University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1895

Page 1 of 196

 

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1895 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1895 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1895 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1895 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1895 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1895 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1895 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1895 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1895 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1895 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1895 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1895 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1895 Edition, University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 196 of the 1895 volume:

VOLUME VIII—1895 A Phi 7 PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY THE FRATERNITIES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA ATHENS, OA. MAY, MDCCCXCVGeorgia, Georgia, Rah ! Rah !! Georgia, Georgia, Rah ! Rah!! Hoo, Rah ! Hoo, Rah !! 'Varsity, 'Varsity, Rah! Rah!! Rah!!! Hoo, Rah ! Rah !! Hoo, Rah! Rah !! Rah! Rah!! G-E-O-R-G-I-A. Hi, yi, yi, yi, Hip hoo ray! ‘Varsity, 'Varsity, U-G-A Razzlcty, Dazzlcty, Sis boom ah! Georgia, Georgia, Rah! Rah!! Rah!!! Atlanta, G a.: Chak. P. Bvbd, Printer. 1835.6 F oard of Editors OF VOLUME VIII OF “THE PANDORA.” Editor-in-Chief. WALTER A. HARRIS, X t . Business Manager. JOEL J. GIBSON, A T A. Associate Editors. W. L. KEMP, 5 N. JOHN WHITE MORTON, K A. JAMES T. DUNLAP, ❖AO. H. V. BLACK, X Y. W. W. CHANDLER, A T 0. HAL. H. STEINER, 5 A E. oPreface If one short volume could comprise All that is witty learned and wise, How would it be esteemed and readStci I. Since the time when Cadmus "or whoever it was that invented books,” in presenting his volume to the reading public, saw fit in the beginning of his work to call the attention of the world to himself as the inventor of this new method of imposing on suffering humanity, it has been the custom of every author whether of an almanac or of a Cherokee Dictionary, to inflict upon his readers an account of the reasons that drove him to issue his volume and the trials attendant upon its issue. The Editors of the Pandora would gladly omit any such a feature from their publication, but such a departure from the universal custom of mankind would not fail to bring down upon us the censure of all the devotees of the common sense philosophy. An account of the trials, vicissitudes and misfortunes through which we have struggled, until at last we are able to present our book to you, it is needless to attempt; for neither space nor the patience of the reader will permit: suffice it to say that more than once the obstacles seemed insurmountable and despair almost overwhelmed the Editors. Such matters as the loss of an Editor-in-Chief in the very midst of the work, and the seeming utter impossibility of being able to obtain a firm financial footing, are examples of the difficulties with which we have had to contend. By dint of much labor we have been able to overcome them all, and are here to make our bow. The Non-Eratcrnity Club has aided us through all, and their editor has been of great service. If you have taken up this volume thinking to gam from it an idea of the courses of study pursued in the various departments of the University, of the methods of instruction employed, of the standing of the men in their classes, and of the general excellence of our college as an institution of learning, we should advise you to lay it down without reading it, for you are destined to be disappointed. We would respectfully refer you to the catalogue, where you can gain information in plenty upon these points. This is not in our line. Our purpose has been to portray the life of the student. Our picture is necessarily a caricature, for on this point also custom is inexorable, and demands that we be witty, though we be not ‘learned and wise.’ Yet we do not deem it necessary to apologize here to those whom we have thus been forced to paint in glaring colors, if they are not true colors, it is their fault and that of the world that laughs at them. We have tried to bow to the “universal opinion of mankind,” and in the deepest sorrow and sympathy with those who arc thus esteemed, we have shown what they appear to the college world. So if you don’t like what we have said of you, go attack the college at large; we arc but a looking glass that reflects its sentiments. We disclaim all responsibility for everything in this book and will not fight. 0n .. j ytr’ •» c iJ A VV. A.HARRIS V XCI «J- J.GI6SCN v ATA f i. H. V. Black, X Y. 2. H. 1 W. L. Kemp, 5 N. 4. VV. VV. Candler, A T 0. 5. J. G. Smith nlap, t A 0. 7. J. W. Morton, K A.Dedication Full many a year has Georgia’s college stood The first among the institutions of the State, The fittest trainer of her growing youth, In all that to the intellect pertains. The lessons that their Alma Mater taught Her sons have ever turned to good account; And now within the legislative halls Those who have gone from out her doors, Control the fortunes of the commonwealth. Despising not the glories won for her By those who thus upheld her fame; In contests where the might of mind was felt, And often learning turned the wordy battle's tide, Nor yet unmindful of the worth of those Who while in college did devote themselves To study and the search for learning deep, I-ay we our tribute at the feet of those Whose victories in another sphere were won, The spirit of the new the age has seized, And we must bow before the customs new— A body sound as well as cultured mind Is what the world docs now demand. To you our canvas armored foot ball knights, Heroes of fiercest battles fought and won. Who from the place where all unknown it stood, Did raise our college to where now it stands The first in sports that make the manly man Of all the institutions in this State, Or in the land of fighting Tillmanitcs; Who did on many a hard fought field Uphold our colors ’gainst the fierce attacks Of mighty men of muscle, bone and brawn, And did in triumph place the Red and Black Above the ensign of your ancient foe. And made the unknown quantity well known To rivals who did learn your might too late; To trainer, captain, players, subs and all Who made up that great winning foot-ball team We dedicate this book that feebly tells Of glorious history you have helped to make. 0University of Georgia departments. I. FRANKI.IN COLLEGE, Athens. II. STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS, Athens, With branches as follows : 1. North Georgia Agricultural College, Da ilonega. 2. South Georgia Agricultural College, Thornasvil e. 3. Middle Georgia Agricultural College, Milledf'eville. 4. West Georgia College of Agriculture, Hamilton. III. SCHOOL OF LAW, Athens. IV. SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, Augusta. V. SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY, Atlanta. VI. GEORGIA NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE, Milledgcville. VII. COLLEGE FOR COLORED YOUTHS, Savannah. •Ino-irnoratod In accordance with an Act of ConRiv-. known a the ••Morrill Act." decrees. The following degrees, any one of which will confer the title of Graduate of the University of Georgia, will be given to those students who complete satisfactorily the course prescribed for each degree: UNIVERSITY DEGREES: Master of Arts, Graduate course. Master of Science, Graduate course. IN FRANKLIN COLLEGE: Bachelor of Arts, Four years’ course. IN STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE : Bachelor of Science, Four years’ course. Bachelor of Agriculture, Three years’ course. Bachelor of Engineering, Four years’ course. Civil Engineer, Graduate course. Civil and Mining Engineer, Graduate course. IN THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS: Bachelor of Law One year’s course. Doctor of Medicine, Three years’ course. Mechanical Engineer, Four years’ course. 10Trustees of fl)e (Jniver ify 1894-1895- His Excellency, Gov. W. Y. ATKINSON, Atlanta, Ex Officio. VV. H. FELTON, Cartersvillf., From the State at Large. N. J. HAMMOND, Atlanta, h. d. McDaniel, Monroe, A. K. LAWTON, Savannah, JOHN SCREVEN, Savannah, A. T. McINTYRE, Thomasvillk, W. H. FISH, Americas, W. A. LITTLE, Columbus, II. V. M. MILLER, Atlanta, A O. BACON, Macon, D. 13. HAMILTON, Rome, J. A. BILLUPS, Madison From the State at Large. From the State at Large. From the State at Large. 1st Congressional district. 2d Congressional district. 3d Congressional district. 4th Congressional district. 5th Congressional district. 6th Congressional district. 7th Congressional district, 8th Congressional district. N. L. HUTCHINS, Lawrenceville, 9th Congressional district. R. L. GAMBLE, Louisville, S. R. ATKINSON, A. L. HULL, Athens, H. COBB, Athens, N. E. HARRIS, Macon, W. Y. ATKINSON, Newnan, President Board of Commissioners Girls' Industrial College. P. W. MELDRIM, Savannah, President Board of Commissioners Colored Industrial College. 10th Congressional district, nth Congressional district. Resident Trustee. Resident Trustee. President Technological Board. of Georgia. Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1899. Term Expires Sept. I St, 1901. Term Expires Sept. 1st, IS95. Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1897- Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1897. Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1897- Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1897. Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1895- Term Expires Sept. I St, 189;. Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1901. Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1901. Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1895. Term Expires Sept. 1st. 1899. Term Expires Sept. I St, 1899. Term Expires Sept. 1st, »«99 Term Expires Sept. I St, 1899. Term Expires Sept. 1st, 1901. Ex Officio. Ex Officio. Ex Officio 111894— September 21, Wednesday: September 19, Monday: October 1, Monday: November 31, Thursday: December 21, Friday: 1895— Januarv 3. Thursday: January 19, Saturday: February 19. Tuesday: February 22, Friday: March 20, Wednesday: March 27, Wednesday: Aprii. 1, Monday: April 3, Wednesday: April 10, Wednesday: May 4, Saturday: May 11, Saturday: May 18, Saturday: May 25, Saturday: May 30, Thursday: June 13, Thursday: June 14, 15, Friday and ) Saturday: f June 15, Saturday: June i6, Sunday: June i 7, Monday: June 18, Tuesday: June 19, Wednesday: September 16, 17, Monday) and Tuesday: i September 18, Wednesday: October i, Tuesday: Calendar Examination for admission. Session begins. Medical School opens. National Thanksgiving Day. Christmas Recess begins. Exercises resumed. Examinations for Entrance, half advanced. Birthday of R. E. Lee; Shropshire medal contest. Anniversary of the Dcmosthenian Society. Washington's Birthday; Anniversary of Phi Kappa Society. Senior Essays due. Junior Essays due. Competitive Senior Orations. Commencement of Medical School. Competitive Junior Speaking. Examination in Elementary English. Sophomore Competitive Declamation. Freshman Competitive Debate. Sophomore Competitive Debate. Junior Competitive Debate. Senior Competitive Debate. Final Examinations begin. Board of Trustees meet in Athens. Examinations for entrance. Senior Class Exercises. Baccalaureate Sermon. Mia. m., Oration before Literary Societies. (4 p. m., Sophomore Declamation, f 11 a. m., Alumni Oration. I Junior Orations. Commencement Day—Summer Vacation begins. Examinations for Entrance. Session opens. I .aw School opens. Medical School opens. 12University of Georgia Faculty WILLIAM ELLISON BOGGS, D.D., LI. D., Chancellor. WILLIAMS RUTHERFORD, A.M., Emeritus Professor of Mathematics. DAVID CRENSHAW BARROW, C. and M.E., Professor of Mathematics. SAMUEL CALDWELL BENEDICT, M.D., Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. WILLIS HENRY BOCOCK, A.M., Millege Professor of Ancient Languages. WILLIAM ELLISON BOGGS, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Metaphysics and Ethics. JOHN PENDLETON CAMPBELL, A.B. Ph.D., Professor of Biology. L. H. CHARBONNIER, A.M., Ph.D., HOWELL COBB, A.B., B.L., CHARLES HOLMES HERTY, B.Ph., Ph.D., WILLIAM DAVIS HOOPER, A.B., JAMES BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, A.M., Dean of Faculty of Arts and Professor of Physics atui Astronomy. Professor of Law. Adjunct Professor of Chemistry and Instructor in Physical Culture. Adjunct Professor of Ancient Languages. Processor of Agriculture. JOHN HANSON THOMAS McPHERSON, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of History and Political Science. JOHN MORRIS, A.M., Instructor in English and Modem Languages. SYLVANUS MORRIS, A.M., B.I., Professor of Laiv. ANDREW HENRY PATTERSON, B.E., A.M., Instructor in Physics. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN RILEY, A.B., D.D, Professor of the English Language and Literature. OSCAR HOLMES SHEFFIELD, C.E., Instructor in Engineering and Free-hand Drawing. CHARLES MERCER SNELLING, (Graduate V. M. I.), Adjunct Professor of Mathematics and Instructor in Military Tactics. CHARLES MORTON STRAHAN, C. andM.E., Professor of Engineering and Applied Mathematics. HENRY CLAY WHITE, B.Sc., Ph.D., F.C.S., Professor of Chemistry and TkrkF.LL Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. CYPRIAN PORTER WILLCOX, A.M„ LL.D., Professor of Modem Languages. 13.faculty of fbc Xaw School. WILLIAM ELLISON BOGGS, D.D.. LL.D., Chancellor. HOWELL COBB, A. M., B. L., SYLVANUS MORRIS, A. M„ B. L., JOHN D. MKLL, A. B., B. L., SAMUEL C. BENEDICT, M. D., Judge City Court of Athens, Professor of Law. Professor of Law. Professor of Parliamentary Law. Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. ANDREW J. COBB, A. B., B. L„ HON. POPE BARROW, SPECIAL LECTURERS. Lecturer on Constitutional Law, Pleading and Contracts, lecturer on Common Law, Evidence and Equity. HON. WILLIAM T. NEWMAN, HON. N. L. HUTCHINS, HON. JOSEPH B. CUM MING, HON. P. W. MELDRIM, HON. JOSEPH H. LUMPKIN, LECTURERS. U. S. Judge, Northern District of Georgia, Lecturer on the Jurisdiction and Practice of the Federal Courts. Judge of the Superior Courts, Western Circuit, Lecturer on Equity and Equity Practice. Lecturer on Law of Corporations. I-ecturcr on Criminal Law and Real Property. Judge of the Superior Court, Atlanta Circuit, lecturer on Commercial Law. 14Tf)e Report Concerning ti)e Univer it The war against the State University still continues. Through the pulpit and the press bigoted prelates and selfish sectarians fiercely attack this grand old institution. Each year there is an outcry raised against the payment by the State of its just debt to the trustees of the University; and not satisfied with curtailing the appropriations so sadly needed by our college, her rivals whine like jealous children because, forsooth, the State refuses to tax its own property. Nor arc these the only methods of attack to which our enemies resort. There arc others, more insidious yet productive of quite as much harm to the interests of the University. Acting upon the old adage “give a dog a bad name and hang him,” those who wish the University ill and are able to control a newspaper arc doing their best to hang our college. These harpies have east slime and filth upon its good name. Under their treatment mole-hills have become mountains; youthful indiscretions have been magnified into crimes against law and decency; the manifestations of the exuberance of animal spirits have been portrayed as evidences of the most degraded state of moralty: so that there are now throughout the State of Georgia a large number of people who believe that the University at Athens is a very hot-bed of vice, the home of the drunkard and the ruffian, where from one day's end to another students study nothing but plans for disturbing the peace and creating malicious mischief. We do not profess to be better than the average of young men who are in attendance at colleges, yet we do believe that in justice we should not be considered below the average in morality. True, there may be among us some wild spirits, but where can you gather together between two and three hundred young men, that some will not be hard to restrain ? We venture to say that we have no larger number of the unrcstrainablc than are in the colleges in whose behalf our Pharisaical enemies cast their stones. 15True, we do engage in inter-collegiate athletic contests, yet no one recognizes more keenly than we do, the dangers of excess. Let those carping critics who attack us because we turn some part of our attention to manly sports, be silent until they have seen us fail in the sphere of the scholar. So soon as athletics shall have been seen to have interfered with the courses of study in the University, we believe they should be abolished or restricted. Yet, we do not think—for statistics show to the contrary—that athletics have been in any measure detrimental to the standing of the men on the teams, nor have they lowered the standard of the college as a whole. In spite of the difficulty it experiences in obtaining money, the University of Georgia has a most efficient corps of professors, possesses well equipped laboratories and gives an opportunity for as high a course of study as almost any college in the South. Why is it then, that we find Georgia parents sending their sons outside of the State or to sectarian institutions, in preference to their own University ? Is it because they believe the reports spread abroad concerning the State college? These have been for many years the weapon with which her enemies have stabbed the University in the back, yet we have only to point to the achievements of her alumni to prove conclusively the falsity of the statement as regards the unfitness of our college as a training school for young men. What other institution is the Alma Mater of so many of the rising young men of Georgia—not to speak of the distinguished older graduates ? In every line of life they have attained distinction and arc a recognized power in shaping the fortunes of the State. Yet they were brought up in the atmosphere which our enemies would have you believe is least fitted for the development of noble characters. These evil reports must be stopped, it is the duty of every friend of the University to sec that no more slurs be cast upon her fair name. We do not ask that truth be suppressed, but that justice be done. l«9f 2 17trb c The curtain falls on Ninety-five, They’ll tread these classic halls no more, Their bark of life now sails away Far from the dear old campus’s shore. With feelings wrought'twixt pleasure bright And sorrow dark, they bid adieu, Amid the smiles there shines a tear, For friends are parting good and true. No more they’ll hear the college yell That echoed through the campus air; No more thcy’l walk by L. C. I. To gaze upon some fair one there. Relentless time has swiftly flown, Commencement day is here at last. Farewell to books and hard exams, They take their leave, the Senior class. Senior. Good bye we bid to all the Profs., Who here four years instructed us, We know they'll never find a class Who know so little how to ‘•bust." Farewell we say to all the hoys, From Freshman green to Junior wise, May every one now follow us And never, never miss a rise. Four years ago as Freshmen green, We entered at the U. of G.; To tread the road of knowledge here. That leads at last to a degree. Commencement day has now arrived, The chapel bell peals out once more. A fond farewell to Ninety-five, The curtain falls—our play is o’er. G. W. R.Class of Ninety-Five YELL. Rah! Rah!! Rah!!! Sizz! Boom ! Ah ! Ninety-five! Ninety-five! Rah! Rah!! Rah!!! COLORS. Black and Maroon. flowers. Sunflower. E. M. GAMMON . . JOEL J. GIBSON . GEORGE W. REAB HAWES CLOUD . H. H. EZZARD . . C. E. BRAND . . . P. J. SHE AROUSE . W. P. GEARRELD . S. G. HUNTER . . .................President. .................Historian. ......................Poet. .................Secretary. .................Treasurer. ...................Prophet. ..................Chaplain. . Captain of Baseball Team. Manager of Baseball Team. 19Class of IRtncfvHftvc. I)., Dcmosthenian Society. P. A'., Phi Kappa Society. FRANK WILLIS BEAN, A. B., P. K., Clinton, S. C. Treasurer of Junior Class, President Phi Kappa ’94, Treasurer Phi Kappa ’94 and ’95. Entered Freshman Class. JOSEPH J. BENNETT, ATQ, A. B., D„ Jefferson, Ga. President of Demosthcnian Society, Junior Speaker, Annivcrsarian Dcmosthenian ’95, Champion Debater and Medalist ’94, Senior Speaker. Entered Freshman Class. CHARLES EDGAR BRAND, A. B.. D., Lawrknceville, Ga. Secretary Demosthcnian Society '92, Spring Debater ’93,Champion Debater ’93, Vice President Demos-thenian ’94, President Jollity Club ’93, Secretary Junior class, Business Manager University Mag. azine ’93, Editor University Magazine '94, Prophet Senior. Entered Freshman Class. ROBERT MANNING BUTLER. K A, A. B., D.. Savannah, Ga. Vice President Senior class, 2nd Lieutenant Company B. Entered Freshman Class. JAMES HENRY BUTNER, $ N, A. B„ D., Macon, Ga. Elected Editor-in-Chief Pandora ’95, Spring Debater ’92, Corporal Corps Cadets, 1st Lieutenant Company A. Entered Freshman Class. Left college. HAWES CLOUD, A. B., P. K., Thomson, Ga. First Vice President Phi Kappa ’94, Secretary Senior class. Attorney at Law. Entered Sophomore Class. 20J. O. COOK, S N, B. S., D., Pooler, Ga. Vice President Demosthenian ’94. Entered Sophomore Class. EDWARD EMMETT DOUGHERTY, X i , A. B., P. K„ Atlanta, Ga. Treasurer Athletic Association ’95, Sergeant Corps Cadets, Member Glee Club, Member Thalians. Entered Sophomore Class. JAMES THOMPSON DUNLAP, t A 0, B. S-, D., Gainesville, Ga. Editor of Pandora, Assistant Manager ’Varsity Foot-Ball Team ’94, Sophomore Declaimcrand Medalist, 1st Corporal Company B ’93, 1st Sergeant Company B ’94, Captain Company A, Captain Track Athletic Team ’95. Entered Freshman Class. HENRY HANSEL EZZARD, B. S., P. K., Vickery’s Creek, Ga. President of Phi Kappa ’95, President of Non-Fraternity Club, Librarian Y. M. C. A., Manager Class Foot-Ball Team ’95. VAN McKIBBEN FLETCHER, A. B., P. K., Jackson, Ga. Secretary Phi Kappa Society ’95, Vice-President Phi Kappa ’94. EDWARD MONTAGUE GAMMON, B. S., D., Rome, Ga. Manager of Junior Baseball Team, Captain Senior Foot-ball Team, President Senior class, Secretary’ Athletic Association ’95, Junior Speaker, Sergeant Corps Cadets. Entered Freshman Class. WILLIAM PENDLETON GEARRELD, A T A, B. S., P. K., Newnan, Ga. President Athletic Association ’95, Captain Senior Baseball Team, Sergeant Major Corps Cadets ’94, Captain Company B, President Phi Kappa Society, Manager Sophomore Baseball Team, Manager Junior Foot-ball Team, 'Varsity Foot-ball Team ’94, Secretary Phi Kappa Society, Sophomore Speaker, Champion Debater, Business Manager University Magazine ’94, Chairman Athletic Council '95. Entered Freshman Class. JOEL JACOBUS GIBSON, A T A, B. S., P. Newnan, Ga. Business Manager Pandora, Historian Senior class, Sergeant Company A ’93-’94, 1st Lieutenant Company A ’94 -95, President P. K. Literary Society ’94, Class Baseball Team ’93-94, President Junior Class, Junior Speaker, Editor Magazine ’94. Entered Freshman Class. 21MOSKS GUYTON, X ❖, A. B., Marianna, Fla. Sophomore Dcclaimcr and First Medalist, President Dcmosthcnian, Junior Speaker, Champion Debater, Senior Speaker. Entered Freshman Class. LINDSLEY HALSEY, 5 N, B. S., P. K., Charleston, S. C. Vice-President Freshman Class, Captain ’Varsity Baseball Team ’94. Captain Class Baseball Team, 'Varsity Football Team ’93-94, Vice-President Athletic Association, ’Varsity Baseball Team ’93, '94. ’95 Entered Freshman Class. WALTER ALEXANDER HARRIS, X ❖, A. B„ P. K., Macon, Ga. Editor-in-Chief Pandora, Junior Speaker, Champion Debater and Medalist '94, President Phi Kappa ’94, Vice-President Y. M. C. A. ’94. Senior Speaker. Entered Freshman Class. SAMUEL GARNET HUNTER, B. E., P. K., Athens, Ga. Manager of Class Baseball Team ’95, Centre-field Class Baseball Team ’93, ’94, ’93. WILLIAM LARKIN KEMP, 5 N, P. K., A. B., Albany, Ga. Editor Pandora, Editor University Magazine, Captain Sophomore Baseball Team, Captain 'Varsity Baseball Team '9$, Vice President Junior Class, Vice-President Athletic Association ’95, Vice-President Phi Kappa Society '93, Manager Tennis Association ’94, ’Varsity Baseball Team ’93, ’94, ’95, Class Baseball Team ’93, ’94, ’95, Secretary Phi Kappa Society ’94. Entered Freshman Class. JOHN WHITE MORTON, K A, B. S., P. K., Athens, Ga. Editor University Magazine, Sergeant-Major’93, Sophomore Speaker and Medalist, Junior Speaker, Member Glee Club and Banjo Club, Manager Football Team ’95, Associate Editor Pandora, 1st Censor Phi Kappa Society. Entered Freshman Class. OSBORNE BREVARD NISBET, X ❖, A. B., D., Eatonton, Ga. Sophomore Declaimcr, Sergeant Corps Cadets '94, Adjutant Corps Cadets. Entered Sophomore Class. FRED. J. ORR, ❖AO, B. E., P K., Athens, Ga. President Y. M C. A. ’95, Vice-President Sophomore Class, Member Thalian Dramatic Club, Member Glee Club, Vice-President Phi Kappa Society, Sophomore Dcclaimer, Junior Speaker, Senior Essayist. Entered Freshman Class. 22JAMES H. PORTER, X t , A. B. t K. President 4 K '95, Junior Speaker, Class Football Team '93. Entered Sophomore Class. GEORGE W. REAB, A. B., A T A, D., Augusta, Ga. Editor-in-Chief Red and Mack, Vice-President Demosthenian, Associate Editor Red and Black, Poet Senior Class. Entered Freshman Class. ROBERT ARCHIBALD RIDLEY, X «t , P. K., A. B„ LaGrangf., Ga. ' Sophomore Declaimer, 1st Vice-President Phi Kappa Literary Society, Member Glee Club, Sergeant Company B, 2nd Lieutenant Company A. Member Thalians, Class Baseball Team ’93, ’94, '95, ’Varsity Baseball Team ’94. Entered Freshman Class. MARSHALL P. ROBERTSON, A. B., D., Athens, Ga. Entered Freshman Class. P. J. SHKAROUSE, B. E., P. K.. Springfield, Ga. Secretary Y. M. C. A. '93, Vice-President Y. M. C. A., Chairman Executive Committee Engineering Department, President Non-Fraternity Club, Chaplain Class ’95. Entered Freshman Class. ARCHIBALD SMITH. D., B. S., Athens, Ga. Class Football Team. Entered Freshman Class. J. G. SMITH, B. S.. D., Ila, Ga. Editor Pandora, Sophomore Declaimer. Entered Freshman Class. H. H. STEINER, P. K„ $ A E, Augusta, Ga. Editor Pandora. Entered Freshman Class. 23II fetor y o f Ninety-Five. In the fall of 1890, there was seen wandering over the campus of the University of Georgia, a little band of Freshmen. Some of those Freshmen, too proud to enter the Freshman class, managed to work their way into the Sophomore. But by far the majority of them assembled together and formed the nucleus of the now renowned Class of Ninety-Five. From time to time this little class was augmented by the addition of a few more students to its original membership. The number of the members of the Class of Ninety Five reached its limit in Sophomore year. Its membership was then about thirty-six. But since then its number has been diminishing. Fate has so decreed it that some of the boys of Ninety-Five were called forth from college to play their part elsewhere-Some of them were forced by various causes to abandon their college studies for a short while, and consequently to honor some later class with their membership. The faces of three of the brightest of our number shall be seen on earth no more; early in their course, ere they had experienced the vicissitudes of college life, the cruel hand of death was laid on them, and their souls were wafted across the gulf of space into the “realms of the unknown." So great has been the reduction of members, that there arc now only about twenty eight. Notwithstanding this great loss in the number of the Class of Ninety-Five, the remaining boys have acted their part well.In the recitation room the boys of Ninety-Five equalled, if not surpassed any of their predecessors. They showed themselves capacitated for mastering the greatest scientific and literary problems. So brilliant arc their intellects and so studious have they been, that many arc the pebbles which they have gathered from the vast shore of truth. In the halls of the literary societies their eloquent voices and their logical arguments are admired by all who hear them. In athletics the class of Ninety-Five is also great. In its freshman year it furnished one of the members of the University foot-ball team. Since then many of its members have fought nobly on the gridiron to maintain the honor of the foot-ball team of the University of Georgia. On the diamond they were still greater. When but freshmen they victoriously carried carried off the pennant; but since then fate has been against them, still they always held second or third place. Two years in succession the Class of Ninety-Five has given to the 'Varsity foot ball team its captain. And now the happy days of our college life have passed. Four years have been spent within the walls of the University of Georgia. How anxiously we have looked forward to the day on which shall be placed within our hands the long wanted “dip.” But nearer and nearer came that day, the less and less we wished for it; for how true it is that the things that are the furthcrest from our possession are the things we wish for most. And with the closing of our college days many a pleasure will end ; but our course at college is over, and before us spreads wide the sea of life, on which we must sail our ship. Deep is that sea and boisterous are its billows, but the boys of Ninety-Five prepared themselves well at the University of Georgia, and they will safely steer their ship across life’s boisterous sea; and when they will have reached yonder farther shore, each will anchor his ship in the harbor of eternal honor. 2520 Ebc Junior The Junior, oh! the Junior, The best, the only class ; The Senior is conceited, The Freshman is an ass, The Sophomoric fellow, His faults he cannot screen, Is neither white nor yellow, But simply, slightly green. The Junior is perfection; The Faculty’s delight, He can cut cross-sections Completely out of sight. He’s long since cut Lucy Cobb, And snows may come and go, “Species of ice” at “town toughs,” The Juniors never throw. He never tricks, cuts nor crams; Finals are his delight; He goes to bed at nine p. m. And sleeps the livelong night. His drink is strickly H, O, Dispensary’s unknown; He never speaks to Freshmen, His “wild oats” arc not sown. He loves to woo the maidens, And break their little hearts, He is certain to accomplish Whatever he once starts. And so the festive Junior Is worshipped all around. He’s the pride of college And just the toast of town. By One of Them.Class of Rinefx-sSix YELL. Hi-yi-yi-yi Y-C-V-I Hi-yi-yi-yi Georgia. COLORS. Navy Blue and White. FLOWER. Buttercup. OFFICERS. T. A. NEAL................... H. V. BLACK.................. G. H. BOGGS...............7.7 H. R. HUNT.................... C. H. HOLDEN................. J. O. PETTIS.................. W. B. JONES................... .....President Vice-President .....Secretary .....Treasurer .....Historian B. B. Captain ... B. B. Man 28Junior Craig Barrow, A. B...............5At . Savannah. Homer Van Valkenburg Mack, A. B. . XY . Atlanta. Gilbert Hillhousc Boggs, B. S..........Athens. Thomas Richmond Boggs, B. S............Athens. Charles Columbus Carson, A. B. ... Ashland. William Wilson Chandler, A. B. . ATQ . Girth. David Thomas Clark, B. S. . . . KA . Atlanta. William Remshart Dancy, B. S. . 5AE . Savannah. Carlos Ford Dodd, A. B............XY . Ford. Percy Powell Ezellc, B. S. . . . KA . Eatonton. Arthur Preston Flowers, A. B...........Doraville. James Walter Griffith, A. B............Bogart. Haywood Shepherd Hansell, A. B.X t . Atlanta. Henry Hillyer, B. S................5AE . Augusta. Carl Hamilton Holden, A. B. . . ATA . Crawfordville. George Pearce Hunt, A. B...............Cedartown. Henry Robert Hunt, A. B................Cedartown. George Fletcher Hurt, A. B.............Atlanta. 25 Class. Frank Standifer Jones, A. B. . . KA . Blakely. James Bothwcll Lockhart, A. B. iAE . Augusta. Malcolm Mabrcy Lockhart, A. B. SAE . Augusta. Robert Hatton Lovejoy, B. E. . . Athens. Shelby Myrick, A. B................. Americus. Thomas Albert Neal, A. B..................Banksville. Maston Emmett O’Neal, A. B. . ATfi . Bainbridge. Elton Smith Osborne, B. S. . . 5AE . Savannah. James Oscar Pettis, A. B..................Jeffersonville. William Moses Pettis, A. B................Jeffersonville. John Green Pittman, A. B. . . . ❖A . Thomasville. Edwin Cabell Ryals, A. B. . . . SAE . Savannah. Tolbert Fannin Smith, B. S................Sand Hill. Roswell Powell Stephens, A. B. . t A0 . Bamesville. James M. Stephenson, Jr., A. B., . ATQ . Oxford, Ala. Herbert William Stubbs, A. B. . KA . Ccdartown. Clinton Peyton Thompson, A. B. ... Columbia, Ala. »History of NinetY v3ix. ‘•Too much magnifying of man or matter," said Lord Bacon, “doth irritate contradiction and procure envy and scorn." Thoroughly recognizing and appreciating this important truth, my purpose in writing a brief history of Ninety-Six is not to extol my class beyond the limits of reason, for that would encourage scorn; but rather to state facts upon which my readers may base their own conclusions. These facts, so numberless and illustrious, may produce envy on the part of other classes, but being facts, they cannot possible be creative of contradiction. Ninety-six began its eventful struggle for knowledge in the fall of '92, the faithful recruits numbering thirty-five. Our Freshman campaign was not indeed very cvcntfui. However, we accomplished all that could have been expected of Freshmen—in the academic department, making a rise; in athetics becoming very proficient players of leap-frog, marbles, catch mc if-you-can, etc.; in politics receiving very many honors holding all the offices in our class. Next year dignified “Sophs," casting aside the mantle of “Freshness,” the pride of their mothers, the pets of the “lassies,”--in their minds, they entered upon the hardest and most trying campaign of the war. There were many well-fortified strongholds to be taken, the most important of which was Calculus and its several outworks. Hard and bravely did we fight. The difficulties encountered led some to desert; others fell bravely fighting; and still others being only wounded, entered the “University Hospital” during the summer, where, with proper stimulants and treatment, they finally recovered to enlist in our mighty army the following fall. This year by hard work and untiring zeal, we captured the baseball pennant; took a very prominent part in athletics, sporting, society, studying and -loafing, (and actually received all the Sophomore speakers and corporals' places.) The following year the battlements of science loomed up before us, and we advanced to the siege. Slowly but surely the outposts were captured, and we have at least succeeded in planting our flag upon 30 the citadel itself. In Physics we have learned why a rock falls to the ground instead of dangling in mid. air. and are really in a fair way to discover the formula for perpetual motion. In Chemistry we have learned how to make H 2 S, that banc of Spring debates; have penetrated the workshop cf the Creator and almost watched Him hook the cosmic atoms together. In Psychology we have learned to conceive the inconceivable, and such things as concepts and intuitions have become our everyday toys. In Biology we have learned how many rings arc on an earthworm; how many joints in a crayfish, and hope in time to determine the exact amount of Simian blood in our veins. All this and more has yielded to our valiant attacks, and now, looking back over the conquered territory, strewn thick with the monuments of our victories, we cannot but weep bccau'c there is only one more world to conquer. Another pen will inscribe the history of that final campaign, and then indeed the Anabasis of Ninety-Six will have been completed. Such in brief is the history of Ninety-Six. In a single year we shall be called from these pleasant scenes to others of a graver nature. Ga-thc, in his prologue to Faust, looks back with fondness to the days of his youth when he fought battles and wooed maidens; when he had nothing and yet had enough; when he yearned after knowledge and yet was happy in ignorance. But from this reverie the poet rises to remind us that to sweep with easy wanderings toward a self-appointed aim, is the task that matuicr age imposes. After all, this is the great lesson to be learned. All life is not spent at college; beyond its classic walls lie the sterner conflicts of the world. To so live and labor here as to be able to grapple successfully with the difficulties that the future present is of a truth the sum of duties for us all. If we do this—if, while here, we work toward a self-appointed aim, letting all our aims be those of our God, our country and truth, then coming years will weave garments of honor for Ninety-Six, and its name, instead of growing dimmer, will become brighter “with the process of the suns." In any event, however, whether success crown our efforts or defeat be our.humble portion. When our college days arc o’er. When we arc here to meet no more, Let us in our memories cherish Precious thoughts that ne'er shall perish, Of the happy times at college When with ’96 we sought for knowledge. Cam. H. Hoi.den. 31 Tf)e C3opl)omore. He monkeys with chemical I ab., And dabbles with Physics too. And tries to show innocent Freshmen What a smart little "Sophy” can do. He will never pass by McGregor’s, For he and old Me “don’t speak,” But he says "unprepared” to old Riley, And then cuts college a week. He goes to germans at night, And fools all his best time away On a charming young miss of thirty, Then sprints down to chapel next day. He stands ’round the corner all day, And loafs at the ’Varsity .Place And tries to drink "Trilbys" and “Flashes," And pass in for checks his “slick face.” But he’s fated to fail on his finals, And his failing will cost him dear, For our sporty and interesting Sophy Will be in the same class next year. B. 3 33 ACta ft of Ninet - cven YELL. Ninety-Seven! Hip! Hoo-Ray! G-E-O-R-G-I-A! Georgia!!! FLOWERS. Daisy. coi.ors. Black and Orange. OFFICERS. HOWELL C. ERWIN............ JAMES W. HENDRICKS......... HARRY DODD................. GEO. T. TRAYLOR............ WILLIAM L. YANCEY.......... C. HENRY B. FLOYD.......... BEN. A. CRANE.............. MARION D. DUBOSE........... ALBERT B. MOBLEY........... ...............President. ...........Vice-President. ...............Secretary. ...............Treasurer. ...............Historian. . Captain Football Team. Manager Football Team. . Captain Baseball Team. Manager Baseball Team. 31C3opf)omore Class John Addison Barwick, A. B...........Athens. Frank Kells Boland.............X 1 . Atlanta. Early Winn Born, A. B................Norcross. Janies Dowse Bradwell, A. B . . t AO . Athens. Robert Irwin Branch, A B . . . SAE . Augusta. Robert Edwin Brown, A. B . . . ATQ . Fort Valley. Henry Grattan Colvin, A.B . . . SAE . Atlanta. Walter Sullivan Cothran, B. S. . SAE . Rome. Benjamin Albert Crane, B. S..........Athens. Florence Luther Culver, A. B.........Greensboro. Benjamin Joseph Dasher, A. B . . . . Fort Valley. John Adrian Davis, A. B . . . . KA . Albany. Robert J. H. DeLoach. A.B............Bloys. Harry Dodd, A.B.................XY . Ford. John Tucker Dorsey, A. B . . . ‘I’AO . Gainesville. Marion Derrellc DuBose, A. B . . . . Athens. Samuel Candler Dunlap, B.S . . ‘J'AO . Gainesville. Howell Cobb Erwin, A. B-.............Athens. William Brosius Fender, A. B . SN . Valdosta. C. Henry B. Floyd, B.S . . . . KA -Apalachicola. Francis Emmet Griffeth, B. E.........India. Malvern Halsey, B. E...........X t . Charleston. Roland McMillan Harper, B. E . . . - Americus. James Walter Hendricks, A. B . . . . Bloys. Isaac Jones Hofmayer, A. B...........Albany. John Mallory Hunt, A. B..............Athens. George Twiggs Jackson, B. S . . SAE . Augusta. William Bryan Kent, A. B.............Glcnwood. Joseph Ignatius Killorin, B. S . 5N . Savannah. Damon Theodore Lanier, A. B . KA . West Point. William Washington Larson, A.B . . .Pembroke. James Bolan Lawrence, A. B . . ATQ . Marietta. Lucius Arthur Lindsey, B. E.........Crystal Springs. George Edmondson Maddox, B.S, SAE . Rome. James Walter Mason, A. B............Fairburn. William Edgar McCurry, A.B . ATA . Hartwell. Charles Allen Mize, B. E............Harmony Grove. Albert Burton Mobley, A. B . . ATft . Monroe. William Lorenzo Moss, B. E..........Athens. Hiram Warner Nalley, A. B...........Villa Rica. Ulrich Bonnell Phillips, A. B . . ATfi . LaGrange. George Whitfield Price, A. B . . 4 A0 . Atlanta. Arthur Sinclair Richardson, A.B . . .Hartwell. John Gibson Richardson, A. B . . . . Hartwell. Thomas Kimball Slaughter, A.B. ATQ . Jackson. Parish Eugene Smith, A. B . . . ‘t’AO . Athens. Frank Spain, A. B...............KA . Quitman. John William Spain, A. B . . . KA . Quitman. Harvey Stovall, B. S...........SAE . Athens. Albert L. Tidwell, A. B . . . . ATA . Atlanta. George Thomas Traylor, B. E . . . . Gabbettville. Clifford Mitchell Walker, A. B . SAE . Monroe. I-arkin Douglas Watson, A. B . . . . Jackson. Connie Alexander Wcddington, A.B . . Atlanta. Clifford Tildcn Whipple, A. B . . . . Cochran. Robert Eggleston White, A. B . . . . Butler. Walker White, A.B............•t’AO . Forsyth. William Lowndes Yancey, B.E . ATA Athens.History of Ninety CSeaen- “History,” says Macaulay, “is a compound of poetry and philosophy.” In one sense this remark is highly applicable to the history of a class in college, poetry and enthusiasm predominating during the first part, gravity and philosophy asserting themselves during the latter part. At first blush, the assertion that any poetry may be extracted from ihe drudgery of the I'reshman and Sophomore years, would seem to be a “hard saying." Hut the fact remains that these are pre-eminently years of rosy hopes and lofty ambitions. In spite of all the difficulties of “Analyt” and " Descript”—in spite of Botanical names and French verbs, youthful fancy still finds time to build air-castles, dream dreams and see visions. It is of this golden period, this first half of college life that the history of ’97 relates. We may be said to have reached the dividing line of our college course ; hereafter 0 . a more serious mien will attach itself to us, and profounder subjects will invoke our ' attention. The year 1893 was an extraordinary one in many particulars. The World’s Fair, the financial depression, and other stirring events, combine to make it remarkable. Foremost among these was the birth of ’97. Then it was that our class began its famous career, and although no heralds announced the coming event; although the heavens were not darkened, and neither signs nor wonders appeared on the face of the earth, no one doubts, at least no member of Ninety-Seven, that in coming years the historic muse will linger more fondly over the deeds of Ninety-Seven’s illustrious members than upon all other events of 1893 combined. Forty-five men began to ascend the rugged heights of learning under the banners of Ninety-Seven. Even in our Freshman year, a few looked with longing upon the greener pastures below, and returned to revel among the blissful jungles of ignorance. Hut at the beginning of the Sophomore year, reinforcements joined us in our ascent and now sixty-six heroes with large hearts and happy countenances arc 36“happy on the way.” Ours is by far the largest class in college, and if the reader will pardon the chest nut, not only abundant quantity, but splendid quality is to be found within our ranks. In every department of college life we have borne “blushing honors thick upon us.” On the gridiron, four of the eleven canvas back heroes that caused the Red and Black to wave so many times upon the breezes of victory last fall, were proud to call themselves members of Ninety-Seven. In the Demosthcnian and Phi Kappa halls, audiences hang breathless upon the words that fall from Ninety-Seven's eloquent lips. In politics we arc on the inside of every deal and our class elections resemble pandemonium. In journalism, four of Ninety-Seven’s facile pens made the pages of the Red and lilack fairly sparkle. In society, we more than hold our own, vicing with the lordly seniors in the grace with which we twirl our canes and walk by Lucy Cobb. In the Thalians and Glee Club, we may boast of several stars of the first magnitude, and Orpheus and Adeschylus would, we fancy, be ashamed, could they listen to the music or witness the acting of Ninety-Seven in the performances which these clubs present. Upon the whole, then, it will be seen that Ninety-Seven is a most remarkable class. And yet the half has not been told, other excellences too numerous to mention, and which the modesty of the present historian prevents him from entering. For it is far from his intention to magnify the achievements of his class. They do not need it; they stand on their own merits. Cromwell once said to a painter: “Paint me as I am.” In that spirit this historian has endeavored to narrate Ninety-Seven’s history. That history, it is true, docs not abound in stirring deeds or epoch breaking events. But the reader must remember that we arc still making history. Two years remain to us at college and beyond them lies the great world to which we arc looking forward with so many expectations. Who knows what deed of epic splendor we may accomplish during all this time? To pierce the veil of future is not, however, within our power, but we may truthfully assert that although in the remaining years to be spent at college, philosophy may place its seal upon our lives and science may unfold its beauties to our delighted vision, yet we shall ever look back with fondness upon the time when as Freshmen and Sophomores we viewed the world through the rose-colored glasses of boyish enthusiasm. HlSTORtAN. 87Pressman Poem. How can muse of Freshmen sing? Surely, surely, everything, That upon their doings bore. Has been written o'er and o’er. Shall we say their caps arc loud, That their souls arc gay- not proud ? Guy them on their child-like ways, And their manners like the jays ? Gags like these no longer go, Freshmen never change, and so, Ton my word, there’s not a thing, Not a single thing to sing. “Blessings on thee, little man,” Freshman year is but a span. In thy pate these precepts keep, And thou’llst never learn to weep Rises come to those who wait, Better “cut” than come in late; Midnight oil will cost thee “mon.”, Boot lick ! and thy work is done. “ II.” 3ftClass of Hmet -Eiglyt. YELL. Hoo, Rah! Rah!! Sis-boom-ah, Ninety-eight, ninety-eight G-c-o-r-g-i-a! COLORS. FLOWER. Royal purple and red. Geeseminum— sempcrvirems. OFFICERS. LEONARD SNIDER, Jr......... DAVIS WHITE................ M. O. MARKHAM.............. F. G. HODYSON.............. W. W. CLARKE............... O. P. HINTON............... J. F. RIDLEY............... ..............President. ..........Vice-President. Secretary and Treasurer. ...............Historian. Captain Baseball Team. Manager Baseball Team. . Captain Football Team. •10Freeman Class Clement Akerman, A. 13..............Athens. George Albon Bailey. B. E...........Athens. Walter Garnett Basinger, A. B . KA . Athens. Richard Bolling Baxter, Jr., A. B. SAE . Sparta. Charles Harmon Black, A. B . . X4 . Atlanta. Frank Ware Bondurant, B. S..........Athens. Ralph Penn Brightwcll, A. B.........Maxey’s. William Walton Clarke, B. S. . . X t . Atlanta. George Washington Collier, B. S.XY . Atlanta. David Conger, 13. E.................Athens. Marshall Mahorne Crittenden, B.E . . Shcllman. Harry Timrod Dearing, B. E. . . X«t . Athens. Fred Conrad Debele, B. S. . . . SN . Pooler. Oliver Arnold Dozier, B. E..........Athens. Albert Otis Edmondson, A. B.........LaGrunge. Lem Gordon Harvey, A. B.............Malden Branch. George Curthbert Hcywood, Jr., B.S . Savannah. Osborn Rogers Hinton, B. E. ... Athens. Fred Grady Hodgson, A. B . . KA . Athens. Deupree Hunnicutt, A. B. . . . ATA . Athens. Alphcus Rainey Johnson, A. 13 . . . . Wintcrvillc. Marcellus Oliver Markham, A.B. 5AE . Atlanta. Robert Downing Mure, Jr., A. 13. . . . Athens. Walter Campbell Pitner, B. E..........Athens. Edgar Erastus Pomeroy, B. S . . SAE . Marietta. Clinton Power, B. S...................Roswell. Hugh Hinton Price, A. B...............High Shoals. John Francis Ridley, 13. S . . . X t . Atlanta. Benjamin Franklin Riley, Jr., A. B. . . Athens. Karl Denham Sanders, A. B. . . ♦AG . Pcnficld. William Washington Scott, Jr.. B. E. . Athens. William Judson Shattuck, A. 13. . . . I-afayette. Horace Pearson Smart, Jr., A. B. . . . Savannah. Leonard Snider, B. S..............ATA . Atlanta. William Francis Upshaw, A. B. . . . Monroe. Benjamin Dickson Watkins, A. B.'t’AO . Monroe. Young Leonard Watson, A. B............Bairdstown. Cruger Westbrook, A. 13. . . . ATA . Albany. Davis Glover White, A. 13. . . t AH . Savannah. Frank Word, Jr., A. 13................Hogansville. 41 Freshman Class History My classmates—nature's noblemen they are, Unequalled heroes, men without a par— Have chosen me as that high potentate, Whose duty is a story to relate Of all our actions, whether good or bad ; Of all our humors, whether gay or sad ; Of all our vices, if such faults wc own ; Of all our virtues, whether small or larger grown. The duty is a most stupendous task, And so your pardon I must humbly ask In case I fail, as I am apt to do, To win your approbation or to woo From you a “Bravo!" or some kindly sign, That having done ray best, I may resign My office, which, though I am proud to hold, And would not abdicate for Croesus’ gold, Is full of duties grave and grievous care, And needs a talent blithe and debonairc. Herodotus or terse Thucydides Would find the task not wholly to their ease. Or Tacitus, could one like he relate, Would find it hard to write of ’9S; For never, if my memory serves me well, Since man by woman in the Garden fell, Has there been such a class to tax the pen, Or spur to ink the hand of gifted men. Not by a microscope or vision keen Could there be found within our eyes a beam, Why need I then waste time and patience too, Trying to tell of things we do not do ? We never drink, that is, to great excess, Nor to our bosom greater vices press. The glaring sins which stalk on every hand Afflict no member of our chosen band. To be concise, we arc from vices free; That is, as free as mortal man can be. Accomplishments we all possess most rare ; With us, indeed, there are none to compare. Sandow is strong but he would lose his fame If he met one of us in any game. Our muscles arc like whip cords and so strong That Sandow could not stand before us long ; And Corbett, he might fight when in his class, But just let him meet one of us ; Alas! Poor chap! He'd soon be forced to hang his head And sneak away and wish that he were dead. What glorious deeds did we accomplish when Wc met those brawny Auburn football men! The U. of G., old Georgia’s greatest pride, Made Alabama’s heroes take a “slide.” And what two men belonging to our team, With nimble rushes on the hard fought green,Did more to make our pennant wave in state, Than Clarke and Snider of old ’98 ? Apollo with his curls and handsome face Was quite a picture of fine, manly grace; Hut there arc men in ’98 I know Who would’nt give old l’hcebus half a show. For instance Upshaw, he’s a beauteous lad ; A smile from him would make e’en Venus glad. And there arc others I've no space to name Whose faces merely would exalt their fame. Some of our fellows have real “Trilby” feet, While some Canova would be pleased to meet, That he in marble might their forms enshrine To shame his Venus with her form divine. Aside from these fine gifts of outward grace, In mental deeds we always set the pace. No other class in all the course of time E’er wrote it's hist’ry in such perfect rhyme. No other class with such precocious speed Flew through its “grinds” like swallows o’er a mead. No other band from “ Polly Me.” obtained Such golden fact's by History explained; Nor with our logorithmic “ Uncle Dave" Plunged down so deep in mathematics’ wave. The Sophs.—“wise fools,” as “Zip” would write them down, Have not the virtues that give us renown. The Junior cads don’t know as much as wc, Though they instead of one year studied three. And the grave Seniors, proud of rank and place. Are but slow seconds in our onward race. Our virtues arc acknowledged everywhere; No talents ever known were half so rare As those which everyone of us possess. So why need I continue to confess Our strength of body, character and mind, When, search the world, our match you could not find. Now there is nothing left for me to write Except a few words on the glorious height To which we all will climb, in future days, When all great men will imitate our ways, And try, like us, to wear with easy grace The laurel wreath which Fame is sure to place Upon our brows. That day is almost here. E’en now I sec the Goddess drawing near To make of Wcddington, a Cicero; To make of Crittenden, a ladies’ beau ; To place on Baxter’s head a kingly crown, That he may rule his tribe with great renown. To make of Smart a Minister to Spain, And Jones, a great inventor, to make rain. Each man is sure some day to fill a place Ahead of all the fellows of his race. If any one should doubt what I relate, Just keep an eye fixed on old ’98, And you’ll confess, as you will have to do, This little Freshman “knew a thing or two.” The Historian. 43Lav Class YELL. Hi yi, yi, yi, Hip hoo ray, Lawyers, Lawyers, U. G. A. Razzlcty Dazzlety, Sis, boom-ah. Lawyers, Lawyers, Rah! Rah!! Rah!!! COLOR. FLOWER. All Red. Dogwood. OFFICERS. T. S. HAWES................ C. L. HELLER............... FRANK C. KEEN.............. WALTER P. WARREN........... C. T. HASKELL.............. JOHN W. WELCH.............. NEWTON WATKINS............. .............President. .... Vice-President. ..................Orator. ...............Historian. .............Treasurer. Captain Baseball Team. Manager Baseball Team. 4«TI)e Lawyer. Oh ! the lawyer of ’95, You can gamble he’s alive, Spouting Blackstone, he is simply out o’ sight ; As a talker, he’s a hummer, He would make a noble drummer, For his gall is something monumental, quite. He’s superior to the style, And he wears an ancient tile While his straying ringlets wander in the breeze; He can “play pull” like a winner, Make a speech or slay a dinner, Split a bottle or a hair, with equal case. When his boning here is done, He will leave us on the run, Astarting on his quest for “dust” and fame; With his fingers on his dip, And his law books in his grip, You’d better b’lieve he’ll get there just the same. “H ”Roll of 5fudents of tf)e Rav Cla R. J. S. Ayers...............Clarkesville, Ga. M. A. Bush...............5 N ........Camilla, Ga. Hugh Chambers . . . ♦ A0..............Irwinton, Ga. Eugene Dodd .... X Y........................Ford Ga. P. D. Dubose............................Blakely, Ga. W. A. Fuller, Jr ... X Y................Atlanta, Ga. C. T. Haskell..............................Savannah, Ga. T. S. Hawes .... § A E ... . Bainbridge, Ga. C. L. Heller.............5 N .... Savannah, Ga. G. F. Johnson . . . . A T A . . . Monticcllo, Ga. F. C. Keen............♦AO... Oglethorpe, Ga. R. E. Lee.............5 A E . . . Hogansvillc, Ga. L. L. Lyons...................................Soque, Ga. Myer Marks..............................Athens, Ga. J. H. Morse.........................New Hampshire. S. A. Newell............................Albany. Ga. M. E. O’Neill________ATfl__________Bainbridge,Ga. M. T. Perkins.....................Clarkesville, Ga. J. B. Petrie..........................Marietta, Ga. F. D. Price........................Farmington, Ga. J. E. Schwarz.........................Savannah, Ga. Howell Simmons . . 5 A E . . . . Americus, Ga. Walter P. Warren. ..♦AO................Atlanta, Ga. Newton Watkins.........................Madison, Ga. J. W. Welch.........K A.....................Athens, Ga. H. S. White...........................Sylvania, Ga. 45History of ffe Law Class To crowd in the narrow compass of my allotted space its virtues and its victories is a task of no easy ful. fillment, and were it my province to catalogue them completely here, I should shrink from so arduous a labor. Right generously have we contributed to the history of the past collegiate year, and though we leave behind us on the campus no engraven stone, or ceremoniously planted tree, to court the remembrance of succeeding classes, yet a record of such brilliancy must long survive our departure. We began the session with the reducer! and inauspicious enrollment of thirteen, but by many valuable accessions were soon increased to twenty-three. In the lecture room we have exhibited a degree of proficiency that is rarely reached, and our every grasp of intricate legal principles has won us countless compliments. And, aside from the pleasant paragraphs of Broom and Blackstonc, we have turned at times to the other fields of college life and enriched them with our work. Our representative on the University Football team contributed essentially to the glorious record with which it closed the season. In many a warm contest on Georgia soil their superior excellence was displayed and their “weighty” influence felt; and from the gridiron of Carolina, too, they returned crowned with their full share of laurels and possessed of more than their quota of "spoons.” In the literary societies our men have felt an abiding interest, and have filled worthily and well the highest offices in their bestowal. The eloquence of a lawyer won the anniversarianship of Phi Kappa over an array of strong competitors, and probably the society in all the long years of its existence was never more ably represented than on its last natal day. Though the field of journalism is somewhat circumscribed here, and the “liberty of the press ” a little bit restrained, yet many of our men have risen superior to these circumstances and shown themselves 40to be writers of unusual versatility. The columns of the Red and Black have frequently attested the potency of our pens, and under the present able direction of a lawyer, that same estimable sheet continues in a state of well-merited prosperity. The Thalians have drawn largely on our dramatic talent, and in every other phase of student life the law class of Ninety-Five has proven itself facile princeps. Apt scholars in the class room, active in the athletic field, eloquent and ready in the debate. Mens sana in corpore sano most fitly describes us. A brief analysis of the class will reveal a remarkable composition. That ten of our men snould be college graduates shows in itself that our intellectual standard is high. Among our number there is a Justice of the Peace, who, for a brief period in each month has left the halls of learning for the hills of Habersham, where he has administered with distinguished ability the duties of that office. We have a member of the Georgia legislature, and while saturating him with legal lore, have not let the occasion escape us of impressing on his mind the need of his prospective Alma Mater. We have a “ Populist ” fly in our precious ointment—mentioned here rather as a curiosity than in pride, realizing that, like the fated bison on the western plains, this peculiar genus of political faith is experiencing a swift declension. We have the two largest men in college, and the oldest man ; we will graduate the youngest lawyer at the Georgia bar. While the above enumerated facts clearly prove that our attainments are diversified, they by no means justify our being characterized as “The Old Curiosity Shop”—a slander traceable, we rather think, to those who arc covetous of their neighbor’s fame. To perform the full measure of our duty has been our loftiest endeavor, and after a year pleasurably and profitably spent, we leave the institution of our love, having won from our own consciences, and “those in authority over us”—the sanctioning plaudit, “ well done.” And armed and equipped from the rich arsenal of our Alma Mater, we welcome the fiercer struggle of the future. If the past is an index of any accuracy the issue of that conflict is already decided, and it requires no anointed prophet to proclaim that the lapse of a few years will find the lawyers of Ninety-Five in high and honored places on the bench and at the bar. Though Fortune may not always lend us the approval of her smiles, we won’t be discouraged or discomfited, for it’s the signalizing spirit of our class to be : “ Great ever in triumph or defeat, Great always without aiming to be great.” Historian Law Class 47Elective Alfred Akerman .... .AN. . Athens. Charles Akerman . . . . 5 N . . Athens. Holcombe Bacon . . . . . X 4 . . DcWitt. Thomas Basinger . . . . K A . . Athens. George Horace Bell . . . S N . . Swainsboro. Wade Hampton Born . . Athens. Joseph David Boyd, Jr . . K A . . Griffin. Ollic Crowe Brake . . . ATQ. . Warrior, Ala. Shirley Brooks . . . . 4 A 0 . . Atlanta. Rufus Burger George Shaw Crane . . A T A . . Athens. Joseph Brown Conally . . X4 . . Atlanta. John Oliver Cook . . . . 5 N . . Pooler. William Amos Cook . . . Pooler. John Cooper . Bascobel. Rogers Burton Davis . . $ A E . . Covington. Robert Daniel Draper . $ A E . . Atlanta. Joseph Elsinger . . . . Savannah. Fortune Chisholm Ferrell 1 . X t . . LaGrangc. Claude Anderson Fleming K A . . Augusta. Frank Lamar Fleming . . X t . . Atlanta. Darwin Benjamin Franklin . . . . Statesboro. Paul Turner Goldsmith . . X ♦ . . Atlanta. Joseph Vowles Goodrich , , , . Charlottesville,Va John Howze A K E . . Birmingham, Ala Mansfield Pliny Hall . . . K A. . Washington,D.C. Stephen Asbury Hunt.............Athens. Hugh Augustus Jones . A T fi . . Fort McPherson. Otis Jones...............A T Q . . Whitcsburg. Willis Bryant Jones . . A Tfi . . Ncwnan. Oscar Lyndon....................Athens. Thomas Howard McKey.............Valdosta. Frank Rice Mitchell . . . X t . . Atlanta. Fred Morris.................3 N . . Marietta. James Audlcy Morton . . K A . . Athens. William Paul Mostcllcr..........Atlanta. A. Cardel Parker..............Millen. James Archibald Perry...........Carl. Oliver William Porter...........Covington. Lucius Edmoud Powell . A T Q . . Waynesboro. Henry Reese.....................Athens. George Owen Shackelford . $ N . . Jefferson. John Easton Tcaslcy . . AT Q. . Hartwell. Stephen Willis .Thornton . X 4 . . LaGrangc. Milton P bcnezcr Tilly..........Doraville. Clarence Rolls Ware.............McElhannon. Richard Franklin Watts..........Lumpkin. Leo Wellhouse...................Atlanta. Robert Prentice White...........Van's Valley. 48Graduate Students. Joseph Akerman, $ N A. B., U. of Ga., '94, Athens. Tutor in Ancient Languages. Biology, Chemistry. Archibald Belcher, 4 A 0 A.B., Emory College, Covington. Tutor in Ancient Languages. Greek, Latin, German. George Phineas Butler, $ A E B.E., U. of Ga., ’94, Augusta. Honorary Fellow in Mathematics. Mathematics, Physics, Engineering. Noel McHenry Moore, 5 A E A.B., U. of Ga., ’94, Augusta. Fellow in Biology. Biology, Chemistry, Psychology. Halcott Cadwallader Moreno, $ A 0. U. of Ga., '93, A. M., '94, Gainesville. Tutor in Mathematics. Engineering, Mathematics, Physics. Rufus Benjamin Nalley, B.E., U. of Ga., ’93, Villa Rica. Engineering, Mathematics, Physics. Mtnter Courses in agriculture. Edward Charles Baumann . Schuylkill Haven, Pa. Carl Hampton Dkckner......................Atlanta. John Centennial Bedingfield. . . . Bethlehem. Graduates................... Seniors..................... Juniors..................... Sophomores.................. Freshmen.................... Electives................... Winter Course in Agriculture Law........................ Summary. Number of Students in Medical Department, . 51 35 “ “ School of Technology . 140 “ “ Girls’ Industrial School 347 49 “ “ Branch Colleges. . . . 758 3 37 246 Total attendance at Athens 4 49 Aggregate number of students in University . 1540IN MEMORIAM JOSEPH E. BROWN COR THIRTY-TWO YEARS A TRUSTEE OF THIS UNIVERSITY AND DONATOR Of THE CHARLES MCDONALD BROWN SCHOLAR SHIP FUND. DIED NOV. 30TM. 1894. GOIN MEMORIAM GEORGE DUDLEY THOMAS PROFESSOR OF LAW DIED JANUARY 6th, 1895 51IN MEMORIAM HENRY HILLYER Class'or ninety-six DIED APRIL 4th. 1895 5aCSigina Alpfya Epsilon Fraternity Founded at the University of Alabama 1886. Georgia Beta Chapter Established 1866. FKATRES IN UKBE. A. L. Hull. Chas. I. Mell, Chas. H. Phinizy, Jos. Hodgson, C. A. Scuddcr, R. B. Russell, E. W. Charbonnier, J. D. Mell, A. L. Mitchell, Rev. C. W. Lane, D.D., Edw. B. Mell, Robert Hodgson, L. H. Charbonnier, Jr., A. F. Latimer, Thos. I. Mell. W W. Thomas. E. C. Upson. FKATKES IN FACULTATE. POST GRADUATES. LAW CLASS. CLASS OF NINETY-FIVE. L. H. Charbonnier, Noel McH. Moore, Robt. E. Lee, H. H. Steiner. A. H. Patterson. Geo. P. Butler. Sam Hawse, H. B. Simmons. CLASS OF NINETY-SIX. E. C. Ryals, K. S. Osborne, Henry Hillyer.f W. R. Dancy, L. D. Draper, Craig Barrow, J. B. Lockhart, M. M. Lockhart. CLASS OF NINETY-SEVEN. R. B. Davis, Geo. T. Jackson, Harvey Stovall, W. S. Cothran, H. G. Colvin, Edw. Maddox, Cliff. Walker. CLASS OF NINETY-EIGHT. M. O. Markham, E. E. Pomeroy, Richard Baxter. •Loll ColltfO. tbecoMed. MLockhart..I. -9fi Simmon (Law' Slolner’96 Pomeroy TO RyalsTO Madttox Lockhart. M. "06 Colvin ‘OT Cothran ’97 Davla VJ Lce(Law) OaborneTO Upton TO Butlor M Pat tenon Moore TO I la wee (law) Barter! Stovall VT Hlllyer 94 Barrow TO Markham’S Draper TO Jacluon JW Walker's; Dancy DCsSigma Alpfya Epsilon Fraternity. ■Roll ot Bctlve Chapters. Alpha Province. Grand Chapter—Massachusetts Beta Kpsllon. Massachusetts Beta Upsllon...............Boston University, Boston. Massachusetts Gamma..............Harvard University, Cambridge. Massachusetts Iota Tau . . . .Mass. Institute of Technology, Boston. Connecticut Alpha.......................Trinity College. Hartford. Beta Province. Grand Chapter- Pennsylvania Omega. Now York Alpha.Cornell University, Ithaca. Pennsylvania Aloha Zeta .... Penn. State College. State College. Pennsylvania Omega.................Allegheney College, MeadviUo. Pennsylvania Delta.............Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg. Pennsylvania Sigma Phi................Dickinson College, Carlisle. Comma Province. Grand Chapter Georgia Beta. Virginia Omlcron............................University of Virginia. South Carolina Gamma Virginia Sigma .... Washington and Lee University. Lexington. South Carolina Mu . . North Carolina Xi . . . . University of North Carolina, Chupcl Hill. Georgia Uela........... North Carolina Theta ...................Davidson College. Davidson. Georgia Psi............ South Carolina Delta-............South Carolina College. Columbia. Georgia Kpsllon . . . South Carolina Phi...................Furman University. Greenville. Georgia Phi........... Oclto Province. .... Wofford College, Spartanburg. ............Krsklnc (College. Due West. .... University of Georgia, Athens. ............Mercer University, Macon. ............ Emory College. Oxford. Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta. Grand Chapter- Ohio Sigma. Michigan lota Beta.............University of Michigan. Ann Arbor. Ohio Epsilon . . . Michigan Alpha............................Adrian College. Adrian. Ohio Theta . . . . Ohio Sigma.............................Mt. Union College. Alliance. Indiana Alpha . . . Ohio Delta..................Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware. Indiana Beta . . . Epsilon Province. Grand Chapter—Tennessee Zeta. Kentucky Kappa......................Central University. Richmond. Tennessee Omega . Kentucky Iota..........................Bethel College, Russellville. Tennessee Eta . . Tennessee Zeta . Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarksville. Alabama Mu . . . Tennessee Lambda..................Cumberland University. Lebanon. Alabama Iota Tennessee Xu......................Vanderbilt University, Nashville. Alabama Alpha Mu Tennesseo Kappa.................University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Mississippi Gamma Z«to Province. University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati. . . Ohio State University, Columbus. ..........Franklin College. Franklin. . . . Perdue University. La Fayette. ............University of the South. Sowanee. . . Southwestern Baptist University, Jackson. .......................University of Alabama. ........ Southern University, Greensboro. ...........Alabama A. and M. College. Auburn. ...........................University of Miss. Grand Chapter—Iowa Sigma. Iowa Sigma............................Simpson College. Indianola. Missouri Beta..................Washington University, St- Louis. Missouri Alpha..................University of Missouri, Columbia. Nebraska Lambda Pi.............University of Nebraska. Lincoln. Eta Province. Grand Chapter—Colorado Alpha. Texas ltho ...........................University of Texas. Austin. Colorado Zeta.........................University of Denver, Denvor. Colorado Chi.......................University of Colorado, Boulder. California Alpha . Iceland Stanford, Jr., University, Palo Alto House.CI)i Pl)i PraternttY Founded at Princeton 1S2- . EtA Chapter established 1SS7. C. B. Griffeth, Geo. T. Hodgson, F. A. Lipscomb, W. A. McDowell, FKATRES IN’ URRE. M. G. Nicholson, T. P. Stanley, B. B. Steedly, W. R. Lipscomb, Billups Phinizy, W G. Wood fin, J. H. Rucker, R. G. Taylor. H. C. White, KRATRBS IN FACULTATE. D. C. Barron, Jr. Edward E. Dougherty, Walter A. Harris, CLASS OK NINETY-FIVE. James Henry Porter, Jr. Brevard Nisbet, Moses Guyton, Robert A. Ridley. •Holcombe Bacon, CI.ASS OF NINETY-SIX. Joe Brown Connally, JIay voo l S. Hansell. Cl.ASS 01' NINETY-SEVEN. Frank K. Roland, Frank L. Fleming, Chisom Fcrrcl, Malvern Halsey, ’Stephen W. Thornton. Charles H. Black, Harry Dearing, Led College. CLASS OF NINETY-EIGHT. Frank R. Mitchell, Paul Goldsmith, Walton Clarke, John F. Ridley. 5 Clarke W llamcl! VO :» Coldsntltii W NUbct VS 'SC CiiytonW Mitchell '95 Dearinu‘3S IV,ii !.ert hcrrvll vv Roland ’97 l.l]ucomt Stccdljr Ridley VS Jlarrla 97- llalacyW Ridley ■ 1‘oricr 91 Klortifiiic V7 Comsally MGCI)i Pf)i Fraternity ■Roll of active Chapters. Alpha. University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Beta. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. Gamma. Emory College, Oxford, Ga. Delta . Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J. Epsilon. Hampden-Sidney College, Hampden-Sidney, Va. Zbta . Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa. ETA. University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. Theta. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. N. Y. Iota. Ohio State College, Columbus, 0. Kappa. Brown University, Providence, R. I. Lambda. University of California, Berkeley, Cal. Mu. Stevens Institute, Hoboken, N. J. Nu. University of Texas, Austin, Tex. Xi. Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Omicron. Yale University, New Haven, Conn. Pi. Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tcnn. Rho. Lafayette College, Easton, Pa. Sigma. Wofford College, Spartanburg, S. C. Tau. South Carolina State College, Columbia, S. C. Phi. Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. Psi . Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. 01Kappa Alpfja Fraternity. Founded at Washington and Lee University, 1865. Gamma Chapter Established 1868. FRATRES IN URBE. I. C. Bloomfield, E. R. Hodgson, Jr., W. M. Rowland, C. N. Hodgson, T. F. Green, B. F. Hardeman, C. P. Wilcox, F. S. Morton, H. C. Brown, A. R. Nicholson, J. D. Moss, E. J. Bondurant. FRATRES IN FACULTATE. S C. Benedict, C. M. Strahan, C. H. Herty, S. Morris. LAW CLASS. J. W. Welch. CLASS OF NINETY-FIVE. R. M. Butler, J. W. Morton. CLASS OF NINETY-SIX. P. P. Ezelle, H. W. Stubbs, D. T. Clarke, J. A. Morton, C. A. Fleming, J. D. Boyd, CLASS OF NINETY-SEVEN. C. H. B. Floyd, T. Basinger, D. T. Lanier , F. Spain, CLASS OF NINETY-EIGHT. Mi P. Hall, F. S. Jones. J. W. Spain, J. A. Davis, Jr. W. G. Basinger, F. G. Hodgson. 62Jones'S} Stubbs'96 HSU'S} Brown '91 "deb (Law) Hodgson W J. W. Spain "97 Clark'S} J. w. .Morton 'M Floyd'T! Fleming 96 Butior’96 F. Spain J. A. Morton?; Hodgson’S} Bord 1 ; __ Basinger VT Kwlle 5P appci Alpfyci Fraternity ■Roll of active Chapters. Alpha . . . Washington and Lee University,Lexington, Va. Bkta ------- ----- ----- ----- ----- ------ ----- ----- OAfiriA...................University of Georgia. Athens, Ga. Delta...................Wofford College, Spartanburg, S. C. Epsilon............................Emory College, Oxford, Ga. Zbta...................Randolph Macon College, Ashland, Va. Eta............................Richmond College, Richmond, Va. Theta..............State A. and M. College, Lexington, Ky. Iota.....................Furman University, Greenville, S. C. Kappa............................Mercer University, Macon, Ga. Lambda .... University of Virginia, Albemarle Co., Va. Mu...........................A. and M. College, Auburn, Ala. Xi.............Southwestern University, Georgetown, Tenn. Omicron...................University of Texas, Austin, Texas. l i..............University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. Sigma..............Davidson College, Mecklenburg Co., N. C. Upsilon . University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. Phi..................Southern University, Greensboro, Ala. Chi................Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. Psi.....................Tulane University, New Orleans, La. Omega..........................Centre College, Danville, Ky. Alpha Alpha . . University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. Alpha Beta . . . University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Alpha Gamma, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La. Alpha Delta .... William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. Alpha Epsilon . . S. W. P. University, Clarkcsvillc, Tenn. Alpha ' eta . William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Va. Alpha Eta...................Westminster College, Fulton, Mo. Alpha Theta .... Kentucky University, Lexington, Ky. Alpha Iota ... • . . . Centenary College, Jackson, La. Alpha Kappa . . Missouri State University, Columbia, Mo. Alpha Lambda . John Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. Alpha Mu....................Millsaps College, Jackson, Miss. 5 65Pl)t Delta TI)eta. Founded at_Miami University 1848. Georgia Alpha Chapin Chartered April 10th, 1871. Fratres in Urbe. E. K. Lumpkin, J. J. Strickland, C. G. Chandler, D. D. Quillian, J. B. S. Cobb, E. B. Cohen, S. J. Tribble, T. W. Reed, E. I. Smith, T UTOR. H. C. Morend. Post Graduate. A. Belcher. Law Class. J. W. Camak. Hugh Chambers, Frank C. Keen, Class of Ninety-Five. Walter P. Warren. J. T. Dunlap, Fred J. Orr. Class or Ninety-Six. S. V. H. Brooks, John G. Pittman, Shelby Myrick, Powell Stephens. Class of Ninety-Seven. I. D. Bradwell. S. C. Dunlap, Jr. P. E. Smith, j. T. Dorsey, G. W. Price, Walker White. Class of Ninety-Eight. Ben. J. Watkins, ec Karl D. Saunders, D. G. White.1 Warren (Law) White. 0. TO Sanders :K White, W.TO My rick TO Watkins TO Bradwell TO Keen (Law) Smith TO Dunlap’ Chamber (Law) Brooks % Jk'lchor (P. G.) Dorsey TO OrrTO Price, G. TO Mon-no (P. G.l Pittman TO Stephens TO Dunlap TOPhi Delta Tl)eta Fraternity. Holl or Bcticc Chapter . Maine Alpha.......... New Hampshire Alpha Vermont Alpha . . . . Massachusetts Alpha. . Massachusetts Beta. . . Rhode Island Alpha . . New York Alpha. . . . New York Beta . . . . New York Delta . . . Virginia Alpha. . Virginia Beta . . Virginia Gamma . Virginia Delta . Georgia Alpha . . Georgia Beta . . Georgia Gamma . Tennessee Alpha . Mississippi Alpha Louisiana Alpha . Ohio Alpha . . . . Ohio Beta .... Ohio Gamma . . . Ohio Doha . . . . Ohio Epsilon . . . Ohio Zeta ... • . Indiana Alpha . . Indiana Beta . . . Illinois Alpha . . Illinois Delta . . Illinois Epsilon . Illinois Eta . . . Illinois Zeta . . . Wisconsin Alpha . Missouri Alpha . Missouri Beta • . Alpho Province. . . . Colby University. . • • . Dormouth College. University of Vermont. . . . William t'oilegc. . . . Amherst College. . . . Brown University. . Cornell University. . . . Union University. . . . Columbia College. New York Epsilon..............• . . Syracuse University. Pennsylvania Alpha....................Lafayette College. Pennsylvania Bota....................Gettysburg College. Pennsylvania Gamma . .Washington and Jefferson College. Pennsylvania Delta...................Allegheny College. Pennsylvania Epsilon.........• .... Dickinson College. Pennsylvania Zeta............University of Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Eta .... •..............Lehigh University. Bela Province. . . . . Roanoke College. Virginia Zeta...............Washington and Lee University. • University of Virginia. North Carolina Bota . . . .University of North Carolina. Randolph-Macon College. Kentucky Alpha.................................Centre College. . . . . Richmond College. Kentucky Delta •..........................Central University. Gamma Province. . . University of Georgia. Tennessee Beta......................University of the South. ...........Emory College. Alabama Alpha.......................University of Alabama. . . . . Mercer University. Alabama Beta................Alabama Polytechnic Institute. . . Vanderbilt University. Alatama Gamma...........................Southern University. Delta Province. . . . University of Mississippi Texas Beta . . Tulano University of Louisiana. Texas Gamma Ep»iloi ...........Miami University. Ohio Wesleyan University. ...........Ohio University. . . University of Wooster. ............Buchtel College. , . . Ohio State University. . . . Indiana University. ............Wabash College. Province. Indiana Gamma . Indiana Delta . . Indiana Epsilon . Indiana Zeta . . Purdue Branch. . Michigan Alpha . Michigan Beta Michigan Gamma Zeta Province. . . . Northwestern University. ...............Knox College. Illinois Wesleyan University. . . . : University of Illinois. ..........Lombard Uuivorsity. . . . University of Wisconsin. . . . . University of Missouri. .... Westminster College. Missouri Gamma Iowo Alpha . . . Iowa Beta . . . . Minnesota Alpha. Kansas Alpha . . Nebraska Alpha. California Alpha . California Beta . ............University of Texas. . . . . Southwestern University. ..............Butler University. ................Franklin College. ................Hanover College. . . . . • . De Pauw University. ..............Purdue University. ..........University of Michigan. . . . State College of Michigan. .............Hillsdale College. .... Washington University. . . . Iowa Wesleyan University. . . . . State University of Iowa. .........University of Minesota. ............University of Kansas. .... University of Nebraska. .... University of California. Lcland Stanford, Jr., University.• Lctl College. Alpl)Q Taa Omega. Founded at Virginia Military Institute 1$ J5. Georgia Alpha Beta Chapter established 1S78. Hon. H. H. Carlton, Prof. G. G. Bond, J. F. McGowan, Ollic C: Broke, • • • - • William W. Chandler, Robt. E. Brown, James B. Lawrence,. . Hugh'. A.'Jpnes, FRATRES IN UR BE. Hon. K. T. Brown, C. W. Brumby, LAW CLASS. Maston E. O’Neal. CLASS OK NINETY-FIVE. Joseph J. Bennett. CLASS OF NINETY-SIX. Willis B. Jones, Jno. E. Teaslcy, CLASS OF NINETY-SEVEN. Ulrich B. Phillips, Albert B. Mobley, CLASS OK NINETY-EIGHT. 70 ’ Chas. D. Campbell, James Barrow. James M. Stephenson, Louis E. Powell. . . Thomas K. Slaughter. Otis Jones.Brumby Mobl«y v: Stcphenaon ‘9C Jon« 'Oi J-awn'cce W Brown 91 O’.Voal (Law) Bennett W Toaaley TW 71 Jonea’SS rblllips’9: Brake '{•» Greer Jonce •» Chandler W Slaughter 97 Alpha Tau Omega 1'raternity. tRoll of active Chapters. Alpha Epsilon................A. and M. Cbllogc, Auburn. Ala. Beta Bela...............Southern University, Greensboro, Ala. Beta Delta............University of Alabama. Tuscaloosa. Ala. Beta P»i.................Iceland Stafford. Jr., University Cal. Alpha Beta................University of Georgia, Athens, Gn. Alpha Theta ....................... Emory College, Oxford. Ga. Alpha Zota....................Meivor University, Macon, Ga. Beta Iota.................School of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. Gamma Gamma . Rose Polytechnic Institute, Torre ilnute. Ind. Beta Eiwilon............. Tulane Unlvor»ity, New Orleans, La. Gamma Beta....................Tuft's College, Medford, Mass. Beta Epsilon........................State College, Orono, Me. Gamma Alpha................Colby University, Waterville, Me. Al] ha Mu.......................Adrian College. Adrian, Mich. Bctta Kappa................Hillsdale College, Hillsdale. Mich. Beta Lambda . . . University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. Beta Omieron..................Albion College, Albion. Mich. Alpha Delta • University of North Carolina, C hapel Hill, N. C. Alpha Chi....................Trinity College, Durham. N. C. Alpha Kappa................. Stevens Institute, Hoboken. X. J. Alpha Omieron................St. Lawrence University. N. Y. Beta Theta...................Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Alpha Nu................Mount Union College. Mount Union, O. Alpha Si ..................Whittcnburg College, Springfield. O. Beta Eta....................Wesleyan University, Delaware, O. Beta Mu................• • Wooster University. Wooster, O. Beta Rho .....................Marietta College. Marietta. O. Beta Omega....................State University, Columbus. O. Alpha Iota.................Muhlenburg College, Allentown. Pa. Alpha Rho............Lehigh University, So. Bethlehem, Pa. Alpha Upsilon..........Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg. Pa. BetaCbi.......................Haver ford College, Havorford, Pa. Tau ... . University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Pa. Alpha Phi ............South Carolina College, Columbia, S. C. Beta Phi...............Wofford Colloge. Spartanburg. S. C. Beta C;bl .................Charleston College. Charleston. S. C. Alpha Tau . Southwestern Pres. University. ClarkcsvHle. Tenn. Beta Pi.............Vanderbilt University. Nashville, Tenn. Lambda.................Cumberland College, Lebanon, Toon. Omega................University of the South, Suwance, Tenn. Beta Zeta............University of Vermont, Burlington. Vt. Beta .... Washington and Lee University. Lexington, Va. Beta Sigma............................Hampdon-Sidnoy College. Va. Delta..............University of Virginia. Charlottsvllle. Va. Kpsilou...........................Itoanoko College, Salem. Va. 73Delta Taa Delta. Founded at Bethany 18G0. Beta Delta Chapter established 1882. FRATRES IN' URHE. G. F. Hunnicutt, Rev. R. M. W. Black, J. W. T. P. Barnett, Hunnicutt. LAW CLASS. Greene F. Johnson. W. P. Gcarrcld, CI.ASS OK NINETY-FIVE. J. J. Gibson.. G. W. Rcab. C. H. CI.ASS OF NINETY-SIX. Holden. G S. Crane. W. E. McCurry, CLASS OF NINETY-SEVEN A. L. Tidwell. W. L. Yancy. D. Hunnicutt, CLASS OK NINETY-EIGHT. L. Snider, Jr., C. Westbrook. 74(.‘r»n 5N)6 McCorrylVT IlnnnlciilC Jubnwn (Uw I Mack TWw«lti»J HMOOa’96 GcarrelcTW ilb on '95 Snider'IK Kc»b AS Wntbroiik 'SS Hunnicutt '98 Yancey V Delta Tan Delta Fraternity ■Roll of active Chapters. Gror)d Division of the South. lambda................Vanderbilt. University, Nashville, Tenn. Pi.....................University of Mississippi. University. Miss. Beta Delia..................University « f Georgia, Athens, Ga. Beta Kpsllon.............................Emory College, Oxford, Ga. Botu Theta............University of the South, Sowance, Tonn. Beta Iota.........University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Beta ' A..................Tulano University. New Orleans, la. Grand Division of the West. Oruicron....................University of Iowa, Iowa City. Iowa. Xi..................... . . Simpson College, Indianola, Iowa. Omega.............................Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa. Beta Gamma.............University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. Beta Eta .... University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. Beta Kappa..............University of Colorado, Boulder. Col. Beta Pi...............Northwestern University, Evanston, 111. Bela Rho . . Iceland Stanford, Jr., University, Palo Alto, Cal. Grand Division of the North. Alpha.........................Allegheny College, Meadvlllc, Pa. Beta................................Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. Delta..................University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Mich. Epsilon....................................Albion Collogo, Albion, Mich. Pi.........................................Buchtcl College. Akron, Ohio. Theta.............................Bethany College, Bethany, W. Va. Iota.....................Michigan Agricultur.il Collogo, .Mich. Kappa.........................Hillsdale College, Hillsdale. Mich. Beta Phi...............Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Mu..................Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio. Chi.............................Kenyon College, Gambler, Ohio. Botn Alpha.............Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. Beta Beta..............Do Pauw University, Grecncastie, ltul. Beta Zeta...................Butler University, Indianapolis, Ind. Beta Psi....................Wabash Collcgo, Crawfordville, Ind. Grood Olvlslon of the Cost. Alpha........................Allegheny College, Moadvlllo, Pa. Upsllon.....Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Tray, N. Y. Gamma . Washington and Jefferson College, Washington, Pa. Beta Lambda .... Lehigh University. South Bethlohem, Pa. Rho............Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, N. J. Beta Mu.............Tuft’s College, Tuft’s College, Mass. Sigma..................Williams College, WilUamstown. Mass. Beta Omicron.............Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Tau...........Franklin and Marshall College. Lancaster, Pa. Beta N'u . Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 77sSicrma Net. Founded at Virginia Military Institute 1SC9. Mu Chapter established 188-1. Andrew Fears, FRATRES IN' PACULTATB. C. M. Snclling, Joseph Akerman. FRATRES IN URBE. F. C. Shackelford, Geo. P. Williamson, LAW CLASS. M. E. Bush, C. L. Hilfyer. J. H. Butner, G. H. Bell, Charles Akerman, F. L. Culver, CLASS OF NINETY-FIVE. L. Halsey, J. O. Cook. CLASS OF NINETY-SIX. Fred Morris, CLASS OF NINETY-SEVEN. J. I. Killorin, Alfred Akerman, W. B. Fender, CLASS OF NINETY-EIGHT. F. C. Dcbele, T. J. Shackelford. W. L. Kemp. R. H. Lovejoy. T. H. Me Key, Geo. O. Shackelford. Clinton Power.F.ShacMvforrt llalM-v’W G. Shackleford "M C. Akerman 97 K. mp M Culver'J: T. Shackleford Power 0$ Heller (Low) __ I’almour J. Akermnn "91 Col. C. 1. Snclllnjs Killorin’V? LoveJoy W Morrli'M Cook v£t" Fcr.rterW A. Akomian ’9. Debele’93Sigma Xu Fraternity. Chapter list. Division I. ...........University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Lambda . .Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va. ..............South Carolina College, Columbiu, S. C. Psi . . . University of North Carolina, Chupel Hill, N. C. Division II. Theta . . . University of Alabama, University, P. O., Ala Phi...................University of Louisiana, Baton Rouge. I a. f°ta.....................Howard College, East Lake, Ala. Beta Theta .... Alabama A. M. College, Auburn. Ala. Upsilon..................Univorslty of Texas, Austin, Tex. Dlvlslor) III. Zeta.....................Central University. Richmond. Ky. Omicron......................Bethel College. Russellville, Ky. Sigma...............Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. Beta Omicron . . . Univorslty of the South, Scwanec, Tcnn. Division IV. Xu..................University of Kansas, l wronce. Kan. Beta Epsilon . Kho.................Unlvorsity of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. Beta Kappa . . Chi....................Cornell College, Mt. Vernon. Iowa. Beta Lambda . Beta Gamma .... Missouri Valley College, Marshall. Mo. Beta Mu. . . . Beta Delta.............Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa. Beta Xi . ... Division V. . . Upper Iowa University, Fayette, Iowa. Southwest Kansas College. Winfield, Kan. ...........Central College, Fayette. Mo. . . . Unlvorsity of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. . . William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. Pi.............Lehigh University, South Bothlehcm. Pa. Beta Rho . . University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, Pa. Division VI. Eta......................Mercer University. Macon, Ga. Mu........................University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. Kuppa...............North Georgia College, Dahlonega, Ga. Xi..............................Emory College, Oxford, Ga. Division VII. Beta Beta............De Pnuw University, Greencastlc, Ind. Beta Iota.............Mt. Union College, Alliance, Ohio. Beta Zeta..............Purdue University. LaFayctte, Ind. Beta Nu..............University of Ohio, Columbus. Ohio. Beta Eta...........University of Indiana, Bloomington, Ind. Delta Theta . ... Lombard University, Galesburg. 111. Beta Pi..................Chicago University. Chicago, III. Division VIII. Beta Chi Loland Stanford, Jr., Unlvorsity, Menlo Park, Cal. Beta Psl 6 81 Univorslty of California, Berkley, Cal.0)1 Psi Founded at Union College 18-11. Alpha Alpha Delta Established 1S90. KRATRES IN URBE. W. B. Burnett, VV. D. Hammett. PRATER IN FACL'LTATE. Eugene Dodd, 0. H. Sheffield. LAW CLASS. W. A. Fuller. CLASS OF NINETY-SIX. C. F. Dodd, H. V. Black. CLASS OF NINETY-SEVEN. Harry Dodd. CLASS OF NINETY-EIGHT. G. W. Collier. 82K. Dodd (I.aw) Collier’?? H. Dodd 97 Blsclc J6 Fuller (Lmw) lUuiinctt Prof. Sheffield C. F. Dodd ’C)i Psi Fraternity. TRoIl of active Chapters. Phi................................Union College, Schenectady, N. Y. Theta........................Williams College, Williamstown, Mass. Mu..................................Middlcbury College, Middlcbury, Vt. Alpha...........................Wesleyan College, Middletown, Conn. Pm....................................Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y. Epsii.on...................University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. Upsii.on..........................Furman University, Greenville, S. C. Beta....................University of South Carolina, Columbia, S. C. Gamma.........................University of Mississippi, Oxford, Miss. Cm.....................................Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. Psi....................................Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Tau....................................Wofford College, Spartanburg, S. C. Nu.........................University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. Iota.........................University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. Rho..........................Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J. Xi..................Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, N. J. ALPHA DELTA.........................University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. Beta Delta..................Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. 85Tl)e Non-Fraternity Club At different times in past years the Non-Fraternity men of the Univcrrity held meetings and kept minutes of such meetings, but on the 26th of November, 1894, they came together in a permanent organization known as the Non-Fraternity Club with twenty-six charter members. The club now has sixty members, holds regular meetings and intends to have, in the near future, a club room well furnished and supplied with newspapers and magazines where Non-Fraternity men may go and study or spend leisure hours in reading. MEMBERS. Barge, J. R., ltMn K W Hendricks, J. W., Scott, W. YV., Shattuck,' W Shea rouse, P. Smart, H. P., Born, W. H., Brand, C. E, Carson, C. C., Hunt, J. M., Hunt, S. A, Hunter, S. G., Kent, W. B. Larson, VV. VV. • 1 r A., Smith, J. G., Thompson, C. P., avup V . «i Crittendon, M. M., Dcl-oach, Jno., Edmonson, A. O., Mize, C. A., Nalley, H. VV., Nalley, R. B„ Neal, T. A, Newell, S A., Perry, J. A., P trir I U 1 IVltlJU, » -f Flowers, A. P., Franklin, D. B., GrifTeth, F. E., Griffeth, J. VV., Harper, R., Elsingcr, J Ezzard, IT H., Fletcher, V., Watkins, N., Watson, L. D., Watson, Y. L., Watts, R. F., Wcddington, C. A., Wcllhousc, Leo., U.UjlU, J . f Harvey, L. G., Haskell, C. T., 1 UUD, » » • 'ii, Richardson, A. S., Richardson, J. G., Robertson, M. P., Schwartz, j. E., UV.IIUUU.1V, k , White, H. S., White, R. E. HONORARY MEMBERS. Judge Howell Cobb, 80 Dr. B. F. RileyAbcmbere of ratemfte Club. $$Members o( ■Moit=JFrntcnntw Club. so umnxn’Y of Fraternities i ’95 ’96 •97 ’98 Post Grad. j Total. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 3 ' 8 8 3 2 25 Chi Phi 6 3 5 6 . 20 Kappa Alpha I 2 8 6 2 19 Phi Df.lta Theta 3 2 4 7 2 2 20 Alpha Tag Omf.ga . ! . 5 5 2 14 Delta Tau Delta « 3 2 3 3 12 Sigma Nu 2 4 4 6 2 1 19 Chi Psi 'L 0 1 1 • 6 Totai 13 9 3 4 21 5 35 91UntQersifY 1. A. C A. CiJorl Of the many fields where professed Christians have opportunities to make practical applications of religious usefulness, probably none are of greater importance than our American institutions of learning. Where the characters of the nation’s law-makers are moulded; where those men arc educated, who, in after years hold the positions of influence and importance in every branch of work—there would it seem that the greatest effort should be excited to elevate and purify character. Some of the greatest men of the nation have gone out from our own halls here at the University. Who can tell but that their careers were shaped right here in college ? If the Christian men in the University would become aroused to a realization of their opportunities to do good, and stir up things next year, the dormant spirit that seems to have enveloped so many, will disappear, and we would have a religious awakening, such as has not been known in years. The prospects for new quarters for the Y. M. C. A. in the lower floor of Phi Kappa arc very bright, and it we can get enough spirit into the movement to have that room furnished, as Mr. Brockman says, “ way up,” and make it inviting and cheerful, there’s no reason why a much better work shouldn’t be done. Hut even if we shouldn’t be so fortunate as to secure the new place, if everybody will just get together, shoulder to shoulder, and push right along with concentrated effort to win souls, it can’t but result in a great victory at the end. We want to get a little true college spirit mixed into Y. M. C. A. work—just such as we have about foot-ball and athletics. So many fellows think that because we talk about “Religion” and things of that sort at Y. M. C. A. meetings, therefore it just must of necessity be dull and too serious for a lively sort of man to get into at all. But it isn’t that way. The meetings arc not intended to make anyone long-faced and glum. The more lively the men arc, the better will be the meeting. The loudest songs inspire the most cheerfulness. As to this year’s work; we have had pleasant visits from Mr. Brockman, Mr. Gales, Mr. Lewis and Mr. Luce, of the Mission movement, and besides all these, the State Convention right here in our midst. Though all expected results from these sources have not been directly seen, it is believed that they each did good. For ten weeks during the year, daily prayer-meetings have been held and this persistent effort to accomplish results is encouraging. It shows an earnestness in the work and an interest in its success. We sincerely hope, however, that the work next year, beginning with the Fall Campaign, will have a a greater amount of push and enthusiasm in it, than has been manifested in the past. F. J. O.Tl)e Saltation Commandant— Lt. Col. C. M. Snf.lung. Adjutant O. H. Nisbet. Sergeant-Major—D. T. Clarke. Company A. Capt. J. T. Dunlap. Lieuts. J. J. Gibson, R. A. Ridley. Sgts. S. Brooks, R. H. Lovcjoy, J. A. Morton, J. G. Pittman, W. W. Chandler. Corpls. W. S. Cothran, J. D. Brad well, W. L. Moss, R. J. H. DeLoach, G. T. Traylor, B A. Crane. Company B. Capt. W. P. Gearrcld. Lieuts. J. H. Butner, R. M. Butler. Sgts. G. H. Boggs, W. R. Dancy, T. A. Neal, G. P. Hunt, H. S. Mansell. Corpls. W. White, W. B. Fender, H. Dodd, F. K. Boland, L. A. Lindsey, A. B. Mobley. 93Demostfyenian Founded Febmaty 19, 1801. Officers 1894 95. First Term. President Vice-President First Censor M. E. O’Neal. Albert I,. Tidwell. Second Consor Secretary Treasurer Second Term. President Vice-President First Censor Second Censor Secretary Treasurer • Third Term. President Vice-President First Consor Clifford M. Walker. Second Censor Secretary Treasurer Frank Mitchell. Fourth Term. President Vice-President First Censor Second Censor Secretary Treasurer Fifth Term. Vice-President First Censor Second Censor Secretary Treasurer AN XIVERS ARI AN. Joseph Johnston Bennett. Subject.—"Secession no Stigma.’’ 94Pf)i Fjappa E iferar sSocief - Toundtd February 22d, 1820. Officers. First Term. H. Bacon................................President. P. J. Shearousr J. J. Gibson.................First Vice-President. V. Fi.etcher . . R. A. Ridley................Second Vice-President. C. H. Holden . F. W. Bean.............................Treasurer Second Term. V. P. Georrf.i.d.......................President. P. J. Shearouse W. A. Harris..............First Vice-President. J. j. Gibson . . H . I I Ezzard............Second Vice-President. J. H. Porter . F. VV. Bean.............................Treasurer. Third Term. H. H. Ezzard............................President. P. J. Shearouse H. YV. Nalley.............First Vice-President. J. H. Porter . . K. D. Sanders...............Second Vice-President. I. J. Hofmayer . F. W. Bean...........................Treasurer. Fourth Term. W. A. Harris.............................President. V. Fletcher . I. J. Hofmayer...............First Vice-President. J. H. Porter . J J. Gibson.................Second Vice-President. F. J. Orr . . . F YV. Bean...........................Treasurer. Fifth Term. J. H. Porter...............................President. V. Fletcher . . C. H. Holden.................First Vice-President. YV. A. Harris. F. L. Fleming...............Second Vice-President. F. Morris . . , F. YV. Bean...........................Treasurer. . . . Secretary. . First Censor. Second Censor. . . Secretary. . First Censor. Second Censor. . . . Secretary. . First Censor. Second Censor. . . . Secretary. . First Censor. Second Censor. . . . Secretary. . First Censor. Second Censor. Anniversarian.—Greene F. Johnson. Subject: “The Glory of Today. 90q Fred Ork . . . P. J. Shearousf. , J. G. Pittman . . F. K. Boland . G. H. Boggs . . H. H. E' .zard . . Akerman, Carson, Haskell, Boggs, T., Belcher, Bean, Smith, A., Walker, Lindsey, Kent, Cook, n. c a Officers. .......................President. ..................Vice-President. ...................... Secretary. ........................Treasurer. . . . . Corresponding Secretary. ........................Librarian. ©embers. White, H. S., Hall, P., Powell, Lockhart, M., Kemp, Black, H. V., Gammon, Stephens, Butler, R. M., Butler, G. P., Reab, Akerman, Chas., Mitchell, White, W., Ridley, J. F., Akerman, Clem, Goldsmith, Gibson, J. J., Bennett, Robinson, Harris, W. A. 96University Publications. panbora. EDITORS OF FAX DORA FROM ISS6 TO PRESENT TIME. VOLUME I. 1886. Editor-In-Chief. G. N. Wilson, K A. Business Moijogcr. W. B. Cook, A Tfl. Associate Editor . W. E. Wooten, S A E. S. McDaniel, X t . C. F. Rice, X ❖. C. H. Wilcox, K A. W. A. Speer, ♦AO. F. S. Stone, ♦A 0. R. D. Meatier, ATS). M. B. Bond, A T A. W. S. Upshaw, A T A, R. L. Move, ❖FA. F. L. Wade, ♦FA. A. W. Wade, S N. W. G. Bsown, 5 N. VOLUME II. 1887. Edltor-lQ-Cblcf. C. F. Rice, X ❖. Business Moneger. J. W. Daniel, K A. Associate Editor . T. W. Reed, ❖ A 0. Glen Waters, ❖ T A. W. J. Shaw, $ N. H. Key Milner, ATQ. A. L. Franklin, A T A. VOLUME III. 1888. Editor-In-Chief. Albert Howell, K A. Business .Manager. Asa W. Griggs, ❖ F A. A oeiotc Editor Wilmer L. Moore, $ A E. T. Remsen Crawford, A TQ. Frank W. Coile, 5 N. Lucian L. Knight, X ❖. W. M. Glass, A T A. VOLUME IV. 1890. Edltor-ln-Chlef. John D. Little, $ A E. Business Mncoger. Walter K. Wheatlev, ATQ. Associate Editors. F. E. Callaway, K A. S. J. Tribble, ♦AO. J. G. Crawford, 5 N. W. D. Ellis, X ❖. W. L. Stallings, A T A. W. N. Smith, X ¥. E. A. Cohen. VOLUME V. 1892. Edltors-ln-Chlef. J. F. Lewis, X t . L. L. Brown, ATQ. Business Manager. W. E. Cristip., 5 N. W. T. Kelly, A T A. Associate Editors. J. C. Kimball, 5 A E. Roy Dallas, ♦AO. j. R. Lane, K A. E. W. Frey, X ¥. VOLUME VI. 1893. Edttor-ln-Chlef. Harry Hodgson, K A. Business Manager. Fred. G. Barfield, 5 A E. Associate Editors. Charles R. Nisbct, X ❖. Nat. B. Stewart, ATQ. Alfred O. Halsey, 5 N. Harry A. Alexander. E. Gerry Cabaniss, ❖AO. Greene Johnson, A T A. Eugene Dodd, X Y. VOLUME VII, 1894. Edltors-ln-Cblcf. Chas. R. Tidwell, A T A. Noel McH. Moore, 5 A E. Business Manager . Paul L. Fleming, X ❖. John D. Stelling, ATQ. Associate Editors. Lunsford D. Fricks, 5 N. William I . Harbin, X Y. Henry Brown, K A. George W. Beckett, ❖AO. VOLUME VIII, 1895. Editor-In-Chief. W. A. Harris, X ❖. Business Manager. J. J. Gibson, A T A. Associate Editor . H. H. Steiner, 5 A E. J. W. Morton, K A. W. W. Chandler, ATQ. W. L. Kemp, 5 N. H. V. Black, X Y. J. T. Dunlap, ❖AO. J. G. Smith, non. 07Board of Editors “Red and F taoif’ September 15TH to January ist George W. Reob.......... F. K. Boland............ W. B. Jones............. E. C. Ryals............. I. J. Hofmayf.r, J. T. Butner, John Welch, Eugene Dodd, Frank C. Keen, . . Editor-in-Chief. Business Manager. . Soliciting Editor. . . Local Editor. Associate Editors. From January ist Ad Mortem Frank C. Keen.......... Harry B. Floyd . . . . Frank L. Fleming . . . . I. J. Hofmayf.r........ Carl Holden, Cliff Walker, Fred Morris, Geo. W. Collier, W. B. Jones, . Editor-in-Chief. Business Manager. . . Local Editor. . Sporting Editor. Associate Editors. 08Walker Hoffniaycr Holden Floy it Jones Collier Morris Keen Fleming Colors—Orange and Black C. L. Jokes, President. Hugh Chambers, Vice-President. MEMBERS. Hugh Chambers. Wm. B. Kent, Otis Jones, J. J. Bennett, 102 Frank S. Jones, W. C. Jones.G. M. I. Tigers. Yell : “G. M. I. Tigers, Hip Hoo Ray. Colors: Mud. J. Audley Morton, General. J. F. Ridley, Adjutant. PR IV, J. W. Welch, C. M. Walker, M. O. Markham, F. C. Ferrell, Frank 1 Percy P. E .ellc, Leonard Snider, Hugh H. Jones, Holcombe Bacon . Mitchell. 103Emor CUtb Archibald Belcher, President. Plinv Hai.l, Blower. Fred. Morris, Scrapper. MEMBERS. Joe. B. Conally, R. K. I.ee, R. B. Davis, Geo. II. Bell, Sam. T. Hawes, Davis White,F. J- E W J- O. R. The ’95 German Club. W. Bean............dcr Mann mit cl Cm Antlitz. O. Cook............Ja was sagte ich, Professor. E. Dougherty..............tier Windshachtel. . P. Gp.arrbld.............dcr immer schneid. W. Morton .... dcr Mann der alles wciss- B. Nisbrt...............Ja das habe ich gesagt. A. Ridley . . . ich kann nicht so viel lerncn. 105ALL- eriCa-CLi - ' : ■■ John Hawzk, President. Kdwakd C. Bronxman, Secretary. Skadokn A. Nf.wrll, Treasurer. ohn Hawzc, University of Ala. . T. Dunlap, Dahlonega. •rank C. Keen, Ala. Polytechnic. John T. Dorsey, Gordon Institute. Malvern Halsey, Porter Milit’y Acd'y, S. C. Edward C. Bronxman, Australia. George E. Maddox, Emerson Inst., D. C. Thomas Basinger, Dahlonega. C. A. Fleming, Sewanec. Tenn. C. T. Haskell, Ottawa College, Canada. John H. Morse, University of Vermont. John W. Morton, Bingham, N. C. Walter G. Basinger, Dahlonega. Thomas H. McKcv, University of Ky. Seaborn A. Newell, Florida Normal Col. IT. H. Steiner, Sewanec, Tenn. R. D. Draper, Georgia Technological. C. T. Whipple, Gordon Institute. J Audlcy Morton, Bingham, N. C. Dark Knight, University of Wisconsin. H. S. White, Young-Harris College. O. B. Nisbet, Gordon Institute.Old Dominion Club. Song: “ Hang John Brown.” High Chief of Commonwealth, W. W. Clarkb. Treasurer of Commonwealth, H. H. Steiner. R. I. Branch. MEMBERS. Frank W. Spain, St. Albans. D. T. Lanier, Bethel College. Jos. V. Goodrich, U. of Va. H. H. Steiner. W. H. Bocock, Hampden-Sidncy VV. R. Dancy, Pantops. W. W. Clarke, St. Albans. H. C. White, U of Va. J. W. Spain, St. Albans. Cologne Davenport, V. M. I. C. M. Snclling, V. M. I. W. D. Hooper, Hampden-Sidncy. 107Ti)e Tfjalians. ©embers i$94 '95. Edwin Cabell Ryals, ’96.......President. Oscar Lyndon, ’98...............Vice-President. John White Welch, (Law) ‘95 .... Manager. Holcombe Bacon, ’96..............Stage Manager. Shirley Brooks,’96............Assistant. Frank Kells Boland, 97 . . . Musical Director. Edward Emmett Dougherty, '95. Frederic Joseph Orr, ’95.+ Robert Archibald Ridley, ’95. George Horace Bell, ’96.“ James Audley Morton, ’96. Fortune Chisolm Ferrell, ’97. John Francis Thomas Samuel Hawes, (Law) '95 Robert Edward Lee, (Law) ’95. Lamar Lyndon, '93. Pliny Hall, ’96. Elton Osborne, '96. Parish Smith, ’97. Ridley, '9S. 10s • Left College, t Bmigned. Gbe Cbaltane,"The Play's the thin?.” Ulnlversltg of Georgia. £bc fEbaltans in “Ibamlet.” Revamped, Modernized and Set to Music. cast. The Ghost of llnmlet. King of Denmark, Mystically Malevolent and Matrimonially Mixed, Mr. Kyats. The Ghost’s Voice, A Sooty Songster, Servile but Slick, Mr. Oscar Lyndon. Hamlet, the Ghost's Son. a Student, A Dreary, Despondent, but Daring Dane, Mr. Hall. Horatio, Hamlet’s Chum, Happy, Handsome and Highly Heroic, Mr. Morton. Polonius, Professor in Wittonburgh University. A Pedantic Pedagogue with Political Propensities. Mr. Lamar Lyndon. Claudius, the Ghost's Brother, Voluble, Vilo and Verily Villainous, Mr. Ferrell. Gertrude, Queen of Denmark, Proudly Potent and Powerfully Peculiar, Mr. Bacon. Ophelia, Daughter of Professor Polonius, Lackadaisical, Loyal, but Luckless In Love, Mr. Orr. Old Ladies of the Court, Gossipy, Garrulous and Gay, Mr. Smith. Mr. Bell. Mr. Hawos. Student of Wittonburgh University: Messrs. Boland, Brooks. R. A. Ridley, Hawes, J. F. Ridley, Lee, Bell, Smith, Osborne and Dougherty. SVNOPSIS—ACT I. Hamlet’s Room, Wittenburgh University. “My lord, I came to seo your father's funeral.-’ “ Nay, do not mock me, fellow-student, I think it was to see my mother’s wodding.’’ ACT II. Exterior of the Castle at Elsinore. “ Now is the witching time of night when church-yards yawn.” act in. Banquet Hall of the Castle. “Whereon do you look?” “On him—on him, look you how pale he glares.’’ ACT IV. The Same. “Put au antic disposition on.” ACT V. The Same. “ Why let the struckcn deer go weep, The heart ungalled play. For some must watch and some must sleep, So runs the world away.” ARGUMENT. Hamlet is sad, His ma would wed loo soon and comes anon, And scolds and growls and drinks too much. Hamlet’s dad Appears in pomp and circumstance of spook, To glut his Ire and claim his throne. Hamlet’s no cad. 'Gainst hidden spies he draws his knightly blade, Polonius thus comes to grief. Hamlet is mad In craft. Horatio and chorus then Go mini at once from sympathy. Hamlet Is glad, Ophelia's his. The villlan’s foiled. Onco moro Ills father reigns, and all is well. IllThe University Moroble-Bee. “ Rise Where I Bootlick, I Boot lick Often." Assignments for 1S95. Bootlick-in-Chicf.................................J. J. Bennett. To Bootlick Boggs.................................C. T. Haskell. To Swell Proty’s Head.............................O. B. Nisbctt. To Swell Charley's Ab.............................W. A. Harris. To Consult Hooper on Points He Doesn’t Know . . M. Guyton. To Work the Y. M. C. A. Racket.......................Fred Orr. To Bluff Riley.......................................Joe Gibson. To Laugh at Zip’s Jokes...........................J. H. Porter. To Slave for Phil................J. Dunlap and W. P. Gcarrcld. To Attend to the General Business of Bootlicking at All Times and All Places . P. J. Shearouse, H. H. Ezzard. 112 t0. T. M. r 3unior Glass Society. Organized by ’95. W. P. Gearrcld, J. J. Gibson, R. A. Ridley, MEMBERS. 95- YV. A. Harris, W. L. Kemp, O. 13. Nisbct, •96. -f S 2 Z A J A A — + X sin y -f o • 6 s — g o — p m n o R L 4 J. T. Dunlap, L. Halsey. HONORARY. 8 The Pug. Darby, 113 Larry, Jerry.Sweeps- Most Exalted Twirler of the Mastodon's Backbone, . ...............................T. Fanning Smythc. Dimmer of the Blaze..................O. Lyndon, of Yale. Biscuit Wicldcr...............................F. Fleming. Prince of Darkness............................P. P. Ezelle. Guardian of the Guitar........................H. Stubbs. Niobc.........................................G. G. Bond. {S. Hawes, J. W. Spain, H. Jiacon, E. C. Ryals. iknlobts ot tbc TClbttc jfcatbcr. DISABLED. P. P. Ezelle, F. Fleming, I. Hofmayer, O. Lyndon, R. E. Lee. Jim Barrow. CAUSE. A Bottle of Beverage. Jawbone of an Ass. Candelabra. Rat Trap. lit(Fj)Nigl)fs of fl)e Ro at Pole. F. Champagne Keen...............................President. Birdikins Brook Halsey,) . . .. . _ _ , )..................Midnight Keelers. 0. Port Lyndon, ) Captain Willie " Lake ” Clark, "j John Moonshine Dorsey, I.................Wrestlers. Miss Lou Slitz Fleming, j John “C. Corn” Howze...............................Hatter. A. Grand Surprise Belcher, } i,.ct,.r F. Box Boland, )......................JC CrS Joe “Canadian C.” Bull Connally.............Heavy Sweater. Samuel Weinerwurst Dunlap, j Cookie Paul Goldsmith, I...........................Sports. F. Trilby Cocktail Ferrell, j Joseph Tromponcnts Boyd............................Orator. M. “Cherry Bounce” Markham..............................C. C. 115Casino Clob COLOR. YELL. All Green. C-A-SIN-O, C-A-SINO. jEitract from Constitution. Art. I. Sec. I. The object of the Club shall be the improvement of the financial conditions of its bers, and the inculcation into the mind and heart of the Freshman of the motto, “It is more blessed t than to receive.” Officers. President................Johnson, Law. Vice-President..............Butler, ’94. Ropf.r-in.................Butner, ’95. Banker.....................Price, Law. O Guyton, ’95. Ryals, ’96. Kemp, 95. Dorsey, 97. iDcmbcrs. Ezelle, 96. Pittman, ’96. Lyndon, 98. Dodd, ’96. lie mem » givePresident, Charley Strahan. flDembers. Picture o in 11 ltd by special r«nuo4i. B. Ridley, S. Porter, 117 J. Dunlap, C. Barron.Glee Club Shirley Brooks, '96....................................President. G. P. Butler, ’94. . ........................... Vice-President. Dk. |. P. Campbell . . . , F. K. Boland, '97 ... . Musical Director. Business Manager. FIRST TENORS. Orr, Ridley, '95, Hall, Boland, Ridley, '98, Pro. Strahan. SECOND TENORS. Morton, ’96, Lockhart. M., Osborne, Powell, Keen. FIRST BASSES. Dr. Hcrty, Butler, ’94, Dougherty, Boggs, G., Fender. SECOND BASSES. Prof. Hooper, Brooks, Hansell, Draper, Ferrell, Lyndon, 11sr Hull Duller I.vndon Boland V---- Strnhan Kldlcjr J. Orr Hansel] Prof. Campbell O bornc Keen Dougherty ,k% t llroot Knlloj It FenderAthletics In introducing Athletics once again to the readers of the Pandora, we do so with a feeling of much satisfaction and pride. No previous year in the University can boast of as flourishing a year in this branch as the present. To begin with we have remodeled our entire organization from beginning to end. Our Association Constitution has been revised and, thanks to the college spirit amongst the boys, the obliteration of politics in Athletics has been accomplished. Not only arc the boys working solidly for the advancement of Athletics, but the Faculty too are behind us with good words of cheer. This they demonstrated by the appointment of a committee in that body for the general supervision of Athletics. On the gridiron for the past season our record of victories is unprecedented. Early after the opening of the Fall session a coach and trainer was obtained, a good schedule of games was arranged and the team went to work with a determination to win. Out of the six games played only one was lost, that being the first of the scries and played with Sewance. The total number of points scored by the team during the season was one hundred and fifty-six, while the total scored by opposing teams amounted to twenty. Immediately after the • close of the games the team selected their captain and manager for the coming season. Already the management has secured a trainer in the person of Glenn S. Warner, who captained and brought Cornell to its high standard last season. A good schedule of games is being arranged and the season of next term promises to be equally as glorious a one as last. The scries of class base ball games was up to its usual high standard. The Junior Class was the winner of the 123pennant, but all the classes played well. After this series the ’Varsity nine commenced to be organized, and already the team bids fair to mark the season with victories, though only one game has been played, besides a practice game with the Atlanta League team, up to the time of going to press. The game with Atlanta was a good showing, while the first regular game with Madison resulted in a victory. Other games have been arranged to be played before Commencement. Of track Athletics Pandora can give no definite account. Field Day, which should have taken place in April, was postponed on account of continued inclement weather until the 14th of May, but judging from the number of contestants it will be up to date. Track Athletics in the future will be made even more popular than heretofore in the University. A definite organization for such is now incorporated in our Constitution, and next year will materialize a team which will be able to cope with other colleges just as we now do in foot ball and base ball. The incorporation of Tennis under the general Athletic Association is also a new feature, and already plans are being perfected for the laying of courts on the campus for the use of any and all members of the Association. With this short introduction to Athletics Pandora closes for the year ’95. J W. M. 124(IniQer tfY of Georgia Athletic Association- W. P. Gearrp.lo . Lindsey Halsey E. M. Gammon . . E. E. Dougherty . . President. Vice-President. . . Secretary. . . Treasurer. ATHLETIC COUNCIL. W. P. Gearreld, Chairman. L. Halsey, E. E. Dougherty. E. M. Gammon, H. W. Stubbs. J. W. Morton, W. L. Kemp, F. K. Boland, H. S. Hansel], C. H. B. Floyd, J. T. Dunlap, O. C. Turner, Hon. P. W. Meldrim, Dr. S. C. Benedict, Dr. C. H. Hcrty, Prof. A. H. Patterson, 125’Var ifY Football Team G P. Butler H. C. Moreno J. T. Dunlap ..........Captain. ..........Manager. Assistant Manager. R. B. Nalley Center Rush. W. B. Kent Right Guard. F. O. Price C. A. Fleming, L. Snider, F. Spain, F. Morris, L. Halsey, J. W. Spain, I i } ..............Right Tackle. .................Right End. G. P. Butler.............. ...........Right Half Back. H. W. Stubbs............... N. Watkins, | J. O. Killorin, J ' ' W. W. Clarke, ) W. P. Gearreld, | .............Quarter Back. G. O. Shackelford........... ................Full Back. Substitutes E. E. Pomeroy, M. Halsey, C. Barrow. . Left Guard. Left Tackle. Left End. Left Half Back.1 Result of Football Games. Athens, October iOth. 'Varsity.....................................8 Scwance.....................................12 Ilustiers—Nalley, Kent. Watkins, Snider, Fleming, Spain F, Clarke. Backs- Butler, Sbackloford, Spain W, Hulsey Stubbs. Spartanburg, S. C., November loth. 'Varsity......................................10 Wofford........................................o Rusheis—Nalley, Watkins, Prico, Kent, Fleming, Morris, Butler. Backs—Spain F, Shackleford, Spain W, Stubbs. Planf'i, Qa., Xovember SUh. ’Varsity...................................10 Auburn......................................8 Rushers—Nalloy, Prico, Kent, Watkins, Fleming, Clarke, Spain F. Backs—Butler, Shackleford, Ilalsey L, Stubbs. Columbia, S. C’., November 3rd. ’Varsity.......................................40 S. C. State College.............................0 Rusher — Nallcy, Clarke, Watkins, Price, Kent, Fleming, Spain F. Backs—Butler, Snider, Spain W. Stubbs. luyurfo, Ga., Xovember 17th. 'Varsity........................................66 Augusta Athletic Association.....................o Rushers—Nalley, Price, Watkins, Clarke, Spain F, Kil-lorin, Fleming. Backs—Butler, Shackleford, Halsoy L, Stubbs. Savannah, Ga., Xovember Z9th. ’Varsity........................................22 Savannah Athletic Association....................o ffusftm -Nalloy, Price. Kent, Watkins. Fleming, Clarke, Spain F. Backs—Butler, Shackleford, Halsey L, Stubl . Total of points scored, 156; by opposing teams, 20. 9 129’Varsity Baseball Team. W. L Kkmp, Captain. F. K. Boland, Manager. Uitrhnx 1 FrED MoRR,S I itchers j j Q pETTIS Catcher........................................................H. B. Nallcy. First Base.............................................M. P. Hall. Second Base.......................................................L- Halsey. Third Base..........................................H. W. Stubbs. Shortstop...........................................W. L. Kemp. Left Field.............................................G. P. Butler. Center Field...................................................R. B. Davis. Right Field............................................F. Spain. Substitutes..........................W. W. Clarke, Halton Lovcjoy. 130Stutito. 3 H. Clarke. Sul . Boland. Manager. Jxtvejor. Sub. Butler, J,. I . Spain, U. K. Morrfa,P. Nailer, C. Petti . P. Halsey,2 B. Davit, C. F. Kemp, S. S. and Capt Hall. 1 B.Class IjcisebciU Teeing Senior Ccam. W. P. Gearrkld..........................Captain. S. G. Hunter............................Manager. Sopbomorc Ccam. M. D. DUBOSE................................Captain J. W. Spain................................Manager. W. L. Kemp . K. A. Ridley . P. O. Price . . L. Halsey . . • W. P. Goarrold J. W. Morton . J. T. Dunlap . . C. H. Horty . . S. G. Hunter . . . . . Catcher. . . . Pitcher. . . Fist Base. Second Base. . Third Base. . Short Stop. . Left Field. Center Field. Right Field. J. O. Killorln . M. D. Dubose J. D. Bradwcl! M. Halsey . . F. C. Ferrell . B. A. Crane . R. B. Davis . F. Spain . . . W. S. Cothran . . . Catcher. . . . Pitcher . First Base. Second Base. . Third Base. . Short Stop. . Ixjft Field. Center Field. Right Field Sunior Ccam. J. O. Pettis...................................Captain. W. B. Jones....................................Manager. jfreabmatt Ccam. W. W. Clarke....................................Captain O. B. HINTON...................................Manager. M. P. Hall . . J.O. Pettis. . J. B. Connelly C. Barron . . , H. W. Stubbs P. P. Ezcllc . T. F. Smith . R. H. Lovojoy F. Morris . . . . . Catcher. . . . Pitcher. . First Base. Second Base. . Third Base. . Short Stop. . Loft Field. Center Field. . Right Meld. C. A. Wedding ton W. W. Clarke . . H. W. Nalley . . H. H. Jones . . . E. E. Pomeroy . . F. W. Bondurant . F. C. Debele . . . J. Elslngcr . . . . A. O. Edmondson . . . . Catcher. . . . Pitcher. . First Base. Socond Base. . Third Base. . Short Stop. . Left Field. Center Field. • Right Field. 133Revolt of Class 5a eball Game }. I. March 19. Sophomores, . . . ... 3 0 0 1 1 4 • •— 9 Juniors 0 0 0 0 0 4 .— 6 2. March 23. Juniors ... 6 0 3 3 2 2 2 .—18 Seniors 0 2 2 2 2 O — 9 3- March 26. Sophomores . . . 0 2 0 1 5 5 3 .—18 Freshmen .... ... 4 3 0 0 1 3 0 0 .—11 4 March 2S. Juniors .... ... 8 5 3 5 4 3 6 I 2—37 Freshmen .... ... 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0— 4 • March 30. Seniors ... 3 i 0 0 3 0 2 0 — 9 Sophomores . . . 1 0 0 0 2 1 2 0— 6 6. April 2. Seniors 0 2 8 4 7 0 4 3-29 Freshmen .... ... 0 0 0 1 6 0 4 3 0—14 7- April 6. Juniors 2 0 4 6 5 0 1 .—20 Sophomores . . . ... 3 1 0 O 1 2 2 1 .—10 Teams. Games Played. Won. Lost. Percentage. Juniors 4 3 1 750 Seniors 3 2 I 566 Sophomores .... 4 2 2 500 Fresmen 3 0 3 000 134Field Da - Held on Campus, May Hlh. isu: . J. T Dunlap...................................Captain Track Team. C. H. B. Floyd................................Manager Track Team. 3uJ flCd. E- H. Dorsey. Hariy Charbonnicr. Fred. Morton. Starter..........................................Carl VonderLieth. Clerk of the Course ... •..........................H. C. Moreno. Scorer...............................................J. VV. Welch. Official Announcer.................................F. K. Boland. Aarebals. J. W. Morton. R. D. Draper. T. F. Smith. C. A. Fleming. Frank Fleming. £vcnto. Throwing Baseball.—'Won by C. Burrow: distance, 300 (t. 2 inches. Second Fred Morris. •Flitting 10 lb. Shot. -Won by F. O. Frice; distance, 30 ft. ■IVi in. Second—E. M. Gammon. Standing High Jump.- Won by E. E. Dougherty: height. 4 ft. 10 in. Second- F. O. Prlco. •Fifty Yanis Dash.—Won by Fred Morris; time, 5 2-3 see. Second--J. W. Morton. ‘Throwing 12 lb. Hammer.—Won by E. M. Gammon: distance. 103 ft. 2% in. Second R. B. Nalloy. •Standing Broad Jump Without Bells.—Won bv E. E. Dougherty: distance, 0 ft. 11 £ in. Second—F. O. Frice. •Hundred Yards Dash.—Won by Fred Morris: time, 10 2-3 soc. Second F. Spain. •Standing Broad Jump With Bells.—Won by E. E. Dougherty; distance, 11 ft. 9% in- 8ccond—F. O. Frice. Pole Vault.—Won by Joe Boyd: height, 7 ft. 11 in. Second— Fred Morris. Half Milo Run. Won by L. Halsey: time, 2 min. 30 1-5 sec. Second—It. M. Butler. •Sack Race. Won by A. Smith: tiino. 10 1-5 sec. Second C. Barrow. Hurdle Race. Won by J. L. Dunlap: time. 10 3-5 sec. Second—F. Spain. •Three Standing Broad Jumps. Won by E. E. Dougherty; distance, 30 ft. 8 £ in. Second—F. Price. •Three Legged Race.—Won by Barrow and Ferrell: time, 6 sec. Second—Fender ana Yancey. Tumbling. Won by C. If. Black. Second—E. K. Dougherty. Mile Run. Won by L. Halsey; time, 5 min. 39sec. Second— R. Butler. Running High Jump.—Won by J. L. Dunlap: height. 5 ft. 1 in. Second—J. Boyd. Bicycle Race. 100 Yards.—Won by Joe Boyd; time, llsec. Second—G. Hurt. Grand Lift.—Won by F. O. Price. College KeconL 135University of (Seorcria Record . Event. Etcord. JloUler. 50 yards dash 5 2-5 sec ioo yards dash 10 2-5 sec 200 yards dash .... 22 3-5 sec 220 yards dash 24 3-5 sec . . . B. F. Pickett, ’91. Half mile run 2 min. 16 1-5 sec. . One mile run 5 min. 39 sec . . . ... L. Halsey, ’95. I io yards hurdle . . 16 sec Half mile bicycle race 1 min. 39) sec . ... V. L. Smith, ’88. One mile bicycle race ....... 3 min. 27 4-5 sec . . . V. L. Smith, '88. Standing high jump $ feet . E. E. Dougherty, '95. Running high jump 5 feet 5 in . . . . ... A. Wrigley, ’94. Standing broad jump (without bells) 9 feet ii)4 in . . E. E. Dougherty, ’95. Standing broad jump (with bells). . 11 feet 9)4 in . . . . E. E. Dougherty, ’95. Running broad jump 18 feet 9 in . . Three standing broad jumps . . . 30 feet 5 in . . . . E. E. Dougherty, ’95. Hop, step and jump 41 feet 7 in . . . .... 1. C. Mcll, ’88. Throwing baseball 334 feet .... . . . . J. C. Mel), ’88. Throwing 12 lb. hammer 105 feet 2)4 in . . . . E. M. Gammon, ’95. Throwing 16 lb. hammer 70 feet 3 in . • . • H. C. Brown, ’94. Rutting 12 lb. shot 43 feet Putting 16 lb. shot 36 feet 4)4 in . . . F. 0. Price, Law '95. •Three legged race 6 seconds .... Barrow, '96. f Pcrrcll, 97. Sack race, 50 yards 10 1-5 seconds . . •World's Amitoor Record. 136TI)e Boomer CUib Rvals . . , . President. L. Halsey, Vice-President. Moreno . . . Secretary. •‘H ai6 ” Crew. Craig Barron, Brevard Nisbct, Jim Dunlap, Rob. Ridley. “Btalanta” Crew. Lindsey Halsey, Malvern Halsey, Hal. Moreno, Davis White. ••Ilrlij” Crew. Billie Fender, 137 Ed. Ryals, Ike Hotmayu.’Varsity Tennis Association Haywood Hassell, Manager. SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON SET. Butler, G. 1 , Moore, Lee, Colvin. CHI psi SET. Black. M. V., Dodd, H , Dodd, C. F., Fuller. KAPPA ALPHA SET. Hall. Ezelle, Boyd, Butler, R. M. DELTA TAU DELTA SET. Snider, Holden, Tidwell, Westbrook. cm PHI SET. Porter, Hansel), Dougherty, Boland. PHI DELTA THETA SET. Moreno, Pittman, Price, G. W., Dunlap, S., SIGMA NU SET. Fender, Power, Kemp, Heller. NON-FRATERNITY SET. Ezzard, Hendricks, Neal, Upshaw.130A Tragedy in Four Acte. ACT 1. On the porch before the Lucy, Long have stood two iron goats, Famed alike in song and glory, Gathering yearly added glory From the colors black and gory Which the students paint their coats. ACT II. When the darkness shrouds the city, Then the Freshman does attack, Arms himself with paint and brushes, O’er his eyes a soft hat crushes, Up the steps of Lucy rushes,— And the goats are Red and Black. ACT HI. But the goats are not defenceless; From among the distant hills, With a force that's truly crushing Comes a mighty Eagle rushing All the mirth of students hushing, Every heart with fear it fills. ACT IV. Tis an awful time for Georgia, From the bird her sons have fled, But the valiant Ryals turning Fights the eagle with his learning, From his come words so burning That the Eagle soon is dead. HODroggi }fatf)a. WITH APOLOGIES TO H. W. I.ONGFEI.I.OW. Yc who love a nation’s legends, Love the ballads of the Students, That like voices from afar off, Call to us to pause and listen, Hearken to this Indian Legend, To this song of Druggistatha. • It was an evening of the winter. Oh, the long and cruel winter! And those buried in their wigwams, Heard without the rustling branches, Heard the bounding of the boxes, Heard the rattling of the wagon, Creaked and groaned and split asunder. “Students,” cried they. “ Those are Students, They are gathering in their firewood.” For they’d come from cross the water, ’Cross the laughing, wide Savannah, Had beat the proud Columbianas In the land of Carolina. « • • • • In his lodge quite sad and lonely, Sat the palc-facc Druggistatha Dreaming of his Minnehaha, Of his lovely laughing Water, Who for years had stood without there, Offering free his choice Havanas, Never dreaming of the Students, Noisy, dancing, prancing Students. Hut at night a fire was kindled, On the lonely campus lighted. Near to the midnight, Druggistatha, Ever wakeful, ever watchful, In his wigwam dimly lighted By the glimmering, flickering, firelight, Heard a shouting oft repeated, Heard a yelling as of vict’ry. From his chair rose Druggistatha, Pushed aside the deer skin curtain, Saw the students and their shadows Moving ’round beneath the arc light, Laying hands upon his darling. Stealing ’way with laughing Water; Stood and watched them from the window. “ Farewell,” cried he, “ Minnehaha, Farewell, O, my laughing Water, All my heart is buried with you, All my thoughts go onward with you.” And the strong man shook and trembled, In his tattered white-skin wrapper. • • • As the coals grew white as ashes And the fire was slowly dying, From his sleepless beef uprising,Druggistatha saw it dying, Flickering, glimmering, glowing, dying. Stood and watched it from his door-way. Sadly grieved now Druggistatha Empty-handed, heavy hearted. That they burned his Minnehaha. But his mighty brain within him Suggested ideas very weighty. • • • • On the morrow, Druggistatha Sought his old friend Mayor-Cita. “ If these hateful Students,” said he, “If these great outrageous fellows Go on thus a little longer, Stealing everything they wish to, Rending everything to pieces, Filling all the world with wonder, What becomes of us Athenians? Who will care for us Athenians? They will tread us down like mushrooms All conspired ’gainst the Students, The audacious, the over bearing, Heartless, haughty, dangerous Students. So they gathered them together, Gathered' Freshmen from the soiree, Gathered Sophs from “ Oh Be Joyful,” Gathered all of them together, lectured at them without mercy. Threatened them with fines anti prisons. Nearly were they thusly conquered. Ended were their wild adventures (?) Ended were their tricks and gambols (?) Ended all their craft and cunning (?) Ended all their mischief making (?) All their gamb(o)ling and their dancing (?) All their wooing Minnehaha’s (?) And the wicked, wayward Students To the paleface humbly journeyed. Spoke to him thus, their leading chief, “ Howdo, noble Druggistatha, We have put you to the trial, To the proof have put your patience, By the insult of our thieving, By the outrage of our actions." Then in Druggistatha's bosom. Spake the still small voice of Conscience, And when later in the season Students won such lasting vict'rics In the great Atlanta city, Druggistatha spoke up nobly, “ Let us hire a drum, Kcc-Nadin, And a fife or Wecbago, I will throw in fifteen dollars, Fifteen hard-earned, well-earned dollars." Thus did noble Druggistatha Satisfy his qualms of conscience Make his peace with College Students. • • • Let this teach a noble lesson To the old men of the village, All the warriors of Police-Force. Let the peace-pipe quick be brought forth And the calumet be smoked now. Do not with the Students meddle, Lest the Students give you trouble, “ Peace be with you Druggistatha, Peace be with you and your people.” M. M. L. 12A Parting Toast. Away from college and campus, from scenes of labor and fun, The Seniors soon will be leaving when their sheepskins they have won; Full many regret their going, for their friends that remain arc a host, Then drink with me to the Senior, and this be our good bye toast : In a loving cup o'er running, We pledge you one and all, Success and plenty attend you, Wherever your lot may fall. Here’s to your health and happiness. May you never “ bust ” again ; Here’s hoping, on the world’s great Blue List, You’ll all be honor men. May fortune e’er befriend you, Adown life’s winding way; “ God bless you, merry gentlemen, May nothing you dismay.” “ H.” Great Expectations. Sagely the student pulls his pipe, Half way ’twixt thought and dozing, Dignity, born of wisdom ripe, On his brow, with grace reposing. ’Tis commencement time and exams, are o’er, All care to the winds he’s flinging, And his musings turn to the year that’s gone, Or the honors the next is bringing. While the smoke wreaths blue the air perfume, His castles in Spain he’s building, And the smoke spirits, kind their sway assume His dreams of the future gilding. Now the smoke spirits kind anew begin, And tell him their welcome story. Of all the honors he’s bound to win, While he plans how to wear his glory. I.’ENVOI. Next day a blue list to bits he’s tearing, With anger in his eyes, In keen chagrin he’s deeply swearing, For he failed to make a rise.TI)e Senior to tt)e Freeman. Ye call me Senior; and ye do well to call him Senior who for four long years has drunk upon the campus every brand of wine or whiskey the full dispensary of Athens could furnish, and who never yet has had enough. If there be one among you who can say that ever on public Millcdgc or in private room, my actions did belie my tongue, let him stand forth and say it. If there be three in all your company dare face me around the beer keg, let them come on. And yet I was not always thus—a Senior at the University, a jag leader of innocent Freshmen. My early life ran quiet in the backwoods of Georgia; and, when at eve I had brought in the wood and we sat assembled around the fireside, my sire told me talcs of his life at Athens; high ambition seized upon my soul and nothing cold do but I must be sent a Freshman thither. To-day I told Zip I was sick on yesterday; and when I looked into his eyes, behold! doubt lurked there. He had seen me the previous afternoon, smiled diabolically, chuckled, and passed me by; the same smile to-day played upon his face that I had marked but yesterday when I passed him on the street. I told him that I had been sick during the forenoon, ay, sick unto death, and I begged that he might remove the absence, and I would come constantly in future. Yea, I besought him, while the Sophomores, but just come in, laughed in high glee, deeming it rare sport, forsooth, to see the proud Senior turn red with confusion before that satirical smile. And they crowded round disorderly, saying, “Let the absence stand, there arc no truthful students but Sophs! ” O Athens! Athens! Thou hast been a tender nurse to me. Thou hast given to that poor, gentle, timid, Freshman lad, who never knew a harsher tone than a bank note, a tongue of forkedness and a conscience of stone; taught him to steal boxes, barrels, and Indian maidens and burn them in a holocaust to Victory; to gaze in the glaring eyeballs of the Chancellor and answer ‘•Unprepared,’’ even as a Floyd upon the mayor. And, when he has attained to the dignity of a legislator from his native county, he shall pay thee back until thy coffers run over with gold and thy sons shall no longer sit on benches which arc as hard as the heart of the Athens mayor. 144 J. H. Butner.Exile from (IaI)cw. There came through the gate a poor exile from Yahoo, The smell on his hot breath was surely of corn, For a refuge he sighed as he fell in a gully And yielded his tromponents there ’till the morn. But the old college arrested his eyes’ roving motion For there he had lived ere the Chancellor’s notion Had driven him forth, and tho' much on ocean, He raised the bold yell "Ouf gee Yahoo, hurrah. ” Sad is my fate, sighed the poor loaded student, From copper and watchman I’ve nowhere to flee; I now have no refuge when rashly imprudent, In swiping a sign board, the police chase me, Never again through the dark midnight hours At the top of my voice shall I test my lung’s powers, And cover the chapel with paint thrown in showers, Or break out a window, or pull up a tree. Old Dormitory, though out in the city, When “shot” I make straight for thy sheltering walls But alas, in my room strangers greet me with pity, And ask that I please raise less Cain in the halls. O, cruel Doc., will you never replace me, In this mansion of peace where no watchman can chase me. Where steal what I may, no detective can trace me— When dread of a sand bag, prevents them from calls. O where are the mighty raids after our fuel ? Pay for a fire! No, zip paid for them all— Banished I am by an edict too cruel; Shall I to my buggy bed ne’er again crawl ? Oh, my old room all covered with papers, Now I can see how her shapely waist tapers, Aye, I see more as she's cutting her capers, That actress that's pictured upon your old wall Where all of Boggs’admonitions ignoring, Oft I engaged in a small game of “draw,” Students now over recitations poring, Which in my lime there no man ever saw; Silent and calm, in thy halls there’s no sporting, Green arc thy inmates in all but exhorting, And no longer sounds like a cannon’s reporting, Yahooitc’s yell, "Ouf gee Yahoo, hurrah.” 10 145Tvcis Ever TI)c»s “A pair of lips of ruby red, A willing lass, a word unsaid, And no one there to stop the bliss That did then come—a stolen kiss. A pair of boots, size number eight, An angry pa comes through the gate, And no one there to help the lad, Out he is bounced! I’ll swear that’s bad. B. 146Tf)e Plover’ Choice. I stood on the campus at midnight, That witching, delightful hour, The stars shone out in the heavens bright With a strange mysterious power. I felt as if they were urging me To backward glance o'er my life; My mind from worldly thoughts was free, From thoughts of toil and strife. Then the trend of my thoughts was changed, And from viewing displeasing facts, I hopefully looked ahead in the way, And planned most noble acts. As 1 thought of my future life, The idea dawned upon me, That ’twas a good time to select a wife; There was given a choice of three. I mused o’er the girl I left behind, When off to college I came; I knew from the glance of her true blue eyes, And the tremor that shook her frame. When we said “Good bye” on the night before I left for months so drear, That she would always be true to me, The charming, delightful dear. And then I thought of my Athens girl, Always cheery and bright; Lighting up my college life, With a joyous, charming light. And then a vision came to me Of a window high and small; There my Lucy Pobb girl did sit With the sweetest smile of them all. And as I pondered doubtfully, For I could not make a choice, A happy thought came over me And made my heart rejoice; A Marechal-Ncil shall be my judge, And from Miss Puss' vine I plucked one, rich and yellow, With perfume most divine. The plan I devised was simple enough; As each leaf I plucked apart, I said one letter of the alphabet, Years ago learned by heart; As petal on petal fell at my feet. My hopes began to fall. Possibly the rose would not choose To select for me after all. As the leaves continued to fall. My heart throbs came very slow, The very last petal came out X, Unknown quantity, you know. And as I homeward wended my way I could not but rejoice That the rose | ostponed the dreary day On which I must make my choice. M. M. L. 14?Fable } for ff)e Fin de sSiede. A man walking in the dark met a Creature with green eyes. “ Ah, I know you, you arc Jealousy,” and he stabbed it. By day-light he discovered that he had slain his faithful house cat. Common sense serves us better than a knowledge of physiognomy. An ambitious Wolf met an old Ram. “Now," thought the Wolf, “is my chance to get a sheepskin with very little trouble.” But the exceeding toughness of the old Ram’s hide gave him indigestion, whereof .he long lay ill. In acquiring knowledge exercise discrimination rather than voracity. A gardener had a lily of purest white—but white lilies are common. So he painted it scarlet and sold it for a good price. What we call Originality is often overdressed Imitation. “ Behold,” says the Pessimist, “ I have dived to the bottom of the sea of knowledge.” “And come back covered with slime,” added a bystander. Said one to a critic : “ Of what use are you ? You plant nothing, you only destroy the work of others." “True,” he replied, “but there must be someone to pull up the weeds.” A man who had breakfasted on bacon and spare-ribs was bitten by a rattlesnake and died. Soon after a wandering razor-back hog dined off the snake. The compensations of nature, though perplexing, are complete. A colony of rabbits seeking a king found a Chinese idol. “ Behold,” said they, “ his impressive forehead and his wonderful silence. He is wise." So they made him their king. But as time went on and he spoke not, they became impatient and cast him away. Taciturnity is no more an evidence of wisdom than ill-fitting clothes of a poetic soul. 14$Said the Weed to the Violet, “ You have no business here, you are merely pretty. The soil should nourish the strong and the industrious." But when the gardener pulled up the Weed, it became apparent that while beauty is only skin-deep it has the advantages. There was a man once who had a dog ; and, like some others, he always delighted to say that the dog was his best friend, and the only one wholly devoted and true to him. One day the dog went mad and bit the man, who then realized that it s not only intellects of a high order that are susceptible of mental distemper. But he diod of hydrophobia all the same. An eagle once sat in a dark and raylcss chasm, and far above him he saw the sun diffusing light and warmth and cheer. And he spread his wings and soared up and up until his strength failed him, and when he realized that he could go no higher his heart sank and he fell to earth again. And in the fall his wings were shattered, and he could never again rise from the earth. But he had been as near to the sun as he could for all that. And a robin who had seen him rise and fall, said: “Well, and what good is all that to him ? Lofty ideals do not alone constitute nobility. He who dreams, and dreaming aspires however high, if he have not the power to perform, wherein is he any better than a balloon without gas? Or an unloaded sky-rocket? I, even I, a poor robin, can still feed my young and migrate with my tribe when the seasons change, for I knew my limitations, while he is crushed forever.” An expert stenographer can always make money where a jack-leg lawyer will starve. 149To and fro on the avenue, Walketh the student lover true; Walketh upon the pavement there, Smiling at maiden, charming, fair ; Standing there with such careless grace, Wreathed in smiles is her girlish face. Life seems all of a roseate hue, To the student who walks on the avenue. Standing there with such careless grace, Wreathed in smiles is her girlish face. What if Miss Millie frown and stare, That is her “fellow” standing there. Strolls she down the porch vine-clad, Smiling sweetly ! It seems so sad, That iron-clad rules separate the two--Her and the lad on the avenue. Mi Hedge. COBB IDYL. But Cupid the rascal, with many a dart, Promiscously shooting at every heart; Has brought out another gallant true. To smile at the girls from the avenue. The same maiden strolls down the porch vine-clad. Smiling so sweetly! It seems quite sad, That she who should to her beau be true, Should smile at that boy on the avenue! L ENVOI. But ’twas ever thus! We all will rue The days we walked on the avenue ; For fickle’s their fancy, as false as their curls— You’d better avoid them ! The Lucy Cobb girls. “Tiik Woman Hater.” B. 150IM La Chevaliers dc la Rose Rouge. Draper 1 M. E. A. Dougherty j Dunlap . E. L. L. Morton Goldsmith 1 J J.H. Nisbct Boyd 1 ) S. M. B. Tidwell Hodgson 1 H. E. L. Barrow . E. H. W. Davis . . L. A. A. Ridley Connally M. E. H. Black Cothran } M. T. B. Yancey . C. A. N. Mostellcr P. L. M. Harris . . J. T. C.Spoons. H pathetic ©rama in One Bet. Scene—Chancellor’s Office. Enter students trembling. Dr. Hoggs (rising)- Young gentlemen, I have called this meeting to attend to an affair which has caused me much pain. I have a letter, which I wish to read (takes letter from desk) first of all— Clinton, S. C, Novembers, 1894. W. E. Boggs, University of Georgia, My Dear Mr. Boggs—Your foot ball club took dinner with me last Friday, cn route to Columbia, and after tncy had left, 1 missed some of my silverware, and upon a close investigation I found that seven spoons and my only pickle fork were gone. Now, I never would have charged it to a foot ball team, but some drummers got off the train and one said he saw several of the men were wearing spoons on the lapel of their coats, and one young man—an extreme blonde, with a mustache, was wearing my pickle fork. Now, Mr. Boggs, I am a poor widow lady, and trying to make a living and I can’t afford to lose my silverware, and the object of this letter is to ask you please to get them for me by the 12th inst, or else I will have the whole club arrested, and you know I would dislike to do this. If they have not got the spoons, etc., they must pay me fifteen cents for each spoon and forty-five cents for the fork. I gave fifty cents for it at Squask’s Cross Roads, and am very much attached to it. Please see the crowd and write me immediately about this. Yours in misery, Amgail Snoots. (Boggs, continuing)—“Young men, this letter astounded me. I could not believe my eyes—why if a man had come to my face and told me, “Your foot ball team is going around stealing spoons,” I would have said, “You lie,” (looking cockeyed) and yet I have it here on paper and from a woman. O, young gentlemen ! Can this be true? What is going to become of the State when her most promising young men go around stealing spoons as souvenirs? Those are not souvenirs. If you want to obtain souvenirs honorably, let the two teams put up their colors as a trophy, and the winner take them. Did Ivanhoc steal spoons ? No. When he challenged his enemy to come out and meet him, to pit science and strength against science and strength in a hand to hand encounter, and when he had unhorsed his opponent and left the field, did he go around stealing spoons? No, but the beautiful horse of his adversary was presented to him the next morning in token of admiration of his skill. Gentlemen, that was a souvenir gained in an 152honorable manner and not “hogged" from a widow lady. But, coming back to our own case—I will hear from any of you. (Sits down.) Silence. Hoggs—“Is this going to be a Quaker meeting ?” Capt. Butler—“Doctor, I suppose it is my duty to speak first, as I had charge of the men on that trip. The spoons were taken, but I would like to say that I did not take one.” Boggs—“Well, young men, there were seven spoons and one pickle fork taken." Fleming (meekly)—“Doctor, I took one spoon.” Dr. B.—“That’s a man, Mr. Fleming, that’s a man.” Snider—“I got one Doctor.” Dr. B.—“Mr. Snider.” Stubbs—“I have one spoon, Doctor.” Dr. B.—“Yes, I thought so.” Watkins—“Dr. Boggs, I took the pickle fork.” Dr. B.—“And you will be hanged as high as Haman for it." Killorin—“One spoon, Doctor.” Dr. B.—“And thou too, O Chlorine." Shackleford.—“I have one.” Dr. B.—“I am sorry, sir.” Nallcy (apologetically)—“I took a spoon, Doctor, but I didn’t know she was a widow lady—I always liked widow ladies, and—” Dr. B.—“That will do, Mr. Nallcy. Gentlemen, there is still one spoon missing, speak out, who ever has it. Mr. Kent, did you get it?” Kent—“No sir-ree, Doctor, I’m a Christian man.” Dr. B.—“Well, gentlemen, there is still one s| oon. Who has it ?” Fleming (with that grin)—"Doctor, since thinking this thing over, I believe I got TWO." Dr. B.—Well, Mr. Fleming, if you hit every hotel that heavy, I shall expect you to open up your stock some times soon. __________ Now, I believe that is all, young men. I shall lay your disgraceful conduct to the Faculty, and will communicate to you their decision on Wednesday afternoon. I’ll not detain you longer.' Exit students with their coats dragging the ground. 158 S.To My Love Merry, wistful, dear Mistress Pruc Thou lovest me—well I know ; And sure my homage, my service true, My love for thee must show. O many’s the time together we’ve played ; Love’s lore oft to thee I've read ; And many a time together we've strayed Where’er bright fancy has led. Thou art content I know to abide, In communion sweet with me; Yet all thoughts of marriage I thrust aside. For I know that may not be. And thou art a maiden fair and true, And I a lover bold— Then why do I not for this small hand sue ? Thou art only five years old. " H.” i To Lora When first I saw thee, Lora, ’Twas on a fair spring day, When Nature told in accents sweet, Half that my heart would say. Lor it told of love and beauty, Of what thou wast to me ; It sung of all that is fair and good, Of what I would be to thee. It told of my soul’s wild longing To win thy faith and love ; It breathed the prayer my heart had sent To the home of love, above. Hut now the voices of the spring, Bring naught but grief and pain ; But sighs for the bright and happy past, That ne'er will come again. Farewell, sweet maid of Athens, Thy charms will ever be A chain of bright and shining links, That binds me fast to thee. R. 55There, Little Don’t O’M- There little boy don’t cry, All your Royal Pale’s gone I know; But it won’t be long e’er you’ll feel O. K. When the action has come to stay. And all your troubles away will fly, There little boy don’t cry, don’t cry. There little boy don’t cry, Your panties are torn I know ; But to turn pretty statues over is wrong, And barbed wire fences are strong. So leave them alone when you’re passing by, There little boy don’t cry, don’t cry. There little boy don’t cry, You’ve lost your derby f know ; So you’d better stay in the house a spell, (For in other head-gear you don’t look well) And wait indoors 'till the clouds roll by. There little boy don’t cry, don’t cry. There little boy don’t cry, They’ve got your popgun I know; But you’d better be everlastingly glad That you answered not that ad. For Cran is longing your face to spy, There little boy don’t cry, don’t cry. "H.’’ 150A Tale of a Fresfyncm. There was a young man named “Cholly, Of Freshmen quite the most jolly; As a Lucy Cobb sport, The girls he did court— This apostle of freshness and folly. But this young apostle of folly Seemed one day a little less jolly; His very best girl Her sweet smile did furl-And hid it away from dear Cholly. And our young friend called Cholly Became extremely melancholy ; His very last cent For jonquils he spent— Thereby showing his folly. But, alas! for our friend Cholly— Our apostle of freshness and folly! For his flowers so yellow She thanked some other fellow And he became more melancholy. And then our Freshman so jolly Repented his very great folly ; Became pale and thin, Believed study a sin— And was straightway “ busted ” by Polly. 157A Dream of the Lecture Room. As I listen, calmly dozing, To old Charby’s lecture dr)’, And think of happy moments That long have drifted by ; There comes to me a vision Of a maiden sweet and fair, With eyes that beam upon me, With a sad and pensive air. And I think how in the gloaming, When the sun had sunk to rest, And had draped the sky in splendor For its union with the West ; We would wander through the meadows, Hand in hand and heart to heart, And forgot the day of sorrow, When our loving souls must part. But, alas! That bright dream faded, Long ago it passed away ; And I turn with heartfelt hatred To the “problems” of the day. And as I think of all I failed To prepare, while I danced last night, I hear old Charby sweetly say: “ Mister R----will you recite ?” Memories My heart is sad and lone to-day, For bygone thoughts come o'er me Of many a scene, perchance ’twas gay. Or perhaps as a ruffled sea. When thought and memory hand in hand Steal back to childhood’s days; Where gleeful hearts the breast expand Beneath the sun’s warm rays— ’T»s then I weep with tear dimmed eye As I view the wide scene o’er, And think of memories long gone by. And a face I shall see no more. Of a face I remember with smiling eyes, So sweet, so calm and still, That now with other loved ones lies On the brow of the cold moist hill. A marble shaft with ivy grown, A loving tribute stands; To a better world the soul has flown; Life’s run its golden sands. But loving memory e’er shall bear This spot in sacred trust; And passing by I drop a tear To mingle with the dust. L.159WI)af Fools These Mortals F e! In Chemistry Class -Dr. White: "Mr. Crane, what kind of a taste has this element ?’’ Crane—“It has a very fragrant taste, sir.” Dr. White—"That’s exactly right, sir, (passing on to Osborne.) Mr. Osborne, what odor has this element ?” Osborne—“A very loud one, sir, and you can’t really detect the difference between the smell and odor of it." In Physics—Chaby: Mr. Cook, how do you find the specific of a solid by Farcnheit’s Hydrometer? ’ Cook—"Well, sir, the first thing you do is to put the specific gravity in the pan and weigh it.” Col. Charbonnier, to Junior Class "Now gentlemen, you must make this distinction. When I say that the barometer falls, I don’t mean to say that it falls down from the wall, or wherever it is suspended, but that the mercury in the barometer falls.” A Junior, at the rear of the class in a low tone—“Colonel, your point is well taken, we never would have thought of that." In History'—Prof. Mel’.: "Mr. boyd, what about the early discoveries of England ?’’ boyd—"Doctor, I think the text fails to mention a man of that name.” Prof. McP.—"Mr. Morton, from whom did William Penn obtain his grant of land in America?” J. A. Morton—"From his heirs, sir.” In the Law Class—Prof. Morris: “Mr. Lyon, how would you prove an inscription on a grave stone?” Lonnie Lusher Lyon from Sopc—"Bring the graveyard into court, sir.” Law Student—“Schwarz, what is the difference between Haskell and Newell ?” Schwarz- "Haskell is a lunatic; Newell is an idoit; the former has lucid intervals, the latter has not.” Professor bocock’s Knack of Making Men Forget Simple Things—Mr. Pettis, (reading,) "They chose one man from each of the ten tribes.” Prof, bocock—“How many men did they choose, Mr. Pettis?” Mr. Pettis—“I did know, Professor, but really I've forgotten.” Bocock—"Are you guessing, or looking in the book ?” Carson—“both, Professor.” In the Lab.—Senior: "What are you doing Tom ? ” Boggs—"I have dissolved a snake in nitric acid and I am trying to precipitate it with hydogen sulphide.” Connally, (excitedly)—“Doctor, I— I— I’ve swallowed some hydrochloric acid.”' Dr. Hertly, (tranquilly)—“Oh don’t be alarmed, Mr. Connally, try the litmus test.” 160Belcher—“Mr. Black, you may read.” Black, (translating In brcvi tempore)—“In a short while.” Belcher—“But we can’t wait.” Kemp, (translating “A. D. Ill Kalcndas,” in one of Cicero’s letters)—“In the year of our Lord— (laughter cuts him off.) Harvey—“Professor, who wrote the dialects?” Upshaw—“Professor, will you please tell me who wrote Ovid?” Question on Polly's Final—“Tell me what you know of the following, Rosetta Stone, Charles V., etc.” Freshman’s Answer—“Madame Rosetta Stone was a lady who lived in the time of Charlemagne, and was hung for putting out the Emperor of Russia’s eyes.” Prof. Morris—"Mr. Johnson, will you tell us what is wrong with this sentence, “My father takes several magazines, Lippincott’s, Century and Scribner’s." Johnson, ’98—“Mistake in the use of words.” Prof. Morris—“What words are wrongly used?" Johnson—“Oh, you shouldn’t use foreign or newly coined words like Century, Lippincotts, Scribners.” Polly—“Mr. Unshaw, what can you tell us of the ‘Golden Bull ?’ ’’ Upsnaw—“Well, sir, he was the sire of the Golden Calf.” Ridley—“Mitchell, that word'is not spelled that way in Webster’s Dictionary.” Mitchell—“Well, I know it’s right, for my dictionary gives it that way, and it’s better authority than Webster’s; mine’s imported from France.” Y. M. C. A. Shark, to inebriated Freshman—“Ah, my friend, don’t you know that your sin is sure to find you out ?” Inebriated Freshman—“’S alright’s long’s Peggy don’t." Nisbct, (to young lady at the german)—“Oh, Miss 15, I think you arc the loveliest dancer in the room, it is a delight to waltz with you.” Young I idy—“I am so sorry I can't return the compliment.” Polly—“Was this battle fought in France ?” Ridley, ’98—"No, sir, it was fought in Europe.” Freshman (passing Athcmcum)—“This hotel doesn’t seem to be doing much of a business.” Ham Sawcs (to crowd)—“Good evening, gentlemen.” Dorsey—“Well, why don't you speak to me ? A ’95 law student received a fee of twenty-five cents for writing the following notice for a man in the suburbs of the city: “Notis—If cny mans or womans cows or oxen gits on to this here lot his or her talc will be cut off as the case may be ' 11 lCiRead -Made Clothes. “ No doubt but ye are the people, and wisdom shall die with you.”—The Facultv. “ Don’t let that awkward squad fire over my grave.”—Col. Snelling. “ His rhymes supply the defect of his reason.”—Rf.ab. “ Their furrow oft the stubborn globe has broke.”—B. Ag. Students. "Thou hast a tongue, come let us hear its tune.”—Gi.ee Club. “ It is small, very small.”—Bondurant ’98. " I will go and wash.”—Yahooites. " Her lovers’ names in order to run o’er The girl took breath full thirty times or more.”—Maid of Athens. “Temperate as the morn.”—“The Jaggy Five.” “ Powder thy radiant hair.”—Perry ’98. " What figure more immovably august!”—Dr. Boggs. " By the way, did you mind what a curious head he has?"—F. S. Jones ’96. “ He taketh most delight in music, instruments and poetry.”—Boland '97. “ Rhyme is the rock on which thou art to wreck, 'Tis fatal to thy fame and to thy neck.”—Cook ’95. "He’s green, I saw it with these eyes.”—Harvey ’98. “ It is very hard, I think, that no provision is made for bashful men like me.”—Halsey ’95. “ I can only be conscious of one thought and that is the thought of myself.”—Mostei.i.ek ’9S. " Never noted in him any study, any retirement, any sequestration from open haunts and popularity. —Kzelle '96. 162“Ye naughty Freshmen should be spanked.”—Indian Body Snatchers. “ What subtle grace doth every movement animate! ”—“Big” Smith. “The male choristers seemed to have been chosen like old Cremona violins, more for their tone than for their looks.”—Chorus ok Hamlet Revamped. “A still small voice.”—Schwarz, Law. “ The vainest thing on earth.”—Morton ’96. “By Heaven, I do love; and it hath taught me to rhyme and to be melancholy.”—Ryals ’96. “ A good name is rather lo be chosen than great riches.”—Homer Van Valkenbukg Black. “Apt alliteration’s artful aid.”- -Lattie Lusher Lyon. “ I've reached the land of corn and wine And all its riches freely mine.”—Mirick Rancher. “ Poeta nascitur, non fit."—Boyd ’96. “ A loss of sight, of thee I must complain.”—Ex. Cadets. “Fierce as ten furies.”—Bean ’95. “ An ide fellow.” -1)r. Moore. “ No sweeter souls e’er trod earth’s ways.”—Lucy Cobb Girls. 163Reviews. “ Innocents Ahroad, or What Europe Saw In Us," by Chas. M. Sneliing and B. F. Riley. This is a most amusing and highly entertaining little book, containing an account of the adventures and misadventures of two mighty potentates, who, on traveling in a foreign land, realized to their surprise that they were only men after all. “Society as It Has Found Us,” by O. B. Nisbct, R. M. Butler, J. Audlcy Morton, and Craig Barrow. The young gentlemen who have collaborated on this work use the word “find” in its colloquial sense of “provide for, furnish food for." They show from their own experience how it is possible to give ger-mans at an expense of five dollars a night and charge twenty-five, thereby showing the advantages of a “ lead-pipe cinch ” on an unsuspecting public. A very valuable book for young men who wish to pay their own expenses while in college. “Elements of Greatness in Fef.t,” by William Ellison Boggs, D.D., LLD. By virtue of the power vested in him by the Board of Trustees whose servant he is, the learned author endeavors in his usual terse style, without one unnecessary word, to show that intellectual ability is in direct proportion to the avoirdupois of the pedal extremities, and deduces as convincing proofs of his argument the examples of such famous Americans as himself, Guyton, Hurt, Trilby, and others too numerous to mention. “Dress Reform,” by Joseph Boyd. The young author sets forth in print the principles he has so consistently illustrated in his daily life. Among other innovations which he considers necessary, he advocates thcadoption of the military dress coat for calling late in the evening. 164“ How to Write a Petition,” by the Count de Valve rax. The author gives young students the benefit of his wide and varied experience and teaches how to frame a petition that would melt the heart of any professor, tho’ it be "as hard as the adamantine lemon-pic of the railroad lunch-room.” “Why I Wore That Collar,” by Clinton Thompson Haskell, of Toronto. Mr. Haskell allays the fears of those who regarded his appearance on the campus wearing a standing collar as a sign of the approach of the end of the world, by showing that this new departure on his part was due to predestination, and was unavoidable. “Tiie Streets of New York, or Doing the Great Mf.trofous in a'Single Night,” by Joe Bull Connally. The chief merit of this volume is its absolute freedom from anything that savors of exaggeration. "How I Led the Boys to Victory,” by Charles H. Black. For the first time since the great Auburn game, the name of the real victor in that contest is made known to the world. By reason of his superior knowledge of the game acquired while calling signals for the Peachtree Blues and his absolute confidence in himself, Mr. Black was enabled by his very presence to so inspire the ’Varsity team as to make defeat impossible. All of this is clearly set forth in this book in the author’s usual lively and fresh style.Nursery Rj) o)es There was a young Senior named Cook Who tried to write poems like a book, Mis rhymes were so vile Everybody did smile Who chanced on his jingles to look. There was an old Doctor named Billy Who held some receptions quite chilly, His terrible stare Gave the Freshman a scare, And his feet knocked the Sophomore silly. There was a man in last year's class Who on “general knowledge” quite failed to pass, So he jumped into law, Where he shot off his jaw, Till the Prof, said : “Mr. H., you’re an ass.” There was a Professor named Dave Who always needed a shave. Any failure in Math Aroused all his wrath, And his Trig, made the Sophomore a slave. There was a young man from Yahoo Who of using his tricks tired grew, White says it's a libel, But he swapped for a Bible And swiped McGregor’s sign, too. There was a young lawyer named Hawes Who loved to neck without pause, Some students one day Saw his business-like way, And this of their smiles was the cause. There was a Senior named Morton Whose forte was newspaper reportin’, He tried to play ball, “ Statuary, that's all," Was-thc sentence that ended his sportin'. There was a law student named Keen Whose smile was the sweetest e’er seen, When the j oor Red and Black It took the wrong tack, On him the Profs, vented their spleen. There was an old German named Zip Who refused a poor Senior a dip., For the man didn’t laugh And his sides split in half At the jokes that fell from his lip. There once was a Junior named Boyd Who was by a siren decoyed, He jumped off a train, When he got up again The look that he wore was annoyed. There is a young man named Brevard Who by the Lucy Cobb hits 'em hard, You can tell by the stvle Of his pretty white tile That he is Beau Brummel’s pard. There was a young man from Pembroke Who in letters of love often spoke, “ She’s married and left ”— Life of joy is bereft, And Larson now says it's no joke. 106A Camped Id U. To the Billy in the Yahoo, Where the men of morals dwell. Came the Billy, great in power, Lord of all, as Freshmen tell. “Give thy Billy me, oh, Billy, In thy biz thou needest it not,” Quoth the Billy great in power, Whom the Junior ne’er can spot. So poor Billy, willy-nilly, While his heart is filled with fear, Must his Billy give to Billy Whom the Janitors revere. “H. 1 Ode to Dr. J. M. T. I cP Respected, if voluble Doctor, On the currency question we split, With our every-day transactions, Your theories don’t seem to fit. By all the accepted proverbs, Talk is silver alway, And with equally strong assurance, Silence is golden th y say. Independent of Bland or Stewart, Your “ sitter ” is uncommonly free, And whatever my opinion of Grover, A gold-bug I've got to be. The Senior.A Aodern Instance. The silence of death rested over the crowded gridiron which lately had resounded with the yells of excited 'Varsity boys. In one corner of the field a hushed and awe-struck group bent over the still and inert form of the great half-back, which a few moments before had teemed with manly life and strength. The surgeon slowly shook his head and whispered something in the car of the friend who supported the doomed football player’s head. “I'm dying, ami?” whispered the half-back to his grieving comrade, and great beads of sweat stand out on that friend’s brow as lie whispers back the mournful affirmation, and asks in saddest tones, “ What must I tell Alice for you ? ” “Tell her,” and the light comes back to his brave blue eyes, “tell her that I died with her name on my lips.” “ And Clara?" “ Tell Clara,” and a puzzled look crosses his haggard face, -‘tell Clara,’’ now the lips smile, " tell her —, well," low his voice sinks with the cadence of death, “ tell Clara the same thing.” The foot-ball player was dead. ICSAn Explanation. A whisper once went ’round ’Mong the muses and the folk That gather at Parnassus' Hill, Of something that was found strangely amiss. Of what they talked You’d never guess. ’Twas nothing less Than this: Pegasus had balked ! "No, sir,’’ said he, "without complaint I’ve borne "All sorts of songsters, some “Who wrote of hearts with anguish torn “And such like truck unutterably bum, "Others that with fiendish hellish glee “Some things whereof ’twere pain to even tell. “Got off such beastly rot as ‘ Sweet Marie,’ “ ‘She’s My Darling Carrie,’ and ‘Daisy Hell! ’ “I'd gladly help on Freshmen poems and such, “No word of protest e’er from me you’ve heard, “Hut Pandora’s really asking quite too much, “When she talks about that Gainesville eagle bird.” We’d thought to have some verses written here About the Gainesville Eagle and his flight, Hut Pegasus straightway a station took, And without him ’twere absurd to write. On such a theme he quite refused to work-, Unmoved by thought of honor or of self, So prompted by the horse sense classical We leave the bird to Gainesville and himself. Eds. 169v ome Rimes of tl)e Times. Maiden in car, Student not far, Window shut tight, Student polite, Window won't rise, Weary, she sighs, Then blushes; he tries, And straight up it flics, And so, All’s well, For he could raise the window. Thus they met on the car, To love there's no bar. Student strong, maiden pure. Affinity sure. Wedded soon, Honey moon, But alack, Troubles black, Student's broke, so perforce, Wifey sues for divorce. By decree of court. Quick it comes—non-support. They never speak, for He could not raise the wind oh ! “H. 170Conclusion. In justice to myself as well as to Mr. Butner, I feel that I should make a statement concerning the peculiar position which I occupy in editing this volume of the Pandora. There is nothing to which a baseball pitcher so much objects as being obliged to take another man’s game off his hands. When I took up the work which Mr. Butner laid down, it was already late in the college term. I was in comparative ignorance as regards the nature of the task which lay before me. Mr. Butner had the work well under way, and he deserves much of the credit, if there is anything of good in this issue However, my labor was of necessity more arduous than it would have been had I not been obliged to begin as a novice when it was already time for the Pandora to be in press. I have had many difficulties to contend with; many mistakes have been made through ignorance, and many features that might have added greatly to the quality of the book have been omitted through hurry. I have done my best, however, with the aid of my associates, to make this a creditable volume. If we have failed it is not through want of will nor of untiring labor, but of time and of ability. I have already spoken of the work and services rendered by Mr. J. H. Butner, who was elected Editor-in-Chief, but was forced to resign on account of ill-health. Mr. Joel J. Gibson, the Business Manager, has had entire charge of the busincssarrangements, and by his indefatigable industry has made this issue possible. The Athletic Department was edited by Mr. John W. Morton, and his assistance has been most valuable to me. Messrs. Kemp and Chandler have also done good service. The drawings are by Messrs. Murphey, ’95; Dougherty,’95, and Floyd,’97. They have been most courteous and obliging, and I desire to thank them most heartily. I have endeavored to make this issue of the Pandora representative of the literary and artistic ability of the college, not of the board of editors alone. With this end in view, I have solicited contribtions from all the classes. Holcombe Bacon. ’96, has done the best work in response to my call for help. Boyd, ’96, and Lockhart, ’96, have also rendered valuable assistance. In closing, I wish to thank our publisher, Mr. C. P. Byrd and his assistants, for their uniform kindness and courtesy. I need not say anything as regards the work they have done; the book speaks for itself. If I can be of any assistance to my successor, I will gladly do all in my power to aid him by suggestions or otherwise. Walter A. Harris.Contents Title page. Board of Editors................ Preface......................... Dedication ..................... Departments and Degrees......... Trustees........................ Calendar ....................... Faculty..................... — Faculty of Law School........... Reports Concerning the University Senior Class— Poem........................ Officers................... Members.................... History..................... Junior Class— Poem........................ Officers ................... Members..................... History.............-....... Sophomore Class— Poem........................ Officers.................... Members..................... History..................... 1'reshman Class— Poem........................ Officers................... Members..................... History..................... rsOK Law Class— Officers...................................... 44 Members....................................... 45 History....................................... 46 Elective Students................................. 4S Graduate Students................................. 40 Agricultual Students.............................. 40 Summary....... ................................. 40 In Mkmokiam— Joseph K. Brown............................... 50 George Dudley Thomas........................... 51 Henry Hillyer................................. 52 Fraternities— Sigma Alpha Epsilon........................... 54 Chi Phi....................................... 5S Kappa Alpha................................... 62 Phi Delta Theta............................... 66 Alpha Tnu Omega .............................. 70 Delta Tau Delta............................... 74 Sigma Nu...................................... 78 Chi P I....................................... 82 The Non-Fraternity Club....................... 86 Summary of Fraternities........................ 01 University Y. M. C. A. Work....................... 02 The Battalion..................................... 92 Demosthenian Society.............................. 94 Phi Kappa Literary Society ....................... 95 Y. M. C. A........................................ 90 University Publications............................ 97 Board of Editors “ Red and Black”................. 98 Mercer Co-ed Club................................. 102 G. M. I Tigers.................................... 103 Emory Club........................................ 104 PACK 3 1 5 6 0 10 11 12 13 14 10 18 19 20 21 27 28 20 80 33 S4 85 36 39 40 41 42The '95 Goman Club...... All-America Club........ Old Dominion Club....... The Thailand............ The Thalians in “ Hamlet” The University IIumblc-Hec O. T. M. F.............. Sweeps.................. (K)Nighta of the Koval Pale Casino Club............. Rainbow Chasers......... Glee Club............... r «»K 105 106 107 10S 111 112 113 114 115 11G 117 ns Athletics— Athletic Article........................ University of Georgia Athletic Association 'Varsity Football Team.................. Result of Football Games................ 'Varsity Baseball Team.................. Class Baseball Teams................... Result of Class Baseball Gaines......... Field Day............................... University of Georgia Records........... The Boating Club........................ 'Varsity Tennis Association............. 123 125 126 120 130 188 134 135 136 137 13S A Tragedy in Four Acts....... Druggistatha.................. A Parting Toast............... Great Expectations............ The Senior to the Freshman.... Exile from Yahoo.............. 'Twas Ever Thus............... The Flower's Choice........... Fables for the Fin dc Sleclo.. Out on Milledge............... La Chevaliers do la Rose Rougo. Spoons....................... To My Love.................... To Lora....................... There, Little Bov, Don't Cry .. A Tale of a Freshman......... A Dream of the Lecture Room. 140 141 143 143 114 145 146 147 14S 150 151 152 155 155 156 157 15S Memories.................... What Fools These Mortals Bo Ready-Made Clothes.......... Book Reviews................ Nursery Rhymes.............. A Campus Idyll.............. Ode to Dr. J. H. T. McP..... A Modern Instance........... An Explanation.............. Some Rimes of the Times..... Conclusion.................. Contents.................... Advertisements.............. Cheap Advertisements........ List ok Full Pack Illustrations- Frontispiece.................... Board of Editors ............... Cut of Senior Class............. Cut of Junior Class ............ Cut of Sophomore Class..... — Cut of Freshman Class........... Cut of Fraternities............. Sigma Alpha Epsilon............. Chi Phi......................... Kappa Alpha..................... Phi Delta Theta................. Alpha Tau Omega................. Delta Tau Delta.................... Sigma Nu........................ Chi Psl......................... Non-Fratornity Club........----- Editors of fa? and Black....... Death of Bed and Black.......... The Thallans.................... Glee Club....................... Athletics....................... Football Team................... Baseball Team................... Tragedy ........................ Shingles......... .............. Grinds.......................... The End......................... YXOt 168 ICO 103 101 ICO 107 107 ICS 109 170 171 in 175 170 2 8 ... 17 26 32 .. 38 .. 33 .. 55 .. 00 . 03 ... 67 ... 71 .. 75 ... 79 83 88-9 .. 99 .. 101 .. 109 ... 119 .. 123 . 127 131 .. 139 .. 154 .. 159 .. 172 174 175 Cheap Advertisements. {Terms: One cent a word, in advance. Wanted—To know how my name originated. Corn-liquor Jones. Wanted—A “dip” and a euro for the mange. C. Thompson Haskell. Wanted—Mamma and “Phil” to let me play baseball. G. P. Butler. Wanted—A college paper. Students. Wanted—A gymnasium. U. of Ga. Wanted—Some one to recommend me to a cheap restaurant. L. Slits Fleming. Wanted—A strong cup of coffee. Hofmayer. Wanted—To be a sporting man. Hurt. Wanted—To know why Jim Dunlap walks sidewise by the Lucy Cobb girls. Observer. Wanted—To know where Nisbct got that hat. Everybody. Wanted—To know why I wasn’t mentioned oftener in the Pandora. Mosteller. Wanted—A rest from the question, “When will the Pandora be out ?” Editors. Wanted—A cure for an aggravated case of “Freshness. Black. Wanted—!•'. very thing to be done by Parliamentary Law. Connally. For Rent—Having a superfluous quantity on hand, we arc ready to let some of our conceit to students who are not already supplied. We refer you to Mr. Connally as an example of our work. Simmons, Chambers Lee. For Rent—Any Glee Club desiring a good falsetto voice can be accommodated by "Baby" Schwars. For Sai.k—An Hypnotic Trance furnished to any negro for proper consideration. Floyd. Found—“Old Mon" Price studying on May 17th. Will make an affidavit to that effect. Ben Watkins. For Sale—Dirt cheap, my chances for a rise. White. 1:0Fok Sai.e—A'Tutor's dignity. Belcher. Lost ok Strayed—Three peculiar animals of the genus Jones, answering to the names of Corn-liquor, Cherry Bouncer and Batten-foost respectively. As they arc exactly suited to such an institution as ours, we will gladly rid any other college of their presence if we can gain any information as to their whereabouts. Mercer. If the miscreant who touched me for that article of wearing apparel does not return the same immediately, I will expose him to the world as being under the necessity of stealing them. For ell. Lost—Two meals. Park Hotel. Lost—A superannuated Prince Albert military coat. Col Spelling. Found—That Harvey is the champion sprinter of 12 America when fired upon at night and unexpectedly. “Night Hawks." Found—The author of “How to be Happy ’Though Married. Booth Ranch No. I. Found—That the train stops just before it gets to Winder. Boyd. Found—In a yard on Prince avenue, a pistol and derby hat. Owner can obtain the same by calling at police headquarters and paying for this advertisement. Charges $25.00. D. Cyan Oliver. Found—Uniforms at last. Athens Police Force. Found—That Fred Morris went to Augusta. Personal—I. T. I., Madison: That is all right. Though I have on my base ball uniform I'll meet you just the same. L. Halsey. 177Just turn thoso Pages o’er and o’er. Established 1818. BROOKS BROTHERS, BROADWAY. COR. 22d STREET. NEW YORK CITY. Clotninq FOR MEN AND BOYS, READY-MADE AND MADE TO MEASURE. In the Department for Clothing to order will be found, in addition to a full line of seasonable goods,—all the year round weights in all qualities, with a wide range of price, thereby giving the fullest opportunity for selection. The particular care exercised by us in the cut, manufacture and novelty of pattern in our Men’s Ready-Made Stock, is also extended to our Clothing for Boys and Children, and guarantee exclusive style and the best of value at no higher prices than arc frequently asked for garments made in large wholesale lots of inferior workmanship. Our furnishing goods embrace a most complete assortment of articles in that line for Boys as well as Men ; Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, and Neckwear in original shapes and colorings imported by us from leading London manufacturers—also Lounging Jackets, Waterproof Coats, etc. In this Department we have added a new line of leather and wicker goods, including Luchcon Baskets, Holster Cases, Sheffield Plate Flasks, Riding Whips, Crops, Dog Canes and Golf Sticks. Catalogue, Samples and Rules for Self-Measurement sent on application. And see what you have never seen before. 1How, when April came in tears, GALLERY OF Photography LIFE SIZE PORTRAITS SPECIALTY C. W. Motes No. 34 Whitehall street ATLANTA, GA- Job Printing = - WILL PRINT AT LOWEST RATES. IN LATEST STYLE. ON GOOD MATERIAL. ALL KINDS OF JOB WORK. FROM VISITINO CARDS TO BOOKS E. D. Stone U TINNER nUILDINO We have ™E BEST 9SORTCO TOCR or FINE DRUOS, CHEMICALS, PATENT MEDICINES, TOILET ARTICLES, Etc. IN N. B. QBOROIA Vcnv Low Pn.er. to MMCMant aocntb ro Muyicn-b Canoicb a no OCAlCft Palmer Kinnebrew 105 Clayton St., Athens, Ga. « - University Jeweler.- — C. A. SCUDDER. - - Diamonds, Sterling Silverware, Watches, Cut Glass. ATHENS. GEOPfilfl Tho Faculty attendod prayers. hDr. Boggs: Times presont, 22: Times absent, 2; Per cont.. 92. GlliliEhflNO’S PltflGE NEXT TO BOOK STORE CORNER. Univj$ksit Soda Fount, Confections COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. ?jeeourg©odsapd get our prices before buying ",, f Fine Havana Cigars WE ARE WITH YOU. MOST POPULAR PLACE IN TOWN. OPEN UNTIL 12 O’CLOCK EVERY NIGHT. Athens Book and Stationary Co., 107 BROAD STREET. ATHENS. GEORGIA. Excuse for Absence: Businoss of the Univorsity. IKProf. Barrow: Times present, 19; Times absent, 5; Per cent., 80. ( )) Ificfittul yj aifcl and | [cu’i y j'ulnohe SPECIAL OUTRIOUTINC AGENTS fOR A. O. SPALDING A BROS.' BA5C0ALL fOOTUAU. LAWN TCNNlt ATHLETIC ANO GYMNASIUM GOODS I . W. MCGREGOR, Afftat for Atbon . (%. i l (Jtctleyc Uve., fUlhcni, pa. 33 PEACHTREE STREET ATI.AMTA, Qd. VARSITY PLACE Ice Cream Parlor AND Soda Fountain m : 3£82® ®mt®0 ® Wo respect full}’ solicit the patronage of tho Faculty and students. Cool Drinks, Pure Ices and comfortatdc quarters. Excuse for Absence: Sickness.Dr. Bocock: Times Present, O. Times Absont, 24. Por Cent. O. The Lcadiug Athletesmv that all Soreness. Stiffness or Swelling is Prevented or almost instantaneously removed, if after exercising, tho muscles are thoroughly rubbed with POND’S EXTRACT. It Is Invaluable for Rheumatism, Wounds, Bruises, Hoarseness, Sore Throat, Piles, Sore Eyes, Catarrh, all Pain and Inflammations and Hemorrhages. Ilcwarc of Imposition. Take fond’s extract Only POND’S EXTRACT CO., 76 Fifth Ave., New York. Lombard Iron Works and Supply Company -BITLDKK AND DKAI.ltUS IN- ENGINES, BOIEERS, Cottoi), Saw, Fertilizer, Oil cr)d Ice MachiQery, arjd Supplies and Repairs. Capacity for 300 bands. Machine Tools. Wood WorK-ing MachiQery, SI)aftlog. Pulleys, Hangers. Leather aQd Rubber Belting and Hose, Mill Supplies and Tools- AUGUSTA. - - - GEORGIA. Man and Estimates Furnished for Complete Motive Power Plant Steam Pump . Kent W ater lleater and lloi-ling Engines. GO TO THE opular Barber hop. NEXT TO SCUDDHR’S. DICK HARRIS, Proprietor. IIA1MTS cured at your homes without psln or confinement. Patients continue business while under treatment. WhUky and nil other drag-Mopped immediately on beginning treatment— do not need them. No treatment yet discovered to compare with it. Have given special study WHISKY ASI OPIUM and practice tothese dl.ca.ot for th.. ps t twenty year , with -uccoful Incrcnso in practice. Write care Department 1 tor my book of cure free. B. M. WOOLLEY, M. D., Atlanta, Oa. Excuse for Absenco: None. vDr. Campbell: Times present, I. Times absent, 23. Por cent. 4. THE leader of . . Styles, Quality ai)d prices-------- CHARLES MORRIS, “POPULAR PRICE” Clothier, Hatter and Furnisher. 218 BROAD STREET. Athens, Georgia. A. H. O'FARRELL eg CO. A. W. JACKSON, Cigars, Cigarettes. Pipes, Smoking Tobacco. Chewing Tobacco, And Everything Pertaining to n Kirit-Claw Cigar Store. Student ’ Trade KtrOMtl; Solicited. CoIIoko Avonuo. ATHENS. GEORGIA. 8 9ashioijxable i ailopf« CLEANING flND REPAIRING. LAMAR LYNDON, B. B. DAVIS. Mechanical ai)d Electrical Dentist. ENGINEER. ATIIUXS. ... OnOKOIA. nS'A East Clayton Street. Excuse for absence: minding the baby. VICol. Charbonnier: Times Presont. 0; Times Absent. 24; Per cont, 0. N ESTABLISHED 1850. £ N Ezs:xzrrxxs:xzux«lj D. W. McGREGOR, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL STATIONBR. BOOSKELLER TO THE UNIVERSITY OF CEORCIA. School and College Text Bool s. FINE STATIONERY. Opposite the Campus. Athens. Ga. a™ -x the cheapest house n -jj IN CEORCIA. Nzzzxzzxzxxxzxzxxxxil Hill, Harris Burch, E. R. W. H. BLACK, attorneys at law, 242 244 EQUITABLE BUILDING, — Mawn Georgia. ATLANTA, GEORGIA. Excuso for absence: Too much trouble to come. vuDr. Herty: Times Present, 1. Timos Absont, 23. Per Cent, 4. Sss« acc ss K.VK ss§®3»sEKfi!a asaetfasKi C. F. HcDANNELL Wesleyan Female College _______—-MACON, QA. PnOTOQK IFnEK Oldest Female College in the World. Best Plant in the South. 1 15 BROAb STREET ATHENS, Qfl. All Work _____ Jtrktlt First-Class. AC-ON given socond best health tv coni of American cities by Tenth U. S. Census. The city is one of the loveliest, and the surrounding country is picturesque and beautiful. The work it has done for nearly sixty years attests its merit. Bishop McTyoiro is reported to have said that Wesleyan had left its impress on womanhood from the shores of the Pacific to the Tybec Beach. Sond for Catalogue, outer now for next fall, and thus become one of the goodly number of women who are scattered all over this Southern land, and who enjoy the benefits and tho incomparable prestige of Wesleyan College Alumna . zj: •J. SZ»SZ9$3B$SS JB35K -V;VS Zl$Zf. Excuse for Absence: Domestic Duties. VIIIProf. Hooper: Times prosont, 2. Times absent, 22. Per cent. 9. LEADING TAILORS AND IMPORTERS. Jacob Reecl’s Sons, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA. The Newest and Best things in Men's Wear of Every Description, including Clothing, Furnishings, Hats, Shoes and Dress Details. FOUNDED IN 1824 BY JACOB REED. BSTABLI8NISO EIMER AMEND, —— Mnniifiiottiror nntl Imporloru of Chemicals and Chemical Apparatus. 205, 207, 209. 211 THIRD AVE., Corner 18th Street, NEW YORK. Best Bohemian and German Glassware, Royal Berlin and Meissen Porcelain Goods, Analytical Balances and Weights, Pure Hammered Platinum and Nickclwarc All kinds of Testing Apparatus and Reagents. Glass Blowing done on premises. Excuse for absence: I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot como. IXDr. Hunnicutt: Times Present, 0 LUCY COBB INSTITUTE, ATHENS. GEORGIA. The Exercises of this School will be Resumed September, 1894. M. RUTHERFORD, Principal. Latest 5tyle Hair Cut. Polite and Prompt Attention. Everything Hirst Class. 5tuilents Invited to Call On L’s. UNDER COflMBRCIAL CORNER, Tonsorial Artist. Athens, Ga. Excuse for Absence: Times Absent, 24. Per Cent., O, perris §S Son TAILORS FOR flEN AND WOMEN. Full Dress Outfits a Specialty. SAC1PLE3 SENT ON APPLICATION. 820 Broadway, — AUGUSTA, GA. DEPART;'!ENT OF LAW FACULTY I WUXI AM B. HOGGS, D.D. Oliaiiocllor. JOHN I). MELT A.R.BL.. rmfckifirnf mteflnr«f FirlitBCOurj U«. HOWELL COBB. A.M.B-U Profo 0rof Law. Samuel c. benedict, m.d. ProfetaOr Of Medical Jnrl»prod«ncc. SYLVANUS MORRIS, A. M.B.L Professor of Law. Write for Information to SYLVANUS MORRIS. Athens, Ga Milking and Churning. xDr. McPherson: Times present 1. Tlmos absent, 23. Por cont. 4. TI CLOTHIERS AND HATTERS. : : : GENTS’ FURNISHING GOODS. Suits .Made to Order and Fits (luarantecd. —• Brood Street. ATHENS. GEORGIA. The Best and JVlost Reliable. • • • WE REFER TO • - • I. T. DEHKICOTTE. When you want a First-Class Job of Shoe Work, remember that he handles the Best Stock. INVISIBLE PATCHES A SPECIALTY. E. H. W. F. DORSEY, Qotl?i[ 5 ai?d puncture. 115 TO 121 CLAYTON STREET. B. I. SMITH, Dealer in Fine Shoes, + COR. COLLEGE AVE. AND CLAYTON ST. CITY DRUG STORE. R. C. ORR COMPANY. No. 8 Oast Clayton Street. Prescriptions a Specialty. _______________ ____ 1_________________________________ Excuso for absence: Don’t have to, thorofore, don’t. XIProf. J. Morris: Times present, 17. Times absent, 7. Per cent. 71. HARRY SILVERMAN, Direct Importer of Fine English Briar Pipes - lul Smoking Articles. MaKcr and Proprietor of the Celebrated Draod of ARAGON HIXTURE TOBACCO. - — — Atlanta, Georgia. EVERYBODY KNOWS H. C. BLACK HAS THE LARCEST STOCK OF First-Class Shoes and Slippers IX ATI. A XT A. CALI. AXD SI! : TUB xr.w STYLES. 7 . C. UIuACK 35 Whitehall Street. The ( ther s Hardware Co. James H. Huggins, J r. I BALBKS IX 33 CLAYTON STREET. CUTLERY, GUNS and Lamps, Lamp Goods, Kerosene Oil, and all Goods usually found in a First-Class SPORTING GOODS: House Furnishing Establishment. Agents for ELECTRIC RAZOR AND STRAPS. PRICES LOWER THAN THE LOWEST ANO G000S FIRST-CLASS. 248-250 Broad St., THE NEW CROCKERY STORE, ATHENS, GEORGIA. J. H. Huggins, Jr.. Prop. 33 CLAYTON STREET. Excuse for absence: Too far off. xuProf. Patterson: Tlmos prosont, 19. Times absent, 5. Por cent, 80. Aladdox’s Studio. PHOTOGRAPHERS. Crayon, and Pastel Portraits. CflLL fIND SEE OUR WORK- Studio, 109 East Broad Street, ATHENS, GA- P. H. HAWKINS, Fine Tailoring; SUITS MADE TO ORDER AT REASONABLE PRICES. STUDENTS’ WORK A SPECIALTY. 35 CLAYTON ST., ATHENS, GA- H.tnbltHhod IHitl. SOLOMONS CO., J0foole? ale and I elail © 163 CONGRESS STREET. paggiistf) Branch Stour: Ball Stroul, Under tbo GulrFi Armory. SAVANNAH. GEORGIA. Prompt n l careful attention to all orders cm rusted to us, and only the best and purest drug sold ordUpcntcd. Agents for the sale of Hutyer's Celebrated Candles. Excuse for absence: Overslept myself. XIIIDr. Riley: Times Present, 6. Times Absent, IS. Per Cent, 25. FINE CATALOGUE AND PERIODICAL WORK A SPECIALTY. SEE US. WE CAN PLEASE YOU. Chas. P. Byrd Publisher Printer Engraver EVERYTHING IN PRINTINC FROM A VISITINC CARD TO THE FINEST HALF-TONE PUBLICATION. ■ No. 8 South broad St. ATLANTA, (JA. Excuse for Absence: Writing a Book. XIV


Suggestions in the University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) collection:

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1892 Edition, Page 1

1892

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1893 Edition, Page 1

1893

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1894 Edition, Page 1

1894

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1896 Edition, Page 1

1896

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1897 Edition, Page 1

1897

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1898 Edition, Page 1

1898

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.