University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI)

 - Class of 1930

Page 1 of 378

 

University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1930 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1930 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1930 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1930 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 378 of the 1930 volume:

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W. ,1 ..113I,",'ff.1v 1 1' ,:11,.gi 11, 1. 1 :pf ' 1 R, .i ff., !:j1', .1 - -1 H W' 1 "'1 -41ff1..1111.- ' X ,111 .1 1 -.'a'l- 1',111f: 1 .' ' 5 -, -1. 1:14 1.51 , - -U1 A1' 1 -QW. 1'Tf.1. 3 -, "X 1'1 .181 1' L., "' ' . 5.11 .' '1 151. 251. ' 1 4 -.-' '1 1' 1 1 1,1 - - ,,.' ' ,511 '11 1, 1- 1,. 1111 ...1 1,- , 5.11 M -1, 11. 1, 7314, .' 111..141.1 .sn 1. '1-51. 1- 11. 1 1 W . 1111n11. '12, 1.1 H.: . 4.1, 1,1 ,nl - . .211 r- M1 1'1' 1.4.1. 11.1 1. 11 Q 1.,4. , 1A,! 1b -1 1 'I W . rwiwffyf 3xs3Q Ql'm1ff'i' A -:GGL , Z BS I, sm A L 1 u '-' ,w w s. an 91:15-1 n QR 6 529 ' 'gi ' 'N ii?Fj"" PA Go DA TOWER, 5 sxxlg N Ni 19 , ..bbf.lE 4 . iii? -536: QW P LM 'gg va jig, . 2 2 4 i Y , A354 M- ., I Aki' Qolvyrzyhf 1930 JOHNC. TREEN FLORENCE NL BERNARD PAULEQ THIELEN vw! Ls xg! 9. .3-41 pri fm' iff:- I N s 'E M55 n. "if 49, ea MQ ,M tg i ' - 'rx 2, L' Z II93' 67244. ' Q mubfzkhed by fha SE NICK CLASS OF THE UNIERSHYU 25 FDETRUVY A ,N We tra zt Nah 27622 A6 Q Q Q 9 'B WM fm! WI' "'fi"yx ,q"1?" 70 Gs "'7'J!1v w f 106 1305 X? v asm? 6?" igL.. QQ-'Pl Xfffffut-'i?.. vflfigf.-'PP .Jak--'4aQ'?, A ' ' ' . 0 lAlr, f 22, I JA 4 N .H 4+ Q. SITA 4 ' Ysfbbn f 5 . 1 4 si s. 4.165 N Q 'Q -V A, I VID: -fag! ,f-5 , I . 'Z pf '. - f-"""' - f'9 9 . Q 1' --- - .T ' ' gf. ,Z A +A -, U w 'V' ' ' T' . ' 'ntl N K , , , N... f lk ,iv , ' r . 4 I 4, , - , 1- J . ..A1,.,,., ,, ,AA,.., J , Q - -I - I' . . " ' N J Y Q5 -'-' f 1 -2:2 53122 , 6 v K' 1 . , 1 . I ,5 lcul .,f, , lV,. v t.4. lu.: 2 A- , T3 V 1 V Q :Om 5 , .PH . Y ' . qu I 1 - A .f 'll . 'o ...wif N.:-M 'Q qvi, ii :, Q S 9' F W' S rx 0. 1.4 A la. A Jhznh ..,..,, llxk . .-, .,,, ...OP Qi.,,- ,,,. -' f Jill ..... 6vx:1X. A 1 D. -1 9 "-393' Gel 5 Wxljivy 53395-?gu, A mx fe bfi' .2 time, ..lltfetnemefcQne w t,.2,,l if l we nf ' 'M 'Mtn fL'J- A A ,.. .4 ,, : ' . 'Eff TQ ' A' www 2 ff Ziff? el Q E1 5 Afexcxdrza Q .19 W QDXYGVO at Allen County Public Library 900 Webster Street P0 Box 2270 Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270 X l ,cv-.1-znw wws-Q.. a"..4:,'- g2F-,g.F,p""-'-YQ 1 59,---.--,..f,e3q,w,m mv 6,6 Q 2?,Gg,1t .fL 5i9Qcf' .fie' 1gJJ5 Ce'fQg ,cg 7 1 L4 "-t ..l-t ff ',-. M 2' 'ff l.ee. te"n 2 5 -- 1 :W 2- 'E 1- V 2 'N' i e.'0,.Q ' 2 ' ,e2, 2 SeQ , e2J-cggtbvlekm 94 .9 ue f e ei?w' Eze.:-2 6'Sv1c?'?fi'5af AAG' 1. 'Y o wwf. -Cp' NM, f Q ,N GJ 'ff ' , , 4, - 1 GAL-.X 1 gp Mem- Q1 Q of f cfm? gi rl? .f WCGYMQQ' 'QQ ' 'F s Q' - Q Zdlltdlllulfa Z5 It is with pride and admiration that we dedicate this bookhto our true friend, who alone of our alumni has attained the episcopal dignity, who has in speech and works so greatly aided Alma Mater, whom we respect for his achievements, whom we love for his devotion, whose enthusiasm and loyalty we covet for our own-His Lordship, the Right Reverend joseph C. Plagens, D.D., Auxiliary Bishop of Detroit and Titular Bishop of Rhodiopolis. , Q mad, ,, t Cecelfa . fbi RJ NCQ 1 AQ IQSQV S 9,1 five jowerj is J 2 6 63123 rf ' 'gli-7 FC'lK'f? .iyzvx Q gmj A e QD EM'JlQfi5A9 Q1?3Q .Qag few 431: if ' 7,5604 -S. 'Q F Q55 N A ee we 5 ' 301,17 4...n1rS ,AJ K-K if L M5 ngnlftn GL Lia! xi-.. J if affeia tg' Y ' . Q 3 'J fave are your , f' Xivgcfoft N' A J ji' U7 f f gil? O If herein is found a record of the works you,ve done ,' of the events of a fleeting year ,' a picture ofa friend or a ineinento ofa delightful day,' an incident or scene you wish to keep and cherishg a ineinory of those who taught you and those who learned with you,' if these pages can but transfer to permanence the rnernories of a year that else would diin and fade-the 1930 Tower will have fuljilled its purpose as a chronicle of the progress of Alina Mater and the achievements of her students. 'l ' 4- J v- t- 1 Q 'Q lg lt, s E Q13 stsr 'r ' yu? 9 Q -14 ' ' - 'U F ' '-5' ' ' :Z 'V x "W X 1 .4, eee G221isL6Q2g-IQxQi'B' Q1'Qe5'-f3?,5,v, i-k92'ia'Qr -fc,-Q fieyit-S?26,eQeiZe?f v 55565 J V 1 Q2 i f ,f 5 -M - 0 ,, '.4 1 , f ' -1' A -' - , GQ,4giHgimMQimwmwQQZQQZQQ EMmmQmmmMQmaQAM2EEa,a 012 izfzig llniversity BOOK 1 . ,GK U W ' ' ' 5 4,2 'X' fqctzvztzes Qgwga S52 B O O K I I 11513 Tiwfa fi fqthletics , 130014 111 CDrgawiZatHMmS 130014 IV Fkatures BO014 V f W"fC"3 WWW 'bfi-5'K5f"""' C. 11 xS?wM'9,Ld91wJ M5549 0115? 5-es wJ,w2w1?sm K' wf:9'327JJ1 C? 1, M ,1 5? 'MR r ' ,A r Q 5 QQ! v or 'Y 61? af 9 1 a Nt , ,ty , "Zu,"-12 was 4. Kx K 3 A 5 fi 1 VVVVQ i,V ew IOHN C. TREEN, Editor FLORENCE M. BERNARD, Business Manager PAUL F. THIELEN, Managing Editor 101-IN C. CAHALAN, Associate Editor THOMAS A. POLLEY, Associate Editor C. CARROLL NUSSEY, Associate Editor IAMES HOBAN, Photography Editor JAMES M. BRENNAN, Art Editor JOHN S. MALLEY, Sports Editor RALPH W. BOONE, Circulation Manager if 41- af' o Q15 4 .BSS fm f' ai fri Lb O 'O Q A ':,, N 'iw kilo ,?.l?fW 5 Q .Y , .f 4 :MQ-E'9?fQL.?' il 4 Z SJ C! X fa 622 'A 7 ul E i Q2 .QD 21 vi i1 Z 591 L W' J2- 0 GF NQQ if.'1cE'i25flQa' x.IiQ.4'1a., fQ . 617201755173 Michael H Gorman S Charles P Kun le GW Z3 egg K5 ff svgjof P E 3, D M 51 C JN KJ 46 Bin 13' ,Ag Af NL CQ' 11 gg, ' , J Ly? w-iff QQ? J ICE 12 C9 ,, e ,K '- Q f 4, .rum j ftfbfcsiwd if I H I f 2 5 ,L ,F f M., 3 :Il sg F c 1 it ji ' "WH lmlHg"il 3 t rt, K, 1 gully : aft' Q yi 5' SRG: '81 J I N, Su We QS! GTE? Q. Sci? gl S D l ,ge SS ,it T lim i 95 QQ gs NAIXZSINISJNJYINXXZXISIVYJXIXA - ist' ' .3 sw Ulm, EWZOVZCLL OZUZV Allnikferfiy J ipetmil' In this book we have sought to tell the tale of Towers which gracefully symbolize the embodied spirit of uni- versity achievement, and to draw therefrom a part of the potent meaning of Memorial Tower, dedicated to our noble sons who have died in strange lands that tradition and culture might be preserved to the yet u n b o r n generations. Symbol of the days of invited knowledge, does not our Tower mean Alma Mater to us? 's .Sf ss I Q 515 Wi: gt f Q 3 s X' S JQXK 5:3 iigff Q x Ski? S511 ,QQX K TQ? QW 1 W x 'NLSSRS if t P H M 3 T 1 g 'fu at XSS l N Q RS l S Stgisf 1 RNS fi? 5' A is 1 ig fit N 's 3 , 5553 5539 Qffg S N4 Sis Nfgrffg ri ff rv- I iii F4 5 1 'QRS' 2 Q? 9 0 ' 43 rn A '+Qf?f ig' . - Qs, vs ..,Q.m5.QQ'4oQa?:,014xwnfiQsk?1. QL J N 2 S? 2 Q zksullj 209 6 k. 95 mW Sf5? 52 Jm1f wg ,A f , 4,4334 'l igfgfggzjgjgsflg if 5515, 1NfxY,JX!x ,,Jvx,v.fxxyY1vy JXfxY fVX IVY ,-fxfx -INXS JNILY-INXX Jxfgzxfg., if IVERSITY , . RL' ,, V .. If.. X, 4 ,,l,1,, -.Sr iv. , li . 1 I- ,, . . 'Q ' 5' "MY: I X ... ' N J W mf, - .PV U I .QV l . 4- 1 1 2' , -I :,1,K,A ng' I 4 m H I "Al f l 'N n .w, 1 -N , H-- , A 1 I '. .. 1 ., " A - -.1 ' v .-6 .. -, -fn'-M' , ' ,VFVQ ,A . ay' SJW. . ,..n,, " ' -i '-'I . ' A V X m. I 1,13 r YJ I . , I . I ' A fit 4 ,. 'Tv u ' ' ' x - 1 ' . '1- W . V V H X ' 1 1 3. 1 4 r , , X X X 1 v 1 R5 X 1 " . 1 1 ' V1 u . K Y . 1 x A IJ , . W . N475-if ,fx Y 4 ' . , r'tj"7flQ E' 1.4f,.'Hf ,4 ' 'Q X'- I y 1 . X . in , -5,1 an ,BH , ,' Jw" 4" I '. V 1. 2 It , ,' ,Q ' y ' '-16, ' , .. .V XV' , fmi-,,lI1s'L:A .. .Erik H flpm-if-"'.1t:i'gq.lI , .1 'JK - 'Qu - Vi., .'?lSJ!1,zr M' ,WN '-I.-4 ' , 'Pg' .4, nv . . .W , X ,x M, ,MI g w:n.1,: "JnfT.2-5: ,af , Wi A -V 1 W . wg is ..'-v.. , , H 1 '-.Jn ' x is N 'o i-32? mg ' 13' WNY 4 y f"ff f l Y 7 w 1 1 u 1 U in '21 V YT 114 ,xl 4 Q 1 I Q 'r rl lx I-if im, if he 6,5 . . Y ? . C, .5 -fn nw- ? 1 PN 1 - 'Z - x K, 1 : J 02 S5 ' . 5 . . r f9'MZSm.Js9 a w, ' mbgw ' 'lixinqem .fetn.L.ffcfArW.?i.a Atop Memo1'z'al Tower : u : I I L:.'-"Nags - u , , four szloer bells rmg Q x -QNO ,,,"g- 1 " out the hour of day- luv' 2 I .J , X a x,,gg, i 4 w- IN , w 1 I f X K Q Y V , , lf if Y 1' , "" - , , A L mxh v . ' 'V nm " , .- -, - ' xv. , ,, , N : f N , 1 E . , 11 . 'I X .1 'T 1 155, fx' it ' u ,auf -X M , ,., vg,,,,g A wjafflf, i V . 1 -. Asi f an Ln ' 1 1 1 . CH M 42 1 I 4 wif d 1 Qu nf 5 ff,-' M Q K igfj iq nf ' I' lxbf 5,1 !'f'1 FI , I .A,f 1 . ., -4 ttf' ,Q -Q-I RN- '.'-" - I lv ,n , A P A, 'VN . 'big' ' 'I nu! v 111' ' s' "q' 7? , ' "" Y ' ' 99, Q 4. ,, . p4. n . A,2:, , ., g -xcgfep Q! 'ju NX fix fjflsi , e e Directing thousands of Q-1 C., r . Q.-,gh .n 4. 531 " earnest students in " -. Ewa' SQ? ' L Q gf' "' "' Xi-i'D-J Search of knowledge- j 73-yt X I P h -- -, - ,,,f'o,.f 'I 1 4' e h K .4 ,A if , of b Inu r fd!! MW Aj, ., vjmlfll lib, . x . JZIQ i ff' A! mfg! 'Ph h , w: N 9 + N xm 53+ M 3212 53 ki FH ? . H19 'N , Y i s! s'- - . -- - -, sf we f 'f FQ ' fwf c1,g".'g - 'Q-' W. ' - A2 " -,Q 0 - 4' 'L AQ Some seeking biology va SQ? and physics here in ea? :?3 wpxi'-.Q the home of science- f , pl.-,a Q 3' ir' :W Wi-f - .. . L., , 5 1.5.1 A -A - wx Q 1' Y, ,.,,. ,4',,, V A 'Fi f-' , ..--, , .X Ip I 5 x Z Q Hug A Hi 8 nv f , , ' e- 'zgix L X 0 . f 4 an V . , Ain," , and . 11 A A! . 4 ' . Y :ls ,H Ji I ' ' Y: if N h ' 2 A 'n , f X -4, " . ,gre f 4 'I' 1411 ' iff ? Ziurfg? ' .54 41 ' , h I? I h x' I h I 1,1 '51 ' P ,, 1 e l ,w, 1 f. - ,f 1 k, 'gg T' x ' 3, M- - xmafxxpk A ' v . r Ili kg, if f . JI, A Q . h Lf I Qs 2 hi i . 1- h "' - NY! '-'-' - vw sv' -... , . 'Q - - nv,-' ' 'I wr: v wv: ' -' "0 27 . ' - '4 's' ,. ,Q . QM, ,. 4- N443 gf fjj' , 1-,x fjfq a -:Ma . 2 'I L Others ply machmes ih I, 31 Q' WZ, where mechanism rules 'STE' age- the hand and mind- fe h n Fiqh' A of 5 .1 H rs Q f r if And where abstractions recewe cz test before utz'lity's judging eye- 1 . I SS L H w ,Q I, , .. I 3 1 1 A 1' Q Q r-4 G 7 drr! J Y M Q ry? !1 f . 95", sf' I Q 6 i . - , -, p -Q fl- Q5 '-7-' - v 7 D7 'fp' - , UL" ' If, DW! ' 11'-' VN N' N "9' 'WZ yx 7" L :ff Or perhaps some delve I bs ,' 'K I 1 a 7' :TQ3 ull -I. 11 P1 here into the secret H ' 'igypa' ivy F 'i 1 RQ and mystic elements- eyf Q .J W P W W 1 w 1, 1 Ps Q15 ' Z 5 '2 .5 Y "K lo s 0 4 l Ill Q 2- SQ 5 1 up '!Z6 1 h as WZ?-Ac ll H And here investigate philosophy and arts or technical finance- ii 1 l.. x 'f-fx . I I 1 i L 7 Wi, '--wi W .N . ?E?bi x , Nm . A, A f-11:liiQ gzQ,gw ' x I A K ,WI -2 f I I .,', Fw A 3 R Q ' A 2' fl 3 q 1, .L EW if I ? Kel' ,S Q i 2 Q UQ in Eg Q. ' S ,gm m I fi W- ' l f5 l ' "fi--,. . if :QA ' -ffiblwglrr I N - , ul ' '.' 3' l.. i J' .1 ' Q f .Ll4Lx 8.7 3 ,,Gk63.'4 In Q ,ggi f.l .. ' 'A .f 4' K - 'fi' ,f .' .W vf 77 Qgffbiz . if 4 3 ufk, J i-gf' -7'Q 6 . 'ggi y 1 ? Q5 0.4 J 1 v Q Wg: Q ,ff N KX , x ff ,Q Q, 29 W' f ig 5 wjjc , wx i , X - sv J x I Elf' 'cf f +5 4 N M ' ff' K ' Q QM QJKQ KF 4? czcuffyfo l5gtQS?MM4gnE4oEasEEQsE?525,QWQEQRR lflf-3 ""' ""w-1 I wi 1930 TOWEQ - Q A ' g --- 'ff x : A on f' X 4 , heggfrfg 'elif i Qi' an 3+ 3 N 4. if, A F n '-3' XM A Qs, 5285 2 VERY REV, JOHN P. MCNICHOLS, Sal. JOHN P. MCNICHOLS, SJ., President GEORGE L. RENO, SJ. GEORGE A. MCGOVERN, S.J. Vice-President Secretary JOHN T. MORTELL, SJ. 4 JOSEPH SCOTT, Dean of Men FLORENCE E. DONOHUE Dean of Women, Registrar KATHERINE HANSJOSTEN LAURA M. DREW Treasurer EDWARD S. BERGIN, S.J. ' Librarian WILLIAM HARRINGTON Director of Public Relations JOHN RUSSELL MALEY Alumni Secretary Bursars GENEVIEVE DOOLEY MARGARET LEPEVRE DOROTHY LUNDY Secretaries l20l fp 1 N ' E 5??Qf I ' iffy a is 53, S01 '45 'mv l ies Z! ll E Kg. ,,A.. gg E 14255 is 1221: Qi L, lii , 2. if .. Jr:-sfacff-'M-ws.afsf,,. ,L 3530- f '--ffilfga 1 'H et' N Am n L f' E l930 To 4' ' ag ze... A-WEE cggf i ' Fi? if Ill I-s71f',f, , , Usrgtgi, 2' fic G A REV. J. JOSEPH HORST, S.J. ARTS AND SCIENCE J. JOSEPH HoRsT, S.J., Dean C. Baldwin Bacon, Leon Baisier, John E. Barlow, S.J., Al- fred G. Brickel, S.J., Leo E. Buss, Raymond Corrigan, S.J., Rev. Carroll F. Deady, Ormond P. d'Haene, S.J., Harmon W. Dunham, Alphonse J. Ei, James J. Fitzgerald, Aloysius F. Frumveller, S.J., Alexander Garcia, Albert Gartner, Ed- win E. Gilchrist, Mark S. Gross, S.J., Paul P. I-larbrecht, Dennis R. Janisse, Lawrence A. Kroha, Andrew E. Lip- sinski, William J. Maledon, William E. Martin, S.J., Wil- liam Mayrose, Frederick A. Meyer, S.J., Richard A. Mutt- kowski, Daniel H. Sheeran, Miguel Suarez, Gerald M. Sulli- van, Daniel M. Sunday, Fernand Vial, Rene Vreven, Louis G. Weitzman, S.J. ll21ll Q'!,,f.S.Ya!k Q g ' 75f'Z'Q9g u -, Y fr, ' I . . LM' fb-f C535 I, Ar' at . J 2. 1 . F50 W' 'U a Qffiixiw JQA4 f-iii?-"Q1xifs9.'C f7!7rB'g?9 r Ol'a!"'A- T -AE'ySil 'A A T HE, OWER L x.. - I ' I X - ng A f .Gi cf? 5 4 , A-li 2 5. rfeifi' ..,-,f M .we wp "Zi, 0+ 51015 .4 5,9-gg y. M! ' 132,-fill? .es'it1.""iQi' f 'V "fx DEAN CARL H. SEEHOFEER DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE CARL H. SEEHOPFER, LLB., M.C.S., C.P.A., LL.D., Dean John E. Barlow, S.J., Lyndon O. Brown, Raymond Cor- rigan, S.J., Ormond P. d'l-laene, S.J., Harmon W.,Dun- ham, Alphonse J. Ei, Alexander Garcia, Albert Gartner, Giovanni Giovannini, Erancis H. Griffin, O. W. Hedges, S. Janes, Dennis R. Janisse, Everett H. Johnston, A. T. Keene, Joseph A. Luyckx, William E. Martin, S.J., William May- rose, Victor X. Mitchell, G E. lVlcGurry, Daniel J. Moyni- han, Richard A. Muttkowski, Bert Reive, E. A. Roberts, Miguel Suarez, Eernand Vial, Rene Vreven, Henry Wilmes. ll22ll K if' lla 2 ,la Q 1 0 'J ,. . tsl! .GE .Q sl: 2 G' Ja-st,fc'fJL2H'Rva,+9k,,. THE Wm 11 ' ' X qu DEAN JOHN A. RUSSELL NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE JOHN A. RUSSELL, A. M., LL.D., Dean GEORGE A. MCGOVERN, SJ., Regent Evan T. Ashman, Lawrence E. Collins, Prank M. Conroy, A. M. Creed, Charles M. Daly, Clayton A. Eddy. Frank W. Edward, Anthony Eilers, George W. Feehan, James Fitzgerald, John M. Flesche, Asa Gallup, Alexander Garcia. George F. Helwig, John Higgins, Samuel J. Hoexter, Willard Holt, W, Kelly Joyce, Donald Kimball, Peter Kinsley, Jo- seph F. Latourelle, John Maher, Lester J. McCarren, Louis J. McClear, Charles T. McDonald, Arthur McGrath, John McNally, Harry Meiser, Louis F. Merz, Daniel J. Moynihan, William B. O'Regan, Paul L. Penfield, E. A. Roberts, James F. Simpson, Alfred N. Slaggert, John J. Spoutz, Richard Stephenson, M. A. Suarez, Leo A. Thaldorf, Arthur J. Welch, Robert Whaley, H. J. Willmes. to -xy E250 if s l! ze' W 'G llfffsi fa. 'ff ssv,xx-,pg 1 'wi I G 1 ' 4 t'f'le23c l23l U iecf J we - X iz st? .. .- 3 F, -' 4.QH J g A, THE lgao TOWER . I ' ' 1 x ' 1 '-lt REV. GEORGE A. MCGOVERN, DEAN PETER MONAGHAN LAW PETER J. MONAGHAN, Dean TIMOTHY L. BoUsCAREN, S.J., Assistant Dean GEORGE A. MCGOVERN, S.J., Regent A Arthur J. Abbott, Arthur J. Adams, Francis W. Allen, Lloyd Axford, John W. Babcock, Timothy L. Bouscaren, S.J., Merle A. Brake, Anthony T. Bray, Hon. Vincent Brennan, Louis H. Charbonneau, Ward Culver, Charles E. Duffy, John H. Engel, William H. Fallon, Alvin D. Hersch, Kurt J. Kremlick, Louis W. McClear, Hon. Patrick H. O'Brien, Anthony Park, Charles A. Retzlaff, Lawrence Sprague, Harry S. Toy, Hon. Donald VanZile, William G. Weber, Otto Cm. Wismer, Ernest Wunsch. ggw,-i as Q 4' J fififql 4?-In 2 ll24ll it 6 if' ,ff ng I .ill n 'J K. Pa . Y ,LB tt? t U KYQ 'W il -03 Gina r Q . l'Qs,f, 531 2 4g2iSiw44?S445iQE3mE?QEwnW33i?J V AF! ' "- Q-1 1 THE '930 TOWER EM .. E ' I4 -TTT : .few .. .5 lg? 'au f 'UL 39.14 f 5442 l 1 DEAN RUSSELL E. LAWRENCE REV. JOHN P. lVlORRlSSEY. S.J. 2-v ENGINEERING Eiab 4 ,3 'W W 'G RUSSELL E. LAWRENCE, M.S., Dean Joi-IN P. MoRR1ssEY, S.J., Regent Raymond Abele, Clarence L. Altenberger, Peter Altman, William Baker, Bert N. Blakeslee, L. Robert Blakeslee, Harold C. Boothroyd, Gilbert Boyd, Thomas Castonguay, William T. Downs, Edward P. DuBois, Edwin Franklin. Aloysius F. Frumveller, S.J., Jasper Gerardi, David P. Gil- more, William Godfrey, Edwin O. Graeffe, Paul P. Har- brecht, William H. Hawkes, George J. Higgins, Thomas L. James, Clair C. Johnston, Leon S. Johnston, Harry M. Keal, John Kennaugh, Francis J. Linsenmeyer, Edward D. McCarthy, James G. McGeary, S.J., Vincent lVlcGuigan, Francis McMahon, Joseph McMannon, Herman E. May- rose, William Mayrose, J. Edward Miller, Lynn J. Myers, Clayton J. Pajot, Warren Pierson, Ward S. Reilly, Dudley H. Rowland, John Stahl, Ralph W. Tapy, John H. Unfer- fate, S.J., Joseph F. Votrobeck, Harry O. Warner. Qawn gay? fend l25l lull , llll I Il llll , llll f cm 3 .,.,v-,, ., , ..,,., .,.,. . M H , 'Vi -',. 'E ,.,Q -Q... 355, 2 53. Q A 4 ff . .1-f' :Z If V ee 1 'W J IZ, l W If ZW? 5:79 J S. 63' A if 23 Q X. A Q mi fi 9 119 r E l L fi "rc Nw If ' Q . l mfg-gm Q F QM rf 7 Af QA9 vi? ,f -1 4 fffnn' i w 1 v i l x l 1 w 4 I il W ,i ll Ll 1 ll ,w li, Nl llg lm lr lll u la H 3 F l i i Ei, .1 ll ggrjiigf lf! lir l fffs ll X , x., f QE? Ne' ?"?fl Y ia' , v Au 1 'cilifilw w .GBX S yi I r 11 ', .5 ., ill Nl "'l "l il lil W il ll ll , l W1 Ml l lily!! g . , li v! l 'Q---!7g"?9 ,nyxff ll? 1H3j93O TOWER Left to Right: Top Row-Abele, Boes, Collins, Goodnow, Howard. Second Row-Jam jatovich, Johnston, Kronk, LaBarge, Lennert. Third Row--Mahoney, Rose, Simon, Schrieber, Starrs. Bottom Row-Stenger, Vachon, Wagner, Valentine. I -vi' l Ll- l xl iid l i C, N l if i l S l My Vials '4 mek. l28ll an , 4, 6 ,au ,,4,G'Sa 1-f.v:.e."-Lsssr'-4 9 .f g F., T 1' Q I ' M SX THE l930 TOWER A xes.. - A ll af' 'gs ,I 5. 4 V., F9088 SENIOR CLASS COUNCIL OFFICERS RALPH C. JOHNSTON, President. W. JOSEPH STARRS. Vice-President. RAYMOND J. ABELE, Secretary. PIERRE J. BOES, Treasurer. ARTS AND SCIENCES Ralph C. Johnston. President. William M. Walker, Vice-President. W. Joseph Starrs, Secretary. Joseph J. Kronk, Treasurer. DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Edward A. Stenger, President. Norman B. Valentine, Vice-President. C. Scott Howard, Secretary. Lester B. Vachon, Treasurer. ENGINEERING-SECTION A Raymond J. Abele, President. Pierre J. Boes, Vice-President. Kenneth F. LaBarge. Secretary. DAY LAW Nathan B. Goodnow, President. William F. Wagner, Vice-President. Erie Rose, Secretary. Boydon Janjatovich, Treasurer. AFTERNOON LAW Richard J. Sullivan, President. Lula E. Powers, Vice-President. Irving J. Gibbons, Secretary. Raymond J. Lynch, Treasurer. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE John F. Collins. President. Anthony G. Lennert, Vice-President. Howard I. Mahoney, Secretary. c assi? Q-523 2 Fred J. Schreiber, Treasurer. Erwin P, Simon, Treasurer, HE Senior Class Council efficiently performed the various duties which are associated with graduating from the university. Early in the year the departmental class officers met at the Jefferson Avenue campus to elect their ofHcers and formulate their plans for senior unity. With this preliminary work disposed of the schedule of activity was sketched. The Council supervised the selection and ordering of the class rings and ap- pointed Norman Valentine as chairman of the committee on invitations. Its most important task was found in the field of social activity since the Senior Ball and all of its associated problems was entrusted to the care of the Council. The Ball represents the acme of class social functions and consequent- ly details an unusual amount of hard work. The Council also contributed incidental support to all other class parties. The Council concluded its activity by co-operating with the faculty in mak- ing the Commencement ceremonies memorable. As a final gesture the Council enthusiastically aided the Alumni Association in planning and staging their annual Senior Banquet. Of all the councils of class officers the senior conclave is the most important. For it is this organization representing the officers of the graduating class of each college that officiates in the many events connected with commencement season. It is upon them that the responsibility for appropriate farewell obse- quies rests, for they are the governors of the final period, of the students col- lege life-the men of destiny of their class. The work of the council this year can be pointed to with pride as an example of the feasibility of unified class effort in the university. be ig I JT. L. S19 9 8 sf6i3 W L ,-g,'s.g ff-.3 31105.-Q3 1.79533 if f' ,' ff if 'fliis I29l -4 ad- ' ' T- -NJ--. , ' X ' ' ' Y G? , r'v'v'vAv'v'v'v'v'V'v'v'v'vAv'v'xf'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'V'v'v'v'v'vAvAv'v'v'Tv V V V A 5 if rg 'Hs- .: ivl .ny RAYMOND JOSEPH ABELE, B.E.E. T Wellston, Ohio ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineers Vice-Chairman CSD: wg Engineering Society: Sodality: Class Secretary C3,i Senior gh . A Council Secretary: Class President CSI: Physics Lab. Instructor. Qc Mia IMATIAS J. ALEoNso, B.E.E. Tampa, Florida ENGINEERING Tuycre: American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Engineering Society. RAY LEE ALLEN, LL.B. Pontiac, Michigan LAW W Alpha Chi: Junior Council: Class Vice-President C3, 41: gi Philomathic Society: Oratorical Contest CZJ. ANTHONY LEONIDAS ALSOBROOK Chattanooga, Tennessee FOREIGN TRADE Delta Phi Epsilon. ARTHUR WILLIAM ANDERSON, B.S. 2 Muskegon, Michigan ' 'x DAY C. AND F. 34 ' CQ, Delta sigma Pi: Football 42. 3. 45. nf- X Flag sr so WN 1 i C LEO JOSEPH ANDRIES, A,B. S . . . 2 - , Detroit, Michigan to bl , ARTS AND SCIENCE .61 ,t,l, Alpha Chi: Delta Pi Kappa: Magi: Activities Honor Society 8 C3, 45: Philomathic Society CID: Sodality: Class Secretary We Cll: Frosh Council Secretary CID: Frosh Frolic Committee ' g CIJ: Junior Prom Committee C3l: Hockey CID: Soph Vig- , :lance Committee C215 Tower Reporter CIJ, Managing Editor CZJ: Varsity N'ews Reporter CID, Business Manager CID. Assistant Managing Editor CZD, Managing Editor C3J, Editor C452 "Merry Ann" Publicity Committee CID: "Aces Wild" Program Managing Editor CZJ: "1-Ioofs, My Dear" Program Editor CBJ: "Hello Stranger" Program Editor C4D. WILLIAM JAMES ATHANSON 4, Detroit, Michigan FOREIGN TRADE Delta Phi Epsilon. WILLIAM IVIUIR BAKER, B.E.E., NLS. Detroit, Michigan W ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Vice-President C4D: Band C2. 35. THOMAS JAY BARTON, B.S. 5 St. Clair Shores, Michigan Q DAY C. AND F. Detroit Society of Accountants Treasurer C4D GRANT EDWARD BECKER, B.C.E. Greenville, Pennsylvania ENGINEERING Tuyere: Civil Engineering Society: Engineering Society. ' ffitvf 'Z' '1 255 N-Pxf Q ,-gf, K N 'ZX-A-,Cv,g-Jkvjxvlg-,yv,i1gvAv1g-,x-1,-J-Lv,-E-.fyvzxvzgvjx-A-AvAvAvA-AvAvA'A-JK'lg-A-AWA-AY1Cv1x-JC jx A A 1 yfvv: t-" "1:1nrt-y'-v- tr""7- fN-1' 0 QV1! 'NX Fvia ' 017 9:62- :wie-Sh' - avwswci-, 4e'1-ifsmvriegc' stirs liao . IQ, M 0 f . ,qv G Q -QQ, 1 'QA ' . is if iaf cgl fa as ...w i495 Qz faga .a2.kLS'-A .i:'?2ZfT mo,,1 .c!. ..,. .Easing G , .EF 252214-arab-A I Q 'VAVAvAV'vAv'v'v'v'v'vAvAv'vAvAv'v'v'v"vAv' v'v'v'vAv'v'v'V 31 'F f'vAV'v'v'VAVAVAV'v'v'N 4 I A .avk.4 ....g. JOHN .TOSEPH BEHEN, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Omega Beta Pi: Kadaver Klub: Sodality. JAMES EDWARD BELLAIMEY, PILB. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Soph Prom Committee CZ5: "Butterflies" Cast CI5: "Merry Ann" Cast C253 "Aces Wild" Cast C35. JAMES VINCENT BELLANCA, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE , Kadaver Klub Secretary-Treasurer CI5, President C2. 35: Sodality. DOROTHY M. BENZ Detroit, Michigan LAW Kappa Beta Pig Senior Girls' Club. 1, JOSEPH ANTHONY BERG ,I X Detroit, Michigan in NIGHT C. F. AND ,A 4 I 'f J 'rf JULIUS W. BERGER, B.ArCh.E. Q J Detroit, Michigan 4 ENGINEERING j' Architectural Society. - X FELIX BERGERON, B.IVI.E. Wi'ndsor, Ontario ENGINEERING FLORENCE MARY BERNARD, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Eta Zeta Sigma: Senior Girls' Club Treasurer C45: Sodality Treasurer C35: Women's League First Vice-President C451 Co-ed Basketball Manager C2. 45: Tower Sales Staff C255 Tower Business Manager C453 Women's League Dance and Bridge Committees C3, 45. CHARLES BENJAMIN BERRY, I..I..B. Detroit, Michigan LAW LEE ARTHUR BERTLINC1, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Magi: "Aces Wild" Chorus and Music Committee C25. FFSAQU 7' 'NVQ' 5'-Q 25 I .-Av,-Avgy Y1-CvfkflggAvA-AvA-AvA-AvAvAvAvAvAvA-A,A-AvAvAvA-A-AvA-AvAvA-Avzx-A,A vA.A.A.A.1x f -5,7-7, 7 l ljI'w!lfl X , ,Ang , ' " 4- ',f 1 " A -0 - 4 - ' .01 . mike y -fe. "f:anu:mS 1' , 4.gE.ey f?SZ .-.teas-.:f.E,f. army' as 4' Y"W fGiRX.Qf"?':r A 919331 Ik 31ll 6 ,, 54.-."'x!!" 'N ' 'ifgigb I C 5'-9' fm 0- a xsvx ' 9 iff'-I if 1 ,H .i tl r " , fl .:.Sf fiv l CLARENCE LOUIS BISHOP ELS. Adrian Mz'chz'gan DAY C. AIND E. Delta Sigma Pi' Sodality ROBERT WILLIAM BLANCHARD B.S. Lima Ohio DAY C. AND F. Argon. PIERRE J. BOES B.M,E. Toledo Ohio ENGINEERIING Kappa Sigma Delta: Sodality Second Assistant Prefect f5J' Engineerng Society: Sen'or Council Treasurer 55: Class Vice-President C4. 55: Tech Ball Ticket Committee C4J' Engineering Banquet Committee CSI. .IOI-IN LEON Boos Detroit .Michigan NIGHT C. AND E wling Q2 3 . . EDWARD BOUCHER B.S. Detroit M'ichigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Magi. ROMAN DANIEL TERRY BOUGHNER, B.lVI6t.E. Confluence, Pennsylvania ENGINEERING Chemical Society C4, 51. FRANCIS LLOYD BRAZIL, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Alpha Kappa Psi: Activities Honor Society: Sodalityg Class Vice-President OJ: Junior Prom Committee GD: Frosh Football Clj: Varsity Football CZ, 3b. Captain C402 Varsity Basketball Q2, 33. Captain ALFRED WILLIAM BREAULT, PILB. Grosse Ile, Mz'chigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Golf Club President Q3, 4,2 Golf Team fl. 2. 3, 42. JAMES LEON BREWER, B.E.E. Birmingham, Alabama ENGINEERING Engineering Society: American Institute of Electrical Engineers HAROLD RAYMOND BRILL Una'erwoodQ Ontario NIGHT C. AND F. Hockey Cl. 4-J. f'v'v'xf'v'v'vAv'v'v'v'v'f'v'V'vAxfAv"v'v'v'v'vAv'v'v'v'vAv-v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v V V V A 1 xx i 1 Q ' Bo . 4 J. Ii ' 4 Gy 1 dai kill ' i C 'c:w'f 'r' '11 sh'- ug -ji' N yx-A-AWA-AvAvA-A-A'AvAvAvA'A-AvAvly-A'A-AYA-AvAvAvA-AvAY4C'AvA-JCYAYA-A-4x'AvA-JC A :C A al. ' Y"'?"'- ff' M' 9' Q5"'Y "'XW!Q,'v-'-35 ' 1557 17:3-' atmteaf ' 825: 'a'M3'?FrfX5,x2'l..S's6' :.w.l5:U.,MI.saGi82x 6.1w. Jmawsewfiax f QS!! il32ll HQ? U 0 ' :san G Q- fff "3Q.' ,QfJ' 9 I nj -x 5 U ! :s4fz.a, '?ZmEL?-lah-2, FQETJRELH., ELAVIUS LIONEL BROOKE A.B. Detroit Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE ALBERT J. BROTZ B.E.E. Sheboygan IfVisconsin ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Engineering Society. CHARLES BRUSHABER B.S. Grosse Pointe Michigan DAY C. AND E. Alpha Kappa Psi: Adspirers. WILLIAM BUCHINGER B,E.E. Detroit Michigan ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Society of Automo- i ' - . tive Eng neers, Engineering Society Class Treasur r I ARTHUR EDWARD BUSH B.E.E. Guelph Ontario ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi, GEORGE E. BUSSIERE, B.Ae.E. Champion, Michigan ENGINEERING Engineering Society: Aeronautical Society: Society of Automotive Engineers: Varsity News Reporter 12, 3D. CONSTANTIN BUTIU, B.Cl7.E. Jneu, Roumania ENGINEERING Scholarship Awards by the Roumanian Government: University of Paris. HOWARD EDMUND BYRNE, B.E.E. New Haven, Connecticut ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi. CLARE ALBERT CAMERON Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Band fl. 2. 3. 4-I. RAYMOND CAMERON, Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Sodality. lei ' x 11 raining- L it ?, f"fil QU 'F' 'QVQQ' 'is 359 J AV-VAVAVAV-VTVAVT VAVAVAvAV'VAvAV'V'V'v'wfTNrAVAVAV-V-V'v-V'Viz 'v'VTV-V'wfv'vAVAN1'VAvAx I I .J 7, . e C J I I 1' 4g v fqh bw' J 2' I -5,AiA-A+AvAvL-JEik-Av-lv1XvA-AvAvAv'AvAvAvAtA'AWA'Av4gvJg-'gtg-AvJgvAvJkv1xv-A-,gig i JgvA-Jxtadih A ' v,v:7 Y,-gp g ,.5,'!,!ff-I , ,Ang Q - - DTr Kali'-si .. -.Vi fSEIEafTnE2BasC25:easea2S'I ,iaaaiiaailcieaerheaaastQ-izaiiiibes esmzaisarswa,gferssapenas IBBI 8 .4 . X407 Q sp gs t U Wg 0 ' 1 9, 1 -C-fmt . ' GL can :ef -fb' J f5 Q..r..Q 4: f- 'F if ac.-14-mYaG:.L-tx.. fi. 12035.-1-A913151 ,3.1mt91Q1i3L1:L a'j?k,R.va.a -m f - 6 35 Sas... ' W MX5 f'Y'v'vAV'Y'v'v'v'V'v'v'xfv'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'vAv'v'v'v'vAv-v'v'v'vAv'v'v'v'v'v VY 'V' fr " ,K f CX, yt .: i'Q. :l 9 ANNA A. CAMPBELL Detroit, Michigan LAW Kappa Beta Pi: Senior Girls' Club 141: Regent Scholarship Award 131. KENNETH HORTON CARR, B.Ae.E. Pontiac, Michigan ENGINEERING Delta Alpha Phi: Glider Club: Aircraft Club: Society of Auto- motive Engineers: Aeronautical Society: Engineering Society: Class Treasurer 12, 31: "Hoofs My Dear" Ticket Committee 141- HAROLD FREDERICK CARTIER, B.IVI.E. Chatham, Ontario ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi. JOHN LEWIS CASHIN, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Pi Kappa: French Club 121: Golf Club 121: Sodality: Philomathic 11, 21: Classical Club Historian 131: Sym- posium Society President 141: Varsity News Reporter 12, 3, 41: "I-Iello Stranger" Committee 141. 'Q 4' GLADYS CATHERWOOD, LI.,.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW 'ig . Kappa Beta Pi: Senior Girls' Club Vice-President 141. . A L C ,A 3 ' u M WILLIAM BENJAMIN CETNAR, A.B. AD Detroit, Michigan '1, ARTS AND SCIENCE ff Beta Sigma Pi: Sodality: Philomathic Society 111: St. Vincent De Paul Society 131. WALTER JOSEPH CHINOSKI Romeo, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Alpha Kappa Psi: Mt. Clemens Club: Soph Vigilance Commit- tee: A. E. C. Basketball 12, 3, 41: Class Dance Com- mittee 121: Bowling 141. 7 . EVERETT OLINGER CLARK, B.E.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Tuyere: American Institute of Electrical Engineers DENNIS J. CLARY, ELS. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Argon: Sodality. RAYMOND PAUL CLEMENT Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND E. Delta Sigma Pi: Sodality: "Merry Ann" Committee 111: "Aces Wild" Committee 121: Associated Evening Classes Rep- resentative 1l. 2. 3, 41. v XY iv f QQ " ' P,-U6'5'N"' fig .4- N ,Aviv lgfk-lk'I-'JK-lxvlx'JXvAvJk-Ava-1x712-1yvJx-Jy-jk-IX-Jkv1N-lQ,Av4LvAlvAvJk4Jg-A'JLwA-1x74-Jkvlk A 1, A Q'FV'T0"' "'ZlTT"" 'Y"""'- "'-" 'n-- 0 "' ' 71 'N'-I '-xx F'V'YA ' ff-xv iv'a' Z- V ,. L lrxfu Xfv w,f5b Q,-Q K-gf-Q W E 3 ac efdai-cf ' -:fe Mawr .. me J:-.nw .ik -17 5 ' LNCS-:QQ-, Jeb-Je .. me ' Q , 34 ' IN? ' 0 ' 'sw G 4 - ff' 'QQ ' 463' Q r -in . asf jvbx.. -. t -.Q 'f b w w ga-S ff-so ,cf-N -N f 'w' 1L, v 5 MMM ..wJefQm1fn- E.r-iiaqga. .QLQIMQ Q .F zienzasffar v - ' -1 AYQVAVAVAVQVQVAKVAX'AXf'VAVAVAVAVAVQXIAVLVAVAV-if4SfA1l-NIAX,-xfA'NfANf-XI ''VTVAV-vTvANfAVAVANfAVAvAx 4 ' A 148.1 1 3 NJ .jlgvf 1 , .5420 l JACK ALLYN COHEN, B.S. A Detroit, Michigan S A DAY C. AND F. Alpha Epsilon Pi. Detroit Society of Accountants Sergeant-at-Arms C41 WALTER B. COI-IEN, Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND E. THOMAS VINCENT COLE Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Sodality. JOHN FREDERICK COLLINS Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND E. Alpha Sigma Tau: Delta Sigma Pi: Activities Honor Society President Cl, 311 Secretary C411 Associated Evening Classes Chairman C3, 411 Sodality: Union Board C211 Erosh Council Treasurer C111 Sophomore Council Treasurer C211 Class Presi- dent Cl. 2. 3, 41: Erosh Erolic Committee CI1: Soph Prom Committee C211 Junior Prom Committee C312 Soph Vigilance Committee C212 Tower Sales Manager C211 Tower Circulation Manager C311 Varsity News Reporter C111 i'Merry Ann" Cast C112 "Aces XVilcl" General Chairman: A. E. C. Smoker Chair- man. I 1. MARCUS COLLINS ,J X North Adams, Michigan ' NIGHT C. AND P. KW. 915 Delta Sigma Pi: Sodality: "Aces Wild" Committee C21. 7 E 4 f 4 I ' V JOHN VINCENT COMELLA, Q Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE jf Sodality: Kadaver Klub. . X EDWARD JOSEPH CORBETT, Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Magi: Symposium: Class President C111 Frosh Frolic Chairman of Patrons Committee C111 Tower Reporter C211 Varsity News Assistant News Editor C111 Society Editor CZ. 31: "Merry Ann" Publicity Committee C111 "Hoofs My Dear" General Arrangement Committee C31. GEORGE GERARD COTTER, Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE I EILLEEN KATHRYN CROSS, Detroit, Michigan I DAY C. AND F. Eta Zeta Sigma: Dramatic Club Publicity Manager C412 Senior Girls' Club Secretary C411 Sodality Assistant-Prefect C412 Women's League Second Vice-President C411 Co-ed Basketball C21 411 Tower Reporter C311 Varsity News Student Man- ager C311 Varsity News Reporter CZ, 3. 411 Women's League Dance Committees Cl, 2, 41. I ORVILLE EUGENE CULLEN, B.M9C.E. I Toledo, Ohio ENGINEERING Kappa Sigma Delta: Chemical Society: Class President C41. if "'r':? P 'Y 'V757' ogg gym! I .NA iJgvlgvly'JgvAY1xZA-Jx-Jxv-A-lgJx-A-AvA'AvAvAJe-AwAvA'AvJxvAYA-A-AvAvAvA-Aw-A-Av1x vJx'1xw1g-1,-jg ' T' 'cjlgbff ' 'Diebyif' I ' gg' 'q w L ' "' 'Ame ' nf - N ." " ' 'S' K5-:z'f5b1:J?. ...bud-4155 ' .8433 fe voasgk-a -iff. 9- 094. - -as fw.Z1kx,9-5'f?1u Q MPQJY -4.79 3511 6 M-U' , - 1 "rio, f ore-1 f --A' v wr: H f'V'v'VAV'V'wfv'v'VANr'v'iv'v'V'vAV'v'v'v'V'v'v'v'V'vAv'V-v"v'v'V-VAV'v'v'v'v' V VN! A, tr .Sf 4iQ QUN WALLACE CUMMING, B.Ae.E. Maxuille, Ontario ENGINEERING PAUL FRANCIS CURRY, B.S, Waltham, Massachusetts ARTS AND SCIENCE Argon: Sodality: Varsity Football Student Manager 141. PAUL LEO CUSICK, B.S.lI1 Med. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Magi: Sodality. GEORGE ALOYSIUS DAKOSKE Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND E. CHARLES JOHN DANNEELS, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Theta Alpha Sigma: Sodality: Varsity Basketball Assistant Student Manager fl, ZH. LEO PAUL DAOUST, B.lVIet.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Chemical Society. THOMAS CUTTLE DAVIS, B.Ae.E. Wyandotte, Michigan Kappa Sigma Delta: Glider Club: Sodality: Society of Auto- motive Engineers: Aeronautical Society: Engineering Society. CASPAR JOHN DEIGERT, B.C.E. Hamtramck, Michigan ENGINEERING Society of Civil Engineers: Sodality: Engineering Society. JOHN A. DELTIN, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Kadaver Klub. MORRIS BLADWIN DEO, Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Kappa Sigma Delta: Civil Engineering Society: Engineering Society. "'9'f 7' "1yXf!'N'5 I 6 .2 ' tk .-Z' Jyv-jg-1nv4y-JL-Jsvlx-lx-xiAvAvAvA-A,1vv1v,AvA-lg-AWA-AvAvAvAvAvAvAwAvJS-Ax-A-AvAvAYgxvyxr-1x jg A A J, ' YW- - ' v x? NX QV-'ii ' GRY XTWQI' at!e!d'.s4E' " Kilt 'twm vrfiiz fat"1'Lsfx.wI'2tf-ZJMQQ. -,NZ2s eS.-es,e, 3Q1:!6 .. 'F-' C ' wil!! 36 W --5 0PAlQ? 6 'QQ , 8 1 fake, ...w .!t.QLQzfa. 5?as...,QtAS'-A ,.iv15? Aoii1 .GL .,. rzdr.-dlzaeziff g ...Z-1 Area.:-1.-Z'-a ka. -2 xr V V v'v'v'v'v'vAv'v-v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'vAvAVTV 4v'v'V'v'vAvAVTVTV'VAvAN t T A Alfa-I ,-ls! N-dl!! SYLVESTER ANTHONY DE PONIO, 1 Detroit, Michigan y ARTS AND SCIENCE I MAX ELVAN DERIN, Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. A Alpha Epsilon Pi: Detroit Society of Accountants ViccAPresident co. , EUGENE LOUIS DIERSING, 3 Youngstown, Ohio ENGINEERING Tuyere: Society Automotive Engineers: Aeronautical Society: Engineering Society. FREDERICK ANTHONY DIETZ, B.A6.E. Detroit. Michigan ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi: Sodality: Engineering Society Secretary 145: Aeronautical Society: Class Secretary 123: Frosh Frolic Ticket Committee 111. HUDSON WILLIAM DIGBY Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. 11 I Delta sigma Pi: "Aces wma" Committee 125. K GW! Hs f 's 2. DONALD HENRY DISTLERATH, D i St. Clair, Michigan , ' 5 DAY C. AND F. Detroit Society of Accountants. f jf LAWRENCE E. DONOHUE. Ph.B.,LL.B. W K Lorain, Ohio ARTS AND SCIENCE Magi: Gamma Eta Gamma: Sodality: Symposium. JEREMIAH JAMES DONOVAN, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Pi Kappa: Alpha Chi: Magi: Activities Honor Society Treasurer 141: Class Secretary 115: Class Treasurer 125: Frosh Frolic Publicity Committee 113: Soph Prom Publicity Committee 121: Athletic Board Publicity 111: Hockey 13,1 Soph Vigilance 123: Tower Assistant Editor 125: Varsity News Editor 113. Assistant Editor 123. Assistant Editor 131. Feature Editor 14-5: "Merry Ann" Publicity Committee 115: "Aces Wild" Program Editor 125: "I-Ioofs My Dear" Script Committee 135: "Hello Stranger" Production Manager 140: "Joker" Staff 121. I RAYMOND DONZE, St. Genevieve, Missouri ENGINEERING Theta Alpha Sigma: Engineering Society. FRANCIS JOSEPH DORAN, Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Detroit Society of Accountants 141. f-755317 'r' 'QVQQQ' -Q 23' J -54 A A AvlxYAvqgvilx-A-4-'A-A-AvAvAvAvA-AvAiAvAvA-AvAvA-A'A'A-A-Avzxvfx-AWA-A-JC-A-A-A-fy, .o'T7 Yf-0 ,. viii ,I 7-'fi ' "-'QW a5Y'.-Q1 ' pt-1 -v-vvi I gi:""' 'S T-RE? ii '-XT!" TWT' 2 -K'-4 4"SNQ vv 'N - 1: -2 I f i. Jo 11 -a:.1WaeusmS .aavey ff few -w e . , facie as s mmtv we . A-so -'Ia Ze 37B - ,-.1 "wee for-1 --A' 9- 1 rAvAvAv'v'vAvAv'v'V'vAv'v'v'VAV'xf'V-V'V'V'vTV'v'v'v'VAVAV-Y'v'v'V'V'vAv'v'vAv Nf V Y A S F R 'ffm .!.kf al 9 RAY S. DORNSIEE Gordon, Pennsylvania NIGHT C. AND F. GEORGE DOWNIE, B.M.E. Pt. Dover, Ontario ENGINEERING Society of Automotive Engineers EDWARD PETER DU BOIS, B.A.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Aeronautical Society: Society of Automotive Engineers. EDMUND JOSEPH DUDZINSKI, BS. in Med. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Kadaver Klub: Sodality. 2 ' ELLIS CHARLES DUNCAN, A.B. Af Johnstown, Pennsylvania ff ARTS AND SCIENCE wx Philomathic Society Secretary 143. 2 ' .. ' I C J , J we Wh., WALTER P. DUTLI, B.E.E. Q4 Enterprise, Oregon Kr I ENGINEERING I ' American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Engineering Society. JOHN FRANK DZIUBA, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE GUSTAVE HARVEY EBERT Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND E. EDMUND J. ENGELMAN, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW Gamma Eta Gamma: Argon: Magi: Sodality: Philomathic Society: Oratorical Contest KID: Skinner Debate QZJ. LEO GEORGE ESPER Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Sodality. 1 ffxxvr iv 13, X53-xvq ' sry S L42 .f N 'jx-AWAWA-Av1svA-1gv1gvJgvAvA-AvA-A-AvAvA-AWA-A-AvAvAvAv4'AvA'AvJvvlgvlk-A-AWAYA-yy-Jg jx A A 1 S7f'V'5-'Q ' "E'1'F'5fT-'-Y" XGNF'-8 "'XW!Qr,'iff's'4w1"NYc.?l"'l'w ae efdeafe ' Ci?wJ9 W'fu-f fe, :Ef.s:.xs .isywqc ar a o.-ego, image ., m y Q A H38 ' TN' .CH 0 ' vw, 6 4, .f -Quo , f 543- 'Ur -nJ,.-X 1, . i'7s Q Cr fb 'T-565 k . 'N Hake, .wztmha M, invite.-Aim.. .is. v2 Af.,,.tc:i. r!7IirJ1 g-:Kg .fr mgacx a Q TV'V'v'V'v'v'v'v'-f'v'v-v'v'v'vAwrfv'v'v'-ITV'vAv'v'v'v'vTv'VT''v'v'V'v'v'v'v'V'VAvTvAx ' A full 3 .1 1 I D 4-A ls .g.'9 ' Q!. NIARTIN JOHN EWALD, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE CHARLES JOSEPH FELLRATH, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Alpha Chi: Argon: Delta Pi Kappa: Sodality: Frosh Frolic Committee Clj: Soph Prom Committee C212 Varsity News Reporter CZ, 3j: "I-Iello Stranger" Arrangements Committee. SYDNEY JOSEPH EINEBERG Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Alpha Epsilon Pi: Soph Vigilance Committee. .IOI-IN A. FINN lVindsor, Ontario NIGHT C. AND F. WILLIAM FULLER FITZGERALD Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Class Secretary CID. 1 40 Y MICHAEL FRANCIS EITZPATRICK, B.S. fqpj tw Kalamazoo, Michigan E DAY C. AND F. J ' Delta Sigma Pi. ', - I itil I0 J ALBERT EDWARD FLEMMING, B.AtCh.E. Q' Detroit, Michigan ' I ENGINEERING Chi Delta Theta: Glider Club: Architectural Society: Engineer- ing Society: Varsity News Reporter C3, AU: Departmental Circulation Manager C4. 51. FRANK FLYNN, B.C.E. Durand, Michigan ENGINEERING Tuyere: Civil Engineering Society. RAYMOND J. FRANKLIN, B.ArCI'l.E. Grand Rapids, Michigan ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi: Grand Rapids Club: Architectural Society Treasurer C5J. JAMES EDWARD FRAZER, PILB. Riverside, Ontario ARTS AND SCIENCE .Iester's Club Cll, Treasurer CZ, 35: Dramatic Club President C451 Philomathic Society President C3J: Sodality Assistant Secretary CZJ, Secretary C351 St. Vincent de Paul Society: Junior Council Treasurer C332 Class Vice4President C352 Junior Prom Committee C3l: Tower Photography Editor CZD. Sales Committee CZJ. Circulation Manager C3j: Varsity News Reporter C2. 33: Circulation C3J: "Aces Wild" Cast and Ticket Committee CZJ. "'fs?ll5-.P T' i"'T'?'.9' -Q 935 J LA-35-AX-JLvJkvA-Y1XiA,A-A-JnvlkvA2-A.vAvAvAvJkYAvA-A-Avjk-Jxv4nvA-Avlxvlxvlxvzyvlxv1xv1x-Jgvly vAvA'A-A-Jg 7F53 57MB Ylf' 5 A I"-'F' X . . 87" 1 , ' xv-v -vvY'1 I-iiiifvl .T 'jvii' fs. .px f if ' Q i?-Q 5 r m . ,,f ,Xif'Qr"' 55' W e-, . ' H N A9 .11 CQ at-,JLG .9...v..! ,aw-J A veuizaa..- 026.-'Ska nc-ig' :f 3 ASPJQDJY IBQI 8 -1 : -SQ' 'Kim W 06' As. 0- a xggff ' O gf- Qf"'y ' f Cfznn. . ' Qwtfoli LA ww' 'Q 0 Q..r.CQ 9 fe f' b amasaaca.. cz... .?2,s,n-as-.a..ie. ,ipstaacsimeia 3Ls,fb..a.e: -m f- LQQES.-mx.. aeslkaxt f'v'v'xfAv'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v"vAvAv'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'V'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'xf'Nf'v fv wf A ' ,I C fx.. 'Y -!g nL Q JOHN FEDUS FREDERICK, l..I...B. Saginaw, Michigan LAW Freshman Football Coach. ARMELLA CYRELLA PRIEDL, B.S. Wausau, Vlfisconsin DAY C. AND F. Eta Zeta Sigma: Activities Honor Society: Senior Girls' Club 641: Dramatic Club C4J: Co-ed Sodality: Women's League Recording Secretary QZD: Corresponding Secretary C3. 4J: Cc--cd Basketball CZD: Varsity News Reporter ll, 2. 3, 4J. JOSEPH PETER IZRISKE, I..I...B. Saginaw, Michigan LAW Delta Theta Phi: Saginaw Club: Union Board of Governors CIM: Varsity l-lalfback OJ: Associate Editor of Law Review C5l. IVIABEL ELIZABETH FROST Detroit, Michigan LAW Kappa Beta Pi: Senior Girls' Club. 4 liy ANDREW A. FULGENZI, M.S. Q ' Detroit, Michigan l K ARTS AND SCIENCE xv' L 1' Sl if' ,KI l If IVIARGUERITE IVIARY GAHAGAN, B.S. E , . Toledo. Ohio DAY C. AND F. Sodality: Senior Girls' Club: Dramatic Club Secretary: Tower Reporter CZ, 35: Varsity News Reporter Cl, 2. 3. 41. JOSEPH GREGORY GAUTHIER Detroit, Michigan LAW V ROBERT ANTHONY GEHRIG, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Magi: Sodality: Kadaver Klub: Freshman Football CID: Varsitv Football PU. RALPH ROBERT GENTER Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. JAMES GERACI Detroit, Michigan LAW 'efkys-" 259'- N -jk-A-A'A-JgvA-A-lyv1xvJxvAvJk-Ava-fy-1xv.1.vAw1gv1yv1x-AvAvAvAv4vAvAv4-A-igw-AvJgv,A-fx ,Al-A A 4, srkv-v'1'g1""'11"6fv-v- 'Ya""'- . -'gg -xx vf-r v iv-.v awfdesfaf v f':4':5'Ew5.fi'rx1'LE-g?bf'k'fGm"l-.yi.xEi1.5'n" X C3EQaQm39!15fffE? fvfzth H40 'tw 0 ' Af- at . fff"1fJ.' 4563- 'Or iv., !:s1S9aE,eC..RIm?EaEL3fbH ,fs?L.i'k--iii., EDGAR WILLIAM GETTINGER B.AI'Ch.E. Festus, Minnesota ENGINEERING Architectural Society. IRVING GIBBONS. Detroit Michigan LAW Magi: Delta Theta Phi: Sodality: Philomathic Society: Class Secretary 143: Soph Vigilance: Knights of Equity Scholarship. J. GRANGER GIBBONS A.B. Detroit Michigan ARTS AIND SCIENCE Classical Club: Sodality: St. Vincent de Paul Society Treasurer 133: Debating 133: Philomathic Society. LEON CHARLES GIBBONS B.At'Cl'l.E. Detroit. Michigan ENGINEERING Kappa Sigma Delta: Engineering Society Vice-President 143. President 153: Architectural Society: Chairman of Junior- Senior Engineering Banquet. JOHN JOSEPH GILHOOLY Detroit Michigan NIGHT C. AND E. Bowling League Secretary and Treasurer 133: Night C. and E. Basketball League Chairman 133. JOHN LOUIS GLEES, in Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Kadaver Klub: Sodality. NATHAN BROOKS GOODNOW, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW Alpha Sigma Tau: Delta Theta Phi: Alpha Chi: Sodality As- sistant Prefect 13. 43, Prefect 153: Union Board 143: Union President 153: Junior Council President 143: Class President 12, 3, 4. 53: Erosh Frolic Committee 113: Soph Prom Committee 123: Junior Prom Committee 143: Senior Ball Committee 153: Athletic Board 133: Erosh Foot- ball 1l3 Varsity End 12, 3. 43: Assistant Editor of Law Review 153. SYDNEY H. GREEN, B.S. Detroit, Mi'chigan ARTS AND SCIENCE OSCAR MICHAEL GREENSPAN, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND E. Alpha Epsilon Pi. GEORGE LUCIAN GRENIER Detroit, Nlichigan NIGHT C. AND E. I lst 'x I 11 n 'E' 'v'v'V'vAv'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v-vAv'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'vAv'vANf'v'v'V3f A-f'v'V'v'v V V V Nf v v x L , 1, e -tl 5 I K 'G- I . 40 KWU Qu 7 A f 4 Sodality. 'Y' ivgm' 4 Wjkv-Jk!vAvAY1kwA-AvAvlv4Xw A-Av4vAvAvAYAvA-A,A-A-AvAvAYAYA-A-A-AvAvAwAW AAAAAA ,X Q ' fTZ1'e','i5Ef"i -SW a w 'Gi a' '-it'-5?'5'3Y 41 6 ,, ,,... Q "' ,NPS X . H 1 ' I Q J' i r ' , ff ,-M mv i '1'5'6'Q"' V,-UKGND ilk .4- N ARTHUR RICHARD CiRIX A.B. Detroit Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Pi Kappa' Golf Club CZD: French Club C23 ' Symposium Society' Philomathic Society: Sodality: Varsity News Reporter , 43' Debating 3 . WILLIAM ANTHONY GUARNIERI Ph.B. Detroit Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Alpha Phi: Sodality' Philomathic Society. J. OWEN GUINEY Ph.B. LL.B. Detroit Michigan L AW Delta Theta Phi' Sodality: Frosh Football Manager ll' arsity Football Assistant Manager QZJ: Cheerleader 3 VINCENT ALFRED HACKETT B.S. Detroit Michigan DAY C. AND F. WILLIAM F. HALDEMAN B.E.E. Detroit Michigan ENGINEERING Americin Institute of Electrical Engineers Secretary C40 Chair- man 5J: Engineering Society Banquet Committee OU. RICHARD MARTIN HANEY, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Sodality. DAN NEWTON HARRINGTON, Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Argon: Sodality. LOUIS LEE HART, Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Alpha Phi: Frosh Football CID: Varsity Right Tackle CZ, 3, 45. ALFRED HAVAS, B.M.E. Kinsley, Kansas ENGINEERING Society of Automotive Engineers President CSD. GEORGE EDWARD I-IENK, B.ArCh.E. Mt. Clemens, Michigan ENGINEERING Chi Delta Theta: Mt. Clemens Club Vice-President UD: Presi- dent C4D: Engineering Society: Architectural Society Vice- President fAv'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'vAv'v'v'vAv'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'vAv v v v it A 1 x . L ' cz. 2 , c J , i C . V Q , 4. 53 tt , 4 ig, 1 Iii? my 1 I 1 f' wg ! C 0 ' K C JXWA-Avlxvfgv Jxvzy-A-1xvJxvJgv1x-J-vfxvlni1xvJxvAvAvA'1x'Jxv1x-AvAvAvJgvAYAvlx-A-Jgg-A A 454 A A A 1, A 4 -r-v-- f--"f . -'-1 - --1' - H42 'KQV 0 ,' Af- c 4. ,ff-qq 1 Afqff I 'lj-N -VAVAVAVAVTVAwFv'v'v'vAvAv'v'v'v'v5f'v'vAV'v'VAv'V-V'vTVTV5f"v'vAV'v'v xr V V V v V x PAUL WILLIAM HILLEBRAND, BS. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Symposium Society Vice-President C4j. CLARENCE W. HINZ Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi. JAMES FRANCIS HOBAN, B.S. Cheboggan, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Alpha Kappa Psi: Citizens Military Training Club Secretary CID: National Defense Club Commander C4J: Sodality Sec- retary CBJ, Sacristan CZ, 3J: First Assistant C-H2 Class Treasurer c3,i Assistant Student Basketball Manager C3J: Tower Photography Editor C4D. E. VINCENT HOGAN, B.IVI.E. Buffalo. New York ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi: Buffalo Club: Sodality Secretary C4. 5,2 Society of Automotive Engineers Secretary C3J. C. SCOTT HOWARD, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Alpha Kappa Psi: Argon: Sodality: Union Secretary C332 Class Secretary C4D: Frosh Frolic Committee CII: Junior Prom Committee C332 Senior Ball Committee C-H: Hockey CZ. 31. Captain C491 Frosh Football Student Manager Cl. 23: Varsity Football Student Manager C3J: Soph Vigilance Com- mittee CZIC Tower Reporter C362 Varsity News Assistant Sports Editor C3J. Sports Editor C433 "I'Ioofs My Dear" Pub- licity Committee C3,2 Union Smoker Committee Chairman C3J. BYRON A. HOWELL, B.Met.E. Colville, Washi'ngton ENGINEERING Chemical Society. JAMES J. HUNT, Ph.B., LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW Gamma Eta Gamma: Sodality. HAROLD ILLIG, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW Gamma Eta Gamma: Sodality. JACOB S, ISBITSKY, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. BOYDON .IANJATOVICI-I, LL.B. Detroit. Michigan LAW Gamma Eta Gamma: Class Treasurer C51 9 N nl .an J -Q4'A,AvAvA,A,A,A-A-AvA,A-AWA-AvAvAvA-AvA-A'A-A-AvAvA-AvA-AvAvA'AvAvA-A A A A A A jg. ,- t-Oy! 7 Q7-'Q'!JiIf'l i yngvfvqv' ' ' li .1771 WW vi vig -Q 'N if -1 S 73" , 'X' -.4 " N -Q if W a J 5 twill? e t-jvifr at was 4 .ge,v.fJfm .-agmw f. aikalfeb 4' s'W61-IAQ? Qu. 1- is -'ia Ji lol 6 , ,,:..--ill' , AWN? ' 'figs ' 'A ofa' 1"-L r 0 u:f'A " 0 G'--- Wt 3 rAv'v'v'VAv'v'v-v'V'v'v'v'xFv'v'v'v'v'wFv'vAv'v'v'v'v'wFV'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'vAv V V V A 317 W .1 A tt, X. ..o.afsNmfso ff L'ie,'fQ" gen'- 5 HARRY H. JANOWER, LL.B. Brooklyn, New York LAW MARTIN JEDREZEK Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND E. FRANK EDMUND JENNEY, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND E. Alpha Kappa Psi: Alpha Sigma Tau: Delta Pi Kappa: Inter- fraternity Council Vicc-President C3 3: Activities Honor Society: Adsp1rc's: Sodality Prefect C43: Union Board of Governors C335 Class President C332 Junior Prom Committee C33: Varsity Football Assistant Student Manager C332 Tower Sales 123. Photography Editor C331 Varsity News Reporter C2. 33: "Hoofs My Dear" Assistant Business Manager C331 "Hello Stranger" Ticket Committee Co-Chairman: C. and F. Banquet C233 Union Dance Chairman C33. RALPH JOHNSTON, Ph.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Pi Kappa: Magi: Alpha Sigma Tau: Interfraternity Council President C435 Activities Honor Society: Philomathic Society Vice-President C33. President C43: Senior Council President C431 Class President C3, 43: Senior Ball Committee 443: Band Cl, Z, 3. 43: Tower Managing Editor C23, Editor C333 Varsity News Reporter CI3, Assistant Editor CZ3. Associate Editor C331 News Editor C433 "Hoofs My Dear" Committee C33: i'Hello Stranger" General Arrangements Com- mittee Chairman C43: Debating Cl, 2. 3, 43: Skinner Debate Medal C332 State Oratorical Champion C33. CLARENCE LEO JOLICOEUR, LL.M. Detroit, Michigan LAXV FRANCIS FELIX JURKIEWICZ, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Beta Sigma Pi: German Club. J. GERALD KANE, LL.B. Mt. Pleasant, Michigan LAW Delta Theta Phi: Sodality. ANTHONY LUDWIG KARCZIVIARZYK, Ph.B. Hamtramck, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Beta Sigma Pi. JACK A. KAUEMAN, B.Arch.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Gamma Epsilon Phi: Architectural Society: Engineering Society. FRANK JAMES KELLEY, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE "Hoofs My Dear" Cast C33. igx-A-A-4-JiAvA-AvAvAvAvA'AvA-AvAvAvAvA-AYA-AvAvAvA'AvAvAYA'A-Ag-A'A-A-AYAYA-A A A A J. ?f-?"Tn1" ' YTQT- ' 'g,?':QN"'n-L! "'XX!g?,?f-'SA ' QR' l'F:d' aERe1EeeQ?" iaeaaaasawesr .,ae4iE2!ii9 .2!t:ectagef?iEEZ3sgsecasg 4kasa1emv3Ih5mE52tfaSS3!?i I44l ffm? 0 'Av- -Q. gf-5-'3q,v ,gxfg-Q f wx 1, t4smw ?QEZ5E":2- -VAVAVAVAVAVTVAVA Nfwf'V'VAVTVAv'v-vAv'v'VANf'v'vAv'Nr-V-VAVAVX Av-VAVAV-vANf'v'yfxf-V'VAN WILLIAM JOSEPH KELLEY, PLD. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Sodality. FRANCIS JOSEPH KELLY, A.B. Salamanca, New York ARTS AND SCIENCE Philomathic Society: Sodality: Class Treasurer C251 Class VicefPresident C-43: Soph Prom Committee C2 D: Erosh Ftclic Committee C491 Soph Vigilance. RAYMOND GEORGE KERN, B.IVI2t,E. Ste. Genevieve. Missouri ENGINEERING Engineering Society: Chemical Society Vice-President C41 President C5J. BERT!-IA A, KOON, LL.IVI. Detroit, Michigan LAXV Kappa Beta Pi. ROY GEORGE KOWALSKI, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi: Erosh Football CID. A. HERMAN KRAET, Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. SIGMUND JOHN KREBSBACH, BS. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Alpha Kappa Psi: .Iester's Club: Sodality: Detroit Society of Accountants President C453 Band Cl, 2, 3. 43: "Merry Ann" Chorus CID. JOSEPH LESTER KREKLOW, PILB. Pontiac. Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Argon: French Club: "Hello Stranger" Music Committee C4-D. EDWARD .IOSEPH KREMER, LL.B. Pontiac, Michigan LAW Gamma Eta Gamma: Soph Vigilance Committee CZH. LAWRENCE ANTHONY KROHA, B.S. Grosse Pointe, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Omega Beta Pi: St. Vincent de Paul CBJ: Sodality: Student Instructor of Biology C3. 45. ' x u riiQy -. 'few jeg?" J L . If 4 3 A 'iw 13' S t 4! it . 4 1 Witt lit 3, ' LJ J -.NWA-A.AvJY.AvA , 4.A.A-vlilkvlkvA,A,A,A,A,AvA-A,A'A-AvAvA-A-A-AvAvA'AvAWA-A-A vAvA,A Avxg, ff 'lts-'7 YF5, I 5 fxfsjxlf-' A 1, ,""fwQi" ' Qva-51 "' li .-vrvr-1 ll f-1,4 M :vi 'it -Ns as-if Qt 'I Ng Qglw 3 1 r --.XJ fi 'DI . 49 , 9 0 ffm? b e- 19.13 ..m:Ju- 0 ,o.gv.-1313 .-.te Jkgf,, .Magee 0 Qviftfgrfate -5,-yjfmi 45B o'rf:--aw f- v,oessra,,a Q Leap? fy .J of 1.-7-egg App? 'ee-'it 3 J 5 . . 1 Nas 1 - . L Q- a - A ' 0 ' ' ' ch5SJ.:.ue.Q1eEPfS 5l,s-.1atk.esgQ.fpE.axsCmtufH:.1saxQ,a..,s.eE'mG,-Lssaisse... arasaaxl KTVTVGXFXFVAQTV-1fw,fXfT3F6A v'V-xf'V'v'xr'VAxfTNr'v'v'V-VAVAV-xr'v'vAVTV 'v'v'v'v'VAVTVAVT K S UN 1 JOSEPH JAMES KRONK, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Alpha Phi: Kadaver Klub: Sodality: St. Vincent de Paul: Philosophical Club: Class Treasurer C3, 45. EDWARD WALTER KULASKI, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. CLARENCE J. KUMMER, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE A Magi: Alpha Chi: Delta P1 Kappa: Symposium Society Cor- responding Secretary 145: St. Vincent de Paul Society Secre- tary C351 Philomathic Society: Activities Honor 'Society Vice- President C45: Junior Prom Committee f35: Soph Vigilance Committee fZ5: Tower Sales CI5, Fraternity Editor QZ5, Associate Editor f35Z Varsity News Reporter fl5, News Editor CZ5, Fraternity Editor CB5, Associate Editor Q45: "Merry Ann" Publicity Committee CI5: "Aces Wild" Business Committee f25: "Hoofs My Dear" Sales Committee C35: "Hello Stranger" General Arrangements Committee C45. BAYARD KARL KURTH, A.B. 5 Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Varsity News Feature Editor C45. . RAYMOND CHARLES KURTZ, , - Detroit, Michigan - ' ARTS AND SCIENCE ' Tennis K45. JOHN BRENAMAN LABADIE, B.S. Detroit. Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Sodality: Activities Honor Society: Frosh Football C151 Frosh Track CI5: Varsity Track C3, 45: Band Manager fl, 2, 3. 455 Cheerleader Cl, 25: Varsity Band Dance Committee QI5. c J ORA ALBERT LABADIE, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Sodality Assistant Prefect C45: Philomathic Society Secretary and Treasurer f3, 45, Vice-President C451 Philosophical So- ciety Secretary 145: St. Vincent de Paul Society Secretary 135. KENNETH ERANCIS LA BARGE, B.E.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Kappa Sigma Delta: Engineering Society: American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Class Secretary C55: Engineering Society Banquet Committee Chairman. WILERED JOSEPH LA CI-IARITE, ELS. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Sodality. J. CRAIG LA DRIERE, Ph.B. I Royal Oak, Michigan i ARTS AND SCIENCE I Classical Club Vice-President C35: Symposium Society His- 1 rorian C45. 1 yr-xxvf 'qv Q, 53-.yy S-Rf Q Ev N 'ZX' Av ,k'A- A' jxvggvjyv kyglwgvbiix-Ikt1xv1kvJLw'!gtjk-lS1JXvNJXtAtAtbTAA-LA -AvAvAwAv1k-JK-lx-A-ly YA-1 eff-v"".T9t' 'r'q,vg- ' ' . Gb?-S "NW!g?,'i7-'QWA ' ox' 'vena avcetefafe e efewmefdt. fe-eicgm .iymcei-, -sxtir cseees, image ., Ii.1 , r f'Q ei ll46l , 0 0 1 u I ,fw Ofjfa I l ,QQQ Q f ,-Q, sv RICHARD HENRY LAETHEM Grosse Pointe Michigan NIGHT C. AND F Qodality. EARL LA FAIVE Detroit Michigan LAXV Alpha Chi: Gamma Eta Gamma: Sodality: Soph Prom Commit- Q 1 Soph Vigilance CZ I: "Hoofs 'Vly Dear" Committee 2 "Hello Stranger" Committee Q4 . FRANK BARRETT LAFFERTY LL.B. Ecorse Michigan LAXV GERALD HUTTONI LA LONDE BS. Alpena. Michigan DAY C. AND F. Alpha Kappa Psi: Alpena Club President 3 45' Sodality Assistant Prefect QU. JOHN A. LAMB Detroit Michigan DAY C. ANID F. Golf Club C231 Sodality: Frosh Frolic Ticket Committee KID' Assistant Student Manager Varsity Football lj: Soph Vigil- ance Committee 2 . THOMAS BARTHOLOMEW LANDERS, PILB. Bondsuille. Massachusetts I ARTS AND SCIENCE Epsilon Sigma Phi: Symposium Society: Hadraja Club: French Club: St. Vincent de Paul Society: Sodalityi Philomathic Society. OVILA EARL LANGLOIS, B.S. La Salle. Ontario ARTS AND SCIENCE Omega Beta Pi: Kadaver Klub. IVIERRIL THOMAS LARDNER, Bay City, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi: Delta Alpha Phi: Sodality: Frosh Football CID: Varsity Center KZ. 3, 41. CHARLES ARTHUR LAURENCELLE, Ph.B. Detroit. Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Gamma Eta Gamma: Sodality: Class Secretary C4J: Frosh Frolic Committee C-H. GEORGE FRANK LAWRENCE, B.E.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineers I I iii all T X I Q, ravi-Q 1 gg. 1. it 'essay "9've9' rg -437 . J AVAVAVAVAYAVAV'vAVAv'v'vAv'v'v'wf'v'v'v'1f'v'v'v'v'vTv'vAv'v'NrA'v'vAv'v'v'v'v'v'v'y-v'x A ,f 1, tee 25 K I. C33 D C . , , 1. . 4,2 y . c ' fw 'IIN c J .J If 1 Q ' W -A-,4.4k,,A-AvAvAvAvAYAvA-A-A'A-AYAYAY4CvA-4-AvfcvzgvgxvA-AvA-AvAvA-A-xg fr "':Yf 21" " 1 "!2"" 'Scif' ""-:mv Qyh' " 'fQ JW" -vrvy-F-15-' 0'2'Vw" Nmfdv -a:.Qw.'ae0aS aaa-.-alma .-.aavm, K '.v wiA",.79b 1-meaawfete sw,-nw? 47 I Q' : av ef ffsfe-'sr-rw'OeW U- f s N eff ' -si Q if W - - a t. ee- -els f I f -J fn-0 -J me 1:-fs if iv.-eg,-Easzttk Wil.. mmgigffi-AS.-2!n'EL rbqdpllwm-1.jKQi4 4-f.E?k,R.c.4.cG -zu f X1S,. .LQAQSGX 5 fAv'v'vAv'v'v'v'v'V'v'v'v"v'vAv'V'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v"v'v'v'v'v'v V v wr A ' ,I l CN, 5. u! ii llhJ NICHOLAS M. LAZAR, B.IVIet.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Chemical Society. MARGARET I. LE IZEVRE Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND E. Senior Girls' Club President QU. RALPH JOSEPH LEHIVIAN, B.E.E. Lackey, Ohio ENGINEERING Engineering Society: American Institute of Electrical Engineers Opera Orchestra 141. ANTHONY GEORGE LENNERT Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Alpha Kappa Psi: Class Secretary CBD, Vice-President C451 Associated Evening Classes Dance Committee: Bowling League Secretary QZJ. Q, 2 if 4 it FW? LAB MELBA MIRRIAM LEVIN, LLM. Zig Detroit, Michigan K Q LAW ? 1 ' wg Athi? i Q7 if ?f HAZEN LoNoToN I? A Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND E. RALPH ROBERT LoRD, B.E.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Engineering Society. HENRY JOSEPH LUKASIEWICZ, A.B. Detroit. Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Beta Sigma Pi: Sodality: "Aces XVild" Cast. I RAYMOND JOSEPH LYNCH, A.B.,LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW Delta Theta Phi: Magi: Class Treasurer f4J. RAY JOSEPH LYONS Wi'ndsor, Ontario NIGHT C. AND F. ICQ .4- N lx-Avlgvxe-AvAvzg-AvJgvgxvix-lx-Avfifx-A,1xvA-Jgvjxvzx-Avjk-AvAvAvA4lLv4vJkvlg'JC-AYA-ygvlxvykqlg A A jg J. ev-v-rf,-' 'Y-me gp-4-g 'w '. .ear-S 'ni QV-W ' ff-'15a"'-133 at-Qfiaife ' eff 'wm ffil-., fsbfs-fx,wI5P.iywac nr isceees, 4e's:f:fe.,T55'b1 ' ' A H48 ' IQ! 0 ' may c 4 . ff- 'QQ , ' 56-J' 'CJff'N -:uf-X 3, . 1 'S asf Q C, "Saw 5 f'3 ' 7 -545 516155442 ...w3eL931m1fn- SEMA.-ASQ ..l::13'TImo,,.4Gi3E. Liiffrdla-1,21 Kp. .fi :5e.1.:aL-flag-'A 4 VNf'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'-r'Nr'v'vAv'xfAvAv'v'v'v"v'vAv'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v''v'vAV'v'vAvAvAvAv'vAv'x I ,M 7 3 um !1. HOWARD IRWIN IVIAHONEY Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND E. Delta Sigma Pi: Sodality: Class Treasurer CEI, Secretary OU? Bowling League Chairman C451 Junior-Senior Banquet Q3J: Smoker Chairman 145. Qt an P1 GEORGE ALBERT IVIANSEIELD, B.C.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING ISADORE IVIARGOLIS, B.A6.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Aeronautical Society: Engineering Society. JOHN SULLIVAN MARR. B.E.E. Wyandotte. Michigan ENGINEERING Kappa Sigma Delta: Engineering Society: Sodality: American Institute of Electrical Engineers. .IOSEPI-I ADELBERT MARTIN, ITLB. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE kk Frosh Football. :A .3 4 'I I 4 J. RUSSELL MARTIN, B.E,E. I Detroit, Michigan I t, ENGINEERING J Engineering Society: American Institute of Electrical Engineers E I Sodality. CHARLES IVIATHES, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE 'HE DON WELLINGTON IVIATZEN, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi: Soph Vigilance Committee. VINCENT FREDERICK MCAULIEEE, A.B.,LL.M. Detroit, Michigan LAW Alpha Sigma Tau: Union Board of Governors C452 Class Presi- dent C4J: Junior Prom Committee C7J: Law Review Editor C723 Debating CI, 2, 3. 41. JAMES DANIEL IVICCARTI-IY Decatur, Illinois LAW Delta Theta Phi. f-7.54 tp vp' 'qfrfij v I -QA-YA..JkvJN vJK,AY1v,JxvAvA'Jk-A-A-AvAvAvA,AYAvA-A-AYJEYA-Avi.-AQA-A-AvAvA'A'AwJgA 'JG-Avlg-A-fg- ,' 'Q A . A ,5 a'Q2!ffv , ' "Li Q J .-.1 1- ,YWY-1 ogvzgwu remix 5 5 ..ou:.42zS 1' ,ata-fy fim f-a.55k ..f UQQQAMHQ- .gili-w fakkfibfu -sw-biwf IMI 8 A' 111' , R r ve-f5Ngs I lofi' . - Q f V 6,- f'v'v'vAv'v'xfv'v'v'v'v'v'v' v'vAvAv'v'vAv'v'v'v-v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'vAv'w 'v'xfNr'v wif v ff fx, Q "X .Lf o mifiiv idi- ' I-"'x?'giv' '-1:-29?.7N"' x 1 9 HERBERT IVICCLURE, Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi: Class President Cl. 25: Erosh Frolic Commit- tee Qlj: Soph Prom Committee CZD: Soph Vigilance Com- mittee CZD. EREDERICK CHARLES IVICLAUGHLIN, B.S. Curwensuille, Pennsylvania . DAY C. AND E. Sodalityg Tennis CZ, 3, 43. ERANCIS PETER IVICIVIAHON, B.M.E. Deerfield, Michigan ENGINEERING JOSEPH IVICIVIANMON, B.M.E. Bay City, Michigan ENGINEERING Society Automotive Engineers: Sodality. EUSTAQUIO VALENTE MESINA, B.E.E. Cauinri. Laguna P. 1. ENGINEERING Filipino Club Secretary C3J, Vice-President f4J. Treasurer C523 Society of Automotive Engineers: American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Society of Engineers. GEORGE E. IVIICHALAK Wyandotte, Michigan NIGHT C. AND E. Sodality: Bowling League CI. 2. 3, 42. CLYDE HENRY MITCHELL, WelIsUz'Ile, Ohio ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi: Society of Aeronautical Engineers: Engineering Society: Frosh Council Treasurer CID: Class Treasurer CID: Erosh Erolic Committee fll: Football KID: Soph Vigilance Committee f2J: Varsity News Reporter and Distributor C211 Engineering Society Banquet Committee. JAMES BERNARD IVIONAGI-IAN, A.B. Detroit. Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Argon: Sodality: Debating Society Cl, ZJ. ROBERT CHARLES MooRE, BME. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi: Engineering Society: Soph Prom Committee Q25: Soph Vigilance Committee CZJ. HARRY W. MOREAU Detroit, Michigan FOREIGN TRADE Delta Phi Epsilon. jg-AYAYA-A'AvA-AvAvAvAvA'AwA-AvAvJ,vA-A'A'A-AvA-AvAvAvAvAv1gvJs-1,-A-AYA-AYAY-A-A A ly A 1 YfR""0"' 'YTG7' of-"' ' 'H-e'w?VM"': ' f can-1 W 657 1 - - fn- 1-ff atmfdesfa ' '-Sic 'wmffiiz f.4n"1.'Lfx,wlI':i.yc,i-acce,tfa37C3?scQ.e.sfti, lccisafc-svfiam cf' "Sin ll50ll IW .W ily 'riff 6 O4 -QQ-J, Y -v U LA' 49 421 ...Q 3taQaQz m- 5T s..aQt-495. J::,.'E Afw.4 ci. .,. Izcalmaa G .za 1nf2J.1L!i-2 -by V V V v'v'V'v'vAv'v-V-V-V-V'vAv'v'v'v'v'v'vAV'v'v'N1'v'V'V3r''v'v'V'v'vAv'v'VAV'VAv'N ' A 4 Jul 17 .GP 3Jz. JOSEPH ARLiE MUFFAT, B.Ae.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Engineering Society: Aeronautical Society President CEU. Vice- President 149: Society Automotive Engineers Secretary C3. 43: Class President 131: Junior Prom Committee f4j: Varsity News Reporter QZU: Delegate Yale Aero Conference Q-U2 Engineering Society Banquet Committee Ll. 3j. JOSEPH CHARLES IVIURPHY, Detroit, Michigan LAW Gamma Eta Gamma: Alpha Kappa Psi: Sodality: Soph Vigil- ance QZIS Debating QI. ZD. RAY THOMAS NAVIN, BS. Marion, Ohio DAY C. AND F. Alpha Kappa Psi: Erosh Football ill: Varsity Football fZ. 3. -H: Erosh Basketball Captain CID: Varsity Basketball Center CZJ: Co-ed Basketball Coach QU. JAMES FRED NELLIS, Jackson, Michigan ENGINEERING Tuyere: Civil Engineering Society President CSM Engineering Society Banquet Committee OU. 1. 40 Y fit! Wi HENRY FRANCIS NIEDZIELSKI, B.E.E. 7 F X I Bag City, Michigan 'l I ENGINEERING Q 4f American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Track QZJ. 1 JOHN STANLEY NovAK, B.C.E. i I Hamtramck, Michigan ENGINEERING Engineering Society: Society of Civil Engineers STEPHEN PETER INIOWACZYK, Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Beta Sigma Pi: German Club. JAMES NUTT, Ann Arbor, Michigan ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi: Soph Vigilance Committee KZJ. EDWIN GEORGE O,BRIEN, Mohawk, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Philomathic Society CI, 21: Sodality. FRANCIS JOSEPH O'KEEFE, B.E.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Engineering Society: American Institute of Electrical Engineers. f'f1:f QF 'F' AQVQ' N-JS Q97 J A A A jCv1CvA-AWA-A-AYA-AvA-AvAvAvAvAvAvA-AvAvA-A-A,A-A-A-A-A-AvA-AWA-A,A vA.1v.A.A.fN.. .ovv Yf-up da!ff' 7 is if "Ig .-qv"--n nvwe YYY "7:,'Y'v1'!T' "7 "'V It 51 me 'vQrQ1E4"1nfffwS 'Sable 'SH-'Q Ht-'nfftff farce ,-Hi-SM-twfafa -:ml-975:14 I I Mu. , v 4'-g,N3x 1 Q 90' fx, 4- a ' u:r'A ' 9 G'-M WIN ,AV-v-VAV-v-VAv-V'VAV'V-V'v'v'V-V'V-V'V'vAv'v'v'v'VAV'v'V-VAV'v'VTVAV'v'v'wfTV V V V Z Y If . .k.fQhfk:.m.'l4iwo I v xv wr V1 'I v5 'miss -499 x EDWARD JOSEPH OLSCI-IEPSKY, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Kadaver Klub: Sodality. DON D. OSBORN Wyandotte, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi: Sodality: "Aces XVild" Chorus CZJ. JOHN EDMOND OTTENBAKER Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi: Delta Pi Kappa: Union Board Treasurer C432 Erosh Frolic Committee CID: .Iunior Prom Committce Q3t: Soph Vigilance Committee fly: Tower Reporter Gt: Night C. and F. Basketball and Bowling. ROBERT C. PAGE, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Omega Beta Pi: Magi: Kadaver Klub: "Hello Stranger" Sales Committee. JOAQUIN GUZMAN PALISOC, B.Ae.E. Manila, Philippine I. ENGINEERING Filipino Club: Aeronautical Societv LOUIS JOSEPH PAPO, BS. Detroit, 1VIichigan ARTS AND SCIENCE St, Vincent de Paul Society. HARRY CHARLES PARKER, Detroit, Michigan LAW PANDHRINATI-I U. PATIL, B.S. in Chem. Bombay, India ENGINEERING RUTH CJERTRUDE PEASE, BS. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Eta Zeta Sigma: Senior Girls' Club: Sodality: Coeed Basket- ball CZJ. EDWIN S. PEEKE. A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE -A A AWA-A'AvA-A-AvAvA'Av,-AvA-A'A-A-A!-A-AvAwAvA'AvAv4CvAvA-JCYAYA-A-AvA'AVVA A :C A 1 - I . -r-'gg-73'-7-n .7-vw- v-eq' 'r "' , 4-svfl! 1"XX Ei'-YA ' lfRv Ftzd' ?S f t v"f - Jtcfm awriem of dim 52 S 165461 ..:Zflc,!.Q.A'7 IIA- f If-LOJJLG'-ff L26-.J2'.1z4tcL1 .P pt2J'J.K-if-ik".A J 'f'W "r SW fW5':5Q' '5 '1"'f""Cfe' QWf"3'o Ji"'57'oJE?. A, ,-1 ,A, fAw ,-, ,-, ,-, ,-, ,-, ,A, ,"x f'vAv'yr'NrAxfNrAV-XlANf'1fANrAVAV "xrANlANf-Nr"VAVAVAVAVAYAVAN CLIFFCRD JAMES PELTIER, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND E. WILLIAM JAMES PEREIELD, B.AC.E. Puyallup, Washz'ngton ENGINEERING Tuyere: Alpha Sigma Tau: Titan Aircraft Club Secretary- Treasurer C-4. 55: Glider Club President CSI: Aeronautical Society Treasurer C3i: Engineering Society Secretary CZJ. Treasurer C413 Society of Automotive Engineers Chairman C432 Varsity News Reporter C313 "Aces Wild" Ticket Committee CZJ. GUNNAR CARL PETERSON, B.E,E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Engineering Society: American Institute of Electrical Engineers JOHN THEODORE PETZ, Detroit. Michigan DAY C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi. J. ERANCIS Pl-IELAN, LL.B. Ft. Madison, Iowa LAW Delta Theta Phi: Junior Prom Committee C4J: Erosh Eootball Clj: Varsity Football CZ, 3, 45: Frosh Basketball C121 Varsity Basketball CZ, 31, Captain C4J. JOHN D. PHENEY, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW Delta Theta Phi: Law Review Staff. HARRY PORTNOY, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND E. Alpha Epsilon Pi. CHARLES POSNER, B.M2t.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Chemical Society. ERANCIS JAMES Ports, Ph.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE I Alpha Chi: Delta Pi Kappa: Symposium Society: Class Treas- urer CZDS Frosh Frolic Committee C151 Soph Prom Committee CZJ: Varsity News Reporter CID: "I-Ioofs My Dear" Business I Manager C3j: "Hello Stranger" General Chairman C4J. JOSEPH ALOYSIUS POWERS, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Alpha Phi: Delta Pi Kappa: Magi: Saginaw Club: Sodality: Philomathic Society C2, 33: Soph Vigilance Commit- , tee C275 Tower Sales Committee C251 Varsity News Reporter C2. 3, 45: "Aces Wild" Committee CZQ: Varsity Debating CZ. 3, 4 D: Union Dance Committee CZD: Tech Ball Com- mittee C417 Skinner Debate and Oratorical Finals CZ, 31. .fl 'A 9 s xi' C J if 73 e4amSaz..af2mgh. la. 1-"'Q7!gv v' Qvifv ' ..,3LvA-AwAvAvAYAzA-A-A-JL-Ai A-AvAvAvA,AvAvA-A,AvAvA-Jv,JkYJk,A.A,A,A,AvJxvA-Avlk vJv.A..4X-A-JX.. . .0177 1,9 ,gg-kb!Q,-1 in ,..v,wg:- - -1? 1.312--.1 ' . oiv?-T amas s -fewvrawms - ,'5RQ':.9J'lfmi 2xJg2 J.Txi3'. able? -SRQAM aft -wma? I53l .4 Z- . 'T JN!-,x " I ' V ' his I f ' , If n I ' ef LULA E. POWERS Detroit Michigan LAW EDWARD P. PTAK A.B Detroit Michigan ARTS AIND SCIENCE FRANCIS XAVIER QUINN BS. Braddock Pennsylvania DAY C. AND E. Argon: spirersz Sodalky: V ty News e - THOMAS E. QUINN B.IVI.E. Morrice. Michigan ENGINEERING HARRY FRANCIS RADLINSKI B.ArCh.E. Toledo Ohio ENGINEERING Ch' Delta Theta: Engineering Society. JOHN CONRAD RADZI-KOVJSKI Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. .IOSEPI-I .IOI-IN RAMMACHER Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. R. ROY REDDEN Detroit, Michigan NIGI-IT C. AND F. Alpha Kappa Psi: Sodality. WILLIAM MARTIN RIDDELL, B.MQt.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING CHARLES WARNER RIGNEY, LL.B. Port Huron, Michigan LAW Delta Theta Phi: Sodality. fAv'vAvAV'v'v'v'v'VAv'v' JAVAv'v'iv'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v"v'v'V'v'v'v'v'v'v V V V' 1 1 xx A Kappa Beta Pi: Class Vnce-Presndent C-ll: Regent Scholarship KZ. 3. 41 Ad 1 'ani R porter Q75 e Z 'Y , . rf' IA I I 2 EW f 1 n I' ' l y Gi gli 24 I 5 C ew" 'f' 1: vo'- fgi ei" N lx-Av,,-A-Av 3iJg1tAvATAtAvAw-lk'-157lk'-2LvA12L!1IX-AvAtkAwvA!1AYAv - vlt1XiAfiMiA A A A 1 ' 7--qv-ur- fe- ' - , Qsvgx 1-xx QI?-15 ' 1,41 170' at!G!d',afE' - elewaaa-yihweliks f,-el1e'weceefar!2x o f?!Ir4:kp:fGv!31,m ,rQt3tf. l54l 'cw Ar -1 ,- ,- - G + 'ff 'fm' 442' 'cf -ff-A . ii it :chas m Maier .J Axr'xr'vAv'v'v'v'v-vAx fAVAx fAw f-N f'vAvAv'V'V'VA v'wf' VAV-VANf'vTVAV-V Av-VAV-VTN 'vAVAVAV'YAv'N PIO CALACAL RIGONAN, B.E.E. Batac, Ilacos Norte, P. I. ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineers. GERALD FRANCIS RILEY, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND E. LAWRENCE GEORGE RILEY, B.AQ.E,. Bulialo, New York ENGINEERING Alpha Sigma Tau: Chi Sigma Phi: Delta Pi Kappa: Buffalo Club' Sodalit Or anist l 2 3 4 5 Assistant Prcf c . Y 8 I -.., 1, ' U I 131, Prefect C4. 51: Engineering Society: Aeronautical So- ciety: Union Board Governors Q41: Junior Council Vice- President C413 Class Secretary QI, 3. 41: Erosh Frolic Com' mittee C11: Junior Prom Chairman 141: Soph Vigilance Com- mittee C21: Tower Sales C211 Varsity News Reporter Cl. 2. 3, 41: "Aces Wild" Music Committee 431: Engineering So- ciety Dance Committee KI1: Student Assistant in Physics Department 141. THOMAS E. RIVARD, B.Ae.E. Wz'ndsor, Ontario ENGINEERING Sodality: Aeronautical Society: Engineering Society: Society of Automotive Engineers. CLARENCE ANTHONY ROBITELL Detroit, Mz'chigan NIGHT C. AND F. Delta Sigma P'. PIORATCIO VIRTO RODRIQUEZ, LaCarlota, P. I. ENGINEERING Filipino Club Vice-President CB1, President C515 Engineering Society: Society of Automotive Engineers: Glider Club. KURT ROI-ILAND, B.E.E. Ft. Wayne, Indiana ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi: Engineering Society: American Institute of Electrical Engineers. ALBERT ROME, B.S. in Med. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Kadaver Klub. CHARLES JosEPH RONEY, A.B. Detroit, Mz'chz'gan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Alpha Pi: Sodality: St. Vincent de Paul Society: Class President Cl, 21: Soph Prom Committee C21: Frosh Football 111: Varsity Football KZ, 31: Varsity Basketball CZ, 31. ERIE ROSE, LLHB. Detroit, Michigan LAW Kappa Beta Pi: Senior Girls' Club 141: Junior Council Sec- retary 141: Class Secretary and Treasurer Q3, 41: Secretary i7",,f.? J MIA 1 J ,f 7 .GP- Qz. in-v 451. . f'f-Q5 gl? "' 'QVVNY ' .N 231 I ,sAw,-AvJxvAvA-4g-45L-AvAvAv1k-A-A-AvAvAvAYAvA-A-A-gxvgxw4xvJyv4gv4n-Avgy A A A A gnvyp A A A A jx.- nhsa' 'v 'aa-9,3 Y 33" Stage!!! .Buena ' ,-aaa:-.-fyffgt-aev ., 41 -52, 55 'S ' Li' F0 'fx' I ' 4 "' "FV - " "ri . . fi fr as Qi? 4- 'Wi He" , RJ-Wf"e' f'aa? ann' 'fa ' - c t . 4' -if 6 ,.-U' A -'K "mg, f.orS-f"-- --A' 6--wrt t x2i'e'jEaQLtJ1QQLgHiQ-mi mmp fvil fm3 t lf S f'YAVAWfAV-VAVAV-V-VAV-v'V-VAVTvAxfV-VAVAVTVAVTVAVTV' VTVAV-YTVAVTV-VTVAV-VTVTV xfRfNf' if f S .-..,. 5 qylmv I v 1 'l,.L29',5N'x IVI. IVIAURICE ROSENSWEIG, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW Philomathic Society. FRANKLIN D. RUI-ILMAN, Pl'1.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Theta Phi: German Club: Philomathic Society: Sodality. BARTOLOIVIE SANTOS, Pinappagan, P. I. ENGINEERING Filipino Club: Engineering Society: American Institute of Electrical Engineers. EIVIELIA SCI-IAUB, Detroit, Michigan LAW Kappa Beta Pi. KARL PAUL SCHECI-ITER, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Alpha Chi: Sodality: Philomathic Society: Symposium Society: Tower Reporter C233 Varsity News Reporter CZ, 35: "Hoofs My Dear" Committee C371 "Hello Stranger" Ticket Com- mittee Co-Chairman OU. ALFRED C. SCI-IEIFELE, B.S. Detroit, Michigan . DAY C. AND F. ARNOLD RICHARD SCI-IMIDT Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND E. CHARLES ROBERT SCI-IMITTER, A.B. Highland Park, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Omega Beta Pi: Kadaver Klub: Sodality: Philomathic Society: Band Cl, 2, 3, 41: Tower Reporter OD: "I-Ioofs My Dear" Music CBJ. RALPH PETER SCHNEIDER, B.E.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Engineering Society. FRED JAMES SCI-IREIBER, B.E.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi: American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Engineering Society: Class Secretary C3D: Class Treasurer f5J: Senior Ball Committee CSD. -fx'-in-fgfv-JL'1-'A-AvAwAvAvA-A-A-AvAYA'A-AWA-A-Av 3kwAvA,lgvJxvAvA-1xvA'4x-Jg A ly A 1 ' Y"""'- ' -T' 'T v Q'N"'! 'NW Q,'7iA ' QR' Xfzd' rwceitfe - ee-.-more-Y -'ee-e'-1..'Ef- at elfi-:iaMeemr:t'a cs-,w. eefiwc ewriam f div. 56 ll . qv nf. ,' Af- 0 4. ,ff-fafaw 46:5 'Q' 'F-,I'-7,5 D laters .Y if V V V V v"v'v'V'v-v-vAv'v'vAv'v'v'v'vAv'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'V3f4-f'vAV'v'v'v'v'V'v'vAv'N It l A nf' Q , 6:4 1 25 J D .s.4f.o NORMAN FREDERICK SCHREIN, A.B.,B.AC.E. Toledo, Ohio ENGINEERING Engineering Society: Society Automotive Engineers: Aeronautical Society. FRANCES ROSE SCHULTE, I..I...B. Detroit, Michigan LAW LEONARD JOSEPH SCHULTE Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Bowling fl. 2. 3, 4-D. NORBERT GEORGE SCHWARTZ Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Sodality: Bowling and Basketball CZ. 31. EDWARD A. SEEDALDT. AB. ,lr Detroit, Michigan N0 D ARTS AND SCIENCE ing Philomathic Society: Sodalityl Debating. 7 K, I Q ,, . A k t 'lg :fx YQ! i HJ CARLETON A. SHAFER, LLM. Q11 i ' Ferndale, Michigan I5 Q' LAW A X Delta Theta Phi: Class President 161. JAMES ARTHUR SHARPE, A.B. Emmett, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE DANIEL SI-IEERAN, Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE SIDNEY RAY SHELBY, B.Arch.Ei Uniontown, Pennsylvania ENGINEERING Chi Delta Theta: Architectural Society CHARLES JOSEPH SHIRES, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Alpha Phi: Symposium Society Treasurer OU: Sodality: Varsity News Reporter Ol. fr,.54 tp '47 'qvywyv I .XA A A A A AYJGYALA-A-A-AvJxwAvAvAvA'A-lxvlx-Aw-Avgx-AvAwA-Dx-AwAvAvAvAvA-A-AvA,vJx'1C'A-A-lg ,YT Tfqj Q7-Wsjvlfl ,-ifqm qvf-y . 49, V " .ulvvi D 171-11 fa v 'Bur -f'1We:i-EMDS ,5l5.:9J 'f "E-51 45 g -i!,f:'5 f:1.NJ K JG'-5?WM"2'si -99,-9? wi I9 57 'V' "'Q'35'g'3.'Z'32'5D"o' f-.aa , N . ff - -A ff ia W- - i ea- -as 1 . I ef- fa , , .fro-A -P an - cz 9-ft fm Lf 2-I 4'-5 :gtk '6l.. 125,51-9.S.151f!a ,rib to C 5554 ..-.EQLX-,Q.c.aa..G -m 1-L 3S.ws... Ettlcalbk 1 fAv'vAVAVTv'vAv'v'V'Nr'v'fv'vAv'VAVTVTVTV'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v-v'vAv'V'v'v'v'v'v'v V V Nr' S rf 'Um- LEO THEODORE SI-IUBNELL, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Alpha Sigma Tau: Jester Club: Dramatic Club:, Philomathic Society CI, Z1: Activities Honor Society President C41: St. Vincent de Paul Society: Sodality: Senior Ball Committee C41: Publicity Committee C112 Hockey CZ, 3. 41: Tower Sales C21, Reporter C31: Varsity News Reporter CI1, Circulation Manager CZ, 3, 41: "Merry Ann" Chorus and Publicity Com- mittee CI1: "Aces Wild" Chorus and Stage Manager C21: "Hoofs My Dear" Cast Manager C31: "Hello Stranger" Cast Manager C41. CARL E. SIMEK, B.Arch.E. Highland Park, Michigan ENGINEERING Delta Alpha Phi: Engineering Society: Architectural Society Executive Committee C41, President C51: Junior Prom Com- mittee C41: Soph Vigilance Committee C211 "Aces Wild" Committee C31. ERVIN PHILIP SIMON Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Sodality: Class Treasurer C411 Junior-Senior Banquet Commit- tee C31: Regent Scholarship C31. FRANCIS EDWARD SMITH, BS. Titusuille, Pennsylvania '2 DAY C. AND F. 45 Sodality: National Defense Club. it nw 21 J. LANCELOT SMITH L C Detroit, Michigan L ,i NIGHT C. AND F. M Qi id" 1 J I f THOMAS JONES SPENCER lr WalherUi'lIe, Ontario r LAW Gamma Eta Gamma. WILLIAM SPICKETT, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Theta Alpha Sigma: Frosh Football C111 Varsity Basketball C21. WILBERT EDWARD STACK, B.E.E. Jonesboro, Arkansas ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineers W, JOSEPH STARRS, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Alpha Sigma Tau: Delta Pi Kappa: Activities Honor Society: Philomathic Society Cl, 21: Sodality: St. Vincent de Paul Society: Senior Council Vice-President C41: Class Secretary C3, 41: Senior Ball Committee C41: Track Student Manager C31: Tower Assistant Sports Editor C31: Varsity News Reporter CI, 2, 31, Editor C413 "Hoofs My Dear" Secretary. RAYMOND THEODORE STEEANI, BLS. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Magi: Kadaver Klub: Sodality. 1 xv' 'wr f 15 ese f 1 '11 X4 rg 322' N A A-AWA-AvAvAvA'A'AvAvJ.'Av1-WAvAvA-AvA'AvAwfxwazggjx-A,A,1s.vJx v4kvJLv1C-1,-gg-AYA-Jyvgyvye-lg A A A J, av-:ey ' ' -.f.?7,f"B-15-N Q. it ,f-wmv -reaFqx'Y Qv, 'f "" tSf-!5o1"'d' xc eteav e ' 'like Ma trix!-. fs- Jr:-36.5 .Qs -f 7 5 " est ate, Mwzfo.. :L a c eil' 58 iw F 'tn ,' :sw G 1-A ff-fmt' 4i'f3"'O' -11-X 1, it :infant .-anfialfza J AVAVAVAVAVTVAVAV-Nf'Nf-xfTwfANf-NIAKIANI-NIAVAVAVANIT NIANIAXIANITNX1 rAxf -xi 3, "1 fAyfANfAv-VAVAVTN fAx1AV45 fAy ALBERT JOSEPH STEINER, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Magi: Golf Club C4D: Sodality: Symposium: "I-Iello Stranger" Program Committee. EDWARD ALBERT STENGER, Pontiac, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Alpha Kappa Psi: Alpha Sigma Tau: Interfraternity Council Vice-President C4D: Adspirers Treasurer C4-J: Class President C411 Senior Ball Chairman C455 "H0ofs My Dear" Ticket Committee C3J: "Hello Stranger" General Arrangements C4D. .IOI-IN OTTO STENGER, B.C.E. Pontiac, Michigan ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi: Society of Civil Engineers: Sodality. GEORGE A. STERBENZ, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. French Club: Sodality: Detroit Society of Accountants Secre- tary C4J: Tennis C4-D: Regent Scholarship C3, 41. JOHN MAXWELL STEVENSON, Wz'ndsor, Ontario ENGINEERING Society of Automotive Engineers: Engineering Society: Aero- nautical Society. RICHARD JOSEPH SULLIVAN, I.L.B. I Detroit, Michigan LAW Delta Theta Phi: Alpha Kappa Psi: Union Board Governors C4D: Class President C421 Junior Prom Committee C3j: Frosh Football C I J . GEORGE G. SWEENEY, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Magi: Sodality: St. Vincent de Paul Society: Class Vice- President C lj 3 Frosh Frolic Committee CIJ: Varsity News Reporter Cl, 21. JOHN SZURPICKI Birmingham, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Sodality. FREDERICK GEORGE TANNER, A.B. Canton, Ohio ARTS AND SCIENCE HANLEY TAYLOR, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Golf Club C272 Sodality: Frosh Frolic Committee CID: Soph Vigilance Committee CZI. 4 135,-Avgy 'Al-A f A-A-AvJLvAvA'AvAvAvAvAvAvA-A'A-A-AvA'A-A 9 x n riQy..-idle' . r-'f-egg-.17 W' v vlkvlkvjxlvlkvlxvlk-jxva vJxvJg-1xvA-jg' ,Fey S Q1 . y f- Q . .N 23 k'?1 4 . U f I " ' -, J . , S 'Tip s AH? nat-AGT- was JPw..ag.f4.a,S. 'anti 4 1, 1:-nw! I I 59 8 -' 5 N,-J' 'Lim ' OCP' A-i 0 9 e ser' ' ' 0 gr--. Qfjy b fg .4.LLa-:Ginn fi. 12535148532 ,3 ..'uit-ii-'x flida .'A3QLb,fb.t.4 .G -ax f k w.. n f. . . 5 fAVAVAVAV-VAVAV-V-V-VAVT JTV-NrAv'xfAV-V-VAV 'V-NrAV'VAV'v'wrAV-VAV'v-VTV'v'v'vAv'v A ' ,I f .: Q WILLIAM EDWARD TEPPER Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi: Frosh Frolic Committee 111: Associated Evening Classes Dance Committees 11, 21. CHARLES ELDRIDGE THEECK, B.AI'Ch.E. River Rouge, Michigan ENGINEERING Sodality. FRANCIS MICHAEL THIEEELS, B.A9.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING JOHN CLARE THRASHER, B.S.iI1 Med. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Tuycre: Class President 131: Society of Automotive Engineers FRANK JOSEPH ULLRICH, PIIB. is Detroit, Michigan if - ARTS AND SCIENCE I Gamma Eta Gamma: Philomathic Society: Sodality. Wig, NN 2 A C qi' E ' ROBERT OWEN UNSWORTH, PILB. ,- i QT bil, 9 Detroit, Michigan ai ,Kill ARTS AND SCIENCE , 4 1 J Magi: Philomathic Society: Sodality. w I I , GAETON URBANI, B.M.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING LESTER B. VAQHON, Bfs. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi: Class Treasurer 141: Frosh Football 111: Varsity Football 12. 3, 41: Hockey 131: Senior Ball Commit- tee 141: Loyalty Award 141. NORMAN DAVID VALENTINE, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Alpha Kappa Psi: Adspirers: Sodality: Class Vice-President 141: Soph Prom Committee 121: Senior Ball Committee 141: Commerce and Finance Banquet Committee 121. GEORGE W. VAN ATTA, B.C.E. Pontiac, Michigan ENGINEERING Tuyere: Civil Engineering Society: Engineering Society: Class Treasurer 12, 3, 41. Y X' ' T 7 YR ' ' 'lin'-9'5" N -yy-A-JC-A-Av1nv1gv1xv1xv1xvAvJx-Avlx-liAYA-A-A-A-A'AvA'AvAvA'Av4x'JCvAv4Jg'AvA-A-AWAYA-A A A A 1 ?f?"2' Q". 'rfw'7- f-vm' V- , -sv-fly v-Xx!B"'+ ' 19-rf :wie-M' - 'ate'-w.:sce'a vilb, H60 fx! 0 v ' 1 - Q -s 4 .ff '00, ' gifif' 'Cjff'N 'gif-3 , 3 if V V V'v'v'vAv'v'v'v'vAv-v'v'v'v'v'vAvAv'v'v'v'V'v'v'VAV3f"v'v'V'VANfVAvAv'V'vAvAN HENRY CYRIL' VAN FLETEREN, BS. St. Clair Shore, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Theta Alpha Sigma: Sodality. VICTOR VARGAS, B.lVI.E. Iloilo, P. I. ENGINEERING Filipino Club: Engineering Society. JOHN WILLIAM VEPREK Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. JOSEPH VERS, B.E.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Engineering Society: Society of Automotive Engineers. LAURA MARIE VIERTEL Detroit, Michigan LAW ROSE C. VIERTEL Detroit, Michigan LAW Kappa Beta Pi. NICHOLAS JAMES WAGENER, A.B.,LL.lVl. Highland Park, Michigan LAW WILLIAM FRANK WAGNER, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW Alpha Chi: Gamma Eta Gamma: Sodality: Union Board of Governors C5D: Class Secretary CZJ, Vice-President C532 Frosh Frolic Committee CID: Soph Prom Committee CZD: Junior Prom Committee C4D: Athletic Board C453 Frosh Foot- ball Cllt Soph Vigilance Committee CZD: Tower Sales CZJ: "Butterflies" Cast CID: "Aces Wild" Property Manager CBJ: "Hoofs My Dear" Stage Manager C452 "Hello Stranger" Advisory Board C5j. JOHN EDWARD WALKER, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE WILLIAM MICHAEL WALKER, A.I5. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE St. Vincent de Paul Society President CD: Class Vice-President D 2 A , 'I' 1 cn. f"f-big? "" '1'YV N15 255 A A A gvlgvA-Aif4xv4kvAwAtJkiAWA-AvAvAvAYAv1k-AwJXvAvJkvJkv1x-JK-fx-AvJXwAvJkv1Xvjk-Jkv!kvyx-js-Jg1A-IX. -0'-': 'far ov-qqyifr' V. 7--'fy Q ' 'Q 'KSQEN' - , N -'gyfi I ' g1'2'Vw"' wmv 'uv -feftwauws - .SE-.Q 31? Q' 2b.3k-9.3. 029 .5 Jwmwefc -sw.-.saw It 6111 3 1,4--1 , f'GV" 'CQNBN ' fl-'R' "H -fi I " ' ' 57"-Viz? I I 7, td f Y If T -M 2mv I LEO WILLIAM WALSH LL.B Grand Rapids Michigan LAW Delta Theta Phi JOSEPH WALTMAN Bay City Michigan DAY C. AND F Argon' Adspirers. HOWARD R. WARD B.S. Pemberuille Ohio ARTS AND SCIENCE Epsilon Sigma Phi: Glee Club: Dramatic Club' Philomathic Society: Track 3 ' B nd 2 3 4 ' Debating 3 . CARL J WEAVER B.C.E New Castle Pennsylvania ENGINEERING C i Sigma Phi' Civil Engineering Society. JOHN EDWIN WEBB Detroit Michigan NIGHT C. AND F RALPH LEONARD WEBER Detroit, Nlichigan NIGHT C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi: Soph Vigilance: Junior-Senior Banquet Com- mittee f3H. GEORGE ANTHONY WEINS, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW Gamma Eta Gamma: Magi: Alpha Sigma Tau. CLETUS JOSEPH WELLING Ft. Wayne, Indiana NIGHT C. AND F. Alpha Kappa Psi: Associated Evening Class Dance Committee HJ. LAWRENCE HERBERT WERNER, B.E.E. Detroit, Michigan ' ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineers DONALD S. WEXLER, LI..B. Detroit, Michigan f'v'vAv'v'v'vAv'v'V'v'v'v'v'v'v'xf'v'v'vAvAv'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v V V v it A Cf x. I' A c J. a c . . J. ' c m h . 'Z A It 1 tai ali ' Q, Q C LAW 1525,-4-5 ? ,C-A-AYAYAYAYA-AvAvAvA,A-J-,A,1-W1-,lv-A,A,A,A,A,A,A,A,A,A,A,A-A-4-AvA-A-A,AvA-A A A Al Tif f t ic? 53?-5?5?'??:?T5l'.'Z-if?-1'c:'S!3?,x H62 .AMS ..-micifnla-3115- my 6.-ffm in 9FA6,iZ6'2.,. .z4:.41a.amXm....'N zmfafzs x- ' J 'c'?"cC-.ggffp Sjvh-:qs-g QA ,c,1A-N,g'fgf5Q+'3, feiqgifvfacaz Q4-gg. '49-sg, AVVAVAVAVTVAV'V'NfNr'VAv'VAVAv'V'v'vAv'VAVAVTVAV-VAVAVAV'VAX' 'vAvAV'v-vAV'v V x, V V X JOHN WOOD WHOLIHAN, B.S. in Med. Jackson, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Magi: sodaiify. THEOPHILE WALTER WIENCZEWSKI, BS Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Beta Sigma Pi. CHARLES WIGLE, B.C.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Society of Civil Engineers: Engineering Society. JOSEPH MICHAEL WILLIAMS, BAS. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Detroit Society of Accountants OU. LOUIS WILLEMAIN Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. SYLVESTER TI-IADDEUS WILLIAMS, B.M.E Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Soph Vigilance Committee 121. ALBERT GLENN WILSON Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND E. MARSHALL PETER WITCHELL, B.S. Lansing, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi: Class Secretary CD. NORBERT JOSEPH WOELKERS, Ph.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE ARNOLD C. ZESCHIN Wyandotte, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. 'x f!! W- ""Sr?Q' ".?'Y "' 'E JV I .-1,WA-Jgv,yvJx'A-1x14-Avlx-JkvlkvA-AvAvA-AvAwAvA-A-Avgg-AvJgvAvJGvA-AvAvA ,X A A A ,X A A A A JL fl-'I '-0:1 210 CT:-qgjfff' RL fw U , ' "-3 'gslra-,1- -v-v"1 vga-vq,-N-1' N361 .- f lwvrfaue-025 C ,4,'.Qv.f'y 1?QT'5fp57a-.v.E. Q." a?.E'.,73'-ER' Jf1Wt2fPS5'f?1u is 4 , JQ 63 Q4 J,-t,m W A ,K r v"if,N3x ' 1 109- 'gn gr -s f " on 5g,,,..,gff- fAY'v'V'V'v'v'v'v'V'v'v'v'vAvAv'v'v'NfV'vAvAV'v'v'v'vAvAv'v'v'v'v'v'v'v'v V V V V V A f Y fx UN I - g N Q-.prev :rx vp' . J Xgvx is -2.-f OSCAR ADELMAN, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW' ALPHONSE JAMES EI, M.A. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE GEORGE STANLEY HORKEY, Ph.B.,LL.B Royal Oak, Michigan LAW ' STANLEY JOHN ZIELKIE, Ph.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Pi Sigma Phi. -JC-A-AvAvAv AvA-AWAWA'A'AwAvA-1LwA,A-A-A'A'A-AvAvA,A'4vAvA'JL'Av1,vAvA'AWAvAvA A A A A J, N7-fV'70"' on - . L fwr- sf' ' 'M'WWW" ' ' F' G-'-1 W BFE" ' 'H' P'-1' atmtima - ef wifi-311 fs2'i.'LQ,wl1':i.ymke,-e'f,3R2xcQEg,'t2?CX4e'ws6:'!5l:'1 ,f' dl? 64 'tw f we - A-Q -e .ff-fun 1 gf:-f ff-s -ax 5 .2 Tv'vAV'vAv'vAv'v'v'v'v'v'v"v'v'xf-xf'v'v'1ifAv5fAv'v-v'vAVTVTv"v'vAV'v'vAv'v V v V v w , SENIORS WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT APPEAR JOSEPH ARNET BROWN, LL.B. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania LAW J. HARRY BUCKMAN, B.S. Fort Madison, Iowa ARTS AND SCIENCE Freshman Football CID: Varsity Guard 12. 3, 41 GLADYS CANPIELD, A.B.,J.D.,LL.M. Detroit, Michigan LAW Kappa Beta Pi. RAYMOND GASHEN, LI.,.M. Meridan, Connecticut LAW Junior Prom Committee CBJ. WALLACE A. GOLWELL Detroit, Michigan LAW THOMAS F. GORBETT, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW SAMUEL GERALD EPSTEIN, B.S. in Med. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Epsilon Tau. DONALD W. GILBERT, A.B..LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW GEORGE WILLIAM GRONPORS, LL.M. Detroit, Michigan , LAW DANIEL JOSEPH HEALY, LLHB. Detroit, Michigan EDWARD JAY HUGHES, LL.M. Detroit, Michigan LAW Delta Theta Phi: Delta Pi Kappa. LAWRENCE EDWIN KELLY, LL.M. Detroit, Michigan LAW Delta Theta Phi: Class Vice-President CSD: Senior Ball mittee f5D: Law Review CSI. IGNATIUS MICHAEL KOPKOWSKI, B.G.E. Erie, Pennsylvania ENGINEERING Civil Engineering Society: Engineering Society. HERBERT JOHN KRAUSE, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE German Club. RICHARD JILLSON MORRIS, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE German Club. JAMES PATRICK MURPHY, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Sodality. LYNN JOHN MYERS, M.S. Sarnia, Ontario ENGINEERING MYER REUBEN, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW DANIEL O'CONNOR RYAN, LL.B. Merrill, Michigan LAW HILLARY JOSEPH SULLIVAN Detroit, Michigan Com LAW LAW Delta Alpha Phi: Delta Theta Phi: Junior Prom Committee Delta Theta Phi: Regent Scholarship CZ, 3l. CU. RUTH YOST, I.L.M. Detroit, Michigan LAW vJx1S..4g,Jx-A,AJn,A,A,Av4L-A-A-A-AvAvA-A-Avk-AvAvA-Af-AYA A A A A lg ft' 'ei' 'g"s'f2"f' tsrtss , A 'QS' " "w' 'QW' " Re -rr' - , "f'TVTY MQW 3 if a ..bL14.wS 9tQ-,-f3f1 4-a.e2'9lLs-:A f? :HJxa4.f59o :!k.G.kQ?fu SDI,-15,31 H6511 M 9 Q f Wfbg 1 A " ,.,4-94 66 Qgifl ef if gf 2 QE ' W Z ff!-E KB MQQWK ga ' N X,. v s ww 63 - 4 O D y a if K ' l if N Gym? K? 4? LL77Z'07jq , 2 9 3 fl all :xl Qgi " w ill l fr' 1 Snag y ll rf s F! " "3-Q 4 -in no , THE i930 TOWER 'i 1 '-X, "' fi g, r .- 'ii- Il l Me eil:-.51 ?'1..xIiEv ll! i a l l ' 1, Z s " I J , , NS v .Q , gli, I i 4 Q A Q 4 'Q Z!-3 1 E l 1 l l l l Left to Right: Top Row-Daly, Delaney, Erdos, Fiedler, Fisher. Second Row-Haggerty, lx i Kaiser, Kane, Lilly. Third Row-Lynch, McClear, McGuigan, Mclntosh. Bottom Row- l Mittig, Monaghan, Parr, Ryan. I l , A ,,,,i V Mm iffifiv l63l THE R30 TOWER E m.. if 'iii : 4' 4 E' .M e- ' L '5' '95 JUNIOR CLASS COUNCIL OFFICERS w ,fi . ,fu if- A" E X kg I ss? I si EDWARD A. MONAGI-IAN, President. PAUL A. LILLY, Vice-President. JAMES A. HAGGERTY, Secretary. JOSEPH F. FISHER, Treasurer. ARTS AND SCIENCES James R. Delaney, President. Vernon E. McClear, Vice-President. Edward A. Monaghan, Secretary. ENGINEERING Joseph F. Fisher, President. Otis A. Taylor, Vice-President. Arnold J. Mittig, Secretary. Martin F. Kaiser, Treasurer. Vincent A. McGuigan, Treasurer DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE LAW Paul A. Lilly, President. James A. Daly, Vice-President. James A. Haggerty, Secretary. Harry B. Ryan, Treasurer. Edward T. Kane. President. Russel D. Parr, Vice-President. Eleanor Fiedler, Secretary. Edward N. Lynch, Treasurer NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Thomas J. Mclntosh, President. Joseph A. Erdos, Vice-President. Charles F. Flynn, Secretary. Joseph Z. Bender, Treasurer. HE Junior class of 1930 through its council contributed in a comprehen- sive way to the university activities of the year. Among its members this year were found leaders in nearly every campus enterprise, including the "Var- sity News," the TOWER, the annual opera, the Junior Prom, the Union, sports, and many other minor activities. The junior oflicers of the various colleges met early in the year and elected from their number a set of oflicers to whom they entrusted the destinies of the class of 1930. This organization immediately began to function as a vital part of campus life, and directed the activities of the Juniors through a very successful year. i Four of the council members participated in the work of the Junior Prom, and the council as a whole co-operated with the committee to make the annual Junior social event the great success it was. With the advent of the annual Union Opera in April, all class endeavor was suspended and the energy of the student body was thrown almost wholly into this gigantic production. Its success speaks well for the work of its committee and cast. The Junior Council co-operated with the opera committee in promoting the opera, and many mem- bers of the Junior class lent their services as committeemen or as members of the cast and chorus. The work of the council, while rather indefinite, is important to the proper functioning of the Junior class, and this task was accomplished so well that the council would seem to have carried out the trust placed in them by their classmates. 1 3Jo NKJ i, SQ V e a V6 55 ite' E ww. ,K gferg-'.4-13 462351 53555 , . " 5: , V, ,v if -if 4 ras.. I69l lf 5 ' i ' l if l .M I tx l i lil l l l ?l it ia I me T ffgitl . ,. QW! QLQ5 i I l i .,l I t A 1 l :il El ill l l l. 11 E l l A I T I QIAYQXO JQX 5 Q. ga b L. .1 A- y - - r 93 TOW st J I? U ' ' ' rfb 'N 659' 1 0 i' ' 1555 ARTS AND SCIENCE Top Row fLeft to Rightj-George F. Kohlmeier, Chester A. Zegarowski, James M. Brennan. Robert A. Stefanowski, Michael J. Kilbane. David S. lVlcHardy, Paul G. Conlan, Otto C. Seebaldt, Brother Protaise. Second Row-James T. Rice, John P. Gilewski, Myron R. Zbu- dowski, Benjamin Caplan, Robert A. Wollenberg, Maxwell J. Laffery. Lawrence C. McHugh. John J. Angel. Valentine Bohla, Stanley C. Hayes, Walter J. Kelly. Third Row--Herbert G. Barak, Ernest V. McClear, Elmer J. Ceconi, Karl F. Otto, Dale J. Devlin. Stanley R. Holwedel, Donald F. Carney, James A. Ryan, Anthony A. Bauman, John H. Hayes, Donald F. Blum. Andrew F. Lipsinski. Fourth Row-Lloyd Teeple, John S. Malley, Martin G. Hannigan. Edward J. George, Frank E. Weaver, Paul V. Phalen, Terrence McNamara, Louis G. Adel- man, Arthur A. Garbarino. John S. Pierog. Walter A. Halka, Sylvester A. Czerwinski. Bottom Row-Samuel C. Epstein, Herman J. Cohen, Frank Kenney, David O. Prendeville. Philip W. Stackpoole, James Troester. Robert G. Jordon, Andrew F. Gucfa, Francis J. Slykcr. 7 9 fa it ll 1 sf, . . 'X 9 A at . .3 ARTS AND SCIENCE 5 Top Row CLeft to Rightl-Joseph A. Meier, Marvin B. Levy, Henry C. Leszcynski, Stanley J. Poniatowski. Eugene M. Savignac, Albert J. Socie. Chester S. Zegarowski, Marcus A. Kellerman. Second Row--John C. Szejda, John P. Gilewski, Francis L. Goscinski, Myron R. Zbudowski, Edward A. Monaghan. Henry J. Flaherty, John D. Modlinski, Samuel Ross. Edmund J. Bojarski, Simon Aaron, Bennett H. Jeffrey. Bottom Row--Matthew J. Gill. Anthony J. Catalano. Benjamin E. Newton. Edward J. Landers, Martin F. Kaiser, James R. Delaney, Robert B. Dehullu, Frederick R. Rossie, John J. Kraus, Benjamin H. Glicksman, Anthony F. Cefay. l70l XA' fi '99s QW. a rg f s 494' E ,435-4.f'.:eE-2s:.ss,4:'Qg.fq"" 3. e E 1930 Tow Q Q . . -H If QW YH- .. GQ. v a ' " -.1 -. TH A if ER idk.. 4' 4 Q 'Jill- D i i 4 8.1 ii - 'fi fig z ,i .sf ei? 2 xinflaiy .. . 9 QW fr":9 I DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row QLeft to Rightj-Raymond B. Beyer, Leslie Butcher. Robert C. Battat, Edwin A. Chapp. Norman J. Mettie, George L. Hess, Charles E. Mangold, James E. Daley, Charles Abramson, Arthur J. Pomaski, Charles G. Borchard. Second Row-John E. Cleminson. Alfred D. DeRonne, Ralph C. Grieshammer, Bernard J. Smith, J. Carl Haines, George W. Yaeger. Max A. Volin, Simon Diamond, Albert W. Wilke. Third Row-William S. Kish- korn, William Calfm, Jacob lsbitsky, Joseph A. Briehl, Jack J. Rodman, Frank J. Stone, John A. Ratcliffe, Anthony J. Petz, Arthur J. Massucci, Emil Turchan, Charles H. Chap- man, William R. Ginsburg. Bottom Row-James A. Haggerty, Morris M. Buch, Betty Montgomery, Dolly Bauser, Mary E. Friedl. Gertrude B. Silvers, Rosella M. Peltier, C. Car- roll Nussey, Eleanor Rheaume, Seymour A. Gelb, Edward S. Skorupski, Gordon S. Harrington. I DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row fLeft to Righll-Harold C. Dumanois, William J. O'Neill, Cecil F. Henderson. Stephen Piklor, Harry B. Ryan, Paul F. Curry, Milburn Hickey, Harry M. De Fer, Fred C. Van Fleteren. Second Row-James K. Ablan, George F. Nebus, Edward F. Ettinger, James E. McLoon, Jack G. Whiting, James A. Haggerty. Third Row--Edward F. Gracey, James Miller, Eugene Seifert, John H. Madigan, Albert De Santo, J. Collins Flattery, Modesto S. Visaya, Don G. Williams. Dominic B. Spagnola, James E. Montreuil. Bottom Row-Neil W. Brown, James D. McMahon. Edmund J. Barbour, Paul J. Aldus, Donald A. Leach. Max Siegel, Paul A. Lilly, Benedict A. Henn, Jack C. Brannack, Michael A. Bida, James M. Oleniak, Anthony E. Nader. ll7lll Q l E X li A Qi W 95" :Z-1 Wil ia if THE 'Q O TOWER - ' ' To ' I ' 3. s' l l 4" ck. it fl Q-ll Q at . i I I . I ENGINEERING Top Row QLeft to Rightl-George J. Doyle, Clarence R. Gaugh, Clarence Houck. Second Row-Vincent A. McGuigan, William T. Downs, Herbert L. Bowers, G. Raymond Young. D. R. Divekar, Lee W. McClellan, John D. Malone, Edward Fricker. Francis P. Moran. Wilfred Hanlon, Edmund Brozae, George DePew. F. J. Henkel, Walter S. Jakubowski, John Deres, Frank J. Bourgeois. Third Row-Alfred C. Hahn, Leroy Anderson, James H. Wood- house, John H. Sihler, Harry J. Gettinger, Francis M. Hull, Russell Grose, Edgar P. Huck. Walter J. Huck, William Gladfelter, John A. Faler. Fourth Row-Joseph E. DiNatale. Daniel Izzo, XValter T. Norris, Nicholas P. Bekema, James W. Brzuchowski, William C. Enright, Charles Stead, Carl Bialys, Floyd D. Blades, Bain F. Kirschner, Donald Sweeten, Frederick A. Fournier, John A. Kase, Carl F. Schorn, Charles D. Robb. Bottom Row-Her bert J. Wendt, William M. Closey, Frank H. Bobrowski, Edward R. Morrill, A. William Losoncy. Eugene T. Keety, Louis M. Ruskin, Aubrey Gordon, Matthew E. Fiscus, Manuel S. Simms, Leroy S. Shank, Elso Elsarelli, Frank Hartsough, Louis Haidy, Francis Murphy. ENGINEERING Top Row CLeft to Rightl-Delbert J. Thayer, Otis A. Taylor, John C. Kerr, Joseph A. Fisher, Wilfred Hanlon. Second Row-Morris Webster, William Greenspon, Carl F. Schorn, Edward Fricker. Third Row-Charles L. Toler, Ralph W. Boone, John O. Drake, Samuel J. Catanese, Eugene E. Telma, George J. Doyle, Alfred F. Mahalak, Fred A. Fournier. Bottom Row--George F. Brown, Floyd R. Borger, Milton Goodman, Frank Hartsough, William M. Closey, Stillman Warner, Peter P. Wasco. C 'J-we ' ll I72l Sig O , 4515 .Q NV. 5 J .4 e L. F' ' .a 'cb ilu +2 Qguggipgggpsava5:Esmsasnc,q3i5g?, . lf! f"" ""'- Q-1, 1 we mc TOWER qv. '4 - Z TT - Le a? II ll Q. -a 85 2 . ' , ENGINEERING Top Row flseft to Rightj--Arnold J. Mittig, Nich. P. Spruit. Franklin H. Hallberg. Carl Phillips, Victor J. Checcola. Carl H. French, Lawrence Brady. Clarence R. Gaugh, Mansfield Dyer, Grove Seitz, Clyde H. Mitchell, Walter M. Keenan. Second Row-William J. Fraser, Louis W. Higgins, A. Sherwood Walter, Richard Arellano. William P. Andre, Lawrence E. Biggs, William J. Kallio, Rupert J. Kempf. Frederick J. Scala, Eugene Ryan, Edward Fricker. John A. Zilles. Third Row-Birger Hoinningstad, Harry Ig. Bindy. Louis W. Higgins. Frank R. Seichter, Vincent L. McEnally, William J. Kallio, James B. Fay, Joseph E. O'Malley, Robert E. Quick, John T. Stahl, Francis H. Ameel, James McSweeney, Henry A. Ruysser. Bottom Row-Louis Szal, Charles A. Kern, Herman Yoder, Robert Redmond, Raymond N. Johnson, Tranquilino Macali, Wilfred Hanlon, Stanley V. Skalski, Walter R. Moyers, Charles S. Stuttle. Joseph T. Ofer, Epifanio A. Duarte, John C. Sidle, Harold W. Potts, Harry T. Fledderman, Roy Bondy. LAW Top Row CLeft to Rightl-Robert J. Teagan, Mark G. Devlin, William E. Hope, Norman J. Laige. Bottom Row-Charles Cataldo, John E. Pendergast, Owen J. Cleary, George B. Williams. ga 'Na 1 g, al l . me S 5:-'raft Frpn-1, CF Q. wb ' l -L .VS l 933541. l73l di 5 '1y'wa1Qf5"f-f""3"Y'9'i"m-t'f'f'Qu.-fyf" T HE 1930 TOWE iflkaii It l ll W I I l l I 1 3 . I I l 4 -in i I I Avy I 3 l QJWQ. 'H 1 Wifi t -"1 'QW T 4 Q LAW Top Row CLeft to Rightj-Joseph F. Clarke, William W. Webb, Selah A. Toutant, Florian Kowalski, Elmer L. Beyer, Samuel Gigante. Mark L. Conrad, Paul Louisell, Gerald J. Mc- Clear, Edward F. Collins. Second Row-Russell D. Parr, Jack C. Quillinan, Anthony E. I-Iandloser, Edward T. Kane, Edward J. Lynch, Edward M. Szlachetka. Charles N. McLaugh- lin, Charles G. Webb. Roger P. O'Connor. Third Row-John J. McGinty, Firmin J. Zettel, Byron Lapham, John L. Wagner. Michael Landers, Ellis C. Duncan, Robert D. McClear, Gor- don W. Lamphere, Clarence R. Horkey, Irvin F. Ballbach. Bottom Row--Piotr M. Kownacki, Harold I-Iardies, Angela M. Gignac, John A. Hird, Abraham Lachover, Maurice D. Cohen, Eleanor M. Fiedler, Romain A. Howick, William J. O'Halloran. Gives 11 f s ' , b ka .Q . ll :Q v Q Q sw W L .Q I 1 If NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE V Top Row CLefI to Rightl-Earl A. Siterlet, Walter R. Legel, Kenneth C. Tiffany, John E. 1, I Dyer. John P. Mindak, John F. Borkowski, Walter P. Patterson, Raymond J. Grostick, George C. Fischer, Allan A. Bridgman. Second Row-John Bisall, William C. Schmidt. M William I-I. Schafer, Maurice V. De Caluwe, John T. Birney, Walter J. Joyce, Waldo J. I Beaupre, Alex J. Doran, Clarence H. Gohl. Bottom Row-Julius I-Iirschman, Louis A. l Malis, Earl A. Murphy, Fred O. Stewart, Thomas J. McIntosh, Ralph Volkovich, Ethelo ll E. DeFobio, Morton Bechek, John L. Warras. ll . , . , R . l l I f I l I I l 1 ram'-in Hr W-lg if ' a l eggftg Ask? SJR. Q.. IMI QQ-5.5. f.1E'-Kass-i'QXM - s F- ' "YQ JA' A wggm TOWER 'fn X4 -A I TT - I AA A A ,f hv s 0" ,N .1 CP, CCYSQ ' 4 we 'Q-S3 24 .!, tl NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE it Top Row CLeft to Rightl-Thomas J. Fox, Charles R. Slimmon. Austin G. Conrad, Her- bert L. Adcock, Arthur Schmitz, Joseph W. Cronin, G. George Parilla, S. J. Flanigan, Oliver Kanter, Allen Greenburg, Rollin K. Reiss, Leo E. Sullivan. Second Row-John H. Fine- , stone, Harold M. Arthur, Ralph R. Radner, Morris Cohen. Harry L. Wilson. James T Murphy, Robert W. Schlager, Joseph H. Bender, Thomas W. Salmoni, John H. Gamble . Carl H. Otter, Harold C. Knobelsdorf. Bottom Row-William Dillon, Earl L. Gruber, I Charles A. Dantzer, Fred A. Weremeck, Colin A. Keith, Sid Wigler, Donald B. Thompson, , 1 Joseph A. Erdos, Edward H. Plos, John L. Hamilton, James Ingram. V. JI FOREIGN TRADE . Top Row CLeft to Rightj-Anthony L. Alsobrook, Alfred H. Wolf, Howard H. Wobrock, I Harry W. Moreau, Robert H. Thomas, Norman S. Dufour, Richard F. Kobetitis, John L. Peltier, Daniel M. Gillen, Francis C. Osborne. Bottom Row-Walter Feehan. Harcourt B. Halvorsen, Harold J. Bouteiller, William Miller, William J. Athanson. Joseph A. Joslcovitz, Stanley W. Hill, James J. Ward, Frederick C. Mannebach. 4 ,l 535591 lI75l , X i gp 5 8 'NUS Ji I yu 3 fffx 3 WEE! f 1 XX xxx X x A ww K QQ' E 213' ,G K- IQ? X ,1 X QM? gg f , an f' " 03 Q " ' Ji- V4 ' 1 46? 1 . X Q, 4' QQ QJKCJ 4? 4? We N wzzby ,g ff -c-4f.g-K-miwsa fs z TO A .J V THE WER e...s'ccIS-If' 0 U11 -K c B ef I f? 9 9 I c Q55 3 ' PRE-JUNIOR CLASS COUNCIL ENGINEERING-SECTION A WILLIAM P. MURPHY, President. JOHN C. CAMPBELL, Vice-President. BERNARD A. CHAPMAN, Secretary. ALEX JUNKER, Treasurer. ENGINEERING-SECTION B LAWRENCE E. Ross. President. BERNARD P. ROCHESTER, Vice-President. THOMAS J. RYAN, Secretary. WILLIAM M. HUGHES, Treasurer. NLY after much difficulty was the Pre - Junior Class Council made more than a mere name, a polite appellation for an organization that should in all reason exist. It was quite a problem to get men together who nor- mally would never have met but for 5 the desire to express class spirit by co- operation. The task took the better part of three years. That it was Hnally accomplished is witnessed in the fruit- ful activity of both sections of the Pre- V Junior Engineers. The "Tech Ball" took place this fag? year as was planned. This affair, the 5, highlight of the Engineers' social ac- Pg tivities, has its origin in the historic Engineers' dance. It gives the Pre- Junior class an opportunity toireveal to the university its class identity. The interest manifestedby the Pre- Juniors in organizing a class council is certainly to be commended. The deter- mination to act as a class group is worthy of praise. Their aid in re- viving the traditional Engineers' Dance is but further proof of their desire to be active. I With the close of this year, the class will step into line as Juniors. For three years they have marched forward together. Unity of thought and deed . . . is Well established. The university has Campbell Hughes reason to expect much from her Junior gffjggef lgiygghv class of 1930-31. ll Lfspjgfg C 'shi-'i-tf.,,. H7811 y CC i wi In r fi Q, y' ISS? 2 Q 35423 fe Q-sf f.:-rea-1:-was 'N- irffvff N" clmff. .9 ef' in -X ' L viii-'ha Ji m THE,-1930 TOWER si akha Yi I f y? ENGINEERING Top Row fLeft to Rightl-Lawrence J. Kelsh, Paul C. Swan, Frederick B. Toffaleti, Julius W. DeMunnik, Francis T. Downs, Donald L. Hepp, Raymond J. Sullivan. Carl Rothenberger. Second Row-Harry C. Van Matre, Arthur B. Aylesworth, A. Lombardini, George Mor- ris, J. Tetmarsh. N. Taylor, William M. Hughes, Louis Sokup, Kenneth R. Burr, A. D. Walker. Third Row-Albert F. Shattuck, George P. Brescoll. Aaro W. Hircimaki, Gregory J. Oberst, Joseph A. Schulte. Bernard P. Rochester, Willard G. Root, Anthony C. Ciesielski. John Kopko. Robert C. Crouch, Walter J. Sneider. Bottom Row-Cletus C. McMullen, Fred Shapoe, E. Closson Hoisington. Milton J. Diamond, Gregory Papp, Charles H. Petty, Leslie Bates, Drew lVlcEnhill, Norman F. White. ENGINEERING Top Row fLeft to Rightj-Herman D. Barkey, Francis H. Pouliot, James R. Brigham, Mar- tin B. Cahill. Second Row-George P. Brescoll, William H. Miller, John A. MacLaine, Joseph R. Beale, Maurice D. Jacobs, Robert E. Walsh, George F. Sheridan, Curtis L. Bates, Joseph L. Krempa. Bottom Row-George T. Downey, Francis Tayler, Howard A. Magrath, Bruce J. Dempsey, John E. Krasinski, Thomas W. O'Donnell, Gregory M. lVlcKeown, William J. Carpenter. fs xl 5 mt -'f fl' fl? if gs , 2 H 'iiika yf6i3 549 S g Q'-.'l,x V: QQ f,Vp!3 I . 5 . , ,. . OA 4 A 5. I79I 'Q gif-el .. 4 P!" "QQ a - L THE N930 TOWER F Q. I I-I I 1 'I .- av III II I I I I I I 1 . I ENGINEERING Top Row fLeft to Rightj-Aaro W. Hirsimaki, Henry Keves. Ralph C. Taylor, Frank T. Ruysser, David R. Leonard, Raymond Sullivan, Donald L. Hepp, Daniel MacGillis, Roman L. Sailer. Second Row-Paul E. Urschalitz, Mateo Pardo, Henry Steenkist, Louis McNabb, Greg ory Papp. Egelhoff. I Surowitz, Third Row--Richard E. Rassel, Lawrence F. Ross, Walter J. Michalski, Harry Charles G. Gergle, Leo L. Moran, Bernard A. Chapman. Bottom Row-Roman J. - I Surowiec, Alfred W. Jones, Jacob Kadushin, Edwin W. Stehle, Theodore Kertesz, Milton J. I. I Diamond. ENGINEERING Stanley A. Rypel. Charles F. Porter, Melvin Anderson, Peter M. Bernert, John C. I N4 L.,-' 5. . Top Row fLeft to Rz'ghtI-Francis T. Downs. William P. Murphy, George M. Schueder, y I I Howard C. Barton, Alfred Bartow. Frank C. Weiler, Elmer W. Birnitt, Henry L. Meininger, John A. Steele. Second Row-Burwell J. Walters, John C. Campbell. Charles F. Hautau. James B. Peltier, Norman P. Pfeffer, James H. Bothwell. Bottom Row-Douglas J. Caton, Curtis L. Bates, Edmund J. Bonkowski, George W. Gambert, Max Grant, Lawrence E. I I Tracy, Thomas A. Coffey. Robert Hupp. . 51 an ' I ' .Q - . f., . 5' 42 . I t a "1 -tr "MS ijfg Jyef ta I +2 , I 5 , I I I I I lfiwfjla II30lI va s V Germ' Wai '.x .651 CCA . 'i "I if 35 2 J 5' g"'.1iiiTgit 'Q 5 f 3 of N-fam ..1f9XZ THE I9 O TOWER 5 IQKN.. G 1 I 5,5 ll g ' I I i UI 'Q 'qw ENGINEERING Top Row fLeft to Right?-Louis J. Janecek, Frank R. McCallum, Jack Sparling, Morris J. Brandwine, Norman A. Kerstien, Ralph C. Taylor, George B. Booth. Second Row-Harlem H. Morris, Norbert J. Hornick. Maurice C. Bleshoy. John F. Campbell. Third Row-Mark W. Stroebel, Stanley Rypel, George Clark, George A. Miller, Charles Gies, Clifford A. Subora, Raymond J. Simsick. Bottom Row-Olaf Saari. George H. Merckling. George W. Reschke, William M. Spillane, Drew J. McEnhill, Florian F. Flemming, Herbert Wilhelm, Paul A. Et- tinger, George Barr. ENGINEERING Top Row CLeft to Righll-George Elliott, Henry Keeves. Charles G. Gergle, Ford A. Thaler. Joseph Bujak. Francis T. Douglas, Edmund E. Anderson. Second Row-Joseph H, Redmond, Harold B. Wilkins. Maurice D. Jacobs, Abe Mendelson, Joseph G. Rashid, Jack T. Meade, Steve C. Maloney, Charles E. Dysarz. Boltom Row-Thomas M. Ward, Edward F. Majeske, Albert Pearl, George Millman. S. Sunders, Bernard H. Sharkey. Edward G. Lehr, Frederick W. Sablacan, William A. Wegrzynowicz. . -Q. s 1.-x f ref- A val! 5 Y Q. ,L , 5 Eff W S YQHW "Q T91 f.x:a',if rr 'why 432418-5 : o, in -C ff . 'tj 4-" A E V ', 4 wifi i, I81ll 9 I 3 ,X Sf 5 W5 ' 5521 'ws f f e Eb Q' 1 Que gag 4 a L X R E g t QQQSQ , r Gm 4? 9 OYHQVQ IVV! : smdew ff'0'+xfffs,,.q5.' U4 HE H930 TOW 'QU 6' ' 1 allr-if l QS' f: ,Q : , is Qu ,ax ' -,A A l-- --' uk' - 'S---v!fc'Q lv rx Q I .,!f' T it i ER L A HW Qi. dis' mtg' Q3 W5 3 P-sl! Q 5v,df mf M-3' E i ss i Left to Right: Top Row-Benson, Crider, Dadson, Falkner. Second Row-Girardin, Hutch- inson, Kenna, Lewis. Third Row--Loughrin, Lyons, McGregor, Myers. Bottom Row- Slater, Sullivan, Teubert, Van De Keere. IV I9 ZVIXEUI . 1 r 1 - sw al-23. 5 s 4 'fads H843 Q1 mf kjfi 1-ll xt, .2 .s ig fl get 2 2 ,wi sf-jules. ff: dfEC!S?naauteemgiiirfrgatlsaxiii? Fa ' ' 'F' l N .Ja- ..r 'x THE OWER L I S.- '?,, -is - 2 1- A-"-"i -. - - I may SOPHOMORE CLASS COUNCIL OFFICERS JACK W. TEUBERT, President. THOMAS F. BENSON, Vice-President. JOHN B. GIRARDIN, Secretary. JOHN L. CUNNINGHAM, Treasurer. ARTS AND SCIENCES ENGINEERING-SECTION A Joseph D. Loughrin, President. Thomas J. McGrath, Vice-President. Joseph C. Slater, President. Fred W. Dadson, Vice-President. Edward T. Sweeney, Secretary. Thomas R. Kenna, Secretary. Louis J. Berg. Treasurer. William E. Hutchinson, Treasurer. DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE ENGINEERING-SECTION B Michael Van DeKerre, President. Jack W. Teubert, Vice-President. Grace P. Crider, Secretary. Chester B. McGregor, Treasurer. Clarence F. Falkner, President. John L. Cunningham, Vice-President. William T. Lewis, Secretary. Edwin S. Myers, Treasurer. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Thomas F. Benson, President. Norvill M. Sullivan, Vice-President. John B. Ciirardin, Secretary. Fred W. Lyons, Treasurer. ECAUSE it is the somewhat ticklish job of the Sophomore Class Council properly to initiate the homesick yearlings into the daily routine of col- lege life it is righly ranked among the most important student organizations on the campus. The Sophs organized their council early in September and had a welcoming committee on hand to greet the ambitious youngsters who jour- neyed from far and wide to secure a higher education at the university. With lanky mountaineers, stalwart sons of the soil, and sophisticated city dwellers the Frosh were a motley group, but regardless of age, weight, height and chest- expansion they all received the same fair treatment from the Sophs. Early in the year this heterogeneous body is subjected to its chastisement. 'Ridiculous red and white pots are planted upon their heads. Peremptory com- mands are given and obeyed promptly and without dissent. While all this domineering may appear absurd and useless to those without an understanding of college life, it serves a splendid purpose. All false conceptions which the first year men may have gathered from the movies and the Sunday supplement are lost. The Freshmen are made to realize the true college spirit. They band together and soon become an integral and necessary part of the university. Aside from teaching the Freshmen what to do and Why, the Sophomore Class Council was instrumental in promoting one of the most successful class dances that has been staged in years and did much towards establishing the prestige of the class of '32. The annual class games were held on May lst and Znd, a Hag hunt opening the games. All eH'orts on the part of the Fresh- men in their search for the flag proved futile. The other events saw the Fresh- men revenge themselves by scoring a 54 to 52 victory. Mo 1 3 7' L W3 sg.-2, . e nf6i3 ZW E f I a'1'6s,, , iw 'ZOAVIQ . 'Q H, 'fag' '55 'fff' lit'-5-ti'+lf. ISSI I 1 1 E 5 1 1 1 l l 1 n qs ps. for a rw ri """ mf'f 1930 TO -1 . f N 10 .f THE WER pr y A 79352 A -STAT: 'X'Ei' .f'WW vii R 'alfred Y"-'M .I in W W i V ' l 14 1 1 l 1 l 1 1 l l ETF . 1 li .115 lg 1. 1 1 1 1 l l l l 1 l i l i I 1. 1 1 1 . l 1' ARTS AND SCIENCE l i 1 Top Row fLeft to Right?-Raymond J. Miller, Walter J. Dzieszko. Harold Gervais, John J. 1 l Hines, Robert M. Carter, George G. Olmsted. John M. Ball, Thomas E. DeGurse, Joseph L. l Q Zemens, Anthony E. Kozlinski, Daniel W. Robinson. Second Row-Richard A. Burkhardt, 1 1,2 i James T. Carroll. Joseph R. Mandel. Walter A. Kaplita, Edward E. Kulinski. Benjamin Lisow- . 'ly I ski, Charles J. Beauvais. Joseph Tocco, John N. Primeau, John J. Hofstetter. Paul H. Muske, '15 4 1 Philip T. Mulligan. Third Row--Martin Garelick, Joseph M. Evans. Denton B. Fox, Howard 1 'N .lx V. Grosbeck, Brandon J. Carey, Victor C. Hillebrand. Everett B. Dodd, William E. Kelly. , , i Joseph E. Berry. Lloyd J. Brecht, Thomas L. Kane, Harry G. Lutchin. Bottom Row-Gerard .da J. Stepanski, Lawrence E. Reck. David Wolff, G. Edward Roth, Richard O. Elett, Homer A. . .4 Phillips. l 1 5, W Y YI 6 Y 115?l11 1 k, gl . s QSM ' 1 ' V. I f lt.. pg ARTS AND SCIENCE 1 Q-3 S Top Row CLeft to Rightj-Joseph Doyle Cunningham. Matthew O. Rae, David E. Kull, 1 11 James H. House, Edmond G. Donohue, Henry J. Eisher, George W. Stewart, Henry C. Annas, 1 l Charles G. McCarthy. Second Row-Carl W. Huhn, Elvatz A. Elsarelli. George A. Cooney, A 1l, lli Robert C. McDonald, John E. Goetz, Albert J. Nagler, Irving M. Hart. Herman L. Brys, J ly lh Cleon A. Oakes, Alexander H. Zaagsma, Joseph E. McEvoy. Third Row-William A. Mad- A p 1 dock, Charles H. Jasnowski, Charles D. Solovich. Theodore N. Rayder, William J. Shook. Joseph D. Loughrin. Lyle W. Russell, Raymond J. DeRyck. Joseph S. Brzostowski, Nathaniel l N 1 1 H. Rubin, Lawrence Schreidell. Albert Epstein. xl lf. W 11 E ll 5 1 l l 1 l 1 .l 1 ll 1 l Ny . ' 2 1 . 1 I I 1 l . 1 I , l : X E l' 1 1. 1 ll l Y l l i 1 . l i"ffvi't 5"'W'3 . A f 'Fi ll ek? .JLQXJ " 5' ll86ll 1 EM' tlV' I Elf'Q . ,., it f . AIQQS ,g4Q?Si?5?E?iFQs31Dx,ima?7+g 15" -Q95 Q6 xw, 4 lk v ff " 4 v THEWO TOWER 'N FW 'Gi 'alll-5 ,f 1 ar ARTS AND SCIENCE Top Row CLeft to Rightl-Thomas J. McGrath, James L. Ballreich, Joseph J. George, Wil- liam J. Mullaney, George A. Crocker, Gerard J. Schulte, John M. Bruce, Joseph D. Lovely, Walter B. Postula, Edward T. Sweeney, John C. Cahalan, Second Row-Frank J. Leszczyn- ski, William P. Rieden, George E. McWilliams. Joseph J. Phillips, Bernard J. Sweeney, John E. Young, Charles E. Brady, Frank J. Brady, William J. Bresnahan. Third Row-Harlow J. Lingeman, Michael T. Mohardt, William A. McEawn, Alfred Kern. Ignatius E. Duggan, John J. Mooney, John E. Holland, Delos H. Stevens, Jerry D. McCarthy, Prank R. Cuncich, Norbert J. Sullivan. Bottom Row-John G. Sullivan, Michael E. Peters, Nathan D. Rubenstein, George D. McKeon, George W. Smith, Ferdinand J. Yaroch, George H, Mavis, Amaranthe L. Michaud. . ARTS AND SCIENCE Top Row CLeft to Rightj-Bernard L. Duggan, Joseph L. Nowak, Philip J. Kerwin, John M. Diem, David H. Emmet. Second Row-Joseph J. Nader, Daniel W. Rizzo, Warren E. Belknap, Oscar M. Mersman, Marshall O. Smith, Harvard W. Shepherd, Frederick W. Oles. Lawrence P. Gillett, Philip H. Paye, George O. Nurse. Third Row-John J. Jablin, Joseph Perkovski, J. Keith Schachern. Waldemar B. Hartman, Mandell Lanski, Granville J. Trinity, David M. Levine, Angus V. McTaggert. LeRoy L. Atlivaick, Ray O. Pilon, Lawrence A. Barera. Bottom Row-John T. Kaniasty, Ernest P. Dunningan, Charles M. Seth, Henry A. VanLooy. Robert Leion, William J. Shook, Howard L. Bergo, Meyer H. Berman, Barney H. Simmons. Ernest A. Rambaldi, Louis S. Leland, Victor A. Zurakowski. ISYI SAM as-fyraggya V sff' ' "Vi 1 I we 1930 TOWER 'in it C V- A47 1 A 63 -vi' " H Ill .tp sf' 4 -3 GJ UEI 3 I tty I 6' DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row CLefz' to Rightj-Lugher C. Olsan. Archie A. Yaeger, Raymond J. Kelly, Clarence J. Minor, Jack XV. Teubert, VJ. Howard Cornford, Edward M. Andries, Maurice J. Clark, Redmond E. Carrey. Alfred J. Smith. Second Row-Robert J. I-Iessler, Joseph A. McClounie. Lawrence C. VJeingarden. Franklyn E. McDonald, George D. I-Iatie. Frank W. McCormick, Edward S. Einucane. Third Row-Eli Glossman, Alexander J. Lutz, Bernhardt J. Steger. Nicholas J. Chylinski, Marion L. Copp. I-Iarold R. I-Iaven. Abraham O. Mittledorf, Joseph A. Lubinski, William G. Buckley, Lucine P. Morleau, Phillip I. Rubenstein, Oswald J. DeWitte. Bottom Row-Lapeer G. Ringholz, Victor E. I-Iartzell, John B. Bonoan, Eileen M. Crowley. Margaret E. Meyers, Mary E. DeGalan, Miriam L. Goldstein, Grace P. Crider. Newton Jackson, Sol. I. Stein, Sidney R. Solomon, Charles Futterman. ENGINEERING Top Row CLeft to Rz'ghtJ- Peter VanRyn. Paul J. Glaser. George Shafferly, J. Egelhoff. Wil- liam G. Sands, I-Iarold S. Naumann, Stanislaus J. Cislo. Second Row-Stanley Stelmaszejuk, Anthony D. Slater. Michael Dragon, Cornelius I-I. Clarke, Samuel Chosid, Lawrence L. Farrell. Chester Konczalski, F. Reyser. Third Row--Hugh Morrill, Ben Waloski, Edward C. Dud- zinski, Nicholas D. Jakovich, Lawrence A. Scharf. Thomas E. I-Iill. Carl A. Yingling. Delmer J. Sullivan. John P. Welsch, Craig E. Bolton. Bottom Row--Albert I'I. G. Girardi, J. A. Weiss, Theodore O'Neill. Clyde K. Balsley, Leon Printz, Charles I-I. Schroeder, James L. Mc- Gonigal. John E. Arnold. 53' -gl, .,'ll 5 if S 15 I 2 ' su My at B 'Y I Y ' 1' V 'I fiat. 5 Mtsh. ISSI 0 W ,Is .1 A-S5 2 ,:5',wg,QsL. Qxxsisgfaggf gg L" HE 1930 Tow GT! A Y 'ER I . ,A Y QF rv, at K 4 Q in Q -s 5 r T A ER 'kv n I - I - I N DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row CLeft to' Rightj-John P. Cannon, John P. Campbell, Francis E. Jarvis, David D. Thompson, Willis L. Baser, Frank J. Singelyn, Garfield C. Buchta. Second Row-James E. Sullivan, Julien S. Borninski, Louis J. Murphy, Frank G. Bliss, Fred L. Goodrich, John J. Sullivan, John G. Hall, William Heck Buss, Joseph H. Nebel, Jack Epstein, Fred O. Jenney, William Parnos, D. Edward Mead, John A. Douglas. Third Row-Francis T. Car- roll, Thomas R. McCormick, James Fenlon, William J. Skalitzky, Ned L. Bowman, Thomas C. Walker. Robert M. Conway, Cornelius J. Ulberg, Charles H. Barnes, Leopold A. Labin- ski, Robert B. Condon, William E. Sonnhalter, John B. Reiser. Fourth Row-Michael A. Van DeKeere, Joseph R. Weise, John E. Verbiest, Bert D. Rossman, Helen C. Doyle, Hortense E. Marlowe, Frances M. Kline, Monica M. Kondratovicz, A. Estelle Fenlon, Austin E. Johns- ton, Jerry E. Fisher, Clifford R. Morris, Earl E. Klebba, Edward J. Duffy, C. Brock Mc- Gregor, Francis C. Maher. Bottom Row--Hilario L. Estrade, Robert A. Boggiano, Wilfrid L. Gignac, Alvin Biderman, Francis A. Gettinger. Lawrence Weingarden, Charles Futterman. Don F. Roberts, Solomon C. Dunner, Joseph G. Ryan, Max W. Temchin, Myron B. Lloyd, Paul A. Rampe. ENGINEERING Top Row CLeft to Rightj-William J. Iekel, Frank Rockwell, William Wagner, Manning A. Seper, Gerald F. Krause, Hurlbut D. Kennedy, Bradford J. Johnson, J. Doyle Hamacher. Bottom Row-Einer A. Ludgren, Charles H. Bohland, Ilie M. Spilman, Marvin C. Jilbert, Reuben L. Katz. ell:-D I I I I I I II 'I I I I I I I 1 I '.S 1 I yi I I I I I I. I. I I I Q ina ISQI Jigga fli-'95'SJss?'Q5g, , ,ly-'ff' ' "'--51: I THE 'iffy TOWER - I 5? C? " H ill 4 bt. WA I .W 'H 9:69. Q5 2 Q Q -sajcfwu , . ' -..,, "" ENGINEERING Top Row QLeft to RightI-Eugene Kimball, Gordon J. Leary, Peter Van Ryn, George Shef- ferly, Stanley Stelmaszejuk. Second Row-John L. Haverstock, Edward A. Sampson, George L. Rosingana, John D. Hubbard, John E. Jamison, George C. Slusser, John B. Byrne, David E. Cosgriff. Robert W. Mantz, Charles J. Morsey, Walter B. Anderson. Third Row-Paul F. Reisdorf, Stanley Yogielo, Patrick J. Carolin, William Wiseman, Gerald L. Wardell, Clement A. Shields, Charles S. Lathrem, Chester A. Schintzius, John S. Winter, Norman F. Fenner, Charles E. Marion. Bottom Row-John L. Cunningham, Frances L. Evans, Robert W. Griflin, William A. Clements, Thomas P. Creagh, Louis Berkowitz, Edward R. Mason, John M. Robertson, Stanley F. Stawski, Gerald F. Krause, John M. Andrus. ENGINEERING Top Row CLeft to Righty-Albert D. Townsend, Stanley C. Mancewicz, Peter VanRyn, George Shefferly, Luciano Coluccio, John R. Thorpe. Theodore M. Conolly, Leon K. Zielinski. Second Row-James S. Rundels, Gordon J. Leary, Anthony Toth, Wilbert C. Baum, Charles J. Csizmansky, John L. Cunningham, John A. Schenk. Third Row-Henry F. Hipkins. Edward J. Derck, Theodore P. Golm, Walter A. Erni. Michael Sheppeck. Henry Sternberg, Charles H. Stephens. Hugh H. Morrill, Max Weingarden, Morris Katz, Earl Gallagher. Bottom Row-John S. Yaretski, Floyd L. Cornely, Eugene Buchman. John A. Robertson, John J. Roundtree, Edgar Leon, Fruman Ford, William Lewis, Clarence F. Falkner, Phillip Plasko, John F. Clossey. I . WM.. ' M ,.,,.f .W A . my - .. .,,, -X - . " . - ,fs :vas f. W vas- . H . WM I+' . as kg. . 5 aj, Fl. fQ 73 ga gs ! QM E gqsmrax we f,x'a,pg ' 1 -J 5633? 3- ' .1 4 u ...X 3. 3 4 tiifk. laol ,U new fs M 3 N W tl- Jw? ISS? 6' QQZTSENW Vim.-K?4"S."'i'Jgjf3lEH6WZ'i,512,?9 -X. P! ' '- Q . -A THE 'QSO TOWER H - ff H' ll . . . . ENGINEERING SCHOOL Top Row CLeft to Rightj-Joseph A. Obirek Joseph M. Beat Bromley B. Schuett Thomas R. Kenna Hugh W. MacDonald Elmer Paddock Joseph McFarland Charles B. Leiner Earl L. Kramer Avon E. Manning Robert E. Townend. Second Row-Lawrence V. LaRou Raymond J. Shreder Reuben Axelrod John Sheremeta Gerald E. Wakefield Raphael J. Villal- pando Harold T. Kennedy Joseph Murga Gregory E. Earrel Weldon T. Partridge. Third Row--Erank J. Condon William E. Hutchinson Ralph H. Lightner Thomas G. Thornton Joseph D. Walker Carl Nordstrum Sam Chosid Joseph Robitaille Olimpio S. Bolong James L. Doman. Bottom Row+Richard B. Benn, Ben Sussman, Phillip J. Blundy. Albert J. Whelan, Sam E. Ager, Nathan Balter, Louis Seltzer, Allen G. Agree, Arthur M. Pasko, Henry Salkin, E. Tabor, Stephen Paek. ENGINEERING Top Row CLeft to Rightl-Albert J. Driscoll, Arthur B. Aylesworth, Aram L. Dinquilian. Eugene R. Eisert, Edwin B. Palmer. Bottom Row-Robert Aronson, Richard L. Cassube, E. Closson Hoisington, David B. Ereyman, Albert J. Gagnier, Remo D'Andrea. ,119 . 1. A y,.x 9,1 QW f'.XY:J!n2 ,sew wc.-:sp 4 ,t ak ' G A A , . 9 4 1 C as ll91ll Qtr, I S58 J Jyl V- it A M a asf. fs ttf 'U G GT ls! ' Q GF54?i5:5E5Wi1D Q ' . . 'ix -.dx - 1' "' 'Riagg QQ if-!J""' '-1'vw,l- THE 'lm TOWER J L J Li' 11 l L l l 4. Q 4 a C53 A f' LS J fl 1 , sd.-. Q, ,K,,,. A MNMQL-W . .. -. . , 3 , K c K H, ..,... ,, . 1.. . trim., W . A' r - 'S-. ,f .. V. sr' . ,r ss V . N' ENGINEERING A Top Row CLeft to Righll-Lathrop Creason, Charles A. Bohland, Edwin Myers, Thomas L. Reilly, Allen Pullmer, Edgar T. Cook, Kenneth M. Barber, Carl L. Schiller, William Stevens. Russell C. Hamlin, Harry J. Wiskofske, Christian Harman, Harry R. Bethune. Second Row- Robert E. Thibodeau. Russell L. Taulbee, Nathan N. Goldenberg, John B. Mulcahy, Lawrence J. DesChamps, Harry W. Roole, Bradford J. Johnson. David W. Ayres, Walton D. Thierault. Robert E. Allan, Lloyd B. Larder, John L. Yuengert, Henry J. Van Wayne, John E. Ryan, Stanley M. Sosnoski. Third Row-Duane V. Sheckler. Arthur J. Schelke, Norman E. Ellis, George A. Dimmer, Russell J. Gleason, Richard H. Seeler, John J. Kulick. Francis W. Mc- Carthy, John B. Moses, Victor W. Sisung, Frank D. Sinclair, John E. McEnhil1, Chester Schintzius. Bottom Row-A. Acevido. Roger J. Blandford, Marion Beer, Chaunsey Dilaura, George O. Sharrock, Henry J. Szczesniak, George J. Prokopp, Carl W. Thomas, Norton M. Brown, John J. Martin, William J. Yurgel, Charles L. Hibert, George A. Kolznak, John L. Haverstock. LAW Top Row fLeft to Righty--Claude P. Dowis, Buell A. Doelle, Richard H. Wernette, Arthur E. Somers, Oswald M. Robins, Arthur J. Murphy, Arthur E. Steiner. Bottom Row-Morton Goldberg. Mathew J. Elsliger, Thomas C. Monahan, Emmett J. Tunney, Walter J. Mc- Aloon, Albert M. Matthews, Charles L. Burke. J l .JI Z f sb? all E l l H ' 1 lg G , v lqll 9,3-9.4 7f.JE9'I.'WJh34'2b,g1 M1930 TOWER Ur-fl I J' , 9. 6542 Qs Kg' f' . V , L85 3 ENGINEERING 'Top Row fLeft to Rightl-Floyd Nugent, Peter Van Ryn, George Shefferly. Ignatius I. Rohrig, Allen E. Tripp, William J. Purchas, Dayton E. Ernest, Albert E. Listman. Second Row-Jack P. Lipscomb, Theodore R. Fredrickson, George Huffman, Clyde H. Wood, Theo- dore J. Ehlrich, Fred W. Dadson, Richard E. Johnson. Third Row-Jerome I.. Laethem, Donald J, Neumann, Harold J. Barnhorn, Lawrence T. Tegler, Cleo E. Copenhaver, David W. Ayres, Maynard Rape, Bruce Greenwood, Virgil K. Simonich, Craig E. Bolton. Bottom Row- Marcel A. Stragier, Charles P. Bedell, Arthur L. Michelin, John J. I-Iutmacher, Philip Essi. Royale C. Lampard, Aloysius Jaminet. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row fLeft to RightD-Clarence Rickenbach, Donald C. Motz, Raymond Wilson, James H. Woodroth, Joseph P. Clifford, Paul Masura, Russell E. NVood, Homer C. Slonaker, Gerald A. Murphy. Bottom Row-I-Iarry E. Stewart, Edgar P. McGann, John E. Bicum. Oscar Moskowitz, Walter E. I-Iinz, Nicholas Gendernalik, Stanley A. Gorski, John B. Girardin, Arthur Weintrob, Erle XVright. I., - fi- xii 1 L-1--Q l I we 'I in ll i I , l -s A J.. . gy S350 p 5 C Q W I I I . . . . . A - l I Emi A 42294 lI93l FTF' , iaafqniiifsvaac. fa '. f c' it , E l9 O TO T4 ,ge T tl WER r .. . c a A A I -1' 'C TP F J ' 1 .- .4 ' 1" s p effigy fcntl l X X ' l ll l I I I 1 lu Ill I 1 ill I 'i 1 lb P ,A lx , E I if Q' , l i 1 ' i I , l 1 il T l I t yi l NIGI-IT COMMERCE AND FINANCE it Top Row CLeft to Right?-Henry L. Roehrig. J. Merle Darling, Everett McIntyre, Robert O. I I Carl, Lewis J. Novak, Albert Tavorozzi, Melvin J. Roach. Peter J. Christian, Ralph D. Sein, Louis Brunswick, Eugene J. Welling, Carl J. Jaminet, Arthur P. Nork. Second Row- Francis J. Glynn, Louis L. Perrone, Gilbert F. Dittmer. David A. Binney, William J. Con- nors. James A. Trombley, William E. O'Brien, J. Charles O'Gorman, William O'Brien, Vin- .jill cent E. Gumbleton, Dennis P. O'Donnell. Bottom Row-Fred W. Lyons, Al Schneider, Frank ,'c'pg 'il i if 1' 'ill . 2' lj' .tw 1+ 1 li N all 1 1 3 I l W Doyle, John L. Reilly, Winson S. Moberly, George E. Dillworth, Ralph W. Moore, Norvell Roach, Frank J. Collins, Ebert Rager. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row QLeft to Rightl-Bernard T. Pietrowski, Joseph Miles, Fred J. Goodrow, Leon- ard J. Barba, John E. Mead. Stephen J. Jaworski, Felix Hower, Andrew Keith, Martin F. Hattar, David J. Lyons, Cecil M. Bourke. Second Row--Gerald J. Madigan, Herbert J. Clarke, Earl Quibell, Guy W. deWaller, George J. Hanna, Harry C. Andrews, Elmer C. Van Tiem, Clarence Rufhng, Julius M. Davis, Thomas F. Benson, Norvell M. Sullivan. Bottom Row- Benjamin A. Schroeder, Walter E. Hinz, Paul Bowman, Cecil J. Rivard, John J. May, Edwin C. Hindelong. Robert T. Mixich, Albert Carr. . . F." 1 Q0 Q13 E r , , 3 ' 4 11404. l94l Q fx 3 V I 5 I tg? Q' -Q 1 QS-35 6' ' 'F' 6-sf f.!EX.'sx'4m 'W f Q -. if F 1-as 3 1 5 . THE 1930 Towf Six -- ae- -A-2-'2??l.5'Qa fx 3 N ' 'K L' S 5 -1' D 'I STUDENTS NOT IN PICTURES ARTS AND SCIENCE Freshmen--Norman Allstin, Agapito L. Bassi, Richard J. Baumann, Francis J. Brady, Jack F. Breen. Lawrence V. Britt. William Brune, Joseph A. Canaan, Donald C. Costigan, Clarence G. Dou- cette, Richard W. Downing, Harry Duttman, George P. Heller, Menislaus Jeszke, Alex P. Kilinski. James J. Lentine, William Levin, Charles J. Maisel, Mar- ion F. McDonnell, Joseph H. McMicken, Harold R. McQuarrie, Shefiick J. Moroun, Jack S. Mor- risey, Kenneth Norvo, Bolis J. Paul, Walter P. Peca, Alexander Perinoff, Merle J. Pippin, Robert J. Rogan, Donald E. Schick, Jack T. Schneider, Theodore E. Sheanan, George A. Stephan, Frederick- R. Stoiber, Kenneth G. Taylor, Stacy C. Thomas. Douglas B. Turrel, George C. VanDusen, Harry F. Vellmure, Robert E. Walsh, Paul W. Waltz, Frank W. Weightman, Louis C. Witker. Sophomores-Louis J. Berg, Dio D. Brenaman, James T. Brightwell, Charles J. Broderick, William Brune, Archie P. Cairns, Cecil H. Collins, Richard Delbridge, H. Edward Devlin, Theodore M. Dorsz, Thomas N. Eickhorst, William P. Fisher, Law- rence M. Garvey, Russell L. Halseth, Pyrle H. Hart, Edward W. Hayes, Richard R. Hocking, Gerald L. Hogan, Lemuel J. Homant, Charles M. Isen- berg, Edward G. Kowalczyk, Harold L. Krause, Conrad S. Lantz, Marvin A. Last, Charles F. Lehman, Kenneth J. MacFarlane, Harry W. Mac- Lean, Robert C. McDonald, Nicholas D. McGlaugh- lin, Kenneth L. Mclver, Jean J. Michalak, Daniel E. Murphy, John D. Murray, Benjamin F. Muske, Frederick L. Napolitano, Albert Nickels, Damian O. Ofer, Charles O'I-lanisain. Clarence C. Quick, Wil- liam F. Ratermann, Saul B. Reiser, Samuel H. Res- jevsky, John J. Sauk, Paul J. Schafer. William J. Slattery, Joseph F. Sullivan, Malcolm J. Tear, John A. Trudell, Isadore Weinshelboim. Juniors-Bernard E. Bauman, John M. Beall. James J. Britt, LeRoy M. Burnstrum, James M. Carroll, Richard L. Creighton, Carl N. Crawford, Sigismund J. Dembeck, Irving C. Drinkaus, An- drew J. Durand, Gerald W. Fitzgerald, William G. Fitzpatrick, John A. Galbo, Bernard J. Gariepy, Edwin F. Gilchrist, Victor S. Grates, Leo A. Grendzinski, George M. Haas, Elwood A. Jenkins, David F. Leahy, Edwin G. Lenfestey, Edward A. Malik, Carl D. Moeller, John P. Nickodemus, Stanley R. Novak, Adam I. Pasieczny, Samuel A. Petix, John W. Pulte, John M. Quinlan, William P. Reiden, Elmer A. Riss, Duncan D. Ross, Nathan D. Rubenstein, Samuel Saxer, Norman L. Schmitt. Milton S. Stasiak, Harry W. Theisen, Arthur T. Watson, William J. Yott, George A. Zindler. DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Freshmen-Charles F. Bair, Lawrence F. Barber, Clarence H. Bronder, Charles C. Corbett, Dominic A. Dallas, Robert Elmes, Donald L. Gautherat, Alan Laurence Hill, Edwin L. Hittler, Francis V. Hunter, Willard V. Johnson, Russell E. Keller. Thomas C. Kent, John H. LaSalle, Maurice C. Leeney, Culmer Lucas, Franklyn E. McDonald, Burdett Phillips, M. Daniel Prendergast, Mark M. Price, Anthony P. Putlewicz, Stanley A. Pytlewicz, Russell M. Rogers, George B. Ryan, John A. Ryan, Frank T. Samels, Joseph Schecter, Henry J. Sko- rupski, John J. Smith, Bruce Somerville, Candace Spangler, Robert H. Steinbicker, Joseph B. Stem- pion, Bernard Stockwell, John J. Sullivan, Lloyd Swan, Marie Szumiak, Louis P. Waldo, Walter E. Wark, Howard L. Yack. Sophomores-Paul F. Bader, James T. Bright- well, Edward J. Burkard, Carroll A. Burroughs, Donald H. Butcher, Clair C. Cross, Leo T. Curley, Thomas J. Dolan, James Dupuie, Eva J. Elliott. John M. Forster, Edmund M. Gapczynski, Fre- mont German, Milton Gersten, Jack W. Gleeson. James H. Green, Ruth H. Greenberg, William E. Guina, Edward R. Heglin, Morin Heric, George N. Howell, Ruth A. Hunt, John V. Keefe, Alfred L. Kent, Augustine Leonard, Thomas J. McErlane. James R. McNamara, Anthony T. Maniere, Lucien P. Marleau, Marcella M. Matgen, Marcel Miller, Max Miller, Francis Murphy, Mary L. Nelius, Harold Nelson, Edwin F. O'Hare, Phil Orrin, Har- old Parker, Robert Parsaca, Charles N. Pearson, James B. Regan, Leo Rollins, Irwin M. Rosenthal, Charles M. Ross, Michael F. Scheidt, Harold C. Schimmer, Michael A. Shadko, Frank Joseph Sheets, George Sierra, Robert D. Squires, Jack Pat- rick Stock, William C. Tost, William W. Warren, James J. Whelan, Jerry P. White, John Gilbert White. Juniors-Petronila Blas, John Dawson, Mary A. Dudek, John L. Hamilton, Albert G. I-Iandloser, Harold Herdwig, Francis Kenney, Robert J. Lan- don, Daniel B. McKillop, Victor J. Miller, Ryan F. Mullins, Joel O. Nelson, Thomas A. Polley, Paul F. Thielen, Leo John Wojtusik. Karl K. Wysong. CContinued on page IIZD ? -2 if: C EQ!-4 2'..ffZ?? ll95ll I o N Mi 2 QW! W 'J 1 A -, sm 'mf ,Q YD av' , 2 f 3' N FB 2 3 , xx gif Q. 55 9 , lfyx 311 1 'fm K D559 1 f V M, . fl ws 52? li- 'ill K Q Q Rim fv A 1 ff 6? 6 9,429 94,89 7f6fA7776'72 i,,,,, O NT, f , , " A Twavwg T!FWE'Q ,,. if i i f"-i ' J , i I 1 W, W, N K W , 1 1 I 1 'i 1 , , Wi up l 1 i .VM ii W!! ,VL il mi ,ro wc. iF 'Hi wi V W: H i .. , X ' 4 3 5 .N ly .Q A 1 . 4 is J' . ,J fi ig VS - i I 'Wx 14 2 W I S" 65" sein? Left to Right: Top Row-Bailey, Beer, Bennett, Britt, Carson. Second Row-Connolly. Demelski, Denison. Dixon, Dyer. Third Row-Fitzpatrick, Francis, Havens, Kelly, Laurencelle. Fourth Row+Malott, Marien. C. Miller, V. Miller. Bottom Row-Newton, Quick, Storen, Vance. 593i fu iis' L f ig w l Q S 'N 4 PA isa n Q 6 W' Q2-9 E I fgil' QRQQ l A xQ,'l .flak . i 1?-l 'T A a. . fssfyi. Ffh 2 'i TfE"Q5'Mff55:?a 1 'rf I9 o T As THE- OWER s ki... FRESHMAN CLASS COUNCIL OFFICERS R. JOHN DENISON, President LAURENCE V. BRITT, Vice-President. JOSEPH F. BEER, Secretary. VICTOR F. MILLER, Treasurer. ARTS AND SCIENCES ENGINEERING-SECTION B Arthur R. Havens, President. John E. Connolly, Vice-President. Edward R. Fitzpatrick, Secretary. John R. Daniel, Treasurer. Laurence V. Britt, President. Joseph F. Beer, Vice-President. Paul N. Vance, Secretary. Mark E. Storen, Treasurer. DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE DAY LAW Eugene J. Chapp, President. Frank J. Kelly, Vice-President. Louis J. Gregory, Secretary. Louis White, President. I-I. Rodman Marien, Vice-President. Lillian M. Dixon, Secretary. Charles W. Miller, Treasurer. Charles A. Laurencelle, Treasurer. AFTERNOON LAW George A. Francis, President. Thomas J. Bailey, Vice-President. Earl J. Demelski, Secretary. Michael R. Martin, Treasurer. ENGINEERING-SECTION A Joseph Malott, President. Wallace J. Carson, Vice-President. Victor F. Miller, Secretary. Raymond W. Newton, Treasurer. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE R. John Denison, President. John B. Bennett, Vice-President. Helen K. Quick, Secretary. James R. Dyer, Treasurer. RESHMEN are the victims, to a great extent, of ineflicient organization. When they came on the university campus they were in a sort of daze. They knew few students and they had no leaders to depend upon. The fresh-- men readily saw that what was needed was efiicient organization. They were unwilling to be the "under dogs," and as a consequence they finally selected officers, who were to lead them in their first year. Initiation was carried on, but the freshmen took on a new attitude. They took on a secret and "just wait" attitude. They now realized that they were strong and had efficient or- ganization. The Frosh Frolic, one of the most popular dances to be staged at the univer- sity, was the result of the efforts of the ofiicers of the freshman class of each department. The oHicers banded together were known as the Freshman Coun- cil. In addition to the Frosh Frolic and the business relative to it the Freshman Council organized the freshmen for the Soph-Frosh games, May 1 and 2. Flag hunts, hog tying, hundred yard dashes and many other forms of competi- tion were indulged in by the Freshmen and Sophomores. The fiag hunt ended in failure for the Freshmen, but they more than re- venged themselves on the following day, when in the other events they made a sufficient number of points to beat the Sophomores to the tune of 54 to 52. EE E" f, "pf JI af, it ,Q 2- 7 . 3 QM" tai? S f ' WW fog!! eff?-2 i A G?-'5 ' 1 i Tai!-ie. IQQI is .tw L WC Geez? Jggbf. ?l'E"5Sf."'?Ji'ff'59,gJ ,G-fgsfgbu . if-1-rn" """-'Q-it Il WE 1930 TOWER L, -f "T T. -'Tx Y T ellnil 1 4 I, .i cc? Adv . Q-S5 3+ ' carp :ll ,P In ' lb 1 bk ARTS AND SCIENCE Top Row CLeft to Rightj-Norbert E. Malone, Alfonse R. Masaitis, Fred G. O'Connor. Fran- cis E. Ratierman, Raleigh R. Raubolt, Fred M. Rickle, Edward J. Kirk. Edwin G. McCarthy. Second Row-Thomas M. O'I-Iare, Arnold Schaal, J. Moruun Sheffick, Simon Najarian, Robert D. Powell, Frederick O. Poelke. Third Row---Edward W. Robinson, Louis P. Schillinger, B. Burke Muldoon, Eugene H. Quigley, F. Judson Phelps. Fourth Row--George McKeon, John Kmiecik, Chester R. Lulenski, Jerome McBrearty, Raymond A. Meng, Morris Reiff. Fifth Row -William W. Robertson, Charles J. Pelletier, James A. Rieden, Charles E. Noah, Frederick C. Phillips, Joseph Rozich, Michael S. Rowda, Hugh M. O'Connor, Jack L. O'Brien, Douglas F. McDowell. Botton Row-Richard Miller, Albert Peller, William J. Nagel, Julius J. Mc- Clain, Joseph A. Ritz, Alvin E. Perry, John W. Piester, Boris M. Prockiw, Paul F. Bolis, Frank L. Petersmark, Carl McCullum. ARTS AND' SCIENCE Top Row fLeft to Rightj--Jack A. Cremer, Joseph L. Bernadotte, Jack F. Duggan, John J. Barry, Joseph F. Beer, Vincent P. Cole. Second Row-John W. Craig, Francis J. Blaszkiewcz. Lawrence J. Clinton, William A. Corner, John S. Burns, Walter Brachulis, Edwin A. Boni- kowski. Third Row-Joseph C. Brisson, Gerald J. Amiot, Robert W. Christian, Peter T. Bari- lar, Cyril A. Cohen, John J. Czarnecki, Bruno F. Domzalski, Anthony C. Dagostino. Fourth Row-Stephen A. Corbett, Jerome J. Bocci, Richard H. Burns, Edward R. Annis, Burke W. Arehart, Harold E. Bantan, Louis H. Bridenstine, Fred E. Burkert, Peter C. Avram. Bottom Row-Donald F. Boogs, Jerome J. Aldrich, John V. Allen, Harold C. Cross, Gordon A. Braasch, Joseph Decker, Ernest E. Belanger, John E. Clifford, Albert L. Alter, Bruce G. Bev- eridge, Edmund T. Donohue. IIIOOH .02 'Q r s' l sew 239 Ply, 9 .52 12'-3' ,S Wf.X All ,I v 1 'VG KAW X wah 5 ,fa tmw ' 6' wif ' 4255-l5W"-'JL A 1930 T C" L P 4 3 .ff-'x T H Wfe pr . m y gg g g M gg - 4- A A-. f- g so ' 4 4-PM . as .i . 'elk-D A ' L...,,. I . l 1' i i H 3, i 5 Q ll l l l l l l w T l ,ll i ' l l l ARTS AND SCIENCE Top Row CLeft to Rightj-Willard E. Fischer. Dell Hoffman. Second Row-George W. Kavanagh, William A. Hathcock, LaSalle M. Lenk, Matthew A. Burns, Alex W. Jozik, Wil- '- fred J. Friday. Third Row-John R. Flick, John B. Federspiel. Stanley J. Kalamajka, Arthur I , F. Kulke. Edwin M. Hiller, Jerome V. Kelly, Ted F. Feldman. Fourth Row-Ernest J. A A Gargaro, Edward A. Hilke, Richard G. Kellogg, George Guest, Louis O. Horvath, John T. 4 Q. x 51 Breshnahan, Raymond J. Kavanaugh, John R. Labadie, Gordon J. Kent. Fzfth Row-Stanley l ny, 11, J. Gillon, Robert C. Lozowski, 'George D. Livingston, 'Abner A. Hamburger, William Tiedel, l ctr.. Joseph C. Lawless, John F. Griflith, Francis S. Kucmierz. Louis Jaworski. Bottom Row- QJ Lee R. Edmonds, James J. Lentine, Nicholas A. Lentine. Harold J. Jarvis, Otto D. Hegedus, C ' Harold J. Gullen, Joseph G. Lipke, Frank R. Longo, Newton E. Felch, Earl E. Kleckner. p J ' Q T A ff i 7 5 Q guy? ARTS AND SCIENCE Avg 'QT Top Row fLeft to Rightj-Mark E. Storen, Herbert B. Seymour. Carl J. Shields, Paul N. Vance, Edward P. Sliwin, Ewald F. Scheiwe, Bernard V. Corbett. Frank W. Sprague. Second 1 Row-Criss J. Schearer, Thomas A. Tenaglia, Jack G. Unger, Wayne F. Swonk, Ferdinand 6, G. Stefani. Third Row-Adelore M. Walker, George J. Walsh, Frank J. Taschner, Virgil H. ya J Terry, Jack P. White, Bernard P. Tykoski, Walter J. Schulte, Leo M. Rahal. Fourth Row- p Walter IM. Siepierski, Milford E. Woodbeck, Joseph V. Walker, Melvin M. Streit. Stanley J. Sobieski, Frank Sniecikowski, Francis P. Walsh, Lawrence C. VanLandingham, David G. Staub. Bottom Row-Marcell F. Wolf. Edward A. Smolky, Leo Spinelli, Archie B. Vaughan, George A. Schwager, Clare I. Toppin, William Szypulski, Thomas O. Stewart, Samuel J. Versaci. Emerson H. Schink, Julius F. Schultz, Brone Spano. -vw-'a 4. l 41.293, 510111 . 7-fr-Alle' 'y "'u"Q!f'x I1 , J THE R30 TOWER h a- if i 2 . f rr A L a ,v A l I J ar-ii Q f u DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row CLef! to Rightj-Robert W. Phillips, Louis H. Lindeman, William J. Bourke, Howard A. Kane, Harold J. Rowan, William P. Thorpe, Paul C. Conrad, Joseph M. Bennane, James S. Galbraith, Walter Kelley, William D. Lane, Raymond G. Steffes. Second Row- Henry D. Muller. Walter P. Campau, Caesar J. Soma, Noel Fraser, Joseph A. Kleefuss, John H. Kebbe, Albert W. Zander, John L. Rise. Marion A. Porch, Clinton S. Titcomb, Robert Crongeyer, Lloyd J. Eberts, Clifford J. Carroll. Third Row-Cedric H. Braund, Phillip G. Tobin, Joseph E. Reck, Warren F. Ashley, Stanley J. Teagan, Andrew Kosko, Earl J. Healey, Henry S. Wich, John A. Schoenrock, Herman M. Roth, Thomas W. Walsh, Francis A. Michalko. Bottom Row-Kenneth H. Mayrand, George F. Sonnefeld, Adam B. Kronk, David E. Ryan, James Brown, Kenneth B. Myers, Harvey J. Jean, Donald A. Ritter, Adam J. Seibert, Frank J. Shaden. DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row CLeft to Rightj-Leroy F. Dowd, Stanley H. Burbank. John R. Agnew, Vincent Schulz, William R. Schulz, Vincent P. Hastings, Charles F. Thornton, Robert A. Cottrell, Alfred J. Knight, Frank A. Lewandowski, Ashley C. Coy, William J. Dirkas, Walter F. Alten- burger. Second Row-Francis W. Boismier, Howard F. Cronenwedt, Lawrence F. Barber, William W. Druery, Henry O. Chase, Basil S. Clark, Earl W. Weber, Bernard J. Cattey, Frank Bartolomei, Albert C. Demschak, Thomas C. Curley. Third Row-Harry J. Anderson, Bene- dict B. Szok, Norman P. Churchman, Sylvia M. Blank, Marcel Frenette, Lillian M. Dixon, Ralph T. Bell, Hugh E. Cameron, Edward M. Castle, Richard J. Loes, Leonard A. Dom- browski, Thomas J. Burke. Bottom Row-Robert A. Lemmon. Stephen Molnar, Hachadoo Magarian. George R. Mobley, Edward T. O'Brien, Frank Orchowski, Thomas P. Nehra, Robert J. Grieble, Louis Greenberg, Roy J. Cogan. E Q L H1023 l l l ,KE 0 p v f . fa gm! M-3' L 1 'iv I L I ug, ,rr G1 ,,,Q'Sv..f-iff'-'E'ER'JS-1?fmg,,, , I' to, HE i930 Tow L T ER r -Is.. : i Z- -nh -i. V . Y T' S e tra! I 1-M I I I I I I .1 I CF, CWC' I Qeggf st? A DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row CLeft to Rightl-Walter E. Vanden Bossche, John J. Roach, Clifford W. Hobarth, William K. McCreery, Joseph Masacek, Fred S. Mutlater, Erwin H. Sibley, John M. Toland. John C. Hammelef, Louis Germain. Second Row-Raymond T. Kelly, Frank J. Girard, Stephen E. Gibbons, Orville G. Karre, Roland D. McDonald, John W. Lappan, Benjamin J. Lipniarski, Arthur J. Kraft, John A. Weinandy, Lionel H. Woonton. Edward J. Lutomski. Third Row-John G. Walsh, Walter J. Theisen, Anthony P. Polonick, Beatrice R. Schmidt, M. Lucille Sullivan. Raymond A. Pilon, George E. Mousseau, June M. McDougall, Catherine M. Henkel, George T. Schurmer, Louis E. White, John C. Palmer. Bottom Row-Homer Smith, Stanley A. Polovich, Syril L. Trenkle, Joseph P. Rakovan. Stanley G. Wright, Russell J. Muekle, Arthur A. Schlak. DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row QLeft to Rightj-Lyle Beck, Cole L. Neuman, Philip D. Conway. Henry J. Schulte, Harry C. Van Nortwick, Charles W. Miller, John H. Cicatte, Rodman Marion, Joseph H1 Rabaut, Joseph F. Trenkell, Edwin A. Nowaczyk. Second Row-Leroy C. Stretmatter, William F. Kay, William H. Wrathell, William D. Pratt, George W. Ladd, Edward Osebold, Fred H. Miebeyer. Dennis M. Tuohey, Adolph Nemsick, Joseph B. Stempen. Third Row- Bernard J. McNab, Clarence T. Gabel, Thomas McLain, Harold A. Berry, Francis A. Starrs. .lohn P. D'Amour, James A. Tracy, Maxwell L. Sargent, Francis J. McDonnell, Edward B. Ba- bula, Edward J. Dietrich. Fourth Row-Stephen Toldi, Frederick J. Schneider, Edward J. Kempel, Truman B. Partridge. Jane C. Barton, Margaret M. McRae, Teresa Murtha, M. Whili- mena Kellerman, Rosemary Hoban, Joseph W. Harris, Henry H. Kern, Clyde J. Challender. Bot- tom Row-Felix F. Best, Francis Miller, Stephen J. Jurczynski, James M. Moore, Joseph M. O'Reilly, Louis J. Flint, Jack F. Boersig, Dean Parker. Edward W. Fisher, James F. Dillon. I 1 I I II II I ,, I II III II TI III YI II .3 II Ill II 'I .I I I lI I, II I 'II I II' II :II I II I III I, -I ,I I I I ,I I III I I I I I I I I I I. gI I I II ,I ,II I I WI I I, II II I I I I I I I I I I , I I I I I I I II I III I ,I II ll, Il' I !I I: I I I I I II I I-2 WTWQX PL. . I., 1 I I If III ,wb I W II, ,I 9, III ,II I I II I I I II II I II I I I I I I 'I I I. I II I Q FE Iiozll AF!" "'Y'i:Av THE mo TOWER qfo xf ii l ' J-A I v? llj ll il ll I li. fu ti ' 590555 Q51 y 1-lt I Q, , l 4 It W rl pf ' 'gf 1 . I s I i , 5 Q M ga 'J l ENGINEERING Top Row CLeft to Rightj-James J. Harrington. Alfred J. Quigley, Sterling N. Kidd, Frank H. Semanchik, Joseph Wood, Robert O. McCahon, William F. McQuade, George A. Weinstein, Leo W. Blum, Francis J. Schwartzer, Elliot W. Bennett, John H. Flemming, Ber- nard Noffs. Second Row-Carl Kelly, George J. Clancy, Frederick H. Jones, Joseph L. Harper, p Charles P. Collins, Raymond B. Cross, Ensio E. Hankilammi, J. Gordon McCutcheon, Ken- t neth Norwin, James C. Selser, J. Leslie Bates. Third Row-L. Barnes, Harvey W. Reid, Sam R. Coscarelli, Edward R. Fitzpatrick, Joseph F. Beck, Wilfred A. Martus, Theodore Freund, Andrew Nossotti, Irving Filler, Paul L. Cronin, Harry C. Schram, Howard W. Francis, Ken- neth C. Stovel, Lawrence P. McGinnis, Jesse A. Crossley. Bottom Row-William I. Johnson, Arthur J. Schoenberg, Sol King, Louis J. Kain, Owen Harris, John Hatalsky, Harry M. New- man, Andres deGuzman, Richard C. Bick, John J. Tonani, Louis H. Rauh, Thomas Newton, I William A. Fuhrman. I ENGINEERING I , Top Row CLeft to Rightj-Bernard F. Borgel, William R. Huck, Ralph J. Engle, Ernest I Dayton, Charles J. Rohling, Howard Hause, Ignatius deSostoa, Kenneth E. Binder, Francis , M. VanLook, George Q. McNamara, Robert A. Erskine, Walter J. Mullin, Frank L. Porch, Henry C. Gudebski. Second Row-Edgar L. Geibel, Fernando C. DeSostoa, Kenneth E. Breish, I Reuben C. Whitlock, Benjamin J. Willett, Harry R. Hobley, Hiram Callahan, Thomas J. Kearney, George R. Wachter, Duncan J. McDonald, I. Gold, Roy A. Jumisco, Stanley Cole- I man, Carl W. Troy, Howard D. Ritter, LaVerne B. Ragsdale. Bottom Row-Ernest W. I Moore, Victor F. Miller, Cyril A. Schemitz. Xavier DeSostoa, Paul Konechik, Lawrence Mis- , bach, Benjamin J. Lapenta, Harry H. Lifshitz, Francis L. Rivard, Edwin J. Hanf, Donald E. Miller, George Pukalo, Pierce H. Sorenson, Frederick Grainger, William F. Vigar, John H. Ryan. l MNTVW ,. grgfggn ,Rrpa-I1 . Il -fi Jiskb' A Ut.-94. lll04ll l W-'Emi v g a' .1 QA- g M1930 TOWER Yr. I - a f a? cf ' ' ' ll Ill n O., A XY . X A sa we ss? .21 ENGINEERING Top Row fLeft to Rightj-Charles F. Green, Raymond J. Vosu, Merwyn V. Meenaugh. Henry Faber, Joseph B. Monahan, Robert E. Werner, Robert J. Terhorst, Henry A. Martens, Andrew B. Costic, James A. Keller, LaVerne B. Ragsdale. Victor E. Gaysinsky. Robert A. Fuller, Robert C. Piche, Elwood L. Rohrbaugh, John A. Howell, Benjamin Crawford, Ray- mond Rickenback, Louis Garcia Armora. Second Row-Willis J. Stoddard. Lawrence C. Fie- big, Baldino B. Pellegrino, Kenneth E. Binder, Robert W. Anke, Wilbur A. McClellan, A. Ford Grant, Hubert P. Goubert, Aby J. Bonawit, Bertram H. Cullen. Thomas G. Crider, Frank T. Cox, John J. Curran, Louis Armora. Third Row-Hayes E. Johnson. Adelbert E. Cunning- ham, Leroy J. Stephens, William Riihimae, William R. Milby, John R. Moeller, David E. Ervin, Michael Warchol, Frank N. Keller, James E. Elavin, Kenneth J. Whise, Bert C. March- ment, Ricica Karel, Clyde A. Keller, Francis McLain, George G. Power, William E. Adamek. Bottom Row-Fernando B. Mendoza, D. H. Altman, Edward W. Jackman, Paul I. Kennedy, Henry W. Baker, Charles F. Wasserfallen, George H. Cotronis, Rudolph Glowacke, Joseph P. Healy, Ferdinand Anderson, Richard Andrus. Eugene D. Starkweather. A ENGINEERING Top Row CLeft to Rightl-Edward P. Holleran. Raymond Cruden, Delmar Jacques, Ivan W. Parish, Samuel J. Allen, Isadore Patt. Second Row-Joseph G. O'Donnell, Joseph B. Mona- han, Gerald G. Dannenbring, Edward A. Barry, William Howell. George E. Maki, Thomas W. Holmes, William C. McKinnon. Wilbert J. Mahoney. Third Row-Victor E. Gayzinsky, John Fogliote, Edward J. Johnson, Frank A. Colosimo, E. Anderson, James C. Selser, Wil- liam A. Willson, Raymond N. Cruden. Bottom Row-Frank J. Young, Harry J. Gensler, Fiorino G. Pacitti, Robert Schiff, John Craig, Victor D. Corriere. John R. Ponsetto. Borah G. Popavich, German R. Atendido. J l l l l 10 wh J ix X SQ 9 s ibm! law c 'G l gi-.vpn nr-,xmlg 35:9 I livin 9 4 'Z-91 510511 ' G' ev. cf'-E-95'-sazfffa 'W 'L " "' " If I 1 WER '-Ns.. HE i930 TO I J - A- A V i , -. Q.. '9 ' 1 X . 2.- 'W 4 V Lil" . x I dig' Berks 5 : " ' if Q85 21 ln.lXI'! 0 Ns K 'oi Q tv ii ENGINEERING Top Row CLeft to Rightl-Henry I. Mueller, David H. Giltinan. Raleigh H. Law, Jerry G. Modie, George L. Ebert, Julius V. Gerhardstein, Floyd F. Zelinski, Arthur R. Havens. Clarence J. Melache, Paul Spelling. David J. Bowman. Second Row-Thomas J. Sass, Elmo Lincoln. Robert H. Robertson, Lyle D. Lyons. William A. Livingston, Delmar C. Jacques, Andrew W. Parkanzky, Joseph L. Stoffel, Russell J. Gildea. Daniel R. Little, John G. Goessling. Third Row-Adam E. Sieminski: Samuel G. Kirkpatrick, Alex L. MacDonald, John Ruby, Ben- jamin Brenner, Robert Field, William R. Huck. Paraflnio T. DeRuiter, Oliver A. Bueker, Paul Ceru, Gilbert J, Burgund, Andrew P. Backelant. Bottom Row--Joseph G. O'Donnell, Stephen A. Palaggi, Thomas A. Hilterman, Paul Glick, Joseph A. Goodhue, Francis P. O'Connell, John Adamaszek, Walter Hnatio, Norman J. Schalm, William J. Sampson, Francisco D. Ariola, Nathan A. Gleiber, Rene A. Montaudon. ENGINEERING Top Row fLeft to Rightl--Benjamin Crawford, Francis Steigerwald, Orville F. Eichen, Stew- art S. Barton, David XV. Murray, Henry Faber, Bernard J. Meldrum, Robert G. Faber, Alfred Gatzenmeier. Second Row-Adam E. Sieminski, Harold B. Mort, George T. Bohner, Edward O. Casenhiser. Thomas W. Muston, Wallis E. Woods, John L. Willett, Jack R. Conyers, Philip K. Stefanowski. Third Row-Wilfred A. Martus, Joseph L. Harper, J. Gregory Goess- ling. Frederick E. Putnam, Richard M. Klenner, VValter E. Slattery. Bernard F. Forster, Rich- ard C. Kullen, Abe Kutlow. John F. Pahl, Stephen Kosmyna, George J. Gillig, Vincent E. Koehler, Melvin F. Auch, Andrew B. Costic, Paul Nagitsoc. Bottom Row-Edward Andrews. F. Rogers. Robert Reinhardt, Alonzo M. Arthur. John C. Beres. Ralph H. Wise, Charles M. Foeller, Alphonse T. Staeger. Leonard N. Conn, Edward A. Smith, Andrew R. Gnesda, Neal N. Plourdi. George G. Hastings. Robert J. Handyside, Simon Moskalek, Baldino B. Pellegrino. 510611 V , ' ,A-A, T 17 'ea 4. J, I vii Zta 3 4 E a to Z .,jf,.'Q. Vx '51 'an 4 ami! .A l,1"7'qi?n?:3 Wy-W i Q Q I r','4l,. 1.- ab' 1 D - x ' i. Q if-:S 2 N. .R M364 2142-9iS's:d:sp,g1 - s rf '- a - 4 52 THE i930 TOWER - 'L ' 'A' ' X ' . G s 4' ' l ' fb 'alll-5' IENGINEERINGG Top Row Uaeft to 'RIIQEIJH-HQIIVCY D. Edwards, Joseph Tumminio, Kenneth'C. Leahy, Hubert A. Cameron, William A. Euhrman, Thomas Newton, Joseph S. Eox. Cecil M. Schultz. Charles T. Gardner, Kenneth D. Roubie, John J. Dobelek, Francis J. McGloin. Second Row-Vincent S. Keshishian, Erank Igolka. Elmer L. Boileau, Kenneth Bousquet, Louis J. Kain, Carl S. Hem- mer, Walter J. Sesny, George Novotny, Bernard J. Frederick, Stephen E. Nagy, Paul J. Welsh. Third Row-J. T. O'Reilly, Joseph C. Callahan, William S. Duckworth, Wilfred Martus. Hayes E. Johnson, Peter H. Wayne, Raymond Wi Newton, Arthur F. Mead, Daniel C. Hine- man, George H. Schwartzberg, William D. Ehrich. Bottom Row-Lawrence J. Bossman, Ray- mond R. Lee, Harold Wiles, Augustine J. Walz, Harold Sechrist, Santos G. Gamet, Raymond A. Lopez, Jack M. Warren, Henry T. Geitzen, Loren E. King, Joseph Malott, Wallace J. Car- ENGINEERING Top Row QLeft to Rightj-Joseph H. Greenblatt, Harry C. Van Matre, Bernard J. Osterberg, Gaylord A. Maben, Robert W. Dennis, Harry G. Wimmer. Thomas P. Moynihan, Charles Wyte, Edward J. Mueller. Second Row-Joseph C. Brehler. Henry C. Gudibski, Albert Greiner, Geza A. Pasternak. Charles M. Slayton, James S. Greenough, Winslow C. Morrow. Stanley B. Clason, Harold B. Mort, Ralph M. Schorn, Roger J. LaBreque, John W. Head, Roger W. Lau, James M. Lynch. Third Row-Harold J. Diehl, J. Eugene Hawkins, Paul J. Burke, Thomas C. Clark, William S. Duckworth, Walter E. Chaman, Benjamin C. Haberek, Edward H. Lloyd, Theodore Mrokowski, Phillip A. Mullen, Gene V. Knight John R. Danien, Joseph L. Harper. Bottom Row-John E. Connolly, Paul H. Dudek, Kenneth Lewis, Herman Brown, John O. Griffith, Jack E. Hagenah, Adam R. Stanny, Marion B. Donze, Roy J. Dusseau, Leo M. Lar- sen, Clarence Whitston, lsadore Shulman, Harold B. Wiles, Bernard A. Wizork. son, Raymond B. Dobmeyer. ---A-.Q-r--Y -L, ia wa, A 'A .wt . . . 3 n ya? F41-if S aww- ww-sz 2919.5 S 2415 559512 4 "fa"n.l' F iIl07H l 1 ellie! l I 1 i ff fist ft H " , egg T l QKERJMSJQWSQQQ .4 ,iff r E --xqs, . THE 'W TOWER if 6 ' - FOREIGN TRADE Top Row fLefr to Right!-Alvah P. Brachman, Leo J. Bondy, Anthony Dittmar, Edward H. Wiethoff, J. Richard Ranta, Ralph E. Atlee, T. Claire Gaugherty, Leonard L. Detloff, Lawrence J. Gibson, William J. Everitt. Second Row--Ray A. Dean, John E. Kuzara, John W. Kinsey, William Shapiro, John E. Williams, Lillian C. Reinhold, Bernett J. Krauss. Richard C. Green, Edward E. Shonherg. Bottom Row-Harry J. Greer, Ronald G. Trumble, Raymond F. Moore. Harvon A. Drittler. Donald M. Cooper, Sydney Volkovich, John L. Bielby. Students not in picture-John H Cartmell, Ronald M. Chisholm, Leo J. Dickson, Cyril M. DiMarco, Mark E. Goddard, Willard A. Haigh, Thomas J. Heuss, Andreas S. Hillc, John M. Kytic, Reginald L. Rivard, Harry J. Schoell, William Simpson, Paul A. Telep. Y 1? G? l . fl-'tif , , F. " 1, o , ,Q QU S LAW i Top Row fLeft to Rightj-Lawrence J. Dowd, Thomas Bailey. Walter Holland, Michael R. Martin, George A. Francis. Bottom Row-Paul G. Marco, Frederick P. Taipele, Gerald J. Lynch, Earl J. Demeleski, John P. Hastings. T l v rw-If v 4 h F' Fan J-mb 4'-92456. iliosll ' G' Q-sk fn.-J's1.'sJs.,+f3 'Q ' .MSW TH ER a r s.. - - . S I 4' " 1 3 : .9 'ethai ann .gf Bef 1 c 'i ,lx . 4 cf A wi All 2 1 fiffwlfit .9 O .. . Qsf. LAW Top Row flseft to Rightj-Howard Ward, Peter Plasz, Stanley J. Kotcher. Frank J. Ullrich. Edwin G. O'Brien. Second Row-Jack I. Schlegel, Alexander Kundrat, Arthur J. Petrimoulx. Anthony J. Kronk, Eugene J. Chapp. Milton J. Maher. Third Row-Franklin D. Ruhlman, Robert O. Unsworth, Russell G. Marsden. Kenneth R. Fournier. Charles A. Laurencelle, Howard A. Scheafer. Fourth Row-Paul W. Waldo, John E. Walker, John W. Conway. Max Schayowitz, Morton L. Wolfe, Paul W. Mohardt. Bottom Row-John Stackpoole, Joseph Maisano, Orville J. Spindler, Leo G. Federman. Allan E. Stein, Patrick S. MacDougall. Albert W. Scholl. LAW Top Row CLeft to Rightl-John C. Bossenberger, Frances J. Kelly, William A. Purvis, Cecil T. Lee. Second Row-Thomas A. Doucher. Alexis Lebedeif, Wencel A. Milanowski, Harry Melnik, Joseph D. Cassidy, Roman P. Rebain. Third Row-Thomas M. Kavanaugh. Max- well P. Craig, Herbert L. Harris, Frank M. Lemke, Joseph A. Powers, Louis J. Gregory, George G. Cotter. Fourth Row-Michael F. DeFont, Albert M. Budman. Albert L. Milling. Max Robins, Francis Mitchell. Bottom Row-Mila L. Zechlin. Marguerite A. Montgomery, Marie H. Bunetta, Doris M. Hicks. ll p lliofall 1 L- 31',,N aff' Ni w an ani. ' ix- A az! g+ Q 1153- Q. wi" v S58 as Sf? rf il. kl, A l it , ...V , Y 24.32 S I Sy I . .J , " G' Qs' f'.?E"2-l:.'N'J.g,+9 'P ' 0 Ar' VP' -T AA 5' wg gm g n n A . gf W'-A 1' nf s? 1 ll l Q NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE i , Top Row CLeft to Rightl-John T. Kelly, Louis Berman. Harold A. Beck, Frank R. Mazanec, John C. Kral, Sam Ventimiglia. Harry C. Bayer, Anthony C. Rzany, Harry Ruben- fire. Second Row-Carl V. Eerry, Edward E. McDermott, Joseph J. Wersching, George E. McKay, Ered S. Anders. Jane E. Williams, Oscar Grammens, Edward J. Delaney, Theodore J. Collins. Irving Ray. Third Row+William J. Mutton, James A. Pembroke, Orvell W. Walters. Terrence W. Barden, Prank E. VanHollebeke, Alexander McAllister, James J. Anderson, Edwin G. Terrell, A. King, Eldridge Baughman. Bottom Row-Elaget E. Charboneau, Ralph B. Ewing, Dugald Black, Fred C. Kroenig. Miron H. Lindner. Maurice L. Davis, Leo J. Wisch- man, Don Foster. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row CLeft to Right?-Emmet R. Foley, Ralph T. McPhail, George J. Doherty, George E. Rakovan, Edward E. Harrigan, John E. Lynott, Marshall C. Huff. Emmett J. Shea. Walter Geraghty. Second Row-Joseph G. Nolan, William A. Boyer, Alfred Wolf, Herman L. Thibert, Stewart S. Garrigan, Joseph E. McHugh, William E. Brogan, Carlyle Lachance, Lawrence C. Grenier, William H. Savage. Bottom Row-Alphonse J. Tourigny, Herbert J. Taubitz, John T. Soleau, Homer R. Doolittle, Louis H. Harris, Edward Anderson. 311011 I ,W l J Jin 2 I .ca 42-P E l i l l rant, 4 'Ada THE M930 TQWER ,. 'Km '-9 ' 2 A . ' T I I of ' ' 4 I L i l 8.14 elf 3 .1 Cf' c ff Que! 1-11 2 NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row CLeft to Right?-Norman Davidson, Lawrence H. Rubenstine, Fred J. Kirn. James R. Dyer. Arthur J. Gardner, Stanley J. Schlaffer. Second Row--Albert J. Stadler, E. W. Baird. Peter J. Tocco. Charles L. Anderson, Jack M. Slutsky, Archie H. Yancy, William G. Christian, James A. Reynolds, Sheldon W. McGraw, Arthur J. Wroblewski. Third Row-John J. Zepf, Elmer Graham. Jack C. Friedman. Douglas Cecilia Harrington, Elton B. Wheeler, Helen K. Quick, Clarence A. Jennings, Edward J. O'Leske, Harold F. Diegel, Wallace S. Gerlach. Bottom Row-Jacob Spiro. Ernest Matousek, Joseph A. Youngblood, Marvin W. Smith, Anthony A. Krzywdyinski, Charles L. Logsden. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row CLeft to Rightj-Alex Peters, Samuel H. Young, Wilfred H. Clark. Oswald J. Bondy. Alton T. Holland, Ernest J. Archambault, Gordon B. Davidson, Casper A. Ream. Jack W. Lawrie, John J. Paling, Louis J. Brady. Second Row-Frances J, Mulvihill, John J. Miller, Charles J. Finnerty, H. R. Steintrager, Leo G. Capham, John F. Devereaux. Albert R. Cox, Ben Gruskin, Philip Langwald, Charles A. Rachwal, Frank A. Richard, Delman F. Kernohan. Front Row-Roland J. Denison, Albert Sherman. John B. Bennett, Edward J. Libs, Aurelia M. Dettloff, Gertrude A. Weyland, Mary Magdaline Sink, Ross Shroeder, Neil A. Gustafson, John Graven, Sidney L. Cohen. If 53. O1 trellis!! A h 1 ll LW' Hlllll s, . 1 -T 5' " 2, g' A - T H E lg O TOWER A ki, Yr. . - Z' ii - if 6 I 57 me . H Ill 4. O., dei-A, ti aft 6 Q-S3 2 gl qs.-as NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Top Row fLeft to Rz'ghtD-Milton Bielfield, Marion H. Ortwein, Jack Pearlman, Bernard J. Sumner, Robert Olsen, Earl H. Chapman, Norman L. McCord Henry M. Naour, George A. Reuter, John F. Corcoran, Morton A. Sullivan, Edward T. Marnon. Second Row-Sol Rothenburg. Harry C. Broder, John H. Schwartz, Doris Ratgen. Irving I. Wirt, Edith O. Zimmerman, Oscar Shapazinn. Franklin D. Stanbury, Carl W. Lahser, Edward J. Marchewitz. Bottom Row-Karl C. Peters, Joseph J. Sandel. Douglas A. McGregor, Marton A. Rocheleau, Jack Katcher, Albert C. Zimmerman, Jack D. McEwen, Basil J. Des Rosiers. STUDENTS NOT IN PICTURES QContz'nued from page 955 ENGINEERING Sophomores-Anthony Adams. Gordon Aitchi- son, George T. Anderson, Joseph Apfel, Julius I. Aurrecoechea, Wilfred H. Barnhardt, Clayton Beat- tie, Frank S. Belch, John M. Bell, Witold E. Bent- kowski, Howard C. Bentley, Edward V. Berberich, Max Bernard, Kender Bishop, John W. Boate, Robert J. Brooks, Burnett W. Buist, Bernard J. Bryne, William M. Capstick, Russell A. Case. Theodore O. Claus, Stephen C. Conlogue, Thomas G. Conway, Charles E. Crispo, Robert L. Cullen, John G. Daro, Paul R. Degnam, Albert E. Diver, Earl J. Eckel, Arthur J. Eldis, Oliver D. Engle, Gunnar C. Erickson, James R. Evans, Robert S. Flemming, Eddie Fossen, Arthur H. Fraser. Charles E. Gies, M. Jerome Glynn, Robert B. Grimmett, Clifford O. Guerin, Joseph Gurski, John P. Hac- kett, Gerald B. Hallahan, Richard J. Harpham, Lloyd R. Harris, Arthur A. Hartman, Paul G. Haskell, Llewellyn A. Hautau, John D. Healy, Ken- neth P. Hill, Ronald S. Hind, Chester W. Holmes, Roy A. Irvine, Ralph E. Johannesen, Harold A. Kean, Henry R. Knyzewski, Gregory L. Koelzer, Nelson W. Kropik, Joseph L. Kwence, Aloysius J. I.aCourse, Jack Lazowsky, Glenn G. Leckner, Harold L. Lemmer, Raymond J. Lewis, George J. McAndrew, James McCann, Edward F. MacDonald, Donald P. McGinty, Samuel McNish, Edward F. McDonald, Richard V. Magner, Steve Matousek. Edward Maxwell, Michael J. Mazur, Gustave H. Meyner. Frank Moehart. Aubrey Mooring, Crowder Mosely, Frank W. Mullen, James F. Murphy, Har- old M. Neibauer, Clarence J. Northwood, Era M. Otermat, Louis R. Padberg, Andrew S. Papp, Nat H. Peet. John I. Pennel, Oliver H. Perreault, Walter L. Potoczak, Furman O. Price, William F. Rater- man, Louis G. Richter, Victor A. Roudoy, Arthur J. Schwartz, Edwin T. Schwartz, Joseph C. Slater, Ladislaus F. Smetek, Frank E. Smith, Harry C. Smith, Reginald L. Smith, Arlo H. Sprunger. Alvin F. Staub, Frank Stawski. Cyril P. Svobada, Philip A. Tannian, Albert D. Townsend, Catalino V. Velasquez, Alfred C. Waggoner, William L. Wainright, Paul V. Weaver, Fred L. West, Cecil Wright, Harold R. Wright, Stanley Yagiela, Phil- lip B. Zoufal, Edward J. Zezula. Pre-Juniors-Armand A. Beltramo, Francis E. Bettiga, Caesar Binkowski, Charles F. Bischoff, Jef- ferson D. Bloom, Freeman W. Brozo, Wallace Ceg- larek, Arsenio M. Columma, Joseph P. Creagh. John H. Crist, Robert C. Crouch, James R. Custer, Anthony J. Daddona, Arnold Davidson, Charles W. Davies, Robert E. Davis, John J. DeMunnik, Roger- YA21 5? 'Nc 3-I in ui. Wfo 'ta .9 vw W f1fw.,,,Sl3 il it .N 3 8 f 9, 4 affirm? 511211 K wa" ' . . Bl?-9 j ll 3 5 is ell. 'Q 25 Q 5 ,-P EJ-32 S V sl Ffa' "Wi la - ,.1f9X THE i930 TOWER I KM - 9, - .35 i : li -1- -' i- -k : 6. 'fri' ' A ' f'-fl' 'ahhh Exits' VY PM-2 T ' X. na Nil? 4? N if "img: 3835 5 G' DePalma, Edmund J, Dombrowski, Frank Doyle. Glenn F. Doyle, Ledru W. Garrett, Robert A. Gill, Robert Harshbarger. Lemuel J. Homant, Leonard H. Hovey, Harry M. Huntt, Alex J. Junker, Ira D. Kingsley, James E. Kirwin, Alfred E. Lanigan, Francis J. Leamon, Edward G. Lehr, William D. McFarrin, Cletus C. McMullen, J. Fred McRoberts, Dan J. MacGillis, Thaddeus J. Machczhinski, Ralph J. Martin, Joseph Matyas, Harry A. Meyer, George Millman, George D. Morell, Henry T. Murphy, Maurice A. Netherland, Clarence G. Ozar, Albert Pearl, Thomas J. Ryan, Roman L. Mills, H. Sam- pey, Ralph B. Scott, Fred Shapoe. Bernard H. Sharkey, Frank J. Wirwaitis, Walter J. Sneider, Val C. Sontag, John W. Sparks, Frederick B. Sturm, S. Sunders, John H. VonRosen, Albert L. Wernette, Howard C. Zintz. Juniors-Thomas Castonquay, Fabian P. Check- al, Ralph A. Clark, Murray J. Decker, George E. Fairclough, Joseph Fishman, Joseph L. Fowler, Alfred Greifzu, Tilford Jewell, Christopher Peters, Morris R. Pierson, Leslie L. Rubinstein, Glen A. Smith, George F. Trudell, George Zernitsky. Freshmen-Everett Anderson, Albert J. Assessor, Palmer L. Auker, John T. Baker, Henry C. Bald- win, Lee R. Barnum, Dudley P. Bartlett, Marcel F. Bellehumeur, George E. Bockrath, Glellno P. Boehm, Bernard L. Bopp, Harry H. Brenner, Mil- lard M. Burg, Fausto S. Camon, Arthur B. Camp- bell, Walter G. Campbell, John M. Clark, Millard Clephane, Thomas J. Connolly, Melvin W. Corbin, Paul C. Costigan, Paul Cru, Hollis DeGrassi, Adolph Drum, Robert S. Dunnebacke, Abundio E. Ecevido, William B. Farrow, Edgar L. Felten, El- dred J. Flemming, William J. Ganley, Thomas F. Gignac, James C. Graham, James E. Gray, C. Leland Gunn, Robert E. Gurney, Thomas J. Guyor, Ben C. Haberek. Frederick E. Hellner, Thomas W. Hite, John E. Howland, Francis V. Hunter, Clifford Jackson, James G. Jackson, Ed- ward J. Jungbert, Albert P. Kelush, Thomas C. Kent, Paul Klain, Robert G. Lake, Orlando H. Lamsens. John M. McCann, David K. McGafiin, James J. Mclntyre, Kenneth G. MacEachern, Donald M. MacGregor, Carl W. Mantyla. Howard A. Markey, Robert E. Marsh, Arthur B. Martin, Ray- mond A. Meng, Estok Menton, Frank T. Mikolas, Fred J. Mikolas, Alfred H. Moore, Jerry G. Mudie, Harold E. Nelson, Robert J. Nestor, Vincent A. Nichols, Hugh M. O'Connor, Victor W. Ogden, Roman J. Paluch, James G. Perini, Robert G. Pier- lott, Charles L. Pierson, Karl H. Pigman, Charles E. Poirier, John J. Polakowski, Steve S. Pomykal- ski, Francis E. Ratermann, Michael A. Remondino, Karel Ricica, Romolo Rigotti, Joseph P. Roche, John Rosenberger, Robert W. Roth, Stanley F. Rozcycki, John A. Russ, Louis A. Ryan, Angelo C. Savas, Arthur E. Scala, Ewald F. Scheiwe, Wil- liam F. Sherman, Stanley S. Sigur, Joseph Sinder. Henry C. Smith, John J. Soboleski, Alpha L. Spears, David G. Staub, Robert J. Sullivan, Oren K. Thacher, Bibiano A. Timada, Milton lx. Toles, Eugene D. Tressenberg. Joseph J. Tlica, Jack G. Unger, Myrton Vandemeer, George H. Wade, William G. Warnock, Bernard T. Wilson. Clark W. Woolnough, Richard R. Zanotti, Philip Zmijewski. FOREIGN TRADE Mark E. Goddard, Leo J. McGauley, Armand E. Michon, Nicholas Saravolatz. LAW Freshmen-f-Edwin P. Dowd, Ned R. Fitzpatrick, James E. Frazer, Ruth F. Peters. Angelo Petracci, Irving Radner, Joseph D. Seyburn. Edmund Stel- maszczuk, John D. Sullivan, John K. Weadock. Sophomores-Frederick G. Allyn, Mary A. Kur- zatkowski, Thomas C. Murphy. Lynn B. Navarre. Juniors--Thomas J. Carrigan, Doris Cecil, Fred J. Dunne, Gerald O. Labadie, Milton L. Middleton, Peter J. Nolan, Adeline Pacevich, Emmett E. Sul- livan, Thomas G. Ward. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Freshmen-Charles E. Bamford, Clifford W. Barry, Harold F. Beaver, Patrick Boylan, Joseph A. Brereton, Edward S. Brisbois, James H. Buis- sono, Clarence E. Carothers, Joseph F. Cornell, Lynn R. Cummings, James W. Cunningham, John M. DeBona, Don C. DeSpelder, Aurelia H. Dett- loff, Edward F. Donner, Paul B. Fisher, Robert G. Funni, Elmer W. Gruss, Douglas Harrington, Joseph L. Wersching, William J. Himmels, Leo J. Hinz, James M. Kohl, Bert J. Kuhlman, Leo G. Lepham, Francis J. Liberty, Louis H. Lindeman, Christopher C. Lough, Lester F. Malhoyt, Justin H. Marcero, Warren C. Norris, Joseph J. O'Leske, William C. Osborn, Julius Rothenburg, William H. Ryan, Vincent Seethaler, Harold Sherman, Leon- ard Simon, John D. Stackpoole, Lloyd B. Tem- nant, Mae B. Voss, Don F. Wells, Louis C. Wurzer. Sophomores-William P. Chowning, Edwin W. Fuller, Oscar M. Grammens, Roland S. Haight, John T. Hauck, Alvin R. Holstein, Robert Mans- Held, James N. Marple, Clemens F. Meier, Joseph S. O'Brien, Max Radom, Leo G. Schulte. William C. Simpson, Herbert M. Spencer, John C. Van- Doemel. Juniors-Albert J. Burch, Warren Crocker, Charles P. Flynn, Franklin C. Haupt, Wardell C. Jaegers, J. Jerome Jordon, Patrick J. McDonnell, Charles W. Miller, Helen A. Minch, James H. Ryan, Elmer F. Ulrich, Gilbert G. Walters. all Ir ra S f U f 'wg , .V KQXXQQQ rife-4:5 52.253 . ,zu-Nafy f 3 1 ,, N , 'g P 2 il.-if ,. M1311 Q 1 , I W f It A Inman? , it ,ry ff" tw ge 3' A Q A.-ir-sift 3 ' assseaaiiiif l ag e '..IIll 1 W tt 5 t if M' t tf ,..,. A ltr! IfInlAlTlQlf n tt :my , WV I V , , MIN ' fi .itll . ll t its ZXXSWIXXXHJNIS 1X!K,2X!gJN!X JVX, 1 PUAQ Ogtinia yataer 0 ,Diva Hay: It was in the Tower of Pisa that Galileo demon- strated the theory of gravi- tation. He was but one of the many men of genius produced in his time, whose activities were watched by an interested public, and whose achievements formed a part of the quickening pulse of knowledge and culture. Here in Pisa a great event took place, and it crystallizes for us the spirit of earnest endeavor for the sake of accomplish- ment alone, a spirit which epitomizes the activity of our students. Qns JL W 03 at f ,D WITIITI B'il'xTni MMHV.--I an I 4 5 gf, or 451 Q : ' s YTTE E klfmllT1tIIIlIlj 'Hi im M l IH' M fc, ,Q . 1 . li t l E Q3 p-1 v-1 QS 'E ' If QW -ace K9 I 2 'Yu' f,1A AI'-5""y fMf'iC 2SQ2a- ,H--Q A lf? A 3 A ,fluff-'s.:a.,s.mI.,y1Ma1y.Xa.f..a f fm .E f K "'A I 1 , I ,I ' f I f XYf'v,'fXY'CQ'V N' '55 vw ,Y ' Ax TWV' ' ' Q H fff ff 6 -566 Q ffsfjcb ,fg'3.g,mI I"S?33'Q-2" z 146'-'555 5 5 8? 20550 I III . f 'J Q I? M 0 ,MI M 1'vXI1vx Jvx .fxjggxfx YJNISV Jxfxvzxfx AA Izvx t ACTIVITIES ' 4, A Ii --' ' sq V - 6 .ln A v Q , . J. -, X 5 L "1 r .Y I I J' 'u ' .' ' " 'T ' 'iff I . Q 4 . . . 'ir ,I al X ,D ' ' f ,Jn ' -,f I ' ' ' 4 1 Q 4 '4 '4 ,- . 'ff L- . L' ' :JI - , -... 5 + Ef3": - H' .Q 'js' 4 - '- .Elly ', T ' 5 u' ' 5591 1-' ,1 we x'f-I - - lt, 4 J... - 'A' -' ax .L fa, N W 5 '-gr ,Rl gf.- X . Y 1-riff, +2 I JM ',..7' vru .V .Q ' '1",,-!tv1.." 'w A l 1 .v ,g"g:.? , n . .1 - ' 5 4 - ' 4 V, ' ' ' 'i ' 'I 0' . ,' "I QL 'AQ '- ' 1 '55-f.' I - if ' ' i A1 , Tfl . , ,M . ,b 1' ' "-x'. O' I , Qu I I ,'I' ,' f' gy , V 1, ,V':i..,. , ' ,, , . , 'QE Y . -1 . ' . 4 V j ,G ya .: - .-- -. 1 ,. W , .- wh , -5 , E.-, . g '1: 3-'. g." I ' 'QT' , 'I - ' '7 I ' .,' 'Q Q - .Qui t- Y ' 'I' ' .. V -3, 1-A x 1.-1 f-fm.: f , .xgr el ffl- rl f. v,r - -1, 'fl' -.:"Y ' - 1? 1- ,, , ' kffr' if ' - I '--E: I "WL - ',:'J.:gtf.'1-N ' 'h In Y Q ' U ' S15-, 'jf Y.. if ,:. .. -3 ', A , 1 - -- ,. U f. .-me , W., YA, ,gp-,, V. .. .. Y. - ne, rl. .Q 1' ,',. 4,1 V ' xi. L - T. ..L 'b 16:1 - P 0, b ' a .I 1 Q- ., L LM l, " ' Q1.,':f" 31 1:5 ' - " I' -' Lili: .A l , 1. .9 A - ,. ': Lv g .E . ' -. 5-W I ' - - ' A' if JH - x :.L 4 f ,., 1 U, i rr -r ', -V H ' L l f. -1- .w '+ h 1-:Tit -In db-,y I , - e : Sad 1: W' Hz" ,. 1 .r.ms.f W' u " ' P I G3 "A 7 1 I . -yu . V .. .f I . J r ' - FY' 1 ' 1, 0 'O-' Sq. 4, '- F ,fy v T .. ai P n -5 I ze,-3 I Q? D 4. b Q1 r y v '1 QQ J I 1 gr .iQ-Wig 5 V sw' X ,Q :T?: K 5 5 5 W Q Sew? f X f U59 9 17 QQ gf CWD 0459 jQmz71zk'!7fczz'z'022 Qfggxh Jn:-Sc4c'f".m.sQ-asf-3fab,1,, ,,-,-53.23-,g : fe' 1930 T A THE, OWER 1 1 T1 TT 1 W Eisxlinvbi 51 0 kd 1 A We .Fi .s i N Q-S5 2 UNION BOARD OF GOVERNORS NATHAN B. GOODNOW, President. JOHN T. SOLEAU, Vice-President. ARNOLD J. MITTIG, Secretary. EDMOND J. OTTENBACHER, Treasurer. REPRESENTATIVES William P. Murphy, Engineering Section A. Joseph A. Fisher, Engineering Section B. John A. Galbo, Arts and Science. Homer C. Slonaker, Night Commerce and Finance. John A. Ratcliffe, Dag Commerce and Finance. William F. Wagner, Dag Law. Richard J. Sullivan, Afternoon Law. HE Union Board of Governors, which guided the destinies of the Union during the year 1929-30, has accomplished a year of intense and suc- cessful labor in behalf of the Union and the university. They set a record for efiiciency, such as has seldom been equaled and one which is a fitting ex- ample for future boards to emulate. With representatives from all Depart- ments on the Board, every undertaking was begun only after its usefulness to the student body was completely estab- lished. This method of conducting business affairs made the Union a truly student affair. The rooms of the Union House on Fairfield Avenue have been completely redecorated and refurnished during the past year. Valuable additions have been made to the Jefferson Avenue branch, which greatly added to the comfort and pleasure of the students on the downtown campus. Add to these expenditures the substantial payments made on the Fairfield Avenue property and the student body can gain a slight conception of the magnificent Work done by this administration in their be- half. The outstanding projects sponsored by the Union during the past year were is it if 924 Z , I it "2 Pig 22 ..- X ,gb 'fp' -:El er fa Goodnow Soleau i H Mirrig Ottenbacher the fourth annual Union Opera Hello Fisher s!f"'oW'f Jimi? 4 116 ll l Q. 1 5 if 1 uj cf . QQ Q n S. Q Qu, Z3 qv' l' H is wx? ff3Kg15"5.JE,25jX1,if" l A ru ,g I 3 T 1, U-.' Q:l? 5. 71 '4 A ci L..0,'fLX 2 THE OWER c : lv Ag- 'ii ig : - g v G , 611101 Stranger," and a banquet tendered to the personnel of last year's opera who did so much to make the production the success it was. This year the Union produced the finest opera of its career. Ably handled, loyally supported, and successfully presented, "Hello Stranger" far surpassed its predecessors and was a fitting token of the great body which sponsored it. Not everyone realizes what an impos- ing undertaking is the annual Opera, and any credit that is given the Board is deserved. Weeks of hard work and worry are put into the preparation for the presentation, and the triumph is short-lived, indeed, in comparison to the energy expended. The Board is a real leader in student activities, and an indispensable partof the school life as the staging of the Opera amply proves. During the past year the Union sup- ported all the class dances. These dances were high -lights in the social life of the university and this season the functions were especially brilliant. The Frosh Frolic, the Soph Snowball, the glorious J-Hop, all owe much of their success to the Union and to the Board of Governors of that organization. The minor events given by the Union dur- ing the past year have been numerous. Realizing the desire of the students for an outlet of their exuberance after see- ing the Titans crush their opponents, small dancing parties were given at Gesu Hall after the night football games of early season. As we glance back over the history of the Union since its inception in 1918, the fact which most interests the student body is that through this or- ganization the students of the different departments of the university have been brought into more intimate contact with one another and have laid the founda- tion of what will be an enduring school spirit in the years to come. Undoubted- 'ZF 1 if N915 gf lg, J 5123 6' v Q a -' M732 E ly, the Union Board has Hrmly en- Galbfg Murphvf h d - If - h Ratcliffe Slonaker trenc e itse 1n t e campus 1 e. Wagner f if aaa N V' Glgiis i-Faffl H1173 ,,,l....l .v af Wi is A Q85 2 5 5' 5725336 'W ' . 6 , -. , 3 1 3 O T if 7 4 .0 qfo X T S' 1 , r ss vii? 'emit r uff ACTIVITIES HONOR SOCIETY LEO T. SI-IUBNELL, President. CLARENCE J. KUMMER, Vice-President. JOHN E. COLLINS, Secretary, JERRY J. DONOVAN, Treasurer. LEO J. ANDRIES. RALPH C. JOHNSTON. NICHOLAS J. WAOENER. JOHN B. LABADIE. F. LLOYD BRAZIL. ARMELLA C. ERIEDL. RALPH W. BOONE. JosEPH W. STARRS. FRANK E. JENNEY. VERY great university has an or- ganization Which e v e r y active 9 student has a desire to be enrolled in and membership in which is a coveted honor. Such an organization is the Ac- tivities Honor Society, incorporated on the campus in 1928 by the Faculty Board of the university. The primary purpose of the society is to honor and to form a bond of relationship be- tween those students Who have excelled in the service of their school. Secondly, the society purposes to ably support every university activity and this pur- pose is doubly fulfilled because Of the fact that the members are represented in every university activity. The existence of the society on the campus forms a great incentive for the students to partake in all activities. Membership requirements are neces- sarily very strict, as becomes an organ- ization of this kind. Members are eligible for enrollment in this society when they have merited a certain number of honor points. Each activity is listed with a number of credit points which participation in it deserves and when a student has merited the number of points fixed he becomes eligible for membership. The members then place the names W as Ol?-2 J, L3 3 :ez H . A . IZ! Ja S Shubnell Kummer of the candidates before the Faculty COHWS Donovan Board of Control, and a vote is taken Andrles Boone tu" N9 S IIIISH 'K' fl 'JBA t .MHZ THE OWER s i s.. I1 ' ' 4 X ' UI .An , uf f x Lili 'li X-i X 2 15. rfb L 9' 8551 bf all 2 by this body on the desirability of the various students. When the student has been passed upon and his petition ac- cepted, an initiation is held and regular membership is tendered to the success- ful applicant. Only such extremely rigid eligibility requirements can make membership in the organization desir- able, and such is the purpose of the school in having them. The society had an active member- ship of thirteen students during the past year, and these members repre- sented every college of the university and membership in every activity in the school. During the past year two initiations were held for those members who had acquired the set amount of credit points. At the Hrst initiation held in the fall nine members were admitted. Ralph Boone worked on the "Varsity News" and TOWER staffs for two years, was a class officer for three years and a member of the J-Hop committee this year. Armella C. Friedl was a member of the "Varsity News" staff for three years, played basketball and acted as secretary of the Women's League for two years. Frank E. Jenny, member of the TOWER and "Varsity News" staffs, officiated as class oflicer for two years, assistant business manager of "Hoofs My Dear!" and as a member of the J-Hop committee of 1929. John B. Labadie was Varsity cheer leader for two years, Band Manager for three years, track letterman, and a member of the freshman football team. W. Joseph Starrs, editor of the "Varsity News" and secretary of "Hoofs My Dear!" was also Varsity track man- ager, class officer, and associate editor of the TOWER. In addition to these, William B. Gregory, Claire D. King and Miriam L. Russell underwent the initiation ceremonies at Webster Hall and were presented with their keys by Dr. Mutt- i NN R "1 L my ML QW? W' 'iv - - - - - Brazil Friedl kovgfsiki. A second initiation was held Jamey Johnston 111 Ely. Labadie Starrs Wagener i-lar' A "51lN'H'! rifffiifil 'fi-?'3Af'2 l'i?m ' I 'rl 5 gy,.t.lg, 119 A" ' " 'U f 'S X- A kd 5 f' N I . J N THE 1930 TOWER V KX I 'c A ' 4' T- ' si- 1 'allrii ?LiU'75'l FACULTY BOARD ON STUDENT i ORGANIZATIONS REV. JOSEPH Jf SCOTT, S.J., Chairman. RICHARD A. MUTTKOWSKI, Secrerary. REV. ORMOND P. D'HAENE, S.J. FLORENCE E. DONOHUE. JOSEPH A. LUYCKX. WILLIAM B. O'REGAN. BERT N. BLAKESLEE. PAUL P. HARBRECHT. LOUIS E. MCCLEAR. HE Faculty Board in Control of Student Activities is an organiza- tion comprised of nine members of the university faculty who act as an ad- visory board for all student organiza- tions and scholastic events. It is the faculty board which solves the mani- L fold problems arising d u r i n g the ' 4 scholastic year, and it is due to the in- , .iq telligent advice of this organization that l X there is a minimum of discord in cam- p Q pus activities. 555 G Since it is necessary for every new y ffb fiakvg organization to receive the sanction of ,QVJQQ may the faculty board before it can assume a place on the campus, only the worthy fig-J J organizations are registered on the uni- f, 51 versity roll. It is a great problem to ia superintend the activities of every cam- pus body, but the faculty board has taken up this task so efficiently that the student body can be proud of every organization on the campus. Another of the duties of the faculty board is to supervise all the class dances. It is the duty of this body to see that the dances are handled by capable stu- dents, to see that the dates of these af- fairs do not conflict with any other campus activities. A member of the board is included on every dance com- mittee so that sound and immediate ad- vice can be tendered to those placed in charge of the event. lt is a generally Scott Muttkowski conceded fact that the class aH'airs of DIHMW Blakeslee the past year have surpassed all records i7"'ffWZ 5355333 ll IIIZOH C QQ, Flax- A ' " A '- -mg ,379 WE '930 TOWER fri ? a ' 'H' 'x '1 v 0 dh-B 12.118 Il 141 of success in the annals of the univer- sity, and to the faculty board is due a part of the credit for these outstanding successes, for it was through the untir- ing efforts and sound advice of this body that each class of the pasr year formed a reputation of success for itself in the social life of the university. This board also sees that all social legislation drawn up by the inter-fra- ternity council is for the improvement of the student body at large, and in this manner there is no partiality shown to any one organization. It is always with the entire student body in mind that the faculty board approves or rejects any new legislation. Much of the success of the various R student activities of the university, par- Y ticularly those of a social nature, is due L to the advice and regulation offered by R 4 the faculty board. Father Scott was in A ,G attendance at almost every rehearsal of H, the Union Opera, and contributed in may pp many ways not commonly advertised N to the production of this annual dra- matic enterprise. The fraternities of the :x ii campus have a true friend in Dr. Mutt- kfij kowski whose experience with the J 24 brotherhoods of other campuses makes , ,S him especially able to make helpful sug- gestions. The advances made in the or- ganization of campus fraternities dur- ing the past few years have been in a large measure due to the effective plans outlined by the secretary of the faculty board. Co-operating with the inter- fraternity council, the faculty board has if rendered great service to every organiza- tion in the university. The work of the faculty board dur- ing the past scholastic year in the gov- erning of student activities is realized when one considers the orderliness with which all activities have progressed. The student organizations possess in X the faculty board a tempering and ' stabilizing influence which insures efli- ' cient progress. Donohue Harbrechr Luyckx O'Regan X ft. 461:92 l H1213 Ou: wa ,4 Qggxw V433 ffZdE'X.sJs-eng J Y 'l?!.,-0-1 k.-o,.1"gg,a: V wr- 1930 TOWER f""1H " ' : 'Q-L f ig! ll .G 5 R855 i rimliwkw' 5,82 f it-2359 '18 JF R Pequegnot Bernard Cross Schulte Friedl Bauser WOMEN'S LEAGUE LUCIE R, PEQUEGNOT, PrQSlldf?r7Z'. FLORENCE M. BERNARD, First Vice-President. EILEEN K. CRoss-, Second Vice-President. VERA C. SCHULTE, Recording Secretary. ARMELLA C. FRIEDL, Corresponding Secretary. DOLLY M. BAUSER, Treasurer. N every co-educational university the Women's League is an essential part of the student life of every Woman. It serves as an aid to the freshmen par- ticularly, and is an ever-ready source of advice to all co-eds, as Well as providing a medium for the girls to meet and be- come acquainted with one another. The social season of the League be- gan with a meeting and informal re- ception sponsored by the Senior girls as a welcome to the new students. Miss Lucie Pequegnot, in a short speech, gave the Freshmen to understand that the upperclassmen were Willing to lend their assistance in every way possible. At this meeting plans were made for the annual I-lallowe'en dance, which later proved to be one of the most suc- cessful dances ever given by the women students. Various meetings were held through- out the year, each meeting having as its hostess the Junior, Sophomore, and Freshmen classes respectively. The final social event of the year was an informal dance given at the Masonic Temple on the evening of May Znd. The Belle I-lop marked a fitting and brilliant close to one of the most successful years of this Women's institution. During the year three alumni stu- dents of the League were awarded life membership certificates: namely, Mrs. Alean B. Clutts, prominent attorney in Detroit, Miss Constance T. Maier and Miss Petronilla Joachim. Under the leadership of Lucie Pe- quegnot, the Women's League has pro- gressed in a most satisfactory manner. H122 W bd Q t WJ 4.-' Q . Sw 3 v 3 -R cl'-99 S cfs awp filifg, ii, , x. ,UK BM In 5 cfh "' z 2 , wi We 2 :JE-:ga ez-it-.2'mses,gg 9 -ss ?! F "Vi 4 - THE i930 TOWER 5L Qkw... H ' ' 4 T ' Q11 A I ,Q 1? ATHLETIC BOARD REV. MARK E. GROSS, S. J., Faculty Moderator. LEO J. NEBEL, Chairman. M. CLEMENT BUTLER, Treasurer. WENDELL HALL, Alumni Member. JAMES M. BRENNAN, Student Member. KENNETH R. FOURNIER, Student Member, JOHN D. MALONE, Student Member. HE Athletic Board of Control, is the "back-stage" body responsible for much of the success of the univer- sity's athletic teams. lt is a business corporation upon which fall the finan- cial and business responsibilities of Titan projects. ln its hands are placed the reins of government over athletics. it approves schedules and frames policies and executes them to the best advan- tage of university and students alike. Coaches' salaries, equipment expendi- tures, the stadium debt and the athletic expansion policy of the university all are handled by the Board. Throughout the University of De- troit's most trying years with compara- tively fruitless efforts for athletic pres- tige, the Athletic Board adhered to its rigid-policies. It tried gamely to make of Titan aggregations, real formidable outfits. It procured efficient coaches and equipment and in every way possible encouraged students to participate in athletic contests. Finally after years of effort it was rewarded with the success of the Titans. The Board is satisfied with the results. The membership of the Board is re- stricted to one faculty member, three alumni members and three student members. Fr. M. Gross, S. J., is the faculty representative. Leo J. Nebel. well known in university alumni circles. is chairman of the Board. Other alumni members are M. Clement Butler, treas- urer, and Wendell Hall. James M. Brennan, a student member, is sec- retary of the Board. Kenneth Fournier . ... . Q.. W MJT L I rllgy . 3 x . Q id , si' 6 ,za 'U and John Malone are the remaining grass gurler 3 ICIIHZII two student members. Fournier Malone f I is 'dye 'fe e'.X'.a,s3 V, wifi Q3 ie, f' ', A? -Q V , If T. Ti Z txxqle. 123 fffx me L emi' H A XX f lf3.,iT. fi N f g TQWER IQ? in W l NOW 'ELEM XT' V gg fn im Q I mf' L f , s'mAm.sa . fx bb +. f z ay? X A J f P Lia Q33 , .SEX X1 uw? Q5 Q X , 'Q as .AL 5, X mf ' Q v C Q W df Hb Q3 Lgigflx ' f ' -I 7 ' SQ W HJ G? 1 939 j df ww 9904 5 fzbcz Zioivf lf -4554 Qixmft' QM - s r- J ' -1 4 Q THE '930 TOWER - 773 1, Y : g A1-Li Ti - in 4532 ' f' Ill I cs? S f. 581 2 THE 1930 TOWER JOHN TREEN, EG'tIOt' FLORENCE M. BERNARD, Business Manager PAUL E. TI-IEILEN, 'Managz'ng Editor JOHN C. CAHALAN, Associate Editor THOMAS A. POLLEY, Associate Editor C. CARROLL NUSSEY, Associate Editor JAMES M. BRENNAN. Art Editor JAMES HOBAN, Photography Editor JOHN S. MALLEY, Sports Editor JAMES HAGGERTY, Assistant Sports Editor ALBERT J. NAGLER, Assistant Sports Editor REV. ORMOND P. D'HAENE. Faculty Moderator REPORTERS Thomas J. Burke Henry S. Wich Eilleen K. Cross John E, Young Marie H. Bunetta M. Lucille Sullivan Fred W. Lyons Bernard V. Corbett Julius J. McClain John E. Holland HE place of the TOWER in univer- sity life is seldom properly under- stood. Its outward duty, to record the student life from year to year, is evi- dent. But the value of this record and its importance in future years is not often emphasized. Someone has said that the best means of remembering anything is to write it down. And it is the TOWER that is the memory of the university. Printed in a form that is beautiful and that conveys more to the reader than mere fact, it presents the panorama of each year's events for present students to remember and future students to read for counsel and guidance. The TOWER is the bearer of the uni- versity's tradition. The customs, the forms, and events of each succeeding year are built upon it. It is only with repetition that tradition grows, and the traditions of today were planted in the yearbooks of yesterday just as the tra- ditions of the future will be founded at bs nc! 7 ' i-,, gt . Q75 i s gre? 5. on the records of the present. Treen Bernard Theilen Boone a- F' 'ft'-gf ,Lass s t ff - t H126 f 175' "sq 44- . sffga THE i930 TOWER qw ? ' - TT A-i TT 6 4 H eb , YC! if 4 Q' ii t - ss .2 The reference book of student activ- ity is the TOWER. For in it are con- tained the records of success and failure. The work of every organization and the means of its operation are recorded here. What better counsel can the suc- cessors to these organizations in the future receive than to inspect the accur- ate report of their predecessors. The staff has attempted to eliminate from this volume its own opinions, and bequeath thereby a true and accurate record. It has sought out those inci- dents and events which illustrate best the spirit of the university. It is the sincere hope of the staff of the 1930 TOWER that they h a v e gathered herein a true and complete record of the year, that this annual will take its place as the reference book of university activity and form a link in that chain of books which tell the story of the progress of Alma Mater. Choosing a staff for the yearbook constitutes a great task each year. To find student writers capable of artistic and accurate work, and who are willing to give their time to this enterprise, is an obstacle difficult to surmount. The TOWER work requires the best journal- istic and organization talent the uni- versity possesses. To find this talent among the modest and retiring mem- bers of the student body is hard. The staff this year was chosen for its record in journalistic work. Some were members of the Varsity News organiza- tion-others were veterans of last year. As a whole, however, the staff was se- lected from new material which was to Q 2 ' lil, Q ew' :ze t l be organized and trained for future pub- lication work at the university. There are probably few other activi- ties at the university that offer the mani- fold personal benefits that accrue from training in journalistic work. Facility of expression and keen observation are but two of many qualities that may be ac- quired from practice of this nature. Exilim ll 32 Q wil. ll 127 Kiwis '9'M1i?f'B?ili I 1 .P 1-'55 i,Jf,Nx r . -,K W THE i930 TOWER C 'allfai T CIRCULATING THE TowER ov ,ew LW r X .G .SEQ eg'- fl RALPH XV. BOONE, Circulation Manager RosELLA M. PELTIER, Assistant Circulation Mgr. STAFF Earl J. Demeleski John B. Cmirardin Bernard J. Chapman IGI-IT years ago the University of Detroit issued its Hrst annual, the Red and White, to replace the small pictorial published each June. In December, 1928, the Board of Governors of the Detroit Union suc- ceeded in having a "Tower Fee" added to the regular tuition stipend at the beginning of the second semester. Hav- ing a definite source of revenue and witnessing the success of last June's issue, the 1930 TOWER Staff pro- ceeded without hesitation to plan a better and more complete annual. An increased enrollment in the uni- versity increased the problems of the circulation department. H o W e v e r , thoroughness a n d efficiency marked every move of that department in plac- ing in the hands of the students a treas- ure of memories of their college days in a university worthy of their loyalty and continued love. When the TOWER was late in pub- lication, a new difliculty of great pro- portion was encountered-and that seems the fate of a circulation staff, difii- culty. How to get the yearbook to those who have left school for the year, some forever? It is interesting to note the many ruses employed by the circulators to accomplish this task. Mailing was but one of many. Addresses, especially correct ones, were hard to get. That is but one way-there were many others used by those genii of mass distribution, the circulation staff. They work hard and do their work in the best way possible under the conditions with Mauey N I which they are confronted, which is all 3 CI' Haggerty Breinan that may be asked of them. 53Z't'f'6W' ,. ,- , 554511 N 'ffl hvl. I 1"fi-Y, A53 iw J- . 7 H128 fs fsvlg Ha S Elf :sei 4 9, -Ze lie' E 546.44 fd . 'i - N M23 2 mp. 'QS Q' alll-D S H 7iKfJu"'Qgx-if O " C . l- -I 5 aft!-X' :jf ef Rf fgyqcq la 4- '. T ER SL N 6? A 930 T A "img ,Ks '41 cfgx Q HE I OW Q dk.. THE VARSITY NEWS W. JOSEPH STARRS, Editor. PHILIP STACKPOOLE. Managing Editor. ALBERT J. NAGLER. Assistant Managing Editor. PAUL E. THEILEN. News Editor. CLARENCE J. KUMMER, Associate Editor. JOHN C. CAHALAN, Associate Editor. C. SCOTT HOWARD, Sports Editor. BAYARD K. KURTH, Feature Editor. LEO J. ANDRIES, Fraternity Editor. JAMES M. BRENNAN, Art Editor. REV. ORMOND P. D'l'lAENE. SJ., Faculty Moderator. REPORTERS Edward M. Andries Thomas J. Burke Ralph W. Boone John L. Cashin Eilleen K. Cross Marguerite M. Gahagan Howard A. Magrath Francis J. McDonnell George A. Miller Paul F. Bader Kenneth B. Myers Jack E. Young Harold C. Cross John F. Holland Robert A. Stefanowski Thomas C. Kent Thomas A. Polley John C1. Walsh Henry S. Wich Karl K. Wysong Charles E. Thornton M. Lucille Sullivan Fred W. Lyons James A. Haggerty ACH year sees a growth in the uni- versity which is little short of phenomenal. Students from every part of the United States, indeed from al- most every part of the civilized world, are beginning to know and at the same time to appreciate the University of Detroit. This Widespread popularity and prestige is due to many causes, foremost among which is the "Varsity News." A The "Varsity News," to a greater extent than any other medium, reflects the true spirit of the university. In it are contained evidences of that wonder- ful spirit which is animating the stu- dent body and which is noticeably present in each of its undertakings: ff 'x fi-1155 iff "Q vivid reproductions of athletic con- Starrs Stackpoole Nagler fide' 'Q af. 5" '. .4 iZ1'rFl1f1 'fi - 4 ggi.. 129 M2 gf S. I 'Si 2 9564 tt-P L Qggiww '7f.vYQ"F!.."9J2S?S,gM 9 - s F' "' " -Q 4 '- . .ffm THE V930 TOWER r s.. Hg ' 'Ai 'X ' gil tests: and a clear and orderly record of every student activity. It acts, too, as a unifying influence. Because of its wide circulation and uni- versal appeal it draws together the dif- ferent units and makes of them one unified whole. To accomplish the all- important ends mentioned above and to perform countless other integral duties it is es- sential that the "Varsity News" have a large and efficient staff. This staff is carefully chosen from the student body and to it falls the task of editing the paper. The work often necessitates staying up of half the night and mak- ing sacrifices, but the efforts of the staff are at once apparent in the never-fail- ing excellency of the "Varsity News." The business of news-gathering is a , difficult one at the University of Detroit. The tendency of the various colleges and W CJ, departments is to draw within them- 656 selves, and consequently to keep what 0 N they know and do to themselves. It is 29555 6 the reporter's job to seek out these mod- g a? 1? - est people and make known their activi- azx l ga MM . 5-r.t'JZ ties to.th,e student 'body through the 0,14 universitys mouthpiece. It becomes a id 21 hard job when they receive little co- ,Q operation, and sometimes violent rebuffs from the persons they approach. Another difficulty is encountered by the editors in making assignments. This job requires imagination and a good nose for news, Many good stories are lost by the fact that members of the de- partments do not seek reports of their doings in the Varsity News-and the editors cannot know everything. On the whole the reporting and editing of the oflicial university paper has greatly improved this year. A greater and more comprehensive variety of activities receive publicity. Improve- ment is possible still, but it may safely be said that the 1930 staff of the H P M Varsity News has done exceedingly well. Theilen Cahalan Kummer Howard 'T"'f?"'S ?F'f575' ll H130 J o 'gf L5 t l ui .i Q. f" an 'N J , v A P' N I4 A A S Laika THE WEP Izkw.. 'Kiki - TTT T-T - ' GTTS' C' I b Q W gl! CIRCULATING THE VARSITY NEWS LEO T. SI-IUBNELL. Circulation Manager FRANCIS A. STARRS. Assistant Cl-l't'UlGlliOH Mgr STAFF Albert F. Flemming Edward F. Majeske Harold B. Wilkins NCREASED enrollment in the uni- versity did not make easier the task of circulating the "Varsity News." When one realizes that copies must be placed in the hands of all students and faculty members in every department as well as the alumni the difficulties en- tailed may be estimated. Leo Shubnell, manager of circula- tion again this year, cared for this task through the distribution system devised by him last year. Too little thought is given to the labor which he and his energetic assistants expend that each student may be made aware of "news- of-the-week" in the university. The particular diiliculties of two di- visions in the Engineering College and reaching the alumni were overcome by the establishment of a mailing depart- ment. Supplying the alumni with the Var- sity News each week almost doubled the circulation and greatly increased the Work of the staff. Shubnell was as- sisted by Jay Maley, secretary to the president, in this work. As a result, the university and the alumni have realized a desire of many years. The old gradu- ates will now be kept in touch with the progressive events of Alma Mater, and a unity of effort should result that will prove of great benefit to the university as a whole. The work of the circulation staff this year has been particularly efhcient, and its members deserve commendation for a work that is not usually popular or credited with any extraordinary public recognition. Little credit and many , 3.5, 4411? X af 1:28225-IZ',f.' .Zvi Ng an lx. tb 5. 2, 3 JW, W S , , Andries Kurth complaints are the ordinary lot. Brennan Shubnell fqnra '-2 'Al- zivfvifi Gfd-f .U f f Q Jfycfjm H1313 ,,.,, Y 'Cf' 3 "' WMYX. " f 291 . f," , ' T' " .5 .I 5 ff A I f M ,M 5 1 W I Q, QW af 4 1 Qv 9 v G9 , 1 +. FJ N 53 x if r gg J, G3 L C EDI W K ,W fig -4 'f Fa L 61? 9 Q QQ? YQ X gg K i n i ,1 -- A Q33 9 Qw LQLCQW mmol EJ WS 3 G", 5 I Q85 2 4581? sig-g,,4te:,v:-x:"+s.sef,ab,u,, 47, 5135 , lf-!-""' ""-'of 1 THE mo TOWER I ke at S c : ,fe --x : g ?e.siT5' UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT UNION Dances SCENE SCENE SCENE SCENE SCENE SCENE SCENE SCENE Cl PRESENTS ITS FOURTH ANNUAL PRODUCTION HELLO STRANGERH AT SHUBERT-LAFAYETTE THEATRE APRIL 20-26 Book and Lyrics by .... JAMES SILAS POOLER Music by ......,.,...... JOSEPH KREKLOW and Staging by .... WILLIAM MCGURN Book directed by .... CHARLES LA DOUCEUR Singing Ensembles by ......... HARRY SEITZ Chairman, Opera Committee, I .FRANK POTTS SYNOPSIS OF SCENES ACT I 1-On deck S. S. "Olympic" bound for New York 2-Ellis Island Custom House 3-Tenement House in New York City 4-Cutting Plant in basement of Tene- ment House 5--The "Oaken Bucket" Cabaret ACT II 1-Park 2-Court Room 3-The Haute Monde Estate I MUSICAL NUMBERS OVERTURE Orchestra Directed by Winfred Weil ACT I OPENING CHORUS ........., Entire Ensemble "WHAT'S DA MAT" . Angela, Guido and Dancers "Too WONDERFUL" rMarie, Seamus and Singers QUINTETTE ...,................... , . ,Marie,Angela, Seamus, Guido and Shuffle HTENEMENT BABY" ,.,.. Shuffle and Dancers "FEELING 'THAT WAY FOR YOUH .... . . . . . . . . . .Marie, Seamus, Singers and Dancers ,Q , 2 IQ," ' ,I 'M E D 3 hx ik I NJ, QW! tw ta "CABARET" ............,..,..... Singers UPICKLE RHYTHM" ...... Shuffle and Dancers "DREAM BOY" .........,. Marie and Singers ACT II OPENING CHORUS ......... Entire Ensemble "I'M A SLEUTI-I" ,... Shuffle and Dancing Girls HRAINBOWSH. . . Marie, Seamus ana' Ensemble IIMAKE YOURSELF AT HOME,, ......... Judge and Mrs. Haute Monde and Ensemble EINALE ,................. Entire Company Potts Donovan Kreklow h w N,z'fa, - -eg.. 513411 . ,aa .elf - I A -, 9 1,2 R cs A Tell 2 54 G' Je-GJf.i.Ews3a9,k4 'X ' THE '930 TOWER r I x alll-D CAST OF CHARACTERS In Order of Their Appearance GUIDO SPINOZA ...,.....,,,, Joseph Tocco MATE ..........A,..... George McW1illiams GUSTAFF I-IOSSENPI-IEEFER ...,. George Nebus SI-IUFELE ..,.............,,. ,John Galbo ANGELA MONTRESSA ,... .... J oseph Nader CAPTAIN BLAKE ..e.. . . .Wana Holland I' SEAMUS O'NEIL .... ..., D avid Leahy MARIE PETITE, . . ,... Jack Teubert PIERRE PETITE ..4...... , . , ,Peter Wayne PHILIP PETERS ,........,. .Roland Denison JUDGE ROCKLIFFE HAUTE IVIONDE Girardin MRS. I-IAUTE MONDE ...I,.. Francis Pouliot ALOYSIUS KRPSKOWSKI ......... Mille Iwdrllrl KATHLEEN O'SI-IAUGI-INESSY. ,Ignatius Duggan GYPSY, .......I.......,.... James Ryan LANDLORD .... .I.... A lex Janher COP ....,. .... F rank Richards Q ' JUDGE . . . , .Walter Holland DANCING "GIRLS" Denton Fox, Larry Mohr. Jack Young. John Verbiest, Sol Stein, Newton Jackson. Clarence Whitston, Frank Longo. Clifford Morris, Ed- ward Smolky. Nicholas Chylinske, George Mc- Namara. DANCING BOYS John DeMunnik. Don Schilling, Phillip Zou fal, Alvin Staub, Sam Versaci. Arnold Schaal James Duncan, Jacob Kaduskin. David Staub, Joseph Brisson, Romer Stoiber, Marshall Bruce. SINGING "GIRLS" Charles Borchard, Stanley I-Iolwedel, Robert Beale, Gaylord Maben, Lawrence Clinton, Robert Powell, Tiffin Downs, Raymond Kelly, Floyd Borger, Louis Janecek, Burke Muldoon, Sam Cascarelli. SINGING BOYS . Roger Blandford, Stanley Stowski, Alfred DeRonne, Bromley Schuett, Harold Lemmer, Philip Paye, Victor Hartzell, Philip Mulligan, Paul Bader. Prank Drawe, Howard Ward, Jerry Denomme. SPECIALTY DANCERS Ray Olson, Zig Jassicke, Edward Noel. 47 my 'Q may Ae .QQ . ig , 'S All la 5' if f r QL A I S Pooler La Doceur McGurn Seitz yeffiw I, .mmg 'ffm GTQVRQ of M:-3 L, 'J V I 'rf-fail I 4. '- 513511 C G' p'9f."'-525-Wk'-?'5D 'E 3 'c ' 'N' ,fbv 1-HE i930 TOWER QL KN in W g , x : J P 47 3,12 ' "' nuff!" THE UNION OPERA Cr ELLO Stranger," the fourth 1 Gif Y? ,V ,s .i Q9 2 a 'cj ,K 1 Q33 3 IJ -4 l gf 3 :, F -x X Saw.. if ry ,Q ws' ,ifffws ,, Schorn Jenney Schechter Malley annual operatic venture of the Detroit Union, met the acclaim of critical Detroit as being one of the most successful student operas ever produced. In every musical venture as large as this one it is impossible to give credit to any one individual. As chairman of the opera, Frank J. Potts assumed the manifold burdens of this stupen- dous undertaking. Supporting the chair- man, experienced and zealous commit- tees planned and discharged their vari- ous duties. The direction was placed in the hands of Bill lVlcGurn who previously staged "Hoofs My Dear." He was as- sisted by Charles LaDouceur, who was in charge of the book and Harry Seitz, director of the Glee Club, who trained the singing chorus of twenty persons. Jim Pooler, an alumnus of the Uni- versity of Detroit, is the author of "Hello Stranger," which was a thrilling romance packed with adventure, love, and countless laugh-provoking situa- tions. John Galbo, in the role of "Shuffles," the sophisticated darky who tutors the credulous immigrants, again earns the merited praise of the dramatic critics. Once more We find Jack Teubert in the feminine le a d, playing the dainty French girl, Maric Petite, whose dark eyes and charming figure finally cap- ture the heart of Seamus. Seamus, the boy with the Irish brogue, was char- acterized by David Leahy in a manner Worthy of a professional. Pete Tocco, as Guido, and George Nebus, as Hos- senpheHer, gained many a laugh with their humorous anecdotes. The snappy tunes to which the men and "girls" danced and sang were composed by Joe Kreklow, S YQ Ti"f.Si n kg. wb il, f WP te 'J iI136ll Q cc fr' v 'N .J 1 v sehr "mbsf " 1 f' ' 'W I " Q Q . n ga? illlg'-11930 TOWE5 Sia n.. cg . 'tit-t j Q1 5 1' . 'ff -63 2 581 24 PRODUCTION PERSONNEL Frank J. Potts, Chairman James J. Britt, Assistant Chairman PRODUCTION Jerry Donovan, Production Manager William Wagner. Assistant Leo Shubnell. Cast Manager Mathew Gill. Chorus Manager David McHardy, Script Walter Keenan. Maxwell Laffrey, Properties Ralph Boone, Stage Technician TICKET SALES Frank Jenney, Karl Schechter, Chairmen Paul Conlan, Arts and Sciences James Haggerty, Day Commerce and Finance Joseph Bender, Night Commerce and Finance Arnold Mittig, Engineering Earl LaFaive, Morning Law George Francis, Evening Law James Troester Charles Thornton Earl Weber Edmund Finucane Robert Stefanowski ADVERTISING Philip Stackpoole, Chairman Albert Nagler Henry Wich BUSINESS Carl Schorn, Chairman Edward M. Andries, Assistant PROGRAM Leo J. Andries, Chairman Albert Steiner. Business Manager Bayard Kurth Thomas Polley ' THEATRE Elmer Ulrich PUBLICITY John Malley, Chairman John Treen, Assistant John C. Cahalan Tom Kent Bernard Corbett John Angel GENERAL ARRANGEMENTS Ralph C. Johnston, Chairman Charles J. Fellrath, Assistant Clarence J. Kummer William Noah Edward J. Corbett 41 X Q be :gf ,, MQ' il? S Michael A. Bida I Jack Mooney PATRONS Donald F. Carney, Chairman Lawrence V. Britt, Jr. Joseph V. Walker, Jr. Jerome Kelly Theodore Feldman Malcolm Tear John Cashin Frank McDonald Stackpoole Andries Boone Johnston Z Que-'?,w, AT: Nr,VA!j fe-'MIS' 4 ... .4 49 1-A5471 . ,Y In . 137ll sw W' 84943 is iljgu Kg ' 3? Q lift. 12 QS? 2 QF on x 1 . names, P' "' 1-Q in ! ,Q , , 45X f Q 1-.ZA -1. Z S s W. . 'L' " 4' 1 ' it-4 if THE BAND ARDLY had the university classes began to convene when the ap- pointment of Gene LaBarre, prominent band-master, to the position of direc- tor was announced by the Athletic As- sociation. Immediately following this selection, rehearsals were called and the De Paul game found a greatly enlarged university band, playing with precision and marching in well-ordered forma- tions. occupying the electrically-lighted gridiron between the halves. The feature of the bands perform- ances was their appearance on the West Virginia field at Morgantown. Per- haps it was the uncheckable attack of the Titan football players that in- spired the band members to the splen- did showing they gave that November afternoon. But whether this was the reason or not, the fact still remains that no student who traveled to Morgan- town for the game regretted contribut- ing to the fund established for the pur- pose of defraying the expenses of the band to West Virginia. Not only did the band play at foot- ball games. Mr. LaBarre,s organization entertained at all of the gridiron rallies held during the course of the season. They likewise made their appearance at the University of Detroit High School- Highland Park High School football game played in the university's stadium. Much of the credit for the successful season can be given to John Labadie, who acted as manager of the band for three years. His work leaves him prac- tically unnoticed by the student body but, nevertheless, it requires arduous and faithful labor. Bob Beale did some very able direct- ing of the band in concert as student assistant to Gene LaBarre, and no story of the band is complete without atten- tion to that strutting, high-stepping, drum major, Rod Marion Cwho threw Labadie , , Beale his stick over the goal postsj. Marion If--i X- ss. fx' - 57 -5' A933 9 llissll 'Q 5--Q J' , 3, 3. 5 2 '39 A 355, sliiig Jyj, E: 'J 3 1 s. I fl lm' lllf 392. 65? -S 'il rg. P U 4 3555! .. tu 3 E K. KN 'NX J fb Qgklgitzir MJ354 f. NJkfS,g, 9 , mph" '--ws.. . 4,3 4 E 1930 To Q ,Qs I ' 2 2 A - fzylfl wl A 1' 'L . 'V nn? vii 'C'm.n tum '- f W " E g UNIVERSITY OE DETROIT BAND GENE LABARRE, Direclor. ROBERT BEALE, Student Dirermr. Lr- JOHN B. LABADIE, Manager. REV. A. ERUMVELLER, S. J.. AND DEAN SEE!-IOFFER. Faculty M'oderators. 9 S58 MEMBERS 47 Trumpets Saxophones Bai-itones Russell A. Case Cole Baldwin Walter Jackman A. J. Detloff Frank S- Belfh Jack M. Robertson Oliver D. Engle DIG Bfenaman L Edward Gomlak Thomas Ci. Crider ra Carl S. Hemmer Harvey D. Edwards A110 Hom Henry H. Kem gred L. iocglrlch Maurice C. Jacobs Paul Konecnik Oward ' ause Sl mund Krebsbach Elwood J. Johnson Pg k M, k G. W. Kavanagh 711505 ran lot Q, , GYCSOYY Obefiif Robert Beale Homer A1 Phillips LOUIS Padbefg Robert Rhinehart Manuel Simms Fred W' Sablacan Charles R. Schmitter Albert Tfudo Chester A. Schintzius Howard R. Vlfard Frank D. Sinclair Clarinets Claire A. Cameron piccolo Drums Norman F' Fenner Wilfred P. Martus Ralph W- Boone Edward 13055911 Harold C. Cross Lemuel J. Homant Trombones paul C. Haskell Ralph C. Johnston Bruce J. Dempsey Abe Kutlov Charles Al. Kern John V, Keefe Frederick Raible VIC J- Mlllef Alfred E. Lanagan Phillip T. Mulligan Edward H. Floyd Jess A. Pasternak Ken MCCreery Cymbals Ernest Schmitter Jerry P. White Edward M. Ferber ' An. X7 If jfaifg- ggi ,gliafaj 3. 'I 1' 4393-js. 1113911 teea- Jes- -,ata I iff -"' J ""+v-+1 I Il i 'TTT i ll e, sl gd N .65 be f We 2 DRAMATIC CLUB JAMES E. FRAZER. President. JOHN A. GALBO, Vice-President. MARGUERITE GAHAGAN, Secretary. MICHAEL F. PETERS, Treasurer. EILLEEN K. CROSS, Publicity. RATHER eventful first year has 1. closed for the Dramatic Club. Despite the great and seemingly many difficulties, the club has become firmly rooted and is filling a need which has long been recognized in the life of the University. lt was instituted in behalf of the better interests of the school and its students. Its aims and ideals were few but well chosen. The primary purpose was to search out and develop all talent neces- sary in producing and staging plays at various intervals throughout the year and to be non-partial in its appoint- ments. It has attempted to bring to- gether all students who are sincerely in- terested in dramatics. y "Two Gentlemen From Chicagof was the first presentation of the club. Father Scott, S.J., Dean of men, Father Horst, S.J., faculty moderator of the Club. and the Glee Club were guests of the Dramatic Club at this one-act per- formance. Those taking part were Lil- lian Dixon, Leo Schubnell, Dave Mc- Hardy, George Schweager, Bernard Duggan, and Matthew Gill. Before the spring vacation, the Club presented another one-act play, "The lVlonkey's Paw." This performance showed a great improvement in the quality of acting. Marie Bunetta, James Frazer, George Schweager and Walter Vander Bossche were the per- formers. At- various intervals throughout the year, the club was addressed by leading men in the Held of amateur dramatics, A , -so 6 , 'fr , H, L 'W P E Frazer Galbo on subjects pertinent to dramatics. Gahagan Peters . v I -gszssfxxiapp, .am-Q 1 'ras 140 zo. 2151 fl fs' all 'fi i7. YiE We al QaT'RN4S'NHf55'5gl9 ,K,l7! f 'Egg - THE 'fm TOWER r ms- H ' ' ill V in 4 U UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT GLEE CLUB HARRY SEITZ, Director. FRANCIS H. POULIOT, President. ROGERS J. BLANDEORD. Vice-President. PETER H. WAH'NE. Secretary. PATRICK J. CAROLIN. Treasurer. FATHER SCOTT, Faculty Moderator. MEMBERS Paul F. Bader Paul E. Marco D. Robert Beale Lucien A. Marleau John M. Bennane David S. McHardy Kenneth E. Binder Burke B. Muldoon Rogers J. Blandford Phillip T. Mulligan Floyd R. Borger. Jr. Joseph O'DOHH9l Patrick J. Carolin Phillip H. Paye Lawrence J. Clinton Homer A. Phillips Doyle Cunningham Francis H. Pouliot John J. Curran Robert D. Powell Fred W. Dadson Alfred P. DeRonne W. Tiffin Downs William A. Hathcock Victor F. Hartzell Lloyd R. Harris George C. Hastings Alton T. Holland Louis J. Janecek Raymond J. Kelley Harold L. Lemmer Henry Leszcwnski Gaylord Ci. Maben Tom R. Price Allen Pullmer Albert Pearl Karel Ricca Bromley B. Schuett Frank D. Sinclair William E. Sonnhalter Roy J. Stephens Howard R. Ward Peter H. XVayne Clarence W. Whitston Harold B. Wiles HE University of Detroit Cilee Club, one of the youngest organ- izations on the campus, has achieved remarkable records during its compara- tively short term of existence, and has firmly entrenched itself in the midst of student activities. In addition to several informal con- certs, the club furnished the singing talent for the Union Opera. The first meeting was held at the suggestion of Rev. Joseph Scott, S.J., Dean of Men. Over thirty candidates reported for the first practice held late in October, 1929. Harry Seitz, promi- nent in Detroit choral circles, was chosen as director. Under his guidance the club grew rapidly in size and abil- ity, until now it is a recognized society, and has become an integral part of stu- dent life, and certainly one of its most enjoyable activities. Pouliot Blandford Wayne Carolin 514111 sn Qs. 5 4393 T11 e 1 s. - ' if 99,2 2' 5 I' Q 47 ...-to r-'lf 'l 5 M542 it if J qgz t S .4 Q Hts fx at 12,35 Y 'ya 1 :Q sz ,ip fa ,Xi 6 c- Milf f x 3 2 ,SDJ c w Q fb : Q wi 'Qs .QE K gg ' QS ' 69 , Q ? fn U B g 2 Q My , QP fav 07f'67QfZ'Cf3 ,A e.N,g-9-Jff..a:2s':svs+S ef f '7 THE '930 TOWE ,.. My gi 2: .2 ,sie 5 T , . Q Q-SS J ' ' M ...ffm R Q 'JR ,, - , x - , DEBATINC1 AND ORATORY HE INTERCOLLEGIATE debate class, experiencing ambitions that never before had been approached, formed a schedule that even the most in- different must admit to be the strongest ever attempted by this university. Unseasoned and yet experiencing a sort of transitional backwardness, the first debating team to take the floor lost by a small margin to the platform logic- ians of St. Xavier College on January 17. This first defeat only served to send the Titan debaters on the warpath and their plunder was great. They met and defeated an array of speakers from Ohio State College on February 7th, Cincinnati University on February 2lst and Oberlin College, on March 6th were the next victims of the Detroit forensicians. Following these brilliant victories, the Motor City logicians were hosts to Western Reserve on March l7th, Creighton University on March 19th, and St. Louis Univer- sity on March Zlst. Two of these re- sulted in decided victories while the third is questionably considered a defeat. Throughout their extensive cam- paign, the question was, "Resolved: that the nations of the world should adopt a plan of complete disarmament, except- ing such forces as are needed for police purposes." The Dynamic City's array of pol- ished speakers were even more success- ful abroad than at home. On March 4th, 5th and 6th a team of select speak- ers traveled to Milwaukee, Chicago and Evanston where they met and defeated Marquette, Loyola, and Northwestern by audience decisions. The second debating tour was equally successful. Another team of Win- ning forensic artists toured the Buck- eye State, where they again met and de- feated Cincinnati University, St. Xavier iii. Ni ff , v- 34, 9 15 'N X.. S P , y i 3 glib! te 'B iobnsron University, Oberlin College, Ohio Ivfdgaghan State College and Western Reserves on .- 5255 5 , lIl44ll e, O : 'iw .,y .Aa be f xg U M5 2 Q eixy, Q-5,1 ?"lK?Q'?""?JX'4?'5DxS1,i.r-'ag , THE i930 TOWE 'J .XC R ALX. 1 " A sig ,I A - - A 1- ...salma B. 4 4 ,f L' fu C- S :XM Q : if 41 1- vi : ' Q, 1 f 2? 'alll-5 ?1.xiS'5' l 'Ui successive nights from March lOth to March l4th inclusive. Debaters in the various contests ir- respective of teams were: Ralph C. Johnston, veteran of many debates, James J. Britt. who will be back at the university next year, Dave Leahy, John C. Treen, Albert J. Nagler, Ben New- ton, Ellis Duncan, Dtto Seebaldt and Ned A. Monaghan. In addition to these public perform- ances, debating activity was carried on extensively within the university organ- ization itself. The Philomathic Society, with a greatly increased roll call, and with new and talented members, car- ried out a regular program of forensic activities during the year. At each meet- ing talks on subjects of current interest were given by the members. The society co-operated with the de- bating organization in furthering foren- sic activity. Among its members are many promising candidates for the de- bating teams of next year. To furnish training in debating to its members, the society held a tournament during the second semester. A trophy was donated to the society and named the Gregory Debating Cup after the donor. Nearly all members of the Philomathic Society took part in this tourney, which was won by a team composed of Albert J. Nagler and Louis Bridenstine. The Philomathic Society also aided the public speaking organization in be- ing hosts for the eliminations of the Skinner Debate and the annual orator- ical contest. Both of these contests were held in May. The six speakers chosen from the candidates who participated in the elim- inations for the Skinner Debate were Albert J. Nagler, James Britt, Benjamin Newton, Edward Monaghan, H. Vvfal- ter Theisen, and Joseph A. Powers. The subject selected for debate concerned pf. I stub R X-. ek.. . " X I t.f ,fl . -R3 7 6' ts ff , , 7 neil . 2? 'J the need of legislation to prevent monopolies by chain stores. keahi' The Skinner debate was held on Taxon I-gn, V71 ft'F,w .UK ,,, fi-1,492 5" ' ' 2 ff4,'c 1114511 U EJ VA fx. - X .M .224 gm E ' , I was .i 'Ev JGTJZN-EFT QSLPIQ F slr-X' ir J ii 'W Ja f Q WE '930 TOWER SA. f" "S t - 3 64"-9 reins? gn its ,A .4 jk lk Quai sfgkxg 4 Q JN.. r. ' ' X - 9 Friday, May 8, at the Knights of Co- lumbus auditorium on Woodward ave- nue. Britt and Monaghan vied for honors in the pre-debate choosing by debating enthusiasts. Joseph Powers, law student, proved to be the dark horse of the debate, however, and won the traditional Skinner medal for excellence in debating. Powers had been a mem- ber of the debating organization for three years. The thirty-seventh annual oratorical contest was held on Wednesday, May 14, in Gesu Hall on the Six Mile road campus. Five speakers were chosen to compete for the gold medal in this event. They were John Peister, James Britt, Benjamin Newton, Ralph C. Johnston and John C. Treen. All except Peister, who is a freshman, were members of the varsity debating squads for 1930. lt was a closely-contested battle of words from the Hrst speaker to the last. Ralph C. Johnston was declared the winner by the unanimous ballot of the judges. lt was the fourth time Johnston competed for the medal, and was his last chance to annex this prize of the public speaking department before he gradu- ated. James Britt was voted a close second by all the judges for his oration on the "Red Menace." Johnston spoke on "The Constitution and Education." He was presented with the medal by Vincent McAuliffe, an alumnus who had previously received the medal him- self. These contests closed the season's forensic activity. It was a highly suc- cessful year, and the public speaking activity of the students of the Univer- sity of Detroit reached its highest level in the history of the university. No activity is harbored by Alma Mater that carries such tradition, and much has been done this year to stimulate interest in this cultural endeavor. Of the 1930 squad only three will be lost through Duncan Seebaldt graduation' Nagler Bridenstine gIs'l.x'M I .,.. .AXQPE l wifi? x 14611 Ko Md -xy Q3 cf W S H 'cf Ufi .63 , S ' ts 3 fe GV fflsws 'N' et TNJAT QV? is tw E 1930 Tow 'sw A fi g? TH ER 51 N g 'x A fi' JIIIJT fi. ills 3, f-X A L' T -I A lx ,E P . .. f- . 3 'JK .. qv- Q' - - I -if? C. BALDWIN BACON THE PAROCHIAL HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING LEAGUE HIS year students of the public speak- ing department realized an ambition conceived three years ago. That was the formation of a Michigan Parochial debat- ing league. This organization was spon- sored this year by the University of De- troit after members of the debating squad, under the direction of C. Baldwin Bacon, head of the public speaking department, had secured the entry of nearly every parochial high school in the Detroit dis- trict. The league this year comprises Detroit and suburban towns within a radius of 25 miles. In nearly all of the high schools of the new league University of Detroit debaters were instructors in public speak- ing. At the beginning of the season debates were scheduled and carried out under the direction of the university. The matches were arranged by Mr. Bacon. An elimina- tion tournament was held at the end of the season from which Holy Redeemer and St. Anthony's high schools emerged as the victors of the semi-finals. The lat- ter defeated Holy Redeemer in the finals held at the Knights of Columbus hall on Woodward Avenue, Sunday afternoon, April 27. At this time a silver cup was presented to the winners significant of the parochial debating championship of Mich- igan. The name of the winner was en- graved on the cup, and the trophy will pass to the winner of each succeeding tournament. In future years the public speaking de- partment hopes to extend the scope of the league to include every parochial high school in the state. Its beginning predicts a future of great success and benefit to its participants. -0 tb .. f'fa-"M 429,599 ' -wifi Q 4 me-1.. HMB .',. .A 72 2 ffflffd-5xXXxX Y. ' v, X ' , xx rv, ., ,, A 1 f, . A x 'rf '. l f Kan- K 1 1' x -s' x ff W rf I I If I If X jf fr " :flu ,N f.x V I x f ' 4 xr I I Vx J N ' V N f X f 'a15x K ii L N 5? I f' , 1, 3 I . ya wi 5 ' IQ 'Vi 1 fx l f LQ , R f 'f I L 3 I' VL lx :E i 4 ' L' f' IK 5-" - Q-, ,f' V i 'P' M25 f"12::2 7 0 v 1 , 2 c - . " f 9 K' El, 3, xi? - mi Q ,..-xy, Q A g fx AN. Q f Xe! 2 - . ' 's !""fff"' 1 X Q'i"3 4 a Q .fig gf - ' 1 "9 T V A if W' ' J 2 .,, J ,f I ,gf qv 4 N ? l Q ,yy ik In-Q .J n 42, ' I E: -lif QW .yy ' xfff X , 1 fi 5 'Q EEQWF- 9 I ,..' 1 ii 1 f . 'J' ' ' V- f lg, 'f Wiiff Q f f 'K fi Q,g,,'a5 X Q lf ' ' 'J kgs? A . u p J 'Q -k fi 'lv ,IQ Ma I 1 , ,,f , 3 4' 1 . fi 1 9 '1 as y' jk , JP 1 C3433 Q59 Qi? da fifjgf - ...K QV THE OWER L s.. rf' . ' 1 T " xx ARTS AND SCIENCE SODALITY L I O if J. if 54 .x A fin 'E gi . Q Q35 3 BERNARD E. GARIEPY, Prefect. ORA L. LABADIE, First Assistant. JAMES T. CARROL, Second Assistant. MARTIN E. KAISER. Secretary. OTTO C. SEEBALDT, Treasurer. REV. JOSEPH SCOTT, S. J., Director. HE Sodality of the Arts and Science College has added another success- ful year to an already enviable record. lt has well fulfilled its lofty purpose in providing for the students of the liter- ary department a truly spiritual organ- ization with a truly religious atmos- phere. Under the able direction of Eather Scott w e e k l y meetings were held throughout the entire year. At the first meeting of each month, the entire so- dality joined in reciting the Office. The second meeting was devoted to a talk by one of the members, While the di- rector spoke at the third and fourth meetings. This schedule was followed during the school year. The talks were always interesting and the topics chosen were timely. The annual retreat was held on January 13th, l4th and l5th under the direction of Rev. Charles L. Crotty, S. J. Er. Crotty's sermons were of un- usual interest and the manner in which he conducted the retreat drew many favorable comments from the student body. Collections were taken up at various intervals during the year and resulted in the sending of many generous checks to the fathers laboring in foreign fields. lt is this service which the sodalities of the university have undertaken with energy. Mission collections have been extended to certain classes in some of the colleges, and calendars of donations have been posted. These designate the mission for which subscription is taken y i 5 . E a Zi. it qi' as 2 2 ff lair Q +2 C1 ' L ' . . Kgfgggy 5:53:12 and the date for contribution. auf!! xl? -"pf" T" I H150 ll 4 'iff It .CQ cf Z .S e .-9,1 T351 2 K' 7' A 'A' . -.1fSX THE K9 O TOWER' Il ' ' f lu 'al ll JT EQ COMMERCE AND FINANCE SODALITY FRANK JENNEY, Pt'6?f6?Cf. JAMES HOBAN, First Assistant. GERALD LALONDE, Second Assistant. JAMES HAGGERTY. Secretary. WILLIAM BUCKLEY, Treasurer. REV. JOSEPH SCOTT, S. J., Director. HE sodality of the College of Commerce and Finance experienced one of its most successful years during the 1929-30 period. This organization accomplished well its work in furnish- ing spiritual inspiration to its mem- bers and in forwarding the Catholic spirit through the student body at large. Under the direction of Father Scott regular meetings were held each Mon- day noon in the chapel of the Chem- istry building. A regular program of activities was carried out which proved of great benefit to the organization. The sodality opened its year's work with the OfHce of the Blessed Virgin. Father Scott opened the second meet- ing of the year with an inspiring ad- dress concerning the purpose of the sodality in university life. One of the interesting features of the year's activ- ity were the talks given by student sodalists at the meetings. Various phases of religious activity at the uni- versity were discussed by these speakers. The fourth Monday in each month was given over for the business of the organization. The work of the year was climaxed with the annual retreat held, on Febru- ary l0, ll and 12, under the direction of Rev. Fr. Cunningham, S. J. This event was praised by those who attended as one of great beneit both spiritually and educational. Fr. Cun- ingham's wit and knowledge character- ized one of the Hnest retreats in several QW- S. GC. ' ' if fre.. rr .' .fy r ,,,,,.' 1 , EQ if .,. ,ijJJ.eQ.-f ' 1 years, and one which drew a large at- I H l , i CITHCY ' O Tdll tendance from the commercial college. ydalnwdc mggmy Buckley :UU-W ,.,, ,., , Q 103933 .23-t5S'2Ff" Q iii-l.. in-l i 1151 wo 'S I- . i if , tit Qaida Q E393 QW S n as sc fo is jx 1 rs eg A f ,J 5 A A . -.1 X T H 1 WER .. Tri x - I 'S ' Ura? g' 1ggi5" 'Lf is .1 cg". ' 3 . is fo. Q-gg 6' ENGINEERING SODALITY LAWRENCE G. RILEY, Pfefecr. A WILLIAM P. MURPHY, First Assistant. PIERRE J. BOES, Second Assistant. VINCENT E. HOGAN, Secretary. THOMAS E. DAVIS. Treasurer. REV. J. A. SCOTT, S. J., Dfreclor. HE Section A Engineers Sodality completed a very successful year during the past school term. The so- ciety has become an integral part of the Jesuit school system and the Univer- sity of Detroit is no exception. ln fact. the University of Detroit has one of the Hnest representations of all Jesuit colleges, and the Section A Engineer- ing department is endowed With as line a spirit and spiritual zeal as any section in the school. Thursday noon Was set aside for the regular weekly meetings of the En- gineers Sodality. A fixed schedule has been drawn up by the unit so that they can accomplish the greatest amount of work possible in the short time allotted them due to their alternating schedule. The Section A sodality follows the practice of the other divisions on the campus by reciting the oflice of the Blessed Virgin each month. Father Scott gave a short instructional talk at the second meeting of each month. One of the members is chosen to give a talk for the third meeting, while the fourth is devoted to the business interests of the sodality. The annual retreat of the sodality Was held on January 6th, 7th, and 8th, with Rev. Theodore Schulte, S. J., act- ing as retreat master. He instructed the assembly in spirit- ual and moral questions, particularly those which pertain to the college stu- dent. Those who attended this retreat were unanimous in approving it as a great source of inspiration, and a bal- ance to a year of study in which spirit- Q 915 3 ' J Li A S' u t i 64" 'J Ifllggfllfy ual matters are too often smothered. Davis gfqvfiym W1 if 'gnupg H152 sl. 943 'E-K'5-'Offs THE mo TOWER SHR.. 7" 94 7 - I T' TT T aa a? H lll ENGINEERS' soDAL1TY -65 Gia 1' 39 4 ba. 5 Q 935 2 SECTION B ' JOSEPH A. FISHER, Prefect. ARNOLD J. MITTIG, First Assistant. VINCENT A. MCGUIGAN, Second Assistant. EUGENE T. KELTY, Secretary. ROGER J. BLANDEORD, Treasurer. REV. JOSEPH SCOTT, S. J., Director. HE Engineers' Sodality, Section B. is one of the largest religious or- ganizations on the university campus. The sodality's work during the year, influencing as it does a large body of students, has resulted in great spiritual blessings to its members. It has kept aglow that fervor stimulated by the annual student retreats, and has helped many to lead a better life than would have been possible without its strong aid. Rev. Joseph Scott, S. J., Dean of Men, has made untiring efforts to make the sodality a force for good in the En- gineering Department. On January 27, 28 and 29, the so- dality made its retreat. Attendance was unprecedented. The annual retreat is the major event of the sodality year and is always fruitful of much good. Revf L. Mullany, S. J., was retreat master. Father Mullany is professor of English at Marquette University. Each Thursday at noon the sodality convenes in the student chapel. A regular procedure, lasting fifteen min- utes, is always carefully followed out. The Office of the Blessed Virgin is said, and the director and one officer each give a short talk. . Joseph A. Fisher, as prefect, is to be specially complimented for his activity in the affairs of the sodality. He was assisted by Arnold Mittig, also an officer of the sodality in 1929, and first as- sistant prefect in 1930. Other officers are Vincent A. McGuigan, second as- sistant, Eugene T. Kelty, secretary, and Fisher Mittig Roger J. Blandford, treasurer. MCGHig2n Kelty Blandford LIIIV ew -, v, ll fait: I '4 MSL 153 ' o W QM , ite s J S? THE ic? TOWER H KS.. III ' ' A T' ' it 's- CO-ED SCDALITY DOLLY M. BAUSER, Prefect. EILLEEN K. CROSS, First Assistant. MARY E. FRIEDL, Second Assistant. FRANCES M. KLINE, Secretary. MARGARET M, MCRAE, Treasurer. HE Co-eds sodality has the small- est number of members of any so- dality on the campus. Yet the organ- ization has finished a year of religious activities equal to any achieved by the others. One of the. greatest inspirations found in the sodality activity of the year was the constant advice of Rev. Joseph A Scott, S.J., who acted as faculty moder- ator. Father Scott succeeded the Rev. James Corrigan who acted as faculty s moderator last year. Dolly Bauser, a junior in the college of Commerce and Finance, was chosen to serve as prefect. She was ably assist- ed by Eilleen Cross, Mary Friedl, . Frances Kline and Margaret McRae. i f The sodality met on the second Sun- day of every month. The meetings showed a large and enthusiastic attend- tj ance, the co-eds going to Holy Com- 51 munion in a body. One of the major accomplishments of this sodality was its participation in the annual retreat which was held on March 8, 9 and 10, at the Sacred Heart Convent on Lawrence Avenue. Rev. Andrew Cook, SJ., of Chicago, conducted the exercises and offered in- terpretations and advice concerning the moral problems which confront the average co-ed of today. This retreat was supported by the sodalists with Z1 large attendance and devotion. The co-eds have accomplished much in the field of religious activity and their work in this respect cannot be overestimated. Each member of the sodality obtained as a result of her par- Bauser MCR22 ticipation in the exercises, a spiritual Friedl Cross - - - Kline reward impossible to estimate. v e ?'3lX'Al ll Base: wi-9-Y illl54 kg. Q J' 57 Ms Q gm! 42-9 E ,J i cf tif: , M X ' G' Q'G!'f'i1Ti5jX'5'S fi f F Wx!-V " Rf Xafqifs fl - R A L r"'l, If i l fa. " ' Q85 2 L' at -f mf, rfvtfi 2 ff 'J 4 Qi - 1 gegtrl. ,x ,. 0... -. 1.8 -ui-gdjgg WE 'W TOWE LAW SODALITY NATHAN GOODNOW, Prefed. GEORGE A. WEINS, First Assistant. WILLIAM F. WAGNER, Secretary. JOHN PHENEY, Treasurer. REV. GEORGE A. MCGOVERN, S, J., Director. HE Law Sodality has steadily as- sumed a place of importance among the other sodalities on the campus, and under the enthusiastic and energetic leadership of Father McGovern they have found an abundance of consola- tion and advice. That they have re- sponded to the enthusiasm of Father McGovern is shown by the fact that the majority of the lawyers attend these meetings in spite of the fact that they are held after school hours. The meetings have been held every Wednes- day at 11:00 o'clock in St. Catherines Chapel. The annual retreat for the Law School was held in January in conjunc- tion with Section A Engineers under the direction of Father Theodore J. Shulte, S, J., Dean of Men at Loyola University, and whoi is more than usually familiar with the problems of the modern college student. The University of Detroit has one of the finest representative sodalities of all the Jesuit schools, and throughout this organization there is no unit en- dowed with a more progressive spirit than the Law group. s It is the annual retreat which cli- maxes the work of the sodality season, and during which the spirit of sodality activity is revealed. Without the so- dality, the religious side of education would be neglected, and spiritual in- spiration would be Wanting. The re- treat best explains to its membership the importance of this phase of educa- tion, and lends further inspiration to the individual who attends and who understands what he hears. Goodnow Weins Wagner 515511 EE X Mr, 'fij 5256.18 QM? . Q. L 50.23 'N Q, is 5-.-A Q 3 ' SM ite E 11 1 I agnf A N I 5:4 1' GX In HV N max X A 1 Q1 - 'A- KG? , . ' R O sera P 3 f in , T 5 . U35 P E J M 469 ,Q I Qi? 97672 Uiygzfcmjl Qegwi Jg-s55,c' ."QJx,?fQAN ,W7'a5?9 v JF!-"Ar JL'-RQQ -.. -J W THE 1930 TOWER : aku Tn ? T I A-L Ts - 'alll-D1 !3' 0...-... I N A ll :'E ' .Lil 'famsxr k s I 1 -E2 ,v,- ,,,, , ' T gl V ,yvl R ll.. . I if I t - I 'A' .2 " ' E. S 1 Cz N o dlcfkf t 94? I. dig . 9 f All 2 HDWARD WALSH MEMORIAL MEDAL The Howard Walsh Memorial Medal was established at the University of Detroit in memory of the late Howard Walsh, a former student of the Uni- versity. The medal will be presented annually to that University student who writes the best essay submitted in the Intercollegiate Essay Contest. "The Catholic Layman in Graduate Studies and Research," was the sub- ject chosen for the 1930 contest. The medal was awarded to James C. La- Driere. FATHER OTTING MEMORIAL KEY The Father Otting Memorial Key was established last year in memory of the late Rev. Henry W. Otting, S. J., past regent of the university. It is given by the Eta Zeta Sigma sorority to that senior girl who has attained the highest scholastic average for four years of work. The Winner of the 1929 award was Iris L. Young, a senior in the Day School of Commerce and Finance. Miss Young's average for four years' work was 92.6 per cent. CHI SIGMA PHI KEY Chi Sigma Phi, prominent fraternity in the College of Engineering, provided a fund for the annual award of a scholarship key to that senior engineer who had the highest scholastic average for his five years of work in the engineering department. This award was inaugurated in 1927. Arthur W. Anderson, out- standing student in the Engineering College, had the honor of being the 1929 recipient of this much-desired tribute of scholastic supremacy. CHI DELTA THETA ARCHITECTURAL KEY In connection with its annual architectural exhibition, the Chi Delta Theta engineering fraternity this spring offered a gold key for excellence in architec- tural design. The award is made during Commencement Week. Incidentally the key was designed by Herbert J. Wendt, a student in the College of Engineering. A bronze replica of the key is given for second place in the contest. 5 a 2 g 'fl ilzijac . il158ll 438 'r e tw 1, sl 'cf .KVA 24 'X .G .V E 1: - Q-is 2 0-'..1e2ff'su:a'QM 9 " ' ' 'N alf- - THE mo TOWER 7f. '- A " I 4 TM' ' up fyllls. MAGI MEDAL The Arts and Science Freshman who attains the highest scholastic standing during the entire school year becomes the proud possessor of the Magi Achieve- ment Award or scholarship key. Always leaders in campus activities the Magi offer this scholarship key as an incentive to greater scholastic effort. The key was presented last year to George Smith. DELTA SIGMA PI SCHOLARSHIP KEY The Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key was established at the University of Detroit in 1921. A key is presented each year to the senior in each of the Commerce and Finance schools whose average is highest in his class for four years. Last year the dual award was presented to Leo S. Mittig, of the Day School, and Carl A. Carlson, of the Night School. i ALPHA SIGMA TAU KEY The Alpha Sigma Tau Scholarship Key was established last year as an in- centive for scholastic attainment throughout the whole student body of the university. It is an annual award, and is given to the male senior who stands highest scholastically in four years of university work. The key is presented at graduation and the winner is not announced until those exercises are completed. To William J. Maledon goes the unique honor of being the first winner. Male- don had an average of 96.676 for his four years work in the university. ORATORICAL MEDAL The Oratorical Medal was established in 1894 by the faculty of the University of Detroit. George Monaghan was awarded the first medal. In the preliminaries, held before a regular meeting of the Philomathic Society, live of the contestants were chosen by the judges to compete in the finals. They were Ralph C. Johnston, James J. Britt, Benjamin Newton John Peister, and John C. Treen. At the finals held on May 13th at Gesu Hall, Ralph C. Johnston was named winner of the 1930 medal, and James J. Britt was given second place. 5 J 7 5 ' i MSL. H1593 I 1 M-sg! L. H , 2 DW! 142' E ' 'f' ,jg-sf F-i1HRNnQ3tv,..'Q ' ,,., .,,-.. ..- A ,Av THE '930 TOWER i ' ' i H! 4 E '59 'cf .2 GP, s f i s ' . U All 2 f ' i A --,575 1, - - LOYALTY AWARD On every football team there is one player who is a constant source of cheer and inspiration to his team mates, who is a consistent football player, and who, through the power of his leadership and personality, proves his worth. It is for this service that the Athletic Association of the university presents the annual Loyalty Award to that player who ills this particular place on the football team. This year, Lester Vachon, quarterback, was presented with the award at the annual Delta Sigma Pi football banquet held at the Book-Cadillac Hotel at the close of the football season. OMEGA BETA PI SCHOLARSHIP CUP The Omega Beta Pi Scholarship Cup was established last year as an annual award to the freshmen of the Pre-Medic department. Its purpose is to promote a high standard of scholarship in the first year of work in preparation for the study of medicine. V The cup was presented to James T. Carroll, who topped the scholarship averages of the freshman Pre-Medic class with an average of 94.2, a remark-- able record for a first year student in any college of the university. SKINNER MEDAL Joseph A. Powers was presented with the traditional Skinner Medal for 1930 when he was chosen as the iinest debater of the six university platform artists who participated in the annual debating classic. The medal is awarded each year and is significant of the university's debating championship. It is sought for by members of the university's forensic organ- ization throughout their four years of platform work. An elimination tournament was held before the Philomathic Society in which twenty contestants took part. Six were chosen to compete in the Skinner De- bate: James J. Britt, Edward Monaghan, Benjamin Newton, Albert J. Nagler, H. Walter Theisen, and Joseph A. Powers. .,... -, , f . Af' as . Ki " m e -X M Ko 6 1,9 is M, F 2 ', .8 it-a t , fbihnil limi if if WJ'-f l l 1 H 1 6011 l l I 4? 'c Ui .X I cb Gi f? G , 'Q . 3- Q85 2 f Gig-x fX1"Qjx5f.gSXXJf-fra r ,. -- A v . 9 I 2 TH ER it XX Q Q.-,x A L- ' ...Q - 1,-b-.A 15' E 1930 Tow wsjgae A- 1-B 2 I 'XX'- V f' 5344 . Q ' V 54 GREGORY CUP William B. Gregory, during his term as president of the Philomathic So- ciety, presented that organization with a loving cup on which is to be engraved annually the names of the members of the winning team in the annual debate tournament. This year's Hnal discussion found Albert J. Nagler and Louis Bridenstine supporting the aflirmative side of the subject: "Resolved, that the government of the United States ought to recognize the government of Russia." The popular decision rendered by the members of the society gave this team the verdict over their opponents, Douglas Turrell and Wayne Swonk. Nagler was voted the best speaker. ARGON TROPHY The Argon Trophy, given by the Argon general social fraternity, is one of the most beautiful awards attainable in athletic activity at the University of Detroit. The winner is chosen by Head Coach Dorais for the greatest improve- ment shown in spring football practice. William J. O'Neill received the trophy last year at the annual Argon Trophy Dance held at the Hotel Statler the evening of May 24. The 1930 Argon Trophy was presented on May 23 at the close of spring practice. ALPHA KAPPA PSI CUP Alpha Kappa Psi, formerly Sigma Kappa Phi, national Commerce and Finance fraternity, last year established the custom of giving an award to that fraternity that showed the highest standing in scholarship for the entire year. The award is in the form of a loving cup of which any fraternity could well wish to be the proud possessor. After the results had been carefully counter-checked and compared it was found that the Delta Pi Kappa had become the proud possessors of this coveted prize, with an average of 84.865, Alpha Chi with an average of 84.638, was a very close second. " ffwv I if"""""7 nr xv-lj 49353 P f H16111 kg. fx flu Pi 352484 fa 11 1 I DJ 1 L, -"Ja ff' " 2g?f',' li. WEL ' L A F f ,Q K'-I I X J ff V f 3- 7 K A 9 J C31 A--TN xA If f' OL-32 'QE ik I . :F S FW , fx X 1' f PW Q19 01 1 9 Kev W1 Q9 V CQ' ' 35 if X. ff 3, :.fE 1 'Kg my Q s! xx .15 w 4 Q 3 2 wif XX A Aif Qg 1 , - 4122 , ,L - , Q 3 E Z ' X tif: xi: .fn ' ? 'Q f' , ' N X Y. I Q5 if 454 ig? 5ff?Q-5 if Lffg Y ggifi fi gi T 1 iii: X f f f 'f F AF 4 g , '?Qfffl 2:as?5 iff 0 'RCD Om MQJ sf4?J ociczf EVEYZMZY' v g "-RQ 4 .. G mfg THE 1930 TOWER IQKN.. G Tv T 4' E' T A My ll 1 Ottf qt .2 Cf L 55 .4 ' "9 Q 535 2 SRA? M if ,f Edward Stenger Agnes McQuarrie SENIOR BALL ILE GOLP AND COUNTRY JUNE 5. 1930 GROSSE CLUB CHAIRMAN EDWARD A. STENGER ASSISTANT CHAIRMAN NORMAN D. VALENTINE GENERAL ARRANGEMENTS Nathan B. Goodnow Lester B. Vachon - PUBLICITY W. Joseph Starrs Ralph C. Johnston MUSIC Fred J. Schreiber Raymond J. Abele PROGRAMS AND DECORATIONS Anthony G. Lennert Howard I. Mahoney PATRONS Norman D. Valentine TICKETS Leo T. Shubnell C. Scott Howard George A. 'Weins FACULTY MODERATOR Joseph A. Luyckx kg. I sl! gf I. .I L, A N29 if , . .9 Q 52-if E gtanr an N15-' lj em t eiffa JLZY' J If Ef'i?Ja..- 1Il64H I 0 'J U41 .x -GI cg-A e 5 - T Q85 2 ' 4' Q54 Pvt?-'QJQQ 'Q ' l v. THE 1930 TOWER .vc . 9 Q' 1 Y alll Ji 1 i 1 QQf55!Sv'B9"- 'J' " "' K' fl' f Q 'fy -fs ' a 5 ' H-- SENIOR BALL OUR years of campus social life comes to a delightful end each year with the annual Senior Ball. It was held this June at the beautiful Grosse Ile Cwolf and Country Club, and proved a fitting climax to a period of association and friendship. Approximately two hundred Seniors and their guests attended the party. Gathered around tables decorated with colorful June flowers, the Seniors cele- brated with gaiety a parting of four years of social association. The dinner was excellent, and of a quantity that caused many of the guests to linger in the dining room before par- taking in the dance that followed. Jean Goldkette presented Jack McGay and his orchestra for the music and enter- tainment of the evening. The program for dancing was an ad- mirable souvenir to keep as a remem- brance of this Senior farewell ball. It was covered in white leather with a de- sign of Memorial Tower and the Uni- versity seal imprinted in red, and was a pleasing favor. It was one of the little things, planned by an able committee, that made the ball outstanding. Flowers also decorated the ballroom in profusion, and the air was laden with their scent. Coupled with the beauty of the club house and its surroundings, the setting was the finest possible for this conclusion of all university social events. It is impossible to say that this party was the finest Senior Ball in the University's history. Thoseewho are here now can remember at most but a few of them. But it can be stated, and with considerable certainty, that if not the best it was at least one of the finest. And certainly no better parting cele- bration could be given than was the Senior Ball of 1930. so 8 .Jn Q, is we 'I iso? 429 E Abele Goodnow Howard Johnston Lennert Mahoney Schreiber Starrs Shubnell Vachon Valentine Wiens ls' .4245 D Hl65ll s V Gldfbf ve' li 412 All 2 N101 H Sls.'f,'w99 U l f-' A' N 'iq J, f C T ER SA NS QU' Z1 A " 'K-C1569 HE 1930 Tow 3 Elmer Ulrich Marion Spindler JUNIOR PROM COMMANDERY DRILL RooM, IVIASONIC TEMPLE MAY 9, 1930 CHAIRMAN ELMER ULRICH GENERAL ARRANGEMENTS Ralph W. Boone James J. Britt John L. Wagner Paul A. Lilly I MUSIC John A. Galbo Joseph A. Fisher PATRONS AND PROGRAMS David F. Leahy Robert J. Teagan TICKETS John A. Ratcliffe Arnold J. Mittig FAVORS Firmin J. Zettel Fred O. Stewart PUBLICITY Thomas J. McIntosh James A. Haggerty FACULTY MODERATOR Paul P. Harb recht ll 3 201 fbi. I1 it . 'A 'm M U 4' axial lla was is w 1? aw Q,-31 I ll166ll . ts? ecf we .122 K ti: 2 Q GS gL,fKuf'NJ J rf r HE 1930 Tow fl T ER 31 xx 'w ' P E3 gs ' QQ! J ' 'L J' " "' K 'a cl Q' -s e .Q x ms 9 ..f'xg I X : X.. I A JUNIOR PROM ARTE MODERNE was the deco- rative scheme of the fifteenth an- nual Junior Prom, held in the Com- mandery Drill Room of the Masonic Temple on Friday, May 9th, ln an atmosphere fantastically mod- ernistic, over eight hundred couples made merry at the gala affair. A sea of rainbow colors hung overhead: strikingly bizarre designs covered the four walls while the fraternity boxes were executed in the same highly im- aginative vein. A powerful, indirect lighting system illuminated this varie- gation of red and orange and blue. In the booths, modernistic furniture aug- mented the decorative scheme. At the stroke of twelve the Grand March got under way to the tune of "Dear Old U of D," played by Wayne King's lighthearted chevaliers and Jack McGay's merry musicians. The march was led by Elmer Ulrich, a Junior in the Night School of Commerce and Finance, and Miss Marion Spindler, both of Detroit. Each feminine guest received for her favor, a beautiful Dutchess Purse of tan Morocco leather, mounted with the University seal. In accordance with J-Prom traditions a silver loving cup was presented to the girl traveling the farthest distance to attend the dance. The award was made to Miss Margaret A. Kendall, the guest of James J. Britt. The fraternity boxes were scenes of small gatherings and more intimate as- sociation. Here friends gathered to ex- change dances and to gossip over cur- rent university affairs. At'the same time the radio was broadcasting the tunes from the two orchestras to those who could not attend the prom, to some who have never enjoyed such a delec- table social event. There is no logical reason why the Junior Prom should be an occasion for sg: U. We x M.. x xx. A XM' M. such general celebration among the stu- Boone Brirr dents of the university. But the unas- Igilggrty S3323 sailable fact remains-it always is. Lilly Mclntosh Mittig Ratcliffe Stewart Wagner Zettel 167 f'f.X 'x C 27-9. 1 Me? isp N 5 9 15 J 5' MJ E 4' ,C is 'Jag r A g r THE l OWER th fr-'O " 4' X ' f a? 4+ ' - . lil 'M an .N .1 . J, ME GSS 21 5, N X if afiil. Clarence Falkner Eugenia Tremblay HE SOPHOMORES remembering the success of their Freshmen Dance de- termined to uphold their class name. With capable committeemen working toward one end, that of unprecedented success, there could be only one outcome. The Fountain Ballroom at the Masonic Temple Was the scene of the Winter Festivity on February 7th. The dance floor was filled to capacity every minute of the evening, with more than eight hundred couples in attendance. Jean Go1dkette's Country Club orchestra provided the music and what syncopation! The Soph Snow-Ball committeemen were: Clarence F. Falkner, general chairmang William E. Hutchinson, Joseph A. Lubinski, Albert J. Nagler, Thomas F. Benson, John B. Cmirardin, Jack W. Teubert, Joseph C. Slater, Michael A. VanDeKeere. Left to Right: Top Row-Hutchinson, Teubert, Slater, Benson. Botton Row-Nagler, Cmirardin, VanDeKeere, Lubinski. Q N lll68ll fzwqx 13 kg. 'sp J .Jug vu Q a MJ' E 'A fairy? l 291' -is urs Ziggy THE 'WO TOWER all 41 Q l ' L t Q35 2 Aww- MQW Laurence Britt Margaret Lambert HE FRESHMEN of 1930 resolved to make their Frosh Frolic a precedent for university class dances. They set up an ambitious program and Febru- ary Zlst saw the realization of their fondest hopes. The entire second floor of the Book-Cadillac Hotel was reserved and nearly twelve hundred couples danced beneath the streamers, fraternity banners, university colors and balloons to the color-melting music furnished by Fletcher Henderson and Joe Kreklow. Laurence V. Britt, general chairman, was assisted by Roland Denison, Joseph Malott, Joseph Beer, Lillian Dixon, Wallace Carson, John Connolly, George Francis, Charles Laurencelle, Francis Kelly, Henry Wich, George Rakovan, Adam Kronk, Thomas Bailey, Victor Miller, Rodman Marien, John Bennett, Mark Storen, Paul Vance, Helen Quick, John Dyer, Frank Richards and Ray- mond Newton. MSE: , S8 .Jn i, SDD E' a Nw lla E I Left to Right: Top Row-Bailey, Beer, Wich. Bottom Row-Quick, Newton, Malott, Marien. ru-'1 x we 'rirgmij jfsf-3: hx-91 1116911 ga New 44,2 6 we 3 All fl Tamaki' , , fp, ' '- .Q , . THE 1930 TOWER IU ' ' ' ' ll NION DANCES-Following a policy inaugurated several years ago the Union Board of Governors again sponsored the dances which have become as much a part of the football season as the games themselves. These dances give the Freshmen an opportun- ity to become acquainted with the upper-classmen. The Union Board appointed Jack Ratcliffe as chairman of these affairs and the lirst dance was given at Gesu Hall after the students had watched the Titans march victoriously over the team from Dayton University. This dance proved to be successful Jack Ratcliffe HE newly organized Glee Club con- sisting of several tiers of gifted vo- calists, Gene LaBarre and his phalanx of instruments, and several boxes of choice domestic ropes were all combined to the ediiication of a large number of students last fall, at the first of two Union smokers. The initial barrage was laid down at Gesu Hall, under the guidance of Arnold Mittig, where the band and the men's chorus entertained the assembled customers. This nicotine orgy was followed by another for the special attendance of night school inhalers, given at the down-town gym. Both affairs served as mixers for unacquainted students on the campus, at the same time focusing attention and marshaling spirit for the football team, whose clash with Loyola University was imminent. c Union smokers are a customary event during autumn months, and many novices are introduced to the deleterious effects of the weed in this way. This type of mass meeting provides one of the most en- joyable socials of the stag variety. socially as well as financially, and it was estimated that three hundred fol- lowers enjoyed themselves. Of course, one essential of every successful dance is the orchestra and this position was ably filled. A second dance, given after the Tulsa game with Jack Ratcliffe again acting as chairman, was as complete a victory as the game which preceded it. It was attended by a large number of students. Arnold Mittig .Avl Ax '45 asv' XY!!! 'f I 1:3 sf ni V P 2 is 517011 A o N if n P , ui QB 9 424' lf s? 'cf 956 - I fr. f K-ls 2 Q qs L. fn ' 'N J Q v A x.v.Jg1?,fAf.Q.NJ,3L4Qx1f.I , Q ctr-BJ' Lffml, we 1930 TOWER :za - ' "-' - L i f 'XY i PY PM - r H2599 ' P N ...ffy A -Xs.. fn 4 - l TT - 5: -5 M H 716 Qlqififol Gi f . fi' 5' 4 0, .Q V. Q fi 517' .2 e HE HALLOWE'EN D A N C E , sponsored by the Women's League of the University of Detroit and held in the ballroom of the Detroit Leland Hotel on Friday, October 25th, was full of the mysteriousness, so typical of the annual fall holiday. The ballroom, a rendezvous of witches, cornstalks, cats, autumn leaves, and the like, presented a weird spec- tacle. It showed evidence of much thought and time on the part of the decoration committee, and revealed much of the delicacy of the feminine touch. More than l50 couples danced to the music of Mike Falk's Collegians. Refreshments served at the dance, proved a welcome diversion and a delightful feature of the HalloWe'en entertainment. To Mary E. Friedl, chairman of the affair, must be paid the compliment of a successful organizer. She was as- sisted by Betty Montgomery, in charge of publicity, Frances Kline, decorations. Armella Friedl, music, a n d V e r a Schulte, patrons. Eileen Crowley Mary Friedl HE BELLE HOP Was the sequel to the unusually successful Hal- lowe'en dance. The Masonic Temple was the site chosen for this affair, which was held on May Znd. A mod- ernistic motif was chosen for the decorations, a decision received with much favor. Most attractive programs were given the guests. A large gathering was present when Myron Schultz and his Ramblers started the festivities. As a special fea- ture of the musical part of the dance. the "hit" numbers from the recent Union Opera were played by the or- chestra. Eileen Crowley acted as general chair- man of the dance and succeeded in mak- ing the affair a success. Miss Crowley was assisted by Mary Nelius, Florence Bernard, Margaret Meyers, Ava Hunt and Lucille Sullivan. The Belle Hop represented a dis- tinct departure from previous League dances and will probably become a regular feature of the Co-eds' social program. iI171J1 fx lj -Nl f'.'4 f:,,5 ' WJ .00 ze A E55 fra fy. fr' 'J all 4' , Keg T ' S' . Q-ll 2 QQ55? Jg-g,cf.L4Y:'2'iSFJ,5,2gQk4 qfyglagj . "!'rp-C ""--vw, 1 THE V330 TOWER -fit? Q' H ul William Murphy HE FRESHMAN WELCOME DANCE, held at the Campus Ball- room, was given for the purpose of ac- quainting the Freshmen of the Engi- neering School with the upper class- men. The new arrivals on the campus appreciated this friendly gesture, for it not only provided them with an eve- ning of entertainment, but it also fostered a bond of friendship between them and their fellow students. The dance was conducted under the general chairmanship of Henry Stern- berg who, with the able support of Clarence Falkner, chairman of the ticket committee, and Joseph Slater, chairman of the reception committee, provided an evening of real enjoyable entertainment. Novel decorations in cubistic motif were employed. Ward S. Reilly and Clayton J. Pagot repre- sented the faculty. Every possible detail that would contribute to making the evening one of wholesome and entertaining revelry for the guests was attended to by the committee. HE TECH BALL, annual social event of the Pre-Junior class, was held on November 29th in the Fountain Room of the Masonic Temple. Wil- liam P. Murphy was chairman, assisted by Fred McRoberts and John Camp- bell. To say that it was a success is meager description. The attendance was large and was drawn from all col- leges of the campus. The Pre-Junior class entertained their guests unusually well, no small part of which was the excellent musical accompaniment of the evening furnished by Jack McGay and his orchestra of Detroit. The motif of decoration was origi- nal. The affair being presented by en- gineering s t u d e n t s exclusively, the Fountain Room was decorated in cubis- tic effects. Angles and circles, tripods and the mysteries of higher mathematics haunted the dancers and those who sat in the environs of this place of gaiety. Whatever characterizes an engineer, they certainly proved artists in conceiv- ing a setting for their class dance. Henry Sternberg Kls'l6'K9'l glvfiag ll if fifiif Q 'C iiffiz-Qs, H172 1 N J a x S .Jin gh, 3 I' '1 it-21 Q ll , H J 51 sf: -t lx ME El f -5 i Q-li 2 1 fl - g six Q? 2 np It A, l....'-4 RJ Ik 0 all cfbxv THE 1930 TOWE ?r'x : " Ti' -.k : HE ASSOCIATED EVENING CLASSES Annual Dance, spon- sored by the Night School, was held in the Knights of Columbus Auditorium on Woodward Avenue, February l3th. The object of the dance, as well as all the activities promoted by the As- sociated Evening Classes, is to draw more closely together the men of the Jefferson Avenue campus. The par- ticular purpose of the dance is to wel- come the Freshmen into the night school and to make them acquainted with the upper classmen. The dance was informal in tone. Save for the colors of the University artistically draped from the ceiling, no motif of decoration was followed, lt was to the jazzy strains of Al Goine's Blue Blowers that those in attendance waltzed and fox-trotted their way into the wee hours of the morning. Cmoodly compliments are due to Joseph A. Erdos, chairman of the event, and to his assistants, John Ciirardin and Thomas Mclntosh. This social affair is eagerly looked forward to each year. Ray Delaney Joseph E rdos HE PRE-MED BALL on Janu- ary 3lst saw one hundred and fifty couples dancing at the Fort Wayne Hotel to the gay music of Howard Bunt's "Syncopators." lt is an annual event sponsored by the Omega Beta Phi fraternity and closed the first semester's round of university socials. Ray Delaney was chairman. The ballroom was draped with uni- versity and fraternity colors. Red and white and blue balloons were strung over the dance floor. Combinations of skulls and bones, decorating the walls, reminded the frolickers that the future doctors were the hosts of the hour. The happy faces of the guests beside the decorations afforded a good study in contrasts. The "Syncopators," besides provid- ing the dance music, amused with sev- eral chorus selections and solos. The pledges entertained with a short skit and songs, the skit consisted of a dia- logue between four pledges and the fraternity monitor and evoked much laughter from the spectators. Q iyaff.. ,V ra, :V Xu'2 fffk' 4523 I azcfgs fra if fjfffsj. 7 'A-' - 5 4 aim? Q. ilmll kg. Q . gf M. a, 95 Ms P 3 ' V45 'J F8-N, G53 7-?7"'QN-3-fSx,,,--'N T r l " .sw-Ht ' " M 'K THE l93O TOWER ru g e e ' A 2 1 4' ""' X : A he h a' Ill ll o V Bae ue: -631 rig , . 'i 5 All 2 Q Frank Jenney HE COLONIAL PROM, held in the Grand Ballroom of the Statler Hotel on the eve of Ash Wednesday, March 4, proved to be the most suc- cessful and best attended affair ever given by Alpha Kappa Psi fraternity. Benedict Henn acted as chairman of this seventh annual prom. A The motif was, by its very simpli- city, beautiful. A few attractive decora- tions, appropriately placed, greatly en- hanced the natural beauty of the ball- room. Vari-colored banners of the university fraternities, strung about the room, were a part of the impressive setting. Splendid music furnished by Joe Kreklow's orchestra served to com- plete an excellent program of arrange- ments. One of the most colorful features of the Colonial Prom each year is the handsome banner given to the frater- nity having the largest percentage of its members present. The possession of this banner has come to be an enviable one, and each year all the campus fraternities go to great effort to Win it. HE SCRIBES BALL, the annual Delta Pi Kappa HalloWe'en Dance, was held at the Masonic Temple on Oc- tober 30th, 1929, with more than one hundred couples in attendance. Every amusing feature and novelty that could be obtained was arranged for the affair, and everyone had an enjoyable time. The dance is an annual affair, given under the auspices of Delta Pi Kappa, the University of Detroit journalistic fraternity. The theme this year was more novel than any of the previous dances, what with pumpkins, lanterns and cornstalks distributed around the ballroom and creating a most Weird effect. The affair was unusually successful due to the efficient work of the com- mitteemen, headed by Frank E. Jenney. The orchestra chosen was Herb Ein- ney's Grosse Pointe Yacht Club. The annual Pi-I, the official "newspaper" of the dance, also made its appearance as per schedule, and made a big impres- sion on the guests with its amusingly dry humor. Benedict Henn 517411 fi I2 WH 5' 441234. fl? Q 'lf my-sl. . . kg. " 5 Ms Q Ire' W S I ttf U41 -65 cgi ' 5 ' QS? 2 ' G1 QJWKLWJLQ fb f c TH ER Sfkw 6'5" 4 ,LU--JL A I- . -I T 5Ik"'!.wf.' E 1930 Tow sw ,. : , X : " HE ARGON TROPHY DANCE held on May 23rd found the Grand Ballroom of the Hotel Statler, crowded to capacity. This dance, which is an annual one, was the final social event of the school year. The already highly enjoyable func- tion was climaxed by the awarding of the Argon Trophy to that varsity football candidate, who showed the most improvement during the spring practice. The ballroom was decorated with fraternity b a n n e r s , balloons and streamers. It was a gala event and thoroughly reflected the real spirit of the Argon fraternity. The music was furnished by Joseph Kreklow and his bunch of melody dispensers. The men responsible for the Argon Trophy dance were James Brennan, general chairman, Joseph Kreklow, William Storen, C h a r l e s Mangold, Philip Conway, C. Scott Howard, Howard Magrath, John Dyer, Kenneth Tiffany and Dale Devlin. Daniel J. Moynihan was faculty moderator. Harry Ryan James Brennan HE TITAN EAREWELL FROLIC, the dance given annually in honor of the graduating members of the football team, was held at Hotel Fort Shelby on November 8th, The affair was sponsored by Theta Alpha Sigma fraternity, which each year thus honors the Titan gridiron veterans. Bob Cruzet and his Cotton Club furnished the music. It was with diili- culty that the committee headed by Harry Ryan managed to obtain the services of this excellent band. Last year the guests were so well pleased with the arrangements and music that this year saw a much increased atten- dance. The presentation of gifts was not made at the dance as was the custom. Due to the lack of an open date later in the football schedule, the fraternity found it necessary to hold the dance on the only possible date, a time too early for the careful selection of gifts. The presentation was delayed till the eve- ning before the Georgetown game, at the faculty building. Tien .!'l lib 3 2 Q' :tw W E If ' fi 'l'l'z 35,523 Q 4 'Kgs 517511 1 fs ,: I I t 1 E. ff C KW rffff 31 ,fl f 521 2 , V, fffpe H M Fx E Q gg A X2 iw w k Rx iS l yn - P xii C Q We ,i M Z QL -- tm' :quit WW In I: gg tm t gigs, QDZUEV , if ' NN V Fl ll' x I My lu' r as -. I Au lmlqf H I R. I I . y S s ' zszng high aboue grand lb l old Paris is the Eiftel t ' v N21 lj Tower. It stands as a monument to the trium- phant struggle of man over the elements. Thus we as- X sociate athletics with the Q I mighty E iffe l. Athletics 1 represent titanic contests t between men of brawn, Q51 struggles that can be likened 'VX AA 'VX AA 'VX 'VX jvxr to this monument founded s on the courage of man and E25 the endurance of steel. It stands a symbol of physical 5 strength and keen intelligence. Ui iw? eflv Jia ' 5 Q: t H sZX!g.,2Nfs Q' 564' E F55 ' 56 313 U Q ,M it l ,ra ta . y 1 I l Nfi 6 rf. X8 fi?-:M :JW 'KBKQM U65 ll an YE Q? Wlvk lXfgYl l3i WL M ,IGS ' W 'Lay fs Qwm-5QaqQCQ!24E'yf3KhEYj l ,. L A .in -.4 iQQ6"QfQ?QS?4SU ,, rf A 4' ,A M M SJ I-IL Tl J Q 3 5? M153 90 if? 5 MT M6 -fxfY V-4 I l I' X4 ' 4 ' -" r A ' F -5 . L ll! 'I 4 n -4 1 . --1 , , FQ' 'f'-1 ' QW: i I v- -1 1 I I J. 'f Ji s A . las: 'JH' sv '1 "'.: ' U .Q cr "L f' M5 2 f hif. g 'Q sr N N 'dill Ji HEAD COACH CHARLES E. DORAIS. COACHING STAFF O say that it is the caliber of the coaching staff that determines the suc- cess or failure of a university's sport teams is merely to apply to our athletic repre- sentatives the old axiom that it is the guiding force of an organization that is the determination of its efficiency. Surely the guiding force of the Red and White color bearers is Athletic Director Charles E. Dorais and his squad of able mentors. It is customary to judge any leader by the results of his attainments. The past three seasons, an epoch in the history of University of Detroit athletics, have con- clusively marked "Gus" Dorais as one of the outstanding figures in the collegiate football world of today. No word of ex- planation, no praise nor plaudit can ever overshadow the achievements he has cre- ated by placing an aggregation on the field to finish twenty-one of its twenty- two last games undefeated. Dorais was aided in establishing this highly enviable record by the combined efforts of his assistants, "Bud" Boeringer and Harvey Brown, line coaches, and Johnny Fredericks, freshman coach. Boeringer has won the undisputed title of "most colorful character connected with the Titan squad." And rightfully so, for who that knows "Bud" does not associate his name with the largest cud of tobacco on the squad, the gruff com- mands of a typical collegiate line-coach, and the all-around nomination for "best fellow in the World"? "Bud" learned his football at Notre Dame where he was chosen All-American center. - Brown and Predericks are also Notre Dame men. Both are preparing for pro- fessional careers in Detroit, and have ac- cepted invitations to aid Dorais and Boer- inger in their spare time. Much of the success of the Detroit teams of recent years can be credited to the careful handling and methods of con- .: iw, Jes, f-I-films,-4'sug,,.,' f E gggzg-,,x , uv., A lkudlpgigg aft TVX?-,l93O TOWE 1 Y in CL ' Q QB Q 242' t ,j'Q:..',f 1 r.'9.'a'j -7'-'m azs,4'Q3 2 6151 1 4 ,.f..r 4.1 1' ,fc--f' 4- 517711 gl -I 'L 2 sl? 2 Mgss. fgarxsnseagt s- g 'A-.. s THE '930 TOWER r Yn fg : f ""' 1' ii : N? cfm 'C'm..n 61.1119 Q ,fs w f -V-V ,K..,, in " W W 0 .-.' ' . if, A v 2 , 1 1 1 I , ,.,. f .aww kg ',, .A -wps- ' ' ,, 2 .t i 2 Q E Boeringer Butler ditioning athletes instigated here by "Dad" Butler, veteran trainer. Besides his work with the football and basketball teams, "Dad" has charge of the track team and although this is a comparatively new sport at the university, the improvement of his squad seems to undeniably state that it will not be long before the U. of D. will be a power on the cinder paths. Louis Conroy showed that he was a very fine court mentor by developing a first-rate basketball aggregation in his first season. The opening portion of the sched- ule was disastrously sprinkled with nar- Brown row losses for the Titan quintet but as the season advanced the players became a smooth-working machine that finished the year with a record that boasted of more wins than defeats. Co-ed basketball was recognized as a minor sport this year and the task of in- structing the players was assigned to Ray Navin, former U. of D. varsity cager. Eddie Kirk, Arts and Science Sopho- more, coached the representative team of the University Golf Club. Kirk is assis- tant professional at the Dearborn Coun- try Club. Fredericks Conroy Navin H1781 ?,l.x ' - "-3 in if 4519 V O gf lv 1 J' In P , vi 6 75 W E 1 O .J Wi ". x cgi a. 'J " lk 585 2 M3554 'fIf.JE'25'.'sJk?'S,g1 - s F! ' 'fi' of A a g ...r m T Hilggo TOWER A, A 7" X 4 7 - A-T i - F u 4, J? H 'll ,il lm' -1 4. , . L. gs, 'J k aw-2 Curry Brennan Nagler STUDENT MANAGERS T the end of a successful season, sport writers and students heap laurels on the heads of the athletes. They seldom are as generous in the cases of the student managers, the students who per- form so many important services to the team and the school. Football, basketball and track are the three major sports at the university and Paul Curry, James M. Brennan and Al- bert J. Nagler, student managers of these sports, received the Varsity George Crocker and Francis Starrs were awarded the Freshman numeral sweaters in recog- nition of their work as Freshman foot- ball and track managers, respectively. To Donald F. Carney, golf manager, and Fred Goodrich, tennis manager, the minor sports medal award was given. Florence M. Bernard received the Varsity "D" as manager of Co-ed basketball. Curry's as- sistants Were Dale Devlin, who took over the managerial duties with the opening of spring practice, and John Holland. Next year's card of basketball games is being prepared by Robert Stefanowski who succeeds Brennan as manager. DeRyck was assistant track manager. Ray Goodrich Bernard Carney H179 ll 4 270. c'. Pi' J 'n Qi Ms F 2 .Qs C ze 'J CHEERLEADERS 4. diary U!" ti CP c 'Q S l Q35 2 ' e .jg-sa faJu'ws,+Qk.,..'v ' Q6?m:N'iRy,L . ,Al , L, " .4 A. - 1k4-',fwQ9 r'5'tF" 1930 T 'War C C .J QM THE OWE-Q AARP 711 9 ' T I T S - 1 fi? 6 A h O? Lubinski ,Wi 'av Murphy RADUATION left but two mem- bers of the 1928-29 cheerleading squad available for duty at the start of the school year last September, Head Cheer- leader William Murphy and Joseph Lu- binski. It was not long, however, before a tryout had been held and four new uni- versity yell-masters had been selected from nearly a score of candidates. These men were Newton Jackson, Thomas Muston, Charles Marion and George McNamara. The work of the squad was not ended at the close of the grid card. They led the cheers at the Union Smokers and pep rallies as well as at the basketball games. The Athletic Board of Control award- ed Murphy the varsity "D" and elected Lubinski 1930 head cheerleader. Jackson Muston McNamara 5-'.1.",el3 X Q93 i4'ff5'.fQi-ll, 518011 Mo is S95 QQ wb! l g gm! MJ' E fix W N ' V ,f f 2 I J ,N a f fp X 1 gk AN E , Y R ' N A j if VKX N! J ,ml is Af Q ' ww fi 5 "lift : 497f Aiawi 7 5 lg Ulf! A ' , Hb gg, ' 'Lf : i "f, , , grew I Q, r P L -. Q53 Q K9 Q up W ff ggofbaff maxim? THE '930 TOWER 71- i N : 4' is : G3 rv? cf ee ll su C65 f t? 1. W-Si 4 Captain Lloyd Brazil E praise this man for what he is and for what he has done in four full years as a son of Alma Mater. As retiring captain of the football team, he leaves on graduation a record of ath- letic achievement unequaled in the an- nals of university sport. He leaves also his classmates and a student body who are fired with honest admiration for this blonde giant of the Varsity. No one can realize but himself the effort he has put forth in the cause of his university. We can never know this, but we have seen the tears in his eyes as he fought on the gridiron-have seen the flush of his appreciation in victory, the sorrow he felt in defeat. We have heard him cheer on his comrades when the crowd was silent, and we have watched him outwit the enemy when they formed for a puzzling play. This alone wins for him the highest tribute we can give. But he is more to us than this. He is the man whom the nation recognized as one of her fore- most athletes. He is the man who thrilled us so often as we sat in the stadium. No one will forget the ability with which he led the 1929 football team, how he played the general so cleverly. How can we ever forget his own unselfish individual performance? A keen mind and a versatile athlete, he is the object of our greatest esteem. Mere words are empty praise for service such as his. But what we lack in words we possess in sentiment, and in the wealth of color which he has be- stowed on our college days. Every uni- versity has its gridiron heroes who symbolize the spirit of its athletic achievement. But we will never admit that any were as great as Lloyd Brazil. L g! W' 443' E 81 7' gg Mig 'twig Q -'T as .- sy 5 ,mi ai-ZW 5 4 'f'w+ we iliszll THE 1930 TOWER vm ' B ' B : I H' -E' X g T 'P av c' ' ' Ill gl! ug, t 45 I cfi A Q 4: 4 'Q . B QS? 2 EXT year Bill Storen will lead the fighting Titans in the pigskin battles. He has already proved his met- tle as a member of the Varsity football team, and possesses that rare ability so necessary to a general of the gridiron. His athletic attainment during the past year is well-known to those who witnessed any of the football games. For it was Bill Storen who filled so well the place left vacant when Tommy Connell graduated. The berth of full- back on a team is not a position which lends itself to colorful play. But it is one of the most difficult to fill, and one which needs a man of steel. Storen has performed his task admir- ably. In those line plunges and hard drives through tackle so necessary in football strategy, Storen has been the central figure during the past football season. He has weight and speed, com- bined with a terrible power in hitting the line. Who will forget that memorable vic- tory, the Georgetown game? Certainly here Bill Storen proved himself to be worthy of his praise. For if it were not for the brilliant play of Storen and a few of his mates, that close contest might have ended much differently. Shall we say that he outdid himself un- Zfs xD Captain-elect William Storen der handicap? Or rather shall we say that in this game he promised us an athlete of great ability to captain the 1930 Varsity? We feel confident that the right man has been placed in trust of next year's gridiron fate, and know that the plucky Bill Storen will justify our con- fidence and the admiration which we now hold for his services. 3" l ay .Jn 2 gl 049 W E L-'RWOX M 8 1 X711 Qs ' 9 it .JS if . , 'Q 1 tifftll 518311 Qfgqm-M354 iaceusg.-msaqgi , , F!-' 'iq ,I A L THE 'gm TOWER is L - I L- X - HI 11 L gl AM .4 s .i cflg 3 'i tg? 5' FA? Les Vachon DE PAUL HE use of artificial lighting equip- ment by many important stadiums throughout the country is well past the stage of experiment, and in launching his football campaign last fall, the canny Dorais determined to take full advantage of his opportunity to introduce this novelty to Detroit gridiron fans. The at- traction drew a record crowd to watch the Titans crush De Paul University, 27-7, in the season's opener. Of course, the brand of football on tap at Dinan field is always the main drawing Captain Lloyd Brazil and his boys run riot against the Red and Blue found the locals in very satisfactory form for a sea- son's opener. The Titans had beaten the same opponents in an opener a year ago and started as heavy favorites. Dorais started his regulars for the first quarter. The novelty of nocturnal sport prevented scoring on either side, but the Detroit eleven began to function smoothly early in the second frame. Brazil was the first scorer of the season, taking the ball for a touchdown after an intensive drive had brought the pigskin from center 1'ield card, and the packed galleries which saw M21,l1aA' :fig A Loyola Pass the Diminutiue Ross Jumped High to Stop 3 v rn YI v 4 F 1 ll A A 4,4-di, H18-ill f is I, L, y S 8 1 jg JNQQ Q-ll S Qftaiiixwygii ff-'Ei'-wrgf K' F BBQ '41 THE 'QSO TOWER Q qv' wb Y 3 4' is 1 : nv cf ' ' UI O .Lf .fi 4 .. Q-Si 2 I YQ Ross Mullins Massucci into scoring range. Snitz Ross added an- other tally a few moments later. De Pau1's scoring opportunity came as the result of a fumbled pass to a Detroit In the last quarter, Ross again suc- ceeded in slipping off tackle for a touch- down, after Brazil's uncanny aerial at- tack had brought the ball to the nine- yard mark. Brown, substituting for Young at left end, was the recipient of another pass from the Flint flash toward the closing minutes of the game. He grounded it after a run of 25 yards. Par- saca's trained toe was good three times out player. The "blue demons" recovered on the two-yard line, and it was carried across on the next play by Harrington, who also kicked goal. Brazil, Ross, Parsaca and Storen were at their finest for Detroit, while "Skeets" Byers of De Paul gave the audience some tense moments. Johnson, De Paul full- back, also provided his share of excite- ment. of four, bringing the Titan score to a 27 SUMMARY: 1 De Paul ........... 0 O O 7- 7 fofa - Detroit ............ 0 0 14 13-27 Sisk of Marquette Gives Hart and Ross a Merry Chase f' I Lbsbh 4 2 1 24? ,J il P , sh 4 e if ' S I !j.'ff.u Ss M , X511 5634? aasfuiy fi f.-fig"-. ' I image. 518511 DAYTON gl N. 925 CQ Ce 5 'E T st, i Q gts cafwifiigrga we 1930 Towfp was s . g I X g 6 ? 4 , W I Ill FA? , u 'X H WN 1 " .f f ' W5 Bill O Halloran 2 7312? , ' ' "gst..:VHj gag: ' ' f x .V Www . , 'W ixbk K V WEEK before they invaded the motor city, the Dayton Flyers had uncorked their own season by a victory even more decisive than that turned in by the Dorais men when they slashed De Paul. A 33-O score over Indiana Central marked Harry Baujan and his Ohioans as a for- midable squad, and no argument was needed to convince the Detroit team that it was in for a strenuous evening. Its unbroken string of victories was also a heavy burden for the squad to carry, and its weight meant an onerous mental handicap. But a week of inten- sive coaching had its effect. The team that had whipped De Paul was now even stronger. The line opened holes, the ends were down on the kicks, and time after time the Titan tackles and guards broke through to throw the Dayton backs for a loss. Polish and form told the old, old story, and the Ohio outfit which had given U. of D. such a scare a year before bowed to an 18-O score. A hair-rising sprint of 74 yards brought in the first score of the game. The non- pareil Ross shot off right tackle and ran the gamut for three-quarters of the field. Natural speed plus perfect blocking en- abled Ross to score. 4 1 . 5, ' . , A .a .L c . New ' J .X ' The Touchdown That Tied the Score in the Marquette Game ilu!! NW? yjalpg Jifexf D 518611 N5 H57 'fi I me a , 3 me s 1. tiff f 1 , s M a ss 2 'lr-0 -, Il .J ,Ffa THE 1930 TOW R it N '94-. 5,'1"fv'?,?f -fi 33? 12 A D 0 A 0 QF x ,u- JB N4 I- T T- T lk v , 4 1 Ao ? E 'lt J 2 R 1' - I TT - s lp' T '35 NK" 'alll-Di Fsxlis' ll' lv af Zettel Brown Barbour "Brazil to Young," that invincible aerial combination, was responsible for the locals second touchdown. The in- domitable Lloyd passed, tossed, heaved, twirled and pitched the Titans to victory. Passing under artificial light is difficult at best, but the captain's magicvnever failed, and after advancing his mates to scoring territory, "Braz" signaled that the ball be snapped to him and he carried it across than he was against Dayton. Ohio papers ran into columns showing why no team, Dayton or any other, could hope to win out against such a gridiron genius. The "Dayton Herald" announced in their ban- ner "Brazil's Brilliant Play Beats Flyers." Detroit made 10 iirst downs against six for Dayton, but she suffered heavily from penalties. Fifteen passes netted nine com- pletions and 121 yards for the Titans. for a third tally. SUMMARY: , , Detroit .,........,. 6 6 6 O-18 Brazil was never more breath-taking Dayton , ,,,, 0 0 0 0- 0 Berg Spearing a Flying Loyolan Runner from Behind iI18711, mfg I3 1 09. I a Q? .00 J gf D ,I if , 5329 ia S 5 , fa fam! ZZ-9 E 1 Ostf we I cgi 'Q . 'i QS 2 QFSINQN 7:-'qty'-'pqjff-?'5JIbs.. fi' 15' 2' F E 1930 To We 52? -.ff T H 1 WER ,. 7""Ll . e ii ' ' X ' a lflia it ng fb' . is ef.. JA ,6 Q .. Art Anderson TULSA HE cluster of nocturnal battles which took the Red and White well into the heart of their 1929 grid schedule ended when the decisive score of 21-6 against Tulsa University conspicuously wound up the first third of the season at Dinan Field. In winning their eighteenth successive gridiron clash, the University of Detroit, although playing on a slippery pasture, displayed a diversified and compelling at- tack. Seasonal anti-climaxes are frequent in the football world and the "Golden Hur- ricane" was generally regarded as provid- ing enough danger to be classed in the "anti-climax" division. The oilmen had already annexed three shut-out victories over strong western opponents. The apprehensive attitude of spectators was strengthened when "Gloomy Gus" Henderson and his cow punchers took the scoring initiative. Benefiel, the hub of the Tulsa attack, took the ball on his own 38-yard line, crashed through tackle for the first breath-taking touchdown of a thrill-saturated game. But the fears of astounded spectators were soon assuaged. Detroit rallied, 'Aint Alone Worth Admission Price-Lardner Snares a Pass QIAYIQXP! iiff rms! em ,Y A a ,A .J-mf 5 Q lIl88ll kg 0 Ms 'lf Jay Q35 3 .5 se 'J Lv 'Lf ' g -1 ll '1 :Gig M9 12 'V Sli 2 ff 'Hvcfff Q-w"Xt?Sx4f95ft "cf HE 1930 Tow Q EE ru Ax A -I A In U.. :H K .J K T ER 3 1' -L 1 is . 'Www-nur' Mm' Hackett Petz Kenney massed her shock-troops, and settled down to prevent another occurrence of this disas- trous sort. Soon after Brazil crashed over for Detroit's first six points, and Parsaca added the invaluable extra point. A series of rushes and passes netted another goal a few moments later when Brazil again found end territory and grounded the oval. An exchange of punts brought Detroit's Hnal touchdown. The ball was advanced by kicking to within 4 yards of the score- posts, and Young carried it across. "Ring" Lardner, whose duties at center were sorely missed against Dayton and De Paul, returned to his line-up against the Oklahomans. The memories of spectators will always retain vivid pictures of the playing of Benefiel, Ross and Brazil. Beneiiel was indispensable to the "Golden Hurricane," and the sensational performances of De- troit's two backs was chiefly responsible for U. of D.'s eighteenth successive vic- tory. SUMMARY: Detroit . . ...... 7 7 O 7-21 Tulsa . . . . .6 O 0 0- 6 he N Aff? ' aaa.. - A Wz'de Loyola Dash That Gained Practically Nothing ,Q f if 09 x 518911 . -4 psig!! iq! .lj ,. Rl. S u . iQ Q J 'Q -25 44 E LOYOLA a. ug, Bef, LW .1 fig Y 'i Wi fl - e Qs, f'-we-:mem fe 1 Qgfgfligx " " " 'M 'NWZQQQ 'f E 1930 To +2 .f Q TH WER Q4 X -A 1?-1 "' ' We 'T I X 4 1 i 1 1 W H HI Lee Hart DEAL football Weather, the prospect of a bitterly-fought contest, the advent of a strong highly touted southern grid machine, and the possibility that Univer- sity of Detroit's unbroken record of 18 conquests might at length be shattered, brought a record crowd through the box oflice to Watch Billy Storen and Lloyd Brazil Hght it out with Junior Lopez, the ambidextrous quarter, in the first day- light grid session last fall. Taking no chances in the early minutes, Dorais shrewdly inserted his regulars, easily crashed through right tackle in an early play. Action lagged until final minutes of the third stanza. Then Detroit's blonde grid- iron giant raced around end for a second score after the opposition had been driven far back. Although Ross is credited with Detroit's third goal, credit is due equally to Bill Storen, whose remarkable return of a Loyola punt placed his mates in a favor- able scoring position. Vachon added two points to the total score With drop kicks, building the home total to ZO. slat ' who promptly proceeded to score as Brazil Ili Q. gf I Lf' 32, a Q new E Two Titans Demonstrate Business of Stopping Lopez t..?'x,f ' A' in GN? t.e4s9:x.'4 i ' If t 1 519011 Q?tf'.,iNjQ+40"f'.'E1'1'.'iJd,5Xw4,?EAj A E l93 T iki""5s'g1 r AA r L k.ff'Kx2 TH1 WER Axw.. fr' "I - I is - I 1, eff ll c 9 ' if liv e C355 fb i My fl I ...g NLK L : lf! -I1 G- Ass y . J'.!'."'ff'f 6' f 3 I VanDeKeere Hess Loughrin Loyola eked out a lone 6 points. With most of the Titan regulars on the bench, the Gulf City boys were playing an up- hill battle when a lucky break placed the oval in the arms of Fannin, Loyola left end. Andy Maniere, Who played impec- cable football all afternoon, was wide by a matter of inches in a pass to Berg, and the ubiquitous Fannin scooped the oval into his arm and reeled off 67 yards for a soli- tary goal, making the score 20-6. Brazil averaged seven yards on his plunges, but although few fans realized it, he was forced to retire because of his leg injury, an occurrence hitherto without precedent in the All-American's career. Detroit's line behaved admirably: the first string Wall was almost impenetrable. Anderson and Hart at tackle, O'Halloran and Buckman as guards, and Hackett and Long at the ends, all performed with a machine-like precision. Storen's activities at full back clinched this position for him permanently. Loyola provided the Titans with their 19th successive victory. SUMMARY: De Paul .... ....... 6 0 O 14-20 Loyola . . . ..... O 0 0 6- 6 The Titan Captain Downing a Loyola Back Single Handed Hia? t fI.',,.' :4 4 ll19lll sf, all Sill gf. 5 i t MJF' W S MARQUETTE 0 V auf Q41 qs L fm -4- -'N J Q65 ,ix Jgsd. f'.,g!.2!.NJk-.f:sbtgA,..'E.2g,5 g rU"-I N -4 is m fix- "mfg-5 I THE '930 TOWER 1 2... f 1-0 e 4 H-.fhsqf :N 'Xxx U 'H l t ' j it H gil .ol f is 2 L'-'fem Ray Navin eg 5 - lf-Z xi HE gods of chance often indulge in queer casts of their dice, and the foot- ball world was provided with an example of fate's capriciousness when the latter elected to bring University of Detroit's long string of triumphs to a close by al- lowing Marquette University to tie the invincible Titans, 6-6. Only one more conquest was needed to bring the magic chain of unbested football games to which the Red and White have been adding link after link for the last two and a half years to twenty, but this distinction was not in the books, for the Hilltoppers brought to Detroit's valiant gridiron war- riors their very equals. Perhaps, by releasing them from their spell, the "Golden Avalanche from the West" wrought better than they knew, for they removed the men of Dorais from the ranks of gods and restored them to gridiron normalcy, so that they were able to pursue their football course unbur- dened by this "undefeated" hoodoo. Detroit's scant six points was placed on the score card by Brazil, but not until after Joe Sisk, fullback for the invaders, smashed off Detroit's right tackle from Brazil Toe-Dancing His Way Through Marquette Tacklers i lk 9 4 HK' 3 i 519211 QQ NJ 0 .Q V ff l my l 9 1253 1 P , iii , -J Q , J l 2? cf S Q. as--f -Q-as--c-fi Q' C' E l93O TOW 'Q' ?Q.xIlS' pw FQ? A - " t f- '1?f5'ql2 e eff' TH ER Qdf: , R Ui? nl I 9 C53 A r' Q . ' All 3 M 'fl' I I lv Schimmers Bossenberger Potoczak the 21-yard line and ran through the Brazil uncorked a barrage of passes in Titan secondary defense for a Marquette touchdown. Radicks kick was blocked by Hart for U. of D. who prevented his mates from suffering a 7-6 defeat. A complicated succession of plays, in- cluding a fluke touchdown and many heartbreaking fumbles and referees' deci- sions, netted the Red and White their solitary score. Brazil, from his position a few feet from the goal, butchered his way across, but Vachon's place-kick was wide, and Detroit's chance for a twentieth vic- tory passed from its grasp. the later phases of the fray, but the Hill- toppers were successful in undermining this method of attack. Although a powerful amplifier, placed so that fans might be appraised of the progress of the game, kept exhorting the Hilltoppers to quit stalling, the latter "lay low" after establishing their tie score, and the game ended as Corbett kicked to Ross in midfield. SUMMARY: Marquette ........... 6 O 0 0-6 Detroit ............. 0 6 0 0-6 S N f S515 as 1 4 W. l .C 3 5 2 v ca ali' E A Titan Tackler Stops Marquette from a Restful Position fl-if at in Nr,V1-,QQ .,A,ff4':-3 G ,. - 'iff F Q 5f'l-Qs 519311 ov CCE S-aff ' W ,z fi evdgszf Q-c-xmre,fSL,fw f elrfxl L A .. V- vig Ja' of '- THE 930 TOWER Sr xs 4' - f -ti - fr"t"? ' F ' n"'n fi. xii is gl'?qNr .F ,x " At lk ui ' N fix, r, 3 I 4' 1 3 , 51 jig l ff r 'xi b -, wr, f 's V X , gg , ,p V ,f.,, X gr 'X QP' V Harry Buckman ill H , , QP , 1 A-1 A.,. Qrk its MORGANTOWN UT on the banks of the Mononga- hela in the mountains of West Virginia, one smiling day last fall, the natives who believed that football began and ended with Morgantown University received an experience that still excites their drawling tongues. Whenever a group of villagers gather for a chat4 whenever the learned professors of this cultured grove are at convention, when- ever the fire in the village grocery beams forth its warmth upon the collected idlers on a winter's evening, they will stop to talk of that immemorial fall day when eleven northern huskies swept down upon their vaunted gridders and clashed, butch- ered, knifed and battled their southern foes to a 36-O washout. And they will tell strange tales of a roaring savage, blond warrior, elusive and electrifying, who spun out of the clutches of enemy tacklers: who punted, and passed, and ran and blocked and charged as though equipped with the shoes of Mercury. And they will tell of another phantom, A Mixup Way Down on the Banks of the Monongahela gn-rrxn b ff .Aaksb r 14 551192, H1941 A M -fy Lf Q93 fa J, jg ta e A ff Jw XM' .X 3953 be . 'i i t ES? L Q 235 2 V s F!" 't Q 1 Q d ev THE l93O TOWER ll : ld Q' X 2 Ci v of f- ' I s' '13 ei . Ind -uw!" V A 1 O'Neill Rollins Gracey whom they remember as "Snitz" Ross, a speed merchant the equal of which has never been seen upon the mountains. But most frequently of all will they relate the amazing tale of how the air seemed alive with whizzing footballs, and how first Brazil, then Navin, then Ross, then Brazil again, kept romping through their papier mache defense, and how the score rolled skyward with incredible rapidity. ing giant in the center of the line, a tre- mendous hulk Who pawed and toyed with their football best as though they were puppets. In their ears will run a riotous rhythm, a rhythm taught them by the U. of D. musicians. It will s i g n i f y football supremacy, invincible and unsurpassed. In their ears will throb the "March of the Titans" and they will ponder, "How can such things be?" And they will nod their heads in awe i SUMMARY: and Wonder as they recall a great lumber- ?Iffg:1t0'wIi ' i j i j j j Vg 13 12 3:33 The Titans Stopping a Concerted Mountaineer Attack 5.ff""6V"9 Nr V Q3 l G-1955 afigfff-1 5 f -. .. aaeg - 415411. H1951 k i 4' Q il ii tg Q W e , 5, '52 file? it 'J QR., D 10 pf. e""t" I9 30 T "t""1 A sq 131 3 r T H E OWER IQAKS.. so qw 1 D 4 -5 Il " ll lll 0 A Q 241 624 lift, fx. Q-S5 A r B .vw , ' A . 4, i . eq., ry., . f S ta M' W Louis Ber N' X R . A 1 6 . g, ,Y A J, we. 'live'-s"' i k vjtffk, 'ax .f -X .... , I is A-rs M at 1 N as A X "'l' 5' MICHIGAN STATE OOTBALL enthusiasm swings its spotlight predominantly toward U. of D. each fall to the exclusion of almost every other gridiron controversy when Michigan State College is slated for the opposition. The two teams are keen ri- vals, and the annual pigskin clash is likely to develop a marked degree of sentiment. Hostilities last fall were staged on for- eign territory. Two thousand local fans made their exodus to shout for the Titans at East Lansing. There they saw Coach Crowley's eleven swamped by the largest margin in recent years. The score of 25-0 was a worse defeat than the agriculturists had suffered at the hands of the University of Michigan. The exciting Lansing invasion and many of the impromptu scenes in down- town celebration that followed the game will linger in the memories of Titan fol- lowers for a long time. The Red and White was never in more aggressive form than when it lined up last autumn before the agonomists. Michigan State had won five of its previous games and suffered the loss of three. She wanted above everything else, to prevent her tradi- Whz'le in the Game Berg Gave State Some Baa' Moments 519611 X' 172753. x . V' wa' 6.- af-1 kg, 'N I , . li J as-. 1? Qu! 42-9' E A:--p F: , li-ii R H fl ,X 34 ,qi-313. .K rf 'O ff-, F 3 f x 83, ,giz- g-'3 .I if ax ce!!! 3 6' 6-as-wssf fmwewffkfs l ' 5 -'za THE 1930 TOWE x a. V V4 Q R A K ., Q A 0 alll-fi ft-his Q6 f-1 ,U 'X J' l-- .4 .., 1. JA.. v P S - 2 Ai- 5 I XXV x 1 4' 6 1 Q Ei" G. Howell Mohardt J. White tional motor-city rival from tendering a third successive trimming, for U. of D. had been supreme in the two preceding on- slaughts. But the roaring thousands who gazed enrapt upon the velvety gridiron on this memorable afternoon soon realized that a State victory was not in the books. Their opponents were invincible. Especially spectacular at this time was the work of Louie Berg, the sophomore flash. Had his period been longer, the r'out of the capitol city lads might have been even more complete. Brazil played his usual versatile game, and the whole team seemed inspired to the height of foot- ball intelligence. When State threatened, as they did once or twice, the Titan line held like a wall of steel until finally the Aggies tired and gave up in despair. It was a gala occasion. Incidentally the games in the football rivalry with State are now all even, and next year's contest may well be called the rubber. SUMMARY Detroit ,..,.,.,........ 0 7 12 6-25 Michigan State ........... 0 0 O 0- 0 tg. . e J xg' il g , rv , Q Qu! M31 S Brazil Tangled in the Scrimmage Line at Michigan State ew v I3 V351 yaw-.1 5 K eg 4 84-23... H1973 OREGON s 1? ,I .ix Q56 .M s QS fl QQEQW M4354 7'9Km'BkQ?S'fM :4F'A' 930 'h'ar' wg 1 - Tgwfs 9f,,"0 " l 'S " ff'-fi Tony Nader il 1.1, WS fs N the dance it's grace, on the bridge it's vigilance, and in the tight places, for the Titans at least, it's the triple pass. Detroit has Won innumerable contests by resorting to this master strategy in dilli- cult situations, and many a football struggle has been determined by the effi- cacy of the triple pass. But not so last fall, when the vengeful "Oregon Aggies" nosed out University of Detroit for the first time in nearly three years of unbeaten competition. The opening sections of the game did not presage the fate in store for Detroit. Dorais' minions took the initiative from the start and with Brazil, Storen and Berg alternatively carrying the ball, they con- cluded a 62-yard march for a touchdown. Vachon made it seven by kicking goal. Oregon retaliated in the second by scor- ing With her offensive. The "Nemesis of the East," also procured for itself an extra point when "Big Chief" Coquelle Thomp- son booted the oval accurately between the uprights. With things evenly balanced at seven all and the game only half over, Oregon and Detroit settled down to a bitter duel. Not the Spirit of Spring, but Young Stopping a Pass 1119811 A " Y as Q-:Q , 5? 523 Sa? W E .Q QHORY Q5 ra'-A .Q Lf! vii, gag is E, EJ? Q5 ,Ks W V 'cf ggi!!! fl 1 H iw: 'Sli 2 '93 V g . -N it tjfgsj T HE I OWER L kw., I ' I 4 T ll 1 1 'elk-5 ?I-dis' Y in 9-K Bohland Wiese I. Duggan The Titans' defeat came in the third quarter, and it came directly as the result of a triple pass which went awry on the 20-yard line. The pass went to Storen, fullback, and thence to Hackett. Prom this point it was designed to reach the hands of Lloyd Brazil. In the course of the play, however, McKalip, the rangy Oregon star, leapt in- to the air and was away with the ball be- fore the astonished Detroit players could intervene. His 20-yard spurt to the goal The Red and White rallied desperately, It tried rushing and passing. It attempted end plays and line plays, but all were re- pulsed by the cautious Oregonites. A fumble or intercepted pass would have possibly reversed the situation but Coach Paul Schissler's boys were not distribut- ing any such entertainment. Brazil played his last brilliant game with Oregon. Injuries were to prevent his participation in the season's Hnal. was good and proved to be the deciding I SUMMARY: f h Detroit ...... ..... 7 O 0 O- 7 score 0 t e game' Oregon State ........ 0 7 7 O-14 ' . ..A..g,m.xa,.. Storen Looks Hungrily at McKalip, Oregon Ball-Carrier l i!"'fih' 5ifQ""K-P3 is ' v fp f "ffl .i 4 519911 xi' , G 'fs I X gy Pl, a s at JP MQ' S ? u qx L, fn 'K -'rx J h rg n "- Q 'xwf ya' 1930 TO S ta A .ff x THE WER t -ks.. at qfnqx 1 ' V 1 gf TT 1 p Mai! fgqgsa' ffmzg gQQ. My ,,. f xc ,I f Im . r fame e ' i 1 ,-" ,, Q3 JWTQE5 3 A tml, Robert Parsaca sl! d'ff 56 Cl! fe ' 'SSS S M g K5 3.4w- is .3 X ' ' lffffwf - ,lm ' 9 1 frwfr ' f N L . GEORGETOVDJ INGLED emotions swelled t he hearts of loyal Titan supporters as the team which had so gloriously rep- resented them for almost three seasons of matchless football gathered before the in- vading Hilltoppers for the last valiant gridiron engagement of their careers. As if in answer to the mourning spectators, the Titans staged one of their greatest football classics of all time. Lloyd Brazil was not in the linal line- up. An injured leg, despite the roars of the stands, kept Lloyd on the players' bench. In his absence, Robert Parsaca and Herman Young bore the burden of trouncing the Hilltoppers. Young blocked a Georgetown kick for the Hrst touch- down, while Parsaca recovered a George- town fumble and galloped 42 yards for Detroit's other score. "Rocky's" gifted toe booted over both extra points. Both of the Easterner's touchdowns were recorded in the second quarter. Hudak plucked the pigskin out of the air and tore half the field for one of the scores, and the other was the result of a fumble. The high wind literally blew the ball for a Georgetown tally when it was fumbled. U. of D. entered the second half much in the manner it did a year ago. She had A Pack of Georgetown Tacklers Chase the Elusive Storen 81171 'yily fhliigf Ah',a!lg ' I fi .hiatus vu .V I 4 Sgt . ic , 5 Emily H2003 f '- ? n,Ca 5 H25 PY ti' il , cffiff +2 .1 ' G' 'L-ff7'iEJa"'By-3-f fb P 6? ,-U., b-fQ,X,f"w'iH' wl,,,2' "' ' Gulf ,' SV' HE 1930 Tow 'Kai Q 1? ' . . 1' "N .P K It x T 1, ER -km ' - Z' Ti - 3 G' 4 ' My fi, 1 fi 3' 4 I. fi' I teh? 32525 1 -Q., , We si we 12,15 623 ef 'F' Gehrig not yet scored while thirteen units were adorning the Georgetown scoreboard. The boys came back in the second half, however, just as they had in 1928, and emerged from the rear with a brand of football marked by passing, line smash- ing, trick plays, and every deceptive de- vice in their bag of tricks. Spectators who shivered and groaned the two hours of the Hilltoppers affair will remember the game for more reasons than one. It was so bitterly cold that many hardy patrons were forced to re- Butler tire, and a bitter wind which swept the field not only made an aerial attack ex- tremely hazardous but reduced the occu- pants of the grandstand to only the most indomitable spectators. The icy pencil of Jack Frost paused long enough to paint the all-important score which spelled another and Hnal vic- tory for a great, beloved Titan Team, 14-13. SUMMARY: Detroit . . . .,,,.... 0 O 14 0-14 Georgetown .....,... 0 13 0 0-13 Billy Storen Retrieving Lost Yardage Against Georgetown vt S58 at . if Hi, , 3 fl-if E ff- vw if 2 0 1 11 bl e. O t I ,Self C , I dig lf: ima QS 2 ' Q' 6e+ff"-l'5'5'WS'ff3 'it ,' . 6. 1 HAT TMnf"'7'f 55 A' THE '930 TOWER 5 , ' " ix "' . ..,:.f ,- 149 Q 4' v eg s ifldj N-nh,- Jt TA -I A I' v EQ: - fs' ' '- -- . MX Q ,qt K1 . I 2 2 T ,b X W, 4' "' G' 4 I TT - h 1'f?9T2? RESUME OE THE SEASON By sAM GREENE NIVERSITY OE D E T R OIT h a s every right to "point with pride" to the achieve- ments of its football team of 1929, and there is no particular r e a s o n for "viewing with alarm" the prospects of 1930. Despite the loss of Lloyd Brazil, Merrill Lardner, Herman Young, Lester Vachon and oth- ers responsible for Titan success in the last three years, Coach Charles E. Dorais and his staff can be counted upon to pre- sent an aggressive, well-balanced team in September. Dorais was encouraged by the sight of more than 100 candidates at spring practice and from this record group he hopes to pick a squad capable of win- ning a majority of its games. It would be asking too much of the football fates to provide another Brazil. His individual brilliancy may not be re- HERMAN YOUNG The fine work done by the University of De- troit coaches and players last fall is readily evident from the record. Much lies beyond the iigures, of course, but the figures are tribute enough. Nine games were played, of which seven were won. There was a tie with Marquette University and a defeat-the first since October, 1927-by Oregon State College. Detroit's most impres- sive victory was scored against West Virginia when they ran up a 36 to 0 count on the Mountaineers. The Detroit team that day was at its peak. Its plays clicked with pre- cision. The line opened holes and the backs dashed through them for long gains. Many Titan supporters were disap- pointed that the team did not complete its second season without defeat. They can take solace in that ancient adage of sport: placed in Titan ranks for years. but that is no sign for the university's gridiron hopes to sag. The Titans s h o W e d in the closing contest of the 1930 schedule. with Georgetown. that they could win e v e n w i t h Brazil on the side- lines. They were no one-man team then and they in- tend to prove it anew in the com- ing autumn. MERRILL LARDNER "They can't win 'ern all." Every winning s t r e a k must end and the University of De- troit team, w i t h sixteen victories, one tie and one de- feat to its credit, is to be heartily congratulated upon keeping its own in motion so long. Perhaps another and even m o r e successful one can be begun next fall. fu!-"-"PW .X -v lj a H202 11 has ilt' 1 T.. Ry 3. ' S.. dig., RN 'W ..,- 5f',, 'x Q! ,ref pizz- C' E Q FRESHMEN FGGTBALL 1 O 'Lf cgi 5 '5 N Q-SE 5' 5,5-'-.5 7s'Y7"Q'33+55"Sg, ,fa Z. G' r -'x la c as THE 1930 TOWE R 0 f 5 AIX G 9 i 6 13 C gr ,X 2 I... ..l A lo.. if l ethos huns' - TT A-I is T HE most strenuous period in a foot- ball player's struggle for collegiate gridiron glory is his year on the Fresh- man squad. Throughout a long season, he is used to condition the varsity team. He helps to furnish the representatives of the university with scrimmage practice and he is forced to learn the plays of the opposing elevens of the varsity so that these players may become better acquainted with their rivals' methods of play. Not only this, but he is compelled to forget one system in order to assimilate the plays of the next team. A short schedule of games is arranged for the yearling squad but the frosh play under so many handicaps that success in these frays is nearly always slight. Their offensive system is unorganized and com- posed of the better plays of each varsity opponent, and their best hope for victory rests in their defensive strength developed in long and grueling scrimmages with the first-teamers. Port Huron Junior furnished the op- position for the yearling season opener. It was the brilliant aerial attack of the 1933 team that caused the final score to read 27 to 2 in their favor. Ray Cogan did most of the throwing with Wrathel and Cicotte alternating at the receiving end of his passes. The manner in which the frosh overwhelmingly triumphed over the "Junies" gave great promise of a suc- cessful season. The next game evened the count of wins and losses when Fredericks' charges journeyed to Ypsilanti only to be given an 8 to 0 defeat by the Michigan State Nor- mal Prosh. This game was played in a steady downpour that made passing im- possible because of the slippery ball. Jerry Flannery, a former U. of D. Freshman football mentor, brought his strong Ferris Institute eleven to Detroit for the third game on our yearling squad's schedule. The Titan freshies led through- out the game and saw an apparently sure victory seized from their grasp when a Ferris back scored a sensational touchdown with hardly two minutes remaining to play after a run of 85 yards. This brought the score to 13-13, the final count. The final game of the season was played at East Lansing against the Michigan State College Frosh. This battle ended with the Staters in the lead by a lop- sided score of 25 to 0. After this final game the members of the squad were honored at a dinner. 5-5'9" 'E' Nr va-13 QF'-ui Q' 'ig .idfiit-D , me QP . 1120311 ff! ,J K wa" ig? It -I if ay fm? ZZ-P -S 11 1 I ag fl 1 QQ sv M ' JV QQ A L ' " Q H 5 . .- f ., . Q5 k 3? 1 f ' ,f f if Q' KQV QJK9 was +1 wi? 2 dfk ezfaff 1 NJ WC 'i 5' if 7"K1"5jN..-41 'N ' w x g,KZef-l- sfSMX, I L fl E l93O TOW r r , 4? TH ER - -xx fr m i, ell:-B is xii 9 W Q6 T, Ax ,A -I 4, ik -,A V s f nf -1 Q 5 Q ffk f 5 MX 51 A I 5 Q N - 1' r O l ii L I FMS? sl: 4 o Captain Lloyd Brazil V 4 ITH a new coach and a somewhat new system of play, the basketball organization fought this year through one of its hardest schedules. It succeeded in winning a bare majority of its games, but its success cannot be measured in victories or losses. For this year was a season of building a basketball team, and this pro- cess cannot take into account merely to win. Two veterans of university basketball were found in Lloyd Brazil and Cy Aaron, and around this nucleus Coach Conroy sought to establish a net aggre- gation of strength. Whether he succeeded is not written in the records of the year, but can only be proven in the future. Although not as brilliant as he ap- peared on the gridiron, Brazil proved an able captain and a steady player on the court. His generalship of the basketball squad is worthy of every commendation, and is a tribute to the versatility of this blonde athlete. Brazil leaves the helm of the basketball squad to Cy Aaron, a brilliant net artist and a pioneer in the university's basket- ball ventures. Aaron's sensational play has been a feature of the Titan court perform- ances, and his knowledge of the game, to- gether with a distinct ability for general- ship, should augur well for the manage- ment of next year's net contests. Next year should see the peak of his individual oerformance, and with the capable help which he seems sure of having in the players developed this season, the Titan basketball records of 1931 should show a distinct improvement. To the retiring captain the university extends its congrat- ulations-in the captain-elect it places the charge of its future aspirations. ' Captain-elect Cy Aaron '95 JY, 5 I ' N L, P 3 . S',?h 1 ff 'U v A I QM 'Haig 5 at 520611 s 3? fl"-t iff, " ig, ' 1 3-,gl dig fi x t'1'. sf?f -5 K cd 3 If-U.-. f. iffaux :"'A:'. c g -U-1El93O TOWE Q a . f3l' x e if A 4, New A "" 1- ' yn ' TL f 2 0 Q A XTL' 'K T. Ik u-4 me 'kxl Z 1 4 1 '1 Af. 1 5 I .K ,A 5 is A - 1' - h 1' G? 'a 2 "'-'- II rem ' fffi Chapp ASSUMPTION SSUMPTION College of Sandwich were the opening foes for Coach Conroy's basketeers of 1930. The game, considered a 'Awarming up" contest, proved to be just the reverse. The Titans were given a blow in the face when As- sumption edged out a 19-18 victory. The chief alibi-cookers of the univer- sity got busy after the game and found out that one of the reasons for the defeat was the fact that it was played away from home-a thing that should never have been done in an opener. They also dis- covered that the Titan aggregation was composed largely of new material. Their crowning effort was the declaration that the Titan netmen were being schooled in a new type of play by Coach Conroy. Detroit's performance was not 'nearly as bad as it seems. Conroy's men played a hard game and kept in the lead until the fourth quarter before they began to tire. After missing live free tosses in a row their defense sagged, while the Canadians rallied and took a position in the van. DETRO11' ASSUMPTION FG FT TP FG FT TP Aaron. f. ....... 2 l 5 Higgins. f. CCD . .4 1 9 Butcher, f ....... I 0 Z Mencel. f ....... 0 2 2 Gracey, f ........ l 0 2 Hickey, f ....... O 0 0 Chapp, c ........ 1 0 2 Dark, c ........ 3 0 6 Fournier. g ...... 1 0 2 Daley, g ........ O O 0 Aitchinson, g ..... 0 0 0 Cagle, g ........ 0 0 0 Goodrich, g ...... 2 1 5 Dawson, g ....,. 1 0 2 8218 8319 ASSUMPTION HE excellence of Assumptions net performance was effectively proven when they added another Titan defeat to run their string of victories up to seven. The contest was held in the Jefferson avenue gymnasium. It proved a thrilling contest through- out, both teams playing a charging of- fensive game. Aaron and Aitchinson starred in the fray and amassed 23 of De- troit's tallies between them. But it wasn't in the books for Detroit to win. When the final gun sounded there happened to be a tie, and even an over- time period decided in favor of the Cana- dians by a margin of only one basket. The score tells of a hard-fought game. Assumption was very fortunate in being able to retain their lead, and in as close a game as this it is only the breaks that turn the fortunes of a team one way to victory or the other to defeat. Records are often untrustworthy accountants, and tell noth- ing of hard playing or sincere effort. DETROIT ASSUMPTION FG FT TP FG FT TP Gracey. f ........ 1 0 2 6 1 13 Higgins, f KCI . . Aitchinson. f ..... 4 l 9 Allison, f ....... l I 3 Pearson, f ....... l 0 2 Beaton, f ....... 1 1 3 Chapp, c ........ 0 3 3 Dark, c ........ I l 3 Hofstetter, g ..... 0 0 0 Mencel, c ....... 2 2 6 0 I I I I 3 4 6 14 2 l 5 1 l 3 I.aDouceur, g .... Dawson. g ...... Goodrich. g ...... Aaron. g ........ Kyniasty, g ...... il- 14 8 36 11 12 34 520711 'HX' 2731 f"".". 'W 2 f an A ' K2 TW-' Ab ggi if -3. Q ,fig-' e. M o A i Un , -J 9 35 i gk GLS, E235 E '- , s 'J Glefkf .gs cfq 5 3 4 533 3 Q, qs L K' 'S JO ra ' w-wdesaf-M-Nrsfac,-fr" 'L' GIF' '-af, '-' 1- 1 A U f'X99 al"hli P ll M. A JM Q, ,u-MJT T " U, A 'fi D '41 wg OWER X A .,,, a My Goodrich ada M ' ,A '1- OLIVET LIVET College was the first victim of the Titans during the 1930 sea- son. The contest was held in the Light Guard Armory-and Detroit accomplished an easy victory. Standing out in the evening's perform- ance was the brilliant work of Ed Gracey. sophomore forward. In his first year of varsity basketball Gracey has proven him- self an artist of rare ability on the court. His work alone in this fray made it really W or t h the witnessing. Neither team showed a brilliant form. Gracey scored 12 of Detroit's tallies alone and led the offensive all the way. But, after all, it was Detroit's Hrst vic- tory, and from a student's standpoint that is surely enough to commend it. Against a better team it is doubtful whether it would have been a victory, but it's a win in the books and Ed Gracey earned his berth as a regular for keeps. DETROIT OL1VET FG FT TP FG FT TP Aitchinson. f ...., 0 0 0 Johnston, f ...... 2 O 4 Pearson, f . ...... 1 1 3 Rhimsey, f .,.... 1 0 2 Hamacher, f ..,... 0 0 0 E. Johnson, f .. 0 2 2 Gracey. f ........ 6 0 12 Cardwell, c ...... 0 0 0 Dunnigan, f ...., 1 0 2 Fyvie. g ........ 0 4 4 Chnpp, c ........ O O 0 Hearkel. g ....... 0 0 0 Fournier. c ....., 1 3 Davies, g ,... .... 0 1 1 Aaron, g ........ Wilson. g ....... 1 2 4 4917 5 0 0 0 Kyniasty. g ...... 0 0 O -- Butler. g ,..... . .0 O 0 Goodrich, g ...... 2 0 4 1 1 4 26 ST. JOHNS HE Titans displayed a greatly im- proved brand of basketball in their fourth game of the season. St. Johns University of Toledo, Ohio, fell before the speed of their attack and were seldom able to penetrate an almost iron defense. The victory over St. Johns placed the Titans' victories even with their defeats. Every play in this contest "clicked" The Detroit defense performed almost perfect- ly and the team-work on both attack and defense was unusual. P At the half Detroit held a 17-5 margin over the Toledo cagers. Each man on the squad performed in stellar fashion, with Gracey again leading the attack with his spectacular basket play. Gracey shot seven baskets for a total of 14 tallies. Lack of ability to take advantage of foul shots accounts for the fact that in four games Conroy's men made only 17 free throws out of 45 attempts. And free throws are often the deciding factors. DETROIT ST. JOHNS FG FT TP FG FT TP Fournier, f ...... O 0 0 McNerney. f .,... 0 2 Z Hammacher, f .... 1 0 2 Calkins. f ....... 0 1 l Gracey. f ....... 7 0 14 Costello. f ...... 1 1 3 Butcher, f ...... 0 0 0 Roberts, c .,..... 1 0 2 Kyniasty, f ..,... 0 0 0 Weber, g ........ 0 2 2 1 Pearson, c ..... .. 1 3 O'Donne11. g ..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 Chapp, c ........ Turby, g ......, 2 0 4 1-Iofstetter. g .,.. 0 1 1 --l- Butler, g ......., 1 0 Z 2 6 10 Goodrich, g ,..... 4 0 8 16234 lu ASQ s 15 -sy, '29 i, 6' ,W l a Jjgj K E 'X 1120811 -23. r J' 'AHA gf as, W x... 1 fin Qs ' G' Q41 FKQSQJQQ 'W ' r-N' -SGD, W, 'R -X-HE 1930 TOWER L1 fb X el 5 ' X vt' alll-5 ' M, 1 , if bw if Y IF. :Ch , I I. SN, TI? 2 5 Ui. 'iv- ll nfs..-J", Butcher MICHIGAN STATE I-IE highly touted Spartans who con- fidently entertained the men of Con- roy at Lansing were given quite a shock when they met a Titan defense that was thoroughly unexpected. The Titans appeared the under-dogs before a crowd of 3,500 of the audience on the floor as fans. The main query seemed to be, "Will State double or treble the score of their opponents?" The Red and White basketeers realized the quality of the team they were facing, and played a waiting game and fought off the Spartan attack repeatedly. They were not, however, able to penetrate State's territory enough to run up many tallies on their own account and succumbed to defeat by a margin of three baskets. With, perhaps, a trifle more confidence the Titan's part of the score might have been considerably in excess of what it proved to be, but as it was the final gun announced a 26-20 victory for the Lan- sing hosts. DAYTON OR the first time in the history of their athletic relations with the uni- versity, Dayton emerged a victor in the Titan's sixth basketball encounter. It was the fourth defeat of the season for Detroit and the first victory for the Flyers during the entire four-year athletic rela- tionship. Dayton found itself eight markers in the lead when the game ended. At the end of the Hrst half the Conroymen were be- hind l l-4, and had only succeeded in net- ting one basket during the first two periods. ' In the second half the Titans attempted a rally which resulted in amassing nine points to even the score. But their hopes were blasted when Lensch, star forward for the Ohioans, pierced the Titan defense for three goals in quick succession. From then on the men of Conroy were unable to catch the flying heels of the Daytonians, and the game ended with Dayton leading 28-20. DETROIT MICHIGAN STATE DETROIT DAYTON FG FT TP FG FT TP I FG FT TP FG FT TP Fgurnigr, f --.... 3 2 8 Van Zuylen' . I 0 I I F0lll'l'1l9l.'- f. ,..... 0 2 2 Andras, f. ..... . . 2 2 6 Butcher, f .-,,... O 1 1 Barnard, f A....l, 0 0 O Aaron. f ....... 0 1 l LEl1SCl'!. f. ....... 4 3 Aaron, f ,,.,,,,. O 1 I Puinco, f ,,,4,, O O O Gracey, f. ,...... 3 l 7 Ladner. f. ....... l 0 2 Gracey, f ,,,,,,,, 1 1 3 Don Grove, f, , , 2 0 4 Kyniasty, f ...... 0 l l Breen. f. ....... .O 0 0 Pearson, c ....... 0 0 0 Denl-ferder, c ..... 2 0 4 BUlCh2l'- f ------. 0 1 l Cabrinhil. C ------ l 0 2 Chapp, c ,,,,,,,, 0 0 0 Harin, C ,,,,,4,, 1 0 2 Pearson, c ....... 2 l 5 Edwards, c ...... O 0 0 Hofstetter. g ..... I 0 2 Scott. g ........ 2 0 4 Chapp. c. ...... I 0 2 Warner, g ....... 0 0 0 Goodrich. g ...... 2 1 5 R. Grove. g .... 0 O 0 Hofstetter. g ..... 0 O O Flanagan. g, .,... 2 3 7 -1-- Haga. g ....... 5 1 ll Goodrich. g ...... 0 l l -lf- 7 5 20 --- Butler, g ......,. 0 0 0 10 8 28 12 2 26 - 6 8 20 1120911 A 4 li- Z, '83 M , S JW' are E 5592, . 'D me fi: f' "s'1'l-2 iz ,iw "' ,Au ' G' f 30 11 93? 'I H E OWER 5 U -A Ax- -. 'LF 0?F,, 5.4 452 .f'5 5 32- Q Gigi S' I A Fournier ALBION TUNC1 by two defeats in a row after they had seemingly hit their winning stride, 'the Titan cagers made a determined drive for victory against Albion College and defeated them by the narrow margin of 26-24. The achievement was a remarkable one. The Presbyterians from Albion, Michi- gan, were M. I. A. A. champions and suc- ceeded in placing two men on the All-Star team. In the Albion fray Conroy's proteges displayed a complete reversal of form. The moody team, for such a title it seems to deserve, won this contest only through their ability to make good their free throws. Heretofore they had been ex- tremely reticent about taking advantage of the charity tallies. The Titans scored 10 out of 16 at- tempts from the free lane. The high scorer of the game was Ed Chapp, junior, playing at center. He accounted for 10 of Detroit's markers. DE PAUL T was back to the defeat column for the Titans in their first game of the Illinois trip. De Paul University of Chi- cago reaped a partial revenge for their de- feat on the gridiron in the fall by achiev- ing a victory over the Red and White to the tune of 21-17. De Paul paid close attention to its guarding in the first half and succeeded in holding the ambitious Titans to four tallies. Detroit had not succeeded in col- lecting a single Held goal, while the Chi- cagoans had romped over the floor for 12 points. In the second half the Titans plucked up a bit and were able to score 13 more points, but it was not enough to down the romping De Paulians who with the Hnal gun had amassed 21 tallies. The De Paul cagers divided scoring honors quite evenly, but on Detroit's side of the ledger Cwracey stood out for basket- shooting. A4355 iw 1 my gaila 5. abit? Gif S Q.. 9' f-if-'QT' g..a 399. I 'J Van! 'U Qaesreer 2-51"-Q',3..,nBN :'.S"9oE.3?F 02 PS' F20 -v-an-n-vs . . ,., ... ,Q ..,,,. .. U .qq. ..... m i 11 I 112' '4 .. .... .I PU :::1t:::.,,9 oo oo-xsoowo.-0-1 "' en G -POINUIN-79h-'Cn-4,-l N -- '-I at -1-oowoxnos.-NU OVWYFU O77 sf-mis?-as ':1E.:!'m4oa- 32 :'f755' Yq"f',,E.5'S .,,,,,,.,..f-S .... . ..,,-, .....T". T" E ffffffff O . .--.... v-UZ WO Nic'-'CBJ'-'lxlt-ici 'T1 Ox v-JINDGO'-'CCDQ,-i N '-I .gs xlNNOx.nN-lrN'U 'U U11 EEN?-039 -ncgwvanw 'AD-m'UE.x."'0n 3-o'U:-53.5-'Z 22.53, S.. NP' nm-mn. gl n.. .. W. . . ,,,., E QQ ...... : ,, ifiififi W .... .... ,HQ or oo-oo'-NN0"l un oooo.-oo.:.3 v- '-I xl como--N-r-evo 939957701 O 3 O-1o'g:o H SGD. no -vO,,,U'nO::s vu -,,n4 ... '05"5'::n ,,, mg fig-rv -:aoon -- .o.. g.. U .g1..,,,:,.. m i'fQfff""f' 2 I I I I i I I I .1-,CI oo QNN--ooowol' U! Q'-'QOOUJOr-4:51, no '-i v-I GN-l'14lllN1OVJGNl'U N I ,.., 535313 "'o'1'i-Q4 lf'-ffitflhj gh-..,f,m IIZIOII ft 6' J 9'S'i' -W5-?f'6Dxg,f--'ggi Q"'2.f5i? fl K '- --fm. 39 . THE '930 TOWER m y 2 I X 3 .1 ll 'll :HN .13 5 I .filli Bra,-e Q 1 Q13 x. ' , R U G 3 E LOYOLA N the second game of their western in- vasion, the Titan net artists lost to the renowned Loyola basketeers by the margin of one basket. It was a contest marked in the later periods by superior de- fensive play on both sides, and a two- counter lead held by the Loyolans could not be broken. The Lions centered their attack around the stellar Charlie Murphy whose fame has few rivals on the national court. Ed Gracey and Kenneth Fournier won the playing honors for Detroit, scoring seven points between them. Experience and a winning form were the factors contributing to Loyola's suc- cess. Two different styles of play were used, and each team solved the other's style resulting in an almost basketless last quarter. lt was a foul that decided the game. Charlie Murphy was fouled in the act of shooting and was allowed the basket as well as two free throws. Another free throw shortly afterward, and the Detroit lead of 10-7 had been wiped away. DETROIT LOYOLA FG FT TP FG FT TP Gracey, f ....... 1 1 3 Flynn. f ........ 0 0 0 Fournier. f ....... 2 0 4 Waesco, f ....... 1 1 3 Pearson. c ....... O 1 I Murphy, c ....... 1 3 5 Brazil, g ........ 0 0 0 Butzen, g ....... l 0 2 Aaron. g ........ l 0 2 Schuhman. g ..... l 0 Z Butler, g ........ 0 0 0 -l- ---- 4412 4210 Dunnigan .MARQUETTE N the Hilltopper's gymnasium at Mil- waukee the Titan cagers fell before a golden avalanche that would not be denied a victory over their traditional rivals. Sports enthusiasts declared the 30-21 de- feat another evidence of the mystic "jinx" that Marquette harbors for Titan athletes. In the first half by brilliant play and accurate shooting the Hilltoppers ran up a lead of 12 points over the Red and White. It was a brave effort on the part of the Titans, featured by stellar basketball on the part of Pearson and Gracey, that en- abled the Titans to close this gap and even the score in the third quarter. A Hilltopper rally in the fourth ended Detroit's hopes, however, and a lead was built up that proved too diflicult to over- come or even approach. The defects of the Titan basketeers were revealed plainly in this contest. That they did not reach their form until their opponents had piled up a formidable lead was the chief cause of this defeat. DETROIT MARQUETTE FG FT TP FG FT TP Gracey. f ........ 2 0 4 McElligot, f ..... 3 2 8 K i t f 1 1 3 O'Donnell, f .,... 0 1 l yn as y, ...... Goodrich, f. ..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 Butcher, f. ..... 3 0 6 Andrews, c ...... 2 1 5 0 0 0 ' 0 2 2 1 0 2 3 1 7 Brady, f ........ King. g ......... Pearson, c ,....., Chapp, c ........ Shipley, g ..,.... Brazil, g ........ l 2 4 Aaron, g. ....... 1 3 5 9624 ,WO Us - J N5 ...W L. 531, 2' , Q 'Q 75 Q-if A Wa 521111 U cts, 1 A QM ,5 Q85 2 58. JQ-gy f'.T.'E.'2'i."'i9s4QX!,.'i5:A J Qii1.F:S?P A ' f 1- -mar Q9 , , - , , affgki THE 1930 TOWER Qiryxaa I- Z' -1' 11- -L : pix 8 4 l ffl? Il ,XQ- . Q, I ffl? gi 'qxvs ll iXgl' ALBION LTHOUGH the second game of the Albion series was not as close as the result of the first contest it was, neverthe- less, equally as well-played. The Titans, having barely managed to eke out a 26-24 verdict in the opening game of the series, were on edge for the final fray, and as a result, they took the lead at the start of the game and held it all the way. Again the Titan scoring was rather evenly divided, with Gracey leading the way with 8 points, followed by Brazil with seven and Butcher with six. The Titans followed the instructions given them by Coach Conroy, and played a strictly defensive game, only shooting for the basket when an opening presented it- self. Albion was forced to play for the ball and the Titans were given many scor- ing chances on account of this. Gray was the high-point man of the game, scoring five baskets and three free throws for a total of 13 points. Brazil and Aaron played a wonderful game. Hammacher MICHIGAN STATE HEIR lack of accuracy at the foul stripe probably cost the Titan bas- keteers their tilt with the Michigan State quintet, the Spartans eking out a 21-I8 victory. A But for missing three successive fouls in the last two minutes of play, the locals might have been able to tie the score and force the game into an overtime. State failed to show its best brand of cagery and had they not put Lloyd Brazil and his mates in a trance by annexing a 6-l lead early in the contest, the outcome might have assumed a different aspect. The U. of D. attack was led by Aaron, at guard. He scored two field goals and Hve charity tosses. Brazil and Pearson followed with two baskets apiece. State's highly reputed zone defense was discarded in this affair, the Green and White employing the man-to-man type of defense. The Spartans left-handed loop wizard, Haga, scored six points for his team. Roger Grove returned to form and got second high scoring honors for State. DETROIT ALBION DETROIT MICHIGAN STATE FG FT TP FG FT TP FG FT TP FG FT TP Gracey, f ...... 3 2 8 Good. f ........ 0 0 0 Gracey, f ....... l 1 3 D. Grove. f ..... 2 0 4 Kyniasty, f ...... O 0 0 O'Rourke, f ..... 0 0 0 Fournier. f ...... 0 0 0 R. Grove f 2 6 Fournier, f ...... 0 0 0 Huff, f ......... 0 1 I Goodrich, f ...... 1 0 2 DenHerder 2 2 Butcher, f ....... 3 O 6 Danyleziyer, f .... 0 1 l Pearson, c ....... 2 0 4 Scott, g 1 3 Pearson, c ....... 2 0 4 Neller, c ......., 2 0 4 Chapp, c ........ 0 0 0 Haga, g ........ O 6 Chapp, c ........ 0 O O Rice. c ......... 0 0 O Brazil, g ........ 2 0 4 -ii- Brazil. g ........ 3 1 7 Koblm, g ....... 0 O O Aaron, g. ,.... 0 5 5 5 21 O'Neil. g ........ O 0 0 Schesler, g ...... 0 0 0 -- Aaron. g ........ 1 0 2 Sheridan. g ..... 0 0 O 6 6 18 Goodrich. g ....., l 0 2 Gray. g ......... 5 3 13 13 3 29 7 5 19 521211 io 2? st V I u f S Qlfdei Q69 E Wm . fag, Lgasfwrag s.'?'9' 3- 4gfffffOl. X ,Q ., , QffB?5N?s!3+4f'?'JEX'Dk'i'3S1M5?f7ri5g,g39 , , 731' "5-'Q ,Ja qu Q' - lf TT - gf G' 1 ' 1 Ill , 1 xx Q, lecf 11,41 93 .1 .293 t l isnt? .2 Q FA? .QQ ig .M 4 ta' x 112.53159 l . .5 o' , .,a MARQUETTE ASES of prostration and nervous collapse were intimated at the Arm- ory last winter among the spectators who witnessed the harrowing court duel be- tween Marquette and U. of D. As the game was about to close, Mar- quette, which had trounced the Red and White earlier in the season, was again leading, 21-19. A free throw by Cy Aaron reduced the margin to one point. and then Brazil, with twenty seconds to play, sank another perfect birdie and forced the affair into overtime periods. At the end of three extra stanzas the Titans finally emerged, 30-21. The contest was featured by an array of long shots: Brazil, Aaron, Butcher, Gracey, Kyniasty and others whipping them in from all corners of the floor. O'Donnell, Marquette's mainstay and high point man, performed with his usual brilliancy, but was held to a lone field goal, due to Brazil's fine guarding. sl" Pearson ADRIAN 1' N a game that featured a shower of baskets the Titan netmen crushed Adrian on her home court with a score of 42-32. It was Adrian's first defeat at home for five seasons. Detroit displayed its best offensive of the year and both teams exhibited un- usual scoring combinations. Adrian's downfall can be attributed to the Titan maneuvers in the second half when they drew out the opposing defense and rushed the basket. A fast passing and dribbling play coupled with accurate shooting characterized the Detroit offen- sive in this game. Gracey was the outstanding star of the contest scoring 13 points. Butcher, Brazil and Aaron turned in fine performances both on offense and defense. The Adrian game evidenced a new Titan cage organization, one of finish and excellence. The indeterminate starts of early games were gone and our netmen took the offensive at the start and slashed their way to the basket. DETROIT MARQUETTE DETROIT ADRIAN FG FT TP FG FT TP FG FT TP FG FT TP Gracey. f ...... 2 3 7 O'Donnell, f ..... 1 O 2 Gracey, f ........ 6 I 13 Patchett. f ...... 4 1 9 Fournier. f ...... 2 0 4 McElligot, f ..... l 2 4 Goodrich, f ...... 0 0 0 Anderson, f ...... 1 2 4 Butler, f ........ 0 O 0 Ruehl, f ........ 2 4 8 Butcher, f ....... 5 0 6 Schonover, f ..... 3 2 8 Chapp. c ........ 0 0 0 Andrews, c ...... 3 1 7 Kyniasty, f ...... 0 l 1 W. Patchett, f. . .1 0 2 Pearson, c ....,.. 3 0 6 King. g ......... 0 0 O Pearson. c ....... 2 0 4 Fisher, c ........ 2 0 4 Goodrich, g ...... 0 0 0 McNamara, g .,... O O 0 Brazil, g ........ 3 2 8 Reed, g ......... 1 I 3 Brazil, g ........ l O 2 Shipley. g ....... 3 3 9 Aaron. g.. ..... 3 4 I0 Geisler. g ........ 1 0 2 Hofstetter. g ..... 0 0 0 McQueen, g ,,,,., O O 0 --1l- - Aaron. g ........ l O 2 Genyo. g ....... 0 O 0 17 8 42 13 6 32 9 3 21 10 10 30 521311 I N r,Val 1 K is 4' rf W 558 We Q. 0 9 l -fel? 9 E . 35 ,v gf 'I ,192 1-if .1 f' -, 5 Q0 1.-J N' 'yi---.a 03 erik? THE 'wo TOWER 7- 5 J " ' 1 ' kgs ffl? Kyniasty W ST. JOHNS HE Titans added another victory to their ever-growing string when they defeated St. Johns College, 40-l5, in the second game of a home and home series. Coach Lou Conroy substituted freely in this contest, as the opposition was not very strong and it gave him an opportun- ity to gauge the ability of his substitutes. As a result, the scoring was evenly divided among ten of the twelve men who got in- to the fray. With the exception of Eddie Gracey, who accounted for thirteen points, no outstanding star could be named. Gracey played longer than the rest of the team, and consequently managed to gather four field goals and five charity tosses. Butcher and Aaron followed. The St. Johns quintet, although behind from the start, fought desperately all the way. Costello, center for the Ohioans, garnered three field goals and one free throw. LOYOLA LL the pre-game dope which had been smeared about here and there and which picked U. of D. as a set up for Loyola of Chicago was quite unexpectedly and conclusively refuted when Coach Lou Conroy's quintet smothered Len Sachs' boys by a 23-20 score. The Windy City loopers were prepared to meet a strong defensive outfit here. They remembered the first game of the series, which wound up with a l2-l0 score, Loyola high. Detroit altered her strategy to include a definite offensive attack ,along with her usual defensive tactics. Both halves were at a speedy pace. Detroit had a decided disadvantage in that her opponents took away every tip- off from center. There was no Titan cap- able of out -jumping the Chicago pivot man, Charley Murphy, who was the main cog in the invaders' offense. Many of the DETROIIQZ FT TP ST' JOHIIQIS FT Tp 2500 fans who packed the Armory were ?31c,2le,f'1i11121l 3 13 W-f,E.1'Telf.f:1L1i3 3 3 our to S22 11713 Stellar A11-Amerlfan P21- Butcher, f ...... 3 0 6 Weber, f ..,..... 2 o 4 f oeedrieh. f ....., 1 1 3 Kemwirez, f ..,.. 1 1 3 Orm- Butler, f ........ 0 O 0 O'Dor1r1ell, c ..... O O 0 DETROIT LQYOLA Pearson, c ....... 1 0 2 Roberts, c ....... 0 0 0 FG FT TP FG FT TP Chafee' C -------- 0 1 1 C0Sfe110- 2 ------ 3 1 7 Gracey,f ...,.... 2 o 4 smirh, f ,....... o o o BH211- 2 -------- 1 1 3 C21kmS' 2 ----- 0 0 0 Butcher, f ....... 2 1 5 Durburg, f ...... 1 0 2 Hofsffffer 2 ----- 0 0 0 HUf19Yf 8 ----- O 1 1 Pearson. c ....... l 0 2 Waescom,f ...... 0 2 2 Aaron, g ...... 2 l 5 Hosfett, g ..... 0 0 0 513211, gl- -'.. 0 1 1 Murphy, C --..., 1 3 5 KVUMFIV' 3 -'---' 1 1 3 '-1 Aaron, g.. .... 5 l ll Butzen, g ....... 2 0 4 Dunmzan g ----r 1 0 2 6 3 15 Butler, g.. .... 0 o o sehuman, g ...... 3 1 7 ""k'- --11 Sextro, g ..... 0 0 0 15 10 40 10 3 23 -ll 7620 1121411 'EQ fbi! 'X f VXU11. 1 4 ge, J. 1 F P5 2 310' 111' 'G O L efk 915 .1 is I 1 - cw pe-1 fi-QQQJQ3 'N ' cel?-A "J" I If - I' .Q fiQ M1930 TOWER WA . 1 : '?b JJ S-4 L- A. ,L 9 P' N .4 fs X 6 5 'lat K WA 2 2 -' ! "ga FK? ST. XAVIER N the first contest of a home and home agreement St. Xavier College of Cin- cinnati trimmed the smiting Titans neatly to the tune of 23-18. It was another de- feat in the see-saw fortunes of a newly- built basketball organization, another evi- dence of the moodiness of the Titan basketeers who at one time seemed almost invincible and at another seemed puny and ineffective. Only one of the Titan warriors earned more than one basket, Les Butcher sank two of his shots. Aaron and Fournier both recorded goose-eggs for the evening's performance. The St. Xavier defense was performing excellently, and the Detroit wall was not quite strong enough to hold the battering rams from Cincinnati. The biggest gun of St. Xavier's attack was the redoubtable Sack, who in for- ward position made six baskets and two free throws. To Sack goes the greater share of credit for St. Xavier's victory. Butcher starred for the Titans. Butler ADRIAN ANS watched the curtain begin its descent on Lloyd Brazil's phenomenal collegiate athletic career when he appeared before the home audiences for the last time against Adrian College. Lloyd's last efforts before a friendly crowd were grati- fying to spectators, who packed the Jef- ferson gym to capacity to watch their captain sink eight of the thirty-seven points which beat Adrian by seven points. Brazil shone brightly for the winners, but the real star of the evening was un- doubtedly John Kyniasty, forward, who split honors with his stellar team mate. Kyniasty, a midget, proved himself the fastest man on the Detroit squad and played a heady game. Detroit, characteristically, got off to a poor start, but found its pace in later stages of the game and piled up basket after basket. Its defensive apparatus should have proved sufficiently bewilder- ing to Adrians' cohorts to keep the lat- ter's score in the cellar. .' .59 Q 1, Yo s A15 .QJ 1 Xin 3 g, il ,A . E' Q Nita? fm E DETROIT ST. XAVIER DETROIT ADRIAN FG FT TP FG FT TP FG FT TP FG PT TP Gracey, f ........ 1 l 3 Sack. f ......... 6 2 14 Gfacey, f ,,,,,,,, 0 1 1 H, Parcherr, f, , .4 1 9 Fournier. f ...... 0 0 0 Teppe, f ....... I 0 2 Goodrich, f .,,,,. 2 I 5 Schoonover, f ,... 0 O O Goodrich, f ...... I 0 2 SIOLII. f ........ O 0 0 Butcher, f ,,,,,,. 0 O 0 Anderson, f ....., 3 I 7 Bllltiher, f ....... 2 I 5 Tracey, C ....... I I 3 Kyniasty, f ,,,,,, 4 2 IO Brown, f ,,,,,,,, O O O KYIIIBSIY, f ...... I 0 2 Bolger, g ........ 0 0 0 Pearson, c ,,.,,. 1 O 2 Fisher, c ,,..... I O 2 Pearson, c. ...... 1 I 3 Wilhelm. g ...... I 2 4 Fournier, c ...... I l 3 W. Patchett, c. . . I 2 4 Cha!-QP. c ........ 0 I I --1 Brazil, g ........ 3 2 8 Nims, g. ....... O 0 0 Brazil. z ........ 2 o 4 9 5 23 Butler. g ........ 0 0 o Reed, g ........ 0 4 4 Aaron, g ........ 0 0 0 Aaron, g ........ 3 2 8 Ryan. g ........ 0 0 0 ' -" ---- Geisler, g ....... 2 0 4 7 4 I8 13 7 37 -1-1-1 I1 8 30 uma: we r xv' 0 f, r 5: 'vii . fp .1 I if-'ff 'is 5 f P522-I.. IIZISH Own Jeri 1 its 2 9 GI k f"' ur 'X J f.-gt.1Q.-os,-font ? wi 1930 TOWER gen.. m e I 2 11 "' A'-. 2 cf ' shi- fff? 1. DAYTON -ONROY'S lads wreaked vengeance on the Flyers in the second fray with Dayton. For the first five minutes, however, it looked as if the Ohioan's vic- tory was about to be repeated. They scored six points immediately after the tip-off. Then Detroit began moving and dis- played a Well-balanced team capable of hitting the net regularly. At half time they were leading the Flyers 15-6. Les Butcher proved the focal point of the Titan rally. By excellent team work and brilliant basket shooting he led De- troit to a margin that was never over- come. Not once in the remainder of the game did Dayton threaten the Titan lead. Cy Aaron and Brazil performed stellar Work, and the entire team contributed to the victory with efficient team co-opera- tion. Dayton's leading threat was held score- less by Brazil who guarded him at the ex- Gracey ST. XAVIER ETERMINED on a vengeful policy toward those who had previously defeated them, the Titans retaliated St. Xavier's earlier victory by presenting them with a 36-24 defeat. In this game the Titans proved that the Armory contest loss Was due only to inexperience. At the half Detroit was in the van, the score being 18-6. St. Xavier was held to a lone Held goal during this period. In the meantime every Titan starter had scored at least one goal for his team, with Aaron leading the attack with five points to his credit. The half-time margin proved too great for Xavier to menace, and though they fought at an even pace with the Titans for the rest of the Way they could never overcome Detroit's advantage. Each team scored 18 tallies in the last half. The Titans flashed their best form in this game, each man on the team sinking a proportionate share of baskets. pense of his own glory. DETROIT DAYTON DETROIT ST. XAVIER FG FT TP FG FT TP FG FT TP FG FT TP Gracey. f. . . 1 O 2 Lensch. f ....... O 0 0 Gracey, f ........ 3 1 7 Sack. f ......... 3 0 6 Kyniasty. f l 5 Andrus, f ....... 0 0 0 Goodrich, f ...... 0 0 0 Beckwith, f ...... 3 1 7 Butcher, f .V ...... 0 10 Ladner, f ....... 4 2 10 Butcher. f ....... 1 0 Z Stout, f ........ O O 0 Goodrich, f ...... Z Edwards. c ...... 0 Z 2 Kyniasry f ,.,,, 2 1 5 Tracey, c ....... l 3 5 Pearson, c, 2 Warner, g ...... 0 Z 1 Pearson, c ....... 1 2 4 Bolger, g ........ l 2 4 Aaron, g.. 7 Flanagan. g ,..... 1 1 3 Fournier c ...... 2 O 4 Bartlett. g ....... 0 2 2 BIBZII: g ........ --1 Brazil, g. . . .... 3 l 7 Wilhelm, g ..... .0 0 0 Fournier. g ...... 5 6 16 Aaron, g ........ 3 1 7 -i-' - - 8 8 24 15 6 36 x7'v'a'g eaqsnp Cv ra W ' +31 - ' wh ' -up N H2161 A be ". , 1 -I .. A .Q 5 ' ere? C445 S 1 ts Wi Kg H E' THE 1930 TOWER 'af' : if 5 2 i .. 'al ll -S I IQ fri? gi 1 74 r'v'i 1 i.j. l BLISS COLLEGE HE Titans closed their 1930 season with a defeat at the hands of Bliss College. They were not overwhelmed but they lacked the punch that character- ized their two previous contests. Some felt that a string of victories had caused over-confidence, others that the Titans were tired out. But the fact remains that Conroy's men were not up to par with their previous performance. In the second half Bliss gathered three field goals in quick succession, and the Titans were never able to catch up. A good defensive team, the tired Titans let it sag and did not possess a strong enough offense to fill the gap. The Titans would have fared worse than they did had it not been for Butcher who kept Detroit in the running during the entire second half. T ' The stellar playing of Woodward of the Blissmen accounted for their victory. He scored nearly half of his team's tallies, and led their attack during the whole game. DETROIT BLISS FG FT TP FG FT TP Gracey. f ........ 1 0 Z Woodward. f .... 3 0 6 Kyniasty, f ...... O 3 3 Morgan. f ....... 6 0 12 Butcher, f ....... 4 0 8 Plank, c ........ 2 1 5 Pearson, c ....... l 0 2 Glossman, g . . . l 0 2 Brazil, g ........ 1 2 4 Lewis, g ........ 0 I l Aaron, g. ...... 2 0 4 - --1 12 2 26 9 5 23 T -6- F -' 'X ii Hofstetter RESUME HE team that "comes back" is the team that receives the plaudits of the crowd. That the 1929-30 squad of Uni- versity of Detroit varsity netmen formed a winning combination would be a pleas- ant story to tell. Their season pre- sented no noteworthy achievements that will be material for stories in the future. But the 1929-30 team did "come back." The early portion of the schedule was as discouraging as it was disastrous. Four games were won in the iirst twelve con- tests carded for the Red and White toss- ers. And none of the vanquished fives were representative teams of major op- ponents. With the ending of the first half of the schedule, the Titans' manner of playing changed completely. No longer were dog- gedly defensive tactics employed to avert another apparently certain defeat. Rather the team played a confident game of of- fensive basketball that fairly astonished their opponents who believed the Titans an easy "spot" on their schedule. The change brought the desired result for the charges of Conroy won seven of their last nine games and succeeded in defeating the championship Loyola University team led by Charley Murphy, All-American center. 521711 '!fXl 4 0-ik. A S kg . 'n . 3 W5 QM S 1.1 r . f-jj, . A-.N ff if VI, 0 5 AH, is Z f Y ., jf, "0 3, Q 41.3 if SGW J iv p E f la ws ' ' Q f Q X Q2 EQ A30 M Z Egg A Q , ' X 431 M . L'Q Z1 fa: ff' 6 Q 1 ' U03 148' T , K 61? 5" K ' Qc' K ' Cf x W Mil 'A L waht -n I A ,.., . A Gi? V E 1 . Q is K9 ww 9+ Aw VJCXL TRACK O., Wi gli f is l a ewsjg-sa facxwcgstg c e THE 1930 TOWE Q A r is Q A L .X r fr ? ' A A al!! -D fi. his PW. ,x ,f L, " ...I 1-. lx an is 1 w R 2 lakh... r. ' I 1 " 1? EW Yeager AVING completed its third year of intercollegiate competition on track and field, the University of Detroit looks forward to the future for greater successes in this line of endeavor. Seventy-five candidates a n s W e r e d "Dad's" call for material early in Janu- ary, among them but four veterans from the previous season, John Labadie, Ed Chapp, Duke Kiefer, and Archie Yeager. These men made up the 2-mile relay team that had set records during two years of competition, first as freshmen, then as varsity regulars. To this quartet has been added the names of many potential stars: Battat, Carey, Green, Kull, Mohardt, O'Neill, Hackett and Straiger. The indoor practices this year were held on the indoor boards at Northwest- ern and Central high schools while the outdoor warm-ups were taken during the month of April on the Central High quar- ter-mile oval. The athletic association at the University of Detroit wishes to ex- press their thanks and gratitude to the au- thorities at Northwestern and Central high schools for the use of their tracks. kg. N It :ish 9 S515 iw' E Carey Labadie , V I3 C t'ff.w?-ls.. Hzzol 1 C LH yr i- '35 all .D PA., ,At l 3 T lk tu.. ' f' N ' " we OWEQ r. 1' ' I 4 X - FA? cgi T '5 T Q35 2 Kull The first meet entered by the varsity tracksters was the most important tourney to be held in Detroit during the last fifteen years, namely the annual National A. A. U. Track and Field Championship meet at the Olympia on February 22. Allow- ing for inexperience and the fact that the entire squad was not fully conditioned as yet, the Titan speedsters did fairly well. In the 1,000-yard run, Yeager led the field for a few hundred yards but was overtaken on the last lap by Vanzke, of the Finnish-American A. C., and was forced to accept a second, finishing 15 yards behind the winner. Kiefer went to the finals of the 600-yard run, and then proceeded to run a beautiful race to place third to Roll, of the Newark A. C., and Bloor, of Ohio State. A week later, March l, the varsity speedsters journeyed to East Lansing to take part in the Michigan State College tenth annual indoor track carnival. They emerged with seconds in dash and the 2-mile relay. time in the 300-yard dash seconds were compared he to Lewis, of City College. the 300-yard Kiefer ran for and when the placed second ln the most g ' o 'ze Q55 iv-F' 'J l Rothenburger Hackett l1""fi1 W? Q1 r,X'Al, A ,U J'5.vi-J 3 C 522111 we 1930 TOWER Hg g " Tx g ' 111 cf ' sa Jig 6,1 WC ,Gi . I 'a ,. I-lf 2 FA? thrilling event of the evening, the 2-mile relay, the crack Michigan State Normal quartet, nosed out Battat, Chapp, Kiefer and Yeager, and, as a result, broke the old meet record by fully six seconds. The fourtlr annual Central Intercol- legiate track and field meet held March 7, was the next scene of activity. Three men competed for the University of De- troit, but none placed. The competition was very keen and many new meet records were set. The preliminaries were held on Friday and Yeager won his heat of the 880-yard run to qualify for the finals, while Kiefer was O'Neill ' barely nosed out for a qualification place. In the meet on March 8 Yeager again led the field in the half-mile run but was beat out in the final by 50 yards. He failed to place because at the start he drew a far- away position and used up all of his energy to get out in front. Labadie ran the mile but did not place in anything. The Illinois Relays were next. Archie Yeager and John Labadie represented the University of Detroit in the 1,000 and 1,500 meters respectively. At Champaign, Illinois, on March 15, Yeager distin- guished himself by placing third in the 1,000-yard run. On the merits of his Battat Potoczak , 35 , . J-951' 5 4 Yfggv H2223 W 5 LQ' 'X as, if . S90 2- 2 i e ff cl-'ll S I 1 ts U41 . x C62 "a. " Q85 fl - e .52,f:,-K-Qing fw 1 THE OWER SLA .. Q s s ff 'or ua F5 ffl' grail 12 II .4 4 work in this meet Yeager can be accorded the high rate of third in the 1,000-yard run among intercollegiate track athletics. Martin. of Purdue, won this event when he set a new carnival record in the time of 2:16 4-10. Yeager was nosed out for a second place when Hinshaw, of Kansas, finished the race like a 50-yard dash man to beat out the Titan runner by barely five feet. The fourth annual Michigan indoor track and field championships on March 22 at Central High School bid "adieu" to the indoor season for the U. of D. speedsters. Coach Butler entered the Green largest number of Titan thinclads since the introduction of track at this institution and they responded by amassing the great- est amount of points ever made by a U. of D. track team. Out of the sixteen Titan entries six either won or placed in their respective events to garner 18 points. One Titan athlete divided individual meet honors with Beatty, of Ypsilanti. Yeager had his own way in winning the 1,000- yard run in 2:29 1-5. He also tied for first in the 600-yard run. The speedsters ran for time in this event and Yeager and Beatty ran a dead heat of 1:20 2-5. Kiefer gained a fourth in the 600-yard Campau Chapp 1122311 X212 wo 315. ' o as 4 R95 QJQM Q , ga v ,fi 142' S ou 96 Cs Cay if M5 Bit THE 1930 TOWER A 'fn 4,9 ' : g -5 : I J? F 4 bl, QQ UI .ruigx .ss - Straiger run while Carey ran the 300-yard dash in 36 seconds Hat to place third. In the field events Kull placed third in the 30- yard low hurdles. The remaining points were made by the freshmen. The 1929 two-mile relay team that startled the mid-west with their flashy running was forced to contend with a jinx this season when two of its members, Kiefer and Chapp, were forced out of com- petition for the time being. The former, through an unfortunate case of ineligi- bility, while Chapp has never been the same since an injury to his foot. As a result the Red and White runners were its not able to participate in the Kansas Re- lays on April 19. So the Titan speed- sters swung into action on the outdoor cinder paths for the Hrst time this year in the Drake Relays on April 25-26. The remaining outdoor track and field championships in which the school was represented were the Ohio Relays on May 3, the Albion College dual meet on May 10, the State Intercollegiate at E. Lansing on May 16-17, and the Central Intercollegiate at Milwaukee on May 30. In June "Dad" took a squad of picked runners to the National Intercollegiate in Chicago. .... kg. N 35: Q4?15 Qjffabsi 149' 1, eng l Left to Right--O'Neill, Chapp, Carey, Butler, Yeager, Battat, Labadie. W f'f'oW"3 . 1122411 Ctif LA f-5 I . 2 ,le .2 QQ gg Q83 2 S8 " F5247 fa M' ZZ? E Zami' . THE 1930 TOWER IQKN.. H ' ' I TT ll 1 'elk-5 l ' Li..-.1 FRESHMAN TRACK HE 1930 Freshman track squad, the of 40 feet, 5 inches, while Wright gave third University of Detroit yearling Yeager a big scare in the 1,000-yard run team, has just completed the most success- when he placed second. ful season ever enjoyed by a group of thin- Mike Mohardt ran the 100, 220 and clads running for this University. 440 yard dashes while attending Emerson The call for freshman track candidates High of Gary, Indiana. "Dad" is build- was answered by thirty aspirants. Duke ing Mike up into a fast 880 man and Kiefer, the varsity middle distance man, also expects to use him in the 440. was appointed by Coach Butler to take Stan Wright, former track captain of charge of the yearlings. The group in- Southwestern High, came to the U. of D. cluded fourteen members with high school with the best high school reputation of experience. any of the candidates. Lane and Lentine, In the National A. A. U. meet held at former milers from U. of D. High, loom the Olympia on February 22, Wright ran as promising material for future varsities the 1,000 yards and placed fifth, a very along with D'Amour of Southeastern: creditable showing for a freshman. Mike Jarwarski, of Hamtramck: Hawkins of Mohardt and Tom Burke ran the 300 and Northwestern: and Shirmer of South- 600 yards respectively and made line show- western. ings. The Frosh participated in the two dual In the Michigan State relay carnival, a meets with Highland Park Junior College two-mile relay composed of Toppin, on May 15 and 20, and a dual meet with Burke, Mohardt and Wright finished third Michigan State. Coach Butler also sent in the special freshman event. a medley relay to the Central Intercolle- The Michigan A. A. U. meet at Cen- giate meet at Milwaukee on May 30, and tral High school on March 22, marked the two-mile quartet to the State Inter- the third and final indoor meet for the collegiate at Michigan State on May 16- yearlings. Burke, Mohardt, Metras, Costi- 17. gan, Toppin and Wright composed the All in all the Freshmen enjoyed a good list of entries. Metras earned a third in season and show much promise: all that is the sixteen pound shot put with a throw expected of a yearling team. G ,. DZ.-Sk ' 522511 ai? me U N C .0 i F 5 w 'fk fi E w Q , . wx fig dj f' ' x Ek 'wi 'Sw Qi- FC! 42 i QQ? , In A ' 3 Hx, ' f 2' 'wifi' .- ' U r 5 ,,, ,..,..,-.,f'f-Jafwl-QQiQg,,,,,, E I QM cam 'KP 4? 627621 060727 s s 0 dleflf ,mx cc? f we 9133 2 MQ-3, f'..Z.J?2E.-wmv.-?'s,g1 v QF!" 'iw Q J N? THE H930 TOWER rv rw - I X - c . s r H ll Left to Right: Top Row-Keifer, Douglas. Bocringer, Moenert, Erickson. Bottom Row- Sullivan, Howard, Doyle, LaBreque, Simonich. WJZXPISITFHTIJCDCHCIEXF E the thirty men reporting when the initial call for hockey was issued, only three veterans from the 1929 sextet were available, Howard, Shubnell and Doyle. The aspirants included Douglas, Simon- ich, and Moenart, of the 1929 freshman team. Scotty Howard was chosen to cap- tain the squad. Duke Keifer acted as manager for the squad, it being his particular business to see to it that his team was supplied with skates, sticks, gloves and what not at all practices and games. This year's hockey team was fortunate in having two forward lines of almost equal ability. The University of Detroit's first string sextet consisted of Doyle. goal: Captain Howard and Shubnell, defense: LaBreque, center: Sullivan and Sampson, wings. The reserve forward line included Moenert, center: Douglas and Erickson, wings. Simonich alternated on the defense as well as taking a turn on the forward line. With only three days of practice the Titan icemen engaged the more experienced Michigan State sextet on January 23, and sent them back to Lansing with a 2-1 de- feat. The victory for the Detroit puck team marked the initial hockey win for a U. of D. squad in the history of the school. Moenart won the game in the final 70 seconds of play when his care- fully aimed long shot eluded the Spartan goalie and dropped through the net for the deciding goal. Sullivan scored the ini- tial Titan point. The U. of D. complete- ly outplayed the Lansing sextet in defense and in stick handling but were outshone by their rivals in the skating department. The Detroit pucksters met the Staters in a return game at East Lansing on Feb- ruary 6 and were defeated in a contest played in the rain on the mammoth Michi- gan State rink. The Hnal score was 2-O. The University of Detroit hockey team played many practice games during the eight weeks of their season. Scrimmages were held with Parke Davis 26 Co., U. of D. High and the Night Commerce and Finance school. Attempts were made to schedule other teams but old man winter could not see it that way, so the plans were broken up, due to lack of ice and good cold weather. The players were coached in the art of stick handling by Coach Arthur "Bud" Boeringer, who had a quite a reputation as a hockeyist while attending Notre Dame. 40 kg. H dj.: 'B w 9 642' 4, 1ln.'l,xQ7 ewrguig .iw H2283 A 1g,i',,xJg-ycff'-E2-"-wNdas3C,,.-Q5,' 655 Av "A I- - A-I T ' -4x. .1 Q' Q ,gm-W --mf... , Q THE 1930 TOWER - 2 ,. -.. 2 S - , af.. '- - I K - .iv 5' 4 5 .Q jo H 'll T . .. , RK' Q-'Sf E If 3,94 I .ffm E5 'ti ,J igs R Qt. if: if iw 2 Li . l, Left to Right-McGrath, Fraser, Powell, Britt, Marion, Mooney, McFawn, Bud Smith. G. Smith, Carney. GOLF HAT the highly successful record of the l929 golf season would be equaled by the 1930 University of Detroit golf team was hardly expected when Coach Eddie Kirk published his roster of candi- dates. Only one member of the champion- ship links aggregation of last year, Captain Billy Breault, had escaped elimination from the ranks of the university's golf team through graduation. There was no hope for the sensational match to emulate the Georgetown con- flict of '29, Followers of the team did not dare to predict another upset of the nature of the one handed Maurice McCarthy of the Washington school by our No. 1 man, Francis Ryan. There was even Whispered apprehensions that the schedule of matches arranged by Manager Donald F. Carney would be too difficult for the inexperienced team to cope with effectively. However, as the old saying has it, there are always new men ready to take the places of those who step from the ranks. No sooner had Coach Kirk, a Sophomore student in the College of Arts and Science and assistant professional at the Dearborn Country Club, announced try-outs when innumerable students joined the squad. Try-outs were staged at the Bob-o-Link Course and the scores made on a day that called for heavy overcoats and fur-lined gloves rather than for par-breaking golf, gave the first insight as to the possibilities of the new men. Their mettle was further shown in the first match against St. Johns' University of Toledo, which resulted in a Titan vic- tory by the score of 1272 to 52. The team that played in this match was com- posed of Captain Breault, George Smith, Jack Mooney and Charles Marion. These men won one foursome and three indi- vidual matches. After this match, the team settled down to regular competition. The Detroit Golf Club was met on May ll in a special match and the following schools all were met before the season was declared closed: Notre Dame, University of Michigan, State College, St. Johns of Toledo and Western State Teachers' College. Started but a few years ago the Uni- versity of Detroit golf team has enjoyed steady progress marked by an ever-growing number of victories. While rated as a minor sport it closely rivals other campus sports in popularity. Students to a great- er extent than ever are beginning fully to appreciate its many advantages. .1 . H 0 ss, Q iii .. 'ff l 1 5 i it QL ' -.Qu fx' A , ff Ng? if T' 'D 'H ff' ox .Q ' f'f7f0"ia-U ., f ? S, it gg. '9 4 V . 1 ,. ,Ev Q. IIZZQH I WJ WC cfm ll- f Q35 21 THE if-Q TOWER em ' A -1 1 4 H' x f- sv 452242 if C' H Jill' if Wifi? Y: g - S , Top Row: Left to Right-Crowley, Bauser, Mattson, Blank, Prenette. Bottom Row-Nussey, I-Ioban, Sullivan, Kondratovicz, Cross, McDougall. COlHDBASKET'BALL HOUGH not having a fair string of victories to their credit the co-eds, nevertheless, were pleased with the results of their second year of basket ball. The discouraging problem of locating a convenient gym all but dashed the hopes and ambitions of the athletic enthusiasts. A satisfactory solution was finally at- tained at the opening of the second semes- ter, when a change in schedules through- out the city made it possible to get the Burton School gym at Peterboro and Cass. Many recruits, the majority of whom had never played on a court and had only a meager knowledge of the rules of the game, turned out for the opening practice. This was the problem with which the coach, Ray Navin, had to cope in organ- izing his team. The Hrst game was scheduled with the Gesu girls for Sunday, February 16th, in the Gesu gym. This encounter was lost in an exciting scurry, when the co-eds were outplayed in the first half and the Gesu team kept the lead to the end, win- ning by a score of l9-9. The co-eds put up a stiff fight, but in this game the oppo- nents were superior. A return game was played the following Thursday evening in the Burton gym. The unexpected defeat of the first game was better than a tirade from the coach or a plea from the captain. With the fast, skillful playing of its captain, Monica Kondratovicz, and her forward, "Mickey" Sullivan, the points began to mount up, and at the end of the first half, the co-eds were leading. Despite the advantage of height and weight of the opponents as well as their quick offensive playing, the co-eds kept the lead and the game ended 17-7 in favor of the co-eds. This was the Gesu girls' first defeat of the season. The third game was played with St. Ambrose and it is to the credit of the co-eds that they kept their flashy, snappy opponents, champions of 1928, to their lowest score of the season, l7-9, In this game, there were plays in which the co-eds displayed flashes of real form. The last game of the season was a return game with St. Ambrose, a rather inglorious de- feat for the co-eds. Monica Kondratovicz was re-elected captain with Margaret Meyers as mana- ger-elect. Letters were awarded to Monica Kondratovicz, Florence Bernard, manager, Mickey Sullivan, Eilleen Cross, Carroll Nussey, June McDougall, Marcel Frenette, Eileen Crowley, and Dolly Bauser. H2303 I si ills 'n I L, H, ii 'f Q Q 'gg Z4-P E ,-".i'.oI1 5 qv! 1-371 - 4 Y! fi .F Cr' L TENNIS 1 Otf KSN . x -6 cgi ' 5 ' Q37 2 es Q,QJ,Q+Jff.iSJe?,3L1,7:v r E s'0 fi le- TH El? 31 'w 1 fi A 3 Y T " f'1 lk Ji fi. rits -- f ' N f- -1 351619 mf' 4- ' .- Tn "4 T I Ar M T if -W ,QW Left to Right: Top Row-F. Ruysser, J. George, Kelley, Leion, H. Ruysser. Bottom Row- E. George, Eglehoff. Goodrich. HE inception of Tennis, at the Uni- versity of Detroit during the past season, resulted in a surprising show of in- terest and brought forth an extraordinary amount of ability. The campus tennis tournament offered Manager Fred Goodrich, who deserves a great deal of credit for his untiring efforts, an opportunity to assemble a group of players who could make an excellent show- ing in the dual meets and tourneys which were held during the season. The squad of candidates included many men with amateur experience and when the tourna- ment smoke had cleared away these same racket wielders made up the tennis squad representing the University of Detroit. The initial meet was a dual match with the more experienced group from Western State Normal College, played on the latter's courts on Friday, May 2. The score was 8 to 1 in favor of the Kalamazoo net men. The Titans made a fine showing for the short time that they practiced. In the doubles F. Leion and F. Ruysser won the only match of the afternoon for the U. of D., when they defeated Bradford and Wolfe, 6-4, 8-6. The Titan tennis team then traveled to East Lansing. The result was a 7-2 vic- tory for the U. of D., Goodrich, Leion, F. Ruysser, and Kelly winning their single matches while the Titans scored a slam in the doubles. The remaining matches engaged in in- cluded a dual meet with St. Johns of Toledo at the Tennis Club on May 9: the invitational meet at Chicago on May 15, 16. and 17: the Detroit Tennis Club on May 18: St. Johns at Toledo on May 20: the Western State Normal invitational at Kalamazoo on May 22, 23, 24: West- ern State Normal in a dual meet on May 26 at the Tennis Club: a dual match with Michigan State on May 31 at the Tennis Club: and the State invitational at East Lansing on June 5, 6, and 7. The U. of D. Freshmen tennis team that began practice after the season progressed met Highland Park Junior College on May 22 and the Michigan State yearlings on May 28. Much interest has been manifested by the students in this lately revived sport. When the call for players was issued. some seventy candidates presented themselves. Although the season cannot be called un- usual from the standpoint of victories, it does reflect creditably on the efforts of the participants. isp 4 1 L. ?' o P tw t gamer w M Rr V413 25932: 4 M-251 li 11231 1 f ,v Il 'Ill X I HJ .fe I wx-xn" X Af ff ff T X gag Q f Q 3 we xxx X 5 - f Q E35 557 'D Q . 5 ij 'GT' 7 ' "' f Q ,g ffl ug, 2 as A , 0 ' 'p s f SX , ,N 6735 51 xo 5 g QM QK9 Cf ww Mmm UYHWOVQ x ow dleebf cg , ,is . fi K2 ' 'i ' 85 4 Q33 2 l l L"7 E,lS93CJ TYDvv 'fl'1 f. Q. 'lll 57? .5'r SNA ""'?1- A fr":9 me alllai iq, ,gg I P' 1 ' N-ffwlg A. A v Y. ' 4' 1- - 3 ,YQ Left to Right: Top Row-Schmidt. Gohl, Dyer. Greenberg. Bottom Row-Doran, De Fobio. Birney, Murphy. A.E.C.BASKETBALL HE A. E. C. Basketball League has always furnished one of the biggest attractions for the Night School students during the winter months. This year was no exception, and the league reached a new high level of achievement under the direc- tion of Sullivan and Greenberg. The league is composed of one team from each of the four classes. After a month's practice following the Christmas holiday, the teams began a hard elimination contest to decide the cham- pionship of the Night School. This brought out some closely fought and tight games, best of which were the contests be- tween the Juniors and the Sophomores. The end of the season saw these two teams tied for first place, with but one defeat each. ln the play-off the Juniors clinched the title by defeating the Sophs 16-12, This season was the first in several that the Frosh were unable to win the cham- pionship. The present Juniors had won in their Freshman year, and the Sophs likewise in theirs: but the Frosh were too weak and were early outdistanced by their upper class rivals. Always a pioneer in university activi- ties, the A. E. C. has taken a big step for- ward in the promotion of intramural sports with its line athletic teams. Chief among these is the Basketball League which has always had the whole hearted support of the students. Founded in 1927 by Eddie Ottenbach- er and Clarence Grix for the purpose of forming a closer relationship between the students of the Night School, the A. E. C. basketball league has advanced to a re- markable degree. This year the league en- joyed its most successful season and was instrumental in promoting and strength- ening an excellent school and departmental spirit among the students. By the development of such finished teams and by providing such healthful re- creation and entertainment for the Night School students the basketball league is well in keeping with the highly com- mendable precedent set by the A. E, C. a few years ago. The benefits which accrue from the season of fast play fittingly cli- maxed by the championship games are manifold. The efforts of the winners are rewarded each year by the presentation of a gold watch charm as a tribute to their line, fast, clean play. The presentation of the prizes was made this year at a dinner dance held shortly after Easter. Q'Qf5Y?nlj Q E19 4. H2343 Ko if in , y ,. 3, . . . if fl? S ,off ew'-3 U41 .M 6' ' W iiifimiiiugqf. Q Q 1930 T - . . il H WEE I YY' v' Y - A-T S - " qv cf ' ' Hg gli J Left to Right: Top RouJ4Clifford, Olsen, Bizall, Lyons. Bottom Row-Brill, Schmidt, Birney, May. A.E.C.HOCKEY HE hockey team organized for the first time this year furnishes another page for the calendar of A. E. C. sport activities. It was organized in response to Bud Boeringer's request for an inter- departmental hockey league. No other de- partments furnishing teams, the A. E. C. looked for competitors among outside teams. The forward line was composed of Bert Johnson at center and Robert Olsen and Joseph DesRosier at wings. Johnson and DesRosier, both Canadians with pre- vious experience, turned in very good per- formances. Olsen showed the greatest im- provement, getting away to a poor start but finishing with a rush to tie Johnson for scoring honors. Both got six goals and several assists apiece. The stick handling of Olsen was the feature of the last games. The defense was taken care of by William Schmidt and John Bizall, both of whom had had previous experience and gave good account of themselves. Heavy body checking discouraged many over-ambitious forwards. John Paling in the nets made many brilliant saves and was the main reason for A. E. C. wins. Any team is fortunate in having a strong reserve. The A. E. C. had an en- tire team to substitute to conserve the strength of the Hrst team. The reserves were composed of John Birney at center, Paul Clement and Fred Lyons at the wings, and John May and Brill at de- fense. This combination performed ex- cellently and should prove valuable mate- rial for next year's squad, for they cer- tainly proved valuable men in many of this year's games. Five games were played: three victories. one defeat and one tie. All games were closely fought, but the most outstanding victory was the Davey Coal Company game which was won by a score of 8-l. Special mention should be made of Schmidt who played his regular position as well as acting as captain, coach, and gen- eral manager. It is Schmidt who was largely responsible for the success of A. E. C. hockey this year. Despite poor equipment and lack of a place to practice, the first season of Night School hockey can be termed a brilliant success: not only in games won, but in spirit developed and interest shown. Losing but two players through grad- uation, Brill and Clement, the prospects for a winning combination next year are very good. gt-'rpm r 1 ll W H235H kg. Q -xy i 'fi n I 13 cf 42-9 'S A.EClBOWHlNGLEAGUE .1tgPqp,,43i?45?ii Sq9535Dxw,A?rifA ' ' 4' 4 '11 THE l OWER 5 L lkx.. ff Y..-Q ' I X ' Ura? nh L11- I O if KQQE .ti a t f 'L R dz 6' Left to Right: Top Row-Erdos. Gilhooly, Esper, Lennert. Bottom Row-Ottenbacker. Mahoney, Haight. SVXF! ,GWB i S"" L Q GN? l ITH the beginning of the school year l929-30, came the demand for the resumption of the league organized in 1927. A call was issued and about Hfty men responded at which time the Cadillac Alleys were again selected as the scene of battle because of their proximity to the downtown school. Games were played every Friday night following dismissal of classes. Six teams of representative strength were made up from among the original candidates. How well the teams were matched can best be explained by the fact that the three-quarter mark found the Bears, Coyotes and Lions grouped at the top of the standings. The six teams and their captains were as follows: Bears, Jack Gilhoolyg Coyotes, Joseph Erdosg Lions, Leo Esperg Wolves, Robert Haight: Panthers, Anthony Len- nert: Tigers, Arthur Lorenz. By consistently good bowling Leo Es- per led the list of individual averages, fol- lowed by Paul Massura, Herb Spencer, Ar- nold Zeschin and Anthony Lennert. As a climax to a season of keen "friendly" rivalry, a banquet was given at the conclusion of the schedule at which time officers were elected for the following year. The retiring ollicers extended their best wishes for a continuance of the suc- cess which has rewarded their efforts. The bowling league of the Associated Evening Classes was founded for the pur- pose of forming a closer relationship be- tween the students of the Night School. Since its inception in '27 the league has enjoyed the spirited backing of students and its success has never been in doubt. At the present time a great effort is be- ing made to provide an intra-mural cal- endar which will offer to every student an opportunity to participate in some form of athletics. It has been the complaint in the past that university sports were open only to a few and that the average student was unable to engage in competitive sports. ln this great move for the extension of athletics at the university it is particularly noteworthy that the Associated Evening Classes have been leaders. By the intro- duction and sponsoring of bowling they gave an impetus to intra-mural sports the value of which is difficult to estimate. Bowling is fast gaining in popularity throughout the country and especially in the state of Michigan since the season opens at that time of year when practically all sports activity is at a standstill. .L ,Y f M a egag ll 236B Q fs rt Q., Q Q 265294. sf' sb .J n I My UK 6,53 423' S 9 I l -ni fa 1 O .J f. LW? n c Bee -5 t All 2 Q L fm """x J r fix, Jes- f..-L2!ws4sx,,,7-'i5,f f - 'Q ar xx Nl J! -' I af." . ,A Q . 1 1.21: 4' . V O H ' ' t THE 'gm TOWE INTRA-MURAL BASEBALL EARLY 200 students participated in the playing of the first university inter-departmental indoor baseball league. Twelve teams, representing the classes in the colleges of Arts and Science, Com- merce and Finance and Engineering, were entered in the organization directed by "Bud" Boeringer, director of intra-mural athletics. The schedule of games was started im- mediately after the Easter recess with teams in the Arts and Commerce schools competing for the right to play the lead- ing nine in the engineering college's league for the university championship. Four x games were played each week, with the carefully-chosen umpire calling "Play Ball" at noon on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays of each week. At the opening of the contest, no trophy had been provided to honor the final win- ning combination. But as the schedule neared completion, the interest manifested in the games, made the continuance of the contest in future years a certainty and the Athletic Board soon announced that the name of the winning team would be recorded on 'a cup to remain in the permanent possession of the school. FROSH-SOPH GAMES HE feud between the Freshmen and Sophomores came to an end for 1930 when the annual class games and flag rush were held on the campus May 1 and 2. Nearly 400 students participated in the traditional events, characterized each suc- ceeding year with scratches and bruises, torn and muddy clothes, and occasional darkened eyes or bleeding noses. The flag hunt resulted in an ignomini- ous victory for the Sophs. The Fresh- men, nearly three hundred strong, could not Hnd the Hag. It was hidden at the base of a sign in front of the Science building. On the next day the Freshmen succeeded in carrying off the honors and overcame their losses of the previous night, winning the games by a score of 54 to 52. A meager victory that speaks more to the credit of the Sophomores who were outnumbered nearly three to one, and who certainly held their own. INTER-FRATERNITY BASEBALL N the first organized fraternity sports contest the Argon fraternity emerged as indoor baseball champions of the cam- pus. Ten fraternities participated in the league and completed a regular schedule of games. The teams represented were from the Argons, Pi Sigma Phi, Delta Sigma Pi, Ayha Kappa Psi, Tuyere, Epsilon Sigma Phi, Alpha Epsilon Pi, Epsilon Tau, the Alida Club, and Barlage Hall. The Ar- gons completed the season undefeated after playing every team in the league. The championship game was held Sun- day afternoon, April 26, at Dinan Field. The Argons, with no defeats, overcame the Tuyere aggregation who had been beaten but once during the season. The score for seven innings was 6 to 1 in favor of the Argons. Bucky O'Neil performed stellar pitching for the winners, and made a record number of strike-outs to lead his team to victory. The Argon bats worked overtime in collecting their winning brace of runs. With the first sport venture between fraternities a signal success, further athletic relations between campus brotherhoods and organizations are planned for future years. 1123711 f,W ,M "5 s S1292 u N I 7 155429, Q N .Ji n K . fb Ms e .Q J QU? 424' S .0"' 1 v Kim A..A r 0 N . , V Q of if V it - 5, f V v H I - V xi' munjlw xv - - x, 1 'n 5V1x'X"" v .d i y. H , M rt!WlYl l g Q M52 f' Q-.2 'KX 3 4 I ssl ww I 'ad fl WNW ' x w it 5 A 3 t f sift t i Q i i l l f rfg i te? c e 2' 5-Q2 we 'Une ampaan ife of G1 ofto Qflorgnce To catch the spirit of the renaissance market, with its bustle, its color, and the jab- bering of many tongues is to know the meaning of a great organization which brought the products of the world to a common center. The glamorous city of Florence, grand estate of the Medici, opulent, magnifi- cent, can only be imagined 5 but we feel that it demon- strates the power of organi- zation in bringing together many talents in common effort for progress. W' 1 55 Q, M as 148 Q 4 fi 1 If if I - e .ay In 1-gd if Zta ! If 2 WW26 gif' 44 1 4 ,, ? , , 'WV f hyd., I 9 l 515, tw fs , 'Z Je KJ i ff? P: :gg :X V 5 if , f t 3 ,I 6 ,Q ,ffl ti-,J 5213-74 fa?-S 00? 1 1 4 J Z ' , My ... Jag We 3 Qa- K g :- like age 9 nf! ge ZA ! 7 W I I ef nfs gm 1 wi My ' Wg lfffsf Sksstatf 'USE' 313 Q, in Q E 8 . L, f, , K??f?? '3-"N ms if-?Jii"5 f 3K T9 l .-. L Gf":i6WT?"5'5""w:'W 3:'35 i3l'?' 5 N 55 ,- I Q 0 "' g qnQjQ51S'5 ' u p 'Q 2 V si , J . W .. bo Qilmfa G53 ff, .1X V 2'N !fg yxfxfyxfglfg bra af" JVY rgiiiegl , fx!X , zxfgrzgfg yxfg , 299 fN.fg.ZXfg, ORG N ZATICDNS ' 'A ,, , ,. ,. ,z Q vi F. . fl , .Eff-. ,. 1 gin- ,- , , . -.,.' , ' 2' A I , .- A n 1 A. ' K v 7 JJ X , f-5 K I -A 1 ,L , wk A 5 1.1 ig' .,. H. a . JA, fu 4.-1 A M 'fa rf 1 D !-.514 I 1 V .r'q1!li 'In I I.. I .wht F., A x ., ug" :. n 1 .'f,4- .fn . 4 1 if Q' .- S . . m1w',.:w .-f - '- -wr-1 ir.. 'x xg. il Pvt, .rf .AP l e 73 KUN 1 w 'QR f E .G f a C05 9-9' L 6? Rf .-vi-3 ' K gy-is .QT of.. Gy Cyicz fe W1 Zfjgf N kt Q J Q Q in E, P ai 1 cap ' f',.xV,g-sb4f'.iSJNe:'.c3q4 QS: tai-T135-'Sw'-ct 'W' 'sr-ffm g et THE i930 TOWER ri ? f g 1 X g f s HQ Ill .ll 0 'Lf .s-it is rl ALPHA SIGMA TAU NATHAN GOODNOW, President RALPH C. JOHNSTON, Vice-President W. JOSEPH STARRS, Secretary EDWARD A. STENGER, Treasurer JOSEPH J. HoRsT, S. J., Faculty Moderator MEMBERS John F. Collins, Night Commerce and Finance Nathan B. Goodnow, Law Frank E. Jenney, Day Commerce and Finance Ralph C. Johnston, Arts and Sciences William J. Periield, Engineering Lawrence G. Riley, Engineering Leo T. Shubnell, Arts and Sciences W. Joseph Starrs, Arts ana' Sciences Edward A. Stenger, Day Commerce and Finance Reinhart E. Vogt, Engineering George A. Weins. Law HE University of Detroit chapter of the Alpha Sigma Tau honorary fraternity was begun in 1924, exactly nine years after the original chapter was organized at Marquette University. This fraternity has increased in size until now nearly every Jesuit college in the country has a chapter. Membership in the fraternity is limited to those students who have achieved notable success in their scholastic activities. Few are so honored, and they are the recognized leaders of the scholastic life of the campus. The successful candidates become members in the latter part of their Junior year and their active membership continues until graduation. As only eleven active members may belong to the society, membership is a distinct honor. The selection of new members rests with the dean of each college and the president of the university. Each college may elect two men each year, while the president is allowed to choose three men from the university at large. Due to these strict eligibility requirements, membership in the Alpha Sigma Tau is one of the hardest honors to attain. There are many candidates for nomina- tion to the fraternity, but only two may be selected from each college. During the past year the organization held its annual banquet at the Wol- verine Hotel in Detroit. The affair was held February 27th, and George Weins was chairman. With the exception of the annual initiation held sometime during the last week in May of each year, this is the only social activity spon- sored by the fraternity. U ' ' XY ' IQ. ffiiiii 52 ci .eiwhqkii P EVQS54... 524011 I P .00 V p i Q ill s S 3,1 , C X I Y , LG px 11- mx. . iii P -2? w,,,,V.!' A QT: A' 'j K' Q.. LQ, f i I iw 1 E 1 1 L E 1 6 Q E I I 5 H 1 y 1 f 1 6 l Q n I 2 5 I ! i 1 l 5 i I 5 i 1 2 J ifrfj , , Ffa' -.sq , - -U-QE-,l93O TOWE v .fl C 'Q A . X qfo exs V- N 'alhai Y"us.!l- i I 0.4 Wi - X C65 f S .. QS? 2 INTERERATERNITY COUNCIL RALPH C. JOHNSTON, President EDWARD A. STENGER, Vice-President GEORGE A. WEINS, Secretary RALPH W. BOONE, Treasurer MEMBERS Alpha Chi-Earl H. LaFaive Alpha Epsilon Pi-Jack A. Cohen Alpha Kappa Psi--Edward A. Stenger Argon-James M. Brennan Beta Sigma Pi-Sylvester A. Czerwinski Chi Delta Theta-Ralph W. Boone Chi Sigma Phi-Lawrence G. Riley Delta Delta Delta Alpha Phi-Anthony J. Kronk Phi Epsilon-Robert H. Thomas Pi Kappa-Ralph C. Johnston Delta Sigma-Prank E. Weaver Delta Sigma Pi-John E. Collins Delta Theta Phi-Joseph P. Eriske Epsilon Sigma Phi-Ned A. Monaghan Epsilon Tau-Charles Abramson Eta Zeta Sigma--Armella C. Eriedl Gamma Epsilon Phi-George E. Millman Gamma Eta Gamma-George A. Weins Kappa Beta Pi--Lula A. Powers Kappa Sigma Delta-Kenneth F. LaBarge Magi'-Clarence J. Kummer l Omega Beta Pi-Robert C. Page Phi Upsilon Chi-Joseph S. Brzostowski y Pi Sigma Phi-Stanley F. Kazor Theta Alpha Sigma-Harry B. Ryan Tuyere-Eugene L. Diersing URINC1 this, its third year of operation upon the campus, the Interfrater- nity Council has clearly demonstrated its ability to promote the general interest of the University and the particular interest of the several fraternities represented therein. The Council has been instrumental in insuring proper co- operation between the various fraternal bodies and subsequently between the fraternal bodies and the college authorities. Early in the year the Council amended its constitution to make attendance at its meetings compulsory and thus secure true universality of representation. Following this action, the Council moved to eliminate the unnecessary confu- sion and competition among the fraternal social events. Other activities included a move to assure the proper continuity of administrative action. l gl-If su. in 'Zi'oH"'!3 M4211 is 5.1 L. El it .Q 1 PM K .2 2. I I I I II II II I I I J, I I I I 4' vw N-we QI If f ,QV C . R. 'Q Q as LX 'N -v r- - HC QC. - 'Na dx f T I II' A J IJ I ' XVN I F 31 I oo tt i I I ,-not jo --viI?fab,.IIf'E'I oo - 3 'QQI11' 11 Gqaii II III??II I I I' If ,.Ir'-If I ll:-B I f , LI ....J IL::::nI ' I I3 I I I II I I I 1 I I , I I I I I I I I I I I I In IV I I I I I I 'I I I I I -I II I I I II II I I ? I I I I I I II I I X IQ I I ,,I I I X I III I II II I MI I I II III C I I I I II I I I I I I, I II- I I I Y I I I I I , I I I I I II :I III I XI ,II I II II I I II z T I II I I ,I I III I I I III I I I II I I I IIIIIIQ . I I I I I . .IQII IIQJII I I I I I'-HQQIYI QQ I I El Y I I I I I I' I1 I iffiea. 5' M I Inn Wi? I? 6' I I I II, Q I I 'hug I I I Ig,I5IiIIIi11Qi"I QI. III,.,gIIf'I,. Q5 MQQQQI I I I I? I II I Inf' JI I I QIIIIII I rs 1 I I I II I I I I I II IIN I I I I II IH I I I ' I I II II I WI I II II I I II II I II I I I I II I II II I' II I I II T I II I II I I I I II II I I I I , I III .- 7 A I I I I Left to Right: Top Row-LaPaive, Cohen, Brennan, Czerwinski, Boone. Second Row- I R1leyI Kronk. Thomas, Johnston, Weaver. Third Row--Collins, Friske. Friedl, Monaghan, I I Abramson. Fourth Row-Millman, Weins, Powers, I.aBarge, Kummer. Fifth Row-Page, !iII I' I Brzostowski, Stenger, Ryan, Diersing. I Q I I' I Q III ,u g M3 III L I243I MEMBERS O A Wi - X .ffl ill Q-.s .l gtg, JE fla-mssg-hls.g Q5 6? x'-N -' T' -lk fwf QQ-ahlhf HHMG. ,Q -.f f m THE 1930 TOWER 70 15, T A' T' , A 4 ? H Ill In qxw 'Ni' FX ati !,?.'l:P ', if L ' ' ALPHA CHI EARL H. LAFAIVE, Counsellor JEREMIAH J. DONOVAN, Vice-Counsellor KARL P. SCI-IECI-ITER, Scribe JOHN W. GLEESON, Custodian of Funds FRANK J. BRADY, Historian WILLIAM F. WAGNER, Sergeant-at-Arms PAUL P. HARBRECHT, Faculty Moderator Ray L. Allen Leo J. Andries Edward M. Andries Frank J. Brady Eugene J. Chapp Jeremiah J. Donovan William C. Enright Charles J. Eellrath Noel Eraser John W. Gleeson Nathan B. Goodnow William B. Ciuina Gerard M. Haley Ronald S. Hinds Clarence J. Kummer Earl H. LaEaive Charles E. Marion George E. McWilliams John J. Mooney Frank J. Potts Robert D. Powell Robert L. Redmond Karl P. Schechter Henry J. Schulte Orville J. Spindler Elmer E. Ulrich John L. Wagner William F. Wagner Alden D. Walker James J. Whalen bi NE of the most consistent fraternities on the campaus is Alpha Chi, founded in March of 1926. Since then it has steadily grown in size and increased the scope of its activities. lts members are selected from every department of the university and only those who are recognized leaders in school activities are chosen. A high scholastic average is also required. The main objective of this fraternity is to bring the campus leaders together and afford them the opportunity of understanding one another's aims and projects. Alpha Chi stands out as the fraternity that has done much for the annual Union opera. A very ambitious program of events was carried out during the past year by Alpha Chi. On September 28th, the organization opened its social season with a dinner-dance at the Northwood. This was followed by two more similar affairs at the same place, on October 5th and 22nd. On November 20th, a formal dinner-dance was held at Oakland Hall, with John Mooney as chair- man. The dance hall was decorated in a colonial setting, with seasonal flowers lending color to the scene. The fraternity held its annual pledging on January 15th. Several new stu- dents were chosen for membership, following out the program of expansion outlined by the fraternity last year. Several smokers were held throughout the year at Webster Hall. Frank Potts and Karl Schechter acted as chairman for the affairs. The Alumni members of the organization gave a smoker near the end of January. It was attended by all the members, both active and alumni, and plans for the future of the fraternity were discussed. 524411 F S' 2. 'mpc . ,S Q ...JAT S. W Md y In . ii A S 5 ia P " 1. ill s alll S Ll 1 O 'Lf .G ai Q W "X Kg. lg' I l R, 3 M W s C6g?8':3..PM,Q'Sp,f. ikhiqiggam nt F!-,-9,1 -C.,,,Ql!,-X, 1 nik? THE i930 TOWER rn 'Q gg : I 1 3 472 9 'egg ,S fi. xiii? ly ll I Q EJ 54" . fl Init F! ll JMB .1 -aw.,-. 2-wr:-w'. l ,, M 1 s'--. .-, ALPHA EPSILON PI MAX E. DERIN, Master LOUIS A. MALIS, Lieutenant-Master ALLAN GREENBURG, Scribe JACK A. COHEN, Exchequer JOSEPH X. FISHMAN, Sentinel CARL H. SEEHOFFER, Faculty Moderator MEMBERS Cy Aaron Solomon C. Dunner Aubrey Gordon Richard Orloff Allen Cm. Agree Sidney J. Fineberg Oscar M. Greenspon Harry Portnoy Nathan Balter David B. Freyman Oliver Kanter Max Robins Morton Bechek Milton J. Goodman Albert J. Nagler Jack J. Rodman Ralph Volkovich IVE years of hard labor was rewarded on the evening of May 18th, 1930. when twenty-five undergraduate and thirty-ive alumni members of Sigma Phi Lambda became charter members of Xi chapter of Alpha Epsilon Pi, na- tional Jewish fraternity. The nationalization banquet, which was held at the Book-Cadillac Hotel, marked the passing of another great milestone on the fraternity's rise to prom- inence in fraternal and scholastic standing on the campus. Since its organization in 1925 by a group of seven men who saw the need of such a society to foster friendship among the Jewish students of the University, Alpha Epsilon Pi has taken an active interest in university affairs. To bring these men into a firm body to co-operate with the university in its activities, has been a great part of the fraternity's program. The year 1929-30 saw this aim carried out. Alpha Epsilon Pi attended the 1930 Union Opera, "Hello Stranger," in a body and helped to make the open- ing night the glorious success that it was. The members occupied a box at the Junior Prom, and the fraternity was at all times a strong supporter of the Inter-fraternity Council. The main social affair of the year was the Formal Football Prom held at the Fox and Hounds Inn. This was a closed dance with Dean Carl H. Seehoffer and Prof. Janes as honorary guests. The motif used in the decorations, pro- grams, and invitations was suggestive of the many gridiron victories of the Titan team. The fraternity held a smoker soon after the start of the school year. This served as a general get-together for alumni and undergraduate members and also as a welcoming party for the new Jewish men on the campus. A similar affair was staged in March. At both of these smokers, which were held at Webster Hall, Dean Seehoffer, the fraternity's faculty moderator, acted as principal speaker. A S ws" I . .lun 'Qi ,, 3 Fl 'J ., 1.41 iigfef 1 QKA 'A i fffafjml I fl246ll l Q5 af- fl ' 1 ,sit Q 4 Q- E wt: A or! W v -o N 1' 4 E 19 30 TO o T H WEQ t tw , ' '74 't t "3 +14 H MQ f it tt 1 Left to Right: Top Row-Aaron, Agree, Balter, Bechek. Cohen. Second Row-Derin, Dunner, y Fineberg, Fishman. Freyman. Third Row-Goodman, Gordon. Greenburg, Greenspon. Fourth t Row-Kanter, Malis, Nagler, Orloff. Bottom Row-Portnoy, Robins, Rodman, Volkovich, qt' H2473 ,t ,1 I 9 P 4 1 Q Q L gf I 5 vig ' tw V 2: Sli .QQ ,josh ff. 'sJXi3,'9cw .E G '5 x - A' - --1 I' QQ, FDB'--" t-1-'Etta ,,9 V ' ' c ' fe - T HE 1930 TOWER , A IRS.. . Yr. X - ' Elf? 4' ' lr N il . 2 -, ,. ALPHA KAPPA PSI FRANK E. JENNEY, President. JAMES HOBAN, Vice-President. JAMES A. HAGOERTY, Secretary. A. GEORGE LENNERT, Treasurer. C. BROCK MCGREGOR, Master of Rituals. STEPHEN PIKLOR, Chaplain. RAY T. NAVIN, Diary Correspondent. JOSEPH A. ERDOS, Historian. CLETUS J. WELLING, Alumni Secretary. LYNDON O. BROWN. Faculty Moderator. MEMBERS Frederick G. Allyn Edmund S. Finucane Irvin F. Ballbach Jerry E. Fisher Edward J. Bellamah Kenneth R. Fournier William G. Buckley John B. Girardin Lloyd F. Brazil Benedict A. Henn Neil W. Brown George L. Hess Charles Brushaher C. Scott Howard Walter J. Chinoski Fred O. Jenney Herbert J. Clark Edward T. Kane Roland J. Denison Alfred L. Kent James F. Dillon Sigmund J. Krebsbach Alex J. Doran Gerald H. LaLonde Harold C. Dumanois .2 1 ts l Fred W. Lyons John J. May Franklyn E. McDonald Sheldon McGraw Dell E. Mead James J. Miller George R. Mobley Francis J. Murphy Joseph C. Murphy John A. Ratcliffe R. Roy Redden John B. Reiser HONORARY MEMBERS Frank A. Richard Don F. Roberts Henry L. Roehrig Edward A. Stenger Frank J. Stone Jack W. Teubert Cornelius J. Ulberg Norman D. Valentine James R. Watson Eugene J. Welling Donald G. Williams Herman D. Young George F. Helwig Lester K. Kirk Joseph A. Luyckx Carl H. Seehofler ETA THETA CHAPTER of Alpha Kappa Psi, National Professional Fraternity in Commerce, was installed at the University of Detroit on May 20, 1930. The installation ceremonies were held at the Hotel Statler. Prior to this date Beta Theta Chapter was known as Sigma Kappa Phi, found- ed as a Commerce and Finance Club in 1918 and incorporated as Sigma Kappa Phi in 1930. Socially the Beta Theta Chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi has enjoyed an un- usually active season. During the summer the calendar included an outing to Put-in-Bay and a moonlight excursion. At the close of the football season, the alumni gave a Football Finale, and in December a Testimonial Banquet to Captain Lloyd Brazil. At an initiation in February, honorary membership was bestowed on Professor Joseph A. Luyckx. A dinner-dance was given at East- wood lnn, numerous smokers and bridge parties, and their annual Colonial Prom at the Hotel Statler concluded the season. Alpha Kappa Psi Scholarship Cup was established in October, 1928. It is awarded to the fraternity with the highest scholastic standing. I 'I on ,- ' 'sam 3 lifak D 4 Elo Q5 3219 ,y it Fl, ,, -va it 'J 1124811 1 1 l 4 4. . , .VS I . M42 W 2 f G5 kffiflwjwa Q f Qffiiiwlgg' 3 O T 'K' if l CD 4 fa? .fix 2 THE WER 5 A r A ' ' : -11" -1- : , -Y x In ws- Y Aif 'i :lain 'alll-D fi-mils' 'Y' F ia,e r D7 'H e F F 5 , I, iq Ng 0 2- , alqifa is ' we M9 L 'B Left to Right: Top Row-Brazil, Brushaber, Buckley, Chinoski, Denison, Dillon, Doran Second Row-Dumanois, Erdos, Finucane, Fisher, Fournier, Girardin, Haggerty. Third Row- Henn, Hess, Hoban, Howard, Frank Jenney. Fred Jenney, Kane. Fourth Row-Kent, Krebs- bach, LaLonde, Lennert, Lyons,'May,' McDonald. Fifth Row+-McGraw, M.cGregor, Mead Miller. Mobley, J. Murphy, Navin. Szxth Row-Ratcliffe, Redden, Reiser. Richard, Roberts, Roehrig, Stenger. Bottom Row--Stone, Teubert, Ulberg, Valentine, Welling, Williams. gp-'r vs fl XVI :gin G I, J' f G A' . H2493 MEMBERS A f I A 6 TH, - ,wer ell:-S I ' ' I ' ll ARGON if 'cf 1 A Qfe :QA 5 'S ' A-SI el WILLIAM J. STOREN, Pf9Sfdet'2I JAMES M. BRENNAN. Vice-President FRANCIS X. QUINN. Secretary PHILIP D. CONWAY, Treasurer JOHN E. DYER, Sergeant-at-Arms DANIEL J. MOYNIHAN. Faculty Moderator George S. Bahorski Robert W. Blanchard Dennis J. Clary Paul F. Curry J. Dale Devlin Lawrence J. Dowd Edmund J. Engelman Charles J. Fellrath James J. Fenlon Arthur A. Garbarino Edward J. George Joseph J. George Daniel N. Harrington C. Scott Howard Roy A. lrvine Joseph L. Kreklow Charles E. Mangold Paul G. Marco James B. Monaghan John P. Lipscomb Joseph A. Lubinski William A. McFawn James A. McNamara Howard A. Magrath William J. O'Neil Charles L. Stead George W. Stewart Kenneth C. Tiffany John C. Treen Joseph A. Waltman Francis E. Weaver PON receiving the required sanction of the faculty in 1928, Argon frater- nity began its career of vigorous participation in university activities, and since that time has taken a prominent place among the fraternal organizations on the campus. The greatest contribution of Argon fraternity to the university is the annual award of a trophy to the player who, in the opinion of the coaches, has dis- played the greatest improvement during the long and disagreeable spring prac- tice. The presentation this year was made by Coach Dorais at the Argon Trophy Dance held in May, an event which has assumed a prominent place on the social calendar of the university since its inception in 1928. November 3rd marked the date of the first pledge dinner of the year. The dinner was directed by John Lipscomb, and it was at this affair that the Hrst group of prospective members began their pledgeship. The first initiation on February 8th was held at the Cadillac Athletic Club. At this event, a well-tried and long-pledged group was introduced to the secrets of the fraternity. The second initiation was held in May, and a second group received their pins after proving their worthiness. On October 6th, a fraternity outing was enjoyed at Pine Lake. On Novem- ber 16th, the fraternity held a dinner dance at the Chinese Princess. The event, under the chairmanship of Francis Quinn, was a pleasant affair and proved highly enjoyable to the fraternity members. A bowling tournament between the members of the fraternity was begun at the Cadillac Athletic Club on March 16th. Argon was also represented in the tennis tournament which was started on March 30th. These are but further proofs of the promotion of athletics which has always been stimulated by the members of Argon fraternity. N3 o ,'?'b gf lf? 1 Atv 9 W tb E tuavrfxvg N! 41 Kip' A , s sae.-3 al-EM 1 'tg Ejjgglg I IQSOI s ef .S .1 cb iw? Q-E: 3 1 K. K' in A:-'N 3, 1 'yxjyb -.f s THE V930 TOWER mx ? 3 ir -1' Qi- -L 1 J a? cf 4 h gil 'Fl E Mg ' J J. S. is ' We ay M5 L Left to Right: Top Row-Blanchard, Brennan, Clary, Conway, Curry, Devlin. Second Row- Dyer, Engelman. Fellrath, E. George, J. George. Harrington. Third Row-Howard, Kreklow. Lubinski, McFaWn, Magrath. Fourth Row--Mangold, Monaghan, Quinn. Stead, Stewart. Bottom Row-Storen. Tiffany. Treen, Waltman. Weaver. Jessi: 3 r 454.91 M6111 Jggg fliiisassimgi - s Ff' ' "QQ 4 -f we 1930 TOWER - Yryxx ll 4- Yi - f' ll ffl K Ovf ed s cgi w GS: f, Q35 21 af" ,,1i4'f9"f5-14 . i'pfgl"'5K "tj sf ll ,lf ,Q ,... .. 1.1 .je . 'f " .. .14 riff ' -.. BETA SIGMA PI 'Tl-lEOPHlLE WlENCZEWSKl, Pfeslidenf MARTIN L. KUKIELKA, Vice-President HENRY J. LUKASIEWICZ. Secretary WALTER S. JAKUBoWsK1. Treasurer SYLVESTER A. CZERWINSKI, Audflflt' LEO E. BUSS, Faculty Moderator MEMBERS William B. Cetnar Anthony L. Karczmarzyk Peter M. Kownacki Joseph J. Michalak Walter J. Dzieszko Chester F. Konczalski Florian P. Kowalski Stephen P. Nowaczyk Francis F. Jurkiewicz Edward G. Kowalczyk Edward A. Malik John J. Sauk N its second year on the campus, Beta Sigma Pi fraternity, one of the most active organizations of its kind at the university, surpassed its admirable record of last year when four very successful affairs were held. This club, com- posed of students of Polish extraction, is an earnest backer of all the doings of the student body and the university. The frat was organized to aid the Polish students in expressing their spirit in the university and to bind them into a co-operative unit to work for the progress of the Alma Mater. This purpose has been carried out in their accomplishments of the past year, and the club has welded its members into a group that has given consistent sup- port to all university activities. Beta Sigma Pi stands high in the scholastic ranking as well as socially and academically. The first social activity held by the frat was an outing given during the summer vacation at the Sunnybrook Country Club. John Sauk, as chairman of the event, made the day a most entertaining one for the members and their friends. Beta Sigma Pi has inaugurated a new and unique precedent in holding social functions during the summer season, and according to present plans will continue to follow out this policy. The first event of the regular school year was a dinner and smoker' held at the Century Club. Walter Dziesko was chairman. The fraternity proved itself to be very active by holding the first event of the school year. The smoker was well attended and everyone had an enjoyable time. The first big affair of the season was a dance held at the Maccabees ballroom on November lOth with over seventy couples in attendance. Walter Jakubow- ski was the chairman of the event, which was as elaborate and successful as any affair held by the club. The final event of the fraternity's social season was the formal initiation held at Webster Hall April 7th. At this time, several new members were ad- mitted to the club, and became part of the group. To further prove the loyalty of this group to the school, the club enter- tained nearly fifty couples at the annual Union Opera during Easter Week. -e gf Z, cg' .X 592.15 y .Q .Q 1 3 :AS 'J Litflpff 4223. I 4 27' il252ll iwjga THE l93O TOWER qu"K'g' - l -A - I 5? 'elk-D ZAMS' I 8.4 LVG I M.. fkx Ll i f QS? a 7 Left to Right: Top Row-Cetnar. Czerwinski. Dzieszko. Jakubowski. Second Row- Jurkiewicz, Karczmarzyk, Konczalski. Third Row-Kowalczyk, Lukasiewicz. Malik. Botlom Row-Nowaczyk, Sauk, Wienczewski. kg. -N Ill P . S 2 Q3 3 W 'J W Q 525311 eggs? -J354 'f-'W-W'S1s. fvf?G23'lQp , rj fl'-f "-wg., 3 JA? THE V930 TOWER i dk. qn xl 2 4, -1 in 2. 7 ' ' 'Sf H HI s all due y cg 5 v. 5 535 2 r. 1 Q 'ly .x 0. sl'1 CHIDELTAfTHETA RALPH W. BOONE, Grand Architect GEORGE E. HENK, Architect SIDNEY SHELBY, Secretary FRED B. STURM, Treasurer GEORGE F. BROWN, Conductor ALBERT E. FLEMING, Guard LEON S. JOHNSTON, Faculty Moderator MEMBERS Melvin J. Anderson John M. Kopko Harry E. Radlinski Jack R. Tetmarsh Wallace Ceglarek George H. Merckling Willard G. Root Herbert J. Wendt Edward O. Fricker Harlem H. Morris Carl H. Rothenberger Norman E. White Richard Guerin Oliver H. Perreault Olaf Saari G. Raymond Young HONORARY MEMBER Bert N. Blakeslee N September lst Chi Delta Theta, architectural fraternity at the Univer- sity of Detroit, established its headquarters at 16823 Monica Avenue, just four years after its inception as a campus organization. It was founded in the Spring of 1926 to bind the students of the architec- tural department of the Engineering College more closely together socially. While primarily social it set for its purpose a higher goal, which its members have since tried to carry out to the best of their ability. Their aim is to pro- mote a high standard of scholarship among the students of architecture, to instill a spirit of devotion in them for their Alma Mater, and to foster an active participation in all activities of the university among the entire body of archi- tectural students. That a warm spirit of enthusiasm prevails among the body is attested by the fact of their marvelous growth. Chi Delta Theta opened its social season with a smoker at Webster Hall on September 24th, 1929. A series of pledgings, open meetings and monthly bridge or theater parties were held during the course of the year. The three professional meetings consisted of informal talks by men prominent in the building Held. The brilliant feature of the social calendar was the dinner dance at Tuller Hotel, March 4th, 1930. Willard Root was chairman of the affair. . An architectural exhibition was sponsored late in the second semester. It was the Hrst of its kind ever to be held at the university and was open to all members of the architectural department. An outcome of the exhibition was the Architectural File, a reference library in which is kept all information pertinent to architecture. Contributions to the file have continued in a steady volume during the year and quite an interesting collection has been made. W li j Li? rig .ff ie 1, . 53' S Ill shawl 4949: H254H al Eg lfff in rw H i Q i 2 1 w F I If , lr 1 3 Q is 1 I 1 w 3 4 'N i 1 X I5 V , I ga gig I ,524 cr , V? Q .v. Q35 S 4,, 'x i 1 Y Y f J 4 1 3 5 N 1 4 , 2 JL? ,,. 1 J ! 'V J Q' W 1 1 I 5 1 Q is W U MEMBERS ft 9' 3 in U' Q 211 bldg it 'J Q. 1 gud .KE be 6 . as l G' K f" in "N f.az.-L.-Wmgt g : 'ef 1930 T 1 A THE OWEQ ' r ' funn ?.,g,gl:i' 1 LIU . 6 1 it S,- CHI SIGMA PHI LAWRENCE G. RILEY, President ARTHUR E. BUSH, Scholastic Recorder HERMAN D. YODER, Vice-President JOHN C. CAMPBELL, Secretary CARL J. WEAVER, Treasurer FRED J. SCHREIBER, Financial Secretary RUSSELL E. GROSE, Sergeant-at-Arms DAVID P. GILMORE, Facully Moderator Howard C. Barren Nicholas P. Bekema James R. Brigham Howard E. Byrne Harold F. Cartier J. Douglas Caton Milton J. Diamond Fred J. Dietz James B. Fay Raymond J. Frankl George W. Gambert Clarence R. Gaugh Vincent E. Hogan Clarence Houck Francis M. Hull t Walter M. Keenan Charles A. Kern John D. Malone Herbert F. McClure in Vincent L. McEnall Y Clyde H. Mitchell Arnold J. Mittig R. Charles Moore Francis P. Moran James D. Nutt Gregory J. Oberst Robert E. Quick Robert L. Redmond C. Dean Robb Bernard R. Rochester Kurt M. Rohland Goerge F. Schueder George H. Shefferly Joseph C. Slater John O. Stenger Mark W. Stroebel Burwell J. Walter Paul W. Weaver Frank C. Weiler HI SIGMA PHI, an engineering fraternity, was organized at the University of Detroit early in the year 1922. Enrollment in the regular prescribed engineering courses which lead to engineering degrees, is a necessary requirement to active membership in the fraternity. Honorary membership is given only to men who have been successful in the pra-ctice of the engineering profession. In Professor John Caton and Professor David P. Gilmore, the fraternity has the best representatives of the engineering profession. The ideals of the frater- nity, character and scholastic ability are best embodied in the work of these two men. On October 18th, Chi Sigma Phi initiated a select number of pledges in the order. The first social event after the adoption of the new members was a Prospect Party held in the Masonic Temple on October 23rd. This party was followed by a closed dance at Clinton Valley Country Club, which proved to be a most enjoyable affair. A banquet was held on February 22nd at Masonic Temple, after which an initiation of the remaining pledges was held. In May, the Chi Sigs sponsored a dance at the Masonic Temple which duplicated their earlier social achievements. The fraternity concluded its social season with a banquet given at the Masonic Temple on June 7th. Chi Sigma Phi each year offers an Honor Key to that senior in the Engineer- ing School who completes his Hve-year course with the highest scholastic aver- f age. This award was inaugurated in 1927, and each year it is presented at graduation exercises. s'-vw 2 - , Z" 4 5 V .N ll256ll afar " 423-ii, f -rr x I l Gun QC I i C ' dsefq ta. ' , 2 ,l l N v I 1 1 c6i.ti'rw'+ egg ima Sem I mf! '0" "' -of s THE 1930 TOWER SEQ. . 'alll-5 ann , lf till an Ml gilt Null tl- f V2 l H lf 1 a ' i A f I' F' l ,fl , I fb' , r it 10 R , gy! l illnl ' l" l ,I l in Left to Right: Top Row-Barten, Bekema. Brigham, Bush, Byrne, Campbell, Cartier. Second Row-Caton. Diamond. Dietz, Fay. Franklin. Gambert. Gaugh. Third Row-Grose, Hogan, Houck, Hull. Keenan. Kern. Malone. Fourth Row-McClure, lVlcEnally, Mitchell, Mittig. Moore. Moran. Fifth Row-Nutt, Oberst, Quick, Redmond, Riley, Robb. Sixth Row-Rohland, Schreiber, Schueder, Shefferly, Slater, Stenger. Bottom Row-Stroebel, Walter. C. Weaver, P. Weaver. Weller, Yoder. Q JE ll257ll 'cf '41 .2 GP, as Q QS? 2 K ,Inj it S9 1 aaa? LE , - 4 Q .1 , .. THE EE? TOWER L lg ' ' 4 'E ' If Fm ll!-D1 funilgi DELTA ALPHA PHI ANTHONY J. KRONK, President CARL E. SIMEK, Vice-President JOSEPH J. KRONK, Treasurer JOHN H. VONROSEN, Recording Secretary JOHN N. NICODEMUS, Corresponding Secretary RUSSELL E. LAWRENCE, Faculty Moderator MEMBERS Thomas T. Adams Kenneth H. Carr Louis L. Hart Charles J. Roney John E. Boersig Joseph D. Cassidy Adam B. Kronk Charles J. Shires James J. Britt William A. Guarnieri Raymond J. Lewis Adolph Simek Lawrence V. Britt Wilfred T. Hanlon Joseph A. Powers John T. Soleau HE reorganized Delta Alpha Phi fraternity completed a successful season during the past year. Three major social events were held during the school year, in addition to several informal meetings and smokers. The club was reorganized a year ago, and has made rapid strides both socially and academically. The members are whole-hearted in their support of student activities, being one of the many fraternities to attend the Union opera in a body on the opening night. Among the activities of its members are offices on the Union Board of Governors, membership on the debating teams, managerial capacities on the A Union opera personnel, athletic monogram men, and positions on the Varsity News staff. Such is the material of which a fraternity should be composed to make it of value to the university. 1 Delta Alpha Phi pledged several lower' classmen during the past year. The fraternity makes a practice of choosing only those students who are campus lead- ers, which accounts for the club's activities. This year the initiation banquet was held May 3rd at the Port Shelby Hotel. Charles Shires was chairman of the event. The first important social function of the year was a dinner-dance held at the Oriole Terrace, February 27th. William Guarnieri, as chairman, succeeded in making the affair a most enjoyable one. The annual spring formal dinner- dance was held this year on May Zlst. The Fox and Hounds Club was the location and a committee of three men took charge of the event. This dance celebrated the eleventh anniversary of the fraternity, Delta Alpha being one of the oldest on the campus. The past year was the first complete season under the new system installed by the fraternity, and it proved to be a great success. One year ago, the club's morale had seemingly failed completely, but under the reorganization, the mem- bers picked up spirit and Delta Alpha Phi once more resumed its rightful place in campus affairs. leaf 9 Hzssll 'elfluli Q? 'J we cgi t -S . t Q-32 5' distggsxvdgngg4E!EiSRmg35bxd,qFg32ib iaffoh "NYsu1 THE 1930 TOWER Sndkw.. - Y 1 g A- - L- 5 : A' 625 Q Left to Right: Top Row-J. Britt. L. Britt, Carr, Cassidy. Second Row-Guarnieri, Hanlon, A. J. Kronk, J. Kronk. Third Row-Lewis, Powers. Shires, A. Simek. Bottom Row- C. Simek, Soleau, Von Rosen. msg! Af" . -5.5 75 M' W E Lil-"l6x99 !'!r,X'Al! Q, ff N 4 is l QZZJQ 525911 . ,lf-! ' ' E""'1.Qfv, I , THE me TOWER I T IT 1-F-T - 1 ' ,js ii 'alfa'-S I gl Ref , . if' I .2 sci QL .f ' ,I Q-Si A ,r ip 9 lf ik l1'l.fi-, , 1 v DELTA PHI EPSILON HARRY W. MOREAU, President ROBERT H. THOMAS, Secretary CHARLES T. MACDONALD, Treasurer HOWARD H. WOBROCK, Sergeant-at-Arms JOHN A. RUSSELL, Faculty Advisor SAMUEL T. HOEXTER, Faculty Advisor MEMBERS Anthony L. Alsobrook Anthony Dittmar William J. Athanson Harvon A. Drittler John E. Kuzara Ralph E. Atlee Alvah P. Brachman Don W. Cooper Cyril B. DiMarco John R. Ranta Ronald Ci. Trumble Richard F. Kobetits William J. Everitt Frederick C. Manneback James J. Ward Armand E. Michon Edward A. Weithoff William H. Miller Alfred H. Wolf Francis C. Osborn Walter J. Feehan Harry J. Greer John W. Kinsey ELTA PHI EPSILON, national foreign trade fraternity, is represented at the University of Detroit by Theta chapter. Begun in November, 1919, at the Georgetown University, D. C., its chapters are established at uni- versities in all parts of the United States. The fraternity's purpose is to promote good fellowship, honor, scholarship. and excellent citizenship among its members: to inspire a spirit of loyalty to respective Alma Maters: to aid each member in the realization of his ideals: to support the Constitution of the United States of America: to aid in the develop- ment and maintenance of the international commerce of the United States: to encourage and foster relationships of friendliness and good will between the United States and other nations. Being a professional fraternity, most of Theta chapter's activities are of a professional nature. Two meetings are held each month, one a business meeting and the other a dinner meeting held on the third Monday of each month. The dinner meeting is devoted to discussions and talks relating to foreign trade by men active in that field. This year, such places as the Palmetto Hotel, Strikers, and the Seward and Statler hotels were the centers for these gatherings. The social calendar of Theta chapter began this year with a Pledge Dinner given in January at the Mansion. On February 14th, 15th, and l6th, initia- tion of the neophyte class into the chapter was held at the Hotel Statler. Theta chapter presents the Rev. Henry W. Otting gold award each year to the most deserving student in the foreign trade department of the College of Commerce and Finance. The award is given to honor the memory of the late Rev. Henry W. Otting, S. J., past regent of the university and past honored member of Theta chapter. Growth in membership made a home for the organization on the campus a necessity. The chapter's house was opened this fall, and is located at 630 E. Jefferson. H2603 'S i if HP? gif 'f slit. F555 K ws" EU ,J 9 2. 39.21 'J il Q6g3g'5N,E:A1Q'gkgf.Z'N.i1:-'5J-i?S,xe5i-f2'gg5g9 ' ' ' h 'N 'Ant THE:-i930 TGWER Aka.. I f 'X ll 5 Yi-N186 .hx , ' 1 uf N1 LWQ X 3 f S' 1 3' a W J 6' Lis l,XF7 Q v is U AMEX Q- X Left to Right: Top Row-Alsobrook. Athanson, Atlee. Brachman, Cooper. Second Row- DiMarco, Dittmar. Drittler, Everitt. Feehan. Third Row-Greer, Kinsey, Kobetits. Kuzara. Miller. Fourth Row-Moreau, Osborn, Ranta, Thomas. Bottom Row-Trumble, Ward, Weithoff, Wobrock. H26l1I ,sb at " J. Q, H., 55? E' a L29 5. W ts? .M V? ,rs .sid ' 1 is 2 diitggighdggsggeE!eassmsasygM,GFQ3gib ri 'IP-,urn-f O ,111-sau Q: THE '93 TOWER 4 ' H ll cf 4 .3 alll-5 S' 4' . EM' Q DELTA PI KAPPA RALPH C. JOHNSTON, President RALPH W. BOONE, Vice-President W. JOSEPH STARRS, Secretary PHIL W, STACKPooLE, Treasurer JERRY J. DONOVAN. Historian JOHN A. RUSSELL. Faculty Moderator MEMBERS Leo J. Andries John L. Cashin Frank E. Jenney Francis J. Potts James J. Britt Charles J. Fellrath Clarence J. Kummer Joseph A. Powers Donald F. Carney Arthur R. Curix Paul G. Marco Lawrence G. Riley James A. Haggerty Edmond J. Ottenbacker ELTA PI KAPPA, the only journalistic fraternity on the campus, is a leader in every university activity. Although one of the smallest it has achieved a position that few fraternities anywhere can equal. The social calendar of the Quillmen was dotted with some of the most out- standing affairs of the year at the university. The initial event was the Scribes' Ball, most colorful and most successful. This dance, sometimes called the Pi-I-Pirate Ball, was held October 30th, at the Masonic Temple. Frank Jenney was chairman of the affair. The liveliest and most amiable crowd of young people, that ever attended a fraternity dance was present at this Pi-I festivity. On December 12th the fraternity held its first open house meeting. John Cashin was in charge of the meeting at Webster Hall. On January l7th, Don Carney and Phil Stackpoole engineered the frater- nity's bridge party, at Webster Hall. Pledging was handled by Ralph Boone, on January 30th, at the Seward Hotel. Following the pledge meeting came a succession of enjoyable meet- ings, during which time, the Cubs, as Delta Pi Kappa's pledges are known, per- formed or didn't, just as the superiors dictated, much to the enjoyment of the active and alumni members. The scene was the Seward Hotel. Initiation of new members was held on May 4. The Quillmen pledged their support to both the Union Opera and the Junior Prom. The' members attended the opera in a body. The social season was brought to a close by Delta Pi Kappa's annual Dinner Dance, under the chairmanship of Phil Stackpoole. I Delta Pi Kappa is represented in every University activity, whether journal- istic or otherwise. Its members are to be found on the publications' staffs, the opera personnel and every other worth-while activity. , . ,L Ji' nf' if-'Q-.M EQQQZXPE .ff its if li "" ii' ll H262H :ft wil, . 6 QW? W if U , VA an 6 fl 9 ,. M. Q-ss .2 QICEWS , , 7, -f - be .A- t THE MO TOWER le. ' ' H' xx e e f av A 5 ia H IH Left to Right: Top Row-Andries, Boone, Britt, Cashin. Second Row-Donovan. Fellrath. Grix. Haggerty. Third Row-Jenney, Johnston, Kummer. Ottenbacker. Bottom Row- Potts, Powers, Riley, Starrs. kg. if J I an A 2 :WP 129' E gg-'I xvs foV"2 iw stef-3 S C H2251 526311 EW JQQJ e:',-K-.ai.'-spa-gk, L f KE 1930 TOWE Q 1. - A e 'fi fi' gi afar' 'L T M 'M " - gig? af ' 2 T is R II ' ' X gl! O., , Q f if l ...EQ .ti AS. QQ- f' ss .2 42. 'I-it. ,4Q'iQ A e-1. g ,al ,' f., ff DELTA SIGMA FRANK E. WEAVER, President MICHAEL J. KILBANE, Vice-President CARL H. ROTHENBERGER, Recording Secretary RICHARD E. DOWNING, Corresponding Secretary RICHARD B. BENN, Treasurer WILLIAM GODEREY, Faculty Moderator MEMBERS Marion J. Beer Edward J. George Joseph J. George Oliver H. Perreault Thomas J. Ryan ASHINGTON'S birthday saw the installation of a new chapter of the Delta Sigma, a national fraternity, on the University of Detroit campus. The old Delta Club about which little was heard became the Eta Beta chapter of this large fraternity. This organization is one of the largest national frater- nities in the country, having nearly one hundred chapters. This organization was formed from the small band of the Delta Club. It was only after much preliminary work that they were iinally accepted as a chapter of the national fraternity. The nine organizers, Prank Weaver, Michael Kilbane, Carl Rothenberger, Richard Downing, Richard Benn, Marion Beer, Oliver Perreault, Edward George, Joseph George and Tom Ryan, are the charter members of this fraternity. The installation, which took place February 22, was handled by Jack Rose, deputy commissioner of the third district of the fraternity. He was assisted by Robert Elmes, William Paulimus, and John Wessels. The first three are mem- bers of the Pi Nu chapter located in Buffalo, New York, while Wessels came from the Gamma Lambda chapter of St. Louis, Missouri. The ceremonies took place at Webster Hall and were climaxed by a banquet at which all the charter members of the local chapter were present. Frank Weaver was in charge of the banquet. On March 18, the Hrst open meeting of the Delta Sigma fraternity was held under the chairmanship of Carl Rothenberger. As this organization has not yet been able to procure a fraternity house the meeting was held at Webster Hall. Michael Kilbane was in charge of the second open meeting which took place March 30, at Webster Hall. The pledges were received April 27, at Web- ster Hall, followed by a formal banquet. Frank Weaver presided over the pledging and arranged the banquet. On three successive days, June 6, 7, 8, the informal initiation and the traditional Delta Sigma banquet for new members were held at Webster Hall. The officers of the Delta Sigma for this year are Prank Weaver, president! Michael Kilbane, vice-president: Carl Rothenberger, recording secretary: Rich- ard Downing, corresponding secretary, and Richard Benn, treasurer. gal' gb, I E.H..4'a HBV if digg it el-I it ,fa r If 3, lfxwgfi WZ JI? r iii iw 'J luv, xg 9X?l!rl? 'wwf s ff?-fb? . . gag.. 360, sl :B xugaiaivja x 4,1553 I 4 MQ? fr. I 26411 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 11 ,. 1 1 4 1 - nv' Mi' ' . ,x '-ff':fg,1:1'., 1 '1., 'e2C?1Ti?55Dg'4"'b"L' "3l1'fQ11.'-Zffiliffwgf !,f1,1, my AT 1.4111 11,1111 1: 1,51 W. 1 1 1 ' 1 Q ff? eC2::?sr1f1 . o .e .. 1 n ..,.f::"'-mfr-l ,1f'T:"'K'TT""'W27.::1i?Q.-:z-NN'--?'i?-1 11-1j5151.,f:- ' 1' ' 'L' 'eg ' "' ' "" " H' one i 1 """' ' J 1 ' ohh' ""'1. 5 1451? G5 1 1 ' 1"1f 1 ' 1 1 1 ? 1-1 11. '1'--11 1 1 .::::q 11 1 1 1 1 111 Qfvg. 4 '4f1,, . , ' . 11' 11 11 1' 1 1 1 .11 1 7 11 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1111 i1 1 11 1 1' ., 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 ' 1 1 Nw 11' 81 1 1 1 11 11 11 U11 11 1 1111 1 Q11 1 1. 11 1 1 11 1 11 1 1 111 11 ' 1 1 111 111 11 1 1 1 11 1. 1, 1 ' 11 1 11 1 111 1 11 11 1 1 1 1 '1 1 11 1 1 11 1 1 '1 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 11 1' 111 11,1 1- 151 11 1 11111. 1 11 12"-. 1. 1 1111 1. 1 1 ' 1 1 6 6 1 11 1:32231 ad 1 11 ,q1!,f31qr1i'a'N, f- 1 J 111ff,4'iF"'fCJ 6 .1 11 11 114mf'1iQ1fif51 L 11 1141- 1 , 1' 1" r lx W f1'..11mJ 1 1 1 1" 'J 1. L 1 ' 1 ' 1' '1 -.J ' 111 11 1, 1 1 11 M H. 1 '1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1' , 1 111 1 1 1 U1 1 1 '11 1 1 1 11 1 . 11 1 ' 1 1 11 1 1 1 11 1 11 1 . 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1111 1 11 1 11 1 11l 1 11 11 1 1 1 1 1? ' . 1 1'1 111 1 1 Hw Left to Rzght: Top Row-Beer, Benn, Downing, E. George. Second Row-J. George, Kil- bane, Perreault. Botlom Row-Rothenberger, Ryan, Weaver. 1 1 1 1 111 1 1 1 I 1 f'-'S-'J 1 11 1 fl? Qvbvfw ' 1ihE4S2s H2651 t . fi ia Q ug El 1 Gi A L. ff' 'N J np v f -N ,Jw HQZQSJNEE 'TiAEi -- CJVVEYQ 55,fgissv g Qk35? as ' r" 4' F"' ' inanw 6 li in 'elk-S l AQ: .exit DELTA SIGMA PI JOHN F. COLLINS, Headmaster PAUL A. LILLY. SCFHJQ GEORGE SIERRA, Senior Warden ETI-IELO DEFOBIO, Junior Warden HUDSON W. DIGBY, Treasurer EDWIN A. CI-IAPP. Corresponding Secretary RALPH L. WEBER, Historian MARSHALL WITCHELL, IVQLUS Ed1AfOl' JAMES FITZGERALD, Faculty Moderator MEMBERS Arthur W. Anderson John L. Hamilton John E. Ottenbacher Edwin J. Barbour Clarence W. Hinz Robert Parsaca Thomas F. Benson Louis J. Jabro John T. Petz John T. Birney Roy G. Kowalski Rollin K. Reiss Clarence L. Bishop Merril T. Lardner Clarence A. Robitell Allan A. Bridgman Howard I. Mahoney Leo Ryan Leslie Butcher Forest J. Malott Charlton G. Shaw 'J Bancroft G. Butler Achille l. Marantette Homer C. Slonaker John P. Campbell Don W. Matzen Alfred J. Smith Paul R. Clement Patrick J. McDonnell Fred O. Stewart Marcus H. Collins Thomas J. Mclntosh William E. Tepper Albert J. DeSanto Dan B. McKillop Lester B. Vachon Michael F. Fitzpatrick Ryan F. Mullins Michael A. Van De Keere S. Howard Flannigan Earl A. Murphy John E. Walker Fred L. Goodrich Clifford Nelson Archie A. Yaeger Don A. Osborn A mgxir rw, ll HETA Chapter of Delta Sigma Pi, international Commerce and Finance fraternity, is one of the largest and most active organizations on the cam- pus. Founded in January, 1921, the fraternity has since taken a leading part in the many social and scholastic functions of the university. The social season opened with a smoker at Webster Hall, September 30th. John F. Collins was in charge of the arrangements. lt was followed by a dinner dance at Hawthorne Valley, pledging of the neophytes at Webster Hall, and an initiation banquet at Fort Shelby Hotel on February 9th, 1930. ln December the fraternity feted the football team with its third annual foot- ball banquet held at the Book-Cadillac Hotel. L. Gordon Goodrich was chairman. The fifth annual basketball banquet sponsored by the organization was held at Fort Shelby Hotel, April 3rd, Following its usual custom, the fraternity pledged a second group in March. The initiation ceremonies were followed by a banquet in honor of the new members. The social functions of a year replete in activity closed with a formal dinner dance at Hawthorne Valley. ll266ll Swrgw-sg . ,wg 0 .' . '54 B f WE sts 3 ' G' F517 9 'WX-21 'D 1' t f HE 1930 Tow A fs -n""""A1- , Y fd Fw 111.0 fonts QU? A U' K '---.1539 T ER YY - -' -- - 1 .1 H ul 4 1 i ,. l Left to Right: Top Row-Anderson, Barbour, Benson, Birney, Bishop, Bridgman. Second Row-Butcher, Butler, Campbell, Chapp, Clement. J. Collins. Third Row-M. Collins, DeFobio, Digby, Fitzpatrick, Goodrich, I-Iinz. Fourth Row-Kowalski, Lardner, Lilly, Ma- honey, Malott, Matzen. Fifth Row-Mclntosh, McKillop. Murphy, Osborn, Ottenbacher, Petz. Sixth Row-Robitell, Slonaker, A. Smith, Stewart. Tepper. Bottom Row-Vachon, Van De Keere. Walker, XVeber, Witchell. f ully. W1 Rrpfaij JM? 'iff l I 52,194 H267H ,AO gf :f l f 5595 EM 'J ol, M fi Q. 1-ls l fg '1v.JG375-if-RN-fahx. fi 7 tiff. ' of to 'U 9 iiiigw' A 1930 T Tfrliglmg 4 P O '11 .ffm WE OWER rlks.. Tn ? I I ' 4' I i ' A . l L g -w, p mn ?.,,,,v' guaqtvy e 5 I l isp: 7 N A Q -my DELTAfTHETAlHU JOSEPH P. FRISKE, Dean IRVING J. GIBBONS, Vice-Dean JOHN PHENEY, Clerk of Rolls ARTHUR E. SOMERS, Clerk of the Exchequer RAYMOND J. LYNCH, Master of the Ritual FRANCIS J. PHELAN, Bdlllliff RICHARD J. SULLIVAN, Ttlibune GEORGE A. MCGOVERN, S. J., Faculty Moderator MEMBERS John XV. Barton Claude P. Dowis Daniel J. Healy Charles N. McLaughlin Norman Beyer Kenneth R. Fournier Gerald J. Kane Warner C. Rigney Joseph D. Cassidy Donald W. Gilbert Edward N. Lynch Oswald M. Robbins Owen J. Cleary Nathan B. Goodnow Gerald J. Lynch Franklin D. Ruhlman John Devlin Owen J. Guiney James D. McCarty Hilory J. Sullivan I Buell Doelle Jack P. Hasting John D. McGinnis Robert J. Teagan Robert O. Unsworth Leo W. Walsh Firmin J. Zettel ELTA THETA PHI has completed a year of intense activity. The Hos- mer senate, University of Detroit chapter of the national law fraternity, has taken an active part in all of the major events of the university and has expanded in numbers as well as in influence. A As in the past, many of the activities of the chapter have been carried on in conjunction with the two other senates located in the city. A formal dance was given in December by the three senates at the Book-Cadillac Hotel. The party was well attended and proved to be one of the most enjoyable events of the social season at the Law School. One of the finest and most successful events of the year was a formal initia- tion banquet at the Statler Hotel on March 8th. At this time, twenty students of the Law School were added to the roster of the fraternity. Following the initiation ceremonies, a large group of the three senates enjoyed a sumptuous banquet, at which Harry M. Crooks, L. L. D., president of Alma college, was the principal speaker. Due to the past successes of this function, it has become an annual event. At this same time, plans were also discussed and formulated for holding the 1931 national convention in Detroit. At numerous times throughout the year, the senate sponsored smokers for the members. These events were always carefully directed and were always social successes. The final event of the organization before the close of the school year was their annual Founders' Day celebration in the latter part of May. Delta Theta Phi was honored this year when Donald Gilbert, of the Hosmer senate, was selected as one of the commission appointed by Governor Green to codify all the Condemnation Laws. H268H WIQXAI F 'xv .v,, i 4 rfaff, sf, 1 :ye .3 Q. :ja ff-32 'J A O., K.'l' fd 0 V,gns44Wl:!fQss35yX,,.fP1 Q"'g,55?F-AA J - ' -' K THE V930 TOWER l . fr' -at ' 2 l Af' 'W' -S 2 B f a? If UI M , f z 4 QQ? 2 Left to Right: Top Row-Cassidy, Fournier, Friske, Gibbons, Goodnow. Second Row- Guiney, Kane, Lynch, McCarty. Third Row-Phelen. Pheney, Rigney, Ruhlman. Bottom Row--Sullivan, Unsworth, Walsh, Zettel. -4 Wa in ww E gi-'rpm wf,x'1m3 of-QQ 9 Q 'five H2693 it X cv. 'Nw l f f EN 0 'jg I tif fa r' A Own gd' we ,ps .1 cfi 5 ' c' I Q-S5 fl 6635334594 'f?'.4E'JE.'sshQs,gt 9 ,JW -X-HE l93O TOWER fr i J: I 4' "' 1 : I l James T. Brightwell Jack P. Cannon James T. Carroll Frank A. Colosimo Donald C. Costigan Leonard A. Dombrowski Bernard Duggan Ignatius E. Duggan Ellis C. Duncan Edward E. Gracey John P. Hackett j ln., . 3 ,f J Q 0 4 ig ... , Af , ,. x. stagg- K. EPSILON SIGMA PHI NED A. MONAGI-IAN, President ELWOOD A. JENKINS, Vice-President HARRY J. FLAHERTY, Seffeltlfy JACK E. GOETZ, Treasurer BENJAMIN E. NEWTON, Sergeant-at-Arms LEON BAISIER, Faculty Nloderator MEMBERS Jack H. Hoffstedder Stephen J. Jurczynski Marcus Kellerman Joseph Loughrin Orlando H. Lamsens Erancis C. Maher Art Massucci Carlyle McDonald Carl D. Moeller Adolph Nemsick John C. Palmer Norman C. Pearson Maurice D. Pendergast Walter S. Potoczak John W. Pulte Joseph H. Rabaut Otto G. Seebaldt Edwin W. Stehle Jack E. Unger Howard R. Ward Joseph Weiss CTOBER, 1929, saw the beginning of the Epsilon Sigma Phi, a fraternity which is fast becoming popular among the undergraduates.. To Ned Monaghan, Ben Newton, Jack Cannon and Jack Goetz must we pay the credit for establishing this new social organization. The movement toward national- ization, encouraged by Doctor Muttkowski and readily sponsored by the many fraternities on the campus, has caught up the Epsilonians and promises to add them in the near future to the group recently gone national. On Lincoln's birthday, Epsilon Sigma Phi held their first formal dance at the League of Catholic Woman's club house. Of this affair Ned Monaghan was appointed chairman. The dance, considering it the initial social event of the fraternity, was an unusual success. The guests expressed themselves as highly pleased with the many tasteful appointments. Although Epsilon Sigma Phi is less than a year old, it was able on March 16 to open a fraternity house at l685l Stoepel Avenue. A formal opening of the house was held, followed shortly by a congenial smoker. At the present time, ten members of the fraternity live in the new club home. This spring, fifteen pledges from the various colleges were initiated into the organization. Thus, from a numerically humble beginning, Sigma Phi has grown in a short time the equal in strength to the average-sized, but long- established fraternity. Epsilon Sigma Phi numbers among its membership men interested in nearly every university activity. Its roster includes those engaged in athletics, forensics and the like. i '5' ff s? ll r u g Q fpfn' .ff,'A'4ff!j H270 Il -. U ELC. my H5 I ffl? wi 'SSE 2 W- 523' v 5 f' -x I-A Mfg? TH?-,lg TOWER 5 HAM, m y - I "' X .- e ll Ill 'M 8. x -qs... 5 X235 ,A ms, Left to Right: Top Row-Baisier, Brightwell, Colismo, Dombrowski, B. Duggan, I. Duggan. Second Row-Duncan, Flaherty, Goetz, I-loffstedder, Jenkins, Jurczynski, Third Row-Kel- lerman, Lamsens. Loughrin, Maher, Mussucci. Fourth Row-McDonald, Monaghan, Nemsick, Newton, Palmer. Fifth Row-Pearson, Pendergast, Potoczak. Pulte, Rabaut. Bottom Row- Seebaldt, Stehle, Unger, Ward, Weiss. Q M" 3 ' g. , I ' l P Y Nez! tw ,S - Ref Q 414:11 H2713 s V a-cf 54,3-sS,, ffl".vY?X'SJS?fQgt ' 'f' 1930 T 'sa' 1 g . .f av THE . RCLWER 3 ' ' ' ' ll E ' L J 'allies E2 .SEQ N ss i rl gr-.fr-we .4491 'Q 2 EPSILON TAU CHARLES ABRAMSON, Maxz'mus Summus HERMAN COHEN, Summus SIMON DIAMOND, SCl'l'pILlS MAX RADOM, Pecunafrius PAUL P. HARBRECHT, Faculty Moderator MEMBERS Herbert L. Barak Samuel C. Epstein Leonard L. Milling George D. Seyburn Maurice D. Cohen Herbert L. Harris Edward E. Shonberg Allan E. Stein Morton L. Wolfe PSILON TAU, Jewish literary fraternity, established its Beta chapter at the University of Detroit in 1927. At the close of the school year, the chapter suffered a serious depletion in its ranks due to the graduation of a ma- jority of its members. This loss necessitated a complete reorganization, a labor- ious task to attempt, but with admirable organization Beta chapter once more assumed a prominent place among the fraternities of the campus. Early in the first semester, a smoker was given by the fraternity for sixty guests. The smoker, under the chairmanship of Max Radom, was held at the Lee Crest Apartmentsz a buffet luncheon, entertainments, and speeches con- tributed to the pleasures of the evening. November 15th marked the date of the Hrst informal initiation of the year. On November 22nd, the first formal initiation was conducted at the Imperial Hotel under the supervision of Max Radom. After the initiation ceremonies, a banquet was enjoyed by forty guests. The banquet, with Edwin Elk acting as toastmaster, was followed by speeches and entertainment, so that a really line time marked the lirst initiation of the year. The Hrst social event of the new year was an informal dinner dance at Bal Taberin, Addison Hotel, under the chairmanship of Max Radom and Edwin Elk. The affair was sponsored by the alumni body and was attended en masse by the members of Beta chapter. Decorations in the fraternity colors and school colors adorned the hall. Souvenirs in the form of decorative dance programs were presented to the ladies in attendance. As the social season drew to a close, the fraternity made plans to terminate its activities with a formal dinner at the Redford Country Club. The party was held on May 25th and far surpassed any event ever sponsored by Beta chapter. Beautiful favors and smartly designed programs were presented to the guests. The clubhouse was gaily decorated with the fraternity emblem and colors. Showing its interest in the activities of the university, Beta chapter was well represented at the Junior Prom, at the Prosh Prolic, and at the Sophomore Snow-Ball. 527211 fi f+:y'3 WM, Yew .413-1,0 'SB .. , be nk' . 5 wfglg kg O 55 'fs .Qi ' ly g I A S s 'v :MS Clif S an 1 1 1 1 1 i J f if-'fir -1 if ff, .,- K-?-QWSM., 651.1-f -115.51 16.914149 1 'P-sf1w11.x1f.f?o" 11 5 5'iiT1r'Ti7'3'1li1:'b:'V A A ..- ""ohl1f:.Sg:'2. ' 171355 1125. -'fr ff: -1111.11 fb 5:1 ,. 4f,1"7f'x1. 1,191 '. -- 1 W " ., 311 1 . W M..-ff f. ,.."V1if?i:C...-.Q 'iff-, , ' 1 Q., ,JJ I 5 Jii'?iij'1"i if, Q ,j'A?j1-A:""i'iL,l.'.'lfi f..1-1...f"'..1.: T.::Q.T.",.,X 1x :::::331-l-- A-fm447f--M-"'-7T7?L1?liZT3I A 711 '1 -11-f M --L 1 1- 1 -nw 1 1 L --W -f--- 1 1 11--W---1W-4.'Ir.T:f:..'-:t:i:'g:Kf Ax 11 1 'L '1'vi,.JfQ'111 ' ' - , . 1-11. i1,j7',fL- , b , 1 5 1 ""x""?-" . 1Hf o 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I1 1 1 1 z 1 A 1 1 1 1, ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 A 1 ' 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 11, ' 1 1 1 Z 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 111 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 11 11 1 1 ' 1 1 1 Q 1 ' T 1 t 1 1 1 1 : - 5 5 1 s ' 1 I: 1 g ' ' 1 1' I I 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 11 1 1 i VN ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 ff-1,11 , 7111 . 1 1 1 1 ' ii11f'Ffl-T1 ' 1 2 1 1 1H'1XggLg '5 5' ' 1 . 2Ewg,pfff1 F 111 :,1l, .:IA:,vK:7'..,x, 11 11 11 A 'ii A ' ' i 1 1 iff' ,Vf 9,3 A QEWVV11 Jwwwmiw S iQ 1 1 1 1 1 rf-'J 1:,1 . . , .111 1 11.1111211047 1 ' 11:11 ,11i..f'7"'4' fy Q 111' 1 11p'f1f'j,f, 1 11-113'-1. 1 1 Y 1. 1, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 v 11 1 1 1' 11 1 11 11-'ff 1 1 1 , 11-.f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I. 1 1 1 1 1 1' 1 1 1 1 1 ji W HM 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 11 1 f- 1 1 1 1 1: 1 1 1 ' i 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M1 WW 11 MH 1 1 1 1 TUE 1 1 1 f 11 WM fH3 1 1 1 1 ,151 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 X1 Q 1 . 1 1 1 11 1 I 1 1 . , I Q 1 1 1 1111 111 12 1 1 11 1 1 .3 1 1 1 1- 1 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 " 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 ' . , 1 1 1 1 Left to Rzghy Top Row--Abramson. Barak. H. Cohen. M. Cohen. Second Row-Dxamond. 1 11, Epstem, Harrls. Mlllxng. Bottom Row-Radom, Schonberg. Stein. Wolfe. 1151' 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 Z 1 il 1 1 .1 1U gr-rrp! .----'11 1 1 1 rl o 1 l J1glgii' f ' ' , fi , P!" of H2731 ffl,-Q -X-HE 1930 TOWER A qr. "? E 7 , : 4' T-T "" i-A : . , fi n? ' ' if ll 'll n. I ts , , Ms. Q1 li Arg an 15 2 ETA ZETA SIGMA ARMELLA C. FRIEDL, President RUTH G. PEASE, Vice-President ELEANOR L. RI-IEAUME, Secretary EILLEEN K. CROSS, Scribe ROSELLA M. PELTIER, Treasurer RICHARD MUTTKOWSKI, Faculty Nloderator MEMBERS Dolly A. Bauser Mary F. DeGalan Mary E. Friedl Ethel E. Mattson Florence M. Bernard Mary A. Dudek Frances M. Kline Gertrude Mattson Sylvia M. Blank Ada E. Fenlon Monica M. Kondratovicz June M. McDougall Marie H. Bunetta Marcel F. Frenette Marcella M. Matgen Margaret M. McRae Mila L. Zechlin HE Eta Zeta Sigma sorority had a banner year in 1929-30, for on the first of December, 1929, their house was opened. The event had been looked forward to by the members of the club, and the realization of this ambition was very gratifying. Despite their small numbers as compared to the thousands of men students, the co-eds have managed to make themselves a prominent factor in campus activities, and no small share of the honor should go to the Eta Zeta Sigma sorority. The organization was enlarged during the past year, and with the entrance of several new members, the club has increased its scope of social activities. The first social event of the year was a mixed bridge party held at the Union rooms on Jefferson Avenue, at the old University of Detroit. Marie Bunetta was appointed chairman of the event. A On February 24th, the initiation was held at the sorority house at 16249 Petoskey. On the following evening, a formal initiation dinner was given at the League of Catholic Women. The entire roster of members and pledges attended this aHair, which was voted a real success. Something novel in the way of social entertainment was given three days later, when the entire sorority went for a sleigh ride. The final social event of the season was the annual dinner dance given this year at the Detroit Yacht Club. The hall was Httingly decorated in a yachting motif, and everyone approved of the unique decorations. The sorority also sponsored a series of weekly teas given each Sunday after- noon during the school year. Both the girls living at the house and those living at home attended these affairs, which were reported very enjoyable. The sorority holds as its aim the promotion of a high standard of scholar- ship, and endeavors also, to promote a spirit of comradeship among the co-eds of the school. The ability to aid in the fulfillment of these ideals is a qualifica- tion requisite to an initiate of the sorority. , L x V J .5 "' Tfisfffql A 'e ,, . l , Tw, i t Bile Qi if 'J LIa.'l6yB 'Q' 5,55 Wifi V4 5" D if J- 3 Ekfji. II 2 74 11 I Xi4if-K,Agggiggiigiggiigiwfigig?P Lf-DB' f' , , , N-::JQa1.n:if Q' W '6' fwnf E930 Tiwwpn Eiygk Ngo , p 1 Mn ff n1nn 113' ff' Q nn fN'f'::F:mj?nwm:LiiJ?eff?ji nn ' 6 rx I 5 5 N35 lr, QV if , VI n J 12 . A 4 6g , 'Jy w Mn . Qkggef ln Q35 j W Y I If Left to Right: Top Row-Bauser, Bernard, Blank, Bunetta, Cross. Sefond Row-Dudek Fenlon, Frenette, A. Friedl, M. Friedl. Third Row--Kline. Kondratovicz. Matgen, E. Mattson Bottom Row-G. Mattson. McDougall, McRae, Pease. Q IEE H275H ffm-x G'S'f'71!E'f7!'5f3'3-?Sxv 'Qi Q"15!5w-:Jr ' to f' 9 Q 'B f' e R N I' 1 wif' v, 5 in I it M 5 V . jst elf E 6, X2 -:HEI 30 TOWE X r a -f.. 2 lava- A-ki EL g Z .fi tit' 'alll-5 shi GAMMA EPSILON PHI GEORGE E. MILLMAN, President PHILIP PLASKO, Vice-President GEORGE J. BARR, Secretary NORTON J. TAYLOR, Treasurer MORRIS KATZ, Sergeant-al-Arms PETER ALTMAN, Faculty Moderator MEMBERS Robert Aronson Sam Chosid Maurice Jacobs Max Weingarden Reuben Axelrod Norman Goldenberg Jack Kaufman Joseph Weiss Louis Haidy Harry Surowitz . OUNDED in October, 1929, the Gamma Epsilon Phi fraternity has slowly but surely become prominent on the campus. Organized for the promotion of the professional, social and scholastic interests of Jewish engineers, the club has succeeded admirably in its aim. A6863 Pour social events were held during the school year. The first of these was 4: I a skating party held in Windsor, Ontario on January 5th, Later in the ta V! month, a social meeting was held at Webster Hall. All the members attended glkaitga and plans for the future of the club were discussed. On February 16th, a bridge party was given at the Wolverine Hotel, the affair being a big success. The J final social event was a smoker held April 6th at Webster Hall. El Although not sponsoring a very large social program, the fraternity has succeeded in joining the Jewish engineering students together both socially and academically. It is planned to increase the membership and thus make the fraternity more prominent in campus life. This being its first year on the campus, the organization was not well enough organized to sponsor any university activity. However, with the passing of a year, the club will be more firmly entrenched in the affairs of the school and consequently wsillf be more active in the social life of the campus. The real meaning of this club can only be appreciated by its members but the good work of uniting men in a common interest can be appreciated by the school-at-large. It is the clubs, fraternities and social organizations of a university that keep life flowing in its veins and it is through such fraternities as Gamma Epsilon Phi, young as it is, that we feel the pulse of the school. Campus life is kept from stagnation not by the separate activities of individual men, but by the organized efforts of united groups and it is their sponsorship of and partici- pation in social activities that keep the campus alive. It is only through the students' co-operation with one another that a school may grow powerful and thus it can be seen that a vital need is felt for more young clubs such as this. Q U-erxva .9 9 l ll276ll H Q Y' x - f QS? 2 4 fe Q JQ5,f:'.-x-as-:sm-sgfagl. R f X 19 30 T WE OWEQ o 1, ' 1I 'em Q if I ,1 QW G A 5 I I 1 ,li gk 1-E 11' HW I, W ,xg V I 5 U , I W: Q ' W ' N 'x o o v G i w 1, . , W . W ! "3 l'I V' W Lo wi U W o , . o, I1 'N o o I N V PM -,s o E 1 1 , ' w Left to Right: Top Row-Altman, Aronson. Axelrod, Barr. Second Row-Chosid, Golden- berg. Haidy, Jacobs. Third Row-Katz, Kaufman, Millman, Plasko. Bottom Row-Surowitz, Taylor, Weingarden, XVeiss. Q HQ H277H 'o 8 . 53 Q F a wg' fb? I is o'J el ccga at if All 2 7 G' grs44E!C2EFvs31D aff fr 'E . .MSW WE mo TOWER g ' ' ' it ii .4 'fee ' rr GAMMA ETA GAMMA VJILLIAM E. VVAGNER. Chancellor GEORGE A. WEINS, Praetor JAMES J. HUNT, Recorder EARL H. LAEAIVE, Sheriff HAROLD lLLlG. Baliflllf EDMUND J. ENGELMAN, Qucestor ANTHONY E. l-IANDLOSER. Tl'pSl'cIU9 MEMBERS Mark L. Conrad Anthony J. Kronk Gerald J. McClear Arthur J. Petrimoulx Thomas A. Doucher Gerald O. Labadie Robert D. McClear Jack C. Quillinan Boyden Janjatovich Gordon W. Lamphere John J. McGinty Erank J. Ullrich Edward T. Kane Charles A. Laurencelle Joseph C. Murphy Thomas W. Ward John L. Wagner HE University of Detroit chapter of the national law fraternity, Gamma Eta Gamma, was established in 1919. The original chapter was founded at the University of Maine in 1901, and since then the society has grown until at present there are 35 chapters in the country. A very ambitious social schedule was undertaken by the Mu chapter and all the events were complete successes. The Hrst was a dinner held at the Cosmo- politan Club, August 28th, a few days before the opening of the fall term. Edmund Engleman, as chairman, succeeded in making the event a success. On the 23rd of October a rush meeting and smoker was held at Webster Hall. Boyden Janjatovich supervised this affair. Anthony Handloser was chairman of the next two events, a pledging cere- mony and the Fall Eormal Initiation and Dance. The pledging ceremony was held in Judge Bartlett's courtroom November 12th, while the formal dance was given at the Detroit Leland Hotel a week later, A combination smoker and card party was held -at Webster Hall on April lst at which plans for the future of the society were discussed, and the names of new pledges were announced. William Kane was chairman of this event, and also supervised the second banquet and initiation which was held at the Eort Shelby Hotel on the 24th of April. The last major social function of the fraternity was held during the run of the Union Opera. All the active and alumni members of the society attended the affair in a body. George Vvfeins was chairman of the theater party and managed to make a great success of it. In addition to this long list of social affairs, the fraternity also sponsored a regular series of bi-monthly luncheons, held in conjunction with the alumni. James Hunt, recording secretary of the fraternity, acted as chairman ,for these events, which have been established as annual affairs for the society. 4 si wb J J if, 93 5' e Q 49.3 'Dei cl E, U 'I rs f"?fo"".U 432 am wif-Ke 112733 gl, We lo A? a S fo g. 931 2 ' 'gf 1930 TO mimi THE WER L o . o . W GPN' vw 'allies .oo N13 Ng 0 Q 5 ff? K wg! ' of-gf 6' 'J Left to Right: Top Row-Conrad. Doucher. Engelmen, I-Iandloser, Hunt. Second Row- Illig, Janjatovich, Kane, Kronk. Labadie. Third Row--LaFaive, Lamphere, Laurencelle, R. Mc- Clear, McGinty. Fourth Row--Murphy, Petrimoulx, Quillinan, Unrich. Bottom Row- J. Wagner, W. Wagner, Ward, Weins. Ag - 9015312 W S Qfwfif Qemvl, H2793 'ef W3 sl dk Fc' 5 T All 2 0 J L' 'F' I9 O TO 3 'je a dv THE WER r f Y 3 4 A-Y 1 3 f.,-i f'f?t 'lumi rims' ".A 1 Us IQ! ll .al-9fY' 5 KAPPA BETA PI LULA E. POWERS, DQCIU HELEN S. ZBUDOWSKI, Associate Dean ANNA A. CAMPBELL, Chancellor FRANCES R. SCHULTE, Registrar MEMBERS Anne S. Alpern Doris Cecil Angela M. Cwignac Dorothy Zenz Elinor M. Fiedler Mary A. Kurzatkowski Gladys Catherwood Mabel E. Frost Adeline Pacevich Rose Viertel Erie Rose HE KAPPA BETA Pl, national legal sorority, was established to serve as a means of combining the women law students, and has increased in import- ance until it now has assumed a position of importance among the fraternities and sororities on the campus. Socially the sorority has been very active, beginning their season with a breakfast at Colony Club in honor of Miss Evangeline Hursen and Miss Clausey, prominent Women attorneys of Chicago. On December 20th, a Christ- mas party and dinner was given, at which time eight of the law neophytes were pledged. The initiation was held at the Cosmopolitan Club with a luncheon. In February a dinner was held at the League of Catholic Women, and in March a reception at the home of Lula Powers Bachmann, Dean ofthe soror- ity. In April Mrs. Teresa Doland entertained at a benefit bridge. The social season was climaxed in May when the sorority were hostesses to the Province Convention at the Hotel Statler. During the convention a dinner was given at the Detroit Athletic Club, with Judge Genevieve Cline, the only woman on the United States Federal Court Bench, as honored guest. The day following the banquet, the members of the convention drove to Ann Arbor as guests of the Ann Arbor Chapter Where tea was served at the Women's League Building. Kappa Beta Pi contrives to bring together those women students having as a common interest their study of law, and to act as an aid to those graduates who are just starting out in their careers. With the number of campus sororities so small, this organization has a great mission to fill in the downtown division of the university. The past year has been one of great success and its members feel that they have gained the social privilege and help which is the purpose of every sorority. It is through Kappa Beta Pi that the women of the Law College have contributed their ability and force to the activity of the university, and their effort has accomplished a real service to the Law College and to the women students who have come within its fold. 112803 me - V lla' aft 7 41 'J wifi.:-Ig f GW . W, 0 'ima h N V 6 'ND 'lr C. S ow eff A cc' Q f , 4645 Q-1? 1 4. ,1 Q W, 1 1 , V , 1 1 1 1 1 1 I, ,, 1, vl . C 1 1 1 1 1 1 ,131 w L QI 'D ?I! g,fxC5s.4-, :J '--D-1 , f 't'f5g," F -'N T 4. X ICJQXVF' gr? f,'j-fix A , . .1 -f, 1,-, ,, ffif-m,:x 'Q 14 ' if f 7 1 si inf" , g s 1 1 :Q I1 3 4.11511 1., QM 111' 11 , h, ,,,, 'N ,iM 11 1,1 1111 1f1 111, 1211 1 4111 115' 1 1 1 1 111, 111, 1, , 111 1.1 1 1 11 11' 11 1 1 11 51 11 11 111W 111114, 11113.51 1 lisp., 15113511 111,4fi.j55 111 1 i 111,JT3R-140 1' 1Qq"1Q 11'1.,,, 1 1111? 11111 1 I1 111521 1115! 111 1114 1115 1111 '11 111 111 1111 ,VL V31 11, H 1 Q 1 1,11 1,1 5 , 111, 1 1 1 111' 1,. 11. ,111 ,1 W, 1 11 'I 11 1 ' f' ' 1 xQ-l. -. Y Left to Right: Top Row-Alpern, Benz, Campbell, Catherwood. Second Row-Fiedler, 11 Q Gignac, Kurzatkowski, Pasevich. Bottom Row-Powers, Rose, Viertel, Zbudowski. ,-J,.: 1112923 4 rsfmf' ,Q 1 V yn I 1 'f'f'f" ' , J 1128111 sl, auf are .IGI .sit f ss fl ' D - ' M' V Q 'Ff ' sa ' 'ox - THE QE? TOWER sig hs.. .. ?r. "? V - I 4' T-T TT 2 E Q' 1 ig 111 In nfgxwy r 1.5 i 1 5221.4 fi Alt' Q12 Epmx .11 .1 ' in -3, I "'v.'T. 1- 3 .J T," KAPPA SIGMA DELTA KENNETH E. LABARGE, President PIERRE J. BOES, Vice-President ALFRED A. MAHALAK, Secretary and Treasurer C. LLOYD TOLER, Sergeant-at-Arms PAUL P. HARBRECI-IT, Faculty Moderator MEMBERS William M. Closey Leon C. Gibbons Clarence C. Ozar Orville E. Cullen Harold E. Kleehammer George L. Rosengana Thomas C. Davis John S. Marr Eugene E. Telma Morris B. Deo John M. McCann HDUGH one of the smallest fraternities of the university, Kappa Sigma Delta is by no means inactive, and has, during the past scholastic year, en- joyed success phenomenal to so young an organization. The fraternity was founded by nine students of the College of Engineering who felt the need of organizing their friendship into a body that could offer its advantage to other students, and could occupy a place in the activities of the university. A charter was drawn up and the fraternity formally became a campus entity in the fall of 1927 when it was approved by the Faculty Board. At the outset rigid requirements were inserted in the constitution to protect the fraternity and make it a body of students valuable to fraternal life on the campus. This close discrimination, though a wise policy, has retarded the growth of the fraternity: but it has resulted, on the other hand, in one of the most active groups in the university. The annual outing held on August 10th gave the fraternity its send-off and was the harbinger of a successful social season. It was followed on No- vember 4th by the installation of oliicers and a dinner at Webster Hall. Both affairs were enjoyable ones and well-attended. A banquet at Diana Inn on January 20th and pledging ceremonies on January 3lst opened a series of social events for 1930. A smoker was held at the Wardell before the informal initiation on March 10th. A banquet was given in honor of the pledges who were then instructed in their duties to the fraternity. Their initiation added new energy to a growing organization. The annual dinner-dance under the direction of Orville E. Cullen was staged early in May. The en masse attendance of the fraternity and their many friends together with the excellence of the arrangements made it a memorable affair in the history of Kappa Sigma Delta. June 4th witnessed the climaxing of an outstanding social year. The keenly anticipated Senior Dance was held to the ultimate satisfaction of the many Seniors and guests. 4128211 aff 1. ifiqxvap ligase 5 Q. eo L 1 -JW. if J , . 1- as li tie E I i S 4 1 241 1 y I 1 1 5, O Y N " me 5 T 6 W. Wxxf' -by 'V ALJ? Q Wpgbb f F. ,X ' 'H if " 1" T,OQ,"3.a"E'm Hifi, AL, f K AL-' ng f'rMj,X, , m5,f g ' - 'T ,532 K efgibwe 1 ' I.-Y' W " W ' 521 Y Y "" ' ' f, - 4 e M- ee e, lf4Kmf ' 6 'ff J!! Usmmiig tr...J CIIZZQM l' t U i V lst vi: ifvf t LV to fig 3551 t :iii WP :gg t V . Ii? W1 J IS' glih MM Wi tw M4 ' V!. ijt lg t 3 jr, 1 ,ff :Nl ? N2 xllg yi 6.24 .1 C' t QM aw? ' Q-gf I V Q W W x W f RK W t 125'- :lfm ' '14, N. if! 1,392 3. ljlfxxs ,U ,Q kilfqfath. i3EfPL3Dx 5 2 Q t 'x W1 , J Vi. 1 r J . 1 1 QE-5 ,, t t ,Pg wif? 1 psf? A14 3 mix b 1 D25 ipgifief' VUE' WE? ti W Ji ' HW 5234 lm JH SQL AI H153 Sox 1 1 'Ui wi W VV' N5 t TW -J uw Alt Mi 1 1 I w , I Left to Right: Top Row-Boes, Cullen, Davis, Deo. Second Row-Gibbons, Kleehammer, HQ LaBarge, Mahalak. Bottom Row-Marr, Ozar, Toler. M wit lt ,gy I 559: H2833 1 GS M ig t All fl G 1 r gF,A" 'A-.. .J SM THE Q30 TOWER Silk.. fggyfgg' I ' ' " ll V' L.. . 2 1 8 'V Y Q 3 1. . ' ll' I . I -af K' 5 ,AGIXCEI CLARENCE J. KUMMER, President ROMAN E, BOUCHER, Vice-President JAMES A. RYAN, Recording Secretary DAVID S. MCHARDY, Corresponding Secretary E. VERNON MCCLEAR, Treasurer JOSEPH J. HoRsT. Faculty Moderator MEMBERS Leo J. Andries Laurence Donohue Ralph C. Johnston Philip W. Stackpoole Lee A. Bertling Jerry J. Donovan Maxwell J. Lalferty Ray T. Stefani Edward T. Sweeney George C. Sweeney Donald F. Carney Gerald W. Fitzgerald Clyde L. McHugh Paul G. Conlan Robert A. Gerhig Joseph A. Powers Edward J. Corbett Edward W. Hayes David O. Prendeville James A. Troester Doyle Cunningham Stanley C. Hayes James T. Rice HE Magi fraternity enjoys the distinction of being the only Arts and Science fraternity on the campus. It was founded in 1919. A successful dinner-dance opened the social season for the Magi on Novem- ber 27th. The affair under the direction of David McHardy was staged at the Lee Plaza hotel. The next event on the Magi calendar was a theater party held on February 17th at the Civic theater. Edward Hayes, chairman, spared no effort in prepara' tions and a well-attended and enjoyable party rewarded his efforts. A fraternity reunion at the Wolverine Hotel on November 19th proved to be a great success and stimulated the members to carry the organization to new heights. The reunion is an annual affair and one to which the old members look forward with keenest anticipation. Two open meetings for the examination and entertainment of prospective members were held at the Wolverine Hotel on February 2nd and 25th. The pledges who withstood the rigid requirements of the fraternity were formally pledged on March 18th at the Masonic Temple. The feature of the lV1agi's social calendar was the annual spring dinner-dance. It was one of the best attended affairs in Magi history, a red letter day. The Magi fraternity because of its high scholastic standing and outstanding achievements has earned an enviable position on the U. of D. campus. Last year it was awarded the Sigma Kappa Phi interfraternity scholarship trophy. and this year the "Wise Men" won the Sigma Kappa Phi banner for the largest percentage attendance at the Colonial prom. The Magi are second to none in sponsoring university activities. The annual Magi scholarship awarded to the Arts and Science Freshman having the high- est scholarship standing has become one of the most sought-after awards in the university and has augmented the esteem in which the Magi are held by all. LU'-'l"1iW? ffsy esta! f i 62242145 N3 1 ls ,,. f is A1 .r .0 so 1 Q gfifg. g YB H2841 .Q sf. wt' , -yn E, 9 5 6' P Q va.. Q KM S dim -WE 1930 TOWER Sink! s" 'xx' 'J S' g swf, tgfkl N ,M G 6 'E Q35 24 N o gf 'Vx 95525 r e Q 4 M QW E Left to Right: Top Row-Andries, Bertling, Boucher. Corbett, Donohue. Second Row- Donovan, Gehrig, Hayes, Johnston, Kummer. Third Row-Lafferty, McClear, MCI-Iugh. Powers. Bottom Row--Prenderville. Rice. Stefani, G. Sweeney. tiara as Ni V451 6:5253 ll 1 ELM 2 4 'las H2853 fa' G'-x,jQ'?Lf47l'5f35-'gfvf Sy, .Q f A M THE 1930 TOWER . 7. 19 i ' I : 1 1 ' 1 3 W I I Q in 6 I bg qc? in gil AM c a cf? . '3 Mig 535 el John M. Ball Charles J. Beauvais John J. Behen Ernest E. Belanger Harold F. Caton J. Edward Clifford Harold E. Cross ya N2 .14- . 1 43.4 f. -. ,v 4 I 'I I dr . ., ywt g X I .sf i. OMEGA BETA PI ROBERT C. PAGE, President JAMES R. DELANEY, Vice-President GEORGE A. ZINDLER, Secretary EDWIN G. LENFESTEY, Treasurer SAMUEL A. PETIX, Historian LEO E. BUSS, Faculty Moderator MEMBERS Richard O. Flett Howard V. Groesbeck George Guest Martin F. Kaiser Stanley J. Kalamajka Lawrence A. Kroha Ovila E. Langlois Thomas E. DeGurse Joseph C. Lawless Robert B. Dehullu Albert Nickels HONORARY Harman W. Dunham George S. Olmsted Homer A. Phillips John S. Pierog John N. Primeau Lawrence E. Reck Frederick M. Rickle Edward G. Roth Arnold A. Schaal Charles R. Schmitter MEMBERS Daniel M. Sunday Frank W. Sprague Malcolm J. Tear Joseph Tocco Edwin R. Walker Francis P. Walsh William J. Yott Joseph L. Zemens MEGA BETA PI, Iota chapter, the first national afliliated fraternity in the College of Arts and Science, was established in 1928 with nine char- ter members. The purpose of the fraternity has been to aid its members during their scholastic days as well as in their subsequent professional careers. During the past year Iota chapter has established itself as one of the most active organ- izations on the campus. Early in September, the fraternity informally opened its new house at 16803 Prairie Avenue. On October 7th, the fraternity opened its social season with an open smoker at the new house. On October 9th, the formal opening of the chapter house took place. On October 21st, the Pre-Meds held their first pledg- ing at the Seward Hotel, at which time twenty-four men took their pledging oath. On October 29th, the chapter's annual informal closed dinner dance was given at the Hawthorne Country Club. On November 29th, a closed party was given at the chapter house in honor of the alumni. On December 9th, founders' day was celebrated by the chapter by a banquet at the Hotel Fort Wayne, at which event the "Loyalty Award" was presented to James Carrol. On January 31st, the annual Pre-Med Ball was given at the Hotel Fort Wayne, and proved to be the finest event ever sponsored by the Iota chapter. The Pre-Meds held their formal initiation ceremonies at the Barlum Hotel on February 17th. Eighteen new men were received into the organization. The Omega Betas concluded their social season With a strictly closed formal dinner dance. glsIl,w B fm' Ami wir If 2 ss 11 sf, wi' .Jl n if Q. Sita? J I jg QL S a 9 7455 N.-41' at I... .-l,.5,.1i31 v -f gg! Fnnh,-4 ' ' - A , g ..,. F39 r 1 'S 5 rg i ' A A rf JU? THE V930 TOWEQ Q? X w s i i i ii'kfg'?tE i ia? ggl X ll QM 2 t M1 l 1 ls ll l E A su ed I Q , ' f a their sl? 2 Left to Right: Top Row-Ball, Beauvais, Behen, Belanger, Caton, Clifford. Second Row- Cross. DeGurse, Dehullu, Delaney, Flett, Groesbeck. Third Row-Guest. Kaiser. Kalamajka, Kroha, Langlois, Lawless. Fourth Row-Lenfesty, Olmsted, Fifth Row-Reck. Roth, Schmitter, Schaal, Sprague, Tear. Page, Phillips, Pierog, Primeau. Bottom Row-Tocco, Walker, Walsh, Yott, Zemens, Zindler. i ls ll W: 3 1!' l l 1 l U O N, J , 2 Q ' J 924 l L29 fl I l l E EE H287H n o 'J dlefkf 4. . CQ - ' 'i All 3 62333 UV if THE V930 TOWER 32 ' X 'Y 9 , ' i . C' 1 A gflk .. Il ' ' ll! gl ran ,GW ll 6 7 fifii- 31.5 wlsbsf W oi T ' as 4' .L-vw 7 PHI UPSILON CHI JOSEPH S. BRZOSTOWSKI, Preslldeflf WALTER M. SIEPIERSKI, Secretary , MEMBERS Edward B. Babula John J. Kmiecik Joseph S. Brzostowski Chester R. Lulenski Walter M. Siepierski RGANIZED in May, l928, the Phi Upsilon Chi fraternity has advanced very slowly, but with a definite purpose in mind. Organized to aid stu- dents of Polish extraction in establishing social contacts with their fellow stu- dents, the club has succeeded so far in carrying out its objective. The fraternity's strict entry requirements have necessitated a small member- ship, and consequently the club did not sponsor any major social event during the year. However, several lower classmen have been pledged to the club, and when admitted, will make Phi Upsilon Chi a prominent social factor on the campus, an accomplishment that could never be completed with a small mem- bership. The fraternity did lend its aid to the Grand Chapter of the organization in staging its annual dance. The Polish fraternities have not been long established on the campus, and it is necessary for them to unite to make the social season a success. With the coming of next year and the many new members, Phi Upsilon Chi will be more stable and will be able to carry out an ambitious social pro- gram for itself. The president for this year is Joseph S. Brzostowski, a pre-Legal student. The secretary is also an Arts and Science student, the position being held by Walter Siepierski. The charter members are, in addition to the oflicers, Edward Babula, from the college of Commerce and Finance: John Kmiecik and Ches- ter Lulenski, both from the Arts and Science department. The majority of fraternities have a period of doubt and struggle when first organized, and the Phi Upsilon Chi is in the midst of that time now. However, the fraternity has been organized to serve a definite purpose in the life of the University of Detroit, and will undoubtedly succeed in making its presence felt on the campus. Membership in they fraternity is restricted to students of Polish extraction. but there is no restriction made as to the college the student attends. A high scholastic average and a desire to work for their Alma Mater, is all that is re- quired. Undoubtedly the fraternity will become a potent factor in the Univer- sity of Detroit before another school year has passed. Hzssll f.x0' 4 'C fzeijs.. 1 st PM -Q- 5.1 in ' 'git S E " 1 L .C5fff'w G ,JihfQJP'm4'4' QUQ:??W?w53w. . "'4"1','wt11., :ji . f C1 "1 Fm Af' 1 Wfqf 1 rf -Y HE 2 .1 Dv TfJg.fg'E P, X, Qgqkx ,X X IT XF' 12 'XQEEETTJ 1' 1 1 -ff 1 F2 A- i'1i'E52fw I 1 V f E 1 R"f'f"f14f' 45' V 1i2jfS2'5,gJy 1 ,Ari-13550 Lf 1 I 1 1 ,-.....-J u.m......N1 5 1 9 1 1 1 11 - 11 15 2, jk 111 111 f V 16 1 111 'M 111 213 M41 113 fi 111 1111 f1! 1111 1115 1111 1, , I, 1 L 11 111, -1 1 P ,U I, ,111 111' 1 ,VM , Q11 1 'gli 1: 1 V 1 11,- 1 R iQ 1 QW 521 fl E41 1' 1 11 14 1 1 1111 1131 111 111 111 115 BH 115 mW WQ1, W ' 1 X111 1 111 1 ,, 1 11? , W1 , Ytsdxx 1 M 1 1 M qjex N' N M 1 1VF59?3 1 ,Z W 1 Q 69' c Q 1 45 W A 11 H lf' U I 1 1 1. 51 1,11 ,. W! 11 Ii 1 ,F 1 ,1 11,1 Ui +I 1 as 5 1x 11 1.,' 1 1 , 1 Y ' I il 1 1 , HH MH Q1 1 11 1 11 Q H15 Left to Right: Top Row-Babula, Brzostowski, Kmiecik. Bottom Row-Lulenski, Siepierski. 2 . 1 a 1 1 1 1 1 H W1 U 1 xg, H289H I 0.4 "YC if All l fin-Esaasifsgt V 1 ' ' -1 Q fe .S . THE i930 TOWER . q v 2 L' "' 'X 2 ca ? Egyjjsv f' H gil sie THETA ALPHA SIGMA JAMES E. DALEY, President ROBERT A. STEFANOWSKI, V1-CQ-Pr9Sl.d8Uf THOMAS R. MCCORMICK, Treasurer JOHN H. MADIGAN, Corresponding Secretary RAYMOND P. DONZE, Recording Secretary CHARLES G. BORCHARD, Sergeant-at-Arms DANIEL J. MOYNIHAN, Faculty Moderator MEMBERS Ned Bowman Richard Flynn Harry B. Ryan Frederick C. VanFleteren Charles T. Daneels Milburn Hickey Bernard J. Smith Henry C. VanFleteren Frank Douglas Stanley R. Holwedel William J. Spickett Thomas M. Ward Irving E. Drinkous Frederick J. Kirn Bernhardt J. Steger I-IETA ALPHA SIGMA, general social fraternity was Hrst launched on the University of Detroit campus, in October of 1927. On October 15th, 1929, under the direction of J. H. Madigan, Theta Alpha Sigma sponsored a smoker at the Tuller Hotel. The Titan Farewell Frolic, November 8th, 1929, was held at the Fort Shelby Hotel under the chairmanship of Harry Ryan and further attests to the activity of the fraternity. On December 18th, 1929, in the Faculty Building, Theta Alpha Sigma presented handsome gifts to the football men in appreciation of their efforts on the gridiron. An informal dinner dance was held on January 15th, 1930 at the Oriole Terrace. H. B. Ryan was chairman of the affair. Following the dinner dance, a smoker for the pledges was held on January 29th, 1930, at the Tuller Hotel. This affair was extremely popular with the guests. Frank Douglas was chairman of the pledges' smoker. In accord with its policy of ceaseless activity, the fraternity continued its social functions, with a card party on February 18th, at the Tuller Hotel. This event was one of the most successful. of the year and Charles Borchard, chairman, should receive his due share of credit in assuring its success by his tireless efforts. The pledges were initiated at K. of C. Hall, on March 26th. Dick Flynn was master of the event. The fraternity proved its loyalty to the university by securing a box for the Union opera, "Hello Stranger," which the members attended en masse. The Junior Prom was the keynote of social activity, and again the familiar faces of Theta Alphs were in evidence. The fraternity had a box for this affair. The fraternity formally closed its activities for the current year with its formal dinner dance at Grosse Ile Country Club, on May 22. Installation of oflicers also took place at the dinner dance. Theta Alpha Sigma's many activities assure its stability in the fraternal system at the University of Detroit. as xv lg 4 H2901 K 9: S515 .Jls ir, S. H . e arg! tl 1' 'S l ' Q.. fWaTff5FCf,f5,f1O1',"i?w"INS,9:?o?1--, .QWER- 11. N -.. ,f " k,,,.ff'ff.4,,1,-5,501 frxrf. 19 -- Zips., 1- o'f-off? ku E-'Ifli1QI,:f-'rf I' - f-1 - 'x XL, 151 ,M,xjQ1' ,Q 'fa F 1 12: Q1 fi .W T'1.'xl,. , N jQ,NLf,,'Z-Jg fmx.K'I'X 1 'fl L- ' J U 'V' II if VU 'X 'W SFI" 11712.13-- 1 L "1 -N. 1 ' "' ' "" """" "'- o" ' 1 ,-no ' 1 -Y 1, 9-1 .---1""A---1-'L-"'--i..,A 1"'f 11""'- --W ' "M -E 1' f-. L1-f -, IV ,, W 'rf ,, 'W 13:5 'inf' " ' .ev ,,Ij,'I.I1...., ' 1,:f1f 5 QQQHI ff-in 3 :Q I 22172 21 we-MA IIIJ III I 1 I 1 I 1I 1 1 N1 1, -1 I 2 If ,-.111 1 A '-.,...,1-, .g.,., 1 ,11 1 I 11 1 1 1 '1 1 11 I 1 1 1 I 'Q 1 111 w awf 1 II I a ' . 17 V 2 1 7 1 I f . I ZIII 1j'1 'XIII 1 I1 I 1' HI' fl V 1 226 1111 WI 111', XI 211 I ' .II I I1 1211 gill QII 111 III III IIII I-1 If IIII II 1 IIII I1 15 1' I 1 TI11 III1 I 111 ' 1 II M I 1 QI IV IIIl 1 1 Q 1 1 NI' Q1 I. 1 1 11 I1 11 I I 11I 1 M VI HJR CTX' 1 '1fff"" I I 1I ' ' II 1'1 ,4 II7If91 If IIIIUIIX , -..1f 1 1 151 IIWIIAX lp I I1 2-EN 6 11 ef " I 1 I I I Iffifffmllfxx 1 1 q,1,if3,'v-' 1 . I iwxiff . ' I II1I7'fr'gii"1 ' a Q ' Lil:-thxgv Jia IVMMF 1 1 1 '-ul-R II Idrirzfl ' I Ifv,i1.f Q1 X I I 1 1111 1 31115 1 ' I QL! 1 V 1 1 1 11 111 I1 III 1 111 I 11I 11 11 1 51 11 ' 11, I I1 I I , E 1 1 , ,1 1 1 I I1 I1 fl IW I IM I1 ZIQ I1 5 1' 1 ,1 1I' I II' 1 II 1EI1 1I1 j1I 1 I 'III I 1 I1I I 1 I 'I1 FI 1 ' ,Left to Right: Top Row-Borchard, Bowman. Daley, Daneels, Douglas. Second Row- III I Drinkous. Flynn, Hickey, Holwedel, Kirn. Thzrd Row-Madigan, McCormick, Ryan, Srnith1 1 Spickett. Bottom Row-StefanoWski1 Steger, Ward, F. Van Fleteren, I-I. Van Pleteren. III1 eiix 1, 1 1 III: 1 1 11 1 .11 I'mW""4""a'l I 1I'Am,,,-,,,,-,4 VW59 IUEwEQ Q 5 1 1 I craig J 1 A"Jag5-53z',b Hzml QJQQSJK. 17.45-1'si.'sns4s,g1 9 v g , ' ' . -. THE 1930 TOWER - 6 Y 813 A i ii -1- ' Qi- ii 3 A V D K' f 'ami Ea. iii fa' Bef s f .i .sill as 21 Matias J. Alfonso Grant E. Becker Roger J. Blandford Burnett W. Buist Elmer W. Burnett Bernard A. Chapman TUYERE EUGENE L. DIERSING, Grand Master JOSEPH A. FISHER, Grand Scribe JAMES F. NELLIS, Master of Finance RUSSEL E. LAWRENCE, Faculty Moderator MEMBERS Everett O. Clark Eugene F. Farrell Frank X. Flynn Daniel S. Izzo Alex F. Junker David A. Leonard Vincent A. McC1uigan Samuel D. McNish Fred J. McRoberts William P. Murphy Walter T. Norris William J. Perfield Chas. H. Petty Thomas L. Reilly Henry A. Ruysser John A. Sparling Charles H. Stephens John C. Thrasher George W. Van Atta John A. Zilles UYERE fraternity, one of the most active organizations on the campus. was founded in 1918. Socially and scholastically the fraternity has main- tained a prominent position in the activities of the University of Detroit and has merited exceptional praise for its fine work. Tuyere's social season has been really active and the members of the frater- nity have realized the benefits and pleasures to be derived from an active frater- nity. The organization opened its social season with a mixed house party on October 18th, after the Tulsa football game. William Murphy had charge of this event and he conducted it in a brilliant manner. On November 15th, a combination smoker and card party was enjoyed at the Tuyere house on Monica Avenue. The iinal event before the Christmas holidays was a swimming party and smoker at Webster Hall, held on December 1 lth. Tuyere inaugurated the new fraternal year with a stag party held at the fraternity house on January 24th, and on February 7th a similar party was given at the same place. On March 14th the yearly pledge banquet was given at the Lee Crest Hotel. This is one of the major events of the organization's social year, and this year the dinner was exceptionally successful. A theater party was given by the fraternity at the annual Union opera which was held this year at the Shubert-Lafayette. The fraternity was well repre- sented at the show and the members highly enjoyed "Hello Stranger!" Of course the event that every fraternity looks forward to and takes great delight in is its annual initation ceremonies, and so on March 24th and 25th Tuyere held the greatest initiation party of its existence. The new members were received into the organization after having proved their value through a long and arduous pledgeship. On June 20th Tuyere concluded the scholastic year with a fitting dinner dance which was under the able supervision of William Murphy. D It is an assured fact that Tuyere fraternity has held up its noble purpose and have proven its worth, not only to the Engineering department but also to the university. Llailgg W9 23.13113 D li i 552.35 is 529211 M4 A 9 ilii it , Sie 5' ., . wal! 32 Et E i E :il V, E l , , i - l ' L l 1 1 ie ff-.fi W es ,w rf. -2 , X , A A. ' 'saw' 5 If 7 Wx 'FZ HQ T 5 W ' 'VW it QWEQ -- ' t f ,fr Q-A 1:1 'ca s 1pij Af"" t "','j:,,q,N i fax 4' i ee" ' i o' t t e dye Q Ht 'gdi l iifiiififiij Q flzgr Jars: he r 3 il LW'-152 .11 1 g, Q, , A , e A lil i iig 5U i l Q' l , , i 2 ,li if M l 51, I I , l? ff 1 , if l 'Q i y Ji , I l i 2 l i em l , i 1 lm . I W ire lift ,-li g'IEf5iz Gp l it Epi Gag if ' 1 1 I fri 71.'f"F'J M1pHi5Q5 i,. f W S lwwwfrgar a -fr is i iftsfrzzietf S rg ii l t 'Il fl ffiw ku, if w, G. im g Jr 5, N5 4 - 1 l 1 'Ci' 2 1 ii! l ig i lil ll il i ll 'f 5 3 I ill 3, T I E i l ? ri wi f Y Hi H Left to Right: Top Row--Alfonso, Becker, Blandford, Buist, Burnett. Second Row--Clark, i Diersing, Fisher, Flynn, Izzo. Third Row-Junker, Leonard, McGuigan, McRoberts, Murphy. 9' Fourth Row--Nellis, Norris, Perfield, Petty, Reilly. Bottom Row-Ruysser, Stephens, Thrasher, Van Atta, Zilles. , law P ii f . l HZQZH .535 r -.?j:l4! ff 51" -Hg N li 4 A -- ll ll ll ll ll f V .. ,iv 5, 2 , 1 A - gi wg ,L -1 ..f4-Ml? ff , .,,,95aN .. :,A I .. I ,A ff' Q 2 Lif- ' -114, J" .. Q , Z, Mr fv' IVN 596 'Q ,, 5'- QW 'Qfx , Me X ' AJ? 654 C Q J W3 .ii- K cf? n ' Q gifs? W G. Q, Z X Z K C fL- , A. Ll w 'B , l I -gf. I l i- ey . , bt I gi. :F-i. g':z1.,' 3, ra , - :mf ff 51 A :- V-5 She 4 ' sr 'Ag If. :TU .fn 'Q' faux " "1 'W ' up i qfi ' . ' ,' - 5- 'liz -j?1+ff:'i 'f' gh 421 . , 5 s ' 'Egw g -Qqlfiwi 3573 FE V - 135 .N , 'ik-hgm in-Q lk' f It -w 4 . 4152 aniiziii f '- FFF? ".wfa'Pf1 4' Y I ku 1 v s Rav '1 k F Q V Lx YQ Q3 kim Q 5 1 P dick 1 QF QW C wicking QQQSNEMQQKQTETM THE 'Cm TOWER em ' A 2 if 2 1 "' - X g . cam? at ' aft' 0.14 Lit' .sat GV, Q Q35 fl Ks Adspirers Club-Left to Right-Dumanois, Lilly, Stenger. HE ADSPIRERS CLUB, formed in September. 1928, has enjoyed a success which, for so young an organization, is remarkable. It has done much too, to acquaint students with the importance of advertising in the modern marketing scheme. The purpose of the Adspirers is to bring stu- dents who are interested in the art of advertising in contact with men actively associated with ad- vertising and who have a thorough knowledge of modern methods. To obtain this end the club at regular intervals brought before the student body of the college of Commerce and Finance men promi- nent in the advertising world. Such men as Floyd Allen, assistant president of General Motors: John S. Reynolds, vice-president of the Union Trust: J. C. Yenke, assistant president of MacManus, ln- corporatedg and Roger M. Andrews, president and publicity manager of the Detroit "Times," im- pressed upon the Adspirers that advertising has taken a dominant and major position in twentieth century business. The Adspirers have fulfilled a long-felt need. The ofiicers were: Paul Lilly, president: Edward Stenger, vice-president: Harold Dumanois, secre- tary and treasurer: and Lyndon O. Brown, faculty advisor. HE AERONAUTICAL SOCIETY of the University of Detroit was organized in 1922 by a group of iifteen engineering students with the purpose of promoting interest in aeronautics and of carrying on research along those lines. The organization is a member of the Inter- Collegiate Aeronautical Association and is also represented every year at the Inter-Collegiate Air Conference. The University of Detroit delegates to the last meeting of the Air Conference were: William Murphy, John Malone, Ray Lewis and Thomas Davis. Also during the past year the members of the club have been privileged to hear eminent leaders in the aeronautical field, among whom were: Capt. R. Collins, Director of the Michigan Board of Aeronautics: Leroy Manning. Chief Test Pilot for the Ford Motor Co.: Arthur Saxton, Chief Engineer of the Stinson-Detroiter Airplane Co., and many others. At the election of officers for this year, Wm. Murphy was chosen president. John Malone, a very consistent student was elected vice-president: Ray Lewis was elected secretary, and James Wood- house, treasurer. All through the year the club was under the careful guidance of Professor Peter Altman, who was chosen Faculty Moderator. Aeronautical Society--Left to Right-Malone, Murphy, Lewis. I 'I in 41,4 EF if gi V 2 A JSZQ J 4 HZ96H AJQ iff .J no .- L6 D, QQ ' We 3 m e Q We? l I9 +2 ' i Q K, K" U "N J 9 QqigigiiugggrsgxfaiilgpuszfaAbiaizigggb fe' 'Z THE 1930 TOWE 5 'AN 1 if i-g 1 G J? fyxii A. I. E. E.-Left to Right-Haldeman. Abele, Moyers. MERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL HE ARCHITECTURAL SOCIETY was ENGINEERS-In its third year on the cam- originally known as the Senior Architectural pus, the University of Detroit branch of the Amer- Society and was composed solely of the Senior ican Institute of Electrical Engineers fostered a very Architectural students, It was organized in Octo- ambitious program of events. Founded in the fall ber, 1927, with a membership of ten students. of 1927, the branch has grown rapidly, and has Professor Bert N. Blakeslee acting as advisor. assumed a prominent position among the technical In October of 1928 the Architectural Society K societies of the University. The Institute is a na- was founded and all architectural students were A tional organization. and students' branches are es- eligible for membership. It was formed with the C. tablished at those schools where the faculty mem- purpose of uniting its members in fellowship and Civ bers belong to the Institute. to promote the aesthetic, scientific and practical 6 'LM The society was formed for the advancement efliciency of its members in the architectural pro- cfvi and dissemination of the knowledge of electrical fession. The society is guided by the oflicers and T 1 engineering. an executive committee under the direction of Pro- The University of Detroit branch sponsors a fessor Bert N. Blakeslee. regular series of informal luncheons, in order to The business meetings of the society are followed is foster interest in the club. A program of bi- by talks on architecture and its allied arts. The G monthly lectures is carried out each year. At each speakers are chosen for their knowledge on the J talk, some man prominent in his particular field subject to be discussed. These lectures are often- ci of endeavor lectures on some timely and inter- times accompanied by illustrations. The social esting topic. activities for the past year were limited to a ban- The officers for this year are William F. Halde- quet and a dance. With the profits from the dance man, president: Raymond J. Abele, vice-president: the society sponsored an architectural exhibit. Walter R. Moyers, secretary, and Roman L. Sailer, The officers were Carl E. Simek, president: treasurer. Professor Harry O. Warner of the En- George E. Henk, vice-president: Raymond J. gineering College is faculty counsellor for the society. Franklin, treasurer: Albert E. Flemming, secretary. Architectural Society-Left to Right-Franklin, Simek, Henk, Flemming. 'i' 6,43 ?i2o""-Q3 4 49331411 ll I E297H 1 O .5 S, silt F iv S t fd, iw l. su diced? cf , 'Z' . ' 'L it L32 6' ' Gi , .,'Gb'2f-7"-5'5'f7'fN4-fJ5'69ise.f,vfFi F HE 1930 TOW 1 J ' tc ---.flags 41- s 7 'Jun mf T ER sf .ff - A L A K r A - -1' ' 1- 4 , ' ,,,, . , Gm s 4 E K - H233 'J 41:41 1+ ff? L A. E. C.: Left to Right--Ciirardin, Collins, Erdos, Lyons. HE ASSOCIATED EVENING CLASSES or- ganization has, since its inception in the fall of 1927, become the leader in constructive endeavor in its department of the University. Representing every student in the evening classes, it has bound them into an effective unit to act for the night school in the life of Alma Mater. This organization was the first to take a con- structive step towards the development of intra- mural sports. Two of its greatest successes are the bowling and basketball leagues. Hard-fought games were held at regular intervals throughout the season. A hockey team, started in 1929, provided much recreation and entertainment for the members. Spurred on by its well-received athletic program, the Associated Evening Classes formed a tennis team which proved its skill on several occasions. Socially, the activities of the organization met with equal success, A well-attended smoker held in the University gymnasium in the early fall, opened the social season. A dance given at the Knights of Columbus Hall on February 13th, drew an attend- ance of more than two hundred persons. The year was brought to a ntting close with a dinner dance. The officers chosen to head the association during the year just past were: Chairman, John E. Collins: vice-chairman, Joseph A. Erdos: secretary. Fred W. Lyons: treasurer, John B. Girardin. HE CHEMICAL SOCIETY, organized in Jan- uary of 1929 for students studying chemical and metallurgical engineering, has proven to be of great value to the students and the school. It is a social and professional society enabling the students to come in close contact with men recognized as leaders in chemistry. The purpose of the organization is to promote an interest in the development of chemical industries and to create a feeling of good fellowship among the students. In order to attain these high and com- mendable ideals, a number of meetings were held at which interesting and educational lectures were de- livered by men distinguished in their particular fields. As is characteristic of University organizations, the Chemical Society has co-operated with the others on the campus in activities of benefit to the University. It is especially connected with' the De- troit Engineering Society and has given ardent sup- port to the various functions sponsored by this organization during the past year, a practice that will be continued in the future. The officers of the society are students very capable of carrying on the good work. They are: Raymond G. Kern, president: Thomas T. Caston- guay, vice-president: James Murray Decker, secre- tary: and John DeMunik, treasurer. Chemical Society: Left to Right-Decker, Kern, Castonguay, DeMunik. L."vl' E ,f Kim M9 I gztsffffgi as N 31 N' -'X D i ?Zf2'3flfs- H298 Il A o . J Jn" Z, p Q Q2-it S Q 1 ,Q Bee , .A ixk -C51 CQQ 585 2 3 ABFWY, Q' 31: 1 f fix-ic,jC'5'-!lf"-.?9-'75-"r'h3iSiX1 fa f fl? ' "WD .c 'I HE 1930 Tow 4 a "' - f 41- Yi '4 r6T'!'1C - - - 1. fm-ai . , .A 3? T ER SVKM Civil Engineering-Left to Right--Fisher, Hornick, McGuigan HE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CIVIL ENGINEERS, organized in the spring of 1928 under the guidance of Professor D. P. Gilmore, has just completed the second year of its existence upon the campus. Its purpose is to promote knowledge in all matters relating to civil engineering, to further fellowship among student engineers. Essentially a product of the Civil Engineering Department, a division of the Engineering College, the society limits its membership strictly to civil engineers and to their professors who possess a civil engineering degree. It is primarily professional in scope. Prominent men of the city frequently ad- dress the members at gatherings marked by ease and informality of procedure. This practice has been pronounced fruitful of much good by the members. That the organization has in two brief years proven its worth, there can be no doubt. Fellow- ship among the engineers naturally suffers under the month school and month work plan. The club has served to knit the members of the Civil Engi- neering Department more closely together and to create among them a feeling of unity. During 1930, James Fredrick Nellis, a senior student of civil engineering, presided as president. Vincent A. McGuigan was vice-president, Joseph A. Fisher secretary and treasurer, and Norbert J. Hor- nick assistant secretary and treasurer. HE UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT ENGI- NEERING SOCIETY is known as "the mother of all engineering societies." The membership is strictly limited to students of the College of Engineering. In addition to success- fully running its own affairs, the society has fos- tered several of the more important clubs organized by the Engineers. The Aeronautical Society, product of the Department of Aeronautics, and one of the newest and most successful clubs, is sponsored by the Engineering Society. The Architectural, Chem- ical, and Civil Engineering clubs have also had their beginnings in this society. The Society of Auto- motive Engineers and the student branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers are under the guidance of the Engineering Society. The most important social event of the Engi- neers' season is the banquet held in the spring of each year. This is a gathering of all the societies and clubs in the Engineering School, and is con- ducted by the mother club. In addition to the din- ner, the various societies hold monthly meetings at which topics of interest to technical students are discussed. Oiicers of the Engineering Society are headed by Leon J. Gibbons, president, Lloyd Toler, vice- president: Joseph A. Fisher, secretary: and Ralph W. Boone, treasurer. anl lhs Engineering Society-Left to Right-Boone, Gibbons, Fisher. YL ills N--1 . J? ll! '4-'Q W, z 5 My Yfnl, g1 e' Q 2 C 'XSL HZQQH Ko L gf Q. S. c X Wg flcf Q9 L ai x I QqszgggargggsgaGizE!Esns?Spgt6G?Q3gib , lr-!.' "-'EQ 4 .. g 1-HE, 1930 TOWER SIQKM U ' ' X ' ll ' f f a' J 0.4 N tie- g gi QS? 2 eww Glider Club-Left to Right-Lewis, Perfield, Carr. HE GLIDER CLUB of the University of Detroit was founded on January 19th, 1929. After several months of effort the glider was completed and from that time on the club members made rapid progress in the art of flying. Several successful flights having been made, the glider en- thusiasts made preparations for entrance into the National Air Races held in Cleveland, August 27th to September 2nd, 1929. Carr had been selected as contest pilot and by his skillful handling of the glider was awarded the handsome Aero Digest Trophy. Upon returning from Cleveland the Glider Club continued activities at the Pontiac Airport. Alti- tudes of four hundred feet were regularly attained and several proficient pilots were being developed when an unfortunate mishap demolished the ship. Fortunately, however, none of the members were injured and maneuvers were continued in a ship graciously loaned to them by the Gliders Inc. of Orion, Mich. In this same ship K. H. Carr and W. J. Perfield placed second in the auto-towing contest held in Detroit in November, 1929. The oflicers of the Glider Club are all charter members and prominent in its activities. William James Perfield is president: Kenneth H. Carr, sec- retary, and Raymond E. Lewis, treasurer. HE PHILOMATI-IIC SOCIETY, the oldest established student organization on the campus, is a forensic society specializing in public speaking. debating, and oratory, It has been highly instru- mental in furnishing the intercollegiate debating teams with speakers who have carried the school to a position of distinction in the collegiate debating world. Following its past policy, the society conducted a series of debates which lasted until Easter. The entire enrollment was mustered into two-man de- bating teams, and a schedule was drawn up by Mr. Bacon, the faculty moderator. The Philomathic Society has diligently sponsored all intercollegiate debates. Since 1894 the organiza- tion has conducted the Annual Oratorical Contest, and since 1897 it has fostered the Annual Skinner Debate, which is the greatest event in forensic ac- tivities at the University. Ralph Johnston, Ellis Duncan, and Ora Labadie served the society as president, vice-president, and secretary-treasurer, respectively, during the first se- mester. Ora Labadie succeeded to the vice-presi- dency and David Leahy to the secretary-treasurer's position at the beginning of the second semester. while Ralph Johnston was re-elected to the oflice of president. Philomathic Society-Left to Right-Leahy, Johnston, Labadie, Duncan. k g O wal! .p Q 4 . Q, I '19 'tc pak' E 8111163 W! QQQQSS agar? + A ff . ., 0. s. if 3 00 11 nl ' G' sj,,c'?5f.7' '-T35-f?f'QgJ,--'S i elf-nv "T ki WMI, 41-1- x l' il Q63 C ' -fzIi5'al9 -J M THE 1930 TOWER I ti. U11 . X fag f 9. 5. , Q55 2 I I fiwl R ,v..I. '?f.i4fTf 4 -tfsi' f S. A. E.-Left to Right-Miller, I-Iavas, Kosel, Simms. I-IE SOCIETY OF AUTOMOTIVE ENGI- NEERS was organized in May of 1928 as a branch of the national society with headquarters in New York City. This organization is one of the largest in the University, with about one hundred and seventy-five members. The membership is lim- ited to students of the Engineering College. The purpose of this society is to further the interest of students in the automotive industry and to enable the students to make the acquaintance of those prominent in this particular field. This or- ganization obtains as speakers, chief engineers, exec- utives, and others conversant with matters concern- ing this industry or associated with it. As a result of this policy, the members become acquainted with the ideas of the leading professional men in their chosen field, and they receive a knowledge of what is expected of them after they have obtained their degree. The officers are: Alfred Haves, president: Herbert Kosel, vice-president: George Miller, secretary: Man- uel Simms. treasurer. I-Iaves, who has been a prom- inent member since the society was organized, is a mechanical engineer. Kosel is an automotive engi- neer, Miller and Simms are chemical and aeronau- tical engineers respectively. Professor Linsenmeyer is the honorary chairman. I-IE SYMPOSIUM. a philosophical club, which was organized during the Hrst semester of the present school year, is among the newer organiza- tions on the campus. The society is the realiza- tion of the earnest work of certain students who saw the need for open meetings instead of the usual closed philosophical discussions. Much in- terest is evidenced by the members in these discus- sions. The purpose of the organization is to foster appreciation for the philosophies of the various schools by delving into their origin, development and merits. At each meeting, one of the members reads a thesis on some phase of philosophy. The society sponsors two public lectures each year, at which some noted scholar gives an in- formal talk. On May 15th, the club celebrated the 39th anniversary of Pope Leo's Encyclical on Labor. Early in April, the club held an interest- ing vote on prohibition among the students and faculty of the University. John L. Cashin, prominent in the school's lit- erary and forensic affairs, is president of the so- ciety. Paul I-Iillebrand is vice-president, and Ora Labadie, secretary. The treasurer is Charles Shires. and James La Driere is historian. Rev. Fr. Freder- ick Meyer, S. J., is moderator. fm-. : 'X Symposium Society-Left to Right-Labadie, Hillebrand, Cashin, Shires, LaDriere 530111 63598. fl K .... q Exif. NX' ' 915 E . if s 7 3 erm' ga S 1 O .Lf M41 it T 1-lt 3 GIF! ' -fsfb c f HE l93O Tow 4 A Ai-'ian Yi 6 4 .0- 5 m i ., r ' ,L N4 A 1, ui aff T E R .. 'ff " I - W Ciolf Club: Left to Right-Howard, Carney. HE GOLF CLUB of the University of De- troit was organized this year by a group of students interested in the sport of the greens and fairway. Its purpose is to promote interest in golfing as a minor sport on the university's athle- tic calendar, and to furnish a suitable organization for continued promotion in the future. At the first meeting William Breault, captain of the golf team, was elected president. C. Scott Howard, for several years a member of the athletic organization of the university, was chosen for thc secretaryship: and Donald Carney, prominent for his university activities, was elected manager and treasurer. Membership in the organization is open to all students interested in golf. The club has assumed the place of ofiicial sponsors for the golf team of the university and actively engaged in securing the schedule of intercollegiate golf matches for this year. The club is afhliated in this capacity with the Athletic Association, golf being now recog- nized as a minor sport on the university's athletic calendar. The Ciolf Club also sponsors intra- mural tournaments, and has planned for a golf meet to determine the individual champion of the university. HE Motor Cycle Club held their first meeting at a lunch at Peter Pan on Nov. 4. The club was the idea of Karl Otto, who, after getting the approval of Fr. Scott, proceeded with the work of organizing it. As far as it is known at the pres- ent U. of D. is the first university in the country to have a lively Motor Cycle Club that is fully recognized by the faculty board as a student or- ganization. The purpose of the club, which is to send rep- resentatives to every important out of town U. of D. athletic activity, is worthy of an organ- ization of the university. The members of the club were among those present who saw U. of D. trounce West Virginia and later run rough shod over Michigan State. In the near future the club is going to stage a field day for the members in which stunt-riding, hill-climbing and races will be on the program. Next year they intend to enter civic events in com- petition with other riders when sanctioned by the proper school authorities. The ofiicers of the club are: President, Karl Otto: Vice-President, Robert McCahon: Secretary and Treasurer, Donald Nauman: Road Captain, Bibiano Timada. Motorcycle Club: Left to Right-Timada, McCahon, Otto, Nauman. 1130211 1 ,Qi A12 i V?-Sis. Y O I. 'sa iw!- Qf f QU E Qgwy as-.af-'aarezsi-wJsg.as5x1,W5l J ' E 1930 TOW J gym. Fu J! F I' ui QQ' P - ... BX T H ER It xm- m e a - 1 ' 'E' X - w 4 , '75 lil-DT flags' Alpena Club: Left to Right-LaLonde. Oles. HE ALPENA CLUB, in its second year on the I-IE BUFFALO CLUB, one of the many new campus, became a potent factor in the social organizations on the campus, was founded im- life of the University. With its membership re- mediately after the Christmas holidays, with an stricted to students from Alpena, Michigan, the enrollment of twenty-five charter members. Al- club was necessarily small, yet successfully conducted though just beginning its career, the club has out- two major social events during the school year. lined an ambitious program. The first of these was the Christmas dinner- The club plans a house near the campus in the dance held at the Owl Cafe in Alpena. The Synco- immediate future, and in addition. hopes to sponsor 4 pators entertained a large number of members and a nationalization program among the Buffalo clubs K tsl their friends. It was the first important event spon- of universities and colleges. .2 Gp sored by this young club, and was a great success. At a dinner held at the Seward Hotel last Feb- 6 The second social function was the dinner-dance ruary, the members discussed the future of the M 0 663 Q held March 10th, at the Oriole Terrace in Detroit. club, and its aims and purposes. Professor Ed- P if This affair, one of the pre-Lenten functions, was ward T. McCarthy, mathematics teacher in the also well attended. I College of Engineering, was elected Faculty Mod- gr X The purpose of the Alpena Club is to foster erator. It was agreed upon by the charter mem- interest in the University of Detroit among the bers that, in order to foster and promote the in- B high-school graduates of Alpena. To further this terests of the University of Detroit in Buffalo and K3 J aim, the club sends bulletins and information about the surrounding territory, the club would offer L if the University to all prospective students, In this such assistance as they could to prospective students. ra manner, the club has made itself known in Alpena Lawrence G. Riley was honored with the first and on the campus. presidency of the'club, while Clarence F. Falkner The officers for the past year included Gerald La- was chosen vice-president. Albert Driscoll is the Londe, who served his second year as president of recording secretary, and Chester A. Schintzius is the organization: Stanley McDougall, vice-presi- the corresponding secretary. George A. Gambert dent: and Frederick Oles, Secretary-treasurer. was chosen for the oflice of treasurer. R. Buffalo Club: Left to Right-Falkner, Schintzius, Riley, Driscoll. U-.wfwra v 1.3447 Gga - l ' 530311 gi Z: C5 em f n' Q WSE 2 - iF!'r 'YQ of B wg me fgwfa ll Cleveland Club-Left to Right-Crider, Brigham, Sonnhalter, Thornton. HE CLEVELAND CLUB was organized in November of 1929 by a group of fifteen stu- dents from that city. The club later admitted twenty Marygrove students as members and have succeeded in establishing a common relationship. The club has for its purpose the social advance- ment of University of Detroit students from Cleve- land and vicinity, and in addition, they send out booklets and information to prospective university students. The club sponsored several smokers for the male members, and in addition. held a number of in- formal luncheons, which were attended by both Nlarygrove and Detroit members. The club also sponsored a basketball team which competed with other fraternities during the season. The members have shown their willingness to aid in any movement sponsored by the university, and appear to have the proper qualification for a suc- cessful and prominent organization. The officers for this year are James Brigham, president: William Sonnhalter, vice-president: Grace Crider, secretary, and Thomas Thornton, treasurer. Donald J. Moynihan is the faculty advisor for the organization, while Fathers Scott and Brickle are honorary members. HE GRAND RAPIDS CLUB is one of the several clubs formed at the university dur- ing the past few years for the purpose of further- ing the interests of the university by the members in their native town. These clubs form a welcoming body to those stu- dents who come from cities other than Detroit and promote a spirit of good-fellowship among them that makes for unity in their work at the univer- sity. This idea has proved so successful for the students and school alike that many other Organi- zations of a similar nature have been established. During the social year this club contributed their best support to the major functions of the university by a large attendance at the class dances and Union opera. They themselves staged several social events. the first of which was a smoker that served as a reunion after the summer vacation. A holiday dinner-dance was given in Grand Rapids during Christmas vacation and proved very success- ful. Another enjoyable dance was given at Easter and the annual banquet climaxed the year. The oflicers of the Grand Rapids Club are Nicholas P. Bekema, president: George F. Brown. vice-president: George E. Clark, secretary, and Ray- mond J. Franklin, treasurer. t ui ff li-P iQ 9, Sw 5 .lily 'J' it N . X ' pi' tft E l A Grand Rapids Club-Left to Right-Clark, Bekema, Brown, Franklin. v , 'wif' 5S'ar,!:i i sv 2 .' ,,Qg,f.35 3 H3043 diitgkimadignggeiylzismsaspgtgqzggigb . sF!' f-s.A1 THE 1930 TOWER giqkhl - 4 'zz ii icq I 'J i C555 , wif "8 . 3- 2 lx. Q-.is 2 Y Saginaw Club-Left to Right-R. Beyer, Malone, E. Beyer THE SAGINAW CLUB formed a few years ago, and temporarily disbanded, was re-organized in September, 1930. New energy put into the club is responsible for its rapid growth and the place it now occupies on the campus. Primarily a social club it has for its purpose the promotion of good-fellowship and wholesome so- cial activity among the students at the university who have their homes in Saginaw. To this end the members have worked industriously A dance given on December 19, during the Christmas holidays, officially opened the season. The en masse attendance of the members together with their many friends and the exccllency of ar- rangements made it a memorable affair. The suc- cess of their first venture spurred the Saginaw club to hold many more throughout the year. Informal get-togethers and smokers were held at regular in- tervals. They were well-attended and proved to be a source of great enjoyment. Eager to continue the friendships formed during the school year the members are planning a dance for the summer months. Those chosen to head the club were: John D. Malone, president: Raymond Beyer. vice-president: E. L. Beyer. secretary: and Daniel Izzo, treasurer. I-IE WILKES-BARRE CLUB was formed in the fall of 1929 by a group of students from that city. By the forming of such an association. the Wilkes-Barre students follow a precedent set by similar organizations Within the past three years. Although only in its first year of existence, the Wilkes-Barre Club has become a real social force on the campus and has earned for itself an enviable reputation. Following to the letter an original in- tention to make this organization an active one, the members carried out an extensive and successful social program. Lively and well-attended meetings and social affairs were held each month. The year was opened by a smoker given during November. This was followed by an enjoyable dinner-dance staged during the Christmas vacation at the Airport Inn in Wilkes-Barre. The members, en masse, and many of their friends were in attendance. A dinner given at the Savoia Club marked the cessation of activities for the season of Lent. Those enjoying the distinction of being the club's Hrst oflicers are: Dominic Spagnola is president: Thomas Ward, vice-president: Frank Belch, treas- urer: Michael Sheppeck. secretary: John Yareteske. advertising manager: and Anthony Adams, assistant advertising manager. XVilkes-Barre Club-Left to Right--Sheppeck, Spagnola, Ward, Belch K t Msg! gf lie 6' 1 , 3 Q21 S fgf 5 i 1 'J Y, 1130511 Q all ffl? El f -5 f K-ll fl nga Q, f",gj-25"-r,-.c..1 or elf-B' "2 'va'-sl, Ile A THE 1930 TOWER Ani:-X 1 M' VV R Z fi. .1 !J'? iff '1 s .xx E 5 .xx 1' Cosmopolitan Club: Left to Right-Skorupski, Lubinski, Lisowski, Bida. HE COSMOPOLITAN CLUB grew out of the belief of a number of students that there were enough different nationalities represented in the University to warrant the formation of such a club. Faculty aid was enlisted, prospective members were approached, and as the outcome of this preliminary work. the Cosmopolitan Club is now an active University organization. This organization is less than a year old, being formed during March, 1929. The purpose of this organization is to promote a more friendly feeling and good fellowship among the cosmopolitan group attending the University of Detroit. It was determined that the best means of attaining this end would be a planned series of social gatherings, the keynote of which would be informality. As a result, the club has held quite a few smokers. Notwithstanding the limited student body from which membership can be recruited, the Cosmopol- itan Club is esoteric in nature. Its maximum mem- bership is fifty. When the number of nationalities on the campus is considered, it becomes obvious that entrance into the society is a distinct honor. Joseph A. Lubinski is president of the club: Edward Skorupski is vice-president: Ben Lisowski is secretary, and Michael Bida is treasurer. THE FILIPINO CLUB of the University of Detroit was founded in February, 1928, to better unite the Filipino students of the university and to aid them in serving their Alma Mater. The club has succeeded in making the Filipinos a vital part of the university life, and has promoted an understanding for them among the student body. The constitution of the club was adopted in March, 1928, and a set of by-laws to regulate its future activity were drawn up at the time. Early in the history of the organization, the members of the club adopted for its motto: loyalty, love and service to their Alma Mater. The entire organization constantly works for the promotion of fellowship according to the American social scheme. A Professor Bert N. Blakeslee, who, having lived among the Filipinos as a missionary for a number of years, has given the club his whole-hearted sup- port and has contributed invaluable aid to the suc- cess of the club. The foremost social event was the dinner party given at Professor Blakeslee's home to welcome the new members. Horacio Rodiquez is. president: Joaquin Palisoc, vice-president: Eustaquio Mesina is treasurer, and Tranquilino Macali. secretary. Filipino Club: Left to Right-Macali, Palisoc, Rodiquez, Mesina. 530611 if N , rnt 'Q 9 li 5321.45 , Si ,.- v e .5 Q 4 4 X 5 I ,f 3.12215 5 Y 'A- rl lg Msg pi l 1 I p. 1' , N I . E- . 'Q , 57:3 Lael' S i I E 4 1 sl I C63 0 . 9 acl 2 'gill s Ca QS ?jQQfl'Ei'9fFJSdg'Qk1,iff ll , cf 0, A N4 A 'N vi , , 7' ' ' 'Q , . cffgu TH?-'i93O TER L QKN.. id.. we f x Co-ed Club--Left to Right-Marlowe, Kline, Nelius, Hunt. HE CO-ED CLUB had its beginning in Febru- ary of 1929 when a group of freshman co-eds conceived the idea of organizing a club so that they could really become better acquainted with mem- bers of their own class. The membership in this club is limited to fresh- men and first-semester sophomores. During the past year, the club sponsored an in- formal dinner-dance at the Oriole Terrace. This was the Hrst big affair to be given by the club and was almost unanimously attended. Dainty programs delineating the Thanksgiving season were given as favors. Eileen Crowley, a sophomore, was the chairman. The club's officers are elected twice a year. Only sophomores may hold oflice during the first semes- ter and only freshmen are privileged to do so during the second. The officers for the first semester were Frances M. Kline, president: Mary L. Nelius, vice- president: Hortense Marlow, secretary, and Ava R. Hunt, treasurer. For the second semester Lucille Sullivan was elected to the presidency, June Mc- Dougall to the vice-presidency, Marie Szumiak to the secretaryship, and Marcel Frenette was chosen as treasurer. ENIOR GIRLS' CLUB-To promote friend- ship, to create a better understanding, to bring about unity and harmony among the Senior girls of all the colleges of the University, so that mutual agreement on all senior topics might be attained, was the motive for the organization of the Senior Girls' Club in 1925. Because of the many and various activities of the first semester, the Club did not hold its first meet- ing till November 21st, in the Women's League room of the Law School. The Club's varied social calendar included a breakfast at the League of Catholic Women, Janu- ary 12th. This was followed by a Saint Patrick's bridge in the Union Rooms on Jefferson. Margaret LeFevre, president of the club, enter- tained the members with an afternoon tea and bridge at her home, Sunday, May 18th. The club concluded its social calendar with a dinner and a theater party at the Wilson. Margaret LeFevre, a night Commerce and Fi- nance student, was elected president. The Law School had its representative in Gladys Catherwood, as vice-president. The day Commerce and Finance was represented by Eilleen K. Cross, as secretary, and Florence M. Bernard, as treasurer. Senior Girls' Club-Left to Right-Bernard, Catherwood, LeFevre, Cross. f n fi. his Q1 ie J ti sa aa. , Q1 'P :Z-3' S ZIQIW 1543 , 'Av M l -!"!r,x .4-13 lfisgai Iltiiii 9 L H595 1130711 N J M uv Ei -si hi' .KW L 0 ggi is? Q built by Edward Bok as a .653 S 2 ge qji v . 331. T mi!! gk fi inaina jonfelf Ogzzke Mizksg jbfidld Silver-throated birds call to each other in the euerglades. And in this primitive set- ting of brilliant color stands the Bok Tower, sanctuary for birds and dedicated to his mother. The edifice stands serene and tall, at peace with na- ture and in sympathy with the free spirit of its setting. There has never been so odd a tower built for such a purpose. It is a feature in the curious and beautiful spots of the world. P if x Q' SK' 5 Q.- 9 at IJ: t X .GI ff? . is T Q-110 Ju lf? is 1 5 fi QE: W 'S ,. xe ffgwlfg !NfX flli l3 l xt? M .b,Q gp' ,., -,Wm QM .xQM,Q i? 4X b i gm gnjqevwvavfs-'fjf guy' 'RIC -ew .1 ie N Qg?SffQ3 Jy Q EATU RE S 5 Q2 2 11 5 it bi, Q 38 -19 32252 is 5 E U Sf 0 I 4 4 fn 1. I 1 I 4: "1 ,a , il ",- if . wb- fav" ,J Vi ,' ' . , i!9'fv!f"Nfu4i 35, "2 ' DU' v "T" jr I , J rl! r 'W'iKe.:-' Jfurig sl 'L J' .1 A ,X ' n -V 4- '.g,,c1ve'2s14s 30 0 Tri x I T - - I I f'-1? JH Ut I uf 6 Q . . r fe G 2 Cf l nfs lxtfasil uf ,V mi, EE -. ,.. .gglit 1 fr CENTERS OF ACTIVITY The Union residence where students meet to plan and play-The "A" House in which are located the oflices of the university sport mentors-Professor Victor Mitchell, censor of publica- tions, at his desk at work on the Varsity News-A scene in the editorial room of the publica- tions' offices-In the inner sanctumg heads of the uniUersity's publications, the Tower and the pray nv! rvf, r"' f--N 9 wil H3093 Lg. 324 L, 4,1 . V 4 3 l y E Varsity News. iE KM EQ l fi I gg AA1 1 1 1 ,I N, Y 1 N IP EE y I y 1 i 4, i 1 r I 1 Y 5 2 f I , E V I nk, FN Q N K V 4 W 111311- ll-Ek? iam? ' 3 ' V 'N l " Y A THE 1930 TOWER g kw.. A In Q. - 4- i - : nv C' ' ' Hg ul L--Q T WA rl ,Y .G T gfl st .2 I'-+4-at vff 1 THE FACULTY, BOOKS AND VJHAT NOT Professors of the College of Engineering pose for photographers on the steps of their edificei The Commerce and Finance teaching staff outside their building--Priests and lag professors of the College of Arts and Sciences-In the Law Libraru-And here in the Peter Pan where the hungry gather at noon and night to eat, and make merry. n'O e J gl 21. Z, 2, 4 Q ' W cl-9 S Elf' 'ul Niger: I ""J'R. I 531111 gl BEA WC .s ei its J 6' M " I AE 'E' ' F' wtf fFiQ"?l"'QJb-.41 'W ' Y rf H . T xrlkv' 's ' '- 3 .I L f-A HE 1930 TOWER 511. I E all:-B gf TI-IE FUN OE BEING AN ENGINEER Some scenes from the University of Detroit civil engineering camp where study and play in the great outdoors made both an eaual pleasureiffan gou imagine the tri-section of an angle associated with swimming and fishing?-Building a wing in the aeronautics laboratories, where theorg and actual practice work hand in hand-Experimental birds in a cage. . 'if' gig? id-xl! ' kg' K V1 fnfl ff by , ig 957235 'J v - f Nfl 5"',!,3 'WSWS G2-slim g . r .. 9 , v , 5 F 5 ,..-' xi-' if 1131211 s isa " rg., A I 0,-Sf r 4 lv 1 sl f E55 at il, F G' ,j6'?5!.f'-3'-WXN'3'Sx, Q Q"'QSNf?F-rr" M d p-Q2 WE mo TOWER m g. ' : l -1 5 : .G ay II Ml 1' 'Lx THE TITAN CHAMPIONS OF THE AIR Two U. of D. gliders off on the winds to soar the clouds-What a glider does without a pilot- The trophy of glider supremacy, symbol of the Titan glider championship-All set to be taken off-Kenneth Carr in the proper glider pose-The safest way of gliding is loading the glider on a truck, although the enthusiasts argue otherwise. 42 sfiiba, ali 25 sf ., I vo ss" .ln P cg 9435 Q LW? W' 'J i "Y ,'.X',f,:3 1 4 Aff 'Q this H3l3H I O , if-.J y - 1, 'iff ij-if , J.',- A 6. A, If Y DOINGS IN THE NIGHT Snitz Ross performing at a night gridiron circus-A bonire of pep, blazing for victory-Some of those who gathered round the fire to shout encouragement--A tangle in a night fray- Preparation for the scene of barbaric festiUityiThe Titans rushing under the arc-lights-A foreign band parades the field. e lfimxf 1 ' lffzfqiifi' .fm ' 1 1 is .ffm I -Q-3jDE'c,' x n W ll 1 1. I, M N! N1 1 U 3 W 1, 'r if i i i W , , , . X- ,.-, .. - . Y. .4 A, tx.. V .Q--.....,..,..,..1.,..--Lili, ,Y . Ai.. . -f ., . ur -,A .. V,.. V .V V, V - -,-V .- - Y -f . -1 ,--w,.,, ....-.V ..,-e-.emu ....XK-..-,,--14-.QVLLT -,-2,4 .,.: , T-.T-,n?:eNi,,k.-,.11vgm """""H ll Q 'lf lil eff 555 Hj lm: M' 3, Eli lil M W AW ffl W W5 ,fy ri IM fn Em uw will QW ill Tjll wi I U ll it gi 5 W l H' i in M V V ll i N ity ml W we lil lil Mr fi? 1. i 441 VM lp l'N N ri t H, Ji 4, ext H1 i V 1 w ,ll it W fl ill lv' Q1 Fl it 19? s- N I ,,,,:i-'H-""" +Ef---ff-SL lf YMTTTWT Q 1 2 igMf2si2ff l G l lv 1- 632:53 3 lf?-'Z' 4 be S - WL., ..,,.-,un -.T .,.-,. M., - J,-FH, V Hx - -Y-,Y -AW-Q.-1.:s.v.,..n.L-e.1..:,.A...-.f..ew,..,,.g.,,.q..V.,A,y,,f:-VV70 , N., iw Ai- 7:,,.-,:,,,,,,,,,, W Y ,W-. WZ? ,,,.:.,.,,- f , 1 , 5' lI314H K. l ,lf 1. IQ ,Q We L33 st 115 . N 4 ' f1.,,gs.:f,fm.ws.+aX,,?, .. 61975 A Kia ja, L Q THE 1930 Towg 4 0. :mg 'M -' - 755: A e 'Q is I t fr'-.9 4 ws r, l - 1 - - If A M ll WHEN THE TITANS STORMED MORGANTOWN The main street of Morgantown University in festive array to receive the Titans-"Varsity" stirs a foreign throng--The red and white band marching on the field of battle-West Virginia trumpeters serenading the crowd--Two scenes in the station going to and coming from the battle of the century on the banks of the Monongahela-The seal on the victors' train. LQQV X, it-S v i 5?'?5 1131511 L' N. .- L, 4 3 ' W4 129 S t I N.J,Q'sif-3'9'7'!f""9t3'Sx. , eg,-an "' fy-11, 'rn ' 1' F I I W I J ts se Kg dl f f s' .I QS? 2 JMX! 5 :U Q .. gq-'I un 930 T A Rf k? THE l OWER LAN.. L- yawn E , Aft' THE BAND Harbinger of Victory, Cantor of Defeat-Sending "Dear Old U. of D." in concert to the skies- Leading the voices of thousands of students and supporters in an inspired "Varsity"-Ensconced in the stadium-Rod Marion, high-stepping drum-major-Maior Van Antwerp. stern general of the drill-The band in formation before the Chemistry Building, preparing to invade the stadium. fb NSS, HI ki-..- 'ig 0 I II316H -O Sw if 'Si , 1 qt? 642' E, 3 V fjkhluifnl ,Q zu, Q W., as 1 I I I l S G91 c g g . use' If 5 QS? 21 7 HJ 1wf7f"f?X:fe,J -A f .- 1 " - iAfi6fff,:if-1-Qf,1QTQ3p ' , , ,wf ,oxrf---d"' 'V"'Qf'!::tEffg"7icTf 5,19 vi' ,1 . 2 ,ry EW il! I 4 , r C9 SN ,J 'N Fm5if'EQ3'DU2 , f :Q Q Q Tm, ,4 M -1 'fx rg. 1 J V - Lx sfif P fs, Rf 421,-sf, , l , - 1 1,1 ,N- A 4 1 . cr-62? t3 1 ' N ' 1 9' we 4 , ,1 X , ,,- 'S' , ' L:..:L, Y WN W, e ,- bN,mn 4, .,,e V I t ' ig, -- e ""5ffu9:f 5 ' 'E' 5 F I 1 s Q L t , 1 t i fs NEW HOMES WERE BUILT THIS YEAR Omega Beta Pi doctors haue artistic as well as SCl9f2ll.flC tastes-Eta Zeta Sigma's living room reveals a quality quite feminine-It is the second year the Tuyere have occupied their manse- Here are the Omega lads on their front porch--Chi Delta Theta's new abode-A new home for a new fraternity, Epsilon Sigma Phi-Exterior of the Eta Zeta Sigma sorority house, we xx is tl ,utr ' ll 'x 'QOXV Vlfiff QJN 1 2 W, - , ! K l4Q35iS9WcJ tw New l J ,Al l 19 W fig? iI3171l .F P- .. LII I I lg. 1 5775-f"7f' I, ,rsh 4 0L'QI2f'7IiI Cgfliw QF? .fi if -142-II 2413.21 " 'I I' V Inf if ,f- .I,. . I W I .I wr I ,wi,,,.iI ,, I 1- fI,I ",I.,?pI I N - -41 II 'yi-ggnxgl J, C2 flfw 2 QAII, III I I, I II I I I I ps-Cs,j:7PPfz3'IRfIQs1,xf N .cifj L, M a n we ,L gain ,I?I.'-'if ' I -1 'Nfl " 3. Wi I 5' VU IUVVE in W -V 7 IfYf:?7Af'fi, I M 3323-G I ffaf+T,III - E- 2- E rf'f"' I E 'NH-E 'SJ ,1 1 T'f'I79'ivI I I Im W E E E' 'E L Ia EIIII I '53 I . I I I fi--N I--d II M I I .-.......fx' I I I I I III II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I ,I II I I I I ,I I, I I I I F I I I II I I I I I I I I I I III KIIQQ - 'Q THE PETER PAN TOURNAMENTS C. Scott Howard, George Harrigan, and Lawrence Dowd, champions at hand-ball-The sought- for fraternity athletics cup-Members of Alpha Epsilon Pi won the tennis tournament--The Argons, champions of the season's indoor baseball-The best fraternity golf players came from the Tugeres of the College of Engineering-Basketball honors went to Epsilon Sigma Phi. IIBISII I I I I f Nd N ,. ba, I , Q I Jw I we I L3 Ia I I I I I I Frog? 'K-ik Q wg I I I I I I I I I I I I 1. 4 ct- QEER gf v 5 ff, ' . q -4 as .MSW WE H930 TOWEQ Wk.. qn m 4 - AT 4 T - s I 'S' If ill - W .Q HY' Q55 T 2 can wwe f7'44n 94' 7 . gli. aQ"'.f" - 1 ,. 9 W, - 1 d'g'l'f fl BARBAROUS REVENGE! The frosh whipped the sophomores in the annual class games. At the top right is a scene from the beginning of the festivities. the baseball game. The photo at the lower right reveals the appearance of four contestants at the Hnish. The tug-of-war through Tower Lake ended in a mud-battle, and the rest of the illustrations are the familiar rough and tumble. HZIQH Ko -xi, .n L. 42, 4 3 T so Q41 L swqx I2 li 'ff-'94, 6658? Jgg nr.-2-asia ,,.,.t,g5,??9 f 1 'V' 'ur W' VV: - THE 1930 TOWER iaxm. i m x: - I 4 X - ng a? HI ll 0 . 4 2. f Q-ti' 2 rf! itat? Va HERE AND THERE At. work in the broadcasting station in the physics department. an innovation of the physicists this year-Just two leapers and runners of the hurdling squad-Billy Breault, captain of the Golf Team, driving off-The Delta Sigma Pi basketball banquet-And below, the great banquet for the football team given bv the same fraternitv at the Book Cadillac. . v M' !-Vps Egfxg I Li. i., 573-4,g1.s,.. Ass i Q H3203 R. ...::. L , . lg ji . 2 I Ht N' 1 gsm! L, Q2 .Q tl W5 415 F' 'J I 5 1 1 -. be ,I s. A ,S is '- GSB 2 -THE 1930 TOWER W gg V 'ar a' i 3 I A' """ X ' on H ll! GAY "HELLO STRANGERH The stars of the homogeneous cast-Demure Jack Teubert surrounded by a group of admiring singers of the chorus-Sailor lads stepping with port maidens in a chorus scene-A tough Customs man, sailors and captain-All together and none so marked as Shuffles-None will ever know but these how heavy hoofs were forced to dainty tread 1 glare,-X vi F6232 6 L.: 9 1 15 8 IIBZIH kg. V." Jn a, iz ia? 12-9 E J GIA ccg Glefkg Q 4 Q s li. Q33 fl F '1 .4554-W7-'5'39lf-?'1f,x. I? Io HE 1930 Tow r r ..ff"X 'I 4 as ER I ff.-vs - I X - 4+ ' I My ll 1 W af, , U, INDIVIDUALS OP THE OPERA Two wolves in sheep's clothing are Woolworth Wilma and Jack the Beanstalk talking to a philanthropical detective-Seamus and Marie. the romancers-The leads in heroic and villainous roles, Girardin, Leahu. Teubert and Pouliot-Teubert displays a neat ankle for the beneit of Dave Leahy-Pouliot as Mrs. Haute-Monde. giant lady of the opera. W 532211 f"'fo2i"'3 Quj, Vials. We :yy J l-. 5.1 " 'za I sf? yer L Qfrgisw-MEEQQ S S? ...AY2 THE '930 TOWE ff 72 'Q 58, I X . 'ffamx' g t 1 ' Z-xlls' fi A 'Q 2 I9 srl US? 2 Q . -' vg .Pi T152 M V-A X v SCENES FROM THE SHOW A poor German trying to declare a jug-Do crap games occur aboard ship? Tsk, tsk!-"Me mother was right about women."'-mAh aint got nothin' 'gainst you. brothah! Hones' ah aint!"--Johnny Galbo as the z'n1'mz'table "ShufHes"-Joe Tocco played the part of a tough dago, Guido Espinosa-George Nebus in the role of Hossenpfeffer, night club magnate. gps: '-wx f,X'Al, thas: QJGQL H323H to 'ef N, J. A u f 1: LOW ite E A-W i 54' I Ng 8 . 'K Q-S5 2 668:37 Jg-su. WSH!-'35NJs?'Q,L ,W,'Q5f?J , W be-'--ew : THE 1930 TOWER fn ? 'V Y N : 4' Af- -is 5 : YY W " af! 'gms ?a.m?-ff Q 2 PAMILIAR SCENES FROM NEW ASPECTS The stadium as viewed from the Union House-A bird's-eye, or perhaps a hotel windoufs eye, view of the campus and tower--The plaza and the Commerce Building-The beautiful hotel de faculte-Tulips blossom under the spring sun on the plaza before the Chemistry Building-The Science Building and a campus buried in snow. HBZLLH Ylfvdi- ' K SX S 'if' m Yu u Q- QK l l L s p. Q i a l "v,i8'g 23,643 U 63? 1 'J w 4 1 J I 4 I w V N 1 w 1 i LL7' Qvevftisevfs 5 Q'- my 5?- k CQ cv? 9 69 x Q 5 Nur "" gas.- .L .y: -w . .My-www . J, , xgfff MW ws? bs-'.,-f. r . 1- lggyfmyz .nw zfzkf' if?- '- . . : 5 A ig 'J'?2?':fX5 ,S X355 gf ,Q yy ,ix Q 9 T, 'L+ 144. 2"':2.-- 2 ff 9 .142 5 f mi' f S . . . ., ..,:.,..y , - 54?-0, ,4 fliw , .1 if 'S I 4-g:1qfx gfirfq-ui ,f f ' .. , vf 4 is aa, gif' . . g.,,3, ,. - :ra .. ' i f f 4 4- . Qis ff if f .4-.. '. X -' E' ws Nei .S J A265343 5 + wi , ,ws M, SEPT, Q ., 4 N 1 .4 5 N "5 x .-1. - ng ,, my s g Q? E xi :fi if ,Q 2 . Q , W. i, Z- S. c- -. ,qw - . ? f ga? 2 a 1 wi? 25555 A3555 ,.f.Ei:' E-'s93:':l?E- w L' ' ' ' .r4t'-::Q'-4:s::- . w::26-:2-:- QW-S :.,. I I1 s ! E 'IPM ' ' T l' 1' 1 t X 1 1 ,A-' s ,.,. af 1 5? 2343 N. 'xlrigyfa ?'3" 5 - we 'S -E Eg: ,Q S, 1' xy , ,Q V A Rv .sly '4' 5 , ,Z ,fA,A I 5, J .ggi me 6- 7 1 with S '1 Q9 lf. Q c W My , z gg v Q, r fl! fi? PATRONS MRS. FREDERICK M. ALGER DR. EDWARD H. BACKSTROM ANTHONY B. BALTIS GORDON F. BENNETT HARRY S. BENNETT BERRY RUG CO. MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM P. BRADLEY BRIGGS 8 KESSLER CO. JAMES E. BURGESS DR. JOSEPH L. CHAMPAGNE CHAWKE E5 SLOAN DETROIT FURNACE 8 STOVE REPAIR CO. MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM M. DONNELLY ECHLIN S5 LENDZION JOHN FELLRATH CHARLES T. FISHER, JR. DR. G. C. GIBBONS FRANK A. GORMAN DR. CHARLES F. GREEN MR. AND MRS. LEO K. HENNES JOHN J. HOGUE THE J. L. HUDSON CO. DR. AND MRS. FRED H. JACKS DR. XVILLIAM EDW. KEANE DR. PAUL A. KLEBBA PATRICK W. KEATING DR. CHARLES J. LILLY MACK GARMENT CLEANING CO T. J. MCINERNEY, JR. ARTHUR J. MCINNES MRS. GEORGE MONAGHAN PETER J. MONAGHAN LEO J. NEBEL FRED A. NOLAN ERNEST A. O'BRIEN POWER PLANT SUPPLY CO. JOHN P. RABAUT THOMAS J. THOMPSON SONS WALKER BROS. CATERING CO. WASHINGTON PRESS WATKINS CIGAR STORES CO. CHARLES J. WEBER J. CLAIRE WILSON Compliments Compliments Qf Complzments O T . IVI A I. 0 N E 0 0 Julian Cheviron F- REITZ FRIEND IIBZOH I COMPLIMENTS GF A FRIEND DETROIT, MICHIGAN II327II Now You Can Advertise In Our Publications on the same business basis as in other mediums A A A An entirely new method of handling advertising makes this possible. For the Hrst time, the newspaper, alumni magazine, foot' ball and opera programs, and all other publications have been centralized in one advertising department. In this new achievef ment, the University of Detroit pioneers. A A A One department, under the supervision of a faculty member and employing only students, handles the advertising for all university publications. You deal with one organization instead of six or ten. You deal with a responsible organization, the University itself. A A A You buy space sold on its merits, represented in a businessflike way. Your money is invested, not donated. A A A We hope that you will feel proud that the University of Detroit-your University, whether as student, alumnus, or friend- has shown the way to every college and university in the country in placing its publications on a sound business basis. They are truly Class Publications of Merit, reaching the rich market of University City. UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT Advertising Department VARSITY NEWS - TOWER - ALUMNUS - THE ENGINEER OPERA PROGRAM - STUDENT HANDBOOK - FOOTBALL PROGRAM Class publications of merit, the Key to University City Hazel! Dan Healy is a Titan Booster Won't you be a Dan Healy Booster C Dan Healy Beauty Shops Corner Broadway and Grand River Avenue Look for the big red sign 532911 BUICK-' . l to 1 S -and in America, people buy more than twice as many Baicks as any other car priced above 31200. NOR H 11 L INT Q --F 4 l l I Day after day, while the motorists of America are buying twice as many Buicks as any other car priced above 351200, fast ships and trains carry other thousands of Buicks to Europe, to Australia, to the Orient, to all parts of the world .... And back from these places come letters-like those reproduced below-saying the same fine things about Buick that you hear in America. It takes this kind of car-IT TAKES A BUICK-to win the praise of the world as Buick has won it in increasing degree throughout a quarter- century. It takes the impeccable beauty of Bodies by Fisher. It takes known performance leadership. It takes flawless reliability. It takes the all-round value that you know you get in the Buick car. You want a new car this spring. You think mighty highly of Buick. World-wide preference, expressed in Buick's dominant sales leadership over any other fine car, assures you that you are right! BUICK MOTOR COMPANY, FLINT, MICHIGAN Canadian Factories Divijioncgflgiziaill Moron Builders of McLaughlin-Buick, Oshawa, Ont. Buick and Marquette Motor Cars f orld- ide reference 1 MAP Q Geo. F. Crum Co., Indianapali: 1 I have been running my Buick continuously for I I years and have made 285,000 miles without repair. It is the most won- derful car anybody can get. It is the first 7-passenger car that came to Syria-and the oldest car-but it's running every day. M. W. Fadlellab . Tripoli, Syria 2 I have driven many cars but I have never had so much satis- faction as I get from the 1930 Buick. It is simple, it is marvelous. Mme. jane Zander Brussels, Belgium 3 I own a I927-1928 Buick model and assure you that .in regard to features, operation, material, comfort and attractiveness, it is one of the best cars to be found the world over. A. George Central Soledad, Guantanamo COrienteJ Cuba 4 You will be pleased to learn that before I owned a car I pledged myself to own none other but a Buickg and I will, whenever I can afford it, own no other. W1 N. Clarke Kingston, Ja., B. W. I. 5 I have owned various motor cars during the last I5 years and have derived satisfaction from some. I may frankly state, however, that my "happiness" has been complete since January, 1926, when I 'bought my Buick 26-47 from your dealers in Mexico. This car has not given the slightest trouble, has always been ready for service and although it has covered 78,500 kilo- meters, is still in excellent condition. foaquin M. De Uriarte, Engineer Puebla, Puebla, Mexico I have been using Buick cars for several years and it gives me pride to state that I have always been highly satisfied and have always preferred this make. joseph Cardoze Curacao, D. W. I. I am very much, satisfied with the performance and service which I have derived from this car, which, as you rightly state, is recognized as unexcelled the world over. V. Ecbeverria D. La Guayra, Venezuela, S. A. My first Buick was purchased in 1920. It served me seven years and was in good condition when I turned it in on another Buick in September, 1927. I may live to buy another though I Em. plgetty old 178th yearj, but if I do I promise you it shall be a u1c . T. C. Wills Honolulu, Hawaii According to very recent statistics of the Shanghai.Municipal Council, it is stated that out of every six cars one 1s.a Buick. Moreover Buick owners are mostly the leading men in China. They have hereby signed their honorable names recommend- ing the new car to the Chinese public. -From a testimonial signed by .twenty of the lead- ing statesnzen, bankers and busznexs men of Cbzna. You canlimagine in what regard I hold Buick's.performance and quality. I have given the name of my favorite car to my favorite Arab race horse. A A. C. Ardesbir Poona, India WHEN BETTER AUTOMOBILES ARE BUILT . . BUICK WILL BUILD THEM ll 330 Che new Qbservatory Building which will soon be erected on the Campus. MALCQMSQN 54 HIGGINBQTHAM 64 TRQUT BAUERfLEMKE CQ. UNION TRUCKING CU. MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 52 4 E i g h t h S t r e e t D E T R O 1 T 61 1 Scherer Building Grand River and Farmer East Freight Handlers To and From all Depots High Class jewelry f - Emblems Fraffmify Jewelry Cadillac zcaoca Cadillac 3607 533111 3-Erom Windsor Eerry via Woodward, M oung men all over the city are coming to us for their clothes for these obviously good reasons . . . Individual styling from exclusive Woolens: personal attention to correct- ness of detail in their making: a second try-on to assure the proper fitting. Selections are Now Ready Sack Suits Collar Attached Shirts Top Coats Two-Piece Underwear Tuxedos Headwear Golf Suits Eoulard Neckwear Riding Breeches Pajamas Knickers Sweaters Flannel Trousers Hosiery CGolfj CANTDNSS IN THE FISHER BUILDING "IVhere you pay no more for the best" Complimentary Two-Hour Parking in the Fisher Garage Before deciding on the paper stock for your next printed matter, call our Service Depart- ment for suggestions. We shall gladly furnish full sheets or dummies from our large and varied stock of papers. Che Union Paper and Twine Company 551 East Fort St. Detroit, Mich Cadillac 86oo Direct Bus Routes to Campus USE THE GREEN BUS 4-From Windsor Eerry via Woodward, Adams, Cass, West Grand Boulevard, Dexter and Fairfield. Cass, Second Boulevard and SixfIVIile Road. All Other Green Busses Transfer to These Lines Special Comfortable Deluxe Buses Seating 12 to 40 passengers, available at reasonable rates for private parties. Call Longfellow 25oo DETRo1T MoToRBUs CoMPANY 1133211 PURE ICE! erifwl Dependable Delivery Our large fleet of wagons and trucks make certain the delivery of pure ice to homes in all parts of Detroit. Thirty-eight years spent in serving Detroit Homes is a guar- antee worth considering. Now is the time to begin taking ice. Call Cadillac 83 oo PITTIVIAN and DEAN Company Making The Start Those Graduates who cultivate habits of thrift and careful investing will be among the Hrst to achieve Financial In- dependence and to reflect credit upon their Alma Mater. The Investment Facilities of our Insti- tution are at the Service of all who care to earn, to save, and to invest. R534-Za! Charles A. Parcells 64 Co. ' 'Conservative Investments' ' Members: Detroit Stock Exchange New York Curb CAssociatedj 639 PENOBSCOT BLDG. Randolph 3770 Amusement Corp. Offer Complete Service in JEAN GOLDKETTE Orchestras and Entertainment for CONCERTS DAN CES SHOWS CONVENTIONS WEDDINGS and RADIO PROGRAMS EXCLUSIVE REPRESENTATIVES of JEAN GOLDKETTE and I-Iis VICTOR RECORDING ORCHESTRA McKinney's Cotton Pickers Henry Biagini and his , Orchestra Fred Be g d Vagab d Breeze Bl Tom D h d H Myron Sch l New YO I' Jack R a H Jack McGay R bl Vene E bl -I G rner D Ray Gorrell Th Studebaker Ch mpions KGWIIJ Also Operators of Graystone, Edgewater Park and Blue Lantern Ball Rooms 812113 Book Tower Cherry 23oo 333 TELFER FOREST CLEANERS 64 DYERS INCORPORATED Ci Hzgh Grade Coffee 533 E. Eorest Avenue 1364 Lafayette Cadillac 0181 Cvlumbia 4200 Dffroir 1 1F1R1-31 EIRE! FIRE! A We know that some ladies try to economize hy cleaning their own garments at home with naphtha. This is very dangerous and false economy. So many have . 1 1 mqet with deathlor destruction to their homes or disfigured 'if if -i"' A a li -TESL .: t emse ves for ifer far-ae 1 To prevent this false economy, we will save you the risk E V4,,Q , , hy cleaning only your dresses and other articles, saving you Z ? ,,.. ,,..... 1 5 fhiS dun UOUS rowdure, and Ou mn do Our Own -.-- . -:i::'e3s3? --- ""'- a2-. - : ---e ' a ,..:r:"-Y ' x -'-2 --X'F?1!'1v-eil - 1 g P Y y Y 1 IAVQ I ..a,. ZEEEEED E .rra an p rc ss i n g. ,,1, at 5 LA MEASURE t y , 1, . I 14504 540 sf Drop in Woodward at S f 2 lVl1le Road -a'1f Tyqn g .. Lafayette zzoo I IRST DETROIT Comp INCORPORATED 735 ORIS WOLD STREET - CI-It-:fry 6930 NEW YORK BOSTON CHICAGO LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO INVESTMENT UNITNDETROIT BANKERS COMPANY 334 30,000 Kinds and Sizes Of Equipment Metalworking Machinery Woodworking Machinery Material Handling Equipment Electric Tools and Motors Gears-3,ooo Kinds and Sizes Tools of Every Description Welding Equipment Grinding Wheels Aluminum-Brass-Copper Bolts-Nuts-Screws-Washers Drop Eorged Tools Pulleys--Hangers-Bearings Leather Belting-Balata Belting Wire Rope-Manila Rope and Many Other ltems The Chas. A. Strelinger Co. 149 East Larned Street Detroit A Proving Ground in a Circle of Service Since 1886, NVestinghouse has been the proving ground for everything electrical. Through its extensive research facilities and broad engineering experience, Wrest- inghouse has discovered and applied basic electrical principles which have been far-reaching in their economic effects. A Westinghouse was founded on the policy of service. Time has tested and proved the worth of that policy. That XVesting- house skill in design, care in manufacture, and follow-through in service are valued by our customers is shown by the fact that the circle of service is expanding every year. WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC 81 MFG. CO. 5757 TRUMBULL AVE. DETROIT, MICHIGAN estinghouse 1iCSI.dl'Ilf'6' ofJuiIl1'11rd lilirke, Buqvrzzs, Ulzio Colorful Stone Homes at oderate Cost In the delightful all-stone house pictured above, Briar Hill Golden Tone Ashlar was used for the exterior walls complete--at a cost of less than 01,000 Just visualize your artistic "dream home" individualized with the soft, natural colors obtainable only in this exquisite wall facing. With its mellow, yet radiant beauty, Briar Hill harmoniously blends colorful distinction with enduring character and charm. Its rare, natural color combinations plus a diversity of fine surface textures provide an exceptional opportunity for original design. And now, reduced production costs and nation-wide distribution make this unique Ashlar Wall Facing available even for moderate-priced residences without penalizing the building budget. An interesting free illustrated booklet of Briar Hill natural stone homes awaits your request. It contains valuable information for the prospective home builder and a full-color reproduction of this famous sandstone. No cost or obligation-just ask for Bulletin TM. The BRIAR HILL STONE CO Glenmont, Ohio See Our Catalog in Sweet's was fe -I s is 1 5-if-ififgfssi... semi?-ia. sm. Mmm Z... M. I ...is Qiseuwttsiiartsaat swag We Q W E gg i Zagggggmtawsssqeiim Q 'sg aa, .msn -W- W GOLDEN TONE F W sANDs'roNE lzzsl WAGNER BRAKE SERVICE We Repair f f Reline f f Adjust and Guarantee our Work Q Qi Eree adjustment for one year on all Hydraulic Brakes relined by us. Q Q FREE INSPECTION Q Q WAGNER BRAKE SERVICE Wagner Electric Corporation 2843 E. Grand Blvd, Northway O21-I IB.. CC. WETZEL S CO., Architects 3? 3 7-2318 DIME SAVINGS BANK BUILDING DETROIT, MICH. Compliments of cz Friend H3263 Brennan Truck Co. Storage and Carta ge 15o4 Second Ave., Detroit, Michigan 32, Phones Cadillac 1018 - Cadillac mg SEQ, Teams and Motor Trucks Extending our compliments to the graduates of the University of Detroit Q Tgis B's:I3hcEBl2at1sf Ga Woodward at Congress Corriclc Bros., lnc. MASTER ,W Mustard Pickles Vinegar Relishes General Contractors on Aerodynarnical Laboratory and Addition No. 1 , 'L' to Engineering Building ,X 7155 Randolph 2934 507 Gwen Building 'I' H . D U P Y C Detroit, Michigan of DETRGIT H337 DCDNALDSON 64 MEIER Duncan 65 Smith Incorporated fl r c li i t e c t s 15 IP4- ' , I , H88 First National Bank Building Distinctive Furniture DETRQIT, MICHIGAN for Oljlices and Homes F 145 W. Larned Street Compliments of ci Friend W. DUNCAN, HERBERT BUHLER, President Sec'yfTrec1s. RESULTS... Not PRICE . . . Determine the Cost Are you getting the hest results from your heating plant? . FREE! FREE! Without cost to you our Heating Expert will he glad to check your heating plant. I-Ie has shown many how to save from IOIZP to ZOWD. Avail yourself of this free service. just call or drop postal to "Fuel Expert". Fitzroy 4380 STERLING CQAL CQMPAN Y fl 'Yard Near 'You I.. fl. DEHAYES, President fl. NIEPER, Secretary H3333 WM. L. DAVIS at CQMPANY , X , Investment Bankers F li D li R A L Members of Detroit Stock Exchange PP PP 6 V V1 BUHL BUILDING We number among our customers DETROIT some of the largest schools and inf dustries in Detroit and its environs. Qur price is reasonable, our work WM. C. RoNI5Y Co. Menzbers Detroit Stock Exchange 2228-43 Union Trust Building Phone Cherry 67oo excellent. Should you be dissatisfied from a viewpoint of economy or quality wirh your present printer, submit your work to us for an estimate. V V 6202 Hamilton Avenue Nladison 5973 The George R. Cooke Company ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 77 77 44 44 y DETROIT 12 1 6 Penobscot Bldg. Cherry 2902 H3393 CD CD CD Cl? DETRQIT CREAMERY CCD. Cass and Cvrand River Randolph 4000 CD O Cl? GJ FRANKFISHEEN lieal Ifstate Compliments of 2349 First National Bank Bldg. gl friend Randolph 0270 WILLIAM E. E. gc L A R K INVESTMENT BANKING Specializing in I-IighfGrade Land Contracts and Mortgages Reference: First National Bank Established 1920 1316 Dime Bank Building Cadillac 2341 Cadillac 1886 For many years we have so1d dry goods on the basis of qual- ity and economy. Our store is in close proximity to the West- ern Market. Dry Goods. Men's Furnishings, Ladies' Ready-to-Wear. and Floor Coverings Let us give you the service that our customers have en- joyed for years. Quality Service Economy ALBERT LUTTICKE CO. 2572 Michigan Avenue WALLACE st c0MPANY PENOBSCGT BUILDING D E T R O I T MEMBERS Detroit Stock Exchange H340H Frank S. Tobias Incorporated 16428 Woodward Ave. Ford Sales and Service Longfellow 79oo Compliments of Puritan Cvarden Cafe 3004 West Cmrand Boulevard Northway 4010 "AL" THE BUTCI-IEA ALLAN L. M1LL1CvAN 7719 Charlevoix Avenue D. KARLE co. Dodgefs Dodgw Manufacturers and jobbers Plymouth H 0 T E L Kitchen and Dining Room C A M' P U S Equipmgng 16809 Livernois Avenue Ch' , G1 d lsawxiisn sAues,1Nc. H I ,Q 8 Soda Fountains and Supplies em OC 97 1 Macomb and Brush Streets Cherry 249o Detroit 7020 Fenkell Avenue Longfellow 9696 Detroit, Mich. Single 86.50 and up. Double 88.00 and up. - Edgewood 6o86 Edgewood 5644 RGYAL QAK Toot AND MACHINE co. EAST SIDE GEAR N, AND TDOL COMPANY . :Nm 9970 MANUFACTURERS OF Tools, Dies, jigs, Fixtures, Special Machinery A W jigs, Fixtures, Tools General Machine Repairing, Gecl7'S and jVIcZrLufclCtu7'irlg Designing .352 2981 Charlevoix Avenue DETROIT, MICHIGAN 631 East Fourth St. Telephone 1080 Royal Oak, Michigan 1134111 'o al university ot Detroit Students, especia y those in the Departments ot Advertising and Journalism we extend a most cordial invitation to visit our new business home. Here you will observe, at first hand, the many modern mechanical processes employed in the pro- duction of printed advertising and publications. And, if you are interested, a detailed explanation will be gladly given concerning the numerous opera- tions required to complete this issue of the "Tower", which came from the presses illustrated above. For those who wish to supplement class work with a knowledge of practical practice we are ofthe opinion that a visit to our plant will be well worth while. I P' 1 I SATURDAY NIGHT PRESS- INC. Direct Advertising sv General Printing I959 EASTJEFFERSON AVENUE STAMPINGS DISC WHEELS EOR JUVENILE VEHICLES Q3 FIRST OPERATION BLANKS OUR SPECIALTY Q3 STEEL MATERIALS CO 17260 Gable Detroit, Michigaxm Lincoln 5075-6-7 ALL PHOTOGRAPHS IN THIS I YEARBOOK TAKEN By Kfjgtigif I POZBTQAJY75 106 RAD sb 115 .1 09 Q 'lntunn' 4' I: ' s 5 QIIIIIIE 'bg fr lON,0F P Randolph 7127 1514 Woodward Avenue, Woodward Arcade 342 National Production Co Precision Manufacturers Special Machinery -Tools Dies and Eixtures Compliments of JUDGE HENRY S. SWEENY Recorcler's Court 4561-46o3 St. lean Avenue Detroit, Mich Lenox 3314--3315-3316 Arlington 0365 F, Compliments of the Every Day in fha Year fy Ed LIVERNDIS MARKET "Quality Foods with a Reputation" Purveyors to G' M- TAYLUR, Inc. UNIVERSITY or DETROIT ST. FRANCIS HOME and HANLEY TAYLOR 3203 Davison A E MARYGRUVE CULLEGE Class 1930 Detroit 15210 Livernois Avenue, at Eenlcell . U' McMillan Co. bring rare imports from every corner of the World for your table, as Well as staple foocl stuffs and outfoffseason vb delicacies 44 RANDQLPI-I 88oo WGQDWARD at EQRT 1 534311 dl o .lrsim sr Ullier Again" QUE are America's largest school annual designers and engravers because we render satisfaction on more than 400 books each year. Intelligent co-operation, highest quality workmanship and on-time deliveries created our reputation for dependability. JAHN 8: OLLIER EN GRAVIN G CO. Tbotograpbers, Artists and Makers of Fine Printin Plates for Black or Colors. 817 W. Washington Boulevard - Chicago Telephone MONROE 7080 ff .A ' ' 5 X' F 534411 Axford, Lloyd .......... . . . . . . 79 A Grganization and Personal Aaron, Simon ........ ...70, 206, 246, 247 Abbott, Arthur J ..................... 24 Abele, Raymond J. 25, 28, 29, 30, 297, 164, 165 Abramson, Charles .... 71, 242, 243, 272, 273 Acevido A. ........................... 92 Activities Honor Society. . . . . . 118 Adamaszek, John ........ . . . 106 Adamek, William E .... . . . 105 Adams, Anthony J .... . . . 112 Adams, Arthur J.. . . . . 24 Adams, Thomas T. .... .. 258 Adcock, Herbert L.. . . . . 75 Adelman, Louis C... . .. 70 Adelman, Oscar ................ . . . 64 Administration ....................... 115 Adrian College Basketball Game .... 213 215 Adspirers Club ........................ 290 Aeronautical Society ........... .... 2 96 Ager, Sam E .... ...... . .. 91 Agnew, John R. ...... .......... 1 02 Agree, Allan G. ............... 91, 246 247 Aitchison, Gordon .................... 112 Albion College Basketball Game .... 210 212 Aldrich, Jerome J. .................... 100 Aldus, Paul J. ...... .......... 7 1 Alfonso, Matias J, .... .... 3 0, 293 Allan, Robert E. ...... . .. 92 Allen, Francis W ..... 24 Allen, John V ..... . ......... 100 Allen, Ray Lee ..... .... 3 0 245 Allen, Samuel J. .... ...... 1 05 Allstin, Norman ....... .. . 95 Allyn, Frederick G. .... . . . 248 Alpena Club ......... 303 Alpern, Anne S. ........ . . . 281 Alpha Sigma Tau Key .... ........ 1 59 Alpha Kappa Psi Cup ................ 161 Alsobrook, Anthony L .... ..75, 30 261 Altenberger, Walter F. ............... 102 Altenburger, Clarence L. ..... . . . 25 Alter, Albert L ....... .... . . . 100 Altman, David H. ........ .......... 1 05 Altman, Peter .....,........... 25 276 277 Ameel, Francis H ..... ............. 7 3 American Institute of Electrical Engineers ..................... 297 Amiot, Gerald J. ................. 100 Anderson Arthur W.. .30, 188, 266, 158 Anderson, Charles L ....... ............ 1 11 Anderson, Edmund E. ................. 81 Anderson Edward ..... 110 Anderson, Edwin W .... 105 Anderson Everett .... 113 Anderson Ferdinand . . . 105 Anders, Fred S ....... 110 Anderson, George T .... 112 Anderson, Harry J. .... 102 Anderson James J. .... ......,. 1 10 Anderson LeRoy ..... ............ 7 2 Anderson, Melvin J.. .. .... 80, 254, 255 Anderson Walter B.. . . ....... . . . 90 Andre, William P. .... ....... 7 3 Andrews, Edward .... .......... 1 06, 135 Andrews, Harry C.. .. ............ ... 94 Andries, Edward M. ...... 100, 244, 245 129 Andries, Leo J. 30, 118, 129, 131, 135, 137, 244, 245, 262, 263, 284, 285 Andrus, John M.. .. ............. ... 90 Andrus, Richard .... ............... 1 05 Angel, John J. ...... 70 135 Anke, Robert W.. . . ..--- 105 Annas, Henry C .... 86 Annis, Edward R. .... . . . 100 Apfel, Joseph .......... ... 112 Archambault, Ernest J.. . . . . . 111 Architectural Society. . . . . . Arehart, Burke W ..... .i....i. - Arellano, Ricardo .... Argon Trophy ......... Ariola, Francisco D.. .. Armora, Louis G.. . . . Arnold, John E. . .. ...... . . . . . . Aronson, Robert .... ..... 9 1, 276, Arthur, Alonzo M. ..... ......... . Arthur, Harold M ........... .. Arts and Science Sodality .... .. Ashley, Warren F. ...... . Ashman, Evan T. ........... .. Assessor, Albert J. ................... . Associated Evening Classes ........... Associated Evening Classes Basket Ball Associated Evening Class Bowling ..... Associated Evening Classes Hockey .... Assumption College Basketball Game.. Atendido, German Athanson, William J. ..... . Athletic Board ......... . . . Atlee, Ralph E. ....... . Atlivaick, Leroy L. . . . . Auch, Melvin F .... . . . Auker, Palmer L. ........ . Aurrecoechea, Julius Avram, Peter C ...... .. Aylesworth, Arthur Axelrod, Reuben ....... Ayres, David W ....... B Babula, Edward B. ..... . Babcock, John W ...... Babula, Edward B.... Backelant, Andrew P .... Bacon, C. Baldwin .... .. R .... B .... .30, 75, 260, . . .108, 260, . . .91, 276 93 ....287 1 1 Bader, Paul F. .... .... 9 5,129,137 Bahorski, George S. .................. . Bailey, Thomas J.... ..... 98, 99, 108 Baisier, Leon ...... ....... 2 1, 270 Bair, Charles F. ..... ...... . Baird, E. Whitney ..... .. Baker, Henry W. .... Baker, John T .... ....... Baker, William M .... .... 3 0 Baldwin, Cole ....... ....... Baldwin, Henry C .... ......... Ball, John M. ..... ...86, 286 Ballbach, Irvin F ...... ..... 7 4 Ballreich, James L ..... ....... Balsley, Clyde K ..... .. ..... Balter, Nathan ........ ...91, 246 Bamford, Charles E.. . . Band, The ......... Bantin, Harold Barak, Herbert G.. Barba, 'Leonard J.. . . .70, 272, 7 Barber, Kenneth M. .... . ....... .. Barber, Lawrence F ..... .......... 1 02, Barbour, Edmund J. ...... 71, 187, 266, Barden, Terence W. .................. . Barera, Lawrence A. . . . . . Barilar, Peter T. ....... .. Barkey, Herman D ..... .... Barlow, Alfred L ..... .. ..... .. Barlow, John E., S. J .... ..... 2 1, Barnes, Charles H ..... ...... Barnes, L. ............... . . Barnhardt, Wilford Barnhorn, Harold J. .... . Barnum, Lee R ...... Barr, George ....... Barry, Clifford W .... Barry, Edward A. . . . . Barry, John J .... . . Barten, Howard C ...... Bartlett, Dudley P ..... Bartolomei, Frank ..... Barton, Jane C.. . . . . ll345Jl H ..... . . . . . .81,276 . . .s0, aisle., 73 161 106 105 100 277 106 75 150 102 23 113 298 234 236 235 207 105 261 123 261 87 106 113 112 100 24 91 277 92 288 24 103 106 147 141 250 169 271 95 111 105 113 25 139 113 287 248 87 100 247 113 138 100 273 94 92 95 267 110 87 100 79 80 22 89 104 112 93 113 277 113 105 100 257 113 102 103 Index Barton, John W.. . .. Barton, Stewart S.. . . . Barton, Thomas J.. . . . Baser, Willis L.. . . . Basketball ......... Bassi, Agapito L .... Bates, Curtis L .... . Bates, J. Leslie ...... Battat, Robert C.. . . . Baughman, Eldridge. . . Baum, Wilbert C .... .... Bauman, Anthony A.. . . . ....71 Bauman, Bernard E. .... . . . . .. Baumann, Richard J. ........... . Bauser, Dolly .... 71, 122, Bayer, Harry C. ....... . Beale, Joseph R .... Beale, Robert .... .. Beall, John M ...... Beat, Joseph M .... . Beattie, Clayton D.... Beaupre, Waldo J .... . Beauvais, Charles J.. . . Beaver, Harold F.. . . Bechek, Morton ..... Beck, Harold A.. . . Beck, Joseph Beck, Lyle M.. . . . . Becker, Grant E ...... Bedell, Charles P ..... Beer, Joseph F.. . . . Beer, Marion Behen, John J ...... .. Bekema, Nicholas P .... .. Belanger, Ernest E ..... Belch, Frank S. ..... . Belknap, Warren F.. .. Bell, John M ...... Bell, Ralph T. ...... . Bellaimey, James E' ..... Bellamah, Edward J. . . . . Bellanca, James V ...... Bellehumeur, Marcel F.. .. Beltramo, Armand A.. . . . Bender, Joseph H ..... Benn, Richard B.... Bennane, John M .... . Bennane, Joseph M .... Bennett, Elliot W .... . 154, 230 .ml 135 ....86 ....74 .79 .79 222 274 139 286 246 1 2 1 1 9 9 ....30, 292 .f f fffff5sl,' bb' .92, 169, 264 .......31, 286 .72, 256, 257 .....100, 286 139 ...112, ........ ... .....69, 75 ....91, 264 Bennett, John B. ............... 98, 99 Benson, Thomas F. 84, 85, 94, 168, 266 Bentkowski, Witold E. . . . Bentley, Howard C.. . .. Benz, Dorothy M. ..,,. , Berberich, Edward V ..... Beres, John C .... ....... Berg, Joseph A. .,... . Berg, Louis J ........ Berger, Julius W ....... Bergeron, Felix A .... .... Bergin, Edward S., S. J.. Bergo, Howard L ..... Berkowitz, Louis .... . Berman, Louis. . . . . . . . Beran, Meyer H ...... .. Bernadotte, Joseph L .... Bernard, Donald Bernard, Florence 31, 122, 126, 171 Bernard, Maxwell ........ Bernert, Peter M ..... .. Berry, Charles B.. .. Berry, Harold A.. .. Berry, Joseph E.. . . . Bertling, Lee A .... Bethune, Harry R .... Bettiga, Francis E.. . . . Best, Felix F. ..... . Beveridge, Bruce G.. .. Beyer, Elmer L.. . .. ....31, 280 ...84, 95 A ...... ............. 179, 274, 275, ....73, 268 106 30 89 205 95 80 104 224 110 90 70 95 95 275 110 79 141 95 91 112 74 287 113 247 110 104 103 293 93 100 265 287 304 287 305 87 112 102 31 248 31 113 112 135 265 141 102 104 111 267 112 112 281 112 106 31 196 31 31 20 87 90 110 S7 100 112 307 112 80 31 103 86 31 92 112 103 100 305 Boyer, Beyer, Norman ....... .... 2 68 Beyer, Raymond B .... ...71 305 Bialys, Carl K. ..... . . . 72 Bick, Richard C. .... ....... 1 04 Bicum, John E. .... ....... 9 3 Bida, Michael A. .... .71, 135 306 Biderman, Alvin.. ....... 89 Bielhy, John R ..... 108 Bielfield Milton ..... ........ 1 12 Biggs, Lawrence E.. . ...... . 73 Binder, Kenneth 104, 105 141 Bindy, Harry L. .... ....... 7 3 Binkowski, Caesar ...... ...... 1 12 Binney, David A .... ...... ....... 9 4 Birney, Jolm T ....... 74, 234, 235, 266 267 Birnitt, Elmer NV. ........ ........ 3 0 Bischoff, Charles F. ..... ...... 1 12 Bishop, Clarence L.. .. . . .32 266 Bishop, Kinder K.. . . .... 112 Bissell, John J.. .. .. . 74 Bizall, John .... .. 235 Block, Dugald .... .. 110 Blades, Floyd G.. .. .... .. 72 Blakeslee, Bert N .... ..... 2 5 120 Blakeslee, Robert L. .... ....... 2 5 Blanchard, Robert W' ...... .32, 250 251 Blandford, Roger J. 92, 137, 141, 153, 292 293 Blank, Sylvia 111. ........ 102, 230, 274, 275 Blas, Petronila ....................... 95 Blaskiewicz, Francis J. .... . . . 100 Bleshoy, Maurice E. ...... 81 Bliss, College Basketball Game. .. . 217 Bliss, Frank G. ........... 89 Bloom, Jefferson D. J ..... . . . 112 Blum, Donald F. ....... . . . 70 Blum, Leo W .... . 104 Blundy, Philip J. .... 91 Boate, John VV ...... .. . . . 112 Bobrowski, Frank H .... . 72 Bocci, Jerome J ..... . .. . . . 100 Bockrath, George E.. .. . . . . 113 Boehm, Glennon P .... .. ....... 113 Boeringer, Arthur EI .... . ..... 178, 228 Boersig, Jack F. .................. 103 258 Boes, Pierre J. .... 28, 29 32, 152, 282, 283 Boggiano, Robert A ....... ............. 8 9 Bohland, Charles A .... .... 8 9, 92, 199 Bohner, George T.. . . ....... . . 106 Boileau, Elmer L. ...... 107 Boismier, Francis VV .... . . 102 Bojarski, Edmund J.. .. . 70 Bolha, Valentine ..... , . 70 Bolis, Paul F. ....,.. .. . 100 Bolong, Olimpio S ..... ...... 9 1 Bolton, Craig E ...... . . .93 100 Bonawit, Oby J. .... ,,,, 1 05 Bondy, Leo J. .... , , , 103 Bondy, Oswald J. .... .. 111 Bondy, Roy ............ . . . 73 Bonikowski, Edwin A.. . . . . . 100 Bonkowski, Edmund J. . . , , , 80 Bonoan, Juan B .... .... . .. 100 Boogs, Donald F. ....., .... . .. . . . . 100 Boone, Ralph VV. 72, 118, 126, 129, 137, 139, 166, 167, 242, 243, 254, 255, 262, 263, 135, 299 Boos, John L. ........................ 32 Booth, George E. ...... 81 Boothroyd, Harold C.. .. ............ 25 Bopp, Bernard L. ..................... 113 Borchard, Charles G ....... 71, 137, 290 291 Borgel, Bernard F. .... ............ 1 04 Borger, Floyd R., Jr... ...72, 137 141 Borkowski, John F .... . ......... 74 Borninski, Julian S. ..... ....... 8 9 Bossenberger, John C .... .... 1 09 193 Bossman, Lawrence J.. . ....... 107 Bothwell, James H.. .. ...... ... 80 Boucher, Roman E. .... .. .32, 284 285 Boughner, Daniel T. .... ..,,,,, 3 2 Bourgeois, Frank J. .... , 72 Bourke, Cecil M .... . .. ,, , 94 Bourke, William J. .... ., , 102 Bouscaren, Timothy L... 24 Bousquet, Kenneth J.. . . ,, 107 Bouteiller, Harold J. . . . , , , 75 Bowers, Herbert L. .... ,, 72 Bowman, David J .... . ,, 106 Bowman, Ned .... Bowman, Paul Boyd, Gilbert NV. . . .. Boylan, VVilliam A.. .. Patrick VV.. . .. Braasch, Gordon A.. . . . Brachman, A'VZlll l'.. . . B racken . J ack R. .... Brady, Charles li... Brady, Francis J.. . Brady, Frank J .... .. Brady, Lawrence P.. . Brady, Louis J. ..... . Brake, Merle A .... ... Brandwine, Morris J.. .. Brannack, Jack Braund, Cedric H... . ....89, 290 ....l08, 361: ....95, 244 Bray, Anthony T. .................... Brazil, Lloyd F .... 1 2, 118, 182, 206, 248 Breault, Alfred VV ....... Brecht, Lloyd J. . .. Breen, Jack F.. . . . Brehler, Joseph C. . . . Breisch, Kenneth E .... Brenaman, Dio D. ...... .. .......... 93, Brennan, James M. 70, 123, 126, 128, 129, 131, 115, 242, 243, 250, 251 Brennan, Vincent, Hon.. Brennan, Benjamin. . . Brenner, Harry H... . . Brereton, Joseph A. . .. Brescoll, George P.. .. H Bresnahan, John T. ....... . . . Bresnahan, VVilliam J.. . . . Brewer, James L ....... .... Brickel, Alfred G., S. J.. .. ...... . . Bridenstine, Louis H. ..... . . . . . . Bridgman, Allan A.. . . . Briehl, Joseph A.. . .. .....74, 266 Brigham, James R. ....... 79. 256, 257 Brightwell, James T .... ....... 9 5, 270 Brill, Harold R .... Brisbois, Edward S.. . . Bl'1SSO11, Joseph C. .... . Britt, James J. ..... 100 95, 135. 160, 144, 159, 166, 167, 259, 262, 263 Britt, Lawrence V. 95, 98, 99, Broder, Harry C ..... . . . Broderick, Charles D.. . Brogan, William F... Bronder, Clarence N.. . . Brooke, Flavius L... Brooks, Robert J .... . Brotz, Albert J .... Brown, George F .... . Brown, Harvey .... Brown, Herman.. . Brown, James ..... Brown, Joseph A ..... Brown, Lyndon O.. . . Brown, Neil W .... . Brown, Norton M .... Brozae, Edmund ..... Brozo, Freeman . . . Bruce, John 111. ..... . Bruce, Marshall .... Brune, VVilliam .... Brunswick, Louis .... Brushaber, Charles ..... Brys, Herman L.. Brzosto wski, Joseph S. 72, 86, 2.42, 243, 288 Buch, Morris M .... .... 135, 169, 258 . 72, 254, 255, . ....... 21 ....71, 187 ... .33, 248, Buchinger, William .................. Buckley, VVilliam C Buchman, Eugene .... Buckman, J. Harry. .. Buchta, Clarence G.. . .. Budman, Albert M. . . . . Bueker, Oliver A.. .. Buffalo Club ......... Buissono, James H.. . .. Buist, Burnett W... .. Bujak, . ...... 100, 151, ......112, ' 248 . ......... 04 292 146, Edward ....... Bunetta, Marie H.. . Burbank, Stanley I' Burch, Albert J ........ 11346 109, 126, 274 1 ........ ........ . . 291 94 25 110 113 100 2111 lllll 87 245 87 73 111 24 81 71 102 24 249 32 86 95 107 104 139 179, 24 106 113 113 79 101 87 32 21 200 267 71 304 271 235 113 137 258, 259 112 95 110 95 33 112 33 304 178 107 102 64 248 248 92 72 112 87 137 95 94 249 86 wc - ...,S 71 33 249 90 194 S9 109 106 303 113 293 81 275 102 113 Burg, Millard M ...... Burgund, Gilbert J.. . . Burkard, Edward J.. .. Burkardt, Richard A.. . Burke, Charles L. . . . . . Burkert, Frederick E.. . Burke, Paul J. ........ Burke, Thomas J. . . . . Burnett, Elmer ..... Burns, John S .... Burns, Matthew A .... Burns, Richard H.. . . . Burnstrum, , Leroy M. . . Burr, Kenneth R. .... . Burroughs, Carrofl A... Bush, Arthur E. .... . Buss, Leo E .... . . Buss, William H .... Butiu, Constantin .... Bussiere, George Butcher, Donald ..... Butcher, Leslie .... Butcher, VVilliam ..... Butler, Michael Butler, Bancroft G... .. Butler, M. Clement... Byrne, Bernard J.. . . . Byrne, Howard E .... Byrne, John B.... C Cahalan, John C. 37, 126 Cahill, Martin B. ..... . Cairns, Archie ........ . Calfm, William ...... Callahan, James D .... Callahan, Hiram ....... Cameron, Clare A... . . Cameron, Herbert A.. .. Cameron, Hugh E.. . .. Cameron, Raymond R.. . Camon, Fausto S. .... Campau, Walter P.. . . . Campbell Anna A.. . . . Campbell, Arthur B.. .. Campbell, John C ..... Campbell, John F.. . . Campbell, John P .... . . Campbell, Walter G.. .. Canaan, Joseph A... . . Canfield, Gladys H.. . Cannon, John P.. .. Capham, Caplan, Leo G.. . . . Benjamin .... Capstick, William M... Carey, Brendau J.. . . . Carl, Robert O.... ....1u2, 126, .......292, ....33, 256 ...,21, 252 ....71, 266 ....201,266 ....123, 178 ....33, 256 127, 129, 130, .. .53 ....34, 102 280 ...78, 80 1 256 ....89 266 I ..... .89 Carlson, Carl A .... ................... Carney, Donald F, 10 135, 179, 262 1 284 1 Carothers, Clarence E. .............. .. Carpenter, VVilliam J.. .. Carolin, Patrick J. ..... ........ . 90, Carr, Albert C ...... . ............... . Carr, Kenneth H.. .. .... 34, 258, 259 Carrey, Redmund F .... ...... 1 00, 220, Carrigan, Thomas J.. . ...... . . . Carroll, Clifford J.. . . . . . Carroll, Francis T .... ....... . Carroll, James M. .... ............ . . Carroll, James T. .... ...86, 150, 160, Carson, Wallace J.... ...... 98, 99, Carter, Robert M.... Cartier, Harold F. .... ..34, 256 Cartmell, John J .... . ....... . Cascarelli, Sam .... ...... Case, Russell A. ...... .... 1 12, Casenhiser, Edwin O .... ............... Cashen, Raymond R. ................. . Cashin, John L..34, 129, 135, 262, 263, Cassel, Edward M ....... .............. Cassidy, Joseph D...109, 258, 259, 268, Cassube, Richard L .................... Castonguay, Thomas T.. .. .... 25, 113, Catalano, Anthony J. . . . . Cataldo, Charles R .... 113 106 95 86 92 100 107 129 293 100 101 100 95 79 95 257 86 89 33 33 95 267 209 224 267 215 112 257 90 135 79 95 71 107 104 139 107 112 33 113 223 281 113 257 81 267 113 95 64 270 111 70 112 86 94 159 302 113 79 141 94 300 224 113 102 89 95 270 107 86 257 108 137 139 106 64 301 102 269 91 298 70 73 Catanese, Samuel J.. .. Catherwood, Gladys ...... Caton, Harold F .... Caton, J. Douglas .... Cattey, Bernard J... . Cecil, Doris ........ Ceconi, Elmer J. .... . Cefay, Anthony F.. .. Ceglarek, Wallace.. . Cetnar, William B.. .. .3-l, 280, 281 .........286 ......80, 256 ...113 ......112 ....34, 252 Challender, Clyde J.. .. ..... . . . .. Chaman, VValter E .... . . . ...... . . . . Chapman, Bernard A ..., ...78, 80 Chapman, Earl H .... . . . .... . . . . Chapman, Charles H. ............... . . Chapp, Edndn As.7L 207,223,224,26Q Chapp, Eugene J .... ...... 9 9, 109, 244 Charbonneau, Flaget F .... ............ Charbonneau, Louis H.. .. . .. . . . . . . Chase, Henry O ........ . . . Daniel, John R. .......... . ..... 99, Checcola, Victor J. . . . . Cheerleaders ........ Chekal, Fabian P. ......... .... . .. Chemical Society ......... Chi Delta Theta Architectural Key .... Chi Sigma Phi Key ......,........... . Chinoski, Walter J .... ....... 3 4, 248 Chosid, Sam .............. 91, 100, 276, Chowning, William P .... Chrisholm, Ronald M. . .. Christian, Peter J.. . . . Christian, Robert W.. . . . Christian, William C.. . . . Churchman, Norman Chylinski, Nicholas J. .... . Cicatto, John H. ....... . Ciesielski, Anthony C.. .. Cislo, Stanislaus J ..... Civil Engineering. . . . Cleary, P. .... 100 Clancy, George J.. .. ........ Clark, Cornelius H... . .... . . . . . . Clark, Everett O. .... .... 3 4, 292 Clark, George B... . .... . . .81 Clark, John M .... . . . Clark, Morris J... . . . . Clark, Ralph A ...... .. Clark, Thomas C. .... . . Clark, NVilfred H.. . . . . Clarke, Basil S. ...... .... . Clarke, Herbert J. .... ..... 9 4 Clarke, Joseph F ..... .......... Clary, Dennis J. .... .... 3 4, 250 Claus, Theodore O.. . . Owen J ..... Clement, Paul R. ..... . Clement, Raymond P.. .. Clements, William A.... Cleminson, John Clephane, Millard .... Cleveland Club .... Clifford, John E.. Clifford, Joseph P .... . Clinton, Laurence J.... ....72 ....266 100, 235, 286 . . . .100, 137 Closey, VVilliam M. .... .......... . Clossey, John . .....72 Clubs ............ ..... Coaching Staff ....... Co-ed Basket Ball .... Co-Ed Sodality ...... . .. Co-Ed Club ......... . . . Coffey, Thomas A .... . . Cogan, Roy J.... Cohen, Cyril A. .... ................ . Cohen, Herman J. ............. 70, 272, Cohen, Jack A ....... 35 242, 243, 246, Cohen, Maurice D. ............. 74, 272 Cohen, Morris ..... ........ Cohen, Sydney L. . . . . . . Cohen, VValter B. .... . . Colasimo, Frank A. . . . Cole, Thomas V. .... . Cole, Vincent P.. .. Coleman, Stanley .... Collins Cecil H. ..... . Collins, Charles P. . . . Collins, Edward F. . . . Collins Frank J. .... . 72 307 287 257 102 280 70 70 254 253 103 107 292 112 71 267 245 110 24 102 73 180 113 298 158 158 249 277 113 108 94 100 111 102 138 103 79 100 299 104 100 293 304 113 100 113 107 111 102 248 74 251 112 268 267 34 90 71 113 304 287 93 141 282 90 295 177 230 154 307 80 102 100 273 247 273 75 111 35 105 35 100 104 95 104 74 94 Crouch, Robert C .... ........ 7 9, Crowley, Eileen M. .... .... 1 00, 171, Cru, Paul ........... ........... Cruden, Raymond Cullen, Bertram H .... ......... Cullen, Orville E. .... ...35, 282, Cullen, Robert L... . ........ Culver, VVard ........ . Cumming, Wallace .... , ,, Cummings, Lynn R. .... Cuncich, Frank R. ....... . . Cunningham, Adelbert ll .... Cunningham, Doyle ...... Cunningham, James VV .... Cunningham, John L.. . . Cunningham, Joseph lJ . . . Curley, Leo T. ........ . 284 85 Collins, John F, 28, 29, 35, 118, 240, 241, 242 2-13 266, 267, 298 Collins, Lawrence E ...... ............ 2 3 Collins, Marcus H.. .. .35, 266 267 Collins, Theodore J .... .......... 1 10 Colosirno, Frank A ..... . . .270 271 Coluccio, Luciano ..... ..,.. 9 0 Columna, Arsenio M .... .. 112 Colwell, Wallace A. ........... .. 65 Comella, John V. .............. .. 35 Commerce K Finance Sodality .... .. 151 Condon, Frank J ........ ........ .... 9 1 Condon, Robert B .... .......... 8 9 Conlan, Paul G. ...... ...70, 135, 284 Conlogue, Stephen C .... ........ 1 13 Conn, Leonard M. .... ........ 1 06 Connolly, John E. ..... .... 9 8, 99, 107 Connolly, Theodore M .... ....... 9 0 Connolly, Thomas J... . .... .. 113 Connors, WVilliam J... , ....... . . . 94 Conrad, Mark L.... .74, 278 279 Conrad, Austin G. .... ........ 7 5 Conrad, Paul C ....... ..... 1 02 Conroy, Frank M.... ........... 23 178 Conway John VV .... .................. 1 09 Conway Philip D ........ 103, 175, 250 251 Conway, Robert M.. . . ............. . . 89 Conway, Thomas G. . . . .. 112 Conyers, Jack R .... .. 106 Cook, Edgar T. ....... ........ 9 2 Cooney, George A ..... ........ 8 6 Cooper, Donald M .... 108, 260 261 Copenhaver, Cleo F.. . . ...... . . 93 Copp, Marion L. .... ........ 1 00 Corbett, Charles C. .... ............... 9 5 Corbett, Edward J.. .. . . .35. 135, 284, 285 Corbett, R. Bernard... 101, 126 135 Corbett, Stephen A.. .. ........ 100 Corbett, Thomas , . ...... . . 65 Corbin, Melvin VV. .... .. 113 Corcoran, John F.. . . . . 112 Cornell, Joseph F. .... .. 113 Cornely, Floyd H. ..... . 90 Corner, XVilliam A. .... .. 100 Cornford, VV. Howard .... .. 100 Corriere, Victor D .... .... .... 1 0 5 Corrigan, Raymond, S. ...21, 22 Coscarelli, Sam R .... ..... .... 1 0 4 Cosgriff, David E. .... .. 90 Cosmopolitan Club .... .... 3 06 Costic, Andrew B.. .. ..... 105 Costigan, Donald C. .... .... 9 5, 270 Costigan, Paul C. ..... ..... 1 13 Cotronis, George H.. .. .. 105 Cotter, George G. ..... .. 109 Cotter, Gerard .. 35 Cottrell, Robert A .... .. 102 Coy, Ashley S. ..... .. 102 Cox, Albert R. .... ,, 111 Cox, Frank T .... . ,, 105 Craig, Jack W ..... ,, 100 Craig, John ......... .... 1 05 Craig, Maxwell A. ..... ..... 1 09 Crawford, Benjamin .... .. .105 106 Crawford, Carl N. .... ..... 9 5 Creagh, Joseph P. .... .. 112 Creagh, Thomas P. .... .. 90 Creason, Lathrop ..... .. 92 Creed, A. M. ............ .. 22 Creighton, Richard L. .... ....... .... 9 5 Cremer, Jack A. ...... ........ 1 00 Crider, Grace P.... 85, 100 304 Crider, Thomas G... . .......... 105 139 Crispo, Charles E. . .. . . . .. 112 Crist, John H .... .. .... 112 Crocker, George J. ..... .. 87 Croker, Warren ......... .. 113 Cronenwett, Howard F.. . . . . 102 Crongeyer, Robert L. .... .. 102 Cronin, Joseph W. ..... ,, 75 Cronin, Paul L.. . . .. 104 Cross, Claire C. ....................... 95 Cross, Eileen K, 35, 122, 126, 129, 140, 154, 230, 274, 275, 307 Cross, Harold C ...... 100, 129, 139, 286 287 Cross, Raymond B. ................... 104 Crossley, Jesse A.. . . .. 104 H3471 Curley, Thomas C. ................. .. Curran, John J. ................... 105 Curry, Paul F .... ...71, 36, 250 251 Cusick, Paul L .... ............... Custer, James R .... . . . . . . Czarnecki, John J. ................ . . . Czerwinski, Sylvester A 70 Q 242, 245, 252, Czizmansky, Charles J. ............... . D Daddons, Anthony J.. .. Dadson, Fred W. ........ 84, 85, 93, Dagostino, Anthony C ...... ........... Dakoske, George A .... ................ Daley, James E ..... .... 6 8, 69, 71, 290, Dallas, Dominic A. .................. . Daly, Charles M. . . . . . D'Amour, John P.. .. ....... . D'Andrea, Remo ..... ........... Danneels, Charles J.. .. .... 36, 290, 4 Dannenbring, Gera Dantzer, Charles Daoust, Leo B.. . . ld G... A. .... .. Darling, Jesse M.... Daro, John G .... . Davidson, Arnold. Davidson, Gordan BI. fff Davidson, Norman. . . . . . Davies, Charles W .... . . . Davis, Julius M.. Davis, Maurice I.. Davis, Robert Davis, Thomas C. ...36, 152, 282 Dawson, John B. .................... . Dayton, Ernest ....................... Dayton, University of Basketball Game 209 Dayton, University of Football Game.. Deady, Rev, Carroll F. .............. . Dean, Ray A. .... . DeBona, John M.. Decker, J. Murray .... 113 Decker, Joseph .... DeClaire, Bernard V .... .... DeFont, Michael F. .... ........... . DeFer, Harry M.. DeFobio, Ethelo. .. DeGalan, Mary E Degnan, Paul R.. DeGrassi, Hallis. . .. .... 74, 234, 266 ......... .100 DeGurse, Thomas .... 86, 286 Dehullu, Robert B. Deigert, Casper J. . . . .... 70, 286 1 1 Delaney, Edward J. ................. .. Delaney, James R ...... 68, 69, 70, 286 Delaney, Roy F .... . .............. Delbridge, Richard Delta Sigma P. Scholarship Key ....... Deltin, John A.. .. Dembeck, Sigismund J. .. . . . . . . . Demchak, Albert C .... . ....... . Demeleski, Earl J. Dempsey, Bruce J... . . DeMunnik, John DeMunnik, Julius Denison, Roland J. . . . .... 98, 99, ........79 J. .... .... 1 12,137 W. ................ . 98, 99, 111, 137, 248 Dennis, Robert VV. . . . . 1 1 112 230 113 , . 103 105 283 112 24 36 113 87 105 141 113 90 86 95 102 141 179 36 112 100 253 90 112 141 100 36 291 95 23 103 91 291 107 105 75 36 94 112 112 111 111 112 94 110 112 283 95 104 216 186 21 108 113 298 100 74 109 71 267 274 112 113 287 287 36 110 287 173 95 159 36 95 102 108 139 298 79 249 107 Fellrath, Charles J. Finn, John A. ....... ....... . . . . Denomine, Jerry .. ....... .. Deo, Morris B ................. 36, 282, DePahna, Roger ...................... DePaul University Football Game ...... Depew, George M. ................. . DePonio, Sylvester Derck, Edward J .... . Deres, John M ...... .... A. .... .. De Reuter, l':irfinio T .... Derin, Max E. ......... . DeRonne, Alfred P .... DeRosiers, Basil J.... DeRyck, Raymond J.. . .. DeSanto, Albert J. ...... . Des Champs, Lawrence J de Sostoa, Fernando C .... de Sostoa, Ignacio A.... de Sostoa, Xavier F .... . De Spelder, Don C... .. Detloff A. J ..... ..... Detlolf, Leonard L .... Dettloff, Aurelia M.. . . Devereux, John F.. .. Devlin, Edward H.. .. ....37, 246 ....71, 137 71, ....111 Devlin, J. Dale .... .... 7 0, 175, Devlin, John ........ ........ Devlin, Mark G .... .. De Waller, Guy W ........ DeWitte, Oswald J. ........... . . D'Haene, Ormand T., S. J. 21, 22, 120, Diamond, Milton J. ........ 79, 80, Diamond, Simon ..... .... 7 1, Dickson, Leo J .... Diegel, Harold F.. . .. Diehl, Harold J... . . .. Diem, John M. ........ .. Diersing, Eugene L...37 Dietrich, Edward A ....... Dietz, Fred A. ..... .. Digby, Hudson W. .... . Di Laura, Chauncey .... Dillon, James F. ..... . Dillon, William ....... Dillworth, George E .... . Di Marco, Cyril Dimmer, George A. .... . Di Natale, Joseph Dinquilian, Aram L. . . . . Dirkas, William J. ..... . Distlerath, Donald H .... Dittmar, Anthony ...... Dittmer, Gilbert F .... Divekar, D. R... . . Diver, Albert E .... Dixon, Lilian M .... .. . Dobelek, John J ...... .... Dobmeyer, Raymond B... Doelle, Buell A. .... .. Doherty, George J. .... . Dolan, Thomas J. ...... . Dombrowski, Edmund J.. Dombrowski, Leonard A.. Domzalski, Bruno F. . .. Donohue, Edmund T .... Donohue, Lawrence E.. Donohue, Florence E .... Donovan, Jeremiah J. 37, 118, 134, 135, 284, 285 Donner, Edward F ...... Donze, Marion B... . . Donze, Raymond B.. . . . Dooley, Genevieve ..... Doolittle, Elmer R.... Dorais, Charles E.. .. ... Doran, Alex J. ..... . Doran, Francis J .... Dornsife, Roy S.. . .. Dorsz, Theodore Doucette, Clarence G.. . . Doucher, Thomas A.. .. Douglas, Frances T.. . .. Douglas, John A.. . . Dowd, Edwin P. . . . Dowd, Lawrence J.. . . Dowd, Leroy F.. . . . . Dowis, Claude P... . . 242, 37, 37, ....103, ....108, ....108, 243, 250 126 256 272 292 256 266 248 260 260 98, 99, .....102, 270 86 . .... 37, 284, ......20, 120, 244, 255, 262, ....37, 290, ..74, 234 248 .....109, 278 ...81. 228, 290, ....108, .. 92, 137 283 112 184 72 37 90 72 106 247 141 112 86 266 92 104 104 104 113 139 108 113 111 95 251 266 72 94 100 129 257 273 108 111 107 87 293 103 257 267 92 249 75 94 261 92 72 91 102 37 261 94 72 112 102 107 107 268 110 95 112 271 100 100 285 121 263 113 107 291 20 110 177 249 37 38 95 95 279 291 89 113 250 102 268 Downie, George ........ Downing, Richard VV. .... Downey, George T ..... Downs, Francis T.. ... Downs, Tiffian ...... Downs, William 'I' ..... Doyle, Doyle, Frank J .... Frank ...... Doyle, George J .... Doyle, Glenn F.. .. Doyle, Helen C .... Dragon, Michael. . . Drake, John O.. .. Dramatic Club ..... Drawe, Frank ....... Drinkaus, Irving E.. . . ... Driscoll, Albert J ...... Drittler, Harvon A. .... Drum, Adolph ........ Druery, VVilliam W .... Duarte, Epifanio A .... DuBois, Edward P. .... . Duckworth, William S.. .. Dudeck, Paul H. ..... . Dudek, Mary A. ...... . .. Dudzinski, Edward C... Duffy, Charles E.. . .. Duffy, Edward J. Dufour, Norman S.. . . Duggan, Bernard L. .......... . Duggan, Ignatius E...87, 137, Duggan, John F .... ......... .95, 264, 79, ....137, 25, ....94, .95, 290, .....91, 108, 260. 25, .95, 274, .....38, .87, 270, 199, 270 Dumanois, Harold C. ...... 71, 248, 249, Duncan, Ellis C...38, 74, 146, 270, 271, Duncan, James .............. ........ Dunham, Harmon W .... . . .21, 22, Dunne, Fred J .... ...... ........ Dunnebacke, Robert S.. . . . .. . . . . . . Dunner, Solomon C .... . .... 89, 246, Dunnigan, Ernest P .... .... 8 7, Dupuie, James ....... ..... Durand, Andrew J... . . . . Dusseau, Roy J .... . . . Dutlio, Walter F. . . . . .. .. . Duttmann, Harry .... ................ Dyer, James R.... .......... 98, 99, Dyer, John E .... ..... 7 4, 175, 234, 250 Dyer, Mansfield M. ................. .. Dysarz, Charles E. . .. .......... . . . . . . Dzieszko, Walter J .... .... 8 6, 252, Dziuba, John F. .... . E Ebert, George L .... Ebert, Gustave H ..... Eberts, Lloyd J ....... Ecevido, Abundia E.. . . Eckel, Earl J ....... Eddy, Clayton A. . . Edmonds, Lee R ..... Edward, Frank W .... Edwards, Harvey D.. . . Egelhoff, John C.. .. Elirich, William D.. . . Ehrlick, Theodore J.. . Ei, Alphonse J. ..... . Eichcn, Orville F. ...... . Eickhorst, Thomas N .... Eilers, Anthony W .... Eisert, Eugene R ..... Eldis, Elliott, Elliott, George .... Ellis, Norman E. . . Arthur J. . . . Eva J .... Elmes, Robcrt. .... . Elsarelli, Elvatz A.. . . Elsliger, Mathew J .... Emmer, David H... .. Engel, John H. ..... .. Engelman, Edmund J.. . . Engineering Society .... Engineering Sodality .... Engle, Oliver D .... . Engle, Ralph J ....... Enright, William C.. . . Epstein, Albert ....... 1134811 ....107, ....80, ...21, 22, 38, 250, ....112, ..72, 244, 38 265 79 80 141 72 228 112 72 112 89 100 72 140 137 291 303 261 113 102 73 38 107 107 275 100 24 89 75 271 271 100 296 300 137 286 113 113 247 211 95 95 107 38 95 111 251 73 81 253 38 106 38 102 113 112 23 101 23 139 88 107 93 64 106 95 23 91 112 95 81 92 95 86 92 87 24 251 299 152 139 104 245 86 Epstein, Jack. ..... . Epstein, Samuel C.. Erdos, Joseph A. 68, 69, Erickson, Gunnar Ernest, Dayton F.. . .........65, 70, 272 75, 173, 236, 248, 249 C. .............. 112 1 1 s Erni, Walter A ........ . . Erskine, Robert A.. Ervin, David E ..... ...... Esper, Leo G.. . . . ....38 Essi, Philip. .......... . . . Estrada, Hilario L ..... . Ettinger, Edward F Ettinger, Paul A ..... . Evans, Francis L.. . Evans, James R ..... ......... Evans, Joseph Everitt, William J.. . . . Ewald, Martin J.. . . ....108, 260, Ewing, Ralph B .... ........ Faber, Henry .... . . Faber, Robert G. . . . Faculty ........... F Faculty Board on Student Organization.. Fairclough, George E .... ............... Faler, John A ....... ................ Falkner, Clarence F Fallon, William H. . ..... 84, 85, 90, 168 Farrel, Gregory . Farrell, Eugene F. ..... . . Farrell, Lawrence R ......... , Farrow, William B. Father Otting Memorial Key .......... Fay, James BI . . . . . ............73, 256 Federman, Leo G .... . . . Federspiel, John B.. Feehan, George W ..... ........... Feehan, Walter J .... .... 7 5, 260 Felch, Newton E. ...... ...... . . Feldman, Theodore F. ..... ........ 1 01 39, 135, 244, 245, 250, 251, 262 Felten, Edgar L. .................... .. Fenlon, Estelle A.. .. .... 89, 274 Fenlon, James J ..... ....... 8 9, Fenner, Norman F .... .... 9 0 Ferber, Edward M .... . .... . Ferry, Carl V. ........ .... ......... . . Fiebig, Lawrence C. ................. .. Fiedler, Eleanor M ...... 68, 69, 74, 280 Field, Robert. ....... ............... . Filipino Club. ...... .............. . Filler, Irving .......... .......... Fineberg, Sydney J... . .... 39, 246 Finestone, John H. .. ..... . . . . Finnerty, Charles J .... Finucane, Edmund Fischer, George O., S.. Jr.. Fischer, VVillard E.. . . . .....88, 135 248 Fiscus, Matthew E .... .. Fisher, Edward W. .... . . . . . . . Fisher, Henry J .... . ..... . . . . Fisher, Jerry E .... .... ........ 8 9 248 Fisher, Joseph A. 68, 69, 72, 116 153, 166, 167, 293, 299 Fisher, Paul B ...... Fisher, William P ..... Fishman, Joseph X ..... ...l13, 246 Fitzgerald, Gerald W.. ....... 95 Fitzgerald, James J... ..... 21, 23, FitzGerald, William F. . . ........ . . . . Fitzpatrick, Edward R ..... ..98, 99, 104, Fitzpatrick Michael F. ......... 39, 266, Fitzpatrick William G .... ....... .... Flaherty, Henry J ...... . .... 70, 270, .......75 Flanigan, S. H ....... Flavin, James F. ..... .. Flattery, Jeremiah C ..... . . Fledderman, Harry T. ....... Fleming, Robert S. ........ ........... . Flemming, Albert E...39, 131, 254, Flemming, Eldred J .............. . . . 255, 89 273 298 228 93 90 104 105 236 93 89 71 81 90 112 86 261 39 110 105 106 19 120 113 72 303 24 91 292 88 113 158 257 109 101 23 261 101 135 263 113 275 250 139 139 110 105 281 106 306 104 247 75 39 111 249 74 101 72 103 86 249 292, 113 95 247 284 266 39 113 267 95 271 266 105 71 73 112 297 113 Flemming, John H. Flemming, Florian Flesche, John Flett, Flick, Flint, Floyd, Flynn Flynn Flynn, Richard O.. John R ..... Louis J ..... Edward H.. Charles F.. Frank. .... . Richard L. Foeller, Charles M. Fogliatti, John J.. . Foley, Emmet R.. . Football .......... Ford, Fruman S... Forensic .... .. E .... .... .... 104 81 23 . . . . .86, 286, 287 .......69 y 101 103 139 113 .39, 292, 293 ......290, 291 Freshman Football . , . . Forster, Bernard F .... .... Forster, john M ..... -.--. Fossen, Eddie ...... . . .112 Foster, Donald S .... ----- Fournier, Fred A ................. .... Fournier, Kenneth R. 72, 107, 123, 210, 248, 249, 268, Fowler, Joseph L. .................... . Fox, Denton B .... .... 8 6 Fox, Joseph S .... . ........... . Fox, Thomas J ...... ............. Francis, George A. ......... 98, 99, 108, Francis, Howard W .... ................ Franklin, Edwin ....................... Franklin, Raymond J. .39, 256, 257, 297 Fraser, Arthur H ..................... Fraser, Noel ........ ... 102 Fraser, William J. . . . . . . . . Fraternities ......... ....... Frazer, James E ...... .... 3 9 Frederick, Bernard J... . ... .. Frederick. John F ,... ...... .... 4 0 , Frederickson, Theodore R ..... ......... French, Carol H ...................... Frenette, Marcel F. ....... 102, 230, 274 Freshman Class .... . . .............. . 9 r Freshman Track .... . . . Freund, Theodore ....... ....... Freyman, David B .... . ...... 91 Fricker, Edward O. ........ 72, 73 Friday, Wilfred J. ............... . Friedl, Armella C. 40, 118, 122, 171, 242, 243 Friedl, Mary E. ...... 71, 154, 171 Friedman, Jack C. ............. .. Friske, Joseph P. ..... 40, 242, 243 Frosh-Soph Games ...... .......... Frost, Mabel E ..... .... ....... 4 0 , Frumveller, Aloysius F., S. J ..... 21 Fuhrman, William A ......... . . Fulgenzi, Andrew J.. . . . . Fuller, Edwin W... . . Fuller, Robert A .... Funni, Robert G. . . . . Futterman, Charles .... . G Gabel, Clarence T ..... .. Gagnier, Albert J. ........ .... . . Gahagan, Marguerite M. ........ 40, Galbo, John A. 95, 116, 117, 137, 140, Galbraith, James S ..... ........... Gallagher, Earl E.. . . . Gallup, Asa O. ..... . Gambert, George W.. .. Gamble, John H. .... . Gamet, Santos G. ..... . Ganley, William J. ....... . Gapczynski, Edmund M. . . . Garbarino, Arthur A... . . ....... Garcia, Alexander ...... Gardner, Arthur J.. . . Garelick, Martin ..... Gargaro, Ernest J .... Gariepy, Bernard F .... . Garrett, Ledru W ...... Garrigan, Stewart S.. .. Gartner, Albert ....... . . . .....80, 246 254 274 274 268 280 25 104 .88 129 166 256 .70 ....2l, 22 .2l, 106 105 110 181 90 143 106 95 139 110 72 269 113 137 107 75 135 104 25 304 112 244 73 239 113 107 178 93 73 275 97 203 225 104 247 255 101 275 275 111 269 237 281 139 107 40 113 105 113 89 103 91 140 167 102 90 23 257 75 107 113 95 250 23 111 86 101 150 112 110 22 Garvey, Lawrence M.. . . . Gatzenmeier, Alfred P ................. Gaugh, Clarence R ...... . Gautherat, Donald E .... Gaugherty, T. Claire . . . Gauthier, Joseph G ..... .. .72, 73, 256, Gaysinsky, Victor E ................... Gehrig, Robert A ..... . . Geibel, Edgar L. . . Geitzen, Henry 1 ...... Gelb, Seymour ......... .. Gendernalik, Nicholas H.. 40, 201, 284, Gensler, Harry J ..... ................. Genter, Ralph R .......... ............. George, Edward J ..... 70, 250, 251, 264, George, Joseph J. ...... 87, 250, 251, 264, Georgetown University Football Game... Geraci, James ........... Geraghty, Walter Gerardi, Jasper. ...... . Gergle, Charles G. ...... . Gerhardstein, Julius V... Gerlach, Wallace S ...... Germain, Louis .... ..... German, Fremont ..... Gersten, Milton ..... Gervais, Harold V ...... Gettinger, Edgar XV.. . . Gettinger, Francis A ..... Gettinger, Harry J. . . . . Gibbons, Irving J.. . . . Gibbons, J. Granger ..... Gibbons, Leon C. .... Stephen E .... Gibbons, Gibson, Lawrence J. Gies, Charles E ...... Gigante, Samuel ...... Angela M. . . . Gignac, Thomas F .... Gignac, Wilfred L .... Donald W.. . .. Ginac, Gilbert, Gilchrist, Edwin F. . . . . Gildea, Russell J ..... Gilowski, John P.. . Gilhooly, John J. . . . Gill, Matthew J.. . .. Gill, Robert A ...... Gillen, Daniel M.. .. Gillen, Stanley J .... Gillett, Lawrence F. Gillig, George J.. .. Gillmore, David P. Giltinan, David H. . Ginsburg, William R ..... Giovannini, Giovanni ..... Girard, Frank J .... Girardi, Albert H.. . Girardin, John B. 84, 85, 93, 137 Gladfelter, William Glaser, Paul J. .... . Gleeson, John W. . . . . Gleason, Russell J.. Glee Club ......... Glees, 'John L.. .. Glick, Paul ........ Gleiber, Nathan A.. Glider Club ........ Glicksman , Benjamin H.. Glossman, Eli ...... Glowacke, Rudolph. Glynn, Francis J... Glynn, M. Jerome.. Gnesda, Andrew R. Goddard, Mark Godfrey, William. . . Goessling, John G.. Goetz, John F ..... Gohl, Clarence A... Gold, Isadore ...... Goldberg, Morton.. Goldenberg, Norman ..... Goldstein, Miriam L. .... Golf Club ......... Golm, Theodore P.. Goodhue, Joseph A... . . Goodman, Milton J. 349 1 .... ..ffIfQQ"f"ffI ...29, 41, 268 .41, 282, 283 .....81 ...,74, 280 ...65 ...95 ...41. ...70 ....25, 256 168, 248, 249 . 2.95 ....108 .....25 270 .....74 ....86, ....276 ...,72, 246 1 95 106 257 95 108 40 105 285 104 107 71 93 105 40 265 265 200 40 110 25 80 106 111 103 95 95 86 41 89 72 269 41 299 103 108 112 74 281 113 89 268 21 106 70 236 135 112 75 101 87 106 257 106 71 22 103 88 298 72 88 244 92 141 41 106 106 300 70 88 105 94 112 106 113 264 106 271 234 104 92 277 88 302 90 106 247 Goodnow, Nathan B. 28, 29, 41, 116, 164, 165, 240, 241 244, 245, 268 269, 155 Goodrich, Frederick L. 89, 139, 179, 208, 266, 267 Goodrow, Fred J .................... .. 94 Gordon, Aubrey ............,... 72, 246, 247 Gorman, Michael H., S. J. ............ . 9 Gorniak, Edward ........... . . . 139 Gorski, Stanley A ......... . . 93 Goscinski, Francis L .... . . . ...... . . 70 Goubert, Hubert P .... . .............. 105 Gracey, Edward E ......... 71, 195, 216, 270 Graeffe, Edwin O.... 25 Graham, Elmer ...... ... 111 Graham, James C. .... ..... 1 13 Grainger, Frederick E .... ...... 1 04 Grammens, Oscar M .... .... 1 10, 113 Grand Rapids Club .... ..... 3 04 Grant, A. Ford ..... . . . 105 Grant, Max A ..... .. 80 Grates, Victor S.. .. . . 95 Graven, John ....... . . . 111 Gray, James E ..... 113 Green, Charles F.. . . .. . . 105 Green, James H .... . .... 95, 223 Green, Richard C .... .... 1 08 Green, Sydney H.. .. . . . . 41 Greenberg, Louis .... . . .102, 234 Greenberg, Ruth ....... ........ 9 5 Greenblatt, Joseph H .... .......... 1 07 Greenburg, Allen ....... .... 7 5 246, 247 Greenough James S .... .......... 1 07 Greenspan, Oscar M.. . . ......... . .. 41 Greenspon, William .. .... 72, 246, 247 Greenwood, Bruce F.. . . ....... . . . 93 Greer, Harry J ...... . . .108 260, 261 Gregory, Louis J ..... ....... 9 9, 109 Gregory Cup ........... . . . . 161 Gregory, William B ..... . . . 119 Greifzu, Alfred ....... . . . . 113 Grendzinski, Leo A .... . . . 95 Grenier, Albert. ..... . . . 107 Grenier, George L ..... . . . 41 Grenier, Lawrence C.. . . . . . 110 Griebel, Robert J ..... . . . . 102 Grieshamer, Ralph C... . . . 71 Griftin, Francis H ..... .. 22 Griffin, Robert W. . . . . . 90 Grilhth, John O. .... . . . 107 Griffith, John F .... . .. ....... . 101 Grimmett, Robert B' .... ...... .... 1 1 2 Grix, Arthur R. ........ ...... 4 2 262, 263 Groesbeck, Howard V ....... 74, 86, 286, 287 Gronfors, George W. .... ........ .... 6 5 Grose, Russell ........ .... 7 2 256, 257 Gross, Mark S., S. J .... ...... 2 1, 123 Gruber, Earl L. ....... .... 7 5 Gruskin, Ben ......... . . .... 111 Gruss, Elmer W ......... ..... .... 1 1 3 Guarnieri, William A. .... .... 4 2 258, 259 Gucfa, Andrew F. ..... ........ 7 0 Gudibski, Henry C. .... . . . 107 Guerin, Clifford O ..... ..... 1 12 Guerin, Richard .... ....... 2 54, 255 Guest, George ...... ...10l, 286, 287 Guina, William E .... ......... 9 5, 244 Guiney, J. Owen ...... .... 4 2 268, 269 Gullen, Harold J. ....... .......... 1 01 Gumbleton, Vincent E .... .. 94 Gunn, C. Leland ....... .. . . . 113 Gurney, Robert E .... . . . 113 Gurski, Joseph ...... ... 112 Gustafson, Neil A ..... .. . 111 Guyar, Thomas J .... . . . 113 Guzman, Andres. ........ . . . 104 H Haas, George M. ...... . . . ...... . . . 95 Haberelr, Ben C. .... ............. 1 07, 113 Hackett, John P.... ..... 112, 189, 270, 321 Hackett, Vincent A. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . 42 Hagenah, Jack E .... ....... .... ..... 1 0 7 Haggerty, James A. 68, 69, 71, 126, 128, 129, 135, 151, 166, 167, 248, 249, 262, 263 Hahn, Alfred C .... ................... 7 2 Haidy, Louis ....... Haigh, XVillard A ..., Haight, Roland S ..... Haines, J, Carl ....... Haldeman, VVillia1n F .... Haley, Gerard M. .... . Hall, John G ...... Hall, NVeudell ........ Hallahan, Gerald B... Hallberg, Franklin H. Halseth, Russell L.. . .. Halvorsen, Harcourt B.. Hamacher, J. Doyle ..... Hamburger, Abner A. Hamilton, John L ...... Hamlin, Russell Hammelef, John C., . . Handloser, Albert G.. Handloser, Anthony E.. Handyside, Robert Haney, Richard M.. .. Hanf, Edwin J ..... . . . Hanjosten, Katherine.. Hankilammi, Ensio Hanlon, Wilfred T. ..... . Hanna, George J ..... Hannigan, Martin G.. . Harbrecht, Paul P, 21, 25, 120, 121 282, 283 Hardies, Harold Harman, Christian, Jr... Hartman, Waldemar . Harper, Joseph L ....... Harpham, Richard J.. Harrigan, Edward F.. 4 Havens, A , 81 249 Jenney, Fred O .......... ...72, 276, ....113, .. 42, 89 75. 95 .. ..74, 278 . . .72, 73, 258, 166, 244, 272, . . . .104, 106 Harrington, Daniel N .... .... 4 2, 250 Harrington, Douglas ..... ...... 1 11 Harrington, Gordon S. .... . . . . Harrington, James J.. . ..... . . . Harrington, William B. ............... . Harris, Herbert L.... Harris, Joseph YV.. . . . Harris, Lloyd R.. .. Harris, Louis H .... . Harris, Owen H. .... . Harshbarger, Robert. . Hart, Irving M... . . . Hart, Louis L. ..... . Hart, Pyrle .......... Hartmann, Arthur A. . Hartzell, Victor F. ..... . Haskell, Paul G. ....... . Hastings, George C.. . . . Hastings, John P.. . . . Hastings, Vincent P.. . Hatalsky, John ....... Hathcock, William A.. . . . Hatie, Geo rge D .... .. Hattar, Martin ...... Hauck, John T .... .. Haupt, Franklin C. . . . Hause, Howard L.. . . Hautau, Charles F. . . . . Hautau, Llewellyn A. . Havas, Alfred ......... Haven, Harold R.. .. rthur R ..... Haverstock, John L.. .. Hawkes, William H.. . Hawkins, James E.. . . Hayes, Edward W ..... Hayes, John H ...... Hayes, Stanley C.. . . Head, John W ..... . Healy, Daniel J. . .. Healey, Earl J.. . . Healy, John D.. . . . Healy, Joseph P.. .. Hedges, O. VV. ..... . Hegedus, Otto D.... Heglin. Edward R .... Heller, George P. .... . Hellner, Frederick E .... Helwig, George ....... Hemmer, Carl S. .... . Henderson, Cecil F .... Henk, George E ...... . . . . 109, 272 ....112 ....42, 190 137 .........112 . . 72, 88, ....106 ....108 ....101 ...104 42 ....98, 99 .......90 95, 284 ...70 ..65 .....21, ...... ..1o7, ..42, 254, 255, 1 1 277 108 236 71 297 244 89 123 112 73 95 75 212 101 266 92 103 95 279 106 42 104 20 104 259 94 70 273, 74 92 87 107 112 110 251 113 71 104 20 273 103 141 110 104 112 86 258 95 112 141 139 141 268 102 104 141 88 94 113 113 139 80 112 301 88 106 92 25 107 285 70 284 107 268 102 112 105 22 101 95 95 113 248 139 71 297 Henkel, Catharine M .... Henkel, George J.. . .. Henn, Benedict A .... . Hepp, Donald L.... Herdwig, Harold... Heric, Moren J.. . .. Hersch, Alvin D.. . .. Hess, George L.. . .. Ilessler, Robert J.... Heuss, Thomas J.. . .. Hibert, Charles L.... Hickey, Milburn... Hicks, Doris M.. . .. Higgins, George J ..... Higgins, John ..... Higgens, Louis XV.. . .. Hilke, Edward A.... Hill, Alan L. ..... . Hill, Kenneth P.. .. Hill, Stanley VV ..... . Hill, Thomas E., Jr... Hille, Andreas S. .... . Hillebrand, Paul VV .... Hillebrand, Victor C.. Hiller, Edwin 111. .... . Hilterman, Thomas A. Himmels, VVilliam J.. Hind, Ronald S. ..... . Hindelang, Edwin C... Hineman, Daniel C.... Hines, John J. .... .. Hinz, Clarence VV... Hinz, Leo J .... ..... Hinz, VValter E. ......... . Hipkins, Henry F., Jr. Hird, John A. ....... . Hirschman, Julius .... a . Hirsim ki, Aaro VV.. . . Hite, Thomas W.. . .. Hittler, Hnatio, Walter ....... Hoban, Hoban, Rosemary ..... Hobart, Clifford W .... Hobley, Hocking, Richard R... Hoexter, Samuel J.. . .. Hoffman, Dell ....... Hofstetter, John Hogan, E, Vincent .... Hogan, Gerald L... Hoinningstad, Birger.. Hoisington, E. Clossin. Holland, Alton T ...... Harry R.. . .. Holland, John F.. . .. Holland, Walter J.. . . . Holleran, Edward P.. . Holmes, Chester VV.. . Holmes, Thomas VV. . Holstein, Alvin R.. . .. Holt, Willard ....... Holwedel, Stanley R.. . Homant, Lemuel J.. . . Honor Awards ...... Hope, William . . . Horkey, Clarence R... Horkey, George S .... . Hornick, Norbert J. . . . Horst, Joseph J., S. J.. .. Horvath, Louis O.. . Houck, Clarence. . . House, James H. .... . Hovey, Leonard H. . . . Howard, C, Scott James F. . 43, 126, .71, 174 248, .79 .71, 191, 248 ...29, 71 ....43 112, ....43, 266 93 ....79 Edwin L. ...... ... ... 127,151 . 80, 217 .-13, 152, ....87 .70, 137 .....95 ....21 ....72 248 103 .23 270 256 .79 111 126 108 103 72 249 80 95 95 24 249 88 108 92 290 109 25 23 73 101 95 112 75 88 108 301 86 101 106 113 244 94 107 86 267 113 94 90 74 74 80 113 95 106 249 230 103 104 95 260 101 271 257 95 73 91 141 129 137 105 112 105 113 23 290 112 240 256 28, 29, 43, 129, 130, 164, 165, 228, 250, 251, 248, 249 Howard VValsh Memorial Medal ........ Howell, Byron A. . . . . Howell, George N.. . . . Howell, John A.. . . Howell, William ..... Hower, Howick, Raymond A.. Howland, John E.. . .. Hubbard, John D.. .. Huck, Edgar P.... Huck, Walter P. .... . Huck, NVilliam R .... Felix ......... ll350Jl 95 104, 291 139 157 73 74 64 299 284 101 257 86 112 175, 302 158 43 197 105 105 94 74 113 90 72 72 106 Huff, Marshall C. . . .. Huffman, George H. . . . Hughes, Edward J ..... Hughes, VVilliam M .... Huhn, Carl W. ...... . Hull, Francis M.. .. Hunt, James J ...... Hunt, Ruth A. ...... . Hunter, Francis V.. . . . Huntt, Harry M. ..... . Hupp, Robert C. ....... . Hutchinson, VVilliam E.. I-Iutmacher, John J.. . . . l Iekel, William J .... Igolka, Frank .... ..... 78, 256, ....43, 278, ....72, ....95, 171, ......9s, . .84, 85, 91 Illig, Harold .......... . . .43, 278 Ingram, James .......... ......... Inter-Fraternity Baseball. . .. Intra-Mural Baseball .... . Intra-Mural Basketball .... . Intramural ............ ..... Irvine, Roy A. ....... . . .112 Isbitsky, Jacob S. ...... ...... 4 3 Isenberg, Charles M.. .. Izzo, Daniel S. ...... . .J Jablin, John J .......... Jabro, Lewis ........... Jackman, Edward VV .... Jackman, Walter .... Jackson, Clifford .... Jackson, James G.. .. . Jackson, Newton ..,.... Jacobs, Maurice S. .... 79 Jacques, Delmar C. .... .. Jaegers, Wendell C.. . . Jakovich, Nich S... . . . Jakubowski, Walter S .... James, Thomas L... . . . Jaminet, Aloysius F. . . . Jaminet, Carl J. ..... . Jamison, John E.. . . . Janecek, Louis J., Jr. . Janes, Simeon ......... . 292 .....72, ...266 137 276 ......88, 81,139, . ........ 105 ....72, 252 .....81,137 Janisse, Dennis R ..... .............. 2 1, Janjatovich, Boydon .... 28, 29, 43, Janker, Alex ............ Janower, Harvey H.. . . Jarvis, Francis E.. . . . Jarvis, Harold J. ........ . Jasnowski, Charles Jassicke, Zig .......... Jaworski, Louis .... Jaworski, Stephen. . . Jean, Harvey J. . . . Jedrezak, Martin .... Jeffery, Bennett 1I.... Jenkins, Elwood A ....... Jenney, Frank E. 278 ......95, 270 44, 118, 135, 136, 151, 174, 240, ......89, 248 9 248, 249, 262, Jennings, Clarence A .... . Jeszke, Menislaus ...... Jewell, Tilford ........ Jilbert, Marvin C. ...... . Johannesen, Ralph Johnson, Bradford J.. .. . . . 89 Johnson, Elwood J .... ...105 Johnson, Hayes E. ..... . . .105 Johnson, Raymond N. .... .... . Johnson, Richard F .... .... Johnson, Willard V .... . . Johnson, VVi11iam I.. . . . . Johnston Austin E.. . . . . Johnston Clair C. .... . . . . Johnston Everett H.. . . .. . . . Johnston, Leon S. .... ... .... . . . .25 Johnston, Ralph C. 28, 29, 44, 118, 135, 137, 139, 159, 164, 165, 240, 241, 242, 262, 263, 284, 285, 300 110 93 65 79 86 257 279 307 113 112 80 168 93 89 107 279 75 237 237 237 233 250 71 95 293 87 267 105 139 113 113 180 277 106 113 88 253 25 93 94 90 141 22 22 279 137 44 89 101 86 137 101 94 102 44 70 271 241, 263 111 95 113 89 112 92 139 107 73 93 95 104 89 25 22 254 144, 243, Kulinski, Edward ll.. . . LaBarge, Kenneth F. Jolicoeur, Clarence L... Jones, Albert W. ..... . Jones, Fred H,. . .. Jordan, Jerome J.. . . . Jordan, Robert G.. . . . Joskovitz, Joseph Joyce, Walter M. .... . Joyce, VV. Kelley .... A .... Jozik, Alex VV. .... . Jumisco, Roy A. .... . Jungbert, Edward J.. . . . . . . . . Junior Class .......... .......... Junker, Alex J .... ........ 7 8, 112. Jurczynski, Stephen ........ 103, Jurkiewicz, Francis F.. . . .... . .44, K 292, 270. 252, Kaczor, Stanley F.. . . . . . . Kadushin, Jacob ............ ..... 8 0, Kain, Louis J, ............ . ....... 104. Kaiser, Martin F...68, 69, 70, 150 Kalamajaka, Stanley J. ...... 101 286. 286. Kallio, William J. ............... . . . . Kane, Edward T. 68, 69, 74, 248 249, 278, Kane, Howard A. ...... ........ . . . . Kane, J. Gerald .... .... 4 4, 268. Kane, Thomas L.... Kaniasty, John T. .... .... . Kanter, Oliver .... Kaplita, Walter A .... . . . Karczmarzyk, Anthony. . . Karel, Ricica ............ Karrer, Orval G.. .. Kase, John A,... Katcher, Jack .... Katz, Morris ..... Katz, Reuben L.. .. .. Kaufman, Jack ......... Kavanagh, Thomas M .... Kavanagh, George XV.. Kavanaugh, Raymond J.. . . Kay, William F. ....... . Keal, Harry M. .... . Kean, Harold A ..... .. Kearney, Thomas J.. . . . Kebbe, John H. .... .. Keefe, John V. ........... . Keenan, Walter M. ........ 7 Keifer Duke ....... Keene A. T, .... . Keety, Eugene T .... Keith, Andrew ..... Keith, Colin A.. . . . Keller Clyde A.. . .. Keller, Frank H.. .. Keller, James O.. . . Keller Russell E. ....... . ...75, 246, . . .44, 252, ...90, 276, ...44, 276. ....101, .. . . . . . .95, 3, 135, 256, . .... 225, Kellerman, Marcus ............. 70, 270, Kellerman, M, VVifhelmina. . . .... . . . . Kelley, Frank J. ,......... .. Kelley, Walter ........ . . Kelley, NVilliam J .... . .. Kellogg, Richard G .... Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelty, Kelsh, Carl ......... . . . Francis J.... Jerome V.. . .. John T. ....... . Lawrence E.. . . Raymond J.. . . . Raymond T... Walter J. ..... . William E... . . Eugene T.. . . . Lawrence J .... 45, sis, 99, .......1o1, ...io5, 137, Kelush, Albert P.. . . . Kempel, Edward J .... . Kempf, Rupert J .... Kenna, Thomas R,. .. . . . .84 Kennaugh, John .... Kennedy, Harold T.. .. Kennedy, Hurlbut D.. .. Kennedy, Paul I. .... . Kenney, J, Francis... ... .70 Kent, Alfred L.. .. ..... .95 Kent, Gordon J.. .. Kent, Thomas C.. .. .... 95, 113 Y 851 9 953 248, 129, 44 80 104 113 70 75 74 23 101 104 113 67 293 271 253 2-12 137 107 287 287 73 279 102 269 86 87 247 86 253 105 103 72 112 277 89 277 109 139 101 103 25 112 104 102 139 257 228 22 72 94 75 105 105 105 95 271 103 44 102 45 101 104 107 135 110 65 88 141 70 86 153 79 113 103 73 91 25 91 89 105 189 249 101 135 Kern, Alfred ...... Kern, Charles Kern, Henry H. .... . Kern, Raymond G ..... Kernohan, Delmar. . . Kerr, John C. ....... .. ...f3, 139 Kerstein, Norman A .... . Kertesz, Theodore ..... Kerwin, Phillip J, ....... Keshishian, Vincent S.. .. Keves, Henry l. ...... .. Kidd, Sterling N... Kilbane, Michael J.. .. Kilinski, Alex P ...... Kimball, D. Eugene... Kimball, Donald M .... King, A. ......... .. King, Claire D. . .. King, Loren E.. . . . King, Sol ....... Kingsley, Ira ll. . .. Kinsey, John XV .... . Kinsley, Peter F.. . .. Kirchner, F, Bain .... Kirk, Edward J .... . . . .....70. 256 1 ..10.y, ...45 80 264 ...108. 260 Kirk, Lester K. ......... . . . Kirkpatrick, Samuel C... Kirn, Fred J. ....... . Kirwin, James E ...... Kishkorn, William S.. . . Klain, Paul ......... Klebba, Earl Kleckner, Earl E. .... . 2 0, ...111, 9 Kleefuss, Joseph A. .... . Kleehammer, Harold F. Klenner, Richard M.. . . . Kline, Francis M. 89, 154, Kmiecik, John J ....... 171, 274, ......100 Knight, Albert J. ................ . Knight, Gene V ...... Knohelsdorf, Harold C.. Knyzewski, Henry R.. . . . Kohetitis, Richard F.. . Koehler, Vincent E,. . . Koelzer, Gregory L .... Kohl, James M. ..... . Kohlmeier, George F. . . ....!J. Kolznak, George A ...... Konczalski, Chester F... . ...... 88 Kondratovicz, Monica M...89, 230 Konecnik, Paul ......... Koon, Bertha A .... . . . Kopko, John M .... .... ....79 Kopkowski, Ignatius M .... Kosel, Herbert O. ...... . Kosko, Andrew ........ Kosmyna, Stephen ..... Kotcher, Stanley F,. . . Kowalczyk, Edward G.. Kowalski, Florian F.. . . Kowalski, Roy G ..... Kownacki, Piotr M. .... . ....95 .....45 Kozlinski, Anthony E.. . . . . Kraft, ,Art J. ....... . Kraft, A. Herman . . Kral, John C.. . . . . Kramer, Earl L ..... Krasinski, John E.. . .. Kraus, Krause, Gerald F. . . . John J. ..... . Krause, Harold L.... Krause, Herbert J. .... ....... . Krause, Burnett J. .............. . Krebsbach, Sigmund J. .... 45, Kreklow, Joseph L. 139 x 45, 134, 136, 175 Kremlick, Kurt .................. Kremer, Edward J. .............. . Krempa, Joseph J. .... Kroenig, Fred C. .... .... . Kroha, Lawrence A.. . . . . . . .45 Kroha, Lawrence W .... .,... Kronk, Adam B. ............... . Kronk, Anthony J. 109, 242, 243, 258, 259, Kronk, Joseph J. ....... 28, 29, 46, Kropik, Nelson W. .............. . Krzywdyinski, Anthony A.. .. H351 1 282 275. 288 260 250 274 104 254 250 .74 266 .74 .89 248 250 286 102 278 258 1 u 87 257 1.19 298 111 72 H1 F0 87 106 81 104 2115 95 90 23 110 119 107 104 113 261 23 72 100 248 106 291 113 71 113 90 101 102 283 106 307 289 102 107 75 112 261 106 112 113 70 92 251 275 139 45 255 65 301 102 106 109 251 250 267 250 86 103 45 110 91 79 70 90 95 65 108 249 251 24 45 79 110 287 21 258 279 259 112 111 Kucmierz, Francis S.. .. Kuhlman, Bert J. .... . Kukielka, Martin L .... Kulaski, Edward VV.. .. Kulick, John J. ..... . Kulke, Arthur F.. .. Kull, David E. ...... . Kullen, Richard C. ,.,...... Kummer, Clarence J. 46, 118, 129, 1.10, 1.15, 242, 84 285 245, 262, 263, 2. , -f. Kundrat, Alexander .....,......,.. Kunkle, Charles P. ............... . Kurth, Bayard K. ...... . .-lla, 129 Kurtz, Raymond C. .............. . Kurzatkowski, Mary 11... Kutlow, Abe ............ Kuzara, John E. .... .. Kwence, Joseph L... Kyniasty, John T .... Kytic, John M. ...... . L Labadie, Gerald O. ...... . Labadie, Labadie, John R ..... . . . Labadie, Ora A .......... . .46, 28, 29, 46, John ll .... ..46, 138, 113, ....108 .....113 139 150 242, 243 LaBarre, Gene. ................... . Labinski, Leopold A .... . LaBreque, Roger J.. . Lachance, Carlyle ..... . . LaCharite, Wilfred J .... Lachover, Abraham ..... LaCourse, Aloysins J ..... Ladd, George W .... .... LaDoucenr, Charles. . . LaDriere, James C.. .. Laethem, Jerome L.. . .. Laethem, Richard H ...... LaFaive, Earl H. 47, 135, 242, 243. Lafterty, Laffery, Lahser, Carl W .... . .. Laige, Norman J.. . . J. Maxwell ....... 70, ...46 244, 245 Frank B .... ............. 135 Lake, Robert G. ................ . La.Londe, Gerald H.. . .47, 151, 248 Lamb, John A .................... Lambert, Margaret .... . . Lampard, Royale C.... Lamphere, Gordon W ..... Lamsens, Orlando H. . . . . Landers, Edward J ..... Landers, Michael J .... . Landers, Thomas B .... . Landon, Robert J .... Lane, William D.. .. Langlois, Ovila E .... Langwald, Philip., . . . Lanigan, Alfred Lansky, Mandell. . . . . Lantz, Conrad S ..... . Lapenta, Benjamin J. . . . Lapham, Byron. ..... . Lapham, Leo G .... .. Lappin, John W.. . .. ...74 ....113 ...47 v r s Lardner, Lloyd V .... ....... . . . Merril T... . .. Lardner, LaRou, Lawrence V .... Larsen, Leo M.. . . .. LaSalle, John H. . . . . Last, Marvin A. ..... .. Lathrem, Charles I. . . . . Latourelle, Joseph F .... Lau, Rodger W ........... Laurencelle, Charles A. 47, 98, Law, Raleigh H. ........ . Lawless, Joseph C ...... Lawrence, George F .... . Lawrence, Russell E .... Lawrie, Jack W.. . . .. Law Sodality ........ msn, 243, 131 280 106 260 278 220 300 282 138 .07 135 158 278 284 249 278 270 286 113 Q 1 x .47, 202, 266, 99, 109, 278, . . . .101, 286, 25, 101 113 250 46 92 86 101 321 106 244. 109 9 135 46 281 139 261 112 214 108 279 224 101 301 283 139 89 228 110 46 74 112 103 136 301 93 47 279 47 285 112 73 113 303 47 169 93 279 271 70 74 47 95 102 287 111 139 87 95 104 74 113 103 92 267 91 106 95 95 90 23 107 279 106 287 47 292 111 155 azar, Nicholas M ..... Lazowsky, Jack ..... Leach, Donald A .................. Leahy, David A. 95, 137, 145, 166, 167. 112, 137 Leahy, Kenneth C. ..,........ . Leamon, Francis J .... . Leary, Gordon J... .. Lebedeff, Olseis M ..... Leckner, Glenn G .... . Lee, Cecil T ...,. . .. Lee, Raymond R .... Leeney, Maurice C .... LeFevre, Margaret J .... Legel, VValter R. .... . Lehman, Charles F .... Lehman, Ralph J .... Lehr, Edward G.. . . Leiner, Charles B. .. Leion, Robert ..... Leland, Louis S .... Lemke, Frank M .... Lemmer, Harold L. . . ..20, 48 ...81 McMahon, James D. .... . L C l k', F' k A ......... .... ewrmc OWS 1 um McQuade, William F .... 256 Madigan, Gerald ...... Lenfesty, Edwin G... . . .95 Lenk, LaSalle' M ............ .... Lennert G. Anthony 28, 29, 49, 164, 165, 236 Lennon, Robert A. .......... . . . Lentine, James J ....., Lentine, Nicholas A ..... Leon, Edgar D. ...... . Leonard, Augustine. . . . . . . Leonard, David A .... . ...80 Leszcynski, Frank J .... . . 286 248 ...95 ,EE Leszcynski, Henry C .... . . .70 Levin, Melba M ..... Levin, VVilliam .... Levine, David M.... Levy, Marvin B. ....... ...... . Lewis, Raymond J ..., 112, 258. Liberty, Francis J .... Libs, Edward J ..... Lifshitz, Harry H .... Lightner, Ralph H ..... . Lilly, Paul A. 259, 296 Lewis, William T .... ................. 68, 69, 71, 166, 167, 266, 267 Lincoln, Elmo .... ................. Lindeman, Louis H... . Linden, Myron H .... . . . . . Lingeman, Harlow 'J.. . . . Linsenmeyer, Francis J .... Lipke, Joseph G .......... Lipniarsky, Benjamin J.. . . Lipscomb, Jack P. ...... . Lipsinski, Andrew F.. . . . Lisowski, Benjamin .... Listman, Albert E .... Little, Daniel R ..... . . . Livingston, George D .... Livingston, William A.... Lloyd, Edward H. ..... . Lloyd, Myron B ..... Loes, Richard J .... .... Logsden, Charles L. ...... . Lombardini, Albert W .... . .. ....102 ...93 ..21 . .8l1, Longo, Frank A. ......... .... 1 01 Longton, Hazen A. . . . . Lopez, Raymond O. . . Lord, Ralph R .......... Losoncy, William A ...... ........ Lough, Christopher C. ........... . Loughin, Joseph D..84, 85, 86, 191 Louisell, Paul .................... Lovely, Joseph D. .............. . . Loyalty Award ................... 270 Loyola University Basketball Game..211 Loyola University Football Game.. Lozowski, Robert C. ............. . Lubinski, Joseph A. 88, 168, 180, 250 Lucas, Culmer .................... Ludgren, Einer A .... . . . . . . . . Lukasiewicz, Henry J .... .... 4 8, Lulenski, Chester R. .... ...100, 251, 252, 288, s a 48 112 71 300 106 113 90 109 112 109 107 95 307 74 95 48 113 91 87 87 109 141 287 101 249 102 101 101 90 95 293 87 141 48 95 87 70 102 300 90 113 111 104 91 296 106 113 110 87 25 101 103 250 70 306 93 106 101 106 107 89 102 111 79 137 48 107 48 72 113 271 74 87 160 214 190 101 306 95 89 253 289 Lundy, Dorothy ..... Lutchin, Harry G. ..... . Lutomski, Edward G, ........ . Lutz, Alexander J .... .... .... Luyckx, Joseph A. .... 22, 120, 121 164, Lynch, Edward N. ........... 68, 69, 74, Lynch, Gerald J .... ....... 1 08, Lynch, James M. . . ........ . . .. Lynch, Raymond J... . ...29, 48, 268, Lynott. John F ...... ............ Lyons, David .... ....... . . . .... . . . . Lyons, Fred W. Lyons, Lyons, 84, 85, 94, 126 12 Lyle D ......... Raymond J .... Mc McAllister, Alexander.. . McAloon, Walter J... . . McAndrew, George J. . . McAuliffe, Vincent F .... McBrearty, Jerome .... McCahon, Robert O.... McCallum, Frank R... McCann, James J.... McCann, John M ...... McCarthy McCarthy McCarthy McCarthy McCarthy McCarthy, McCarty, McClain, McClear, McClear. McClear, McClear, Lester J.. . .. McCarre11, , Charles G .... , Edward P... , Edwin G .... , Francis , James D .... Jerry D ..... 9, 235, 248, 249 104, s 113, James D. ....,.. .... . .. Julius J.. . . .. Ernest V .... . Gerald J ...... Louis W.. . . . Robert D ..... McClellan, Lee W ...... McClellan, Wilbur A .... McClounie, Joseph A .... McClure, Herbert F .... McCollum, Carl V.. . . McCord, Norman L ..... McCormick, Francis W.. McCormick, Thomas R.. .68, 69, 70, 24, 74, 268 100 284, .74 23 278, 1 .50 256 v .89 McCreary, William K.. . . . . . . . . McCurry, C. E ......... McCutcheon, Joseph G. . McDermott, Edward F.. 290 103 McDonald, Carlyle ...... McDonald, Charles T .... McDonald, Duncan J. ......... . . . McDonald, Edward F ........ ..... McDonald, Franklyn E..88, 95, 135 McDonald, Robert C .............. McDonald, Roland D ..... . . . McDonnell Francis J. .... .. McDonnell, Marion F .... . . . . . McDonnell, Patrick J. ...... .. . . McDougall, June N. ...... 103, 230 McDougall, Patrick S .... ....... McDowell, Douglas F .... . . . McEnally, Vincent L .... .... 7 3 McEnhill, Drew J ...... Mclinhill, John E ...... McErlane, Thomas J.. . . McEvoy, Joseph E ..... McEwen, Jack D. ..... . McFarland, Joseph L. , . McFawn, William A .... McFerrin, William B... McGafhn, David K.. . . McGauley, Leo J. .... . McGeary, James L ...... McGinnis, Lawrence P,, McGinnis, John D ...... McGinty, Donald P ..... McGinty, John J ....... McGlaughlin, Nicholas.. . McGloin, Francis J .... . McGonigal, Joseph L. . . , McGovern, George A., S. J ...... McGrath, Arthur L. .... . H352 ll 270 248 .86 .... 103 113 274 .79 1 .Q'ad Hffi .278, 20, 155, 20 86 103 88 228 268 268 107 269 110 94 298 106 48 110 92 112 49 100 302 81 112 282 23 86 25 100 92 49 87 269 126 285 278 120 279 72 105 88 257 100 112 88 291 139 22 104 110 271 23 104 112 249 95 103 129 95 266 275 109 100 257 81 92 95 86 112 91 251 113 113 113 25 104 268 112 279 95 106 88 268 23 McGrath, Thomas J .... McGraw, Sheldon W ...... McGregor, Chester B. .... 84, 85, 89, McGregor, Douglas A. . . McGuigan, Vincent A. 25, 68, 69, 72, 153, 292, McGurn, William ......... ....110, 293 .........135 ...........85, 248, 248, 1 1 1 McHardy, David S... .... 70, 135, 141 McHugh, Clyde L .... ......... 2 84 McHugh, Joseph F. .... ..... . McHugh, Lawrence C .................. McIntosh, Thomas J. 68, 69, 74, 166, 167, 266 McIntyre, Everett .................... McIntyre, James J.. . . McIver, Kenneth L .... McKay, George E ...... McKeon, George V .... . McKeown, Gregory M .... McKillop, Daniel B' ...... .....87 ....95, 266 McKinnon, William C .... . .. McLain, Francis W ...... McLain, Thomas .... ..... McLaughlin, Charles N.. McLaughlir1, Fred C. ..... . McLoon, James E. ..... . McMahon, Francis P .... McManmon, Joseph C .... McMichen, Joseph H.. . . . McMullen, Cletus C .... McNab, Bernard J .... McNabb, Louis A .... McNally, John G ...... McNamara, George Q .... McNamara, James R .... McNamara, Terence .. .... .. . . ...74, ....25 ....25 ....79 ....104, 137 ........95 McNichols, John P., S. J .... ..... . McNish, Samuel D. ..... . McPhail, Ralph T. ..... . McQuarrie, Agnes ....... McQuarrie, Harold R.. .. McRae, Margaret M ..... McRoberts, J. Fred .... McSweeney, James .... McTaggart, Angus R ..... McWilliams, George E ..... .... 8 7, M Maben, Gaylord G. .... . Macali, Tranquilino Macdonald, Alex L.. . . . MacDonald , Charles Mac Mac Mac Mac Mac Mac Gregor, Donald L.... T.... ....112 .......103 ....154, 274 ....113, 292, 137 I 137, .......73, ....107, Donald, Edward Donald, Hugh W ...... Eachern, Kenneth G.. . .. Farlane, Kenneth J .... Gillis, Daniel P ...... ....80 M .... Machczyinski, Thaddeus J .... Mac Laine, John A .... .. Mac Lean, Harry W.. . . . Maddock, William A. . Madegan, John H. ..... Magi Medal .......... ....71, 290 Magarian, Hachadoo .... Magner, Richard V .... .......... Magrath, Howard A...79, 129, 175, Mahalak, Alfred F .... .... 250 282 .....72, 9 Maher, Francis G.. .. .... 89, 270 Maher, John ........... ............ Mahoney, Howard I. 28, 29, 49, 164, 165, 236, 266 Mahoney, Wilbert J. ............... .. Maier, Constance ....... ............ Maisano, Joseph .... .. Maisel, Charles J. .... . . . . . Maieske, Edward F .... .... 8 1 Maki, George E .... . . . . . . . Maledon, William J.. . . . . . .21 Maley, John R. ..... ..... 2 0 Malhoyt, Lester F. . . . Malik, Edward A .... Malis, Louis A.. .. Malley, John S. .... . . . .........- .....9s, 252 .....74, 246 . 70, 126, 128 87 249 249 112 299 136 284 285 110 70 267 94 113 95 110 100 79 267 105 105 103 268 50 71 50 71 50 95 113 103 80 23 180 250 70 20 292 110 104 164 95 275 293 73 87 244 141 306 106 260 112 91 113 95 113 113 113 79 95 86 291 94 159 102 112 251 283 271 23 267 105 122 109 95 131 105 159 135 113 253 247 136 Malone, John D..72, 123, 256. 257, 296 305 Malone, Norbert E. .,................. 100 Maloney, Steve C ..,. ................. 8 1 hlaknt, Forest J. ...... 98, 99, 107, 266 267 Malott, Joseph .............. ........ 1 69 Manciwicz, Stanley C.. .. ...... .. 90 Mandel, Joseph R ....... .......... 8 6 Mangold, Charles E ..... .... 7 1, 175 250 Maniere, Anthony T ..... .......... 9 5 Mannebach, Frederick C .... .... 7 5 260 Manning, Avon E .... .... ..... 9 1 Mansfield, George A.. . . . . . 49 Mansfield, Robert .... .. . 113 Mantyla, Carl VV. ..... 113 Mantz, Robert W. ....... 90 Maranetette, Achille I .... 266 Marcero, Justin H. ....... . . . ... . 113 Marchewitz, Edward J. .... .......... 1 12 Marco, Paul G ...... .......... 1 41 250 262 Margolis, Isadore ..................... 49 Martus, Wilfred A ..... ...104, 106, 107 139 Marion, Charles E .... ...... 9 0 138 244 Marion, Rodman .... ...... 1 03 169 Markey, Howard A .... ........ 1 13 Marleau, Lucien A. ...... .... 9 5 141 Marlowe, Hortense E. .... .... 8 9, 307 Marnon, Edward T. ............. 112 Marple, James N .... ................. 1 13 Marquette University Basketball Game ........................ 211 213 Marquette University Football Game.. 192 Marr, John S. ................. 49, 282 283 Marsden, Russell G .... ......... 1 09 Marsh, Robert E ..... . . .. . 113 Marshment, Bert C ..... 105 Martens, Henry A. .... 105 Martin, Arthur B... . .,, 113 Martin J. Russell .... .. 49 Martin, John J ...... ........ 9 2 Martin, Joseph A.. .. ...... . . . . 49 Martin, Michael R.. .. . .... 99 108 137 Martin, Ralph J ........ .............. 1 13 Martin, William E., S. J. .......... 21 22 hdartus, YViHred A. ...... 104, 106 107 139 Masacek, Joseph ...... .............. 1 03 Masaitis, Alphonse R .... . . . ....... . 100 Mason, Edward R.. . . ........... . . . 90 Massucci, Arthur J .... ..... 7 1, 185 270 271 Masura, Paul ....... ......... .... 9 3 Mathes, Charles ..... ............. 4 9 Matgen, Marcella M.. .. .... 95 274 275 Matousek, Ernest ..... ......... 1 11 Matousek, Steve ........ . . . . . . 112 Matthews, Albert M.. . . ........ . , 92 Mattson, Ethel ....... . . .230 274 275 Mattson, Gertrude. .. ,.,,,, 274 275 Matyas, Joseph ...... .......... 1 13 Matzen, Donald W .... .... 4 9, 266 267 Mavis, George H .... ............. 8 7 Maxwell, Edward .... . .............. 112 May, John J .... .......... 9 4, 235 248 249 Mayrand, Kenneth H. ................. 102 Mayrose, Herman E. .... .....,..... 2 5 Mayrose, William ..... .... 2 1 22 25 Mazanec, Frank R.. .. ... ... 110 Mazur, Michael J.... ...... .. 112 Mead, Arthur F.. .. ........ ... 106 Mead, Dell E. .... .... 8 9 248 249 Mead, John ..... ... ........ . . 94 Meade, Jack T. .......... .. 81 Meenaugh, Merwyn V .... 105 Meier, Joseph A. ....... .. 70 Meininger, Henry L. .... .. 80 Meiser, Harry ......... ... 23 Melache, Clarence J. .... , , , 106 Meldrum, Bernard J. .... , , , 106 Melnik, Harry ........ , . , 109 Mendelson, Abe ...... ..... 8 1 Mendoza, Fernando .... ........ 1 05 Meng, Raymond A ..... .... 1 00, 113 Menton, Estok ........ ,,..,,,,,, 1 13 Merckling, George .... 81, 254, 255 Mersman, Oscar M .... ......... 8 7 Mertz, Louis F .......... .,.... 2 3 Mesina, Eustaquio V. .... .,,, 5 0, 306 Mettie, Norman J. .......... 71 Meyer, Frederick A., S, J .... . 21 Meyer, Harry A. ......... 113 Meyers, Margaret E.. .. Meyner, Gustave H .... Michalak, George F.. . . Michalak, Michalak, Joseph J. . . . Jean . . . .... 88, M ichalko, Francis A .... Michalski, VVa1ter J .... Michaud, Amaranthe L. ........... . Michelin, Arthur L ......... .......... Michigan State College Basketball Game ........................ 209, Michigan State College Football Game. . ............. . . ......... . Michon, Armand E ..... Middleton, Milton L.. .. Miebeyer, Fred H... . . Mikolas, Frank T.. . . . Mikolas, Fred J. .... .. Milanowski, XVencel A.. Miles, Joseph .......... Millby, William R .... . Miller, Charles VV.. . . . Miller, Don E ...... Miller, Edward. . . Miller, Francis J.. .. Miller, George A.. . . Miller, James J ..... Miller, John J .... . . . Miller, Marcel V.. .. Miller, Max ........ Miller, Raymond J ...- Miller, Richard ........ Miller, Victor F., Jr... Miller, Victor J ..... . . . Miller, NVilliam H.. . . . ....113 . . . .98, 99, 103 .. .81, 129 ...71, 248 . . ..... 98, 99 ....75, 79, 260 Milling, Leonard L. ....... . . .109, 272 Millman, George F. 81, 113 , 242, 243, 276, Mills, Roman L. ..... . .............. . Minch, Helen A. .................... . Mindak, John P.. . . . . Minor, Clarence Minor Sports .... Miotke, Frank Misbach, Lawrence.. . Mitchell, Clyde H.. . . Mitchell, Francis T .... Mitchell, Victor X.. . . . J.... ...50, 73, Mitteldorf, Abraham C. ........... .. Mittig, Arnold J. 68, 69, 73, 116, 135, 153, 166, 170, 256, 257 Mittig, Leo S. ...... . Mixich, Robert T ...... Moberly, Winson S.... Mobley, George R.. . . Modie, Jerry G. .... . Modlinski, John Moeller, Carl Moeller, John R.. . . Moe-hart, Frank ....... Mohardt, Michael T .... Mohardt, Paul . Mohr, Larry ......... 248 ....102, ...95 ....109 Molnar, Stephen ..................... Monaghan, Edward A, A 68, 69, 70, 144, 160, 242, 243, 270 Monaghan, James B .... ....... 5 0, Monahan,. Joseph B.. . . Monahan, Thomas A. . . Montaudon, Rene A .... 250 Montgomery, Elizabeth ....... . . . 71 Montgomery, Marguerit Montreuil, James E .... Mooney, John J ....... . Moore Moore, Moore Moore n x Alfred H. .... . Ernest W .... . James M .... . . Raymond F. . . . Moore, Robert C. .... . Mooring, Aubrey ..... Moran, Francis P .... . Moran, Leo L. ...... . Moraeu, Harry W. .... . Morell, George D. .... .. Morgantown University eA ..... .U87,. . . .50, 256 .....72, 256 . . . .50, 75, 260 r55u5a'ii ' c'a'n5Af 256, 135, 244, Morleau, Lucme P .... ............... Moroun, Shettick J ...... .... . ......... Morrill, Edward R. . . . . Morrill, Hugh J .... . . 11353 1 1 171 112 50 95 252 102 80 87 93 212 196 260 113 103 113 113 109 94 105 113 104 25 103 301 249 111 95 95 86 100 104 139 261 273 277 113 113 74 88 227 139 104 257 109 22 88 167. 159 94 94 249 106 70 270 105 112 87 197 137 102 271 251 105 192 106 168 109 71 245 113 104 103 94 257 112 257 80 261 113 194 88 95 72 90 lVIorriS, Clifford R.. .. ...89, 137 Morris, George B... ..,, 79 Morris, Harlem H. .... ...81, 254 Morris, Richard J ...... .... 6 5 Morrisey, Jack S. ....... 95 Morrissey, John P., S. J.. .. 25 Morrow, VVinslow C. ...... .... 1 07 Morsey, Charles J .... .. ........ 90 Mort, Harold B. ......... .... 1 06, 107 Mortell, John T., S. J .... ...... 2 0 Moseley, Crowder ......... . .. 112 Moses, John B ...... .. . 92 Moshalek, Simon.. . . . . 106 Moskowitz, Oscar.. . 93 Motorcycle Club .... . .. 302 Motz, Donald C .... . . . . . . 93 Mousseau, George E.. . . ..... . .. 103 Moyers, 1Valter R. ................ 73, 297 Moynihan Daniel J. .... 22, 23, 175, 250 290 Moynihan, Thomas P ......... ........ 1 07 Mrokowski, Theodore F.. .. ... 107 Muckle, Russell J .... .... . .. 103 Mudie, Jerry G. .... . . . 113 Mueller, Edward J .... . . . 107 Mueller, Henry T.. . . . .. 106 Muffat, Joseph A.. . . ..... . . . 51 Mulcahy, John V. .... ........ 9 2 Muldoon, B. Burke... 100, 137 141 Mullaney, VVilliain J .... . ........... 87 lllullen, Frank XV. .... 112 Muller, Henry D .... ........ 1 02 Muller, Phillip A. .................... 107 Mulligan, Phillip T. ...... 86, 137, 139 141 Mullin, 1Valter J. ..... ........ 1 04 Mullins, Ryan F. ..... .95, 185 286 Mulvihill, Francis J .... . ......... 111 Murga, Joseph ........ . . 91 Murphy, Arthur J.. .. ..... ... 92 Murphy, Daniel E ..... ........ 9 5 234 Murphy, Earl A .... .... 7 4, 266, 267 Murphy, Francis .... ......... 9 5 Murphy, Francis J. .... 248 Murphy, Francis X. .... .. 72 Murphy, Gerald A.. .. . . . 93 Murphy, Henry T.. .. . . . 113 Murphy, James F ............... .... 1 12 Murphy, James P. ..................... 65 Murphy, Joseph C. .... 51, 248, 249, 278, 279 Murphy, Louis J ..................... 89 Murphy, Thomas C. ....... . . . .. . . . 113 Murphy, William P. 78, 80, 116, 117, 151, 172, 180, 292. 293, 296 Murray, David W ..... .. ........ 106 Murray, James V.. . . .. 75 Murray, John D.. .. . . 95 Murtha, Teresa J .... 103 Music and Drama .... 133 Muske, Benjamin F. .... ..... 9 5 Muske, Paul H ....... ...... 8 6 Muston, Thomas VV. . . . ....... 106 180 Muttaler, Fred S ..................... 103 Muttkowski, Richard A. .... 21, 22, 120 274 Mutton, William L. ..... ........... 1 10 Myers, Edwin S .... .. . . .84, 85 92 Myers, Kenneth B ..... .... 1 02 129 Myers, Lynn J .... .... . . . 25 65 N Nader, Anthony E .... . .... 71 198 Nader, Joseph J. .... .... 8 7 137 Nagel, William J. .... .... 1 00 Nagitsoc, Paul ........................ 106 Nagler, Albert J. 86, 126, 128, 129, 135, 146, 160, 168, 179, 246, 247 Nagy, Stephen E.. .. .. . 107 Najarian, Simon ........ . .. 100 Naour, Henry M. .......... 112 Napolitano, Frederick L.. . . . . 95 Naumann, Donald J. ...... . .. 302 Naumann, Harold G ..... ............. 8 8 Navarre, Lynn B. ..................... 113 Navin, Ray T. ....... 51, 178, 192, 248, 249 Nebel, Leo ........................... 123 Nebel, Joseph H .... . ...... 89 Nebus, George ..... .... 7 1, 137 Nehra, Thomas P .... ..... 1 02 Nestor, Robert J. ...... Neibauer, Harold M .... Nelins, Mary L .... . Nellis, James F .... Nelson, Clitliord. . . Nelson, Harold E.... Nelson, Joel O.. .. Nemsick, Adolph ....... Netherland, Maurice A. 266 267 Neumann, Cole Neumann, Donald J.. . . Newman, Harry M ..... Newton, Benjamin E. 70, 145 Newton, Raymond VV.. . Newton, Thomas ....... Nichols, Vincent A.. .. Nickels, i Albert ....... Nickodemus, John P.. .. Niedzielski, Henry Noah, Charles E ........ Noah, VVilliam. .. Noel, Edward. .. Notts, Bernard ...... Nolan, Joseph G .... Nolan, Peter . .. Nordstrom, Carl ..,. Nork, Arthur P .... Norris, Walter' T. .... . Norris, Warren C ...... Northwood, Clarence J.. Norvo, Kenneth ..,..... Norwin, Kenneth VV.... Nosotti, Andrew .... Novak, John S.. . .. Novak, Lewis J. .,.. . Novak, Stanley R ..... Novotny, George .... Nowack, Joseph L.. . . .. Nowaczyk, Edwin A .... Nowaczyk, Stephen P... Nugent, Floyd L. ..... . Nurse, George O. .... . Nussey, C. Carroll ..... Nutt, James D. .... . O Oakes, Cleon A. ..... .. Oberst, Gregory J. .... . Obirek, Joseph A ...... O'Brien, Edward T.. .. 71,126, O'Donnell 213. 270 262 263 95, O'Brien, Edwin O'Brien, Jack L ,...... O'Brien, Joseph S. .... . O'Brien, Patrick H. Hon.. O'Brien, William E ..... O'Brien, William R.... O'Connell, O'Connor, O'Connor, O'Connor, O'Donnell, Francis P. . . . Frederick Hugh M ,... . Roger P.. . . Dennis P.. . . , Joseph G.. . Thomas VV.. . . tn.. Peller, O'Donnell, Ofer, Damian N.. . . . Ofer, Joseph T. .... . Ogden, Victor W. ..... . O'Gorman, J. Charles. . . O'Hal1oran, William J.. O'Hanisain, Gurgen C.. O'Hare, Edwin F. ..... . O'Hare, Thomas M.. .. O'Keefe, Francis J.. .. Oleniak, James M.. . .. Oles, Frederick VV.. .. O'Leske, Edward J ..... O'Leske, Joseph J.. . .. .....95, 171, ....51, 292. ......95, ...103, 260. , 159, 160, 270 98. 99, 107 ..........104 ....95 ....95 ffjifxi ...51 127 ...51, 256 79, 139, 256 .....51 ...100 ....105, 106, ....74 ....87 Olivet College Basketball Game ........ Olmsted, George D .... ......... 8 6, 286, Olschefsky, Edward J.. Olsen, Robert O. ...... . . . 112, Olson, Luther C.. .. . . .. Olson, Ray ,.... ............... . . O'Malley, Joseph E.. . . Omega Beta Pi Scholarship Cup... .. O'Neil, Albert J. ..... . O'Neill, Theodore ll... 112 307 293 266 113 95 261 113 113 103 93 104 271 169 107 113 286 258 51 100 135 137 104 110 113 91 94 293 113 112 95 104 104 51 94 95 107 87 103 252 93 87 230 257 86 257 91 102 109 100 113 24 94 94 106 100 113 74 94 141 79 95 73 113 94 186 95 95 100 51 71 303 111 113 208 287 52 235 88 137 73 160 195 88 O'Neill, VVilliam J. Orchovvski, Frank .... Oratoi ical hlerlal ..... O'Regan, VVilliam B.. .. O'Reilly, James T. .... . 71, Oregon State College Football O'Reilly, Joseph A.. . .. Orloft, Richard ....... Orrin, Phil ........ Ortwein, Marvin H.. . .. Osborn, Don A.. . . . . Osborn, VVilliam C. .... . Osborne, Francis C.. . .. Osebold, Edward J.. . .. Osterberg, Bernard Otermat, Ezra M. ..... . ja. Ottenbacker, Edmund J. 52, 116, 236, 262, Otto, Carl H. ........ . .... . Ozar, Clarence G. ..... . Pacevich, Adeline. Paccitti, Fiorino G Padberg, Louis R.. Paddock, Elmer J. Paek, Stephen ..... Page, Robert E .. Pahl, Joh.. F ...... Pajot. Palagi, Paling, Palisoc Palmer, Palmer Paluch, Papo, Pawn, Papp, Pardo, Parilla, Parish, Park, Clayton J.. Stephen A. John J.... P cp 747 .....-. - -, , Joaquin G.. .. Edwin B.. , John C... Roman J.. Louis ...... Andrew S.. Gregory. . .. Mateo ..... George, Ji Ivan VV.. . Anthony... Parkanzky , Andrew Parker, Dean VV.. . Parker, Harold... Parker, Harry C... 777 ---, 224 .23. 120 Game. . . N246 Ei .75. 263, ..70, 113, 113. 243, 103. XV... Parnes, VVilliam. .. Parochial High School Parr, Russell D. .... . Debating Parsaca, Robert ...... Leag . . . 95, Partridge, Truman IS.. . . .. . . . Partridge, Weldon T.. .. Pasieczny, Adam I.. . .. Pasko, Arthur M.. . .. Pasternak, Geza A.. .. Patil, Pandharinath .... Patt, Isadore .......... Patterson, Walter P .... Paul, Bolis J. ...... . Paye, Phillip H.. . .. Pearl, Albert ..... Pearlman, Jack ...... Pearson, Charles N. ...... . ...87, ...81, Pease, Ruth G. .--- . Peca, VValter P Peeke, Edwin S.. . .. Peet, Nat H. .... . Peister Peltier, Peltier, Peltier, Peltier, Pellegr , John .... .... Clifford James B.. . . . John L. ...... . Rosella M .... . ino, Baldino IL... Albert .......... Pelletier, Charles J. .... Pembroke, James A.. . . Pendergast, John E.. . . . Pendergast, Maurice D .... Penheld, Paul L. ...... . Pennel, Jolm I. ..... . Pequegnot, Lucie R.. . . Perfield, William J. 5 'P ..... -, .68. 266 260 75 282 280 112 286 .52 20 .79 69 200 107 137 113 274 105. 270 UC. 53, 240, 241, 292, 293, Perini, James G ...... .. Perinoff, Alexander. . . Perkowski, Joseph .... H354 250 102 159 121 107 198 103 247 95 112 267 113 261 103 107 112 302 283 281 105 139 91 91 287 106 25 106 111 306 91 271 113 52 112 80 80 75 105 24 106 103 95 52 89 147 74 266 103 91 95 91 139 52 105 74 95 141 141 112 271 275 95 52 112 159 53 S0 75 274 106 100 100 110 73 271 23 112 122 300 113 95 87 Perreault, Oliver H..112, 254, 255, 264, Perrone, Louis J. .................... . Perry, Alvin E. ...... Peters, Alex ............ . . . Peters, Christopher S.. . . ... Peters, Karl C. ....... .... . Peters, Michael F.. . . . . . .87 Peters, Ruth F. ...... .... . Petersrnarck, Frank L.. . . . . Peterson, Gunnar C .... . . . . Petix, Samuel A. ...... .... 9 5 Petracci, Angelo ...... .......... Petrimoulx, Arthur J.. . . .... 109, 278 Petty, Charles .... 79 292 Petz, Anthony J.. .. ..53, 71 Petz, John T. ....... .... 2 66 Pfeffer, Norman F.. .. . . . . . .. Phelan, J. Francis .... .. .53 268 Phelan, Paul V ....... ............ Phelps, Francis J. .... ............. . Pheney, John D .... .... 5 3, 155, 268 Phillips, Burdett ..... ............. Phillips, Carl ........... ............ Phillips, Frederick C. ............... .. Phillips, Homer A... .86, 139, 141, 286 Phillips, Joseph J. ...... ............ . Phillips, Robert YN.. .. Philomathic Society .... Piche, Robert C. .... . Pierlott, Robert Pierog, John S. ..... . Pierson, Charles L.. .. Pierson, Morris Pierson, Warner LL... R.... Piester, John W. .... . Pigman, Karl H .... Piklor, Stephen ....... Pilon, Ray A. .......... . Piotrowski, Bernard T... Pippin, Merle J. ....... . Plasko, Phil P.. .. Plasz, Peter ...... Ploe, Edward H. .... . Plourdi, Neal N.. . .. Poelke, Frederick G... Poirier, Charles E. ..... . Polakowski, John J., Jr. Polley, Thomas A ...... 95 Polonick, Anthony P.. .. Polovich, Stanley A.. . . . Pomaski, Arthur J.. . . . Pomykalski, Steve S ..... Poniatowsl-:i, Stanley J... Ponsetto, John Pooler, Silas ........ Popovich, Borah G... Porch, Frank L.. .. Porch, Marion Porter, Charles Portnoy, Harry .... Posner, Charles .... . . . Postula, Walter Potoczak, VValter L.. .112 Potts, Francis J. 53, 134, 135, 136 Potts, Harold VV ...... .. Pouliot, Francis H. .... . R. ...... . F.... B. ..... . Powell, Robert D.. .. . . Power, George G. ...... . Powers, Joseph A. 53, 109, 160, 258. 259. Powers, Lula E..29, 54, Pratt, William D. ...... . Pre-Junior Class ........ Pre-Junior Class Council. Prendergast, M. Daniel.. Prendeville, David O.. . . Price, Furman O. .... . Price, Mark M .... .... Price, Thomas R., Jr.... Primeau, John N. .... . Printz, Leon J., Jr.... Prockiw, Boris M.. .. Prokopp, George J.. .. Protaise, Brother. . . Ptak, Edward P .... Publications ..... Pukalo, George .... 126, 193 24-4 100, 262 242, ....70, ....86, .70, 286 ....71 ....87 .90, 276 127, 129 y 1.5 in 222 245 246 270 .79. 137 137, 141 263, 284 243. 280 284 286 265 94 100 111 113 112 140 113 100 53 286 113 279 293 189 267 80 269 70 100 269 95 73 100 287 87 102 300 105 113 287 113 113 25 100 113 248 103 94 95 277 109 75 106 100 113 113 135 103 103 71 113 70 105 136 105 104 102 80 247 53 87 271 73 141 244 105 285 281 103 77 78 95 285 112 95 141 287 88 100 92 70 54 125 104 Pullmer, Allan ......... Pulte, John M.. ....... .. Purchas, NVilliam J., Jr.... Purvis, William A ..... Putlevicz, Anthony P.. . . Putnam, Fred E .... ..... Pytlewicz, Stanley A.. . . C2 Quibell, Earl .......... Quick, Clarence Quick, Helen K.. . . ... Quick, Robert E.. .. Quigley, Alfred J.. .. Quigley, Eugene H.. . . . Quillinam, Jack C.. . . . Quinlan, John M.. . . . Quinn, Francis X .... Quinn, Thomas F. . . . . R Rabaut, Joseph H.. .. Rachwal, Charles A.. . . . Radlinski, Harry F.. . . . Radner, Irving ....... Radner, Ralph R.. . .. Radom, Max .......... Radzikowski, John C .... Rae. Matthew O. ...... . Rager, Ebert ............ Ragsdale, La Verne B.. . . . Raible, Frederick ........ Rakovan, Joseph P.. . . . Rambaldi, Ernest A.. .. Rammacher, Joseph J .... Rampe, Paul .......... Ranta, J. Richard .... Rape, Maynard T.. . . Rashid, Joseph G.. . . Rassel, Richard E. .... .. Ratcliffe, John A. 71,116, 117, 166 ...95, 98, 99 .....73 ...74 .fsi ....103 ...54 ....113 ....l08, 167, 170 Ratermann, Francis E ........ . Raterman, William F.. .. Ratjen, Doris E ...... .. Raubolt, Raleigh R .... Rauh, Louis H. .,... . Ray, Irving ......... Rayder, Theodore N.. .. Ream, Casper Rebain, Roman P.. .. Reck, Joseph E. ...... . Reck, Lawrence E.. . .. Redden, R. Roy ..... Redmond, Joseph H.. . . . Redmond, Robert L...73, Regan, James B. .... .. . Reid, Harvey VV.. .. Reiden, John P.. . . Reiff, Morris V.. .. Reilly, John L. .... . Reilly, Thomas L.... Reilly, Ward S. .... . Reinhardt, Robert ...... Reinhold, Lillian C.. . . . Reisdorf, Paul F. . . . . Reiser, John B.. . . . Reiser, Saul B.. .. Reiss, Rollin K. ...... . Reive, Bert ............. Remondino, Michael A.. Reno, George L., S.J .... Reschke, George Reschevsky, Samuel .... Retzlaff, Charles A.... Reuben, Myer ....... Reuter, George A .... Reynolds, James Reyser, F. ............. . Rheaume, Eleanor L.. . . . Rhinehart, Robert .... 2 ...86 ...54 245 44, ...92 ...QQ .92 270, 111 256 278 250 270 254, 272 104 103 260. 248 100 .95 286 248 256 292 248 .75 .....71 Rice, James T ....... . .... . . .. 70, 284 Richard, Frank A. ...... 111, 139, 248 Richter, Louis G.. .. .. . Ricica, Karel ..... .113 141 271 93 109 95 105 95 94 95 169 257 104 100 279 95 251 54 271 111 255 113 75 273 54 86 94 105 139 110 87 54 89 261 93 81 80 249 113 112 112 100 104 110 86 111 109 102 287 249 81 257 95 104 95 100 94 293 25 106 108 90 249 95 266 22 113 20 81 95 24 65 112 111 88 274 139 285 249 112 141 Rickenback, Clarence H. Rickenback, Roy A. ...... ..... . Rickle, Fred M. ...... . Riddell, William M.. . . . Rieden, James A.. . . . Riedan, VVilliam P.. . . Rigney, Charles VV.. . . Rigonan, Pio C. .... . Rigotti, Romolo ...... Riihimaa, William A .... .. ..l00. .54, 268, Riley, Gerald F. ................. . Riley, Lawrence G. 55, 152, 240, 241, Ringholz, Lapier G.. . . Rise, John L. ....... . Riss, Elmer A.. . . . Ritter, Donald A.. . . Howard D.. . . Ritter, Ritz, Joseph A.. . .. Rivard, Rivard, Francis L .... Cecil J .... Rivard, Reginald L.. . Rivard, Thomas E .... Rizzo, Daniel W.. . . . Roach, John H. . .. Roach, Melvin J.. . . . Roach, Norvell .... Robb, Charles D. . . . Robbins, Max ........ Robbins, Oswald M.. . . Roberts, Donald F.. . . Roberts, Enos A .... . Robertson, John M.. .. Robertson, Robert H.. .. Robertson, 'William .. Robins, Max ......... Robin, Oswald M.. . .. Robinson, Daniel XY. . . . Robinson, Edward XV .... Robitaille, Joseph ....... Robitell, Clarence A.. . . Roche, Joseph P. .... . Rocheleau, Morton A.. .. Rochester, Bernard P.. .. Rockwell, Frank H.. . . Rodman, Jack J. .... . Rodriguez, Horacio R . . Roehrig, Henry L.. . Rogan, Robert J. . . . Rogers, Russell M.. . . . Rogers, William F .... Rohland, Kurt M.. . . . Rohling, Charles J. . . . Rohrbaugh, Elwood L.. . Rohrig, Ignatius A.. . . . Rollins, Leo S. ...... . Rome, Albert ........ Roney, Charles J. . . . Roole, Harry VV.. . 242, 243, 93 105 286 54 100 87 269 55 113 105 55 256, 257, 262, 263, 303 256 ....72, 248 22 ....89, V ..... 90 ....90 ....2-16 55. 266 ....78, 79 ....71, 246, 55 ...94, 28 ....55. 256 ....95 .....55 Root, Willard G. ......... ..... 7 9, 254 Rose, Erie. . .......... . . 28, 29, 55, 280 Rosenberger, John ............ ....... Rosenthal, Irwin M ..... Rosenweig, Maurice. . . Rosingana, George L. . . Charles M ..... . Ross, Ross, Duncan D.. . . . Ross, Lawrence F.. . . Ross, Samuel ........... Rossie, Frederick A.. . . . Rossman, Bert D.. . . . Roth, G. Edward .... Roth, Robert W. ...... . Rothenberger, Carl Il. 79, 254, 255, Rothenburg, Julius .... Rothenburg, Saul ..... Roubie, Kenneth D... . . Roudoy, Victor A .... Rountree, John J.... Rowan, Harold J.... Rowda, Michael S ..... Rowland, Dudley Rozich, Joseph ........ Rozycki, Stanley F .... . Rubenfire, Harry ...... Rubenstein, Leslie L.. .. H3551 ....90 ....95 78 ....86, 286 .........102 264, 265 88 102 95 102 104 100 94 104 108 55 87 103 94 94 257 109 268 249 23 139 106 100 247 92 86 100 91 267 113 112 256 89 247 306 249 95 95 106 257 104 105 93 195 55 258 92 255 281 113 95 55 280 185 95 80 70 70 89 287 113 321 113 112 107 112 90 102 100 25 100 113 110 113 Rubenstein, Nathan D... Rubenstein, Philip I. .... . Rubenstine, Lawrence. Rubin, Nathaniel H .... Ruby, John .......... Ruffing, Clarence L. ..... . Ruhlman. Franklin D .... Rundels, James XV.. . . . Ruskin, Louis M.. . . . Russ, John A. .... .. Russell, John A. .... . Russell, Lyle VV ..... Russell, Miriam L.. .. Ruysser, Frank J.. . .. Ruysser, Henry A.. . . Ryan, Daniel O... . .56. 109, ....23, .87 268 260 1 1 .....73, 292 290 137 .92 264 .80 254 208 215 Ryan, David E. .... .. . . Ryan, George B. ..... ........... . Ryan, Harry B. 68, 69, 71. 175 242, 243. Ryan, J. L. ........... ...... . . Ryan, James A ........ ..... 7 0, Ryan, James H... ..... Ryan, John A.... Ryan, John H.. .. Ryan, Leo ....... ....... Ryan, Louis A.... . .... Ryan, Thomas J.. .. .. .78, 113, Ryan, XYilliam H. .... ....... . Rypel, Stanley A ..... , . , Rzany, Anthony J.. .. S Saar, Olaf ........ .. ...81, Sablacan, Fred XY... Saginaw Club ............. Sailer, Roman L. ............... . St. John's Basketball Game ....... . St. Xavier College Basketball Game. Salkan, Henry ........... Salmoni, Thomas XV.. . Samuels, Frank T.. . . Sampey, Hazel M.. . .. Sampson, Edward K. .... . Sampson, VVilliam J., Jr... Sandel, Joseph J. ....... . Sands, William ti. ...... . Santos, Bartholome, N. . . . Sargent, Maxwe'l L. . . . Saravolatz, Nicholas .... Sass, Thomas J. ..... . Sauk, John J. ..... .. Savage, XVilliam H. Savas, Angelo C. ..... . Savignac, Eugene M.. . . Saxer, Samuel ...... Scala, Arthur Scala. Fred F. ...... .. Schaal, Arnold A. ..... . Schachern, James Schafer, Paul J. .... .. Schafer, 50511113111 H Schalm. Norman Jfif Scharf, Lawrence A.. . . Schaub, Emelia ...... Schayowitz, Max ......... Scheafer, Howard A. . . . . Schemitz, Cyril A. .... . Scheidt, Michael F Scheifele, Aldred ...... Scheiwe, Ewald F. ..... . Schechter, Karl P ' .....Dlw, Schecter, Joseph ..... . Schearer, Criss J.. . . Schelke, Arthur, Jr.. .. Schenk, John A., Jr... Schick, Donald E. . . . . Schiff, Robert ...... Schiller, Carl L. . . . . . Schilling, Don ......... Schillinger, Louis P.. . . Schimmer, Harold C.. . . . .....95. 252 . . 100, 131, 286 lx. ................ . 135, 136, 101, 244, .95 Schink, Emerson H. .................. . Schintzius, Chester A.. . Schlack, Arthur A.. . . . . Schlaffer, Stanley J.. . . Schlager, Robert VV.. . . . . . . .90, 92, 139 95 88 lll 86 106 94 269 90 72 113 262 86 119 80 293 65 102 95 291 89 284 113 95 104 266 113 265 113 81 110 255 81 305 80 214 216 91 75 95 113 90 106 112 88 56 103 113 106 253 110 113 70 95 113 73 287 87 95 74 106 88 56 109 109 104 95 56 113 245 95 101 92 90 95 105 92 137 100 193 101 303 103 111 75 257 Schulte, Leo G. ....... Spiro, J Schlegel, Jack 1.... . Sclnnidt, Arnold R.. . . . Schmidt, VVilliam C.. . . . . .74, 234, Schmitt, Beatrice R. .... ........... . Schmitt, Norman L.. . . ........ ..... Schmitter, Charles R. ...... 56, 139, 286 Schmitter, Ernest .. .......... .. Schmitz, Arthur .... .. Schneider, Al ............ .. Schneider, Frederick J.. . . . . Schneider, Jack T. ..... .. Schneider, Ralph P.. . . . . Schoell, Harry J .... .... . . Schoenberg, Arthur J. .... . . Schoenrock, John A.. . . . . . . . .. Schohl, Albert XV .... . ......... . Schorn, Carl F. .... . . .72, 135 Schorn, Ralph M.. . . . Schram, Harry C. ..... . Schreiber, Fred 56, 23, 29. 164, 165, 256 Schreidell, Lawrence ..... Schrein, Norman F. ..... . Schroeder, Benjamin Schroeder, Charles Schueder, George F .... Schuett, Bromley B .... Schulte, Frances R.. .. Schulte, Gerard J.. . . . . Schulte, Henry J., Jr... 95 Schulte, Schulte, Schulte, Schulte Schultz Schultz Schultz Schultz Schurmer, Schwager, Schwartz, Schwartz, Schwartz, Schwartz. Leonard J.. . .. Joseph A.. . Vera ...... VValter T.. . . - Cecil M .... Julius F .... Vincent ...... VVilliam R.. .. Edwin T .... John H.. . .. George T.. . . . George A.. . .. Arthur J.. . .. A. .... ..... . .....80, 256, .....91,137 ......57 . . .103 ....122, Norbert G. ........ . . Schwartzberger, George H .... .. Schwartzer, Francis J. ...... .. Scott, Joseph, S. J. 20, 120, Scott, Ralph B. ....... . Sechrist, Haro'd ....... Seebaldt, Edward A... Seebaldt, Otto C. .... 70, 14 Seehoffer, Carl H ....... ..22, 139 Seeler, Richard H ..... Seethaler, Vincent. .. Seibert, Adam J. ..... . Seichter, Frank R.. . . . Seifert, Eugene V.. . . Sein, Ralph D ...... Seitz, C. Grove... Seitz, Harry ....... Selser, James C. .... . Seltzer, Louis ....... Semanchik, Frank H.. .. Senior Class ......... Senior Girls' Club .... Seper, Manning A... Sesny, Walter J.... Seth, Charles M. .... . Seyburn, Joseph D .... . Seymour, Herbert B.. . . . Shaden, Frank J. .... .. Shadko, Michael Shaefer, Carleton A.. . . . Shafterly, George ....... A .... . . Shank, Leroy S. ..... . Shapazian, Oscar Shapero, William .... P.... Shapoe, Fred ......... Sharkey, Bernard Sharpe, James A. .... . Sharrock, George O.. .. Shattuck, Albert Shaw, Charlton G .... . Shea, Emmett J. ...... . Sheahan, Theodore E.. . . . Sheckler, Duane V .... .. H .... E .... 141, 150,151, 6, 150, 270 246 135, 136, .. . . . . .104, ....113 .. 79, .....81, 109 56 235 103 95 287 139 75 94 103 95 56 108 104 102 109 136 107 104 86 57 94 88 257 141 280 87 244 113 57 79 171 101 107 101 102 102 103 101 112 112 112 57 107 104 152 113 107 57 271 248 92 113 102 73 71 94 73 141 105 91 104 27 307 89 107 87 272 101 102 95 57 88 72 112 108 113 113 57 92 79 266 110 95 92 Sheeran, Daniel H .... Sheets, Frank J. ..... .. Shefferly, George H.. . . Sheffick, J. Moruun .... Shelby, Sidney R. ...... . Shephard, Harvard VV.... Sheppeck, Michael ....... Sheremeta, John ....... Sheridan, George Sherman, Albert .... Sherman, Harold ....... Sherman, VVilliam F .... Shields, Carl J ..... . Shields, Clement A .... Shires, Charles J. ........ . Shook, 1Villiam J ...... Shroeder, Ross ...... Shreder, Raymond J. ..... . Shubnell, Leo T. 58, 118, 131, 135, Shulman, Isadore. ..... . . Sibley, E'rwin Sidle, John C. .... . Siegal, Max ........... Sieminski, Adam EI .... . .. .21 90, 93, 25.6. 254. 57 Shonberg, Edward E. .... .. 9 164 Siepierski, lValter 111 ....... .. Sierra, George ......... Sigur, Stanley S .... Sihler, John H ...... Silvers, Gertrude B. . . .. Simek, Adolph ....... Simek, Carl E ......... .... Simmons, Barney H .... Simms. Manuel S.... Simon, Ervin P. . . . . Simon, Leonard ...... Simonich, Virgil F.. . . Simpson, James F. . . .. Simpson, VVilliam ...... Simpson, VVilliam J .... Simsick, Raymond Sinclair, Frank D .... Sinder, Joseph ...... Singelyn. Frank J.. . . Sink, lllary M. .... . Sisung, Victor XV.... Siterlet, Earl A. ...... . Skalitzky, William Skalski, Stanley V ..... Skinner llledal ......... Skorupski, Edward S .... . Skorupski, Henry J.... Slaggert, Alfred N .... . Slater, Anthony B. ...... . 58, 112, Slattery, VValter E. ....... . Slater, Joseph C...84, 85, Slattery, William J ..... Slayton, Charles M.... Slimmon, Charles R ....... Sliwin, Edward P ......... Slonaker, Homer C.. . 93. Slusser, George C. ...... Slutsky, Jack W .... Slyker, Francis J ...... Smetek, Ladislaus F .... Smith, Alfred J. ...... . Smith Bernard J.. . . . . Smith Edward A., Jr.. .. Smith Francis E ..... . . Smith Frank E ..... . . . Smith George W ..... Smith Glen A. . . .. Smith Harry C. .... . Smith Henry C.. . . . Smith, Homer W. . . . . Smith, John J ...... Smith J. Lancelot ..... Smith, Marshall O. . . . Smith, Marvin W .... Smith Reginald L.. . . Smolky, Edward A.... Sneider, Walter J .... Sniecikowski, Frank .... Sobieski, Stanley J .... Soboleski, John J.... Social Events ........ Socie, Albert J.. . . . H356 ll 11 6. ...90 258 108, 165. 101 258 fii .28 .62 259 272 86 240 288 .95 258 259 139 29 .93 139 ...71 168 117 .88 .71 , 256 266 266 290 .87 101, 79, 57 95 257 100 255 87 305 91 79 111 113 113 101 90 301 273 87 111 91 241 107 103 73 71 106 289 266 113 72 71 259 297 87 301 58 113 228 23 108 113 81 141 113 89 111 92 74 89 73 160 306 95 23 88 257 106 95 107 75 101 267 90 111 70 112 267 291 106 58 112 159 113 112 113 103 95 58 87 111 112 137 113 101 101 113 163 70 1 9 Society of Automatic Engineers... Sodalities ............................ Sokup, Louis C. .................... .. Soleau, John T. .......... 110, 116, 258 Solomon, Sidney R .... ............... Solovich, Charles D ..... Soma, Caesar J. ...... .... . Somers, Arthur E.. . . . . . .92 Somerville, Bruce ..... ........ Sonnefeld, George G. .... ........ . Sonnhalter, William E .... . .... 89, 141 Sontag, Val C .... ...... Sophomore Class ...... . Sorenson, Pierce H ..... Sosnowski, Stanley Spagnuolo, Dominic. . . Spangler, Candace. . . Spano, Brone ........ Sparks, John W ..... Sparfing, John A ..... Spears, Alpha L .... . M.... Spelling, Paul ..... Spencer, Herbert M .... Spencer, Thomas J ..... Spickett, VVilliam J. Jr.. . Spillane, William M. . . . Spilman, Ilie M. . . . . Spindler, Marion ...... Spindler, Orville J. . . . Spinelli, Leo ....... acob ...... Spoutz, John J .... . Sprague, Frank VV .... Sprague, Spruit, Nicholas P .... Sprunger, Arlo H.. . . . Lawrence. . . Squires, Robert D.. .. Stack, Wilbert E.. . . . Stackpoole, John 1J..... Stackpoole, Philip VV. ....95 ....81 ....58, 290 ...109, 244 ...101, 286 .......109 70, 129, 135, 137, 262 Stacller. Albert J .... .................. Staeger, Alphonse T .... . .... . Stahl, John T. ........ 25 Stanbury, Franklin D .... Stanny, Adam R. ....... . Starkweather, Eugene D.. .. Starrs, Francis A ...... .. Starrs. VV. Joseph V .........103 28, 29, 85, 118, 129, 164, 165, 241, 262, 263 Stasiak, Milton Staub, Alvin F ..... . Staub, David G ..... .. Stawski, Frank, Jr.. .. Stawski, Stanley F .... Stead, Charles L ..... Steenkist, Henry ...... Stefani, Ferdinand G.. . . Stefani, Raymond Stefanowski, Philip Stefanowski, Robert A. 70 Stettes, Raymond G. ............ . Steger, Bernhart J ...... Stehle, Edwin Steigerwald, Francis. . . Stein, Allan E. ..... . Stein, Sol I ..... ...... Steinbicker, Robert H.. . . Steiner, Albert J ..... Steiner, Arthur E.. . . . Steintrager, H. R. ....... . Stelmaszczuk, Edmund . . Stelmaszezuk, Stanley .... Stempien, Joseph B .... Stenger, Edward A. 28, 29, 59, 164, 240, 249, 296 Stenger, John O .... .... Stepanski, Gerald J. . . . . Stephan, George A. .... . Stephens, Charles H.. . . Stephens, Leroy J.. . . . Stephenson, Richard . . . Sterbenz, George A. . . . Sternberg, Henry. . . ....112 ....101 ffffii ' '255' ....58 284 129,135 290 .........290 ..80, 88. 270 ...109 272 .......88 ....59 241,242,243 .. .... 59,256 ....90, 292 ...,105 ...... 90 301 149 79 259 88 86 102 268 95 102 304 113 83 104 92 71 305 101 113 292 113 106 113 58 291 81 89 166 245 101 111 23 287 24 73 112 95 58 113 284 111 106 73 112 107 105 131 240, 137 113 112 90 251 80 101 285 106 291 102 291 271 106 273 137 95 135 92 111 113 88 103 248, 257 86 95 293 141 23 59 172 Stevens, Delos H. . . . . Stevens, William .... Stevenson, John M .... ....... Stewart, Fred O .... .. .. Stewart, George Stewart, Harry F. . . . . Stewart, Thomas O .... Stock, Jack P. ....... . Stockwell, Bernard .... Stoddard, VVillis J.. . .. Storlfel, Joseph L. .... . Stoiber, Frederick R.. . . Stone, Frank J ..... Storen, VVilliam J .... . .. .74, 167, 266 .....86, 250 95 ......71, 248 .....98, 99 Storen, Mark E. . . . . . . .175, 183, 250 Stovel, Kenneth C.. .. .... . . . . . . Stowski, Stanley .... Stragier, Marcel A .... y Tocco, Peter J ..... . Streit, Marcel A .... .... Stritmatter, Leroy C. ........... . Stroebel, Mark W .... ......... 8 1 256., Student Athletic Managers ............ Sturm, Frederick B ..... . . . . . .113 Stuttle, Charles S .... ..... ......... Suarez, Miguel A. .... . . .21 22 Subora, Clifford A.. .. , .... . . . . Sullivan, Delmar J .... . . Sullivan, Emmet J. .... . . . . Sullivan Gerald M .... . . . . . . Sullivan, Hilory J. . .. .. . .65 Sullivan, James E. .... . . . . Sullivan, John D. .... .. Sullivan, John G. .... . . . . Sullivan, Joseph F. .... . . . . . . Sullivan, John J. .... ........... 8 9 Sullivan, Leo E .... .............. .... Sullivan, Lucille M ..... . . 103, 126 129 Sullivan, Morton A ...... ............. Sullivan, Norbert J. ..... ...,. . . . . Sullivan, Norwell M. .... ..... 8 4 85 Sullivan, Raymond J. ............... 79 Sullivan, Richard J. .... 29, 59, 116 268 Sullivan, Robert J. ................... . Sumner, Bernard J. . .. . . . . . Sunday, Daniel M .... . . .21 Sunders, Singh ..... ,,,, 8 1 Suroiec, Roman J .... Surowitz, Harry .... Sussman, Ben ...... Svoboba, Cyril P.. Swan, Lloyd ...... Swan, Paul C .... Sweeten, Donald . . . Sweeney, Bernard J .... Sweeney, Edward T .... Sweeney, George G.. . . Swonk, Wayne F .... Symposium Society .... Szal, Louis B ....... Szczesniak, Harry J .... Szejda, John C. ........ .. ...80, 276 ....85, 87 ...59, 284 Szlachetka, Edward M .... Szok, Benedict B. ..... . Szumiak, Marie. . . . . Szurpicki, John .......... . . Szypulski, William A.. .. 'r Tabor, Saul E. ...... .. Taipale, Frederick P ...... Tanner, Frederick G ..... Tannian, Philip A.. . . Tappy, Ralph W... . Taschner, Frank J .... Taubitz, Herbert J. . . . Taulbee, Russell L.. .. Tavarozzi, Albert . . Tayler, Frank J .... , . Taylor, Hanley ..... . . Taylor, Kenneth G .... .... Taylor, Lloyd ....... ......, Taylor, Nordon J.. .. ..... . .276 Taylor, Otis A ..... ...68, 69 Taylor, Ralph C ...... ......... 8 0, Teagan, Robert J. .... .... 7 3, 166, Teagan, Stanley J.. .. .... . . . .. 87 92 59 267 251 93 101 95 95 105 106 137 249 101 251 101 137 93 101 103 257 179 254 73 23 81 88 113 21 286 89 113 87 95 95 75 171 112 87 94 80 269 113 112 286 113 80 277 91 112 95 79 72 87 284 285 101 301 73 92 70 74 102 95 59 101 91 108 59 112 25 101 110 92 94 79 59 95 79 277 72 81 268 102 Tear, Malcolm C... .. .95, Teeple, Lloyd M. .... . . Tegler, Lawrence T.... Telep, Paul A. ..... .. Telma, Eugene Temchin, Max W. .... . Tenaglia, Thomas A .... Tennant, Lloyd B .... Tepper, William li .... Terhorst, Robert Terrell, Edwin G,... Terry, Virgil Tetmarsh, Jack R.. . . .. Teubert, Jack W. 84, 85, 88, Thacher, Oren K. ...... . Thaldorf, Leo A.. . . . Thaler, Ford A. .... . Thayer, Delbert Theeck, Eldridge C. . . Theisen, Harry VV. . . Theisen, VValter J. . . . . Thibert, Herman L ...... Thibodeau, Robert Thiefels, Francis M. .... . Thielen, Paul F. ........ . Thierault, VValton D ..... Thomas, Carl W. ...... . Thomas, Robert H ....... Thomas, Robert W.. . . . Thomas, Stanley C... Thompson, David D. . . . . Thomson, Donald B.. . . Thornton, Charles F.. .. Thornton, Thomas G.. . . . Thorpe, John R. ..... . Thorpe, William P.. . . . Thrasher, John C. . . . . Tiedel, William ...... . Tiffany, Kenneth C. ....... 74, Timada, Bibiano A.. . . Titcomb, Clinton S. . . . Tlica, Joseph J .... . . Tobin, Phillip G .... . . Tocco, Joseph ..... .... 8 6, Toffaleti, Fred B.... Toland, John M .... Toldi, Steve ........ Toler, Charles L .... Toles, Milton K.. . . . Tonani, John J ..... Toppin, Cfare I ..... Tost, William C. .... . Toth, Anthony ......... Tourlgny, Alphonse J .... Toutant, Selah A .... . Tower .............. Townsend, Albert D.. . . Townsend, Robert E.. . . Toy, Harry S ....... Track ............ Tracy, James A.. . ......... . . . Tracy, Lawrence E. ......... . Treen, John C..126, 135, Tremblay, Eugenia ....... . . Trenkle, Cyril L.... Trenkle, Joseph F. ..... . Tressenberg, Eugene D.. . . . Trinity, Granville J ,.,... Tripp, Allen F .... ..... Tloester, James A ..... Trombly, James A.. . . Troy, Carl NV. .... .. Trudell, George Trudell, John A ..... . Trudoi, Albert ................ Trumble, Ronald G. .......... . 137, 135, 286 ...72 .oo, 2:10 . 79, 254 168, 248 ....103 126, 129 243, 260 102, 129 ......91 .60. 292 175, 250 ..........113 137, 286 .72, 282, . . 8 . '90, 5555 E55 sggai Tulsa University Football Game ....... Tumminio, Joseph ....... Tunney, J. Emmett .... Tuohy, Dennis M .... T11fCl1an, Emil ....... Turrell, Douglas B .... Tykoski, Bernard P .... H3571 287 70 93 108 282 89 101 113 267 105 110 101 255 249 113 23 81 72 60 95 160 110 92 60 130 92 92 261 75 95 89 75 135 304 90 102 293 101 251 302 102 113 102 287 111 79 103 103 283 113 104 101 95 90 110 74 126 112 91 24 219 103 80 251 168 103 103 113 87 93 284 94 104 113 95 139 261 188 107 92 103 71 95 101 Ulberg, Cornelius J ..... .. . .....b-'9 Lillrich, Frank J. .......... 60, 109. Ulrich, Elmer F. .... 113, 135, 166, Unferfate, John ll., J. ...... .. Unger, Jack ti. .......... 101, 113, Union Board of Governors ....... Union Opera ......... ....,,.,, Vnsworth, Robert U. ...... 60, 109 Urliani, Gaeton ....... ......... lfrschalitz, l'aul E.. .. V Vachon, Lester B. 28, 29, 60, 160, 164, Valentine, Norman D. 165, 184 28, 29, en, VanAtta, George W.. . . . Vance, Paul N. ...... .. VanDoemel, John C .... Van Vandemeer, Myrton ..... Vanden Bossche, XValter Van Van Fleteren, Fred C .... Van Van Landingham , La wrenc Van DeKeere, Michael A. 84, 85, 89. 164. 165 .....60 ....98 168, 191 Dusen, George C .... .. ,,., .......71 Fleteren, Henry C. ........ 61 Loom, Francis M.. . . VanLooy, Henry A. .... . eC ....... Van Matre, Harry C ..,, .. Van Nollebeke, Frank . . . . Van Nortwick, Harry Van Ryn, Peter ............ Van Tiem, Elmer C.. . .. Van lVayne, Henry J.. .. Van Zile, Donald H .... . Vargas, Victor ........ Varsity Hockey .... Varsity News ........ Vaughan, Archie P ..... Velasquez, Catalino V.. . .. Vellmure, Harry F ..... Ventimiglia, Samuel .... Veprek, John W. .... . Verbiest, John Vers, Joseph ...... Versaci, Samuel J .... Vial, Fernand ...... Viertel, Laura M .... Viertel, Rose .......... Vigar, William J. ...... . Vilalpando, Raphael Visaya, Modesto R. .... . J.... Vogt, Reinhart E .... .. Volin, Max A ..... Volkovich, Ralph .... 248, 278, 244 270 268 246 248 292 99 266 103 290 290 .79 .89 Volkovich, Sydney .... ............ Von Rosen, John Vosu, Raymond J.... Voss, Mae B. ....... . Votrobeck, Joseph Vreven, Rene ........ W VVachter, George R .... Wade, George H ..... VVagener, Nicholas J .... . 1 a ....101 21 61, 280 U 74, 246 113, 258 21 ..i..61 NVaggoner, Alfred C. .... .... . . VVagner, John L. 74, 166, 167, 244, VVagner, lN'illiam F. 245, 28 29 61 89116,117, 244, 245, 278, 279 Wainright, William L ..... Wakefield, Gerald 278 135 Waldo, Paul VV.. . . . . - - Walker, Alden D.. . . . . . . 79 Walker, Adelore M. . . . ....... . . . . . VValker, Edwin R. . . . ......... . . .286 Walker, John E .... . .... 61, 109, 266 Walker, Joseph D. .... ........... . Walker, Joseph V. .... . . . 101 249 279 245 25 271 78 134 269 60 80 267 249 293 101 113 267 113 140 95 291 291 101 104 87 107 110 103 88 94 92 24 61 228 129 101 112 95 110 61 137 61 137 22 61 281 104 91 71 240 71 247 108 259 105 113 25 22 104 113 118 112 279 155 112 91 95 244 101 287 267 91 135 XValker, Thomas ........ . 89 1Valker, VVilliani M. . . ...28 29 61 XValoski, Bennie .... ,......... S 8 XValsh, Francis P... .... 101 286, 287 XValsli, George J... . ........ .. 101 XValsh, Jolm G .... . ....... 103 129 VValsh, Leo VV. .... ...62 268, 269 XValsh, Robert 1'1.... ...... 79 95 XYalsh, Thomas NY... ......... 102 XValter, Burnell J. ..... ...80 256, 257 VValter, Sherwood A.. . . . . . 73 XValters, Gilbert G. .... . .. 113 VValters, Orwell XV ..... ......... 1 10 VValtman, Joseph A .... . .. .62 250, 251 XYaltz, Paul VV. ....... ......... 9 5 VValz, Augustine J. ..,. .. 107 XVa:'chol, Michael ...... i............. 1 05 VVard, Howard R. 62, 109, 137, 139, 141 270 271 XVard, James J .......... ...... 7 5 260 261 XVard, Thomas G.. . . ............. . . 113 VVard, Thomas M... ,. .81, 290 291 305 VVard, Thomas VV .... .... 278, 279 VVardell, Gerald L... . . . . . 90 VVark, VValter E.. .. ... 95 NVarner, Harry O.. .. ... 25 VVarner, Stillman ..... . 72 VVarnock, NVilliam G.. .. . . 113 Warras, Jolm L ..... 74 XVarren, John M. .... .. 107 VVarren, YVilliam NV.. . . . .. 95 Wasko, Peter P ........ .... 7 2 VVasserfallen, Charles F.. .. ... 105 XVatson, Arthur T. .... .......... 9 5 VVatson, James R.. .. .. .......... .. 248 NVayne, Peter H .... .... 1 07 137 141 Weadock, John K .... .....,.... 1 13 VVeaver, Carl J. ..,....... ..... 6 2, 256 257 VVeaver, Francis E. 70, 242, 250, 251. 243 264, 265 XVeaver, Paul V ........ ....... 1 12, 256 257 VVebb, Charles G.. .. .. ...... . . . . . 74 VVebb, John E. ..... ,, 62 Webb, VVil1iam W. . .. .. .. 74 Webber, Morgan G.. . .. . . . . 24 NVeber, Earl W. .... ..... 1 02 135 Weber, Ralph L.. .. . . . . . .62 266, 267 YVebster, Morris ........... ......... 7 2 Wegrzynowicz, VVi.liam A.. . . ... .. . 81 Weightmann, Frank W.. . . ..... . . . . 95 Weiler. Frank C. ........ ...80 256, 257 XVeinandy, John A. ........ . . . . . 103 VVcingarden, Lawrence ......... 88 VVe-ingarden, Max ........ ..... 9 0 276 277 XVeins, George A. 15, 62. 155, 164, 165. 240, 241, 242. 243, 278, 279 VVeinshelboim, Isadore. . . . . . 95 NVeinstein, George A... .. . 104 VVeintrob, Arthur .... ..... ...... 9 3 XVeise, Joseph R. ..... ........,. . .88 199 Weiss, Joseph ............ 270, 271 276 277 VVeithoff, Edward A. .............. 260, 261 Weitzman, Louis G., S.J. ..... ....... 2 1 NVelch, Arthur J ........... ....... 2 3 VVelling, Cletus J ..... . .. ...... 62, 248 Welling, Eugene J... .. .94, 248 249 Wells, Don F. ...... ......... 1 13 VVelsch, John P ..... . . . . . . 88 Welsh, Paul J. ...... ........ 1 07 XVendt, Herbert J .... . ...72, 158 254 NVeremeck, Fred A ..... Werner, Lawrence H. . . . XVerner, Robert F. .... . xVC1'llCl'fc'. Albert L ...... 1Vernette, Richard H.. . . XVersching. Joseph L.. . . VVest, Frerl L .... ...... NVexler, Donald S. .... . XVeyand, Gertrude A.. . . XVhaley, Robert ....... VVheller, Elton B.. . . VVhelan, Albert . . VVhelan, James J.. . . . VVhise, Kenneth J .... NVhite. Gilbert J.. . . XVhite, Jack P .... XVhite, Jerry P.. . . XVhite, Louis E.. . . . VV11ite. VVhiting, Norman F.. .. Jack G. ..... . XVhitlock, Reuben C.. . . . VVhitston, Clarence NV... XVholiwhan, John W. . . . . VVich, Henry S. ...... 102, VVienczewski, Theophil VV ....... VVieth0ff, Edward A ..... XVigle, Charles ....... VVigler, Sidney ..... VViles, Harold B. .... . NVilhelm, Herbert VVilke, Albert VVilkes-Barre Club .... ......107, 126, 129, XVilkins, Harold B.. .. VVille1nain, Louis ..... wmett, wmef, J Benjamin J.. .. ohn L ,...... XVilliams, Don G.. . .. VVilliams, George B.. . VVilliams, Jane . .. VVilliams, John E. . . . . lForeign Trade! NVilliams, Joseph M.. . .. VVilliams, Sylvester T .... YVi1mes, Henry ....... . VVillson, XVilliam A ..... VVilson, Albert G.. . . . W'ilson, Bernard T.. . . . VVilson, Harry L. .... . XVilson, Raymond C.. . . VVini1ner, Harry G.. . .. VVinter, John S. .... . VVirt, Irving 1. ..... . Wirwaitis, Frank J.. .. VVischman, Leo J .... XVise, Ralph H. ....... . Wiseman, VVilliam A.. . . XViskofske, Harry J... .. NVismer, Otto G. .... . XVitchell, Marshall P.. . . VVitker, Louis C. ..... . Wizark, Bernard A.. . . VVobrock, Howard H.. .. VVoelkers, Norbert J... NVojtuski, Leo J.. . .. Wolf, Alfred H. .... . VVolf, Marcell F.. . . . Wolfe, Morton L.. . .. VVOIPE, D avid.. ..... Wollenberg, Robert A .... Women's League ..... Wood, Clyde H.. .. H3581 110, ...95 95,139 .......99 79, 254 137 135 63, 252, . . . .107 ...81 71, 248 ...2-2-, 63, 266, ....75 ....75, 110 i 109, 272 75 62 105 113 92 113 112 62 111 23 111 91 244 105 95 101 197 103 , 255 71 104 141 63 169 253 108 63 75 141 81 71 305 131 63 104 106 249 73 110 108 63 63 23 105 63 113 75 93 107 90 112 113 110 106 90 92 24 267 95 107 260 '63 95 260 101 273 86 70 122 93 Wood, Joseph ........ Wood, Russell E ..... . VVoodbeck, Milford Woodhouse, James Woods, Wallis E. ...... . Woodworth, James Woolnough, Clark NV.... Woonton, Lionel VVrathell, VVilliam H.. . . Wright, Cecil M. .... . VVright, Earl A. .... . Wright, Harold R.. . . . YVright. Stanley G. ..... . Wroblowski, Arthur J.. .. VVunsch, Ernest ......... XVurzer, Louis C ..... Wysong, Karl K.. . . Wyte, Charles. . . Y Yack, Howard L.. . . . Yaeger, George W.. .. Yagiela, Stanley ..... Yancy, Archie H... . Yaretski, John S .... .. Yaroch, Ferdinand J. . . . . Yaeger, Archie Yungling, Carl Yoder, Herman .... Yost, Ruth ...... Yott, VVilliam J .... A ..... A.... Young, Frank J .... Young, Herman .... Young, Iris. ........ . . Young, John E. .......... . Young, Raymond G ..... Young, Youngblood, Joseph A... Yuengest, John L.. . . . Yurgel, William J.. . . . Samuel S. ..... . Z Zaagsma, Alexander Zander, Albert W. ..... . Zanotti, Richard R.. .. Zbudowska, Helen ..... Zbudowski, Myron R.. . .. Zechlin, Mila L. ...... . Zegarowski, Chester A... 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