University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1893

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1893 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 220 of the 1893 volume:

Tf)e Pandora. Volume VI.—1693. PoMisfjcd AnnoallQ b«i the Vraternltics sr m (Jniver it of (jeorgia. ATHUfiS, GUORG1A, .nAU, ADCCCXcm. LAW LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA ATHENS, GEORGIAHoo! Rah!! Rah!!! Hoo! Rah!! Rah!!! Rah!! Rah!! G-E-O-R-G-I-A. Copyrighted, By Harry Hodgson. PRINTED BY THE Franklin Printing and Publishing Co.. Atlanta, Ga.CONTENTS Title I nge. Yell..... Contents......... Board of Editors Greeting......... Preface............................... — Dedication........ Editorial.......... Departments and Degrees. Hoard of Trustees........ Calendar ................... Faculty................................ “Why Wage War on the State University?” Law Class Poem ................................ Officers.....'....................... Members.............................. History ............................. Senior Class Poem................................. Officers............................. Members.............................. History.............................. Junior Class Poem................................. Officers............................. Members.............................. History.............................. Sophomore Class Poem................................. Officers ............................ Members.............................. History.............................. Z AOK 1 Freshman Class 2 Poem.......................... 3 Officers...................... 7 Members....................... 8 History....................... 0 Elective Students.................. 11 Agricultural Students............ 12 Students in Each Department...... 13 Social Life at the University.... Jjj Fraternities..................... Sigma Alpha Epsilon.......... 1; Chi Phi....................... Kappa Alpha.................. Phi Delta Theta.............. Alpha Tau Omega.............. 24 Delta Tau Delta .................. Sigma Xu..................... 2(3 Chi Pal....................... Summary of Fraternities.......... Religious Life at the University. .t, lx Mkmokiam E Tliomas Cobb Hull.................. »! Charles Morris.................... w The Battalion...................... Demostheuian Society............. Phi Kappa Society................ “ Lea Chevaliers De La Rose Rouge ” 7; Young Men’s Christian Association. 40 “ Eib7’ Students ............... Senior Science Club.............. 43 Engineering Society................. 44 Seuior Economic Society.......... 45 University Democratic Club...... 4« Thaliau Dramatic Club............. PAOB 40 50 51 52 51 55 56 57 61 62 56 70 74 78 82 SC DO 01 95 07 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 106 107 108 109 110Bou-Ton Immigrants Club. ....... “The Wandering Minstrels” . ....... University Publications Pandora ................................. Georgia University Magazine Engineering Society Annual. Studeuts’ Hand Book............ ............. Annual Announcement...................... The ‘‘O. B.” Gennau Club......................... Law Class Mating Club................. University BauquetClub........................... Senior Class Banquet............... . ....... University Jollity Club...................... Grand High Order of Ex-Cadets............. Aueient Order of Angora Goats...... ...... Ye Fiends of Calculus.............. u. a i .......................................... University Boating Club................... Huimicult's Bock College Oheeso Lifting Association Ye Merry Mermaids League......................... Athletics........................................ 'Varsity Football Team....................... 'Varsity Baseball Team....................... Class Football Teams......................... Class Baseball Teams ................. ...... Fraternity Tenuis League..................... Annual Field Day Program .................... American Inter-Collegiate Records. .......... University of Georgia Records................ Senior Class-Tree Exercises...................... Senior Class Song...... ......................... Light Literature Haunted...................................... A Pair to Draw To............................ Just My laick................................ The War with the Anncbie..................... The Demised Marechiel NIel................... New Books Just Published..................... Our Alumni at the World's Fair............... The Defeat of Quintus Cuvier................. Vice-Versa .................................. Chestnuts Cracked Every Day.................. The Law Class, Ninety-Three ................. “ Would-be” Jokes............................ paor . 113 . 114 . 117 . 11$ . 118 . Ill) . Ill) 181 122 . 123 • 124 125 127 . 12$ 12!) . 130 181 . 133 130 138 140 143 144 140 148 140 160 130 161 162 153 . 154 165 166 157 168 1-60 ICO 102 102 103 101 A Ix»t Letter.... ............................ A Freshman's Composition.. ............... Senior class Poem.................... ........ Statistics.................................... Wants, For Sale, Etc.......................... A Farewell Ode-"'-................... ........ The Dirge of the Sophs........................ Letters from the People....................... A Warning to Freshmen......................... Grinds ....................................... The Ij»st "Cram ”.............. .............. The Freshman Baby Soug........................ The Lost Waltz of Commencement................ In Conclusion.................................... J.I8T OK Ft'I.I. PAOK IM.USTR.VTIONS. Board of Editor ................................ Cartoon.......................................... A Corner of the Ctmpus........................... The I-awyer...................................... The Senior....................................... The Junior....................................... The Sophomore.................................... The Freshman..................................... Fraternities . ............................... Georgia Beta Chapter of Sigma Alpha Kpsiiop .. Eta Chapter of Chi Phi........................ Gamma Chapter of Kappa Alpha. ......... Georgia Alpha Chapter of Phi Delta Theta...... Georgia Alpha Beta Chapter of Alpha Tau Omega Beta Delta Chapter of Delta Tau Delta......... Mu Chapter of Sigma Nu..... ... ......... Alpha Alpha Delta Chapter of Chi I isi........ The“tab”......................................... The Thalian Dramatic Club in “ A Regular Fix ”.... University Symphony Club......................... An “O. B.” Dance................................. The Ex-Cadets.................................... The Cheese IJftere............................... Rock College..................................... Athletic Plate................................... 'Varsity Football team .......................... “Our Alumni at the World's Fair”................. Finis ........................................... Advertisements................................... PACE 1 15 105 166 1GS 170 171 171 172 174 176 178 170 180 181 6 10 14 22 28 86 42 48 61 63 67 71 76 79 S3 87 01 105 111 116 120 12(5 132 135 137 141 15!) (4)Roard of J ditors. EditOr-in-CMcf. HARRY HODGSON, K A. business Manager. FRED G. BARFIELD, 2 A E. (Jssodate Editors. CHARLES R. NISBET, X I . GREENE JOHNSON, A T A. E. GERRY CABANISS, ♦ A G. ALFRED O. HALSEY, A' N. NAT B. STEWART, A T 0. EUGENE DODD, X V. HARRY A. ALEXANDER. (7)Pandora's Greeting. ' I "'HIS is the key, dear reader, that unlocks The mystic lid of fair Pandora's box, From which of old escaped those earthly ills Whose fittest sequel is in doctor’s bills. This is the key—but when the lid you ope, Heaven grant you find there some faint my of hope To cheer you, as it hath in other ages, And light your way through these degenerate pages! (8)PEBPACB. X editing this volume of Tiik Pandora we have worked hard to give to the public a' faithful picture of student life as it is at the University of Georgia. We have tried to make a good annual, one that will give a faithful record of the year’s work and one that will entertain and amuse our readers as much as possible. If we have succeeded we shall In highly gratified; if not we will derive consolation from the fact that we have done our best. We know that there are some diseased humans who arc so constructed that they cannot appreciate a joke, no matter how good it is, if they arc in the least involved. They will probably get mad at something in this book. If they do, of course, we will Ik; very sorry, as it was not our purjiose to wound the feelings of any one. Everything has been written in a spirit of sweetness and good will, but we know that some of the afflicted ones can not jmssiblv see it that way. Well, for them it i but right that we should make this little statement. We have a lighting editor of the finest type who has complete control of that department. His address can be had on application. Just by the way, we might say that he has eaten boarding house hash for four years and has played on the football team for two. Tell him about your troubles and he will attend to your ease. With this little “damper” for the offended ones and our thanks in advance to all of our friends who receive this little book with favor, we lay down our office. Tn, ta. Tiik Editors. i (0) ?. « Dedication. ft ft Jo T rg. Dr. peltoi) of Qartersoille. I To (lice, O lady, who with pen so fear loss Hath swept the prating prelate from the path Of higher knowledge, till he hied him cheerier Across the Ox Ford, blighted by thy wrath; To thee the “well done” of our approbation. Good health and greeting and—this dedication ! II How flashed thy j»en when Envy hurled her fires And pricked with thorns our loveliest, loftiest rose! The frying-pan too warm was for the “friars” And served them hot, as everybody knows. Aye! there they sizzed and whizzed, with many a caper, And then were nibbed with salt and Emory paper! II Thy pen hath dashed them, smashed them, crashed them, hashed them! Made every foe that marched against us wince; Its diamond edge so mercilessly slashed them, Brer Candler has been limping ever since! “Well done for thee, our champion!” shouts the chorus: Take Candler’s blessing, mingled with Pandora's. 2 (11)(Editorial. bet Os Concentrate. The Pandora is the strong friend of her Alma Mater, and has an abiding faith in her future. Wc believe in the work she is doing, and wc long to see the sphere of her usefulness extend throughout the South. To this end wc raise Pandora’s voice to the Faculty, to the Trustees, to the Alumni and to Georgia in the erv, “ Let us concentrate.” Ever since wc learned the fable of the dying farmer’s lesson to his sons, taught from the bundle of sticks, we have come to believe more and more that the policy of concentration at Athens of all efforts at higher education is the true jtolioy for the most rapid advance of the University. The Trustees have already begun the good work in regard to branch colleges. They have censed to parcel out in driblets an income whose full amount is inadequate to the full needs of the parent institution. Should not the next step look to the establishment of the Medical School at Athens? Where is the economy of maintaining two equipments when one will suffice? The splendid laboratories of the University might well find a further usefulness in the better equipment of the young di»ctors of the State, if the medical department were carried on in Athens. That Athens has sufficient population and sufficient medical talent to equip such a school need not be doubted, when the University of Virginia conducts a most successful medical department in a town not half so large. Why not have the whole body of University men within reach and within touch of one another, each adding inspiration and zeal to the other, and centering aronud the Alma Mater a common love which is now divided and weakened? And in the question of athletics, what an impetus to the manhood of the University would come from the presence of seven or eight hundred men from whom to choose her champions. It is useless to say that any of the colleges of South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana and Florida can enter the same class of competition as the University of Virginia so long as the policy of these several States keeps each institution small in numbers and incomplete in educational equipment. Georgia has a grand opportunity to make her University the Harvard of the South. Ixtcatcd in as healthy and beautiful a spot as can be found on the continent, already the head by virtue of merit as well as by law of the educational interests of the State, a wise policy of concentration of resources, of sympathies, and of numbers, set on foot just now while other Southern States arc inactive, would build up an institution to which the whole South would pay glad homage, and from which a stream of knowledge would flow that would fertilize, the dark places of the land with an abundant supply of intelligent, upright and patriotic citizens. (12)(Jniversitv; of (jeonyia DCPARTi ENT3 I. Franklin College, Athens. II. Statk Colijvoeoh Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Athens. With branches ns follows: 1. North Georgia Agricultural College, Dnhloncgn. 2. South Georgia Agrieultunil College, Thoninsville. 3. Southwest Georgia Agrieultur.il College, Cutlibert. 4. Middle Georgia Agricultural College, Milledgcville. 5. West Georgia College of Agriculture, Hamilton. III. School ok Law, Athens. IV. School ok Medicine, Augusta. V. School ok Technology, Atlanta. VI. Georgia Nohmal and Industrial Coi.lixjb, Milledgevillo. VII. Ooi.lkge kor Colored Youths, Savannah. •Incorpor lc l In accordance with to Act ol Congrt-v knowu n- the •• Morrill Act." DUGREE5. The following degrees, any oue of which will confer the title ot Graduate of the University of Georgia, will he given to those students who complete satisfactorily the course prescribed for each degree: In Franklin College: Bachelor of Arts..............Four years’ course. Bachelor of Science.. .....Four years’ course. Bachelor of Letters...........Four years' course. Master of Arts................Post graduate. Master of Science.............Post graduate. In State College ok Agriculture : Bachelor of Science........... Four years’course. Bachelor of Agriculture.. Three years’ course. Bachelor of Engineering.......Four years' course. In the Professional Schools : 1. Bachelor of Law............ One years’course. 2. Doctor of Medicine. .. . .Two years’ course. 3. Civil Eugineer.............Post-graduate. 4. Civil and Mining Engineering.Post-graduate. In the School ok Technology : • . Mechanical Engineer. .. Four years’ course-. (13)1 ' i______________W. H. Fklton, Cartersvllle From tho Stato at Largo X. J. Hammond, Atlanta From th« Sue® at Urft. H. D. McDanibl, Monroe From the State at I.argo. A. H. Lawton, Savannah Prom the State at 1-arico. John Scrbvkn, Snvnunah. Pint Congrttvional DUtrlct. A. T. McIntvkk, Tliomasvlllc. . Socond CongroulOBal DUtriet. B. P. Holms, Americus Third Congreulonal DUtrlct. W. A. Ltiti.f, Columbus............... Fourth Congrcaalonal DUtrlct. H. V. M. Millkr, Atlanta.............. Fifth CongrcatloBxl DUtrlct. A. O. BaOON, Macon.................... Sixth Congr««tlonal District P oard of Trasteev His Excellency, Gov, V. J. South bn, Atlanta,. Kx officio. Term expires Sept. 1st, 1S90. Term expire Sept. 1st, 11)01. Term expire.-- Sept. 1st, 1SW. Term expires Sept. 1st, 1S97. Term expires Sept. 1st, 1S07. . .Term expires Sept. 1 't, 1S97. Term Expires, Sept. 1st, ’07. .Term Expires, Sept. 1st, 95. Term expires Sept. 1st, 1805. Term expires Sept. 1st, 1901. I). D. Hamilton, Borne. Term expires Sept. 1st, 1901. Seventh Congrtaalosal DUtrlct. J. A. Billui% Madison... . Term expires Sept. 1st, 1895. Eighth CongrtMlonal DUtrlct, X. L. Hutuiiins, Ixiwroncevllle_______ Term expires Sept, let, 1899. Ninth CongKMlona! DUtriet. J. B. Ci'MMixo, Augusta........... Term expires Sept. let, 1899. Tooth Congmatoaal DUtrlot. S. JR. Atkinson, Brunswick..............Terra expires Sept. 1st, 1899. Eleventh Congrcaakmal DUtrlct. A. L Hull, Athens.........................Term expires Sept. 1st, 1899. Rcldont Trustee. A. J. Cobh, Athens . .............Term expires Sept. 1st, 1901. Resident Troxtoe. X. E. Harris, Mneon ......... ...............................Ex officio. President of Toohnologlcal Board. W. Y. Atkinson, Xewnnn.......................................Ex officio. Preatdcnt Board of CotamUxioncra Olrh' Industrial College. 1 . W. Mkldhim, Savannah ....................................Ex officio. President Board of Commissioners Colorod Ir.duxtrlal College. 16® ® © (Calendar. ® 91 September 10, Monday.. September 21, Wednesday October 3, Monday...... November 2S, Thursday. December 23, Friday ... 1392. ....Examinations for admission. .................Session begins. Medical School at Augusta opens. . . National Thanksgiviug Day. ........Christmas llrctw begins. 1393. January 4, Wednesday ................Exercises Resumed. Examination for Entrance half advanced. January 10, Thursday .......................................Birthday of it. E. Lev; State Holiday. February in, Sunday.................. Anniversary of the IX-mosthculan Society. Monday observed. February 20, Monday........................................................ Senior Essays duo. February 22, Wednesday ..............Washington’s Birthday; Anniversary of the Phi Kappa Society. March 1, Wednesday...............................................Commencement of Medical School. March 0, Monday.................................. Juulor Essays due. Competitive Senior Orations. March 13, Monday ................................................ Competitive Junior Speakiug. April 4, Wednesday .........................................Examinations in Elementary English. April 10, Wednesday..........................................Sophomore Competitive Declamation. May 2d, Friday........................................................Final Examinations begin. Juno 15, Thursday..............................................Board of Trustees meet in Athens. June 10, 17, Friday and Saturday.................................... Examinations for Entrance. June 17, Saturday ... . . . Senior Class Exercise . June IS, Sunday..................................................... Baccalaureate Sermon. Juue 19, Monday............11a ,M., Oration before Literary Societies. 4 c.m., Sophomore Declamation. Juftc 20, Tuesday .. . . 11 a. m., Alumni Oration. 4 r. 1., Junior Orations. Juue 21. Wednesday................................Commencement Day. Summer Vacation begins. September 18, 19, Monday and Tuesday .................. . Examinations for Entrance. September 20, Wednesday .................................... Session opens. I-aw School opens. October 2. Monday. .. Medical School oj ens. (10)University of Georgia. WILLIAM KLL1SON BOGGS, Chancellor. Faculty. DAVID CRENSHAW BARROW, Jk., C. and M. E., PROKK-SSOK OK MATHKMATICS. B. Sc., C. M. K. Unlvereity of Georgia 1874. Assistant State Geologist 1N74-1.S7G. Instructor iu Pure and Applied Mathematics 1S78-18S2. ITofessor »f A|»|»lic I Mathematics 1SS2-1RS9. Professor Matlicmatics 1889—. SAMUEL CALDWELL BENEDICT, M. D„ PR0KKS80K OK MKDICAI. Jl'RISPRl'Or.N'CK. Born Hartford, Connecticut. September 20, 1885. Professor of Medical Jurisprudence Law School University of Georgia 1880. Vice-President National Association Railway Surgeons 1891. Honorary Chairman Pan-American Cougrcss 1S93. Member of American Medical Association 1888. MeinbcrGeorgia Med-icnl Association, Kappa Alpha. WILLIS HENRY BOCOCK, A. M., Pkok»ssor ok Latin and Gkkkk I.ancu aors and Litkhatckk (Milledge Professorship). A. B. Hampden Sidney College, Virginia. Beta Theta Pi. A. M. Hainpdcu Slduey College, Vlrgiuia. Graduate of tlic University of Virginia. Instructor iu University School, Charlottesville, Virginia. Greek Master McGuire's University School, Richmond, Virginia. Professor of Greek. Ham| den Sidney College, Virginia, 1S8G-1S89. Professor of I itiu aud Greek University of Georgia 1S89 —. WILLIAM ELIJSON BOGGS, D. D„ LL I)., PROKKsSOK OK MkTAI IIY81CS AND ETIUC8. A. B. South Carolina College 1S50. D. D. Southwestern Presbyterian Uuiverslty 1873. LL D. Central University 1889. Boro at Ahmednuggur, Hindustan. May 12, 1838. Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Polity Columbia Theological Seminary 1SS2. Chancellor of University of Georgia aud l’rofessor of Metaphysics and Ethics iu the same 1SS9. (17)JOHN PENDLETON CAMPBELL, a. B., 1 11. I)., PltOKKSiOR OK HfOIXJOV. Horn at Cumberland, Maryland, November 20, ISOS. A.B. Johns Hopkins University 1SS5. Fellow 1S.S0-1887. Pb. I). 1S8S. Beta Theta Pi. Professor of Biology University of Georgia 1SS8. Memlier Anierletiii .Society of Naturalists, American Physiological Society. Author of “Biological Teaching in the Colleges of the United States,” and articles in “ Studies from the Biological laboratory of Johns Hopkins University,” “Educational Heview,” etc. LKON HENItl CHARBONNI KB, A. L, Pit. 1)., Pkokexsoh ok Physio, and Astronomy. Born In France, August 2, I8SX. Educated in Military School of France. Adjunct Professor Ancient languages Uuiversity of Georgia lSStMStiS. Professor Civil Engineering 188S-1877. Since then ITofessor of Physics and Astronomy. Honorary A. M. and Ph. D. University of Georgia. Member of American Association for the Advancement of Science. ANDREW JACKSON COBB, A. B., B. L., Pkokkssok ok I,a v. A. B. University of Georgia 1S70. B. I,. University of Georgia 1S77. KapiKi Alpha. Born Athens, Georgia, April 12, 1S.»7. Professor of Eiw University of (Georgia 1SS4. HOWELL COBB, A. B., B. L„ Pkokessok ok Law. A. B. University of Georgia 1S«2. B. L. University of Georgia 1SG . Phi Knp) a Society. Born Athens, Georgia, July 0, 1S42. Professor of Law 1SX9. Judge City Court of Clarke County 1S70. JAMES BENJAMIN HUNMCTTT, A. B., PlIOFIXSOIt OK PkACTICAI. AOHICt’l.TVKK. A. 15. Emory College 1868. A. M. Emory 1S80. Mysllo Seven. BoruCowetn County,Georgia, 1838. Professorof Lit in Emory College 1881. Prof sor of Agriculture University of Georgia 1801. Assistant State Commissioner of Agriculture 1880. Manlier American Congress of farmers. JOHN HANSON THOMAS McPHERSON, A. 15., Pit. D.. Phokixsohok History and Pomtioai.Scikxck. A. ]5. Johns Hopkins Unlvendty 1SS«». Ph. I). Johns Hopkins University 1800. Alpha Delta Phi. 15orn in Baltimore, Maryland, Oetolier 30,1866. Eel low in History Johns Hopkins University 1888-lSflO. Instructor in History University of Michigan 1898 1801. Professory of History and Political Science University of Georgia 1881. Member American Historical Association. Author of “History'of Liberia.” CHARLES MORRIS, A. M., Pkokkksok of Kxoi.ish I.anoi aok and Lit- KKATl'KK. Horn in Hanover County, Virginia, April 27, 1828. Was gradu-ated M. A. at University of Virginia July, 184-5. Ap|»olnted Professor of Law at William and Mary College, Virginia, in 1SC0. Professor of Relics I-cltres and Rhetoric at University of Georgia January, 1858. Made Professor of Greek in same University In 1873-1878. Elected Professor of Aueicut languages in Randolph-Mncon College, Virginia, iu July, 1S78. Elected Professor of English and English Literature in University of Georgia 1SS2. )WILLIAMS RUTHERFORD, A.M., Emkkiti's Pkokkssou oP Pi'm; Matiikm.vtkw. A. M. University of Georgia 1857. Demoethcnian Society. Born Milledgevillc, Georgia, September 8, 1 1S. Professor of Mathematics am! Astronomy University of Georgia 1850. Pro-fe «orof Pure Mathematic 1S0C. Emeritus Professor ISSO. CHARLES MORTON STRAHAN, C. - Sl M. E., Phokkssok ok Enoinkkkino. C. and M. E. University of Georgia 1SS3. Kappa Alpha. Horn in Gooclilaml County, Virginia, May 0,1804. Assistant State Chemist 18SSMSD0. Instructor in Mathematics and Ancient languages University of Georgia 18S4-1SS7. Assistant Professor Analytical Chemistry University of Georgia 18S7-1890. Professor of Civil Engineering University of Georgia IS ) —. Contributor to Popular Science Montlily. Author •‘Clarke County and the City of Athens.” State Director National I-engue for Good Ronds. GEORGE DUDLEY THOMAS, B. S„ B. L., Proxkksom ok Law. B. So. University of Georgia 1S70. B. L. University of Georgia 1878. KnpiHi Alplin. Rpm Athens, Georgia, April 10, 1857. Professor of law University of Georgia 1SS1 —. HENRY CLAY WHITE, B. Sc. AND Plf. D.. F. C. S., Phokkssok ok Cmk.mistkv (Terrell Professorship). Bom in Baltimore, Maryland, December 30,1S50. B. So. University Virginia 1809. C. and M. E. University of Virginia 1876. 1 11. D. University Virginia 1885. Follow American Association Advanced Science 18S0. Corresjiondlng Mem- 0 ber British Association 1887. Fellow Chemical Society Ixm-don) 1893. JVofcssor Natural Science St. John’s College, Maryland, 1871-1872. LecturerPeabody Institute, Baltimore, Mary In ml, 1871-1872. Professor of Chemistry University of Georgia 1872. State Chemist of Georgia 18S0-1890. President State College 1S-'X . Contributor to scientific journal . President Association Official Chemists of the United States 18S3. CYPRIAN POUTER WILLCOX, A. M.. LL. I).. PltOKRSSOR MnitKKN LaXOPAORS. Boro in Sparta, Ga. M. A. of Yale University 1S47. Middle life passed ehielly in Europe, "'as elected Professor of Modern Languages University of Georgia December, 1871. LL. D. University of the South August, 1801. Student at University of Gbttengeu 1851. JESSE COATES, B. E., IxsTHfCToK in Physics. Born at Baltimore, Maryland, February 7, 1870. Educated at WnUovd Uoanllug School 1888-1887. B. E. University ol Georgia 1S90. Kappa Alphn. Fellow in Physic 1890-1881. Instructor in Physics at University of Georgia 1881. CHART.ES HOLMES HEBTY..B. Pii., Pit. D.. iNSTKftTOM IN ClIRMISTllY. Horn in Milled gevllle, Georgia, December 4, 1S87. Graduated at Middle Georgia Military and Agricultural College in 1SS4. B. Ph. University of Georgia 18S6. Kappa Alpha. Ph. D. Johns Hopkins University 1S90. Assistant Chemist Georgia Kxperimcnt Station 1800-1881. Instructor in Analytical Chemistry in University of Georgia 1881-1892-1S03. Contributor to American Chemical Journal. Member of “ Die Deutsche Chcmische Gesol Isoha ft.” WILLIAM DAVIS HOOPER, A. B., INSTRUCTOR IN ANCIKNT La.NGCAOKS. A. B. Hamjxlen Sidney College, Virginia, 1889. Signm Chi. Born at Liberty, Virginia, August 18, 1868. Professor of I itin and Greek Southwest Georgia Agricultural College 1SS9-1S90. instructor in Latin aud Greek University of Georgia 1S90. OSCAR HOLMES SHEFFIELD, C. E., INSTRUCTOR IN ENOINKKKI.no AND DRAWING. University of Georgia B. K. 1891. C. E. 1892. Chi Psi. Born in Early County, Georgia, February 22, 1867. Fellow in Engineering 1891-1892. Instructor in Engineering ami Drawing. Secretary for the State of Georgia of the National League for Good Roads. CHARLES MERCER SNELI,ING (Graduate V. M. I.), iNSTRfCTOK IN M AT II KM ATI CS AND MILITARY Tactics. Assistant Professor Mathematics Virginia Military institute 1881. Commaudaut of Cadets and Professor Mathematics South Georgia Agricultural College 1SS7. Commandant of Cadets and Instructor in Mathematics University of Georgia 1S88. ADAM ALEXANDER HOGGS, A. It., Fellow in Modern Languages. A. B. University of Georgia 1S92. A. M. University of Georgia 1893. Horn Memphis, Tennessee, September 29, 1871. VIRGIL EUGENE FRANKLIN, A. B., Fellow in Biology. A. B. University of Georgia 1892. A. M. University of Georgia 1898. Horn Excelsior, Georgia, September 9, 187U. GREENE JOHNSON, A. H., Fellow in Enom.sh. A. B. University of Georgia IS93. Delta Tau Delta. Horn Katonton, Georgia, August 19,1873. SAMUEL HALE SIBLEY, A. B., Fellow in Ancient Languages. A. B. University of Georgia 1892. B. L. University of Georgia 1893. Chi Phi. Born Union Point, Georgia, July 12. 1873. 9)WH Wage "War on tl)c )tatc (Jniversit $? A Pointed Editorial Copied from ti e Atlanta Constitution of February 11, This question is pertinent and deserves to be pondered by the writers and speakers who seize every opportunity to disparage its methods and hinder its enlargement. Founded by the fathers of the Commonwealth, who had just emerged from the smoke and din of a seven-years’ struggle for independence, it is clearly entitled to respectful recognition, and within just limitations to the fostering care of the people’s representatives. But what must we say of the effort to make the annual appropriation of §8,000 a downright gratuity when it is a matter of history that it is simply the payment of a debt due to the trustees of the University? To allege this payment as a sufficient reason for withholding any additional appropriation is not only disingenuous but positively dishonest. It is not so generally understood, but it is nevertheless incontrovertibly true, that during the whole lifetime of the institution the State government has contributed less than §100,000 to its support, a smaller amount than it 1ms paid in the last ten years to the education of the negroes in a single congressional district. The University’s endowment has not come from legislative appropriations, but from the benefactions of individual citizens and the bounty of the general government. If for no other reason the long roll of its illustrious Alumni, which for nearly a century have illustrated Georgia in the field and forum,ought to have commanded better treatment than has been awarded to it, at least by recent legislatures. The Roman matron, in whose veins flowed the richest blood of the Cornelian gens, could not point with a greater pride to the future Gracchus than this venerable Alma Mater points to Tom Cobb at Fredericksburg, Frank Bartow at Manassas and Gordan at Gettysburg, or to Hill, Toombs and Alex Stephens in the halls of congress; or to Jackson, Bcn-niug, Xesbit and Linton Stephens on the supreme bench; or to Pierce and Palmer in the pulpit; or to Henry Grady and Albert Lamar in journalism, and more than a hundred others who have been strikingly prominent in church and state. While the friends of the University are quiet, they are confident that with its present resources its permanency aud greater prosperity is assured. In the meantime the sober second thought will demand a larger liberality on the part of their representatives, so that its scojk may he widened and its curriculum improved in response to the needs of the age. We need co-operation not pugnacity in Georgia and throughout the South amongst all the friends of higher education. We trust soon to see the rosy dawn of this era of good feeling. (21)]f)av ( Uivss. i. You never knew, and never saw A brighter class than that in law; In Blackstone they could pick a flaw In half a minute; With shrewdest smiles upon each face, The gift of “gab” in lieu of grace, Forsooth, they could take any case (Of wine) and win it. II. Lawyers they are, or soon will be Their shingles now (in dreams) they see, And pocket many a client’s fee And haste to use it. The fees! the fees! they come—they come In many a golden, glittering sum; They’ll get the case and make it hum Before they lose it! III. Yet, let not any well-meant joke The anger of the class provoke, For when this rich old world is “broke,” With heads still level, Their cash, piled up from floor to rafter, Will jingle with a sound like laughter, And when they strike the great hereafter They’ll raise—the devil! (23)LAW CLA33 Colors—Royal Purple. Flower—Jonquil. Yell—Who are we! Can’t you see! We are lawyers!! Ninety-three. Hot Toma lley. G-E-O-R-O-I-A. Louis L. Brown.. V. W. IIii.es___ Ccyleu Smith .. N. A. Morris----- F. G. Gov an ...... J. E. Dean....... T. W. Hardwick. Blanton Winship Officers, .....................--...President. .................... Vice-President. ..................-.......Secretary. ------—-------------------Treasurer. .........-........—..........Orator. -------------------Historian. .........— Captain Football Team. ......— --Captain Baseball Team. CM)taaW (;lass, in - ree. Wallace Winn Bacon . .X A E....................Albany. Joseph Pierce Brown.......ATU..................Greensboro. Louis Leonard Brown ......ATU A. B., U. of (Ja. .Fort Valley. Francis Willis Dart.......A T A................Brunswick. Joel Kdward Dean..........X X..................Home. Samuel C'laytou Dean......atu A. Ik, Mercer. ..Atlanta. Alexander Erwin ...............................Athens. Leon Carlton Greer........A Tit................Oglethorpe. Frederick Gregory Govan ...♦iO.................Home. ThomasWilliamsHardwick ♦AO.....................Tennille. Clarence Pope Harris...........................Watkinsville. William Virgil Harvard.....X X.................Vienna. Arthur Hcymau.................. m..............West Point. William Walter Hiles......♦AO..................Rome. Millard Cortez Horton ....Xt B. A., U. of Ga Pendleton, 8. C. Ozv Enoch Horton..........X ■}• B. A.. U. of Ga .. Pendleton, S. C. John David Humphries...........................Hapevllle. Joseph William Humphries.......................Hapcville. James Vincent Kelley...........................Tennille. Lee Joseph r-angloy. ................ ..... William Josiah Mathews . . _ Edward Thomas Moon....................... Newton Augustus Morris............... Robert Benton Odom..... XX................. Monroe GouvcrueurOgden ATu Edward Ivlncheley Overstreet...... Orville Augustus Park...................... Zeb Vnuce Peacock........XX................ George Ogden Persons........................ Samuel Rutherford.......................... Walter Wade Sheppard.....♦AO............... Robert I-ee Shipp........X A K............. Samuel Hale Sibley.......X ♦ A. B., U. of Ga., Telemon Cuyler Smith........................ Lee Lumpkin Sweat........XX ............... Jasper Esten Whelchel....XX A. B., U.of Ga. Daniel Brittain Whitaker................... Blanton Wluship..........A Til............. . Athens. Bartlesville, .Logausvillc. Roswell. . .Newton. Macon. . .Sylvania. . .Greenville. . .Cochran. . Fort Valley. • Cullodcn. ..Ix ng Brauch. ..Cordele. .Union Point. . .Atlanta. . Wayeross. . Gainesville. ..Franklin. ..Macon. (25)fttstor of }Q baW (Jlass. T Unit, the infant, mewling and puking In the nurse's arms: Then the whining school boy, with Ids satchel, and shining morning face, creeping like a snail unwillingly to school. • • • And then the Justice, in fair round belly, with good capon lined, full of wise saws and modern instances.''— A You Like It. And thus Shakspenre lias summarized the history of each member of the Law Class f '93, leaving a blank of but one short year to be filled by their historian. (To present such an account of that brief period as will not do injustice to the fuller volumes of the future is an embarrassing task. To commit to the cold | age of history facts and feats welded together in our minds by the warmth of college com|xu»ionship adds increasing difficulty; and to approach, however modestly and reverently, the theme of the excellencies and achieve- ments of suc i a year and uch a class as this present with an ordinary pencil backed by an ordinary mental motive power, seems nothing short of sacrilege. Mr. Shakspeare evidently shirked the job himself.) When Miss September, surnanied 1892, found herself called upon to execute the long-standing decree of fate and crown the career of the old University by assembling the goodly com-|ttnv that now meets from day to day in the building crowned with the ivy wreath, conscious of the weight of her charge, she seems to have picked over the great United .States in the search for the little us. Of far California was demanded her Chief Justice (of the peace), the universities of Virginia, Tennessee, South Carolina and Alabama gave their best talent. Ploughshare was ruthlessly stopped, counting-house and emporium of trade closed, family circles broken that she might properly execute this, her chief life-work. Thirty strong she left us. One son of her choice, a worthy brave of the lodge, has fallen by the way, but we rejoice to add, into an editor’s easy chair; and eight others have been summoned to take his place. I oud-voiced fame forbids my entering her domain, (20)and the retiring modesty of my classmates adds a protest against allowing confidential acquaintanceship to proclaim their individual virtues, or even their Christian names. But facts speak for themselves. Blackened paths of progress through hide-bound crvpts of learning have in the alchemic alembic of studious thought brightened into golden bauds of knowledge whose width and wealth a startled jiosteritv is to Ix-hold. A single genius has already applied modern physics to political problems and nullified election turmoil by devolving the presidential choice on an “electrical college.” The halls of eloquence have blushed to own a former attention to Toombs or Hill or Grady, and literary honors, the honest recognition of literary merit, have showered down at the majestic thunder of law class oratory. Though giant intellect can refuse to allow its bodily supj ort to stoop to physical contests, our class has not lacked athletic distinction; and when longer days and less arduous duties .afford opjwrtunities for the field, let com] ctitors hide out. Nor have the lawyers allowed themselves, nor been allowed 3 (2 by others at interest, t forget that a heart was of the anatomy of even a legal frame; ami maiden smiles and maiden blushes are the tell-tale records that betray attendance on Cupid’s court. But stronger than the bonds that bind even when Hymen forecloses Cupid’s mortgage on the heart arc the ties that have been woven here between man and man in the endless contentions over rights, wrongs and remedies. Silken in their softness, silver in their brightness, lmt steel in their lasting strength. That union is our crowning achievement and glory. Can these thirty-seven strong young souls, armed with the sage decrees of the Georgia legislature, hut escape the pulpit and starvation, the Scvlla and Charvhdis of the legal profession, deeds will doubtless be done that will cause the very sun in heaven to rise each day to view them anew, the stars to blink in wonderment over them, and the winds to sigh, and the clouds to weep in envv at them. But I transgress upon the prophet’s sphere, and with an apology for the harmless trespass I resign the function of Histoiman. ) Plje pernor (plass. I. They :irc “drifting away from each other” After all the sweet friendship of years; Kacli faec is the face of a brother, With eyes that seem misty with tears. II. The links of the post must lie broken— The past with its mystical spell; While the pain of the parting is spoken In a song and a sigh of farewell! III. How dear were the friendship that bound them As one in that lieautifu) past, And tenderly haloed around them A light that will linger and last. IV. A light whose soft beams will caress them And temper the world and its strife; Its beauty a joy that will bless them And brighten the pathway of life. V. Hut a joy that surpasses all other In fullest fruition is theirs: They part with the smile of a mother Whose sons are her sons through the years! (29)Class of NinefY Tl)ree Coi rs—White and Fink. Flower—Hyacinth. Yki.I.—Hoo! Hub!! Kiv!! Hoo! Rail!! Hee!! Georgia! Georgia! Xluety-Tlirco. H. C. Moreno... F. G. Barfield E. P. Green M. A. Lewis H. A. Alexander B. T. Frey [„. C. Sladf. . Sam Lawrence A.O. Halsey ... M. A. Lewis. A. O. Halsey . E. G. Oabaniss.. . Officers. ............ .... .. President. ..... Vice-President. Secretary. . Orator. Poet. .............................. Chaplain. . .............Prophet. Historiau. . . .. .Captain Football Team. __ Manager Football Team. -Captain Baseball Team. ____ . - ..Manager Baseball Team. (30)(;lass of J'linety-fpfyree. ). Society. '. 1C. Phi ICappa Society. Hamkv Aakon Ai.exandkb, a. B., I). Atlanta, Ga. Pandora Editor. Claw Poet ixflci. Sophomore Sjicaker (Second Medal) 1 SOI. Chniuplon Debater 1 SOI. Junior S|K nker 1S02. Historian Juuior Class 1n92. President Dcmosthcuinu Society 1802. Sergeant 1802. First r.ieutennnt Compnny B isai. President Democratic Club 1803. Fukdebick G. Uahfieu), I a E, a. B., D. Cutlibcrt, Oa. Bittiness Mnnnger Pandora. Vice-President Class 1803. Troos-urer Banquet Club. Sergeant Compnny B 1802. Lieutenant Coni|Miny B l$si3. Edwaio) Wii.i.iamsox Baiixwbm,. B. s., 1). Athens, Ga. Vice-President . M. C. A. 1893. Sergeant Company B 1892. First Lieutenant Company A 1883. Thomas Jackson Bennett, a T a, B. S., D. Jclfeixon, Gn. President Senior Science Club 1893. Ki.iikiixie Gkkky Caiianiss, ao, a. B., I). Savannah, Ga. Pandora Editor. Junior Speaker 1802. Secretory Se nior Science Club 18! 3. Sergeant Company A 1802. Captain Company B 1803. lams Camak, B. E., D. Athens, Gn. Vice-President Sophomore Class 1881. Kitikne Bonn, • •. A. B., J . Font, Ga. Pandora Editor. President Sophomore Class 1891. Associate Editor of Magazine 1802. President Dcinostlienlau Society 1808. Ilron Manson Dormry, K a, A. B., I). Atlanta, Ga. President Deinostheninn Society 1M 2. KdItor-in-Chicf Magazine 1808. President Banquet Club 1883. Vice-President Tiutliini Dramatic Club 1893. Sergeant Company B 1802. Lieutenant Company B 1883. Champion Debater 1881. K. B. Kim’S, + K, B. E. Albany, Ga. Associate Editor Engineering Society Annual 1883. (31UoitKitT JosKi’ii (i'axti'i ■ K, B. E. Athens, Gn. President Pill Kappa Society 1893. President Engineering Society 1S93. Historian Sophomore Class 1 SOI. Private Annlver-snrinn Phi Kappa Society 18111. Associate Editor Magazine 1803. Associate Alitor Engineering Society Annual 1893. LVNN V. OEltlUXK, iKi', A. B., I). West Point, Miss. Vice-President Senior Science Club 1803. Wn.r.iAM Hknuv Goodrich, k a, A. B., ♦ K. Augusta, On. Business Manager University Magazine l$s«. Emmct P.vtkick Ghkkn, + K, A. B. Marietta, Ga. Business Manager University Magazine 1892. KdItor-ln-Chicf Magazine 1893. Secretary Senior Class 1893. Aj.kkkd Oi.XF.Y Hai.skv, - X, A. B., K. Charleston, S. C. Pandora K litor. President Junior Class I$92. Captain University Baseball Club 1892. Captain Foot and Baseball Tennis 1893. Executive Committee Senior Science Chib 1883. Prcsi-dent Athletic Association 1S93. Sergeant Company B 1892. Captain Company A 1893. Executive Committee College Democratic Club 1898. KmvAim Lind.si.ev Hai.skv, IN, A. B., ♦ K. Charleston, S. C. University Baseball Twin 1S01,1892 and 189th IVeaideut Ex-Cadet Association 1893. GHOROK HII.J.VKK, Jk., X ♦, A. B., D. Atlanta, Ga. Treasurer Athletic Association ISifc!. Vice-PresldeUt JuuiorClass 1S92. Business Manager University Glee Club 1S92. Executive Committee Athletic Association 1893. Secretary O. B. German Club 1893. Business Manager Thnliau Dramatic Club 1893. Sergeant Coni| nny A 1893. Harry Hoiklsox, K A, A. B., I). Adieus, Ga. KdltoMn Cbicf Paudora 1803. Scrgennt-Mi Jor 1802. Adjutant 1803. Clinirmnn F.xecutlvo Committee College Democratic Club 1803. Greene Johnson, a t a, a. Bm -k. Montlccllo, Gu. Editor Pandora. Champion Debater 1S90. Sophomore Speaker 1801. Junior Speaker 1S02. Prviddeut ■ Phi Kappa Society 1802. Editor-in-Chief Mngn Jue 18Q2. Exiimtlvi1 (!oninii(tce OolUftc Democratic Club 1803. Charles Davih Kline, a o, d. Mexico City, Mexico. Disciple of Spencer, Mill and Hume. Senior Class Birthday Poet. M Alters Ai jnzo Lewis, a T a, a. B., ■ K. Eaton ton, Ga. Junior S|H-;iker I802. President Phi Kappa 1802. Sergeant Cnnuvnny A 1S92. Executive Committee Senior Science Club 1S93. Samuel Lawkkxck, a t o, B. E., k. Marietta, Gn. Junior Speaker 1892. Historian Senior (.'lass 1803. Executive Committee Banquet Club 1803. Lamaii I.yndon, B. E., I). Athens, Ga. President Thalian Dramatic Clnb 1S03. Chairman Senior Banquet Committee. Hau-ott Ca) wai.lai ki{ Moreno, + AO, A. B., D. Gainesville, Ga. Junior Speaker 1802. President Senior Clas 1803. BUKC« Benjamin Xali.ky, K, It. E. Villa Idea. Ga. Junior Speaker 1802. Secretary Engineering Society 1803. University Baseball Team. University Football Team 1892-1803.Charms ltlCHAKD Nishkt, X o It. S., D. Loiaiue, Gn. l andom Editor. Sophomore Speaker 1891. (First Medalist.) Junior S| eaker 1892. Business Mauager Magazine lS!i2. President University Glee Club 1S92. Executive Committee O. It. German Club 1802-189$. Associate Editor Magazine 1S!«3. Critic Dramatic Club 1893. Annivcrsnrian Demos-then inn Society isnct. ItK.vjAMi.v Lank Uointrkk, - x. A. I!., ♦ K. Summit, Ga. Associate Editor of Magazine 1S93. Vice-President Phi Kappa Society 1893. Lkstru Cowdkuv Sj.aok, X , A. It.. D. Carrollton, Gn. President Dcmosthcnlnn Society 1892. Junior Speaker 1892. Secretary Junior CIrkh 1892. Secretary Demostbenian Society 1893. Sergeant Company A 1S92. Lieutenant Oompauy A 1S93. Natiianiki. It. Stkwaict, a t t, A. It., I). Butler. Gn. Editor Pandora. Secretary Sophomore Cl a— 1891. Vice-President ltan |uct Club 1893. Executive Committee College Demo-cmtle Club 1898. Jamkk TiVinn, SI A B, A. It., I . Americua, Ga. Secretary Demostheulun Society 1892. Sergeant Company A 1892. Lieutenant Company B 1893. Wai.tkk Phkston Wakkkn, ♦ a n, a. B.. ♦ K. Atlanta, Gn. President Americo-Gennan Society. Nkwton Watkins, ❖ K, A. B. Untiedgo, Ga. Vice-President College Democratic Club 1S93. Football Team 1892-1893. President College Fighting Club.ftistor of (Jlass inet - p ree. ()X(i years ago, as far back as eighteen hundred and eighty-nine years A. D., thirty lean, hungry figures were seen strolling on Campus, the garden of all learning. When asked by Faculty, the king of the garden and god of all knowledge, why they so tres|tasgcd on his premises, they said: “We arc men of ’03 just from the Land of Ignorance, and we seek the knowledge of thv bosom ” “Follow me,” said Faculty, “and mark well mv savings and you shall drink deep of the Pierian spring that gushes forth from the bosom of all knowledge.” Faculty called for White, the G d of Chemistry, to make a |Hjrspective analysis of those structures before lie made further advancement. His report read as follows: “Each is a homogeneous mass of the dust of the earth, with the breath of life forced into them by some powerful and mysterious effort of nature. 1 recommend them as valuable organisms.” Faculty being pleased with this report began, by some mysterious method, to weave the web of intellect in their omniums. So cjuiek was their jiereeption that with this intellect and a “trick” as a means, and a “rise” for an object, they were made to produce powerful “effects” by demonstrating the most complicated problems and translating the most difficult Greek. This intellect associated itself with honor, ambition and energy, and for a while it seemed as though the light of prosperity east its brightest rays among this band of philosophers. Faculty was proud of his work, and the world said: “Well done, thou good and faithful Faculty.” dust at this time, when all was good, a dark cloud appeared and the voice of Satan could l c heard afar off in the form of thunder, and his sparkling eyes could be seen in the form of lightning. N'o one knew who or what was coming, blit when the cloud dis-apjienrod and the golden sun had dived into the big pond to take its daily bath, and while the philosophers sat upon “Mother Earth” with their eves turned towards the starry heavens studying the mysteries of nature, a large, mean-looking snake came creeping up to them and said in a low tone: “Fear not, it is I; I ain’t going to bite you.” Here they studied the stars until the dead of night; and when all was still the ISndman said: “Follow me and 1 will teach you the art of ‘picking’ and ‘stealing.’” The next morning, whenFaculty rose from his wean- couch he found that all of his locks had been “picked” and his examination papers “stolen.” lie questioned his philosophers, but they said it was Satan, who rn the meantime had hidden himself behind a fig bush in the garden, and Faculty thought he had gone. So, he said to the philosophers: “i am goiug to cleanse you of all your evils by washing your mouth with soapsuds and make you fresh again,” and from this they were called “Freshmen,” and this period of their existence was called the “Freshman” year. As time passed on they regained courage; great development was the result, and the world pronounced them cured of all evil doings. They again became the pride of Faculty, and their advancement was wonderful. But very soon, while all was quiet and things were running smoothly again, old Satan came from behind the fig bush and mingled with the philosophers. When they were thirsty he led them not to the Pierian spring, but to the “Dispensary”; when they were hungry he gave them not bread, but a chew of tobacco. One night when all was still he introduced the arts of “lying,” “cheating” and “doing murder,” and very soon they were found lying in bed until the bell rang; “cutting” (murdering) recitations and prayers, and “booking” (cheating) on dailies. Faculty called them up and said he would have to cleanse them agaiu, whereupon one of them cried aloud: “Soap, oh, more soap! what must I do?” and from this they were called “Soap-oh-morcs,” and finally “Sophomores” for euphony. This cleansing was so effective that when Satan came from his hiding place to instruct his pupils they abused him, whereu|K n becoming enraged he departed to parts unknown. Just here a great change took place, and so wonderful was their progress that Faculty pronounced them qualified to dive dccj er into the Pierian spring, whereupon they made a plunge, determined to master all that man can appreciate. They studied why it was that the sun shone in the day instead of at night, and the reason why “math” was a good brain food, and why metaphysics was good for the soul and nothing more. They dived so deep as to appreciate that “they know not what they are, but what they were a moment before.” So rapid was their advancement, that Faculty, being so pleased with their good work, said: “You shall no longer be known as “Sophomores” but “Juniors,” signifying that you arc ones who even make science “june.” As time drove on they continued to dive for knowledge until they reached the bottom of the Pierian spring, whereupon Faculty called them up and said: “Your work is done, you shall no longer be known as ‘Juniors,’ but ‘Se(e)niors,’ since you have seen all; and in conclusion I present to each a ‘sheepskin which I call a ‘Dip-low-er,’ or better, ‘Diploma,’ since you have dipj cd so low in the Pierian spring for your knowledge.” With this they departed; where they went or what they did is as great a mystery as where they came from. H ISTOItlAN ’93. to) TV J an tor ( lass. O, willing muse, how shall you time your Harp to sing the aspiring junior? See him entering the gate With a look that’s quite sedate, While he strives to emulate All the seniors as they pass, And would overleap his class If he could but shine—alas ! In their sight! See him strut and see him stare; See him striving to appear Just as if he didn’t care For the seniors—while his mission Is to get to their condition, And lie longs for recognition Day and night! (), junior! junior! much we owe thee, lint, we know thee, yes, we know thee! (87)Class of Ninef -Foor COLOiuv-lSUck and Blue. Flower—Peacb Blossom. YELL-Hoop! U! Hoo!! Hoop! La! Hoo!! Ninety-Four I Ninety-Four:! Black and Blue! Officers. James H. Butner......... David C. Barrow.................. Oscar C. Turner.................. Thomas A. McGregor------------------- Byron B. Bower.......... —........— H. C. Brown................ G. P. Butler---- L. D. Fricks..........- - ..... . .President. .. .. ------Vice-President. .............. Secretary. - .....- Chaplain. .......Historian. Captain Football Team. Manager Football Team. . Captain Baseball Team. (38)Joseph Akerman .. .X William B. Armstrong...... X William Thomas Bacon ..... Benjamin .Smith Baldwin X George Phinous Butler......x James Henry But tier.......X Robert Cicero Cleglioru • David Lowe Cloud...........A Edwin Davis............... K Jasper Xewton Dorsey . Paul Lamar Fleming. .X Lunsford Dixon Fricks. . . x William Alford Fuller......X William Pickens Harbin_____X John Madison Harrington k X . A. B Athens. ... A. B Atlanta. ..A. B . .Lexington. X ... A. B Cnthhert. A E... ..B.S. Augusta. X... A. B . Macon. AO A. B . .Summerville. Ti B. S. ..Thomson. A A. B .. Greensboro. AO. . A. B Gainesville. ... A. B ..Atlanta. X ... A. B . Rising Fawn. ... A. B . .Atlanta. t ... A. B . .Calhoun. A A. B West Point. ■’ L It Colics . Members. David Crenshaw Harrow 8d . 2 A E A. B Athens. Byron lkoufort Bower, Jr . ,K A . . A. B .. .Bninbridge. James Ewell Branneu. .. A. B .. .Iric. Henry Crowley Brown ......K A...B. E —Augusta. Cicero Decatur McCutchen ,1'X . .A. B . .Dalton. William Alex. McDougald.. K A . A. B Columbus. Thomas Alonzo McGregor...............A. B .Mt. Vemoti. Noel McHenry Moore ..IAE A. B . Augusta. John Deidriek Stelling .A TU . ,B. K_Augusta. John Vivian Stubbs ... A. B_Oedartown, I a mar Chappell Toomer X t...A. B______Portsmouth, Va. William Morrill Wadley . K. . . B. K Boliugbrokc. Arthur Wrigley.......... .K A_____B. E___Macon. Samuel Benjamin Yow.... A 0 .. A. B___Avalon. (39)•piston; of J'linety-pour. LI- the world’s a stage, and all men and women merely actors;” all history a drama, and historians but playwrights. So let it be. Yet think not this chronicle a farce, but rather a serio-comic based on fact. The curtain rises, i he title is “The Class of ’04.” Place, University of Georgia. Time, Junior Year—from September, 1892, to June, 1893. The actors step ti| on the stage. ’Tis difficult to tell the hero. All arc stars, and each plays well his part. The scenery is grand and imposing. Scene first represents a spacious recitation room, the class assembled, truly a fine body of men. At a desk, in front and facing the class, sits the beloved professor, who, though young, has the mark of strong intellectuality stam| ed upon his brow, and that “high born eye that checks low mirth yet lacks not courtesy.” The class is called upon and recites, each and every member informing his part with case and precision. The class goes through the general routine of class work, and after a short while a bell rings. The class rises to be dismissed. The professor rises, but before dismissing exclaims, as his face beams and his eyes sparkle: “Well done, my good and faithful friends! Would that your examples were emulated by all other classes.” The curtain drops. It rises again, displaying a large rectangular field. Across this field are drawn long white lines, dividing it, seemingly, into other smaller rectangles. Xo seer is needed to interpret or explain these hieroglyphics, for all recognize at once the football field. The two teams arc seen to come uj on the field. Both arc composed of men true, trained and tried, young giants, with their flowing locks, large chests, broad shoulders and clear cut limbs. Their uniforms arc black and old gold, and black and blue. With their handsome faces, their rounded forms and their dignified and sclf-eomjM sed mien, the Black and Blue boys are the cynosure of admiring eyes and the general favorites. The Black and Old Gold boys have won every game played (40)up to this time and meet for the first time the Black and Blue boys, who boost of never having lost a game. The referee, a little man with a nervous step, calls off the two captains, sj eaks a few words to them, and they begin to form their teams, having tossed for sides. The Black and Blue win choice and take the northern end of the field, the Black and Old Gold occupying the opposite side. The referee pulls his watch aud calls the game. The Blue and Black form a wedge and come dashing over the field. But look how the Black and Old Gold line up to meet them! They meet—they halt—they tug—they sway—ami the wedge goes through for ten yards. The ball is down—hard fighting on both sides. Each man has a foeman worthy of his steel. Black ami Old Gold get the ball, but fail to gain anything. The ball soon goes to Black and Blue and they gain five yards. After much scrimmaging the captain gives 14—300-96-45-10, and a Blue Black bucks the center for ten yards. The boys in Blue and Black are slowly but Surely carrying the ball towards the enemy’s goal. Both sides are exerting their utmost. Now they arc lining up. Black and Blue have the ball. Her center snajw it back and a Blue Black streak goes round the enemy’s end, past all pursuers, safe behind the goal posts touching down. And then pandemonium ensues. Such yelling ! But clear above the din and louder and louder is heard: Hoop-Ja-hoo, Hoopla-lioo, Ninety-four, ninety-four, Black ami Blue. 0 Curtain drops once more. The curtain again rises, this time on a scene magnificent and never to l e forgotten. There is a sound of revelry by night. The beauty and chivalry of Georgia is gathered here. The brilliant lights, the l eautiful decorations, the spacious ballroom and the groups of lovely women and handsome men seated here and there remind us of the splendid levees of some powerful king or mighty emperor. Over on the opposite side of the room, just under the bowing leaves of some palms, is a couple which attracts more than passing attention. She is fashioned with all the grace and loveliness of her sex—“a daughter of the gods divinely tall and most divinely fair.'’ On her breast she wears a large rosette of black and blue. He is tall, straight as an arrow, and has a well rounded figure, a splendid dome shaped forehead which would do honor to a Ciesar. He, a typical man of’94, with his fair jxartner, is to lead this German, the last and mast elegant of a gay commencement. Directly they face about to the crowd, and noticing the multiplicity of black and blue around the room, he smiles triumphantly. A shrill whistle stops the laughter, and as the sweet strains of a dreamy waltz from invisilbe musicians float to their ears, they glide out on the smooth floor, followed by others, and the curtain drops. Thus may every member of’94 glide through life with the object of his ho) es attained, on the smooth floor of prosperity, to the music of his invisible approving conscience. The Historian. i)TUe )opI)omore (plass. The Sophomoric fellow—you will know him when he comes; There’s no use to announce him with a rattle of the drums, Or a blowing of the trumpets; you can spot him anywhere By the wonderful assurance of his consequential air! He’s left the Freshman’s greenness just a mile or two behind; lie has really quit his meanness and developed half his mind; lie knows the sun is shining and the earth is like a ball, But he’s now in double trouble, for he thinks he knows it all! O, the Sophomoric fellow! he is getting there so fast That he wonders if it really isn’t most too good to last! And to sum up every feeling in a solitary line: He feels the world a-reeling, and he chuckles: “It is mine!” («)Class of Ninety-Five Colors—Black and Maroon. Flower—Sunflower. Yell—Rah: Rah!' Rah!!' Six ! Boom! A-h! Ninety-five! Ninety-five! Rah! Rah!! Rah!!! Officers. John Kill, Jr_____..._______________ Frederick J. Orr_________________ .. Arthur F. Latimer.......... ........ Clinton P. Thompson............... C. P. Thompson........................ J. C. C. Black, Jr__________________ W. L. K BMP__________________ W. P. Gearreld______________________ _______...President. ........Vice-President. ...____________Secretary. _______________Historian. Captain Football Team. Manager Football Team. .Captain Baseball Team. Manager Baseball Team. (44)ft embers. David Crenshaw Barrow 4th. X a e A. B Pelham. James C. C. Black, Jr K A. ..A. B.... Augusta. Charles Edgar Brand Lognnsvillo. Carlos Ford Dodd ..A. B Font. Edward Emmett Dougherty X l . B.S Atlanta. James Thomson Dunlap. ♦ AO ..B.S ... Gainesville. Henry Hansel Ezzard . . .B.S. Vickery’s Creek. William Pendleton Gearreld A TJ, B.S Xewnnn. Joel Jacobus Hibson A T A B.S Xewnnn. Thomas Gilbert, Jr. ♦ a e.. • B.S Columbus. Charles Lane Good rum B. K Athens. Moses Guyton Marianna, Fla. Lludslcy Hulsey XX -B.S ■ Charleston, S. C. William W. Hamilton X X ... B.S . Dalton. Walter Alexander Harris ... X . -A. B .Macon. Willis Alston Hawkins. X ♦.. . B.S . Amoricus. John Hill, Jr B. S Columbus. Samuel Garnet Hunter .B. E Athens. Frank Staudifer Jones ■ A. B .... Blakely. William Larkin Kemp A. B Albany. Arthur Fleming Latimer... X A K.. B. S Athens. Frederick Milledge Lockhart X A E.. A. B .... Augusta. Janies Both well Lockhart.. X A E.. A. B .Augusta. Malcolm Mabry Lockhart X A E. A.B Augusta. Eugene Edmund Murpliey. X ♦.... B.S .Augusta. Osborne Brevard Xisbet . X 0... A. B Katonton. Frederick Joseph Orr ♦ AO . B. E Athens. James Henry Porter, Jr B.S .Atlanta. Itobert Archibald Kklley. . X 0.... B.S LnGrange. Linton Stephens Selma u... B. E . Powder Springs. Perry Joshua Sheorouse.. . .RE .Springfield. B.S Joseph Griftlth Smith.. A. B Ha. Clinton Pcvtou Thompson. A. B Columbia, Ala.(Jlass history of J4ine+ -pi0e. HE first historian of ’9u truly said that his class was just beginning to make history, and a right enviable one she has made too. Of the original fifty-two, only twenty-seven answered “Here, sir,”at the opening of the present year. Time and other things have thinned our ra.iks. Six fell out by the wayside ere the race was run; five failed to climb the sleep; three have crossed over the river and arc answering the roll call in the Beautiful Beyond; and eleven, for various reasons, did not return. We now number forty-four, seventeen new men having entered the class. Some of these intended entering Freshman, hut strained up a little; others aimed for Junior, but lowered their mark—all for the purpose of entering this immortal class. Before our Freshman year ended we had impressed every one that we wore the best all-round Fresh class that ever registered here; nor was this impression altogether wrong. In proof of which let the following facts sjieak for themselves. In the class-room the professors were surprised at our deep and logical reasoning, ready answers, good order, and general high average. And not here alone was the genius of this class made manifest. In society we took a leading part and wijied out the long standing opinion that Freshmen are babes and sucklings. In the old Demosthenian and Phi Kappa Societies our voices were often raised, and many a time did even the stubborn lawyer’s doughty argument yield to the force of ours. When commencement came wc had a worthy rcpresentaiive on the Champion Debate. On Field Day our prowess and 'trength were the wonder and admiration of all, and it was a common remark, “ Were ever such Freshmen seen ?” Lawyers, Seniors, Juniors and “Sophs” went down before n in one humiliated mass. Out (46)of a possible thirty, we won eleven prize-, broke one rccortl of long standing, and eipialled two others. Our cup of unmeasured success was well-nigh full when we triumphantly marched oir with the baseball pennant. It was the work of our batten that won the great game that caused Auburn’s defeat. Although we have lost sonic of our liest athletes ; yet, we this year had a football team that bade fair to Unit everything else, and so sure were the other teams that we would again carry off the baseball pennant that they deemed it Inst to do away with class games altogether, rather than have it such a one-sided affair. We have been prominently represented in every department of college life. We now have five out of six Spring Debaters; Secretary of the University Young Men’s Christian Association; Representatives on the Magazine; and as one of the I'reshies said : “All of the corporals.’’ We have the only real genius, the tallest man. the heaviest man, and altogether the smartest set of men in college. While our class has done so well, it has made some mistakes. The princijxtl of these arc stealing examination | aj crs and spending too much time walking by Lucy Col,l . Fulsome eulogy, elsewhere disgusting, is pardonable and wholly inadequate when the theme is one's own class. Perhaps, dear reader, upon finishing this history you will exclaim with Burns: •• O wad some power the- jiiftio i»lo us. To (00 on riels iu ithers too u .” Vet wc can but add that wc will realize our fondest dreams andv our best wishes for us, too, if we are as successful in after life as men, as we have been hero as a class. Historian 95.pl)e pressman p'lass. We know him—so humble of mien— A curious bundle of flesh; The grass on the campus is green, But never as green as the “Fresh.” His smile Makes a mile By good measurement—sure, And his laugh— You’ve heard thunder? No need to say more. In a garment fantastic he comes; He lands in the ranks with a thud. He’s good on persimmons and sums And great on molasses and mud! He’s cuffed And rebuffed Till lie’s far from serene; The grass Turns to hay, But he’s green—“ Evergreen!” HO)Class of Mnet 3ix John Gerdixe - ... COJ.OR—Navy Blue and White. Fbowut—Buttercup. YKtJy— Hobble-Gobble. Raszle-Dazzlc. Here we are. U of G-«, 81tS-Room-Ah! Officers. __ President. ......... Vice-President. George S. Crane - .Secretary. Thomas Z. Daniel Historian. P. P. Ezelle. . ..Captain Football Team. C. A. Fleming... Captain Baseball Team. (60)Members. Holcombe Bacon. .X ♦ . A. B Atlanta. Bobert Halton Lovejoy.. A. B. Athens. Harry Baughman . ..B. E .Stanford, Ky. •Williams McCarthy X +. A. B... Atlanta. Frank Abbott Chrter .B. S. Atlanta. George Ix vick MeBnc.. ss. A. B Athens. Thomas Zuch ria Daniel .X X.. ..B. S. Milieu. James Audlcy Morton K A . Thomas Albert Neal ... ..A. B .. Banksville. Percy Powell Ezellc .K A ... B. E . .Eatontou. Edward Stephens O'Brieu, Jr A T A . B.S (Maude Aiulersou Fleming . K A . „ ..B.E Augusta. John Green Pittman ♦ AO . ..B.S ..Thomasvillc. Hubert Waight Fuller .X ♦.... ..A. B Atlanta. Vivian Alvau Bol crts ..A. B . .Sandersvillo. John Gerdiue. Jr .DAK.. B. E .. .Athens. Grantham Israel Taggert, Jr ..B.S . .Savannah. Henry HUIyer ..X A E.. ..B. S. ... .. Augusta. ‘John White Welch KA ... ..B.S . Athens. Carl Hamilton Holden. ... .AT A. . ..A. B... Cniwfordville. Pettus Kinuebrcw Wilson. . B.S Bichard Stuart Hunter ..B. 8. . Winchester, Va. '•Lett College. (61)pV sfyman ffi$t©rj!- is characteristic of historians to extol to the skies the merits of their respective classes. The duty is now imjtoscd upon me to praise the beautiful qualities and wonderful achievements of ’96. But I do not intend to swerve from the narrow path of truth, for '96 need never resort to exaggeration. Freshmen are like little school girls, very modest. In fact, further than this there rests upon them the mantle of greenness. Ninety-six is destitute of all color, for we have neither a Green, Black, White or Grey amongst us. We must admit that, when we first saw the campus, the slightest tinge of verdancy could l e distinguished upon our unsophisticated faces. Like bunco stecrcrsthc noble Juniors and Sophomores then grnS| od our hands. They showed us the great “ Yahoo,” Lucy Cobb, and all the other beautiful things to be seen in Athens. Thus did ’9G begin her existence. Kvcr since our arrival here we have been looked upon as an ideal class. We have attended prayers regularly and only once did covet our professor’s examination papers. None of us ever “ look upon the wine when it is red,” but drink strictly H;0. Each of us carries a Bible in his vest pocket, and we have all been good religious fellows. On account of our modesty we have not forced ourselves upon either the college base or football teams. We, however, hope to bloom forth on Field Day and astound the college with our now dormant athletic powers. Had the class games in foot and baseball been played wc would have been surely the victors in both. As Spring Debaters we arc pre-eminently qualified. As society men wc are the pride of the girls, and as " sports” excel even the Seniors. (• 2iOur class at present numbers only 35; our average weight is about 138 pounds, and height 5 feet 8 inches. Some of us have lovely mustaches and others only antenna;. Very often has some honored member of ’96 been invited to attend the Chancellor’s monthly reception. In fact the invitation has been so pressing to some that it is to be feared that they will be suddenly called home “on account of sore eyes.” 1'hc Freshman class, like a big ball of rolling snow, adds an increment to its mass each year as it approaches Senior as its limit. Surely if we increase in intellectuality and number according to the same ratio at which we arc now progressing, we will be the Faculty by the time we reach our Senior year. With ’96 a new epoch begins in the University, and, from hence, its arrival here will be that j criod from which all collegiate events will be dated. So I predict for ’96 the brightest future. May her pathway be strewn with roses and her career be most prosperous. Historian. (53)elective CSfadents •Samuel Kendrick Abbott . K A Robert Fleece K A .. —New York, X.' Alfred Aker man Van Fletcher. . Charles Akcrman ,.SX Edward Montague Gammon Houry Banks, Jr ..ATI! James Walter Griffith George Wilkes Beckett. .. ♦ AO Frank Tramel Harrington ... K A West Point. William Troy Bivlugs ,.SA E •Aguew Hilsman 2 A E Gilbert Hillhonsc Boggs. . Johu Boykin Madden. Thomas Richmond Boggs Tliomns Ralph Move ...... Harrison. Shirley Brooks ..❖AO Richard Wiun Peeples Clarence Kdgar Brunson... ..A TO Roomer Wesley Proctor Rolx-rt Manning Butler . .. K A George Walton Reab A T A Thomas Hark ness But trill. AT U Frederick H. Rounsaville ♦ A O Rome. Guilford M. Cannon ..25 X Alexander William Stephens Hawes Cloud Heury Hcgncr Steiner - A E Itnlph Owen Cochran ..A TO George G. Stiles K A Oartoisvllle. Henrv Harford Cmntning.. Charles Reuben Tidwell A T A William Clark Davis .. A T A Osoar Crcdelle Turner William Moore Draper Arthur Flatau ..25 A E William Archibald Wilkins, Jr. - a E Waynesboro. «I-ci« Colic . (.54)Winter ( oarje in Agriculture. Charles English Cheney. Flcmue! Hates Gaskins James Ilenry Gaskins Haul Hadawav G. M. Hcidt ' Oscar Lyndon John Thomas Mathews William Richard Moore George M. Norton. Robert Rives. Arthur Henderson Tuck Buirdstown. .. Nashville. Nashville. Athens. Savannah. ..Athens. Thomson. -Sharon. Savannah. Devereaux. Athens. Summary. Post-graduates . 2 Seniors. .......... .................................. . ... 28 Juniors . . ....... . . . ... . 20 Sophomores..... ... ... . . ........ 34 Freshmen ... 27 Electives .41 Winter Course in Agriculture ........ ..... .11 Law. . ........................................................... .'IS («) Total 210amber of Stadents in J acl) Department. Metaphysics and Ethics........... Algebra...................... . Plane and Solid Geometry Trigonometry...... ..... Analytic Geometry..... Calculus Physics and Astronomy Mechanics and Astronomy. Physical Laboratory ... French............. — Gerrnau. General Chemistry ... Industrial Chemistry....----- Agricultural Chemistry.............. Chemical laboratory. .. ....... Geology............................. English — Botany ..................... Vegetable Morphology and Physiology Invertebrate Zoology-- ... .. Vertebrate Anatomy.................. Biological Laboratory- . . .. 1 .at in .................. Greek........................... Engineering. . ........... .. Drawing History .... Military Tactics . . —........... .. ____ 47 ____91 . ... 48 46 41 51 93 . 10 4 .... 65 ____57 _____43 . .. 31 ____ 41 30 31 152 ... 25 10 .... 9 27 .. .38 .... 110 .. 36 .... 33 . .. 40 . 132 136 (60)Social lsif( at % Or i )ei'sity. A most important feature of modern education is the recognition of the fact that the essentials of learning arc not merely a possession of the individual, but are the common property of all cultured men. These essentials may be acquired by the individual, not alone by bookish training of the intellect, but also by association with other men. Good books arc great teachers. But the varied interpretations of the substance of good books by many minds add much, by interchange, to the value of the teaching. The scholar is no longer a recluse and a hermit; lie is a man among men. The silent, grave and solitary owl no longer typifies the possessor of great wisdom. The modern race horse would better typify the modern'scholar. Bred from a herd of the best representatives of his kind; possessor of all the best qualities of the equine race; preeminent in the particular quality of swiftness because of special training to that end, his excellence is achieved and preserved because of constant competition with his fellows. Society is itself a great training school, and therein men may learn many things which they may not learn in books, and gain better understanding of the things taught in books. The social life of a community of students is therefore an important factor in their scholarly development. In our University this powerful agency for good service in the cause of education is turned to most excellent account. To begiu with, the daily class-room exercises are in the nature of a social intercourse of professor and students. As one of the faculty has expressed it, “American colleges, and especially American universities, are rapidly coming to understand that professor and students are not simply classes of beings created for the sole pur| ose of harassing each other with distasteful tasks and unruly pranks. Bather the University community is an organization with its older and its younger members all bound together by common purposes— the maintenance of morality, the conservation of scholarship, the advancement of learning. To these ends all contribute: the faculties, as the older members, poiut the way, and traiu the younger members, that, together, they may hold fa«t to those things which arc good, and hew out new paths to those (57)things which may he better, and thus together in their generation serve God, the State and their fcllowmen.” To maintain and fulfill this high ideal of college life there is no stronger incentive than the cordial sympathy created by the social intercourse of professors and students. In this—which may be called the “official” society of the University—all the essentials which should characterize a community bound together by common purposes are preserved. Mutual respect, mutual confidence, mutual toleration arc joined to individual freedom of thought and expression. The class-room exercises arc no longer what tradition pictures them to have lieen in the past—dreary performances and irksome bores partici|vatc l in by a stern, terror-inspiring preceptor on the one hand, ami a band of cringing, uninterested pupils on the other—but a keen, active, zealous, “search after truth” (the animating principle of all true education), led by an enthusiastic instructor, and followed by the quickened intelligence of interested students. The “atmosphere of learning” found within the University walls is no longer stratified—with the professor in the clouds ami the student on the earth—but is uniform, equable and all-pervading, enwrapping harmoniously both professor and student in its mystic folds, and inspiring l oth to be workers and seekers together after that which is true and that which is good. It would be impossible to overestimate the strength and worth of the infiuence exerted upon the student by conditions which lead him to feel himself-—so long as he is a worthy member of the University community—a respected member of a society of learned men. The official re- (J lation of professor and student is therefore a social relation, and speaking for our University, we doubt if there is another college in the world where the social relations of the teacher and the taught are so intimate and so cordial, while, at the same time, the dignity, respect and deference due to differences in station, authority ami age are so entirely preserved. But the social relations of the University extend beyond the class-room. The office of a groat State educational institution is not alone to make individual scholars. It is charged with the rearing of good citizens, men who shall by their talents and acquirements not only make famous among the learned and the scholarly the commonwealth that bore and trained them, but also who shall by daily intercourse with their fellow citizens influence and lead them to better lives and higher ideals of citizenship. Such men need to learn in their youth how such influences may best and properly be exerted, and as the University community is a commonwealth within itself, the social relationship «»f the students is an admirable training school to this end. A number of organized societies exist in the University community—the Literary Societies, the Greek Ix-tter Fraternities, the Science Club, the Engineering Society, the Moot Court, the Athletic Club, the Glee Club, the Banquet Club, each having specific pur|Ki es, but each at the same time affording opportunity for the cultivation of a common purpose—the development of the individual as a member of society and his training to exercise a proper and beneficent influence upon bis fellows. In such organizations, not only are wits sharpened and intelligences piickencd l y contact with each other, hut the member arc taught that courtesy, good temper, kindness, unselfishness and res|K ct and consideration for others arc useful (it not essential) as well as graceful qualities in every man. The interest ami participation of the professors—the experienced members of the community—in the proceedings of these societies add much to their educative value, and they probably accomplish ns much if not a greater good in their social purpose than in the specific purposes for which they arc nominally formed. “Society" is organized humanity. Any form of it is sadly incomplete that gives no place to the best element of human kind—woman. As yet law and custom (which may or may not be expedient and wise) bar onr class-room doors against the gentle sex. Hut in many ways the gracious and ennobling influence of woman i manifested in our social life. The University families and the homes of Athens furnish a multitude of kind and cultured matrons and bright, vivacious maidens who, in grace, beauty and accomplishments would adorn the choicest society of any land. In their contributions to the social training of the students they arc unstinted in their lil -crnlitv. For more than a century the “college boy" has l cen the social ward of the “Classic City.” Hefined homes, hospitable houses, cultured social circles arc more than freely opened to him; he is solicited and urged to take advantage of their beneficent influences. Within these homes and in this society young men learn what they cannot learn elsewhere—how much there is of sterling worth in social amenities, and how contributive arc refinement, courtesy, politeness, and even the (C 5 graceful forms of good society to morality and happiness. Some there Ik? who rail anil mouth at social forms, and j eck their little hills at “society,” as if it wore a fetich consecrated to fashion and frivolity. Happily the number of these grows less as civilization and common sense increases. A diamond in the rough may be a very good thing, but it is not a gem until it has received its polish at the lapidary’s hand. “.Society” is the lapidary that moulds and harmonizes the best qualities of the worthy man and makes of him a gentleman. Paste crystals may sometimes intrude themselves among the gems, as baser stones may be admixed with diamonds in the rough, hut a society that is true to its purposes is no less quick to put a rightful estimate upon the unworthy imitation thanex-|M?rts iu other lines to scjwrate the jewels from the dross. We do not think we overstate the case when we say that the well-bred society of the University and its surroundings is the greatest conservator of the morality, purity and temperance of our University life. To this society we arc also indebted for many of the lighter pleasures of our college days. Some of us dance—and some (who can) even dance the “cotillion” (miscalled the “Ger-man”)—that epitome of horrors to some well-meaning but ignorant critics, who either never saw it, or have been misled concerning it, or fancy the participators to Ik? as brutish as themselves—and for these the German Chib furnishes occasional opportunity for the cultivation and pleasure which attend such a social function. Some of us can “play a part” (or think we can) uj on the stage, and the “Thaliuns” and the 0)Minstrel Club, reinforced by local talent, by occasional performances to large houses of good-natured and tolerant auditors, cultivate their minor ambitions in this direction. Many of us can neither dance nor act, and these take contented refuge in “evening calls,” picnics, straw rides and the lesser functions of polite society. Whether on its graver or its lighter side, the “tone” of society in our community is that of purity, morality, courtesy and kindness. One of the glories of the University is that, although a century old, its society has never known a stain. Woe betide the man who shall dare l csmirch its fame! Social life at the University, in all its phases, makes for good; it is educative, it is helpful, it is inspiring; it awakens enthusiasm in the cultivation of learning; it kindles ambition to excel in those things which are approved and acceptable in the eyes of good and true men; it inspires to thought and conduct befitting a “gentleman”—a type of humanity combining the “high-mindedness” of the intellectual Greek with the humanity and morality of the faithful Christian. And who of us that has enjoyed it will not say that it also makes for happiness? Have we not all felt the chief charm of our college life to have been the intimate, sympathetic and kindly association of all members of our college community? And as each of us shall pass beyond the walls, will we not hold in constant affectionate remembrance the happy hours of our social communions of every kind, and assign to them a chief and foremost place upon the “sunshine jiages of our mortal lives?” Alma Mater—Kind mother; faithful muse; strong protector; wise teacher; brave leader; sweet contributor to our happiness—Mo perpdua!w§i|ma eAlpfya 6psilor . Founded at University of Alabama 1S56. Georgia Beta Chapter Established 1866. Rev. C. W. Lone, I). I)., John D. MclJ, A. L. Mitchell, L. H. Chnrboniiicr, Jr., C. A. Seudder, FRATRES IN URBB. Thos. S. Mel I, W. V. Thomas, G. C- Hamilton, Joseph Hodgson, T. CJ. G'erdlue. R. M. Wade, M. D., (’has. I. Mcll, It. It. ltussell, E. W. Chnrbonnler, PRATER IN FACULTATE. I.. H. CharhoiiDier, A. M., Pb. I). LAW CLASS. W. W. Bacon, Jr., Robert .Shipp. CLASS OF NINETY-THREE. Fred G. Barfield, James Taylor. CLASS OP NINETY-POUR. N. M. Moore, W. M. Draper, G. P. Butler, W. A. Wilkins, D. 0. Borrow, :td. Arthur Latimer, CLASS OF NINETY-FIVE. B. C- Borrow, 4th, F. M. Lockhart, T. B. Ix ckbart, M. M. Lockhart, W. T. Bivings. Hal Steiner, CLASS OF NINETY-SIX. •Aguew G. Hilsmaii. John Gerdine, Left College. Henry Hlllyer. (C2)(Scoria Beta (tyaptef of Sigma cjAlpfya Gpsilon pVatefnity. Bacon . ktkixkk. Lock II a kt. Kun.r.K. UtlXYKS. Barrow. (th. I'Kor. CiiAKiioxxir.ii. WlI.KIN . Hamilton. Taylor. Kaki'iixd. Latimkr. T. Gkrdink. II. ClIARIIOXMKK. J. Okrocsf.. MKU_ K. ClIAItnOXSIRR. Moork. Barrow, M. Lock mart. Lockhart.§ i ma sAlf a €|Dsilor (Pratei'nity. ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. ALPHA PROVINCE. Orand Chapter—MuxchiKlIi Bela Upillon. Mh»aclnwlt» Beta Upsilon............. Boston University, Boatou. Connecticut Alpha......... ... . Triuity Collect, Hartford. Massachusetts Iota Tau. Massachusetts Institute Technology, Boston. BETA PROVINCE. Orand Chapter—Pennsylvania Omega. New York Alpha .................. . .Cornell University, Itlmca. Pennsylvania sigma l hl........ Dickinson College, Carlisle. Pennsylvania Omega...............Allegheny College, Mendvilie. Pennsylvania Alpha eta.. Pennsylvania State College, State College. OAMMA PROVINCE. Orand Chapter -Georgia Beta. Virginia Omierou ............................ University of Virginia. Virginia Sigma..............Washington and I-ec University, Lexington. North Carolina XI..... University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. North Carolina Theta ...................Davidson College, Davidson. South Carolina Delta . .. South Carolina College, Columbia. South Carolina Phi................................ Furman University. South Carolina Gamma Wolford College, Spartanburg. South Carolina Mu ......................Erekin College. Due West. Georgia Beta .................. University of Georgia, Athens. Georgia INI............................Mercer University, Macon. Georgia Epsilon............................Emory College, Oxford. Georgia Phi............... Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta. DELTA PROVINCE. Grand Chapter—Ohio Sigma. Michigan Iota Beta.............. University of Michigan, Aun Arbor. Ohio KimIIou.. Michigan Alpha............................Adrian College, Adrian. Ohio Theta------- Ohio Sigma..............................Ml. Union College, Alliance. Indiana Alpha. Ohio Delta....................Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware. (G5) University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati. ....Ohio State University, Columbus. ..........Franklin College, Franklin.• • tyi Phi- • • Founded at Princeton 1854. Eta Chapter Established 1S67. T. It. It. Cobb, Billups Phiuizy, C. B. Griffith, FRATRES IN FACULTATE. H. C. White, ! • C. Barrow. LAW CLASS. Samuel Hale Sibley. CLASS OF NINETY-THKEE. George Hlllyer, Jr., Charles it. Xishot. CLASS OF N1NETY-KOUR. William B. Armstrong, 1 011! I . Fleming. FRATRES IN ORUE. Frank A. Lipsconib, William McDowell, W. (;. Woodfln, W. MeK. Cobb. J. If. I tucker, George Hodgson. Walter A. Harris, Eugene N. Murplicy, Moses Guyton, Holcombe Bacon, CLASS OF NINETY-PIVE. Juo. It. Hill, Jr., Robert A. Ridley, Henry Porter, CLASS OF NINETY-SIX. Stewart Hunter, Willis A. Hawkins, Brevard Nisliet, Edward Dougherty. James I.. Dickey, (00) Left college. 'Win. McC'arthey, Robert Fuller.Eta tyapter of ($i ptji praternity. STKKOLY. SlHIXV (LAW). Kl.KNlNfi '91. Ct'YTON 'ffi. ItIC'KKY 't» . BaCON FVUJW PORTER '«• . lll XTKC oc. Doioiikrty V‘. IIii.i.yei: '«X H. X|»P. T •». Micfiir.Y 9 . Akvstkono '91. McCarthy «fc Hawkins "aX C. Nimikt '93. Kiih.ky '9k lliu. US. Ha«ki US. il Jl (Jfy pty praternity. Roll of Active Chapters. Alpha. .................................. University of Virginia. Beta— Harvard University. Gamma Emory College. Dki.ta.....................................................Rutgers College. Epsilon.... .. Hampden-Sidnev College. Zbta ........................... Franklin and Marshall College. ETA........ University of Georgia. Theta............................Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Iota..................................... Ohio State University. Kappa........................................................Brown University. Lambda.................................University of California. Mu......... ....................................Stevens Institute. Omickon...................................................... Yale University. Pi......................................................Vanderbilt University. Rho....................................... Lafayette College. Sigma......................................................Wofford College. Pm.........................................................Amherst College. Chi....................................Ohio Weslcvau College. Ps i........................................Lehigh University. Omega.......................................Dickinson College. (69)• • Kappa eAlppa. • • Founded at Washington and Lee University 1567 Gamma Chapter Established 1S69. J. C. BloomHeld, FRATRES IN URBE Sylvnuus Morris, B. F. Hardeman, J. 1). Mohs, F. .S. Morton, ( . II. Nicholson, C. 1’. Wile x, .Jr., W. Howland, E. B. Hodgson, Jr. Chits. Morris, FRATRES IN FACULTATE. Jesse Conus, C. I . Wilcox, A. J. Cobb, C. M. Stnihnn, s. C. Benedict. C. H. Hertv, H. M. Dorsey, CLASS OP NINETY-THREE. W. H. Goodrich, (;. 1). Thomas. Harry Hodgson. 1$. It. Bower, Jr., CLASS OF NINETY-POUR. W. A. McPougnld, H. C. Brown, W. M. Wadley, J. M. Harrington, Arthur Wrigley. J. C. C. Black, Jr., Sam’l K. Abbott, CLASS OF NINETY.FIVE. CLASS OF NINETY-SIX. Percy 1 . Estell, H. M. Butler. F. Harrington, J. A. Morton, Claude A. Fleming, John W. Welsh. ELECTIVE. (■») Ix-!! College G. G. .Stiles, Itobert Fleece.Gamma (papier of Kappa eAlpfya praterr ity. Vi.cxi.tn ,ijt’.. Jukes •si. McDoi'Oai.h ’91. ABBOTT C»AT«t ■)). lllVB '.'I STICK '9J. BOWCft "91. WaIMLBY '91. BUCK UV WMHil.Br 91. iIakoknan ss». Hokskv -a:. I'hof. Straiiin "si. H. Ilor». ox nu. Brown i wkick K. Moiitox Hakiiixotox '91. Ku«« •»• . Kxku.k IUi-.risotox -x. Butler K. iloi-. ox vj. Uoohmicii :I appa eAlpfya fPrafernit . ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. Ai.i’ka. . .Wa hiugton-Lcc University, Lcxingtou, Va. Bkta. . .........Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Va GAMMA . University ofGcorxin, Athens, Gn. Dki.ta . ..................... Wolford College, Spartanburg, S. C. Kwiia.v ................................ Emory College, Oxford, G:». S5bta . Itnndoipli-Macon College, Ashland, Va. Eta............................. Richmond College, Richmond. Va. Iota...........................Furman University, Greenville, S. 0. Kappa ............................ Mercer University, Macon, (ia. Lambda ................University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Mr ................................ Krskine College, Duo West, S C. Nr .Ala. State Agricultural Mechanical College, Auburn, Ala. Xl.....................Southwestern University, Georgetown, Tex. O»nchon....... ., University of Texas, Austin, Texas. ......University of Teuu« e«, Knoxville, Tcnn. . .S’outli Carolina College, Columbia, s. C. Sioma -------------Davidson College, Mecklenburgh County, X. C. Ursiixi.v...... University of Xortli Carolina, Cliu] cl Hill, X. C. I’m..........................Southern University, Greenslioro, Ala. Cm........................ Vanderbilt Cniverslty, Xashville, Tenn. l i.............................Tulaue University, Xew Orleans, La. Omkga................ Centre Col lege of Kentucky, Danville, Ivy. Ai.vjia Ai.rua . — . .University of the South, Sewauce, Teun. Ai.rHA lllfrA............University' of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Ai.i’iia Gaxma . J misinna State University, Raton Rouge, I ». Ai.pha Dki.ta.................... William Jewell College, Lilierty, Mo. Ai.rii. Krstixjx..........S. W. P. University, Clarksville, Teun. Al.miA Zirr. William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Va. Ai.riiA Eta. .................... Westminster College, Fulton, Mo. Ai.i ha Iota........................Centenary College, Jackson, La. Ai.riiA Kappa............Missouri State University, Columbus, Mo. Alpha Lambda . Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. (73)pty Delta tp eta. Pounded at Miami Unlvcnlty 1848. Georgia Alpha Chaiter Chartered April io, 1870. Edward Iv. Lumpkin, KRATRES IN UR3E. J. F. Jackson, E. H. Klmbrew, C. A. Durham, Erl want I. Smith, Thomas V. Kced, J. B. L. Cobb, D. D. QuIHalu, F. W. Cheney, 8. J. Tribble, K. B. Cohen, J. W. Camak, F. G. Govau, (’. G. Chandler. LAW CLASS. . W. W. Hilts, T. W. Hardwick, E. G. Cnbanks, W. W. Sheppard. CLASS OF NINETY-THREE. H. (.'. Moreno, Walter P. Warren. J. X. Dorsey, (.'. D. Kline. CLASS OP NINETY-POUR. B. C. (leghorn. 8. B. Yow, J. T. Dunlap, G. W. Beckett. CLASS OF NINETY-FIVE. T. F. Gilbert, Fred Orr. CLASS OF NINETY-SIX. (74) S. V. H. Brooks, Johu Pittman.Qeor ia «AI{ n?a (;fyaf)ter of piji Delta fpfyeta {fraternity. IlnoviCK (!. « . BROOK'} 'Wi. GiuiKr.r ••A . Klixic 1i MoHKXO VB. UKCKCTT 91. rinxAS "us. OovaX (Ijiit) Yovr Hi. Oku '• . Snmir.KD iUw). Hii.k iIjiw). DobaKV 'ill. C’A HA SI4} ■•.tv CUGIRHUe ’W. WaRI-.KX '9X DlXl-AR ''.O.pty Delta tp eta prafet't ify. ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. ALPHA PROVINCE. Maine Alpha.................................. Colby University. Pennsylvania Alpha.. New Hampshire Alpha. Dartmouth College. Pennsylvania Beta.... Massachusetts Alpha.. Williams College. Pennsylvania Gamma Vermont Alpha...... .. .University of Vermont. Pennsylvania Delta .. New York Alpha....... Cornell University. Pennsylvania Kpsilou New York Be in.................................. Union College. Pennsylvania Zeta___ New York Gamma . .College of the City of New York. Pennsylvania Eta. New York l eltn ............................. Columbia College. BETA PROVINCE. Virginia Alpha .......... . .. ...............Bonnoko College. Virginia Ki Uon..... Virginia Beta........................... University of Virginia. Virginia Zeta Virginia Gamma...........................Handolph-Mncon College. North Carolina Beta.. Virginia Delta................................ Richmond College. South Carolina Beta... GAMMA PROVINCE. Georgia Alpha...........................University of Georgia. Alabama Beta......... Georgia Beta..................................... Emory College. Alabama Gamma .. . Georgia Gamma........... ........ .......... Mercer University. Mississippi Alpha Tennessee Alpha............................Vanderbilt University. Texas lietn......... Tennessee Beta..........................University of the South. Texas Gamma.......... Alabama Alpha...........................University of Alabama. DELTA PROVINCE. Ohio Alpha.....................................Miami University. Ohio Epsilon........ Ohio Beta . ................ —Ohio Wesleyan University. Ohio Zeta.................... . Ohio Gamma.................................... Ohio University. Kentucky Alpha....... Ohio Delta.....................University of Wooster. Kentucky Delta... EPSILON PROVINCE. Indiana Alpha............................... Indiana University. Indiana Kpsilou .. Indiana Beta.................................. Wabash College. Indiana Zeta... ludiann Gamma................................Butler University. Michigan Beta_____ Indiana Delta......... .......................Knmkliu College. Michigan Gamma. ZETA PROVINCE. Illinois Alpha..........................Northwestern University. Illinois Zeta ... Illinois Delta....................................Knox College. Wisconsin Alpha. Illinois Epsilon..................Illinois Wcsloynu University. ETA PROVINCE. Missouri Alpha...........................University of Missouri. Iowa Alpha ....... Missouri Beta............................Westmoreland College. Iowa Bern.. Kansas Alpha............................. University of Kansas. Minnesota Alpha Nebraska Alpha..........................Uulverslty of Nebraska. California Alpha.. (77) ..............LaEavettc College. ............Pcnnsyl vania (-ollege. Washington and Jefferson College. ..............Allegheny College-. ...............Diekinson College. ......University of Pennsylvania. ..............Lehigh University. .....Virginia Military Institute. Washington and Lee University. .. .University of North Carolina. ..........South Carolina College. .....State College of Alabama. ..... ......Southern University. ...... University of Mississippi, .............University of Texas. .......Southwestern I'niverslty. ............. .. Buehtel College. .............Ohio State University. ....................Centre College. ................Central University. ....................Hauover College. .................DePamv University. .........State College of Michigan. ..................Hillsdale College. ....lombard University. University of Wisconsin. .......Iowa Wesleyan University. State University of Iowa. .University of Mluuesotn. .University of California.eAljD a fpau ©me|a. Pounded at Virginia Military Imtitutc Georgia Alpha Beta Chapter Established 878. FRATRRS IN URBE. Hon. II. H. Carlton, Hon. E. T. Brown, Prof. G. (i. Bond, James Barrow, J. F. McGowan, Howard Neely, Cliarle I). Campbell. .1. 1 . Brown, I.. C. Giver, Sam C. Beau, LAW CLASS. L. I . Brown, Monro 1 Ogden, Blanton Wliuhlp. CLASS OF NINETY-THREE. Samuel I awience, N. B. Stewart, T. J. Bennett. J. I). Stclling, CLASS OK NINETY-FOUR. Edgar C. Bruuson. B. O. Cocliran, CLASS OK NINETY-FIVE. Henry Banks. CLASS OK NINEry-SIX. T. H. Buttrlll. (7S)(Beorgia sAlpfya Beta (;f?a| ter of iAIpfya tyau 0me|a ]«Vafeft ity B oux (Law). Stkwakt "31. Uxi x-on ‘IM. Cochran -v,. L. Bxows (Uw). J Kan (!.««). BKNMTTT ••«. H NK« ■.. IKJHES (LnU‘). NKCLV. .STRLUXO ’31. MctiOWAN. Bl TJHII.I. 'yr.. Wix nir (Law) «RI» R (!j u).eAlpl?a au ©me|a praternity. ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. A I.I’ll A EPSILON. Beta Beta .. . Bkta Delta...... A 1.1’HA Omk ia. ALPHA BETA Alpha Theta..... Alpha Zeta..... Hkta Iota. ..... Hkta Alpha...... BETA El’SILON... Alpha Mr........ Bkta Lamhoa..... Beta Kappa... Beta Omichon Beta Upmlox..... Alpha Kappa ____ Alpha I.amhoa___ Alpha Omickon .. Bkta Tjilta..... Alpha Delta..... Alpha Eta..... . Alpha Chi....... Alpha Mu........ Alpha l sr...... A. M. College, Auburn, Ain. ..Southern University, Green-boro, Ala. University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. ____University of Florida, Lake City. University of Georgia, Athens. ............Emory College, Oxford, Ga. ........Mereor University, Macon, Ga. ............School of Technology, Atlanta, Gn. ..... Slmjisou College, Indiana, Jud. Tulnne University, New Orleans, La. .....Adrian College, Adrian, Mich. — _______University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. .............Hillsdale College, Hillsdale, Mich. ............... Albion College, Albion, Mich. ...................State College, Orono, Maine. ...... . Stevens Institute, Hoboken, N. J. . .Columbia College, New York City. . ., St. Lawrence University, Canton, N. Y. ... ..........Cornell University, Itbaca, N. Y. ___University of North Carolina, Chape! Hill. ..... ' .............Mcbnne, North Carolina. ..............Trinity College, North Carolina. ...........Mt. Union College, Mt. Union, Ohio. ..........Wittenberg College, Springlield, Ohio. Beta Eta.............. ... Wesleyan College, Delaware, Ohio. Beta Nr........................... ... University of Wooster, Ohio. Beta Hho..............................Marietta College, Marietta, Ohio. Alpha Iota ....................Muhlenburg College, Allentown, Pa. Beta Cm................................Hnvenford College, Pennsylvania. Alpha Itno . Lehigh University, South Bethlehem. Pa. Tap......................University of Pcunsylvauia, Philadelphia. Alpha Uisilox......... . .. .Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg, Pa. Beta Xi — Charleston College, Charleston, S. C. Alpha Phi............. University of South Carolina. Columbia. Omeoa. .. .. ........University of the South. Sewauee, Teuu. Alpha Tap S. Presbyterian University, Clarksville, Term. Lamhda. Cumberland College, I banou, Teun. Beta Tap. .....S. W. Baptist College, Jackson, Teun. Beta Pi.................. Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Teun. Beta Zeta. . .... Uuivcisity of Vermont, Burlington. Beta................Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va. Delta............................. University of Virginia, Virgiuia. Epsilon............... ...............Iloauoko College, Salem, Va. Bcta Sioma......................Hami den Sidney College, Virginia. Beta Tap. ............Lola ml Sanford, Jr.. University. California. Beta UPSftox.................... ..State University, Columbus, Ohio. Gamma Alpha.......................Colby University, Watervllle, Me. Gamma Bcta............................Tufts College, Massachusetts. (81)Delta fpau Delta. Pounded at Bethany i860. Beta Delta Chapter Established 1882. F. G. Hunnieutt, J. W. Barnett, FRATRES IN URBE. T. P. Hunnieutt, Z. C. Hayes. LAW CLASS. Francis Willis Dart. CLASS OF NINETY-THREE. Marcus Alonza Lewis, Greene Johnson David Lowe Cloud, CLASS OF NINETY-FOUR. Charles Reuben Tidwell. CLASS OF NINETY-FIVE. ♦William Clark Davis, Wm. Penn Gearreld, Joel J. Gibson, George Walton Reab. CLASS OF NINETY-SIX. Edwin Sidney O’Brien, Jr., Carl Hamilton Hoidcu. (82) «Lelt College.Beta Delta Chapter of Delta ffau Delta praterrvt . (Ijiw). Tl JDWEI.1. ’10. JOHNMJN 'iC. ( "Loro '01. iKAfcRI.M 'K, O'Kriek ‘DC. l.r.wrs ’«). Read "ftV. Gi»i«)X '30.Delta fpau Delta praternit . ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. GRAND DIVISION OF THE NORTH. Bcta. ...... .Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. Dki.ta . University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. Kiviwji Albion College. Albion, Mich. Zkta— Adclburt College, Cleveland, Ohio. Kta................................ Buchtel College, Akron, Ohio. Theta ..................... Bethany College, Bethany, West Virginia. Iota. .. .Michigan Agricultural College, Agricultural College, Mich. Kai’I’A ...........Hillsdale College, Hillsdale, Mich. Mv .................... Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio. Phi ................................ Hanover College, Hanover, Ind. Cm ...................................Kenyon College, Gambler, Ohio. Psi.......................... University of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio. Hkta Ai.pha Indiana University, P. O. Box 013, Bloomington, Ind. Bkta Hkta.................. . Dol’auw University, Grconcastle, Ind. Bcta Zkta.........................Butler University, Irvington, Ind. GRAND DIVISION OF THE SOUTH. Hkta. —...................... Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. Bcta Thcta.................. University of the South, Sewnnec, Toun. Pi.......University of Mississippi, University, I, Fnyette Co., Miss. Bcta Iota .................University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. BKTA DELTA. . University of Georgia, Athens, Gn. Bkta Xi. .. ... , .Tulnne University, New Orleans, I.a. Bcta Ei ma .x...........................Emory College, Oxford, »a. ORA.NI DIVISION OF THE EAST. A 1.1’ll a ...........................Allegheny College, Meadvllle, Pa. Gamma Washington and Jefferson College, Washington, Pa. Nn......... .......................IaFayette College, Easton, Pa. Pi... . ......Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, N. .1. .Sigma .... Williams College, Willlarastowu. Mass. TaU................. Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa. Uiisiia X..............Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Troy, X. Y. Bcta Lamiida ..............Lehigh University,South Bethlehem, Pa. Bcta Mr.. ........................ .Tufts College, Somerville, Mass. Bcta Xr.......Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bostou, Mass. Bcta Shim a.......................Boston University, Boston, Mass. Bkta Omicuon .....................Cornell University, Ithaca, X. Y. ORAND DIVISION OK THE WEST. Omickox....................... University of Iowa, Town City, Iowa. Bcta Kta................University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. Xi................................ Simpson College, Indlatiola, Iowa. Bcta Kafka......... .........University of Colorado, Boulder, Col. Omega.................................Iowa State College. Anns, Iowa. (85)Pounded at Virginia Military Institute 156). Andrew Finn W. V. Harvard, V. Peacock, B. L. Rountree, Joseph Akennan, I. L! O'. M. Cannon, Mt Chapter Established 1884 FRATRKS IN URBE. (Jco. I’. Williamson, K. C. Shackleford. PRATER IN FACULTATE. Clwis. M. Suclling. LAW CLASS. J. K. Whelchel, II. Bodom, L. Ia. Sweat. CLASS OF NINETY-THREE. E. I Halsey, Jr., CLASS OF NINETY-FOUR. C. D. McCutcheu, I). Fricks, J. II. Butuer. CLASS OF NINETY-FIVE. idsley Halsey, Wm. Hamilton. CLASS OF NINETY-SIX. Charles Akcrmau, G. L. Mcltao. (Sd) T. J. Shackleford, Jr Sam’l Rutherford, J.'.lvd. Dean, A. O. Halsey. II. S. Baldwin T. Z. Daniels, I-cit College.Mu (fyapfer of Si ma f-lu Fraternity. McRae. J. akkkmax M i. Frick • !. F. aucKitFMD Vi Uovjctrke ■;«. Wnoin (tatr). Iiasici . 96. T. Phacki.k»ori Vi IIarvaiih i i.-tw.) Hmiifkioi-.d (l.rin . a. IIaimv .«. I eas (I au). k. IIaixkv Peacock (Iaw). NcCitomon X. L. llAI-KV Vi. AKKKMaX "-M. BaLOWIX VI. SWEAT (lAW) § i|ma I'lu praferr it . ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. A 1.1 11 A Virginia Military Institute. UPSIKOX — University of Texas. Bkta I'nlvorsity of Virginia. Phi University of Louisiana. ('AUMA. University of North Carolina. Chi Cornell College. Dki.ta .. .. . I'nlversity of South Carolina. Pst University of North Carolina. Kpsiuix Bethany College. Bkta Bkta DePauw University. Zbt a Central I’niveralty. Bkta Gamma Missouri Valley College. Eta Mercer University. Bkta Dki.ta Drake University, Iowa. Tiikta University of Alnluimn. Bkta Krsiutx . Upper Iowa University. Iota Howard College. Bkta Zkta Purdue University. Kappa . North Georgia Agricultural College. Bkta Tiikta .Alabama A. M. College. I.AMIDKV Washington-Lee University. Bkta Iota .. Mt. Uniou College. MU University of Georgia. Bkta Kappa .Central College, Missouri. Nr. University of Kansas. Bkta T.. miii a Xi .. .Emory College. Bkta Nr University of Ohio. Pi Ix-high Unlversltv. Bkta Cm Inland Stanford. Jr.. University. Jllto... University of Missouri. Bkta Psi Sigma . Vanderbilt University. Dki.ta Tiikta . I unhord University. Tap. ■South Carolina Military Academy. li (SO(p?i psi. Pounded at Union College iS«i. Alpha Alpha Delta Chapter Established 1889. V. B. Burnett, FRATRES IN URBE. W. P. Hammett. PRATER IN PACULTATB. 0. H. Sheffield. M. C. Horton, LAW CLASS. 0. K. Horton. CLASS OK NINETY-THREE. Eugeue Dodd, B. T. Frey, L. C. Slade. W. A. Fuller, CLASS OF NINETY-FOUR. V. P. Harbin, Lamar C. Toomer. CLASS OF NINETY-FIVE. Carl F. Dodd. (00) Mlpha Delta (Jfyapfer of (Jl?i psi prafernity. Harbin 'iM. Horton (Uw). Frey ’ {. K..Doi»i 18. Toomex ‘91. sheipield 'vl. Fuller '94. Slade i C. Dodd 'SO.(;fy psi {fraternity. ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. I i........ .. Union College, Schenectady, X. Y. Theta.................... Williams College, Willlamstowu, Muss. Mo.........................Mi ldlebury College, Middlebury, Vt. Alpha....................Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn. Pm..............................Hamilton College', Clinton, X. Y. Epsilon ............. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. Upsiloh....................Furman University, Greenville, S. C. Beta................ ..University of South Carolina, Columbia, S. C. Gamma...................University of Mississippi, Oxford, Miss. Cm.............................Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. Psi............................Cornell University, Ithaca, X. Y. Tau..........................Wofford College, .Spartanburg, S. C. Xu..................University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. Iota................... University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wls. Itiio.....................Rutgers College, New Brunswick, X. J. Xi...............Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, X. J. ALPHA DELTA .. .University of Georgia, Athens, Gn. (03)§ummar of fraternities. Law. ’93. 04. ’05. ’96. Electives. Total. Sigma Alpha Epsilon..... 2 2 3 5 2 o 19 Chi Phi.................... 1 2 2 9 5 19 Kappa Alpha........................ 3 7 14 o 20 Phi Delta Theta............ 4 3 3 3 1 3 17 Alpha Tau Omega......... 0 3 1 4 14 Delta Tau Delta............ 1 2 1 2 2 3 11 Sigma Nr................... 6 3 5 2 2 2 20 Chi Psi.................... 2 3 3 1 9 Totai............. 22 21 2o 23 16 22 129 (94)Religion Life at tfje University IT Ims been thought not amiss to introduce into this record and registry of the University lor the current year some account of our progress and position on u line whose significance in our colleges has but begun to be recognized. It is the development of the religious element of education through its outward expression in a permanent organization. The former characterization of colleges at large as hot-beds of vice and courts of inquisition for the extirpation of every form of morality is fast becoming a recognized injustice to the institutions of higher learning throughout the country. The effective agency in the revolution has avowedly been the College Young Men’s Christian Association, which, in its policy of aggressive activity, claims the support of every rightly inclined student, and establishes, if only in the exciting of opjwsition, a recognition of Christianity as an element and an object in a college boy’s life. The University has never lacked in facilities to furnish cultivation for both the intellectual and the social element of a liberal education. But for securing that best element of the manly character at which alone, as its end, education should look, the Christian ideal, her reputation has been not so free from attack. Within the past five years the first real attempt at the organization of religious sentiment by establishing connections with similar institutions elsewhere was made. Success has been tardy, perhaps, but sure in its slowness. And a review of the past year’s progress will give small reason for complaint even on that ground. Under the leadership of efficient executives during the spring and fall of the past year and the current season the Y. M. C. A. has made strides both in doing and in increasing ability to do. A room in one of the college buildings has been comfortably aud attractively fitted up with tables, chairs and bookcases, where a. constantly growing collection of sound reading, mostly of a religious kind, and files of the current religious (05)piijKTs :iii«1 magazines are to be found, affording a convenient assembling place for every one at all times, ami e j ecially attractive for whiling away the long hours of the Sabbath evening. A system of intercollegiate correspondence, including the occasional visitation by a delegate to other colleges of the State for the purpose of establishing new or encouraging weak organizations, has been put into operation. Financially the Association has this year fir t entered upon its existence. The imposition of dues has provided an income that it i hoped will not only promote domestic improvement but permit foreign aid. And inasmuch as where one's treasure is there will his heart he also, it is not unreasonable to trace an increase of interest in the members to the sacrifice they are called upon to make of their | ockctbooks. The roll of membership, too, is kept on the increase, and by organized committees the influence of the Association is sought ever to be widened and intensive cultivation of the field already covered to he promoted. The open, decided and active stand which membership bes]ieflks is a prologue in this opening of the drama of life that may not ill indicate what the subsc- quent acts will be. The helpfulness secured in this way alone is sufficient ground for a demand for countenance and su| [x rt on the | nrt of all interested in the welfare of the student body. But perhaps the most marked triumph is the undeniable improvement in the general morale of the whole. A promotion of general good behavior and moral sentiment i- Iwund to lie, and has, in fact, lieen the result of this constant appeal to the boys’ better selves; and the innate nobility of each youthful soul, while individually jiowerless to overbear or even successfully resist a general atmosphere of wrong, when linked with others in this strength-giving union, has, by the weight of combined influence, turned the general college spirit to recognize right for right’s own sake. The record is bright, the future brighter. Coming years alone can disclose the possibilities of the moral weight of the Association, even in so unresponsive a balance as the college boy’s conscience is generally sup| osod to be. And with a well organized and constantly swelling army of willing college workers, Christianity is reinforced strongly for her world’s conquest. 0)Iln fiDemoriatn. THOMAS COBB HULL, CLASS OF ’95. Died Aucust 19th, 1892. (97)IIn flDcmoriam. t CHARLES MORRIS, A. M., Professor of English Language and Literature. DIED MAY 3, 1893. mrp e Battalion. E. W. Barnwell, W. M. Wad lev, J. I). Sidling, C. B. Slade, R. A. Bidlev, COMMANDANT IT. COL. C. M. SNELLING. Cadet Officers. Adjutant..........................................Harry Hodgson. Sergeant-Major...................................Arthur Wrioi.ey. COMPANY A. CAPTAIN. A. O. HaLsey. COMPANY B. CAPTAIN. E. G. Cabuniss. LIEUTENANTS. L. C. Slade, H. M. Dorsey. SERGEANTS. j. II. Butuer, D. c. Barrow, 3d, W. B. Armstrong. CORPORALS. J. T. Dunlap, J. J. Gllwon, E. E. Murphey. LIEUTENANTS. H. A. Alexander, F. G. Barlield, James Taylor. SERGEANTS. H. C. Brown, G. P. Butler, I’. I Fleming, F. J. Herty, W. A. Wilkins, N. M. Moore. H. S. Hollaud, W. P. Gearreld, I . Halsey, CORPORALS. C. P. Thompson, J. C. C. Blaek, Jr., W. A. Hawkins. (A9)Demostfyenian biterary Society. Founded February 19, 1801. President...... Vice-President First Censor.. President ..... Vice-President First Censor.. President _____ Vice-President. First Censor. President...... Vice-President. First Censor. President...... Vice-President. Find Censor. OFFICERS. FIRST TERM. ........... Eugene Dodd. Second Censor......... .........George Hillyer. -Secretary.. .......... ............Moses Cuvtou. Treasurer............. SECOND TERM. ............S. H. Sibley. Second Censor....... .............K. T. Moon. Secretary............. ............ F. S. Jones. Treasurer............. THIRD TERM. ...........F. G. (Jovan. Second Censor.......... .... ..Artlmr Heymaii. Secretary. ...............S. B. Vow. Treasurer.____ . FOURTH TERM. .........Lee J. Langley. Second Censor. . .............V. Peacock. Secretary............ ...........I. I.. Dunlap. Treasurer ............. FIFTH TERM. ............ J. E. Dean. Second Censor.......... ............C. E. Brand. Secretary.............. .........f. K. Bra linen. Treasurer............. ANNIVERSARY EXERCISES FEBRUARY 19. 1893. Charles It. Nisbet, Orator. “The Republic—Tts Dangers and the Only Remedy.1 (100) .....J. B. Sweat. .C. P. Thompson. ...W. M. Wadlcy. .... C. E. Brand. .......John Hill. ... v. m. Wadley. . E. M. Gnmnion. ....John Bill, Jr. .. W. M. Wadlcy. .H. II. Cunnning. .....I-. L. Sweat. ... W. M. Wadlcy. ....A. A ken nan. .....L. Jj. Sweat. . W. M. Wadley.pfyi Kappa taiterary Society. Founded Febkuary 22. 1820. OFFICERS. FIRST TERM. President. First Vice-President • Second Vice-President.. Secretary it. J. Gantt. Treasurer .... A. (). Jlalxejr. Find Censor It. O. Cochran. Second Censor O. C. Turner. W. M. Draper. Percy Kzclle .. G. W. Beckett SECOND TERM. President First Vice-President Second Vice-President. Secretary .M. ( . Ogden. Treasurer... . . Blanton Wlnshlp. First Censor 0. A. Park. Second Censor... .. O. C. Turner. W. M. Draper. James Dickey. M. M. Ixx-khart. THIRD TERM. President First Vice-Pn-sldent . Second Vloe-Pre-ldent. Secretary O. C. Turner. Treasurer John Harrington. First Censor. .. W. A. Harris. Second Censor W. P. Gearreld. . .J. Akerman. It. A. It id lev. Percy Kzcllo. FOURTH TERM. President First Vice-IVsident. Second Vice-President Secretary. — Paul Fleming. Corresjionding Secretary B. I- Houmree. Treasurer.. . . it. .1. Oanll. First (Vnsor V. 1’. Gearreld. Second Censor. . T. H. Buttrill. .Joseph Akerman. T. F. Smith. . F. Bean. FIFTH TERM. 1'resident First Vici-l rvsidcnt Second Vice-President. Secretary. N. A. Morris. Corresponding Secretary Alex. Stephen . Treasurer Alex. Erwin. First Censor V. P. Gearreld. Second Censor.. . T. II. Buttrill. Joseph Akerman. H. I jveloy. V. Fletcher. ANNIVERSARY EXERCISES FEBRUARY » . lt Samuel C. Dean, Orator. The South in War and the Propw Site Han Siuoe Made.1 (101“bes ( eOaliers De ba I ose I ou £e." W It.KINS -E. I. G. McDougai.d 1. ('• K. lioWKR 1 F. A. M. Winsiiii . ... X. B. Hodgson Park .B. O. Ha It FI KI,D A. H. V. Harrington . B. E. C. Stiffs L. O. G. Dean ... M. U. T. Morton K. A. T. Hkidt M. «P--s” V. Bacon .. P. D. J. Dickey A. X. V. XISBKT M. E. M. IIii.i. A. ). T. Davis ). W. Stki.mng M. O. B. E .kli.k •S. (J. H. Goodrich. li. M. M. Ogden ... P. II. H. Huti.fi: ) Smith . C. I. M. Lockhart. M. U. Ci. (I OBJOniOersii our Men’s ( ristiar Association. JoSKI'll AKKHMAN. V. A. Harris.... W. A. Fi'lj.kr.... 1 J. Siirakorsr.. T. A. McOrbook. T. A. Mc 5rbgok, Joseph Akernian, T. A. McGregor, P. J. Shea rouse, J. B. Madden, A. Akernian, W. M. Draper, It B. Odom, Henry Bank , omci'KS. DEVoTIONAJ. COMMITTKK. 1 . J. SHKAKOI’SK, nEft CIfcS. C. P. Thompson, B. T. Frey, G. I . Butler, Geo. Hillyer, O. A. Park, C. Akernian, F. Beau, V. F. Fletcher, ...............President. ..........Vice-President. Corresponding Secretary. ....Recording Secretary. ...............Librarian. S. B. Vow. L. C. Toomcr, K. W. Barnwell, A. A. Boggs, N. A. Morris, N. M. Moore, V. K. Franklin, F. E. Griffith, L. L. Brown. (103) “Isab." Students. V. E. Franki.in, C. E. Brand, H. H. Gumming, K. 0. Cochran, W. W. WILK INS, J. T. Dunlai , G. H. Boggs, II. H. E . .ari , T. R. Boggs, .1. J. Gibson, W. P. Harbin, W. P. Gearrei.d, E. E. Murehey, Lindsley Hailey, Henry Hillyer, A. F. Latimer, V. B. Armstrong, F. J. Orr, ]■'. H. Kounsaville, G. I. Tagckrt, A. Smith, S. G. Hunter, G. H. Porter, Jr., John Hill, Jr., Willis Hawkins, P. J. Siiearouse, Oscar C. Turner, E. M. Gammon, Thomas Gilbert, L. S. Selman, C. R. GOODRUM, E. E. Dougherty. §et ier Science (Hub. T. .J. Bennett .. L. V. Gerdine Gerry ('araniss . ... President. Vice-President. Secretary. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. Dr. H. C. White, Chairman. A. O. Halsey. M. A. Lewis. Meetings arc held monthly at the residence of Dr. White, S. Millcdge Ave. Essays are read, discussed by the member.' »f the club. Essays. November Meeting...L. C. Slade....... II. A. Alexnudcr. . ....... Michael Faraday. The Number Seven in Science and Religion. February Meeting. T. J. lieu nett A. O. Halsey . M. A. Lewis .. December Meeting...Greene Johnson...........Herbert Spencer. C. R. Nisbct.......................Money. (’has. I). Kline............ Observation. January Meeting—Eugeue Dodd.................Count Rumford. K. V. Rarnwcll __ Rain and Rain-making. March Meeting George Ilillyer, I m Is Cnnmk. April Meeting...... terry Cabciui" R. J. Gantt. .. May Meeting .......H. M. Dorsey Lunar Lyndon X. It. Stewart (106) and then the subjects are Sir John Lubbock. I jirtb |Uakc . ........The Progress of Science. Jr..........Count IK1 l-cssop . .....Sir Christopher Wrenn. ..................Photography. ......................Alchemy. .....................(Joyners. ............Charles Darwin The Mound ItulblcrsEngineering Society. R. J. Gantt............................................................... President. II. c. Brown..........................................................Vice-President. R. B. Nai.i.ky...............................................Secretary and Treasurer. ncn c rs- Professors Strahan, Barrow, Shcllield mid Coates. Seniors. Juniors. Sophomores. Freshmen. Caniak, Beckett, Good rum, Crane, Kppes, Brown, Hunter, Fleming. Gantt, Stellings, Orr, Genline, I-awrence, Wadley, Shea rouse, Marks. Nalley, Wrlgley. Scllman, Lyndon. Hill. Meetings held monthly at the residence of Professor Strahan, 418 Harris street. ESSAYS. September meeting.........Organization perfected, no jrapers read. October meeting—1“The Bell Telephone”......By Mr. Goodrum, ’95. “Brick”.......................By Mr.Camnk, MW. “The Road Question”..........liy Mr. Gantt, MW. November meeting—“Tlio Magnetic Needle aud its Uses,” By Mr. Brown, MM. "The Solar Compass”.......By Mr. Stelling, '94. “The Maintenance of Track” . By Mr. Eppes, MW. December meeting—“ Water Ways and Water Transports,” By Mr. IJuntor, ’95. "Wooden Pavements”...........By Mr. Orr, ’95. January meeting—"The Forests”............ By Mr. Scllman, '95. “Preservationof Timbers,”. By Mr Wadley, '94. February meeting—"Concrete”...................By Mr. iAwrcnco, M«. "Levod".................By Mr. Shea rouse, '95. March meeting—“Tunnelling”......................By Mr. Nnlloy, ’at. "Some Notable Engineering Feats,” By Professor Sbeflleld. April Meeting-" Artesian Wells”.......... By Mr. Beckett, 'W- “Transversion of Heat Into Energy,” By Mr. Lyndon. ’93. 7 (107)§er ior Economic Society. Cha . D. Kune..........................................................................President. Jambs TavIo 1. ..................................................................Vice-President. Wai.tkk 1 . Wakhkn.................................................... Secretary aud Treasurer. KXKCl’TIVK COMMIfrBK. EI'oknk l i i . Chairman, Nkxvton Watkins, K. W. Haknwkm- ESSAYS. “Socialism” “St. Simon aud Fruiuler” "Natural Monopolies” “Industrial Functions of the State” George Hlllyer, Jr. "The Forestry (Question” "The I ibor Movement" I(. V. Genii lie. "Malthusianism” a I). Kline. H. L. Kountrec. "1‘nblie Debts" "The l nltcd States National Debt”.. 11. M. Dorsey. "t’nited States Jlevenue” "First n in I Second Initod .States Hanks".... K. (J. Karlicld. "Hank of England”................................. E. L. Halsey. “National Hanking System”............. ...........T. J. lienuett. "The Sub-Treasury System”....................... W. H. Goodrich. “Bl-MetalUm”..........................................E. 1 . Green. "Adam Smith”.........................................H. T. Frey. “Interstate Commerce" .... lames Taylor. "I’rotlt Sharing” ......... ......................F. Hoiiusavllle. " United Stutes Coinage”....... j„ c. Slade. “History of the Tariff to isr.]”.................... |. .y IaiwIs. “History of the Taritt 1S01-1S03”................k. W. lfcirmrell. "Taxation"........................................ Eugene Do«ld. "History of Political Economy”.................. Greene Johnson. (103)OniOetsity Democratic (;lub. SEC. I. ARTICLE II. OF CONSTITUTION. “ i'lie object of this organization shall bo to celebrate the victories of the Democratic party ‘with ]xim|) and parade, with shows, games, s| orts, guns, tails, bonfires and illuminations.’” Popular Vine. Klmtoral Vote. CLEVELAXD.................... 5,550,533........ - 277 [WE DID IT.] Harrison............ _ .. 5,175,077. ... 145 Weaver........................ 1,222,045............. 22 President — . .. . . H. A. Alexander. Vice-President..__...... ....... X. B. Stewart. Secretary R. B. Xallev. Keg Poller----- A. O. Halsey. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. Harry Hojxjsox, Chairman. H. M. Dorsey, J G. Barfield, L. C. Slade. (1011)he Thalian Dramatic Club. First Performance New Opera House, Athens, March io. 1893. Members. Lamar Lyndon, ’93 ..................................President. Hugh M. Doney,'(«, Vice-President. George Hillyer, Jr., '93. Mn unger. Clias. R. Nlsbet, '03, Critic. George Beckett, '04, Musical Director. William 1$. Armstrong, ’W. Paul L. Fleming, MM. Oscar Lyndon, MXi. Harry A. Alexander, 03. Henry Banks, ’95. Edward E. Dougherty, DJ. Robert J. Gantt, '03. Holcombe Bacon, '0 j. Shirley Brooks, ’On. Edward V. Barnwell, 03. (jerry Cnbanlra, M«. Mi Hedge I jekliart, 'Do. J. A ltd ley Morton, ’08. THE FARCE. " K Rctfulor fi " CAST. INTERLOCUTOR.. Tainbo. The 7Wlnntr«:lu. ___Mr. Alexander. Bones. Hugh De Brass (a society swell).............. ... Mr. Fleming. Surplus (n lawyer)....................................Mr. Bacon. diaries Surplus (nephew to Surplus)..... . Mr. Alexander. Abel Quick Surplus's head leric Mr. Khlxt, Smller (Sheriff's oMi-cr).......................................Mr. Dor y. l’orter............................................. Mr. Morton. Mrs. Surplus..........................................Mr. Gantt. Deborah Girtcr (housekeeper to Surplus) ..............Mr. Bank . Emily................................................. Miss Hinton. Matilda Jam- ---Mi— Stem. SYNOPSIS. Mr. Hugh l)c Brass, a society swell, gets druuk at bis club and then goes to a reception, where he falls asleep in a chair and is awakened the next morning and knows not where he is or how lie got there. On looking out of the window he sees Pounce, the Sheriff's ottieer. waiting to arrest him, and lie does not leave tin house. The rest of the play is given up to the many subterfuges which De-Brass u »es to remain in the house and thus avoid arrest. Mr. Armstrong, Mr. Gantt, Mr. Cabaniss. (a) Overture......... (bt Topical Song — Mr. L. I.yndon, Mr. Banks, Mr. O. Lyndon. ........................By Company. .............................Beeket. Mr. Bauks. (C) Solo—Ojteii Thy lattice............................ Gregli. Mr. Nisbct. (d) Solo Farewell Marguerite.......................... Boardmnn Mr. Morton. (e) Song Mush, Mush, Mush. Mr. Beckett. (f) Quartette. The Sweet Girl Graduate............................. Recitation Mr. Armstrong. Musical Selection—'The Wauderlug Minstrels. Skirt Dauee. Signora Henrietta Banks. (110)fpfft 13or -(pon Immigrants (Hub. M. A. Moni:ik. California........ C. D. Ki.ixk, Mexico............... Rojjeut Fi.ikss, New York. L. C. Tooxikk, Virginia........ Horn Baughman, Kentucky. 11. V. Gcrdine, Mississippi. E. L. Halsey, South Carolina. O. E. Horton, South Carolina. M. A. Morris, California. Members. F. V. Bean, South Carolina. Moses Guyton, Florida. Limlsley Halsey, South Carolina. R. S. Hunter, Virginia. C. I . Thompson, Alabama. ........ President. Vice-President. . - Secretary. . ... Treasurer. Robert Fliess, New York. A. O. Halsey, South Carolina. M. C. Horton, South Caroliua. C. 1). Kline, Mexico. L. C. Toomcr, Virginia. (113) “tpfye 09anderin| Minstrels.” “ With fxtUatlt, tony and xnatchc , and dreamy lidlahy." 11. 11. ItowKlt, Jn. ................... .. Pmddcut. (!. W. IlKCKKrr ...................................... Musical Director. (.'has. Xlsbet, Audlcy Morton, Ed Barnwell, Quartette. guitars. Gerry Cabnnlss, VJIotinn. Edwin Davis, Shirley Brooks. E 1 Dougherty. (114) - George Beckett, Lamar Lyndon.OniOersity Sgmphorig (Jlub, 1892-’9§- Hwkktt 'tM {Jfuttcal Director). Okkihnk ’W. llARXWEU. ".13. IKH’GIIKKTY t®. J.ockhart 'S . Crooks "'JO. Cauaniss 'yes. McCvtciibon £ «. Moors W. University publications VOt.UMH VI.. »M).'I. EdItor-in-Cblef. HARRY HODGSON. K A. Business Manager. FRED G. BARFIELD, Z A K. Associate Editor . Cbarlo R. Nlsbet, X • . K. Gerry CabanF-s, ♦ A o. Nat B. Stewart, A T u. Greene Johnson, A T A. Alfred (). Halsey, 2 x. Eugene Dodd, X . Harry A. Alexander. JPA.NJDORA.: Hounded 1886. Published Annually by the Fraternities. VOJ.VMH I.. 1880. Editor-in-chief. G. N. WJliSOX, K a. Buaineaa Manager. W. B. COOK, A T O. Aaaociate Editor,. W. E. Wooteu, x a i K. McDaniel, X . C. F. Rice, X . C. H. Wilcox, K A. W. A. Speer, ❖ A O. F. S. Stone, • A o. It. D. Meatier, A T u. M. B. Bond, A T A. W. S. l’|wliaw, A T A. It. L. Move, 1' r A. I . L. Wade, • I A. A. W. Jones, 2 X. W. («. Brown, 2 X. VOI.CMK III.. IK ii-i. Editor-in-chief. ALBERT HOWELL, K A Buaineaa Manager. ASA W. GRIGGS, PA. Aaaociate Editori. Wiliner L. Moore, 2 A K. I.uelan I . Knight, X T. Renisen Crawford, A T u. W. M. Glass, A T A . Prank W. C’olle, 2 x. VOI.UMB IV.. IHIK). Editor-in-chief. JOHN I). LITTLE, 2 A K. Buaineaa Manager. WALTER K. WHEATLEY, ATM. Aaaociate Editors. F. E. Callaway, K . . W. I). Ellis, X • . S. J. Tribble, AO, W. L. Stalling! , A T A. J. G. Crawford, 2 X. W. N. Smith, X t. E. A. Cohen. VOl.t'MIS II: IK 7. Editor-In-Chief. C. E. RICE, X • . Business Manager. J. W. DANIEL, K A. Associate Editori. T. W. Reed, ♦ AO, II. Key Milner, A T U. Glen Waters, ♦ P a. A. I- Frnukllu, A T A. W. J. Shaw, 2 X. voi.umh r., tssrj. Editora-in-Chief. J. E. LEWIS, X ♦. L. L. BROWN, A T li. Business Managers. W. K. CRIST IE, 2 X. W. T. KELLY, A T A. Associate Editor . J. C. Kimball, 2 A K. J. R. Lane, k a. Roy Dallbs ■ a o. K. W. Frey, X t. (117)Georgia iv ersit T aQa ine. Published Monthly by the Djemosthenian and Phi Kappa Literary Societies. ftoard of Editors A??. FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. Hr OH M. DokSEY, Dcmostheniau, Edltor-in-Cblof. M. C. Horton ami J. D. Stklmno, Busiuess Manager . Dernosihenian Society. L. C. Slade, J. E. Brannon, 0. H. Nhbct. Phi Kopy Society. M. A. Lewis, P. L. Fleming, R. O. Cochran. E. P. Green, Phi Kappa, Editor-In-Chief. W. H. Goodrich and O. K. Horton, Business Managers. Drmoithenian Society. Phi Kappa Society. Gerry Cabanhs, W. T. Bacon, Edwin I)a via, L. C. Grier, T. A. McGregor. B. I- Rountree. Gngineering gociett Annual. Containing Special Papers Read Before the Engineering Society During the Year. Oscar H. Sheffield................. Robert J. Gantt and E. B. Epps . (H8) Editor-iu-Cblef. Associate Editors.‘['be Students’ and-gool of the University of Geor£'a Compiled under the Direction of the College Young Men's Christian Association. MANAGING EDITOR. Orville A. Park, ’93. ASSOCIATE EDITORS. E. W. Barnwell, ’93, T. A. McGregor, ’94. This little book is furnished free upon application by the College Y. M. C. A. It is especially valuable to the new student, furnishing information about the University, the city of Athens, the Association, etc., which is not to be found in any other publication. The following extract from the preface will give a good idea of its contents: “Having ourselves been new students, and realizing how “green” a new boy feels, we have endeavored to put that boy in possession of a few facts which we hope will prove helpful to him, and to furnish all students with sonic data of the Association.” be Annual Announcement Hod Catalogue of the 0fflocro and gludento of tHc UnivorOlty of Georgia. Published by the Faculty and furnishing all necessary information regarding the institution. Furnished free on application. (119)" fpfye “©. G .” German ( lub. Byron B. Bower, Jr----------- William A. Wilkins, Jr. Geor«k Hili.ykr, Jr .. Jno. D. Stei.i.ix ;.......... -----President. Vice-President. .. Secretary. . .Treasurer. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. B. B. Bower, Jr............................ Charles R. Nisret. II. A. Alexander, W. B. Armstrong, Holcombe Bacon, Wallace Bacon, Dave Barrow, 3d, Fred Barfield, J. C. C. Black, Jr., B. B. Bower, Jr., R. M. Butler, Jr., II. C. Brown, Jesse Contes, Sam C. Dean, J. E. Deau, W. A. Wilkins. Jr., Chairman. William A. McDot ;oai.d. Members. James Dunlap, Paul L. Fleming, It. A. Flicss, Harry Goodrich, Percy Ezelle, T. W. Hardwick. Jolm Harrington, Willis Hawkins, John Hill. Jr.. George Ilillycr, Jr., Hflrry Hodgson, C. D. McCutcheon, W. A. McDougnld, Audley Morton, Eugene Murphy, Chas. It. Xisbct, 0. B. Nisbet, Mouroe Ogden, Z. V. Peacock, G. 0. Persons, Heury Porter, It. A.’ Ridley, Sam liutherlbrd, T. C. Smith, John D. Stelliug, Blanton Winship, 1211 Sam B. Yow.Commencement Banquet, Commercial Hotel, Tuesday June 13. 1893. S. H. Sibley.................................................. Toa»t Master. " Mingle- m lih the friendly bowl. The font of reooon Hurt the flow ol K ul."—Pojx. Thos. S. Hardwick “ I till the cup to one mnde up of loveliness alone. A n-otnau. o( her gentle sex the teeming; ptrxgon."— Plrimcj Monroe Ogden......................... .. Cliorogus. " And one o( hit greatest chnrltlc- Is rauife." J. E. Whelchcl..................The Law Department of the University. These arc my Jewett!■’ My Lady. T. Cuylcr Smith..................................... ... The Universitv. •• The crowning Jewel of the State " A. S. Erwin, Jr.................................................. Marriage. " Domestic till hot proved my bane."—Ottbtrt. A. J. Cobb............................ ................... .Our Country. “ Va«t the circumference of hope. Anti ye arc at Its centre. Your country- «nu t complete her ulorloui dt-itlnv— Bey In even now."- II erdt ucori h. 1 . W. Meld rim........................................... Cou6ervati9in. No K-ap. no fall; No effort. nosucews «t all." MENU. Little Neck Clams. Half Shell. Caviar. Hnut Sautcruo. Green Turtle Soup, with Sherry. Sainton Coquillc. Potato Purisienne. Boll Rose. Spanish Olives. Celery. Chicken, a la Soubeise. Cauliflower an Gratia. As|Kintgtis. French Peas. Tenderloin of Beef, a PEmperom-. Champagne. Quail on Toast. Water Cress. Saratoga Chips. Terrapin, a la Stewart. Champagne. Ix ttuce en Mayonalse. Artillery Punch. Crackers. Cheese. Sherry. Bananas. Salted Almonds. Coffee. (122) Ornuges. Iec Cream. Chocolate. Cigars. G rapes. Charlotte Rusfce. Cognac. 1 ■ j(pfye 0nivter$ity Banquet (Jlub. H. M. Dorsey. .................................................. . President. N. B. Stewart. .... ..........................Vico-President. F. G. Bnrlicld.. ..................... ................Secretary and Treasurer. COMMITTEE ON ARRANGEMENTS. Samuel Ijiwrcnce, F. G. Dnrlivld, J. C. C. Black, Jr.. E. Murphcy, W. M. Wilkins. MEMBERS. H. A. Alexander, D. C- Harrow (8d), B. B. Bower, Jr. It. M. Butler, H. M. Dorsey, C. Fleming, Harry Hodgaou, K. Murphy, X. B. Stewart, Win. Wadlo.v, F. (f. Bnrileld, J. C. C. Black, Jr., Henry Brown, Jt. O. Cochran, Percy Ezclle, A. Hllsuinn, Samuel Lawrence, J. D. Stelling, James Taylor, W. M. Wilkins, H. Bacon. Christmas Banquet, Commercial Hotel, Thursday, December 15,1892, 9:30 j . ni. 1 11100 Soup. Blue Point Oysters on Half Shell. Baked Poni|ieno. Sherry. “Purisiennc Potatoes.” Croquettes mid Green Peu , Sautcrue. Claret. Cranberry Sauce. Turkey, n la American. Fried Oysters. Bice. Hollandaise Potatoes. Roman Punch. Quail on Toast. Salad de Poulette. Edam Cheese, lee Cream. Cake de (tour, a la Billups. Malaga Gra|Ks . Indian River Oranges. English Walnuts. Raisins, Salted Almonds. CnfO Xotr. Fleur de Classic Cordial. Cigars. Celery. Champagne. Maryland Biscuits. Diplomatique. (123) IN VINO VERITAS. Hex Convivll..........Hugh M. Dorsey. TOASTS Our Club .................X. B. Stewart. To beset mutual r«r»rd. stimulate and engender a feeling of fellowship. a:wl fiirnhh remlnheciKee for the future. The University........................................H. A. Alexander. Ye . de»r oM friend, we love thee well, In caption critic spite. The I tdies.................. ........................B. B. Bower, Jr. The world w » wd. the Garden wa a wild. And man. the hermit, sigh'd till woman stalled." Old Folks at Home ....................................... Janies Taylor. TH sweet to know there la an eye will mark Our coming, and look brighter when we come."§er ior ( lass I3ar quet Commercial Hotel. June 19, 1893. TOASTS. Twist Master.............................. Mr. Haloott C. Moreno. The Tendency of the Age.................... ..... Mr. Chas. Kline. Collcge'as I Have Found It. ...................Mr. U lcr C. Slade. Tlie Beuellts of I'nlverslty Suspension.. . Mr. Harry A. Alexander. The Class of 98 in Polities.....................Mr. Eugene Dodd. "The I idles, God Bless Kin".......•...........Mr. Clms. It. Nlsbet. Nine-Three's Bugbears. ..................... Mr. Greene Johnson. The Faculty...................................Mr. Robert J. Gantt. From My Point of View... ......................Mr. Izunar Lyndon. Mr. Hugh M. Dorsey. menu. Cocktails. Celery. Pickles. Olives. Fish. Aux l‘onlines de Terre. Mayonnaise. Claret. Sliced Tomatoes. Asparagus. Frapi . Rhine Wine. Chlckeu Croquette . Turkey Stuffed with Mushrooms. Currant Jelly. Orange Water. Ice. Sweet Brenda. Aux Petits Pols. Champagne. Chlckeu Salad. Strawberries. Biscuit Glncf . lev Cream. Cheese and Toasted Crackers. Fruit. Nuts. Cafe Xnlr. (1-4) Reminiscences. Maraschino. Punch. Chartreuse.University jollity (;lub. C. E. Brand-------------- . .. ..._____________ .President. D. IJ. Whitaker-------- ----------------- —. ...Vice-President. K. W. PuKPj.KS------- . — .Secretory. 0. P. Thomi-ron. .. .............................................. .Treasurer. K. T. Moon................................... . _ .. He pon ler to the Toast. Members. .Join) Hill, Jr., A. F. Latimer, J. J. Gibson, W. L. lvcmp, Henry Banks, Jr., J. I). Humphries, J. V. Humphries. (125) Jdrand ©t'der of Gx-(;adets, Commandant..............E. L. Halsey. Adj u tu n t............G reene Job nsou. Captain Company X.......Lamar Lyndon. Captain Company Y.......B. B. Bower, Jr. Captain Company ........Charlie Kline. .Sergeant Major.........I L. Brown. Lieutenant Company X Eugene Dodd, H. C. Moreno, K. P. Green. Lieutenants Company Y. .B. T. Frey, X. Watkins, Louis Camak. Licutenauts Company Z...W. I . Warren, It. B. Nalley, Odor Bearer.............George Hlllyer. Gun Cleaners Gilbert Bogglets. Drum Major Drummer Bovs. ... B. L. Rountree, Lyn Geixline, Louis Camak. Markers Tom Bogglets, Bob Gautt Sergeants Ben Baldwin, V. E. Franklin. File Closers A. A. Bogglets. High Privates J. E. Wheichel, Whitelet J. Coates, S. H. Sibley. Pensioners. .. Stewart and Daniels. S (127)■ f THE ANCIENT AND INDEPENDENT ORDER OF Angora Goats. Most Grand High Hum.....................T. Cuyler Bc«clinm .Smith. . Eminent Butters.....................Noel Moore and John Xtolling. Grand B-a-a B-a-n....... Hr Goat . Italic Wilkins, Itilllc Armstrong, Italic Bogjrs, Italic Draper. .......MHlodge J-oekhart. .Van nits. Miss Sallie Porter, Miss Henrietta Brown, Mis« Georgia Hillycr, Miss Mollic Fletcher. »Tbc Draper Goal wnf. ejected from (be order on account of IfCily. (i») Ye Fiends of Calculus. Most Grand High Flunker First Infinitesimal Increment. Harry Jlodgxon. | a d, $ 4 (v 0 )4 dv (?j ]| § x v J 1 S = $ . || • •' a 171 II'alter P. Harmi. (,x"dx t § X @ 1 fJ Sin Cos xdx ' J 0 X x" dv Integral of Ami-Trigonometric Functions. . James Taylor, y—Sin'1 j £ ? $ 8-- Sec x tan‘ x. Fundamental Formula for Curve .Rectification, E. IT. Barnwell. S j [ 1 , | dx=per X U. V f' or- f — j dy vl Indeterminate Derivative Do rid id C. Harrow, Jr. | = ± oe W § £ $ Mr f f f f = oc oc § J v E. W. Barnwell, Harry Hodgson, Expelled for knowing too turucd much. Members. D. C. Barrow, Jr., (129) Jim Taylor, Walter P. Warren.U. S. L But! Bla !! Bla !!! U! S!! L!!! Sheeny!! J. C. C. Black, Jr.......................................... - — President. Jno. Hill, Jr Vice-President. Byron B. Bower, Jr._ .... .Secretary and Treasurer. PROCURERS OF THE GEESE. R. A. Ridley, J. A. Morton. COMMITTEE ON GARU.. J. C. C. Black, Jr., Wm. Draper, E. E. Murphey. COMMITTEE ON SWEITZF.R KASE. R. M. Butler, R. A. Ridlcv, Jno. Welch. COMMITTEE ON WIENERWURST. Geo. Hillycr, Jr., J. L. Dickey, O. B. Xisbct. BEER TAPPERS. Milledgo Lockhart, J. Audley Morton, Byron B. Bower, Jr. HONORARY MEMBER. Blanton Wiusbip. (130)University Boating (Hub. OFFICERS. E. G. Cabaxiss ... . President First Term. H. A. Alexander. . .......... . President Second Term. W. W. Wilkins ........................................... .. ..Treasurer. George IIii.lyer, Jb _____________________________ - Secretary. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. H. A. Alexander, E. G. Cabauiss, A. O. Halsey. George Beckett, W. B. Armstrong, H. A. Alexander, CREWS. FIRST CREW. E. G. Cabaniss, A. O. Halsey, SECOND CREW. James Dunlap, 1). C. Barrow, 3d, THIRD CREW. George Hillyer, Jr., Holcombe Bacon, E. L. Halsey. John Hill, Jr. W. Wilkins. (131)rHuiwKutt’s ssogatioi?. Eugene Dodd.. J e«ter C- Slade ___High Cuckoloriiin ami Stealer of the Cheese. Hugh M. Dorsey........................... Planner of the Theft. S. (). X. and Preserver of the Boodle. Oscar Lyndon............................ Suggester of the Plan. Motto: “Fromagea la If Ag’s.” Feast—Yahoo Collseuni, April 20th, 1803,11 i . M. till Daybreak. Ttotlpc 7W -.mba:rn. Find Honor.. Dorsey. Second Honor . Dodd. Dutinguitktd. 1. Slade. 2. Hodgson. 3. Lyndon. 4. Green. b. Stewart. 0. E. Halsov. Billie Ellison Boggs, Fatted on Condition. Barfield. Hilly or. Shepherd. A. Halsey. Toomer. Johnson. Honorary 'JWcmbcro. Jimmie It. Iiunuk'Utt, Failed. Lawrence. Goodrich. Hill. Fleming. Norton. Harry See (?) White. ‘fbe Rape of the Gheeses Gratefully dedicated to Dr . Hairy White. Billie Boggs nnd Piofoaor Jimmie Uunnlcutt, makers o( delicious cheeses and founder of tho Uuivcrxlty Dairy School. The Dairy School became a great success : IU teachings spread both tar an l Wide-Numerous experiment, were tried. Delivered many a teamed address. But that which proved it greatest pride Were ch« c inudc ol flavor nice: No need ol aromatic spice. But nil thing needful were supplied. Bright vtalons did the Prof , behold Of medals for these chee»e» fine— Bright dreams their fancy did outline Of " boards" dressed with these heaps o gold. These dreams were never realized; One day they shed much glory 'round. The next not one could there be found— Gone. stolen. were these products prized. (183)In vain did Harry. Jim and Kill Call all the student to account: The mystery they could not surmount. Try • they- did with all their will. There I n band In college with a name Suggesting well their purpose and their aim— Cheese Lilting Club they well do dub themselves; Their cbeooa come from better people' belvea. Whenever by a real aucce lul mid A cheese or two upon their •• board " is laid. These fellow in the very dead of night Do (east and drlnlc with heart and spirit light. While yet professors grave a a ed to know Where (Aose rare golden cbveaea chanced to go. Tbe c student met in an oUl • Yahoo" room With happy heart to dissipate it gloom. Around the " board " they gathered and full well Dlrpceed of cheese and bread nnd beer. A spell Of alienee uiu upon them that did last Till thirst was well appeased and hunger past. Then one by name of D—d. known as their chief. Cprow and thus did speak in language brief: “ My boon compnnlona. ere we leave this spread. Which our brave deed and cunning have secured. •To well that each should draw from out hts head The thought that by thl feast have been matured; Condense what you say and snake so clear That ‘twill not be obscured by Honing beer." First D-rvy rose—a yonth wboae plou mien Deceive his tutors—sallow, liink and lean. •• I drink," aald he, " to that o'er provident class Who struggle long great treasure to amaas. They by grot Ubor gntber: wc, with case. Take all their treasure any time we please." Next followed H-dga-n. a most honat man; Me steals bnt when be a tnl, not when he eo . Fellow ," Mill he, •• while we do merer make Forge! not those whose cheev wc do Ukc. 1 drink to Harry White. whose brilliant knowledge Permits of feasts among the boys In college." Then upetood dear old truthful L-»t-r S-l dc. A hopeful lad. and one with manner staid. "God blew." raid he, “ the college dairy farm. Keep it from evil, guard it from all harm; It b a biasing to our fettle ' baud. And never fall to meet our just demand." Then nproto one whoae name portray hltn Gr-n. But fresher men than he are often wen. There one in A them, a man pure of heart. Who at ihb moment with dire pain does smart; If ne knew of our feast, wortc were hi woe: WUh with me. l oy». that Jltn will uevec know.” Cr n J-ha'-n next arose and tbu outpoured The thoughts that in bb brain long time had soared: I drink not beer or other spirit vile. Life 1 too sober to evoke 1 a smile;- But 1 eat cheeaes, for they're like the moon— Both full and round: let's have more of them oon." Then la t apoke W-re-n. thefr one wayward mate; He loved bis friend , hi cncmfe did bate. ••Fellow ," he cried, "if Hilly e'er should know That we his cheese took he'd raise a row. Call u before him. make a scorching talk. And let u« change our pleasant dally walk. But he's not shrewd, and cn y to be fooled, A» ir stand uow our issues all are pooled; I drink that Billy ne'er will shrewder grow. And that on us bb wrath will ne'er bestow. Join me In inaklug this one gladsome hope: May Billy never learn with u to cope; May he and Jim and Harry never know Who took those cheese , nor where they did go.” A. II. ?4)Rock College. (The Dairy Farm where the Clu-oo were ir.mlc.) » %r Mermaids’ ls ea gu(. Millcdge Lockhart........................ Queen of the Nymphs. Bob Kidley.............................. .Groom of the Dolphins. Bob Gantt..................................Keeper of the 1’earl . Hugh Donwy.......................................Chief Charmer. GeneMurphey.................................] Hill Draper................................. Hie Three1 Graces. Jim Hlaek.................................. J WV don't wc'tr no-------- (18 )Athletics. Lust Commencement it was whispered aronml amongst the bovs that the Trustees wore contemplating the abolition of all forms of athletics. Hut little attention was paid to the rumor, for we never for one instant sup| osed that it could have an authentic foundation. We returned from the holidays and immediately started to look np balls, bats and uniforms, and to survey the held of new material with the object in view of organizing athletic teams superior to any which have ever represented this University. The work had just started when the Faculty announced that their interpretation of the Trustees’ resolution was to the eflcet that all inter-collegiate games must be discontinued. A sudden clap of thunder on a bright summer day could not have created more surprise and astonishment than did this announcement. Athletic men were discouraged, and the boys in general felt that they had been deprived of their greatest source of recreation and amusement. Xo more to hear the old college yell as our sturdy team tussled for supremacy over some sister college. No longer to hear the exultant cheer of a victorious class, and to see them hear their joyous team off the field. Indeed, the prospect was gloomy. It was not until late in November that the first bright rays of the sun jiecped through these dark and gloomy clouds. As suddenly as they appeared so suddenly did they disappear. Our Trustees announced their action rescinded, leaving a bright and promising future for athletics. Such a period of inactivity at the beginning of the term was in itself sufficient to cause a temporary cessation of athletic games in almost any college. But with that energetic spirit which has always characterized our hoys, we set to work and soon organized a football team in each class. Several games were played, which proved not only interesting but revived the dormant athletic ardor. college football team was organized with the object in view of playing Furman (J38)college. The team was an excellent one, and a great deal was expected of it. Suitable arrangements could not be made with Furman, nor could dates be secured with other college of our class. So it was decided to disband the college team and prepare for baseball. In order that the college team might have sufficient opportunities to practice and to develop up new material the class baseball games were discontinued temporarily. The practice games of the college team showed that it hade fair to excel the champion team of last year. Hut in vain did the management try to obtain dates with neighboring colleges. It was ini| ossiblc. In order to play a game of baseball it would be necessary to travel three or four hundred miles at the risk of losing a great deal of money. The idea of playing intercollegiate games was then given up. The class baseball league was quickly organized. Five good, strong teams entered the field and several interesting, sharp games have been played. Deep interest is taken in these games, mul tlic bov» nrc bound in closer ties of friend-ship. A large number of Indies are always present, and here the college boys and citizens become acquainted. The advantages derived from these games arc innumerable, and it is hoped that in future years they will be continued. Field Day took place on the 28th of April. It was the most successful ever held u|miii our campus. The college records in the running high jump, throwing the hammer, three legged race and half mile race were broken, while the fifty yards dash record equals the best ever made here. In looking backward over the jmst year’s work we can well sav that, under the circumstances, we have done uobly and well. May Fortune smile tqiou our brave band of sturdy youths, and when they return next year may our dear old yell cheer them on to many a victor}'. Go upward and onward, boys, never stopping until you have encircled the highest jioint of the pinnacle of success with the black and red. A. (). II. 0)Varsity football (peam. A. O. Halsey............................... C'aptnin. George Hillyer, Jr ... . .... Manager. R. B Nalley.................— Center Rush. J. C. C. Black, Jr _ .Right Guard. George G. Stiles.... Left Guard. Blanton Windup,.. ...................... Right Tackle. Newton Watkins......- ... Left Tackle. Jesse Coates....................... .. . Right End. L. D. Fricks.......................-........ Ix Ft End. H. C. Brown........................ Right Half Back. A. O. Halsey- ...................... Left Half Back. W. B. Armstrong. ... Quarter Back. G.P. Bntler Full Back. (140)I ’Varsity pootball ffeam, 1892-'93. FMCXy W Nai.lkv CoAT»» ’91. V ATKIN 'WJ. STILES '96. BI.ACK 'tt. WlNUIIlr (Utt). Cabasin !0 (Sul,). lti-TLER MM. Halsey ’W (Cai : ln;. BkOWX '91. ARMSTRONG '91. HlM YEK tJfat-nyr) Mo nr. no MK (Sub).'Varsity A. C). Halsey Geokoe Hili.yki?, .Jr Albcrl Foster........ C. Beussee______ . _ S. H. Sibley. _ .... A. O. Halsey ! . Halsey C. P. Thompson------- E. L. Halsey. . . . W. L. Kemp.. ........ K. H. Salley____ .. Baseball (Hub. ...... Captain. . _________ -Manager. .............Pitcher. .............Catcher. ... .. First Base. . . Short Stop. Second Base. .. Third Base. ......Left Field. ________Center Field. ........Right Field. (1-M)Qlass pootball fpeams. SENIORS. A. 0. Hai-sky... _ _ .. . Captain. M. A. Lewis .. Manager. R. B. Xalley . ..... .. Center Rush. B. T. Frey „ .. i Right Guard. Newton Watkins. Left Guard. E. L. Halscv ... . . Right Tackle. R. J. Gantt I eft Tackle. H. C. Moreno .. . ..Right End. George Hillyer, Jr.. . .... I.eft End. A. 0. Halsev— . Right Half Back. M. A. Lewis Left Half Back. K. G. Cabaniss . .. . Quarter Back. W. II. Goodrich Full Back. JUNIORS. H. 0. Brown. . Captain. L. D. Fricks- . Center Rush. E. Davis — . Right Guard. W. M. Wadley I .eft Guard. S. B. Yow. Right Tackle. C. D. McCutchen .. . ... -Ivoft Tackle. C. R. Tidwell -- - Right End. A. Wriglcy. ... Left End. W. B. Armstrong Right Half Back. G. P. Butler — .. .Left Half Back. V. A. McDougald. Quarter Back. H. C. Brown. ... . Full Back. (144)SOPHOMORES. FRESHMEN. c. P. Thompson . ..Captain. P. P. E .ki.i.k J. C. c. Black. .Jr . Center Bush. T. F. Smith. -- L. S. Selman.... . ..... . .. Bight Guard. F. E. Grifleth . E. M. Gammon . I eft Guard. J. W. Gritfcth.. C. E. Brand.. . Bight Tackle. J. H. Buttrill B. 0. Cochran. ... . . J eft Tackle. .1. L. Dickey W . T. Biviugs . ... Bight End. T. A. Neal C. P. Thompson .. Left End. S. Brooks w . A. Hawkins Bight Half Back. I’. P. Ezclle w . P. Gearreld . — Left Half Back. •J. A. Morton E. E. Murphey . Quarter Back. Frank Harrington L. Halsey ... Full Back. J. W. Welch LAWYERS. B. Wixsiiip. . - Captain. J. E. Dean J. V. Kelley _______ E. K. Overstreet---- 1). B. Whitaker Z. Y. Peacock___ A. Erwin_ _ X. A. Morris •Jesse Contes B. Winship---- J. E. Whclchcl. ... W. W. Bacon Center Bush. Bight Guard. ___ ]x?ft Guard. .. Bight Tackle, l oft Tackle. Bight End. .......Jx;ft End. 1-eft Half Back. Bight Half Back. .....Full Back. Quarter Back. (145) . .. Captain. Center Bush. ..Bight Guard. .... . Left Guard. Bight Tackle. . I eft Tackle. . Bight End. .Left End. Bight Half Back. I.eft Half Back. .Quarter Back. . Full Back. 9(Jlass Baseball eams. SENIORS. A. O. Halsey..................................... Captain. E. G. Cabaniss . .Manager. R. B. Nnllcv................................... Catcher. A. 0.Halsey __________ .. ........ .Pitcher. E. L. Halsey..... ......................... First Rase. Fred G. Barfield............................ Second Base. Newton Watkins ... . Third Base. M. A. Lewis. ......... .. .. . .ShortStop. E. G. Cnbaniss. . . J efi Field. T. J. Bennett. ................ . Center Field. il. M. Dorsey....... Right Field. JUNIORS. 1.. D. Fricks ....... . .............. -. Captain. C. D. McCutchcn.................................. Catcher. H. C. Brown..---------- .. Pitcher. P. L. Fleming_________________ ..._______ First Base. C. R. Tidwell ........................ Second Base. Edwin Davis............................—Third Base. G. P. Butler...... .......................Left Field. 1.. 1). Fricks Short Stop. W. A. McDougald............... ........ . .Center Field. Arthur Wriglcy.-......................... Right Field. (1-W)SOPHOMORES. LAWYERS. W. L. Kemp. w. P. Gearbkld W. L. Kemp. ______ C. L. Goodrum. W. P. Georreld. Lindsley Ilalsev. It. A. Ridley..... C. P. Thompson . J. T. Dunlap J. J. Gibson . G. I. Tagger t . C. A. Fleming . C. A. Fleming. P. P. Ezclle. T. II. Buttrill. •J. I.. Dickey John Gerdino, .Jr . F. T. Harrington T. A. Xeal.. Prof. Ilerty T. F. Smith. .... ..... Captain. Blanton Winship .............................. Captain. — _________________ Manager. J. V. Kelley_________________________________ .Catcher. Catcher. J. 1’. Brown . Pitcher. Pitcher. F. G. Govan.. ..... ........................... First Base. First Base. S. H.Sibley . .Second Base. — ------- - ■--- - Second Base. Blanton AVinship................................... Third Base. Third Base. S. C. Dean..................................... Short Stop. — ... Short Stop. J. E. Wheloliel______________ .. . ... .Left Field. .Left Field. V. V. Harvard________________________________ Center Field. ................. Center Field. M. G. Ogden................................. Right Field. .............Right Field. FRESHMEN. __________________ . Captain. ------ . Catcher. ...... ......................Pitcher. _______ ____________... First Base. ................... -- Second Base. ___________ . . Third Base. ...... Short Stop. ......Left Field. ......................Center Field. _________ . Right Field. RESULT OP GAMES PLAYED BEFORE PANDORA WAS SENT TO PRESS. April 2dth.—lawyers, 19; Freshmen, 13. April 27th.—Seniors, 22; Sophomores, 3. April 29th.—Lawyers, 10; Juniors, 4. (147)Praterr ity fpennis taea|ue. SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON SET. George Butler, ’94, Milledgc Ix ckhart, ’95, Noel Moore, '94, D. C’. Barrow, 4tl , '95. CHI PHI SET. R. S. Hunter, '96, E 1. Dougherty, ’95, Henry Porter, '95, Holcombe Bacon, '96. KAPPA ALPHA SET. Percy Kzelle, '96, Ilarrv Goodrich, '93, Prank Harrington, ’90, Arthur Wrigley, '94. PHI DELTA THETA SET. ALPHA TAU OMEGA SET. •I. D. Stelling, ’94, Thomas Buttrill, '90. Henry Banks, Jr., '95, Sam’l Lawrence, ’93. DELTA TAU DELTA SET. Charles Tidwell, '94, J. J. Gibson, '95, W. P. Gearrcld, '95, D. L. Cloud. '94. SIGMA NU SET. L. D. Fricks, '94, C. D. McC’utcheon, '94, Lindsley Halsey, ’95, G. L. McRae, '90. CHI PSI SET. (148) E. G. Caban is , '93, H. C. Moreno, '93, James T. Dunlap, ’95. S. B. Yow, '94. Lamar C. 'roomer, '94, C. F. Dodd, '95, W. P. Harbin, ’94, W. A. Fuller, '94.©Annual fPield Da program. Held on the Campus, Friday, April 28th, 1893. 4 P. M. FIELD COMMITTEE. It. B. Nalley, E. E. Mitrphby, E. B. Eppes, C. D. McCutciieon, E. G. Cahanirs. MARSHALS. Fkkj Barfield, Fait.Flkmi.no, C. P. Thompson, Byron Bower. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. Gkorok Hillykk, Jr., Chairman, A. O. Halsey, S. B. Yow. JUDOES. Goodixjk Yancey, B. F. Hardeman, Park Howell, Starter. Order of Events. (Urotccn rccofit ! in heavier type.) Fifty Yards Dash n «u by H. C. Brown...............Time 51 seconds. ad, Arthur Wrigley. Throwing Baseball Won by A. O. Halsey..........Distance 2981 feet. 2 1, T. It. Moye. Standing Broad Jump—Won by E. K. Overstreet. Distance 9 ft. 1 in. 2d, A. O. Halsey. 100 Yards Dash Won by Arthur Wrigley Time 10! second . 2d, H. C. Brown. Putting 14-pouud Shot—Won by H. C. BrO'vu .. Distance 35 feet. 2d. E. K. Overstreet Distance 33 ft. oj in. Horiz yntal liar Won by Wallace Bacon. Hurdle Kace Won by Arthur Wrigley .. 'lime 18 seconds. 2d, A. O. Halsey. Throwing 14-ponnd Hammer- Won bv B. F. Frey_______Dis. 75 ft. 2 in. 2d, It. B. Nalley................Dis. 72 ft. 4 in. .Standing High Jump—Wou by H. C. Brown . . Distance 4 ft. 0 In. 2d, Arthur Wrigley. Itiiimiiig High Jump Won by Arthur Wrigley . . Distance5 ft. 5 in. 2d, H. C. Brown. Heavy-Weight Wrestling Nalley vs. Watkins Wou by Nalley. Light-Weight Wrestling—Wallace Bacon vs. John Gerdiue. Jr. —Wou by Bacon. Three-begged Race Winners, J. II. Harrington, It. M. Butler.... —Time 7 seconds. 2d, Frank Harrington. H. M. Dorsey. Slick Race Won by A. O. Halsey..................'rime 14 seconds. 2d, Newton Watkins. One-half .Mile Ituu Won by J. I). Stelling Time 2 iniu. 10‘- see. 2d, W. P. Gcarrold. Tug of War—College vs. Law Class Wou by College. College Team A. O. Halsey, Watkins, Black, Frey, Fricks, Nalley. law Team—Dean, Morris, Moon, Overstreet, Wiuship, Horton.eAmefican Intercollegiate Records. Keent. lie ford. Champion. 100 yards dash.........10 sec...........L. H. Carey, Princeton. 230 vanl dash ........21} mv...........J . H. Carey, Priuceton. 120 yards hunllc ......15| see... . H. L. Williams, Vale. 220 yards liunllc......35} sec. ........H. I,. Williams, Yale. Half mile run..........1 min. 571 gcc . W. C. Rohm, Princeton. Milo run........ ......4 min. 29} sec...C. 0. Wells, Amherst. Two mile bicycle.......6 min. } see.....Jt.il. Davis, Harvard. Mile walk. ............7 min. j sec. ______I Oolite, Columbia. Running broail jump... 22 ft. 11} In . V. Maples, Columbia. Running high jump ...0 ft.. . ____O. It. Fearing, Harvard. Pole Vault.............10 ft. 7} in. ......K. I). Ryder, Yale. Putting 16] ouud shot 40 ft. 9} in. .... A. B. Coxe, Yale. Throwing 10-lb. hammer.107 ft. 7} in....J. It. Finlay, Harvard. 440 yards run..........49} sec .....G. R. Shattuek, Amherst. (I OniOersity of (§eorgia Records. Eunt. •50 yards dash. Winner. Record. • II. C. Drown, ’{Mi .. .......I Julian H. Lane, '92 , oi • — , V. W. Gordon, '9o... . 10) see. . . .B. F. Hardeman, ’SO.. ..22} sec. .......1$. F. Pickett, ’91....24? »eo. .......J. D. ft Oiling, '04,2 jnin. lt l see. .......B. F. Pickett, 'ftl...10 sec. .......V. L. Smith, '88..1 min. .191 see. .......V. L. Smith, ’88.3 min. 27} see. .......Geo. Shackelford....4 ft. 7 in. ......Arthur Wriglcy, ’91.. .5 ft. 3 in. . without bells).J. E. Whelchel, ’92_9 ft. 6 In. Standing broad jump (with bcllsl—J. K. Boston, ’88.......10 ft. 3 in. I tunning broad jump..............B. F. Pickett, '91.IS ft. 9 in. Three standing broad Jumps. .. . J. K. Whelchel, ’92.. 30 ft, 4 in. Hop, step and jump................J. C. Mell, ’SS....41 ft. 7 in. Throwing baseball........ .. .......J. C. Mell, ’88...........334 ft. Throwing hammer..................B. T. Frey, ’93.....7.5 ft. 2 in. Putting 14 | ouiid shot-..........A. Broyles, ’87................43 ft. 10O yards dash 200 yards dash. 220 yards dash. Half mile run... 110 yards hurdle race Half mile bicycle met One mile bicycle race Standing high jump, ltunuing high jump.. Standing broad jump Tim l gKWl lto, .......{SSSyL.- !. M)(;lass t'es Exercises §eniof (;lass OniOersity of @eor gia. Thursday, April 13, 1893, 4 p. m. PROGRAM. Prayer.................The Chaplain—B. T. Frey. Song. ___________________________ The Class. Poem__________________________ ..Harry A. Alexander. Planting the Tree.__________ . The Class. The Pipe oe Peace. . The Class. Benediction....... Prof. W. 1). Hooper. Yell. (151)Senior' We are the boys of the Cln- '03. Vive a la coinpagnie. The salt of the earth you can very well see, Vive a la corapagnie, The pride of our college of aucient renown. Vive a la coiupaguie, And we are the lads that tear open the town, Vive a la compagnic. Chorus: The great and good class of the year ’03, The best that e’er entered the old U. of G.. Studious are we, learned we be. The pets of the Faculty. In das room we never reply “ unprepared,” Vive a la compagnic. For halls and for Itanquet we never have cared, Vive a la coiupaguie, We study all night and we’re in college all day, Vive a la conipngnie, Except when we drill in a very small way, Vive a la compagnic. Chorus. (;lass §on £. When tltc day of commencement once more shall come round, Vive a la compagnie. We hope on the Blue List our names will l e found, Vive a la compagnie, And we can predict that at some future date, Vive a la compagnie. Old ’93 men will be ruling the State, Vive a la compagnie. Ciionr . To Freshmen nod Juniors and Sophomores, all, Vive a la compagnie, We give this advice, which you'd better recall, Vive a la compagnie, Study as we have, and work a wc’vc done, Vivo a la compagnie, And you’ll get your “dip " but you won't have much fun, Vive a la compagnie. C11ORU (1 2)•jaunted. V stood upon the brink of some clear, sun-lit stream; I heard the tuneful melody—saw the laughing gleam Of lucent waters and their silver spray; But far beneath the purling of its pebbly bed Me thought I saw her eyes, sweet eyes, dear eyes, that led My soul from night to everlasting day. I watched the silent setting of the golden sun, Beheld the glorious strife of colors melt in one, As fiery sapphire lit the skies above: But gleaming far beyond the sunset’s radiant hue 1 saw her eyes, sweet eyes, dear eyes, so true, That taught my heart to know of life and love. A. C. X. 1158)  oA Pair to Draw o. (Both Act .) Who is, you think, the college pet? Old Tub. Who hns not |Mtid his rent bill yet? Old Tub. Who fools the Freshmen with his wails, And lives in style from peanut sales. And always tells the same old tales? Why Tub. Who has a most euphonious name? Old Potts. Who runs “The Yahoo” just the same? Old Potts. Who must we call with all our might When tire’s wanted at daylight, And who is just then out of sight? Why Potts. (1M)Like a fairy. Sweetest Mary, Light and airy, Passes by. It was seeming, Love was beaming, .San rays dreaming, In her eye. I pursued her, And i woo’d her— Understood her To say “yes.” Xow I'm choking, At her joking. So provoking, She said “ guess.” (135)fpift ($af Witty AND it came to pass, while the A Bites were peacefully at work with their cray-fish and bed-bugs, that a sudden report came from the land of Waterworks saying: “That the whole tribe of A nucha were up and in arms.” Verily the chief and ruler of the A Bites wnxeth wrathy, and gathered! his whole tribe under his wing. And there wore many brave warriors with their squaws; but no children had been born unto them yet. Yea, verily, one .Strong Arm by name had fought in the football war and was wounded badly. And his squaw, The Butler Flower, was very beautiful but fierce, for she too, had fought in the football war with the “Scrub” tribe, and was also Queen of the Sergeants. The fiercest of all warriors was Moore, for he had cut many a worm’s throat. And his squaw, Camming, was very grave and sad, having once murdered a terrapin in cold blood. Then there was the old squaw Move who beat her husband, Harbin, very much—yea, even in class-stand, and they were divorced accordingly. The oldest squaw of the tribe was Black Cloud. Truly, men were an abomination to her, and she liked to sit by herself and play with co-sine and tangents. The chief did exhort his band, and, after drinking some cat’s blood and kissing the frogs good-bye, they set out into the wilds of Athcnsland to kill the whole tribe of Anuebte. Truly they did have many cups, spears, knives and sharp glass botties with which to cut the throats of the wicked Amoebae. And they did brave the dangers of Lumpkin street and passe til many a snoring “cop” on the wayside. And they did see the wonderful cars, shining lights, lire engines (i- Mmoebas. and all the other lovely tilings which the great Athensland jHJssesses. They did wash themselves in the street sprinkler, which was good, for they needed it. Selali! •Scouts eoou did announce with clinking of bottles and clashing of cans that the land of Waterworks was in view. Then did the Great Chief, “Proty,” climb a high mountain called Gate P »st. Verily he grunteth, “That looketh suspicion,” and the whole tribe rusheth forward with uplifted bottles. But soon they were thrown into deep consternation, for their Great Chief engngeth in single combat with a barbwire fence. The tribe did pull him out and cut the fence in twain, but the Great Chief’s armor was much torn. Then Proty wept, and his tribe was sorely grieved. But soon they revived their fallen spirits and they gave their yell and all did rush into the land of Waterworks. The Great Chief grunted and ericth again, “That looketh suspicious,” for he did think that he spied the Amrehie afar. The l enutiful Camming did throw a bottle at an imaginary Aiwvhie, and the fierce Moore broke a frog’s back. Old Blue Cloud tumbled into a deep ditch, and little Strong Arm spilth afar an Anhenscr Bush, bearing a hop flower, and, thereupon, ehaseth after it. The Great Chief boggoth deep in the mire, nud did think himself captured by the Anuebte. He did dash a large can at them and ericth for aid. But his whole tribe did desert him and rusheth back to Laboratoryvilie. Yea, verily, even to this day the A Bites looketh through long lenses for the wicked Amoebic; but verily, verily I say unto you, no Anuohie ever did live in the land of the Waterworks. Selah! 8)In green festoons and graceful curves Its climbing limbs were formed; Its verdant leaves in shining waves By summer’s suit were warmed. For many years around the door Of that old college hall It gently clung and tried to bore Its tendrils in the wall. The satin petals of its blooms Were delicate and fair, Sweet maidens oft inhaled their fumes, And wore them in their hair. Its lovely head the dewdrop caught, And morning rays reveal A sparkling diamond, that’s set Within a Marechicl Neil. (157) A college boy once plucked the best Of all this rosebud kind, And in its yellow-tinted breast His manly soul con lined. A bright-eyed maid reached forth her hand, And as the blushes start, She kissed the bud and gently pinn’d It o’er her love-lit heart. We miss thee now, angelic tree, That did our door adorn, Ah! cruel must the uxman be Who stole thee from the morn. Your loveliness in memory stays, As do our friends above; We used thee in those happy days As tokens of onr love. J.H.B.peW Books £jusf published. “How to be Fenny.” An excellent treatise on Wit ami Humor as we have found it in our class-rooms. By Professors Wilcox and Charbonnier. We heartily commend tins book to all lovers of stale jokes. Everything in it is mellow with age. “ Pabi-oi: Gymnastics; ok, IIow to ‘ Neck ’ with Ease.” Something new, clear and concise ami worthy of your careful perusal. By A. Flip Riblets and Squeeze M. Tight. “The Reward ok the Righteous; or, Booti.icki.no Made Easy.” By Lynn V. Gerdine. 12 mo; cloth, $2.00. 'Phis book is altogether practical and scientific, l eing based upon ex| eriments which have been especially useful and successful during the past three years. «When Wim, I LeaveTiiee, Dear Oi.dCollege?” A very sad, true and pathetic poem on the prosj ect8 of two years more at the old job. By Robt. J. Gantt, Class ’90, '91, ’92, '93. “Where Are Your Math; or What’s Wrong with Calculus?” By Warren, Tnvlor and others. Being a discussion on the latest methods of assimilating higher mathematics without labor. Of es| ccinl interest to Sophomores and Juniors. “Cadet Caitain Bogglets; or What WkShould Like to Be.” By Thomas and Gill ert Bogglets. This is a very touching poem, in which the aspirations of two young Freshmen to be like Big Brother Adam arc very cleverly expressed. A c piote the opening stanza, which give.- a pretty fair idea of the nature of the poem: What office will we get, Mr. Suelling? Wc hope you won’t forget, Mr. Suelling, That wc are both vonr | cts, And we arc the two Bogglets, And the Chancellor’s our daddy, Mr. Suelling. (15S) () ( R ALUMWI AT THE WELD'S FAIR «... ,_ I L »_l(Jtye Defeat of §uir tus (Ju ler. A lttcription of «n cxdtlns ih»UI«1 ilxht In Aiideni Ro«" r. vni.ili.lmi o« Uoiis which ilncc—The Roman Komm. ciarnifs. MAT menu those loud resounding cheers that come Like thunder from yon thickly crowded room? Have you a contest for the pnetorship? Has any consul made some fatal slip That hriuga on war with all its blood and tears, And eloquence re-echoing tliund’rous cheers? Al'l'IIX No war has Jtome on hand, thanks to her Hag. Which floats o’er land and sea an honored rag: Then- is no pnetorship left vacant now. Nor consul mixed up in a serious row. That's hut the home of Koine’s most learned men, Made famous by the gifts “the upper ten” Have oft bestowed; but fa mod above all things For eloquence that through the old hall rings. The cause of all the Cheering that you hear To understand let’s draw somewhat more near. Once ©very year from these old walls are turned I apply to a more mol.ru neat with which n «rv all fxmlliir. -Aburbe on.llt 67i The youths who take their place among the learned Who hold the helm and guide the ship of State To the bright star, the harbinger of her fate. This yearly event with much pomp mid show Is celebrated, as you doubtless know. Koine’s sages, orators and | oet8, all Keel honored to obey their mater’s call, And lend their skill to make the event grand A tribute worthy of their noble band. So stands the pant. The future seems to scan One greater than the past. A wond'rous mail A man whose mind seems like to living flame— And destined by the fates to glorious fame. More eloquent than Cicero and far Ahead of Cesar in the art of war; As |Kitriot, Brutus fades quite out of view. And yet more caustic than the C’asean grew; A man he seems and yet he’s but a youth, A scion of a noble house and—Truth; And yet Ambition holds him so in sway He'd change the oldest customs in a day. (100)He dure unto the loftiest place aspire Of that event which sets the brain on lire He worid he orator on Commencement day And bend all Home bcuenth his forceful away. He’s speaking; listen with what magic skill He holds his hearers to his fervid will. Sl'KECH or Q l'1ST VS CVVLKK, OVEHIIKAKD BY CLACDIV ASP APPll'S. Romans what glory does your |Kist proclaim Of triumph both in war and peace? What fame Lies in your future? Brilliant skies overhead That glisten while the sun’s pure rays are sited Iu undimmed splendor seem as shadows gray Beside the splendor of your boundless sway. Home’s pennant Hies the brw x of every clime, Rome rules the world, and will to end of time. What placed her firmly on her regal throne, What keeps her ruler of the world alone? Oh, Homans, cull from History’s vivid page The tragic scenes of this and every age, The flame that patriots’ hearts doth tire you'll see And eloquence sow the seed of liberty. Youth is the time when both most freely burn- -'Hie soul to hope, the wisdom to discern, The heart to dare, the courage to uphold. In youth great actions and grant empires mould. And therefore, Quintus, by every art At your command give youth a foremost part In war, in science, love ami in delta to, Aud keep proud Home, as now, forever great. And now, dear friends, what need for us to scud Abroad f »r speakers their great powers to lend 1ft 1 To our Commencement exercises when Among uh may be found aft able men. The (Jmcchls, Sclpioo, all have made their name, Why not let us attempt to do the same; From out our ranks select the foremost maul'll serve, and do the very best I can. Elect me to this place, and I will show How orators can sway minds, high and low; Elect me, and I will a banquet place ltcfore you far more sumptuous than did grace The Augustan tables when the poets dined, And ne'er shall guests more liberally be wined. ’Tis true this changes custom centuries old, And may opjiose the views our teachers hold; Hut what arc customs, and pray who are those Who dare oppose us In the plans we choose? No other student now should make the nice, For have I not announced first for the place? And Is there any other who so well Can represent you? If so, plainly tell; You say there's no one, then oh, Romans dear, You will eleet me! There's no cause for fear. CbAlfDIfJ . (Monologue.) He closed. Applause like thunder rent the air; His eloquence caused lengthy dicer on cheer; His modesty, despite ambition’s boat, Ne’er left him, and lie, blushing, took hi seat. As front the scene I slowly went my way I thought how long proud Itontv would hold her sway; If she could ever raise up youths to tight For her, ns this one, In the cause of Right. A. H.Vice Uefsa. What youth 1o all the girls call sweet, Who dances with such supple feet, But yet is hare of all conceit? That’s Cuvier '9-3. Whose mouth so like a maiden’s small, Closed always in Phi Kappa’s hall Was never known to give up gall? That's Oscar ’04. Whose face has never worn a smile, Who is, indeed, quite free from guile. And only “books” once in a while? That's Ilenry '95. Who hates so much to be a tough. And criticizes all that’s rough, And never says “That’s just the stuff?” That’s Israel ’96. (Jfyestnuis (JracKed Gv ei Day. Our author puts us on guard, Mr. li., against the error of, etc. The current impinging on tlic wheel increases its rate in the r-r-r-ashio of, etc. Gentlemen, as Prof. C. will not be here to-day you will please meet me at his hour so a.- to lose no time. Well, Mr. C., suppose you take it up there. I never knew it to fail. It takes three years for a class to learn this idiom, and then they don’t know it. Oh! that must be the hypo-glossal uniting with the glossopharyngeal. Well, now, gentlemen, I don’t think that’s necessary, but, anyhow, I’ll reduce it to nine pages. You see the point our author tries to bring out? “And the Lord spake all these words, saying:” (162)(pfye baW (;lass {4ir ety-fpi?ree. In style concise as any style may be Behold the Jxiw Class men of ’U3. Their modes of life, their virtues we portray, But touch their faults as lightly as we may. Than Sammy Dean, where's a more mournful sight? Than Orville Park who shines with more delight? Can man be Mi ter than is I mi Brown? Than Cuylor’s can you find mote classic frown? Bill Hiles would put a corpse's face to shame. And Horton’s brightness dim the electric flame. Sweat’s wisdom makes him always in demand. While Sibley plays a splendid poker hand. Matthews exemplifies a lawyer shaved, And Sheppard shows one always well behaved. Ed Moon, lovesick, Is always wan and pale, While Greer’s red face must make a toper quail. Tom Hardwick, as a preacher, moaus and prays, While Humphries, drunk, lu idleuess spends his days. There’s Harris, who was never known to smile, Though Overstreet might get off jokes most vile. Poor Bacon, now as often on a “high,” And Harvard much too good to tell a lie. Whelehel, who goes to bed nud rises early, Says ’tin late hours that Erwin makes so surly. Pearsons is not handsome, why should he lx- vain? Aud why should Ogden primp with might and main, If not ns Winship does, to make a “mash,” Or do, as Hutherford, something just ns rash? His thick brown tresses Heyman saves by piety, While Brown’s bay-window comes from inebriety. Much learning surely will make Kelly mad, And blithesome girls keep modest Peacock sad. Kd l ean, like life, too short to make a pun, While Govan thinks of nothing else but fun. Poor Whitaker’s in the world without a cheek, And Dart is fat, yet very, very meek. Hi us ends the list - two names were brought in double; It saved two lines and also saved some trouble. These lines are dull to those who know us not. But form a perfect picture of the lot. H, (103)“09ould-be” ,0oRes. A POOR PUX AND A BIO BUST COM BIX KI . Dr. B.—“Mr. Taylor, will you please give us Kant’s discussion of this subject?” Mr. Taylor.—“I can’t, Doctor.” A SAMI'I.E ok krksiimax wit. A. ’96.—“Did you know that Dean was very sick this morning?” B. '96.—No, hadn’t heard it; which one, “Big” Dean or “Sain” Dean? A. ’9G.—“Neither. Sardine. Sec?” A NECESSARY ADJUNCT. Col. S.—“Mr. B, why do you keep punching Mr. S? You disturb the whole class.” Mr. B.—“iS has my rabbit foot, and I can’t work this problem till J ‘hoo-doo’ this chalk.” THE AUTOMATIC TIRE. Peacock.—“I saw a jim dandy joke in Puck the other day on the Jersey mosquito.” MeCutchcn.—“J.et us have it.” P.—“The mosquito was so big that he punctured the automatic tire of one of those new-fangled bicycles.” McC.—“ You fool; you mean a pneumatic, not an automatic tire.” P.—“ What’s the difference?” McC.—“A pneumatic tire is one that’s full of air, while an automatic tire is one that ought to be.” (HU) WHERE are IT? Prof. C.—“Mr. Warren, what is the formula for the volume of a sphere in terms of its radius?” Mr. W.—“I don’t remember, Professor.” Prof. GV—“ Why, Mr. Warren, where are your Math ?” First Bright Sophomore.—“Why can’t Doctor lioggs have the measles?” Second B. S.—“Well, really, I don’t know.” First B. S.—“Because he has (h)Adam. Sec?” AT DEATH’S BOOB. “Charbey”—(Noting absence of about half of the Senior class.)—“What is the matter with the rest of the class?” Class, in concert.—“Sick.” “Charbey”—(Bemembcring that they have a final examination in political economy the next day.)—“I hope it’s not a final sickness.” And then one of those “ ain’t-I-bright ” smiles lights up his divine mug, and the class approves with much demonstration. IIII.LYER HITS ’EM HARD. I)r. B.—“Mr. Hiliyer, will you please discuss the connection between our sensorium and the great question of space?” Mr. H.—“Well, suppose we look at any object; the cognition of certain dimensions is forced upon us, etc., etc.” Dr. B.—“Hold on, Mr. II. Suppose yon were blind.” Mr. H.—“Then, sir, I could not see.” Dr. B.—“Certainly not, sir; that’s exactly right.” iA taosf lsettei'. (Pickod up on the Campus.) Dkak IN»n K«:- I have been here for five weeks and f think this Is n lovely place. The town has a noble set of |x Ueeiucu and the care art just grand, and run without horses. When I first came here the boys treated me to soda water, took me out ruling and shook my hand every time they met me. Hut now they pass me by. I thought that I was very popular at first, hut now I find that I am not. The boarding-house have plenty of horsestcak and gravy. I manage to keep alive on this together with what 1 can steal from the fruit stores. The “Yahoo” is a grand house and some nice fellows stay In it. They have religious meetings each Friday night and the shoutings can he heard out in town. The cellar i a lovely room. Here the “Cheese Club” and Seniors meet and sing praises. T have learned lots since I have been here. 1 can tell why the “male cow” don’t give milk and why the chickens don’t sing; that a crayfish has its teeth in its stomach and that a bullfrog has no teeth at all. This is not all and I expect to learn much more. We have some nice professors. Some of the boys boot-lick them l»y bunting up dead snakes and going to Y. M. 0. A. Friday night. I have got a green bedbug in my trunk and I ex|x-ct to get a "rise” on the strength of it. We have a real skeleton here, and also cut up dead dogs, SO as to see their blood and play with tliclr livers. Please send me some moss to stuff my pillow with; also some bedbug ] oison. If you would gather up all the old pieces of bread and ham you have and send them to me I would thank you a gnat deni. Your loving sou, . 1 Pressman’s Composition. Goats. Goats is real live auimuls which has beards just like people. Goats onn smile just a - sweet as some girls I know. Goats must have souls because they can say “inn" as idee ns some Athens babies. There is a goat’s skeleton in the room where we cut up flowers. Professor Campbell says that it is n “great specimen," hut I don’t think so. Goats is of two kinds—Indy goats and gentlemen goats. Lady goats give butter anil cheese, but gentlemen goats do not, although they are better butters than the lady goats. A » u of a lady goat and a gentleman goat is called a “kid." These follow their ilia’s and drink milk all day long. Goat drink water and eat tonimat-toe cans and paper. They are also very fond of old shoos and stove-pi| es. Goats remind uic of the chemical laboratory when Dr. Hcrtv is making U S. I would not like to have a gentleman goat as a pet on this account. We have lamb at our boarding-house |iiltcofteu, but J know well that it is some cooked dea l goat. There ought to lx-a law against cooking dead goats. Goats sometime die of old age. I don’t know where dead goats’ souls go, but their bodies are taken to the butchers. I sine the Pledge. IK)I nior 0ass po m. Delivered by the Class Poet when the Clin Tree was planted. Kind hearer all. nwmbW hero This old and honorable excrcl‘0 to see. I bid yon welcome tor tho Senior C'.na— Th - clan whore yell conclude with IB! The tree which we intend tbi day to plant, Has been relected with the greatest care; It fa the very highest type ol tree And naught with it proportion can compare. The men on whom it obooaring did devolve, A Main art. brave and gallant bind wore they. Their leader w« the elder ilatrey Imld. And When they sought It In the wood , he led tho way. Into tho forest wild they took their course. And many « shapely sapling did they sec; Bui there were none which they did deem A worthy of the use of 'S3. At last they reached the tortuou itreet car track. On which the electric line It course doth run. And growing there between the steely rath. They found a tree which suited every man—ye , every one. Moreno mid he thought It wa» a gem. And 1-cwi conued it with approving view. And CtbanKs remarked It strictly suited him. While Stewart 'lowed lie thought that it would do. And so. kind audience, you have it here. We bo| o it will liecome a tall and stately tree. Beneath whose shade, the future Freshman may cool hi mawvc brow. Anti wonder if he'll ever roach the heights ol to. But (here I one not ad and mournful thought. Which o'er this hope a dark'Dltlg cloud dotn throw. For experience tcache with unerring tongue That claw tree here were neter known to grow. lint be it thus, thl fa our with. if our should grow, until it vault With strong and boiuuou life Into the golden air. We hope 'twill typify our fame, iridic, out fault . Thl ceremony, though a happy scene. Is not without a sad and touching phase. From these loved walk we hove most shortly go And follou life frail thread midst sterner days. And like the mother, who. when her favorite boy The am time from her side af.ir mint go. Keep for hi- memory a golden los-g. This green memento, we be on. (1«6) 'Tis like in 6mire. too. that flower fair. II general fiction I a truthful art. Which Hands the pledge 'tween svi eel heart true When the time has come for them to part. Yes. dear old school, we love thee well. Of all the many who with high or low degree Have left thy side In former year . None bear thee loftier faith or truer love lhau we. The college great and old. we'll not forget. In which that rare |ii«drvnnlum ha- passed. Of college life and youth and Joy ami hope. Those day unl |iie—too sweet, loo rare, to last. •Ti now the springtime of the awakening year. With button ups and Jonquils, golden I the lea With banner gay. Proserpina, the (air. The full possc-don take of earth and sea. Bin summer soon, in fuller beamy clad. Will drive this lovely prince from the field. And where her blossom , sueel and fragile, died. The queenly rore her scepter red will wield. And then we ll part, old boy of "At. The prospect' one at which we well might grieve. And In our thought sweet vision rise Of thins beloved, wc find tfa had to leave. The Campus, though for beamy not renowned. Au object dear and loved of heart hit grown. For summer paint It gras her brightest green. And 'ncath her aged oaks, the broadest shade fa thrown. Old Yahoo Hall, with architecture of ibe simplest style. Will. In our mind's eye. never cease to lurk. Nor Its many window . In which nightly glow the lamp Which shine on revel or on work. And many other objects inanimate and still. Which in our college life their pre- nce blends. Bring to a« now almost as deep regret As do the farewell with our true, real friends (We count you), gentlemen of the faculty, you're midst the first of there. Between you and the Class of Ninety-three Strong friendship twines its cod , and In jour hearts, wc hope. Kind memories of us will ever lie. But at thl lime and place I can't forbear To touch upon a theme which Interests u« all. And make a lighl suggestion on a point Which, at Commencement Day. ne hope you will recall—When giving out the sheepskins or dip , aa sometimes tensed. And we with anxious mind the chapel stage surround, We hope that you no overall;hi will malte. And have enough ol theta to go around. And when our hair ha turned u silver-gray. And Time has taught us many a lemon stern. The things you did. the won! you said. Will still in twilight reveries return. Could we forget Professor Wilcox' puns? Or l r. Campbell's names with many a Joint? Or Dr. Boggs' conscieutla 1 Or what our author says upon that point? Or the lectures chemical, which smoothly flowed, Like crystal streamlet In some sylvan spot, Or Major Morris with hU favorite setter dog. . Beloved by him almost as well a the books of W alter Scott ? And If upon u fortune e'er should smile And we attain the height of fame and glory. The word of Cotonel e harbonnlcr we will recall And found at once an astronomical observatory. There'll be a niche In memory's hall Devoted unto one whom name 1 need not toll. Suffice It. in the library tho rule . And how to grow sweet flowers knowoth well. And MUlfdgc Avenue, the pride of Athens' streets. Sought by the boys upon each afternoon. May your architectural beauty e'er increase. And boast paved streets and s I do walks soon. And Lucy Cobb, thy praise I would sing. But 'its an old aud oft-repeated Ule, And If 1 tried to add a single word Unto thy beauties' fame. 1 fear I'd fail. But tell me why. Fair M«ld of Lucy Cobb— And this deep question which I put to thee Ha tortured many a sigh from many a student's heart, And ma lc their live a dreary waste to bo— Oh. tell me why upon the v loo-el ad porch Or broad front stairway at tbc Institute. We no more see thy face nor sunny smile, While thy sweet voices are so still ami mute? Why hast thou fled the place which of yore Thy charming presence knew on every sunlit day. And left them all o desolate and drear Like lovely fairies who have whisked away? Is It perhaps because you've tired grown Of seeing college boys so constantly by. Or bowing back to those who so oft do bow When from the sidewalk they can meet your eye? The sorrow wrought by thU. I could oot paint. The sad dejection or the bitter woe. Bat note the students as they walk ou Mlllcdge Are. With hats unlifted and with head bent low. Alaa. we miss thee, thou fairest of the flowers That Georgia's old red soil so plain doth bear. We hope you will fontsve these faults of ours. And soon on the veranda reappear. There's another also, the far-famed Home School. Whose students H3 And hard to bid adieu. If vou likewise prove false, and from your porch withdraw I cannot find the wool to tell what we might do. Here's to athletics: 'tU the hope of f3 Kre many year have pAseod u» by, A football pennant, won by those we've left, Will, in victory, o'er this campus fly. And the baseball pennant which e'en now Is ours, 'Neath the star of victory may It ever How And spread its streamers over neighboring States Until to Moton-lUxon’s lines its conquests go. From this bright hope I'll let my verse descend. To bid our boapllng-houre a fond good-bye; How often have thy dinner bell’s sweet tones Brought Joyous lustre to our hungry eye! Fair Maid of Athens, famed oaptorefs of hearts. To whom so many line have been addressed. I'll not revive that chestnut old and stale. From which no doubt you'll gladly take u rest. But for you. fair sorceress, I've a sad reproach, We'd made a rise In math—'lis doubtless into; Bat how eoald one of sines and cosines think When from your witching glances he withdrew? To the future, clssonate . we must turn our gate. And though the Fates should drive us far apart We'll still be classmates. Arm and true. And stand one by the other, heart to heart. If ouc of us hi fnture yean by Fortune's crown Or Fame's bright smile should decorated be, To the distant Campus we'll In thought return, And hang our laurels on the old class tree. So plant it midst the grasses and the flowers. Ami may the lovely Goddess of the Spring Breathe on it leave the magic breath of life. And the wiud around its wordless arias slug. Kind audience. 1 ask that you'll uot scrutinize Too closely this my verse, which now must end— For I was elected poet when I was out of town And could not from this task myself defend. But still I'm elnd, though ray ver e was ''off." That none have fled away, but all have stayed. While I've convinced you of that ancient truth— A poet still is born, uot made. —H. A. A.statistics. In anticipation of an exciting year in Georgia politics, the Paxdoka has conducted a vote among the students of the University in regard to the next governor's and senators' race, the result of which is here given. The vote was not confined to general | olitics, however, but involved many local features, which we hope will prove especially interesting to tile students at At liens. In the vote for the most popular student iu the University, A. (). Halsey. M«, won ; 8. II. Sibley, of the Law Class, seeoud, and .J. C. C. Pluck, '95, third. For the handsomest mau, Jim Dickey, won, with Henry Brown, ’04, second. S. II. Sildoy, I .aw, won for the most intellectual man in the University; Johnson. second; Moreno, 1®, third. unw ciinss. The average age of the law student is gl years; height, •'» feet HA inches; weight, 143 pounds; size of hat, 7 MO. Crover Cleveland received hy far the largest vote for the favorite public character. For the next governor of Georgia Atkinson received the largest vote; James Blount seeoud. and Evan 1’. Howell and Steve Clay tied for third. A. O. Bacon and DuBIgnon received the highest vote for United States seuator. Xorthen, Hammond and Bacon all received scattering votes. For the next Democratic nominee for president Adlal E. Stephenson received the highest vote; Flower second; Gresham and Hill third. Iu the vote for the most popular professor in the University Por-fessors Andrew J. Cobb, White and Burrow ties! for the lirst place. S. H. Sibley was declared to he the most popular and most intellectual student in the class; L. I.. Brown second. Winship received highest vote ns the handsomest student, with Baeou, Ogden and Wbelchel rtumiug close for second. For the ugliest man Moon won by a full length. Brown and both Humphreys came in for second place. SDNIOR CUASS. The Senior averaged 21 years; height, o feet 10 inches; weight, 14s pounds; hut, 7 1-IC; shoe, 7. Gladstone and Cleveland tied for the favorite public character. Steve Clay received a large plurality In the vote for the next governor of Georgia ; Atkinson second. Tom Watson received a few scattering votes. For senator Xorthen was thegeneral favorite; Crisp and DuBiguon second. Hammond, Bacon, Pope, Barrow and Colquitt all receives I votes. For tlie next president Stevenson received hugest number of votes; Flower and Whitney next; Hill and Carlisle third. Scattering votes for Gorman, Dickinson and Boles. Professors White ami Barrow tied Iu the vote for the most | opular professor; Morris second; Herty third. A. O. Halsey received largest vote for most popular student in Senior Class; Stewart and Johnson second. Most intellectual student, Johnson lirst; Morouo second; Alexander third. For the ugliest man in the class Cnmak won In a trot. Hodgson and Kline tied for second place; Dodd and Bariield ran close for third. Alexander won as the handsomest man; Warren and Stewart second. (ids)junior cunss •• The nwragc Junior Ik a) veare old, weigh 130 pound , is H feet 0 inches high : hat, 7 ; shoe, 7. Cleveland i hi favorite character; Gladstone next. In the Junior’s vote for governor Clay and Atkinson received the largest number; Blouut and Xorthen next. For senator DuBiguon and Xorthen tie l. Profewor Hooper was declared to be the most popular man in the Faculty, with Professor Harrow second. Vow was elected the moat Intellectual man, with Bacon second. Henry Brown won for the handsomest student, with P. I,. Fleming and McDouguld tying for second pluoc. Fuller received the largest vote for the ugliest man. Stephens, Wilkins and (’leghorn wore all honored with votes. sophomore cunss. In the Sophomore vote it was found that themembereof that cIuk averaged 1»years in age; height, 5 feotxj Inches; weight 13ft pounds; hat, 7; shoe, 71. Favorite public character, Cleveland; second. Gladstone; third, Bismarck. Forgovemorof Georgia, Atkinson and Clay liret; Kv«n P. Howell second ; Blount, Bacon and Watson third. For senator, Xorthen tiret; Dultignon. J. C. (’. Black and X. J. Hammond scattering votes. For president Hill won by a large plurality : Flower second; Stephenson, Whitney and Carlisle third. For the most popular student in the class Black won; Murphcy second; Hill, Halsey and Itldley tied for third. For the most Intellectual man Thompson won ; Harris second. Handsomest man, Murpliey first; Cochran second, and Black third. l'gliest man, Harrow, 4th, won; Fletcher nut! Bean tied for second place; Jones third. Burrow won for the most popular professor; Hcrty and Hooper second; Morris third. In the Freshman statistics the age was found to average is year-; height, ■ feet $ inches; weight, 1 4 ; hat, 6;; shoe, Gk The favorite public diameter was declared to he (Undertone; Cleveland second ; Hoke Smith think FRESHMAN CIiASS. In the vote for the next governor of Georgia I-awsou received a small plurality. The vote was so scattered that eight men tied for second place. Kvidciitlv there is little concord among our Freshman brethren. For senator Xorthen received a large majority; Colquitt second. For next president Hill was fir t. Whitney and .Stephenson tied for second; Boh and Carlisle third. Iu the vote on most popular man in the class Ezello won with a nice majority. Hunter ami Harrington, F., tied for second. Holcombe Bacon won easily the place for most intellectual man; Ezello, second. For handsomest man Dickey won with a good majority; Morton second. Roberts took first place for ugliest man In a walk; Lovcjoy and Fleming second. Professor Burrow was elected most ]K pular professsor in the Faculty; White second, and Hcrty think09artfs, fPoi' fi ale, Etc Lost.—All hoi of A “rise."- Eke Fleming. Wanted.—A wet-nurse.—.V. M. l x-khart. Found.—A new mau for Cochrane to uon)iiiAtv. WANTED.—A lied shaped something like tills —Gammon and Carter. Wanted.—a baseball ten in. Apply to “ Freshmen.” Wanted. A Hot Tom-alley.—Fiiel c. Wanted. A syndicate to buy up half interest in that unexplored cavern iu Oscar Turner's face. A line opwing. Fok Sake. All that vacant room iu Dunlap's up|)cr story. Apply at this oHIoc. Fok Rent. I will lease niv dignity till June, 90, or will rent at a reasonable figure. JMcombc Jlacon. Iaxst. A pompadour, valuable ouly to the owner. A reward will be paid to the tinder. Darid C. larrotc, At i. Fok Rent. A young moustache—three hairsou each -ide. Apply to H. Hanks, Jr. Fon Sai.k.—Four corner lots on Guyton's feet; aly about twenty intermediate lots: each lot has from SO to 40 feet frout. Apply at this ofllce. Found. A new laugh—guaranteed. Apply to W. L. Kemp, Room 1, Yahoo. For Sat.e.—Pouic and “Jacks”- all well brokeu into use.—Ikxld Jlros. Wanted.—To engaire a walker.—Barfield. i:o)eA paffW ll ©d(. To tl?e famous fflaid of Ufyei)s: Brace up, darling, dry your tear , Remember tliat for thirty years You have always played the part Of giving back the “annual heart.” But if you are discouraged, dear, Why, just brace up and never fear, Although you’re old you mustn’t mope; Remember “while there’s life there’s hop The course of ’93 is o’er But there is left old ’94; If they won’t stick, don’t fail to strive To hold the heart of ’95. If they, too, make you give it back I fear, old girl, you’re off the track. There’s nought to do but strive to fix The fresh green heart of ’96. f[% Dirff of % §»opl?s. The day is sad aud dark and dreary, Old Zip’s tongue is never weary, Old Dave makes us all feel small And all must answer to Philippi’s call, And the day is dark and dreary. The day is sad and dark and dreary, Old Zip’s tongue is never weary, Polly’s blowing forever will last And the hope- of a rise fall thick in the blast, And the day is dark and dreary. Cease not, sail heart, cease not repining, Behind your clouds no sun is shining; From the hands of David and Phil you’ll'fall Straight into Proty’s—the worst of all. All days will be dark and dreary.betters from tfje people. Column for Gorrcsl ondentu. Hash Hole Hollow, University of Georgia, December 2, 1892. dErc liArrY. As i am Sure i will be Sorter Sick tomorrer i Thought i woodent Study to night but would Sorter try my Hand at ritiu you some j»oitry, Beins as you said, all poitry Was in demand by the pandorcr. i coodcnt make up but 2, but you cjiii have them if you will Sine my name to them and l’ut them at the top of The jwge. the first one Is Sorter short bur I think it is rite Good. MAX AS A RULE IS A MITETY BIO POOL The other one I’s Sorter personnel but that don’t Cut No ligger with me. i rote it fur my Boding house Keeper SAY SAL GIMME SOME 8001 AND GIVE EKE FLEMING SOME TOO IF YOU PONT I’LL SLAB YOU IN THE SNOOK AND BEAT YOU BLACK AND BLU i Rote all this by myself and i want you to Sine my Name to it. if you Don’t you can’t Put it in. jiM BIAck. Buzzard's Roost, University of Georgia, May 10, 1893. J-xlifor of Pandora: Gentlemen—If you mini tell about that box of Huylcr’s and set of Scott’s novels all right. But mind you one thing, don’t try to be too funny about it. You know I'm from Mexico, and that Spanish blood courses through my veins. 1 carry mv stiletto, and use it when it is necessary. There isn’t half as much humor in that little joke as you fellows seem to think, and 1 warn you right now, before you publish that darned Pandora, to speak lightly when you mention my name. Charles Darwin Kline, of Mexico. [Why, of course, we won’t make any big fiis- over that, Charlie. That wasn’t any sort of a joke. If "'c were you we would do the same thing over again. That’s just the way to work girls of that sort. Have you ever sent her any roses yet? You ought to, old hoy. No, no; don’t ever think of our making a joke out of that. Why, that was just the .slickest job you ever did.—Kps.] 172)Bowery, University ok Georgia, December 3, 181)2. Pandora Editorx, I ni certify of Georgia: Gents—Henry Banks ami Milledge Jjockhart arc always coining around me with tlicir hands over their faces as if they were ashamed of something that J have done. I declare that I didn’t do it, leastwise I don’t think I did, and l esides it’s none of tlicir business if I did. J know they arc going to try and get you to write it up in Pandora, but if you won’t I’ll do most anything for you. Herein I send you three coca-cola tickets. If you promise not to mention this I will give you two more the next time I see you. and if you will call old Milledge Ixickhart “dimpled sweetness” I’ll make it ten, indeed I will. Very truly vours, etc., Beane, ’05, P. O. Box 22. Uickskillet, University of Georgia, February 13, 1893. Kditur of the Pandorur, Athens Ga. City. Deer Sur: Good you tell me and Chubby Goodrich any good anecdote for bowed legs. We have been sufthrring with them so long we fear our eases is crounick. Bob Ridley, Bob Ridley. [You have neglected your case so long that we fear it is too late. However, you might consult Jim Dunlap, ’95, as lie has straightened his out considerably within the last six months.—Eds.] (173)©A ($arnin £ to pressmen. There is a very motley crew Of men at Georgia’s college, Who style themselves "The Faculty," And dish us out free knowledge. Wc love them all, we must confess, But still ’tis only fair That to the poor, coufiding Fresh We speak in time—BEWARE!!! Yes, green Freshman, that’s the word, Beware of every man From Doctor Boggs to Jesse Coates, They’ll fool you if they cau. They all have most enticing ways, And likely you will deem That each one is a Mogul but Things are not what they seem. There's Billy Boggs, the Chancellor, He'll till your heart with glee If you will come on Sunday night To see him AFTER tea. And Harry White—oh, what a man ! He always fools you so; He says “that is exactly right,” But marks you dowu zero. (174)Our “Charby” is a handsome ninu, Whodresses very slick; But say, where would mechanics be If Charby lost his "trick?” We sent old "Zip” to Germany; Alas! we sent in vain, Although he took his jokes away He brought them back again. And “Protococcus,” he’s the one Who loves to cut up llies-- Just keep him well supplied with cats. You’re bound to get your rise. Tell Hooper that ho knows it all, And listen to his gas; liny him a brand new meerschaum pipe And he will let you pas . Now, if you want to bootllck Strahnn Just say so be can hear: “The height of my ambition is To be an engineer.” Beware of “ Dave,” the good old man, With soul from guile so free (?), The wretch last June threw eighteen men From class of ninety-three. We ennuot take up every one— You’ll know them soon enough; I'll tell you this, however, you May watch out for their bluff. Yes, watch them close—the Faculty, Are not the meu they seem; If you dou’t watch the "dips” you seek Will vanish as a dream.(ktnutk: "Thou who hast the fatal gift of beauty.” QertUnc: “ A dewy freshness fills the silent air." Ji---n The Senior Clam sent outa mighty poor committee to get their class tree. (■---mm—How is that? II---ii 'l'liey took with them a down Anhctwer bushes and only brought buck one little maple tree. Gammon: "Fashioned so tenderly, tall and so fair.” Sophie M'airnt: “She hath a natural, wise sincerity, a simple truthfulness.” lean: “ Ktcrnal smiles his emptiness betray, , » Like shallow waters dimpling all the "!l- Flrming: “ I am revolved to grow fat.” JlUlycr: “Thy voice is a celestial melody." Vo . Ifoojter—Mr. Itrunson, is that talc Latin? Mr. It. Yes, sir; I wrote it at two o'clock last night. Tamer: ‘‘Thy modesty is a candle to thy merit.” J fori on, O. “ Ye were twinned lambs that did frisk in the Horton, M. C.: sun and bleat the one at the other.” (1701Bunk : “ He smiles and smiles, but lie's a villain still.” Prof. White (in a gentle I'olce)- Mr. Watkius, will you throne speak a little louder? I cannot hoar you. Mr. Watkins- What did you say, professor? “ Ca ic,} thick: “A mau of good parts if we count it by bulk A man of some depth as shown by his feet.” Prof. White—Mr. Tawrence, mention five ways of dyeing. Mr. I., [awaking from ilecji dumber on buck bench)—First, gunshot wound; second, bleeding to death; third, want of breath; fourth, delirium tremens; fifth, eating too much. Prof. IK—Exactly, sir. First, chemical change; second, dipping in dye-stuff; third, solvent; fourth, precipitate; fifth, mordant. 11 (17 Pro . Mcl’hcarton Now, genUeiueu, we have a few minutes left; are there any questions you would like to ask? JH j Smith What time Is it, professor? Hilly Boygf: “ 1 " ill leave large footprints on the sands of time” —(very). Gantt: “Beautiful iu form and feature, Lovely as the day— Can there be so fair a creature Formed of common clay?” Pittman: “Get thee to a nunnery." Ni«M: “He appeared as tall us an ordinary spin steeple and took about ten yards at every stride.” 7)fpift bast “(-tem.” ADAPTED FROM I.ISX. NJGIIT—2 o’clock, ji nk 2. Wake me early, dearest mother, wake me ere the break of day, If you don’t, I tell you truly, there will be the “deuce” to pay; For to-morrow Protococcus is to give his last exam, And although I studied all last night, 1 still have lots to cram. Now remember, dearest mother, do not let your poor boy sleep, For I tell you, if yon do so, he is bound to lose his “sheep.” MORN I NO—11 O’CLOCK, JUNE 4. Do not wake me, please, dear mother; have compassion on your boy. I must sleep a little extra to wear oil' my extra joy. Protococcus thought he’d fix me so I couldn’t make a rise, But I knocked his sock off, mother, and 1 biffed him ’tween the eyes. (ITS)ADAPTED That Freshman Jack Horner Once sat in a corner, Thinking that he should die, Hejremcmbercd Ins “trick” And he pulled it out quick And cried what a smart boy am I. Chorus—Freshman, Freshman, tiny little Freshman, Hold your “trick” and don’t let go, You’ll be a Sophomore soon. Pittman1 nom te plume. KltOM THE OfEKA " WASCO." A Freshman named Muffetf Once thought he could bluff it, And so he cut drill one day, Put as lie went by He met Philippi, Who frightened the Freshman away. Chorus—Freshman, Frcshmau, tiny little Freshman, Watch old Phil And don’t cut drill You’ll be a Sophomore soon. tTb t's Eke Fleming' nom dc plume. (179)'Be rcl (j'® 3cz ri ce. (k K» 4 c I'1—"PAy c ii $t’Waltz. j or AMSM’f w The senior, deor hid, his lndy-love To iiis swelling heart enfolds, And softly glides with flippant feet •Mid a throng of happy souls. To-night Is his last, the hllssflil hours Of his college life are o'er. But liugcring strains of music float O'er the hall where oft before With maiden of fairy form he’s danc’d With a heart ns light as foam; He waltzes his college life away To the strains of "Home, Sweet Home.” He waltzes away from things most dear, From his friends, his club, his class; He waltzes away from boyhood days, For the Joys of youth must pass; He waltzes away from school-boy cares To the cares of business life; He waltzes away from friendly s|s rt To the scenes of worldly strife; He waltzes away from pleasant past To the life of toil to come; He waltzes away from college life To the strains of “ Home, Sweet Home.” J. H. B. (1W 1In Conclusion. I desire to express my sincere thanks to those who have aided and encouraged me in the prc|Kiration of this book. Fred Barfield, the business manager, deserves the most credit. He has worked faithfully and well, as can Ive very clearly seen by reference to the advertising pages. Of the associate editors, Halsey and Stewart have done the best work. The contribution of Hey mans and Sibley, of the Law Class, have improved the tone of the book very much, 'flic best work from underclassmen came from Millcdgc Lockhart, ’93. Very valuable contributions were received from John H. Boston and A. (’. Newell, of the Class of Ninety-one. The drawings arc princi|Ktllv from the pens of Eugene Murphev, ’95, and Cuvier Smith, ’93. Dougherty, ’9.3, and Miss Jennie Smith, of Athens, also added to the artistic features. There arc many others who have given me valuable suggestions and proven their interest in the work, to all of whom 1 am extremely grateful. To The Franklin Publishing Com- pany, who have shown me every courtesy and attention possible, I also desire to express my appreciation. Before closing, 1 desire to suggest to the Fraternities the extreme importance of organizing the Pandora editorial staff before the summer vacation begins. To compile a book of this sort and keep up with all college duties is by no means a trivial job. There is a great deal of work in it which might well ! c done during the summer months. If the organization is complete before Commencement the retiring board of editors tan give to the newly-elected board a groat deal of information about the publication which they might otherwise learn only after most unpleasant experiences. 1 hoj c this suggestion will he tarried into effect, for I am sure it will be a great benefit to my successor and bis associates. Harry Hodgson, Editor-in-Cheif. (I.Sl)r I‘4 fp© all §fuder fs and jJViends of ifye UniOersity. It is mainly through the support of our advertisers that we are enabled to publish the Pandora. If you are pleased with this publication, show your appreciation to our advertisers by giving them your patronage. For without them it would be a failure.INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENT . r.uir.. Allen A GInter IlmiK'li, (.IjprvtUK.................. .. 185 Athens Banner.............................................. 20S Athens Steam Iziundry....................................... 3K Auld, Jeweler............................................... SK Baldwin A Co., Shoes...................................... lie Brenner A Co .............................................. 185 Brooks Brothers, Clothes lsx Broun House................................................ Chasmar A Co„ Eugravew .................................... 218 Crunk-haw, Jeweler........................................ 187 CrrMttuup A West, Engravers «I5 Cohen, Tobaccos.......................................... |si» Derricotte, Shoemaker..................................... 201 Dorr, Tailor............................................... 2tM Hurl A Wilson, Collars................................... in; Etonian Bros., Clothes................................ 185 Elder, Tobaccos.............................................204 Elkln-Waitson Drug Co., Gandies............................195 Engineering School, University of Georgia ..................207 Krankliu Printing and Publishing Co. 217 Kroeman Jewelry Co ........................................ 193 Georgia University Magazine ................. ......... .. 211S Clreen, T. Fitzgerald, Attorney Ilnsclton A Dozier. Musical Instruments ................ 191, Hauser, Jeweler............................................... Hill, Harris A Birch, Attorneys............................ 2«Jl Hood A Move. Attorneys. q Horsnmn. Sporting Goods.................................... 20S Jackson A Burke Co., Rook — ]gg Jackson, Tailor..... ......................................... Jacob's Pharmacy, Drugs................................... 205 Kandy Kitchen................ ................................ l A«K Keelcy Institute . .. ........... ....................186 Ketillel A Ksser, Drawing and Surveying Instruments....... 200 Lllley A Co., Military Goods.................. ........... list Lippincott’s Magazine. ...................................3)8 l )mbnrd, Machines........ ............................... 194 Lucy Cobb Institute........................... ........... Ji7 Maddox Brothers, Photographers ...........................3 2 McGregor, 1). W ...... 98 McKenzie A Itlley, .Shorn....... ......................... 194 McKclden A Carlton. Shoes and Hat ....................... 399 McMahan, Gent.'s Furnisher................................297 McQueen A Carter, Barbers. ...............................3H Minder, Tailor ........................................... 194 MI rick. Photographer ......194 Morse Twist Drill and Maeliiue Co......................... 193 Morris, .'cut's Furnisher.. .......................... 100 Muw Clothing Go........................................... 19» Nelson, Tailor............................................ 197 Newman, Jeweler ..................... 108 Palmer A Kluncbrew, Drugs.......... ................ ..... 3)1 PotkPa Extract ■ 198 Pope Manufacturing Co., Bicycles..........................203 Knphacl, Gent’ Furalslier........... .................... 192 Raymond A Whitcomb Tours................... .............. 191 Kumford Cliemicul Works, Acid Phosphate....... ...... 198 Scuboard Air Line.................... .................... 212 Scudder, Jeweler ......... ............................... ISO Smith A Co., Shoes........ , .............................197 Southern Shorthand and Rusiuem College ................... 2°! Stem A Oo., Clothes.................. .................... 1S9 Summer Schools, University of Georgia ........ ........... 211 Thomas, George Dudley, Attorney ..... ....................391 University of Georgia ........... .. ..................... 2lnA is for Armstrong, whose room overflows i RICHMOND f STRAIGHT CIGARETTE. Cigarette smoker who arc willing 10 pay n little more than the Drier charged for the ordinary trade cigarettes. will find THIS Bit AND Hiperfor to tU other . THE RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT NO. I CIGARETTES Arc made from the brtebtat, mo ! delicately flavored and hi licit cent f!ou Lr.Ar grown In Virginia Thl- I tho Old and Original hrnud of Straight Cut Cigarette . and w v brought out by n In the year 1ST-' Bi.vrmi.or Imitations and obterve that the firm's name » below 1 ou every package. THE ALLEN . CINTER BRANCH Wy PIANOS ORGANS. THE WORLD’S BEST INSTRUMENTS. LOWEST FACTORY PRICES GUARANTEED. Sheet Music and Piano Tuning a Specialty. Peter A. Brenner Co. of the American Tobacco Co., Mnnufncturor . ... Hlelmiond. »’ . .Street - AUGUSTA. GA. Manufactory, Baltimore, Md., s i ! l Washington, D. C.f Corner of 213 W. Cerman St. 7th E. Sts. E1SEMHN BROS. one 1’i'ice Clothiers, Tailors, Hatters and Furnishers. 15 17 Whitehall St., Atlanta, Ga. No Branch House in lhi» City. With deshabille pictures of girls without hose. ti»)B is for Black, who in drill is quite fine. The Keeley Institute rOR THC CURE or —T1IK— Liquor and Opium Habits —AXO— Nerve Exban$tion. Cocaine, A'SD Chloral and Tobacco llabits. Cif-irrltt SmoWitj Perm ni'nlly cured In from •even to fourteen daya. Treatment tdrallral with tl at of Dr. LealSc K Keolcy at DwtfM. 111. Averse tlm roialrol for tmtmcnt, four wockt. NoConincmont. No Pain. No Krtipw Tbr roo t human aiwl oaly certain cure known. For i' rtlcuUr addrcvi The Keeley Institute, EUgcwood Avo. A Ivy St., ATLANTA. tIA. IV T | The genuine DOUBLE CHLORIDE OF OT 1 C0 I OOLD TREATMENT, discovered bv Dr. Leslie A K. Keeley, of Dwight, III- can be bad In Gcorgln “ only nt ‘fllK KKGI.KY INSTITUTES of Atlanta, Dalton. Indian Springs and Augusta. Any person not connected with the •liovo Institutes, clnimlng to havoor mo tlii' treatment, i» an IMPOSTOR •nd a FRAUD. and the public is hereby warned against being deceived by such unscrupulous persons. W. W. HOUSTOS, Uanogor Kttlty Irxtitults of Crwjio. University -- BOOK STORE DKALISRS IS College Text P ® s + + RND SUPPLIES. --------- SEE OUR GOODS AND GET OUR PRICES BEFORE BUYING. M)e ffire You!. Tr fO " JACKSON BURKE CO., 107 BROAD ST., .... ATHENS, GA. When he “ drosses ” in front, he sticks out behind. (180)C is for Camak and Cochran and Crane, DIAMONDS, Sterling Silver, Jewelry, T V V ? V - — CUT GLASS, ETCHINGS.|— — CHARLES W, CRANKSHAW, — TEWELEB. «— 2©i WHITEHALL STREET, TJ 3 STAIBS. You never will meet such a trio again. (187)D is for Dorsey, both Jasper and Hugh, ESTABLISHED 1818. BROOKS + BROTHERS, BROdDWdY, QOR. 22b JTREET, NEW YORK CITY. Clothing and Furnishing Goods, READY-MADE AND MADE TO MEASURE. The qualities of our Ready-made Garments need no especial mention. The particular care exercised by us in the cut, manufacture and novelty of pattern in our 7V en’s Readj -7Vlade Garments, is also extended to our Qlotfting f°r and Ghildren, and guarantees exclusive styles at no higher prices than are frequently asked for garments made in larger wholesale lots and of inferior workmanship. Patterns at all Noticeable Always Limited to Small Quantities. Hats for Boys and Youths—Lincoln, Bennett Co. and other makes. In Furnishing Goods— Allen, Solly Co.’s Underwear, and the best qualities in all staple articles with novelties in Neckwear, Gloves, Waterproof Coats, Scotch long Hose, etc. For both Deans and Dunlap and Dougherty, too. 088)E is for Ezzard, the private most high, JNO. COHGN, (Successor toG. IIAU8ER.) GHAS. STERI] GO. Clothiers and Hatters, TOBACCO ANn CIG-ARS. GENTS’ FUKNISHING GOODS. Cor. Jiroad St. and College A ve., ATHENS, - GEORGIA. Suits Made to Order and Fits Guaranteed. Jirond Street, Athens, Gsi. £ UNIVERSITY JEWELER. 3 E f . SCTJDDEF , Diamo , Sterlii) Silueruyan?, WATCHES, CtJT GLASS. ATM ESS, - - GEORGIA. Who wears a Prince Albert for old “ Philippi. ” (18©)F is for Fuller, who carries a face HASELTON DOZIER, ‘fbe Acknowledged headquarters-; ■ • • Pine Clot!)ino;, PIANOS AND ORGANS. N ♦ + FURNISHINCS AND HATS. + ♦ Pictures, • Picture • Frames • and • Artist • Materials. CH AS. • MORRIS, ATHENS. _____ CEORC1H. popular price Qot i r. fiatt r ai?d furrier. N. HAUSER, SOLE AGENT FOR THIS CITY FOR Uounq’s Celebrated $3.00 arid $4.00 Practical Optician DERBY’S, «■ YV)atcbma er and Jeweler. §5.00 and §6.00 S' K Bats. ALL THE LATEST FADS IN . PECIrtLTY ON WdTCH REPdIRINQ. • Globing, e furnishings 4»- x Vv and J ats. opposite post office. yovu i.'si'sono.v aohicirun. That many consider a public disgrace. (100)G is for Gantt and for Goodrich and Green, Special parties, under personal escort to all the principal points in ----------THE--------- I nited States, Canada and Mexico, auska. sandwicV slaxps and japan. WEEKLY PRRTIES EmuR LD-S. IR. including stay at the RAY|V10ND WHITCOMB GRAND. SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULAR MENTIONING PARTICUEAR TOUR DEN1KED. RAYMOND •• •• WHITC07VTB, III SOUTH NINTH STREET (Under Continental Hotel . PHILADELPHIA,..........................PENN A. Three Seniors whose “dips” are not apt to be seen. (i»i)H. Hodgson, both Halseys and Hillyor, you’ll see, S. RHPHHEL MERCHANT TAILOR AND 8 College Ave., Athens, = = = (xeoro’i a. Will “ pull” their diplomas in June. ’93. :(1W)I is the “ Ego,” so says Dr. Boggs, MORSE TWIST DRILL MACHINE CO. NEW BEDFORD. MASS. SPECIAL TOOLS TO ORDER. ___________________________— :---------------------------------------- The way some men use it, you’d;think they were hogs. (193) 12J is for Johnson on whom are no flies, McKenzie Riley, pine Boots and Shoes :iO "Whitehall Street, ATLANTA, GEORGIA, Special Discounts to Students. JOS. MINDER, Suits made to order at reasonable prices. STUDENTS’ WORK A SPECIALTY. MeDowoll Jlulldinir, - - ATHJSXS, GA. A. J. WRICK, Studio, 115 [ road Street, ATHENS, - - - GEORGIA. PHOTOQRdPHER GEO. R. LOMBARD CO. roiadij. KitUlne. Bciler AMO OIN WORK , He’s never prepared “on account of sore eyes.’’ (194)K is for Kline, our Mexican poet. ip-U atsoi? Dm Qd. HTLHNTH, GEORGIA. HUTLER’J FINE CdNDIEJ. G 0 prompt attention Qiven to 7V a'l 0rders. His rhyme is quite rocky, but he doesn’t know it. (i%)L is for Lyndon, who loves so to tell POND’S EXTRACT. If you wish to take REGULAR DAILY KXKRCISE. and not bo eoinpolled to desift from work bccuiiw of SOKE Ml'SCLES, you must, after exercising. THOROUGHLY KL'It the MUSCLES with POND'S EXTKACT. By St use you are made QUICK and ACTIVE and ALL SORENESS. STIFFNESS or SWELLING i prevented and you will AVOID the DANGER of TAKING COLD on going out after exercise. We have r book full ol testimonial from the most famous athletes; to quote them i superfluous. Almost everyone in training mo it. But don’t -xpccl wmo cheap substitute for POND'S EXTRACT to do what the genuine article will, for you will surely be disappointed. Manufactured only by POND’S EXTRACT CO., 76 Fifth Ave., New York. THE JVI. C. LillihEY CO. . . . MANCFACTtRING COXTKACTOK-S FOB . . . Military, College, Band, Police and Fireman Uniforms I IJjquipmei?ts SAMPLES ANO QUOTATIONS ON APPLICATION. ......CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. address THE M. C. LILLEY CO.. Cefunibut. Ohio. I . 9. A. That he’s been to Stephens and Yale and Cornell. (198)M is for Moon, whoso clear voice, like a bird. I. Smitf? 0 Qo. . . . HEADQUARTERS FOR . . . FINESHOES {or. Qolleg? five, at)d Qlaytoi? St. ATHENS, - GEORGIA. BUERV PAIR GUARANT »BD. L. D. NELSON, ilviPORfrNC TAILOR ATLANTA, GA. FHEElWflN JEttlEliHY GO. (j 25 Whitehall Street O ATLANTA, - - GEORGIA. susses WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF FINE MEDAL AND .... BADGE WORK .... In melodious sweetness so often is heard. (197)N is for Nisbet, the girls call him sweet; ATonic HORSFORD’S ACID PHOSPHATE. Prepared according to tbc direction of l rof. K. N. Houston d. This prcjMiration is recommended by Physicians as a most excellent and agreeable tonic and appetizer. It nourishes and invigorates the tired brain and body, imparts renewed energy and vitality, and enlivens the functions. Dr. Ephraim Bateman, Cedarville, N. J., says : •• I have used it for several years, not only in my practice, but in my own in-dividual case, and considor it under all circumstances one of the best nerve tonics that wo possess. For mental exhaustion or overwork it give- renewed strength and vigor to the entire system. Dr. P. W. Thomas. Grand Rapids, Mich., says: ••One of the best tonics. It gives vigor, strength and quiet sleep.” Dr. H. K. Clarke, Geneva, N. Y., says: •• It has proved of great value for its tonic and revivifying influence.” Dr. R. Williams, LeRoy, N. Y., says: • A good general tonic, and worthy of trial.” Dr. J. H. Stedman, West Brattleboro, Vt., says: “Best tonic I ever used.” Descriptive pamphlet free ou application to Itimiford Chemical Work , Providence, K. 1. BEWARE OF SUBSTITUTES AND IMITATIONS. CitTIOV—B «r. Il» »orJ - II OKS Km US I, fklSTKU «« Ur UWI All rtl.r. are .pvlaM. .....XEYBK SOU) IX Itt'LK. His body’s quito small, but, oh lord, see his feet. (198)0 is for Ogden, the student of Law. C. W. BALDWIN CO. GEORGE MUSE LEADING DEALERS IN Fine Boots and Shoes. Special Attention Given to the College Patronage. A. I hndy ITCHEN. • ICE CRE qn, 50bA WATER AND CONFECTIONERIES. CLOTHING CO. 38 CUhitehall Street, ATLiANTA, GA CLOTHING, HATS FRESH TAFFY AND GROUND PEA CANDY. _ASD— O College Ave...............- ATM EX S, G A. FURNISH I NGS He’s just the best fellow that he ever saw. (199)P is lor Pittman, his name is John Green, BEST DINING CAR SERVICE 72V THIS WORM). The Kock Island it forement In adopting any advantage calculated to improve speed and give that luxury’ wifely and comfort that popular patronage demands. Its equipment it thoroughly complete, with vcttibulcd train , magnificent dining cart, sleeper and chair coaches all the mo t elegant and of roved pattern . and capable management and polite, honest servico from employee' are important item . They are a double duty—to the company ar.d to traveler —and il l tome times a task difficult of accomplishment. Pn sc «ors on this line will find little cause for complaint on that ground. A very popular train on the Chicago. Kock Island A- Pacific Railway leaves Chicago daily at 10 p. m. It is called “TIIK lilG FIVE." is only one day out and pa-engers arrive at Denver. Pueblo and Colorado Spring early the second morning. The Kock Island has become a popular Colorado line, and the train above referred to is rcstibuled and carries the Rock Island's excellent dining car service. For full particulars as to tickets, maps. rate', apply to any coupon ticket office in the United Slates, Canada or Mexico, oraddreas , jnO. SEBASTIAN, Geo'I Ticket ,fc Pass. Agent. Chicago, 111. E. ST. JOHN, General M u; cr. Chicago. HI. recently imp Faithful Ghlcaao. rock island Patino R u. THl vot® 0' wv®v®r"- li,, T0 0 BEST TRAIN is the: bio five limited LEAVES CHICAGO DAILY 10 P. M- E. ST. JOHN. FOR TICKETS jno Sebastian, 0»« l • » «« - 'T 7__ OCN «. T a e AO-r. w. I. ALLEN. GE0- F- LEb- ck caoo. ul . ass-tocn-lm o r 104 CLARK ST., it s a WEST A more wicked sinner „ “ner you never have seen (200)Q is a letter so queer and so quaint, GEO. DUDLEY THOMAS, ATTORNEY, ATHENS, • GEORGIA. W. B. HILL. N. E. HARRIS. WM.U. BIRCH. HILL, HARRIS BIRCH, Attorneys at Law, MACON, - - - GEORGIA. Sautl|Bi n Shorthand $ Business College, 57 S. Broad Street, • ATLANTA, GA. The Ceding Qommeroial College of the South. FOUR COLLEGES IN ONE: Shorthand. - IiooU-UaopInfg. - Toleyropby, - i'on-Art. The moat largely patronlied Ba.lnew College In the Southern Slate . Large Catalogue Free. Prescriptions —, CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED AND PROMPTLY DELIVERED. PALMER KINNEBREW, 105 Clayton St., ATHENS, GA. T. FitzGerald Green. ARTHUR HOOD, ROBERT L. MOYR, Georgetown College. 1). C. University of Go. ATTORNEY AT LAW, HOOD 7VAOVE, ATTORNEYS AT LAW, ATHENS, GA. CUT H BERT, - - GEORGIA. I guess I will skip it for fear I might faint. (201)R is for Roberts, of such handsome mein HADDOX BROTHERS, PHOTOGRAPHERS CRAYON - Si-PASTEL-PORTRAITS CALL AND SEE OUR WORK. Stereoscopes and Stereoscopic Y)iew s OF ALL KINDS KEPT IN STOCK STEREOSCOPIC VIEOUS OlflDE TO ORDER. STUDIO, 104) 15. Broad Street, ATHENS, . . GEORGIA. As to be worshipped, needs but to be seen. (202)S is for Stowart, a man of great push, Pleasurable Exercise. i-jfc V ' The gymnasium is now universally recognized as a necessary adjunct to a college education. But there comes a time when the weather is too warm and outdoors too inviting to work inside. Then what is better for all-around exercise than the bicycle? It will take you swiftly along the smooth streets of the city or carry you out into the fresh air of the open country. Back again to your study with clear brain and quiet nerves. But your nerves will not be quiet if your bicycle does not run easily, so get a Columbia, for Colum- ..—_ bias run easiest, wear longest, and look the best. Have you ever thought of taking a bicycle tour during vacation ? We have a finely illustrated book about -.- r Columbia bicvcles. Send to us for one. ■ » POPE MFG. CO.. BOSTOIcHic ao, NEW YORK. HARTFORD. If he can smell anywhere Anheuser-Bush. (208)T is for Taggart, who loves so to rob McQueen Carter, Tonsorial v Artists. Latest Stylo Hair Cut. Polite and Prompt Attention. Everything First Class. Studonts Invited to call on us. Toorucr Hotel. - - ATHENS, GA. THE RIGHT MAN IN THE RIGHT PLACE. I. T. DERRICOTTE, 10 E. CLAYTON STREET, ‘f be I est and 7Vlost Reliable §boe Repairer. WHIJC OAK SOUS. INVISJBU PATCHCS A SPeCUllY. SATISFACTION OOANANTCCD- A. G. ELDER. LEADER IN TOBACCO AND CIGARS. DORR’S. Fine © tailoring, © Fine ® f cits, Fine © Furnisb ngs. 718 Broad Street, - AUGUSTA, GA. Tt)e Tailor Ipp. Suits Made to Order. Your Old Clothes Cleaned and Scrubbed. Pants Making a Specialty. I carry a Full Line of Fine Samples. Prices Cheap. Call and bo Convinced. dHo. t. jrckson. The hearts of the maidens within Lucy Cobb. (201)U is for ugly and ugliest too. LOOK THIS WAY! ---—-THE -■—===— £ tfiens Steam laundry “THERE’S MONEY IN IT.” For fifty thousand article usually sold in a first-class drug store. Send to u . We buy at --GUARANTEES TO TURN OUT- NONE BUT FIRST-CLASS WORK. You will be convinced of this by giving me a trial. Retail and Wholesale Rales. MAURICE, JAJSKOWBR, Proprietor. Exprei charges arc usually 25c. on package under 6 pounds. Nearly all dollar preparation we soli at 68 cents and everything else in proportion. Make up your orders, send to us and save money. Send for price list and be astonished at our low price . Address or call at JACOB’S PHARMACY, Corner Prachtne and rUrictta ATLANTA, QA. Try our "Celery Phosphite.’'the great Southern remedy for exhausted men and women. Be built up from the first dose. One dollar per box, prepared. It makes manly men and womanly women. JWjr'v'V’S’ v 'V'v tw? I D • I— • -A LJ I— D maKiueacturcr or riNfe. grade. COLLEGE FRATERNITY BADGES ns 3i lCOLUMBUS. OHIO.I n.wh. They say Hodgson got it, but that isn’t true. (2W)V is for Vacuum, which, it is said, V --- ©inft-W! Broom Boose, MACON, GA, Directly opposite 1’nion Passenger Station. Itapid transit to all parts of the city by electric cars, which pass the door. This well known and popular hotel oilers to visitors a convenience of location, cuisine, and service not equaled by any other hotel in the city. JS. W, SPERRY, 1’roprletor. Is all that is found in a green Freshman’s head. (20ClW is for Watkins, the great “ Missing Link,” THE University School of Engineering. A DEPARTMENT OF- Tt|e University of Georgia. COMPLETE EQUIPMENT. THOROUGH INSTRUCTION. Large Amount of Field Practice. R n a LX A R CO UR SIS, 4 VonrH. Loading to the Degree of BACHELOR OP ENGINEERING. POST-GRADUATE COURSES, Leading to the Degrees of CIVIL ENGINEER AND CIVIL AND MINING ENGINEER. Land Surveying, Railroad Engineering. Hydraulics, Sanitary Engineering, SPECIAL COURSES. Descriptive Geometry, Freehand Drawing, ing, Topographical nnd Map Draw Dotalla and Design . Bridges and Roofs Architecture, Linear Drawing, Projection , NO TUITION. OPBiVS Third Wednesday in September. L'NDS Third Wednesday In June. For Catalogue and Further Information Apply to C. MORTON STRAHAN. C. M. £., Professor of Engineering, ATHENS, OEOROIA. Loc Cobb Institute, ATHENS, • GEORGIA. The Exercises of this School will be Resumed Wednesday, September 13th, 1893. M. RUTHERFORD, Principal. J. J. C. McMAHAN, Clothier, Hatter and Gent’s Furnisher, 117 Clayton St., - ATHENS, GA. Who knows how to talk but not how to think. (207)X is for Xenophon, Grecian of old. r-ixac---- Qeor ia diversity T)a £azii)e. Published monthly by the Demosthcnian and Phi Kappa Literary Societies. SUBSCRIPTIDH SI.00 PER YEAR. THE ATHENS BAHHER. Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine. PUBLISHED BY J. B. LIPPINCOTT CO., PHILADELPHIA. T e Leading Daily Paper of Northeast Georgia. SPLENDID ADVERTISING MEDIUM. Who augments the Freshman’s work nearly ten fold. (208)Y is for “ Yahoo,” tlie old College Hall, McK.EIj]DE]Nr cto CARLTON, Shoos and Hats, ATLANTA. ARE YOU going to a Ball? ARE YOU going to Church? ARE YOU going to a Wedding? ARE YOU going to a Card Party? ARE YOU going to Commencement? OUR PRICES ARE At anv of these places you arc compelled to wear Shoes ami Hats. You can find wlmt you want at RIGHT! McKELDEN CARLTON’S, CALL TO-DAY. 4-5 PEROHTREE ST., - RTLRNTH, CR. TWAOttW MARK. KEUFfTL CSSER.N Y ij7-F«itonst,_KEUFFEL ESSER CO., «»■ M BRANCH: - 265 STATE STREET. - CHICAGO. FACTORIES: HOBOKEN. N. J. DRAWINC MATERIALS AND SURVEYING INSTRUMENTS. PARAGON DRAWING INSTRUMENTS. Each Pitta Stninpvd KEUFFKt. A E4SBR CO., or K. K. CO. Kxlm Quality German Instrument . each t-io Fine German Instrument . each piece stamped umi«l TRACE gKjf MARK TMtfa !-MAR Hurd Rubber Triangle , Curve . Vc. Steel Triangle-. T-Squares. Straightedges. Wooden Triangle-. T-Square«. Curve . c Scnie of Ivory. Boxwood; Paper Scales, K. K. C'o. Hsirngoti Scales, division on white odgei. Drawing Papers. .Mounted Paper . Tracing Cloth, C. Water Color-. India Ink. China Ware. Ilrushe . Pencil . Pens, Thumbtack . All our Good are Warranted, Catalogue to Student on application. That contains the ••buggy-beds” known to us all. (2001 13-i?Lfor 2eta OM-that 1. th« Mm.______ THE UNIVERSITY OF 0S0R Establish d KTHENS. GEORGIA tutioq of the State in 1785. Endowed by the General Governrqeqt. 1HH HEAD OF THE STATE SYSTEM OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. Open to All White Males From Any State. Tuition absolutely free except in professional schools. The only charge beiug S15.00 per year for incidental expenses and use of library. DEPARTMENTS: I. FRANKLIN COLLEGE, offering regular classical degree of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Letters. II. STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS, offering the degreess of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Engineering. III SCHOOL OF LAW, offering the degree of Bachelor of Law which entitles to practice in all Georgia Courts. Splendid Scientific and literary equipment. Of an Order that has a most excellent aim. 210)TI)e University of Georgia, -ATHENS, SUMMER SCHOOLS ©pen July 3d. __Gl©se ugust 12tb. For Teachers and Students Preparing to Filter the University. The Fee for Any One Course is $20. For Any Tuio Courses $35. Board may be obtained in Athens at $3.50 per oieek. «.------------------------------------- School of 7 athemQtioB. Offering follow I ns course : 1. A course in Algebra and Geometry. 2. A courv- In Plane and Sphcrlcnl Trigonometry. and Plane Mid Solid Analytic Geometry. 3. A course in Different! ! and Integral C '.en!uv For further Information, address. PROFESSOR D. C. BARROW. Ja., Cniverity of Georgia. Athens. School of Catin and GreeK- In this Rebool «1! who pass the rlnsl examination will he passed to the respective elosse of tha University without further examination. Author read will he selected a far as powible In accordance with the iudlvldiutl need of each student. For further information, address. PROFESSOR D. HOOPER. University of Georgia. School of SurueyinS and Drawing. The two following course offered: 1. A cour c In Surveying mid Drawing, embracing the theory and practice of Survevlog. with the use of the compass, transit, plane table, level, etc., ami lustra menial Drawing, including Linear Drawing. Projection . Plotting. Map Making and 2. a course in Free hand and Mechanical Drawing, embracing Linear Drawing. Projection . Isometric and Perspective Drnwiug. lAdtertiig, Tinting and Water-Color Work, I inscriptive Geometry, aid Free-Hand Work lu Charcoal from suitable model . For further Information, addrww. PROFESSOR 0. II. SHSPFIKI.D. University of Georgia. Sohool of fronah and G« nian. By concentrating the attention exclusively upon one lnaguag,-, and working Mcadily for fix weeks, experience shows that a pupil o! fair, average ability may expect to acquire such knowledge of the language as will enable him to prosecute the uudr advantageously and with pleasure to hlmvclf at home. Th-uo who have already woe knowledge of trie language and «re aiming to teach It. may, by further work along llnr Indicated, reasonably expect to be able to do «o. Courses lo Spanish and in Italian may be added In the future, a demand for them develops. Address, for (urthcr particular . PROFESSOR C. P. WILCOX. University of Georgia. gahool of Botany. Two Courses ol instruction are offered: SYSTEMATIC BOTANY.—In tbl course the structure of Flowering Plants will be first prevented, alter which the student will receive abundant practice lu the analyst oi Flowering Plants. The course will consist ol lectures, laboratory work and field excursions, and by reasonable application during this time the student al.ouhl be able to readllv identify any common plant. CRYPTOGAMlc IK)TANY.-Opportnnltles will be afforded In this course for the study of Ferns. Mow . Moulds and other lower forms of vegetable life. Three courses rany be taken together nr singly. They will be conducted In the Biolfgrlcal Laboratory of the University, ol which the entire equipment ol microwopee. etc, I at the disposal of studcuti. Apply, for further Information, to PROFESSOR JOHN P. CAMPBELL. University of Georgia. (211)SOLID TRAIN WITH THROUGH PULLMAN PALACE BUFFET SLEEPING CARS BETWEEN ATLANTA, DA., AND WASHINDTON, D. D. ABSOLUTELY THE QUICKEST SCHEDULE BETWEEN Atlanta, Ga. Richmond, Va. AND ONLY LINE WITHOUT CHANGE. SHORT LINE to NORFOLK AND OLD POINT COMFORT, VA. THROUCH CAR LINE TO CHARLESTON, S. C. via COLUMBIA. Only one change of care between ATLANTA, GA., am! BALTIMORE, PHILADELPHIA, NEW YORK and BOSTON. ASK FOR TICKETS VIA THESERBOMRD HIR LINE. O. V. SMITH, Traffic Manager, T. J. ANDERSON, Passenger Agent, NORFOLK, VA. H. W. B. CLOVER, Div. Pass. Agt., ATLANTA, CA. (212) p. EXCELLING ill the making of Unique ami Artistic nenus, Programmes, Dance Cards, Souvenirs, etc., we offer our services to those requiring High Class Work. Correctly engraved Invitations for Commencement and Class Recep tions, Social Gatherings, and Fraternity Spreads. Steel Plate work of every descrip tion for Iraternity uses and College Annuals. In our Fainting Department special attention is given to College Work. We have every facility for printing Annuals, College I'ublications, Catalogues, etc., and will contract for Illustrating, I’rintiiig and Binding. All work is executed under personal supervision and only in the best manner. Our unequaled facilities and experience place us in a position to produce the most finished and artistic work and our reputation is a guarantee for the excellence of our productions. Designs, Samples and Prices sent on application. A. II. Chasinar Company, New York. 34 Union Square, Past.Magazine and Newspaper Work Illustrating 01 Boom Editions LIVE STOCK FLOWER SeOD NURSERYMEN'S and Souvenir Numbers Engravings for College Annuals Railroad Route Rooks, Boards of Trade Publications CROSSCUP WEST ENGRAVING CO 911 Filbert St., Phita., I a. The Leading Engraving Establishment in the Country SPECIALISTS IN Half-Tone V ork IVES PROCESS Ht t in the World to redact the llalf-Toue to a commercial working tads ll.I.l'ST HATING OF Town and I;amily Histories Town and band Company Catalogues Fine Souvenirs Books Fine Art AMD OTIIRR Publications Requiring high tirade Engravingh. T. INMAN. President. Z. O. HARRISON. Vice-President. STATE »Rf.VT8R8 A.VQ Pt’BUS IERS. 1 tCOXFOXATfD 1893 0E0. V. HARRISON. Otitnl Manager. ® Plea»e Address all Correspondence to the DIRECTORS: M. T. INITAN, Z. D. HARRISON. W. A. HEMPHILL. II. H. CABANISS. JAS. W. ENGLISH. GEO. W. HARRISON. to Aoorcss ail Gorrespondonc Company—A'ot to Individual!. TREASURER'S OFFICM The franklin Printing and Publishing Go. 65-71 IVY STREET AND EDGEWOOD AVENUE. LA W BOOK PUBLISHERS. Hint,I.- ton .-.. Mntlf It, Or,Iff. Ktillroittl. HttnUlnic. Cor mml mi uml Cummorc ii l,rlntlnu. Stvrootypinu nntl ISft’ctmty lntf- Your 0rdcr lo 8otloltcd. TELEPHONE 98. UKO. ». H.tllUISON. See')- A Treat., Gra’I Msnsver. May, 1893. o Publications, o The Southern Cultivator and Dixie 1'armer, Atlanta rtcdlcal and Surgical Joornal, Home .'lls lonar . Tlje Southern Architect, Tyloch's Price Current. Oar Home Held, We lev,an Christian Advocate, Stlle'5 Price Current, Southern lidacatlonal Journal, Our Church Helper, Tl e Church In Georgia, Tlje Southern Unltariun, Southern Traveler’s I'.allva Guide, Schumann's Price Current, ••Dixie.” Unsurpassed Adierlislng Mediums. The work of Printing and Binding on this volume of ‘‘PANDORA’’ ie the product of the Franklin Printing and Publishing Company, of Atlanta, Ga., and is a specimen of our work. We solicit your Printing of ALL kinds. With ample facilities, new and improved machinery and type, and the effort to please, we GUARANTEE first-class work and satisfactory dealings in ALL respects. Special attention to COLLEGE DIPLOMAS, SCHOOL CATALOGUES, REPORTS, CIRCULARS, LETTER HEADS, ENVELOPES. Blank Books and Printing of EVERY description. Send us your orders from a Postal Card to the Finest Law and OTHER BOOKS. Yours truly, THE FRANKLIN PRINTING AND PUBLISHING CO. GEO. W. HARRISON, Gen. Mangr. (217)ESTABLISHED 1850 D. W. McCRECOR, WHOLESALE Altl RETAIL STATIONER Bookseller to the University of Georgia. 5el?ool arjd Qolle e 5ext Bool s. FINE STATIONERY. OPPOSITE THE CAMPUS, ATHENS, GA. THE CHEAPEST HOUSE IN CEORCIA.


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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1888 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1890 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1892 Edition, Page 1

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.