University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI)

 - Class of 1973

Page 1 of 278

 

University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection, 1973 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1973 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1973 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1973 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1973 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1973 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1973 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1973 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1973 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 278 of the 1973 volume:

w o eff L. SQ O 0 CH 5003 THE it I... URBAN ALMANA AND YEARBOOK A' CALCULATED ON A NEW AND IMPROVED PLAN lax FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 6 'Fas w" is 1 if Lv QQ lil? f1v,f54'h:? N ,Q Contaxnlng besldes a goodly number of Photographs and a Calendar for every month of the academlc year, a varlety of OLD USELESS AND POSSIBLY INCONSEQUENTIAL MATTER V -,wt -Ji our ' H14 xii b'blf ,-I W-SP Fr -L nl- XAQ ME ' -X3-5.-,X -60+ sw ilk' :'?'f'f" P 'fm ,fz,.iI.iE.e pi p 21,52 k T I J! f.J-'Ur :lug PEI u Sl 'ml :LIT-gphx -Q' x" :1 'MT ' f lf 'F x1S.m,I-"1 -"S-"ri ,-3 'Q' s .AN Passer by For how many years have you been sellmg a1manacs'7 Seller Twenty years your Excellency Passer by And lf you had the chance to rel1ve exactly the llfe you have already had ne1ther more nor less wlth all the pleasures and sorrows that have passed? Seller No I would not w1sh It Passer by Not even you wlll turn back wzth thxs foreknowledgeq 1 'Guns Lb Seller No excellency truly I would never return Passer by What 11fe therefore would you w1sh yourself? Seller I would wlsh llfe as It IS as God w1ll glV6 xt to me wlthout other condltlons Passer by Lnfe by chance knowmg nothing m advance just as one knows nothmg of the New Year? Seller Exactly GIBCOIIJO Leopardr Copynght 1973 by the Board of Publishers of the Unlverslty of Detrolt COVER T M REGISTERED FN? I6 UNIV of DET LIBRARY IN U S PATENT OFFICE QM 9 CATALOGUE NO LD 1641 D45 Qfflod 53 G3 630550 'K CI e b, 14 Q V .ie " ' an .14 ' J u 'n n n u Q n n u d u n nI 5 In n I u a u 5 .025 E9 6 , 3 .1 65 .. 5 ,J , Vg . c. ' .-.I1.I, J 57'-Q :llf'QGI:i rj T .139--9--.u-,"9,' , r 9 ' ,I .- -1,2 A., - CD90 .EHR I 11 , ' Y .. v. Q L I Igff. -wi .V I.IIII.I gl-Igapff . 1' I, J9 'ii ' ' -. , fn . f, ' H 'l - , 1 , fd . - ' v. fire . 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H II gn I q - n u n 2: . : 3 u n s y HE Z CCNTENTS 4 Somethings you might have missed . . . 16 Urban Dwellers Handbook 34 The Calendar: 1877-Beyond the Infinite 46 Administrative Metamorphosis 56 Academia-Student Viewpoints 98 Consortium Qfeaturing The Theatrel 118 The Uther Campus 134 Sports and Games 156 Anecdotes, Recollections, and Other Stories 156 "Cn the Effects of Ken Feit, Guest-Fool-In-Residence'i 1 Dean Canjar From the Foreigner's Eye . . . 58 1 60 162 Maintenance 64 70 .4 4 University Week 1 Elections '72 4 Student Government H Speakers and Other Performers 186 Varsity News -90 Tower 192 YEARBCOK 4 72 76 4 ' Somethings you might have missed P jg ' ,Jr , . I V , V V f fi . ', lk. . W "' -V ' 4' 1 , ifliu' IH- Q A ' A g J 1. V Vv X VVVV ll I ' 'l ,f I f 1 IU, -I 4 'rl ." 4' YA 'V 2 ' ' 1 A H.-, ,, IV V, . klq . , le. ' 4 3,11-,,f-.',,. -, -Q - :ff 'V -1. ., "Y,1h-,-' x 1 .IV V ,.,h..1 .ff . 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" 4 K ' 4 E .'4.."-'5i.!..'f-. 4' A - 'A' , fm' s '1 ' k x ' I Situated in a city of this size, the University of Detroit cannot help but become involved with the surrounding area. University presi- dent, the Rev. Malcolm Carron, S.J., a native Detroiter, is the chairman of New Detroit Inc. This is an organization of civic and business leaders that was formed after the riots in 1967. He is also a member of 30 other civic organizations. Jesuit Universities used to be thought of as closed societies. But as they became more secular, they were bound to become more a part of their communities. U-D and other universities may have "turned out Archie Bunkers by the barrelful" as was pointed out in an article from the Nov. 21, 1972 issue of World Magazine. But things are changing. A large number of departments offer students the opportunity to go out into the community. The Urban Law Clinic, for example, furnishes legal advice to indigents for a minimal charge, and 1 A the Dental and Psychology . Clinics serve people in .,,. - a similar manner. While 4" 1 the Engineering co-op f V program is the most well known, other co-op ,- opportunities are available from the College of Business and Administration f and the Departmentlf V11 of Media Studies. Field placement is a part of the Sociology curriculum. Programs of this type give students the experience they need and enable them to serve other people at the same time. The Detroit area Consortium of Catholic Col- leges, an organization of eight separate insti- tutions, allows students to take courses at campuses other than their own. The Consoli- dated Performing Arts Center of U-DfMary- grove College, called The Theatre, combines student and local talents acting in critically acclaimed plays. Attendance records illus- trate that the plays have been well-received by theatre-goers. Students, however, failed to support the speaker series sponsored by University Stu- dent Government. After two events, the series was dropped because USG was afraid of losing too much money. Comedian Dick Gregory at- tracted a large crowd, but attorney Melvin Belli only managed to draw about 50 Law students. At the start of the first semester, 12 concerts were planned by the Department of Performing Arts. The first concert, with folk singer Gordon Lightfoot, made a profit. However, after that, attendance decreased and several acts cancelled their engagement. The series was discontinued because Dr. James Rogers, Performing Arts director, felt it was too difficult to book entertainment in the Memorial Building. Noticeably absent this year was the publicity usually given to campus crime It was only a few years ago that the local newspapers were runnmg stories alluding to the terrible security problem With everything that was mentioned concerning muggmgs armed robberies rapes and car thefts it was no surprise to anyone that enrollment began to drop But the story was different this year Except for a few incidents involving thefts from Shiple Hall dormitory security received little attention The fences which were erected last year to completely surround the l campus seemed to reduce the number of cars stolen out of University parking lots. One theory explaining the rise of crime is that U-D itself was responsible for bringing this problem tothe area. The University, as the attraction for crime, was then an easy target for outsiders to prey upon the campus and surrounding area. Following this idea, the administration chose to increase campus security with the hope of improving the neighborhood situation as well Interestingly this 1S not the only explanation for the crime increase The city of Detroit was plagued with a high number of murders and police shoot outs and the neighborhood around U D was not able to escape this One shoot out that involved patrolmen from the undercover unit STRESS CStop the Robberies Enjoy Safe Streetsl occurred only a block from campus When Newsweek Magazine reported the story they referred to this area as the Near Northwest ghetto . . . . ' 1 , - - 0 . ' V , X ' . . . . 1 ' - Q , . . . . - 9 i , Y . . . 1 - , , ,X ' 5 . . . l ' . - I l l , I . . , - ' - -I 1 , l I I ' V- I Q - . . '. . V , ' ' . ' ca as N 4 ,AV ' W ' , 1 V, A I -, , DETROIT,S NEAR NORTHWEST GHETTOU: A SECOND LOOK H ft 3NfiKj ff 1 H .v A ,---1,-.L A .1 .if ,- ,,.f. K i . fl ug: '..iA ' Lge!! ai?:":Lf I I O 1 .., . -A . ,g g-h, ' kk-1+" A 5.11 if 'WY' ' L, ff' Aj' ,fx Wit- 4 ' ",A ' ,j.'R f- ' wif ,.v?E 4' T T . gn. , Aofia- A Q mm I . ....- . . , n ali. -. . iff ., :J-A ' uf? .:f.,g::.As. "J L . ' Q., I L N N. . 0 in Lies k' ufhni 1? 1- 1 . ' I 5 , , 7 ' 2 ,, X ' ' ' ' - A n -F, li L , ' 'tg +, . "--fl-f A, , . ra,"-yi -Q., tr, " Q , -. fx , ' w- '..L.,.k,,,. 4 G 4. fri. -.Q ,, , ' .. H , L.u-4M:.a4- . ma.. W X F ,, A f-, N f..., .. ...M ,v,,,A,,,Q ,. 1 V lxlixr? fm 1-4.f4f,Q13J He-f.xu.w,.i:f..4 M., : A,1'ffr'-11 ...N ......w.. 3 -5 'f.-.- R '21 EEL '1' 4 ,uxitru ' . V. 1 Q 4 w "V EH ui .., 5 ---6"'Y ' 1 - . . P17 . ,, W5 fx .X .. Y - , , 4 v- X , X r V1.1 f2'1-f,4i53w2 ! ' "" 3 -'---- Y, X M x 3 - A..,w-J' 'TM' .g :ff rf" 1- f 1 ' ' N '- N ' - AW' A I 01 .Di -N5-. I: X, ,L-1, eu-s , '-,,- sf X .N - 'L ' '...."""' " . '-. - ' 1 , , 5 ....,,k,-,, , . , , A Q , "'-' -4 N . . . K . . 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XX- I . :fi TRAFFIC VOLUMES Peak Hours McNichols fEastboundJ at Livernois 7 am - 9 am Daily Traffic: 12901 4 pm - 6 pm at Wyoming 8 am - 10 am Daily Traffic: 11696 4 pm - 6 pm at Hamilton 8 am - 10 am Daily Traffic: 10122 2 pm - 4 pm McNichols KWestboundl at Livernois 7 am - 9 am Daily Traffic: 11097 4 pm - 6 pm at Wyoming 8 am - 10 am Daily Traffic: 10732 4 pm - 6 pm at Hamilton 8 am - 10 am Daily Traffic: 11008 4 pm - 6 pm Livernois lNorthboundJ at McNichols 4pm - 6 pm Daily Traffic: 18886 at7Mile 11am-lpm Daily Traffic: 16861 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm at Puritan 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm Daily Traffic: 22930 Livernois fSouthboundl at McNichols 7am - 9 am Daily Traffic: 19511 2 pm - 4 pm at 7 mile 7am - 9 am Daily Traffic: 13361 at Puritan 7 am - 9 am Daily Traffic: 21088 12 pm - 2 pm 2 pm - 4 pm DETROIT POLICE DEPARTMENT Accident Prevention Section Highest Accident Intersections for the City of Detroit for the year 1971 Number One: Livernois and McNichols Exceed safe speed Varying course of travel Left center of street Under influence of liquor or drugs Struck rear of vehicle Failed to yield stopped intersection Failed to yield right of way - vehicle Improper left turn oncoming traffic Improper right turn wrong lane Ignore red traffic signal Number Two: Livernois and Grand River Failed to yield right of way Exceed safe speed Under influence of liquor or drugs Inattention - hit stationary object Drinking - hit stationary object Struck rear of vehicle Failed to yield right of way - vehicle Improper left turn oncoming traffic Improper right turn wrong lane Ignore red traffic signal Ignore officer's signal al! of Vehicles 2181 1671 1751 1651 1384 1397 1041 2126 1018 1935 1181 2026 3306 2044 3136 3944 3336 2356 2855 3235 2513 2508 49 2 1 1 2 3 1 1 23 1 14 49 - - - 46 1 1 2 4 1 5 2 21 2 6 1 CAR qi. .i I . if . KA v- -fi 7-qi T wx ,:..- A ? -V ,-f4- 4 1.55 - - X X , Ai -4 . '- - -: r' . . . "'h,'1U1' f 4 .f-Ff Af I xxluz . if .--M . If M, ,. ' .- o , F, , . 'I 4 , ' 1' C .l'1f'k ' wza, , ,Jr ,J 1 '..'v" A. 1 xr, "fw- . v- an ,. RS, - ,. ,,:..1f - ,J viva' -.""' ' --., .Y 1 :,. .. F, , v , X X -on u I 1 F, Y Wif QP: . '. ' "- 1 ini' 1 ng, : Q 1:53-wig -- 6134 I. 'Q 'K' - fa 'T' z , Visas. 'A 44 ' 1 --misun- -"e-- 'H -f -, 1 3 - F ,I -A , -AL.. Agia ,, . .r Q i:3"5'," 41' - I -,f-'ffc . K dm? "' - -4 x ,X Q LL!! Buff fur f. 1 .,f.,-f Q,' at IJ . ., V wi, - gg-e' .JJ- '4- no -xg!!! QF VE-Brix Lwiwbfhfi 'XpzGgx'3-N, ., 'Qt- ttf" DORMITORIANS As some might know, but many don't, the emphasis in the Residence Halls is placed upon "community living". This concept implies two things: first, an awareness of yourself and others, your neighbors, and second, respecting the rights and freedom of fellow residents. Accomplishing these objectives is no easy task. The administration is often confronted by students on issues which do not violate basic policy, but which must be refused for security reasons. Services offered to the dorms are often at the mercy of Public Safety, or else subject to rip-off, as evidenced by the theft of a full-size color television from the Reno lounge. When these conditions infringe upon W the residents' life-style, any ff,T,:g,i ' ''community-living-concepts'' suffer. ,JJ 'WJ But life goes on. . . Dear Mr. Frommeyer, your name has been brought to my attention on several occasions since last September for miscellaneous minor incidents which violate the community living concept, namely on 10-22-'72, 2 10-29-72, 11-6-72, ,,,.,a -1- , ,, ,H 1 24 11'30'72' .1 1-13-73, 1-17-73, 1-18-73, WW A A . wi 'tn' ' X ., mv k n ww ' -aw, S , 4 P i NE' ,R :F . . f.,-,z :B "I Q ., 'f. 'fg-1-1 "'5,,,,.- 'I 'F .N. ' "Nairn sg.,- 'x .4 , L ' A . . , c ' L. ,H if txx' " ' v .N I , . , ,JL qi , J x' JQQN-,li I A 1,1 , 'Q r Y. 1 ., N n 1, W . fix, ' .1!. is fl' COMMUNITY SERVICES REVIEW- The neighborhood around U-D includes many types of businesses which rely on students for a good part of their livelihood. Although dorm residents probably have the most contact with these merchants, there are some establishments which are well known to all students. The best example of this is the ABC Bookstore. Every person, at some point of his academic career at this university, buys a book from them. The management makes sure that every student at least knows about the place. In fact, it is virtually impossible to go through registration lines at the start of each semester without receiving a circular from them. ABC, the University Bookstore's only competition, survives because the prices are lower and the service is more reliable. More and more instructors order their textbooks from them only. Manned by student help, the store operates during registration in such a way that the customer is often out the door before he realizes it. A system of clerks find the books for you and whisk you through the cashier's line. Within walking distance of the University is Clayton's, a small, traditional-looking restaurant. It is popular especially with dorm students who tire easily of the in- stitutional food served at the University cafeteria. Moderate prices and food that tastes home- cooked are what keep this place alive despite its short day. It is closed by 6 p.m. Clayton's boasts of the best pies in the area, and a taste test justifies this claim to fame. The National Bank of Detroit branch at Livernois and Puritan is where most campus residents have their accounts. It is almost always crowded but students seem to complain the most about the bank's population explosion that occurs every Friday and the first day of each month. Conveniently located across Livernois from the campus, the Golden 20's has long been "the barn around U-D. Ever since the State of Michigan changed its law to give 18 year-olds the right to drink, undergraduates have been the bulk of the clientele. While the food quality has deteriorated somewhat in the past year, this has not stopped anyone from visiting the bar, es- pecially on Thursday nights. Zoo night, the weekly alcoholic ex- perience, makes the 20's the most crowded and stuffiest place near the campus. Without fail, students flock there each Thurs- day mostly because there is nothing else to do. The price of beer and drinks is lowered for this one night only. Greeks and off- campus residents make up a large part of the crowd, but recently, girls from Mercy and Marygrove Colleges and Immaculata High School have been known to fre- quent the tavern. A GUIDE TO AREA MERCHANTS College Pharmacy, close to the University, at Puritan and Liver- nois, is the neighborhood's storehouse for cold beer. It also has a fair selection of wines and liquor. Most campus alcoholics purchase their beverages at Trade Winds, on Livernois north of McNichols. It is reputed to have the largest selection of beer, wine and liquor in the area, and at reasonable prices. m 51 -Y A fE7Zi?.2l!-Eitgfju ' --- gvigfwg. zzawxuasz LLQH - .a.rE.iQ....- . -iq Q., 'f 1 lu DRUGS I .rg -"Fake .li sf- Y - -'f1 K - oiwaiiwes . - "i -,.s2::sia.':.".z'.r::.2'.. f-R fHl.i,:qg, , .v 5. : A .m.,w..f . yi., I gg ,J MJ' -I. .i.H..h. A -U A A few blocks from campus, west on Puritan, is the Venice Bar. Featuring "Spagetti a'la Venice", the bar is the neighborhood's closest thing to a genuine Italian restaurant. The prices are reasonable and the atmosphere is pleasant. The bar and dining room are seldom crowded. Bob Bolton's Bar and Grill, located on Livernois, south of Fenkell, is the type of bar where students can go for a quiet drink. Bolton's, under new manage- ment, promises to liven up the at- mosphere with a new piano player, who will play contem- porary music. The A8:P, behind Shiple Hall, offers the resident poorselection, warm beer and dirty aisles, all at high prices, but it is the handiest grocery store in the area. By far, a better deal can be had at the expense of a short jaunt down Livernois to Wrigley's, which moved into the area recently, bringing with it lower prices, greater variety, and more impor- tantly 24-hour service. I X 1 , Lou's Finer Delicatessan, located directly across the street from Marygrove College, is a popular restaurant for students with cars. Between U-D and Marygrove and the neighborhood, Lou's is busy nearly all the time. It also at- tracts people after performances at The Theatre. A large selection of sandwiches highlight the menu, but the place features the kinds of food you would expect to find in a good delicatessan. Lou's also has a large volume of carry-out business. 29 OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING Despite the obvious conveniences of living on campus, each year an increasing number of students look to the surrounding neighborhood for alternative shelter. Foremost in their reasoning are financial considerationsg in many cases the pay-as-you-go plan makes more sense, on a limited budget, than the University's one-time, lump-sum program. Those who seek out the added responsibility and experience of off-campus living are met by an administrative policy of non-assistance. Yet, a vacant seventh floor of Shiple Hall stands as testimony to the success of their efforts. 1 1 .Ali sub 11.1 Q15 -Q:-, 'gha- noeoooconutllb-0 . .4,.,......-. . on anna-.nun-u ' , 5. nl ' ' I N , was , M K. 1 , r . ,' xl P i - .tv-R , ii Y ufagk, -yy 2 ' wr. ' J" f L 5 , , 'X . , ' gh' M I r .QA ,Li --' ' ' .Q 5.57 'ff' 5' QL' ra 27 ffm wh f-...- 5- fy .. -. , I. .-H-, ' . P2512 I i',5f'au Eg' 4 'f,"tT'f ,FL ,gf-A-A-, -,mfr -gf ,IQ-?J:jz'.'--i czpfavi. 'I - 'AH 4 -- L-75-F-,f",4g, f L 3'-L2 .15 ' . H' 53133, nflgff? 1,1 1 " , .-4a-- I-Al fn.- -,wr V 4. " - ' Y .f 'V f- ', .. 1 'K ' , " ' -1 'T' vg A fi Aff: , . 15. LU ' '- nw-Lan . ., 71,-Q.-..1. L, ,'...A. - ,--, ,7-:L. " v .'v 'fl . 1 ' sf Vw, I Ll-1 1-'5?'Pi?5ff "Ffa W1-H ',1---'fig HE'-Q " " W' 1fifggi-3-?X'Q2-4 .1 '4 i 1' - 4 .,V.t,Mw5'zki'. -V , .lu FT , Q g:Q',3-ii-f" 2 H ' -45' wwf- - wk' si- ,W A-N 'YK' " ,",QJ.,. usi' Mm, AW- 75'7"L-:1T'i M 1.1-M N- 4- 31. .-, L,-.-,V .. -5 ' AV -3 . fv ,, Q . ,f 1 f -ups 1' ,Y-Y.. Q , A. .yu If ,wa 4' j i 1 ful ...IP R R 5 in T 71 3 :Ir Q , , el f . , 4 "1 Q! gf X: .34 - ,,:-.I -. .gr ., ,sm - . x .- '- .-,kn 1,5 4 13 7 W- V -1+ I 'S -1 , A 1 iii? ,.f-,ms .Q- E: ' I ' -, xy - Q 'R -' V. 551 , M .. ' LP' I -. . Ljff I 4 4 wi?" 'I n V-rs. .11 ' , , ' v4!7'?M x -' '-7? 'Y , R Nb 'Q 414. , ..1---'Q' . . .., XL x 41 - X U.: f ,771888 1890 1911 192219231 Before the purchase of the land at Six Mile and the Livernois in 1921, the property served as farmland. The Commerce and Finance Building was an onion patch, the stadium a cowpasture, the Engineering Building a sheep pasture, h Ch ' B 'l ' t e emistry ui din a Swimmin hole? Future Home of the University of H ' ' - E . an e ' ' 'n Dfnrtiti tx:?.1.:t:'Ch"fRn'! 'bf at-' Df- . Md,-nm-e ut Jelterson and Antoine to the Clengebmfgyagdg l'3::.3:b.3LS:13.."rh. fwllflfliiUi"fr-ifiilffllifd ' , 'lffguils who agree to found and maintain a ' P L L' 'J""m'm' m""'ii' im F 4-ollvge. For the hrst two years the school S m -A - - - - "-'m"'0'1S We academy- In fhe..ff1'10f 1379- . tiffiihfirollffw 552353.31filIid2E?'1'Z3lf.1f'3rS2SLi?Sl5i'fS?I5tan. Arts and bclences becomes the hrst college with . aulaculty of three fathers and' t.wo scholastncs. July 1, 1922,S0d is turned 'I he enrollment for the class is 84. S for the new Stadium , , at ix Mile and Livernois. Nov. 26, 1896-In its first intercollegiate football game, Detroit College loses to St. Ignatiaus Know Loyola University of Chicagol. Jan. 30, 1918-The Varsity News begins publication as a bimonthly. ' ' 1552! MIEEJ, 'rw mfg "'5'q-43,55 Y i.JL.f.S.l. - FIRST GRADUATING CLASS. Row Ig E. A. Nolan, J. A. lg Rmb l K ED Y '5-'times Whitevv takes its Russell, Rev. J. P. Friedan, S.J., J. W. Kearns. Row 2,' W. H. Reaney, T. C. McKeogh, J. E. Lacriox, Conrad Sporer. ,gc-m.,,qg+4'f SY 'H . ' if fl' q i f-fr ,-'- -rf - A " ' 1'!l..w,g R -. ....- 1 E., .gy ., .. '.- 1- , -an-. , . A Q1 , l el 5 . .. l . Wgg,JT "'3 Q 1923 Th ,, d d . ....,,.. rg ., rm."-'v - ' ,.e...G...g.-f ...,... - Re 1 --w r. e an 'L 541559: Qfdffrf5.i.l??SEiE15:Q.f5:Eft'i' T 'L 1 I wr.. mmnm-.umm-lm un., Q ., ,R -amS.-sa..f.. ,m1N::-...ff . -- . .x . . Z .1 "maiden voyage". DETROIT DOWLING DETROIT FIRST COLLEGE HALL COLLEGE YEARBOOK FOUNDED ERECTED ' IEE-IICEIOMES EFNIVERSITY DETROIT CAMPUS FIRST S LAND ' DEGREES PURCHASED NEW tuition S40!yr. tuition S60fyr, tuition 9b100!yr. - I g UUQCSS I 8 his C8I,l'l9fII'8l End d th S B . Dec 10 1942 The Engmeermg Faculty Councll votes to admnt women as regular students 1n the College of Engmeermg on the same b3S1S as men students 1937 Charles Gus DOIIBS IS elected head football coach of the College All Stars Dor1as came to U D ln 1925 as 1ts Athletxc Drrector and football coach He gamed fa tNotr Dm Un t nthd f me a e a e 1vers1 y 1 e ays o Knute Rockne when the pass combmatlon Donas to Rockne was feared 1928 The football team wrth a 9 0 won 1053 record IS acglalmed Nov 27, 1955 After seven years of ra1s1ng one of the best In the Qguntfy funds through donatlons carmvals and Lloyd Brazll 1S named All Amerlcan a benefit performance by Arthur Godfrey the new Student Umon 1S dedxcated 'WELS S-HIDE, intl.. trges of a farmlng commum re V1S1bl8 near campus at SIX le and LIVGIHOIS Sept 1 1932 The doors to the Dental School open for the first tlme Forty three students attend the classes after less than a month og admlnlstratlve an Mi faculty preparatlon M72 QE V J: wrt fi' ww 'X fx What' l' .1 rw-'fir Wwwm 322231 ei Eg! K X Mfg flatslimrfrt lg! r null!-has ' ll 1 Oct 6 1955 An unex pected storm leaves ul ten lnches of ram on 4-:JF the gampus and sur as P"f'-" if roun 1ng commumty 7"--f d fu nd dlver P prov1 mg n a an-...--I s1on for the student body "SAG 92192 19461950 195 19 LASSES HOLDEN LIBRARY RENO BRIGGS EGIN 53359 BUILT STUHDERT 95311995 IX MILE MEN S UNION AMPUS DORM OPEN soHooL OPENS or DENTISTRY l5U1l5101'1 5220fy1' f111fJ101'1 S400fy1' tu1t1on S448!yr O , - . js:-gn . ,12 - 5' 'V ' ' .J ,g'aj,ff.. 1... 9 .g- Wg? - ' ' - V "'-SN gy 547'-'I . . . ' , ,- - , Af- , , A ' n H. if, 5.1L . . Q .dl I at I -'F-sb . . . Af: .- ---'- ' x .N , NQAJMH , -f s ac - as -- 1 . - . , . ' - - - , . - u 1 u 1 - . I Q n , u , ' I I .Q-ww-ww: x , .- --4 f- ff--AN -.. 1 . N 'ffm 1 + MP 'I " ' . . . V 2 - ' J -A -31 Q rf L, -,Z .11 if x .1f:,."r'f 'l I 'lil HSI-l"l1 ' ' fill' . . h 5 'gd - -fs-K 1 ll, Q 1 , ' F , a sg so " 1 l "' ,A A ,.,.1. ' V . ,Elgin ,Z ' I A lg-V! E ' I A F '.'- ' "' .- TQWPIIW Wk 1, my 1 .5: ,. I 1 Psi- 1 ,si Jn , 1 ,sh 11:1-.,1., "Qs, rfg,1.i.gr-liege ., " will I , ,f - 12 ,VM 'sw sf. '. ' 'f -E. .. My L- -:q1,,': .' 'V ,v ' , . . 1 I , , :1 1-1,5 vx.. -xx 1 ' I '- sa, . I. , 1 ' ' Q . - X ?' E l:'1.,L'. " j, ' -, - .- ,-. , , ' 1: J ll " Fffli. ' ii ' I. '15 I I 1' - V' .,.,.. . 1 M.-f - I ,,.- , v- , . . -, f -. iw '. - ,H.,pl'-.1 , , F, H ' . -, -1 , " T, ' " - ,, 2:- ' , f 2 -,ral 1 k --+1 . 4- ' 5122? '-12 , - ' 1 If y. sl Ll his .,, :. -' .'wl"1! 'gpg 1 ' 83- - fllb 'U A-'J , , 1 1 , f LV ' f',sff.tfillf. I " in r ll, z ' ' q. 'r l 'ftllill' Jil' 1 " 1 -- 2 x I, lr' ' '- " 9a'l'fi' Ll- ' A ' V - , A 1 ,LJ 1 '-- 1 TQ, 'ug V4 in, 1- -jj' '- 'Q' - ,':1' , 4'-N ' . , - - ' X , V. . 4 --1 untill., M N 'NAi1,:,,.ifpQ:fi1-gfif,f:1 vp -g 'I ,., s" - i f sng, i h . . 5-hx I I, 1 2 M.TWX.?Z,E::1.. " --,fe.,f,-M Q, 41,-,j.f,'.":w13ff1g, ', ' ,J ' : ' 'r1'f-sw" 15.5 ..,1H53jg:g-L:'1-,I 'J-..,,1-H., . . . S n 551 I . . - 9 YF 4 - - .mf -:ut .1 .' ' , -, " I . . . ' 1' ff?f"f'5'Ef'f':'4:1A-faw . . . ' ' . -4 , WL 3, N. - ... K 2 N . . -f ' -. . -a...' -I Y , f Y . 1 ' c ' "' g . . . 7 A I 7 D . 1965-Varsity Cross Country is established to retain NCAA status. 1967-Club football begins with a 3-0 seasong the first undefeated football team since 1928. 1967 -Two floors of the downtown Tuller Hotel are arranged to accommodate the overflow of out-of-town t d t A h ttl b t Nov. 30, 1964-Varsity football is 1 5 11 en S, S 11 e ug Opera eg discontinued, leading to riots on campus. 1967 -Holden Hall becomes between the hotel and campus. Approximately 1,000lstudents took a female dorm. part in blocking traffic , , further along ' 9 Jefferson 1966-The University on Livernois Six Mile 1954,Richa1-d Lesnau and the Lodge Expressway. becomes the 25 000th May 3, 1967-The Rev. Peter Arrupe, S.J., superior 1969-After playing Varsity Basketbal at U-D during his sophomore yea Screammg and running person to receive general of the Society Students removed a degree from U-D upon of Jesus, dedicates Stovhghts In Protest- earning his D.D.s. the Ford Lifescience April, 1966-The first Doctor of Philosophy degree, mar s e 1 s superior general has visited U-D. offered solely ind Chemistry . IS conferre 1963-Dinan Hall is demolished to make way for the Chrysler Freeway, moving the Dental School Avenue to a Chrysler The Corporation School building. Of Architecture This gives is established U-D three as separate and diSfi11C'0 distinct from campuses. Engineering. SCHOOL f. - . ig? lm gg I "T -'T 4: . 5 - T j, fivfgli 1'-1: E' ilu.. - .5-gg wx -'a '? p H '-"iv 322. 1- .el ., Zi, ' gl U n ,uv - ,. ..-, -- 1---"T .V -T . Eiga A-1-tw-A gg .. '-iv" TTS' V T261 R . 25 '!f?'T' TF . mtg, T, -LT.. ., ,V g irly' :F ""h"E"f'7-3-,,,,.Js': i ' ff. -sf..-mzsa -, V 1: .af if 'z .sr purchases the aging Palmer Hotel and names it Foley Hall, making it the first dor- mitory for women. 196 CARRON BECOMES PRESIDENT Building. The visit k th f'r t time t hat a D Nov. 1968-About 150 w o m e n s t a g e a demonstration deman- ding better security. News of the event is carried on the National Associated Press Wire and makes newspapers across the nation. Spencer Haywood signs a "hardshi clause" contract with th enver Rockets of the AB ' In the fall Dwigh Dunlap, captain of th basketball team quit becoming the thir player in two week to leave the squa 5-lx , g ' R+- ith 1 A A 5 3 Q fax ,4 Q . W l 4425 I . l 9' " ' 9 We 'A R 521-5' ' igibitmlm BQ' Ip lllil ' lil . - 1 iw- :fri 5 f 3- ight 445:41 Q nlilzli A ' F' fi' .5 5' Sept. 1969-The Qua 5-' 5 V rangle, four separ sl A - ' 'l M dormitories connected rl H Q a commons, opens. 1968 1969 1 U-D! MARYGROVE JOIN FINE-ARTS OF DENTISTRY EQQHUOL MOVES ARCHITECTURE SHIPLE TO HALL HNEW., FORMED FORD DINA N FISHER - OPENED HALL CENTER BEFSQEESCE DEDICATED CLASSES QUADRANGL I HALLS tuition S768!yr. tuition S864!yr. tuition S1150!yr. tuition S1400fyr. t e presence of recruiters on After a list of stu- de ands is referred to es, a 78 hour sit- place in the Ad- Building. 1970-The TV and Journalism ts are under chairman. ,V 6191.5 ' s.-. .V l are thrown off campus following W a week of disruptions The actions 'td hr started after the university s ft' 'S 5555 termination of contracts for Cooper and James Miller both instructors in the Black Studies Department 22 26 1970 Seventeen area arrested for i?5:Ei2uEe97lel,1?aidZCh2g1ig? Feb 1972-Club football is dropped. . . h. . . t fflgiyplsgfe clude Environmental Studies Sept. 1971-The second and third floors Aug. 3, 1972-Fencing coach Dick Perry quits over a salary dispute. r A April 17, 1971-History professor W , l W 7 y ,i- Edward Cooper and five black students are ,J A 1 it ' ' " A , - . , 5.111 .,...ew5-rj 'f'-.5 . Erie. I . 1 Fir f . V - SN 'I' Q 'l . . 1 . 1 . .f .,..L fag, . hr 1 ' ' ' 13' .Q Y 1 ' if T Y! , m of Shiple go co-ed. Summer 1971-Radio-TV and Journalism become Media Studies. .rf M13 my . rifir- I ff - ' I, I' 'ff f :+I f lr cr 0' . , --4--4 - .27 1 "1-I - 3 lx? 1 .2 Jw, x '--134. ,. 'H time """1,- ' ' 1 - " 9wYi'.'.fc 1 '- ' estate'- .. . 1 T Hg ' ' 1 -' V W "ll-H 'NNY-T' - , jf' ,f C fifgyfeir i--.- 1 1 A .- . ' . as--fy ,, .. i, , J-A - 1, ' if 555 ex' March 25, 1972-Fencers win the NCAA cham- pionship, the first such ti- tle in any sport at U-D. Tyrone Simmons is first in foil for the second time. July 1, 1972-Richard Braun is July 1972-Rev, Paulinus appointed Dean of the Law School. For th efl S.J. d s o e, , an Dr. Michael Blend, of the Biology Department, are awarded a three-year, 890,000 grant by H.E.W. to study the effects of drugs on mice. Aug. 11-14-A car produced by a team of engineering students wins top honors in two categories of the Urban Vehicle Design competition held at the General Motors Proving ground. -1--v-H17, tuition 5B1700!yr. 1971 1972 DlNAlX PARKING WOODRUFF BECKER STADIUM LGT APPOINTED NAMED DEMOLISHED WITH PROVOST ASSOCIATE A 311,700,000 FEE DEFLCIT REPLACES DOME ANNOUNCED STADIUM RAZED L PROVOST Wun- Sept 18 F1fty USG and resldence hall students Sept 10 Sen Tlm Beck Sept 11T1m and the madequate attempts to censure Beck w1thdraWs campus secur1ty S n Mlchael Can ar f and for Jeapordlzlng Sept 15 Elton e reputat1ons of many Ace Anderson IS named other 1nd1v1duals 1n USG new fencmg coach. Sept loses o eve an a e but beats Walsh College 26 29 flow score wmsj CROSS UNIVERSITY COUNTRY WEEK ADD DROP TEAM OPENS FIRST PERIOD BEGINS US G DAY SEASON RESIDENCE CLASSES STUDENTS T Oct. 3-Soccer team Sept. 25-Club Soccer team defeats Detroit Institute of Technology 4-0 in the season opener. S9PY- 25jAtt01'nQY Sept. 30-Cross Country Melvin Belli speaks in Wins by forfeit the Student Union to Saginaw Valley- Ballroom. beats Eastern Michigan 1-0. Oct. 28z3- The Detroit News editorial "U-D's Dramatic Recovery" and the Detroit Free Press Sept. 298r30-Soccer team beats gedltoflal UU? BHPk U-M CDearbornJ 3-0 and Lawrence ln the Black Pfalse Institute of Technology 1-0. budget Surplus- Oct. 11-Cross Country beats Lawerence Institute 21-35. Oct. 7-Cross Sept. 26-The State Board of Education approves 25-After two of financial resulting in cut-backs and freeze, a sur- 0 n f EB427,000 is ced. Black Studies teaching minor. This will allow instructors Sept. 28-Adrian Headley, citing health reasons and lack of time to prepare his disseration, resigns as head of Media Studies. Larry White, assistant professor in the department is named acting chairman. to teach it in high Country defeats Oakland 21-34, but loses to Ferris State 50-15. ls. Oct. 10-USG speaker series features Dick Gregory. A---vii OCTOBER 28Z9W123456789w S422 000' UNIVERSITY DICK BUDGET WEEK GREGORY SURPLUS CLOSES SPEAKS ANNOUNCED HEADLEY QCEJSEER RESIGNS UPENS iiiianirx STUDIES SEASON CHAIRMAN 25 26 27 IN BALLROOM Oct. 14-Cross Country defeats John Carroll 27-29. Oct. 17-Soccer team beats Wayne State 3-1. Oct. 19-The student senate cuts all powers of finance from USG President Mike Robinson, with a 6-5 vote. Oct. 14-Gordon igglggfgoixfiisgfgigi Oct. 17-A two foot by five Building foot green and white sign, ' declaring the location of the Department of Public Safety, "appears" in front of the Student Union. 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19,2 Oct. 28-29-James Gang and Jerry Butler concerts. second in Nov. 3,4,5-Soccer team finishes the Eastern Michigan Invitational Tournament. Nov. 1-USG Student Senate elections are held. Over 600 votes are cast. ' Oct. loses Oct. 24-Soccer 28-Cross Country to Hillsdale 50-15. Nov. 3-Cross Country loses to Wayne State 49-15. Nov. 5-Linda Jeness, the Socialist Workers Party presidential candidate, team beats NOV- 3-RGHO Hall speaks to less than a dozen Wayne state 3-1, Coffee House re-Opens students in the ballroom. Oct. 21-Cross Country places Oct' g8'SQcCer team loses NOV- 6-D12 Lawrence Calllaf- seventh in the Grand to University of Michigan 3-1. dean of the College of Valley Invitational Tournament. Oct. 21-Soccer team loses to Lawrence Institute of Technology 5-2. 21222324252627-28293031-1 2 3 sse 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Oct. 21- Participants in the "First Annual Stroh's Pitch-In Line Up" accumulate 1800 bags of leaves, litter and cans. St. Francis Club takes S300 first prize. Nov. 2-The National Pro- Life Coalition and U-D Students Against Abortion hold a rally in front of the Student Union. The demonstration follows two weeks of lobbying on cam- pus. Engineering, dies of a heart attack at his home. .i S Wi' 'filth Una'-'14 KS, me mi' ara Nov. 8,11,12-Soccer team tak -r -.-,.- ,ff - ir ff i ' 45 fl.- ux l ,flu X l Q 4-554-A-fray' ' '1 m '- " -5' iii , . srl' X -1 3 'fwxg I Q, 1-2 . " -- , 5' L .5 I. .5 .J sl"-1--L -.- mx, ' first place in U-M CDearbornJ Invitational by defeating U-M CDearbornl 1-0, U-M CAnn Ar- borl 3-2 and Central Michigan 3-2. . NOVEMBER FIRST USG CROSS CLUB ANNUAL SENATORIAL COUNTRY SOCCER STROH'S ELECTIONS PITCH-IN WITH WITH 10- 3-1 Nov. 17-Dick Halloran is named new director of residence halls replacing Mike Steenberge. Nov. 14-Sociology instruc- tors Jack Bloom, Joyce Stephens, Angela Kennedy and Ralph Kresojevich are notified that their contracts will not be renewed at the end of the year. Carleton W. Smith, Sociology Depart- ment head, is relieved of his position as chairman by ASLS dean John Mahoney. The decisions are followed by student demonstrations, a USG Senate resolution and a Nov 16th 't ' th . si -in on e fifth floor of the Ad- ministration building. FIFTH FLOOR FISHER 6 5 RECORD RECORD NATIONAL SIT-IN ELECTIONS BUILDING Dec. 9-The basketball team defeats the Ugiiiiersity 9 7 -77 Nov. 21-Provost James W. Woodruff Dec.. 4-Four O iglgggnime. is called "a stunning Detroit Police Dec. 5-The basketball symbol of the new STRESS officers are team beats Wisconsin 100k in Jesuit, education" shot at LiVeI'IlOiS State 81-49. in 3 lvlgiflgugllagazini article god IlgtoN1o?o15 Dec. 16-The basketball team entit e " e Rema ing w ie a emp ing - . 1 t M' h' 74-65. of the Jesuit Colleges." . to invesffgats lgrfsffiiigiglhsefggglng Squad Oses O lc lgan Author Robert Blau Kalsofv dm Zneiagii the 1973 Season in the December 16-The School of Dentistry gufgilgg gfiugzhtement g p ' Illinois Invitational . becomes the third school in by Saying that he is Dec. 1-,Iwi Schqol Tournament at Champaign. the UASbtJcZtf1suE fortyfone' Prgtestant of Law Celebratqs Its Dec. 12-The Varsity News' satire Dental Science and divorced. 60th anniversary with a t- f t de ee in less sec ion ea ures gr banquet at Coho Han' Craig Newman as than four years. 20-USG sponsors Former justice of the nude centerfold. Wonder, 'War and George Wllhams ln is guest Speaker. Dec. 8-An underground cable breaks between the Chemistry and Science buildings, leaving the campus without power for about 45 minutes. the Supreme Court, Arthur J. Goldberg Nov. 27-29-Omega Psi Phi and the Center for Neighborhood Relations sponsor free sickle cell tests. , 1 Dec. 2-The varsity basketball team opens with a win against Hillsdale 47-46. DECEMBER 212223 2425262728291-3012345678910111213141516 THAN KSGIVING BASKETBALL SEMESTER RECESS TEAM ENDS CAMPUS FIRST WONDER, WAR, BLACKOUT 'ACCELERATEU' WILLIAMS DENTISTRY IN CLASS CONCERT GRADUATES Dec. 20-San Francisco State falls to the basketball team 72-42. Dec. 22-Carlton Smith files suit against the University in Wayne County Circuit Court. The action demands his "re-instatement as h ' f th c auman 0 e Sociology Department or S750,000 damages." is 5 M f Jan. 3-The basketball team loses to Loyola of Chicago 77-68. Jan. 2-Gov. Milliken signs into law a bill to increase from S800 to S1200 the maximum tuition grant available to Mic igan students attending state independent colleges and universities. , .lm ..- Y. Dec. 29, 30-The basketball team beats Denver 84-79, and Massachusetts 75-59, to win the Motor City Classic. . ,' 1, - , I ...L 3 Ag. Qi 1' - X " . . 1, Jan. 6-The basketball team loses to Louisville 76-58. .p 011- ' -3 '31 '.-17" ' ' - ..-4 - --- Jan. 4-Coach Jim Harding S11SP9HdS Center Jan. 10-The basketball Gerald Smith and b forward Owen Wells St, P33-I: 77TgZ? indeiinitel Y f f . Vciglgllfogg Jan. 10-Forward Preston Pace is declared ineligible to play b k tb ll f failing to meet as e a or university requirements as a full-time student. JANUARY 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 BASKETBALL MICHIGAN SECOND TEAM TAKES MCTOR CITY CLASSIC TUITION SEMESTE GRANT CLASSES TO BEGIN BE INCREASED TO 551200 456789101 Jan 31 Entues for USG presldentral race are Dee Kemker Harry Mallgrave Jan 27 The basketball team defeats St John s 81 52 Jan 23 Accord1ng to the Jan 27 The fencing lncldent report summary Squad falsos of 1971 72 Don Stevens 1155 Season record dlrector of Pubhc Safety to 4 1 Wlth Vlotoflos has determ1ned over Windsor Jan 17 The basketball J 20 Th a 5421 decrease 26 3 and Toronto 16 11 team beats Western baskgslgau tears rn cr1m1na1 at thoopwvogol? Mlohlgan 57 55 defeats Southern offenses m so Ill 62 60 at from the Jan 13 The Varslty mlzlilrbondale prevlous year Jan 24 The basketball basketball team defeats team defeats Bowl1ng Xavler 79 73 Green 67 65 Jan 22 Ken Fe1t becomes U D s Fool m Resxdence He IS sponsored by Performmg Arts and the Offlce of Campus M1n1stry W- Jan 25J Clark Jan 20 The defendlng NCAA champlon U D fencmg team opens the1r season by beatmg Bowhng Green 25 2 and Tr1 State 20 7 but loses to Wayne State 10 17 14 15 BUDGET COMM TTEE RECOMENDS 3150! YR TUITION INCREASE 16 17 18 19 20 Sm1th adm1ts that although a balanced budget for 1972 73 1S w1th1n reach a 85200 000 def1c1t 1S poss1 e 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 COFFEE HOUSE S200 000 NOW DEFICI WITH POSSIBLE BAR Stephen Nelson J1m Prosser Steve Mason Dale Evans Marty Krall Ray Berels and Tlm Beck Ralph Kmg Feb 1 Basketball team loses to Fa1rf1eld College 67 63 Feb 2 Groundhog Punxsutawney Phll emerges from h1s wmter burrow on Gobbler s Knob 1n Punxsutawney Pa t 7 29 a m and sees h1s shadow pred1ct1ng another s1x weeks of wxntry weather He contradlcts the Detro1t area groundhog who faxled to see h1s shadow Jan 28 USG Senate defeats Canjars Revenue Sharxng Program a rogram deslgned t allocate funds from USG to Student Counclls and other campus orgamzatlons 2829303112 CARBON NAMED N W DETROIT REOPENS N AGAIN STEVENS CHAIRMAN CAMPUS FENCERS BEGIN glgllfvlg 54 f SEASON 2 - 9 . - 3 - , . . " . 3 - 9 ' ' y . 9 . . . I I - , 5 n ' - , ' . . - ' ' . , . . - u , . v , i, a I ' . - I . . .n .1 1 , ' ' - - 1 ' " U 4 . . , K , ' , - V , . , . n I Y p ' O 9 J , ' ' - 9 - I L. " ' 1 ' ' . I aka ri' m l- o n f ' . I - ' -H s- - - I I I - - , - sid . I I , . may ' 1 U y gl ' ' I ' I . . z 2' ' M A Viv: ' - 0-0.4321-,,55fA . ,', , a 9 " rw . - - qi ..J ' ' C N . J f cc ' 77 Feb. 24-Basketball team Fb.21-B ktb llt . - zpeb. 13-Btasketbau beats Ifoyola ofighfcago 6933? beats Southern Ill1no1s 60-57. eau? ea S Mar. 4-Fencers - . A . 20-A ?liaZl,Z,t?g1g1 Feb. 14-Basketball Feb. 24-Fencers beat beat the Umv- investigation , ' team beats Bellarmine Michigan State 22-5 and of Buffalo 18'9 Tower "books" bogi F b 10 F College 83-69. University of Illinois and Walk out begat Ncitremlggliiie 14 13 and fchicago Circle, 18-9 of the Ibletili Cfter M 214 B k tb 1 ' 0 339 8l'. - HS 6 8 the U111V- Of Chicago 22'5- Western and team loses its last Feb. 17-Basketball Feb- 25-The USG Feb 3 Basketball Feb. 11-A North Quad girl team loses to ,, Senate stgiglggrllg ifyvcsfiiiirciirirggnifrsiy eam loses to St- is stabbed by her suitemate Marquette 77-55- 0911511192 to fence 84,70 and Duquesh Bonaventure 58-57. driringl an fwlrgument over and condemnlsle them. 73-70: respectively. a ou y p aylng s ereo. , Feb 2 3-Fencers Feb. 17-U-D triples its Varsity M , 1-0 950 t . beat Milwaukee Feb. 17-Fencers existing scholarship News- Gag: in a gfgse Stggjlftar Tech 21-6, University 1056 to the U111Ve1'S1ty ro ams b rovidin ' , . . P gl' Y D S Government election. of Wisconsin 17-10 Of 111111018 15j12, b11t 85 new four-year Feb. 24-Mar. 3-A Tim Beck and Ralph Kin and Ohio State 18-9. beat WISCOTISIH grants worth one quarter 100 million year are Chosen to be USG ' Feb 4-Malcolm Carron appears on Let's See program at 10 a.m. on WJBK-TV, Channel 2. The show examines guidelines by which leading Detroiters make decisions. Feb. 7-Donald Stevens, director of Public Safety, leads a drug raid on a sixth floor room in Shiple. Two students are busted Parkside 17-10. of a million dollars, which will be awarded primarily on the basis of high school performance. old four-ounce moon rock is displayed in the library as part of the Copernicus Exhibition. Feb. 17-The Board of Trustees elects two members, including its first woman, Mrs. Stephen Fuller of T 1 - 45. 'qw' ' "Et s- executives, while controversy surrounds the write-in election of nine Varsity News staff members to the "legislative body." J, and asked Bloomfield H1115-Thenlaymeh Feb. 19-23-Engineering Week 1973 ,o to leave HOW have 3 9-3 I11aJ01'1ty OVSI' features lectures, panel discussions, ,rs campus. the J6Sl11tS- Ballroom displays and "Fun Day." UARY 1 R S it S ' ' '-I 3678910111213141516171819202122232425262728 Wagga TR E SEAS N ELECTED OPENS TUITION RECCRD HIKE APPROVED BASKETBA 1 TEAM RESTS WITH 16-9 SEASON RECORD MHLOEU5 F RM Fouowg L 5 rw, + Aug 28 1975 After J mmf failing to come up A P, J fxffkfwf' I A151 If with a new name for it F, ,TMGLE , 2 the Administration r Nfgg "ff jf ' FUUCTIQN me fggugggg-f . ff .gli 1.41 1 , bnunvld lfkg I A hav? A fnujlu , 055,1- - ' ' ', , 'U 5' " ' 4-mg connncu- nfumqvln . .I 9 A oo u F-mera: Acme I 4-he canglrucan Sdn' ' 'Ni' 'G' vman.. . 4 N ' ' --l"2""aJrif ' ' "'C"""5f2- HF ' 3 C C I Chef avfr human . . . , U f MJ .ffl d M P . fm a-lan , "' ' decides to drop the I 'I' Media Studies department 1973-The Oct. 7, 1975-J. Clark Smith, Treasurer and Vice-President in charge of Business and Budgeting, announces a S565,482 budget surplus and promises a tuition increase to maintain it. 1974 19 1977-Architecture, Environmental Studies and Knowledge expands . . . Apr. 30, 1978-Malcolm and Carron announces his decision 'X May 1, 1978-Father Becker, Vice President in charge of the Provost, not to seek another 12-year expresses interest in Carron's job, gets term as University President. citing the successful changeover faculty t th D D ' ZS stem o e ewey eczma y of cataloguing in the library and J . 1976-E ll t d . . . its name an mo men rops 23127 as proof of his capabilities. Apr. 1979-Tim Beck is named Dean of Student Affairs. Dec. 1980-The Titans make Cobo Arena their home court, but fail to draw any more fans than before. r.TiL.x1.s.nar:...-Q.' . . I Sept. 3, 1977-The University celebrates 't t n ' I b r fl- . ' ' . . 1 'ht . v V . ff4.Z2'i.'a:,f ' L if ' K ' . rfb. .ix L 9 'f 'I' " wx , fy I :L xx -Y I, E.--I ,, ,Q ORM-" .4 : 'f I r - . .ffif Li :ft-f:.'. " .21 . "NH .E',S'ff'-'v .' fi" s R lf. ',. . , QQA ' .'--1-1,-.-. 'iff .,"45 3: -5 fir" 7 T, 11 ..-42. ' Lgfffffyig ,313 3532 fr - ' -uf. 1- '.- . ,- '-':-.' -' , " - ,fra 111- - ' "' I' . g M- wr. -muff., L f wr- " 11:-sf ' " ' ' 12 , ,. , w I . b . A g t. , Engng, L 'w I ! Q ,Q-7 'fn ' , ,,- - -' , .9 -J - ,,-H ., I K- 1: 1 'vft' Y: -.., -Fc' r, -Y A, . 1 s cen e ma y ' wwf f,,f',,E., fha.. ,ni ,of , . moving back downtown. kggagi, ,UL W :mul 19 O 1984 1997 2901 GEN TEN IAL BRIGGS TOWER, CELEBRATION BUILDING CSLF, LAW LIBRARY BUILT DOWLING HALL RENOVATED TORN CHEMISTRY DOWN SGIENCE1 ENGINEERING BUILDINGS NEWLY CHGSEN DEMOLISHED DQVYILIEE - A PRESIDEN TS RERENOVATED FIRED tuition S1950!yr. tuition 32100fyr. tuition S2500!yr. tuition S3000000000000000000000000000000000000O0 x 1 1 1 L 1 I '51 1 1 X ' 1111 - 1 in 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 11 11 11 111 11 I I 1 , V .1-P. . -hgpfig .,-. ik. Q - V wffv-4 '-1. . , 1 ' 5 T , 1 . D vie, . L., iff- E1 M 1 T.f"1i-.' 5-Arai 'L A N -pu-3.3, R. ,, :HH , 2-if 4 1 ADMINISTRATIVE METAMORPHOSIS The administration at the University of Detroit un- derwent many changes beginning in October, 1970. At that time, U-D President, the Rev. Malcolm Carron, S.J., announced that the University had in- curred a 81.3 million deficit. In the two years that followed a job and wage freeze was instituted, and personnel was decreased. Budget cuts were made in every department, and a tuition increase went into effect for the 1972-73 school year. The presidentis staff gradually changed from five vice-presidents to one. In the spring of 1972 the remaining vice-president, Dr. James Woodruff, was named acting president during Fr. Carron's absense due to illness. Later the administration reorganized. The title of vice-president was gone, and new people were promoted and given lesser titles. Dr. Woodruff became the first provost in the history of the University, and Dr. Henry Maloney, from the division of teacher education, was named dean of faculties. Fr. Paul Becker, S.J., was added to the new administrative team as associate provost. By the end of September, 1972 the financial picture began to look brighter. This time Fr. Carron had good news to announce-a S427,000 surplus. 47 u IJNIVI-IRSITV SEN ATE BOARD OF TRUSTEES MIII'1lI..Ill'.Ih'lHI.V I'IlMMl'l'l'Ifli s I PRESIDENT 190 VICE PRES. FOR AFFAIRS A 1: lmu.u.1,Jn ADM IN ISTRATIVE urlxzrrr COEKIPYTER NINSTITUTIUNM- UNIVERSITY RELATIONS II If III '.v.w. .Q .1 VICE PRES. FOR VICE PRES. FOR AQADI-IMI ' AFFAIRS L .lx .u.1.r.m,w.x I.: VICE PRES. FOR BUSINESS AFFAIRS I M IIl.X'I'lFI II REAN OF STUDENT FFAIRS I' II' hII.lIIIIII'Ix' Illll. I'lI!'S.l'LAN'l' H F lllIH'II'l'llK Illll. PHIIS. ANU ANI! SEV. 1'nVN'II!Hl.I.I-.Il I'I'III'IlA:4INII AUX. AI"l'. 5:1 'l'Ifl'I'!.IMI fl 'I IJHISIIIW ll-I 'VIIHNIII VSICI fl I' !'I'CI4llI 'I xxxnlevrolx rrzxwn RFSISMICH .1 4' s.vl1'n .1 ,1.I.w.w H F mm,I.v 1 UIRECTUR OF DIR. YUNUS DIIK. l lJIKI'1'l'0R DF llllll' LTIYII ,ummm m:vr:I.oPMI-:N1- unwmnrruxasm- ummns vvm u Im Il -I Ml 'NRA I' W Il I'J KHNNAN .U II II WINE I 'II IIIN luwmw.1's11 CI-INTER FOR ASSUC. DIR. UF A5500 IJIII. 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' 'I', ,f' N ' I 1 .' :I xrl: l: Il'l.'x I - :M-,IV 7153 NK ' ' ' ' ' Malcolm Carron-An Interview with the Preside 6 G MANY UNIVERSITIES COULD BE LOCATED IN CITIES AND STILL NOT BE URBAN UNIVERSITIES. BUT WE WANTED TO BE A UNIVERSITY THAT REALLY PARTICIPATED IN THE AGONIES AND THE TRIUMPHS AND THE LIFE OF THE CITY., 9 50 TOWER: Father, could you explain the directior which the University is going? CARRON: First of all, we are going to remain 2 l grow as a university. In no way are we going to t around so much that we can go back to a simple, ' complex, college-type education. different kind of university. You have a kind proto-type American university in a university t heavily stresses research and graduate educat Ours is different in the sense that we are beginnin Secondly, I have always stressed that we wen i u l resemble a new model. And that is an urban-type ' iversity. In the future you aren't going to compare Harv. and the University of Detroit. They're going to two different models, that's all. Many universities could be located in cities and s not be urban universities. But we wanted to be a ' iversity that really participated in the agonies 2 the triumphs and the life of the city. And thirdly, we're trying to be a new type religiously oriented university--with a new type Jesuit thrust. from the way it used to be with the vice preside CARRON The administration If you take it in broadest concept, is all the deans and the depz ment chairmen, too. But I think you're referrin what I call my staff-the people who work at elbow everyday and act like a cabinet. First of they're a much younger group than I had before z TOWER: How is the new administration differ . . . - . r E 4 4 FR. BECKER HAD COME IN, AND HE WAS INTERESTED IN COMING TO US IN ALMOST ANY CAPACITY. AND I HATED TO SEE HIM GO, SO I APPOINTED HIM AN ASSISTANT TO DR. WOODRUFF. , , place-a kind of coordinating thing. So let's appoint two people, with your approval. And we'll call one provost and the other dean of faculties. So they agreed on Dr. Woodruff and Dr. Maloney. Fr. Becker had come in and he was interested in coming to us in almost any capacity. And I hated to see him go, so I appointed him an assistant to Dr. Woodruff. TOWER: Concerning the surplus, could you explain what areas were involved in budget cuts? CARRON: It was mostly people. First of all, 70 per- cent of our budget is salaries, in one form or another. So when you look through your budget, looking for places to cut, you don't go to the equipment. If you want to save big money, you start cutting down on your personnel. So when we began to wonder where we were going to get a million dollars out of the budget, we began to look at every department. First in the administra- tion, because we didn't want to hurt any of the quali- ty of the University, and later, in the departments. We did a lot of this, not so much through wholesale firings so much as letting people retire or retiring them right on the day of their birthday. And when people went away on their own we didn't replace them. So altogether we had about 55 positions that were not filled or people released in one and a half years. We didn't give any raises and the faculty accepted that. So that saved us some money. TOWER: Father, where are students being drawn from now and where do you expect to draw them from in the future? CARRON: Of course, most of our students are still coming from the city of Detroit and the metropolitan area. We have an increasing number coming from the suburbs because people are moving to the sub- urbs. As our number of black students increases, suppose they're going to come from the metropolita or inner city area. I think there will be a slight increase in the numbe of students from out of state as our professiona schools' reputations increase. I would like to hav students-as nice a mix of students-as I coul possibly get. You know, foreign students, student from the east. 6 6 I MAY BE THE ONLY PRIEST IN THE COUNTRY probably less experienced. But they're very dynamic people, and I see them acting much differently, es- pecially in dealing with students. TOWER: What about your job, Father. How is it changed? CARRON: lt's a little less office work and more P.R. fpublic relationsl and fund raising. Everyday I'm here, putting things together in my own way, and then kind of moving out as the day wears on. I've been downtown already today a couple of times and in and out. I've been to three large foundations in the last couple of days, and I spend an awful lot of time with New Detroit. I'm on the board of the Chamber of Commerce, and I spend some time there. I may be the only priest in the country that's on a Chamber of Commerce and nobody knows howl got there. TOWER: How were the titles provost and associate provost arrived at? CARRON: I wanted to kind of start all over again in building our structure. You see, the positions didnlt change. You still have four people in key positions. You can't monkey around to the extent of not having somebody in charge of students, somebody in charge of the academic program, somebody in charge of business and somebody in charge of public relations. So these four positions were always there. They used to be called vice-presidents. They aren't anymore mainly because we had younger people in them, and I wanted them to grow into something. The provost WHO'S ON A CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, AND NOBODY KNOWS How 1 GOT THERE., ' could have been called an executive vice-president. But we chose the name provost because schools are beginning to use that phrase more. TOWER: How were Dr. Woodruff, Fr. Becker and Dr. Maloney chosen? CARRON: Dr. Maloney and Dr. Woodruff were chosen by a search committee. At first we were look- ing for a man called academic vice-president. And I was sick at the time and remember, I had to appoint Dr. Woodruff acting president. And I said Cto the search comrnitteej, even if I recover 100 percent, why not have him in that 5 5 SOMETIMES, IT'S INTERESTING, BECAUSE OF THE WAY BLACK STUDENTS CONGREGATE, YOU'D THINK WE WERE ALL BLACK. I CAN LOOK OUT MY WINDOW SOMEDAYS, AND I DON'T SEE ANY WHITE STUDENTS? Our racial mix is pretty good now. I found out the other day that we're still about 16 percent black, or minority they call it. It's not all black, but mostly. And that's pretty good. Sometimes, it's interesting, because of the way black students congregate, you'd think we were all blacks. I can look out my window somedays, and I donit see any white students. And you know all that means, out of the 16 percent, that's about 1500 students. But it's because of the movement, sometimes you get a different impression. TOWER: Father, what would you say will happen to U-D as the city of Detroit changes? CARRON: I think, when you say the city of Detroit changes, it depends on what the changes are. Right now, most people who know anything about Detroit are quite enthusiastic about a kind of Atlanta-type renewal downtown. And if that goes well, the University is going to be a great big successful part of that. That's why we're developing our downtown campus. TOWER: So, is there any chance of consolidating both campuses uptown as it was once planned? CARRON: No. If anything, I'd rather see the whole university move down there. 9 APPOINTEES PRovosT Dr. James Woodruff has held the position of provost since April, 1972. As provost, he is responsible for handling the day to day operation of the University, once the prime concern of the president. Woodruff was brought here to develop the Special Projects program, and he initiated Project 100. He then successfully climbed the administrative ladder in a relatively short amount of time. In 1970 he was made vice-president for academic ser- vices. Following the Administrative restructuring of 1972, Woodruff, as the only remaining vice- president, was an easy choice for acting president when Fr. Carron became ill. Fr. Carron has called him a "strong right arm" and praised his work. In the article entitled "the Remaking of the Jesuit Collegesi' from World Magazine of November 21, 1972, author Robert Blair Kaiser refers to Woodruff , l as a "stunning symbol of the new look in Jesuit 1 education." Kaiser, a former Jesuit, implies that among his most important qualifications for the position are that he is black, Protestant and divorced. Woodruff does not deny that he may be a new sym- bol. However, it is his contention that he was chosen because his philosophical point of view was compati- ble with Carron's and that he had something to con- tribute to the restructuring of the administration. ASSOCIATE PROVOST Associate Provost Rev. Paul A. Becker, S.J. is Dr. Woodruffs assistant. His job is similar but he prefers to call it "more flexible." Fr. Becker came from the New York Province to join U-D's administration because he was familiar with this community. While completing his graduate work at the University of Michigan, he was officially assigned here. r. Becker's areas of responsibility include the com- uter center, the libraries and admissions. e estimates that he spends 80 percent of his time ith admissions because he believes it is "one of the ost important in the areas in the University." He njoys going out to meet with high school counselors nd groups. e has some very definite ideas about recruiting tudents. For instance, he feels that both the strong nd weak points of the University should be com- unicated to prospective applicants. ecommendations from high school counselors mean great deal to him when it comes to accepting tudents. r. Becker is pleased with the computer center and elieves that most students are satisfied with itg owever, he would like to eventually see more tudents involved with it. Sociology and psychology tudents, as well as others who are concerned with atistics should also be using the computers, accor- ing to Fr. Becker. EAN OF FACULTIES r. Henry B. Maloney, dean of faculties, also receiv- his appointment in April, 1972. He is in charge of e academic personnel and is responsible for con- ening the college deans for meetings. r. Maloney also serves as the chairman of the niversity Rank and Tenure Committee. This is the oup that determines when a faculty member shall e tenured, or given a near permanent teaching posi- on, general it is his duty to deal with academic atters that affect the University. The decisions that Dr. Maloney makes concerning the hiring or dismissing of instructors are largely based on recommendations from the various deans. Because of this, he must work closely with all of the deans and be familiar with all the colleges. Although technically he is responsible for the entire University, Dr. Maloney deals more with the McNichols Road campus. Q2.:'..."?"'-' 55 56 i5 Klip ' U D 'Q-x X SOCIOLOGY The dismissal of four faculty members, and the demotion of the -- department chairman in November, can only serve to undermine the Sociology Department. We were given no reasons for the actions which seems to imply that it was purely an administrative move that blatantly neglects our interests as students. .N D-I The instructors have an extensive background in work with the community. They were instrumental in developing a sociology curriculum which was urban oriented. It remains to be seen in what direction We will be headed. MEDIA STUDIES We have become immune to the numerous organizational changes which We have been subjected to over the past three years. These changes have failed to alleviate our problems. Administrative funds are still lacking and the department is understaffed. A full-time faculty of six cannot handle the large number of students now enrolled. The department is once again in the process of implementing some changes. Classes have been consolidated to include six hour lab courses which will start next fall. Journalism students will prepare a lab newspaper in the typing room which will be built in the Smith Building, While Radio-T.V. students will have more time for production. Also, a professional advisory committee has been established. 57 X Ya ff ,X W ww , wi W4 pssqqx w.. U QSD cloei At first we were surprised to hear that Adrian Headley had resigned and Larry White was now acting chairman. However, the reaction quickly changed to 'it was about time'. Our department has seen many changes in the last few years. We hope this decision brings stability. 60 Student support was active in the heat of the controversy but mterest quickly dropped after the Thanksgiving break. Finals and Christmas vacation seemed to get in the way. Recognition that the re-instatement of the faculty was a dead issue soon became apparent. We still feel that an injustice has been done to us and we remain distrustful of administrative decisions. Our only alternative is educating ourselves on the issue of freedom vs. repression in preparation for future encounters. qi"-has-, " "'-12, 4 'vf 11 fi 9 1 r J X mfg, ' fE'f'1 ,P 1 I .I I 'Xl W II BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION The Business College has at its core a conservative faculty and student body. We have one of the largest enrollments on campus, which few people realize because we are not the newsmakers. The curriculum is efficiently run and the co-op program is excellent. The classes offered give us an opportuni- ty to grasp all the aspects of the business world, While providing an in-depth study of our particular fields, which range from accounting to management science. An important asset of the college is the availability of the co- op program. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in it, since they can find jobs in which to apply some of their theoretical knowledge while gaining valuable insights in their fields. The experience is also an aid when seeking out prospec- tive employment upon graduation. 63 64 The curriculum is generally very strict. Occasionally even our electives are closely scrutinized, which leaves room for interaction with other eges on campus. We tend to operate as an entity within ourselves. However, the recent shift from pure finance theory to emphasis on the con- sumer has produced some changes. Many students are now choosing classes in the social sciences and mass communication to give them a deeper understanding of social psychology and interaction. People in business tend to be conservative, and the college echoes these sentiments. We develop a perspective from which to study changes and predict outcomes. You'll see few business students with long hair and fewer still involved in protests. That is just not our nature. We see jobs to be accomplished and do them quietly and efficiently. Our future jobs will be behind a desk. It seems that we are preparing ourselves for that outcome by developing business- like attitudes. 66 , mfr. l ' F ' NP 67 es ARCHITECTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES The School of Architecture has gone through many revisions in its curriculum in the past two years. Now we can obtain an Environmental Studies degree after four years of pre-architecture, with the option of continuing in a master's program for a degree in architecture. Most students feel that a bachelors degree is not sufficient, and continued study is almost imperative. ENGINEERING What the Engineering College has to offer is high tuition, a co-op program and a close-knit, forward-looking faculty. What keeps us here despite the cost and recently lagging co-op opportunities, is the tremendous faculty interest in the students, the innovative techniques and the classes offered. The curriculum is tough and comprehensive, covering virtually every aspect of engineering. Dean Canjar was among the first to recognize the current need for the socially conscious engineer. He was instrumental in introducing the Sloan Project to senior engineering students. This project focuses on a specific problem in the city. This year the project is analyzing the Fire Department. For two semesters, the seniors study the department and by the end of the year will offer various plans for its improvement. The project emphasizes people, so socio-economic factors need to be considered along with traditional engineering. Projects seem to multiplv, and due dates are somehow always yesterday ,....n.--.-. 4n.,.L,-.Q. . ' -x :-fr xi, " As engineering students, we are aware of the social stigma which surrounds the profession. The engineer is far from solely responsible for the environmental ills which have increasingly plagued the quality of life. The average man is bombarded daily by air and water pollution. He faces rush hour traffic and blames it on poor road planning, and sees the engineer as the cause. Engineering is simply not looked upon as an honorable profession. Somehow society feels that we are responsible. -s Hg gf? ff K. n if si? 5 null 'lf ing-i-535, Few people seem to realize that these problems can only be solved by an engineer. The trend will change, and we will be ready when it does. The Engineering College is striving for a medium between the socially conscious and the technically able person who is willing to accept responsibility. G K' 'X-i'.Q-E-'11 Our work is generally of a graphic nature, which needs time and concentration. Development of thought is constantly occuring because removal from the actual situation requires imaginative insight. Use and function of design is emphasized to give form and structure to assigned projects -V as ,7 In the past few years, we have seen an increasing emphasis placed on the study of subject matter heretofore considered beyond the scope and outside the realm of classical architecture. The new curriculum, a result of collaborative decision-making between students, faculty and professionals from related disciplines, reflects a profound concern for the pressing environmental problems facing mankind today, and is structured with the hope of affecting such an awareness in all of us. MM -.v ii yay 'W FK, .I f Primarily our work is divided among books paper work and the laboratory. The basic plan is to afford us an opportunity to relate problems to practical matters. Gradually more emphasis is placed on projects which require time and patience, but provide groundwork and experience in problem solving. Last year the Urban Vehicle Design Project worked on emission control. Once a problem has been defined and analyzed, we must begin to work toward a solution. gf 13-1 Qi, We Recently, many students have not been considering engineering as a profession. The noticeable drop in enrollment over the past few years is not a picture of what the college has to offer. What we as engineers want is a good, comprehensive program, and that is what We get here. Classes are still tough, and the work load is heavy. We still believe that our role is important and that it takes a special breed of man to be an engineer. 534 X vf N, Q M ,sy L. Q 1' ai xi, , -' ':" gk A . 155'- - . V 1:: U N A, 1 , ' . -, Q. Eg , . " 1 25 1 , . ,- H... .W ,... -wwf , . ,..fL.ge-f,- -. ' 5 x ' 1 aj 1 s N N . - QNXYA M' gf 1' ,,. . 3. I 7 ,HE fr U EW it , 1 V. E ...fy , W? x,,.v.. . . .11 5, Q' 1 QP' 1,-.Y ,,,. H, fu ...wguw , 41... A .41 N , . ,xx - -..- X I N ,- ,.- 7'1-1 ,- 9 ..A , 1 , : LL- " , V, , '.'? '7'V , - .. ., 1 I ' if JP 1--QE , f ..,.fw ,A v fn Ei... Fifi fl'-'z ' " - I' . 'ma' , Y. 'Ii W, 5 YT1 1 ,A 'f7?""f"?' ' " " u. . 1 - t ' vt, Z A " Q,F '9.'f:f5pQi ?? , If V I '--1.335 Y V ' "V dl an 'jugs .W ' I ' H - .-'akliif "'.' T x 1 , ,-ft. if f, 3 fill" L. V ' ,.,.41 . , Lv',, ff A I ff ff I ff S . I 'W 4 , wi. fu, 'in' ,S 'fm R ,bil ""um' if "Q W, ,lI,'1,.,i7'k, 4 lil 1 . 1 L if-1 S ,. 1 4.1! - A .vi ' V a wa LQ!! 4.4.4. - Qi,:,. in Sv' 1 --T --4,1 gf --waitin 1 Q2-f h '- my ?9Li-5:1j.Wfi?!r- li - --4-... W 1 1" ---J- , 1, w .Ili ""'l'E"" " mu nv 'f"'!ll 1 W 'B Q -,. ,Q H L Y W 1 Y I sr 15 w , vs -- -.,,,-v .X fl --.-5 X, 1-Xi-X Y N xii -S. 19' -'A A VN,-Ji, if,- . - IL- 'Q' K'-,tim 56"- .W EI'- Alii' ' I . ,P rg K, '9-Au' 'r fs- B 9 , -' ' jf' 'Tug R -N 4, , if' , 1 , -,A nf V --5 ul 'XX fx 7' x f " Q- X -. 1 ,. ? I 1 Q '-'7 1 " Hs :V -L I " Q-I , t .A 1 Lr xx X ' Q , .1 41? 7--M x M f - : M1 - ' l' ff-X .ff--"4 ff 3 1 . ,.,,- . . 1- .f ... ,f , , - , ., , v -- 1- '-Q...4' xfv -Vf . XX S ' 1 5 X 12 Q ,, I yy -. i is, I NV- -. - f-T ,,,.- f -4 ..1 Q . ,- . -' ,.-:ww-, ff . ,jg . -.' A 5,-1, : I me i .fl-3 ll- 1 O-I v xi 'Gif . wc x 'N-1 -L -, A z W Y Y, ,wa 'qwff ,Nam ' iff? ' . :H--Av",'1, A 1 'q . vi, ,.--, . I ' 462,11 W1 lllllll -Q ,.g1'::LY.gggg '27 1 wx X YY-l :A I ' :Ag mfjwp, I 1-If Y NYE? x W, ,V . w . ,Azz w .rf- The physics department provides us with an ideal learning situation. The upper division classes are small, and students receive individual attention. We have an excellent faculty, and the equipment is plentiful, though rapidly becoming out-dated. Students in other sciences are encouraged to have a background in physics so the department is a catalyst for many of the colleges. PHYSICS PSYCHOLOGY One of the basic elements in understanding man is psychology. In the department, on the undergraduate level, time is spent in the study of man with particular emphasis on patterns of reoccuring behavior. In the past few years, other colleges and departments have recognized the need for such study and recommended it to students. We think that the study of psychology as a recognized science is near. S51 , ,., ,,, , I' 'Silk-.M -g, yen, 1, L. l V Q3 A L Jw W 'ri , .x L -1 v-sw,-fan-1-Q' 5.- MW. X v gd. is - I l Smallness is an asset to the math major. Working in abstract theory demands a personal involvement of the student with a problem. You need to get close to math and the small number of majors in this field get opportunity to closely scrutinize problems with help of instructors. Working in the psychology clinic gives us a chance, as graduate students, to study actual cases under the supervision of qualified faculty. We handle three patients a year. Doctors and ministers are our sources for referral. 'Q .l, PQ. iii: " Eu U1 ny V - - . VET in ,mx PN, X 5- -sv- 47 -r ' r' B 'Yi A 5, K ! WW' Q ' Y N -SAW-1' .iw ,L1 v""V-!wl,Hlt,-.1"'f. tml. ut .. r ..,,, M , in - lf: . ' J A, 'V A 'E , .4 .1 L..L.'., -- 4. N V N I. 5,1A...:?V,li A .,!.m L. 1,4 HL-1 1. V X r- u "' 1. vu- '-'I .3 ,, gy- -f, -- -5 4...---A---M ' '11 ' " 's MAH ' A "'. . -1:-".f..' ., -- 0 r , ,w. ,-,U ,adams-1: ..., .. w-:1ueeuirsbs-..- a1l:n,qe,4-.-A......f.'..,:.v.um-v-4.11 Quinlan ---V ' ' 1 .Ol 'nn 'll' u The aim of the student in the department is not so much to study philosophy, but to do philosophy. It is insufficient to be acquainted with metaphysical terminology, we must live according to a scheme. How individual philosophies are derived depends on each student: the curriculum is relatively open. The few required courses concentrate on the historical development of thought. Different movements, their circumstances, causes and effects, are analyzed. This general orientation serves to establish preferences and directions which will not only shape further study, but the mode in which we conduct our life. PHILOSOPHY The outlook of the religious community has undergone gradual changes. Lately the tide has swung toward a socially conscious church, and the classes offered echo that change of sentiment. Along with courses studying the bible are classes in women's liberation and discussions on the identity crisis of modern youth. Many courses focus on dialogue. Day to day problems are aired and examined with the intention of presenting frameworks for making personal decisions. 87 f -Q, Q-xfqw? 7 -al-21 -1 -4 ' u.. . ,., 2 , - -V +51-.ff FX, " " 14-,i f V"-it? ' in ' L -3: 3 T1 . :II-5 1 A J " ' ...,...-..--- ' ,qu-i Y! X L X v "3IlMl!lKM P BL 'X' NSN 1 Q L I L.. V D ' n 1 21.2, 1 V .,:.: L, Vx uw Y N VA x 1 ,f pf? xg! , f r . 5 g 5 ' 'L 1: -FQ N 5' , , N 1 f 7 1 7 .: Q ,nxm A I 4 -a ' 'Q - .. , and MF iq.. . . If ' wugflfw' -Q , . wua'-, 1 xy J- .rqrrl .H -1. L" 'S' f ' Y ' 4 ,J ,'., -.,-A -,- .1 Q uu, 'gkmwf hx.-f.-E-f - H' lf' -..,,,-igqgg N an -. ,ggimfls -t I 7, I K "'iFE?'3iE ,.w-4,225 Vw 16 vm il fig rex--' ffm? Q For many students, history is a rather outdated area of study, unlike professional disciplines, its applications are secondary. Yet, the subject seems critical in light of endless appeals to historical precedent. Both the analysis of current events and the projection of trends demand a historical perspective. Because history pervades every discipline, many courses are offered in conjunction with other departments, including philosophy, political science, and religious studies. HISTORY .. ,Q it X. I ' 45" 3,11 l I- is ., ...- .vii-Dhwii ,, in el EJ' .NA ur l.. ..- 1. .H Jn., 'W "E ,,,,. pf. -Xian. . Q' '- ' it 'IQ' .,. .54 m.4', 12 Ng..- 1 , T , 3 -'fr w, s..." ' 1' J.. -.1 f' POLITICAL SCIENCE We examine political institutions and structures of governments. Classes are small, interesting and important for future careers in law or politics. Occasionally, courses are taught by people now holding public office, who give us a first-hand glance into the working of the system. .- www , Wg? . E fn gf H? ! vu W V H 1... n- .,,--mm in ' in AM- ... Strange as it may seem, an English major does not have to be an expert in the use of grammar. We work with the art of communication, studying the thoughts and techniques of masters expressed in writing and film. We learn to understand the moods and tempera- ments of men by reading works of different periods. E GLIPI LA GUAGE We learn more than com- munication skills in the Language Department. Students in the upper division analyze cultures and predomi- nant philosophies of other countries. The training we receive however, severely limits us to either teaching or continuing study at a graduate school. If an interpreting class were offered, acquainting us with different facets of translation, it would broaden our opportunities. 1-:swf 4 gg 4 'EUC 1 Y 52335 xii' 1 Wi? . 'zi The most outstanding feature of the English Department is the quality of the faculty. Most instructors have attained their doctorates, offering the undergraduate a thorough understanding of many fields of literature. Courses are difficult. We are required to read volumes of materials and then synthesize our thoughts onto pages which sometimes approach the length of books. We have a good atmosphere in which to study, and the classes are often discussions which gives us time to air our ideas. 'af - 'M u ry- ,,,....A.. "-0 IIILZIIIIU. .e gr H ,,,,,.,r .- , 5-.,r.-,,,,,,, ,, EEN S. A gr 1, J xiii, is as Q-ai: 4- nature and applications of are the subject matter of Topics include animal unication and body language. nerally courses are inter- isciplinary, mostly appealing to l tudents majoring in psychology ducation and English. , As future teachers we encounter the classic complaint that education courses give little insight into the teaching profession. Gener ally, discussion-centered classes are most effective because we ana- lyze responses to s1tuat1ons we feel we would be unable to handle. Unfortu- nately classes of this type are scarce. The best experience, however, is student teaching. During this time we are free to experiment with our own ideas and lmplement those We have been taught. TEACH EDUCATIO ,I F-.W Q, My gi I N . .5 fl 1 W. ,, ff .5 ,....9 Z nr "-- AQ? CONSQRTIUM IK 'Sid .--v KM- ,W a -K es 1 In 1968 the University of Detroit and Marygrove College joined academic forces and created a cooperative scholastic exchange program. What began with a handful of Art students and a twenty-minute traipse between campuses now involves several shuttle busses, hundreds of full-time students, and the bandying of thousands of credit hours between the eight institutions which comprise the Detroit Area Consortium of Catholic Colleges. The original decision which led to the merger of the two schools was probably based on factors more financial than academic. Faced with a S5 million operating deficit and decreasing applications for enrollment, the consolidation proved wise, and the program began to expand with enthusiasm. The numerous and complex procedures which once plagued registration are annually condensed, while the scope of course offerings is widened to attract students in every discipline from Environmental Studies to Criminal Justice. 1OO sexg is 1 .,,g. x 2 ,JS :fa if gals' Qx L VH? - s if QU!! ME E- I z f .,f"' Egg, E gg. ,rf ji . H pi' Q.: -A fg- ' ff:--. 1?HEQ?S" '3,ir ' '7 A ty i CR , ' ' ' ' at Er .,. ggi. '--,pn -Mm ,if ...L I M 1 s 545,45 :Ugg Iii ,E :nw Lizylf, x Q 4 1 Z HM I- ' N L W ,, X! - .,...,. V E-5, V I nf 1 1 J. Q if 4 f Ill! 102 i if W, KX 'S 9' Zi . f , J ca ,K , .V 4' ef if ' ' B lg Q? HEMI The IDEAL college for YOUR daughter TTL" M RYGRO E COLLEGE DETROIT QA 'National Catholic College for Women THE IVIARYGROVE IDEA wt-nr ga to cauqet Wim a. College rom wim were at are Manrcnovrs GIRL? wt... mt .ie oo? The MARYGROVE graduate is a BACHEIDR of ARTS-in our Catholic Culture, an ART means the RIGHT WAY OF DOING A THING-and the degree is granted, not for a mechanical accumulation of "credit hours" or miscellaneous "points," but for the proved possession of those RIGHT WAYS OP DOING THINGS, those ARTS, those POSITIVE and distinctive PERSONAL POWERS that have always characterized the AUTHENTIC Bachelor of Arts. The MARYGROVE GIRL strives to acquire those capacities that constitute, for our day and generation, the SEVEN LIBERAL ARTS: l. THE ART OF BEIAVIOR BEFORE GOD: CATHOLIC CHARACTER, the habit ol SELF- CONTROL through responsiveness to motives de- velu ed lv the knowledge and- love and practice ol our HOLY RELIGION. ' 2. THE ART OF BH'l.AVIOR AMONG DEV: SOCIAI. SUCCESS through thevyower ol PERSON- ALITY and social CHARM. ho have inlueneed you most in life?-people ol Pl:ksoNAu1'Y. that graceful hut dynamic manner or prevailing upon others unto good: that poise. enmposure. grsciuux dignity ul demeanor and rational sell-assunnee thst are nowhere better cultivated than through CAMPUS CONTACTS that reproduce ideal conditions ol CULTURED CATHOLIC SOCIAL LIFE. 3. THE ART OF BKPRESSION: The ruanery ol the MOTHER TONGUE, the spell ol the written and spoken word. msn?1ulsted wit clarity and correctness and some degree o polished elegance and ease. 4. THE ART OF RPASONING: Neo-Scholastic PHILOSOPHY. the only genuine RATIONALISM left in the world today. with its true solution nl the NATURE, ORIGIN and DESTINY of MAN. brought to bear on the burning SOCIAL ISSUES of the hour. THE ART OF HISTORICAL REAUZATION, lor our tum lives, ol the INTEIJJICTUAL GLORIES of our CATHOLIC CULTURAL tradition. through visualized tool of the roposition: CIVILIZATION is the FAITH-the FAITH is CIVILIZATION. 'I1'IE ART OF LEISURE: Its utilization and enjoy- ment in later Iile-the development ul CULTURAL INTERESTS to outlast enllege aus. through the knowledge and love ol BOOKS, USIC and ART. THE ART OF MAKING A LIVING: Providing eve induate with the POWER. when need arisel. ol rSE F-SUPPORT-through the acquisition ol a SPECIALIZED SCIENTIFIC T HNI UE enabling the raduste to become a of Sdatsol Tunis. , Woekn. Banking or Ensndal Espssfs Anangu. Buses Seaes:-y.,lounlk,Lilaruisss.Anh, Main, Staind Wife lad Mother in I Ii Cllhoie Hail. FACULTY-Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart nl' Mary, assisted by a corps of distinguished lay and clerical professors, all with higher university degrees. SUPERBLY APPOINTEJ laboratories, libraries, studios, conservator-iea and museums. MARYGROVE CAMPUS, beautifully wooded, eighty-acre park in an exclusive residential section of Detroit, alfords ample scope for golf, tennis, hockey, skating, archery. horseback riding and other healthful athletic sports. DETROIT, at the door of MARYGROVE, provides, under proper supervision, all the multiple oppor- tunities, social, intellectual, artistic, of a great metropolis. Foe CATAIOGUE, address the SECRETARY, MARYGROVE OOLLEGE, DETROIT, MICH. GEORGE HERMANN DERRY, Pls.D., LLD. President 1929 TOWER 1 O5 06 IQERFORMING ARTS l The Consolidated Performing Arts Center is a merger of the Speech and Drama Department at Marygrove College and the Department for the Per- forming Arts at U-D. The Center's major concern is presenting to the community quality dramatic productions, while providing its students with the training and experience needed to become professionals. One result of this dual purpose is the balance achieved in casting the plays. Students are selected for appropriate parts, yet the Center also has a large company of local performers who fill roles such as those calling for mature actors and children. After many years of existing in temporary theatres, including the third floor of the library and a classroom in Life-Science, Performing Arts is now housed in a permanent facility. "The Theatre" was designed by H. E. Thrasher and by technical director Michael Huesman. The structure is a 450-seat open- end thrust stage which incorporates the best features of the Guthrie Theatre in Minneapolis and the Festival Theatre in Stratford, Ontario. The highlight of the 1972 Summer season was Arthur Miller's A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE. Featuring the Center's Guest Artist-in-Residence, David Regal, as Eddie Carbone, the cast was composed of a balance of veteran actors, students from area colleges and universities, and "extras" from the U- DfMarygrove community. This American classic details the violence that erupts as a result of an un- cle's inordinate attachment to his niece. The 1972-73 season opened with ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO 'S NEST, adapted by director James W. Rodgers from Ken Kesey's novel. CUCKOO'S NEST was both critically and popularly received, breaking the record for attendance set last year with CHILD 'S PLA Y. Featuring David Regal, the con- temporary drama, set in a mental hospital, recorded current bias that the members of a society who can't "cope" and are put away are actually sane and human than their "keepers" s THE COMEDY OF ERRORS, by Dominic Missimi and designed by his Nancy, was conceived partly as a result of their long study tour of Europe last year. This far- comedy of mistaken identity was staged as a of clowns, incorporating elements of com- NJ dell'arte and French mime. Mrs. Missimi's done in black, white and brown, and original, shared the clown motif. lay, consisting primarily of students, was one P approximately 250 entries in the Annual American llege Theatre Festival competition. After reliminary judging, the production was one of six lays selected to compete in the Regional CMichigan- ndiana-Ohioj playoffs. Highly praised, THE COMEDY OF ERRORS was recommended to com- pete in April for national honors at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. The second semester opened with John Steinbeck's OF MICE AND MEN, a powerful drama about two men in search of their dream. David Regal played Lennie, the simple-minded strongman, and Kelly Burke-a U-D alumnus, now a news reporter for WXYZ-TV-was seen as George, his protector. As a portrait of an age, OF MICE AND MEN chronicled the longing and rootlessness experienced in Depression-era rural America. The season will be completed with the Detroit premieres of two contemporary plays using ancient subjects: ABELARD AND HELOISE, a medieval love story, and THE HORSE, a satire of the Roman emperor Caligula. T 1 . W. ' "Q, 5 K -A x.n"" xg, s 1 -'fl' X W. , gi .v. ' ' 1- M 6 my 'ii .j N 'L ' ' uf K All , , .4 - t .. . Q as 1 ,-aw.. ,gg ,t gl - 1 L: if 91 , syssii , 5 'H QQ B w is ,, ,H F, X ilfaig 'qifffia , All if .. S' '. ' ' .ffl 752' I 1' W-, '0- ' ' ,I 4 ' . P 9 Q t - 'R -21 . l . ' w 3 h I FQ? f Y, .K . l-L, A mx X . S1 MN .- E View from the --,,,, bridge I ! 4 K ' L f,z I 1 , .. , XX 5 . - 1 ' JlL l a ' ' ' , 1 4 I , a r , I I. Y . maj? Af f 113215 Alvb Q q- 65+ E, ,wg 5, xml 5. I uv-1-, 30 D ..- . ,qlv r- 112 45 .1 rap X M mf , 1 Xb 5 Sf 3, , P Y E9 4 V .15 . . , "' l Q , "- . ,f x 13 -rf b V "' xx fy A 5 , Q yx 4, A 'Y ii X 4' 2.-ng, WI M ,ng 1 -..,,,. -1.41. in YCIHMOO 'EIO EHOHHH f""3,,A lu -,At-. 1 r- L 'YQ '17 4 . Q i . . - ."T'!9"., U, .lg- gw , Ea. 33 11 56- kvifgb ' 1 Y' , Y ll . '1 35 E SEXAS aw i -if 1.,1.,-g.. -' 4.'.L.rW ., I ' I Q . l , W . ,, 1 ,df f- 1-5, ,...x.-5-01 VZ Ffa?" .Q-2:4 K "-4543 G. g H Af W . . 4- , as f " E. - QA Of Mice and Men ., l I 1 gk F - ir A V E 1,1 , - x fl N V 'il'-9" , sz -"-f A A t 'N- ,gg IQ V .Q 1- kb . 1- " ' X V .- Q "A" "X ' 1-T ,-.., z ::-- . '-35' ' 'I ' 4, , ,Q : ,A lgllz B d , .1 A 5 4 q H V F, Nd 117 if 4 ' 'H Q -hah-gl' L- ,f yn 'f ff., V. 'J mm Jw 118 1-4 nu Dow TO 1 The downtown campus includes the Evening College of Business and Administration with the Law School in Dowling Hall, and further along Jefferson Ave., the Dental School. The Law and Dental School clinics have received nationwide attention. Until recently, the administration has basked in the notoriety, but done little to contribute to the physical improvement of the facilities. There was speculation in the late 1960's of abandoning Dowling Hall and bringing the campus uptown. However, the administration decided to re-furbish the old building and spent EB275,000 converting an adjacent store into the law library. When the Detroit Riverfront Project received financial backing, U-D found itself across the street from the proposed development. The decision was made to renovate and add to Dowling Hall. Plans for the building include sand-blasting of the exterior and re-painting of the classrooms. An addition will be built in the central courtyard and will house a new library, student lounge and added classrooms. Estimates of the cost have been between S5 million and S6 million. LAW SCHGO The School of Law over past few years has had a mar, ed increase in the number c applicants. The growing ir terest in U-D is mainly due t the stress of practical training Freshman students gain ei perience in the Moot Cour' where hypothetical cases 31 studied and 'triedf Thi prepares them for actual cas work in criminal and civil la' courts during their second an third years. 121 1 'll hum J A 122 -q I. ff 5 mi... ....a.. .J ,I. I. H LAW CLINIC e Urban Law Clinic offers a good vehicle r acquiring experiences in the practice of aw, and students who participate get a chance to defend clients in real court situations. With a running clientele of about 120, the clinic also serves the dicial system by relieving overburdened ublic defenders. Because it operates at inimal costs, frequently free of charge, it laces both student and client in an ad- antageous position. The client receives badly needed legal advice, while the student practices in casework under supervised conditions. in Q T, ' n Q ' 54 1 'I I 1 Mi S' CQ G If f 5 gh I ,nn N44 A Q f il" ?3e5SI hi! vw, ,, Fx uw Ei EVENING BUSINESS AND 2 ADMINISTRATION The people who attend the Evening College of Business and Administration take their role as "college student" much more seriously than the average undergraduate. Time is divided among job, family and academic responsibilities, leaving little extra for campus activities. Though students have the option of taking elective courses at the McNichols campus, most prefer to remain downtown where the atmosphere is "more professionalf' 125 YFIQI-vv A"iIlLIiQ5lx5'si-40 . 4,7 -Y .born- - ,an 126 s 1,35 14. ili 35 A., X, E wx.. 1. ,.. .,,4.u.--v ibjyfflwial ,, -If HL-Hft,.:.:f!5 Lil if 127 X XS: Xbiik X gg xxx x ix , 104' 49" ffm'- ,J 40" Yi' 91 ,i gg: F P7 1 3 SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY Recognizing a nationwide shortage of dentists, the Federal Government has given aid to programs which produce dentists more rapidly In response to this demand, the Dental School has changed its curriculum from four years of study to a consolidated three year program. A significant accompanying change has been that freshmen are now making dentures, a clinical practice previously restricted to juniors and seniors. The early involvement with patients is seen to be beneficial, and students have supported this move. Term I of this academic year marked the end of the change. The first three-year dentists have graduated. Soon the effectiveness of the program will be open to evaluation. 129 5 7 ,V ,Mf L. V 43'-, I--f' .. - M ,- IH - ff ' F "7" V' , 1' ' 'H ' 'C . .A ' . . , 1 ' ' b ,..-.1-' W1--1 i ' " F ' 7' . K 1, Q3 l Va Z' Xl 4. 131 132 A U-D now requires two years of college before admittance into their Dental Hygiene program. The move was made in preparation for a relaxation of state and federal laws which limit the hygienist to preventive dentistry and patient education. The added years of study should improve the comprehension of patient handling and create a stronger basis for expanded duties in operative dentistry. if J fi ,r 3- Q .w 11. Mu Q 4 1 .,, ' ,Q .153 1 EGL . A-Q Vg, Wg, Q" Emi, N1 A ' t- X ' w QEQQL ,,-. 'F x x 5: 1 'f w S 1 -..',,-,Q- -vw' I . 'x 4 ff 4 -rv' 'U 1,2 ggi "EEE 133 SPORTS AND GAMES With football and hockey now only a memory, the athletic department has attempted to build a new image of success despite its many past handicaps. Yet, the surviving teams still suffer from a lack of proper facilities, proper interest, proper publicity or a combination of the three. The most forceful endeavor has focused on develop- ing a top-notch basketball program. This effort has improved cage competition and formulated a reputa- tion for the unexpected. Last spring, Titan hopes for an NIT bid were cancel- ed by the ineligibility of Daryle Johnson. Someho the fact had gone unnoticed throughout the year The 1972-73 season has not broken step with th past. Starters Owen Wells and Gerald Smith receiv ed suspensions in early January for curfe violations, which were followed by the release o Preston Pace for "failure to meet academic re quirementsf' Still, the Titans enjoyed moderate success on th court. An upset of touted Illinois rose hopes for banner year, only to be shot down by a loss t Michigan and a humiliation from Villanova. But th squad rebounded to stand 16-9 at the close of th season. It was then that the half-expected resignation head coach Jim Harding came. Ending a four-ye stay of pressure and frustration, Harding decided t leave "the most difficult job I've ever had" to pursu a brighter but obscure future. The Harding era was over, to some, it was reaso enough for celebration. Still, the university was le to find a replacement willing to accept the almo impossible task of bringing both basketball tale plus a spectator or two to the echo-filled Memori Building. U-D's most unheralded sport, cross country, recor ed its first winning season in its brief history with 6-5 tally. The deceiving record, however, was a resu of two forfeits from U-D opponents, and the omissi of some high-class schools included in the 19 schedule. Captain Greg Niemiec is a perfect example of t light of cross country. The senior, who received his ourth varsity letter, ran three meets with sprained nkles to avoid a Titan forfeit. And, like his fellow unners, the only persons to see the harriers compete ere his parents-if the weather was good. ith no scholarships, no recruiting, and a coach that oubles as a ski and basketball instructor, one could ardly expect more from the dedicated few who keep he team respectable. Cross country's worth lies sole- y in its existence, it was added to the program to eet NCAA requirements when football was axed in 964 ince then, it has met its intended purpose--it has xisted, and nothing else. ast of the infamous club sports at U-D is soccer. onsisting almost entirely of foreign students with igh individual talents, the squad boasted another uccessful season, finishing at 10-3-1. It reached the inals of the EMU Invitational and won the U-M Dearbornl Tournament. nfortunately, the team appears to be taking the ourse of club football and hockey. Because the raduation of a number of key players will add to the sual difficulty in rounding up players, club soccer ould seem to have no future at all. hances for another winning season, however, might ur some action by next fall. The only requirements r the sport to continue are 33500 from the university r expenses, some athletic interest, and a black and hite ball. sport in its own class is fencing. In 1972, the fencers brought the first national collegiate title to both the university and the city of Detroit. The team compiled a 19-1 record en route to the NCAA tourney, where three superstars-Tyrone Simmons, Ken Blake, and Freddie Hooker became the first all-black trio to take the championship. Simmons grabbed his second consecutive first-place finish in the foil, while Blake notched second in sabre and Hooker was fifth in epee. But, in that unique U-D tradition, fencing was not spared from the expected tumult. Head coach Dick Perry quit over a salary dispute last August. His replacement was 24-year old Elton Anderson, a U-D architecture graduate, former fencer and assistant under Perry. Anderson inherited a squad divided between the gifted talents of Simmons and Blake, and a variety of still-developing teammates. At this writing, their meet record stands at 13-2, and with two All- Americans plus junior epeeman Greg Kocab in the lineup, the NCAA title is again a possibility. The major detriment to the athletic department remains the hovering aspect of mediocrity. Con- sidering its budget and unexplainable powers for get- ting the wrong kind of publicity, the program in general has to be labeled on the upsurge. Perhaps the most typical attitude toward U-D sports is expressed by cross country runner Niemiec, one of the few students on campus to wear the cranberry letter jacket with the varsity "DH standing proud. "People see me with this jacket on and ask me what high school I go to." v , 7 Q -Nw --, Qui: A? 9' SJ 12 INTRAMURALS Igffl H fe 138 . V' Y phi' vfy.,,w" ,,., 1 , ng, a i , -.ny . ., ,rv -N. ,V . , 1 P:Q'1-'i, Q 'I . I, .V ,V i. i. 44- , Q , , : - -., f. ,4 gf- . wwf , A . ' f.4:-,-'wx ',wf.ff,v, ' " . -- " -nn , L. 1 . -, , , A' - ,- .i!f'.'.' " .' ' fu-fs-pk,M'i'.f.z , ' '-' " "-x"'.,51:?A,H, ,..'fwff 1 "f'??P'?fi , IWZYEG-'QL ff," ,,a- !V1.,, 1. jf -,,- -jg , -.5 l.?"""1z"?5fMA-if 'Ji 12,1- bgvyriilflfgxmtgd.klitfix df I-F F5 iw I 11 .4 3 f,',,"Aw VF'-ll gf v 5- 1 4 .f F I 5 ,N 21 F -- -.. y . :ai 6 . g 4 . 3' L' IP! 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'. , -. . x - Hr' .n " .ws 1 . s . . .1 X A b, wa" 1 X 4 Follnw the Tit3Il5,I1'3llif ummvnyarnmirmmemmnball 197273 up., mar zsqvmuuulvuuvv SLMWDJ 'nun F514 30:1 :Hur-:rf 0.4-vf0?.z' 5, X' 02111342 1000 forseasvlltkkbfinfotmztidl-e 4 C ll E0 C HUIIICHIONS CORP 1 I Z: 9 'xx .!3l1'T.3'uHj'-3,35-f ww Follow the 'litans'n-ml, 197243 Univmiryoi umm nm uasman Senegal, W can 342. moo f0T 5635011 KICK!! lIlf0I'm31.i0n. 0 f w 1 Wx qqef,y1Hg10PQlL,L,,: ,f-:HQ '54 Q k ww-, N-, -:Y N. A rf" -z I. ,J 147 K 6 - f f ' l I Q I J Q Ll 4 QQ vl x N P . Q Xu. 1 tiff' xvjv-f u 'f qi: . gg X 3 u ff K if K W 'PX 3 .A J 1 A 5 . 9' OIQ.-v' , - . H:.,AN ffuxm Q' QQ, Q i L 91421 1' O , Y I wx-'MEAL X gr X AX if nh w- 33 K AB 'ul A ai.- Q 1 thai. S,- g- K ku, , ,vp- :KVI 'fr.:,.h., . g - ' ,, ,. . ' E. ' -A-M ,115 -mi, .V V --5.3 E , 5.1. , -. if s I' W O O O g 1 Q 0 , . 6 8 . i 'L , - 0 0 3 it Q!!-ME, Q t K Q O 0 -S . - M - A 'h'55R2':'TL' :gf as 1 vi Q ,R O "t'.i. - . . . 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" .' , , Q' X 155 E-in Fllhe Eiffieets of Kes Fleits, Quest-I-Tee!-In-Residerase fEven stones in streams of mountain water compose songs to wild cherries ---Onitsural here in the big grades in the midst of our daily desserts: salame sandwiches and hot fudge icicles little furry mittens were just little furry mittens fwe had not heard of puppets on our handsl because shadows were just plain shadows Csurely never an unearned playmate from glancing blows of lightl in short: all the unicorns had died from the meandering duldrums of why-look-upfevery-day-in-day-out-ness it was then i heard of his coming the fool he it was would set me free from these ordinary sorrows "i shall know him by his jacob's coat i will spot him with his coxcomb i shall rap him on the sconce and command him to perform" 'fand perhaps i'd add a "please"J so i looked for the crowds but only met his face i listened for their laughter but heard only his psalms - saddened i sought out some corner and shut off my lids "you fool you" i cursed without speaking this he must have understood for as i slanted my head he rubbed my eyes he found me in my silence quick-in-response i pleaded my fears "frank-a-ka-knock-a-for-me,sir? design questions that laugh at my quibbles and together could we plot ployland?" Cffwhen my soul was but a menu lost among the fatmien edible sunkies i should have devoured him as the last five cent C5431 fi mean nickel candy barl saved the wrapper for the coupon digested his nonsense and flushed him out and away with the eleven other toetripped dangling fankies too late with my starches the magic of his mirellum soon melted the way of my senses i followed his tin-flute before me i felt his presents pry minds of liver-canaries filled: free JD ' cold and alone in the puddle by a corner i plumbed the caverns of my stomach and sensed the fulness of my dream i began to fast could let the fool man free i have waited behind since that thaw to hear the icicles drip. -an rgnm' m i nheth Qrr, 'x in Q .M Q Hifi-L-M.. N I Sympathetic, honest and innovative are tributes rarely attributed to just one person, but they were all personified in Dean Lawrence Canjar. His accomplishments were many and diversified. A degree in chemical engineering was conferred on him by Carnegie Institute of Technology, and he subse- quently received several teaching awards from various institutions. In addition to publishing 70 ar- ticles and one book, he was a member of several University committees, including Project Harmony, which worked to promote better racial interaction. Heiwas also an active member in church discussion groups. Dean Canjar believed that the problems that plague society would ultimately be solved by the engineer, and he stressed the need for socially relevant engineers. Students were encouraged to minor in one of the humanities so that they could relate with peo- ple on a non-technical basis. 158 DEA JAR Realizing the need for creative engineers with an ex tensive background in design and problem-solving he instituted the Sloan Design Project. Last yea project workers helped the administrators at Detroi General Hospital by systematically analyzing it problems, while this year students are working wit the Detroit Fire Department to improve it capabilities. His death on November 6, 1972 at age 49 le students and faculty with a deep sense of loss. Dea Canjar had excellent rapport with the students, eac year he held freshman orientation in his home, an was a frequent guest at engineering stag parties. H was reachable, and that is what made him special In seven short years at U-D, he changed the attitud and directions of the engineering college. It takes special kind of man to do that, and Lawrence Canj was that kind of man. IX' ff 'TP' 5.1- -u-..,...,,, ,fr" S-I 160 f --l - -- - 1- -1 Five hundred ambassadors! Ya, it's certainly true. I was really amazed to see this university housing about 500 international students representing more than 60 different nations of the world. And what is an international, rather foreign, student's role when he goes to study in another country? He is looked upon as an unof- ficial ambassador of his country. He will be ask- ed by his hosts, questions about his country's political system, culture, religion and people. Generally speaking these were my ideas when I came here last September. One foremost impressive feature of this universi- ty is that it was born out of love for God and fellow man. Because of its founding and history it remains a self-proclaimed Jesuit University. It's not important whether one goes to a church, l l l a temple or a mosque. It is the basic faith that counts. Students are challenged to become involved in human problems. They are urged to examine their notions and ideals through active involve- ment both in and off campus. They are taught not only to think over their own subject of study but also to apply their reasoning power to the general questions of religion, morality and human values. . The urban environment is encouraging students to get involved in the day-to-day problems of modern life. The city of Detroit, in this respect, quite properly serves as a laboratory where students prepare for their future roles as respon- sible members of a changing society. -Mohan Joshi F ... 'MQW' V V A ,H ,ar , N ,I 21 I L Q: K x 1 l 1: - V! x .gj Y an-Q 'Q R -U dw H ERS qv"'yTJL AQ.: VS: 5 - , , W 4 .Su ,V ' v- , , M1 NV! l- - - ' sf " 2 3- Q ' r- 2,4 4 Q5 -..2?"'g LS 5 ' ' F P ww xr -' 4- ,. F r Jf J 'ff -g 3 if ' -' Q , S -0 ,,.' Tiff, f il nu-iff. '-.A O ggjxkw' ' , , 1 ff ff, -fl r 4, I Q! I v .-,iff ,Aw I 1 V ' w ' ,qu ,f 1 , ,-Q ff ' "' 34' .V u-V' .rl , ' I K' :I f A ,W ,U I flf! ll TJ . " ' :-,ffl 1 1 H "Aj f '1ff i ,5 ,f aff' 'f!f1- ,ffxfi . ' ,gi "Sf , '- X I 4, A 1- ,.- V , ' , fd' , if? ff' f ff 1 E X' I 'V g ff! sl-3' I 'Y QQ 'll 1 Q5-an .X ,Q X-gf' , x I 1 0?- ,a -",..:-'-"3 E- I lv x I f J 1 rv , . .q.,...,- vvvu on 11?-ll IDYSX . Q l"il'1M " T .. , 3 Z ' if: rm ' 4 ,- lg .LX - . ' -4' TE -u x 163 fx 164 They told us it was an autumn festival. We were vaguely aware of cars hesi- tating in the morning and puffs of vapor during conversations. Posters and proc- lamations barraged the outer eye. People were making grandiose statements, and university week became a functional label. Purple and brown rainbows surrounded a distorted tower on billboards and lapels. Giant struc- tures of steel and girder bore names like Twister and Zipper and parking places were difficult to find. They told us U-D is what you make it. Close friends seemed important at this time. The cocoons of familiarity were comfortable. The outstretched opportunities seemed somehow staged. People were performing duties according to prearranged scripts and we were quick to ignore. An organized im- promptu concert gathered people in close quarters and you fleetingly felt the touch, but it soon passed. Dancers performed un- der dismal skies, while we peered through fences and grinned at the unusual. Artists provided their visions while we remained unimpressed. We made new friends in U I ERSITY WEEK classes and parties, or merely stared, eyes down. The cold seemed to encourage us to turn inwards and we complied. They told us it was a new beginning. We saw tricycle races. Somewhere people were gorging themselves on food and drink. Organizers provided game booths and flea markets and crowds of kids took full advan- tage. People sold chances on games of skil and offered bribes of boats and trips, wit incentives of the thing that talks, money Paper planes and arrows shot through th air over empty fields. It was all within ou grasp. Deans said it was an exceptionall fine job and a president walked th grounds. We were commended for our corn munity spirit and neighborhood childre ran rampant. We felt the cold and dam and stayed away because the newness wa. too old. Clouds passed over the sky and i was much easier to stay in one place tha challenge the weather. Helicopters drone overhead and deposited names and faces o a common council president while we ex amined sidewalks and books and exams. I was all there. And we remained silent. fl va., ,,..-for a ,rig-f, 4- jv . f., .' 9 ' 1 1 ... ,,., 'E- r J' ' 1 f 4 .V S I Q 4 -if 4 4-A f .Q 8 ., 1 IP. ' 54 vi ,.w,. y X--v . ' F1 'ri' Je J-1 I 153 H W uf, , , , ,, N41-+ u g M 5 - 'V qi . . .- Q ,' j. 'I ' 1 3 xrwix. 'B f X '- ' 5 TUX " ' 14' ink.-X .. N .5 1, X 4 ., ' 2 RQ. A-T' Q' " l hy" ' 'X X --lfx, . 1 'JK N. 1 .-, x .l fa- Q. mx' . ' ' , 41 X 1 ' L ,K sl vf 5-' I J 1 f , 5-Q51 34,1 , ' ,, 1 L. JJ, , x , K ,, A " in A1-,Q , lg .H , R f Q 1 I Q," . Wt If ggli..-gxw. , ' - I J ,--JA 1 I'f".1'q 1' gay , I p U . 4 J,,x,j'1'E? X' . f .xr i ' fu .' 1 ', 4 U ,I ,f x'V',k4!Llf'.., 'M'f,.,l ., If ' - -' 1- ' "4 ' 'V ,. , x . .U if- :jk al, I , . '11 g A 5 Q " L .N Y A1- l ff. ":g'!':x31J','f!i , lm, ' ., lm, v .-' r 1 f".f ,x U ' 2 N I xr..-"':'1, " ljgqlf? Ifnifg . fl rr ' h K I V' 'Y .lf V- ,LH-K-,Y fl V 1. 1 4 I , ... .J Im . -,I A-I-3.,xX?q,, 'I 'Q ' v . '1 ,, 'V N . gx' r l f ' , ." . JVM X A , V, i V !'II'y1ldJ,,y3SiL,1l di 3 X 'qu , .. . ,. w .. , 1' ' , I W JK- 4 " ' "iM,v7'n.,X --Y K ' 4 1" A1 'J ,,. , . ,A nlfyll, J H ,luv 'Is 1 lu I::..v' ,UJI4 4? 5 qA,:? ' ' 1 . ,-,Wm I . 'N ,a Wifi' J . ,J ,n 315 39" .1 WSE' 1 ru' 'X xi ,V 168 i f , . Y J? v ' fi ff Q f ' limi ' L Eg 283- W K H 4 x Cfvk.. REER mc-I Q99 1 5 Q 1, f "T'YYV '1' N . M, Y 'K K 'X .X l , 1 N NX A, M 'Q ga is in-5. nr' ' 1 f x -I -'. D 3.-1 . H K Youth Against Mc Govern , .,. XT Lax- Q ' n 'N' . TX- u . rresodon ' Leia L " .H . "" vanessa , ' ah tiu I F U A' - e i-ff-A-1--fl- ----W f- ef: .- ..,,... , , ., f Q.. ,Win-:YV , .. .. F, .W L25 .-,: ..45,-,gg14a.mg., g r-m,g.g- MQGQVQW now mmf: Pit-no -Q25-ya ..f,:,-TP..e3?.T.-H qw . .,... -...M . ' - " "ff '-QgQ'f."'ri'L51:1f.:L"": Those that approached the polling booths last fall saw little more than long lines. There was none of the excitement of other presidential elections. Only percentages seemed to be in doubt. The surge of enthusiasm in the early spr- ing for Senator George McGovern quick- ly faded with the heat of widespread bungling. Searching for a candidate, many felt embarrassed by the lack of an acceptable alternative, and quietly withdrew. Finally incorporated into the adult pop- ulation, young voters quickly moved to outdo their predecessors and became a truly Hsilenti' new minority. Of those 18- 20 year-old registered voters, only 48 percent appeared at the polls. It wasn't necessarily apathy that kept the percentages down, but the apparent lack of importance of the event, the vote, and the inevitable result. Campuses everywhere saw generally limited campaigning. The only political personage to visit the U-D campus was Attorney General Frank Kelley, this -' 7-5, S, E 'lkaii -'E S- 5-, ,T- xik fzh X A 5 .. - - i i gif' Ziff: ' ELEoT1o '72 time running for Senator. I-Ie stayed for an hour. The most vehement vocalization and ex pression of ideas came at the anti abortion rally, which aimed its rhetoric at the body politic of the college com munity. The issue was charged with emotionalism and thus managed to get some attention. Tempers flared and opinions flew by students hurrying to class. In spite of the energy expended by pseudo-action groups to verbally flagellate the vascillating attitudes of a nondescript voting public, the results maintained the clear-cut preference es- tablished shortly after the conventions. Election year passed and little changed. Nixon's well-timed peace proposal im- mediately fell through and the bomb- ings on Hanoi increased. There were few demonstrations and no loud outcr at the deception. And when upeace' finally was announced there were fe shouts of joy. It all came as no surprise 3- ,- QQ- Sffm -1354 M' 1: H His' ,L iff " 2.3, 3 ' k QA . ,, S A . i, 2 221:-1:4 'Ti K My wifes, sa 'ig F K if: , , V :f if .wx x M Signs... ,115 in , . f -' Wm , -f vt E2 V W i , 4 21 X Z m M, . X I, j Xl,- H lx A L' 1 'FL -w. its jj-5'-3 'ff -R , '-ffggs, H: - f, 1-dsl , - 459 A I ,ATU I xi? EQ? H Q , ' V. .. l .S N Q W E if I wh Pfgl Egg? Q 172 fd' Ni: Student Government made a very important contribution to the University this year: it gave the Varsity News material for the front page. Publicity centered around the bickering between the executive branch and the USG Senate. But criticism of Student Government reached its peak when the VN editorial writers jumped on the anti-USG bandwagon. Mike Robinson was the second black USG presi- dent in four years. A 30-year old Navy veteran, he became well known to the campus because he was a full-time employee of the University games room before taking office. Robins0n's white vice-president, Bill Pace, was rarely heard from. The USG Senate had all kinds of problems because its members could seldom agree on anything. The position of president pro tempore changed hands several times between Tim Beck, Mike Canjar and Ed Rapoport, but Beck held X -2'-gm the seat for the majority of the time. The Senate was divided into three basic groups, the Beck and Canjar camps and a small group of in- dependents. Rapoport sided with either Beck or Canjar, depending on which side of the fence seemed greener. Much of the controversy that surrounded USG had to do with the antics of Tim Beck. The stu- dent senator was criticized for many things dur- ing the year and was even named in student court suits that stemmed from alleged libel and conflict of interest charges. A member of many organizations, he was ac- cused of having his "finger in every pot." The major complaint against Beck was that he was a senator and a member of Robinson's staff at the same time. Nothing in the USG constitution prohibits this and he used the opportunity to become familiar with the top position. 44 .s t b is iv ' arms Sh-- 3 Q, SPEAKER SERIES: USG MEETS MINIMUM REQUIREMENT DICK GREGORY MELVIN BELLI 178 OTHERS A LSU SPGNSOR OUTSIDE SPEAKERS NEIL WESSON J ..-N... VINCE WADE Obscure concert series opens with Gordon Lightfoot. 4 0 .,q H -MS-..,,.-N .,-S 1 x .V XA Q o Y X- 'K ' gi Nw. '. ., Qt fi N-,lib 5 I 5: l ' 3 i ' N. :A s AW i.. ZBTSEI Z All I JM, N! ,....-f. 'Vx ' N . ' x 1-. H , 55.51 - ,w..l Q 'W fs 7 11.23 J- ,Z l ,ij--5'qEAfT: ', gf ' wp , I V! .JV -4 1- gi' gm , .. .f:- ' ' . .hid ' V "Li at 1 -Wg 'I fr X 'nip if X v 'A 'R , Lal ff ,ff ,A .' N --...H 1' , uf, W. ., H -ng ll I ' I N Ja i 'Jil xl. 'Ng ,yds Y. .W , AF- 4 1 1 , r sqm Q 2 gif . , 'o X gl I v 1 K 4 o 1 5 '-f-. ..., -.. if I . fx-. ' N1 4' B x V V , .QW -., 'wf1...,,..l-., J A I, . -QL: . V I . ,,, 4 S r t- "qi L... I v. . ,sg - Q-'E . ,l' I 1 C 1' 'M f S4 'ITS NIA! . r ' Q. r ' ,. 1 Na N . - iii A. A A QA 1 .A-'m-"4 x if 1973: the year the musi n W 4 l My-fuzz.:-L-1.1-4-11,-4"'J' " --..i,...-Q-- ,., ,-. iv '- if-Luz -I-Li-lt' hm, , - -Ll-INLI I I 1 . ----. ,... .,,...4., VJ " "- , - -. ,- ' ' . N ff I. ' 'gwm-' iff' 'N' - ff, 4 I ' -i '- . X 'Gif if f I f . ,, ,, x'r'1Z1 'iff S-xg! , ull: I I I r I I I N: A1 N 'xr'-, p aunt: ,Tl-lilly", I 1 -K I - 5. -. " '-:'1 . P13113 'R ' I f - J .I 1 ' ' 'E , k 'Q -,-- 17 'X Z1 'nu' -J, -f. 1.513 fx, A lg , 1, 'Q Q, -Q-, 3 fx Q ,'. .ta I' p I 'J ' T, V YS- -ERA 3 Mx , ' . 'K ' 111 A Ft ' ""'. Tw: 'fb Ft 5 X , ' :' Q -Q' T xx , w 3' IP, 3 I-PG? Q-Y' 'Y-Q X r' A ' , Q' , ' 'HT Qi T013 'A x ,ff F1 1-ff?--,I',::x I- .2 T -.-.IL f rj!Q',Effwr Vip I-Q1-1, T 'Q X, , , I F My .I 'Y A X.. 'flrfil fk 1 .V 1, J- 1, 1- X -M A- ,4a. 4,f- f ff -f?f 7, flgjffk 11:1 " ' T , Y-3 , I 'QL -2-, If 4 "- 1 f- ,f fm U,-F Q T X .:, ff. Y. ft Sf . fj L H F, f! L L 'mv' 1 ,f , V' I V - - '- .- A-1 " Lv?" f , "V - Af' 1' fi- fl f j .C I f 3 - .f ,ff ,-1 1 , , 1 -v f- 7- I J L v -1 X K I, 'fi' I D ,xg 7 ' Y ,-"X x A A ., V fig: N. yfx- -X-V f-gi A ', 157 ,L I I Z, x- -.., XX? ! fx I ' " F1 '. ' ',,- ff' 'YZ p .-- Aux., ,f j' jf 7 Q ,,-X 'iff fn 2 Q- 4' qi N ' f 1,1 xf K4 " f. ". ff W - 6 If If .' P' f f ,- .X 1' ff. VARSITY NEWS TERM I Joe Ayaub Rick Berschback Bill Warren Kathy Usitalo Lorraine Blasor Karen Brown . . Jim Cencer Yddguomw Hia Ken Tash Ron Kitlas Martin J. Habalewsky Stephanie Nano Mark Dlugoss Jan Warren Barb Brumrn . Q. A ..- 2 4 ' Xia-,gn Z V V! V i -as., 3 L Pat Foote "'N .32 i'ca4! Lib - I-, QE' X. 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Q N X' I , , 2 V V 34:3 X w 9 . w J I ,V . 5, f' V V E- . 'V fd-rf ' 'V , , 3 ki P -M ' vw , - ' -ff. . V L H- Q'-f - ' V V M -1, V if ' P 1' ' - 1 1 .1 1 -, ',V- ' - ' ' ' 5 ,,,' '. 3' ,I fig ,v - y i, I " 1-"a"H ' V Q- , ,lxf-v .Ee-'F "" ' iz" V i ,, 4 . 1, . ff ' if '-1531 . 1 fp, Q Y. HJ" I M? 1 ' ' - . .g ' 7 f' 1- .- I 1 'Pf Q I ,Af I X A' 'By -YJ.-,uw C? V V, ' , , 31' , 4 - , 1 " A9"P"'!tA -Jw ' ' f f -.fi I .r .- J E1:.'5,5g:52f -'.-' .-'-I ' I l n S:2g:!::f-sg: -:.:,-:.0:.:,- '-5.-5-525.32 .'Ef5I2f:15:f' :'.-3.3.-g. .....:.g,:,:., D v . ,aI I '.'.a' U 0. . . . . . .3 . . . . . -., . -. ., . .,. . . 5, -. ,- vu . ...- . , .' -,- Z ,...:.. -'.-,-' '.' . . - . . . . . .z -,.-,. . ,-,. - . ,. v . . :J ,n.,.,. -', . - . ,v., Greeks Groups Grads Patrons Ads Index Credits Staff va...,,w+... iwlsf 1 4 A W in .as - .Ai .Adi fir 1 ilu I I il R I di r N ,. ' . ' f' f 5:55 2.4 rl- D i - ' .. " I v f-g 'P JE'?Ls-s V F T7 - W , H KL. 3 1 I suoxlns f U-lf' A - 1 N 3 i 4 I 'QE' AJ s-' 1l"Nfr7f QI 'tu 17' ', ' lrxur 5 , ""1a j',QS+,-1,, 11,1 - PEQPLE ARE GIVI C UP DUI C THEIR WN THI C AVQR CDF DCI G THINGS EUR OTHERS... America has a unique heritage. It is based on the freedom and brotherho of man. Because of this heritage, the American College Fraternity is u paralleled anywhere in the world. The first college fraternity was born the same year as our country. 0 December 5, 1776, at the College of William and Mary, the society known Phi Beta Kappa came into being. It has weathered all the trials, struggles a wars that a new group must, to become one of the most prestigious honora fraternities of our time. More fraternities sprang up in the 1800's and early 1900's, with the syste blossoming after World War Il. Some men came back from the war eager raise a family, while others who wanted to get an education, but still be p of a family, joined a fraternity. The late 1960's brought new insights to fraternities and college life. Priva colleges were on the verge of bankruptcy and some began to think frat nities were obsolete. House mothers were "out" and drugs were "in Undergraduate members forgot how to rush while the alumni took t fraternity for granted and offered it little help. Now, in 1973, a slower type of economy will bring new changes into t system. People are giving up "doing their own thing" in favor of doing thin for others. Students are setting up a new system of values. Prayer meetin and empathy training sessions are taking the place of sit-ins a demonstrations. Haven't fraternities offered college students a way become involved for almost 200 years? We must express our indebtedness to those who made fraternity life wha is. They have planted the seeds which we must harvest. Because the futu has even more changes in store, ties should not be cut with the fratern upon graduation, new ideas must grow from old ones. More important than the past is the future. Will there be something to p on to our younger brothers and sisters? The answer to that question lies the present, with us. We must preserve the heritage with our goals and . complishments. The efforts will never be in vain. The only losers will be th who do not take part. Kenneth I. Lill I 0 c First executive director, Council of Fraternal Organizations S 20. 19. 18. I7. l6. IS. I4. I3. I2. I1. I0. 9. 8. 7. 6. 5. 4. 3. 2. 1. igma phi epsilon fred baver pete kreher oscar battle dave fleming dennis reid mike norris phil durocher tim stetson steve walthers jim Ioizzo karen van assche chris koss noel thomas tom koch kevin baumann tom yohe bill gessner ken lill mike eagen iohn griffin Hi H 1 J Q , - X vga! IV i Yi ,H iw -ff 'ui ' 1 V 3 im xv. E .-WK V - 'wa -ggm-ISHN -Y .fm Q2 - in-1 qw., . Q., 3 Qs.:-?ef" , M 2, V , L-- W- .3 V C. , 55,1 , v .K .., I ,-fu 4 y 3 N 4W .,f? v -Y kqiuv' . E ' , ,-L Wg ,a !'-- Q ,. N. I fE'..AZ rf i ,. 'ffa4f5QE-12:74. ' .f fi: ,A efv- Fw: ' ,- - .qw In " 'gill - .4-5 ,g"':g5,f li U . . -'V N n' Q 1 -' fm' "" v L . 1 11 Q if fi-11 jlgiik-fi Q .pw l . ,-.T,, V ,'. rl 154 155. -- ini? A A mx f .iss xA, v-gn-A w . X uno HQ. ..,.:w V rggrl 2 'M E 1 nt sr' wk' , Wd. f- 15 I' i F tg - Q-if wig f .,,, 'L 1 . 'lf iff, W? z 1 I ,I A at ' -f ,. .-V " ii ...- Q r C ' g ""'kL . cf' V lf J -i N v ,yi 3 . 4. ls" I n , , ' r , n 4 . ,tl Y' Y .gg A, EY , . A 'Ls Q1?l.L1,. x .Lx .f , if Ai? 13 F 'wi ' :--gig' .. ', 1 1' ' ' I ' L I ' w f Q Nr - - .1 1' .1 rzgw x - ' ,gg 9 inf , YUT, S 5 n Q X, 1 -Ji . fx 1 ' fl i ' 'L Z? LH? ,- 4' .gaze-'L - f Zi.. . .,, WH- wig f ' ,. SYQY'1RWl gs:-5J,"'X ,Ali VH, - ,r?"n -,-,,.. I 4-,A few M-J 'B N sigma, sigma, sigma peggy foley nancy lotfy tina cozzolino kathy Stephenson karen hartman mary mc henry not shown: paula reegan pat watson marcia woityna pat wenzl ruth hinkson patty funk vicky karpinski sandi chitmani jean stilphen sue conlan iudy Iipinski linda mack pat tringali sharon muglia sal malek gail schneider chris booth mary chris schmidt i 1 , 'Wa .. .-.- . 8 9 Y r f iz- p7,r.- M "?'i'45l"5X' I ' bf 462'-Z' :i33t?f"23m 41219922 -a .:--- 1- fn gaa. :G Ms. - vi i f Hrimea.. I 1 ' " M ' """W' ' A ' as W1 15" - L ' ' " Q- 'E Q - LJ" ' u' 'Q 'G . , i Q -4.. Q41 -,-. ' . ' Y A El' A Ml ifilp' s' 5 T ' 'Q Q as 1 -f' ' 5 H , H, , AN . Z'f'f,f' 4 535?g:n:unuang 4m::+.4fYs, --lv., ' .. ,IL -f-1-.: yi. , -1 1 W :V -I 8 1 l I A 4 I N551 xii I- We ' 1 F 'll r- i mi' ,- . fr- .mx A , 1 - 1 L , a g A .4-Q' . ' , Am., H , 'Q A A.. , 3, I . 3 1.5.5 ' 1 , 'U ., ,-.....- lg , 'b an in lag'--,AA ," bl , Jw J iw .4 L A 1 1 . 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X , .J 'T' - ipfgi fg-f1 - ' " . , A , 'f'-'-. :"2":'jap.-,.z , -5E'5N"'.q:3'F X 4-3833531-11-,1",. , l . Y' u V , ."' j - -' ,H ,Q H x i"jg1g5:1'7: -'-3151.,-23-5 -' 4 " ,..'f:f'. -, J mi' ' ' " Lf J' - , :,:qffmg1g-Q5-155553-p',:'21"' nf, -rg,iQf ' L --- j"5?'., R. " . 1 7.5.1.1 - 5 ' ww V , w .V ,Jr 7-, ,--.3 , IJ hypig ij !:?g-v::V,,.,-4,,,, 6 Y .J .fy 1, Y I , L x. 1 Y , .,.'fi,.ar-.iq AJ P M P, , , jk, ,W V M W 'Q 1,"'f:,f ' ,:'-.-Fw:-, 4 .-.5-g Jw,:-ww1,3i','1z:r-'A-. 14.7.-af 1 1 ,f tau kappa epsilon iohn de sostoa george l'heureux dan scanlon jim prosser steve nelson iim flynn not shown: 11. dennis sherman 10. harry deutsch 9. lynda deutsch 8. mike flannery 7. mark haglage 6. bob cratin 5. paul frascella 4. mark coleman 3. greg coon 2. steve vokes 1. paul didas phi kappa theta M w I R W Q- W W W 7 " f ' A fa ,7 , swggv-f 9" 1?' 4. ' f I 4 202 ice capito terry rowson charles schmidt brannon holt tom madden mike gaski greg hindenach nick pantano denny miller ed zyiewski jack peluse paul hathaway ralph cellars mike kacir dick hindenach ed meglio denny cleary geri mato jack dillion bob vander laan lee kaplan brian sullivan frank piserchio pat reynolds iames la londe rick yenson dave shuhert bill cahill ' f I N ull"' T3-- ' ,Q n F 1 my .' ty 'Y' -3 D 1-L.: . EJ kg! 1 'ff' BV ,K 1 5 dp 4 X.. :QV ,J 35149 A . f .-' if-Y , 1 5 Y, H: -' Ev Lug: ' PM -5, ' s 49' W .1 ,- I v.-'i-5 L 9 f " JW "iii 1. r '- 15 1 V, - . . 4, I I X 7 r 5, W ED' 1 , .QQ . . 4 L - fi . X In T? 3 'Q ff' 'J .ff ! f 'F I W xfx ' 'all 'x ' 'X "' 'W uffif -f . , .,. M Y 'Z-.-.A :if R' 0 5' he -, Q A 5 wk f 'V 'U 1' 555 K "J 5 , .f F Z 5 1 1 rx 3 ' fs? X . W7 X. , , In A. K W l A- Q, G Y bf t 'ff 4 , -XXL, j? 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J X 'E 5 'E A ' H' 1 " " f , ", Q, f V' 'L 'M U , ' S. . , 'fi '3 N f '4 .J ? 1 if 4 K H li, F .lg nl A 5 , ttf: nffeqlia JQQPIA: , 1 .fe 4 -x AJC Ll I B I' H- 4- Q 'JH tx f' A - -W.-f .. - QM - .aria ,f,,,:l-E24 .LEM ,,.. ,?,u:x,.-E'?',7m.. 51,1 V, -..-dwg... ,. , . xam ' J - 'Q ' w -"' X PM blatant boys rar we wciffaiw g XR tf Ip. N a. . . n . mike 'ego' o'mara 14. bob 'bocco' sartini 13. roman 'daddy' halanski ir. 12. frank 'sea' vrabel 11. jim 'timba' timberlake 10. bill rice 'patty' 9. peter ray 'milano' 8. 'evil' ed eberle 7. gerry 'woodchuck' reich 6. iim 'stick' pilny 5. iim 'sparky' loizzo 4. tony 'cowboy' ianicki 3. ioe 'clutch cargo' germano 2. ken 'spanky' Iill 1. phil 'spalding' kaiser not shown: gary 'cap'n easy' bartosewicz oldis 'otis' terauds mike 'duh' deiraca 205 . A ' 'r 45 'ifxflj 'I '. w p .X L Li N Q - N . . . . 4 I - ' A ' f . if . Ex W X k ' - i l I V p at YI - A4 H x X 'f:--- . r ,V-1 ' - ' I . J ., - ' X I L. Nr V. 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Znkxfigiffif 4.1.42 mary ann accavetti ioni albrecht karen van assche patti battersby stephanie nano patti walker david piper diane pierce theta phi greg campbell ralph king ted price craig chavous robert teabout clarence iennings larry moon king blackwell mark james fred cook carl moore S charles pugh victor ford oliver bure wally gator greg adams speed andrew mc gee steve brooks joe collier ed bartoszek paul bieber tim clos iulius klimowicz al kramer roy mantelli ray mersino ken o'reiIly bob presto marty simon not shown: 31. ralf malaker ed noreika mark calcaterra les booms pat hughes scott foerstner keith garascia larry Iuchi mike wierzbinski ron panasiewicz steve hudak hob panizzi rich woicicki ted ellyatt dave barilovich iim butke 30. 29. 28. 27. 26. 25 24. 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 Q . . n a gary woolard 15. greg sefchik 14. bob bauman 13. chris grabowski 12. iim gleason 11. ed siegwarth 10. glenn wood duncan 9. mike slesinski B. joe cammarata 7. mark dlugoss 6. john tigue 5. richard krakowski 4. dick long 3. dale kramer 2. dick scott 1. Jff-f' sigma p , . ,. . ss 1 5 1, ', ' .. .. ' 4 mu' in ' Z .-4 'Frei 'f 'lf' eff?-3' "-"7'V H?" V AP 7? 337 ,, -Le' . Q, H . H -'Y w 33? '.r,-3:1-,M a ,, ' gy-gm: sql, Q - '- . u - i4?,.'5'-fvl . . -L x - qt, va- N., vww -- F:---'I I Y' 'fe-Q 5 x ,Mn w. gf :,, '.. 7 -?,"' :Q .WE g ' ' 13, 1'-. 'YQ . fi W. -. "5 " "" L' , ' x Ear ,z, ,, 5' 5' vm' ' 3 C-1 A E xr' Lf' 7 ,ggi ., x Y a X- 4:4131 S ,QTY -, 'E' IH-- ,5 " 145 , , 1 ...X g. LTYQA 1 Wifi-H 1:1-ggi . ,, ,wx If za, yfij. Eg-,I 1 C, , J'-fit. 15121 iw! i, YF. ry A Q 1 lv rv- JK I l Y' nil . , gms, ,. vm ,. Q1 , I I E. ' V Ava X Q33 : 4 Q - ,-. ' ' ' e 4'- Q I A 'F lo 5 E A '. ,. J... .--L.. ng m gn .W X- - , JM W W GAMMA THETA : ' A ' ' ' ' T' f ,..4, 5 "1 . ' .J gs 1 , ' is 4 n. In -I. ' 5 '- - - W - ..f1.,.-Y U' ,-x-- Q .. ,J A, P f.' , '.m. vfxz '..X. ':, Q 'l , ff., . ,jV. . .., . ' .' , , H. . 4 1 A 1 . . q l .1 I , , -. ' Y , . 1, , I l , A.. , 'iv , ' g,,., --. ' l,"k , .J ,- ' :I , "-v1':f' Q , -.R V 1- V I . , . - 'C' 'W - - ' . . ,. -X Q, , U.. 47 . . '1 A3 1 . 1: ' . I-' Q. k 9 . .. , 5 - - .,,"' , . if . , 5.3. A , l . V -X I .' x Z -v pm. ' xxx' SQ xg . , - , fn 2 K v 7' . ' .' . M . ., " "" . ' -- . -. , ' 1 Q 5.1 ,mm . 4 ,K , X . - . 1 I ' L2-4, L . ar I ,Iwi r X. Q. X .-325 EW' -V. if r, A E RHO. Front row: Mary Beth Langenhorst, Louis Edward Petrykowski, David A. Brown, Dave Gudes, Hank Dembosky, president, Dave Stanton, Diana Wing, treasurer. Back row: Karen Gleason, Susan Soltis, Tom Poisson, Gene Kruszewski, vice president, David Eisen, Ira Gold. Not shown: Ed Hinch, Tom Breutsch, Cortney Morgan, jim Conlin AIR FORCE R.O.T.C. Front row: Mike McKinley, Mike Foley, Mark Butz, Dennis 1. Bykowski, Kenneth Stumpf, Gus Torres, lean Devos. Middle row: Ramune Stonys, Eric L. Cintron, John lasterzembski, james Kearney, commander, Douglas A. Cameron, joseph Marino, john Connolly. Back row: Erwin "Buzz" Hohmann, Bob Elder, Bill Gallagher, Chris Moore, Rick Elder, Gary Ciranna, Greg W. Campbell. Not shown: David N. Welsh, Chester lubinski. ALPHA EPSILON DELTA. Front row: Tim Flanigan, Bill Berkowski, Don Fisco, Dan Gadzinski, Dan Burton, vice president. Middle row: Mike Maehoffer, Lenny McCulloch, Conrad Maitland, Tania Fernandez, Arlene Marcy, Cindy Trosin, Tom Mianecki, treasurer, Noreen Rossi, Dave Gadzinski, Ottis Allen. Back row: Frank Walkine, Gary Gondek, Ken Thorp, president, Bob Bauman, secretary, Fr. Gerald Albright, Mike Matuzak. Not shown: Warren Meretsky, Mike Hall, Don Derez, Ken Burnette, David Boes. ALPHA KAPPA PSI. Front row: Glen Coker, Winston Glass lr., Daniel J. Stuczynski, Martin H. Hardy, Earl W. Cain, Tony Mifsud. Back row: Harry Burrell, Manny Contino, Dale E. Godboldo, Michael Sywak, Michael F. Scott, Alex Wroblewski, Sam Contino, Bruce Domitroff, David Underdown. 216 AMATEUR RADIO GROUP. Paul Lorance, president, Buzz Hohmann, vice president. AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS. Front w: Richard A. Zwolak, joseph M. Wozniak, Charles D. Riska, simer Marzec. Middle row: Dennis M. Zelmanski, Richard V. Long, treasurer, David j. VanDamia, secretary, Gary F. man. Back row: Dr. David Camp, faculty advisor, joseph A. kiewicz, Mark j. Waldecker, Richard F. Cronin, president. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS. Front row.' Kenneth Stumpf, jim Barnack, secretary, james Nolan, F. Almeida, faculty advisor. Middle row: Carl Fenochi, john Pocius, treasurer, Rich Bochnovich, president, Bill Mikula, ve Barilovich. Back row: Edward Litke, Michael McComb, Doug Sordyl, Robert Walz. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS. Front row: Dale Valvo, Bernard Zukowski, joseph Vincler, joseph Sterlazza. Back row: Paul j. Bonenfant, john S. Pastula, Thomas j. Welter, Victor Nowak, Prof. Arthur Haman, moderator. ANGEL FLIGHT. Front row: Mary Luyckx, Judie Bell. Back row: Sue Mallory, commander, Anne Gerlach ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY. Front row: Mike McKinley, deputy commander, Mike Foley, commander, Mark Butz, Dennis 1. Bykowski, administrative officer, Kenneth Stumpf, Gus Torres, jean Devos. Middle row: Rick Elder, Ramune Stonys, john lastrzembski, liason officer, David Welsh, operations officer, jim Kearney, information officer, Douglas A. Cameron, Chris Fitzsimmons, SJ., Bill Gallagher. Back row: Chris jachulski, Bob Elder, Erwin "Buzz' Hohmann, Chris Moore, Dale R. Burkhart, Eric L. Cintron, Carl McDaniels, Greg W. Campbell. ASSOCIATION OF BLACK BUSINESS STUDENTS. Robert Turner, Gregory Randall, Charles Brown, Melissa Foster, Walter Rushing, Timothy Crawford, Denise Walker. Not shown: Larry Hightower, Bernard Buxton. BETA BETA BERRO. Front row: Mark Butz, joe Yunker, Paul Sivanich, Dick Bucci. Back row: Mark 1. Weissert, Edward T. Sprock, Bobby Elward, Buzz Balsis Rick Dzurnak. Not shown: Len Dorociak 218 I BLACK ENGINEERING SOCIETY. Front row: Mohamed S. Sylla, Adam Lecompte Ir., Bilbo McCarty lr. Back row: Harry Mont, Milton Coleman. BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION STUDENT COUNCIL. Front row: joe Berkowski, vice president, Chris Dasard, presi dent. Back row: Michael Dupuis, Rose Ann Maniaci, Charles E Brown, Roger S. Smigiel. CHEERLEADERS. Front row: Carol johnson, Pauline Powe, Adrienne Smith. Middle row: Carol Watson, Kathy jackson, co-captain, Sharon Crockett, Denise Tucker. Back row: Vicki Karpinski, captain, Valorie Brown, advisor, Patty Duthie. CHEMISTRY CLUB. Front row: Noreen Rossi, Rev. Edward M. Nemeth, SJ., Sharon Ziemniak, Vicki Cooper, Monna Wejrowski. Back row: Bill Berkowski, Tony Catka, john Domagala, Walter Brukwinski, Anne Maddalene, Albert Pierce. CHI EPSILON. Front row: john Pocius, marshall, Robert Mahoney, treasurer. Back row: Kenneth Stumpf, associate editor, Carl Fenocchi, president, Douglas Sordyl, secretary, james Nolan, vice president. CHORUS. Front row: Christine Ryan, president, Betsy Heffernan, Carol Klosowski, Lillian Liberatore, Evelyn Spurrier, Rachelle Neumann, Laura Hoskin, Monna Wejrowski, lacqueline Morin, Susan McCafferty. Middle row: Mary Klosowski, Carol Kelley, secretary, james Harold, Reginald Van Tyson Ill, William Brang, Roland Clark, Timothy Miller, Ron Northrup, Carol Schmitz. Back row: Don Large, director, Bill Kolis, business manager, Michael McComb, Benjamin I. Patterson, Georg Smith, Gary Senick, treasurer, Robert J. Vorbroker, loe Herman, vice president. COLOR GUARD. Carl McDaniels, William Helwig, Karol Klonowski, commanding officer, Larry N. Yee. Not shown: William Boik, Gerard Fix, Norbert Stransky. Mark Coleman, Beth Kronk, Fran Miskinis, Celia Makarew Marge Sobieski, Carol Elliot. Back row: Steve Hudak, Ma Dlugoss, Greg Hindenach, Denny Miazga, Patrick Clancy, Dean Robert Puchalla, Ken Lill, Gary Shovlin. COUNCIL OF FRATERNAL ORGANIZATIONS. Front row:. 1 I DELTA SIGMA PI. Front row: john R. Stevens, jerrell E. Barnhill, john Stachowski, Mike Berthiaume, Cy Wayman, joseph Beck. Middle row: Bill Tudor, Ted Sudomir, Dennis Stoll, Manfred Rosenkranz, Ramon Berg, Rick Kaminski. Back row: Tony Carmen, Wayne Baxter, Tom Wallace, jim Hogan, Edward j. Lesniak, jr., William N. Campeau, Paul C. Shoup, Larry Socle. ENGINEERING STUDENT COUNCIL. Front row: joseph M. Wozniak, Casimer Marzec, Douglas Sordyl, Bilbo McCarty jr., Gary Rudowski. Middle row: Rich Bochnovich, Bernard Zukowski, Adam Lecompte jr., Thomas j. Welter, David Van Damia, Prof. Arthur Haman, moderator. Back row: Paul j. Bonenfant, vice president, joseph A. juskiewicz, Dale Valvo, treasurer, Don C. Bramlett, president, Richard V. Long, secretary, lack Gemender. Not shown: jim Dresbach. ETA KAPPA NU. Front row: Mark P. Calcaterra, Palaniappan. S., Dan Mehall. Back row: john Hengesbach, Ron Pavetto, Gary Rudowski, Rich Krakowski. EVENING BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION STUDENT COUNCIL. Front row: Marie Michael, president, Timothy N Kelly, vice president, George P. Angell, treasurer, Daniel j. Ruese, secretary. Back row: Alex Greene III, Nick C. Spiroff, Dorothy E. Bennick, Martin H. Hardy, H. joseph Pariseau, Albert E. Clingman. Not shown: june Strong. EVIL NEFARIOUS RECEIVING-MAIL CREW. Front row Tim Knoll, Rick Taylor, Bruce Adelman, Dohn Smythe ll Adolph Paul, Tom King, john Chancey. Back row Rick Casazza, Rick Palonka, Stewart Neuville, joe Nicholls, Brow, Not shown: D.S. Guzden, missing in action, Roy Mantelll FLOOR REPRESENTATIVES. Front row: Robert Thomasma, lohn O'Leary, Phil Kaiser, Bill Hotz. Middle row: Werner Biedermann, Amy Fouinier, Walt Heffernan, Douglas Becker. Back row: Rowena Stridiron, Cheryl Wilcox, Beverly Pickett, joe Spencer. FOOD SERVICES COMMITTEE. Front row: Phil Kaiser, Dean Henry Fagin, Edward Rapoport, Mike Steenberge. Back row: Lee Kaplan, Werner Biedermann, john Haubert, Edward Evertz, Paul Howe, Richard Bochnovich. FORENSIC FORUM. Front row: Michael Braum, Patrice Desmond, Janet Yerby, faculty advisor, Marie Braun, joy jones, Mary Ablan, vice president. Middle row: Charles Dause, faculty advisor, Patricia Coleman, Harriet Harris, Mary Powers, Ann Goliber, jill V. Street, Barbara Kenzie, Gloria Wesley, Robert Fontecchio, president, Dennis Dellinger, coach. Back row: Ross I. MacKenzie, business manager, Bill Solomon, varsity, Joseph I. Ayaub, varsity, loseph Cozzolino, Robert Latimoro, Gene Petruska, john Hawkins, Frederick Glenn. ll . A "M 1 4 553 F., GAMMA PI EPSILON. Front row: jean Stilphen, Bette Alderman. Back row: Marguerite Schervish, Eileen Hagerty. Not shown: Denise Mathes, Pat Handley, Donna Van Buhler, Trudy Vincent. GOSPEL CHOIR. Front row: john Blackwell, director, Marilyn Selden, Laura Hoskin, Deborah Gray, Deborah Mitchell, Paula Skyneska Denson, Czerny Esters, president, Eileen Tann, Gloria Smith, SeCretary. Middle row: Gregory Denegall, Harry Mont, Bruce Clark, Carlton Hill, Kenneth Robbins, Walter Rushing. Back row: Raymond Hayward, lack Clanton, Robert Twyman. Not shown: Bernard Buxton, vice president, Eddie Hatton, Carol Morgan, Larry Hightower, treasurer, Cynthia Stallworth, Diana Hason, Brian Mims, LeRoi Harmon, LeRoy Meadows. HONORS PROGRAM. Front row: George Pickering, Eileen Hagerty, Karen Brown, Sheila Lahiff, Vicki Cooper. Middle row: Monna Wejrowski, Anne Maddalena, Ava Glanz Al Motil, Larry Heidkamp. Back row: Nick Lombardo, john Seely, joseph I. Ayaub, Robert Vander Lann. INDIA ASSOCIATION. Front row: Vinod Patel, B.S. Sata, president, Pushpinder Bindra, secretary, T.C. Venkat, vice president, Palaniappan S. Back row: Mahesh Desai, Mirza G. Beg, Deepak Ihaveri, treasurer, Bipin B. Parikh. INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS. Front row: Gary Rudowski, Dan Mehall, Steve Hudak, jim Dresbach. Back row: Mahesh Desai, Don C. Bramlett, john B. Loughney, jack Gemender. Not shown: Mark Calcaterra, Richard Krakowski, Ron Pavetto. INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ASSOCIATION. Front row: Roger Palaganas, Chandana Tongpradith, jose Escobar, Somchai Klunklin, Atul Gandhi, james Bowe. Middle row: jef- frey Beneby, Said Pajoohi, Mirza Beg, Walter Sprick, Yoji Komori, Sheila Perrault, Wandida Phuangpayom, Ed Rapoport, Stan Dalle, Dorothy Bautel, Deepak jhaveri, janak Desai, Mohan joshi. Back row: Passakorn Suwanakanit, Betty Go, Fr. Arthur Loveley S.j., Reza Shafii, Rajesh Shah, E. Richard Salisbury, Foreign Student Director, Bonlap Chan, Krishna Shrestha, juergen Duenbostel, Mrs. Phyllis Salisbury, Churdvit Ridhiprasart, Tony Liu, Bill Chung, Pat Chen, lssaraphan Petchaptana, Daksha Shah, Tanes Sucharikul. KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS. Front row: Richard Niemiec, deputy grand knight, Bill Reczkowski, inside guard, Richard LeTissier, trustee. Back row: Arthur F. Gawconski, financial secretary, Ed Leelun, trustee, Cordell Ray, warden, Tim Cupples, recorder. MANDELLA. Front row: Dave Gudes, Nancy Sharbatz, Doug MacEachern, Leola Dickey, Bill Welch. Back row: jim Dresbach, Marilyn Sharbatz, Annie Musinski, Deborah Greene, Mike McLain. Not shown: Pete Heron, Larry Brady, Itha Gabriels, Gina Montgomery, Pete Webber, Diane Tesin, Mike Rutz, john Ryan, Mary Walker, Lou Sanner, Pete Miceli, Bob Remiger, Ellen Rodgers, Cliff Neumann, Helen Middleton, Skip Davis, john Mason, lim Breen, joe Killian, Tom Gedgaudes, Tony Piccione, Bill Wood, Mike jablonski, Doni Miller, joe Farinella, Marty Thomas, Kathy Voisard, Mike Meehan, Marty Bloomfield, Mo Lebel, john Saliba, Dick Weber, Frank Weschler, Pat Gibbs. 3 if 55 ,,... ag ...L I OMEGA CHI EPSILON. Richard A. Zwolak, vice president, Dennis M. Zelmanski, president, David I. Van Damia, treasurer, Bill Parish, secretary. PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL. Marge Sobieski, president, Chris Grabowski, vice president, Celia Makarewicz, secretary, Fran Miskinis, Sharon Ziemniak, Carol Elliott, Terry Pulido. PHI ALPHA THETA. Front row: Kenneth O'Reilly, secretary-treasurer, Beth jevitz, Eileen Hagerty, lim Rucinski, Greg Popowicz, Herman I. Muller, SJ., faculty advisor. Back row: Thad Makarewicz, Aggie Kempker, Brian Cloyd, vice president, Joseph 1. Ayaub, president, Christopher B. Welsh. HI GAMMA NU. Front row: Mary Kontolambros, Dorothy Bennick, Mildred McGurgan, Rosalie Charlton, Kathy Tullock, Pat Diekman, Concetta C. DiPonio, Bernice Dufort. Back row: Elaine Riff, Delores Holden, Marie Evanoff, Ann Betts, Larrain Thomas, Elizabeth Bozigian. Not shown: Pat Benvenuti, Cynthia Blean, lean Ford, Georgette Kattula, Lois Lewis, Emma McCallum, Collen Norwood, Eleanore Sadowski, Virginia Sternick, June Strong, Ruby Thompson. I M. r I I l I I as 0 'R In 1 I-: ' ' 1, M V , b C.. 32 ' I ...Iii H .e - I" 'eq 2,555 -.I 1 ' V? ' lj - ' I I . sq' 3,,,, I aff I II . , 4- .i,v. l I SSH' if ' -5- I I -1 133 I", I g-v 7 l , Zi' PHYSICS CLUB. Front row: Peter Keefe, David Gadzinski, Mark Conti, Rick Church, Dr. Blass. Back row: Patrick Higgins, john Lloyd, john Perko, David Weeks. PI MU EPSILON. Front row: Rick Church, Maria Radyz. Back row: Anna Marie Wiringer, Dennis johnson, Kathy Dettloff. PI TAU SIGMA. Front row: lim Kearney, recording secretary, joseph Marino, vice president, Dale R. Valvo, president, lim Strausbaugh, treasurer, Paul Sivanich. Middle row: Prof. Arthur Haman, moderator, Mikel De Irala, john Connolly, Christine Hoyt, Bernard Zukowski, Lawrence Graczyk. Back row: Al Schaeper, Thomas jasinski, Angelo L. Guido, Gerald Wika, David Troup, Ed Myzienski, Larry Turek. SAILING CLUB. Front row: lra Gold, Bryan Wehrung, Frank Kilcullen, Tim Beck, joe DiGeronimo Middle row: Peter Ray, Al McGuire, Ralph Micallef lim Dresbach, Evelyn Hirt, Larry Mandziuk Back row: Frank 1. Vrabel, Mark Milligan I SIGMA DELTA CHI. Front row: Ira Gold, Mary Puz, Rick Banas. Back row: Martin I. Habalewsky, Hank Durkin, Gerry Skora. SIGMA PI SIGMA. Front row: Peter Keefe, president, David Gadzinski, Gerhard Blass. Back row: John Perko, Patrick Higgins, Iohn Lloyd. SKI CLUB. Front row: Margie Gallagher, Eileen Kenney Peggy Kenney. Middle row: Renata D. Cieciura, Bill Gibbons, Erwin "Buzz" Hohmann, Gary Gallagher. Back row: Fritz Glade, jim Timberlake, Frank Faron. SOCIETY OF AMERICAN MILITARY ENGINEERS. Front row: Henry Dombrowski, Alexander F. Ianisz, secretary, Karol Klonowski, president, Chester Iubinski. Back row: jim Dresbach, e.s.c. representative, john Connoly, vice president, joseph Marino, joseph A Iuszkiewicz, treasurer. Not Shown: Capt. Michael Matthews, rnoderator, Robert Schulte. r SOCIETY OF AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERS. Front row: Rob Balsis, Patricia Radwan, Mark Weissert, chairman, Christine Hoyt, Dennis Dellinger, Stephen Tech jr. Middle row: Bob Elward, john S. Pastula, Paul Sivanich, Dale Valvo, joseph Marino, john Connolly. Back row: Al Schaeper, Paul j. Bonenfant, Thomas j. Welter, Thomas jasinski, Robert Fontecchio Angelo L. Guido, Gerald Wika. SOCIETY OF MANUFACTURING ENGINEERS. Front row Valvo, Adam Lecompte jr., Bernard Zukowski, Thomas j Welter, Middle row: Mohamed S. Sylla, john Connolly joseph Marino, Lawrence Graczyk. Back row: john S. Pastula, Angelo L. Guido, Gerald Wika, David Troup. STADIUM COMMITTEE 1923. C.L. Bruce, A.W. Drew, T.W. Chawke, F.j. McGough, j.P. Scallen, chairman. TAE KWON DO. Front row: Edward Cahill, instructor Paul Pabian, Bill Sandretto, president, Edward Yee, Doug Trombley. Back row: Mike Ziaja, Gary Gondek, Len McCulloch, Terry Miller, Rev. Arthur Loveley, S.j gait 19 NC r"' et' in nr,-S TAU BETA PI. Front row: Douglas Sordyl, treasurer, Robert Laleunesse, cataloger, Richard A. Zwolak, president, joseph Marino, vice president, William Parish, corresponding secretary, lim Strausbaugh, recording secretary. Middle row: Dr. Gerald A. Berman, faculty advisor, john S. Pastula, Kenneth Stumpf, pledge trainer, Steve Hudak, Mark P. Calcaterra, Anthony Pesta. Back row: james Nolan, John P. Hengesbach, David Troup, jack Gemender. Not shown: lim Gleason, Rick Krakowski. TITAN RANGERS. Front row: Carl McDaniels, Alexander F. Ianisz, jerry Westhaus, jose juan Giboyeaux, Larry N. Yee. Middle row: Jim Moroney, Norbert Stransky, Gordon Taylor, Dale S. Duda. Back row: Henry Dombrowski, William Helwig, james Boyd, Stephen Nugent, LeRoy Osborne. UNIVERSITY BOARD OF PUBLISHERS. Front row: Victor Dziekiewicz, joseph J. Ayaub, Tim Beck, Martin J. Habalewsky, Hank Durkin. Back row: Anne Spenthoff, Leslie Banas, Earl Gilewski, lim Cencer, Chris Philips, Henry Fagin. Not shown: Dr. james Wey. WOMEN IN COMMUNICATION. Front row: Beth Kronk, Carol Kelley, treasurer, Cleopatra Lee, associate. Back row: Pat Fiol, Judy Serrin, advisor, lanise Warren, president, Cynthia jones, associate. Not shown: Linda Schmidt, Malenna Carey, Ventra White. 229 B S Production Management M of Arch., Architecture Mary Ablan B.A., Psychology Mary Ann Accavitti B.S., Biolo y james Adamii B.S., Management john Agnew B.S., Finance Matteo Agosta B.S., Marketing Q-T' Frank Albrecht B.S., Marketing Bette Alderman B.A., Math Education 1,-. Bernie Aliberti George Angell Business Ram Armon john Austin B.S., Marketin William Axtell B.A. English joseph Ayaub B.A., Historv Francis Azzopardl B.A., Political Science Sundersingh Bala M.B.A., Management Brian Ball M.B.A., Business Christine Banas B.A., Economics Rick Banas B.A., Media Studies Taghi Baniriah M.A., Political Science George Barbu B.C.E., Civil Engineering james Barnac B.C.E., Civil Engineerin Connie BarricE Dental Assisting Robert Bartley B.A., Sociology Derek Bastian B.S., Financial Administration Bernard Bator Paul Battani B.A., Political Science Patricia Battersbry B.A., Speec C7 -'ew 'eff fo if fix ,i yi' Raymond Berels B.A., History Debra Bessel B.A., Social Work Benjamin Beverly B.S., Finance Linda Bidigare Dental Assisting B.S., Biolog 'Pia' ..-ff du if 'F . 2-.1 t ,J Robert Bauman B.S., Biolog joseph Beck B.S., Finance john Berberich the ?.S.,BM?Crketilng Q oe er ows I B.S., Management Science Michael Berthiaume B.S., Administration Douglas Bieber Barbara Bieker B.S., Business Michael Bien B.S., Mana ement ..ff' Nannette liair B.A., Art Debra Blaul S 'Sh LP' 'KZIZ' Christine Booth B.A., Humanities Francis Borasz B.E.E., Electrical Engineering lerome Borski B.S., Finance Howard Bosworth B.A., Media Studies B.A., Social Work Bernard Bloch j.D., Law Edward Bobilin Engineering Richard Bochnovich B.C.E., Civil Engineering Raymond Bolduc B.S., Physics Paul Bonenfant B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering i -K 4 - 'tsi Dr KX A 1-xg x . ' leanne Bourget B.A., History Geraldine Boyer B.S., Marketing Terrence Boyle B.S., Marketing Walter Braem B.A., English Don Bramlett B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Mary Brang B,A., Elementary Education Chris Brent B.S., Accounting Richard Brodeur B.S., Biology David Brown B.A., Media Studies jesse Brown B.S., Marketing Valorie Brown B.S., Personnel 81 lnd. Relations Katherine Burkhardt B.A., Humanities H. Burrell Daniel Burton B.S., Biology Linda Burton Michael Busse B.S., Biology james But e B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Me vin Byr M.A., Public Administration Erlin Cadaret .X B.S., Marketing Mark Calcaterra B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Kathleen Campbell PP B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering james Carethers B.E., Mechanical Engineering Mary Carmodly B.A., Frenc Robert Carson j.D., Law Brian Caste B.S,, Accounting Isabel Catallo B.A., Secondary Education Tony Catka B.S., Chemistry james Cencer B.A., journalism john Chancey B.A., Psychology Linda Chandler B.A., Humanities Sandra Chimienti B.A., Social Work 232 ,.- its ii ra- gf' if iv! ,fs rv' 40" TX fm. 5 JF-1, if HK its . H. Christophel M.B.A., Accounting 84 Finance Marvin Chupinsky Commerce and Finance David Claeys B.S., Biology Maureen C ancy B.A., Psychology Drexell Claytor B.A., Humanities Dennis Cleary B.S., Marketing Albert Clingman B.S., Accounting Glen Coker B.S., Accounting Vera Coleman B.A., Media Studies Beverly Collins B.A., History lohn Collins B.A., Economics lohn Conley M.A., Education lohn Connolly B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Sandra Cook B.A., Pre-Medicine Thomas Cooney Mechanical Engineering Lapinzg Coins B.A., ocio ogy gi Sebastian Coppola B.S., Accounting 'N Rickard Corbett B.A., English Maura Corrigan 1.D., Law Daniel Courtright B.A., Social Science William Covert B.S., Business Administration Timothy Crawford B.S., Accounting Mark Critz B.S., Engineering Richard Cronin B. Ch.E, Chemical Engr, Annie Crumpton B.A., English Charles Cunningham B.S., Management Rufus Curry B.S., Physical Education Stanley Cybulla B.A,, Management Denis Cyr B.S., Finance 233 B S., Management Science jaigrakash Dempo M BA Personnel Ind. Relations M S Electrical Engineering M S Mechanical Engineerin Mark Daigler .Ai B.S., Engineering D. Davis Oriana DeAngeIis B.A., French Diana Decameron Dental Assisting Edward Deenihan Thomas Denton B.S., Marketing Mahesh Desai Robert DeSpirt Kathryn Dettlog B.S., Mathematics Piero DiMambro B.S., Accounting Concetta DiPonio B.A., Management Mark Dlugoss B.A., Media Studies Larry Dlusky B.A., Media Studies Henry Dombrowski B.M.E., Mechanical Engr. john Domagala B.S., Chemistry David Donnellon B.A., Architecture j. Donnelly john Downs B.S., Marketing Pamela Driskell B.A., History Thomas Dues M. of Arch., Architecture james Duffin B.A., History joseph Dugas B.S., Marketing Robert Dunavan M A., International Politics Michael Dupuis B.S., Accounting Hank Durkin B.A., Media Studies lx Victor Dziekiewicz ff ,f 3 B A History of Ideas and Design ' , ,, , Bernard Edelson , AJ l f.- B.A., English D ffm ,Ja QA a ,Ji .Rafi 437' 'E at 500' cf' 'E 'US Bettie Farrior B.S., Marketing Carmen Farris B.A., Social Work Kathryn Faulkner B.A., Architecture Carl Fenocchi joseph Elias B.A., Sociology Gloria Enoex B.A., Humanities Marie Evanoff Business Thomas Ewald B.A., English Ignatius Ezechuky M.A., Economics fl B.C.E., Civil Engineering 'R lack Fraser B.S., Accounting Dennis Fryz Albert Ferguson B.S., Economics Brenda Ferril B.A., Humanities james Fiebelkoro Business and Administration Donald Fisco B.S., Biology Francis Fitzgerald B.S., Economics Christopher Fitzsimmens, SJ. B.A., Philosophy Timothy Flanigan B.S., Biology Marjorie Forrest B.A., Media Studies Ann Forster B.A., History William Foss B.S., Industrial Engineering B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Florence Frziekowski Fanatic Arts Marilyn Fucinari B.A., Sociology P'- nr l F fr 4 1 Rr : it . 5 t Patricia Funk B.A., Humanities Daniel Gadzinski B.S., Biology Howard Gamble B.S., Management Robert Gargus BS Accounting Armand Garza BS Biology 235 B E E Electrical En ineering Fred Gassert B.A,, Sociology Mary Gassert B.A., History Russell Gates B.S., Finance Alan Gebauer B.S., Economics Deloris Gee B.S., Accounting john Gemender B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Wallace Gemignani B.S., Accounting Gerard Genello B.E.E., Electrical Engineerin Anne GerlacE B.A., Social Work Raymond Gibson M.B.A., International Trade Paul Giuliani B.S., Management Terrian Givens M.A., Sociology Thomas Gladden B.S., Finance james Gleason M.E., Electrical Engineerin Ira Gola B.A., Mass Communications B.C.E. Clvil Engineering james Golemblewski Norbert Golemblewski Claude Goodwin M.A., Theology William Goss jr. james Eorczycki B.S., Accounting Christine Grabowski B.S., Biolog Lawrence Graczy Engineering Lawrence Graffigna B.A., Sociology Charlene Grass B.A., History James Gray jr. B.A., Socio ogy janet Graziani Dental Assistant Winifred Greer B.A., Elementary Education ff 'Pad CZ? ,E ,. fi"- Wife .-.- JL 'zvs J . E' 'V . ff' Q55 Paul Griffin B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Gretchen Grumbac er Graphix Angelo Guido 'Irv B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Richard Gushman B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Thomas Guthrie B.S., Accounting vow, John Hackett B.S., Chemistry Eileen Hagerty B.A., English Patricia Handley Arts and Sciences .rf- Eric Hall M.B.A., Business Lawrence Hamilton B.A., Art Shanna Hamilton B.S., Physical Education Richard Hammer B.A., Economics Sten Hansen B.S.E.E., Electrical Engineering Michael Hapanowicz B.S., Economics Q... X. C., , Martin Hardy B.S., Finance Lelia Harris B.A., Humanities 5, Margaret Harris wwe B.A., Elementary Education Gennetta Harrison B.A., Sociology Norma Harrison B.S., Accounting 47" 9.1 AL? -Lf 'Q-5 George Harvilla B.S., Biology Eddie Hatton lr. B.A., Media Studies james Hawkins B.S., Accounting Florence Hayman B.A., Education jill Hayosh M.B.A., Business john Hengesbach B.S.E.E., Electrical Engineering james Herr B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Catherine Herzog B.A., Music Herbert Hess B.A., Management Lawrence Hill nu B.A., Architecture 237 james Hllli oss M.B.A., Personnel 81 Ind. Relatgons Industrial Relations Gregory Hindenach B.S., Marketing Management Richard Hindenach B.S., Management Science james Hineman B.S., Finance Ellen Hines B.A., Education Ruth Hinkson Arts and Sciences joel Hinojosa B.S., Accounting DonaIdBHi.xson usiness 5:7 Anne Hoban B.A., Sociology Ridene Ho an B.A., English james Hojnacki B.M.E., Mechanical Engineerin ' Lucy Holifielg B.A., Psychology Douglas Hollywood B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Mattie Holston B.A., Social Work Catherine Hopkins B.A., En'-glish john otia B.S., Management Henrietta Hotzkiss Hebrew History Thomas Huber B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Steve Huda B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Br. joseph Hund O.F M B.S., Accounting john Hus B.Ch.E., Chemical Engineerm William Husa B.S., Accounting Mujahid Hussain M.B.A., Marketing Felicia Ioli j.D., Law Ellsworth jackson B.A., Social Work .1 Michael jackson B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Robert jackson jr. j.D., Law Thomas jackson B.S., Biology Vernice jackson M.A.T.M., Mathematics john jacoby B.S., Marketing Michael jankowski B.S, Business Administration Robert jaromin B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Paul jeffries B.A., Media Studies Debra johnson BA English Dennis johnson BS Math Kenneth johnson B.A., Psychology Louis johnson B.A., Sociology Guy jones 1' B.S,, Accounting Rutha Mae jones B.A., Humanities Brian jordan B.S., Economics judith junghans B.A., Socia Work joseph juszkiewicz B.Ch.E., Chemical Engineering YY' Chester Kaczmarek B.S., Finance jeffrey Kane B.S., Accounting john Karpach 'Q-1' B.A., Experimental Division Larry Kazmirowski B.A., Psychology james Kearney B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Michael Kedzierski B.A., History Rose Kelly B.S., Accounting Timothy Kelly Business Steven Kemper B.A., English Walter Kempski B.A., Graphic Art .YA Patrick Kennedy B.A., Economics .gs Carol Kiefer B.S., Biology Sung Kim M.S., Chemical Engineering Gary Kleier B. of Arch., Architecture Thomas Klimek B.C.E., Civil Engineering B.ch.E., chemiElliuEnlQIlfl'2c2'flfQ M.E.E., Electrical Engineering B.A., Poldigly 55525122 B.S., Business and Administration Richard Krakowski B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Allan Kramer B.C.E., Civil Engineering john Kulaga B.B.A., Management Frank Kummer B.S., Physical Education Louis Kusnier D,D.S., Dentistry Robert Kuszynskl B.A., Media Studies BS Accounting M.CA Corrections Pushap Lamba M.A., Guidance and Counseling MaryALangenhorst B.A., edia Studies Michael Laurain B.S., Accounting Timothy Lauster M.B.A., Marketing Claudia Lee B.A., Humanities B.E E Electrical Engineering B. of Arch., Architecture Salvatore Lentine .. , B.S., Management Gregory Lewandowski T .4-P' B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering , Wilma Lewis 6' ' 1 Business 8' Russell Lieder B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering I Michael Lennon , 4 24-df' Ted Lietz B.A., English Kenneth Lill B.S., Accounting Jane Linahan -ng, -4 B.F.A., Theatre "1 Loretta Lindberg Lin uistics Fred Lindsey M.A., Urban Affairs ,A-1 '4Z"' s-I Kathleen Lipiec B.A., Sociology Alexander List M.A., Economics Gregory Lomas B.S., Management Science Nicholas Lombardo B.A., English li pw 4-1 Richard Long B.Ch.E., Chemical Engineering Marco Lora B.A., Psychology lohn Loughney B.E.E., Electrical Engineering jeffrey Lovero B.A., Psychology David Lovetere B.C.E., Civil Engineering 6 '55 Walter Lucken l.D., Law N' " A Henrietta Luckie . ' fe' Dorothy MacDonald Dental Assisting Douglas MacEachern V 1 B.A. Media Studies Linda Mack B.A., Art 1-X, ,K Carol MacKenzie B.S., Physical Education Q Larry MacKenzie fl- igflarketing d k u ene Macu zins i 95' 5 BS? Finance Thomas Madden B.S., Production Diane Madej B.A., Humanities 241 Vannasri Manomai-Udom B A Language and Lin uistics Conrad Maitland Diane Majkows I BA Humanities Cecilia Makarewicz B,S., Personnel 84 Ind Relations Y B A Psychology Lawrence Mandell M.A., Urban Studies Rose Ann Maniaci B.S., Marketing Christopher Mann B.A., Sociology Vern gvianor Arts and Sciences loseph Marino M.E., Mechanical Engineering Susan Markiecki Dental Assisting Richard Mar B.C.E., Civil Engineering jimmy Marsha B.S., Marketing Susan Marsha B.A., Psychology Arthur Martin B.S., Management Casimer arzec B.Ch.E., Chemical Engineering loan Masinic Dental Assisting Mark Massa, SJ. B.A., History john Matous B.S., Finance Kenneth Mattson B.A., Political Science Michael Matuzak B.S., Biology Michael Matz B.S., Finance Robert Mauk B.S., Management Kathleen McCarthy B.A., Elementary Education T' ,,,-ar 'S S:-'Y 7 Q90 T Z' l Annena McCleskey B.A., Elementary Education john McCloskey LD., Law Ronald McCully B.S., Accounting Wallace McGee B.S., Business and Administration Alfred McGuire B.S., Accounting Kathleen Mclsaac B.A., En lish I, Patricia i4cLeod 1' B.S., Personnel 84 Ind. Relations Frankie McNair B.S., Administration George McNamara B.S., Marketing Thomas Menzies B.S., Accounting Elvira Meza B.A., Spanish Thomas Mianecki B.S., Biology Dennis Miazga Marie Michael B.S., Finance Richard Michaels B.S., Management Michael Micheletti B.S., Accounting Helen Middleton B.A., Social Work Maude Middletown Metalsmithin William Mikuqa B.C.E., Civil Engineering George Miles B.S., Finance Francis Miller B.S., Biology john Miller B.S., Administration Carmen Minchella B.A., Media Studies Judith Minshall B.A., Experimental Division Deborah Mitchell B.A., Sociology Dennis Mltclienor B.A. Psyc oo Kiichiro Miyalgdl M.B.A., International Trade William Modrzynski B.A., History B.E.E., Electrical Engineering 243 B M E Mechanical Engineering B.A., Media Studies B M E Mechanical Engineering B A Mass Communications B.S., Physical Education Edward Modzelesky B.E.E., Electrical En ineering Wilfreg Moffatt M.B.A. Economics Michael Moir D.D.S., Dentistry Robert Molitoris B.S., Biology Beatrice Moore B.A., Social Work Gig. Regina Moore BA., Social Work Susie Moore B.A., Social Work john Morehouse B.S., Mathematics Iacqueline Morin B.A., French David Morrison B.S., Marketing Ernest Morton B.S., Marketing Ronald Munger B.S., Finance Christo her Myers Floyd Myers Stephanie Nano B.A., Media Studies Richard Napior M.B.A., Business Naif Naseef Business Natalie Nekkormat Naval Meditation Marcia Nepjuk 1.D., Law Orest Nestorowicz Sonja Neuville B.A., German 3- Stewart Neuville janet Newman "" Dental Assisting Lawrence Niedowicz Gregory Niemiec B.A., Psychology james Nolan B.C.E., Civil Engineering Michael Norris Arts and Sciences Ronald Northrug B.A., Englis Nancy Nowmorethanever Y B C E Civil Engineering Charles O'Connor B S Business and Administration Edward O'Donnell BS Accountinlg Kenneth O'Rei y BA History Thomas Ossy B A American Studies Michael O'Sullivan BS Management B M E Mec anical Engineering Joseph Pariseau William Parish M.Ch.E., Chemical Engineering Robert Parker M,B.A., Personnel 84 Ind Relations Marsha Parks B.A., Psychology William Parne lr M.B.A., Finance Anthony Paschke BS Accounting john Pastula B M E , Mechanical Engineering Norman Patalon BS Accounting lagdish Patel M B A., Accounting Vinod Patel M B A., Accounting Fannie Patton M.A,, Reading Ronald Pavetto M.E.E., Electrical Engineering B.A., Media Studies B.S., Production Management Frederick Peltier B. of Arch., Architecture Anthony Pesta B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Sandy Peters A.B., Mathematics Patricia Pharaoh Palestinian Plateware llene Phares B.A., Mathematics Mohini Plmputkar M. of Science, Chemistry Kathleen Pitloc B.A., Social Work john Pocius B.C.E., Civil Engineering john Pokryfki B.S., Personnel 81 Ind. Relations joseph Polniaszek jr. B.E.E., Electrical Engineering A.B., jay Prinstein B.A., Media Studies Christine Provencal B.S., Biology james Qualters B.A., English Ronald Quincy M.A., Urban Affairs james Quinn B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering 246 Marlena Peleo Donald Peltier Patricia Phillig B.A., Frenc Sheila Phillips B.A., History jerome Pietryla Engineering Suzanne Pilat B.A., English 'E Gregory Popowicz Mathematical Economics Penny Posionkowski Polish Studies Shirley Pratt B.A., Psychology jesus Prieto B.S., Marketing -., james Regan B.S., Accounting loyce Renforth B.A., Art Richard Retman Z, B.S., Accounting Manuel Reyes B.S., Accounting Gary Rhoades B.A., English Patricia Rice B.S., Biology Claude Richards B.S., Business Administration Churdvit Ridhiprasart M.A., Public Administration Margaret Ristagno B.A., Spanish Sandra Ritter M.A., Histor David Rivard' B.A., Social Work Richard Rivard Business lose Rivera B.S., Finance Marie Rivers Randy Roberts B.A., Sociology Linda Robinson B.A., Elementary Education Robin Rocket Rock 84 Roll Ronald Roman B.S., Management Kenneth Rossi B. of Arch., Architecture joseph Rowe B.A., Political Science Barbara Rudd B.A., Humanities Deborah Ruf B.A., English Charles Ruifrok M.B.A., Accounting Charles Russell M.A., Urban Affairs james Rutkowski B,A., Psychology Eleanore Sadowski ,tr B.S., Accounting Tom Samoray B.A., Media Studies Frank Sanda B,E., Engineering B.S., Business Education B M.E., Mechanical En ineering james Sanford B.A., History Sommart Sangchanthamanee B.A., Economics Lou Sanner Arts and Sciences john Saunders B.S., Management joseph Scaglione B.S,, Administration Marguerite Schervish B.A., Sociolog Charles Schmidll B.S. Economics Glendon Schmidt B.S., Biologiy Linda Schmi t B.A., Media Studies Carol Schmitz B.A., French 41 Karen Schulte B.A., Social Work Donald Sedo! B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Katherine Seefe t B.A., EnFlish Gregory Se chik B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Felix Seldon M.A., Education Administration Paul Selesky B.M.E., Mechanical En ineering Carol gerafinski B.A., Social Work Michael Sessions, 5.1. B.A., Religious Studies Robert Seymour B. of Arch., Architecture joseph Sferlazza B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Samantha Shaalom Semitic Studies Prafulchandra Shah M.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Ceasar Sharper B.E.E., Electrical Engineerin Patricia Sherro B.A., Psychology Alan Shinkman Stangey Shipp B.S., Ph sical Education Xnthony Shivers B.S., Marketing Nicholas Showic 1 B.S., Management Lawrence Simmons B.S., Economics Si 248 Fx Q 6 'Fx Donald Sitarski M.B.A., Public Administration Gerald Skora , V A B.A., Media Studies --af Suzanne Skorupa -sg., B.A., History 3 , MSR. if David Sluka X B.S., Accounting X as - - ., l 2+ Roger Smigiel B.S., Finance Thomas Smith B M E Mechanical Engineering Thalerngsok Snitwongse M B A Personnel Charles Sobers D D S Dentistry Lawrence Socie B S , Management Suzanne Sofian B.A., Humanities E. Marie Sommerville B.A., Humanities Sonia Sonicboom Science Mark Sophiea --f Arts and Sciences Douglas Sordyl B.C.E., Civil Engineering Barbara Sortor B.A., English Margaret Spindler B.S. Physical Education Nick Spiroff B.S., Administration Phyllis Spivery B.A., Social Work Victor Stafford B,A., Media Studies Victoria Stanczak B.A., Social Work lacquelyn Stanley B.A., Humanities lane Stasser B.A., English Kathleen Stephenson B.S., Marketing john Stevens Philip Stevens B.S., Business Administration Georgette Stieber Dental Assisting lgichard Stoey r usiness s.. Clarice Stovall B.A., Social Work Susan Strzykalski B.A., Math Education 249 Daniel Stuczynski ' B.S., Management Kenneth Stumpf B.C.E., Civil Engineerin Sgzie Sigccrgasg utie un ries Daniel Succarde in B.A., Industrial Psychology Theodore Sudomir B.S., Management john Sullivan B.E.E., Electrical Engineering Timothy Sullivan B. of Arch., Architecture Thomas Swaney B.S., Accounting james Sweeney M.A., Urban Affairs Vance Swift B.A., History Ronald Sykes B.S., Management Edward Szawiel B.S., Finance Tillie Tagalong Ta Tales Danny Tang M.B.A., Accounting 81 Finance Patricia Tarnowski B.A., Business Education David Tash B.S., Accounting Gordon Taylor Phillip Taylor B.S., Marketing Stephen Tech Jr. B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Paul Tellers B. of Arch., Architecture Richard Terlaak B.M,E., Mechanical Engineering Phil ip Tewe M.A., Guidance Counseling Pariyavadee Theerathada B.A., Language and Linguistics Michael eisen B.S., Mathematics Lauri Thom Dental Assisting Margo Thomas B.A., Social Work Noel Thomas Media Studies Verlyn Thomas M.A., Guidance 81 Counseling 250 xg, in ? WJ . 7 'fa 6 vs.- T' Robert Thomasma B.A., Media Studies Deborah Thomcpson B.A., Mass Me ia Ruby Thompson B.S., Marketing John Tigue B.E,E., E ectrical Engineering Gregory Tomaszewski B.S., Mechanical Engineering Louis Trama I Patricia Tringali an B.A., Humanities Daniel Trompeter B.A., English David Troup Mary Lou Trugiano B.S., Physical ducation Yaovanee Tulyasathien B.S., Accounting Leroy Twehues B.S., Accounting Robert Twyman B.A., History David Underdown B.S., Management Lloyd Utterback M.B.A., Finance Dale Valvo Donna Van Buhler B.A., Humanities Dental Assisting Jeffery Varga Edna Vasciuez B.A., Mat ematics Nancy Verdura G' A.B., Mathematics Trudy Vincent B.S., Biology joseph Vincler B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Patricia Vinson janice Wais B.S., Physical Education Wanda Wakajawaka Weightlifting Mic ael Wa czak B.A., American Studies Mark Waldecker Denise Walker B.S., Accounting M.M.E., Mechanical Engineering B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Sandra Vanden Boom B. of Arch., Architecture B.Ch.E., Chemical Engin M R.E., Religious Education B M E Mechanical Engineering B B E., Electrical Engineerin loyce Walker B.A., Social Work Patricia Walker B.A., Media Studies Patrick Wallace B.A., History Tom Wallace B.S., Management Sr. Loretta Ann Walsh james Ward William Warejko Keith WarlicE B.S., Accounting janise Warren B.A., Media Studies 5 George Watson B.S., Management Patricia Watson B.A., Humanities Uzziel Wayman B.S., Accounting Richard Weber I Bryan Wehrung B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering ?"" Linda Weiler B.A., Humanities William Welch B.S., Mathematics Darrell Welling Business Patricia Wenzl B.A., Humanities Leonard Wernette B.S., Management Frank Weschler, SJ. B.A., English Wendy Whir igig Witticisms Arthur White B.A., History joseph Wickens M.B.A., Finance Michael Wierzbinski B.S., Accounting Gerald Wika B M E Mechanical Engineering 15: Emma Williams B.A., Humanities james Williams Mechanical Engineering Morris Williams B.S., Management john Willis D.D,S., Dentistry Marlene Willis B.A., Speech William Willoughby B.A., Media Studies Anna Marie Wiringer B.S., Mathematics Arnold Wojciak B.S., Finance Richard Wojcicki B.S., Management Michael Wojciechowski B.A., History Marcia Woodward B.A., Social Work Gary Woollard B. of Arch., Architecture joseph Wozniak ill B.Ch.E., Chemical Engineering Thomas Wozniak M.A., Mathematics Daniel Wright Gai' Wyman B.Ch.E., Chemical Engineering Mary Yaquinto B.A., Social Work Pierre Yuen M.B.A., Business Michael Yurick B.S., Accounting Richard Zapala l.D., Law Richard Zaranek B.S., Physical Education Rosemarie Zaremba Dental Assisting Steven Zarowny B.S., Accounting Carlos Zela-Koort lx if Sharon Ziemniak B.S., Chemistry joseph Zott M.B.A., Finance Richard Zwolak M.E., Chemical Engineering Bernard Zukowski B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering Thaddeus Zyrek B.A., History B.M.E., Mechanical Engineering B We f f v N Z5 Jb ' d I Q , J tli 4' it -in fc L ll p9 L . . A PW KYQ f -1- Vi Ai! WD iilvw All L , H9153 SQ f if Qi fl! Hg sg fm yay J fa'r.s,"' f Dr. Wm. E. Alton, D.D.S. Dr. Max Appel Lewin F. Barber, D.D.S. Dr. William L. Bates Dr. Stephen Baynai D'57 Dr. Robert Becker, D.D.S. Dr. Fred Bianco Dr. Thomas j. Birney Bockstanz Brothers Company Dr. and Mrs. Norman K. Carstens john R. Champagne, D.D.S. Chaplow Lumber Company Chirco, Donaldson, Ruwart, and Musgrove Dr. George M. Cohan Dr. john V. Comella Mr. S. Gerard Conklin George and julia Cooney Dr. joseph A. De Perro, D'45 Dr. Louis j. De Perro, jr. D'50 Detroit Marketing Products, Corp. Dr. Norbert A. Dittmar D'56 Buell Doelle Dr. Richard S. Fedorowicz D'55 Dr. Robert G. Fisher D'54 Dr. Horace M. Floyd john L. Francis Wm. H. Gibbs, jr., D.D.S. William D. Gilbridge Bernard Girard Dr. Samuel Glossman H. W. Goldstrom, D.D.S. Edward T. Goodrich Dr. james C. Greenlees D'66 Dr. Simon Harrison Hyde and Bobbio, Inc. A.T. jones and Son Dr. Bernard P. Kean Dr. Harry Kems Milton Herman Kionka Dr. john Koerber Koperski and Peters Dr. james Robert Kranz Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Leithauser Dr. Henry E. Lenden Norman j. Le Vasser Dr. Benjamin Lisowski Dr. Francis A. Lutone j. Bernard Mclnerney Dr. and Mrs. Bernard j. Masson james P. Mattimore Dr. john Paul Mehall Dr. Paul Mentag Monarch Welding Company Dr. A. W. Moss William Murray L'39 Dr. Harold D. Nixon Dr. Melvin A. Noonan D'44 Dr. Samuel L. Olen Brackie j. Orr L'51 Marvin j. Petrous, D.D.S. Dr. james D. Pfeiffer D'58 Cass Piotrows ki Dr. and Mrs. S. j. Poniatowski Dr. jerome Sage D'59 Carl H. Schmidt Co. Harry G. Sellars, D.D.S. Dr. Leo Shipko Gerald C. Simon Dr. and Mrs. j. Skoney Dr. Albert P. Span D'56 Dr. Fred D. Stoye Dr. George D. Thomas Dr. Stephen William Turansky D'6O Dr. Daniel Wadowski D'59 Ralph R. Weiss, D.D.S. james C. Wetzel L'53 joseph R. Zanglin Dr. Robert j. Zobl, D.D.S. WK Y Y I? ,546 Er ,auf Lrg? WY" ff F'1 1'-mifmf' 'ee , 3 - it W i wsu ee 1 y Jo ar :ix ' 'V fi' is .i it lie i i te. -E W i i ee I is, IS? me i 1, gi ii liar "fi L ,i ii up , lst: 'I ,ter 1 i. ly Q I- TWT 'TTTT ' f if I AIexander8rAIexander of Michigan, Inc. ist DIA Division 'si Over 60 Years As NM 7650 Second Avenue lei Detroit, Michigan 48202 No. 2 Nortntield Plaza i- i Troy, iviiCmgan1ieoe4 ia intl T I i : I- PLUMBING HEATING FIRE PROTECTION I-41 Alexander8tAIexander lil Insurance E3roker!Agents al lt and Consultants . . ggi Serving Business and DeI"o'I SUQUWW lndustry Worldwide. M Il all I? Regional Headquarters: Compliments of Atlanta i Baltimore l Dalai i DRUMMY Detroit I It I Los Angeles I MmiO'lS i LD M0 Bl LE NevvYork City i i Li . ll 14925 E. 8 Mile Lil , I ie.t i i I at Gratiot ,ifmiwigi if WWI? 51' ,,l i 'T' "" "l 'ff i 'Y It' f,,i ul I :Mi I I. at ff' 4 ,f"'71,. i i i I - V l E 0 51- Detroit I f f'i if Ll me "Exif i P R 2 - 2 2 I 1 I ..,' 2, Twif G Pllfltali EIBGIYIC 15500 Wy t 3 3 Unlversal Blndery Co 3615 Hart Ave Detroit Mlchlgan 48214 VA 21636 S S White Company PENNWALT CORPORATION MAIN OFFICE 1 N th thf Id M hg 48075 A I S IS LEDERMANN OFFERS THE FINEST IN OCOMPLETE MAINTENANCE OREPAIRS LEDERMAN ELEVATOR COMPANY 923 6095 The M1ese1 Company FOOD SERVICE SPECIALIST 825 7990 6000 BUCHANAN Its the real thing Compliments of l oming, De roit D UN - - 0.50 ' I I Adivision of D I I EQUP I CI S DDI' OMODERNIZATION D t 't - A A b L . 9 - S Q. 2460 t lLl'gh y S . . . F I ' D r ppl' I ' O as A 99 ' 5 ' 70-31 was Y L ff planning and design. UNivcrsily l-3539 J GW- 09 L ng!! J rocess Ga L NECATIVES :S OFFSET PLATES O I"CO'I 14849 LIVERNOIS AVE. DETROIT 38. MICHIGAN call GAIL 81 RICE TALENT, 537-62OQ 24453 GRAND RIVER for complete information about NAME BANDS d ACTS, Loca or Knowledgeable Help in Choosing a Location and Office Planning itton Dental store manager will gladly assist you in selecting DETROIT'S NEWEST! FINEST! ntsnunmt Ann cocmn nouns: 7525 W. McNICl-IOLS cs BLOCKS WEST or LIVERNOISJ ITALIAN AMERICAN CUISINE BANQUET FACILITIES FOR ALL OCCASIONS for RESERVATIONS call UN. 2-6455 - AMPLE PARKING - a location and in Y will benefit from his long experience in many other ways. His knowledge of y needs enables him to carry adequate stocks of proven and accepted dental ppl es and equipment at all times Csome 10,000 different itemsy. He maintains a re- for information or advertising rates p nd installation department. He is your friend with the know-how to help you. call or write Litton Dentol Products Co. Litton Industries 1238 Anderson Rd. Clawson, Mich. 435-2424 David P. Seifert Director of Advertising University of Detroit KoPEcKY MATTRESS co. 4001 W- MCN1Ch01S Rd' TW1-9034 Detroit, Michigan 48221 12460 Conant Detroit,Michigcn 48212 Ext. 268 Mattresses and Pillows Any Size American comfort, European handlin . 111ey meet in Monte Carlo. , Q Monte Carlo has always been a car unllke any other Yet our 73 Monte Carlo S IS even more unrque Chassls frame and sus penslon geometry were extenslvely redeslgned to aclneve speclal handlmg great road cars of Europe Coach wrndows molded full foam seats rlch uphol stery and a classlc lnstru ment panel reflect Monte Carlo s 1nd1v1dual1ty The new flow through power vent1lat1on system adds to 1ts guletness Power front dlsc brakes power steerlng and a brg V8 are standard of course can be added Monte Carlo S We thlnk you ll f1nd lt one of the best road cars you ve ever dr1ven 1973 Chevroiet Bulldmg a better way to see are 23,5 A traits like those found in the M A power-operated sky root . . M . t f Q, HEINEMAN 8. LOVETT CO. INC. . J WELGUME Building Restoration and J i , WaferprooHng Contractors 8700 TIREMAN AVENUE " V f WEbster 3-7161 , x-53 . V p li m i t . . . to the world. Wh our education chuges you , ,,,, paw... ,, KQPECKY MATTRESS CO, ith a responsibility to mankind. ll May you discharge that responsibility TW 1-9034 ' V lf ilgflf with strength and wisdom. 12460 comm Denon, Michigan 48212 f. Moffresses and Pillows W Q H If , 2 A Rorc Any Size ' AT THE UNIVERSITY 0F DETRUIT , ,,,,,7,i "We don't need a concept, we're a newspaper." EDEX Mon 60201944 002595 ABELARD AND HELOISE, ABLAN, MARY, 222,230 ACCAVE'I'I'l, MARY ANN, 210,230 ADAMS GREG, 211 ADAMSKI, IAMES, 230 ADELMAN, BRUCE, 222 AGNEw, IOHN, 230 AGOSTA, MATTEO, 230 ALBRECHT,FRANK, 230 ALBRECHT IONI, 210 ALBRIGHT SI, GERALD ALDERMAN, BETTE, 223,230 ALDERMAN, BILL, 213,223 ALIBERTI, BERNIE, 230 ALLEN, 0TI'IS, 216 ALMEIDA, F, 217 ANDERSON, CARLO, 208 ANDERSON, ELTON, 38,135 ANDLER, GEORGE, 206 ANGELL, GEORGE P , 221,230 APPLEYARD, MARG, 203 ARCHITECTURE, 36,69 ARMON, RAM, 230 ARNFIELD,1 M, 48 ARRUPE, SI, Pener, 36 ATKINS, MARVARINE, 204 AUSTIN IOHN, 230 AXTELL, WILLIAM, B0 AYAUB, IOSEPH I, 86,222,223,225,229,230 AZZOPARDI, FRANCIS, 230 BACON, DARNELL, 199,200 BALA, SUNDERSINGH, 230 BALDIN, FRANK, 206 BALL, BRIAN, 230 BALSIs, BUZZ, 210 BALSIS, ROBERT, 220 BANAS, LESLIE, 229,230 BANAS, RICK, 191,227,230,270,271 BANIRIAH, TAGHI, 230 BARALT, IR , A R., 4 BARANOWSKI, IOHN, 207 BARBU, GEORGE, 230 BARILOVICH, DAVE, 212,217 BARNES, DAVE, 196 BARNHILL, IERRELL F., 221 BARRETT, MICHAEL, 207 BARRICK CONNIE, 230 BARTLEY, ROBERT, BARToszEK, ED, 212 BASTIAN, DEREK, BATOR, BERNARD, BATT, BILL, 206 BAITANI, PAUL, 230 BATTERSBY, PATRICIA, 210,231 BATTLE, OSCAR, 195 BAUMAN, BOB, 212,216,231 BAUMANN, KEVIN, 195 BAUTEL, DOROTHY, BAVER, FRED, 195 BAxTER, wAYNE, 221 BECK IosEPH, 221,231 BECK, TIM, 30,43,226,229 BECKER, DOUGLAS, 222 BECKER, S I, PAUL, 47,49,s2,s4,ss BEDDOW,lEFF, 214 BEG, MIRZA G, 223,224 BEGAN, MARY PAT, 203 BELFORD, THOMAS, 200 BELL, IUDIE, 218 BELL, NANCY, 199 BELLI, MELVIN, 14,39,170 BENEBY,IEFFREY, 224 BENNICK, DOROTHY, 221, BENVENUTI, PAT, 225 BERBERICH, IoHN 213,231 BERELS, RAYMOND, 43,213,231 BERG, RAMON, 221 BERKOWSKI, BILL, 216,219 BERKOWSKI, TOE, 214,219,231 BERKOWSKI, T A, 40,49 BERMAN, GERALD A , 229 BERSCHBACK, RICK, 186,187,270 BEIITHIAUME, MIKE, 221,231 BEssEL, DEBRA, 231 BETTS, ANN, 225 BEVERLY, BENIAMIN, 231 BIDIGARE, LINDA, 231 BIEBER, DOUGLAS 231 BIEBER, PAUL, 212 BIEDERMANN, wERNER, 200,222 BIEN, MICHAEL, 231 BINDRA, PUSHPINDRA, 223 BIOLOGY, 37,79 BIRCH, KATHY, 197 BLACK STUDIES, 37,39 BLACKWELL, IOHN, 223 BLACKWELL, KING, 211 BLAIR, NANNETTE, BLAIR, RICHARD, 214 BLAKE, KEN, 135 BLASOR, LORRAINE, 186,187 BLASS, GERHARD 227 BLAUL, DEBRA, 231 BLEAN, CYNTHIA, 225 BLEND, DR MICHAEL, BLOCH, BERNARD, 231 BLooM,IAcK, 40 BLOOMFIELD, MARTY, 224 BLUITT, BEN, 134 BOBILIN, EDWARD, 231 BoCHNovICH, RICH, 217,221,222,231 BoEs, DAVID, 216 BoIK, WILLIAM, 220 BOLDVC, RAYMOND, 231 BONENFANT, PAUL I 200,217,221,22B,231 BONICH, MITCH, 199 BO0KWALTER,W D, 48 BOOMS, LES, 212 BOOTH, CHRISTINE, 190,231 BORASZ FRANCIS, 231 BORGRSS, BISHOP, 34 BoRsKI,IERoME, 231 BoswoRTH, HOwARD, 2 BOURDUA, ROB, 206 BOURGE'I',lEANNE, 231 Bows, IAMES, 224 BOYD, IAMES, 229 BOYER, GERALDINE, B1 BOYLE, TERRENCE, 231 BozIGIAN, ELIZABETH, 225 BRADY, LARRY, 224 BRAEM, WALTER, 231 BRAMLETT, DON C. 200,221,224,231 BRANG, MARY, 232 BRANG, WILLIAM 107,200 BRANHAM, LAWRENCE IR, 208 BRAUN MARIE, 222 BRAUN, MICHAEL, 207,222 BRAUN R L, 37, BRAXIL, LLOYD, 35 BREEN,CAROLYN, 199 BREEN,TIM, 224 BRENNAN,IIM, 213 BRENT, CHRIS, 232 BREUTSCH, ToM, 216 BRICKHOUSE, BENITA 204 BRIsCoE, NANCY, 204 BROCKWAY, B G, 48 BRODEUR, RICHARD, 732 BRODIEN, R, 49 BROOKS, STEVE, 211 BROW, 222 BRowN, CHARLES, 210,219 BROWN, CHARLIE, 110 BROWN, DAVID A 216,232 261 "- 1 1 f". -": ' :WG x G :I . . 0 231 ' BARNACK,1IM, 217,230 BLASS, DR., 226 , ' , . 37 . 230 107 230 230 , I 224 , .. 216 - - , , n 31 -- 225 ' 1 . 1 . , . . 49 BROWN, IESSE, 232 BROWN, KAREN, 186,187,223 BROWN, VALORIE, 219,232 BRUBAKER, KEN, 214 BRUCE, C. L., 228 BRUDNAK, GEORGE, 207 BRUKWINSKI, wALTER, 219 BRUMM, BARB, 106 BRYLL, NANCY, 209 BUCCI, DICK, 199,210 BURE, OLIVER, 211 BURKE, KELLY, 107 BURKHARDT, KATHERINE, 232 BURKHART, DALE R., 218 BURNETT, KEVIN, 213 BURNETTE, KEN, 216 BURRELL, HARRY, 216,232 BURT,MIKE, 199 BURTON, DAN, 209,216,232 BURTON, LINDA, 204,232 BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION, 14,63 BUSSE, MICHAEL, 232 BUTKE, IIM, 212,232 BUTLER, IERRY, 157 BUTZ, MARK, 216,210 BUXTON, BERNARD, 218,223 CATKA, TONY, 219,232 CELLARS, RALPH, 202 CENCER, IIM, 1a6,1a7,229,232 CHAN, BONLAP, 224 CHANCEY, IOHN, 222,232 CHANDLER, LINDA, 232 CHARLTON, ROSALIE, 225 cHAvoUs, CRAIG, 211 CHAWKE, T. w., 220 CHEMISTRY, 36,79 CHEN, PAT, 224 cHILD's PLAY, 107 CHIMIENTI, SANDRA, 190,232 CHRISTOPHEL, H., 233 CHUNG, BILL, 224 CHUPINSKY, MARVIN, 233 CHURCH, RICK, 226 CHUTORASH, RON, 196 CIANCIOLO, THOMAS, 207 CIECIURA, RENATA D., 227 CINTRON, ERIC L., 216,218 CIRANNA, GARY, 216 CLAEYS, DAVID, 233 CLANCY, MAUREEN, 233 CLANCY, PATRICK, 214,220 CLANTON,lACK, 223 BYKOWSKI, DENNIS, 216,218 BYRD, MELVIN, 232 BYRNE, DR. DONALD, 207 BYRNE, M. D., 48,49 CLARK, CLARK, CLARK, CLARK, BRUCE, 223 E. M., 48 ROIAND, 220 SANDRA, 204 CLAYTOR, DREXELL, 233 CLEARY, DENNY, 202,233 CLINGMAN, ALBERT E., 221,233 CLOS, TIM, 212 CLOYD, BRIAN, 225 COKER, GLEN, 216,233 CADARET, ERLIN, 232 CAHILL, BILL, 202 CAHILL, EDWARD, 228 COLEMAN, COLEMAN, COLEMAN, COLEMAN, COLEMAN, BE'I'I'Y, 204 MARK, 201,220 MILTON, 219 PATRICIA, H2 VERA, 233 CAIN, EARL, 216 CALCATERRA, MARK, 212,221,224,229,232 CALIGULA, 107 CALIHAN, ROBERT, 40,49 CALLAGHAN, CHRISTOPHER, 207 CALUCCHIA, IAMES, 232 CALvANo, ANGELA, 232 CAMERON, DOUGLAS A., 216,218 CAMMARATA, IOE, 212 CAMP, DR. DAVID, 217 CAMPAU, IUDY, 203 CAMPBELL, C., 49 CAMPBELL, GREG w., 211,216,210 CAMPBELL, KATHLEEN, 232 CAMPEAU, WILLIAM N., 221 CANIAR, LAWRENCE, 40,40,69,1s0 CANIAR, MICHAEL, as CAPITO, IOE, 202 CAPPADONA, SAL, 206,232 CARBONE, EDDIE, 106 CARETHERS, IAMES, 232 CAREY, MALENNA, 229 CARMEN, TONY, 221 CARMODY, MARY, 232 CARRIER, MARK, 214 CARRON, s.I., MALCOLM, wver,14,41,43,47,40,49,s0, s1,52,53,s4 CARSON, ROBERT, 232 CARVER,TARA, 197 CAsAzzA, RICK, 222 CASIE, BRIAN, 232 CATALLO, ISABEL, 232 COLLIER, IOE, 211 COLLINS, BEVERLY, 233 COLLINS, IIM, 206 COLLINS, IOHN, 233 Comedy of Errors, 40,114,115 CONLAN, SUE, 198 CONLEY, IOHN, 233 CONLIN, IIM, 216 CONNOLLY, IOHN, 216,22G,227,228,233 CONSORTIUM, 14,911,100 CONTI, MARK, 226 CONTINO, MANNY, 216 CONTINO, SAM, 216 COOK, FRED, 211 COOK, SANDRA, 233 COON, GREG, 201 COONEY, THOMAS, 233 COONS, LAPINA, 233 COOPER, EDWARD, 37 COOPER, VICKI, 219,223 COPPOLA, SEBASTIAN, 233 CORBETT, RICKARD, 233 CORRIGAN, MAURA, B3 COURTRIGHT, DANIEL, 233 COVERT, WILLIAM, 233 COZZOLINO, IOSEPH, 222 CRATIN, BOB, 201 CRAWFORD, TIMOTHY, 207,218,233 CRITZ, MARK, 233 CROCKETT, SHARON, 219 CRONIN, RICHARD F., 217,233 CROSSON, PATRICK, 214 CRUMPTON, ANNE, 233 CUCINOTTA, PAULA, 197 CUNNINGHAM, CHARLES, 233 CUPPLES, TIM, 224 CURRY, RUFUS, 233 CUSON, TERRY, 196 CYBULLA, STANLEY, 2.13 CYR, DENIS, 233 DAIGLER, MARK, 234 DALLE, STAN, 224 DANIELS, IOHN, 196 DASARO, CHRIS, 214,219 DAUSE, CHARLES, 222 DAVIDSON, KATIE, 187 DAVIS, DENNIS, 207,234 DAVIS, SKIP, 224 DAVIS, T. F., 48 De ANGELIS, ORIANA, 2.34 DECAMERON, DIANA, 234 DEENIHAN, ED, 213,234 De HONDT, TOM, 206 De IRALA, MIKEL, 226 DELLINGER, DENNIS, 222,228 DEMBOSKY, HANK, 206,216 DEMERY, IASON, 214 DEMPO, IAIPRAKASH, 234 DENEGALL, GREGORY, D3 DENSON, PAULA SKYNESKA, 223 DENTAL CLINIC, 14 DENTAL HYGIENE, 132 DENTAL SCHOOL, 35,36,41,119,129 DENTON, THOMAS, 234 DENYS, ANDRE, 214 DENYS, GARY, 214 DEREZ, DON, 216 DESAI, IANAK, 224 DESAI, MAHESH, 223,224,234 DESMOND, PATRICE, H2,271 DE SOSTOA, IOHN, 201 DE SPIRIT, ROBERT, 234 DETROIT RIVERFRONT PROIECT, 119 DETTLOFE, KATHY, 226,234 DEUTSCH, HARRY, 201 DEUTSCH, LYNDA, 201 DEVOS, IEAN, 216,218 DIBBIN, EDWARD I., 200 DICKEY, LEOLA, 224 DICKSON, SUE, 203 DIDAS, PAUL, 201 DIEKMAN, PAT, 225 DIGERONIMO, IOE, 226 DILLION, IACK, 202 DIMAMBRO, PIERO, 234 DIMERCURIO, FRANK, 214 DINAN HALL, 36 DINGLE, KEVIN, 206 DI PONIO, CONCETTA, 225,234 DISTEFINO, DOREEN, 197 DLUGOSS, MARK, 186,187,212,220,234 DLUSKY, LARRY, 234 DOMAGALA, IOHN, 219,234 DOMBROWSKI, HENRY, 227,229,234 DOMITROFF, BRUCE, 216 DONNELLON, DAVID, 234 DONNELLY, I., 234 DDNDGHDE, KEVIN, 215 DoRIAs, CHARLES Gus , DORMITORIANS, DOROCIAK, LEN, DOUGLASS, PHIL, DOWLING HALL, 119 DOWNS, IoIfIN, zu DRESBACH, IIM, 221,224,22s,227 DRESBACH,IOE, 206 DREW, A w, 228 DRIsxEI.I, PAMELA 734 DuDA, DALE s., 229 DUENBOSTEL, IUERGEN, 224 DuEs, THOMAS, 234 DUFFIN,IAMES, 234 DUFORT, BERNICE, 225 DUGAS,IOE, 214,234 DuNAvAN, ROBERT, DUNCAN, GLENN wooD, 212 DUNLAII, DWIGHT 36 DUNN,SI,H E, 48 DUPUIS, MICHAEL, 207,219,234 DURRIN, HANK, 1B6,187,227,229,234,271 DuRocIIER, PHIL, 195 DUTHIE, PATH, 219 DZIEKIEWICZ, vIcToR, 191,229,234,27o,211 DzIuI:A, II E, 48 DZURNAK, RICK, 218 EAGEN, MIKE, 195 EIIERIE, ED, 205 EDEISON, BERNARD, 234 EDMONDS, DENNIS, EISEN, DAVID, 216 ELDER, Boa, 216,218 ELDER, RICK, 216, EIIAs, IOSEPH, 235 ELuoTT, CAROL, 203,220,225 ELLYATT, TED, 212 ELWARD, nos, 218,228 ENGELMYER,lLENE, 203 ENGINEERING, 35,s9,72 ENGLISH, 92,94 ENOEX, GIoRIA, 235 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES, 5 ESCOBAR, IOSE, 224 EsTERs, czERNv, 223 EVANOFF, MARIE, 225,235 EVANS, DALE, 43 EVENING BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION, 119,125 EVERTZ, EDWARD, EWALD, THOMAS EZECHUKY, IGNATIus, FAGIN, HENRY, 4B,49,222,229 FARINELLA, IOE, 224 FARON, FRANK, 227 FARRIOR, BETTIE, 235 FARRIS, CARMEN, FAULKNER, KATHRYN, 235 FEIT, KEN, 43,156 FENOCCHI, CARL, 217,220,235 FERGUSON, ALBERT, 235 FERNANDEZ, TANIA, 216 FERRARO, GEORGE, 206 FERRIL, BRENDA, 235 FESTIVAL OF ONE ACT PLAYS, 108 FESTIVAL THEATRE, 106 FIEBELKORO, IAMES, 235 FIOL, PAT, 229 FISCO, DON, 216,235 FITZGERALD, CHIP, 199 FITZGERALD, FRANK, 214,235 FITZSIMMONS, S.I , CHRIS, 218,235 FIX, GERALD, 220 FLANIGAN, TIM, 216,235 FLANNERY, MIKE, 201 FLEMING, DAVE, 195 FLYNN, IIM, 201 FOERSTNER, SCOTT, 207,212 FOLEY HALL, 36 FOLEY, MIKE, 216,210 FONTECCHIO, ROBERT, 222,228 FOOTE, PAT, 186 FORD, IEAN, 225 FORD, VICTOR, 211 FORREST, MARIORIE, FORSTER, ANN, 235 FOSS, WILLIAM, 235 FOSTER, MELISSA, 207,218 FOUINIER, AMY, 222 FRANCIS, KEVIN, 200 FRASCELLA, PAUL, 201 FRASER, IACK, 235 FRATTI, BOB, 213 FRENCHI, MARK, 213 FRIEDAN, SI, I P, 34 FROMMEYER, IIM, 24,206 FRYZ, DENNIS, 235 FRZIEBOWSKI, FLORENCE, 235 FUCINARI, MARILYN, 235 FUNK, PATTY, 198, GABRIELS, ITHA, 224 GADZINSKI, DAN, 216,235 GADZINSKI, DAVID, 216,226,227 GALLAGHER, BILL, 216,218 GALLAGHER, GARY, 227 GALLAGHER, MARGIE, 227 GAMBLE, HOWARD, 235 GANNON, PATRICK R., 191,270,271 GARASCIA, KEITH, 212 GARGUS, ROBERT, 235 GARRETT, ELIZABETH, 270 GARZA, ARMAND 235 GASKI, MIKE, GASSERT, FRED, GASSERT, MARY, 236 GATES RUSSELL, 236 GATOR, WALLY, 211 GAWCONSKI, ARTHUR, 224 GEBAUER, ALAN, 2.36 GEDGAUDES, TOM, 224 GEE, DELORIS, 236 GEMENDER, IACK, 221, 2 ,229,236 GEMIGNANI WALLACE, 236 GENELLO, GERARD, 236 GERDEMAN, GEORGE, 199 GERLACH, ANNE, 218,236 GERMANO,IOE 205 GESSNER, BILL, 195 GIBBONS, BILL, 227 GIBBS, PAT, 224 GIBOYEAUX, IOSE IUAN 229 GIBSON, RAYMOND, 236 GILEWSKI, EARL, 229 GIULIANI, PAUL, 2.36 GIVENS, TERRIAN, 236 GLADDEN, THOMAS, 236 GLADE, FRITZ, 227 GLADYSZ, PETE, 213 GLANZ, AVA, 223 GLASS IR , WINSTON, 216 GLEASON, IIM, 212 229,236 GLEASON, KAREN, 216 GLENN, FREDERICK, 222 GLISPlN,I P, 48 GO BETTY, 224 GODBOLDO, DALE, 216 GODFREY, ARTHUR, 35 GOLD, IRA, 216,226,127,236 GOLDBERG, ARTHUR, 41 GOLDEN 20 s, 40 GOLEMBIEWSKI, IAMES, 236 GOLEMBIEWSKI, NORBERT, 214,236 GOLIBER, ANNE, 222 GONDEK, GARY 216,228,236 GOODFELLOW, KEN, 206 GOODWIN, CLAUDE, 236 GORCZYCKI, IAMES, 236 GOSS IR , WILLIAM, 236 GRABOWSKI, CHRIS, 209,212,225,236 GRACZYK, LAWRENCE, 226,228,236 GRAFFIGNA, LAWRENCE, 236 GRANT, REGINA, 204 GRASS, CHARLENE, 236 GRAY, DEBORAH, 223 GRAY IR , IAMES, 236 GRAZIANI, IANET, 236 GREEN, IOYCE, 204 GREENE Ill, ALEX, 221 GREENE, DEBORAH, 224 GREER, WINIFRED, 236 GREGORY, DICK, 14,177 GRIFFIN, IOHN, 195 GRIFFIN, PAUL, 237 GRIX,I C, 48,49 GRUMBACHER, GRETCHEN, GUDES, DAVE, 216,224 GUEST FOOL IN RESIDENCE 43,156 GUIDO, ANGELO, 226,228,237 GUILFORD, LARRY, 207 GUSHMAN, RICHARD, 237 GUTHRIE THEATRE, 106 GUTHRIE, THOMAS, 237 GUZDEN D S, 34 HABALEWSKY, MARTIN I, 1ns,1a7,227,229,271 263 235 ,, ,, 35 A 2 4 24 , 218 208 , ' I 234 , . 235 FORSTHOEFEL,S.I., PAUIINUS, 37 GoI.EI3IEwsKI, DAVE, 199,236 , 208 .. . . 218 235 9 237 222 I , 235 235 , 1 202 236 , HABINA, ANDREW, 207 HACKETT, IOHN, 237 HAGERTY, DON, 40,49 HAGERTY, EILEEN, 223,225,237 HAGERTY, MARGARET, 199 HAGGIS SYSTEM, 79 HAGLAGE, MARK, 201 HALANSKI, ROMAN IR., 205 HALL, ARMAND, 208 HALL, ERIC, D7 HALL, MIKE, 216 HALLORAN, RICK, 49 HAMAN, ARTHUR, 217,221,226 HAMILTON, LARRY, 237 HAMILTON, SHANNA, 237 HAMMER, MARK, 213 HAMMER, RICHARD, 237 HAN0ERT, IOHN, 200 HANDLEY, PAT, 223,237 HANSEN, STEN, 237 HAPANOwICz, MIKE, 214,237 HARDIN, RO0ERT, 207 HARDING, IIM, 42,134 HARDwICK, CLYDE, 41 HARDY, MARTIN H., 216,221,237 HARMON, LEROI, 223 HAROLD, IAMES, 220 HARRIGAN, CAMILLUS, 271 HARRIS, HARRIET, 222 HARRlS,'LELlA, 237 HARRIS, MARGARET, 237 HARRISON, GENNEITA, 237 HARRISON, NORMA, 237 HARROUN, 000, 206 HARUILLA, GEORGE, 197 HARVEY, WILLIAM, 207 HARVILLA, GEORGE, 237 HATHAWAY, PAUL, 202 HATTON, EDDIE IR., 223,237 HAU0ERT, IOHN, 222 HAUCK, w. I., 48 HAwKINs,IAMES, 237 HAwKINs, IOHN, 222 HAWLEY, EVERETIE, 207 HAYMAN, ELORENCE, 237 HAYWARD, RAYMOND, 223 HAYwOOD, SPENCER, 36 HAYOSH, IILL, 237 HEADLEY, ADRIAN, 39,60 HEFFERNAN, BETSY, 220 HEEEERNAN,wALT, 222 HEIDKAMP, LARRY, 223 HELWIG, WILLIAM, 220,229 HENGESITACH, IOHN, 206,221,229,237 HERMAN, IOE, 197,220 HERON, PETE, 224 HERR, IAMES, 237 HERZOG, CATHERINE, 237 HESS, HERBERT, 237 HEYN,IAKE, 206 HIGGINS, PATRICK, 226,227 HIGHTOWER, LARRY, 218,223 HILL, CARLTON, 223 HILL, IAWRENCE, B7 HILLIGOSS, IAMEs, 230 HINCI-I, ED, 216 HINDENACH, DICK, 202 HINDENACH, GREG, 202,220,230 HINDENACH, RICHARD, 230 HINEMAN, IAMES, 238 HINES, ELLEN, 230 HINKSON, RUTH, 190,230 HINOIosA,IoEL, 238 HIRT, EVELYN, 226 HISTORY, 90 HITT,l. s., 48 HIXON, DONALD, 230 HOIIAN, ANNE, 230 Ho0AN, E. E., 40,49 HOGAN, IIM, 221 HOGAN, RIDENE, 238 HOHMANN, 0Uzz, 216,217,218,227 HOINACKI, IAMES, 238 HOLDEN, DELORES, 225 HOLDEN HALL, 36 HOLIEIELD, LUCY, 230 HOLLYwooD, DOUGLAS, 238 HOLSTON, MATTIE, 230 HOLT, IIRANNON, 202 HOOKER, EREDDIE, 135 HOPKINS, CATHERINE, 238 HORWITZ, RONALD, 207 HOSKIN, LAURA, 220,223 HOTIA, IOHN, BB HOTZ, BILL, 222 HOwE, PAUL, 222 HOYT, CHRISTINE, 226,228 HUITER, THOMAS, 238 HUDAK, STEVE, 212,220,224,229,238 HUESMAN, MICHAEL, 106 HUGHES, PAT, 212 HUMENIK, GREG, 199 HUND, IOSEPH, 207,238 HUNT, D. C., 40,49 Hus, IOHN, 230 HUSAK, WILLIAM, 238 I-IUSSAIN, MUIAHID, 238 HYLAND, MIKE, 206 IOLI, EELICIA, 230 ISSA, DR. AMAD, 207 ITO, R., 49 IABLONSKI, MIKE, 224 IACHULSKI, CHRIS, 210 IACKSON, ELLSWORTH, 230 JACKSON, KATHY, 219 IACKsON, MICHAEL, 230 IACKSON, VERNICE, 239 lACOBY,IOHN, 239 IAGUSCH, STEVE, 196,197 IAHDE, KATE, 264 IAMES GANG, 157 IAMES, MARK, 211 IANICKI, TONY, 205 IANIS,l., 48 IANISz, ALEXANDER, 227,229 IANKOwsKI, MICHAEL, 239 IAROMIN, ROIIERT, 239 IASINSKI, THOMAS, 226,220 IASTRZEMIISKI, IOHN, 216,210 IEEEERSON AIRPLANE, 270 IEFFRIES, PAUL, 239 IENES5, LINDA, 40 IENNINGS, CLARENCE, 211 IENNINGS, DR. IIM, 207 IERDONEK, RON, 213 IEVITZ, BETH, 225 IHAVERI, DEEPAK, 223,224 IISA, LISA, 264 IOHNSON, CAROL, 219 IOHNSON, DARYLE, 134 IOHNSON, DEBRA, 239 IOHNSON, DENISE, 204 IOHNSON, DENNIs, 226,239 IOHNSON, KENNETH, 739 IOHNSON, LOUIS, 739 IOHNSTON, DAVE, 199 IOHNSTONE, IENNIEER, 264 IONES, CYNTHIA, 229 IoNEs, GUY, 207,239 IONES, IOY, 222 IONES, RUTHA MAE, 239 IORDAN, BRIAN, 213,239 IOSEPH, 0AR0, 203,206 IOSHI, MOHAN, 107,224,270 IUANA, MARY, 264 IU0INSKI, CHESTER, 227 IUIIINSKI, DAVID, 216 IUNGHANs,IUDITH, 239 IUSZKIEWICZ, IOSEPH, 199,217,221,227,239 KACIR, MIKE, 202 KACZMAREK, CHESTER, 239 KAIRO, DAVE, 264 KAISER, PHIL, 107,205,222 KAISER, ROBERT BLAIR, 41,54 KAMINSKI, RICK, 221 KANE, IEEEERY, 207,239 KAPLAN, LEE, 202,222 KARCzEwsKI, MIKE, 214 KARPACH, IOHN, 239 KARPINSKI, VICKY, 190,219 KAsPROwICz, RICH, 199 KATTULA, GEORGETTE, 225 KAzMIROwsKI, LARRY, 239 KEAN, HELEN, 48 KEARNEY, IIM, 2l6,218,226,239 KEARNS,I.w., 34 KEARNS, S.I., R. I., 48,49 KEDzIERsKI, MICHAEL, 239 KEEPE, PETER, 226,227 KEHM, ED, 270,271,4590 KELLEY, CAROL, 197,220,229 KELLY, FRANK, 40,170 KELLY, ROSE, 207,239 KELLY, TIMOTHY N., 221,239 KEMKER, AGGIE, 225 ' KEMPKER, DEE, 43 KEMPER, STEVEN, 239 KEMPSKI, wALTER, 239 KENNEDY, ANGELA, 40 KENNEDY, PATRICK, 239 KENNEY, EILEEN, 227 KENNEY, PEGGY, 227 KENzIE, BARBARA, 203,222 KERNAN, P. I., 48 KEsEY, KEN, 107 KHEMISTRY, KEITH, 265 KIEFER, CAROL, 239 KILCULLEN, FRANK, 226 KILL, TED, 199 KILLlAN,l0E, 224 KIM, sUNG, 239 KING, IIM, 199 KING, RALPH, 43,211 KING, TOM, 222 KISH, BILL, 206 KITLAs, RON, 170,186,187 KLEIER, GARY, 239,270 KLIMEK, THOMAS 240 KLIMOwICz IULIUS 212,240 KLONOwsKI, KAROL, 220,227,240 KLOSOWSKI, CAROL, 220 KLOsOwsKI, MARY, 220 KLUNKLIN, SOMCHAI, 224 KNIGHT, CAROL, 265 KNOLL, TIM, 222 KOBEsKY, LARRY, 240 KOCAB, GREG, 135 KOCH, TOM, 195 KOCIAN, TERRY, 240 KOMARA, FRANK 240 KOMORI YOII, 224 KONG, KING, 265 KONTOLAMBROS, MARY, 225 KOPIWODA, THOMAS, 240 Koss, CHRIS, 195 KOszYCKI, MICHAEL, 240 KowALsKI, TIMOTHY, 240 KOZERSKI, ROSEANNE, 107,271 KRAKOWSKI, RICHARD, 212,221,224,229 240 KRALL, MARTY, 43 KRAMER, ALLAN, 212,240 KRAMER DALE KRANK KRAUT, MIKE, KREBs, BILL, 206 KREHER, PETE, KREMPA, LARRY, 213 KREsoIEvICH, RALPH, 40 KRONK, BETH, 197,220,229 KRUSZEWSKI, GENE, 216 KUCIK, BARRY, 207 KUlAGA,l0HN, 240 KUMMER, FRANK, 240 KUNTz, IIM, 199 KUSNIER, LOUIS 240 KUSZYNSKI, ROBERT, 240 LHBELLE, ARTHUR, 240 LACRIOX,I E. 34 LACY, KATHLEEN, 240 LAHIFF, SHELIA, 223 LAING, MARY, 209 LaIEUNESSE, ROBERT, 229 LALLY, PATRICK, 200 LaLONDE,lAMES, 202 LAMB, D., 49 LAMBA, OM, 240 LAMBA,PUsHAP, 240 I.ANDUYT, B. E., 48 LANGENHORST, MARY BETH, 216,240 LANGUAGE, 92 LARGE, DON, 40,49,220 LATIMORO, ROBERT, 222 LAURAIN, MICHAEL, 240 LAURI, SARA, 203 LAUSTER, TIMOTHY, 240 LAvICH KATHY, 203 LAW CLINIC, 123 LAW SCHOOL, 37,41,119,120 LEARY, KEVIN, 213 LEBEL, MO, 224 LECOMPTE IR , ADAM, 219,221,220 ,CLAuDIA, 240 ,CLEOPARTRA, 229 ,IANIE, 240 , RICHARD, 240 LEELUN, ED, 224 LEEEBVRE, s I , REGINALD, LEMIEUx, MARKETA, 240 LEMMONs, HERBERT, 240 LENARTOWICZ, BARBARA LENNON, MICHAEL, 241 LEON, BRUNO, 40,49 LEOPARDI, GIACOMO, 1 LESNAU, RICHARD, 36 LESNIAK IR, EDWARD, 221 LEIISSIER, RICHARD, 224 LEWANDOWSKI, ANTHONY, 207 LEWANDOWSKI, GREGORY, 241 LEWIS, LOIs, 225 LEWIS wILMA, 207,241 L'HEUREUx, GEORGE, 201 LIBERATORE, LILLIAN, 220 LIEDER, RUSSELL, 241 LIETZ, TED, 241 LIGHTFOOT GORDON, 15,39,156 LILL, KEN, 194,195,20s,207,220,241,270 LINAHAN, IANE, 241 LINAHAN, IOHN, 191,270,271 LINDBERG, LORETTA, 241 LINDsEY, FRED, 241 LINGUISTICS, 95 LIPIEC, KATHLEEN, 241,271 LIPINsKI, IUDY, 198 LIST, ALEXANDER, 241 LITKE, EDwARD, 217 LIU, TONY, 224 LLOYD, IOHN, 226,227 LOGSDON, I T, 40,49 LoIzzO, IIM, 195,205 LOMAs, GREGORY, 241 LOMBORDO, NICK, 223,241 LONG, RICHARD, 212,217,221,241 LORA, MARCO, 241 LORANCE, PAUL, 217 LOUGHNEY, IOHN, 224,241 LOVELEY, s I , ARTHUR, 224,220 LovERO,IEEEERY 241 LOVETERE, DAVID, LUCHI, LARRY, 207,212 LUCIDO, IOE, 214 LUCKEN,E, 49 LUCKEN, WALTER, 241 LUCKIE, HENRIETTA, 241 LUVCKX, MARY, 210 LYDICK, THOMAS, 207 MaCDONALD, DOROTHY, MMEACHERN, DOUG, 187,224,241 MACK LINDA, 190,241 M5fKENzIE, CAROL, 241 MacKENzIE, LARRY, 241 MacKENzIE, Ross I, 222 MACOsKA, PAT, 206 MACUDzINsKI, EUGENE MACZUGA, CAROL 203 MADDALENA, ANNE 219,223 MADDEN, TOM, 202,241 MADDox, IEROME, 200 MADEI, DIANE, 199,241 MAEHOFFER, MIKE 216 MAHER,Sl,THOMAS, 41 MAHONEY, IOHN, 41,40, MAHONEY, ROBERT, 220 MAITLAND, CONRAD, 216,242 MAIKOWSKI, DIANE, 242 MAKAREwICz, CELIA, 209,22o,225,242 MAKAREWICZ, THAD, 225 MALAKER, RALF, 212 MALEK,sALAAM, 196,190 MALIET, DR LEONARD, 207 MALLGRAVE, HARRY, 43 MALLORY, sUE, 210,242 MALONEY, H B, 47,40,49,55 MANDELL, LAWRENCE, 242 MANDZIUK, LARRY, 226 MANIACI, ROSE ANN, 219,242 MANN, CHRIS, 213,242 MANOMAI UDOM, vANNAsRI, 242 MANOR, VERN, 242 MANsON, BONITA, 204 MANTELLI, ROY, 212,222 MANUszAK, MIKE, 242 MARAONE, DENNIS, 214 MARAONE, MICHAEL, 207,242 MARCINIAK, DONNA, 242 MARCY, ARLENE, 216 MARDIA, PRABHAT, 242 MARIO IOSEPH, 216,226,227,22B,229,242 MARKIECKI, SUSAN, 242 MARL, RICHARD, 242 MARNELL, G C, 48,49 MARSHALL, BILL, 206 MARSHALL, IIMMY, 242 MRASHALL, SUSAN, 242 MARTIN, ARTHUR, 242 MARZEC, CASIMER, 199,217,221,242 MASINICKI, IOAN, 242 MASON, DIANA, 223 MASON, IOHN, 224 MASON, STEVE, 43,200 MASSA, S I , Mark, 242 MATH, 84 MATHES, DENISE, 223 MATO, GERI, 202 MATOUS, IOHN, 214,242 MAITA, NAGUI, 270 MATTHEWS, MICHAEL, 227 MATTSON, KENNETH, 242 MATUZAK, MIKE, 216,242 MATZ, MICHAEL, 242 265 241 1 1 , 241 I I 1 r ' , LEE LEE LEE LEE 1 . . 41 I I 49 , 187 KOLIS, BILL, 197,220, LENTINE, SALVATORE, 241 MAKAREWICZ' PAUL" 214 1 1 1 1 , , 212 - , 1 206 195 1 1 ' 241 - 1 MAUK, ROBERT, 242 MAYEs, DEBORAH, 204 MCCAFFERTY, SUSAN, 220 MCCALLUM, EMMA, 225 MCCARTHY, KATHLEEN, 242 MECARTY, AL, 206 MECARTY, BILBO IR., 219,221 MECLESKEY, ANNENA, 243 McCLosKEY, IOHN, 243 MECOMB, MICHAEL, 217,220 MCCORMICK, PETE, 196 MCCUISH, TOM, 214 McCUllERS,VALERIE, 204 MECLILLOCH, LEN, 216,228 MECLILLY, RONALD, 207,243 MEDANIELS, CARL M., 210,220,229 MEDERMOTT, MIKE, 196,197 MCEVOY, E. M., 48 MEGEE, ANDREW, 211 MEGEE, WALLACE, 243 MCGLYNN, s. I., I. v., 48 MEGOUGH, E. I., 228 MEGOVERN, GEORGE, 170 MEGRATH, KATHY, 199 MEGUIRE, AL, 226,243 MEGURGAN, MILDRED, 225 MCISAAC, KATHLEEN, 243 MCKEOGH, T. C., 34 MCKINLEY, KEVIN, 206 MCKINLEY, MIKE, 216,218 MELAIN, MIKE, 224 MCLEOD, PATRICIA, 199,209,243 MENAIR, ERANKIE, 243 MENALLY, CECIL, 266 MENAMARA, GEORGE, 243 MEADOws, LEROY, 223 MEDIA STUDIES, 14,37,57 MEEHAN, MIKE, 224 MEGLIO, ED, 202 MEHALL, DAN, 221,224 MEIGE, s.I., IOHN, cover, 33-34 MENzIEs, THOMAS, 243 MERETSKY, wARREN, 216 MERRITHEW, KEN, 206 MERSINO, RAY, 212 MESANOUK, BOB, 206 MEzA, ELVIRA, 243 MIAECKI, THOMAS, 243 MIANECKI, suE, 203 MIANECKI, THOMAS, 216 MIAzGA, DENNY, 220,243 MICALLEF, RALPH, 226 MICBETH, GARSPAR, 156 MICELI, PETE, 224 MICHAEL, MARIE E, 221,243 MICHAELS, RICHARD, 243 MICHELETTI, MIKE, 206,243 MIDDLETON, HELEN, 224,243 MIDDLETowN, MAUDE, 243 MIESIJD, TONY, 216 MIKULA, BILL, 217,243 MILES, GEORGE, 243 MILLER, ARTHUR, 106 MILLER, CATHY, 203 MILLER, DENNY, 202,203 MILLER, DONI, 224 MILLER, FRANCIS, 243 MILLER, IAMES, 37 MILLER, IOHN, 243 MILLER, TERRY, 228 MILLER, TIMOTHY, 220 MILLIGAN, MARK, 226 MILLIKEN, WILLIAM, 42 MILNES, RAYMOND, 207 MIMs, BRIAN, 223 MINCHELLA, CARMEN, 243 MlNSHALL,lUDITH, 243 MIRANDA, C., 49 MIsKINIs, FRAN, 197,220,225 MISSIMI, DOMINIC, 107 MIssIMI, NANCY, 107 MISZKOWSKI, BILL, 187 MITCHELL, DEBORAH, 223,243 MITCHENOR, DENNIS, 243 MIYAKE, KIICHIRO, 243 MODRzYNsKI, WILLIAM, 243 MODzELEsKY, EDWARD, 244 MOEEATT, WILFRED, 244 MOHAMMED, C., 49 MOIR, MICHAEL, 244 MOLITORIS, ROBERT, 244 MONAGHAN,IOE, 270 MONT, HARRY, 219,223 MONTGOMERY, GINA, 224 MOON, LARRY, 211 MOORE, BEATRICE, 204,244 MOORE, CARL, 211 MOORE, CHRIS, 216,218 MOORE, REGINA, 244 MOORE, SUSIE, 244 MOREHOUSE,lOHN, 244 MORGAN, CAROL, 223 MORGAN, CORTNEY, 216 MORIN, IACQUELINE, 209,220,244 MORONEY, IIM, 229 MoRRIsON, DAVID, 244 MORTON, ERNEST, 244 MOTIL, AL, 223 MUGLIA,SHARON, 196,198 MULLER, s.I., HERMAN I., 225 MuLQuEEN, GEORGE, 196 MUNGER, RONALD, 244 MURAWSKI,lAMES, 207 MUROWSKI, IIM, 214 MURRAY, D. I., 40,49 MusINsKI, ANNIE, 224 MYERS, CHRIS, 206,244 MYERS, FLOYD, 244 MYzIENsKI, ED, 226 NANO, STEPHANIE, 106,187,21IJ,244 NAPIERALSKI, WILLIAM, 207 NAPIOR, RICHARD, 244 NASEEF, NAIF, 244 NATKE, PAUL, 187 NELSON, STEVE, 43,201 NEMETH, DR. ABRAHAM, 138 NEMETH, S.l., EDWARD, 219 NEPIUK, MARCIA, 244 NFSTORWICZ, OREST, 244 NEUHENGEN, WALTER, 200 NEUMANN, CLIFF, 187,224 NEUMANN, RACHELLE, 220 NEUVILLE, SONIA, 244 NEUVILLE, STEWART, 222,244 NEWMAN, IANET, 244 NICHOLLS, IOE, 222 NEwswEEK, 15 NICOIAY, DAVID, 200 NIEDOWICZ, LAwRENCE, 244 NIEMIEC, GREG, 134,206,244 NIEMIEC, RICHARD, 224 NIxON, RICHARD, 43,170,272 NOLAN, E. A., 34 NOLAN, IAMES, 217,220,229,244 NOON, HIGH, 265 NOREIKA, ED, 212 NORRIS, MIKE, 195,244 NORTHRUP, RON, 220,244 NORTON, EMMETT, 206 NoRwoOD,COLLEN, 225 NOYAK, T. E., 49 NOwAK, A., 49 NowAK, VICTOR, 217,245 NOWMORETHANEVER, NANCY, 245 NUGENT, STEPHEN, 229 NUNEZ III, DR. wILuAM, 43 NUTZ, KRIsTE, 265 NYCEK, MITCHELL, 245 NYE, TOM, 200,245 O'CONNOR, CHARLES, 214,245 ODENWELLER, IOE, 206 O'DONNELL, EDWARD, 245 OF MICE AND MEN, 43,107,117 OHLINGER, N6 0'LEARY, CHICK, 206 O'LEARY, IOHN, 222 O'MARA, MIKE, 205 ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST, 106,107,112 O'NIEL, IOHN, 197 ONITSURA, 156 O'REILLY, KENNETH, 212,225,245 OSBORNE, LEROY, 229 OsTRANDER, BOB, 199 OGULLIYAN, MICHAEL, 245 OSSY, THOMAS, 245 Orr, ROBERT, 245 owENs, DENNIS, 245 BABIAN, PAUL, 228 PACE, PRESTON, 42,134 PACINI, IOHN, 245 PAGE, GAIL, 204 BAGGI, MICHAEL, 245 PAGNOITA, sTEvE, 206 PAIOOI-II, SAID, 224 I-ALAGANAs, ROGER, 224 PALANIAPPAN,S., 221,223 I-ALAzzoLO, IAMES, 207 rALCIsKo, BERNIE, 206,245 EALKA, LENNY, 206 RALMIORI, ANGELA, 245 PALONKA, RICK, 222 PANASIEWICZ, RON, 212 PANEK, DE0, 203 PANIZZI, non, 212 PANTANO, NICK, 202 PARDO, CARLOS, 245 PARIKH, IIIPIN, 223 PARIKH, RASHMI, 245 PARISEAU, H IOSEPH, 221, 45 PARISH, BILL, 225,229,245 PARKER, ROBERT, 206,245 PARKS MARSHA, 245 FARNELL IR , wILuAM, PASCHKE, ANTHONY, 207,214,245 PASTULA, IOHN, 217,220,229, PATALON, NORMAN, PATEL,lAGDI5H, 245 PATEL, VINOD, 223,245 PATERSON, BENIAMIN, PATTON, FANNIE, 246 PAUL, ADOLFH 22 PAVETTO, RON, 221, ,246 PAYzS T, 48 PELERITO, MARY, 203 PELTIER, DONALD, 246 PELTIER, FREDERICK, 246 PELUSE, IACK, 202 PERDUE, I v, 48 PERFORMING ARTS, 106 PERKO, IOHN, 226,227 PERRAULT, SHEILA, 22 PERRY, DICK, 37,135 PESTA, ANTHONY, H9,246 PLTCHAPTANA, ISSARAPHAN, 224 PETERS, SANDY, 246 PFIRUSKA, GENE, H2 PFIRYKOWSKI, LOUIS EDwARD, PHARAOH, PATRICIA, 246 PHARES, ILENE, 246 PHIL, PUNXSUTAWNEY, 43 PHILLIP, PATRICIA, 246 PHILIPS, CHRIS H9 PHILLIPS, SHEILA, 204,246 PHUANGPAYOM, WANDIDA, 224 PHYSICS, 82 PICCIONE, TONY, 224 PICKERING, GEORGE, 2z3 PICKEI1, BEVERLY 222 PIERCE, ALBERT, 219 PIERCE, DIANE, 210 PIETRYLA, IEROME, 246 PILAT, SUZANNE, 246 PILNY, IIM, 205 PIMPUTKAR, MOHINI, 246 PINKSTON, ROBIN, 204 PIPER, DAVID, 210 PISERCI-IIO, FRANK, 202 PITCH IN, 40 PITLOCK, KATHLEEN, 246 POCIUS, IOHN, 217,220,246 POISSON, TOM, 216 POKE, IRVIN, 200 POKRYFKI, IOHN, 246 POLITICAL SCIENCE, 90 POLNIASZEK IR., IOSEPH, 246 POPowICz, GREG, 225,246 PORTER, FATHER, 41 POwE, PAULINE, 219 POwERS, MARY, 222 PRATT, SHIRLEY, 246 PRESTO, Ron, 212 PRICE, TED, 211 PRIEIO, IESUS, 246 PRINSTEIN, IAY, 246 PROSSER IIM, 43,201 PROVENCAL, CHRISTINE, 246 PSYCHOLOGY, B2 PSYCHOLOGY CUNIC, 14 PUCHALLA, ROBERT, 48,119,220 PUGH, CHARLES, 211 PULIDO, TERRY, 203,225 PUz, MARY, 227 QUALTERS,llM, 246 QUINCY RONALD, 246 QUINN, IIM, 199,246 RADWAN, PATRICIA RADYZ, MARIA, 226 RANDALL, GREGORY, RAPOPORT, EDwARD, 107,222,224 RAY, CORDELL, 200,224 RAY, PETER, 205,226 RAYIIURN, w G, 49 REANEY,W H, 34 RECZKOWSKI, BILL, 224 REDA, A, 48 REDLIN, ROBERT, 207 REEGAN, PAULA, 190 REESE, CLAIRE, 203 REGAL, DAVID, 106,107 REGAN,IAMES, 207,247 REICH, GERRY, 205 REID, DENNIS, 195 RELIGIOUS STUDIES, 87 REMINGER, sos, 224 RENFORTH,IOYCE, 247 RENO HALL, 24 RENO HALL COFFEE HOUSE, 40,43 RI:'I'MAN, RICHARD, 247 REYES, MANUEL, 247 REYNOLDS, PAT, 202 RHOADES, GARY, RICE, BILL, 205 RICE, PATRICIA, 247 RICHARDS, CLAUDE, RIDHIPRASART, CHURDVIT, 224,247 RIFF, ELAINE, 225 RILEY, SHAWN, RISKA, CHARLES D, 217 RISTAGNO, MARGARET, 2 RITTER, SANDRA, 247 RIVARD, DAVID, 247 RIVARD, RICHARD, 247 RIVERA, IOSE, 247 RIVERS, MARIE, 247 ROBERTS, RANDY, 203,247 ROBBINS, KENNETH, 223 ROBINSON, LINDA, 247 ROBINSON, MIKE, 38 39 ROCK, WILLIAM, 200 ROCKET, ROBIN, 247 ROCKNE, KNUTE, RODGERS, ELLEN, 224 RODGERS, IAMES w, 15,40,107 ROMAN, RONALD 2 ROMAN, SUE, 197 ROMANSKI, RICHARD, 200 ROSENKRANZ, MANFRED, 221 ROSSI, KENNETH, ROSSI, NOREEN, 216,219 ROULIER, C, 49 RowE, IOSEPH, 247 ROwSON, TERRY, 202 RUCINSKI, IIM, 225 RUDD, RARBARA, 247 RUDOwSKI,GARY, ,224 RUESE, DANIELI RUF, DEBBIE, 191,247,271 RUIFROK, CHARLES, 247 RUSHID, 000, 214 RUSHING, WALTER 210,22 RUSSELL,l A , 34 RUS50, MIKE, 214 RUTKOWSKI, IAMES, 247 RUTZ, MIKE, 224 RYAN, CHRISTINE, 220 RYAN, IOHN, 224 RYSIEWICZ, ELAINE, 203 SADOWSKI, ELEANORE, 225,247 SALETNIK, RANDY, 206 SAUBA,lOHN, 224 SALISIIURY, E RICHARD, 40,413,224 SALISITURY MRS PHYLLIS, 224 SAMAR, IOHN, 206 SAMORAY, TOM, 247 SANDA, FRANK, 247 SANDRETIO, IIILL 220 SANFORD, IAMES, 240 SANGCHANTHAMANEE, SOMMART, 240 SANKIEWICZ LEONARD, 207 SANNER, LOU, 224,240 SARTINI, 000, 205 SATA, 0 S, 223 SAUNDERS, IOI-IN, 240 SCAGLIONE, IOSEPH, 240 SCALLEN, I P, 228 SCANLON, DAN, 201 SCANLON, MICHAEL, 107 SCHAEPER, AL, 226,220 SCHAUER, DENNIS, 200 SCHERVISH, MARGUERITE, 223,240 SCHMIDT, SCHMIDT, SCHMIDT, SCHMIDT, sCHMITz, CHARLES, 202,248 GLENDON, 248 LINDA, 209,229,248 MARY CHRIS, 198 CAROL, 220,248 SCHNEIDER, GAIL, 190 SCHOEFFLER, DR CHARLTON, 207 SCI-IUIIECK, S I, T L., 48 SCHULTE, KAREN, 248 SCHULTE, ROBERT, 227 267 , , 35 , 47 . 2 I 247 , . 245 - 245 245 221 no ., 221 , 2 224 , 4 ' ' 3 mm' MARLENA, 2,6 RUSSELL, CHARLES, 247 4 , 226 218 216 , . , , . , . . 247 247 206 47 SCOTT, DICK, 212 SCOTT, MICHAEL E., 216 SEAMAN, IACK, 270 SEDOR, DONALD, 240 SEEPELT, KATHERINE, 240 SEELY, IOHN, 223 SEFCHIK, GREG, 212,240 SEIEERT, DAVE, 49 SELDEN, MARILYN, 223 SELDON, FELIX, 248 SELESKY, PAUL, 240 SELLERS, D. I., 49 SENICK, GARY, 220 SERAEINSKI, CAROL, 240 SERRIN, IUDY, 229 SESSIONS, s.I., MICHAEL, 240 SEYMOUR, ROBERT, 240 SFERLAZZA, IOSEPH, 248 SHAALOM, SAMANTHA, 240 SHADRICK, FRED, 48 SHAH, DAKSHA, 224 SHAH, PRAEULCHANDRA, 240 SHAH, RAIESH, 224 SHAKESEARE, 107 SI-IARBATZ, MARILYN, 224 SHARBATZ, NANCY, 224 SI-IARPER, CEASAR, 240 SHERMAN, DENNIS, 201 SHERROD, PATRICIA, 248 SI-IINKMAN, ALAN, 240 SHIPLE HALL, 15,37 SHIPP, STANLEY, 240 SHIVERS, ANTHONY, 240 SHMINA, P., 49 SHOUP, PAUL C., 221 SI-IOVLIN, GARY, 196,207,220 sHOwICH, NICHOLAS, 240 SHRALL, MARK, 207 SHUBERT, DAVE, 202 SHUEY, M.D., I. M., 40,49 SHUMATE, GERALDINE, 204 SIEGWARTH, ED, 212 SIMMONS, LAWRENCE, 240 SIMMONS, TYRONE, 37,41,135 SIMON, MARTY, 212 SITARSKI, DONALD, 249 SIVANICH, PAUL, 210,220,220 SKORA, GERRY, 227,249 SKORUPA, SUZANNE, 249 SLESINSKI, MIKE, 212 SLOAN, PROIECT, 69 SLOWIK, IAMES, 207 SLUKA, DAVID, 249 SMIGIEL, ROGER, 214,219,249 SMITH, SMITH, SMITH, SMITH, SMITH, SMITH, SMITH, SMITH, SMITH, ADRIENNE, 219 CARLTON, 40,42 GEORGE, 220 GERALD, 42,134 GLORIA, 223 I. C., 43,40,49 THOMAS, 249 THOM R., 200 w. C., 40,49 5MYTHE II, DOHN, 222 sNITwONGsE,THALERNGsOK, 249 SOBERS, CHARLES, 249 SOBIESKI, MARGE, 203,220,225 SOCIE, LAWRENCE, 249 SOCIOLOGY, 57 SOCLE, LARRY, 221 SOEIAN, SUzANNE, 249 SOLOMON, BILL, 222 SOLTIS, SUSAN, 210 SOMMERVILLE, MARIE, 249 SOPHIEA, MARK, 249 SORDYL, DOUG, 200,217,220,221,229,249 SORTOR, BARBARA, 249 SPAROUGH, MICHAEL, 270 SPEED, 211 SPENCER, IOE, 222 SPENTHOEP, ANNE, 229 SPINDLER, MARGARET, 249 SPIROEP, NICK C., 221,249 SPIVERY, PHYLLIS, 249 SPORER, CONRAD, 34 SPORTS, 134 sPRICK,wALTER, 224 SPROCK, EDWARD T., 210 SPURRIER, EVELYN, 220 STACHOwsKI,IoHN, 221 STACK, IIM, 206 STAFFORD, VICTOR, 249 STALLWORTH, CYNTHIA, 223 STANCZAK, VICTORIA, 249 STANFORD, CHUCK, 213 STANLEY, IACQUELYN, 249 STANTON, DAVE, 216 STASSER, IANE, 249 STEENBERGE, MIKE, 222 STEINBECK, IOHN, 43,107 sTEPHENS,IoYCE, 40 sTERLAzzA,IOSEPH, 217 STERNICK, VIRGINIA, 225 STETSON, TIM, 195 STEVENS, DON, 43,49 STEVENS, IOHN R., 221,249 STEVENS, PHILIP, 249 s1IE0ER,GEORGErrE, 249 STILPHEN, IEAN, 190,223 STOEY, RICHARD, 249 STOLL, DENNIS, 221 STONYS, RAMUNE, 216,218 STORMS, MARK, 48 STOVALL, CLARICE, 204,249 STRANSKY, NORBERT, 206,220,229 STRAUSBAUGI-I, IIM, 226,229 STREET, IILL V., 222 STRESS, 15,41 STRIDIRON, ROwENA, 222 STROH BREwERY, 40 SrROH'S,IOHN IR., 196 STROH'S PITCH IN, 32 sTRONG,IUNE, 221,225 STRZYKALSKI, SUSAN, 249 STUCzYNSKI, DANIEL I., 216,250 STUMPF, KENNETH, 216,217,218,220,229,250 STURDIUANT, CYNTHIA, 204 SUCCARDE, DANIEL, 250 SUCCOTASH,SUZlE, 250 sUCHARIKUL,TANES, 224 SUDOMIR, TED, 221,250 SULUVAN, BRIAN, 202 SULLIVAN, IOHN, 250 SULLIVAN, TIMOTHY, 250 SUWANAKANIT, PASSAKORN, 224 swANDO, RICK, 196 SWANEY,THOMAS, 250 SWEENEY, IAMES, 250 SWEET, SUE, 203 SWIFT, VANCE, 250 SYKES, RONALD, 250 SYLLA, MOHAMED S, 219,220 SYwAK, MICHAEL, 216 SZAWIEL, EDWARD, 250 SzCzEPANIAK,GERRY, 199 TADDONIO, D. A., 48 TAGALONG, TILLIE, 250 TANG, DANNY, 250 TANN, EILEEN, 223 TARNOWSKI, PATRICIA, 250 TASH, DAVID, 207,250 TASH, KEN, 106,107,270 TATE, ELAINE, 204 TAUD, ALFRED SIGMUND, 197 TAYLOR, GORDON, 229,250 TAYLOR, PHILIP, 250 TAYLOR, RICK, 222 TAYLOR, VIRGINIA, 204 TEABOUT, ROBERT, 211 TEACHER EDUCATION, 96 TECH, IR., STEPHEN, 228,250 TERLACK, RICHARD, 250 TELLERS, PAUL, 250 TESIN, DIANE, 224 THE COMEDY OF ERRORS, 107 THE HORSE, 107 THEATRE, THE 14 THEERATHADA, PARIYAVADEE, 250 THEISEN, MICHAEL, 250 THOM, LAURI, 150 THOMAS, DANIEL 'Spiro', 271 THOMAS, THOMAS, THOMAS, THOMAS, THOMAS, THOMAS, THOMAS, LARRAIN, 225 MARCO, 250 MARTY, 224 MIKE, 206 NOEL, 195,250 VERLYN, 250 VERNA, 207 THOMASMA, ROBERT, 107,222,251 THOMPSON, DEBORAH, 251 THOMPSON, RUBY, 225,251 THORDEN, DR. NORMA, 41 THORP, KEN, 216 TIGUE, JOHN, 212,251 TIMBERLAKE, IIM, 205,227 TOMASZEWSKI, GREGORY, 251 TOMEY, I. B., 40,49 TONGRADITH, CHANDANA, 224 TORRES, GUS, 216,210 TOwER, 1929, 105 TRAMA, LOUIS, 251 TRASHER, H. E., 106 TRINCALI, PAT, 190,251 TROMBLEY, DOUG, 228 TROMPETER, DANIEL, 251 TROSHYNSKI, B. I., 48 TROSIN, CINDY, 216 TROUP, DAVID, 226,220,229,251 TRUPIANO, MARY LOU, 251 TRUPIANO, STEVE, 48,49 TUCKER, D. S., 49 TUCKER, DENISE, 219 TUDOR, BILL, 221 TULLER HOTEL, 36 TULLOCK, KATHY, 225 TULYASATHIEN, YAOVANEE, 207,251 TUMA, PAUL H., 200 TUREK, LARRY, H6 TURNER, ROBERT, 218 TURPISI-I, WILLIAM I., 200 TWEEL, PHILIP, 250 TWEHUES, LEROY, 251 TWYMAN, ROBERT, 223,251 UHLAR, RUDY F , 49 UNDERDOWN, DAVID, 216,251 UNIVERSITY WEEK, 38,164 URBAN, LAW CLINIC, 14 URBAN VEHICLE DESIGN 37 URBAS, MARY AUCE, 270 USG, 14,39,40,43 USITALO, KATHY, 186,187 UTTERBACK, LLOYD, 251 VAN ASSCHE, KAREN, 195,210 VAN BUHLER, DONNA 223,251 VANDAMIA, DAVID I, 217,221,225 VANDEN BOOM, SANDRA, 251 VANDEN BROOKS, LIZ, 199 VANDER LAAN, ROBERT, 202,223 VAN TYSON III, REGINALD VARGA, IEFFERY, 251 VARSITY NEWS, 34,175 VASQUEZ, EDNA, 251 VENKAT, T C, 223 VERBISCUS, TONY, 199 VERDURA, NANCY, 251 VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE, VINCENT, TRUDY 223,251 VINCLER, IOSEPH, 217,251 VINSON, PATRICIA, VOISARD, KATHY 224 VOKES, STEVE, 201 VORBROKER, ROBERT I, 220 VRABEL, FRANK I 205,226 WADE, VINCE, 179 wACNER, WESLEY WAHL, DOUG, 206 WAIS, IANICE, 251 wAKAIAwAKA, WANDA, 251 wALczAK MICHAEL, 251 WALDECKER, MARK I ,251 WALKER, DENISE, 218,2 WALKER, IOYCE, 252 wALKER, MARY, 224 WALKER, PATRICIA, 210,252 WALKINE, FRANK, 216 WALL, sTEvE, 49 wALL,T, 49 WALLACE, PATRICK, wALLACE, ROB, 206 WALLACE, TOM, 221,252 WALSH, SR LORETTA ANN, 252 WALTHERS, STEVE, 195 wALz, ROBERT, 217 wAR, 41,150 WARD, D, 49 WARD, H A, 48 WARD, IIM, 206,252 WARD MARIA, 209 wAREHAM,I C, 48 WAREIKO, WILLIAM, 252 WARLICK, KEITH, 207,252 WARREN, IANISE, 105,229, WASKIEWICZ RON, 199 WATSON, CAROL, 219 WATSON GEORGE, 252 WATSON PATRICIA, 190, WATTS, DEBBIE, 204 wAYMAN, CY, 221 wAYMAN, UZZIEL, 252 WEBER, RICHARD, 224,252 WEEKS, DAVID, 226 wEHRuNC, BRYAN, 213,226,252 WEILER, LINDA, 252 WEISSERT, MARK, 210,220 WEIROWSKI, MONNA, 219,22o, 2 WELCH, WILLIAM, 224,252 WELLINC, DARRELL, 252 WELLS, owEN, 42,134 wELSH CHRISTOPHER 225 WELSH, DAVID, 210 WELTER, THOMAS I, 200,217,221,220 WENZL, PATRICIA, 190,252 WERNETTE, LEONARD, 252 wEsCHLER, FRANK, 224,252 wEsLEY, GLORIA, 203,222 wESSoN, NEIL, 179 WESTHAUS, IERRY, 206,229 wErrER, KEITH, 271 WEY, DR IAMES, 229 wHIRLICIc,wENDY, 252 WHITE, ARTHUR, 252 WHITE, LARRY, 39,50 WHITE, VENTRA, 229 WHITFIELD, EvELYN, 204 WHITING, RON, 213 WHITTY, MIKE, 214 WICKENS, IOSEPH, 252 WIDLAK, PAUL, 213 WIERZBINSKI, MIKE, 212,252 WIKA, GERALD, 216,220,252 WILCOX, CHERYL, 222,271 WILLIAMS, EMMA, 252 WILLIAMS, GEORGE, 41,150 WILLIAMS, IAMES, 252 WILLIAMS, MORRIS, 252 WILLIS, IOHN, 253 WILLOUGHBY, BILL, 186,253 WING, DIANA 216 WIRINGER, ANNA MARIE, 226,253 woICIAK, ARNOLD, 253 WOICICKI, RICH, 212,253 WOICIECHOWSKI, MICHAEL, 253 woLTYNA, MARCIA, 190 WONDER, STEVIE, 41,150 wOoD BILL, 224 WOODRLIEE, IAMES, 47,40,49,52,54 WOODWARD, MARCIA, 253 wooLARD, CARY, 212,253 WORLD MAGAZINE 14,41 wozNIAK, IOSEPH M, 199,217,221,253 WOZNIAK, THOMAS, 253 WRIGHT, DANIEL, 253 wRoBLEwsKI, ALEX, 216 wYMAN, CARY E 217,2 YAQUINTO, MARY 253 YEE, LARRY, 220,229 YENSON, RICK 202 YERBY, IANET, 222 YOHE, TOM, YOU RE A Coon MAN CHARLIE BROWN 110 YUEN, PIERRE, 253 YUNKER, IOE, 210 YURICK, MICHAEL, 253 zA0LoCKI, BILL, zAPALA, RICHARD, 253 zARANEK, RICHARD, 253 ZAREMBA, ROSEMARIE, 253 zAROwNY, STEVEN, 207 ZEDAN, Lou, 213 ZELA KOORT, CARLOS, 253 zELMANSKI, DENNIS M , 217,225 zIAIA, MIKE, 228 ZIEMNIAK, SHARON, 197,219,225,2s3 ZIEMNIAK, WALTER, 195 zorr, IOSEPH, 253 zuKOwSKI, BERNARD, 217,221,225,220,253 zwoLAK, RICHARD A, 217,225,229,253 ZWOLAK, ROBERT, 207 zYIEwSKI, ED, 202 ZYREK, THADDEUS, 253 269 , ' ., 217 51 . , 252 , , . . . ,49 , . 53 252 , , , 252 , vALvO, DALE, 217,221,226,228,251 WEBBER, PETE, 224 YEE, EDWARD, 223 , , ' 195 2 3 , 220 , , 111 251 I 214 -, , 200 270 Photo credits Rick Banas pp. 28br, 32tl, 58br, sobl, 167b, 168-1, 169tmr, 179r Victor Dziekiewicz pp. 8-l, 9tr, 13tr, 18, 50-55, 62-63, 64-I, 72br, 74br, 77bl, 78-I, 8 Otm, 82-l, 83brnr, 84b, 8Btr, 89r, 90-I, 92-l, 96tr, 97t, 100b, 146-l, 166-l, 170-171 Patrick Gannon pp. 69t, 70t, 71mr, 74mr, 75tr, 77t, B7t, 88tl+mr, B9r, 119tr jefferson Airplane, Volunteers album insert, pp. 170-171 Ed Kehm pp. 6-l, 7, 9bl, 11-t, 12r, 20, 21-tr+br, 22b, 23bl+tr, 24, 25b, 26-l-br, 27, 28 bl, 29tl+m+br, 30bl, 60tl+br, 61-t'l-br, 64r, 78r, 80tr, 8'ltl', 83-l, B5bl, 86, 88trn, 90 r, 91-t+br, 92tr, 94r, 93, 95tl+b, 116t, 119tl+bl, 124, 126b, 127tl, 134, 138-l, 148- l, 150r, 153, 152tl, 155-l, 157tr, 160-161, 163, 165, 176b, 180-181, back page Ron Kitlas p. 91br Gary Kleier pp. 19b, 21-tl, 23br, 30tr, 31-tr, 72tr, 73t, 74tl, 76tml john Linahan pp. 5, 6r, 9mr, 10, 11b-l+r, 12-1, 13-lm+lb+r, 16-17, 19tr, 22t, 24t, 25t , 26bl, 28m, 29bl, 30br, 31-l, 46, 56-1 +m, 57, 58t-l-bl, 59, 60tr, 61bl, 68, 69b, 70b, 7lb+tI, 72tl+bl, 73b, 74tm+br, 75tl+m, 76tl, 77br, 79, 80-81b, 100t, 101-115, 116bl, 117, 118tr, 120t, 122b, 123, 125, 126tr, 127b, 128, 130-133, 136-137, 138r, 139-141, 143-145, 146r, 148r, 149, 150-1, 152tr, 154, 155r, 157tl+b, 159, 162, 168r, 169br, 17 2-175, 178, 179r, 182-187, 195-214, 216-229, 271 Nagui Matta pp. 9tl, 14, 32b+tr, 33, 81-mm joe Monaghan pp. 9br, 19tl, 169-I jack Seaman pp. 120b, 121, 122t Ken Tash p. 56-I Mary Alice Urbas pp, Bt, 15, 166r, 167t Credits Council of Fraternal Organizations copy - p. 194, Ken Lill "Fool" copy - p. 156, Michael Sparough and Elizabeth Garrett "From the Foreigner's Eye" - p. 160, Mohan loshi Sports copy - Rick Berschback Calendar paste-up - Keith Wetter Photo cutouts - Ed Kehm Victor Dziekiewicz Editor Rick Banas Managing Editor Patrick R. Gannon Graphic Arts john Linahan Photo-Graphics Debbie Ruf Copy Marty Habalewsky Copy Assistant Ed Kehm Photo-Graphics Assistant niel "Spiro" Thomas Chief Lackey eith Wetter Graphic Arts Assistant Contributors: .Patrice Desmond Hank Durkin illus Harrigan Roseanne Kozerski Kathy Lipiec Cheryl Wilcox Keith Wetter Ed Kehm Daniel "Spiro" Thomas 'Ht K 1 1 il r .1 is gl q A -- Y-Mr 1.--' 3 ' g ' Marty Habalewsky 271 ----.-17 -777 777777, 77777 777 ,,,..t--. 7 '- ff!-' '75 Y'5"f 'vm' ' H 'Y---'E -Y -ww-, -Az-- --f-f-- ---- 7-W 77 7777 77 77,7 ,, - - -if f ,Tx -fb - .7 7- . 7 -, .. - . 1 'v 1' .1-, A g',.,w ,. , , - ,, -. Hr.. U A Sf' 7- gr-w,"'w -- - - -' . - ' ,-,- Aff , f - . -' ' - '- ' - ' ' , . ,, ,W . K ,K , , ,+L . M ,E Q' 1 - pix, Q 0,9 lr 1 'U . -. . uqfp, f' , 'A' ,,-bf. 4 ,Ma-2 f ' , ,- , -2, 7 . I ' QW' Q. 1 .1 5 , '- :vu V , - V ... R V -.VQJQ - J 67 Isis . , 1, - .. . ,Q .u Q.. ' 4 5 w - , t , O. .f . ,- - . , , ,. f . 5-. 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University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Page 1

1968

University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

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