones. Jack McCartney writes a Freshman letter. Jack applauds and says ’tis good. Lush-at's heart is touched with compassion for the suffering Seniors and he excuses them from work during the Christmas holidays. Charity Ball is not given. Charley Russell. Minor Boyd and Paul Jette celebrate its memory instead. , Young Mill forgets himself and tells the truth. Sidney Jones returns to college, and for a moment ceases to be Sid Jones, and everybody likes him for it. Colonel Snclling plays with hydrochloric acid and gets some in his eyes. Freshmen get jagged. They serenade Lucy Cobb, l.ucv Cobb vesper services. Pete Calhoun and Joe Hull are marked absent.12. Poopy Max Plot on Krenson is attacked by three daring desperadoes and qualifies for the Track Team. 14. Zctachi initiates a promising member. New member salutes Jim Lowrcncc. whose dignity is very much disturbed thereby. 19. Geo Ragsdale immortalizes himself as a 4. McIntyre defines a lie in Senior ethics as “an abomination in the sight of the Lord • but a very present help in time of trouble.” 7. Krenson am! Poopy put Prof. Bocock out of the business with a golf ball. Poopy qualifies again. (See rcb. 12). Poopy also drops Gulk. 10. Prof. Park to Wilson Hardy: Read your synopsis. Hardy: 1 did not bring it to graceful master of ceremonies. Walter Jackson, “assisted by the Thai ians," gave a performance. Sam Johnson i mentioned. His head docs not swell because such is impossible. Its limit has been reached. The ladies of the audience turned green with envy of Dinkey’s sylph-like form. class. Prof. Park: Have you written it? Hardy: No. sir. 13. Harry White says that sleeping in the class-room is alright, but that he must draw the line on snoring. 19. 10 A. M.. Independent Order of Herd Caters organized. 11 A. M.. Prof. Park acquires controlling interest. (Alas! this follows the road of other college enterprises). r ”9Nonsense Rhymes There w»s a young man named Graven. Who leave vo!ci 10 wild monthly rave . O'er The Georgian's contents. But his raven had no sense. And his pralt's, them, nobody craves. There h n young sport they call Juck on. In French. ho gets not rise or notion. Rut he whlstte and sing (?i And ms llute-llkc throat rings; And this is his only attraction. We nil know the handsome Hooka Jonr . Ills b auty breaks up heart and home . The ladle - nil lovo him. And heaven above him. He'll reach on Just three stopplng-ston «. A ubiquitous Kreshman named Bower. H thinks of his Hock ho' tho flower; fame to college this year. But If he were not here Hymn of praise would he sung every hour. Our Y M. C. A. man. named Nix. For heaven put In somo good Y-cks. But ho fills Pletbol'a shoes. And pond no gem for boox«- (or anything else). Now. ain't that a terrible fix? You all knew the grvat SlbUy Jim: You certainly have hoard of him. HU great massive brain Buts the profs, all to shame. And makes their poor learning In'k -I ni And then ther•■' the great Kdwin Camp. Whose Intellect suffers from cramp. (Its word , they flow freely. But Ideas, really. You could not And hi with a lamp. And then ihere'a that Spaniard. De Guerra, Ho walk Just ns atrnlght as an arrow: He’s seldom at school; Shoots crap and shoots pool. And nightly rid- boozed In a wheel-harrow. And. oh. what an Infant Is Park: Poor Noel, with vole like a hark Ho tries all he can To bo a big man. But his frat. keep him !n after dark. Don't forgo: pool Captain Dean, Who got kicked o hard by his queen. Ho looks very sad And feels very bad. And Pee Wee says "It I m-an." 120 - THE SPHINX.The Sphinx. Wilson- M. Hardy, P. P. Sterling H. Blackshear. D. S. B Noel P. Park, P. H. Longstkeet Hull, K. S. Cam Dorsey, K. S. Henry J. Lamar, X. X. X. Sandy Beaver, (39) Sterling Blackshear, (33) 1 oncstkeet Hull, (27) Andrew Calhoun. (35) M. S. Richardson. (37) H. J. Lamar, (28) M. M. Dickinson. (34) C. D. Dorsey. (36) (' . Y. Legwbn, (40) X. Park. (30) Prof. W. D. Hooper, (2) I". M. Ridley. (41) I'.. S Walker, (38) W. M. Hardy, (29) Prof. A. H. Patterson. (0 A—H. Brown Q—G. T. Jackson X—H. Dodd O—C. 1L Black- honorary MEMBERS. li—W. A. Harris I—H. G. Colvin B—G. Butler F—H. Bacon R—Chancellor W. B. Hill C—O. S. Sibley G—M. P. Hall D—F.. F.. Dougherty H—F. K. Boland P—W. R. Tichenor M—F. R. Mitchell J—W. S. Cothran K—W. Spain L—J. T. Dorsey 123 Y. M. G A. First Term. Officers. Wilson M. Hardy, President. F. C. Jackson, Vice-President. W. B. Suaw, Secretary. M. S. Monk, Treasurer. Committee Chairmen. Second Term. Sidney J. Nix, President. C. R. Oliver, Vice-President. O. Benton, Secretary. T. L. Hudson, Treasurer. Handbook-T. L. Hudson. Bible Study-J. O. Newell Mission Study-C. R Fall Campaign—O. Benton. Devotional—J. R. Roberts. Oliver. 124 LK v W. 1. MacIntyre, C. G. Strickland. I«. Bower. J. D. McCartney. K. R. JERGKR. T. Atkinson. A. T. MacIntyre. P. P. Brooks. J. Bower, R. BOwKR. J. E. Craigmilks. J. K. Vincent. D. H. McDowell. 25 i i i Engineering Society, Jaxm K. Jordan, President. J. 15. High, Vice-President. T. L. Htdsok, Secretary and Treasurer. iEngineering Annual Hohkict L, McWii0VTK.lt, Edilor-in-CImf, Jamks E. Siiii.ky, Senior Editor, llt'NLKY Altliorr, Junior Editor. M. I . UtCilTKlt, Sophomore Editor. T. It. Kino, Business Malinger. Paul Eovrioy. Assist. Manager Bull Dog Club.Colors: Groan and Yellow. Banquet Day: Fob. 18. UNIVERSITY CIRCLE. Officers. First Term—Ecoexk Herbert Clay, No. I. William G. Solomon, No. II. Second Term—Robert Franklin Gross, No. I. Charles Frank McLaughlin, No. II. Members. Honorary—Col. Charles M. Snbllino. I Joiin Durham Wino, Jr................1903 II. Euokne Herbert Clat...............1903 III. Henry Fort Scott, Jr..............1904 IV. Cone Morgan Allred Maddox...... .1904 V. Robert Franklin Sen rim...........1904 VI. William Flkwelltn Newton..........1903 VII. Martin Luther Richter, Jr........1904 VIII. Charles Dennison Russell.........1903 IX. Robert Franklin Gross............1903 X William Johnston Cranctoux.......1905 XI. Alvin Gordon Goi.vcke............1004 XII. Frederick Rao6Dale McMillan......1905 XIII. John Henry McCalla...............1903 XIV. Don Roland Rower.................1904 XV. Charles Frank McLauohun..........1904 XIV. William Griffin Solomon, Jr......1903 XVII. Smilik Johnson..................1903 129Irish Club, Drink and Be Merry.1 Pewee Hardy...........................President. Silver Lake Jette................Vice-President. Red Eye Russell.......................Secretary. Stone Mountain Belt...................Treasurer. Followers. High Ball Clay Gin Fizz Turner Green River Boyd E. Ellyngtone Dinkey Monogram Richardson Boose Grafter Jones, The Hooks.Ambition ok Each Member: To Get Out. "Mcllin’s Food Makes Babies Fat.” Membership. Harvey Moorf. Evan Basch Baby Lyndon Derry Robertson Baby Coile Roy Stubbs Little Dobbs Hugh Scott. (Not in for his size.) Erwin Vonderau Robert Newcome I key Solomon President. Walter Jackson, (Assisted by the Thalians). I3iFIRST TERM. ACTIVE. Wallace MlLLKK, G. M. Paul Jette, V. G M. Louis Wkioht, H. G. M. Gordon Carson, P. G. M. Randolph Jaquks, Jit., H. 11. D. M. SECOND TERM. Ralph Meldkim, G. M. Randolph Jaquks, V. G. M. Fort Scott, R. G. M. I OUis Wright, P. G. M. Wallace Miller, H. M. D. M. Gordon Carson, Josktii Hull, Walter Hodgson, Paul Jette, Randolph Jaquks, Jr. Kalpu Meldrim, Wallace Miller, A. DeHosette Rohertson, Fort Scott, Nkyle Simpkins Lons Wrioht.Skull and Bonos Club.VCAED. FIRST TERM. M. S. Richardson.................President. Edwin R. Camp.............. Vice-President. Wilson M. Hardy..................Secretary. SECOND TERM. Botiiwell Graham.......................President. H. J. Lamar, Jr.................Vice-President. Robert G. Stephens.....................Secretary. MEMBERS. M. S. Richardson Sidney S. Dean II. J. Lamar, Jr. Noel P. Park Edwin R. Camp Mitchell King Wilson M. Hardy Frank H. Barrett Miles W. Lewis Junius I’. Lewis Robert G. Stephens Ralph A. Graves Botiiwell Graham 37The Atlanta Club. Madison Bell...........................President. Dewald A. Cohen........................Secretary. Andrew Calhoun....................Vice-President. Robert J Moran.........................Treasurer. Julian Baxter Cam D. Dorsey Cone Maddox Fort Scott A. A. Thornton Samuel Johnson Members. Madison Bei.i. Andrew Calhoun Robert C. O’Farreu. Marion Smith Marion Richardson Edwin R. Came Minor Boyd Robert J. Moran Framitox Ellis F. Roberts W. Goldsmith I. O. Dougherty. Jr. Drwald A. Cohen Mitchell King IFuc ii Scott Marion Monk D. McClesky Mark Tolbert. 138Atlanta Club.The Thalians. OFFICERS: W. M. Jackson, Jh................President F. R. Ridlky............... Vice-President Wilson M. Hardy...........Rusiuesa Manager Pinko Happ. ..Musical Director and Stage Manager MEMBERS: 1 M. M. Dickinson, 9 W. M. Hakdy, 3 W. M. Jackson, 4 F. M. Kidlky, 6 K. E. Dallis, C D. S. Walkkk, 7 M. Uoyd, 8 W. Hodoson, 9 J. Dull. Vow, 10 P. E. Jkttk, 11 W. A. HALLOW 12 H. Hlacksokak, 13 W. G. Solomon, 14 P. Happ, 15 M. Miciiakl, J. D. McCartney. 14 PROGRAMME. PART I. Mu.lc. "flunk; Dory"..........................Orcheatra A Thalian Rehearsal in a Student's Room. Iniroductnc |K« Foltovlnc Number : I. guartelte.........“Down Wher the Colton Bloaaoma tiro " Mftltl. lllackihear, Ridley. Hodgeon and Jackton. . Rapid Fire Converration......Meoar . McCartney and DallU a. Mandolin and Uutlar Club...............“Moiqulto rarade" t. "If Dreamt Com True".................Mr. W. M. Jackaon, Jr Mnale. "Invincible Kagle".........................Orcheatra PAPT II. FROM RABUN GAP. A Puce In One Act tnd Flv« Scvtivi. CABTi Jonathan ScruKKln ...........................Mr. Dlcktnaon Mr. Brown...................................Mr. Black a hear Augoatue Mmroy.................................Mr. Baxter Harry Clifton..................................Mr Solomon l’olla man......................................Mr. Ilardy Mitt Brown.......................................Mr. Dallia Belinda Jaa Ilopklnt............................Mr. Boyd Min Annie Brown...............................Mr Walker .Scene I. Room In Mr. Brown' bouse. Scene II. Yard In front of Mr. Brown'a bout Seen -III. An apartment In Mr, Brown' bou»e. Boer e IV. The aarne. Scene V. Mr. Brown'a parlor. 142The Thali ns.- La Media Noche. Time ok Meeting: Whenever We Have An Excuse. Place: Unknown. Object: Also Unknown. Officers "We believe in liberty, equality, fraternity.” Member . Minor Boyd Frank Ridley Sydney Jones Frank Barrett Julian Baxter Jack McC artney Hooks Jones Miguel de Guerra Will Solomon 145Mandolin and Guitar Club, Leader—A. Calhoun. Musical Director—P. B. Brooks, Business Manager—E. Y. IIili., First Mandolins:-; Baxter, J. ¥. Brooks, P. B. Jaqvks, s. It. SIIallowks, W. Jesteu, C. 146 Mandolin and Guitar Club.University Battalion E. L. Griggs................Lieutenant-Colonel. T. R. King................................Cadet Major. C). L. Keith, Captain. B. V. Graham. First Lieutenant. M. King, Second Lieutenant. S. Beaver, First Sergeant. V. H. Jackson, Second Sergeant. S. S. Johnson, Third Sergeant. J. L. Manley, Fourth Sergeant. YV. M. Hardy..........'.............Adjutant. I). A. Coiien.................Sergeant-Major. T. A. Barrow, Fifth Sergeant. R. Mkldkim, First Corporal. Max Michael, Second Corporal. — Wade, Third Corporal. YV. T. Seirels, Fourth Corporal. L. Anderson, Fifth Corporal. Company A. Company B. E. YV. Ragsdale, Captain. S. J. Nix, First Lieutenant. N. P. Park, Second Lieutenant. M. Boyd, First Sergeant. J. F. Baxter, Second Sergeant. V. O. Cheney, Third Sergeant. E. W. Martin, Fourth Sergeant. J. B. High, Fifth Sergeant. A. G. Golucke, First Corporal. A. Falk, Second Corporal. M. S. Richter, Third Corporal. YV. Reid, Fourth Corporal. P. Lovejoy, Fifth Corporal. Company C. J. K. Jordan, Captain. R. G. Stephens, First Lieutenant. P. Harr, Second Lieutenant. D. H. DuPree, First Sergeant. ;. A. YVorsiiam, Second Sergeant. T. L. Hudson, Third Sergeant. YV. H. Jones, Fourth Sergeant. H. F. Scott, First Corporal. YY’. C). Roberts, Second Corporal. N. II. Simpkins, Third Corporal. M. Rambo, Fourth Corporal. L. L. Griner, Bugler. J. Yow, Bugler. Bugle Corps. W. J. Cranstown, Bugler. M. Nichols, Bugler. A. J. Lyndon, Drummer. '. B. Hodgson, Drummer. J50 G«i University Battallion.Pi Omicron Gamma. FRESHMEN. Ai.iskkt Tiiokxtox .. .. i’resident. i-KKOKKICK M( Mll.l.lX Kih;k «»ktii Lamkix. .. . , . .. Vice-President. Kkitii Coxway .. .. Members. I'lXTOX I’.AKKK Khckwoktii I.amkix Wll.I.IAM Hxcl.AMI (ircottcK Sii:i.kv Kkitii Coxway I)r ; s McO.kskky Hakvky Mookk Thomas C'ozakt Wll.I.IAM C k a x sro r x JoXKS You Wll'KI.I l-‘KIv iol.DSM ITII I'kkihvukk Mc.Mii.mx Wll.I.IAM XKTIOI.S Di di.ky McDowki.i. Aw.kkt Tiiokxtox 15- . . . Secretary. . .. Treasurer.Pi Omicron Gamma Fraternity.Georgia Literary Club •R. A. Graves......................President. G. B. Franklin................Vice-President. Time ok Meeting: October. Subject for Discussion: "Poe." Poe’s Prose Work............Madison Bell. Poe’s Life..................Jas. L. Sibley. Interpretation of "The Raven".W. T. Sieiiki- . Time of Meeting: January. Subject for Discussion: "Longfellow." Life of Longfellow..........Konr. J. Moran. "Evangeline"................G. B. Franklin. F. E. Eli.is........................President. C. W. Band..........Secretary and Treasurer. Time ok Meeting: February. Subject for Discussion: “Walt Whitman." Whitman, Not a Poet .. Wilson M. Hardy. Whitman, a Poet...................F. E. Ellis. Time of Meeting: March. Subject for Discussion: "Sidney Lanier." Lanier’s Life..................F. H. Barr'ett. Lanier’s Poetry........................Jno. H. Monahan. Lanier’s Character and Prose Works, R. P. Brooks. Time of Meeting: April. Subject for Discussion: "Timrod." 156 Left College.University Orchestra Prof. J. P. Campbell. Cello. Morris Michael, Piano Pinkus Happ, Violin. Will Hallowbs, Violin. Max Michael, Violin. Oscar Keith, Violin. Carlton Jkstf.r. Violin. Haiti. Lovbjoy. Violin. Dewai.d Cohen, Clarinet. John Cakitiibrs, Cornet. Henry Elliot, Cornet. John Culp, Trombone. Joe Morton, Snare Drum. Walter Jackson. Bass Drum. Selections. ‘Invincible Eagle." "Matinee Girl." "Bunch o' Blackberries. "Mosquito Parade." “Hunky Dory. 157The Loom. Tins take hi dole of emlles and tear . 11 weaves upon bis nolsel loom And make the fabric of ih« year . The various (breads of Joy and (loom, Th« colors formed of peace and atrlfe. And (he whole icarb of human life. -WILLIAM HAMILTON HATXK. 1581 Georgia State Oratorical Association. f G. W. I,f(wrn. V. I M.u Intvki- .. Gi.knn W. Lkgwkn..........................I’resident. Georjfio's Representative, Oratorical Contest, April 25, 1902. M. S. Johnson. Si’iijkct: "Social L'nrcst." University Oratorical Association. ..............President. M. S. Johnson....................Vice-President. Roiikkt J. Mokan..................Secretary. M. S. Johnson. lCO M. S. JOHNSON. Representative at Inter ColleKlate State Oratorical Oontcat. WILSON M. HARDY. North Carolina Debater. 161$. J. Nix. President Dcmosthene n Society. I. S I'kkbi.ks J. K. Jordan. Other Presidents. E. W. ItAiMiAi.K. J. S. F.vfsr. 11. 1). Stuuiss. 162Georgia and North Carolina Debate. Held at Chapel Hall, April, 8th, 1902. Sr»:jK T: "Resolve !. Tlia; Our Democratic Institutions Arc in Danger h'rom the Crowing I’mvcr of Centralization." C. A. IlYXfXI (ieorgia North Carolina J. I). McCaktxky Ocorgia Won! W. M. I I. ki vPHI KAPPA PRESIDENTS. R. L. McWhorter, L. P. Goodrich. H. M. Fletcher, W. M. Hardy, J. H. Monohan. M. Bell, J. F. Hart, W. I. MacIntyre.History of Phi Kappa for 1901-1902. HE history of Phi Kappa this year :s a story of victories and of . changes in the constitution of the Society, both of which have contributed to a renewal of interest in her welfare and an increased attendance upon her meetings. It has been a year of hard, earnest work, of steady toil, and of consequent success. Never before in the history of the Society has she won so many victories, the glory of which is undiminished by a single defeat. She commenced the year by initiating sixty one new members, thus giving to all interested in oratory and debate a chance to prepare themselves for future success. And. animated by the same spirit which urged the University to give to the farmers of the State a better education, she threw open her doors free of charge to the Winter Agricultural students. Her meetings throughout the year have been regularly held and largely attended, and great has been the advantage derived from them. She has, selected as her presidents men who stand high at the University in every line of work: Irwin MacIntyre, for the month of September, and L. P. Goodrich, for October, last year’s winners of the Georgia-North Carolina debate: R. A. Graves, in November, well- known in University Oratorical and Literary-circles; R. L. McWhorter, December, a quiet but persuasive speaker; in January, Major H. M. Fletcher, for nine years a professor at the G. M. I.: Wilson Hardy for February, known for his participation in tiie recent victory in dedebate over North Carolina: Madison Bell, for March, president of the Atlanta Club; Jack-Hart, for April, whose eloquent reasoning and commanding presence imparted a new dignity to the office of President; G. 13. Franklin, for May, a convincing debater; and John Monahan, for the month of June. These men have one and all devoted their time and thought to the best way of increasing interest in the Literary Society and placing Phi Kappa on a higher plane, and the result of their work is now seen. Of all the victories which Phi Kappa has won, that over North Carolina was the greatest. The question for debate was: "Resolved, That our democratic institutions are in danger from the growing power of centralization in the United States.” Though this debate is open to both Societies, only one Deinosthcnian, contested. Messrs. Hardy and McCartney, both Phi Kappas, secured the two places; went to North Carolina; championed the negative side of the debate: and won the decision. 165Second to this, is perhaps, the selection of Sam Johnson, a Phi Kappa, to represent the University in the State Inter-Collegiate Oratorical meet. At the opening of College the Chancellor asked a man from each class to speak for his class, and of the five si eakers on the stage on January the sixth, four of them were Phi Kappas: Bullard. Meldrim, Reynolds, and Major Fletcher. Mr. Frank Barrett, of Augusta, won the An-niversarian Contest, and represented his Society in this capacity on the 22nd of February. He created a new precedent on this occasion l v disregarding tradition and striking out in new and untried fields, describing to the audience the condition of literature in the South and the causes for its mcagerncss in quantity and quality, instead of harping on the threadbare story of the University's and Phi Kappa's past, and the lives of the great men of both. His speech was original and thoughtful, catching the attention of the audience and holding it throughout. And still another victory is added to Phi Kappa’s list. In the student's program at Commencement, in which the speakers arc elected by popular vote, the three men who will represent the three departments of the University this year are all Phi Kappas. They arc G. D. Blount, of the Law Department; Ira Williams .of Franklin College; and Jack McCartney, of the State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. One of the features of the present year has been the number of amendments to the constitution. During the year seven amendments have been passed and all of them have benefited I’hi Kappa. There has always been a good deal of dissatisfaction regarding the eligibility clause, and an attempt to better it -was the cause of the most important of the amendments. It provides that eligibility pertains only to such events as arc strictly Society affairs, such as class debates, the Champion Debate, the Anniversarian, and the holding of offices and voting in the Society ; that a member to be eligible must take part in one out of every four consecutive debates, and that if he becomes ineligible on account of some Providential reason, he may be restored to eligibility by a three-fourth’s vote of the Society. 'Hie Anniversarian will, hereafter, be elected in the following manner: "All contestants for the Anniversarian’s place shall submit one week before the preliminary contest, their speeches to three Faculty judges, who arc to judge solely on literary merit. These marks are to count fifty per cent, of the entire mark. On the night of the contest three judges are to judge solely on the oratory of the contestants, these marks to count the remaining fifty per cent, of tlie entire mark. The one receiving the highest average is to be chosen." An objection to the Champion Debate has been that it is too long. To remedy this the speakers have been reduced to two on a side, each speech not to exceed twenty minutes. By another amendment the regular program of Phi Kappa now includes a declamation and an oration. The declamation is delivered by a Freshman or a Sophomore, while the oration is the work of a Junior, Senior, or Lawyer. With a view to increasing interest in the class 166debates a radical change has been made. The trustees offer two medals a year to each class in College, one to Phi Kappa and the other to Demosthenian. With the concurrence of Demosthenian the class debates wcic made inter-society affairs, one Society submitting the question in each class and the other choosing the side. The amendment intended that cadi Society hold a preliminary contest, selecting three men, to champion their Society in the final event, the man making the best speech on cither side, winning the prize offered by the trustees. In this way only one prize was offer-ed in each class, so as to give it a new significance. Unfortunately, after this amendment was passed, dissatisfied parties brought it up, undoing the work already done, by giving a prize in each Society. The Senior Debate has been discontinued. Looking back over the work that has been done Phi Kappa may well feel proud of her progress. She has increased her attendance, wrested victory from North Carolina, sent her representative to the Inter-Collegiate Oratorical Meet in Atlanta, and bettered her own constitution; she has ever aimed at the highest, at the noblest, and the best; she has urged her men onward in their struggle for self-ir.iprovc-ment, leading them up that narrow path to the high precipice of fame and glory where sit Toombs, Stephens, and other distinguished sons of Phi Kappa stretching out their hands in welcome. R. MORAN .THE MISTLETOE. In summer when the Artist Nature paints The fields and forests bright and green, we deem The mistletoe a thief that saps the life Of Its own parent oak. But when the winds Of winter strip the woodland bare and whirl Th" dead and withered leaven. and her chill breath Turns all the patient fields from green to brown. Tho mistletoe—a smile that summer left— Bedecks the naked tree and brightens all Our Christmas-tide. And thus the IdU dreams That rob the po -t of hi time and gold. Return when age and sorrow strike him down And lend a glory to his Ion some year . That neither power nor the wealth of kings Can purchsa or destroy. -rRAMPTON r. KI.LtP.The Literary Societies, Hli increasing interest manifested by the students, this year, in the Literary Societies of the University justifies an attempted sketch of the Demosthcnian and Phi Kappa Societies. A few collected incidents concerning their methods of procedure and their relations with each other, in the past, may he of interest. As a rule, all students feel a becoming pride, not only in the present and future of their respective Societies, but past records have for them more than a passing interest. Yet the average student knows but little regarding the history of his Society save the few stock traditions common to all. and these oral traditions, transmitted from student to student. often undergo such changes in their varied repetitions, that but little credence can be given to their authenticity. Pleasant it is to recall past history if it be bright and stimulating, and where can be found brighter and more stimulating histories than the histories of the Literary Societies? Year by year both Demosthcnian and Phi Kappa have progressed in their usefulness, and while interest has waned at times, and active attendance has been small, yet such conditions have been invariably followed by a reaction characterized by increased attendance, work and activity. From the very year that Phi Kappa was founded there has always existed just enough healthful rivalry between the two Societies to make each member zealous for the welfare of his own Society. In this way. by vigor ous. yet good-natured competition, have the reputation and standing of each Society been sustained and insured. The students of the University have always shown a marked interest in debate and public speaking. The result of training thus acquired in the debating hall is found in the histories of the graduates of the University, who have filled offices of trust and honor. Time ami time again have the Alumni of this institution been heard to say that their success as teachers, law- 170vers, preachers and orators, had its source in the experience and training acquired by active participation in the Literary Societies. With one year to spare has the University rounded a century of usefulness. Popular opinion gives to the Dcinosthenian Society an existence of like duration, but an old record shows that Dcinosthenian is not yet a centenarian by one year. Neither record nor tradition tells us what means the students of the University, in the first two years of its existence, had for training themselves in debate and speaking. Perhaps they were extended vari-ied opportunities for practising the art of persuasion in tltc class-roont .as an old student says, in an extant letter, that "each student responded to the question propounded while standing upon his feet.” The details of the founding of Dcinosthenian Society arc recorded in but one place, in an extant letter, written by William S. Rutherford of the class of 1804. According to this letter, to the class of 1804 belongs the credit of founding Dcinosthenian Society. NTot, however, until their junior year, did the members of this class see the necessity or expediency of an organized Literary Society. This old letter shows that on February 5, 1803. ’ the junior class began by a general consultation the establishment of a society for the promotion of extemporizing, or extemporary speaking." Nine days later, at the 'time of appointment, ' a constitution was framed for the ‘‘good regulation of the late-established Society.” Inference alone leads one to conclude why this Society received the meritorious. name. Demosthenian. The first debate held by this Society was on February 23, 1803. and the subject for discussion was: “Is a mon-archial government preferable to a republican?" This debate took place at night, "after the dispensation of the classic business of the day." Xot a word remains that tells which side was victorious, but it seems that a "tolerable’' discussion was the impression left by the speaking upon the only member of the Society recording the proceedings. There were ten charter members belonging to the Society, all of whom were members of the class of 1804. Thus, the founding of the Demosthenian took place in 1803. if this only extant record of its foundation be authentic, and it gives evidence of being a genuine and truthful record from the pen of one of the charter members. Upon this evidence will time-honored "1801" have to give place to iconoclastic "1803.” The attendance at the University for the first nineteen years of its existence was rather small, the matriculates during this period rarely exceeding thirty for any one year. All this lime, however, the majority of the students took an active part in all exercises held by the Demosthenian Society. In this Society, the 171methods of procedure were very formal, the most strict order and decorum preserved, and excessive fines imposed upon all delinquents. Constant troubles and petty quarrels sprang up between rival members, yet these were usually settled in an amicable way, through committees or tribunals acting after a decidedly formal and stately fashion. It is quite a celebrated tact, that during the first three decades of the existence of the University, there existed an extremely contentious spirit among the students. Not only did they have many difficulties and fights among themselves, but serious differences often sprang up between students and instructors. These troubles were considerably diminished on the inauguration of Or. Waddell to the president's office. in 1819. He thoroughly remodelled and reorganized all the departments of the institution. In 1820 the attendance of students at the University was more than double that of any previous year. More students and brighter prospects were the immediate results of l r. Waddell’s administration. But his coming to the presidency of the institution did not bring peace and order to the Literary Society, as the troubles there increased in numbers and intensity. As the result of these disorders came the idea of forming a new Society. That idea soon became a suggestion, the suggestion ripened into action, and the result was the founding of Phi Kappa Society. This took place in 1820. through the withdrawal of a few members from Demosthenian Society. An intense rivalry now sprang up between the two Societies, the Demosthenian attempting, for a time, “to freeze out” and ostracize the members of Phi Kappa, but this latter Society soon gave evidences of such "marked growth and ceaseless activity,” that the respect and admiration of the rival Society was won. Amicable relations sprang up between them and a formal treaty “to preserve order, peace and friendship between the two Societies,” was entered into. In accordance with the terms of this treaty all matters of dispute were to be settled by “definite committees.” Its wording, in places, was indefinite, two constructions often being placed on the same passage. Such loose phraseology gave rise to many misunderstandings between the two Societies. One clause in this treaty was to the effect that no member from either Society was to approach within a certain distance of the Society of which he was not a member, while said Society was in session. This clause was often violated through carelessness, ignorance or malice. The one case, out of many, which produced the longest and most bitter negotiations, took place in 1829. It seems that W. I. Vasou, a Demosthenian, willfully crossed the “dead line” into Phi Kappa’s territory. Phi Kappa at once 172demanded reparation for his conduct, declaring through a committee that such conduct, if not punished, would "produce confusion, disorder, ill-will and possibly a rupture between the two Societies." The offending gentleman, acting on his own suggestion, attempted to confer with Phi Kappa individually, and not through the standing Demosthenian committee, appointed in accordance with the treaty. Mr. Vason declared that "the person or persons reporting him, did it through a revengeful spirit of retaliation. calumny or defamation." Phi Kappa highly indignant over this action, sent a formal protest to the Demosthenian Society, demanding that the "offending member he punished.” The protest contains in rts close the following inflated yet sincere language: "The members of the Phi Kappa Society repose the utmost confidence in your strict amity, their l osoms glow with the same emotions. They hope a day of discord will never arrive when the voice of reciprocal affection shall be changed from its melody to the harsh clamors of hate. If anything is calculated to stir up tumult and create unholy animosity it is such conduct as we now investigate. A beloved member may indeed err, but our hearts 'entwined around him may dislike to censure him. But we fear not this result, we know your prudence and your justice, and await in confidence your decision." Xo record remains telling what punishment was meted out to Mr. Vason. but a punishment satisfactory to Phi Kappa's wounded dignity must have been indicted on him. as there were records oi ricndly relations that existed between the two Societies one month after the date of the above protest. A clause in the treaty stipulated that there should be "annual forensic debates" between representatives of the two Societies. As early as 1831 we find records showing that negotiations were carried on between the Societies towards the abolishment of these debates. It scents that Phi Kappa—"for reasons which a small majority deemed good"—determined to ask the Demosthenian Society to annul, with the consent of both Societies, those articles of the treaty providing for annual debates. The Dcmosihcniaus agreed to the projtosals. stating, however, through their committee, that they agreed to the proposals solely because Phi Kappa requested it. and not because they believed it would be beneficial to themselves. On the contrary, they expressly stated that such a course would be decidedly disadvantageous to the best interests of both Societies. The members of Phi Kappa, on the reception of this communication, at once rescinded their former action, declaring that they did not wish to be in faul: over the matter. If the annual debates shoo'd be abolished they declared it would be 173over their protest. In a firm, yet court coos, communication to Demosthenian Society, they declared that, “we, now, in no way, desire the abolition of the annual debate, nor do we fear ui the least to meet you in debate.” This fearless assertion was made good by | hi Kappas winning the annual debate at the next commencement. During the early history of the Societies there was no open electioneering to secure new members, as the second article in their treaty S| ecificd that each student at the I'nivcrdiv should have an "ample probation period." in which time to decide upon the Society he preferred to join. This clause was a constant source of trouble, both Societies often disregarding it. Each infringement, however, was always followed by a demand for investigation from the opposing Society. As might be inferred. constant breakings of this article brought about, before a great while, the methods used at present for securing new members. The most serious rupture between the Societies occurred in 1S39. It began over a very trivia! matter, but soon developed into what seemed a very hitter feeling and fierce rivalry. The matter grew so serious that an arbitration was finally agreed upon, in order to bring ahum a reconciliation. The whole difficulty grew out of the Dcinosihenian Society's giving no forma answer to a communication made to them by 74 Phi Kappa, on a subject relating to the selec tion of junior orators. On account of the sickness and negligence of some of the members of the Demosthenian committee, a formal answer was never submitted. Phi Kappa demanded an apology: Demosthenian Hally refused to apologize. To the arbitration committee each Society submitted pa| crs, "exhibiting vigilance on the part oi cadi, to sustain unsullied the high teputation of their respective Societies." According to the terms of the arbitrators, concessions were made by both sides, but strained relations existed between the Societies for a great while afterwards. Time and time again were the terms of the treaty broken by each Society, and many were the infringements made by individual members. Each Society would apologize for the infringement of individual members, by ascribing all errors to be “etrors of the head and not of the heart." This much-abused excuse invariably brought peace and restored order, if submitted in a tone sufficiently apologetic. In order to keep all members familiar with the articles oi the treaty, there grew up the custom of having it read on the anniversaries oi the respective Societies. If there is any one thing more interesting than all others in the old records of the Societies. it is their early constitutions. A striking contrast is shown when these early constitutions arc compared with those of the pres-cut time. Formality, and not expediency was the rule followed on every occasion. The constitutions of both Phi Kappa and Dcniostheniau arc materially different in but few places. The following illustrations are taken from the oldest extant constitution of the Demosthenian Society. They are fair representations of the peculiar and eccentric miles and regulations common to the constitutions of both Societies. “In ye olden time” each member of Demosthenian Society obtained his scat by drawing a ticket bearing a number corresponding to some scat in the hall. Woeful forebodings seized upon the timid youth drawing a front seat, for in that seat did lie have to remain, as abandoning his seat called down upon him a heavy fine. Attendance upon the exercises of the Society was compulsory. A fine of 25 cents was imposed upon the member missing roll-call: more upon him who was absent from an entire meeting. Three successive absences brought with it suspension or expulsion, unless valid excuses could be produced. Each student, however, if he thought the demands of the Society made it impossible for him to attend to his other duties, could ask for an honorable dismissal, by which he could sever his connections with the Society altogether. Such resignations were rare, but some lew arc on record during the time the constitution was so extremely strict. The. one law (hat changed not was to the 75 effect that every member must take an •'active part in all the duties incumbent on .very loyal member of Demosthenian Society." The letter of the law was observed, even to the minutest details, and fine after fine fell with the strictest severity upon delinquents and offenders. The President did not possess, in some respects. a prerogative as great as lie docs at present. He was not allowed the deciding vote to break a tie until three successive ballots had been held, each ballot being the same—a tic. And then, he was expected to "exercise due moderation” in his decision. Furthermore, the President did not decide the winning side in a debate. This was left to a vote of the members present. In case of a tie. he could bring his judgment into exercise by choosing the victorious side. One of the articles in the constitution specifics that "no member, be it hot or cold, shall sit immediately before the fire-place." thus showing that a rather stoical indifference was manifested towards the condition of the weather. And yet. the fire-place was an oft-frequented place, as many defaulters had to stand squarely in front of it and declaim under heavy penalty. One philanthropic feature of the Demosthenian Society, in its past history, lies in the fact that many worthy young men of limited means, were educated through its be-nevolence. The funds for this purpose were obtained by having an initiation fee of five dollars, three of which were "devoted exclusively to the education of young men unable to educate themselves." Is not such a precedent worthy of emulation? The following is an acknowledgment to Dcmosthenian Society from a student receiving such aid: "1 ac- knowledge myself under the greatest obligation to you. I am. indeed, sorry that 1 can repay you with naught, at present, but the offerings of a heart whose sinccrcst and warmest wish is your present and eternal happiness." A custom once belonging to the Dcmosthenian Society was the giving of badges and diplomas to its members. Each senior, after graduation, and after "paying up all dues, fines, and arrears of any kind." on the payment of two dollars to the treasurer, was entitled to a diploma. The badges were purchased by individual members and were always worn on the right side of the coat. Upon this badge was the inscription. "Dcmosthenian." engraved in a semi-circular form, and under this was the image of Demosthenes declaiming on the seashore, "with suitable coloring and scenery around it." The greatest respect was shown by the De-mosthenians to the memory of a deceased brother. Becoming resolutions were always passed, memorial meetings were held, and crepe was worn upon the left arm of even-member for thirty days after a fellow-member's death. The minutes of the Society, prior to 1840, give some very interesting subjects for debates. Questions concerning the political, social and moral conditions of the times were often discussed, but abstract questions predominated over all others. One might question the literary taste of the Demosthenians of 1831. after noting in the minutes that a “most uncommonly dull and uninteresting debate" was held on the subject. “Is the literature of the United States inferior to that of Europe?" The criticism would fall on the decision—eleven to nine, in favor of the negative. On Aug. 20. 1831. a splendid discussion took place on the subject: “Is mankind more disposed to ad- here to old customs or to establish new ones?” A large majority gave a decision in favor of the adherence to old customs. Incidentally, would the al ove decision, linked with the fact that there was a ten-dollar fine for bringing “any female, on any occasion," into Demosthenian Society, be likely to have likely to have any connection at all with the absence of co-education at the University of Georgia ? The records of Phi Kappa's early history arc not so full as those of Demosthenian. The oldest minutes of this Society bear the dale of 1826. In the January minutes of this vear. are 176found, in substance, these words: "Resolved, that all motions resolutions, proceedings, and alterations in the constitution be recorded in a blank book, and that this resolution be the first inscribed therein.' For several years from this date the minutes arc on record. Phi Kappa had more secret features than Demosthenian, and was much less formal in procccdurc. The term "brother” is invariably used in designating a fellow,member, thus showing a strong spirit oi brotherhood existing among its members. The early constitution was noted for its length and minuteness, an abridged form being read to the honorary members on every anniversary day. It might be of some interest to note that the second earliest debate on record was held on the subject: “Would the establishing of a national university comport with the interest and policy of the United States?" After a "warm and interesting debate” a negative decision was given. Every anniversary was a gala day for Phi Kappa, every member, regular and honorary. who could possibly do so, being present. The following extract is taken from the thirteenth annual report, read to the Society on the anniversary held in 1832: “Fellow members of Phi Kappa Society:—The committee to whorrt was referred the difficult and responsible duty of examining into the proceedings of the Society for the last twelve months, beg leave to report that, having carefully consulted the re- cords arid inquired into the various departments, they have every reason to congratulate the Society: whether is considered the excellency of our laws, the good conduct of our members or our present prosperous condition.'' Then follows the body of the report, setting forth all the workings of the various departments of the Society. This is a typical report, selected as a representative of many, all of which show a marked optimistic feeling concerning the welfare of the Society. All the records of this Society arc very neatly kept, showing great care and faithfulness on the part of the secretaries. There arc but scant incidents in the early history of Phi Kappa, yet all methods of procccdurc and customs were so similar to those of the Dcmosthcnian, that the incidents of one are equally characteristic of the other. One must understand, however, that formerly the proceedings of each Society were kept secret, and each Society knew but little of the internal workings of the other. A common source of complaint was the persistent prying into the internal character and proceedings of caoli Society by members of the other. By private contributions sufficient money was secured from regular and honorary members of Dcmosthcnian Society to build, in 1824 the building now known as Dcmosthcnian Hall. It was erected at a cost of $4,000. In 834. like 77contributions enabled Phi Kappa to erect a hall at a cost of $5,000. Before the building ol their respective halls both Societies had regular places for holding their meetings, but constant reference is made to the inadequate accommodations and lack of secrecy connected with these rooms. The earliest records show each Society in possession of a library. Books, periodicals and maps were added yearly to the collections of each. Individual members and friends often made valuable additions. Dcmosthcnian appropriated yearly one-third of the total amount of money received into the treasury "to be expended in the purchase of standard books." As early as 1832 Phi Kappa Library possessed over one thousand volumes. Liberal donations were made yearly from the treasury for the buying of new books to add to this number. Each Society looked after its own library, buildings and all furnishings being entirely independent of University control and direction. The librarians were elected from the members of each Society, and their duties were rather onerous for honoraty positions. The rules and regulations governing these, libraries were similar to those governing the General Library at present. The Libraries were open for a short time on specified days, however, and the students had to arrange themscives in alpha' betical order around the room before »any books could be received. Pines were imposed upon members keeping out books over the specified limits. 1'hc records oi the librarians show that the students took due advantage of these So ciety libraries. In 1891 the Societies, seeing the general carelessness shown in the maintenance and management of these department libraries, with the consent of the Faculty, unreservedly donated all their records and books to the History Department of the University, where they may be seen to this day, an unntolcsted and antiquated collection. This article embodies some gleanings, not a history, of the past records of the Societies, for their history is wytten in the memories and lives of those nurtured and equipped for life under their influence. The writer expresses the hope that this article will have some influence in awakening a still livelier interest titan that now shown, in the past, present and future history of the Demosthenian and Phi Kappa Societies. W. O. PAYME 7  ■ ■$m msi S g- Foot Ball Team 1901. S. S. Dean, Captain of the Track Team. i8_  Foot Ball Team 1902.Varsity Football Team. F. M. RJDLE.Y. Captain of the football Team. H. Kktkon........ S. J. Nix......... S. A. Bk.u kh .. Marion Smith 11. J. LaMAR .. J. I'. Ranticr .. .. .. Center. Right Guard. .. Left Ciuard. Right Tackle. . Left Tackle. .. Right End. L. M. VVkiHiiT . W. R. Turnkr .. M. Dickinson .. A. Calhoun .. . J. Monahan .. . I M. Riih.ky .. .... Left End. Right Half Rack. Left Half Rack. .. .. lull Rack. .. Quarter Rack. ..........Captain. Subs In Game. Worsham Toi.ak Cordon Dka.v Hui.l Record of Games. October 12.— ieorgia vs. South Carolina, in Augusta. (la. (ieorgia. 10: S nth Carolina. 5. October 19.—(ieorgia vs. Vanderbilt, in Nashville, (ieorgia. o: Vanderbilt. 47. October 21.—(Ieorgia vs. Sewanee. in Se-wanee. (Ieorgia. o: Sewanee. 47- October 26.—(Ieorgia vs. Clemson. in Athens, (ieorgia. 5; Clemson. 29. November 2.—(Ieorgia vs. North Carolina, in Atlanta. (Ieorgia. o; North Carolina. 27. November 9.—Georgia vs. Alabama, in Montgomery. Georgia, o: Alabama, o. November 16.—Georgia vs. Davidson, in Athens. Georgia. 6: Davidson. 16. November 28.—Georgia vs. Auburn, in t-lanta. ieorgia, o: Auburn, o. 184Athletic Department. University of Georgia Baseball Team. Noel P. ParK. Manager. Xoki. P. Park .... Manager. M. M. Dickinson .. Captain. W'm. A. Rkvnoi.ds . Coach. McWiioktkr. ('. S. . Wai.kkr. 1». S Short Stop. Dickinson. M. M. .. Third base. Mct AU.A. 1. II. .. . Left Field. J Ayres. S. R Andkkson. Frank .. Right Field anil Pitcher. Mowkk. J. 1)......................Pitcher. Substitutes. Cai.iiocn. A. CoolMvK 186 M. M. Dickinson. Captain.ERLE M. DONELSON. MaXaosr 1«0I Kootbai.I. Tkah. NOEL P. PARK. Manaokr Raskiiai.i. Tr.ASi GEO. C. HEYWARD. Bv«iskm Ma.xa kk 1 vn PoothallTcam.4 ‘Baseball Record. March 22.—Georgia vs. Athens. Georgia, 10: Athens, o. March 29.—Georgia vs. Hobart College, oi Geneva, X. Y.. at Athens. Georgia. 9: Hobart, 2. March 31.—Georgia vs. Cornell, at Athens. Georgia, 6; Cornell, 6. April 1st.—Georgia vs. Cornell, at Athens. Georgia, 3; Cornell, 8. April 15.—At Columbia, S. C. South Carolina College, 6; Georgia, 4. April 16.—At Chapel Hill. Georgia 2: North Carolina, 8. April 18.—At Spartanburg ,S. C. Georgia, 7: Wofford College, 6. April 19.—At Clemson, S. C. Georgia, 2; Clcmson, 1. April 25.—At Atlanta, Ga. Georgia, to; Auburn, o. April 26.—At Atlanta, Ga. Georgia n; Georgia School of Technology, 10. May 3.—At Atlanta, Ga. Georgia, 7; Tech., 8. May to.—-At Athens, Ga. Georgia, 9; Tech., 7. May 17.—At Macon. Georgia, 1; Mercer, 3. 190Football Team, Square G, Men Entitled to Wear G. Ridley, F. Nix. S. Monk, M. Dorsey, C. Smith, M. Clay, H. Dean, S. Monahan, J. Hardy, W. Wright, L. Dickinson, M. Ketron. Hey wood. Baxter, J. Ti rner, W. Beaver, S. Lamar, H. Calhoun, A. Baseball Team, Octagonal G. Dickinson, M. Coilk. Walker, S. McCalla. Bower, R. Ridley, F. Beaver, S. Anderson, F. ♦Park, N. Bower, J. Jaques, R. Blackshear, S. McWhorter, C. Blount, D. Track Team, Round G. Nix, S. Blount, D. Dean, S. Wrig'Ht, L. Manley, J. ♦Park, N. Baxter, J. Hardy, W. Coii.e, W. Hodgson, W. ♦Lyndon, A. Dorsey, C. Boned, J. Barrow, T. ♦Managers only entitled to "G.” on cap. Dougherty, D. Hart, J. Anderson. 191Tech. vs. Georgia, Field Day. One Hundred Yard Dash.—Winner, Baxter, of Georgia, 11 1-5 seconds; Hardeman, of Tech., second; Inglis ,of Tech, third. Running High Jump.—Winner, Cowan, of Tech., 5 feet and 6 inches; Blount ,of Georgia, second; Thrash, of Tech, third. Shot Put.—Winner, Towers, of Tech., 30 feet and 4 inches; Cowan, of Tech., second; Coile, of Georgia, third. Two Hundred and Twenty Yard Dash.— Winner, Baxter, of Georgia, 24 seconds; Hardeman, of Tech., second; McDaniels, of Tech., third. One Hundred and Twenty Yard Hurdle-Race.—Winner, Dean, of Georgia, 20 seconds; Dorsey, of Georgia, second; Griffith, of Tech., third. Half Mile Run.—Winner, Wagoner, of Tech., 2 minutes and 14 seconds; Hart, of Georgia, second; Nix. of Georgia, third. Pole Vault.—Winner, Bower, of Georgia, 9 feet; Dorsey, of Georgia, second; Cowan, of Tech., third. Four Hundred and Forty Yard Dash.— Winner, Baxter, of Georgia. 53 4-5 seconds; Hilliard, of Tech., second; Crawford, of Tech., third. Hammer Throw.—Winner, Coile, of Georgia, too feet; Towers, of Tech., second; Nix, of Georgia, third. Two Hundred and Twenty Yard Hurdle Race.—Winner, Hardy, of Georgia, 29 4-5 seconds; Hilliard, of Tech., second; Griffith, oi Tech, third. Running Broad Jump.—Winner, Blount, of Mile Run.—Winner, Smith, of Tech., 5 min- Gcorgia, 19 feet and 1 inch; Anderson, of utes and 7 4-5 seconds; Dougherty, of Geor- Gcorgia, second; Thrash, of Tech., third. gia, second; Barrow, of Georgia, third. First place counts 5 points; second, 3; third, 1. Final score: Georgia, 62; Tech., 46. 192Athletic Council First Term. PiNKUS Happ..........................President. Henry J. Lamar..................Vice-President. Hugh Scott...........................Secretary. H. W. Gordon.........................Treasurer. F. M. Ridley..................Captain Football. Erlb M. Donaldson .. . Manager Football. M. M. Dickenson..............Captain Baseball. N. P. Park............................Manager. S. S. Dean..............Captain Track Team. Andrew Lyndon .... Manager Track Team. Paul Lovejoy..................Manager Tennis. A. H. Patterson......................Professor. R. E. Park...........................Professor. Judce Cobb.............................Trustee. E. H. Dorsey........Resident Member. Brooks Clarke .... Non-Resident Member. Second Term. Sandy Beaver..........................President. Fort Scott.......................Vice-President. Henry J. Lamar........................Secretary. Wallace Miller........................Treasurer. F. M. Ridley..................Captain Football. George Heyward............Manager Football. M. M. Dickenson...............Captain Baseball. N. P. Park.............................Manager. S. S. Dean...............Captain Track Team. Andrew Lyndon .... Manager Track Team. Paul Lovejoy...................Manager Tennis. A. H. Patterson.......................Professor. Dr. J. C. Campbeli....................Professor. Judge Cobb..............................Trustee. E. H. Dorsey..................Resident Member. Julian Lane...............Non-Resident Member. Advisory Committee. Sydney S. Dean, X.a.H. Hugh Scott, X. P. W. Solomon, A. A. C. D. Russell, James K. Jordan, . T. U. Noel P. Park, -V. f. C. W. Bond, -. M. S. Monk, A'. George F. Gober, Non- Frat. P. Happ, Independent. Prof. A. H. PattersonPat Lamkin George Sibley Bill Reid University Golf Club. Officers. Billy Hooper...........................President. John Morris.......................Vice-President. W. B. Hill.............................Secretary. W. H. Bocock...........................Treasurer. Poopy Max Platan Krensox.. Instructor. Members. Sylvan us Morris Pete Calhoun Charles Russell Walter Hodgson-Young Hill Brick Jette Caddies. I key Solomon-Cone Maddox Sydney Jones Reveand Benedict Neyle Simpkins Randolph Jaques Goat Thornton Bosco Cleveland Dilly Pickle 194 Tennis, r- » Manager—Paul Lovejoy. Lamar, Smith, M. H. | Slum: 6-0; C-0 Solomon, Lewis, | Solomon: 3-G; 6-3; 6-3 Dorsey, Fleming, | Dorsey: 6-3; 6-3 Barrett, Gober, | Barrett: 6-7; 6-4; 6-1 Blount, 1 Blount: 8-6; 6-3 Brooks, ) Dorsey 1 I y j Solomon: 7-5; 4-8; 6-3 } Dorsey: 6-3; 6-3 I Dorsey: 8-C; 6-0 Dorsey plays Blackshcar (holder of Chsiuploaship.) Dorsey, Blackshear, I Blackshear: 6-3; 6-2; 61 I Dorset: f6-3; 4-6; 6-3 196Annual Field-Day Programme. EVENT First Second His Record College Record Holder 100-Yard Dash. Hanson. Baxter, Ridley, Barrett, Jones H., Ridlev 10 3-5 lOsec Johnson. H. 0. •01 Coile, V , ’03 , Hammer Throw. Coile W., Nix, Ritchie, Oliver, Dean, Coile Ritchie 09ft 4in 100ft High Jump. Hardy, Starr, Ridley, Jette, Blackshear, Blount, I«aw ’03 Cox, II. O.. ’00 McIntosh, '00 Colquitt. ’93 220.Yard Dash. Baxter, Hanson, Ridley, Jonca II., Graham, Pole Vault. Baxter- Jones II Wright 3 4-5 22 3-6 Oft 7 l-2in Mile Run. Russell, Roberts, Dougherty, Collier, Bar- row — 220-Yard Hurdle Race. 28 3-5 27 4-5 - 440-Yard Dash. Baxter, Wright, Hanson, Anderson, England, (Tamp Wright——- Anderson 45 1-5 53 4-5 Cox. H. O., ’00 Baxter, '03 197Annual Field-Day Programme-Continued. EVENT First Second His Record College Record Holder Shot Put. Nix, Ridley, Coite, Oliver V., Strickland, 36ft 4 l-2in...... Price, F., '93 Broad Jump. Anderson, Hardy, Ridley, Illouut, Bower Blount Anderson 18ft 4 1-Sin..... 20ft 4in Weaver, '90 Half-Mile Run. Manley,Scott, Nix, Cheney, Moran, 1'awcett, Nix — - 2min 0 2-5tec.... Marshall. Law 120-Yard Hurdle Race. •09 20sec 10 l-6scc . Gordon. W. W., 50-Yard Sack Race. 50-Yard Three Legged Race. Hardy a Dean Blount a Camp 6sec.. ( Barrow, 'M Ferrell. ’97 Relay Race. Senior. Junior. Sophomore. Freslnnan Junior Freshman _ 3min 41 2-5 Smin 41 2-6 03 98Pandora. Editors of PANDORA from 1886 to the Present Time. Volume I, 1886—Editor-In-Chief, G. N. Wilson, A'. A. Business Manager, W. B. Cook, A. T. Q. Association Editors, W. E. Woot-ten. 2 . A. A’; McDaniel. V. P ; C. F. Rice, X.4- C. H. Wilson, K. A ; W. A. Speer. P. J. 0; F. F. Stone, J. 0; R. D. Mcader, A. r. L : M. B. Bond. J. T. J; W S. Upshaw, J. J ; R. S. Moye, I'. J ; P. L. Wade, . I J; A. W Wade, 2 . V; W. G. Brown, 2 . A. Volume II, 188?—Editor-in-Chief, C. F. Rice, V. 4 . Business Manager. J. W. Daniel, A. A; Associate Editors, T. W. Reed, 4. J. 0; G. Waters, 'A. . J; W. J. Shaw, 2'. .V; H. K. Milner, .L T. U; A. L. Franklin, J. T. J. Volume III, 1888—Editor-in-chief. Albert Howell, K. A. Business Manager, A. W. Griggs, J- T. J. Associate Editors, W. L. Moore, 2‘. A. E; T. R. Crawford, A. T. i!; F- W. Coile. 2‘. N; Lucicn L. Knight, X. P; W. M. Glass, J. 7 . J. Volume IV, 1890—Editor-in-chief, John D. Little, 2’. .4. E. Business Manager, W. K. Whcatford, .V. Associate Editors, F. E. Callaway. A"- A ; S. J. Tribble, . J- 0; J. C. Crawford, 2-A'; v. D. Ellis,-V. W. I.. Stallings, J- T. J; W. N. Smith, .V.f-E- A. Cohen. Volume V. 1892—Editors-in-chief, J. F. Lewis, X. i L. L. Brown. A. T. Q. Business Manager. W. E. Cristie, 2 V; W. T. Kelly, A. T. ft. Associate Editors, J. C. Kimball, 2’. A. K; Roy Dallas, d-0; J. R. Lane, 2‘- A. A ; E. W. Frey, .V. r. Volume VI, 1893—Editor-in-chief, Harry Hudson, A . .4. Business Manager, F. G. Barfield, 2'. I. A'. Associate Editors, C. R. Nisbet, X. N. B. Stewart, A. T. ft; A. O. Halsey. ,V; H. A. Alexander; E. G. Cabaniss, tf . A. 0; F. G. Johnson, A. T. ft; Eugene Dodd, x. r. Volume VII, 1894-Editors-in chief. C. R. Tid-well, A. T. ft; Noel Moore, 2'. A. E. Business Managers, Paul L. Fleming, A.. ; John D. Stelling, A. T. ft- Associate Editors, L. D. Fricks, 2 . A'; W. P. Harbin. X. ft; H. Brown, A’. A; George Beckett, 4 . J. tt. Volume VIII, 1895—Editor-in-chief. W. A. Harris, X. Busiucss Manager, J. J. Gib-sou, A.T.Q. Associate Editors, H.H.Stciuer, 2’. A. E J. W. Morton, A. A ; W. W. Chandler, A. T ft; W. L. Kemp, 2'- A’; J. T. Dunlap, J- 0; H. V. Black, X. f; J. G. Smith, Non-Fraternity. 200Volume IX, 1896—Editor-in-chief, Pliny Hall, A’. A. Business Manager. J. G. Pitman, • J. 0. Associate Editors, M. M. Lock art, A. E J. B. Connelly, .V. P ; Fred Morris, 2 .V; c. H. Holden. A. T. ‘»; J. M. Stephen-son. Jr., A. T. il; A. V. Black, .V. T. A. Neal; R. B. Nalley. Volume X, 1897 —Editor-in-chief, H. G. Colvin, 2 . A. ;. Business Manager, R. E. Brown, A. T.U. Associate Editors, F. L- Fleming, .V. l J. W- Spain. A'. A Harry Dodd, -V. T. P- S- Smith, J- 0; A- L. Tidwell, A. 7.2; H. Lovejoy, X. X W. B. Kent; J. W. Hendricks. Volume XI, 1898—Editor-in-chief, Harry Dodd, .1. Hugh White, -. V; Business Manager, J. C. McMichad, A. A. Associate Editors, C. H. Black,.V i' E. E Pomeroy, X A E C. Westbrook, A T.U J. T. Dorsey, •P. J. 0; H. R. Perkins, A. T. Q. Volume XIf, 1899—Editors-in-chief, Garrard Glenn, 2. A. A. P. Adams, .V. P. Business Manager, P. E. Johnson, V V. Associate Editors, J. B. McCurry, A'. A; W. S. Blun. A r !■ F. E. Brodnax, A. T. U W. E. Watkins. X. A; D. G. Heidt; J. W-Mason. Volume XIII, 1900—Edttors-in-chief, Archibald Blackshear, A. .-I; Fair Dood, .1-Business Manager, F. E. Brodnax. A. T. U. Associ -to Editors, F. P. Calhoun, A. ♦ ; E-P. Shannon, P- J. 0; F. G. Tupper, X.A. E J. P. Gardner, X. .V; William Davis; E. H. Hamby. Volume XIV, 1901—Editors-in-chief. E. P. Shannon, P- J. 0: J. D. McCartney, X. A. E, Business Manager, Jack Banks, X. P. Associate Editors, P. A. Williams, X. .V; V. H. Bullard, A. 7. 2; R. G. Stephens, A. A; I. M. Putnam, A. 2 ; W. D. Hoyt, A. James L. Sibley. Volume XV, 1902—Editors-in-chief, Frank H. Barrett, X. A. E; Sterling H. Blackshear, X. P. Business Managers, J. K. Jordan. A. T. 2; M. W. Lewis, .V. V. Associate Editors, J. D. Russell, . J- 0; I. S. Peebles, X. A ; M. S. Johnson, A-- A H. M. Fletcher, A- 2'; Donald Cohen. 201Editors “Red and Black First Glenn Legwex..................Editor-in-Chief. Sidney Nix...................Business Manager. Marion Richardson.. .. Associate Editor. Mitchell King....................Local Editor. Secone Edwin R. Camp.................Editor-in-Chicf. Dan H. DuPree................Business Manager. W. O. Fleming...............Associate Editor. H. F. Scott.....................Local Editor. Third W. O. Fleming.................Editor-in-Chicf. Henry J. Lamar...............Business Manager. Hitch M. Scott..............Associate Editor. Campbell Krensox................Local Editor. T erm. Ernest Dallas......................Athletic Editor. Frampton Ellis..............Exchange Editor. Dan H. DuPree, Assistant Business Manager T erm. Ralph Mei.drim.....................Athletic Editor. J. L. Sibley...............Exchange Editor. J. C. Vinson .. Assistant Business Manager. Term. D. A. Cohen .......................Athletic Editor. C. R. Lawler...............Exchange Editor. J. D. Bower .. Assistant Business Manager. 202 t 0m - r Editors First Term. Editors Second Term. t t t fir ♦ Editors Third Term.THE RED AND BLACK. There may be other college yell Whose martial awing and stirring ring Contain their own peculiar spell ; Th- Ir own peculiar Joy may bring To other heart that hold them dear And fondly love their ancient cheer: •But each one something seem 10 lack. For aomohow these can not compar.-To that old yell we love «o well. When out upon the evening air. With rhythmic beat and rising swell There breaks the wild Inspiring nolso Of "Hoo-Rah-Rah!" for Georgia, boys— So comrades, here1 to the Red and Black! There may be oth.-r color , too. A tattered rag, a battle-flag. A scrap of faded ribbon blue; May cause the steps of Time to lag. And from tbo vault of memory's hall. Like spirits of the past, recall Fond reeolh lion trooping back. But let their silken shimmer gleam However brigh In other ' sight. To mo no color o'er will seem I-Ike that stem shade a dark a night Combined with crimson, which we claim as emblems of old Georgia's fame— So. comrade , here's to the Red and Black! O. T. J.. 'S7.fllililllfllllW x Ttit Georgia i f: PUBLISHED BY THE STUDE 1T5 AT THE ■ » • - ..X U WEFpITY 8—1 ■ IlliiiiliJIiUi I ipr M Frank H. Barett, '02. Frampton E. Ei.lis, ’03. Cone Maddox, ’03. Editors. John D. McCartney, ’02. Lucien P. Goodrich, ’02. ’Glenn W. Legwen, '03. Business Managers. Assistant Business Manager.. .. Wilson M. Hardy, ’02. C. R. Lawler, ’03. Max Michael, ’03. 206The Georgians.University Press Club. Vice-President. Vice-President. v" 209 First Term. F. H. Barrett........................President. G. W. Legwen .. . R. J. Moran..........................Secretary. Second Term. Jas. L. Sibley.......................President. R. J. Moran.......... W. O. Roberts........................Secretary. mA FRESHMAN’S JUBILEE. (A In Frank Stanton). "Can't yer guess what make tnc laugh o? Kver git so full o' glee 'At yer Jc t can't he'p fum laughin'? Well. that'.- what's ailin' m ''Still. ye thinks It mighty curious That cr mine on healthy chop Should be caught a-aclln' as If He wun't nothin' but cr 'Yap.' 'Jest a-yeliln' and cavortin', Alt' a-cuttln' gln'rul Jack. An' his mouth a-growln' wider Tw II ho emllcs clean roun' his back? "Jlno hund . boys! llalleluyer! Taln't no u«o ter hold her In; When yo're jest a-runnln' over. Laughin' ain't no burnln' nn. “Yea. It's bl-cged ter come a-gushln'. Xer If more thin one kin hoi . An' a feller' boun' ter tell It. When there's glory In his soul. "And ye'r• rallly Inter-rested? Want ler know my reasons why? Want ler know what mske me happy Why I'd ruther laugh thin cry? "Well. I guess I'll have ter tell y r; Taln't no secret! 'Hip! Iloo-rah!' I'm n-feelln' mighty Jolly— I've Just got a check from n !'" -If. V... Law 01. 210HZTHE GROOM'S TOAST, This Is a briny breath of day Whose sea-born song In sung: A wind-fall from the fragrant way Where rollick ro e sprung— Where opiate bees And lyric leas Gave every Joy a tongue. Thla la a crocus of the Spring Whose ardor could but die, A pinion moulted from tha wing ‘Which lleckcd our carries sky— A vagrant dream To fit their theme Who preach and prophesy. Y t tenderer tendrils here entwine; Tho Illy shames the rose; Beyond the wayward eglantine The sturdy Ilex grows— Tho cooler wine Which snows r fine Still sparkles as It nows. So let this be a briny breath l-'rom sea we yet shall sail; This wind-fall fragrance vhb«pereih Of yet a spiel r gale— More « weetly still The duffodll Shall deck the calmer vale. 212 —CHARI.KS J. BAYNK. ia. The Centennial of the University. fN June, 1901, the University of Georgia celebrated the centennial of its organization. The charter dates back to 1785, making this institution the oldest chartered State University in the United States. The University of Pennsylvania is entered in the list of American Colleges and Universities (1 Butler's Education in the United States, p. 243) as founded in 1751, but the University of Pennsylvania, despite the evidence of its name, is not a State institution. Men (including women) take pride in their youth; nations and institutions, in their antiquity. Nothing could be here said about the Centennial celebration which would be of interest to living readers. As Robert Louis Stevenson has said, “books are a mighty bloodless substitute for life," so any words of description would seem tame to those who felt themselves borne aloug by the high-tidcs of enthusiasm luring the Centennial week. This article then, can be written only for posterity; and we commiserate posterity, as Henry IV pitied the tardy Crillion: "Hang yourself, Grillion; we fought at Arques and you were not there.” But you (I now address posterity) will be at the Bi-ccntennial and you will then make game of us for being too early, as we now have the laugh on you for arriving too late. One of you (how I long to know what manner of man you will be!) will be looking in 2001 for data for an article or address on the Centennial, to be read or delivered at the Bi-ccntennial. You will, of course, resort to the Pandora for your facts. Pakdona here and now provides for your wants; not by telling you the whole story, for which it has not adequate room, but by telling you where you may find it. Look in The University Bulletin, in the Mid-Summer Issue of 1901, and you will find the entire programme, including all the speeches of the eminent men who took part in the public exercises and an account of the Alumni Reunion. We suspect that you will smile at the number of speeches ami wonder at the enthusiasm of those who listened for a whole week. 213Already the signs of the times point to an abbreviation of Commencements. Perhaps, in your day they will be wholly abolished. Pandora desires to protect the editors of The Bulletin against the possible injustice which might arise on account of some of the errors in the proof-reading of that issue, and to express the hope that by the year 2001 the problem of proof-reading will be solved by automatic and infallible machinery. Pandora, also, fot the guidance of the iuturc searcher after facts, refers with gratitude to the press of the State in whose columns large space was given to reports of the Centennial: and to the Centennial Edition of The Atlanta Journal. One of the most interesting facts dcvelo|K d during the Centennial year was that during the first hundred years of its existence the University received from the State only $81400. This would be incredible, if it were not true. (Por the history of the matter see Vol. t, Mo. 2, University Bulletin, pp. 8-11.) The liberal donations of the last General Assembly indicate that the long lane has had its turning. By universal verdict the Centennial celebration was a great occasion. It was described at the time as “the most brilliant literary event in the .history of the State." Athens became the center from which widening waves of influence extended over the whole of Georgia. A great revival of education began at this time and the University cherishes the belief that the Centennial was one of the factors in the awakened interest. For aught that any one can say to the contrary, it may be, dear Alumnus of 2001. that your Bi-centennial could not have been what it will be but for the good start in that direction made by the Centennial of 1901. WALTER B. HILL.The Alumni and Alumni Spirit. Mil University of Georgia, at her Commencement of Nineteen Hundred and One. celebrated the Centennial Anniversary of her founding, and now enjoys the distinction of being the only centenarian among the educational institutions of Georgia. For over one hundred years her influence has been wielded for good in our State, and the progress and historic growth of Georgia in a large part represents the fruits of her good work. During the memorable Centennial Commencement of the University her living sons were gathered together from far and near, and at no other time in her history was there ever such an expression of love and loyalty for her by her Alumni. Upon the historic campus at Athens, in old Phi Kappa Hall, there were assembled, in Alumni meeting, representatives of classes as far back as Eighteen Hundred and Thirty-Eight, and as one family united again, around the home altar, each heart present beat with love and devotion for its very fair and venerable mother. Veterans of a past century, whose thoughts were no longer of this world, were inspired upon that occasion with the fire and spirit of youthful devotion; men of middle age laid aside for the moment the cares of a busy life and threw their souls into the sacred revelry; and the younger graduates amazed by the sublime spectacle, made solemn pledges that the cause of their Alma Mater should henceforth be a part of their life work. The spirit of that occasion is the rock upon which the success of the University is founded, and is the only foundation upon which her future will stand. With an income even inadequate to supply her actual needs she has coped with and forged ahead of all rivals in the past: and it has been accomplished almost entirely by the work and efforts of her alumni. In-dee I. she has had, and will always have, many friends, as exponents of higher learning, but in the times of crises, as in the past she cati only depend upon the strength of an united band of Alumni. Every Alumnus, from the oldest graduate down to the last man who has received his diploma, should be impressed with this idea, and each one should feel that a grave responsibility for the future of his Alma Mater is resting upon him as a member of the Alumni Association. As sons of Georgia and heirs to an historic past, we owe to the University a debt which we can never repay, but we can, and ought to, express our gratitude by our best work in her 215behalf. She represents our highest thought, and under our fostering care the minds and characters of Georgia’s noblest sons were directed and moulded. The truth of her teaching and the high chacacter of her work is reflected in the lives of those who have gone out from her walls in the past and have left the impress of their minds and characters upon the present structure of our commonwealth. As an evidence of the high type of our people and a monument to the purity and loftiness of our thought her history is very dear and sacred to us. and it would be a black stigma, indeed, upon our present generation if we should allow the grandeur of her past to be marred. ft is a fact that the Alumni Club of the University is mere strongly united than ever before and with one of our own number as Chancellor. we arc in closer touch with the student-body than at any previous time, but it is our opinion that the future presents more obstacles to l c overcome than confronted our fathers. The future growth of the University will not be co-incident with the progress of various other institutions for the reason that the goal of her endeavor is planted upon a different summit. As the designated leader among the institutions of higher learning in Georgia, her arm is raised to strike all forces of commercialism which tend to corrupt and belittle the purer and higher thought of our people. If our observation is not obscure it is the tendency of the age to encourage those institutions of technical training which prepare men to succeed in trade to the disparagement of the institutions which develop the higher faculties of man and instil into the young mind the essence of truth. The president of the most gigantic business enterprise of the century is an avowed opponent of higher education, and he no doubt speaks the sentiment of the age. It is. therefore, very evident that the University will not rise in the future u|K n the current and moving tide, and it logically follows that unless the united strength of her friends and Alumni come to her aid she will progress more slowly and the power of her influence will be greatly weakened. We arc not apprehensive, however, that the influence which the University has wielded for good in our State will ever wane or that her growth will ever he curtailed by the antagonistic forces of the present time. In conjunction with those who do not believe that higher education is beneficial to an American citizen there will also be many who will fight the University as a State institution on the curious idea that the people should not be taxed for purposes of public instruction. The Alumni, however, can l)c depended upon at all times, to fight against these influences which would wreck our educational system, and they will create the tidal wave upon which the University can be safely steered through the most dangerous crises. Our distinguished Chancellor, with the co-operation of a united Faculty, is carrying out a policy which will place the Unversity among the foremost colleges of America if the Alumni continue to give him the support which they have promised. In several of the larger cities of Georgia local Alumni clubs have been organized, and the work of these smaller organizations in the interest of the University has proved very successful. They not only provide means by 216which poor and deserving boys can obtain a University training, but they create interest among the Alumni and inspire them to more zealous work in behalf of their Alma Mater. Every city and town in Georgia should organize a University club, and each local club should send several delegates to every annual meeting of the general Alumni Club, in Athens. The work of the Alumni Association could be carried on more easily and better results could be reaped under such a system. The University has only a very limited and meager income, and as its growth continues and its actual needs become greater, the State, by which it was founded, is the source to which it should naturally look for financial support. By the efforts of our Chancellor, and the honored legislator from Clarke county, with the aid of many Alunmi, the true worth and the extreme need of the University were presented to the Legislature in the fall of Nineteen Hundred. and as a result, a very substantial sum of money was donated by that body for the erection, on the campus, of the two handsome new buildings, recently completed. This is strong evidence that the State is willing to help the University, if those who arc in closest touch with her management will only ask for an appropriation and show the need of it. The Alumni in every county should, therefore, enlighten their representatives upon the work and needs of the University, and should get their promise to help the University in every legitimate way. Also prominent and influential Alumni should help the Chancellor, each year, in presenting to the Legislature the cause of higher education in Georgia. The future of the University, to repeat, absolutely depends upon the united efforts of an united Alumni Association, working as an auxiliary and aid to the Chancellor and Faculty. Let every Alumnus fall into line, without more delay, and honor himself by helping in the accomplishment of this great work. ALUMNUS. U17VAIN REGRET. Lova came a-knocklng one summer day At the home of ft maiden blithe and Kay. And though ho ne’er had called before. Full well sho knew who knocked at the door; So with n mischief-meaning sm'.lc She bade him tarry yet awhile. Or If perchance, he weary grew. Some other day, as well, would do. In vain he pleaded, threatened, prayed. The maiden heard but still delayed. Till Love grew weary of delay And ellently ho crept away. Then, with misgiving in her heart, For fear in truth ho might depart. "I did but lease thee. Love." she cried. And flung tho doorway open wide. But lo! In place of Love appeared A stranger gaunt, with grizzled beard. Whoso eyes, so restless, seemed to burn W.th longings unexpressed, and yearn For Joy that he l»nd never known Until they had forever flown. Uko birds that wing their rapid night Across a glade of dazzling IlKht. So bright, we do not know their kind Until they leave the light behind. And forthwith Into her abode. Xor waiting to be asked, ho strode. And said In deep sepulchral tone. "Henceforth thy home shall be m own. Where'er thou chooscat to abide Thero shalt thoo find m - at thy aide." "Ah Blr.” she faltered In accent low. "Pray, who art thou. I fain would know? Indeed, I am sure we ne er navo met." "My name.” he said. "Is Vain Regret." -O. T. J. -97.Northern and Southern University Life. HS Lord Hale warns young law students "the law is a jealous mistress," not less so is one’s Alma Mater, and by that term I mean only the college where one’s undergraduate years arc spent. However great he the institution at which the A. B. strives for the L. L. B., he never can feel for it quite the same degree of affection that he entertains for the college whose gates received him as a Freshman whose Faculty disciplined him as a Sophomore, and whose Cancellarius cl Curator,s made it known unto all men to whom these presents should conic, with greeting, that this "youth of our University" was (at tlut stage of the proceedings) a bachelor of all the arts. So there is no danger that the following perfunctory remarks will he tinctured with any degree of bias against our own University. Leaving'out of account that strictly postgraduate institution. Johns Hopkins, the colleges of the North appear to be divided into two great classes. As representative of the “small college" stand Trinity and Williams. In the salient features of such a college, saving only that it is not Southern (and there we find a great difference, easy to see, hard to describe) it differs little from our University. The college is the limb of a small college town: fraternities flourish in its atmosphere; its constituency is gathered from almost one sort and condition of men, the wealthy parvenus preferring more glittering academic environments for their sons; and life moves along quietly, broken only by a good showing of the football team against Vale, and the commencement festivities. Y dc and Princeton do not belong to this class, nor to the other presently to be described. They seem sui generis, and to describe them you must attend them and each of them. To this remaining cl«tss the great specialized University, Columbia, belongs. It conveys no meaning to say you are of Columbia unless you arc exuberant and wear a cap, in which case, of course, you are an undergrad- 219uate. George the Second’s royal charier created King's College on the lines of Oriel or Magdalen. Its corporate successor. Columbia University, contains the "college” proper as only one of many grerft divisions. A man may well spend three years in Law and never know a soul in Mines, Archiieciure. Engineering, or the College. The Law School is housed in the north wing of the Library Huilding. The student commons is in the University Hall. The Law students number as many as the College students, and bound their academic sphere with these monuments. An exception is formed by those of the Law School who have graduated from the College. These keep in touch with the College, and from them we hear what is happening on the campus. These men and the undergraduates sustain that mysterious thing we all know as “College life." They ring cow-bells at the games with Vale. They sing on the Library steps. In short, they arc orthodox. The Law School is a little world in itself. Every section of the country is represented, yet its student-body is quite homogeneous. Its atmosphere, however, has more of Lincoln's iron than of Oxford—as befits a school whose former dean, a Georgia man, too, is the recognized ultimate authority on quasi contracts, and whose present dean is a learned real property lawyer. The life of a law student is pleas- ant in the extreme. The work is hard: bin. to ax. it. there .arc tile moot courts, the Law Review. and that indefinable feeling ?f comradeship which is an anefent precedent of tl»c profession. Sectionalism, of course, you never encounter. The President of the Class of 1903 is a Scwancc Alumnus. An advantage, and. in some respects a disadvantage. is Columbia's location in the city. To the law student it is an unqualified advantage. Though he gets small time to attend the courts, yet he can the better keep up if he pleases, with the recent decisions, and if he is ignorant of the looks of a court-room, as many a law graduate is. the Appellate Division sits for him, where, with five justices on the bench and learned counsel on the Hoor, he can study the machinery of a very dignified Appellate Court. Or he can go further down town, to tlt.2 County Court House, and, in a special term, sec the equities thrashed out of an interminable case, or stepping across the hall to trial term, observe that bulwark of our liberties. the petty jury, doing business at the old stand. Two things the University of Georgia has, and Columbia has not. One is the Honor System. Not that Northern students, as a class, are less sensitive to the dictates of honor. But here the delicate task of disciplining the weaker vessels is left to the Faculty, whereas at Georgia the students themselves handle it. Georgia, too, enjoyed freedom irom the fear of co-education. In fact, there is n danger of it at Columbia, but the students think there is. As there will never he co-education in the I-aw School this quarrel is not mine. The fault is not so much with Barnard undergraduates as with those ladies who take postgraduate courses. There are many who like co-education, of course, but let us hope their kind will not increase in Georgia. From what I hear of its progress in the feminized colleges of the land, the issue of co-education produces chiefly rancor and spectacled young ladies. I find 1 have not described anything scarcely, outside the Law School, but I can do no better. Indeed, when you get down into the heart of it, the life of the true college men of Columbia is much the same as elsewhere. 1 have here caught glimpses of the familiar figures of College Editor, on whose shoulders rests the weight of heavy responsibility; of College Orator, bcctling-browcd but often shallow-patcd; of College Snob, who docs not speak to Freshmen; of College Athletes, surfeited with homage. Have not these types, at different times, appeared upon Georgia’s campus as well? Yet, of all these. goo l, better and best, comes the next generation of Americans and Southerners. GARRARD GLEXX. 221RAIN SONG. It Isn't raining rain to me. If raining daffodils. In every dimpled drop I t« Wild flowers on the hills; The cloud of gray engulf th© day. And overwhelm th© town, It Isn't raining rain to me. It's raining roecs down. It isn't raining rain to me. Hut fields of clover bloom. Where every buccaneering bee May And ft bed apd room; A health unto the happy. A fig for him who frets— It Un't raining rain to me. It's raining violets. The Dawn Is a wild, fair woman. With sunrise In her hair; I»ok where she stands, with pleading hands. To luro me there. SONG. The Dusk is dark and glorious. A star upon her brow; With sunset blushes In her cheeks. She beckons now. I. ever fickle, stand between. Upon my lips a rune. And In my summer-winging soul— The holden happy Noon. -ROBERT LOVKMAN. SONG. Here I my !g»dy nutterfly. Atnl there Is Itaron Roe, Sir Humming Bird Ij preening nigh. Upon a cedar tree. The«o royal folk nr© very gay. For bud and bush and bloom. All know. Queen Rose at noon today Doth hold her Drawing Room. LINES. Poor rambling, shambling soul of mine. Beyond tho night. lx yond the day. When thou dost unto death rewlgn This happy habitat of clay. In high conclave, at feast divine. Will legions leap to heed thy nod? Or. doomed to dsrknew . wilt thou whine. A beggar nt the gates of God? Folly, we, alas! have been Joeund, ofi and time again Modest virtue now shall be Fair handmaiden unto me. TO FOLLY. In thy loving ©ye the tears Hallowed half the wastrel year . Ocean odors tn thy hair, Dips that led to Passion' tatr. F.irewoll. Folly, let us part. B.nd the old wounds In tho heart: Gentle Virtue now Khali be Swo ! handmaiden unto me. NOTE—These verse have appeared before, but were sent expressly to The Pandora by Mr. Doveman. 222 - Maids of Athens. Farewell, 0 Maids of Athens, I love you every one, Your graces rare, so debonair, Your eyes with mirth o’er run. Your winsome, smiles so cheery, Have captured soul and mind, And as I go I well do know. My heart is left behind. Then farewell Maids of Athens. A last, a Ion,' farewell; Though heart prompts more I say but o’er The one sad word—Farewell. Willie. 2-’4A Miniature ILLY frowned heavily. "Surely you will not let these old ghosts of the past— this old aunt and uncle—come between us. If you would only stretch the analogy a little you would have to marry any old lobster that happened to propose to you, simply because your grandmother Eve accepted his grandfather Adam,” lie said, savagely. "Now, please do not be ridiculous, Billy. You know that my aunt, Caroline Sophia Hey wood, refused your uncle, William Harden Marbury. and now, I, Caroline Sophia I Icy wood, refuse you, Billy Harden Marbury. You sec it is the force of custom. Of course, all the other Caroline Heywoods will go on refusing all the Billy Marbttrys forever, now.” "I don’t give a continental,” exclaimed Billy, "what becomes of all the other Billys and Carries in the world, and as for those old ghosts of an aunt and uncle—” "Tut, tut! Billy, such utter disregard of the welfare of others and such irreverence for the past!” "Oh, fiddlesticks!” “And, Aunt Caroline was such an exemplary young woman; nothing that she did could have been wrong. Anyway, it isn’t as if we really cared very much.” "But I do care," retorted Billy. "So said the other Billy Harden Marbury, but he went away and married an Indiana girl, and was happy ever after.” "I'll go away and I’ll marry any old thing. I’ll marry an Indian squaw.” This wrathfully through the closing door. “I wonder if the uncle was a real Billy.” said Caroline, musingly. "No, he must have been just plain William Marbury, or he never would have gone away." Billy had sought comfort in an exploring expedition into the plunder room, and was listlessly examining its contents. He had just put down a faded pair of epaulettes and an old battered grey cap with the tarnished letters, "C. S. A.” on it, when his glance fell upon a little gold locket, resting on the top of a pile of dusty and disreputably kept old letters. With quickened interest he picked it up and opened it; there before him was the bcwitchingly beautiful face of Caroline—the same dimpled checks and laughing brown eyes. Her eyes were a little dreamier than usual and her brown hair was parted in the middle and combed back in a queer, old-fashioned way. After gazing awhile at the miniature Billy dis- 225covered a ca. •fully folded paper inside the cover of the lockd. Drawing it out and opening it. he read: ‘‘Dear Old Billy:—Mow silly you were to allow me to refuse you. It was all your own fault, for you should have been more determined and masterful. I find that I can not do without you, so you must come back at once to "Caroline.” "I . S. It i- a pleasurable conceit of mine that I am carrying this message to you. myself, so you can not !• ok into my eyes and disobey me.” Billy gave a low whistle. "Whew! Billy Harden Marbury. you arc in luck! But how did Caroline know that I would come prowling around this rid den of curios? Anyway, it is here, and hci • I have found it. And this isn’t an old den any more now, it is a corner of Paradise.” He turned his attention again to the miniature and was engrossed in a deep study of its smiling face, when a slight noise aroused him from his reverie. Turning, he saw the original of the miniature standing in the doorway. "So here on arc hiding away in a dingy old burial place for curios. Why won't you be reasonable. Billy ,and come on out and amuse me? You have no right to be so selfish and shut yourself up in this old hole all the afternoon." She stamped her foot on the floor in anger. "No, thanks, "replied Billy, appreciating his advantage, "] don’t care to come out right away; I am very well satisfied where ) am. Just a little while ago I was feeling awfully blue and everything around here looked dark 226 and cheerless, but now all that is changed, I’ve brightened up wonderfully and this old hole, as you call it, is chuck full of sunshine. You sec I found them." he blurted out. ‘How nice of you to have placed them here! But how were you ever so clever as to know' that I would come moping around here and find them, just when I was making up my mind whether it should be the Philippines or South Africa." "Oh, my! What does all this mean? You have found them and I put them here? And it was so nice of me to put them here? Why don’t you speak out, Billy? What arc you talking about?” "Why, the note and the miniature, of course. Here they arc. Didn't you put them here?" Billy handed them to her in a dazed manner. A careful scrutiny of both objects, then a peal of laughter from Caroline, very immoderate and untimely laughter, so thought Billy. “You dear old simpleton, so you thought that I placed these here?” A subdued ‘‘Yes.” “And.” delightedly, “you thought that this beautiful miniature was mine?” "Yes," in the same tone. “ Don't you see Billy, hold old the note is— the paper is faded and the letters arc blurred. And the writing is not in my hand. This miniature is Aunt Caroline’s, and the note is one that she wrote to the other William Marbury. Of course he never received them; they were missent. or something else as bad happened to them.” Silence. "Billy?' ’ "Well, not exactly." "Now, don’t be ridiculous. Caroline. You see your Aunt Caroline Sophia i ley wood accepted my Uncle Hilly Harden Marbury. and now you, Caroline Sophia Hey wood, accept me. Hilly Harden Marbury. You see it is the force of precedent. Anyway, it must be alright. for Aunt Caroline was such an exemplary young woman: nothing that she did could have been wrong." "Yes.” "Do not documents—and notes, sometimes, —like other things—gain respectability by age?" "Yes." "Well, then, can't you see. perhaps, the note may he true after all." "Oh, said Billy, recovering himself, and seemingly, in utter disregard o: the last observation. "then she didn’t refuse him after all. In fact, I believe, she really accepted him.”The Dream A toller net by hi midnight lamp. Without the wind walled drearily. And the stormy night wee cold end damp. As he turned from his task full wearily. That day he’d encountered sore defeat; Fair Fame his best efforts had npuiocd. He’d followed er. prayed to her, knelt at her feet. Out. In derision, she from him had turned. Heartsick and weary. In the firelight's glow, lie lists to the wild wind’s walling. Until on hla arm his head droops low And leep deadens the anguish of falling. He drrams of hi homo In that sunny state. Whore the gotdi-n gardens glow. Where Joyous the mockbird sings to hi mate. Undisturbed by frost and snow. The orange blor«om sway In the br'eae— He catchew their fragrance rare— Oranges on the dark green trees. Turning de j gold In the sunlit air. Ho wander’s again on the lnke'a bright strand. Where the ripples the white sands lave; Where the graceful willow drooping, stand. Rending their head to klse the wave. And Hope ceme to him In dreamland then. A beautiful vision robed In white. Whoso mission Is to soothe the soul of men. Gladden the cheerless, make sad heart light. And In accents low hc said, that day. Her oul with sympathy replete. •’Dark fortun » must come In every one's way. All must, sometime, endure defeat. ’’Strive on. True Heart, tho’ thy fortune be Dark or bright, as Fate may decree. Wh n Misfortune’s dark cloud hange over thee. I'll cheer thee on to victory." Tho vloton departed, the wind walled wild. With toy finger the sleet b’at the pane. Tho dreamer awoke from hi dream and smiled. Determined to enter Ilf-’ battle again. -EDGAR OLIVER. 228The Reign and Fall of Solomon the Wise. A Drama in Two Acts. Place: Athens. DRAMATIS PERSONAE. Solomon the Wise. Russell, the Chief Counsellor. His Honor, the Chief Justice of Athens. Followers. A Freshman. Policemen. ACT I. Scene i: A Street in Athens. (Enter Solomon the Wise.) Solomon: Mcthinks I now shall have a wondrous night of it, For I shall all my followers congregate, And to that Opera House we’ll penetrate, And glorious sport will have. , (Enter Russell,Chief Counsellor.) Russell: Most wise and honored Solomon, Beloved man and gracious prince, I bid you fair good evening. 229Solomon: Thanks, noble Counsellor, For thy good greetings 1 am grateful, sir; But can'st thou tell me where my followers are? Russell: Yes, noble Prince, they come not far away; Lo! now, I hear them coming near. (Enter Followers.) Solomon: Good evening to you, my dear followers all. Followers (in concert): We thank you gracious Prince. Solomon: My followers, I’ve a wondrous plan conceived; To yonder far-famed Opera Mouse We’ll go and have the rarest lime My people ever knew. What say you, wisest Counsellor? Russell: Right, right, my Prince. Your glorious mind has surely schemed A plan most wonderful and grand. Solomon: What say you, my dear followers? Followers: We go. Where calls our Prince We always go. (Exit all). Scene ii: In Opera House. Solomon: Look, look! The enchanting scene And what a gathering rich and grand, Of beauty and of chivalry. We'll sit as silent as a mouse Until that curtain shall arise, And then we’ll sec who’ll piay the part, That most is heard or noticed far. Russei.l: You say aright, my Lord and Prince, And we shall have most glorious sport. (Curtain rises; play 6cgins. Solomon makes hooting noise: Russell joins in; then followers; noise grows louder; chairs are knocked over; general disorder prevails; policemen rush in, collar Solomon and Russell, and followers, and carry them out). Scene hi: Athens Street. Policemen in charge of Solomon, and Russell, and followers. Solomon: What mean you, blue coat knaves, To thus expel a Prince and his dear followers? Russell: Yes, speak, or we shall have your tongues Pulled forth with red hot barbed irons. Why did you this base conduct perpetrate? Chief Police: We know not Princes, Kings nor Queens. Here one is as another man; Our land is a democracy, And he who breaks our sacred peace Must suffer, whosoe’er he be. (Carries the Prince and Counsellor and followers to custody. ACT II. Scene i: Court of Justice in Athens, Chief Justice on bench. Chief Justice: Come now, my honored Chief Police, Bring in the offenders all.(Policemen bring in Solomon, Russell and followers). Chief Justice: What is the offense of these fair youths? Chief Police: Disorderly conduct is the charge. Your Honor, please. Ciiikk Justice: And, how? Chief Police: Twas last night, at our Opera House, These men did much disturbance make; Were drunk with too much wine, I think, And stopped the play by much disorder bad. This fellow here, who calls himself Prince, And this, his so-called Counsellor, Were chiefest in this bad offense, The others merely hangers on. Chief Justice: Call in the other witness, Chief. (Enter Freshman, who is sworn). Chief Justice: Conte, young man, tell all you know Of this disturbance at the play. Freshman: I know that this man, Solomon, Who calls himself a foreign Prince, But is, indeed, a student here Of law within our College grand. And this man Russell, so-called Counsellor, Much daptage there did do. ‘Mong other things they pulled my hair. And ran me over benches high Until they scared me most to death. Ciiirp Justice: Enough! Enough! I’ll hear no more. N'o. Solomon, sit down and hear My sentence, just and fair: You. followers of this proud youth, 1 give to you your liberty. Go to your books and study hard. And roam no more upon the streets To seek bad company. But you, who call yourself a Prince, And you. the said Chief Counsellor, For this affair I hold you reprehensible; A penalty you both must pay, Or else in prison must requite For these your guilty deeds and bad. Chief, take the prisoners. Scene ii: Prison. Solomon and Russell behind bars, followers in front. Solomon: Woe is me, that thus sad fate Should bring me to this drear)' state; Go fast, my dear good followers, Unto my father far away. And tell him that misfortune frowns Upon his son and my sad Counsellor; And bid him send a ransom great To free his son from prison walls. And let me taste again sweet liberty; And my dear comrade, too. (Curtain falls). JAY. 231A FRESHMAN'S SOLILOQUY. (With profuse apologies to Hamlat.) To do It. or not to do It. that la the cues-tlon: Whether 'tl nobler In the mind to suffer Tho sling and taunts of scornful upper-claaamen. Or to take the p.-lnt and wmenr tho he-goats In The mystifying midnight?—To smear.— to paint— Aha: And by a s: «»r to nay we end The ruylmr. and a thousand natural fear That Fresh are h lr to.—'Tl» a consum-matlon Devoutly to b' wished.—To paint.—to smear:— But hold; Perchan e to be CAUOHT! Aye there's the rub: For In that sketching scene when watch-men com'-.— When our gleeful painting's at Its height. We fain must p use: there's tho respect We give th Saw. -To pause? Aye. to depart. For who would bear to disconcert the man Who keeps the peace. h!a nocturnal vlgtt To annoy, to cause moat grewsome apprehensions To arise within his atom and manly breast. When he himself might all these things avoid By honest flight?—Who would InauKs bear Front over-bearing wise-fool Sophomorea. But that the dread of being caught and carried Into the Institute, from whose bourne No Frcwhman e'er r turns, puzzles the will; And makes ua rather bear the Ills wa have. Than to fly to others that we know not of? Thus rBTTICOATS make cowards of ua all; And thus the fear of angered woman' tongue. And taunting school-girls' grins, oft maka men alow: And enterprise of great pith and moment (As stealing kieses, whispering lov -words. painting Bllllea). With this regard, their currents turn awry. And loos the name of action. -WILLIE. 232Roasts. Birds of a feather will gather together.— Hard Toters. He has occasional flashes of silence that make his conversation perfectly delightful.—I)c Guerra. Three thousand ducats—Well!—Hardy. He doth indeed show some sparks that arc like wit.—McCartney. Time elaborately thrown away—3 hours per week of drill. It is an irrepressible conflict between opposing and enduring forces—Freshman-Sophomore Rush. In thy face I see the map of Jerusalem.— Bernstein. Very sporty, and I want somebody to know it.—Grincr. Nature abhors a vacuum, so she fills some beads with sawdust.—Hugh Scott. He could lie with such ability that you would think truth were a' fool.—Cone Maddox. Twas an explicit satire on mankind.—Joe Hodgson. He wants to trade his ability to chin girls for an ounce of common sense.—I key Solomon. As loquacious as a flock of geese.—Lucy Cobb Girls. Vaulting ambition, which o’crlcaps itself and falls on the other side.—Hardy. Wise from the top of his head up.—Smilic Johnson. This man’s soul is in his clothes.—Krenson. He bids fair to be a man when lie is grown— Noel Park. How like a river—largest at the mouth.—Joe Hull. They, including Maddox, have eaten me out of house and home.—Mrs. Clifton. The vain little, plain little fellow', each day, Will put on his gloves and his hat, And then as he looks in the glass, lie will say: “Oh! I can’t be as hqndsomc as that!” —Boyd. Full well we laughed with counterfeited glee at all his jokes, for many a joke had lie.— "Steve.”“See! Who comes here? A countryman."— MacIntyre. His face would cook coffee.—Dinkey Dallis. The time was that when a man lost his brains he died.—Collier. A dimpled, blushing; well-rounded youth.— Robertson. His name describes him best.—Dilly Pickle. An honest man's the noblest work of God.— Young Hill. Rejoice ye! Nature formed but one such man and broke the die in moulding.—Faust. Is seldom seen with a white shirt.—Ketron. Who doth nothing all day but jabber, jabber. jabber.—Clay. When I beheld this 1 sighed and said within myself, surely mortal man is a broomstick.— Dinkey at the Thalian Performance. As idle as a painted ship upon a painted ocean.—Electives. Full longc were his legs and full lene. yf lyk y staf there was no caf yf sene.—Louis Wright. From, all ye damned tribe of Bowers, Good Lord deliver us.—The Trio. The pain of one maiden’s refusal is drowned in the pain of the next.—Walter Jackson. Oh, ’c’s little, but 'c's wise; E's a terror for his size." —Dorsey. I will sooner have a beard grow in the palm of my hand than on his check.—Jim Lawrence. So lie standeth next to none In getting off a beastly pun. —Pete Calhoun. We arc very slightly changed Front the semi-apes that ranged India’s pre-historic clay. —Freshman Class. No characteristic trait had lie of any kind.— Jcttc. "Damn that boy, he’s asleep again.—Ellis. Would echo helpless laughter to your jest.— Yow. Such labored nothings in so strange a style, Amaze the unlearned and make the learned smile. —Abbott. If silence is golden thou should’st he a millionaire.—Bob Stephens. I was never deep in anything but in wine,.— Sydney Jones. Whose chin is but enriched with one appearing hair.—Marion Smith. A gentleman who loved to hear himself talk. —McCartney. Tis sweet to court, but, oh, how hitter To court a girl and then not git her. —Dean.But in the matter of bargain, mark ye me. I’ll cavil on the ninth part of a hair.—Park. His reasons arc two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff; you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have found them they arc not worth the search.—Oxford. Essence of babe, calf, goat and kid, Of whom many would be gladly rid. —Joe Hodgson. I am Sir Oracle, and when I ope my lips let no dog bark.—Barrett. Not any marvellous story told, but he himself could tell a stronger.—Hill. It’s so soon that I am done for, I wonder what I was begun for. —Freshman Ex-Sports. Sir, 1 admit your general rule. That every poet is a fool, But you yourself may serve to show it. That ever)- fool is not a poet. —Jim Sibley. I sav the earth did shake when I was born.— Bell. The rabble call him lord.—Gay. It is in truth a cheerful little thing.—Basch. An athlete—with his mouth.—Clay. No bcarde had he; he never non shuldc have. —Ridley. A very gentle beastc and of a good conscience.—Russell Gould. Thou Inst a pestilential gall, young man.— Blackshcar. As big a bluff as stands by river banks.—Absence Rules. 1 hear a hollow sound. Who rapped his skull.—Young Hill. As one nail, by strength, drives out another, so the remembrance of my former love is by a newer object quite forgotten.—Mitchell King. Aye, in the catalogue he goes for a man.— Noel Park. Sentimentally I am disposed to harmony; but organically I am incapable of a tune.— Charley Strahan and Billy Hooper. I pray you, write me down an ass.—George Sibley. He is a soldier, fit to stand by Caesar and give direction.—Ragsdale. Ah! Here's a chap as lean as Cassius’ g'.iost; a shadowy phantom of the thing called man.— Ransom. An apple cleft in two is not more twin than those two creatures.—Ridley and Oxford. Midnight revelers.—La Media Nochc Club. A kind of man that was tolerated, Generally laughed at and seldom hated. —Prof. Hoyt. Sad-visaged man, thy face unmask and smile. —Carson. Conceited men arc but little boys in prints.— Sam Johnson.An Imitation of George Ade. X'CE upon a time a Horrible Rube from Rob Park’s Dcestrict came to the University to have Peduncle teach him how to Extract the Lacteal Fluid from the Mild-Eyed Bovine of the Feminine Gender. Whc.i he had Learned to Squirt a Straight Stream he began to sit up and Take Xoli.'c. He saw a lot of Swell Geezers ith Aggressive Clothes, wearing Funny-Shap d Pins. He asked What Them Was, and they -aid Frat. Pins So Rcubc i said He wanted to Join a Order. Pa was a Mason. Shoot-mouth Clay, Abraham Falk, and Sling-thc-Dough Hardy said he was Easy Fruit, and then proc eded to Can this Lobster. They told him about Zeta-Chi, and he Sprained an Ankle in his Rush to Join. They led him to the Slccp-itory and Offered Him up as a Lamb to the Slaughter. It was a Nasty Bunch and the Stunts they did to the Youthful Cincinnatus would have brought Sad Salt Tears to the Optics of an Angel. William the Goat butted in with Fierce Glee. They poured Molasses on His Thatch and pasted Fly Paper on His Rear View. They Bedecked his Classical Countenance with Green Paint and covered his Manly Form with Bruises. Ira told about the Straight and Narrow Path that Leads to Destruction. Then they Robbed Him of 39 cents and a Piece of Blue Pool Clialk, and gave him the Grip and Signs. He gave the Signal to Steve next day and Steve had him Incarcerated in the Foolish House, and a Shining Light was lost to P xlunk County. But the Tormentors thought they had done a great deed. 'Jim Sibley agreed with them. Moral: It’s no honor when its easy. 236The Giants of Auburn. OW the eldest of the daughters of Georgia is Alabama. And Alabama lictfi beyond the Chattahoochee, on both sides of the river where in olden days the red men said: "Here we rest." Now in the land of .Alabama is Auburn, proud village of the plain, and Auburn is a village filled with the lust of the flesh. For the inhabitants of Auburn follow after the pride and glory of the world. And it came to pass in the first year of the reign of Thcodosus, king of Cuba and Philip-pia, that Auburn had a race of giants. And these giants did go about the earth seeking whom they might devour, and much damage did they perpetrate. And the Captain of this race of giants said to his band: "Behold, let us go over into Georgia, for Georgia is our enemy, ahd we will go over and take her.” Thus did the Captain of the giants turn the hearts of the giants of Auburn against Georgia, the mother of Alabama. Then Georgia turned to her sons and told them to go forth and fight with the giants of Auburn, which were the sons of Alabama,. And the sons of Georgia were small of stature, yet they feared not the giants of Alabama. nor the Captain of the giants, exceeding powerful. For the sons of Georgia were men of knowledge and understanding, much skilled in battle and in the arts thereof. And the sons of Georgia went forth to meet the giants of Auburn, and they met them on the plains of Brisbinc. on the day of Thanksgiving. And the battle waxed long; and there was much blood spilled of the sons of Georgia, and of the giants of Auburn, and there were many wounded. And the giants of Auburn did strive to press back the sons of Georgia, but the sons of Georgia held fast. And the giants of Auburn did try to break the line of the sons of Georgia, but they could not break the line, 237[ Then the Giants of Auburn moved back to rest, and there was quiet on the field of bat-tdc, for the sons of Georgia did also rest, for they were weary. Then the Captain of the giants of Auburn looked, and, behold, the sun was sinking towards the west, and the Captain of the giants of Auburn rose up and led forth his band again to battle against the sons of Georgia. And the giants of Auburn again strove to push back the sons of Georgia, and to break their line, but the sons of Georgia held fast to the end and began to press back the giants of Auburn. A And darkness fell upon the scene, and the giants of Auburn had lost the fight. Then said Georgia to the giants of Auburn: "Not by might nor by power have my sons fought this battle, but by skill of mind and strength of heart. Go ye back beyond the Chattahoochee and trTl my daughter, Alabama, that her giants cannot whip the valiant sons of Georgia. So the giants of Auburn gathered up their arms and their wounded, and returned into the land of Alabama. JAY. SENIOR CHART DEAN. NAME. Ambition. Married? Main Characteristic. Favorite Drink. Chief Amusement. . — WILLIE PAT AIKEN’. To learn to recite. Can't express himself Getting balled up. Sorghum. Eating. F. CUBBIB BONETT. To outrank Plato. Too young— Age 17. Big head. Hot water tea. Acting fr»eh. KRATIC BLACKSHEAB Keerybody know he's been Conct It. Oconee Cocktail. Trying to tng. GIAN AD PA. BLACKWELL To get a dip. turned down. Seven year ago. Gray hair HI wife's coffee. Hiding bicycle. E. ROBERTSON CAMP. To b,- a tournallot. Talk loo much Curly hair. Any Intoxicant. Criticising. M W. COLLIER. (?). Can't. Hunting. Water. I’umplng. 8POTE DEAN. To kiss and make U| . Tried and failed. Big ears. Cafe nolr. Writing to the girls. D. O. DOUGHERTY. To b a physician. Misogynist. Pity the g l Dirty collars. Teetotaler. Going to classe . JOSEPHUS FAUST. To b a great man. Hot-headed. Red lemonade. Eating peanuts. O. MY. FLEMING. To be a nlc fellow. Too quiet. Silence. He doesn't indulge Cheas. JUDGE G GOBER. To be a real Judge. Doean't care to. Toe-headed. Tobacco Juice. Studying French. LUKE GOODRICH. To be an orator. Isn't thinking of It. -High Fellows." Corn. Debating. RUSSELL GOULD. To get an A. M. Too baahful. Long legs. Beanery soup. "Boning." B GRAHAM. Who would have him. High forehead. Has none. Never amuecd. RALPH GRAVES. To be wise. Afraid of women Painfully polite. Sweetmllk. Study, study, study. PINK MORTON HAPP Good. Never had a chance. Brunette. A rsour. Shooting pool. HAS BEEN HORBKAK. To learn history. Well, guess not. Red-eyed. Soapsuds. Curing, P. W. SPENDTHRIFT HARDY. To bo a college magnate. No; )o«t put 00 long pant . Close-listed. Anything free. Bootlicking. JACK HART, To equal Jim Smith. Mortgaged. (Goode). Deep voice. Buttermilk. E. Y. HILL. Jr.. To be a musician. Bachelor. Lying. Rot-gut. Loafing. HOWARD. J. F. Haa none. Hasn't found a big enough foo'. It'a oui of the question Simpleness. Bug Juice. Talking. AUGUSTUS T. HULL. Jr.. To bo an athlete. Erect ness. Mint Julep Playing ball. UTTLK WALTER JACKSON. Jr. To got a rise In French. She turned him down. Insignificance. Kettle tea Trying t« be a rashlon- JORDAN. JAS. K . To be well Informed. Mike put him out. Good head. Non-participant. Shootlng Polly. OSCAR KEITH. Poor. Too alow. Frustrating. Fr%'nch wine. Calling on J. L. M. KINO. To know every lady. Hasn’t time. Greasy. Alcohol. Hugging associate MONK LAMAR. To Jerk aodn. Too nutty. Barber oils. X. C. Rye. Giving her a reach. J. P. LEWIS. To learn "Pollt." Engaged. Grinning Sllly-bub. Playing tennis. LEWIS. M. V. Excellent. No. by George! Dark eyes. B. wash. Working on Pandora. JACK D. N. M'CARTNEY. Degenerate. Could If he would. Same as Ket Justs little very often Working. (??). W. JOKER M’INTYRE. To make money. We think h; I Beauty. (?) Kgg-knogg. Smoking. ROBT. T. M WHORTKR. Low—Ability high. Too expensive for him. Learned. Syrup. Reading. SYDNEY J. NIX To be a footballlat. Ills name 1 against him Beofy. Strawberry soda. Wearing h.r G. EDGAR OLIVER. Legislature. Would If he could. •'Squash.'' Anything he's offered Arguing with profs. NORWOOD OXFOOT. High—Ability low. Too much mouth. Resemblane to Hidley. Nicotine. Laughing BABY KID LITTLE PARK. To be a big man In college All. No! Youth. Too strong to drink. Trying to -• prominent. RAGGED RAGSDALE. To be a "Jack-leg." Is thinking of It. Polltlc.an. A red hot. Asking Qiieedlon . M. SIMMS RICIL RDSON. Wo never have .found It. Too shy. Quietness. Very few knew he Making up condition . JIM AMBITIOUS SIBLEY. To hold college honore. Girl , beware. That voice. Squirming l W nos . BRIGHT STARR, Star high. In poetic state. Bright ss an Invisible star Writing poetry. BOB STEPHENS, Minna- Never thought of It. Blunt. Bo.ng alone. STUBBIE STUBBS. To bo a bold, bad hoy. Too small. Loud. Billiards. THOMAS. W. M. 0. Gosh bum! No! Bay window. H30. Playing organ. IRA WILLIAMS. To get through. Who. Williams? Droopy. Yoo know he doesn't Doing nothing. drink 239 Suggestions Called Forth on Seeing Toomb’s Oak. (From the or » Test-book.) Uk« a relic from romolo snttqulty. Shattered by ngc, with tvy overgrown. Standing "HU. venerable and alone. It yet poaeewtes all It former dignity. Devoid (hough of Its pr ttlno symmetry. It youth and the friend of Its youth are gone. Hut It la not friendless and forlorn: It tlll has Us younger friends—tht historic tree. So let tho Tuturo promWto you. my friend. An ago free from remomc—a peaceful end Of active days. Let your llfo bo Unblemished like that of this old tree. That when you're gone, the friends you've never seen May crown your life with memory's «vor-green. A 240Centennial Commencement, ♦ITT was the best of times; it was the worst of times.” It was the concluding chapter, the finis, of that long story of struggles, successes and failures and all else that goes to make up college life. It was the brief preface to that longer story of the larger struggles, successes, and failures of “this Caravanserai whose portals arc alternate night and day." There was the deep regret "that youth’s sweet-scented manuscript should close;” there was the impatient spirit to put our tools to the test in the workshop of Life. It was much the same spirit that must have touched the cavaliers of Wellington at that memorable dance in Brussels, when they awaited the battle at Waterloo, chained by bright eves and laughing faces, yet stirred and impatient under the expected roar of the coming conflict. So it was through an atmosphere of love of the past and longing for the future that the Class of 1901 viewed Commencement. In this atmosphere the class heard the stately address of Mr. Strauss, the scholarly, democratic or- thodoxy of Mr. Van Dyke, from the North, and the brilliant unorthodox democracy of Mr. S|»ccr from the South. But, perhaps, the most effective speech, as far as the Class of 1901 was concerned, of all the speech-making of that speech-making period, the one the meat and substance of which the members of the class will carry longest with them, was the brief but classical farewell addicss of the Chancellor. Then there was the Alumni Banquet, where the newly-made Alumni strutted, but for all their strutting, imbibed something of the fire of love for their Alma Mater that glowed in the breasts of those around that board. Then, there was the social side of Commencement— the girls, the drives and the dances—which was. of course, no less delightful than the speech-making and the banqueting. It goes without saying that, all other opinions to the contrary, in the minds of the members of 1901 the Centennial Commencement will always be the greatest Commencement of Georgia’s history. .NINETEEN’ Hl.’XDREl) AND ONE. 241In Memoriam. jole t. McMullen, Class 1903. ROY CALLOWAY, Class 1902. ISHAM PARK GOSS, Class 1902. 242THANKS. The Editors of Pandora desire to express their deepest thanks and sincerest appreciation to Prof. Park, whose generous assistance in time of need, raised Pandora from the slough of despond; to those men who aided the Editors in their efforts to pay off a burdensome debt and to the following friends: Mr. Eugene Murphcy. Mrs. S. V. Potter. Mr. Lewis Gregg. Mr. 1 G. Edge of the New York World, Miss Frances Mcldrim, Mr. Otho Cushing of Life, Mr Pierre Holst. Miss Glenn, Mr. Phinizv Calhoun. Miss Garland Smith, Miss Hardy, Mr. Gabriel Solomon, Mr. Garrord Glenn, Mr. Cliff Elder. Mr. Oscar Payne. Mr. Robert Lovcman. Mr. Charles J. Bayne, Mr. Sidney Dean. Mr. George Jackson. Mr. Blanton Eortson, Mr. Edgar Oliver. Mr. Riley, Miss May Reynolds, Miss Sadie Cranston. Miss Helene Hall. Miss Laura Blackshcar, Miss Lucy Goodrich. Mr. F. T. Richards, of Life, Miss Bertha Barrett, Mr. Andrew, Calhoun. Mr. Henry Hull. Mr. Harris. Mr. North Winship, Mr. Frampton Ellis. Mr. Renter Denmark. Mr. Robert Moran. Chancellor Walter B. Hill. Mr. Paul Hamilton Haync. Mr. Jack McCartney. Mr. Wilson Hardy. Mr. Herbert McBride. Mr. Hinton Booth. Mr. Miguel Dc Guerra. Mr. Geddings Tuppcr. Mr. Julian Baxter. Mr. Ralph Mcldrim. Miss Ilallic B. Park. Miss Annie Lewis. Miss Blanche Carson. Mrs. Holce. Miss Lucy Woodall. The management wishes to thank Messrs. Wallace Miller. D. A. Cohen and Frank Barrett for their valuable services in aiding them to secure advertisements for Tin: Pandora. 243V Southern Railway THE TRUNK LINE THE SYSTEM OF THE SOUTH. Excellent Passenger Service, INCLUDING THE FAMOUS WASHINGTON AND SOUTHWESTERN VESTIBULED LIMITED BETWEEN---------- New York © East and the South —and the South Via Atlanta. Via Atlanta. THE CINCINNATI AND FLORIDA LIMITED. THE CINCINNATI AND FLORIDA EXPRESS. VIA ATL ANTA. THE RICHMOND AND ATLANTA EXPRESS. ALSO AMPLE WAV TRAINS FOR LOCAL TRADING ACCOMMODATIONS. • BEST LINE TO AND FROM ATHENS. Complete information cheerfully furnished by any Agent of the Company. J. M. CULP, W. A. TURK. S. H. IIAKDWICK, W. H. TAYLOE, R. W. SIZER, Traffic Mauager, Aut Past. Traf. Mgr., Oeo’l Pass. Agt , A »t. Gen'l Pass. Agt., General Agent, Washington, D.C. Washington, D.C. Wasiiinoton, D.C. Ati.anta, Ga. Atiikxs, Ga.Seaboard Air Line Railway. Traversing the Best Sections of GEORGIA, SOUTH CAROLINA, NORTH CAROLINA and VIRGINIA, with Double Daily 0 0 Vestibuled Trains, Composed of Pullman's most Modern and Palatial Drawing Hoorn buffet Sleepers and magnificent Day Coaches, provided with excellent I,avoratories and lighted with Pintsch Gas, to Raleigh, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Petersburg, Richmond, Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York and the E.ast. For Information pertaining to rates of fare, schedules, reservations of Sleeping Car accommodation, call on nearest Ticket Agent, or address WM. B. CLEMENTS, Trav. Pxu. Agt, Atlanta, Ga. W. H. FULTON, T. P. A, Atlanta, Ga. W. E. CHRISTIAN, A. G, P. A„ Atlanta, Ga. R. E. L. BUNCH, G. P. A. Portsmouth, Va. THE DIRECT AND POPULAR ROUTE TO THE 4 EAST 4The University of Georgia — - - = ATHENS. GEORGIA.-.- =-= £ ESTABLISHED BY THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE IN 17S5. ENDOWED BY THE GENERAL [GOVERNMENT. THE HEAD OF THE STATE SYSTEM OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. Open to All White Males From Any State. TUITION ABSOLUTELY FREE EXCEPT IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS, THE ONLY CHARGE BEING $15.00 PER YEAR FOR INCIDENTAL EXPENSES AND USE OF LIBRARY. .. DEPARTMENTS: — - t -sr— I. Franklin College, offering regular classical degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Letters. II. State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, offering the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Engineering. III. School of Law, offering the degree of Bachelor of Law, which entitles to practice in all Georgia Courts. SPLENDID SCIENTIFIC SIND LITERARY EQUIPMENT.J. WILLIE LEVY, ■3B HIGH ART £• CLOTHING. Fit any Size Man, To ?e Ladies: Wc carry a large line of Walking and Tailor-made Suits, Ready-to-wear Hat , Neckwear and Shirt Waists. A full line of Boys’ and Children’s Suits and Hats. £ 4 4 J. WILLIE LEVY, 844 Broad St., Augusta, Ga. Hardwood LUMBER. OAK, POPLAR, BEECH, RED GUM, BLACK GUM. BAY. Any of these domestic woods cut to order in car lots or mixed lots. Savannah Valley Limber On. AUGUSTA, GA.DRINK Augusta Brewing Company’s EXPORT PILSENER BEER. For Sale at the Athens Dispensary. A MILD AND DELICIOUS DRINK. EPPES-WILKINS CO., Wholesale and Retail Grocers, Corner Broad and Thomas Sts., ATHENS, SA. C.W.MOTES •30ARTI5TI C r Photographer COL-l-EQE AVENUE, Athens, Georgia. Everj style of First Clues Work from the smallest to life size Portraits. College Work a specialty. The leading Photographer for a quarter of a century in Atlanta.CLEAR WATER BLEACHERY FHCTORY-Clear Water, S. C. OFFICE—817 Reynolde St , Augusta, Ga. Does all Classes of Bleaching, Printing and Dyeing Cotton Goods. Business of Cotton Mills, Dry Goods Merchants and Converters of Cotton Goods Solicited. Langley Manufacturing Go., MANUFACTURERS OF Sheetings, Shirtings and Drills, Factory: Langley, S. C. Office: 817 Reynolds St., Augusta, Ga. Aiken Manufacturing Co., MANUFACTURERS OF Print Glotljs, Wide Sheeting? and Twills FACTORY: Bath, S. C. OFFICE: 817 Reynolds Street, Augusta, Ga.Frank E. Veltre, TAILOR, 356 Second Street, MACON, GEORGIA. PHONE 686. Augusta's Greatest Clothing Store. OF COURSE YOU’VE HEARD OF the olii lady who. jui the train stopped, asked the conductor whether she could change trains there. He said she could if she wanted to. hut she better not. Well, you can buy your Clothing. Shoes, Hats and Furnishings at “any old place' if you want to, but you'd better not. Our store is “THE YOUNG MAN'S STORE." Its up-to-date. Everything that's new and uobby from "head to foot," Clothing. Shoes, Hats, Furnishings The RIGHT STYLES at the RIGHT PRICE. Try Us For Your SPRING OUTFIT. « w H. J. Porter Co. AUGUSTA. GA. Acme Malt Tonic For Weak Men and Women. Made from the best material and unfailing in ita results. Nursing mothers should drink it. Recommended by the best physicians in the country. It is a natural food, which is both meat and drink. It builds up the system and stiengthens the nerves. If it is not for sale by your druggist write to the Acme Brewing Company, MACON, GA. Write lor one of our “Tiny Tots" Drawing Books. It is Free.Stephen Lane Folger 200 Broadway, New York. Club and College Pins and Rings, Gold and Silver Medals, Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry. Telephone 2456 Cortlandt. THE CUSTOM OK EVERY STUDENT At »h« University of UsorgU r»»t ci?ully sod cordially solicited. Et CH rTXT4 shoe dehler, I n, ,4 Cl0„om Sir,,I. AT MEN©, GJ A. The Electric City Engraving Co. 507-509 Washington St., Buffalo, New York. High»Class Engravings by all Processes. The Engravings used in this Publication are the Product of our Establishment. TAYLOR Shoe Company, 519 CHERRY STREET. Macon, Ga. An Elegant Ltine of Stylish Shoes for Summer Wear. Oxfords a Specialty.Dearing Stelling, IMPORTING TAILOR. College Avenue. A HEJVS, GEORGIA. A Remarkable Record in Printing. 4 One year ago we put in a Job Printing plant, and proposed to give our friends and the community the Best Work and the Best Stock that could be given in keeping with the prices agreed on. We have within the year increased the capacity of the office four-fold. If this should be read by anyone who has had difficulty about getting their Printing done as they want it, either as to time, execution or prices, we invite them to correspond with us. We do all manner of work from a small card to school catalogues, magazines, etc. D. W. McGREGOR, Bookseller, Jobbing Stationer and Printer, ATHENS, GA.Hodgson Cotton Co., ATHENS. GA. FERTILIZERS. MANUFACTURERS OF GEM OF ATHENS 'j REDSTAR SPECIAL , QUan08 TAP ROOT J IMPORTERS OF Nitrate of Soda. Potash Salts and Dealers in all kinds of Fertilizer Materials. GELDER’S RESTAURANT __AND_ European Hotel, ATLANTA, GA. (TO WEAR. Catering to a critical class, every turn of fashion is anticipated here. Mail orders receive special attention. Always First with tbe Newest JOHN G. EADS I CO., MACON, GEORGIA.For 50 Years A Hardware Store. Our Corner is known the State over, and has been for years, as headquarters Hardware, Sporting Goods, Stoves, House Furnishing Goods, c. Anderson Hardware Co. 33-35 Peachtree Street. 2 -1 6 Edge wood Ave. Harvard University, Uwreijce Scientific School. The Lawrence Scientific School, which b under the same Faculty as Harvard College and the Graduate School, offer professional courses leading to the degree of S. B. in Civil, Mechanical and Klcctncal Engineering; Mining and Metallurgy; Architecture; I-and scape Architecture; Chemistry; Geology; Biology; Anatomy; Physiology and Hygiene (as a preparation for medical schools); Science for Teachers, and a course in General Science. Graduates of colleges may be admitted to advanced standing without examination. For information concerning courses of study, expenses, and plan of admission, address J. L. Love, Secretary, lfi University Hall, Cambridge, Mas . N. S. SHAtER, Dean. HEAD MCMAHAN, ATHENS, GEORGIA. IPhs Clothing AND Gents’ Furnishings.Fine Tailoring, Hats, Men’s Furnishings. DORR, Augusta, Ga. ESTABLISHED 1873. T. 0. BLIGH, Importer and Jobber of Glass, China, Earthenware, Chandeliers, Lamps, House-Furnishing Goods, etc. 809 Broad Street. ATHENS Electric Railway Co. Electric Power __FOR_ LIGHTS, MOTORS, FANS and HEATING. C. D. FLANIGIN, General Manager, ATIIKXS, GA. Clayton and College Avenue.ESTABLISHED I TBS. Aeademy of Riebmond Gounty, AUGUSTA, GEORGIA. Col.C. H. WITHROW. Principal. •»esE« J. N. Williamson FOR A NICE TURNOUT. Telephone No. 1. Opposite Y. M. C. A. Three Stores. TURNER HODGSON. Goods and S}o $ CHAS. STERN CO. Glothiers, Hatters, Furnishers. SUITS MADE TO ORDER. FIT GUARANTEED. 1 S3 Clayton Street, ATHENS, GA. I E.H. DORSEY. Clothier, Hatter, Furnisher, 115 Clayton Street, Athen«, Ga. DORSEY A FUNKENSTEIN, ATHENS, GA. The moet complete stock of FURNITURE carried by any house in Georgia. Rocking Chain, Morris Chain, Mattresses and everything in Furniture. Corner Clayton and Wall Sts. JOHN L. ARNOLD, »mti m Paints, Wall Paper, Lead, Oils, Vanishes, Japans, Glass, Putty, Artists’ Materials, Lime, Cement, Plaster Parts. rin« line of PUture and future Frame . Picture Frames made to enter. Telephone its. Qayton Sc Jackson Su., Athens, Go. THE AINA INDEMNITY CO. FIDELITY, COURT AND CONTRACT BONDS. FAIR DODD, Mgr. for Georgia, SHEPARD HRYAN, Att’y for Georgia.


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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1898 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1899 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1901 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1903 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1904 Edition, Page 1

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