University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1894

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1894 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 206 of the 1894 volume:

 • be pandora Volume ) —189 . Published T nnually by the fraternities of the University of Georgia. Athens. Qa. 7YWir, 7WDGGGXG1V. Univ , kG l ALX F S' f » t 3 i 4 Hoo! Rah !! Rah !!! Hoo! Rah !! Rah !!! Rah !! Rah !! G-K-O-R-G-I-A. iv.M, Bv K. TinwRU- rKINTSO BY TIIB KBA.YKI.IN I'BISTlNi; ASK I'CIILIMIINC CO., ati.anta. c;aDUE TO THE SIZE 0? THE 300K WE WERE UNABLE TO SEW. A NEW METHOD OF GLUEING WAS USED FOR THIS ITEM.I oard of gditors Y)olume H. of be Pandora. gditors-in-Ghief. business TVlanagers. •CHARLES R. TIDWELL, A T A. PAUL L. FLEMING, X f . NOEL McH. MOORE, 2 A E. JOHN D. STEELING, A TO. ftcsooiate Editors. LUNSFORD D. FRICKS, 2 N. HENRY BROWN, K A. WILLIAM P. HARBIN, X . GEORGE W. BECKETT. !• A 0. (Mpreface. s most prefaces take the form of apologies, the present Board of Editors would gladly send out Volume ' VII. to the public, for the sake of novelty, without any reference to their trials; but the evil spirits set free by Pandora seem to have beset their liberator this year with unusual fury, so it is but pro| er that some facts should be made known us to the various obstacles encountered by the Editors, and leniency on the part of the public requested. The present Board of Editors was not elected until after the ('hristmas holidays, so the work of a year has been crowded into a few months. Again, on account of the unusual business depression, it has been almost impossible to secure advertisements, and’twas only after repeated and earnest efforts on the part of the Editors that a sufficient number were secured to warrant the publishing of our Annual. The Editors, recognizing the fact that such an eventful college year as that of 1893-’04 should not be passed over unnoticed, have worked earnestly, and now offer to the public Volume VII. of the Pandora, in which a brief account is given of the most interesting and important events that have transpired at the University during the present year. In giving a “ true history of.student life,” we have necessarily inserted a few jokes, and in some instances referred to boys as having the faces of dogs, the brains of butterflies, and the mouths of alligators; but we assure them beforehand that it was all done because of our desire to give a true history of student life, and not in order to wound their feelings. Should our a|»ology not be accepted, the offended student can obtain satisfaction by applying to any hro of the Editors. If, with all our faults and shortcomings, we have succeeded in costing a few faint rays of pleasure upon the dark clouds that gather in the lives of all, we feci that our humble effort has not been in vain. The Editors. G°MAJOR CHARLES MORRIS.To the Memory of the noble Gentleman, professor Qbarles 7Vlprris, who, for twenty-eight years, instructed the students of the University by the example of his lofty character, as much as by his eloquent discourse from the chair, this volume is dedicated with all love and veneration. (9)7V ajor Gearies 7Vlorpis “He was a man, take him for all iu all; We shall not look upon his like again.” i jJscikxce teaches us that no energy is ever lost; vary it may in form, but beneath all its protean disguises the sharp eye of analysis detects its unmistakable presence. Disappear it may from the realm of the seen, but rest assured “ Somewhere yet that atom’s force Moves the light-poised universe.” In like manner the energy of human character, the force of a true and noble life, is never lost. Generations may come and go, dynasties may rise and fall, boundaries may change and thrones crumble into dust, but the waves of influence thus set in motion are as restless as the sea—more resistless than its tides. Long after the force of such a life has been seemingly spent, its unifying and ennobling touch is felt; long after the material part has been shattered, the perfume of true and righteous living remains to please and delight. Such a life was that of him to whom this volume of Pandora is dedicated. For years he was a center from which radiated rays of light to every part of the Empire State. From the rugged crags of the Blue Ridge to the blue waters of the Atlantic hundreds of high-minded and patriotic citizens— men whom the commonwealth delights to honor, and who form its true bulwark in time of trouble—learned at his feet not only the elements of that true and vigorous English of which he was such a consummate master, hut, what is infinitely more important, the elements of that true and lofty manhood of which he was such a perfect exemplar. These, we are persuaded, will be pleased to know that the students of the University affectionately dedicate this their seventh (10)Annual to him who was tor so long a time their beau idOaJ of manhood, their more than Chevalier Bayard. This outward manifestation is, of a truth, insignificant; but it testifies to the inward flame of admiration and affection that burns in the hearts of every loyal son of our Alma Mater. Herein alone lies its importance and fitness. It is no part of Pandora’s pur| oso to enter upon an extended eulogy of the life and character of Major Morris. Othcrand farabler hands have portrayed the wonderful power of his intellect and the beautiful symmetry of his character. Pandora desires simply to add but a leaf to the garland of eulogy that has encircled his touch. Major Chari.ks Morris first saw the light of day upon the soil of that State famed in the history of the Republic as the “ Mother of Statesmen.” lie sprang from the old Virginia aristocracy, and in the bosom of an aristocratic Virginia home breathed those influences that moulded and s)ia| ed his life. The old Virginia aristocracy has of late years fallen into hostile hands; it has been caricatured to such an extent that the world is apt to forget that from its ranks came the men who, above all others, for more than a hundred years shaped the destinies of the American colonics. The members of this aristocracy may indeed have been somewhat reckless and prodigal; but the historian discovers nowhere, save in (1 classic Athens, such an amount of ability, talent and genius produced by so small a society. Strong-minded, courageous, hospitable and generous to a fault, proud as any Englishman who boasts his Norman descent, and chivalrous as any knight of “vc olden time,” the Virginia gentlemen of the old school formed a type of which history furnishes no parallel. Major Mourns possessed more, than the excellencies of this excellent type. In him were happily blended all those elements that went to make up the typical Virginia gentleman—without, indeed, the faults that so iuq times marred the picture. There was that about him which made you feel that you stood in the presence of one of Nature's noblemen. Of a very truth he was what he was. No sycophancy or deceit ever found lodgment in this heroic soul. Others might cringe to a sickly public opinion, others might bow the knee to the false gods of a degenerate time, but he would abide by his convictions; he, even if alone, would stand erect. Not content with sem blance, he sought, above all, to know things as they are. And when he had thus learned them you might rest assured that lie would give a true transcript of his brain. Men might differ from him in opinion, but none doubted his absolute sincerity. In analyzing heroism Emerson notes that sincerity forms its essential clement. Under this conception of the case Major Morris was truly heroic. Sincerity was the one I)all-pervading force of his life. A SjMtrtan in the sterner virtues of manhood, he was a Bayard in courage, attainments and integrity. A Stoic in his rigid adherence to morality, he was, nevertheless, a Christian in all the heavenly graces. Words are powerless here. Xo mere word-picture can do justice to the beautiful symmetry of his character. To those who learned wisdom at his feet he will remain ever embedded in memory as their model of true and lofty manhood,and sad, indeed, will he the day when they forget his shining example. “ Green be the turf above thee, Instructor of our better days. None know thee but to love thee, None named thee but in praise.” (12)University of Georgia Departments. I. Franklin Com.rok, Athens. IT. State College ok Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Athens. With branches as follows: 1. North Georgia Agricultural College, Dahlonega. 2. South Georgia Agricultural College, Thonia.svllle. :{. Southwest Georgia Agricultural College, Cuthbert. 4. Middle Georgia Agricultural College, Millcdgeville. o. West Georgia College of Agriculture, Hamilton. III. School of Law, Athens. IV. School ok Medicine, Augusta. V. School ok Technology, Atlanta. VI. Georgia Normal and Industrial College, Milledgevllle. VII. College kor Colored Youths , Savannah. •Incorporated In accord unco will, an Ac» of Congress known ns the ■■ Morrill Act.’’ Degrees. The following degree , any one of which will confer the title of Graduate of the I'Diversity of Georgia, will be given to those students who complete satisfactorily the course prescribed for each degree: In Franklin College: Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Letters Master of Art .... Master of Science . In State College of Agriculture: Bachelor of Science. .. .... . Four years’ course. Bachelor or Agriculture .. .Three years’ course. Bachelor of engineering. . .Four-years’course. In The Professional Schools: 1. Bachelor of Law..........One years’ course. 2. Doctor of Medicine.......Three years’ course. S. Civil Kugineer.... ..... Post-graduate. 4. Civil ami Mining Engineer .Post-graduate. In The School of Technology : Mechanical F.nglueer......Four years’ course. .. .Four years' course. . Four years' course. .Four years’ course. . Post-graduate. .. .Post-graduate. (13)Tmk Mookk Bun.mxo.trustees of the University of Georgia His Excellency, Gov. W. J. NORTHEN, Atlanta...............Ex oillcio. V. H. Felton, Cartersville................Term expires Sept. 1st, 1S99. From the State at Large. N. J. Hammond, Atlanta ..................Term expires Sept. 1st, 1901. From the State at Urge. H. D. Me Da Niki., Monroe..................Term expires Sept. 1st, 1895. From the Stale at Largo. A. It. Lawton, Savaunah....................Term expires Sept. 1st, 1897. From the 8tate at Large. John Scrkvkn, Savannah.....................Term expires Sept. 1st, 1897. Rim Oongrearional District. A. T. McIntyre, Thomasville................Term expires Sept. 1st, 1897. Second Congretsional District. W. H. Fish, Amerlcus.....................Term expires Sept. 1st, 1K97. Third Congressional DUtrlct. W. A. Little, Columbus.................... Term expires Sept. 1st, 1895. Fourth Congressional District H. V. M. Miller, Atlanta ............. Term expires Sept. 1st, 1896. Filth Congressional DUtrlct. A. O. Bacon, Macon........................ Term expires Sept. 1st, 1901. Sixth Congressional District. D. B. Hamilton, Rome.....................Term expires Sept. 1st, 1901. Seventh Congressional District. J. A. Billups, Madison...................Term expires Sept. 1st, 1895. Eighth Congressional DUtrlct. X. L. Hutchins, Lawrencovllle.. .. Term expires Sept. 1st, 1899. Ninth Congressional District. J. B. Ccmmino, Augusta...................Term expires Sept. 1st, 1899. Tenth Congressional District. S. R. Atkinson, Brunswick.................Term expires Sept. 1st, 1899. Eleventh Congressional DUtrlct. A. L. Hull, Athens,Sec’y and Treas. . Term expires Sept. 1st, 1899. Resident Truatec. Howell Cobb, Athens Term expires Sept. 1st, 1901. Resident Trustee. X. E. Harris. Macon.......................................Ex oillcio. Pre !dcnt ol Technological Board. W. Y. Atkinson, Xewuan....................................Ex oillcio. President Hoard of Commissioners Girls' Industrial College. I . W. Mrldrim, Savannah................................. Ex oillcio. President Board ol Coininl-stonerx Colored Industrial College. (15)Galendar September 18, Monday: Skit km rkr 20, Wednesday: October 21, Monday: November 30, Thursday: December 22, Friday : January 3, Wednesday: January 19, Friday: February 19, Monday: February 22, Thursday: March 21, Wednesday: March 20, Monday: March 28, Wednesday : April 4, Wednesday: 1893. Examinations for admission. •Session begins. Medical School at Augustaopens. National Thanksgiving Day. Christmas Itecess begins. 189 . Exercises Resumed. Examinations for Entrance, half advanced. Birthday of It. K. Lee; .State holiday. Anniversary of the Demostheniau Society. Washington’s Birtliday. Anniversary of the Phi Kappa Society. Senior Essays due. CommcMicement of Medical School. Junior Essays duo. Competitive Senior Orations. Competitive Junior Speaking. Examination In Elementary English. April 11, Wednesday: May 5, Saturday: May 12, Saturday: May 19, Saturday: May 26, Saturday: May 28, Monday: June 14, Thursday: June 15, 16, Friday and Saturday : June 16, Saturday: June 17, Sunday: June 18, Monday: Junk 19, Tuesday: Junk 20, Wednesday: September it, 18, Monday and Tuesday: September 19, Wednesday: October 21, Monday: Sophomore Competitive Declamation. Freshmen Competitive Debates. Sophomore Competitive Debates. Junior Competitive Debates. Senior Competitive Delates. Final Examinations begin. Hoard of Trustees meet in Athens. Examinations for Entrance. Senior Class Exercises. Baccalaureate Sermon. {11 a. m. Oration before Literary Societies. 4. p. m., Sophomore Declamation. Mia. in., Alumni Oration. 4 p. m., Junior Orations. Commencement Day—Summer Vacation begins. Examinations for Entrance. Session opens. Law School opens. Medical .School o| eii8. (10)University of Georgia WILLIAM ELLISON BOGGS, Chaxceiaok. faculty. DAVID CRENSHAW BARROW, Jr.. C. «fc M. E., Professor of Mathematics. B. Sc., C. M. E. University Of Georgia, 1874. Assistant State Geologist, 1874-1870. Instructor In Pure and Applied Mathematics, 187S-1882. Professor of Applied .Mathematics, 18N2-’89. Professor of Mathematics. 18S9--. WILLIS HENRY BOCOCK, A. B., A. M., pROFhxsoR ok Greek and Latin Lanouaoes. A. B. Hampden-SIdney College. A. M. Hampden-Sidney College. University of Virginia. Instructor in University School, Charlottesville, Vu. Greek Master McGuire’s University School, Richmond, Va. Professor of Greek Hamp-den-Siduey College, Virginia, 18S«-S! . Professor of Greek and Latin University of Georgia 1889—. WILLIAM ELLISON BOGGS, D.D., LL.D., Professor ok Metaphysics and Ethics. A. B. South Carolina College 18.19. I). I). Southwestern Presbyterian College 1878. LL. D. Ceutral University 18S9. Born at Ahmednuggur, Hindustan, May 12,1888. Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Polity, Columbia Theological Seminary 1882. Chancellor and Professor of Metaphysics and Kthics, University of Georgia 1889—. JOHN PENDLETON CAMPBELL, A. B., Ph. «)., Professor ok Bioixxiy. Born at Cumberland, Murylaud, November 20. 1883. A. B. .lohns-Hopkius University 1885. Fellow 1SS6-87. Pli. I). 1888. Professor of Biology University of Georgia 1SSS. Member American Society of Naturalists, American Physiological Society. Author of •' Biological Teaching in the Colleges of the United States,” and articles in “Studies from the Biological Laboratory of the Johns-Hopkins University,” “ Educational Review,” etc. (17)LEON HENRI CHARBONNIER, A. M., Pn. D., Prokkksor ok Physics and Astronomy. Born In Franco, August 2, 1838. Educated at Military School of Franco. Adjunct Professor Ancient languages. University of Georgia, 1866-1888. Professor Civil Engineering 1868-1877. Since then Professor of Physics and Astronomy. Honorary A. M. and Ph. D. University of Georgia. Member of American Association for the advancement of Science. HOWELL COBB, A. B., B. L., Professor ok Law. A. B. University of Georgia 1S62. B. L. University of Georgia 1866. Phi Kappa Society. Born Athens, Georgia, July 8, 1842. Professor of Law 1889. Judge City Court of Clarke County 1879. JAMES BENJAMIN HCNXICUTT, A. B., PUOKBSSOK OK PRACTICAL AORItTLTI'HB. A. B. Emory College 1868. A. M. Emory I860. Born Coweta County, Georgia, 1836. Professor of Latin Emory College 1861. Professor of Agriculture University of Georgia 1891-Assistant State Commissioner of Agriculture 1890. Member American Congress of Farmers. JOHN HANSON THOMAS MoPHERSON, A. B., Pir. D., Professor ok History and Political Science. A. B. Jobns-Hopklns University 1886. Pb. IX Johns-Hopkins University 1890. Born in Baltimore, Maryland, October 30, (IS f 1865. Fellow in History Johns-Hopkina University 1889-90. Instructor in History University of Michigan 1880-91. Professor of History and Political Science University of Georgia 1891. Member American Historical Association. Author of “ History of Liberia.” WILLIAMS RUTHERFORD. A. M., Emeritus Professor ok Pork Mathematics. A. M. University of Georgia 1857. Dcmosthcnian Society. Born Mllledgeville, Georgia, September 3, ISIS. Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy University of Georgia 1856. Professor of Pure Mathematics 1866. Emeritus Professor 1889—. CHARLES MORTON STRAHAN, C. ani M. E., Professor ok Enoinkekino. C. and M. E. University of Georgia 1883. Born in Goochland County, Virginia, May 9, 1864. Assistant State Chemist 1882-1880. Instructor in Mathematics and Ancient Languages University of Georgia 1884-1887. Assistant Professor Analytical Chemistry University of Georgia 1887-1890. Professor of Civil Engineering University of Georgia 1890 —. Contributor to Popular Science Monthly. Author "Clarke County and the City of Athens.” State Director of National League for Good I toads. HENRY CLAY WHITE, B. 8c., ani» Pii. D.t F. C. S., Professor of Chemistry (Terrell Professorship). Born in Baltimore, Maryland, December 30,18-50. B. Sc. University of Virginia 1869. C. and M. E. University of Virginia )1876. I’li. D. University of Virginia 1886. Fellow American Association Adwnod Science 1SS0. Corresponding Member ltritis.ii Association 188”. Fellow Chemical Society Ix)ndon) 1893. Profissor Natural Science St. John's College, Maryland, 1871 1872. I,ecturer Peabody Institute, Bal-timore, Maryland, 1871 1872. Professor of Chemistry University of Georgia 1872. State Chemist of Georgia 1890-1690. President State College 1890. Contributor to Scientific jour-nab. President Association of OfHcial Chemists of the United States 1883. CYPRIAN POUTER WILLCOX, A. M., LI D., Pbokkssik Modern Languages. Born in Sparta, Ga. M. A. of Yale University 1847. Middle life passed chiefly in Europe. Was elected Professor of Modern languages University of Georgia December, 1871. LL. D. University of the South, August, 1891. Student at University of Gotlengen 1881. JESSE COATES, B. E., Instructor in Physics. Born in Baltimore, Maryland, February 7, 1870. Educated at Westtown Boarding .School 1882-87. B. E. University of Georgia 1890. Fellow in Physics 1890-1891. Instructor In Physics University of Georgia 1891 . CHARLES HOLMES HERVY, B. Pit., P»i. D., Instructor in Chemistry. Born in Millcdgevilie, Georgia, December 4, 1807. Graduated at Middle Georgia Military and Agricultural College in 1884. 0 H. Ph. University of Georgia 1880. Pb. D. Johns-Hopkins University 1890. Assistant Chemist Georgia Experiment Station 1890-91. Instructor in Analytical Chemistry in University of Georgia 1891—. Contributor to American Chemical Journal. Member of “ Die Deutsche Ohemisch Ges-ellschaft.” JOHN MOItRIS, A. M., Instri;ctok in English. A. M. Itamlolpb Macon 1883. B. L. University of Georgia 18S4. B. L. University of Virginia 188.3. Practiced law, Birmingham, Alabama, 188-3-1890. Professor of Laliu and Greek Georgia Military Institute 1890-1891. Professor of Latin and Greek Southern Female College, Virginia, 1892-1893. Instructor in English 1893—. SYLVAN US MORRIS, A. M.t Professor ok Law. A. M. University of Georgia 1874. B. L. University of Georgia 1877. Practiced law, Athens, Georgia, 1S77-1898. Solicitor City Court two terms. Professor of Law University of Georgia, 1893—. BENJAMIN F RANKLIN' RILEY, Pkokicssoh ok English. Erekine College, South Carolina. Pastor of ihiptist Churches in Mobile and Montgomery, Alabama. President of Howard College, Alabama. 1889-1893. Professor of English, University of Georgia 1893—. ' )WILLIAM DAVIS HOOPER, A. B., INSTRUCTOR IN A NX IK NT LANGUAGES. A. B. Hampden-Sidney College, Virginia, 1889. Born at Llber-ly, Virginia, August 13, 1868. Professor of Latin and Greek Southwest Georgia Agricultural College 1889 90. Icstructor in Latin and Greek University of Georgia 18D0. OSCAR HOLMES SHEFFIELD, C. E, INSTRUCTOR IN KNOINKKRING ANI» DRAWING. University of Georgia, B. E. 1891, C. E. 189 2. Born in Early County, Georgia, February 22, 1867. Secretary for the State of Georgia of the National League forG od Roads. Instructor in Engineering and Drawing 189 2. CHARLES MERCER 8NELLING, (Graduate V. M. I.) Instructor in Mathematics and Military Tactics. Assistant Professor Mathematics Virginia Military Institute 1-S84-1S87. Commandant of Cadet and Professor of Mathematics South Georgia Agricultural 1887-88. Commandant of Cadets and Instructor in Mathematics University of Georgia 18S8. HARRY AARON ALEXANDER, A. M., Tutor in Modern Languages. GREENE FLOURNOY JOHNSON, A. M., Tutor in English. IIALCOTT CADWALLADER MORENO, A. M., Tutor in Mathematics. LE8TKR COWDERY SLADE, A. M., Tutor in Biology. Faculty of Caw) School WILLIAM ELLISON BOGGS, I). IX, LL. IX, Chancellor. Howell Coiiii, A. B., B. L., Judge City Court of Athens, Professor of Law. Sam URL C. Bknkdict, M. D., Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. Lecturers. Sylvanuk Mourns, A. M., b. I. Professor of Law. Georoe Dudley Thomas, B. S., B. L., Andrew J. Curb, A. B., B. I,., Lecturer on Common I aw, Evidence and Equity. I ecturer on Constitutional Low, Pleading and Contracts. . John D. Mei.i., A. B., B. I , I-ecturer on Parliamentary I aw. Special Lecturers. Hon. William T. Newman, C. S. Judge, Northern District of Georgia, Lecturer on the Jurisdiction and Practice of the Federal Courts. Hon. N. L. Hutchins. Judge of the Superior Courts, Western Circuit, Hon. Joseuh B. Cummino, lecturer on Equity and Equity Practice. lecturer on Law of Corporations. Hon. P. W. Meldkim, Lecturer on Criminal law and Real Property. (21)With thoughts that blond regret and joy, He secs his life’s first era close, Whose days were all of sunshine wrought And tinged with colors of the rose. With deep regret—because ’(is pain To leave the things one loves so well, With jov—because ambitious hopes Within his eager bosom swell. Of college life, so gay and bright, He carries naught away perchance, Except a flower or photograph That bears some sweet significance. mor Another scene breaks on his view. The conflict keen of human life, So vast, so fierce, he feels himself A worse than Freshman in the strife. But yet he stands arrayed in strength And with his classmates forms a band, By cultured brain and spirit made, The future leaders of the land. So hail ye, Senior, and farewell, And may what Fortune yields to thee Be not less bright than ideals wrought In heat of youthful reverv. A.Glass of ninety-four. yell. Hoop! La! Hoo!! Hoop! J.a! I loo!! Ninety-Four! Ninety-Four!! Black and Blue! Golors. Block and Blue. power. Beach Blossom. 0fficers. J. M. Harrington,.................................President. J. K. Braxnen,..............................Vice-President. W. A. Fuller, Jr.,................................Historian. B. B. Bower, J r.,.................................Prophet. J. D. Stellino,......................................Orator. C. R. Tidwkli....................................Secretary. D. L. Cloud,.....................................Treasurer. J. M. Madden,.....................................Chaplain. T. A. McGregor,........................................Poet. C. D. McCutchen,........................Captain of Football Team. S. B. Vow,........................Manager of Football Team. C. R. Tidwell,..........................Captain of Baseball Team. T. R. Move,.......................Manager of Baseball Team. (24)Glass of I ineRf-Four I). Drmox henian Society. J K. Phi Kapjta Society. JOSEPH A KERMAN, 2 N, A.B., P. K., Athens, Ga. President Y. M. C. A. President P. K. Treasurer P. Iv. Junior Speaker. Secretary Senior Science Club. Entered Freshman Class. WILLIAM R. ARMSTRONG, X , B.S., I)., Atj.anta, Ga. Vice-President Glee Clui ’04. Entered Freshman Class. WILLIAM T. BACON, A B, P. K., Lexington, Ga. Editor-In-Chief of Red and Black. Junior Speaker. Associate Editor Magazine ’03. Entered Freshman Class. BENJAMIN S. BALDWIN, D X, A.B., P. K., Cutiibkrt, Ga. Entered Sophomore Class. . DAVID C. BARROW, 3i X A K, A.B., D., Savannah, Ga Associate Editor of Red and Black. Vice-President of Junior Class. Spring Debater ’02. Sophomore Speaker. Entered Freshman Class. GEORGE W. BECKETT, ♦AO, B.E., P. K., Savannah, Ga. Musical Director of Thalians. Editor Pandora. Entered Junior Class. BYRON B. BOWER, K A, A.B., D., Bainisridgk, Ga. Editor-In-Chief Magazine. Historian Junior Class. Prophet Senior Class. Entered Freshman Class. Historian Freshman Class. President German Club ’92-’93. Vice-President German Club ’91 -’02. JAMES K. BRANNEN, A.B., D., IRIC, Ga. Associate Editor Magazine '93. Vice-President Senior Class. Entered Freshman Class. HENRY C. BROWN, K A, B.E., D., AUGUSTA, Ga. Pandora Editor. President Athletic Association ’93-’9i. Vice-President Athletic Association ’92-’9S. Member ’ Varsity Eoot-Ball Team '9l-’92-’93. Associate Editor Magazine. 1st SgL Co. A. Captain Co. A. Junior Speaker. Captain Junior Football T am. Entered Sophomore Class. GEORGE P. BUTLER, s a K, B.E., D., Augusta, Ga. Captain ’Varsity Football Team ’93. Member ’Varsity Football Team’92-’93. 1st Sergeant Co B. Captain Co. B. Junior Speaker. Member of Executive Committee of Athletic Association. Treasurer Y. M. C. A. !93-’94. Entered Sophomore Class. Member Glee Club. (25)DAVID L. CLOUD, a t A, B.S., P. K., Thomson, Ga. Treasurer Senior Class. Entered Sophomore Class. HENRY H. CUMMING, IX, E., Romk, Ga. Entered Junior Cluss. EDWIN DAVIS, K A, A.B., D., Grkf.nesboko, Ga. Associate Editor Magazine. Member Glee Club. Entered Freshman Class. JASPER N. DORSEY, ❖AO, A.B., D., Gainesville, Ga. Entered Junior Class. PAUL I . FLEMING, N « , A.B., P. K., Atlanta, Ga. Business Manager PaNDORa. Business Manager ’Varsity Football Team ’S)3. Anniversarian P.K. Literary Society ’94. President Thalian Dramatic Club. Sophomore and Junior Speaker. Sgt. Co. B. Lieutenant Co. A. Treasurer Athletic Association ’92-’93. Chairman Executive Committee Athletic Association ’93-’94. President P. I . Society. Editor Red and Black. Associate Editor University Magazine. Entered Sophomore Class. Senior Speaker. LUNSFORD D. FRICKS, S N, A.B., I . K., Rising Fawn, Ga. Editor Pandora. Member ’Varsity Football Team ,‘»l-’92-’ti3. Captain Junior Baseball Team. Vice-President Athletic Association ’93-’JM. Entered Freshman Class. WILLIAM A. FULLER, X t, A.B., P. K., Atlanta, Ga. President P. K. Literary Society. Sophomore S|»eaker. Junior S| eaker. Historian Senior Class. Associate Editor Magazine. 3d Lieutenant Co. B. Entered Sophomore Class. ABRAHAM D. GREENFIELD, P. K., E., Albany, Ga. Entered Junior Class. WILLIAM P. HARBIN, X , A.B., P. K., Calhoun, Ga. Editor Pandora. Associate Editor Magazine. Entered Freshman Class. Sophomore Speaker. JOHN M. HARRINGTON, K A, A.B., P. Iv., West Point, Ga. President Senior Class. Junior Speaker. Spring Debater ’£ 1. Vice-President P. K. ’92. Entered Freshman Class. JOHN B. MADDEN, A.B, D., Concori , Ga. President Dcmostheniun Society. Chaplain Senior Class. Entered Freshman Class. CICERO I). McCUTCIlEN, Jit., N, A.B., D., Dai.ton, Ga. Captain Senior Football Team. Member ’Varsity Football Team ’£ 3. Secretary Athletic Association. Lieutenant Co. B. Entered Sophomore Class. WILLIAM A. McDOUGALI), K A, A.B., D., Columbus, Ga. Executive Committee German Club ’93. Entered Juuior Class. THOMAS A. McGREGOR, A.B., I)., Mt. Vernon, Ga. President Demostheulan Society. Associate Editor Magazine. Associate Editor Red aud Black. Senior Class Poet. Entered Sophomore Class. NOEL MeH. Moore, 2 a e, A.B, D., Augusta, Ga. Editor-In-Chief Pandora. Class Historian ’9i-’92. Enteretl Freshman Class. THOMAS It. MOVE, A.B., P. K., Harrison, Ga. Manager Senior Baseball Team. Entered Freshman Class. JOHN I). SPELLING, a Tii, B.E., I)., Augusta, Ga. Business Manager Pandora. Business Manager Magazine two terms. Sophomore and Junior Speaker. First Lieutenant Co. A. Orator Senior Class. President Engineering Society ’93-’9t. Treasurer German Club ’92-’93. Entered Sophomore Class. ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS, A.B., P. K., Atlanta, Ga. President Phi Knpi a Society. Editor Red and Black. Entered Sophomore Class. »)JOHN V. STL'BBS. A.B., IX, Ckdaktown, Ga. Entered Sophomore Class. CHARLES R. TIDWELL, J T J, A.B., D., Atlanta, Ga. Editor-iu-CI«lef Pandora. Associate Editor Magazine. Captain Senior Baseball Team. Secretary Senior Class. President Demoslheniau Society. Secretary Demostheniau Society. Entered Junior Class. EDWARD EPSON, X a. E., E., Athens, Ga. Entered Senior Class. WILLIAM A. WILKINS, JR., - A E, E., P. K., WAYNESBORO. Sophomore Speaker. Junior Speaker. Vice-President German Club ’92-'03. Sergeant Co. B. 1st Lieutenant Co. A ’93-’9l. Eutered Sophomore Class. ARTHUR WRIGLEY, K a., B. E.. IX, Maoon, Ga. Member ’Varsity Football Team ’03. Sergeant Major ’92-’93. Adjutant ’03-’04. Entered Freshman Class. SAMUEL B. YOW, ♦ A G, A.B., IX, Avalon, Ga. Editor-in Chief Bed and Black. Sophomore Speaker. Junior Speaker. Treasurer Athletic Association ’93-’94. Sergeant Co. B. 91-’92. Vice-President Athletic Association ’91-’02. Executive Committee Athletic Association ’92-’l 3. Manager Senior Football Team. President Senior Science Club. Entered Junior Class.Glass of Hinety-F°ur. N THE early fall of 1890 there might have been seen oil the historic old campus of the Georgia University a large number of strange faces. Such a coneourse at that season of the year of new men, or, as they soon get to be called, “Freshmen,” indicated that the grand old institution was about to begin another year’s work which would only add fresh laurels to the glories of the past. Some of the new comers were seeking the dignity of the Sophomores; a few aspired to the Junior Class; but by far the most of them were directing their energies to enter as humble Freshmen. Having passed safely through the terrible ordeal known as entrance examinations, they were ushered into their classes, and for the first time the hoys of the Black and Blue were united as the Class of Ninety-Four. With awe and trembling the first few days were spent. Soon, however, they came to look upon the Faculty as their friends, and as men intent on bestowing upon them the price- less gift of a thorough education. They were not long in “catching on” to College life,and entered with full spirit into all College affairs. Thirty-six strong, the Class of Ninety-Four began its brilliant career. Many of the pioneer members have left us; some have fallen by the wayside; some few failed to climb the ladder which separates the lower from the higher classes; one or two have dropped out for other reasons; but Nature has blessed us, and called none to the “unknown realm,” and Ninety-Four has to-day, as its nucleus, the bright and happy band which first came in ’90. On the field of athletics the Black and Blue waved triumphantly the very first year, notwithstanding the fact that the other classes generally have the advantage over the Freshmen. The battery for the College Nine, Wadley and Jlerty, was furnished by us, while our class team was victorious in every game save one, this being won by the Sophomores in playing off a tie. In the only football game of the season Ninety-Four defeated the boys of Ninety-One. (28) Then all went merrily with Ninety-Four; she had made a record, and was proud of it. The Freshman course was drawing to a close. However pleasant this year may be to a student; however much he may rejoice at the victories of his class; and however much satisfaction lie may get from an approving conscience for his well-done work, he always welcomes the close of the year, which, at its best, is one of taunts and jeers. Soon the finals—the “pon axinorum” of College life—were held. The bridge, though narrow and steep, was safely passed, and the boys of Ninety-Four went home for a few months with happy hearts, knowing that their time would come in the fall, and that they would wreak vengeance on the succeeding class for all the sorrows and troubles of their Freshman career. . At the opening of the Sophomore year over a dozen new men came to share the fortune of Ninety-Four. Again were our boys prominent in athletics. To the ’Varsity Football Team we furnished the Captain, and, under his guidance, it defeated Mercer to the tunc of oO to 0. The third act of the drama began in September, ’02. lint little was done this year in athletics, on account of resolutions ) a sed by th Board of Trustees, which forbade inter-collegiate games. These restrictions were removed, however, at their next meeting, and the season of ’93 and !94 opened under the most favorable auspices. Each of the classes organized a football team. The picked men of these were chosen as a College team—Ninety-Four furnishing four out of the eleven. The class team of Ninety-Four defeated the .Juniors, with a score of twelve to six. The other classes were saved from a similar fate only bv an agreement of the Captains to leave off the rest of the class games, for the purpose of devoting all time and energy toward training and perfecting the 'Varsity team. Such has been the history of Ninety-Four. When this brief encomium reaches the eyes of the public, the class will have had one of the brightest and gayest Commencement seasons in years. Away from the Alma Mater, in the hands of the world, they will take the world into their hands, fill the big offices of the land, and rule with such power and wisdom that all will exclaim, “Great is the Class of Ninety-Four!” The Historian. 29) Tim Ji sior’s Drkam.T he Junior. Who’s called the pride of Tv. C. I.? Who wrings from maids in town a sigh— A killing glance in either eye? The Junior. To whom is sent by Kale and John A billet-doux entitled dun, Until it ceases to be fun? The Junior. Who always, is at chapel found, Attentive so to every sound, He wouldn’t turn his head around ? The Junior. Who thinks of course lie knows the rule By which the kindly Prof, to fool, And then returns to summer school ? The Junior. Who see within the Future’s glass Themselves the greatest Senior Class That e’er did through the college pass? The Juniors. A. (31) :Glass of Qinety- iue y®u. Kali! Rah!! Rah!!! Sizz! Boom! Ah! Ninety-live! Ninety-five! Rah ! Rah!! Rah !!! Golors. Black and Maroon, flower. Sunflower. Joel J. Gibson, William L. Kemp, . Charles E. Brand, Frank V. Bean, . Ralph (). Cochran, E. E. Murphby, . . W. P. G KARR ELD, . Lindsley Halsey, . E. M. Gammon, Officers. ..........................President. .....................Vice-President. ..........................Secretary. ............................Treasurer. ..........................Historian. ............Captain Football Team. . . . . Manager Football Team. ................Captain Baseball Team. ..............Manager Baseball Team. (82)Junior David Crenshaw liar row, 4tb - .U£. . A. B.. . Pelham. frank Willis Bean Clinton, 8. C. James C. C. Black, Jr . .A. B. . Augusta. Charles Edgar Brand . Logansville. Robert Manning Butler • . . • . A. B. James Henry Butncr . s s . . . A. B. . Macon. Hawes Cloud . A. B. . Thomson. Ralph Owen Cochran . A.B . . Palmetto. Carlos Ford Dodd . Ford. Edward Emmet Dougherty . X ♦. . B. S. . . Atlanta. James Thomson Dunlap . . . .♦AO . . B. S. . . Gainesville. Henry Han sell Ezzard .... . B. S. . . Vickery Creek. Arthur Flatau . B. S. • . Athens. Van Fletcher . A. B. lvdward Montague Gammon . B. 8. . . Romo. William Pendleton Gearreld . . A T A. . . B. 8. . . Xewnan. Joel Jacobus Gibson . A T A. . . B. S. . Xewnan. Moses Guyton I.indstey Halsey .IX. . . li. 8. . Charleston, 8.C Walter Alexander Harris. . . . X ■ . . . . A. B. . . Macon. Gordon Hiles B. S. . . Borne. (3 Glass Samuel Garnett Hunter. . . . Athens. Frank Staadifer Jones . A. B. . Blakely. William Larkin Kemp . . . . A. B. . . Albany. John White Morton . K A. . . A. B. . . Athens. Eugene Edmund Murphey • . X 0. . . . B. S. ■ . Augusta. Osborne Brevard Niabet - - . . A. B. • . Eaton ton. Frederick Joseph Orr . ♦ a o. B. E. . . Athens. Samuel Lumpkin Olive. . . . .SAB . . A. B. . . Lexington. James Henry Porter . x +.. A. B. . . Atlanta. George Walton Reab .... . A T A. . . B. S. . . Augusta. Robert Archibald Ridley . . . . X . . . B. S. . . LaGrange. Oscar Leslie Rogers . B. S. . . Milledgeville. Laetus San dere . B. S. . . Pen field. Linton Stephens Sehnau . . . . B. E. . . Villa Rica. George Owen Shackelford. . . . 2 N. . . . b. f;. . . Jefferson. Perry Joshua Shearouse. . • ■ Archibald Smith . Athens. Joseph Grinith Smith .... . Tallahassee,Fla. Henry Hegner Steiner . . . . . S A E. . . A. B. . Augusta. Grantham Israel Taggert, Jr. { istory of Hinety Fi 6- N attempting to give only a mere idea of the (’lass of Ninety-Five, a a class, with a few events connected with its history, such a brilliant lustre clusters around her jxist that the historian, conscious of his own inability to do her justice, with reluctance takes up his pen to tell of her history—unexcelled in the past, and with a bright future. Our remarkable aptness to learn, and studious habits, have endeared us to professors and students alike. Verily, the days when Rome was in the zenith of her glory, and “to be a Roman was greater than a king,” is produced in miniature in the Class of Ninety-Five, for it is only necessary to state that you arc a member of Ninety-Five to command the highest respect. The Professors all agreed that ours was the l est class that ever entered the I'niversitv, and we have upheld our prestige. Of the fifty-two that registered in onr Freshman Class only nineteen original ones remain. The inexorable decree of time has caused some to fall by the wayside, some to give up in despair, and the Almighty, in his beneficent wisdom, has summoned three of our brightest members to “That undiscovered country from whose bourn No traveler returns.” lint reinforced in our Sophomore year by eleven, and in our Junior by six, we now number 36 loyal members. While in our ranks the brain of a Shakctsjieare or a Milton has not been revealed, yet Ninety-Five claims a man the literary peer of any undergraduate. We have reaped our share of the honors. Last year we were represented by a champion debater. This year one of our number was the editor-in-chief of the Magazine. We also have a representative on the Red and Black. Curability is best shown in the halls of the literary societies, where the eloquent voices and convincing logic of the members of Ninety-Five have never been equaled. As for politicians we arc as numberless as the stars, as the sands of the seashore. It has already been predicted that we will have the first Representative in the Georgia Legislature, and when his candidacy shall have lieen announced, each of (34)us will enlist himself uudcr his banner, mul crown his ambition with success. We present the greatest variety of men of any class, having a preacher, the tallest man and the largest man in College. Poets, orators, hard students, or athletes, do not alone constitute our class, hut we possess them all in a remarkable degree. And no douht the success of the Glee Club ami the Thalian Dramatic Club is due, to a great extent, to the efforts of Ninety-Five. On the field Ninety-Five is the pride of all. In our Freshman year we marched off victoriously with the | ciiuunt. Last year fate decreed that we should -come second. One of our members is honored with the responsible position of Captain of the ’Varsity baseball team, and another is Manager. In football three out of eleven places on the “’Varsity” team were filled by Ninety-Five, ami it is a recognized fact that in the victories of the “’Varsity” over Furman University, Augusta and Savannah, much of the credit belongs to us. Though a number of athletes have fallen out, our prestige is still recognized by all. In conclusion, kind reader, judge not too harshly this imperfect narrative of a class, characterized alike by their lofty character and purity of thought, tor the fault rests in the historian. When the subject i one’s class, it is commonly thought that siijierfluous praise is engaged in, and events magnified, and faults unobserved. If such has been my failing, my prnver is for light, that I may see the unvarnished truth. Historian. (!») C£HErA! U N ivb F.r rN XTHE.N3, LIBRARY OP GtOK«.iAT'be Sophomore Oh, how did he ever from the Freshman Class escape, Is a tiling that we all would like to know, For excepting self-esteem, his freshness is the same That it was in the days a year ago. He may smoke a cigarette with a liner air of grace, He may get excused from drill with greatei ease, And, to Doctor’s swell receptions, may be more often bid, But show his gain in knowledge, if you please. For the faculty were dreaming when they said that ho could rise If wisdom is the test on which they pass, For his emeraldine ways are as verdant as of yore, •lust intensified by egotistic brass. ’Tis his pride to make the Freshman’s lifea nuisance and a bore By plaguing him with every sort of prank, But it comes from secret fear which he knows is grounded well, That they’ll class him in the very self-same rank. So the unregenerate fieshness of the Sophomoric lad Strong witness to this simple fact doth bear, That his present name’s inaccurate—it really ought to be The second-handed Freshman from last year. (17)Glass of ninety »§ix Yell. Hi! Yl! Yi! Yi! X! C! V! I! Hi! YI! YI! Yi! Georgia! (Jolorn. Navy Blue and White, flower. Buttercup. Holcombe Bacon, .i. W. Griffith, . T. . Da niki,, . Henry Htli.yer, Siiihi,ky Brooks, C. A. Fleming, . Siiiki.ky Brooks, . 1 . P. Ezei.lk, . I Ioi.comr.K Bacon, Qfficers. ..........................President. .......................Vice-President. •.........................Secretary. ............................Treasurer. ..........................Historian. .............Captain Baseball Team. ...............Manager Baseball Team. .............Captain Football Team. ...............Manager Football Team.Sophomore GlQSS Holcombe Bacon . X «• . . . A. B. . . DeWitt. Craig Barrow . X A K. . . A. B. . Savannah. Homer Van Valkenberg Black . X t . . . A. B. . Atlanta. Hilbert Hillhouse Boggs. . A. B. . . Athens. Thomas Richmond Boggs . . . . A. B. . Athens. Shirley Brooks .♦AO. . . A. B. . Atlanta. Thomas Harknesa Buttrill . . .ATI!,. . A. B. . . Jackson. Charles C. Carson Frank Abbot Carter William Wilson Chandler . . . AT U. . . A. B. . . Girth. David Thomas Clark . K A . . . A. B. . . Atlanta. John Oliver Cook • XX.. . B. S. . . Pooler. George Shaw Crane . Athens. William Remshart Dancy. . . . EA K . B. S. . - Savannah. Thomas Zachariah Daniell . . Frank Hamilton Bearing. . . . X ♦ . . . B. S. . . Athens. Robert Daniell Draper .... .EAE . . B. E. . . Atlanta. Percy Powell Ezclle . K A . . . B. S. - . Eaton ton. Claud Anderson Fleming . . . K A . . B. E. . . Augusta. Arthur Preston Flowers. - . . James Walter Griffith .... John Gerdine, Jr.. . . . . .EAE . . B. E. . . Athens. Heywood Shepherd Hauseli . X ♦ . . A. B. - . Atlanta. Henry Hlllyer.................. - a E . . B. 8. • • Augusta. Carl Hamilton Holden............A T A. , .A. B. . . Crawfordvlllc. George Pearce Hunt............................A. B. . . Cedartown. Henry Robert Hunt.....................A. B. . . Cedartown. Kiclmrd Stuart Hunter...........X 1 . . . It. S. . . Winchester.Vn. George Fletcher Hurt.................. ■ B. E. . . Atlanta. Merrll Oscar Hutcheson........................A. It. . West Point. Robert Hatton Lovejoy ... .EX . B. K. . . Athens. James Audley Morton..............K A . . . It. 6. ■ . Athens. Thomas Albert Neal............................A. B. . . Banksvllle. Edward Stephens O’Brien, Jr. . A T A. It. S. . . Barnett. Muston Emmet O’Neal.............A T li. . A. It. . . Bainbridge. Elton Smith Osborne............SaB . . It. S. . . Savannah. James Oliver Pettis...........................A. B. . . Jeffersonville. William M. Pettis............................ A. B. . . Athens. John Green Pittman..............♦ AO. . A. It. . . Thomasvllle. Lewis Edmund Powell..............A T Q. . . B. S. . - Waynesboro. Frank C. Richmond.............. X A K. . . B. S. • • Savannah. Edwin Cabell R.vals...........EAE. . B. S. - Savannah. Tolbert Fanning Smith.........................It. S. . - Sandhill . James Madison Stephenson, Jr..................A. It. . . Oxford, Ala. Herbert William Stubbs . . . . K A. . . A. B. . - Cedartown. Albert K. Thornton............................B. S. . - Columbus. (39{ istory of [7inety -Six. !!i) Macaui.ay has said, in one of itis essays on history, that the pcr-fcct historian is the one who relates no facts and attributes no expression to his characters which are not authenticated by sufficient testimony, and in whose work the character and spirit of an age is exhibited in miniature. Thus it is that the historian of the Class t Ninety-Six will attempt to write. The character and spirit of the past year shall be exhibited in miniature only, for the achievements of this class have been so great that should they be shown otherwise, they would go beyond the limit of belief. Neither will he relate any fact, nor give any expression to his characters that is not proven hv sufficient testimony. Where truth abounds such prevarications are not necessary. The (-’lass of Ninety-Six has done well- 1" nil branches of College life it has carried off its full share of honors. At every meeting of the literary societies may be heard the stentorian voice of some Sophomore, tearing in pieces and throwing to the winds the arguments of Freshmen, .Juniors. Seniors, and even lawyers, making them only a mass of thoughtless nonsense, and leaving their owners with a lot of confused and chaotic ideas. As presiding officers their dignity is something surprising, and their decisions arc fair, just, unprejudiced, and given only after due thought and consideration of the discussion. In athletics they rank from the strongest to the weakest. In the “gym.” they arc equal to any. In the class games of football they won every game they played and didn’t loose a point. On the College team they had four members, all of whom made handsome records. lit society they do well. They can walk as slow by Luoy Cobb as anybody, and the girls say their way of making love is something real cute, and the rapidity ami business-like manner with which they go about it is awfully nice. As dancers, musicians and seronaders they have a very wide reputation. In the recitation room they arc so orderly and attentive- (40)that the Professors are always glad to see them. With attention at good, booking at very good, and recitation at excellent, they equal, if they do not surpass, any of the other classes. So far the reader lias only seen the sunshine. Dark clouds arc sure to sail over the clearest and brightest sky. Ninety-Six has had, among all its sunshine, some dark and stormy clouds to hover over it, and threaten its destiny, for the members of Ninety-Six find great sport in booking, and, pushed on by the desire for mischief, they will cut. The “reception,” too, is sometimes an attraction. But, with all our good and bad works, another year has come and gone. The half of our College course is finished. Have we done well? Yes, and better still, for since the launching of our ship in September, wc have .sailed her successfully. Smoothly has she glided through the seas of knowledge, and easily ridden the billows of opposition. With her prow of determination she has ploughed deep into the waters of learning, and though tossed by the storms of discouragement, and threatened by the rocks of temptation, she sails serenely on. Hold to the wheel, boys. Keep her rudder straight. Ix?t her sails Ik?ever outspread, catching the winds that drive us continually on to a higher education. And when at last we shall have completed the entire journey, let us weigh the anchor of hope that the future will be as well, as good and as prosperous as the years of ninety-three and ninety-four. Historian. 11The Ur The Seniors’ Tree and Dei-five it of its Christening Fi.uid.‘fhe freshmen What causcth thee, my little man, to weep ? Come, leave thy tears, and sit upon mv knee— Here, take a handkerchief, and dry thine eyes, And now confide thy troubles all to me. Have they unkindly hit thee with a stone Kor playing marbles on the baseball ground, And said thy head, when by the missile struck, Gave forth an echoinglv hollow sound ? Perhaps thou hast been handed a cigar, Which secretly thou didst attempt to smoke? Thou should remember when they give thee such Tis less a favor than a cruel joke. Or say they that thy class clap is so loud Its echo can l c heard for quite a way, And did it not thy manners match so well, They could not let thee wear it for a day ? Or have they made a rule at Luev Cobh That nothing less than Sophs can walk thereby? 1 know that this would grieve thy very soul— Thou say’st ’tis none of these that make thee erv Then ’twas the gravest danger of them all That did thv little Freshman’s life inclose— Thus be thou warned, in spite'of all we do The college old maid sometimes will propose.Glass of Hinety-ge ?en yen. Ninety-Seven! Hip! Hooray! G-E-O-K-G-I-A ! Georgia! Golors. Black and Orange, flower. Daisy. Qfficers. Walter S. Cothran,...................................President. Ben Crane,......................................Vice-President. Frank K. Boland,.......................Secretary and Treasurer. Walker White,........................................Historian. F. Chisolm Ferrbli.....................Captain Football Team. Pinckney A. Steiner,.....................Manager Football Team. Rogers B. Davis,.........................Captain Baseball Team. Frank L. Fleming.........................Manager Baseball Team. (+ T'be freshman GlQSS John Addison Warwick.................B. K. . . Atlanta. Frank Kells Boland..........X + . . . A. B. . . Atlanta. Early Winn Worn......................A. B. . . Norcross. .lames Dowse Bradwell . . . A 0. . . A. B. . . Atlanta. Steiner Branch.......................A. B. . . Ber elia. George E. Cato .............X . . A. B. . Plains. Hersehel Virgil Clanton............A. B. . . Ellavllle. Henry Gratton Colvin . . . -AK. . A. B. . . Atlanta. William Amos Cook .... . . B. S. . . Pooler. William Sullivan Cothran. . - A K . . B. S. • . Home. Benjamin Albert Crane................B. S. . . Athens. Oscar Alexander Crittenden.. A © . . A. B. . Skelmau. Robert John DoLoach..................A. B. . . Bloys. Roger Burton Davis..............UK. . h. S. • . Covington. Henry Dodd.....................X + . . A. B. . Ford. Charles Wellborn DuBose...............B. 8. ■ . Athens. Marion Durrell DuBose ...............A. B. . . Athens. Samuel Candler Dunlap, Jr. . ♦ A 0 . B. E. . . Gainesville. Howell Cohb Erwin....................A. B. . Athens. William Brosius Fender . . .X X . . A. B. . . Valdosta. FortuneChlsoloi Ferrell ... X . A. B. . . LaG range. Frank I imar Fleming........X + . . A. B. . Atlanta. Charles Henry Floyd.........K A . A. B. . . Apalachicola, Fla. Darwin Beujnniln Franklin.............A. B. . . 8tatesborough. Russell Wilber Gnihain................A. B. . . Fayetteville. Malvern T. Halsey . . . X . . B. E. • . Charleston, S. C. James Walter Hendricks. . A. B. . . Bloys. Perry Nance Hill . . . X . . B. E. . . Columbus. Isaac Jones Hofl'meyer . . . A. B. . . Albany. William Washington larson . A. B. . . Pembroke. Lucius Arthur Lindsay . . . B. E. . . Crystal Springs. Oscar Lyndon B. S. . . Athens. Charles Allen Mize . Harmony Grove. Albert Burton Mobley . . . A T Q . . . A. 1$. . . Monroe. William Lorenze Moss . . Athens. Charles Hugh N’cisler . . ■ . A. B. . . Butler. Ulrich B. Phillips . A T 0 . . . A. B. . . LaG range. Rufus King Reaves, Jr.. . . . B. E. . . Athens. Carl Denham Banders. . ■ . ♦ A 0. . . A. B. . . Pen field. Pinckney Steiner . 2 A E . . B. 8. • . Augusta. Harvey Stovall . Athens. Stephen Willis Thorntou . . X . . . B. 8. . . I Grange. Albert L. Tidwell . A T A. . . A. B. . . Atlanta. George Thomas Traylor . B. Ag. . Gabbettsvllle. Richard F. Watts, Jr. . . . Lumpkin. Robert Eggleston White . . A. B. . . Butler. Walker White . A. B. . . Forsyth. William Ixjwndes Yancey. . . A T A . . B. E. . . Athens. Leo Wellhousc . Atlanta. (46)f)istory of GlQss 'C)7. s September 20, 1893, the University of Georgia opened its doors and began the session of 1893-94. This event, though at the time it excited no particular attention, is destined to adorn a bright page in the history of our State. Perhaps this statement may seem startling to those unacquainted with the facts, but a word of explanation, and all is plain—it marked the beginning of the Class of Ninety-Seven. When this Class first met it gave promise of becoming the best in the University, but it has excelled even the most sanguine hopes of its friends and admirers. 11 has been strengthened numerically from time to time, and, with the valuable assistance of the Faculty, its members have added to their store of knowledge, until now it is acknowledged by all to be the leading Class of the University of Georgia. The first week of the fall term was devoted to politics, but when the Class officers had been elected and a majority of the Class had taken their “ turning," they gave themselves up to the business of making a record and “ thereby hangs a tale.” In athletics Freshmen have taken a prominent stand. We were allowed to meet only one team, the Sophomore, on the football gridiron. True, we were defeated by that team, but the defeat was probably due to our over-confidence. Tlu other classes saved themselves from an ignominious defeat at the hands of the Freshman team by deciding not to play the remaining class games. We aided the “ arsity’ team by furnishing two substitutes. In baseball we intend to stand at the top, and doubtless the end of the season will find our team near the top and struggling hard for tin championship. On field day we intend to show the great athletic ability of Freshmen by feats which will surprise the higher Classmen and astonish even the Lawyers. Socially we are as popular as anybody. Although, a a ( 8)rule, Freshmen sire too much devoted to their book to go in society, yet those who do indulge in social pleasures take a leading place. As an evidence of our popularity, we need only refer to the number of Freshmen who attend the Chancellor’s monthly reception and the Commandant’s receptions on drill evenings. Our record in politics is well known. In the Literary Societies we have held, at some time, almost every office, and the election of any officer of the Freshman Class is an exciting event. In the class room onr record is one of which we are proud. We have studied and toiled, not for our own glory, but that, we may be a credit and honor to our State. Some of u intend to be Congressmen, while others, sad to relate, may some day be members of the State legislature. If our career in alter life be as bright as wo intend our college career to be, there is no honor for which, with hopes of success, we may not aspire. In the College Orchestra, in the Glee ( lab, in the Literary Societies and in every organization where talent is recognized, we have been well represented. What ('lass can show a better record ? Yet college life has not l een a bed of roses for the average Freshman. Hard work has fallen in the path of most of them. « A few, from sickness and other causes, have been forced to leave us, but in the Fall, strengthened in numbers, we will make the campus ring with Ninety-seven ! Hip! Hooray! G - E - O - K - G - I - A! Georgia. If the Historian unintentionally lias failed to keep within the limits of truth, his only excuse is that in his endeavor to do justice to such an inspiring theme he may have failed to see the limits. When so many truthful statements ean he made which are favorable to us there can be no excuse for intentional exaggeration. If any have formed the idea, from reading this Class History, that Freshmen are conceited, we beg leave to undeceive them. This apparent conceit is caused by the fact that, as every cloud has a silver lining, whenever a cloud existed, we have endeavored to push back the dark face and show only the silver lining. Such has been the past History of the Class of Ninety-Seven; time alone will reveal the future. As it lies before the Historian, bright with great achievements, he is tempted to reveal it ; but no, that would be unfair to his successors. To these shall he left the pleasant task of relating how the future has kept the promises which the past has made. ') Historian. ■yT'be Lawyer. Behold the flower of all the flock, the erudite student Of law, Whose laudable aim is to rise in the world by the resonant clank of I I is jaw. He carries a cane wherever he goes, to add to his Dignity rare, But the Freshman’s his chum, and his innocent wavs have a painfully Grassy-green air. For lie cannot play cards, lie’s a novice at pool—raise your hands all who this Do believe— But his knowledge of law is so deep and profound as these minor defects To retrieve. So drink with me, then, to the bright legal light—since he scruples to drink For himself— With a hope from our hearts that his talents and tongue will never repose on The shelf.Caw Glass y«u. Nicky! Ilickv! Ki! Ki! Mucky! Mucky! Kay! I! To! My! Orjr! I ory! Mucky! Dory! Kay! I! Colors. Black and White, flower. Whito Roaabud. Geo. V. Young, II. C. Strong, H. D. Hush,. . 1 K. Lrotkii, . (.'. II. Smith, Jit., .1. C. Mki.i., . S. 0. Cpsox, . . 0fficers. ...........................President. ........................Vice-President. . . . •....................Historian. ...........................Treasurer. .............................Secretary. ...............Captain Baseball Team. ................Manager Baseball Team. mRoll of S dents in the Cavv) School 1893-’9 Robert Durell Rush . . . Augustin Dennis Duly . Charles 0. Fink lea . . . Charles Thomson Haskell Charles David Kline . . . Jefferson Davis Lanier . l’haros Rufus Lester . . . (iabriel Pierce Martin . James Cooper Mel 1. . . Frank Mitchell......... John Homer Mobley . . 2 X . . . Camilla. A T U . . Macon. a «. . . Savannah. s: x . . . Savannah'. s: a k. . . Athens. • Cruwfordville. K A . • . Lumber City. Barrett Phiul .y .... Charles Henry Smith, Jr. Klcazar Joshua Stafford David Samuel Sterling . Hugh Calvin Strong . . Stephen Cummins Upson James Quinton Wallace . I.ouis Bacon Warren . . John White Welsh . . . George Young.............. . . . . Athens. .......Buford. .......Tarbo rough. S AJv . . Atoka, Tenu. .......Atoka, Tenu. .......Athens. - N . . . Albany. K A . . . Macon. K A . . . Athens. .......McLain, X. Dak.f istory of the Caw GlQSS- UKyino the trumpet call of outraged justice, and vowing vengeance upon her adversaries, a number of young men embraced her cause, and the better to prepare themselves for the conflict with the world, the flesh and the devil, matriculated at the University of Georgia. At the opening of the Fall Session these were few in number, but formed a nucleus that by numerous later additions lias grown to almost double its former size, and forms one of the brightest and best, if not the largest class, that ever graced the city of Athens with its lordly presence. Georgia, our own well-beloved, is well represented and her pristine honor and dignity well sustained by her noble sons of noble sires, while from Canada, Mexico, Dakota, South Carolina and Tennessee come the pick and flower of their chivalry to identify their interests with ours. One comrade, to our sorrow, has fallen by the way and is with us no more, having acceded to the urgent request of King Tillman to become bis Koval Counselor and Adviser. May success be bis, and may lie, in the near future, honor us as we hope to honor him. In every line of college work and pleasure, the representatives of the Law Class stand among the foremost. Ours are the best and deepest students; ours the best athletes; ours the dead-game sports; ours the pets and darlings of society. Among us are to be found men of all ages, sizes and conditions. The frolicsome youth and the beardless youngster of eighteen years, ami the mature, but jolly, old man of forty, who, like Uncle Ned, has no hair on the top of his head ; the delver in the bidden stone of psychology and philosophy, the student of deep, ethical problems; and the staid, matter-of-fact man; the argumentator, the predestination 1st and the man of free will; the flowery, eloquent and the practical business man ; the timid and retiring youth and the gay and careless sjKirt; the woman-hater and the woman-lover; yet are they all diamonds of the lirst water, in the rough, perhaps, hut when polished by rubbing against the world will dazzle the senses of the | eople by their lustrous brilliancy. The earnest and well directed efforts of our instructors have (62)been heartily seconded, and the Class. while progressing rapidly, has gained a thorough knowledge of the principles of law. Xot content with this, hut desirous of better fitting themselves for their vocation, the members of the class organized among themselves a debating society that has proven of great benefit to each member thereof. The stars that, in the horizon of public greatness, represent Toombs, Webster, Calhoun and that late, but brilliant star of Grady, have veiled themselves with the mist of obscurity since the advent of the Sun (of LAW, ’94.) The Moot Courts, presided over by their Honors, Judges Morris and Cobb, have proven successful beyond expectation. In the cases thus far tried there has been displayed no small amount of legal learning and address. The verdant Freshman, the all-wise Sophomore, the aspiring Junior and even the solemn and dignified Senior, listening in reverential awe to the soul-harrowing, hair-raising and ear-splitting appeals of the future Kernels, have been swayed by their magic eloquence, even as the saplings are bent by the wintry storm-blasts. Alas, for the day when Law ’94 shall receive their diplomas, and go forth into the world to punish wrong, to prevent injustice and uphold the right, but above all secure the cash— the just reward of their labors. Woe to the wretch who falls under the ban of their displeasure, for his life is short and his cash in the pocket of the lawyer. Verily, the sheep-stealer shall steal the little lamb, the lawyer shall recover the lamb and his lee shall be two sheep. The rich man diet!) and his heirs sue each other for his property, but they sue in vain, for it is become the possession of the lawyers. Men may have money and men may have property, but the lawyer gettcth it all after awhile. Justice must be done to (he poor and the rich, to the idler and laborer, to the merchant and farmer, to the innocent and criminal; but the lawyer’s pocket must be tilled thereby. So beware, ve wrong-doers, lest ye fall into the clutches of ’94 s Kernels. Historian.TUTORS.postgraduates and tutors. Harry Aaron Alexander, A. M., A. B., D......... • • • Atlanta, Ga. Tutor in Modern Languages. Edward Williamson Barnwell, M. S., B. S., D...........Athens, Ga- Ernest Brown, 0. E., ...............................Alliens, Ga. LouisCamak, C. E., B. E.,D............................Athens, Ga. Lynn V. Gerdlne, 1 K K A. M., A. B., I).......West Point, Miss. Greene Flournoy Johnson. A T a, A. M., A. B., P. Iv. . . . Montlcello, Ga. Tutor in F.uglish. Halcott C. Moreno, « A 0, A. M., A. B., I)......Gainesville, Ga. Tutor in Mathematics. Rufus Benjamin Galley, C. E., B. E., P. K. •......Villa Rica, Ga. Lester Cowdery Slade, X +, A. M., A. B., D............Carrollton, Ga. Tutor in Biology. •Left Collese. («) V)inter Gourse n Lgricuture. (.'eorge G. Brinson, Miller. Washington G. Cook, DanleNvl le. John Thomas Mathews, Thomson. David Crockett Pierce, Hen. James Hart .Sibley, X ❖, Union Point. Herbert Alphonse Williams, Gibson. Summary . Post Graduates.................................. . . i) Seniors.............................................. 20 Juniors •••... . . -31 Sophomores...................................... . . 33 Freshmen........................................ ■ ■ 40 Electives............................................ 36 Winter Course in Agriculture........................... i Law ................................................. 21 Total attendance at Athens.................... .211 (30)Plumber of Students in department. Metaphysics ami Ethics.................................51 Algebra................................................89 Plane and Solid Geometry...............................4!) Trigonometry...........................................44 Analytic Geometry......................................39 Calculus...............................................53 Physics and Astronomy..................................95 Mechanics and Astronomy.................................7 Physical Laboratory....................................43 F rench................................................57 German .................................................47 General Chemistry..................................... 51 Industrial Chemistry...................................20 Agricultural Chemistry.................................28 Chemical Laboratory................... Geology.............................. English............................... Botany............................... Vegetable Morphology and Physiology . Invertebrate Zoology................. Vertebrate Anatomy.................... Biological Laboratory................ Latin ................................ Greek................................ Engineering........................... Drawing.............................. History............................... Military Tactics ... ... 42 25 107 05 13 12 6 88 125 48 36 57 104 125 (67)0up T lumni. Ifthk purpose of an institution of higher education, under the control of the State, is the training of citizens for that State in all the walks of life, surely the University of Georgia has well fulfilled her mission. Though she has struggled for over a century against abuse and calumny, with slender resources and poor equipment, it has been her proud privilege to give to the State a few of those great names “that were not born to die ’ and to give, besides, a host of men who, in every calling, have well illustrated her teachings, and repaid a thousand-fold all the benefits conferred on them by the State. It is greatly to be regretted that better statistics of the Alumni of the University have not been collected. One who would write on this subject must rely on the Centennial Catalogue, which is necessarily very incomplete, and even where complete very condensed. Hut even with these meagre statistics the attempt to confine an article to the limits of this publication becomes almost impossible. Single names occur on which volumes have been written. Many things of interest strike even the cursory render as he glances over the pages of this modest Catalogue. He sees names ranging from the Vice-President ot the Confederate States through all the grades of (mlitical honors, Cabinet Officers, United and Confederate Stutes Senators, United and Con- ( 0 federate States Representatives, Senators and Representatives of the State of Georgia, Mayors and Councilmen of cities without number, l ie sees judicial officers ranging all the way from Justices of the Supreme Court down. He sees military officers ranging from Major-General down to the humble but heroic private, and reads again and again the ennobling words “killed in battle.” He sees the significant blank under the years 1861 and 1865. He sees the names of great divines, whose godliness and eloquence have made their names famous throughout the church : great teachers, whose fame is bounded not even by this continent ; journalists, whose pensand tongues have led public opinion on the great questions that have confronted the nation ; and men of administrative ability, who have done much to make good Georgia’s boast that she is the Umpire State of the South. No mention can be made of the large number who, though they have attained no eminence among their fellows, have yet, in humble but no less important positions, done well the work that lay before them, as industrious and patriotic citizens, to build up the waste places, and disseminate those germs of learning and culture which are here fostered. From the very first the University has given to the State men of prominence. The second name in this Catalogue isthat of Augustin S. Clayton, Judge of the Sii|)erior Court, member of the United States Congress. The same year furnished Williams Rutherford, who, after serving his State so well for so many years, now passes his honored old ngcquietly on the scene of his old labors, as Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. The record of the first ton years, 1801-IS PI, containing the names of G1 graduates, shows four Judges of the Superior Court, three members of Congress, one S|ieaker of the State House of Representatives, eleven members of the Board of Trustees, and four College Professors. And this proportion is well maintained in the records that follow. Merely to call the roll of distinguished names would almost fill the covers of this book, so that this rapid review must notice only a few of the most prominent. In 1821 occurs the name of E. A. Xisbet, Judge of the Supreme Court; in 1822 that of Wiley W. Mason, the distinguished Chancellor of the Supreme Court of Alabama; and in 1823 that of I verson L. Harris, another Judge of the Supreme Court. In 1826 occur the names of John A. Campbell, Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, and Assistant Secretary of the Confederate States; Chas. H. DuPont, of the Supreme Court of Florida, and Paul F. Eve, the distinguished surgeon and Professor of Surgery, with Robert Dougherty, Wm. E. Jones and James A. Meriwether, Judges of the Supreme Courts of Alabama, Texas and Georgia, respectively, and the two latter members of Congress. The year 182b was rich in teachers and preachers, comprising Nathaniel M. Crawford, President of Mercer University; Shnlcr G. Hillycr, (i Professor in tlie same; Richard I). Moore, Professor of Medical •Jurisprudence in this University; Geo. F. Pierce, Bishop of the Methodist F.piscopal Church; Thomas I-'. Scott, Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church; John X. Waddell,Chancellor of the University ot Mississippi, and John B. Trippe, Treasurer of the State. In 1832 graduated James Johnson, Provisional Governor of Georgia, and Alexander 11. Stephens, member of Congress, Vice-President of the Confederate States, again member of Congress and Governor, statesman and orator. In 1833 John J. Gresham, the late distinguished Pres-ident of the Board of Trustees. In 1834 we have again two Governors: Howell Cobb, member of Congress for many years, Secretary of the United States Treasury, President of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States, who rose from the rank of Colonel to that of Major-General in the Confederate States army; and ilerschel V. Johnson, also member of Congress, Judge of the Su| erior Court, and Governor. In 1835 graduated Crawford W. ls ng, for whom is claimed, and ju-tly, the distinguished honor of being the discoverer ol amesthesia. In 1830 occurs the name of Benjamin ('. Yancey, member of the Legislatures of South Carolina, Alabama and Georgia, and Minister to the Argentine Confederation; in 1837 James Jackson, member of Congress and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court; and in 1838 Isaiah T. Irvin, Speaker of the House; John LeContc, the distinguished Professor of Physics, and sometime President of the University of California, and Bcnj. W. Palmer, Pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of New Orleans, and one of the most eloquent, influential and distinguished ministers of that powerful denomination. In 1839 Alexander M. Speer and Robert I . Trippc, Justices of the Supreme Court. In 1841 the gallant T. R. R. Cobb, Brigadier-General C. S. A., and Joseph LeConte, the distinguished Professor of Geology in the University of California. And so this list might he extended indefinitely. We will mention only J)r. J. I . M. Curry, Trustee of the Peabody Fund; Benjamin II. llill, the distinguished orator and U. S. Senator; N. J. Hammond, the present distinguished President. of the Board of Trustees; James H. Blount, who served his Slate so well in Congress for many years that friends and political enemies united in an unexampled ovation when he retired; A. O. Bacon and Pope Barrow, the former for many years a member of the Legislature and S| eaker of that body, and the latter I ". S. Senator; Malcolm Johnston, the well-known litterateur, and Henry W. Grady, journalist and orator, whose untimely death was, and is still, so universally mourned. This list is so for from being exhaustive that great injustice is done to many men whose services have been no less valuable and no less appreciated by their State. But the claim has been made that the University has outlived her usefulness, and no longer sends out men fitted to become leaders of the people. A single glance will show how untenable this position is: one of her sons is President of the Senate of Georgia; another the Speaker of the House, whose (6 predecessor was also an Alumnus; four of her largest newspapers, and dozens of her smaller ones, are managed by Alumni—while the names of Blount, Hammond, Bacon, Barrow, Thomas, and a host ol others now living, and the rolls of her Representatives in the Legislature, attest her influence in the Suite. And this is not all. Even her younger Alumni arc rapidly pushing to the front, as is attested by the number who are elected to positions of responsibility and honor. When we contrast the small number of the citizens of Georgia who are trained in the I'niversity with the large number of her Alumni who rise to prominence, we must admit that the University has repaid many times the small debt she owes the State. A most pleasing fact is the interest the Alumni feel in their Alma Mater, as is attested by the number banded together in the Alumni Associations throughout the State. The greatest credit is due Major P. W. Meldrim, of Savannah, for the interest he has taken in these Associations, and if his efforts are seconded as they should be the united body of Alumni will make an impress on the State that will silence all op|H -sition. The claim is not made that every man who graduates at the University becomes famous, but it may truly Ik said of her, that while many colleges can claim more Alumni, few can claim more who have risen to high places of honor. «)lyvThJE. Of DE.R Op'Sigma T lpba Gpsilon fraternity . Founded at the University of Alabatnu !u 1856. A. L. Hull, C. A. Scudder, A. L. Mitchell, L. H. Charbonuier, Jr., Clias. I. Mell, It. B. Russell, James O. Mell, D. C. Barrow, 3d, G. P. Butler, D. 0. Barrow, 4th, Edward Ryato, Craig Barrow, Jno. Gerdino, W. K. Dancy, Beta Chapter Established 1SG6. Fratres in Urbe. Itev. C. W. Lane, D.l)., Arthur F. tatlmer, Tbos. S. Mell, E. W. Charbonuier, I’M ward B. Mell, Chas. H. Phiuizy, Fratres in Facultatc. L. H. Charbonnier, A.M., Ph.D. Law Class. Class of Ninety-Four. W. A. Wilkins, Jr., E. C. Upson, Class of Ninety-Five. H. H. Steiner, Class of Ninety-Six. Class of Ninety-Seven. W. W. Thomas, Joseph Hodgson, G. C. Hamilton, John I). Mell, Robert Hodgson. D. S. Sterling. N. McH. Moore. S. L. Olive. E. S. Osborne, R. D. Draper, I C. Richmond, Heury Hlllyor. Left College. R. B. Davie, Geo. T. Jackson, Walter S. Cothran, (62) P. A. Steiner,' Harvey Stovall, H. G. Colvin.Vpsoo. ‘91, narrow, 91, Klchmomi,'tv. Butler, "91, Moore, '»l, Sterling(Law). Steiner, TO, K. Moll, Stovall, 1 7, Barrow, MV. Hillvcr, "HO, Dancy, J. Mell (I-twi. ltyals, vl. Barrow, IS, Jackson, -07, CoUirun, ’! 7, Davis, •«, Osborne, ’t«, Colvin, tiT. Steiner, V7. Draper, t«.§igma 7Uf ba Cpsilon Fraternity. ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. Alpha Province. Grand Chapter—Massachusetts Beta Utwllon. Massachusetts Beta Upsilon.............Boston University, Boston. Massachusetts Gamma............Harvard University, Cambridge. Massachusetts Iota Tau . . Mass. Institute of Technology, Boston. Connecticut Alpha........................Trinity Collego, Hartford. Beta Province. Grand Chapter—Pennsylvania Omega. New York Alpha.............................Cornell University, Ithaca. Pennsylvania Alpha Zeta .... Penn. State College, State College. Pennsylvania Omega...............Allegheney College, Meadvllle. Pennsylvania Delta..............Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg. Pennsylvania Sigma Phi...............Dickinson College, Carlisle. Gamma Province. Grand Chapter- Georgia Beta. Virginia Omioron..............................University of Virginia. South Carolina Gamma...............Woli'ord College, Spartanburg. Virginia Sigma . . . Washington and l.ee University, Lexington. South Carolina Mu..........................Krskine College, Due West. North Carolina Xi. . . . University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Georgia Beta...................University of Georgia, Athens. North Carolina Theta.................Davidson College, Davidson. Georgia Psi..........................................Mercer University, Macon. South Carolina Delta..........South Carolina College, Columbia. Georgia Epsilon...............................Emory College, Oxford. South Carolina Phi...................Furman University, Greenville. Georgia Plii...........Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta. Deha Province. Grand Chapter—Ohio Sigma. Michigan Iota Beta............University of Michigao, Ann Arbor. Ohio Epsilon......................University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati. Michigan Alpha...........................Adrian College, Adrian. Ohio Theta........................Ohio State University, Columbus. Oblo Sigma...........................Mt. Union College, Alliance. Indiana Alpha ..........................Franklin College, Franklin. Ohio Delta....................Oblo Wesleyan University, Delaware. Indiana Beta.........................Perdue University, LaFayette. Epsilon Province. Grand Chapter—Tennessee Zeta. Kentucky Kappa .....................Central University, Richmond. Tennessee Omega.............University of tbo South, Sewanee. Kentucky Iota........................Bethel College, Russellville. Tennessee Eta.........Southwestern Baptist University, Jackson. Tennessee Zeta . Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarksville. Alabama Mu................................University of Alabama. Tennessee Lambda..............Cumberland University, Lebanon. Alabama Iota..............................Southern University, Greensboro. Tennessee Nu.................... Vanderbilt University, Nashville. Alabama Alpha Mu...........Alabama A. nnd M. College, Auburn. Tennessee Kappa...............University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Mississippi Gamma................................University of Miss. Zeta Province. Graud Chapter—Iowa Sigma. Iowa Sigma..........................Simpson College, Indianola. Missouri Beta ..................Washington University, St. Louis. Missouri Alpha................University of Missouri, Columbia. Nebraska Lambda Pi......................University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Eta Province. Grand Chapter—Colorado Alpha. Texas Rho............................ University of Texas, Austiu. Colorado Zeta.......................University of Denver, Denver. Colorado Chi.....................University of Colorado, Boulder. California Alpha..Leland Stanford, Jr., University, Palo Alto House. (65)Gbi Phi Founded at Princeton 1824. Eta Chapter Established 1807. Pratrcs in Urbc. M. Nicholson, Billups Pliinizy, 0. B. Grinith, Frank A. Lipscomb, William McDowell, Tom Stanley, Rutherford Lipscomb. W. McK. Cobb, J. H. Rucker, George Hodgson. Fratrcs in Facultate. II. C. White, Class of Ninety-Four. 1). C. Barrow. Win. B. Armstrong, Class of Ninety-Five. Paul L. Fleming. Walter A. Harris, Eugene E. Murphey, Robert A. Ridley, Henry Porter, Brevard Nlsbct. Edward Dougherty, Moses Guyton. Class of Ninety-Six. Holcombe Bacon, It. Stewart Hunter, Class of Ninety-Seven. Heywood Hnusell, Frank H. Hearing. Frank K. Boland, Chlsoloin Ferrell, Frank L. Fleming, Malvern Halsey, J. Hart Sibley. S. W. Thornton, Perry N. Hill. °Lcft College. (86)Halsey. '97, Dearine. '90. Dougherty. 'V . i Fleming '94. Guyton, '90, Ridley. 1 5, Harris. - X . Bacon. K 7, Thornton. '97, Steeply. Ferrell. ' . 7. Armstrong, '91, Liptcotnbc, ltlshop, NKbet,'!». Hill, "97, Sibley, '97. Porter. '9o. Hunter. '97. Fleming. 97. Hnn»ell,’96, Boland. '95. Murphey, -9i.Gbi Phi fraternity . ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. Alpha................................................University of Virginia. Beta................................ Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Gamma......................................................... Emory College. Delta................................................... Rutgers College. Epsilon . . .................. . . Hampdeu-Sidncy College. Zkta . . . Franklin and Marshall College. ETA................................................ University of Georgia. Tiieta ... . . Rensselaer Polytechnic institute. Iota.........................................................Ohio State College. Kappa........... ............... .............. . . Brown University. IiAMBjjjA..............................................University of California. Mu. ... .... Stevens Institute. Nu.........................................................University of Texas. Xi . . . . .... .... Cornell University. Omicron.................................. .... .... Yale University. Pi................................................ .... Vanderbilt University. Rtto...................................................... Lafayette College. Sigma............................................. ... . Wottbrd College. Tau....................................... . University of South Carolina. Pin..................................................... Amherst College. Chi.......................... . . . . . Ohio Wesleyan College. Psi................................'.....................Lehigh University. «0)Kappa ?Upba fraternity Founded at Washington and l,ee University 1S«7. Gumma. Chapter Established 1800. Fratrcs in Urbe. J. C. Bloomfield, F. S. Morton, K. K. Hodgson, Jr., G. J . Thomas, .1. I). Moss, W. Rowland, G. R. Nicholson, A. J. Cobb, C. P. Wilcox, Jr., B. F. Hardeman, Fratrcs in Facultatc. Harry Hodgson, Fitzgerald Greene. Sylvanus Morris, C. M. Strahan, C. P Wilcox, C. II. Herty, Jesse Coates, Law Class. S. C. Benedict. L. B. Warren, J. W. Welch, Class of Ninety-Four. J. H. Mobley, B. B. Bower, Jr., W. A. McDougald,’ J. M. Harrington, Jr. II. C. Brown, Edwin Davis, Class of Ninety-Five. Arthur Wrigley. J. C. C. Black, Jr., R. M. Butler, Jr., Class of Ninety-Six. J. W. Morton. 1 P. Ezelle, D. T. Clarke, C. A. Fleming, II. W. Stubbs, J. A. Morton. Clais of Ninety-Seven. C. H. B. Floyd. (70) •Left College. Floyd. '9‘. Butler, ‘Of . WriKler. '9t. Mobley (Law), Clark, •; . Darla, '.m, Black, ■», Morton, Brown, '•)«. E»llr. 'Of, Stubb . 'SO, Bower, 'll, llnrdcman. Warren (Law), Harrington. M. K. Morton. H. Hodgton, Morton, '90, Flcnalng. Welch (Law), E. Hodgiou.Kappa .Ipba fraternity. ROLL or ACTIVE CHAPTERS. Aijpha..........................Washington an«l Leo University, Lexington, Va. Sioma Davidson College, Mecklenburg County, N. C. Beta...................Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Va. UrsiLON . . . University of North Carolina, Cliaj el Hill, N. C. GAMMA....................University of Georgia. Athens Ga. Phi .... ... . Southwestern University, Greensboro, Ala. Delta............................Woflord College, Spartanburg, S. C. Chi.............Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Term. Epsilon....................................Emory College, Oxford, Ga. ' 1 81...........................................Tulane University, New Orleans, La. Zbta.........................Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Va. Omkoa.Centre College, Danville, Kjr. Eta............................................................... Richmond College, Richmond, Va. Alpha-Alpha . . . . University of the South, Sewance, Tenn. Theta. . . . . Kentucky State A. and M. College, Lexington, Ky. Alpha Beta ....... University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Iota.........................Furman University, Greenville, 8. C. Alpha Gamma . . Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La. Kappa............................Mercer University, Macon, Ga. Alpha Delta.........................................William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. Lambda...............University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. ALPHA Ei 8iLON . . . . S. W. P. University, Clarksville, Tenn. Mu.Emory and Henry College, Emory, Va. Alpha Zrta .... William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Va. Nu..............................A. and M. College, Auburn, Ala. Alpha Eta.......................Westminster College, Fulton, Mo. Xi.................Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas. Alpha Iota.....................Centenary College, Jackson, La. Omicron........................University of Texas. Austiu, Texas. Alpha Kappa.Missouri State University, Columbia, Mo, l i..................University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. Alpha Lambda . . . . Johns-Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. Rho.......................South Carolinu College, Columbia, 8. C.phi Delta ‘['beta Founded at Miami University 184$. Georgia A!pint Chapter Chartered April 10, 1870. Fratres in Urbe. F.dward K. Lumpkin, C. 0. Candler, I). D. Quillian, J. B. S. Cobh, Thomas W. Reed, E. B. Cohen, S. J. Tribble, Edward 1. Smith. Post-Graduate. H. C. Moreno. Law Class. Charles David Kline. Class of Ninety-Four. J. W. Camak. .J. X. Dorsey, G- W. Beckett, Class of Ninety-Five. S. B. Yow. J. T. Dunlap, Frederick J. Orr, Class of Ninety-Six. W. T. Tuggle. Shirley Brooks, J. G. Pittman. Class of Ninety-Seven. James D. Brad well, Samuel 0. Dunlap, Walker White. Oscar H. Crittenden, Karl D. Saunders, (74) Utt College.White, 97, Crittenden, '97, KlluC(Un), l iltiniui, ' , Bradveell, V7. Moreno, I’. G„ Vow, Dunlap, 97, Orr, ''J6. Dunlap, •». Brook , '%. Beckon, '9t, Tuggle. '•», Honey, 'M.Phi Delta beta Fraternity . ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. Maine Alpha............ New Hampshire Alpha Vermont Alpha . . . • .Massachusetts Alpha . Massachusetts Beta . • Rhode Island Alpha . New York Alpha . . . New York Beta .... New York Gamma . . Virginia Alpha . Virginia Beta - . Virginia Gamma Virginia Delta . Virginia .eta . . Georgia Alpha . Georgia Beta . . Georgia Gamma Tennessee Alpha Mississippi Aloha I Louisiana Alpha Ohio Alpha . . Ohio Beta ■ ■ Ohio Gamma . Ohio Delta . . Ohio Epsilon . Ohio eta . . Indiana Alpha Indiana Beta . Illinois Alpha . . Illinois Delta . . Illinois Epsilon . Illinois Zeta . . Wisconsin Alpha Missouri Alpha . Missouri Beta . . Missouri Gamma Alpha Province. . . . Colby University. . . . Dormouth (Allege. University of Vermont. . . . Williams College. . Amherst College. . . Brown University. . . . Cornell University. . . . Union University. . . . .Columbia College. New York Delta . . . New York Epsilon . . Pennsylvania Alpha . Pennsylvania Beta. • Pennsylvania Gamma Pennsylvania Delta . . Pennsylvania Epsilon . Pennsylvania Zeta Pennsylvania Eta . . Beta Province. ...............Roanoke College. North Carolina Beta ........University of Virginia. South Carolina Beta . . . Randolph-Maoon College. Kentucky Aloha . . .....Richmond College. Kentucky Delta . . Washington and Lee University. Gamma Province. University of Georgia. Tennessee Beta . . . . Emory College. Alabama Alpha . . Mercer University. Alabama Beta . . Vanderbilt University. Alabama Gamma Delta Province. . . University of Mississippi. Texas Beta . . Tuiane University of Louisiana. Texas Gamma Epsilon Province. ..........Miami University. Ohio Wesleyan University. ..........Ohio University. . . University of Wooster. ........Bucbtel College. . . Ohio State University. . . . . Indiana University. .........Wabash College. Indiana Gamma . Indiana Delta . . Indiana Epsilon . Indiana Zeta . . . Purdue Branch . . Michigan Alpha . Michigan Beta . . Michigan Gamma Zeta Province. . . Northwestern University. Iowa Alpha . . . .................Knox College. Iowa Beta . . . . Illinois Wesleyan University. .Minnesota Alpha . . . . Lombard University. Kansas Alpha . . University of Wisconsin. Nebraska Alpha . . . . University of Missouri. California Alpha . . . • Westminster College. California Beta . . . . Washington University. (” ...............Columbia College. .............Syracuse University. .............' Lafayette College. ..............Gettysburg College. Washington and Jefferson College. ..............Allegheny College. ..............Dickinson College. . . . University of Pennsylvania. ...............Lehigh University. University of North Carolina. . . . South Carolina College. ....... Centre College. ........Central University. . . . . University of the South. .... University of Alabama. Alabama Polytechnic Institute. ...........Southern University. . . . University o( Texas. Southwestern University. ..............Butler University. ................Franklin College. .................Hanover College. ...........De Pauw University. ..............Purdue University. . . . . University of Michigan. . . . Slate College of Michigan. ................Hillsdale College. . . . Iowa Wesleyan University. . State University of Iowa. .... University of Minnesota. ..........University of Kansas. ........University of Nebraska. .... University of California. Lelaud Stanford, Jr., University.7 lf ba Tau ©mega Founded at Virginia Military Institute I860. Georgia Alpha Bela Chapter Established 1S78. Fratres in Urbe. Hon. H. H. Carlton, J. F. McGowan, C. W. Brumby, Prof. G. G. Bond, Hon. E. T. Brown, Charles D. Campbell. James Barrow, Law Class. Augustus Dorr Daly. Class of Ninety-Four. John D. Stelliug. Class of Ninety-Five. Ralph 0. Cochran," Joseph J. Bennett. Class of Ninety-Six. Louis E. Powell, William W. Chandler, Maston E. O'Neil. Class of Ninety-Seven. Ulrich B. Phillips," Albert B. Mobley. (781 “Left College.Mobley, •»:, Sielliog, -91, Cochriui, Komi, Powell, 'DC, ClumUcr. "jG. DOAM, Only (Law),T lpba Tau 0mega fraternity ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. Alpha Epsilon.......................A. and M. College, Auburn, Ala. Bkta Beta.....................Southern University, Greensboro, Ala. Beta Dki.ta.................University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Beta Psi........................Leland Stafford, Jr., University Cal. Alplin Beta.................University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. Alpha Theta...........................Emory College, Oxford, Ga. Alpha Zeta .... .........Mercer University, Macon, Ga. Beta Iota.......................School of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. Gamma Gamma . . • Rose Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute, Ind. Beta Epsilon....................Tulaue University, New Orleans, La. Gamma Beta............................Tuft’s College, Medford, Mass. Beta Epsilon...............................State College, Orono, Me. Gamma Alpha......................Colby University, Watervllle, Me. Alpha Mr...........................Adrian College, Adrian, Mich. Beta Kappa.......................Hillsdale College, Hillsdale, Mich. Beta Lambda..............University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. Beta Omicron.......................Albion College, Albion, Midi. Alpha Delta . . University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill, N. C. Alpha Chi..........................Trinity College, Durham, X. C. Alpha Kappa........................Stevens Institute, Ho! oken, X. J. Alpha Omicron......................St. Lawrence University, N. Y. Beta Theta.........................Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Alpha Nr......................Mount Union College, Mount Union, O. Alpha Psi.......................Wittenburg College, Springfield, O. Beta Eta.........................Wesleyan University, Delaware, O. Beta Mr............................Woof ter University, Wooster, O. Beta Biio...........................Marietta College, Marietta, O. Beta Omega.........................State University, Columbus, O. Alpha Iota......................Mublenburg College, Allentown, Pa. Alpha Biio.................Lehigh University, So. Bethlehem, Pa. Alpha Upsilon..............Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg, Pa. Beta Chi.........................Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. Tap.................University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Phi..................South Carolina College, Columbia, S. C. Beta Phi..........................Wofford College, Spartanburg, S. C. Beta Chi..............................Charleston College, Charleston, S.C. Alpha Tau . . . Southwestern Pres. University, Clarksville, Tenn. Beta Pi....................Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. Lamkda..........................Cumberland College, Lebanon, Tenn. Omega......................University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. Beta Zeta..................University of Vermont, Burlington, Yt. Beta................Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va. Beta Sigma..........................Hampden-Sydney College, Va. Delta...................University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Va. EPSILON.............................Hoauoke College, Salem, Va. (81)£)elta ‘j'au Delta Founded at Bethany I860. lido UeH ( Chapter Edablixhed 1882. Fratrcs in Urbc. G. F. Hunnlcutt, J. W. Barnett, ' . C. Hayes'. Rev. R. M. W. Black, T. 1 . Hunnicutt, Post-Graduate. Greene F. Johnson. Class of Ninety-Four. D. h. Cloud, C. R. Tidwell. Class of Ninety-Five. W. P. Gearreld, J. J. Gibson, G. W. Reab. Class of Ninety-Six. 0- H. Holden, E. .S. O'Brien. Class of Ninety-Seven. A. L. Tidwell, W. I. Yaucev. (82)Tidwell. ’!M. Genrrcld. 'V . Smith, Barnett, Tidwell, in. Cloud, i, Johnson, P. 0.. Yancey. 'Vi. Muck, O'Brien,«. Oitoon, Tft, Holden, '96, Kwb, '9f.,I elta au Delta paternity ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. Grand Division Lambda....................Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tonn. Hi......................University of Mississippi, University, Miss. Beta Delta................University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. Beta Epsilon..........................Emory College, Oxford, Ga. Grand Division Omicrox........................University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. Xi..................................Simpson College, Iudinnoln, Iowa. Omega.................................Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa. Beta Gamma................University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. Grand Divisio Alpha..............................Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa. Beta...................................Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. Delta...................University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. El’Sll.ox.........................Albion College, Albion, Mich. Hi.................................... Buclitel College, Akron, Ohio- Theta............................Bethany College, Bethauy, W. Va. Iota............................Michigan Agricultural College, Mich. Kappa...........................Hillsdale College, Hillsdale, Mich. Grand Divisit Alpha...........................Alleghany College, Meadville, Ha. Gamma ... Washington and Jerterson College, Washington, Ha. Uho................Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, N. J. Sigma.......................Williams College, Wiliiamstowu. Mass. Tau...................Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa. of the South. Beta Theta..................University of the South, Scwanec, Tenn. Beta Iota.............University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Birr a Xi.......................Tulane University, New Orleans, La of the West. Beta Eta . . . . University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. Beta Kappa ..................Univtrslty of Colorado, Boulder, Col. Beta Pi.....................Northwest m University, Evanston, III. Beta Riio .... Leland Stanford, Jr., University, Palo Alto, Cal. of the North. Mu......................Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio. Phi...............................Hanover College. Hanover, Ind. Chi...............................Kenyon College, Gambler, Ohio. Psi ........................University of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio. Beta Alpha.....................Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. Beta Beta.....................De l’auw University, Greencastle, Ind. Beta Zeta.......................Butler University, Indianapolis, Ind. of the East. Upsii-on..............Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N. Y. Beta Lamkda...............Lehigh University. South Bethlehem, Pa. Beta Mu.........................Tuft’a College, Tuft’s College, Mass. Beta Omickon......................Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. (anSigma Ru Founded at Virginia Military Institute 1889. Ah Chapter Established 1884. Frotres in Facultate. C. M. Snelliog. Fratres in Urbe. Andrew Fear. . George P. Williamson, F. C. Shackelford, T. J. Shackelford. P. R. Lester, Law Class. R. 1). Bush, J. O. Wallace. J. H. Butner, J. Akerman, J. O. Cook, Class of Ninety-Four. C- D. McCutclieu, .Ir., Class of Ninety-Five. L. Halsey, Class of Ninety-Six. T Z. Daniels, L. D. Fricks. Geo. O. Shackelford. R. H. Lovejoy. Class of Ninety-Seven. W. B. Fender. ♦Uft College (86)Butner, Daniel.’56, Frick .'W. Wallace (Uw), Shackelford, foster (Law), Shackelford. Heivcy, to, 'Cook, 56. A. Kcnnan. TM, Fonder, •97. McOUchen, W, Baldwin, 1M. Bush (Law), Lovejoy. IK.§igma Hu fraternity. CHAPTER IJST. Division I. Alpha,Virginia Military Institute, Lexington,Va., Chapter dormant. Lambda. . . . Washington and Lw University, Lexington, Va. Beta...................University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Tau . S. C. Military Academy, Charleston, S. C., Chapter dormant. Delta........................South Carolina College, Columbia, S. C. Psi..............University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. Division II. Theta...................University of Alabama, University P. O., Ala. Phi.......................University of Louisiana, Baton Itouge, la. Iota................................ Howard College, East Lake, Ala. Bcta Phi............Tulane, New Orleans, La., Chapter dormant. Utsilon..........................University of Texas, Austin, Texas. Beta Theta.................Alabama A. M. College, Auburn, Ala. Division HI. Zeta.............................Central University, Klchmond, Ky. Sigma........................Vuuderhilt University, Nashville, Tenn. . Divis Nu............................University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan. Bito..........................University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. Chi...............................Cornell (College, Mt. Vernon. Iowa. Beta Gamma....................Missouri Valley College, Marshall, Mo. Beta Delta........................Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa. Omicrox.................................Bethel College, Hmsellville, Ky. Beta Omicrox..............University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. i IV. Beta Epsilon.................Upper Iowa University, Fayette, Iowa. Beta Kappa...............Southwest Kansas College, Winfield, Kan. Beta Lambda............................Central College, Fayette, Mo. Beta Mu......................University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. Beta Xi.........................William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. Division V. Pi..........................Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. Beta Alpha, Yale University, New Haven, Ct., Chapter dormant. Div.sion VI. Eta..................................Mercer University, Macon, Ga. Mu.........................University of Georgia, Alliens, Ga. Kappa........................North Georgia College, Dahionega, Ga. Xr......................................Emory College, Oxford, Ga. Division VII. Beta Beta.......................Del’auw University, Greencastie, Ind. Beta Iota......................Mt. Union College, Alliance, Ohio. Beta Zeta........................Purdue University, LaFayette, Ind. Beta Nu.......................University of Ohio, Columbus, Ohio. Beta Eta.....................University of Indiana, Bloomington, Ind. Delta Theta.....................Lombard University, Galesburg, 111. Division VIII. Beta Cm . . . Leland Stanford, Jr., University, Menlo Park, Cal. Beta Psi..........................University of California, Berkley, Cal. (89)Qhi Psi Founded at Union College 1841. Alpha Della Chapter, Established 1889. Fratrcs in Urbe. W. B. Burnott, W. B. Hammett, Fratre in Facultate. O. H. Sheffield. Post Graduate. j. C. Slade. Class of Ninety-Four. W. A. Fuller, W. r. Harbin. Class of Ninety Five. C. F. Dodd. Class of Ninety-Six. H. V. Black. Class of Ninety-Seven. H. Dodd, O. K. Cato. m Dodd, '07, Sheffield, Fuller. '!N, Dennett, Harbin. W. Black. ’06. Slade. P. G.. Cato, "J7.Qhi psi praternitj ROLL OP ACTIVE CHAPTERS. Pi........................................Union College, Schenectady, X. Y. Theta...............................Williams (Allege, Wllllamstowu, Mas?. Mu......................................Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vt. Alpha................................Wesleyan College, Middletown, Conn. Phi.......................................Hamilton College, Clinton, X. Y. Epsilon ........................University of Michlguu, Ann Arbor, Mich. UPSILON................................Furman University, Greenville, S. C. Beta..........................University of South Carolina, Columbia, S. C. Gamma...............................University of Mississippi, Oxford, Miss. Chi.......................................Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. Psi.......................................Cornell University, Ithaca, X. Y. Tau.................................. Wolford College, Spartanburg, S. C. Xu..............................University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. Iota................................University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. Rho...................................Rutgers College, Xew Brunswick, X. J. Xi..........................Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, X. J. ALPHA. DELTA........................University ol' Georgia, Athens, Ga. (93)Summary of fraternities. Post Graduates. Law. 04. ’95. ’96. ’97. Total Number of Student In Chapter at A then . Number of Chapters lu Fraternity. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 2 5 3 8 6 24 49 Chi Phi 2 7 4 7 20 .) Kappa Alpha 3 3 5 1 18 33 Phi Delta Theta 1 1 3 3 2 5 15 70 Alpha Tau Omega 1 1 2 3 2 9 Delta Tau Delta 1 2 3 2 2 10 39 Sigma Nu 3 4 3 3 1 14 40 Chi Psi 1 2 1 1 2 7 17 Totai 3 10 25 25 28 26 117 315 (W)fraternity J ife at the University THE fraternity spirit at the University is one of the most strongly marked and attractive features of the eollegc life. It is practically the savoring salt of the ten months of almost unintermittcnt college duties, bringing together in the closest social and fraternal relations the students in numbers just large enough to afford them the enjoyment of close association without the danger of disturbance from internal wrangles or dissensions. Of fraternity life in general it may be said that association is a natural instinct, a first principle among human inclinations. It is exhibited in earliest childhood. Cliques and clans, in the milder significance of bands of associates, characterize all early schoolboy days; the fraternity of college life is the intermediate association enjoyed by the youth on the verge of manhood; masonry, with its kindred associations, with their binding ties, is the fraternity field of the adult. “Show me the man who is a good Mason,” said a well-known Knight Templar, “and I’ll show you a good man.” So it is almost throughout. The collegian who is true to the principles of his fraternity, if they be good ones, and none founded on bad principles can long survive, is the best student of hooks and of men. He is as good a moral factor as a college can have. Abolish the fraternity which affords him his foundation principle, and he loses his influence in a great measure to discourage and prevent the formation of cliques and bauds whose only purpose and aim is to annoy and destroy. The only tie of such a band becomes the common knowledge of the mischief done and the perpetrators are not revealed. The spirit and feeling among the Greek letter men is on a far higher plane. The strength of the tie which hinds them finds its origin in higher motives and aims. It grows out of a desire for a pure and elevating social intercourse, an association which benefits and strengthens. In daily college life a man associates with all; in his fraternity sanctum he comes in closer association with those whom he has chosen and whose influence upon his life and actions is more impressive and lasting. This in its last analysis is at the bottom of fraternity life. While the introduction of the fraternity into college politics is perhaps to be deprecated, it is no more than natural, where the field of honor is oj eu, that a candidate’s friendsshould urge him strongest. This feature of the fraternity tie, however, is entirely incidental, not basal, necessarily so, | cr-haps, as long as there is such a thing as jsditics among the collegians, but none the less incidental. Fraternities are not sought, nor do they seek with political ends in view. When a member of a fraternity enters the field, it isincumWnt upon his associates to support him, but the idea which draws college men together in these fraternal bands does not have its origin here. It is the association, the social feature, which is uppermost. One great mistake made by the opponents of the (ireek letter society lies here. They mistake its objects and purposes, or if they do not, conditions have undergone a great change in the short time since the writer was a student. The place for reform is in the politics of the campus, the animus l of which is not confined to one or two fraternities, but rather to cliques of much larger numbers. It is not expedient or necessary to discuss here the means of reform. This is not the purpose of this brief statement, which is but to assert that the fraternities in their spirit, purjmse and aims arc not inconsistent with the best and most satisfactory college discipline. It is needless to refer to the aspirations of fraternity men to see that their fraternity maintains its rank in scholarship. It is needless to refer to the rivalry among them to retain their share of the college honors. If it has been shown that the basis of the Greek letter fraternity life is a desire for an elevating social intercourse, not transitory, instead of a desire to produce strife or dissension or to earnout |K litieal aims legally or otherwise, the bumble purpose of the writer has been accomplished.T'be Ijjattalion COMMANDANT, MAJOR O. II. SHEFFIELD. Qadet Qfficers. Adjutant...............................Arthur Wkioi.kv. Sergeant-Major..........................W. P. Gkarreld. COMPANY a. COMPANY B. Captain. H. C. Brown. Captain. (5. P. Butler. Lieutenants. Lieutenants. First—W. A. Wilkins, Jr. Second—P. L. Fleming. Third—W. A. Fuller. J. D. Stelllng, C. D. McCutcheon. Sergeants. Sergeants. First—E. E. Murphey. Fourth—L. Halsey. First—J. T. Dunlap. Fourth—E. M. Gammon. Second—It. A. Ridley. Fifth—R. M. Butler. Second—J. Gipson. Fifth—D. C. Barrow, 4th. Third—0. B. Nisbet. Sixth—J. W. Morton. Thlrd-J. C. 0. Black. Sixth—E. E. Dougherty. Corporals. First—T. It. Neal. Third—T. H. Buttrill. Second—J. A. Morton. Fourth—G. H. Boggs. Fifth—0. N. Holtleu. Corporals. First—J. G. Pittman. Third—T. It. Boggs. Second—S. Brooks. Fourth—H. I.ovejoy. (t»7)k)emostbenian literary Society . Founded February 10, ISO I. President . . Vice-President Secretary . President. . . Vice-President Secretary . . . President . . . Vice-President President . . . Vice-President Secretary. . . President - . Vice-President Secretary . • . President. - . Vice-President Secretory . . . Qffieers. First Term. T. A. McGregor. Censor.................................................L. C. Slade. . . B. B. Bower. Treasurer...........................................J. K. Brannen. . . C. B. Tidwell. Second Term. • ■ J. B. Madden. First Censor..........................................C. E. Brand. . . . G. W. Iteab. Secoud Censor........................................J. V. Stubbs. . . C. T. Haskell. Treasurer...........................................J. E. Brannen. Third Term. S. L. Olive. Secretary............................................A. L. Tidwell. . J. W. Grifletb. First Censor.......................................I). T. Clarke. j J. V. Gritfctb. Second Censor...................................... M. K. O’Neal. ' V. W. Lai'son. Treasurer..........................................J. K. Brannen. Fourth Term. J. E. Brannen. Fint Censor ... ...............................0. C. Carson. . C. H. B. Floyd. Second Censor .....................................I.. A. Lindsey. . . . . H. Dodd. Treasurer.................................. . . . . J. B. Madden. Fifth Term. . . C. R. Tidwell. First Censor.........................................C. T. Haskell. . • . T. A. Neal. Second Censor................................. J. M. Stephenson. . J. W. Hendrix. Treasurer...........................................J. B. Madden. Sixth Term. . . . M. Guyton. First Censor.............................. ...........G. P. Hunt. . . .E. C. Rvals. Second Censor........................................J. O. Pettis. . . . L. Sanders. Treasurer...........................................J. B. Madden. Anniversary Exercises, February 19, 1894. Orator: Harry Aaron Alexander, Atlanta, Ga. Subject—“ Education as’it Concerns the Commonwealth’s Prosperity.” (93)Phi Rappa Citerary g0ejety. Founded February 22. 1820. President............ First Vice-President . •Second Vice-President First Censor......... President .... First Vice-Prceideut . Second Vice-President First Censor......... President............. First Vice-President. Second Vice-President First Censor......... Officers. First Term. A. W. Stephens. Second Censor .... . W. P. Harbin. Clerk...................’ . J. G. Pittman. Corresponding Secretary . W. A. Harris. Treasurer............... Second Term. . W. A. Fuller. Second Censor .......... . . D. L. Cloud. Clerk................... . . . S. Brooks. Corresponding Secretary . . R. A. Ridley. Treasurer................ Third Term. . R. O. Cochran. Second Censor........... . . . Fred Orr Clerk.................... . . D. I,. Cloud. Corresponding Secretary . . J. J. Gibson. Treasurer.............‘. Fourth Term. . . . . H. Bacon. . W. P. Gearreld. . . T. H. Buttrill. Joseph Akerman. . . . G. T. Hurt. . W. P. Gearreld. . . T. H. Buttrill. Joseph Akerman. . . K. S. O’Brien. . . W. P. Gearreld. . T. H. Buttrill. Joseph AkermitD. President............ First Vice-President . S»coud Vice-President First Censor......... . . J. J. Gibson. 8econd Censor.......................................F. W. Bean. E. E. IXougherty. Clerk..................................................8. Brooks. . . V. L. Kemp. Corresponding Secretary.............................. V. L. Kemp. . . . C. F. l)ood. Treasurer........................................Joseph Akerman. Fifth Term. President...... First Vice-President. Second Vice-President First Censor..... Joseph AkermaD. Second Censor................................................G-T. Jsckson. . . V. A. Fuller. Clerk.......................................................S. Brooks. . . . . H. Bacon. Corresponding Secretary............................W. L. Kemp. . . W. A. Harris. Treasurer.....................................Joseph Akerman. Sixth Tetm. President............................................ A. Harris. First Vice-President............................ Second Vice-President.................................. Fletcher. First Censor......................................«• O. Cochran. Anniversary Exercises February 22, ISM. Pail I Fleming, Orator. Second Censor.................................W. P. Gearreld. Clerk............................................W. L. Kemp. Corresponding Secretary........................J. G. Pittman. Treasurer....................................Joseph Akerman. The Achievement of the Cavalier.’' ( ')Akerman, Bean, Bennett, Black, H. V., Boland, Butler, G. P., Carson, Clark, Dancy, Dodd', C. l’ , Dodd, 11., Kzznrd, • The associate member number about fifty. y. M. G. K 0fficers. Joe Akermax, - - W. A. Harris, - - -W. A. Fuller, - -P. J. Shea rouse, - - G. P. Butler, - -T. A. McGregor, - -P. J. Shea rouse, ) S. B. Vow, ' - T. A. McGregor, j - - - - - President. - - - Vice-President. - Corresponding Secretary. Recording Secretary. - - - - - Treasurer. ----- Librarian. - "Devotional Committee. 7 oti ?e 7V embers. Fletcher, Gammon, Gibson, Gneissler, Harris, Holden, Lindsey, McGregor, Moore, Neal, Phillips, Sanders, Shearouse, Tidwell, A. L., Y ow. (100)G G he 50 ) • Q ers Yow, forton - Harrow, ia r ., L,o0ir Gofafo J-?« er. Cot lint o, -Black, .............. Mell, ? B. Butler, JO i t K: y Gearrc l, Da i s. ; - . s. i. O. urj lieV ■ B. b: Js eleli, . • k O. K T otig-hartx, ) 7v‘ 7 - r x, .'% '• •• K A. X . B. U. M_ - G. A. . . I , I . If. ..................Af. O. 11. •S. .1. 77. . C E. K. . . n. ic. it. If. . JBack,.....................B. -A- - J- . I— Fleim'ii ,...................7 J C , I . C. Harrow', :lrt , - - - i Vr lr -A - 15. Afoblev, -....................« % D- lbarvUifrtott, I . . - - • ' ' Ifi titer, ) _ ;. 11. pron n, - _ H- 3 - -'7. Ecrrrll, Cl€Pl)University Press Association. Qfficers. H. .A. Alexander,..................................President. G. W. Read,...................................Vice-President. « 7V embers. II. A. Alexander, P. G., Atlanta Journal. G. W. Real), '95, Augusta Evening News. (i. W. Beckett, ’94, Savannah Evening Press. L. C. Slade, P. G., Columbus Enquirer-Sun. J. II. Bntner, ’95, Macon Telegraph. L. B. Warren, Law, Macon Evening News. J. W. Morton, 59o, Augusta Chronicle. (102)University Publications pandora. Editors of Pandora from 1SSG to Present Time. VOLUME I., 1886. Editor-in-chief. G. N. WILSON, K a. Bunincs' Manager. W. B. COOK, A T Q. Associate Editors. W. E. Wooten, - A K, S. McDaniel, X ♦. C. F. Rice, X ♦. C. H. Wilcox, K A. W. A. Speer, ♦AO. F. S. Stone, ♦AO. It. D. Meatier, ATfl. M. B. Bond, AT A. W. S. Upshaw, a T A. It. L. Moye, ♦FA. P. L. Wade, ♦I’A A. W. Jones, X N. W. G. Brown, 2 N. VOLUME II., 1887. Edltor-in-Chief. C. F. RICE, X ♦. Business Manager. J. W. DANIEL, K a. Associate Editors. T. W. Reed, ♦AO. Glen Waters, ♦ V A. W. J. Shaw, 2 X. H. Key Milner, A T 0. A. L. Franklin, A T A. VOLUME IV., 1890. Editor-in-chief. JOHN D. LITTLE, 2 a k. Business Manager. WALTER K. WHEATLEY, A T 0. Associate Editors. F. E. Callaway, K a. S. J. Tribble, ♦ A 0. J. G. Crawford, 2 X. W. I). Ellis, X ♦. W. L. Stallings, A T A. W. N. Smith, X . K. A. Cohen. VOLUME V.. 189a. Editors-ln-Chief. J. F. LEWIS, X ♦. L. L. BROWN, A T U. Business Managers. W. E. CRI8TIE, 2 X. W. T. KELLY, A T A. Associate Editors. J. C. Kimball, 2 A K. Roy Dallis, ♦AO. J. R. Lane, K A. E. W. Frey, X +. (103) VOLUME VI., 1893. Editor-In-Chief HARRY HODGSON, K A. Business Manager. FRED. G. BARFIELD, 2 A Associate Editors. Charles It. Nlsbet, X ♦. Nat. B. Stewart, ATfl. Alfred O. Halsey, 2 X. Harry A. Alexander. E. Gerry Caoanlss, ♦ A o. Greene Johnson, a t a. Eugene Dodd, X +. VOLUME III., 1888. Editor-in-Chlef. ALBERT HOWELL, K A. Business Manager. ASA W. GRIGGS, ♦Fa. Associate Editors. Wllmor L. Moore, 2 A E. T. Itemseti Crawford, A T o. Frank W. Coile, 2 X. Lucian L. Knight, X ♦. W. M. Glass, a T A. VOLUME VII., 1894. Editors-in-Chlef. CHAS. It. TIDWELL, A T a. NOEL McH. MOORE, 2 A B. Business Managers. PAUL L. FLEMING, X ♦. JOHN D. STELLING, A TO. Associate Editors. Lunsford I). Fricks, 2 X. William P. Harbin, X . Henry Brown, K A. George W. Beckett, ♦AO. University 7VlaEa3 ne- Montiii.v Publication. R. O. Cochran,. Green Johnson, I Eugene Dodd, Dcmosthcnian Society. C. R. Tidwell, II. C. Brown, J. C. C. Black, Jr. B. B. Bower, . . C. H. Brand, ) W. P. Gearreld, Dcmosthcnian Society. J. E. Brannon, C. II. B. I'loyd, C. E. Brand. Editors. First Term. ....................Editor-in-Chief. ....................Business Managers. Associate Editors. Second Term. Phi Kappa Society. W. A. Fuller, J. J W. L. Kemp. Editor-in-Chief. Business Managers. Asscciate Editors. Phi Kappa Society. J. W. Morton, V. P. . Gibson, Harbin. (1M) T'be Red and [glae . Weekly Publication. £ditors. First Term. S. B. Vow,......................Editor-in-Cliiet. P. L. Flemiug,..................Business Manager. Associate Editors. S. L. Olive, P. It. Jtester, W. T. Bacon, II. A. Alexander. Second Term. W. T. Bacon, . . . , P. It. I wester, .... A. W. Stephens, . Associate H. A. Alexander, P. L. Fleming, W. P. Harbin, T. A. McGregor, G. W . . Editor-in-Chiel. Managing Editor. Ivocal Business Manager. Editors. II. C. Moreno, D. C. Barrow, .'Id, W. W. Chandler, I.. B. Warren, . Real . (105)  be Senior (Economic Society Joseph Akkkman C. R. TlDWBLL . W. T. Bacon • • • .............President. • ■ Vice-President. Secretary and Treasurer. Gssays. “ Socialism »...................................J. M. Harrington. “ Land Nationalization ”........................C. D. McCutclien. “ Natural Monopolies O. I Rogers. “Industrial Functions of the State”...............P. I.. Fleming. “ Malthusianism”.............................................T. A. McGregor. “ Public Debts ”..................................N. McH. Moore. “State Banks”...................................A. W. Stephens. “ United States Monetary History ”..................W. A. Fuller. “ Hamilton as a Financier”..........................J. N. Dorsey. “ Karl Marx and the German Socialists”..............B. it. Bower. “St. Simon and the French Socialists”...............J. B. Madden. “ First United States Bank ”........................B. S. Baldwin. “ Second United States Bank”...................D.C.Barrow. “National Banking System”..........................S. B. Yow. “ The Sub-Treasury System ”....................J E. Brannen. “ Bi-Metal bin ”............................... J. V. Stubbs. “ Adam Smith ”....................................D. L. Cloud. “ History of the Tariff to 1861 ”.................L. D. Fricks. “ History of the Tariff 180I-1S83”................CL R. Tidwell. “Taxation ”......................................W. T. Bacon. “National Debt”...............................Joseph Akermau. “ Gallatin ”......................................T. R Moye. “ Labor Movement in America”...................Edwin Davis. “Socialism in England”............................W. P. Harbin. (106)Senior Science S. B. Vow,..........................................President. Joseph Akekman,.......................................Secretary. 7V embers. J. Akermnn, II. G. Brown, •J W. B. Armstrong, I). J,. Cloud, ( Y. T. Bacon, P. S. Fleming, I G. W. Beckett, J. 15. Madden, G. P. Butler, T. A. McGregor, £ Assays. G. P. Butler,...............................John Tyndall. G. W. Beckett,.......................Development of Music. S. B. Yow,..................................Lord Bacon. W. T. Bacon,........................................Germs. J. Akerman, . Importance of Training in Political Economy. J. D. Stalling,...............................Electricity. . 1). Stelling, l. Stephens, C. Upson, . Wrigley, . B. Yow. be (Engineering Society J. I . Stej.lixc, President. E. W. Barnweix, Vice-President. L. S. Selmax, .... Secretary and Treasurer. 7Vlembers. Beckett, Yancey, E. V. Barnwell, Moss, Hurt, Camak, Reaves, F. J- Orr, Shearouse, Dunlap, Brown, Limlscv, L. S. Selman, Hill, Reese, Stalling, G. P. Butler, Traylor, Crane, Barwick, Wrigloy, S. G. Hunter, Mize, Lovejov, M. Halsc 0SSQJ S. (J. W. Beckett, . The Tower Electric Light System. E. V. Barnwell. . Architecture of the World’s Fair Buildings. S. G. Hunter, . . Stadia Hairs and Stadi ia Measurements. Professor Barrow , . Squaring the Circle. I (108)The Un iuersity Qlee Qluh Iteoryunized February 20, ISO . J. C. Mri.l, Law, . H. C. Brown, ’04, . Dk. J. P. Campbell, Prop. C. H. Hbrty. F. K. Boi.axb, ’1)7. First Tenors. ■]. C. Mel I, I aw, A. J). Daly, I aw, W. P. Harbin, ’94, F. J. Orr, ’95, R. A. Ridley, ’95, F. K. Boland, ’97. First Bases. G. W. Beckett, ’94, E. W. Barnwell, 03, Edwin Davis, ’94, E. K. Dougherty, ’95. G. II. Boggs, ’9(5, Oscar Lyndon, ’97. . . . President. . Vice-President. . . Musical Director. . Business Manager. . . . . Secretary. Second Tenors. Prof. C. M. Strahan, W. B. Armstrong, ’94, H. C. Brown, ’94, G. P. Butler, ’94, J. A. Morton, ’9( , E. S. Osborne, ’90. Second Bases. Prof C. II. Hcrty, Shirley Brooks, ’90, II. S. Hansel 1, ’96, L. E. Powell, ’96, B. Fender, '97, F. C. Ferrell, ’97.T'be Paul Lamar Fleming, ’94, . . Harry Aaron Alexander, ’93, . Holcombe Bacon, ’96, .... George Beckett, ’94, .... James Audley Morton, ’90, . . . Manager. . Stage Manager. Musical Director. . Vice-President. Edward Williamson Bannvoll, ’93. William Buckingham Armstrong, ’94. John White Welch, Law. Edward Emmett Dougherty, ’95. Edwin Cabell JRyals, ’96. Shirley Brooks, ’96. David Crenshaw Barrow, 3d, ’94. Rufus lister, Law. Augustin Dorr Daly, Law. Frederick Joseph Orr, ’95. Elton Osborne, ’96. Oscar Lyndon, ’97. Frank Kells Boland, ’97. honorary. Patronesses. Miss Daisy Mae Talmadge, Miss Sarah Elizabeth Rucker, Mrs. Leon Sledge. Mrs. H. C. White, Mrs. A. C. Rucker, Miss Jennie Smith. (110)Dougherty, '!i3, Bacon,'!«, Fleming, 1‘t. Alexander, P. G., Morton,‘Or., ltyaB, 1 C, Boland, '97. Beckett 1 1 Osborne. •;«?. Brooks. '!)«. Barnwell. P. 0., Barrow, '91. Orr, 16, Daly (l.tw), Lyndon, '97, Welch (Law). be T'balians. Organised January 17, ISOS. First Appearance Second Appearance Third Appearance (113) March 10, 1893. . June 19, 1893. March 30, 1894. bird Regular (Entertainment. Oi'kra IIorsK, March 30. 1891. The 7V .instrels. Interlocutor, MR. FLEMING. } » » ■ Bf: r';rronK'} Ta“b “- “ Knights of the Mystic Star"......................... Overture. Creole Love Soug................................. . . Mr. Morton. “Klllaloe”..........................................Mr. Beckett. “ The Prodigal Son ”.............................Mr. Armstrong. 11 And the Verdict Was”.......................... . . Mr. Lyndon. “The Winds are all Hushed” ....................Thalian Quartette. EASTER SWELLS, An artistic drill by several young ladles and gentlemen. MR. DALY In Topical Songs. Messrs. ARMSTRONG and bacon, Presenting a burlesque of the celebrated Midway Plaisancc feature. Flora Bell and Mjzcll, Spanish Dancers. “ Second Floor, §poof endy e.” A Comedy in Two Acts. By Grace Livingston Furuiss. CAST. Artie Bruce, who may lose his train but never his nerve . Mr. Ryals. P.lgler Jimpson, who forgeta to briDg his nerve, but is a good fellow just the same.................Mr. Bacon. Col. Thomas Quincy Gluty, who “shoots first and explains afterwards” ..........................Mr. Armstrong. Tyroue Herbert, leading man at the “ Melpomene,” aud delight of the “ Matinee Girl ” ......Mr. Fleming- Jenks, the janitor..............................Mr. Lyndon. Tessie Gioty, very much engaged to Artie, and deathly afraid of “ Papa ”..........................Miss Rucker. Dodo McLaren, leading lady of the “ Mel| omene,” who has a short memory but Is a warm friend, Miss Talmadge. Sally, her maid, equally struck with the stage, Tyrone Herbert aud herself.......................Mrs. Sledge. Scene—Dining Room of Miss Dodo McLaren’s apartments in "The Spoopendyke,” Murray Hill, New York. Time—The Present. (1H) ) -1  Conunander-in-Chief, Chief Marshal,. Commissary-General, I). S. Sterling, Tennessee. 1 . Halsey, South Carolina. C. C. Fin Idea. South Carolina. J. (i. Smith, Florida. .1. M. Stephenson, Alabama. . . . L. V. Gkrdinb, . . . . . (J. Youxg, . . . . . . 0. I). Klixk, . . . fhe Gornmonvv?eal. Frank Bean, South Carolina. G. Young, North Dakota. J{. S. Hunter, Virginia. II. C. Strong, Tennessee. C. T. Haskell, Canada. (1)7) West Point, Miss. McLain, N. Dak. Mexico. M. Guyton, Florida. M. Halsey, South Carolina. C. H. B. Floyd, Florida. C. D. Kline, Mexico. L. V. Gerdinc, Mississippi.Senior G1QSS I3anquet- June Vi, 189 . Committee. II. C. Brown, Chairman. C. D. McCutchen, N. McH. Moore, W. T. Bacon, W. P. Harbin. Rox Convivii,...............J. M. Harrington, Jr. Toasts. Alma Mater—S. B. Vow. “ Our hearts, our hopes, are all with thee.” Our Class—N. McH. Moore. “ Friendship is no plant of hasty growth. Tho’ rooted in esteem’s deep soil, the slow and gradual culture of kind intercourse must bring it to perfection.” Our Future—P. L. Fleming. “The hope and expectancy of the republic.” Athletics—C. R. Tidwell. “ Mens Sana in corpore sano.” My Lady—B. B. Bower, Jr. “ Her health ! and would on earth there stood some oPstieh a frame, that life might be all poetry and riness a name.” University Publications— V. T. Bacon. “ Turn to the press, its teeming sheets survey, Big with the wonders of each passing day.” (118) more wea- Senior Glass [banquet. 7V enu. Chicken Patties la Cr mc. Olives. Sautcrne. Hock. Imported Sardines, Maitre d’Hotel. Saratoga Chips. Sliced Tomatoes. Pickles. Sherry. Roast Turkey. Dressed Ham, ft lu Victoria. Cucumbers. Radishes. Lettuce. Russian Cavairc. ChamjKignc. Chicken Salad Koval. Lettuce Mayonnaise. Lobster ft I’lvcarlate. Potatoes ft la Richelieu. Anchovy Sauce. Asparagus ft la Vinaigrette. Claret. Roman Punch an Surprise. Ice Cream Neapolitan. Sherbet. Gftteau Crfcme. Maccaroous. Lady Fingers. Strawberries, Raspberries, Peaches, Grapes. Burgundy. CallS N'oir. Tea Glac6. Cigars. Annisette. Curacoa. Chartreusse. (119)Alexander, '93. Butler, ’t).1). Davit, ’97. Butuer, '95. Bower, '94. Tidwell, ’94. Murphey, '9- . Daly, Law. Ridley, ’95. E .elle, ’96. O'Brien, '98. Dimlup, 95. Mobley, '97. Sauce Samplers. Waiters. Champion Eaters. Butner, Berry Hill, Ezelle, Murphey, O’Brien. Bower, Daly. Alexauder. Time-Keeper—Draper, '96. Cork-Puller—Tidwell, '97. (120)Thornton, Black, ’05, P. K. 13. S. T. Glob. i Iilcs, ’05, . . McCutcheon, ’94, Davis, 97, . Black, ’95, . . . Beer Smuggler. Keeper of the Jugs. . Bottle Holder. . . Beer Carrier. 7V .ombers. ’97, Davis, ’97, Barrow, ’94, Hiles, '95. MeCutchen, ’94, Dunlap, ’95, JRidley, ’95, Ferrell, ’97, Tuggle, ’95. (121)Knights of the Round able. Upson, Law, Guyton, ’05, Fuller, ’94, Powell, ‘90, 0ffieers. “Koval Flush” Dorsey, ’94. “Same Here” Barrow, ’95. “These and Those” O’Brien, ’90. “Phil King” Taggart, "95. Akcrmnn, ’94, Lester, Lcnv, Thornton, ’97, Dunlap, ’95, TWemhers. Cochran, ’95, Stelling, ’94, Draper, ’96, Bnttrill, ’96, Halsey, ’97, Butner, ’95, Butler, ’94, Ezelle, ’96.0de to 0 little Dip.—of sheepskin wrought, Whose folds bright ribbons gay entwine, In Latin writ—I softer doubt If I shall ever call thee mine. 1 sought thee long, I sought thee well, With | erseverance firm and true, Until there crossed my path in life A winsome maid with eyes of blue. Alas, that Science lacked the charms To draw my thoughts from that sweet face; Alas, that Knowledge lacked the j ower To blind me to that beauteous grace. a £)iploma. But so they did, and now my hopes Of owning thee dotli fade away. I fear they will have disappeared By dawning of Commencement Day. Howe’er, thv loss is not the stroke That thrills the chord of deepest woe; The annals of my Senior year A sadder talc than that doth show. I could resign thee with a smile, And let thee pass without a care, if that those eyes of azure hue Sought me, and not that Freshman there. II. A. A. Athens, February 0. (ls» ' iCommencement Program Thursday Evening, June 14—Senior Banquet. Friday Evening, June 15—Junior Hop. Saturday Afternoon, June 16—Senior Class Exercises. Saturday Evening, June 16—Champion Debate. Sunday Morning, June 17—Baccalaureate Sermon. Monday Morning, June 18—Oration Before Literary Societies. Monday Afternoon, June 18—Sophomore Declamation. Monday Evening, June 18—Thalians and Cotillion Club. Tuesday Morning, June 19—Alumni Oration. Tuesday Afternoon, June 19—Junior Speaking. Tuesday Evening, June 19—Athemeum Reception. Wednesday Morning, June 20—Senior Exercises and Delivery of Diplomas. Wednesday Evening, June 20—Senior Hop. (125)I iologieal laboratory Students. William JJ. Armstrong, William P. Harbin, Lunsford P. Fricks, David L. Cloud, Noel McH. Moore, Henry H. Ezzard, Joel J. Gibson, William P. Gearreld, Lindsley Halsey, James T. Dunlap, John W. Morton, Eugene E. Murphey, Oscar L. Rogers, J. G. Smith, A. Smith, L. Sanders, G. 1. Taggert. (126)T fter the [gall II. We sent out a challenge To all the teams around, Hut when the games were over My arm could not he found. Jxmg did I search it, The Captain’s aid did call, Hut still that arm was missing After the ball. I. A little maiden climbed a wooden leg And tor a story she began to beg, “ Why have you one eye, whv a broken nose, Why has your left ear such a crooked pose?” “ Ah, little maiden,” sighed the uncle, sad, “ Long years ago, pet, I did not look so bad. I became an athlete early one fall, And this is the outcome, after the ball.” Chorus:—After the ball is over, Many a head is aching, After the game is done; If wc could know it all; After the players leaving, Many the shoulder that’s out of joint After the set of sun. After the ball. hi. Ixmscly in its socket Hung my other leg, And ’tis for that reason I wear this wooden peg. My left car was crooked, Black my eye and all-Oh, 1 was in a sad plight After the ball. (128) TV. I ong years have past, child, Since I took my bed, Washing my cork arm With the tears I shed. Perhaps that’s why I’m single And my head is bald ; No one would have me— After the ball. thleties The past year has ushered in a new era in the history of University Athletics, and never before have we met with as much success in all its branches. At the present time athletics are on a firmer foothold than ever at the University, and the progress made during the session of 1893-’94 has surpassed the expectations of even the most sanguine. Immediately after College opened, in September, the Captains of the class teams, who had been elected the preceding year, just before commencement, set to work at once to organize their respective teams. A class league was formed, dates of games arranged, and two or three exciting games were played on the campus. The class games, however, were discontinued, in order to form a “’Varsity” team. In the class games that were played, though, some excellent material was developed, and it was seen that by proper training a good “ ’Varsity ” eleven conld be formed. So the services of acom-|w:tent coach were secured, and all men trying for the team went into strict training at once. Every afternoon on the campus the “ ’Varsity ” and “ Scrub ” teams were kept hard at work. The team which was finally put into the field met with splendid success, considering the very short time they were in the hands of a trainer, and out of the five games played won two of them and tied another, the two games lost being the first two played. Our boys deserve a great deal of credit fortheeucr-getic way in which they worked, and nothing but love for the old University could have prompted them to act thus. Although we suffered some inconvenience in training, on account of not being provided with pro| er training quarters, yet never a grumble was heard. Good training quarters arc something to he desired, and there is not a man in the University who does not sincerely wish that the time will soon come when we shall become the proud jMJssessor of this long-felt want. After a short period of inactivity following the Christmas holidays, a class baseball league was organized, consisting of five strong and pretty evenly matched teams. After a couple of weeks or more practicing, the match games were played, which not only proved very interesting, but develop! some good baseball talent, which otherwise might have remained undiscovered. We always had large and enthusiastic crowds to witness the games, and a neat sum was netted the Athletic (131)Association resulting from the gate receipts. The pennant was won by the Sophomores, this team winning all games played. A “ Varsity” nine will now l»e formed, which will no doubt be a good one, judging from the very fair sample of ball-playing exhibited in the class games. The annual field day exercises were held on the campus, Friday, April 27. From the number of records broken, it is seen to be the most successful one ever held at the University. The following are the events in which our College records were broken : Standing high jump, standing broad jump (with bells), standing broad jump (without bells), putting 16 lb. shot, three legged race, pole vault, sick race, and throwing 16 lb. hammer, while the records in all the other'events were very close to the best ones ever made here. With the field day exercises, this short history of athletics for the past year cuds, and merely a glance over it will show the great progress made. We secured rather a late start in football, ’tis true, but this could not have been very well avoided. But the benefits of an early start arc many, and easily seen, and it is hoped this fault will be remedied next year, for although our team met with much success, still with an earlier start, they could have met with more. We can say, however, and conscientiously too, that we have done well, but. we must remember though that we can do better. With this fact in view, and with the experience of the past year to back us, let us return next year all agreed upon one thing, and that is to work for our University, and never to cease, until we stand pre-eminent among our sister Colleges. II. C. B.University of Georgia. athletic Association. H. C. Brown,.........................President. L. I). Fricks,..................Vice-President. C. I). MoCutciien,...................Secretary. S. B. Yow,...........................Treasurer. Executive Committee. P. L. Fleming, Chairman. G. P. Butler, H. C. Brown. (133)’Y)arsitif football T'eam Geo. P. Butler.........................................Captain. Paul L. Frkmixg........................................Manager. L. D. Fricks, ) II. C. Moreno, Right End. A. Wrigley, C. 1). McCntchen, j C. A. Fleming, T. F. Smith, Right Tackle. L. B. Warren, C. 1). McCntchen, j Left End . I oft Tackle T. F. Smith, C. A. Fleming, Right Guard. J. C. C. Black, Jr., l eft Guard R. B. Nalley, ) D. Hirsch, j G. P. Butler, | C. Barrow, ) G. Shackleford, L. Halsey, E. E. Murphey, P. P. Ezelle, ' • • • • G. S. Crane, W. B. Fender, Center Rush. Quarter Back. ................Half Backs. (131) H. C. Brown, ) II. W. Stubbs, J Full Back.Crane, Stubbs Fricks Fender, Warren, Smith, Nalley, BUCK, Fleming, C. Moreno, Brown, )'. Fleming, Manager, K. Brown. Coach. McCutchen. Wrifler. tzclle, Halsey, Butler, Captain, Shackelford, Barrow, C. Mtirphey.Result of games placed. 1893. Athens, Ga., November 4. Nashville, Tcnn., November ti. University of Georgia, . . 6 University of Georgia, . . 0 Georgia School of'Technology (?), 22 VauderbiltUniversity, . . . .35 Savannah, Ga., November 30. University of Georgia, . . 0 Savannah Athletic Club, ... 0 Augusta, Ga., December x. Augusta, Ga., December 9. University of Georgia, . . 24 University of Georgia, . . 22 Augusta Athletic Club, .... 0 Furman University,...............8 (187)SENIORS. C. 1). McCutchen, S. B. Yow, . . . T. R. Moye, . . A. Wrigley, . . . S. B. Yow, . . . L. I). Fricks, . . W. A. Fuller, . . E. Upson, .... II. C. Moreno, . - D. C. Barrow (3), . H. C. Brown, . . C. I). McCutchen, . G. P. Butler, . . tss football Teams Captain, . . . Manager, . . . Ix'ft End, . . . Left Tackle, . . Left Guard, . Center, . . . . Right Guard, Right Tackle, . . Right End, . Quarter Back, . . Uft Half Back,. Right Half Back, Full Rack, . . JUNIORS. E. E. Murphev. V. P. Gear held. I). C. Barrow (4). C. E. Brand. E. M. Gammon. L. S. Selman. J. C. C. Black Jr. L. Saunders. J. H. Porter Jr. E. E. Murphev. J. J. Gibson. W. P. Gearrald. L. Halsey. (138)SOPHOMORES. FRESHMEN. P. P. Ezellk, . . H. Baoos, .... G. S. Crane, . . . T. A. Neal, .... C. C. Carson, . . . A. E. Thornton, . . T. F. Smith, . . . J. H. Buttrill, . . . E. C. Ryals, R. H. Lovejoy, ) P. P. Ezelle, . . . C. A. Fleming, . . II. V. Stubbs, . . . C. Burrow, . . . On account of the played two games: Seniors, . Sophomores, Captain.......... Manager, . . . . Left End, . . . Left Tackle, . . Left Guard, . . Center, . . . . Right Guard, . . Right Tackle, . . F. C. Ferrell. P. Steiner. P. Steiner. W. W. Larson. W. B. Fender. 1). Hirsch. L. B. Warren (Law School . L. Wellhouse. Right End, . . . . C. H. B. Floyd. Uft Half Back, . Right Half Back, Full Back, . . Quarter Back, . F. K. Boland. F. C. Ferrell. R. B. Davis. R. D. Draper. late start the Class league disbanded after having 12. Juniors...............C. G. Freshmen, . . . . 0. (13»)’Y)arsity baseball T'eam. Lindsley Hailey,................................Captain. R. B. Davis,....................................Catcher. J. O. Pettis,...................................Pitcher. L. B. Warren,......................................First Base. Lindsley Ilalscy,..........................Second Base. H. W. Stubbs,.............................. Third Base. L. D. Fricks,......................................Short Stop. W. L. Kemp........................................Field. J. C. Mell,................................Centor Field. Edward Upton................................R'ght Field. Substitutes. G. P. Butler, P- L- Fleming, C. 1). McCutchen. (140)Glass Baseball cTeams Lawyers. J. C. Mull,..........................................Captain. S. C. Upson,.........................................Manager. L. B. Warren,........................................Catcher. J. C. Moll,..........................................Pitcher. 1 . R. Lester,...................................First Base. Prof. J. Morris,................................Second liase. F. Mitchel,......................................Third Base. J. W. Welsh,.....................................Short Stop. Prof. Strahan,...........................................Left Held. Prof. Herty,....................................Center Field. A. D. Daly,......................................Fight Field. Seniors. C. R. Tidwell,....................................Captain. T. R. Move,.......................................Manager. C. D. McCutchen, .................................Catcher. T. R. Move, 1....................................Pitchers. E. Davis, J P. L. Fleming,.............................First Base. E. Upson,....................................Second Base. L. D. Fricks,.................................Third Base. H. C. Brown,..................................Short Stop. G. P. Butler,.................................Left Field. C. R. Tidwell,...............................Center Field. E. Davis, ............................Right Field. D. C. Barrow (3), f (Hi)Juniors. Sophomores. L. H. I.SKY, E. M. Gammon, W. L. Kemp, . R. A. Ridley, . W. P. Gearreld, L. Halsey, . . J. J. Gibson, . O. L. Rogers, . .1. T. Dunlap, J. W. Morton, S. G. Hunter, . C. A. Fleming, Captain. S. V. Brooks, . . Catcher. C. A. Fleming, •T. 0. Pettis, Pitcher. H. W. Stubbs, A. Thornton, ) C. Barrow, Short Stop. II. Lovejoy, . I eft Field. P. P. Ezelle, , Center Field. S. Hunter, . Right Field. W. M. Pettis Freshmen. R. B. Davis,..................... F. L. Fleming,................... R. B. Davis,..................... M. D. DuBose,.................. J. D. Brad well,................. M. Halsey,..................... F. C. Ferrell,................. B. A. Crane,................... F. L. Fleming,................. F. K. Boland,.................... W. S. Cothran,................... Captain. Manager. Catcher. . Pitcher. . First Base. Second Base. . Third Base. Short Stop. Left. Field. Center Field. Right Field. (H2)Result of Glass J aseball 6 ames 1. April 3. Sophomores 0 4 4 7 2 0 0 2 —19 Juniors . . . 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 1— 8 2. April 5. Lawyers. . . 2 8 0 2 o 0 5 0 —19 Freshmen . . 0 0 3 1 • •0 0 • 0 0- 8 3. April 7. Juniors . . . 1 1 1 6 0 1 0 1 3—14 Seniors . . . 1 1 0 1 i 0 0 1 1- 0 4. April 12. Sophomores . n 0 3 1 0 8 2 1 0-10 Freshmen . . 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0- 4 5. April 14. Seniors . . . 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2— 6 Lawyers . . . 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 1— 7 6. April 17. Freshmen . . ] 2 1 8 2 0 2 o 2-15 Juniors . . . 0 0 1 0 1 6 0 2 0-10 7. April 21. Seniors . . . 2 5 0 3 O 0 1 0 1 0-14 Sophomores . 5 2 0 3 0 4 I 0 •—15 8. April 24. Juniors . . . 0 7 0 1 10 0 2 C 2—34 Lawyers. . . 2 0 2 o 4 0 1 2 1—12 9. April 26. Freshmen . . 6 1 8 2 2 0 0 —19 Seniors . . . 9 8 1 4 0 1 0 —23 10. April 28. Lawyers. . . 2 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 0- 8 Sophomores . 2 1 0 0 1 7 1 2 —13 TRAMS. GAMES PL1YRD. WON. I-OST. PERCENTAGE. Sophomores . 4 4 0 1,000 Lawyers . . . 4 o 2 600 Juniors . . . 1 2 2 500 Seniors . . . 4 i 3 250 Freshmen . . 4 i 3 250 (143)T nnual field Qay program. Held on Campwi, April 47, 1894- Field Committee. I . P. Kzki.i.k, G. P. Butler, W. L. KKMP, C. R. 'I'lDWKf.!.. Marshals. L. I). Fricks, B. B. Bower, S. B. Yow, W. P. Geakrki.d. Judges. Hakky Ciiarbonnirr, Kart. Voxdbri.ietii, Goodloe Yancey. Starter, A. R. Nicholson. Order of Event . oO Yards Dash . . . Won by H. C. Brown . . Time, 6J seconds. 2nd, Arthur Wriglev. Throwing Baseball . Won by G. P. Butler - . Distance, 307 feet. 2nd, S. Hunter. 100 Yanis Dash . . . Won by H. C. Brown . . Time 10$ seconds. 2ud, Arthur Wrigley. Standing High .Tump Won by K. E. Dougherty • Height, 5 feet. 2nd, I). C. Barrow (3). Standing Broad Jump Won by H. C. Brown, Distance,9 feet JMn. 2nd, K. Pi. Dougherty. Standing Broad Jump (with bells), Won by Pi. E. Dougherty, Distance, 10 ft. Ill in. 2nd, P C. Ferrell. Putting 10 lb. Shot, Won by H. C. Brown, Distance, 34 ft. 81 in. 2nd, Pi. M. Gammon. Three-Legged Race, Won by Barrow C. A Ferrell, Time 6} seconds. Pole Vault ... Won by H.C. Brown .... Height, S feet. Hurdle Race............Won by J. Duulap .... Time, 17 seconds. 2nd, T. R. Moye. Running Broad Jump, Won by H. C. Brown . . Distance, 17 feet. 2nd, B. B. Bower. Half Mile Run . . . Won by J. D.Stalling . Time 2 min. 22! sec. 2nd, L. Halsey. Sack Race ...........Won by C. H. B. Floyd . Time 11 second . 2nd, J. Pittman. Three (3) Standing Broad Jumps, Won by E. Pi. Dougherty . . Distance, 30 ft. 1 in. 2nd, F. C. Pencil. Running High Jump, Won by T. R. Moye . . . Height, 5 ft. 2 in. 2nd, H. C. Brown. 'Throwing 16lb. Hammer Won by H.C. Brown, Distance, 70 ft. 8 In. 2nd, Pi. M. Gammon. One Mile Run . Won by J. I). Sidling, Time 6 min. 461 sec. Tug of War Juniors and Senior vs. College. Won by Juniors and Seniors. Junior and Senior Team—Fricks, Black, Gammon, Selmaii, Akcrmau. College Team—Warren, Smith, Carson, Larson, Neislor. •College Record. (144)University of Geop2 G Records. Erent. Itewrth Ifoftkr. 50 yards dash ■ 5J H. C. Brown, '94. • • J. R. Lane, »02. 100 yards dash . 10} see .... 2U0 yards dash .225 81 0 220 yards dash . 24$ sec . . . . B. F. Pickett, 01. Half mile mu . 2 min. 16i see . . One mile run . 5 miu. 40J See . . 110 yards hurdle . 16 sec . . . . B. F. Pickett, '91. Half mile bieyle nice . 1 min. $9‘ sec . . .... V. L. Smith, ’88. One mile bicycle race 3 min. 27 sec - . .... V. L. Smith, '88. ltuuning high jump . 5 foot 5 in • • • • A. Wrlgley, '94. •Standingbroad Jump(wlthout bells), 9 feet9 in . . . . Standing broad jump (with bells 10 feet 114 in . . . Kunning broad jump , IS feet 9 in . . . . . . . B. F. Pickett. ’91. Three standing broad jumps . ■ ■ ■ 30 feet 4 in . . . . . . J. K. Whelchcl, ’92. Hop. step and jump 41 feet Tin. . . J. C. -Moll, ’SS. Throwing baseball 334 feet J. C. Mel), ’88. Throwing 12 lb. hammer B. T. Frev, '93. Throwing 161b. hammer 70 feet 3 in ... . Putting 12 ll . shot. . • 43 feet A. Broyles, ’87. Putting 16 lb. shot 3-1 feet 8} inches . . . . .11. C. Brown, ’94. Three legged race 6J see Barrow, ’90. Sack race 11 seconds . . . . . . . 0. H. B. Floyd, ’97. (1451o University bicycle Gluk. 7Wembers. G. F. Hurt, ’96, ('. N. Noisier, ’97, W. R. Dancy, ’96, W. L. Moss, ’97, G. W. Reab, ’95, •I. V. Morton, ’95, II. H. Steiner, ’95, I’. B. Phillips, ’97, J. A. Morton, ’96, II. Hillver, ’96, R. D. Draper, ’96, A. L. Tidwell, ’97. Honorary Member—Jesse Coates. (HO)T be locating Qlub. Qfficers. H. A. Alexander, .... President. W. A. Wilkins, Jr., .... Treasurer. “Daisy” Crew. Billie Armstrong, Jim Dunlap, Dave Barrow, 3d, E. K. Mnrphey. “Trio” Crew. Lindsley Halsey, Malvern Halsey, George Beckett, Hal Moreno. “ Atalanta” Crew. Ilolcoinbe Bacon, Edward llyals, Harry Alexander, Lunsford Fricks. (147)The University of Qeorgia tennis Association. Organised Match 16. 1894. E. W. Barnwell, ’93, G. W. Beckett, ’94, Shirley Brooks, ’96, II. G. Colvin, ’97, W. R. Dancy, ’9(5, K. E. Dougherty, ’95, L. D. Fricks, ’94, 7V embers. Hoi.com bk Bacon, ’96..........................President. G. P. Buti.er, ’94........................Vice-President. F. Iv. Boland, ’97 . . . Secretary and Treasurer. V. A. Fuller, ’94, K. M. Gammon, ’95, W. P. Genrrald, ’95, J. J. Gibson, ’95, H. S. Hansell, ’96, G. W. Reab, ’95, A. B. Mohlev, ’97, E. Davis, ’94, P. P. E' elle, ’96, W. A. Harris, ’95, J. W. Hendricks, ’97, C. H. Holden, ’96, G. F. Hurt, ’96, W. L. Kemp, ’95, L. A. Lindsey, ’97, N. M. Moore, ’94, II. C. Moreno, ’93, C. A. Mize, ’97, T. A. Neal, ’96, C. H. Neisler, ’97, J. H. Porter, dr., ’95, (148) E. C. Kyals, '96, A. L. Tidwell, ’97, C. R. Tidwell, ’94, II. C. Brown, ’94, II. W. Stubbs, ’96.Glass Tree Gxercises, Glass of 'C)U, Unioersitj of Georgia. Wednesday, April 18, 1894. program. Prayer, .... The Chaplain, J. B. Madden. Poem,.......................Poet, T. A. McGregor. Song,................................The Class. Planting Tree,.......................The Class. Yell,................................The Class. “ Pipe of Peace,”....................The Class. Benediction,.....................Prof. Barrow. (149)Wo are the Class of ’91, Assembles! here to-day, To plant our little sapling And to sing our little- lay. We look ahead with much deli "lit To the day wc get our "dips,” And embark upon the Sea of Life, With smile wreathed round our lips. Chomps: Ta-ra-ra, Ta-rn-ra, The Class of ’91. A finer looking set of men Was never seen before. We started out as Freshmen, A lovely Set of boys, Who had Just become accustomed To do without their toys; Hut it did not take us long to learn To look out for number one, And not to let the college sports Relieve us of our "mun.” CllOKl'8. From Freshman Class to .Sophomore Was but an easy jump, But to get from Soph to Junior We had to get a hump. From Junior then to Senior We came without a halt, And now If we don't get our “dips" It won’t be our fault. Chomps. Glass gong The sapling which we plant to-day We contemplate with glee, Because we think this sapling Will become a mighty tree. Wc think that ours will grow aloft And spread Its arms out wide, Although most ull of the class trees planted Here before have died. Chorus. We’ll plant our tree and give our yell Aud smoke our pipe of peace, And when each one has takeu a puff Why, then 1 think we’ll cease. We’ll water our little sapling With a bottle of "Eau de Vie,” Because we think that "Eau de Vie" Has a life-giving quality. Chorus. We all love one another, With more than the love of a friend ; We'll serve each other gladly I'ntil our Journey’s end; And when we've crossed the .Sea of Life, Almost to the other shore, We’II each recall with kindest love This Class of ’04. G. w. Beckett. (150)0£ istle to the philippians I NOW ye, little Philippians, that it came to pass, at that season of the year when the members of the Faculty do throw dice to see who shall go abroad to study (?), that I, Philippi, did throw the largest number—of Freshmen. In as much as it had been agreed upon that he who could throw the largest number should travel in foreign lauds, I went forth, having donned the trappings of a General and adjusted golden spectacles upon my brassy features. For twelve long months have I been going to and fro in the earth and walking up and down in it; but since ye have been delivered unto me to be persecuted and tormented for a term of four years, 1 shall soon return and make myself known unto you. In the meantime, peace be with you, for when I come into your midst woe shall be thine! He that knoweth not the art of Mattery shall fall by the wayside, but unto him who Hattcretli and indulgcth in all manner of bootlicking many and great honors shall be bestowed. Yea, verily, the flatterer and boot-licker shall meet their reward. Yc may pay homage to the King of the Faculty, for lie hath certain powers; but know ye that by me Corporals are created and Lieutenants given commissions testifying to their bravery. Little Philippians, obey your officers and guard well the honor of your commander, for the Emperor of Germany returneth with me and verily much is expected of my soldiers. I have spoken to him often of my Regiments and my Drum Corps, of my Officers and my Privates; but now he comes to see with his eves that which he has heard; so, soldiers, wear your collars, shoes aud other accoutrements and try to put up as good an appearance as possible, for the reputation of your commander is in the balance. The monarchs of Europe have placed crowns of laurel upon my brow, and have said unto me: “Tarry yet longer in our land, for well do you know that a prophet is not without honor save in his own country.” Often have I rebuked them, saying: “My services are needed in my own land, and if my real worth is not there fully known, it matters not, for conscious of my abilities, I shall return to my people and ever labor to raise them to a true knowledge of my greatness.” Finally, Philippians, rejoice and be glad, knowing that ye have a leader who willingly easts aside all these honors to serve you.Years at Qollege. The Freshman sees life lull of hoj e, Ambition holds him in her train ; Examinations make him mope, He longs to “rise,” but longs in vain. The Sophomore, with conscious pride, On maidens casts his lingering eyes; He takes the dear ones out to ride, His heart soon breaks—lost is his prize. The Junior works both morn and night— He feels the “honor” in his hand ; The “blue list” ruins his prospects bright— He’s the maddest man in all the land. The Senior no ambition feels— He breaks hearts, his has long been steeled He eats each day three happy meals, Receives his “dip,” and then is “heeled.” The Lawyer with the Fresh stands pat; He nothing knows Save to cut prayers; His P. A. coat and old silk hat Show that he aims to put on airs. A. H.Serenade Oil, loveliest maid of Athens town, As thou art passing on thy way, Wilt thou not deign a moment’s heed Unto a minstrel’s lowly lay? A rosebud in the garden reigned— Sweet heiress of a royal line— Her wondrous beauty made her queen ; But then—it was as naught to thine. A sunbeam fell upon a flower, And gilded it by magic wile With splendor rare, but sadly failed To match the beauty of thy smile. A lily ’neath the wind’s caress Her chalice swayed in grace divine— A motion like a melody, But then—it was as naught to thine. H. A. A. The minstrel, too, doth strive in vain Thy | ccrlcss beauty to express, But words must fail—they only tell A part of all thy loveliness. (163)  be Student’s Soliloquy". TK parody. To cram or not to cram—that’ the question. Whether ’tis better for us to “bust,” The result of lack of study nud of ignorance, Or to take book against im|»ending woe, And by hard study ’scape it. To cram, to pass, What more; and by that cramming end for once The being plucked, and all the painful incidents Following after. ’Tis a consummation Devoutly to be wished. To cram, to jwss, To pass, perchance to “bust,” aye there’s the rub. For in that last “exam” what questions come, When on one sleepless night we rest our fate, Must give us pause. There’s the respect That makes our idleness of so long life; For who would hand in paper poor prepared, With half the questions left unanswered, And run the risk of getting zero; who Would gird himself to meet the taunts of more Successful fellows in his class; who would Spurn the thought of parent’s ire o’er money Wasted, and years illy spent; who would frame Dull pictures of a lowly life, beset By ignorance, and bereft of love, but that The thought that after all the crammiug the “bust” may be. But more complete, makes us endure rather A “bust” with sleep, than one that comes upon us With bodily weakness, headache and bleared eyes. Thus dalliance docs make idlers of us all; And thus the native hue of cramming is Sicklied over with the pole ca t of work; And thus it is we linger long in College At each examination badly plucked. A. H. IM)T'be UnParcl°nafrle Sin A nmn once went to work, a groat dislike to win. He thought and thought and then he bought A parquet seat, the eighteenth in, Went out ’twixt acts and came in late ; By this he won a cordial hate. This spurred him on, he longed for more. He worked his brain and once again Aroused dislike, disgust galore. He unto him a loud voice got And carefully explained the plot. Still more of hate did he demand ; He went his way and one hot day Ho asked an apoplectic man Tf it was hot enough for him. The Cup of hate tilled to the brim. One day be tempted fate too far. Beside him sat a graduate. A maid just 'scajK-d from Madam's rule. He asked the ancient question : “Are You glad or sorry to leave school?” It was the fatal straw that broke The camel's back. Alas! alack! The maiden slew him with a look. They dug his grave, alack! alas! And buried him in a coffin of brass. (155) he Fatal Fipin£ It was drill time on the campus, And the soldier boys were there; The llret drum loug had sounded forth With quite a martial air. The Major in his office -«it listening to reports Of the ones that were delinquent. As they slowly sallied forth. Still the noise remained a mystery, Though he laid it to a gnu In the hands of some young private That was brimming o’er with fun. There were smiles upon the faces of the boys Who gathered round, but about the guilty private Not a one did make a sound. Tin- drill at lad was over, And the Mqjor issues forth. Commanding all the officers To sec him at his post. Then he found the grave offender And he likewise sent for hilt), Whom he soundly reprimanded For making such a din. “Rut I did not know t’was loaded,” Was the answer that he made; Said he only snapped the trigger As with the gun he played. And he then advised the Major That the guns be all looked o’er, In ease a wandering cartridge Should be found within the bore. Rut the Major lie was positive About this grave offence, And very strongly hinted that The youth should wander lienee. Wander from the “Classic” city, From the ’Varsity so dear, Though the Sophomore vainly pleaded That his innocence was clear. So from this take a lesson, boys, And when you get your guns. Cast vour eye into the chamber Asa guard against sucli fun. For the firing of a weapon On the campus is a sin ; So keep your guns quite silent If your Dip. you wish to win. «. w. K. Rut soon a loud explosion rang upon the campus calm, And the Major from his office hurried out ill great alarm, Quickly scanning all the faces of the noble soldier-boy , Asked the officer on duty the occasion of the noise. (1-36)T'be Gonv et Dramatic Qlub “ From ft Justice of tile peace who forgives no offence, But construes the law in its most rigid sense, And still to bind over will Hud some pretence. Libera no !" play— be Judicial parce. CAST OF CHARACTERS. H. C. Tuck, . . . Cobh Davis, . . W. A. Harris, . . . W. T. Tuggle, 1 F. C. Ferrell, ' Henry Porter, I I). C. Barrow, 3d, j G. W. Beckett, ) S. L. Olive, E. E. Murphcy, Holcombe Bacon, j •Justice of the Peace. . . . . “Big” Chief. ................Criminal. . Little Boys with Rocks. ..............Silent Men. ................Witnesses. Absentees from Court. (137)7V odern PRELUDE. The Athens football team had played a game That covered them with victory and fame. Their college mates full well did celebrate Their feat so glorious, and their conquest great. But sonic of them, so lightsome was their joy, Upon the streets of Athens chanced to toy, And by some grievous necideut no doubt tier beautiful electric lights knocked out. This was a crime- at least o thought the Chief, And o’er it mused the Mavok in much grief. The next day saw a sad and sombre sight. The Mayok mad, the bog$ iu fearful plight. He lined them, fast as they might come to view For what they did, and what they didn't do. Old Jove was ne’er more powerful than Hr Xor hurled more thunder, even on a spree. The scene’s the court-room, and what there took place, We faintly try on | apor here to trace. Gourt geene. THE MAYOR. Mv worthy chief, thou valiaut mau and tried, Stand forth, and here in open court proclaim "Who have with boldness our sound laws defied For this disturbance, who here is to blame. TIIE CHIEF. My honored sire, last evening rather late My force was roused from sleep by noises great. It seemed as Bedlam sudden broken out, Wo went straight to the spot or thereabout; A hundml students, bent on mischief, saw, Without regard for us. or for the law Armed to the teeth, wo dared not them attack; Borne others, watchers on, were not far back These were unarmed—we lirst did closely seau And then arrestee! -Sire, there stands the man ! But he arrested, dared us to molest By shaking to a friend of his arrest; (1.58)Till friend did dare some insolent remark And we arrested him r’oi fn the dork, But then tlie mob perceived us, and we lied And now have ’gainst them coses made Instead. THE MAYOR. Well done, my faithful Chief, long may you live Your pay to draw, your counsel us to give Who heeds the light and seeks to run away, Oft lives to light or run another day. Cutprit stand forth! What say you to this charge, This grave ofl’ouse of being out at large When my night watchmen should be 'lowed to sleep? Why should you force them such strict vigil keep? The very gods look down on you in wrath. Do you not knoyv that night is made for rest? That you may better walk your daily path I’ll you of fifty dollars now divest. And you who dared my soldiers to airront By words unseeming to their modest ears. One hundred from your pocket quickly count Or take a seuteucc for full twenty years. And what know you of this disgraceful scene lu which my Majesty and Power both 'Neath ruthless feet have badly trampled been And slight regarded my official oath? Nothing! How dare you thus so lightly treat Tills act, this riot, this most barefaced CRIME! Tav five au«l twenty, little enough I weel For such dense ignorance in our classic clime. And ye who stand around, and look as though Ye think Tins Court its pre-tige doesn’t know, I ook well, ye give us not the slightest cause To throw round you the meshes of our laws, For wk are wtkong aud great, and feel our Power And know how much aliove you we do tower, Even now proclaim to us allegiance due Or feel our mighty, weighty wrath on you. THE STUDENT BODY IN CHORUS. Hail, our liege Lord, with humbled hearts we |»euk, No more shall Athens see a student’s freak; No more shall we attempt thee any harm; No more for fun give out false fire alarm ; No more- turn darksome night to howling day; No more in life will we indulge in play. And by the presence, sentenced by thy look, Without thy mercy we are quite forsook. Here on our knees, who never knelt before, To thee swear fealty; we thee here Implore I t not thy wrath cou-ume u- as a fire, But let sweet charity temper thy just ire. A. H. )The Senior’s Iu such a time as this, ’tis strange How pain and pleasure meet; How the mournful strains of sorrow’s voice Are measured by joyous feet. We are glad to lay text-books aside for awhile Aud never stand finals again, But the thoughts of parting with all we’ve known here Can bring with them nothing but pain. We are glad to quit Campus and old Yahoo, To see again “ Home, Sweet Home,” But we bate to leave Athens, and we’ll think of her still, No matter wherever we roam. Of the various times in the lives of men, There are times when they watch and sleep, There are times when the world seems happy and gay, There are times when they mourn and weep. But the saddest time one knows in his life, And none lived without ever a sigh, Is when lie looks in the face of those whom he loves And bids them a last good-bye. l«0) farewell. Yes, sad tears will gather in true men’s eyes When they say farewell to each other. Whether comrade, shipmate, classmate, or friend. Or closer still, a brother. Tears, whether sprung from sorrow or joy. Are manly and noble, not weak. They are safety valves of hearts surcharged With trouble and ready to break. If you’ll watch the foremost fighting rank In danger’s dark career. You’ll find the hand most daring there Has wiped away the tear. But 1 stray from my subject, tlie past seems brig But as sometimes there arc S|K»t8 on the sun; So those happy days had troubled clouds Across their path to run. How oft has Philippi with loud, trumpet voice. Filled our trembling souls with dismay. As he sent us to board in harsh, scolding tones In Col.’s inimitable way ?And “ Proty ” never stuck to spots in his life, Am! has busted us times without end. We’ll forget the busts, but we cannot forget I)r. Campbell, our ever loved friend. Professor Hooper’s Latin was hard oftentimes And Professor was sometimes hard too, But in the future, when thinking of true loved friends, We’ll think, Professor, of you. There’s a name in our Faculty hard to pronounce, We call him “ Charby” yon know. Well, from everything he ever did or said Sweet memories shall ever flow. But shall the memory of Harry White die? Shall the sound of his voice pass away ? This needs no answer, our children shall love “ Old Harry ” when we arc gray. The future may bring us many sorrows and joys, May bring to us wealth or fame, But whatever it brings amidst it all, We’ll cherish our Chancellor’s name. 0 Mental science, morality, logic may go, As day shall tread upon day, Yet his tender words and kindly smile Shall with us forever stay. Many stars have shown on our lives as we’ve passed To hrighten learning’s hall to our view, But of all that have gleamed aud twinkled there The brightest, Professor Wilcox, was you. The green leaves of summer will soon turn brown, ’Neath the sultry kiss of the sun ; They’ll wither and die and fall to the ground, And then their nice is run. But the memory of Charlie Strahan’s gentle voi« , His ways so calm and serene, Shall not as summer leaves fade and die, lint with us shall ever l c green. If there is one that lives for whom tender thoughts We’ll carry with us to our grave, A man whom we love, a man without guile, That man, 1 know, is “ Old Dave."’ 51) W. G. P.pandora’s Photograph’s. Stephens: “A man occupied with public business cannot attend to orthography.” Barrett Phinizy: “I am not great, but simply elevated.” Yow : “ A book in breeches.” Haskell: “ A sophisticated rhetorician, inebriated with the exuberance of his own verbosity.” Dorsey: “The Phoenix of convivial felicity.” Charles David Hume Kline: “Had I been present at the creation, I could have given some useful hints for the better ordering of the universe.” Bower: “1 must sit down, for when I am up everythi that is in my mind conies out.” (102)Beane: “That was a fellow whom we cannot imitate.’ Wilkins: “ His manners were distinguished, his tastes magnificent, his carriage noble.” Zip: “Look, he’s winding up the watch of his wit. Bv and by it will strike.” Armstrong: “ You say, you nothing owe; and so 1 sav: He only owes who something has to pay.” Lucy Cobb Girls: “Eyes that shame the violet, or the dark drop that on the pansy lies.” Lyndon: “ Why should every creature drink but I '! Why, man of morals, tell me why?” Sheffield: “He is a soldier fit to stand by C'sesar and give direction.” Hurt: “All’s well that ends well.” McGregor: “The melancholy madness of | oetrv without the inspiration.” tie Jester: “The Prince of lawyers.” Charby’s Astronomy: “Was ever book containing such vile matter so fairly bound?” Taggart: “Heaven bless thee! thou hast the sweetest face I ever looked on.” Akcrman: “ He that hath knowledge sparet h his words.” Edwin Davis: “Gin a man with such angelic face so many sins within him hide?” H. Bacon: “He is slowly but surely coming.” Audley Morton: “Sum pholks iz like an egg, so ful ov themselves that they kant hold ennything else.” Mel I: “lie, overbold, boasted himself preeminent in song.” Beckett: “It will devise most elegant music.” University of Georgia: “Her children rise and call her blessed.” 3)T'be Tl8 a aad, sad talc, this tale of mine, A talc I Imte to tell; The talc of how the .Seniors fought And how the Seniors fell. A gallant baud of handsome men, With hearts as light and gay, And voices as ringing with brightest hoj)c As the mocking birds in May, Was this Senior team, of which I write, Who entered in tin games With smiles as full of confidence Ah the famous Jesse James. The first game which these Seniors played Was with the Junior team, And the conclusion was forced upon them That "things are not as they seem,” For it seemed 'twould be an easy thing To beat them If they’d try, Ami that it looked as though they could I really can’t deny, But somehow when they came to bat, And thought to lose the "sphere,” By sending it with one fell stroke On a journey through the air, The ball would seem To take on wings And fly this way and that And curve all round the batter’s legs And dodge all round his bat. And laugh aloud in fiendish glee As it whizzed by very near And landed in the catcher's mil, Willie the Senior fanned the air: Or else just for the fun of it Would come by quite demurely And coax the Senior to strike at it After taking aim quite surely. Ah! Then--------with muscles rendered strong By excitement and by training, Qppops That Senior would make sure Ills aim, And every muscle stralulng, Draw back and with a murderous gleam (»ive the baseball such a rap As would semi it to the left fielder, Known a “Tar-Bucket” Jim Duulap. Whon in the Held, tho Seniors thought That the ball played every antic, And always stayed Just out of reach Of the Seniors rendered frantic By seeing Juniors running buses As though they had all day With laughing, skipping, hopping, jumping. Along their merry way. But the Juniors would become fatigued Perambulating bases, And take the outfield to rest awhile, By reclining in their places. Thus they played and kieked up dust On the baseball field’s arena While tire sorrowful Seniors growled and cn»ed At the score of Hal Moreno. When the sun was down and the janitor moke Was lowering Cbarhy’s tlag, And those who bad money on the Junior team Were contemplating a jag. This interesting game was brought to a close And the Seniors thought 'twas the tricks Of that villainous ball which lost them the game On a score of fourteen to six. The next game played by the Seniors was With a team of Professors partly, While the balance of this selected team Was law class men right smartly. The ball apparently had become fatigued For it played its tricks no more,But still iu Home unaccountable way Tlie -Seniors lost as before. And the sorrowful team who lost the game, All wished that they could Ilnd .Some hole which they could crawl into And pull iu the opening behind. The lawyers won on seven to hi'x, Which was a very good score, And when a mao has done his beat. Than that he can do no more. The Sophomore team was the next one. Which the .Seniors were booked to play, But the first time that they played them, A thunderstorm spoiled the day. And so the game was postponed until The second day after at four, And again the gallant Senior team Met the plucky Sophomore, But ns usual the game was a dead sure thing For the side the Seniors played, Though everybody lost the count Of the run’s the two sides made. And when the game was emits I And Morcuo announced the score. The Seniors were found to have made fourteen And the Sophomores made one more. Oil! cruel, stern, relentless Fate, Why treat the Seniors thus? Why cause them all such sorrow and shame? Why make them growl and cuss? And oh, ye implacable scorer. Who sat so undisturbed When others were excited And their angry passions curbed, Why did you not for charity’s sake Score the Seniors a few more runs, And instead of making big round O’s Just make some little IV? How different then would things have been ! How it would have altered the case! The Seniors then would not have come out The last ones in the race. The Freshmau team is a plucky one, But in spite of all their pluck. They canu- out like the Seniors did. For they played in mighty hard luck. Aud when these two unlucky teams Came to play against each other Each wished the other team to beat. And tried their best to bother Their own men so as to allow the men Of the opposing team to score. And thus you sec, as a natural tiling. The score grew more aud more. At one time it looked as though The Seniors could enjoy defeat, But they did not have juito time enough, And so they had to beat. And here the Seniors had to bear Misfortune with a grin, For when they really wished to lose They were obliged to win. And now, oh kiudest reader, My tale Is almost through, The score was such an enormous one I'm afraid to tell it to you, But still, 1 suppose I have It to do, As my duty 1 will not tlec, The Freshman team made nineteen runs And the Seniors, twenty-three. The Seniors are now a discouraged lot, For them defeat has no terrors, For they have gotten used to defeat In their “Comedy of F.rrors.” G. B.Chestnuts. AX OLD JOKR. Senior—“ Why is Char by like a leopard?” Junior (at beginning of the college term)—“ I don’t know.” Senior—“ Because he can’t change his DESIGN' IX NATURE. Freshman—“ Why did they put that miling around the top of the water-tower?” Lawyer—“ To keep Barrett Phini .v from drinking out of it every morning when he comes down to college.” AX AGNOSTIC. Fricks—“ Why is it that a horse can see so much better at night than a man ?” Harris—“ I don’t know. I’m no optimist” A MISTAKE CAUSED BY BAD PRONUNCIATION. Charby—“ Mr. Dunlap, what is a toll ” Dunlap (who has just returned from “ up the river,” and knows nothing about his lesson)—“A vault is something used in a bank to keep money in.” what’s in a name? Bower (after mispronouncing a proper name)—“ Professor, is there any fixed rule for the pronunciation of proj er names?” Prof. Hiley—“No sir; you might just ns well pronounce your name Bore as Bower.” TOO MUCH LATIN. Law Professor—“ Mr. Upson, is the testimony of a dying man accepted as evidence in the trial of his murderer?” Steve Upson—“Yes, sir; postmortem testimony is accepted by any court.” NEEDED MORE TIME. Dr. Boggs—“ Mr. McCutchen, what does our author say in regard to the doctrine of Free Will excluding the j ossibil-ity of foreknowledge and providential direction?” McCutchen (having time to read only part of first sentence) —“ I believe, Doctor, that’s where he says: ‘ It’s one thing to ask this question and quite another to answer it.’ ” ASKING TOO MUCH OF A SENIOR. Dr. Boggs—“ Mr. Fleming, look into your mind and sec if consciousness does not testify to the existence of moral freedom in choice.” Paul Fleming—“ Doctor, I have been suffering from my eyes for some time and don’t like to tax them.” (1« Jol es A HAD MISTAKE. Professor Morris—(Finding a mistake in an exercise being read by a Freshman)—Mr. Halsey, what have you there? Malvern Halsey—(Fating candy on rear bench and thinking Professor Morris has noticed it.)—I have some candy, sir. A DEEP MIND. Reab—(soliloquizing)—If all cards were blank, what a tine mind trainer whist would be. GENEROSITY. They say Henry Hillyer is so generous that when he has no money he goes down to the V. M. C. A. bowling alley and sets the ten-pins up. EX POUT. Pinckney Steiner was the greatest sport In college, But now they have sent him away, And his heart is filled with sadness, For he’s an export now, they say. A VALID EXCUSE. Real), ’95, to Prof. McP-r-n.—“Professor, I was up late last night, and in consequence could not study and would like to be excused.” ONE OP “Zip’s” JOKES. “Zip,” to Senior French Class—“If you put a puppy on a block of ice, in what way will it resemble a kiss?” Puzzled Seniors give it up and “Zip” smilingly says, “It will be dog-on-ice.” AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE. Prof. Johnson—(In Sophomore Latin Class)—“Mr. B., where was Mr. Caesar born?” To the Public.'—I hereby challenge any man, barring Harrington, to play checkers for gate receipts and stakes of a Coca-Cola ticket to 6 cents a side. g. f. hurt. SOME TIIINCS YOU HAVE NOTICED, PERHAPS. Many strange things are to be seen In this world, If we would only watch out. We’d find some things so very strange As to cause a dumb man to shout. We’d find some boys who would never cut. And some who would never He, And someday we’d find Uiat Homer Black Lucy Cobl. had not passed by. We’d find Walter Cothran’s legs were straight, And that Perry HIU was not a sj ort, And that Old Boh Draper was not knock-kneed, And that Gammou’s legs were short. i«. o c. (167)0up 0ne Qent a W)opd page. Fob Sai.k—One barrel of hair. Apply to Manager of’Vanity Football Team. Wanted—A quart of “ Old Corn.” University Boat Club. Fob Salk—Conversation upon any subject. Apply to C. T. Haskell. Fob Salk:—Two jugs. Apply to C. J). MeCutchen. Wanted—A bromo-seltzcr. Oscar Lyndon. Wanted—Some one to wake me up after chapel service. John Vivian Stubbi. Wanted—A man tall enough for ine to throw a ball to. Gammon. Wanted—New benches in English room. Students. Fob Salk—A piece of candy. Apply to Malvern Halsey. Wanted—A chain to twist around my finger. J. M. Harrington. Fob Sale—Four pair white trousers. Apply to Jam Students. Found—Two Lucy Cobb sports, labeled “ Carter and Black, ’96.” Wanted—Some one to cut Jasper Dorsey and Big Smith’s Hair. Students. Fob Sale—Old fish; guaranteed to be tender. Apply (o Jtioloyieal lAxboratory Students. Wanted—Some noise loud enough to drown “Froggy” Cook’s voice. Liberal price offered by suffering students. Wanted—Proof that Darwin’s theory of evolution Is correct, and that Camnk supplies the “ Missing Link.” Any student who will positively identify Camak with the “ Missing Link ” will do me a great favor aud will be liberally rewarded. D. C. Barrow, jUt. Fob Salf—A number of Choice Corner I-ots in the territory surrounded by Hurt’s Shoes. Wanted—An automatic “elevator” in Clems. College Boys. Fob Sale—A good second-hand boot-lick on any member of the faculty. Sanders, '95. Found—A method to produce class spirit among the members of '94. Athens Dispensary. Wanted—An automatic machine to mark students absent from chapel. Professors. (108)@ur H)ime 7Vluseum. “ Walk right, this way and see the greatest curiosities of the age.” Just to the right you will sec Jasper Dorsey, “ 'Ihe Cottonheaded Man from Hall” In the cage on the opposite side you will see “ Big” Smith, “ The Man with Lone Hair,” captured in the swamps of lower Georgia and not yet civilized. In the next cage you will see “ The Putty-faced Irishman,” captured in the wilds of Ireland, and brought to this country last fall for the first time. Mr. Oscar Lyndon, “ The Comical Freak,” will now entertain you for a few moments, and then Mr. David C. Barrow, •3rd, will give one of his beautiful, artistic drills. We would now call your attention to Mr. Joe Akcrman, “ Tht Fat Boy,” and Mr. .Suit . Carter, “ The Living Skeleton,” who sit side by side upon the next platform. The eage to your l ight is occupied by “ The Dog face Boy,” who is the greatest curiosity on exhibition in America. Messrs. Jim Dunlap and Bob Itidley will soon give an exhibition upon the next platform and a prize of S-jO.OO is offered to anyone who can walk like them. We will now close.our little show by giving you a glimpse at “ The Prize Beauty of America,” Mr. John White Morton, who received by far the largest number of votes for the “ Handsomest man at the University of Georgia.”BooKs by the I est Authors. “College Life,” by Edwin Davis. In a striding manner Mr. Davis relates how lie went through college without buying a book, and led Athens every week without permission. He very modestly attributes all of his success to his persuasive abilities. In this work Mr. Davis also treats upon the trials of college life, and ’tis pathetic to read his accounts of how, during the cold nights of winter, he went from house to house looking for “spots” in Physics, Biology and Latin. “Predestination,” by C. Thomson Haskell, 99 vols. Mr. Haskell treats of this subject in quite a voluminous style, which is characteristic of most of his writings, but there are many novel expressions in this work which commend it to the public. Ilis highly imaginative mind is given full sco| e in the discussion of the subject, and his arguments are convincing. “Skirt Dances, Artistic Drills, etc.” This is the title of a splendidly written book by Messrs. Bacon, Armstrong and Barrow. We heartily recommend it to all parties wishing to get up amateur performances. “Civilization in the South Sea Islands; or Why Little Willie was Killed.” Price, one dime. Extracts from this very exciting and blood-curdling novel were read by the author, Mr. McGregor, before the members of the Senior Class last winter, and, it is needless to say, were very much enjoyed. Mr. McGregor has treated of this subject in his earnest, logical style and produced a novel which is sure to rank among the greatest works of the kind ever published. “An Explanation; or Why I Entered the Sophomore Class,” by li. D. Draper. Mr. Draper proves conclusively that ho did not petition the Faculty to let him enter the Sophomore Class for fear lie could not stand the Freshman finals, but because lie didn’t want to be in the same class with Oscar Lyndon. “Why I Love Jesse,” by “Big” Smith. This is a very pathetic and touching love story, in which the little disagreements common to all love affairs are beautifully described. Mr. Smith ends his beautiful little novel thus: “In the words of the Immortal Jesse, P-O-O-H!” (DO)Statistics. Knowing the interest that was taken in the statistics published in last year’s Pandora, the present Board of Editors has again given the students of the University an opportunity to express their opinions u|hmi questions of particular interest to University men. In doing so, we have given up much time in order to give to our readers accurate results of the voting ns conducted among the students of the University of Georgia. We find that the average Senior is G months younger this year than last; his height is exactly the same and he weighs one pound more than last year’s average Senior. The average Junior is one year younger; his height is the same, but he weighs 5 pounds more than the average Junior last year. The average Sophomore is one year younger; he has grown one-quarter of an inch and weighs 5 | ouuds more. The Freshman is six months younger ; his height is one inch less than last year, but his weight is tin same. In the vote for the most intellectual student in college, Johnson came first; Yow, second and II. Bacon, third. J. W. Morton received the largest number of votes for the handsomest student in college; Henry Brown second, and George Butler, third. Paul Fleming is considered the most popular student at the University; Joe Akerman, second and Henry Brown, third. Scott is the favorite author. Gladstone is the favorite public character; Crisp, second and Cleveland, third. Evans is the favorite candidate for Governor, but Atkinson has many staunch supporters among the students of the University and the voting was very close. More interest seems to have been taken in the contest for the most popular professor than in any of the others, and, after compiling the statistics, we find that the students have decided that Professor Barrow is the most popular professor in the University of Georgia ; Professor Hooj er second, and Dr. Herty, third. Professors Morris, C'harbonnier, Strahun and McPherson also received several votes. SENIOR CLASS. The average age of the Seniors is 20 years and 4 months ; height, 5 feet, 9 £ inches; weight, 149 pounds. Professor Hooper received the largest number of votes for the most jh j -ular professor, with Professor Barrow a close second. Paul Flemingreccived the largest numberof votes for the most popular student in college; Akerman, second and Black, third. (171)Johnson is considered the most intellectual student in college by the members of this class; Vow, second and Moreno, third. ITenrv Brown received the largest number of votes for the handsomest student in college; Alexander, second'and J. W. Morton, third. In the vote for the most popular student in the Senior Class, Paul Fleming came first; Akerman, second and Brown, third. Vow received the largest number of votes for the most intellectual student in the Senior Class and Bacon came second. There seemed to be so many handsome men in the Senior Class that it was difficult for them to decide just who was the handsomest, but Brown received the largest numberof votes, and Butler, Fleming and Harrington tied for second place. We find among the Seniors -I Presbyterians, 3 Baptists, 2 Methodists, 2 Christians, 1 Hebrew and 14 members of no church at all. The Seniors, after four years of e. | crienec, decide unanimously that Saturday recitations should be abolished, and but one Senior believes in compulsory chapel. Shakespeare is their fovorite author. Evans received four more votes for Governor than Atkinson. Gladstone seems to be the Seniors’ favorite public character ; Crisp, second and Cleveland, third. Judging from the statistics, we are led to believe that the Seniors keep their lamps burning late at night, but seldom see the sun rise. (1 The Seniors believe that athletic sports help the mind as well as the body and are unanimous in their support of college athletics. Fourteen play football, thirteen play baseball and nine play tennis. Seven Seniors subscribe to the Bed and Black and ten to the Magazine. JUNIOR CLASS. The members of this class average 19 years in age ; 5 feet 9j inches in height and 146 pounds in weight. The Juniors rise at 7:35 a. tu. and only sit up long enough at night to prc| are their lessons for the next day, retiring at 11:10 p. m. The Juniors voted Professor Barrow the most popular professor in the University, and Professors Hooper and Herty tied for second place. With the members of this class, Paul Fleming is considered the most popular student in college; Brown, sccoud and Fricks, third. Brown is considered the handsomest student in college by the members of this class; J. V. Morton, second and George Butler and llansell, third. Johnson is considered the most intellectual student in college by the Juniors ; Vow, second and George Butler and Bacon, third. Black received 13 votes for the most popular student in in this class and Halsey 5. Harris received 17 votes fov the most intellectual Junior and Guyton 4. ?2)J. W. Morton received the largest nund er of votes for the handsomest student in his class and Murphy second. Nine Juniors are members of no church : 5 are Methodists; 4 Presbyterians, 3 Baptists, 2 Episcopalians and 1 Lutheran. Two Juniors believe in Saturday Recitations and four in compulsory chapel. Scott is their favorite author. Atkinson received one more vote than Evans in this class for Governor. Cleveland is the favorite public character and Gladstone next. All the Juniors agree that the University needs money more than anything else. All the Juniors favor athletics. One-third play football, one-half baseball, and two-thirds tennis. Thirteen subscribe to Red and Black and eleven to the Magazine. SOPHOMORE CLASS. We have found the average Sophomore to be a man of the age of 18 years; his height is 5 feet 9 inches aud he weighs 146. He rises just in time for breakfast at 7:50 and retires at 11:10. This Sophomore believes that Professor Barrow is the most popular professor, with a smaller part of his love given to Professor Herty. Paul Fleming, Moreno and Brown arc the most popular men in college. Ezelle was voted the most popular man in the class, with Bacon second. (1 Johnson, H. Bacon and Vow arc the most intellectual men in college, if the Sophomore’s word is to be believed. The class unites upon Holcomb Bacon as the most intellectual man among them. It was hard for the class to decide upon the handsomest man in college, but J. W. Morton, Brown and Murphy are the handsomest according to the voting. A. Morton, Hansel! and Ezcllc are the ideals of manly beauty of the Sophomore Class. Strauge to say, one-half of the class are not members of a church, but this is to be accounted for by reason of their youth. The remainder are members of the Presbyterian, Baptist, Episcopal, Methodist and Catholic churches. Four of these Sophomores believe in Saturday recitations and in compulsory chapel. Scott and Dickens are the favorite authors of the men of this class. If the Sophomores elected the Governor, Evans would beat Atkiuson by just seven votes. Speaker Crisp is the favorite public character of this class, with Gladstone and Cleveland a tie for a close second. They are unanimous in believing that the greatest need of the University is money. They are also unanimous in not being opposed to college athletics. One-third of the class play football, nearly one-half play baseball and almost two-thirds of them play tcunis. The college papers are received by about one-half of the class. f3)FRESHMAN CLASS. The average age of the Freshman is 17 years, G mouths; height, 5 feet, 71 inches, and weight 134. In this class Professor Barrow received 22 votes for the most popular professor; Professor Hooper 5, and Dr. McPherson 1. Paul Fleming received by far the largest uumber of votes for the most popular student in college, and Akerman and Black tied for second place. Yow is considered the most intellectual student in college by the members of this class; Johnson, second and H. Bacon, third. George Butler received the largest number of votes for the handsomest student; J. W. Morton aud Mnrphey tied for second place aud Hansell came third. Boland is considered the most popular student in his class ; Cothran, second and Burton Davis, third. In the vote for the most intellectual student in the Freshman class, Cothran received 17 votes; Jackson 4 and about ten tied for third place. Davis received the largest number of votes for the handsomest student in the Freshman class and Ferrell came second. There are, in this class, G Methodists, 3 Presbyterians, 2 Baptists, 2 Episcopalians, 2 Catholics and 2 Hebrews. Two Freshmen believe in Saturday recitations and in compulsory cha| el. Dickens and Shakespeare are their favorite authors. Evans received 17 votes for Governor and Atkinson 7. Gladstone is their favorite public character, but the Freshmen also admire Crisp and Cleveland. The members of this class rise at 7:35 in the morning and retire at 10:45 at night. The Freshmen agree that money is the greatest need of the University, but some of them complain awfully of the hard benches in the recitation rooms. None of the Freshmen are opposed to Athletics; one-fourth play foot-ball, one-half base-ball and one-half tennis. Twenty-one subscribe to Red and Black and nine to Mag-aziuc. ■4)Conclusion. Alter concluding our work on Volume VII. of the Pandora, we wish to thank those who have aided us in making this issue a success, and to make a few suggestions to the succeeding board. It would be impracticable to mention all those who have aided us by contributing to the literary and artistic detriments. In fact some, from extreme modesty, have requested us not to mention their names; so we take this means of thanking all who have helped us. We believe that the prosperity of a college is greatly advanced by a good annual, and, after the jwist year’s experience in preparing Volume VII. of the Pandora, we are led to believe that the assistance and cooperation of the Board of Trustees would uot only enable the students to publish a much handsomer annual, but would also be of great benefit to the University. We again wish to urge upon the Fraternities the necessity of electing the Board of Editors early in the fall, for it is impossible for the editors to do justice to both their studies and the Pandora in the short time allowed them in the past for work on their annual. We would suggest, as did last year’s editor, that the Board of Editors be elected before the summer vacation. We wish to thank the Frauklin Publishing Company not only for their splendid work, but also for kindness shown us upon all occasions. Offering any assistance in our power to next year’s Board, we are, Very respectfully, The Editors. (17 )Title page. Yell................... Hoard of Editors. Pre-face.......... Dedication........ Major Charles Morris Departments and Degrees. Trustees.'............. Calendar............... Faculty................ Faculty of law School. Senior Class— Poem................ Officers............ Members............. History............. •Junior Class Poem....... ........ Officers............ Members............. History........ •Soi'HOMORE Class Poem ............... Officers....... Members............. History.......... Freshman Class— Poem................ Officers......... -. . Members............. History............. Contents 1 Law Class 2 Poem........ 5 Officers. 0 Members............... 9 History.................. 10 Post Graduate Ci ass— 13 Members................. 15 Agricultural Students and Sum man-. U; Number iu Each Department........... 17 Our Alumul...................... 21 FRATERNITIES— Sigma Alpha Kpsilon......... 23 24 25 28 31 32 33 34 37 35 3!) 40 43 44 43 40 0 Chi Phi........................... Kappa Alpha ...................... Phi Delta Theta ................. Alpha 'Hut Omega................. Delta Tail Delta................. Sigma Nil......................... Chi Psi........................... Summary of Fraternities........... Fraternity Fife at the University. The Battalion......................... The DemosUianinn Society....... ...... The Phi Kappa Society................ The Youug Men's Christian Association Ix s Chevaliers de la Lucy Cobb...... The University Press Association...... The Pandora Ofllecrs.................. The University Magazine............. lied and Black........................ Senior Economic Society. ............. Senior Science Club................... r«) FAOE 49 fiO 51 52 55 58 57 58 62 66 70 74 78 82 86 90 91 05 97 9S 99 100 101 102 103 104 JOS 100 107r oit Hie Engineering Society. The University Glee Club.. 1M The Thaiiana............. Coxey’8 Army. .. ............ The Senior Class Banquet................................... US The’Varsity Oyster Club................ ■ ,2U The P. A. B. S. T. Club................................... -» Knights of the Round Table ... Odetoa Diploma.......................................... 123 Commencement Program...................................... ,2S Biological Laboratory Students ... l-'l After the Ball......................................... — !2S Athletics— Athletic Article...................................... 1:11 Officers of Athletic Association........................133 ’Varsity Football Team..................................134 Result of Games Played..................................13" Class Football Teams....................... The ’Varsity Baseball Team.............................. Mb Class Baseball Teams.................................... Ml Result of Class Games................................... M3 Annual Field Day Program................................ M4 University of Georgia Records........................... M3 University Bicycle Club............................. • 146 University Boating Club................................. M7 University Tennis Association.......................... 148 Class Tree Exercises...................................... Ml) •Senior Class Song........................................ l°b Epistle to the Philippians............................... ,;,1 At College.................................... A Serenade............................................. 1® The Student's Soliloquy—A Parody................... — 134 The Unpardonable Sin...................................... 133 The Fatal Firing.......................................... bib The Convict Dramatic Club................................. 13" A Modem Court Scene....................................... 158 til Tlie tumors’ Farewell. PACK 100 Fandora's Photograph . 162 The Comedy of Errors ... 104 Chestnuts ... 160 Jokes 167 Our Oue Cent a Word Pago 168 Our Dime Museum 169 Books by the Best Authors . 170 Statistics 171 Conclusion 175 Contents • • 170 Advertisements 179 Index to Advertisements ... ISO List ok Full Pack Illustrations Board of Editors ... 1 Major Charles Morris 8 The Moore Building 14 Cut of Senior Class Cut of Junior Class .so Cut of Sophomore Class 80 Cut of Freshman Class 42 Cut of Law Class ... 48 Cut of Post-Graduate Class 51 Cut of Fraternities 61 Sigma Alpha Epsilon OS Chi Phi 6 Kappa Alpha 71 Phi Delta Theta 75 Alpha Thu Omega 79 Delta Tail Delta 83 Sigma Nu . 87 Chi Pal 91 The Tlialians—Members 111 The Thalians- Scenes of Play 115 Cut of Monument to German Club ... ... J24 Cut of Biological Laboratory — 127 Athletics. . ") Patronize those w o ave aided us. (179)Index to Advertisements. pack Atlanta Busiucss University 181 Athens Book and Stationery Co..............................-182 Athens Steam Laundry........................................183 Athens Steam Dyeing and Cleaning Co.........................195 Brook Brothers........................................... 19® Brown House ............................................... 191 Baldwin, C. W. A Co.........................................199 Cohen, John ........................................... • 188 Crosscup A West.......................................... 198 Douglas, Thomas A Davison ................................. 184 I)avl», B. B............................................... 188 Elscman Bros................................................185 Franklin Printing and Publishing Co.........................201 Gilleland, C. F,............................................182 Georgia Steam Dyeing Co.................................... 183 Harris, Dick................................................195 Holmes' .Sure Cure....................................... 198 Horsman Tenuis Backet .................................... 193 Hazleton, H. Dozier.........................................189 Jacobs’ Pharmacy......................................... 186 Jackson, J. T... .......................................... 198 JcflTersou, R. B...................... • 195 latcy ( )bb Institute.......................................194 Law Bros......................................... • •..... 181 I jmbard Iron Works and Supply Co ........................ .202 Miuder. Joseph............................................ 190 McGregor, D. W. A Co ..................................... 203 Maddox Bros ..... Miriok. A. J.... McMahon, J. J. C McQueen A Carter . ... Melt, T. S. Morris, Chas .......... Newhaus, Chas. A Co Newuan, J. F........ Pond’s Extract...... Porter's Buduess College. Raphael, S ...... Royal Baking Powder ... Bochin A Sons.......... Scudder, C. A.......... Smith, E. 1. A Co ..... Spalding, A. G. A Bros Stein, Chas. A Co...... Solomons A Co.......... Seaboard Air Line...... Thomas A Barton........ Taulunson A Corbett Tidwell A l’o| e....... White Frost Ixtrd...... Weil, Peter............ Woolley, B. M........ University of Georgia— PACK 187 191 194 195 198 1SS 194 190 193 193 188 192 . 190 . 181 . 183 . 184 189 . 191 199 . 197 193 189 192 192 192 200 (180)A is for Archie and B is for Ball. LAW BROS., lO Whitehall St., - - ATLANTA, GA. -----HU A OQIJA liTBHS I OK Jeweler . » C. A. SCUDDER. Men’s Fine Hats AND FURNISHING GOODS. MATT. ORDERS SOLICITED. Diamonds, Sterling Silverware, Watches, Cut Glass. ATHENS, GEORGIA. EDUCATE FOR BUSINESS AT THE THE ADVANCED BUSINESS TRAINING SCHOOL OF THE SOUTH. patronized by Teachers and Graduates of other Business lle$?s. Investigate tfoe f . B. U. Send for ?atalo$ue. ddr ss ATLANTA BUSINESS UNIVERSITY, 23 WHITEHALL ST., - - ATLANTA, GA. Just put them together and Smith we recall. 0«l)C is for Cook, a Freshman quite loud. (Jill lai?d’s piaee. UNIVERSITY A7J.Yr TO BOOK STOUli COH.V iK. Cafe, Soda Fount, Confections and r "» Fine Havana Cigars. on a i.bns is College Text Sooks Most Popular Place in Tooin. Open Until 12 O’eloek Every Night. AND'SUPPLIES, See our Goods ar?d $et our prices before buyii?$. 09e sAre 09ith ou! x Athens Book Stationery Co. 107 BROAD ST., ATHENS, GA. He’s not hard to find in the ball guying crowd. (182)D is for Davis, a Freshman quite fair, Athens Steam Laundry " S----------- N GUARANTEES TO TURN OUT None but First-Class Work. You will be convinced of this by giving me a trial. , . C. GIUGBK. _________________________Proprietor. C I. Smitfy 9 Qo. ..HCAOOUARTCHS TOR.— FINE SHOES. 5or. College pue. ai?d Qlaytory 5f-ATHENS, - GEORGIA. EVERY PAIR GUARANTEED. 22 Glayton St., next door to E. J. Smith So. Dyes, Cleans Presses —A1.1. uisos or MEN'S WEARING APPAREL. I Make Students’ Work ex Specialty. W FRIEDBERG, Proprietor. Awarded 1st Diploma «t Southern Exposition, Montgomery. Ala.. 1801. JNO. COHEN, (Succenor to 0. IIA USER 1 ov.Ai.nn is- — Tobacco and Cigars or. Broad St. apd ?olle$e flu?.. ATHENS, - - GEORGIA. When it comes to ball playing you'll find him right there. ( $3)E is for Eke, of an athletic kind. OF OUR 35 DEPARTMENTS ar $t:roi) r tl? Men’s Furnishing G o o ci s. Everything n man wears, except his outside garments, from head to foot. Write for catalogue. Douglas, Thomas Davison, Athletic and Gymnasium GOODS @ OUTFITS. A. G. Spalding Bros, are the official outfitters of Yale, Columbia, Princeton, University of Pennsylvania, University of Virginia, and in fact all the leading colleges in America. A. G. SPALDING BROS., Chicago. Philadelphia. New York. Agency in Athens, Ga., D. U . T e(jre §or’s Bool $tore. ATLANTA, GA. In all college sports, ho’s right dead in line. (184) F is for Freshmen, a cute little crowd, : ; ESTABLISHED 1865. f)|ft® One Price Clothiers, TAILORS, HATTERS, FURNISHERS. | Eiseman Bros. fj 15 and 17 Whitehall Street, ATLANTA, OA. WASHINGTON, O. C. Co . 7th Af.0 E- St . N. W UALTIMORC, MO r CTO r. 211 W GCHma ONI.Y flANUFACTURERS OP CLOTIIINO IN TMR SOUTH DEALING DIRECT WITH CONSUMER. • . , • % (!XiX X5teX i • • • • • •' • . • . Though the caps that they wear are unusually loud. (185)G is for Goarreld, who carries a smile SAVE MONEY. XXTo Soli Evorytliiiif; at Rotail at Wliolo«alo Prices. IMPORTED BRUSHES. BLACKINC. CLOTHES, HAIR. NAIL, TOOTH, SHAVINC, ETC. Nowhere in Atlanta can von sec such a stock and variety of Brushes as with us. Some people on find coming into the Store have asked us whether we kept anything else but Brushes? We do, however, as you well know. You can buy a Hair Brush of us from 25c. to $5.00, and at whatever price you decide to pay, you will obtain for the money a much better brush than elsewhere. We import Tooth Brushes in lots of five thousand. The best ones we sell have our name on them, aud we get 25c., 35c. and 50c. for them. If a bristle comes out in three months after you buy one, you can return it and either get your money returned or a new brush. From this price they run down to 5c. Our 15c. Brush is what you are generally asked 25c. for. HAIR BRUSHES.—To mention au article of this kind in an advertisement is very unsatisfactory. Hair Brushes with Mr. Jacobs is a sort of hobby. Unless you have seen his stock of these goods, you cannot know what a stack of Hair Brushes is. He has Brushes from 25c. to $5.00. No one knows, who has not at some time or other owned one of those good Hair Brushes (by this we do not mean necessarily a 85.00 one, but a brush, say, from 81.25 up), what a positive luxury a good Brush is. A good Hair Brush is worth all the hair tonic wo will shortly enumerate, not even excepting Jacobs’ Quinine aud Rum Hair Tonic. It will do more to take away a nervous headache; it will do more to keep the dandruff out; and it will do more to keep yon from getting bald and gray than all other things. A good Hair Brush is not only a luxury and an ornament to a room, but is also cheaper in the long run than bad ones, as it will last for at least ten years if taken care of. That catches the girls at least half a mile. (ISO)H is for Haskell, who joined the Law Class, Maddox Brothers, = PHOTOGRAPHERS CRAYON AND RASTBD PORTRAITS. CALL -AAtSED SEE OTJE WOBZ. OF ALL KINDS KEPT IN STOCK. STEREOSCOPIC YIEWS MADE TO ©RUDER STUDIO, 109 E. Broad Street, ATHENS, - GEORGIA. Who in ’96 was unable to pass. 087) I is for ideas, that so much harass 'IHIIIIillNlllllllimillliillllHIIKillllllig The Leader 1 Styles, Quality = Prices, x | niiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil Charles Morris, “POPULAR PRICE" Clothier, Hatter @ Furnisher, 218 Broad St., - - ATHENS, GA. B. B. DAVIS, S. RAPHAEI Merchant Tailor -A DENTIST LT_ -AND- Men’s Furnisher, 115 East Clayton St. No. 3 Colley© Avenue, ATHENS, - - GEORGIA. The Seniors and Juniors in Dr. Boggs’ class. (188)J is for “ Jack,” a rather small mass, CHAS stern CO. HASELTON DOZIER, Clothiers and Hatters. PMH05SORQANS. Gents’ Furnishing Goods. r-— -—: - Pictures, + Picture + F raipcs + and + Artist + Materials. Suits Made to Order and Fits Guaranteed. IVJ OlAYTOX ST.. ». O. HOX BROAD ST., ATHENS, GA. ATHENS, - GEORGIA. K. W. TIDWIL1.. D. W. l-OPK. TIDCQELLi POPE, W HOLESALE GROCERS, 27 and 29 WESr MITCHELL STREET. ATLANTA, - GEORGIA. Exclusive Control of the Celebrated Brands of FLOUR, “SOLITAIRE,” “ECLIPSE” and “STERLING.” Who the Freshmen all say Is leading his class. (mK is for Kemp, whose power is great Ml NTION 'M PANDORA, Watch an l KnKaicrmcat Ktn . RSTABI.I9HED 1549. Fraternity Xovcltlcv Approval Faekacc mb: oo rojeeat of Chapter CorrriponJent. JOS. MINDER, ... pipe Jailorii j ... Suits made to order at Reasonable Prices. STUDENTS’ WORK A SPECIALTY. C. W. BALDWIN CO. LEADING DEALERS IN Fine Boots and Shoes. McDowell Building. ATHENS, GA. Special Attention given to the College Patronage. In stopping the balls as they pass o’er the plate. (190)L is for “ lab,” where they test “ Monterey,” A. J. MIRICK, Studio, 115 Broad Street, ATHENS, GEORGIA. - Brou i? j-iou$e - MACON, - - GEORGIA. Directly opposite Union Passenger Station. Rapid transit to all parts of the city by electric cars, which pass the door. This well known and popular hotel oilers to visitors a convenience of location, cuisine, and service not equaled by any other hotel in the city. B. W. SPERRY, Proprietor. Though that is not what it’s called by the boys of to-day. (HU)M is for Mobley, a Freshman quite fair, Highest of all in Leavening Power.—latest U. S. Gov’t Report ABSOLUTELY PURE You want the BEST, and , Cedar Rapids, Iowa. you buy WHITE FROST kflRD. ASK YOUR GROCER FOR IT AND TAKE NO OTHER. PETER WEIL, AN IOWA LARD. Made from Iowa Hogs. Shoes Hade and Repaired. All Work Promptly Done. All Work Guaranteed. Clayton Street, - - - Opposite Talmadge Brightwell's. WHISKY AM) OPIUM HA HITS cured III your homo without pain or contlucmcnt. I’m lent continue buxines while under treatment. Whisky and all other drug .topped Immediately on beginning treatment -do not ueed them. No treatment yet discovered to compare with it. Have given special study and practice to those diseases for the past twenty years with successful Increase In practice. Write care dept. ? for my book of cures free. I . M. WOOLLEY. M. D., ATLANTA. GA. He can always be told by the tint of his hair. H92)N Is for no one that ever would tell Porter’s Business College ------AND----- School of Shorthand. Triangular Block, - Macon, Ga., Is the best place to acquire a thorough Business Education. Porter Anderson. POND'S EXTRACT. If you wUh to take REGULAR DAILY EXERCISE, and not be compelled to desift from work beoaufO of SOKE MUSCLES, you mutt, ,fter exercising. THOROUGHLY KUH the MUSCLES with POND’S EXTRACT. Uv its use you Itro mndo QUICK and ACTIVE, and ALL SORENESS, STlPKNBcS. or SWELLING is provonted,and you will AVOID the DANGER of TAKING COLD on going out aftor oxerciting. Wo have a book full of testimonials from the most famous athletes to quote them is superfluous. Almost everyone in training uses it. But don’t expect some cheap substitute for POND’S EXTRACT to do what the genuine article will, lor you will surely be disappoints. Manufactured only by POND’S EXTRACT CO, 7ft FIF Til A VIS.. TtUW YOltIC. U A. TASLUN80N. R- T. CORBETT. TANLUNSON CORBETT, The Exclusive Garpet House Carpets, Mattings, Draperies, Shades, Curtains, c. 49 Peachtree St. (Opposite Walton St. , - - GEOHGIA. ADDRESS, Who painted the buildings and raised so much h-1, (103)O’s for O'Brien, though mostly called Ned. CHAS. NEUHAUS CO., MAXCPACTVBER OF IBurcjica', Dental and 0ptl)opaecJical instruments, TRUSSES, BANDAGES, SHOULDER BRACES, Abdominal Supporters, Elastic Stockings, Crutches, Anti ull A i j l 1 nnt'OH for Doformll ion. • OTABUSHKO l$i . SOLiOmOfiS CO., 09I?olGsale ar d Retail Dru ||ists, 163 CONGRESS STREET. liitAXCH Stokk: Bull St., Under the Guard’s Armory. SHyRNNHH, - GEORGIA- No. 510 N. Eutaw Street - Near Franklin, BALTIMORE, MO. Prompt awl careful attention given to all order entrusted to tu, and only the best and purest drug sold or dl pca«cd. Agents for the sale of Huyler’s Celebrated Candles. LUCY COBB INSTITUTE, Athens. - Georgia. J.J.C. McMAHAN, The Exercises of this School will be Resumed September, 1894. Glothier, Hatter and Gents’ Furnisher. M. RUTHERFORD, Principal. 117 Clayton St., - ATHENS, GA. He generally states that he came out ahead. (194)P is for Powell, the Sophomore grind, McQueen Carter, Allis Sleam Dying aid Cleaning EslaMislmenL 4 Tonsopial 4 Artists. 4 GOOD WORK GUARANTEED! Lnteat Stylo Hair Cut. Polito and Prompt Attontlon. Everythin? First Class. Students Invited to call on us. PROMPT ATTENTION! Under Baldwin's, - - ATHENS, GA. -r lrt JIVSK8 joh.vso.v, No. 10 Clayton St. Proprietor Dick Hahjris, R. B. JEFFERSON, TAILOR. fto flifcii fjsto |b|. Suits Made to Order, Pants Especially. All of the latest styles in Hair Cuts. CLOT tins CLBAXRD AA’D I’RBSSBD. Both Base Ball and Foot Ball Suits Made and Guaranteed. Broad Street, - Athens, Ga. BROAD STREET. When his washerwoman calls he’s hard to find. (195)Q is for questions, that come in exams, ESTABLISHED 1818. BROOKS BROTHERS, Broadway, cor. 22d Street, New York City. Clothing and punishing Goods - FOR------ Men and Boys, Ready Made and Made to Measure. In the Department for Clothing to order will be found, in addition to a full line of seasonable goods, all the year round weights in all qualities, with a wide range of price, thereby giving the fullest oppor- tunity for selection. The particular care exercised by us in the cut, manufacture and novelty of pattern in our Men’s Ready Made Stock is also extended to our Clothing for Boys and Children, and guarantees exclu- sive style and the best of value at no higher prices than are frequently asked for garments made in large wholesale lots and of inferior workmanship. Our Furnishing Goods embrace a most complete assortment of articles in that line for Boys as well as Men; Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, and Neckwear in original shapes and colorings imported by us from leading London manufacturers—also Lounging Jackets, Waterproof Coats, etc. In this Department we have added a new line of leather and wicker goods, including Luncheon Baskets, Holster Cases, Sheffield Plate Flasks, Riding Whips, Crops, Dog Canes and Golf Sticks. Catalogue, Samples and Rules for Self-Measurement sent on application. They generally cause an explosion of d-m-s. ,1!"'R is for Ridley and Rogers and Reab, MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. Superior Goods and Moderate Prices. The Largest and Most Complete Stoek in the South. EVERY VARIETY OP Mandolins, Zithers, Guitars, Flutes, Clarionets, Autoharps, Metronomes, Banjos, A Specialty in Band Instroments. Music Boxes 50c. io $150.1)0. A Full Line ok Strings for all Instruments. THESE INSTRUMENTS Are unrivalled, ami are acknowledged by Professional Players ns the best for tone, finish and durability. Every one fully warranted. Sene lor Catalogue ol Prices and Testimonials. Special Discounts to College Clubs. All Kinds of Musical Instruments Carefully Repaired. Shoot 3VC uHtc and Music BooIcm, THOMAS 70S and. 710 Broadway, tfc BARTON, THE CELEBRATED WASHBURN, BAY STATE and STEWART BANJOS. WASHBURN. BAY STATE and MARTIN GUITARS. MANDOLINS and BANDURIAS AUGUSTA, Cr-A.. They are leading their class, you had better believe. (197)S is for Sheffield, the Major so grand, Holmes’ Sure Cure MOUTH WASH AND DENTIFRICE. Cures Bleeding Gums. Ulcers. Sore Mouth, Sore Throat. Cleanses the Teeth and Purities the Breath. Used and Hecomrnonded by leading dentists. Prtpnrol by DBS. W. K. HOLMES MASON. UotUU. Mixon, On. roe amc •» «u orugcists an© ocntists. She bailor5 §h©p. Suits Made to Order. Your Old Clothes Cleaned and Scrubbed. Pants Making a Specialty. I carry a Pull Line of Fine Samplos. Prices Choap. Call and be Convinced. A'o. O Clayton St., Up Stairs. JOHN T. JACKSON. LAW OFFICE —OF— T. S. MELL. SAVINGS BANK BUILDING. Though his voice is quite weak when he gives a command. (198)T is for Thornton, who thought college life NEW PAST IvIX12. SOHO TRAIN WITH THROUGH PULLMAN PALACE BUFFET SLEEPING CARS BETWEEN ATLANTA, Gfl., AND WASHINGTON, 0. G. ABSOLUTELY THE QUICKEST SCHEDULE BETWEEN Atlanta, Ga. i5B Richmond, V a. AND ONLY LINE WITHOUT CHANGE. NORFOLK AND OLD POINT COMFORT, VA. THROUCH CAR LINE TO CHARLESTON, S. C., via COLUMBIA. Only one change of cars between ATLANTA, (5 A., and BALTIMORE, PHILADELPHIA, NEW YORK and BOSTON. ASK FOR TICKETS VIA EISEHBOKRD AIR LINE. O. V. SMITH, Traffic Manager, T. J. ANDERSON, Passenger Agent, NORFOLK, VA. H W. B. GLOVER, Div. Pass. Agt., ATLANTA, CA. Would not be complete without having a wife. (109)U is for Upson, a student of law, diversity of (je ATHENS, GEORGIA. Establishes! by the Constitution of the State in 7W.5, Endowed by the General Government• THE HEAD OF THE STATE SYSTEM OE PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. OPEN TO ALL WHITE MALES FROM ANY STATE. Tuition absolutely free except in professional schools. The only charge being $15.00 per year for incidental expenses and use of library. DEPARTMENTS: I. FRANKLIN COLLEGE, offering regular classical degree of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Letters. II. STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AM) MECHANIC ARTS, offering the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Engineering. III. SCHOOL OF LAW, offeriug the degree of Bachelor of Law which entitles to practice in all Georgia Courts. SPLENDID SCIENTIFIC AND LITERARY EQUIPMENT. Who in Blackstone and Coke can pick many a flaw. (200)V is for Varsity, Georgia's great college, Franklin publishing pouse, Ivy St. andEdgewood Avc., ATLANTA, QA. H. T. INMAN. • O. HARRISON. GKO W. HARRISON. Pr«»i J«Ai. V -Pr«ald«nt. S«o’y and Trees. 1, • • • THE • • • pranlilin Priiitin andPiblishing Go. Is the Uorgest end moatsueccssful business corporation in the south It respectfully solioits your patronage for every description of Law, Society, and JOB COMMERCIAL, PRINTING I Catal03ue REAL ESTATE j ; ■ Special Edition And in fact anything you may choose in that line. GEO. w. HARRISON. 65-71 Ivy Street, General Manger. ATLANTA, GA. PUBLICATIONS. Tbe Soutberi) ?ultiuator ai d Dixie parmer. Ula ta T edieal apd 5ur iealJournal. Tbc Soutberr) Irebiteet. Block's price urrer)t. Our ?bureb flelper. T oemo8yf eai)-“Dixie. Home I is$ioi)ary. pield’s U. 5. history. Stile’s price ;urrei)t. 5b ?bur ;b i Georgia. Sobumat 0'6 Prlc Qurrept. Soutb ro du atiopalJournal. Soutberi) Travelers’ Railway }ulde. Where all of the students gain vast stores of knowledge. (201)W is for Warren, who’ll always be found with Lester and Upson, loafing around. --FOE IPIKST CLASS— Railroad, Cotton, Saw Oil, Fertilizer and Ice Machinery and Supplies, New Work and Repairs, Complete Mill, Engine Gin Outfits AT BOTTOM BRICKS, Don’t fail to write i» before jrou buy. We cast every day, capacity for 800 bauds. LOMBARD IRON WORKS AND SUPPLY CO., Augusta, Ga. X is a letter in Algebra used, So much by the Freshman and Sophomore abused. (202)Y is for Yancey, of Class ninety-seven ; from his looks you would think he had dropped out of heaven. ESTABLISHED I860. D. W. McCRECOR, MII0L1.MIL » t ItKT.lU. STATION Er R. Bookseller to the University of Georgia. $el?ool ai?d College 5ext BooHS- FINE STATIONERY. OPPOSITE THE CAMPUS, ATHENS. GA. THE CHEAPEST HOUSE IN CEORCIA Z is a letter I’ll have to omit, as none of the names of the boys will it fit. (203)


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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1890 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1892 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1893 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1895 Edition, Page 1

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