University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1901

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1901 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 236 of the 1901 volume:

  J!?e Qoooi er, abl , f i sberry, ar?d U ellii)$toi) . . ARE . . peerless pianos PERFECT IN ALL points And preferred by all prominent PERFORMERS. 77IE carry a full line of Violins, Guitars, AV Mandolins, and Sheet Music at lowest and popular prices. Write u« for Catalogue. “America's Greatest Piano House." The Cable Co. 96-98 WkitektU Street. . . ATLANTA. CA. C. O. MOTES 2bety |2 t£le tfitjfccla £Jorfe College Work a Specialty. My facilities for large groups of Fraternities and Classes are unsurpassed. Have the only atudlo light in the city especially adapted to Urge group .PANDORA Published by The FRATERNITIES of the UNIVERSITY of GEORGIA. June Tenth, Nineteen-One.ond ryr , ro 7 ‘“ volume is complete, with oil issues, index ond title pogc? Imperfect volumes dcloy return of binding. Thonks. BOUND BY THE NATIONAL LIBRARY BINDERY CO. OF GA.  Dedication. jfdown the crowding ranks ofyears Vhe long lino grows. Sfnd youth and mg Sot'n hands to swell the brotherhood 0 " Seorgia’s " sons. Cornelia-like Old " Seorgia " proudly points you out, " fnd these mg jewels are, “ she says. Vo you, who by oft words of cheer, Who by your Hues, your toils, your call Vo great endeavor, and your fame, Jffave cheered us when the road was rough. When steep and sterile seemed the slopes Vhat upward to the summit lead ; Vo you, who 'ue watched, and warned, and now, Vhe summit gained, glad greetings give, jfnd welcomes fraught with tender thrill; Vo you, alumni, fratres, friends, Sn honor of our mutual loves, We dedicate this book of ours. ft, J J 7Calendar. 1900. Sxptxmber 17th-18tii. Monday and Tuesday— Examinations for entrance. September 19rn. Wednesday—Session opens; Law School opens. October 1st. Monday—Medical School opens. November 20th. Thursday—National Thanksgiving Day. December 21st. Friday—Christmas recess begins. 1901. January 8d. Wednesday—Exercises resumed. Examinations for entranco half advanced. January IOtii. Saturday—Birthday of R. E. Lee. February IOtii. Tuesday—Anniversary of the Demosthcnean Society. February 22d. Friday—Washington’s birth- day. Anniversary of the Phi Kappa Society. Abril 2d. Tuesday—Commencement of the Medical School. May 26tu. Saturday—Final examinations begin. June 12th. Wednesday—Commencement bo-gins. 6University Centennial Commencement. Programme. Tuesday, Junk lira—10:80 r. m.—Sophomore Hop. WtDSUDAY, June 12tii—Local Celebration Day. Centennial of City of Atheni and County of Clarke. 11 a. m.—Addreaa by Dean Sylyanus Morris (Class 1872). 10:30 p. m.—Hobo Hop. Thursday, Junk 13ra—Undergraduate Day. 11 a. m.—Sophomore Declamation. 4 p. m.—Junior Speaking and Delivery of Sophomore Prir.ee by Hon. John Temple Graves (Class 1876). 10:30 p. m.—Pan-Hellenic German. Friday, Junk 14th—Graduates’ Day. 11 a. mX-S«nior and Law Claes Exercises. 4 p. m.—Prir.0 Drill. 10:30 p. m.—Junior Hop. Saturday, Junk 16tu—Literary Societies Day. 11:30 a. m.—Address before Literary Socioties by Hon. J. L. M. Curry, LL. D. (Class 18-15). 4 p. m.—Laying comer-stono new buildings. 8 p. m.—Champion Debate between Demosthenean and Phi Kappa Societies. Sunday, Junk lOra, 11 a. m.—Baccalaureate Sermon, Rev. Benjamin M. Palmer, D. D., LL. D. (Class 1838). 8 p. m.—Sermon before University Young Men's Christian Association, Krv. R. J. Willinoiiau, D. D. (Class 1873). Monday, Junk 17td—Centennial Day. 11:30 a. m.—Address before University, Hon. Oscar Strauss, of New York. 4 p. ra.—University Celebration. 10:30 p m.—Cotillion Club German. Tuesday, June 18tii—Alumni Day. 10 a. m.—Session of Alumni Society. 11:30 a. m.—Alumni Address, Hon. Emort Speer (Claw 18C9). 4 p. m—Second Session Alumni Society. 8 p. m.—Social Reunion. 10:30 p. m.—Lawyers’ Hop. Wednesday, June 19m— Commencement Day. 11 a. m.—Baccalaureate Addrew, Dr. Henry Van Dyke, Princeton. 10:30 p. m.—Senior Hop. Places for Gass Reunions. Tho following places havo been arranged for class headquarters. The object in appointing these places of rendezvous is to enable members of tho samo class to meet each other more readily. A book, in which members may register upon arrival, will be provided in each of the places named: Classes from 1830 to 1851, Professor Barrow’s room, Library Building. Classes from 1851 to 18G3, Profewor Snelling’s room, Library Building. Classes from 18CG to 1876, Chancellor’s Lecture-room, Science Hall. Classes from 1876 to 1830, Dr. ‘White’s room, Science Hall. Classes from 1880 to 1886, Law School Building, first floor. Classes from 1885 to 1890, Law School Building, second floor. Classes from 1890 to 1895, Demosthenean Hall. Classes from 1895 to 1900, Phi Kappa Hall. 7Greeting. The editors of the 1901 PANDORA tender their kindest greetings in this centennial year of our University. They present this volume to the world with no appeal for charity or apology for the faults to be found herein : but with the sincere hope that it may plcisc each reader and recall to his mind in future years the student life at Old Georgia. 801AtSaciAri-CDi foR l.M fji 1AM RC U»a(.n» ka P A. Win. A M3 L.N. AtloC.ATe- EO'TORS MM BOLLARD A7W WDM«YT Xt JLSIBlCY I 0'f«A -n- C« r JT).N AdCMjNH CaC BU»ltftS7- WANAtJfW Ja«N BanAS ItTrustees of the University of Georgia. His Kxcellency, Goykknor A. 1). Candi.kr, Atlanta. Kx-officio. (i. F. GoiiKK, Marietta........................From tbe Slate-at-large..........................Term expires September I at, 1607 Cl.ark Howku., Atlanta.........................From the State-at-large..........................Term expires Scpteml er lit, 19H1 F. G. DuBionon, Savannah......................From the State-at-large..........................Term expires September lit, 1605 W. K. Simmons, Lawrenceville...................From the State-at-large..........................Term expires September 1st, 160 B. A. Dkkmark, Savannah........................First Congressional District.....................Term expires September 1st, 1006 B. B, Bowkk, Buinbridge........................Second Congressional District....................Term expires September 1st, 1006 V. II. Fisii, Americus........................Third Congressional District.....................Term expires September 1st, 1006 Hknky Pkrsons, Talbotton.......................Fourth Congressional District....................Term expires September lit, ion 11. D. McDaniki., Monroe......................Fifth Congressional District.....................Term expires September 1st, 160 A. O. Bacon, Macon...........................Sixth Congressional District.....................Term expires Septernl or 1st, 1901 D. B. Hamilton, Koine..........................Seventh Congressional District...................Term expires September 1st, 1901 H. T. Lkwis, Greensboro........................Kighth Congressional District....................Term expires Septcrnl er 1st, 1608 N. It. Hutchins, Lawrenceville................Ninth Congressional District................... Term expires September 1st, 1607 G. T. Baknkn, Augusta.........................Tenth Congressional District.....................Term expires September 1st, 1‘HiT H. ( . Tl'K.vkk, (Quitman....................Klcvenlh Congressional District..................Term expires September 1st, 1607 A. L. Hull, Athens.............................BesidentTrustee..................................Term expires September 1st, 1!K)7 Howkll Conn, Athens ...........................Besident Trustee.................................Term expires Sepicmtor lit, l!«oi N. K Harris, Macon. President of Technological Board, Kx-oflicio. F. G. DuBionon, Savannah, President Board of Commissioners, Girls’ Industrial College, Kx-oflicio. P. V. Mklorim, Savannah, President Board of Commissioners, Colored Industrial College, Kx-officio. 12The Academic Faculty. Wai.tkr Harsard Him., A. M., B. L., CliniH-vlIor. mul Profoiuir of •"' Lllilo . Henry Ci.ay White, Ph. I)., E- C. S., I'nvitlitil nf (In Georgia S|hi«' of Agrieulturw himI tlir Mcelinnic Art», mul l itifi »nr of (’licmiidry. David Crenshaw Harrow, A. M., C. and M. K., Iof Fniiikliu College. xml l’n fi- or of MhiIwiihIki. John Pkndi.hton Campbell, A. H.. Ph. D., l'nifi Hir of Itiolvjty. Wim.is Henry Bocock, A. M.. I’mfnwir of Amnciit I .mulling . Charles Norton Strahan, C. and M. ]• ., I’nofcMuir of Civil Hugim-oring. John Hanson Thomas McPherson, A. H., P11. D., Prufiaxor of lli.tory mul I’olitu-nl Sciwuv. Chari.es Mercer Snei.i.ino, A. M., l'rtif««Mir of Mntlii'inutio. William Davis Hooper, A. M., I'mfuMir of l.niiii. John Morris, A. M., I’rofi w.r of Knglidi Lmtgiiiigc mul Teutonic Philology. Law Walter Barnard Hill, A. M., H. L., Chancellor, mul Ixvturvr on tlx- Science mid History of l.nw. Federal bw, und Ia yul Kiliii . Howell Cobh, A. M., B. L., 1’rofcMor of l,nw. Sylvants Morris, A. M., B. I,., I’rofwworof I aw. Joseph Lustrat, Bach, ks J.ett., l,rofi »orof lioiniuiir Uiigunt'M. Andrew Henry Patterson, A. M., I’mfiwr of Pliv.ic mid A»troliotiiy. Hugh Nkshit Starnes, A. B., I'nifatMir of Agriculture. Robert Emory Park, A. B., A. M., I’rofoMor of Rhetoric and KnglUli l.itcrwlurv. Charles Holmes Herty, Ph. B., Ph. D., Adjiini'l I’rrifcMor of Chfinutiy. Uriah Harroi.d Davenport, B. S., InMnirtor in IMivniin miul Klectricnl Ernest Lee Griggs ( Graduate V. M. I.), ln»lnictor in Kii iiiivrino nnd Coiniiuinilmil of Cadet . James Madison Stephenson, Jr., A. B., Tutor in Knglixh. James Boi.an Lawrence, A. B., Tutor in Aui'ii'iit l.iiiigunge . Eugene Cunningham Branson, A. M., I.veturer in l vclio)ogy mid I gic. Miss Sarah A. Frierson, Librarian. Faculty. John D. Mell, A. B., B. L., I'tufiUMir of pHrlimncntiiry Law. Samuel C. Benedict, M. D., l'n ft M.r of MhImhI .lurtf|iru«lence. J. H. T. McPherson, A. B., Ph. D., Lwtuivr on Koinun Law. 3«4 PROF. R. E. PARK, Jr.Robert Emory NOT many pleasures arc as genuine as that which now is afforded us. Almost solely to the counsel of Mr. Park and his financial aid, is this edition of Pandora made a possibility. This act of his is an index to the true character of the man. Mainly through his untiring efforts was Georgia able to successfully cope with North Carolina. Solely, might we say, was a new Georgian resurrected, and it has profited by the errors of the past, making from an apparently unrccon-structiblc failure, a college magazine that is the peer of any such publication in the South. Not only has this benefactor of Georgia oiled the hinges of our brains and made Georgia foremost in the forum and journalistic field, but he has encouraged the union of brain and brawn in the athletic field. Thus we see that Georgia has been indeed fortunate in the selection made for the chair of English. By some this eulogy may appear inappropriate but the editors of Pandora willingly submit to all criticism in order to be able to express in lasting words their appreciation for one who has made his every effort and the advancement of Georgia’s interest synonymous. Professor Robert Emory Park was born in Tus-kegee, Alabama, December nth, 1869, where he was educated in Park High School of that place. He received an appointment in 18S8 to West 5 Park, A. M. Point Military Academy, where he was in college for eighteen months being compelled to withdraw on account of crushing his ankle. He received In’s degree of Bachelor of Arts from the University of Alabama in 1892 and one year later he received his Master of Arts degree. He then accepted the position of superintendent of public schools of Gainesville, Georgia. After holding this position for three years he gave it up to open a private school in La Grange, Georgia, the citizens of that city giving him the ground and building to induce him to take charge of the school. This position he resigned in the spring of 1899 in order to complete his education at the University of Chicago. While there he was elected to the chair of English which duties he began in September, 1900. Though a native by birth of Alabama, Professor Park has ever been a Georgian by sentiment and descent. In the roll of the alumni of the University there arc perhaps more of his immediate family than that of any family in the State. His father, grandfather, two uncles, and a first cousin all bearing the name of Park, and a number of other relations of different names, all appear on the roll, and it affords us much genuine pleasure to record among the lovers, supporters and promoters of our dear old University the name of Professor Robert Emory Park.“Pandora,” Its Purpose and History PANDORA, "the gift of all the gods.” Every god and goddess contributed something to her perfection. Beauty and charm were hers, Pandora, the gift of all the students. Every student contributes something to her—we will call it perfection. Beauty and charm arc hers. Pandora herself was fashioned as a curse for man; our Pandora is fashioned as a blessing. She has a mission to perform and has she not in the past performed it well? Her duty it is to portray college life, college habits, the college itself, as they are; to convey to the outside world an idea of what we arc doing. She must, collect, gather, accumulate, everything of interest that has happened within the walls of our alma mater, sift them and give them to our alumni, to the State. What a flood of recollections flows upon an alumnus when the name Pandora is mentioned? Docs he not once more live his college life? Docs he not once more pass through that joyous time when he stands irresolute upon the threshold of life, fearing to proceed yet unable to retreat? Pandora starts this train of thought. To it he turns in his leisure and loves to think of his vicissitudes as a college boy, of his woes which he thought could never be equaled, his successes which he thought could never be eclipsed. Let us glance backward for a few years and trace the history of Pandora. It will be most pleasant as well as profitable. Pandora represents not only college life in all its manifold phases; it is not only an outlet for the literary activity and thought of the college; but in addition it purposes to be a history of the college during its year. If the University is prosperous it follows that the Pandora is brilliant and successful. If the University is laboring under hardships naturally this reacts uj on the Pandora and it falls below the standard. Let us trace, then, its history since its establishment. Set on foot in 1886 by some bright mind it has been published annually, up to date, save in 1889 and 1891. The Pandora published in 1886 was a pioneer in the South as only one such Annual had preceded it. It was small and unpretentious; bound in pasteboard. Xotwithsta«ding all this and regardless of the fact that it was far below the average of the volumes which followed it, more than twice as many men were required to edit it, as now constitute the Pandora board. At the time this volume was issued very little happened in college worthy to be published in an Annual. Football in the South was then considered to be absolutely barbarous and consequently no college indulged in such sport. Baseball here was limited to intcrclass games and one with the Athens City nine. The Pandora of '86 is so unpretentious that it contains no illustrations and but few pen-and-ink sketches. No clubs and organizations with 16which recent Pandoras have teemed, were known in the University at that time. Thus we see what a limited field there was to cover; what a limited scope there was to view. The Pandora of 1887 in appearance resembles its predecessor yet it has evolved from its embryonic state and has begun its first upward shoot. This issue abounds in wit and humor depicting college pranks and jokes. In it is chronicled the first Zeta Chi initiation which has always been the bane of the Freshmen’s existence. Editorially, the Pandora deplores the lack of a gymnasium in the University and suggests several plans by which the necessary funds might be raised. There is also an article eulogizing Chancellor P. H. Mell, who then stood at the helm of the University. In this year we find that Field-day was observed for the first time and a list of the winners on that occasion is given. The year 1888 marks a still greater evolution in the Pandora. It is bound in cloth with a neat cover design and contains some good illustrations. The poems have improved and several long articles arc inserted notably one descriptive of Athens and its advantages. The editorial space is consumed by an appeal to the Legislature for more funds and a statement of the deplorable fact that Mercer and Emory were on a better financial footing than the University. So great was the need of funds to back the Pandora that no issue was published in either ’89 or '91. The Pandora of ’90 makes little improvement over that of ’88. Yet it contains an original 1 idea that of giving a history in a sarcastic style of the different editors composing the staff. Here we find the last account of a Zeta Chi initiation until the quiet Freshman was again disturbed in the fall of '98. By '92, the difficulties seem to have been overcome and Pandora is at last on a firm footing. Since that time it has thrived and prospered. The principle subject of interest with which this Pandora dealt was the installation of Dr. William E. Boggs as chancellor. The year 1892 marks the first game of intercollegiate football played in the South. Auburn and Georgia were the contestants. Since this time the colleges have been brought into closer union with each other. They have discarded their old prejudices and enter into friendly rivalry in various fields. The Pandora of 1893 came out in a new and attractive style, rectangular in shape with a neat black and red cover. This Pandora represents a broader field as the college had taken on a new growth. Here for the first time we find pictures of the various fraternity groups. Also the Thalians and the football team arc given prominent places. The ’94 Pandora closely resembles its predecessors. In ’95 we find an account of the formation of a glee club in the University. Here also the Non-Fraternity Club first has its picture published. The most prominent original feature of the ’96 Pandora is a well written history of Demosthenian and Phi Kappa Literary Societies. 7In 1897 the size of the Pandora was increased and it was issued in a more attractive form than ever before. The plan of tins Pandora has been closely followed by the volumes of '98, ’99. and ’oo, which have fully recorded events of note in the University during their respective years. And the volume of 1901 will surpass all others, we arc perfectly confident. After our graduation, to look back over our college course with a Pandora by our side will veritably be a joy; to think of our old friends; of the irresistible and charming beauty of youth; of our hopes and ideals and how we have lived up to them, F. B. iS Senior Class Officers. E. A. Duke . . . . F. R. Happ .... W. G. Thompson . Historian J. M. Gantt . . . R. M. Goss . . . . Poet Fred Jackson . . . Harold Hirsch . . J. D. McCartney . John Banks .... L. E. Tate . . . . H. C. Johnson . . J. C. Brand . . . . 20 H. C. Johnson J. C. Brand .Senior Class, 1901 Jons Banks, A (fi, Phi Kappa..........................................................La Grange, Georgia A. II. Entered College, September, ’97. President Sophomore Class,'98-99; Treasurer Athletic Association, ’98-99; Business Manager Red and Black ; Athletic Editor lied and Black; President Thalians ; Business Manager Mandolin and Banjo Club; Athletic Council; Secretary and Treasurer Junior Class, ’00-01; Corporal Cadets,’98-99; Sergeant Major Cadets, '99-00; Adjutant and Captain Company "C,” Cadets, '00-01; President Art League, '98-99; Junior Hop Committee ; Chairman Senior Hop Committee ; Captain Senior Baseball Team ; Business Manager 1901 ’Varsity Baseball Team ; Business Manager 1901 Pasdoka. J. Charles Brand, Dcm.....................................................................Canton, Georgia B. S. Entered College, September, ’97. President Demostheneen Society; Manager Sophomore Football Team and Senior Track Team. Karl Clarence Campbell, Dem...........................................................Monticello, Georgia A. B. Entered College, September, '97. J. A. Crawford, Dcm.,.....................................................................Athens, Georgia B. S. Entered College, September, ’9C ; Left College, March, ’01. William Mazyck Davis, 1' A A , Phi Kappa....................................................Macon Georgia B. S. Entered College, September, '97. Business Manager Bed and Black, Two Terms; Associate Editor 1900 Pandora ; Manager 1900 Football Team; President Phi Knppa, '00; First Lieutenant Company "C,” Corps of Cadets; Toastmaster Senior Banquet, March, '01. Eugene Alberto Duke, Dcm.................................................................Newborn, Georgia B. S. Entered College, September, '97. Sophomore Declaimer ; Junior Orator; President of Dcmosthcncan Society; Engineering Society and Senior Class ; Editor Georgian John M. Gantt, Dem......................................................................Marietta, Georgia A. II. Entered College, September, ’97. President Dcmosthcncan Society. Ralph Montgomery Goss, J T J, Phi Kappa...................................................Athens, Georgia A. B. Entered College, September ’9C ; Out of Collego One Year. Member Senior Hop Committee; Senior Class Poet ; Second Lieutenant Company “ B,” Corps of Cadets. Harold IIirscii, Phi Kappa................................................................Atlanta Georgia A. B. Entered College, September, ’98. Sophomore Spesker; Sophomore and Junior Class Football Teams ; Captain of Second Football Team, and Substitute on ’Varsity Team, 99; Center on ’Varsity Football Team, '00; Assistant Business Manager Georgian, ’99-00 ; President of Athletic As«ocialion, ’01 ; Member Advisory Board, ’01 ; Master of Ccremoniea North Carolina-Georgia Debate, ’01 ; Second Lieutenant Company “C,” Corps of Cadets; Manager ’01 Football Team. 21William Dana IIoyt, .V 9 Phi Kappa............................................................Home Georgia A. II. Entered College, September, '97. Secretary Athletic Association, ’99-00; Junior Speaker; Prize Essayist of Engineering Annual, '00 ; Editor Georgian, '01; Associate Editor '01 Pandora ; Senior Editor Engineering Annual, '01. Fred Carlton Jackson, Dcm...................................................................Athens, Georgia A. B. Entered College, September, ’97. President Demosthenean Literary Society; First Lieutenant Company "A,” Corps of Cadets ; Sophomore Dcclaimer; Junior Speaker; Claa Historian, Junior Year. Frank Rensak IIapp, Phi Kappa................................................................Macon, Georgia B. S. Entered College, September, ’97. Member Orchestra; Thalians; Mandolin and Guitar Club; Winner of Professor ’ Prize in Drawing, ’99; Chief Bugler Drum Corps, ’99; Adjutant Corps of Cadets, ’01; Athletic Editor ll«l and lllack; Vice-President Sonior Class. J. Frank Howard, Phi Kappa.................................................................Atlanta, Georgia B. S. Entered College, September, ’97. Business Manager Engineering Annual; Left College March, ’01. Horace J. Cornelius Johnson, A' Phi Kappa,..................................................Etowah, Georgia B. S. Entered College, September, ’98. Captain of Track Team, ’00; Sophomore Declaimer; Senior IIop Committee; Member Sphinx. Thomas R. Kino, Phi Kappa...................................................................Athens, Georgia A. B. Entered College, September, ’9G. Business Manager Engineering Annual, ’01; Captain Company “B,” Corps of Cadets. Warren Clarence Lott, I A E, Phi Kappa,...................................................Waycfoss, Georgia A. B. Entered College, September, ’99. Left College, December, ’00. Herbert Johnson McBride, 1' A E, Dcm.....................................................Tallapoosa Georgia A. B. Entered College, September, ’97. John D. N. McCartney, 1' A E, Phi Kappa................................................Thomasvillc, Georgia B. S. Entered College, September, ’99. Vice-President University Literary Club; Editor of the Georgian ; Editor-in-ChieflOOl Pandora. Claude IIa.mmond Story, Dcm................................................................Augusta, Georgia A. B. Entered College, September, ’97. Preeidcnt Demosthenean Literary Society. Lucius E. Tate, J T J, Dem....................................................................Tate, Georgia A. B. Entered College, September, ’98. Captain Company “A,” Corps of Cadets; Athletic Editor Bed and Black, '01. W. C. Thompson, Dcm........................................................................Madison, Georgia A. B. Entered College, September, '97. President Demosthenean Society; Associate Editor 1900 Georgian; Member Advisory Board, '00; Sophomore Declaimer; Junior Orator. 22W. G. Thompson, Phi Ivappa..............................................................Endora, Georgia A. B. Entered College, September, '97. Sophomore Speaker; President Phi Kappa Society. IIbnry Goldsmith Wells, X 'F, Dera................................................Stone Mount, Georgia B. S. Entered College, September,’97. Lieutenant Company • A,” Corps of Cadets; Pan-Hellenic Committee. Elective Members. Joseph Francis Gatins, 2’ A •’, Phi Kappa......................................................New York City Entered College, September, ’98. Cotillion Committee; Irish Club. Cliff Green, P J 6, Phi Kappa...............................................................Atlanta, Georgia Entered College, January, ’01. Associate Editor 1902 Paxdora. John Randolph Humphries, Phi Kappa...........................................................Acworth, Georgia EnteredKJollege, September, ’99. Sophomore Speaker. 23History of the Centennial Class—1901 THE Class of 1901 lias the honor of being distinguished as the “ Centennial Class,” and it is indeed fitting that this honor should be conferred upon such a noble body of young men. Young men of high ideals, noble character, lofty ambitions, imbued with the spirit of independence and courage, and determined in every duty undertaken. To mention the many honors and victories won by the members of this class, in our college life, would be impossible in so short an article. But in looking back over our college career we find our men in almost every struggle for college honors, and in almost every position of importance and responsibility we find men of this class at the head. Beginning with the jolly Freshmen, of four years ago, when starting out upon their long journey, those tics of love and bonds of union, of which we can yet boast, were made and scaled. Though with their share of the “ tinge of spring ” this unity made them strong and they were never baffled by any foe which came within their range. It is true that some of the paths of our Freshman life were rough and perilous, but all Freshmen have to become acquainted with college life. We soon learned how things were done at college, and in after years it was our pleasure to help conduct other Freshmen along that road which all newcomers must travel. While Freshmen our ambitions were indeed lofty. The goal for which we so eagerly sought was the thought of some day attaining the high distinction of a Senior. With this end in view we fought bravely the battles of the Freshmen, and whether in the classroom, upon the gridiron, or upon the diamond the Freshmen were seen and heard. As Sophomores we were in a position to enjoy with the upper-classmen the actions of the timid Freshmen, but this fun did not last long for we were soon busily engaged with the subjects of which we had heard the upper-classmen speak so much. The work of our Sophomore year will be remembered as the most difficult in our college course. We soon saw that to be able to master the methods and problems of Mr. Wells, the history of the English people as recorded by Mr. Gardiner, and the beautiful Homeric stanzas it would be necessary for a Sophomore to bum the midnight candle, lose many hours of sweet sleep, and refrain from attending the social gatherings which would have been a source of great pleasure. Although our work in the Sophomore year was quite burdensome, we see a number of our men taking an active part in athletic contests and in many instances coming out victorious. And now as the year was drawing to a close we were proud to know 24that we had mastered those difficult subjects and were ready to advance to the next class. Our Junior year was one of much smoother sailing than the preceding. In this we had more time to devote to the reading of the works of the great authors and thus our knowledge of the literary world was greatly broadened. The metaphysical subjects which were then presented aroused much interest and discussion and have been among the most beneficial contributions to our college life. As Junior speakers, and as orators and debaters in literary societies we will ever be proud of the record which'the men of 1901 made. And in the management of college publications and all important offices of honor the men of this class took a high stand. In class athletics, the Juniors of the Class of 1901 marched forward with the banner of victory. And in every phase of college life you will find the members of this class liberal supporters of the best interests of their college. The jolly Freshmen of ’97, arc now the dignified Seniors of '01. Our minds and ideas have greatly changed and our ambitions arc of a much higher character than that of being a Senior. 2 Our ideals of exalted characters and true manhood have been very much elevated in our ethical discussions and we are enabled to see life in a much purer light. And in the investigations of other subjects we have had broad fields opened to us from which each one has reaped an abundant harvest. In the literary field of our Senior year we have indeed accomplished a great work, and have cultivated an interest for research in the works of the master minds of literature. The part taken in the literary societies is shown when we see that eight of our number have had the honor of being elected presidents of their societies. And in public exercises and the staffs of both the college publications we have had men holding important positions. When we come to the athletic department we find that the manager for next year’s football team and the managers for both the football and baseball teams for 1900-1901, were chosen from the ranks of the Senior Class. With this record in college we may expect our men to be called upon when they enter public life to direct the affairs of the government both State and National. And we may feel sure of success in all undertakings, if we will profit by the lessons of our excellent instructors. Historian. 5Class of 1902. Officers. Eugene Wofford Ragsdale Isixam Park Goss Roy Davis Stubbs Lucian Pritchard Goodrich Treasurer James Longstref.t Sibley . . Miles Walker Lewis .... Historian Pink us Happ Augustus Longstreet Hull . Henry James Lamar .... Sidney Smith Dean .... Kf.xion Eugene Edwards . . Edwin Ruthven Camp . . . . Captain Track Team Mitchell King 28NAME Class of 1902 POST-OFFICE Aiken, Willie Tat .... Barrett, Frank Harvey, X A A’, . Blackshear, Sterling, X P, Blackwell, Reuben Lee . . . . Brownlee, Edwin Darnall . Bullard, Newton Hudson A T Q, . Camp, Edwin Rutiiven Collier, Miles Willis . . . . Calloway, Roy...................... Dean, Sidney Smith, X A A, . Edwards, Kbnion Eugene Faust, Joseph George .... Gober, George Fletcher, Jr. Goodrich, Lucian Pritchard Goss, Isham Park .... Gould, Russell...................... Graham, Botiiwell, A T A, Graves, Ralph Augustus, K A, . Griffith, Arthur Jesse . Happ, Pinkus........................ Hardy, Wilson Moore, X A A', Harder, Homer Reynolds . Hart, James Fort, A' , ... Hill, Edward Young, X A A’, . Hull, Augustus Longstreet, Jr., X A A', Jackson, Walter Marion, X A A', Jordon, James Kollock, A T li, . Pennington Augusta Athens . . Dip Plainvillc Milledgcville Atlanta . Comer Lexington . Rome . Sylvester Lexington Marietta . . Griffin Decatur . . Athens AtllC118 Bainbridgc . Danic)8villc Macon Rome Harmony Grove . . Athens Washington . . Athens . Augusta . Sandcrsville 29Johnson, Clifford Sneed, A' A, Keith, Oscar Lovell . Kino, Mitchell, X 0, Lamar, Henry James, Jr., 0 J 6, Lewis, Junius Poullain, X Lewis, Miles Walker, A' . Michael, Morris . McIntyre, William Irwin McWorter, Robert Ligon Nix, Sidney Johnson Oliver, Edgar .... Oxford, Norwood Ragsdale, Eugene Wofford Richardson, Marion Simms, X 0 Sibley, James Loxgstreet . Stephens, Robert Grier, K A, Stubbs, Roy Davis Thomas, AVilliam Milton Thompson, Lewis Jasper Williams, Ira AVellington . . Waycross . . . Athens . . . Atlanta . . . Macon . . Greensboro Greensboro . . . Athens Thomasville . . AVoodvillc . Harmony Grove Kissimmee, Florida . . Monticello • . . Dallas . . Atlanta . . . Athens . . Atlanta . . . Eatonton . . , Athens Rocky Head, Alabama . . Villa Rica 30History of the Junior Class GIBBON said that history is little else than a catalogue of the crimes, mistakes, and misfortunes of man. If this be true the Junior Class has little history and the Historian is entirely without material for his work. If it were possible to prove a rule by a particular case it would be an easy matter to show the fallacy of Gibbon’s statement by pointing to the record that the Junior Class of the University has left this term. Her crimes arc none unless that of mercilessly “ shooting ” professors be counted against her. Her mistakes are rare and the only misfortune under which she labors is that of not having enough positions of honor and trust to distribute among her worthy sons. Indeed, to say that ’02 is proud of herself is putting it very mildly. Her deeds should inspire the most callous heart with pride. In every phase of university life she has taken the lead and has demonstrated her ability to deal with every problem of college affairs. Her load has been a double one and the way in which she has borne it has won the admiration and respect of all who know her. A complete list of the honors and duties imposed upon ’02’s members, with an account of the confidence with which they were undertaken and the success with which they were carried out, would prolong this article far. beyond the necessary limits. However, in justice to the Class and to substantiate his boastful statements the Historian feels con- strained to mention some of the more important trusts given to '02 men. First in athletics: She was represented on the football team by two star backs; and the successful financial termination of the season is largely due to the assistant manager. In baseball she is as well represented, the back-bone of the team being ’02 men. The whole department of track athletics has been turned over to Juniors, and it was never in better hands. In the Athletic Association ’02 men hold the positions of vice-president and treasurer. In debate, she has more than held her own. This is shown by the fact alone that ’02 men have repeatedly been called to fill the highest positions in the literary societies. But greatest of all, it remained for two of her steadfast sons to break the long list of defeats sustained by the University and to win over most worthy opponents in debate. In journalism, her record is enviable. She is always represented on the Red and Black staff and two of the most energetic of the Georgian’s editors together with the manager arc ’02 men. The Board of Editors of the 1901 Pandora has three Juniors. Perhaps in the classroom more than elsewhere docs ’02 lay her claim to superiority. It is not her boast that she possesses record-breaking students, but she does indeed boast of her remarkably large per cent, of sober, steady students, intent upon learning and research but not to the neglect of 3 other branches of college life; ’02 has time and again been complimented by members of the faculty on this score and it is a source of great pride to her. More than once her attention has been called to the fact that something more is being expected of her than of the average Junior Class at the University and she l;as yet to hear of room for complaint concerning the way she has met her obligations. Last, but not least, conics the University Orchestra. It is enough to say that the success of this organization is largely due to the number and efficiency of the men the Junior Class has supplied. 3 With the above facts in mind, it is easy to see why we can unhesitatingly predict a most glorious and useful career for ’02 in the future. She will enter upon the Senior year with at least fifty members. Her average man is the representative college man, and this alone makes her an ideal class. She is a sober, energetic, conservative body of men with one purpose alone in view, that of duty. Her merit is recognized by all who come in contact with her, and when the day for separation comes the University will reflect honor upon herself by sending forth from her walls her most steadfast and loyal body of men—the present Junior Gass. Historian. 2Officers of Class 1903 J. H. Monahan . C. R. Lawler . . W. O. Cheney . . R. J. Moran . . . F. M. Ridley . . F. H. Richardson H. M. Scott . . . C. S. McWhorter C. M. Johns . . . L. P. Young . . . E. H. Clay . . . D. A. Cohen . . . J. F. Baxter . . ..........President . . . Vice-President ............Historian .................Poet . . Captain Football . . Captain Baseball . . Manager Football . . Manager Baseball ............Secretary ..........Treasurer .............Chaplain Manager Track Team Captain Track Team 34Roll of Sophomore Class Anderson, J. B., 2' A', Barrow, B. H., .V J , . Barrow, T. A., A' A, Baxter, J. F., 2’ A F, Baxter, T. W., 2 A F, Beaver, S. A. Benedict, R. G., K A, Bond, C. W. Boyd, M., 2’ A F., . Burn, C. C., XxV, . Calhoun, A., .V Cheney, W. 0. Clay, E. II., X fl, Cohen, D. A. . . Dallis, E. E. Dickinson, M. M., K 2’, Drake, W. E. Du Pree, D. II., 2 iV, EcnoLS, G. L. Farley, F. M., X Py Franklin, G- B. Franklin, 0. J. Grinbr, L. L., A T Q, Ilion, J. B. Hill, E. C., K A, Hodgson, W. B., A A, Hudson, T. L. . Atlanta Athens . Pelham Atlauta . Sparta Augusta . Athens . Canon . Atlanta Cedartown . Atlanta Bairdstown Marietta Rutledge , La Grange La Grange Buena Vista . Danville Ila . Atlanta Excelsior . Excelsior . Dublin . Atlanta Washington Athens Gainesville 35Hulsey, L. J., K A, Jackson, W. A. Jerger, E. R., K A} Jester, J. C. . Johns, C. M. JonNSON, M. S., K A, Johnson, S. S., V . Jones, W. H., 2 A E, . Kelly, E. C., K A, Krenson, C. M., K A, Lawler, C. R. Leowen, G. W., (P A 6} Lyndon, A. J., Jr. McCalla, J. E. 0., K 2’, McCalla, J. A., A T Q, McDonald, J. M. . McIntyre, A. T. McMullen, J. S., K A, . McWhorter, C. S. Manley, J. P. Mask, W. S. Moran, R. J. . Martin, E. W. Monahan, J., I N Newton, W. F. . Perry, W. 0. . Potts, K. Richardson, F. H. . Ridley, F. M., X I , . Rounsaville, J. R., (P A 6, ........................Atlanta .......................Athens Thomn8ville .......................Athens .........................Bishop ......................Atlanta .........................Etowah ........................Macon .....................Monticello Savannah .....................Tallapoosa . . . . Crawfordvillc .........................Athens . . . . Ileardmont . . ... . Conyers ......................Conyers t Thomasville .....................Hartwell ......................Woodville ......................Griffin .........................Athens ......................Atlanta .......................Crawford . . . . Savannah Washington, District of Columbia .........................Carl ........................Atlanta .....................Hartwell .....................La Grange .........................Rome 36Rounsaville, R. B., P A 8, Russell, C. J)., ( A 8, . Scott, H. M., A' P, Seymour, W. W. Smith, M. H., 2’ A Et Stanton, J. M. Stevens, 0. B., Jr., P A 8, Strickland, E., K A, Thornton, A. A., X Py Tolbert, M. L., 1 N, Walker, B. S., 2 A E, Watson, R. 0. Whitfield, C. H., 0 A 8, Wino, J. D., .t Py . Worsham, W. A., 1 jV, Young, L. P. . . . . Rome Savannah . . Atlanta Dahlonega . . Atlanta . Winder . . . Griffin . . Dalton . . Atlanta . . Atlanta Monroe Kissimmee, Florida . . . Macon Atlanta . . Forsyth . Woodville 37History THIS year’s Sophomore Class was composed of an unusually large number of old men. But we welcomed into our midst more than enough men to fill the places made vacant by our former members who had left college. We commenced our career of conquest when a Sophomore was chosen to represent Georgia in the State oratorical contest. In athletics we showed up better than any other class, not only in the number of men, but also in their quality. Among our best football players were many Sophomores, among them the captain of next year’s team. In baseball we were still more successful in furnishing star players. More than half the players on the team including the captain were Sophomores. At the time this was written Field-day had not come off. But, if we judge by the number of victories we won last year on that day, we certainly will gain more than our share. This is the first Sophomore Class that has furnished Varsity a captain of the football team, the first to furnish a captain of the baseball team, the first to furnish an anniversarian for one of the literary societies, and the first to furnish Georgia’s representative in the oratorical contest. of 1903. We have shown up well in every phase of college life. We have been represented on the staff of our college papers. The Sophomores have not lost their reputation, made, even while Freshmen, of being leaders of social events. In fact we have been thwarted in but few of our undertakings—unless, perhaps, some of us undertook to make a rise. We succeeded admirably well in shearing the Freshmen's scalps. We had decided to capture the toastmaster for the Freshmen banquet and all those who were going to give toasts, and had appointed men to capture them. The men appointed caught them and imprisoned them. But the Freshmen had formed an alliance with their dear kinsmen, the 9 lawyers, and by their timely aid the ones captured were liberated. They reached the feast, but they did not have much light on the subject. Some Sophomore had cut the electric wires. There are many other deeds and accomplishments of the Class of 1903, that would be worth mentioning but my space is limited. Suffice it to say that we believe our professors when they tell us that 1903 is the best class, taken as a whole, that ever entered the University of Georgia. When we examine our past we can not help but say: “ Surely, surely, ’03 is great,—’03 is great.” Historian. 38oo '01 % § '03 0 NOBLE FRESHMEN of rRe past-BE WORTHY °r THEM. Lives or FRESH MEW ALL REMIND.US WE CAN MAKE .UR LIVES UBLTME »cz£—Officers of Class J904 Paul E. Jette......... Richard P. Hicks . . . Taney 0. Benton . . . Alvin G. Goluckk . . . Willie T. Seibels . . . Hugh H. Gordon . . . Charles G. Strickland James Boswell .... Marion S. Monk . . . . John Henry Poole . . ..............President .... Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer ....................Poet ...............Historian . Captain Football Team Manager Football Team Captain Baseball Team Manager Baseball Team ................ChaplainRoll of Freshman Class Anderson, W. L., K A, Archer, L. S., A' 2, Basch, E. Benton, H. C. . Benton, T. 0. Boswell, J. G. Bower, D. R., K A, Bower, J. D., K A, . Broach, C. E. Carson, G., A' A, Carter, M. C., A T Q, Chandler, I. W. Chandler, J. C. . Clements, F. L., P A 8, Cleveland, J. F. Cline, B. M., A T Q, Conway, K. . Cooolbr, 0. J., K 2’, David, J. Davis, E. H. Deadwyler, C. M. Falk, A. . Fardstein, J. Felker, J. K., P A 0 Golucke, A. G., fi A 6} Atlanta . Guyton . Savannah . Monti cello . Monticello Penfiold Bainbridge . Bainbridge Magnolia . Savannah Scott . Planters . Planters . Buena Vista Wart race, Tcnn. Milledgevillc . Athens Rivcrdale . Paoli . . Orem an Fort Lamar Charleston, S. C. . Athens . . Monroe Crawfordville 4iGordon, H. H., X 0, Guerry, Do P., K A, . Hainbs, A. A. Haines, G. W., X P, . Harbin, J. C. . Hicks, R. P. Hines, R. W. . Hodges, M. P. Hodgson, F. B. Hodgson, J. L., A T Q, Hollingsworth, G. B. Hull, J. L., 2 A E, Jacques, S. R., Jr., 2 A E, Jette, P. E., X0, . . Johnson, Carleton, Johnson, E. . Johnson, J. Jones, S. C., 2 A £, King, P. J., K 2, Koch, J. C., K 2} Lang, J. W. Lovejoy, R., 2 jV, Luciguani, A. . Maddox, C. M. A., 0 J S, Mbldrim, R., X , . Michael, Max Miller, W., K A, . Monk, M. S., K 2, Morton, W. J., K 2f . . Atlanta Macon . Wrightsville . Savannah . . Athens Wrightsvillc . Calhoun Logansville . Athens Athens Whigham Athens . Macon . Savannah . Athens . Baxley . Baxley ' Waynesboro . Summerville . Tallapoosa . Waverly Athens Key West, Fla. Atlanta Savannah Athens Macon Knoxville, Tenn. Gray Deceased.Mosely, D. D.......................................................................Kastanollcc McLaughlin, C. F., I Ar,............................................................Greenville McMillan, I). B., P A 6,.............................................................Savannah Nichol, L., 2’ Ar,.....................................................................Atlanta Oliver, C. R............................................................................Plains Poole, J. If........................................................................Alpharettc Kambo, M., A T Qy.....................................................................Marietta Reid, Carleton,........................................................................Atlanta Reid, W. L...................................................................Crawfordville Richter, M. L P A $,................................................................Madison Roberts, "W. 0......................................................................Yatcsville Sciiirm, R. F., P A 6,...............................................................Savannah Scott, H. F., X P,....................................................................Atlanta Shavt, " V. 3.,K Lafayette Sibley, G. R., K A,....................................................................Augusta Seibels, W. T...........................................................................Gcromc Simpkins, N. H., A' A,................................................................Savannah Sorrells, R. J...........................................................................Boggs Starnes, B. M...........................................................................Athens Steiner, M. C., I N,...................................................................Augusta Strickland, C. G......................................................................Valdosta Swanson, B., A’ P,...................................................................LaGrange Thompson, A. F. .......................................................................Conyers Threlkeld, G. W., A' 2’, Cairo Traynham, T. G., A f,...........................................................Laurens, S. C. Vonderau, E. H..........................................................................Athens Wade, G. II.............................................................................Etowah Wartman, II. A...........................................................................Citra Weatherly, E. B.........................................................................Athens Welsh, G. V., A T £,..................................................................Marietta 43Wilburn, H. H...................................................................Monticello Wilkins, E. L.......................................................................Athens Woods, R. W.........................................................................Athens Woolfolk, T. N., 2 A E,...........................................................Albany Weight, L. M., 2' A E,...............................................................Rome Wynn, J. H.........................................................................Carlton 44History. ABOUT the middle of September, 1900, ninety-three boys, representing many sections of Georgia and neighboring States, came to Athens to attend the University. As .soon as we entered college we organized ourselves into a band to be known among “ the powers of the world ” as the Freshman Class. Having elected officers, we had a meeting and arranged a time for “ painting the town red.” A committee was appointed to secure brushes and paint. A few nights later we went on an expedition and displayed our artistic skill in a royal way. The historic statuary at Lucy Cobb was given a fresh coat, and the time-honored custom of painting the water tower was not neglected. Next morning ’04 greeted the towns-people from nearly every wall and fence and high up on the tank the figures of ’04 gleamed in the early sunlight. We enjoy the distinction of having our figures highest and have the satisfaction of knowing that no others can be put higher. Our Class is such an extraordinary lot of boys that any complete account of their doings would require volumes to tell. Their noble achievements and daring deeds would burden any historian to record and would be too long for practical purposes; hence, it is necessary to omit the minor details and note only the more important matters. At the beginning of our college life, we were charged on all sides with having a verdant appearance. Several upper-classmen assured us that by all means we should keep off the grass, else we would not be conspicuous in the sight of the faculty. The heartless scamps (upper-classmen, of course), tried to convince us that we could have our laundry done at the Chancellor’s better and cheaper than at any other place in town. Soon after our entrance in college we settled down to hard, earnest work and have since been “ good little boys and have learned our lessons well.” Our Class has been closely united from the beginning and whatever honor has been achieved by any one has been distributed among us all as a common possession. We take an interest in our Class affairs second only to our interest in the dear old University at whose fountain of knowledge we arc drinking to-day. We have played two class games, a game of baseball with the Junior Class in which the purple and white came out triumphant. Our second game was also a game of baseball which we played with the Sophomores and, sad to relate, they won. But the victory was theirs mainly through want of training on our part. In athletics,our Class is well abreast of the others. We contribute three men to the 'Varsity football 45team and also gave three to the baseball team, besides several of our number being sub players on both teams. It has been claimed by sage men who have the gift of prophecy that the future of the University depends upon the Class of ’04. The Freshmen have been prominent in every phase of college life. Many have served with credit and distinction in our literary societies. In debate we have often surprised our elders by our logical reasoning and with our persuasive eloquence. We arc represented in the Guitar and Mandolin Club and in the College Orchestra. We all have good voices and love to sing but some of us arc a little hard of hearing and get things badly mixed in chapel sometimes. On April 15th, we had our Gass banquet at the Commercial Hotel. It was a complete success and no one who participated in that royal feast can ever forget the occasion. Numerous toasts were responded to and no words can tell of the eloquence that broke forth that night. If there is any one thing upon which our boys may justly pride themselves it is upon their personal appearance. They have the rosiest, cheeks, the prettiest eyes, and the most charming, curly locks of any boys in college. In fact their curls arc so attractive that several Sophomores double-teamed on one of our boys and tried to clip his locks. They succeeded in getting a curl and it is said that a young lady in town who came in possession of it, 4 has framed it and intends to keep it for its wealth of beauty. To retaliate for the outrage of cutting our fellow Freshman’s hair we armed ourselves with tongs and sheep-shears and proceeded to take the wool off many a Sophomore head. A wool dealer in town got a wagon and followed us, picking up the tufts that fell. It is asserted on good authority that the aforesaid wool dealer has since retired from business and, •• Now he keep a carriage and pair, For rich he became from Sophomore hair." Our college life has been brief,—just one short year, but how full of stirring scenes and memorable incidents! We have enjoyed it beyond expression. We have played with our own Poole, we have sailed by our own Wynn, we have been lighted by our own Jettc; we have dug with our own Maddox, and we have our own Miller to furbish the " staff of life.” We have our own Archer to shoot the faculty, and we have our own Fort (Scott), to dodge behind; but it is our custom always to do Wright. Our boys have the pluck and determination that it takes to win out and we arc resolved to do even better in the future than in the past. We intend to sec that our ability is recognized and that our merit is rewarded. We expect to make “ Ha, Reuben Rah ” rival “ Home Sweet Home ” in popularity and fame. Historian.«7Officers of Law Class, 1901 S. D. Hewlett . . H. J. Qoincey . . H. Hollis...... E. P. Shannon . . A. P. Adams . . . F. P. McCutcheon H. McWhorter . . G. Callaway . . . A. J. McDonald. J. H. Brannen . . Judge Ricketson . ...................President ..............Vice-President ...................Secretary ............Captain Football ............Manager Football . . . . Captain Track Tean . . . . Manager Track Team ............Captain Baseball ............Manager Baseball ...................Historian J. P. and Ex-Officio ChaplainLaw Class Roll, Adams, A. P., X 0, Adams, J. AY. . . Bacon, R. J., Jr. . . . . . . . . . . Baconton Belaval, H. S. . Bennett, R. L. Berry, AV. H., X N, . Booth, R. 11., J T J, . Bowen, C. C. Bradwell, J. X)., J A 6, • Branch, J. A. . . . . Magnolia Brannbn, J. A. Brown, A. C. . Brown, Paul, A T U, . Burtz, A. H. . Calhoun, E. N., XX,. Calkens, J. E. . Callaway, G. L. . Carney, AV. H.. Coleman, G. Y., X . Colvord, J. S. . Cone, Howell Cooley, Pemberton . Cox, A. T., X A E, . . . • • • • , , . . . Atlanta Cross, J. A. DeHart, John Temple Denmark, R. L., X A R, . 49Dickerson, M. D..................................................................nomcrville Dbnsmore, R. E...................................................................Birmingham Dobbs, E. O.......................................................................Woodstock Dokal80N, E. M., K A,............................................................Bainbridgc Dreciisel, K. C. H.......................................................Philadelphia, Pa. Elder, J. C., A' A...................................................................Athens Erwin, J. L2 A E,....................................................................Athens Fortson, B. E2 A E,..............................................................Washington Gay, F. T...........................................................................Augusta Garrett, 0.0......................................................................Roopville Grioos, C. 0.....................................................................La Grange Grubbs, W. E......................................................................Sylvester - Hammond, W. J., K A...........................................................Thomasville Harris, Q. II........................................................................Athens Houser, Emil.........................................................................Athens Herring, Lee Roy.....................................................................Climax Hewlett, S. D., K A,...............................................................Savannah Hollis, Howell..................................................................Buena Vista IIosch, W. n., K A,........................................................., . Gainesville Hunnicut, D. II...........................................................Tullahoma, Tenn. Hunt, J. M............................................•...........................Cedartown Jenkins, J. A.....................................................................Montezuma Lankford, W. C......................................................................Sirmans Lanier, F. T.....................................................................Statesboro Latiiam, E. A...................................................................Fernandina, Fla. Latimer, T. E.....................................................................Woodstock Logan, A. R. ......................................................................Amcricus Mabry, W..........................................................................Brunswick McCuen, D. E.......................................................................Savannah McCurry, J. B., K A,.......................................................-. Hartwell 50McCutcheon, F. K, X I , McDonald, A. J. McKibben, M. V., 2’ Ny McWhorter, II. J., P d 6, Martin, W. J., 2’ Ar, . Moore, C. J., K 2 . Mott, J. P. . Odom, Patrick H., 2' Ar, . Parks, B. G., 21 Ar, Potts, Paul Powell, J. H. Putnam, I. M. XX,. Quincey, II. J. Ricketson, J. E. Roberts, T. W. . Roop, C. E., ATS,. Rucker, L. C., 21 A Et . Russell, L. D. . Sandford, S. S. . Seymour, S. II . Shannon, E. P., 0 d 0., Simms, W. P. . Smith, W. W., £ N, . Terry, Richard Tison, J. L. . Turner, S. M., K A, . Walden, II. S. Whitten, P. E. Whitehead, Frank, II K A Williams, P. A., 2' Ny . Dalton Pendergrass Jackson Lexington Leesburg Cambridge Johnsonvillc Lyons . Gainesville . Atlanta Oamella Arlington Bronson, Fla. . Pearson . Woodstock Roopville . Atlanta . Dunn Tolcn, Florida . Athene Elberton . Atlanta . Augusta . Preston . Savannah . Quitman Spread New York . Warren ton . HaganHistory of Law Class 1901 IF a detailed account of the proceedings of the University of Georgia during the session of 1900-01 should be written, it would be amazing to outsiders to know how many of these various events have been instigated by the Law Class. The enrollment of that class for the present session numbers more than eighty men and we arc recognized by all as the “ legal light ” of the college. I shall not attempt to narrate all, or even half, our victories. Glance over the following questions and be convinced of the many successes we have achieved: What class is the largest at the University? Who arc the leaders of athletics? Who arc the editors of the Red and Blackt Who arc the editors of the Georgiant Who arc the leading counsel for both? Who arc the leaders of the Glee Club? Who arc at the head of the Press Club? Who arc the organizers of the Literary Club? What class has the highest yearly average? Who arc the leaders of every enterprise among the student body which tends to the upbuilding of the University? The answer is, The Lawyers. Thus in the above questions it may be seen that Lawyers arc anszeers, contrary to the general rule that they arc interrogation points. The above facts, pleaded even “ to a certainty of common intent,” arc sufficient to convince the most casual reader of our importance in college circles. Our Class is composed largely of college men, since fully sixty per cent, of our number hail from the various colleges of the land, and bear such insignia as A. B., B. S., etc. Yea our brows have been bathed in the original founts of knowledge in the highest universities of two continents. Go to the granite hill tops of old Vermont, and remember that we arc represented there; descend to the heights of Boston, “ a city set on a hi!!,” a paragon of skill, knowledge, literature, culture, and legal lore, and we arc there; come to the Mother of Presidents, renowned for truth and chivalry from time “ whereof the memory of man runneth not to the contrary,” and we are there; cross over to the “old Palmetto State,” a veritable home of heroes and statesmen whose wise sayings have immortalized her throughout the world, and we arc there; take a steamer to St. Augustine, among the calcareous rocks of Florida,and we arc there. My reader,if not sea-sick, sail to the isles of the sea and we arc there. Last, but not least, return to the “ old red hills of Georgia,” the cradle in which was rocked the infant of liberty, the asylum of the distressed and oppressed, whose head is fanned by the winds of'the great Atlantic and whose feet arc washed by the waves of the same, and we arc here. 52No wonder then our Class has achieved so much. Search creation round and you will not find a better band. We have met upon the arena of Quiz the most abstruse principles of legal science, and at each combat have acquitted ourselves most gloriously. We stand to-day in the very zenith of blessing that a happy prosperous college life can give. To say “ That we are skilled in hardest laws, To tickle men with legal straws.” would put it rather mildly. Let it suffice, brothers-in-law, that no class with such high hopes and flattering prospects has ever left the University; that we are the capstone, aye the crown of the century, of our alma mater's history. Now that our college life is drawing to a close, soon we must say “ Good-bye.” May we, in whatever section our lot is cast, remember that we go to make illustrious old Georgia; may we in every conflict of life bear the “ red and black ” victorious from the field; may we cherish for one another and for our honored faculty the very fondest recollections; may we all hail the occasions in subsequent life that shall bring us together in genial influence and generous joy, where affections arc exercised, friendships are cultivated, the bonds of brotherly love arc strengthened, and there is fostered that homogeneity of thought, feeling, and sentiment upon which patriotism shall build its firmest hold for the perpetuity of our old Institution, and for the peace and prosperity of our peerless Commonwealth. Historian. v ml 53Law Class WE the cadavcric-rigidificd Law Class of 1901 being about to leave this vale of tears, in lull possession of a sound mind, memory and misunderstanding, do make and publish this our last will and testimony, hereby striking and making void all former wills by us at any time heretofore made. And first we do direct that our funeral services shall be conducted by our beloved sistcrs-in-laws the Lucy Cobb Girls, with the stipulation that Professor " Sylvie," John Doe, Richard Roc, and Abraham Baldwin be our pall-bearers, only enjoining that the funeral be carried on with all the dignity and pomp that our situation in the University scale has merited. As to such estate as it has pleased the fates, our own strong arms and craniums to give us, we do dispose of the same as follows, viz: Item i : We give and bequeath to the Asylum authorities (commonly known as the Faculty) restful nights and peaceful dreams. We promise them a rest from Nineteen Hundred and One’s variations, petitions, intoxications, cuttings, clippings, and surplusages. No more will we be called upon to bend the haughty knee to supplicate; no more will they be pained to refuse. It has been hard to have our fondest wishes thwarted; it must have been hard for them to refuse so fair a pleader. They have done their duty and they have their reward. We Will—1901 have acted by compulsion and expect to receive our ' dips.” Nineteen and One has always been modest and retiring, especially from the classroom and at night, and she docs not want to create a commotion or appear at all prominent, except in athletics, tennis, germans, on street corners, at Lucy Cobb and at all charity balls. Item 2: We give, bequeath, and quit-claim to the University as a whole the following songs: “ Come, All Ye Loyal Classmates,” “ America,” “ Dixie,” “ Home, Sweet Home,” and 441 Feel Like I Feel,” on condition that she hold them in trust as a nucleus to which each year shall be added others, until we have a collection to be proud of. May alma mater be the theme of far better songs in the future. Item 3: We give and bequeath to our best beloved and cherished sisters-in-law, the fairy maidens of the L. C. I. all the wealth of love and blessings they may want. May our mantle of love fall completely on their shoulders. We will waste no time in giving to those who seem so very able to get. Item 4: We give to the University Freshman Class the following advice: Copy Nineteen Hundred and One; learn to work if not to win ; development comes sooner through bearing failures than successes. It isn't fun, but still, look at Nineteen Hundred and One and be encouraged. 54Itf.m 5.: The subjoined list will be recognized as entailed estates, to which we do declare the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Two the real and rightful successors: First. The Law Class scats in chapel, the same being as yet unknown to the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Two. May she be as fond of the back row next year as we have been this. Let every member show his gratitude for the gift by being promptly in his seat each morning, especially when Professor “ Sylvie ” is present. Second. As to wealth, our Class is in a most flourishing condition; we have succeeded in getting credit and many goods from almost every merchant in the “ Classffc City.” We are now the happy possessors of many clothes and other smaller things in profusion, which safd merchants should have kept upon their shelves. We have nothing out, except debts, bills, notes, and promises to pay, and these our successors may collect in and fulfill as they sec fit. it being a matter left wholly to their discretion. The work the worry and the glory arc now in other lawyers’ hands. Perhaps the most valuable of all this list will be found to be the Law Class Politics. Nineteen Hundred and One has enjoyed the excitement of many stirring elections and has been chagrined with much joy, at least twice, when they were compelled to proceed to lay one pugilistic Roberts and Alfonzo Jenkins upon the table, on account of general debility to capacitate in their respective capacities. How the list lengthens; next come the Law Class 5 privileges—with the Dean’s permission—too well understood to be detailed. Law Class dignity is always handed over to the new-made lords of the University world. We are afraid that this will be a strain upon the nerves and muscles of the gay and debonair Nineteen Hundred and Two lawyers, but all hope they will rise to the occasion, as they not always sometimes can. Last comes the one thing hard for us to part with. To our successors we must give our course in Moot Parliament, Medical Jurisprudence, and Roman Law—and let me say that these arc studies where you learn that lots of things that you once knew arc not so. Our upward extremities arc packed with knowledge upon these all-important topics, and we could relate many interesting facts about “ Cadaveric-rigidity,” “ Corpus Juris Civilcs.” and the “ Previous Question,” but we desist, as we fear that the consensus of desire, would be to “ cut ” hearing it. We will leave it a scaled book until next year. If Nineteen Hundred and Two gains half the profit and the inspirations we have found in the upper middle chamber, and sanctum sanctorum of the Ivy Building with the Dean, this will be their most precious possession, as it has been ours, as it is the one we are most loath to leave. Besides these enforced gifts we leave, not of necessity but of our own free will, our blessing and a pledge of friendship from henceforth. All the rest and residue of our property, whatsoever and wheresoever, of what nature, kind and quality soever it may be, and not herein disposed of 5(after paying our way back to the mountains, and funeral expenses), we give and bequeath to our beloved Dean, for his use and benefit absolutely, and when he is no longer “ a sweater under the collar,” “ a plain old tin pan,” “ pusher along,” to the generations who shall come along in his line, born and to be born. If he see fit, he may use the knowledge and startling information and experiences we have given him at whatsoever times we may have had quizzes and written examinations, in the education of the younger goslings who are sure to try to fol- low us. This latter matter is however entirely at his discretion. And we do hereby constitute and appoint the said Dean sole executor of this, our last will and testament. In Witness Whereof, We the Class of Nineteen Hundred and One, the testators, have to this our will, written on a sheet of parchment, set our hand and seal, this the twenty-third day of April, Anno Domini, One Thousand Nine Hundred and One. Law Class of iqoi. Per B. G. P. 56s:Fraternity Life at the University of Georgia. THE student at the University of Georgia changes his idea of its fraternity life many times. At first he thinks it is one bewildering succession of rushes and dinners and drives, and he feels he is a very important person, lie thinks these new-founil friends of his arc the kindest men, and have the truest appreciation of merit, his merit, of any he has ever met. lie is only sorry that he can not join all the fraternities. Hut when he has made his choice and the bellicose goat gets in his work, the Freshman is apt to feel that fraternity life is a delusion and a snare. Hut as the months pass by he learns to love it more and more. Fraternity life at Georgia has a tone and atmosphere all its own. Eight different fraternities have chapters here and the mystic little emblems arc worn by one hundred and fifty men. Of course rivalry is very keen, but after all it is good-natured. I'he personal relations between the members of the different chapters and that between the fraternity and non-fraternilv elements are of the most pleasant kind. Several of the chapters arc domiciled in fraternity-houses. These are mainly built in the colonial style and are surrounded by spacious and well-kept grounds. In the houses are elegantly furnished parlors and plainer yet comfortable smoking, and reading, and sleeping rooms. A feature of these last, is the number of bizarre decorations, each with its talc of some wild prank, which adorn their walls. The fraternities not occupying chapterhouses, have well-appointed meeting halls. Each one of Athens's charming girls,—and they are many—claims allegiance to some one of the fraternities and wears its pin. Their interest and their loyally add zest and piquancy to the sum-total of fraternity life, and their " sisterly ” offerings of sofa-pillows and banners, freezers of cream and waiters of cake are material benefits by no means to he despised. Each fraternity gives an annual banquet and entertains occasionally luring the year with ger-inans or other social functions, (hiring the commencement season, the social gaiety centers in the chapter-houses and a pretty custom of having a commencement picture of each fraternity and its girls has been in vogue for many years. When the old graduate looks back through the haze of memory and draws a picture of the old chapter-house with its pillared front and wide verandas on which a gay. careless, crowd laughs and jokes and sings, and when he calls to mind the dear old days when life was young and hearts were warm and cares were few, he is sure to say with all of us who have been fortunate enough to have taken part in it. that fraternity life at old Georgia is the most pleasant phase of a man's college career.SI 59Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foandod at the Ualrentlty ot Alabama, 1850. Georgia Beta Chapter Established, 1800. Colors. Royal Purple and Old Gold. Fratres in Urbe. E. Bancroft v G. V. Brunson J. W. Brunson Z. L. Cobb H. C. Erwin John Gkrdine LeRoy Hart James Hodgson Robert Hodgson A. L. Hull A. F. Latimer E. B. Mbll J. C. Mbll J. D. Mbll T. S. Mbll A. L. Mitchell C. H. Piiinizy W. W. Thomas A. H. Patterson Albert Troup Cox C. A. Scudder Fratres in Facilitate. John D. Mell Law Claw. Blanton Erwin Fortson H. Stovall E. C. Upson G. E. Thomas H. N. Starnes Lamar Cobb Rucker Remer Lane Denmark John Lamar Erwin Qa» of J90J. Herbert Johnson McBride Warren Clarence Lott John D. N. McCartney William Mazyck Davis 6idais of 1902. Edward Young Hill Wilson Moore Hardy Sidney Smith Dean Frank Harvey Barrett Joseph Francis Gatens, Jr. Walter Marion Jackson, Jr. Augustus Longstrket Hull, Jr. dm of J903. Julian Fitzsimmons Baxter Minor Sadler Boyd William Henry Jones Marion Hoke Smith Cam Dawson Dorsey Thomas Wylie Baxter, Jr. B. Sanders Walker, Jr. dots of 1904. Sidney Carswell Jones Joseph Hull Louis M. Wright Samuel Randolph Jaques, Jr. Thomas N. Wooleolk, Jr. 62Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity Directory, Province Alpha. Boston University (Massachusetts Beta Upsilon), Boston, Harvard University (Massachusetts Gamma), Cambridge, Matt. Matt. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MattachutetU Iota Worcester Polytechnic Institute (MatsachutelU Delta), Wor-Tau), Boston, Mass. caster, Mass. Trinity College (Connecticut Alpha), Hartford, Conn. University of Maine (Maine Alpha), Orono, Me. Province Beta, Cornell University (New York Alpha), Ithaca, N. Y. Dickinson College (Pennsylvania Sigma Phi), Carlisle, Pa. Columbia University (New York Mu), Brooklyn, N. Y. Pennsylvania State College (Pennsylvania Alpha Zeta), 8tate St. Stephen’s College (New York Sigma Phi), Annandale-on- College, Pa. Hudson, N. Y. Bucknell University (Pennsylvania Zeta), Lewisburg, Pa. Allegheny Collegi(Pennsylvania Omega), Meadville, Pa. Gettysburg College (Pennsylvania Della), Gettysburg, Pa. University of Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania Theta), Philadelphia, Pa. Province Gamma, University of Virginia (Virginia Omicron), Charlottesville, Va. Washington and Lee University (Virginia Sigma), Lexington, Va. University of North Carolina (North Carolina Xi), Chapel Hill, N. C. Davidson College (North Carolina Theta), Davidson, N. C. Wofford College (South Carolina Gamma), Spartanburg, S. C. Ukitkiuhtt of Georgia (Georgia Beta), Athens, Ga. Mercer University (Georgia Psi), Macon, Ga. Emory College (Georgia Epsilon), Oxford, Ga. Georgia School of Technology (Georgia Phi), Atlanta, Ga. Province Delta. University of Michigan (Michigan Iota-Beta), Ann Arbor, University of Cincinnati (Ohio Epsilon), Cincinnati, Ohio. Mich. Ohio Stato University (Ohio Theta), Columbus Ohio. Adrian College (Michigan Alpha), Adrian Mich. Franklin College (Indiana Alpha), Franklin, Ind. Mount Union College (Ohio Sigma), Alliance, Ohio. Purdue University (Indiana Beta), West Lafayette, Ind. Ohio Wesleyan University (Ohio Delta), Delaware, Ohio. Northwestern University (Illinois Psi Omega), Evanston, III. University of Illinois (Illinois Beta), Urbana, 111.Province Epsilon. Central University (Kentucky Kappa), Richmond, Ky. Bethel College (Kentucky IoU), Russellville, Ky. Kentucky Sute College (Kentucky Epeilon), Lexington, Ky. Southwestern Preshyterian University (Tennessee Zeta), Clarksville, Tenn. Cumberland University (Tennessee Lambda), Lebanon, Tenn. Vanderbilt University (Tennessee Nu), Nashville, Tenn. University of Tennessee (Tennessee Kappa), Knoxville, Tenn. University of the South (Tennessee Omega), Sewanee, Tenn. Southwestern Baptist University (Tennessee Eta), Jackson, Tenn. University of Alabama (Alabama Mu), University, Ala. Southern University (Alabama IoU), Greensboro, Ala. Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College (Alabama Alpha-Mu), Auburn, Ala. Province Zeta. University of Missouri (Missouri Alpha), Columbia, Mo. University of Arkansas (Arkansas Alpba-Upeilon), Fayette- Washington University (Missouri BeU), 8t. Louis, Mo. ville, Ark. University of Nebraska (Nebraska Lambda-Pi), Lincoln, Neb. Province Eta. University of Colorado (Colorado Chi), Boulder, Col. Leiand SUnford, Jr., University (California Alpha), Palo Denver University (Colorado Zeta), Denver, Col. Alto, Cal. University of California (California BeU), Berkeley, Cal. Province Theta. Louisiana Sute University (Louisiana Epsilon), Baton University of Mississippi (Mississippi Gamma), Univer-Rouge, La. aity. Miss. Tulano University (Louisiana Tau-Upsllon), New Orleans, La. University of Texas (Texas Rho), Austin, Texas. Alumni Associations. Boston, Mass. AtlanU, Ga. Alliance, Ohio CbatUnooga, Tenn. Knoxville, Tenn. New Orleans, La. St. Louis, Mo. New York City ■Worcester, Mass. AugusU, Ga. Cincinnati, Ohio Jackson, Miss. Detroit, Mich. Washington, D. C. Birmingham, Ala. Wilmington, N. C. PltUhurg, Pa. Denver, Col. Savannah, Ga. Chicago, 111. Kansas City, Mo. Cleveland,Ohio 64tChi Phi Fraternity. Founded at Princeton Unlrorsltjr. 1»«1. Eta Chapter Established, i»67. Billups Phinizy J. H. Rucker F. B. Stanley Fratres in Urbe, F. A. Lipscomb C. B. Griffith George T. Hodgson M. A. Nicholson Yancey Harris Walter B. Hill Fratres in Facultate. D. C. Barrow, Jr. H. C. White, A ’66 CL of 190J. Alexander Pratt Adams, Law John Banks, A. B. Frank Kelley McCutchrn, Law Cta of J902. Sterling Hamilton Blackshear Mitchell King Marion Simms Richardson James Force Hart CL of J903. Eugene Herbert Clay Andrew Calhoun Frank Marion Farley Hugh McDaniel Scott Alfred Austell Thornton Benjamin Henry Barrow Frank Morris Ridley John Durham Wing CL of 1904. Benjamin Graves Swanson Hugh Haralson Gordon, Jr. Gordon Wayne Haynes Henry Fort Scott Ralph Meldrim Paul E. Jette 67Chi Phi Fraternity. Roll of Active Chapters. Alpha, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Beta, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. Gamma, Emory College, Oxford, Ga. Delta, Rutgers College, Now Brunswick, N. J. Epsilon, Hampden-Sidncy College, Hampden-Sidney, Va. Zeta, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa. ETA, University ok Gkoroia, Athens, Ga. Theta, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N. Y. Iota, Ohio State College, Columbus, Ohio. ' Lambda, University of California, Berkeley, Cal. Mu, Stephens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, N. J. Nu, University of Texas, Austin, Tex. Xi, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Omicron, Sheffield Scientific School, Yale College, New Haven, Conn. Rho, Lafayette College, Easton, Pa. Sigma, Wofford College, Spartanburg, S. C. Phi, Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. Psi, Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. 68I 00 $0UTHC nHultcy 8«mow McCu'iy C»'«o » K«l'y Si pAin few. d. JohA»on. C- HotcK St'lck.'»«0 H» rmo«4 An4»nor G'i-m Sibl«y. G- Hill, E. C. Job i»o« HtwMU Kr nton Ho Jj on. W Mill ) OontHon St«ph r l 8«-.«%ixt 80 tr. J. Tv n«iKappa Alpha Fraternity Gamma Chnptor. Eatabllsliod, 1808. Fratres in Urbe. Dr. J. C. Bloomfield E. J. Bondurant Judge A. J. Cobb Charles W. DuBose Marion D. DuBose E. Robert Toombs DuBose Thomas F. Green Benjamin F. Hardeman Charles N. Hodgson Edward R. Hodgson, Jr. Smith Harry Hodgson, E. R. Kinnbbrew J. D. Moss John W. Morton Frederick S. Morton John W. ' Joseph W. Morton J. Audley Morton A. R. Nicholson R. S. Rawland W. M. Rawland Fratres in Facilitate. Professor SyIvanus Morris Dr. S. C. Benedict Dr. C. H. Hrrty Professor C. M. Strahan Law Class. Erle Meldrim Donation William Hosch Juuan Berry McCurry Samuel Dunbar Hewlett Walter Jones Hammond Simon Morton Turner John Clifton Elder Qa» J902. Ralph A. Graves Clifford Sneed Johnson Robert Grier Stephens Class 1903. Thomas Augustine Barrow Revaud G. Benedict Edward Chatfikld Hill Walter Blenshall Hodgson Luther Jordon Hulsey Edward R. Jkrger Middleton Samuel Johnson Campbell M. Krenson Elmo Clyde Kelly Joel Sinclair McMullan Edward Strickland Class 1904. Walter Lester Anderson Donald Rowland Bower Jackson Dickinson Bower Neyle Habersham Simpkins Gordon Cubbege Carson DuPont Guerry, Jr. Wallace Miller George Royal Siblby 7 Kappa Alpha Fraternity, Roll of Active Chapters. Alpha, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va. GAMMA, University of Gkoroia, Athens, Ga. Delta, Wofford College, Spartanburg, S. C. Epsilon, Emory College, Oxford, Ga. Zcta, Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Va. Eta, Richmond Collego, Richmond, Va. Theta, Kentucky Stato College, Lexington, Ky. Kappa, Mercer Univeraity, Macon, Ga. Lambda, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Nu, Agricultural and Mechanical College, Auburn, Ala. Xi, Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas. Omicron, University of Texas, Austin, Texas. Pi, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tcnn. Sigma, Davidson College, Mecklenburg Co., N. C. Upsiton, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. Phi, Southern University, Greensboro, Ala. Chi, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. P»i, Tulane University, New Orleans, La. Omega, Centre College, Danville, Ky. Alpha-Alpha, University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. Alpha-Beta, University of Alabama, University, Ala. Alpha-Gamma, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La. Alpha-Delta, William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. Alpha-Epsilon, Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarksville, Tenn. Alpha-ZeU, William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Va. Alpha-Eta, Westminster College, Fulton, Mo. Alpha-Theta, Kentucky University, Lexington, Ky. Alpha-Iota, Centenary College, Jackson, La. Alpha-Kappa, Missouri State University, Columbia, Mo. Alpha-Lambda, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. Alpha-Mu, Millsaps College, Jackson, Mias. Atpha-Nu, Columbian University, Washington, D. C. Alpha-Xi, University of California, Berkeley, Cal. Alpha-Omicron, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. Alpha-Pi, Inland Stanford, Jr., University, Stanford, California. Alpha-Rho, University of West Virginia, Morgantown, AV. Va. Alpha-Sigma, Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. Alpha-Tau, ilampden-Sidney College, Hampden-Sidney, Va. Alpha-Upsilon, University of Mississippi, University, Miss. The Order of Kappa Alpha Fraternity was founded at Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va., in I860. 727 3Phi Delta Theta Fraternity OrffAQlzod At Mlnral University, 1819. Georgia Alpha Cbaptor, 1871. E. K. Lumpkin S. J. Tribble J. W. Camak Fred J. Orr E. H. Dorsky Fratres in Urbe. C. G. Ciiandlkr J. B. S. Cobb E. I. Smith T. W. Reed D. D. Quillian J. J. Strickland E. B. Cohen J. T. Davis Frater in Facilitate. % U. H. Davenport Law CUa. J. D. Bradwell E. P. Shannon H. McWhorter, Jr. CUa of 1901. Cliff Green CUa of 1902. H. J. Lamar, Jr. CUa of 1903. G. W. Legwen C. D. Russell 0. B. Stevens, Jr. C. H. Whitfield R. B. Rounsaville J. R. Rounsavillk CUa of 1904. C. M. A. Maddox R. F. Schirm M. L. Richter J. K. Falker A. V. Goluckk D. B. MacMillan Felton Clements 75Phi Delta Theta Fraternity Roll of Active Chapters. Alpha Province. Maine Alpha, Colby College, Watervillc, .Me. New llamjahire Alpha, Darmoutb College, Hanover, N. II. Vermont Alpha, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt. Massachusetts Alpha, 'Williams College, Williamstown, Mas . Massachusetts Beta, Amherst Collogo, Amherst, Mass. Rhode Island Alpha, Brown University, Providence, It. I. New York Alpha, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Now York Beta, Union University, Schenectady, N. Y. New York Delta, Columbia University, New York, N. Y. New York Epsilon, Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. Pennsylvania Alpha, Lafayette College, Ea6ton, Pa. Pennsylvania Beta, Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg, Pa. Pennsylvania Gamma, Washington and Jefferson College, Washington, Pa. Pennsylvania Delta, Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa. Pennsylvania Epsilon, Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa. Pennsylvania Zeta, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. Pennsylvania Eta, Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. Beta Province. Virginia Beta, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Virginia Gamma, Itnndolph-Macon Collego, Ashland, Va. Virginia Zeta, Washington and Leo Univ., Lexington, Va. North Carolina Beta, Univnrsity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. Kentucky Alpha, Centro College, Danville, Ky. Kentucky Delta, Central University, Richmond, Ky. Tennessee Alpha, Vanderbilt University, Nashvillo, Tcnn. Tennessee Beta, University of the South, Scwanec, Tenn. Gamma Province. GEORGIA ALPHA, University or Gzoroia, Athens, Georgia Gamma, Mercer University, Macon, Ga. Ga. Alabama Alpha, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Georgia Beta, Emory College, Oxford, Ga. Alabama Beta, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, Ala. Delta Province. Ohio Alpha, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. Ohio ZetA, Ohio State Univorsity, Columbus, 0. Ohio Beta, Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, O. Ohio Eta, Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland, O. Ohio Gamma, Ohio University, Athens, 0. Ohio Theta, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, 0. Michigan Alpha, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich 76Epsilon Province Indiana Alpha, Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. Indiana Beta,Wabash College, Crnwfordsvillo, Ind. Indiana Gamma, Butler College, University of Indianapolis, Irvington, Ind. Illinois Alpha, Northwestern University, Evanston, 111. Illinois Beta, University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. Illinois Delta, Knox College, Galesburg, III. Illinois Zcta, Lombard University, Galesburg, III. Illinois Eta, University of Illinois, Champaign, 111. Wisconsin Alpha, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. Minnesota Alpha, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. Indiana Delta, Franklin College, Franklin, Ind. Indiana Epsilon, Hanover College, Hanover, Ind. Indiana Zota, DePauvr University, Grcencastlc, Ind. Indiana Theta, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. Iowa Alpha, Iowa Wesleyan University, Mount Pleasant, Iowa. Iowa Beta, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. Missouri Alpha, University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. Missouri Beta, Westminster College, Fulton, Mo. Missouri Gamma, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. Kansas Alpha, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. Nebraska Alpha, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. Zcta Proyincc. v Theta Province. Mississippi Alpha, University of Mississippi, University, Texas Beta, University of Texas, AusUn, Texas. Texas Gamma, Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas. Louisiana Alpha, Tulane University of Louisiana, Now Orleans, La. Eta Province. Boston, Mass. Providence, R. I. New York, N. Y. Baltimore, Md. Pittsburg, Pa. Philadelphia, Ta. Washington, D. C. Richmond, Va. Louisville, Ky. California Beta, Lcland Stanford, Jr., University, Stanford University, Cal. California Alpha, University of California, Berkeley, Cal. Washington Alpha, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. Alumni Clubs. Annual Alumni Day, March 16tu. Nashville, Tenn. Columbus, Ga. Atlanta, Ga. Macon, Ga. Montgomery, Ala. Selma, Ala. Birmingham, Ala. Mobile, Ala. New Orleans, La. Cincinnati, Ohio. Akron, Ohio. Cleveland, Ohio-Columbus, Ohio. Athens, Ohio. Detroit, Mich. Franklin, Ind. Indianapolis, Ind. Chicago, 111. Galesburg, III. LaCrosse, Wls. Milwaukee, Wis. Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn. Kansas City, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. Denver, Col. Austin, Texas. Salt LakeCity, Utah. San Francisco, Cal. Los Angolcs, Cal. Spokane, Wash. 77JL SoAlpha Tau Omega Fraternity. Foandod at tho Virginia Military Jnatltuto. 1865. Georgia Alpha llota, Foanded 1878. Fratres in Urbe. H. H. Carlton J. C. Cobb James Barrow C. W. Brumby G. C. Bond Graves Stephenson i • E. C. Branson Fratres in Facilitate. James M. Stephenson J. B. Lawrence Law Qisi 1901. C. E. Roop Paul Brown Class 1902. James K. Jordan N. H. Bullard Clan 1903. J. H. McCalla l. L. Griner Class 1904. M. C. Carter 8i B. M. Cline Joseph L. Hodgson Marcellas Ram bo G. V. WelshAlpha Tau Omega Fraternity, Roll of Active Chapters. Province I, Alabama Alpha Epsilon, Agricultural and Mechanical College, Auburn. Alabama Bet Beta, Southern University, Greensboro. Alabama Beta Dolt , University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. Georgia Alpha Theta, Emory College, Oxford. GEORGIA ALPHA BETA, University or Georoia, Athens. Georgia Alpha Zeta, Mercer University, Macon. Georgia Beta Iota, School of Technology, Atlanta. South Carolina, Beta XS, College of Charleston. Province IL Illinois Gamma Zeta, University of Illinois, Champaign. Indiana Gamma Gamma, Polytechnic Institute. Michigan Alpha Mu, Adrian College, Adrian. Michigan Beta Kappa, Hillsdale College, Hillsdale. Michigan Beta Omicron, Albion College, Albion. Nebraska Gamma Theta, University of Nebraska. Province IIL ' North Carolina Alpha Delta, University of North Carolina, Pennsylvania Alpha Upsilon, Pennsylvania College, Getty6-Chapel Hill. burg. North Carolina Xi, Trinity College, Durham. Pennsylvania Tau, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Pennsylvania Alpha Iota, Mublcnburg College, Allentown. Virginia Delta, University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Pennsylvania Alpha Pi, Washington and Jefferson College. Province IV. Ohio Alpha Nu, Mount Union College, Alliance. Ohio Alpha Psi, Wittcnburg College, Springfield. Ohio Beta Eta, Wesleyan Univorsily, Delaware. Ohio Bet Mu, "Wooster University, Wooster. Ohio Beta Omega, State University, Columbus. Ohio Gamma Kappa, Wesleyan Reserve University, Cleveland. Tennessee Alpha Tau, Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarksville. Tennessee Bela Pi, Vanderbilt University, Nashville. Tennessee Bet Tau, Southwestern Baptist University, Jackson. Tennessee Lambda, Cumberland College, Lebanon. Tennessee Omega, University of the South, Sewanee. Tennessee Pi, University of Tennossee, Knoxville. 82Province V. Maine Hoi Upjilon, University of Mai no, Orono. Now York Alpha Lambda, Columbia University, New York. Maino Gamma Alpha, Colby College, Water rill . New York BeU TheU, Cornell Ualveraity, Ithaca. Massachusetts Gamma Beta, Tuft’s College. Rhode Island Gamma Delta, Brown University, Providence. New York Alpha Oinicron, St. Lawrence University, Canton. Vermont Beta Zeta, University of Vermont, Burlington. Province VI. Louisiana Beta Epsilon, Tulane University, New Orleans. Texas Gamma Eta, University of Texas, Austin. Gty and State Alumni Associations Augusta, Gn., Alumni Association. Allentown Alumni Association, Allentown, Pa. Boston Alumni Association. Birmingham Alumni Association. Chicago Alumni Association. Cleveland Alumni Association. Dayton Alumni Association, Dayton, O. District of Columbia Alumni Association, Washington, D. C. Dallas Alumni A-socialion. Georgia Alumni Association, Atlanta, Ga. Louisville Alumni Association, Louisville, Ky. New York Alumni Association, New York City. Tennessee Alumni Association, Nashville. Texas Alumni Association, Dallas, Texas. 83k 8$Sigma Nu Fraternity. Foundod Rt Virginia Military Instltoto, 1H00. Nu Chapter Fstabllahcd, 18H4. Fratres in Urfee. F. C. Shackelford A. C. Fears T. J. Shackelford Fratres in Facilitate. C. M. Selling Clem Akerman G. H. Williamson Law Class. W. H. Berry Ben G. Park P. H. Odom William M. Smith P. A. Williams M. V. McKibbkn E. Noble Calhoun Class 1903. C.W. Bond Archie Worsham John Monahan Dan H. Dupree Class 1904. M. C. Steiner C. F. McLaughlin J. B. Anderson Paul Lovejoy Mark Tolbert Jack Tolbert 87Sigma Nu Chapter List. First Division. Beta, 1870, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Vu. Lambda, 1882, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Epsilon, 1883, Bethany College, Bethany, W. Va. Va. l'si, 1888, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. Bota Tau, 1893, North Carolina A. and M., Raleigh, N. C. Second Division. Theta, 1874, University of Alabama, Ala. Beta Phi, 1888, Tulanc University, New Orleans, La. Phi, 1887, l-ouisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La. Bela Theta, 1890, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn Ala. Iota, Howard College, Hast Lake, Ala. Upsilon, 18SC, University of Texas, Austin. Third Division. Zota, 1883, Central University, Richmond, Ky. Omicron, 1884, Bethel College, Russellville, £y. Sigma, 1886, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. Fourth Division. Rho. 1886, Missouri State University, Columbia, Mo. Beta Lambda, Central College, Fayette, Mo. Beta Mu, 1893, State University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. Bela Xi, 1894, William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. Nu, 1884, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan. Fifth Division. Pi, 1884, Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. Beta Rho, ( Sub rosa ) Sixth Division. Eta, Mercer University, Macon, Ga. Mu, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. Kappa, North Georgia College, Dabloncga, Ga. Xi, Emory College, Oxford, Ga. Gamma Alpha, Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. 88Seventh Division. Beta Beta, De Pauw University, Grecncastlc, Ind. Beta Iota, Mount Union College, Alliance, O. Beta Zeta, Purdue University, LaPayette, Ind. Beta Nu, University of Ohio, Columbus, O. Beta Upsilon, Bose Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute, Ind. Pella Theta, Lombard University, Galesburg, 111. Beta Eta, University of Indiana, Bloomington, Ind. Beta Pi, University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. Gamma Gamma, Albion College, Albion, Mich. Eighth Division. Beta Chi, Lcland Stanford University, Stanford, Cal. Beta Psi, University of California, Berkeley, Cal. Gamma Chi, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. Alumni Organizations. Texas Alunini Association Louisiana Alumni Association Missouri Alumni Association Soventh Division Association AlaDlima Alumni Association Iowa Alumni Association Sixth Division Association Pittsburg Alumni Association Philadelphia Alumni Association New York Alumni Association Atlanta Alumni Chapter Kansas City Aluinni Chapter Birmingham Alumni Chapter 89 31Chi Psi Fraternity. Koundod nt Union Collogo, 1811. Alpha I)olta, Established 181)0. Frater in Urbc. W. B. Burnett Law CL Si. G. Y. Coleman Class 1901. w. D. Hoyt H. C. Johnson Class 1902. J. P. Lewis M. W. Lewis N. P. Park Class 1903. C. C. Bunn W. F. Newton Class 1904. T. G. Traynuam H. G. Wells W. N. Sheats . S. Johnson, Jr. 93Chi Psi Fraternity, Roll of Active Chapters. Pi, Union College, Schenectady, New York. Theta, William College, Williamitown, Massachusetts. Mu, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont. Alpha, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut. Phi, Hamilton College, Clinton, New York. Kpsilon, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Chi, Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts. P i, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. Tau, Wofford College, Spartanburg, South Carolina. Nu, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ' Iota, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. Rho, Rutgers College, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Xi, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey. Alpha Delta, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. Beta Delu, Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Gamma Delta, Stanford University, Stanford, California. Delta DelU, University of California, Berkeley, California. Epsilon Delta, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. 9495CoogKt SW 96 Moo » ThroAtld Ko OkUiwon Pvtn»m Mo-i • • •« MotionKappa Sigma Fraternity, Founded at University of Virginia, 18«7, Dota lambda Chapter Established, 1001. Israel Mercer Putnam Law Class. Charles Johns Moore % Class 1903. John Earle Overby McCalla Marion McDowell Dickinson George Washington Threlkeld Class 1904. John Christian Koch Oscar Johnson Coogler Marion Stinson Monk Walter Barnett Shaw Paul Jones King William Jewett Morton Linton Stephens Archer 97Kappa Sigma Fraternity Roll of Active Chapters. District I. Psi, University of Maine, Orono, Me. Bota-AIpba, Brown University, Providence, R. 1. Alpha-ltho, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. Alpha-Kappa, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Alpha-Lambda, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt. Betn-Kappa, New Hampshire Collego, Durham, N. II. District II. Pi, Swarthmorc College, Swartlimoro, Pa. Beta-Delta, Washington and Jefferson College, Washing- Alpha-Delta, Pennsylvania St»to College, State College, Pa. ton, Pa. Alpha-Epsilon, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. Beta-Iota, Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. Alpha-Phi, Uucknell University, Lewisburg, Ta. Alpha-Alpha, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. Alpha-Eta, Columbian University, Washington, D. C. District III. Beta-Beta, Richmond College, Richmond, Va. Delta, Davidson College, Davidson, N. C.% Eta-Prime, Trinity College, Durham, N. C. Alpha-Mu, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. District IV. Alpba-Nu, Wofford College, Spartanburg, S. C. Beta-Lnmbdn, University or Georgia, Athens, Ga. Alpha-Beta, Mercer University, Macon, Ga. Beta, University of Alabama, University, Ala. Alpha-Tau, Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. Beta-Eta, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, Ala. District V. Theta, Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn. Omega, University of tho South, Sevranee, Tcnn. Kappa, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tcnn. Alpha-Theta, Southwestern Baptist University, Jackson, Lambda, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. Tenn. Phi, Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarksville, Tenn. Alpha-Xi, Bethel College, Russellville, Ky. Bct -Nu, Kentucky State College, Lexington, Ky. 98 Zeta, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Eta, Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Va. Nu, William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Va. Upsilon, Hampden-Sidney College, Ilampden-Sidncy, Va.District VL Alpha-Upsilon, Millsaps College, Jackson, Miss. Gamma, Louisiana State University, Baton. Rouge, La. Epailon, Centenary Collego, Jackson, La. Sigma, Tulane University, New Orleans, Lsl lot , Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas. Tau, University of Texas, Austin, Texas. District VIL Xi, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. Beta-Gamma, Missouri State University, Columbia, Mo. Alpha-Omega, William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. Alpha-Pai, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. District VUL Alpha-Sigma, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Chi, Purduo University, Lafayette, Ind. Alpha-Pi, Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind. Beta-Theta, University of Indiana, Bloomington, Ind. Alpha-Gamma, University of Illinois, Champaign, 111. Alpha-Chi, Lako Forest University, Lake Forest, 111. Beta-Kpeilon, University of Wisconsin, Madison, "Wis. Bctn-Mu, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. v District IX. Beta-Zcta, Lcland Stanford, Jr., University, Stanford University, Cal. Alumni Associations. Philadelphia, Pa. Yazoo City, Miss. Pittsburg, Pa. New York City Now Orleans, La. Chicago, III. Indianapolis, Ind. Richmond, Va. Buffalo, N. Y. St. Louis, Mo. Pine Bluff, Ark. Boston, Mas . Ruston, La. Nashville, Tcnn. Chihuahua, Mexico Memphis, Tenn. Louisville, Ky. Atlanta, Ga. 99Quoth the DeviL More potent then the angels, I wield the will of men, Though cursed by ben of God end men : wherever, how, end when I will man'» will to do my will, he yield end yield egein. Rocked in the cradle of en infant race, Twin-born with men and mind, I more then with the world keep pace And by exalted mean or bate A thousand thousand touls in cringing servitude I bind. A thouiend time on reeking tod Or heaven-lifted tower I ’vo mote the ho«ts of men and God, I ’ve mote and seen their power Dissolve—the power that once the magic poll Breathed in p alm-tuned ec tacy that threatened regal hell. In quiet dale, In whirling gale, In court, on field, or tea, Man’ every deed, like bending reed, Doth terve and honor me. A long as man shall breatho and act, A long at time shall last, Till earth's foundation stone it cracked, Time swallowed in the past, So long with scepter more than gold, From my all-ruling throne, Shall I men’s deeds design and mould And claim them for mine own. IOO —C. D. R.Tuud r June I ilh, 10:30 p. m. Committee. G. W. Legwbn, Chairman; Andrew Calhoun, D. H. Dupree, Andrew Lyndon.Pan-Hellenic German. Committee. jum I 3th, 1901. E. P. Shannon, 0 A 8 B. E. Fortson, 2’ A F. F. K. McCutciibn, X J E. M. Donalson, K A L. L. Griner, A T Q D. II. Dupree, 2’ N II. G. Wells, X WCommittee. FrM»y, June Mth, 10.30 p. m. H. J. Lamar, Chairman Sterling Blackshear S. S. Dean, ' Mitchell King Noel ParkCotillion Monday, June 17th. 10:30 p. m. Committee. S. D. Hewlett, A. Pratt Adams, Chairman ; J. F. Gatins.Lawyers' Hop. Tu«»A»y1 Junt 18th, 1901. 10:30 p. m. Committee. Hamilton McWhorter, Chairman ; A. Pratt Adams, P. A. Williams, E. M. Donalson. 106W«Jiw Ur. June 19 th, »90», J0.30 p. m. Committee. John Banks, Chairman R. M. Goss H. J. McBride 107 H. C. JohnsonCalendar. September. College opens. Sam Johnson returns; general rejoicing. A new "lion ” among the ladies makes his appearance in our menagerie; i. o., Simeon Morton Turner, l'oolc joins Zeta Chi. A letter of advice and warning to new Owls and Serpents is received from Beckett. Noble Calhoun drifts in and begins to tell us about his grandfather. 2C. Barch dismisses his nurse. October. 1. The Athens Carnival. 2. Clinton elopes with Bosco. 3. Dean buys season ticket to the Oriental Theater. 14. 4. Gordon gets in trouble. War between Athens Guards and students. Booth springs into prominence with a long talk. 20. 9. Mr. Blackwell (to Professor Davvy): "Will you please repeat that question ? I was trying to figure November. 2. Will Shenta gives bis famous definition: " A ghost is a 10. mental hallucination on the cortex of the cerebellum.” 6. Dr. Benedict (in Medical Jurisprudence): " I can givo a better idea of a mentally unsound person by talking than by referring to the text-book.” 13. 7. Professor Park appears at Chapel with his hair combed. 15. December. 3. Freshmen start the beautiful custom of yelling in Chapel. 1C. 4. Bob Bounsaville forgets to be pleasant. 10. Red and Black appear without a reference to Dinky Dallas. Dallas sues for damages. 12. Profe sor Bocock attends Chapel. 19. 14. The Chancellor meets bis ethics class for the second time. out which could drink the more water, a hippopotamus or a rhinoceros, and did not hoar you.” Walter Jackson leaves college for a week. W. I. Mao-Intyre mourns for his return, because when Walter is absent, Mac. is the poorest student in the French class. The proud Simeon’s great papa come to town. Simeon stops shooting pool and smoking cigarettes. t In a scrap with Jette, Robert James Moran is knocked unconscious for two hours. Vote of thanks to Jette by the student body, and recommendation to make it longer next time. Joe Gatins studies a lesson. Ilirsch pays his board at the training-table; Mrs. Ashe faints. The Chancellor (in Ethics Class): "Mr. Hirsch, what are your ideas as to the immortality of the soul ?” Mr. Hirrch : "I don't know, Mr. Hill. 1 ’ll have to ask Rabbi Rubcnstein." Sylvie admits for once that he is wrong. 108January. Qcorgian appears. Some one suggest the namo 18. Boolhian. Herbert McBride, haunted bj the cry of “ Madge t Madge !” says the life of a literary light ii not a bed of roaea. 13. Sammic Johnson gets kidnapped. Full particular later on. 14. Sammic return . The solar system resume it sway. 16. Wiregra Club banquet. Jerger amokea a cigar; telegraphs for papa and Carrie. 19. 16. Freahmen gel ther hair cut at Sophomore barber ahop. Ouerry and Simkins appear aa chief mourners. February. 4. John Marshall Day. Gramophono Odom and Cone rep- 14. resent tho law class. 16. 6. Judge Bleckly enters college. Is greeted by Remcr. Say he hopeaMtemer it not a representative student. 19. 7. Logan is hazed, but doesn’t hovo his hair cut. 8. The Judgo tell Folly Mac. that he (Folly) is a callow 22. youth and doesn’t know much about Folitical Economy. 11. The Judge i Bred for absences, but before leaving awear ho knew Mis Pus before the flood. March. 1. Kell Pott leaves college to devote hi time exclusively to 11. com and rye culture. 3. Our jtvpular students leave for Washington under the careful guidance of Nurse Stevenson. 18. 4. Thompson and Sibley allow Bill to be inaugurated. 6. The popular ones return. Steve is detained in the Philadelphia jail. 22. 109 Freshmen and Sophomore declare war. ltules for Freshmen : 1. Don’t get gay. 2. He In your room at (even. 3. lie good babica. 4. HaU off to Soph . 6. Ilair cut once a month. Hugh Gordon and Monk get Haby Lyndon’ calp. St. Valentine’s Day. Hirscb give Mis Pu» a ring. Holiness and Purification meeting at the Chancellor's home. Tate and Will Davi represent the Senior Class. Dcmosthenean anniversary. Smith and bis mouth and his dress suit at 11 a. m., make a powerful impression. Old George’s birthday. Phi Kappa anniversary. Sara Johnson makes u suffer, llamp McWhorter weeps because Sam has no dress suit. Jimmy Lawrence (to Greek Class) : “ Please excuse me, gentlemen; I have to go fill Professor Hocock’s pipe for him." The Irish Club celebrates the birthday of its patron— Patrick. Dispensary and Mayor's Court greatly enriched thereby. Senior DanquoL Ask Will Davis; ask the Commercial Hotel; don’t ask Wells or Green.The Freshman Hair Clipping. I tell no talc of ancient day , No story of the dead, dark past, I twine no wreath of floral praise, Nor carol choral roundelays, In memory of the storied, vast, Unnumbered throng of demigods And heroes, at whose shrines arc cast The homage of the humbler classed. 1 gaze not with prophetic ken Beyond the Future’s wicket gate, Where serried ranks of giant men Loom grand in view. Nor yet again, In Action's reulm dare I create A story such as none have heard. And, yet, to got my story straight, So much by preface I relate. ’ T was night. The customary shade And shadows screened the drowsy town The hours passed on. From near-by glade , The screech-owl trilled hi serenades In solemn monotone, adown The silent ways an echo stirred. All else was still. The stars threw down Upon each spire a starlit crown. The midnight hour had long since fled ; Kadi glimmering lamp had disappeared ; Kach Freshman student in his bed Lay fast asleep. No dream of dread Disturbed their rest, nor night more wierd, Thoy little guessed the danger near. These guileless youths who nothing feared, Had dangers diro undaunted dared. Had gloried in tho heyday rout, Had battles waged and laurels won, Had victors been in many a bout; But now unconscious that throughout The town the Sophomores had begun To steal in silence, one by one, With vengeful aim and purpose grim, Adorned with arms, in warlike trim. Down to tho campus gate, Not long the valiants wait. Each armed with pondrous shears, And “ knocks " and clubs and spears, And masked. ( Yc$, strange to tell! ) They gave one frantic yell; And rushing forth to combat, went In squads of five. Kach squad, its man, One man, had chos’n for punishment,— To give their vengeance surer vent. In gloating joy their deep-laid plan They haste to execute. The ban Of scorn will fall on him who quails, On him who in duty fails I The Freshman waking in the mom Enraged to find their forelocks shorn Full vengeance vow, If late or now, The kindly fates in luck allow, That on the sea or solid ground, The guilty culprits e’er be found. Meanwhile’t i hard to tell which most The Sophomore gladly, vainly bosut: — The vict’ry won that fateful night O’er foes, whose hopeless, drowsy plight In that affray, Made them a prey To easy conquest, or the gray And guzzled trophies, dark and fair, — Their pocketfuls of Freshman hair. —Chansaw. IIOThe Sphinx A. Pratt Adams, P. P. John L. Erwin, P. H. Remer L. Denmark, K. S. Horace C. Johnson, D. S. B. John Banks, H. A. P. Adams, (7) John Banks, (16) Sterling Blackshear, (33) R. L,. Denmark, (17) N. Park, (30) Prof. W. D. Hooper, (2) J. L. Erwin, ('24) W. J. Hammond, (31) V. M. Hardy, (29) Prof. A. H. Patterson, (i) Longstrert Hull, (27) H. C. Johnson. (21) H. J. Lamar. (28) F. K. McCutchbn, (26) L. C. Rucker, (32) A—H. Brown E—W. A. Harris I—H. G. Colvin M—K. R. Mitchell Q—G. T. Jackson Honorary Members. B—G. Butler F—H. Bacon J—W. S. Cothran N—H. Dodd R—Chancellor W. C—S. H. Sibley G—M. P. Hall K—W. Spain o—c. H. Black B. Hill D— K. K. Dougherty H—F. K. Boland L—j. T. Dorsey P— v. R. Tichenor 112  Bible Study. I. W. Williams, Chairman C. R. Oliver J. P. Manly Mlidooary. R. D. Brownlee, Chairman E. W. Martin W. O. Roberts E. P. Shannon Officers. Wilson M. Hardy I. W. Williams . . ) E. W. Martin . . ) W. B. Shaw . . . i M. S. Monk . . . ...............President . . . . . Vice-President . . Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary ...............Treasurer Standing Committees. Hi od-book. Sidney S. Dean, Chairman Milton Thomas B. S. Walker, Jr. Fall Campaign. S. J. Nix, Chairman W. C. Thompson G. H. Wade Devotional. F. C. Jackson, Chairman Prof. R. E. Park J. D. McCartney ”5Walter J. Hammond Rkmer L. Denmark Simeon M. Turner Earle M. Donalson John D. McCartney Members. Warren C. Lott W. I. MacIntyre Ralph Graves Clifford S. Johnson Edward Jerger T. N. Woolfolk T. A. Barrow A. T. MacIntyre C. G. Strickland J. D. Bower D. Roland Bower i 16Engineering Society, E. A. Duke.......................................................................................President Russell Gould...............................................................................Vice-President J. K. Jordan.....................................................................................Secretary Lectures Before Society. 1900-1901. Prof. C. M. Strahan Prof. A. H. Patterson Dr. C. H. Herty Engineering Annual. Colonel E. L. Griggs W. D. Hoyt ) E. A. Duke j ' ’’ T. R. King ) F. M. Howard j . . Editor-in-Chief Associate Editors Business Managers 117 «« - fROXAVA | f • story v I l. T ft ov rAlN A1ARI c t ta I CD IBB i 5 p N‘'s KK t tK. VtHMOlt county club Officers. Prof. J. B. Lawrence..............President J. L. Sibley.................. E. H. Clay...........................Treasurer Members. G. F. Gober J. M. Gantt Marcellus Rambo A. H. Burtz J. R. Humphreys G. V. Welsh C. Secretary J. Moore i iS OfiN A CorfE l SOttpo©§. I Ei eK-Cut.-J COTT- ok-it I qP tFScKi -T V ioj F-NEv ToiJ-'YI TiNl- icjlTEIVHHonorary Club of the Class of J902. Koundod tn Sophomor© Year. Officers. FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. I. P. Goss..................................President....................................F. H. Barrett Bothwell Graham..............................Vice-President............................M. S. Richardson J. P. Lewis.................................Secretary and Treasurer.........................E. R. Camp Members. F. H. Barrett E. R. Camp Sidney S. Dean I. P. Goss Bothwell Graham Longstreet Hull Mitchell King H. J. Lamar Wilson M. Hardy R. G. Stephens J. P. Lewis M. W. Lewis N. P. Park Marion Richardson 120!}l Oratorical Association. Officers. J. P. Mott, President. F. C. Jackson, Secretary and Treasurer. James L. Sidi.ey, Vice-President. 123S.Wo. I Officers. THIRD TERM. F. H. Barrett, President. Geek W. Legwin, Vice-President. R. J. Moran, Secretary and Treasurer. FIRST TERM. Julian B. McCurry, President. E. W. Ragsdale, Vice-President. E. R. Camp, Secretary and Treasurer. SECOND TERM. W. G. Thompson, President. J. D. Wing, Vice-President. F. H. Barrett, Secretary and Treasurer. R. L Blackwell E. D. Brownlee T. A. Barrow J. C. Brand J. D. Bower D. R. Bower M. W. Collier K. R. Camp K. C. Campbell 0. F. Coogler R. E. Dallis R. A. Graves R. G. Golucko W. M. Hardy Members. J. B High W. M. Jackson, Jr. J. R. Jordan Paul Jcttc M. W. Lewis Jack McCartnoy R. J. Moran S. J. Nix, W. P. Newton N. Oxford N. P. Park E. W. Ragsdale Martin Richter W. E. Reid C. H. Story E. P. Shannon Yf. 0. Thompson I. W. Williams J. D. Wing . L. Sibley 124Official Okoax: The Georgian. A. P. Adams ...................President J. D. McCartney . . . •James L. Sibley....................................Secretary Vice-President Programmes. January J7th. Clastic Myths .... Literature of the Bible . . . J. 1). McCartney Opportunity . . . . Rev. J. T. Davis Some Hint . February 8th. Causes of Dearth of Southern Literature . . F. H. Barrett Future of Southern Literature...................C. D. Russell Discussion May 2d. II. Korin Adair The Literary Societies . . . . It H. Booth Prof. W. U. Bocock f E. P. Shannon Prof. K. E. Park 125 A Literary Life W. B. HillJohn Henry Monahan Hugh McDaniel Scott Benjamin Henry Barrow Thomas Augustine Barrow Andrew Jackson London 126Red Devils Officers. L. J. Hulsey M. R. F. M. Ridley L. D. B. S. Walker D. E. Andrew Calhoun D. K. M. S. Johnson I. G. Members. Luther J. Hulsey Andrew Calhoun Austell Thornton Marvin Dickinson Sam Johnson Campbell Krenson Frank M. Ridley Sanders Walker Cam Dorsey Sandy Beaver Minor Boyd 127Skull and Bones. Officers. FIRST TERM. P. E. JETTE.......G. M. S. R. Jaques . . . V. G. M. Ralph Meldrim . R. G. M. J. L. Hull . . . . P. G. M. G. W. Haines . H. M. D. M. SECOND TERM. S. R. Jaques. . . . G. M. N. H. Simkins . . V. G. M. H. H. Gordon . . R. G. M. J. L. Hull . . . . P. G. M. P. E. Jette . . H. M. D. M. Members. P. E. Jette S. R. Jaques Ralph Meldrim J. L. Hull G. W. Haines Wallace Miller DuPont Guerry G. C. Carson N. H. Simkins H. H. Gordon W. L. Anderson L. M. Wright 128• 9Members. S. M. Turner, G. E. J. L. Sibley, G. H. W. I. MacIntyre, P. R. A. Graves, Z. C. G. Strickland, B. W. J. Hammond, V. G. E. G. R. Sibley, W. G. A. T. MacIntyre, D. E. R. Jerger, F. C. M. Krenson, R. Honorary Members. Emilio Aguinaldo E. P. Shannon J. D. McCartney Carrie Nation Judge Logan E. Bleckley Edward VII. Billy Hooper, LL D. 131University Golf Gub. Jack McCartney Emory Shannon R. F. Schirm . J. L. Sibley . . Dan Hunnicut Officers. ..............................President .........................Vice-President ..............................Secretary ............................. Treasurer .............................Instructor Members. C. D. Dorsey C. D. Russell J. F. Gatins W. B. Hodgson Jack McCartney J. H. T. MacPiierson Dan Hunnicut W. M. Davis W. H. Bocock C. M. Krknson 'r. F. Schirm J. R. Rounsaville Simeon Morton Turner Emory Shannon Athens Members. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Griffith Ellie Williams Isabel Thomas Gertrude Thomas Gertrude Jackson Florence Anthony Lucy Cobb Tyler rr Susie Lumpkin NANNETTE HODGSON Marion LumpkinVoung Men's University Temperance Association. Motto : Down with Booze. Pratt { Adams President Macon Johnson, Treasurer for the school’children (. WlLUAMS ) of the City of Athens. Ira W. Wiluams............................Secretary Members. Hamilton McWhorter, Saratoga, Ga. Siiam Pane Whitehead Captain Kelly,'of.Georgia Wilson M. Hardy Lieutenant-Colonel Julian Berry BensonJMcCurry Missionaries in Other Lands. Kell Potts Tom Woolfolk Ben Swanson Charles D. Russell Will Shbats George Coleman Carrie Nation 33Irish Club You all know the motto. Harold Hirsch............................................President Frank Happ..........................................Vice-President St. Patrick..............................................Secretary The Common Herd. McWhorter Gatins McBride McCutcheon Wells Hewlettk Banks Adams Fortson Williams Donalson 34Kindergarten Club Members. Evan Basch Erwin Vonderau Noel Park R. D. Baby Lyndon Cam Dorsey Frank Barrett Honorary Members. The Lucy Cobb Girls and Walter Jackson. Yell. Give us more Mellin’s Food. 135 Stubbs Fred Jackson Colors. Baby Blue.Shannon...................Pitcher of the Himes Bacon.....................Chimpanzie Squealer Brlaval...............................Trillist Sanford.............Keeper of the tuning fork Calhoun.................................Chief Blowist Tison.......................Musical Kickist Whitehead and Burtz .... Too hoarse to sing Booth.........................Most Bass of all Drechsel...........Herr Von Ancient Rhymster Bowen..................Striker of the low notes Relay Quartette . Anvil Chorus Odom......................................Soft soloist Smith..........................The wild west wailist Bennett...................Vocalist a la midnight cat Cross.............................Squeaky but loud Jenkins, Ricketson Williams and McDonald .... Adams, A. P., Latimer, McCuen, Denmark and Cone 36Tiger Club. Motto. ’T is better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all. Officers. Andrew Pete Calhoun (' used to be h— ”).............................................Chief Mahout Simeon Morton Turner...................................................Grand (Blind) Tiger Hunter Joseph Francis Ignatius Gatins............................................................Growler Members. E. Ellyngtoyne Dinky Dallas William Mazyck Johnson Henry Goldsmith Wells Horace Cornelius Johnson (Sam did it) Walter Marian Jackson i37Banjo and Mandolin Club, Officers. Frank R. Happ.................President and Leader Walter M. Jackson, Jr. . . . Business Manager Baxter. J. F. Baxter, T. W. Hill, E. Y. Jaques Members. Banks Hulsey Calhoun, A. Fortson Jester Happ, F. R. Jackson University of Georgia Orchestra. Members. Prof. J. P. Campbell, Cello F. R. Happ, Clarinet O. L. Keith, Violin Walter Marian Jackson, Drums Paul Lovejoy, Violin Morris Micholl, Piano Carter Jester, Violin Max Micholl, Violin Pinkus Happ, Violin D. A. Cohen, Clarinet 138Officers. K. C. H. Drechsel.........................................................President and Musical Director Hinton Booth......................................................................................Secretary W. M. Jackson E. P. Shannon H. S. Belaval Members. B. E. Fortson D. H. Honnicott L. H. Hulsey i39 Jack BanksThe Thalians. Officers. Jack Banks . . . Walter Jackson Pinkus Happ . . Emory Shannon Frank Happ . . .... President . . Vice-President Business Manager .'stage Manager , Musical Director Members. Banks Happ, P. Shannon Donalson Jackson Happ, F. 4° ForbesUniversity Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel E. L. Griggs F. Happ..................... W. M. Hardy................. J. L. Sibley................ ................Commandant. ..................Adjutant. ............Sergeant-Major. Sergeant and Chief Musician. L. E. Tate . . F. C. Jackson H. G. Wells . Company A. ......................Captain. ............First Lieutenant. ............Second Lieutenant. Company B. T. R. King..............................Captain W. G. Thompson............................First Lieutenant R. M. Goss....................Second Lieutenant k Sergeant . First—I. P. Goss and O. J. Keith. Third—J. G. Faust and A. L. Hull. Second—B. Graham and S. J. Nix. Fourth—M. King and H. J. Lamar. Fifth—N. P. Park and E. R. Camp. Corporal . First—S. Beaver and J. Baxter. Third—G. Legwin and 0. J. Franklin. Second—C. Whitfield and G. B. Franklin. Fourth—D. Dupree and R. G. Benedict. Fifth------Lawler, G. Echols and M. Bryd. Company C. J. Banks.............................Captain. W. M. Davis..................First Lieutenant. H. Hirsch...................Second Lieutenant. Sergeant . First—E. R. Ragsdale. Second—R. G. Stephens. Fourth—S. Blackshrar. Third—P. Happ. Fifth—H. Harder. Corporal . First—C. Johns. Second—P. Young. Fourth—S. S. Johnson. Fifth—B. High. Third—W. B. Hodgson Sixth—J. D. Wing 141A kiss is like a bath Thai you lake from the river : You can lake, and take, and take, And lake them on forever, And still there ’a just aa many Aa if you had n't taken any. Dream-Dreams. Did you ever dream of sleeping Where the world disturb’d you not? Did you ever wake a-weeping Over sorrows long forgot? Did you ever dream of waking From a dream within a dream, When you found your heart e-breaking Over things that seem’d to seem? Did you ever dream of dreaming? In a dream from dreams awake, Just to And your happy seeming Seemed to seem for seeming’s sake? Have you seen the stars in daytime? Or the sun shine all night long? Have you seen it snow in May-time ? Or a Christmas coming wrong. Have you thought all wisdom foolish? Things below to seem above ? Or the cherubim seem ghoulish? Then you 'vo never been in love. Dak Hukkicutt. Marriage is liko a candle-light, Placed in a window on a summer’s night, Inviting all the insects in the air To corno and singo their pretty winglete there: Those that are out butt beads against the pane; Those that are in butt only to get out again. X42Presidents of Phi Kappa. H. McWhorter S. M. Turner I. P. Goss I. W. Williams J. R. J. Bacon, Jr. W. M. Davis R. J. Bennett W. G. Thompson 144 L. ErwinMSPresidents of Demosthenean Society. V J. M. Gantt C. H. Story F. C. Jackson W. C. Thompson E. A. Duke J. C. Brand »47 John L. Tison H. S. WaldenState Oratorical Association Contest President G. W. Legwen, University of Georgia Georgia's Representative G. W. Legwen Georgia-North Carolina Debate. Held at Athens, April 5th, 1901. Kksox.vkd, Thai the combinations of capital commonly called trusts arc more injurious than beneficial. Subject: Georgia Affirmative: Negative: Messrs. Stern and Williams. North Carolina W. I. McIntyre L. P. Goodrich Georgia won ! 148G W. LEGWEN, Or.! x.«.1 Rop-ownt.t.v W. I. MclNTYRE U. P. GOODRICH. North Crol.no Dob.t«r. M9o %  f o o Officers Football Team. I900-J90J. F. K. McCutchen ......................Captain W. M. Davis.........................Manager E. E. Jones, Princeton.................Coach F. M. Ridley J90M902. ............Captain H. Hirsch......... Billy Reynolds.......................Coach Manager FOOTBALL. THE history of the football season for the current year is the talc of a scries of defeats. The cause of these is the fact that Georgia has for the past few years nourished an unhealthy and thriftless custom of having hired men on her teams. This had grown to be so very degrading that all saw at once the necessity of an immediate correction. To this change we attribute our lack of victories. But we can promise to the athletic world a team in the season to come that will show the grit of Georgia as it really exists. The personnel of the team is as follows: Shannon, Terry, Hirsch, center; Swanson, McCall a, right guard; Cross, Putnam, left guard; Monk, right tackle; Gordon, left tackle; Ridley, Rucker, right end; Baxter, Rucker, left end; Dorsey, Monahan, quarter-back; Shannon, Lamar, Hull, full-back; Hcwlettc, Dickerson, right half; McCutchen, Hull, left half. Substitutes, Dean, Hardy , Potts, Walden, Smith, Clay, and Calhoun. 155Baseball Team J900-I90J. John Banks........................Manager M. M. Dickerson.....................Coach Sandy Beaver (Captain) Gordan i Hulsey j........... Hull | McMullan ].......... Gordan Richardson ......... Hull ) . Catcher . Pitcher First Base Second Base Blackshear | Richardson ) Walker . . . Jaques .... McCalla . . . McWhorter . Third Base . Shortstop Center Field . Left Field Right Field Substitutes. Hines Monk Bower 57«S9Tennis. Manager. John MonahanAthletic Council. FIRST TERM. A. Pratt Adams ) Harold Hirsch i H. J. Lamar . . . R. G. Stephens . . W. D. Hoyt . . . A. Pratt Adams ) R. L. Denmark j W. M. Davis . . . E. H. Clay . . . . John Banks . . . John L. Erwin . . John Monahan . . A. H. Patterson . Dr. Campbell . . . John Welch . . . F. R. Mitchell . . Judge Cobb. . . . F. K. McCutchen A. T. Cox....... H. C. Johnson . . SECOND TERM. President Athletic Association......................J. B. McCurry Vice-President...........................................H. J. Lamar Treasurer...........................................H. H. Gordon Secretary................................................H. M. Scott Editor-in-chief Red and Black J. D. Bra dwell Football Manager.............. Manager Second Team .... Baseball Manager.............. Track Manager................. Tennis Manager................ Physical Director............. Faculty Member................ Resident Alumnus Member . . Non-resident Alumnus Member Trustee Member................ Football Captain.............. Baseball Captain.............. Track Captain................. Harold Hirsch . . % . John Banks . . . Noel P. Park . . . John Monahan . . A. H. Patterson Professor R. E. Park . . . . E. H. Dorsf.y . . . F. R. Mitchell .......Judge Cobb . . F. M. Ridley, Jr. .......S. Beaver .......S. S. Dean 162Annual Field-Day Programme. EVENT. FIRST. SECOND. HIS RECORD. COLLEGE RECORD. HOLOER. 100-Yard Dash. McCutchen, Johnson, 11., Baxter, Ridley, 10 4-6 10 sec Hammer Throw. Archer, Bennett, Hewleltc, Calloway, R., 74.4 High Jump. Hewlettc, Johnson, II., Ridley, Unrdy, Cal- Wrigloy, ’95 II. 0. Cox, ’00 220-Yard Dash. 24 1-5 22 3-5 soc Shot Pul. Bennett, Ilewlette, Nix, Parks, B. G., Lamnr, 35.3 3G ft. 4$ in F. Price, 220-Yard Hurdle Race. Hart, Hardy, Dorsey, Parks, B. G., Dean Pole Vault. Dorsey, Latimer, Rucker, Wright, J., Bower, McWhorter, C. S., Forbes, John - Ilnrdv (3) l’nrke 30 1-6 Law, ’95 Black, ’98 8 ft. 9 in McIntosh, ’99 (3) Dorsey 163Annual Field-Day Programme.—Continued. EVENT. FIRST. SECOND. HIS RECORD. COLLEGE RECORD HOLDER. Mile Run. Rucker, Bovd, Scott, H., Hart, Lamar, Reid, 11. C., Smith, W. 31 Rucker 5 min. 21 sec.... 4 min. 43 sec ... Colquitt, Law, '98 120-Yard Hurdle Racei (3) Scott Hardy, Dorsey, Dean, Barks, B. 0., Hcwlettc. 50-Yard Three-Legged Race. Parks 20 sec Hardy (3) Dorsey Nix and Thompson, Schirm and Starnes. Hardy and Dean, Parks, B. G., and 440-Yard Dash. Baxter, Scott, Nowton, Starnes, Schirm, 63 4-5 see H. 0. Cox, ’00 Broad Jump. (3; Camp s 31cCutcben, Johnson, IL, Calloway, R., Ridley Weaver, ’99 17 ft. 10J in. 17 ft. 6 in. 17 ft. 4} in. Half-Mile Run. Boyd, Wright, Manley, Lamar, W. G., Wright Thompson 2 min. 22 2-6 sec 2 m. 10 3-6 sec.. Donaldson, '99 50-Yard Sack Race. 31 an Icy Starnes, Dorsey, Dean, Lamar, Reid H. C., Nix, Parks Parks Relay Teams. 3 min. 66 see... Law, ’01 1643S3nt )crsttp ubl teat tons.Pandora Editors of PANDORA from 1886 to the Present Time. Volume I, 1886-Editor-in-chief, G. X. Wilson, K A. Business Manager, W. B. Cook, A T Q. Associate Editors, W. E. Woottcn, XAE;3. McDaniel, X ♦; C. F. Ktce, X ♦; C. H. Wilcox, K A; W. A. Speer, ♦ 4 0; F. F. Stone, HO; R. D. Meador, ATI); M. 11. Bond, 4T4; W. s. Upshaw, 4T4; R. S. Move, ♦T4; 1’. L. Wado, ♦ T 4; A. W. Wado, 2 N; W. G. Brown, 2 St. VOLUME II, 1887—Editor-in-chief, C- F. Rice, X ♦. Busi. nets Manager, J. W. Daniel, K A; Associate Editors, T. W. Reed, HO; G. Waters, H4; W. J. Shaw, 2 X ; II. K. Milner, ATQ; A. L. Franklin, A T A. Volume III, 1888— Editor-in-chief, Albert Howell, K A. Business Manager, A. W. Griggs, A T A. Associate Editors, W. L. Moore, 2 A K; T. R. Crawford, A T 0; F. W. Coile, 2 N; Lucien L. Knight, X ♦; W. M. Glass, A T A. Volume IV, 1800—Editor-in-Chief, John D. Little, 2 A E. Business Manager, W. K. 'Wheatford, 2 X. Associate Editors, F. E. Calloway, K A ; S. J. Tribble, HO; J. G. Crawford, 2 X ; W. D. Ellis, X ♦; W. L. Stalliogs, A T A ; W. X. Smith, Xt; E. A. Cohen. Volume V, 1802— Editort-in-Chief, J. F. Lewis, X ♦; L. L. Brown, ATI). Business Managers, W. E. Cristie, 2 X; W. T. Kelley, ATQ. Associate Editors, J. C. Kimball, 2 A E; Roy Dallas, H 0; J. R. Lane, 2 A E ; E. W. Frey, X +. Volume VI, 1803—Editor-In-Chief, Harry Hudson, K A. Business Manager, F. G. Barfield, 2 A E. Associate Editors, C. R. Xiibot, X ♦; X. B. Stewart, ATI); A. 0. Halsey, X X; II. A. Alexander; E. G. Cabanits, HO; F. G. Johnson, ATQ; Eugene Dodd, X +. Volume VII, 1804—Editors-in-Cbiof, C. R. Tidwell, ATQ; Xool Moore, 2 A E. Business Managers, l’aul L. Fleming, X ♦ ; John D. Sidling, A T Q. Associate Editors, L. D. Fricks, 2 X ; W. P. Harbin, X t; H. Brown, K A ; George W. Beckett, ♦ AO. Volume VIII, 189 —Editor-in-Chief, W. A. Harris, X ♦. Business Manager, J. J. Gibson, A T,Q. Associate Edi. tors, H. H. Steiner, 2 A E; J. W. Morton, K A ; W. W. Chandler, ATQ; W. L. Kemp, 2 X ; J. T. Dunlap, ♦ AO; H. V. Black, X ♦; J. G. Smith, Xon-Fraternity. Volume IX, 1806—Editor-in-Chief, Pliny Hall, K A. Business Manager, J. G. Pitman, ♦AO. Associate Editors, M. M. Lockart, 2 A E; J. B. Connally, X ♦; Fred Morris, 2 X; C. H. Holden, ATQ; J. M. Stephenson, Jr., ATQ; II. V. Black, X t; T. A. Xeal; R. B. Nalley. Volume X, 1807—Editor-in-Chief, II. G. Colvin, 2 A E. Business Manager, It. K. Brown, ATQ. Associate Editors, F. L. Fleming, X ♦; J. W. Spain, K A; narry Dodd, X +; P. S. Smith, ♦AO; A. L. Tidwell, ATQ; H. Lovejoy, 2 N ; W. B. Kent; J- W. Hendricks. 166V01.VMK XI, 1808—Editors-in-Chief, Harry Dodd, X ; Hugh While, X X; Business Manager, J. C. McMichael, K A. Associate Editors, C. H. Black, X -r-; K. K. Pomeroy, SAK;C. Westbrook, ATQ;J.l Dorsey, ♦AO; II. it. Perkins, A T Q. VOLOMX XII, 1800—Editors-in-Chicf, Garrard Glenn, X A E; A. P. Adams, X ♦. Business Manager, P. E. Johnson, X +. Associate Editors, J. B. McCurry, K A; W. S. Blun, A T Q; K. E. Brodnax, A T fl; W. E. Watkins, v x; D. 0. Ueidt; J. W. Mason. Voll'mk XIII, 1000—Editors-in-Chief, Archibald Blackshear, K A ; Fair Dodd, X +. Business Manager, P. E. Brodnax, A T Q. Associate Editors, F. Y. Calhoun, X ♦ ; E. P. Shannon, ♦AO; F. G. Tupper, X A E; J. P. Gairdner, XX; William Davis; E. II. llamby. VOLL'MK XIV, 1001—Editors-in-Chief, E. P. Shannon, ♦AO; J. D. McCartney, X A K. Business Manager, Jack Banks, X ♦. Associate Editors, P. A. Williams, XX; V. II. Bullard, AT U; H. G. Stephens, K A; I. M. Putnam, K X; W. D. Hoyt, X Y; James L. Sibley. 167Editors “ Red and Black.” First Term. A. Pratt Adams.................Editor-in-Chief E. R. Camp.....................Exchange Editor C. H. Whitfield..........................Local Editor John Banks...........................Athtetic Editor W. M. Davis.......................Business Manager Noel Park...............Assistant Business Manager Second Remer L. Denmark................Editor-in-Chief G. W. Lkgwix.................Associate Editor Sam Johnson...................Business Manager Dan Dupree .................. Third J. D. Bradwell..................Editor-in-Chief E. M. Donalson................Associate Editor S. J. Nix.....................Business Manager D. H. Dupree.................. Term. Frank Happ.............................. Athletic Editor Andrew Calhoun....................Exchange Editor E. L. Camp.......................V . Local Editor . Assistant Business Manager Term. L. E. Tate...........................Athletic Editor Mitchell King............................Local Editor Paul Brown.....................Exchange Editor . . Assistant Business Manager 163; 1 Cl jl ♦ fr r y 'it 11 EOITORS FIRST TERM EDITORS SECONO TERM IO0 EOITORS THIRD TERM To Renee. Arcli hltlo maiden, your mi!c and your eye Tell me, though young, you arc Awfully wise. Child though you may bo—what matter it then ? You are match with your art for a dozen of men. Innocent maid, whom no prctco o deceive , You welcome the suitor who trust and believe . And Judge not hi suit by his fame or his pelf, Hut see tho true merit and worth of himself. Sweet little girl, it is just such a you, Make this world pleasant for journeying through. An angel descended from Heaven a while, Clothed in it brightness and bringing it smile. Hence, my dear, you may trample my heart Under your feet, if you will For inv part, No revenge will I take, but to Heaven I’ll pray To keep you forever, a sweet as to-day ! Edwiw Vail. To Renee Asleep. Alas 1 ’T is in vain all my art have been plied ; Down on her cheek the long eyclashc sweep. Weary is she, and although 1 have tried To please her—her lids droop, ami Hence ’ asleep. What a sweet picture she makes, as she lie With head on her arm, in a tangle of brown ! She i dreaming of fairies, she can not disguise Her smile, ns she greet them in Lullaby town. Sleep, little maiden, and sweet be thy dream . What though thou slightest the suit 1 would pay I Heavy thine eyolid have shut out the beam , That thino eve from the sunlight have gathered all day. Dear little maiden, omo lovers might grieve At the thought of your cold now, and be in despair. Happy am 1, that you do not deceive I Heaven watch over you I This is iny prayer. Kdwjx Vail. 171IT: EDITORSNIGGER" •74ABOUT three thousand years ago the unter-rified Democracy of Greece was under the control of a clique of gods and goddesses called the Olympian Council. Led by the mighty Zeus, they formed a ring which ruled the Grecian people for centuries. As a still greater handicap to the country, heroes were then so thick in Greece that you could not throw a stone inside the city limits of Athens without hitting one of them, and you could not go down to the post-office in Sparta without tripping over the feet of the cheap third-class immortals that loafed on the doorsteps. Old Zeus had stood this accumulation for a long time, but lie wearied of it. In order to improve the situation lie decided to weed out the superfluous stock of heroes by exciting a war. Thirty centuries or more have elapsed since Zeus stirred up the fighting blood of Greece's choicest cut-throats, but the facts about that famous fight have been so cob-webbed with the dreamings of poets and the dust of ages that they have never been told in the shape of naked truth. 75 A young man named Paris, of Troy, was made a judge in one of the goddesses’ beauty shows. Since he could not avoid it, he made a decision and awarded both diploma and medal to Aphrodite. There were others in the contest. They charged that Paris had carelessly accepted a bribe too openly, but still the decision stood, and the corrupt judge went at once to Sparta to spend his ill-gotten wealth. At Sparta, lie was received into the best society. He first visited one of his old college chums, Mr. Castor, the inventor of the well-known Castor Oil, who was the senior partner of the drug firm of Castor Pollux. By him, Paris was introduced to the Hon. Menelaus, who was then at the summit of his fame as the boss of Spartan politics. Castor and Menelaus were great friends. Menelaus allowed Castor to keep his drug-store and blind bar open on Sunday and in return for this favor Castor furnished the oil for the political machine. Mrs. Helen Menelaus (nee Pauline) was at that time the belle of Sparta, and she was consideredby the best judges to be the tcn-thousand-dollar beauty of the country. She was all the rage. Her picture was in all the face-powder and complexion soap advertisements, and when Paris came to Sparta the cigarette manufacturers had begun to use it in their “ Spartan Straight-Cut ” boxes. One day, while Paris was visiting at the Mcnc-laus mansion. Mr. Mcnelaus was so giddy and foolish as to go down to Crete on a Sunday-school excursion. Assisted by Aphrodite, the prize goddess of the Beauty Show, the gay young Trojan planned and schemed. The man and the opportunity were there. “ Madame,” said Paris, as they arose from the dinner table on that eventful day, “ have you ever seen the city of Troy? ” " Never," replied the fair Helen. “Very well, we shall go at once. In fact, Madame Helen, we shall elope. Have your baggage ready as soon as possible.” “ It is very annoying," said Helen, “ but my husband has used my Saratoga trunk to take his lunch to the picnic, and I can’t find my telescope anywhere.” “Ah, I sec; you have lost your grip. Never mind, we shall get along without it. I still have mine. Let me try this skeleton key on your husband's cash box,—it doubtless contains something worthy of my steal.” Helen went to her desk and wrote the following telegram to Mcnelaus: “ Hon. N. G. Mcnelaus, Crete. Have gone off with handsomer man. Good-bye Meny. Incomprehensibility. t Helen.” “ This is all right, of course,” said Paris, as he looked at the message, “ but what in the name of Zeus docs that last word mean?” “Oh, nothing; but you see it makes ten and it don’t cost any more. I just put down the longest word I knew." “ Hadn’t you better leave it out,” asked Paris; “ It doesn’t do any good, and it might worry the old man.” “ Never,” replied Helen, decidedly; “ I don’t care if it does worry him. It ’ll do him good. How much do you suppose he has worried me,—staying 176out nights and going off on wars and hunting trips? It's time he was worried a little.” “ Well, let it go. But I suspect that when he gets that message he ’ll start on another hunting trip.” " Let him hunt; I'm game. Have you got the tickets? " Within a few days this venturesome couple had safely arrived at Troy. Upon receipt of the message from his wayward wife, Menclaus returned in hot haste to Sparta, swearing large round oaths in choicest Greek and vowing vengeance upon Paris and all his people. Arriving at tte house of his brother Agamemnon at about midnight, he jerked on the front doorbell so fiercely that he pulled the knob off. Agamemnon stuck his classic head out of an up-stairs window. "What do you want?” he asked, in a voice that would have come from his shoes if he had had them on. Menelaus gasped hysterically, “ Oh, Agamemnon, my wife—” “ Well, send for the doctor ; don’t bother me. What in the name of Cerberus do you want with me at this time of night? I'm supposed to be asleep.” Menelaus gasped again. He was purple in the face with rage. “ She’s gone,” he howled; " she's gone off to Troy with that rascally Paris. Perfidious wretch! ” Agamemnon fell down-stairs. Assisted by his brother, and also by all of his political supporters in Sparta, Menelaus at once organized an army for the purpose of taking Troy up by the roots and removing it from the map. All the heroes of Greece flocked to the assistance of the Spartans, anxious to make use of their unemployed heroism, which was becoming weak and flabby from lack of exercise. Among them were Diomcdcs, Nestor, Ajax, with his patent puncture-proof shield, and an Ithacan farmer named Odysseus who claimed to be the champion wing shot of the world. The famous Achilles also joined the army, bringing with him his friend Patroclus and many other followers, all of them panting for gore and glory. Meanwhile Paris, assisted by Priam, his father (who was then Mayor of Troy), began to collect a force to defend himself and his prize from the avenging Grecians. Hector, a brother of Paris, took an active part in the defence of the city. When the Greeks approached the city, all of the Trojans except ncas deemed it prudent to retire within the walls at once. ALneas tarried outside to gather up his live-stock and that worthy hero was promptly chased under cover by Achilles, barely escaping with his life. For ten long years the Grecians loafed around the walls of Troy, calling the Trojans names and daring them to come out and fight. The Trojans peeped over the walls and made faces at them and asked if Achilles wouldn’t like to come in to supper. Every little while a squad of venturesome Trojan heroes would stroll outside of the city and get into 177an altercation with some Greeks. These little debates generally ended in the extinguishment of many shining lights of that heroic age. One day Achilles got mad at some of the Grecian leaders, and, refusing to continue the argument, he crawled into his tent and sulked. The Greeks being without the aid of their best warrior, the Trojans took advantage of the chance to make a score. Hector sallied forth and drove back the Greeks with great slaughter, killing Achilles’ friend Patroclus. Hearing of the death of Patroclus, Achilles forgot his anger and returned to the fray, killing Hector and chasing his followers back into the city. During all these military operations Achilles was protected by a complete suit of the finest Harvey-ized steel armor,bearing the trade-mark of Hephees-tos Vulcan, and guaranteed by the makers to be free from all or any defects in material or workmanship. A flaw in the heel of this armor was the occasion of his receiving a mortal wound from the hand of Paris. Achilles' wife brought suit in the Court of Athene and was awarded heavy damages. Odysseus and Ajax were candidates for the position of Grand Mogul of the Greeks, which had been held by Achilles. Odysseus was elected, and Ajax, being sorely disappointed, gracefully fell upon his sword and expired. But Troy could not be captured as long as the Palladium, a charmed statue, given by Zeus, remained within the city. Disguised as a tramp, Odysseus sneaked into the city, swiped the precious statue and escaped. The Greeks then put their heads together to devise a scheme by which they might enter the city without being detected by the guards. The goddess Athene, who had been to school at the University of Athens, suggested that a pony be constructed by means of which they might pass the examination of the watchful guards. The plans and specifications submitted by Athene were accepted and a large hollow horse was built of fir planks. Inside of this huge effigy was stowed a choice assortment of the finest heroes of Greece. The Grecian army then retired, leaving the game in the hands of a bunco-steerer named Sinon. This famous confidence man advised the unsuspecting Trojans to take the horse into the city, and they were green enough to do it. That night before the moon was up, while the Trojans were refreshing themselves with sardines and pop-skull whiskey, the gray-whiskered old Nestor slid down the horse’s front leg and let the Grecian army in through the back gate. The heroes all tumbled out of the wooden horse and Troy immediately fell with a dull sickening thud. 178Mcnclaus then proceeded to make a bon-fire of the city and also had the inhabitants pacified by the process of extermination,—much to his own satisfaction and amusement. jfcneas and his aped father were allowed to escape the general destruction. Taking with them nothing but a hand-organ and a small chimpanzee, they went at once to Italy and founded there a race of new people who were afterwards known as the Dagoes. After attending the funeral of Priam and a few other prominent Trojan officials, Menclaus went to the house of Paris to meet his long-lost wife. Walking boldly into the house, he found the fair lady busily packing her trunk. “ Helen! ” he called, in a stage whisper. Heaving a heavy sigH as easily as if it had been a feather, Helen fell upon his sunburned neck and wept. “ Meny,” said she, “ how did you leave the baby?” “ Out of sight,” said he, “—and hearing.”My Pipe. 0 faithful comrade, stanch and true, Midst changing scenes and faces new, Thou hast e'er my refuge been From dobta and woes and hateful men. If love grow cold, if friendship cease, In thee I And content and pence. If pay-day’s far and I am “ broke " My “ bustedness ” will end in smoke. And when to rest from earthly toil 1 shuffle off this mortal coil, No priest I want nor shrift from friar, ' But only thou, my trusty briar. Bo thou lie fast within my hand Until we reach Styx’s farther strand ; For, thou once lit, flames cut no ice— Thou ’dst make in hell my paradise.The Freshman's Farewell “ Oh, won't you look upon me It would make me, oh, so happy ! As I kneel hero at your feet? To know I 'm In your grace, Just one little look of pleasure And to have you look upon me From those eyes so grave and sweet? With a smile upon your face. I ’vo known and loved and sought thee, Sometimes with hope, then fear, And all of this ha cost me— First, a smile, then groan, now tear. With a broken heart, I leave thee— Leave the to another's care; But whoe’er it is that wins thee, Wins a jewel, ah, so rare ! ” R. Sweet Variety. “ How happy I could bo with cither, Were t’other dear charmer away, And another would do if neither Would bother me just for a day. One mnn is as good as another, “ And just a bit better,” said Pat, So, I can bo happy with ‘‘t'other,” “ A man is a man for a’ that.” What matters a formal affiance, When others are mine to command ? Small gifts for the sweets of suppliants, A smile, or a touch of the hand. When others with charms so beguiling, They tempt me, ( but still I am true I ) Yet, I can be loved for a-smiling, And any old charmer will do. Ho’s gone, my betrothed, and I miss him, Sometimes—when no other is near, And, sometimes, I wish I could kiss him, And sometimes, 1 drop him a tear. My heart is for him and no other, God bless him wherever he roams ; But, now, I ’ll be happy with " t' other,” And happy with him when ho comes. Dan Hunnicott. i 8 iThree gay young men went out a bike, ’ With each gallant a miea. They rode—until they reach’d the pike, In dom like file ran- thii. But when they reach'd the wooded lane They (ought for eweeier bliss, So, o’er the quiet, shady plain They in like rode two thi . The road lod thro’ a narrow past— Nor did in come amiss— Each lad still rode beside his last, But er like clos- up this. The lad in front bis lassie press’d And tried to steal a kiss— They fell, as also did the rest, Alltangleduplikethis ! I ! I Dam Hcnxicdtt. x82Things the Catalogue Does Not Tell. DEAR JACK: I understand that you contemplate going off to College next fall, and as we fellows arc very anxious for you to join us here I take the liberty of sending a catalogue of the University; but there are numerous advantages of this place that no catalogue can tell, and pardon me while I presume upon your time to set forth a few of them. Did you ever consider that one of the chief controlling forces of a man’s character is his environment. This i£ not only a theory of the psychologists but a fact of practical life, and since it wields so potent an influence it is surely a factor that should be regarded at all times, and particularly when one is looking for a place to spend the formative period of his life. Now all this argues that you should come to Athens to college, for here we have the environment that will tend to make a gentleman and a student out of any person on earth. The place itself is an ideal college town —not too large nor too small. You remember that the University was founded more than one hundred and fifteen years ago, and that its buildings were not only almost the first to be constructed in the town, but even in the county. Thus the town has grown up around the University and has adapted itself to the needs of the school, so that its twelve thousand people consider the interests of one as the interests of the other and arc never pitting themselves against the students as the city people do in many college centers. Because the University has been here so long it has made Athens a scat of culture and refinement such as is seldom found. Nearly every person here, both man and woman, has a collegiate education; the very air of the place tells of the Henry Gradys, the Ben Hills and the Cobbs that made it their home. All this environment puts learning at such a premium and ignorance at such a discount that the student can hardly help choosing the former, even if he were not naturally so inclined. You have often heard it said that when a boy goes to college he goes there for mental training alone. Well, that is a mere soap-bubble theory, for all mind training and no self-culture leaves Jack an awkward boy,and that’s not the kind that grows into successful men. A little social inter-mixture is the healthiest thing in the world and the sort of social intermixture that Athens affords is certainly a most delightful one. The girls arc prettier than the ones in your own town, and as gracious and charming as the “ queen ” herself. Nor is society dominated by the “ all money and no manners ” class. Provided a boy is refined, and gentlemanly, his social success depends hardly a straw's breath on his financial condition. Society in Athens is always simple, always pleasant, and it is never too exacting.The conditions of every-day existence arc another thing a person should take into consideration in selecting a college. At the University you have presented both the fraternity and the non-fraternity life; both have their supporters, and both arc the best of their kinds. If your lot should be with the fraternities, there will be added to it the delights of the chapter-house home, which at Georgia is regarded by both faculty and citizens as a veritable home. Club-house life gives the satisfaction here that it does at few places in the country, and it holds the favor of everybody. But should your lot not be with the fraternities these every-day pleasures are far from wanting; life in some private family or in the old dormitory all have their advantages and their special privileges. After a few more months there will be a new dormitory, too, that will be fitted up like a palace, speaking in terms of college comparisons, and it will accommodate a hundred boys. But in these days of diversified knowledge, what is man’s chief mental end? Is it to narrow his mind by absolute specialization, or is it not rather to broaden it by the acquisition of wisdom, even if that acquisition precludes any specialization at all? It is a lamentable truth that many colleges do really have that former end in view, and that Georgia does not have it is one of her greatest advantages. Could that college be called narrow which has almost as a motto “ Wisdom, rather than knowledge, is power.” The day has conic when broadness of intellect instead of mere information, counts for sue- cess; the University of Georgia presents the means of gaining this breadth that arc the best in the world. One of the chief of tfiese means is by lectures on intellectual topics by outside men. As often as once every week or so there is an outside lecture on some subject of particular interest, perhaps it may come on Saturday morning after chapel, or on some night under the auspices of the Engineering Society, or the Young Men’s Christian Association, or the Literary or Press Club; or, again, perhaps it may be at Lucy Cobb. Instruction by lectures has come to be a chosen method in late days, and you can depend upon it that it is not only a very satisfactory, but also a very delightful method. The State University is always the headquarters of education in the State, and because it is we often have the privilege of visits from noted men that ctfher institutions of learning do not have, these men put their best strength in their lectures, and it is reflected in the whole tenor of the College. Another advantage you will find at our College that even the Northern universities do not present is personal contact with the professors. They arc not the great inapproachable bugbears that you have been taught to think such men, but they are your friends. There is not a man on the faculty but is willing and anxious to help a boy whenever he can. You need feel no hesitancy in going to them for advice even as personal friends. If you have literary talent and wish to exercise it, or if you have none and wish to acquire it, come 84to Georgia. There arc more student publications here than most colleges of twice the size can support. If a man inclines toward newspaper work the Red and Black, a typical weekly paper is open to him; if he inclines toward pure literary work the Georgian is his developer; if he prefers scientific study the editors of the Engineering Annual will be glad to cultivate his ability for writing, and lastly the Pandora will catch him up and give him opportunity all around. These publications arc every one student enterprises, and arc supported practically alone by the students; their columns arc always open to them and they never go unfilled. Debates, both intercollegiate and local, arc very common thing with us, and you have only to try to win a medal or a place as representative in them, to realize the stage of development this work has reached. You have doubtless heard of our recent victory over North Carolina; well,the men who won that debate did not work much harder than some of the fellows who arc laboring for victor)' for their society in a local contest. The training given here in writing and delivering speeches is as good as you can find no matter how far you look. While Georgia’s athletics have not been particularly successful of late years from the standpoint of victory, that very fact is prima facie evidence of their success in another respect, and that respect is the main end and justification of college athletics; it is the affording of wholesome exercise not only to students who arc bom athletes, but to students who arc athletes for the sake of health. It would be a safe assertion to say that fully half of the students that enter college could make an athletic “ G ” by good practice. A majority of the representative athletes have been developed to that point of efficiency from green aspirants. Every line of activity in this field is given full room, and if a person docs not like football or baseball, the tennis courts and the track arc open to him ; if none of these suit, he may find his forte in the gymnasium. Neither arc religious influences found wanting; in fact, they arc very much evidenced. The College Young Men’s Christian Association occupies a position of respect and power among the boys and it is unnecessary to speak of the city churches in this connection, for any one should know that the churches in Athens arc as strong and helpful as they arc anywhere in the country’. The pastors all take an interest in the boys and regard them as members of their own congregations. I fear I have trespassed on entirely too much of your time, but only let my efforts be successful and neither you nor I shall ever regret the imposition. W. M. H. 35A Face. There '» a picture jn the Banner that is haunting me tonight— Just a face with dreamy eye that seem to look another way ; And a wealth of hair above it with a ringlet on the right, While an car is hid among it—and my Cupid's there to stay. There’s a nose that ’• just perfection (something that you seldom see); There ’• a mouth that ’• almost smiling, there’s a twinkle in her eye, And her lips arc full uf passion just as sweet as sweet can be, And an oval chin so charming 1 could love her till I die. Head was never poised more graceful, face was never half so sweet— Never since the Virgin Mary have such eyes been seen on earth. It would be a taste of heaven such a charming girl to meet— Just to see her face a-smiling and to bear her voice in mirth. As I look at her I wonder—well, about a thousand things— Would she let mo keep her picture if she knew I loved it so? But 1 ’ll cut it out and keep it just for luck until it brings Me a message from my sweetheart—such a mascot will, I know. —Dan. a A Toast. Here's to the men that conquered Spain— To the " pigs ” that wouldn't suey; bad cest to the men that sunk the Maine— Good luck to our gallant Dewey. Here's a mint julep made of “ Old,” For our boys who fought so well; And here is a drop of water cold For the Spaniards now in hell. Luck to the girl, Kentucky bred, Whose parents named her ‘‘Sueie; ” Here's a hip-hooray for those who wed And name a son for Dewey. Here's a health to the maidens fair That kissed the hero hold; Good luck to them till gray is tho hair That now is eighteen-carats gold. To the privates, now, wc ’ll drink all round, And soldiers, all, "Attention I ” Good health to those without a wound— To all the rest a pension. —D. H. Uvshicvtt. 186'-'ft "'THE KIDNAPING SAMMY JOHNSON'.' 3 gj O—C 4J Tlie Fable (lu Slang) of How the Boys Did the Pat Crowe Act to Sammy Johnson. (WITH APOLOGIES TO GEORGE ADE.) ONCE upon a Time there was a Broad Youth, named Johnson who lived in Atlanta, but that Burg got too small for him, and it was Him to the Choo-Choo, and off for the Diploma Well at Athens. Sam was as Verdant as a Vernal Meadow when he first struck the Classic Shades of the Sacred Center of Learning, but he soon got Next to Himself and began to Run Things. He was a Youth of Great Possibilities, and he began to Organize before lie had been in College a Week. Within twenty-six days lie had Mark Hanna laid in the Shade, and Boss Crokcr and Tom Platt looking like a thirty-cent Piece with a Hole in it. He could give Matt Quay Cards and Spades and Little Casino and beat him out. The Main Guy of the Diploma Well, whom the Y. M. C. A. Molly-boys call “ our Honored Chancellor ” clamped his Optics on S. Middleton and Communed with Himself thusly: “That Geezer is a Hot Cup of Tea. He Knows more about things than I do ; I will make him Vice-Chancellor.” Then Sam began to do the Alexander Act and Sighed for New Worlds to Conquer. So he Started in to be a Social Success. AH the Squaws were Dotty about him, and would Walk Miles to get the Loving Glance from his Cerulean Lamps. One Night he had been Conferring a Little Happiness on one of the Gentler Sex, and was Hitting the Grit toward his Domicile, wherfc he Desired to Hit the Feathers. As he was going past the City of the Dead at the ’Witching Midnight Hour, about twenty-eight Bold Bad Highwaymen Sprung up. They shoved 44’s in Sam’s Classical Countenance, and took his Ticker and his Wad. They then Bound his Tender Flesh with Cruel Thongs, and Hied Away to the “ Rural Regions,” with Sam in their Wake. About Steen Miles from Town, they entered a Hut with a Coco-Cola sign on it, and Tied their Weeping Captive to the Bed »87w4u u_ S =—_ __ _______________ ttfl Vy Ls fc w- VtU KlcLa-As i «ccL Post. They then Dispatched the Following Note to the Chancellor: Dere Chan Cellar : We have took away yourc pet. You can get Sammy back by paying a hansom ransom of 46 sents. We are concealed on the syllabubs of town house No. 4—11—44. Blud. When the news reached Athens, Universal Mourning broke forth. All the Flags hung at Half Mast, the church bells Tolled Mournfully, and all the Calico in Town threw a few Spasms of Grief. Great Mass-Meetings were held and by Strenuous Efforts the forty-six cents were raised. Even Tight-Wad and Pec-Wee Loosened Up with a Jitney apiece. The Next Morning Sam was Ransomed—and when 138he came back—the Sun burst Forth from Behind a Cloud, the Church Bells rang Peals of Joy—and the Athens Band played “ Hail to the Chief.” Sam had his Mug struck and sent it to the Constitution and had a two-column Puff about what a Great Man he Was. So he was Happy, and the Rags were Happy to Have their Hero Back and the University Resumed Exercises. Moral:—“ All's well that ends well.” Mac. I89The Personal Reminiscences of Ham. Told to n lteiK rtor Daring th© linyn of llftbc). BABEL was on a boom. Seta and Nimrod, the grandsons of Ham, were doing a land-office business selling sandwiches, ginger-cakes and soda pop to the Babel tower laborers. Their shop was on Main Street and directly under the office of the “ Babe] Times-Dcmocrat.” Their store was the favorite loafing place of all the tower workers, hen-pecked husbands, and lastly for their own Grandpa Ham, now a hale old man about eight hundred and thirty-nine years old, but whose tongue was as loose and active as ever, and many a stick of type had his yarns filled for me— then an humble reporter on the aforesaid “ Times-Dcmocrat.” One night the rain was coming down in sheets and slabs, and as I left the post-office, the idea occurred to me, that as it was such a wet night a larger crowd than usual would be hanging about Seta Nimrod’s place, and perhaps I might pick up an item or so of news. Accordingly I stepped into the shop, drank a ginger pop and sat down to sec what was going on. I had made several notes of local interest, such as electric lights being installed into the town, the contract for elevators being let, Jabet Baiba was sporting a new automobile, etc., when in stepped my old friend Ham, his raglan dripping with wet. ' Rainin’ purty hard outside, ain’t it? ” asked one of the loafers, as he sent a stream of tobacco juice against the stove and leaned back inquiringly in his soap-box chair and whittling a piece of soft pine. “ You fellers ain't never seen no rain. This ain’t no mor’n a straw in er whirlwin' side de one I wuz in onct—me an’ the ole man an 'the boys,” sarcastically responded Ham, as he drew up an empty cracker case and sat down upon it. I guessed what was coming—a story which the “ Babel Howler ” had often tried to draw from him, and many were the copecks that had been spent in treating to Milwaukee’s famous in so doing, but all in vain. He wouldn’t draw. Now if I could get this exclusive and run it in the morning paper, the “ Times-Dcmocrat ” would score the beat of the century. In a jiffy I had out my pencil and upon the reverse side of a tomato-can wrapper, I wrote in shorthand the story of the flood, just as old Ham told it. After borrowing a slab of natural-leaf, biting off the major portion thereof and handing back the smaller piece to the lender, he contributed to the beauty of the stove, and continued talking in a peculiar mixture of coon dialect and sorry white-folks gab—he being once a white man, and now a negro. “ That ain’t no lie—y ’all don’t know rain when ycr sec it. Whut's mo’ y 'all ain’t never goin’ to sec 190sich rain cz that wuz. Hit wuz the onliest one—a sorter one p’formancc act. Hit sorter soun’s fishy, I acknowledge, but hit's dc gospel truf jes dc same. Well, hit wuz lak dis. Ev’ybody wuz genin' so tarnal mean that it wuz cr shame to let uni live The men went out at night, and hung erbout s’loone shootin’ craps, playin’ poker an’ drinkin’ liker wus-sen enny booze comedians you ever seen. They never onct thought how wicked they wuz, but jes kep’ on keepin’ dives open all night an’ Sunday, buyin’ votes an’ pullin' wires in polyticks, bettin’ on bisicklc races an’ prize fights. Sich prize fights cz they wuz! Sharkey an’ Jeffries wuzzen in it wid dcm. “Well, thejuss thing you know, my ole man— he wuz powerful good, Noah wuz—he got a tip straight, as to how they wuz goin’ to be a flood an’ drown cv'ybody ’ceptin' him an’ his fambly. Then he tuk an built the owdashustest boat you ever seen, three storis high and three hundred cu-bicks long. It could give hearts and spades to them Atlantic liners an’ then beat urn out by a lap when it com ter size. When it wuz finished, he went out in dc woods an' gethcrcd in de crackcrjackcst lot of animals, birds an' snakes which ever come down dc pike. I wuz alius erfraid of wil’ animals, but I clum cr tree and watched um sloak in. Ycr kin talk erbout ycr ‘ great an’ only show,’ ycr Bamum's circus, ver sag-in-back trained animals, but if dc flood had'n kilt all dc foks I could a took jis one half ob dcm dat wuz in dc ark, an got cr hiperdrum tent an' made jes money ter thro’ at dc birds. 1 Ham’s Cucus—the Biggcs’ and Onliest.’ “ After dey wuz all in, de ole man called me, an’ I come shinnin down outen de tree an’ started fer de ark, but befo’ I could walk fo' cubicks de rain, hit started. An’ sich cr rain! I took cr jump an’ reached de do’ jest in time ter git in befo’ de ole man shet me out. “ I looked outen de winder and hit wuz sho rainin’. Draps wuz conun’ down ez big cz er pig-skin football. Well, hit rained, an’ rained an’ rained. Hit did’n stop for forty days an’ nights, but crlong befo’ dat we wuz cr floatin’ erbout in hot style. Hit wuz fine fer erwhile fer none uv us had never rid on a big bo’t befo; but purty soon hit begin ter git sorter tiresome and I started ter huntin’ up sump’n to ’muse myse’f wid. I wuz rummagin' erbout in de ole man’s brichcs pockets which wuz hangin’ on a stob on de wall when, bless yer soul, I found two dices—cr set uv bones! De gov’ncr didn’ wantcr lose de breed so he foch erlong er pair uv dice same as de rest of de animals. I slipped uni out whilst he wuzzen lookin' an’ went lookin’ fer Shem and Japheth—' Plict ’ I called him fer short—who wuz tryin’ some new flies which dey had sunt oft’n through de mail an’ had jes got befo' de flood come. De flics wuzzen no good an’ dey had only coched fo’ minnus. Dat comes from blevin’ everything dey read in dese cheap trashy papus. “ Purty soon dey quit fishin’ an’ we got up cr crap game which would make cr Georgia nigger’s eyes bulge, an’ ’t want long befo’ I had Shem an’ Phet on de pig. I wuz white den but I wuz goin’ter be black and dare ain’t no white man whut kin shoot craps wid cr nigger. We shot cm fer a jit cr roll an fo’ long I had way down in my jeans, cvy copeck them boys had. Dey wuz easy money. I thought I'd give Shem er chanct ter win some back an’ shelled out fo’ bits an’ told him I’d roll high fer his pants. His brichcs didn’t cost but ninety-nine copecks at a fire sale so he thought hit wuz er good deal an’ begin ter roll. De fust time he roll lebben, dc next he roll ten and den ten agin. Lordy, but dat wuz cr good role. I was skered my fo’ bits wuz gone, but I spit on one, made a cross mark on dc flo’, blowed on my hands an’ rolled lebben lak he done dc fus time. Come agin! an’ I rolled seven. Go down! an’ I throwed emuthcr an' won Shem’s pants. He had ter go ter bed an’ have his vituls sunt ter him 'till his ole woman could make him ernother pair out No. XXX Hour sacks. " Well sech cz dis went on fer nigh onto sebben mont, when dc ole man ast me ter go up in dc lof an’ let out cr crow ter see if it could fin’ any lan’. “ I wuz skeered ter go up amongst all them wiP animals so I mumbled out as ter how bad my hed wuz akin. “ Shem heard me an’ hollered out ‘ col’ feet.’ I could’n stan’ dat, so I said I'd go anyways, an’ up I went. I foun’ dc crow an’ sunt him out an’ had started back ergin when I put my foot on sumthin soft an’ hered dc offulest sound uv my life an’ at dc same time sumthin coch me frum bellin’ on de bottom ob my brichcs lak nail tongs ’til I come tumblin’ clown de ladder hollerin' murder-fire-perlicc jes cz loud cz I could holler. The ole man come cr runnin’ an’ took de bulldog loose from me an sunt her back to her pups where I had trodded on one. I had ter eat offen de mantelpiece an’ sleep on mcr face fer a mont’. “ At las’ de ark set down ergin on de mountin’ an’ de water went down. De govner built an orchid an’ a vin’yard an’ begin ter farm proper. He planted grapes lak he thought he had ter stock cr big market wid wine, when he wuz the only one ter drink hit cz we wuz only erbout er hundred years ole an’ too young ter drink it with him he said. But dat wine wuz most sholy good. De ole man got ter be er regular booze grafter, an’ one day when I wuz tryin’ ter squeeze sum wine outer de bung hole of cr keg whut ustcr have beer in it, I hered the curiousest fuss you ever seen, cr coinin’ out de ole gent’s libry. I keps cr listenin’ an’ purty soon I hered ’im cr tryin’ ter sing one uv them ragtime coon songs which wuz so poplar them days. The ole man wuz erbout three sheets on de toot an’ havin ’cr high rollin’ time. We won’t go home til mornin’, he hollered onct an’ den he got patrotic an’ sung sumthin erbout the ‘ stars an’ stripes.’ He wuz purty drunk den. Fo’ long, he quit makin’ any noises an’ I knowed he wuz tcctotally fessed, so I slipped easy lak into de room and sich a sight you never seen. De ole man’s silk dicer wuz on de flo’ squshed up lak he’d set on it; his shoes wuz hung on de gas jet an’ lie wuz on de flo’ slccpin’ lak a log wid his feet on de sofa, an’ a ccptin’ one 192sock, an’ a collar an’ a red necktie, he wuz ez necked cz cr jaybird in huckerbcry time. “ Shem an 'Phet found out ’bout the gov’ncr’s stunnin’ jag an' crawfished in backcrcd an put er comfort over him—an’ me—coz I did’n do ez they done I wuz turned cz black ez the blackest nigger in the State of Georgia.” Old Ham quit talking and spat at the unoffending stove as if it had been the cause of his downfall. I saw he wasn’t going to talk any more so I shinned up-stairs, and in a few minutes by the watch, I handed the astonished night editor the biggest beat the Timcs-Dcmocrat ever scored. The next day the qianagcment of the Hmvlcr offered me two hundred copecks per—but as my own boss had 193 done the real thing by me, I declined with thanks. I afterwards became editor and sole owner of the greatest daily ever published in that grand but doomed city of Sodom. We ran six automatic self-feeding and cutting Hoc, triple deck presses and our Sunday editions were crackajacks with three hundred and forty pages, besides a sixty-page supplement in fourteen colors, mostly shades in yellow. Thoughtless, pessimistic people called it a “ yellow journal" and attributed the destruction of Sodom, in a large measure to its presence. The presses were burnt up though and I came near crying when I saw Lot’s wife turn to a pillar of salt and didn’t have a paper in which to write it up. She was a society woman, you know, and the article would have scored a big hit among the upper ten.Then and Now. 1801—1001. LET us inquire into the condition of the University of Georgia in 1801—a new-born babe with a glorious career awaiting her. Let us glance at the matron and mother, as she is to-day—the fountain-head of education, in the Empire State of the South, with a past rich and blessed with memories of great men who have passed through her portals—with a future as rich and promising in the hopes of great men who will receive her blessings and call her mother. “ The roll-call of her alumni and the noble status of her centennial year crowns the grand old University with the laurel of perpetual usefulness.” The University of Georgia chartered in 1785 was the second oldest State institution of its kind in this country, antedated by Pennsylvania only. The senattis or governing body of the newly created University decided upon Greensboro in Greene County as a suitable site for the buildings to be erected. .The trustees had property in their charge, many acres of new and virgin land in Northeast Georgia, bestowed upon the University by the Legislature. Accordingly, in 1801, with the money accruing from the sale of a portion of these lands, the machinery of education was set in motion by the election of Josiah Meigs, of Yale, as President, with a salary of $1,000 per annum. The senatus, dissatisfied with their first action whereby Greensboro was selected as the site of the University, upon reconsideration decided to locate the University in Jackson County which embraced within its limits the present county of Clarke. To quote the tablet on Old College: "The site of this building was chosen on the VI day of July, 1801 in the XXVI year of the independence of the United States of America, by George Walton, Abraham Baldwin, John Millcdgc, John Quiggs, and Hugh Law, a 94committee from the Senatus Acadcmicus of the University of Georgia.” and for the benefit of the institution the adjacent land was on that day given by John Millcdge. It will not be out of place here for a remark-relative to this gift of John Millcdge. Far-seeing enough to realize that higher educational facilities would be of incalculable benefit to the State, he was at the same time sufficiently patriotic and public spirited to donate several hundred acres for the site of the new University. This gift was of invaluable aid to the struggling institution, and fairly paved the way to whatever prosperity she has had. 1 do not think that the University pays the respect to the memory of John Millcdge which his services for the infant institution merited. He is not honored as he should be. I do not think that it would be at all out of place were there annually a celebration commemorating his sendees, or perhaps it would be well were the new dormitory to bear his name. 1 will venture to assert that at present fully seventy-five per cent, of the men who attend the University, leave, never hearing of John Millcdge, never knowing who he was or what deeds he performed. It should be made apparent to them, they should realize, that the present position of the University is largely due to his work in her behalf, not only his generous gift, but his efficient service on the board of trustees. Contrast the simple and primitive state of affairs existing in 1801 with the complex workings of the University to-day. The University was then the i proud possessor of one instructor and he the President; to-day she employs twenty in Franklin College and the State School of Mechanics alone. Thirty students in comparison with more than three thousand 1 Wonderful change! Miraculous transformation ! But remember that one hundred years has intervened and the nineteenth century has accomplished marvels. The trustees authorized and directed Meigs to travel over the State and select such students as were worthy of a collegiate education. This was done and about thirty efficient students were secured. Were the present methods the same?—but the University is far more conservative to-day. However that was all very good in its time as a prosperous start was necessary. Only the A. B. course was given in 1801, first as a six-year course but soon shortened to four years. The other degrees now offered, B. S., C. E., and B. Ag. are the results of later years. The University has advanced with the progress of science and art until to-day she is on a par with any University in the South. In some departments she has outstripped the others. A few months ago the new department of electro-chemistry—a department of which few of her sister institutions can boast—was created. In 1801, Franklin College alone existed. But the turning of a hundred years has truly wrought marvels, worked wonders. To-day in addition to the University proper situated in Athens there arc as many as eight branch colleges, all integral parts 5of the State University, all engaged in higher education in and for the State of Georgia. This leads us to the question of the support which the Legislature has given and gives the University. It is noted that in 1801 the trustees asked and the Legislature gave. In 1901, again they asked and again they were given unto. Let us not look at the intervening years, of neglect, of pecuniary struggles and hardships but have eyes for only the first and last years of the University’s existence when the Legislature indeed realized their trust, the University’s worth and the grand mission on which she is bound. In 1801, a few log huts were employed to teach and inspire the few aspiring students. In 1901, large, commodious and handsome buildings grace i( the campus. Truly, a beautiful sight—the picturesque buildings, the graded walks shaded by long vistas of widespreading oaks, the beautiful lawns, the symmetry everywhere. The University was founded in a virgin wilderness. Athens was unknown. The frontier of the Cherokee country was distant only twelve miles; nothing seemed conducive to the rise of an educational center. The forest was early cleared. Athens is the result of the axe and hammer. Athens! Its intonation carries a classical idea and meaning. Can Athens live up to this idea? Athens indeed is a cultured community, perhaps the center of culture in the State. The students are surrounded on all sides by beneficial and upraising influences calculated to make them stronger, truer, better citizens. Frank H. Barrett. )6Verses. " A fig for care, and a fig for woe. If I can’t pay, why, I can owe.” University’s Sons. • “ Midnight shouts and revelry, Tipsy dance and jollity.” —Adams ancf McWhorter at the Charity Ball. • “ My mind to me a kingdom is.”—Freshman. “ My mind to me an empire is.”—Sophomore. “ He giveth his beloved sleep.” —Dr. Benedict lecturing to Lawyers. “He wears the face of youth upon him.” —Blackwell. “ With just enough learning to misquote.” —Bennett, Law ’oi. “ The rose that all arc praising, Is not the rose for me.”—Walden, Law ’oi. “ Pride in their port, Defiance in their eyes.”—Irish Clud. “ You write with ease to show your breeding, But easy writing is cussed hard reading.” —Hewlette, ’oi. “ For the rain, it raincth every day.” —Athens Climate. “ To be wroth with one we love, Doth work like madness on the brain.” —Smith (the jilted lover). 97Roasts Bescii.—“ A babe in the house is a well-spring of pleasure.” Elder.— “ Great wit is sure to madness near allied. And their partitions do their bonds divide.” McCurry.—“ And laughter holding both his sides.” Gatins.—“ How doth the little busy bee improve each shining hour.” Coocler.—“ A simple child that lightly draws his breath.” Adams.—“ Can a man with such angelic face, so many sins within him hide? ” Dorsey.—" He found the blessedness of being little.” McWhorter.—“ Lord! Lord!! how this world is given to lying.” Booth.—“ He draweth out the thread of verbosity finer than the staple of his argument.” Strickland.—“ A Mcllins Food Baby.” Maddox.—“And still the wonder grows, how one small head can carry all his nose.” Hewlette.—“How much in love with himself and that without a rival.” Clay.—“ A social success.” Fortson.—“ Fair insect that with thread-like legs spread out.” Donalson.—“ A lion among ladies is a most dreadful thing.” Brand.—“ What a spendthrift is he of his tongue.” Sam Johnson.—“A politician, one that would circumvent the gods.” Cliff Greene.—“ Often the cockloft is empty in those whom nature hath built many stories high.” Carson.—“ White, so very white.” Davis.—W. M.—“ I have seen better faces in my time.” Rucker.— “ Beautiful in form and features Lovely as the day, Can there be so fair a creature Formed of common clay.” Simeon Morton Turner.— “ There may have been greater men than I, but I don’t believe it.” 199Weatherly.— “ By outward show let’s not be cheated ; An ass should like an ass be treated.” Pratt Williams.— “ For by geometric scale Could take the size of pots of ale.” “ Davvy.”—“ The very hairs of your head are numbered.” The Chancellor.— " Narrow in form but broad in mind, One who knows more were hard to find.” Phil Shelling.— “ Placed on his chair he seems a very god While under-classmen tremble at his nod As all around sit wrapt in speechless gloom, His voice in thunder shakes the sounding dome Denouncing dire reproach to luckless fools Unskilled to plod in mathematics’ rules.” Banks.— ' When a woman’s in the case You know all other things give place.” Lustrat.—’ Did nothing in particular and did it very well.” Charley Strahan.—“ Those legs ; oh, those legs.” Billy Hooper.— “ Swans sing before they die. T were no bad thing Did certain people die before they sing.” Calhoun E. Noble.—“ He left a name at which the world grew pale.” Humphries.—“ Ma, gimme a cent ; I want to be tough.” Ercom.— “ The down upon his lip, Lay like the shadow of a lingering kiss.” Ricketson.— “ Be wise with speed, A fool at forty is a fool indeed.” McMillan.— “ I am too handsome a man; I ought to have been a woman.” McCutchen.— He is given to sport, to wildness and much company.” Hoyt.—“ I was not so fond of his company at first, but I am sick of it now.” Tison.—“ His equal lives not; thank heaven for that.” 200Sylvie.—“ His gags as stale a lot ever man did hear.” Horace Johnson.—“ A fly sat on the axle of a chariot-wheel and said, Whew 1 what a dust I raise.’ ” Oxford.—“ T was for the good of my country that I should be abroad.” The Freshman Class.—“ Chattering nonsense all the day long.” Jack Bower.—“ I met a fool in the forest, a motley fool.” Billy Hoyt.—“ A harmless necessary cat.” 21 Tiirelkeld.—“ Where gotst thou that goose look?” Mitchell King.—“ He gives his tongue no moments rest.” Jenkins.—“ No Hercules could have knocked out his brains for he had none.” Blackshear.—“ My only books were woman’s looks and folly all they taught me.” Jim Sibley.—“ No little scribbler is of wit so bare.” Noel Park.—“ It’s fun to see him strut about and try to be a man.” 51Wanted. Men who can dispense half as much conceit as Matt, Sam Johnson and Hunt. A man who has been boot-licked more than “ Silvy.” A Freshman, fresher than Hunnicutt. A man with a “ focus ” on his mug like Quincy, when Sam Hewlett allows him to preside over Law Class. Something as dry as our lectures on Medical Jurisprudence, moot parliaments, or as “ Cutting ” as the lectures on Roman Law. Men as important as Calkins, Quincy and Calloway. ' A lad who can talk more than Herbert Clay. A kid who loves “ Lucy ” more than Bobby Schirm. 202Farewell By Cross, Friends and Fellow Citizens, Ladies and Gentlemen, Fellow Students, Mr. Chancellor, and Professors of All Departments, Fellow Countrymen. Boys and Girls, Colored Folks and Poodle Dogs: Before I go away with my departure, I am inspired with an oration which I should like to leave with you. 'T is nine months since I First came to your city, but I remember it as distinctly, as had it been but yesterday, for the hackman who took my trunk up from the depot came near keeping it because I didn’t have twenty-five cents to pay him for his kindness. Then, too, as I peeped out of my window from Hotel Yahoo to behold this city, I saw a young lady who smiled upon me and threw a kiss at me. I ventured over to get it, but her father threw an iron poker at me; then I hastened away! away! But, as I was about to say, before I said that, you have all been kind to me, and have noticed me as I promenaded your streets with Ben Parks’s walking-cane in my hand, and my hands gloved with my black gloves, and my cuffs reaching to 2 Oration Law, ’oi. the ends of my fingers. Upon my head I wore my high silk beaver, while my long Prince Albert coat almost trailed the ground. Upon my feet were my tan shoes of larger size than any I know, and by my side was John Clifton Elder, who was dressed as nearly like me as could be. Thus we walked, with eager pride, with high collars about our snowy throats; so much so till our faces were almost turned heavenward. I guess, yes, I even know, that all who came in contact with us during our perambulation stopped in admiration and utter surprise to meet such gallant sirs. And wonder “ who they be? ” Envy doubtless got the best of the sports of this “ burg ” when they did us see, and for a season they had fluttcration of the heart. And their minds were bewildered and bumbled about with exceeding muchness. But it’s no use a-kickin’, because “just like it is, 't is.” But now I am soon to pass from you—and indeed much sooner than I expected, for these contributions arc spoiling this historic Prince Albert, which is indeed greater than I can bear. Adieu! Adieu! 03Answers Requested. Jack Tison.—“ Yes; I think the Faculty will get you to write a hook on parliamentary law; also, have you teach it.” Gay—‘‘Yes; we all knew you. You could tell something of the same nature but more of a mystery than anything we could tell. Also, you could " cuss ” louder and more than any man we knew. Bacon—“ Yes; your bright smile haunts us still. We remember that you spoke in the House of Parliament, and that you told Silvy of a friend who sold pecans at fifteen dollars a pound. Bf.n Parks—“ Certainly, everybody knew you. You took a prominent part in the Carnival, speiling Things to Adams—standing on his head at the Oiarity Ball. Booth—under the influence of coffee. Sam Johnson—the kidnapped. Turner—and his golf balls. McCurry—and his fancy hat. McWhorter's—creditors. Calhoun—amending by injection. Odom—singing bass. Cross’s—gloves and tan shoes. Jenkins—The parliamentarian. Will Davis’s—mustache. for “ Bosco.” Also, a few you “ ate alive.” Moreover, you arc personally acquainted with Grover Cleveland, and Lieutenant-Colonel Julian B. McCurry. “ Dinky ” Dallas—” Who don’t know you? Hugh Scott saw you wearing your short coat and thought it to be a vest with sleeves in it.” Brand (applying for scholarship at University of Chicago): “ I hear one of the Professors of the University of Chicago is here; shall I see him personally?” Professor Park: “ For God’s sake. No! Get out of the way. Don’t let him see you. Talk to him over the ’phone.” be Noticed. Silvy—sweating under the collar. Bclaval—and his white vest in mid-winter. Drechscl—and his pistol going through the keyhole. Shannon—reciting all the lesson. Four " Frcshics ”—on Sunday outing. Faculty—shooting Poole. Banks—the poet. Hines—in tights. Ben Parks’s and Billy Smith’s appetites (at the Beanery). 204II WHO?”Majority Rule; or, the Story of the 1901 “Mute” Parliament. A COMKDY IN TWO ACTS. ACT I.—"Getting Started." Time: n :30 a. m., Mon- Place: Upper story of day, February, 1901. the “ Ivy Building." (College bell sounds in the chapel tower; great excitement; lawyers seen gathered in small groups discussing the great event near at hand; soft music from afar.) John Mell, Chief (starting up and rapping twice with Jenkins’ famous “ rapperquiet reigns.) “ Comrades, mine hour is now come. Hark! The great day is at hand. Horace said, ' Carpe diem 1 ’ I-ct us now hasten to organize I Business—yes, business indeed—much business—great business must needs come before the House. Prepare ye now to meet thy Water-loo, for politico-pub-lico . . . .” Carney (sotto voce): "What ‘Lou’ is that?" (Hunnicutt secs the joke and inwardly roars with suppressed merriment.) 207John Mell, Chief (forging ahead): “ ... is the glory of sic semper tyrannis. Whom will ye have to rule over ye? Now’s the appointed day. Choose whom ye will while I stand near yon stove.” (The merry crackle of peanuts is overheard, and Walden snores.) Cherokee Cross (unfolding himself on the installment plan): “Mr. Ch—eh—chairman, I have got up t—t—to . . . . ” First Voice : “ It’s time to come down!" Second Voice: “ Take off your hat!! ” Third Voice: “Whisper, and we can hear you! ! ! ” Fourth Voice: “ Unwrap your legs! ! ! ! ” (McDonald embraces Quincy; and Hunnicutt sees the joke.) Cross (looking vile): “ I am up to nominate a m—m—man for t—t—t—temporary ch—ch—chairman . . . . ” Calhoun (eagerly): “ Gents, fearing lest some mully-duggin chap of a politician should bust the airy bubble of my nutch-hugged ambition, I now most cordially nominate myself for Doorkeeper and my smiling little friend. Renter, (pats Remcr's head ; Remer automatically smiles) yes, Renter, the newspaper man, for my assistant.” Cross (stamping with rage and one of his “ No Tens”): “Shut up till I git through!” (Calhoun trembles; Cooley draws forth his butcher knife and frightens George Hosntcr Harris, the scribe.) 208 Cross (continues fiercely): “ I want t—t—to nominate a ni—m—man for p—p—p—president of this sh—sh—shebang! ” Cooley : “ I second the motion! ” Odom : “ I move we adjourn! ” Booth : " I move we all stop and take a drink 1 ” Tison : “ I nominate Jenkins! ” Voices: "Jenkins! Jenkins! ! Jenkins! I !” Cross: “ Shut up, you d—d—durned fools. I'm goin’ to n- n— n—nominate him myself. I nominate Mr. Jenkins. All in favor say Aye! ’ ” Voices: "Aye!” "Aye!” President Jenkins (rapping like thunder): “ If you all can't keep still, I’m going to leave the room.” Moore: "You’d better take the room with you.” (Hunnicutt sees the joke and Walden snores.) Bacon : " I move we have an election! ” Shannon : “ I move we have a collection! ” Odom : “I move we adjourn! ” (Billy Hosch grows amused and falls off the bench.) Erwin: "I move that infants, idiots, lunatics, drunkards, persons under duress, and married women be excluded from membership.” Cooley : " I second the motion 1 ” Burtz: "Aw—aw—aw—what’s the question?” Dreciisel (to Burtz): " If you say that again, I ’ll fight you, I 'll fight you! ’’ Ricketson : “ I move we all put down where we arc from.” Tison : " I call for the previous question! ”President Jenkins (continues to rap): “ Gentlemen, the motion have been made and seconded.” Hunnicutt: “I move we put everybody under the table who makes a motion after this.” Calhoun : “ Everybody remember to vote for me and Reiner.” Cross (rising with difficulty): “ I n—n—nominate Mr. B—B—Bclaval! ” Bf.laval (pulling at Cross’s coat-flap): “ I refuse ! I refuse! ” Bowen : “ It seems like I hear the curfew.” Odom : " I move we adjourn! ” President Jenkins (much confused and still rapping): All who want to be president, stand up! ” (Hunnicutt laughs.) President Jenkins (shaking the gavel at Hunnicutt) : “ You think that is funny; but it ain’t.” Calhoun : “ I move you all let me talk I” Cooley: "I second the motion!” President Jenkins : “ Mr. Burtz, what was your motion? " Burtz : “ I aw—aw—aw haven’t moved.” President Jenkins: “ Will somebody please call the roll?” Calhoun: ” I will, if you ’ll all vote for me and Rcmcr.” (Quincy embraces McDonald.) Callaway : “ Let’s all vote! ” Bennett : “ Yes, that’s it; let's vote! ” Voices: “ Vote! Vote! ! Vote! ! !” President Jenkins (shaking the gavel wildly): “ If anybody else speaks or says a word, I ’ll send for the police! ” (Much laughter and stamping of feet.) President Jenkins (grows frantic): “Police! Police! !” (In the midst of the confusion, a tremendous explosion on top of the stove fills the room with smoke and sends the Chief bounding towards the stage. The two Adamses and several others mount desks and several take refuge under benches and in the skeleton room. “ Ghosts ’ “ anarchists,” and " ventriloquists ” arc in turn shouted on all sides, and at the height of the bedlam the curtain closes on the smoke bedimmed convention, revealing in the distance, as it goes down, the valorous Chief and the still more valorous Jenkins engaged in mortal combat over the gavel.) ACT II.—“ Getting Stopped.” Time : 11130 a. m., Thursday, February, 1901. Place : The same. (President Dinsmorc in the chair; Peter Riketson rises to call the roll; stern looks on the faces of all; McWhorter and McCurry, the two politicians, arc heard confabbing in subdued tones; Sanford wipes his glasses and laconically smiles; Shannon, Calhoun, Tison, and Hunnicutt writhe in agony, for each has his mouth covered with sticking plaster; the house is resolved to have order at whatever cost.) 209Peter R.: “ Now everybody tell what county they come from while I call the roll.” (Calls roll.) “ Adams, A. P.” “ Just outside.” " Adams, J. W.” " Nowhere at all.” “ Moore.” “The land of the Boers.” “ Elder.” “ My law office up-town.” “ Smith.” “ Lucy Cobb.” “ Bennett.” " Okcefinokcc.” “ Walden.” “ The land of Nod.” “ Bacon.” “ Down in South Georgia.” “ Carney.” “ The Green Hills.” “ DeHart.” “ The Streets of Cairo.” “Mott.” “China.” " Booth.” “ The Solar System.” “ Grubbs.” “ Mother Earth.” “ Williams.” “ State at Large.” “ Roop.” “ The Islands of the East.” “ Calhoun.” “ Palatka, Florida, sir! ” “ Bclaval.” “ Cooling Room.” “ Herring.” “ The deep, deep sea! ” President Dinsmore (rising): “ What business comes before the house to-day? ” Turner: “I move we do over again what we did yesterday.” (President Dinsmore puts the motion ; no response; he turns red and puts it again; again no response. He declares motion lost.) Tison (rises, groans through the plaster on his mouth, is recognized, and takes his scat.) Calhoun (rises, groans, waves his arms, is recognized, and also takes his seat.) Hunnicutt (makes a start to rise, but McCucn secures the floor first, and then silently resumes his place.) President Dinsmorf. (standing on one foot): 44 All who want to get through electing officers, say 4 Aye!'” Callaway: 44 Aye I” President Dinsmore : 44 Opposed, 4 No!' ” (No response; motion declared lost.) President Dinsmore: 44 All who want to learn parliamentary law, say 4 Aye! ’ ” Williams and Logan : 44 Aye 1 ” President Dinsmore: 44 All who don’t, say ‘No!’” Cooley and Odom : 44 No 1 ” Voices: "Division! Division!!” (President Dinsmore puts question again with same result; and then declares motion lost.) President Dinsmore (rcadingMrom Tison Melt's Articles of Confederation): 44 All who are in favor of Section One, say 4 Aye! ’ ” (No response ; motion lost.) President Dinsmore (red in the face): 44 All who are in favor of Section Two, say 4 Aye!' ” (No response; motion lost.) President Dinsmore (red from collar to crown): 44 All who arc in favor of Section Three, say 4 Aye! ’ ” (No response; motion lost.) President Dinsmore (desperately): 44 All who arc in favor of Section Four, say 4 Aye!' ” (No response ; again the motion was lost.) 210Hunt (coming to the rescue): “ I move we all put ten cents fine on each other.” Voices : “ Put him out! Put him out! ! ” President Dinsmore instructs the Doorkeeper, McCurry, to eject the boisterous person who made that motion, but instead Mac conceals him in the skeleton room, where Hunt continues his cry, “ Ten cents! ten cents! just ten cents apiece! ” Williams: “I move we don't go home till morning! ” (Booth's brother, a visitor, laughs at something or other, and is fined for disorder; McCurry resigns as Doorkeeper; and great confusion ensues; Bcla-val, Rucker, qnd Harris escape through the door.) Rucker : “ I move we dispense with the critic’s report to-day.” John Mell (springing on a chair): “ Mine hour is at length at an end. Adios. Mes bons amis, adios! Well have ye wrought! Much parliamentary law have ye crammed into your receptive and capacious caputs, and now a long and tender 4 adios.’ In parting now, while our distinguished fratcr and compeer, Brother Cross, leads the famous 4 Cherokee Cantata with Variations,’ we will all join hands, chime in the song, and march round the room three hundred and forty-six times with out any applause." (Quincy and McDonald embrace each other; Walden snores; and Hunnicutt inwardly roars with merriment.) (Quick Curtain.) 211In Memoriam JOHN B. GORDON JONE.S, Class 1900. Died July 26th, 1900, Age, Twenty-one Years. 212 In Memoriam. ALVIN ALFRED HAINE.S, Class of 1904. Died December 20th, 1900, Age, Nineteen Year . 213Valedictory. Br J r CWioo. Farewell, Athena, city of learning, Forth from your gatca I sadly am turning Into a world of turmoil and strife. Year loom behind me, brimming with pleasure, Sprinkled with bitterness, sparse though, its measure ; Full of their labors, mingled with leiiure, Now they are past, like dreams of my life. Farewell, now, thou grand University, Dear Alma Mater, shield from adversity, No more I ’ll walk in the shade of thy walls. Farewell, professors—I must be moving— Farewell, Chancellor, firm, yet so loving, Now are my tears my heart’s anguish proving, As I depart from yon college halls. Fare ye well, now, kind people of Athens, Out from your homes forever I'm passing, Homes that lavished their comforts on me. You have given me friendship and gladness, Sweetly consoled mo when borne down with sadness, Kindly reproved me when wrong, without madness, Now to lifo’s sterner battles I flee. Farewell, all, for now I must leave you, Never again, perhaps, shall I see you ; Never more hear that old chapel bell, I must bo oflf for the future’s to-morrow, No more from grief her burdens must borrow, Yet is my voice now choking with sorrow, All I can say is the one word, Farewell. 214THANKS The Editors of Pandora desire to tender their most sincere thanks, and deepest appreciation, first to Professor Park, without whose aid this volume could never have been Issued; next to Mr. Hlrsch, who has been of Invaluable assistance to the business management; and almost equally with these to the following friends: Miss Laura Blackshear Mr. Phinizy Calhoun Mr. Andrew Calhoun Mr. Harris Mr. Parks Mr. Barrett Miss Lucy Woodall Miss Garland Smith Mr. MacMillan Mr. J. Sibley Mr. Stephens Mr. Hardy Mr. Simms Mr. Russell Mr. Booth Mr. Hunnicut Miss Fannie Meldrim Mr. Boggs Mr. ElderND now the time to say good-bye has come, and the PANDORA editors leave their worK with you. We hope that you have been pleased with it. Laboring under many difficulties, we have done our best. If the merits of our booK havo pleased you and its faults have not wearied you too much, we are satisfied. Our hearty thanKs are due to the many friends who have' aided in the production of this volume, and it is with Kindest thoughts of these that we say farewell. THE EDITORS. 216I 2 7  C»« Cliff Rouse TALLULAH FALLS. CEORCIA. THE ONLY HOTEL DIRECTLY at the Falls Is being remodeled, enlarged, and baths and toilets put in. UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT AS LAST SEASON. Attractions £ ■r if £ f «£ ■f ■£ £ An excellent orchestra and 3 ball six nights In the week, horseback riding, driving, bowling, pool, and billiards (free), tennis, straw-rides, and picnics. Easy of access and the finest climate In the South. Rates Reasonable. J- c. WYATT, of ttae Misigcr. Commercial. ATHENS. GEORGIA. 'i ■r I •r •r I §« f § H $ SEND US YOUR ORDER o o George muse Clothing go. FASHIONABLE, UP-TO-DATE (GKKMIIIIKRS amirmEs Aira IFUKEHUISIEIBIBS t 4 4 4 Our Clothing Fits and Wears Well. You will be pleased with your purchases from us. 38 WkitckiU Street. ATLANTA. GEORGIA. r £ SOUTHERN RAILWA Y THE TRUNK LINE SYSTEM OF THE SOUTH EXCELLENT PASSENGER SERVICE INCLUDING THE FAMOUS WASHINGTON AND SOUTHWESTERN VESTIBULED LIMITED BETWEEN NeW York 1TED STATES he East FAST MAIL AND THE ---- and the SouthATLAWT AND NEW: and the South YORK EXPRESS Via Atlanta Via Atlanta THE CINCINNATI AND FLORIDA LIMITED. THE CINCINNATI AND FLORIDA EXPRESS. VIA ATLANTA. THE RICHMOND AND ATLANTA EXPRESS. ALSO AMPLE WAY TRAINS FOR LOCAL TRADING ACCOMMODATIONS. v M M M M M BEST LINE TO AND FROM ATHENS Complete Information Cheerfully Furnished by Any Agent of the Company. J. M. CULP, W. A. TURK, S. H. HARDWICK, W. H. TAYLOE. R. W. SIZER, Traffic Manager, Asst. Pass. Traf. Mgr., Gen'l Pass. Agent, Asst. Gen'l Pass. Agt., General Agent, WASHINGTON, D. C. WASHINGTON. D. C. WASHINGTON. D. C. ATLANTA. GA. ATHENS. GA.J. J. GOODRUM, JR “ nptl)tng tijat Smokers g mokc.” PRUDENTIAL BUILDING Corner Forsythe and Marietta Streets. ATLANTA, GEORGIA Henry Thornton Bicycles and Sporting Goods baseball and football Uniforms, Jerseys, Etc. In Correct College Colors In Stock. 4J North Pryor Street ATLANTA, GEORGIA. SOMETHING EVERY ONE NEEDS. t Our Roses and myrrb Cootbwasb. Delightfully Fragrant, Highly Antiseptic, Keeping the Teeth white and the Gums In an elegant condition. Price, 25 Gents. ht u by.. H, R. PALMER SONS, DRUGGISTS, ATHENS, GEORGIA.The University of Georgia - ATHENS. GEORGIA. - ESTABLISHED BY THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE IN 1785. ENDOWED BY THE GENERAL GOVERNMENT. THE HEAD OF THE STATE SYSTEM OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. j ' ■ •' Open to All White } Lales From Any State. TUITION ABSOLUTELY FREE EXCEPT IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS, THE ONLY CHAROE BEING $1500 PER YEAR FOR INCIDENTAL EXPENSES AND USE OF LIBRARY. .... = DEPARTMENTS: = I. Franklin College, offering regular classical degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Letters. II. State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, offering the degrees of Bachelor of Sci- ence and Bachelor of Engineering. III. School of Law, offering the degree of Bachelor of Law, which entitles to practice in all Georgia Courts. SPLENDID SCIENTIFIC AflD LITERARY EQUIPMENT.Hirsch Brothers " CLOTHING 44 Whitehall Street, HEADQUARTERS ATLANTA, GEORGIA. SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS LEADING . . . CLOTHIERS, TAILORS, FURNISHERS, ____________HATTERS LIPSCOMB COMPANY FIRE INSURANCE 'Phone 54. ATHENS, GA. Your Business Solicited. SMOKE “RUBY STAR" 5 CENT CIGAR. FOR SALE AT THE “ GEM CAFE,” ATHENS, GA. DANFORTH WILLARD, Wholesale Distributors. AUGUSTA, GA. A. J. McBRIDE, ATTORNEY AT LAW, 43} Whitehall Street. ATLANTA, GA. HENRY HULL. ATTORNEY AT LAW, JO} South Broad Street. ATLANTA, GA. t £1 4 = TWO STORES =- Dryuoods turner hodgson ..ShoesPotts=Thompson Liquor Company — (iHMIMKIl) —i AGENTS FOR ORIGINAL BUDWEISER BOTTLED BEER. OPPOSITE MAIN ENTRANCE KIMBALL HOUSE. FRANK M. POTTS. Pr.«id«nt DISTILLERS OF hinhvpotts.s t Stone mountain Corn CUbiskcv Telephone No. 48. .No. 9 North Try or Street. -Atlanta, GeorgiaTine Printing fraternity Stationery Htbletic Goods ALL THE NEW BOOKS TEXT BOOKS AND STUDENTS' SUPPLIES D. W. McGREGOR 2B DoQss(tar B» AS PUBLISHED. .... ATHENS, GEORGIA. Chas. Stern 6 Co. E.. H. DORSE.Y, (DlLCDmimiKBS mi OTiKBS Glotbier, Matter, lmiiKlISIHlEIBS jfurnleber. Suits made to order Fit guaranteed ”3 Chyto St.. ATHENS. CA. 115 CUyton Street. ATHENS. CEOHCIA. WE PRINTED THIS AND ABOUT FIFTEEN OTHER ANNUALS THIS SPRING. 


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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.