University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1887

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1887 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 168 of the 1887 volume:

 rrt y-vxAj‘,. r iEaHors Brapers A. SPECIALTY ■ROADPerkins Mfg. Co. SHINGLES, LATHS, BUILDERS’ HARDWARE. MB ©AfcHOUM STREET AUGUSTA, GEORGIA. THOMAS BARTON ARE THE LEADING DEALERS IN WITH A FULL STOCK OF SMALL MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS LARGEST ASSORTMENT. BEST GOODS. LOWEST PRICES. EASY TERMS. jggr REMEMBER THE ADDRESS, THOMAS BARTON, 924 1JR0A)) STREET, AUGUSTA, GEORGIA. WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICESE. H. T. ANTHONY CO. 891 BROADWAY, N. Y. Manufacturers and Importers of hot© graphic APPARATUS AND SUPPLIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. Sole proprietors of tbe PATENT DETECTIVE, FAIRY, NOVEL, and BICYCLE CAMERAS, and the CELEBRATED STANLEY DRY PLATE. AMATEUR OUTFITS in great variety from $9.00 upwards. Send for Catalogue or call and examine. TJIore than Forty Years Established in this line of Business. §. YY. Stu h Bo. Wholesale and Retail College Jive., JIT HE NS, G jl.phijgical Cheigical Apparatus For Schools and Colleges, We will send tbe following CATALOGUES on application : Complete Catalogue of Physical Instruments for High Schools and Colleges. Illustrated Catalogue of School Apparatus, simptified and combined, with directions for use. Catalogue of Chemical Apparatus. Catalogue of Telescopes. Catalogue of Anatomical Models. Catalogue of Optical Lantern and Apparatus for Projection. Catalogue of Electrical Test Instruments. Catalogue of Standard Rules, Gauges, Callipers, etc. E. S. RITCHIE SONS, (Within Ctty Limits of Boston.) BKOOKLINE, MASS. [Mention this Book.] ESTABLISHED 1850. €©MEM, McMAHAM C®. ready-made; crothing in all the Newest Cuts aud Newest Styles, always on hand. Gents’ Underwear in large variety. Dress Shirts, and Earl Wilson’s Collars and Cuffs a specialty. Novelties in Men’s and Youth’s Straw Hats, Fur and Wool. Pressed Flexible Band Stiff Hats in all Grades. , Dress Goods, Silks-, Velvets; Embroderies, Laces and Notions. AlSd -filll line of D6?de$tic and Staple Dry Goods at.-Lowest Market Prices. py COHEN,, McMAHAN::’ CO. I "•✓ r SQp3 C.K3?ice . Jno.WJ)cintef M. J KeyPAjf»er ATA TTVKjR«€.c{C e« VK.Te , T4, J JT £A«w s.jy. -nr . 4X.KrahK iA 74, iTo those Citizens of the “Classic City who, by their v ords, actions and deeds, have shown their ardent love for the Students of the University of Georgia, is this Book tenderly and affectionately dedicated.INTRODUCTORY. I I rvjhE herewith present to you Volume II of The Pandora, 5-itI for your perusal. While we have not reached the top Tl round in the field of College Annuals, yet we ask that you carefully examine the contents within, and we believe you will say that we have gotten up a good Annual. With this number The Pandora passes up the state of childhood, and reaches the point where we can stand alone. Now we want to get into such a condition that we can walk. To do this it will require time and energy; it will also need your aid. So let us say here, that we humbly beg that you do everything in your power to aid The Pandora, so as it may be firmly planted on the soil of the University of Georgia for years to come. The year is nearly gone, and it has been one of activity for the old University ; fully two hundred students have been with us throughout the terms, which clearly shows how popular the State institution of Georgia is getting to be. In presenting the products of our labor we do so conscious of the result. You will, we know, heap criticisms on us, but look out! What you find in this book we have put there, and if it does not suit you that does not make it look as if we had made a mistake, but it goes to show that your opinion is worth nothing. If you find anything herein to take exceptions at, we ask that you pass it by. It is, probably, a mistake—you may know it is done as a joke. It came from a humorous brain and not a pure heart. In stepping out of the editorial shoes we do so reluctantly, and with a sincere wish that our friends will see us through by12 THE PANDORA. purchasing at least a dozen copies of this Annual, and sending them all over the world. Our endeavor has been to prepare for our friends a book which may afford them an enjoyment not for a day, but such as shall merit frequent perusal; and if in years to come this volume, all covered with dust and colored by age, be brought to light, that your heart may again be made happy by its brightness, and then indeed has our object been accomplished.EDITORIAL. 13 .EARLY every first-class college in the United States, except the University of Georgia, possesses a gymnasium of some kind. We all realize the necessity of securing a gymnasium, but seem to be at a loss as to how we shall ever make our hopes accomplish anything. One fact may be considered as certain, the State will not aid us— for if they have any money to put on the University it will go towards repairing the edifices which now adorn our campus. Matters may be simmered down to this point—we must erect a gymnasium through contributions, or not at all. Now, what is necessary more than anything else, is to start a fund —the University Gymnasium Fund. Let this fund be started both with contributions and money that can be made otherwise. This fund once started, will in the course of time, if we push matters by soliciting aid from alumni and friends of the University”, be the cause of collecting enough money to build us a respectable building. This plan that we have suggested is easily talked of, but can only be carried out by hard work. It will be difficult to imagine the material aid the University of Georgia would realize by making this proposed institution a reality. In conclusion let us make an effort in this line. If we do not collect enough in a year to erect this building, no loss will .be felt. A new committee can be appointed year after year, and we opine that, by untiring efforts, if we do not succeed in a few months, we will do so in the course of at least two or three year. Who will start the ball in motion ? od714 THE PANDORA. sHE system of vacations at the University of Georgia is f(M || open to criticism. The summer vacations begin entirely too late in the year. Commencement at the University now occurs at a late period in .the summer, instead of being held in the latter part of July; it should occur not later than June 15. By having Commencement so late in the summer the college work is crowded on us in the hottest part of the year. It is entirely too hard on students to make them do their hardest studying—learning final examinations—in the hot weather. The Pandora desires to suggest to the Trustees (we mean those who take enough interest in the University to attend the meetings) that they investigate this matter, and see if Commencement cannot be held sometime in June, and if necessary open the University in September. We ask the Trustees to consider this if they do nothing else.EDITORIAL. 15 ur |E think it our duty to say something in The Pandora concerning the needs of the University of Georgia. The greatest need that to-day stares us in the face is, the need of money to repair our buildings. Last winter a committee of the Georgia Legislature came over to see if we needed anything in the way of appropriations. The Legislature is always very kind to appropriate anything in the way of money to repair our buildings, but it is very hard for them to be convinced that we need anything. After searching the campus thoroughly, they came to the conclusion that some appropriation was necessary, and recommended that the enormous sum of five thousand dollars be given us for repairs. As yet the Legislature has taken no action on the report. Five thousand dollars would hardly amount to nothing. Its benefit would hardly be felt at all. When we heard that this committee was to come, it struck us that we were on the eve of securing a good appropriation. But. our hopes as yet have amounted to nothing. We hope they will in the dim, distant future. The University of Georgia, one of the oldest institutions of learning in the Union, should be cherished by our people above any institution in the State. That we need a heavy appropriation no one can deny, not even the cranks who hate us can deny it. We ask our friends, and alumni of the University, throughout the State, to speak a kind work for us, and in voting for men who will be selected to a position where they can aid us, to sound them and see whether or not they are the friends of the University of Georgia. We want to see the day when the Georgia Legislature will not only be willing but glad to appropriate money to our renowned institution. To this, friends and alumni of the University should come to the rescue. By an effort on their part we could soon have matters in such condition that our worn out domitories and weather beaten buildings would be turned in to attractions. So we say, friends and alumni, help us, work for us, and our success in securing good appropriations, which are so much needed, will be assured.i6 THE PANDORA. Why You Should Attend the University of Georgia. 1st. It is a State Institution. 2nd. It is the oldest College in Georgia, and one of the oldest in the Union. 3d. Its Alumni are among the foremost citizens of Georgia. 4th. When you attend the University, you are thrown in contact with sons of the best families in Georgia. 5th. You receive instructions from a Faculty composed of the best educators in the South. 6th. The Chemical Departments are the most complete in the South. 7th. The Law Department is composed of a most excellent corps of Professors. 8th. 'The course in Parliamentary Law is as thorough as any in our country. 9th. The University is one of the healthiest places in the Union, as very seldom any sickness occurs among the students. 10th. Diplomas are awarded in eleven different courses. 11th. The system of educating is more thorough than any college in Georgia. 12th. You can complete a course at the University for less money than any college in Georgia, admission being free. —■ -«.. — We desire to tender our thanks to Waters, ’87; Milner, ’87; Burrows, 89 ; Williams, ’89 ; and Barnett, ’89, for their excellent drawings, which are herewith inserted.BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 7 € J J. J. GRESHAM..............President. H. V. M. MILLER............Vice President. LAMAR COBB.................Secretary and Treasurer. H. V. M. Milder........................................Atlanta Joseph E. Brown........................................Atlanta B. C. Yancey...........................................Cave Spring D. A. Vason............................................Albany James Jackson .........................................Atlanta J. A. Billups.........................j................Macon Samuel Hall............................................Macon J. W. Beckwith.........................................Atlanta Lamar Cobb.............................................Athens J. J. Gresham..........................................Macon John Scriven...........................................Savannah A. R. Lawton...........................................Savannah A. T. McIntyre.........................................Thomasville Alfred H. Colquitt.....................................Atlanta W. W. Thomas...........................................Athens J. B. Cumming...................:......................Augusta R. C. Humber...........................................Eatonton James S. Hamilton......................................Athens B. P. Hollis...........................................Americus W. A. Little...........................................Columbus H. D. McDaniel.........................................Atlanta Pope Barrow............................................Athens W. M. Reese............................................Washington D. B. Hamilton.........................................Rome Alex. S. Erwin ........................................Athens N. J. Hammond.........................................Atlanta H. W. Grady............................................Atlanta A. L. Hull.............................................Athens C. Z. McCord...........................................Augusta W. H. Felton..........................................Marshalville S. M. II Byrd..........................................Cedartown James II. Fannin.......................................La Grange L. F. Livingston ......................................Covington P. W. Mbldrim..........................................Savannah P. A. Stovall..........................................Athens Henry Jackson..........................................Atlanta J' Commissioners on School of Technology. X. E. Harris..........................................Macon E. R. Hodgson..........................................Athens O. S. Porter..........................................Covington Columbus Heard.........................................Greenesboro S. M. Inman............................................Atlanta Deceased.i8 THE PANDORA. Hon. JOEL A. BILLUPS, ’45 Hon. D. A. VASON, ’37 JULIUS L. BROWN, ’68 Hon. P. W. MELDRIM, ’68 Prof. D. C. BARROW, 74 SYLVAN US MORRIS, 73 President Vice President 2d. Vice Pres'dt 3d. Vice Pres'dt Sewetary Alumni Orator for 1887BOARD OF VISITORS. 19 J. H. ALEXANDER, T. E. ATKINSON, W. S. BASSINGER, O. H. B. BLOODWORTH, C. B. CHAPMAN, L. B. EVANS, H. C. HORNADY, M. L. PARKER, T. G. POND, W. J. SCOTT.20 THE PANDORA. k ► P. H. MELL, Chancellor, D. D., L. L. D., Professor of Metaphysics and Ethics. WILLIAMS RUTHERFORD, A. M., Professor of Pure Mathematics. L. H. CHARRONNIER, A. M.; Professor of Physics and Astronomy. C. P. WILCOX, A. M., Professor of Modern Languages. H. C. WHITE, C. and M. E. Professor of Chemistry. W. G. WOODFIN, A. M., Professor oj Latin and Greek Ixinguages and Literature. CHARLES V10RRIS, A. M., Professor of Belles Lettres. D. C. BARROW, Jr., C. and M. E., Professor of Engineering. W. L. JONES, A. M., and M D , Professor of Natural Ilist-ory and Agriculture. C. M. STRAHAN, C. and M. E., Tutor in Mathematics and Ancient Languages. DEPARTMENT OF LAW. FACULTY. P. H. MELL, D. I)., L. L. 1)., Chancellor and Lecturer on Parliamentary Law. GEO. DUDLEY THOMAS, B. S.f B. L., ANDREW J. COBB, A. B., B. L., Professors of Jjaw. SAMUEL C. BENEDICT, M. D., Tjecturer on Medical Jurisprudence.DEPARTMENTS. 21 IPMical Qtpxxtmttot at gutgt sta FACULTY. % EDWARD GEDDINGS, M. D., Dean of the Faculty. GEO. W. RAINS, M. I)., L. L. D., Professor of Medical Chemistry and Pharmacy. HENRY F CAMPBELL, M D., Professor of Operative Surgery and Gynaecology. DeSAUSSURE FORD, M. D., Professor of Midwifery and Clinical Surgery. EDWARD GEDDINGS, M. D., Professor• of Physiology and Pathology. THOMAS R. WRIGHT, M. D., Professor of Descriptive and Surgical Anatomy. THEO. LAMB, M. D., Professor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine. W. H. DOUGHTY, M. D., Professor of Materia Medico, and Medical Jurisprudence. JAMES M. HULL, M. D., Special Professor of the Diseases of the Eye and Throat. ............................... Demo-nstrator of Anatomy, and Prosector to the Professor of Anatomy.THE PANDORA. Departments of the University of Georgia. 1. ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. Known as Franklin College. II. STATE COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. Being the State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. III. LAW DEPARTMENT. IV. MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. At Augusta. v. BRANCH COLLEGES. 1. North Georgia Agricultural College. At JDahlonega. 2. South Georgia Agricultural College. At Thomasville. 3. Middle Georgia Agricultural and Military College. At MUledgeviUe.23 CLASS LIST OF '87. 24 THE PANDORA. Class £ist ef ’ST. Colors—Dark Green and Cardinal. ROBERT L. JOHNSON. JOHN D. MOSS..... MARION T. DAVIS.. H. K. MILNER..... ROBERT L. FOREMAN. GEORGE H. WINSTON U. V. WHIPPLE.... JOHN D. MOSS..... President. . V ice-President. Secretary and Treasurer. Historian. Prophet. Poet. Orator. Chaplain. Name. Residence. William Lawrence Manning Austin, SAE.....................Greenville, S. C. James H. Blount, "2AE....................................Macon, Ga. William Beall Crawford, ATDj.............................Lincolnton, Ga. Marion Tracey Dayis, PAG................................Athens, Ga. Mortimer Morris Elk an...................................Macon, Ga. C. F. Finch, 2AE..........................................Quitman, Ga. William Americus Florence..................................Thomson, Ga. John Ebenezer Flowers 2N.....................................Doraville, Ga. Robert Langdon Foreman, KA.....................................Washington, Ga. Hugh N. Gallaher, 2N........................................Sandersville, Ga. William Hampton Hammond, 2AE..................................Thomasville, Ga. Walter Lee Hodges, MM....................................Hartwell, Ga. Left College.CLASS LIST OF ’87. 25 Name. Residence. Robert Lee Johnson, ATDl.............................Columbus, Ga. Ernest Charles Kontz, KA.............................Atlanta, Ga. Charlie C. McGehee, 2AE..............................Atlanta, Ga. Henry Key Milner, ATfl................................Birmingham, Ala. John Dortch Moss, KA.................................Athens, Ga. Robert Lee Nowell, AT A..............................Monroe, Ga. Wesley Peacock, 2AE..................................Thomasville, Ga. William Barclay Powers, P AG........................Palatka, Fla. Charlie Frank Rice, P..............................Atlanta, Ga. William Frank Smith..................................Social Circle, Ga. Ben Hill Thompson, 2ZAE..............................Atlanta, Ga. Albert J. Tuggle AG................................LaGrange, Ga. Glen Waters, $rA.....................................Atlanta, Ga. Charles M. Walker, 2AE...............................Monroe, Ga. J. H. Walker, 2AE....................................Monroe, Ga. Warren W. Wimberly, 2AE...........................4... Bullards, Ga. Ulysses Virgil Whipple, $rA..........................Cochran, Ga. George H. Winston, $AG..............................West Point, Ga. Left College. 326 THE PANDORA. cf| tfp ®{»$$ cf '87. S I have been a member of ’87 since it began as a wea ly Fresh class four years ago, the thought that upon me devolved the duty of writing the history of the Class has given me a great deal of pleasure. But now that the time has come for it to be written a host of doubts and fears beset me, as to what I shall say in regard to this Class. Fears that I may not be able to do it justice, that it may not be in my power to give those unacquainted with its past history an idea of the prowess for which it has been noted throughout its four years of existence. Its career has been an eventful one and a complete record of its doings and misdoings would take up too much precious (?) space. The Class of ’87 was the last Fresh class to have the pleasure of taking Math under our highly esteemed Prof, of Engineering. The Sophs of ’87 were the first ever carried on the Junior engineering trip. As Juniors, they were the last class to be whirled through the giddy mazes of descript by our distinguished Prof, of pure mathematics. And now lastly, as Seniors they have made more rapid progress in their studies than any previous class, and will graduate twenty-six men —the usual proviso being understood—’87 has had the names of two men added to its roll this year; both are men of whom any class would be proud. But at the same time 87 has been so unfortunate as to lose four fine men, all of whom were obliged to withdraw from College on account of ill health. ’87 is quite up to the average in Athletics, as Field Day will show, when she will take more prizes than any other two classes in College. Physically, the members of ’87 are all good men, some far above the average and none below it. She has the largest men in College, and if she could wipe out the Fresh class would have the oldest also. The average age of ’87 is twenty, the oldest man is twenty-seven, theCLASS HISTORY ’87. 27 youngest sixteen, their average weight is one hundred and forty-five, the heaviest man weighs one hundred and eighty-six pounds, the lightest one hundred and thirty. And when it comes to brains ’87 is in the ring. Why, no class the University has ever graduated can compare with ’87 in this respect, as any member of the faculty and the public in general will say—and when our time comes to leave, certainly no class can claim a higher or more enviable a record, or look forward more confidently to a future of usefulness and honor. HISTORIAN ’87.28 THE PANDORA.CLASS LIST OF ’88 29 Class £ist of ’88. Colors—White and Blue. ------------- NASH R, BROYLES.......................President. THOMAS W. REED...................... Vice-President. WILLIAM M. GLASS......................Secretary. . EUGENE W. WADE........................Treasurer. LUCIAN L. KNIGHT......................Historian. Narae. Residence. Robert Weldon Ai.mon...................................Franklin Co., Ga. John Andrew Barnes, 22 AE..............................Augusta, Ga. Benjamin Beauregard Barnes.........................Waxahatchie, Tex- William Edward Baldwin , 2AE...........................Cuthbert, Ga. Emmet Joplin Bondtjrant, KA............................Augusta, Ga. Jos. Clifton Boone...................... ..............Gainesville, Ga. Williams George Brown, 22 N............................Alpharetta, Ga. Nash Rose Broyles, X$..................................Atlanta, Ga. Joseph Emerson Boston, X$..............................Marietta, Ga. Levi Mangum Brand......................................Logansville, Ga. Lamar Cobb, Jr., PAO..................................Athens, Ga. Braxton Curtis Carter, 2AE.............................Columbus, Ga. Edward Benjamin Cohen, ................................Athens, Ga. Frank Westly Coile.....................................Winterville, Ga. Thomas Mayhew Cunningham, 2 A E........................Savannah, Ga. Hugh Moss Comer, Jr., KA...............................Savannah, Ga. Julius Benjamin Hill Day...............................Social Circle, Ga. Edward Campbell Davis..................................Albany, Ga. Oscar S. Davls, A 0..................................Greenesboro, Ga. Left College.30 THE PANDORA. Name. William Alonzo Davts, A T A...... John W. Daniel, KA................ A. L. Franklin, AT A ............ Hugh Urquhart Downing, KA........ Paul Hubert Estes................ John Robert Evans, $F A.......... Clarence Paul Fuller, 2AE........ John Ellison Foy, $AG........... William Martin Glass, AT A....... Benjamin Franklin Gunn........... William Mosley PI awes, $F A..... Thomas Richmond Hardwick, PAG... Arthur Heyman.................... Thomas P. Htjnnicutt ............ Joseph Gilmore Jarrell, $AG...... Lucian Lamar Knight, X .......... William Augustus Kennon, £F A... John W. Lamar,f KA............... John Dozier Little, 2 A E........ James Cooper Mkll, 2AE........... George Arthur Mercer, 3AE........ Wilmer Lee Moore, 2AE............ Arthur Hicks MoCarrel, KA........ William Duncan Nesbitt, ATfL..... Charles Cunningham Poe........... William Henry Quarterman......... Edward Gaston Russell, ATfL...... Thomas Walter Reed, $AG.......... Victor Lamar Smith, KA........... Bryan J. Smith................... Edwin 0. Stanton, X $........... William Evan Thomas, A TCI....... Eugene W. Wade, $FA.............. George Arthur Whitehead, Jr., 2AE Quincy Lamar Williford........... Mitchel Jeshurun Webb ........... Francis Wayland Wright, X$....... Edgar William Way ............... Residence. Newnan, Ga. .Augusta, Ga. .Covington, Ga. .Columbus, Ga. Gainesville, Ga. .Washington, Ga. .Atlanta, Ga. Egypt Ga- Warnerville, Ga. Fort Gaines, Ga. Thomson, Ga. Atlanta, Ga. West Point, Ga. .Turin, Ga. .LaGrange, Ga. .Atlanta, Ga. .Hoboken, Ga. .Savannah, Ga. .Columbus, Ga. .Athens, Ga. .Savannah, Ga. .Atlanta, Ga. .Augusta, Ga. .Marietta, Ga. .Atlanta, Ga. .Walthourville, Ga. Athens, Ga. .Atlanta, Ga. Atlanta, Ga. .Statenville, Ga. .Seneca, S. C. .Valdosta, Ga. .Athens, Ga. .Savannah, Ga. .Athens, Ga. .Dawson, Ga. .Augusta, Ga. .Savannah, Ga. Left College. t Deceased.CLASS HISTORY OF ’88. 31 dj tfp §ln$$ 0 '88 T is with many misgivings that I attempt a brief outline of the history of the Class of ’88—the Class recognized by all as the life „ and soul of the entire College. At the outset I am overwhelmed by the multitude of incidents which present themselves, and I am at loss to know just how to begin. To select the most interesting and important events which have transpired during the year, would be no easy task, since they all vie with one another in interest and importance. To record them all would require more space than I am allowed, and besides more endurance than I possess. Perhaps it would be better to begin by giving a general description of the character of the Class—which may give a deeper interest in the history which is to follow, and at the same time suggest some plan of procedure. In the first place our membership is about fifty. Mentally, we are considered by our professors to possess very extraordinary ambition, inferring their opinion, of course, from the character and extent of the requirements exacted from our capacities, in the shape of lengthy “ dailies” and exhaustive topical examinations. Physically we are as well developed for our age as nature would admit, the average weight being 140 pounds, and the maximum 174. The average age of the Class is 19 3-10fhs, which is rather lower than that of preceding years. The average height is somewhat in the neighborhood of 5 feet and 7 inches. Last year we prided ourselves on having the lowest and the tallest boy in College. This year however, the Freshman Class has won the pennant for the shortest man, and we can only boast ourselves of having the tallest-who measures six feet four inches in his boots, with the prospect of yet adding a few cubits to his stature. Our Class was first formed in the fall of ’84, and was somewhat below the average in size. Of the original number only nine are incorporated in the present membership. At the opening of the present session the Class numbered fifty-five. Five of these have since withdrawn, leaving us fifty steady, earnest fellows, all bent on winning honors and acquiring distinction. Last year we enjoyed the reputation of having the best base-bal team in College—the score for the season placing us considerably in the lead. The team this year promises to be equally as good as the last,32 THE PANDORA. and from the interest already manifested we confidently expect to repeat our victories. For the past two months we have mainly upheld both of the literary societies, the Seniors being disposed to neglect them altogether. In the recent champion debate elections we obtained two places from the Phi Kappa and one from the Demosthenian. Such honors as these are seldom awarded to Juniors, being usually conferred upon the more experienced Seniors. We have also two or three representatives on the present editorial staff of the Pandora—offices usually filled by Seniors. In all of the College enterprises, in the engagements of the recitation room and the sports of the play-ground, our Class has shown unusual interest and superiority. As regards the pursuits in which we intend to engage hereafter, our preferences are various, the majority of us, as is usually the case, propose to engage in the practice of law; the balance will be physicians, scientists, merchants and ministers. The number of aspirants to the latter vocation however, is limited to two, which fact will occasion no surprise to those acquainted with our reputation. Those of us who intend to pursue the studies of medicine and chemistry expect to augment those sciences by several valuable discoveries, and especially the latter by the crystalization of carbon and vastly superior methods of chemical analysis. Those of us who aspire in other directions expect to achieve equally as brilliant results. But it is said that the future seldom fulfils the promises of youth, and that the road to success is no easy one to travel. But need we be disheartened or discouraged? Shall the experience of others dampen our ardor, destroy our cherished hopes and sacred resolutions ? Those who have failed to achieve their desired ends have in nearly every case been lacking in zeal and fidelity. Labor and devotion seldom fail to receive their true reward. Then with our motto “nil desperandum” let us strive with renewed determination, looking with bright faces to the future, and: “Whatsoe’er our lots in life may be, Our brows shall wear the wreaths of victory.” HISTORIAN OF ’88.CLASS HISTORY OF ’88 3334 THE PANDORA. Class £ist of '59. Colors—Pale Pink and Old Gold. JOE GERDIXE... A. C. WILLCOXON T. R. CRAWFORD.. W. B. DIXON... W. II. POPE... President. V ice-President. Secretary. Treasurer. Historian. Name. Residence. George David Anderson,.......................................Athens, Ga. Paul Semmes Black, N P.....................................Rome, Ga. Jacob Jackson Barge..........................................Osanda, Ga. John William Barnett, AT A.................................Winterville, Ga. Charles Lansing Burrows.....................................Augusta, Ga. Mark Allen Candler, ATTl...................................Gainesville, Ga. Bryan Cheves Collier, SAE....................................Albany, Ga. Edwin Albert Cohen........................................Macon, Ga. John Gordon Cranford, 2N...................................Statenville, Ga. Thomas Remsen Crawford, ATfl................................Lincolnton, Ga. Thomas R. R. Cobb, N$....................................Athens, Ga. Zacharias A. Crittenden, $1'A..........................Shellman, Ga. John Randolph Cooper....................................Logansville, Ga. Sanborn Chase, AT A........................................Florence, S. C. Edward Ware Charbonnier, 2AE.................................Athens, Ga. William Benjamin Dixon, $PA.............................Fayette, Ala. Luther George Dozier ........................................Athens, Ga. Asa Tucker Drake........................................Philomath, Ga. M. C. Edwards ..........................................Cuthbert, Ga. Howard Erwin Felton.....................................Cartersville, Ga. Edward Clayton Fleming, KA..............................Augusta, Ga. Louis Alfred Fleming, ..................................Brunswick, Ga. ♦Left College.CLASS LIST OF ’89. 35 Joseph Lumpkin Gerdine, KA...........................West Point, Miss. Augustus Milledge Hartsfield, AT A...................Newnan, Ga. Robert Erwin Hardee, KA..............................Savannah, Ga. Benjamin Frank din Hardeman, KA......................Washington, Ga. Maxey Reddick Hade...................................Columbia, Ga. William 0. Henderson.................................Stilesboro, Ga. James Allen Jones, AT A..............................Warnersville, Ga. Theodore A. Kline, 2N......................;........Macon, Ga. Alexander Atkinson Lawrence, . 4 ................Marietta, Ga. Warren Waldo Martin, X P.............................Ocala, Fla. Robert McGotjgh......................................Forsyth, Ga. Robert Foster Maddox, 2 AE...........................Atlanta, Ga. Edward Jones McRee,. 17Y2...............................Valdosta, Ga. Eugene J. McWilliams, PAQ..........................La Grange, Ga. James Munro Mitchell, 2AE...........................Lawrenceville, Ga. William Hayes Pope, X P..............................Atlanta, Ga. Hope Cochran Polhill, 2N.............................Indian Springs, Ga. Gabriel Toombs Palmer ...............................Washington, Ga. James A. Parks, AT A............................,, Newnan, Ga. William Dennis Reid, ................Eatonton, Ga. Simon Peter Richardson, 1 N.........................Athens, Ga. Robert Lewis Sample, 2 N.............................Midville, Ga. Edwin Stewart, TA.................,.................Carrolton, Ga. Bolling Anthony Stovall, Jr., 2AE....................Athens, Ga. Robert Edward Lee Spence.............................Camilla, Ga. Lycurgus Walker Stanford.............................Hamilton, Ga. William James Shaw, 2N...............................Coosa, Ga. John Sikes ..........................................Jefferson, Ga. Gale R. Tate, .......................................Tate, Ga. Thomas Jefferson Thornton, X .......................LaGrange, Ga. Edward Lee Thomas, ATO...............................♦..Valdosta, Ga. Ashley Spencer Thompson..............................Smithville, Ga. Frank Stewart T witty.;..............................Camilla, Ga. John Philip Upshaw, AT A.............................Social Circle, Ga. Samuel McWhit Varnado, A TO,.........................Valdosta, Ga. Samuel Eugene Walker, 2 N............................East Point, Ga. Charles R. Warren, KA................................Savannah, Ga. Lawrence William Wells...............................Tyler, Tex. John Henry Williford.................................Athens, Ga. Augustus Cleveland Willcoxon, AT A...................Newnan, Ga. William Hafed Williams, $PA..........................Hartwell, Ga. George W. Whitaker, 2N..............................Sandersville, Ga. Andrew Bartholomew Weaver............................Athens, Ga. Phillip D. Wilson, KA................................Atlanta, Ga. Sewell A. Wright, 2N................................Greenesboro, Ga. Left College.36 THE PANDORA. -ilffolunj of) lfp ®la$$ dj 89.1- ST is supposed to be the duty of a Class Historian to comment on the virtues of his theme, disregarding with the blindness which love is said to beget, all faults however glaring. While the writer does not pretend to be an exception to this rule, it is deemed at once courteous and parliamentary to let “the other side have a showing.” In furtherance of this opinion, the following have been selected from the daily lectures of our honored instructors, as showing the esteem in which we are held. One of these indulges in the plain English, “This is the most disorderly and inattentive Class I have ever had.” Another exclaims very classically: “Stop that noise;” and a third, after a mathematical calculation of several months, arrived at the following result: “I have about exhausted my patience in this subject. If you have any regard for place and propriety, you will cease this disorder.” Not to take issue with those expressing the above opinions, the writer does not hesitate to assert that ’89 is a big Class. View it as you will, from the standpoints of numbers, brains, or muscle, and yon come back to the original assertion with a confession of its truth. At present, ’89 has a membership of 66. Of this number only 19 enjoy the distinction of having been Freshmen: and it may be remarked that there are none in the Class so ready to join in the cry of “Turn him” as these nineteen, who, it is supposed, go on the principle of doing unto others as others have done unto them. Our ages vary from fourteen up into the twenties; and the average Sophomore moustache, like our love for “Math,” may be regarded as an infinitesimal quantity. In support of the assertion that ’89 is brainy, one has only to look at the twro literary societies, where it is said the Spring debates, composed of Sophomores, will equal the Champion contest in which the best men of the Junior and Senior Classes strike swords. It may also be mentioned that we have far distanced our predecessors in the amount gone through in all our branches of studies. From an athletic standpoint '89, together with '88, is most prominent in the University. Although we have not obtained a gymnasium in which to lay a ph} sical foundation, corresponding to our mental training, by stated exercise, the return of Spring brings back baseball and other athletic sports. On the University nine, several of the most important positions, notably second base, are occupied by ’89ors. Our team was organized early inHISTORY OF CLASS OF ’89. 37 the year, and is now ready to do some “scalping.” But the writer has neglected to speak of ’89 from the standpoint of beauty. While we do not profess to have many Adonises, it is confidently asserted that we would not lose by comparison with any other Class in College, not excepting the Senior, some of whose members are “too utterly utter” for anything—’89 graduates, exactly a Century after the inauguration of the “Father of his Country” as President; let us hope that from among us may come a Washington who will free the country from its social evils, from the red coats of society. But time fiies. We who are the “Sophs” of to-day are already on the threshold of the Junior ; soon we will revel in the beauties of Physics and Chemistry, and attempt to find the loveliness of “Analjt.” Beyond this year, which will pass too quickly, we find ourselves as “lordly Seniors;” another step, and we venture out upon the great unknown. The world, with all its cares, will serve only to remind us the more of the happy College hours, of the grand opportunities gone, gone forever. That each one will so improve the fleeting moments that, in future years, he may look back with unmitigated pleasure to 44 The days of Auld Lang Syne, Spent in dear old ’89,” is the sincere wish of the Historian of ’89. 1THE PANDORA.CLASS LIST OF ’90. 39 Class List of ’90. Colors—Red, Purple and White. G. J. STROTHER..................................President. T F. GREEN......................................Vice-President. C. A TALMADGE................„..................Secretary. S. UPSON, Jr....................................Treasurer. J. E, DOBBS.....................................Historian. Name. Residence. Eugene Clarence Allen ..............................Buford, Ga. John William Arnold.................................Athens, Ga. Horace Baber Atkisson, AS..........................Davisboro, Ga. John Houston Barr...................................Athens, Ga. Eugene Barry........................................Athens, Ga. John Matthis Bates..................................Cherokee Co., Ga. Edward Calhoun Beard, KA ............................Birmingham, Ala. John William Bennett................................Jesup, Ga. Fred Ferrin Bingham.................................Poplar Mt., Va. Frank Erwin Callaway, KA............................LaGrange, Ga. John Newton Carlton.................................Athens, Ga. Cicero Guy Chandler, PAQ...........................Athens, Ga. William Moore Crank.................................Athens, Ga. Albin Eugene Dkaring................................Athens, Ga. John Erwin Dobbs....................................Athens, Ga. Moses Wadley Garbett................................Midville. Ga. Thomas Fitzgerald Green, KA.........................Athens, Ga. William Merritt Hairston ...........................Elberton, Ga. John Hale...........................................Elgin, Ga. Beverly Washington Hall.............................Elberton, Ga. John Washington Harrell, Jr.........................Valdosta, Ga. George Erskine Heard................................Athens, Ga. William Charlton Horton............................. HoschtOD, Ga. Marion McHenry Hull,2A E............................Athens, Ga. Samuel Percy Jones..................................Athens, Ga. Lamar Lyndon........................................Athens, Ga. Robert Lee Meaders, A T£1...........................DeKalb Co., Ga. Noel Lamar Poullain, X P............................Madison, Ga. William Arthur Pittman..............................Athens, Ga. Henry Nicholson Reaves..............................Athens, Ga. Sidney Powell Reaves...............;................Athens, Ga. John Lee Riley......................................Harris Co., Ga. James Elijah Rogers.................................Waverly Hall, Ga. Lewis Caroun Russell, T£l..........................Athens, Ga. James Henry Simmes..................................Athens, Ga, George James Strother, 2N...........................Walhalia, S. C. Charles Allen Talmadge, f PA.......................Athens, Ga. Stephen Upson, Jr...................... )...........Athens, Ga. Edward Ingersoll Wade...............................Athens, Ga. Left College.40 THE PANDORA. uf tip ®Ius$ of '90. UR first year in College ! Who can depict the thrill of pleasure, mingled with a to-morrow’s dread, that emanates from the soul of a Freshman as he goes for the first time into a Professor’s recitation room, and realizes that he is one among that famous crowd — College boys. There were twenty six of us to register October 6th, 1886 ; each and every one looking as if he was ready and anxious for all the work, pleasure and fun that might fall to his share. We can boast of some unusual members of Class of ’90, having the oldest and youngest, men in the College, two married men, two or three Knights of Labor, and one or two members of Class of ’89, who found the Fresh so attractive that they concluded to remain with them another year, of which we are very glad, since they (as also the others mentioned) have, by their good general average and excellent behavior, added to the fine record of ’90. The remainder of our Class are unusual only by their superiority over the Freshmen Classes who have gone before us, whom you all know. You now have an outline of what we are. Next I will tell you what we have done. Our first Class meeting was held October 20th, ’86, in the Ivy building, to elect Class officers. Each man seemed desirous of an office, consequently there were many candidates and some excitement. After some reasoning by the older members and much force by the stronger ones, quiet was at last restored and the above officers elected, much to the satisfaction of those elected. For a while it was all work and no play — monthly examinations rolled around with alarming rapidity, and as all were anxious to make good impressions on the Faculty, some hard work was done and good papers handed in, as reports show. The Christmas holiday-, though short, were enjoyed by all. In the pleasures of home and various other charms, that we need not mention, we forgot that the time for immediate Finals was drawing near. However, our forgetfulness in this instance was no injury, since we have stood the Finals and are nearer the Soph Class than before. We will here remark that our Finals have not been to us “ a cause for our undoing.” We all admit that our hearts thumped with fear when we first undertook a Final, but when we had done our best and come out all right, we felt equal to •’anything the future might bring forth. Having organized a base ball team, we. have been anxious to showCLASS HISTORY OF ’9O. 41 what we could do, but we have not yet been able to persuade any of the other clubs to “tackle ” us, so our laurels are yet to win in that line. In the way of “ silver-tongued orators,” the Freshmen are proud to know that they are well represented in both literary societies, two of our Class having been elected Spring Debaters, one from each society. The Sophs would feel too bad if we neglected to give a small notice of their vain efforts to humiliate us. They once upon a time recognized us as “ Little Freshie,” etc., but they have at last discovered that we are a Class of “grit” and “backbone,” an‘d can treat their insignificant remarks, as they deserve, with contemptuous silence. Lately, a few “jokers ” have been discovered among the Fresh, who “ hit hard,” and cover the poor Sophs with confusion, since then we rest in peace. The record of a year is finished. Wo have tried to win your regard and excite your sympathy in our behalf. If our good qualities surpass the bad, do not, I beg, accuse us of conceit, but rather bestow upon us good wishes and cheering words, to encourage and help us on to nobler aims and better deeds during our remaining years at the University of Georgia. Historian of ’90. 442 THE PANDORA. » School of ’87. Name. Residence. .Robert Emmet Andoe...................................vCoal Mountain, Ga. Edgar Lawrence Ballard, AT A..........................Palmetto, Ga. Walter Scott Chisholm, Jr., KA........................Savannah, Ga. William McKinley Cobb, X $............................Athens, Ga. Herbert Henry Dean....................................Nacooehee, Ga. Fred Walter Gilbert...................................Washington, Ga. James David Howard, A Tfl.............................Thomson, Ga. Greene Sharpe Johnston................................Dover, Ga. Joseph Pottle, A TO,..................................Warrenton, Ga. W. T. Shockley, KX...................................Atlanta, Ga. Franklin Elmore Twitty, X $...........................Camilla, Ga. Left College. I I I I I » »THE FRATERNITIES 4344 THE PANDORA. « In The Order of Establishment AND RE-ESTABLISHMENT.SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON. 45 (NOT REPRESENTED IN THE PANDORA WITH AN EDITOR) MEMBERS IN FACULTY. P. H. Mell, D. D., L. H. Charbonnier, A. M. Class of ySy. W. L. M. Austin, J. H. Blount, Jr. C. C. McGehee, Wesley Peacock, C. F. Finch, Ben Hill Thompson, Warren W. Wimberly, Chas. M. Walker, J. H. Walker, W. H. Hammond. Class of ’88. C. B. Carter, J. D. Little, J. A. Barnes, W. L. Moore, C. P. Fuller, G. A. AVhitehead, James C. Mell, Mayhew Cunningham, George Mercer, W. E. Baldwin. Class of ’89. J. M. Mitchell, E. W. Charbonnier, B. C. Collier, B. A. Stovall, Jr. R. F. Maddox. Class of ’90. Marion Hull. ♦Left College.46 THE PANDORA. —GSWABIjISHED IN 1867. FRATRES IN FACULEATE. H. C. White, A, C. M. E. W. G. Woodfin, 0a. I A. M. J). C. Barrow, Jr., Z7, C. M. E. FRA TRES IN UR BE. E. W. Burke, Z7, Pope Barrow, Jr., II’ Wm. McDowell, Ga., ,4 Chas. B. Griffith, H, George Hodgson, ZZ, Billups Phinizy, ZZ, J. H. Rucker, ZZ, Thomas P. Stanley, H, R. G. Taylor, ZZ, M. G. Nicholson. ZZ, ACTIVE MEMBERS. Law School of ’87. William McKinley Cobb. Franklin Elmore Twitty. Class of ’87. Charlie Frank Rice. Class of ’88. Joseph Emerson Boston, Lucian Lamar Knight, Nash Rose Broyles, Francis Wayland Wright, Edwin 0. Stanton. Class of ’89. Paul Semmes Black, Warren Waldo Martin, Thomas R. R. Cobb, William IIayes Pope, Louis Alfred Fleming, Cail Riley Tate, Thomas Jefferson Thornton. Class of ’90. Noel Lamar Poullain. ♦Left College. 8 3jUNext Convention meets Nov. 16, 1887, in Philadelphia, Pa.CHI PHI. 47 ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. Alpha......................University of Virginia. Beta.......................Harvard University. Gamma......................Emory College. Delta......................Rutgers College. Epsilon....................Hampden-Sidney College. Zeta.......................Franklin and Marshall College. Eta........................University of Georgia. Theta......................Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Iota.......................Ohio State University. Kappa......................Brown University. Lambda.....................University of California. Mu.........................Stevens Institute. Omicron....................Yale University. Pi.........................Vanderbilt University. Rho........................Lafayette College. Sigma....................... Wofford College. Phi .......................Amherst College. Cm.........................Ohio Wesleyan University. Psi........................Lehigh University. Omega......................Dickinson College. ALUMNI CHAPTERS. Aleph . ...................Baltimore, Md. Beth ......................New York City, N. Y. Vau........................Washington, D. C.48 THE PANDORA. Gamma Ghaptei —Established i860. FRATRES IN FACULTATE. Charles Morris, A. M., George D. Thomas, B. L. (Law). C. P. Wilcox, A. M., Andrew J. Cobb, B. L. (Law) C. M. Strathan, C. and M. E., Samuel C. Benedict, M.D. (Law) FRA TRES IN URBE. James C. Bloomfield, Z7, ’81, Fred. S. Morton, Z7, Harry H. Phinizy, Z7, 82, J. N. Smith, B, C. H. Sylvanus Morris, Z7, ’76, G. R. Nicholson, Z7, W. M. Rowland, Z7, II. N. Wilcox, Z7, Wilcox, J7, Law School of ’87. Walter Scott Chisholm, Jr. Class of ’87. Robert Langdon Foreman, Ernest Charles Kontz, John Dortch Moss. Class of ’88. Emmet Joplin Bondurant, Hugh Moss Comer, Jr. John W. Daniel, Hugh Urquhaiit Downing, Class Edward Clayton Fleming, Joseph Lumpkin Gerdine, Robert Erwin Hardee, J ohn W. Lamar, Victor Lamar Smith, Chas. Ed. Morris, Arthur Hicks McCarrel. of ’89. Charles R. Warren, Philip D. "Wilson, Benjamin Franklin Hardeman. Class of jO. Edward Calhoun Beard, Frank Erwin Callaway, Thomas Fitzgerald Green. ♦Deceased. m ’The next National Convention will be held at Columbia, S. C.f 'KAPPA ALPHA 49 OTJnsrZDEID 1866. RO OF ACTIVE dUkrTBM. Alpha . Beta . . Gamma . Delta . Epsilon . Zeta . . Eta . . Theta . . Iota. . . Kappa , Lambda . Mu . . . . JSS. . . Omicron. Pi. . . Rho . Sigma . Upsilon. Phi . . Chi . . ». . . Omega . Alpha-Alpha . Washington-Lee University..Lexington, Va. . Virginia Military Institute . .Lexington, Va. . University of Georgia . . . Athens, Ga. . .Wofford College..........Spartanburg, S. C. . Emory College.............Oxford, Ga. . Randolph Macon College. . .Ashland, Va. . Richmond College..........Richmond, Va. . Sub-Rosa. . Furman University .... Greenville, S. C. . Mercer University .... Macon, Ga. . University of Virginia. . . Alb’marle,Co. ,Va. . Erskine College...........Due West, S. C. . .Alabama State College. . . Auburn, Ala. . Sub-Rosa. . 1508 Rio Grande Street, Uni. Tex., Austin,Tex . University of Tennessee . . Knoxville, Tenn. . South Carolina College. . . Columbia, S. C. . Davidson College, Mecklenburgh County, N.C. . University of N. C........Chapel Hill, N. C. . Southern University. . . . Greensboro, Ala. . Vanderbilt University . . . Nashville, Tenn. . Tulane University.........New Orleans, La. . Centre College of Kent'y . Danville, Ky. .University of the South . . Sewanee, Tenn. Alpha Beta . . University of Alabama . . Tuscaloosa, Ala. Alpha-Gamma . Louisiana State University . Baton Rouge, La. Alp ha-Delta . . William Jewell College . . . Liberty, Mo.50 THE PANDORA. FRA TRES IN UR BE. Edward K. Lumpkin, Y. G. Woodfin, Jr., Edward H. Kimbrough, John F. Jackson. Edward 1. Smith, Edward Walter L. Childs, J. B. L. Cobb, Edward II. Dorset, Frank W. Cheney, C. A. Durham, Sanford. Class of ’87. Marion Tracy Davis, William Barclay Powers, 'Albert James Tuggle, George H. Winston. Class of ’88. Lamar Cobb, Jr. Edward Benjamin Cohen, Oscar Swift Davis, John Ellison Foy, Thomas Richmond Hardwick, Joseph Gilmore Jarrell, Thomas Walter Reed. Class of ’89. Eugene J. McWilliams. Class of ’90. Horace Baber Atkisson, Cicero Guy Chandler. ♦Left College. mwtXA.puu . tCo t. rtytot;PHI DELTA THETA. Si Established Dec. 26, 1848. BOLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. ALPHA PROVINCE. Maine Alpha—Colby University. New Hampshire Alpha—Dartmouth College. Massachusetts Alpha—Williams College. Vermont Alpha—University of Vermont. New York Alpha—Cornell University. New York Beta—Union College. New York Gamma—College of the City of New York. New York Delta—Columbia College. Pennsylvania Alpha—Lafayette College. Pennsylvania Beta—Pennsylvania College. Pennsylvania Gamma—Washington and Jefferson College. Pennsylvania Delta—Allegheny College. Pennsylvania Epsilon—Dickinson College. Pennsylvania Zeta—University of Penn. Pennsylvania Eta—Lehigh University. BETA PROVINCE. Virginia Alpha—Roanoke College. Virginia Epsilon—Va. Military Institute. Virginia Beta—University of Virginia. Virginia Zeta—Washington and Lee Virginia Gamma—Randolph-Macon College. University. Virginia Delta—Richmond College. North Carolina Beta—University of N. C. South Carolina Beta-South Carolina College GAMMA PROVINCE. Georgia Alpha—University of Georgia. Georgia Beta—Emory College. Georgia Gamma—Mercer University. Tennessee Alpha—Vanderbilt University. Alabama Alpha—University of Alabama. Alabama Beta—State College of Alabama. Alabama Gumma—Southern University MississippiAlpha—University of Mississippi Tennessee Beta—University of the South. Texas Beta-University of Texas. Texas Gamma—Southwestern University. DELTA PROVINCE. Ohio Alpha—Miami University. Ohio Beta—Ohio Wesleyan University. Ohio Gamma—Ohio University. Ohio Delta—University of Wooster. EPSILON Indiana Alpha—Indiana University. Indiana Beta—Wabash College. Indiana Gamma—Butler University. Indiana Delta—Franklin College. Ohio Epsilon—Buchtel College. Ohio Zeta—Ohio State University. Kentucky Alpha—Centre College. Kentucky Delta—Central University. PROVINCE. Indiana Epsilon—Hanover College. Indiana Zeta - DePaun University. Michigan Beta—State College of Michigan. Michigan Gamma—Hillsdale College.52 THE PANDORA. ZETA PROVINCE. Illinois Alpha-Northwestern University. Illinois Delta—Knox College. Illinois Zeta—Lombard University. Illinois Epsilon -Illinois Wesleyan University Wisconsin Alpha—University of Wisconsin ETA PROVINCE. Missouri Alpha—University of Missouri. Missouri Beta—Westmoreland College. Kansas Alpha—University of Kansas. Nebraska Alpha—University of Nebraska. Iowa Alpha—Iowa Wesleyan University. Iowa Beta—State University of Iowa. Minnesota Alpha—University of Minnesota California Alpha—University of California ALUMNI CHAPTERS. New York Alpha Alumni—New York, N. Y. Ohio Alpha Alumni—Cincinnati, Ohio. Pennsylvania Alpha Alumni—Pittsburg, Pa. Ohio Beta Alumni—Akron, Ohio. Virginia Alpha Alumni—Richmond, Va. Kentucky Alpha Alumni—Louisville, Ky Dist. of Col. Alpha Alumni—Washington,D C Indiana Alpha Alumni—Franklin, Ind. Maryland Alpha Alumni—Baltimore, Md. Indiana Beta Alumni—Indianapolis, Ind. Georgia Alpha Alumni—Columbus, Ga. Illinois Alpha Alumni—Chicago, III. Georgia Beta Alumni—Atlanta, Ga. Illinois Beta Alumni—Galesburgh, 111. Alabama Alpha Alumni—Montgomery, Ala. Missouri Alpha Alumni—Kansas City, Mo. Tennessee Alpha Alumni-Nashville, Tenn. Minnesota Alpha Alumni—Minneapolis, Minn. California Alpha Alumni—San Francisco, Cal. The next national Convention will be held at Bloomington, Illinois, in the XLI year of the Fraternity, commencing Monday, October 10, 1SS9, and closing the following Friday. xGEORGIA ALPHA BETA. 53 RESIDENT MEMBERS. H. H. Carlton, A. F. Bishop, C. D. Campbell. ACTIVE MEMBERS. » Law Class ’87. James David Howard, Joseph Pottle. Class of ’87. William Beall Crawford, Robert Lee Johnson, Henry Key Milner. Class of ’88. William Duncan Nesbitt, Edward G. Russell, William Evan Thomas. Class of ’S9. Mark Allen Candler, Thomas Rrmsen Crawford, Alexander Atkinson Lawrence, Edward Jones McRee, Samuel McWhir Varnado. Class of ’90. Robert Lee Headers, Lewis Carolin Russell.54 THE PANDORA. Founded September ii, 1865. Incorporated 1878. ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. 18G5 Va. Beta............ 1868 Va. Delia.......... 1869 Va. Epsilon........ 1884 Ky. Zeta............ 1870 Ky. Mu............. 1877 Tenn. Omega........ 1878 Oa. Alpha Beta..... 1879 N. a Alpha-Delta.... 1879 Ala. Alpha-Epsilon.... 1880 Ga. Alpha-Zeta..... 1881 Ga. Alpha-Theta..... 1881 N. C. Alpha-Theta .... 1881 Penn. Tau........... 1881 Mich. Alphas-Mu..... 1881 jS. J. Alpha-Kappa.... 1882 Ohio Alpha Nu...... 1882 N. Y. Alpha-Omicron. 1882 Penn. Alpha-Rho..... 1882 Tenn. Alpha-Tau..... 1882 Penn. Alpha- Upsilon. 1883 S. C. Alpha-Phi..... 1884 Ohio Alpha-Psi .... 1884 Fla. Alpha-Omega... 1885 Iowa Beta-Alpha.... 1885 Ala. Beta-Beta ..... 1885 Mass. Beta-Gamma.. . 1885 Ala. Beta-Delta...... .Washington and Lee University .University of Virginia .Roanoke College .Central University .Kentucky Military Institute .University of the Soutli University of Georgia .University of North Carolina .A. M. College of Alabama .Mercer University .Emory College .Sub-Rosa ..University of Pennsylvania .Adrian College .Stevens Institute Mt. Union College .St. Lawrence University .Lehigh University .S. W. Presbyterian University .Penn College South Carolina College .Wittenberg College .University of Florida .Simpson Centenary College .Southern University .Massachusetts Institute of Technology .University of AlabamaBETA DELTA CHAPTER. 55 Established iSSz, Ch.a.pter olL. Lazv School of ’87. Edgar Lawrence Ballard. Class of ’87. Robert Lee Nowell. Class of ’88. William Alonzo Davis, William Martin Glass, A. L. Franklin. John William Barnett, James Allen Jones, Sanborn Chase, John Phillip Upshaw, Class of ’89. Augustus Milledge Hartsfield, Edwin Clifford Stewart, James Alvin Parks, Augustus Cleveland Willcoxon.56 TIIE PANDORA. Delta Taa Delta. Founded i860. ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. ■d ................................Allegheny College P..................................Stevens Institute of Technology T..................................Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute N..................................Lafayette College T .................................Washington and Jefferson College If.................................Lehigh University 2..................................Columbia College M..................................Ohio Wesleyan University. X..................................Kenyon College W..................................Wooster University Z..................................A del bert College B..................................Ohio University 6).................................Bethany College H..................................Buclitel College BE.................................Emory College BA.................................University of Georgia BO.................................University of the South A..................................University of Michigan ..................................Hanover College E..................................Albion College 1 ................................Michigan State College K..................................Hillsdale College BB.................................De Pauw University BZ.................................Butler University 0..................................Iowa State University .................................Iowa State College £..................................Simpson College B1I................................University of Minnesota BK.................................University of Colorado A..................................Vanderbilt University II............................. ...University of Mississippi 2 ................................Columbia College T..................................Franklin and Marshall College. ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS. NASHVILLE, CLEVELAND, CHICAGO, NEW YORK, MICHIGAN.—KAPPA DKUTERON CHAPTER. 57 Established 1871-1884. Dr. John J. Hill. IN URBE. Llewellyn S. D earing. Class of ’87. Walter Lee Hodges, Ulysses Virgil Whipple, Glen Waters. Class of ’88. John Robert Evans, William Mosley Hawes, William Augustus Kennon, Eugene W. Wade. Class of '89. Zacharias A. Crittenden, William Benjamin Dixon, William Dennis Reid, William Haped Williams. Class of ’90. Chas. Allen Talmadge. ♦Left College. 553 THE PANDORA. Founded 1848. ROLL OF ACTIVE CHAPTERS. 1848 A....Washington and Jefferson College 1882 r....University of California........ 1882 A.....Bucknell University......... 1852 Z....Indiana State University....... 1855 H.....Marietta College................ 185G K....Baylor University........... 1856 A.....De Pauw University.......... 1858 £....Pennsylvania College........... 1859 0....University of Virginia......... 1858 II......Allegheny College............... 1885 2....Wittenberg College.......... 1864 T.....Hanover College............. 1865 V.....College City of New York........ 1880 X....Racine College................... 1866 W.....Wabash College.................. 1865 Dj......Columbia College................ 1S67 A A.....Illinois Wesleyan University.... 1867 BA....Roanoke College................. 18671 and ■ PA.... Knox College................... 1885 J 1870 A A...Hampden and Sidney College..... 1868 EA.....Muhlenberg College.............. 1870 OA......Ohio Wesleyan University........ 18711 and KA.....University of Georgia........... 1884 j 1885 A A...Denison University.............. 1878 OA...Ohio State University.......... 18S2 IIA.....University of Kansas............ 18S2 PA......University of Wooster........... 1883 2SA ....Lafayette College.......... 1884 TA......University of Texas........... 1885 A$.....University of Michigan.......... 1886 BX....Lehigh University............... 1886 Z$.....William Jewell College.......... 18S6 £A......Adelbert College................ .Washington, Pa. .Berkley, Cal. .Lewisburgh, Pa. .Bloomington, Ind. Marietta, Ohio. .Independence, Tex. Greencastle, Ind. .0ettysburg, Penn. .Charlottesville, Va. .Meadville, Pa. .Springfield, Ohio. Hanover. Ind. .New York City. .Crawfordville, Ind. ..Wabash, Ind. New York City. .Bloomington, 111. , Salem, Va. .Galesburg, 111. .Prince Edward Co., Va .Allentown, Pa. .Delaware, Ohio. .Athens, Ga. ..Granville, Ohio. ..Columbus, Ohio. .Lawrence, Kan. .Wooster, Ohio. ..Easton, Pa. .Austin, Tex. Ann Arbor, Mich. ..Bethlemen, Pa. ..Liberty, Mo. .Cleveland, Ohio. Delta ALUMNI CHAPTER. ...................Chattanooga, Tenn. MU CHAPTER. 59 The Sigma Nu insert was lost in transit, hence the omission. F©HJKIII)IEI1D 1884k FRA TRES IN URBE. J. W. O’Kelly, G. H. Williamson, A. D. Ciieney. • Class of ’87. John Ebexkzer Flowers, Huon N. Gallaher, Class of ’88. William George Brown. John Gordon Cranford, Hope Cociiran Poliiill, William James Shaw, Geo. W. Whittaker, Class of ’89. Theodore A. Kline, Simon Peter Richardson, Samuel Eugene Walker, Sewell A. Wright, Robert L. Sample. ♦Left College. Class of ’90. Geo. James Strother.MU CHAPTER. 59 F0UPJIDB1D ERA TRES IN URBE. J. W. O’Kelly, G. II. Williamson, A. 1). Cheney. Class of ’87. John Ebenbzer Flowers, Hugii N. Gallaher, Class of ’88. William George Brown. John Gordon Cranford, Hope Cociiran Polhill, William James Shaw, Geo. W. Whittaker, Class of ’89. Theodore A. Kline, Simon Peter Richardson, Samuel Kugene Walker. Sewell A. Wright, Robert L. Sample. ♦Left College. Class of ’90. Geo. James Strother.6o THE PANDORA. Alpha.....................Virginia Military Institute. Beta......................University of Virginia. Gamma.....................University of North Carolina. Delta.....................University of South Carolina. Epsilon...................Bethany College. Zeta......................Central University. Eta..............'. . . . Mercer University. Theta.....................University of Alabama. Iota......................Howard College. Kappa.....................North Georgia Agricultural Col. Lambda....................Washington-Lee University. Mu........................University of Georgia. Nu........................University of Kansas. Xi........................Emory College. Omicron...................Bethel College. Pi.................. . Lehigh University. Rho.......................University of Missouri. Sigma ... ... Vanderbilt University. Tail......................S. C. Military Academy. Upsilon...................University of Texas.THE PANDORA. 63 What means this large mysterious crowd— These whispers quick and low, As o’er the campus like a cloud Those hurrying students go? Why do they gather at that hall And wink at one another? Who is that fellow, large and tall, Whom they all salute as brother? Why do they bind his eyes so tight And march around and groan? Why do they all disrobe him quite With many a shuddering moan? 1 Why do they pour that mixture on And paint him black and red? O, why do they insist upon That green paint for his head? Why do they bounce him in a sheet And drop him on the lloor? Why does he sing so wondrous sweet The same thing o’er and o’er? Why do they o’er his shudderring form Pour mixtures strange—but holy? And scrub him with the sacred broom To music melancholy? Why do they rush with sudden yell And leave him there alone? Where is the “brother” who can tell The thoughts of H -rst—n.64 THE PANDORA. ATHLETICS. 65 OFFICERS. E. J. BONDURANT,...........................President R. L. NOWELL, .... 1st Vice-President. W. L. M. AUSTIN, . . . . 2d Vice-President. 0. S. DAVIS, . . . . Secretary and Treasurer. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. E. J. Bondurant, B. F. Hardeman, N. R. Broyles, R. L. Nowell, V. B. Dixson. 0. F. Rice, W. L. M. Austin,66 THE PANDORA. C. E. Morris, ’88, Pitcher. W. D. Nesbitt, ’88, Catcher. R. L. Nowell, 87, First Base. F. W. Coile, ’88, Second Base. E. J. Bondurant, ’88, Short-stop. J. H. Williford, 89, Third Base. J. C. Mell, 88, Left Field. B. F. Hardeman, 89, Centre Field. Q. L. Williford, 88, Right Field. T. M. Cunningham, 88, Substitute. SENIOR NINE. R. L. Nowell, Catcher and Captain. C. E. Morris, Pitcher. C. F. Fincii, First Base. J. H. Walker, Second Base. W. L. M. Austin, Third Base. H K. Milner, Short Stop. C. C. McGehee, Left Field. G. Waters, Right Field. C. M. Walker, Centre Field- JUNIOR “A” NINE. W. I). Nesbitt, Catcher and Captain. 0. S. Davis, Pitcher. G. A. Whitehead, First Base. F. W. Coile, Second Base. J. E. Boston, Third Base. E. J. Bondurant, Short-stop. J. C. Mell, Left Field. N. R. Broyles, Centre Field. Q. L. Williford, Right Field.ATHLETICS. 67 JUNIOR “B” NINE. % C. E. Morris, Catcher and Captain. G. A. Mercer, Pitcher. V. L. Smith, First Base. T. M. Cunningham, Second Base. J. D. Little, Third Base. J. A. Barnes, Short-stop. Lamar Cobb, Left FieJd. C. P. Fuller, Centre Field. F. W. Wright, Right Field. SOPHOMORE NINE. J. H. Williford, Catcher. P. S. Black, Pitcher. • S. Chase, First Base. B. F. Hardeman, Second Base. E. C. Fleming, Third Base C. H. Willcox, Short-stop. C. L. Burrows, Left Field. W. B. Dixson, Centre Field. W. D. Reid, Right Field. RECORD OF OFFICIAL GAMES. March 8—Sophomores 4 Junior “B” 12 March 12—Junior • A ” 9 Junior “ B . ... 7 March 14—Senior 15 Sophomores 5 March 19—Senior 13 Junior “ B ” 25 March 23 Sophomores 2 11 March 25—Junior “ A ” 10 Junior “B” 9 March 26—Junior “A” 6 Senior 3 —Junior “A” 18 .... Sophomores .’....17 May 13-Augusta 2 .... .. . Univeisity ....'.24 May 14—Augusta 9 University 7 May 14—Augusta 4 University 2368 THE PANDORA. COMMITTEE ON ARRANGEMENTS J. G. Mell, W. D. Nesbitt, T. W. Heed. 1. 100 yards dash. 2. Standing broad jump. 3. Putting shot (two trials). 4. Horizontal bar. 5. 200 yards dash 6. Running broad jump. 7. Throwing baseball (two trials). 8. Standing broad jump. 9. One half mile run. 10. Throwing hammer. 11. Potato race. 12. Hop step and jump (two trials). 13. Wrestling match. 14. Vaulting. 15. Tug of war.SPRING MEETING. SATURDAY, MAY 28 th, 1887. SATURDAY, MAY 28th, 1887. HUNDRED YARD DASH. Contestants Time. Height or Distance. First—Bondurant, 88...............................Time, 11 seconds Second—Wade, ’88....................................11 1-5 “ STANDING BROAD JUMP. First—Bondurant, ’88......................................9 feet Second- Quarterman, ’88 ; Milner, ’87.......8 feet 8 inches PUTTING THE SHOT. First—Thompson, ’89......................................36 feet Second—Cooper, ’89.........................31 feet 6 inches RUNNING HOP, STEP AND JUMP. First—Mclly ’88...................................38 feet 6 inches Second—Quarterman, ’88...................................35 feet BAR JUMP. First—Mell, ’88...................................11 feet 9 inches Second—Quarterman, ’88.....................11 feet 6 inches STANDING HIGH KICK. First—Bingham, 90..........................7 feet 2 inchesTHE PANDORA. STANDING BROAD JUMP with Dumb Bells). First—Milner, ’87...........................10 feet 4 inches Second—Quartern!an, ’88...................................10 feet TWO HUNDRED YARD DASH. First—Bondurant, ’88..................................22 1-5 seconds Second—Thompson, ’89 HALF MILE RUN. First—Collier, ’89 .2 min. 30 seconds Second—Black, ’89 .2 min. 36 seconds RUNNING BROAD JUMP. First—Charbonnier, ’89 Second—Mell, ’88 THROWING BASE BALL. First—Mell, ’88 Second—Broyles, ’88 BAR ACTING. First—Barry, 90 Second—Milner, 87 WRESTLE. Cooper, 89 TUG OF WAR. ’88 vs. ’89 ’89 WinnerTENNIS CLUB. 69 OFFTCERS. E. J. BONDURANT, B. F. HARDEMAN, JNO. W. DANIEL, E. J. Bondurant, Jno. W. Daniel, E. C. Fleming, R. L. Foreman, P. D. Wilson, W. M. Rowland, F. E. Calloway, President Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer. J. L. Gerdine, R. E. Hardee, . B. F. Hardeman, J. D. Moss, C. M. Strahan, C. E. Morris, V. L. Smith. CM PM Tennis Club N. R. Broyles, W. W. Martin, P. S. Black, J. E. Boston, F. W. Wright, F. E. Twitty, L. L. Knight, N. L. Poullain, C. R. Tate.70 THE PANDORA. OFFICERS. W. B. CRAWFORD,............................President B. A. STOVALL, Jr., .... Vice-President A. S. THOMPSON, . . Secretary and Treasurer. MEMBERS. W. B. Crawford, B. A. Stovall, Jr. J. E. Pottle, A. S. Thompson, P. D. Wilson, II. K. Milner, B. F. Gunn. W. D. Nesbitt.ENGINEERING SOCIETY. 71 JUngine ring Society. JOHN D. MOSS, ...... President. W. A. KENNON,...............................Vice-President. 0. S. DAVIS, ....... Secretary. A. II. McCARREL, ....... Treasurer EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. R. L. Johnson, 0. S. Davis, G. A. Whitehead, A. H. McCarrel. MEMBERS. Class of ’87. H. K. Milner, R. L. Johnson, W. B. Crawford. J. D. Moss, M. Elkin, Class of ’88. G. A. WniTEHEAD, A. H. McCarrel, W. A. Kennon, 0. S. Davis, Lamar Cobb, John W. Daniel, A. L. Franklin, C. E. Morris.72 THE PANDORA. On Monday, the 2d of May, 1887, with all the “pomp and circumstance'1 calle d for by the solemnity of the occasion, seventeen handsome and accomplished engineers left the shades of Athens on the usual “Engineering Trip.” At exactly 12 o'clock, on the 5th day of May, seventeen wilted but happy engineers, for the last time on earth, threw their stakes in one common heap, and shared a common joy—for the survey was over. It was exactly 12 o'clock when Elkan dropped the compass in the soup pot, and John Moss pulled it out, and Johnson said “dammit"- and the survey was over. You could tell by the way that McCarrel began hunting for chickens that it was all over. You could tell by the way Bi.roett smiled, that his work was done. You could look at Ben Franklin's contented face and tell at once that the survey was finished. You could even tell how far they had come, if you had looked in Elkan’s pocket, for there were in said pocket eighteen large pebbles and one small one—which by McCarrers measurement, meant exactly eighteen miles aud one half. You could tell when they started, from the faded impression of the last Sunday’s sermon. You could tell they were happy, and that the trip was finished. Monday—a long to be remembered Monday. A Monday of tramp, tramp, tramp. A Monday of dust and stakes and levels, but the dinner was good, and the supper was splendid. Then, Tuesday, Elkan found his shoes—and fell into a ditch. Kennon succumbed and said Sunday School words—while Oscar Davis forgot to whistle and ate more than anybody. Wednesday— very exciting. Whitehead only three chickens behind McOarrell—Barnett invents a new method of adding departures, and Elkin challenges John Daniel to mortal combat—then nightfall on the outskirts of Jefferson. Then seventeen jolly young students—then one small police—then one mayor—ah! Then John Daniel “jaws” the mayor - and finally seventeen scared and dusty engineers lay down to dream of blue-coats, and brass buttons and fines, Bill Crawford borrows Milner’s handkerchief and weeps, and the scanty form of Cobb tosses in troubled anticipation. And that run away marriage, and Whitehead and Daniel were best men—and didn’t the bridegroom look funny?-Elkan made a mistake and congratulated Chas. Ed----, and the whole thing was romantic out there in the moon- light—with the Katulids and Crickets for the band, and the railroad track for a platform. And then Thursday—and that banquet—Wells and Stovall beat the record—and the Doctor gives them soothing syrup —and then the good bye to Jefferson and the return to Athens. It was an awfully long way there—but it was not so long coming back—and that midnight ride wasn’t the worst we’ll live to take. And now, when a ou look back on it, and think of the fun, and forgot the work and trouble, you regret that the trip is all over, and find yourself wishing that Joffersons were more numerous—and, run away marriages and bouquets wore not so scarce. You even have a vague impression that maybe you wouldn’t hide Elkan’s shoes if you could only live it all over —and that you wouldn’t mind driving a few stakes now and then—and that those dusty tramps didn’t hurt your appetite so much after all. Oh, well! Good times can’t last always—maybe it is best just as it is. But when 1 am an old man—and maybe with children—or grandchildren, io mirror out my young days—I shall often think with fond recollections of our “Engineering Trip.”THE PHOTO CLUB. 73 R. L. JOHNSON, . President. W. B. CRAWFORD, . Vice President. JOHN D. MOSS, . . Sec. and Treas. MEMBERS. R. L. JOHNSON, J. D. MOSS, W. B. CRAWFORD, H. K. MILNER, R. L. FOREMAN, W. B. POWERS, GLEN WATERS.74 THE PANDORA. jlnmuemmms mtb Jblmbrs. A NNI VERSA RIA NS. DEMOSTHENIAN SOCIETY. ROBERT LEE NOWELL. PHI KAPPA SOCIETY. ERNEST CHARLES KONTZ. CHAMPION DEBATERS. DEMOSTHENIAN. A. HEYMAN, W. L. HODGES, F. E. TWITTY. pm KAPPA. L. L. KNIGHT, G. WATERS, T. W. REED. ' SPRING DEBATERS. DEMOSTHENIAN. W. W. MARTIN, A. M. HA RTSFIELD, P. H. ESTES, II. C. POLHILL, W. II. POPE, F. E. CALLOWAY, PHI KAPPA. J. G. CRANFORD, J. W. BENNETT, A. A. LAWRENCE, R. E. SPENCE, S. P. JONES, A.C. WILLCOXON.EDITORIAL STAFF. 75 The Pandora A. L. FRANKLIN, AT A H. KEY MILNER, AT£1 T. W. REED. $AG C. F. RICE, X$, Editor in Chief. JOHN W. DANIEL, KAy Business Manager. W. J. SHAW, 2N GLEN WATERS, $TA76 THE PANDORA PUBLISHED WEEKLY By the Literary Societies of the University. FIRST TERM. C. F. Rice, D............Editor in Chief. Associate Editors : K. L. Foreman, P. K. G. H. Winston, D. W. L. Hodges, D. N. R. Broyles, P. IC. T. W. Reed, P. K. H. IC. Milner, D. SECOND TERM. C. F. Rice, D............Editor in Chief. Associate Editors. F. E. Twitty, D. U. V. Whipple, P. K. T. R. Hardwick, P. K. E. J. Bondurant, D. R. L. Johnson, D. A. L. Franklin, P. K. THIRD TERM. R. L. Foreman, P. K......Editor in Chief. Associate Editors: E. W. Wade, P. IC. J. E. Pottle, D. W. A. Davis, I). W. D. Nesbitt, P. K. J. E. Boston, P. K. W. B. Powers, D. FOURTH TERM. R, L. Foreman, P. K......Editor in Chief. Associate Editors. W. B. Crawford, D. T. W. Reed, P. K. L. L. Knight, P. IC. C. F. Rice, D. E. L. Ballard, D. N. R. Broyi.es, P. K. COMMENCEMENT. 77 ommencemerit Program. FRIDAY, JULY 8. Board of Trustees of the University meet. SATURDAY, JULY 9. 4 P. M.—The exercises of Class ’87 occurs, pion Debate occurs. 8. P. M.—Cham- SUNDAY, JULY 10. 11 A. M.—Commencement Sermon. 8 P. M.—Sermon to the Praper Meeting Society. MONDAY, JULY 11. 10:30. A. M.—Oration before the Literary Societies by Hon. Peter W. Meldrim, ’68. 4:30 P. M.—Sopho- mores speak. TUESDAY, JULY 12. 10:30 A. M.—Oration before the Alumni Society by Sylvanus Morris, Esq., ’73. 4:30 P. M.—Juniors speak. 8. P. M.—Chancellor’s reception. 10 P. M. Juniors’ Hop. WEDNESDAY, JULY 13. 10:30 A. M.—Seniors speak. Diplomas awarded graduates. 4:30 P. M.—Literary Societies meet with Alumni members. 10 P. M.—Commencement Ball given by ’87.78 THE PANDORA, Interlocutor...............W. B. POWERS. —PREMIERS— fR. L. JOHNSON, Bones — R. L. FOREMAN, ( W. D. NESBITT, (W. W. WIMBERLY, " “ WILSON littlp:. Tam bos— P. D. WILSON, (J. D. -GYMNASTIC PERFORMERS-L. H. Charbonnier, Jr. C. H. Willcox, H. H. Nicholson. -GUITAR QUARTETTE— R. E. Hardee, M. T. Davis, V. L. Smith, J. D. Little. —HARMONIC QUARTETTE— O. S. Davis, W. E. Baldwin, Geo. Mercer, J. D. Little. —VOCAL QUARTETTE— V. L. Smith, J. D. Little, C.M.Strahan, W. D. Nesbitt. -ORCHESTRA- V. L. Smith, T. R. Crawford, B. A. Stovall, W. B. Crawford, Ciias. McGhee, J. D. Little, R. E. Hardee.8o THE PANDORA. At? h, From our esteemed contemporary The Reporter. LOCALS, Examinations! Athens is a dry (?) town. This means we have Prohibition ere. The Reporter is only a dollar a year. Subscriptions payable in advance. The measles are raging in the University. One new case broke out last night. X. Y. First Skull, an old University boy, was with his friends on the 19tli. lie thinks of entering the Law Class. The large gate to the Campus was smeared over with paint last night by some careless students. The Faculty will not stand such as this any longer.UNFORTUNATE. 8l The Georgia Legislature may bo expected to meet in Atlanta this year as usual. The outlook for an appropriation to the University is not at all encouraging. Speaking of “Snakes,” “Rats,” etc., we leave for Europe soon. The trip will, no doubt, be attended with many joys to us. Mr. Rainwater made his first speech in the Phi Kappa Society last Saturday. For an hour before his name was called his majestic form was in a shutter. Everybody expected Mr. Rainwater to fail, but strange to say he fairly shook the building with eloquence. UNFORTUNATE. I. One more uqfortunate, Minus a rise; Rashly importunate, Gone to the skies. II. Gone to a place Where sorrow is not; Where in Infinite grace All math is forgot. III. No longer to sorrow In care and vexation, Math loses its horror In endless vacation. IV. Reckless unfortunate. Thy tale is told; Rashly importunate, Peaee to thy soul.82 THE PANDORA. I am dyne, Harry, dyne, Give me H o; And to those I leave behind, “Ones” forevermore. To the Class 1 leave behind Be, O Harry, good and true ; And list careful while I’m dyne To the things I say to U. Green the shades of Death are falling, Thick as they can B, And I hear sweet voices calling. Prom far o’er the crystal C. With cold-damp my brow is reekiog, And my spirit chafes at waiting— Physiologically speaking I am fast disintegrating. I’ll be turning ere long, Harry, Into Ca. C08, And the ignis fatuus airy Will be farming over me. CH4 and C02 Will wreathe my weeping willow, And PH3 will hover too Around my lonely pillow. I must go and leave you, Harry, Take this message as good-bye ; I’ll get even with you, Harry, When we meet in Philippi. ♦The reference is to page 632 in GanotBUSTED. 83 “BUSTED. » The shades of eve were falling fast When o’er the college campus passed A youth, whose forlorn features named hith ; A youth, whose general cut proclaimed him— “Busted.” His face was pale, his feet beneath Seemed bursting from their leathern sheath, While high his dismal treble sung. In full fledged Academic tongue— “Busted.” “O, stay,” old Hauser said, “and pay The bill you’ve owed for many a day.” A tear bedimmed his dark green eye; He simply sighed as he passed by— “Busted.” Then straight down College avenue, ’Till his gaunt form was lost to view. His restless course was onward bent, And legend says in truth he went— “Busted.” And on and on, forever on, From dawn to eve, from eve to dawn, The people paused and wondering heard The oft repeated tragic word— “Busted.” They found his body in the river, The tired form was stilled forever. Of sheepskin first—then life—bereft The youth whom Foot’s exam, had left— “Busted.”84 THE PANDORA. His sorrowing classmates still deplore him; They had a monument put up o’er him, Aud verily they put thereon (Just under date when he was born) “Busted.” - And now these Juniors1 cussing math By way of simple logic hath Recalled, from memory’s vague entwinals, The youth that on our Junior finals “Busted.”THE PANDORA. S5 B Y=T H E=W AY. “Damp ground causes sickness.” “We will begin the recitation, young gentlemen.” “Please do not demonstrate to-night, on the contrary I hope you will co-operate with me.” “You have made your bed, and you will have to lie on it ” “ The attendance at the University this year is heavier than it ever has been.” “ Gentlemen: Allow me to present to you Mr.86 THE PANDORA. The Spring Debates were successful. A certain daily paper published not a thousand miles away announces, that student’s actualy wear eye-glasses. This is startling, but evinces that sore eyes are common. It is estimated that at least one hundred and twenty thousand dollars are spent by students of the University annualy, in Athens. The University Reporter should be heartily supported by every student and friend of the University of Georgia. A few less finals would be better for the students of the University of Georgia. As it is they are about as common as a College Boarding House meal. Read The Pandora, and if you like it, send the Business Manager another fifty cents and secure a copy for one of your friends. We hope the Faculty, Trustees and Alumni, without a single exception, will aid us by purchasing at least one copy of this Annual. The Pandora has done more to advertise the University than a dozen newspaper ads ” put in out-of-the-way places. The Class Tree exercises of ’87 occurred Nov. 25, 1886, on the Campus. George H. Winston delivered the oration, which was received with interest by the large audience. Since planting the tree, it has departed life. A College Boarding House is a Paradise on earth. What better should a mortal want here below ?QUOTATIONS. 87 A' A babe in a house is a well-spring of pleasure—(The Freshman.) I do not sot my life at a pin’s fee—(The Law Student.) He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument—(The Champion Debator.) So lonely ’twas that God himself scarce seemed to be—(The Geology recitation.) As idle as a painted ship on a painted ocean—(The I). 13. M. Student.) I cannot eat but little meat my stomach is not good—(Guest of the Hotel de Summy.) Where wine and beer are I am sometimes—(The Strong Drink Seeker.) I lived to write—(The Reporter Editor.) The angers in heaven wept when he was boro—(The Masher.) They have a plentiful lack of wit—(The Reporter Editor.) A little lower than the angels—(Class ’87 ) They neglect everything for mathemaics—(Class ’89.) Hell is empty and devils here—(Class ’88.) I had rather a fool make me merry than experience make mo sad— (Ye Zcter Ki.) The tart ness of his face sours grapes—(A. L. F-n.) A pretty fellow is but a half man—(H. K. M-r.) Little things can make a great noise—(B. C. C---r.) A little, round, fat, oily man—(E. J. M-e.) I am so fresh that the new green blades of grass Turn pale with envy as I pass—(M. R. H-1.) Would that we could all be sports like thee—(J. F. W-w ) Thy strength is notin proportion to thy height—(C. C. P-e ) Thou art a thorough Texan—(B, B. B---s.)88 THE PANDORA. Professor—(Iu recitation at Physics, turning the plate of the electrical machine)—“Mr. YV-k-r please describe the action of the electrical machine.” W-k-r—“Well, sir, it is a glass plate, turned by a crank-” (Professor suddenly stops turning the plate.) White—“Mr. Cr-w-rd, where does the plant get its carbon?” Cr-w-rd—“From NHg.1’ Would-be-Champion-Debater—“TIello, D-z-r, Pm mighty glad to see you how are you ?” D-z-r (’89)—“0, pretty well, how are you ?” W. B. C. D (Confidentially)—“Say, D-z-r, I would like mighty well to have your vote for champion debate.” D-z-r—“Well, -----, I like you very well, but Fll have to vote for those other fellows. You see Pve decided to vote strictly on merit this year.” (He never smiled again.) __________________ Charbey—“Now, Bailey, lower that window about two centimetres,please” Bailey (Thunderstruck)—“ Do what, boss I” Charbey—“Lower it a couple of centimetres.” Bailey (Looks all over the window for some new screws)—“Boss, I don’t see de place, sir.” _________________ Crawford (’87) [Very much indoubt]—“Now White said, use H2S04, and Strahan said use sulphuric acid, and Fll be blowed if I knowed which to use.’ “Zip”—“Mr. Foreman, why was you absent on last Wednesday.” Foreman (’87) [Piously]—“Well Professor, that was Good Friday, and I went to church that day, sir.”SLOGS. 89 Pkof. Math— ‘‘Mr. Kline, if you add 7x to 3x wliat do you get?” Kline—“The sum, sir.” Old Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard To get lier poor Doggy a bone. But Ch-r-s W-lk-r got there So the cupboard was bare, And thus the poor Doggy got none. White—(Ten or twelve in succession have answered unprepared)— “Mr. El-an, in what condition was K plant food originally found ?” El-an—“Un------” White—decomposed silicates; yes, sir. Where is it usually found, sir ?” El-an—4 Un--” White—“—der the surface layer, yes sir; very good, sir. It is not probable, is it, sir, that we shall be able to make them soluble?” El-an—“Unprepared, sir.” Don’t risk it - don’t risk it— A Surnmey House biscuit Won’t do ’till you're ready to die, I advise you to wait When they pass ’round the plaie And avoid dissolution thereby. J-N-8—“Mr. Il-c-e. if you came across some of these ice markings, where would you look for the terminus of the glacier ?” It-C-E—“At the end, sir.” 790 THE PANDORA.SLOGS. 91 i Professor in Engineering -“Mr. W-h-t-he-d, how do you find the true Meridian with the compass ?” Wii-t-ii-i —“You take a piece of tin, catch the reflection of Polaris, and put a brick on it.” Professor in Piiysics—“Mr. Wr-g-t, what does water do on freez-ing ?” Wr-g-t—4‘Becomes a solid.” Prof. R-d—“ Mr Burrows, What is the hypothenuse of a right angled triangle equal to P” Burrows—“The sum of the other two, sir.” Prof. C----R—“Mr.----- what is velocity ?” Student—“ Velocity is what a man puts his hot plate down with.” E. C. D v-s (’88) says, that “ the parabola will sorter do, but he can’t stand the eclipse.” Fre h—“ What does »h vice-preTdetu of he Junior Class do?” Sophos-moros “ He presides over the v;ce in the Junior Class.”92 THE PANDORA. E. C. K----tz (’88) [Just after a lecture on acetic acid] “—White just kept on talking about a cedar casket and I dont see how a cedar Casket can have a formula, anyliow.” Here lies a student—he owed a bill. Doomed by a creditor this grave to fill. Thompson (’89)—“I don’t believe--will fight lie called me a liar, and when I told him I was not a liar, he would’nt do a blamed thing.” Prof. C------r—“Mr. Elkin, how do }’ou prevent the errors that might arise from this ?” Elkan (’87)—“ You make allowance for them.” Smitii (’87) [soliloquizing]—“This thing must be wrong, ho talks about at least a dozen different radii. I’d like to know how many radii a sphere has anyhow.” There was a young man named G-rb-lt Whose form resembled a target, The Zeta Chi’s hazed him, Which much amazed him. This Moses Wadley Garbetf. . I)-v s (’87)—When he smiles and nods look out for some fun, He’s nursing a word and will get off a pun. M-ln-r (’87)—Find me a bottle of II20, please. R-CE (’87)—I can find no II20, but here is some water.DIES GAUDII. 93 Dies Gaudii - Dies Juvenis. O college days! O days of joy! When all the world seems fair ; When pleasure has no base alloy, And hope pervades the air. The gayest, brightest, time of life, The freest from all care ; When everything with bliss is rife, And friends are everywhere. Before cold contact with the woild Has warped each gen'rous thought ; Before the wings of Hope are furled. And all is lost that's sought! When friends are friends in deed —not word—, And friends for love alone ; When common aims together gird Warm hearts of flesh —not stone! When all things wished for lie before, And, seeming, may be won ; When, gazing, we behold the shore Illumed by youth’s fair sun. The golden future, which enthralls Our raptured longing gaze ; But wThicb, when noonday on it falls, Fast pales beneath the blaze! Apples of Sodom —round and fair, But wormwood to the taste— Are all things which —in prospect dear— We grasp with frenzied haste! O joyous days! when no dark cloud Obscures bright Hope’s fair dawn, But rosy tinted cloudlets shroud The radiance of the morn! When e’en the passing shades of doubt, Swift wafted by the breeze, In brilliant loveliness shine out— By changeful beauty please! For youth’s fair sun can quick dispel ’I he deepest Stygian gloom ; Can dissipate the shades of hell, And light the darkest doom! P. L. W.94 THE PANDORA. Professor—What is the difference between now and right now. Mr. H-d-ges (’87)—-Well, the latter is more now tban the former. Professor to Mr. F-ll-er (’88)—“ I observe you have written your name upon my desk. I assure you, it was unnecessary, as I shall remember you without any aids.” Mr. F-ll-r appears greatly elated. But the Professor continues:— “Therefore you will get some sand-paper and rub it off, and then revarnish it.” (Awful silence reigns.)SLOGS. 95 B. (To young lady in dark parlor): “O, darling, how I lovo you!” W.—(Under piano): “Chestnuts !” (Screams and scatteralion.) C----R-----, Athens, Ga.: My dear sir—I have written you repeat- edly for the little account you are still due me. It seems as if you do not intend paying mo, as it has been due fifteen months. If you do not call and pay me at once, I shall try other means. Respectfully, P. A. Summy. Junior—“ Well, McG—gh, what did he look like ?” McG-gu (’89)— (Solemnly) Well, sir, he was the smallest man for his size that I ever saw.” R-ce (’87)—“Now we want to have some grand old exlempores to-night.” [feels in his pocket, aside] “Blamed if I hav’nt lost my speech ” Upshaw (’89)—“Say, was George Eliot a married man?” Librarian (blandly)—“Well, sir, have you any preference ?” " C-per (’89)—“Well, if it is handy, I believe i’ll take one of Mr. Wavorly’s novels.” Prof. W-l-x (Recitation in French)—“Mr. Gunn, please read. ” (Gunn, ’89, wakes upi can’t find the place.) “Come, come, Mr. Gunn, don’t hang fire.” Prof. B —w, (Out surveying)—“Mr. Franklin, bow many pins have you there ?” Fk-kl-n — “Five, sir.” Prof. B--w,—“Bring me half of them, please.” Rch-s-n (’89) (Soliiiquizing) —“I thought them common logarithms was mighty hard, but when you strike pyerian logarithms you just might as well give up ” P-p-e (’89)—'“Say, what is u J. I. Os.” record ?” C-ll-r (’89)—“Two sixty-five, I think.”9 5 THE PANDORA. When a student dies Ilis spirit tlies (At least it will, if the student ’s wise) To a wonderful place of indefinite size, Somewhere—anywhere—up in the skies— Diplomas free and the festive rise By gracious provision is given likewise— No more physics to memorize— No more chemistry to analyze— Plenty to oat by way of surprise— No more Greek to anathematize — No more English to criticize— No midnight oil to put out his eyes— Everything spots—nobody tries— “ Nary a linal ” after he dies. Nothing to do but soliloquize How a student suffers—’till after he dies.ORIGIN OF “MATH 97 HlS 1$ V6RV T3 W Po nol DIS T«M H N I s98 THE PANDORA. T —CtfAflCEiiOll ff. PHOTOGRAPH of whom is in tho front of The Pandora, isone of the most eminent educators in the South. Dr. Patrick Hughes Mell was born in Walthourville, Liberty County, Ga., July 19th. 1814. At the age of fourteen he was left a penniless orphan. But by perseverance he secured an excellent English education, and after teaching a primary school he entered Amherst College, where he remained for two years. He subsequently' taught school in Massachusetts and Connecticut, and returned to Georg'a in 1838. In 1842 he was elected Professor of Ancient Languages in Mercer o n University, which position he held for thirteen years. In 1856 he was elected Professor of Ancient Languages in tho University of Georgia ; and in I860 he was elected Professor of Ethics and Metaphysics in the same institution. In 1878 he accepted the position of Chancellor of the University, to succeed Rev. Dr. H. H. Tucker. He is recognized as one of the ablest educators and executive officers iu tho South. He has been tendered the Presidency of several Southern Colleges, but has each time declined Several prominent BaptLt Churches have also called him to the Pastorate, and all of them he has seen fit to decline. He professed conversion, and joined the Baptist Church in 1832, and was ordained to the ministry ten years later. Since which time he has, whenever opportunity' afforded, supplied the pulpits of different Churches, serving the Bairdstown Church, in Greene county, thirty-three years. As an expounder of the Gospel he has no superior—being logical, precise, and at times eloquent, holding his audience spell-bound with his beautiful, yet simple flow of speech. For many years lie has presided over the Georgia Association, the Georgia Baptist Convention, the Southern Baptist Convention, exciting by his just rulings and plea ant humor in this capacity, the admiration of the members of these bodies. He is recognized as one of the ablest parliamentarians in the country, and his Manual of Parliamentary Law shows that he is a99 ILLUSTRATED. N Tt e ----MtWJ'sllM stft wn.iv£«IOO THE PANDORA. July 15, 1886. Vol. I of The Pandora arrives and is put on sale. July 15. At 9 p. m., ’87’s hop to ’86 occurs at the DuPree' Opera House. The affair is a grand success. July 16. The Board of Trustees of the University meet. July 16. 9 p. m., reception to ’86, given at the residence of Prof, and Mrs. H. C. White. July ’.7. Class exercises of ’86 occur under the “Historic Oak.” Champion Debate between the Demosthenian and Phi ICappi Societies occur. The Phi Kappas win. July 18. Commencement Sermon is preached in the Chapel by the Rev. Dr. Adams, of Augusta. July 19. Oration before the Literary Societies delivered at 11 a. m., in the the Chapel, by W. B. Hill, ’70, and at 4 p. m. the “Sophs.” spoke. July 20. At 9 a. m., Alumni Association met; at 11a. m., the oration before the Alumni Society is deliverer! by Judge L. PI. Bleckley; at 4 p. m., the Juniors “orated;” at 9 p. m., the Chancellor held a reception. July 21. Commencement day. Seniors spoke in the morning; diplomas are awarded graduates; the Class of ’86 gives a hop in the evening at the Du Free Opera House. October 6. University opens. General stir; fraternities engage in a rush for men. The average merchant has a smile on his face. October 9. The Reporter is re-established for ’86 and ’87 ; editors and business managers elected for two and a half months; editor-in-chief for four and a half. C. F. Rice is elected editor-in-chief by the Demosthenian Society. October 17. The Classes organized. November 6. Kontz ’87, elected Anniversarian of the Phi Kappa Society. November 13. Nowell’87, elected Anniversarian of the Demosthenian Society. November 15. Editorial Board of The Pandora is organized Seven fraternities go into the publication—to-wit: A’ , ATA, $VA, and 2N. November 27. Editors and Business Managers of The Reporter are elected for the second term. December 23. The University closes for the holidays, the students “having all pulled out” a week before.OUR CALENDAR. IOI January 3, 1887. University re-opens. January 14. Phi Kappas select Spring and Champion Debaters. January 29. Demosthenians select Spring and Champion Debaters. February 1. New system of Finals are instituted. These Finals known as “Topical Finals” begin with this date and continue for a very long time, causing much sickness. February 12. The Phi Kappa Society selects R. L. Foreman as Editor in Chief of The Reporter. Both societies select Associate Editors, for the third term. February 19. Demosthenian Society celebrates its 84th anniversary. R. L. Nowell, the anniversarian, delivers the address upon “'The study of the Law.” February 21. John Lamar ’87, died while cn his way to Savannah, his home. College exercises are suspended for the day, in respect to his memory. The K. A. fraternity and Junior class meet and adopt resolutions in his respect. February 22. The Phi Kappa anniversary is postponed until February 25, on account of inclement weather. February 25. The Phi Kappa Society celebrates its 67th anniversary. E. C. Kontz, the anniversarian, delivers the address, taking as his subject: “ Ich dien”—I serve. March 1. R. L. Foreman assumes charge of The Reporter, as editor-in-chief, together with a new staff of associate editors. March 10. The Classes organize their Nines. The craze commences. April 1. Contract for publication of Volume IT of The Pandora is made. April 9.—The Demosthenian Society elects Reporter stall' for the fourth term. April 16. The Phi Kappas select their Reporters for the fourth term. The Demosthenians decide to award a medal for their best debater. The contest is put down for the fourth Saturday in May. April 19. Athletic Association meets ; committees to arrage for “ Field Day,” and also to select a University Base Ball Team, are selected April 20. Committee on “ Field Day ” select May 16th as the date for the contests. The University Base Ball Team is selected. April 21. The University Rifle Club has its first record shooting. May 7. Rumored riot of University Students in Athens. “Cran” Oliver and his “cops” get very mad. No trouble. “Cops” go to bed badly scared up.102 THE PANDORA.HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY. 103 |N the year 1784, the Legislature of Georgia passed an Act laying out the Counties of Washington and Franklin, including the territory now occupied by Clarke, and perhaps a dozen of the adjacent counties. These new counties were in an uninhabited territory, and the lands lying within their borders were considered as the property of the State, to be disposed of as the State authorities thought best. There was at this time no school in the State which deserved the name of College or University. In consideration of this fact, the State Legislature thought that no more wise disposition could be made of the funds, arising from the sale of these lauds, than to appropriate them for the support of a University, to be the property of the State, and for the benefit of her people. The result of this opinion was the passage of a bill, in 1784, conveying 40,000 acres of the lands above mentioned tc the Governor and certain others, to bo held in trust for the endowment of a College or Seminary of Learning. In the following year, on January 27th, a bill was passed granting to the persons holding the land, together with certain others, a charter as trustees of an institution to be called the University of Georgia. In the bill granting the charter we find quite forcibly expressed the motives which actuated the fouuders of the University. They recognized the fact that nothing would more rapidly advance the interests of the people than education. Desirous of advancing these interests, they undertook to establish an institution where a thorough and complete education might be had. The first section104 THE PANDORA. of the charter entrusts the general supervision and regulation of the literature of the State to two boards: the Board of Visitors, who are to see that the general intent of the institution is carried out, and the Board of Trustees, who are to appoint professors, prescribe courses of study and fill vacancies in their own Board. These two Boards united composed the Senatus Acadernicus of the University of Georgia, having power to enact all laws necessary for the government of the University, subject however to the approval of the Legislature. The charter provides that whatever public measures are necessary for the welfare of the University are to be laid before the Legislature by the trustees. All officers of the University must be of the Christian religion, according to the charter. The endowment, consisting of 40,000 acres of land, provided no immediately available funds, and consequently the efforts of the Trustees were directed at first to raising some cash funds by leasing the college lands. The first meeting of the Board of Trustees was held in Augusta on 13th of February, 1786. Perhaps it will be of some interest to mention the names of those who attended the first meeting of the Trustees ever held. They were Abraham Baldwin, William Few, William Glasscock, John Habersham, Nathan Brownson, Hugh Law-son, and Benjamin Taliaferro. At this meeting of the Trustees it was decided, in order to facilitate the disposition of the college lands, to lay out the. town of Greenesboro on a portion of the land. William Greer was elected Treasurer of the University, and several surveyors employed to divide up the college domain It seems that the design of the Trustees was to raise the desired amount of money by leasing the lands and not by selling them. Nothing besides leasing the lands was done until the year 1798. At a meeting of the Trustees in Augusta during that year, the Treasurer reported the funds of the University as amounting to $7,463.76. This amount seemed sufficiently large to start the University into active operation.HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY. 105 The selection of a location for the University occasioned considerable trouble. It was very difficult in those days to get a quorum of the Senatious Academicus, on account of the difficulty in travelling' and the want of interest in the enterprise on the part of some members. Two or three meetings were hold without determining the location. Finally, in the year 1800, on the 24th of November, the County of Greene was settled upon as the temporary site of the University. A committee was appointed to contract for a building to accommodate 100 students. Prof Josiah Meigs of Yale College was elected presiding professor, with a salary of $1,000 a year, and arrangements made for procuring books, and a limited quantity of philosophical apparatus. A course of study, to extend over Six years, and embracing very nearly the same subjects as our present A. B. course, was arranged. The next meeting of the Trustees was held at Louisville, in January of 1801. Professor Meigs was elected President of the University, with a salary of $1,500.00 a year, and an appropriation of $500 made to pay the expenses of his removal to Georgia. It seems that the school never went into active operation in Greene County. At this meeting of the Trustees, their action locating it in Greene County was reconsidered, and the County of Jackson selected as the permanent location. A committee of five was appointed to select the most suitable site in Jackson County, and to purchase the land including it, provided it did not lie within the College domain. Their investigation resulted in the selection of the site on which the University now stands. The Hon. John Milledge • donated three hundred acres of land surrounding the site of the University to the Trustees, and arrangements were made for the erection of a College building, to accommodate one hundred students. The City of Athens was not then in existence. A virgin forest covered the ground on which it now stands, and only one or two houses marked the spot. 8io 6 THE PANDORA. The Trustees directed President Meigs to visit the various Academies in the State and select from the young men attending them such as he thought thoroughly qualified to become students of the University, and to give directions as to how they should be instructed until arrangements could be made for their accommodation at the University. The six years course was reduced to four years,—the scope of the course remaining very much the same. A few log huts were erected in the College grove for the accommodation of President Meigs, and about thirty students whom he had collected by the method suggested to him by the Trustees. The instniction in the University commenced in the spring of 1801, all the work being carried on at first by President Meigs. During the year 1801 the Trustees authorized President Meigs to ask the Legislature for a loan of $5,000. This was the first aid ever asked of the Legislature by the University, and it was granted. The building now known as the Summey House was commenced and pushed rapidly to completion in 1801. In 1802 a donation of $1,000 was received from Mr. James Gunn. The number of students, in 1802, having increased considerably, the Trustees decided to appoint a Professor of Languages to assist President Meigs. William Jones was elected, with a salary of $500 a year. During the same year a small frame building was erected, on the site now occupied by the Library building, for the accommodation of the students. At a meeting of the Trustees, in November of 1803, President Meigs made his first report. From his report it seems that the students of the University were pursuing their courses of study with considerable diligence. At this meeting of the Trustees, it was decided to establish a grammar school at Athens to prepare students for the College classes. During the following year aHISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY. 107 building was erected on the site now occupied by Professor Wilcox’s house, and an instructor employed at a salary of $600 a year. The school was an integral part of the college, and under the superintendence of the President. On the cist of May, 1804, the first commencement of the University was held. The degree of A. B. was conferred on the following eight students: Gibson Clarke, Augustin Clayton, Thomas Irwin, Jeptha N. Harris, dared Irwin, William Jackson. James Jackson, Robert Rutherford and William Williamson. Two important features of the commencement, - long ago abandoned, were the recitation of dialogues, and the delivery of Latin and Greek orations by members of the graduating class. In those early times only Seniors were allowed to speak at commencement. In fact the only commencement exei'cises were the speeches of the Seniors and the commencement sermon. The exercises were held in the grove in front of the building now known as the Summey House. We find no mention in the record of this first commencement of honors being awarded for high class stand. By the end of the year 1804, the cash funds of the University amounted to $30,000. In May of 1805, the second commencement took place, only five presenting themselves for graduation. The general features of the commencement were much the same as in 1804. During this year Mr. Pettit De Clair-ville, of Savannah was elected Professor of French, with a salary of $400 a year. The college building was nearly enough completed to be occupied by the students. The Trustees at a meeting in May, decided that this building should be known as Franklin College. From the minutes of the meetings of the Senatus we would suppose that they carried out the object of the founders, by not only exercising a general supervision over the interests of the University, but over the educational interests of the entire State.io8 THE PANDORA. • Athens, since 1801, had grown into a village of perhaps five hundred inhabitants. In these early days of the existence of the University, the students roomed in the college building, and took their meals at a Steward’s hall kept for their benefit on the campus. As an instance of the close attention paid the students by the Trustees and faculty, we find in the old records of their meetings numerous rules laid down by them for the government of students in their rooms and at the table. Some member of the faculty always roomed in the college building to preserve order among the students. We even find regulations as to what articles of food should be furnished them at each meal. In 1809 President Meigs resigned the presidency of the University. It was quite fortunate for the institution that in its infancy it was guided by one in every way so capable as President Meigs. Naturally intelligent, and possessing that cultivation which accompanies a thorough education, he displayed in his every action those characteristics which belong to a true gentleman. The presidency remained unfilled until 1811, when the Rev. John Brown was unanimously elected president, and immediately entered upon the discharge of his duties. During the same year John Golding was elected to the professorship of Ancient Languages, and Henry Jackson to that of Natural Philosophy. The college community then consisted of the president, two professors, a tutor and from seventy-five to one hundred students. In 1813, we note the establishment of a chair of Mathematics, and the election of William Green to perform the duties of the chair. The instruction in this department had previously been given by the president, but since 1813 it has remained a separate chair. It will be remembered that the funds for the support of the University were at this time drawn mostly from the rent of the College grounds. Tlie Trustees were not allowed to dispose of these lands by sale. The funds HISTORY CF TIIE UNIVERSITY. IO9 arising from the rent of these lands not being adequate to the support of the College, the Trustees presented their financial condition to the Legislature, together with a request for aid, either in the shape of cash or of some more effectual law with reference to the management of the College lands. The result was the passage of an Act in 1815, authorizing the Trustees to sell the lands belonging to the College, receiving in payment therefor either cash or the notes of the purchasers, provided they were accompanied by good securities. The Act forbade the use of the principal arising from this sale for the payment of the expenses. After the sale had been effected, the State proposed to advance to the University a sum not exceeding two-thirds of the amount called for by the notes, and to receive these notes in return for the advancement. The amount settled on as two-thirds of the amount called for by the notes was $100,000. The State, instead of paying the cash, turned over to the University one thousand shares in the Bank of the State. In doing this, the State necessarily took the risk of these shares becoming valueless. When this stock subsequently become valueless, the State immediately recognized the fact that the $100,000 virtually remained unpaid and was still due the University. This sum has however never been paid, but every year since the failure of the Bank, interest, at eight per cent., amounting to $8,000 a year, has been paid the University by the State. This transaction with the State placed the finances of the University upon a firm basis, and enabled her to 'commence that career of usefulness and progress which has lasted for over sixty years. Since, after this period of rapid growth, the history becomes much more uniform, and consequently less interesting, we will only notice those events which either changed or enlarged the plan of the institution. No mention has yet been made of the two LiteraryI IO THE PANDORA. Societies now carried on in connection with the University. It seems that as early as 1801, a society for literary and moral improvement, known as the Demosthenian Society, existed among the students. In 1820 a similar society, known as the Phi Kappa, was founded. In 1827, at the request of these Societies, the Trustees recognized them as an integral part of the College, and since that time both Faculty and Trustees have done all in their power to encourage them. In 1830, one of the buildings which contained the Library and Philosophical apparatus was destroyed by fire. To repair the damage thus done, the Legislature donated $6,000 a year until 1841, after which nothing was done for the College by the Legislature until 1875, when a donation of $15,000 was made. In 1854, Dr. William Terrell of Hancock County donated $20,000 to the University. This occasioned the establishment of the Terrell Chair of Agriculture. It has however not been very regularly filled owing to the limited number of students in that department of the college. The late Governor G. R. Gilmore left $15,000 to the Trustees, for the purpose of improving the school masters of the State. The Trustees have turned this over to the University as a part of the general funds. In 1862, an Act was passed by Congress giving to each State, provided they used it for educational purposes, an amount gf land equal in quantity to 30,000 acres for each Senator and Representative. In 1866 the State of Georgia accepted the land on the condition specified, and authorized the Governor to receive and sell the scrip representing the land. In 1872, Governor Jas. M. Smith transferred the fund thus obtained to the Trustees of the University. On May the first of the same year the Trustees opened at Athens the Georgia State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. The establishment of this school amounted to nothing more than a considerable increase in the educational facilities afforded by theHISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY. 111 University. Since its establishment the University has conferred certain degrees which before it did not, and considerable addition has been made to the Philosophical equipment. Since 1872 four branch Colleges, located at Milledge-ville, Dahlonega, Cuthbert and Thomasville, have been established, which draw their support mainly from the land scrip fund. They aro under the control of the Trustees of the University, and are considered as a part of it. The establishment of these Colleges is the last event of any importance connected with the history of the University. Taking all the circumstances into consideration, we must say that the University has been remarkably successful as an educational institution. If the mark which her alumni have made in the intellectual world is any indication of the character of the College, she can compare favorably with any in the South. From the present prospect it seems that her future history will be one of usefulness and progress. A. L. F.112 THE PANDORA. £rass rce Song '874- Old eighty-seven’s going, While her class tree’s growing, To show what she can do ; And unless the Judgment Day Causes trouble and delay, We’re going to put things through. Chorus : A great class, and a good class, Old Alma Mater's pride. The best men and the wisest, Since old George Washington died. 0, really ’tis a pity, To paint the classic city— ’Tis monstrous I declare ; But I think I’d like to see ’m Just touch up the Athenajum, To let ’em know we’ve been there. When the sheep skins are given, In July eighty-seven, I hope we will make a rise ; And by the laws of nature We’ll be in the legislature Before the old “dip” dries.MUS1NGS. 113 aS'¥E Ba®SIK©8'SC They say there’s a grief In the graduate’s heart, That surpasseth belief, When the time comes to part. But awful the grief—O, bitter the tear— And huge the regret that 1 ever came here. o o Yea, I will be durned If I don’t wish that I, Unknown and unturned, Could lay down and die. t So greatly unfortunate—more is the pity That 1 e’er trod the dust of the classical city.THE PANDORA. — In Iftgmorimn — ♦ JOHN RUTHERFORD, ’27. JOHN T. GRANT, ’33. JAMES JACKSON, ’37. WALTER S. GORDON, ’68. ROBERT P. HILL, ’76. DANIEL P. HILL, ’77.IN MEMORIAM ”5 In lit cm o riant FebrTzajry g1, 1887. —on Jerilj of Joljn K(. Jnntmj— CLASS ’88. HERAS, it has pleased Almighty God, in His unerring providence, to take from our midst our beloved friend and classmate JOHN VV. LAMAR, be it resolved I. That it is with inexpressible grief that we have heard of this sad calamity, and that our hearts go out in deep sympathy for the bereaved and sorrow stricken family. n. That in his death we lose a valued classmate, a genial companion, and a warm friend, whose place can never be filled, and whose memory shall be cherished by us always. HI. That a copy of these resolutions be transmitted to his family, and be published in the University Reporter and The Pandora. LUCIAN L. KNIGHT, Chairman. EMMET J. BONDURANT, VICTOR L. SMITH.THE PANDORA. I 16 Nonne Conveniemus ? When the ties, which now may bind us. Shall be severed and forgot ; When the friends, now gathered ’round us, Shall have left this classic spot ; Shall we meet each other never? Shall we part, to part forever? When we go forth to the battle, Scarce prepared for war’s alarms, Out into the noisy contest— Clashing, clanking, crash of arms ; Shall we not as friends meet ever? Shall we part, to part forever? Shall conflicting int’rests ever Fix a gulf we cannot pass ; Will not cherished recollections Bind us, somewhat, to the last? Shall we meet in rnem’ry never? Shall our hearts be sep'rate ever? Though our fates and lives be diverse As the tinted leaves of Autumn, Shall we not in thought or fancy, Meet again? — Shall hearts grow dumb, Not responding, callous, ever? Shall they part, to part forever? Shall we be so widely severed— So distinct in thought and heart— That we may not feel in common, In some common thought take part? Shall we not, in thinking, ever Meet again, in the forever? Shall not youth’s sincere affections, Rosy hued and ardent love, Last beyond the College portals,— Form a lasting bond above?— May we not, in spirit, ever, Meet somewhere, in the forever? P. L. W.p « We respectfully ask that Students and others patronize those that patronize us, as by advertisements alone can the continued publication of THE PANDORA be ensured.LIMITED and moo Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Society and College Engraved Commencement, Class Day and Society Invitations ® Programs Fraternity Plates ana Illustrations Engrayefl—Designs Simittefl, STAMPING- AND ILLUMINATING. ENGRAVED PLATE AND FIFTY CARDS,...............$1.00 EACH ADDITIONAL ONE HUNDRED CARDS,.............0.75 Address all Communications to 834 Chestnut Street. (MUSIC as easily purchased at a distance of a thousand miles from a music store as at the side of its ■ counter. Ditson Co. call attention to tlieir wonderful system of sending Music and Music Books, by mail, to any part of the Continent. Packages of Music up to the weight of four pounds go readily by mail. Ditson Co. are aware that a large portion of those who read their advertisements live at a distance from Music stores. All who love Music will find the Newest and Best Music Books faithfully described in their advertisements. Lists and Catalogues freely furnished, and all inquiries cheerfully answered by their corps of corresponding clerks. Understand, that by sending the Retail Price by Money Order, Registered Letter or Postal Note (or in small orders Postage Stamps), you can receive by return mail any one of Ditson Co.’s thousands of Music Books, or tens of thousands of pieces of Music. Since the advent of “Richardson” many excellent instructors have oeen published, and have attained groat favor. Pre-eminent among them are New England Conservatory Method, price $3.00, or in parts, each $1.50, and Peters’ Eclectic Piano School, price $3.00. The first book has had the important indorsement of the great Conservatory, and the second has sold immensely—solely on its own merits. OLIVER DITSON CO. 449 and 451 Washington Street, BOSTON, MASS.3Vci5 ------------ o — ______ DYSPEPSIA, MENTAL AND PHYSICAL EXHAUSTION NERVOUSNESS, DIMINISHED VITALITY, ETC. ’ Prepared according to directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge. A preparation of the phosphates of lime, magnesia, potash and iron, with phosphoric acid in such form as to be readily assimilated by the system. Universally recommended and prescribed by physicians of all schools. Its action will harmonize with such stimilants as are necessary to take. It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body. It makes a delicious drink with water and sugar only. AS A BRAIN AND NERVE TONIC. Dr. E. W. ROBERTSON, Cleveland, 0., says: “From my experience, can cordially recommend it as a brain and nerve tonic, especially in nervous debility, nervous dyspepeia, etc., etc.’’ FOR WAKEFULNESS. Dii. WILLIAM P. CLOTHIER, Buffalo, N. Y., says: “I prescribed it for a Catholic priest, who was a hard student, for wakefulness, extreme nervousness, etc., and he reports it has been of great benefit to him.” IN NERVOUS DEBILITY. I)r. EDWIN F. YOSE, Portland, Me., says: “I have prescribed it for many of the various forms of nervous debility, and it has never failed to do good.’’ FOR THE ILL-EFFECTS OF TOBACCO. Dr. C. A. FERNALD, Boston, says: “ I have used it in cases of impaired nerve function with beneficial results, especially in cases where the system is affected by the toxic action of tobacco.” INVIGORATING, STRENGTHENING, HEALTHFUL, REFRESHING. Prices reasonable. Pamphlet, giving further particulars, mailed free. Manufactured by Rumford Chemical Works, Providence, R. I- BEWARE OF IMITATIONS "Vslt F, Weber1 Go. SUCCESSORS TO mmnn weber, MANUFACTURERS OF 3 rtists’ Y aterials Novelties for Decorating, Papier Mache Plaques, Lacroix China Colors, Metalic Colors for Lustre Painting, Engineers’ . Draughtsmens’ Supplies, Mathematical Instruments, Drawing Boards, Squares and Triangles, Blue Print Papers, Sensitized or Plain, Drawing Papers in rolls sheets, P, W, Co.’s Drawing Inks, ail colors, Tapestry Canvas, Colors, etc. Wax and Paper Flower Materials. 1125 Chestnut St., Philadelphia,ITENTION • IS • INVITED • TO • OUR • LINE • OF • FINE WRITING • PAPERS OF • FOREIGN - AND • DOMESTIC MANUFACTURE, • SELECTED • ESPECIALLY • FOR POLITE • CORRESPONDENCE. A COM LETE - SPI.( IMEN • BOOK • OF • PAPER • TOGETHER • WITH • SAMPLES • OF ENGRAVING • AND • DIE • STAMPING • WILL • BE • SENT • UPON APPLICATION. ... ¥ LASS • DAY • AND • FRATERNITY • INVITATIONS, • AD DRESS • AND • AUTOGRAPH • DIES, ■ FAC SIM) 1 ES, CIPHERS, - COATS • OF • ARMS • AND • EVERY - FORM OF - SOCIETY . ENGRAVING • EXECUTED • IN THE REST • MANNER. COLOR • AND • LETTER - PR ESS • PR IN TING F EVERY • DESCRIPTION • EXECUTED • IN "• THE • HIGH KST STYLE DONE . ON • THK • PREMISES OF • T1IE_- ART. UNDER • OUR • PERSONAL ALL • WORK • IS SUPERVISION. X £ p • MAKE • A • SPECIALTY • OF • UNIQUE • AND ARTISTIC • MENUS, • PROGRAMS • AND • DANCE-CARDS, | AND • CLAIM • ORIGINALITY • OF DESIGN • AND | SUPERIORITY • OF • EXECUTION. BY • A • PATENTED PROCESS • WE • MAKE • EXACT • REPRODUCTIONS • OF • JEWELED SOCIETY • AND • FRATERNITY • PINS • ON • MENUS, • ORDERS • OF DANCING, • PROGRAMS, • ETC. A. E. ClIASMAR Co., ART STATIONERS ENGRAVERS, Sjj Broadway, Kray York.PAPER BOX MAKING A SPECIALTY. IB1ANK A9D BOOK BIKlINt EXECUTED IN ALL STYLES. The Pandora Printed and Bound at the Chronicle Job Office.CHILDS, NICKERSON CO. -Wholesale and Retail Dealers in — Hardware, (dutlery, (duns, Pistols, Etc. Cot . Broad and Thomas Streets, ATHENS, GA. REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. ZB320-iL3D STiESIFDIEj , -A-TZHTIEILSrS, C3-AL... J. H. K ED A R EY, -Wholesale and Retail Dealer in- Diamonds, Watches and Jewelry Manufacturing Jetoelft IVJonog am $pectaclB£. Broad Street, Opp. Monument, AUGUSTA, GA. T. FLEMING SON, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in RAZORS, ETC.m I?? Fulton and 42 Ann Streets, NEW YORK, N. Y. Manufacturers and Importers of tank upfeyii| J a§truuiei|t ||:- The most Complete Stock in the World Nearly all our Goods are of our own manufacture and are warranted by us Keutfel Esser’s “Superior Swiss” and “Best German” Instruments. Hard Rubber Drawing Tools, T Sq uares, Triangles, Curves, Scales, etc. Keuffel Esser’s Drawing Boards, Drawing-Tables, etc. Excelsior Measuring Tapes. We beg lo call Special Attention to our Celebrated Drawing Papers, all of which are Watermarked along their’edge with their names, as follows : aiAAon Qwftax WOBMOlh $LnviC Catalogues and Samples of Paper sent on Application.MIXTURES FOR PIPE OR CIGARETTE: THREE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. MELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. TURKI8H and VIRGINIA. PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. GENUINE TURKISH. FLAKE CUTS, especially adapted for the Pipe. VANITY FAIR. OLD GOLD. SALMAGUNDI, a new Granulated Mixture. Fragrant Vault? Fair, Snjerlatire, M of M STRAIGHT CUT CIGARETTES People of refined taste who desire exceptionally Fine Cigarettes should use only our STRAIGHT CUT, put up in Satin Packets and boxes of 10s, •20s, 50s and 100s. We take pleasure in announcing that we are prepared to supply, without delay, COLLEGE FRATERNITIES with our SATIN STRAIGHT CUT CIGARETTES Packed in FRATERNITY COLORS. Also Class and College Colors. Name of Society can be inserted on label if desired. OUR CIGARF fTES were never so fine as now—they cannot le surpassed for purity and excellence. Only the purest rice paper used. Established 1846. Fourteen First Prize Medals WNl. S, KIMBALL 4 CO,, Peerless Tobacco Wools, Rochester, N, I, CRAWFORD’S ECZEMA WASH A quick and certain cure for Eczema, Scald Head, Tetter, Itch, in all forms and stages, St. Anthony’s Fire, Pimples, Pustules, Salt llheum, and all Irruptive and Scaly Diseases of the Skin. It gives immediate relief and makes a complete cure in from one to four days. It contains no oil or grease, and will not stain the skin or clothing. JOHN CRAWFORD CO., Sole Proprietors and Manufacturers, ____________ATHENS, GEORGIA.____________ IDIR. IB. BIBB JDJLTV'TS fLDENTAL SURGE0NJ2 _ Special attention given to Children’s Teeth. All work Guaranteed equal to the best. Teeth extracted without pain by the use of Nitrous Oxide Gas. Office, cor. College Avenue and Clayton Street, ATHE1TS, G-EOEGIA. OFFICE HOURS—8 to 12 A. M., 2 to 6 P. MJ. C. VONARX. A. R. HART. Hart Vonarx, Efl AVE jp PRINTER 19 Park Place and 16 Murray Street, NEW YORK CITY. Photo-Lith. Reproductions, Photo-Mechanical Printing, Steel Engravings, Copper Engraving, V ood Engraving. • .MANUFACTURERS 88 and 90 CLAYTON STREET, - - GEORGIA. pH ®. GRIFFITH, ATHENS, GEORGIA. Farms, Water Powers, Mills and Gity Property.P. H. MELL, D.D., L.L.D., Chancellor. AFACULTY P. H. MELL, D.D., LL.D Professor of Metaphysics and Ethics. WILLIAMS RUTHERFORD, A.M., Professor of Pure Mathematics. L. H. CHARBONNIER, A.M., Professor of Physics aud Astronomy. C. P. WILLCOX, A.M., Professor of Modern Languages. H. C. WHITE, C. and M. E., Professor of Chemistry. W. G. WOOD FIN, A.M,, Professor of Anciet Languages. CHARLES MORRIS, A.M., Professor of Belles Lettres. D. C. BARROW, Jr., C. and M.E., Professor of Engineering. W. L. JONES, A.M. and M.D. Professor of Natural History and Agriculture. C. M. STRAHAN, C. and M.E., Tutor in Mathematics and Ancient Languages. The University comprises the following departments : FRANKLIN COLLEGE, Tn which are given the following Degrees : BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE, BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. In which are given the following Degrees : BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING, BACHELOR OF AGRICULTURE, BACHELOR OF CHEMICAL SCIENCE.LAW DEPARTMENT, With the following Faculty: GEO. D. THOMAS, B.S., B.L., ANDRE W y. COBB, A.B., B.L., Professors of Law. SAMUEL C. BENEDICT M. D., Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. MEDICAL COLLEGE OF GEORGIA. This is situated at Augusta, and has a full Faculty, of which the Dean is— EDWARD GEDDINGS, M.D. The Scientific Departments of the University are provided with ample apparatus for full illustration of methods pursued on scientific investigations. The Departments of Physics, Chemistry and Engineering, occupy each a floor of a building 100x50 feet. The Lecture halls, apparatus, model and drawing rooms, and laboratories, are most conveniently arranged, and furnished with gas, and an abundant supply of water. The apparatus of these departments is new and bought of the best makers. By means of it, the instruction is made thoroughly practical. In the laboratories students are enabled to handle apparatus and perform by themselves the various experiments and tests; while the large collection of woiking models attached to the Engineering, enables students to form correct ideas as to the details of construction. This department is also supplied with full sets of Surveying Instruments, and every session the Senior Class are taken on a railroad survey, where practical field work is done. A farm of seventy acres, on which experiments are made, is attached to the Department of Agriculture. EXPENSES—Tuition in Franklin College, and in the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts is free, but a matriculation fee of $10.00, and a library fee of $5.00 are required. The necessary expenses of a student, including both of these fees, and board, washing, fuel and lights, are $200 per annum. For catalogues, and full information concerning those two Colleges, address : Prof. L. H. CHARBONNIER, Sec. Faculty, Athens, Ga. For information concerning the Law Department, address : Prof. G. D. THOMAS or A. J. COBB, Athens, Ga. And for information concerning the Medical College, address : Dr. EDWARD GEDDINGS, Augusta, Ga. LAMAR COBB, Sec. Board of Trustees.Jo Jo MINSW®, PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER and JRWEEER Located at Dr, Lyndon’s Drill Store, ATHENS, GA. Repairing Watcher, dloelp and JeWelfil a pecialtsij. Grows all kinds of FRUIT TREES and VINES. Genuine LE CONTE and KIEFFER PEARS grown from cuttings. Lawson, Bartlett and many other Pears grown on Le Conte Roots. Also APPLES. Send for Catalogue Free. W. W. THOMPSON, SMITHVILLE, 6-A. VMf, THE TJ 1L01(, Has now in Stock and is daily receiving the Largest and most Elegant line of Cloths, Cassimeres and Nestings, of his own importation, ever brought to this market. He begs that all in need of FIRST CLASS GOODS will come and examine Stock. Mr. LYNCII is well known throughout the South as a Tailor, having been in the business for many years, and at one time worked for White Rich, of Athens, who did a large business in days gone by. If you wish anything in the line of Cloths, Cassimeres, any Suits made to order, or Fine Furnishing Goods, don’t forget to write or call on JERRY LYNCH, Merchant Tailor, No. 8 Whitehall Street, ATLANTA, GA.THE TAILOR SHOP Cleaning and Repairing neatly done PANTS A SPECIALTY BROAD STREET, Up Sta.trs. " J. T. JACKSON Tailor. C. SCTTZDIDIEIE Repairing Fixe Watches, Badges, Pins, and Jewelry a Specialty. Q e cJLes rx. ATHENS, GEORGIA.. Broad Street, ATHENS, GA., Opposite Cohen’s. China, G-lassware ancl Crockery from all countries. House-Furnishing Goods of every description. Fine Extension Library and Hall Lamps a Specialty. THE ELECTRIC LAMPS always on hand.s% Cor. College Avenue and Clayton Sts. • ATHENS, GA. MUD MR, mm % Apples, Dates, Oranges, Etc. Q OIGARS, CIGARETTES AND TOBACCO ATHENS, GEORGIA. Make? of BADGES and MEDALS in Gold and Silver COLLEGE. SCHOOL. MILITARY. BICYCLE. CLASS RINGS. CLUB PINS. ATHLETIC. MASONIC. SOCIETY. “An artist in gold.”—Sunday Telegram. “His ruedal work is the finest ever exhibited in Atlanta.”—Constitution. “His medal work shows a degree of skill and fine workmanship seldom seen outside of New York.”—Evening Journal. 32 y Whitehall Street, Atlanta, Ga. Catalogue on Application. Old Gold Made .Over. C. STERN. S. SLOMAN. CLOTHING, GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, HATS, CAPS, Etc, Suits Made to Order. Fit Guaranteed. New Hunnieut Block, Broad St., Athens, Ga. German American, of New York. Phcenix,. of Brooklyn. London and Lancashire, of Liverpool. Royal, of Liverpool. JAS. A. GRANT INSURANCE AGENT Office—Cor. Thomas and Clayton Sts., Athens, Ga. Westchester, of New York. Continental, of New York. Western, of Toronto. B. W. BURKES Cor. Broad Street nd College Avenue BRANCH HOUSE—CLAYTON STREET, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN Blank Books, College and School Books, PIANOS AND ORGANS, Snail Musical Instruments, Strings, Cases, Music, etc. JOB PRINTING EXECUTED IN BEST STYLE.Still in the Ascendant WM. T. HARRIS, LL.D., Supt. Schools, St. Lends, Mo. A. J. RICKOFF, A. M., of Instruction, Cleveland, Oto. MARK BAILEY, A. M., Instructor in Elocution, Yale College. Based on the true principles of progressive education. Develop the powers of thought and expression. Embrace the Word, Phonic, and Alphabetic methods Elementary studies in Elocution introduced occasionally. The most successful and instructive Readers ever published. Recently adopted by the Board of Education of the City of Philadelphia, for immediate use. The following are among the other principal Cities in which Appletons' Readers are now successfully used. CITY OF NEW YORK, CITY OF CHICAGO, CITY OF BROOKLYN, CITY OF CLEVELAND, CITY OF JERSEY CITY, CITY OF OMAHA, NEB. CITY OF PATERSON, N. J. CITY OF KANSAS CITY, Mo. CITY OF HOBOKEN, N. J. CITY OF ATLANTA, GA. CITY of POUGHKEEPSIE,N.Y.CITY OF SYRACUSE, N. Y. CITY OF OAKLAND, CAL. CITY OF DETROIT, MICH. and many hundreds of other cities and towns throughout the country. ggf Descriptive Circulars, Price Lists, etc., sent free on application. Favorable terms for introduction and exchange. Send for new educational Catalogue. Subscribe for “Educational Notes” (free). Do not introduce new books until you have examined our list. D. APPLETON CO., Publishers, New York, Boston, Chicago, Atlanta, San Francisco. JOS. VAN HOLT NASH, Atlanta, Ga., GENERAL AGENT FOR SOUTHERN STATES.THE Price ££2.00. With the Miniature Camera any one can take Photographs of anything and everything as well as with a $25 outfit if the instructions are followed carefully. It consists of a Mahogany Finished Dove-tailed Box, with Sliding Tube, Lens Cap, Dry Plate Holder, Focussing Glass in Frame, Package of Dry Plates, Sensitized Paper, Developing, Fixing and Toning Chemicals, with complete instructions. Sent by Express upon receipt of $2.00. PRICE LIST OF EXTRAS. Miniature Plates...............................................Per doz. Miniature Sensitive Paper....................................... “ Developer 1 and 2, in 4 ounce bottles, both for...................... Toning Solution A, 5 “ “ ................................. Toning Solution B, 2 “ “ ................................. Or both A and B for.............................................. Hypo, per J lb box..................:................................ Extra Plate Holders, each........................‘................... Ruby Oil Lantern..................................................... Graduates for Measuring Liquids........................1 oz. 25c.; 2 oz. 30c. 10c. 60c. 20c. 60c. 75c. 10c. 25c. 60c. 35c. CARDS FOR MOUNTING PICTURES. White, plain, per pack of 25... 8c. Gilt Edge...................... 30c. Brown, “ “ “ 25... 10c. “ “ 32c. Black, “ « “ 17... 17c. “ “ 40c. We send extras by Express only. PECK SNYDER, 126, 128 130 Nassau St., N. Y. SEND FOR COMPLETE CATALOGUE.Corner College Avenue and Broad Street, Athens, Ga. BEST EQUIPPED LIVERl STABLE IX TI1E CITY. e rrj J"- EL HEAVES, Proprietor, (Successor to Gann Reaves) Neat and Handsome Turnouts, fine Horses, Harness and Carriages, MARRIAGE OR FUNERAL OCCASIONS PROMPTLY SERVED. Best Feed Stables in the City. Pure Spring Water Constantly. Reliable Stock and Good Drivers. Running Through Stables Charges Moderate. TTIOIv£.A_S ST., TX3IE3SrS. Cast. f" 'inoqjiAV ao 83(JBiv ✓; Aiuuaitud MUAv aarXNIHd ‘wadwj 3uhua J° sai g oqj HVj0 WlS JOJ TJ UXOJJ pejuud spivo } P«W ‘P0A«j8ua SumSIA Jl • +-V SMOIiVJLIAMS Hoixaaoaa—oKiaaa —goaaioo t 9 c O p oDREXA 1121 CHESTNUT ST., PHILADELPHIA. Commencement,Fratemity,Recep{ion and Wedding Imitations (5l$ DIEg, ILLUgTipOMft tpflO AM o. ONLY IN THE BEST MANNER Fraternity Stationery Always on Hand, SAMPLES AND PRICES MAILED ON APPLICATION. Wholesale Grocers p ATHENS, GEORGIA. HENDERSON WAREHOUSE SO, A HODGSON BROS., Proprietors. ©OW©M STOMAGE ATHENS, QEOBGIA.F. W. CHRISTERN, 37 West 23rd Street, NEW YORK. IMPORTER OF Agent for the leading Paris Publishers, Tauchnltz Collection of British Authors, (2500 vols.,) Tcubncr’s tircek and JLatin Classics. Separate Catalogues of these publications will be mai ed on demand stating those wanted, also catalogue of American and Imported School and Text Books, for the study of European Languages. Agent for Be JL. Sauveur’s Text Books for the study of French, according to the u Methode Naturelle.” Wenckebache and Schcakantp’s Books for the study of German on the same system. . Catalogues of the principal European Dealers in Anti-quaria Books will be mailed to those desiring them, on specification of the particular subjects they wish to be informed upon, and in what language. JOSEPH GILLOTrs STEEL PENS. Cold Medal, Paris Exposition, 1878. For Artistic Use in Fine Drawings, Nos. 659 (The celebrated Crowquill), 290 ana 291. For Fine Writing, Nos. 303, 604, and Ladies’, 170. For Broad Writing, Nos. 294, 389, and Stub Point, 849. For General Writing, Nos. 404, 332, 390, and 604. JOSEPH GILLOTT SONS, 91 John Street, N. Y. HP. NR V HOE. Sole Agent.Henry C. Tuck, Miss Vonderlieth, siT ttoraeij at _£,aw Vy uUlilLu 1 lUllLniLOy v ATHENS, GA. Base Balls, Belts and fancy Goods. College Avenue, Athens. WM. H, FLEMING, Reference—National Bank of Athens. Wiley B, Burnett LAW OFFICE, ATTORNEY AT. LAW, Over Opera House Entrance, i26 Broad Street, ATHENS, GA. AUGUSTA, GA. Practices in State and Federal Courts. J, W. Echols, ATT01N1Y AT LAW, Dr. J, E. POPE, —OFFICE— BROAD STREET, near Athenaeum. —RESIDENCE— Broad Street, intersection Pope and Bearing Streets, ATHENS, GA. OfTice Hours—8 to 10 a.m.; 3 to C p,m. E. T. Brown, T. S. Mbll, Solicitor General Samuel S. Benedict, ED. BROWN MELL, Attorneys at Law, 59 SLAYTON STREET, ATHENS, GA. ATHENS, GA. McQUEEN DURHAM THE BEST BARBERS IN ATHENS Only First-Class Shop in the City. Pope Barrow. Geo. Dudley Thomas. Barrow Thomas, Attorneys at Law Tap Vann Qf Opposite BANNER-U aCKSOIL Ob.WATCHMAN OFFICE GIVE TIIEI I A CALL. ATHENS, GA. OVER NATIONAL BANK.A. J. Cobb, IRVIN ALEXANDER, Attorney at Law, Lot, ATHENS, GA. AUGUSTA, GA. W. B. Hill. N. E. Harris. HILL HARRIS, Attorneys et Lev , MACON, GA. ARTHUR HOOD. ROBERT L. MOYE, GEORGETOWN COLLEGE 0. C, UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA. HOOD MOYE, at [jam-,: CUTHBERT, GA. Practice in State and Federal Courts of Georgia. Prompt Attention Given to Collections. 7 LINEN jf miimn — • AND -— ALWAYS GIVE SATISFACTION •: THE best made:- School Text Books, History, Fiction, Theological, Medical, or any kind of Book, will be sent to your address on receipt of the publishers’ mailing price. A large stock of the above line of Books always kept on hand, and any not in stock will be ordered from the publishers. SHEET MUSIC and MUSICAL GOODS are also given an equally careful attention. STATIONERY of all kinds in large or small quantities. If you don’t know the price of the Book or article you want, drop me a card and we will promptly inform you of the amount necessary to be sent, to have it mailed or expressed to you. We cannot send a catalogue, as one would be loo extensive to be contained in any ordinary size volume. No extortionate prices asked ! Remember, all Books mailed on receipt of Publishers’ Mailing Prices. S. B. RICHARDS SON, 37 Whitehall Street, Atlanta, Ga. [Estaalished 1848.]■Mm Pull and. Complete Cme of Imported Move! Line of Dress Trimmings. _. _ __ Write for our Illustrated Catalogue. J. A. Mullane Go. ATHENS, GEORGIA. P. O. BOX No. 278.Grtigbiffl Vitalized phosphites IS AN ACTIVE, NITROGENOUS, BRAIN PHOSPHITE, Other preparations of Phosphorus are but Labor atory Salts or Acids, and have nothing in their compo ■ sition to make them a brain supporter, an organismal element. Laboratory Phosphate Salts and Acids give no nourishment to the brain, they are diuretics only. Prof. Percy, in an essay which was awarded the prize by the American Medical Association, and of the Medical Society of the State of Xew York, demonstrated that the Brain of Man needed VITAL Phosphites that could not be found in Laboratory products, but could be eliminated from the brains of animals and fish and from the embryos of grain. This active Vital Phosphite gives great relief in the prostration that follows excessive study or mental labor. There are many lawyers, statesmen, clergymen, who never attempt a great mental success until fortified with Vitalized Phosphites. There are many who without them have broken down and suffered from long prostration. Mental Derangements, Sleeplessness, Lassitude, Debility are cured by this special Brain Food. It has been highly recommended bv many of the very best Physicians, by Prof. Willard Parker, Prof. Alfred C. Post, Prof, G-eo. W. Beard, Prof. John C. Draper, and moi e than a thousand others. CROSBY’S VITALIZED PHOSPHITES, 56 WEST 25th ST., NEW YORK. For sale by Druggists or sent by Mail, $1.00. Musie' Art House of the South L II. S. XI. II SELL PIANOS AND ORGANS ON EASY TERMS AND AT LOWEST PRICES. PianoS CHICKERING, MATHUSHEK MASON HAMLIN, BENT, - ARION. MASON HAMLIN, BAY STATE, BACK ARE ORCHESTRAL. $50 $25 SAVED ON SHEET s MUSIC THE LARGEST STOCK IN THE SOUTH, AND PRICES THE LOWEST. ORDERS FILLED SAME DAY RECEIVED. - at® ICAJBr HESSCBAKKSB An Immense Stock of GUITARS, VIOLINS, BANJOS, ACCORDIONS, FLUTES, PICCOLOS, CLARIONETS, MUSIC BOXES, BAND INSTRUMENTS, Etc. ARTIST MATERIALSf STRETCHERS, CANVAS, TUBE PAINTS, OIL AND WATER COLORS, PALLETTES, BRUSHES, EASELS, and a complete assortment of all goods used by Amateur and Professional Artists. Our Prices Guaranteed as Low as any House in the Country. FIOTTXIRIES FRAMES We have the largest collection of Pictures in the South, consisting of ARTOTYPES, INDOTINTS, CRAYONS, PASTELS, OLEOGRAPHS, ENGRAVINGS, PAINTINGS. Etc. We sell a fine INDOTINT for 50 cents, usual price $1.00. Carry in stock, of assorted sizes and kinds, over 300 styles of Mouldings, as well as a large Stock of Ready Made Frames? and our facilities for manufacturing to order any desired size of Frame cannot be excelled. CHRISTMAS, NEW YEAR, EASTER AND BIRTHDAY CARDS, IN SEASON. BRASS, BRONZE AND BLUSH GOODS. INK STANDS, PAPER WEIGHTS, CLOCKS, THERMOMETERS, ALBUMS, BISQUE GOODS, SCREENS, EASELS, MUSIC, RACKS, CABINETS, VASES FRAMES FOR CABINET PICTURES, BOX PAPERS, and a large assortment of fino CORRESPONDENCE STATIONERY always on hand. Our Stock always fresh. Our Goods received by every Steamer One price to all, and all Goods guarantod as represented: Money returned where goods are not satisfactory. O'4% I O Gr "C7 E Sfc Published as follows and Mailed on application: CATALOGUE No. 1. Pianos—From Five different Makers. Each under Separate cover. CATALOGUE No. 2. Organs—Prom Three different Makers. Each under separate cover. CATALOGUE No. 3, Music—Two largecCatalogues of Sheet:Music and Music Books. CATALOGUE No. 4. Band Instruments—Cornets, Bugles, Drums iCymbals, Fifes, Clarionets, and everything used by Bands. CATALOGUE No. 5. Baud and Orchestral Music. CATALOGUE No. G. Automatic Instruments—Orguinettes, Organinas, 'Euphonias, Celestinas. Melodias, Musical Caskets, and Music for same. CATALOGUE No. 7, Small Instruments—Violins, Guitars, Banjos, Accordeons, Harmonicas, Flutes, Music Boxes, Music Folios, and all kinds .of trimmings, such as Pegs, Bridges, Tailpieces, Rosin, Bow Hair, etc. CATALOGUE No. 8. Strings—For Violin, Guitar, Banjo, Violoncello, I Double Brass, Harp, and Zither. CATALOGUE No. 9. Piano Stools and Covers. CATALOGUE No. 10. Artists’ Materials—Paints, Pencils, Brushes Canvas, Stretchers, Crayons, Plaques, etc. MAIL OLSZDEPBS Receive our prompt attention, and are filled on day of reception Pianos and Organs Sold on easy terms, all other goods Cash. SAVANNAH, GA.ATHElI .Ga. TEST FREE- -lSOLD BY DRUGGISTS Or sent by Express, Charges Prepaid, onjjreceipt of the Price. FERRIS SON, Gents’ Furnishers, FUItf, DRESS OUTFITS A SPECIALTY.


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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1886 Edition, Page 1

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