University of Findlay - Argus Yearbook (Findlay, OH)

 - Class of 1936

Page 1 of 140

 

University of Findlay - Argus Yearbook (Findlay, OH) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1936 Edition, University of Findlay - Argus Yearbook (Findlay, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1936 Edition, University of Findlay - Argus Yearbook (Findlay, OH) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 140 of the 1936 volume:

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E DEDICATE TO Dr. R. J. Wertheim ff" "Upon the Wall-s the graceful ivy climbs And Wraps with green the ancient ruin grey Romance it is, and these her leafy rhymes Writ on the granite page ot yesterday." -Sherman. v Y 0- 1 S k . I "V A 'W' T,,'YX A ,V ,, T' . lf' .r'-5.. 'wmv 4 V w "And now the drooping Willow tree bestows Upon the ground its gentle tracery, And from its silver spangled foliage goes The poignant spell of fleeting memory. -Hnyero, f SB W 1 C110 N ON fy 1 CLLE GE f E.,C VZ TWELVE Homer Ross Dunathan returned to his alma mater in the tall of l929 and took up the arduous duties ot President oi Findlay College. ln these seven years the rise of Findlay College from a place of semi-obscurity to a position ot emi- nence among the institutions of higher learning is a tribute to the industry and leadership of our president. Guided by the principle, better students for Findlay, the PreXy's efforts, We feel, have not been unrewarded. An enthu- siastic supporter ot athletics and vitally interested in the development of extra- curricular activities, President Dunathan has Well earned the universal respect ot the entire student body. His native humor, subtly exercised, has done much to relieve this serious business ot getting a college education. -1 E ru IPI U 3 Z U2 I-1 su IP' f-1 O Z mm:-1 I-iZl"1UI-IV-lU15U"d mm-1 Uw!HOuu IPI 'JU U O "lil I-1 'JU Cl rn I-I l?".I D1 rn First Row-Myrtle Deming, Executive Secretary of Findlay College-Treasurer: Rev. B. H. Rogers, Ill.: H. R. Dunathan, President of Findlay College: Rev. I1 L. Updeqraph, Penna.- Presideni: Rev. S, F. Bauders, Ohio-Secretary: Rev. H. R. Lobb, Penna.: Mrs, Mary Cherry Ballfinch, Ohio. Second Row-Dr. W. S. Miller, Ill.: Dr. Clyde Grose, Ill.: R. K. Davis, Ohio: A. O. Hamilton, Ohio: S. W. Weiqer, Ohio: Iudqe Chester Pendleton, Ohio: Rev. E. E. Heltibridle, Iowa: W. L. Stevens, Perma: V. H. Cunningham, Md.: Rev. C. H. Heiqes, Perma.: Rev. S. Kahl Dustin, Ind.: M. A. Hoff, Penna.-Vice-President. Frank Berkheimer, Penna., was absent TIIIHTEEN BC UK.-'Y CARROLL A. MOREY . . . Dean . . . Pros fessor of Chemistry . . . AB., Oberlin Col- lege: M.S., University of Colorado: Ph.D. Partial, University of Michigan. Findlay College 1921 . . . BERNITA DREITZLER . . . Dean of Women . . . Professor of English . . . A.B., Oberlin College: M.A., Oberlin College. Findlay College l927 . . . RAYMOND M. GONSO . . , Dean of Men . . . Professor of Philosophy . . , A.B., Finds lay College: B.D., Yale University: M.A., Yale University: Ph.D., Ohio State Univer- sity. Findlay College 1929 . . . ROBERT A. HONN . .. , Professor of Psy- chology . . . A.B., lohnson Bible College: S. T. M., Iohnson Bible College: E.S.C., Southwestern Normal: M.A., University cf Michigan: Ph.D., Univeristy of Michigan. Findlay College 1930 . . . WILLIAM C. LEVAN . . . Professor of Biology . . . A.B., DePauw University: M.A., University of Michigan: Pl'1.D., Uni- versity of Pennsylvania. Findlay College l929 . . . W. A. BAIR . . . Professor of Education . . . A.B., Findlay College: M.A., Ohio State University: E'd.D. res., University of Southern California. Findlay College 1921 SIXTEEN HOWARD C. PERKINS . . . Professor of Political and Social Science . . . A.B., Uni- versity of Toledo: M.A., University of To- ledo: Ph.D., Yale University. Findlay Col- lege 1934 . . . IAMES R. MOCK . . . Professor oi History . . . A.B., DePauw University: MA., Uni- versity of Wisconsin: Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. Findlay College 1930 . . . YALE K. ROOTS . . . Professor of Physics and Mathematics . . . B.S., Wooster Col- lege: M. S., New York University: Ph.D., Boston University. Findlay College 1930. ROY I. WERTHEIM . . . Professor of Ro- mance Languages . . . A.B., Ohio State University: M. A., University of Chicago: M.A., Ohio State Universityg Ph.D., Ohio State University. Findlay College 1929 . . . I. RUSSELL BUCHER . . . Professor of The- ology and Classical Languages . . . A.B., Findlay College: S.T.B., Princeton: S.T.M., Princeton. Findlay College l925.. .. NEAL CRAFTS , . . Professor ot English . . . B.E., Ohio Northern University: B.Pd., Ohio Northern University, Findlay College 1934 .... SEVENTEEN EIIHITEEN STUART K. HOLCOMB . . . Director of Physical Education . . . A. B., Ohio State University: Graduate School, Ohio State University. Findlay College l932 . . . ELIZABETH DAVIS . . . Instructor in Phy- sical Education . . . A. B., Wittenberg Col- lege, Graduate School, University of Mich- igan. Findlay College IQC34 . . . NELSON IONES . . . Assistant Athletic Director . . . A. B., Findlay College. Find- lay College 1935 . . . MABEI. KING . . . Office Secretary . . , Findlay Business College. Findlay College l925 . . . MYRTLE DEMING . . . Executive Secretary . . . Findlay College Commerce School. Findlay College 1917 . . . CATHERINE ELLIS . . . Librarian . . . Miami Universityg B. S., Ohio Northern Univer- sityg Western Reserve University. Find- lay College l929 . . . ANNAMARY DEVERTER . . . Director of Conservatory . . . Graduaie Dunmire School oi Musicg B.Mus., Findlay Collegeg A.B., Findlay College. Findlay College l925 . . . WENDELL SANDERSON . . . Director of Vocal Music . . . A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University: B.M.E., Nsrihwesiern Univer- sity. Findlay College 1930 . . . OLIVER SCHUMACI-IER . . . Director of Orchestra and lnsiructor in Violin . . . Bluffton Collegeg lnsiiiuie oi Musical Art. Findlay College 1929 . , . CHARLOTTE WALTERS . . . lnsltuclcr in Pipe Organ . . . B.Mus., Findlay College. Findlay College 1935 . . . E. E. MAGOON . . . Direcior of Commer- cial Departmeni . . . A.B., Findlay College. Findlay College l92l . . . MARGARET ANSCHUTZ . . . Secreiarial Instructor . . . B.S., Kansas Slaie Teachers Collegeg Graduate School Kansas Univer- siiy. Findlay College i935 . . . DONALD MAGOON , . . lns'rucicr in Ccin- rnercial Subiecis , . . B.S.E. lM.E.l, Univer- siiy oi Michigang M.S., Universiiy of M'cl1- igan. Findlay College l934 . . . l NINETEEN 1 1 t RSSB S QL o SE TWENTY-TWU NIO ATHLETES By their own admission a class "with almost ireakish originality," the Class ot 1936 will be watched with a great deal oi interest during' the next several years. The word originality suits this collection of competent scholars, charming friends, and whimsical mediocrities. As a group they represent What is probably l:'indlay's finest senior class. Athletes, orators, organizers, and lead- ers, they are a curious me- lange. not likely to be for- gotten. Not all outstanding, to be sure, but with more than a few destined for greater things. Rugged individualism has determined the manner in which they have carried on the activities oi their four years at Findlay College. Any attempt to survey their manifold services within the pages ot a single book would do an injustice to them. W'e have all watched them at various stages oi their evolu- tion and remember well their May Days, Home Comings, Harvest Homes. But these activities are only forms into which the individual mem- bers ot the c-lass have breathed lite. lt is, thereiore, fitting that we offer you a few thumbnail sketches, a few brief biographies of these, our departing seniors. A FEW BR IE BI RATORS, ORGANIZERS, AND LEADERS Don Armbrecht: extraordinarily active . . . exceedingly modest . . . a photo- grapher-Ellsworth Beach: healthy, husky . . . refreshingly trustworthy . . . Pop -Viola Beach: twice Who's Whooed . . . beauty, brains . . . offices without num- ber-Dick Beard: an original old smoothie ...A a clever stylist with pen and tongue-George Blackburn: popular . . . football, basketball, and baseball . . . mogul in Varsity "F"-Merrill Bushong: a quiet fellow . . . whose tennis re- flected steadiness . . . perseverance-Ralph Calabrese: participant in all sports . . . .serious, reflective . . . language student . . . n'est-ce pas?-Betty Caskey: pensive, haloish . . . Y. W. president . . . ideals-Allen Clopper: a clever year- book . . . man of convictions . . . impunible punster-Francis Ensign: honored by class, Y. M., popular poll . . . a printer of distinction . . . Whittle4Mary lane Gaver: sharp sophistication . . . charming air of cynicism . . . long remembered, M. I.-Wilbur Gromann: a rebel spirit . . . his battle against hypocrisy . . . evi- dence of a firm sincerity-Charles Hirsimaki: an athletes' athlete . . . Viking . . . handsome-Dick l-loose: a jesier and a gentleman . . . leader . . . perennial president-Evelyn Hosafros: a talented musician . . . warm personality . . . ideas-Willis Howell: air of a scholar . . . attached to ideals of study and re- search-Charles Huston: shy young man . . . intelligently entertaining . . . friends-George Huttel: school spirit . . . pugnaciously argumentative . . . cheer- leader-Harold Kurtz: one of the boys with a goal . . . serious, determined- Donovan Lanning: well liked . . . deep interest in sports . . . congenial-Grace Leonard: shyly intellectual . . . missionary-elect . . . lucky heathens-Carl Maurer: sincere, earnest . . . faithful historian-Buthanna Maxwell: charm and style . . . and a wisdom all her own-Kathryn Moyer: versatile . . . faithful and depend- able . . .joiner-Harry Nerhood: research . . . investigation . . . Michelet, to your laurels-Lelia Pfost: a distinctive laugh . . . blonde hair . . . reserved-Harry Bahmann: devoted to principles . . . strength of character-Franklin Bodabaugh: Y. M. man . . . a scientist . . . Bluffton bound-Mardyth Sanderson: high praise . . . to a conscientious scholar . . . Sanders, the man in a hurry-Glois Schrader: cheerful humor . . . and ready wit-Beva Staley: biology, bugs, some of her in- terests . . . reliable-George Stout: "victim of circumstances" . . . Leap-Week King . . . popular scientist-Orton Street: outstanding freshman in '32 . . . record proves soundness of that choice . . . college boy-Sheldon Taylor: a brilliant student . . . scope of activities attests his ability . . . our la Ptochefoucauld-Hem rietta Tinsman: a born executive . . . fated to command . . . vitriolic wit-Robert Trout: well favored by the gods . . . all-round athlete . . . handsome man- George Tuttle: to be remembered . . . caresser of ivories . . . Thespian-Reba Wagner: quiet.. .a girl whose modesty hides her true value-Richard Wallen: Finkelsteinian memory . . . arises on any occasion . . . will talk his way to suc- cess-Guynieth Wilcox: devoted to her studies . . . and to Dick Meyers-Charles Zumpft: a football player who knows his psychology . . . and whose name is a joy to pronounce. OGRAPHIES OF THESE TWEIITY-THREE DON ARMBRECHT Findlay. Ohio Major: Math-Physics Alethean 3, 45 Alpha Club 2: Argus Staff l, 2, 35 Ein- stein Club l, 2, 3, 4, Presi- dent 35 Rambling Peppers 1, 25 Student Council 4, President 45 Y. M. C, A. l, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3. TWENTY-FOUR VIOLA BEACH Franklin, Penna. Major: Math-Physics Alethean l, 2, 3, 4, Anti-War Confer- ence 3g Argus Stait 35 Einstein Club 1, Z, 3, 45 Forensic 27 Most Likely to Suc- ceed 4, Peranian lg Rambling Peppers 29 Student Council 3: Who's Who 3, 4, W. A. A. 3, 4, Vice-President 3, Presi- dent 3g Y. W. C. A. l, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 2, 3, Vice-President 4. ELLSWORTH BEACH Williamstown. Ohio Major: Chemistry Track 2, 45 Varsity "F" 2 3, 4. GEORGE BLACKBURN Columbus. Ohio Major: Government- Sociology Baseball l, 2, 45 Basketball 35 Class Secretary 25 Foot- ball l, 2, 3, 4, Program Chairman 45 Poly Sci 35 Vice-President 35 Varsity "F" l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 4. RICHARD BEARD Findlay. Ohio Major: History Alethean 2, 3, 4, President 3, 45 Alpha Club 35 Anti-War Conference 35 Argus Staff l, 3, Editor-in-chief 35 Convocative 3, 45 Debate l, 2, 3, 45 Ministerial lg Orange Peel 1, 2, Editor 25 Peranian l5 Student Council 2, 35 Y. M. C. A. l, 2. MERRILL BUSHONG New Stark. Ohio Major: Chemistry Einstein Club l, 2, 3, 4, President 35 Forensic 25 Nu Psi Rho 3, 45 Student Coun- cil 35 Tennis 3, 45 Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. TWENTY FIVE BETTY CASKEY Decatur. Ill. Major: Biology Argus Staff 37 Biology Club 3, 45 Nu Psi Rho 3, 45 Stu- dent Council 3, 47 W. A. A. 3, 45 Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 4. TWENTY-SIX l..-ek RALPH CALABRESE Erie. Penna. Major: Spanish-French Baseball 1, 25 Basketball l, 2, 3: Class Secretary 35 Football l, 2, 3, 4: Nu Psi Rho 37 Track l, 2, 45 Varsity "F" l, 2, 3, 4. ' W ALLEN CLOPPER Clearspring, Md. Major: French-German Alethean 2, 3, Vice-Presi- dent 31 Arqus Editor-in- chief 3, Debate 2, 4, Ein- stein Club 37 Student Coun- cil 3: Y. M. C. A. l, 2, 3, 4 Vice-President 3. 1 FRANCIS ENSIGN Findlay. Ohio Major: Biology Biology Club 3, 4, Vice- President 3, 45 Cap and Dagger l, 2, Chorus l, 27 Class President 47 May Day Page l, 31 Most Popu- lar Man 47 Nu Psi Rho 4, Student Council 45 Y. M. C. A. l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, WILBUR GROMANN Arlington. Ohio Major: French-Latin Alethean 3, 47 Nu Psi Pho 3, 4. MARY JANE GAVER Upper Sandusky, Ohio Major: Chemistry Alethean 2, 3, 47 Anti-War Conference 37 Argus Staff l, 3, Class Secretary lp Class President 3, Debate 25 Einstein Club 3, 4, Sec- retary 39 Forensic 27 Or- chestra ly Rambling Pep- pers l, 2, Secretary 1, Stu- dent Council 3, Secretary 3: W. A. A. 3, 4. TWENTY-SEVEN CHARLES HIRSIMAKI Conneaui. Ohio Major: Government- Sociology Alpha Club 25 Baseball 45 Basketball l, 2, 35 Director Varsity "F" Basketball Tournament 3, 45 Football l, 2, 3, 4, Program Staff 3, 4, Chairman 35 Poly Sci 2, 35 Track 1, 2, 3, 45 Varsity "F" l, 2, 3, 4. TYIEIITY-EIGHT EVELYN HOSAFROS Carey, Ohio Major: English-French. Alethean 2, 3, 4, Secretary 45 Cap and Dagger 15 Class Vice-President 35 En- semble l, 2, 3, 45 Musical Arts Club 45 Nu Psi Rho 35 Student Council 45 Y. W. C. A. l, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 3, 4. RICHARD HOOSE Elyria. Chio Major: Political Science Alpha 2, Secretary 25 Alethean 2, 3, 45 Argus 25 Cap and Dagger l, 2, 3, President 2, 35 Chorus l, 25 Class Vice-President 25 Council 3, 45 Debate 2, 35 Football l, 2, 3, 45 Iester 2, 35 Most Popular 35 Nu Psi Rho 3, 4, President 3, 45 Track l, 2, 3, 45 Varsity "F" l, 2, 3, 4. CHARLES HUSTON Wharton. Ohio Major: Chemistry Biology Club 3, Class Vice- Presiclent 25 Football 3, 4 Nu Psi Rho 4, WILLIS HOWELL Continental. Ohio Majors: Theology, Psychology-Philoso- Phy GEORGE HUTTEL Cleveland. Ohio Major: Political Science- History Cap and Dagger lp Cheer- leader 3, 4, Football Pro- gram Chairman llp Poly Sci 3, Treasurer 35 Track l, Manager 25 Varsity "F" 3, 4. TWEIITY- IIIIIE DONOVAN LANNING Carey. Ohio Major: Chemistry Football 2, 3, 4, Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3. TIIIRTY ff' HAROLD KURTZ Roaring Sprinqs. Penna. Majors: Biology, Chemistry Argus Staff 35 Bio-Chemistry Club lg Biology Club 2, 3, 4, President 2, 37 Chorus lg Nu Psi Rho 3, 4, Vice-Presi- dent 4, Orchestra 15 Student Council 4, Y. M. C. A. l, 3, 4. GRACE LEONARD Ruffsdale, Penna. Major: Theology-Greek Argus Staff 3, Class Secre- tary 4, Ministerial Associa- tion lp Nu Psi Rho 3, 47 Student Volunteer l, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4, W. A. A. 3, 4: Y. W. C. A. l, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 3, Secretary 4. RUTHANNA MAXWELL Findlay. Ohio Major: French-German Alethean 3, 4, Argus Staff 1, 2, 31 Cap and Dagger 27 Chorus 1, "Rose Maiden" 25 Class Secretary 3, semble 1, 2, 31 May Queen 45 Rambling Peppers 1, 2: Tennis 25 W. A. 'A. 41 Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 3, 4. lx HARRY NERHOOD Altoona. Penna. Major: History Convocative 3, 4, Head Waiter Harvest Home 2: May Day Announcer 3, Min- isterial Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Student Volunteer 2, President 25 Y. M. C. A. 1, 2. KATI-IRYN MOYER Findlay, Ohio Major: French-German Nu Psi Rho 3, 4, Secretary 35 Orchestra 11 Rambling Peppers 1, 27 Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 3, 4. TIIIRTY UIIE , xl I LELIA PFOST Scott. Ohio Major: English Biology Club 45 W. A. A. 3, 45 Y. W. C. A. l, 2, 3, 4 Cabinet 4. FRANKLIN RODABAUGH Williamstown. Ohio Major: Chemistry-Biology Cap and Dagger 35 Einstein Club l, 2, 3, 45 Forensic 25 Nu Psi Rho 3, 45 Stu- dent Council 3, 45 Y. M. C. A. l, 2, 3, 41, Cabinet 3, President 4. T u 1 n T v . 1 w n - 1,f-' HARRY RAHMANN Brackenridge, Penna. Major: Theology- Chemistry Aristotelian Literary So- ciety 15 Baseball Manager 2, 3, 45 Basketball Manager 3, 45 Football Manager 3, 45 Ministerial Association l, 2, 3, 45 Student Volun- teer 15 Track Manager 25 Varsity "F" 2, 3, 45 Y. M. C. A. l, 2, 3, Secretary l, Treasurer 2. Major: GLOIS SCHRADER Columbia City, Ind. Major: History-Social Science Einstein Club l, 2, Nu Psi Rho 3, 4, Treasurer 45 Stu- dent Volunteer 4, Assistant Recording Secretary' 47 Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. l MARDYTH SANDERSON Miller. Nebr. History REVA STALEY Mt. Blanchard. Ohio Major: Biology Biology Club 3, 4, Einstein Club l, 2, 37 Nu Psi Rho 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4: W. A. A. 3, 45 Y. W. C. A. l, 2, 3, 4. TIIIRTY-THREE ORTON STREET Bellevue. Ohio Major: Government- Economics Anti-War Conference 3, Baseball lg Football l, 2, 3, 4, Golf 3, 4, Outstanding Freshman lg Poly Sci 3, Varsity "F" 3, 4. TIHRTY-FUUR GEORGE STOUT Wharton. Ohio Major: Chemistry ' Bio-Chemistry Club l, 2, Biology Club 3, 4: Cap and Dagger 2, 3, Einstein Club 3, 47 Football 31 Nu Psi Rho 4, Y. M. C. A. l, 2, 3, 4. SHELDON TAYLOR Findlay. Ohio Major: German-French Alethean 2, 3, 41 Alpha Club 2g Argus Business Manager 3g Class Vice- President 47 Debate 47 Ein- stein Club l, 4, Forensic 27 Rambling Peppers 3, Presi- dent 35 Student Council 3: Tennis l, 3, 45 Varsity "F' 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, Secretary 45 Y. M. C. A. l. 1 HENRIETTA TINSMAN Findlay. Ohio Major: Enqlish Cap and Dagger 1, 2, 3, Secretary 3, "Tweedles" 2, Chorus l, 2, 3, 4, "Rose Maiden" 2, "Messiah" 3, 4 "Ruth" 35 Y. W. C. A. l 2, 3, 4. GEORGE TUTTLE Findlay. Ohio Major: Chemistry Cap and Dagger 1, 25 "Tweedles" 27 Chorus 1, 2, 3, 45 Debate 3, Dramatic Recital lp Einstein Club 45 Ensemble l, 2, 3, 47 Musical Arts Club 45 Orchestra 3, 45 Student Council lg Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 4. ROBERT TROUT Van Buren. Ohio Major: Chemistry Alethean 25 Baseball l, 2, 4, Basketball 4, Einstein Club 2, 3, Football 2, 3, 47 Most Handsome Man 2, 47 Peranian 1, 27 Varsity "F" 3, 4: Y. M. C. A. l, 2. THIRTY-FIVE REBA WAGNER Deshler. Ohio Maj or: English Einstein Club 2, 3, 4, Sec- retary 4, Ministerial Asso ciation lg Y. W. C. A. 2, 3, 4. RTY-SIX Wk -x F , GUYNIETH WILCOX Deshler. Ohio Maj or: Theology-Greek Chorus 4g Ministerial Association l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4, Y. W. C. A. 4. RICHARD WALLEN Findlay. Ohio Major: Psychology- German Alethean 2, 3, 4, President 4, Alpha Club 2: Anti-War Conference 37 Argus 2, 31 Cap and Daqqer 25 Chorus l, 2, Debate 2, 3, 47 Ein- stein Club ly Forensic 2, President 27 Most Likely to Succeed 45 Rambling Peppers 25 Student Coun- cil 2, 45 Uqliest Man 27 Who's Who 4. CHARLES ZUMPFT Geneva. Ohio Major: Psychology Band 3, Einstein C1ub 25 Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Nu Psi Rho 4, President 4: Orches- tra 13 Varsity "F" 3, 4, Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. CARL MAURER Findlay. Ohio Major: History Chorus 1, 2, 3, Convoca- tive 3, 4, Forensic 2, Per- anian 1, 25 Rambhnq Pep- pers 15 Y. M. C. A. 1, 2. TIIIRTY-SEVEH 0 J TIIIRTY-EIGHT UNIOR THIRTY-FIVE The thirty-five members of the Class of l937 claim a proper share in influencing the activities of the College. The third-year students may well be proud of their accom- plishments. ln athletic prow- ess, executive positions, so- cial events, and academic standing, their record is of considerable interest. The officers for the group were Mary Emma Laliiowe, president: Iustine O r i a n s, vicepresidentg Richard Mey- ers, secretary-treasurerg and Robert Lee, Student Council representative. Marjorie McGranahan joins Elizabeth Harpst for a week- end in the country, Y. W. girls off on an outing . . . lames Pederici, Paul Biddin- ger, Al Calabrese, and How- ard Trostmiller, the campus idols, pose on the gymna- sium steps after a strenuous session . . . Forrest Creason and Sam Owens cram forthe midterm international rela- tions exam . . . Paul Halde- man and Paul Leckey in the Y. M. C. A. parlor anticipat- ing, formulating, and promul- gating new plans, new hopes, under guise of study- ing . . . Chemistry students Don Powell, Elda Osman, and Dick Wright, during a brief respite, pondering a structural formula and won- dering why among the bot- tles . . . Twila Lucas and Iames Manafo, sports editor and librarian, compare notes on life on the steps of F. C. MAY WELL BE IEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1937 1 OUD OF THEIR ACCOIVIPLISHMENTS 0 J FUIITY UNIOR Z-11, THEIR RECORI Pauline DeMuth likes to sing and Robert Clapper likes to accompany her and we rath- er like it too . . . Close har- mony by two charming peo- ple . . . Pauline Gross ex- plains the whys and where- tores of Findlay College to a new arrival . . . Ruby Shoe- maker listens attentively while taking a bit ot a rest in the Y. W. parlor between classes . . . Declan O'Keefe and Gordon Bocldy protect- ing Iustine Orians from the rigors of the great out ol doors . . . The most popular coed with two popular tel- lows . . . Del Drake taking a breather just before entering to take part in some manly diversion . . . Florence Rider and Robert Lee doing some checking over on the history lesson while Mary Emma La- Rowe looks on . . . Iohn Shank and Don Vansant, two big men, stop a heavy dis- cussion to oblige the Argus photographer . . . Dale Small, Dick Meyers, and lohn Gates emerging from the dorm on their way to class . . . well, emerging anyway . . . Out in the cold, Kathryn Gaver and William Duttweiler atter nu- merous ettorts give you this . . . Iohn LaRowe and Evelyn Eatherton . . . just a couple ot strangers, that's all, just a couple ot strangers. S OF CONSIDERABLE INTEREST t WITH MEMORIES O.F LAST YEAR First How-Gardner, Bird, Swasick, Caughman, Reese, Opperman, Winders, Perkins, Deter, Yohe, F. Miller, Behman. Second Row-Hamilton, Rosenberger, H. Lee, George, Iohnson, Inbody, Williamson, Roberts, Bibler, DeLoris Mowry, Dorothy Mowry, DeGood, R. Boyd, Thomas. Third Row-Gephart, Carpenter, M. Howard, Wilkin, Manes, Cullen, Russell, Musgrave, V. Trout, Ornclorff, Mazza, Grimm, Bell. Although it cannot be said that it is its only claim for distinction, perhaps the most char- acteristic thing concerning the Class of 1938 is the disparity between the number of men students and coeds. Outnumbered more than seven to one, the coeds find no trouble in se- curing eligible males. This year's sophomores were probably the most neglected first year class that it has been Findlay Colleges occasion to entertain in some years. Cornpelled to undergo the extreme humiliation of being deprived of the rare privilege of wearing the token of submission, only Vincent Bell ot the tour elected freshman officers mustered courage enough to return to Findlay's fair halls. The Sophies swallowed their pride and vowed that this year's crop of fledglings would wear pots and wear them they did. With memories of last year still green, a vigorous initiation committee composed of lack Gardner, chairman, Martha Roberts, Ruth Williamson, Max Swasick, and Iohn Yohe, hero of many a former Soph-Frosh skirmish, early made its position known to the unsuspecting Freshies. With fear and trembling the green-potted greenhorns obeyed the stern dictates of the second-year men. The sight of a horde of Freshies salaaming a lone sophomore was not uncommon in those first few weeks. The customary paddling, grease and flour mas- sages, variety entertainment in front of the court house, and the subsequent cinema were the order during the evening of October 23. The Sophomore Class numbers forty-three students. Those not present when the picture was taken include Iohn Amendola, Marion Bair, Leo Kaminski, and Robert Magoon. t IT IS NO EXAGGERATIO .TILL GREEN A class ot serious intentions it has scattered into various fields ot activity where its energies although not fully matured have given indica- tions ot much promise. Helen lnbody as W. A. A. presi- dent, as the Y. W.'s most ideal student, and the col- lege's best woman athlete, Raymond Reese, Myrl Mus- grave, Richard Cullen, and Craig DeCfood as Y. M. potentates, George Williams and Musgrave as officers ot Findlay College Ministerial Association, Helen Lee and Elmer Orndorif, high rnoguls in the Y. W. and Einstein re- spectively, Vincent Bell, lack Gardner, Leo Kaminslci, Iohn Amenclola, Elmer Orndorff, Iohn Behman, Al Mazza, and Van Trout in major sports, Bell as sharer in handsomest man title, Iohn Winders, Wil- liam Opperman, Robert Boyd, and Max Swasick in tennis, and Winders in debate form but -a partial list ot this class's activities. lt is no exaggera- tion to state that the Class ot '38 has made a very definite impression upon those about it. The elected officers were lohn Winders, presidentp Helen Lee, vice-presidentg Raymond Reese, secretary- treasurerg and Frank Rosen- berger, Student Council rep- resentative. STATE SGPI-IOIVIORES FURTY-THREE ALL IN THE INTEREST OF GOOII First Row-Finton, Niswander, E. Miller, Chatelain, Ferguson, C. Myers, Marshall. Second Row-DeVore, Weimer, Ketzenberger, Cochrun, Robert Howard, Dickes, Konkel, O. Miller, Feiber, Lozier. Third Row-Schiwek, Wittebort, M. Wright, B. Ensign, Hare, Geraldine Wilcox, Farthing, Mildred McGranahan, Gompf, E. Moore, Abegglen, Har- kins. Fourth Row-Crosse-r, Strouse, Greig, Frye, Crawford, Sucher, Good, Rogers, R. Drake, Rissinger. The Frosh, like the poor, are always with us. One of the more coherent of their group was heard to admit shamefully that he wouldn't mind going to college if he didn't have to start his first year as a freshman. This sentiment pretty well echoed their attitude when came the dawn October 2. Maybe the Sophies were a bit rough but it was all in the interest of good, clean fun. Given a rousing welcome through the interests of the faculty via the Reception, of the Student Council in the Mixer, and the Sophomores by way of initiation the yearlings bore it mantully. The revival of custom took place as Frosh Howard was "potted" by Soph Win- ders at historic Pot Rock. The fledglings accepted the humiliation in the customary inno- cent, goodnatured manner, and their bright green "pots" were a spot of color during those first drab months. After a bit of playing around, trying this, trying that, the Freshmen settled down and soon learned to get out of the road of their all-important upperclassmen. Their cooperation in gathering wood for bonfires and in menial tasks during Harvest Home, Clean Up Day, and May Day underw the watchful eye of overseer lack Gardner were performed, if not whole- heartedly, at least efficiently. Although limited in their activities they quickly filled all available niches with surprising competence. Robert Howard was accepted as a member of the Y. M. cabinet and those two incorrigibles, Herbert Greig and Don Frye, did yeoman service on the debate squad. COLOR DURING THOSE FIRS l' CLEZXN FIIN Those who daringly laid down their lives for the var- sity in gridiron scrimmage include Eugene Abegglen, Clair Burrell, Gene Crawford, lohn Crosser, Raymond Flan- agan, Wayne Niswander, Errald Miller, Thomas Col- ston, Richard l-larkins, Robert Harris, Richard l-loward, Max Rissinger, Michael Soccoccio, Robert Sucher, and Gerald DeVore. Thirteen Cage hopefuls toiled under Freshman Coach Nel+ son Iones and gave much promise ot upholding F. C. on the basketball floor in the next few years. Robert Drake, Don Frye, and Carlton Strouse joined gridders Crawford, Colston, Harris, Sucher, Abegglen, Rissinger, Soccoccio, Harkins, Burrell, and Howard to compose the squad. The enrollment of the Fresh- man Class is forty-nine. Ot this number there are almost twice as many boys as girls. Members not included in the picture on thef preceding page are Clair Burrell, Thomas Col- ston, Carl Crippen, Raymond Flanagan, Robert Harris, Es- cil l-liser, Richard Howard, Louise Magoon, Beverly Na- than, and Mike Soccoccio. Administrative duties oi the Class of l939 were capably filled by Robert Howard, president: Orval Dickes, Vice- president, Robert Drake, sec- retary-treasurerg and Esther Moore, Student Council rep- resentative. RAB MONTHS FIlESI1Ml3N RTY-FIVE SBC 1 1108 1 TVJO BCTX VXTXE f- 'Yr' v "-'K ca 'Nqr' V: 1, ..1. Tj '- -1 'I L . A -J 1.51 1 Q l f ! B GP-N 1 1 X151 s 108 2 1 FIFTY 5223 9.1.5- 50o."' infos' m:+-1'SU ., mo .3-2 C0319 T45-U2 VI Soo? 1113519 2355 Hmmm ,.... 50252 'T1mO: o:'5t79, sw -- -4 .- ga nf rf-its etrlmfl 5915" f3'Q'mE SSM mom im: SPE? v-V E,-1 s?sG 51.2.-'m C3010- Qsm 3 amio W2- E-PU mini-' 5133 wi' D3 r-+:1Q ,,,,.. :U -Q ogg Soi' 5952 M5 mga S:- :NRE Eitg aw:- WCQwb mwpam I-I EE W IIII H M AS I PLEASE Up and up and up . . . to the Seminar Room . . . Tuesday at seven . . ."redI" . . . "black!" . . . bur- lapl" . . . "buckram!" . . . budgets and bickering . . . snaps and snickering . . . typing . . . proofs . . . dead- lines made and deadlines broken . . . the annual raid on merchants . . . led by Iohn LaRoWe . . . Gaver gives marching orders . . . Small budgets the small budget . . . proofreading sessions . . . identifications . . . Osman wields the paint-brush on the Senior vig- nettes . . . A September sun . . . pictures on the carn- pus . . . by the old willow . . . and December snows . . . bring pictures in the chapel . . . All the bustle behind the scenes . . . toiling away early and late . . . pasting and clipping . . . a thankless task . . . this enclosing the flavor and savor of school lite . . . between two cardboards . . . and calling the product . . . Argus 1936 . . . Smitten by the screaming rneem- ies from counting letters . . . torn by Writer's cramps . . . the Staff finds surcease with the Spring. - v v-1.-an-igygnt ' - t-1. E :nf 23 C725 U! ES mm mn: F3 mm W U! 55W355?325Q5EQ59?9 HO Bc1owQ'm5OfPt52.H'EQ15 IT Q ,.. fDyQn+:3-', 41 O4 fD'Tw'UE5H'oPfm,. H5540 548 """c"1:r'D"'5w:352 cn -at ,. F-- Qfsw-05 90'fDO.aHe.Ew U-' "".23""Ov-Gu--mfg-.'O"",':5r'I"i Q5'53.-..-gU"'s:?,oQg'-'g5o.g ...,W- :J-oco D1 O5-,g:.8.,,, 5 KCQQOEIYILY. 'fD5-'MUSE-ZZ 324'-S' ' HCHH ff .. - :Qg23gm'go65Ef5fD, -51 ?H3.5'LE5'f3:'35rf8a:O5IU E'QJ5'A'H'0f'w"cn"w. wtf O kqmrn5m5'::S2.':S2. 59bQ.'1U1 :Ug+m'i2O..Q..:'5,+:,-.ZSJQSQLQ .-:S O: -0-, 2 p-1-GA g'm'...-g8g3Q905'Ugf3mgO'-if Q3-f3wa'OwUO9-Wwoag ,... '-1 fazmQmWa5w95OQDBQ' QQQSQWQMSSQQESQSQ' C ,4 l . LQ.-M '-'-U15S'LQ,... afnmgw-U1-UE595fD9."""f rn, CQ"".9' QJCJI,Uz""41fD H 529,012 S5525 gbmlcz H'UW823.'3SH1w--Zmmfe, UO Cm mxO:3..v-4' UPF- ,.,'.I't-'mmDJ- Q-DHD-I '.UJ O asigufvfa-EaW,f6"fS0-H85 fD5'2'aH-sawgiifzgasz 3mfo48Q.LQI'csE'f"F::v"vrfPu4. I:"l-IOZC-100 STI? s:E Q- Fad WS Sl :rw D.-C "1 375 O. Ti 2111- H11 'J WE. 59:1 3,9 wi 0:1 gm 22 23 5, 53 ... I1 ai go - 2 5511 59 mm PQ 7314 rm :W Em E01 's SU rr 'QE EQ 22 ga 30:11 30 wa. 239' FIFTY-UNE FIFTY-TWD THEY SHALL INHERIT . . THE EARTH . Hymns and hornilies . . . follow the gleam . . . voices raised . . . Potential pulpit pounders . . . and hopeful helpers ot the heathen . . . singing psalms of service . . . Myrl Musgrave in charge . . . and with the second semester George Williams returns to his presidency . . . aided and abetted by Harry Nerhood, DeLoris Mowry, Myrl Gephart . . . Social evenings now and then . . . The third Tues- day of the month . . . down the river . . . to the County Home . . . where services are held . . . Every Monday . . . hints on pastoral charge by Reverends Cabbage, Denny, Hayle, and Dunham . . . A conscientious group . . . directed by Clas- sicist Bucher . . . enjoying lectures sponsored by the Ohio Eldership Board of Ordination . . . firm in faith . . . devoted disciples . . . seeking salvation by saving sinners . . . From Books ot Covenant . . . from discussion . . . gleaning a religion . . . measured not in Sundays . . . but in deeds. M I N I S T E R I A L First Row-Geraldine Wilcox, Farthing, Guynieth Wilcox, Musgrave, Prof. Bucher, Dorothy Mowry, DeLoris Mowry, Hare. Second Row-Small, Schiwek, R. Meyers, Maries, Gephart, Ferguson, Yohe. Third Row-Nerhood, Gates, Rahmann, Wilkin, Good. First Row-Caughman, I. LaRowe, Swasick. Duttweiler, Dr. Roots, Orndorff, Armbrecht, Bushonq. Second Row-Carpenter, K. Gaver, V- Beach. WBQHGT, M- GGVGY. EBUISIIOII. Tuttle. R. Wright. Third Row-Powell, Taylor, Stout, Haldeman, Deter, F. Rodabaugh. E I N S T E I N IF I HAVE FOUR APPLES Phonodeiks . . . Oscillographs . . . an intrepid band of investigators . . . led in search tor truth by Dutt- weiler and Iohn Lalitowe . . . supported by Orndortt, Powell, Armbrecht and Reba Wagner . . . Dr. Roots advising . . . mathematical wizards . . . they know why stars come out at night . . . and how . . . and the why of lights . . . discussion . . . and more discus- sion every other Tuesday . . . ballistic pendulums . . . flying lbullets . . . color photography . . . nomograms . . . phosphorescent and tlourescent phenomena . . . streamlining . . . movies on the excellence of spark plugs and divers matters . . . in darkened chapel . . . and November 16 the Ohio Physics Club . . . Swas- ick, Bushong, and Armbrecht . . . expository explan- ations before convened researchers . . . Variations on the social theme . . . Christmas banquet at Hilltop . . . picnic at Catawba . . . excursion to Detroit, Dear- born, Greenfield Village . . . explorations north, south, east, west . . . scientists all. TY-THREE - , TY-F0 First Row-M. Gaver, Gates. Hosafros, Prof. Gonso, Wallen, Maxwell, Taylor, V. Beach. Second Row-Winders, Gromann, K. Gaver, Swasick, M. Lalltowe, Duttweiler, Inbody, Arm- brecht, Orians, l-loose. A L E T I-I E A N IT .SEEMS TO ME. "Emotionalisrn versus Rationalismn . . . rational the- ories oi value . . . twenty philosophers . . . twenty scholars discussing college and lite . . . limited mem- bership . . . an organization devoted to serious con- sideration . . . of The Denorninational College of Edu- cation . . . ot Euthanasia . . . of The Philosophy ot History . . . of Appreciation of Beauty, Opportunism, Free Will . . . arguments pro and con . . . without end . . . dinner meetings at frequent intervals . . . The loqvacious Mr. Wallen wields the presidential gavel . . . and no mean iob . . . for ideas are ireely ex- pressed . . . and volubly . . . Evelyn Hosairos pen- ning the minutes . . . and holding the money-bags . . . 1935 sees the regular publication of the "Ale- thean Register" . . . a digest . . . classical and orig- inal ...' covering the field . . . from Socrates to George Santayana . . . the essence ot great philo- sophies . . . and conclusions drawn . . . under the guidance of Dean Gonso. YOU HAVE . THE FLCOR Iudicial Review . . . the Supreme Court and Congress take a beating . . . affirmative and negative . . . over- night trips and 3 A. M. sessions . . . Airtight cases becoming vulnerable . . . filing card cases filled with quotations from Boudin . . . Corwin . . . Cohen . . . Hughes . . . Iefierson . . . quoted and misquoted . . . reversal ot form under astute tutelage of Dr. Perkins . . . sumptuous banquets after victories . . . FFFFF . . . climbing in and out of tuxes in small hotel rooms . . . comeback at Ohio Conference . . . second honors with victories over Bluffton, over Oberlin, two over Heidelberg . . . punitive phrase-makers . . . "state of mind" . . . "human rights over property rights" . . . "constitutional safeguards" . . . non-decision affairs with Bluffton, Capital, Wittenberg, and Baldwin-Wab lace . . . victor over Xavier . . . loser with Muskingum . . . the White hopes . . . Gates, Greig, Frye and Wind- ers. I2"1l-1bllIllJ1U rn Q, 2 :U O T Q O rs ro CD :I CJ 9. CD If' -3 O1 'i O rf GJ '1 2, 'P U rf 'U 9. E :S V' U7 CD O 9 r-Y CL DU O i on CD DJ 'I P- 'TJ '1 fc SD 5 : CD F Winders. TY-F TY MEN AND BRETHREN To answer the spiritual needs ot the college men . . . a social organization . . . with high ideals. . . and Worthy aims . . . The newly furnished "Y" room . . . a radio . . . davenports . . .Where one may rest his Weary bones . . . at twenty-tive cents a semester . . . Game Room . . . Harvest Home . . . deserving commendation . . . Sponsor Gonso . . . Laurel wreaths to Don Armbrecht . . . general chairman oi the most successful Harvest Home since '84 . . . another paean of praise . . . to Paul Leckey and George Williams . . . tor weekly pro- grams rich and varied. . . and the activities for the iirst semester directed by Franklin Rodabaugh and cabinet . . . Don Armbrecht, Allen Clopper, Iohn LaRoWe, Paul Leckey, Myrl Musgrave, Hay Reese, and Dale Small . . . and tor the second semester by Paul Haldeman and his cabinet . . . Dick Cullen, Bob Howard, Craig DeGood, Kenneth Good, George Williams, and Dick Meyers. Y M C A First Row-Bushonq, Armbrecht, Reese, Musgrave, I. LaRowe, F. Rodabaugh, Prof. Gonso, Clopper, Leckey, Small. Second Row-Rissinger, Cullen, Maries. Rogers, Kurtz, Zumpft, F. Ensign, Tuttle, Bob Howard, Schiwek, Yohe. Third Row-Good, DeGcod, Stout, Hamilton, Shank, Wilkin, R. Meyers, Haldeman, Gephart, C. Myers, Clapper. First Row-Todd, Moore, Weimer, Ranes, O. Miller, Feiber, Cochrun, Baird, Konkel, B. Boyd, Ketzenberger. Second Row-Hosafros, Piost, Moyer, H. Lee, lnbody, Orians, V. Beach, Caskey, Maxwell, Leonard, M. LaRowe, Osman, Lucas. Third Row--Oberlitner, George, Wil- liamson, Shoemaker, Schrader, Staley, Tinsrnan, Rider, DeMuth, Marjorie McGranahan, Dorothy Mowry, DeLoris Mowry, Hare. Fourth Row-B. Ensign, Iohnson, Bibler, Guynieih Wilcox, Wagner, Geraldine Wilcox, Farthing, Harpst, Eatherton, Mildred McGranal'1an, Grose, M. Wright, Roberts. Y W C A FORGET IF YOU CAN "Physical . . . Spiritual . . . Moral" . . . broadening horizons at Geneva . . . and Cleveland . . . The Young Wornen's Christian Association . . . headed by Betty Caskey and Marjorie McGranal'1an . . . ad- vised by Dreitzler . . . lends a hand at Harvest Home . . . Program highlight . . . replies of Mrs. F. D. B., Frances Perkins, Florence Allen, Dr. Katherine How- ell, and Mary E. Wooley . . . to inquiring correspond- ents Burkett and Miles . . . anent the keys to success in the business World . . . Before the holidays . . . a bit of a celebration tor mothers and daughters' . . . teas Without number . . . Silver, Geneva, St. Patrick's just a few . . . Banquets at Willard Hall . . . multiiar- ious functions supervised by Beach, M. Lalzlowe, Leonard, Hosairos, H. Lee, Lucas, lnbody, Moyer, Pfost, Maxwell, Orians, Osman, Feiber, B. Ensign, Miles, Grose, Eatherton, and George . . . and May Day . . . the acme of the year's activities. TV-SEV TV-EIG First Row-Williamson, DeMuth, Mrs. Honn, Hoose, Dr. Honn, Lucas, Leonard, Caskey, Second Row-M. Howard, Bibler, Marjorie McGranahan, Harpst, Moyer, Staley, Schrader, Orians, Grornann. Third Row-Stout, F. Ensign, Zumptt, Huston, O'Keefe, Kurtz, Bushong, F. Rodabaugh. CIZ l-1U3"U Oman z III EE 3 z U U1 "El 0 'JU O IT' U Schizophrenia . . . psychosis . . . dementia praecox . . . bandying, defining terms . . . discussing the new- est principles . . . reviewing books hot off the press . . . The psychological procession forth . . . to Col- umbus . . . to Toledo . . . to Lima . . . to institutions . . . Where abnormal cases are observed, are studied, are analyzed . . . A comparatively new organization . . . the Nu Psi Rho . . . under the counsel of Dr. Honn . . . headed by I-loose and Zumpft and steered by committeernen . . . Bibler, Caskey, Leonard, Lu- cas, Orians, Bushong, Rodabaugh, Gromann, Schrad- er, Harpst, Staley, F. Ensign, Moyer, and Kurtz . . . ardent Adlerians . . . fervent Freudians . . . Wise Wat- sonians . . . entertaining and sponsoring consulting Psydhologist Trettien . . . in M-arch ...1 social eve- nings in the Fireside Room . . . seeking fundamen- tals . . . exploring the highways and by-paths of the mind . . . striving toward the goal . . . the ideal . . . health of body, of mind, of soul. . STRICTLY BUSINESS The clattering and iingling of typewriters . . . the scratching of symbols . . . the boys and belles of the business department . . . a business-like bustle . . . three flights up . . . solving the puzzles of pot hooks and brief forms . . . speed studies . . . the intricacies of double entry bookkeeping . . . the psychology of advertising . . . mass appeal . . . competent calligra- phers . . . adding dizzy columns of figures . . . with rapidity . . . and accuracy . . . Dear Sir . . . in re those twenty bales of cotton . . . all in the attempt to become the executives of tomorrow . . . cornpto- rneters and mimeographs . . . In a lighter vein . . . valentine exchange . . . the affair at the Elks' . . . for sweet charity . . . sponsored by the Commercial Club . . . Wayne Lanning, Don Redman, Mary Miles, and Gerald Robinson . . . chief execs . . . and with the terrn's end . . . efficient lads and lassies graduating into the business of life. l L-'ha--O:ub133OQ SWT scifi we 2 ? '52 fill 2:50 5:5 O'p 525' mgm H.-,,, m mm D"6',-. 'SSE . WL UIJOOI 238 swf QE? LLEF il gm? P155 se? 73 Ego HLQ' UI f-3 gm? Hg 51's OI T511 58 512151 IQ mg- 7' m Q., . -Q mag .gm wg? 393 doris, D. Saddoris, Oberlitner, Weaver, Tussing, Beucler, Wilson, Hanna, Phillips, Solt. FIFTY-NINE SIXTY .THE CURTAIN . RISES Cantatas . . . Orchestrations . . . Rehearsals . . . Thursday after Thursday . . . result in such perform- ances as "Ruth" . . . in the spring of thirty-five . . . with solos by Dorothy Traxler, Pauline DeMuth, Iohn Gates, and Helen Lee . . . " l-lark! l-lark! The Cymbals C1ash" . . . "Call Me Not Naomi" . . . Christrnastide brings "The Messiah" . . ."Hallelujah" . . . "For Unto Us a Child is Born" . . . high praise to Miss Walters . . . for faultless accompaniment . . . and for thirty-six . . "The Crusaders" . . . Crescendo and counterpoint U1""'m 0' 9Q:9W50' Qargalg' Qmgsdmadgo CD"1v-1m"4D' 5 UIQ-J U1 5-f-fn '-3Ogg1EO'.fU'C3'-F Qgseigog ,: LQCDQJ cDg5oJ5Q5O rv-o1OU1r7f5J'g '-145 5 CDQ-, Q5To88m o,f+ f--' W'.m55Q I-PLQ V"'w ggfgafgg QWGEFUQZ 052.3 2-g E 5' ami Q .:1' ' 0wuQT mg Q-,prov-,Orr mam go 555'-lm! ao.:-Lf, Q,m.'Z2'-f-B- .IIS '3' . Q. ogfvgg - og. 501939-'D Umfnzm. G also wa ..--',:,.Q.' H, U1 -.CS 553.. Q5 MGWOEO 'UULQVQ QnT:.mg9,Q 'U5:'UE44nQ- 2!f"9-""fD'Tm C :x E mglnpivigl' g"'5-ifgwg Km:-I-1QQg:...,.1 -Smiffffss' ... O- C.'.L-1fD,'f'.- iiggiaa 5 mo' Sglifaf m LQ QmgoQcnQ oC'DU'fi"'5 ,U . '11 -,. . gow :YQ 'FHS av Q-OEgH5 fgwiwamg O Oh-1 54 Ulfiflnf 3392 my "5Q?O U"3m'l"2'.9 rnEf'm9,lm 5505555 smgsga 0,.-xD Em min-miwn 0I5'!1"1gtT' 5wmzT'5 45' 012117501 Pgggmxzg ofgpgg? OJ N ' 5-Q'QgO'U fn UDJUWH Uog"39h Egatgg L-'Hn' 05:11 CD'J"4"'1:1f1g fvgggama gp mSU'2 ,fefowo ua a'i'25s s9fQlz' mayqwvqafll :l'fDoCf.'?.'2 ffl'-150- In SWB"-3'-gm 922253 First Row-Whisler, Goldner, Fenberq, Taylor, Baldwin, M. Smith, Herbst, Bowman, Snyder, E. Moore, Hybarger, Wolfe, l-losairos, D. Myers, Konkel, F. Myers, Buis. Second Row- Owens, Guess, O'Keete, Opperman, Russell, C. Robinson, Tuttle, Schumacher, Hutson, Mrs. U c :1 E :r DI P 'U '1 CD Sn U s: IJ H :- DJ P PJ. En' "1 Y' U KD 41 CD 1 CD ri '-4560!-lIbl45Ul"1U7lZOO UNFINISHED Rhythms ringing, ripples racing . . . as a symphony moves so the Conservatory of Music throughout the course of the year . . . First movement . . . "Allegret- to vivace" . . . the crescendo from Visuola to Podol- sky begins . . . analyzing Debussy . . . Podolsky, vi- brant virtuoso of the Volga . . . "tops" in tunes and tempo . . . Second movement . . . "Andante" . . . De- Verter drills the dutiful dubs . . . assisted by Margar- et Weimer and Esther Moore . . . Third movement . . . "Scherzo," "Minuetto" . . , the Musical Arts Club swings along , , . headed by Marilynn Ftunkle Wolfe . . . to hear Ormondy . . . Rodzinski . . . the Cleveland and Minneapolis Symphonies, Dumesnil, Myra Hess, Milstein, and Farbman . . . to discuss lturbi, Eddy . . . drilled by Cora Frank Bish on pronunciation oi musi- cal terms . . . Fourth movement . . . "Rondo" . . . fin- ale . . . spring recitals and Schubert's love melodies U1 . . . the cool tinkle of Chopin . . . the swish of satin . . . the crackle of tuxes. YMP1-IONY XTY-0 SIXTY-TWD First Row-Orians, Marjorie McGranahan, Miss Davis, Inbody, Lucas, Caskey. Second How- Staley, Rider, H. Lee, M. LaRowe, Leonard, V. Beach. Third Row-K. Gaver, Piost, Eatherton, Osman, M. Gaver, W A A .THE ROAD LEADS ON. Swimming . . . tennis . . . hiking . . . Women's Ath- letic Association . . . daughters of Atalanta, ot Diana . . . Helen lnbody and Twila Lucas win the elections . . . and as presidents . . . stimulate physical activity . . . and recreational pursuits attain importance . . . assisted by Iustine Orians, Marjorie Mt:Granahan, Hel- en Lee, and Grace Leonard . . . Individual supervisors for individual sports . . . Grace Leonard demonstrates crawl and backstrolce in pool . . . Caskey and Osman with trusty alpen-stocks lead venturous bands all the Way to three miles in the great wide open spaces . . . LaRowe and Beach illustrate the fine points of basket and volleyball . . . M. I. Gaver emulates Moody and Jacobs to lure the girls on the courts in the spring . . . and Mari McGranahan pushes soccer in the tall . . . baseball conducted. by Evie Eatherton . . . spon- sor Betty Davis . . . proud and glowing . . . an all- round physical program tor every coed. Q- ef e ,T-,,-J, V-,,,.f..sW-.f.ue--'aug-,-z,q:.-,,W,.WW .. F-f..f:ims.7,, Q , .PATHS OF. GLORY Double wing back . . . sucker shots . . . squeeze plays . . . lobs and smashes . . . putts and drives . . . anchor men . . . football and basketball, baseball and tennis, golt and track lettermen . . . united by a common in- terest to perfect and excel . . . and the closer union formed on the gridiron, the diamond, the courts, the greensward, and the track . . . conducted through a successful year by George Blackburn, Sam Owens, Sheldon Taylor and lim Manaio . . . Trackman Hut- tel scores with a snappy football program . . . the Iohn Carroll game and Dads' Day . . . and after that the banquet . . . set up by Rahmann, Boddy, Owens . . . December brings the new pins . . . distinctive symbols . . . marks ot prowess, of physical ability l . . March brings the Mixer with reminiscences by Ross, Drake Sr., and Morey . . . and the Gold Medal Basketball Tournament under Hirsimaki . . . with the usual success. IQPIHUIWQQ "1 3193? O-num KDG"" 1D'm 53-5-2 :1 Ml o'O '6wS .IDG Us' E-133: img 538 SUSE 0 or Sl- IQ2? 5:1 Q. .391 :J QM H Es' mgg 01,501 9:5 'H- 33:9 0. H on "'1.pAr-I new 009, PE-U' 5 ESU? Ho. 24LH 5122 gg.. :-'-5591 ga. U50 si gl? : 5 F EJDQ IJ? -049' .ga 4 o SP151 2 E'-gm Sm 5 505 :4P':-' Thomas, D. Drake. SIXTY-THREE f PUYHL E-'EXC S 1 el A HEARTY RECOMMENDATION FOR THE EFFORTS SIXTY-SIX The department of physical education in l935- 36 broadened its scope, diversified its activities, and increased its effectiveness. The widespread interest demonstrated by the entire student body was a hearty recommendation for the ef- forts of those who were responsible for it. No little credit for the fine showing for Findlay's athletic achievements must go to Headcoach Stuart Holcomb. Although his sources for mate- rial were dwarfed by those of many of his rivals, F. C.'s youthful mentor has been widely praised for the consistent showing of well- trained and well-developed teams representing Findlay on the gridiron, diamond, and court. Gifted with a keen understanding of college men, and expertly grounded in the technique of the play, Stu has Won the admiration and respect of his boys. Miss Betty Davis completed her second year as director of women's physical education. ln this short time she has built up the reputation as an enthusiastic, tireless, exacting leader of feminine sports. A well-organized program of volleyball, soccer, basketball, softball, swimming, and ten- nis was followed with interest throughout the course of the year. Nelson Iones returned to the alma mater to serve as Freshman coach and assistant physical education director. In the former capacity he uncovered and developed what are hoped to be "sophomore flashes," but it is really in the latter capacity that he gave his greater contribu- tion. What was probably F. C.'s first full year of intramurals, stands as a monument to the efforts Coach Stuart Holcomb. of Mr. longs. Girls' Coach Betty Davis. Assistant Coach Nelson lones Managers: Yohe, Drake, Rahmarm, Omclorff. Football Siadium Cheerleaders: Good, Huttel, Duttweiler. DOWN THAT FIELD SIXTY SEVEN FOOT BALL SIXTY-EIB Football, unlike such sports as basketball and baseball, seems in a large meas- ure to swallow up the individual members of the team and presents to the average eye the appearance of a machine of eleven parts which may or may not function smoothly and efficiently. Therefore in describing the activities of the different players it is with a great deal of difficulty that we are able to single out the merits of the various members of the squad. lt is highly possible that those whose actions were least apparent were the most valuable members of the team. This we are in no position to determine and thus in presenting a summarization of individual playing must present it as it appeared to us-from the sidelines. Iohn Amendola served his first year on the varsity as a capable substitute for Guard Boddy. Iohnny played in nearly every game and won his letter with ease. Iohn Behman was used in relief roles this year and will no doubt be Cofini's successor in F. C.'s 1935 aggregation. Iake's beset effort was in the Iohn Carroll game. Vincent Bell joined Amendola and Behman as a first year man and won a place in the starting lineup at half. Few will forget Bell's performance in the Reserve game for not only did he keep the pass-snagging Kelker under control, but he scored l:'indlay's only touchdown. George Blackburn was the Oranges regular quarterback. A veteran, George did much to stabilize the team by his clever iudgment and sound strategy. Gordon Boddy was selected by Davis-Elkins as guard on their all-opponent team in his sophomore year, and his performance this year confirmed their judgment. His blocking and charging in the Bluffton game was one of his finest exhibitions. Albert Calabrese was especially valuable to the Orange for his illusive, decep- tive broken-field running. Although handicapped by his small stature Al served as the spark-plug of the attack when he was in the game. Ralph Calabrese played his final year in l935. Cal was badly cut in the Detroit Tech game and was lost to the team for some time pending recovery. Cal's clever ball handling made him valuable in the execution of intricate lateral pass plays. Nord Cofini retained the reputation established for himself during his first two years of varsity play. Nord was a constant thorn in the side of the opposition offense. He played his tackle position without helmet and without fault. Forrest Creason, regular end, was one of those less spectacular linemen who did everything that could be asked of them. The finish of a play usually found Creason involved. lames Federici was Findlayls ace backfield performer and leading scorer. Babe could run, pass, or kick with equal proficiency. He was a hard worker of the fighting type and inspired his teammates to greater efforts. Letterman: Hirsimaki, Vansant . . . Amendola, Street, Morrison . . . Federici, Behman . . . Mazza, Owens, Manafo . . . O'Keefe, Al Calabrese, Creason . . . Bell, Lanninq . . . Trost- miller, Thomas . . . R. Trout, Boddy . . . Zumpft, Blackburn. Cofini not present. MISS. "YQ-Qi' is 'fffgezwfl' .. 4' mn: A- i .Lili an H .Ja V . A.: 1 SEVENTY AS IT APPEARED TO US lack Gardner followed his brother here and proved in his first year as varsity eligible that he could be depended upon to fill the end position with com- petency. lack was troubled with a bad knee much of the year and his effi- ciency was greatly impaired. Charles Hirsimaki completed his third year as varsity end. Hirshi proved to be a fast, game, aggressive gridder. No amateur in the art of catching passes, he augmented his defensive worth by being something of an offensive threat. Richard Hoose was the lightest player on the squad. Bothered by injuries, Dick got little opportunity to display his wares at end position. Charles Huston served his final year at tackle. Quiet, capable, Chuck came up to Coach Holcornb's expectations when called upon. Leo Kaminski proved his worth in his first year's collegiate competition. Although he was slight of build, Kaminski's agility and fast thinking offset this handicap. His proficiency in executing lateral pass plays gives much promise of further usefulness. Donovan Lanning served his last year as a capable replacement for Ends Creason and Hirsimaki. Rugged and aggressive, Don got into nearly every game and won his letter in a creditable manner. Alphonse Mazza was relief quarterback, playing in nearly every game and starting his first two games of collegiate football. Slated for first string quarter- back next year, big things are expected from Al. lames Morrison was paid the tribute, "hard to beat as a running guard", by Coach Holcomb. Deceptive in size, it was hard to believe that lim held down the tough guard assignment, but hold it down he did. Sam Owens was a valuable man in the Findlay line being an exceptionally good blocker and defensive player. On the defensive, Sam played guard, and Boddy, regular guard, backed up the line as roving center. Sam's efforts in the Bluffton and Reserve games were commendable. Declan O'Keefe served quietly at tackle and more conspicuously in attempting conversions after touchdowns. Findlay was rather unfortunate in that it had few games in which O'Keefe could show the potency of his gifted toe. lohn Shank gave creditable exhibitions in his frequent appearances in the lineup. Big and husky, lohn proved to be a stalwart in the forward wall. Orton Street's affable expression belied his grit and drive. ln the thick of the scrimmage, Gabby was a man to be depended upon to stop opposition drives. Lawrence Thomas returned after an absence of one year and took up his burden where he had left it after being named All-Ohio quarterback in his freshman year. Playing more regularly at half in l935, Muggsy was one of the main cogs in the Orange offense. Howard Trostrniller, alternating at end and at half during his last year of varsity competition proved that he could fill the bill at either post and became one of F. C.'s most valuable and versatile gridders. Robert Trout, according to Mentor Holcomb, developed more in his last two years than any other Orange lineman. ln his last year Bob gave evi- dence of his coach's expert drilling. Van Trout in his first year on the varsity found little opportunity to break into the lineup against veteran competition. With Gardner, however, he will be immediate successor to posts left Vacant by Hirsirnaki, Lanning, and Hoose. Don Vansant was highly commended by Coach Holcomb for his faithfulness and persistence, and clirnaxed a good year by Winning the coveted "F". Charles Zumpft, as did Thomas, returned after a year's leave of absence and made a creditable showing at center. Zurnpft was P.C.'s only replace- ment at the snapperback post and was frequently called upon and ably filled the tough assignment. First Row-Thomas, Hirsimaki, Ccfini, Morrison, Owens, Bodcly, R. Trout, Creason, O'Keefe, Blackburn. Second Row-Rahmann, Federici, Bell, Trostmiller, Amendola, Kaminski, Mazza, A. Calabrese, Manafo, Street, R. Calabrese. Third Row-Coach Iones, Orndorti, Gardner, Behman, Shank, Snyder, I-loose, Vansant, Lanning, V. Tout, Zumpft, Huston, Coach Holcomb. FROM THE SIDELINES SEVEIITY-DIE THE FIGHTING ORANGE AND BLACK ,..-- No apologies need be made for Findlay's 1935 gridiron showing. This year's schedule was rather unbalanced. Findlay met either teams superior in number and size or teams which were no match for the aggressive Orangemen. Of all the games which Findlay may well be proud, strangely enough the one chosen by nearly all the members of the squad was one in which the local gridders Went down in defeat. All those who saw the plucky play exhibited in the Reserve game may truthfully say that never did Holcornb's boys perform more nobly. Findlay ended with a .500 record in the wins and losses column. Here's a resume of the season. The Orangemen opened their year's play inauspiciously, losing to Akron Uni- versity l9 to 6. The game was played on a rain-soaked fieldp and mud, slippery balls, and Akron's strong offense and superior strength proved to be too much for the boys. Highlight for local fans was midget Al Mazza's 46 yard run for F indlay's lone tally. The second game on F. C.'s schedule was with our traditional rival, Bluffton. The Orange and Black scored at will during the first half, but the Beavers threw up a tight defense for the remainder of the game. After Hirshi recovered a fumbled punt, Federici went over from the seven yard line for the initial score. Findlay made virtually all of its yardage through the running game, fakes, spinnens, rand revenses. lt marked the firtst night home game and the largest crowd that ever saw a Findlay College game was on hand. Score- l9 to U. The lateral pass was used to overpower Detroit Tech. Passes from B. Calabrese to Kaminski to Mazza went for long gains While rolling up a 34 to O count. Findlay's powerful offensive netted more than twenty first downs to Tech's two. Detroit never seriously threatened Findlay's goal. Al Calabrese, Trostrniller, F ederici, Hirsimaki, and Bell accounted for F. C.'s scoring. The Orangemen registered their second victory over Michigan competition by downing Ferris Institute 33 to 6. Findlay's aerial game clicked all the way with Blackburn and Federici propelling the pigskin. l'lolcomb's commendation to Morrison, Cofini, and Bob Trout. A capacity crowd on an ideal night saw Findlay's dogged gladiators stubbornly go down before what was probably the finest college football team ever to play before local fans. The defeat was not wholly unexpected, as it had been gen- erally conceded that the Orangemen were going out of their class to engage the most formidable eleven ever developed at Western Reserve, one that had negotiated four brilliant triumphs, including a decision over Cornell University. SEVEIITY TWD But despite the setback, 1-lolcomb's boys looked heroic in defeat. Burgwin, lppolito, and R. Zeh combined to amass 27 points while Federi-ci pumped a pass to Bell who speared it, side stepped two tacklers and raced to the goal line for Findlay's only touchdown. The boys never gave up in the face of tremendous weight handicaps and power. With its running attack halted by a scrappy' Findlay eleven, the undefeated Mt. Union gridders took to the air for all of their touchdowns whipping the Orange- men 19 to 13. Findlay lost an early advantage of 6 to 0 in the first quarter. High spots: Federici's touchdown after a 51 yard march, Thomas' pretty 36 yard dash for the goal stripe, and Mt. Union's stand on its own eight yard line in the last quarter. Making the most of their scoring opportunities, Findlay's gridders turned in their first Ohio Conference victory by beating the heavyaset lohn Carroll squad 13 to U at Donnell Stadium. After a scoreless first half in which the Cleve- landers lost several scoring chances the boys began to click more effectively and Federici and Thomas accounted for all of F. C.'s score. Findlay's line played a stellar game, Creason, Owens, Hirsimaki, Street, and Cofini giving fine exhibitions. Making its last appearance of the 1935 campaign at Berea, Findlay wasn't given much of a chance for victory beforehand, but the size of the score was hard to believe for the Orange and Black supporters. Baldwin-Wallace apparently could do nothing wrong as they piled up the humiliating total of 79 points while Findlay was unable even to approach the goal line. The boys haven't been able to figure it out yet. The last debacle notwithstanding, Findlay's supporters were proud of the Orangemen's record on the gridiron. With the few replacements made neces- sary by graduation, in capable hands the outlook for a future record is more than bright. The schedule makers have made up for the discrepancies in the opposition and Coach Holcomb confidently hopes to surpass or at least equal the fine showing in 1936. Of worthy mention are the faithful efforts of Managers Rahniann, Orndorff, Drake, and Yohe. GAME SUMMARY 'Findlaybn .,,. ..,,.,,. - A- 6 -Akron ,,,,,,.. Findlay ..,,, 19-Bluffton ....,,,r Findlay ,...... ...... 3 4-Detroit Tech ......, ..,. Findlay ...... 33-Ferris ,-.i.....,.,.,..,,,..... Findlay ...,,r 7-Westem Reserve 'Findlay .r.,,.,. ...... l 3-Mt. Union ,,c....,.r,,,,.c.. 'Findlay ..r.. r,.,.,.. 13-lohn Carroll ..., M. 'Findlay .,,,, ,..,.,........... U -Baldwiri-Wallace " Ohio Conference NJOYS A SUCCESSFUL SEASON SEVENTY-TIIREE . CONFERENCE . SUMMARY Won Lost Marietta ..........E 0 12 1 Mount Union ...... -.,.., l 1 2 Toledo .........,.,. 9 2 Otterbein ......... Y,,,,, 9 3 Wittenberg ..,...., ,,,,A, 9 3 Baldwin-Wallace 7 3 Muskingum -- .. ..... .,,,, 1 O 5 Wooster ...v. .10 5 Findlay ,,,., ,t..., 7 5 Akron .... ..,,.. 7 5 Capital .... 6 5 Case ..............,.. ,.,.., 5 5 Kent .............,,.,.v-,.- ,,.,., 6 7 Bowling Green .io,. ,,ivi, 6 8 Kenyon .,,..,i..,..., ,,,,,, 4 7. Ohio Northern .... ,.,i,. 3 9 Denison ......,,.,, ....,. 3 10 Iohn Carroll ,.... ,..,.. 3 10 Oberlin ,.......,. ...... 2 7 Heidelberg .,.. ...... 2 l3 Ashland ..... - ..... 2 16 SEVENTY-FOUR BASKET When a basketball team lacks height it must develop a fast-breaking, accurate-passing, deceptive offense. This Coach Holcomb was able to accomplish in 1935-36 with the result that Findlay Colleqe was represented on the basketball court, both here and on the road, by a team Which enjoyed more than averaqe success. ALL Back for revenge after a disappointing first year in the Ohio Conference the Orangemen started a season oi upsets by tumbling the highly touted Mt. Union outfit. Although all the upsets were not on the favorable side of the ledger it may be said Without exaggeration that F. C. made quite a stir in conference circles. Findlay Findlay Findlay Findlay Findlay Findlay Findlay Findlay Findlay Findlay Findlay Findlay Findlay Findlay Findlay G AM E . SUMMARY 26-Bowling Green ,,.,,,i........ .33 37-Mt, Union ,,,.....,. ........ 3 5 51-Ohio Northern ,.,,. ........ 3 2 32-Kent State .,,,,.. .i...Vi, 2 5 34eCapital U. ......, .,.,...Y 3 6 30-Bluffton ..... .....VY V 31 4l-Capital U. .,,. ...,.... 3 3 31-Toledo U. ,,,.,., ....,,., 3 3 37+Heidell3erg ,,.., ........ 2 3 41-Kenyon ,,..,.... .- ......,. 35 46-Kent State ,,........ ........ 3 3 50-Ohio Northern ,,,.. ........ 5 6 44-Hiram ,i.,.......,,,.. ,..... , ,730 35-Kenyon .......,,,. ...,.... 3 8 40-Bluffton ..,., .,....,. 3 8 SEVENTY-FIVE THE BASKETBALL ELEV john Amendola joined the veteran varsity squad this year and won a berth as relief guard. Cn numerous occasions johnny gave demonstra- tions of adept and clever ball handling. A canny sense of timing and native agility give reasons to believe that he will be one of the mainstays of next year's team. Vincent Bell, although following the tradition of F. C.'s centers as regards height, was perhaps the finest pivot man to represent the Orange in some years. Consistently inferior in height to the opposition centers, Vincent just as consist- ently outjumped and outplayed his rivals. Al Calabrese ably filled his captaincy by being the sparkplug of the Findlay attack. Al attracted attention throughout the conference by his sparkling floorplay and aggressive leadership. He never failed to give the fans both a treat and a thrill by sizzling passes and short shots from the foul ring. lim Federici was again named by the scribes on the All-Ohio-Conference squad. This choice was undoubtedly based upon Babe's point making. Considered the man to watch by the opponents he was rarely hampered by the tight defenses set up to stop him. Gifted with a rugged frame Babe seemed to go best when the going was the toughest. lack Gardner served his first year on the squad as understudy to Center Bell. Although this was a tough assignment Gardner filled it faultlessly. The tallest man on the squad, he was especially valuable in getting the ball off the backboard. The experience gained this year will make h'm an outstanding contender for the positions left empty next year by the exodus of the regulars. Leo Kaminski alternated at the starting forward position and although at something of a disad- VENTY-SIX vantage because of his small stature proved worthy of his coach's consideration. A cool player and a sure shot from the foul line, Poozh was a great asset to the team. Al Mazza was another of the sophomore finds which will form the nucleus for teams of the next two years. Size and experience were small matters for Mazza for he gave creditable show- ings every time opportunities presented them- selves. Iim Morrison completed this last year of varsity competition by repeating the capable showings given during the past two seasons. Considered a mainstay in the Orange attack lim was no little factor in quite a number of F. C.'s victories. A dangerous player at any time lim broke through occasionally just when the scoring punch was most lacking. Elmer Orndorff joined the squad this year wlth no high school experience and a little acquired on last year's Frosh squad to supply one of the surprises of the season. Few will forget Elmer's dazzling exhibition in the Ohio Northern game. Lawrence Thomas served as the balance wheel on the Findlay l935-36 basketball outfit. A heady player Muggsy was skilled in setting the pace. Whether calling for more drive or de- manding a slower gait his judgment proved almost infallible. Expert in dropping in long shots Muggsy was more than once an offensive threat to be reckoned with. Howard Trostmiller after a short period during which he was uncertain as to whether to come out for the team or no, gave Coach Holcomb much cause for rejoicing by rejoining his team- mates. Although handicapped somewhat by this late start Howard rapidly gained his stride and ended his basketball career in a blaze of glory. EN L in QA. Q va-A if, L A 7f 1 'jg :MP ' f .N ,. Y n N -V eg? ..3,,5 b A E' fr fx Y,HJHE. ! ggii fam iw :Tj ,ngig if F ew? -W' M A 'F q w A Q, 1 .554 V - ,, -M, Y . . Af T ff!! ' 0 wg van A 5' 4 'Q E ,Y - ii , 5171 , - H 4' eg ,,,.. 11 - ia 5 'K -1 si: , E 4 U JE, ffisqggmv V 3 ' 'V 'PX C E V H V H ' 'wr' I Q f 52 E . ww f 5 P I ff" -A 1 . . --Q.: 1 QV f' A YJ-L' ' ' , ' 6 ' wfwx ' W UW ?-. if 2f,' 1 'nk Q . 4 .' ww f VENTY-EIG The outcome of Findlay's first game of the season with Bowling Green was rather unsatisfactory to the local fans. A slow game throughout With the score knotted six times, B. G. broke a 26-all tie in the closing minutes to triumph 33 to 26. lim Morrison gave a creditable account, leading the Orangemen with eight points. The highest scoring basketball team in the state last year-Mt. Union College's quintet-was tumbled from its lofty perch by Findlay College's basketeers in a game that had the spectators wild with excitement. F. C. was given little chance against this veteran outfit but their accuracy from the toul line marked their first victory of the season and a 37 to 35 defeat for the Mounts. Scoring honors to Federici. A crowded gymnasium, cheering lustily at every offensive thrust, saw the local lads take off to a 7 to O lead, gain a 21 to l4 advantage at halftime and then lose the enemy forces in the last half with a flashy exhibition of skillful floor play and basket shooting. Ohio Northern was the opposition and Findlay gym the place. The final score-51 to 32. Fincllay's conquest of Kent came in a stirring finish. Tied at 26-all with only five minutes to go, the Orange broke loose with Muggsie Thomas, guard, in a starring role, and registered six points to clinch the argument while holding the Flashes scoreless. F. C. appeared lost for a time early in the game on the large Kent floor but recovered in time to chalk up a 32 to 26 victory. After a run of three straight Ohio Conference triumphs-the longest win streak of the year-the Findlay College cagers lost aheartbreaking 36 to 34 decision to Capital U in the Columbus gymnasium. Although the close- ness of the score indicated a close battle the Lutherans were ahead all the way. In addition to playing a fine floor game, Bell made five of Find- lay's fourteen field goals to lead the team in scoring. With less than 30 seconds to go, l-leiks, relief Bluffton forward, goalecl from under the basket to give F. C.'s keenest rival a 31 to 30 victory. The Beaver's largest basketball crowd in history saw lay-lay Miller, rangy Bluffton center, defeat the Orangemen almost singlehanded. Al Calabrese was Findlay's standout performer. Spotty passing gave the Orange followers a few uneasy moments in the return game with Capital played in the local gymnasium. Despite these lapses an "ironman" combination of Al Calabrese, Kaminski, Bell, Thomas, and Federici turned in a victory over the invaders by a score of 41 to 38. This victory sent F. C. into a temporary tie for fifth place in the Ohio Conference. ON THE BASKETBALL COURT A VERY COIVIIVIENDABLE RECORD Finding the large Toledo U. field house a bit bewildering the local court- men spotted the upstaters fifteen points before they started clicking. After an uphill battle to erase the deficit for a two-point advantage the Orange saw their hopes go glimmering when Cupp and Mostov sank fielders to give Toledo a final 33 to 31 victory. Bell and Trostmiller were the center of F. C.'s attack. Q After amassing a twenty-four-point lead the Orangemen were content to idle home to a 37 to 23 victory over Heidelberg. Thoroughly outclassed the Student Princes were no match for the fine passing and shooting of Al Calabrese, Trostmiller, Federici, and Bell. Babe entered the game in the second quarter to lead the Findlay scoring. Kenyon's rangy cagers found the small but brilliant Orangemen too tough a team to conquer and Went down to defeat by a 4l to 35 count. Bell repeatedly controlled the tip-off although opponent Sebach towered 6'3". Trostmiller and Thomas shared the scoring honors. The Orangemen rang up their seventh victory in ten conference games by defeating Kent State 46 to 33 after a sluggish first half in which they trailed 22 to 16. Rapid fire goals by Bell, Federici, and Kaminski tied the score and Thomas sank a two-pointer to put Findlay ahead to stay. ln ta Weird game in which forty-five fouls were called by a conscientious referee, Findlay lost by a score of 56-50 to Ohio Northern and evened. the season's standing with our Ada rivals. From the starting lineup, Bell alone escaped banishment due to fouls. The poor .500 record from the foul line cost F. C. the ball game. Trostmiller again shared the scoring honors but this time with diminutive Al Calabrese. The Orangemen avenged a long-standing defeat when it topped Hiram after a game marked by erratic passing and much fumbling. In spite of the loose play the fans got a kick out of the efforts of the eleven cagers Whom Coach Holcomb saw fit to inject and eject. The score-44 to 30. A much improved and smoother functioning Kenyon team took measure of their former conquerors when Findlay failed to duplicate its recent win. Although the local lads had whittled down an early lead to 17 to 15 at the intermission they Were unable to meet Kenyon's strong attack in the last half and consequently dropped the game 38 to 35. In one of the finest games of the season, Findlay College's cagers brought their campaign to a close with a 40 to 38 victory over the Bluffton Beavers. With five minutes left to play, Trostmiller, in his final collegiate appear- ance, fired two field goals to send Findlay into a lead which they never relinquished. This game left the fans jubilant but jittery. VENTY-N EIGIITY Federici, Clapper, Boddy, Street. G O L F FROM A SMALL GROUP OF LINKSADDICTS Fi1'1dlay's divot diggers found the opposition rather difficult in the spring of 1935. Handicapped by lack of experience in match play, the men marked no scores in the Victory column. Coach Holcomb assem- bled his team from a small group of linksaddicts. Redding, Clapper, Boddy, and Federici, ranking in that order, putted, mashied, spooned, and drove for F. C. over the greens, traps, fairways, and bunkers. Although their record was not impressive Findlay golfers gained experience against Bowling Green and St. Iohn's of Toledo, dropping both matches with the former and tying the latter. Much more may be expected from this year's squad as three of the regulars, Clapper, Boddy, and Federici, and alternate Street will be available. The fellows expect to profit by their summer's practice and to make the team a formidable competitor on the green- sward. More power to Findlay Colleges infant sport! . UNDEFEATED ON . counrs IN 1935 Although out of competition for one year Findlay experienced no difficulty in assembling a competent tennis team. Coached by Dr. Mock the flannel-clads found the opposition comparatively easy. Taylor, Powell, and Bushong outstroked and out- smarted the ranking players in singles and combined with Watson, Fenimore, Dunlap, and Guess to over- whelm opposing doubles combinations. Bowling Green, 3-27 Ohio Northern, 6-U, Bowling Green, 3-25 St. lohn's, 5-lg Ohio Northern, 4-lp St. lohn's, 5-U: Ohio Northern, 5-ly Defiance, 3-2, Bluffton, 3-27 and Defiance, 4-l fell victims to the Orangemen's devastating net play. Undefeated on the courts in l935, the net men face this year's schedule with high hopes. Taylor, Powell, and Bushong will be back augmented by Opperman, Winders, Swasick, and Boyd of last year's frosh squad. T E N' N I S First Row-Powell, Taylor. Second Row-Dunlap, Bushonq, Dr. Mock, Watson, Fenimore. EIEIITY-UIIE EIGIITY-TWU Carpenter, Duttweiler, Holliqer, Gohlke, Halliwell . . . Innes, Amendola . . . Mildred McGranahar1, Inbody . . . George, Wright, Mowry . . . Rahmann, Drake, Biddinger, I-Iirsimaki, Niswander, Creason . . . Bushong, Armbrecht . . . All-Iniramural Team . . . Kahle . . . Amendola, Mazza . . . Varsity "F" Tournament Finals. Hirsimaki, Bell - Federici - Bell, O. N. U. center. Squeaks . . . squeals . . . and some good shooting. That is a de- scription of the qirls' intramurals sponsored by the W. A. A. En- tered in the Varsity "F" B. B. tour- nament was a team composed of Eatherton, LaRoWe, Lucas, Inloody, Leonard, K. Gaver, Mari McGrana- han, Ensign, and Orians. Yells . . . passes . . . dribbles . . . The senior class team, corn- posed of Street, Taylor, Huston, Zurnpft, Blackburn, Hirsirnaki, Bid- dinqer, and Arrnbrecht, emerges victorious in the boys' basketball intramurals. GENERAL ATHLETICS The all-intramural team selected includes Manafo, Creason, Hirsi- maki, Blackburn, Rosenberqer, Boyd, Swasick, Rodabauqh, Bob Howard, and Street. Dives . . . handsprinqs . . . flips . . . and What have you! That is the repertoire of Duttweiler, Good, Haldeman, and Whetstone-the tumblers. Long hours and hard strenuous practice have left these boys with a bag of tricks that look easy until you try them. 2555: i EIGHTY-THREE E' t EIXTU Y-E CHARM AND ATTRACTIVENESS - - THE KEY l""': JAMES FEIJERICI HELEN INBODY W BEST ATHLETES E FOR SPORTSMANSH SCCIAL SUCCESS S Y MUST ATTRAGTIVE vmcfur BELL, PHYLLIS PHILLIPS, noasm mour ..,,-:ff ROFICIENCY AND ALL-ROUND ABILITY E:NDow1s:D.w1T1 , T MUST POPULAR w 1 FRANCIS Eusmu Jusrmz onmns IF PRESENT EFFORTS PREDICT FUTURE ATTAI HOSE QUALITIES WHICH ENSURE POPULARITY VIULA BEACH mcmxnn WALLEN Z S N ,N Q 'NH W, .. , , H, W H X , Y , - 1 MOST LIKELY T0 SUGGEED ENT THESE TWO MAY DAY NINETY ' The third Wednesday in May marks the celebration of the twenty-eighth annual May Day Festival of Findlay College. lt is the pride of achieve- ment of the Y. W. This day of all days we have been anxiously awaiting, and at last the day arrives. What a delightful morning! Serene, peaceful-just an ideal day for frol- licking on the green. This must be responsible for the feeling of happiness and geniality which -seems to permeate everything. The crowd is fast assembling. The bleachers are rapidly filled. Some of the girls are seen arranging the last few flowers on the lattice behind the throne. The May Pole has been erected and stands with its fluttering streamers waiting for a group of pretty Freshman maidens to dance lightly around it and weave its ribbons into a beautiful pattern. The last of the crowd is now taking its place. We hear remarks commend- ing the girls who so graciously served the breakfast to alumni and friends. The success of the day depends in a measure upon the May Day break- fast. All the girls have executed their duties energetically and completely. But look! Here come the trumpeters, in costumes of long ago. They reach the throne and now, as they sound their trumpets, every eye turns to see the queen and her procession begin on their promenade to the throne. How lovely and happy the queen looks! This is her day! The announcer is calling the names of the notables as they appear ..... the attend- ants-the stately ladies of the May with their handsome escorts, the Maid of Honore-Viola Beach, and the Queen-Ruthanna Maxwell. The tester gambols about performing amusing acts in rapid succession. There is no telling what he will do next. Now he dances with the girls around the May pole-now he is ioking with some youthful admirers among the spectators-and so on all through the festivities he capriciously entertains. Meanwhile the queen smiles graciously about her, showing her approval of all that is being done in her honor. The various features of the program are presented in the same pleasant and iovial manner which characterizes this thrilling spectacle of the spring. All contribute their bit of entertain- ment in the hope of pleasing her maiesty. But alas! the end of the festivities draws near. The queen and her court begin the recessional. The crowd slowly disperses, commenting all the while on the impressive services of the day. Surely no other occasion or festivity can encompass the splendor and magnificence of May Day. Attendants: Guynieth Wilcox, Reba Wagner, Glois Schrader, Letia Prost, Reva Staley, Maid of Honor Viola Beach, Henrietta Tinsman, Evelyn Hosafros, Kathryn Moyer, Betty Caskey, Grace Leonard. MAY QUEEN . . RUTHANNA MAXWELL THE COURT NINETY-UNE 'K COLLEGE X I BREVITIES 1 ETY F0 N NIIIETY-FIVE CALENDAR September: ll-Registration starts . . . split majors and teaching minors . . . Freshmen in a dither. . . Girls' Mixer. 13-Classes begin . . . the Prexy extends a welcome and a send-off . . . Faculty Wives give reception . . . lanuary, February, Iune . . . where's a December? 16-Rev. Cabbage on "Adding to Your Stature". .. . Einstein installs at the Roots'. . . Dear- born, Detroit, Toledo, Mansfield contemplated . . . Nu Psi Rho organize . . . Nerhood risks his all for the history department . . . W. A. A. hike. l7-Football practice officially started . . . up, down, up, down . . . oh, me . . . Y. W. cabinet slumbers at the Prexy's . . . breakfast. 22-The Y. M. takes to the country . . . Sunday retreat to Armbrecht's. 23-The W. A. A. and the Commercial Department decide to organize. . .the mighty seniors choose Ensign. 24-All-Campus Party thrown by Student Council . . . "Lost Elevator" amid falling screens Baer and Louis cuff a bit . . . pictures by the Dean . . . Biology organize. 25-Human side of American Constitutional Convention by Bair. 26-Harvest Home date set . . . committee set up . . . Dr. Mock interprets ltalo-Ethiopian tangle . . . calls Mussolini a meanie . . . ll Duce not heard from . . . LaRowe named to head the Iuniors . . . Akron 19-Findlay 6. 27-Dr. Ralph W. Sockrnan on first forum number tells balconyites what's wrong with the world . . . Argus staff named by Gaver . . . football programs planned by Huttel. 30-Y. M. beanfeed at the dorm . . . Denny, Gonso, Zumpft expostulate . . . Ministerial meets for first time . Winders chosen by Sophs . . . appoints initiation committee and skulduggery begins. October: l-Frosh pick Howard and receive "request" from Gardner . . . stroboscope expounded by Swasick . . . Drs. Perkins and Mock decide Ethiopian fate . . . Haile Selassie unheard from this time. 3-First bonfire pep meeting . . . cheers by Huttel, Good, and Duttweiler . . . Maxwell entertains Alethean . . . the "press" errs on "Candlebearn." 4-Night game . . . Findlay 19-Bluffton O . . . how's that? 6-Marie Weller. 7-Osman appoints Biology committeemen in Fireside room. 8-Miss Wayne on India . . . Y. W. subcabinet tureen in Willard Hall . . . Gaver and Small tell whats what for Argus . . . dead-lines set . . . Esther Moore and Marilyn R. Wolfe allay the Y. W. girls. 9-Harvest Home ticket drive launched by Reese and Prexy . . . Student Volunteers or- ganize. 10-Wrestling life by Dr. Albert Edward Smith. ll-Pots for the Frosh . . . October l4'2l . . . restrictions and regulations. 12-Findlay 34-Detroit Tech 0. lfl-Pots fail to show up . . . is Reese's face red? . . . postal investigation threatened . . . Dad's Day arranged by Varsity "F" . . . Student Council elects. . .W. A. A. chili party. 15-The Prexy lets the Y. boys in on "The Essential Realities of the Campus" . . . Maxwell reviews "The Road to War" in Y. W. l6-Einstein sponsors sparkplugs in chapel . . . M. I. Gaver tells all there is to know about Nova Hercules l934 . . . Nu Psi Rho lets down the bars and receives eight would-be psychologists . . . the upperclassmen under Leonard trim lnbody's underclaissrnen 4-3 . . . still no pots! 17-Argus pictures taken . . . just a little to the right, please . . . pep session for Harvest Home in Aristot. . .Rev. Cabbage informs Student Volunteers, "You Have Your Nerve." ETY-SIX CALENDAR 18-Dean Morey pots Howard at Pot Rock . . . and Sophs extend initiation . . . Alethean makes annual excursion to Upper Sandusky. 19-Findlay 33-Ferris 6 for the third straight . . . Sunrise Service in Boyd's Woods by Stu- dent Volunteers. . .twist breakfast at 5:30 A. M .... ho hum! 20-Y. W. joins Y. M. retreat at the Gonso's . . . Harvest Home subject of discussion. 22-Helen lnbody named Ideal Student by Y. W .... initiation!! . . . and the Frosh take it . . . Top Hat at the Harris. 23-Gonso on "The Challenge of ldeals" and his beloved Plato . . . Prexy announces no classes Friday . . . wheel A 24-Harvest Home . . . Home Coming . . . Western Reserve . . . 500 at dinner . . . 5000 atgame . . . 27forW.R. . , . 7forF.C. 28-Hard Times Party at Foster's for the Biology Club . . . W. A. A. plans for benefit. 29-The ideal professor discussed by Y. W. with no names mentioned . . . Dr. Galbreath talks to the Y. M. 30-Salvi returns to F. C .... "softest melodic passages to most brilliant arpeggios" . . McMurray and Swart evangelize at chapel time. 31-Rev. Lindsay and D. E. Reynolds discuss local school situation. November: l-I-losafros on "Beauty" for Alethean at Wallen's. 2-Mt. Union l9-Findlay 13. 5-Podolsky secured by DeVerter for conservatory master class. 6-Honn on "Historical Background of Modern Psychology." 7-Lloyd Douglas discusses "Green Light", "Magnificent Obsession" to packed house . . . Personal Adequacy. 8-Student Volunteer Fall Retreat at Columbus . . . Findlay has largest delegation in the state. 9-Dads' Day . . . lohn Carroll trimmed 13 to 0 . . . Dr. Perkins presides and introduces Blackburn, Mr. Gardner, and Iackson Betts . . . Y. Women to Cleveland. 10-Tri-State conference at Bluffton . . . Y. Members Rodabaugh, Musgrave, Howard, and Armbrecht represent. 12-Reports on World Acquaintance tour in Y. W .... Dr. Finton tells the Y. M. all about hypnotism . . . watch that, Svengali. 13-Annual popularity contest and winners announced . . . wuxtra! . . . college office looted! . . . Inspector Konkel reports no loss. 16-Newest in science discussed at annual meeting of Ohio Physics Club . . . Extending the Range and Usefulness of the Zeleny Electroscope by Automatically and Mechanically Counting Rapid Oscillations . . . Zowie! . . . F. C. snowed under at Berea 79-0 . . . Zowie! - 18-F. C.'s anonymous benefactor makes another contribution. 20-Debate squad announced . . . Rev. Elsea talks to Student Volunteers . . . Glathart to Nu Psi Rho . . . commercial coeds astound Y. Women by correspondence with bigwigs . . . Dean talks on tides. 21-Charles Wakefield Cadman and quartet . . . Dr. Perkins on "This Business of Going to College." 25-W. A. A. Benefit Party in gym. 26-Y. M. induction in Peranian Hall . . . formal opening of refurnished Y. M. parlor. 28-Thanksgiving vacation. December: 2-First deadline for Argus . . . broken . . . Nu Psi Rho to Toledo. 3-First Debates of season . . . non-decision duel with Bluffton . . . Miss lones on France . . . Dr. Mock on Politics. NINETY-SEVEN CALENDAR 4-Beach and Wallen for Who's Who . . . Iones on future of physical education. 5-Affirmative drops debate to slick Muskingumites . . . rest at Muskingum House . . . garcon! . . . negative meets Capital. 9-Affirmative tangles here with Wittenberg . . . St. Louis Symphony discussed by newly- organized Musical Arts Club. 10-Y. Member Bushong demonstrates short-Wave . . . the Bucher's entertain the Ministerial . . . Debate squad under watchful eye of Dr. Perkins fares forth . . . Wittenberg Tues- day night . . . then back to the Shawnee '. . . over to Columbus and the Chittendon . . . 3:00 A. M. session . . . second place in the Ohio Conference Thursday. 12-Tussing, De'Muth, and H. Lee sing and play . . . M. I. Gaver on "Relationship of Phi- losophy and Science" for Alethean at SWasick's. 13-First basketball game of year . . . B. G. 33-F. C. 26. 14-Faculty Party. 16-Findlay upsets Mt. Union 37-35. 17-Einstein Banquet at Hilltop. 18-Bev. Lindsay gives Christmas Chapel . . . Y. W. Mother-Daughter Banquet . . . O. N. 32-F. C. 5l. 19-Vacation begins. Ianuary: 6-School again. 8-Annual financial report by Prexy announces things are looking up. ll-F. C. beats Kent 32 to 26. lil-Einstein chooses second semester potentates . . . Y. Woman Caskey on inter-racial mar- riages . . . Mrs. Bish tells Musical Arts Club how to pronounce . . . Orange bows to Capital 36-34. l5-Delegates Gross and Wayne report doings of l2th Ouadrennial Student Volunteer Ccn- vention . . . Bucher on Basic Elements of Modern Worship. 17-Maurice Dumesnil pleases music lovers with piano artistry. 18-Caskey, -Leonard, and Moyer go to Y. W. C. A. Northern Ohio area conference at Bluffton. 21-Exams! 22-Duttweiler takes to skates. 24-Glenn D. McClellan leaves F. C. for Akron. 27-Registration begins . . . I. Middleton Murry confuses and confounds on "Enjoying Life." 28--Business Department children pass the time by singing "The Music Goes 'Bound and 'Round" and recording it on the dictaphone. 29-Bluffton 31-Findlay 30 . . . they can't do that to us. 30-Miss Margaret Anschutz joins faculty . . . replacing McClellan. 31-Alethean gathers about the festive board at the Elks'. February: l-Findlay 41-Capital U. 38 . . . Ahh! Revenge! 3-Senior Class Play announced . . . the upperclassrnen will struggle with Tonkonogy's "Three-Cornered Moon". . . committee for Varsity "F" Tournament announced . . . . . . Hirsimaki to head. 4-Whisler and Armbrecht lecture to Einstein . . . Salo Finkelstein reconfuses and recon- founds by numerical Wizardry . . . Haldeman chosen by Y. M. 5-Toledo U. 33-Findlay 31. 6-Baldwin-Wallace negative meets Winders and Wallen . . . punks properly squelched . . . by the latter. 7-Negative boys meet Xavier and are given the nod by ludge Hopkins . . . the stuffed shirts rate a picture. 12-Catherine Headworth. nlnsrv -EIGHT CALENDAR 13-F. C. 37-Heidelberg 23. 15-F. C. 4l-Kenyon 35. Nice work! 18-Leap Week King race opened by Student Council . . . Freshman Dickes receives appoint- ment to Annapolis . . . congratulations. 19-McGranahan chosen by Y. W .... Powell discusses "Streamlining" at the Orndorff's. 20-H. Boston Greig tosses his hat in the ring. 2l-Sir Herbert Ames speaks on "The Great Reconciliation and lts Aftermath" . . . points out to balconyites the sore spots of Europe. 22-Kent State 33-F. C. 46. 24-Al Calabrese, Stout, and Boddy join Greig . . . the faculty "sneak" day was only a par- tial success . . . Bair and Dreitzler only ones cooperating . . . Varsity "F" Mixer . . . pictures, refreshments, and gab. 25-Al Mazza gets into the race . . . dinner meeting of Y. W. in Willard . . . Rev. Cabbage and Gonso tangle discussing ideals for Y. M .... O. N. 56-P. C. 50. Z6-Leap Week Party . . . Stout returned victor and George and Nellie reign . . . Hoose and Wallen entertain . . . Richard Howard receives prize. 27-Hiram 30-F. C. 44. 28-Alethean to lnbody's. 29-Kenyon 39-Findlay 35. March: 3-McGranahan names cabinet . . . Alumnus Phillips tells Biology Club about taxidermy. 4-Maxwell chosen May Queen . . . Wallen and Winders give their all for Scripps-Howard . . . and the ten dollars. 5-Missionary Hicok speaks to Student Volunteers on Sadhus-the Holy Men of India. 6-Findlay exults . . . conquers Bluffton 40-38. 7-Beard and Wallen debate Asbury in an afternoon session. 9-Senior Play Cast announced . . . Wallen, Tuttle, Street, Bushong, Huttel, Tinsman, Beach, and Maxwell to don the mask and buskin. . . Miss Dreitzler to direct. 10-Y. Members and Y. Women report on Kagawa. ll-The Siberian Singers take F. C. by storm . . . Pooch and Huttel give an old-fashioned Welcome . . . Rodentia Society organized and social meeting held. l3-Northern Ohio Debating Tournament at Baldwin-Wallace . . . Beard and Wallen ha- rangue and caiole into second place. 14-Student Volunteer Convention . . . Leckey elected state president. 20-Dr. Trettien sponsored by Nu Psi Pho on "Living in the Midst of Personalities." 20-Virginia Solt. 25-Winders, Gates, and Clopper report impressions and finding at O. S. C. P. A. of the 20th and Zlst . . . Wallen, Cullen, and Winders vie with Akron U. anent Supreme Court. 26-Maxwell names Vi Beach maid of honor and chooses attendants. 27--Spring Silver Tea given by Y. W. . . . Alethean meets at the LaRoWe's and receives new members . . . 'Winders on Pareto . . . . Moore, Hosafros, DeVerter, Walters, Tuttle, Gates, and Opperman to Toledo to hear Myra Hess. 31-C. I. Landis discusses peace with Y. M .... date for Senior play set again . . . Mrs Le- Van speaks to Y. W. April: 1-Nu Psi Rho's All Pools' Party at the Honns' . . . Gromann and Harpst receiving the laurels. 2-American National Mathematics Association, Ohio Division, meeting at Columbus. 3-Convocative attends the Ohio Academy of History at Columbus. Spring vacation. 14-Students start the last lap of '36. 15-The Staff gives a sigh of relief. IIIIIETY-HIIIE 1 1 l 1 XSE-M BNTS D VE-Y-'Y 1 SUITS . . . COATS . . . HATS K A N E L' S "The Best" in Men's Furnishings HAI-EYS BARNHAR1' FURNITURE FUNERAL H O IVI E At the Bridge FRIENDLY SERVICE ORANGE 8: BLACK Compliments of Home Made Ice Cream Lunches-Magazines The FC.Sh.1Ol1 SUNDAY DINNERS FINDLAY'S Across from Findlay Coueg LEADING WOMEN'S APPAREL "For the Discriminating Buyer" WILLFORD'S CASH MARKET Phone 1170W 1043 N. Main sf. i Compliments of R AY' S B A K E R Y BUY AT RAY's-rr PAYS Phone 113W 321 N. Main Congratulations CENTRAL DRUG STORE "THE REXALL STORE" I. C. Hochstetter 8: Sons L. 1. C O O K E -E929 Grain - Feed - Seed - Coal X SQUARE DEALING W. Main Cross Street OPTOMETRIST Findlay Ohio Niles Bldg. Phone 1651 Westinghouse DUAL AUTOMATIC FINDLAY PRINTING 8. and Crosley Shelvcldor REFRIGERATORS 406 S. Main Street HOMER POWELL INC Findlay Ohio 606 S. Main St. Harris Bldg. Compliments of Compliments of NATHAN'S a22s.Mains1. HARRIS THEATRE THE OHIO OIL COMPANY Producers Refiners and Marketers oi L I C . Gasoline Motor Oil Takes this Opportunity to Thank You for Past Patronage General Offices FINDLAY, OHIO Compliments of JUNIOR SHOP Distinctive Feminine Apparel Turner-Crosby Shoe Co. for ' The Home of Good Shoes Wee Girls, Juniors and Misses Phone 529W 515 S. Main COMPLIMENTS OF "THE ELECTRIC COMPANY" CENTRAL OHIO LIGHT 8 POWER COMPANY N SAVESNSERVES Findlay, Ohio INSURANCE SERVICE Compliments of THE BLUFFTON J . C . S P E N C E R MFG- C0 228 First Nclt'l. Bank Bldg. Phone 983 "Spencer Service Satisfies" .o" --.:: f iv . -.4,.,. ,i ,,. U -. -, -. . 1., .- I -W : :fr ees 1.44"1qmgEfsLE'fzv"i , - ..,q.awi .. - . . ....:.1:::::s:z:s:2:z:s:s:s:z:s15:5:1:f:f:::::::.:.:.:.:....., . gf.: - ' Q I-I-if- -:-:-1-: : :-1::3:f:2:2:f:f:i:2'5 ' if-ss-be-w'f , 45525:Es2S5:s:s:s:5f5f2Ea::, .' .. 1 Q1 ' "' aux 'Yo s i x x A QQ I -. P 9 N -. xx v-:M H N1- 'Et 1 N QQ 5 vx -'2 'xx .Q Q W I -5 xii C x -I Q X -sq A x 0 Q., , xx xxx... ' Qs sf vm N" I T ' - i''4415251E5555555535552E13IEEE:E2ErE1EfE2Ei5E5E5Zif' ' , ' ' ""1'I'--1:15155355555555151E5E5E5S5E5E5553E5S553gE: ,I Y V -.-:.:::::::::::1:::::::5:::-- STANDARD COAL CO. Phone 1 B E A G L E YE SWEETE SHOPPE B E A U T Y S A L 0 N Ice Cream...Cclndies. L h Phone 519 Front 8: Main Sts. Phone 677J Compliments of PAGE DAIRY Findlay Toledo The Very Best in Jewell-Y A Modern Store in Your Vicinity Doesn't Mean Expense The If You Choose Here Findlay Carpet Store Lester ThoInas-JeWe1er Showing the Most Complete Stock of RUGS - CARPETS - LINOLEUMS DIAMONDS AND WATCHES CURTAINS-DRAPERIES-SHADES 302 S- Main Sf- W. W. Crates W. E. Crates LYNN A. LYON 620 S. Main Street FRIGIDAIRES - PHILCOS - EASY WASHERS Pittsburgh Plate Glass VALUE FIRST CLOTHES Company Wallhide Waterspar Excluswe at Wall Paints Enamels-Varnishes , Barn and Roof Paint . ! Sunproof Floor Hide 'feta 4 House Paint For Floors Glass Phone 249 216 s. Main sf. Clothes Men Like Compliments of S. 8: S. DRUG STORE Opposite of Court House Drugs - Toilet Goods - Sundries - Books - Soda Fountain BROWN BOOTERY The McCullough Motor Findlay's New Shoe Store Sales CQIHPQDY Shoes that are Distinctive DODGE-PLYMOUTH Style Patterns -I-hat are New and Different Parts...Wreck Car Service...Sales For the College Student 205-207 N. Main Phone 2621 RITA Shoupe's Shoes x X Collegiate Hyun X favs , 'V 'H' ' 'X , , A or x . ,..-V--g":2:::::L7g:4.. X ln .fi-wr' Og,-'I-' x V 21'f"'f.- 4-2 5 Meng Square Toes SfYles and Heels Too WAALAND'S GREENHOUSES CUT FLOWERS Pot Plants of All Kinds Corsages 138-142 Larkins St. Phone 369 Complixnents of David Kirk, Sons 8: Co. Sporting Goods Wholesale Groceries OAK PHARMACY We - Sell - Drugs - That - Don't Come - Back - To - Customers That - Do We Pull For You You Pull For Us .Km We . o .www vin! . e'CCA6ilfl5gl:2-C6 Zlfety Q7 in Me 7631. PA'rrERsoNs of i!L6 VLGW 510073 COVZZLVLZ in Me vfozm .ml WMZCAEJZJ 570144 144. Findlay Paint 8: Glass Co. Compliments of E. M. JOSEPH, Manager 7 Distributors for Dean 8: Barry Paint Products in Pratt 8: Lambert Varnish Products , LADIES 517 s. Main sf. Phone 71 READY -TO - WEAR SAN-A-PURE DAIRY CO. Complete Dairy Service MILK + CREAM + BUTTER + BUTTERMILK COTTAGE CHEESE Makers of San-A-Pure Brand Creamery Butter 217-218 Beech Ave. Phone 613 Bloomingdale's Flowers Grocers North Side Mercantile Four Doors South of Harris Company Phone Main 328 General Merchandise FLOWERS OF DISTINCTION For Every Occasion Phone 656 818-822 N. Main SHOP PENNEY'S First in STYLE AND QUALITY Featuring Clothing, Furnishings and Footwear for Everyone At Substantial Savings J. C. Penney Co. Inc. THE PHOENIX HOTEL Compliments Cafe Adjoining of FINDLAY ICE 8: FUEL Across from Courthouse BRANDMAN IRON 8: METAL CO. Wholesale and Retail Dealers in COAL - AUTO PARTS - 2ND HAND PIPES Office: 400 W. Front St. Phones: 512 and 515W Yards: 300 N. Cory St. BRUCE B. BRYAN Builders' Supplies Phone 257 W. Main Cross St. DIETSCH'S For "Ice Cream That Hits The Spot" 533 N. Main St. Harris Theater Building K E S S E L' S COATS DRESSES At Popular Prices Drugs - Sodas - Toilet Articles Dr. M. Hanna DRUGGIST First Corner South of Bridge Findlay Ohio Findlay Ohio or rvnomicn rump ornn nun I ' For 1936 The Only Complete Low Priced Car COMPLETE BODY, FENDER AND DUCO SERVICE H. 1. HARRINGTON CO. Phone 117 Compliments of Trout 8: Jackson Co. Good Furniture Since 1886 l 1 Carl Mueller Tinning Plumbing Heating ALLEN'S SHOPPE, INC. SCOTT BRYANT'S A Complete Line of COATS - DRESSES and All-Leather Footwear ACCESSORIES 335 South Main Street Conectfitting WHEN YOU CRAVE GOOD COFFEE Ask Your Grocer for HI - TEST COFFEE FINDLAY COFFEE, TEA AND SPICE CO. Entertain at the Compliments of E L K ' S G R I L L for Uhlman's Dept. Store BANQUETS - TEAS - LUNCHEONS Findlay, Ohio Call Betty Hirzel for Suggestions and Arrangements Across from Court House MILDRED HADLEY KEISER CHIROPRACTOR 301-303 Ewing Bldg. Ph0I1e 774 Perry Hughes - Cleaner compmems of Where Every Cleaning is a Saving Reese Confectionery 112 W. Front Street Phone 617W Findlay Cor. Main and E. Sandusky Science is Ever Busy.. .At its back door are many glasses made obsolete bv MODERN METHODS We use modern methods for correct- ing eyes. for better vision and eye strain. M. B. THOMPSON 107 Court Street ' -if-I I-,wvfvn V ,v5,g1, 'N H 'gg -5- ,,..., I , "1 '- 'Wg 1 ' j igs' ---', .gzraziisfit wf gs f '- ,W -rfnrmsupanswvv TFFQEQ 3 1 ' -f.,,g 51122 :fi - ' 2' .. . , " 1 smwwwmQw,gVwrW - 1 ' ' S "57'W .M 5 ' 'H' f Y V ' KING'S EAST-VIEW JERSEY FARM Producers and Distributors of Iersey Milk and All Milk Products The National Lime 8: Stone Co. Crushed Stone for All Purposes Monarch Lime Products Agricultural Lime 8: Limestone Findlay, Ohio The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company of Milwaukee, Wis. Robert K. Davis .... District Agent Richard K. Davis .... Special Agent 212-214 Ewing Bldg. Phone 558 Findlay riff FOR BETTER PHOTOGRAPHY .1. 1.11, 1.P.H.CJ.H.1kyl-N3 There are few fields where fhe necessify for progress-fhe demand for new ideas, is as pronounced as in 'rhe produclion of School Annuals. 43 Here in Canion we 'lake pride in noi only keeping pace, bu+ in sefiing fhe pace for innovaiions and changes in 'lhis highly progressive field. 9 When you work wi'I'h Canion you are hand in hand wifh experienced people, cons+an+ly on fhe alerf fo sense +he wanfs of Annual publishers, and quick fo change from +he old order, and offer new and unusual ideas fo progressive edi+ors. me cANroN ENGRAVING s. emecmorvrs co., cANroN, ol-no 'XEESE 6 V8 lflj0yZ6! 'J '- The Gray Printing Company Cra tsmen has enjoyecl being of service to you, in preserving tlflrough in hzze A tI1e Graphic Arts, the story F I . In of of your Iaapplest Jays. May P1-mfwg happiness continue to he ever SINCE present tlnrougla a long and Worthy lifetime. THE GRAY PRINTING COMPANY - - FOSTORIA, OHIO - ez 1 1 s NDXCB .PICTURE INDEX. Abegglen, Hi ....., Arrnbrecht, Don ,.... Arnendola, Iohn ..,.. Arnold, Eleanor ,.,,, Arras, Theron .o... Bair, Marion ,o.,,oW.,. ,c-ffff'EZif'5'ifE5,"5'Zif'SE, 69, 71, 44, 82, 77, Baird, Rowena ,,...,..., .........................v.oo.o,......o,. Beach, Ellsworth ..,.l., ..................... . . ..,,.,,,. ..., .... 2 4 , Beach, Viola ........... Beard, Richard ..,.., Beck, Paul ,,.,iava., Behman, Iohn ..... Bell, Vincent ..,.... Beucler, Donna .,,.. Bibler, Alice ....... Biddinger, Paul ...... 47, 53, 54, 57, 62, 89, 57, 63, 91, 25, 42, 69, 42, 69, 71, 77, 83, 71, 87 39, 57, 63 l 1, 82 57 82, 82, 1 r Bird, Henry .........., cc,,c,,,,,,1.c1,.,.,c,. Bishop, Esther ,,,,,,,. ..............,.....c.ccc,,vcc,. Blackburn, George .,.,.a, .,..c.. 2 5, 63, 69, 71, Blackford, Anna ....... .,,....-..-...,.-.,.,.,. Boddy, Gordon ....... ,,,,, 4 1, 63, 69 Boyd, Barbara ..... ..,r,,, , ,,,,r,,,,,,,,.,.,-,,, , ,, Boyd, Robert .,,...... cr,1., ..,....,.,...,,.r.,,,,, 4 2 , 47, Bushong, Merrill .a..vaa .,...,.1..,..r,,, 2 5, 47, 53, 56, 58, 81, C Calabrese, Albert ,.1... 39, 69, Calabrese, Ralph ..,,,., ...... ,,,,,,,,ri,,,,. ,i,,., 2 6 , Carpenter, Max .ra,.- ,,,,, ,,,,,,, 4 2, 53, Caskey, Elizabeth ...... ....., 2 6, 51, 57, 58, 62 Caughman, Richard ...... ,a,r,,-.,,.o.,.,raa 4 2, 47, Chapin, George ....,,.. Chatelain, Robert v..... Clapper, Robert ..,... Clopper, Allen .aar--....,- , Cochrun, Marguerite Cotini, Nord ....,...,v,,.,,.l Cole, Edward ..,.,.,,.... Crawford, Gene ..... Creason, Forrest rr,,. Crosser, lohn 1,,,.,,. Cullen, Richard -, ,,,, 41, 50, 56, 26, 44, ii, 39, 63, 69, "W-"'ffffff'LiQ,l 71, 63 60 91 53 60 55, 57 71 92 ll, 71 56 1 1 I DeGood, Craig ,..Y..o ..,. i 42, 56, Delvluth, Pauline r,..,,. .,,.rr , 41, 57, 58, Deter, Cloyce ..r,,i,.. ,,,,,,,,,,,,, 42, DeVore, Gerald ..., 1 ,,v,,.,,, , ,,,A.,,,,,, Dickes, Orval ,.,... ,,,,.,.,,,i,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Drake, Del ,.......... i,,.,,, 4 1, 63, 67, 82, Drake, Robert .,,....., , ,,,,,c,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,-,,,,, 1 1, Dreisbach, Virginia ccc.r, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,-.,, , Duttweiler, William . 41, 47, 53, 54, 67, 82, 93, Eatherton, Evelyn ,,,,,. ,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,-,, g W 41, 47, 53, 57, 62, 0 N E 94 95 82 92 95 94 59 94 93 55 59 92 93 59 58 82 42 59 91 59 8,0 59 94 93 77 71 82 92 93 59 44 80 56 60 92 93 44 82 44 92 93 60 53 44 44 93 44 59 95 93 NDREII NINETEEN ...PICTURE INDEX Eberhart, Bernice ..... Ensign, Betty ......... Ensign, Francis .,... Essinger, Orville ,.... .,..,.,.. F Farthing, Geraldine ..... .v.... Federici, Iames ........ ......... Feiber, Lucille ......... Ferguson, Howard ...... --- Finton, Richard ....,... ............ Frye, Don ......,..v.... Gardner, lack ..,., Gates, lohn ............ Gaver, Kathryn .,.,. Gaver, Mary Jane .... George, Gail ......... Gephart, Myrl .......... Gompf, Marjorie ...... Good, Kenneth ...... Greig, Herbert ...... Grimm, Edgar ....... Gromann, Wilbur ,i.,. Gross, Pauline ....,. Haldeman, Paul .,... Hamilton, Ioe ........,.. Hanna, Margaret .i... Hare, Erma ............ Harkins, Bernard ..,.. Harpst, Elizabeth .,.... Harris, Robert ............ Hirsirnaki, Charles ....... 1-loose, Richard .......,. Hosairos, Evelyn .....i Howard, Milo .....,., Howard, Robert ..... Howell, Willis ....... Huston, Charles ..... Huttel, George ....... lnbody, Helen ......, Iohnson, Odah ...... Kaminski, Leo ............. ........ Ketzenberger, Nellie Konkel, Wilma .i.......... Kurtz, Harold ........... ......... L Lanning, Donovan ...... ...,..... Lanning, Wayne ..... Lape, William .,,. , .... LaRowe, Iohn ..............,, LaRowe, Mary Emma ,,,.. nn: nuunnzn rweurv --,-, 27, 51, 56, 58, 7uullf55fE5f65f9lf5i me 6 ......... ummm' ...., iffflf mu4r5Q5L 52 53, 27, ffl! 39, 52, 53, ---,- 28, 63, 69, 28, 54, 28, 47, 54, 71, 58, 57, ll, 44, U--- 42, 54 sr 29, 29, 57 47, 30, .-,---- 30, 41 41, 50, 44 51, 63, 50 51, 1 ...PICTURE INDEX. Leckey, Paul ..,........,.,,.,...,,...,....,...,.. ............................ Lee, Helen ,,...,.. Lee, Robert ..,.,..,. Leonard, Grace ....... Lucas, Twila ........ Lozier, Virginia ...... Manaio, Iames ..,.,... Maries, lames ...... Marshall, Sam ...., -1 42, 57, 1 .,,. 30, 57 41, 50, , 58, 62, 39, 50, 57, 39, 56 60, 62 51, 95 91, 95 58, 62 -,------------------,,--- 44 39, 63, 69, 42 52 ---------- 1 71, 82 , 56, 60 44 Maurer, Carl ................ ------------f.--------- ----4- 3 7 Maxwell, Ruthanna ....... .....Y........... 3 1, 54, 57, 91, 93 Mazza, Alphonse ,,v,,,v ..... 4 2, 59, 7l, 77, 82, 93, 95 Meyers, Richard ....... ........V...4..... 4 1, 52, 55, 50 Miles, Mary ........... ..V..............-.f....YYvY1... 5 9 Miller, Errald ...... - ..........Y 44 Miller, Floyd ...... ..-f---- 1 1, 42 Miller, Olive ..,.,. ........... 4 4, 57 Moore, Esther ........ ............ 4 4, 57, 61 Moore, Frederick ...... ....,.........V..... 9 2, 93 Morrison, lames ..... ....... 5 3, 59, 71, 77, 94 Mowry, De1..oris ,.,,, ....... 4 2, 52, 57, 50, 82 Mowry, Dorothy ,,,,,,, ..,,................. 4 2, 52, 57, 50 Moyer, Kathryn ,,,,, ,.,,,..,,,............, 3 l, 57, 58, 91 Musgrave, lvlyrl ,,,,, ...,.. 4 2, 51, 52, 56, 60, 91, 92, 93 Myers, Carl ................ ....,..........,.,,.1............. 4 4, 55 Myers, Freda ,. ,..,.-,,,,.,,, .,,,,,..............i...,..,.. 5 9, 61 McGranahan, Marjorie ....... 39, 57, 58, 62 McGranahan, Mildred ......., 44, 57, 82 Nerhood, Harry aaa,,,o... ,,.-,o,v,a,, .i.. 3 1 , 52, 94 Niswander, Wayne -- ...,,,. 44, 82 O Oberlitner, Nellie ..... .,...................Y.Y.... 5 7, 59 O'Keeie, Declan ............ .....,......... 4 1, 58, 51, 63, 59, 71 Opperman, William ,..... .........,..,,.,,........,.......... 4 2, 61, 94 Orians, Iustine ....,,,...,. .....,. 4 l, 47, 54, 57, 58, 62, 88, 92 Orndorff, Elmer ..,...,.. ..,........, 4 2, 53, 67, 71, 77, 94, 95 Osman, Elda ...,,., ...,,. 1.,,1,..,...,...1.,......, 3 9 , 50, 57, 62 Owens, Sam ......, 1 ..,,,,,,.,,, ,,,.,,,, 1 l, 39, 61, 63, 69, 71, 93 Perkins, Robert .,.... ,.,..,.,.,..........,.,,..... 4 2, 95 Piost, Lelia .....,,.,, M ,.... 32, 57, 62, 91 Phillips, Phyllis ..... ,.,,,, 5 9, 87, 92 Powell, Donald ..,... ............,,..,.,,,, 3 9, 53, 81, 94 Rahmarm, Harry ,...1... ............... 1 1, 32, 52, 63, 67, 71, 82, 93 Ranes, Hildeqarde -,., ,,,,,,oor,,,,,,A,o,,,o,,vv,,,,,-A,, 5 7, 59 Redman, Don .,...... ..,,,,,,,-,-,--------,-,-,--------,----- 5 9 Reese, Raymond ....... ,oo,,. 4 2, 56, 93, 95 Reimund, Martha ..... ,.V,.,,,,wv---,,,,---- 9 3 Rider, Florence ....... -.o,,, 4 1, 57, 62, 92 Riggs, Gayle .,....1... ,,,,,,,,,,--,,,.,,,, 5 9 Rissinqer, Marvin .,.,.. ,,,,, 4 4, 56, 60 Roberts, Martha .,.... ,-,- , , 42, 57, 50 HUNDRED TWEIITY-OIIE ...PICTURE INDEX Rodabaugh, Franklin ,.4,.-, ---,-,- 2 3, 51, 53, Rodabaugh, Irma --- Rogers, Marshall ,.,.-..... Rosenberger, Frank ,..... -M Russell, Robert ......-... -,,,.,,,, S Saddoris, Dorothy .....,., .,....... Saddoris, Geraldine ..... Sanderson, Mardyth ..... Schiwek, Karl .....,.,.... Schrader, Glois ....... Shank, Iohn .v...-,.v,,..., ......,.., 56, 42, 55 Shoemaker, Ruby ...... ...................... , , ......... - Small, Dale .....,.., 2 ........ ,l.... 4 l, Smith, Seely .,..... Snyder, Gerald .,..... Solt, Virginia ...... Staley, Reva ........, Stout, George .,,.,,,... 47, 50, 51, 52, 56, 33, 57, 34, 47, 58, 53 Stover, Mary Faye ..... .,.......,...,...,..,rv....... 71 Street, Orton ........,,. Strouse, Carlton ...., Sucher, Robert ....... Swasick, Max ..,.,,, Taylor, Sheldon .,.,.,. Thomas, Lawrence l,... -,- Tinsman, Henrietta ..... Todd, Betty .,................ Trostrniller, Howard ....... Trout, Robert ,............. Trout, Van ...,..,..,,... Tussing, Evelyn ...... Tuttle, George ...... Vansant, Don .....,l Wagner, Reba ,........ Wallen, Richard ...... Weaver, Eileen ...... Weirner, Margaret ......... Whetstone, Frederick Wilcox, Geraldine ...... Wilcox, Guynieth Wilkin, Gaylord .c,...... Williamson, Ruth ..,.... Wilson, Caroline .... Winders, Iohn ....,,,. Wiseley, Richard .......... Wittebort, Iules .............,. Woodward, Margaret Wright, Martha .........,... ...,,. Wright, Richard .,....,.. r.,......... Y Yohe, Iohn ......, Zurnpft, Charles ...... E HUNDRED TWEIITY-TWD ll, 34, 63, 69 I ll, 42, 50, 53. 34, 53, 54, 42, 47 35, 'fffff'ilif'55f """""""""55f55f55f'50, v 1 54, 55, 63 57, '55 35, 63, 59. T035-il 35, 53 35, 51, 54, ,Qifff-Qilif -rin 36, 52, 57, 42, 42, 50. ---flff'55, 44, 47, 42, 37, 56, 58 63 ...GENERAL INDEX. . Administration ....... Athletics ............ Basketball ...... Coaches ......... Football ......,..,........ General Athletics .............,........... Golf ................................................ Manaqers, Stadium, Cheerleaders Tennis ........,..................,. . ,... i ...,..... Board of Trustees ..... Classes .............. Freshmen ....... Iuniors .....v.. Seniors ......... Sophomores a..... Contents ............ Dedication ..... Faculty ..... Features ......,...,.,., May Day ......,............ Popularity Winners .,..... Snap Shots .........aa.. Foreword .l.......,. Organizations .............. Alethean Club ...,, Arqus Staff ........,.... , -i Chorus ..,............,...,......,. Commercial Department ...... Conservatory Group ,.... Debate Squad ............... Einstein Club .....,,.....,......... Ministerial Association .,...i Nu Psi Rho Club ..,.....c..., Student Council ...... . ll u Varsity F ....,a.i. W. A. A. ...... - Y. M. C. A. Y. W. C. A. ..... A Scenes ...... -.,-- 12 65 74-79 66 68-73 82 80 67 81 13 mv- 21 ------ 44 38-41 22-37 42 6 ---- 7 15-l9 85 90-91 86-89 92-95 6 49 54 50 60 59 61 55 53 ----- 52 58 51 63 62 56 57 8-9 4- DIIE HUNDRED TWEIITY-TIIREE Q, ,Q jlQ3L,,11L, 1.,,',f?f ,1A,"'gl,'+.h H - f'r'A V ':V' "l V ' '1. 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