University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI)

 - Class of 1929

Page 1 of 433

 

University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1929 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1929 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1929 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1929 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1929 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1929 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1929 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1929 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection
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Page 12, 1929 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1929 Edition, University of Detroit - Tower Yearbook (Detroit, MI) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 433 of the 1929 volume:

'A - 5 If' Ralph Uohnston Gditor Holm Green managing editor mary Friedl " ' 'Business manager games 'Frazer 4 Cnrcnlatnon manager Ralph 'Boone 0 4' Hssocnate Qdltov Clarence Bllmmev f' Hssociate Gditov G. Cawoll Dusseg A 4 Hssociate editor Frank Uenneg 0 Dhotographg Gdltov Uames 'Brennan 4 A A Hrt GdltOI' Uohn Qlnalleg A A 0 Qports Gclltov wtllmam Dawlngton Humor editor i sefofgyi ,5. " . ,,,, A r 4. iw 2 are-'N D err if Y et i i 4 so Qi S g+1k-J?f'?f4k-AviY4Jf-ffvfnx-ff-4kv'?+J?-'T-'?"5+'S'v4kviX4zk+Zkif'b?4'E N3 f if 4 r 21 he 1929 Gower seeks to con' 4 i through the words on its pa the true record of the progress Q Q lma ater and the aceompli 4 41 ments of her students. ag 1 le t of X "fifvZs.. 533 4 ra? v rr in 34 4 41 Q, ,sk O , 1-25? tiff? 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'u ANR JOHN P. MCNIOHOLS, SJ., President GEORGE L. RENO, SJ. VicefP'reside-nt GEORGE A. MCGOVERN, SJ. Secretary JOHN T. MORTELL, SJ. Treasurer 6 j.xMEs A..MESREL1., SJ. Dean of Nfeu FLORENCE E. DQJNCJHUE DCUTI of YVnmen, Registrar KATHERINE H.-XN-TCUSTEN B ufsu 1' ARTS AND SCIENCES 1. JOSEPH HORST, S.1., Dean C. BALDWIN BACON, A.M., LEO E. BUSS, M. 8.5 RAYMOND CORRIGAN, 8.1.5 MICHAEL CRAVATTE, Ph.D.g CYRIL R. DEFEVERQ ORMOND T. d,HAENE, 8.1.5 CHARLES W. DUFFY, A.M,g HARMON W. DUNHAM, M.8.g ALPHONSE 1. EI, A.B.g ALOYSIUS F. FRUMVELLER, 8.1.5 ALEX' ANDER GARCIA, A.B.g ALBERT GARTNER, A.M., MARK S. GROSS, 8.1.5 WILLIAM H. HAWKES, M.8.g DENNIS R. JANISSE, A.M., LEON S. JOHN- STON, A.M.g LAWRENCE W. KROHAg WILLIAM 1. MALEDON, ROBERT E. MANNING, 8.1., CHARLES H. METZOER, 8.14 FREDERICK A. MEYER, 8.1. 5 1. EDWARD MILLER, B.8.g RICHARD A. MUTTKOXVSKI, Ph.D., JOHN T. NOONAN, 8.1.5 CHARLES ROEMER, S.1., MIGUEL A. SUAREZ, AB., DANIEL M. SUNDAY, A.B.g RENE VREEVEN, A.B., WALTER S. WEEKS, M.A.g LOUIS G. WEITZMAN, 8.1. E273 G ..-f 1. -. YT. 'I I' .f?""'.'f" ' H. ' v A ue" 52514 '!...4 r- ,IN "A I' A --, . 2. .. R - ,- . 5 I 3-4-:rev g I A 1 V - 4. Q' . .MI DAY CCMMERCE AND FINANCE CARL H. SEEHOFFER, LLB., M.C.S., C.P.A., LLD. Dean CARL F. BEHRENS, M.S.g LYNDON O. BRONVN, AB., DR. EDXVIN O. GRAEFFE, LD., F. H. GRIFFIN, B.S., M.A.g E. T. HART, A. B., O. W. HEDGES, A.M., LL.B., ID., SIMEON JANES, M.C.S., C.P.A., L. K. KIRK, AB., JOSEPH A. LUYOKX, A.B., LLM., C. E. MOCURRY, A.B.g VICTOR X. MITCHELLQ D.ANIEL J. MOYNIHAN, AB., BERT REIVE, M.C.S., LL.B., C.P.A.g E. A. ROBERTS, B.C.S.g DR. HENRY WILLMES, Ph.D. A . .. . 2 A f ., 1'-:Q -'Y Ib . " ,y g f 1 'J' .'I'f.2ff',',1-jf'-'I SIZV.:-+13 ' I I , ,Ag-5... 3255? "ju All - JQRFQL ... :RV if . -- 4iM...2'77QL'L""1'lM3 -fy, ?L.'l 4: I, L233 . .- - N-.-.V - ---' - Lg, K . W 5 if lr., 5. -,,g A, --.,. V 's ,A-,J .- "" ..".Q2 Vi. ,I'f?...Li 5' 71-II' 'rig I Ali 3 - + 1394.1 'LI g a I' 1, .1 .,. I, f I 9 -'Ja .' 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'I - 1 -1 4-If ' 'af I ,rrhpqf-p. ily- if -mg in .3 4 .grae .....,!y. , ,Q 7,4 5, 1, 4 . ,, f , E -1 he -L 'J ' If .ij j5g1L4,1Lfg. I L, gif.. 'Jjg 1 ffjr .A Ria,-.5-.' A ' W. ., f J' f 3 V , , . . Y , 'f I .ffd AJR TS infsifw ,rv-k 'u ' .J ."W3,,v' imjiif LSWJ AM Q . I 1 ff. 'I 'Yi Wa' YI. "Y JJ Sk .E IRG Y J me Im JI.. -f - Ia. J Ja 3 ,f 'Wx .,,,. . ,R X-'J I. gif -I -.An if il 1. N5 mg CR' -I-vw, .Lf W . ,L ,, '..'v,- W I Im I H: I, -v WU , .W 'mv' a'E?'i'Z .-1.7 If .r, gjfTJ'Ffi .Tv-k ,If 5 - -'Q' 'rqky : JE fl fu "Lf if J . 3 I a' Q2 ff 'Saw ffwifftg "' PT . zfhlrfil . :BF . ,I wk' Q2 ff':,'l V B ,fl 6 flfwy Ii MF' L5 .5 K .I ,- ENGINEERING RUSSELL E. LAWRENCE, M.S., Dean CLARENCE L. ALTENEURGER, M.S.g PETER ALTMAN, B.AeE.g WILLIAM BAKERQ DONALD BIGGE, B.ch.E.g BERT N. BLAKESLEE, B.S.g L. ROBERT BLAKESLEE, B.S. of A.g HAROLD C, BOOTHROYD, B.Ch.g GILBERT BOYDQ THOMAS CASTONGUAYQ WILLIAM CROXVLEYQ JASPER GERARDIQ DAVID P. GILMORE, M.S.g PAUL P. HARBRECHT, A.M.g WILLIAM H. HAWKESQ GEORGE J. HIGGINS, B.S. in Ae. E.g CLAIR C. JOHNSTON, B.C.E.g HARRY M. KEAL, A.M. , I --D QQI 1:5 ji ,fq 121' jLf2v32-w.f'g?:EAA..,-E11-'?:If". , Mufti? milk .,,,"?f-:',7.".Ar' REQLQEQQRELEQRLGQEREQ' .,.-. WJWADw.1'r4 V797 L'M ' lf?-91 4' 4- 42 PM ' 115 I. gg +I.. rw. ., 5, F Iv "fair , V f' 1 1 -L M' HF.. 'N' fl 1 A-f C '- v ' ly rfy' I. E. T, Q QI. f 045.0 I F PI XM " .uifkfr 1, Vx ' If-.IH 'I L XA, ,V 9 ,V I ' jf I wx - I 1 I . ' 'HT , , I ,1' . l Nix., , J I 1-. 1 31 . vg- J '- F Y 3. v I 1' lv 1 ' v. I .. , ' .. .,, I N I " ,LI E,-'JV ..-.1 .Rtymf if ' I' Q' - ,, I '4 Q I 'Is m V-L' I I 1 ., , f,.,u I F ,w ,".'f,'.f w ",'I.-INN . wk " 4,1-Jury Lf .H wg.,-1 If H.: . 1-?i-'l"f,"?'-F Y.. 5 Q., . .. Lu . 'W '31-V I, QT , me ,JR If -IH I , ':Q'n"lI W , -f- - , III FN :".. MH R N f' RF I 'lm pf J Nu.. , , I, F15 "- if 5. N1kk'I'i2J'5 sf'-A 5'-2q,Yg'1ff1 ,IJ UM' ' I' mi., M. 113133 jf gf' lm IMF 'e?Wggw ww ,E gg I N -,K FL- ,w wi A 1'f:47fg A .44 J. ,v,j' 'fp " -f 'f7x. I .Q 1 ' .Il 5, .TH . x ' ,J ' N ENGINEERING JOHN P. MORRISSEH', Regent JOHN KENNAUGHQ FRANCIS J. LINSENMEYER, B.M.E.g RAYMOND MCCAUSEYQ JAMES L. MCGEARY, S.J.g HERMAN E. MAYROSE, B.S. in M.E.g WILLIAM MAYROSEQ J. EDXVARD MILLER, B.S.g CLAYTON J. PAJDT, BC.E.g WARNER PIERSONQ WARD S. REILLY, M.S.g LANVRENCE RILEY: DUDLEY H. ROWLAND, B.Cl1.E.g RALPH STOODYQ RALPH W. TAPPY, B.S. in Elec. JOSEPH TEPLEY, S.J.g HARRY O. VJARNER, B.S. in Elec. E.g WALTER S. WEEKS, M.S. 42301 PETER J. MONACHAN, Dean GEORGE A. MCGOXVERN, S. Regent ARTHUR J. ABBOTT, ARTHUR J. ADAMS, FRANCIS W. ALLEN, LLOYD AXFORD, JOHN W. BABCOCK, MERLE A. BRAKE, ANTHONY T. BRAY, HON. VINCENT BRENNAN, LOUIS H. CHARBONNEAU, WARD COLVERL CHARLES E. DUFFY, JOHN H. ENGEL, WILLIAM H. FALLON, ALVIN D. HERSCH, PAUL H. KING, LOUIS W. MCCLEAR, GEORGE H. MARSTON, PETER J. MONACHAN, HON. PATRICK H. O1BRIEN, ANTHONY PARK, CHARLES A. RETZLAFF, LAWRENCE SPRACUE, HARRY S. TOY, HON. DONALD VANZILE, WILLIAM G. WEBER, OTTO G. WISMER, ERNEST WUNSCH. X311 LAW uf P 'QM L 1!-K. I, H+ M4 :few .- 'fw 9. ji 717' ' , ,154 P L. ififinfa i"'H if . 1 ."'1 f' rf-.ff "fr fax. X, um ,, nm. , . ".,qf I A I V, 4 V, 1' A' V. :- 3. Atv. I 2145. ff 3-F... :P . 1 151 NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE ff'g'f1N GEORGE A. MOGOVERN, SJ., Regent if" HAZ JAMES H. BLAKEQ THOMAS A. EVANS, C.P.A.g CHARLES D. CARRQ FRED 19- J N. CLARKEQ LAWRENCE E. COLLINSQ FRANK M. CONROYQ A. M. CREEDg HERBERT B. CROSS, B.G.S.g LSUDZ CRUSOE, McS.g CHARLES A. DALY, Qgfjj M.A.g JAMES S. DISSETTE, C.P.A.g FRANK W. EDWARD, Ba..C.A.g ml Q", ANTHONY W. EILERS, B.S.g ASA O. GALLUP, C.P.A.g GEORGE ZHEGXVIG, ,gfk B.A., B.C.S.g JOHN HIGGINSQ WILLIAM N. HINES, A.B.g SAMUEL E155 J. HOEXTER, M.E.g JOHN A. JORGENSON, C.P.A.g W. KELLY 5' ff, JOYCE, A.M. L.L.M. ,fig Jsj v'Qr5.?q?,.5, HL:-J it 5-T5 J,"jQ9 L ig 5521 I. ,'f .Q A Lf 3-'fl' lif. IL - 1. fwfr. B Ex. 5 .- .Wig-?5T".' ri 31 I H '5 . .4 . iq . W f N, ' .Q - f V4 I! 4 '. I. ky' 'I ,I 19" . 1-If X 1 ti X X J 9 K 1 " A YIN : J L W. f. rl. 5, 1 .S --.ry . .I V-F-.I ,I .Nw Twig L Ai -,E . .IV 'fffQI:5f:! Vqfyjfxi... I '-I 'v.:l?L'W' win?-f'7' JVM ww ,.1,. X ,L .. 1:3 ---5 1 ," 3- 131 4 ff' W .01 ILL. Q W' ., .vw -.F mf if .11--f 'WJ af W 'g59.3Q"1i' .fm A A I? E. 'Nu 4.T'Q.L.LfE ?3:.?fr. 'I gl L25-A-f' Q1 .9 'I 'I,'j' ,T JL: L . IJ' I . NIGHT GGMMERGE AND FINANCE JOHN A. RUSSELL, A.M., LLD., Dean ' DONALD M. KIMBALL, C.P.A.g PETER F. KINSLEY, B.C.S.g JOSEPH F. LATOURELLEQ CHARLES T. MODONALDg LESTER J. MOCARRENg LOUIS MCCLEAR, LL.B.g ARTHUR L. MCGRATH, A.B.g JOHN G. MCNALLYQ ' JOHN MAHERg LOUIS F. MERTZQ WILLIAM B. OHREGAN, A.B., LL.D.g PAUL L. PENEIELD, B.A.g JOHN W. RANKINg ENOS A. ROBERTS, B.C.S.g RUSSELL I. ROSE, G.P.A.g ALFRED N. SLAGGERT, M.A., LL.B.g GERALD E. STEDMANQ VICTOR C. SWEARINGEN, A.B., J.D.g ARTHUR J. WELCH, C.P.A.g AMOS C. WINOER, C.P.A. .1 1, J, H., "W Nl I U N I I ' E351 45 SX I2 Q Q Q Gm Yup W 5i A if J W ,877 1'5- ax Q H, " , W fx 4 4' MGS "lm 6 saga? 5'Qx C393 1 fffzggq f- - 1 if fs Qffw' 3 C! f1 X ff'1 W mx .", e'Xfew:,f 'wa' 1 A I 1 x "J .WA 5. , My .. QQ ,Glu 7? ,V , 'ight' vp? L F- 2? ,Q 5 Q W QL, . 1 - ,m Fifi s lg. -rx, fs. ,-6555 53,42 x .:. 1. f X qs 'P Z? ,559 EQ ' S M X 5 - X' ' V- ix 5-gL:.g2J,3g,,g:fzf,'5a f ' 1 , O O Q 4 - 4 f , B 5 5. A be 'J 5? E 522 05275 Y' I my ,ff - S553-.94 'Ax TC-C N' M M gjglj iii Joi? x F gi fr' Left to Right: First Row-Barr, Brady, Brown, Crowley. Second Row-Deloge, Fitzpatrick, Kammer, Kelly. 'Third Row-Long, McCormick, IvIcGovern, Mittig. Fourth Row- Mullin, Pequegnot, Shea, Trudeau, Ulbrich. E363 SENICR CLASS CCUNCIL CFFICERS THOMAS M. MULLIN f f f President DANIEL G. SHEA f f f VicefPresident LUCIE R. PEQUEGNOT f f f Secretary GEORGE D. MCCORMICK f fTreasurer ARTS AND SCIENCES HARVEY J. LONG f f f f President NED R. FITZPATRICK f f VicefPresident JOHN M. TRUDEAU f SecretaryfTreasurer DAY CCMMERCE AND FINANCE LEO S. MITTIG fffff President THOMAS J. CONNELL f f VicefPresident LUCIE RAYMOND PEQUEGNOT f Secretary FRANK J. BRADY fffff Treasurer ENGINEERING GEQRGE D. MCCOIKMICK f f President NOEL P. KAMMER f f f VicefPresiderIt HARRY F. BARR fffff Secretary WILLIAM A. CIKOWLEY f f f Treasurer LAW DANIEL G. SI-IEA fffff President LAWRENCE E. KELLY f f VicefPresidertt ELEANOR HUNTER BROWN f Secretary JOHN P. MCGOVERN ffff Treasurer NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE THOMAS M. MULLIN f f f President CARL A. CARLSON f f f VicefPreside-nt EMIL A. ULBRICH f f f Secretary M. JOHN DELOGE HE university's most venerable student organization, the Senior Class Council, has finished a year of unceasing activity in promoting the interests of its class and pref paring its members for their final parting from the fold of Alma Mater. As an or' ganization it was one of the greatest factors in securing a unity of action among the senior classes of the various colleges of the university. The importance of such a body cannot be overestimated in synchronizing those efforts of natural college rivalry into a uniform force that Works for the good of the senior class as a whole. Its purpose, clearly visualized and carried out, was to faithfully perform its function as official organ of the senior class and to unify the senior activities so as to form a more intif mate feeling among seniors of the various colleges. ' The council met early in the year to elect its officers and form plans. It unified the classes of the various colleges into a solid organization to carry out the schedule of activity which had been formed. In the Held of social activity the council, as usual scored a triumph with the annual Senior ball. Harvey Long was elected chairf f f f Treasurer man, and was assisted by the council in arf ranging one of the nnest parties ever given by the Seniors. In addition to this annual dance, the Seniors contributed their support to every other class social function and ex' trafcurricular activity. Each year the Seniors seek to outdo their predecessors in their annual closed dance. This year's party will stand as one hard to surpass by the senior classes of posterity. Its success was due in no small way to the enthusiastic work of the council. The year ended with extensive preparaf tions for Commencement week, that time of all times to Seniors. The council Worked hard to make these ceremonies ones which would last forever in the memory of the graduates of 1929 as the supreme moment in their lives. They also cofoperated with the Alumni Association in making the annual banquet for the Seniors a memorable one. Their work will be mirrored in the mem' ory of those who graduated this year, as an achievement that made the last year of their undergraduate careers one hlled with many highlights and many inspirations to future tasks. I37I ROSE O. ABRAMSON Detroit, Michigan LAW' Kappa Beta Pi. JOSEPH A. ABAS, B.E.E. Athens, Greece ENGINEERING American Institute of Elcctricztl Engineers. ARTHUR NV. ANDERSON, B.M.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi: Alpha Sigma Taug Engineering Societyg Sucicty of Automotive Enginccrsg Class Trcasurer HJ. CUTHBERT W. ANDREWS, B.C.E Wiiidsor, Ontario ' ENGINEERING Society of Civil Engineers Vicc-President QU: Engine-erin Socictyg Engineering Sudaliry Bnnqucr Committee. JOHN ANDREWS, M.A. Highland Park. Micliigavi ARTS .-xslt SCIENCE NVILLINXI FR.-wczis ARTM.-xx, B.M.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Tuycrcg Varsity Golf Club Prcsitlcn: 11.3,-IJ, Captain H13 Engineering SO-:ictyg Scicicry of Atitunmtivc Engineers. Ons IASKENV, BS. Nienipllis, Tcniiesxec DAY C, .txxlr F. Siginzi Kappa Phi: Smlnlity: Claw Truasurfr 131. LAURMNO SEVERO IKSTRONONIO. Ph.B. Vigun S. Sur, Philippine Islands ARTS Ash SCIENCE Filipino Clulwg Sudztlityg Philnmzttic Sucicty. EDXVIN BERNARD B.-uso, B.S. Greenville, Pewinsylvama DAY C. .xxn F. Delta Sigma Pi. TI-IOM.-XS J. Bfx1L13Y, Detroit, Michigan DAY C. .xsii F. Delta Sigma Pig Froslx Frolic Cnmmitlrcg Snplmnmrc I'rm:1 Commitrccg Sophomore Vigilance Cloninmiucng Ann." Hlvfcrry JOHN FRANCIS B.xi112R, B.C.E, Detroit, Micliigim ENGlNEIiRINfl Class Trcasurcr Q-U. Wi1.Li.aR1 M. BAKER, BEE. Detroit, Micliigim ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Enginccrs Viccfllrcsiclcnr HJ: Band IZ, SJ: Band Director Gig A. I. E. E. Bun' qucr Commicrne. JAMES WiLL1.Ax1vf BAKEY, B.M.E. North Adams, lvIu.ssacl1useLls ENCINEERINII ELDRED IVICKENN.-X B.-XRDEN Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F, HIARRY FORRESTER BARR, B.M,E. Nevada, Missouri ENGINEERING Tuyercg Society of Automotive Enginccrsg Engineering So' cietyg Class Sccretary Q-I, SJ. Louis G. Bixsso, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. ANU F. I59l I40l LEO JOSEPH BEAUDOIN, B.S. Manistique, Michigan DAY C. AND F. JOSEPH VITALIS BEAUSE JOUR Bay City, Michigan LAXV Gamma Eta Gammag Football fljg Basketball flj. RICHARD MILLER BECK, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. W1LL1.aM P. BEGG Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Hoclccy Team ll. ZJ. FRED GEORGE BENNETT Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Dcltn Siqnin Pi: Sodality Il, ZI. I'I.-XROLD EDWARD BENNETT, BS. Lansing. Michigan DAY C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pig Football Banquet Commiuecg Basketball Banquvr. ROBERT JAMES BENNETT Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. Asn F. Dclra Sigma Pig Sodality ll, Il. V x J A .X a, A e F l All 1 I -E.. FELIX JOSEPH BERNARD, A.B. ,. l I Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE '-. , -..,, Ni x ' 1 V. A lr I I if I f we R . a, .Q 1 'ff' -f i 9 TTS" 5. ll R i X -1 Hs P' N. Y ,V-Ptwtx ' -.!9' if I1 I ' ik I 'V l Q P ...Ei xi .13 E I fi .FW If 1 'ax I I 'dn - IV TQ' , .. , -"J.a 4. ,gt I ,Il r I 1 V 4' ,,Q, 5 S ' ,-4 Q ,, V - ..a ..,,... K., ,gg S' ai J .r, If . . ...-. EM-.Wm ,rv , I F"--" .. -.1 g :I-vii'-"" ' "' " W1 1, -., WILLIAM ANTHCJNY BERNOCIQ Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. ANI: F, Smlzllity. JULIAN JOSEPH BEST, BS. jackson, Michigan DAY C. ANII F. Dclm Sigma Pig Sodzllily Il. Z. 3. -ll: Sudnlity TII::IsIu'I:r f-ll: Football Banquet Cununittc-:Q Bzislwtlwzull BIIIiqIIvI. CIOIII' mittcc. JOHN J. BIALIQO, B.E.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Engineering Society: Amcricnu lnsritutc OI' lilrclriczil lin' Hiiwcring. CLEVELAND MEREDITI-I BICE, LLB. Detroit, Michigan LAXV ,Icstcrs Club: "Mcrry' Ann." ANTON CONSTANTINE BIEDRZYCIQI, BS. Grand Rapids, Michigan DAY C. ANI, F. DONALD MARTIN BIGGE, B.ChIE., M.S. Manistee, Michigan ENGINEERING Dclm Alphi Phi Prcsidcnt HJ: SCCFCIHIK' 1351 Alpha Sigma Tau, ViccfPrcsidcnt lil: Activities Honor Socicty 151, Detroit Union President Ml, Sccrctnry CSD, Class Secretary Ill: junior Council Trcnsurcr C-Hg Engineering Sales Manager of 'iTowCr" filq Scnior Ball Committcc lil: Tower Staff HJ, Assistant Business Manager of "Aces XVilcl" ffl: Chi Sigma Phi Sclmlzirship Key filg Sonlzilily Sccrctary QU. FRED BILLINGS, LL.B. Detroit, Micliigan Dclt:I Thcta Phi, Union Board Of Governors lil. I 4 ANNIE BLUMA BOCKOFF Detroit, Michigan LAW' Kappa Beta Phi, Associate Editor U. of D, Law Review 192809. -,I LIU bbq-ayogugasunndovqustpbhI-tanninsndllinsauaclldlauoollolnbDollssslnpoulluhoouooaounoaaasoooonoqaoqcousonooapunnaoannaouauunounaua-nouns -an ' . , 'i I fl i I 9 i Q 0 8 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I n I. l I I i I I .ii I a l l I Q. '. fl I'- s a U l I al 01UnltdU!00960083-ptboduqlaiulutionscan D 9 l 8 I I Q 2 i If 3 I K C U S it I I 4 S Qihlltnmqlnltlibhibtaielilibi9ltilClsQ1!l014918tllliabnllblnlltdalticldbe0310110000 ,M ' 4' . fi I' 7 ,. 3 :Q ' - ,: 4 fi N M y -N I I 4 NW zi. , ., I :Lil--i T5 J . , J. , ' , . .3-5 Vx ,, , V .11- ' If. 'rf-,. if-5 'fi 'Qi i".'Qi,.'I1 'V , " Ii ,I -, ,LII QI- :V I I-: 'nu 4. alias-I .N Jill. 'f'i51'-,,"'i"f,"' if-Y-.. ' 5 , ,',1-.i,,f'-W I --fm it ,I I iffy 'ffl'-' ..,..-sf'IIQ.qi.- .fm F1 -Y ,, , I . . . I ff'-Wil" I'-ls.I..ix,w:-,..1"l1'l's"?W1,? I-. " '- I ', ,". ' I 'I 5 we I! H I'L,Qv3w:'.rA,jEs-.,-s7?,J,-wi-, gmfnmlll- XJ? N -1 rv V, Qt, JS? .A -. , A, V Y' - ' M- - - Lvnkq-' "1-mg--"'-'4' . N -I W, ' . I ,f 4- ,,-,- :,.,,HE!M,J .Iv Q., ..f,..i.. ,1',-if, ,Nas .. ,Y ,,,.,,,..,, . -, , A L15 I' I41l I42I I I -, "fL.q ,fm 1 I 4 3. 'J ' .f:. ., -' ., I L- 4- . 1 ,, . 1 I-I.. 'x.f,3,ff'- ,q,,,.- , .f figs' , gi' ..:.-. 'L' A .3511 I ,' Wf-4 .-Ra-ii. H, 'R EMMETT DANIEL BONDIE, B.S. XVyandotte, Michigan DAY C. AND F. LEO JOSEPH BONDY Windsor, Ontario NIGHT C. AND F. EDWIN HERM.AN BOWER Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. GILBERT W. BOYD, B.Met.E. Highland Park, Michigan ENGINEERING Clhumical Sucicry Prcsidcnt 155. FRANK JOSEPH BRADY, BS. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pig Class Trcasurcr f-H3 S-:niur Cuuncili Sum--r Ball Cumnxiucc: SI-Jzulicy tl, 2. 3. -H: "Hook, My D'J.ll'A4 Cum:IIiII-Qc. EDWIN C. BRENDTRE Detroit. Michigan NIGHT C. ANI: F. GILBERT XV. BRICHTER Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. Asn F. CZ. :Ind F. bIId:Ility Sncrismn. ADOLPI-I IVI.-XRTIN BROXVN, MA. Detroit, Micliigari ARTS IX.. SCIENCE n AQ. . . Hg' K ., . X V.. '-R Jr' It 'Y J R -, . -If I. I .V ,P K IM I 4 ,4 ,. if it .sl lvl .II mil s J I .-. ,, 4. I -.6 -,I I I .r, 1. II .1 , R Q ,M I . I 1 Q4 II x3 I 11- A. w 1 - F sp Ii xl sl, if-lily I :.wI.,'II E , ..,.n,. 'W it-I--I ,I 5 'E Wil, 1 xl l Lil' y.,'1'I' f-ng!-f I+: .l fl-I If CU ld..-..I ,A ,XIII- 1. II' As J I x X' .'uII"tw .- ,' .. ,L L, QL,-...,..-l. -. , ELEANOR HUNTER BROWN Detroit, Micliigcm LAXV Senior Girls' Club Sccretaryg Baskctlwnll Gig Class Svc' rotary I-H1 Scnior Council l-ll: Fcncing Captain I-ll. IVI.-XRTIN FRANCIS BRUTON, B.S. in Med. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE DAYTON FREDERICK BURDENO, BS. Grosse Ile, Michigan ARTS ANI: SCIENCIZ THOMAS ERHARDT BLIRILILIARDT, B.Ch.E. Dayton, Ohio ENGINEERING WILLIAM BUTCHER, B.C.E. Walkeruille, Ontario ENGINEERING Society Of Civil Engineers: Engineering Socictyg Luttcrnizin in Basketball 12, 3, 41. LLOYD MIDDLETON BUZZARD, B.Ae.E. Bay City, Michigan ENGINEERING Aeronautical Society. JAMES GERALD BYRON, L.L.B. Detroit, Michigan LAXV Gamma Eta Gammag Magig Assistant Prcfect-Law So' dality: Philomatic Societyg Varsity News U13 Baskctball U35 Class Vice'President fllg Frosh Frolic Committee. J. MEREDITH CAMERON Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Sigma Kappa Phig A. E. C.g Basketball fl, 2, 3, 4Jg Colonial Prom Committee HJ. t ,I 1 ' 2' 1 A I I I43l 4 4 v A CARL A. CARLSON Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Sigma Kappa Phig Class Secretary f3Jg VicefPrcsiclent C-GJ. , JOSEPH DANIAL CASSIDY, Ph.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Philomzithic Sucicty 12. 31. CHARLES WILLIAR4 CASTROP, BS. in Med. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE EUGENE JOSEPH CHAPP, A. B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS .AND SClENCE Alpha Chi: Sodaliry il. 2. 31: Class Officer ill: Tower Statf, Dcpartmcnt Salas IFJ: Class Prcsidcnt C391 "A-:cs XX'iltl'4 Curnrniucc. AUGUSTUS JOSEPH CHRISTIE, B.S. Ancliorviile, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pig Alpha Sigma Taug Activities Honor So' ci-:tyg Mr. Clcmcns Club, Organizer ISI. President I-il: Sudality 41, 2. 3, -U: Rvprcs--nrativc fil. Prcfcct 1-Il: Band ll, 3. -U: Advertising Club HH: Tower Salesman igli Pwsisrzmt Chairman Cast Committee "Aces Wildf' Chzurman Advertising "Hinds My' Dear." STAEEORD J. CLEMENT Detroit, Michigan FOREIGN TRADE Dclta Phi Epsilon. JAMES lVlICl-IAEL COLLINS, BS. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F, Delta Pi Kappa: Ad Club: ,lcstcrsg Sodality ll, 2, 3, -U: Merry' Ann" Chiirusg "Aces XVild" Committee. WILLIAR1 CONLEY Lapeer, Michigan NIGHT C. Axn F. 'x "4-W .. .Lf a- 5. We i i n A- l 5 l T 1 v - . V: iff, . . .1 1, i rl . wif K' f l'l'lfx v. ' ff' U I X, 11 i -I - ,'...4, 2 ' '- . 1 , j fear -Sip fiwtgja , - V N 3. V V N ,M ,551 .th an-,E,.,.kAM.l. . H 4: ' QQ ',,g--4 fe -f ', iff ,i 4,5 V 1 'V . Emu... -NI -.. fl- .F 4. xix--0-fn-v-' 4' L- -' pp, l44l L I .f. '.': 11 'C "", , THOMAS JOSEPH CONNELL, BS. Chippewa Falls, Wiscoiisin DAY C. AN11 F, Sigma Kappa Phi, Activities Honor Society: HD" Clulu Secretary: Football ll, ZJ, Captain CJ, -Hg Basketball ll. 351 Class ViccfI'rcsitlcnt I-U5 Junior Prizm Commitlcug Senior Ball Committee. MAXWELL D. CONWIXY, B.Arch.E. Decatur, Nlicliigan ENGINEERING Chi Delta Thctag Dctruil Engineering Sncicty. JOHN W. COROORAN Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. ANI: F. JOSEPH FORREST CORNELL, B.Arcli.E. Lowelluille, Ohio ENGINEERING Chi Delta Theta, President IZ. 3. -ll: Activities Hunor Society Vice-Prcsidcnt I-Hg Architectural Society, President U13 Engineering Socicty ll. 3, -L il: Varsity News lj. -U, Assistant Business Manager 1311 Tower 13, -IJ, Art Editor QED: Junior Prom Committee HJ: Engineering Su' misty 13, -Hg "Aces Wild" Business Committee: Goodfcllow Fund Committee I-H: lntcrfFratcrnity Council Nj. JAMES WILSON CRAWFORD Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. ANL- F. WALTON STEWART CROSS, B.C.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING FRANK R. CROWLEY, B.S. Greenville, Pennsylvania DAY C, Axn F. Sodalityg Varsity News IZ, 31, JOHN B. CROWLEY, Ph.B. Hillman, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Theta Alpha Sigmag Jesters Club: Alpena Clubg Varsity ' News ll, 2, 3, 415 Track l3Jg Sodalityg 'iMerry Ann" Chorus: "Aces Wild" Chorus. J "I-' i I ft ,. qu 'if ti 5. ., i MT - '-V X. 4 T- ., v pfv- I- -V 'Ol 1 M M. ,. .., .K L ,.,. an V A 451 4 a I Jalal l 4 WILLIAM A. CROWLEY, B.Ch.E. Titusville, Pennsylvania ENGINEERING Chemical Society, Class Treasurer 1319 Class President C415 Class Treasurer 151. 'RAYMOND L CUDNAU Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Secretary Associated Evening Classes 1413 Sodality fl, 1, 3, 415 Associated Evening Classes Delegate fl, 2, 31, A. E. C. Basketball fl, 2, 3. 413 A. E. C. Bowling ll, 2, 3, 41: Class VicefPrcsiclcnr 131, juniOrfScnior Banquet Committee Chairman. EMMET JOHN CULLEN, B.S. Toledo, Ohio DAY C. AND F. Theta Alpha Sigma, Ad Club, Sodality 13, 41. W l ALLEN WILLIAM DALLAS, B.Ae.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Aeronautical Society, President H13 Society of Auromof tive Engineers: Inu-rclass Football fl, 21. JOHN'T.DANELL,LLB. Lauriurn, Michigan LAXV HAROLD IDAXVE Newfoundland NIGHT C. AND F. l ROY DE CESARE Detroit, Michigan LANV BERNARD VINCENT DECLAIRE Detroit, Michigan NlCl'lT C. .AND F. I 41 I1 .' - A , 1 f 1 '..-- T A1 ., -"3 'Eg -spa -.,-. ,. y 1 '.-'.'I'I': .J,.,.. ' ,, 'l .ik ,f,lf"t.1I ' ' 3 i'.YA ' Ig I s f 1 Wiz." .-AL' .,,,'.' .35-'i s, we "Q "K Y 1 I " . A' ' l,'.,'fg fr . ' -, ,. ' ' uf . '1,i2'f'ff,fI,p-.f' -in - ' gf" it-3 R, -,,-. ,. ,. L -f .:,1.fN- 3, I "'lg.,.. Jr. ,Ig 'Q g fs-aff?-v uf "" 's..f'f 4"'4.,,r,g. " '-"" " I x I I 5, 4 1 . . .. . T ' l ' I. E . .1 ff ,ww A R s rx--f' ae." , Q-ff' '- I! I' ' nf I J W I i -mi.-. . EM - f f i461 ev.. 4 ' X 4 , T CYRIL RAYMOND DEEEYER, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Kudavcr Klub, Prcsiclcnt I-Hg Class Tre-:isiircr ul. ROY FRANCIS DEL.-XX EY Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. .AND F. IVI.-KTTHEXV JOHN DE LOOE Chathani, Ontario NIGHT C. AND F. Sigma Kappa Phi: Sodality fl, 2, 3, -H: Union Board ol 'Tewcrnrars l-H: Senior Council I-Hg A. E. C. I-il: Class 1 Treasurer HD: ,lunior'Scnior Banque: IU, Seninr Brill I-U GERALD PETER DEMEKE, B.C.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING .-Xmcriccm Association of Civil Engineers HERBERT AUGUSTINE DENIS, LLB. Detroit, Michigan LAXV Associate Editor of the "Law Review" HDI. M,iNUEL FERNANDEZ Dui, BS. Tampa, Florida DAY C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi: Varsity News ill: Football Ill. WILERED CHIPMAN DICRTE, LLB. 5 1 I' if x fe I ,Te 'Y A ,gf ' .- E at f. X 5,5 'E i !, .gg 1'2 tg--t ,51 1 - ' 'H , ' N, Y U . . . . . ' odqecolaonsnvuounoovsi dqlqqdiui 3 -NO.- K , 1.4. A 1 9 ,, e- 1 R , if Q Detroit, Michigan LAXV ANTHONY DITTM.-'SR Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. I l GW , , .,. Q' . N H i . so E i,E,N.gVH Aq .T-r',.i,,-f ' if f L.' . - . ' - ---,- - ' wifi"-Qs-T,-.I - .M f. ew .if ff , I-1i.ii,3"Ts-5tLLl2,fgg2',f,,-si,-.,'"4.:..lf'-Q.-W"-. :ig '-'w.g,,,b R-.. ' - 1,1,.4.-,.- - ., .. ,, - i . --,,,,,,,,.,- -1.2 wi..-f 481 MICHAEL DIZDAR, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. LEONARD NORVAL DONAHUE, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. LAXVRENCE E. DONOHUE, Ph.B. Lorain, Ohio ARTS AND SCIENCE Mzrgig Gamma Era Gammag Sodality. Sigma Kappa Phi. LEONARD ANTHONY DORR, B.M.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Engineering Society: Society of Automotive Engineers Sudzility lily Band 11, Z. 3. Hg Orchestra ll. ll. ANDREW FRANK DOWD, LL.B. Wf11dSO'T, Ontario LAXV Unmmzi Em Gzimmng Delta Sigma Pig Baskccball fl, 5. -0 L,-XXVRENCE JOSEPH DOWD, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Argon, CLARENCE J. DOYLE Chatham, Ontario NIGHT C. Asn F. Sigma Kappa Phig Sndnlity, W.+LrER JOHN DULCZENVSKI, B.Ch.E. Amsterdam, New 'York ENGINEERING Tuyere: Engineering Society. lx i,A.., ,."'th DAVID EDWARD DURST, A.B., B.Met.E. Little Rock, Arkansas ENGINEERING EMU. T. FAUR, B.E.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Anwricnn lnstitutc of Electrical Engineers, Clviirniun C-il: Varsity News flig A.I.E.E., Clmirmzing l5zmt1i,it:t Crininiittcug Program Cnmmittcc 131, GEORGE FEEHAN Detroit, Michigan FOREIGN TRADE Dcltti Phi Epsilon. RICHARD THOMAS FELLRATH, BS. Inlqster, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Alpha Chi: Soclality ll, 2. 3, -H. M. EDXVARD FERBER, B.S. Highland Park, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Spanish Club Secretary ilk Varsity News Art Editor 1213 Rcportcr QS'-ll: "I'IOofs My Dear." Advertising Committee. ROBERT FERDINAND FISCHER, B.M.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Engineering Sociatyg Socicty of Automotive Engineer: JOSEPH STANLEY Firz Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. NED R. FITZPATRICK, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Pi Kappag Magig Varsity News, Assistant News Editor 1215 Class VicefPresident C3Jg Class Vice'PresiclEnt C-ljg Fresh Frolic Committeeg Soph Prom Commiltecg Senior Ball Committee. 5 A r, . I49I Raya, ff . f MU' "iii- Q. nmswiiii 4 Af in, in I VF l .iwvr -. .., .," v,, - --.,'-M 1 .L V- 211, I I I-'EAL :J , ii, f b ,Q 'Yi 4 " I IVIARTIN L. FLANNERY, BS. Saginaw, Michigan DAY C. AND F. GEORGE FLEMING FOUNTAIN, B.A.E. Port Huron, Michigan ENGINEERING Chi Dclta Thctag Enginccring Societyg Varsity News: Departmental Circulation Manager: Architectural Society Secretary GJ. ANDREW A. FULGENZI, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE FRANK MICHAEL FURBACI-IER Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. ALFRED G.-UEXVSKI, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. CURTIS Louis GARY, B.M.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Tuycrcg Enginucring Society: Society of .'xLll0l'lIOllX'C Engineers. SIDNEY Gn-XSSEL, BS., LLB. Detroit, Michigan LAXV Sigma Phi Lzimbtlag Varsity Band, Assistant Dircctor lili Dircctor H, 5, 6, 73. GEORGE GATES Detroit, Michigan FOREIGN TRADE Delta Phi Epsilon. I Q I I if 1' f l l ,l 'V ' ' , x iw 4 Wa, J ,f I 'A :fy , I 4414 slrmfliilgigl A cad! ' '- i. v in I. I iw I L ' - ff '-"- A4,Q.J..i- I , . ' I , I , I'r-A-is iuklf 'R -' 9 ' I - . '. ,'H ' ,ffl-1: "M, " ' ".. : Ill I H' 1 sl l ,. . .,xv,M Mfg .u. lv - I., .Vi if W, jk " f ' f :L?2i.Zf': 'ljatf'iff-w+-Hfifcff'I-'iff'U5-J V501 iff PACIFICO G. G'ATIL.-XO, B.M.E. Binalbagan, Occ. Neg., P. I. ENGINEERING Filipino Club. Pre-sidcnt 1415 Engineering Sncictyg Society Oi' Automotivc Engineers. BERT J. GELMINE, B.E.E. I-Iigliland Park, Miclrigaii ENGINEERING JASPER GERARDI, B.C.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phi: Engineering Socictyg American Association of Civil Engineers, HAROLD D. GOLDS, LLB. Detroit, Michigan LANV I'IOXVAR.D S. GOULD, B.E.E. Highland Park, Michigan ENGINEERING EDWARD JOSEPH GRADY, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Argong Sigma Kappa Phig Varsity News 12, 3. 41: Com' mittee Chairman Frosh Frolie 1115 Soph Prom O13 General Chairman Trophy Dance 1313 Frosh Football Manzigcr 111. WILLIAM BRUCE GREGORY, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Alpha Chig Ad Clubg Alpha Sigma Taug Varsity News I2, 314 Class President 111g Class Secretary 1315 junior Council Trcasurerg Frosh Frolic Committeeg Soph Prom Committee: Junior Prom Committeeg "I'IOofs, My Dear," Production Managerg "Butterflies" U13 "Aces Debating 11, 2, 3, 415 Freshman Football 111. wud" mg THOMAS ADOLFE GRIFFIN Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE , B.S. I I fa if I ,, ' J I ,Y ,610 I' I 5 .xi I I ' I e i 5 1 A , J W RI H X ni , ,. K 1 I If , 4 N. IH- -1- -P Q Kadaver Klubg Golf Team fl, 3, 41. ' x 5 I H i,.. 2. mi R-A1 I V I A--I 'JI JIT iv' -r A I I' , i"i:?- 1.1 . . I, I ' --T: ' . " i' " :'- ,"s' q' W, ff, - 3 'I :.' f."ulii53l3f-fifrkziigeg-iii.' fri. JW I E- if I 3 V A -1 .I,,Uui .. . D,-,Q . : H ,. -1- H, .ra -' I mg, '-Ls , ' L-'H-1-14,5 x ji. ,. S-1--2-,qu -" . Vs 2 f' wg-. ia -'ui' -.f I 'i .A-I. .""' I WF 'S .L -.Q3+"-k-a.I.,g.j,gg.,f- r.,.,,,f'f.H'bg5.l---a.,..w-' wQ,,ri,f ' U-.W +0 Ifll announce I N - M . ' 1' Tw., I Q I I N SN G3 G 5. V S' , Q FSE- , Q f ffl- ' 5 ? 'gf 95" .R 9 j ' Q, W, fi, V, XVWA N X my has I W , .. 3 S ..-JA - .- I l--5:-:t..:,.-g5', ' , gxlxai, , v V, I I I U21 C I LOUIS JAMES GRIMALDI Detroit, Micliiga-fi NIGHT C. AND F. Sigma Kappa Pliig Sodality. MAURICE A. GROBE, B.Met.E. Flint, Michigan ENGINEERING Chemical Society: Engineering Socicty. JOHN ANTHONY GUSTAI'fIS, B.Ae.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Society Of Automotive Enginccrsg Aeronautical Socictyg Engineering Society, PETER WILLIAM I'IACAL.-K, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Sigma Kappa Pliig Sodality fl, 2, 3, -455 Varsity Football ll. ll, HERMAN GEORGE HIAFFNER, BS. Ft. YVayne, Indiana ARTS ANU SCIENCE 'ilvlcrry Annug Philnmathic Society i-ll. LAWRENCE JOSEPH I'I.-XNLEY Wiiidsor. Ontario NIGHT C. .-xxn F. GEORGE R. I'I.-XRRIG.-KN, AB. Detroit, Michigan ARTS .-xxu SCIENCE Arg-ing Class Presi-.lent lil: Sophomore Prom Gnmmitteei WILLI.-INI B. HARRINOTON, B.S. Tecumseli, Ontario DAY C. AND F. I Alpha Chig Sigma Kappa Phig Activities Honor Society: "D" Club: Sodality 12, Sl: Varsity News, Sport Editor 13'-IJ: Assistant News Editor 1213 Tower fl. 3. -U. Assist- ant Sport Editor CSI: Football flfllg Cheerleader 13, -U2 "Aces Wild" Committceg "I-Ioois, My Dear" Committee. I EDWARD ARLINGTON HATCH, BS Highland Park, Michigan . DAY C. ANIQ F. Sigma: Kappa Phi. LAWRENCE K. H.AYES, B.C.E. Pontiac, Michigan ENGINEERING JAMES J. HEATHERSIJN, Ph.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS .wir SCIENCE Magi. STANLEY ANDREW' HEJNOWSIQE, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS ,mn SCIENCE KENNETH EDMOND HENDERSKDN, Ph.B. Lapeer, Michigan ARTS ,IND SCIENCE C.-XSPAR JOI-IN HENKEL, B.Ae.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Alpha Sigma Tau. MARK H. HERLEY, Ph.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE GEORGE WILLIAM HESS, BS. r.,1' ". ' .3-qfvrg E 'innqooiupquupauogcno-iqueenuse gaipi ii? I Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND E. Sigma Kappa Phi, President f-05 Ad Clubg Alpha Sigma Taug Activities Honor Societyii Vicr:fPresident I-Hg "Tower" Sales Manager Ujg Class President Gig President I of Junior Council 433, C. Ea' F. Banque: Committee 11, 2, f- 3, 415 Sophomore Prom Committeeg junior Prom Commicteeg ' Senior Ballg Union Board of Governors f3Jg "Merry Ann: Committeeg "Aces NViId" Committeeg R'Hoofs, My Dear 'i Committee. I I I1 I I u 1 1 1, - .I 4' , , of - K I-'IE I".fQ".f1.11,?i . 4 ' U L. K 's . -fY""1i - 'JU , -11 - ' ,,f."'l' w . . , ' 'f ,Iv .N I1f:,,QQHg5f.?5?j,PI,Q:,IfQ.'qL 'I-"L: . 'I Q ., A , if ,N 3, , J in-541 my emi?-GLS! E':'I!:PaixmliJ VII-,QV gh gy, ELMI,',i:w..x:3J,-Zlflvf.. LL.. I. --.I . . it if-is U ,gi Ig Q -V' " A. 51,43 Q3I,-Lx5,,ti.fmq,..,L,,5,,.-I'LQ,,g,,1 fr - s ---wo... E-.--'x.,.' .ad wk-,.,.f. s,,,. -one M gf V731 IIVPGXK l 1 ,.....fj:?,w'2': I WV: V I if YA Vpvr ,, I, . W in W1 . ilv. RL CHARLES LOUIS HICKEY, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW Gamma Eta Gammag Philomathic Society ll, 215 Sodality' fl, 2, 3, 4. 71, First Assistant Prefect GJ: Class Vice' President fljg Frosh Frolic Committceg Soph Prom Com' mittee 1253 Vigilance Committee C213 Assistant Football 1115 Intcrflcratcrnity Council JAMES L. HICKEY Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C, AND F. HEIKBERT HEINRICH HINNRICHS, B.Ae.E. Milwaukee, Wisconsivi ENGINEERING Aeronautical Sucicty: Engineering Socictyg Society of Aiitunuitivc Enginccrs. DC7N,ALD HOFFMAN Detroit, Michigan LAXV Gamma Eta flnmnri HENRY IXNDREXV HOFFMAN, B.S. in Med. Detroit, Michigan ARTS .-xxn SCIENCE ALFRED TI-IONIAS HOLII-IAN, Ph.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Nlzirmtgcr nl' Coll' Tcam ll, 3, -O. ARCHIE FRANCIS HOLIHAN, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAXV DANIEL JOSEPH HORGAN, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Argong ,lcstcrs Clubg Varsity News Staff ll, I. 3. -i-li Fresh Frolic Ccmmittcc: Gooclfclloxxs Fund Committee 12, 3, -U3 Assistant Football Manager Q-Hg "Mcrry' Ann" and "Aces Wild" Castg Sodality ll, 2. E, -H: Assistant Secre- tary of Sotlality HJ: Tower Sales Stall 131: St. Vincent de Paul 131: l"liilI'Ini:ItlIic Society lil. o , , 541 L' ,I f"' i f.--ff ff . H.. v 1 -, . , i. ,,. l' ' -Q -' yi , -,315 i w- -.-. , 'x W JOHN W1LLi.AM HUETTEMAN, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS ANU SCIENCE Alpha Cliig Intci'-Fraternity Council Treasurer I-ll: Alpha Sigma Tang Kaclavcr Klub: "Tower" Stall 1355 Class President fl, 29, Frosh Frolic Committrzcg Sophomore Prom Commitrccg junior Prom Committee Chairmang Band Man' agcr C255 "Houis, My Dear" Committee Chairman: "Aces NVilcl" Coniniittcc, "Merry Ann" Commiltccg Soclalily fl, 2, 3. -il: Assistant Prcfvct I-IJ, "Buucrilics" Comrniuu: ill, HENRY' ROY HUCEHES, LLB. Detroit, Michigan LAW Delia Theta Phi: Sodalinyg Law Revicxx' Circulation Ivlanagci' ISI: Class Treasurer Qll. LEONARD FREDERIC HYDE, BS. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. ANU I". Sigma Kappa Phi: Ad Cluhg Union Opera Cuniniilwc, VICTOR E. JAGER, B.Mer.E, Vfyaiidotte, Michigan ENGINEERING Society of Auloiniitivu Engineers. FRANK CHARLES JENUVJINE Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. ANU F. CLARENCE LEO JOLICOEUR, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW NOEL PFISTER KAMMER, B.Arch.E. New Orleans, Louisiana ENGINEERING "Tuycre"g Class Treasurer C215 Class VicefPresident C715 Senior Councilg Engineering Dance Committee fllg Engi- neering Banquct Committee 141g Cheerleader K3-Hg Head Cheerleader HJ. KATHLEEN MARY KEHOE, B.S. Toledo, Ohio DAY C. AND F. 4 Eta Zeta Sigmag Interffraternicy Council Secretary H53 Senior Girl's Clubg Varsity News fl, 3, -Hg Basketball LBJQ "League" Committees Of-0. i, h-C .i 1 1-N :W r ij.-1, i., .,i, . f ,,A, i Q 'R ', " , i M ,,.:' - V sly, 'L . - 4 Ag-. ,. E ,, ,-,f- ,,mV, - La' , 9 . . ---r- ..-.-'. 3 ,:--- ---- E .... , ,:.-fyE,:,:,.-Msage.-.-fis...,....s,.., ggi-s..4s,r:e,a..s -. . Le. sf ..- , .4..,.f Mi, -s F.. , . L... - -.1-1-.A 1 ,-. 5- h -- --.. -- - - - , A f s. .. . . is -. . v 1 , f 5. i- I' 1 . -I g '- -1 7 ., : i ' f ii 2 1 5,51 ' 1" ' " I - .E O -I .-., -V . . , E4-V' rl - ifS??11.-Tfflif.,.efflr:"3 I Nix.,.?qeiavze:'v.11:4: 4.-. 4 .Vg E E .1 4 . I - ff, . - gif'-' A , i .... E .Q..::fsgEE1r':.,..,1i.,.g:gA:t-.cc4:iz-11:.i.-.s.--+:f?5..,af:-E-E,-1-1 E . .Jr - ., ..., - , A - ' - . . - - V 4 -"' ' 5 ' 'iivpiti fhogh 'as shnoip ounce" an one qiacuoocuomcucococ siqiajiawiogpqnbuqgiinsnouunnnal . E551 ,KYX 9 -x f P E.-V., -.. 1..r'f' 1 x MARSHALL CHARLES KELLEHER, B.S. Cadillac, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Alpha Chi. LAWRENCE EDWIN KELLY, LLB. Detroit, Michigan LAYV Delta Theta Phi: Srwdality: Class Vicc'Presidcrxt ISU: Law Rcvicw, Circulation Manager ISJQ Senior Prom Committee. JAMES JOSEPH KERWIN Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Alpha Sigrnax Tau. VINCENT M. KEYES, Ph.B. Detmit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Alpha Chi: Sigma Kappa Phi: Hockey KI, 2, 3, -ll, Captain HJ: Class President 423: Sophomore Prom Com' mince: Chairman Sophomore C. if E. Dance: Sodality Sacristan Q-U . CHANO YING KIANG, B. Mining E., B.Ae.E. Shanghai, China ENGINEERING FLAVIUS NELSON KINNEY Detroit, Michigan LAXK' Gamma Eta Gamma: Al-Hiip Crxmmiucc LEON.-XRD JOSEPH KOSAL Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. V.kLENTINE KOXVALSKI, B.S. in Med. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Bula Sigma Pi: Kadavcr Klub. . 5 ' , rf. ' A' V -L-A. " I. -5 ., -- ,fa f', 5-.ive g ,a 13 - ,I .' " S' i.,,A-E 2' 'I' , 'A ' A If . ' X, A - ,'L ,. Y ,ggmiar frifg'.-fE',Q.,,,,s Q-i,'f'., -. 1 - V AJ, .. ,IA -,A-I, faamf- f 1.- U61 A' " iz? M n FRED JOHN KRAUSHAAR, BS, Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. NIARTIN LEONARD KUKIELKA, BS. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. Axn F. Bora Sigma Pi. JOSEPH JOHN LAIOE, MS. Grosse Pointe, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE ID.-KNIEL JOSEPH LARAMIE, LL.B. Salt Lake City, Utah LAXV Dclra Them Phi. GRACE VJILMA LEFEVRE Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. Axn F. Senior Girl's Club Treasurer Q-ij. WILLIAM CARL LEITENEERGER, B.M.E. Johnstown, Pennsylvania ENGINEERING Engineering Societyg Society of Automotive Enginccrsg Assistant Football Managcr 1215 University Orchestra UD: IntcrfClass Athletics 013143 . JOSEPH LEMKE Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. HARVEY JOHN LONG, B.S. South Haven, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Sigma Kappa Phig "D" Club, ViccfPresiclentg Football fl'2'3'4Jg Fresh Basketball fljg Class President 1415 Chair' man Senior Ball. I X ,4- .Q ,N a "'2 . l Q ." .L I ' .JA-' my 'J' . 'I x. 1-...I iffy' if E' , - ' , If 'I 'Vi' "7 11 ' L. ' ' 'I 4 , new , gil' T . A . P' N , I....ff' wA,4..f 'rm .L.L-- .IJ Li.. v .- V571 P 39 -P lf.: vhs!! 126.0 qnpo blip 4 .L1, im QE I RTR 52? ' iv... ., I. , xx QV 'mari' 9 , 5 'I I K 1 Q J I .,,v. X, "F .. DONALD LOUIS LUDDEN, B.S. Grand Rapids, Michigan DAY C. AND F. i Grand Rapids Club. JOSEPH A. LYNCH, B.C.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Chi Sigma Phig American Association of Civil Engineers, President Q-O. JAMES FRANCIS LYNN, A.B., LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW Alpha Sigma Taup Class Treasurer fljg junior Council. VINCENT F. MCAULIFFE, A.B., LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW Magig Alpha Sigma Taug Class President I-Og Junior Prom Ciimmitrcc HI: Debating ll'3--ll: Skinner Debate Medal Qllg Gramrical Medal fill. PATRICK' FRANCIS MCCABE Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. Ast: F. I Sigma Kappa I'l1i: Sodality. FR.-INK JERRY MCCARTHY Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. Axn F. Assiiciaxccl Evening Classes. JOSEPH A. MCCART1-II' Pontiac, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Class Treasurer ISI, Class Sccrcrary fllg Sophomore Priim Ccmniittciz Ill. RAYMOND J. MCCAUSEY, B.M.E. Portland, Michigan ENGINEERING Suciczy uf Automotive Engineers, Engineering Society. 4 I f , II I t , J i ,A I Il- , 9 L n - ' II N L", 1' 1 3 F Lil a 4 ,R I L, '29 f kwa ., M .. 5. I-,, J.. . - rx. 5' - wus, i lg- if, . iV'. I, i,.a'i QQ U I lo" . ... ., ,... . .. , . .-find' , .iv - I , ' - ' '-5 .. l- -J A-emu . - ' ff- 'I ' .. ff' J . I Aa'f,lfftr,,,-wil-"PY-'11-lE.I. E I .A A. , 5- - -, , ,, f.. 1.4 . 3 ' "mfg !3,,f5'2.j3Bfg,cEv,N M ,,1. RMI' j'wf'C Q,-""'.,5's ' i',:,v'I.:-'Ei' .S ,A IJ. , .. "Wj,.-..-'f fx: "L-,f 'QL Q 'i .-,Q3,J:,.3'Y?fhLS'-fMf"""..,u.vf-f is...- U81 lit,- l. 'I 'W DONALD JOHN MCCLELLAN, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAXV Gamma Eta Gamma. GEORGE DANIEL MCCORMICK B.M.E. 1 2 I I 'I I l. '- l K ,f ,. f" ,Qi l V 1 1 ,fi 1 til ' fJl'V I 1. F-4 Ii-2. ",1 4 it-, ,- ,- ,I , Je, .v Clarlfs Sunimitt, Pennsylvania ENGINEERING Tuyere, Alpha Sigma Tau, Interfiraternity Council Presi' dent 151, Engineering Society Vice-Presiclcnt 131, Secretary 141, President 151, Union Board of Governors 141, Treasf urer 151, Society of Automotive Engineers ViccfChairman 14-51, Sodality Prefcct 1461, Senior Council Treasurer 151, Red and XVhite Sales Stall 111, Varsity News 131, Frosh Frolic Committee, Sophomore Prom Committee, junior Prom Committee, Senior Ball Committee, Sophomore Vigil' ance Committee, MARY E. MCGARVAH Detroit, Michigan LAXV Kappa Beta Pi. JOHN PATRICK MCGOVERN, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAXV Senior Class Treasurer. HENRY MACNAN Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND P. ELIZABETH MARGARET MAIER, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. VJILLIAM JOSEPH MALEDON, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Alpha Sigma Tau, Activities Honor Society, Sodality 11f2f3f41, Assistant Secretary 111, Secretary 11f21, VicefPrefect 131, Prefect 141, Varsity News Reporter 121, Managing Editor 131, Editor 141, Tower 12451, Editor 131, Junior Prom Committee 131, "Hoofs, My Dear," Director of Publicity, Classical Club President 141, Hon' orable Mention Philosophy Essay Contest 131. JOHN RUSSELL MALEY, B.S. Johnstown, Pennsylvania DAY C. AND F. Sigma Kappa Phi, Sodality 11f'l-3f41, Assistant Prefect 131, "D" Club, Varsity News, Football 11f2f3f41, Hockey Manager 13'-41, Basketball 111, Class Secretary 121. . 1 -4" M4 U .'..- 1. ' I.,.i.,g , uri' .,,,,,.,.., , .- Ht: . . --vt,.- m, ,N A 1 xi 'fegqg'-H",l' 'C' -frm lv 'Al' ' 1 +R. Jill if ,At ",, vw .,l I, .. ,'.P. L51 -', IJ It .- hi. ' -f- I' L. 1 1 'N ifffcfl li 'Tl 5-'l 5' 'Gr It . If "lf: 5.1, f 4 "T I 4 1' eff' 152.233 lv 5 '.Q .5 . -l.-""l"F- ft--I-"ffl Il? Ji M I iq' l :S XI, -li' L1 , , 4 1 J 1 ,u ns , ,I Ly -..1"-- ,ef---w 1 15- 4 3 . "NZ M, Ml 7 I- , xl iv i 1, LH . 1 Q l I E' My .. 1, . S- ' in gqivLw.,,m ,R-v.,?, wax: In tg. X ,lil HEL' Q, iz M.. Vasiwisqmi-s.i'4,,1v ' 1 A A V Q uf I fi .T . .4 ' .,a1t-'gffiffu Liga if ',, N 4 'T ll' 1 I . 1 A ji I i' .4,tw, I . . ew, 4 .f.-:,.'.' ' hui. Y' 'Q ' .E It , Lf 'win " i' R rltflw iflxwt '1 'll 1 " 4, 3 N y, --.f, L. I , LV ,J tm Aw, iw ij be wgm, maufud kg .i'll in ff he Ohottsas .it Q. r . . ' ' 153-5.13 - X' 5' if fd-1.15. . -1 ,. : 15... . 4- N . .554 Y I I .H . . S 'A I 5 .. . f. 1 5. D : ' .iff , ' -L EV n ., ., 5 .1-"' Va 4""--- . ,I . I I l I I I I I I U I I I I 1 I I I I I ' . . . 1 . O I I I O C 2 oaouooononcusnucoonuocliiiuIllilucccnlctclosioillq' . -ar- f ...ff Q' F." f W... .,..,, ' viii-L ' EDWARD JOSEPH MALONEY, BS. St. Albans, Vermont - DAY C. AND F. Sigma Kappa Phig UD" Clubg K'Football fl'2f3'-U1 Basketball 111213-451 Soclality Treasurer 4354 Coach Cofecl Basketball Team 131. H.fXRVEY ANTHONY MANORE River Rouge, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. I CHARLES JAMES MASACEK, BS. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pig "D" Clubg Football il-3--Hg Hockey HJ. BRADLEY MARVIN MASAITIS, B.Arch.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Engineering Sncietyg "Mcrry Annu Chorus CLARENCE BERNARD MASTERSON Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Sigma Kappa Phi: A.E.C.g Basketball fl-2-3'-ll. JOSEPH lVl.-XTYAS, B.C.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING CYRIL VJILLIAM MEANS, BS. Paris, Illinois DAY C. AND F. Alpha Chi: Slltllllllf' ll-2-5'-lj. LED S. M1TT1G, BS. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND E. Sigma Kappa Phig Sodality flf2'S--U, Assistant Prclcct 13'-U5 Class Treasurer Ill: Vice-President ISD: Class President C453 Senior Council: Scnior Ball Committee: C. r fi F. Banquet Committee OAS-45: Opera Salesman I-Sl: Regent Scholarship 125. l I l60l W -l 1 . , . . X , . - . - Q f- ' V if frlifl-'Vit-E..+ H H -52, x I wt rf' ' "lf-1'7" ' -f - - Lt " . . . ,... 5.4.-A ...J 4 , , -I -- -- A J . 'C' . z , . - f1'lwf"a .. IQQJR N .-M AA,f'x, if A, . ...Q vu, -P ' A LW' ' . - . , gm., 1. .h . ,. F- -, K. .3 Nei , af ,.-.- ,UA ku. -i I I Y ' 4 , 1 , '2 Y , l' I ti I . .. . ,, L J . .' I ' X l,,, if 'f l if A 11 NTf.ijV.. l.. 2 . :' I ffl' '--. I A ' 5 K....f1,' . i X I ig. 'I 'R if JI, I J .4 -I 1 I . . I l I I l I i ii, . Vi A lf V I . 1 i 'Lsx"'IF . J. x 1 .QQ .1 kt 1 ,. Lvrk, . .al l- , 1 , .. .3 - 1 Mskwiqi , i -:- Y .:'..'.,.' ' :X I -L e TJ if :X 3' I: I- 3 l In D 5.3 " 'gli' Itcfltfliy D- lf 1... 'I ' ...iff 5 f -: . .g341,. lt' ' '-4. ' 'V . .MSF-,,.i, 'L' fe., .lyk ' ..-5" A if ,.-.. A A " I I.. . .. A- . A J' Eg I 5 A1 T. thu ,iqnuuu . . ,,,. .,ar EDWIN STEWART MOAO, LL.B. Detroit, Micliigait LAXV Delta Theta Phi: Sigma Kuppn Phi. LAXVRENCE JOSEPH MOLONEY, LL.B. Pontiac, Michigan LANV Mzigi, Gamma Eta Cammag Sndality Prcfeet lil: Varsixy News l2lg Committees: Sophomore Prom, Freshman Frolic, Vigilance: "HnOfs, My Dear." JOSEPH ALOYSIUS lVlONVETT Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Sodnlity. DANIEL JOSEPH MOYNIHAN, M.A. Worcester, Massachusetts ARTS AND SCIENCE Argong Theta Alpha Sigma. THOMAS M. L. MULLIN Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Associated Evening Classes ill, Treasurer 13--Up Sodality 11121, Assistant Prefcct CBJ. Prcfect 1453 Class Secretary C113 Class President 126'-Hg Senior Council President f-Hg Frosh Frolic Committee: Sophomore Prom Committceg Junior Prom Committceg Senior Prom Committceg ,luniorfScnior Banquet Committee. FRANCIS JOSEPH MURPHY, B.S. Wyandotte, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Sigma Kappa Phig Sodality 121343. JOSEPH A. MURPHY, LL.B. Mt. Pleasant, Michigan LAW Delta Theta Phi. JAMES VINCENT MURRAY, B.C.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Tuyereg Engineering Societyg American Association of Civil Engineersg Football flfljg Basketball Kljg Class Treasf urer fllg Class President fljg Frosh Frolic Committeeg Sophomore Prom Committee. l I A . .....-r.- ',,,-..-.,......-,. ...... -..lm , . -.. ...-IIrf 7.-,1fQ..,....ig.,..... . ,. A-. -,.... l ,' . E' . ,l ' .4 C 1 V .. .1 .' . .- . z.. K . f Q T" " -- ffl t 3 - -,- . :Vw-a P. I I . - . , 'r' -L I III-ff A If- - -A I 1. . "ptr A ill . ,I t , .,g , -- ' i -l '. '11 i - what 'V' 'J' .' R' r WI, ' -' I. .-t- 1'-1, .,,.x 4 I Il .V . , . rr I, -T7 -R -Zgaxx ij g'.E-V-lf-:'2V.!a ,P 1-if R' fy. "Viv-I . ,lv '-LQ t llg,-,5.'..-A,.,'il .A 'H' " JL, P., E i -In 5 Y H S ' Me W "mf .LH fi-sQa!":'...i wr- IW " 1 fri- 'A ' E.. ,Q I- A t A ,J J, .3-qw r . M If . ULN.. :t..,.:f .t..., '14-g.,',.-1 -' '-gs uw- ' f-J " ' wil LYNN JOHN MYERS, B.Ch.E. Sarnia, Ontario ENGINEERING 'LLOYD RAYMOND NEFF, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAXV JOHN BERNHARD NILL, B.S. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE EDWARD JEROME NORRIS, B.S. Holyoke, Massachusetts . DAY C. AND F, Sodality f1'2'3'4J. GILBERT 0'CONNELL, Ph.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE ARTHUR J. OQCONNOR, B.S. Pontiac, Michigan DAY C. AND E. Delta Pi Kappag Jcstcrsg Sodality 111213413 Varsity News 116'-U5 "Merry Ann" Chorus: "Aces lVild" Chorus. JOSEPH JOHN OLDAN1 Grosse Pointe, Michigan LAW' VINCENT OLSHOVE, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Sigma Kappa Phig "D" Club, Football fl-Zjg Basket ball 123. J : J f l i l 4 , D E ,I , ' -QLW3 'mf' - Y Y , , ' ' i V X T1 L . ' T -. ' fig .!4" '- 4 1 f f i s 1 , , 53 .. '. Lf 'elif'-ef J .1 A Z FJ' 7 '11 v 4 1 P r' ,, B' a Y- QM? J L I L J f62'l f.. . , X11 W, ' f'w.f'xl. f -e , . 1 ,i ...- ',,r-'V' . . yli 1 ,f RALPH J. OSBORNE, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAYV CAMILLE EDMOND JULIEN PARENT, LLB. Tecumseh, Ontario LAW Gamma Eta Gamma: Alpha Sigma Tung Class Secretary UIQ Union Board of Governors QU: Tower Sales Q31-U: Law Librarian 13'-U. OSCAR L. PASSARELL, B.Arch.E. Fancher, New 'York ENGINEERING Engineering Society. JOHN CLARK PENROSE, B.M.E. Varna, Ontario ENGINEERING Society of Automotive Enginccrsg Engineering Society. LUCIE RAYMONDE PEQUEGNOT, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY G. AND F. Eta Zeta Sigma: Senior Girls' Club, Varsity News I-U5 Co-cd Basketball QU, Captain 131, Class Secretary Q-ll: Senior Council Secretaryg NVomcn's League Dance Commit' tee f2f3Jg XVomen's League Bridge Committee Chairman 1313 First VicefPresidcnt of XVomen's League UIQ Sodality Treasurer OJ, Prefect 005 Tower Sales KU. ADELE CATHERINE PERMEN, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY G. AND F. Eta Zeta Sigma, Senior Girls' Club ViecfPresidentg So' dality C2f3f4Jg lVomen's League House Chairman LLIIQ Varsity News 12131-U5 NVomen's League Social Committee f2'3J. FRED CLARE PETERS, B.C.E. WaI'kerville, Oritavio ENGINEERING American Association of Civil Engincersg Engineering Society. ARTHUR JOSEPH PETRIMOULX, A.B. Bay City, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE InterfCollegiate Debating C3005 Oratorical Contest Un 3'4Jg Philomathic Society f2'3Jg Sodality f2'3f4J. I l I lift' X l im 1 , lv i , 51 2. 4 ik' I W: W ' , , I iv? i i 'I " . .11 . 1 1 fel 'r'i.j-j . J i631 I., ,Tift -I-"1 WW I-' IJ -I '-Lie. '-.H -1-' 'TLUUL-f I H I' Wi I ig,--',..' ,-'ff"1-A-f'K..,'1 f21.2:i?fIMI. I I: , 'wx ---4-5 LF L - 'N QEQQ. RT-3 - ---W 'f nfl 11:36-y-I ,U , A TTg':'4:. XI, r .fx -I.j2.'ff.Qg...i'f'J,v. igisi I .Elia Xffj. 5. . f my -M 5.54 nS1,,.A' QWQE ,L I" '- Sf ,K , OAI HERMAN S. PETZOLD, PITB. ,417 Detroit, Michigan ARTS ,IND SCIENCE I .Igi Ivan EDWIN CHARLES PFEIFFER, BS., Iii Detiroit, Michigan Wvifl NIGHT C. ,IND E. f", ,1' Sigma Kappa Phi. ,ff l I MORRIS PORTNOY, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. l Sigma Phi Lambda: InterfFraternity Council C-U, Tennis . UI- . I CHARLES NELSON PRENATT, B.C.E. X Titusville. Pennsylvania ENGINEERING ' Enginccring Socictyg American Association Of Civil I K Enginccrsg Sodality. I I I I CLEMENT MARTIN PUNG St. johns, Michigan LAW VxflLLIAIv1 ALEXANDER PURVIS, AB. . Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE ! Sudality Sncristnn 11125. Secretary QD, Assistant Prefect I I-Hg jestcrsg Varsitv News 121541: Sophomore Prom Com' 5 mittccg "Merry Ann" Cast, "Aces NVild" Cast. I JOHN GERALD QUINN, B.Arch.E. , I . .- . Morrice, Michigan H, X-577 , I ' - R ENGINEERING G, y I Engincring Sociczy. , f 'gli : 5. .L F" 'I 2 ,V , : vm VII i Tr I LI If 1 A- S: 1 ' i - If I' -I ' A' Q ROY RADNER . 5 ' I Detroit, Michigan - 1 "gy ,f Z LAXV ,L .f . ,- n .I ,r-I. A I A , I - if ' I "f" 'VV , ' I .1 'V S : 151K it bg 3153.5 K 0 Ty.. ,411 iq:-'I ' I . n 'av ,ff he. . V, Q V V, Y , . I '-..E- A Vp.. , .I , ' I . .2 ff ffl flfvfffgifiudsfoan-:ous:pa-uoanooasonsfnodqz 'WIA'-I E Y qlffi1i.,'1'.-'i-ff'f- -if f. V I .A u.,,,,w Z ir I "'3'ffiif'1L-im '- j,fj"fA 'I:?'i:i':E-c"'1 , VM.-Rr--"'1"T' . . I I 4'-N .-if I Rf, -- T . Q " N fx. ,ri '-55.1 "' T 4 41 - 4i -gg- E 4, 'Q .QL'I'T"'f"'?: I-mf'-'-'-'L-ia! -' fibmwf' . -,:!7, ' X5 'kk-Ig 'fr..Q' .K NCI. -.,i'.-fc., 1. gi I .IFE 'MSI w, ' .'-:f.""' if" R' 1...,f""i'L5h'-. - 1 . -ig-fm 1- .f ' ' 'r-. In V -'1v117g3."'-fniqgj "L, 1 Z' A5 I -T-Jj,hu:H-I! I1 .' lf, - -22 ',1 l-.4 T I Dc..-V if 5, 5 , . I I 'if ,gf 'A,..f' f 5 I . I N - I. .I x I I. I .nII.'j.w .1.f1p-Mr. .1 J,-1 K 2 I 'I .. -- . ' -, 'rx , ,- if iii-1,,':ffS-Lffs. , J 'V' E If gh f' ,'-,.., I V , -I - V., XA .V t... iq f r F1 Ink-. .. .qw 1 1 ,vf 2---' V ...A - NJ " -Q - .. f -, ' L.- ww, I I-,-5 .,.. -.555 .,,!'JxI,fA-'f'-5"',.T.r-1.-,.,.2 Lcwf R, 1 E643 filffjjgzt ' " 'NJC 'ff f".,'i, S. r' .pi .Lb -tk' If 3-"' -' E:-yin' ,'. . C I v.. I rn. ., ..'. . J' . ni.- 273 1 'Fr f , 7,0 M ibm. ,Y ig 5 -in' frilly , I- lg lf E, ' I 1 'R " ,' ' 1 ,. l " nc- ' 'r . 3, gli, 3 j.I,,.t,gi, in 55.9 9 'ff ig. A I rx- I , V J' " time Xut r 'l H5 ,s 3. x 1 .4 bf I I'- J" i I l ly li ff I . is ,ii "Q .L -,X an I i 'L 1- i - ii A li . f - I F.. I? L .ii f ' 1 6' A' vi r V I, L I., 5 ,i'l:F".n:F'-.L lx 1 1 ri In ix 55.gmqf.1x,, a EQ. lit! if, Lin., A, D- fi V i ir i .. -.- L -- ...,.. If... .. ' I 1'-J'-'P ' f,- , - -1 N I.- . ,.4.,.., C-, .V Y if JOSEPH EMMETT RALEIGH Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. Avia F. Delta Sigma Pi. VINER A. RANTANEN, B.Arch.E. Ashtabula, Ohio ENGINEERING Clxi Delta Theta: Architectural Society Vicwllresidciitz Engineering Society. CLEMENT JOSEPH R.-ITKE, B.Ae.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING KRISHNAJI MANOHER R,-XTNA'PARKHI, B.E.E. Nasik, India ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineer PAUL M. REILLY, B.C.E. Emsworth, Pennsylvania ENGINEERING Engineering Society Treasurer 13'-Og American Associaf tion of Civil Engincersg Class VicefPresiclcnt flflullz Class Treasurer U15 Engineering Society Banquet Committee Chairman Gig Tnyere. DANIEL FERDINAND RITTER, BS. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND E. Argon: Sigma Kappa Phig Sodality fl-2-3'-Hg Varsity News 13'-U3 Assistant Basketball Manager C213 Basketball Manager C3-4J. MELVIN LEO RIVARD, A.B. Bay City, Michigan Am-s ,IND SCIENCE Debating I2-3-41. HIPOLITO DEL ROSARIO, B.C.E. Cebu, Philippine Islands ENGINEERING Filipino Club President C415 American Association of Civil Engineers. by X ..L- ,..,., 1 JS as 110, 9 4, 22 ,I fi fl '. 1 ' . lj . Q ff J' . -f' twill- few? L iw-if IA, ,W 'Mfg I 'V I : , I - 5 g fmiywf' 'H fl I' lx ,'l""' ' fin. 'J Y,,,if'm ' - 1"iu-.1-,ALQQ " 3. I ww. -f-fa xL0mimtfj:t.i?,'::: I' E! LPSQE-.liaise A ff Ht- ,,.- 1-gf' 31. L'Q,,,T,b,,Jg, ,,.E.t..f.Y f L-fx, :Z LAD--W. f . ---p- --- - - f L- Y - i A Y? gill' K -'il',.:jl:4:g,71,f-'.!'?Y.CQ:zigiE?Tx'f J,-eizi-T.-A--i.T.', , Yr' 7 ""' " " ' . ' I W5 A 'bla Z ' A "V-IF 1- U 'fit i fvi VE,-w'n 33.3, J., E. I.. A Jiwgi AJ. LIL 'V H. 'iv' 2 Lb , jf -rf ' , I Irxavi E., 5, yt-r,,'F..sA V ,',,..,l ,L ',, .1 fr " "" .T Vins' ' api, C. if .lx Tlx, . I I LH . ISZNI IF: il "- N, '!,,ej4-,'lli,liI,g. . 'M . Mlfy - ,nh Q gmt. ,X-JZ. f I- , N . SP5 I , i 'Th' J Qi " :Ili 4"x:'-- it 'W -5,-fi I 4 V .l V. .V A -. f -, . 1, , Ld, is.-. X M it.. . tw, .. - . 2, , . , , It 1- 31,1-fi-2.49.59 ',.+f",, .. I V, ,. E f ' V. It I -:..,'f, -Y-.,m,-mmf ,id-ss-am W---f5,.'? i :Us . QI ix ,L ' , ,W " , Q' - .Q - .ff 115 I-:F as ,JJ Aifra'...,t:""-viii.-'Ji.,'!1:,'i..- J 1- 'nz' 1 , fa.. L ,ff '-MJ ff-...-,ff 4-i,L-...M 'mg I ,V E l6'5l I ABRAHAM JULIUS ROSENSHINE Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. RUDOLPH E. ROULIER, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAXV SYLVESTER PHILIP RUEDISALE Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pig Sodality flfllg Class Basketball Qlflf 3--Hg Associated Evening Classes Secretary UD, A. E. C. Bowling League HD. RUDOLPI-I ZAVALA RUIZ, B.C.E. faral del Progreso, Guanajuato, Mexico ENGINEERING Engineering Society. MIRIAM L. RUSSELL, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. Asn F. Eta Zeta Sigma: Senior Girls' Club: Varsity News 13'-U5 Tower Staff GNU, Tower Circulation C-41. JOY RYPSAM, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Em Zeta Sigmag Senior Girls' Club: Cofed Basketball ll'f'.'3l. ALFRED HONVARD SANFORD, B.M.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Engineering Society, Society of Automotive Engineers HOWARD A. SCHEAFER, B.S. St. Clair, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Sodality. ' I I I - r I T661 , -.. 1 1. 1 I ,Y JOHN RAYMOND SCHEEL, B.C.E. Chicago, Illinois ENGINEERING American Association of Civil Engineers, Varsity News Ul- ESTHER SCHLESINGER Detroit, Micliigaii LAXV Kappa Beta Pi. IRVING W. SCHLUSSEL, LLB. Detroit, Micliigaii LAYV NICHOLAS JOSEPH SCHNEIDER Detroit, Micliigavi NIGHT C. AND F. ARTHUR SCHULTZ Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pi. 1 4 5 Q ERWIN HENRY SCHUTT, LLB. Detroit, Michigan X LAW LULU BARBARA SEIEERT Detroit, Michigan LAW Kappa Beta Pi. DANIEL G. SHEA, LL.B. Lake Placid, New 'York LAW M Delta Sigma Pig "D" Club, Varsity Football C1f2f3lg . . Class President 005 Class VicefPresidcnt C315 Senior Ball I .32 Committee. 4 1, fi . lk, M f 1 isgl 'L' I , ,QQ-4' 'FJ-gfyg Lvl? V A J ,J A . .,'...' , ' ,g,,.. 1 - ., , I gb C '4h.11,'g4'WI"f UM I' N Y i -i l v f , fr 4, BH., 1 , L- 1,5 1. .5 1-- .- ,V 4. -,.,, J f67l F w -.Q . me-.: Y-P, "": '-wf""'- .W-vw 1- ix :,, 4' L, 3' cal i ,f W, ffwu, '11 . f" iff" yL.": .J,fG",g,,'!,l'WEi' 1 jilriif gy, XJ, EX--Q DY it A -' A A wh I , A -.r..'iLf"?a. 1 -F1134 P' i .ll - .-,..m..,,."- i f v' gl ' w 1 iv ,azfigf ' I if gh 35' "vis in V 1 U " ? ,E Q"',3'I"'a rf I ,S ,gg il " 'gluyti if .4 CARL THEODORE SHEEHAN, B.S. E,-1 'A Detroit, Michigan ,fl 5 DAY C. AND E. it l I 1 A! fu l i I WILLIAM JOSEPH SIMPSON, LLB. ff"-F Detroit, Michigan P' LAW 5 Gamma Eta Gamma: Varsity News ill. HAROLD F. SLOWINSKI Detroit, Michigan FOREIGN TRADE Delta Phi Epsilon. VJALTER IRVING SMITH, B.S. Royal Oak, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Delta Sigma Pig Soclality Cl-213'-ll: ,lunior Class Secretary 135. BERTRAND SYLVESTRE SOLEAU, PH.B Det-roit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Magi: Delta Alpha Pliig "Paces Wild" Committee: "Hook, My Dear" Committee. HERBERT J. SPEY, B.AE.E. St. Clair, Michigan ENGINEERING Acmnnmiczil Society: Society of Automotive Engineers EUGENE BURRITT STEVENS Blenheim, Ontario NIGHT C. AND F. ..t:ll l.,. ,A 1 '1 ll + L , -ml' 1. in VJILLIAM EUGENE STEPHENSON. BS " D Grand Rapids, Michigan I I ARTS MD SCIENCE j Q,'f I 7' 45 i A '. f.,-' 14 i . , " , in - I MH' l' ' f - L. L. j v"L' :1n,' ' " . l I lk: ' Nflffifff L ,yjgf A", ' L .. .L -' L 1 fur' ' 'Jiri :gf--Q-ff-.X 'y A I I I-452 E ., X X' Vai s...' fi, -- Q .' x nj., 'H bt: vfif, N1 V rcgf 'f '-y'.l'3l'ffijgFi:7 , . 1' f Exit' 1? -- 7 ' , .--Tpf' I68l I , -,II , .. .I M... 1 . .- , I fl , . I v .SIA ll I I I, , 4 ns...--4' FREDERICK LAXVRENCE SULLIVAN Holyoke, Nfassaclmsetts LAXV Gamma Eta Gamma. , DANIEL MULLANE SUNDAY, M.A. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Delta Pi Kappag Varsity News 11125, "Thi: Bxxltcrllicsuz Debating flfllg Oratoricul Contests f2f3J. CHARLES L. TALBOT, PH.B. Detroit, Micliigari ARTS Axim SCIENCE JULIUS C. TAPERT, B.S. IN MED. Detroit, Michigan ARTS ANI: SCIENCE WALTER E. THILL, B. ARCH. E. Detroit, Micliigan ENGINEERING Delta Pi Kappa: Chi Dclta Thctag Activities Honor .Socicty Secretary UIQ Architectural Society: Engineering Society: Varsity News IE'-11. Departmental Circulation Manager I-U, Tower HJ. . JOHN JOSEPH TREFF, B.S. Detroit, Micliigavl DAY C. ANU E. JOSEPH VICTOR T ROMBLY, LLB. Detroit, Michigan LAXV Band f3f4Jg "Aces Wild" Chorus. JOHN MATTHEW TRUDEAU, BS. Detroit, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE Basketball C2'3Jg Class Treasurer C-lj, Dramatics 126'-U. -. J, -I ,I 1 I ' L J ., , .. f 7 -,fe-r.,.-. .fjy-I'IQgI,'Ii',:V..T. "' LI. jug : 1-1 ' 'L v as '-I I- ' ff ,I x..Q.2 ,,' If J. ' .2 H -III: "' lf69l I 4 I ,af .fi I-Y .. . 'TI S-S -, 4 , ' I 9 N I 1 -, , . . - i "H ,., , 1 EMIL ALOYSIUS ULBRICH - . I tif Ferndale, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. ,IM Senior Ball Committee. Sigma Kappa Phig Associated Evening Classesg Sodality fi' Treasurer 131, Secretary 1413 Senior Council, Class Treas- F55 urcr QZJQ Class Secretary C455 Soph Prom Committee, Q15 .ls 1 HENRY ANTHONY VALENTE Detroit, Michigan ,-El Q' LAXV Z' 7' ' I a EDWIN JOHN VAN DAMME, A.B. Detroit, Michigan 1 ARTS ,INS SCIENCE Smlality. ROMAN AUGUST VAN VJAETERMEULEN Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. Sigma Kappa Phi: Sudality. DAVID D. VILLENEUVE Detroit, Michigan - NIGHT C. .-IND F. RICI-IARD THEODORE VON MACH, AB. Detroit, lvfichigan ARTS .mi SCIENCE Magi: SI,Rl:IIiry llfll. THEODORE BENEDICT W.aGNER Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. AND F. IVIICH.-XEL FRANCIS W.aLSH, B.S. Port Austin, Michigan DAY C. AND F. FrImh:Ill ill, Ton-cr Sales ill: Soclality fl-I-3'-Og "HOOfs, My Dear" Orchestra. A P 1' bf . I 2 . . . . - ....- - -, ef' , x fZJ.'F'J"' , l,' f'.r 14,51 gi., ' " ' II 'MTH . 'lf A' ,L t .7 X vhjrajylii .Qi i :I .P '. .- F I 'l " f' ' . QW" Iv ' I- S' If iq- I 5 if F ' I, . H 1 ,4 1-Kilt AFQ- N. Us-14. 35351, by ,IN '55 1 Q ' f ,I . . , ., 11--II:-. ,I ,-i I T-H. . I'I.-:Iii I I.-Ag: Ili if 'I L. " " .I ' 1 . ' I -. 1"-WLT" I ri ' ff- -:'iTf7ffQ5"f'?'f- - 'iii 'ij ,511 if-E Mn -ffn gg Yi., X - 1-. . .U A H 'i,.f'-'.KId!1, .ly "I :af xi. -v L, H: if . ,lkix 57,92 j':""""'E'J':-f i'.,,?-e"Ik 14 NN.,--'t,,,,. ,gg , g. ...J 1.5 , ,I iw.. .JM -uv 15. fat.,-,,4-..::V:,,, -.,,5k:g..x J '.Qg,,te-1 ,Jen 'md .MQ-,, F701 THOMAS PATRICK WALSH Detroit, Michigan NICI-IT C. AN., E. !"'l l Pr i 1 If I F l f 'vM1.f :PH-iv with Inu, - q-wi . .VI I N A Ivfl -I IQ. , A 1-,'f-aw I ,. " .I 2 " ,gf 1 I f- '- ! I I L , ,LY , .-.4 . J Q I 6 1 V in Q W' I , " 'K W I I " C3 I, PETER JAMES WARD, B.C.E. Ogdensburg, New 'York ENGINEERING Tuycrcg Amcrican Association of Civil Enginccr THOMAS WINFIELD WARD, B.C.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Tuycrc. WILLIS EDWARD WEEKS, A.B. Flint, Michigan ARTS AND SCIENCE FRANCIS VICTOR WEIPERT, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Dclta Sigma Pig Sodalityg Football Bzinquct Committee 1315 Basketball Banquet Committee L-0. MARVIN VINCENT WESTRICK, BEE. -Marysville, Michigan . ENGINEERING American Institute of Electrical Engineers Trcasurcr C-U. Vicc'Chairman HJ. WARREN GEORGE WINDISCH, BS. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Ad Clubg "HoOfs, My Dcarn Committee HI. CARLTON HUE WOLF, B.AE.E Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING Tuyercg Aeronautical Societyg Society of Automotive Engineers. A! Qlf., - ' K -' ' ' " " ' '7aY.I1,,m:"'I:li' -- I . , , ' -I-, 25711 -V V45-A 'vit' N A L ,LA Mulch pr-r:'-.arf I, .1 it x K in ' K A V V. ' ,,fi'FQ,:+,g.I'k"'Iwf:' --mv A why.,-' .L ,Qi i711 -. F "'--. s If 5 fl "1 '- A , , I 'I - S I GILBERT JOSEPH YAEGER, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Ad Clubg Soclality 1341. VIRGIL YENNER, B.M.E. Warsaw, Indiana ENGINEERING Engineering Societyg Society of Automotive Engineers. CHARLES LELAND YESBERA Detroit, Michigan FOREIGN TRADE Della Phi Epsilon. IRIS LAURA YOUNG, B.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND F. Eta Zeta Sigma: Senior Girls' Club:,NVomen's League Recording Secretary 1-U3 Tower 1313 Varsity News 1Z'3'-U5 Humor Magazine 131. HELEN STANLEE ZBUDOXVSKA, LLB. Detroit, Michigan LAXV Kappa Beta Pig Senior Girls' Club President 1-Il: Basket- lwall 1315 Fencing 1451 Class Secretary 133: junior Council Secretary 131g Womens League Representative 111. LOUIS H.-xRP.INOTON ZECMAN, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan I..-XXV Sigma Kappa Phi: Activities Honor Society: Sodality Sec' retary 1313 "D" Clnbq Varsity News Reporter 123, Sport Editor 131, Assistant Sport Editor 1-PII: Tower Sport Editor 1475 Track Manager 1-U3 Class VicefPrasident 133: Athletic Board of Control Secretary 153: Athletic Associa- tion Vice-Presitlenn 12'3l, President 1-U. JOSEPH ALIJYSIUS ZIELINSIQI Nfanistce, Michigan NIGHT C. Asn F. MICHAEL J, ZUKE Detroit, Michigan NIGHT C. .bmp F. Sutlaliry 1112-313 Sigma Kappa Phi, Freshman Class Dinner Dance Committee Chairman 111. A s m 1 I ' ' J- I72l ,YA-'L 'f1,x.."-" WM 'IQEQ -TGIIIR WILLI.-xiii LYONS DONLEY, M.S. Detroit, Michigan A ENGINEERING En-gincering Society. ' :EDITH CHRISTINE GABRIEL, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAW 'Kappa Beta Pi. .GIGVANNI GIOVAN-NINI, A.B. Detroit, Michigan ARTS' AND ISCHENCVE - MARTIN L. HUSSEY, B.Arch.E. Detroit, Michigan ENGINEERING ERNEST C. TAMBLIN, B.Arch.iE. jackson, Michigan ENGINEERING Delta Aliplm Phi: Delta Pi Kappag Architectural Socictyg Varsity News 62, 3, 4.15 Red and White UD: Union Board of Governors HJ: "Aces Wild" Committee- Q-Og Junior Prom Committee C435 Engineers' Dance 135: Engineering Socicty Banquet Committee Q3Jg Band fl, 2, 3, 4, il. PI-IILLIAP J. MCELROY, LL.B. Detroit, Michigan LAYV JOSEPH K. NAUIMES Detroit, Michigan LAW HSE FENG HSU, M.S. Detroit, Michigan DAY C. AND, F. WILLIARI H. MEADE, BS. in Med. Detroit, .Michigan D ARTS AND SCIENCE .IAMIES KENNARY, B.Si in Med. .D,ezroic, Michigan ARTS AND 'SCIENCE In 1- ' my S Q Xi' 1Q 'fA GYDF 5? 4? "'-7: A H! LV E? 3 N1 NLF asian-aa smesmw --1,4 '1811 is 9 Q5 W N WW A, ,A 'll vx Xxlx Cv 9 O O O 0 O b fi ,A 3326, Aw! ,..g O 1 I Y fffvh f Q X ' " L 222 f f gig? we X W W gg ,mn ,J ,g ,1,,, .nw . a Y, ? Af, , 1, A. , if-1 i, Hi' 3, 4 ' Yi, ff "0Z4,f f 'QQ-1Y?','i,y 4 1 f Q 4 .V , ff , D I ,253 0 ' 5 if S' il , W' ,. Hug ,N Y M 3' , 1 5 fig --,,, , I1 A ' ,fofq GXQX. Qxvx 1-1.7 W Z ' ' X vvb Cx-va 6 6 AWN P ' ,gm 325 19 334 " ers go Jo YQQEKGDS W Wk M M I A Q0 JO Q0 fo 40 Q0 Q0 if ji PX ni I w ' , A V: RNA 'r v 4 v 1 ? , -, 4 5 ' '-' --' A-"fp-x. .v9j,'5L, W au, Left to Right: First Row-Allen. Bucs, Brazil, Collins, Cullen. Second Row-Frazer, Goodnow, Hoban, Ienney. 'l'hi1'd Row-Johnston, Kronk, Lennart, Mahoney, Ottcnbaclmer. Fourth Row-Riley, Rose, Starrs. Van Atta, Witchcll, l l76l . 4 A , r i -v v' 'Ev' Q: pt, , yu I 5,f1?'s . f" gf , AL, .I .A Tllj 'fl-1n'lI'flQ -,-..A 5 ,E ' 6 1 w :F I' Q ,M N1 -ws . sit., ' 1 Y -'Ax 1 L."-W ', ivfl 'R 1 4 . I v .7., 'fl A i ,l f l, l l I A 1 V A L' 1' AY! um. 1 vu L! Y:- , , -' , l . ,Z . . . 1 'i 'fl u I,- zf, '- . 'i 1' W . it-L j' ",' FAI '-'H l 3 !a...'.,x' I.. ff' fr -I J x 9 in l r -is 4 a , -4 '12 H L4.,avx . ,F - - -,' M .lf fr' F JUNIOR CLASS CCUNCIL CFFICERS NATHAN B. GOODNOW f f f f President LARRY RILEY f f f VicefPresident ERIE ROSE "" f Secretary JAMES A. FRAZER f f f f f f f f Treastwer ARTS AND SCIENCES RALPH C. JOHNSTON ffffff President JAMES A. FRAZER fffffff VicefPresident JOSEPH STARRS f f f f f f f f Secretary JOSEPH KRONK 5 fffffff Treaswrer DAY CCMMERCE AND FINANCE FRANK E. .JENNY fffffff P1-ggidgm: LLOYD BRAZIL f f f f VicefPresident IVIARSHALL VJITCHELL f Secretary JANIES HOISAN ffffff f Tfreasiwefr . ENGINEERING GRVILLE CULLEN fffff f President Pierre Boes f f f f f f VicefPreside11t LARRY RILEY ffff f Siggfygm-fy GEORGE VAN IAXTTA ffff f T7-ggigmfgy LAW NATHAN B. GOODNOW f f f f Pregidem RAYMOND L. ALLEN f f f f f fVicefPo'esident ERIE ROSE fffffff Sec1'etaryfTreastwer NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE JOHN F. COLLINS f ' f f f f f President EDMOND J. OTTENBACKER f f f f f VicefPre.sident ANTHONY J. LENNER1' f Secretary LIOXVARD MAIIONEY f HE members of the Junior Class Counf cil are to be congratulated on the vvonf derful cofoperation which the class of '30 lent to the support of various school acf tivities. The junior officers of the depart' ments met early in the second semester and elected from their number those students Whom they believed best qualiied to guide the destinies of their class. The council was recognized as the official organ of the Junior class and did great work toward the elimination of that certain element of def partmental rivalry which invariably manif fests itself in university life. It created and sustained a more intimate feeling of good' fellowship among the Juniors and at the regular meetings the various members exf plained in detail the aims of the class which they represented. The council functioned perfectly in asf suring the success of the 1929 Junior I77I f Treastwer Prom. Working in unison with the Prom committeemen the council members were instrumental in bringing about the attend' ance of more than six hundred junior class students at this memorable aiiair. Wheii such university projects were launched as the annual Union opera the council furnished valuable assistance. No class did more to insure the success ,of the opera than did the juniors, and it was the council who generated that excellent cof operation which the class evidenced throughout the promotion of the univerf sity's theatrical venture. The unity of the organization as a whole and the smoothness with which it repeatf edly functioned is a itting tribute to the executive ability and keen foresight of the council's personnel. Left to Right: Top Row-Hart, Tanner, Sweeney, Engleman. Brooks, Meyers, Labadie, W. Kelley. Bottom Row-Martin, F. Kelley, Rancourt, I. Kronk, Walker, Breault, Corbett. ARTS AND SCIENCES Thomas T. Adams, Leo J. Andries, john J. Behen, ,lames E. Bellaimey, james B. Bellanca, Leo F. Bloink, Roman E. Boucher, lack R. Bracken, Lynus T. Brancheau, Alfred W. Breault, Flavius L. Brooks, Harry J. Buckf man, LeRoy M. Burnstrum, Raymond R. Cameron, Frederick B. Carlson, John L. Cashin, Harold E. Caton, William B. Cetnar, John V. Comella, Edward J. Corbett, Leon B. Cote, Gerald G. Cotter, Sigismund 1. Dembeck, Sylvester A. DePonio. I'78l 5. . K -rr I rf' ' I +7 If ,I af T lg' wg .lf 'fill Liga V . fa : ,F HM' . 'girl ,NIJ '- "--I. . 'lv-1 iii i -a f 4 1 lf E .I If fs ,. CJK N , 3- 1' Tw, V I 5 , 11.2. wi .5 . A I x I I . , ., 'Q l fl ' .. ,xxx -l xlfd' ag' "4 .1- .w X13 Lnrllr'-1 S1-,fa iv ' ,W Ig, M. Y IVJE2' fad 2711,-fl -Q rw -311, A-l .Mez V. 'IE , 3, 2 'li alla ww W4 'ii all an Kai' My Q L. 3 MWF, ,zwf-fi Left to Right: Top Row-Frazer, Kelley, Woelkers, Murphy, Shubnell. Second Row-Potts, Fellrath, Kreklow, Boucher, O'Brien, Ward, Gregory. Bottom Row-Kummer, Donovan, Monaghan, Guarnieri, Doucher, Hart, Murphy. ARTS AND SCIENCES Lawrence E. Donohue, Jerry J. Donovan, Thomas A. Doucher, john Dowd 7 Ellis G. Duncan, John F. Dziuba, Alwyn A. Engelman, Samuel G. Epstein, Charles J. Fellrath, James E. Frazer, Edward B. Galazin, Robert A. Gehrig john G. Gibbons, Sydney H. Green, Louis J. Gregory, Arthur R. Grix William A. Guarnieri, Richard M. Haney, Louis L. Hart, Paul W. Hille brand, David W. lsenberg, Ralph G. Iohnston, Francis F. Iurkiewicz, Frank I. Kelly. 1 . 7?,g2jgfW,fE f ie.ef-1 2 lt W. ' P M. ,Y , .. r -. ,if ,.. 1 i' I . 1, l . . 1 . ..1- Ja, .. nf, . .-....- . - f :wand 11, x,1g4,,.,i , ..1, 1 ., , 1, 1 rf -V . 115.3 -.Vi jg." -ai'-D1 xg- 1 i- --aff. l79l 3 9 f P Left to Right: Top Row-Shires. Secbaldt. Starrs. Lukasiewicz. Cetnar. Gibbons, Haney. Second Row-Ulrich Taiple, Kronk, Laurencclle. Hillebrand, Cashin, Grix, Cameron, Page. Bottom Ronmz-Woelkers, Cotter. Landers. Ptak. Bloink. Phelan. Unsworth. ARTS AND SCIENCES William J. Kelly, Francis I. Kelly, Frederick A. Kramer, Herbert I. Krause, Joseph L. Kreklow, Lawrence A. Kroha, Anthony I. Kronk, Joseph J. Kronk, Joseph A. Kuenz, Clarence I. Kummer, Alexander Kundrat, John B. Labaclie, Ora A. Labadie, Wilfred I. LaCharite, Iames C. LaDriere, Thomas B. Landers, Cvila F. Langlois, Charles A. Laurencelle, Leonard L. LaBarge, Walter R. Lindsay, Stanley L. Lipinski, Arthur I. Lech, , James R. Lowrey, Henry I. Lukasiewicz. IS0l X Left to Right: 'Top Row-Schniitter. Stefani. Second Row'-Roney, Langlois. Russell, Cote, Caton, Behen Bottom Row-Gehrig. Rodcn. Spens. Storen. Stankey. Curry. Dowd. ARTS AND SCIENCES Milton J. Maher, Stanley A. Meisner, Joseph A. Martin, Raymond A. McCarthy, Vernon J. McGrath, George A. Meyers, James B. Monaghan, Richard J. Morris, Denis W. Murphy, James P. Murphy, John M. Nader, Stephen P. Nowaczyk, Edwin C. C'Brien, Edward J. Olschefsky, Robert Page, Louis'Papo, Erancis J. Potts, JosepheA. Powers, Otto J. Preston, Edward P. Ptak, Cyril J. Rancourt, Charles J. Roney, Eugene H. Roney. E813 "y K. ' ,Y A K - Y 4 --4 Left to Right: Top Row-Brancheau, Preston, Carlson, Kramer. Second Row-Wienczewski, Richard, Levy, Schiff, lsenberg, Dziuba. Lipinski, jurkiewicz. Bottom Row--Dowd, Nader, Kuenz, LaBarge, Tomilson, Bellanca, Papo. ARTS AND SCIENCES Theodore A. Ruedisueli, Franklin D. Ruhlman, Karl P. Schechter, Charles R. Schmitter, Edward A. Seebaldt, Charles Shires, Leo T. Shubnell, lsadore Silverstein, Lester B. Stankey, joseph W. Starrs, Raymond T. Stefani, George G. Sweeney, Julian C. Szczudlo, Frederick P. Taipele, Frederick G. Tanner, Ledyard Tomlinson, Frank J. Ullrich, Robert C. Unsworth, Edwin Walker, William M. Walker, Howard R. Ward, Theophil W. Wienczewski, Norbert J. Woelkers. . a f- w's'75,Wv fr- Af 1 ,iii ,V1 l32l 4 i - 11 V1 L vi yi-J 'X if 3 1 ky," Alla ' 'i'-Q,2"f ii f-C4 ..- i. 3 I I 4 r. r 'ir .a,f" .vm i . W .- .v .MV . M. V1.1 x,v -' . 1 X x A LAMN '. r li ,L H . I L 1-' J Q,,'S',,. ' f :if ' x li -Y 'Ll F' 'I-f1'I."' 1 Q 3 ix . ii 1 " . W K rx l fir' 'iff hi r il 4 4' S W7 '21 hiiiiif ' 3. Milf ,fill V .L-5 . Lf, I 54' ,mix ii '-'Pin . 'r'!'s'll .L :ly 5 N I 'il i' -F l s 'A I , . 1 .. rw. .1 .WV f1?f53'.. 'fy L. F ,gh -1' , TV.. 1' A . P. fT'Lf,5El fq Q 3 ,Gif 1. ,ff f'QHHlL'7l'f ii,fL:ih5i - ff- " M .Wi :Tfg V fr M 1' -FUR s,, 'Vg Q 'I' I awk' :K ,Egg HQ.. ' Wifi? . rii'f'4' .ai--. -'tv rfifsgw y, . r.. . Left to Right: Top Row-D. McKillop. Second Row-Young, Krebsbach, McIntyre, Smith, Kulaski, Matzen Third Row-Scheifele, Williams, Lamb, Harrington, Woodree, Spindler. Bottom Row-Sterbenz, Taylor, McLaughlin, Pease, Bernard, Howard, Walker. DAY CCMMERCE AND FINANCE Arthur W. Anderson, Thomas I. Barton, Florence M. Bernard, Leo A. Bertling, Robert W. Blanchard, Iohn C. Bossenberger, Lloyd Brazil, Charles Brushaber, Ambrose Burke, Dennis I. Clary, Jack Cohen, Walter B. Cohen, Eilleen K. Cross, Charles J. Daniells, John B. Dawson, Max Derin, Simon Diamond, Donald Distlerath, Francis J. Doran, Michael Fitz' gerald, Armella Friedl, Marguerite Gahagan, Vincent A. Hackett, John L. Hamilton, Dan N. Harrington, Elaine Helmar, Charles F. Heslip, james Hoban, C. Scott Howard, Frank E. Jenney, Roy G. Kowalski, Allen N. Kraft, Sigmund J. Krebsbach, Edward W. Kulaski, Gerald H. LaLonde. "H wire rua. Hi 'ifylcirl .. ,-,,., ,.. ,. -.3-n,..,.. '5r5,,fg,9,f'.f',-g, .Q--jiffrsg tf:"':-bf - 1,,..-'- if 1 ISN --4v'i'. .- .iz -. , . Q. ff., --, -PQ :T-'.,":Sf-1 fd" "Q, ' ' ' I L V r at ,f.A.: -E,,'-:,.G.,,r-cjrrxxir-ilk a I 1 -as T if Pu .,, Le t to Right: Top Row-Stenger, Hamilton, O'Leary, Cohen, Anderson. Second Row-Distlerath, Hunt, Doran, Heslip, Brushaber, Bishop. Third Row-Ienney, Hoban. Derin, Cohen, Peltier, l.aLonde. Bottom Row-Nebus, Kraft, Dannclls, Hackett, Cleary, Barton. DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE john A. Lamb, Merrill T. Lardner, Ronald E. Mclntyre, Daniel B. Mcf Killop, Fred C. McLaughlin, joseph Leo Marcero, Donald W. Matzen, Ray T. Navin, John F. O'Leary, Ruth Pease, Clifford J. Peltier, John T. Petz, Harry Portnoy, Francis Z. Quinn, Gerald F. Riley, Francis Ryan, John Ryan, Aldred Scheifele, Francis E. Smith, William Spickett, Cryille I. Spindler, Edward A. Stenger, George A. Storbenz, Stanley H. Sullivan, Hanley Taylor, Lester B. Vachon, Norman B. Valentine, john E. Walker, joseph A. Waltman, Joseph Iwi. Williams, Marie Margaret Winthrop, Marshall P. Witchell, William A. Vsfoodree, Herman Young. l3-Fl -0 , V If at 8.5: Q ill' 42 W T if-551 L 1 511519 . Q. F ' drill' il Eff! 591 1 . Q ll' 59,32 . ,. MAT? at 1 '. Fifi "mg 1" .l :YL 4" 'V E lgnl A El ' 1. if ' 'JI . Fr. t.-Yi ,. 'ffl' hi, Iv ii- 'i'U',i fy- .- ghbgyl. eh- 'Q ,,W'-1- tt... .J f Ra' . lifli' f I if-rgur. 1551 LQ 7, 5' . 5 'GN , l 3 1 ::' ' as .5 ' hltfjil ei gif? Tjful " ii V ..l , r. 1, --I L., Ll! 'i .G- 31 F' 1,-L ggi' 'rf-,HJ - 1 'F , ,.,'- .Q M Qt. ' '.'74'13'- 1 or Q.. W, T -s T 1 ll f wJ9"f1Fi .if ..v". "Za, , Q ,Q 'big 'Vt up . 'fwbrlx K V . ..-.. 3 1,3 , , , QF' fy' R N iv , n r?l.1Q'54 Sfdigff N55 ' 4 ,. rg- . 31-ff' 1 ,E 4,.,.-,. fi ,ya -, w,-' 'ifr2':'9 .A ., liiltlal ,L 'IA' Ein. lf, '. 3? .vhiixgtif MF' 1 ,' rl yin, ii in MW 1 w, . 1' A ,,.. ,. .., . 91. il rv, any s - u xy "".'1:' -K A ,V '. 1 1' g. ,, . ,, 4. . f. Y., ,:, w . .Y Q, -' Left to Right: 'Top Row-Cartier. McClure, Moore, Diersing, Willizims, Quinn. Second Row-Palisoc, Hogan ,L ,ji ,t 1 M . , 'yrjg L ,VF -5. I .X ... xjf. fam' - I i"fJQ 3 . 4, Q. . it .-- E Y 1 -x 'P 1, .,, s -:ffl fi'-:ras . ,ji 1-.l"Lsl J' Ar, ,gall ,ffiflv-'il . :W Qlallii li N I ',i .1 5.14 L 51. .l w' 4 lie M CNW if-3' 'ff miilsgs' ll.l??,iV?l .fi aff-if F 92 ll! in fa as .Q gillfil Jill W3 rn-"xff:,a 11 F air, X.'v ,X Q-sf? Sf, Margolis, Dietz, Sweeten. Rivarcl, McManmon. Third Row--Riley, Bowes, Bourgeron, Davis, Stevenson DuBois. Nutt. Bottom Row-Carr, Perlield. Bussiere, Hzivas, Donzc. Vargas, Urbani, Rodriquez. ENGINEERING Raymond J. Abele, Matias bl. Alfonso, Grant E. Becker, Ioseph R. Beckley, Julius Berger, Pierre QI. Boes, Daniel T. Boughner, Albert J. Brotz, WiHiam Buehinger, Arthur E. Bush, George E. Bussiere, Howard E. Byrne, Kenneth H. Carr, Harold F. Cartier, Everette C. Clark, Paul G. Clark, Grville E. Cullen, Leo P. Daoust, Thomas C. Davis, Casper I. Deigert, Morris B. Deo, Eugene L. Diersing, Fred A. Dietz, Raymond B. Donze, George Downie, Edward P. DuBoise, Walter F. ,Dultio, Edmund I. Fitzgerald, Albert E. Flemming, Frank Flynn, Raymond J. Franklin, Edgar W. Gettinger, Leon C. Gibbons, Willia.m F. Haldeman, Alfred Havis. ,E rms. 5 ,, , n f ,-' . A. , - u , . vi-x . yn, ,haf jg., i- V LL. ' . ' -S. . V 4 ia' v.5f-HL," -- Y in ,-.-:S ' 5 - . H 1' . 1 gr - - i. 1 wrt, Mba. ,X ,- ,Q 1, Y.. .. ,U y I - ,J L wg ,L -'-.E -' J 2 -, A, , . I, . . ,i .W-.,ii,v,' LK, -fl r... 1 L -, ' V vw., L A , Av '11 - Y- f' f- 4- 1, g "-:nn ... Jr" WF TSN Let to Right: Top Row-Mesina, Haldeman, Abehe, R. Clark, LaBarge. P. Clark. Second Row-Martin Lehman, Sullivan, Niedzielski, Rohland, O'Keefe. Snyder. Bottom Row-Buckinger, Peterson, Lord. Vers, Schreiber. Brotz. Marr. ENGINEERING George E. Henk, Saul Herscovitch, E. Vincent Hogan, Byron Howell, lack Kaufman, lack P. Kennaugh, Raymond G. Kern, Ignatius M. Kopowski, Kenneth F. LeBarge, George Lawrence, G. F. Lamers, Nicholas M. Lazar, Ralph J. Lehman, Ralph R. Lord, Herbert F. McClure, Francis A. McGraw, Joseph G. McManmon, George A. Mansfield, Isadore Margolis, John S. Marr, J. Russell Martin, Eustaquio Mesina, Robert G. Moore, joseph A. Muffat, James F. Nellis, Henry F. Niedzielski, John S. Novak, Francis O'Keefe, Joaquin G. Palisoc, Pandharinath Patil, William J. Perheld, Gunnar G. Peterson, Warner W. Pierson Charles Posner, Thomas F. Quinn. I86l Left to Right: Top Row-Novak, Kopkowski, Stenger, Franklin, Bush, McMahon, Nellis, Flynn, Gibbons. Second Row-Kaufman, VanAtta, Deo. Simek, Fleming, Radlinsl-ri. Delgert. Bottom Row-Henlg, Mansfield, Becker, Weaver, Shelby, Gettinger, Wigle. McGraw. ENGINEERING Harry F. Radlinski, William M. Riddell, Pio C. Rigonan, Lawrence G. Riley, Thomas E. Rivard, Horacio R. Rodriguez, Kurt M. Rohland, Louis M. Ruskin, Bartolome Santos, Ralph P. Schneider, Fred J. Schreiber, Nor' man F. Schrein, Stewart I. Schuler, Sidney Shelby, Carl E. Simek, Wilbert E. Stack, Louis F. Starr, Iohn C. Stenger, john M. Stevenson, Emmet I. Sullivan, Donald Sweeten, Eldridge C. Theeck, Francis M. Theifels, John M. Thrasher, Charles L. Toler, Gaeton Urbani, George W. VanAtta, Vic' tor Vargas, Joseph Vers, jr., Reinhart E. Vogt, Carl J. Weaver, Lawrence H. Werner, Jr., Charles Wigle, Sylvester A T. Williams, Isadore B. Zaneville. i373 Left to Right: Top Row-Barry. Collins. Coodcnow, Qlanjatoviclu, Illig. LaFaive, Hunt. Ianovei Bottom Row-Engelman, Horkey. Adelman, Kramer. Gcraci, Healy, Friskc, Allen. LAW Cscar Adelman, Ray Lee Allen, Leib Altman, Dorothy M. Benz, Charles B. Berry, Ioseph A. Brown, Anna A. Campbell, Gladys Catherwood, Max Cohen, Edward F. Collins, Rhea Bolton Coleman, Wallace A. Colwell, Thomas Corbett, William Dohany, Edmund J. Engleman, Chas. H. Fisher, John F. Frederick, joseph Friske, Mabel E. Frost, joseph G. Gauthier, James Geraci. l 38 l .5 ., hiv ff 3,4 1 f , -f 1 'crm ' J ali! v Left to Right: Top Row-McClcar. Ryan, Phelan. Parker, W4lg'l1Cl', Freclericlcs. Rosenweig, Weins Bottom Row--Phcncy, Ruhin. L. Vicrtcl. R. Vicrtel, Pascvich. Rose, Rigney. Walslm. LAW Irving J. Gibbons, Nathan B. Goodnow, I. Gwen Guiney, Daniel I. Healy, George S. Horkey, Iames J. Hunt, Harold lllig, Boydon lanjatovich, Harvey I. Janover, J. Gerald Kane, Edward I. Kremer, Earl H. LaPaive, Raymond - I. Lynch, John McGinnis, Richard Minnie, joseph C. Murphy, Harry J, V Mrirray, Edward I. C'Donnell, Harry C. Parker, john E. Pendergast. l39l Left to Right: 'Top Row-Sullivan, Colwell, Pendergast, Gibbons, Williams, Gauthier. Bottom Row-Catherwood, Benz. Powers, Campbell. Frost, Schulte. LAW J. Francis Phelan, John Pheney, Lula E. Powers, Charles W. Rigney, James R. Pohl, Erie Rose, Maurice Rosenweig, Myer Rubin, Daniel O. Ryan, Anna F. Sampson, Frances R. Schulte, Richard I. Sullivan, James C. Shea, Robert Teagan, Laura M. Viertel, William F. Wagner, Leo William Walsh, George A. Weins, Donald S. Wexler, George B. Williams. R 5 i J' l 'lf ' i E90l 5. , iv 7, ., . . .i .V -N A iz , r-4 , ,. lfliil T 'J- I 1. N535 i I, l"', l. ,. ,f , -1 ,JA- M l' L Y gi If -J Jig' Zi .LH ,. lx. ff'-,piwiigir ,Hg l Q X. Qfeil hi i .ff , .lQ"a1l'?Q' ' mv, :. 3.6"-52 'iili 3 -- , Q .5 , .Hp wh 1 .-1-J - i-- ,, T! 1 " ' ' xi. v 5 'I T , , ll "ri 'T ., 2'5- zv if .1 ' 1.-1, iLv'l7fi." i ff: ,pi - V41 l i',5'5iR, . , 1 'V ,i-li lisa'- 'lfl'ff.7 Q. i -. ,. QJWEVLN a ' Malik' x 5 lui ,,jgf.,.qv' sl . 531, .,+.i-. v 1. ,, V 1 - iairgwgiil if in "W,-, fgw ,V 'Wi viii? ' hi" ,'pius3,, ,-1 gi Y lib,--I . ,gy 1 lid! .XF ga. aa, QL .-cv ..,i -get is le' s L f! ,- ,. ..,, 4.31 i A-1,-l',-V g,E-igviifial-t,7',--'Rt L ..-.Lg i . , . LEE 1"-.1-V P1 5 f?,g?Jf3yg,':.i, af, . Left to Right: Top Row-Mahoney, Lettvin, Vwfalsh. Dornsife, Finn, Lyons, Collins, Gentes. Bottom Row-Collins Laethem. Lennert, Finebcrg, Simon, Smith, Rammacher, Boos. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Victor George Avrunin, Leslie F. Babcock, George Joseph Bazner, joseph Anthony Berg, John Leon Boos, William Theodore Boutt, John Gilbert Brennan, Patrick Brennan, Harold Raymond Brill, Clare Cameron, Cather' ine A. Casey, Thomas Carnagan, Walter Joseph Chinoski, Archie E. Clark, Raymond Paul Clement, Thomas Vincent Cole, Jack Frederick Collins, john Leo Collins, Marcus H. Collins, Roy J. Cutcher, George Aloysius Dakosk, Charles Ed. DeBlois, Hudson William Digby, John Dolan, Roy S. Dornsife, Gus Harry Ebert, Francis Edson, Leo George Esper, Gordon Farr, Sydney H. Fineberg, John A. Finn, William Fuller Fitzgerald, Louis Flatbery, , Louis Fletcher, Charles Forrest. i911 x ii 'W f W' A hr' ,M fp Le 1: to Right: Top Row-Grcnier. Brill, Schulte, Michalak, Fitzgerald. Second Row-Szurpicki. DeKoske. Chun L1 Tepper, Schwartz. Schmidt. Ebert, Weber-. Bottom Row-Hinz, Longton, Welling, Jedrezak, Bazncr, Digby. Cole, Zeschin. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Leonard Alphonse Fox, Ralph R. Genter, john I. Gilhooly, Leo E. Gould, George Lucian Greiner, Max Grossberg, Williani Hendrickson, Clarence W. Hinz, Martin Iedrezak, losephine Kayser, john King, Williani Carl Kolpack, Albert Klebba, Martin Kockx, Richard H. Laethein, John Laird, Margaret I. LeEever, Anthony G. Lennert, Fred Lettvin, Hazen A. Long' ton, Arthur Lorenz, Ray Joseph Lyons, Mark Loush, John Hugh McDonald, Harry E. McFadden, Howard I. Mahoney, Michael Malone, George E. Mickalak, Bernard Monaghan, George Moody, Ralph I. Nelson, Ralph Moore, James O'Donnell, Don A. Osborn, Iames Gswald, Edmond I. Cttenbacker. f92l with alfa, 5, rf 1 ' '41 Jef" 1. fi 'T . ef'-Q5 Ui, 'f9'.5,f ' if ja "" ,fi ..,f.:' 3' XJ Q 1 liiigi' 'eiiisglf ' Natal-il"4lrQN-vs-f.'i'.vf"m f"'i'a1Z'+r 'E .-"T, it Q , A, 92: F . . auf' . pq' 1.1 ,hz Le. X12-Q if iQfi1f'f' 7' Ya' 45 we .f :rr f 2?"l5i'.t 9? J' 1' , . . ffl 429 -i: .H lefas .,. , .f 1" 'Q if 4 il ' Jr , ,A .?"'i,f,n' E flgaail iw V4 ., 'lf' 'E T' .r' labs: J A, 15, 4.5, 3:-., ' lui, . llQL 1655 .M ' tilt 'L ,125 l' -2 r 1: "KVM J I .VMI- ww. I. fr' '. 'L ,, fr H l 4 R I 1 . 2.11 'l'i"" lyme, --rv 91 -. - 4-,J .. . gi ,'.'i-VW .5 Q ,VU , 5- jpeg deb: aff -N. L fiat if ' 'M rN,:!.,. "' .r lyxffljx 31544: . . .Q '2g.y'f'. l ' Q M if S Qi. 'Tp' QW'-a.. ii: 4 .H il 'X ! .- L T i .ii , liiiga 1 .fs-4' 'fm 1-ug., 3 if-a 7 , ,Log tY'57'l T ix" - 1 1: f 5.rfi,"Jli' fi? F? ll li Y " ,J-ui , 'tis' :Lv 1' E315 xjgf lt 5311?- lls Il " rlllljm 1, I? H wfylpfl ji life-. r wl2'T-52 'wi . ,, , Maw .,Mw FTW sr' fl- 14" l , ?S5' V350 vllja.. , 'f Lili:-Q' 'Effflfx fy-aa M wi. . rhhgf 12-icy "' 4 . J 9' , . .2054 f 1' g I H, , W-E ,,., ri ff -a' ,f a t 'a.'l."?.'D 'ff .pi "' 4 A, .saw as Am' .RM .- ra., -L -AJ - . Q, ., fir, "vt Left to Right: Tow Row-Clement, Wilson, Webb, Grossberg. Avrunin. Carroll. Bottom Row-Robitell, Lorenz, Ottenbaclcer. Mahoney, Depreli. Cameron, Gilhooly. NIGHT CCMMERCE AND FINANCE Irene Pallister, Roy Pallister, Andrew I. Patrovitz, Margaret Paulick, John Radzikowski, Joseph J. Rammacher, R. Roy Redden, Eugene Reynolds, Clarence A. T. Robitell, Arnold R. Schmidt, Leonard I. Schulte, Norbert G. Schwartz, Ervin P. Simon, I. Lancelot Smith, Robert Smyth, Ann St. Clair, Ethel St. Clair, John Szurpicki, Edward Taylor, William Bernard Tepper, John Tincnell, John Veprek, J. Richard Walsh, john Webb, Ralph L. Weber, George Weitzman, Cletus Joseph Welling, Cletus Joseph Willef main, james Sweeney Williams, Albert Glenn Wilson, Thomas Wolff, Frank Yuke, Arnold C. Zeschin, Hazen Frederick Zang. .. Lag, , , 73 w E931 xv""u F X xx 0 QTY UP - uv uv 'G My My Q- ff-"SL, 4 2 S L 11- - .1877 . x t 42" Q ZR GO-D 9 llxlxh Jo O F - ,mi Cl O O O O O v I ' t W f' .' I ' ' gk 'L ' M k j I M j 1 ' Q s I f f KD 4' ,' Q Q w A ' wc A, 'lk I' nk- fn' , 4: Ui , T277 N gfbfff 544' 6: J, ,.Q 2 Q ,L!- X 2 ff . gf! fy M Q ff filwff We Nf gw asf 51, , 7,5 9 W J wi ff M 4? ,f 5 f ff, fu W ?5 GV 9 fhlifff 1 my 1-gf, ig fm, 2, -pesiff , 1 ,V gb E' ,If fffj QSQ.-3 PRE U IDRS '-Ldifi.-rp A , f x , l f I v 0 Q . 'L fOr , Q y 4 P 5 30 an ESQ W I ' P 'N ' fig WON' 4 O5 ?X g' li- I-I S I: , 1 ' X ATX F N jZlf.rJA9K M Kozv 4,03 4015 0? I 3 Left to Right: First Row--Boone, Fisher. Second Row-Grose, NI-:Guigzm Third Ronu-Mittig. Smith. E961 PREJUNIQR CLASS OFFICERS ENGINEERING-SECTICDN A QTIS A. TAYLOR f f f f f f f f President LEONARD B. SMITH f f f Viceflgresident VINCENT A. MCGUIGAN f f Secretary WILLIAM J. EMZRIGHT f f f f f Treasiwer ENGINEERING-SI-ECTION B JOSEPH A. FISHER ffffffff President RALPH A. BOONE f f VicefP1'esideIzt AIKNOLID J. MITTIG f f Secretary RUSSELL GllOSE f f T1-gaglwgy HE PrefJunior class of the College of Engineering has always been a problem. It is not a class common to all colleges of the university, and hence it often seems to have little connection with the universityls activity. Standing alone, smaller in num' ber, its task as an organization was doubly great. Ordinarily it served to break up the class activity of the engineering students and became an impediment to their success. With this year this problem seems to have been overcome, and the prefjuniors have assumed a role as an individual entity in university endeavor. They have become a class in themselves. A glance into the his' tory of the present class is proof enough of the truth of such a statement. The present PrefJunior class organized as Freshmen in the fall of 1926. It consisted of both sections of the Engineering College. The section leaders during the Freshman year were Herbert Kosel and H. Robert Winkle. And the class functioned with the rest of the university and took an active part in all its affairs. As Sophomores, this class was lead by John Sullivan and Joseph Fisher. They were the first class of Sophomores on the new campus and enforced many new rules for the firstfyear men in the Engineering department. The construction of the first f97 huge bonfire on the campus, for the Notre Dame game, was largely due to a committee from its ranks. And then came the PrefJunior year, and no class connections with the university. ln the past, the PrefJunior engineering class has been socially more or less inactive on the campus. But the activity of this group could not be allowed to deteriorate, and a dance was planned. It was decided that the "Tech Ball" would be revived and sponsored by this class each year. This would restore the historic Engineering dance, and also give this class without social connections with the university, a chance to participate in some of these activities. Vv'ith the close of this year, the class will step into line as Juniors, and will so func' tion with the rest of the university. To future classes of prefjuniors the work of this year's organization will form a pat' tern easily followed. The foundation has been laid, and little difficulty should be enf countered in their finding a itting place in university endeavor. In solving the prob' lem of the PrefJunior class, the support of a large number of valuable students has been added to the university's activity, and a new page has been written into the history of her progress. Left to Right: Top Row-Castonquay, Clark, Henkel, Bekema. Second Row--Beckley, Brown, Bladges, Kase, Wasko, Spruit. Bottom Row-Iakubowski, Woodhouse, Sullivan, Ward, Greifzu, McClellan. ENGINEERING Francis H. Ameel, LeRoy Anderson, WiHiam P. Andre, Richardo Arellano, Charles Beckley, Nicholas P. Bekema, Armand A. Beltramo, Felix A. Ber' gerson, Carl K. Bialys, Lawrence E. Biggs, Harry L. Bindy, Lloyd G. Blades, Frank -Bobrowski, Roy Bondy, Ralph E. Boone, Floyd R. Borger, Ir., Frank il. Bourgeois, Herbert L. Bowers, Lawrence P. Brady, James L. Brewer, George F. Brown, Edmund Brozae, james W. Brzuchowski, Thomas T. Castonguay, Samuel Gatanese, Victor I. Checcola, Fabiran P. Ghekal, Ralph Clark. lf93l .-aw' 4 l. .i ..., . ,.. -,k T? , ff. -,+ iif' 13 XY .Sm ,ff .H-lf ,fr fi-E -V 7 M , Alu? ii l" B li. "v',.,l' ,ll Mig' H ' lf J' :il 7 E' a an -1 Jr., .1 . ,AMW 1. 'fl ily' 1 v '..f,'4".',ii7i' C .7 fi '51 ...- .V .1 1 l -A g ,it A ' l 1 . I .Vg- W A ly ll., v ' ,- .. , , .Url . ',..i. .ix JV' 1-1 A31 I ng ,' . ff , -21' .5:,, .':-. ' ' .-gfiillv ..-1' ."flL 4-lf.: .Irv 'A Fi'-L .,'fw'l1 ,l?' -4 EL . -jg . 1,'I 1 l F 1 ' .150 J. 'kai -. 'zz' EQ! . . X. ,Q .' 5 .4 If 9' .A , f- A ,.. -1 ,-- . ,l:lk:!' , ni.-1 15, ', ffl-.EQYY 'JA' :FL ' 7 fl 4 4 r .n . 4- n 'Q,is,3'?g-'ngfigu V13 H-:V y..,,ik, ,..,,,u Q I 'qi'-1 LW' fig' 'Fill 4+ 1 :vi J V li, ji M win ' I 1.1 .. ..--ff.. . . 4 . . -I . . ,. . ' '. . - 1 f , 1 ,ii f-. s, , ,Q-r1'sfi'.'..'Qs J... f-,L -4 .. ,- rr i P- J- 'Y r ' '-5 '- f , . H- ,,",f. f J. 1 - -L .. J' .' ,r . ,,,.- . ' f. -, 4 'H ., v +V - , -7 -.- ,,' M. E G12 MMV3' "'53g3,a -5,1 'vga' qv, vi., . A Q 1 ,Ark 157 Y. Q . 4,4 - .4 v, Lg. HEEL, .,kf,.,f'Llvirf 7 - 'if .Lila ?'Q"1 lb viii is f. . I 5 Hi, . - 1- A Wil . HZ. 9 m Er 'T5 J , ffihal' xiii' .asa 1 rx fi A . .' Sri Yi .gill G11 . E331 . in fir ci? .4519 QW " .fm .figs 1 1 1. ,f .fa Q? Ka G53 Ffallliy n Q, Q : --:ff A' aial' I fill it it is ll . E Q! . la in . Left to Right: Top Row-Lloyd, Zillas. Second Row'-Fowler, Quick, Murphy, Johnson, Gergle. Bottom Row-Ruysser, Decker, Bindy, Ozark, Deres. ENGINEERING WiHiam Glosey, Everette E. David, J. Murray Decker, Roger DePahna, George M. Depew, John M. Deres, Tony A. Ditta, D. R. Divekar, Laurence D. Donovan, Francis T. Douglas, George J. Doyle, John O. Drake, Joseph L. Drueke, Epifanio A. Duarte, Robert W. Duncan, Edward J. Dundon, Mansfield M. Dyer, Elso Elsarelli, WiHiam C. Enright, George E. Fair' Clough, John A. Faler, James B. Fay, Matthew E. Fiscus, Joseph A. Fisher, Joseph Fishman, WiHiam H. Fitzgerald, James E. Flannery, Fred A. Fournier. in. 1 0 ,Q 'L ". lr' fd V'-pi ,L '1'.'iUi1,.' H 2, .1 .,f,., F Mgffi 1-NN: Vw :J 4. ,jig ix v 1, ., 61 i- ' f f I .1 , Q1-T, .. .. 'H 24 ref? U f 'F . al. ,i.'y,l-ml. Sli' l51'i'far f- idwf llz'F4.'i' -2,5 J . ,1""u 'I' mix' ,' t ij.-. f1 ,lie . '. .. 1. ilw 'fi- gi-5 . , . ali" Jer V., ,fu 1, -.. L M ,. f-we - wigifsg f ubllllspn v 1' .J ., 4, . ,pp Q. u' - fig ,- ":4.' 4 .4-' 3, .93 bs- i ., .f 1.-' if 4" y if A -4 5'7i .I 'kg fi 1 il: - all 'ffl ll 9313" 3192+ ' I 5.i'i:' iflifiwal wt iglff 51 mWQJ llEg"'!fsW 'N-IE-'H.. 'lil-J '- X! - X e M.: W, ,, ..,f -4' .SJW 1.2.2 i ,fjia fl: 2 -au Jn J Q' fl: lr J, ll l'Ef4'.w fTki5"f.f'-. .,l:Jifvr' . ,ANU . JU 1' "il KQV ijMl M ' L1 lliiiwf 'A' fg-figgaejjig, f.'7,f5'Kf'fJ,1 ww JIM 'N w,wg 'i'1a1oJ.+ .T3 Wi? .TAM V11 "Wi sgrfis ,jf 4 yr: Y. ' 'l' fi ill. Y, 'wi ' r wg ff li it N l QQ lx 52 Lgkeg,g,alJ l in lil? ' tl wing J JJ-?3'-1 " if -r M4134 J 4 ,- . a. . Tr, E J-Fzixl,-l4e19'1 "'fl2faSVg,lR . ' '- ' .L 'H ' " L E" --"QV .if VHF f . , W " 'F .. f'3f',,"'f,' .r-if-.-,, I fi' A ,-rl.. li . '-. 'W ' 1 ...:' -. 7. ' - lf? IN :fi .1'."3'a "'-. A fir.. 5-'7"'Lo-at . aw f7!M3rr"f-".' s. fi ffl f' Inv 57f71+fi'f"?'5Q-fini, 3.5.3-lfa5i15'i? if rf-lllfiisff ftf2w3ffr.frfS ' - iq J nz-k1lENjf.,,.sJ ' 4 . ,fgy Um r, 3, Q i , My I9 ,A J ss, A. -. 5.3 M JN.. J ,ju ,FERT-5 if-,M a 1.-:Nw sqm.: up-A-ba E'-,.,-, r. ' w ' -' ', 1- .,. r ' , R . 111- - , . ' X- ju : K " fr. f' W,-. 1 J Y, '-"L 'L .' PM -, file. J .',J,' 4 ji .," . , ,!jf. 1' - HL.. MH...fL..J E-ir., -.al-f'c.ff.frl-Q:-1'-. M51 - f"""f 'ff1L'2w:iJ'-E2-rife' L.,+:1 - -+51 . . .. -... , Qi N J ,, Y . E991 -117 'l ' 'fif'-If,-'SH f I. 1 V, . - ...L , .-Q, 5- 1 :Q-fe I-M J x K" ,, L -"N :W :"? I- I Waugh "--., ' 1,54 '-f ', lip ,, . if-,...--,f 'I , i L ,-,Nt i, ,gi . .,-. ,, af.-,L '- 7 -ii' . 'R i 'u l,.rg, .uk f' , -pjfbqn fx.-.,rL,e:a-fall. -- -' l""' V ,lu A .. - dl: -,.l"'w fgixfgf 5?g'1ff1f'1+F""f,?,,LJ R- ,J ' Q .1 . ,JQQ 1 Faiifigf. '-4e:Sf"l"f4f -QS.-.,3,,!1,i4f1Q?fj +1 1' -U A3 M Zigi! W .. ,gg-4,3 1 MM Left to Right: Top Row-Potts, Gladfelter, Hamlin, Krug, Offer, Martin, Seitz, Faler. Second Row-E. Houck, Thayer. Drake, Berger. Keenan, Fricker. Skalski. Bottom Row-W. Houck, Peters, Fiscus, Kidle, Goodman, Gettinger, IvlcSweeney, Gordon. ENGINEERING Joseph L. Fowler, William J. Fraser, Carol H. French, Edward O. Fricker, Clarence R. Gaugh, Charles G. Gergle, Harry Gettinger, William E. Gad' felter, Milton J. Goodman, Aubrey Gordon, William Greenspoon, Alfred Greifzu, Anthony E. Gribben, Russell Grose, Alfred C. Harn, Louis Haidy, Frank H. Hallberg, Wilfred T. Hanlon, Frank G. Hartsough, Ferdinand I. Henkel, Louis W. Higgins, Frank A. Highfield, Anthony A. Hohnhorst, Clarence Houck, Edgar P. Huck, Walter I. Huck, Daniel S. Izzo, Walter S. Iakubowski, Tilford Jewell. Tir Tia". 'fi ',,'i?r 51001 - 4.1: 3 I lin 13 E- ,Q A-M 4 f ,s 'iigf 3' I lr 1? 1753 NEW LEU if . R I , -I-il'l3l 1, slim -N. X 1 v Q .-. .EFF ,nj x .F 4.4, "gf ,I if,"lfl,3' il lisfii 5 3 .H if , 'gs 'liv Q ,rl Wu: . Q, ,- Q . hi f ,f, H., , . iff! Az .Q df.,- Lij 3. ,I 2.71. 'hl " kv nr 3. ylmfr 4, aakaqifiw ..ni,,l ci'-Q-Fl' ,X I ,. 7f'li'lf fp-rf' , .yl"i.,,,, 1:3 J :',"+Ilf. 5.14 A I Iwi Q, I 'ae e' .iiffjfi ,if ffl F '7.?,L gl' R, V, , . '15, I. . u gf, si .-ip Y. ei - .Slifer .- -.4 vwkfw : x-.Q .il law? ' ITT 'v' ' . 41-. -. H, A .H wi wil ,Iw"'r I-253: 'sl V, .. A -il :Qi I ,- as I l fl wel Q' .T Ir? 527 ng SP' I .' 032 fi? ...iff "1 ' f .If miyf' J' v', A1 5 ,:-Aj Hd.,-v f- .1 :gi L IIJJ' .I le im-rv x T f,,-4 4 f , . ll 5-F Av vw I- fb , V -, fu lf' ' K F ,.' , I ,A i E. . F-A--,. , 'V Q ,fi '-J'S'f:l'!"f' ,,. Q. X-1,5 ....,l'j,"'i .-'94-gl:-..3 ,Q R, :Lf ,f. i 'Q' 4:1 f V 'N : ' 4' '?""t' """W" 'iQ'f'1fi'i:"w""'-Jifidf' 5--3'f.E'ff!"'uJ .53-. 'gf' "':,k"ji i..,.J'1ll'- -1,5 MJ "'11.a"'i"d'.,C4SElf 72756 5. lr? g. fi, W5 1' if la u. i 5 131 fri ', 5. J' WV' lik Wh V., ,UW rib 1, x 18961 .vyvfff .. ' fih fs' -Q L tsl" AP. .fi .Q jj if .tw 1 .15 ' I yr' 'i ? tml?-V 5, Q ,:,n,,'p 'I 'l1.1'.'l Z-T. . . lj, Q ,. 'Faq' 1,11 .. 'g-, ll , ,L , , as .... , Y .lv,. , Q 1 l 1, . V ,. A of af 1 ix ,Aj gamlk gil' .,2?i,..' :E FV ,. 'mlm' W ,Y .-al, 3, .--. A, 4 lk 'Q 1 f 9 , vi ll Nfl-G, -"Q ,- I 4, J Left to Right: Top Row-Q'Malley, Dundon, Ryan, Moran, Taylor, Keer. Second Row-Dyer, Kemp, Hahn, Gaugh, Muriel, Young, Kouclc. Soleau. Third Row-Scala, DePalmer, Keele, Robb, Hilfield, Kelty, Wendt, Bongerious, Grose. Fourth Row-Fay, Drueke, Norris, Waltei's, Bobrowski, Quick, Hartsough, Anderson, Iohnson, Boone, Mittig, Fisher. Bottom Row-Haidy, Flannery, David, Schorn, Simms, Closey. Arellano, Fricker, Hamlon. ENGINEERING Raymond N. Johnson, William H. Johnson, Edmund A. Kachnowski, Wilf liam I. Kallio, John A. Kase, Jr., YV alter M. Keenan, Eugene T. Kelty, Rupert J. Kempf, Charles A. Kern, john C. Kerr, F. Bain Kirchner, Harold F. Kleehammer, Herbert 0. Kosel, Victor Kosman, joseph Krug, C. I. Lehance, Kenneth B. Lloyd, Benjamin I. Long, William A. Losoncy, Lawrence F. Lottier, Leo W. McClellan, Vincent L. McEnally, jr., Vincent A. MCGL1lg3H, Iames McSWeeney, Tranquilino L. Macali, Alfred E. Mahalak, John D. Malone, James F. Marin. ...I -,. . . 1 . ., - , . n , f . fs gr' L' ki .I ,N V. fag' i- 'f101l an -an w, 3 Xl ,0'W'1 ""'f.ff'lQ, if ia: 12? Q '. X wifi? ' 3 f ,-highrilr '-I A! v'i .J-it lf? N' .V Q. LQ'-JY 'u -. Y. .if'7'l,,i..,, .s-:':- ,, .fig 4: X 'N 44 - ' 4 .T hll-1'-ml .K Q., -A Eimlflfg 9 a :M ,. 'F U x- . l -, . '.':'r V4 if T.,-1. tr 4' fs viii, 'Q lik " 'L ' 'xr in 'ff ,K :WJ ii. 4, .F Q,-: -I li.-1,-, fr' 'ilu 1' ,, r, Wi I 1 ' . 15' ' .. ui, ' 'rif- .I ,U l Left to Right: Top Row-Bondy, McGuigan. Zilles, Frazer, Kallio, Douglas, Andre, Brzuchowski. Second Row- Elsarelli, Izzo, Stahl, Darte, Seichter, Higgins, Bindy, Divekar, Fairclough. Bottom Row-Haidy, Fourniers, Fishman, Sauber, Hallberg, Ameel, Redmond. ENGINEERING Arnold J. Mittig, Francis P. Moran, Edward R. Morrill, George B. Morris, Walter R. Moyers, Francis X. Murphy, John L. Nizinski, Walter T. Norris, James D. Nutt, Joseph E. Cfer, Joseph E. C'Malley, Bernard D. O'Neill, Mateo Pardo, Christopher S. Peters, Morris R. Pierson, Harold W. Potts, Robert E. Quick, Robert L. Redmond, Charles D. Robb, Leslie L. Rubinstein, Henry A. Ruysser, Eugene J. Ryan, Stuart R. Sauber, Fred F. Scala, Carl F. Schorn, Frank R. Seichter, C. Grove Seitz. 1 H f Q, s al IIOZJ ft to Right: 'Top Row-Stead, Nizinski, Malone, Nutt. Second Row-Doyle. Warner'. LaChance, Belt Checcola, O'Neill. Bottom Row-Kern, Kachnowski, Smith. Bialys, Jewell, Mahalak, Ruskin. E N G I N E E R I N G Stanley Skalski, Leroy S. Shank, John Sihler, John C. Sidle, Manuel Simms, Glen A. Smith, Leonard B. Smith, James D. Smith, John T. Soleau, Nicholas P. Spruit, Iohn T. Stahl, Lionel J. Stanfield, Charles Stead, Charles S. Stuttle, John I. Sullivan, Otis A. Taylor, Eugene E. Telma, Ford'A. Thaler, Delbert Thayer, George Truedell, Sherwood A. Walter, Thomas M. Ward, Stillnab Warner, Peter P. Wasko, Morgan C. Webber, Herbert I. Wendt, James H. Woodhouse, Raymond G. Young, John A. Zilles. 51033 QW, Q Ai L E N ,,, QSM 7 " A " , .ww 3 624, 3 ' K SMG9 Q, 5 W f W DQS 2 Sgin S- -yy :Wy J .3551 GSK-1 EO o O O O . l,,, , , Q 2 fl .5 J xl is :LLL KE 15 I3 f., --j X gg x Y I ,QW Q 555' .fy Win . 1 , my ,5 W 25 425 Z ,,, 3 " 1 , E7 ff gf- A f X? -,T I , Tiff , N "M V . , X f v 'v'1 lx 1219 .,,. f X 211-'.': fy 4' X !' , I , xx x K , 7, I 0+ uf I ., X 'l - . ' 4 1' Y W--' Ni? X Xxxx . ,J 1' A x 5 5 ' x 1 X CX peg: i J' xx ZA 1 1 g E I I 4 NC X ' Q . ' - X xx A -5 x X vy A - .I X., ' X afg ,m x x 1 M I H- . ' 5 Q x - '-72 ,, 1 ' ' x I ivan " I . mai? N It X X -1 f ' 'SW E , ,tu X 5 I' N :--, V Uv V N - 4 ' s if? ? A , M 1 'LA P ,Il 5 I 3 E , I 'X 454 1 2 f ' . gli I 1 A Q ,., I Q, PHO ORE ' ' ' , V V : -,Y 5 K !,Jo zz 1 ' Q10 ei fo 1 J uf .9 M FXQX- Yx , G igi M -L 5. I My op 01 ojx KO? v 4 Oxs , 1 If' D Q Oxrl , QEOW VV i f M + 0 r . w N 51 x ' 109 f ' flour V Z H t foly 403 Left to Right: First Row-Adelman, Bida, Campbell, Chapman. Second Row-Daley, Guswiler. Haggerty McIntosh. Third Row-Monaghan, Murphy, Ratcliffe, Root. Fourth Row- Rothenberger, Scott, Seebaldt, Sparling. I:106j SCPI-ICMCRE CLASS CCUNCIL OFFICERS WILLIAM P. MIJIKPHY f f President THOMAS J. MACINTOSH f VicefPresident EUGENE F. GUSWILER f f Secretary JOHN A. RATCLIEEE f f Treasurer ARTS AND SCIENCES NED MONAGHAN f f f President JAMES F. SCOTT f f f VicefPresident LOUIS C. ADELMAN f f Secretary OTTO C. SEEBALDT f f f Treasurer DAY CCMMERCE AND FINANCE JOHN A. RATCLIFEE f f President ENGINEERING-SECTICN A WILLIAM P. MURPHY f f President JOHN SPARLING f f fVicefPresident BERNARD A. CHAPMAN f Secretary JOHN C. CAMPBELL f f f Treasurer ENGINEERING-SECTION B EUGENE F. GUSWILER f r President CARL I-I. ROTHENBBRGER VicefPresident JAMES A. I-IAGGERTY f f VicefPresident JAMES E. DALEY f f f Secretary MICHAEL A. BIDA f f f Treasurer NIGHT CCMMERCE AND FINANCE THOMAS J. MACINTOSH f President J. JEROME JORDAN f fVicefPresiderit EUGENE F. GUSWILER f f Secretary WALTER M. JOYCE f f f Treasurer WILLARD G. ROOT f f Secretary FREDERICK B. STURM f f Treasurer HE Sophomore Class Council is one of the most important student organizaf tions on the campus, because it is this body of students which properly initiates the homesick yearlings into the daily routine of college life. The Sophs organized their counf cil early in September and had a welcoming committee on hand to greet the ambitious youngsters who journeyed from far and wide to secure a higher education at the U. of D. Farmer boys from Iowa, cowfhands from Texas, coal miners from Pennsylvania, celery growers from upper Michigan-they are all the same to the Sophs. Immediately this heterogenious group is subjected to its chastisement. Ridiculous red and white pots are planted upon their heads. They are made to obey orders promptly and without dissent. While all of this domineering may appear absurd to those who do not understand college life it serves a splendid purpose. All false conf ceptions which the first year men may have gathered from the movies, all vestiges of arf rogance, all semblance of conceit are lost. The Freshmen band together. They or' ganize and fight for their rights. They turn out en masse to athletic events. They forget their preconceived ideas of college life, and wake up to the fact that they are a single unit in the machinery of an institution which is striving for a common end. Aside from teaching the Freshmen the important essentials of that intangible some' thing we call school spirit, the council was instrumental in promoting one of the most successful Sophomore class dances which has been staged in years. The council after much investigation and consideration, elected Bill Murphy as general chairman of their dance. They assisted Murphy in se' lecting a capable committee, and at a meetf ing in the early part of December named his assistants. The success of the dance is proof of the wisdom which the council exercised in sponsoring this great social event. The last official act of the council was the staging of the FroshfSoph games in the latter part of April. In promoting these games the council again demonstrated its ability to organize, and the Sophs returned from the scene of battle with a victory over the Frosh. f107J 1 iK,1.,. ,yy ,V 21 J 1 :J w t.: 111 ' " 'fl ffl 1 "fl K z .1 1 w 'Tv is tif' C l ,J . 'fn J d,.Zi1r1. 1493.1 si. r-EL A f".QIl. J 55:75 ws- J. ,-r 1:11 . A . lsF9l in W fyx' ji . Wag-A. ,... . 3 fEQLiSl,f'f gi qiykvxf L1, 4. el lf7'l'1li H. . .21-, ,gif 'Agn QM- 1'i'f'f3lL1i jKJ.t2l,.'s1l igww' lui, 1 f -. 3.1 'fl ffl 53 4' ,iw fin! .'i Twin W 5 1 ,fr ' 3266 xg: X I l r if" 5' qi 4 .xl f 4 I fa: J .4 1 - Qilln' FN.fTyfwIgi1a4Q4?fdrn ' - ,, . - '. 1 ,391 Tpgfaf' .im .3919 ,EPT is ln 'PJ init 'X' ,I 1 Q -ag, .,, .1 if -, .vi -i. -,.f,f-3,-,1.l1, 1 ' 1 11 l , 1 , , 1 x - 1 - f..1.... 1 . ..-..- -, Nm.. .,.,..i,f- -.,,, 'I " " ' K' .11'.5,' str: , - X - . .,5- -,.,,,1ma .1 -V-.L :,'r4 assi. , .--.- sf A Left to Right: Top Row-Catalano, Flaherty, Ross, Yott, DeHulla, Meyers. Bottom Row+Jewelsky, Chapaitis, Glicksman, Watson, Angel. ARTS.ANIDSCIENCES Simon Aaron, Louis C. Adelman, John Angel, Thomas P. Ashlock Herbert G. Barak, Anthony A. Beauman, Bernard E. Bauman, John M 3 Beall, Donald F. Blum, Edmund J. Bojarski, Valentine Bolha, Frank R. Booth, John F. Bowen, James M. Brennan, James J. Britt, Edward W Bujak, Gordon B. Burke, Benjamin Caplan, Samuel J. Carey, Donald F. Carney, Anthony J. Catalano. . Af.. xi.,-1 n.. . l .- .ag ff' , ,Y L.. .1 ,JA ,Av A.: , .,... 1 ., 3 ,-. ,. ,JS-I ,Wh 1"fli.'l :fin 3 n., 0 .. ,., . 1,r:,d'1,1'-3.2. Q1 tj! ln .lx 1-1 , N1 ,xml l H. 11QA'qn 1 1 if 11 I if f -w A J "gig 145' N . 1vii6luF'!- 1,1-sg! . .QW r- . Q jf" 1 ,I fl':..v . 15, , -i, ,MP ,n -A 1 Q. am f -1 M 4' IW' Ms ml' 'J , Q'-lp' sl ,gli ttyl vi, ', E .5"'?"5'11I 3+ Y',': 1 ff! Qs' ,f.'1,f5lg wffp 1. I Mlm . slimy g,.,,ui, :'i,,l'X-V' 6-'f.,'xlf.4 ., Q., 4 la 11 .. , 1. 5 fif: ,,'.M1L, 5 flff 4 gl: ' dl: f ,fir K. " 1. lg. . .'f'.1 I, x f, - m, a xl.-v Lu' - Q . 5: 1:4 -,,.', 'cl .gf 'e 1 -Rig. K' W. 3 ,W n"" '1'-ff -,1F,,'r,'P . a, in. nj? .1 1' ful Q-F L44 477. l ,affix iii? ,iffy ff?-if :ziggy ,lil ' fe ' -.2 ., W 'Fail ff -, U K'-FIQBE5 'Er . ls i f ,ffl Tv we if t.:1,,.- 4 x -WM: ' ra lg4g,119i ' WL' I .M , . 4'.i-fix .A 2 ,li 1 gif '- F '5 .fl 1, W1 312.3 1, -fy , ff, I Q, . ,. , 4 ' ' 5, lg A. l 1 L ,fx x af - T1 fl if - Q:-lyk - - a ' u " F: 'diii ' I 4 A --1947 Vrttri '- 1"--5 ""' ' , ,ff-W" 51083 -1 ' if 3 lit -.A .,-4 .. PD1"5f"'WV 'TA f' Q. . '-.-ffmw-rf New lf-'AL f ...V .S .. R- f':2D W. ffm- .4 .J f 1 , -' , " , " ,- f. K . ' , 4 U .f -A -. , rf? f - S' ,f 9' "' .S f 'v 'ff :fx -., '-. . ,Q 5 Y, - fb- H R v l Q, www, lf f l13,-'E..:..?5'w 'S J ' - , ff' ' 1 . 35 .fi 4' i Sf" M -,-1. , . y 'l f'fr3l.Q1i5?KKsg'le5w gNA ., .5.gL,,,.,f"'S?':.,5j,rgw FQKA? ,lguill 3 Qffffi JT-.gli A.-Tliygx-Egfwgxl ,a-.Qi . Q' f' vu 'l 1 4 i . ,,, 'gl' as ,jg if al? 'W xg? 3 fffigv gf if' .4 Y A 425' ff"lf'9' flirt 1' '1,:'zfkff,,f3 'lk A . ,,, .Qw.'?f3. Ali 'gal 5 11 1 A gif 6 , , 'v xx ' fa-" 3. ,My if 25 1-uf ' 553:81 . ll L" Welt' af 1 "37'-bs, ZAi1w:f4 VN ,- 1 sri- . S-.H -X' 1 fr . Jr., 1.92 ,A if. al lwflvqgf 5' flflf 5 fl 19 ll?1if41'2 uQP'll5lU Left to Right: Top Row-Cefay, Czerwinski. Second Row-Bro. Protaise, Rice, Troester, Kelly, Lubinslci, Hayes, tfilfgfjfjs Ryan. Bottom Row-Stefanowski, Taffey, McHardy, Holwedel, Grates, Devlin, Carney. lifgia' llflrifl pam SEL. llilffi We 1' A 'il A -lrfifif' r. .LQ ff '- H Eslwafl l ' ldggf fl-fl, li ARTS AND SCIENCES Y lla ' 1'17?.:.'Q F511 . Anthony E. Gefay, Roman V. Geglowslu, Edmund B. Ghadman, Edward G. Ghapaitis, Herman Gohen, Hugh E. Gommasford, Paul G. Gonlan, ,f1"X," M . . . . Q5-:S john -W. Conway, Maxwell A. Gra1g, Wllllam E. Gurtln, Sylvester A. , Gzerwinski, Robert B. Dehullu, Robert W. DeLand, James R. Delaney, Earl J. Demeleski, Dale I. Devlin, Edwin P. Dowd, Irving E, Drinkaus, 1 ff . . ' ' ,xt R Andrew J. Durand, Leo G. Eederman, Wllllam E. Ferguson. . I A 61:15.- yl?il'l l A 5 ip., ' l lu ww 'W . if 'fgvqjtlg f E 1-Q92 -2 ld E X H i-Q., Jig...- f ' -F"'n.v-S, - . N vfihswfwl SFQQ3 v 'Lf J2?gfwfz5 if fl vfayilfff, iw -'S f , ' W 'S R al 1 ,nv 5iiwip,Mr'e I-g"f'?1 usipfk. 'llrflsfiifl Q5Ql?Y1ffP"f "'- LIMS.. RLw3lE5:Ra..wfC2-zigaaagmrla 1 l S fl .J-.ff S w.Mf?faf . H0921 A wg .c v" ,lvl wr N I L if Left to Right: 'Top Row-Deland, Slyker, Seebaldt, McClear, McHugh, Prendeville, Monaghan, Brennan. Bottom Row-Garbarino, Weaver, Kilbane, Demoleski, Fisher, George, Bujak. ARTS AND SCIENCES Clement F. Fisher, Gerald W. Fitzgerald, Henry I. Flaherty, John A. Galbo, Arthur A. Garbarino, Edward I. George, Edwin F. Gilchrist, John P, Gilewski, Matthew J. Gill, William R. Ginsburg, Benjamin H. Glicksf man, Manuel R. Goldberg, Francis L. Goscinski, Victor S. Grates, Leo A. Grendzinski, john A. Guarnieri, Andrew F. Guefa, Geo. M. Haas, Edward A. Halka, Albert G. Handloser, Martin G. Hannigan. , 1 v fum ,ii li. HU'tC .. ff, 1: VT., 'Fla ..L!l..,- -9 . 1, W yan? il Kill. if i. Sf.-1 H, , iyzfxa? xf' ai m- . 3' at fi gm- ' -if JQPW ifggjfif 'l -H I-.l Mn, 'i 5-:J zpdp 1 , .-. 'fzflirlgg l ' .A .-gh, E Uffh A.7,,.M -' 'R ' -in 'lf ,Y - Q 4- .Av . :JI-1 A ,V :Ii Mu . 1. ,, I.W,,l'.'Ij .4 ,1 ' KL 151 .N Y 5 -13 -37112 fu. : ' f mf if I .IJ'4,t if 1'..'? 4 1 i, ln? 4, . ragga ll'-lei 5 ,A ia., , bf 1' if '-'fa -v-Tm vi. F F - l'vgill'5 3 EQ? if 1:59 .2 553. Six' ,a gig, 7?.s gA,f i i ,ul 5 X ...II .fs-'I . iff.. fyjf v W "' 1. ' " l. .HJ i 7' lvl If T' ,gf .1 yztfii 4 2 -' 1 I-'-21 -Q- 4-33 , gr 4 .LM -55 i.fQr t.?q t lfggxilai if nw' .1 rp? ., T. F- .li 4' rip 'LS ' I 'flag'-. L qi Wwfi .,, Lgif fyg, 'Eff if 'Tim agmlgef r':j,. il- l li A-I H13-73 , ., , 31,5 E? ' iii-'l,'ll?f 1 J 'fb-'-li gi l efsw' ,---,.J-- , ., ,W .mn I., J .' Aw V, J ' 1 - ,'.',1"s"' Q r5lq"'4,f1'g'+ n 4- .af nr- ' ' 'Lu J. 4-1' lf. si! gfQ? liiyfali RFE? i'f'9Q'i gi pi 5 N1 rx! l n . lil! 5,1 ' Ui? a fig ff 1. i ,lf ,PI l Ts , ' 5 'Q :xg Q rw: filygfk fl ,,. fue XM? 5433? ini? ff? Q '-ell 'f 4, ,ij W' K' 9'- 1-2' Eiga 'x Q.Q 4 1155! Q gf. W5 - 54.1 ' .1 QQ , L .. ll 1 ',i:r.. I' Left to Right: Tap Rowe-Hayes, Shada, Watson, Cohen, Kaiser. Second Row--Roudoy, Otto, Zindler Novak, Delaney. ARTS AND SCIENCES Herbert L. Harris, John Hayes, Stanley C. Hayes, Walter I. Holland, Stanley R. Holwedel, Bennett H. Jeffery, Elwood A. Jenkins, Felix I. Ioseflak, Stanley F. Kaczor, Martin F. Kaiser, Andrew M. Kaluzynski, Robert J. Karl, Thomas M. Kavanagh, Harry M. Kavanaugh, Owen A. Kean, Walter I. Kelly, Michael Kilbane, Chester A. Kozdroi, John Kraus, Maxwell QI. Lalfery, Edward J. Landers. 1'-"ELM V flu. ,-3, 3- ,. 2, 'VEQ-Vai-A-I-q,5.E'5,'!, 21,1 5 V, V Y I ,V I '., VH - ' 'L-1, Rf' ' 'Tl' 7' rs 'M, -3.5. nfl'-rw - ' ': L , ' 1 , V' -.,, .,g ' ,1 5 if r .- "wif rr-L-' .' 4 'tx..f-"LJf-31-fs+s-r'f13lv,.- 'r'-Q H 1 An- rf f ' 'f--1 ' A W' " " -"-. -, ,Q M',..4.!-jp fllll J ..,R. got. erin! .,1, 4, ,V 5. J 'sl iff." Ql, n".xr.4J' gl'-K lla 7, ..wJ X 'Q lv fa? +'. J f 1 12. QVQ' 'jj .42-1, r VI? I 1 , I I' J J P H .ljfsj I: 11,4 ar., M.W 1-' "ff, jr Ulla Q . ill "xl Hgmm , ,M ' K" :W 555.1371 X' ' x,,,.s iiipxd A. V Q.,-FQ' 1 524 .aftlrif 'lil FZ. T?:'l 3. .Q aftlu' Lg gijn ,y ,yt a -mf M, -A 16' 1-4 liwvf' 1- if- lr fi, J' ,Jw is 1 .. , , 1L5E:',y.l fuiq 1 it 3 1.4: F 'v ffm, it .f -fry YJ wisp,-ar, ,A 4.02 'X 1? "ill- ' M '1 jg. fjgfq... rt- L ,f..,, 5333 . rug, V, , 2. .f - "' lllfi"',' -.-,wi 'All U- ,., Aetla' - '...:-, 'lil , .M if-,lla 54119 51,54 SJW :Pal .Q .. juli '1- FAQ' 'fy 1! 1 I- Iq 'frm . l'vf'j' . au 441: ,4,,, ,, Til If 4, 1... pl "lil , U tag -f vzhlz' . 4, .l '7 ,f--.-J' it A ., . r ,if as fry-2.,g,s1fi'.T'f-'asia H VA, Q 'H+' , , -. B 1 qi V, fill? ix. - L ' lg' llwlllfl-LL' YJ J 'Ulu'-,' 4 ?v QXN .Tw wr . 5-up QE 4 z ' - ci-if, -.Jk 1 L inf .ki ig 143: W g 55. frm WG in Q A X, . D- 1 ,NXIV -B . if it -. 'M i ll. - lm 'A 12593 ij, r sw. 'Y I :if 4 my fl I. 'Y-JA 5 ...HJ iltivifjflffl- 2, 4 fl 1 will jk Ml i gi-L' iv ' 'A ll. . W ral "n"J?: ,ar .V ,K .,' 1- 1. K" A l' Q' :af a mul 'kai' . ,Awe ...B ll' -1' H NEA xw in X195 . - mt 5 rw W viwgiii Jig viii alll, 3 .i 5 l,l'v QV. P' 'S'-ffdb. N any , . f lwff evra' ..4'if,'S A 5,5 ,wx-.. .- iiifi 1,j?1Hl 1" ef 'D 1 , 5319" gy.. , A' 'r Ae? 5 .1 lil, rg' l. and , QW. V f clk' ..A'g.vf 48 'tim f f l ff-q' . 'FQVXE' ffm . W. A.: xiiiggv. 'r fill will 'cl- 'QQ-f Q ,.- . .L V.!.r 1 I , x 'JI ui l 'HJ -E34-1.2 1 Left to Right: Top Row-Angel, Bauman, DeHulla, Jeifery. Bottom Row-Devlin. Gill, Lenfesty, Petix. l ARTS AND SCIENCES David A. Leahy, Clseis M. Lebedeff, Edwin G. Lenfesty, Mawin B. Levy, Andrew F. Lipsinski, Arthur R. Lynch, john A. MacLellan, Ioseph Maisane, Edward A. Malik, John S. Malley, Paul G. Marco, Ernest V. McClear, David S. McHardy, Clyde L. McHugh, Joseph A. Meier, Joseph A. Melnik, Charles W. Miller, Francis T. Mitchell, John D. Modlinski, Paul W. Mohardt, Edward A. Monaghan, Benjamin E. Newton. FQ . ff swf fa 'Eli :af vc 7 . F Fi ri ., Vx is .Fw-?. 4 Q V F, ,I l'T?'f r. KH lf '-J -4"a Wi: sl we ylwvfx-P 1 lr lf 'wltgigi N . Q' FQ x . J. will . F ,f rf sf - ffl' 69 4 lkrg isifrff 'xnqil 13 . aft 1 . w Xi: hwy fl If . is li , so -' A A 1' Y A if" N """'w-' l '78 of 4 U f"w'1:.- is f - .- - -. sf-.f .. rw.. ff . xl 'A .. Qs- A - zmtllqlijg f y ,, Jf1-.,,?llfff:5fi M3175 ,f iaff JE 1 3 " f J.-73? M lf, 'ff -2 i-' ".'j,5j::", Q 9'.qi.5 . :I gi-,ailgm gfi , '51, - n.q1.j'fa,'.f1ft: " Pi- "Lff.,T:'9, f ' W" t" . ,i U N "n, :I-' Y 1... U,-' -'K '-,Q A. ,, ff . iff'-'jk ' "K", 'L ' I . , -',f4'-E4 ' . ' '3fik'i2f3f1r"f'E2f.g,.7 i'ilitia'Lsf.L'firf1.f 1-4'-' ' ll-4 'ff A-w - if 'L-' 2fLi'ff5fL....af"i'f 6:1 rf'l.44lf--'19 - Ja. C Zqimtniik. A V,-vifig -'kin Y IIIZI . v- -. 4 e , X , R V JN! 1 A , fwfwwfifx A c""'iN ,cw eww' in-5 if A f-f eww aff- -me fs cfs- f'm61H"2fA"Z .. . . fa-fn f M . fav" .- . -.ei - .-. . . P ,. . . .fi ,fii'w4"Q! ESQNQ 1, '- V ,vL':i9'fv.59" mi' ee- fiixff XSL-'T D U' li '-'if 'H 11- 'R 'ii' ,"-- ,y V w-0 if ff. 'ai f'r'm.iJ" kifl if 119' 94' 1.f'5'gfrli1:'ii-H, X 'F , ,-'15 3 , K-in i QI-L an 41- W JA H - wo N Vx V. Y Q- V -Y , z -1 W --41 -. -f ,.' ,4 s, r lf-H flak-., lv- 3, P K' Eff ggi, .. J-my sr- W 1' ,gyzf '-...L di, ,fucqyf 4.14 .,,,N..f fi, . 'fl ,H 'fi 1.,,:' J.-, ll ii lu.,-., .,M'gf.- Nfzvj-4,1-f'0-cf-.frff'-,'fxg-...A iujs,'ilyg 'ig A . . ., . . W. . an ix X W -l-. . if' c ive? WSJ, all . .fx 5? Q. lei? 1 ig? PEW iff" ' new 'li if B sf JA l W - . i .A . If? .iii 1 Q. Vi A , Vigil: fi -F I :girl Milli? if wi? abil. . i , inf f J .. N 3145! 1' ' - wif' -. i ii? l lfilfifii is . dl iiilggiii 1 ' ur.. 7 ' T' L7 T35 gm fifzijuil QR xii U1 ld 1 5 1 . ' fmxiiqali 1 vi i f W1 2+-wil c , qi,,fi,g Left to Right: 'Top Row-Burke, Fitzgerald, Karl. Second Row-Ross, Malek, Handloser, Chadman, Galbo, ff Kavanaugli, Schmidt. Bottom Row--Bauman, Zbudowski, Beall, Stackpoole, Bowen, Kileszinslci. wi l im la: 'if-fel ffm: W! .F in-1.55 J?!', Sis 30 'ayfkwii W if figimifil A N? gf L las '-4' . AD '31 in-2. ' lCA Qibl ARTS AND SCIENCES ,E 45. , Vlllyggjgy GJ Iohn P. Nickodemus, Stanley R. Nov-ek, Adam l. Pasieczny, William M. ' . . .Q W' Pann, Samuel A. Petix, Angelo Petracci, Paul V. Phelan, Stanley J. Poniatowski, David C. Prendville, John M. Quinlan, Roman P. Rebain, igrgqagl ' 34. Thomas M. Roden, Duncan D. Ross, Samuel Ross, Frederick A. Rossie, l s James A. Ryan, Joseph D. Sapsowitz, Eugene M. Savignac, Samuel Saxer, ,. ., ,Qf Wig. K- f N ,f I f - V J., ' ' 1.119 Max Schayowitz, Benjamin A. Schiff, Nowman L. Schmitt. lallilll 1' 'Zig Q S , ill gil i 49' i -1 aria! . N 'fs is 51133 r 1 X Q Q ..C' " j We 1 ,I . ,J ,ri F, iv.. X- 1 if. 'il ' I 2 N .J P u K . WN My .Nix . K H ,Qu A fi J 1 5 1 Q jll ,.2j,le,s' Nw . W .Anal is Q' 'F f Li. 'Qi A llflki 1343 'Hg' ..i:'4"J: .-:f','2l 1 ""-'41 ' BET!! I-4' f 11 Ji' . 'Y if . if 1 Vial?-fl' 1 ra 2 ,gf i. . 3 Tk 211 rv, ' .,,. , v r a . ,f-Ldw.!? ix..- ZWL-ti F3 ,F'V,"' ,S ,.-.1.f.. 4. T3 ' .S 1 .. .Lg " ,Vaal ,tbl 1: -.iv Lf? i . ,143 i., F41 ll'-Qi A .Mix n T.','f,' le 2'-i1?52E,'x gl1l',n fgllj' w -'f 5, 'gf ri .a Ml! 'iTff'?bf. HW we if .54 fiifllr' " T8 fr Yu 'lf--5' W ,': mi. 'rum 1-A, at A v' Q. all lg, 51 Efillltlk .J A - Al wry fn, A-JL ..,.fizl2'. 'Q r 'Q I. . -N' 55:35 1'V' fl F . .ft .,,. , fa-. ,f, ly., 4-,J ' in ,V ,Ly .Q i l i ,.'jff-Lf: EY: ,f,"T.fi'S TW., L 13. -4.1 -iff--,, su 133- g-gg. 1 . . . "" rQ'L1Q,v-'f'i' '-"'4iT?4"'-FTA fi' Left to Right: 'Top Row-Malley, Marco, MacLellan, Wolfe, Sapowitz, Harris, Rebaib. Second Row--Ginsburg, Kavanaugh, Hannigan, Craig. Ashlock, Drinkhaus, Holland, Rubenstein, Siedlaezek. Bottom Row-Melnik, Maisano, Petracci, Lededcff, Shayowitz, Stockton, Mitchell. Federman, Conway. ARTS AND SCIENCES James F. Scott, Ctto C. Seebaldt, John E. Sevald, Edward S. Siedlaczak, Francis I. Slyker, Paul W. Spens, Phillip W. Stackpoole, Robert A. Stefanowski, Allen E. Stein, North I. Stockton, John C. Szeida, John C. Treen, lames A. Troester, William W. Warren, Arthur T. Watson, Francis E. Weaver, Frank A. Weiner, Morton L. Wolfe, William I. Yott Myron R. Zbudowski, Geo. A. Zindler, Roland T. Zurawski. 3 , ,fi-.f-' . .A.. . .-,Ag ,, A ' J?" :J ji.:.j-ff-- ' -,nlisllai ,, ,- -- .Hi V. , - - ,io - V Q ,'.,.,L!.iL fy-1 ' , 5,-ra 'X ,- - ' X , f ,1 . .. .. . .V 1, .,. , V ,. 6 W ,l X ,,,.i,,,.+ - ,. ,V Y X L.-1:.g:.:..5Q,f',"r-L.3 .eg -- -f fe s...-4 ' 'mn ,S -4--M' f 114 3 4 . 1 A fill!! x We it Sa W 'wx ' 1 V2 W -il ill sw iii wall 2 Ji" fl' l ffajlf 1.2! l ffl, ff , l "ll" T? l rl i Mi! -, .-,A V ta -U3 wh' ff gy, 'L"lu', al n .1 lf-- 'E -H RX 5 if p N it I -,. I Hu' l' Ls Shi-ef' Rial , rfb, lf' J Q , Ky- ? .-'HW Xillalii' GN. EQ? KTM ,S-Fiil. aj!! V. F1359 . , . . I' , 1 .Lai la Arab I QW 's ll 1:21 H, ff 'P W' l rj a llljl pr., lv ,J Ig?-L Mb, S- ,fr W ' ' IM ' .kyle -Q, ..-. ,Q . ff '52 M, V ywq Unk-f 5 ,alll '34 1 f 6 1 , Mi. 'lt-HM. P3,.3:Af, xfgivrj .? 4 gi if ilffbi 'dw R35 li 19+ D..-, 13 M53 "Q J af" J 19331 nr . J' I'r'f .'- .-,al Y-if Jr l"'!"6' '7 fJfx'!', 'xii V. ut' -. fffrxtggl 1 srlarr intl, 1 K 5- ' .1 U :Ag w-, iijll J' Pali l ,Nia Y-" r ' :fl-, ' tjlgfi V3 "Iyar fi .t r 1 . r,.i','-Q, l 'Jig S, ',Yfllf.' RE 5'-7 if QE A3411 ffaiji Jn 1 left' tain ' A 5:915- . .1 is git?" iii'-mfs 1 ,L-gif' QQ A ' 1 J -1 E3 . LM 'fp Y, r' Alf . -VH! at I, f'QSjlfylJq,. . W xg . J: slilitgif was is, 1 9 of X, ru , -'QL gilt 'J V ' GT .Hogg -1 ef tj .jifggiy 'Gm'-!W 1 W Left to Right: Top Row-Cleminson, Kishkorn, Butcher. Second Row-Battat, Bossenberger, Daley, Mangold Miller, Cleniak. Third Row--Henderson, Ryan, Pomaski, Nader, Kolb, Beyer, Smith. Bottom Row-Wunchel, Wilkie, Utchenck, Ratclifle, Estrada, Turchan, Wojtucik, Bida. DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE I James K. Ablan, Charles Abramson, Paul J. Aldus, Peter P. Bankowski, Edmund J. Barbour, Robert C. Battat, Dolly Bauser, Lee A. Bertling, Raymond B. Beyer, Michael A. Bida, Ernest Blohm, Charles G. Borchard, Margaret M. Brady, Charles Briehl, Neil Brown, Morris M. Buch, Albert M. Budman, Marie H. Bunetta, Thomas C. Burns, William Calfin, Charles H. Chapman, Edwin E. Chapp, James B. Christen, Wilham E. Cody, Neil W. Conlin, James E. Daley, Harry M. Defer, Alfred P. DeRonne, Albert J. DeSanto, Leonard W. Dolan, Alex J. Doran, Mary Anna Dudek, Harold C. Dumanois, Edward Ettinger, John A. Eearn, Jeremiah C. Elattery, James H. Fox, Kenneth R. Fournier. N4 ,','.,..x14., ,j.j:v.H3.!::-, ,, , '1 il .WV -l"'h " an 4 4. I-'re-13.1 ', K W,,,vg.ak:'iyfL..1'- '. f I - , " ' J 'ge .. " .42 if. 'f--5--"E . .,- firsj -'I wif , nf. 4, 1' -iw..-.4 fo" -,T ,l 3' , fp: in , 1" V' I' rl. 1,2 - 1,1 e .Hr 1,15 a uf Q laik., u Eiiiir . 511 ii gf S1552 A, it , 5 an J, ffl-gill: fe: Af' 'YJ'-:rg ,E if-.'j, s, if 5. 5, 'si ,v' I'-ll. fx, f J 751' 'lwi' if C-,l Jf WL. '- 15,-Q " , if 7 'll l'1',HI'J i,','f1'i2' iq i.'.,. ,vi - -4 .meal 2' r L, .-"Mg Y. fl . ,Qi liglill if IJ 1',,fls,'?,, ii 1 nf 'gilt ,' ', .,. . , LJ cf -11. ,Q ly ., 193 I X Fifi, lk f'.':"1iQlil ,. in Y i 1 1, . I w ,-1' ,ii ,g ,G i-M Wi 'il - ' f. P. , -gs H, il .sv f 'si kv ,, ., . - .- , -V a 1, ,,"V1,. i f i'i3il'.lf4, Mg,-" -' Hwy! i. ., w. Lrg, f 3. . fi, .Mi wI,,.k,.'w,f '1.f17'?f'4Q' ,, liftiflll il' ..,.,, itll 5-afif' ll lib' 45421 l 'Fig 3 ii?--l ,' 'Ml fe" vv 'Eff l .IVFQ1 lv-. 1 Q -, afellil 1. T 1021-,"i .l 3-Ili' fir si wllillgllfi V- 753- ,'a.,i',INzfi 4. ,. .Luigi 'fig' 5 lllilitlgl ,1,1i,VJn ,.,,el,"- LL, 1 5--fi n .5 " ll"54:"l ll " f .rv .kph , ,Tw ' ll ' ' lil! lm , in fi. .iii ' ' Y M. xy, A at im Mill J.-. ., ,nf-5-, - fit' i i,.i"sALi ff . :QL , ,N 'r".:', 'Ili li' 4' 1 ' if "II Qi 'N 1L,..,g" 'if ' I, -,3,'9-,f'f.f,, xg" all 9 Q, Y. - .- , ff ' 5 Ex ' E-A' frm ' 'E' . 5 ' 'i " 1 ' 'i ""'f:-A A fl' -. 'Pa' U :FU ti'F'! -A - - I I .5 9 l Left to Right: Top Row-Chapp, Mettie, Henn, Haines, Cody. Massuci. Second Row-Aldus, Grieshammer, Nelson, Madigan, Hamilton, Fearn. Bottom Row---Gelb, Chapman, Ablan, Blas, Ettinger, Flattery, McLoon. DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Mary E. Friedl, Seymour Gelb, Ralph C. Grieshammer, John M. Griffin, James A. Haggerty, Carl J. Haines, Albert R. Harrigan, Gordon S. Harrington, Ben-edict A. Henn, Frederick H. Hein, Harold Herclwig, George L. Hess, Milburn Hickey, Jacob S. Isbirsky, I. Francis Kenney, William S. Kishkorn, Geo. F. Kohlmeier, Raymond C. Kolb, Paul J. Krantz, Geo. W. Krausmann, Jos. I. Kulsea, Maurice Y. LeBarre, James T. LaMeasure, Norbert Landon, Donald A. Leach, Paul A. Lilly, Eleanor McCarthy, Lawrence I. McDonnell, Fred S. McFawn, James E. McLoon, James D. McMahon, John H. Maclegan, Chas. E. Mangold, Arthur I. Massucci, Norman I. Mettie, Max Miller, James E. Montrouil, Ryan F. Mullins, Anthony E. Naclerl LT Jw 1-,-a.f5i,P'ii':-Gi, T' 1 . ,ffQW,,z' 'Q--.-If Q? up -. ,Mx-...f., rm s Y - f- - - - 2 Y, i Vw. -. if , f Q7 if 4 Vi, I, ,... . ,N ,.,,. it fTF1,.fb-My Q' A , , W i 4 ,J 'E L , i 1 1 1 X fl if-333 X. i , if fs' 1 . W ' if -' , 1 v mf' A Q w ,v wiv e. 1 lfiik Q ie Wg ii u iw iw! 41 rf 1' 15' . Q ', En Iii., ll Lf. .ig I Tw ll 'KU s 1 r J ll I 5 JJ U . "fr if , fvplfiuq -- Flew, Mig, Tw V, , A: M M5 N , fag r ig fp Qji C:is.r5E'W"f-satisfleftwyfiifff,-Ti' F f c -l- xi - ...Wa Q,f2ff:ffLL1i1s's,,:3fe,fE?3,tQg-fQ,'5,,,1.33, Q: r xFFK"'ss-i,k,.v fwv""' ' f 116 1 , I. ,grfi W ., 'F' W' - A . - . a' .' eil?" A 'HT Y " i . Y "QAM P -- -yr 2 - .ti fl.. wg .-F. -7.f'," , Afp- not A5323 f , 5 ,JW "" 'L:l1"s,fQ" 3,2 '1.fi'f', GS, Aff-W'1l"'fiE A - if 'of -Irv ff 2 A if .1 1. . -. . A 1 11,13 ff' 1.-i1fa2w':" --.L -V '13 lfffllf-43-Vs'1sf.:.i 'i riff-Q Q-' S , ' I- gf . ig ' V." jf H ,.-A ,Ji pf A- f y A , 1,-,b,,., ' 9.2 -W w.,f".N - 5 , IF' . ,Qian I pf., "-51. V gil,-,,f' yvl gif:',,:g-fr-.,fgQ5S1,,w'f, y " ' si-- .aff 'slew ' u:p:f,f.-f 4 . J if -.-.ff . i if uftrri-11 if if .wif , if ,J-"H 1- J-M l Jil Q , ill .ffialz ff. 1 I . Y H, -7 31" Q .f .4 fr J f. 1.1. - I M71 filqij . 'I .L A' .fi QW L1 .is .af ' -3' A will .'tl..SW . -Iliff:-14 I ni: ' 5 W ,Kufqfifs it . ".g+f5,6 M. . ,IA , fi ' 1' ill il rgfmffi 'iii' 'Sl M' M ' 1' Sli.. W if ,ls E. l l K 1 W, I 1 iii' fill gif. W l ifllM.i , K ,'Lr,z',g,,,s 'lbgvulfi is Left to Right: 'Top Row-Brown, Bertling, Ruhlin. Second Row-Barbour, Hess, McFawn, Petz, Landon, Kenney, 0. , McDonald. Third Row-Haggerty, DeRonne, Piklor, Budman, O'Neil, VanF1eteren. ' Bottom Row-Burke, Bunetta, Nussey, Silvers, Dudek, Williams. ,,7i'5-lg, 9' . ' ll'T7'f.'l . ' . -is ,Ai 0 ill, 1 A355555 W ' Q far: f' 353.1 t DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE W, 73' 'ai - X J' W- i Rosella Mae Peltier, Anthony J. Petz, Stephen Pickler, Arthur J. Pomaski, John A. Ratcliife, Eleanor Rheaume, Iohn C. Ruhlin, Harry B. Ryan, 4, .. U" v J , Joel C. Nelson, C. Carroll Nussey, James M. Cleniak, Albert I. ClNeill, S if all A' -,Y Gus U. Schafer, Max Siegel, George Sierra, Gertrude B. Silvers, Edward S. Skorupski, Bernard J. Smith, Dominic Spagnuolo, Frank John Stone, fgggi 2, Lloyd M. Teeple, Emil Turchan, William E. Utchenik, Fred C, Van' ,gl ,v Mfr'- i ,, Fletoren, Clifford C. VanHorn, Douglas P. Vannier, Max A. Volin, lj William W. Warren, Claire M. Welch, Jerry P. White, Jack G. Whiting, V .iiifx lg' 3 I l Sidney Wigler, Albert W. Wilkie, Don C. Williams, Leo- J. Wojtuski, Eg Robert A. Wollenberg, Vernon B. Wunchel, Ceo. W. K 1 ik' bfi Yaeger, Mila L. Zechlin. Vx A-" ' , X in .Q . V We U' . Q. F' fbi? in fffxivi, 'Xl 'llliiffb' - ii . ,.,?:?"l , 2 15 ll H ,gizlji i.......i, x,g'::.'+ ' - V 'I' 'vaffi .. 1, '1F'fT1f" -:ffl w"'fl'Q'YQQ ,il H1 fi "E55'.f"-,f"1T' Li "' 'S " 5 ,.i ". 'M "3 1 A ,'X"3:"' 'X '- 11 V' ' 'J' - 5 . ii. 1- 'eff 11,3 5 4 , "LT 'i""'l 'hi lf 5 . - f A. if . ' - V- vs- . - - sw iw if K. ... -ia 1 . . K, . .. V ' 2.-"W .,- 11, 2 'J' .. A "ff ,-fa-ff,-L.-' - ., Y , '- -- '1 'A S f yy! 1 gti.51k.4x ".7kE'g331w'1Ig:QgJ.-ji!!-fgxf 153351-.-r.',' '-QL. Ji: 'af f f -nf' L: 56' Lf' 'fmi-V K1 full? .g,-'a- -E' wif-. H ---- -1' - " V' 'E' '-s-v,5,,.!,,2-1.13.-49" V ' A fum J .. Q". JH! ' LQ ' x i f fi it W W ,f .,a'1'ieT"1 .,4,:q.-4 gl' X is .,g, , . w, X ""l if .25 H, ' "1 S 5 '4v"3S3igl h Q,z'b.15' lt'l,ifJ'f- xl ' V5 me--'11, luf Rlzliff ' iijrilglgf-QE, EW? i EH gfrlirfa' it ai , ,iw . , -- ,L . aggr- l lwlrfry '1 ' all 213,-, . ..A. M' . t ..,!i,. .- . M? L' 'U:,,"'. "2 ww .yy ls I I . f' T, 4 1 'w-. E' :Viv yy Z, V... , 15 ,. I J fa 44-nf 1 .Tr 1, ,, w. , 11 V1 41 'vi li 1 ,ig 1. 7' 34.-' -e "iii if J' 1 1' 5 7 .1 V, L., M Ii 'Z xi . i, X, i I .!f-in mg? IF, vi? x vr.v,t.i'- A JV Mimygm V .3-A e YF W M -3 .. X Q,!.i:,: jk, N 7 ,, 1 .E .. ,4vg,'3j,ii4Ef.,,g,a g,.,,'v4..Hv'Nr5".is! is ' - yf 31 V fl lr N-wa . at tw. rfiifyg ,L f' Q 1 1: "-13.elf--.f4Lg5sff1'fG?e.1.L22f 131' ' H as Left to Right: Top Row--O'Donnell, Creagh, Weiler, Martin, Palmer, Caton. Bonkowski. Second Row-O'Mulvany, Brozo, Hautau, Kirn, Simsick, Hunt. Bottom Row-Pfeifer, Morrell, Coffey, Grant, Roth, Gambert, Subora. ENGINEERING Edmund B. Anderson, Melvin I. Anderson, Robert Aronson, Henry C. Austin, Arthur B. Aylesworth, Douglas G. Bader, John I. Ba-der, Alfred L. Barlow, George Barr, Charles F. Bates, Joseph R. Beale, Harold A. Beck, John M. Bell, Thomas I. Bennet, Donald A. Bernard, Peter M. Bernert, Elmer W. Bernitt, Francis B. Bettiga, Conrad A. Bielcki, Caesar Binkowski, Charles F. Bischoff, Wilham jf Blashill, Maurice E. Bleshoy, George E. Booth, Jacob Bordoff, Raymond J. Borger, Morris I. Brandwine, George P. Brescoll, James R. Brigham. , .f . V f-4-at , , .. it- .J pr W , l "' v'-- ' N,-'-. -pail Liga' ,Keir Q gil .. wi, '1 3, FEM ,s. R, L ye all rel live 'i Q. ua 4, , mr' .f f' i "El Wigs.. ' 1 T, , .A q Ell, mf Midi I .J 7 3 .3 Marlin le 'I M- ' r ,L V, fc. ,P 451.-.'..1 1g jf- M. , V, . -x' lffrf tl- A' 1 X tl. 4 15, 2, TAEEPL Q , . 3 A 4' X? -A 53561 f .lv ,gif C, .dy-f' " ui!! - .-sf Nl. .jp- 'Li ' :. 'Wi 'ilggff Y-. i -fri' fl. ,- 'r I if we 'Y all fi 1. Q23 EH If" Y, ling- J ff QQ swf A if 'wiki rl: 4M-,-1 . . 'H 3 4 ..., L, -Q i- -cr ,riff ...iff .LY A ' 1 7,1 , ,, X. ' 'C ,.,', ',: E f-. ,..-gayw.',M1f4l' ?,l,'5,lE,ir"-J s t ,'.i?,fL 415346. - lfliaz. .ij rl, ,K-WE. i,i."f5 J-,N ., I - I:118l cf.- .E l-4 ini ' .fm J.- 11 .vi -N AMX, Y 9' l1T.1E' J " ol' f- '5TA'fJx'Tf5'51"'7'1' fl- -fiisfw? "Gia 1'P"i3T'--"" i':'iF"7 - J' f'-"'f1 "' ,f"if5 -. f' fi wif-l"t-.'iJ' ' iwmaxmaiawwiwiwwsw g' as fm 1 'Uri 1faifbaQn1 1i1,1"fvH'1i:f+"Hl'H::2ff:1' "'-vfff' -tizism -'H 12-'ae Q -4 aff 1' ' 'G E11 f ,F 'ig "gy 13 I A " -- "'-'11, aa -1-ei ,. ., -. fllv F " W-g , Jw vu 'Pj '. W'-f.1'?'J Wa p as A A A HM K 111:15 ' '-.1 ' 'W , 11 M H Q...-:M . J' f' -'1'iT,x1i'4 G l ' Qf.a:,11 1 ' . 1, - ' Qillii, ang? 11"1'1- , 15 'l1l1ll'l'l 1 V 1, 1 . f' 1 Jig 141 1. Neff 5 gsm: 1 EL wf'ij'1l1,g J M1 ' ' l '1 f 'fi 151 - '1.,'j? if 1?'..J-I lf, ,J X. : 15,11 C i y 1 ' 1 1.11 7.5 .41 11 15 1 fgjgfllf R limi -' Kiev Jfhfij. I , - H11 4 E 1 at , Wglifff'-4, 1 -A 'Ui fatal 7551: 1 1 ,- A, 1 --1,9 IVR fl 'M WM .'1g iv fl: --M, Ng? :ll J ai i...,1,, 5Qi'ilSMfQ if 1, Q H11 'J 'W . ,, 1 itil' Lfgigf ag ll x . '11 Left to Right: Top Row-Sheridan, MacLa-ine, Bernitt, Cahill, Shuder. Gladden, Miller, Krempa, Carpenter. Second Row--Taylor, Brescoll, Shattuck. Reschel-ce, Stroebel, Tracy, Bates. Krasinski. 'Third Row--Beck, Downey, Wilhelme, Aaronson, Steenlcist, Cassube, Sunders. Bottom Row-Dysarz, Petty, Murphy. Mendelsohn. ENGINEERING Freeman W. Brozo, Joseph Bujak, Glen B. Butler, Martin E. Cahill, John C. Campbell, 'Pedro D. Carhonell, William J. Carpenter, Richard L. Cassuhe, J. Douglas Caton, Bernard A. Chapman, Marcus Chovich, James B. Christen, Anthony C. Ciesielski, Francis B. Clark, Thomas A. Coffey, Arsejio M. Columna, Dallas H. Corser, George F. Coughlin, James T. Crainean, Joseph P. Creagh, John H. Crist, James R. Custer, Anthony J. Daddons, Vernard L. Dailey, Remo DlAndrea, John Dant, Arnold Davidson, Charles W. Davies, Arden DeLuca, Cordon W. Demike, Bruce J. Dempsey, John J. DeMunnik. M, :' 'Mag-J' -' 'illf-f1f1.1"r3'l l1 47 7. ,. 1 ,,-i. 4 ,1.., 'va A Il 41 19135 .- ' lleiffk, '1 .J .- r.-XA ,E U 1'1ffl1,2 15 1 'Q 1 1' I' 51' il' '1' f' 1, . 7 75 f ,1- ,,, 91.15 - M211 I 2 - S VH, af H fmt, U. 1 ,. . ." " 'Q T.. .N . J EJ: 1 tif? 'N .1 LW 1.1. 11 111,-'14 1' ry, 1121- if .1 I J 1r"- lf, 11 11,1 1, 4 fu 3. 1 1,1 - 43,1 ,L 151,49 4,11 1, . '1WH:lh,f1y1 ' i"111""!ln111V 1 '1 mf 2, '. 1 5i."11.7" . .1 ,,,- Ff1"- llW1lQa1'j1' '-1' ' X5 1' H. 5' -ft- ea .1 1 ll?1'- '1 ll 1 gf Q11 Q Q 'lk ml ,V ix 1 :11 'lilali Alf? Y 1 , all 'U sv. .155 M , LQ Xialg.-4' film fn S SF? 1 1 wt 11 51,1 ' 1 ,LV ,e I-QT' lv 12:1 J' 'ha 1 . .11 4171. il ' 'g,1lQf:"f',b7 H U J K F L it-.fi-.w wg :n1s.,d11::,.,:A V H 17? " - ,LL . :'5"!E fr"-.11'f'lf 'RL 25 Q01 "S 11.'3'Kw:bff'i"k' 1 Th "9 "drill-Fil" ":fEJ""-i '- :Q-T' 'J ,W 111' All s 11? P, . an W 5 1i 'ig-215.71 f5f1Qf.15,',,, ,. 511. 1.,',,1Eif,.f.Q,,, -y - 'i .. - 1 Y QL 1,1 51 ri - ,P M V XT., 1711 1,31 ' 1 4 it , ,. fx ,JM 1 , sig? 5 m,,1,11.fi 11 .fa M.--1.s:,1f ff-f,f,,1,. ,, -- ,, .1 1 1 .11 Y- - ,J1 - 1 W 'f - - f 1 .1 x , X 1 Af-5, kg I-11. V 1 1 . 14? Q ' V Ln",,.-1? f " . 1- ' 1 - A , 1'- .' f-'Y-'X V- f u. -' --'Er' N-,l.f"f-Ja., Lfrilfii-Qi 'iL',Q91:. .-3 '-fiif-7'1" ?9ftNlEii-5 11'.f"' ' Q.-." 2 1 -' ' -'A f ' "Ui "" lf" ' L' '55 " ' ' W' -I " ' ' ' "vm, 1 :"' f119J if fl-1 J.-5-11-ill , J- 3- . .MR FM X V, V. . L.. , .J .9 442, --:' x. ..e . , g Vw J .+- :Fill -'- HA .-2 ii ik ,,.+,,f ll v 'A' ,i 1 F,,i-'fl 53 ir, I vgjftiy . fl 'f' 1 H Ax : 'gg 7 "9 lr' .lm-3 45-.' 1 .R X 'W l -.Jn ? :J ff' lx 3253 , le fi 22' 3 I wwf, EQ! +1i?'Qg?ll, . fi is fa ,-T - V, gi -if C-'ill 915. aff, -. fx, if nfs 'S- S ft.. Ml l, ,J ., ll -issllfz lg A ,fi f if 'eq If 215.5223 Rig? ' y Lia, fl fl NN 11' .ll Q if 'ill lfufi 'snuff ral! 'll C 'zfq fx if' , . A- ' if . 'z :'4L.1i,,,!p fx 1, +2 1. .45 .1 hmjx. TH! ,E all 1 .- .. .- i -fw . 1 fcgwjlgim R " . 1 Jviil- :tiki 53.7. V, .J iw 4 114- i'w,1'.,-Zfziilj Wi-s-1 figfixx ' ,, ,NM - -f vw A-- - rf 1 ' ' -ef 1- , , V 4 Q A . , , I . , , . .Y ,Q tx V-,elf , E P Juv , T, ,lk 4151- r ' A 151' .Q .Q 'ma-giil' 'f i' .ll Left to Right: Top Row-Bradwine, Sampey, Bleshoy, Downs, York, Bader, Gies, Netherland, Macenhill. Second. Ji fp, 5 Row-Machczynski, 'Meyer, Urschalitz, Delucu, Hull, Sarri, Payea, Zincc, McRoberts, Meininger. iz Bottom Row-Bader, Ruskin, Flemming, Sparling, Peltier, Walsh, Walker, Bader. ENGINEERING Julius W. DeMunnik, Milton Diamond, Aram L. Dinquilian, Edmund J. Dombrowski, Joseph F. Donnelly, Edward F. Donovan, John H. Dorsey, George T. Downey, Francis T. Downs, Frank Doyle, Albert J. Driscoll, Joseph A. Dugan, Leroy T. Dunlap, Charles Dysarz, Louis E. Elkan, John D. Elliott, Paul Ettinger, Florian F. Flemming, Basil B. Flynn, John M. Forster, David B. Freyman, Albert J. Gagnier, Donald L. Gahagen, Wil' liam J. Gallagher, George W. Gambert, Joseph J. Gies, Robert A. Gill, John N. Gladden, Ralph E. Gordinier, Max A. Grant, Raymond H. Granville, Eugene F. Guswiler. Y' as H , .V I' X f Ti Q .1 - .y , , ,. N vu J , r ,,-. Ligfjfyv. f -- -,Q ,ww-' " IIZOJ J 1 . A. F.. Y, if gt, 55" . "ggi, , .fix f' iffwi, ,,, . s23l,p V- 4 il N.. .- 'il liiflli J .yffiliig , ,Q lg , l it if F 255 Gal L, .. ll iii? 1. 57: Q -'N ulifk " HQ .l JLYQQJ G? .155 lwsf ' r lf- 3? l ' ,1 J? : ,J , Tx li FJ gl . I 5 r Qfh tjffilpi gift 'KJ liitfa r tg I ' 1--f e'Tf mf i r3'S"fJl x - vsgj V ,VJ - - ., ,. fr. '1.,':'l' ' 1, .- ' TTS' i:Q'ig'5T""7i l',aJ"., J ...M f.1lgii.af f'Lf:ft f-fr ,. , ,V .,j, , '-'11,-I . -n -,H 1 ,lima " J... -+1.1- V .-LJ? Q ffer J' l-LU! V' fel Ima' 215' lx,Q'5"g Yr" if 'HIS . ill. 'a Qi, ,Q cf all fp 'Snr 1, ff? it Ifvil' 5 al I if L 1 fl ia 'ggi 1 . ,X . ,I 4. . itll- .IL HW LD ia 1,1 Kgf t Q? its . gi E13 i v. 3' so jk J 'EJ 12,32 ma Y 'i?"iYX 4, '1 'if-it l I if Qi' ,I vl rg 1 Xl, .I ,Q V JIU 7i,llfl"""- JTC'I'fd'f'l H ' I ,Til lilo I K t Q51 I fear .J M- M ,, ' 'jr s Ill .H ,fb-i'li alia, 1 I We . R1 Wil? I ll qv' L- X. Mi 'J' gl' ff 3'v't?.""'.. W. 1-'ff 1 ...wx ., jx, '."" 4 -4 ,- .-.AI-J, -7. Left to Right: Top Row-Junker. Driscoll, Yaeger, Pouliot, Brigham, Barlow, Carpenter. Second Row-Lanigan, Yaeger, Kerstein, Magrath, Porter, Dempsey, Blashill, Gahagen. Bottom Row-Gagnier, D'Andrea, Spillane, Pitts, Millman, Campbell, Walters. ENGINEERING John A. Haenggi, Robert Harshbarger, .Charles F. Hautau, John H. Hayes, Donald Hepp, Aaro W. Hirsimaki, Ed. C. Hoisington, Lemuel J. Homant, Norbert J. Hornick, William M. Hughes, Jerry E. Huhn, Francis M. Hull, Harry Huntt, Robert C. Hupp, Roy A. Irvine, Maurice D. Jacobs, Louis J. Janecek, Albert W. Jones, Alex Junker, Louis Keller, Norman A. Kerstein, Theodore Kertesz, Henry I. Keyes, James S. Keyes, Fred J. Kirn, James E. Kirwin, Dan A. Klinglesmith, John EL Koessler, John M. Kopko, Paul J. Krantz, John E. Krasinski, Joseph J. Krempa. , I.,.J'. . . 7 V. K ,. 'Qi H ai . -21" ,,-twfrqs Q. 4 f :. r .9 yt. 51211 1'f-l , g f.,-.1 'lm' ' f. 3 .V KJ, ,l ',f,1,i I Q' .- 1.i M' 1 .I sig . fo, . 75, L, ,L ian f L ., w 1 u'1fi9'li ,A W r 1, Q Wm. J, illllxlf. ,IRE ,fl . -I . j,6Qv'fi. .I-1.-at Fl' .ttiiw . ,TJ J. K lr. ,U Ji' .lvl 'Ili :la . vl f J Ll -4' fluff ll :LM I gm illj kwa Til' 1:-,vin I ,Fit-,1 ,gl l Iiliilfl 5 53,1 I s lull 'l Ellgllj vw yr, -I, 6 f""'w. mr' 1,1 If 61 Y-Al -. fi A 'l iff' Za. V: f 'I Iliff-w . . 'l :ff '14 if? ' 'iz' -aw' x ' 'S-" 1. ?'fQ"i ' I 153 " . 37 Q3 fjiliJ.4T1 , .vial flea ll N-1 H ,..K .1 1. , .Lf Elf: 'l+HfI,,,,a3A, I 1, 4 1 If l lk? I ,2fi.j',l ,. e' wig I it 'll . , 3:55 'wt l:.4lf"fl5." , ,IH-Li, +' "M 'w . ' ,yr . f-ix-ai, .'.1?l",' xx 1'-.'-'nfl ' we vm, J.. VR,-My ,Pye 1 ' J: ,-., ,Wa . I 'f . . ,JJ . '. A ,UU ' '+L -E m. Ui. ,fl wwf an la xl, ,utr ra .5 A+, ,vi Hrfffl . 3 I, v X WI i p I I 4 A. 1 ' . :' ,Ng ,qu 3 L.:-all r- 1 ' ,Q 4 A .1 .4- 4 , Q ,iv , n ' if f '. 1, 1 lv "T ,a.',l,,1 .1 'V . yi Y. .V L:.l",.,n 4 5 fa iz-I., 'J'j '5 ,,. V , . ! . EJ xl.. . xv ,ai V ,wily A. vi. 11 IL' i W1 E t Tye f, "' 3 N., A-gi asm ff f' .' ll 'll l gil' 1.2 i.lrJxf 31.12141 . A-I l I xg if .- w l 'fig 'Tl' ,l in I l"-'vi ll'-lg r. . .5 ,lkillnl "1lQ,:'.' 5' 2 '. W 'lilfjaag .fail if 'if 'l?4.fi"'l VTP' 'KK- 1..r .rg e A- .. :- s,?l,?gjl V, .3 .1 ,. l Qlgtix lf T9 Tfmli' '-7' 5 A .fills f' , 2,2 '-A ' 3' EJ? 'Lf ' 4 L N" TJ'-iff: 'l f' f' radar Msg Wi .V in 1E.2iri.., 'M 1 l '19, - R33 .ff K.,.!1w 33911 53 , 1. Iv? LJ 3' nl, f Wg 51 any f Q M"ln'l A. ml H' 'F Sli l VH' i'43E'i11 'ffllflff ,gi-.,w?1.' if-.r.3'Ei'., lr .H ,, . 7717! jill 'la 5,131 .Lf ll 4 P Ti 41-' QM. A ffl i' .T .. gi. 414' iiwxcf' K. Til 7 s2'1"!'H . - is pv 4 .- f ,. YV., L., ,. v -n .,.m , 2. i , . A M ---.aaa " ,I ' .' if D7 v i?"3..E f"I::f:5' se, 1 " . 'EVER w -- '. "' ' A ll T . 3 E iwlrl ff im :Iffgjl E l s s .. XL 'Sha hi? Qiifllb' .iflllf 475. 'ii A fit . s J hi I .1 J . Je -c Left to Right: 'Top Row-Harshbarger, Wilkins, Booth, Sailor, Shapoe, Lahman, Steele, Macholski. Second Rowf-Elkan, Ross, Anderson, Doyle, Hayes. Third Row-Jones, Bujalc, Bettica, Diamond, Hoizington, Gallagher. Bottom Row-Majeski, Yaeter, Redmond, Leonard, Surowicz, Wernett, Dombrowski, Marty. ENGINEERING Charles P. Kunkle, Chester R. Kushler, Alfred E. Lanigan, Francis I. Leamon, Edward G. Lehr, Jr., David A. Leonard, Albert W. Lombardini, Max Love, Frank R. McCallum, Joseph McGlounie, Drew McEnhi1l, Herbert T. McGurn, Gregory M. McKeown, Peter B. McManman, Gletus G. McMullen, Louis A. McNabb, Samuel D. McNish, J. Fred McRoberts, Daniel J. MacGillis, Thaddeus Machczyinski, john A. MacLaine, Howard A. Magrath, Edward E. Majeske, Steve Maloney, Ralph I. Martin, Stanley Marty, Jack T. Meade, Henry L. Meininger, Abe Mendelson, George H. Merckling, Samuel I. Merriman, Harry A. Meyer. . .J L. - . --Y in . W W. . pfewmmwmwmwww ' w' FQ' l- -.l"ax"""l3" ' sr-ie?-1 .- "5 "L j.-gl Magix Ag gli., lfpl.. ,Q ,IJ ,f . Q - " - V,-5 -a:.:.:f-f x.,,,.f.z'- -...ta :..,.- .- .1 az... I 50' fi: 32 .,. fi l K fa 4 vi lv ,V if A SP1 5342353 A M... X up in ell H3 iff .5 as ya 4 . 'lff' .57 'lla J' .- N 4,-fly' .Lge I 4 .1,, 1 li u 1 -. 1 W' ' x x I g.1 I,-,' ' ,'. iw, . lvl? vi H, J' ' iff, Cg.HF Tiff -gl I gg .5 Lag.. Us-U JQEQQLJVV Q51 W? I V if v.- s. ' I .ini 'Jffn I ,asv e is - fw liliij 753-li " '1- , . . ffie it f LQ I, 35653. ,ie 1- .arf n 3 if l3f1l'f,lJ if owl g'wjiff1,? 'hr HM .M .V 4. 4 , t 53333 I. ...fl Im Il' il I I 4. QQ! 1.125 2,3 f fm' F2452 tm . tg.. 2, H Q- ., -.ff . R , A lciili s 1, W., -A I 'H fl-lv IIIQE5 if' 5 . stir.-iw .- I l ,H Y-I' l'fI'I'. ' ,ii . . 'Jil . ,A ,ff . :" QW . L -gi Wu -m I 'Sill 1 'li . Ili? F xgriwglf "MTH, Q' rl 'SIRI-A Left to Right: Top Row-Borger, Brescoll. Second Row- Rassel, White, Rissman, Anderson, Ryuel, Sturm. Third Row-Yaeger, Ciesielski, Kopko, Ettinger, Sokup, Hughes. Bottom Row-Merckling, Rothenberger, Guswiler, Tetmarsh, Dailey, Bennett, Root. ENGINEERING Walter Michalski, George Miller, William H. Miller, George Millman, Leo L. Moran, George D. Morell, Harlem H. Morris, Leon J. Mousley, Robert J. Mulvaney, Henry T. Murphy, William P. Murphy, Maurice A. Netherland, Gregory Gherst, Thomas W. O'Donnell, Clarence G. Czar, Edwin B. Palmer, Russel K. Payea, Albert Pearl, James B. Peltier, Charles H. Petty, Norman E. Pfeifer, Isadore I. Pitts, Joseph Pont, Gharles E. Porter, Francis H. Pouliot, Thomas D. Quinn, Joseph G. Rashid, Richard Rassel, Norman A. Reckling, joseph H. Redmond, George W. Reschke, Thomas E. Riley, Garl L. Rissmann. " f -f ' J"t'1L-.4-nfffx 'rf-W' '-if-V 'A 1+ E. JE' W." I 13'-f'7+57' fm .--11' w - tl ff 'I U fx. we-.I fri?fMlF.AfQQa1... I fiimef P ' I 1 Q :L5.x..Sf:ag?m. at 1 ' . I f1231 1 . A 1 4 A ,-Q iii"- .xk ,I i 'lj wifi. pl' .:. I I ",, bg' . .A WE. al Q," J. 'i -71 kg ' , 'ki' ij X ' ,..n.,i." J.. il' Eyfli .- ,... M . E--"lc if J' ljifllili ?,lJg.,,'uA"5 .YM-YV , .I ff if I3 1 .. I' I--. i!,l7Au,5',-I 1- Q if Q .- ',N,.1.. R313 , 'TUG Q, I' 1 G ,ax 5. la. -'V -f-3? 'V ,IJ-rm. wlif-j?: 1' -sw l5B1fIe"s - if 1- , 3 . U . tug V, A : :H ,r fin, .QV Vfiljf-ri 11,-1f, . rl I " ' I I l ii. 'll A 5 L44 M-4, , .. I t. I A tiff? . "-i- I-1. 'lngfv , Fil? "1,-. M. gx hr' 4 4 I x Let to Right: Top Row-Bielicki, Gladden, Ryan, Elliott. Homant, Meade, McCullum. Second Row-Bettiga, Donnelly, Coughlin, Maloney, Lombardini, Hepp, Borger. Third Row-Mosley, Davies, Sirwaitis, Krantz, Christen, Taylor, Rochester, Welter. Bottom Row-Freyman, Miller, Brescoll, Kertesz, Beale, Petty, Dunlap, O'Neill, Lehr. ENGINEERING Bernard P. Rochester, Willard G. Root, Lawrence F. Ross, Carl H. Roth' enberger, Charles V. Roty, Russell Ruben, Thomas J. Ryan, Stanley A Rypel, Claf Saar, Fred W. Sablacan, Roman L. Sailer, Mills H. Sampey Ezekiel Sancen, Ralph B. Scott, Robert I. Schneider, George M. Schueder Fred Shapoe, Bernard H. Sharkey, Albert E. Shattuck, George F. Sheridan 5 3 7 Howard R. Sigler, Raymond bl. Simsick, Frank I. Sirwaitis, John I. Sled' zinski, Louis C. Sokup, ,lack Sparling, William M. Spillane, Henry Steen' kist, Edwin W. Stehle, Morris I. Stern, John D. Stevenson, Mark W. Stroebel, Frederick B. Sturm. f124l va. 32' fu, ' 'HH . ,,J V A-f.ge,,:,,..,F,1 - 'F . till' f "2 4' 452,41 L' lmeivff :iq ,kan ,z rf.. f. . li , if 2" rf aww' .. f- . h- I if 22115 in -I 'lfiimf ll "3 wir .1975 I'-5523 'P .WXJ nf 57? B50 iueffiiw 'vgliflfgk R-I f 1. H , .U ffl!" 'N I 9? I M if ,lgllli ,tliw lllflln i,.v'fli55i 'llgffji A .,-1 J ,gy fiiffs. Qfk-, lffrffjsl :Qi glaze, ,stills .pf l' Elf 51 .W ,x,A .5 163 153-4 if 1 w 7,5251 'gn . .1 W0 M' ij lr, J- ill fjix F -1 if V'q'i .1--2' 'H hfyglj CY! ' 1 w X 'll N' 'P lf! ua, gf?lI.B iff? 562' fx L flfliflg .yi 6-5, 'Ra fl fl ' P n ll ,u'Tlx ', .f, I 1 l In F -, fl' -if' 'flirt-?"1.f5l'I"f'1'l A . ,... , , ,Wm '97, .f""".,1'RQfFQ, 3,.gg..,f"1g-s-, .f"'. .. . " iff, ,V 445-1-'..g, ,..-, 3, CHfWQfh121lWFl3fH7.f r U- -5 2 1 2.173 r 3 ' -Q l'- xl-f'. 'i 1 ""r" 'fx' F Eh Q'5Tff'5 355 Elf-5 1, 42, 1" 'T W in ws , -X21 fl L, V l 5 li. is :ig .cn ,K-. Ne. .as N., Y-yi v x 4 ,J ill ll -'snyislil L51.,J'in5x 1 . - Alf is ? .Q F M il l l l Left to Right: 'Top Row-Yost, Gill. Second Row-Rashid, McMullen, Kirwin, Bordofli. Third Row-Sharkey, Moran, Ross, Dugan, Diamond, MacGilles. Bottom Row-Hirsimaki, Keyes, Sablacan, Murphy, Dedona, Granville, Oberst. I ENGINEERING Clifford A. Subora, Singh Sunders, Harry Surowitz, Philip A. Tannian, Frank J. Tayler, Nordon J. Taylor, Ralph G. Taylor, Jack R. Tetmarsh, Fred B. Toffaleti, Lawrence E. Tracy, Everett Uloth, Paul E. Urschalitz John VonRosen, Alden D. Walker, Robert E. Walsh, Burwell I. Walter William A. Wagrzynowicz, Frank G. Weiler, Lawrence G. Welsh, Gayf lord A. Welter, Albert L. Wernette, Gilbert I. White, Herbert H Wilhelm, Archie A. Yeager, Happy A. Yeager, Howard F. Yeager, Hayward F. York, james L. Yost, Walter F. Zdrodowski, 9 3 l L. , . .T wx, ui.-3 1,- f Qi.-'1 mg--.Y f lr 3J2j5g1,, lx y 'vi , , 3 -gt" ,lffi-M' 'rf ml' 'L-,., fill'-Y H22-'-s .W i, fw, l'wvi".1 5 ',f.g.Li Q i 32 N X QQ J Rvfy'-, 'PH l A ifflika lr? Hill" 1,7 lv J lg 'br' - ,J Q -1 'Q f 7 if l Qi 1 5.5 1 l12iiT,g ll 5.35 HE! ,fbi get at-3 Kiki j ,' 0' Q. ,,iiAe Q, .. iz 'Veil Y iff if Jw, 13555 ugltffifgpgi ff' , ,..5,,,g,,5, 1 V' 'Sf -Qin' , Y George Zernitsky, Howard G. Zmtz. , f T 1 '-,ffl ' 1 T 6 "ll lea' A . Wfllitqfy li . gif- IN A - Gilt? Y "xt r'11lillliihi" ' l 'lffij Ku., Lil ' .sf ' '. fcjfs SEX, ,,,,,,.,r x,,,mN . . i""nT'5 iowx- ' 47' 931 ' f' iw ,- 'Fila .zzafili 1' iikiff' -fb' fc: E, if'-:'3."it::g,.w:",fu " gliff ,'I.,"T .. -fr. .fps Wei ' ' Y 1 . .ef ,Era nr t-7"z1 J l 'wel ' 1? fr fl 77f'lfwJ'5I5f civanfffaify sfffflilir A' i 51,321 ll -, M541 K R' Ffa if-91 " '-.Sw - .ia . H A--1 Q Sf' ,f Qi -ff I . :ai-fvjpifr 19.'ff,,, .1 f 'A -Fm' -N 1 iff- M.: 'M - . v- fsss:'wa.e,f"m5 ...f 23-w-'Jff"1-15.11. 'Q ' .ff 'WJ -' Mi, -ff'-1' rf" 5-ft' LTA Sigel- ?'..,1ill-V7 .aisfpegzfff .if cw' ' Q-avg'-:ax-'mahalfvz-'Jw' ' fizsj ,f-'ai 1 ,S 1, ,y- fl - .nl 1. ,VUAI ..4., V 1, , Y.-il bi .V+H.,s?.,, 4, r r...:, L.:-My me , . if , I ,1 l , , it, , Left to Right: Top Row-Middleton, Dunne, Hape, Deblin. Bottom Row-Cataldo, Laize, Cleary, Doclle. Steiner, Dowes. I,fXYk7 Charles R. Cataldo, Owen J. Cleary, Matthew I. Crimrnins, Mark G. Devlin, Fred J. Dunne, William E. Hope, Violet Helen Kidder, Norman I. Laige, Milton J. Middleton, L. Clancy Nanry, Edwin I. Scallen. X r .J i G w li .wr : ' ' N ,.x 1 l "X'r",'1i""9'l. V H ma, , ., r , , f. .L :, V Tv , J, J. ,, ,, V , , 1 f126l t .- , I, 455. Q'-1.5 'ffl :fl '. Q. Q., - Left to Right: Top Row-Legel. Knobelsdorf, Radncr, Gruber, Tiffany. Second Row-Keith, Jordan, Joyce Shaeffer, LaMeasure, Gambla, Dyer, Flannigan. Bottom Row-Schwartz, Taylor, Dantzen, Otter, Malis, Volkovich, Reiss, Mitchell. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Herbert L. Adcock, Morton Bechek, Joseph H. Bender, John T. Birney, John Bizall, John F. Borowslci, John Brennan, Allan A. Bridgeman, Albert J. N. Burch, Julius R. Bush, Gerard Carroll, C. William Cole, Philip D. Conway, Frank Corbett, Warren Croker, Joseph N. Cronin, John Dallas, Charles A. Dantzer, Maurice D-eCalume, Ethelo DeFobio, Dorian Denio, William Dillon, Harold Drury, John'E. Dyer, Joseph A. Erdos, John H. Finestone, George O. Fischer, Frederick R. Fischer, Robert E. Fitzgerald, S. H. Flanigan, Cyrill J. Flemming, Charles F. Flynn, Helen Foley, Thomas J. Fox, Ester Fuller, Emmett Funnie. I 1 5' W ll ,I . L 1 , I - . . P F"-' '-1 w.'4'5N' . AIU, 1 . - f. . ' I .' tQ,,Ef'15!l,5flf4.i3f '--11-1 Y . Wd f?'.hl-,L..fi Af. ' R11 '-f ' f f. 51273 ...A w .L Jw. .. i'.'f..'v - I'll"..' Q. l , . ' . 'UN' X. pf. w. wt, Ill 9 'TNR fi' 1 ' ww XL J' fl-N ra' 3435? .Q , 'l.i:.l"f 'i 1.2 '-JJUH ' ,lnlkx ,ll .' i.-Jilfli A n'-"..15',a of +lQil'g"l' ,li iff? :li rllilf- i fi 'I 'l . L N..,,. ' 4 'F '1 , ll I I -1i2,ga..i..i .L ,liyiqt-.ns N sk , i, 1 . 1 " iw iffy! .gf S.. . .ia :ws- lijifif-il "l5l'.fS'5 g,i4".r'T'n' .qi,w 'li ' 1,.Q.dI :il 11. 1 1 '33?fh'?:il- 'ISGS' 1 ., -'ZH . lla. if Wil- aff: f' xiii? 5 4 g ",' 4, V: ag ' 'I 'J a .Fl it islwgilii ff-tafiifl i. f.y'.:5,. Z-f'Qp?' I :kiwi , . F -"f. irifllvllli. .I--lil il' 1 .. , wifi ltr' Left to Right: Top Row-Flemming, Siterlet, Murphy. Wilson, Schlager. Second Row-Ryan, Gohl, Brazil, Schmidt, Yaeger, DeColuwz, Cronin, McDonnell. Bottom Row-Parilla, Mindak, Bridgman, Don, Minclc, Croper, Ploe, Kanter. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE John H. Gamble, Thomas Guines, Vxfalter Cancer, A. Charles Gerich, Clarence A. Cohl, Allen Greenburg, Raymond J. Crostick, Earl LeRoy Gruber, Bruce M. Head, Julius Hirschman, Walter Hebestreit, James Ingram, Wade P. Jacobs, Wendell C. Jaegers, Cecilia James, Emily Jicha, Jerome J. Jordan, Walter M. Joyce, Oliver Kanter, Edward Keating, Keith Colin, T. James LaMeasure, Harold Knohelsdorf, Walter R. Legal, John W- 'rg' - - xl - A . L... aut' .,1l'f'v, Ilff... I .L I .il 1, msjjiac Hifi H+. 'iii .J W lin sf f mf! R, iff? wig, If Y. iwdiw ,L-1.5.31 1 l, 1' 'QW 'fprlffjfn riff? ,Jn ,i fa 51,4 i f 1' J 'iff' .4 X! .f'l'lF? 3255. if rl L A yi .5 qi. i f.. .1 1 Y w 1 Filly if iifvj its? Qfifi, lf! .K 5' A Q? . . f'f-'X-'EQ' I- 3 Y? .gf . SQQFQ Z fad' algal 'ill Ck? 'ie Q V - 4 1 .. ai gl Linn :PZ V A. Longnoord, Louis Loranger, Andrew C. Lyon, Louis A. Mahs, James J. Nelson, Helen Minch, John Peter Mindak, James Mitchell, Elbert lJ'i.fQf1W Moore, Earl A. Murphy, James T. Murphy, Patrick Josephy McDonnell. '- .syxgkk V I fhill Qlflfi -f..Wfrf lv-1??'li"3' kg. ' P , A' It M.. QQ, f'3,lg2gl5fg,5.,.-.-.-'fQQ,tlf,i''itll ,Aw --,....' lf1281 .' ll 9 C, .zgzr . f jflf. . ' x, s. " 4 -s . .wi .,, 'fr an 4' N i' if f G . . 1 51,1 l-al if .'f' r .wt lh 1 u. ,.a. - 'I-s sirh ,. n iw - ,wif-ey-.gf -.A rail 2 Xf'as?7.Q fr fr W - f - .,' .,, -., Q.. T .fy A A in - 5 . W ixgyvi 1 r -i iP! i k l if Le, 'Q sit. I ima V i 1' 'NX- Q, lf? ' it N , ll Left to Right: Top Row--Bender, Fox, Greenberg, Erdos, Winterer. Second Row--Flynn, Finestone, Shaw, Murphy, Hirschman, Burch, Fisher, Fisher. Bottom Row-Flemming, Ulrich, Grostick, Birney, DeFabio, Bechek, Bockowslci, Adcock. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Thomas I. Mclntosh, Clifford Nelson, Carl H. Ctter, George Parilla, Walter P. Patterson, Clifton C. Perrin, Edward H. Ploe, Ralph R. Rad' ner, Rollin K. Reiss, William George Rowe, James Hilliard Ryan, Leo Ryan, Norman H. Sarvis, Joseph Saro, William H. Schafer, Robert Wil-f liam Schlager, William C. Schmidt, Arthur Schmitz, Warren Senecal, Charlton G. Shaw, Edward Sheeran, Earl A. Siterlet, Russell C. Slimmon, Fred Cliver Stewart, Lloyd Taylor, Donald Black Thomson, Kenneth C. Tiffany, E. Elmer Ulrich, Ralph Volkovich, Gilbert George Walters, John Leo Warras, Leo Weinert, IamesfB. Weeks, Cyril White, Harry Lee Wilson, Ludwig Winterer. 1 ! 'V .H gf 7 ivikf . z '. yi? Xu l QE 1 if yr' , if ,fy . 4 f Mu. Kiln,- fi.-',,-ef W Y.."i. .g kg- ..,-. l if ai me Siiiilfif - ix. 1, fm .f m4',,1,- . LWUL1' . ellsll me f .3 .422 'ii'- i,,-wg Tel L 0 .rg 2 A Ll' , ES .fl 1 .5 ja i X 3 gall ir? l g if i s . i w M. fatal C0 R fills KE, 1 E y U l I - ri ire? M ti .,M v lr., 11. 'E s f ? fill J N 1 ii ' ll ,fy .W if if was rage., .gf vs "--Eliail S x ' Ha, . ' 'h - .sf ,c ' , -' ----- - . ,, " vi L -Q ' . ,.- .,-. .U . 0- ., 4-. rr., , 'users-'-. ..: '-fs. 'HY' 7 if q:"'f-. ' A roi ,fa Y V ' QMS 1 . , V 5 gi " Agf- - , , 1. -- -- 1 , .,."k,,.n. -K3 wgijx' "r4'a:,H ,5jfvw,yxe- ' -'--an A", -1 .QM .H .f Y. N g ,gsijj-cl, fr'--.fi1.s5'.'5'xs...e,Q3Zg!5f,gr-aae,frLze.fK.?i .fag LJ' if Lf Q ' -lilea-eeaswiliiir f 1S'm'1Dq,.a,,4-sir'-'T I 129 il "v,2i,f,g5zi wuz Q N xg GSYUP ,pf my uv 'G My My 4, 1 if - il :- GD G5 ff D,-GD mxf,mX4 'M+mg9 "" - . .l8'l7. --4' '27 S 1 S C+ 4 :AQ Cfxfifif' VMQIV5 G4 QQQR Xu v, . Q29 Q 1 . If ' O 4 1 1 faq: fo' 4 , vi ir? E A III KX Tslljg Ry. X, ,, 6 5 6 , fy .5 ,A ZW 4 W5 J , Ev if Mai! - 2 1 view: 'Af M X 3 A r 1 5 dvi X ww ,ffm 91? W , We 1 45' Q W Vg? xy in A ,K'I,,'g ' - V ' !'f5 f J RESHME AX , x , P ' 4!O! Ho, . s 0 + ,wi l'O'r Q! O r 4 f Q, r 40? ,OW P, W 134 1 X Wx Aix M jf,f Kfoif ,pu i 93 .X my ffnru Left to Right: First Row-Allen, Benson, Fiedler, Gignac, Girardin. Second Row-Grix. Harman, G. Johnston R. Johnston. Third Row-Iondro, Lamplxere, Loughrin, Lubinski. Fourth Row-McDonald. MeGrath, lvleyer, O'Connor. Fifth Row-Pearson. Reilly, Rountree, Squires, Sweeney. 51321 JOSEPH D. LOUGHRIN f f Treasurer FRESHMAN CLASS COUNCIL OFFICERS FRANKLYN E. MCDONALD f President GEORGE S. SCHWEINSBERG, VieefPresident JOHN B. GERARDIN f f Secretary ARTS AND SCIENCES JOSEPH D. LOUGHRIN f f President THOMAS J. MCGRATH f VicefPresident EDWARD T. SWEENEY f f Sem-erm-y JOSEPH A. LUBINSKI f f f Treasurer DAY CCMMERCE AND FINANCE FRANKLYN E. MCDONALD f President GEORGE S. SCHWEINSBERG VicefPresident MARTHA ELLEN MYER f f Secretary CHARLES N. PEARSON f f Treasurer ENGINEERING-SECTION A G. RAYMOND JOHNSTON f f President RICHARD F. JOHNSTON VieefPresident ROBERT D. SQUIRES f f Secretary RAYMOND J. LEWIS f f f Treasurer NE of the most vital things to a Freshf man entering the University of Def troit is the organization of his class into a strong body. Without an organization of this kind he is lostg he becomes a slave to those keenly devised tortures of the ever' watchful Sophs. When he first steps foot on the university campus, he is alone, and there follows that difficult period of acquainting himself with the other members of his class and with the routine of the university. Eventually the class organizes in the com' mon cause of defending themselves against' the machinations of their superiors, and Enally the Freshman Class Council takes its useful place as defender of the "green" With the advent of this latter body, the Frosh are able to hold their own and some' times even to retaliate. They become a uni' fied force and take their rightful place in the activities of the university. The Freshman Class Council of this year has surpassed all of its predecessors in achievement. Socially they staged one of the most successful class dances the univerf sity has seen. Besides assuring the Freshmen cofoperaf tion in all university activity, the council, ENGINEERING-SECTICN B ROBERT E. ALLEN f f f President THOMAS L. REILLY f f VicefPresident JOHN J. ROUNTREE f f Secretary CHRISTIAN HARMAN f f f Treasurer LAW ROGER P. GQCONNOR f f President GORDON W. LAMPHERE VicefPresident ELEANOR M. FIEDLER f f Secretary ANGELA M. GIGNAC f f f Treasurer NIGI-IT CCMMERCE AND FINANCE MERRILL A. GRIX f f f President THOMAS F. BENSON f f VicefPresident VERA JONDRO ffff Secretary JOHN B. GIRARDIN f f f Treasurer together with the Sophomores, staged an annual event of their Own which attracted the interest of everyone on the campus. The flag rush and class games, held in April, fur' nished untold amusement for the upper' classmen, and in addition gave the Frosh and Sophs that longfawaited opportunity to "have it out." There were hogftying fights, bagfrushes, a tugfofwar, and many other rough but ex' citing clashes. Of all, none was SO humor' ous nor so seriously engaged in as the tugfof war. In the first place there was no tugging done. The rope was extended over a small body of water which drains in a hollow on the campus each year and is appropriately named "Tower Lake." It is shallow, and very muddy. The Freshmen and Sophof mores lined up, both determined to tug and to win. At the first pull, the rope snapped, and both sides tumbled into the mud. Incidentally, for the Second time in many years, the Sophomores were the victors of the games. The council's work was at an end. They had formed a union of the Freshmen of all colleges Of the university, and had prepared them for their academic careers. fissj L Left to Right: Top Row-Nader, Bresnahan, Trudell. Second Row-Brichetto, Curklinski, Duggan, Ballreich Bruce, Smith, Crocker, Brady. Bottom Row-George, Langel, Reiden, Cairns, Annas, Schaefer, Mooney. ARTS AND SCIENCES Joseph M. Atlhoff, Henry C. Annas, Leroy L. Atlivaick, John M. Ball, James L. Ballreich, Lawrence A. Barera, Charles J. Beauvais, Warren F. Belknap, Louis J. Berg, Howard Bergo, Meyer H. Berman, Joseph E. Berry, John J. Bissell, Frank Cf. Bliss, Charles E. Brady, Lloyd J. Brecht, Wilham J. Breshnahan, James T. Brightwell, Chas. D. Broderick, John M. Bruce, Herman L. Brys, Joseph S. Brzostowski, Richard A. Burlchardt, Archie Cairns, Joseph A. Canaan, Brendan J. Carey, James T. Carroll, Phillip M. Clinton, Cyril A. Cohen, Jacob A. Cohen, Mahlon F. Coller, Neil J. Collins. f134J 1 ee-1 ' iw my Y. L .lv nf 1,fT', 1.-,,. ,.V f anim, 1' 'T ,. -l .v .xfpf ,, 4-, ..i4'. . 71'-Q' . . ,, , X . e ,C s um-4 IV, sn' H, .."m'2 '.9l'fg' Nr , ' 161 3".s5"i ,N . f xl, we 5 L '. IN.. T 'sf i '.'Rl'L , Jw -vu , A .- ,ii 1. gm. , , - :L-a, ' 'V' ',.'. 1 vl i.. 1 ,. ij 1 ,f 'Q' I ,l If -Jv- l fr N rgyfll 1, .M-1 ,k J , 3 ' Fitz ,s -Q.?,,l,-H ,E 325131 , I9 "lvl 5 .,, r.. ' , my F v.-.'T3f 'i. gram .5 , .I if in' V.' ,vlffajf i, -jg,-W. l 41 --MY. ' " .T "x 1, Q 1 . f 'Pm a ii? 'v gl h -xi" ..-, . , V kr 'sf Iiffx . ff Hi' H5 lx -1"-' 'L-in f , si. .,gLL,?j.vj5 1,1..y4C 1" , ' 1 rl!-1-,Q H. ,P f vw if in 1 .a+. Ha '11 2. l- "1 X2 X.:-: -' M. Ali!-'x :-,,' 'ui , . X. D .ivr . . Y Utah x. 'wzf Y -A -A ,.,,. fn u,,.. , , , t.,e- 4 'wil' i"1-1 Q, v 'N' All '55-. ,g Left to Right: Top Row-Stepanski, Dembreck, Flett, Hines, Tocco, Roth. Second Row--Muske, Kulinski, Muske Hartman, Lansky, Mulligan, Kane. Bottom Row-Kaplita, Evans, Kozlinski, Berry, Kelly, D. Levine, L. Levine. ARTS AND SCIENCES George J. Crocker, Frank Cuncich, joseph D. Cunningham, Walter L. Curklinski, William J. Dean, Thos. E. DeGurse, john ll. Demheck, Ray' mond J. DeRyck, Edward H. Devlin, John M. Diem, Edward I. Donohue, Theodore J. Dotsz, Howard Douville, Ignatius F. Dugan, Ernest P. Dunne' gan, Walter I. Dziezko, Elvatz A. Elsarelli, David H. Emmer, Gaillard C. Emmons, Albert Epstein, joseph M. Evans, Henry I. Fisher, William P. Fisher, Richard C. Flett, Denton B. Fox, Robert S. Fox, Martin Garelick, Bernard F. Gariepy, Lawrence M. Garvey, Joseph I. George, Harold V. Gervais, Lawrence F. Gillett. W at ?fTf'ff'qff . M- , Q A ffllzllli. lx, "C "1 xg' Y 1-' Qi ' l s Y In .Jil-'eil-1.5, ,V.i Mg. , 6 . .. iiiafilg WH, V, , y xl., ,':- 5-:N ,sggh . , .. -. " X ' .rf ' - ' V 'a ,. -W ,ak Ju.:-. 51353 V .V.'f:"" '- , if. . , , 1 , . 1.7, ...,,,,, g. . .- N .. 74-,.,,,,w, Q 1 li 1- - Y--fx..-1.1.-,. i Left to Right: Top Row-MacLean, Lingeman. Mavis. M3Williams. Second Row-Leszczynski, McCarthy, Clinton, Sullivan, Morris, Sullivan, Krabach, Sullivan. Bottom Row-Krause, Cuncich, Holland, McGrath, Schulte, Smith, Williams. ARTS AND SCIENCES lay F. Gibbs, John F. Goetz, Edward T. Grantham, Bernard J. Grehb, Howard V. Groesheck, Irving M. Hart, Waldemar B. Hartman, Edward W. Hayes, Norman P. Herr, Victor C. Hillebrand, John J. Hines, Richard R. Hocking, John J. Hofstetter, john F. Holland, Alfred C. Horn, james H. House, Carl W. Huhn, Charles M. Isenherg, john I. Jahlonski, Leo I. Jasionowski, Charles H. lasnowski, Erwin D. Iohin, Thomas L. Kane, john T. Kaniasty, Walter A. Kaplita, Hugh W. Kaylor, William E. Kelly, Phillip J. Kerwin, Leo J. Kirchner, Leonard F. Kolodzieski, Edward G. Kowalczyk, Anthony E. Koslinski. P 1 fl36Nl 12 . Jweglgl il 1 H it 'ff 'f 4,1-l li , . 4, V l Gift r 4 fr .il-.F f m , l"gZf,",:k Ulf--I io' 5.52121 .. Ai, 'S sq. 1. v my-ef i-"wa Mgglgx lll lg 4'-, ll i.. ll' . I I Vg, 2'Q.,.Q?j' 4 ai ,h ...' 54-'I' l ,li . -Je, F 4, ,. ,,.... I1 lr . , 4 . .nlgg ' Ah. it 'fig- 'sm' 1 .,,f .flfiq li 1 Hn? , i al. . . -, .I .5 s . e i lynn- if if. ,I V 1 .'-4. ll 'Cliff W .: l'QQ1'uY ra.:-ii K, 'Qi' . 1 ,f 533,95 flillfli E657 ' x'.,g P' srlf' 5 WE44' 55. 4. .-.vi X55 r fLffn'f5: 5 Kan... ..:. fi' -gi' F4 E. , 'gg 1"".'3Q fi . li fl.-5,71 '. W, "1 Q' 'Ali 'F 4 l ' r 4? -I i i, Qi.:-Q V252 'lf llfdril 1, J'-gl me Nl, i?,?,E,'r 5? to ,. . f'-fi if Ed Gigi-ft H, Q" nfl . A ...1 v:..4,',. J 'fi- fg ijjl? E' A? 3" f 'lui tsl.-. jig, fu ,l ,. W 1 6, ,. . 1 F 1 J Q3 W- v Z ,"45ff .sl Je -' 1355 if lil., if i W ,Libs 5 ,, -R54 J -1, E 4' lib tp. N4 " 4 1. ,4 Left to Right: Top Row-Lantz, Lisowski. Hillebrand. Salive, Brzoztowski, Carroll. Second Row-Garvey Zurakowski, Miller, Hofstetter, Mandcll, Burklxardt, Nurse. Bottom Row-Groesbeck, Beauvais, DeGurse, Zemens, Ball, Dzieszko, McTaggart. ARTS AND SCIENCES Fred C. Krebach, Harold L. Krause, Edward E. Kulinski, David E. Kull, Stephen E. Kuretic, Edward R. Langel, Mandell Lansky, Edward S. Lantz, Marxfin A. Last, Charles F. Lehman, Robert Leion, Erank J. Leszczynski, William Levin, David M. Levine, Louis Levine, Harlow I. Lingeman, Benjamin Lisowski, Joseph D. Loughrin, Joseph A. Lubinski, Harry G. Lutchin, Harry W. McLean, Joseph R. Mandell, George H. Mavis, Charles G. McCarthy, Russell W. McCauley, Robert C. McDonald, Jof seph E. McEvoy, William A. McEawn, Nicholas McGaughlin, Thomas I. McGrath, Angus R. McTaggart, George E. McWilliams. ,jay , -. ...wtf -an 1' 'fm W ..s, , 5 n Y Hier 1- ki . i-,N 'if-lf? 1 is T51 Q, lg' Q 3, "" 191 'fi N., 7 2551? iff' '-ew . wg, 152-5. , it T514 l' f137j 'l-N 'lgfrv ,W 1 l 1. f .lu Lf 3 - wer? 'XJ 1 . 0 . If up ,"" , A W , V . . F an X -,.gg,gg,!gj'-gait. ml:-.i,i .F, we W, yi, ,fig I A , 1 'L ' '- 4 - 'IJ 'Z K Y jg , . . . . . . il T TE Q: I ly Evf' 5 - f?':i'l 2 i3.l:'Lls.v' r i 'Q V Tl Fin llc' eq. J I L .3 ,lf I .T"'kz "f"-EMF iljgiil' . !,,-1 !1rw,N.,,3k-,I tr,',:jJl',Q lqiigwii WQQVY . wi-L ' 5' dl ff!! inf? my Ii ,. 'fi , X 'fr Eff ,. -l ai. fy 'llfljmi lag lm W. 1: 'ifl ill .B A., ei ,F . i. , .ar ., L' 1 . nik . H, Sf' X .1lLI',.'i, . lk",-,f'?'1I ll l rm' . ,. -H", ., -,Mir W il . DkfQ1J".' A 1, .nw ,,'-:Qin .-,- I A. .YU tl .J W, Ki. il.. 56532. F' 511 -pai in ,gghiisilr 'iii I, I , ,J .ff vig' iraqi' 5 i, ...,.i. ,i 4- ff' . 1 . '-'Mf' " l'nIy6QJ ll'ig,",-ff. al iff? 7l3f1's'. -F 'i2zQ5l?'1 ' " 4 w Y' sf' '34,-' Lx 45,1 4" f"'i . u,l:r3214iL ', fri..-' . - -"f f Y LDL Ii 'a W" 5. " x"-VL 'I 5' A-IM.. v ' 5' 'y ' '..'Jf.' t '5' '13 'W' ' I all' WM: F7133 W1 v., gg girl-yy. 4sffY.',T".1'pq, r-.1 ik I ix. ,V ,, 'iifitff' 14 Lf r Qlff. P3742 ,lil Qfftiaiilf QM! 4' '25 1. my Y J' 9739 33 s"'ii5 b - is ' Qkilfsi .Mow .1 I ., -.x. gi Left to Right: Top Row-Oakes, Stewart, Epstein. Second Row-Fischer, Deryck, Cunningham, O'Neill, Solovitch, Saperstein. Bottom Row-Lubinski, Coller, Collins, Russell, Slattery, McAvoy, Devlin. ' ARTS AND SCIENCES Gscar M. Mersman, Joseph Michalak, Raymond I. Miller, John Mooney, George F. Morris, Williaui I. Mullaney, Phillip T. Mulligan, Benjamin F. Muske, Paul H. Muske, joseph J. Nader, Albert N. Nagler, Albert Nickels, Ioseph L. Nowack, George G. Nurse, Cleon A. Oakes, Damian N. Cfer, Gurgen C. Ghanisain, Frederick W. Oles, George S. Clmsted, Luther C, Glson, Williain I. O'Neill, Phil Grrin, Norris H. Guellette, Francis C. Padzieski, Phillip H. Paye, Joseph Perkovski, Michaels F. Peters, joseph L. Phelan, Sylvester J. Pheney, Joseph L. Phillips, Walter L. Phillips. fd gi QQ , lil , ! ,Lx X v Cs :sr .gill '. 'fm 4 'sq 521552 53233 Ca 1. ' .JJ -, x5 l J an ,vs 2512 Q A--1 .Q ' rt,.Jj 9? ' Q' 11.55 Q U 1 3 it F ii -5331 Q9 llgi .1 53 ,fait ' la. ,iffy ,rsh 1 , .5f'5if,1.:f' Q Ll A 1. , .1 f i'?:?jT'lgk. ,-.L-.-ff ' ww- ?2".'tfli1'f---" L .,,, "' F, "MS V IW. i v '. .e v'2Z'J11 Vey. rig, ," 7- N I 'N A, i'1ff'YfT"q ,335 jfflilgiw ,f-f5f"'7"-1,1575-"gfi I I- , I iv L rg . r Y .. A. - 4 gm... i. - a-A - , 1. .M ,, . , . , . . 1, .. -1: x . , , . 3 I Rama . ,J iuff..i . ' U L T' at it --.NM --pp A .ar-16434 iffy-f" Q H 1' 1- ' " . , -f- Y -- ' V- .Q-,sf 52-1'.:'.g.1J ff L-.gre afsxme l'1l3S1 faq... ,,. if ,E I-. J., . .1 - . If - 4 . .,,,., . -,. Y .1 . .. . -1 . 1 N ' in A l A . v.. 1 :Ayr .. ,. ,,4. 4. if ,. f ,, ,J an l in -f g,...,,s',l. fl f-ij' W- , ,ij,1..g.' JJEL Hutt if wil, .. ., , Eff li . ,Sv R'-PI!!- Maia Wifi? i xl-rl, Hai EMEA i HJ, ii, Myth' u, '-" . A ' , :gi l Sify? W . w.,A3,: X I -- Q. v rw..'i1l-i- ii.l'Q1gf-, an 'fksil 5 sjigfi if. J' Eff ' lxw.. +1 ,.'2' ,ARR iw' WI' If 'H vi V. nm 'iii 3' "1 - I 142 . K I .1 .1 ... . .I N n Trai If ' - . , l . .I xr 'M 'f 'K f' J l A V. 2,1 lie if X 5.44, I wi 2 'W .1 ' Q 7' ii, ' x ' -5' g , fR Zvi. ,M i f X 1.3-' n, F J, ng. ., M 512'- wi.:-J LH.l?',-5, ,Y r X Y, , ffislw-1... jV?,iiilMgi.v fi 'IM' ,MW i'f.'f4"N " swab icy, Wifi? row? llfvllf A 4 Yi, u- ,. ,r?f A '..., ii K 'fl 7 5 . 'V-5, " vga, Grl'L.ff,E'm+'i ' i., .. .Vin H., . Left to Right: 'Top Row-Hart, Emmoncl, Zaagsma, Rubin, Rechevsky. Second Row-Brzostowski, Jasionowski Gates, Huhn. Kull. MacDonald, Schreidell. Bottom Row-Donahue, Bryce, Nagler, Herr, Skorupski, Levin. ARTS AND SCIENCES Raymond O. Pilon, John M. Premeau, James E. Purcell, Irving Ra-dner, Ernest Rambaldi, Saul B. Reisner, Samuel Rechevsky, William P. Reiden, Max Robins, Daniel W. Robinson, George E. Roth, Victor A. Roudoy, Nathan D. Rubenstein, Nathaniel H. Rubin, Lyle W. Russell, Marcel A. Salive, Albert Saperstein, John J. Sauk, Paul J. Schafer, Charles G. Schneider, Lawrence Schreidell, Gerard J. Schulte, Charles M. Seth, Har' yard W. Shepherd, William J. Shook, Henry N. Sierant, Milton Silver' man, Barney H. Simmons, Francis E. Skehan, Henry J. Skorupski, William J. Slattery, George W. Smith. h - . -Q. a w ,feif,.,.,fg.:, 'f ' ,i-2, 5 VZ-I. 6 I I, n 1 J" if 1. Ava' ' .-J... 5, . A-A -.w v 1 N' , fi ri-Eiifwvfi.-gif .--5,5 --w my 'w - J, a,..-- :Q ,Y W .1'i,1 f.. f139J Le t to Right: Top Row-Gillctt, Smith. Shook. Second Row-Orrin. Last, Lehman, Nowack, Diem. Bottom Row-Rambaldi, Ottivaick. Burman, Gervais. Emmer. Pilon, Luchin. ARTS AND SCIENCES Harry C. Smith, Marshall G. Smith, lvlilford H. Smith, Charles D. Solovich, Bruce Somerville, Gerald I. Stepanski, Leonard H. Stern, Delos H. Stevens, George W. Stewart, Jack P. Stich, John G. Sullivan, Joseph E. Sullivan, Norbert J. Sullivan, Bernard I. Sweeney, Edward T. Sweeney, Harry W. Theisen, joseph Tocco, Granville I. Trinity, Iohn A. Trudell, Henry A. VanLooy, William P. Van Looy, Frank W. Vxfeightman, Law' renee Weingarden, Isadore Weinshelhoiin, Joseph R. Vxfeise, Thomas P. Wilcox, Nelson R. Williams, David Wollif, John E. Young, Alexander H. Zaagsma, Joseph L. Zemens, Victor A. Zurakowski. H., , . , .I-.L I I 3' 9 aa .l T' i-'HL' 'I,..gg?e -if, iff. l l 'J 4 I mi' .. -Ag " Clfrk li 'w Tx' a , 'ly'-.3 i 7 l -V 4. gli- 1 i 1 Elf 1' .4521 'UL Qu 4' 1,.' 'ln 1' 1' 1 V G' :ij !"" Q' ff il iff--3 -,I Qnify 5i'iT"w rife? H. glfffeik il 1, -'A' 15:1 Y Q-3 X . .- Qi 3'--2 i ,iff I H' ,LL ai ,.iLr1'- ,-Ll'-f' lei!! , . . 1.2 35" -'lt' . f -F, Y., J fl401 sarah- 4.4, , ., 'R J L5 F , 1-i .AA ,.- - .... -. , Ui, 1-.lla-a.'Ffv...wp1-Ti ..-:'ff5' . J . ' f L r--- r Y-...i-' :. ,i - - . . . - . . ir- -. :" I Q ,J 11. Q. l x"'F'4"fii . L Wg' I4 H ' ..'u' 11, v 4335, ...f ,,-f'1g'ai4f ,FIRE li Mm +i ,ku ,L . il ,Y iilfii I' Fi fr' . .Z wwf if ,fi Liga. ,.- ,gl fi. levi- if iffy., -Cr. .r"i".. '. If fw,".... Vi l..-'n 3' ' ir r I. Q A.-N, Vo VW f ii-. i ,. X m il 1 . W ' " ,lf . 1:13 l .lx I . ,im f'1!y,i' " il-f W l ' 5. I ,. 5 3 J l ,. 'X l i-Q. 4-' . .. ,'i, .4 1, .fini ,, If -5 .ai , r NE Vg, ..i i -fa, ' . i ' 'I lf F f ai-,iw .F 3-sg, . V, , -. lib,-di 1l+1'!n'2T,5 WFl:':f'.,'j Ii gfflgfvi l if ,Lf iff' 4? -E51 fr,-ipgri, .f5.,lY4,yEl,f i I - , Left to Right: Top Row-Curley, Goldernick, Clark, Gapczynski, O'Connor, Kraussman. Second Row-Gignac, Green, Fenlow, DuPuis. Third Row-Mittledorf, Mason, Katz, Goodrich. Roberts, Dolan. Fourth Row-Gersten Finucane, Cornford, Derby, Gallagher, Gettinger. Parker. Bottom Row-Cooney, Epstein, Meyer, Elliot, Whiting, DeWitte, Sparling. DAY CCMMERCE AND FINANCE Norman Alistin, Edward M. Andries, Robert W. Babcock, Charles H. Barnes, Willis L. Baser, George H. Beach, Frank I. Beechler, Ralph F. Bell, Edeep I. Bellamah, Abe A. Biderman, Anthony F. Blaszkiewicz, Frank Bliss, Robert A. Boggiano, Juan B. Bonoan, Iullian S. Borninski, Frank I. Brady, jack Brannack, Joseph A. Briehl, Roberta Brown, William D. Buchanan, Clarence G. Buchta, Edward I. Burkard, Carroll A. Bur' . ,.. rw ,M ,,. Q Y' 9911- '-V' Pill .-4"T T, 'f.-. .'-.f'Ti' 7' ' -' .. - A... ,inf E . ,. . 2,-.,.,.,.b Q LV, x -rn .',.1, . , nt . LEU! V I A l. 4 'ii . I 1 ii .V , v.,,. i . ...f, .Y -, 3 . .gr vi ..i.,. .a,-7 E. -X .Nh .I- ..,. I f. ...pf 411.9 l- 1. - - - W 5 i' Q-1',',f,,3g, roughs, William H. Buss, John P. Campbell, john P. Cannon, Richmond F. ,gi ii Q 'V . . . . . N -- Carey, Charles Cayelli, Nicholas J. Chylinski, Morris I. Clark, john E. "", if ' - - Clemington, Martin W. Cody, Robert B. Condon, Robert M. Conway, l?,,1fL'1'A .lm 4 A I :yi-i ,gf George A. Cooney, Howard W. Cornford, Ashley S. Coy, Grace P. Crider, W-l's,rg+ 'figfi Eileen M. Crowley, James P, Cruise, Leo T. Curley. J if H gf! V Mm 1 :"":'iP was . ifgiff. Gi 1 i'3:'i.iT I' afgllkfr' V 1 , 5.3.2.2 ,mjawx . Nia sn 1 in wlgqxr,-X"-1en:...,u-Z , ,, ,H I ,. - 1 ax v ',,,- 4,-wr ., . . a 'N Q. ff? .,"'X"'1. :Y ,fi 'lg ji ,bi-4"Qf 'jgzff' , f ,1 :T 'Ra wwf-5'-.EE , n ,ig-. if Hai' id'-5 1 -GQ'-:f , zFAf'T'iG'v,,4':T1'-- f 1 . lf- i' il 21 ' K...-i "'l'e"' rf .i-, f "li-umfak,,4.-waff- 5 141 1 X , ,5.,'.. ,V 1: - ' ":f.,,': X' :4 .- . . .ft ,,' V '.i,"",I1.,I,,,i'fT.::1'AfD!:'..,. ts'-Y ' ... Kyfrg cl ,I .-, 4 nf'- . H' ,, ay. V if. ,...V a..f',a'v-,.,.,, . .. , vm ., .i,U'n'1v'- f 4.4. - ,V .gr .,f , f -, I, fer F V 52.4-"K 'vial-,,Ffi? -1,,..,.4 Q- PM , vi wif '24 fluff! ., .PY-'1A,1 , ga. f' ff 'LAKE , ,.,,, lawd .sri My J, E? My ,rgrLj'i- 595: B' :frig s 1 ns 5' J ,. i . W 1' . if ff: 1 L E' 13 'QA 55" 41,-. qggiili nl if' "1 5 WI .H ' ' fu" " in-' 5512 J S "J 1 ..' J, 4. I 'f WI J, iv' 4.3 yi 1' rv L,-.A-S Q' 'L ,. s .. . fx .ful-Lg.. ii Q J' ry, ' -lu J ". s ' hi IH, L. .fr .,. 'x ,-6 'rl lFf'5 Le t to Right: Top Row-Sheehan, Sonnhalter, McGraw, Blaskowitz, Sheets. Second Row-Skalitsky, Sullivan, Sullivan, Rodman, Stein, O'Connor, Wayne. Third Row-Thompson, -1-, Solomon, Zalimini, Shaunessey, Rayder, Barminski. Bottom Row-Temchin, Verbeist, Rossman, Teubert, Dunner, Polagyi, Ulberg. 3EiL :fFf". 5-if-,ll .FWF 1 lptfilfg lr "-31'-if DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Mary F. DeGalan, Harry W. Derby, Cswald J. DeWitte, James F. Dillion, :ii . . fl .'l ivy Wilfred J. Dittman, Leonard W. Dolan, Thomas Dolan, John A. Douglas, Gif,-Q . 5... Helen C. Doyle, James P. Dream, Edward J. Duffy, Solomon C. Dunner, "-I Frederick J. Dupuis, Eva J. Elliott, Jack Epstein, Hilario L. Estrada, James Qsfiffi J. Fenlon, Estelle A. Fenlon, George J. Fierer, Edmund S. Finucane, Ar' QQ thur J. Finzel, Jerry E. Fisher, John B. Fox, Charles Futterman, James C. . . . . -IJ F Gallagher, Edward M. Gapczynski, Nicholas H. Gendernahk, Milton Gersf ton, Francis A. Gettinger, Wilfred L. Gignac, Jack W. Gleason, Eli Gloss' . . . . . . 1?-Y, man, Rosaline Golclsteen, Miriam L. Goldstein, Frederick L. Goodrich, iifgi' Edward F. Gracy, Catherine Graffius, James H. Green, Louis Greenberg, Ruth Greenberg, Carlton E. Gregg. ,wp All", ll fx:"'??3 no 2 6592 tix? X. Tffif Hs r exif ' ' J . ea, ' ,,,-In f142J -f"'- -w"'x .s fu. fgvf - -. 1, W -A ' . ., - 'J 'F'-J"5 "4 in -lui' .-f' f A 51-'X-.iff 4' 1. ',,5-l I-. hm nu: -M. '- If , 'N' N s " -'n-5 Y '5 , l V fl U 'Q , ,,,, . , , h.,,,:,2g.tQ,,v,:,,,1,Lf ,I A .1 , , fy H . e r ww .1 --L -4 few ref' le? 'J Tiff 1 iw -A f' Q3 mf! J 9 rf A271 .Q My la Q, lb ,rp l WJ L -ul l 4 Iwi --1 15551 .'-is 'MQ l I -31:9 Jail lea 2 in Qi! - ' x 6 J' ill s...J iff, A ,-5g.:.L '.f:,,-fr' s '- .. 'ea V Left to Right: Top Row-Stackpoole, Campbell, Dillon, Condon, Schmidt, Wallinberg. Second Row-Carey, Beach, Buss, Tusciny. Third Row-Biderman, Barnes, Baser, Chvlinski, Caille, Vfhalen, Mallot, Griffin. Bottom Row-wBeechler, Steger, Matgen, Crider, Marlowe, Perry, Buckley, Brady. DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Elmer W. Gruss, William E. Guina, Pyrle Hart, Catherine M. Hartman, Victor F. Hartzell, George D. Hatie, Harold R. Haven, Edward K. Heglin, Frederick O. Heid-en, Frederick H. Hein, Cecil F. Henderson, Moren J. Heric, George N. Howell, Ruth Ava Hunt, William H. Hutchins, Newton Jackson, Francis E. Jarvis, Fred O. Jenney, Austin E. Johnston, David P. Katz, John V. Keefe, Raymond J. Kelly, Wayne H. Kelly, Alfred L. Kent, Levi D. Keifer, Eugene V. Kirchgessner, Earl E. Klebba, Frances M. Kline, Monica M. Kondratovicz, Theodore A. Koski, Russell E. Lagarge, Leopold A. Labinski, Stanley C. Larson, Louis Lavine, Dorothy L. Lowry, Alexf ander J. Lutz, Francis W. McCormick,,Thomas R. McCormick, Franklyn E. McDonald, Sheldon W. McGraw. s 4 mf. 7' i f ,7 RL" 55,15 Q'f'1l7x -Lefflif 519.3 eii- li 1' L lil' fQiE,ii'w:J in-'fri 1 A54 5' 1 5 , l M4 ,,. 40 ,L hx ., ff' l 11 1'-,Vg "h31-1,,- i A r 'ff fill K, 1 :dw ll fwfllf 1 .ful l.f4.ll,v' "M, 'vw 'C' 4 A -, aff. . ay V -film . .f..1'e M.. Tm w I 1 ff?-aj J'- .M L 9' Q 'Q' if eff? f. " ' s Us-" U wi w f, 1, J l., l Je.'41i1',' A, 'x' . W, J J 'el is .r--J: .: , liuilflil-ii ,7.'.,.fQjFQi,i V A if ffm gfw,f1 Jiri? 'l nigga 1, gg V ,. J 'xlfglf A J 7 ., i., 61333, . ,. . fi vflfil n""'x ' 'lv iffflfi lvlgbvalx 1 wi a kg? 1 if J, ami f2gl1e,e'.f QW 111.gif ' N549 f x ,-1.11 ll lnhf Lf all 4 Tub f lf, fl' , fi M 'gjisfilk ,l .J gel C 1 ,ffl 7: . QV .131 Q, MJ V af. ff' -. Kfexfi J X ld? 135' 'J AF "f',p1'P'r. Jfg,a,,., is . .nf ' , 'jvff , f""f:. 'fy ,:g,.,f"1 Q. fp asf .1 , ,.i",," . Y .- I ' - , " .ifgiu-3 s . L", r ', ,',"f T g , , 327, ,'f:jfsf"."f. ', .HL if-ff'-' I-' "' '55-s?liQq,Q4fm,?f4c' 'ffm giifiiflf' " l lf' 1 - 4 -f' 2 :P-rig 45' 1-1 av.: :if-L. ll-'zfflffffif '31 .N 1.1 N-iw filo 'Vi is , ,l ali . ' 'L' lllgnii if ..f'si'1?f :N A'f3.wfz":fQ,'nI A ll .. 3'i.s'wf'w aft-QSlSf,11f5f:"-1 rises. 44 QQ ll I J isa -l P-swf-Z J x -V -- 1-Y -.kfclggyavf fjxhrn .qiglgfww-,"s,D,-' -,,,'l 4' av if .f --'mu fu J 'kv 45,1 14.449 'img-,, f-S,-is-f cffsfemef -QNJJL .,-' 1' ,: ' L+ 'gs-4 J' 14-SJ nl if 1. , l-As 5 -mcg,-wf., .C -. 'W J" f---.. .A- " , 1152551 A511 !fkW'ZZ?7:W'i'K22..F'gvg-t:fi 'J' . , 75.52" Elf: Q' ki'-'?'.rf'1, ' yr' 'k5"nQ-KT7., W " - 5- 515' S"e"+::f:f' as 11522:-is " s:f,..Zw5 V fir? ,F -L iflff WE if FW ' P .rf l 89. 442,12 WQQ' 'I ,mi if Q 71 M25 f all 5' ,Q-if . .L Ks 'E 5 W in-v , -yy., 11555 5--'ijl v..w.t-V i. Q' i: 3: Y . SSM? 4' ,p . V I ' f J' Al-Y ,, . l. ' .-4.5. f. - J" -ff 1 X' rr ' I 4 2- .4 ' 1 ,Q Left to Right: Top Row-Burkard. Second Row-Fournier, Miller. Babcock, Bonoan. Third Row-Austin, Q-H1 i . Butcher, Ryan, Heatherson. Fourth Row-Boggiano, Goldsteen, Graffius, Goldstein, Andries. Hallahan. Bottom Row-Greenberg, Fenlon, Kondratovicz, Hunt, Kline, Doyle, Meyer. Hartman. DAY CCMMERCE AND FINANCE Chester B. McGregor, Robert N. McLaughlin, George R. Mabley, Sigf muncl J. Mack, William A. Macldock, Francis G.,Maher, Forest J. Malott Anthony T. Maniere, Florean J. Manteuflel, Louis V. Marks, Lucien A Marleau, Hortense E. Marlowe, Stewart S. Mason, Marcella M. Matgen William C. Mayville, Dell E. Mead, Margaret E. Meyers, James J. Miller Marcel V. Miller, Max Miller, Victor Miller, Jr., Clarence J. Minor 7 7 J 3 Q f. - v nw . lv i J . . W. 'f fl. ,. ' ' gr Ffh vi . '44 S4 , ,i fr A' , . ..-A . vf,1,f,. FM- 4,1 ,J -v",a .JF ,, 1' 'J ry "X Ig H 1'. L5 4' I 'lp-. .A E ll 'gl X I , 2 Nfki af WL, r. .,,.. Abraham C. Mittenclorf, Elizabeth Montgomery, James E. Montreuil, ng: Clifford R. Morris, Earl R. Motok, George E. Mousseau, Robert A. lfgghx J' JP" ' . sm" li QQgf',iF Munson, Fred S. Muttaler, Leo J. Murphy, Louis J. Murphy, Max L. ,Egg ilfflf' Myers, Joseph H. Nebel, George Nebus, Mary L. Nelius, Harold Nelson, L L" Joel C. Nelson, Jessie Newman, Marjorie Nickel. ,-4. 1 813 'fs 'JH W Wx, , ., 'll A Q, 2.52, M-. ,Z , 55" ." lj ISK., 4 fl .. ffeifg Vi' J ,PEL ' 'T Y . F"ff"ff7fl.3l":iif?2? 'f'i92??i?fi'fff53ff'l3 . 51443 fi'-'if-i , '-Q-0, ""w.f'f'f " --ri' ij- - 4 TRW ,I .,f,5,i1iP.i .- wry L 1- A ,ag J My l I " M 1 Lil 1. " if L: 5-Q 3 gs iid? asia -415 Wi 'E 5:2 C Mi' il: H NQLH 4 'I :Jug Mlsfr lt Lia ,F -liflliffi ll l. ' l ill :,vu 5 -HH J ,vp evyul so ,ml , 'fi -f- 'lZ',,':f"fy f 4 vu .f,,. ill? 1 f 1' if 'pill'-3' I nv. if al' ll' "TT l ff vi .. ,i-'P I iilzf-i fini ' gwrl' fry Nil, 1 ,-. f W! - 1 lgiljlgts 7 n f',--. w -' 'lf-3' Y ."ie1'Tf, A I: ' no so- 'Ali - C115 ,ff .1 as 3? l ,-40 ,PH M 5 QKUQI igffk, Q. 'Ni .llail . K' stiff, , i, iiillegia .- iz, K, . if if 9' N .affiaw X A i P+- ' 1. 1 -. ' .pi-13,-l i-"L Q, gp ., as ,ff-v .. ...W .-,,,w,,- i..,,,, . W . I 1,-1. -' ii P il fi? R ll ,-'5 ' 'A 1 . 1 .., a ,Y , ,ii - fi J, E f 4 1 Hg My ig- 4' 'xii-lj . '--' l- :U ik - it . A", l'z'llp1i- .Mil -,. M i i. r 'J .wg-ig ,. 7 lv. 4 ,, pi X 'l':, 1 -. . . ig, Left to Right: Top Row-Mead, Sindelyn, Nebel, Scliachern. Second Row-Miller, Phillip, McGregor, Purcell, ,QWJJA Reiser, Rollins. Third Row-Minor, Maniere, MacDonald, Woods, Richard, Rubenstein, Scheidt. Bottom Row-Haven, Miller, McLaughlin, O'Connor, Rose, Marleau, Rampe. nfij .1 f DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Donald C'Connor, Gabriel C'Connor, Phil Orrin, Stephen A. Palagi, Harold Parker, Jerome Parle, William Pernes, Robert Parsaca, Robert .ft ' 'pw-A Q 9 John Patterson, Charles N. Pearson, Leon A. Perlinski, Kathleen R. Perry, 'L . i x1 .I .,,. H Homer A. Phillips, Robert W. Phillips, George R. Purcell, Anthony P. Pytlevicz, Paul Rampe, Theodore N. Rayder, M. Catherine M. Reilly, John B. Reiser, Frank A. Richard, Lapier G. Ringholz, Donald E. Roberts, Jack J. Rodman, Leo Rollins, Henry M. Rose, Charles M. Ross, Bert D. ,,,.g,g.,, Rossinan, Philip I. Rubenstein, Joseph G. Ryan, Katherine Ryan, Hazel J' lt' ff vi Eff I-gr 312 .Tig mg, We gif-H1 W. J ,, ,,.:1i,, ffiliiw' .-kg gr, X i- :Am .L 5, 1 . . . X 4, 1, M. Sam -e ames Schachern Michael Scheidt, Harold C. Schimer Ed' A , P Ya s a al. . . . , ,il pf ' mund A. Schmidt, George S. Schweineberg, Jack W. Segwalt, Eugene ing? it . ,jgf p V. Seifert, Mark J. Shaughnessy, John R. Sheehan. img ja, l, ll 354,25 'I I 'LJ in iaifij-r-. J S ,qw i l gif fl' 'cf . ,ai--4 nf'-.., . zijf' , " . ' Fra. A . TNT ii f at 1053 if-f?+ifw. iii 'i-F-if? gfiff'-.ie'Qg,'4QQLg1gi f'1v-:Tsai if?f'1J?l.lif-523 Q3 ' .. 5 If 244 if kv' .. .3'M-safer:-fr'-tr'-f-24..L-czaiqafff -1-M deff so-'fsavrf armw-f i--,a.f.a-fa aw., W'viu,.v,,,,gviv" , f145J cf "U, 5: 1, . -A A 1 nil' ' ' ,- 1, ' '--Q J ,F 2- Ar. -1 .. 5 fu-..,'C,5ga,'5S 1 " JANQSL fwpzfifsr-ect. w:i.1,i.f.tJ 'mf' ahh.. 4 ,J -4. - up .mil im. lfphyi ' " i..'f'h ,,..w 1 1695 i . Y 1 ' 'fig , . Left to Right: Top Row-O'Connor, Cannon, Holbit, Gleason, Halleck, Johnston. Second Row-Krausman, McCormick, Newton, Jackman, Jenney, LeBarge, S. Larson. Third Row-Lutz, Labinski, Murphy, Kelley, Hattie, Heiden, Morris. Bottom Row-Lloyd, Hutchins, Kirchgessner, Marks, McCormick, Klebba, Kent, Jarvis. DAY COMMERCE AND FINANCE Frank J. Sheets, Thomas I. Simpson, Frank J. Singelyn, William J. Ska' litzky, Alfred J. Smith, Michael Smith, Sidney R. Solomon, William E. Sonnahalter, Joseph Soron, Robert D. Squires, John D. Stackpoole, Martin G. Starr, Bernhart J. Steger, Sol I. Stein, George A. Stephan, William E. Strable, Ignatius D. Sullivan, James Sullivan, Bernard J. Summer, Max W. Temchin, Jack W. Teuhert, David D. Thompson, Lenten G. Tomlinson, Alphonse S. Tuchevvicz, Ralph E. Tuscany, Cornelius J. Ulberg, Michael A. Van De Keer-e, Yvonne C. Vander Ecken, John E. Verbiest, Modesto R. Visaya, Joseph L. Wagener, Thomas C. Walker, Joseph R. Weise, James J. Whelan, Mary Catherine Whiting, William J. Williams, Robert A. Wollenherg, Howard Woods, Frank Yakovick, Anthony P. Zalimeni, Paul Zuckerman. rg, J if ufftil A is il ' .3 fiisr 1J -x . f. k af 'ff :Vg 1 tw. hiiifi gsf3?f aft? ,135 9, "2 w'gn-5 1 i 41.-5,5 -4 1 1 it.-4 J-' r 'uyfgfut '1--if J 1' 4 , ,. , ,JB W LL fi li, ':'i,l.! V.. i, , ,- '. THU' ,, i rl. , . ,L irsfii i u 75 , .. 'filly Q, ' ifyyz 'Qi . 23. Y' r -'iff'-2.1 ! 1 V . ,Y 'if Fa-" F 55 .ll ,K J. 5.4 fi: if Fiji Ra gg aiu 'vi,.'.. 49" IVSNA " find .K ig: in .xii i -. a . . ',f'if.1'Q! Qt3g4g nf' nge Yjigrlf' i'Ei. 7 Yr. ,, 1' R3 D 'I vi, J '.".f"W liyivi ir,-r 'L 5,1 A-Q,lQ,j J F' fig, . ,szgfgjl ': if Q . i' J J 53531 fag' 5 'lf I. ,--1 17. Y 'tlrsigbhl r f J-3 fi ,. , 1 wif. -352K f-21.551 ,wh L .' 35249 J .i 'M FR J 3 . all "riffs", lli"w :U U LIN' 1131 .TV 1 53-luv-, .'.:.,X 4,-l' il 7i'9'l"'5'Q 22:-MJ 3"-:jf ri .- J ,ii li-, 1 -- rs:Mf-Aww-S in? iwtvfi .. i 1 ' ,,:.-" asgslf 'Ei.1Q'T.'-J-..i .?irf7 J146J W. -i ,. 4 "1 'X i ,mp '-. nl .- I, 5 .f mf ' ff i-ev' . f U ww .A l',. V' 'H' 'fl . U' 1, L WW' 'rg' A :' t 4 'J -1 . 2 i V." fi? ' '-,an J' .'.'.-'53 1 -c ,' ,QQ-. 5' I' lv . . ', . il Q NT '.'?,.-Xp' e lr u ' ll. 1 ll 1 ww in 1 Q S, Zjiz' f ' I a -.1 H J 1.41 +iNME ., . Nm '-r.- li 4' '4"',Q'. lf? l:'."," , I -s.. -. .al H i-,!,J,.". if-yr 's fe-fill' 'i 'x 'fn ,tr l 'i -. 5 ,ii . vf',fn,-'I . an . M' 1 A "x 1, ,gn lg 1' flsl '-"1 . .f ,HL 5 LV, 1 l .il'J' A A":-7" Vsjszgk, V' ig 1-his P1 J' N.. 1L.X'5'f1'. fs. . " y ii .,.-,RL-gi fy . 1 3.f"l-' - 4 1 .-,k 0. l4ff?5,.i5y.l ,N-'l. i M, H. it ff ,lg ,lj :mai Juli' ilfi UU' he ew. fll lsfji W' T '1 fl' J lf' il' v , wi H .lx B , PQ' 15 f ff bi-It ,:f,w,.w M in An QR. E, 4:- 3 wil' Left to Right: Top Row-Diver, Lightner, Hoffman. Dadson, Purchas, Sands, Wiseman, Apfel, Ager. Second Row-Bentkowslci, Partridge, Rape, Kennedy, Yingling, Kenna, Clark, Clemens, Benn, Mullen, Essi. Bottom Row-Tabor, Copenhager, Krause, Cislo, Townsend, Slater, Hutmacher. ENGINEERING Anthony J. Adams, London V. Agnew, Allan G. Agree, Sam E. Ager, Gordon Aitchinson, Robert E. Allan, Walter B. And-erson, Joseph M. Andrus, Joseph Apfel, John E. Arnold, Reuben Axelrod, David W. Ayers, Wylie E. Bailey, Clyde K. Balsley, Nathan Balter, Kenneth M. Barber, Wilford H. Barnhardt, Harold J. Barnhorn, Roscoe N. Baughman, Wilf bert C. Baum, joseph M. Beat, Clayton D. Beattie, Charles P. Bedell, Marion J. Beer, Carl Beitner, Frank S. Belch, Floyd W. Belmer, Richard B. Benn. . 1... . X . v. 11: ., , - - it gf-46 1 fmg. r 1 RJ.:-,.: 'lf..f"?w G "Qf"!3,r V., ' 'lvl .,,' -I. ,"'K'g,v.,f:' ' 'A If 1 ,.,, X f.. C Lili ,"- ,, r- . W ::1'f!ff'i J . , ..5 .lx . 1 . , ff... 1 . ea,--., .. .. . .,. if 511-554' -slkp ., 'J -.1-Q. 1 .H . , n ,..- I1471 a . 4 X ,.. E' lx ll -r ,,f, , 1 11.1 M wg K' 5. 'Q l rl 1.1 Q A .4 ig, .w . Q-k ,vvl 5,3 '.S f- u . rj- .,f-' fry - , V. .K r, fl, . .N -5 gm-91 '1 gl.- W. 'fi W. in r. rut., ,iv ,ff uw .sq r J 3 ,,. A V sg. N, , -A , ., V ,P- L fi ,sg---.g,c--..T . -,ffl f.. ff " A re A- H . - 9-.W i-25,9 Pdf' , L W 3,49 fi 51.425 1' 3' ,.g3'jjxj.jv, gi ,- f.-' .VM '11, rr, .,IP2--...fl-1' f rwif vpn .i - , .- .- . 4-.U -.. -,lv gm " iwww f-1.9 -.Q '- L '- if Left to Right: Top Row-Frederickson, Christensen, Hetrich, Knyzewski, Otermat, McBrayne, Householder, Greenwood. Second Row-Lemmer, Kochinowski, Walker, LaRou, MacDonald, Johnston, Buist, Rosingana, Michelin. Bottom Row-Goldenberg. McDonald. Lathrem, McCann, Mantz, Sussman, Hallahan. ENGINEERING Witold E. Bentkowski, Howard C. Bentley, Louis Berkowitz, Maxwell Bernard, Kinder K. Bishop, Roger I. Blandford, Philip I. Blundy, lohn W. Boate, Glennon P. Boehm, Charles A. Bohland, Craig E. Bolton, Norbert B. Boucher, lohn D, Brazil, Clarence N. Bronder, Norman ql. Brown, Norton M. Brown, Eugene L. Buchman, Burnett XV. Buist, Bernard J. Bryne, John B. Bryne, Gilford W. Calhoun, lose Cancio, NVilf liam M. Capstick, Patrick J. Carolin, Robert P. Cartier, Russell A. Case, Andy G. Chek, Sam Chosid. K i .J wr, '-- mm .1 if ' Uffiih J fl-' m liar r -.rr ll 'FTA ' K , ,s Ri ggs 4 'Ms We .. V li 'wif .Ll six, ii-' els-fm, E -.r' if Dlfillewlf if -KA.-1. .1 p .-S ...i r K. jg "i'T'f' 'sg' ., ' 4l.." .ir .r . -5. K .fp A wif- f ':'WfM' 17. . rf li L, f, K ,Q Ai,T.,:Y,' 1- mt-- .'l , ' I ' V , ,' -I Q':'l 1 1 . 1 , ' Q 'nw f . L- 4. V , lr Y L 1 e L f, 1 Q. .' .. Y .lf 'B , A ll' 1 'Kg Q2 .rQ,ff, . 'N-S A' pau, l?i1.7V-A , 'ww X , . K in 23 . fur 3.115 'X 31? ffbjjif l'1.gg'.f at 7 'if' . g SGP' .145 lffggfg 'Pix 5. .pb . ..-5, I ,- ,.',- ., . , , N ,, 59' W JH 3,2 'T' -. Y- Vifii'-J-V " r f- -SV: '.-' ','.yl"'- ,' '- E" 'f:,ff,L1 F' in 1? rj-.it 3' . 1 ,V -is .th -',LV..,w+l. 134 41.2 :.- .Ll 1 'xiii 4 -gl!3'g.Lg J .-:NL ,,.:q, -Q -mx, A..-5,3 I N Ly 'b thnx Lv., j'-4.'.Llj?,, gg qxjgjf P,,,jj,'f1' f 1- -- -' ' A-1 if v b - -J 15,-.1 pw' V ,ff -,, 'aa' ' '-f' ' for 51483 ,, 'f ,V ssl . . . IQ Q" X L. lf-L fs. Q .- a., lpllll '1'..'a Q! .f ,, Vi -is f.-.4f.H ,Q f A 'f 1 't 44' .. .lf 44" l lf: K 1. l I uf, v xg! ,M l. ..'. . 21-.V , . '4 f."l4' ll- .I 3' fklr . 1 Left to Right: Top Row-Van Collie, VanRyh, Cullen, Naumann, Frazer, Murga, Nebel, Laethrem Pennel F s O l ' r K l l hi . rl! . 3: ra , ' RW it .3ifi'!f fill f mf My Qkijgx H? "lr, Q l 1123? xflllrgrf 'rp 1 F13 tif Fifi Wuxi' em M f-- .Ln k'1i3f"'.. Griffin. Second Row--Belch, Emery, Simmonich. Lundgren, Roh, Berkowitz, Price, Mason, Adams, Jaminey Harris. Bottom Row-Svobodo, Trattner, Agree, Seltzer, Wardell, Lipscomb, Wilson. ENGINEERING Jotindra M. Chowdhury, Henry C. Ciesluk, Stanislaus J. Cislo, Cornelius H. Clark, Raymond M. Clark, Theodore O. Claus, William A. Clements, Luciano Coluccio, Sidney I. Commer, Frank I. Condon, Stephen Conlogne, Theodore M. Connolly, Tom G. Conway, Edgar T. Cook, Cleo F. Copenf haver, Floyd H. Cornely, David E. Cosgriff, Auguste D. Coyle, Thomas P. Creagh, Richard L. Creighton, Charles E. Crispo, Harry W. Crowe, Chas. 1. Csizmanshky, Robert L. Cullen, John L. Cunningham, Fred W. Dadson, lohn Daro. W 'Ki,!?4,1""v9,,,kQ3fg..fl.'jq,gi'xQifrit.. mrpgi yi 'vggzl'-:Isl '1.'4" .uf Q -nl' fi " ff-l if' 'ii ll 'lkfldff' is..- ,wmi 9m.i RMWH - t" M sg, ...A-dj. ,.L.,.. swat- A..-1 -- f 51491 NJ" 4.15 fr, .. I Q." ,L W ' f. , . ,D 1 J -mwfvn H i ' -. ' "'ffH5.,Q,?1," 'f' if 'l'?,f.vl:wf flvjlfr -wr. ' ,,j2- .ff . JY:-V ,..,FN.v:fsvfn ,af ,, f wx, 1, . -1 g r, . . .r an hx .. - f 'v:4,.-'Y vi-'gp swag A! Q '51 I Left to Right: 'Top Row-Morsey, Hutchinson, Fenner, Commer, Holmes, Mancewicz, Cartier, Robitaille. Bottom Row-Listman, Ehrlich, Rohrig, Tegler, Zezula, Meyner, Leiner. ENGINEERING Paul R. Degman, Ray W. Denis, Edward Derclr, Lawrence I. Des' Champs, Chauncey I. DiLaura, George A. Dimmer, Albert E. Diver, James L. Dogman, Michael Dragon, Edward C. Dudzinski, Francis A. Dumas, Brown S. Easton, Earl hl. Eckel, Theodore I. Ehrlick, Thomas N. Eickhorst, Arthur I. Eldis, Leo F. Elichek, Norman E. Ellis, Harold L. Emery, Cliver D. Engle, Gunnar C. Erickson, Walter A. Erni, Philip Essi, Francis L. Evans, Iames R. Evans, Warren C. Fairchild, Clarence F. Falkner, Eugene F. Farrell. 2 .A-77 , 8,1 E .. , "v ,1 'f"'7-2-f ,. W, , , ' ",f'mgf .af i -gg. u --. wwf- -wav. .-:fi -Ji I-Q' l afn, ' u ' "4- V -'f . .if Jvrlfli-fd, l Qsiflfl ijgal vii Ml r-,,, LIB: f To li 'iillkilizla 'rift . '41, ,gall if ' 'fini ' l fi lily? Fr 3 il, . ' -13 -, .f by f if'-" an fm 1 : lg a fi!" r Ji llllfl' .nw ,- 'iff ffl L' 'ff iw ii alll-LLL." 4+ , llhhfa A .x l -, -.T r ve. 2,11 PD. vllg' .4 1' a X 1 421.22 .,..x .N--I Q' f1'i'.g" aviwlfi' T, '11 ig lf i' , Q. 53: .F 'nga f ,nd TCE' wr' 4 if .-'ff Q1 14' 'WITL-ff is wif :Av in l' . fi 1 gui i ir v ' ' fxlir 'A 9145, ik 1, 38.1, 5 5-llfsl ', S-.,,fj':. fi- llrfiii a iii ah 'fs-,ji Aa' :YJ NM Gil' ,.. V 1 v." ifV'l?s 51.55 Elf' Q32 if 'i ffftal 'Lf' J ,,.,,. A ,fa Qs T131 .,, . s., ,. V., V - , fp H ., -,g,-T, , ie- ui iw 1 P M l ' . A 1,111 ' 'Egret lf ' - .J ',.- nfava 'ff Q., .1 ,N Ii ' " if fisoi ...-' arf' J- ,. 'EG Y ,,- AW,---.i . ff' - .4 , ,, Q V "gff1"l'g -gh, f""":, Iwi' ,V tiff' 1 ,A Y - -Q if .2191-v -inf.,-v W 4,11 -i ss- I , Ms... . . A --ff' 1 - ,- -. -,ii ' e. mi I 2:22, f lfflf lf' . cal? C .J 72-.Q 3 lfrf, fj 9,55 - Rv liz? ill? if X' lllw '. .v . RTK ,G 4 V . Jan lm! 1194! l Waif I M'?'E'7i1 llif., ' 5 YQ lifts? ' F E ff . S-Fila 1. . a. .t V . 51' H354 . YQE .5. iw lg ,5 wi -Q we X . ' T. lil' 5,,g,lv5'. ff? ll sid! li 'sf LW L, . '. 3 Q T roll 41, sw Rl r sg iggiva E A rx. ,-... is. , . - rf, z- - - l - Mu W,-, 3--fif,gsQ,,,..Y-", 'ff' 'mr-,i V' V. . fl 1 4 fe- -'-- :gg J -' win," - i, " . . Left to Right: Top Row-Hubbard, Squires, Doman, Paddock, Manning, Schwartz, Farrell, Thomas. Bottom Row-Yagiela, Axelrod, Hessler, Aprunger, McFarland, Wagner, Degman. ENGINEERING Lawrence R. Farrell, Norman F. Fenner, George I. Fierer, Fenton G. Forbes, Eddie Fossen, Arthur H. Fraser, Theodore R. Fredrickson, Harry A. Friedericks, Earl M. Gallagher, Lloyd M. Gaynes, Gharles E. Gies, Albert H. Girardi, Paul J. Glaser, Russell I. Gleason, Michael I. Glynn, Moe M. Goldenberg, Natan N. Goldenberg, Theodore P. Golm, Ray L. Goodenow, William H. Goodspeed, Garlton E. Gregg, Nat. Green, Wilhs I. Green, Bruce F. Greenwood, George E. Griffin, Robert W. Griffin, ' Glifford 0. Guerin, Ioseph Gurski. v..-ir,-v' mn .,-1, f -Riffs'-r 'f'f",-fziw ,Q-ihlf-A -iimw ,"2.f'if1-f- " , , " rf-3? Q fr :,LT1.?EpJ:l:.i'3,'g 4 J X,-flaFv17,Eg,-I4fw1,q?l,4 75? ,I f E rw . if .J 7 , . A Y 1 2 X 1 ' 1w.,'v 1 i.' .Jul 'i.:p1.f ' "' swf" ...i v'-Q.. - . , " 1 , . rg ,,.f,lJ",,15 g?d,.gg:1r,,rG4'l,A ,.,".J,..,---7.1fg- H3 L A,,,!..,,.. f - . . iv., . lf.- .EW f -. . . .- ,..,,A fwwdw-,. --. f 1-si 1 , . S , lil fuu- .v .Q 4 ,,. lf 0: 1, " -.1 ,M il'-5 my 4, H... fi W. Ar -. .pg 4 . vi I 'Qi . P' , lm lslf l gh Fl W ,limi W' T nf ' Z 1 F1 1 .V Vll , 4 vial' ,gi ,ff ,xi 1 N , . . Lb, . II EA R lL .iz .' r' ' l 'Dil ..,g .,, 1 llrljlh' W, 111 Fil.. 1 A. ml. if X , J- , 5 l '45 fy, ,ws V+.-' -'v .IP !4,. :gl 4 lm!-. 'Vrl .Q U' 2 .,. -s l' w .r- .elf .51 Y . 4 -wr .rj-:T i f." rr l F 'faq k-f I 'L 4 it . ig! H, an '1 Q. ,ral L lla' if f 1 .J af 4. e. ff Left to Right: Top Row-Crispo, Cosgrifl, Jamison, Stawski, Johnston, Boehm. Second Row-Theriault, Stevens, Whelan, Cancio, Evans, McDonald, Hunter. Bottom Row-Barnhardt, Balter, LaBoc, Sampson, Weaver, Pasko. Marion. ENGINEERING john P. Hackett, Gerald H. Hallahan, Russell C. Hamlin, Christian Har' man, lr., Richard I. Harpham, Lloyd R. Harris, Arthur A. Hartmann, Paul G. Haskell, Manford E. Hatten, Llewellyn A. Hautau, john L. Haverf stock, Robert J. Hessler, Lamar R. Hetrick, Charles L. Hibert, Kenneth P. Hill, Thomas E. Hill, lr., Ronald S. Hind, Harry F. Hipkins, Bernard I. Hoffman, Chester Holmes, Earle C. Householder, John D. Hubbard, George H. Huffman, Francis B. Hunter, Williani E. Hutchinson, John J. Hutmacher, Frank I. lzydorczyk. , ff. 1 n x , ,.. l fl r J 5, ' . .f ww, A 'Vla- . ,. N ,,..-1. s - ...,. --I '- ,J N Uwf f152'ji had .J 11. 5 -Y Av. , A fl , fi, Lf, .,7' -. Vxlwi 4 L' il.i. ,ffl .kg,. 1. 3 PJ: . 'px r. v, Pg, Ll "Vx Nqr i, .krhflhb 1125 , 'll Jr. .. 1. .wr .Y J, K . . in-A - IQ!-fl, ,I 1 f ' ye 1 ,1' 1 .Y . . X 'E .4 . mg ' wj. f w -a .-+A. .J C 4 .1 M . M- .. .- ..i lfljf' , . . V . ,r 5... : ALT-." il W fl f fiiifg LT f f ii-if-z. I I if- 4" .will N 11,02 ln. All , . 'v M. J, 4 -.-" .I 2 Cf 1 V' rf.. .'- --Q 4 4 -- 1 r '.J'1 if' , .E 11' 4 's .i s 'Q or, iq, .,,'4' ag w' . ii- fr.- .WI I ll 'ffm Rx F,: .if ' li x x A ..,-.i as.: .,. .na . x 'x3l....J, E, L . L Y A rf " 'lil z. ll! H, ANI. ,,. ,fi f 1 bs! 'Lt L I l in, ilgl 1. .-'Hi 535 -4,.f-if "W W if fp rf' J . 4 Jzwaia. ,Q .,. ,l f. l KA ,H ., J. 'A A . I . qi 'Z .L.'J' MU, -.,-.Q K ,-:3' .E 4, ,-.5-v . gm . 1 in V ..,,, .,.. ai w' i lx 'f ff, . ill. -,fi ,A X .. 1 2' x 1" v'-, 3, 'M-f , ', .y vi . gi, .i if 1 X 4 'A ' -fl ' -4 i J if T :.."Ll'w"Mf, l 'f af' . J,-...A ' ' Tl ll' ', . i. ,fl is ,., l "1 -Wi fm l .,f a fl.. Wd, ,Ziff ll' ', i . li? , 77 V "'3:n.. .SQ jeasgg, , y,gl9A,,., all ai 5, J I Left to Right: 'Top Row--Bryne, Sheremeta. Anderson, Johnston, O'Reilly, McLure, Wood, Erickson, Thornezek. Second Row-Stowski, Forbes, Creagh, Nugent. Lewis, Smith, Schuett, Eckel, Cose, Agnew. Third Row-Bedell, Shields, Murray, Conlogue, Katz. Lampard, Gurski. Matousek. Bottom Row-Nordstrom, Slusser, Coyle, Beattie, Hautau. ENGINEERING A Nick D. Jakohich, Aloysius F. Jarninet, John E. Jamison, Lyle L. Jannisse, Vserolod A. jilinsky, Ralph Johannesen, Bradford J. Johnson, Richard F. Johnson, George R. Johnston, John G. Johnston, Jacob Kadushin, Gscar Kahan, Morris Katz, Reuben L. Katz, Harold A. Kean, Thomas R. Kenna, Harold T. Kennedy, D. Eugene Kimball, William L. Kline, Albert I. Knight, Henry R. Knyzewski, Stanley A. Kochanski, Gregory L. Koelzer, Harry I. Koessler, Arnold E. Kolden, John I. Kolehmainen, George A. Kolznak. .LL Hr"--V '. MM' ,gi 1 I kilt l. V 5 4 J l i .M . i . H ,xv-1. -4, ',ffl'S2' 1' 5,5 ' -F .. -or -' -nw -1, . ...,:Y,Vv l'l53j 4. , 53' '11 '? ,Qs I ii if' 1, T lf ,. .K . .,,, V il " .', B glial VM V rr Cv' .rp if 5 'J a- iv . i '. b .MI . LQ.. "J ' All faq i .4311 wi J :fi I '+C ,A 1 ,, il ...A 1 'Ax ,. 4 'ig V K, . Eg! '9 Fi f ,Y ff fa ,iii lic' . fTE:2aQ?'e21'?r?f9.f1a.ffffg-Esfalciss. fa 'J ' e swiss f f J . ..q4:g1alsf3L..S-,.ffH-fa. .wfi:,f.2f"'.. ,. U V ag, as 2. my f,Xi'5jf'9P'r J 111' 4'iyEI'flwf1-1::g-13:9 Qflaflfiis, qgizi-"u.T'M1EP" ' I. xg ALJ' 'L ' "l',.1.. 'nj Cwtxlbj - W , ' -A .J ' I-" -2 ' Mr 11.35. l SQ M9 uv 1? ali? n. .-X ,Q 4. L f u-,J l. I Q. ..- S .- Qghgf A , . F3235 J' V J If lfliiflf.. JI ' 1 f 5--Q-'m:,?r,vh X srsr f f 'L f f Left to Right: Top Row-Tripp, Huffman, Staub, Villalponde, Wakeneld. Bottom Row--Blundy, Mercurio, Carolin, Gies, Peck. Q 9 Mi-SJ? , m ily YM. if 3-it i x 4 mv 11'-4:2 il. , - f. lftffi fm 'ij-J will LLB! E N G I N E E R l N G fiiillzl riff? Chester F. Konczaldki, Earl L. Kramer, Gerald F. Krause, Nelson W. Kropik, John J. Kulick, Joseph L. Kwence, James C. LaBoe, Aloysius J. LaCourse, Jerome H. Laethem, Dougal Lafframboise, Royal C. Lampard, ..a-..h"l.fI,' - ' - Lloyd C. Larder, Lawrence V. LaRou, John H. LaSalle, Charles I. Lathrem, g Jack Lazowsky, Cordon J. Leary, Glenn C. Leckner, Charles B. Leiner, 'xfqlffep xg M' ff . . . . Harold L. Lemmer, Ed ar D. Leon Ra mond J. Lewls, W1ll1am T. Lew1s, lf if fir., g J Y ' Q ,-7-Isifwm - . . . Ralf H. Llghtner, Jack P. L1psco1nh, Albert E. L1stman, W1lfred E. Love. U Wx? Q3 1. .3 . 'EJ U Jlriil V' we A--sf , ,--A ,--ffl., ,- qqgni: 4. A .-., ,"M-.1 Nixgxh J I f+ifffJa.'f5i'u'- :Ti F3 gif'-J if':9s?f?2vvl5::ZsJf4e12gywg?.'vrg, L .fe fe'-I J rw? wza .,-,cf-1: 3"l,lifi'J.I'3"f . A 'ff 9 Q-H f "wrfsl ixwl gl' '4.:Lf'S.JA.:flm'-f.'.1v 1.32-,.,,f' '-'lf-25" 'wgi:w-24-'ff2':yf1. ff-A1 , '-'.",, 2.1.x-..':, H.,-' ,Prev if yy -Qjr!.f-ygyx i:,!' ' ' ,,,j'2,,,'-,QA img if c , H . ,BW ' ', f-fsses'-5-rua, ef NL",-1.--sr " J W., , ,-1 -fix' rr isrsrfl ...rdf cya? 1 fig" .fTl..254f'H,..f',F if -rm-fs, pl, '5"I,"cf" "' 'l'?i,F1'.rT .. , x - R' "vm, ' , ' :i"r',. U, V gy: 11 . :ci ' " , , 5 i'1?l,:jgw,.s-:'.sg'g5 A' 'inf :Qi12sw'wi?4f.:i-Kimi wif :i,..f',u9" S-,Ji ff uf L. f ' . M? " 2, . 'Ea , 1 M fr' WLC lla lillr , l If l wi ,233 .'S if . ,I ,EAN 3? lr ri' V 5 li' W3 'wir -gr N T, 'lililfii . M ml ' iw xii-:Ps l jf fi, 51 -. 4 il afar lf ITM. may 5 l, F ,J iii-pi Giga' xi' 5 f W ,ii Qt, .5 BT1 I' Q' Bl ,gli aff ri ff .K 4. r r Q Ng Left to Right: Top Row-Kelly, Thorpe, Bishop, Blanford, Lewis, Belmer. Second Row-Allan, Girardi, Dreck Stephan, Yuengert. Ellis. Harman. Third Row-Stephens, Andrus, Daro, Golm, Wainright, Gallagher, Boyd. Bottom Row-Koessler, Pessolano, Beitner, Leon, Wright, Hipkins, Zielinslci. ENGINEERING Einer A. Lundgren, George I. McAndreW, Ross C. McBrayne, James I. McCann, Bernard J. McCarthy, Francis W. McCarthy, William L. Mcf Clure, Francis I. McConnville, Edward J. McDonald, Marion F. McDonP nell, Bernard A. McDougall, John E. McEnhill, Ioseph L. McFarland, John I. McGirl, Joseph L. McGonigal, James J. Mclntyne, Robert McLeod, Thomas McLeod, Hugh W. MacDonald, Raymond Mackert, Richard V. Magner, Stanley C. Mancewicz, Avon E. Manning, Robert W. Mantz, Ernest D. Marine, Charles E. Marion, John J. Martinf W ,. K, J, ,,. ,M f -+.. 1 5 ' 1 V Y N AM ' .,x!,Yl.r1- '- Q1 flax .. .Lfj F-,tgi-LJ, Ljifiifxif' qw ,Q fs?-if 7 s ' Q .,,, .,.,. .,..4.,.-l I I 13,'KJa.Ev.., ,Lf-.3,,i,L NG. .U ,,L,3'5.xA-axilyrljf' !g,,.4,:Qi, 'aes -a -A , P ri ,xflfiei'3' . K i r:f:3'. lil-Ill, 5,4 l ay. iggkinol' 'f1:L, u in Q' hfffff skim A ?'i.f'f f :VL nj' JAH Wy -rf., 1 . ,L , 4 ,I ,Qi Pig! ig H' c u Ffa, 1 4" i Q .5 ,- afar A .Vf'x..g'Qv,i.,a ,m,v X ?.Q'QM'f:x,. ff rr lll- J Hilsl, -:fff A ' r . V ill al PN. ri? l' ' .Wd i 'mia wb, M 4 "5gf!e,, f Y NW' H ,.g.Zgs,,. nw, if ' , rc ffl'-.. ef , I , .Lira ,ji 'V' .L ' ,1,m13,., J . . lf 'ri llc, r- I , ,E LXR.. Lf.: Ui, f Q, M Al, :Hi 7 I' , .1 - ., . ' 'Y '1 ' if .' l 'c Y rg Lx-,afff 4 A:j,Q:i5 ,. jfs J ll? lp' ii- W' f,Qj,,,l, M ere. his? ii: LW Y 7' 'ffl av lt. 9. in-. mf, ,W .W .. i1..."l1E' . R , , yt 2 " 'i B1 , wif' ' ei if li fi V , ' 3.-ainlfff . al- U l E13 fr i ., E fr-11. M U, is ah 17,2-u-We Q tw-21,5 I I, ,., WL x - 'U fr-W FP'-:-, . ,f4Tijf,aGnff, 'H Wa" :agar ,rf 2 ' ,-'ir if-J' Lrg- 3 ,gr "'Qsfg3lA,::'5 H 11321115-. 4 ' , ' B ? if ' ng? in 1.3 -A4 -aa f 'A"'372?eq4i'lf 'L7f!:1?lL N'- -Tu. .,,ad,. 1'5" 51553 I 1, ' 4-. , A , , sv, f-',w.- :Z J AJ' r .v57,lEV,,J J w'1.Jl F T.-if r , .. . ., , - ,A -w ky -:1"',':f F ' ' ' 'L Left to Right: 'Top Row-Chowdberry, Easton, Robertson, Pilon, Eickhorst, McLeod, Scharf, Cislo. Second Row-Baughman, Brown, Rubenhre, Weiss. Seeler, McEnhil, Hill, K. Hill. Bottom Row-Sharrock, Mullen, Rosen, Eidis, Hind, Northwood, Morrill, Sinclair, Ramstrum, Thoeming. ENGINEERING Edward R. Mason, Steve Matousek, Michael J. Mazur, Michael A. Mer' curio, Gustave H. Meyner, Arthur L. Michelin, Walter G. Miller, Thomas S. Modjeski, Frank Moenart, Hugh J. Morrill, Charles J. Morsey, John B. Moses, Arthur H. Mott, John V. Mulcahy, Frank VJ. Mullen, Joseph F. Mullins, Joseph Murga, John D. Murray, Edwin S. Myers, Donald J. Nauf mann, Harold G. Naumann, Louis M. Nehel, Harold M. Neibauer Carl Nordstrom, Clarenhe, J. Northwood, Floyd L. Nugent, Clarence J. C'Gorman. 3 .y "--, ,a- 1. '--L+ ,,-'Vw .V .V ,JJ Wi J 5 i wtiie I5 ' rl W .2 1-.. I- -1 52, 5 ' l R4 I lllfle J' V ,aff 1 1 :silt ,F .. , 'ff' l 2' 11:1 Ng iiffl- ,wjfzw 31-as ,. V, ,, iv:-tw fl K if .. f , r f 4 ilk n 1 ,lf 'e I-'11 . . . V N ,-V if I ,c'?!.'.-2 V . if sr lid . ,N 4 yug- QVL . I , ,H A af 1 'I' ' S 4 if 1 .. L 5 1' .AM 'un , li lx x 'l 'fl' . 'ii 15 Q ,lg 7. 5 X i .QL ,I in I. I' . ."f,3U -ik.-V iw . Wfqf T' , il ' flfi rf" TQF'-', ,um-'A li gi ESQ sw 5-iii JE. VE IP H ,FW '-if .I ti 1? U ll.,-1! J' QLJQ ..-M. 1.,, MWA Q' 'YJ Ti fi ai iff. ' , , J,,. ..,. r . 1 . , Vg .-lf, A if-qi., mn, 'N' J -a ff-:'7i'f1+fis fsfi-iw ' 'il 'A Q i-: 'Jil'l"'lJALll6'r.JJJ" "lJJJJJLl +"5-iff,-'bf - " ',g-g+tL!.f.-,Lg-7+- 'f-gf-1' 5, gr"-1 'N'-araivl fl56J I' L.: 1. . ,1... .rf ' H "' "J ' 1 f W -rv, K 'iq'-W! xg W. Na, ,A 1 f V ,r , . .-.L . . . 1:4 V-J,-, .E awww r f..f' wf x r , n"l' w ' . 5 ,M fl lla'-,Pa JL '31 fi E L. ,xi '1 I, A Ti . ,Q lilll .vw '11, W 1- , M434 :G H341 17" ' lg f 'fir .YU 6,1 nw 4 is, 1. . '1 fr ' ,,, , ilffrf' ' In 'fl -, ri , Y'-l, 1. ,. 'i gy ' A w . ,Q , 1, , if 7 f 4 , ln..- 1-.VJ I r s J. 1 'n I- . tl '4' -qv' lx . -ill!" ...in l'!'a ,aff 'ff -. Lani? il in r A.- , .-- x - . I , kv.. "'- 3 1: nan- '- ' Left to Right: Top Row-Ryan, Rundels, Boucher, Kimball, McGirl, Neihauer. Second Row-Haverstock, Rockwell, Knight, Johnson, Denike, Hibert. 'Third Row-Dilaura, Yurgel, Mullins, Hartman, Cornely, Sutyax, Weler. Bottom Row-Farrel, Olseon, Leary, Buchman, Moses, Kuliclc, Konczalski. ENGINEERING Clarence Ulson, Theodore H. O'Neill, James T. 0'Reilly, Merlin W. Qsterf man, Ezra M. Otermat, Elmer I. Paddock, Stephen Pack, Andrew S. Papp, Weldon T. Partridge, Arthur M. Pasko, John I. Pennel, Qliver,H. Perreault, 1 -,,, M . svn., -it -,i Q., Q,1fW ' , , ivnn ames T. Pessolano, Robert G. Pettit Don E. Pierce ames E. P1erc Ra ,M , , Y, ,, A. Pilon, Phil Plasko, Harry W. Poole, Walter L. Potoezak, Francis I. 3354- Potucek, Bernard G. Price, Furman O. Price, Leon I. Printz, George I. -.:....i'.. , , 3 153125, Prokopp, Omer H. Pulte, William Purchas, Jr. lgio ,' ' :1 A, lliilffi lx fli.l,?ii 1 liz? HQ'YH'fl . H+. T G: gggf f ., ,w K-HIM-,f.a4,. fl -H-A-,SMA W J :fix WW ffm.,-fwfeffa ,-ffm f1ai.mfw..w w'af:-wi me ' f-1 1 ' +i'?wwfff- 'fE'1'1. l'iuf':fl 'fc 4 Y f, -fi -Tiff-il ,jill -'ii 375155-ii 3'ficrfl-ciffffff5f'KlllfAif131?'255559 'A if .f157l 4 'n a, . ve.. . K J F :Lg If - 'B ' .5 1 "ll , I in ' . "T:ii',H.,, 3 .-wyrcih ., .W gi 1 Q? li 'ff' xlllllif L4-rifle. ' 1 ,- .. .- - L. . .. . lfiiiill ic, A .-.A r I 9 ' N f 117 A G ,H fa-f Ii' TQ?-u., f", ,mljxl i,--i?3S.ip-iv,-yylgzax Q-y'juj-S51:"5 ' fs' fl ,Ms " V ' ,' few in Q Q ' 'f r 1 U A 1 ,, ,, ff ir I 'Q-I-Sli flslffif'-46' -is '-I ' I-4 A W"7'Nf""' I ' . I iw? ' . ' Jfwfi? V li iggalj iris? F r ,gg ,N if-I eff I 0,r,.' -. - 5 , Ugg?-I4 Qff 35 J ' V ' ,. if ' ililigflax is ii llfmll? il YWJ Q fiilaifl ' I. i L ' f 'lil fi X -13 Yi ii ,gif 'YJ ra- -,talked I-'Pal ,ew Ru, 1, ,li .ri lima .. li fj' Hi if- 'iiixflj ,il 'rg' -, f' ' -5 lil ,R 'silky 2 1325 ,V ' ij'-,r 1 af 4 '- ir. Jiri! 4 Hfdggr iw" I ' il? ' 1' ME wi 'rf NA," i. ii. .1 3,-vL'-'- ' A ,-1-I ,.s,4f. .,,.,1,,+.Q,,, -31:5 Ln I5 -Jrvlillv ri. ive' w , nl-Y' .lei ,ET ,LX if MV. N3-,gk-jig .' AIAQE3, ' 'L:iJ,l ..1Mfi1v xl TM 1 - -+1 "iii 'W i 1 :Ur HN" 3 '- ,gvyfff .1 'lf' 'i "4" gif sm, SJ . ,, 134 55151 fi , "H ui,-y, : I sm ,xg W l ,fy , Wg-i, 'iq 1. ,X Ya fy al .' 'J' 1 if i,4jJil'?g V? il ., lj, .33 . t.-- - .Q Left to Right: Top Row-Hamlin, Conway, Hackell, Perreault. Glynn, Mackert, Second Row-Crowe, Emi, Reeves, Sternberg, McAndrew, Johannesen, Ringholz. Third Row--Chek, Leckner, Poole, Lardner, Bolton, Schintzius, Naumann, McLeod, Griffin. Bottom Row-Moenhart, Simons, Arnold, Quinlan, Silverman, O'Neill, Hitchison, Wayne, Fairchild, Goldenberg. ENGINEERING Harold W. Quinlan, Erik Ramstrurn, Maynard T. Rape, Edward I. Raya, Harry W. Reeves, Gustav I. Reich, Thomas L. Reilly, Paul E. Reisdorf, . Lewis G. Rice, Roy A. Rickenback, Wilberr H. Riley, Lapier G. RingholZ, John M. Robertson, Lawrence A. Robertson, Kenneth D. Robins, Joseph Robitaille, Frank H. Rockwell, Edmund V. Roh, Ignatius A. Robrig, Meyer Rosen, Irwin M. Rosenthal, George L. Rosingana, John J. Rountree, Harry Rubenire, James W. Rundels, Cornelius J. Ryan, John E. Ryan. 1 rl .2 1 iw? Nix. iisfi 'ufkgi-V X . F girl 3 'lb ig. , fl "-,.i, , 'IGA fi .,,f,g, X ey,--. azz? 1349? Ffiiy I x .Fw a 14 111' 1 . . Va .. M , . E393-'gil lk J 1:7 'QL I' i .VH , mba . . Q gf dial, ' tif 3,53 'asia 5. . L-all ir.1f.s?.-13' J f' . T , , , 1 A -,JD ,, , Ji . . ,EH ,Z W ' . If f.. mx ,Q-. F f'f?,f,, Q"7'n.,e lewis. ,rfy ' ,Rfb 1- iI,1'.13a'?i',L ,9iT.'?'-sfffl--5l'?'gg'2. 4-Tyfiri.. I--ffl-gi, llhfi Y'--1 2,2 ., ",f'1.' 4 'fe LL I 'fa qu it ii" if--EYIEY. '??'gI'fl"g-4fhQT1QL'g'l'hglf' Efrqmlf' ifsi 'H f . '- a .X -- .-',:.,glZ 1 .. fa, ru,-ia V 1 ,f -. " ' 1 9 ,I V -, , ,, .Q . 1 ,. , i, L , 1 , 1. ' .f f ' f , if H, . , A, l,il."1:i:wPw?ff"siwflii,'J'?gm1r.1i..1H iwsffi,'i 11155 .-1? I 1 P'-wg 5" P- 'E' . la iilfilb'-'?5fQf"' ish., Mwlf.-fj 1 ' .E3-,FAQ-35V,,s55,:,Q.lW1-3,.,k.19 g,,,ifffj,a42Qt53- an 1.4.4, .4 I., i, .- -W L.,-" gi.,-' ,ggye E ' K alfa ' f 1-ada V A ,A mpmqi.-ff:.,r ' 51583 f .. Q H ' .rw ff' . 3, W 'ef RJ - - " xx, l.... ,,-.. tvs kr lv-.1 J..-"",,3""'4ft.f: . ., lf,-, . 1.-, ff 1 fl 1 2, 5fl .-H""QT:"-- ,fy .- ff",-, er Nqr'-n 'laik if 'C ,f cw f-.'Y Q sm " .f - :L -. 'BD' fr, -"rf" '-I 5 'fi' " '. fs. f 413: "l -TV .J '1' 'cf'-7 ' l ,--- fs- ,X-V v 'D ' 'U M' flu- '-1 'F i. 1 vi 4'-' T1 '-ff 'il '- V 2 , ,fp it-1 -' 4, .ff .f V ,, 1 ,, H , , f M.. y 14 my J , 1 fa- wif, EAQ- ,-.L t ,+ Q3 vt , L1-fu YF , H 4 , f . W E .mh,.f., P . 4 , ' W - nm . Qw.,.e, .--ala www A N j v, J' b 4- --' -- V' .fLf- v V'-.fx W, r'. lv 15, .gl ii' "'. .I fi ',,,y,vl AL- ". . .:- . -iill-q lp -1' fr K , l ,, U, '. ,,4, E -. , '11 4 ,B - A ,v. , sf, - ,Nz Nl. . ,,,f 0 we-1 Q imxth .QL 311521 'veg I is I-'vp .xy- fb fi? ill l fk '-X ,A u. Left to Right: Top Row-Papp, Sheckler, Wollaston, Slater, Balsley. Second Row-Bernard, LaFramhoise, Coluccio, Simon, Shields, Woloski. 'Third Row-Vipond, Kolehmainen, Baum, Sutherland, Kolznalc, Mazur. Bottom Row-Hackett, Brazil, Claus, Kropilc, Glaser, Dudzinski, Plasko, Raya, Csizmansky. itll I f E113 -11 if V 1'-V' 'I e if-15: Q .lf A .-J ' fe WJ 7- V. , .i iv Eli lg-.., E591 C l ogy ls.-lla . its-3, lily if all flgilf 2523 I ENGINEERING Lawrence A. Sailer, Edward K. Sampson, William G. Sands, Thomas J. Sass, Lawrence A. Scharf, Arthur J. Schelke, John Anthony Schenk, Ir., Carl L. Schiller, Chester A. Schintzius, Charles H. Schroeder, Bromley B. Schuett, Arthur I. Schwartz, Edwin T. Schwartz, Richard H. Seeler, Louis Seltzer, Glennon E. Sexauer, George C. Sharrock, Duane B. Sheckler, George H. Sheflerly, Mike Sheppeck, John Sheremeta, Clement A. Shields, James M. Shortt, Raymond J. Shreder, Joseph M. Silverman, Walter W. Simon, Virgle F. Simonich. ,. . 'st if, Elia ii? fn, .I . gfllwft fa fl 'Hfwl ,flrll Ltr? 'A x inf. L L ,lv l'i "al'f 94 "Fl T? V-Tag. .t 1 G 1 'Yagi' 7, Mill:-"al, Y." .A ,nf 'et ,J f. . f l-. Ziff'-1 - '. , 1, .ni X "-.L -A ll iytli , .,,.:,-A5 Nfiwll f .i'z3Xll'l 1 WMA? 43 -iw- .at Q e 1 iiijifls f 15'i?l3 Fwy ,911 w lf 'lf f A ,in-41 I hfgyf I-'v k"'.ni' W 1- 10 .. . . 2 .limi fel 1' -' '-w 2-I is sq, Q -' svg.g,f,p.,i 'QQ--2 '- fir wfixw- v.'llf'fFl ' -. 114.3-1 -if vi' l.ll'1,a' Q45 gl i, Des' VU. -12?-QQ Twig! .1-,pil L 11 Qflfill 24-alia! Qifllfm Q 5131! as' if 'Q , 1 7 f- 3 -1' .gay ,wi ?' il -1, '- V :fi-me-fllxrezfa, he -L .1 . bf?-at if l L ?'. A.. t.. .. .f . .4 .11 . 1,-,ff,, . an-.urs , .. -it al dass .v .. .i,,f. 3 fi as-... ..m,.,. A . . 3 f ' 1 , g fZ,!?ig.Q:,-'rw -,s,ggf'.Q.Ag1,, ,yin-',.-x,.f wr J xp ,Q ,., .QF .3 i.4q:.r53 L-WI,-52,143 343.5 Y'f.f.4.aQS:i'X,iLp ,tl"e.f,-12. f 1 Y -I .A ,xg , LV alles. 5,f,.gNLuj L.wQw-.:i JL,L.-251' 'Q-4,9 ,, -6,1 ,rf ,.-"'kke:Fi1gE,- cf fn.-"2'g5?m...r Q flaw ,qs-1+ rw? 1:1591 - ay- 4.,!91'1"E'L?f E r.-,, ,., 4.. ,.. fs: --. 1 , . , . .aww np, fe V J Zi:-. . A,,- ,1-tt f .',f ,-..f- ', Left to Right: Top Row-Ayres, Miller. Second Row-Cook, McCarthy, Condon, Myers, Smetel-r. Third Roto-Wright, Schiller, Brown, Bentley, Kahn, Vwfiskopske. Fourth Row-Yaretski, Kwence, Elichek, Gregg, Struezek, Green. Bottom Row-Dimmer, Steinberg, Boate, Katz, Falkner, Rountree. ENGINEERING Henry A. Simons, Frank D. Sinclair, john W. Eiwik, Anthony B. Slater, Joseph G. Slater, George G. Slusser, Ladislaus F. Smetelr, Frank E. Smith, Reginald L. Smith, Henry P. Sorensen, Stanley M. Sosnowski, Maurice . Spector, llie Spilman, Arlo H. Sprunger, Robert D. Squires, Alvin F. Staub, Francis Stawski, Ir., Stanley F. Stawski, Stanley Stelmaszejuk, Samuel Steinberg, George A. Stephan, Charles H. Stephens, Henry Sternberg, Gordon H. Stevens, Stephen S. Struzek, Ben Sussman, Harry G. Sutherland. . 1 - .wi : ,543--. IH y .. . , we -- 4 .L - 1 . W . . f . 1. 1, .1 5' " 'ft H .J ., Y Q' .,i ':, an "ffl iytjix. ,wp I 3. '- li ,- la Ali. '1 .-'fl V I-if all E- '5 1 lj ff? j Q-1-.Y l ' ,ef - J rw ...V f fr. "J, YL '. I f l l f P' 1 nl 5 - 'EA"1uiQ' ,a xv- qaffi' QL. , 2 Wi.- Qqm it if J 'Jiri ,alg- . , .,, Q wr. a,f,,4,g elf-'lf-tb Mit L, I.. , 2 gif! is tax .4 ..L,3,vQ,, 1 W- A " f.--1Q.1ll.,'w'i, 1 1 . . 1 . .".f.r 11 .ffl ',f . 1,4 i s fn , .ff.,' " ,1"" 1, '- 5 lj -.f 4 -7 g -4 f'-zizniv 1,,,-fr-5 tw " H603 1 7:5 1-61? 1-W .M i.. -,:' , KT 1' ffr' l ,I . Ii, , .,, : "7w'f":7' ' 'PF' 'T E" fa :A " -f. ri f -.ne ll. - ., .-- , . If A!:a,f+i",,E..' - W, Q 3,",.f' P is ,'l','i,' " K ?Lj.g"v.3':',f'A3'TFF-f??',.fi'l '-S.f,'3'-G", fl, 1- Q, XP Q ,-I V .Wi ' U 'l, 4" ,Av 7 Tl-9i.f:, if 1'.-...ff 1 .N ,, 1.1 'Tiki v ,lf , :".' 1' il-A 1,3- lffl 4 T ' if fi r El . ef, my , sffiwk ' a'3'.?'rl 3' girl V' Q Alf, A r WEL fi5'1Tii-fl kwa, Kari, ,Q Wi. Avi- ' . , . div' f if ij? ' - . 3525155.14 . ' ' ,'ffi'iQ , 253 ,127 riff, Q". K aff.. Left to Right: 'Top Row-Connolly, Reisdorf, Reilly, Thibodeau, Prekopp. Second Row-Stelmaszczuk, Byrne, all lf Sorenson, Martin, Taulbee, Sheppeck. Third Row-lxydorczyk, Weiss, Toth, Schroeder, Schenk, Marine, Price. Q lg:-iff Bottom Row-McGonigal, Mclntyre, Schelke, Spector, McConville, Schortt, Smith. 5 wif, lngizrfif A - -'ll7.r'i' If iff QB f PTQTSS. ' .. 'E '," . Illsirg-4 N ,i 3152251 ln ,Tlfg in 'Biz'-,, X kfiiifgfh E N G l N E E R I N G filly' Andrew P. Sutyalc, Cyril P. Svobocla, Harry I. Szczesniak, Saul'E. Tabor, ll-fi-.Q-Qi Russell L. Taulbee, Lawrence T. Tegler, Walter C. Theriault, Robert E. -QSM! Thibodeau, William H. Thoeming, Carl W. Thomas, Alfred G. Thomizek, 1 .f' X, ,f V' is., John R. Thorpe, Anthony Toth, Albert D. Townsend, Robert E. Town' Q. . . '.ff5L:"I,i" gitgiii send, Julius Trattner, Allen F. Tripp, Carl W. Troy, Arthur A. Van fl-Qg'g.5,.,. , Co1ll1e, Peter Van Ryn, Victor H. Vernier, H-enry J. VerWayne, Raphael l " 'I . Villal ando, Ceor e Vi ond, Wilbur B. Wa ner, William L. f'T'..sEll TJ P g 'H is Q7 Wainright, Cerald F. Wakeield. lfgirggx X Q. 1 I . S Wa T flelf 59 Qilffs v . T 'n QQ P will w. M ar: rm 'f-.,,,-K -f-3 ,ax by I H f K x W fs. TW .r'i- lx E' 5-fig."-. ,.,'3?5f-3'-irpff, ,K - :ff"-v:-.Tw.' 4'-'- F' .335 W i ,'i' T,'JfF'r -,f.f'?1f' f"' QW: H 3 'igffll11llliill'2r:'?3'?5f5.l.+4"'Pqi!,3"Ti.-14.37 1 ell ' 12 -fl-fffrfl"1f'1.f-Qlf-417Pkf?f'l'f?'lm? lffll'5:lfj2'i2'P ff4??3fTfflr . A Q,,1l,,,wllL,j1vUkafae'.4s-"75'5:.Q'3.2.'lf:-'T'.Qiif'f5warca.f'EJLQLW'Qi:5'J' if J 4jif"Y3"4l'Lis:a-5' fflllg.v-f-i.a"?2Le,.1i4l-"slid"'...."f ""q"'i-,g.,,,.pv-'y 1:1611 ff: fa i - i ,1 pi Stanley Yagiela, John S. Yaretski, Carl A. Yingling, John L. Yuengest, 4 f f- i A- " I fi "ii1?:3?zrr ri , ' , i. fic '1 ' ' A 5, .AV, 2 -,'- ' if ra 2155"-Avg 5fQ'P"K"5 E N Q--QU W.: 'L me -L A- W3 hxjx 'if ' the . W 53,19 Y 1 if a ri ig, 'Q 255x453 V ' 3 'nj-Il, W N ami, . ' 1 fr H '1 33,11 ,. , ftjfgfgll , A , 5 U 3. -is 1 vf ' . ix 'zi'f'1Qll,, l ' 1 ' f l 'X j!,,iqQvL?f ,1 . I Left to Right: Top Row-Sailer, Townsend, Bohland, Dragon, Bronder, Evans, Weckesser. Second Row-LaCourse ci' h Modjeski, Ryan, Shefferly, VerWayne, Zoufal, Weingarden. Bottom Row-DesChamps, Chosid, Lazowsl-cy, Mulcahy, LaSalle, Piercy, Potucek. . jwgizii, ' 3-.all ' YT' tan We' . Nil' fi,- :iw-3 fb '1 7' ,ii .i,.fsajS N f' I 'QT' Wag' l rap L9 9, ik. .,, iw ,ijiiigilg ENGINEERING Rfligiil- in JJ .il 'ff1.QW U H 1931 iiyjjl Ioseph D. Walker, Bennie Waloslqi, Gerald L. Wardell, Peter H. Wayne, RWD Paul V. Weaver, Charles L. Weckesser, Henri E. Weiler, Max Weinf garden, Albert Weiss, Ioseph Weiss, Albert I. Whelan, John E. Williams, f' 1-fl :JH -- . . . . . Warren C. Wilson, William A. Wiseman, Harry I. Wiskofske, Pennock H. Wollaston, Clyde H. Wood, Ir., Cecil M. Wright, Harold R. Wright, We J ' E5 14: 1-Q? iiiflf . ,fm - William I. Yurgel, Edward I. Zezula, Leon F. Zielinski, Phillip B. Zoufal. lag: I ,1 'fi oftf' we 5252 P+ -E-L-h., .ire-F" .f4T.'!'. df eeqvvr- r it r' A fk.-A - ."'1fM,l'..-, .- lul,C,A',. ,. s- .e fr Q -1 "' rw 1-ffm-, ffl' 1+ few f-f"w Ig T., ,Milam -WQZMJ. .. ...,,7.,,,3l4'tgvxi,. ,xii-Q '- .3 5.1, 1. Q., ,M ig. u..-.5-fxeg.:am,.,AQJE3f3wgi,isfig.Eg fees Q , :Q . ii 111 -filfw jfs' , f -.rim it 1. f ,ag ft' -iff' . 'FE . J " fiezi ff Y 5-A ,, . 1 ,, U Af" jj .?f?f3vl1,4.-,",R:fFf'iM.JiE .ri Jug? .VE . LY. Y. .1 ,Z ,ii ,L ,., f :Giga 1 41,1 -J 1 I 4 . 1, :.."i . ,. W, .VY '-U4 . P 'R ,,,, 5- " , ' ' nfl. ' 1. -9 3 .l-'- T c . ,., F1 -ill lf? ed: 99 f. ji 'Tl .I ,iw filigfffl 13' 'iii 5 Q. Qivff In ' qu 4 6. 2 -l .K . 'lu . 1 .5 H f, ,-.M QUT. lji"l?" -rg'--..A ' 1 -Y -ST 'jg' lg: T WW Iv I Il 'NV .5 - f .5Zj,l. P, ., ,.. 'wg-. ,, .. lf s M 2T,41F,'7'1 A. ,, yyiu f J .il 1.-Y. J, -, w fe' t-J if wg lx-I:".ii V, W' .. 1 'fix .., 4 's X al- ,ff 1 AH, ri'-PH it v f.1.'q,'. .ri A 4. A-Q - .X .pill .-F gc'-.S" ll . 1 r ,Hmm if Wf 'r' fi g.,J',- frm ,ut 25-'sf aft' ..'?5fe'.. 2 g5.',,, -ww .ia iisfjaf' J z -J 1' iafllgi if .Q .I .. ',-- J Q, l W fgflu ig, f iw? .iiiqtff - lMQ,r':,.fQ-9 xii . , Y Gait , . i ,.. + ft. 11 J .is X .. it , Left to Right: Top Row--Thomas, Banon, Bouteiller, Beckett, Pinder, Wobrock, Peltier, Gillen. Second Row-Michon, McGanley, Miller, Holworsen, Kobetitis, Hill, Stork, Wolf, Maunebod. Bottom Row-Sherwood, Lan, Ward, Alsobrook, Lynch, Saravolatz, Ioskovitz, Shaw, Feehan. FQREIGN TRADE L. Alsohrook, William H. Athanson, Beckett, Harold J. Bouteiller, Irene E. J. Feehan, Daniel M. Gillen, Harcourt Stanley NV. Hill, joseph A. Ioslrovitz, T. Lau, William H. Lynch, Leo. J. McCauley, Fred C. Mannehach, Armand F. Michon, Vv7illiam Miller, Harry VJ. Moreau, Gerald T. Murdock, George Qchenduszlco, John L. Peltier, Walter R. Pinder, Nicholas Saravolatz, David Shaw, Richard M. Sherwood, Edward K. Stark, Robert H. Thomas, James I. Ward, Howard H. Wobrock, Alfred H. Wolf. McLean Alexander, Anthony Charles E. Barron, Dorian Q. Casey, A. P. Doherty, Walter Halvorsen, Hilary H. Heaphy, Richard F. Kohetitis, Edward 3,5 f."ZwI1gf,:.: -..,. f "Fuji .I-fly. ' Ei Wi 34- u X, r YQ, 2T1f-'1 Q'ZxQQ.,-ewgg. ,ak rg: Q . -: t Y ,Y , 'f M ' . 1 U " " :fx M.. ul- fT'?..- I ,,.,' - ." , ,- an QEERJ Q34LfQ .JMfa5iwe ,... I - Q"gj 11. fa .L , yang' - If163l l L Fil .. l ,Q , ,. . 5, 1. .. -C.. w.,,, ff l, JW u ll -y 12 L M' ...J F 5 was E Luis.- 1,lm'i N" lb '15, ',,1f?'f ma., ,y - lf. 1 we 1-gf: -c ,ya 'T .1 Hv ,.1. "Ii gk-,V - i, wx hw -. -,FA xl E lllf H" ,Ma srl" ,. .. get yr. 3 v. .if 1' ' .ly . ,-R It -A LT' gfv in "Eli,ef 'H ' tugv XM., 'fa I, Y 5' wi l .f 0 W, F r pil, 1 -H .f -Mfg-af iflfsfif Left to Right: Top Row-Lynch. C'Hallorzin. Second Row-Zettel, McClear, O'Connor, McClear, Parr, Webb, Toutant. Bottom Row-Wagner, Nolan, Martin, Webb, Stanczk, Szlachetka, Matthews, McLaughlin. LAW Frederick G. Allyn, Samuel Babcock, Irvin F. Ballbach, james A. Bechtel, Elmer L. Beyer, James I. Caldwell, Thomas I. Carrigan, Ioseph F. Clarke, Maurice D. Cohen, Mark L. Conrad, Maurice DeSchepper, Buell Doelle, Claude P. Dowis, Mathew J. Elsliger, Eleanor M. Fiedler, Samuel G. Gerber, Samuel Gigante, Angela M. Gignac, Morton Goldberg, Anthony E. Handloser, Harold E. Hardies, John A. Hird. H' Ah!- H.: '-Q, ,.-V. 'N ,, Fi . 'N- ag 3BEtg.55V:.l lr, , , R :MUN l 9: Ao, 'lf .ui f-,XG ' "'V'H F wr rf Qin 1. ibl' ,I 1 LA if Eff? 'aff' 0' fn -,-1.2, l 'A .1 4., 1 ,.. II, ii '14 J J.fr-ef.-ig-, ll-,K :Q s .tl X ilk., fl 1 ffl 'J . r , 9 . 'll- ,gl-'Q . ' ., . 'w!',i ,V .r -.r L 'Q 1 5 M." V :vt ljl 1 I r U gig. f .". ,elf 'fl ' -,.'. .AJ nl 'narr- , 5 L s Nfl , x ..-V -Y, ,. l"'1. V . lr. A' F :ff , . -Ah ,, jail.: . -fi' i ' l 52 " , Eff! F .fivfij ' I ." 'i"f?.'lQ: ly- if li lp.. fm? 5 life 9' , .QF-rv, 541242 'rf- 75 M ' My J 'ar . .5- ii. 5 ' J V. f. gg, if 2 Mini' 1f"'fl'+.X 'ilyg-ff -W, .Jef oil nigh M -1 62,33 ml -Y . 1- V W Q k . .. if-J" . f F' 1 'fi--'. -ff4w5',,J .,,,. L- ,ff It 73. ff, ,tai .gg E 'lu ,f,,- A-L ,J . .. , . . L, La... , ., ,.,,'g.,,, ,- A .- .,,.,.,, . ,.-f. g in ,N 'P nqm-f -'-lfg 1- 4-,..,,,,r, w 1 , ,J r, ' :et ,N--JH gf Q I f - sn., r. . f f' ' .Q 1 X, i X F, , ., ,l in N 11 ri, fy Q . . ,. ,J . .,. v1 ,P Y , V, It . 5, Lf ,,k4ILiiYz 4-f-, PM Ig. J? M:-J op, "L-. .4 ,",, -f,"g-v, 1. 71" ','fb"?,f...""m ff ' 1434 "-,":q 3, 5:7 F1 -'T 1 , f. ff, ' ' 'tw 9' R x .-i.. dn, H A. m, 'gg ,Y ,,,-. , Y, ,fy My , 'T' . A " 1,4 ff '- -li - 'Q-J Y. ix., ,.' '-1--t Q- J' -a' new . .. ..u 1 , ,. . ' .. ,- .' r- - - V i q -f - . J. . 51641 . rjf f fue -1 .9 -" 'l'2:L,.i7 f"f1f,,' ..iu'1f,i li?" Ji T, .' L I V 9- 1 1. I l I J' I l V L , ii lf,1.l'x - 3.11.5- .ir L' i-.l .. . J I 'Y fplifq ' 'S 2 "HQ 137: .fl , ,v,, 4 'I 1 , lil V. in '-riff iii xg, 'Q' Kilda if-wi-Asglhli I . 'Uv Nw? ,Y-5. 15,44 V1 .1 " X. 4, i r Left to Right: Top Row-Hird, Balbach. Handloser, Harkey, Kownacki, Gigante. Second Row-Kane, Clark Quillinan, Bayers, Allyn, Karczmarzyk, Goldberg, Conrad, Cohen. Bottom Row--Kowalski, Hawick Lachover, Fiedler, Gignac. Hardies, Pamphere, Babcock. L LAW Clarence R. Horlcey, Raymond A. Howick, Cyril V. Ianosky, Edward T. Kane, Anthony Karczinarzyk, Mark Karr, Florian F. Kowalski, Piotr M. Kownacki, Martin A. Kronk, Gerald O. Labadie, Abraham Lachover, Gordon W. Lamphere, Michael J. Landers, Bryon Lapham, Edward N. Lynch, Harry M. Martin, Robert R. Maniere, Albert M. Matthews, Gerald I. McGlear, Robert D. McClear, Gharles N. McLaughlin, Thomas A. Monahan. if' '17 '- Fifi' l' . 1-far. Ar: I 1 ..m:f,.A,,.:-W, 5 .. "-rilvfl-i!.l'r 'qpf3'.'A. .Q r Q 3 ,V WR1--r,'- I- '- hid " 3' 'ly V-. l - -Q l V ll.-F,-Jia -R nw . M J . i H 1 -1tff'lx..iHq' -4-kfwwy-i.-.." ' " ' . -' f16i1 , Mifa. :ii f i .s -wCf.fga2:,t.5s:.m 'w'Q7fSf'.'1fM-..,gf,!.1. if f 1 to -P Nw, 1, A ,pfgfuqli ' ' 'e l ala? A' WL?-.1 H. : f x-',,L,1.- f self 4 1 511, , 'Wi li 5 ---s Fai? ia:- I . Y 1 Fi ,-VT. .5 +1 if l ki' All-:SY 'I 'gn -1 F' lst ' 5 1--Es' :Ti wif ,. HM?-.r T ?,i,B5ii'Ezli N. if f' 1lEf'fv'f .,jjEL"ggi!l Qian, gr if fi! .1 'JZ ,v ,W p.l.,5fQi.A '+..'i-QQ' Fir" 'li r J 7- if In Y. Vi Left to Right: Top Row-Goldberg, Caldwell, Kronk, Mttrphy, Wernette, Teagan. Bottom Row-Monahan, Tunney, Theisen, Simon, Janosky, Elsliger. 9, ,'N iff?-7 H L A W Arthur I. Murphy, Peter J. Nolan, Roger P. C'Connoer, William I. C'Half loran, Adeline Pacevich, Russell David Parr, Jack C. Quillinan, Leslie H. . w Rushbrook, Frank R. Schnettler, Vxfaldo J. Simon, Arthur E. Somers, Stanley B. Stanczak, Arthur E. Steiner, Edward M. Szlachetka, Edwin C. , Theisen, Selah A. Toutant, J. Emmett Tunney, john L. Wagner, Tom G. ql1guif,'7 Ward, Charles G. Webb, Vx7illiam W. Webb, Richard H. Wernette, Eirmin I. Zettel. i.i:i'a Q Tilt f,,g..E,i,i: it .V 1 1,5133 fig it . A 4 fi :ff 4 +A " . .fm F, .--p" ' 51661 . r - 4-. I, -wr" -"' fmwfri . . " ' ' ' ,--Y -f-- . . -. , . ... ,,, -, Q. ,JJ if " Q , ,. , , J ,. V, - -, .:'1.:, ' .. ' .W - -"lf Esf1u"f3':l'1--Wf,5"?. 'F'-' , " , ' or 'wr Tr 'F' J f- f' fp: 1J's5'.' 4 f.ggL'g,a1:,,Jv:-'g,r.,3.f4-Q,t!p, llfnZ2f'-fmlw,1j""f:- if Affuysl ," n'1",f'-,i L jx! X 'T' , w kr Y' .Q - ,ulfw .. ,uh 'J . .'I,f'f',."'g ug , J H lu.-'f Q55 'lily' 5'-3?'E?3""9L31af-' ig ' A fy" ' " '-'ijf-w' ' f.+:.':- f J M' WH J .X .. ,, . M 'ld' -:vw 2. . "Mtv F. A ,y f .. - 1 Walla q" af.,-.6 ' lin. L lille vp. EL-1 ,fy " J, . Li.. 1 uf lg Nil? fe "I EZVIFA.: Ju rf U HM jl - ai' . flflrleh ah' V lim?" I. .. - W ,A . ,Q 'N Wir. J V Fil? ,flu lspiffil F 5-W. ,J J Mil , .pal-all A le.f5f'a-1 ' 5:43 ll FP v -i, H I Jn., PWM I ' Milli' L- . 1 ' if elf f FLY' VE. jf l 5 ku ii! 5 pl: 'hui' -ll - fi,--jjg 5 is-J at 4 1 . ' .7 l' ,tg uri, N- --A . 5' In-A .K t.-lx, ,r 'H ., Lx-Mn 1 , W 1. .ah-ff' I ., A.. ,wg-., i k i wx, Q 1' 3, .0y":+, Vg' 'fill i ' . 'Q - J if 5.1 4 r l k QQ ll ,M teak-'31 g...,..., .. .f ff-" 1' -sv Left to Right: Top Row-Cook. Layman, Supus, McGinn, Boemel. Jaworski, May, Tucker. if Ig. Bottom Row---Hattar, Hall, Mohan. Pietrowski, Breault, Madigan, Stewart, Waller. lvl qw I v NIGHT CCMMERCE AND FINANCE Edward Anderson, Ralph E. Adamson, Harry Andresa, George S. Bahor: " ' V-A ski, E. Whiteney Baird, Mr. Baranowski, Leonard J. Barba, Elmer Beck, Ulb, I Thomas F. Nenson, John Eldon Bicum, Davis A. Binney, George M. Bissett, x ,J N. William Blum, C. M. Bourke, Francis E. Boutt, Paul Bowman, Francis . A. Breault, Louis Brunswick, James D. Callahan, Robert Carl, Jerome L. Caroselli, L. Albert- Carr, William P. Chester, William Paul Chowning, Peter John Christian, John A. Clancy, Herbert J. Clarke, Joseph P. Clifford, J Earl E. Cloyd, Fred B. Cole, Frank J. Collins, George P. Connors, William .John Connors, Lawrence W. Cook, Anson Coulon, BYron E. Cullen. e L' ia if 3 Fifi? 1 , '. Q YF- . . JFQA w,aN,,i .,.. .,,,a-..,,n..,,ffTf2frfsn,f,,w, .,.. .,, Ma..,a ,k,Wf' . J ,izfwi . - in ,M-em,-1. ,mn-'Ly t1fc3:g,y1",f,:' '3-353 ff,. ,l',,v,4Yfg',f' '-eff ' f 35' H f-v, 5. 5, in-f 1 jx ,-'j.-,eg-'qs f'-Q.-nj fr t1.f ,,r'-.,.W .,,::,2a'3rw1, .5 1,--,.-, .... -1-,ll lil .-f" 5f2",:1i,7FfQ1t'53'.Lai-Wifig i"l 9 ..'iii.fL5l5' ff? ' ., ,,m?:BxwMrisg: .1 5 167 1 Left to Right: Top Row-Nowell, Sullivan, Binney, Clancy, Burke. Bottom Row-Redick, Dittman, Wright, Bowman, OlBrien, Murphy. NIGHT CGMMERCE AND FINANCE James Cummiskey, Charles P. D'Aaoust, Joseph A. Danna, Jesse M. Darling, Julius M. Davis, Roland J. Denison, Galin Dietz, George F. Dillworth, Mercedes F. Dimmer, Gilbert F. Dittmer, William Dohson, L. Stanley Doll, Frank J. Doyle, Edward James Dunlay, Donald Burffe, Russell C. Erb, Milton J. Foley, Edward A. Gage, NVilliam J. Gardner, Albert J. Gebauer, George J. Gettleman, John Brinton Girardin, Charles A. Goodrow, Fred J. Goodrow, Donald G. Gorman, Stanley A. Gorski, Oscar M. Grammens, Merrill Henry Grix, Vincent F. Gumbleton, Roland S. Haight, Gilbert Hall, Francis J. Harris, Martin Huttar, John T. Hauck, Arthur H. Jay Herryman, Edwin Charles Hindelang. j l from .L .,s,n it ', -I N IJ I 9 , W :VI . . 4. Jima, I .ii ,.- .f luJ'4,'4 'F 1 :Jul ., .,,.f.l3E vv..Sq, l..,e., 4 . , ,af 4' if P 1: K L'-'Hi :AY 3 L 'M I R 'FK- A' 9 :R .J' . Y' .V Q 'If' 1 ,JW- I w 6 I J 1 li ,Jia - Q' d 1 -E "E xr. -ASW, 15f1f" -1 WT:-3 'N f-X: if 1?I:fr:i4fl nu' f will 1. I- rv 5 . 4, , .. ,. il Left to Right: Top Row-Connors. Hindelang, Doyle. Barba. Hanck, Moskowitz, Richenbaclc, O'Brien Bottom Row--Sweeney. Hinz. Schneider, Gumbleton. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE Walter E. Hinz, Robert Hollow, Alvin R. Holstein, Daniel I. Hunt, Matt Ilmoni, Keith Inch, John Ivers, Lewis Iabre, Herman Iaconson, Carl J. Iaminet, Stanley G. Janson, Stephen Iaworski, Abelmino Jimenez, L. R. Johnson, Verg Iohdro, john A. Kane, Joseph Kaller, Ernest E. Kathrein, Andrew Keith, Delmar Kernohan, John C. Kinggo, John E. Kuzara, Crval A. Lamsens, Cswald I. Lamsens, Carl Layman, Roy Lee, George I. Lehr, Bernard A. Lowry, Edward C. Lutowski, David Lyons, Fred W. Lyons, Robert T. MeBrady, Willis E. McCarthy, Edward C. McEligatt, Edward P. McCann, Joseph T. MeGarry. if' 1 g Y' 'I ,Av uc: 51693 L t to Right: Top Row-Rosenbaum, Hunt, Simpson, Doll, Holstein, Burson, Wood, Bisset. Seco cl Row-Grammens, Darling, -Girardin, Slonaker, Davis, Rivard, Masura. Bottom Row-Rivard, Mclntyre, Nork, McGlynn, Novak. Iabro. O'Donnell. NIGHT COMMERCE AND FINANCE William McGinn, Francis McGlynn, Patrick A. Mclntosh, Everett Mclntyre, Gerald Madigan, James Madigan, Marjorie Mahoney, Robert Mansfield, Paul Masura, Ethel Mattson, Gertrude Mattson, John I. May, John Mead, Howard Messenger, George J. Michael, joseph Miles, Robert T. Mixich, Winson Moberly, Philip Mohan, Jack Webb Montgomery, Ralph W. Moore, Powell C. Morgan, Charles E. B. Morris, Cscar Mos' kowitz, Donald C. Motz, Frederick. C. Moyer, Hazen H. Munro, Geral-d A. Murphy, Richard A. Muttschall, Arthur P. Nork, Lewis I. Novak, Cecil C'Boyle, Joseph S. C'Brien, William E. C'Brien, William Robert O'Brien, Dennis P. C'Donnell. 51703 Left to Right: 'Top Row-Inch, Andrews, Keith, Lyons, Ruffing, A. Tavarozzi. Bottom Row--Iandro, Poisman, Mattson, Dimmer, L. Tavarozzi, Wilson, Edwards. n NIGHT CChHAERCE.AND EUNANCE Peter H. C'Donnell, I. Charles C'Gorman, George Ochenduszko, Stephen M. Orlowslcy, Frank C'Shea, Louis J. Petrone, Kenneth L. Pfister, Hugh Philips, Bernard Piotrowslci, Harriet E. Poisrnan, Earl E. Quibell, I. E. Quick, Max Radorn, Ebert Rager, Erank M. Rdick, Edward I. Reeser, John L. Reilly, Clarence H. Rickenbach, Aurelius J. Rivard, Cecil John Rivard, Melvin Roach, Henry L. Roehrig, Manuel Rosenbaum, Charles A. Ruedisueli, Clarence L. Ruffing, J. L. Ryan, Harold Sampson, Art. Scharton, Al Schneider, Carl Scho-enborn, Louis H. Schill, Benj. A. Schroeder, Henry Schulte, Leo C. Schulte, Jack W. Segwalt. 51713 Left to Right: Top Row-O'Brien, Trombley, Connors, Michael. Second Row-Scholl, Stefanac, Roehrig, D'aoust Bicum, Welling, Gorman, Chowning. Bottom Row-Lyons. O'Gorman, Rager, McElligatt, Mixich. Dilworth. Miles, Mansfield. NIGHT CCMMERCE AND FINANCE Ralph Sein, William C. Simpson, Homer C. Slonaker, Albert Smith, Her' bert M. Spencer, Aubray Spredlin, Marie C. Sullivan, Norvell M. Sullif van, Frank M. Stefane, Harry Stewart, Marie Stilwell, David W. Sweeney, Fred Suppes, Albert Tavarozzi, Lucille Antoinette Tavarozzi, Leo Theisen, William Thompson, James Thompson, Harold James Trombley, Harold Tucker, Edward J. Valentine, John Gordon VanBoemel, Elmer VanTiem, Raymond Victor, Ellis Vitale, Guy Waller, Edward Y. Walsh, Elizabeth Weber, Arthur Weintrob, Eugene I. Welling, Lorna Wilson, Raymond C. Wilson, Barnard Wise, Russell E. Wood, james H. Woodworth, Erle Ebenezer Wright, Joseph Zoellner. fivzg what wnrks are these that rharm ns num, Sparkling in the glnrinns sunlight nt nur hagsg what trienhs are here tn press nnr hanhs, Eluueh in the rnnuiuial ings nt passing gears, munlh tahe tn :harm nn mureg their sweetest hnhs milting, umnlh tall, trampleh 'neath marching euentsg SDih nut memnrg, hlesseh histnrian, hnlh them Gln her lmsnm, hnrg them in the tastnesses nt her heart Hs heah leaues in winter their snhstanre giue Eu enrirh the earth trnmiuhenre theg spring, Qu in the rnlh, nlh gears ut lite, memnries rnme Qfreeping hack, tn rheer anh rnmtnrt the time-wnrn snnl what memnrg hulhs nn hanh mag tnnrh, anh in Qer heep reresses, tlnufrs nt the fleeting gears Eine nn, in an euerlasting present.' 51753 Q 43+ C -u 'O I K A as Za? ' 11 Zi' mgdfgf ' 3 W 1-41 CZ!! O O O O . I fT ' JW 4, P M x l,rQ X W, 1, R - wx I 'X 'x We I 1 wi pf gf ff 1' W 1 li: U? fi 'SME I P w ?A 5 'I ' .z e n ky P - ' N7 M6473 ljg ., . A , YJ H b 2 , k 1 43 to 4 o ,toy J' " . l 2 lid M ? w 49' 14503, 4,05 Kok Left to Right: First Row-Andries, Biggs, Christie, Collins, Connell. Second Row-Cornell, Donovan, Harrington, Hess. Third Row-Gregory, Johnston, Kummer, Long. Fourth Row-McCormick. Maier Maledon, Pequegnot, Fifth Row-Shubnell, Theisen. Thill, Young, Zeeman. f176j ACTIVITIES HONOR SOCIETY JOHN E. CoLI.INS f f GEORGE XV. HESS WALTEIK E. THILL OONSTANCE T. MAIEIR f f f President f VicefPrcsident f Secretary f Treasurer MEMBERS LEO J. ANDRIES DONALD M. BIGGE AUGUST J. CHRISIIE THOMAS J. CONNELL JOSEPH F. CORNELL JERRY I- DONOXV.-KN WILLI.-XM B. H.-XRRINCITON WILLI.aM B. GREGORY RALPH C. JOHNSTON CLARENCE J. KUMMER NE of the most highly prized honors on the campus is election to the Activities Honor Society. This organif zation was formed in February of 1928 by the Eaculty Board of the university. Its purpose was to create a unifying bond among those students who had excelled in service to their Alma Materg to make more than a merely honorary organization, to form a society that would bring the greatest talent of the university together in a common effort for progress. This year the society had an active mem' bership of twentyffour students drawn from nearly every department of the university. This body represents those who have conf tributed and are contributing the most to the activities of their departments. Members are admitted to the society when they have earned a certain number of honor points. Each activity is accredited with the number of points which participaf tion in it deserves, and when a student has acquired the number set by the Faculty HARVEY J. LONG GEORGE D. MCCORMICK WILLI.xM J. MALEDON EDWARD J. MALONEY LUCIE R. PEQUEGNOT FRANCIS J. PHELAN LEO T. SHUBNELL EDXVIN C. THEISEN IRIS L. YOUNG LOUIS J. ZECMAN Board he becomes eligible. Every activity of the university is listed, together with a scale of points for each office in that parf ticular activity. At the beginning of the year eight stuf dents were chosen for membership. They were initiated at a banquet in their honor at Webster Hall on November 22. On May 14, seven more members were taken in at a second banquet at Webster Hall. General meetings of the society were held throughout the year at which business of the society and affairs of the university in general were discussed. The purpose of the organization is to promote the extraf curricular activities of the university and encourage students to participate in them. Their aim has been Well carried out, and the past year has seen a quickening in every field of university endeavor. Bef cause of the fact that the members of the society participate in practically every ac' tivity of the school, they are in a good position to accomplish the purpose for which the body was conceived. f177J Left to Right: Top Row-Butler, Clark. Center Row--Gross, Maniere. Bottom Row--Ritter, Zeeman I 178 I ATHLETIC BOARD CF CCNTRCL WILLIAM E. CLARK f M. CLEMENT BUTLER f MARK S. CROSS, SJ. f ROBERT MANIERE DANILE RITTER LOUIS H. ZECMAN WENDALL HALL f HE hard part about university sports of modern times is without doubt the financial one. Sports are more than the physical side of education. They are a busif ness, a business which must face energetic competition, and which must be handled in such a way as to insure financial success. Failure means the loss of university athf leticsg and loss of university athletics means a great decrease of attendance at the uni' versity. The Athletic Board of Control of l928f 29 has held to a policy of strict business that has enabled sports of the University of Detroit to reach a higher peak of success than had ever been imagined possible. They have left the athletic department on a basis that is financially secure for the activity which will follow in this Held. Nor has this been accomplished without diffif culty. There were problems at times which seemed almost insurmountable. ,But hard work, and a keen insight into the things which make for success in athletic activity, battered down the barriers that stood in the way and placed the university in the front rank of collegiate athletics in the country. A brief review of the season's accomf plishments makes' more clear the great work that the board has done. In addition to hiring the coaches, the payment of sal' aries, and the carrying out of the univerf sity's athletic policies, the board has ref duced the debt on the stadium to a size from which it can easily be liquidated. A l A f f Chairman f f Treasurer f F acuity Moderator f Student Members f Alumni Member great achievement, and one that formed the greatest problem in the athletics of the university. The board also enlarged the field of university athletics by the addition of two minor sports, hockey and track. Both were placed in intercollegiate competition for the first time this year, and track especially won considerable success. These two sports were unremunerative, and operated at a complete loss to the athletic departf ment. They were, however, a source of enjoyment to the students who played in them, and furnished the physical side to the development of the university's manf hood. Football has, of course, been the great work of the board. Sponsoring the greatf est football team in the history of the university, it completed a year great -in success. The board has seen its work ref flected in the progress made by this remark' able organization, a true reflection of its policy to give athletics the best possible. lt framed the hardest football schedule that ever faced a University of Detroit team, and its confidence in that team resulted in its coming through the season undefeated. This achievement brought more renown to the university than any other factor in the year's history. With a year of such accomplishment the board has formed a model that will be worked up to in future years as a standard of perfection in athletic management. firm .Left to Right: Top Row-Blakeslee, Harbrecht. Center Row-Donohue, Meskell. d'Haene Bottom Row-Luyckx, O'Regan. li 180 I THE FACULTY BOARD ON STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS REV. JAMES A. MESKELL, Sl. DR. RICHARD A. MUTTIcowsKI Mlss FLORENCE DONOHUE f REV. ORMOND P. DHHAENE BERT N. BLAKESLEE PAUL P. HARBRECHT 1 1 f f Chairman Secretary ' f f Dean of Women Moderatoi' of Publications JOSEPH A. LUYCKX WILLIAM B. O'REoAN LOUIS W. MCCLEAR HF. Faculty Board on Student Organ' izations is comprised of nine members of the faculty of the university. It func' tions in an advisory capacity to all student organizations, and is a working system for handling applications and reports on stu' dent dances. Throughout the scholastic year, the Faculty Board plays an active part in the solving of student problems. The main problem which confronted them at the beginning of the 1928729 school year was the rapid growth of social organizations on the new campus, and their activities. After deliberation, the board decided that the solution lay in the codification of regulations governing the activities of the different organizations. The result of their studies, an interfraf ternity council, was offered to the presif dents of the fraternities. This council would cofordinate the activities of the campus fraternities and enforce necessary regulations over them. It was the belief of the board that this council would prof mote the interests of the fraternities and the university at large, and would insure cofoperation between the fraternities and the authorities of the college, thus improvf ,S ing to a large extent the fraternal condif tions on the campus. This proposal met with the approval of the heads of the various fraternities who appointed a committee to frame a constif tution for the new organization. The conf stitution was accepted by all fraternities, and the InterfFraternity Council has be' come one of the guiding bodies in student affairs. As a result of the .interffraternity council, the university has experienced a year of unprecedented activity among its fraternif ties. The success of the individual func' tions of these organizations has been greater because of the fact that in no inf stance was there a conflict of dates for their social functions. Consequently, the student support of these activities was un' divided. A common rule of regulation for all fraternities has served as a force of equalization and has stabilized their efforts as nothing else could have done. The work of the faculty board in the regulation of student activities is realized in the orderliness with which these func' tions were carried out. It was a unifying force, long needed, and now accomplished. 51813 Left to Right: Top Row-Bigge, Billings, DeLoge, Friske. Center Row-Goodnow. Gregory, Howard Bottom Row-jenncy, McCormick, Riley, Tamplin. lf182l DETROIT UNION DONALD M. BIGGE f f JAMES SPARKS f f G. HOWARD SCOTT f GEORGE MCCORMICK f f f f f President f VicefPresident f Secretary Treasurer BOARD OF GOVERNORS WILLIAM B. GREGORY f FRANK ,IENNEY f f f MATTHEW J. DELODGE LAWRENCE RILEY f f ERNEST TAMPLIN FREDERICK BILLINCS IOSEPH FRISKE f HE Union Board of Governors for the year 1928729 has created an en' viable record for itself . Entering the year With considerable debt, the board has cleared itself of all obligations and is leavf ing a substantial surplus upon Which the incoming administration may build. The furnishing of the neW Union rooms on the doWntoWn campus for the use of Law and Night School students, at a cost of several thousands of dollars, will remain as a monument to the retiring Union Board. Add to this extraneous expendif ture the payment of interest and principal on the Union House on Fairfield Avenue, and the Student body Will have some idea of the board's Work. Among the projects backed by the Union Board Was the third annual Union opera, "Hoofs, My Dear," known to stu' dents and alumni as the outstanding Social f f f Arts and Science Day Commerce and Finance Night Commerce and Finance f f f Engineering Engineering f Night Law f Day Law success of the year, and as entertainment par excellence. A feature that contrib' uted much to the interest aroused in this year's opera Was the decision on the part of the Union Board to hold the shoW in April instead of at Christmas. Among the minor events sponsored by the Union Were the small dancing parties at Gesu Hall and the smokers given at various times during the year. All of these affairs Were given for the sole ben' eflt of the students Without the hope of any proiit. In addition, the board superf vised the class dances, all of Which Were successful both socially and Hnancially. It fell to this year's board to exercise its poWer of appointment on two diiferent occasions, brought about by the resignaf tion of tWo of its members, G. W. Hess and James Sparks. Frank Ienney and Naf than Goodnow Were appointed to fill the vacancies. ' f183j Left to Right: Top Row-Bauser, Pequcgnot. Center-Maier. Bottom Row-Freidl, Young 51843 UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT WOMEN'S LEAGUE CONSTANCE T. MAIER ffffff President Lucie R. PEQUEGNOT f MARY QWEN f f ARMELLA FRIEDVL f lius L. YOUNG f DOLLY A. BAUSER NDER the able leadership of Conf stance T. Maier, the Wonien's League has assumed an important and inf fluential position on the campus. Lucie R. Pequegnot, irst vicefpresident, contributed valuable cofoperation and generated pep, energy and a lively interest in all activities. The league opened its social season on Thursday, Cctober 18, with a bridge party held in the hall of the Commerce and Finance building. At this social, Miss Kathleen Kehoe, chairman of the commit' tee, welcomed the new members, the Frosh cofeds, to the league. A secondary purpose was to acquaint the upper classmen with their younger classmates and to establish that spiritual bond of friendship, and loyalty. Many of the professors availed themselves of this opportunity to meet the Frosh girls socially. The "Pumpkin Dance," which was the outstanding social event of the year, was given on Friday, November 2, in the League of Catholic Women's ballroom. The setting was in harmony with the sea' son. Cornstalks, pumpkins, Jack o'Lant' erns, ghosts, moons, cats, skeletons and orange lights transformed the ballroom into a rendezvous for goblins and witches. This was an occasion which afforded cofeds and male students the opportunity to become acquainted socially. The faculty which supports cofed activities in a special way, was well represented by many of the prof fessors and their wives. At this dance, which was a closed event, the Sophomore f First Vicefllresideitt f Second VicefPresiderLt f Corresporzdmg Secretary V f Recording Secretary ' f Treasurer girls were hostesses and were ably assisted by the other classes. Miss Dolly Bauser was chairman in charge of all arrange' ments. The league striving to uphold its ideals of unity, cofoperation and friendship, sponsored a prefLenten bridge on Saturf day, February 9, in the Lee Crest Apart' ments. lts social purpose in this, was to bring about a closer contact between alumnae and student cofeds and to strengthen the bond of unity which stamps an organization, a success. The Freshmen girls who were the hostesses were given the undivided support and stability of the upper classmen. It was a lamentable fact, however, that the alumnae were somewhat delinquent in supporting this function. Cn Saturday, April 13, the league sponf sored its Hrst postfLenten social, a bridge tea at which the Iunior girls with Ruth Pease as general chairman, were the hos' tesses. Music, table prizes and refresh' ments were features of this successful event. Every activity staged by the league was a success socially and financially. The un' precedented number of large functions was indirectly sponsored in an attempt to carry out the ideals of the university and to bring about a greater understanding among its members. At no time in the past history of the organization have the girls succeeded in improving the welfare of the Women's League to so great an extent as they have in l929. 1:1851 '55 Wm li Q W' 'W I xv DP V V , LN:-I 'v , F5Qf ?'4jiEaEEESb ,577 W' I ca 'W fax ff-12'-. 75 W - "?,'5"-1 U pg, . E 33 :An Sifihh 'swbb 455C-gm gfmfxwi by " ' ,:?'Wt' v Y 1 ' ,gd N I Q51 ' qu ' U-f? A , 1S"Z' my NW, i gy 'fffrjw 1 f ll ,,. V H xf Vf N X 7 WV' ' 1 ff Q ' Q Q 9 Qfww QXQX lv 0 Q Z ' ' X J , 1 Um JOURNALI TIC EE 9 'Q e i K gof - 4 , O 3 M M ,ggq A4 59, 3045 402 5 .LV .Vg . f ffl' rf? v 'L 'Fl 7 7 , J Q J i 1 ,!' . " S ,f- ' ' 1- t V , 1 'QQ , "1 .. il' jpg 1' 5 ' ' s.-.J-f.Jf. .1-A --L-v5.:1,.i14 if-1 ,xi 11:5 1m".,51 p'-- :S J' Qs-jg.4.i" yti,55gLiv 'i:,..Q 'g VW ','f.4Jq Ji fb, '5..,,j .1 -'Sh T. Jlii 'Serif .Ain ,513-:L AL MXLIY 5, giiiklf gl 11 'JJQQ 'rf 9 E3 WW- 4.r:v.5,+.' .-wiki: t'i5'5i" ' -i 'VJ V" '-1 T F' 1' J. 1 QWMQ ,Q ' 4 2 its '. J. J I .- A L L., r A .pli- ...,f KM' -1 .1 -v W' 1 1-.J 1 a 'yi' J' K' A l .1-lr, . . fi, .. A, l A A .QV I' Q 1 is L4 fl t gif A TISOJ1-Y ! A .' . ffl I .Auf wi. 'jf' .1521 l 'V 4 .f.,,. .v.. .1 -gn- L 1 J-I 11' . KA ..'. Amr. .Y .5 ku .kwa ,. if "ip 'L 121, , V, -, .. .. A, . . .- . . ,,-, ,: .. 1 J- ,L - , i L. "if 'H rn --,f l -w .- .."-.R 1ff'ff"'t-R A 'xviTTa3?'zJU tlj"'X 113. r'f-zJ"5f"'f'-' rut J , , ,s , . s' 6' 1 N, 0 , , ,i f , ' "' JW? 4 , it U 1 r' 'iv il' "F'fpk-Af :-I-J.-js: A w51-f2i':xf,j- , - . I ' , Mb A - f A X ii 1 f J .E 'LMA' ..:.H'Qt.5f?.l55lr-ARAP. L L 5, gags 2 A :Lf 'f.1..L'... 1, wi .,7 "W-.,,,,gf1fs-.gjfg-.QB TOWER EDITORIAL STAFF RALPH C. JOHNSTON JOHN C. TREEN RALPH W. BOONE f C. CARROLL NUSSEY f CLARENCE J. KUMMER FRANK E. JENNEY 1 JAMES M. BRENNAISI JOHN S. MALLEY JOSEPH W. STARRS f ALBERT J. NAGLER f Editor f Managing Editor Associate Editor f Associate Editor Associate Editor Photography Editor Art Editor f Sports Editor Asst. Sports Editor Asst. Sports Editor EDMOND J. OTTENBACHER Asst. Sports Editor REPORTERS ti el A . ' g li .f l ' , QT gf K J il .i X .fit A FMF I .5233 fli. 24:5 si-2 "cgi-si 'FS if W Y VTX? J'- W' - tar!" f E21 ' f" 1 it , if if 54.32 iii' ws' xii! VJ . .4 ,tiger I-if f ' Fi "l if .iA,x.'-Ui, Phillip W. Stackpoole Iris L. Young '., fi--ff' 1. fl ' r ' . . . . -'E . Daniel F. Ritter Eileen K. Cross "",i4:, ' E W . A-l4lfQi?T."f . 4 "P 35,142-my Charles R. Schmitter Leo T. Shubnell fzfrf C. Scott Howard Miriam L. Russell :LX wi.. XL ' ,arf-.til A-eff, 14.314571 4: fi r,'T'a 'Y' ' "a 1'- .ri1'fJ'f?' In 'i3A,i?i'T1 G' . 'Arif 'Wa Wi 'Wil v-.- QQ! ' if' ' Johnston i,..x'j"f F I dl ff. .. 5 ml tie p, Treen W. ,-1. . 'i"f If 1 FQL ,Q 15+ . f' .. V if 4, Y if . B 'Hip EJ? ii' A' L-F U ., -sv' il. i A ' "H I li Qty A . Q., ,,- , R- . w. . -, .gs.i.-,.,,--Sgr. " . i.g'1f, fj-N '-rf-A -1f'+v.,-"'T 'lb' " i?'lii"3ilI1lQf7 ' J ...LQ-' 31 --..qf.f1' E-'QR " 9' J' HV-Jf-14.TJ-Iii!-l"C'i-T'f.?'?fl-iii'Gag. JJ . rieiffff''3:vwzli'-lla-'.-f"L"1.' "L1a.L"'4 " F. -..f .Ai-14 --" jj'P-:N-7A1.s:..wl-f2T'f5"f'Qv'f7,1i,gi"'J3"-L--1-"ft't"'-3"' L.,-fE5'f7'J-5ii4'- , ,.,,,,. Jrv, , " s-run., P.-an f188J Q .iw -1 ,il ,. ' 4 1' f H ' 1 J J .i u U .. iq. 'x , .i , . A ,,.A - Q X, I lx" f V .lb-,rt A, V," . v ' --Jfwb , -ti I N., QV' gr .g. fu ' 'W' 'vip-1 if- s gi- .v ,-1,-, I1 J' , 'I 1 ,., . f' my vi S it M' .ilgigti , 124, -PWM vi Q, ,ag ,, M J. 9- ,- .q..l,, iv .-wijt Lag-a .. ., 1,-' ..i.7.Q,- wg. , .f 1 il ' "nw 45 til' J -:W 'S Q Y, . THE TO'WER HE seventh year book of the University of Detroit has a definite message to carry to you-the message of a thrilling and vital spirit -the message of a growing, expansive, and progressive school. An attempt has been made to mark down a year's history of your university life and the task of recording so tremendous a story fills one with a feeling of incapability to complete the work. As we look back on the year of 1929 most of us realize that there is a fascination exerted by crowds of students. Perhaps we stand too close to the picture to have a clear conception of it. Perhaps in future years when we thumb the pages of this Towmz we will recall pleasant memories of old student friends and happy ex' perien'ces. Then and then only will you fully recognize that there is a charm about your TowER. You will come to realize that the things that you read in print represent a herif tage even greater than the imposing Tower memorial that rears its majestic shaft above our new campus. ' How striking is the scene which that stately tower daily looks down upon, the plunging tor' rent of university life pouring its mighty force down the rocky mountain side of knowledge to the valley of sincere pursuits. If we have succeeded in conveying to you some idea of the magnitude of that dynamic spirit which permeates the University of Def troit, we feel that our work has not been in vain. Cur intention was to improve upon the efforts of our predecessors, and for any measure of success which we may have attaine-d, we wish to sincerely thank all those students, faculf ty members, and individuals who have so will' ingly extended their cofoperation and labor. The editor has nothing but the warmest thanks and kindest words for all of those stu' -dents who were unsehish enough to subordinate Qi' their own interests to the success of the TOWER. The staff of the 1929 TowER has done its 55353 best. We offer you the story of a year at the Boone Nussey ,Rf U. of D. and fondly hope thatour message is Kummef Jamey clear to you-the message of a thrilling and vital spirit-the message of a growing, expanf if - sive, and progressive school. Q F "" . u y , 1 f 4 rz.. ..f. - A i 51893 if-'T' v YV if E T f fi i -be if I 5 . l .i I rv , 1 Q I i x 1 42 QUE S T O W E R BUSINESS STAFF EILEEN K. CROSS e e f e Business Manager JAMES E. FRAZER f f f f f Circulation Manager MIRIAM L. RUSSELL f Assistant Circulation Manager JOHN F. COLLINS e Assistant Circulation Manager DEPARTMENTAL MANAGERS CLEMENT F. FISHER ffff Arts and Science JAMES A. HAGGERTY f Day Commerce and Finance BERNARD A. CHAPMAN - 1 e Section Engineering RUSSELL K. PAYEA ffff Section B Engineering ERIE ROSE ffffffffef Day Law ARTHUR E. SOMERS ffrf Afternoon Law KENNETH C. TIFFANY Night Commerce and Finance MAILING DEPARTMENT Marie H. Bunetta Florence M. Bernard ' Earl J. Demeleski f?f"5 5 Jr S if 5 3 i XX 0 if MQ I Qi If 2. Li- ef- gif - N Malley Nagler b Ottenbacher Starrs v Harrington .xr , .W K' I . gf- Q " fwfr? .fry , it ig . 1 L X ' N X A Q I , U " . S En t G Ei A f1901 3-.,. . ,,. J. . Y- 6E34t"faa-"Elgar-1. aa . 1 pr 1 TOWER CIRCULATION Ge HE TOWER circulation for this year more ' than triples that of any previous annual of mf-at this university as a result of the fee which Was 2 l added to the regular tuition stipend at the sec' V T ond semester. On December 4, 1928, the Boar-d of Govern' Aff my llf ors of the Detroit Union drew up a petition l if . recommending a L'ToWer Fee" and submitted lille, ., ' it to the Board of Trustees of the university. fi gg W. The Trustees granted the request and Iohn P. gnff Q 3 McNichols, SJ., president of the university, ji signed. the dictum. The TOWER staff being, certain of a definite , source of revenue immediately made plans to 9, produce a more comprehensive annual publicaf . ' vi tion than ever before attempted. Relieved of gif' 3 the old problem of financial uncertainty the 5 gi H 3 staff was enabled to progress Without fear of J altering its plans at the last moment before pub' vi lication. All members of the staff cofoperated ,f l in an attempt to include in this year's producf , Q tion every branch of activity in which the stuf fag C dent body is interested. This plan received the ,T J full approbation of the undergraduates and the Union Board is to be congratulated for having WEN? O . petitioned so Wise a policy. , O 1 if i Picture three thousand students storming the Wai tk l TOWER office for a copy of their annual and , you can gain some idea of the magnitude of the ' problem which faced the circulation depart' . ment. Under such circumstances one would v E imagine that confusion and disorder would ref 'ZX sult, but the circulation department planned their Work in a thoroughly efficient and comf jjff'lg:,.-- FQ! l petent manner. :J In the final analysis a year book is no more ggQj'9 than a complete record of all the accomplishf T 9 1" ' Q25 1 S, if .iq v , 1 If as 7133? 15,555 this f ri ments and activities of the student body of that institution which it represents. The action taken by the Union Board has enabled the 1929 Staff to place a copy of this book in the hands of every student at this university an-d familiar' J .71 , 'V V M., T J 125531 f R 1' ize them with the progress which their Alma i 133 l . Mater is making and with the noble traditions .1 which are a part of their university. Every Frazer R H ff. possessor of this annual holds a treasure which Collins um li K. will serve in years to come as a constant ref .W minder of the most enjoyable and worth while H3 .1 period of his life-of his college days. f fa ww ., V ' I feifyjl xlgg p ' 1- gl , ...AW p 51911 I H' ,- .gr . z .- get Qs. . fl' ' ,yarn J .,. J 'fi Il J ,hx 4 g " J -I I JI Y.. lt N ls If " 5 j- ff, . I uf ,qw . "" if V 9. L i,' nn' VW"-1' l is R Q: il I ' f 'ii flat! ur. 5-lla gf YAY 1' up., K?-I N ,- ir .A Inf. ., I., , it ,i .. . ,I 1,3 W.. 'jam R. FW 'lloi l .Lib :L 51,f2Jn, -I yas lilly 52? M."I?tsI ij IL f.'f":Jl fziffif Xw.',.,,1i M 54--gsgj 4 14- " -.- - a-f--. - wx -R ""'-' data. fit E L1 we LW"2"fw"i wr f 3 we A-ff,.',,r "f- -M ---R 'F' .1 . , .. df. J .-- ..v . . I -0 - 'r- .41'0i:-ffm-. I ..f ig .-.. is U .3 A 11' -LQ: Y :.,w-1..l I I, ICM, .ef '-g '51, 5i'4..Iy "-.fa-'5t'A:.f5 Y fp A 1, ' A J.. -f N...-f I VARSITY NEWS E D I T C R I A L WILLIAM J. MALEDON f LEO J. ANDRIES f JERRY J. DONOVAN f JOHN C. TREEN JOHN S. MALLEY f Asst. RALPH C. JOHNSTON f Asst. CLARENCE J. KUMMER f EDWARD J. CORBETT f STAEE f f Editor Managing Editor Associate Editor Associate Editor Managing Editor Managing Editor Fraternity Editor f Society Editor WILLIAM B. LLARRINGTON f Sports Editor LOUIS H. ZECMAN f f Asst. Sports Editor ALBERT J. NAGLER f Asst. Sports Editor C. SCOTT HOWARD f f Asst. Sports Editor REPORTERS Marguerite Gahagen Iris Young Miriam Russell Adele Permen Arthur Grix Charles Shires John Cashin Ralph W. Boone Joseph Starrs Joseph A. Powers Dan Horgan Williani B. Gregory C. Carroll Nussey Mary Friedl James J. Haggerty Bernard Chapman James M. Collins Arthur O'ConnOr Dolly Bauser Armella Friedl Jerome Parle J. Stackpoole Ed. Andries Kathleen Kehoe Eileen Cross Larry Riley Elmer Bernitt Charles Fellrath S"rx-.,gl'L QVLELQ .,. ,,:.t,. 'r J ,s F51 . lyzihx ' 1 .I .was . is... Q pg. xii, gi ,Lb .. its T . L- A fi 5331 .,...ri,?,'f.4' r I J'- 'ii 159,-'I FE. J , . "ts-ff' flgggni. l page I ,DI .FI T - 'I 'lf' I vt 1' 4 . . . WJ. 2 qv- . . ,.!. J L53 si 1:11 Q 4, Y . ln t LH "ri if. la U W .,.,. f- L.: K .l L.:-,A MNJJ 1 -4 G . . ' 31,19- 1 .u ur ,Av- - K: -.' If., 91' 1 11 J' 515-iz' rr iff 3 in P RJ KJ. ! I J' ., .3 5... ' ffl: .r-'fi-,,' 'I 5-I. f 1' 515.4 5 I 'R Bruce Dempsey Donald Carney Lucie Pequegnot Phillip Stackpoole i 74 2 Em1l Eaur James Brennan C Earl Demeleski A'tf-A3 2 Ji P ,4 C.. .SV -' Maledon ,I Cross Q Andries . ,WPS xflpl 'Q I-1 ,E ' in ff . I' , ,EW-,',: f, gif-M if 'F' ig 'D L E rf . I A I I R A all - -I. . I 2 .A .-11-,f +L. 'rea ,':f,A1g:.fsfi-'Ares-4.2.-'i.J,-'f- J.. ll -f.- 1' . rs" f192J 1 M11 rv' - fy: J LM! ' M' mi , .Lv 'Ji . N, ,SWF f 'i-Fw' 3 . L2'fQ3'Z1 n ' QM 14, wg ' !-.js wif JM' .3 'rl' lil it , f. 'Rail F . .I 'Y l +I 1 THE VARSITY NEWS HAT the Varsity News really does in the field of student activities is seldom understood by those who read its pages with interest each week of the scholastic year. It is read because the work of each organization is pictured there, because every event of imporf tance that occurs is recorded in detail. But its real purpose is not fully appreciated. That purpose, unfailingly accomplished, is the unity of force which it lends to the comf bined activity of' every organization existing on the university campus, and the unanimity of support which it draws from the whole student body. These values, so important to the prog' ress of the university, so necessary to its pres' tige, are obscured in the personal services which it performs for the individual organization and the individual student. lts second year on the new campus has been marked by efficiency and growth. With the increase in size of the university and the result' ant larger numbers of organizations and func' tions, the Varsity News has kept step and has measured its progress with that of Alma Mater. With a regularity exceeding that of any pref vious year, the university weekly has appeared, and during the whole year has not fallen behind the standard of eight pages set in the fall of 1928. Nor has it failed in all that time to be available to the students on Wednesday, the day set for its publication. This accomplish' ment has often meant working half the night before, but the editor and his staff placed the achievement of a spotless record before personal sacrifice. The result has been a satisfaction throughout the student body with the univerf sity's 'Lnewsfoffthefweekf' The policies of the.Varsity News during the past year have been characterized by impartial' ity in the allotment of news space, by harmony of administration, and by regularity of publicaf tion. lts pages have at all times been free from departmental rivalry and partisanship. lf there have been any complaints, they have been largely from those who sought their personal gratincation and elevation at the expense of others who were equally deserving. ln its en-' tirety the year's work of the Varsity News has been unprecedented in the history of University of Detroit publications and will furnish a strong basis for its progress in the future. ff 1 ,fans fflhdm' Y J f. A ' " Lg. , wg, .e' A-gs, Asa., ai- 2-g ,,r 5, :gui sig, , ., 1 ,A -, ,r " ' Qfaffls' may ffiuiskitu 'J11'2':hQ,p,v.f.5 ' , X- f -N s 1. -- .-an - . ws' ' fr- . Q 'r,?'r,? ,iiggmjs 2.,",'9+,Li .75.".".'. 'V " f ' , . -r- .,'i,.1- fs- ..'.'r,g,, 'ii-, H " 1, -NAg,,..gg:f V ,- s. . - , - N miS,.J.ff Lg: ag. r'f:,.. !t,,r.' view' r, 51933 I l 1 . i l 1 1 1 l l I 1 'l 6 3 , E , Z i 1 3 l I 1 ri l l s -I 4 l s I 1 Donovan Treen Malley Johnston Kummer ll 6 s A NY fx VARSITY NEWS BUSINESS STAEE . V2 Y Q j EILEEN K. CROSS e e e Business Manager 3- LEO. T. SHUBNELL f e Circulation Manager E? sl DEPARTMENTAL MANAGERS ii' JAMES E. FRAZER ff-ff Arts and Science A 'J FRANK E. JENNEY e f Day Commerce and Finance lg f ALBERT E. FLEMING fffff Engineering A KENNETH H. CARR - f Engineering B fi ROGER P. OSCONNOR fffffffe Law HOMER C. SLONAKER, Night Commerce and Finance Y T MAILING DEPARTMENT RUSSELL K. PAYEA feeeeee Manager fl Edward J. Derck Cornelius J. Ryan Eugene Buchman Thomas S. Modjeski John V. Mulcahy Clarence E. Falkner qw' John H. LaSalle Edmund A. Schmidt John B. Moses Frank E. Smith Clarence N. Bronder Theodore M. Connolly el' .T 1 T igqfu 'QW Hx '15 Corbett Harrington if' Wim Zeeman Howard 2 EJ Nagler W9 .F34-R, leg ani . ff'f+?EF' fl is . ' erin-rw' . ' . P A i , if A 1.3.19 T 3 viii' fig? 'le i 1 4' gsifeiw. T53 , -' A 1:1941 - x in 1 L83 ff? in gr 'L 1. X is 1' if 0 rc, if.-"v V. . N f.. -.I ' 11 f ' i , ,---1 A- --,' ig x N -. P. ' .1 fair: T if U., 4 ,.-."7N- L M"-i ik ta:-irq . NH, ff T'+,f'1?5:" , 'Ki' Y Tlx if J QT' tu -if WeA-3'l'Ti.fit:':.T'-iii' if .sis Qi its y if Q gi.,3.pQjQ,.l it Qfivj. -if fgjy 'lf' RL, s3sQ3,ayg,.f5g,mi,istw5i?yw VARSITY NEWS- j'l'llq 99' CIRCULATION era V' 5. f . , J iz cg is .fix Sify. 'M-1.-11 .r i, 15141, gi -a,.r f l 'fail 1: X" -1-M -c elif iw if if il a f r,qZ"25i i 1 iff a. .iii T it-at gd! fi! A 41:1 ai'sl,TT'll 'lll,FQli'Ti iv 'ii lilify. yy ' ".".w. illill elif C Va- X13-'li -Qiaafgii .H , .li la IRCULATING the Varsity News has alf ways been a difficult task. Mistakes in mailing or distributing have sometimes been the cause of some student finding himself without the university's "nevvsfoffthefvveek." To devise a system to overcome this difficulty was the duty of Leo Shubnell, manager of circulation this year. The result Was a plan of distribution sup-erior to any hitherto in operation on the campus. The papers were given out in the classrooms shortly before noon each Wedniesday in suffif cient numbers to insure that each member of the class received a copy. In addition to this a special mailing, list of the engineering students was compiled so that those who were out of school would receive their Varsity News through the mail an-d thus be saved trouble in obtaining it. The latter part of this plan entailed the establishment of a special department for mail' ing. The members of this department were chosen from the engineering students them' selves, and the success of the plan proved the wiseness of the choice. Vxfhen one considers that it was necessary to put the Varsity News in the hands of every student, department, and faculty member on the day of publication, the diificulty of the prob' lem of circulation is realized. Another handicap which was successfully overcome was the existence of two campus bodies, one on Jefferson avenue and the other on Six Mile road. At the Jefferson avenue division of the university it was necessary to distribute papers in the evening as well as dur' ing the day on account of the night schools of Law, and Commerce and Finance. To care for this exigency, copies of the Var' sity News were delivered to the Jefferson school and placed in the hands of a representative of each department of the Iefferson division. Up' Qhubneu :Sing V . razer All on these representatives rested the responf Skmker Fountain QW' sibility for delivery to each member of their Ienney TQ department. .flags If , ni i- 'V' at-Q-Aa . ' ffrf' Wflh L"-1 Thi- M f-.fi-" H. 1- Ta. '1f::f1,'?'vliHa:x-. ix" ii Y.m'i. 44. ii'-iff ' 1 ' """x.e19-fl-H1 5 1951 -,fx I, .ggi 25: 'fri if .ffirtlisixl lg . 1 . i f i"'.i w fi.Qfffm,, E 'ill A 1 J, A Qfxsgyri L ,sv iailffffa- 'Aa ff, ll r fl! I i ggfzi' ev. iii " sl i -1. gif .mf- Mlffig' aim! is fir -:GET 4 'Q Vx -is ' wif, WZ, iv . . 3" -1 ,.V4., li I Jeriiq-pi. if A9.1w,1f,g , J 3 Q f .W ,,.1 ., F'f!f'h'.l lfflffil alll? ..,-u gi J ii' Cf' 1 ...J .g"zaa, iiiggifli ififflli wi n..:1 ' ' ff-ll! 3 . 3: fit., ,Syd . . .ai lag? if a .J ri filwlegl . f 'affix ei iii v ini 441537 f, .af V, Z i.-air. 2 Wim' if-2 Wiatr f- W mer gf , ".f'f'-'.,:, 'Gulf' , , 5 ,V 1 VJUW .' if-fi 1. iff I, wx. ML1 'Q ' if if-Effie' in-lvqig, 'IQ 'Ni ffm zu 0 Ki WEQPQ 'iff li. 'agar-411.201 xii. WF W. 'W I '- Y, . 1 l. fi?Ti'gD1-asf N" n ll? is L'!lQ im 'f:- 1 fr W1 '1 f' .1 ,hm :rl .- iw fglrli J .I Q. gg ,I ,L r rr QL, Y-at ,+V N' 'Sis mg 11: 1, i tg , 4 li an-I 9' fi . 1- 1.44 iwiifz ' -,V-r. I fr? M3110 X 1' S Q xg WDP Q, . CD , ? lr. H! LY if 'S NA! Lv Qsmesma nmmmem -. 'la-317' -- W S M 1,,.,,x 6 :AQ Qlglgfgb "s4Q4e'3 Ci! .lf 9525545 0 O m il.-N W 2 zz x S4 S7 NW? v Az ,. my , ., Q Q ' 9 9 1 iff" .f Q? 5 E Qfj O O O O Q lj? Q ly? A izQes-f- 3 A 15 Q md? X 3 si f- , -252 2. Z 5 , w,.vf:a:fQfs,5..X-Vf.wf:y,wyi.g9,QQQQw4g,.,pQ4iWW 539.52rmw,:f,yfan.:3ws,wg4xm,Q5 yyf,-5 ,- W -V M, .XX qw Ufww ,wwf fffammfqfwf f f Q55 if 442 wk AQ f f ' 5 AW Zffwf X55 603 fr ' ' J 4 52 ,lvl Us RELIGIOUS - Joh :Q QOr 4!O,+ wt? 5+ ' 4' s Your 405 6 iii M Am M 33.1 . My cp Y WO? 4, O 'p 4014 ,QNX 9 Y, .4 . . . rcir2,o'terJ?R... y Gigi! 'A f iii: - 4 B if? . f x .1 1. Ai 4 Y if? ' i 1 1 il? 'Y' " FE . i lf? e r - - A iii, I Frazer Purvis Maledon Huetteman Gariepy I V ll- ARTS AND SCIENCE SGDALITY JQ WILLIAM I. MALEDoN f f f f f f f Prefect 41 WILLIAM PURVIS f f f First Assistant ' aff . ' JOHN HUETTEMAN f f Second Assistant . JAMES FRAZER f f f f Secretary BERNARD GARIEPY f f f Treasurer Xlfg, Wi' , in MIM: IAMES A. MESKELL SJ. f f f f Faculty Director is fi ' ' ' ID A Etta' ' HILE not as large as some of the was followed by a short address by Rev. cf ' sodalities of the university, the Arts James A. Meskell, Sl., Dean of Men. His f ,-" and Science College religious organization subjects were at all times well chosen, and M33 finishes a year of accomplishment equal to dealt with topics of interest to every colf 3 any achieved by the others. lege student. 4,431 5 . . . . ,I 5,-' Quality rather than numbers has been A new plan was mstltuted m the fell by i J ..-i'vy?' . , . . f, the kCYU0'CC Of the SOdH11tY S HCUVIW- the reverend moderator. At each of the ,.. ,W J is W3 E h b h t 'b t d hi share in ' 11 ' f h ' ' 7 fi' . ac mem' er. as con I1 u e S meetings a co ection or t e missions was 1,-A the OrgaU1Z2l'C1OI1 S SUCCESS. taken. These funds were turned over to F, William Maledon, as prefect, was asf the Rev. Milet, SJ., who is carrying on eififsjewfp sisted in his work by John Huetteman and IDISSIOHHFX WOrk in India. Being H fOfII1Cf William Purvis, both outstanding in their Student of the University of Detroit? he gl j services to the university. They were was chosen as the recipient of the univerf ' chosen as assistant prefects in the sodality's sity's support in this field of religious work. organization at the beginning of the year. Perhaps no Cause is in greater need of -.gf The other Offices of Seefetary and treasurer funds nor is accomplishing a more valuable BZ 1 were Qapably filled by Jamgg Frazer and work than that of the missionaries in farf Bernard Gariepy. off Ulndia, where millions of. persons are 4 rm The meetings were held in the Chapel on denied the religious needs of life as well as -A the new campus each Tuesday noon, and many of its PhYS1Ca1 necessltles- E I' Aw were well attended throughout the year. Rev. Charles A. Schuetz, SJ., conf U The programs were opened by a reading ducted what was one of the finest retreats of the Office of the Blessed Virgin. This held in years at the university. Ji fin iq r", assi . . - 4-WW. " fi fra . ' H-,, e 3 ,Q -134517: Hr.-'im ,l'5?3 , lpf'A'.'IF..f-ev' 2 fv'e',1g.-'L 'Y 'A 2' 6, A .' 'gqq'1..- 'b ,. " Q., ii' A ig "Q-an-.. 459' I i ,Af-I ., ,ha E . ' -.1 , 'Y 'J , J' W ' fgaf-as fs .fe . --kr -A .. - ii-. ' , .. , ,W ..c .aw A 1-A-.Af-as fe'-A-Ulf'-l .2 T1 . A .,.. , 'I-'tiF".fi2+ ffffwigfgf .ii?"m,i'f wff,sf:1'Mf-tzyif 'm . " - W' A ' .- aff .- lL TTT! Magi", 5'4'iHl"'-i't--2-Le" "--l.jM-tw .al-.. uri! if'..ff.Q' H. ful ul fi.-f :Jf-1? eel' Aint-f.'+ziuT1? '--ag.e'Y"f'.w"'V.1ilf512:.f5"Z't'f.VW."'5l9? it ty - Q' I .,f,. -.,,,-44 .. ikltgg ' .JNL "yi visit' v . Ji,1,Z?.f - t'i"g:wfA N ' . if M 1.5 P' Ting 'I Kit fu 1,9 5 n 5, i . 5 ,. ' -w. if 1. ,i 1 A if 4? r J LQ' . it ,, .gft 1 1 ,sbt - ati 'fl iid! A Q V12'Ca Rf'-fi y 4 -'mis rg, IQFJEZ lltifiqf .vfftr-v. i 'Ai 3' if H".-5 ,il,'3Ii'g"x 'mia :pg-,ir N42-I -al-. MESS" ll'ui'f' V Wi. ' Vx ,Vi Qxtgpl twain, all 4 . f- ai- fx, Qi. lift Y ' v ts. tiilfllf' r" ravi: ,v Fil 1 it it i.5,31ii'9 Y' 'Q iiiaif.. 4-new . ra 3' L . .M i I f , 1' ' V ' . . ' mite? 1-:sl A A' Q' 1 - , :FH ' ' . ' V , xii tiki 12 -'FEW 22-ff .... . . . ...V i .i L 8 4 124' i ' ,i , . Hoban Mittig Christie Marthen Best DAY CQMMERCE AND FINANCE SGDALITY AUGUST CHRISTIE f f LEO MITTIG f BERNARD MARTHEN f JAMES HOBAN f JULIAN I. BEST f f , JAMES A. MESKELL, SJ. HE meetings of the Commerce and Finance Sodality during the past year have proved most fruitful in the spiritual benefits which they offered. Without the sodality university life would contain a void in its spiritual side which could not be nlled. It is the sodality which equalizes the education of the student and gives him a wellfrounded view of his task in the world from the moral as well as from the sofcalled practical Side. The spiritual need is one of the greatest to every student, and it is this need which the sodality fills. One of the greatest inspirations found f f f f f Prefect f First Assistant f Second Assistant f f Secretary f f Treasurer Faculty Director annual retreat. This religious conclave was held on February l, 2, and 3, in conf junction with the Section B Engineers, and was one of the valuable parts of the year's activities in the spiritual life of the Com' merce and Finance students. A large representation of the sodality members were present, and took away with them a religious sustenance which should conf stantly serve as an inspiration to themf selves, and to those with whom they come in contact. It was one of the best atf tended retreats held at the university, ap' proximately 300 students being present at iff.. H' .L sm. I - .UV ,iviifigi ...WK .fy If "w:.:2:x R E s-FQ .Q 1? 'fi ' ,. -'P w"f!F'nq"!., ':,-Wim .9 1:1 r ri gig.: . Ml'?'l fi N ,Y ,g iff'-:"'.'z 5,15 f" 'swirl if .raw .f.. ..g,r WV, .Q .3,i.n'-i-Q l '-'mf' var:- :J ,,7-'-.sf A F'-A Qfgg. 1.191 ' .- "-V' u ,gi2'1i!.- v ara. gwffh 1' 4414 P gill- t- i- .. . ' Ju ' 2, lv , .Tr p ,cm . . f' . 'i,, Al... ' 5 ,W lf.. -,E 1 W acl .,,, ., Ulf, I X'.,g,,.l 1 Q 5, A FN. T-Th-, if! 9 ffl-if 'V fi." L 5, b 4 '4 T i 1 . . A' 4"f.' ' . 1 1 ,vi .. I, i'7"l. I, .. .fy , 4.1 v yy" ...,.,. , F-likw Lf 4:,Ls,,.'iV 'vu,.U .1-i.,,y:..u f3,. - Q79 fi-title itigllhhai vt g- 1. ,i lat.: li we lifx ' 1 . -.1 an . . in the sodality activity of the year was the CHC11 CXSTCISG- IKE! . constant advice of Rev. James A. Meskell, August Christie, prefeet Of the sodality, SJ., Dean of Men, who directed the or' proved to 'be a capable leader, and handled ganization as faculty moderator.. His brief hle etgehlzetleh Wlth efhelehey through, Q ICCUJYCS COHTQH-lned l3h05e Splfltual, gem? out the year. The meetings were held limfg Wl11Cl'1.3.fC Pf1Z6Cl bY'3 Sttlflenf Who 15 Sefl' each Wednesday at noon in the university ously interested in his religion. Chapgl. They were Opgned with the u5ue1 One of the major accomplishments of Cffice of the Blessed Virgin, and were the sodality was its participation in the featured by brief talks by Fr. Meskell. '94 - ii... 1' 12" ie-....... . .-'fsi. A E. . TQ"f.,-ggi if " I A All ,iff Vi.' 4 if 4 ' L 'V 'il :g 1591 4 ,Vg .1 . l f 'e - -- 13,1 Ja. Murphy Reilly McCormick Ward McGuigan SECTICDIIK ENGINEERING SCDALITY GEORGE MCCORMICK f f f f f f f Prefect PAUL REILLY f f PETER WARD f f WILLIAM MURPHY f f EUGENE MCGUIGAN f f JAMES A. MESKELL, S.J. HE Sodality of the Blessed Virgin was founded with the intention of aiding the college students of our campus in their spiritual work. Since its inception, the Jesuit Fathers have regarded it as an inf tegral part of their educational system. The U. of D. has one of the finest repref sentative sodalities of all the Jesuit schools, and throughout this organization there is no unit endowed with a more progressive spirit than the Section A group of the College of Engineering. George McCormick, a senior engineer, was elected by the body to serve as its prefect. In casting about for an able staff of assistants to aid McCormick in support of the sodality's policies the students se' lected Paul Reilly, first assistant, Peter Ward, second assistantg William Murphy, secretary, and Eugene McGuigan, treasurer. f f First Assistant f Second Assistant f f Secretary f f Treastcrer f Faculty Director When Father Meskell announced the series of annual retreats for the various colleges of the university, the Section A engineers decided to hold their's in conf junction with the day Commerce and Fi' nance College. Rev. Charles A. Schuetz, S.J., nationally known retreat master, conf ducted the exercises and offered interpretaf tions and advice concerning moral prob' lems which confront the average college man of today. All of the services were well attended, and Father Schuetz proved to be more than worthy of his famous reputation. The sodality made collections at its reg' ular meetings for the foreign missions, and all of the proceeds were sent to Rev. H. A. Killian, S.J., who is working among the Jesuit missions in Patna, lndia. 52001 'K 5 l -1 1.1 l l ', -S. ,,Yg, t5'fi,:L'.', w. Apt, ,af im: ry.-WJ - -.R as ,fx -", lbw: -, L 1-Wi r . Y -4 ggi. p -.77 nf 'Qin 11:2 4, 'nggjlifr R. J U . Z Kr .ilbgji Jl,,g:1lf.fiGH .F rfefqiyyy ailfsfilk llfliiiili H A .ij-1. rig? QQ or ,nw I' l l Effffrlf ltj.-Tai 3 5, I a'-irate il 'SEEK -V w'r!H.y.n"l' J fr if--I if, 5 'Nix ,fr A 1- 5,-, - -1 as A 1 rs Y. 'ia - -wwf' 'i Rf-'Af V .t F. , Qlwfiif ' w ',r" 'u. ', I . ,' - "f 53' -'44 Hogan Beckley Riley Mittig Fisher sEOT1ON E ENGINEERS SGDALITY LAWRENCE RILEX' ffffffff Prefect ARNOLD MITTIG f JAMES BEORLEY VINCENT HOGAN f JOSEPH FISHER f f JAMES A. MESKELL, S.J. f NE of the largest sodalities in the university is that of the Section B Engineers. This sodality's work during the year has resulted in great spiritual blessing to its members, and has placed it among the most successful of the religious organizations on the campus. Rev. James A. Meskell, Dean of Men, has made special efforts in carrying on his work in the Engineering College, and through his assiduous direction the sodalf ities of that department have greatly benf efited. Une of the most remarkable achievef ments of this organization was its annual retreat. lt received unprecedented attend' ance and was unusually successful. The annual retreat is the major event of the sodality year, and its fruits are full in spirf itual benefits to the students. Fr. Meskellis ardent leadership was one of the greatest factors in the organizations .V I Fggugm f First Assistant f Second Assistant f f Secretary f f Treasurer f Faculty Director success. Its officers, however, infused a spirit of cofoperation and sincerity into the endeavors of the sodality throughout the year, and their worthy efforts deserve com' mendation. As prefect, Lawrence Riley, a Junior, was particularly active in the affairs of the sodality, He was especially fitted for this Office in view of the fact that he was one of the most prominent students of his class in all campus activity. He was ably assisted in this work by Arnold Mittig, another student prominent in the affairs of the Engineering College. Mittig Occupied the post of assistant prefect. Aside from the work of the officers, and the helpful direction of the faculty mod' erator, the members as a whole contributed greatly by their sincere cofoperation to the work of the sodality. Large in numbers, the work of this sodality measured well with that of similar Organizations on the campus. ii-gal. J 1 A 4 rf ws +tl12"Hr'1'3.s.'22.f.v. 1 A A . . H A tc wiqxpi f2OlJ 1 r.. I x Q . v ,. .r ' 4 in-. . ai' I ii. J. . MQ. P. JP 'N ix Qi if.. if I .Ins N., il. jjma. A- 377' i i. gn . fs .li 1 P w I 1, M, 2 y"'i 0- I -, 1-rp . Hickey .4 Moloney L A W S Q D A L I T Y LAWRENCE MOLONEY fffffff Prefect CHARLES HICKEY f f JAMES BYRON f f f JOHN P. MCNICHOLS, S.J. f HE Law Sodality has been functioning with an enthusiasm hitherto unknown. Under the progressive and energetic leader' ship of the Rev. John P. McNichols, S.J., president of the university, the meetings have resounded with the echoes of his conf solation and advice. Meetings were held bifweekly in St. Catherine's Chapel. This section proved to be highly appreciative of the guidance of Father McNichols. Durf ing the past year the membership has inf creased fifty per cent, and this, in spite of the fact that all meetings are held outside of the regular school hours. At the first meeting of the year Lawrf ence Moloney was elected prefect. Charles Hickey and James Byron were selected as first and second prefects, respectively. With these men forming the nucleus Father McNichols has built up the Law Sodality so that it now commands the at' tention of every Catholic law student. During the school year the sodality atf f First Assistant f Second Assistant f Faculty Director tended the Masses and General Comf munions, which were celebrated on the first Sunday of each month in the students chapel. The annual retreat was held in conjunction with the Section A engineers. lt was necessary for the prospective lawyers to travel out to the new campus at the Six Mile Road and Livernois for the retreat services. Rev. Charles A. Schuetz, of Marquette University, inspired the sodalists with his devotion and vigor. lt is seldom that the professional men from the law department have so consistently at' tended the retreat exercises as they did this year. It meant the sacriiice of a great deal of time from their regular work. With the coming of a new year the law students hope that the work of the sodality will be more general and progressive, but it is hard to imagine that any further steps can be taken to improve on this year's labors. .1 -. K., C. gf- .I. il fl e -,jjf 2 Ftgliliffg E12 ? if J"1 "La- if Llffwed' x gp-, fzkmif -fran E Q 'i'W sf' fl: 'Jig ' 'SEQ 5, . is gsm if .aj Hifi" K i ,. J fir-'i isvilx ' 4 y. vt. ..A . alxfs, V if in-EB flffb ing L, Bai: is' if - -J '2,i?f',g - wig, N, . rm' Y. Jin fl 1, 1' -YI I,--Q' ' '.' YJ f' z. -1' 1' fi ii. " 4' r'. .' fa- A x 1 -1 If-'J' EFI: -L J i' '. . UQ' J 'Vigil lg'-.L5j if 'f it Fi A Ky, . ' .f-x,. 1 Hfiqf , . . 1151-. ff! if . if!-55 ' "J-Qi, f?"'x'-5, 3' 1. 'fha '-Ltr? RT ,B kai I -ff 6' u 44' "P iii? .3 .1., 'iii ia M.:- u " i. if - mu' . 'ATL if .-4'-:J 47 -.Q v I -..f.Wf.i4.a., 'QL-213 52021 .v .W , 1.-1 f". ,N v ka tl, . .1 fn 'if-' fx.. X ii lf 'i ,-. -, ,. r' if i fflfli it . A153 .n its , A, 1 ii' , .. 1. if A Ab. Mgr.. ivflxxpf ,ha Y? - f. .ta cv 36.13. iii ,iii 'M 3,1 ie W 2 -.T . ff'f"'.,, ' 5 ,-- i ,rf ik. Dv 4 xr-1" I 'Will T JM' 'Lit , v- ! V -41 .rg ,vw ly ,Q ' A E., 'xiiii' 1. Ili' 1. vis!! lt-'PU' I :gs 3, CJ ,vb Ting . 1 fi .r X4 .A :J V F2231 i , " if I 3 ., ap, N. K., ,-wg ,Swv t 55 ig 'iw V. xi t- ! . i ik x. ,ls mt cf' if My fu i-P g, 1,4 ,. '. .K ,, A YA., .1 1 I I . r Ulbrich McDonald Mullins Dyer Ottenbacher NIGHT CQMMERCE AND FINANCE SCDALITY THOMAS MULLIN f fffffff Prefect HUGH MCDONALD f f First Assistant JOHN DYER f f f Second Assistant EMIL ULBRICH f f f f Secretary EDWARD GTTENBACHER f f f Tffgagwfey WILLIAM FOLEY, SJ. f f Faculty Director HILE the sodalists on the new uni' versity campus have been pursuing their work with zeal, those who remained behind in the older part of the university have not been idle. Reports from the Night School of Commerce and Finance show their religious organizations to have been among the most active of the whole. The night school sodality was one of the ,mn sf if largest sponsored at the university. Rev. f-Milj. William Foley, SJ., recognized as one of F'H'1i'1l , . . . . - :Jia the most brilliant and interesting orators of the faculty, has occupied the post of Ltgipiify faculty director of this branch of the so' dality organization, and the students of the ' ' night school have derived unusual spiritual fi benefits under his leadership. ixiiwil Thomas Mullin, prominent in the night Fiji school activities, was chosen as the stu' dents' first representative in assisting the 17?l1Xt:i?:. ,,-+.f'.iis .sissy ,f-A k"?w'1'.,,L?A Q, .5 '41 ,,,,,jQ. e. ' -A . ,- work of Fr. Foley. Under his direction, and the other officers of the organization, the sodality functioned perfectly. Espef cially active in carrying on the work of the sodality was John Dyer, who was chosen as assistant prefect. Meetings were held bifweekly in St. Catherine's Chapel. The Cifice of the Blessed Virgin was recited at the opening Of the service. The sodalists have learned to follow the favorite precept of St. Fran' cis Xavier: "What does it proht a man if he gain the whole world, if he suffer the loss of his own soul." All of the activities instituted by the dean of men, Rev. James A. Meskell, have been heartily backed. The retreat, which was held at the chapel on the new campus, was supported by the sodalists by attendance and devotion. Rev. Charles A. Schuetz, of Marquette Uni' versity, was the retreat master. -f 1, , .M I .1?f,..e. fr- . W-f .' .ff '.---...r-f-.i 7-g.'.,, " f' fe.. i D.. 52031 .., . .Q la... , , .. ,L am. . ., --,,h ,L 1 M tw. .,,, ru ,,i.s.Q.4. an 5,1 .1 5 dl ' as 'f 'T-Y, . .. Y., R- .,-. .y - as R r., ,,4,, ..6r?, , 5 ll -' 5 '-":'- Q v ., ,si 'F .L'- ' ' ,jg -mi Ji ak -R, 51' td. . l,f',Y..v J :sf 1-1, as- aa' 'V .53,Z'1'i',,f!e"nT3'?'::l-,Z 'i AQ' -fiom NL. Fdedl Pequegnot Bernard CCfED'S SCDALITY LUCIE PEQUEGNOT ffffffff Prefect MARY FRIEDL f f FLORENCE BERNARD f f RAYMOND CORRIGAN, SJ. HE CofEd Sodality of the university has concluded another year of spiritual activity. No previous record of accom' plishments can parallel the list of achieve' ments which the college women of '29 have performed during the last scholastic year. Under the able guidance of Faculty Dif rector Raymond Corrigan, SJ., the cofeds conclusively demonstrated that the smallf ness of their numbers did not affect the scope of their activity. With a vitality of spirit that would not accept failure, the women students rallied around Father Corrigan, and forged forward to the front ranks of sodalism. The highlight of the past year in the cofed sodality was the retreat for college women held- on March 9 and 10. The scene of the exercises was the Sacred Heart convent located at Lawrence Avenue. Rev. Bakewell Morrison, SJ., of St. Louis University, was secured as retreatfmaster under the auspices of the Bronson Guild. Nearly one hundred college women were A V , . f f Secretary f f 'Treasurer f Faculty Di-rector in attendance, and the spiritual advice which they secured from the exercises was a tribute to the ability of Father Morrison. Lucie Pequegnot, senior Commerce and Finance student, was elected prefect of the sodality, and proved to be a very capable leader. Mary Friedl acted as secretary, and Florence Bernard was chosen treasurer. The cofeds are more or less segregated from the majority of the university's activf ities and have too few opportunities to demonstrate their genius for organization. However, when the occasion presents it' self, the women students are quick to disf play their ability to cofoperate and func' te' ' .2 lf. iii 5, i Wai is! ct' R if TIS.. if. ,C 1 ,I V. J, L, Y. . f f J gif . ii'?fwi K, ,V ji'Se"l i 'F Ziilafi 1 .. W., . ,fggfkl , is Q ti' f iw' m'nf ..q R: u .1,, "1 Hi r "' , Flwq' HWTf Iliff -l 'PKK Vu: 5 Wg,-. 1'-Miz-5' 'Wea' x, 5. L ' '-,. H - 4 s wg s' . Q4 L. E f I Y 5,112 r ,f 4,6 5 l c' 2 1 4,3 K A . wi ' kggx ' all I' 1-.51 ' 1 SKY W3 tion smoothly with the faculty directors. 'QQK Father Corrigan has encountered little difficulty in securing a good attendance THQ? record at all of the sodality's regular Q fl meetings. y The cofeds have accomplished much in the field of spiritual activity, and their work is worthy of the most sincere KQWQ commendation. .fly 1 . ir-3,13 gi-if-fp , - .. Q. 1:2041 g-A -rf"-"Q 3. ., -...'.:,- A .: 1 fwfr f- - I' I7 g . . r .n.. '5 , vm, , 1. . . .'-wp. ,,,,.z: 1' -pr ,,, .f 1 fills.-,",-iw,-,,r lb' '-e,. -A A -- x:.x,I,- N- up , X, X :firm we 1 -me L- 1 f Q M 2 . X, 1 ,,, 'fcj jpg., iffy h?'sl:"h if ' sr: 'n' .34 , Y, 1 ,3- . -sy. L,-.frdgg sniping. l.5ix'Qf'W 51, ifg If !' ieiflliii leafs. ,gf',.htj. HI .1 T "1 It V.-5 f N. H 'iitflif A ."ll1", , , V 'f' eil". ' HF if U iff H r, , . gang, ig Ac! W. 1: A1915 t -'U an ' R I. K iff.-.sz .tryin .- ff- N We-"J , 9' w-4,1 WW: 'P F511 ., a Ti Fifi r1"flff'ffi-5' lf'5lF?1-' "' . .fa QM QF' lid? -f 72 'i jtikuwih n4l4:,ilnk 3 tg. ...W i f r. ,l'f': 3. ' '3 x f-ff w 'fra Ai J r... Kummer XValker 3 Sweeney Gibbons ST. VINCENT DE PAUL SCCIETY WILLIAM M. WALKER ffffff President GEORGE SWEENEY f f CLARENCE I. KUMMER f GRANGER G1EBoNs f f REDERICK CZANAM, a law stu' dent at the University of Paris, is generally accepted as the founder of the St. 'Vincent -de Paul Society. From a humble beginning in the year 1833, the society has spread rapidly until it now has a conference in practically every Christian city of the vvorld. f VicefPresident f Secretary f f Treasurer In addition to this form of charitable work, the society has been interested in distributing magazines to patients in hos' pitals, and nursery books to parentless children in our orphanages. Representatives of the society attended all the city and state conventions, and op' erated under the advice of the St. Peter The,UH1v2fS1tY Oh Dehfolt COUUC11 of and Paul council in distributing their gifts the society was organized in 1926 by Rev. to the poor' Ag' Louis Weitzman, SJ., and it has been pri' H d d f hid , D l Id marily to his efforts it owes its success. Uh re S O 1 ren lhl etfoft Wou Father Weitzman is professor of sociology, have khhwh hh JOY at Chhstmas if ft had and under his directorship the students hot- hem fhlf OUT UUIVETSWY COUHCH and come into direct contact with social conf ther Splehfhd Whlfk- T00 few Of the ditions in our big City. undergraduates realize the large number .of - This year the University Council was uhfoftuhate PCOPIC to be fohhd 1h.C1tY unusually active. Repeated drives were hospltal-SPBOPIC Wh-0 have Uelfh-Cfff1CI'1dS me P made among the undergraduates to collect hor fel9't1Ve5' Qffehflmes 3 SIUSIC Word 9. bundles of old clothes and distribute them Of ehcohfagemehta when fl mah 15 OU the if among the poor of the City. Every Monf border of despair, will change the vvhole day night two membgfs of the Sggjety ag, course of his life. Herein lies the virtue P companied a representative of the St. Of the St. Vincent de Paul Society. Its 7' ' ji Peter and Paul Conference on visits to the members are performing a service which homes of the poor. can not be overestimated. , a n i ' N Jfeq,..:Ew,v9"11sexse.,f,rN 1 A- . ' L ' A 52053 135 w w X 9 IB X f c,x1YUl-' Q- m m 1 was L mmm """ . 1877 . .T N 5-fp Q -f I 'Z' S W 6+ 9 :AQ Q!g!Q!g0 "'sfQ44'5 CU Qs 2 CVQXV75 Q! , O f Wifi J X, YI 22 -1 ' QQXQE ggi: Q M3 1 95,3 , , Aviv N 3 ' 5 1, '- :3,Q,,s. X V Wi? N F425 ,Q C' 1 ?'f Q' lwi ' ,, . yi I Q ,, , L, W, 2134? ' O 'o O ,. 4, - 1 ,36 ni Y " Q '25 s ,f , ig Q.fL Q ff? ii fQ si 2 ,fx ' E N , 2 -ff' Uiklfi ' Mfg,- Qw A, f 1? 4,1-is 42, ' 12 1 , 1: ,iii E 4: YQ- , fl' M7 1 fx, f .4 , .,.'s 5 ,ri W' ,. nw f 2 2 W ff 4:2253 ZWVKJ , ' 35.11 55 ' ' in Q 1131315 -Am 5' f?l?1 f fi, iii? 4 gm? w X N 252,55 mm: aw, , S T 'M :,, fx . , .. ,W ., ,,,,:nvwff- wAf,Mfx.w V-ff-ww J ,W ,f V , . - K V , ' W ff Aff Sf Sf Q. .lf AQ 1 ? , K40,+' U TIC MN f W ' 21 , g 9 af' , ' I ' g g fel: 4 0? U w mor 40, V 15 80? , . A 1. R I 'R A . f- -ef-7' A 1- :fem '- .- R ' I 1 2 I its .:- I . . 1. QTG..IFE,. . ,safes . . vt- KW L 'EEA li . L 1' eff G9 THE UNIVERSITY o E D E T R o I T Presents I I lff1'i',,,,, IIooEs, MY DEAR S' at y TEMPLE THEATRE 3531 S' " APRIL 28 f MAY 4 and - - , WILSON THEATRE MAY 1Oe11e12 An Criginal Musical Comedy in Two Acts. is Books and Lyrics by ........... JAMES SILAS POOLER ' A' Music by ....................,...... FRED BERGIN l. F.: 1 . 4- fligfii 11 I . Ike ar' . 45' 'L' I f Play staged by .........,. ..... F RANK B. WELLS Dances and Ensembles by ........ WILLIAM MCGURN Musical Direction by .............. THOMAS BURKE Opera Committee Chairman ...... JOH-N HUETTEMAN SYNOPSIS OF SCENES - 1 "lf Qlffil ACT I A YM Scene I ..... .... E state of Colonel Pedigree Scene II ..... ........... ' 'Pretty Thingl' 'WG Scene III ..... ..... T he Pedigree Stables T V Scene IV ..... ............., H aunted Hollow an IK., I Scene V .... ........ E state of Colonel Pedigree ACT II I Scene I ..... ....... T he Village Square in Bluegrass gl Scene II ............... A Shed Near Upson Downs A Scene III. ........................... "Hot Hoofsw he V A ' - Scene IV ..... Outside the Racetrack at Upson Downs i 1- I ' Time-The present. ,. Location-Bluegrass, Kentucky. V MUSICAL NUMBERS "Follow Us Around" F-R "jockey Swing" it "That's O. K. With Me" A ::Suzanne"' H 'fy it Pretty Thing iq - "Silk and Satin Blues" if Lf A "What's It Going to Get Me Anyhow?" A y "It's the Little Things You Do" L3 1 -.RI "Kentucky" I 1: Q, ',,'1 I ',..,. i -f,-S', i 1,.. 2 I I I "Hoofs, My Dear" Q13 Huetteman ELDUSW Roads" Q Potts "Never Mind Talking" g Gregory 'Tm Susceptiblen I Donovan M . API ' K -if if-Q ' ' --" 'I 'eff ..r' ' f -- ' , .Aer .1 A 'F 1.1 .S Izosj I I fa. f, , H. xr. , 'il H me ,,, , I wb' rv . hffilffi , A,.,A .I I -., Qffngrr I, I31-45122511 Q,,vIr,?rf'25f1""ffIi51."?S7ffX -rf' . f . 1 U up - ' -w -'e I my M- We 'TM 1, C- MV' .55-,r,, f ?F'-xfgfma if? M..-l' ,ri ll' ll fhtli A 1, I 9 efriii ' .4S.Ig5,f "gQ'lv 3-E519 fig!- alfa, 'tn S Q 5 65' lil: CAST IN ORDER CF APPEARANCE l Colonel Pedigree .........,....... JOHN RATCLIFFE Colonel Ruffing ..... ...,.. H ENRY ANNAS Nero Migawd Totlree. . . ........... '.-JOHN GALBO ' J ,Servant ............ .... J OTRINDA CHOWDBURY " Peanut .......... . ....... SIDNEY SOLOMON N if Perry Mncnel . . . ...... DAVID LEAHY lik? Cynthia Pedigree . . .... THOMAS RODEN Doctor I. O. Dine.. ..... FLAVIUS BROOKE M 1: Lee Ruffing ..... ..... E RANK KELLEY Q I -1 Suzanne Pedigree , . ..... JACK TEUBERT Q2 Shinola ........ ...... G EORGE MORRIS fgtgh Judge Payne ., . ..... EDWARD CORBETT It 3,5 Guard ..,... .... R OBERT STEFANOWSKI " Q ' if LADIES CF THE ENSEMBLE 1, if Erank Brady, Clyde Jilbeit, Bert Rossman, Richard i J Harpham, Norton Brown, James Doman, Louis Estrada, I Gabriel O'Connor, Denton Fox, Jack Gleeson, Wil' ggi liam Guina, Clarence Peterson. ,ff I , CENTLEMEN OF THE ENSEMBLE Philip Zoufal, Don Schilling, John DeMunnik, - I Robert Stefanowski, Jack Elliott, Alvin Staub, Done J "'l ald Roberts, Charles Crispo, Edmund Schmidt, John M, iw Angel, Neil Collins, Eli Glossman. W l 3 1 ' EIGHT HOT HOOI-is ,PWR Charlie Jenkins, Al Cohan, Bob Lemereaux, Joe , 1 Ameredio. Lf ' Z9 I I I L9 Q3 Keyes 1,2 Christie ,, Q Maledon 1 Soleau J -f 1 3 f O if if-we 1: i f I 4 f fm , I or www? T . ff . I t IF' DQ eifiliilefic f2O9JI 'Pgfiffa hw" , PDE. .Nfl ' "inf: ff. .ffi42fg,., fig ,-,gi-. ff, . . 'P-'L 'Q ,f Q ':4'f'5 10- - Fx f Q", - , y . V " A ' , .fl"P?ff'2 Pwdf? 1 '1t'1'I.'t'IE?f'i'V't J I bf Tam- f 'T .-cv.. LF? fhfga .. I I f i 1 A . 1. BEE . ff 4,,g,--:J -,L .Xp Mk -is . 5 -- -Af . .,f I 5,2 . .5 mv - L, .ky ,I I A ,I , I frI "fa2a5,.f" 'A 1 Q ', A V ' " 1 . ' ' TQ . I FS . . l'ag':i, -N N I Q' fri ' I ieifffg 5 i-igxgw. "1 if 5142 I T' A I r I I W 71' .QE-. fu 'N .gm 1.2.1, I it Q: 96,14 ,fliifii IV' " lx W I I nj 11 if f.f?'iA we 59331 3' 'ifsigw fum if 'MRI' " 'l"LR if E- . 'xiii Mil. Wi-ff 4V RI? IRQ 515182 ..I .. my -Hr. jf 'FJ Q . i'3E.ig,+ PRODUCTION PER-SQNNEL JOHN HUETTEMAN. . . FRANK POTTS ...... FRANK JENNEY .........Chairman . . . . . . . .Business Manager MARSHALL KELLEHER WILLIAM B. GREGORY .......... Production Manager WALTER KEENAN JERRY DONOVAN . . . WILLIAM WAGNER. . . JOSEPH STARRS. .... . .... . . EDWARD CORBETT .................Script . . . . . . . . .Stage Manager . . . .Committee Secretary FRANK BRADY A. J. CHRISTIE ........... WILLIAM J. MALEDON ALBERT NAGLER GEORGE KRAUSMAN PHILIP STACKPOOLE LEO J. ANDRIES ...... ELMER ULRICH ..... KARL SCHECTER PAUL MARCO LEO SHUBNELL ...... . . . .Advertising Manager . . . . . .Publicity Manager JOHN MALLEY C. SCOTT HOWARD EARL DEMELESKI A . . . . . .Editor of Program . . . . . . .Business Manager DONALD CARNEY JOSEPH BENDER ..........CastManager MATTHEW GILL JAMES BRITT ......... ANTHONY KRONK GEORGE HESS ......... . .. ..... . . . . DANIEL RITTER ....................Patrons JOHN MOONEY . Arrangements MELVIN RIVARD RALPH JOHNSTON BERTRAND SOLEAU, ....... . . . . . . . . .Ticket Manager VINCENT M. KEYES ............. Assistant Manager FRED KRAMER ROBERT DELAND HENRY ANNAS EDWARD STENGER LEO MITTIG JAMES HAGGERTY JOHN GLEASON KENNETH CARR JOHN SOLEAU LOUIS NEBEL JOSEPH FISHER VJILLIAM MURPHY ROBERT ALLEN GEORGE MCCORMICK fg ., EARL LAFAIVE JAMES KERNVIN CAMILLE PARENT ANTHONY LENNERT W. ' ' A ROGER O'CONNOR ELMER ULRICH I , JOHN GIRARDIN Anclnes Starts ' I Shubnell Wagner f xx 3399 I 'PQ J W, iff WS MTF . fi' 'M I I 1 Gift-Rf: P' f'R'q-JEWEL A f img ' I Ev. Y il. 6 ,V I 1153 r , Q f LS. i ' I fs '+- if ff-E. 3 Q P :iv 41 , 1 ..n-f I- v- v',17L,,,, Us limi, .H . .,, .",'f1w .N 5 ' I si. H45 .-. v F, ,. . N, ' fat 'ig' ..-. .gi lx ii YQ!!! , ra fl, I-, ii' N P if' it , . .... vu. xg' w ' wi .rag 'vii 'tw au' 8.4 ia aw , ,. ., Sf: .1 li. 1 ' I K 'M 'NA 'n Ut-w J l L". .'l at ,.g.,1:' 5152.7 .,, Vila? 3- K,-...W , Nr 'f-W, grim .. . I: J: .11 '-'. fl' ' in .Alfalfa V ,T 3 1 lei '2-bl if. -Vg .z .r 'x .,i,'P UNION OPERA U OOFS, MY DEAR," the third annual .L theatrical venture of the Detroit Union gained the unstinted praise of all of the Detroit dramatic critics, and met with the unqualified approval of the student body. In the vernacuf lar of the show world-"Hoofs, My Dear" went over with a bang." It is almost impossible to give credit to any one individual for the success of this year's musical presentation. Behind the production we ind an experienced committee planning and executing under the able direction of John Huetteman, general chairman. We see a cast and chorus willingly sacrificing their time to drill and drill and drill until they acquire a per' fection similar to that of professionals. We see Bill McGurn, the dance director, working as zealously to make a success of this college prof duction as he worked to make a success of "Hit the Deck" and other famous musical comedy triumphs. We see "Doc" Wells employing all of the skill which he has acquired from twentyf five years' experience with the Shuberts and Ziegfeld on the New York stage. Just as "Doc's" superior directorship was the power behind "Honeymoon Lane" and numerous other New York productions, so also was it the dynamo back of "Hoofs, My Dear." It can be seen then, that the success of the third annual opera must be attributed to the complete co' operation of all concerned, and not to the eHorts of any individual. Jim Pooler, an alumnus of the U. of D., is the author of "Hoofs, My Dear." Jerry Donof van, creator of Otto Zilch and other famous characters, lent his able assistance to Pooler, and between them they turned out a show blessed with many original uwisecracksf' As one newspaper critic expressed it . . . "There are more laughs in 'Hoofs, My Dear' than a year's subscription to College Humor." Such excellent popular songs as "Silk and Satin Blues" and "It's the Little Things You Do" require a real musicfmaster for their com' poser. Fred Bergin wrote those captivating lyrics. Another success has been recorded in the annals of dramatic activity at the University of Detroit, and L'Hoofs, My Dearw stands as a last' ing tribute to those who made its presentation possible. if 4 ffl-1'::'7l +5 'lPf1",'1' ur' q52..1,f -f1i,1:g.f7.f-ar,.1 'ft' 52113 Pooler Wells McGuirn Bergin Q5 Mm wmv II yu' mf Q Q XS ' GY Ur GTA? VW! Fx+.H m M 'I 'I' .5 X" '987 -S W S M 6 :AQ Q!g!Q!g0 "ifx4i'5 ' CM WEEK-2 'QM 1433? mf: 552 if sf, 2 I , 5,, 5 ,, 4 X f Z A iw 3 O O O O O . at W ff '- Q2 5 , X -'xxeihl 1 fi L ' x A X A y XX .l'l Y.,.i,,-V I f , RK f YN-35: H . ' ' , x .,,j,,,. ,,,. x.,, U X. ,711 , .ga ,ljii.',.TJ,Qg,i5'2j'i',,'i , ,QQ Mx! XM " y 4" wi 50599 Qgf s fi GRENSIG . Y . A Ra OK , , 9 0 4 0 ,4,o+ Aolh Ov! Oxr ONE, op og t! r 4 S QNOVX R ftok 40: JON? 1 Y w w 1 im ,IV V L 405 9 ? 9 '. ,' .1 il' I 1- L Q nm ,. ,Lv ...f ef 3 I. 1. if 'Xia 5424i Ji rifffffl qili' il'-'w I it fl' . -lsr ' it i --,, -. at-V, ails'-IHJE pk .Q . , ii , . ... I ra Wifi' ' 1 ,Fail x. ,il , IW- ,i i iwlsff, .iz . wi, s 4' .N may f' drfjiglii arg fi, wifi R., 'pf' 51 ,ff 'mf' . I Jiifji. X 'flifxfi-F - - 1-I ii ui ,'.,,9ai-.lu is Lx R14-i-,I :, L-Y 'ir 'Nu-'XII f '-'M 'big 5' ' .0 'E 'i 4 " 'L 0' -'J - .gif Fl Y HW 1 yvzgiaii- inf' ' Iii: 51 ,1 3, Iii " iiwtwy. . L g gf tn. .1 f .1 1, ' . I -L"QW'i'7 ii f A 4, ,if ir'-' Yf 'L v .ii ,H ..a . by " alifilw' f in-ffffl us.--.vw 5 ur:-. I If-A' fsfgi zfgfgfxi I fl pf if i- 'Jil 3 I 5, I fy ' , RJ S li, '. x,,1N'.,i.- ln-:T 1.5-i' t -qs! , s' QAFHQQ H .1 I I 2253 ,jgzis Q '.,iig:,ljj4l5,I'iigQ tile ,ov ,-5 i - i, Aff' . 'ff-4 '-i 5: gal? fiarfifi it lily? Ji Vi' 1 gflfii. fa- Gig '-as i, .- , .-9, fvilllfifi ti 3 9-413, fifth? iiI7f'th-in -5.11 If "QfEQQ', -5 get ,'.?9 -""c-- -L1 W'rL,,l's 512.-3 ,- M . Q umfifx i Gregory Grix Johnston H .-. .F 1'-. v i 7 ff..-i.. . FCRENSIC ACTIVITIES ITI'I more than fifty students actively inf terested in intercollegiate debating, it was predicted that the university would enjoy a successful season in the forensic field. The roll of the Philomathic Society revealed an un' precedented membership, in addition to which Prof. Bacon, coach of d-ebate, organized a select class to study the nner points of argumentation, and the preparation of important debates was carefully developed during class hours. Work' ing under the stimulus of this spirit of reorganif zation the traditional debating club organized a new method of procedure when the personnel of the entire society entered an elaborate def bate tournament which was continued through' out the first semester. In the meantime the intercollegiate debate class was preparing to plunge into the most difficult 'schedule ever attempted at this instituf tion. Cn Thursday, December 6, a team of postfgraduates arrived in Detroit from Northf western University an-d officially opened the def bat-e season for the University of Detroit. Lawrence McDonnell, WiHiam Gregory, and Ralph Johnston, encountered the visiting dia' lecticians in a spirited discussion which cenf tered around the potentialities of the Kellogg peace pact. The nrst clash was held in the Florence Ryan auditorium of the Commerce and Finance building, and by mutual agreement there was no decision. Detroit's nrst tour of the west for the '29 season was begun the second week of February when a team composed of Ben Newton, Melvin Rivard, and Ioseph Powers went forth to meet Dayton University and Oberlin College. On February 14 the team arrived in Dayton, Chio, and inaugurated the new auditorium in the Albert Emanual Library. The U. of D. debaters forced the Daytonites to take the short end of popular vote by the audienceg the margin of victory being 6 to I. The next night found the team in the foren' sic auditorium of the Students' Debate Union in Cberlin, Ohio. There was no decision rendf . + V , -vi.. .s . - ,v i ,-51.4, lpn--h ,-,,.-.- 'M 'QW ' " ,r 'ivf'2', ".Ti'-Uffa 1. U , . 4".. 3-11, 'iff'-.H ,I 52141 YV, . N ir , ,s V J ii-i.,-2,-.n ll, '-' I 2, -13 'tif' f Hg 1,53 . liajf: 2 1 , IJ-,Zig -ECL . .gfli lil ski? .ipgn If 13 Sis x,l1n"x. , E ' V: 5 -Ir l,j V My E . I 4' ,N Q xla fi li. x ig! it di? .. I-an 2551, ix 5 lsr-4 4 gif' fr s F X X if Qi f l EQ' '3'-hs.. fi. ii?-5 i " f q . ' pkg op' 141 . i lids' Ai-I KN' ' ' ff! 531 I Wh? H ax 4? ii .isa ? uid: .J 632,553 3 l izjjgl . tr w init' gj-zpnd l Y V" mf ' Y .Wi - i ,mvif 1 1. 'I if 'tiff' 1 X. ,. .U QWJW lit cf 6 1. if 'E . ig, .-, .n f 1 lap , f' ' f XWLQQ 41- FT' .il ,Ji n,j,fsw1 ' My 'l fi.'b'ai ' Ili. qv, it ff, '. sf Q1 Fl .I 3 ills-ia W r Uv X . .1--L' wa 'Lil' li , I 1 1' 1. 1.41. . ,115 , . is at 1 wr Q litre, .,, N- 3 F 2.1 ia- Q F-. ,I 2, 'tg-1 I l P I, .FJ ,- . .,.,.,. 'ara , if -v . fiyu ,,,. .ZIIZ Y. J'i'y -'x "li -ri 291 il FFT? T?-NY: l lU5FY 1, ,n, V .ie-c .,s..,J, , . Y.. Q .JI 11 'xl :if is-'. Life X ...LJ if if .N 5. ,J r l"i,'-WSJ. Yi? VT sm, rp.-1 .Q N . 1 fm i' KU M.: ig 1 '82, 5 . 3227, 'fi' "M . ilg,tl.lt yin -.-L.. v ered in this debate, but the concensus of opinion se-eme-d to be that the U. of D. forensic artists had outclassed their capable opponents. The second tour of the west was started in the latter part of February when a team com' posed of James Britt, Ned Monaghan, and Arthur Petrimoulx traveled to meet Loyola, St. Viator, Notre Dame, and Northwestern Uni' versities. The team arrived in Chicago on February 25, and introduced an innovation in debating circles by broadcasting its Loyola forensic tilt over a Chicago station. From Chicago the trio journeyed to Bourbonnais, Ill., where it encountered St. Viator's best platform stars on the -evening of February 27. Fast train connections landed them in South Bend, Ind., in time to exchange logic and argumentation with the Notre Dame verbal artists on the ev-en' ing of February 28. The concluding contest called for the Detroit team to be in Chicago on March 1, where it successfully subdued Northf western University before starting for home. The experience and pleasing style of the U. of D. debaters evoked praise from their opponents throughout their tour, and another conquest on "foreign soil" was added to the everfgrowing list of Detroit's forensic victories. The Knights of Columbus Auditorium was the scene of the next intercollegiate clash in Detroit. William Gregory and Ralph Johnston, the representatives of the university, defeated the crack debating team of Loyola, Chicago. Richard Ford and Iohn Keating, both of promif nence: in the Middle West, brilliantly outlined and demonstrated their case, but Gregory and Johnston had little difficulty in winning an overwhelming popular vote as well as a two to one judge's decision. lll,'f'9ig 1.1, l Cn Thursday, March 7, three days after the Loyola debate, the University of Dayton, which ' had been setting the pace among the Ohio col' Mimggfjn leges, arrived in Detroit to participate in a def Newton bate scheduled to take place at Holy Redeemer Auditorium, located at Junction and Vernor 'Y-' ..-' I , .. .. . .. 'fil' ff5SI? 'L A A i li - ' . 52153 Pctrimoulx Powers Rivard p 41.--. ! -M 2.51 '11 fha, Vg: F 1 .1 Y. L' if ,sg if -T5 ..,, Y. Q - 9 im, .Tv an 54' 7 1 M, H, Ln V.k it sfflgx Highway, W. Lawrence McDonnell, Williain ijlffi Gregory, and Ralph Johnston maintained the splendid forensic reputation of the school by wresting a victory from the highly praised Daytonites. 35 r'i'-wg Marquette University landed in Detroit the following week to stage their annual clash at the K. of C. Auditorium. Lawrence McDonf nell and Ralph Johnston took the platform against two of Marquette's most famed speakf ers, Messrs. Sullivan and Staudenmaier. The Yfiif'.i debate proved to be one of the most interesting of the season. Neither side wasted time over j,',"Q-ff quibbling and technalities. Both teams used oratory, logic, sarcasm, and humor, in an at' Q-s'fg'g tempt to destroy the solidly constructed cases. iii The discussion concerned public ownership of A' hydrofelectric power, and proved both enter' ' taining and educational to the audience. The next debate of the season found Mc' Donnell, Gregory, and Johnston at Marygrove College where they encountered the debaters from St. Viator's. The students of Marygrove extended a most cordial reception to the speak' ers, who, in an effort to show their appreciation, gave an excellent exhibition of modern forenf sics. The contest was a headfon clash from the outset, and ended with enthusiastic applause. April 15 brought a new student into the def bating ranks when Arthur Grix teamed with Lawrence McDonnell and Ralph Johnston to oppose Oberlin College of Oberlin, Qhio. The Florence Ryan auditorium was packed to near capacity for this discussion and every individual present was of the opinion that the clash was Qfslfs far superior to the average intercollegiate def ,,,,gQLg,,'Q bate. Grix turned in a ine performance for his first appearance on a college platform. Some degree of variety was offered the pub' lic speaking fans on April 18th when the annual oratorical contest was held at Gesu parish audi' torium. Six of the Hnest speakers in the univerf fglsiff sity competed for the honor medal award which was inaugurated at this institution over twenty' ive years ago. These students had previously 915,351 won the right to pit their forensic ability against each other by surviving a preliminary elimina' "La -,J' A Q V fag i 4 g1'3ggLff f'.a-M. . gg - -"' f f J: " 52153 N -..s tion. The speakers were James Britt, Arthur Petrimoulx, Ralph Johnston, Joseph Powers, Edward Monaghan, and Ben Newton. Edward Monaghan covered himself with glory in a blaze of splendid oratory and captured the award. . ,.'.' u - 7 1- -ft.,-it M. X vw J Q V-ri' 'Fi :.,.1. ppl fx :V fi 1 17. J l ' nc Y' W, l!.:."i 2 . E V"".'! Q'1J"'i'. '1ff..ijr'S 'fl , .JE nf--""i .gf 5. vw.. s4'T.'7i .Ni gpg , ,,'-'wfirlll 19' 21135111 'f - . nj igwl., Maxi, 1 " midi 4, rj. .:. . 7 .3 gs- gL.l','w3j, 1,2359 2:31:59 .ff 2 iimzf .tiff tl 'Tift N'- j 3 j jj. . fa K 9 get llifla jjj it- "2 1 .fi D! .f'rf"fx W mf 'Lf' V . A 1 '74 W' f..f?1 Us 'im' .M "ig . W. at-, .A K jk-J A .1 an ra' X. .nv . '. w t J Q, ,L-..' W , I L" -'jfyljll .1 if I fl i '- f'V ,W- '1 1 "?.1'Qif3fi Lai! .Y '.Ji,?'U4l'TL j-'1,J1i , Lflfi iff. 'H sf.-' X M -5 -.wi ,A 'H T" '-4 M 5 1. ,.: Ralph Johnston, who had won the right to represent the university in th-e intercollegiate oratorical contest, placed second to Monaghan. The climax of the season came on April 26 when Arthur Somers, Waldo Simon, and Ralph Johnston opposed a postfglraduatedebating com' bination from Notre Dame at the Knights of Columbus auditorium. The subject under dis' cussion was concerned with the abolition of America's criminal code. The contest was a great debate from beginning to end, and the popular victory won by the U. of D. speakers was a sincere tribute to their ability. The annual Skinner debate marked the conf clusion of Detroit's most successful forensic season. Ben Newton, Ned Monaghan, and Ralph Johnston upheld the affirmative side of a discussion in favor of Michigan's criminal code. They were opposed by Joseph Powers, James Britt, and Arthur Petrimoulx. The contest was most excellent from the time that the chairman introduced the first speaker until the judges retired to make their decision. The affirmative team won the verdict over their opponents, and Ralph Johnston was awarded the historic Skinner medal, emblematic of the university's best debater. And so the curtain was down on a year of forensic activity which stands without parallel in the annals of the university. The debaters repeatedly outclassed their guests in all inter' collegiate contests. When the oratorical season reached its height the university entered the National Intercollegiate contest and Ralph Johnston proved the calibre of the Titan forenf sic men by defeating six Michigan colleges and winning the state oratorical championship. The success of the 1929 season is the result .of an ambitious program of expansion under' taken in 1927. Since that time the U. of D. L-3.5" jjg.j',.g has been steadily increasing the number of its '.Q"f1f,J forensic engagements, and just as steadily inf s.':?'1igW creasing the number of its conquests. Cur reputation as one of the leaders of forensic ac' t1v1ty in the middle west has grown until we :r,.f-"jj, ' now command an envious position throughout if .,,,Q the country. 5.5. 't,,,-:Q..fr,,,jg3t1.fgEg1 j'.' 2 ,,g,sw'1J'F,,.,,.- ' A fZ17J Simon Somers Ward 4? N00 0 . -., 6 GY ' Q -5 4- JJ 5 9 0 :J Z 7.9 Snr, - , fm .9 187 5 77 7 Q if ZX ! af f G+ 6 SQA MW X. - of cv ffibk f " Q if 7' Fx ' ' 1. ' X I. Y , . . Y , ' i wf L 3 , V, Q 2 . WV Q? ki fi , Vo 4... fi? V K2 'J f q Q 7 'JJ N f hw fb g Z g Z Q Yffi Q ,F ,Q ,y 7, ky 4- 3 S W! XXV -4 p 5, viagra . 'axgfgss + P6 ,Om A Eli K il o 5 f ' af s A 40r ' ' ' 41!'Q h 5X 7 3 3 1 , W 'i :Zi 4' 0 r Q40 N919 A you Soir' Gassel i I f Labadie VARSITY BAND HE University of Detroit's Band has just completed its most successful sea' son since its organization four years ago. The musicians set a precedent this year by appearing on Dinan Field for the first footf ball game of the season. This appearance at the first game necessitated a week of practice more intense than any other of the year. The student musicians convened every night at considerable sacrifice, but they were loyal enough to make it cheerf fully. Too much credit cannot be given to Sidney Gassel, the student director. He has shown real ability in the way in which he has handled the band during the past year. The Varsity ensemble compared favorably with every band that appeared on Dinan Field this year. Dean Seehoffer and Manager John La' badie both worked arduously and faith' fully for the band. Labadie, the manager, held a position in which he was unnoticed by the student body. He has done his work well and it is only htting that he should have recognition for his efforts. Dean Seef hoffer, himself a musician, has been an inf spiration to the men during the year by the interest and support which he lent the organization. Une performance of the band during the past year is especially worthy of recogf nition. Their loyalty to their Alma Mater was clearly demonstrated when they met the Titan squad Sunday night as they ref turned victoriously from Tulsa, Gklahoma. The band wanted the team to know that they were for them, and they let it be known by greeting the returning warriors with the lively strains of L'Dear Qld U. of D," "Varsity," and "Frat" The climax of the season was the bands, trek to Dayton, Ohio, on migration day. The feet of the U. of D. students beat time on the Dayton streets, and the Qhio ozone echoed and refechoed our school songs. Truly a great migration day and one which will be long remembered. Football, pep f meeting, and all student conclaves were graced by the presence of the band. Most of the students who comf pose the present organization will be back next year and we can look forward to an' other successful season, but it will take much work to surpass this year's band. I J 52203 1 4 -. ,,,:,,, .. ZTl":,f :if Z "1" " - 61'---Arr?-5 " nztfliif UNIVERSITY GF DETROIT BAND SIDNEY GASSEL j fffff Student Director JoHN LABADIB f Student Manager ARTHUR SCHUMAN f Drum Major M E M B E R S John Bader Maurice Jacobs Fred Sablacan Rosco Baughman Robert Beale Joseph Beckley Ralph Boone John Daniell Bruce Dempsey A. J. Detloif Wilfred Dorf Leonard Dorr Oliver Engle Norman Fenner Eddie Fossen Joseph George Fred Hein George Higgins Ralph Johnston John Keefe Charles Kern Sigmund Krebsbach Edward Lengel Alfred Lanigan Russell McCauley Nick McGlaughlin Phillip 'Mulligan Gregory Oberst' Homer Phillips Fred Raible, Sr. Fred Raible, Jr. Wilbert Riley f221J . Chester Schintzius Charles Schmitter Earnest Schmitter Glennon Sexaur Manuel Simms Frank Sinclair Lester Stankey Earnest Tamplin Albert Trudo Howard Ward Francis Weaver Gilbert White Carl Yingling Herman Yader , 'L U 1,11 ,, 4' AMW 1'-:la 65 f Q 0 ig '-'oX'i . YUP . i . :X 77 W J QQ.-f 'INK - MQ 4 NA xfvio Q6 O O O Q T3 01 6 5-v. fiaki "iv X ' E g in gh l ' 1 1 V 1 '.'.',' , ' J ,I l . iii . - lgvgf I' , P .v , i ' ' ' ' r 4 ' 'Cf - ' . Z , , , 1 . I , 1--Z6 - V ' ' 3 if.. Y. ,. :fx,,., , i . I r l.1 N 33545 f .fi If EV 7, , A 2 A 2 If ,A fy? 5 ,MV- lip? Gpj 4 f Y F2 n ' N X E VI M! X K 'f 3 LJ 0 w 5' 1 -an I I 4' 1 E wa X I R I + S e. gf? K 4 1 lf' A x VN f 5 r I P all M 'XX N , QZ ff Wx ff 7 ff' 11 5 I I I ' ' ' w js Z K 1 Q f W4 Z X A IJ 1 a YN J Z W H ' ..'f F i K QQ A H f I O O 'Wm 0 fl' O O O ,Q 'Q o OX W fi 4 0'? 90? N u 1 4,05 4o L ,J In ALPHA SIGMA TAU SCHCLARSHIP KEY m..,,. Mn- 'T f-IJ GYEIJ 0 :I . 2 L THE Alpha Sigma Tau Scholarship Key was established this year as an incentive for scholastic attainment throughout the whole student body of the university. It will be an annual award, and will be given to the male senior who stands highest scholastically in four years of university work The key will be presented at graduation and the winner will not be announced until those exercises are completed CHI SIGMA PHI SCHCLARSHIP KEY CHI SIGMA PHI, prominent fraternity in the College of Engineering, provided a fund for the annual award of a scholarship key to that senior engineer who had the highest scholastic average for his five years of work in the engineering department. This award was inaugurated in 1927 and Andrew Freimann, outstanding student in the engineering college, has the honor of being the first recipient of this much desired tribute of scholastic supremacy. DELTA SIGMA PI SCHCLARSHIP KEY THE Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key was established at the University of Detroit in 1921. It represents the highest degree of scholastic attain' ment achieved in four years of education in the Day and Night Schools of Commerce and Finance. A key is awarded each year to the senior in each department of the Com' merce and Finance school whose average for his four years of college is the highest of his class. Every university possessing a chapter of the Delta Sigma Pi fraternity awards this scholarship key. FATHER CTTING MEMCRIAL KEY ' I 'HE Father Ctting Memorial Key is given by the Eta Zeta Sigma sorority to the senior girl who has attained the highest scholastic average for four years of work at the University of Detroit. It was established this year in memory of the late Reverend Henry W. Ctting, SJ., past regent of the university. Competition for the key is limited to the cofeds of the Day and Night Schools of Commerce and Finance. It will be an annual award. MAGI SCHOLARSHIP KEY T HE Arts and Science Freshman who attains the highest scholastic stand' ing during the entire school year becomes the proud possessor of the Magi Achievement Award or scholarship key. The Magi fraternity has established the award as an annual instituf tion on the campus and it believes that the award will be directly responsible for higher grades among the first year men in the Liberal Arts department. 1:2241 ORATCDRICAL MEDAL N 1894 the faculty of the University of Detroit awarded an oratorical medal to George Monaghan. Since that time to the present day every year has witnessed an oratorical contest, and with the passing of time a glorious tradition has been woven around this annual forensic classic. Many famous Detroiters are the proud possessors of this cherished treasure. Among the former winners are such notables as Wil' liam F. Foley, Vincent M. Brennan, P. J. M. Hally, and John A. Reynolds. To Edward Monaghan, a sophomore in the Arts and Science College, goes the honor of winning the historical award for 1929. Monaghan delivered a brilliant oraf torical selection and successfully conquered the upper classmen who competed for the honor. Though he was only in his second year at the university, Monaghan was by no means an inexperienced speaker. Upon his rnatriculation into the university, he conclusively demonstrated his forensic abil' ity by becoming a member of the varsity debate squad in his Freshman year. This accomplishment was made possible by much previous experience acquired while in high school. Speaking upon "Naval Armamentv, Monaghan displayed a thorough knowlf edge of his subject and it was clearly evif dent that much planning and consideration had gone into the preparation of his ora' tion. With perfect composure and excelf lent technique he thrilled his audience and carried himself to fame and glory. SKINNER MEDAL HE annual presentation of the Skinner debate medal was inaugurated at the University of Detroit in 1897. The award is symbolic of supreme excellence in arguf mentation and debate. Each year a large number of students who entertain forensic ambitions compete against each other for the honor of par' ticipating in this traditional tourney. From this group six students are selected and divided into two teams. At the final clash between these two teams the judges select the winning team, and the debater who manifests the most polished delivery and logical thinking during the course of the discussion. Ralph C. Johnston, a Junior in the Col' lege of Arts and Science, received the great honor of being awarded the Skinner debate medal for 1929. Johnston is a veteran debater who has participated in more interf collegiate forensic contests for the Uni' versity of Detroit than any other student on the campus. He became a member of the intercollegiate debating squad in his Freshman year and since that time has cap' tained Detroit teams to victory over many famous opponents. Previous to his maf triculation at the university, Johnston ac' quired much valuable experience in high school forensic circles where he won the Michigan oratorical championship for the parochial high schools. 52253 SIGMA KAPPA PHI CUP IGMA KAPPA PHI, national Com' merce and Finance fraternity, conf ceived the idea of donating a scholarship cup to the University of Detroit to be awarded to that fraternity having the highest scholastic average at the completion of each school year. When the InterfFraternity Council for' mally announced that this new tradition would be inaugurated on the campus the statement was productive of much heated discussion concerning the ultimate out' come of the award. Immediately the statisticians of the campus undertook the task of compiling the various fraternal averages. When the results had been carefully counterfchecked and compared it was an' nounced that the Magi, Arts and Science fraternity, was the proud possessor of scholastic supremacy. For years the mem' bers of the Magi have claimed the title "Wise Men" and it now appears that their boast was well founded. On Monday evening, April 8, at a meeting of the InterfFraternity Council, George W. Hess, president of Sigma Kappa Phi, presented the treasured trophy to Bertrand Soleau, Supreme Magus of the Magi. l Q 15, OMEGA BETA PI SCHOLARSHIP CUP N HARMONY with its policy of prof gression the Omega Beta Pi, PrefMedic fraternity, has taken a definite step toward encouraging high scholarship accomplish' ments among the Freshmen of the Pre' Medic department. The fraternity will annually award a scholarship cup to that Freshman who has distinguished himself by the greatest scholarship ability in the Pre' Medic department. This year marks the first presentation of the award. It is fi masterful piece of crafts' manship and a fitting tribute of the honor which it represents. The scholarship cup serves as a stimulant to the first year men, many of whom ordinarily receive scholastic averages below the standard of the upper classmen. During the past few years the PrefMedic department has expanded with startling rapidity and the students who comprise this group are constantly becoming more active on the campus, The Omega Beta Pi scholf arship cup marks a milestone in the progress of the department and it is certain that the award will grow more and more a tradition on the campus with the passing of each succeeding year. .,. .ff iw ' fy 'Ci 1 ,.1.f,2fff-.Aa M ftfg. 1 ilg, N1-' J, . . 'Jr v. .il x' 'W 9. f -,L iiglwp I-9 . P .. il, lb-. .sf :E nf, X- f . 44, gf: Jw -Q . if MN fi 's ? 4 H -it - i '1 H, Y- an 5 Nl -. -.L .. --r- A rv, -, -V f ',j'r.,-H ,ii - ,Ji l,f"'fvf iw., fi' .ills -2454, - 4'hz..:s-'- H ,,,,.1 - tif- eg.: +13 fzzsg 5 -e LCYALTY AWARD N EVERY football team there is one player who is a constant source of cheer and inspiration to his team mates, who puts life into every play, and makes a cofoperating whole of a group of individuals through the force of his own dominant character and personality. It is for this great service that the Athf letic Association of the university presents the annual Loyalty Award to that player who fills this useful place on the football team. This year Thomas Connell, captain and halfback, was honored with the award. The presentation took place at the annual Delta Sigma Pi football banquet held at the BookfCadillac Hotel at the close of the football season. Hundreds of students and alumni were present when Coach Charles Dorais bestowed the award. The loyalty award is a beautiful Illinois watch of white gold. Cn its back is en' graved: g'University of Detroit Athletic Association, Loyalty Award to Thomas Connell for exceptional service to the foot' ball team of 1928.9 Always a brilliant and steady performer on the football field, Captain Connell was a constant source of inspiration to his col' leagues of the gridiron. His fidelity and hard work served as a model for their efforts, and to Thomas Connell is due much of the credit for the great success of the football team of 1928. . iv.:-Lf. .. . .apr J,- ...V1 -,i ,.,....1, ...,, TW. ., Y xi... ,xg K, ARGCN TRCPHY HE Argon Trophy is one of the most beautiful awards attainable in athletic activity at the University of Detroit. It is given each year by the Argon fraternity, general social organization, whose memberf ship includes students in every college of the university. The winner is chosen by the director of athletics for the greatest improvement in the spring period of foot' ball practice. William J. C'Neil received the honor this year, and took the trophy from the hand of Coach Charles Dorais at the annual Argon Trophy Dance held at the Hotel Statler the evening of May 24. He made the most improvement and showed the greatest promise in the opinion of Coach Dorais of any of the recruits assembled in spring practice. This year was the second time the award was given, having been founded last year following the organization of the Argons as a campus fraternity. Its hrst winner was Sam Merriman who presented a brilliant performance in the spring of 1928, but was prevented from playing in the fall through an accident at Camp Czanam. The trophy represents a football player carrying the ball in action. It is of burnf ished silver and stands eighteen inches in height. The base is made of ebony and carries a silver plate upon which is engraved the name of the winner together with the honor which the trophy symbolizes. 1 'S gig rw 31, x 4 '-A 1, -'-X. i' -A -riff -.f V. . 51273 My 0 gig 4, ,, - L5 + ff-1 4329 Q .0 1 Q6 'Q O, ' Y l ! 577 S We 'E' A,i-RQ 7 47 ff KS W W C-Oo 0 ykgvw Q93 Q E x,-wici r , . 1 X "+9f5Xg1w?4,ekgQ, f 1-aff.fv,y-y,q,1w,gQw -.4v yfwn., N'?' f N 21.-g,,Qg.W, .- 4, WM 3, 9 ,,,1, ,-AW W ,, , W , . V , , , 1 A 1 W 1' f 1 ' i WA, vw? 1 if SQ fi. 34' C2 E Z 4 Q Kc , . 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I L. II .. 1 , ,gli WAN H I X- ., wx 7 , 51" ., ,ffl ' x v I I ,,. I, -7 fl zIl':,f"f 'PQ JH, .5145 4 ' I .I II I 5 A Nun' ai-If --fZ:"1:,Qvr 1- P' ril'-4.'!3,i 'JT'-1..,Z--" '., 'MLAIL H3 ,.:m1j" il' 1-1 41 lm 'ga A, RT'-fip.'V't..'G' F5 Qgfr-lfftgza. 'Q Y MV I .,,.' :R - "- L' , an X ,49"l'N,-N., wgyagg Harvey Long Dorothy Berry S E N I O R B A L L HARVEY LONG, Chairman THOMAS M. MULLIN, Assistant Chairman GENERAL ARRANGEMENTS GEORGE D. MCCORMICK GEORGE W. HESS INVITATIONS AND DECORATIONS EMIL A. ULBRIGH LEO S. MITTIG M. JOHN DELOGE NED FITZPATRICK DANIEL G. SHEA MUSIC AND PUBLICITY PROGRAMS PATRONS WILLIANI B. HARRINGTON THOMAS I. CONNELL LAWRENCE E. KELLY .if E , 63 A I X fi? . 14.35 LMI-54, .LMI wi fy L B 'Q 1' ' Af . 55157: H' 'yrgbf I 5 QQ!!! -R 'EU u ,ff F ff? :LW I T V..- ,II -"4 4 ,Y my 21. ., Q n- K. XLILJ Ijkaf' l I I,.Q:Iy,1, 4. .I,.-ul, AL- GK- 7: jj' 3 'A ?,lI",J:,.. A Kr I v J v A 1 1 I bi JY.: ijljvi ff. ' 1 ' .sr H . 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A F 4 ' r HB Senior Ball! . . . the culmination of a season of social successes, the highlight of a college career, an ecstacy of colorful harmony and wistful melody, an echo of four fleeting years! The cool. fragrant scent of a thousand roses wafted through the pastel glow of a spring evening . . . a night of nights bathed in the silver cadescence of a shining half moon . . . haunting refrains calling back thoughts of yesterdays . . . memof ries softened by the spell of a fleeting fantasy. Such an affair was the Senior Ball of 'Z-9. To the strains of the Breeze Blowers directed by lack McGay, more than a hundred and sixty couples glided over the ballroom floor of the Grosse Ile Golf and Country Club. But the excellency of the music was only an aftermath of a marvelous cuisine. When the guests arrived they were ushf ered into the dining room which was gorf geously decorated by the city's leading artist and floral craftsman. To the first surprised glance of the pleased couples the banquet hall seemed to be filled with thousf ands of exquisite American Beauty roses. The flickering flames of candles cast a mel' low glow over this background, and pref sented a perfect scene for romanticism. g The simple statement that the Senior Ball of '29 was the greatest in the history of the university is in itself the highest compliment that can be paid to the com' mittee. This annual event carries a heritf age and precedent which has grown with the passing years. Yet, amid the glamor and gayety of the dancing couples, there creeps a tremulous element of regret and longing. Four years of constant association and good fellowf ship are swiftly sweeping to a close. The highroads lead in different directions never to recross. The music ended, the departing guests carry home cherished memories of the Senior Ball of 529 . . . Last Dance! "m -i bei. rf-..,f. A ia, xx i--, 1 ,.g,,,.i "1'il.j v -K, ' ' 52313 4:-41 Connell Delsoge Fitzpatrick Harrington Hess Kelly McCormick Mittig Mullin Ulbrich Lawrence Riley Helen McGrath J U N I O R P R O M LAXVRENCE RILEY. Chairman ARRANGEMENTS FRANK E. JENNEY CLARENCE J. KLIAIRIER JAMES FRAZER MUSIC CARL E. SIMER FRANCIS PHELAN PATRONS VJILLIAM F. WAGNER JOSEPH A. MUEEAT LLOYD BRAZIL A TICKETS JOHN F. COLLINS LEO J. ANDRIES N. BROOKS GOODNOXV FAVORS RICHARD SULLIVAN C. SCOTT HONW'ARD 52523 Q 1 if ,3 " a fray .. ,. ..l ni, lf-'15 Q ac. L A . 1:3115 i itll? 6-,'iX.d5',. Bri- Q 1 if is . li'i,g'3'iiv'f Pvt 'Q ' xii' if 62 ifgairirafq til? eff itil i id fr. 5 .tr W 1 3 iv- iii.:-' .yi-'f ,l . 'Q , .QW L ,.3,..,l T Y: ar v lk a' ,K ii Q I K 41 "iv vb' Ii. Y is J" AMT 2 R Hi: ,, -4' . il -J! ' ,- ki .e. Q-Qggfff ' uh- r Qkggnfyr fJ5?'fT5 'ixgxjffj V yin 1.41 fi l gf 'ff 1 li in A1 ' l E5 .Ti Gigi. J35? ,Wifi 1.g'1f-Jimi wi:-,QE I if 1 if ff 9.51 ggi 2'4" 3 iv!-rl ' -. 1 -.lil ll v' mi Mm-. 1 .."'wi'? Q 1 wffll i -+ mv ,W 5,311 :fri .. a-. fd fl 'ii-3 is .Lx . lg. if , fi' .ttf-Aixilu .li--'. . 1 f qi 57 " . ,ah a V . 21 f. Vi' TEPPING from the streets of a metro' politan city into the witchery of a desert oasis is an experience that usually has only been dreamed of. It remained for the actual occurrence to take place on April 5, when the Junior class of the Uni' versity of Detroit presented their annual Junior Promenade in the mammoth Com' mandery Drillroom of the Masonic Temple. As the beautifully gowned ladies and their escorts filed through the drillroom doors they found themselves in a restful oasis with gaily striped Arabian tents nestling against towering -date palms. This hallucination was the result of weeks of labor on the part of the commit' tee and the services of the leading deco' rators of this section of the country. The committee of this fifteenth annual Junior Prom, realizing the crowded condif tion that existed at many previous proms, determined to limit the sale of tickets to 750 couples, a number well under the ca' pacity of the drillroom. Though this move entailed a Hnancial sacrifice, it contributed greatly to the evening's enjoyment. Ted Fiorito's Edgewater Beach Hotel orchestra of Chicago furnished the music for the festivities. They were ably assisted by a Jean Goldkette ensemble. The U. of D. anthem and school songs, and popular tunes from the Union Opera were broad' cast over station WIR. The grand march was one of unusual splendor and was led by Lawrence Riley, prominent student of the Engineering Col' lege, and his guest, Miss Helen A. Mcf Grath, of Rochester, N. Y. Miss Grace Ward, of Wilson, Oklaf homa, was awarded the trophy for having traveled the farthest distance to attend this memorial affair. Miss' Ward was the guest of Richard Beck. There must be an awakening from every dream. The music over, the guests stepped forth from the glamor of the "Oasis of Cmari' into the dark streets of the slumber' ing city. 52351 Andries Collins Goodnow Jenney Muffat Wagner Brazil Frazer Howard Kummer Simek ' I W 1 F-A R4--A M, .- f - - ,L . .L Q C - . f . f- v- A--L .7 H :F-rf ' ' - ' I if P F I rj X I , - --.F Y V' :J 1. .MT I idx' r 'T'-'fp I ' - ' ' 3 '- "if ' ,,. Q' 5 'I . Tk '- i ' ' " JR if J". 'W .14 4. W' 4' - Vg' ,U --3""',jN?f'fI I J dx Nfl:-J Nun 1 I-is F., I dx Sv' urJJ:lt,::g5 5.3, . '-fb' I KI'-tix!" I na ILCJ Q? 1 , 1 X n 3-5 I 'J I . Rf' Y' . V -" fr? 3 W4 1 J f :tg '51SI:I. 3153 HQJ' I 1-s.1.II.L A ,ff 45.1-' '51 Q ,jf Aff :g,f4f'I'W ' fix-ng IYJE',I'f :,,ffI,J'JI Ijp. 'L,,IT.. ,-QR r IK-xg kgvw, ",2.j'f'J ' 'midi 1 mf' F' WPI! JMQN EIN .JJ J' W mm.: JJ I Jiwfu " Jw 5 ti II V, 01- K. ct 'Rf 'MII QA J Iv' I" "WI 0 'I Jiiaffuf I 4- 'R MLAI fn 'J II? . I lm, LJ. I I NIT. X71 RV W V I M141 Ei W-'I' ' 1- Juv' J-"Ur I L' u, .4 HQ. YJ' L71 .. Iii Vfl' Z' J 3 I Iuffu. JJ ' N. ,1,f.. W5 LJ! JZ ,yr If 'N.Q.g'f51'. . -N fy 613- Ijfgli I qi I WWF' . :JI ff? ai feqfc-J , -Q '- I-I L ,Ip-, Y .- ,, W! I: 'H ' U" Tj3.l.' ,, J z .V .V j lt' 1' l fu 1' .. fl!! I I Mff M L f J U I n I 1. I Xvilliam Murphy LaVerne Felix SOPHOMORE SNOWfBALL WILLIAM MURPHY - f f f f ' f f f Chairman JOHN CAMPBELL NED MONAGHAN MICHAEL BIDA M. LAFFERTY JOHN RATCLIFFE MUSIC JOHN SPARLING BERNARD CHAPMAN PUBLICITY . JAMES BRENAN ROBERT DELAND HARRY THEISEN M. WOLF DONALD CARNEY - PAUL MARCEL A. PETRACCI TICKETS GEORGE L. HEss JAMES SCOTT FRED MCROBERTS ROOT J. JEROME JORDAN DECORATIONS EUGENE GUSXVILER MARIE BLINETTA FRED STURM MARY FRIEDL DOLLY BAUSER JAMES Hi.-XGGERTY PATRONS ELMER ULRICH THOMAS J. MACINTOSH xxx-A L II.. ,I.,- DQ? R61 IF I t 1? -lgf N I I Cl I W 155' . iii . J, fhf' .LQ 1:- ' I yr , In fi . gf., in , lf Q 'Q if, Y- Y' .1 1 . ci.-fx J '-,Qi i.I1?"Y I . V551 i! PJ lvl! . 44,1 VQZQQQ -:.-1 -5 Y. Tffif- 15.15-5 , VF. 'LI I ' fn".- I' !'f'- V J 9.15 'l ' lf- :I ,514 I. ffef Lwm .Asif 'Y pr ig I ,-.' fi' '.:f,- .R ..,f L, - 1 1... I fl - 14,47-A ..'.'A'F,l,i 'I '-'LI' fi-'JA ,r'-', 1.. .IEE L , Q,! '- - wg' sf: L,'f'd' 1 Y ' J , -I f234J J . sftf..f'fs:f--ff . my -- V' ,arf--fi i5f4f,E" it i 1 Lili? fl". rfafff flffgayfg lltl' 3: lik Q2 ESPITE the fact that the paper snowf ly balls ran out and- there was no grand march, 1,200 guests thoroughly enjoyed the annual dance classic staged by the ig' fl, Sophomore class the evening of January ll .ij in the Fountain Room of the Masonic Temple, under the title of "The Soph 'i SnowfBall." gf- The decorations were most unusual, and in harmony with the title of the party. In ',lli'fHi the center of the ballroom hung a huge 5 "'i il snowball of papierfmache, from which white f in T fi 'Jah ",2lJlsf'f, i wily, s' laid! - ,. v ,. ,i 0 -, .5'.,"-if '1 ali?-11 lligmy Fl -U . -'-7:35 if 5. N. M. . ,. N: . l 0.'9i'lEV ffl nfl' ,i, mm. .-,Mi J Q .f P 1- .Nw ,B v 'Y 'Q 'fp'-vile! ' i,"f4 EMM KLQQTW if QW:-5 ,Erik ltljmr . . .W . . fvqr 1. 'lfflf .M .' -Q. Q Yu an --rw nn l vi . ,F H v v " 15... rl L, 4. ' i 2. .1 if i iff 52 A 'iii 1 T Il. g. 2 . . . ve ' Qi? at .. .V ' - L'-if ,ml , w . 'QQWQ1 I .5 v I.. Nxlflflfn drapes extended on all sides to the ceiling. Whiter still, and cold in appearance, was the pseudofsnowman which stood in the fountain casting shivering glances at the dancers. To add to the wintry scene, reinf deers pranced in the background of the snowfcovered stage on which the orchestra played. Incidentally the orchestra contracted to appear disguised as Eskimos to complete the icy effect, but through some mistake in arrangements they came clothed in formal attire. The uncomfortableness of their situation, however, did not detract from the excellence of their musical perform' ance. Pat Dollohan's recorders justified their reputation as musicians with their fine performance. The "snow" motif was carried even into the unique dance programs of silver and red. The dances were entitled sleighfrides, twenty of which were listed. Un the first page of the program was a festive quotation from Longfellow which said something about chasing cares away, and the enterf tainment provided enabled the guests to abide by this admonition. The name chosen, The Soph Snow' Ball, did more than furnish them with a name, it gave them a motif on which their decorations and favors could be carried out, and their extensive and successful use of the suggestion contributed greatly to the effectiveness of their dance. Incidentally the whole motif was in perfect harmony with the frigid temperature of January. As the first class dance of the year, it proved a great success and qualined as a good opener for a season of class festivities such as those which followed. 52353 Bauser Campbell Friedl McIntosh Ratcliffe Brennan Chapman Guswiler Malley Ulrich Q. 2.1 e I"1w 5.1 -1 '. QI ' fi ' . 1X I I., 2 .u 'jig- I w .., K xwf,,,,1. r'if,EZiQ 'ff 4 'sf' .Mfg J au, 49. J 4 -JS. 2 .fl 4 Agn' . w':,'iZ5 :R.,1, . 15. if 'IIW' an VR' 1?,..,.' 1331 Tia. 45 DEW if fig. A 'fix 'X F 'rfi'w 1' fm., - MSM.,-A' ..f- Y .' 1' waIu!"kJQL - mv -A I .J 5 I. WJ I HIM' uffqxkf 5: T' JAX nf' F' Q.. Aff? " 'I .fr ...I ig, ff 'i W IAQFIXL JJ ik Igqpip Ig' us-. 527- ,.Q',IIQ! f"fI'-VIII' X -.Ji I Q? if: . I , :Mal 7 MSQJTZ1 ' 'f I: IRAHJJ I A . ... 1 "fi -sal T ,wigs .1 gg-L ,Aw I Nix- I X M 5.95. 7 T .PHI . J ,LY .-1'-AW' . wg,-. 1, 'F 4. S,-In If I F-.if 1'Xff'f'T3L 'Sg,4if., foifigiffal .L .5 -. 1' ' "V - - -I I f .1 .'?II'1'M+ ,, 4.5. .,. ,A -.j,Jf,5.:, . Ii-.. V-L W .L "xl 195, I :fir . r .5 V23 fakkyiifva? ,vw .417-. f" If ,., . 3521.35 . LW I :' Rf V, -llflff 'W ,J 1.1 .Jn Hi '13 ..I Ng--A-. J. ff.: "5- Tfgr. 'Q f WL' V N r, . J ... .Ev Q I- iw- I 'T -r', V ,, J.-Q-H'.:".N?,.3J wa-R J- ni., 1: 1+-,Lg VL' I 1.1 .fx I' I f- f.-', , - .,I.'!".. G. RAYMOND JOHNSTON G. RAYMOND JOHNSTON LEWIS J. JABRO THOMAS BENSON MERRILL GRIX ALBERT J. NAGLER MARTHA E. MEYER JOSEPH D. LOUGHRIN ROBERT E. ALLAN FRANKLYN MCDONALD G. Raymond Johnston FRESHMAN FROLIC CHAIRMAN COMMITTEEE FRANK E. MCDONALD PROGRAMS ALBERT NAGLER MUSIC G. RAYMOND JOHNSTON RECEPTION LOUIS J. BERO PUBLICITY LEWIS J. JABRO PATRONS MARY K. WHITING EVA ELLIOTT TICKETS Genefal Chairman JOSEPH D. LOUGHRIN JOHN B. GIRARDIN FRANKLYN MCDONALD THOMAS J. MCGRATH JOHN B. GIRARDIN EDXVARD SXVEENEY JOHN B. GIRARDIN ROBERT E. ALLAN JOHN J. BISSELL DECORATIONS WILLIAM BUCRLEY HALL EVA ELLIOTT JOSEPH D. LOUGHRIN MARTHA E. MEYER JOSEPH LUBINSKI 1 "if T yy 'ie ,Vg 'E-'iv , . . .Ldv Q - cl--. 'Hi ,Nw ffff aff A PI. A- S A11 If? . ... 'iff I 'iii RR 1 .uv .F K I.. Aj, . Y, TW? Lg . Adi V f '. 7. If Im' 11 - '31 IL . ' ,fi .. I ,J 5. rjh IIA'-:D X, .EQ 'K IRI L xivxkxl , 0 A f sl' . Ii W' M F42 V. if 1943242 FQ! AG, . 51.33 P! Y J. Riu I LJ fglfkfg .gg " I ' J .ff . IS -' 1.'19"i'r ,fi -P Y ml V YT 'A- . ' 1 :' 'Pkg Jw" 9' - 1. rg-egg-. JJ.,-' 755: 'H - . I I -- '-. MTW: fl . ' gif" ."- T - 'r I-'B' T' "5 M .V . . . A I Rfk.. A . .ER IRQ? Y- .+ - '- ' ,-' T .'f:?g5f.3f"g13-:LI WTS-L31-V 1 , , ., 4 .."' -f'-51-fi" , 52363 '1 1 X 1 ,F 1 f 1 .r " im.-Q, P, " ,ii fu .1 s A -fciwmij '1 bm K 1ll.py,.1'1:, qiyxll .,1,n. we 'ic'b?.3, l 'A H'1,' "tif Q pq." 'li ni.-1 g ,u i '3-1 i 'lz.1g1.! la."f'2. ,gr 'L U, 'J 11 kgilhj, Tiff' -' uf., illf'Eg iff-' 1 rf' .N 3 1. n . G ig' 55.5.1.1 ALJ ff-an 2 5 1, A 1162 fzfiigfsiifil H" . " -"N Ji. '-.12 1 ' 'fs-af' Cgfgv , 'Q,1'lg -l .N vga., Q F-63 I v- 451 .W ,g-4 1 , 2 .aw fiigj QM' 1 . ,A 1fE1--53231,-1 61 -1 'lie if-1..gl'1fi1 35? 21 ffdg. 1 K5-pil? W .eq 3 1 9 42351111 ss? 5 Q J. l 1' .qu 1 "+V- 1111 1 " 1 r . - ...-1 4 HE freshmen have always had the reputation of being able, through some uncanny means, to stage an unusually good party. The Freshman Frolic given Feb' ruary 8 at the Masonic Temple was no ex' ception to the rule, and incidentally estabf lished an attendance record for this annual event with a total of eleven hundred couples. Both the Crystal and Fountain ball' rooms of the Masonic Temple were engaged for the frolic and the guests were kept busy circulating from one dance floor to another during the course of the evening. Carroll Dickinson's radio broadcasting orchestra from the Savoy Hotel of Chicago was the headline feature of the occasion. Dickinson's tenfpiece colored band played in the Fountain Room. The Detroit orf chestra, Jean Goldkette's Country Club ensemble, playing in the Crystal Ballroom, seemed to have equal musical ability, and included in their number several enter' tainers of extraordinary talent. The Freshman's idea of college life was well brought out in the decorations. They were done after the manner of John Held, Ir., cartoons, with "Merely Margy, an awfully sweet girl," and all the rest occupy' ing prominent places about the ballrooms. A huge red banner announcing HU. of D. Frosh" formed a background for the orchesf tra in the Fountain Room, and red and white pennants encircled the floor. A novelty program in red and white furnished a souvenir for the guests. Despite the abandon which the Freshmen threw into the preparation of the frolic, the affair proved an nnancial success. Perhaps the Freshman's lack of knowledge in busif' ness matters and the resultant lack of cauf tion in expending funds is responsible for the success of this event. Cverfcautiousf ness often stints the value of a university event, and the reputation of the Freshman in this regard insured the guests an affair which they knew would not suffer through this fault. - The class of 1932 really gave the Unif versity a treat with its 1929 Frosh frolic. - ' 95- V. - 1:2 1.15 : f Mamie ' - YQSM-5 1 -' 4 :- " -was .' 1. V ,wa x ' ' 'ff'-. ..Qs?2:v - "2 fi? a ff .' ' .1 i1151'f:. 51fffs,,,4q. ,gf - .. '9,4iZ0i 4 'Z' ' 4 1. ,.2'1-- "-1-1 Lgwnfi . -ffm Allan, Benson. Girardin, Jabro. Loughrin, McDonald. McGrath, Meyer. Nagler, Sweeney. 'f ..-,..-. . "" W- m - -1 -. -. - . f .. . .rf .. .g.'s,:.a..,-W-,Z Ace., .g.1'!-1z.,.-v-23,ifflrp-233,11laffvxi-libs?-ii,,.N 11 in ' i 1 , X As.. tl.-. Mp, ww fi' L 1 V . 1 J 7 r . 1:g"'.i.1- , 41 -.wsilfiif-n' 1 .-.-- r f, , rf' .1 -A . tryna -1 3141.1 -S-1.,g,r.M5 3.233-,ga-"fx-3511,-zqjg5,..r-,,.felgg-,1.:a ,.'. . ,- 2 ,- 4 ,QQ - , 1.- " 3 Chas. ...N ,,.-:fa lr' " 52373 'tiff g li lflf ., i ' 1 . J f.-jrju .1. . i!,'1:l'fL . ,Lf 1 L.,-2 ,Fv " E' ' ,ff K -L. .- . .i ,l V. -1 . blip I -I K 35, , lib?-J ' -r ff ,.' .1 li-'1 ,Ji .J ff'-'T axwnli, ri 'X l' Ni. . 1' .. Hgh, A M:-' .,'. 21' if SV, lg My 'g vf'2!:P.w '1 'wif' A-1 Q-WT-2.1 .ffitza P 1 ffl' gear... iff' if'- iyl rt" if-.Q life' T f New fi K ig", 1 if fr-gQ1l,f..s. li T1 'W IVE 1 1 2 if silly I1 4 L F 1 J 11754.51 ,f f'51'L7z:':p f1l1"'?1yw' '1 li 'fel 1,1-1, y gg. Wrgspil X yell 1 pl' f Y, la Ns '-.Sim V Ffh' M. wif 1' fail "'l1'.p ff' inf ug ., NIM... 14 ' 'Q 1 Q 'sv 1. pf if dgfiif. Fig V . .,, . -1 111. 6 .1 7.1, ,.1. if Frank Ienney HE Union, early in the first semester, decided to carry on with the policy of sponsoring bifweekly dances at a popular price which proved so successful the year previous under the direction of Ed Theisen. Earnest Tamplin, the Section A Engineerf ing representative on the Board of Goverf nors, and Frank lenney, who performs the same office for the Day Commerce and Finance department, undertook the promof tion of the dances at the request of Presif dent Bigge. The first dance was held the last Thursday in Qctober in the Gesu Parish Hall across from the campus. Two others followed on November 8 and 22. The prime object of these dances, to prof vide a means for all the students to get to' gether and become acquainted was achieved. These parties were especially ap' preciated because of the opportunity for en' tertainment which they provided the stu' dent newly arrived on the campus. The boys staying on the campus were especially in evidence, and we had -a real U. of D. crowd at each dance. The committee provided very approprif ate decorations on each occasion. Block 'LD's" and red and white ribbon on the orchestra stand and ceiling were the usual .ga ,aa YY-A Whig - P Yrgl Lia, I! s,:,r,T,-.,,,'i,i.'l- rv A ' sk .- ,,-F'-, A. 4' ,mar ," ' ,af n . f'iv'- " fi."-Q. if YM' my -ff. 'k'f":fz Magis l '-, --W, r-,,.f'. " sir- .ms ,W ,.. 'M -rf - . . - mafia--fiuarff at 5-W. ,rm I UNION DANCES Chairmen FRANK JENNEY EARNEST TAMPLIN Arrangements RALPH BOONE THOMAS ADAMS FRED HEIN setting. One piece, a white block "D" of large proportions set in a red background and then suspended in front of a silver screen used on movie nights, was very vivid and drew the eyes and admiring comment of all present that particular night. The orchestras, different each time, were composed entirely of school men, and al' ways managed to please the crowd and jus' tify the faith placed in them by the corn' mittee, The boys played as they never had before when they saw all their friends out there expecting to have a good time but realizing the impossibility of it if the orches' tra did not deliver. The posters used to advertise the dances were of such brilliant and blazing hues that anyone seeing them could not help but be impressed and drawn irresistably to the parties whose merits were shouted to the world from their green, orange, and red surfaces. The Union board was very much pleased with the attendance and enthusiasm at the dances. Perhaps even a greater number of students would have shown up if the aff fairs had been held on Friday nights. We may all look forward to a continuation of these dances next year as the board will recommend them to their successors. . are 'rx 1, 1 ,fp J: rg? T11 Ji li? ll Wm ., Y '43 Ni NM- IA.. C. qtrff 2'4- ,-wesu '1 A- an V 1 qi ltr. is ,Y llfi 12. .A -wr W il ' ' L, 'v W' 1" , lr E :ULU Jlfi Y'-' r. ,M , Mui' 1 ui: ' tv'-1, .'1, l ,N Y. 'F tj 'vi ,f if H :iff , ., fn'-V .i .. V - ! . ,I I -.' 1 1 V' .I v rn ', 5 fr., ,P ' 4 ig HI, .'f4' .f," Kffiffe. ,,-I z -- ., , if A+, 'IW HW. r 'l,,...." Q-- H J f-v 1 0 i Jaffn. . .,,-.,-1 , .-.. --,, H .a.g .J-, . D V ,,,... l,,',. A , -, ,i L., -T '.:' --'Fig 5, A-. ' iff' f2arf,,i'lfQf2'l Y E P N i . , l i, uf.. ,fm I -'vw - A' - ,,,."'f"1j.,C?M" s..sLf"""-'li'-'E-P7 gm--.V .5 . fzssj vi. A11 . yi' 'R Vu.- it ... . I QL' .WNV- -:1,1 Wi'-1 ff A rl li - 'I 1 .' 1 l 91.49 1 1 :. I . "' if if Ei, cfrllihflij !..5.,.l .F ""l .UQ-121. '-Wil" . jg 'TQ-1 V, -A :F-il if 'X l .AJ ,QS .,1 ,i... 'I . ffl , 1. i ,.. 1:12 fr fax . .. A -1Tl"A'L'lf 1 1, , . fun! I 1' we f '1 .l QW- 3 - 1 fi I- MJV, l , 1 ,fi "rw .- fljfug. 41 Ivb-"" ill l ," ,I-,T I 11.51 . ,1 vm 1 M. fi K.. A 1'- yy M., .Y : 'I,.'?j:f5f'1 ., 4:15, 'fvi -' ' r . H, 1:1115 -.H , .1 " 5:1 51 ,fl Dolly Bauser HE premier event to be given by the cofeds of the university was the G'Pumpkin Dance" at which the Sophof more girls were hostesses for the Women's League in the ballroom of the League of Catholic Women on Eriday, November 2. A decorative motif which was in keepf ing with the harvest season, was pictur' esque with Orange and black as the prevailf ing colors. The ballroom was turned into a veritable rendezvous of witches and gobf lins. Cornstalks and pumpkins and real autumn leaves lined the walls and concealed the boxes, orange lights cast an eerie glow on the dancers, while witches, jack O' lan' terns, ghosts, moon, cats and skeletons aided in carrying out the motif. This proved to be the most popular dance sponsored by the League, and to say that it fulilled its purpose is to put it mildly. It brought a better understanding and ac' quaintanceship among the students and fac' ulty, and enriched the League coffers. More than a hundred couples danced to - - A H l 11,. I "i.:1.1:i1 M ' .' " 1 '1.. .. L 1 A, . -,..1 1 .11 '.. ,. 11v.. LEAGUE DANCE A DOLLY BAUSER, General Chairman COMMITTEES Invitations MAIKIE BUNETTA, Chairman .ROSELLA PELTIER MARY DUDEK ETHEL MATHESON Decorations BETTY MONTGOMERY, Chairman MARGATKET MAIIY BRADY EMILY IIOHA HELEN EOLEY Music MARY FRIEDL, Chairrnan GERTRUDE SILVERS Patrons CARROLL NUSSEY, Chairman MILA ZECMAN ELEANOR RHEAUME Seymour Simon's orchestra and enjoyed the refreshments. The unique setting as well as the originality of the program established a feeling of goodfellowship among the guests. Serpentine confetti thrown from the boxes while the orchestra played the "Confetti Finale" was a novel feature and added greatly to the merriment of the dancers. ' The dance program provided for a "jack C'Lantern dance," a 'LCorn Trot," a "Witches' Erolic," a L'Coblin's Chase," a 'GBlack Array," a 'gCorn Stalk," a 'Tlarf vest Moon" and a "Confetti Finale" with suitable interpretations. To distinguish the entertainment com' mittee the girls wore dainty shoulder bouf quets in pastel shades. Assisting the Sophomore girls were representatives from the other classes. These were Lucy Pequegnot, senior, Armella Eriedl, juniorg and Mary K. Whiting, Doris Archambault and Martha Meyer, freshmen. L xQ..,..ywi135,eg:,.,ggiak,gilt ri ,,gvj,...,apggvjfviw ,, . , , 'Lg -2- . .. , .,-P1 -X ..- 52393 Joseph Fisher N THE good old days on the University of Detroit campus, two dances held a large share of the limelight in social affairs. Cne was the Jfl-lopg the other was the Engineer's Dance. As time went on, through neglect, the latter gradually faded from prominence, and finally was disconf tinued altogether. The unprecedented progress of the enf gineering department and its great increase in numbers, could not long permit this tra' ditional function to lie among the forgotten events of university social life. Consef quently Eriday evening, May 10, witnessed the revival of this dance under the title of "The Tech Ball." lt was given in the Crystal Ballroom of the Masonic Temple, and received an attendance attained by few social functions of the university year. The decorations presented an appearf ance well in tune with the gayety surf rounding the revival of an old tradition. Their originality was unsurpassed by any seen at a university function this year. The committee succeeded in creating designs that were an artistic emblem of the en' gineering profession. The motifs consisted of logarithmic curves, cubes, and squares. TECH BALL IOSEPH A. FISHER f f f General Chairman ARRANGEMENTS JOHN SOLEAU, VINCENT MCGUGIAN PROGRAMS, INVITATIONS, ORCHESTRA RUSSEL E. Gizoss fff' f f Chairman BALLRCCM LEANORD B. SIVIITH fffff Chairman DECORATICNS R.iLPH W. BooNE fffff Chairman PUBLICITY , JOHN SOLEAU ffff f Chairman PATRCN CARL I. SCHORN f f f f Chairman TICKETS ARNoLD J. MITTIG f f f f Chairman The ball was sponsored this year by the Engineering Society. The committee in charge of the arrangements, however, was picked entirely from the prefjunior class of engineers. This was done in view of the fact that this class does not partake in any of the regular class and campus activities at large, because of its being an odd class and limited only to the engineering college. Joseph A. Fisher was chosen as general chairman for the event. - The music for the ball was furnished by Jack McGay and his Crange Blossom or' chestra. Their performance is familiar to the University of Detroit and was thorf oughly enjoyed by the guests at the Tech Ball. Vv'ith the exception of the music, everything, including the unique decoraf tions, was the work of the engineering students. l 'I f' I4 .5 V . 1 , v,""'. 'L V' x ,.,,. ix T 5 .fy ,.' Q l: izhjvv C if L 5 ' ry: ,viJ'J1l' A v -.,. I ' ., ,,. mt :Hn U. fi., .,, if ' A .i 'Eli .. f 'til' 'hal .sgfi 5, 4' ,ini f', 1 'Wifi f E .WJ . 1 ,. ' 4 xtnfiw S' if -i ,,. if I1 avifff 1.143 , illti 'i Q? . . , F .J 1 fad: ,K J? rffa. :S few I .' G ig rbi? if F' L-51 'F 'G W. X ,N 1 ii.iY1Q,'.l 5 A+", lib I lf f' ?i.i52'i if ' 3 J, S11-L ill u, T 11412. , L ,tix sign! M., The great success of the Tech Ball has , 'igll already given rise to plans for its continuf ance in future years. It is no longer an event of questionable enjoyment, but an established affair synonymous with social activity in the College of Engineering. , . e-arse. N403 .- v. . V- f.,.. .-1 1 .n 44 i y-xg. y.'."'-is 93,--..,. " ag F2 TE'-3 . 1 if V' ' ga . int gi T rff fist ffifflw 'Fi ,i in ' A. E . C . D A N CE qgxi CHARLTONc3.SHAW7 f f - Cmawwmn -Eggi THOMAS MCINTOSH f Music Lifgigf ,fx JOHN DYER f f Remmuon ff. CHARLES F. FLYNN Tickets lk r T 's Jw 1 ii - -1 at . E FH x ' 'liii l it 1 'D ii gf . 'D t 'W iii? Thomas Mclntosh Q T c , LD. .1 T f Q g I O transform the old Jefferson gymnaf were the variations and blendings, that a ' i sium into an attractive setting for I1 veritable panorama of prismatic beauty university social- function is no small task, was presented on every hand. In addition Qffeiisllf- and when Charlton Shaw, general chairf to elaborate decorations and clever light' Xl T , man of the A. E. C, dance, announced that ing effects an extraordinarily entertaining he and his committee would attempt the orchestra was engaged for the occasion. . . . . i , in underlglkglg' 3 general all of Sceptlclsm When the masters of the blue melody . , gfeete 75 elf Statement' struck up their fantastic and irresistible The primary object of the dance was to jazz the guests were compelled to succumb Welcome the Freshmen into the night to its weird rhythm. The music at such lf! school and make them acquainted with the an affair is always a big factor in the evenf . . . , . . . .Y LP" 't J upper classmen. Being new arrivals on the ing s enioyment and the captivating gang 'gym campus the first year men sincerely appref of jazzfhounds selected by the committee my ciated the party and the Sophomores are to met with the enthusiastic approval of the nr I., ' . I if -XT fix 5 1 , 5 be congratulated for engineering a social guests. 4' LM I' s I I . .l.-'H fe' 1 COUP d etat- W Ev-ery possible detail that would conf W More than one hundred couples attend-f tribute toward making the evening one of gf ed the dance and the entire assemblage was Variety, revelry, and pleasure for the 1 gi lavish in its praise of the committee's work. guests, was included in the plans of the 5, V No ancient gymnasium greeted their eye committee, The guests reluctantly def Q upon arrival. The old hall had been parted from the hall at the conclusion of transformed img an enticing Sggnig gf the ceremonies with that intense feeling of Q f beauty. The basic color scheme was the pleasure that results from being delight' A university's red and white, but so clever fully surprised and entertained. We , 1 .N 'X' . vlfpzflifj 'TTR'ATT?'Wf.2t35wMWWaf59ft3k55?fi?7iil'ggffifdi Uf?ii?MHi3F'?EsQ5VE5iQ?3fH?7TEfH7Wf5HW tg 4-H, A W 4 Tx' Tania-.,MMaa!P'Tr'T'f 52413 , . I, Ir' 'VIL -f' il..Si4f"' " Ia .-ti .f ri ar fi I fer he 1 - i. 4 ,Ll 4 .i si ., . .WL ,J- ahsa.-JA , . M- qi --aa A ., 1 .f'f ' -, .5 i lf, .5 ll -:nr xg, Iwi? .F is . ,Lal 'Q F, I ,. .,. u ,' A - .. 1 ' ' .hy -V! Q , ,N .I U.. A , 1. ee -4? e - fvizxseeev t ,- i!QjjJg?u.ix .elite fi 2- Aj' M, g 1. fr : J, 'H ,g xejlisil-if ARGCN TROPHY DANCE KENNETH TIFFANY, Chairman ENTERTAINMENT A hh! me i si I.. 11 JOHN C. DYER .................... Chairman fer p :jj Music X EDWARD C. ENGELMAN ............. Chairman ffiigg DE OORATIONS - will ni - DANIEL HARRINGTON .............. Chairman e5.r:IiQf'5..Q' INvITATIoNs JOHN C. TREEN ............. .... C hairman TROPHY ,Li-335.1 I 1 GEORGE HARRIGAN .......... .... C hairman M A TICKETS '.t,jara' ' WILLIAM C. STOREN ......... .... C hairman PUBLICITY ea 1 ROY C. IRVINE .............. .... C hairman "Quit HALL y 15,i,,g'j PHILLIP CONWAY ........ .... C hairman em' Kenneth Tiffany 1" it ircrlfefi. HE gran-d ballroom of the Statler celebrating the future of U. of D. football, "5 51 ar V--l' Hotel was the scene this year of the as well as the closing of the present year. jj .'lIl Argon Trophy Dance, the final big social The Argon Trophy WHS H fiftiflg award gfftef function of the university year. More for the great honor which it represents. gif. than six hundred dancers occupied the lt is a miniature figure in silver of a foot' floor in this climactic event. ball player carrying the ball and stands The height of interest in the party was frghreen Inches m height' The base which f'5efi:f?, . . molds the statuette is of ebony and conf at the awardmg of the trophy for Improve' tains a silver late u on which is en raved fair, ment in spring football practice. This -P -e e yZ"i'7Hq r , , h the name of the winner of the award. It LI... I . award 15 swan each Yaaf t0 tha PraYer We O is an annual prize established two years ago ggjgil if .I P- Shows the meer Prorrrree for the eemmg by the Argon fraternity. This orgartizaf ,ge ri r..'Q.Tr.?'r Year' rr rs a Seerer Wrrrerr 15 Onry r eveareer tion, now one of the foremost fraternities r-eff by Coach Charles' HGUSHQ Dorais at ereveh on the campus, was formed but two years ,fllffirf .fr 6010011 OH the night Of the ahhh?-1 dance ago from a club which existed outside the ,,.' ,J given in honor Of this PlaYe1'- fold of the university. They now possess After the usual gayleties of the dame, one .of the largest enrollments of any uni' ,frgf the festivities were halted, the music Vererry rrarernrry, and have figured reese 5 ceased, and Coach Dorais advanced with grermneidy among these Organizations egg Kenneth Tiffany, general chairman of the uflfii inisrigsgoalerie tm h dance was affair, to the center ofthe floor. He called F . h d b I k K . Ip rg h. B 1, lf iii out the name of William C'Neil and Auems C Y 'ae melee an rs arce rishll Meg? h fl h f h . . , f t onians, the featured orchestra on WWI Amr r e . nest OPC O r e Umvefslfvs U ure radio programs. That their tunes were 'Xi sf1d1fOH Sueeess advanced re rrreer the gay and their pranks entertaining was evif ff summons. Embarrassed, he seized the dent from the great enjoyment Whieh the Covafad tf0PhY, ahd, after muttaflhg. a Guests derived. As a whole the dance W few incoherent words of thanks, rushed Emved worthy of its place as the dosing if .J i'ri'QQff back to his Cifflle Of ffi6I1dS- The festivif event of a year full of exceptional social ties were resumed, and the dance was on, functions, rut it .. e. .A , . A . . , . - . e. .. . r ie I I Q19 " f if! . 5 . i 3 ,.,, . fu-:..,......4" 52423 v lx. 4, -W fy, YA. . .J -w .- ' J ia' J levi . ii? QQ? CCLCNIAL PRCM THOMAS J. CONNELL, Honorary Chairman fins JOHN RATCLIFFE, General Chairman Decorations JAMES HAGGERTY RAY NAVIN Music g CARLSON CARLSON iff-R Invitations if CHARLES BRUSHABER will Patrons GEORGE L. HESS JOHN M. CAMERON il Publicity C. SCOTT HOWAIKD John Ratclilfe wig 15.15, Colonial Prom of the Sigma Kappa to the fraternity with the largest number gggjfy Phi fraternity has become a tradition of its members present at the dance. The at the University of Detroit. This year, winner of the banner was the Argon fra' yi as in others, it proved one of the most en' ternity, and it was accepted in the presenf joyable of the season S dances. Held in the tation ceremony by Lawrence Dowd, pres' Grand Ballroom of the Hotel Statler on the ident of that group. The banner was one evening of Tuesday, Feb. 12, it achieved well worth winning. lt was cut from red the largest attendance of any 'of the unif velour and carried letters of' silver. This versity fraternity functions given during award was an innovation with this year's ,Ffsjfgt 1929. Colonial Prom. The beauty of the ballroom was en' Pandemonium nearly resulted toward the hanced by drapes of red, white, and blue end of the dance when whoever was in hunting which decorated the walls, and by charge of "stamping" the guests as they left national flags and shields commemorative of the dance floor for a rest in the lobby lost the it Lincoln's birthday. The finishing touches rubber stamp. The result was that the man' xl 4, viiw- 1 'Ui ff: .Q as!- iix M' . 1, V , l. Z., to the decorations of a naturally beautiful ballroom were streamers in the university's colors of red and white, and in the fraterf nity's colors, blue and gold. At one end of the ballroom was hung the University of agement was unable to check those who ref turned and consequently gave the Stags a chance to 'Lcrashf' It was late enough in the evening, however, so that no serious loss en' sued to the fraternity, and the Stags ref Detroit banner, while at the other that of ceived a boon that seldom comes in the life Sigma Kappa Phi was suspended. In all, of a stag. the decorations formed an impressive set' T0 elaborate on the Sueeesg nf the dance . ting, 6II1l3l6II1E11ZiC of the theme of the dance is unnecessary to 3, function 50 linked with and fitting for Such a popular Occasion. tradition as the Colonial Prom. A dance of Nearly every fraternity on the Campus its sort is always well attended and always - was represented among the evening's guests. enjoyed, because of this attendance and of An outstanding event of the evening was the feeling of goodfellowship which J the presentation of a large U. of D. banner prevails. 1 E e L N . ., , -.., -QA. -s.-f!a,. A .- - A -- ff 'Q H H -- 'H - r f243J in ,gf ' 1 1 4 i . V ' TA. i, llrflf i' '1 'rfqii - ,, 1T9'Q':2fle 'Wal' T Q, M --i X, 1-1 31+ i1,, , J,-,V f fa' ails sw ui -- lfllillfj H23 5 , .,, E-Y"m -rl fs -3 fvigiii, 'FQ 'iw Fjy' Vw 25:54. 1-5,7 nj yi sl' Q , ff'lz.'f:'f" Ek -f w - filliuiill ,4i,Y,.31 F955-.f.,lf "'clii!'Jx fl 'I .O i HX, NMM fi TQ Wil i ':'. 3 ii' sri is i " H, I I ,, l Mi F Vp - John Behen HE "Iota Fooleriesn, sponsored by the 'wi-Q' If if QL?-,sl IQTA FGOLERIES JOHN . BEHEN General Chairman SAMUEL A. PETIX Music LEON P. COTE Tickets RAYMOND I. DELANEY - Reception Iohn Galbo and Francis Quinn, under' 1,5 K. X i xi, N Ti tg 9? "",73',f' iff V-.-ibn' 5' S i--Q w --ff- A 'K as '-I f- v af-V ' . i ' -M -. ' ' i fl si-If-f wr ri fe ,, .. in :M E. I , , - , 1 1 1 ' TC io f national prefmedic fraternity, Omega graduates of the university, presented their ' lf Beta Pi, afforded a brilliant celebration for imitable intgfpfetations of some of the 4. the completion of the nrst semester. latest Popular Songs. The Pledges of the ' The evening of January 30th found the fratefmty took an aftlve Part m the pro, Jw- yi, . ceedings of the evening and were made to crystal ballroom of the Masonic Temple 1 1 , s elaborately decorated in the colors of the eiiecute many Udmflous and Iudlcrous an' university and the national fraternity. The UCS much to the delight of the guests' b0X9S OU the bQlC0UY Suffoundlflg the da-me The success of the 'glota Fooleriesn gave floor vvere assigned to the various fraternf assurance to the members of Qmega Beta QJ ities whose banners draped before them. Pi that in the future they COU1 d Plan to 5 The distinctiveness of the affair and the ssfflbllsb lfhls dance 351 H feature of the novel name which it bore brought many gmverslfyj' greg? S0531 Calendar- The QQ' student couples to the scene of the festivif 110015195 Promises tO be QU? Of those X qi? ties. The guests were enthusiastic in their Cl3'1?CeS 'SPOU50fed bY P1 ffafefnm' for the Q praise of the party and thoroughly enjoyed university at large. Of late years several the incomparable dance music and enterf of the more active fraternal bodies have fi tainment furnished by Bob Cruzet and his inaugurated such social projects and met dusky harmonizers. As a novelty feature, with no ordinary success. Q , .. ii ,iff-as-f3'i"""":'i'j""'-4-f-E 'I 104 iff 'rs-. H' s cf ---if Cxfh' A s-A-1,,fT i ix, , .E+ ' l ,':i'?f3,,E3' ,Q 'Pl-r.. , 1 0116" 52443 Plfl PIRATE BALL CLARENCE C. KUMMEIK, General Chairman Publicity RALPH C. JOHNSTON JOHN C. TREEN Decorations LAWRENCE RILEY LEO ANDRIES Mi.csic R.ALPH W. BOONE JERRY DONOVAN Arrangements JAMES BRITT DONALD CARNEY Tickets A RALPH P. MILLEIK BERNARD KUMMEIL K ALLCWE'EN NIGHT, Cct. 31, witnessed the revival of an old uni' versity function by the Scribes fraternity, Delta Pi Kappa. A costume ball was held in the old armory, and proved one of the outstanding social events of the year. The scene chosen was the best in the city for a Hallowe'en party. The dismal streets leading to the armory lent an atmosphere akin to the spirit of the occasion. Cne eerie lightfbulb burned in front of the building, and the darkness outside its circle was ample hiding place for a hundred ghosts. Cnce inside with ticket purchased and cloaks checked, a program was presented which directed the guest aboard the Jolly Roger, the Pifl Pirate ship. Creatures from all lands were gathered there, dames of the Sveldt, ladies from Paris, - dancers from Spain, princesses from China and Japan, ghosts of colonial times, Turks, gypsies, and finally the pirates themselves, of all times and of all varieties. Clarence Kum mer The drillroom, itself, had been trans' formed into a pirate ship. At the west end a telephone pole reared itself into the' vaulted darkness of the roof and made a very realistic mast. A sail which it sup' ported spread across a goodly portion of the northern wall. Around the balcony hung large banners of a variety of countries, in the center of which drooped the black flag of the pirates with its skull and crossf bones. Varicolored lanterns overhung the floor to form a colorful ceiling of light. The orchestra played from a cage of black paper against the northern wall and posed as the galley slaves of the Pifl Pirates. The music was furnished by Bob Cruzetls Cottonfpickers, who, While not as excellent musicians as the famous originals, played in a manner that was thoroughly enjoyed. At one o'clock the guests reluctantly took their departure from a function that was prof nounced one of the foremost of the uni' versity's social activities. f247J 'Q I P , k Y L P V ""' "' " ' ' I ' Ln. 5 g 1 ,Y .""1, -A 5 ' -'fm .-"' fs- ..- , , .. .- .. - .,, 'J 'i . , , . g .G f --.-'.,- 4 A i'A1fl"'A'-'W' JH ff' if., as fr- .i ff . . V i '-if " to-.f . H -Q... S Q' . , -in Q.-,iq +.4.,11 gl- ,f ,V f, ,y-It 1, . 1 ,- ' '-' f - 3 .- 1. .V g,., V 3, . - Ag p F,-455--,h,,l-is X1 .5 , fm.. i J ns. . , . . K 1 , i .4 , , L , . . , ,IL . ,W .,,.- . .wr .1 ,T ,"f-Q-1, . 1 J f "ai, -.1 hal, fn- -. ' , -f , , ,- ' . . , A 4 - , f. i ' W , - f, 2 L. .1 1 3' ,Ji ,N lf.k.:.,.q f,.,,3gg,.- 'mg-' -, fr, . . J , ., , ., T v I- V .J ,. ' K -H. -if 4 ffl .. U41 il HM-rig ' fl' V Yi W 1.9: wi fl fi sir.-'v', .r- Z '5 in' G fr "Jr1'll V V' 1 2' -.Ji A .' "'jJ'1 lf? wi 4 Q. wlmug .l 4 rffagi 1- '1 :bl 4 in , ,. A ll. l 'fi' E 1.5-, , M M ,Q . X 1 ,N L.-', ' 5 riljnlug, - 'n f lfgw l.Z "li: 'f LK. 'f n-J 513' fr. . l Xl 1. If ' .. . 'wif' .l xx K4 .my ,U i ai' J 4 gl. G' Ts- any 1511?-fx 'il-3 i J f - . 2 sai- ic... 1, nyivyg. fiyif 'Bi ltiif ,. . .lf-.3 . if 1 J! . r-3 -il r"'l'f ,lflii ks,fJ'.F ff JT. 1 5, if 'jf' .V .L . 5 I W. Ji: 61355, Q ' ,' -fwluzl, Q. ,,,. ,pl lit fan Charles E. Dorais CCACHING STAFF V HE University of Detroit is very for' tunate in having a man of the caliber of Head Coach Charles E. Dorais as di' rector of athletics. During the four years that he has had charge of the Titan teams he has raised this school from comparative athletic obscurity to the position of recogf nized national prominence it now holds. ffi ff-Fld In his production of the 1928 Titan fl3'ff,iil, gridders, Dorais brought into play his own f'gif"' experience as quarterback at Notre Dame. p He was among the first passers of the game ...V and was the hurling end of the first famous Q: passing combination, Dorais to Rockne, the pair that demonstrated the possibilities ffl .1 flip of this style of attack and thus completely revolutionized collegiate football. . Real evidence of the greatness of Dorais "grf+5Q'nlQ was pointed out in the writing of the var' 'iffiiif +QA'l'i+.l . - . lamawaaswav ,gg aryl., , , ,M . ious sports critics after the season had been completed. Hugh Fullerton, prominent syndicate sports writer, having the interest of his Alma Mater at heart, wrote to the president of Ohio State University that an attempt be made to have "Charley Dorais of Detroit U. replace the resigning Dr. Wilce." 'lBud" Boeringer, head line coach, was an important factor in the success of the '28 Titans. He came to the university with as fine a reputation as any man could possibly attain. He has starred for three seasons at South Bend, and at the end of his last year of play he was a unanimous choice for AllfAmerican center. At the U. of D. L'Bud" has shown that he not only could play football, but that he could teach others to attain this high standard.- 1:2471 '- .uf , , F w rf ' 1 5' if-...,Af"I' -if ily ' ' Wi rg: t gif.. Hlfilfl I iflflffd' , if Q7-9 IU i 11?-vc? -i fl '. i ,Icp ki fe '. 'L'-i 12-is X- 'x... ,W A ,,lv.:+l . A im trawl. is it ,H 1,3 lid' 1'l.f36'. 'J f 1 .:"'iIFsf' 15' Q 3 W R' if if fglf 25' T, ..ryis'f'l4 -1 is 9 r- I . 31,3 L- ' -15 .Law up ' . p.',:4l',l" X . '-':-.. W N A iw! '.,. -P-ft ml, rf . ,ay H W7 ...kv , J "V -SPE leg. Qi 5 all -fl 5' lk 5311. LJ , ,i 4, -.sa L .5!"'f-7 I ,'.K.2fi,'QFil 'flgzq 5 U .. . . 'li "pm lk. 'Vfififi 4 'mi' Vx 1335. 1, ,. mei l 'wit . if. -..,i i I Ji FW. ,gr ' . , 1--,mf .13 w..y.l15 I ., .- Pl. W, . Jr.. ..,, Le ,, ii' 7 L, ,Q 4' pq- v "t fr' ,x x. ', , .-'is-H .. I f,f+'.- I. W I, ,I 3lg.Gi,PirLix,T+ 1 219 ' 'vig' f 77 1','i'1- F" .r , N V 'if elf? Vi:-.mmf :FWF " Wir P-Jvzfv M Deli. 5- Q S. Paul Peter Harbrecht Perhaps the quality that aids 'LBud" the most is the fact that he is well liked by the men he works with. Every man on the squad soon nnds himself so attached to this rough diamond of a sportsman that he is willing to give his utmost in order to attain success not only for himself but also for his coach. Every one of the men who is under "Bud'i respects him, and knowing that his vast experience gives him something to teach, they try to emulate him. Soon there appears a championship team and back of it all is the coach who understands the fellows and thus makes them work. Besides playing football at Notre Dame, Boeringer earned his varsity letter in hockey. When he came to the University of Detroit he expressed his desire to es' tablish a rink team. This year his desire was fulfilled when the first hockey team Michael H. "Dad" Butler 'ef -211. 1 ., J-nv J 1 . J ' ,. T l-3256 F94 1 'S' a ll 154, .,1X'f,i' ,hm V G! ,K !...,.g. r 4 J r.-it ' r -2,241 7221i-' i T, -V 1 A x , :fl fiiff 'Y Hi' .L ffiiili 9 :QU l K'Ji75:i fi? ll 1 T V I sw e-1931. J: 9 ,vi I , 4 in the history of the university was organ' ized. After forming the team Boeringer became its coach and created a winter 52755 sport which gained considerable popularf 4' ity. The credit for the university's future in hockey will be shared by its founder whose love for the sport made possible its realization. fri " F4 Harvey Brown, Boeringer's assistant with the line, captained the 1923 team of Notre Dame. After his graduation from Notre Dame he went to St. Louis Uni' versity to study medicine. While a stu' dent in the postfgraduate college he coached the line of the Billiken grid aggref .Le gations. Last year he graduated and upon receiving his degree he interned at St. lugitgyix Ioseph's Hospital in this city. When the football season arrived Harvey resolved to remain in touch with the game he loved by aiding Dorais and Boeringer in the prof . . i ' ' duction of the Titans. 1 .,,,.zf,r,p1- 3"LlY'.'1:'-'.' I usa 4'm,, i: iv f -N vilflfff , us. 1' i ff rfqq-ff: B' , f . 5-aj, f ,Qf1iiif'1F'sfv.fii'fi1LFJ7R, i f . '-'Eff -- ,fi iam 'F ,, ggi-fiigfzilgf Qi ifiif lille- g 'fini 'figlj 1 if fa! Johnny Fredericks handed over to Coach already made as a precedent and calculatf 5 Ik t if Dorais many promising men for the com' ing season. Cn his Hrst team he had nine men who had received allfstate mention in their prep school days. By the strange workings of fate Fredericks again finds himself the understudy of Boeringer. At Notre Dame Johnny stepped into the pivot position left vacant by "Bud's" graduaf tion. Cut on the coaching field fate has decreed that he shall train players to serve as fodder for Boeringerftrained huskies. The schedule for 1928 was a challenge to the mettle of any trainer. It presented all kinds of weather, such as 97 degree heat of Tulsa and the snowfcovered field of Georgetown Day. If a trainer can keep a team wellfconditioned under such ad' verse circumstances he must be a real trainer. This year was the first for varsity track ing what advancement is possible under "Dad" Butler, one may say that it will not be long before our school is a real power in collegiate track circles. Coach Harbrecht is a very fine court mentor. He showed this during the past year, for the team that finished the season was an entirely different team from that which started the season. Perhaps the greatest of his handicaps was that his play' ers all had to be taught the fundamentals of the game. Besides this, the regulars were members of the football team, and with a postfseason grid battle in the air, they were not allowed to practice basket' ball until a short time before the opening game. It is the wish of every student of the school that, given better cofoperation, Coach Harbrecht will develop a championf if '14 . J.. fe- L. Y. -51 , lf? if KW' .F Q, all ,, .Jr W ft. 855 at the U. of D., but taking the progress ship team here. al s v s eff? i SW 1 . - . Y ,lf iii . kg ig 1 in i ' ig. p I l Qi. Q r , d E U Q, l W Arthur 'LBud" Boeringer - John F. Fl'6d61'iCkS , . . A r . M, A "' f '2e'l?r2f'f'd' "-i 0 ff .warm Q .M QL. A. 5. A M A , , N . .-: 3,v.g5,?'E, 11 1 2,53 gs lr, 1- , za A 5154! ,Q ,slfpijfy i , -' ,.,w.eZf..f'Q2aEXa . -. is as J,C.f'-1':is'5fsaM-X . Ns-5 .. .15-1 52493 Ritter Howard Starrs STUDENT MANAGERS QOTBALL, basketball, and track are recognized as major sports at the U. of D. and student managers of these teams are awarded the Varsity "D" at the end of the year. The three students to receive the Varf sity "DN for being managers of a recogf nized majorlsport team durmg the year 19284929 were: C. Scott Howard, foot' ballg Daniel Ritter, basketball, and loseph Starrs, track. To Alfred Holihan, golf manager, Jay Maley, hockey manager, and Joseph Kuenz, fencing manager, the minor sports medal award was given. Frank Brady and Albert Nagler were awarded their numerals for being, Freshman foot' ball and Freshman track managers respectively. Scotty Howards appointment to varsity football manager was the result of years of hard work in university extrafcurricular acf tivities. His efforts during the 1928 seaf son had much to do with the success of the team. His assistant managers were Paul Curry, a junior in the College of Commerce and Finance, who took over the managerial duties of the Titan gridders with the start of spring practice, and lvlichael Peters, Arts and Science Fresh' man. This was Danny Ritter's second year as varsity basketball manager. He arranged the 19284929 court schedule and was able to bring about games with many leading colleges of the Middle West, including Notre Dame and Marquette. Next year's list of basketball games is being prepared by James Brennan, Ritter's hrst assistant this year, who will be the manager of the team next year. Joe Starrs was "Dad" Butler's right hand man in the running of the track squad. His was the hrst varsity track team that the U. of D. has had in its history. In fact, most of the members of the aggref gation were in their second college year. Starr's assistant was Albert Nagler, Fresh' man track manager. 52503 Alfred Holihan, a Senior in the College of Arts and Science, again drew the posif tion of golf manager. His work consisted in letting the world know that there was such a thing as a Titan golf team. How well his work has been accomplished is at' tested by the amount of comment and space devoted to the golf team by the newspapers. His main task resulted in a schedule of matches and suitable playing grounds. The feature of his schedule was the first college sectional golf tourney ever to be played, that of Detroit against George' town. Jay Maley and joseph Kuenz, were both managers of new sports at the University of Detroit. Maley carried the sticks for the hockeyists, while Kuenz took care of the foils for the fencers. The managing of the freshman teams was in the hands of Frank Brady and Alf bert Nagler. Brady was awarded his num' eral sweater as Frosh football manager after a season of hard competition for the honor with Albert Nagler, who later won the track sweater. A last minute confer' ence between Coaches Fredericks and Dorais decided the issue in his favor. As yearling track manager, Nagler aided Joseph Starrs. The "troubles of the manager" are epic themes for composition, and have been used by these weary workers in many moaning tales appearing in the university publications. The manager performs many services for the members of his team, and in return receives the brunt of all their complaints. His are the ears which har' bor the stories of the athletic troublesg it is his sympathy which lightens them. He takes orders from the coaches, delivers them, and receives in return other orders from his athletes. And at the end of a successful season, sport writers and stu' dents heap laurels on the heads of the athf letes and coaches, but seldom are generous enough to consider the very important serv' ices which have been rendered by the managers. Holihan Brady Nagler ik F 52513 i , -.T ,f 2 fc-',, 1 .L. .1 V i .,- . 52,159 :V 7 ,, 1 A. fr 3,1 d la g.g,-if lj' . , ,,. 21, V: 1 Q 5 Wt ..1n 1 i. 1.-. ,ill ti. 'Ili rf, 'ASQ ., , i ,,- r ,qi Ml., I I ii - ,, J., I .'. ein ,L H e ., K Y 'l K T. 2. l vi 'I 1- nfl , ,,3,..,,., N 1 Xt ,r . I 1 .314 kj ' .--1 .- ,, . '-5, -J ,,,, ay, 'mf , 3 ' i in vi: gi WJ! xl fL"'aZ:4'lf'v ,PE , . ... . l4'Ll,?,1' . A I.: ,ji i tm' .lm 414' -'N 'E . H Hg 'a A ., Y:-'M ,,.ji'f 'Lf ' i -'aa .4 ,:i,,f1.,, , ,,,!. 41 f .ggif-, W 'vw 'm ,. -gi, Q, if. , -, ai 'W , if 5 1" if F 'viii I-ri iff ig -'ai N , , J .v 1' ' :QRS .P . . .1 '1 . ,- ,-. ., -we. , F, F- V 5, WL -- V -V qs. f:42s.wif't'ec' . , ,, JF ffalrriw n, ' A Q if 1 , ,Q r, ,J 1 A V .Br N-rung' WY 7-I-i.-.-fi riffs'-FN . , si . 1 .wg 1 rss-g...srf-.Q-N, , 'i 'r 1 .1 i K.. -.1a,,.1.-if ' 4 6 r 1 if 5 CHEERLEADERS HE University of Detroit has some of the finest and most consistent rooters of any college in the country. The pep, vim, and vigor which they put into their cheers adds a distinctive college color to our athletic clashes, and their wild and bellowing yells are particularly productive of great enthusiasm at the football games. Back of this excellent collection of viva' cious and zestful rooters we find Head Cheermaster Noel Kammer and a smooth functioning corp of hard working assist' ants composed of "Minnow" Harrington, 'LDannyl' 0'Connor, Bill Murphy, and Joe Lubinski. The work of this group of m-egaphone wielders has been unusually effective during the past year and no small measure of the success of our great Titan team is attributable to their efforts. Noel Kammer was an assistant member of the cheering squad in '28, and turned in such fine and consistent work that his asso' ciates elected him as their leader for this year. Their faith was not misplaced be' cause Noel very capably assumed the ref sponsibility of tutoring his squad. "Minnow" Harrington was one of Kammer's most trustworthy assistants bef cause he has had a vast amount of experif ence in this field. For the past four years "Minnow" has been dancing up and down the sidelines encouraging, the undergraduf ates to imitate a London foghorn, and the results which he obtains would make any auctioneer blush with shame. "Danny" O'Connor is another veteran who has witnessed both lean and prosperf ous gridiron days for the U. of D. When "Danny" gets down on all fours and imif tates a maddened grizzly out for blood, he is in a class by himself. His famous 'give it to me gang' will linger long in the memories of the undergrads. Bill Murphy completes his second year of duty on the squad. Bill is seen at his best when it comes to leading songs, and when the band strikes up "Dear Qld U. of D.," Billls voice rings forth with all the majesty of a traffic cop during the rush hours in the downtown loop. Joe Lubinski was the only recruit in the '29 pep outfit. Joe worked along side the veterans as if he were born leading the famous Titan Locomotive. The dynamic and diminutive blond actually radiates an energy which spontaneously effects the crowds. 99' -fi5ff'i- 'fi K, . .-2flf'.l'i'l5,f Wi' Jipzlfl sk, X Q Y' AX 5 ,-. fl 'ev . I - I - 1 ag! N' Q X Q71 ' Hill A Y if if B Yaf- :ff ,.'i 4 Q'-,ii fb? C . Q, 593' if " full, mai 1. - N W s,,.,,. .. irtw a Ali :gl tg Q' 4. rr,- x +3 ., . ,J-l iz., , .sw vi fu. Q-f i- . ral' ifiigv- iiiggffiff, 'fl 9 1 af if jlflglf if 1 1, al' lifiifl rf. ff' 5 . .F We I L ls , M JI, l. 3. iw? 1 f fffgr' 22555 u,M fe 4,16 fxtlih, KW T 'ees-R, ,H W lg'iJlr sive? if til' . Atl ff" ,i " Wiliis limi? 'sg 35539 li Qt sa iff' rvyi . i , , fwfr -A . xii-..4g::' i V JVQE? Lubinski Kammci' Murphy in MQ, . nf ' Jn. -,fl LL ., gg F, , .,.., iv ,if-1' fl,-i" '. 'a"'e 'rl' , ' 'f 'J7?"3?'1 " T. . a .4 .' . 1. -1 'A - .- ' . - ..1r"i, ,-5' - 'r "f", "B-I f'i1f"'lLf'Q ? "K f'fff'V'. ' ll ri -, 1. l ' -'law 934 Velf 4' 'T' F. I 1 ' 6 1' ' 1. '1 ' .HF l'q:.I 3113- '5?5l.fi" f" fav: -fait ' I .V . f , . -. M, s. ff, ,wa A , ,I .4-T .T .:, , Q. - , I 4' -. ,eq I, 'fa ,f 4, . ,a . im, If i N Q. N. . HJ N 1 ,T M.,-:Q . rl, -,i3:,,- vying.. i I E, J-,gk ir 1,-.kg Q V i.. U 1, Maulwhx t J A gg, . If J f V. 'e'gg9',,'4z,.u.'.1dr75g5L-' ag., ' 'ilpgfgl we...'.,g'iVq,4- gat., -Wi ,U-A 1, af- .LJ J f,,f 'fi' -.pn-Yam: Qslk-333,-,L1"vsg,,g15.a'1.,4 ,g'-:AJ,L'v,.4-"'j'JJg:. - ,QA e' 4 V . -,..,,g Hs- -' -93" ' ' " N ' and ,Lim fat, . l f O O O C i W z Q R sax 4+ ' .Wee kg O O . I f x r Q x' 'Q tk f' WRU c y a f f + . ,., ff N X Q? f T- "' QM ff -5 SQ? f I K Q E ' GLY: N' If 1, " :-PACS' I X4, Q: f Q v if A' gi' 6 213:52 A JM? 63' gh. ,Q 11.,,,v Q, 1, Iv , .0 .7 N l:,i 5.,'-I-Z 1 If 22? A--3:1 ,,f difQ,,,f F? ' ' - 'k ' ff - - ' f ,, mwzz ,. ' ,A ' ,V nn? 'Q , Y, tj?" , C N, V Y 1 F51 1 - 2 . ,sw-,f - ff 2 f 1 , , : A ' f L U Q- I.-f , J' 'N ' X! - .N 2 V:-- . - ',' . Z u ' c . f I ' -I ' N--'Q' -V 5' ff wi ' A ' .. A 1 - 'iv' - 1 'fffilif ' X V U I U 9 'EM - QW! Ac J. Q X of N 9' wal - ' N .EB 21' ff -f'aQ C455 1 X ' ' "' A I V ' ' W! fl' Z2-:E if . " - - J' . ' f-tif X ' w , .2 .,., ' S Z I' a -.qf 78 A- i 'L 'I 'L ? g- ' ,- ---'- "' --L.--,'1'i 7 A H2 . f ,. ,: ,wMw,W,. , AWW N ,, MWMWMWWVMM,VwQ? . ' Q In , ' Y I Qf'f0 fN'X7 vyb Cx-xi 6 . v I 2- X ' k' ' I 40 ' '32 , Q2 J :Qs 2-' lm Q 1 O W w O O 41 cl 403 if ' f r QWOJ 1 ' 4O SM!X ww , 4 1, A , gwouyx r V E 414, ,A fv i ' 40? ? 1 HOW, 4, 'p Og, fi THOMAS "COWBOY" CONNELL EVERY athletic organization that attains supreme glory has a born leader at its head, a leader who is willing to sacrifice himself for the good of his team, a leader who instills courage into the hearts of his comrades, a leader who is honored and respected by his followers. Such a figure is Captain Thomas "Cowboy" Connell. With modesty, courage, ability, and determination, he blazed a path of glory for the greatest Titan football team in the history of our university and won a permanent place in the hearts of the student body. Connell exemplifies the ideal leader and the perfect sportsman. With his departure the Titans lose a superb captain, a man whom they respected and obeyed, a hghter and a gentleman. 112541 LLoY,D "BRAZ" BRAZIL B ITH a vast amount of natural ability, a dynamic spirit of relentless drive, a love for the clash of physical struggle, Captainfelect Lloyd "Braz" Brazil, stood out as the greatest football player among a host of stars who com' prised the Wfhundermg Titans" of '28. His team mates, quick to recognize in him those qualities which make for leadership, have chosen him to carry on the work of retiring Captain Connell. With Lloyd Brazil to direct their destiny, the team feels that they cannot fail to reach the pinnacle of success. The Titans sincerely believe that Brazil, the All' American, will confirm the confidence which they place in him. He is admired for his marvelous ability, respected for his sportmanship, and feared by all opponents because of his ighting determination to tvun fzssj Z5fz'bute to the z'trm.f By H. G. Salsinger HERE have been few better balanced teams in football than the University of Detroit eleven of 1928. The system that Charles E. Dorais inf troduced at the university when he arrived from the west coast four years previously, delivered full returns. lt takes several seasons to properly plant a system and the head coach of the Univerf sity of Detroit produced results in a ref markably short space of time. ln 1927 the effect of his coaching was plainly evident. There was promise of better things in 1928 and the promise was fuliilled. Whether the 1928 team was the best in the United States is open to argument. Due to the schedule the team was denied the opportunity to prove its full strength and ability. This denial was not the fault of anyone connected with athletics at the university, simply the misfortune of battle. It would have been a fine thing for foot' ball if the University of Detroit had been able to meet the pick of the major elevens, or at least three or four representative major elevens. We would have had full confidence in the outcome of such meet' ings. Vvfhat defense could have successf fully smothered the attack of the Univerf sity of Detroit? What line and secondary would have proved ingenious enough to halt the crimson tide? In Vachon, Connell, Maloney and Bra' zil the University of Detroit had the best balanced backheld we have ever seen. Here were four men of Allffxmerican cali' bre. Vachon is one of the most intelligent field generals we have ever watched. He makes few mistakes on attack. He is a wonder at picking the right spot. He mixes up his offense in a manner to be' wilder any defense, no matter how "liquid" it may be. Vachon had exceptional material for the kind of attack he launched. Where was there another combination like Detroit's? Connell, off tackle or around end, is as good as any man we have seen in recent years. He has about everything a ball car' rier needs. Brazil is one of the most verf satile performers who ever appeared in a backfield, a player who can do everything. Maloney can smash or crash or slice a line better than any other back we saw in 1928. Vachon himself is most efficient in quick' opening plays. Here were four men equipped for any kind of an attack that any team would want to use. A line might hold Maloney but there was Connell to slide off tackle or turn the ends. The ends and line might hold Maloney and Connell and Vachon, but there was Brazil to throw forward passes over the line. lt was the kind of backfield that coaches dream about but rarely find. And the crimson line of the University of Detroit was a firstfclass line. lt helped the backs. Goodnow and Phelan were probably the best pair of ends of 1928. You rarely see two ends of like calibre on the same team. Between the ends the team was strongly equipped. Ruhlin and O'Hallf oran at guard, Long and Ryan at tackle and Lardner at center. They were well fitted. Each man was an unusual forward. Truly an unusual team, one of the very best that has appeared through a long span of football seasons, a team that executed the modern style of football in its most ad' vanced form, a team that played versatile football and, therefore, interesting football, a team good to watch and a team that many coaches might study for their own advancement. We repeat, that it is most regretable that the team was denied an op' portunity to prove its genuine value and establish its true place in football. tzsoj Us 1 . , as L 141,21 ALL VICTORIOUS COACHES HEAD COACH-Chavles E. Domis LINE 'COACH-Arthur "Bud" Boeringer CAPTAIN Thomas J. Connell, '29 MANAGER C. Scott Howard, '30 ASSISTANT MANAGERS Paul Curry, '30 A Michael Peters, '31 THE SQUAD -Herman Young, end -Al Horigan, end -John Bossenberger, tackle -Anthony Nader, guard -Lester Vachon, quarterback -Arthur Massuci, tackle ' -Edward Maloney, fullback -Lloyd Brazil, halfback -Harvey Long, tackle -John Ryan, tackle -Jay Maley, quarterback -John Ruhlin, guard -Lee Hart, tackle -Nathan Goodnow, end -Charles Roney, center -Arthur Anderson, tackle -Harry Buckrnan, guard -William O'Halloran, guard 52-Firman Zettel, fullback -Francis Phelan, end 54-Ryan Mullins, quarterback -Thomas Connell, halfback 56-Charles Massacek, guard 57-Anthony Petz, center 58-Ray Navin, end 59-Merrill Lardner, center 60-Joseph Marcero, fullback 62-Edward Barbour, quarterback 63-Clifford VanHorn, halfback 64-John Fearn, end -Francis Kenney, guard 66-Niel Brown, end -Sam Merriman, halfback 68-Joseph Friske, halfback -Vincent Olshove, end 70-Thomas- Burns, halfback 71-Jerry White, fullback ' V9 QP 1929 I V v L l I l "vw, Z1 if ,L 1 u. lu," N, , W. De Paul .of D. , , . ,. , . .,. .. ..- -..f.. ...- .-. -- .f-.:-.,... .-1,-1-7 - +- 1--T -:fx--M' .,"' . .Wm .. ,M,v' Ai.-.,r,..u .I,., 4 . 2. J .ii -'T' ' -S' ---f M 1, ,QV N...-ar ...- I . .. Y, . , .V 4 ....-- -Y . . gy 1 FIRST VICTORY if i - 1 A T 0 2 0 rl, I uf: ' A, .A , - - , ..,,- . ,. ,.,.-..Sr,A': 1.11 ur-.112 -. 1. v, lfflu -.', .- 1 3 O . 20 39 TT D E P A U L ITTLE hint of the actual prowess of the Titans' 1928 team was given in their opening engagement with De Paul University on the home gridiron. De Paul was weak and never forced the Red and White to extend themselves in Winning, 39fO. Several faults were evident in both the Titan's line and in the Titan offensive. Dorais began to plug these holes the next few days, so that the ,, ,kt I-.J ..' K.. v 2 a -.,f ,Next - ...M i I EM' lgifai Q if " ffl Mit: ffiirai ll, " -rl i. ,rf lf-iw W, 'TIQAQQ KS ll ' , - - i A frfgig' frfi-'Ate 'tvffivli ri' fp. + , 'YY v . , U F 31 f I 4. .gil if 5' is .2 I i l. if-QM .u 5 if u X E L f.. is-.7-' , .. , fa, l at .ggi A ,- . " ff? U i ,, fi" f:l'."Sf' if 2 .x -I 4? ,- 'x De Paul contest served mostly as a scrub game to reveal . 1 I-' ' vulnerable points of the eleven. . P5 , The highlight of the affair came as Charlie Masacek, Hi4ff'I 4 a stiff breeze at his back, puffed along for 65 yards on an intercepted pass. He had a bad charlie horse and seemed alfjxq to be running uphill. The feat was as ludicrous as it was spectacular. Masacek, a lumbering linesman, took fully fifteen seconds to cover the distance and he looked like a Agigf . f 4- ' in slowfmotion character. Lloyd Brazil's first attempt to run the team from the ig ' Long halfback position was very successful, although Lloyd ix himself did little ball carrying. He was content to let his 3',?1g','2' ff :' '.1 ti. F , 'UQQEYH Jlhk 4 , .4 J ' I . .fflg , L U ,. A ', fb - , 4 .. . . .- sag! .Wg A, , . E . , 95" .lsr fri:'rI-f.:- W f f if f ' " ' ' 1" Q-- -1 'i -"Q v. fi rr 'fl'-'Ii 2 itr' irr- Lwf.-mJ!'m ff fa -. ll1i',' ' E ,,,. ' 1 . f..fn-m 4 . S4 ' X 7 ' ' jing f,1xy'hY T",f. 1 Mg.-'MwQ,5' gl as , K J '., .ligyfgl - 14 "' .Lf ,f f M151-f fi W ' 9.86 X ' ' s aiwf Y 57551, . ' 35" 'I L nf" uk- ' 'gift 'YI-J JS ' 'ga -- A' 7 -fkf ,"fTA'?1 Milf' '- ia33i'f2i:'?'Q-iih2,r' I0 f?'iff'Bf 1 Q" '- Q ' - . ' ' 4- " S. '. . , Q -- "' ' -. - . if i, Q if T- -- .f"vf:'1'+- 4 f V- f 1 5 '?-":v'5':'-1f3-'- .stil -' in-v1:'fh14l'4fai.. X J 2'-Q3 l,::,gnAil .,:, 1 gn. QQ ,Jian I ,fr r 1 L p xtgiglf laaxglixiti ,migxlbfyxkrgl-3,.F!:. 5. V'-i ,555 1 . if 3"' '- 15 rf 'Q2,grfv--N-" 55!iJ'ifQx1?1af"ug?r:,r1. if ri 3,4 ,i-, i , 1 P Mgr- --agar-. ,'1:lFi',?.-643,-,+.'5pA' 1 . xmrg u A. fluff 4a,jr,f .-.. ' fu r 5951.-vfvf. ,A-lim -gg: ,,.fn,g,d"S P' Q ' - B' , cgkj ,I . 3,35 in., N ,I it ati? gms, - A I if -' . E 5 " 'zt' 1 3.3 .--' - 1 L ff '- rim ' -T 2, ' :- 1. f .I 1 ' !J,,p ',,. A.: A 2 L 1 A B 7' lc' ,i .Qffjgw ' if -- '....g"' 5,4 .' . .4-1 -, .-- 'A . 2 -j. 4 A-f.f Q' 5r51Qr .L . i 'il if its r 'est ' 5' 5 by t if r T sr "r'r :PQ v,.i: :-.: li'1: 0 - 4 1 J ' - f ,i s's's I' ' :ax r ,L .. ,.v,,, . 4 ,wus-c ..., ,J .. ,, ,.,,.. ...,.. . N , in. .. -.+,, My . L . .. 1. "Q 9' f. za, +'S.i ' if' -Q 'v 'V' B is' W' S' zl' 35 "': ' favs 5, 'A ix rr" " "it' H ,,.., ffgfftq "Braz" outsteps De Paul 2,-Q QM Q IJ? a ---11 , 1 -rm f- ' ' , .fx-ev ag., -11 ' ,--zz'-,N . 4f': --".,1r3'lff"'t'- ' ' -- " F735 f 22.1-'if?'r'1J'f'-Ti.a'-JT1 ,J-' vii -5 Auigihk T M' 52583 A CONNELL sTAczTmNo A spmmr. . - QDENEQ wirra DE PAUL. 'i M - ws- f QQQ5 fr LL -surf "N-'N-w-4ur'S,, Srrxw fFNx,5,,,-,. """"'v . """Y ' --.hw fi - 1 -- 'X"'N- fx, x 5 r S -,A D :-bvillv 4 jx" ww W 'X ' f .X -5'-'1"'u' L E i 'W f -Q T- .N . " 1 X' 5' 'X . a ' .. . 'N , - 1 S--f- -5' Aw ' T .1 r . ' fe ,Luv ,X , F "i"i7 it 1 a 4 Lg.,-F 1 ', , , 1 mates handle the pigskin. Although his modesty had the upper hand at most times, he didn't do a half bad job of running, punting, and blocking. His incisive voice, barking signals, kept courage and stamina in the ranks. Captain Connell was up to par, as was the diminutive Vachon. Among the linesmen, G'Halloran at guard and Long at tackle showed to best advantage. Throughout the fray, De Paul, with but one outstanding man on her team, could not get going. Most of the play was in her territory. Detroit scored heavily in the first and fourth verses, annexing a total of 33 points in these two frames. "Skeets" Byers, for De Paulls backfield, threatened the Titans occasionally, and carried the brunt of the former's attack. . All in all, the De Paul engagement amounted to little more than a scrub contest to limber up the Titans. The season before them was to bring big things and difficult things. De Paul loosened up the -kinks, showed the weak spots of the Titans, and got the year under way with an easy win. V Masacek Kenney Roney .Y .1 52591 .1 9 ,,. -: 1 5,5-. r, 1 'i T A' a f ' f I .. is 'ab ., l TF X assar fr f1 s s so ,ni Z 3 ,. -. ., N... .,,.. KM., ,,,. .Lyn i,m1a,,,.:a,,.,ava.m.:-,..,,a.,m,,-,,.....,,,..,,c,,,,,k,,,,,,c.,,,,,w. I SECOND VICTORY l 'G' ' I if gig' F I i,,LZi:2i:T"fr..ri,g X -Vg . ' N' 1 51-xg QQ AL Kg, J ,la 'Lal , 'Lf il 5 Kal N.-XL 4 .5 'Q fix' i i ' l T1 . li 4 Q Tulsa lil 14 v 0 0 i 0 4 14 i . is .lf Q i i 5 : K T' , ... a - - Fifi T l T l wif - l 4 T ' T Wir. -14. av fgill' Y gli ., ' Y Gaxikp ig, , is 'H i iv Ati limi, ix wif' A ,. -wg iL31,g?ifJ law" Rod 4... 1 if . ' 3 H su. .rp sf-yr ,fr ?llHf'45..' Ur, . wry , ,Q 5 :L gil! is 'ff . 'flu-2. 'E'q?k'i3f'?T,:'- a 2. ' y ,w av-,i'im1'? g Pg-'F . 5 4. .iiiaf lil-ligiyly -.'- IT U I TEMQQ S .E P 2 7 Y ni' ,f,'-sir'-H" - X an , l',2'F'fil , Vx 3- I viii' fl K Tr I . il' H. 'JJ , " Vi'-Liffglg .waggi- 'gi at-. 5'ggI?laiQ,' ,f 4 S, :'f"".'fT fm -,igg-il15?ii ,,Yg.lf,f fi swf!-if 1 ,Ein lei? salsa 1,-37:22, Hg if ,L ,va Us U 'iv ., ,W U , . if 5 in- 'f iz, .,,,, '1,'f:jf" ff jk. Yay if - Wi. TT xg, al ,si TULSA LMOST every conceivable adverse condition figured in making Detroit's second tilt a strenuous one. Stiff and weary from a' thousand mile train ride, the Titans had to stage an uphill battle in gaging Tulsa, Oklaf homa, and squeezing out their narrow 19f14 decision. They found the westerner's gridiron carved out of a mounf tain side, and the local eleven was forced to adopt mounf taineer's tactics in making each gam. ' Enough energy was expended in scoring the three touchdowns which won for U. of D. to win any other two normal games. The Titans slashed and battered their way through the Tulsa defense. They labored and per' spired. They played probably the hardest game of football of the season against the westerners. And from the stand' point of the spectators, it was one of the funniest. Outside from its ludicrous features, the game was a drab affair. But it served, early in the season, to stamp MMOHQY the Red and Wlnte as a dangerous organization. During the contest, in which four hours were consumed in proving .. . or .-!,I T 5 lla' 'TS'-F' was Q Fifi A aa K if l I f Eat va l? Glfiffig J ' I, 1? fi if 3 Q , :rj,f't,?i A T' 1 'Q' i I' I 'Tulsa receives a punt f Tsai, J.-. ij: 'XTTTJY -W -was . T a, T . ftrfmf """'wf-. "' if fi fa vs mfvtfiaffff f f:?"'l ' 'T l Hf'4f55i5?"a,f9: w-Wi 'Q 'ZLFSQI' aikaaawfiff !.fs."'i' 'K 2. li 5, ls 'i 2-I '-Qiifw ffflsf. Q55 'dial' 3? gl 9 f l L ,Q --G 4 - , 1, Y . N. , ' , L , , -Y ,R gf f, .nr . K . 'i I , A!! - K, 1 . Q"-f--it-+1 has Tl " -- ff' fri, ,Q '- P "j'.,,,b-f '-ff' .ara-:+"'ai?,.s.9.',: aw' -'I'l,.lf'w'k.a.""a? . 142'-'wa' 5 260 J ' i . as .N 9' ' V' ' -' " Y ---ne at .. .. . .. 1 'Y A . ,.. .' f:+f'3i,j'Li'g-if-f4.awf'IfQ'-, i"37if'a' ki - in f ' . . 71 7- M-53 .,1if,,-'+:'lflf'sIg. W1 ,'fi'l2f7,j-ff' i"+, as - in crew' -4 T ' A ' . ' ' -' .V in f - it ' rf- 'Q' JNL-I my . -. if.,,.,.i Sl ' if iffffi VT? f X4 ry-Q3 , ,vig , ' i ll,- fir Q , Q A l f T' I- X' E' aye' 7 - . g is., 'il 4554, .,., ,N , ,, fl xffktj D " lmfif, A X ' -9 W. psrvp i Q 5 ft- - la - .STOREN DUNTS SAFELY Nax- Q TULSA GAME ' . W l i fi Fa 'H X ss 5 A T 35" f il U' -'ffl J' .f s, ' f pf' fl? x FII, ' 1 Xb 4 A ' K 2"l 9? the mettle of Dorais' outfit, the thermometer hovered about the century mark. Manager I Scoty Howard is authority for the statement that no less than 36 pails of water and 10 i 1 ' Y J dozen of oranges were consumed in the course of the engagement. S lf ' W if J Tulsa got off to an early lead with her dangerous aerial attack. Detroit's eleven, im.. unused to the uneven, sunbaked field, had difficulty in coping with enemy's attack. 1 T It was not until they found their "mountain climbing" legs that they began to even things up. ii! Iwi lL13,' The affair seefsawed back and forth, with Detroit trailing until the last minutes of ,f ,ig play. Finally, in almost utter darkness, the BrazilfConnell combination galloped their way across the final chalk.mark to hang up the decisive touchdown. My Critics and followers were inclined to think highly of the Titans when results of this 1 H fiasco was flashed to Detroit. The returning conquerors, still sore and bewildered from the 1 struggle, bore the stamp of invincibility. Their performance had given some hint of the ,Qgi great things that were then expected, and later realized, of the best team yet produced by the University of Detroit. of -. . - --.ri .- .. , lm , . L" If x if 41793. li 'V+ M1554 iq will if iffibrf 42 . f'if'l'il liillff, R. 2 f if ':ief2'ls, M.. 1 S ! . ,l ,fiigfli H' if fjf to f 'T L if :if T f :LH . I' ut 'N' 4' 4 ug. T, 1' 'fl .. J! aii'Wy. Q, , .i.'f.x J."5nF" i Sprites, Agfa! -PW la. i, l 3, 'xjflllf HJ 9.31:-I A ' F W. '5l2l39fH.1 fm? .iw Q:,'?','e f it .,, N. 2.?'52,'-,M-.N ,li gi if -.vw .v:'?'5f9. H ' H . 5 Mr rw- tE'v'l ,. 1 J-Lw Qrg,Lg4.,.fi , .. W x-4 i 'iidfa W?-? r llfit T 'Iliff illi ' V ta ' Phelan Hart Long , Q ei ss. ttsikf -i isa- psig yr .4 'wi F.. ' ...B Louisville U. of D. Goodnow THIRD VICTORY O 000:05 1 T A" U' 7 27 6 I 6 46 . 1.1, 1 E 9 .,,-V . - LOUISVILLE STINGING 46fO washout was the bitter pill swalf lowed by Louisville on their Detroit invasion. In spiking the Cardinals, Dorais' men nailed up their ninth successive victory in two seasons and the third of the year. Although it was lopsided, the game wasnot without its thrills. In the second quarter, Detroit's artists swept around ends, gained on off tackle slants and line bucks, passed at will and totally demoralized the downfsouth aggregation. The game reached its high pitch in this quarter, as twentyfseven tallies were scored in fifteen minutes. Brazil and Connell turned in the most interesting performances. It was this pair that accounted for the nd touchdown, when Connell distinguished himself with a '75fyard run. The coach used his first stringers sparingly, since the issue was never in doubt. They were inserted only in the first and third stanzas, but during this time they threat' ened the Card's very existence. s '. . K. l- w v f, i J.. PM Connell eludes Georgetown f262j pl. vm, ug li JJ-. Y '. 5 ,ii-"LK .1 li .r -5 -.4 - 1 4 ,-1 'V Q Lg: 1: T f' -.Q Ai: 5113 N A-ri-' .- f,-Jr. 4 , 47, . I' L-. 1 1, I 5' .f . ff wa' 13 fri? 1 A.. .' in A Lia' ,S .1 '. 1 J fa 7' 'fre gn' .- U '12 'L'-ff " iff-,,-v rg A twirl lm If . ,A-, ..:I,, K v- K t 1 . -I l I ,N u 1. .--, . r H,- -rql. lf f-f R. u, ,, 1 . 7 , .1 4, fm. 5 5 . lf "Qs .ffl .. l. Q P..." i.. li , ,J .' rffru .'.A,,A. .H 1 ' 1. -A ' -I . l,,,..L -' ff . , .i 15.1 ,i ,. 'E f- X5 wl- W-Q.-' f .sf 'i Ll ff . Vina 'hifi-l .x-px fbi. 1' V", ' ' v- A fill 'L wit? Q Q QQ 'li Lit w 'Hb lgfifnl ' Sf -J of E , . .L ga 0 I i rl fq iii: F2 Iii' f Q3 ma.- ' M- . ff r. 4-. .?v!,::f. ,Wu -0. .- .4 . 'n.".--va P' I' '- vAc.x-AON OFF For-1 A LONG RUN LOUXSXHLLE GAME . lm" M - :ve - 'I 'I' '7 . Louisville, whose principal forte lay in speed, relied entirely on her highlyftouted halfback, Earl. A sloppy Held had much to do with his failure to distinguish himself. In fact, the marshy gridiron slowed down both teams, but affected the Southerners more, removing all trace of any snap or punch to their game. In the rare moments when Louisville gained possession of the oval, they were usually tossed for a loss. Bucking the Titan line, already grown calloused and almost impregnable through it previous games, was like hammering a brick wall with a feather. Jerry White, hitherto somewhat obscure backfield man, showed to brilliant advantage against Louisville with his vicious runs and plunging tactics. He lead the attack of the reserves, and made such a spectacular showing that he eclipsed the work of the Varsity stars. White was declared a "find" by experts after his performance against Louisville. All in all, the embroglio was a walk, so that after the Hrst few minutes the stands resigned themselves to a Detroit victory and settled back to watch Louisvillels inglorious massacre. Navin Horrigan Bossenberger f 263 3 1556 J ,fi3Qi ai7D.l-5 '?5aff 1 .V?affJ . Q' .' J t f -f . f'- g Ha , ' 'A' -sQ1.ifs'f , .. .a. as , ca. c c gg 11oURTH VICTCRY p - N- D ET if Qg V-grieqgi 115359 liiflfll NAL KW .M. 'l w A l f'i ,X Loyola p O p 0 f O Q 0 , 0 gi L ,gg ' D D it in . D i l a fi e d bfi ,fig 2 ' , 1 LQ,g rp U. of D 7 13 4 0 7 27 N l A . . l. r . N . aw e ra -K 1 Xa 5 5 as 'Eb . L' L81 3 2 HM? eff' arf LCYGLA - DETROIT'S first real test for the 1928 season came with the invasion of Loyola. At all times a team to be reckoned with, the New Orleansmen boasted an especially formidable outfit last fall, and came north with several auspicious scalpings under their belts, including a moral victory over Notre Dame and statistical superiority over several other hard teams. So it was with an apprehensive eye that local fans gf' and the team itself regarded their advent. Would the Titans, with three easy "cinch" type victories laid away, be able to stand them off? Loyola looked like the crucial 5,,,qw,rg game on the Red and White schedule. Naturally a great sigh of relief issued from the stands gfjg. as they heard the final gun bark to the tune of 27fO, ir . Detroit up. Detroit had repulsed a foe worthy of its steel llgvf and made a real bid for national recognition. Phelan Detroit showed the full power of a brilliant offense and a powerful defense. Line bucks, spinner plays and, in general, oldffashioned football were played. A few . , 6 u , .,. sam. ??QQif l r . . -1...s .Q ia 'K lr U 'x A 5 ggi A D 'Z'x"?y -vw i ayrsrrwrsarrramrfaffaa raw ' 52643 LOYOLA GAME PHELAN GETS AWAY , K,i0"N-'nv--lX'14l"Af-:Owl 'Q' ' 'VW'uw'n "qf:7r'VVA'1"Rqhk rain? f nn 4 fNfM 'I Q -3' A '.t,, -noon' ' 'FW'-. Ana 'appafgn AA -sl . I i, -,,.,i ji, passes were successful, hut in the main, it was airtight, safety first football that the fans saw. Once under way, Detroit showed a powerful offensive and it wasn't the highly touted overhead attack that caused the primary damage. Getting off to an early start, the Titans rolled steadily down the length of the pasture on a '7Ofyard march that terf minated in the first touchdown of the day. Not a single yard of the drive was taken via the aerial route. Brazil, Maloiiey, Connell, CTI-lalloran, Long and Lardner all turned in a performance that warmed the hearts of the spectators and accounted for the shutfout score. Lloyd Brazil, stellar halfhack, showed a touch of old 1927 form against New Orleans. The Flint star found his stride just a little late in the year. Although his performance was always consistently excellent, little of that old pyrotechnic style of Brazil was shown previous to the Loyola tilt. ln the wake of the game, newspaper writers began to open up and admit that Dinan Field was showing something distinctly worthwhile in its gridiron programmes. Nader Mullins Friske fzssj ,r 'I n T, it ,,, vw-- f fr - if r is T- ' ' i i , ,Z "ff -'I . A.: W ,H ,-T.-,r, , , i. so - - i. ,M nn, v wg i A' - If , y F PTH 1CToRY X565 -1 -fwrh -- ,Ty H . ai.:l1,-f.':,g, Q.. !m1-i,-,,,,1ga il :' , sf + ,. O1 l 1 ' 4 lfliipi, 5.1, i T L " 4 thi! Dayton O i 0 P O 3 0 i 0 1 ffjglg wi 1-' - ' i. ,. fi-Tiff r i , lr T A I i s , f 35112 '- "'+ 'r"""' rrmrr A sis" Y rr sr' i M"-"ws r' ' ' 'c' 3 is ll i 9 if 'Qiii El I 2 y x vii il A 1 - ' 2,5 ,239 QQ'P A - Uf D- il ' 0 n 0 T 0 wif'-2915 fill'if Wlfif lr 1 T if Wfffigf 'H , ,,7'I,L11- Gy,-1,3 TTT-TiWTTiLiTMii'WT " '- QEW D Y D A Y T O N fpitflnx Nikhil H ' . . . 2 fin, ECIDED contrast in both mental attitudes and physif -jwapgn' . . . . . -, i Q H L, vfvqgix, cal conditions played the major role in the Titans .Tiffin I ,-'i,-ix,-Ms . . . . . . . ggfxn ,- gg-Whpifpl' Migration Day festivities in Dayton, Ohio, when a weary, .t,f,f,3 desperate Titan team lined up against a fresh, confident '- Ohio eleven to nose out a bitter 7fO verdict. 1 Vid Battered and shaken and bruised from the gruelling Tflgizf ames of revious weeks the Red and White outfit was ff-3 'isjgl g , ' , , the-Lf. forced to draw on its last reserve stamina to withstand 'gqnfji Wit the Daytonites. Qfjm Mig f The irst, last, and only touchdown was scored shortly 'nigh vpn at-A, '11 ',. als -'W lr"."f Q. .Wu-L Vifihm w ' J r ' 'i .L J. X Ai , 1, ,ia-an , fl ," Q, . . iff, -'r ' .LUN . lr :fm ., .- L I YJQI . ,MN :, y L : gk' ...yi x fi 'fe ' LM . A' 'vu A iii 'W 5, ... ,L , .1 mil ...W 'lw:"'1 'I'1g.QK al e- .1 1,5 tt , f 3, , ,W I r jf., yu fully, 9' H 1912 1 1. 1 11-, V , fi .. gp? 'M sk..-4 fm -, H y'jY,,. xl- 11:5 t ' n' 1 1' s .1 f' ,rat . 6 5:3 L Isl , Q'4xS.ig, 1"'7w.f tim' il W In ef-2' Af F. iffrfw T -vm. -'.-i..'-1,,.- .-1 Q, , Ryan after the curtain rose. Taking the oval deep in their own territory, Connell and Maloney butchered their way over two first downs. Then Maley, by concealing his diminuf tive form behind Lardner, center, stole up on Ohio a few more yards. Again taking charge, Maloney and Connell knifed and slashed their way, in four plays, up to the onef yard line. Un the next attempt, Connell dynamited and blasted out a trail across the goal strip to score the first debit worked against Dayton in two years. , lu - . I, 4 g ,sal 5 ir' mf i if fl 2? ,,w uf E E 215,41 I gf-,br ffl ',.. Hf Q . fe ,camp 13. ft, -7' -+"+.12' I -. flirt agiiflf 3 .,'..rs-'-,ga lijigx' f5Qg,,? S4153 rs ll I ff? I .H , f la- l its -- 6141 fa- IQ ,T completes a pass 313531 1 . 3 f'1'i'l33?f'. W X' "'7'-xiii" 'fi i 9 ' ,UMTS "CF: iktffif lift- 'lyfigi 'fl if li-1-1, f'i'I:::fif', 5.1.34 f"'7-4i'43'Z.21 l1,l'l'55.4' 52663 i , fp 5 ,. li ,. w, 1, , li A MALQNEY MAKES Fiasr DOWN , DAYTON GAME S ' - -5 ' 'T ails, fini?" F " FAA Vt! linen? A E ,, I1 five-ups-nb agen ,,v-'sf-., -'44 'vu-.,,,Cun-Q Lili 'hu ln the defensive department, Detroit was unique. Its entire line, shaken and miserable, fought blindly, valiently. It was not inspired football, but sheer grit alone that staved off catastrophe for the Titans. Harvey Long played a supreme game against Dayton, Hguring prominently in the latter's shutfout score. But while Long fought with supreme bravery, his mates on both sides were doing their share, and more. Early in the game it was seen that offensive tactics would yield little towards victory, and the defense took it upon themselves to save the day. They furnished a dull brand of ball from the spectators' standpoint, but it was a commendable brand, nevertheless. Detroit threatened only once again after its early push. A frantic, concerted drive had placed U. of D. well into the enemy's territory, but Dayton found no means to stop them until Maloney was downed six inches from the line. The ball was surrendered here, and action lagged, as the fans shivered and peered down through the blue drizzle that had settled over Soldier's Field. Several hundred local fans, who had poured into Dayton, Friday and Saturday mornf ing on trains, cars, and busses, witnessed Detroit7s dismal showing. After the game, however, enough impromptu celebration was evidenced to make the occasion one of the most successful student migration days in history. Goodnow Olshove Brown ' ii ,i - H M 5 K 3 ,. ,. N. . L' 52673 St. Louis .. , V .. M ph: J, ,, Q., f 1. f,'1t.'vIEff"a, if Wi, i3,I:i'lq'?.-KV?-,HWQ -""?g"'v"g'i. plum' -L -.1 f' ' pb-,ffif Ui. Q J. . J W, V, -as --. ..-- f. 3 .1-" .r. - :--,,,,f- - , a "-YJ .igtgw ' : " " ef Y, wr, .- , -., ,M ,,... , .,..M1., p SIXTH VICTORY , i 1 ..a N O OTO O 0 .ofD. O 20 12 f38 ST. LCUIS NY lassitude which may have held the Titans in check the previous week was hung on the shelf, as they smothered Hunk Anderson and his St. Louis aggregation with a 3843 blanket and won their twelfth successive rrriffxik we vs! .1 arf, f'-rin? ,,iA+1f5Q qw ...A . lg'21LXv fab? 'J .J -Q Sl,-i,Lg,v .ma 45?-vw 'A-'Ng ,4 .ff A Tuff' 1. ' "A" L '-E358 M." '43 t iff -, . ,fri ff" - 1 . QU.. 1 5. lflif S lv f'ff,j ff, . .Qing lf ' Qs :fri H 3 Q, ng Y l ', E A WL HJ V' f af :wil Q T- I 3 -:..i.l.A . 7- L .llrlfl-fflg 6 ,. www ' w- ...-1 'I .44 A ijt , i Nj: Xa f ii r 'Lf ff if fn-:Tn , 1 ui 1. L" ' 4 10' ,,.., game on Dinan Field. The Missouriaiis have played Def fi. troit six tim-es in the last six years and lost each game, by jg decisive scores. Dorais expected little trouble in offsetf ffl- ting Anderson's proteges, and the game was perhaps the ig If least exciting of the dramas staged at the local stadium .gg-,V last fall. 'lfflrij ln every department of the game, the Titans carried the play to St. Louis. From the opening whistle, it was g'lQQg all Detroit. ln reviewing the season, critics are inclined to regard St. Louis as the nearest approach to "set up" afforded the Red and Vxfhite during its difficult season. 'fgfjp While the Titans had recuperated from their dejection - . . '. Y Ruhlm of a week before, their opponents were in the throes of inf,- a perennial and characteristic slump. :'4r',2gl5j. V Y . ---V 'TQXLILLQ 'gg a'f'!9N.f 511.2 .i M-af.'. illffleiif 54531 i'1i+'i'1f ,'LN4,yi-5 S 7? ,fifahf Trib "' Maloney spreads havoc in the Georgetown line ' ' c. p l ' A p .gfpf 'L g.51,23-gJ'Qj.31 f'5i?L',r ,.'. - .. ,r H Y X,-Iigwzi:-3f..,v 'V . T 'F-v--7. L.-arf' f2681 . A. 1 i A "?' -. 1 ' . if 3,17 :.f,,,g,-L-'v.i.'j.v ,f L Y f , Qi-'ml oi' tive- SQ , ,1p'f3,,., ST. LOUIS SCRAP . QT'- QONNELL. GOING ovi-ER aff 1 nu. 'x . . "2 f p I 4. fzfff , A ' M . V f ---. pZ,i?5Q7i.f -v 5 A 1 n N ff--.Ei 1 ,- 1 , i ., -v. ,...,.,, , xi 1 , Q, 'L,ggm,, g 0 I if flaws fu K K L fxiwl' B Q W I N .bl V f'sunf 'H . , ---L -ll . ' 2 . 5' fs 1- K 4. - n l L-V-,ff ,L A . A f"v Riff, 'X lj 1 ' 1' 'LN 5' fi' 'I ,X ' , - . lxlillij MLM 0'9" ' 'i 'T 7 X - 121,229 , xv Qfnffiazc 51 .54-6cf'f,fff,o1 if.:Zfg'l?f , ' ff ' I-3 fiffi' liifxn Offt Itttth thfi p d,btf thhyp dp, V o a a e s ar, ere were no scores in e rst erio u a ter e o s o ene u .,p.',..?jqff there was no stopping them. Tom Connell modestly assumed the mantle of scoring ace, H ,L-NJ - - . . . . . . X q contributing twenty of the thirtyfeight points registered, and boosting his season s total skyward to take a seat with the nation s leading scorers with seventyfone tallies. , , Detroit's weakest spot kept recurring against St. Louis. Throughout the ,season the penalty jinx hung onto the boys, and they could not shake it oil, Against Anderson's QQZU' squad, U. of D. received a maximum of penalties. Several important gains were neutralf ized and set backs received through roughness, overfeagerness and oifsides. All . . . . . . Although the team was never pressed, several line exhibitions of individual plays marked the game. Fans were especially enthusiastic over the play of Harvey Long, Whose eiforts alone were worth the price of admission. . Honorable mention should also go to Phelan, Goodnow, and Young, as well as to Brazil. These men looked especially good, While Lardner, doughty center, whipped his tlgrgsyq. traditional enemy, Corcoran, down to a - ere the final gun. 1. ,Q , M-iw X r. '-Ta "1 Wi .li l fist? -ea' 1.4 .WS 4 l W l lx ig , 'fa it Ma ,xi-.P SEZ' im, L , Eli f li is '. li. A is ". im Wlmite Zettel ' Massucci 'W' 9' ..a.s. .Q . 4- 1 f-J-i fig.. ,-t Hgh, ., X fs. fs . r"", if -', .llcgry 7"f:g-0,-f"'ii "HQ WL- 'df .' f x- 4 ' A -f If 1 ., 52693. 1 rt r. . JI r. D I . .' -31,1 . E V . Y 1 l I '-i. .- it ,f,,5,', J ,Cla fi ,- . , . flxlm., , v jul il " viii-."i N . I , i.i1,,i m 4-wt: ' N gr 1-X L Tit? T :hav- "? . H Y VT ii ,- . X 4 I' .FI u Xflw, MN. lp-M. ,Q MJF' VU-,Q my il 5'-Q 'gr . ' ". 5 4 i 4 li" "fl 5 -x Ln, ng ,P 1 , 3. ,AH ww. .Y 1.14- gr .J !F1-.,f, '1f.-Inf . If W1 - , ., 'axial 1-Lf MTTPSF K' rgfi,-' fy' , 'lS.'i41"i in lgagrtf, if A-as ..wi.1. f W- ' L1 ' .FS 'li 'tj 1, cf Ti' . ...., Q gy 'cl ii it ,L , J 1 ji' .' !f.J",'a ,: 5,1 .M s .5 iz 'fu 0 z . . Mgt Lg, ri' 1 w,'+-W ,S 9 , 1.1 ,' M, ltdilfif 1 p av. fs ry, 'L-if " wr M755 V33-:fir l ,If 4 ii- 'l'i,U,J'1.1 'Wren A -Winn jf ' ,-Tm.. w5g,i.Rii STI- V," IL 1 Jg,f4.1 if L xi ill V' 'ill it t i,',, .-.. isq,gw,W 1, 'Q Jlllf WTI V MWF 'll.,,Jf'1Q! .i. NLM . ff ., fill! vi H - m7'f',' W" -2' rg 'wifi YQ -lL1"'l"5 ' f . Fifi: ,' lfflnf-'.:f liwf' EW Q-ik. ,igljabkh wr., Q V.. ' t. ff nf' 'T'-I-'.J.--VE-, r-.e,.,,:""' ,Aff V 4 -f ,, yi.: Ki, -HCfA15fi?'54. ' F :'..,-Y' ga ,,,A,,,Y,,, ,U , Q., . Y , .-mi , .. ,,..... ,, ,. . -, , . v ..-. .. ---:. Mic ll SEVE TH VICTORY ll T h. State of D. 0lOUOUl" O'Halloran w ,. - f , . . -,, sf 4v..,:-,ll 1 i w ll ., .. 1 if' 'y .1 L '1"1'2 ll ll i R' ll if V , 0 18 21 O '39 +R l MICHIGAN STATE ER bulwarks splintered, her seams spread, her hold flooded and her colors drooping, the crew of Michigan State Colleges ship of state took refuge in their lifeboats and watched the mother ship sink to inglorious defeat before her traditional rival, the "Titan Red Typhoon," in one of Detroit's most colorful football sagas last fall. ' In the words of one observer: "The line swarmed over the railg Brazil crippled the portf sideg Connell submerged the starboard and aft, Maloney stemmed the quivering flood, rushing over the bow. Vachon slashed the stern, cut' ting down those who attempted to stem the on' coming tide. State, driven on the reefs, slid beneath the tidal downpour. .,..'g xvz, fs., HA 4' ,Fgg'..1-, xl r" -- ' .. ,w 3 rl fig -,,..f ,uk '?.- W 47 4' 1 i 6 f.Lf.-4 V 'L' iii Wim, M ' . .w -1 xx E' X X ,fm I 'u ef' . X' - -as V.. if !,i,gn.j,1 Anti' ., Jw. E3 , e Qi- A 4-,aff w ,, T74 ,H 1 F Qu e,vQk,fm. n :Vial wil Q 1 1 '- 1 7 . , 'f-JJ! in W A ' 4. 'A 11.2 it 2 .fihiif I L. 5 F 5.1 if ,ilQ'l','7fT M." I' 1 nl A ,MW l X 'll fi 'T VT' V , x ,A Q .5 5 ,Jie 5. if f l' arg: ' .n 5' Y , nl 6lLV,llil1f " if ff: I -. sf PQ,-E -Q I Q' 1. '-5. if 44 ggi lf' ilkinwt 'T-iv! , sa . Tail 1+.x.,,j, x ff, V UH if 'J,2J'u ,N . 'l'16tf.? 'ivy GJ? , :ff .fl E 1.'?'J 1 agar? LQ, . wiv, J ggfj. 12545513 SU:-, n 4? i a-M -.':f'..-P .1-FE' ' 1 W? lvl x . A tlffwdbv '. 'IJ' . V fin-15-,r :tgp ,wp F ' 'al .Ill as N ., fi cu xflirfg, Efw i 1' 1 X139 M-az, 132.5 f i ' ' 5' "0 . .. ,, WE-ily Fordham tries to catch the Cowboy 2 .icq its if ffl , U J 'ft'.',4i . ,K Alfa.-,Ili -- , l. -',. -" . f' "" ' ,fa . g,f""9 ,, TT 'ff-Nl 'frli jvih r - T A G ur rw", V Atffir il l.,-13365 'fifrp 'f- J 4 " '.,"ii"f if +4 T JQPQJ. .J ,frvdi rv fl-7' t. 'L,- -'C '. u , A". f r - H-,li 'V :Eff bs, 1-7-,a- 5-.J",.' --if -.af 9-3.1 1-3:1 ' 52703 - IN R- K. -as-,-Y f 'li , fffvf- 4-W X' Q 'Y A ' 'Pl I ,kff 3 !?- MICHIGAN STATE F DETROVY RECOVE 5. Three great plays thrilled the packed stands of ticket holders who had gathered on this ideal autumn day last fall, Brazil's spectacular dash of sixtyftwo yards was the oustanding piece of individual effort, executed in his great sidefstepping, loping manner. But the runs of Tom Connell and Maloney were not eclipsed by Brazil's performances. The former's dash of seventyfflve yards and Maloney's of fortyfive, both resulted in touchdowns, and demonstrated the machineflike qualities of the team as a whole. And, on the ludicrous side, was John Q"Sod"j Ryan's hectic thirtyffive yard run back of a kickoff. Ryan snared a kickoff early in the second stanza, and streaked for home. Irish hearts in the crowd beat high with pride. Ryan was loose! But the path between the giant tackle and the goal was cluttered by one of his own teammates, whom "Sod" could not well avoid. In his own words, as he lined up on the next play, "I mighta been in the scoring, 'Natie', if I'da shifted the old marble, but I was afraida fumblin' the dern thing. Still, they ain't every tackle in the country kin run a kickoff back twentyffive yards." Barbour Burns Maley 7 J, U Il Q ,., nga", ' 52713 K ,r., f, ., nil' tix J Q-.l,i'g?'lf V, V, tgxqt' .i 1235, Wim '- 15?-G fddan pid 3 " I 1 awp, Nj? 5- ids? if if J 32 .sill all ill ,' if 'S' ig T ill? 1' il 5' ik: - 'Q E ,' l lj 11... .ffifgly 'ffflily Vw R I flaw ,-ay , bl, 5 ,. . ,Ya ' 1 'fi . " J f .w- - l,lig,.m up ri f" fail aa, f We iv W 'ini' N Wil K L7 af i i so Ili 4... , . uf if 11, Iyar, ' '. ilfitf' ' ' nn. v 3 .fl " TW it J , "1-. . " V "' 'L"""1 Fei .9553 'fw:f?T?"'s- ' 7 N 71 'P , 1 it l . . f..'iraffEanf? 'E-may fafq' 1f31"f5'iftfffx , W, ., ,,,,,,3 V., , Qt .,.'. . .,, 453, fag., --Nl, ,K ,g?'75'.4L,:..f. 5-341 .. .. V . L'-! 'li 41.5 I -3 v, '..1g:!ivfZ',f, .iqais-73, -geigisggffgald D.. H- V -vv - gf----,---nf fa- a -. ...G - V 1 1- 27. gage-1. :-,-- f,,.Y.a.r:,. Y r:.v-.orgy EIGHTH VICTORY E ix 3 QE... .fiifjig Q ' ' v ' Fordham ll . 4 My qi-,-.,Qf...f --..:,-:ei i, if-1 i .-5...-2 Y-gf an I W --T-Ur. -.--,,.,f:fa-:Luau-5--gg .. Y m digg Q ig. Q 1 Lisa: Q. -l 1113 131 H Fw Q 1 1 . O i 0 l 0 0 l w l Q. 5 ., . D D, , , .,.,..,,..-......-.--lJ,i.. W- -..--....-l.-- -..M-...---.--f- -1 --1, .-iV--Q-----4---m---a- - ff 1' 'ew .y - W 'f.,-' ll' 5.-gferg, 5.1 ,zen if ."':.f,jf'2 fdfrv Q .i , L. .,,,Lf,LfH l 'gf U. of D. 37" ' KRW' ' i.. I., ,g .J r Q i - l. X ,-Mag, ,T . in CR....+.n-.ga..a...-:iam w. Aj f 9Fa+a.la,-.. pg ,,W .-.. Vachon .vi-1 - 'Al l n i'-J -11-at E Q l ' , l A O 13 l 6 l O 19 3 1 it Q l 5 W . ' .....1.,.m.....- .-.EFEQ s FQRDHAM N antifclimax to Detroit's sensational sea' son was furnished by the l9f0 drubbing meted out to Fordham University, New York. Before the game was played, the circle of undefeated teams had narrowed to but a few select elevens, the U. of D. among them. Performing as they did under the very noses of Eastern grid scribes, from whom frank praise is like pulling teeth, the Red and White forced the typewriters to clicking, off columns of eulogy by the sheer merit of their performances. "U. of D., a second rater," became "U, of D., the greatest team seen in years," "U. of D., a western prodigyf "U. of D., an unbeaten, invincible eleven, easily the best of this seasonf, ' wa Q9 A If mf f 1 . r' H f Q . 'S W ln fx f' fa . I . fi? LJX if' tt A' Q '1 Y J l Y. G+. xx ea ll f 5 ' W .: Connell scores on Fordlzam ffl 'aww-5 A I.: F:-Af.-u-4"A'-n-.xv-,,l p 1 77 - .' fs- .4..'WE'iaiii fftP1""f f'.r"f"t" 3 tlf lfrif-'s'e f . if N -44 A,'iy?ia-'4f1,,l5if3.,3.,,''-A--3, J, 5 4 'A-.ivdff --r1f,f.f-5-'hz J ' f -"'1H-":- 5' "--f-l"..a.na-'-'-i':1rt.t 423' "--'V 5' LM .- ,f'...v-X: - -2,1 ' H --A .v--9--' "' ""!n- r, V ..-av-' tml ic, ..-A I .. ,, I I HMV .- nv-'r"'J-fQf'i:-5B"lQiwL ',Z.'.'fw 'x v , 1i0'v5'i5' ". " ' RM, . -1. .Y N 1' . , , ,,. . , ,, 4, , . , , r My ,f,,ii 1.-V kg ik snags W, .1-.Vg-v -L,-5, vw. r-,ar I I .N W- Vi-q.,:..-1,-k 7.5 -.-hryr .ugm f w Q ly Q" mr .vs ig ,p U ,Qing 4 1: Q-ug 'w 1 4 Hwy 5 r '31 -af .. 1" 3 4, v li' -91 ,V 6 .f ,. if f f-uf W U, , u iflflfl "A i- - I -ch . -' vi' 1 Wai .JNQ-Q 4 .'QV .ii f 285' . N 5 im' .W l - "rf, X, .,1.g, rq, ,... N O F 5, A A , "sf U 'l x 4 0 ' fi ' ,5 B . ' if li -D lla' if I v 0 L A P , f filler!-r 1 fq' . 1 J J' . N f . f' fl Q f .-.g .. --5, ef . no . X 1 f p 1' lf' , ' ' IQ! f 1 . '. 'fill . ' W f Y "- v x B x Gif? N-MJ' in " ' -' i r- I . , , - 4-1-f' , . -. K. , I f 1 " " , ! H ' 4 fiililvl' if - ' A -i H ', w - . A il li ' , . i . t . sf 1 Q I ix , lr-fllsvwr 3 rl F i laik -P di ORDHAM GAME: l+ixW,j 2 , ...ill BRA'Z.l 1. swims 1-He END W, 42? , -'f' . . ,igffg The Titans swept down upon the Maroons with one of the greatest passing attacks seen "?...g,gf dingy in the East for an entire season. Although Brazil failed to jam his way across the Polo f.fQ,wQggsg Grounds goal line in person, his deadly passing arm, his generalship, and his superb per' Wil formances set the spectators agog. j My lbw Captain Tom Connell casually scored nineteen points, turning in three touchdowns and a kicked point, thus boosting his season's total well above anything else in sight 1' f with 105 points. ii ',l, tif, ln Detroit Saturday Night, E. A. Batchelor commented on the team at length. Some i'l !qA,'.,,'? excerpts follow: lliigfl "Detroit has a magnificent backfield, with Brazil, Connell and Maloney sharing the l"f-iw! honors " 5 5555 Eff, LL ' - - w - M Vi - uBraz1l is the country s outstanding back. ' 'Zig' Bud Boeringer, who coaches the Detroit line, has developed a set of forwards worthy flgligl 65 t k th th t t f 11 t flfff o ran wi e grea es o a imef' .gggqg "A sprained ringer, sustained by Brazil, is the sole injury to befall the Titans in a year. Butlerfcoached teams are famous for their lack of injuries." But the pinnacle of fame was to be followed in the engagements in store for the Titans the following week. By swamping Fordham, they removed the last obstacle in their path before confronting Georgetown, the real object of the season. l' A , , , , - ., , . Sf'???w5- ffm' ,lf if - fl? yffir ,gi p if We fly' ' J if ef- ,pifff ygfil 1.9.3 1 ' ' an . . I K A "fi X. l ' 1 D V J, W0 'iffffir-f i ' ' if '-3,2 9 Storen Fearn Petz . V if - gs Sgaw agar Y 'vii Nils. W , Qfffiff' .2f'-'rest ,JG-H T "1 ,fnfgjff-,. ,fi-1' 'SFHFY2-La fi "+I "'- .4-:'31"':,'1w '-W T' 'i'- 3, f n 3" f ' "'- .V ,"'fff , 7-i' :Fifi 4327!-'if?1 Sfillggifl 'liffgji 13554 Fil'-l3f' ft' Al' fail " VJ" fr 'lf' f 2-'33 if l'rQ""'f1i1'f5' .1 iff-Qlffw fI,.f3'Q' Wi l " '17 if 'HI-. 5 ' mll3""'fv!- V V. ' 'HV 1' ' f .' 1- i- V.. ..f'-,- f. . A A tt V 1 ,f fi' f" V. J' 2- q... rv f .- A' V- 10. . I ra-. l - -ii i ' A f.-..f-1 .N .,,a,u.:,f -' 1:2731 fs- r--' ' -,, M' TE, i , , We .. '.,1..,1 N! Kath, 5. 'xx Lil J K., 2, 'ly arf., 1, 4. gli lv:-ii if MMR? :' f -ll' 1 ., - v'?"'w 1' ' -1 'f sad if We if tp 1 4' if ir? N 'ff E LN. A psi' lilfiiw lfwlgg ylflalffill 1 'img If hflliilgl ..:-pcllfwi Wig if W" fx 2. W5 'vi f fi, .,,.s, . if igll as Q53 . tsl Mrs-fa ' QA' will 66.55 A - FW 122.10 tilt? ,,--r . -Q '--fy, . '-will .f . - .J s-f.- . 1 r . .51 ffq,geff,gfa2ef33., .1 y, iii? "iUif.1'i A'c- 1 . .if'F1'fi4'fgT,. .stiff K' tg? lltalfcflyir if lid ' ,.rQQ1.QQT T QQ ,Q Q,r,,..Qt.LgaQgj.if ia..,....a.ag.gLQ....l....,.,i. . --a,...aa ,Q Q NINTH VICTORY ca l w , ' Geofgfown 13 g 0 f 0 0 Q 13 T ' l f I iii. i. 1 ,, -. an-..,, i rico-5 'iH'-""'T""""- ' 'T . U. of D. 7 V 0 3 13 f 13 l 33 v . ir. f . -f .f1-3 A ' '-as ' miie'-f e,-iff r HE most thrilling conceivable climax to a brilliant sea' son of football came when Detroit locked horns with the invincible Georgetown outfit, and whipped them conf clusively for the fifteenth consecutive victory of two spectacular years. U. of D. smashed, battered, butchered and rode roughfshod over the Hilltoppers to take the long end of a 3343 count. lf football history was ever made, it was made against Georgetown. The latter, with only one defeat in a year, provided a crucial test for the Red and White and in beating them Dorais' squad established its merit as one of the greatest teams in America. The thousands who witnessed the Georgetown classic still shudder from the gridiron thrills heaped upon them during the tilt. As the stands settled down for a desperf ate game of football and uttered silent prayers for the sucf cess of the Titan boys, they were immediately electrified by Gonnells run back of kickfoff for a touchdown. It begun to look like an easy Titan win. After this however, the Titans lapsed into stage fright, Lardner l . I Q '1 Brazil smashes a Georgetown back fix 'ff ., 1524s ,:"' "', :QTL a1'?"q,, 15. I,-lv", - 11, 1?..,'.',,-'rfb ' -i ..., -I if' K, Tre. 1" gf.. N " .-if , . K- f' 'F' 4 if Vai bil rr ' 'j 4' -G'wji-X55 ggi-,-'N if "' ,ali'.-F-'1.,.i,j v L, tg! . .'f,,f1,!-,Q I X i ,.4 'rr l, ,,"s.,, w .Q Q -'-al' ' 4, . 1. i '.4 'g,,,QJig'a,,,gfHl.1,,Qw1'li,,T,.w'-Kari-.tif-Q" M.: .L -J ia' Qs-,rrfiagpffk BS?-5.13ct- .f c,,L,,-ff4l,:f:g,f'p . 1 Thr l,,,-Pvc" N f 274 3 ,sl ff .. W F V11-L "Thx :M.u n- :.- - exalt Rita , 11 M iw if :+'L" 2 X It vs: th f""h'J3 Qfmgf,-ig 1 rflj 4? 133.-.i ,lg ,735 .W,f F531 ,, .m 2 .Jul i.4, , 1 'Y f -' ?g,:"'s 'fa .figJ il -V - ! sr il: .'.1,,, 'wx x' Xu" M X J M' L. T, in Ji at, Q1 . zffwi 13 l , 2, imjf. lYlWW kfkwf .f fee, '55 QJH5 mul Nts? li , '-sf 1 x. nf? .- ails 'llglgrf - 1 fi. ,gal i W ASW l 31' ,.5"i7y b + 'ji ll a 4.4-Q xrll 'i.g,!Q N . 'Q iie fi4?ff.g lQfQ 3' bs U?T i".ZmJg,, . -iid' 'AP-Wav nwwfv fini' 'nf ' ,fir crux,-if fwMH' " Wi! 1 l!lY'Y.:5fi' is 1 -A+ F f' P llrlilli- if 'bert sf ii' X' lifq 'Uig iflxlsi M f xf-.-Fw 1, 1 ' X ' r- fx-X C A I Y .5 " , -ggv Y . Kg ,pp ,rx X n i In - o X lr Q ' I rv, I ,Qi : ll? , is-x 1 i v X ,, 1 , - . fi U.. 'A I M I G , X l- Q N SUIV6 . -'ihf 1 4' 4 K 7 ,s.i, 4 rv iyp ,---:S---' , I f ' x X" A y, V ' t 5 X gl? +,-,., N -in 'X x V sr. i I, if Al gb N 'W , .V-M g ' K , g H 1 mis-.... BD.A-zu. Rr-zveasss me LD g -it n' t '4"' c QEORGETQWN GAME. and Georgetown took advantage of it to score thirteen points in the irst half. In the second stanza, Detroit took a new lease on life, fathomed their opponent's tactics, and rolled up four touchdowns. It was the most spectacular comefback seen around Dinan ,. Field in years. jg piigfi. Mi fy Brazil performed superbly, basing his allfAmerican claims on his Georgetown work. was .s, r To mention any particular names, however, without touching on the merits of every ilii f single man in the play would be an insult. A11 of them excelled themselves. Lou Little's outfit walked off the field with the most humiliating defeat it had ever suffered. ffl 'Qffilill At every minute of the game the play provided a new thrill. It was simply the most Wd 121 gripping, exciting tussle ever seen by Detroit fans. At every moment the outcome hung , fm ,.'i 4 wwf " rm. 1 1 351-p2V',.l'.i by a hair. There was never a tame moment. And by overthrowing Georgetown, the 1 vn- Titans emerged unscathed from perhaps the most severe season of football ever under' taken. Final statistics revealed the fact that a string of sixteen successive and decisive victories over a period of two years had been hung up. QF th V 5 x if 1 gr, iliiiieiifi 1, l 'V 31' f f, ..Q whim W im' l yt! l ii-'il Anderson Buckman Maloney 'Ill .lr '- ' 1 pn.. f r.-H f fggi 5' ffl? f..f tif?-s.giC"',4if-fir' r'1t'1l' "ti ' ' iw ,rf-i Q5 Y :!!,V v,,1: g3?Jf.v,iV,ENr,, X IV., i .Q ,,..' V X ,rrt N .J , V l .. J, ,gl 1 g ,.'V iff, qfgg, , .H -1-Q-f", J' , ' wp.- 52773 o flifa, g . E' lwslfaw ,a-:3.i'f' f Ll in wflwftfiw i Y -X ..v.-Y I-. t 7 5 5' - i2f,'1.fj?'.1Q1 51.15 .. :J4-1F52-5Q3'QK'+Qiilfa,-lrezgk 1 4 ff 313,32 ' W iff, it . , , ,Ei lt? .,, J ws' M il? . 'Y rw l ll, A V, ff? 'ff' rillglli ' 4 lake I Dy FRESHMEN FCOTBALL ROSTER . QW, . 5 ooAcH l Gift folm F. Fredericlgs fl MANAGER V , A I' ' 'Q j Frank Brady If 1 .lf -' ' 1 MT 142 ASSISTANT MANAGERS a ata W ,I Waltcv' Holland Albert Nagler j N xg' . l f THE SQUAD Y' Robert H. Babcock, left end Anthony C. Mayville, quarterback I AN 5" Louis Berg, left half Paul H. Mohardt, quarterback , John J. Bissell, left end Harold Parker, right guard D aj! Ernest Blohm, center Robert Parsaca, quarterback Q l, Edward Burkhart, right tackle Charles N. Pearson, center IQ ' Robert M. Conway, quarterback joseph L. Phelan, fullback "D Ignatius Duggan, left guard Williani P. Rieden, left guard Q Nicholas J. Gendernalik, left guard Daniel W. Robinson, right tackle ' John P. Hackett, right tackle Leo S. Rollins, right tackle Pyrle Hart, fullback Charles Ross, left half Q W -4 John H. Hofstetter, right half Paul I. Schafer l George N. Howell, right tackle Martin G. Starr, left tackle I David E. Kull, left half Allen Treudale, center l l Joseph D. Loughrin, right end Michael Van DeKeere, right end George E. McWilliams, left tackle Joseph R. Weise, left guard Q , Forest J. Malott, left guard Howard Woods, fullback Q vi L 213 H in ffl gf' M rw 5'5vfQ9w:asff.' -Q, ffafwf'-'afar' ,la :fl oifzl BQ., -.fo A A n ig-.-...v V' L 276 3 FRESHMEN FCCTBALL " LL VICTCRICUSH were the '28 Titans and 'tAll Victorious" were the 528 Titan Yearlings. It was a perfect year for the gridiron teams of the U. of D. 'This year's Freshman football team has been called "the U. of D.'s best Frosh teamf' In its four games it was undef feated and barely missed being unscored upon when the strong General Motors Tech team of Flint pushed the ball over for a solitary touchdown in the closing minutes of the last game of the season. But this is hardly worthy of mention for at that time it was the third team that was defending the Red and White colors. In these four games, the Freshies amassed a total of 102 points to that lonesome 6 points accounted for by the Engineers of Flint. But winning games is not the sole purf pose for which Freshman football teams are formed. The main object in their or' ganization is to furnish the varsity team with scrimmage practice, to learn the plays of the opposing schools so that the first team may become better acquainted with them and so become better fitted for the oncoming game. A yearling team must learn one set of plays for a week and then, at the beginning of the next period, forget these plays in order to assimilate an enf tirely new system of offense. Consequentf ly they entered -each game under a great handicap. They never had any set method of offensive play. Their attack was the combination of 'several teams' plays. Even these plays were not learn-ed so well since they had to be hurried in order to help the varsity. Considering these obstacles, the success of the 1928 edition of Titan Frosh is very noteworthy. The hrst game of the season was played at Port Huron against that city's Junior College t-eam. It was a onefsided victory for the Frosh with the final count reading 34 to O. It was in this game that one very promising back showed that his prep school reputation was not for naught. That back was Charles fSnitzj Ross who presented a triple problem to the Hjuniesv with his passing, running and kicking. After playing a half of ragged football, the yearlings returned in the final stanza in their next game, which was played in Kalamazoo against Western State Teachf ers College Frosh, to gain a hardffought 12 to O win. The score at the end of the half was a scoreless tie and it was not until Louie Berg, the flashy halfback who starred at U. of D. High the previous year, ran 55 yards for a touchdown that the Red and White outfit really played their regular game. But it was for the next game that the yearlings were really pointing, the game with Michigan State Normal Frosh, the eleven that for seven straight years had successfully downed the Titan teams. The boys entered into the game with much added enthusiasm and soon had completely broken the "Y psi Jinx." The final score read 25 to O in our favor. After this game the campus began to wake up to the fact that the class of 1952 was being represented on the football field by a team that was of the calibre that could be expected to maintain the brilliant record of the varsity. So when the Frosh journeyed to Flint for their final game of the season with the Engineers of General Motors Tech, the students anxiously sought returns on the battle. The results of this game left no room for disappointment. The score at the closing whistle read U. of D. Frosh 31, General Motors 6, and that single touchdown was the only blemish on an otherwise perfect season. Reports in the Flint newspapers tell that never since the days of Lloyd Brazil had such an exhibition of ballfcarryf ing been displayed in Flint as that of Louie Berg. Berg, to use the Flint reporter's own words, "thrilled the huge holiday crowd with two long runs of 54 and 42 yards, both for touchdownsf' 52773 85 -,,- w 0 M SMQ S , W Qmp my My '6 My My Wir R ' 157 . ' 45 S Q Q Wo S A, A OO-1 V x 9 qfiss. -aw Ci! ., A ln O , O1 0 O 1 I f W , QU Q32 1 J Y 1 f I L 424 fi - G " 'KS , gf 2 X 7 wif' .f Z ' ' ww f,,E"'f? , f INK! 7 X sg 3? W ' 1 f 3 5 X ,Z' 'J W4 ,M 5 fi J' W gf 4 1' f W i l ' X" X291 2 M . 2 V X- K, ,A qxvig Qfofb O er O O 1 O g E if C5 351 'S M 405 4 4LO1 .405 P 1 ffox linll .V -1 I-!'P'azv2 Q I 'fa 5 ff wi ,, .gr nw, 1r"7 2 1,.,...f . . .1 gm 1 - .YW -n, ll 6 Y, 4, J , up 'X ff .. I Captain Francis Phelan T H E S E A S 0 N T WQULD be anything but ethical to maintain that the court season recently experienced by the Titans was successful. As a matter of fact the red and white quintette staggered through a most dismal season permeated with repeated setbacks, and despite our desire to rhapsodize U. of D. athletics, we cannot in conscience eulof gize our net and loop artists. However, a snap judgment is not justi' fied, because several factors contributed to the ignominious season, which were out' side the control of the players or coach. In the Hrst place the schedule of the mesh' men severely handicapped them. They were forced to open their season against some of the strongest teams in the country. and their games all came in clusters, some' times two or three on successive evenings. It would have required a team of supermen to successfully stand the strain of such a spasmodic and illogical sequence of games. The drab grind of court tussles got off to its dismal start as Harbrecht's aggrega' tion tied up with Penn State and lost to them, 31118. The mainstays in the local outht were mostly gridiron luminatiesg Brazil, Phelan, Maloney, Aaron, and But' ler. Roney and Yaeger also appeared in the lineup. This nucleus, during ensuing weeks, unsuccessfully locked horns with Penn State, Notre Dame, St. Johns, Michif gan State, and Adrian College. Smothered here, losing by lopfsided margins there, now trounced and white' washed, it was not until late in the season when the Titans tackled St. Johns, that they won their hrst game. When the final statistics were tabulated at the end of the season they revealed four victories and eleven defeats. The Titans wrenched victory from St. Xavier, St. lohns, Adrian, and Loyola. 52803 i , V qt ,fn lyghe ffl K 1 Efilillli. ll if arf, Qjigx ffl! f': fffrf l li' lj Vx U if ia lliifs 'N lvl ll 4 l' J- fill Amy tiff Tf?'w lffslfi A lfill .. ii. lynx . X 4. 5 Wi Z:...1g1':. I5-If ff, ggi, I i ' l'f4Efllf'l aff, , fate' Qi als-T19 ,,3. ,Z 4f"'2?ll frffil 1 lffif TL i u 5 .1 QQ lfriilii -Jfiliihz gl ' 'E fi: 3 tlflglmfixl , fad.. if 1 Pm ' V 3 is-. , ji ' ai. l l J. .W ,.. ' ' ' V ' "J I'f'u2-ip "V ffl ' ,TZLQQTK fl Ji' fn., 1 I ' "T f 1 13 Fl 1' W- W' w' ' c s. U Q, Q . 8975-1 V rf r ,ig .Q-, , ' . . - f, 4 Jem. 1 bf- -":- 5. ,,.. ,, , - M. .3 xl , 1-. ,Q V-' .va--Hp ,., o..f..J.Q. , ! J"".,. ms ,win 6 M9-A Y I F-Mi 7: , .-A -4 CaptuinfElcct Lloyd Brazil Notre Dame and her net artisans pro' vided the climax and the debacle of the year. The Ramblers rode roughfshod over the Titans in a clash at South Bend, but when they visited Detroit for a return en' gagement they were forced to desperate stalling in order to stave off defeat at the hands of the vindictive Titans. In looking back over the season several names stand out on the basketball roster. The men who stood staunchly by the team and turned in the best performances were: .5933 Brazil, Fournier, Aaron, and Dawson. Brazills consistent brand of ball was th-e high light of the season. Both Fournier and Aaron flashed a brilliant game on sevf eral occasions, and Dawson turned in a comparatively high seasonal card. Cap' tain Phelan and Yaeger are deserving of their share of praise. Coach Harbrecht had illimitable diffif :Hifi w s culties with which to cope in grooming his team. They were provided with no adef quate training facilities. Their practice court, a tiny, pinched, and squalid set of boards, scarcely gave breathing room for the sweating gladiators to practice. There is not the shadow of a doubt in the minds of the student body that if the overworked, but assiduous and capable Coach Harbrecht, were furnished any' thing approaching normal facilities, the equal at least of neighboring colleges, the calibre of his teams would immediately and correspondingly improve. Battling against almost ludicrously inadequate means, handicapped by an astonishingly adverse schedule, struggling against insurmount' able odds in every branch of work, Harf brecht and his team deserve unstinted praise for the season they did eventually accomplish. 52313 'x L, .,l- 'll . QV" L- .Ja Q ...Capt TEH 1 P 5 if 'ull T. ,..., ,q. 1, 2, Vw i1 . ... ',-JJ' -H. jn. .X 4, ,. ,ry f, .r lr' ,-an -.fi , A., 3, v !!4'f+5 -agar .31 1. wylffrawv ivan tv pulls: if wg' ': '11 'rl jig -. l 'bali l .,..n,rly hp lr ,lf-' -Ja 4 'ffglf J Q ,, ' '-Mr lg. .mr g 1 fjwril 3. .3 'f'.l1lli,l' M ' J: J-ji . if-lv' -4.1 ','., Q .QM ll -' it li. w ,Y 6, Q f' L' lglr, gl 'FH .l imp- If' LMU . ,,. ,ffffi ..a -, .VJ '- ,1 ,. W2 . 'clk Am Q',.awL.f V.g.,,, vi.. .f.. , pk? W1 i ixlj, .lr-4-'ll 5, -N mi'-Zac.. ll, i-'l'ill'l itil? .T J .F " if 5.111 1 P4- Arg" h V :djlgf if A75 "U .E ,.e1'g-' lg af 'rg , illilf f2,i?i'+1i 'l ,J fx .M q'il . ,..:X,J vw '. 1 1 ,J ' E., Yfaw X ,.- QV- 1,3 ., 4, , . ,F 1, 'Rl .4 ,A -- -Pit, 115. w. K, A , .4 . Y lx .will 'Ai ,Vail 'fl 1, f ...f ,"f' A 5. x, -. JJ. " ' fx . ,. L I. ,. . f 3' m V' r "4 f'T'5"Z"' W' fi?-fililff, 'J fi! Nf'.f" Q41 TI ' J -- S -' --. '- 'K f:"'5: I "J,,,l?af Ulla'h'lf,,Q,'f'3?""7ki,fl7Tf'ff?:7'w,l.T,,.TL': ., ,,,-""fff'5 . . "iw-gl .. 'f'5f."3'1,'lfl TD' - 12'-Thai? ' - 'l L'-"ill ' 'ir ' ff sl-5" '.:'rf41 ., i'H'lf,'I 4 T' "KW-'rw 'V 'A B e :fi-4" ' "' '5 'N -.' 'JN b"'5"u la f,,,- ,. W - Jr, ,A if 7,,.4, -,gp 1 fl , -,El -,I w -Y -,' " A' ,', ', Q -. 1 i ,'- X ."',.r.f',,l1L 1 wa-I a . 1-, 1 fr.-., 11' ' -It '. avr. , 2.3, 'flu U30 , , Q, -gs .5 i 15, 'W ful iii' .Al gr. " 1' r 1-1 4 'W ull CT, li ' I yi f .xfk .' l, i'l 1 , qv, 3. ,n -w . 1 .lqr -ru-W' If JW'-, ,V x j . E 511519 ilk Left to Right: Top Row-Brennan, Nagler, Devlin. Second Row-M. H. Butler, Christian, Dawson, Brown, Yaeger, Brazil, Storen, Barbour, Pont, Harbrecht. Bottom Row-Butler, Maloney, Butcher, Phelan, Fournier, Aaron, Roney. 1 f I I A . , wif , ,, . I 7 K ,J , ,,.,.- 2.. .,,,.,, -- .. , ,-- , .,,. -.,,. :J ,dlp 'v..,,,.,, rl A 'ia ' - rc,-33 I Q? 1 T559 J' 255544 9' q V- b Jw a I ll L ffl l' ff 'i if 4' ' frf-gel rsqjlfff ,X P' f"'f" r ilqpx fm ,gf iff 1 kj? rv if 5- I X1 'J Y,':,'1 'w5f'lq. ,W ,lu -Fill ,. igfki i,2"'FD?f4 'ma I yr fr., , fini 1? 'fb Q, N, . Gigi? Kill? ll , X I r-,vm llfll'm34I I 'wlzgx VARSITY BASKETBALL RGSTER COACH Paul P. Harbrecht CAPTAIN Francis Phelan MANAGER Daniel F. Ritter ASSISTANT MANAGERS Dale Devlin james M. Brennan THE SQUAD 4-Peter I. Christian, forward 32-Francis Phelan, center 11-Happy Yaeger, center 33-Kenneth Fournier, forward 23-Edmund J. Barbour, forward 34-Simon Aaron, guard 26--joseph Pont, forward 22-Neil Brown, center 35-Edward Dawson, guard 36-Willianl Butcher, forward 28-William Storen, guard 37-Edward Maloney, guard fa JI--Bancroft G. Butler, forward 38--Lloyd Brazil, guard 39-Charles Roney, guard ff- N,.....f' X..-.xv-HK 'W M mf1Pu w rx f G , wg .fx X rw 1 4 I J .1 J Nd J' ow"-Qi 1 I I W K Q ll .far ,Q I4 ' f Sal 2- may ,f'-,ww .. ff f-rw 1- - , 'P . .. , -- - J- .V M., V . . 1 fl f - f 1 -I liaise? W 1, - .f' 1, Q ,..,1'-:Ir if, Vt J 4-1.-. , j l- V' 6' ' P.-e..f:-'-.J '--QQ - J ,fbi i- 'f ' f iff J,.,HJf'za' J Wag! , L, -. -, N, ,, ,f 1-wa,-.,, ,..,ad' 52823 1 V . Q- xv: .- swim CDTNQIYG M40-W fan PENN STATE , h ea-DT 'W ia T , A 1 T CME harhinger of the dismal season in store for the Titan basketeers YV was sounded in their initial game of the year with Penn State. Not g 'J' only was the local team in poor shape, the schedule outlined for it was ,Q unfair, bringing unusually strong teams for the opening games and saving , - I 2 T G5 A the weaker ones until later. The Titans were trounced so severely in their first game that supporters wisely held forth little hope of a very brilliant ' , court season. The score with Penn State was 31 to 18. T The Nittany Lions came west with a highly touted court outht, teamf , gig T, weakened, however, by the loss of two of its stars. Penn outplayed and QT, L - 7 outclassed the Titans in every department of the game, blanketing the latter 2 "1 ' 3 f -7 V in a deluge of baskets and foul points. - 'T' 'T Lloyd Brazil proved the star of the game. He hung up six points from T T 3 T 1 the field. Brazil's work was almost equalled by Captain Phelan and Ed. T 'L , M .'-r Maloney, both of whom were just rounding into shape. Ban Butler, Chuck T, 1 Roney and "Hap" Yeager all played a good game. M. I . it T TT . J' :Tr f '.' -P 1' T if l., s, ,Y DETROIT PENN STATE ,R . 'N BG. F. T - I Aaron, rf. ..... .... 1 O 2 Iacobson, rffc. ........ 4 JT, Butcher, lf. ..... .... 1 2 4 Rienhold, lf. .... . . . 4 LI. T 1 Phelan, c. . . . .... 1 1 3 Ercivilnstein .. , . . . . . S A B 'l . .... 3 6 ate,r.--- M Drzjxiisonfglg. ..... .... 1 8 2 Kockflg- g ----- - - - 2 T Tl X. Fournier, rf .... .... O 1 1 MGYCYS, lf- ---- - -- 0 11 1145 Yeager, c. .... .... O O 0 HHUIGS, C- - - ------ 1 T '- S Butler, rg. .... o 0 o - , j. . Roneya lg. l , , ,,,, 0 0 0 Totals .... ...... 1 3 'I 1511. ' ' T' Totals ..... .... T Z E .1-A , TJ , X F J- , . 1 U Maloney TT T -+1 T it 2 was a T - TTS. ii? cc,-AE, fzssj Q 14 if . l ,ri ,f . 'Simi I . A. . ,QTY 2' szfw UUTE w -ff' NOTRE DAME HE astonishingly lopfsided score of 49 to 14 marked the second game of the 1929 basketball schedule. Notre Dame, ga formidable aggregaf tion, was on top. The tilt was played at South Bend on the Irishmen's floor. 1 Detroit got away to' a fairly promising start. The Titans felt desperate over the debacle of the week before, and were out for blood. They simply tackled too tough a bunch. Notre Dame playing smooth, fast, flawless basketball and kept things on ice throughout the entire session. During the Hrst half, the Red and White loopmen dribbled and passed and guarded feverishly, and managed to hold the score within reasonable bounds. At the end of first half, the matter stood Notre Dame 15, Detroit 4. ' In the second stanza, Detroit simply could not stand the pace and the Irish pulled steadily away from them. Brazil, with,his consistently sound though seldom brilliant play, was again scoring ace. He pocketed a third of the local tallies from his position at center. ' , A provoking absence of initiative, and stamina characterized the Titan play. Notre Dame players ran circles around them and swept them off their feet. They dribbled through them at will. They passed with ease. Detroit, emerging the crestfallen victim, resolved to polish up a bit before tackling anything like South Bend again. 1? Y 'N 'N Tx 5 i K fi .ff ff Lf-1 .J if .W Q3 U12 " T if 'v f --I 4 DETROIT NQTRE DAME Q ' . FG- F- T- BG. F. T. , ' 'l Butler, rf' "" ' ' ' O 0 O Crowe, rf. . . . . . . . . 2 0 4 ' ' Butcher. lfs - - - - - ' O O O Locklyn, lf. . . . . . . . 2 1 5 V Bfazllf C- ' - ' ' ' - 2 l 5 Colrick, e. . . . . . . 0 O O . . X Dawson, rg. . . . . . . 1 1 3 Donovan, rg. . l 3 2 6 I 9- Aaron. ls- ---- - - - 1 2 4 smith, ig. .... .... 3 0 6 .- ' A Phelan, ff- -'-- - - - 0 O O Newbold, c, . . . . . . . 0 0 0 Fournier, lf. ..... . . . O O O Gavin, rf. '.... . . . l 3 0 6 '-J X IQIHIOIWY, C' '-' --- 5 3 76 Teders. lf. .... . . . . 2 O 4 'G 5 0neY,fg- ---- MC h, ..2 4 8 Brown, lg. .... ..... O O O Leih2:,TtC?r ' . ,,,. 3 0 4 K 1' ii f - - Busch. c. ..... .... 2 0 4 W 1,1 A Totals '--' ' 7 4 14 Bray, lg. ........ .... O O 0 'T CDV' Moynihan, rg, . . . .... 1 O 2 , Vogelwedde, c. . . .... 2 2 6 . Totals. . .. .... Z 7 49 Q - 5. ' " ,"' , 1' -,' 1 ,, QP m a - c t ' MQ JJ - X 'D D i 4 ' 'Ny -. g Q U 1,1-nf' v'-vpn B P vrvh ,F ab, 5 J- Q i?i?"'gq,c'!Q.f-K. ,- 2Qf.f,.i-Z1 :Ml 2, V. , v W , ' , , 1 J., . , W, ' , 'f' " 'if'-.1 ,Ig 5 ' ' -if ' ' x 1-A A ,. , c, cfQw'L2a5-KN F "'-' LI,-J is Q f 284 1 var.: as ff. -.:.1, 'xc' ,ff V v ,ph ,Q ml ,L .1 Ti-fikg' . a 1 I I ' -1 . U N I ' f N r is-55:-NX R A V's1'.,3,qQmi7TH.,l rw 'X V ff ,.T.i, - - X- w 'L , ,'. 3 gk' M, X l 1 1 1 71,7 625. K 'T sa signal U Zsrfefilfl girl V 1- fr. my sr. 1oHN's UNIVERSITY EXT? . ' GY , 3:4 1 Sal NIVERSITY UF DETRQIT emerged on the sunny side of a 58 to 18 3,533 Qs score and won its first game of the year by trouncing St. Iohn's Unif gif. versity ive on the Cadillac Athletic floor here. The team showed a marked K si improvement and a better brand of ball in defeating the Saints. it any Particularly noticeable was the team's offensive work, led by Lloyd fg Brazil. In previous games the Flint Flash had been unable to cope with his opponents in any spectacular way. Against St. Xavier, however, he found fa" himself and caged six Held goals and two fouls, a total contribution of 14 points. Second in scoring to Brazil was Cy Aaron, Sophomore guard. Cy dropped in 12 counters during the fray. '5'lg?'3 St. Iohn's presented a team that was light, and fast. Ed. Ivlaloney, in U . . . . . . . . lk . .u the pivot position, helped in their undoing, turning in a hard, clean brand of performance. He added nine points to the score board. The Saints j My il! were forced throughout the game to rely on foul throws, and they made ggi" good use of them. Qut of 16 chances, their foul tosses found the meshes 115.561 15 times and they added two field goals to this total during the play. qriffr ' ATS? Ti gill Q'-Tariff 'ii PBNM will I It fp-- Yitii gill? ff r.'1f'eY15"i" 11.91 filo! fbtalf fl-1'5YTl1 rffifl DETROIT ST- JOHNS 1. -Wa +17 54.551, Fo. .,5,.,.-, Butler, rf- t . ..,- Costello, rf. ...... . . . A I . . lgi' Nally, .... . . . A?-MN .J Brazi , M asle c 'fj pg, Maloney, c. . .... E Y' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 55122--'f fiflgihvi Aaron rg. .... .... K rusoe' rg' "" ' ' ' 4?li'1l'ifj- ff ' Dawson lg. . . . .... EI-ugray' flg' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 E5 ' usner,r.... xml Fr Eontg rf. if ..... .... ulgy, lf. A I . Q I U 11 1319951 utc er, . . . . .... m tt, c. . . . . . -"4 pdf' Fournier, lf. . . .... Kqftoxfvlicz?-rf, . . . . . . fggf Roney, lg. . . .... Brown, lf. . . . . . . iw - f - Fw! ' Totals ,,.. .... 1 4 10 38 Totals ..... . . . l lj , tl 4 -IA. ci 1 1 11 1 3 . gp wg 1 Storen A ' a -a ' f'i"A"'t'S f if f- figs it 'ft r Q 31 239 s2'Wef-'P if lf" f , fri 1 ij 285 3 ww w .fsmmwif a 'H 1 Q st 1 1 N 1 1 i ii? lit v MARQUETTE as HE third defeat for the Titans was chalked up against them when they 1 L' ' met the strong Hilltopper quintet of Marquette University in the first Q! .p I? athletic contest between the two schools in several years. The game was 1' played in the Light Guard Armory, and although the wearers of the Red and White rallied during the second half, the final count showed that Marquette's earlyfgame lead had carried that team to a 21 to 13 win. 'f . lql' It was the first half, or rather the inability of the Harbrecht team to score A during that period, that caused this Titan loss. ' All the points that the local X ' 3' , five could garner throughout the first stanza were three foul shots. They p. F' . D I u did not score from the floor until well into the last half. ln the meantime, 1 , Q however, the 'Toppers were steadily raising their total points, and the score YV V . ' at the end of the first half was Marquette 15, Detroit 3. u T rj Xt 1 I But during the second half, the Titans astonishingly came to life. They ' Y , completely outplayed the leading Marquette outfit and outscored them pf 1 p IAW- 10 to 6. Had the charges of I-larbrecht played the same brand of basket' .. ' f t' ball throughout the entire contest that they displayed in the closing period IQ b y of the game, the final count might have been different. gp "Jimmy" O'Donnell, Marquette's petite forward, led the offense of his E team by scoring three times from the floor and twice from the penalty line L 1. A ' 4' for a total of eight points. Lloyd Brazi1's seven foul shots made him the 4 1 i t 1 leading Titan scorer by a wide margin. X 13:- lr ' 1 .gf Q .1 P 1 E lx Il . 3 I DETRo1T MARQUETTE W Fc. F. T. Fc. F. T. -" ' ' , Butler, rf. .....,...... 0 O O O'Donnell, rf. ......... 3 2 8 1" Brazil, lf. ..... .... 0 7 7 Shumocher, lf. ....... 1 O 2 ' Maloney, c. . . . .... 0 O 0 Gebert, c. .......... . . . 1 O 2 J Aaron, rg. ...... .... 1 1 3 King, rg. ............. 0 2 2 tw Dawson, lg. ..... .... 1 O 2 Schuette, lg. .......... 1 1 3 3 3 X , Pont, rf. ...... .... 0 1 1 Brock, lf. ............ . 0 0 0 ' Phelan, c. .... .... 0 0 O Bugge, c. ............. 1 0 2 1 ""f,' - - - A. Shumocher, rg.. . . . . . 1 0 2 Totals ...... .,.. 2 9 13 Gonyo, lg. ............ 0 0 0 hr' Total ...... ..... -E T E 19,11-1 em 93? QM ft 19 kygsjtlygf-, f!l,S"'e. F' AJ:w, . fpti wi fi -'5li'7fq'11'fJ' 441' 'qxf"',f'igfa-:,.f-H':fs.- ig fa "H-A." f'-ggi, , . . L -'fu f fK'1lfl?LEEi'74m Kigiltiim iiiuia- "L'1't!'l' ,',. A gf2li5i'.:-'Il " 17 A Ti' '. if-fi " if g:f"wQ,?i7.5'eQ5-W' 3 , hxbvifzi R' Q lg,-13 .4 f 286 3 217+-fm... . ,EN it f' TY' JUW 3' 1 'A 21+ffwf'..f1.- r . -- ' fic. ,fs 'fNQ .f...a.f..y::-. F :L-1 IW "' ' ibflliiff I f p ll'f,L:-'L"s.T1 , ii. .- 'lr,l,.ff +.,...r lie, 'VJ fg,a:,rg,saf:: "4aJ,,Qif',h-Qrgxiff? ZQQQL-,rf,--i'-gm'l I, -.ga Liz, I 3 Mft' . . .f-'gala I . L r F?" ' FIRST STATE GAME like r 9 ' I . DESPERATE second half Titan rall , brin in momentar ho e to 6 . Y S 8 Y P .3 3 , I, local supporters, failed by several baskets to even up the overwhelming I lead built up by M. S. C. when the latter smothered the Titans for the A W- f ,. .4 ' fourth time of the season. The final score read 2743. K ' During the first half, the Titans were in the throes of a spell or a trance. ,ip ., They .gazed and moped about, they trotted and stared, but, for fifteen I minutes scored no baskets, and scarcely touched the ball. Brazil at len th A 3 5' broke the ice with a foul and a field goal, and the disorganized Red and A White, after half a Game of loafinsf, sna ped into action. 5 V an 0 P 4" The pandemonium of the second stanza was short lived, however. The gi "lf Spartans just couldn't see themselves giving up to a team they had held ' ' hel less for half a ame. So after the Titan scorin flourish sizzled out into C1 P g g an innocuous deed, the State crew continued on their merry way, dropping ,A in the baskets from every corner of the floor. f lg Butcher and Fournier, for the U. of D., helped to cheer the disconsolate 259 spectators with their spectacular play. E7 U - u I Child rf si? ii-Y iff' Ch, X 1,1 . S. X r, Y 35, .,. 4 A lla? Fei . 1 DETROIT Brazil, rf. . . . . . . T 'S MICHIGAN STATE R. Grove, rf.. . .. F.G. F. O T 1 1 ....1 'Z 4 7. 1 bfi . iii? Emi if-:fm F aff: fl .va-' F' '!"' -I-37 "1 i Qtr 1' an w ' ' .-1 r, rf J lv' nllvtjjflli r ,r ,,.., Et: Yi :ii"1',i,-556. 7.'-. I -1 f'ir'if J' ,M ,' -5'aEf?s'4 X 'ffl' ' alike, ffpjsgjfi salem? m'l'i'I"ji' I' i -,gi pw Y, ,ml 563: - I . -'H r -fe .Wfilu . ,, Z H, 3 . I .. W '1'.'1s,, f WEN. Ulu lr, If , ?JA rgl .wh fy., -i ,X . I 1 H . L5 ld?-li Butler, lf. . . . . . 0 Dickeson, lf. . . ' fl pbwiki Phelan, c. .... . . . 1 Totten, c. ....... .... 1 O -it Imp Maloney, rg. .... . . . 1 Prendergast, rg. ........ O 1 il-5,,k3,'if Aaron, lg, .... . . . O Russo, lg. ...... .... 1 0 2 Q Butcher, rf. O D. Grove, rf. .... .... O 2 2 Fournier, lf. . . . . . . 4 Van Zylen, lf. .... .... 3 4 10 'n -,W , L Christian, rf. .... . . . O Den Harder, c... .... O O O iwialif vfigsfi Yaeger, c. .... . . . 0 Haga, rg. . . . .... 1 0 Z , Dawson, lg. . . . . . . 2 Scott, lg. .... .... 1 1 3 r 1: - - - - - - Totals .... . . . 13 Totals .............. 8 11 27 wks", Referee-Dufour QGeorgetownJ. fb-ff '1- vi' 1 Pr I I' Ml ,ii . ,wx gif Cf 0,69 'X - '-'Uri ., 27 fm? n' ' f 'J l Lum H' ik' 'ne .ff 'H -- iff i Wil 'ISL-Ii. 'r Butler T351 :EJ nag, -Q r5a5xmk,,,W ,,.,a,. . ,,. .,, , , . W f ,fra .I L Pri... fp.. ', ,Q v ,E . , , j I "7,,,1-I -1 - 'IlIf'i1fr"'-lwS1'Efmf1f. iffy laflr-"ALF'- w1'te:VH"' r . I - . in .I r- " Lv, f'w'f,f 2, ,,,, ' ,fggl lznj Q-. -'1a4,,,,f'v'.Q.f -.fb -'. f. ,W .--41A-.,.'M,- iff s.3v,.pi ,Fila-.. 4.gg.frf:413,1l:g.',f' pg-.4l,H"f,.--v.,,,-jig,.rj,J If 287 I K i f' ., . ,I i ll f ip g From the standpoint of the spectators, the game was a good one. Adrian 1, ll ,l QQ ' L2 Q QQ Sw LCE? if Q5'F'3.,1fG,f . 5 42 1. TJ r V l ADRLAN - e-9 l HE TITANS entered into their first game with Adrian College with an ' a determination to cast off the hoodoos and jinxs that had been follow' ing them all season. Gut of five games, the men in Red and White had - X . 1 : . annexed but one. ' - 7 Perhaps it was the result of this determinationg perhaps the team was ar 3 Q1 actually improving, at any rate the Harbrecht men did somewhat vindicate ' P themselves. They turned in a merry 4465 score for their second win of V .fo the season, boosting their percentage to .5 33. - i iivr lead by three ,points at the end of the first half due to the work of their f captain, Bassett. He dropped five neat long shots from the middle of the i so that it' counted for Adrian, but this only spurred the Titans on. Cy ik Aaron scored three successive field goals, and the team decided to hold this if , in Ma . QF ,,,, ,B 4, , ' lead for the rest of the game. f fy Linefup in the first Adrian game: is g Y i -Q - Ez ,r QC J ' ,I 4 .Hr ix. is u " av! 4 'D gg calf, . -J., f x 1, Q , 3 W' li! , -4 . I ,PVVV .G. F, T. ,f-figfaf ADRIAN lkglll F ay if I 4 , V Pachett, rf. ........... 2 . --1 'J ' l 5 ' YQ, -- ' Schoonover . . . . 3 1 7 K f v ,....- , V Bassett, c. ..... .. . 7 1 15 'x . . Geisler. rg, ..... ..... 1 1 3 lxsxgg Reid, lg. ...... ..... o o o X Anderson, rf. .......... Z 1 7 j" Sheets, lf. ..... . . . O O CJ DETRo1T - - - fell Wxug Totals ..... ..... 1 5 Z7 35' 3 F.G, , f 'W Yeager, rf. ............ 1 ' 5 V ing Fournier, lf, ..., ..... 3 is -' Phelan, c.... O V Brazil, rg. ... ..... 3 4 10 Butler, ig. ..... ..... o o o 'V liggf, Butcher, rf. .... ..... 3 O Dawson, rg, .... ..... O O O ,' ' Aaron, lg. ..... ..... 3 O 6 fb! ' - - - ws, Totals ..... ..... l S 8 44 is w S Butcher 21.929 1:2881 ' court. To start the second half, Yeager threw a basket in the wrong goal r. r Q-neva " .1 H .Q-A Q" - a ,A- 5 . - . A , fi! r V A ,.. ,- K .--ff--, WN, 'YV' C11 f'l"".g-f""'w Q 9 . -'36-"YQ . e.1w-N-'PJ tml fs.. T' 95 ff'2'.f1.i Flag-.f vii A--1.16, , ,N M 2 ' ' it r -if -fri 24" 'S 'M' li "ff , an ' ' .,f'- lv w.,:s.y "'f1-if . . Jig! 1' raiffz-fS3'?i-4: .ix 'aff fi-.lt1.l "aff l.. ln '.:.-f.k.'i.'Q- X-'xfsffir f-i,'fg,.Qi ff T fail T f ,flfvq a 3 llfilil ', 's tariff s T. X A v 1 E R -pq .. -'.1g.,,Y vi. - - . . . rillff' HATEVER impetus the Titans got from their unexpected win the . i L f previous week over Adrian was short lived. They proceeded to mainf l.,'5f'ff, tain their losing form by letting St. Xavier, of Cincinnati, walk all over .f'T,f.1" them. The tilt was run off at Cincinnati in the Saints new gym, reputed to r ' . gs li be among the best in the country. if-at 'fu . ' Ah :Slufx ,V During the hrst half, the game was very close. Neither team could l is break through the other's defense. When the gun designated the end of klifilfl flirt' K .1 Aw-5 fn, 2 , wi'-ig flfifi' A ' -. 'it 1 . 4 1 1 the period, the score stood 9 to 8 in favor of the home outfit. But the second half was vastly different. It was well over fifteen minutes before the Titans were able to score their hrst points in this stanza. Even after they did score, the Detroit five counted but three points for the entire last half. The St. Xavier boys, however, were not idle. They quickly ran their score up from nine to 24 and won the game by a 24 to 11 count. Chip Cain, with eight points, was high scorer of the game. 'Mflf' 'l .J H-1.-.Vx 'e 5 ff +1 iff' Za., Q u v ifyj., fl .mf Lfikli' 1 ,L 113 elim . WSI' ,ig -VF Fegfll all Tig' Hifi xl, fill? Q . 25"'1 J ..-, -.. '1 v fill T' . wr y The linefups were: ,ii T , -giifynfii lj, '- wif? H Q .. if lla? ' . lsiiff 'T . A V 'lx H5 ig, W ll-f 5, e..:llyn,' 'ff HW gf liz -vial -i: 63,-if . K5 aff f MN DETRo1T sr XAVIER gg FG I 'f'--1 li ' ' lflifiill. .. '- diff' Fournier, rf. . . . . . Cain, rf. ...... . . . 3 'Spf 1' ' Butcher, lf. .... . . Bartlett, lf. . . . . . . 2 Phelan, c. ..... . . Phillips, c. .... . . . O fhlffgli A,axp,Lf,. Dawson, rg. .... . . Eagan, rg. ..... . . . O 2,1-,ff Q. Aaron, lg. . . . . . Sterman, lg. . . . . . . . . 2 ififgisfffl If ' if Storen, lf. . . . .... McDermott, lf. . . . . . . O LW .' Aga' Maloney, c. . . . Arnzen, c. ..... . . . 3 W Brazil, lf. . . . . Doherty, rg. . . . . . . O If,2j.,?g'A .mcg Stout, lg. ...... . . . O li A J Totals -- lk il' ly ,wt . . . . . . ,L:.,.,i uf M Totals .... . . . 10 Riagg! C' . 'Q 5,1 . . J br. , L, l nl ll 1 i l -J TN . J - . wi if r , 5 Christian Q. x .1 . .. F-.,.,,3 ..- M ,gyiqgfunxrfyhh,.1,fmi?,,,..-,u,,.r,c W f .y mf-.,fvj,'f',E',refQ'E:t 53233, r K 1 , Q. , Y ' ,Ar gl , Y .- wx, - gi + 47. 5,1 jsjzgogigzib 1 X p 4, XA qi? ,I fpf-Q39 Lf? Y t -:Kit 'aide-gin K, 1 - L- '-ir' V 1 ,Ami gg- 52393 Que ' .- 1 I H ,. "wx ,u ,Axial '7 sT. JOHN s UNIVERSITY View HE Red and White netmen evened the count of victories and defeats on their Ohio trip when they trounced St. John's University, Toledo, in the return game of the season on the latter team's home floor. As a result of this encounter, the Detroit ive had to thank the Saints for contributing lgfl two of the three games in which our team had come out on the long end of the score. Both teams started slowly, each feeling out the other's defense. If it can . .... , -1 be said that the Titans scared the St. Xavier rooters on the night before, . . . . 'wir the same can be sa1d of the Saints in regard to the Titans. The half ended jaglf with I-larbrecht's men holding a more than slim margin of one point, the count being ll to 10. But in the last half our team outscored the St. John's quintet 23 to 6 so that the final score was 34 to 16. Captain "Benny" Phelan played his best game of the season in this tilt. 1? He scored six baskets and two fouls for fourteen points. 3 The linefups were: Mail j . -fn its f-Tiff Rlxw75, 5525.3 .F -gi "QQ-.wi P 2 -131 I QQ x2,,,.4l:Q' Qffaf 3 ?gP. 1.17 DETRo1T sr. JOHNS ,313 , Fo. F. T. Ro. T. Fournier, rf. . . . . . 1 1 Nally, rf. .... . . . O Butcher, lf. . . . . . 5 0 10 Costello, lf. . . . . . 1 '-rfilvil Phelan, c. .... . . . 6 2 14 Measlcy, c. . . . . . . 0 lim fi Dawson, rg . . . . . 1 O Drugay, rg. . . . . . 9 gfigg Aaron, lg, . . . . . 1 0 Krusoe, lg. ...... . . . 1 j" Brazil, lf. . . . . . 1 1 Kotoswicz, rf. . . . . . . 2 '1 - - 1- Kruby, Fl.. Y . . . . . l '5'JVl1fYl' Totals .... . . .15 4 34 Kusner, rg. . .. . . . 2 .-. T. 1. ff Y Totals. . . . . . 16 .fl,f5lf,. Wf-21,3 exif Clif fi lnfllntl pill. lilly' 1 Q--1.w'.y3 Roney fzsvoj I 1 , ef, L LOYGLA . 11' - 1. . ' et?-,To'zwe:REiZ If T. OACH PAUL P. HARBRECI-lT'S muchfdefeated Titan court team came within an ace of being the only team to down Len Sach's veteran quintet from Loyola University, Chicago. The two teams met on the U. of D. High court for the first of the home and home series. As close as the game was, it was still a defeat and the Detroit aggregation took the count for the sixth time in the 1929 season. The smooth working zone defense system of the visitors left the Titans safely out of dangerous territory. Detroit's manftofman formation held the Ramblers well in check, also, so that the game was largely one of defensive work. The first half ended with Loyola in the lead by a 12 to 6 score. Howf ever, the Titans slowly but surely closed the count during the opening of the second stanza, and it was but the greater experience of the Rambler players and the fact that Charley Murphy was playing center on their team, that they did Hnally win out by the close score of 22 to 19. The linefups were: ' I . -921' H1 if in lt 1: -ti QM . DETROIT LGYOLA F.G. F. T. , FG. F. T. 1 Butcher, rf. ..... . .. 3 3 9 Weasco, rf. .... ..... O 2 2 is in Fourr1ier,'lfg ..... . .. 1 O 2 Lawless, lf. .... ..... O O 0 Phelan, C. ....... .... 1 2 4 Igflvfphv. C- - ----- 3 2 3 fr- ---- ---- 2 0 4 BiZii?.'.5g1g','1:1..1i111 1 1 7 if Dawson: 187 '---' ' ' ' 0 O 0 Deegan, ,c. ..... ..... O 1 1 Romer. rg- ------ 0 0 0 ' Smith, rg. ..... ..... 1 0 2 , "' -' " - - - C . Totals .... 7 5' 19 Totals .... ..... 8 6 22 , g ,Q 1, . gig ,W xg 1, . .Irs . LM .me . -. sg, . X sf wg 5' . ' - ,Y A 1 ., , , , ' "'9"fx , N- ,. , , -,--A 1,6-M .fn gf-1 , - ga. 1 fs., "1 fm: N 1 on A A-f'fiZ':.4f.f.y 1' 1 -fr' fp W ri.: 5 ,1 1 M emi is 2 'sf 1:5 1 1f'tgr..w 52911 y F - fo . f 1 so 1. - A FA F 1 . at iff MICHIGAN STATE 11 . A ai . N FEBRUARY 15 the basketball squad journeyed to East Lansing to Y yr l 'r V. receive a very well administered beating at the hands of the Spartans i f A of Michigan State College. 'D in 'l The final score of the hectic game, in which the followers of the Green ' -- took sweet revenge for the washout defeat which they suffered in football, , was 40 to 15. just as the count reads, the Spartans were superior in a 'F very marked degree to the Titans. Never during the game was the finish 'K.p5lfl in doubt for the charges of Coach Ben Van Alstyne displayed a fast' all passing and surefshooting attack that never faltered whether it was the regular or scrub team that was on the floor. ff . The high scorer of the tilt was Van Zylen, tall Spartan forward. He collected four goals from the floor and three free throws for a total of 11 ,f i points. Artie Haga scored on three beautiful counts down the court. ' ffl . The linefups were: In-9' 564 . Taller. n'! 'igglgi' 1mq?J'lif tail wwn. F DETROIT MICHIGAN STATE F.G. F. F.G. F. T. J Butcher, rf. . . . .... 2 1 5 DenHerder, rf. ....... . l. 1 3 mf'-1.51 f Fournier, lf. .... 2 1 5 Van Zylen, lf. ......... 4 3 11 11.44-,E Phelan, c. .... .... O O O Felt, c. ......... .... 1 2 4 Dawson, rg. . . .... O 3 3 Haga, rg. ..... . . 3 O 6 ff-fl. Aaron, lg. .... .... 1 1 3 R. Grove, lg. .... .,.. 1 2 4 T 'ly Butler, rf. .... ,... O O 0 Nordbc-rg, rf. .... .... 1 O 2 .431 Storen, lf. .... . . . . 0 O 0 Sheathelm, lf. ... .... O 0 0 F, Yeager, c. .... .... 0 O 0 D. Grove, rf. .......... O 0 0 Roney, rg. ...... .... O O O Dickison, lf. .......... Z O 4 .fs ag Maloney, rg. .......... O O O Van Antwerp. lf. ......, O O O -- - -- Totten, c. ............ . 1 O 2 if Totals . . .... 5 5 15 Scott, rg. ....... . . . . 1 0 2 '91 Prendergast, rg. . .... 1 2 4 Russo, lg. ....... .... 0 O 0 ii? T . " 'T f' ig Otills .... .... l. 6 b 40 all K W F Fournier . m , , i A 'N Hi?-1. ' 5 lan' x I' ' " ""f5rv-l 'T' S - 1 ' . ' ' ' my K all , -..-55 Q-g,.,"Qf,A,.Q.m,' 123 Q fQ i ' ' "ssh - f ' A '- 'NfVMi'D7"x,1y . - ., ad 5 292 3 f s fer fr T6 en, as Q ' esta O'lIJ'Ef'r seize I MARQUETTE M y p ARQUETTE UNIVERSITYS strong basketball team, led by their 2 v diminutive forward, Jimmy O'Donnell, came from behind to force the Z if Titans into their eighth defeat of the season when the teams played the J return game in Milwaulqee. The Detroit five held the lead throughout the , ' iff? first three quarters of the game. Cnce overtaken by the Hilltoppers, how' 425 ' - ever, they could not regain their lost margin. ' H T XC, Mtich of the scoring in this game was done from the foul line. The A, it Titans counted eight times and the 'Toppers netted seven throws from ff- ' p the penalty mark. The five regular men on the Red and White team J. pnih , Q committed fourteen personal fouls, a gross average of nearly three a man. J' The Marquette players were called for ten infractions of the rules. Benny +A I, I Phelan netted a third of the Titan points from the seventeenffoot line. 1 . ., I . , Q lf ei f J NF-gli il, if g fi QQ? yi' - 1.1 34 , 'V i a t I l ,f f " T 'Yi ' DETRoiT MARQUETTE BG. F. T F. T. , Butcher, rf. ........... O 1 1 onnell, rf. ......... 1. 5 . R Fournier, lf. ...... i ..... 2 O 4 Brock, lf. ....... .... If lj E -' -' Ph 1 , . .... . .. o s s Q Aaioii rg. ............ 1 1 3 1 0 2 xt . Dawson, lg. ........... O 1 1 Gonyo, lg. ...... .... O O O Q a n . Butler, lf. .... ...... O O O McEll1gott, lf. ......... 2 1 5 ij Yeager, c. .... ...... O O O Kinge lg T 9 Totals .... . . Q Totals ..... ,... 6 7 19 , U' T 1 ' W Dawson T .., T i ,S r ' --an fir: iQ.qgf:-vfify A ftp E-tmej,vff1 f ,-1-Q1 wa, i -M 1 a it it imma 33111511 A, 1-L-s4ta+a.,s ...ok LL-4' fs, 5295 3 1 . qi ' ' V- 1 -V - ... I .. I A , x "f"b'f' ,Q A I , I A a 1 'I .ifgelzzi if .MI ' ' ' .' ' w. A f - 1 i ff ' - I ' M .WT ' ' 1 W ' 5lP42fi73. "'w.,.r'4gD?El9Cf1ts'f fa. 55:5 vslfifif lf gs -' '- fy X 4 , 2. if " fit f If it 1 HH . "gag, I 1 i I 5, L ' LOYOLA TTER inability to score against the Loyola zone defense cost the Titans A - I ' . I4 another game, the worst beating given the Detroit quintet during the i I T -i i , vvhole of a disastrous season. The final score was 24 to 6 with the Titans ' t ,if scoring but two points, a solitary field goal by Cy Aaron, throughout the S .i b i-i first half. Loyola ran into a 12 to O lead before Aaron sank a long shot from the 5 center of the floor for the first Titan counter. The other two Detroit i if baskets were also from far out on the court since the Red and White , tossers never had a shot at the net from within the foul line. M u p As in the first DetroitfLoyola game, the Rambler offense was led by their I i ' y'i- sixffootffourfinch center, Charley Murphy. This player scored exactly half lf' F? of his team's 24 points and besides controlling the tipfoff, he acted as the A -Y It rf 3 pivot man on their passing attack. Bremner, who was playing his fourth I 'X ,f ix V year of 'varsity basketball, accounted for six other points on three shots T from the floor. ,gf - i p ii ' i ii The linefups were: T I W 1 we it a fQy I M ""' Ii 1 , fit K3 fviwvx Jin x' 1 I iff?" A 1 I gl., X I r DETROIT LOYOLA ' ft Butcher, rf. .--.- - -- Durburg. rf. .. . . .. 'f " i Fournier, lf. .... . . . Lawless, 1fI I I I I I I I H Q Phelan, c. .... . . . Murphy, CI I I I I I I 'lQIEg,,iI ISPIFOU, rg. .... . . . Bremner, rg. . . . . . . .asRQIi1"'f aW50D, 8- - - ' - - - Smith, lg. . . . . . . . . . . . .ff 503355 FE- "" ' ' ' Weasco, rf. ........... .g 1 ,3 638013 C- - - -- - McDonough, lf. . . . . . . . O f ' 'gram Butler, lf- - - - - - - Deegan, rg. ..... . . . . 0 0 O Lx tffiw. '- - - S , I . .... .... O O O ' . I is Totals .... . . . 3 O 6 extro g .-. - ... Totals ..... .... 9 6 24 KS, . W fl Qifll f 9 Q n X . fl - ' Pont i K'-fe Y Ian tip- I,,- Y iifiwlllifgx MV' iffflzf ff 1 V 'Ja 2- GTP? A "TTT,-N . --Q .- f' 5' , fx if' 1 ' ' 4' '1 'ily 0 it 'T r.g:1fs.,fwf:i,..,f1 It-f :U i.:f4sf1.:a-A 3f+"'4-s 'Fw nl,-'ill .fa ' " '- ' 52943 F . F MTowain, ADRIAN V , 1 W PLAINLY showing the defects of a hard threefgame road trip, the it ' tg T' U. of D. basketball team lost its third game on the Western trip and its - ' A ii tenth game of the season to Adrian College in the second game of this vear7s i 'l'l A , , 'Ji series on the latter teamls court by the score of 39 to 31. -L 'Y of .y Lloyd Brazil, who had been suspended from the team for two Weeks, in returned to the linefup for this game, to lead the Titans in their attack. iii "Braz" scored six field baskets, being Detroit high scorer. All of these " l goals but one came in the last ten minutes of the first half to give the Red and White a share of an 1848 tie at the end of the stanza. Adrian took r d f ,V the lead at the start of the second half and from then on ran the count into a fx", comfortable lead to win the game 39 to 31. Q 1 ' kim Both teams used a manftofman defense throughout the game and the I , shooting was hurried and inaccurate. A total of 20 personal fouls was 'A QA H , A called during the game. Detroit counted five times by this route while Adrian took advantage of seven gift shots. . The linefups Were: if A fl iw c x V7 ke - , H J' 1 l j l .5 if X I l J X DETROIT it Pc. F. T ' Butcher, .... ..... 5 5 1 ii . F ' , . ..... -. f- U Prana .. ..... 0 2 2 ADRIAN , Aaron, rg.. .... ..... 4 1 9 ,. , D so , lg. ..... O 0 0 F.G. F. T. iw .l Q, 7 Br?Zi1,Ilf. ..... ..... 6 0 12 t, f Q5 3 15 . , i Butler, lf.. . . . . ..... Oi O O Schoonover, lf, ........ Q 1 7 wi, Tlx 1 A - - .- Bassett c. ..... ..... 3 3 9 la . rj, ? Totals .... ..... 1 3 5 Z O 4 ' ,jug p J ' ' O 4 Ml - - QV fx I f Totals ...., ..... 1 6 7 39 ' K is ll U LU Barbour 1 i,i 5, IFJ is W 52953 ..,. we ,i X, ri, i. .ai L, f' ff ,fl11.:i' xv- rglfis,-Q. -W, - ' . -'i.l'Zlv. ,E wig- -ff - la-vu --' 1 x ... ' s .ll 'x -- 'Z' N- - H. 'Fifi'-7' JB Y-"?':Tf" - .J ' D . 'ef' ' -a it 'f " QU' 'rem . . I . ir.5.l-all 2 ivygfr- NOTRE DAME 'ig 1 ff" N .. . f -fl HE climax of a very drab season was reached with Goach George W- -'fri' i , . , , , 'f J Keogan s redoubtable Rambler five of Notre Dame invading the Light ggi? Guard Armory for the return game of this year's series. To say that Mr. Keogan was surprised at the battle his team had to ight in order to win would be putting it very mildly. The truth of- the matter was that he was genuinely afraid that the game would be lost, and it was only through .mi . , . , -- the use of real basketball strategy that the Notre Dame netmen did come y out on top. 1 ff W . . . Although the first half ended with the South Benders five points in the ri. lead, the game at the close found them ahead by but one basket. Many of ig 1 W , . . f, those who saw the game believe that had the conflict continued but a few 5, fg moments longer the U. of D. would have won. It was the stalling tactics that meant victory for Keogan's men, for they scored three of their six ling'- neld goals from this formation. Dawson starred for Detroit, both on mir'-X f' ' ' f 'isgffgygigx defense and offense. :fig L' iM'5'lJlif . C' If if The lmefups were: Lu:.,.0,' "and itil, jugs.. il lqrflj. 1,yhJ',1 . A Viral fj DWKV: liixfa i..-A 'Di l 'qi QD in' ' f mf-,ffff fi .f w gi f tiff QW: ff fm ing! W Nl-fx J' .qrggh 'f'7?9i'g'l Q..-if at l'.',f1'wq 1 " "-iiggi il is wing, Q '.' - Z 1 -H5 'J--,fx .' f.Sf.f,Q,?Q -wa fz,li',1 'Tal as-1 , Ui "1 'i -Y: . 'il is M girl! ie' 'Pg I P .iii :vii fi 5,5 J whip l on a is L. .J UN' Nfq, Qi wx H fill Hiker X a' ,'...,... I 7 IT mug. n 1 'ff' wwf Butcher, rf. Fournier, lf. Phelan, C. Dawson r . DETROIT 1 E Aaron, lg. .... . . . Butler, rf. . . . . . Brazil, c. .. Totals .... . . . Yaeger Ifiil9dI' NOTRE DAME P.G Jachym. rf. . . . . . 0 Crowe, lf. . . . . . 1 Colrich, c. . . . 3 Donovan. rg. . . O Smith, lg. ... .. 2 Gavin, rf. .... .... O McCarty, lf. .... .... O Rockham, lf. ... .. .. O Bray, rg, ..... .. . . O Totals. . . . . 6 .W I xus! r' 4-. if f' ,- ., mf ul -kt 4 by ,fer-4' Q21 .xt X, 1?x5 l. his 5-,mx 15.3 X an QM xi' lr ., am , . filsgif' ii 33 -as Q- - fr 7 -:wir ,I sh , -'Nl' . ff! in ,,,3N-A tv VJ 1: '. di- 'ff5?5i'll Ji .1 .56 W, .gl ,- 4, 1. f ' 1' 1 . i . 5. 6 -. .1 t'1T Q "TF ' 1,-' ' ' fist 'ifizfgs'-. mfg ly QQE? S'I'. ff.fX'X7lQflTl 4' ," ' .1 'W , . HE Titans brought their season's record to a total of 4 won and 11 lost in 15 games by taking revenge on the St. Xavier team from Cincinnati 11-j in the Hnal game of the season. The score was 24 to 19 with the Titans " 'V' taking the lead in the final minutes of play and running it into a sizable margin of five points before the final gun was shot. As Dawson shone in the Notre Dame game, so did Cy Aaron, playing his first year of 'varsity ball, star in this game. Aaron held Chip Cain, the Mtisketeer scoring ace, to one lucky overhead basket. Besides this he led the Titans in scoring with three baskets and a foul. The St. Xavier team was a point ahead with about ten minutes to play when Dawson broke up their passing to net a pretty one from the corner. This gave the Titans the lead and they never relinquished it, for Butcher and Aaron counted in rapid succession from the floor to gain a clear margin of points. ffhe lnieuaps vvere: ,JF VJ . of f DETROIT sr XAVIER BG. T P Butcher, rf. 1 Z Cain rf '1 Fournier,lf. Z 4 smug 1 Phelan, c. . .. ... 1 4 Phmibs 'C ' ' ' "' 2 Dawsonafg "'2 5 Eagan U-O Aaron, lg' " " 3 7 Sterman lg. O BHHU,H-- -' -- 5 3 Banknjli ...... fi 1 Butler- lf' ' ' ' ' 'i 1 Daugherty, rg. . . . . . . 1 A Totals. . .... 10 24 Totals. ' ' 1 I ' . A if 137- is FLT Aaron ral? url 4 I 52971 55 X? My M yu' wx Q W y1Yl7,IgN ' ,- Q ',,'x - ,, uv mv ,, vw' My -G 1 - fmfmf ,S m"z+m"' -- 1577 - AA ,W XX MQW Q' AQ Qlglgfgb "s2QgQ'5 il ,Q 'fi L JL v .- W ff ,f " D O O Z ' 3 7 g ,W 5 K9 DETRDI' yu X . foe? QB f f 1 M wx + -iw N P4 L 4AX Sew' ff I ' ' W GK Us A , ,O - Wv ' WOT you X405 S f 34 0,+ E , 4O15 I 13? . ' Q .Qi M l 40: gov 5404 froff C fi"7:f" v Q-' l pl , A p -n V V Vx 'P T 2 A . Tv ll .. q xl , --.- ww' Ll, f , -- Tw xx,-gf H, ,- ,I V , Q. J.. v3k,,V'1.4-"- A. X J' ll. "- lljqjlff xl: l 1, fi 9 "E PM A A' A A ' .r 1 . "' ' f . 755523 l IJJQRYQE .gli 111115, ' ffl 545546 :mf , -'B Imzfua l .lfygy l Le t to Rlght Nagler, Ryan, Dant, Yaeger, Chapp, Labadie, Keller, Schaefer, Butler, 'Dad' Butler T R A C K R Q S T E R COACH Michael H. "Dad" Butler MANAGER foseph W. Staffs ASSISTANT MANAGER Albert Nagler THE SQUAD john J. Bissell Milton I. Maher Richmond E. Carey Charles M. R055 fidwlll AE CSHPP Eugene J. Ryan 1 + 1 gnauus . uggan , . Eugene O. Ericker Gus V' Shaeftr ', -,'-' Duke Kiefer North J. Stockton ,F David E. Kun Archie A. Yaeger ,.-,LJ John B. Labadie Happy A. Yaeger .'j"lT. .Wal 1 ' gfimiif 1:3001 wig v f 5. 4 fa , . .if nrfaff . ' 5. ,,.a- J., . J, A .V i ' , Us 5 .arkiggywfftiflf-:1r'fa11i't"Y'-. 'Isfiffir W' - ..,, . K-My nw-fzfwgi 'raw 9- ir'xwf'f'i.w...+'iI. ,ff f A A .mil .U l .ferlif 5251, nfl by V:i,+fT"'i A if "N Lg" "Wi, Hr:-, "J ,f'.f'lf.g N-,v"7, .'ii w"Q'Xff.,,"i w ' l, 19,5 iw' I '03, 5-ii "e, WiG'i1tzf3i'i'44ifQf"v..N-1Sf,r'1i,gs:-.9?fL'1+L:av' ifiwfviefuaij , :mi Belt! '12-0-'fi t,,,..g..tj,g. r x .-4' 14 Rl K2 'fm' A f fffifiii f'?'l'f5 1' -1 is V143 fl i p 4:0 " J 1 '-rififl . r ff.. .yjyi J f1'i11f4'f" li Q 'A ' iii 'EBF ' P Jlliiigifi 'Ti I 'im' .. 'A ,G 'T fifilii' Q? i ygfy P 1 'UV' 5. Q" i'i'1,Lg,':, 1 V ,qj'i f Keifer if ,V E i p 'UQV'f, " ' fllvpaj- ' tx 1 ' uf! 7' 'A' W' . . V . . . . A -"Sp any AKING IUS debut IH 1r1'C6rCO1l6g1a'C6 fer, Butler, Labadie, and Kiefer reported Yfajyiy 1 COIUPCUYIOU, the UH1V9fS1fY Of DG' for the varsity squad, which was the first ifligilr troit track squad has completed a success' to represent the University gf ,DQtfQit. iggfjii . ,Q D 1 5 F V 1 ' 1 .4 1 r KJ--f", f 5+ fist! ,ig 1 x r U l ful season and has gained a foothold in this field of sport within the short space of one year. The credit for such an acf cornplishment should be given to M. H. "Dad" Butler, the Titan track mentor, whose name is synonymous with success in cinder circles. When the initial call for track candi' dates was issued in the spring of 1928, over seventyffive men reported. Working with this large, untrained squad, "Dad" Butler developed a freshman relay team that attracted the attention of track' devof tees. The first meet in which they were entered was the Michigan State College track and field carnival at Lansing. Ed Chapp, John Labadie, Duke Kiefer, and Archie Yeager running their first race for the University of Detroit, captured the honors in the tvvofmile relay. Later in the season, the same men travelled to Milwauf kee to run in the Central Intercollegiate track meet. Here they scored again by placing first in the medley relay. At the beginning of the 1929 indoor track season, Chapp, Dant, Yeager, Schaef The four members of the varsity tvvof mile relay team, Chapp, Labadie, Kiefer, and Yeager, turned in ine performances. They ranked among the best in the country. In addition, Gus Schaefer, Jack Dant, and Ban Butler showed good form in the dashes. Butler was also the teamis leading pole vaulter. The hrst event entered by the varsity tracksters was the annual A. A. U. meet held under the auspices of the Department of Recreation at Northwestern High on January 8. Chapp, Kiefer, Labadie, and Yeager were entered in competition. Def troit scored eight points by virtue of Archie Yeager placing Hrst in the 1000 yard run. The Michigan A. A. U. championships, February 20, at Qlympia, was the next contest for Detroit. Duke Kiefer was en' tered in the 600 yard run. At the start, Duke shot ahead of the field and stayed in first position to the iinish. His flashy runf ning was the talk of the evening. Alf though drawing a position near the rear iiigailig i."fif.4l 'iffjxl e- +R- V TI' 'x il -:Qi f' 4.52 . 53 nziiif f fi' Hn, .. givin? in. 'Q TQ f . pf' 1 ilsfv if1f3'i'.i 'ii- 'rl - . if it -1 .ii K 1-1 ff' f 1 . " ' v ' rr. c-..,'f.f1ff.'7lT-T s.. 'A fi if ffm ,mf A . f'O1j . ' ,gang ff l i. , Q fi fab 9 2' if ff" .vvf wm A . 't asf, 1 up X Y Q g,,,- ,, D Q, 'EYE ww Pg y- Q , A Labadie of the contestants in the 1000 yard run, Archie Yeager ran an unusual race to inf ish third in the event, Arnold, of Mich' igan State Normal, and Benson, of Mich' igan, being first and second respectively. Gus Schaefer, running in a fast heat in the 300 yard run was placed third, but in the final comparing of times failed to gain a place. A The red and white runners emerged from the Michigan State College ninth annual track carnival, held March 2, at Lansing, Mich., with a first in the twofmile relay, a second in the 880 match relay, and a second in the fortyfyard dash for Fresh' men. The seven men who made the trip, Chapp, Dant, Schaefer, Labadie, Kiefer, Yeager, and Ross, ran against some of the best men in this state and created a lasting quarterfmilers, and Labadie a halffmiler. Scarcely half an hour later, Labadie and Kiefer coupled with Chapp and Yeager tore around the track to best Michigan State Normal in the twofmile relay. This was the outstanding surprise of the eve' ning. Archie Yeager turned in a stellar performance in running the last halffmile for Detroit. At the start, Potter, Michf igan Normal's great distance man, took the lead over Yeager. He kept this place until the last two laps, when Yeager running with a perfectly timed stride, drew ahead of Potter, and finished by breaking the tape while his opponent was fully six yards from the final line. Charles "Snitz', Ross was placed second in the 40fyard dash for Freshmen. Craig of Michigan State Norf mal bested him by a few inches. The Central Intercollegiate track and Held meet held March 6, at Notre Dame University, was the next scene of activity. Three men competed for the University of Detroitg two placed, and a third barely missed taking a third position for points. Archie Yeager, Duke Kiefer, and Ed Chapp were entered in the halffmile run. ? ijt, , N, ta riff fe? .tfjis 3 VT W .ttf .ff , 4 6 Y impression among track followers. Run' ' Ll ning their first race in the Michigan State Y . fieldfhouse, Schaefer, Dant, Labadie, and - Kiefer made a hne showing in the 880 A A A 5 P, match relay with Michigan State to place Q second in the event. Schaefer, leadfoff ' , l man for Detroit, was the only 220fyard -T W man on the team, Dant and Kiefer being Dam , . if .5 'yil a-as 2 -. -aia." ' ."- f'ra 1 1' K T C A S V T ria. s fa 1929 .5 , 'Q 95f4..f9r2,fPJ5i A 53023 - L 5? 1. riff ,M W f"Qw"i If PM N7 -4' 1 '-..""" Hp M 4 1' N , . .I .I . . , a I i f , 'I gm"-. if 1 .ITL fx af ,Q TW f 5?j31Q1aJ.,.f'..:'f51-f W'-EJ I' .. ov uf lx., ' I 5' In the preliminaries held in the morning, itgifiliiihi ' Yeager and Kiefer finished first in their GA respective heats, while Chapp also qualif - hed for the finals by coming in fourth in p his heat. In the finals, the Detroit men sf- , , drew positions far from the rail. In spite I 7 of this difficulty, Kiefer and Yeager drew fG'tif'ljE . fa up in the lead early in the running. They ' X maintained their leading positions until the seventh lap, when Hackney, of Michigan ug I State, came up from third place to take the I lead, a position he held to the last. Yeager I i , fought hard to pass Hackney in the Hnal F 11 f 3 spurt, but placed second at the tape. Kief fi' I' fer of Detroit came in third, with Chapp .99 fp placing nfth in the event. The University V , of Detroit was placed seventh in the entire ., J A I meet. Schaefer 3 ' i I ' I I In the midst of the fast Illinois Relays, .QQ ,I "Dad" Butler's twofmile relay team com' me n prised of Chapp, Labadie, Yeager, and t b t d t m 1. h it the I i i, , Kiefer, came out of the battle with a secf Sam was ei elqfan- O acco p 15 t? d A gri ond in the feature of the day, the twofmile - nggirsgy if molibrumigrs Wie une tl fm The LEM at bsisiwmifffisiit 55523.11 golf fqiuziinilimopfgii 216655533255 dtcfdilg about 8 seconds after the Illinois runner. .55 . . . . ' Ohio State's reat four finished third in This was the hrst time that Detroit s relay this event- flghis performance by the De, troit runners established the school in inf f jf tercollegiate track circles. , 3, While "Dad" was at Oregon State his y i'l' ' relay teams usually returned home with victory in relay contests. They won for A the last seven years at the Seattle Relay games, twice during the last four years at 9 the Kansas relays, and twice at the Drake ji Relays. Q .N This year Coach Butler returned to the di Drake Relays with a Detroit U. relay team 5 which was acknowledged to be one of the best in the country. The members of the squad were Ed Chapp, Iohn Labadie, Duke ' i Kiefer, and Archie Yeager. Gus Schaefer, dash man, also made the trip. The day , SQ previous to the tryouts for the finals, Yeaf lgpw ger in his initial run on the Drake track stumbled and broke his ankle. This ref - I sulted in the withdrawal of the Detroit ' Q relay team from the meet. After a conf L' F5 Ryan sultation with physicians, L'Dad" expressed . ' . I Q U, 4 i ,,. an , , ,,',. was 3, t ' ,J-1, rs q' ' 1 53033 W . t fa, 5. ...x .ff'iYi, 5f'l'f'lfB'x-.'fl39.f .ff'iV"ll . f- Lf- ffl fltfiilffftfglffu I 3? 1 E3 44 '15 l I Q 155559 1 A i,1a .,. of picked runners to the National lnterf collegiate meet in Chicago. Ma QEWQ A . is i,,, QQ .1 Ed Chapp, leadfoff man for the team, ,fl-ivll 1 ii' 'l" Q consistently runs the half mile in 2:02. ,f,Z3'lf'fef3' , 'e,iq, 1 , ,Q imf' Although vvithout running experience in ,flsilkw .'.,ii h 1 Ch ,Cu C1 el ed , cfm? , ......4,ip:,,., Ii' prep SC OO' app rap. Y QV OP UH if ft'-iff V,i. der "Dads" tutelage into a crack halff mfr' John Labadie, a star miler while at Nor' ig, Avc' 1 , thern High, was converted into an 880 F F 5 ,f , man and has taken his place with the best. 1 VFP SEE' X 185253 S38 . . 1 E W Archie Yeager, of Joplin, Mo., was ix , rated as one of the best halffmilers in the 1.-ll':f'i.. country. Tutored by "Dad," this rangy 'ffm 3337, l l f'V Sophomore has steadily forged ahead in ":'1 X "" 1 :1 1" ' intercollegiate circles. He runs the half mile consistently in less than 1:5 8. Yea' V5 lahilshljieff Butler er is one of the 'lfindsn of the ear, and gl - . ,JM g U Y . 1611 should bear watching next season. 5:-1 li ss 11 - Duke Kiefer, anchor man on the relay U Qbvijffkf team, hails from Gridley, Ill. While in 'Ch9,0Pi1?i0H that Yeager would HUC fun high school, Kiefer Won the National Inf wi 21821111 th1S Year- terscholastic ' 440 yard championship. 591 Gus Schaefer, Detroit's leading dash Dlflfe fgme tO,D2ffO1ff HS 3 dash man, h man was entered in the 100 yard dash. but Dad has utilized him as a halffmiler. ' TU-Q52 Three heats were run, the two men placing lqgifl Hrst and second in then'respecdve heats 'ggfi behag entered in the inals. Schaefer ran in a fast field in competition with Claude Bracey, Rice Institute star, accredited with running the 100 in :09 2f5. At the start 1 Q11 Schaefer vvas seventh but vvhen the 50 44535 a yard mark had been reached, he pulled J p 'l-' -1 ahead to run among the leaders, and fin' x ished third. Bracey vvon the heat. ln the Hnals for the century, Bracey broke the QL.. tape three yards ahead of Elder, Notre f U53 1, Dame flyer, Tolan of Michigan and Wilf Sf cox of Kansas finishing third and fourth. 7 f.?"'?"V ig , . . ' Yeager s injury prevented the relay team Q from entering the Ohio Relays scheduled ggi for May 4. U The remaining outdoor track and field , championships in which the school was gfigy represented xvere the naeets at hdichigan State on May 18, and at Marquette on Tgggp bday 25. In June, uIDadv took a squad R05 Q f fi 1 1-.mmf -1'A'74j if 1-win -fir ' impair" K A-4 , a ug Y 1 1 - 1 W c 4 ifr5WfQecf'f"- 'F -Q- . f 304 l i .,., .lk .,- PW" .ii . 1 A 1.1. 1... if , , - gffpifffp - . .-aa, F - Y, ,A V ,N 'J ,F 4,1 4-,,f,7,:3,n , .71 , 'E' . F., ii,-si .wg kl., it-lx frijwx I , s E-Bfiwyfi-.lL,b'i . 1 i fl? ' r . .k-. Q ,gh-I 1- F ,. ff EL . . . , S 1 ,i I 4 4, .. 4- 1 . ..V, 1- ., p., ,. ,.., , if all . ,IV . l'if1.f-.25'2fff:5f:f+-4' A-asv' lim?-'.i mr-af" -' f V fi at .J f f i".-miwfl 1 Q swf? .xxx I tg, ,qvgp-, . l:.35':fii,z I A- i'j'i'i1N! 'CSB ,LEU n He runs the first 300 yards at a faster pace El-ff,,, than any collegiate runner. .il- sgfln Ban Butler, the Titan track mentor's ,PL son, turned in some fine performances as Wfafvf a sprinter and pole vaulter. 'jj ig, li 'FQ . Gus Schaefer has done 9 4X5 in the century, and 23 in the 220 yard dash. He iiaifgjm l,'l,1LQ', was also a member of the 880 relay team. ,ii?i,gf,'j Among the Sophomores who show igmfyp QS iff promise for next year are Jack Dant and M Bob Battit. Dant was rated as one of the ryifkf fastest prep dash men in Michigan while gffa-ij' at Northwestern High. Battit is a 440 'ja-Quin p. Iwi man who is sure to make the varsity squad. 41, i , , Ross, Carey, O Neill, Kull, and Green lquv ,NCQ 5 fm of the Freshman team gained much valuf ,l.i?7lifih able experience this season and should def i lgjlfizygy P, velop into varsity calibre. Chapp "fig""1' ' "X -. . . . E -'Till-L it Such, in brief, is the personnel and recf ijfif ord of accomplishments of the University . 3:...'2"li of Detroit's Hrst track squad. Viewed on Paper, i'C'd09S H015 HPPQHY to be CXC?PFi0U?11 light of existing conditions you will realize or unordinary, but if you consider it in the that it is truly 3 great 1'CCOfd,. I L I 'llfliffi "Dad" Butler came to this institution fayiffff ,Xp with the highest possible recommendations A' lf. ' from track critics and intercollegiate SQ sportsmen. When informed of the fact that the Athletic Board of the University E15 W of Detroit had secured M. H. Butler to j , , coach their track teams, one of M1ch1gan's Fifi ki?-5 leading sports writers commented as folf lows: "Wherever you find 'Dada Butler f . :lil and average material, you are sure to ind 6 a first class track team." Despite this high class publicity, few 1, students on the campus expected to see ,. Q "Dad" accomplish much in 1929. HThey in knew the conditions with which Dad" ftrgfg ll would have to contend: no held house, limited equipment, no seasoned material. my Reputation or no reputation, they did not 2' '-,ssl gg P believe that any man in the track world A p-'Lvl .pl was wizard enough to combat such adverse forces and emerge victoriously. "Dad" ,, -I ,1 f, Butler achieved success where others , K y iv i Yaegef visioned nothing but failure. fy, . . ff - A V-r 7, X 1 - Nagy, i , 14232 ' Q I -H .4 f307l Wg! W W 0 G D 5 , - iw W agp . Q6 W I8 gf 5 in ,' ' . t M, Q Qi vfiin KKK ' Vin 1 11 u 11' , 1 1 O5 O 1 0 1 O O 1 o X Q P 1 X X X f, X i 1XXX X -1 XX X, ' X K X . 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Xxx 1 1 1 1 - f' .. is 1 3 11 ,ND F-E1 D u SMX XX lj1X11X1t I 1 111 11 X1 1 1 11 1 1 1111 1 ,' 1 1. 1 1 XI 1 1131 1.1 ml 13 A1 1 1 "" 111f Ill 11111 3 U fl,1 I, 11 .11 1 1 1 U 1 11 '1 ' 1 1 11 1 1 1 - 1 1 - ' 1 1 1 1 1 1- 1 11 11 11 1 1 1 1 11 1111111 1111 X 1 1 11 1 1 ' 1: 1 ' 1X 1 1 ' ' - .1-rl... X 1 11 1 1 1 1 . X 1 111' 1 ' Q fi 'f"'f7f77W gehgrl iii 91,1 ' 1 X1 X 1, X 1 5 511 J XX ' ff .YY11', ,. 1 V- Lui - 9 'f'f57 ' GN Q.x,.x, 1. Q 11 1 X J - 1 1, ,,,WV1x, XXX 1 1 '14 W' A 'H W 11" 1 ff' 5,11 1' f X ' 0 X XX X A XX XLQX 1 'X 1 11 gf 1 :10111 X y 11, J 1 '1 . ,,1' 11 ,,X Ugijfg :I XX gf O 1XX 1' X 'LX ', 1 QX' 1" 1 1X 11 q 1 OX11111' 2,11 11 '1 11 11 11 1 11 O 1 1 1 I' X WI 15 1 ., A111 11 1 1 111 N QVQA1 151. V "1 X1 .1 , 11.1 1 E1 ,. 11 X1 1 XV X X 1 '1" ' A 1111 1 1 1 1 0 15 " 1 1 ' . . 1 ' X1 . A X 11 ,11XX'X ,,X X - - 2 X . 1 1 -1 . ' A X.'10X11 LX . 1 -fs -11 W 1 1 ' 11'-"1 1 if 1 H 11 O1 11 " 1' Y F 1 1 1- . 1, 1 :1 Q, 1 1.5, J Q 1 1 1 1 f,,,X ,1 111 !1,1,,N, -X ,Ii-ff, 14 1 1 7.1. , -1111 f 11 111X 11 '- ,zg , 1,455 11 Ll,XXf1f XX,J1XXX 1X1.gf'1 fl1.,1,X:X1 LX 117,11 ,. TXX1 will f1 !',Ty Qfrff -' "- Qi' L' ,' "PV A f,' '41,g'y:' W1 1 Vs -"V 'VQL,,,,,"' 1 QQ- ," ' I Q 413' Wa ,X XOX '1 11, 0,1191 41 ,1, 1111. 11 '11 15511 '11, 51111 '11 111 0 U2 A 'Q ' W fre' in ew . 21 r ,Q ,....fe..,, -' :Jw KWCIHE' .staffs lt ki - P A Q 1 frm, 'gf . A gr L ' Q ,f 1' of' lilly. ,kg nf. Left to Right: Boeringer, Shubnell, Donovan. Sparling. Howard, Massacck, Nader, O'Neill, Maley X ' I JLSWSL X I rd vw VARSITY HOCKEY RCSTER xi, Q . COACH my l Arthur "Bud" Boeringer K., CAPTAIN NL Vincent NI. Keyes tg? my MANAGER john R. Mazey f THE SQUAD . Jerry J. Donovan, left wing Charles Massacek, defense W C. Scott Howard, defense John Nader, right wing I l John Doyle, goalee Bernard O'Neill, left wing Vincent M. Keyes, center Leo T. Shubnell, defense y C John Sparlincf center f U 'A J ' iff.. l A or A fr' WG? ' Qs C fe ef ew A 1 w e to y 'fm +455 1929 e5ZSK,F ew 2' , .f 1:3081 HCCKEY UNIVERSITY CF DETRCIT hockey team became a reality for the first time in the history of the school when Coach Boeringer issued a call for candif dates last January. Boeringer was one of the best hockey defense men ever turned out at Notre Dame University, and it was his ability as a hockey player which helped put a team on the sports calendar at this school. This move greatly advanced the university's standing in the field of college athletics. Upwards of twenty candidates turned out for the nrst practice. Cut of this number there reported only five players who had much experience in the ice game. Vincent Keyes, who hails from Stratford, Ontario, the home town of Howie Morenz, greatest of all hockeyists, was the best of the lot. Keyes was chosen to be captain of the university's first ice team, and he certainly proved worthy of the faith placed in him. Doyle, who guarded the net for the Titan hockeyists, is also a Canadian youth with previous experience. The forward line was composed of Vachon and CINeil on the wings and Captain Keyes at center. All three being experienced players they gave good acf counts of themselves against all opposition. The defense was composed of Leo Shubnell and Scott Howard. Neither of these two had previous experience but under the able coaching of Boeringer developed rapidly. The players who made up the reserve strength were Sparling center and Nader and Donovan wings. Cf these three Spar' ling showed the greatest development and should be capable of filling the shoes of Captain Keyes next year without any trouble. The iirst game with Michigan State was played on February Z at East Lansing. This first U. of D. hockey match proved to be a very interesting one. The Titans started well and held their heavier opponf ents to one goal in the first period. But in the second period the defense cracked and State put over three goals. In the third 9 period four more goals were scored by the big green team of State, making the final score 8 to O. For an unexperienced team playing their first college hockey game the boys from Detroit gave a good account of themselves. The second game with Michigan State was played on February 15. A grim, def termined, and fighting band of Titan war' riors, unequal to the task before them, went down to defeat for the second time at the hands of State to the same tune of 8 to O. In this game the Titans showed better form than in their first game. Although the score does not indicate it, the Titan def fense was much improved, but the Red and White skaters lacked the physical condif tion for a sustained attack. The last game of the year was played against the Alumni on February 21 at Clympia. In this game the Red and White skaters put up a brilliant brand of hockey. In the first period the Alumni scored two goals against the youngsters and this ended the scoring for the rest of the game. In the last two periods the playing of the young' sters was equal if not better than that of the old grads. The stars of the Alumni were Boeringer, H. Cuiney and C'Neil, while Captain Keyes, Sparling, Howard and Vachon were best for the undergrads. Although the first U. of D. hockey seaf son cannot be called a success from the won and lost standpoint it was the start of hockey at this university and in years to come will undoubtedly develop into one of the undergraduates' most popular sports. What future years will hold for the hockey sport at the University of Detroit can only be a matter of conjecture. Its success depends largely on those students who train and enter competition for the team. A good team will always arouse interest among the students, and this inf terest will carry hockey to a prominent place in university activities. At present the equipment of the hockey teani is of small extent. In years to come it may be enlarged as the hockey sport experiences a gradual growth. I ,. ' 'frfffif '1- . -9 all av fi A A W anew at S -. ' , ff J ' -l -r'-' A . ' f ' ,X A ' ' . .- , g- , S r, l.r2:v4'5f:f3f-er S 'T k ca-6s5S5"Nm f A' .1 l - 4 , S S la W 7 zi ifl S '.,V ,, V ti Y A W' A -1 ' f. . 5 .Ml , is ,X V Lkiili' ' V 3, ak gf! R Q - Artman Griffin Ryan McFawn Cummiskey Brenult W, i l 9 I V I . . 'i Q '73 Q VARSITY Gow RCSTER 5533 I -X '- p - V' coAoH A E1 N j' Paul P. Harbvecht ' 1 MANAGER 'fy A Alfred 1. Holihan F-gg Lrffi THE SQUAD ell F l William F. Artman Arthur W. McFawn ,L ml Alfred W. Breault Fred S. Mclfiawn N H Mancourt T. Cummiskey Francis Ryan 'Ziff 2 A Thomas A. Griffin John Vxfhiting lkgl THE SCHEDULE ' h Detroit fl May -Loyola of Chicago .... ..... 2 34 3 ' itll' May -St. John of Toledo . . . .EM QM fi' May -Ohio Wesleyan . . M HM May -St. Xavier ..... ..3 6 Q XE May -St. John ............ 3 6 , fl' May -Michigan State ......... J 12 Q ' May -Detroit Country Club T A - May -Georgetown ...... . . . . 6 el f' ' S A S Q 9 We wr - A r F J l.. 6 53103 I 1 1, 'l r 91 f' 4 Hg 1 il 13,5 1 ' H . 1, xx qs? 1, 1 1 A .v IIA K'-'IW' il .,.I .1 nil , g riff, .1 trALLJ if ,5 it , 1 i H1517 1 In lf - ' I - gy, ,ffl 3 fm, 'QV ? I Y-.f lt ,A .V 1. ...'!. L ,.J, g,ayr .K .1 ' 541 .. ,,,y. '. f 1.1 ' I A . :NP In 'iil' . 'A 4 r . at-, 1 Q i?f" .,' 1 5. sl 'Y L' ajyg 'u nl Life. JJ? f i F2 'lik AW k',i,.wg!x. ,Q-4"f'Qlf1l1 lIll'fff5V ,'4?Qfif '279lf'15?f?x 1331 z..'f:lWl:?QS1y Qywlyw ff 'Q 7-2:1 'Wai+?'5f5. 'lv 1, . .V ta., lwff. QW iffy: HW . W .if I GULF I-IILF. indifferent success met most of the sports conducted at the uni' versity during the past year, in at least two departments of local athletics considf erable merit was shown. During 1928 and 1929, football and golf brilliantly shone among sports on the campus. With a decidedly auspicious season in 1928 al' ready behind them, U. of D.'s golfers loomed in the spring of 1929 as a team of wellfseasoned, thoroughly experienced players. As the season got under way in April, a nucleus of a half dozen expert brassie and midfiron enthusiasts turned out for early practices at the BobfOfLink course Most of these men boasted of previous rec' ords in various amateur circles about town, and at least three held tournament championships and were sent to the Na' tional Gpen last summer. Francis Ryan, Gakland Hills champ for the past three years, showed the best form in . the qualifying rounds played off in the spring. Ryan, a recognized entry in the national amateur, had his supremacy ref peatedly threatened in early qualifying trials. Among the entries who spurred him on to maintain his leadership of the local golfers were Breault, Artman, and Gummiskey. As the year book went to press, an eightfman team had just been selected to represent the school for 1929. Trial qualf ifying rounds eliminated all but the follow' ing from a field of over fifty tryfouts: Ryan, Gummiskey, Breault, Artman, Griffin, G. McFawn, Whiting, and A. McFawn. Judging from their perform' ances of previous years, a brilliant season was in store for this octette. Last year, in 1928, a difficult season on the links netted six wins and only one def feat in seven hard tournaments. The recf ord follows: May 5, U. of D. defeated Detroit Golf lege of Law. .wx m, ,.,. May 11, U. of D. defeated St. Iohn's of tj, Toledo. ll, s!if7f"'i"?l..z.. ,.. . . . T. I .9 ' ,," -fVTAllliil9,jV' '7f:..1,-.J T " ' " May 12, U. of D. defeated M. S. G. at Detroit. May 17, Fisher Trophy won by M. T. Gummiskey. May 18, U. of D. defeated St. Iohn's at Inverness. May 25, U. of D. defeated M. S. G. at Lansing. May 27, U. of D. lost the match at Western Golf Glub. The university has some great golfers in its midst. Besides Ryan, Bill Breault holds the Grosse Ile Golf and Country Glub championship for the second year. Bill Artman walked away with every title at Gowaine last season, and has also the District mixed foursome to his credit. Tom Griffin was runnerfup to the invincif ble Ryan at Gakland Hills last year. Professor P. P. Harbrecht again essayed the task of moderator for the team in 1929. I'Iarbrecht's guiding hand, it is felt by members of the bunker and hazard squad, has been and will be indispensable to the team's success. While essentially a basketball specialist, Peter Paul is an allf around athlete and no piker on the golf links. Under his tutelage, according to the team, anyone can play inspired golf. The local golf team is sponsored by the University of Detroit Golf Club. Last year William Artman was chairman of this body, but for 1929 William Breault was picked to ill Artman's shoes as leader. Managing the team this year is Alfred T. I-Iolihan. Outstanding among the events of each golf season is the tournament for which the Louis A. Fisher Trophy is offered as a prize. Bud Gummiskey was the fortuf nate man last year, with Fred McFawn dogging his heels a stroke or so behind. The trophy consists of a giant cup, which remains in the possession of the school as a perpetual trophy. Individual winners are awarded handsome medals in gold, silver, and bronze. 1' . I:31l1iI ff, .,,.. . Se: S 1 . 'levi 5- -- 8, 1 C -I-. A . ' ' "1- AWWFQ ""H .,It f-ff ,Q i SIUE, if-S 4 - . F -J lik . i 'Y re i - A "H" fi i Mg W. '29 13 11 f cat? A A 'til 'mr' vsfiifl ' uf SN, I WJ E? 57,1 'A- - V . K 'ik it jx? ,af if ii I X , TJ l r if .-4. ' J' Kuenz Defever Schmitter fi ill! f -,ui ., x. ?45g.gi?i AJ .,h. :J-ga, if? yi' 'fi Mi!-' may Q '-V 1 I 1 it-' EL q- w.',:w 'Kit tfifiii fn .. FENCING gh 1 ' I COACH fy ' W1'll1'a1n H. Caswell 'igftj W' bw CAPTAIN .A f foscph. A. Kuenz QL15 j if 'f"",f , If F! f THE SQUAD ,Q f' Cyril R. Defever Carroll A. Burroughs I Charles R. Schniitter Giovanni Giovannini ITM 'Z ,- vii Lauri mo Artronomo iwga Qlliilifl ST' . 5 f ' if THE SCHEDULE . Feb. 16-Michigan State vs. University of Detroit at Michigan State College. X5 Score-M. S. C., 6g U. of D., 3. A 1 al. . . . It-4 March 16-Michigan State vs. University of Detroit at Miclugan State College. ig Score-M. S. C., 9g U. of D., 2. 'QI March 23-State Fencing Tournament at M. S. C. College. Kuenz, defeated in unior contest. Schmitter won old medal for Novice chain ionshi . i , g P P A May 25-Kalamazoo vs. University of Detroit at Kalamazoo. I ,.-til N Rig? "1"sAj5g3" Q hm' at .-vamp gli - ' 'f -1 -- -N 'I f- J- ,www - -1- - "A-':-iz.,-igrixl-'A-Si: S ik' ' ' nf " 'C ' ' P -wa A-1. 'HP' "N 953 ll 5. " Q.-EL. 2-wif? ,-4, ',g.a.1 A I cwzl A . . U, , ff'-1121 .if -1:-s ,e V , . I fi "r 1' ' Y WH A . . v -. ,w V 3114,-RX,,i!fJf'mh'Wi . pw ,.. ,,,A...p-.N L 1.40. . Wi' . 1 -, il 1' msiixjc ,if 5111111 aff 'i 1, .. 1 1 fa J 1 11 igfly-1' Mill' "'Lr.,"'1ue"' 'iiLyf'Z"a.. "1 .f,f"' J--,, la ii 1' X.Q11 ..-J, f pug xiii:-1' f l n ar, .-.f My ...gi V1-if 6 1 is V I . V, 'i i F E N C l N G J if-11' ' if NE of the oldest and finest sports is The irst fencing bout entered by the ki-, ' that of fencing. Honored in history, team was with Michigan State College. r.ii.,,.T'i, it is a tradition from those days when it After but a few months of practice-they 1.gJQ"1l,: Q-,Lyn was more than an art, more than a sportg were conceded little chance of making a gljgjl days when it was an effective means of creditable showing.. They did, however, Q16 defense. Time was when its cultivation win three of the nine contests of the bout, was necessary knowledge to every gentlef a remarkable achievement for so inexperif QX1 man, so much so, in fact, that the heart of enced a team. Kuenz, 111111311 CY111 D6 many a fair lady rested on the skill of the Fever HDC1 C11Plf1CS 591111111191 90111l105991 jj X12-1 chevalier who handled the foil. Grudges this team- n f gllilyi were settled by skill with the blade, even A worse defeat was 111 Store fQr them Af,j'535Qw 'f Q1 as now they are ofttimes settled by skill W11911 they 10113111 ?1'19'CU111 190111 W11511 1' with the fists. With such a historical back' 1V119111g2111 S1119 13911011 W011 0111313 5111819 t. ground, it is little wonder that the art of 90111951 0111 01 111119, 211111 0119 91199 0111 01 t fencing has survived into our own times as 1W0-A At 1V119111g111 519159: 110W9V91, 19119' 1 1 a sport of merit, and that the knowledge of 1118 15 1 511011 01 101155 5111119111185 111019 5111' i. 1 Q55 this sport is considered no small distinction. 1191115 115' 0119 101 1119 1911115 111111 001159' "i. I hqige Sport of gagging was introcglcei to glpsgiyfgtlgge is a greater field of fencers to '1 1 A' t e niversity o etroit uring cto er, ' . ,i 1928, bl'-loseph Kuenz, a senior in the Gdn Igffarch 2? the Dstrolt fencfrsfen' , - College of Arts and Sciences. Kuenz was fare t 6 State emlng Oumamen. Elven I Qi? an experienced foilman and his activity in by the Spartan Fencing Club at MIC 15113 QW fostering this sport at the university ref Ente College' De Fever 1313? prmleldte . 1 sulted in the formation of a small group of .rom Cgmpetmg as abllfsu Z an Enury interested students. They practiced dilif mcllrre gnfln Eutomo 19 accl ent' uqnz 11' gently, and hnally formed a fencing team 195151919 m 1 e tcfurnament. as a JUIEGY' 1 1 that was able to enter collegiate compef- Schmltter 35,21 novlcg' Novlces are t .056 19111 C113 p ation. of one years experience or lessg ,Juniors I iff. Vxfiumm H Caswell mmment alumnus must possess from one to four years experif A .9 y of the College of Lavwpbecame the coach 35552 3812818236 gglligqergcutwghslliig 11 ' of the fencllqg team at the begmnmg of the Schmitter had survived the elimination ip g pf 1 season.. His profound knowledge of the Grind and had WGU the gold medal em, 1A XX intricacies of this ancient art proved to be Elematic of the State Championship of the lp xxx an.i1nVa1uabI1i eg to df novices undef his novice class. It was a tribute to the dilif 61.1 Q1 Y J ilaiceh d f' 55156 I Coidstiintly 131531 gence and perseverance of this student who fi, .A A i the artin is gil? tae un gamenta s o psziilcticedl with incpnipletedequiprriing lagnd l . g .L ' s 1 acquire a per ec ion a ena e im 1 -1 T119 90'9C1 51119191115 01 1119 11111V9151'CY 139' to defeat fencers from all colle es of the Q W 1 ,tl p came interested in therapid advancement State. g 5 31 tg i.. which the varsity fencing squad evidenced A gg-,Od Start has been made by the it - .1 1 Q under the tutelage of Mr. Caswell and pioneers of the university in the fencing iq V asked him to lend his- services to their def aft, Undgubtedly in years to mme feng, 1 velopment. He graciously accepted then' ing will be numbered among the popular invitation and the first night of practice minor sports of 'the university' Joseph ' found fifteen of the girl students on hand, Kuenz, its founder, is leaving the university q' 11 pf ,V V ready to be initiated into the secrets of the this year together with his protege, De 2 foil. Before the season closed the cofeds Fever. But he has left behind several stu' ur if, acquired a vast amount of valuable knowlf dents who are developing into fencers that 1 4 11 5 ' - 1 edge concerning fencing and undoubtedly will ably carry on his work and represent I they will reorganize next season. the university in future foil activities. , . qfiix J I at - ,f ""TT-by T-ATT' ' i.1. at if L f 4+fsiJa5w1iillLa.:2'we-aff' V- -1 -' y. 1-.vs ,.., EA'-if 53131 Q45 9 - w o M W 1 M Q '-'91 Y , A.. A,.,VV, 3 Q A 3 9 M Q0 '75 O -'K NN 1 S J ' N gg, , '-'Ez- ts' -gpg? ,Q H wg-4, I .57 S S V2 4' ff' f S W ff X 9 SKA MQYA fav: W! A 21+ ,S 'K 1 ifzrg. mm 'vbfif X -aw .A. , Q , ag Q f ,W J, 754 I ,fgfa ff iq ,il 1-Q7 a 4 2 Wm, 0? Q. O xi. " O 5 o ? ol xl O 4 ., , . 3 I KA ' 1 l,V X. " 1 Q Q X g "" K F - WJ w 2 3 if f LN 1 If ar 11 X j' f -T N xg? r 'fl' .41 w fi Q 11 , Q W' if 5' 1 7 P H5426 A ' H? M it 'Xi E Y 2 , A 1m,2wssffQ-f- .rf W' I' I ' Q I f f f y- , a QM I I RAMU A P TS pdsg' :'A ' V , L' . 1 Oy ' , , f g ' O r 7 M Oxy H W 1' - Q , ,xl ,K A or .J l OS . 1 if 3 N . , 4' . A T, ' 4 O M X ' Q ,WWQ , Y 7 N Y, , , ,,,,L,,U,u, , W , , J, , , K .-,, N 'N 7 ,W -, ,, 7 Q5 , , 4 Q51 L 0? 4 0? i M. 0? P 1 ,nf 05 Ui 1.. Ok Q flier , . - a . Ufllfh. it lea 1 - li 'il l- Ii 'gb EEL U . Mtg lf J J i fi A Vxuv l 3 "' Left tolRzgl1t: Top Row-Roehrig QMgr.j, Holstein, Brunswick, Iabro. V , V, A ' N ,A Bottom Row-Trombly, Moskowitz, Goodrow, May, Sullivan. ' 'w er.e IX . lf. CI. IB IX S Bild 1?lB fX.l,ls Vi i HE A. E. C. Basketball League was Captain Jabro of the Frosh team led his founded in 1927 by Eddie Ottenf men through eight straight victories. Norf ' ' ' bacher and Clarence Grix for the purpose V911 Sullivan was highfpojnt scorer, while of forming 3 Closer relationship betweell his team mates, Trombley, Goodrovv, and QQ the Students of the Nlghe Sehwl- This Holstein, proved to be masters at the art Year the league en1OYed les most Sfueeees' of smooth team work. The Sophs were fl ful eeeson and was mserumental In Pro' forced to be content with the short end of motmg and Strengthemng. fm 'excellent l4fl6 and 13f2l scores handed them by l gl school and departmental spirit among the h 1. . 4' students. t 6 Yearlngs' gxgfh The schedule called for games to be Af the Coiclusfn of thi Season each played every Monday, Wednesday, and member of e c ampions p team was Q Friday night after the regular classes. The Presented Wltll 3 gold Waeelyehafm HS 3 A im,p 5 scene of these contests was the high school tflbllte to 'Shell' fhle, filet, elld Clean PIQY- 1 gym, The presentation of the prizes to the win' r l The battle for the Championship was ners was made at a dinner dance held April ' marked by some very fast and shifty 18 at N0f'5hW00d IDU- ' , P1?1YiUg- The S0PhOfI101'eS, who had been The league is proving the most success' the Champs in ,282 felt Certain that they ful attempt in the field of intramural sports I 'M7 h1jfU1tt1effO Worry agxfut and Wollgd repeat yet attempted by the students of this uni' i t elf per Ormance O est year' V Owever' versity. The Night School students are to subsequent results proved the prophets to b 1 d b . th .O ears in ' M be very poor at predictions, because the 3-Congratu ate en emg CF ,H h i Freshmen placed a combination on the ehls endeavor-, They are eymg t e M U ggurt which refused to be Stgpped foundations of a new era of student throughout the season. activity. .tags ' sg:-LI Y Q "X-...M t 1 it fe' LLP- ' ' "' 1 ' eu' '- ' A , fsisq Left to Right: Top Row-Mullin, Lorenz, Gilhooly, Esper, Cudnau. Bottom Row-Schneider, Ottcnbacher, Fineberg, Reudisale, Masura. A. B. C. BOWLING HE bowling league of the Associated Evening Classes was founded in '27 for the purpose of forming a closer relaf tionship between the students of the night school. The league was backed by a num' ber of spirited students and was destined to meet with success from the outset. After a satisfactory schedule had been arranged which called for games to be played every Monday evening following the dismissal of classes, the organizers of the project cast about for fitting place to compete. In fthe end the students agreed that the Cadillac Bowling Alleys would be the scene of battle. The league was comprised of eight teams of more or less equal strength, and a keen spirit of rivalry was manifest at all times. As the league progressed in its schedule a marked improvement in the inf dividual bowlers was evident. Tom Mulf lin topped the individual highfaverage column with a score of 185. Cther stuf dents who turned in far better records than the ordinary bowlers were 'LLes,' Esper, 'LNick" Schneider, "Jack" Gilhooly, and "Art" Lorenz. At a banquet held shortly before the end of the scholastic year the league pref sented prizes to those students who had distinguished themselves in match play, and elected the officers who will guide the league's destinies in 1930. The A. E. C. believes that the bowling league is doing much to promote a high standard of competition among the stu' dents of the night school, and at the presf ent time theievening classes are attempting to organize a bowling league which will inf clu-de every department in the university. It is noteworthy that the A. E. C. is proving to be the leader in the establishf ment of intramural sports at this univerf sity. Bowling is fast gaining in popularity throughout the country and especially in the state of Michigan. The season opens at that time of the year when practically all sports activity is at a standstill. No ability or previous experience is required of a student who wishes to compete in this sport. All of these factors afford salient arguments in favor of a bowling league throughout the university. 55173 Tk +5 1 -X A 1" X' XLAXX v 5 ' f . 1.-"::1f,a1:sX:X:a.XA..-X X w,Xwess:f-ssafl2,11-XX-,W2X'wP'Xf11-:4fXfXir M33if-X'mii'1fH?:1Q:51:lbwX'S:XfLfsai,fX'afs1aww, e,i11:wMXw2 5" ' XX X -gg'-f5g:5q,g5 X ':1.X:g.wg,afWX:3f' 'k:ifLQ"L,'gr5"fl" X b'-2X.'Xiz'1y.5:v- X5i,,kZi5w9fE'iS"4511 -Xw , .,'5'P'Xa ' Q Q .W .f X - ' - 'X:P1,,,..me X.,f -X-'X RJ- " - X-X' Y -:EL-1. 2-' ----.,:-eX, . .-' . u-- -F'f115?:1sEe'fX ' X ' "' X XXXgX,+.,X:,Fn, .,:,XXi.XpX.gLX,1.fX.v ' XJ MQ' 4 . - ' 'iQ,9,.gg,g,,,m4fw,. XX X X e':X'b-1'-fvzikff, ulisf--' ,.... '- 1 25 1' ,P11Xmif'-W-1 ff- 4-uelw. :Hia 'YV' 'W 19 Xz,fw"'V2G'+"f2-F30 -3 ' , X , X " , X. ' X X X:1a2i'.riX-iX:X' X, riff. '23 F' U ' . . '51, vfzifa 'if 'W'i'2Lf59'ff2?3FrX9'V' Wersi' - ' ' X. 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I'-:1e' ,X I., ir' Iv Af .14 -a .I f .I A Ly " r 11 ."s,, . I , 3 uhm? .:.,, af . A 'reeifiifgtieelmifiiax ifila , it 1 A gpg ff' ' I' f f le " "L, if bil' ' -' " 'V if' gg -J ' if li 'v 'Y 5' 1' U' 'L eau-'.i img, J. 1 INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL ,--, GEORGE D. MCCORMICK ffffff President 11 FRANK E. JENNEY 1 1 1 Vice1President KATHLEEN M. KEHOE 1 1 Secretary I J. ,gg-F'f JOHN HUETTEMAN 1 1 1 1 1 Treasurer -as MEMBERS hdlfglpn Joi-IN H. HUETTEMAN 1 1 1 1 1 1 Alpha Chi deli VINCENT F. MCAULIITFE 1 1 Alpha Sigma Tau 1 . LAWRENCE J. Down 1 1 1 1 1 'Argon q:jk1,fig1 1 PETER M. KOWNACKI 1 1 I Beta Sigma P1 63 53171 G. RAYMOND YOUNG 1 1 Chi Delta Theta if FRED A, DIETZ 1 1 1 Chi Sigma Phi JOHN T. SOLEAU 1 1 Delta Alph1'Pl'11 tqliuii? I, GEORGE FEEHAN , , DggtitPh1g-Elpsilon if , 1 1 1 e a 1 a a il 4 II:IeAIi1Ebii1?E. ETEEIETKNETT 1 Delta Sigmallelqi lj'Q1j'.L.?y DANIEL J, ISARAMIE 1 1 De1tETl?et21Fll9hi fpj-'Bt ,JF 11 LAN E. TEIN 1 1 1 S1011 au ' Z' 1 IIQAJTHLEEN M. KEHOE 1 1 1 Eta feta Sigma CHARLES L. HICKEY 1 1 Gamma Eta Gamma mEd?.'iIT,,111 QRVILLE E. CULLEN 1 1 Kappa Sigma Delta dwg! K :?i'-Jjli BERTRAND S. SOLEAU 1 f-ff Magi ff'F"f ,F 'lx FRED A. KRAMER 1 1 1 Omega Beta P1 5- I55-1tf.im. ROMAN V. CECLOWSKI 1 1 Phi Epsilon Chi ,YHA-Q my ,fllll STANLEY F. KACZOR 1 1 .1 Pi Sigma Phi l1f.i,:?jf" FRANK E. JENNEY 1 1 1 S1gma Kappa P111 Llftag milf 21' MORRIS PORTNOY 1 1 Slgma P111 Lambda X51-ff iii- HARRY B, RYAN 1 1 1 Tau Alpha Sigma fJ1:f,m.ip GEORGE D. MCCORMICK 1 1 1 1 Tuyere ' fer' 'eu if HE rapid growth of the University of every worthy undertaking sponsored on the Detroit in the past few years has given campus in future years. p 5' 3'?ii'lil Use 'fO .the Pmblem Of fegulatmg the fre' Cne matter of basic interest to the stu1 I A temal hfe Of the Campus' Une ,Of the great' dent body is that of intra1mural athletics. est Squrces of Power endecmgtlic 10 SIU At the present time the council is attempt1 ef iigfiflltifeahflglliliitilTiff6251? ali mg fo fad a Solution to this Pfoblem- is I , . F ternities. Recognizing this to be true, the Among the council's worthy achIeve1 ai? university decided to Organize an Infefffg, ments since its brief existence was the move X, fl flfiitj-ty' temjgy Cguncjl to guide and direct the which Itdsponsored to encourage superior +I ,ry ,filisiiip Organizations df this institution. scholarship. honors on the campus. Sigma aj Laws governing membership and activi1 KaPPa.Ph1, One Olf the largest fraternal ties of all of the local fraternal chapters 1106165 m the COUHC111 volunteered to award Ti were formulated in Such 3 manner that a scholarship cup to the fraternity having A 'J they would in no Way infringe upon the the highest scholastic average at the end of 1. pi long established traditions of the individual the Seheel Veer' bOd1eS- I l s From present indicationslthe council vvill MEL I The time which the directors expended function more smoothly with each passing fl In carefully planning and executing their year. Being in the formative stage it IS 3 9' G1 fig project was not in vain. They have added working very slowly for fear that some , pgjgad an organization to our university life that is hasty and careless move on its part might perfect in its operation and presents obvi1 endanger its future success. The fraternal f i ous advantages to the fraternities. The bodies will watch its development with council will lend invaluable support to much interest. igiilrlilftfivfe we-. at--,. """1""Ti' 1-1.-is ffm-1. 11, . ., 'TT le ,. , ei'-ee, .1 . , . rv .-, W- 1 ee A' 'W iii-.f"Hf.g'-3.i. Y 'gli 1'-, Hiifill 1f11j,i"i'iIfle,',.gar if--5,-fu .,. it 1 1 Al A' 4' 1 iff giwff V 55931 rf -- Pet! - i ie' 'A .1 , ,pdttw MMBWNJ, , .. . . . ., . L f S20 3 ,. V, Left to Right: Top Row-Bennett, Ceglowski, Cullen, Dowd, Feehan. Second Row-Hickey, Huetteman, Ienney Kaczor, Kehoe. Tl1i'rd Row-Kownacki, Kramer, Laramie, McCo1'n1ick, Portnoy. Bottom Row- ' Riley, Ryan, B. Soleau, Soleau, Stein. N211 ' I .32 ,,,' J ties I . . - .. , . - " ' . , . - . - A ,--'- . 1 --- ,fy - f .s --,. A I .gf -, . ' -. f-. f . f"- ,f ' - ' . ' f.5ift5"'9i. I fv A- .A l xg? 'V I 5 f 'A V. r s if if f f A L P H A .C HI A. JOHN H. HUETTEMAN ffffff Counsellor ' I X u VINCENT M. KEYES f f VicefCoimselloi' C .-Qjfjl-.'I5,' WILLIAM B. GREGORY f f f' f Scribe 3 I X RICHARD T. FELLRATH f f Custodian of Funds li CLARENCE J. KUMMER f f f 'Historian WILLIAM F. WAGNER f f Se'rgeantfatfA'rnis MEMBERS I , Ti 2 f. I, .1 N ffl if r u . ,I - I j - I II .uw J - . 1 if 'I I L 'Y J l Q 4 1 ,." 'Az f b Ji . ,, 'ful '. , ' I1 A, j .ff I RAY L. ALLYN LEO J. ANDRIES FRANK J. BRADY EUGENE J. CHAPP JERRY J. DONOVAN WILLIAM C. ENRIGHT CHARLES J. FELLRATH LPHA CHI stands as one of the most progressive general fraternities on the campus. It was founded in March 1926, and since that time has never experienced a period of depression. Alpha Chi recruits its neophytes from every department of the university and carefully selects those students Who are recognized as leaders of the undergraduate body. The fraternity also insists on a high scholastic standin JoHN W. GLEASON NATHAN B. GOODNOW WILLIAM B. HARRINGTON C. MARSHALL KELLEHER EARL H. LAFAIVE CYRIL W. MEANS JoHN H. MOONEY FRANK J. Porrs CARLCP. SCHECTER ORVILLE J. SPINDLER F. ELMER ULRICH L. JOHN WAGNER ship had been stimulated among the members. The first formal party given by Alpha Chi was a dinner dance at the Detroit' Leland Hotel on December 27. Through' out the evening the banquet hall reverf brated to the sounds of joyous laughter, and "Clcl King Pleasure" ruled supreme. An' other social success had been scored by Alpha Chi. During the course of the year the fra' 1 K IE' mix, 1, Sli Hott KRD , Wi. lxgwi .LT vi. is li! sei ff II . JJ .f, g. f' J The main objective of the organization t .V . . . t d f 1 d . Q, .f j is to bring the various departmental leaders tlignltyinitlzge tW,.l?hgrO?fPS O p e ?eS new A into close contact with each other and aff Org mza jon' go megs ai? P ammgg Mr!! lj! 'jf' ford them an opportunity to understand E program? eicpagslogt an. t IS was t 6 one anotheris aims and campus projects. It rst Step ta anim t at uiectlon' I 1 .X mei . was this fraternity, for example, which was The ffeffefmty ended les long String Of jj instrumental in reviving the annual opera. 5043131 eeh1eVemef1f5 Wlfh H farewell bafl' No orcglzinizatjon on the calippus worked gglei if the ffidljltlnggieibis glvelg ln 1-ij. more 'i ent to insure t e success of e 3 ef Per 0 HY- 0 t emem ers 5 . I if I 'LI-Ioofs, 1515, Dim" than did the Alpha Chi were present and the fraternity has one V, 'T Q -Y fraternity, consolation, and that is, that these men will This fraternal body undertook a very beeeme 3 Working Unit in their highb' fl w x .I ambitious scxjal progiiairg eaaljilin the Hit active alumm bOdY- me J ' semester., ter eac oot a game t e There is every indication that Al ha , A organization staged a dinner party at the - Chi will soon become affiliated with sdgme I ','A ' Detroit Yacht Club. Long before this national social fraternity of note. The Y Q? series of delightful entertainments was com' organization is rapidly progressing and has g 3 J . W pleted a noticeable Increase of goodfellowf a record of which it may justly be proud. I M I ' -fl. . L ' I f' ' ri gs ... if 55. f322J Left to Right: Top Row-Allan, Andries, Donovan, Chapp. Second Row-C. Fellrath, R. Fellratlu Gregory, Goodnow. Third Row-Huetteman, Kelleher, Keyes, Kummer. Bottom Row-LaFuive, Means. Potts, Ulrich, Wagner. 53233 :XI I -II R If: 5. 5 Iv. we ,G ,I V .I , .-.I 'N W' 'QE 1-P 'X f- A- -A 1 . - .. .gm -. -. , I , , ,f ,. L 1 , , A at-SeffIR'i:rw A I fs. I fi! is I f f I G + , . IAM . I. . . I el em A JUQQQL K ' G E' Y ff.- ee, NQQHS I is ALPHA SIGMA TAU , lilryeffl' WILLIAM I. MALEDON , f ffff President ' tj I JAIJIES I. KERWIN ffffff VicefP'resident Qi ARTHUR W. ANDERSON f f f Secretary IOI-IN HUETTEMAN f f f f Treasurer 5 MY J. JOSEPH HORST S.I. f f f f Facult Advisor "- 0 ! 7 . y X , 1 liifivi' if I MEMBERS I DONALD M. BIGGE JAMES F. LYNN I AUGUST J. CI-IRISTIE VINCENT F. MCAULIEEE I I WILLIAM B. GREGORY GEORGE D. MCCORMICK ' I . I CASPAR HENKEL CAMILLE PARENT f E ' ggi YQ CEEORGE XAf.IiESS . T4 5 4 Mild A X HE Alpha Sigma Tau honorary fra' junior class. These strict boundaries make e ternity was founded in 1915 at Mar' Alpha Sigma Tau one of the hardest quette University. Since that time it has honors to attain on the campus. There are 1 'fait spread to nearly every Jesuit institution in many candidates, but only two from each . A the country, and its membership is one of college may be chosen. Often the choice CH the greatest honors which those universities betwen several students is difficult, and but Q, p 1 ' Q may bestow upon one of their students. E1 Slflgle Cletilll of WOr'Ch during their college The Detmit Chapter was founded in career may raise one above the other when ' f 'L A .... . the final selection is made. During the ref . ' 1924, and ipernberslhipfin ii is an achieve, mamder of their College days, members Cf IM? me? eaglfri Soug t .Or 512 every. min Alpha Sigma Tau stand as examples of iw CD20 . t .Z unlvegsgg' a mfchgalicfjge those qualities which make a good Student 'S ' ' I Y fmor 1 Slgm ues, an SY fe U 3 r ' in a university, and they are admired as nized leaders In the scholastic life of the the Outstanding leaders in Campus life. -'QL YQ U1 - . , I-gl Ca pus I Those who were chosen for membership Mgmbefship in 13112 ffT1tCff11fY 55 gfa-mid in Alpha Sigma Tau this year were: Ralph cj 35 3 istimct YCWHT to f OSC Stu ents W 0 C. Iohnston and lose h Starrs from the C' hav? Show? loyflltl' ,and Eiiidefed gf?-'C College of Arts 5 and, Scienceg Nathan 'fi fl! 53 SCIVICB to U C UDIVCTSWY- CY must H SO Goodnow and George A. Weins from the fp A p have distinguished themselves- in scholarf College of Laws Lawrence G. Riley and lg Ship- They bewlffle ff16H1bCfS 111 the latter WiHiam Perfield from the Engineering Colf Q ,wi-u part of their junior year and the1r.active lggeg Frank E, Jenney and Iohn E. Collins y II1CII1b6rSh1p extends throughout thelr 511211 from the School of Commerce and Financeg 6 I ig Yea? at the UDWCYSIYY- The Humber Of and Edward Stenger, Leo Shubnell, and R. T e T active members is limited to eleven students. E, Vogt from the Ulqivefgjty at large, I Selection of members to Alpha Sigma Stenger is a student in the Commerce V I .lf Tau rests with the dean or regent of each and Finance school, Shubnell in the Arts I college, and the president of the university and Science College, and Vogt in the Col' may choose three students at large from the lege of Engineering. E K4 I-ami . I I A wp fi ff if f- I v w I X 'IT Htl .bm -1- -Q ,I I if-Q ' ' ' Riff! . K 3 . . .3esI3.I:s S, 6 H-,,..,,, 5524 I I f f n 'M ,1 1 . ,kr , v ' ,' I . X, fa . ff, Xlifil , f A J, nf-wax I ".'5N'gIJ I xg xx, X l-5-' nfs' til K" H52-A W Q? :ff Q! fry n, Flu. 'W 1 K3 gym' W, -'QQ31' 5. 5-N ,lfjil X W , ,, f . ff ,if Ely, W. J ' ix f " 161.22 --,115 ' 'UVM 1 ,i nw4.:v, , 'WG 1 .Riff , 11 Left to Right: 'Top Row-Anderson, Bigge, Christie. Second Row--Gregory, Henkel, Hess. Third Row- Huetteman, Kervvin, Lynn. Bottom Row-McAuliffe, McCormick, Maledon, Parent. 53253 1 fr, Wm, 2 1 1 ,W f D N 1 , F' 1 1 A K K I .. Levi? KSN' .XI A J - .- - 'ER . . lasts? ... - .- E A 4525 A 4 l i 4 CPA I' . 7: . i t, QI, ,l:", Q 7 "Ii ' ' IJ ' l 'm im i fu I 'bk gr! .. 1-'x xg If I 1 VI' X XII. H ....?. ff . ii iii l 'U WML.. . I . -If f A R G C N LAWRENCE J. Down fffffff President KENNETH C. TIEEANY f fVicefP'resident PAUL F. CURR.Y f f f f Secretary DANIEL F. RITTER f f f Treaswrer GEORGE R. HARRIGAN S6TgCdHf'df'ATmS JOHN C. TREEN f f f f Historian DANIEL J. MOYNIHAN fffff Faculty Moderatov' MEMBERS A If l 2 3 its k.."!f'.I X Wifdf' ROBERT W. BLANCHARD CHARLES J. FELLRATH PAUL G, MARCO JAMES M. BRENNAN RAY G- FOURNIER FRANCIS X. QUINN I. .4 H MN JOHN A. CLANCY EDWARD J' GRADY HAROLD L. SAMPSON I J - .I P L A CONWAY DANIEL N. HARRINGTON C L Y S 'f HI IP ' DANIEL J, HORGAN ' E TON TEAD Q 13 JOHN Down C. SCOTT HOWARD WILLIAM J. STOREN J JOHN E. DYER RQY IRVIN JOHN J. SULLIVAN ,hs R.. , mfg EDMUND J. ENGLEMAN JOSEPH L. KREKLOW JOSEPH A. VJALTMAN f 'T ut , I- , il N ITS second year Of 21CfiVity OD the showed the largest attendance of any gen' campus the Argon fraternity has comf eral fraternity on the Campus. g filii pleted a record of excellence both in its Al . h . f h . . A own interest and in supporting the activif . Ong Its Support O t 6 Umvefslty i l l ties of the university. EOi1i5CSlEifi2t2eH?rgOnS have ff 120 fins, I w as a rea ro erf 'III I c'q The Afgons have always been conspicuf hood. Chief among the secret work of the 4 Il ous for their enthusiasm and interest in the organization have been the two successful Q ,J L ' school's activities. The fraternity's second initiations of large classes to the mystics of Q annual "Trophy Dance" sponsored on the the society. M . 24th of May at the Crystal Ballroom of the , I Masonic Temple was a fitting climax for a . A Ffedfe fhlgmer Shiraz agterhlfhe ficpen' 'ffl very successful social season and a dance to mg 1 SC OE egafl ilehp E .gas 11:3-O ten ,J - ' be looked forward to from year to year. mem ers W O recewe t gpm OH Ovem' I ber 24 at the Hotel Imperial. The second no 1 2, As is customary, the dance was featured pledge dinner for neophytes took place at 6-If. ' by the P1'6S6HtHtiOH by Coach DOraiS of the the Chinese Princess Cafe on February 21. fy A Ar on Tro hy symbolic of improvement of Initiation for ifteen led es took lace on . g P. . . P s P . football ability during the long and disf May 11 at the Savoy Hotel. As 15 the UIQ agreeable spring training grind. custom of the organization, long term .5 .mi . 1 . . . . . J All of the school dances have received P edgeshlps Preceded both mmaflons for .in 5 . 1 .2 reasons obvious to any fraternity man. QD V W the hearty support of the members of the . . . . 1,1 .. . . . . With this policy of long pledging and the rf if 3 Argon fraternity. Their Interest in the .5 . . . Qi - .A J . . . . . strict requirements of organization, the Q9 I . social activities of the campus had its 1 . h f . h Q rg, . . Argons ook forward Into t e uture wit 5 ,H f climax at the Colonial Prom when they I I . . . the expectancy of even more prosperous I I - ' carried home the banner significant of the da S tc Come largest fraternity attendance at the affair. Y ' At the Junior Prom, the only other dance A closed dinner dance on the fifth of I . at which a check on the attendance of fra' February was the ma'or social function of Q? ternities could be taken, the Argon section the year for the fraternity. V ., A , L K , ' . . . . . V . K I Ydv Y M - ff in X 41,9 3 ,..1QNJ lxymw, It Af gxpxrgb I' . Q9 e , Kat. -J 5- A ya sp p. .fl M . if J ,gg .,, qt If 5 I xl If . vfdflifaw A - U if . R- f326J Left to Right: Top Row-Blanchard, Brennan, Curry, Dowd, Dyer. Second Row-Engelman, Fellrath Grady, Harrigan. Third Row-Harrington, Horgan, Howard, Kreklow, Marco. Fourth Row-Moynihan Quinn, Ritter, Sampson. Bottom Row-Storen, Sullivan, Tiffany, Treen, Waltinan. ISZ7 JA 2.4-ji'p, I . bil. . fs I ours-aB.. . ' I? -f-, 'JS O o o O of io 0 . 0 c Os 50 o ,Q Q 9 X? ., I . if BETA SIGM-A PI i y PETER M. KOWNACKI fffff President .- ' Q FRANCIS F. JURKIEWICZ f f VicefP1'esident , ' ANTHONY L. KARCZMARZYK f f Secretary A .,: ' MARTIN L. KUKIELKA f f f Treasurer A ' . THEOPHILE W. WIENCZEWSKI f f f Auditor LEO E. Boss fffff Faculty Advisor X MEMBERS I ' WILLIAM B. CETNAR CHESTER A. KOZDROJ STEPHEN P. NOWACZYK by X I SYLVESTER A. CZERWINSKI HENRY J. LUKASIEWICZ ADAM I. PASIECZNY A WALTER J. DZIESZKO EDWARD A. MALIK JOHN J. SAUK I VALENTINE I. KOWALSKI JOI-IN NIZINSKI EDWARD S. SKORUPSKI 5 ' EDXVARD G. KOWALCZYK STANLEY V. STANCZAK ' A' HOUGH organized but one year ago, were present. The success of the party F Beta Sigma Pi has become an integral was so great, that immediately plans were -- part and has made its presence-felt in the made for another event of a similar nature. - life of the university. lt was formed by a The next party took place on New Year's H group of students of Polish descent, who Eve, and was followed by another-on St. felt the necessity for such an organization Patrick's Day, both of which were well cf of fellowship to express their spirit in uni' attended and thoroughly enjoyed. 'H versity activity and to bind them into a co' , I The primary social event of the year was V V sv A operative unit to work for the progress of Alma 'Mater. This purpose has been carried out in their accomplishments during the past year, and the fraternity has welded its members into a group that has given its constant support to university endeavor. Beta Sigma Pi stands high in the ranks of scholastic achievement, and has proved itself to be a splendid organization with which to co' operate in promoting the interests of the student body as a whole. The inauguration of the fraternity's social season took place on Thanksgiving Day. The Occasion was a dinner dance held at the home of one of the patrons of the university. More than thirty couples the spring dance. lt achieved unforeseen success and spoke well for the future social activity of this young campus organization. Following the spring dance, the fraternity was host to thirty couples at a theater party at the opening of the annual Union opera, demonstrating its sincere willingness in supporting the activities of the university as a whole. The season was closed by the Beta Sigma Pi dinner held in the ballroom of the Mac' cabee's building. At this time new mem' bers were formally initiated into the fra' ternity and became a part of that active group. lt was a fitting climax to a year of unusual activity and accomplishment of this young fraternal order. L . N,-1"" 'W :fx .rw , ,, 1 rw , nb. - L 'I . was f ff' A MF 53283 p Left to Right: Top Row-Buss, Cetnar, Czerwinski, Dziesko, Iurkiewicz. Second Row-Karczmarcyk, Kowalczyk, Kowalski, Kownacki. Third Row-Kozdroj, Kukiekla, Lukasiewicz, Malik. Bottom Row- Nowaczyk, Pasieczny, Sauk, Stanczak, Wienzexvski. 1:3291 V s is ' CHI DELTA THETA RAYMOND G. YOUNG f f f f f President VINER A. RATATANEN f f VicefP'resident HARRY E. RADLINSKI f f ,Secretary WALTER E, THILL f f Historian MAXWELL CONWAY f f f f Guard BERT N. BLAKESLEE f f Faculty Advisor MEMBERS MELVIN ANDERSON PAUL BADER JosEPH BEORLEY RALPH BOONE GEORGE BROWN WALLACE CEGLARER JOSEPH CORNELL DALLAS CORSER BERNARD DAILEY EDWARD DUNDON ALFRED E. FLEMING GEORGE FOUNTAIN EUGENE GUSWEILLER GEORGE HENK HARLEM MORRIS WILL,ARD ROOT CARL ROTHENBERGER OLAF SORRI SIDNEY SHELBY JACK TETMARSH FREDERICK STRUMM REINHART VOOHT NORMAN WHITE HI DELTA THETA, architectural fraternity of the University of Def troit, Was founded on April 16, 1926. It Was founded on the ideal of goodfelf loWship, to fill a need of closer relationf ship between the students of the architecf tural department of the Engineering Col' lege. While primarily social in its essence, it set for its purpose a higher goal Which its members have since tried to carry out to the best of their ability. This goal Was to promote a high standard of scholarship among the students of architecture, to inf still a spirit of devotion in them for their Alma Mater, and to foster an active partif cipation in all activities of the university among the entire body of architectural students. This aim has achieved a success more than Would seem possible in vieW of the few years of the fraternity's existence as a campus organization. 1928729 has seen a year of diligent activity in Chi Delta Theta, socially and in university activities as Well. Several banquets and swimming parties are listed in the social calendar of the fraternity's events, as Well as the regular pledging par' ties and initiatory ceremonies. The greatest and most successful social event of the year's activities in the fraterf nity, hoWever, Was the dinner dance Which Was held at the Yacht Club. lt was well attended and Well enjoyed. Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Lawton Were hosts to the fraterf nity on this occasion, In the field of university activity, the fraternity sponsored one of the foremost events of the Engineering College during the past year: an architectural exhibition, on May 19. lt Was the first exhibition of its kind ever held at the university, and Was open to all members of the architecf tural department. It has also been among the foremost in promoting the newly or' ganized Architectural Society of the Uni' versity of Detroit. 53301 Left to Right: Top Row-Anderson, Beckley, Blakeslee, Boone, Conway. Second Row-Cornell, Corser Dailey, Fleming. Third Row-Fountain, Guswiler, Henk, Morris, Radlinski. Fourth Row--Rantanen Root, Rothenburger, Saari. Bottom'Row--Shelby, Tetmarsh, Thill, XVhite, Young. 53511 2 C is , RR CHI SIGMA PHI FRED A. DIETZ f f f f f f f f President LAWRENCE G. RILEY ffffff VicefPresident CLARENCE HOUCK f f f Secretary LEONARD B. SMITH f f f f f Treasurer ARTHUR W. ANDERSON f f Scholastic Recorder RUSSELL GROSE ffffff SergeantfatfA'rms MEMBERS ' ARTHUR E. BUSH HOWARD E. BYRNE JOHN C. CAMPBELL HAROLD F. CARTIER J. DOUGLAS CATON JAMES B. FAY RAYMOND J. FRANKLIN CLARENCE R. GAUGI-I JASPER GERARDI E. VINCENT HOGAN WALTER M. KEENAN CHARLES A. KERN VINCENT L. MACENALLY HERBERT F. MCCLURE JOHN D. MALONE ARNOLD J. MITTIG ROBERT C. MOORE FRANCIS P. MORAN JAMES D. NUTT HCNCRARY MEMBERS ROBERT E. QUICK DEAN C. ROEE BERNARD P. ROCHESTER KURT M. ROHLAND J. FRED SCHREIBER JOHN O. STENGER BURWELL WALTER CARL T. WEAVER HERMAN D. YODER 5. 4.. .. JOHN J. CATON HI SIGMA PHI, an engineering fraf ternity, was organized at the Univerf sity of Detroit early in the year 1922. Active membership in the fraternity is confined to students enrolled in the regular prescribed engineering courses which lead to engineering degrees. Honorary memf bership is given only to men who have been successful in the practice of the enf gineering profession. Because of the exact' ing requirements of the organization and the care which they use in selecting their members their roster is never numerically large. Every member of the fraternal body is a student who has established a brilliant scholastic record in the school of engineering. The ideals of the fraternity, character and scholastic ability are matters of serious consideration. They are best embodied in the work of two men, Professors Caton and Gilmore, whose successful accomplish' ments in the Held of engineering stand as an example for the fraternity. Professor John Caton, automotive engineer, and former cofordinator at the university, is an honorf ary member. At a banquet given at Webster Hall on February 9, 1929, Prof DAVID P. GILMORE fessor David P. Gilmore, M.S., civil en' gineer, was granted the honorary degree. In these two men the fraternity has the best representatives of the engineering profession. In Cctober Chi Sigma Phi initiated a choice selection of pledges into the order. The first social event after the adoption of the new members was a stag party at Birmf ingham on November 2. This party was followed by a dance at Clinton Valley Country Club which proved to be an un' usual social success. At regular intervals throughout the school year the fraternity gave informal parties of a strictly closed nature. In April the Chi Sigs sponsored a dance at the Lee Plaza which duplicated their earlier social achievements. The climax of the organizations social season came on June 15 when they staged their semifannual banquet at Webster Hall. Every member of the fraternity was en' thusiastic in his praise of this dinner party. Chi Sigma Phi is pledged to the promo' tion of the interests of the engineering def partment and of the university as a whole. 53323 . I 'I' J,,f,'N R, rl-. Q A 1 Li . will I N 5.1, Isl. fe- 's 4' if 1 YN: f.,:i3.?l1 'udffif r In! V, , it f I Iihitllrf :lint F' Jnlilfi .V lift JA: f". ' X -2 ., 'L-f . WW '- l me rl, E! H 'M-IU "P i -Hitt J "'l E - rl ' ., .5 f..,L-If -'iflib I iff" ., if FI. J 4 ,. IJ Wd..- .-J:-. iii-al .H R 't .-5' .K 51,15 fr- .. ,Y-I 11.1 flax Jw if 14 fin. F' 1, M1 .Eg J rj 51,- . .. VI.: sf, ff., in 3 R 5 ,J 1 R 'i. ,. ft, . I." 1 rtlii lf' "- z, X Zi. f ' C il '- iuvgy. v .Sf lf 5 pt.: in'a"'," V 'wi K Q .I : Q ur - I f t 'zu -in .x I., xjsliq. ily 'Q' I I fa: f -..,+.1'? . 4 . r' : I 1. .jill r H N 3 ' ,. -I lm I ' W7 fx ., I7 Left to Right: Top Row-Anderson, Campbell, Cartier, Caton, Dietz., Fay. Second Row--Franklin, Gaugh Gerardi, Grose, Hogan. Third Row-Houck, Keenan, Kern, Maclinally, McClure. Fourth Row-Malone Mittig, Moore, Moran, Nutt. Fifth Row-Quick, Riley, Robb, Rochester, Rohland, Bottom Row-Schreiber, Smith, Stenger, Walter, Weaver, Yader. 53533 -Q ii? 57' c I, - ' I t i t SRE' DELTA ALPHA PHI JOHN T. SOLEAU ffffffff President CARL E. SIMEK f f VicefPresident JOHN VON ROSEN f 1fff Secretary KENNETH H. CARR f f Corresponding Secretary I JAMES J. BRITT f f ffff Treasurer RUSSELL E. LAWRENCE fffff Faculty Advisor Mernbers DONALD M. BIGGE ANTHONY J. KRONK CHARLES J. RONEY JOSEPH D. CASSIDY JOSEPH J- KRONK CHARLES J. SHIERS WILLIAM A, GIIARNIERI RAYMOND J. LEWIS BERTRAND R. SOLEAU WILERED T. HANLON FRANCIS MANER WALDO J. SIMON LOUIS L, HART JOHN N. NIKODEMUS EDWIN C. THEISEN JOSEPH A. POWERS FTER a rigid reorganization at the bee ginning of the year, Delta Alpha Phi fraternity embarked on What proved to be One of the most successful years of its career as a campus organization. Its activf ity in university functions has been varied and effective, and has been a constant ref flection of honor to its members. It has fused its spirit into all Works of the student body and consequently has contributed greatly to the university's progress. Among the activities of its members are numbered offices on the Union Board of Governors, membership on the debating teams, committee places on the Junior Prom, managerial capacities on the Union Opera, achievement of letters on the foot' ball team, and numerous other minor Serv' ices. Such is the material of Which fra' ternities should be composed, and such is the value of a fraternity to a university. To organize its members into a force that Will Work for the university as a Whole is an ideal for all fraternities to follow. Delta Alpha took some of the univerf sity's most prominent lOWer classmen into its fold during the year, building an able organization that will carry on the Work of the fraternity When the present members have become inactive. The annual initiaf tion banquet Was held the evening of May 11 at the Statler Hotel. Russell E. Lawrf ence, dean of the College of Engineering, was guest of honor and Was presented With an honorary membership in the fraternity. He Will act as faculty advisor for the organization. After the formal rituals prior to the banquet, ten pledges Were bee stowed With their fraternity pins. The social activities of the fraternity for the year sparkled With a number of inf formal parties for the members held at the various country clubs near the city. These affairs Were most enjoyable and created a unity of spirit among the members that nothing else can quite accomplish. The big social event of the fraternity's calendar Was their annual dinner dance given at Crosse Ile Country Club on the evening of May 24. The dance commemorated the tenth anniversary of the fraternity, Delta Alpha Phi being the oldest recognized fraternal body on the campus. The dance was a fitting close for a social season Without an equal in the fraternity's history. The beginning of the year saw a decade ence in the morale of Delta Alpha Phi. The season's end saw a rejuvenated organif zation as strong as any on the campus. The activity of its members and a new fraternal spirit resulting from it, saved the organization from apparent disintegration and alloWed it to assume its rightful role as one of .the most prominent fraternal bodies on the campus as Well as one of the most active. 55343 Left to Right: Top Row-Bigge, Carr, Powers. Second Row-Simek, Simon, B. Soleau. Thivd Row-J. Soleau, Tamplin, Theisen. fsssj " V: if-A K K ' 3. fa . Q' H' DELTA PHI EPSILCN GEORGE W. FEEHAN 1 1 1 1 HERBERT F. SLOWINSKI FRANK I. MCELROY f STAFFORD I. CLEMENT f JOHN A. RUSSELL 1 SAMUEL 1. HOEXTER ANTHONY L. ALSOBROOK F. MCLEAN ALEXANDER WILLIAM J. ATHANSON DORION C. BECKETT AMBROSE P. DOHERTY WALTER J. FEEHAN GEORGE GATES GEORGE E. GOECHEGAN MEMBERS CHARLES E. JAMES RICHARD F. KOBETIS EDWARD T. LAU WILLIAM H. LYNCH LEO J. MCGAULEY FREDERICK C. MANNEBACH ARMAND E. MICHON WILLIAM MILLER 1 f President VicefP'residev1t f Secretary f Treasurer Faculty Advisor I Faculty Advisor H.ARRY W. MOREAU NICHOLAS SARAVOLATZ EDMOND K. STARK ROBERT H. THOMAS JAMES J. WARD HOWARD H. WOBROCK ALFRED H. WOLF CHARLES L. YESBEKA HETA is the University of Detroit chapter of Delta Phi Epsilon, national foreign trade fraternity. This order, which originated in 1919 at Georgetown Unif versity, has become one of the largest and most powerful in its field, and now includes chapters in many universities in all parts of the United States. Its influence is felt inf ternationally as its members may be found in every part of the world where they have entered foreign trade business. The purposes of the fraternity are to promote goodfellowship among persons studying or engaged in foreign trade work, to inspire a spirit of loyalty for its Alma Mater, to assist in the development of the international commerce of the United States, and to aid every member in the realization of his ambitions and his ideals. Delta Phi Epsilon, being a professional fraternity, most of Theta chapter's activities are of a professional nature. There are two meetings held each month, one a business meeting and the other a dinner gathering devoted to discussions and talks by men who are actively engaged in foreign trade. Several informal parties are held each year, and two formal dinner dances. The preflsenten dinner dance was held in Feb' ruary this year at the Seward Hotel, and the springtime dinner dance was given May 29 in the Grand Ballroom of the Statler Hotel. Theta chapter is the donor of the Rev. Henry W. Otting gold award presented each year to the most worthy student in the foreign trade department of the College of Commerce and Finance. The award is given in memory of the late Rev. Henry W. Gtting, SJ., past regent of the uni' versity and past honored member of Theta Chapter. A smoker for the pledges of the fraternity was given in February of this year. The neophyte class was initiated into the chap' ter late in March. Plans are being made at present for the opening of a fraternity house for Theta Chapter next fall. The growth in membership has made a home for the organization a necessity. It will be located in the downtown section of the city near the university. . "- if, , I P-.3 3261- C J lf L- l Y E'-fa ff'-.:"N M., 3 K... Mg! - +I 1. gl' wt. ' fag if if'sI,f 1 -. ..- -' x I . rl- w, If .v F' Ni' ,R tbl 9' ., ,f 1:,Y , 'f 1- ' ' iv if?-'f ' ., 5.-. -A A '1 f'ifi1-in 135.1 7.1 ka, J I ,fx fi 'Y let! .1 . iff' Q24 f .fu ' ff . :gpg , Li I: ,,. fra? I ".. pf 145-.ki lzfi Yffjjigz iv M- .M .W ,. 3322.3 Alf? F 'Q . Wi lffqrij ff .7 I-. 'I Q? car: Q,Ig,..., .ij irg. Riff 5 H-ff :li ,iw yu. i,',,',F"::,e .v fx "' "Vi, , t ""if'l5 I- :M I- :ap .. Left to Right: 'Top Row-Alsobrook, Athanson, Beckett, Clement, Doherty. Second Row-G. Feehan, W. Feehan, Gates, Kobetitis, Lau. Third Row-Lynch, McGaugley, Mannebach, Michon. Fourth Row- Miller, Moreau, Saravoltz, Slowinski, Stark. Bottom Row-Thomas, Ward, Wobrock, Wolf, Yesbera 53573 ei '94 ll 'Sm . .5 R DELTA P1 KAPPA LAWRENCE G. RILEY f fffff President CLARENCE J. KUMMER f f f f VicefPresident JOSEPH A. POWERS f f f Recording Secretary JAMES M. COLLINS f f Corresponding Secretary RALPH W. BOONE ffff Treasurer WALTER E. THILL f Historian MEMBERS LEO J. ANDRIES JAMES J. BRITT JOSEPH F. CORNELL F. DONALD CARNEY JERRY J. DONOVAN CHARLES J. FELLRATH ELTA Pl KAPPA, the only honorary journalistic fraternity on the campus, has again taken an active lead in the social and scholastic functions of the university. The outstanding success of the Scribes' social calendar was the Pifl Pirate Ball held at the Detroit Armory on Qctober 31. This dance was a revival of the costume balls which were given several years pref viously by Delta Pi Kappa. The acclaim given it by those attending was of such a nature as to insure its repetition next year. Cn May 8, Delta Pi Kappa gave its an' nual dinner dance at the Eox and Hounds Inn at Birmingham. Already established as one of the most enjoyable affairs of the school year, the 1929 dinner dance lived up to its enviable reputation, and more than Hfty couples participated in the gayef ties of the evening. As members of Delta Pi Kappa are ref cruited from students Working on univerf sity publications, the number of pledge' ships is limited each year to only those who take an active part in journalistic en' terprises. Five members of the Varsity News and TOWER staffs were initiated into the ranks of the Scribes at the end of the present school year. NED B. FITZPATRICK RALPH C. JOHNSTON PAUL MARCO GEORGE MEYERS ARTHUR OQCONNOR W. J. SIMON PHILIP STACKPOLE JOSEPH STARRS ERNEST TAMPLIN JOHN TREEN The fraternity numbers among its mem' bers men who have merited reward for their activities in student affairs. The Organization in the last year sup' ported all student enterprises and was par' ticularly prominent at the Junior Prom. The fraternity box which the members maintained for its guests was the center of jollity. When the Union announced their third annual opera the members of Delta Pi Kappa pledged their support to the enter' prise and several of their number acted as the keystone of the committee. On the opening night of the show the entire fra' ternity was present en masse. Another project which owes much of its success to Delta Pi Kappa is the 1929 '-l1OWER. It was through the initiative of a small number of men in this fraternal body that the TOWER was able to adopt its present commendable policy of expansion. Delta Pi Kappa seeks to instill in the hearts of its members the ideals of clean and ethical journalism. It affords those having journalistic tendencies the opporf tunity to expand them in the interests of the university. f338J Q4 527, Z1-Ar..--I-T j aj , 1 w, 4 ,.,, N JN iq. 52, f ,: z "-4.1',,1.v. ' .WM 1 is 6 ,-.-g 1. H' 15'-ln F-1- Es, ffl lr 1 '- , ffm, 'PT' fa . ltgfgx ll rg- U 1 ijt ifka, . 3 'H HETSMII . "lx 'xilllhl i ,.. W. '1.l.:,:.! ifigfili . MW 'LWB kr! lfabk alll , n Q.. 539 Q All .751 fda! J Q!!! gyliff ' QC? ,iw , di Y w .M P Q aff 559 l 422:15 ICU . A30 ! Xhlxri Wwlh. N j Pain ' :+wW V l jf? lil Fi, rl lilfflll me " .392 fziflfrffr .- A -fm If 1. V. - .y v-, , MQFW' 'p 'Ml ,fy V' , , N fag, rl! 'Epi VA Wt . - ffl g A. 1, QL FAM? r-"9-A x..-iii? ill -x in --y. K, ,, 7,4 , , v 4 k 1 . .hx ,.. ,.:-'ffgbf'-,.""V ,ln-L, YQAV if? .v fi, L. , I ' -..--'-Q N 4- I H 1 1 ,.'. A IH' . ,, - A - . + - ,.lf"Nm W lflfn.. 1 1+ f f' .Q .- 4 A r 'Q ' 1 f m' . . I , -31,,A..'..-,s-- -.'-- 9, Y, .M . ,v .- ,- - , X 1, , l 1 Q 'rl 'Q , , ,Tw-N, .., ' ' - whlfiw ,, V121-,kdm Ffh' qw., m. li 14. J 21,1 eng: vf x 1 .Left to Right: Top Row-Andries, Boone, Carney, Collins. Second Row-Cornell, Donovan, Fellrath, Fxtzpatuck Third Row-Johnston, Kummer, Ma1'co, Meyers, Fourth Row-O'Connor, Powers, Riley, Simon Fifth Row-Stackpoole, Starrs, Tamplin, Thill, Treen. ':. HW' V, :KK-ll As .MW Y H ,NKJV ,921-H-J,11, 1, ,ML -W Q, -. . . . . . .v"lf,d,3.1- - 1,g,--3',f"'-.,T:- Q, ,aff r 1. ,Lf .4 ,. 1 . Q ' -TA' '- 2 . ,gpm V 5,5"'4gfg' ' 15533 ?x1'.k,3 .QL --Nj, qw" .. A .l .Q " .X 2 ' 'Lp of 1. if . . i' 4 , ,, J 1 r" ,vi '1- , ww , 'J ,fm 4 -V , " ' : , - ,, J . ' 1'3:ff, ,, ,W N ,uf V ig "?f.gS1Wg "+,:.s132g35f' '-fini,'1.Q,g,.Qf"yf 5 wx' ' w' f' sf f f.. A '-4421?-'x' Q 5-il'1'igj"f4' 'fa-,..n ff' A X-sr, w,,'?n ,Mmyr-' 51' f339J In. .fer F 9-ff",, Q? ig P.. f5f"'f7" J 1 T251 ' 'V itfif .i A Ti as A-I..f'vc"'5' ffjfwifit-7? 'J' I MGHQ EH AJR r35i1avFwp.+r N'w1VT-fLr?r' NQHMQEEQ t. Fw gg, JTI' I Ji3ry:y'lL-'Ji' "F " 1 . F2555 3l'7i""i,1.,f -' AL. 1 i' 'IE k,:"iY-,Q-.J bfin iaggif +3..E'.J' jig? ID fllQ'T1Zh. S I Ciihd XX l?'LT I fr4i If HAROLD EDWARD BENNETT f f f f f Headmaster -Ililkrfilg JOHN F. COLLINS f ' ' f f Scribe .Hive , Mg FRANCE XHCTOR VVEETRT f f f f Tramurm' ,Qgxm JULIAN J. BEST f f f f Master of Festivities MANUEL F. DIAZ f f f Master of Ceremonies G. FREDERICK BENNETT f f f Senior Warden BANCROET BUTLER f f f Junior Warden Wi' HUDSON W. DIGBY f Q f f f Historian WALTER IRVING SMITH f f Corresponding Secretary 4' T . MARSHALL P. WITCHELL f f f News Editor that lk 'L 1' YN J . I. -J MEMBERS J fr A J' EDWIN B. BABO JOHN HAMILTON EDWARD J. CTTENEACHER I j L u EDMUND BARBOUR CECIL L. HARRIS JOHN PETZ ' A 'UI I THOMAS JEFFERSON BAILEY CLARENCE HINZ ALFRED PIPP 1 M Nl JOHN BERNEY ROY G. KOWALSKI JOSEPH E. RALEIGH ' vb , ROBERT J. BENNETT MERRILL LARDNER ROLLIN REESE I I .T I CLARENCE BISHOP PAUL LILLY JOHN REGAN I FRANK J. BRADY JOSEPH MCDONOUGH JOHN ELDER ROCKETT . " ALLAN BRIDGMAN THOMAS MCINTOSH SYLVESTER RUEDISALE 8 EDWIN CHAPP ROLAND MCINTYRE LEO FRANCIS RYAN . AUGUST J. CHRISTIE DANIEL MCKILLOP GUS SCHAFER IR ' PAUL CLEMENT HOWARD MAHONEY ARTHUR W. SCHULTZ ' I "-I F , MARCUS COLLINS ARCHIE MARANTETTE CARLTON SHAW ETHELO DEFABIO CHARLES MASASECK GEORGE SIERRA ALBERT DESANTO DONALD MATZEN WILLIAM TEPPER Rjklqel MICHAEL G. FITZPATRICK RYAN MULLINS LESTER VACHON HOWARD FLANNIGAN CLIFFORD NELSON JOHN WALKER fddf GEORGE GOLCHERT ALBERT OSNEIL THOMAS WARD LEO E. GOULD DONALD CSEORNE RALPH L. WEBER ,X .E . MTX? . . , HETA CHAPTER of Delta Sigma ball team With its second annual football Phi, international Commerce and Fi' banquet held at the BoOkfCadillac Hotel. nance fraternity, Was organized at the In March the basketball squad was feted fx, university in January, 1921. At present, by the fourth annual basketball banquet it JP the fraternity is the largest and one of the sponsored by the organization. most active on the campus, and takes a Harold Bennett, headmaster of the 153335 leading part in the many Social and Schof chapter, attended, with several other figglf lastic functions of the university. brothers, the bifannual convention in Ibill The social season of the fraternity Champaign, Ill. An invitation was ex' wg opened in October with a bridge party. tended to the fraternity to hold its next X' A large number of bridge parties and convention in Detroit, in 1930. This in' lr. smokers Were sponsored during the year. vitation is being taken into consideration . A Smoker closed the preflsenten social by the supreme officers. W activities. The Social functions closed with the ' In January the fraternity feted the footf annual dinner dance held in May. ik? ,Q S. , rifis-gL.., G., I K I Q Q -V T 4 Y affix A 'ff f, r og as rwywgor ern 5 -a,mr"fsE+E.igst.l1.2JKfE-if 5fV-.f4is?1ff'5:3N'.iEllLw.g,Lg.rftfSe'2tfmRxft'-L95-gcf, . A jj lg, f34OJ Left to Right: Top Row-Babo, Bailey, Barbour, F. Bennett, H. Bennett, R. Bennett, Best. Second Row- Bishop, Brady, Bridgman, Butler, Christie, J. Collins. Third Row-M. Collins, DeSanto, Diaz, Digby Fitzpatrick, Flanigan. Fourth Row-Gould, Kowalski, Lilly, McDonough, Mclntyre, Mclntosh. Fifth Row- Mahoney, Massacek, Matgen, Mullins, Nelson, O'Neill. Sixth Row-Osborne, Cttenbacher, Raleigh, Ruedisale, Ryan, Schultz. Bottom Row-Sierra, Smith, Tepper, Walkei', Webber, Weipert, Vifitchell. 53413 .- Amp H495 , v DELTA THETA PHI DANIEL J. LARAMIE f ffffff Dean HILARY J. SULLIVAN f VicefDecm RAYMOND J. LYNCH f f f Clerk of Rolls LAWRENCE E. KELLY f f Clerk of Exchequer JOSEPH E. MURPHY f f Master of Ritual JOSEPH FRISKE f f f ' f Bailijjf RICHARD SULLIVAN f f f f Tribune MEMBERS JOHN T. BARTON FRED BILLINGS OWEN J, CLEARY IVIATTHENV J. CRIIVIMENS TRVING J. GIBBONS DON W. GILBERT NATHAN B. GOODNONV OWEN J. GUINEY DANIEL J. HEALEY ROY H. HUGHES GERALD J. KANE JAMES D. MCCARTHY JOHN D. MCGINNES CHARLES N. MCLAUCHLIN EDWIN S. MOAO FRANCIS J. PHELAN JOHN PHENEY CHARLES W. RIGNEY WILLIAM A SHAW ARTHUR E. SOMERS ROBERT J. TEACAN EDWIN C. THEISEN LEO W. WALSH FIRNIAN J. ZETTEL ELTA THETA PHI has experienced one of the most progressive years in its history. The Hosmer senate, University of Detroit chapter of the national law fra' ternity, has taken part in nearly every major activity of the university and has strength' ened itself both in numbers and in influence. Many of the activities of the chapter this year Were carried on in conjunction With the two other senates of the fraternity lo' cated in Detroit. The other tWo are War' ren senate of City College and Cooley senf ate at the Detroit College of Law. Cne of the hnest and most successful events of the year Was the formal initiation banquet given at the Hotel Statler on March 9. At this time ten of the most prominent students of the LaW College Were added to the fraternity roster. Nearly 35 O members of the three Detroit senates of the fraternity Were present at the dinner. Among the interesting parts of the program Were the speeches of Chief Justice Marshall of the Chio Supreme Court, Circuit Judge Joseph Moynihan of Detroit, and Hon. Edward Moinet, judge of the United States District Court. Attendance at this affair surpassed all previous records for the fraf ternity, and its success Was so great that the three chapters plan to make it an annual event. Foremost among the fraternity's social activities for the year Was the formal dinner dance held in December at the Book' Cadillac Hotel. More than 350 couples attended the dance, and it was one of the most enjoyable parties of the social season at the College of Law. The last event of the fraternity before the closing of the year Was their Eounder's Day celebration held the latter part of May. The three local senates collaborated at this time in celebrating the founding of Alpha Chapter, the hrst senate of the national fraternity. f342J ' Left to Right: Top Row-Billings, Crimens, Friske, Goodnow, Healy. Second Row-Hughes, Kane Kelly, Laramie, Lynch. Third Row-McLaughlin, Moag, Murphy, Pheney. Bottom Row-Rigney, Somers, Sullivan, Theisen, Zettel. f343:l .1 . , . I f.,.gwf' A f 2-4 , .Hs w x -fx af l 1 M. EPSILCN TAU ALLAN E. STEIN f f f f Maximtis Summus, MAX RADOM f f f Summus SAMUEL C. EPSTEIN f Scfriptu HERMAN COHEN f f f f f Pecimcwius MEMBERS CHARLES ABRAMSON DAVID W. ISENBERG SIMON AARON JOSEPH D. SAPSOWITZ HERBERT ISENBERG MoR'roN L. WOLFE PSILCN TAU, Jewish literary fra' ternity, established its Beta Chapter on the campus at the University of Def troit in December, 1927. In the first year of its organization the chapter suffered a serious depletion in its ranks caused by the fact that many of its most prominent leadf ers and organizers graduated into profesf sional institutions and the business world. As a result a complete reforganization of the entire Beta Chapter was undertaken during the 192829 school year. Too much credit cannot be paid to those who struggled and succeeded in carrying the chapter to new heights in the fraternal life of the campus. Early in the first semester Epsilon Tau launched its expansive program by hold' ing, a smoker at Webster Hall. Many guests were invited and the alumni of the fraternity attended en masse. Entertain' ment was provided by the stars of 'LAces Wild" and "Hoofs, My Dearf' and before the evening's program had been concluded a new fraternal spirit had been engendered in the organization which grew in strength with each succeeding gathering throughf out the year. The largest and most lavish initiation in the history of Epsilon Tau was held at the Savoy Hotel late in November. The ceref monies were followed with a banquet 4 featured by prominent afterfdinner speakf ers of the alumni body. During the autumnal season a Half lowe'en party was staged at the summer home of one of the members. Brilliant decorations of the festive season furnished an appropriate background to a scene of gayety and mirth. The fraternity featured its Christmas holiday week with an informal dinner dance at the Criole Terrace which was very well attended. As the social season drew to a close the fraternity made plans to terminate its ac' tivities with a formal dinner dance. The party was held on May 10, at the Redford Country Club, and no amount of expense and labor was spared in making this gala closing event a great success. Beautiful favors and smartly designed programs were presented to the guests. Decorations of the fraternity's ensign adorned the club' house. In every respect the party attained the height of perfection. The fraternity feels that it has suc' ceeded in forming an organization which will be a permanent one on the university campus. The past year has seen a develop' ment of fellowship which will stand as a model for future brothers of the organization. 1 Left to Right: Top Row-Abramson, Cohen, Epstein. Second Row-Harris, Isenberg, Radom Bottom Row-Saposowitz, Stein, Wolfe. 53451 ! A . ETA ZETA SIGMA KATHLEEN M. KEHOE f M. JOY RYPSAM f RUTH PEASE ffff ARMELLA C. FRIEDL f f f President f VicefP1'esident f Treastwev' f -f Secretary f Faculty Advisor r f f DR. RICHARD A. MUTTKOWSKI f f FLORENCE M. BERNARD EILLEEN K. CROSS ELEANOR M. FIEDLER ANGELA M. GIGNAC S THE only active organization of its kind on the campus, Eta Zeta Sigma sorority signifies in itself the spirit of the cofed student body. lts work is synonyf mous with the activity of the women stu' dents of the university, its achievement with their success. With the smallness of their numbers in comparison with the thouf sands of men students, the cofeds have made their presence in university life felt to a remarkable degree. This accomplishf ment is largely due to Eta Zeta Sigma. The year 1922929 has been a successful one for the sorority. The organization has been enlarged, and has carried out a prof gram of social events which have added a brightness to the scholastic life of the cofeds. The meetings for the year took the form of bridge parties held at the homes of the members. At the beginning of the year the roster included thirteen active members: two initiations were held, one in November and one in May, which nearly doubled the active enrollment. The initiations of the cofeds are always remarkable affairs. The necessity of making them less rough than those of the fraternities, leads to the creat' ing of a variety of unique stunts to properly train the uneophytesw in the ideals of selff subordination and sacriice. Riding ukiddief MEMBERS CLAIRE D. KING CONSTANGE T. MAIER LUCIE R. PEQUEGNOT ADELE C. PERMEN ROSELLA M. PELTIER IS4 6 ELEANOR L. RHEAUME MIRIAM L. RUSSELL M. JOY RYOSAM IRIS L. YOUNG liars," selling mud pies on the main thorf oughfares, and playing marbles in the streets, are a few of the brainfchildren of the initiators used in the past. The ref markable thing about the selling of mud baked goods is that the attractiveness of the salesladies often makes up for the def nciency in the value of the product, and the male victims of their wiles inevitably fall and pay out their change like boule players at Cstend, incidentally adding cash profits to the initiation. The sorority holds as its aim the promo' tion of a high standard of scholarship, and endeavors also to promote a spirit of comf radeship among the cofeds of the university. The ability to aid in the fulfillment of these ideals is a qualification requisite to an initiate of the sorority. Among the events of the sorority's social calendar for the year were: A Halloween party for the pledges, an initiation banquet at the Statler in November, a Spring rush party at the Lee Crest in April, and a second initiation banquet at the Book' Cadillac Hotel in May. The big event of the sorority was their annual dinner dance given at the Detroit Yacht Club on Tues' day evening, May 21, which met with unprecedented success. l Left to Right: Top Row-Bernard, Cross, Fiedler. Friedl. Second Row-Gignac, Kehoe, King. Third Row Pease, Peltier, Permen. Bottom Row-Pequegnot, Rheaume, Russell, Young. 53473 4,3142 GAMMA ETA GAMMA 1 1 1 1 CHARLES L. HICKEY HAROLD R. SULLIVAN f - CAMILLE PARENT f f LAWRENCE J. MOLONEY f JAMES I. BYRON f f EDMUND I. ENGLEMAN f JAMES J. HUNT f f f FRANK A. DOWD f f WILLIAM SIMPSON f MEMBERS BOYDON JANJATOVICH EDWARD J. KREMER FLAVIUS N. KINNEY EARL H. LAFAIVE MICHAEL J. LANDER VITALIS J. BEAUSEJOUR JAMES J. CALDWELL MARK L. CONRAD VICTOR'C. DOHERTY WILLIAM F. DORN Charicelloi' f Pmeter f f Index f Sheriff f Lictor .Quaestor f Recorder f Bailijf f Tipstave DONALD J. MCCLELLAN GSWALD T. MCGINN JOHN P. MCGOVERN MILES L. MCMILLAN FREDERICK L. SULLIVAN ANTHONY E. HANDLOSER DONALD HOFFMAN HAROLD ILLIG AMMA ETA GAMMA, a national law fraternity, was founded at the University of Maine in 1901. Today there are 26 active chapters and 9 alumni chap' ters representing the leading law schools of the country. A charter was granted by the National Curia for Mu chapter at the Unf iversity of Detroit in 1919. Although fraternalism is the prime object of the orf ganization, its members and alumni seek to advance the high ideals of the legal profession. The faculty of the law school includes three honorary members of the chapter, they are Arthur J. Abbott, Louis W. Mc' Clear, and Lloyd Axford. Numerous prof minent members of the legal profession are brothers, either as active or honorary members, including Judge Charles Bartlett, Cscar Riopelle, Peter Drexilius, and Fran' cis Fitzgerald. The past year has been marked by ac' complishment, because Mu Chapter, besides maintaining a fraternity house throughout the year, has engaged in numerous activf ities. Both those functions of their own, and those of other Organizations have felt their sincere support at all times. HARRY M. MARTIN GERALD J. MCCLEAR ROBERT D. MCCLEAR WILLIAM A. WAGNER GEORGE A. WEINS WILLIAM A. WELSH There Were two initiations, one being held early in November and the other about the middle of May. At the former twelve men Were initiated, while at the latter ten new men were added, increasing the chapter roll to thirtyffour. A formal dinnerfdance at the Lee Plaza was the foremost event on the social calf endar during the year. The affair was sponsored by the alumni and besides the actives, many prominent members of the Detroit Bench and Bar Were present. A formal dancing party held on the eve of May 15th rivaled the dinnerfdance in popularity. It Was likewise supported by the alumni. Cther functions of the year included, a house warming on the opening of a new home, a smoker at which the actives were host to the alumni, a formal theater party on the opening night of the third annual opera, and several smokers. Bifmonthly luncheons proved exceedingly popular among the brothers. Gamma Eta Gamma during 192829 has seen one of its most successful years. Frat' ernal progress has kept even step in its ranks with the progress and growth of the university. 53483 f 33 Left to Right: Top Row-Beausejour, Byron, Conrad, Dowd, Engelman. Second Row-Handloser, Hickey, Hoffman, Hunt. Third Row-Ulig, Kinney, LaFaive, McClellan. Bottom Row- Martin, Moloney, Parent, Simpson, Wagner. f'549'l Q Q fs A :WIT KAPPA SIGMA DELTA CRVILLE E. CULLEN f f f f f f f President KENNETH E. LABARGE f SIOHN S. MARK f f PIERRE I. BOES f f f f VicefPresident f Secretaryf'I'reastwe'r f Sergeant'atfArms HERMAN E. MAYROSE fffff Faculty Advisor MEMBERS PAUL CLARK THoMAs C. Dfxvis MORRIS B. DEO LEON C. GIBBONS ALFRED F. MAHALAK HCUCH one of the smallest fraternif ties of the university, Kappa Sigma Delta is by no means inactive, and during the past scholastic year has enjoyed success phenomenal to so young an organization. The fraternity was founded by nine stu' dents of the College of Engineering who felt the need of organizing their friendship into a body that could offer its advantage to other students, and could occupy a place in the activities of the university. A charter was drawn up, and the fraternity formally became a campus entity in the fall of 1927 when it was approved by the Faculty Board. At the outset rigid requirements were inserted in the constitution to protect the fraternity and make it a body of students valuable to fraternal life on the campus. This close discrimination, though a wise policy, has retarded the growth of the fra' ternity, but it has resulted, on the other hand, in one of the most active groups in the university. The most serious loss that has yet oc' curred to the fraternity was the death of Angelo I. Dabieri on December 26, 1928. Dabieri was a charter member whose ac' tivities in the fraternity and College of Engineering were always outstanding. I-Iis achievements fraternally and scholastically will be remembered by his brothers in Kappa Sigma Delta and will serve as an inspiration for their future endeavors. The fraternity's social program was given a sendfoif on September 17, with a smoker at the Lee Plaza. A theater party held the evening of Cctober 19, proved very enjoyable. It was followed by dinner for the members and their guests. A banf quet was tendered the newly elected off ficers of the fraternity on November 5 when they were formally installed. The climax of the social calender was the second annual dinner dance given at the Island Country Club the evening of May 29. It was the most entertaining affair in the fraternity's history and well attended. January 21 witnessed the introduction of a class of promising pledges into the fraf ternity with a banquet in their honor held at the Criole Terrace. The pledges were instructed in their duties to the fraternity and were given the neophyte's degree. Their initiation in the Spring added new energy to this growing organization. Kappa Sigma Delta has made a sound beginning. Its policies are those which make for the establishment of a strong fraternal organization, and undoubtedly it will become one of the hnest in the Engineering College. fssoi Left to Right: Top Row-Boes, Clark, Cullen. Second Row-Davis, Deo, Gibbons. Bottom Row-LaBarge, Mahalek, Marr. f35l1 M A G l BERTRAND S. SOLEAU f f f f f f President CLARENCE J. KUMMER f f f VicefP1fesident GERALD W. FITZGERALD f f f Recording Secretary ROBERT W. DELAND f f Corresponding Secretary LAWRENCE E. DONOHUE f f f f 1 f 'Treaswrer MEMBERS LEO J. ANDRIES LEE A. BERTLING ROMAN E. BOUCHER JAMES G. BYRON. DONALD F. CARNEY PAUL G. CONLAN EDWARD J. CORBETT DOYLE CUNNINGHAM JERRY J. DONOVAN CLEMENT E. FISHER TRVING J. GIBBONS EDWARD W. HAYES STANLEY C. HAYES JAMES J. HEATHERSON WALTER J. HOLLAND RALPH C. JOHNSTON WALTER J. KELLY MICHAEL J. KILBANE ANTHONY J. KRONK JAMES LAFFREY VERNON E. MCCLEAR DAVID S. MCHARDY CLYDE L. MCHUCI GEORGE A. MEYERS LAWRENCE J. MOLONEY ROBERT E. PAGE JOSEPH A. POWERS DAVID O. PRENDEVILLE JAMES RICE EUGENE H. RONEY JAMES A. RYAN JAMES C. .SCOTT WALDO J. SIMON PI-IILLIP W. STACKPOOLE RAYMOND T. STEFANI EDWARD T. SWEENEY GEORGE C. SWEENEY PATRICK E. TAIPLE EDWIN C. THEISEN JAMES A. TROESTER RICHARD T. VONM.lXCH HE Magi fraternity enjoys the dis' tinction of being the only Arts and Science fraternity on the campus. It was founded in 1919 for the purpose of prof moting the interests of the university and creating a more brotherly feeling among the students in the "Liti' department. On November 11 the Magi celebrated its tenth anniversary by holding a convene tion at the Verdun Hunt Club. More than half of the alumni members were present. The convention proved to be a great success and stimulated the leading members to carry the organization to new heights. The first big social triumph of the fraf ternity was a Fall Dinner Dance staged at the Detroitleland Hotel on November 28. The dance was a closed formal party and more than fifty couples attended. Numerous social meetings held at the fraternity's club rooms, located at the Pasadena Apartments, were followed by the annual Open meeting at the Wolverine Hotel. This meeting is always a source of much pleasure as it affords the old memf bers an opportunity to join in the festivities with the active men. The feature of the Magi's social calender was a closed dinner dance given at the FOX and Hounds Inn. After much discussion it was decided to limit the attendance to thirtyffive couples and many students on the campus were disappointed because they could not attend this affair. The date settled upon was April 16 and it stands as a redfletter day in the history of the fraf ternity. The fraternity closed its season with the initiation of eighteen new men into the group of "Wise Men." The new members were carefully selected from the Arts and Science department. The Magi restricts its membership to those students of unimf paired scholarship and recognized ability in extrafcurricular work. The fraternity boasts of the highest scholastic standing on the campus and durf ing the last year they were awarded the Sigma Kappa Phi interfraternity scholar' ship trophy. fsszl 1 Left to Right: Top Row-Andries, Bertling, Boucher, Byron, Corbett. Second Row--Deland, Donohue, Donovan Fitzgerald, Heatherson. Third Row-Kummer, McHary, Meyers, Moloney, Page. Fowfth Row-Powers, Rice, E. Roney, Scott, Simon. Fifth Row-Soleau, Sweeney, Taipale, Theisen, Troester, Vanlvlach. IISSSI iw.: C M E Cf A B E T A P I FRED A. KRAMER f f f f f f f f President JOHN J. BEHEN f ROBERT C. PAGE f f EDWIN G. LENFESTY f EUGENE H. RONEY f HAROLD F. CATON f f LYNUS T. BRANOHEAU f LEO E. Boss ffff f f VicefPresident f f Recording Secretary f Corresponding Secretary f f f f Treasurer f f f Historian f Sei'geantfatfA'rms f f Faculty Advisor I MEMBERS CHARLES J. BEAUVAIS FRANK B. BOOTH GORDON B. BURKE FRED B. CARLSON LEON P. COTE THOMAS E. DEGURSE MEGA BETA PI ICTA CHAPTER, the first national affiliated fraternity ever established in the College of Arts and Science was founded February, 1928, with nine charter members of the Pi Kappa Mu. It is a fraternity for the purpose of assisting its members both scholastically and in their subsequent professional careers. Its lofty purpose and rigid requirements contributed greatly to its rapid expansion and success. In a perio-d of less than four months its active membership increased from nine members to nineteen. Its first social at' tempt was a successful dinner dance on May 2, 1928, at the Hawthorne Valley Golf Club. Following the convention of Cmega Beta Pi, the only national profesf sional prefmedical fraternity in existence, which was held at Austin, Texas, on June 8 and 9, Pi Kappa Mu was sanctioned, and later installed as the Iota Chapter on Def cember 7 and 8 at the Hotel Statler, Detroit. JAMES R. DELANEY HARMEN DUNHAM ALBERT G. HANDLOSER ROBERT J. KARL OVILA E. LANGLOIS ALBERT NICKELS STANLEY NOVAK GEORGE CLMSTEAD SAMUEL A. PETIX EDWIN R. WALKER JOSEPH ZEMENS GEORGE A. ZINDLER In keeping with its rapid growth to a prominent place in campus affairs, the Omega Beta's have sponsored several social affairs. Cne worthy of notice was the "Iota Fooleriesu held on January 30, 1929, in the Crystal Ballroom of the Masonic Temple. Cmega Beta Pi demands scholastic effif ciency, and to further promote this will annually award a loving cup to the pref medical Freshman holding the highest scholastic standing. Omega Beta Pi is represented in the faculty by Leo E. Buss and Harmen Dun' ham. Its active membership at the present time is composed of twentyftwo men, eight of whom will enter Medical School this fall. It also has a pledge list of thirteen. The fraternity seeks to cofoperate with the faculty and to promote the interests of the prefmedical school of the University of Detroit. img I Left to Right: Top Row-Beauvais, Behen, Brancheau, Burke, Buss. Second Row-Carlson, Caton, DeGurse Delaney. Third Row-Handloser, Karl, Kramer, Langlois, Lenfestey. Fourth Row-Nichols, Novak, Olmstead, Page. Bottom Row-Petix, Roney, Walker, Zemens, Zindler. H553 SIGMA KAPPA PHI GEORGE Wg HESS f f EDWARD A. STENGER f A. GEORGE LENNERT f M. JOHN DELOGE f FRANK E. JENNY f f LLOYD BRAZIL f f LESTER K. KIRK f LYNDON C. BROXVN f f f f 1 1 f f Meagus f Deputy Meagtcs f f Scriptufr f f f Bursar f Fimmcial Scriptur f f f Marecltal f Faculty Advisor f f Faculty Advisor MEMBERS ' FREDERICK G. ALLYN OTIS T. ASKEW TRVIN R. BALLBACH WILLIAM E. BARRETT NEIL W. BROWN CHARLES BRUSHABER THOMAS C. BURNS J. MEREDITH CAMERON CARL A. CARLSON WALTER J. CHINOSKI ARCHIE E. CLARK THOMAS J. CONNELL L. NOWVAL DONAHUE ALEX J. DORAN CLARENCE J. DOYLE JOSEPH A. ERDOS JOHN A. FEARN KENNETH R. FOURNIER EDWARD J. GRADY LOUIS J. GRIMALDI IGMA KAPPA PHI, the first national PETER W. HACALA JAMES A. HAGGERTY WILLIAM HARRINCTON EDNVARD A. HATCH FREDERICK HEIN GECRGE L. HESS EDWARD S. HOB.LXN JAMES HOEAN G. SCOTT HOWARD LEONARD E. HYDE EDWARD T. KANE VINCENT M. KEYES SIGMUND J. KREBSBACH GERALD H. LALONDE HARVEY J. LONG JOHN R. MALEY EDWARD J. MALONEY CLARENCE B. MASTERSON PATRICK F. MCCAEE C. BROCK MCGRECOR LEO S. MITTIG EDXVIN S. MOAG FRANCIS J. MURPHY JOSEPH C. MURPHY RAY T. NAVIN VINCENT OLSHOVE EDWIN C. PFEIFFER STEPHEN PIKLOR JOHN A. RATCLIFFE ROY R. REDDEN DANIEL F. RITTER FRANK J. STONE EMIL A. ULERICH' NORMAN D. V.4LENTINE R. A. VAN WAETERMEULER CLETUS J. WELLING HERLTAN D. YOUNG L. HARRINCTON ZECMAIN MICHAEL ZUKE commercial Organization on the cam' pus, Was founded at the University of Detroit in 1918 as a Commerce and Ei' nance club, and later as Alpha Chapter of Sigma Kappa Phi With twentyffour charter members. Sigma Kappa Phi is the largest and is recognized as one of the leading and most active fraternities on the campus. Alpha Chapter has at this time an act' ive membership of sixtyffive, eleven of this number having been initiated on January 12 of this year at the Savoy Hotel. Thirty of the present actives, the largest number of Sigma Kappa Phi ever to be graduated in one year, will become members of the Alumni Chapter. Sigma Kappa Phi seeks to promote and maintain the highest ethical and scholastic standards in commerce and iinance, to im' press upon the minds of the student body and the graduates a spirit of fraternal co' operation and loyalty and service to their Alma Mater. The Sigma Kappa Phi Scholarship Cup Was established in Cctober, 1928, to en' courage scholarship in the fraternities. ,The social calendar of Sigma Kappa Phi included such noteworthy activities as an outing to PutfInfBay, a moonlight excurf sion, a Thanksgiving dance, a dinner dance at the Lake Shore Country Club, numerf ous smokers and bridge parties, and their annual Colonial Prom at the Hotel Statler. The roster of Sigma Kappa Phi includes many athletic stars and student leaders. 53563 1. ,,. ,. 1 ,- If TAP 'H if'-' Q YQ' ' , T ,fl J-' f..' . . , X i "Y'5- lx"flS'i fir? 1 . , L ' . ' . u, x l5'?k""x3"'f't:2f'.'ff"1f,m--'-,nl -ff. Q-Q. M -X fs. , ' t 4 'V W 'H l ' N fl ' i I SP lf'-Ifwv "Q Liv" -., "ir" ' f . -A 'H -J' 1- ' ,-' "'-if , - as .swf w 1 'N fi ,f, N 4 ,I ,Q 1 ,AW xr il i Nfl r Q'-my W ' -N?wl',J gl 'fm 'wiv' ' ' 5521, ' PJ .gf , fy A' .i,lfiQ 0. :Tl ll yu-f'1i,fw Q, fr . -iyfljff. ' ,H fx-x Q: ' 360 .Mill 'qrir "1,wff,f'r alll, "5,'i'fW km? , :Jr YM ig 'Q l,'QEv apr! ll., .f 3 Y "N lvl' llrllhl l ,Q milf- - xii, as .4 'mill' -N il M'u1'.'-jf -fl Z ' 5 'fm fliflvzvv lr ix V..,,l . ay. 1 pg 1 Q 51 ms-,1 i .,-'ggi' W me CRL, ff, 4 g, - .. w, 155 1 .nv ,.. 1-Ska, 1...,-19+ 'l ,-ali' 'xfifi I 9,1 Q'y"5T,L' 1' Q 1 :QQ :S 'A 'rift 5 ' .-,il gf ff. . 531-gf: if f mari, '-l,f.?'f : U7 3356? N? tiff' 'lu'-l' v . fuk-.LJ if Lf- '- 1'-":'l,,,f5-EQ vl-Q,-Q1 2 uf 'ffm' KQLQ--1 51,1 Sr Q, ,G billy I. Lf 1,55 534, pg US..-5,2 .5'e,.'.x,.'h l x 9' ,Pl f 31,11 V H.. . 51431 N Kfaili' "ff rf 'stf7'Q'mg 'Q .7 f lf'fEr15'1 fr J' A' g 21, fly-P til H, lbs l f , 5 M ' f H I Llllllfjlw' -H Y X ,'Q.gLQ5,f !'if.'24 xi- llfagifllw 'ig R" ij., 1 fx- Q if if N mv 'Q Q, ' In , --A af , , f. '1 gf Left to Right: Top Row-Allyn, Askew, Ballbach, Brazil, L. Brown, N. Brown, Cameron, Carlson lfhjhffxjl Second Row-Connell, DeLoge, Donahue, Doyle, Erdos, Fearn, Fournier. Third Row-Grady, Grimaldi, GI." 5 5' "-,jltwl Hacala, Haggerty, Harrington, Hatch, Hein. Fowrth Row-G. L. Hess, G. W. Hess, Hoban, Howard, Hyde, ".-jjj? .tailfkfz Ienney, Kane. Fifth Row-Keyes, Kirk, Krebsbach, LaLoncle, Lennert, Long, McCabe. Sixth Row- ,. ZQIVM McGregor, Maley, Maloney, Masterson, Mittig, Moag, Murphy. Seventh Row-Navin, Olshove, Pfeiifer, , Ratcllife, Redden, Ritter, Stenger. Bottom Row'-Stone, Ulbrich, Valentine, lf, ,J Van Waetermeulen, Welling, Young, Zeeman, Zuke. :L 'Jeff' X l 11 J 1 ' V 1:3571 W L Ria . '..E. SIGMA PHI LAMBDA. MORRIS PORTNOY f f f f f f Grand Master SIDNEY GASSDL f f f f Master HARRY PORTNOY f f Master of Finance ' MAX DERIN f f f f f 1 Scribe CARL H, SEEHOFFER f Faculty Advisor MEMBERS JACK COHEN LEWIS MAL1s SIDNEY FINEBERG ROY RADNER HE year 1925 saw the founding of the Sigma Phi Lambda fraternity by a group Of seven men who saw the need for such an Organization to foster friendship among the Jewish students of the univerf sity. lt has since attained prominence in fraternal and scholastic standing on the campus. Membership in the fraternity is limited to Jewish students of high scholarship, good moral character, and high ideals. The fra' ternity holds these three points as ideals upon which it is founded. lts purpose has been to foster fellowship and the attainf ment of a high standard of university life among its members, and to impart this spirit with other university students with whom its members come in contact. As a result the fraternity has done much to bring students of Jewish nationality into closer contact with one another, and to organize them into a Drm body that could cofoperate with the university in its activf ity. The fraternity is a general, social fra' ALLAN GREENBERG MARTEN BEETOHAR OSCAR GREENsPoN AUBREY GORDON MAX ROBINS JOE FISHMAN SOL DUNNER RALPH VALKOVICH ternity, open to students of all departments including the night school. More than one hundred and eighty stu' dents were guests of the fraternity at its annual smoker held at Webster Hall. The object of this event was to bring the stuf dents together and acquaint them with the activities of the fraternity and of the Jewish students as a whole at the University of Detroit. The fraternity acknowledges its indebtf edness to the aid and support of Dr. Carl H. Seehoffer, dean of the Day School of Commerce and Finance, who is their hon' orary member and faculty advisor. His advice has been a constant source of new life to a fraternity starting out in a good work. That his work was not in vain, nor the individual effort of the fraternity's members useless, is evidenced by the unf usual success which this organization has had on the campus since its conception in 1925. IZSSSI Left to Right: Top Row-Ackerman, Cohen, Darin. Second Row-Fineberg, Gassel, Gordon Bottom Row-Greenspoon, Malis, H. Portnoy, M. Portnoy. 53593 filii , of. VVA4 Q Q -- xg o o .-hill, THETA ALPHA' SIGMA HARRY B. RYAN ffffffff Presicleoit FRANK T. DOUGLAS f VicefP1fesident WILLIAM SPICKETT f f f Secretary JAMES E. DALEY f f f f Treasurer ROBERT A. STEFANOWSKI f f Se'rgecmtfatfArms DANIEL J. MOYNIHAN f C ffff Faculty Moderator MEMBERS CHARLES G. BORCHARD RAYMOND B. DONZE THOMAS T. MCCORMICK FRANCIS R. BOOTH IRVING E- DRINKAUS JOHN H. MADIGAN JAMES B. CHRISTEN RICHARD D' FLYNN BERNARD J. SMITH MILBURN HICKEY JOHN B. CROWLEY STANLEY R' HOLWEDEL BERNHART J. STECER EMMETT J. CULLEN LESTER A. HOMANT FRED O. VANFLETTEREN CHARLES J. DANIELS ALVAN KELLY HENRY C. VANFLETTEREN RALPH DONZE FREDERICK J. KIRN THOMAS M. WARD HETA ALPHA SIGMA, formerly known as the Tau Alpha Sigma, be' gan fraternal activities with sixteen charter members in October 1927. Since that time twelve new members have been added to the Organization. Theta Alpha has ad' vanced rapidly at the U. of D. due to its many social functions. The Titan Farewell Frolic, given at the Wardell on November 25, was the first annual tribute awarded tO the eight def parting members of the 1928 eleven. At this dance each graduate was presented with a military set as a token of apprecif ation for the national fame brought tO the university through their efforts. Application has been made for admitf tance to a prominent national social fraternity. The social program for the past year was the most enjoyable in the history of the fraternity. It Opened with a bridge party which was held on Cctober 3 at the Lee Plaza, an informal affair which furnished an impetus for the social activities which followed. On November 23, when the football season was nearly over, the Titan Farewell Frolic bade adieu to the graduatf ing members of the varsity team. Three most enjoyable Stag affairs were held during the year at the Seward Hotel. These Smokers, held on Uct. 9, Jan. 20, and March 21, were well attended and gave the members an opportunity for fraternal companionship that could be gained in no more fitting manner. Prospective members first met the frat' ernity at the annual guest night held March 1 in the Seward Hotel. Cn March 25 following, those who were chosen for pledges were formally bestowed with the rules of their station. The Tuller Hotel was the Scene of a pledge banquet on April 24, and the neophytes became members of the Organization at the formal initiation held May 10 at the Seward Hotel. The members of Theta Alpha Sigma were very active in their support of the social activities of the university, having boxes at the Junior promenade and attend' ing the Union opera in a body. They finished the year with their annual May dinner dance, a year well spent in fraternal work so necessary to the university as a whole. 53603 Left to Right: Top Row-Cullen, Daley, Danze. Second Row-Douglas, Flynn, Holvvedel. Thifd Row Homant, Kelly, Kern. Bottom Row+Macligan, Moynihan, Ryan, Spiclcett. 53613 ME? J nfl 'V TUYERE GEORGE D. MCCORMICK f EUGENE L. DIERSING f PAUL M. REILLY f MATIAS J. ALFONSO WILLIAM F. ARTMAN HARRY F. BARR GRANT E. BECKER BERNARD CHAPMAN EVERETT C. CLARK ALLEN W. DALLAS JOSEPH L. DRUERE WALTER J. DULCZEWSKI MEMBERS JOSEPH A. FISHER FRANK FLYNN CURTIS E. GARY DANIEL S. Izzo NOEL P. KAMMER WILLIAM P. MURPHY JAMES V. MURRAY JAMES F. NELLIS WALTER T. NORRIS WILLIAM PERFIELD Grand Maste'r f Grand Scribe f Master of Finance CHARLES PETTY CHARLES N. PRENATT JACK SPARLING JOHN C. THRASHER GEORGE W. VAN ATT.A PETER J. WARD THOMAS W. WARD CARLTON W. WOLF JOHN A. ZILLES HE past year has been the most sucf cessful fraternal period enjoyed by the Tuyere fraternity Since its inception a decade ago. Socially and scholastically it has maintained its position as one of the foremost organizations of its kind in the College of Engineering. Tuyere has the distinction of being the first fraternity on the campus to erect a fraternity house. After months of planf ning by the members, the house was built on the lot which the fraternity had purf chased at 17367 Monica avenue, one block north of the Six Mile road. lt is a beautif ful home, and possesses many unique feaf tures both in architecture and in operation. The opening of the new house was cele' brated on January 27. Since that time twentyftwo members of the fraternity have made it their home. lt has been the gathf ering place for all the other members, whether active, alumni or associate. Previously, meetings of the fraternity were held twice a month at Webster Hall. Since its opening, they have taken place at the fraternity house, and the difference of the spirit engendered at these meetings was markedly apparent. A new atmosphere of fraternal fidelity and mutual interest per vaded the activities of the fraternity, with the result that Tuyere finishes the year a stronger organization than it has ever been during the ten years of its history on the university campus. lt has furnished a noble example for other fraternities to fol- low, and has accomplished Something that will mean much in solving the social prob' lem which exists at the university. A step has been made in the right direction, it ref mains for other organizations to follow the lead of Tuyere and furnish real homes for university students who come from other cities. Most enjoyable among the events of the fraternity during the past year have been occasional bridge parties. They have added brightness to the social life of the members throughout the winter months. The fra' ternities big social event is the annual din' ner dance held in the spring. Twenty pledges partook in the ceremonf ies of initiation into the fraternity on June first. A pledge dinner held at the Gran' wood Hotel, February 28, preluded this im' portant event. Their addition to the roster added a new strength to the Tuyere organization. f362J Left to Right: Top Row-Alfonso, Artman, Barr, Becker, Chapman. Second Row-Clark, Dallas, Diersing Drueke, Dulczewski. Third Row-Fisher, Flynn, Gary, Izzo, Kammer. Fowrtll Row-McCormick, Murphy Murray, Nellis, Norris. Fifth Row-Perflelcl, Petty, Prenatt, Reilly, Sparling. Bot:om Row-Thrasher, Van Atta, P. Ward, T. Ward, Wolf, Zilles. f363j 45 Wm Ii mr' 'up J ? ff: eam na ameames -f..:,,.: 1877 p Q W Q WOW 1,,v,x 9 VX' s v Cexqxl-43 3 .QJV cf O Jffiz 061 6 04 0 O O O I I N ' U 52 .'f' ffV-V' yv W 1 , 3 X. ID 1 . - I ' ' W 44 555 l' L ss ' w gf H Zi s ? vs ? Q K J Z if in , X , J Q2 ah -Q: 1 NWS? xl. . ,, if Ax. .5 V' . ,. 4 Q Qi? ...... . , -6 N155 PP : wig? Y E W f " a f M viiif xv YQ-,. o 5596 I Cxv . agggfg CLUBS HN 'W f fir L o ORGH IZ TI NS . QLOW go + QQ 'Q w --- FAATAJRXJE tok, ff 4 0 r A09 ?X -- DSC ,AY DZ-i NM M iof me 401, O? I ul J. r A fa -'i 1 -fp.,-Q13 , M ig. 'A' fa' E -a-' 4' Q 1 , , 3. it-'awe Q 'wif f - .ry '- 'rlvrfl if ll! .M i :gif it -.:,,,,,., .lr .,. 1.-f Er? v.-ns i-. 5 'A+' il l, ii E' f wif A lliilitilzi. il- lilill-If pi-'T:"'gl fa. r 9 ' 'mg-E: my il-1 v' 7 :lil 1 sql' U - 4. Ny' ,- li, my 1.v,,,,.,.,y . W., TB- 'fu 'fd- . ,,r ., -' A at . .T rf., 1 A .Wt . waz.-J. , Ai : -l 'V , ,ir . vs 'ff- L' lf! '4 - - ll ,li:',.g. , 5.-L., ,E ,xg-I ' 'NA v-'ry ulfffzw rl 'il iawifil, . , fi 2 ' iff at .. .1 1 t' ' I-391151 3- ff.-.yr .' 'i ff-El" l L' ' W. 1 i ,JJ 125,152 .Qjr',Q,q'.Lsr f i' 'wiv Alf .1 sg? ,. .,,v..,.-wg N-',.:f"'fgL5'-1,' .4 sg! lf -Vi.----all v ,X ,D I ra? 392' 7'.a"se1wf - .-v If gin : 45,137 '7 Qs, .F ,fr l., Xia fri milf' 24,5 -,QM -" Jggfyilrg . 1711 EK .I 31 'wlfffll f . Q' 9 1 511.5 ' M574 fr x .V r. .N-',1y', l f W " .5 tl x-,- . I - - a- --E-. .....s,,M,1 5'iY"'3,Ft""1s .i . an Y q,- ,e 1143--1 if N' 1,56 My 'fx . .,.f- rw --E M.. M J'.fw smmjgfrv.-Q 4 . E 4f"'l?f'fF4.:1i.ff?... " .tr sis' J".-fi, 15 .. 'in f .- iw . mf. gg: F-1 iss' 't - 'H sei ll . ,Its E142 ' Gregory Mittig Christie ADVERTISING CLUB LEo MITTIG ffff LEo HYDE f f f AUGUST 1. CHRISTIE f WILLIAM B. GREGORY f TANDING in the front of the numerf ous infant organizations on the camf pus is the University of Detroit Advertisf ing Club. lt was organized early in 1929, with fourteen charter members. The need of a club of this nature was long felt by the students of the Commerce and Finance College, who were interested in the great field of commercial advertisf ing. lt was one method of associating themselves with the practical men of this profession, and furnished a means of draw' ing them together for the discussion of problems common to them all. The purpose of the club is manifold. Primarily it endeavors to promote an inf terest among the students of the Commerce and Finance department in the advertising and merchandising functions of business. It also seeks to encourage closer contacts f f f President f VicefPresident f Secretary f f f Treasurer studied in the classroom, a factor most necessary to a thorough and a wellfrounded understanding of the profession. Membership in the Advertising Club is limited to those students who maintained a high scholastic average, and who have shown marked interest and adaptability for their chosen work. These limitations are strictly adhered to, thus insuring the personal interest of each member in the affairs of the society. The club aims to cofoperate with the faculty by securing recognized business men as speakers to address the interested students of the Commerce and Finance school. They are assured a constant stream of practical and current business information through this mediiun. To Professor Lyndon O. Brown, instrucf tor in marketing and advertising, and hon' Mg A . ll l i , 3 .f i n i fr .sr t." I gf! lisi' S 'iw 14' rift. ,,nlQ,?'x'v J . 5 . 'Ui li A 75491. law .ia . 1, . 3 x A A' 3? '. ggi fivt 1. 'L 9 ll between the students and those men who orary member of the club, is due the credit I have acquired prominence in the advertisf for the formation of this serviceable organf ,Up ing world. Thus the practical side of ad' ization. The club has assumed a place as S lg vertising is presented along with the theory an essential unit in University activity. ' t'f,'r,.f!-fffif f .Tr--TiifT'i',sa,-ifjfii A 'ts lf- 4. .H'.:.fgf--Jirff' 1' +P .:tFr?rF4:f"'1 . 2.1'ElL14f'9f'fl..5+f+a Mififfll-I--2. ' S .is. . li 57? 4' f-A n-2111? - ,.,a Q -. . ' wax, f366j ," ' A 'P as r ' ff. - ,I N a .rf ,. ',Qi'r'7j' I . V jx . lefrsf ,fvdjjl 'ja-ij, 'Ti sri eff "1 1 if Gif 393 J .ggi lgiffii n" K, fsiifl its -Eyrjl' ,. M- I A. 3 Tisflli as If jf 7.3-', fl Qi X"'l 3 ...fs ,f L, ,K .x , .N U2 :Wir f -.ii I ESQ: I. ma N, if ,M -V .-, ., ,, ' I . EHR .. 1 . .- 'ji LE Perfield Dallas Muffat Murphy AERQNAUTICAL SQCIETY ALLEN W. DALLAS fffffff President JOSEPH A. MUFFAT f WILLIAM I. PERFIELD f WILLIAM P. MURPHY f HE University of Detroit Aeronautical Society has completed its most successf ful year of activity since its inauguration in 1924. The primary objects of the society ff if are fast being attained. lt has succeeded in creating and maintaining a feeling of good' fellowship among the future masters of the sky that is unparalleled on the campus. lts meetings have been the source of much educational information to its members as well as affording them social recreation. jfijfjfji The gatherings of the society are often attended by nonfmembers seeking bits of ij? ll knowledge concerning this infant Held of endeavor and enjoying the airfminded at' mosphere of the sessions. IQQKQ The part which the aeronautical society played in the organization of the National Qffff Intercollegiate Air Conference was perhaps is its most notable achievement of the past A A year. The first meeting of this body was fi' held on the campus of Yale University with 'L I about fifteen aeronautical schools in attend' .1 lit? ance. It proved to be a great success and the representatives of the University of r?'!4-A-:3if.i1"' IG-f . fig 555 fr f 'asl A+ A f VicefPo'esident f Secretary f Treastwefr Detroit invited the group to its home for the second meeting. This meeting was held in conjunction with the AllfAmerican Airf craft Show early in the spring. The setting was perfect and the delegates left with many kind thoughts of the hospitality of the local society. The technical value of the societyis ses' sions were extraordinary. The science of gliding was foremost in interest and many eminent authorities on this popular sport addressed the organization. Prominent leaders in the aircraft industry were heard throughout the society's busy year of ac' tivity. The list included Capt. L. M. Woolson, of the Packard Motor Car Co.g Harvey Campbell, of the Detroit Board of Commerceg Major Ralph Royce, flight commander at Selfridge Eieldg Lieut. Paul Wurtsmith, of the First Pursuit Group and former student at the universityg Edward S. Evans, glider enthusiast, of Detroitg and Carl B. Eritchie, of the Aircraft Develop' ment Corporation. N673 ffl 'li 'L Jr' P j W " Q ii. 'V I .V A L ,r rv: I.. .,.3 4. w I P View lic f. .Q :I lp.. E-AMI! 'Q ".:'i3'J . kfljfi 3' - I -re 1. 392, l' 1 ' 'P . . an 'lfsfflffj VY if if Q ef. ' ir, " ln, ,gkfy ,Ig .f fs' ' "f 'flafff . I.4f..Iij fl fi 'If-if-Tflrlli .Y 8151? , .L .. I , . 1 I drain ,W , in jkifj jr my 11 'f':l'.5 ,N Vx . .J . l. i I.. ,ti -1, rgr I - if gy In 3 5 fl! .l if 1 via , Mi-. ...H V- 1jI."lfJ Q mf, 9' .I . ii s 'bw' .w 1' .,-. l .f I .' '.' x ','1. fn' 1 Y'-:nt ,,. . .. u -L wi J Ilyy I' S T f ffl L' I: if 31' ,r"t W". '. A s-ik., L l.j'.a,1j?l' lfh .i-lfffyivfl 'f ws- J I ' ,f Y su i . Q5 :-,Y . . is lf '. iswffi. J-25141 if ff rgfla ,. 1 .F '-1 'I 5515 Li ijja . T' E li dim nwgfl if gy ip, V bl airy ig? .lf -I f :nf 'M " Lfitffif .vgzfsgf iff' Ml if Tiff! 1 -A' f' vl I Q -s-3 J f .1 . .-3 img , 4,-. .,-. .-.. MA, ' .,-w . W3 :Q ,... 1 .-'a lfa f --.' 'L , .1-,j.31IlA2, "3lg,,""QJ.f:,XDd5I," lvqjsff' 5, ' 4-Ly. 'start ' Hayes LaLonde Oles Homant A L P E N A C L U B GERALD H. LALONDE fffffff President FREDERICK W. QLES f JOHN HAYES f f f LEMUE1. I. HOMANT 1 HE students from Alpena, Michigan, who are attending the University of Detroit attempted to organize a club in the fall of 1926 but their efforts met with failure. They were too few in number and their interests in university life too varied to form a lasting organization. At this time it was evident that the necessity for such a club did not exist on the university campus. This year, however, with a substantial increase of students from Alpena interested in promoting their welfare, the need for an Alpena Club became clearly evident. The result was a complete reorganization of the club followed by a year of successful activity. Unlike their hrst attempt to organize, this effort received loyal sup' port and splendid cofoperation from its members. The primary object of the Alpena Club is to bind the students from that town into a body which will reflect credit upon their native city and promote good fellowship among that group of undergraduates who are boarding in Detroit and consequently f VicefPresiderLt f Secretary f Treasurer are deprived of extensive social connections. Their work, other than that which they perform on the campus, lies in the creation of a statefwide knowledge of the university and its activities in the field of education. This endeavor is largely carried on by the personal contact of the members with the youth of their home town who are pros' pective students of the University 'of Detroit. Small informal parties proved a source of much enjoyment to the Alpena students. These affairs were staged by the various members of the organization according to a definite system of rotation from one to the other. The club climaxed its social activity with a banquet at the Greenwich Manor on November 10. Every member of the organization was present and the club feels that it is destined to become a permanent organization on the campus, growing with the university, and making accomplishf ments parallel with the university's accom' plishments. ,,+, R 462. N .9914-, WEE: aa. "F sf? -213,31 " .--:ffl lg af, My 2534 , My A 't gags I K. qt lt, ' ik, C ,JI it Mr .fsifli "'N'ktKI"1 2 I Q' Q E , jyvofi . y If M lgtjtxggty C IJ. .Aw-...,vP 'QV .Q i ...,.f', llfg-1 tilts, f. .52 '- if .R i 3. ,'-.ff-v'. , .,: ,I V ,. .I ,rj .-, J P W' : i 1 'ze si 1 ji' it , fm, 'flrigfx , V4 ,wat Q , . . , ru, W ,. , ' A few .1 "rf5lQ, si W, .f 4 In vi 1, ., Iwi!! ZW" .' 5 'u 1 gl"'2 J? xarl na' H . 'f axvjygmwx r nj i"ffl?s-F31 if it sg? 27111. --Wi it-fafv .fH-Rv'f'- 'Z'::A-iff' .g'f:f"l5ii if 4 ? 5 51,-I ' 5-Y, f: 5 4,1 jf-3-. ,.m,: ,' ', 'lu . ,Q,.! in ' fu . -bl. 'wr ,-fa ,. x i rq, f368j . .. 'wk 'gl f , ' -U '-12 "-dw --' F fr VZ?" "'if'elg,,.5L,-1l,5:s1gQf5-' W-..q, as - il .' 1- , ... 1 ff. 1 if .iv - - .' 1 , . , 5 ,.i45vri, i-1-ij git i . 1, ls. S' . f.-4.3.5 '- . f.Q,:5..i a--mfs: - ., 1 ' 1 4 f 1" ' is ', '.i.:.' 1 fs r,. .- ...4 ..' 'I' ii' Q- :visit '- lm. W4 'iii- ifilflglli. li lim-iii?-dl filfhfv rEl'fi"iff t 'A - 'fit : I f fr Fisher Lynch Andrews McGuigan , . AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CIVIL ENGINEERS JOSEPH A. LYNCH fffffff President CUTHBERT W. ANDREWS f fVicefPresident , JOSEPH A. FISHER f f f Secretary VINCENT M. MCGUIGAN f Treasurer CLLCWINC the precedent set by the railroad bridges. Mr. Nellis, of the Detroit other divisions of the Engineering Col' Edison Co., explained modern methods em' lege the Civil Engineering Department ployed in mixing concrete. David Alex' organized a society in the spring of 1928 ander, chief engineer of the Canadian under the watchful guidance of Prof. D. P. Bridge Co., related the trials and tribulaf Gilmore. The growing need of being tions encountered in designing and laying banded together was apparent as they the DetroitfWindSor Tunnel. Mr. Cohn, watched the benefits which other depart' of the International Bridge Co., gave a ments of the school derived from similar very interesting account of that great strucf organizations. The great amount of ture from both an engineer'S and Hnanciers' knowledge, both technical and otherwise, viewpoint. Cther activities included the that can be found at a meeting of Such a entertaining of the University of Detroit group is surprising in its almost limitless Engineering Society, the Civils mother' scope. body. ln this function the society cof Cne of the important factors in the sucf operated with the Architects and the prof cess of any organization of this nature is gram furnished an educational and enterf A the quality and prominence of the men taining evening to all who were fortunate secured to address them. In this matter enough to be present. 1 the Civils were very fortunate. Among The year was brought to a successful -all the engineers who addressed the gatherings close with the annual banquet celebration were men who are dealing with projects of at which time the officers for the forth' nationfwide interest. George Porter, of coming semesters were duly installed. This the Canadian Bridge Co., gave a resume of affair was the keystone in the social calf the work entailed in the construction of ender of the society. 4 , 4 6 1 fha. , A 55693 ., . Q L ,X "ff fv mv if 1. 1 . I .4 ,, ,,, , 1.11 1,-,sr 'i 1 -1 'H 'ff --'J Ls 51" V . "1 5' f' a t - '-A '1 445. xl 4,44.f,y,g-.3 ' 4f"'f"?':f' sliiiildlilsi 'I 111321 xg! , 'gli fi" 2. A II 1. ,F I1 5 tw fl .wig- +, f- mf- - staffs i Y! 'u3sl1f'W' il lw'11d1'lai' M111 xii' f 'ilu J: ' a s q j 1 3,.':A'r1 ' M521 ,SG xx 1 'VI' Ia . , if 1 A ful? el I I 1 1 Lg ,vig 1 Wifi- ,f,e,,A iz M, 'lui5,, Af vi 1 ati. if 7.-fa.5wf, yr., im-.1 ,.-.1-iff., af. , - , Hp.-ab, ww . -- f'x.e'g, 91.9 -if .gh,iFSAjT' 1 5 A 14 . .1 -.-,i,.c,p lqegf ., ffgfi:,,iianig . I , Alphonso Faur Westrick Haldeman EQ? S1 L15 . , Tl :N -I i, ,gl if ' 1 q u. .eight .Ili I 116 r AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS EMIL FAU11 f f f ffff Chairman VINCENT M. WESTRICK f f VicefPresident WILLIAM F. HALDEMAN f Secretary . I 1:5 MARTIAS I. ALFONSO f f f f 'Treasurer AS in HE University of Detroit lJI'aI1Cl1 of N0tQw0fthy amgng the Vafjgug func' the American Institute of Electrical tions sponsored by this branch was the 'll' Engineers was organized at a mass meeting annual banquet which was held gn May 1 of electrical engineers of this university on 9, and which was the major activity of the V ' the evening of October 19, 1927, and offif past year. Among the many present were cially recognized as a branch of the Na' the regent, dean, and six professors of the tional Institute in May, 1928. At the Engineering departmentg three prominent it ' I same time Professor Harry O. Wamer, of electrical engineers from various industries Q," the Electrical Engineering department, was of Detroit, and fiftyffive students. ,Q ,. F573 Lh. , nominated and accepted as the student Regular meetings held at the various inf counselor of the branch. . tervals during the year furnished the tech' if Student branches are organizations of meal Ylewpomt for Whlph the branch- was v Ig dents which have been established in Orgeimzed' At Such times .a pmmnient ,5E,f,13g32f. Stu . . f 1 . b f It , engineer lectured upon a suitable subject. In 55 mstltuuons O eammg Y acu .Y mem Luncheons were held at two month's 3 igiaji' bers who are members of the institute. . 1 , d . f 1 1 h yy, f U h interva s, an in orma unc eons were Us Milf' The purpose of this branch, as embodied held one hour before the regular meeting in the byflavvs, is the advancement and was scheduled. These acted as a getftof dissemination of knowledge of the theory gether party for the students and visitors. HQ 1IIIII?.? and practice of electrical engineering, the At the ninth annual banquet of the U. ig 1 presentation of a proper prospective of the of D. Engineering Society the A. I. E. E. engineering work and the opportunity to was well represented, having three guests ijgljg become acquainted with the personnel of present at the reserved table, and a repref . ' ,.Qf7,5,s,gg the American Institute of Electrical sentative of the branch as a principal Q fffgja Engineers. speaker. I'if'l't:LA ff 131352, sf,-f ...af ,.r1 ,ri if p f-.ff.1.:f.-ass. .iss .rw 1. ,saws I ,,.. ..t, 1 irr, .X .X A as saw- LA , 1 N.,,,r .. apnea ,..,,.,.,r nk, . wwf- f370:I aff N' ' LW TTA- Mi. I ,EW .5 l, V ,, , 1.4 . . gp, f ya 2-it .aqjv-I F ' - f nf 'f-,z ' ,B fs it 'f yfifgifi !f'u'f' J' iv .7 ,, :i.f!'LvLj Q 1 ri, K' A Iii f K l 4 Tu"'. A .bi ,., .fs HM--Q 1.0.5.- ,s.'.'f If H , .43- .."-.. ,il n Vi' T" ,f gi. xx . . 'Mfg ix .. .W . , ga.. l A iw.. xcil ..,. ,-, .LL he ,Q as, ji 2- if Fountain Cornell Rrlutanen Boone ARCHITECTURAL SCCIETY JOSEPH F. CORNELL f f f f f f President VINER E. RANTANEN f f Vicefllresident GEORGE F. FOUNTAIN f f Secretary RALPH W. BOONE f f f Treasurer HE University of Detroit Architecf tural Society was founded Cctober 2, 1928, by the present Senior architectural class for the purpose of uniting its mem' bers in fellowship, combining their efforts so as to promote the aesthetic, scientific, and practical efficiency in the architectural profession and to encourage the developf ment of architecture at the University of Detroit. The Architectural Society, whose Orig' inal membership consisted of fiftyfone students, has grown until the present roster includes more than a hundred. All archif M tectural qstudents of the university are W eligible for membership in this society. Under the leadership of the officers and the ,im executive committee, composed of class jpg representatives, the society at its monthly Q in meetings has been able with the assistance I of special committees, to educate and en' 5 tertain its members. The meeting usually izffaif consisted of a plain or illustrated lecture presented by a speaker versed in architecf ture or its associate professions. In obtain' , s I ' .1431 'E L, ,- W r 53.73. - H, fi., r- , Q, fp , , . - - K-Yf.,, "gi, .l. ' - ing these speakers preference was usually given to the alumni. The lectures were followed by a brief intermission, after which the society's business was presented. The Architectural Society, although still in its early stages, has accomplished much for its members and for the University of Detroit. It offers its members that much needed combination of social and educaf tional activity which is so desirable for all architectural students. A society having such a purpose and scope as the University of Detroit Architectural Society is cerf tainly destined to advance. At a meeting of the society in the early part of April the executive committee def cided to restrict their membership to those students of the university who had success' fully passed all architectural engineering entrance requirements. Considering the fact that this is the organizations first year on the campus the Architectural Society has made remarkable progress in recruiting an active membership of more than a hundred students. 53713 3- 4 Q5 - I ' ,H ,, - .r . . 15" ,. -Q A lg' !wi5?,4.K-jeg? fasgehqg' Y- ,xSff'3iafgg5..,. .J , , it 4 , Y .f n sr. , A 1. I U fr- , nf, -Q '- .Q '-ffm: - vm M-,, 5--QQ. , ,WH .J Q' 5513-if :"gJ'iv.f-2333. R' fi - -' ' f--of 1 - ' s 3.-Y -. aajaagpxqy ,, :fmt ' Mullin Collins THE ASSOCIATED JOHN F. COLLINS f f THOMAS I. MCINTOSH f RAYMOND I. CUDNAU THOMAS M. MULLIN f HE Associated Evening Classes or' ganization was formed in the fall of 1927 by Bernard Kummer, prominent stu' dent of the university, with the intention of centering the activities of the Night School of Commerce and Finance. Since that time it has become the leader in conf structive endeavor in its department of the university. Representing every student in the evening classes, it has bound them into an effective unit to act for the night school in the life of Alma Mater. The group is composed of the officers of the four classes of the school, together with three delegates from each class ap' pointed by their respective presidents. This year has seen a quickening in the work of the night school due to the unf usual activity of the Associated Evening Classes. Cne of its greatest successes was the bowling league which met every Monday night. Sixteen teams of ive men each were organized and competed in the contests throughout the year, This phase of activity was under the direction of Eddie Cttenbacher. A basketball league Mclntosh Cudnau EVENING CLASSES f f f f Clwaiwnan f VicefCl1ai'fman f f Secretary f f f Treasurer was also organized and included four teams, one representing each of the classes of the night school. Its schedule covered a period of twelve weeks, and was conf cluded with a championship match which was won by the Freshman team. These activities hlled one of the greatest needs felt by students of the university, that of adequate sports in which every member of the student body may take part. Socially the activities of the organizaf tion met with equal success. Dinners were held each week at one of the downtown hotels, and on May I3 the association held a very entertaining smoker in the gym' nasium of the old university. A dance sponsored by the evening classes scored an extraordinary success and drew an atten' dance of more than two hundred persons. Carlton Shaw was chairman of the affair. The association's last accomplishment was the opening of a subscription fund among the evening classes for the purpose of a plaque which is to be erected in the lobby of the university building in memory of the late Rev. I-Ienry W. Ctting, SJ., who died in June of last year. "- '.' F, 6' - . . .-. . . 5-f . ...F- l ' if . fn.. A ,,a5,.'l'.-j ,i" greg 1 A 1 ,Irffgn:.I Gigi' 55723 ...-, .5 F. - ,gk ..f,-v,,g-- iqggii. gnu... V. 41 I -U. +: Iii stiff? J?',gEQ.Qi. Ii likfga IL . IEW 42' IL ll" wal., ltd .aa 'K 42 7 ' AI.. Flirt Mahi' , HUM V italy .il -ii! STI. in-I llfiill Wi' his if if af' K' K:-J! rg. Iazxlrg .. .,, ,, .- ' ' :if J 2+ F .i,xi.L,, .' fLTa.,r v: il 3 "a-3' . .1 fm 3 at 1- I . ., 1 Af , :-R X 'F 1 I .Q if g ' 'I F ,signs 17" '. .'r4"i W 5.-gf, gjf 4:4 'I-If. .ku ! :wr 3 I I l - , L 1 za!! 5:5-1 vi 4 . 4 f . I :.'..i,,'Q! I K., jf ,. U-59, .,, . . bl l if,-fl :rg T- A . f""a-.- L""'!7 Ill si- 'xg J A-,elzii r - Q " 7 I+ -S Pu. ff' '41 1' r L I .Q-qwanfgs ' ' 'gl 'Q " -' H- , ' , ,Y ra f. ifT+r'xff:iffiQ5' 'fiat-I".e ffelf. qi Y F J , . ' fel, -1 I. y wt is 9 ."r'f'T'lii"-de---7lLH I R lr". :wif 'L ' V' -A I 1 1' . I J awfvi -new ,fff--' if ,fiQfgl'J"'J5ll2i:Qg,gff:' 'r,l,"'fQ-"' ,,.g4-iI:'4LYf,"' Jigs sjj-,j14,,' J., I 1 ,, .,Qf.f,:T'.'ig.1 w,jf,'T 3:1 1, , if -4 fel' i., ys Q 3155 Wal. QW EM fig-'Q 1"f'?if : :ij 1 , RW, ,si Q a Wal Y, Vila HQ T 1 ,I n-Iwi . u , 'ffffl L'LH,q Q If N I - 4 , 19' I, Z ij. P' , 1. if ,I 1 ir? '- v . I . -,I , . - ly rig' :am G ,J if, E 31,4135 9 Nj: 'sg' Klqifll, .. 2-,iw 'I Eivjf? 3+ ,Ei-Q, W , W' iiffgfiji iles? 15 ll? i V, . .. ., , - Kern Boyd Castonguay CHEMICAL SOCIETY GILBEIKT XV. BOYD f f f f f f f President CHARLES A. KERN f f ViCC'PTCSIdCHI THoMAs CASTONGUAY f Secretary LAWRENCE LOTTIER f HE formation of the Chemical Society, to bring the future chemical and metallurgical engineers into a closer relaf tionship, was accomplished through the efforts of Fr. Morrissey and Mr. Altenf burger. The first meeting washeld Decemf ber 6, 1928, with Mr. Altenburger acting as temporary chairman. The hrst organized meeting took place in the Chemistry Building january 30, 1929. And the newest engineering society of the campus took its place in the campus social activitiesa I The membership is composed of any students taking any form of chemical en' gineering. Automatically, .he becomes a member. The faculty of the Chemical Engineering College form the honorary members. f f f Treasurer nent men of Detroit have addressed the society. In this way, the members are given an opportunity of hearing of the ways their course in chemical engineering will serve in the business world. Practical exf perience, combined with their ordinary curriculum, is necessary for such a prof fession. Among the most noteworthy of the outside speakers was Dr. Waterhouse, of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech' nology. He is one of America's foremost metallurgical engineers. Although only at the end of its first year as an organized club, it demonstrates that if succeeding years are as successful, the Chemical Society will attain the foremost rank among the societies that represent the Engineering College. With the formation of the Chemical Society, the engineering school now has an ,I W 4 2 ,ft . I fl-fail All ,ia Q . --nf ., , if X nil' ,x F. Q ,vi .5 'ix f' I if, iv, ailfff iff, 5 ' 51: ..U,,,, ge,-y r bl, ,M V px -, -7 Q-4 ,R N s if 3 N Er. Morrissey, who has ever directed his Organization representing nearly every is Ji? f.'fgi,f',fi' thoflghts 'foward the Ofganfzatlon Qf 3 branch of its curriculum. These societies -,ge ig SOCIBW for the Students Choosms Chem15t1'Y do more than function as campus bodies, fi? :mf as 3 PYOICSSIOU, 193931116 the first h0U0f?1'Y more than furnish a common bond in their ifffIi,f I gf' member and advisor of the Chemical ' Y . ' , 619 . particu a- ranc , t ey ma e or a eig t ,M 'eww SOCICW- ened interest in the studies which they ,H-f ' NU In the short time of its existence romif re resent. I 'WQV li 1 gg-f 5-5 ' "V-Eu.. c -K ' 1 4, be Em- we ,. Us.-sw 373 I ,,p.'4 ,u' ,lay s -m. ...vu fl N, . --4 I I H 1, 9 ".,.j ', .L 4 1 at: it 2 -Mx. v 'l','lP. F 11, 1' 'r . -:Ti lfldfi" i:i'l'i"-'il frf:f,.f fx., Aj, ,,. .-' 4' :wg I 1 :U 5.1 L yjdi, V' J In I' J 4 I l ' w lil 1' 'X :i.1,1.i I W., fri, .. .- Y ,, Milli '1.wf:,:' ',':""4, c. ,xi 1 :fly rr T v 4, -l,,- f ll, I-V ,f5j.ygf,i., .-cl, I if I . w- ', sh. Y L 'L . '- Qi ,, Qu fi Mlm LL,-f' 4 ,, .Iii 'v V",-441 .LL ng fp :N Ji-ly! "T f' a I t ,if 4 - 4 J' I . 1,4 .gy . - , 4 L .,,. yifgg IT- ,'rNx' .. ,il I, lf li .15 'F-ffQffL' I Ffiii., fiqflffelll' a,f",f,6 lf: llpl ,wi-W.,-1,5 ' .1 if 2511! I! mf' lpn . Mg? rf' as 4' 'll :L fjvls Qld 'ls - "WW : r 4.31 Q - V rr, V Avvb VN l QV, ' to , he - - - I . it 11 51? , ig, is ' if Qi? ' sl il- G, iss I . wi. it 33 fi "il 5,5 Maledon Seebaldt UNIVERSITY CE DETROIT CLASSICAL SOCIETY WILLIAM J. MALEDoN f f f f President BROTHER PROTAISE f EDWARD SEEBALDT f ER. RoEMER, SJ. f HE Classical Club was organized in the early part of the school year in order to better acquaint the students of the ancient languages with the classical culf ture of the Creek and Roman civilizations. For this purpose a seminar was formed at which the members met once a week to study and discuss the work of the ancient authors with the moderator of the club, Rev. Charles Roemer, S. J. During the first semester the club treated Greek literature of the age of Pericles, the Writings of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and the early plays of the Cref cian theatres. The second semester was spent in the study of Roman culture from the works of the Ciceronian and Augusf tinian ages. These include the writings of Horace, Virgil, and Cicero. f VicefPresident f f Secretary f Faculty Advisor to afford the students an opportunity to hear lectures by men prominent in the field of the classics. The first of these meetings was called on November 23 at which Dr. Cravatte lectured on the classical influence in the modern cities of Europe. At the second gathering of the club on December 18, Rev. J. A. Erumveller, S. J., gave an informal talk to the students on the value of the classics and answered objections that are often advanced by its opponents. Rev. Father Manning, S. I., by means of an illustrated lecture on numismatics, the study of coins and medals, gave the history of the advancement in civilization and culture of the nations of the ancient world to the club on February 18. The club had the honor of a second talk by Dr. Cravatte on April 12 when he delivered a lecture on classical influence on painting 4.1 I all Q QU! M23 .: 35 Lid? H. in a ,.,i, ', v' 1' L. I . x 5 ,I si: -' , Rh ,I jw, ri 'Ziff lf gift. Cla? i1'lJiZ.,:7 I. ' ' ' 'I-f 1" ,I psf. 'Jil ,filffiif ,V ,. lkiiaffg- al f,l'3..., F' ,Q . s EMI ak' NH 'gil gg ,. A .' 14" njvif iii, sig' is 91,1 hi 1' ,,,,a,Q7 Evening assemblies were held through' and illustrated the different types of the Q if out the year under the auspices of the club art by lantern slides. Q' Pilllggglilill t fi X . i'i.lr-:tiffHleifffr :1T5'7': rl' 'Ili 375.-iil?lL:'iQffl!f.?11l'?n'l'TE:'1fL l Wgf.Q:f.zL4i11f,, 1 I Q. --'r ,'7y41'l.Tlf5-f ,' '. , w, TNF., gif " ff.'fr7.,,.,,,.ijrf"LQ-jf 'jf - - 4- ...- -f - Sf-,M - - t A'-, f-.. 4 ..1s as ,,,V.. L11 , .- X. img rdr ijuiivw, 71..- .ii- 1. l" " I -1,1 .ag Mx - JP rv, " 1 .ui 1. , ,W l if r H -1 A r J'+?'i'l- 5 ' " B .-. , g ,U-,Q-A M is J. .3 fulfil 5' up PI 1 wif' Dietz McCormick Gibbons Perfield ENGINEERING SCCIETY GEORGE D. MCCOIKMICK ffffff President LEON C. GIBBONs f f FRED M. DIETZ f f WILLIAM I. PERFIELD f EVER in its history has the Engineer' ing Society enjoyed such a successful year. The initial meeting was held on Cct. 8, 1928, at which time the gathered members were addressed by Eather Morrissey, Dean Lawrence, and Others of the faculty. Pic' tures of the new Chrysler engineering building were shown and explained by I. A. Macauley of the Chrysler corporation. Coach Boeringer spoke a few words on the topic of student support, Captain Connell and "Sod" Ryan told some interesting hapf penings of the Tulsa game. Nov. 19, 1928, was the date of the second meeting. This meeting was sponf sored by the Aeronautical Society and was a lively affair. The speakers of the evening were Harvey Campbell, vicefpresident and secretary of the Detroit Board of Come merceg W. A. Strickland, chief engineer of the Cadillac Motor Car CO., and now naf tional chairman of the Society of Automof tive Engineers. Pictures of cadet pilots training at Brooks Field, San Antonio, Texas, were shown and enjoyed. f VicefPresiderLt f Secretary f f f f Treasurer The sOciety's annual banquet was pref sented on a huge scale with 516 members in attendance. Harvey Campbell acted as toastmaster, while the speakers were Judge Vincent M. Brennan, of the Circuit Court of Wayne County, C. E. Hirshfeld, chief of research in The Detroit Edison Com' pany, E. A. Batchelor, editor of the D. A. C. News and sports writer for the Detroit Saturday Night. Another meeting on the evening of April 29 was sponsored by the combined Civil and Architectural societies. As their speaker they introduced Mr. Cohn, 'the field engineer of McClintockfMarshall Co. of Pittsburgh, contractors on the new Ambassador Bridge across the Detroit River. The talk was illustrated, 'and dealt with various construction problems arising from the building of the bridge. A general meeting was held June 9 at which all business of the present year was summed up, and recommendations made for the future. Officers for the new year were elected and introduced. 53753 H T7 Qu'-i M Q l 1 . ',w4'..v 1 H 1 05? f .M..i.' , ,, .ni fzifg1f1",,!f x . l .. f.'t-qnn ,CMJ fm i gm 1 N 1 YL E, in ts, l srl .. i ,. I Q L' fl F", r A 'EL 2. in 3 r'-E Q4 "rl" I 1 . .14- . -n , , 'inf-'fs "Sf 5 4 wr . a ' ft-lil s ',a,,,. 1 ...V .il- 4413 ' 4 ,gen if P 'a if 'vi-'gem-E' ., . .V J fa Q rf- 1" x.g,f'i1,. ' a ...ig m . , 5.2! 'P .f ,asf 17:9 N , Aifbcxnl ,':e '1 r- , f- F , -144 ni' ' " niv' 1. . .. I lv- 4 gf 1. f i -...., . r. .J -. -' ' -. 'F-ff' ' if ff a '-J' 1 L C , Y N f-- . w A w Y I I , . I Q 5 . E JL ,,'g1f!'f?P5j, .X E I 19046374 ' M , . -iq 1 , - + A-wr--sf - .5 ' i , A Vx A '.sNE,'.-,sl mp, ,,.1 i Y.-1 4: V V, :V N4 ' mv .ng 1,3 iw-ij-.jrgf.' 'V - "+e,.Tgg,te'-f'sFssf-lfp Mesina Rosario A Z5 r . , .f, ffm XIQZQ 43221 Duarte Santos FILIPINQ CLUB H1PoL1To DEL RosAR1o ffffff President EPIFANIO DUARTE f f EUSTAQUIO MESINA f BARTOLOME SANTOS f HE number of Filipino students at the University of Detroit having grown considerably, they found it necessary to organize a club in order to foster better relations among themselves and become a vital part of the life and activity of the university. The Filipino Club was organised in February, 1928, and formulated a constif tution and set of byflaws to regulate its .. A R N ,F I ,ins Fl'5.,f'3" "ff.ifaf!AvQ:1ii .-,hi "f1'g,',. . "' f ViCE'P7'CSldC71I f f Secretary f Treasiwer standing which exists between its members and the student body in general. The members have won the whole' hearted support of Prof. B. N. Blakeslee, who having lived among the Filipinos a number of years as a missionary worker in the Philippines, is contributing invaluable help to the success of the club in the caf pacity of advisor and friend. The club's most successful social event .I by lt? F' 1 ,. -25"-, ' . if E 5 rp . 5, P 1- V, fied 'Gigli 3' .- M "f I X 'uf .--vw :gif"N 'I fin' -ff-31 s -r 'YM 'A f 5.-sv If-f..-5. '.7'3.H:J7 'af 'ri' J- iff. 'T -u 1 ' kv 1 . I - ' - of the year was a dinner art iven at the Subsequellt actwliuesl , l . n home of Prof. Blakesleepon Blllivember 3, EFLYIY 111 the h1S'50fY Of 1755 Ofganllaflona for the purpose of entertaining the new the members of the club adopted as their members gf the Organization, 1,311 motto, loyalty, love, and service to their The Filipinos who constitute the mem, Alma Mater. The entire organlzation bershin nf the dub are for the most part ffgfg constantly works for the promotion of fel' Students in the Engineering department. lowship under the American social scheme. However, the Club is also prominently The club has been directly responsible for 1-epregenrged in the Arts and Seienee and '53 the better social and intellectual under' Commerce and Finance departments. Lib -:A A A 521' H Q -.... . '..fi ..-' i . z I, 'T' it ' ' 2 5 -..,,,w,f-as rsvej .1-Q. Z, R. J' airway - Q 'ff :. -1' . 2,1 J, 'J -- 4' win- , 5. -ki, . we -E. V ,f -1 f-. R' . M...-an--1 -.- 1 Franklin Brown 1 l . l Ai Clark Bekema GRAND RAPIDS CLUB RAYMOND I. FRANKLIN ffffff President GEORGE F. BROWN f f NICHOLAS P. BEKEMA f RALPH CLARK f f MCNG the campus organizations which fill unusual places inthe field of university activity is the Grand Rapids Club, a body composed of students from that city attending the University of Detroit. The club was organized two years ago for the purpose of furthering the interests of the university in its members' native town. Such organizations are among the most important factors in creating a statefwide and nationfwide interest in the work of the university and in its dependability as an educational institution. As other clubs perform this purpose among persons with whom they come in contact, so the Grand Rapids Club fulhlls its mission among the people of Grand Rapids. In addition to their work outside the university, the club forms a welcoming body to those students who come from their native town to the University of Detroit, and promotes a spirit of goodf fellowship among them that makes for unity in their work at the university. ..2if',..f. , ,I jk. .. ,F-R L .,,. .. i -. J 9 f.1'j,fg.qv .1 312223 -5,315.71 gy ,U 454 l .u 91 aww. A eeA ' - ,. -2 A qitifflq-4fFfi5k"sl -R' MR"-i if if I ' 'u f Vicefllresident f Secretary f Treasurer During the past year the club has been very active socially. Their nrst general meeting was held on November 1 in the club quarters at 4115 Midland Avenue. At this time a schedule of activity was formed, officers were elected, and new members acquainted with the old. The first social event was a swimming party followed by a banquet at Webster Hall held on December 13. Spring Lake was the scene of a closed party on December 28, and the activities of the year were climaxed with a banquet in their home town of Grand Rapids on April 1. Pros' pective students from the high schools and junior colleges of the furniture city were invited to this function. The members of the Grand Rapids Club contributed their best support to the major functions of the university year, attending the class dances and the Union Cpera as well as participating in the various extraf curricular activities. ' 1 .J 15' 'ef 53771 xiii: 'rl gif? 'Asa' ffiift lt I 'J' K 5 ' 5 ' A! is fs! .x A L 1? aa ' , 3 wg T. tlsllm ff it Sify fi .,a Kiwis, tg-353, M mr ik l lx A in Z, 'i lf E lk xi 'L v' in G9 5 ai li i i 5 i Lf? J N g V A " s . fs ,I w --a " .. ,,,, , A,,---,, 4- ,.,A- ,sf-. X -. .. 5 fw.g+v ,s 'N ' - ,,f,'3L'f11 '-."'..vf'f -5,-:1gs:sa3f,E:ss. igiaf-a"f-' i ij ,,-ss .fs R iv it .,' H .Ja-.g " T .. s . - 9 1 A .1 iff-1'-'Q f.1'l..- 'i fi A 'iii tvs? lr' ff 'ff'sf:wk9'f'sf' fr' as-' -- .,,Sa...f r. K- if : 142' .I Y lr A.sf1.t-'.'-if 'Tiff r 1. aa A H 'ali-1' riff -r J 4+-f raw'-f L' A '- 5'-' -f ' R' ' t xr' E' - " A e 5 yn . w.f:a . , -.g..V.', V 3 Mitchell Craig Harris H A D R A 1 A o L U B THOMAS P. AsHLocK f f f f f President MAXWELL N. CRAIG f f VicefPresident FRANCIS T. IVIITCHELL f f Secretary HERBERT L. HARRIS f f Treasurer CR the past few years the members of the PrefLegal classes have felt a definite' need for some organization which would bring them into closer contact with each other and gain for them their proper posif tions in the campus limelight. A small group of the more dynamic members of the classes determined to fill that long felt need and organize a Pre' Legal social club. Thomas Ashlock was the leader of this group and was the pri' mary motivating factor in forming the "Hadraja Club." The charter of the club was accepted by the Faculty Board on stu' dent organizations in November, 1928. has held weekly meetings. The common procedure followed at these meetings was parliamentary and the programs consisted of debates, speeches, open discussions, etc. The club sponsored a smoker in Decemf ber which enjoyed an excellent attendance. Cn April 28, a banquet was given at the Chinese Princess Cafe, at which time new members were enrolled in the club. Most of the Hadraja's roster is composed of Pre' Legal Freshmen. Undoubtedly this organization is des' tined to play an important part in the uni' versity life of the future. PrefLegal stu' as bs 2 il .121 sv 55 fa V 'A All students who are taking PrefLegal dents in the past have been more or less G gp curricular requirements in the university segregated from the regular activity of the V i I are eligible for membership. However, the campus. This state of affairs is accounted bl 'L club selects its roster according to a for by the fact that they spend but two 9 ' rigid standard. One of the requisites for- years at the university. However, the membership in the club is high scholastic Hadraja Club intends to enroll their mem' j standing. bers when they are Freshmen and thus 7 The Hadraja's salient purpose is to afford them an opportunity to immediately tg stimulate an active interest in debating and become a functioning unit in a great U legal work. Since its formation the club university. ff' G A Q Y A ,ff--q"""hF"""w-wxkxb V ' WJ "i.fafffsfs . S T f. f 4 . Q-U'jr A fn ai? A if tilt? Qc.. 'WC-..,N,.1-ny" 53781 4 ,Q Tis' 4. 1 A if V X if ' W - JF, N- , -A I it 4 . f C' .72 f Ai . . sffsfig ,T y gilt T wr , X, i -iiigiljf G u l i T if .lif 'T I i .Ii GK 1 i-V! J M , I . . li Frazer Shubnell Galbo ,lp I ltlv X I f I E S T E R S . p MILES MCMILLAN ffff f f President W JAMES E- FRAZER ' f VicefPv'esident Z Leo T. SHUBNELL f Secretary T - JOHN A. GALBO f f Treasurer ' 1, ,..-v T X ,J I' T-Ye 2 Q if , T' u" J, -ffl-. f K i 11" - ,H 1' 'gif pf 5' fi if ,ig i . RICR to three years ago dramatic ac' tivity at the University of Detroit had breathed a last dying gasp, and was for' gotten on the campus. Then came new talent, and new leaders, foremost among whom was Claude H. Heithaus, SJ., prof fessor of classics. He conceived the prof duction of an annual opera under the sponsorship of the Union, and as a result "MerryfAnn" came into being. It was a dramatic event of considerable note and took a place fbeside the best collegiate theatrical productions of the country. As a child of this supreme success in a field hitherto neglected, came the Jesters Club, an organization of members of the cast and chorus of the university's first annual opera. The club continued as a campus entity the following year and put its efforts into the task of repeating its first success. Still under their former leaders, the members succeeded in contributing to another anf nual opera that at least equalled, if it did not surpass, the success of their first. "Aces Wild" contained most of the talent of "MerryfAnn" together with several new stars in the Held of college drama. The first semester of this year passed, however, without the Jesters being heard from. lt was rumored on the campus that another opera would not be attempted. "Hoofs, My Dear," the third annual opera, was produced, and the Iesters were vindicated. Some of its members will leave this year, but new members from 'iHoofs, My Dearv will take their place, and continue their valuable work. This year the club has def cided to enlarge its program by staging one production each month in addition to the annual opera. It is believed that such a policy will keep interest in dramatics at a height throughout the year, and eliminate the possibility of that activityls passing into the decadence which it experienced but four years ago. ' .'-4 W M eff-. " V sf H 1 l 7 Ii3791 3.9, i his 1 rl . , ' 'S file Q, J Q. -J ,, i md.: ' iw, , K Vi I ' ill Q 1 V Ik f sea - ,rg ., .,.. ' 'Q L' 'T 1-. , . Wi., .f ' " 'T-' . 1 ,t.a,5.. 7 rt M U .gatgasyxgw ,rigwff . Qs. .Q'..",. .:!'," ", .gif ,,-' , Q' ':'- 'Qs--lg f N Q. 2' V. 5- riffs' A 3 3 ff is i A T tgirl ,csv ng-.apart -9515 af' ,sis 'ral -I -.fc .-4- A.. . ,, 3 it tiff. '2.:sa. ' 'ggfj:.j'.f. V fgu 1- ' J 11- V in gf.. .J "I-.,1f,.i M ,agus 'fagjfigiffg 1 4. f T. Engelman Meyers Defever Zemens K A D A V E R K L U B CYRIL R. DEFEVER fffffff President GEoRGE A. MEYERS f ALWYN A. ENGELMAN f JOSEPH L. ZEMENS f VERY useful place in the activity of the prefmedic department of the uni' versity is filled by the Kadaver Klub. lts membership is composed of those students who intend a future career in the medical profession and are preparing for it at the University of Detroit. The purpose of the club is not social, as in the majority of university organizations, but educational, and the activities of this body serve as a valuable supplement to the curricular work undertaken by its members. VicefPresident f Secretary f f Treasurer ing visits made during the year was that to the ParkefDavis laboratories where the manufacture of various medicines is carried on. General meetings of the society were held twice a month at the university. At these meetings men and women at the head of the medical profession addressed the members. Among those heard during the year were Dean MacCracken, of the Detroit College of Medicine, and Dr. Elaine L. Straith, plastic surgeon. Dr. Straith "1-, -. gEl5reP .imaig im! .. , ,yd X W "FTE I HE- 1' 'lf if -,gy Trfiti j rt, lui? 1 V134 if x- J .,.f ie ng 12? f T .lfigri h H1323 it 2955? E L' i:,t"t3 33413. 4 F42 I. .ikfkl 2 J 3:4 F24 - "Qi tg! it 5 The practical side of the medical profession gave an intensely interesting lecture on the is presented at the meetings of the club, and modern development of plastic surgery and aids in the application of the theory found illustrated it with slides taken from plastic 3 in the studies of the classroom. operations. Q3 During the past year the club has been The Kadaver Klub has approximately especially active in its Held of endeavor. one hundred members, and claims the larg' ftfgfllj Each Saturday excursions to hospitals or est enrollment of any club in the university. other institutions concerned in the medical Any prefmedic student who attains a high he-l profession were made. The members were scholastic record is automaticaly made a gn organized in groups of ten or twelve for member of the club. The accomplishments these visits. At the various hospitals of of the club during the past year have ref 5 the city the students were allowed to witf sulted in manifold benehts to its members, 4-24.5 ness operations and other applications of and have greatly contributed to the progress C modern medical skill. One of the interest' of the medical department of the university. fy , " ' ii bf ..'A' J X 5 WLM? fssoj x x . ,Q ' rw wffmr 'A X. 1. Hi- I f my z, iVj,',,f1'UflH1,'f,ff71.,,K4, Qupv-Irvi fx. V' ,'-'gi . ,.,',1",-. ,"f,"','L'k-,fin .. - I Q j-Q-Mlu Vgi"'A- "1' ,V ', ig' r- 'E 1'w"- 4.5-W 4,33 " " ,I,g4,ll,'5..:'3Fi.'lk'i- 14.'ff'if..f' 'vmlai' Lggjfi ". J,- W '1 .Qi 'l ,,' Q,-gy ",,. 155- ' , ' ,n,f'f...' ' - ' YJ sv-, in I Q . . V f 'fl - ' , Stat 1 1 . T Q? ' V Q. l 'T 'lm Lfgf' I lata, A l ' .f.'3l'ilj3i . Pwnlll ' ii- fb il ' Vi Defer Henk Ameel Meiers M It ..Qj'.q'.1," MT. CLEMENS CLUB GEORGE E. HBNR I ffffff f President . -fiif.:.y FRANCIS H. AMEEL f f VicefPresiderzt if HARRY M. DEFER f Secretary fgffiw. JOSEPH A. ME1ERs f 1 fffff Treasurer gi 'pam' I HE Mount Clemens Club was Orgilil' given to the Mount -Clemens Club for the , ized ifl the 152111 Of 1927, and 111 1fS two effectiveness and originality of its activities. l-gift., .A years of existence has earned the distinction If is the purpose gf the Club to bring back Tvblgt of bringing many new students to the from the dances a good representative ,P University of Detroit. It has endeavored group of Mt. Clemens students to start the to retain such associations with the home fall term at the university. If town of the Mount Clemens students as . . '. . . ' - .l .. . . Bes des its own activities the club has it will induce others to come and partake of . 1. . . H . . . f . . . given its entire support to a activities o ru- , I V-.fi the benefits of the University of Detroit. . . . J. , gif' -:I K . - - - h the university. The Union Cpera, the A .'p,.Qi..,f The social activities of the club ave JP th t f th iversit the ...p i been very successful, and promise a still IC rom' etsptor iho bi. aid all grim' more happy future. Several dances as well Oiellslc Con es S? le PU dlca 1011513 f 1 'iw as social dinners have been given at Web' OE 61 extrqcurrlcu if ii eggfrs wal ebt 'llifff ster Hall by the club. The men have now FTE Sntllauiasmfffyf t icthtcl Enilgstalegtg undertaken Something new in the Way of of individchzflceiiigmbefs have been di' lfllfiii Hleetmgs' They take the Orm of Weekly rected in to the proper channels. Thus has dinner meetings, which, as a rule, are held th- I b t .b t d b ta tau to these im, at the Carlo Cafe, near the campus. f 6 all CODE U Z. in H 1 Z hov M.ixQ..l Plans are now being formulated for a bingilons W1 t SV IC 1 S mem ers a e dancing party to be dedicated to the seniors C 6 Comme 8 P' of all the high schools of Mount Clemens. The value of its works lie in two direcf The unique way in which the dances are tions: one within the university, as an ac' 6m.jf'Q handled serves a two fold purpose. It dis' tive body of students working in its plays the ingenuity of the members and schedule of endeavorg the other, as a force , their initiative, and serves to carry the repuf outside the university, drawing new stu' tation of the university to a wider Held in dents from a city which respects the value an impressive manner. Credit must be of higher education. QQLQ5-., If . I . ' fi t 381 1 ,.- .f .tg fwfr in .-Q53 . ofufe i 5 -. . sis S9 ,gg ll" ls 'l i ,AHQ I blagler Frazer Labadie PHILOMATHIC soo1ETY JAMES E. FRAZER f f f President f,,i 1NLBBR1'I.IJAGLER f fYWcePWendent CRA A. LABADIE f f Secretary HE Philomathic Society is a forensic combinations and a careful schedule was f V organization which aims at specializaf formulated. WiHiam Gregory, senior in i tion in public speaking, debating and the Arts and Science College and president oratory. During the past year the society of the society, donated a trophy to the X , has been instrumental in developing many organization with the understanding that QV- f . speakers from the Freshman class who will the names ofthe two students who won the if l be eligible for next season's intercollegiate championship of the debate tourney should If i Cgmpetjtion, be engraved on the trophy each year. tl The membership of the society totaled The duet which enjoys the distinction of 7 fortyfiive during the past year. This num' being the first students to win this coveted ' ber is smaller than that of '28 due to the honor is composed of James Frazer and M fact that the university added a course in Ellis Duncan. Especially worthy of honor' intercollegiate debating to the curriculum able IHGHUOD HFC Albert Nagler and of the Arts and Science College. All those lVl21l1lOIl Collar Wl1O placed second. H ' students who have had one year's experi' The society finished its season of activity ia ence in the Philomathic are eligible to en' with a study of famous old orations, and lg, roll ilfl the d9l3?1ti1'1g ClflSS, H115 the fI1Cff1lDCfS the various members delivered them at the l . of this class comprise the forensic combinaf regular meetings, if tions which fepfessvt the University in ln' The Philomathic is one of the oldest and K i -' tercoueglate Competltlon' most popular organizations in the College W at P After its formation at the beginning of of Arts and Science. Since its foundation S the present school year the society inaugur' the society has trained many famous def ' ' M ated an extended series of debates which baters and orators. No other society on I, lasted until Easter. The entire member' the campus possesses the worthy traditions ship was organized into twofmen debating of the Philomats. . . x, ia M, -. N l . ,- in S ft t -Aga --se. fl 1 ff i""W,t at A i . ,- 999 fsszj 43: lf il ' 1 P' if .. fr 'P .i X F , . fr' Brown Zbudowska Perman LeFevre SENIOR GIRLS' CLUB HELEN S. ZBUDowsKA ffffff President ADELE C. PERMAN f f f VicefPresident ELEANO11 HUNTER BROWN f f Secretary GRACE W. LEEEVRE f f Ti-eagiwefr HE Senior Girls' Club was organized in 1925 by the members of the College tured into successful bridge parties held at the homes of the different members. gfggeii as " is J its 5 1 Fa" 6' , Q? ,Slit A i 'f' J ,3jy . it f l' w Q It i f A ff, r' E i ' ' 3 x fi i K E ly X i f ii ! i J -93 Q'ii'V W M, t I . , of Comfnercijand Fmgnse fogfhe llmrpljse The alumnae chapter of the association F -35 5 t O Creatmg a etter lm ersitan mg' Ormmg entertained the members with a delightful f f ., e A, more permanent friendships, and promotf . . . -,V.1 A . . . luncheon, at which time the girls were Q.. , ing unity among the cofeds, so that a mutual f H 1 . h 1 b d ,Vw Ai, A 'I agreement on all senior topics might be Orma Y We Comed Into t 6 aumnae O Y' E, it attgjngdu - The club concluded its social calendar in The dub, DOW four years Old, has estab, with its annual senior girls banquet. The lished a worthy precedent. The officers of P9-1'tY WHS Staged lil the Ship Room of the t,ij',tqi Q V' the present year,have been chosen from the League Of Cathdlc W9meU, Which V15 7 entire body of senior girls, including those bCHUf1fUuY dewfated m Ye119W and Orchid- V in the Law Department, and both day and The table WHS 3 hilfmonlmfs Panorama . night departments gf the Cgmmergg and of yellow roses and orchid ribbons. Ap' Zljixg, 1 Finance College- propriate and exquisite souvenirs were 9 Elections were held at the beginning of Presented to the s1f1S HS tokens of femem' 'X , the present school year. As proof of utter bfance- Q ty, tb lack of departmental rivalry in the balloting, The excellent spirit which permeated all 25.13 the Club elected Law Students into the Off of the activities of the Senior Girls' Club fices of 'president and secretary, and Com' during 1929 promises much for the future QQ? . meree EDCI ETHHHCC SlfllClCI'1tS lflto the offices of Organization' Thg P3-St School year W, ' Of V1C9'PfeS1deUt and treasurer- witnessed the club's most successful season i, A ,Q Ui The social season was inaugurated by a since its inception, and it is destined to ' series of informal meetings which later ma' experience still .greater prosperity. , f X f f - ,W W A ,Y , E- , ,M . I , ' ,.., E f E -i S- ri ra .R t--ii We - ,fat 'fi if ijssaj E532 r 11, - fi ,-,. 2. - A.. Tw, , . 1, r ,gif i . , , I i me - Wi' ' 4 i..i.7Iif'2 w , J ,. gan, Q UHF, .'sii'y!' " ff' if '77, , . nik f. 1 l" W .. A ' 'G-HJ L, "QI, i 1 In ' '. 'va . 'Q - Ori .. K. .V5'1' as ". Q" u .A . .. .. .1 i ry . I T.. Z IQ., me-' V :Hana ' -1 , , vs up J T 1 is ff' ls' .3 Vpii! ill- fs A nf.. rip? yiixg-3' 2 C,"' ,We- Feraf- ,fr . I 'T-' Y ' X JF ,ff --,eil Egigja wwf l gl - .li ,. mQfV'y - I i ,, ,4 lf 5' CK - lil' .f.., 9 I t EAM -.3 ,,i I f'-in -if .nf ja, .. ,,. .L'i3f4a1 .fiiff aff, 4. , .f'l'I. .Q AEQJC. F1 .S A , e J,,:f , ' if '1 .4 'u.f?il1"-s. I ' f I ' ' 1 im' ' - f at wr? , i , , .a -i ,,,-,pi gi If. 4 ,YVX -V ,AA vpn I fimgi ', i .gr 4155,fZ.'Lv,g.a,':'ffl. twgiifw - -H - ---- e -I-,gr Ns--MALI, In sf' I ' .ggsidl .EX Nw sk lfi , :ff'5i?. is' l Muffat Perfield McCormick Hogan SOCIETY OE AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERS XXJILLIAM I. PEREIELD f f f f f f f Chairman' GEORGE D. MCCORMICK f JOSEPH A. MUEEAT f VINCENT A. MCGUIOAN f MERRILL E. GRIX f f -HE Society of Automotive Engineers now includes in its roster the names of some Eve hundred students seeking the degree of automotive or aeronautical en' gineering. It is obvious that it may truth' fully lay claim to having the largest mem' bership of any organization on the univerf sity campus. With such enormous backing much was accomplished in the past year that was important to the members. This year's activities of the society conf sisted of several meetings of a combined social and technical nature. The members and their guests were conspicuous at the annual dinner of the Engineering Society held in January. They took an active part in arranging this most successful event, and should be given a great amount of credit for their efforts. Early in March the society, with the aid of the student branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, entertained the Engineering Society at their regular meeting. They f f VicefChairrnan f Recording Secretary f Corresponding Secretary f f f f Treasurer offered as the speakers of the evening, Dr. B. I. Lemon, chief development en' gineer of the MorganfWright division of the United States Rubber Co., and O. T. Kreusser, director of the General Motors proving grounds at Milford, Mich. Dr. Lemon spoke of the extremely bright pros' pects which the future holds for the local organization, while Mr. Kreusser ref lated many interesting tales found-in the testing and proving of machinery in the automobile industry. On April 22 the U. of D. section held a joint meeting with the Ohio State group and the student sec' tion of the General Motors Institute of Technology in the new General Motors research building. The society closed its year with its annual banquet, when they listened with keen attention to the words of Eddie Rickenbacker, internationf ally known in automotive and aeronautical circles. vt -V -- ,...-372 . . . w ,p .V ,W are it H .1 '-.Na -...s1f'.f.af-L, 'J - N843 I' 'nxlpxlr ggggya :fwfr iwgil mild Xryf qi ,YS 5' Eriigfr ffl if X 4, gi I-A Qllgii M n 1 ri I .H .V 'ig iglffiif i E I r I ii'l361,i,! 1 W WIA. , MW 'f :M-" li! xylia Q.:- c'i3?,'Pl K I, .. ' ,. nl B5 l, Q. 45' iii f bi u 11 'F A ,VK-9, r .i' ,I 21114. 'I 'AE 'Ui' flfglp-41 I Q? ' 'N 'ff i.,i .r.g Iii? il .ifgifti Si? . ,f ,i ia Q' . x .6 L "ill .wi wel? THE STORY OF 1929 TOWER VERY thing of beauty and value must possess unity and balance. Especially is this true of any artistic endeavor in the Held of literature. In casting about for a theme upon which to build the 1929 Towsiz, the artists hit upon a motif that was both beautiful and unique. They chose the history of the Society of Jesus. Their conceptions in color from this theme are remarkable and make the art work of this volume outstanding in the field of university annuals. Their paint' ings are brilliant and artistic-worthy representations of the story which they tell. The decoration is taken from illumin' ated manuscripts executed by monks of the sixteenth century. These manuscripts oc' cupy a high place among works of art. The illustrations are don-e after the style of the leaded glass windows adorning the' cathedrals of this period. The major divisional pages present the highlights in the activities of the Jesuit Order. Each event which they picture was chosen for its apparent application to the division of the volume which they represent. For the univ-ersity section is chosen an illustration of St. Ignatius Loyola in the role of General at the Jesuit- headquarters in Rome. He is writing his letters, instrucf tions and proposals for the direction and help of the Jesuits throughout the Oathf olic world. The Glass division depicts St. Francis Xavier teaching in India. About him have gathered all castes and classes, kings and princes, beggars and coolies, awed by his simplicity and goodness, and acknowlf edging through him the greatness of God. Father Marquette and his courageous explorations on the unknown continent furnish the subject for the Athletic divif sion. The fearlessness and perseverance associated with sportsmanship Hnds its highest example in this zealous missionary who went far into the savage corners of theaearth, conquering the elements as well as the superstitious fears of pagan wor' shipers, and turning ignorant savages toward the true religion. Organizations are exemplified by an illusf tration of St. Ignatius talking with his companions. The scene is laid at the Uni' versity of Paris where he drew about him those who formed the nucleus of the So' ciety of Jesus. NVe see them here in their student gowns, eagerly listening to the words of their leader. For the Activities section a scene of the Jesuit Fathers attending the plaguefridden people of Marseilles is represented. It is a soulful portrait of their singlefhearted def votion and undaunted bravery. In 1720 thirtyfeight Jesuits fell in the service of Oharity during the horrible plague which ravaged the old world. The value of activf ity in the University of Detroit is a miniaf ture. The work of the Jesuits in sending succor to the suffering peoples of the world is the model of all valuable service. A very interesting episode of conversion by the Jesuits is found in their history for the year 1655. Don Jose Pereira arrived in Sweden as Portugese Ambassador ac' companied by his interpreter, Don An' tonio Macedo. The latter was also a member of the Society of Jesus and had been sent to instruct Queen Ohristina of Sweden in the Oatholic Religion. The Queen became interested and at her re' quest the General of the Society sent Fathers Oasati and Molino to her. They were introduced as Italian gentlemen who were touring Europe. Through their efforts the Queen was happily converted, the event taking place in the royal palace of Gustavus Adolphus, one of the most zealous defenders of Protestantism. She abdicated her position and was received into the Church at Innspruck on the 5th of November, 1655. This remarkable event is the subject of the illustration for the Features division of this volume. Besides furnishing an admirable theme for division of the book, the extraordinary events of Jesuit history form a noble herif tage for the works of the University of Detroit, one of its modern institutions. ' fsssj Q v v F P I' P I' Y L 5- ' ' ' Y ll ' , LQ rf xiii? . , Q ,- xv We i nf,-Q 43 gf gr .r 'i ' ' fx J Q'-Jul A-new P wsu -' i ' " ffqfffw - it r . va,-110 QA.: ' 1.4 i f f , -T ima, i lg gipffi lQ3,?ffH ll Q' GQ! iilrrw' ' l- lull"-rw. zillf ,Q if iii, l r , i .X . fl I it fi ' Q 4 1 J' a 5 9 Q, f . I f 1 Production Vforlq on the Tower--Any Tuesday in the Varsity News Office-Mr. Mitchell Rushes Thru Copy Finding jobs for Students in the Business Research Bureau-Digging for Knowledge in the Library , M. l msgfiyf 6' .ffl ,lv -v'f1f?l.', , W'Qk1!zl'R,, iw' iw iq in il' www 1552452 QW fi l as U' SEM. ff-JP x , EH ' . Q., Wil, V564 Q fglll 1 if J and yi kg t F' lab i Q ' if 1 ll wg gm l, ea if i . M5- i -f c g iall ' 'i it - r ' N.- My i-1. ' QQ f387j r RQ- 1 A ., X , 1 4 ,, "' Q A, 6, ., Qzkbzk 5. " .3 'VM fe NVHWW HeFmV'f3TNvQi5vTx Q Qy5wH6fffRQ, A - ,ge e4i'b nf, .TQ +,fgLQiz 525 w, ,-ij! ,fa , ,J ,g, H: KNEE if Z AIX. 4 '-m:hyx,:1::azun- x e .nv A1 L fi M 7 QD -ik , X , - . i Leafning the Latest in Aircraft-A Windftunnel Drag Balance-Gift from the U. S. Naval Department--Construcv ing a Glider-A Gathering at the Ford Airport--A Section of the Experimental Department fssal ,gif ww, 51331 ie-ifffi' 1,3-Q 7,1 Agfa . F: gilt . Wf ikaitf' '9 'fm ff wif J 3 W-f-.'i, ,5Ef5 FE1"'Q.f +7 . 17 ,T V , ,gal Kr 'gym - , IF! K- 'U JM: y-'uw'-L. 9.7 M ,:, ,. -vm?-5 ' wt: -H.. u'kaJ. n.,v,.v 1 "li , ue-. xf , .' 4. V a.-,i g 'J M ff? .5 Lffi 1: , fi!-ff: Qffw kit-3 !'.'g H L 1 -,t:T':l fi fx-' ? 1 ZIJ I 1f+' -",f" 5f' N121 ' V"5 4 .' W9 Q 1' Eg 5TfQli' WPI-, 3 2 Keg? Lf? I, Jr, v 1. '- if 'V-1 3 Aff? 153523 r1gf.3 4- wifi nf'! . f 2121153 evfx ,h x,.,-., . 33. ,,-. , fi-3,-sir v V . - " Q ' 'v.:fl. , :+1r1.r,,1"-N.'n'w ' " - -.-fwu Lf , r 1 1 -. I - , lg"f,,k' ' 5 1 . ' V.-' 2' ' ,...J- Seekirzg Lost Microbes in Biology Lab-Careful with Those Acids!-Testing New Patents in the Great Engineering Laboratories-Getting Down to Bare Facts--Figuring it Out in Theory-Testing In in Practice 53893 . Hpiffi? "5 ,re A 35 J,-3 ,jig ,gli i ,A J,,'L,. If My -3 in Q-we-fy, ,U i, V ix ,JV ,H , . , .- If ':"'.1l-qt,u:",.j -A. Z. 3 17 if ,. 4-N' l!',.f..,ff.-s,."g.1k wi- ay 51 u .4 ini- if --ge '1 w 'xiw Q W. "w'6,-.. ,K . 1 V- 1 ' , l .. - 2 QPF? 251, LQ,-gif L-'fL.5'-,Q c. M V fi 'G' ' -' "' viva' qs ' , 1 -A -' -, ' F' - A Effie-"' isa:-wwswbw ' 'lfxfnmf ,Sa 'L 2' 'kill' Qwffau itil f3m:f+fif' "1-Sci"-f .: - H if ' we gi, 1- - ",'2'f' F7 V ' N .T 12. ff "fl" .dn "iss" Q, f ff, fp . , NL-,, W 534245 e fAf291:3, K iw Y 4' 1 'ff wr EL' , if , - - 5. M41 A . . . ' ' ' Iii-624 , ,"' ' ifillil l X NTT' Q JW:-'," ,i u Q rf, 5 KW -Ll' WSJ .lv 4:1 ,7 JA 3- as l V lf '22 Px"3:"?xi 'ia " lm f mls? fix ,F ww L1 lfclcv K wi 'J' 3 in ilk- 594' mx El 1, sl len?-'le ,QYMQV l 'A K. 'lil H gil: M Y .ngfg 15 S 1 in Hi me .ffifw Gi ,el F. , wl- l - l ff f if 'Z ,Q l D l aa I 7 7 . n b l lf ' 1 .. '- 1 ' 3 , i 1 l I I lil: Seeing the Campus at a Distance-Green Lawns Surround the Faculty Chapel Wlzile the Tower XVatcl1es from a ' 1, Distance-Tunneling Out on the Snowfbound Campus-Tl1e Plaza from a Window of the Commerce and Finance Building-The Memorial Tablet at the Base of the Tomuer-Wlzere Thousands Watched the Victorious Titans Q? E5 lf L fin' H' 9. f X cl 1 'l il fii ,eele e . no l an ws, " D'f'53"g 5 Qfa . fe., F 929 Qs-faiguu-.,6-'pgszgf I 390 I i V ' I , 'A , 'Q W V. i . igififfkifr main Q' ,351 K1 fx-111-,J GWQQ feffzy ,w QA ffiwlg ,A nj Xilvis",',5i" 1V5f5Z ff " 1'-by X2 H qqi'!!h,hl ' xii ,lf h' Q17 , fx-'i Nw ,z . ,wi xii Vggv, 'H jig 5,51 ,2lT.-N :q VULPJ'-5" fr fw. rlifkf I. , ,, - Lx- w 'N -if A . Q. xv' c mf c . e N, K, XL N Father Horst at Work--Father Morrisey in His Office it the Chemistry Building-Dean Seehojfer at the Tele phone, Miss Lundy at the Typewriter, in the Commerce and Finance Offices-Miss Donohue, Registrar, at Her Desk-Dean Lawrence Figuring Out Some Engineering Problems .,"N 'f ,413 J, yn IZQLJ .1 .f 1 5 E ,Q-A , -a.,"1"m , 15.5 r " 'Sqn ' l"2A, gs- Q. 'X ,V V .x, ., vff,--,. Q'-, . 9- ' I " I 1 A i -1 . 1 V- - 'D A ,, M, L. -1, , , p 4., N .. . A, ' "' 'Han' ' "' l xv wg-'P f -f 5 3,131 .1995 axgy! 'lo f-ggi, i'1f"3'f5'5 ' u, F f Q .zlykxk Y-. ' 5 A" V ygiyk -an 4 1jgg,'l,? 7 -V , ffl: W-, 5 if-,Ja .L-, E' ,xy ":'Q,j iiigw of 45, ..:'.,,y 16 1 i--71 i Qi. r Jul' lvao . 1.-Ng. ,mf 'E ., 5.-V i l' figvw . ' 1, .Kai New lvpgi, 1 J 4 X X l i I , V j ,Q ..l ' lr . i 1 . A A i if- Q --KL V V ,, , ...0' I 71 '5k'Z, .. X Av .f -i K . -gp , 'Y ' ' . . 10. '. . Qi'-5 ATf79 The Great Annual Delta Sigma Pi Football Banquet-The Basketball Banquet Sponsored by tlie Same Fraternity The Engineering Society at Tlieir Annual Banqiiet-Wlle11 Pi Kappa Mu Became Omega Beta Pi ' w ,, ' . if .17 -I V 1 K , .U-fn, 1 -an .Q ,. , 53923 ,-as r V' , , nay! 'U , sm .- lv il lg an H. l., rx if lf". v RLT qv- v ., 1 ,,,, S M,1.'L' 4' 'lar' -,iffy - - 'H' 314' if - V 'fy' Twill f'iv't,,i Cs? 1 3511 . l Qi! 2, :J iw.. ti A . g- A Q- 1 41 251-ed? J L Q 5 'N ' 'f"f':f2-1 wwf- in . W-J 8' 'X-of A a.,?g iff A-'-.-,mf-f-X ".-X.-"':'+W:W'1Tl:'Wff'a1 o fm,n'5i5k'Y oQ ig. o-Qgjw 1 '9' ga'-ycE?w,n.5WmM o o 'Qsffapos H,1'NA5 wgru. ofuaoxwowohsfwqwQweifwezzgfwowgqjgi W ' 'iiyginif . -1435. V P' 'fin , ,,,, t . 5131.531 .9 JM if . A Q fi , r. x I 3 Sm P Ti' 2335! if Magi, W S19 G 13 'K I. L. 19 'L a?'Tf if Wiz Qhf 5 1 TXJ7. gf! fiivfpo SIQQJQ gf- J w Wiz , , ,, " LJ ' 359' .:. v6' FET? Kgs 'fig S ,gfihliii .Vw ' o sy Mfqigzflf HQ ,j we 'L ff .T s ht Mlm 'fix 2555 .5451 3-135213 Msg A " iq 5' . FIT X-4 A ,:-Q, .' P3 -1 .1 I iii? Q3 if jy if ? if iff? Eng. 41 1 ,:i. H342 . wg ml. 59 'Y ' V ' The Start o A11 Ol m ic Heat-The Finish-The Cfossfcountvy Men Grow Tired-Not V uite Far Enough- 3' D Z Over with a Foot to Spare-A Home-stretch SPLLTK for the Tape-A Mighty Heave from a Husky Afm ,. X ,- ' Q53 ' iigugg ' alfa Y wi" wiv, L,: ,L5351 .MJ JK 1- gr V J 'lu 'Tx rf " ' fr 55.-1-s , o wimfm 3 ', 'o ,-L , .w,f'h"245Q,hqAf-g.??3xg'?wf5Nb,,Q3 f,5Ffw5wqgg.f.,QiQ3f,o ,gfigfmfw ' 51 ' Lp, X3 Iwfgkgg of . 24?-wgamiixdgga 53933 n . ,. J ,R ,if-'Q .. ff. . f ' 55 ,Q Ck -'-Wy e. -1 94, pl' f"--g"4gw1. fy! BN - .. 1. ,- lg .v ' 1- 1 e 1 ,K - 1 'J V 5 fc L l--V H' - H ra I 1 - -.7-. , 1 X AE Clean 'That Drivefway Pledges-If 'You Could See 'Yourself as Others See 'You-Come On! Make It Snappy!- J , Y-uv .H is J' - A-.4 , A , V, , ,...,,k . L, 3, -M' 1.. wirqjy,-55 A ,.., 0 M . V1 .-1 f 'f-'L 1--AQ ""'-P, .Cf 'Wa 4 X z., I' U. ,097 l?f 1' ,Q-9 Flu J1- Q Q 1 'Wx .Qfgqg 2 EW La' A K-W '- 4 I fl: If 'tl V9 .-iq 1 of x, lf' 'VW ,A fl-Qi?-:f,! P, e H ff '24 Q fs " K-:i'tl:': . ,J. -- lvl' ,1 ,- i-xl :Vg X . ,-11,3 .f"f fi .. , ff: ' bi, Q, 4l,' , A," . 1 7? 1 l'.A1W, i,w'sY5:. 1-- K., , 4. V? 1' ' 1 ' 1, 1 V P N f'.,',. ,I r A ' 1 ,ll 'jay - :-fn ,L,,a.4' .U-sry., 'H-in S jglj A - 11 e- '-We .' VU., lf! 1 'Ui :fi Mfzf L ..,.,. , . V ,fvri m, .GJ F -A 'I : ' F- lf .'HtI,1 11' , .1 ,bfi T. ,J aa. v -, is if ' "LJ vw lad- yy 1 Yo 41- 1 rr-.,. A 7 ' A , gf .. , wg 'jf 11 ,ful 1' A 7 5 HY. l .,-L 54, .wi 1 .... 4" A. mm' Y 'X-fx-.wJ'b I .' . I, I 1- 'F 'l fziagl .jf Horsemen for the Chariot-A Royal Collection of Saps-Ironing Out the Wrinlilex- K' ' O, Death, Where is Thy Sting? gl: rf 2.1353 . -' rf fig?" wi?- E, f-.f ' K-j,r",. ' -+ X 'ell' 1 Y ' ,Q X 4, Leffggggx . bs ,'L: X 1, one ' ,is L -Y, kj,:Ti3,,,,gT2???f,'f4''it f??.'f3'f3,! 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The Sandfbags Left Havoc in Their Wake-- -Mudfslinging-Many a Valiant Rider Was Doomed to Fall- 'fhe Boys Hogftie Each Other-The End of a Terrible Day .urwnix 2 I Minh' lgsfgr iE"f',2 QQ: 5 fZIj.-,.,-air qrimw ch W' ' N'fT'5'5f' ?"fz,i2-?'-- 'iL::i?iL'T".. 5,1 Za., H- if ff- ,Q -rw, 2, 'A ,I 4 W, . e , E . w f l,"fb,1 , A, Egfr! 3-eggvgl ,:k5aifZlf5e".f NTL-1,-'H. -fgffr-wg+i-P,-,.f-L 'J hi' ff fi, fry V-gfxf,,1?L11w,,',,-10 fr 1 X . ,. ,ff ' ',, f.-5. . lm, 2 iff -5- 3543. -:fm Q -,v2f5'e, V' -fl' F-f':"f +4-', - 0 by .A M fv - :lf gf- ,ww-1' Q M , - A-1' - ' , "lf- " . IQ' ,'?-,awgg 15,1-gL5x5f.e-,Qi g, CK-9 45' fh,,l,:3!"yix13f-,QJ,,1- 1111! - 'l' 44.5, g QQ: ,fra-F.-5.1 F u,!',-.,.i,'1 -,A g ,i 5 -L if 1, fkhjih 4, , 'Si-3, ngwhw--'e3"4,I ,1 M 'b,13'.f.--"r.:1,,,,-sxghl-Iffi.nflA A.:,'g,fk , 1, 1, I A -1, lg, Lg, fy -5- gr., 47,71 .a ,-,5-Q: VY ,W H I ,v - - ff if-L-9 -.1-.gizga .1 x,-an . A ..., f v. 4 - ,A - --.J -fa-wig. if -ik, wiv,-gy ,Lia 57.1. 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"' 9 :-'5 Q7"7"'xx77f55w. Q QT' 5f"'i?t:A" ' '53 ' V' ' "' . ' K t . E ' 'L' '17 Q" ."' 1 f Rf". , , f 5, 'H' --- "fav"-'5.. if M fl'-"L" if . QQ.,-5'5!2.lfL . -. , -fa f . v W. ,1"'1f"1.'? ,L1,14,5 "J ' : 'QP Ir- If .. up .-'H ,, Pr' i ,hr X 'f , H " , - 1- f ' L '- V' ' ir! iif A 'H H29 5? 1"a 4' Q ,, X. 2 W,-2 gif' ,lla ' 9501: ' .. gm .miigsvgl ' Ev 1' - vii fa' ' 2 3 261 is . J Q53 gl A rf ' 'lj The Engineers Encamp-SuTveyo'rs-What is So Gay as a Sleighwide Party?-Spring Practice Before a Sensational Season-Lest We Forget the Cofeds-PM Pirates on HaUowe'en Night-When Seven Would Ride. Q Q, 6 'iii ,W ft" K. A .ft f , , 1'!4"k- ,., .K . H "A -r - ,. ,, . .. N. , , ,,., J' " ,. A" ... , v ., -. . -f ,. ' - Y . Y-rn , a gipvfgkl-L' RMQ-a,ffiQ-,giF.51qfg., "Q,Qffi7'. N i,e1'2:.'f1.fff'w'?- 1 'jf 25, ,5 , 5, Y:-,jf fy, fi-fowl ff-,.jf',fe?"'f' "-.Mg ifgffx ff" 4 ,4 'we-'-5'-4 3-1522 r':-514, pq, Aran- 'avr'-.,w 1 , we-'J 2' ,f 2 ll ' .,1 ' 'H .z ' 4' if h.'.'1f 1' N - 1 "H, "K 'L H'-'T' fb W- ' -' V . uw. - ff. fe, qgwlfr'-mf L"!f,p15f -1. - Y -Xa. -:""T7!13Q?4J- Q --' 1: +4 . 5 ,r 1-' H 4- 'J -' ,fi-' If?-:fm LY'f.'7'g'f'f -Qitlnp ,J gy'-' J AJ ,A , N 5 jing, ff' 252.-ffa:'Q'LPxf3 -. I' gi-2" '.:l,:QQ"2--N""1"'5,:,g,1"'5"' ,L i bmi 'el 'f v' H '-1'-rf' f I-f' ff, ,- 'lj' "'.41g:-air" Pi ....-.Ji-,J K K ' -15? ' 'N V -Q ..-ff 'Sr 11 ' xitlbx ,-2-1:-" 5 396 3 KK." iii-si IA' if f i 'Q 3 5: F ue o ix i o o X LQj::f -il Eta, Zeta Sigma's Luxurious .Quartefs-The Women's League Room, Scene of Cofed Gatherings--Room in the jefferson Union Eluafrters-The New Tuyere Fraternity House-Study Hour for Tuyeres- Spending Leisure Time at the Union House fievg 114 , A '- 1 The Band at Attention in the U. of D. Block Formation--The Silver 'Trophy in Recognition of Sid Gassells Four 'Years of VJUTR with the Band-Arthur Schuman, Stately Drum Major-Eacli Member of the Ba-nd Received This Medal-The Snappy "Hoofs, My Dear!" Band, A Ia XVa1ing's If598fl f ee 5 Taking the Kinks Out of Those Legs-The Cast of "Ho0fs, My Dear" in Their Civilian Attire-Get Hot! Please, Cynthia: What Do 'You Mean, Please?-One of Those Calisthenic Dances-A Group of the More Manly Attractions of the Opera f399j 'Sig 7 -ff "V La Belle M'Selle lack Teubert-Raw Recruits fm' the Chorus-just Two Boys Playing at Love-Fnmlq Kelley is Really Puzzled with -lack in His Feminine Togs-"Beg Pardon, Hauevft I Seen 'You Before?"-Some of tlie "Gals" After Being Polished Up a Bit-Ufbani-le the Incomparable Danseuse l'400il fl, x 1 IK M' P4,4N"sf'3",v""fe T12 Wg 3 e -fx 1- -' i--ew gi e - ,Q :Arg ' 'gf fl "'L.QJ'725 ""1,.:'Sg-157 ,iif1',.'P'4 1 'if ' ' 1 4 '-. X ' I - L sq? 8" iiaffe, fl 'vile W xii? - I I 4 ,-A, E? ' LZ .Q 1 W fm ' 4i'w? 5 f Vx? iifa:7+ HL . kr gg. -ji - Wi 15 M W. P L, el M, fwm' u, L, ,asf V, 'ang ' 1 ' -W I'-Wqhf, 4U7?15, fx Q- Y, -iam -- Hlwff' .M I 5, if hr' ' fs iffy f a' df' am 'wifi has 2 Q . - ,f QSMI' r' ,iivgf 7 iff" ' ,Q av W Rjffzi 532543 ii 3? 2221! 5Qf"fi, 32:3 A JUKWFA T' ' f ig 394 Ck V 'll ffm P, ,M -1, . .M ' ., Y? 1 , , H3522 fi? - w X . ' . X U, Please Take Away the Dahkness!+Not a Bad Ankle-Come Heah, Cullahd Man-There's a Dark Avgument Here Looks Like a Proposal-Cynthia, Herself, Oh, Cynthia!-"A Dollah's a Dollahf' says johnny Galbo-Oh, Lawd, J -,44finf 1- .. '74 2' ,ff . mi H-Tk. M., w, . I 1 1' '1's'P'a??Q'i:':f- 'Q-, " fs" l':M'3L F' 7' " ' ' 'N ': 'd ' JV - M ' f T I 11 nf- my-h fglgl ' ,5 "j i"f'fA:4' wen' 'Qi"'r.!' ..,jf,. Y 'QQ' g.. 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X 5 4' Warming Up forthe Michigan State Game Around the Bonfire-States Band Parades in a Crowded Stadium- Fr. Meskell Snapped at the FroshfSoph Struggle-Fr. McNichols' Campus Watchdogs-The Red and White Band Performs for the Football Fans at the M. S. C. Game-The Union Hangout with Some of the Hangersfout-Not an Astronomic Photo But Fireworks in the Stadium on Independence Day-The New Parking Grounds . . M I-- 535.3 e 52? -xv, QT 'Q r rig Y. iii: 3 11 If K 1 421 ' 3? JNL! 'E' e ir .sf ,npiai ff . .I-ff' 'R jr .flag is if 4 E If 3 ii-5:7 133 1 my M4 if JV -- 1 lg' hfil .R kg, F233 , 2 P? W, ,,. f QJ ga ixgiii rl 'T - 'X' I 5" 7' 1. . 9 kj. 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QW TQ .T fl -x Q, 'Z E E ,., .., -, .. ,... 2 Q ... E3 ,Q ,.. ,.. ,..- ,-. ,K .N ,., f,:. EJ '52 Z" f- ff ,- ,- 7- ?' . ,. Q ff- ,.f- F- ,. f- Z-" ,- '9- ff g ,4- '73 ,- f-,. 5:- ,- ,.. ,..f-' ,.f- ,. g fl- ,- 'I- ,- ,- ffl I ,-" ,. ,E ',f: EE 51 -'E i ..- E'-" fr. ,. ,. ,- ,4- E. ,CT- ,- 711 'QPU 77-we 7 -Tlggl 0- ..,, g. 5 1' 4 X. .La 'Tl .., ... .:,.' .., ..-57 ..4 i iw ::.! if 7 E 7 xr-7 :: ix ' .1 ..4 ,f ... i 5 uufrmmmfmzurmruuumu 777f77777777f777 miriam Muff 17fuffcgffffffratwffwffqywzqggl 74033 The Staff ROARING JIM PUMPERNICKEL, alias Highf pockets, our simplefminded editor. The large success of the "Tottering Towera' would have been much larger if the editor could have been found before it went to press. As it happened he was on a hunting trip at Palm Beach and was drowned. That is, he .would have been drowned but saved himself by using his head. His head kept him afloat for three months in midfAtlantic and he would have starved if he had not had the forethought to carry his luncheon He returned to his mother Alma none the worse for wear and when interviewed gave his usual terse re mark, "I may have something to say later, but the less said the better." CUNNING MAY FRIZZLE, manager of business Pushing her books aside she was able to announce "We will break even." May prided herself on her keen business ability. "I am always on the alert with my ear to the ground," she said. "Why with my ear to the ground? A silly question. Why an eye to the keyhole?" CORN ELIAS VACUUM, managing editor. Called the second Edison, he startled his home town of Friedberg with his patent hatftipper. Now everyone in Friedberg tips his hat and it is known as the most courteous town in Africa. "What does this mean?' asks Corn, and answers himself by saying, "It means that the 'Tottering Tower' will continue to totter as long as C. E. Vacuum remains its managing editorf A. WETT BLANKETT, nonfcensor. "The Tottering Tower must fall" was his motto. He introduced the bib and tucker napkin to the members of the staff or the "Tottering Tower" at the centennial banquet The chicken seen upon his plate is a leftfover from ' the last festivity. It has remained in the biology de partment, a pickled specimen of bygone days, but was resurrected in an attempt to cut down the ex pense of some silly thing. This farewell ,banquet was indeed a sad affair since many of the older members were passing out. f 404 3 Dedication to the Rising enerdtzion HEN conversation lags at the Union House, in the class room, or at any place or time, what do we talk about in order to keep the ball rolling? The answer is, The Rising Generation. Do you really know how big and strong the rising generation is? Do you know what or why the rising generation is? No, you do not know. Nobody knows, nobody but the rising generation, and for this and many other reasons which we do not intend to explain, we dedicate the "Tottering Tower" to the rising generation. In the first place, the rising generation is that generation which rises. Where the rising genera' tion is rising, or how long it will continue to rise before it reaches its highest rising point, we do not know. This much however is clear, the rising generation is with us, it is in our midst at the present time. What is to be done? How are we to master this menace? To organize our greatest fighting strength we must organize a union, because a union is at least two people, and everyone knows that two people together can have more fun than two people not together. For proof of this statement let us take the Arabs for example. The Arabs do not have many unions. They wander and wander, but where does it get them? Now that we have our union we must investigate certain questions. If the rising generation rises, is not that a good thing to do, because if they did not rise they would be perfectly riseless, and to be perfectly riseless, means that you are held fast. Now next we must consider is it a bad thing to be held fast? The answer is, it depends on who is doing the holding. And so we feel justihed in our dedication. The rising generation needs help if they are to keep on rising. We offer them this dedication, and we bear malice toward none except, prohibition off ficers, eight o'clock classes, traffic cops, restaurants which get 15 c for pie, etc., etc. 54053 Ye Staggering Historee of Ye Totteiring Tofwere HE histery of the Tottering Tower is olde, olde, olde indede. In fack it daits back to the dayes when Noas Arc landid on Montain Cyanide and all the litle dina saures were maykmg whoopee an olde Noa thote that a tower shoult be bilt which coluld reach hier than the Eiffel tower which hadnint ben bilt then but witch was bilt at a later period. Sow Noa got all his cohorts together and he tole them thas was a verry good idear sholde a tower not be hilt and they all answer him in the affirmation for they was verry enthusiastik ofer the thot. It was simpel to maik sinse bricklayers was getting no one dolar an ifty sents per hr. an mass producksion was not nown. But somthing went rong somware an nobody coluld speak the saim langwidge witch nobody elts spoke and the direcksions werint folloed like as they should have was been folloed. They says theirfour to no one in partiklar sints they coulldn't unerstand each other "les call the tower Babble." so they agre to call the tower Babble and to this day it is known as the leaning tower of Pisa. Sientists, who are pipple which is supposed to no somthing, say that some day they think they are goin to predick that the leaning tower in likely to col-col- is likely to iallg maybe yesg maybe nog who noes? Sints the tower is tottering' and this public kation is in the saim predickamint they are united in spirit to com bat the unscene force whitch saim is attemting to destroy both. Theirfour they have taiken as there mottoo the olde saying "United we are divided, but divided, give us liberty or the freedom of the press." N063 Athletics 1 SWIMMING We won't never be able to pay back the service Drake "Hellfdiverl' Mallard done for us. He was a rare swimmer and practiced so much in "Tower" lake that he got webbed feet. Here he is shown doing his inf famous crawl stroke, trolling for perch at the same time. RUNNING The track team this year was composed of G. Mustel Bound. He posed for one picture this year and done very well taking both medals. He woulda lifted the weights right to the top but the ropes broke and he injured his nose which kept him out for the season. Financially, track was prof1table, as Mustel wrote his memoirs which went over big with his friends. Next year if the ropes will break again we will have another successful track season. FENGING The Gofed fencers is purty good. They know how to thrust and to parry, in fact they is so good that they have a riding club or shetland pony society which daily trots from the front barn door to the rear barn door. To the left you see Inez "Gutup" Everbody, foreman of the fencers. Inez is purty good. The Gofeds never lost no matches this year, but maybe they will play some games next year so as they can lose a match. . EVERYTHING Intermural sports was carried on this year in back of the engine house. More than 600 went out for the sports but all but four was killed off in the opening matches. This picture shows the survivors in a trying moment for the champeenship. Sadie Schmaltz was not given a show until the boys threw away the quoits and started pitching pennies. Then Sadie cleaned house and was awarded the trophy by the coach. The coach is seen watching the games and warning Willie Oopsenf hoofer to shinny on his own side fthe little cheaterj. f407I 1 0 f ,,,, ...W ,V ' W V. i... ,Fig rfv g.. .M-L q V 4 . . 1 1? . :r W -M21 , ,- .Jj ' 1 I bf-gf .-fwfr ,if ...c , . W K I li r 4 ' ,Z ' lr N gtg V. f - I f ' Y .f ff' ,' 'I I ,4s2.'fl3l'f l." it fx? 17 i I ""N 512, W.. -1 , A TS, I f -1 xxx 4 iv . TS.. SL 'wa OUR SNOOPING PHOTOGRAPHER SNEAKS A SNAP OF THE SENIOR GRADUATING EXERCISES A ERESHMAN REGISTERS PROFESSOR MCFOGG, POPULAR HEAD OF THE FRESH AIR DEPARTMENT A CORNER OF THE VJOMAN'S LEAGUE ROOM CANANBALL BACER, AUTHOR OF "MOTOR MANIACS' PAYS A FLYING VISIT TO OUR CAMPUS f4os3 vuium +3i+ +3?+ +19++1E++Ef +E++!++i+ +B+7i+ff'+I9+I+ CO FEET H 1 ,gi Xxx iii li g ggi ill 1 ' -" Axfh , .1 .If ll! 2 x- P2Q.5z.H XXI VQQA X 'L"f'.i' iwll .' AK 'i"f'fZIl,lf'rlllllilllilllx-lx I ARMED Magnetic Foot Battery. Klein'ifvuplr'1ll0L'XL'l'y ymrnr in Pmiwqiiuiwviiff:-lil iw-1 :xml limlis.ll1:m1r-im :muy--ll1:'r' vzxrlw-. 'I'-I lam-p Ilw IR-1-I wairm is in piwulvvl ilu: wlniin' lmnly. Our 1l:l,L:lu'li1' l"uul l:3llll'l'l1'h will xxzirul ll1l'I'1'l,'l inilu-illil1l1Kn'Q,:milkm-vi-:i m'.mll'm'i:nlrli'. gc-ixiiil ,uluw in line fi-wt :mil limlwznll mlny lying. 'llllcm' Yil:lll.'lnpg lfuui lizillwril-N iiirrwlmf ilu- lluxx ui lwli-.nl in ilu- im-I :mil limi-N, iwlimw- ilu- liri-Il slI'l4-l1v:lil:u'lu- s':m:4v1l lly inn murli lull-ml upml ilinzlwrziiu. 'lllww Xlzium-lit lfm-l l!.illuv'i1-- wiirk uni :x vlizlnuv fur ilu- wlmlv lmmly,v1:rc lilxvuuizl- tism, .Xclnw :mul Vninx iii ilu- li---i mul l.iml-Q, x'1-imnwf l'lxillvl:iiirf, :mul valium- :1 pl.-:xs:uxl. zuqiw-I-V zilwimz Il,-ulirlu1ii"lii'I', vizfir. :lull wxirmlli. 111111111 lu Ilu- Hail rnxw ul sunfliixu-. Xlzxguvliani is " lini- llwl Nxnxliliivf' ll' you wuulwl luixuwzlrm fvvl, ' ' ' 'P ' ' ul, si-ml lurllii-ru ln:-Ulu, Hal :1 pair: ., pziiw 1m'Sw,., lvy mtlll. Svwl fm' um' limi' lvrmk, "sl f':"ill'll ll'11:Hl' I- ,'lfi1,.'f7." frm' in :my :ulnlrn-es. THACHER MAGNETIC SHIELD CO., 1445 Masonic Temple, CHICAGO ILL. The Or11yMach-ine of its Kind. EAC THE EASIEST RUNNING IN THE WORLD. !15TSpeed, Comfort and Sqfety AGENTS WANTED. 'Srfaxuf-1 Auromomng STANUAHD CARRIAGE No. x. on I TheAutomob1Ie AMZI LDRENZO BARBER President tha market the more than ten carrxagcs per It rings wzthm t a reac: means the powfex to travel an-ate of speed up to forty 17 by the character of the road at a cost that is with the Stanley carnage the purchase prxca live twentyumiles out of the city, and te: make the three cents per passenger exih 1 city ffl 'X li , . Ilkxfl""lH' Q ysfx xii' i X! I . C9 . 0 0 1 Patsy or Batsy? Our Annual Bedtime Story NCE, or, twice, upon a time, there were two little girls, twins, who looked exactly alike. From the tips of their lingers to the tips of their ears, and from the tips of their dainty little toes to the tips of their pink roundish noses they were precisely the same and couldn't be told apart even by experts. Think of it! Each carried a cute little brownish mole right on their cunning little chms, and even these moles were the same to every microscopic detail. They were proud of their similarity and had just oodles of fun in playing nasty little tricks on their boy friends who never did know who they were going out with. Their names were Patsy. Vxfhen they were named, one of them was given the nomfdefplume of Batsy, but when they grew up to know enough neither would admit that their name was Batsy, and and so what could you do about it? Nothing, and that is precisely what was done. XVhen they became sixteen years old, a terrible tragedy occurred. A hair sprouted from one of the little moles, while the other mole remained barren and undecorated. Pitiful! The Patsy were in a 7 l V 'N MEAT5 I l D. Sullivan P I Thos. Thompsonr8C Sons C00 Z ,Wy CM, 1262 Michigan Avenue l ll 133, mmm 5,S,TWM Street Cadillac 2762 Q Pllorwt Glfndalf 0435 lvllllluf 5550 4 Barlage Hotel 17181 Dexter Blvd. I E blished iss ' I W Q l qpetfoit Forging Compliments Company - 1 HUM GC UTCYS 0 I 1 M f 1 f Ol' Arlington 9716 DROP FORGINGS Q , J. L. Marcel-0 it Co. N F I l . AUTO MKoIs IvI.If:5, 1 Rooms for I F . M. , U, of D. Students MS1?31E5i?5fES 3 1 mmac' 'C 1' I I i DETROIT, MICHIGAN l l 54103 Frenzy. Now they could easily be told apart, and everything would be positively spoiled. Yes, absolutely ruined! All available scientific skill was brought into play to remove this terrible defect. Gasoline was put on it, mustard, Sloanels liniment, flyfkiller, epsom salts, and asfetida, but to no avail-the hair thrived on it. Deplorable! 'LYour Batsyn, said the hairless twin. "Nobody but a Batsy would grow a hair on their mole." "Can you prove it?" cried the unfortunate one: "Ha, Ha!" laughed the former, "No one needs to prove that you are Batsy with that hair-You are Batsy, you are Batsy-ha, ha, hafa!" At this cruel remark, Batsy, as she was now called, became inf sanely enraged, and pulling out the lverflohnson fthis ad was not paid fork, which she always carried in a handy place, she shot her twinfsister dead. - LLWho is this girl?" asked the coroner. "Batsy,l' answered Patsy. mf, x ,' fi X I 7 S2 ix f X pl ,-rv , . h af' if w 0 Batsy or Patsy? C0mpfz'mem's 0 51 Mem! 54111 lufl I0 Si f E, I -sa! ll ' ll ::asl,.,.aiH I -fain' Q, ,A ,-:. .ig 63429 W: bg-LL Q Q ' ETHELBERT: I'VE BEEN DECLARED A SEMI4 "HOW COME?" THE AGONIZING TRIO WILL NOW SING THE GHOST PA GAVE ME A DIME FOR BEATING WILLIE SONG, 'LI AIN'T GOT NO BODY." PUMPERNICKLET Direct Bus Routes to Campus Use the Green Bus Route No. 4 From Windsor Ferry Via Woodward, Adams, Cass, West Grand Boulevard, Dexter and Fairfield. Route No. 3 From vard and Six Mile Road. Windsor Ferry Via Woodward- Cass, Second Boule- All other Green Busses transfer to these Lines. SPECIAL COMFORTABLE DE LUXE BUSSES Seating 12 to 40 passengers, available at reasonable rates for private parties CALL LONGFELLOW 2500 DETROIT MOTORBUS COMPANY 1:4121 fl . M j1,6u,.,. v Aww- 1. . A .mv 4 -. - .. '4',Hfw i . , W -. i ff Q JW-agsw , gig!-fl I so kr. 2 U- fi A XT" 5 B"b'.'rn' l if . A W 1, :UU . . . . . ' ,. ' EI GH- NDUSTRIAL Detroit, with its long line of , A ,g Si' . 'iq . . . ,- rv 5? in brilliant achievements, can well afford to 5 3' ' pause and pridefully view the growth of 5 'T ? its Temple of Knowledge . . . a growth that bears E I testimony to a culture that keeps pace with wealthg I a spirit that transcends material things. For the - 35 7 Temple of Knowledge is democratic in tradition, enf X Q-. . . .' . . ' 9 nobling in its examples of character, inspired by the Us - 4 u . 4 I idealism of a high and useful erudition. 5 IL 2 This Year Book is but the visual symbol of that silent strength of mind and heart and body which i' ' L . . . 5 t 1 Q35 is above all other things the essential wealth of a Q ' , - . Q52 ggi community. 'f f V C 2? , . . 4 Qt , " As printers and publishers whose normal schedules F' " ' 0-ll, t ,Qt 7 Q, contact us continually with the world of commerce Eff and industry, it has been a refreshing and stimulating experience to cofoperate with the editors and pubf 2' lication personnel in the production of this Year I 1 WWKWX WW Q. 4 1 ,L . - rs 5 Book of Nineteen Hundred and Twentyfnine. g QOXTS COAMZ ' 'Q --- A K? 'Din 'ft - o. vw Vt 5 I nGNIsHT P9066 I FL I ' ORRIS QOMPANX l 1 i l Q lf 550 Lafayette Boulevard, at Second Detroit, Michigan slit, ot , i I . 5 Operating Day and Night- One Hundred Craftsmen to Serve 'You H ,saga ' A V' fi , - N 'k Q, "'kf'75 ew 0 S be 7. ' m g , 1 fa' 2 All . x,:f., Hr 'f 'H'5'1 . U H , N , , , . , , ., -. '-AQ", ,-,' .5 '.,- N f v - - Q 1 N "7 'fwswccwswcwswiiwewswiwswcwswatfvsxmlgylgggwaiwiwswcwsmwswrwswmsx ' ' A fmffe, " .3 l , ,a f fuss,-'S ' .A ,Z ,V , , J , fi 54151 Mtlahn dt Ullier Agaiinw 6351-3 are America's largest school annual designers and engravers because We render satisfaction on more than -400 books each i year. Intelligent co-operation, highest quality workmanship and on-time deliveries created our reputation for dependability. JAHN 8: OLLIER ENGRAVING CO. Thotograpbers, Artists and Makers of Fine Printing Plates for Black or Colors. 817 W. Washington Boulevard - Chicago Telephone MONROE 7080 6'-'xx e onotsu -erm ff-Q I l Organization and ersomzal llmllex A Aaron, Simon . . . ..... 108, 119, 282, 299. 344 Abas, joseph A. .... ............. .... 3 8 Abbott, Arthur ,I ...... .-------- 3 1 Abelc, Raymond ,I ..... ..------ - 55. 86 Ablan, James K ..... ........ 1 15 116 Abramson, Charles . . . .... 115, 344 347 Abramson, Rose O ,... --------- - 38 Ackerman, Bernard ..... ---- ---- 3 5 9 Activities Honor Society. . . --.-- 177 Adams, Anthony I ...... ...147, 149 Adams, Arthur ,I ..... ---'--- 3 1 Adams, Thomas T ..... ..---- 7 3. 7-33 Adamson, Ralph E .... -----'---- 1 67 Adcock, Herbert L ..... ........ 1 27. 129 Adelman, Louis C ........ . .... 106. 107 108 Aclclman, Oscar ........... .......... 8 8 Adrian College Basketball .... ..--- 7- 33 297 Advertising Club .......... ------ 3 66 A. E, C, Basketball ...... 315 A. E. C. Bowling .... .. 317 A. E. C. Dance ..... -- 7-41 Aeronautical Society . . ---- 367 Agcr, Sam E. ....... ----- 1 47 Agncn, London V .... . . . .147, 153 Agree, Allan G ..... ...147 143 Aitchison, Gordon . . . ---' ' 14 Aldus, Paul J. ..... .......... 1 15, 116 Alexander, McLean . ...... ..... 1 63 Alistin, Norman .... ...-.--- ------ ' - - Allan, Robert E, ............ 1-17, 155, 236 237 ll n, Francis W, ........................ Allin, Ray Lee .... 76, 77, 88,132,133 322 323 Allyn, Frederick G. ............... 164, 165 Alpcna Club ........ ................. Alphonse, MHfl3S . . ...... 85, 362, 363 Alpha Chi .............................. 324 Alpha Sigma Tau ........ : . . L ............. 7 Alpha Sigma Tau Scholarship lxcy ..... u ...... Z-4 Alggbroolc, Anthony L ............. 163, 336 337 Alcenburgcr. Clarence L. ................... 29 Althoff, Joseph M ........ --1- ---- 1 3 4 Athansony XVilli3m H .... .... .... 1 6 3 Altman, Leib ........ 5 ------f-- 83 Altman, Percr ...... .......... ,Y . 29 Amccl, Francis 1-1 ......... ........ 9 S, 102., 381 Ameredio, joseph .............. . ......... 209 American Association of Civil Engineers ..... 369 American lnstitutc of Electrical Engineers .... 370 Anderson. Arthur W. 38, 83, 8-1, 7.57, 324, 325, 332. 333 Anderson, Arthur . . ...................... 275 Anderson, Edmund E ............ ..... 1 18, 123 Anderson, Edward .... . - A ------- - 167 Anderson, LeRoy . . . ..........., 98. 101 Anderson, lvfelvin ...1lS, 122, 330, 331 Anderson, NValter B ..... .... ..... 1 4 7, 153 Andre, Xvillinm P.. ...... ---- 9 3. 102 Andrevvs, Cuthbert W .... ..-. 3 8. 369 Andrcsa, Harry ..,..... ..... 1 67, 171 Andrews, John M, .... .1..-.---- 3 3 Andries, Edward M ......... ..... 1 -ll, 144, 192 Andries, Leo 1. 78,147,176,177, 192, 211, 232, 233. 245, 322, 323, 338, 339, 352, 353 Andrus. Joseph M ..................... 147, 155 Angel, John J ......................... 108, 112 Annas, Henry C ............ . . .13-1, 209 Annual Oratorical Contest .... ....- 2 17 Annual Skinner Debate ...., ...- 2 17 Apfel, Joseph ........ .... .-.. 4 7 Architectural Society . ....--- 071 Arellano, Ricardo .... .... 9 3, 101 Argon .............. ..... 2 27, 326 Argon Trophy Dance.. ..... 242. 227 Arnold, john E ...... .. ..... 147, 158 Aronson, Robert ....... ............. 1 18 Artman, William F ....... . ...38, 310, 362, 363 Arts and Science Soclality. . . ............ . 198 Ashlock, Thomas P .... . . . . . . 108, 114, 378 Askew, Otis T .........,... ....... 3 8, 357 Associated Evening Classes .... ........ 3 72 Astronomo, Lauriano S ...... .... 3 8, 312 Athanson, William S ...... ...336, 337 Athletic Board Control. . . .... . 179 Atlivaick, Leroy L ..... ..... 1 34 Austin, Henry ...118, 144 Avronin, Victor G .... .... 9 1, 93 Axelrod, Ruben . . . ..-- - 151 Axford, Lloyd ...... ------- 3 1 Ayers, David W ....... .. .147, 160 Aylesworth, Arthur B .... ..... 1 18 Azelford, Reuben ......... . . . . 147 Babcock, John W ........... . . . . . . . 31 Babcock, Leslie F ...... ............ 9 1 Babcock, Robert W .... ...144, 141, 276 Babcock, Samuel .... ........ 1 64, 165 Baba, Edwin B ...... .... 3 9, 340, 341 Bacon, C. Baldwin. . . ...... .27, 214 Bader, Douglas G ..... ..... 1 18, 120 Bader, John J ....... ...118, 120 Bader, Paul F ...... ...120, 330 Bahorski, George S .... ..... 1 67 Bailey, Thomas J ..... ...39, 340, Bailey, 1Vylic E ..... ......... Baird, E. 1Vliitney.... Baker, John F. ........ ..... . Baker, 1Villiam .... 29, Balccy, james YV ..... ......... Ball, john M .... .... ....... 1 3 4, Ballrcich, james L. . . ........ . . . . Ballback, lrvln F, .... ..., 1 64, 165, Balslcy, Clyde K .... ....... 1 47, Baltcr, Nathan . . . ..... 147, Band, The ......... .... 2 20, Bankowski, Peter P .... ...... Barak, Herbert G .... ..... . Barnnowski ..... . . ...... . . Barbra, Leonard J ..... .... 1 67, Barber. Kenneth M ........................ Barbour, Eclmuncl ,l. 115, 117, 257, 271, 282, 295, 340, Bardcn. Eldrud M .......... ............... Harcra, Lawrence A .... ........ Barlow, Alfred L ....... .... 1 18, Barnes, Charles H ........ .... 1 41, Barnliarclt, 1Vill'orLl l'l ..... .... 1 47, Barnlmrn, Harold ,l, .... ....... ........ Barr, George ........ ................. Barr. Harry F ....... .... 3 6, 37, 39, 362, Barron, Charles E. .... ................. Barton, Thomas .... 83, 84, Bascr, Willis L .... ,,,,, 1 41, Basl-cclbull ......,.. ,.,,,,,, Bziskcllwzill Mzinngcr . . . , , , , Basketball Season llcviru ,,,, Bnsso, Louis C. 1. .... ,,,, , , Bates, Charles F ..... .... 1 18, Baltat, Robert C.. . . , , , , , , Baum. Willwcrt C. ...... .... 1 47, Baunman, Anthony A ......... ......... I 08, Bauman, Bernard E ..................... 108, Baughmznn, Roscoe N ................... 1-47, Bmpr. Dany ..115,184,185,192,234,235, Bazncr, George ,I ........................ 91 Beach, George H ............ ......... 1 41, Beale. ,loscph R .,.. . ,.,, 118' Bczill, john M ..... . .... 108. Bear, ,luseph M ....... , , , , , , , Beanie, Clayton D .... ..... l 47, Bcaudoin. Len J ........ ...... .... Bcausciour. Vitalis ,l .... . . .-40, 3-48, Bcauvnis, Charles J .... .... 1 34 137, Bechelc, Morton .... ....... 1 27, Bechtel, vlamcs A .... , , , , , Beck, Elmer ....... ,, Beck, Harold A .... . .......... 118, Beck. Richard M.. . . ............. 40, Becker, Grant E ...... .... 8 5, 87, 362, Beckett. Dorian Q .... ..... 1 63, 336, Beckley, Charles .... ........... 9 8, Beckley. ,loseph R ..... ...85, 201, 330, Bedcll, Charles P .... ....... , . .1-17, Becchlcr, Frank I .... ......... 1 41, Beer, Marion J ...... , , , , , Bcctchak, Martin . .. , , , , , , , , , Begg. 1VilIiam P .... ........ , Behcn, john J ..... .... 7 8, Sl, 244, Behrens, Carl F.. . . .,,,,,,, , , , , , Bcicncr, Carl ....... .... .... 1 4 7, Bclcema, Nicholas lf. . ..... 98, Belch, Frank S ....... .... 1 47, Belknap, Warren F .... , , , , , Bell, John M ....... ,,,, Bell, Ralph F ......... ,, , Bellaimey, James E .... Bellamah, Edeep ,l ..... .... Bellanca, James V ..... ...... 7 8 Belmer, Floyd XV, ...... .... 1 47, Beltramo, Armand A .... ..... 9 8, Bender, ,losenh H ..... . A . . . 127, Benn, Richard B .... ....... .... Bennett, Fred G ..... ...... 4 0, 340, Bennett, Harold E.. ,. . . . .40, 320, 340, Bennett, Robert J .... ...... 4 0, 340, Bennett, Thomas J ...... ............. 1 18, Benson, Thomas F. ........... 132, 236, 237, Bentkowski, 1Vitold E ..... ............ 1 47, Bentley, Howard C ..... .......... 1 48, Benz, Dorothy ...... ....... 8 8, Berg, Joseph A .... ...... .... Berg, Louis J ...... .... 1 34, 236, Berger, Julius ...... ...... .... Bergeron, Felix A ..... .... .... Bergen, Fred ....... .... 2 08, Bergo, Howard .... 7 . .. . . . . Berkowitz, Louis .... .... 1 48, Berman, Meyer H ..... ...... Bernard, Donald A .... ................. Bernard, Felix J ....... ................... Bernard, Florence M ...... 83, 190, 204, 346, Bernard, Maxwell . . . ............... 148, Bernert, Peter M ...... ................. Bemitt, Elmer W ....... .... 1 18, 119, Bernock, William A .... ........... Berny, John ......... ......... Berry, Charles B .... .... Berry, Dorothy . .. ............. .. .. Berry, Joseph E ..... ................. 1 34, Bertling, Lee A ..... .... 8 3, 115, 117, 352 f415:l 341 147 167 39 39 39 137 134 357 157 152 221 115 108 167 169 147 341 39 134 121 143 152 147 118 363 163 342 143 279 250 280 39 119 115 159 112 113 156 239 92 143 124 113 1-17 153 40 349 354 129 164 167 119 233 363 337 236 331 173 143 147 358 40 35-1 28 155 377 149 134 118 141 78 141 82 155 103 129 147 341 341 341 123 333 148 160 90 91 276 85' 98 211 134 149 134 118 40 347 159 118 192 41 340 88 230 135 353 Best. Julian J ..... .... 4 1, 199, 340, 341 Beta Sigma Pi ....... .......... 3 28, 329 Bettiga, Francis E ,.... .... 1 18, 122, 124 Beyer, Elmer L ......... ...... 1 64, 165 Beyer, Raymond R ..... .......,, 1 15' Bialko, J. John ...... ,,,,, 4 1 Bialys, Carl K ...... ,,,98' 103 Bice. Cleveland M ..... .............. 4 1 Bicum, John E ....... ............ 1 67, 172 Bida, Micheal A .... ....106, 107, 115, 234 Biderman, Abe A. ...... ........,... 1 41, 143 Biedrzycki, Anton C ........... ..,......... 4 1 Bielicki, Conrad A ........,.......... 118, 124 Biggs, Donald M. 29, 41, 176, 177, 182, 183, 324, 325, 334, 335 Biggs, Lawrence E ......................... 98 Billings, Fred ........... 41, 182, 183, 342, 343 Bmcly, Harry L. .... ............. 9 8, 99, 102 Binlrowski, Caesar . . , ,,,, ,.,- 1 18 Binncy, David A, .... 167 163 Birncy, John T. ........ 127' 129 Bischoff, Charles F .... ,. ........ ' 118 Bishop, Clarence .... .......... 3 40 341 Bishop, Kinder K ..... ........ a 4, 155: 184 Bissell, John J, ........ .... 1 34, 236, 276, 300 Bissct, George M., Jr .... ........... 1 67 170 Bizall, John ............ ............. 127 Blades, Lloyd G ..... ................... 9 8 glatc, James H ........................... 32 a eslee, Bert N ......... 29, 180, Blakeslee, L. Robert ............... 1.31.'. .1.' 333 Blanchard, Robert YV ..... .......... 8 3, 326 327 Blandford, Rogers J ..... ..... 1 48' 155' Blashill, William J ..... 118, 17,1 Blaszkicwicz, Anthony .. 141, 142 Blcshoy, Maurice E ..... 118, 120 Bliss, Frank G ....... 134, 141 Blohm, Ernest .... 115' 276 Bloink, Lco E ...... U 80 Blum, Donald F ...... ,,.,. l 108 Blum, Norman KV .... ,,,,,, 1 67 Blundy, Philip J ..... 143 154 Boate, John W ..... 148, 160 Bobrowski, Frank ...... .......... . 98, 101 Boclcofl, Annie B ........ ................ 1 41 Boehm, Glcnnon P. .................. 148 152 Bwinger. Arthur "Bud" ..... 249, zsv, sosl sw Boes, Pierre 1 .... .... ...... 7 6 , 77, 87, 370, 351 Boggiano, Robert A ..... ............. 1 41 144 Bohlandi Charles A ..... ....... 148' 161 Bojarslci, Edmund I ..... .,,.. 108 Bolha, Valentine ..... 108 Bolton. Craig F ...... 148 157 Bonclie, Emmet D,... .... .., 42 Bondy, Leo J ........ ,,,,, 4 2 Bondy, Roy ........... ,,,, 9 3 102 Bonkowski, 'Edmund . . . ,,,,. 113 Bonoan, juan B ...........4...,...... 141, 144 Boone, Ralph W. 96, 97. 98, 101, 188, 189, 192, 238, 245. 330, 331, 338, 339, 371 Boos, John L ......,. - ..,................... 9 1 Booth. Frank R ....... .. .... 108, 394, 360 Booth, George E ....... ...... 1 18, 122 Boothroyd, Harold C ..... ......... 2 9 Borcharcl, Charles G.... 115, 360 Bordofl, ,lacob ......... ...... 1 18, 125 Borgcr, Floyd R., ,lr .... ........ . 98, 100 Berger, Raymond I .... .... 1 18, 123, 124 Borlcowski, John F ...... ......... 1 27, 129 Borninski, Julian S ...... .............. 1 41 Bossenberger, John C ..... .... 8 3, 115, 257, 263 Boucher, Nobert C ..... ......,.. . ..78, 79 Boucher, Roman E. .... . 148, 157, 352, 353 Bourgeois, Frank J. ..... ........ . 98, 101 Bougnner, Daniel T.. . ............ . . 85 Bourke, C. M ....... 167, 168 Boutt, Francis E ....... ...... 1 67 Boutt. XVilliam T ........ ..... 9 1 Bourteiller, Harold I ..... ...... 1 63 Bowen, John F ......... 108, 113 Bower, Edwin H ..... ...... 4 2 Bowers, Herbert L .... . ........ 98 Bowman, Paul ...... ..... 1 67, 168 Boyd, Gilbert W. .... ...29, 42, 373 Bracken, Jack R .... .. ........ 78 Brady, Charles E ............... ........ 1 34 Brady, Frank J. 36, 37, 42,141, 143, 209, 276, 322, 340, 341 Brady, Lawrence P ...............,....... , 98 Brady, Margaret M ..... . 115, 239 Brake, Merle A ..... .....,.. .. 31 Brancheau, Lynus T ,..... ...78, 82, 354 Brandwine, Morris I ..... 118, 120 Brannack, jack ........ ...... 1 41 Bray, Anthony T .... ...... 3 1 Brazil, John D ....................... 148, 159 Brazil, Lloyd 76, 77, 83, 232, 233, 255, 257, 281, 282, 357 Breaulc, Alfred W .................... .78, 310 Breault, Francis A ......................... 167 Brecht, Lloyd J ........ 134 Brencltlce, Edwin C ............ ............ 4 2 Brennan, James M. 108, 110, 188, 192, 234, 235, 282, 326, 327 Brennan, John ........................... 127 Brennan, Vincent Hon... .. .31, 225' Brenner, John G ....... ................ 9 1 Brescoll, George P .......... .118. 119, 123, 17-4 Bresnahan, Vlilliam I .... ................ 1 34 Brewer, jamie .... ................ Z 3 ' ' ert .... ................ . giiiigfilil, Allan A .... , .... m, 128. 340. gg Briehl, Charles ..... ...... .......... I 4 1 Brighl, joseph A ,... ......... ..... I 2 1 Brigham, James R .... - - - 113, 4 Brightwell, lglamis T.. . . ............... 19.1 132 ggi: Eggs J ........... 108, 217, 245. 334. 338 Broderick, Charles D ...............,...... 134 Bronder, Clarence N .............. 148. 161, 194 Brooke, Flavius L. ..... ------ - 78, 7-09 Brotz, Ailiieqt .... ...... . .85, Brown, o p .... ............. Brown, Eleanor H .... ,...36, 37. 43- 333 Brown, George F. ........... ..... 9 8, 330, 377 Brown, Joseph A ,......................... 88 Brown, Lyndon O ..................... .28, 357 Brown, Neil W ..... iii 117, 257, 267. 282. 357 Brown, Norman I4 ................... 148, 160 Brown, Norton M ................ 148, 156, 209 Brown, Roberta .... ---- ------- 1 4 I Brozae, Edmund .... ......... 9 8 Brozo, Freeman ..-- 118, 119 Bruce, John M ...... ........ . 134 Brunswick, Louis .... .,.... 1 67, 316 Brushaber, Charles .... ..... 8 3, 84. 243 Bruton, Martin F ........ --------- 4 3 Brys, Herman L .......... . ..... 134, 139 Brzuchowslci, James W ..... ........ 9 8, 102 Brzostowski, Joseph S .... .... 1 34, 137, 139 Buch, Morris M ......... ........... 1 15' Buchanan, Eugene L. ..... .... 1 48, 157, 194 Buchanan, William D ..... ...... ...-- 1 4 1 Buchinger, William .... -.--- - -81 36 Buchta, Clarence G .... .........,. 1 41 Buckman, J. Harry ..... ...78, 277, 273 Buclman, Albert M .... ..---- 1 15. 117 Buist, Burnt-:tt YN .... -------- 1 48 Bujak, Edward W .... ............... 1 08, 110 Bujak, Joseph ........................ 119, 122 Bunetta, Marie H ........ 115, 117, 190, 234, 239 Burch, Albert I ....................... 127, 129 Burdeno, Dayton F.... ................. .. 43 Burkard, Edward I .... .... 1 41, 144, 276 Burke, Ambrose .... .,...... 8 3, 117 Burke, Gordon B ..... .... 1 08, 113, 354 Burke, Thomas ........ ........... 2 08 Burkharclt, Richard A.... ...... 134, 137 Burkharclt, Thomas E .... ........ .... 4 3 Burns, Thomas C ........ .... 1 15, 257, 271 Burnstrum, LeRoy M ..... ........... 7 8 Burroughs, Carroll A .... ...... 1 41, 312 Bush, Arthur E ...,..... ...... 8 5, 87, 337. Bush, Julius R ........ .. ............ 127 BLISS, LEO E ...... .... 2 7, 328, 329, 354 Buss, William H. .............. , ...... 141, 143 Bussicre, George E ............... .......... 8 5 Butcher, William ........ 43, 115, 144, 282, 233 Butler, Ban ....... 282, 287, 300, 304, 340. 341 Butler, Clem B, .........,.. . ..... ,...,... 1 19 Butler, Clement M .... .................... 1 79 Butler, Michael "Dad".. .... 248, 282, 350 Buzzard, Lloyd M ...... ......,.... 4 3 Byrne, Bernard I ,.... ................. 1 48-, 161 Byrne, Howard E ....................... 85, 332 Byrne, John B ................ ,....... 1 48, 173 Byron, james G ,... .43, 202, 348. 349, 372, 373 Cahill, Martin B .... .... ........... 1 1 9 Cairns, Archie ....... ............ 1 34 Caldwell, James .... 16-1, 166, 3-18 Calfin, William ...... ........... 1 15 Calhoun, Gilford W .... ..,...... 1 48 Callahan, James D ...... ......... 1 67 Cameron, Clare A ........ ....,.... 9 1 93 Cameron, J. Meredith ...... ..... 4 3, 243, 357 Cameron, Raymond R. ................... 78, 80 Campbell, Anna A ....................... 88, 90 Campbell, john C...106, 107, 119, 121, 332, 333 Campbell, john C ........... 141, 143, 134, 235 Canaan, Joseph A ............ ............. 1 34 Cancio, ,lose ........ .... 1 48, 172 Cannon, John P ........ .... 1 -ll, 146 Caplan, Benjamin ....... ...... 1 08 Capstick, William M ..... .... 1 48 Carboncll, Pedro D .... ......... 1 19 Carey, Brenclau I ..... ........... 1 3-1 Carey, Richmond R ..... .... 1 41, 143, 300 Carey, Samuel I ....... ........... I O8 Carl, Robert ...... ............. 1 67 Carlson, Carl A ,... ......... 37,'44, 243 Carlson, Frederick B .... ...... 7 8, 81, 354, 357 Carnaghan, Thomas ...................... 91 Carney, Donald F. 108, 109, 192, 234, 245, 338, 339, Q52 Carolin, Patrick I ......,.............. 148, 154 Caroselli, Jerome L ..... ................. 1 67 Carpenter, William I .... .... 1 19, 121 Carr, Albert L ........ .............. 1 67 Carr, Charles D ....... ................ 3 2 Carr, Kenneth H ..... .... 8 5, 194, 335, 335 Carroll, Gerard ..... ......... , .93, 127 Carroll, James T ....... ..... . ...134, 137 Carrigan, Thomas I .... ...... . . . 164 Cartier, Harold F ..... .... 8 5, 332, 333 Cartier, Robert P .... ...... 1 48, 150 Case, Russell 11 ...... 148 91 Casey, Catherine A .... ...... . Casey, Irene E, ...... ...---.- 1 63 Cashin, John L ........ . . .78, 79, 192 Cassidy, Joseph D ....... ..... 4 4, 334 Cassube, Richard L. ....... .......... 1 19 Castonguay, Thomas T .... ...29, 98, 373 Castrop, Charles W.. . 44 Cutalano, Anthony J .... . ...-.. 103 Cataldo, Charles R ..... 125 Catanese, Samuel J ..... 98 Catherwood, Gladys .. ............... 88, 90 Caron, John J ........ ................... 3 32 Caton, Harold F ..... .... 7 8, 81, 332, 333, 374 Caron, J. Douglas .... .............. 1 18, 119 Cayelli, Charles .... .............., . 141 Cefay, Anthony F .... ---- - 109 Ccglarelc, V-fallace .............. ..... 3 30 Ceglowski, Roman V .................. 109, 320 Central Intercollegiate Track Meet .......... 301 Cetnar, William B.. ........... 78, 80, 328, 329 Chadman, Edmund B ................... 109, 113 Chapaitis, Edward G. .................. 108, 109 Chapman, Bernard A. 106, 107, 119, 190, 192, 234, 235, 363 Chapman, Charles H ....,.............. 115, 116 Chapp, Edwin A ........ 115, 116, 300, 305, 340 Chapp, Eugene J .... .,........... , 44, 322, 323 Charbonneau, Louis H ...... ............. 3 1 Checcola, Victor J ....... .... 9 8, 103 Cheer Leaders ........ ....... 2 52 Chek, Ander G ..... . . .148. 157 Chekal, Fabiran P ,.... ..... 9 8 Chemical Society. . . . . . 373 Chester, William P .... . . 167 Chi Delta Theta .... .... 3 30 Chinoski, Walter J.. ......... . . .91, 92 Chi Sigma Phi .................. ..... 3 32 Chi Sigma Phi Scholarship Key .... ........ 2 7.4 Chosid, Sam ....... ......... ...... 1 -1 8, 161 Chovich, Marcus ............. .1 ......... 119 Chowcllnury, ,lotinclra N .... ..... 1 49, 155, 209 Chewing, William P ..... .......,... 1 67, 172 Christen, James B. ..,... . . .115, 119, 124, 360 Christensen, Anton M .... ............... 1 48 Christian, Peter J ............... ..167, 7.82, 289 Christie, A. J., Jr. 44, 176, 177, 199, 209, 324, 327, 3-10, 341 Chylinslti, Nicholas J ........ . .......... 141, 143 Ciesielski, Anthony C. ...... . . . ..... 119, 123 Cieslult, Henry C ....... ...,...... 1 -19 Cislo, Stanislaus I.. .. ...1-17, 149, 156 Clancy, John A ...... . . . . 167, 168, 326 Clark, Archie E ...... .......... 9 1 Clark, Cornelius H .... ...... . .1-17, 149 Clark, Everett G.... .... 85, 362, 363 Clark, Francis B .... .......... 1 19 Clark, Joseph F.... ........ 16-4, 165' Clark, Morris J .... ........,,... 1 41 Clark, Paul G ...... .... 8 5, 36, 350, 371 Clark. Ralph .......... . . .. .... 36. 98. 377 Clark, Ravmond M. .... . ........ 149 Clark, YVilliam E. E .... . . . .17S, 179 Clarke, Frcd N ......... ..... 3 Z Clarke, Herbert j,. . . .. . 167 Clarke, joseph F. .... . . . 16-1 Clary, Dennis j.. . . . .SIM 8-1 Classical Club ...... ...,. 3 7-1 Claus, Theodore O ..... ..... 1 -19, 199 Cleary, Owen J ......... ...... 1 26. 347. Clement, Raymond P. .... ..... 9 1, 93, 3-10 Clement, Stafford J ....... .... -1 4, 336, 337 Clements, William A ,.... ..... 1 -17, 149 Cleminson. John E ..... .....1-ll, 117 Clifford, ,loscph P,. .. ..... 164 Clinton, Philip M ..... ...IS-1, 136 Clusty. Vfilliarn .... .... 9 9, 101 Cloyd, Earl E ..... ..... 1 67 Coaches ........... . . . 247 Cody. Martin XV .... .,.,, 1 -41 Cody, 1Villiam F-.. ...117, 116 Cofecl Sodality ...... ..... 2 04 Coffey, Thomas A ..... ...11R, 119 Cohen. Albert ...... ......... 'I 09 Cohen, Cyril ..,... ,... ......... 1 3 -1 Cohen, Herman... ...... 109. 111, 3-14 Cohen. lack .... .... s 3, 84, 353, 399 Cohcn. Jacob. . . ........... . . 134 Cohan, Maurice ....... 164, 165 Cohen, Max .... ..,. S S, 3-H Cohen, Walter .... S4 Cole, C. William .... , , , 117 Cole. Fred B ........... ..,..... 1 67 Colc, Thomas V ....,.... ....... 9 1 92 Coleman. Rhea Bolton. . . .......,. . . 88 Collcr, Mahlon F ...... ..... 1 34, 133, 332 Collins. Edward F .... ............... 8 8 Collins, James M.. ..... ...... -1 4. 191, 338. 339 Collins, John F, 76, 77, 91, 176, 177, 190, 191. 232- 233, 32'-l. 340. 341, 372 Collins, Frank J ........................... 167 Collins, Lawrence E ..1. ........... 3 2 Collins, Marcus H. .,.. .... 9 1, 340, 341 Collins, Neill ....... ...13-1. 138. 209 Colonial Prom ...... .......... 2 43 Coluccio, Luciano ..... ..,.. 1 49, 159 Columna, Arsenic M .... ,,,,, 1 19 Colver, NVarcl ....... ,,,,, 3 1 Colwell, Wallace A .... . . ,, ,33, 90 Commasford, Hugh F .... , , , 109 Comella, John V ......, , , 78 54163 Commer, Sidney J ............... ...149, 150 Commerce and Finance Sodality... .... . 199 Condon, Frank J ......... . ........ .. .149, 160 Condon, Robert B ...... ........ . . .141, 143 Conlan, Paul G ..... ---109, 372 Conley, Wiliam C .... .---. 4 4 Conlin, Neil XV, .... . .. .. 115 Conlogne, Stephen ..... ............... 1 49, 153 Connell, Thomas J. 37, 47, 176, 177, 227, 230, 231, 243 254, 257, 357, 377 Connolly, Theodore M ........... 149 161, 194 Connors, George P. ..... .......... . .167, 169 Connors, William J .... ............. 1 67, 172 Conrad, Mark L ,..... .... 1 64, 165, 172,--348 Conroy, Frank M .... ............... 3 2 Conway, John Vi' .... .......... 1 09, 114 Conway, Maxwell .... .. .45 330, 331 Conway, Philip ...... .... 1 27 242, 326 Conway, Robert M .... ....... 1 41, 276 Conway, Tom G .... ...149, 157 Cook, Edgar T ........ ...149, 160 Cook, Lawrence W. .... ...... 1 67 Cooney, George A ......................... 141 Copcnhaver, Cleo F .................... 147, 149 Corbett, Edward ,l...78, 192, 194 209 372, 373 Corbett, Frank ................ ............ 1 27 Corbett, Thomas .......................... 88 Corcoran, John W. ........................ 45 Cornell, Joseph F. 45, 176, 177, 330, 331 333 339, 371 Cornely, Floyd H ...................... 149, 157 Cornford, W. Howard ..................... 141 Corrigan, Raymond, S. I.. .. ..... .27, 204 Corscr, Dallas H ......... .... 1 19 330, 331 Cosgrifl, David E.. . . . . . ........ 149, 172 Cote, Leon P ....... .... 7 8, 81 244, 374 Cotter, Gerard G ...... ........ . .78, 80 Coughlin, George F .... .. 119, 124 Coulon, Anson ...... ...... 1 67 Coy. Ashley S ..... ......... 1 41 Coyle, Auguste D .... ....... 1 49, 153 Craig, Maxwell A .... .... 1 O9 114, 378 Crainen, James T ..... ......... 1 19 Cravatte, Michael ..... . . . .27, 374 Crawford, James XV .... ....... 4 5 Creagh, Joseph P ...... .... 1 19, 118 Cteagh, Thomas P ..... .. 149, 153 Creed, A. M ..,...... ...... 3 2 Creighton, Richard L... ........ . 149 Crider, Grace P .... .... ....... 1 4 1, 143 Crimmcns, Matthew J .... .... 1 26 3-12, 3-43 Crispo, Charles E ....... ....... 1 49, 172 Crist. John H. ........ ......... 1 19 Crocker. George J ..... .... 1 34, 137 Croker, XVarren ...... . . 127, 128 Cronin, Joseph NV, ..... . . . . . . ..... 127, 118 Cross, Eillcen K. 53, 183, 192, 19-1, 346, 3-17, 190 Cross, 1-lcrbcrt B. ......................... 31 Cross. Walton S ....... .... ........ . -H Crowe, Harry XV, .... , .. 149, 157 Crowley, Eileen M .... ...... 1 -11 Crowley, Frank R ..... ...... 4 7 Crowley, ,lohn B .... .. .-15, 360 Crowley, 1Villiam ..... ....... 2 9 Crowley. XVilliam A,... .... 6, 37, 46 Cruisc, James P ....... ....... 1 41 Crusoe, Lsudz ........ ......... 3 2 Csizmansky. Charles ..... ,.... 1 -19. 159 Cudnau. Raymond I. .... ...46 317, 372 Cullen, Byron E, ...... .... ............ 1 6 7 Cullen, Emmet I ,.... ............. 4 6 360, 361 Cullen, Orville E ...... 76, 77, S5 320 350, 331 Cullen, Rob-:rt L ,... .... .....,...... 1 4 9 Cummislfcy. ,lames ..... .. 168, 310 Cunich, Frank .......... .. 135. 136 Cunningham, ,lrzhn 1-19 Cunningham, ,loscph D .... .... 1 38. 392 Curkinski, 1Valtcr ..,.... .. 13-1, 137 Curlcy. Leo T. ....... .............. 1 -11 Curry. Paul ......... ..,S1. 257 326, 327 Curtin, William E. ...... .............. 1 O9 Custer, james R .......... ............ 1 19 Cutchcr, Roy I ............. ............ 9 1 Czcrwinski, Sylvester A.... .... 109 323. 329 Dablvicri, Angcln .......... .... S Datldons. Anthony j ...... .............. . 119 Driclson. Frccl XV ....... ............... 1 47, 149 Dailcy, Vcrnard l. ............ 119. 123 330, 331 Daliosli, George A ........................ 91, 92 Dalcy. ,lam-:s E. .... ..,. 1 06, 107. 119 360, 361 Dallas, Allen XV .... ........ 4 6. 362 363. Q67 Dallas. ,lohn ....... .................. 1 27 Daly. Charles A.... 32 D'Anclrca. Remo .... ..... 1 19, 121 Danicll, ,lohn T ....... . ......,. 46 Daniells, Charles T.. , . .... S., 84, 360 Danna, Joseph A .... ............ 1 SS Dant, John ,......... . .... 119 300. 302 Dantzcr. Charles A,. .. ......... 127 D'Aoust, Charles P-.. ..... 168. 172 Daoust, Leo. B .... .. ...... S? Darling, Jesse ...163, 170 Daro, John G ...... ...1-19, 155 David, Everett E ..... . .. .99, 101 Davidson, Arnold .... ....... 1 19 Davies, Charles XV... .... 119, 12-1 Davis, Julius ....... 168, 170 Davis, Thomas. . . ..... S7 350. 351 'va 1, , Dawe, Harold ................. Dawson, Iohn B ............ . ....... 83 Dayton University Football Game ........ Dayton University Debate ..... .. Dean, 3Vi1liam I ............... DeB1ois, Charles E, ....... 'De Caluwe, Maxirice. . . . DcCesare. Roy ........ Decker, I. Murray ..... DeClaire, Bernard V Dedona ............. Fenner, Norman F.. . 377 209 117 232 '122 DeFer, Harry M. .... .....-.. 1 17 Dafever, Cyril R.... ...27, 47, 312 DeFobio, Ethelo ...... .... 1 27 129 DeGa1an, Mary F ..... .......... Degman, Paul R ........ ...... 1 70 DeGursc Thomas E ..... .... 1 37 137 Dehullo, Robert B ..... .......... 1 08 109. Dcigert, Casper I .... .... ...... . . . . . .87 DeLand, Robert XV ....... 109 110, 234 372. Delaney, Iames R ............ 109, 110 244, Delaney, R-oy F. ........................ . DeLogc, Matthew I. 36, 37, 47, 182, 183, 230 231, Delta Alpha Phi ......................... Delta Phi Epsilon ......................... Delta Pi Kappa ............ .. Delta Sigma Pi ................ . . Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key .... .... Delta Theta Phi ........ . . . . . . . . . . . DeLuca, Arden .............. . . .119 Dcmbeck, Iohn I ..... ..... Dembeck, Sigismund I. ............ . Demeke, G. Peter .... ............... Demeleski, Earl I. . . . . .... 109, 110 190 Dcmike, Gordon W. . . .......... . . . . Dempsey, Bruce I.. . . ..... 119 121 Dclvlunnik, Iohn I .... .......... DcMunnik, Iulius NV.. ....... .. Denio, Dorian ....... ...... Denis, Herbert A .... .1..... Denis, Ray XV. ...... ........ 1 70 Denison, Roland I .... ..... . . . . . . . Deo, Morris B ....... .... 8 7, 87 370 DePalma, George ....... ........... 9 9 DePaul Football Game .... .......... Depew, George M ....... ....... .... DeRyck, Raymond I ..... ..... 9 3 137 DePonio, Sylvester A ,... .......... Derby, Harry XV ....... ..... 1 41 Derck, Edward I. .... ........ 1 70 Deres, Iohn M. .... ............ . Derin, Max ......... .... 8 3, 84 378 DeRonnc, Alfred P. ...... .......... 1 17 DeSanto, Albert I .......... .... 1 17 340 DesChamps, Lawrence I. . . . .... . . .170 DeSchcpper, Maurice ..... ......... Detroit Country Club .... ,... .... Detroit Union ......... ......... Devlin, I. Dale ...... .... 1 09 112 Devlin, Edward H .... ....... 1 37 Devlin, Mark G ............ .... .... De1Vitte, Oswald I. ......... ....... 1 42 D'Haene, Ormond T., S.I ..... ..... 2 7 180 Diamond, Milton I ......... .... 1 20 122 Diamond, Simon .......... ......... Diaz, Manuel F .... . . .47 340 Diem, Iohn M ...... .. .,...... 137 Diersing, Eugene L ................. 87 362 Dietz. Fred A ....... . . .87 320, 332 333 Dietz, Galin ........ ................. Dickie, 1Vilfred C.. . ............ . . . . Digby, Hudson XV... ,... 91, 92 340 DiLaura, Chauncey I .... .......... 1 70 Dillion, Iames F ..... ........ 1 42 Dillon, XVi1liam ..... .. .. . . Dillworth, George E. . . . .168 Dimmer, George A ...... . . .170 Dimmer, Mercedes F .... , , ,158 Dinquilian, Aram L ..... , , , , , , Distlerath, Donald .... ,,,, 3 3 Dissette, Iames S. . . . . . . . Ditta, Tony A. .... ,, Dittman, Wilfred ..... ,,,, Dittmar, Anthony .... ...... Dittmer, Gilbert F .... ,,,,,,, Diver, Albert E .... ,,,147 Divekar, D. R ...... , . , 99 Dizdar, Michael .... ,,,,, Doelle, Buell ...... , , ,125 Dogman, Iames L .... ,,,,,,, Dohany, William .... ,,,,,, 3 3 Doheny, A. P ...... ' ,,,,,,,,,, Dolan, Iohn ......... ............ Doherty, Ambrose ..... .... 3 36, 337 Dolan, Leonard XV. .... ,,,,,,, 1 15' Dolan, Thomas ...... ..... 1 42 Doll, L. Stanley ....... ,,,168 Doman, Iames L. ....... . , , ,151 Dombrowski, Edmund I .... , , ,120 Donahue, L. Norval ..... ,,,, Donley, William ..... ,,,,,,,, , Donnelly, Ioseph F ..... ....... 1 20 Donohue, Edward I .... . . . 137, 139, Donohue, Florence E .... ...... 2 6, 130 Donohue, Lawrence .... 48, 79, 372 Donovan, Edward F. ....... ............ . Donovan, Ierry I. 79, 176, 177, 192, 209, 322 32 247, . 3, 333, 338, 339, 372 Donovan, Laurence D ............... J. .. Donze, Ralph . ............ . 46 293 266 217 137 91 128 46 99 46 127 381 380 340 142 171 374 112 , 87 373 374 47 377 334 336 338 340 224 342 120 137 78 47 192 119 192 119 120 127 47 177 168 371 101 278 99 138 78 142 194 99 379 117 341 161 164 310 183 282 138 126 141 181 127 83 341 140 363 168 . 47 341 177 143 127 172 160 171 120 . 84 32 99 142 47 168 170 102 48 164 170 168 163 91 348 142 141 170 209 122 48 73 124 377 181 373 120 308. 373 99 360 Ra mond B .... Donze, y Doran, Alex I ....... Doran, Francis I. . . . . 4 ....87 360. . 247 277 361 117 84 Dorais, Charles E .... .... 2 27, , , 326 Dorn, 1Vi1liam ...... ................ 3 48 Dornsifc, Roy S ..... .............. 9 1 Dorr, Leonard ...... - - - 48 Dorsey, Iohn H ...... 120 Dotsz, Theodore I .... ...... - ....... 1 37 Doucher, Thomas A .... .............. 7 9 Douglas, Francis T.. .. .... 99, 102, 360, 361 Douglas, Iohn A ..... . ............. 142 Douville, Howard . . ....... , .... 137 Dowd, Edwin P. .... ........... 1 09 Dowd, Frank A .... ..... 4 8, 348, 349 Dowd, Iohn ......... ..... 7 9, 81, 82,326 Dowd, LawrenceI .... .... 4 8, 320, 326, 327 Downie, George ..... .............. 8 7 Dowis, Claude P. .... ............. 1 64 Downey, George T ..... ....... , .119, 120 Downs, Francis T ..... ............ 1 19, 120 Doyle, Clarence I .... ................. 4 8 Doyle, Frank I. ..... .... 1 20, 122, 168. 169 Doyle, Iohn ........ ................ 3 08 Doyle, George I .... ........ 9 9, 103,377 Doyle, Helen C .... ...... 1 42. 144 Dragon, Michael ....... .... 1 70, 161 Drake, Iohn O ......... . . . . .99, 100 Drake University Relays .... ......... 3 04 Dramatic ............... ........... 2 07 Drcan, Iames P ....... ............ 1 42 Drinkaus, Irving E .... .... 1 09, 114, 360 Driscoll, Albert I.. .. .......... 120, 121 Druekc, Ioseph L.... .... 99, 101, 362, 363 Drury, Harold ...... .............. 1 27 Duarte, Epifanio A .... .... 9 9, 102, 376 D11Boise, Edward P.. . ........... . . 87 Dudek, Mary A. ....... .... 1 17, 117, 239 Dudzinski, Edward C .... ....... 1 70, 179 Dully. Charles E ...... ......... 3 1 Duffy, Charles NV .... ..... 2 7 Duffy, Edward I ..... .............. 1 42 Dugan, Ioseph A ..... ............ 1 20, 127 Duggan, Ignatius E ............ 134, 137, 276. 300 Dulczcwski, Walter I ..... ........ 4 8, 362, 363 Dumanois, Harold C... . .... ........ . 117 Dumas, Francis A .... ........ 1 70 Duncan, Ellis C ...... ..... 7 9, 382 Duncan, Robert XV.. . . ...... . . . 99 Dundon, Edward I .... .... 9 9, 101, 330 Dunham. Harmon W ,... ....... 2 7, 374 Dunlay, Edward I .... ........ 1 68 Dunlap, LeRoy T ..... .... 1 20. 124 Dunne, Fred I .... .... ........ 1 2 6 Dunner, Solomon C ..... .... 1 42, 378 Dunnigan, Ernest P... ..... . 137 Dupuis, Frederick I .... . . . . 141, 142 Durand, Andrew I .... ...... 1 09 Durlle, Donald ...,... .... ........ 1 6 8 Durst, David E ........................... 49 Dutlio. Walter F .......................... 87 Dyer, Iohn E ........ 127, 203, 241, 242, 326, 327 Dyer, Mansfield M ..... ....... .......... 9 9 , 101 Dysarz, Charles ........................ 119, 120 Dzicszko, 3ValterI .... .... 1 37, 137, 328, 329 Dzluba, Iohn F ...... .,............ 7 9, 82 Easton, Brown S .... .. . .... 170, 177 Ebert, Gus H ...... ...... 9 1, 92 Eekel, Earl I ...... .... 1 70, 173 Edson, Francis 91 Edward, Frank YV. .... ..... 3 2 Ehrlick, Theodore I ..... ..... 1 70 Ei, Alphonse I. ........ ....... 2 7 Eickhorst, Thomas N .... .... 1 70, 177 Eilers, Anthony W.. . . ..... . . . 32 Eldis, ArthurI ..... .... 1 70, 176 Elichek. Lco F ..... ...... 1 70, 160 Elkan, Louis E. .... ....... 1 20, 122 Elliott, Eva .. .... 141, 142, 236 Elliott, Iohn D ..... .... 1 20, 124, 209 Ellis, Norman E ..... ....... 1 70, 177 Elsarelli, Elso ........ ....... 9 9, 102 Elsarelli, Elvatz A .... ........ 1 37 Elsliger, Mathew I .... .... 1 64, 166 Emery, Harold L ..... .... 1 49, 170 Emmer, David H ...... .... 1 37, 140 Emmons, Gaillard C ..... .... 1 37, 139 Engel, Iohn H ........ ...... 3 1 Engelman, Alywn A .... ,.............. . .78, 79 Engelman, Edmund I. 88, 242, 326, 327, 348, 349, 380 Engineering Society ........................ 377 Engle, Oliver D ........... ............ 1 70, 221 Enright, William C .... ..... 9 7, 99, 322 Epsilon- Tau ......... ......... 3 44 Epstein, Albert ...... ...... 1 37, 138 Epstein, Iack ......... ....... 1 42, 141 Epstein, Samuel C. .... .... 7 9, 344, 347 Erb, Russell C. ....... ............ 1 68 Erdos, Iosepli A ....... .... 1 27, 129, 377 Erickson, Gunnar C ..... ....... 1 70, 173 Erni, Walter A ....... ...... 1 70, 177 Esper, Leo G. ....... ...91, 317 Essi, Philip ......... .... 1 47, 170 Estrada, Hilario L ..... . . . ....... . 142 Estrada, Louis H .......... .... .... 1 1 7, 209 Eta Zeta Sigma ................. . . , . . . 346 Eta Zeta Sigma Scholarship Key .... ...... 2 24 Ettinger, Edward .............. .... 1 17 116 54171 4 Ettinger, Paul Evans, Francis L .... Evans, Iames R .... . Evans, Ioseph M ........... Evans, Thomas A .... . ...... F Faculty Board ............... 120, 170, 170, Fairchild, Warren C ........ Fairclough, George E ..... . . Faler, Iohn A ..... Falkner, Clarence F .... . . . Fallon, 1Vil1iam H .... Farr, Gordon ....... Farrell, Eugene F.. . . . . Farrell, Lawrence R. .... Faur, Emil ......... ........ Fay, Iames B ........ ....... 9 9, Fearn, Iohn A ...... 117, 116, Federman,LeoG,... Fcehan, George ..... . 49, 320, Feehan, Walter I .... Felix, LZ1VEf11E .................. Fellratli, Charles I. 79, 192, 322, 323, Fellrath, Richard T ...... Fencing ............. Fenlon, Estelle A ..... Fenlon, Iames I. .... . . 326, Ferbcr, Edward M ........... Ferguson, William Fiedler, Eleanor M...132, 133, 164, Fierer, George I ........ ......... Filipino Club ......... ........ Fineberg, Sydney I .... .... 9 1, Finestone, Iohn H ..... Finn, Iohn A ........... Finucane, Edmund Finzel, Arthur I ........ Fiscus, Matthew E ,... Fisher, Charles H .... Fisher, Clement F ..... Fischer, Fred R .......... Fischer, George O., Ir .... S ..... F .......... 11111 170, Lid 101, 277 163 327 .49f . .Sb 167 3.1.7 iid Fisher Golf Trophy .... Fisher, Henry I ....... Fisher, Ie rry E ..... ........ Fisher, Ioseph A. 96, 97, 99, 201, 240, 362 Fischer, Robert .................. Fishman. Ioseph ............... 99 Fitz, Ioseph S .......... Fitzgerald, Fitzgerald, Fitzgerald, Fitzgerald, Fitzgerald, Fitzgerald, Fitzpatrick, Edmund I ..... Gerald W ..... Michael ..... Robert E ..... William F ..... Ned R. 36, 37, 49, flfiici. 113 William H, .......... . I 230. Fitzpatrick. Michael Gerald. ..... . Flaherty, Flanigan, Flannery, Flannery, Flattery, Flattery, Flemming, Henry I ........... S. H. ......... .. Iames E ..... lvlartin L .... ,lererniah C ....... . ...127 . .l.dl.. 231, Louis ........ , .... . ..... . . . . . Albert E....87, 87, 194 Flemming, Cyril I ........ . . . Flemming, Florian F ...... Fletcher, Louis ....... Flett, Flynn Flynn Flynn, Foley, Foley, Foley, Richard O .... ,BasilB...., . Charles F .......... Frank .......... 87 Helen ............ Milton I. ........ William, S.I .... Football .......... Football Manager . Football Roster ....... Forbes, Fenton C ........ Fordham Football Game.. Foren 51C -..........-..- Forrest, Charles ........ Forster, Iohn M .... Fossen, Eddie ...... .. Fount Fourn Fourn ain, ier, Fred A.. ...... George F ....... ier, Kenneth R, . . . . . . S21 'iddf .70, 197, ...117, , 197, 127 127 361 ..32, 170, .99, .99, 160, 170, 192, 332. 273. 109. 336, 336. 333, 322, 312, 142. 141, 171, 346 142: 378 127 1111 .99 .190- 127 127 .1.3.5. 363 102' 372 .83 ..9 338 'ibs 340 ...99 ..117 330 128 129 362 127 203 ...171 '55b', 282, Fournier Ray G ...... Fowler, ,Ioseph L ..... Fox, Denton B ...... Fox, Iames H ..... Fox, Iohn B ...... Fox, Leonard A .... .... Fox, Robert S .......... .............. Fox, Thomas I ......................... Franklin, Raymond I ....... 87, 87, 332, Fraser, Arthur H ...... Fraser, William I ...... Frazer, Iames E. 76, 77, 79, 190,' 191, 194, 232, 233, 379, 382 Frederick, Iohn F ............... 88, 89, Frederiekson, Theodore R ............... French, Carol H ........... ....... Freshman Class ........ Freshman Council .... . . . Freshman Football ..... ..... Freshman Frolic .... 171. 331 .99 292 137 '122' 333 171 100 197, 249 148 276 1 1 1. 123 172 161 137 33 181 177 102 100 194 31 91 177 171 370 333 377 114 337 337 234 339 323 313 144 142 221 49 109 347 171 376 379 129 91 142 142 100 88 372 129 129 311 138 142 369 49 378 49 87 373 340 127 92 99 339 341 110 341 101 70 116 91 331 129 120 91 137 120 241 363 239 168 227 203 271 277 173 272 214 91 120 221 371 102 377 326 100 142 92 137 129 377 149 102 198, 276 171 100 131 133 277 236 124 300 347 239 151 343 90 374 50 127 127 50 142 73 168 121 192 121 50 79 379 155 142 122 32 120 128 348 128 142 110 27 168 135 198 27 137 363 359 337 51 333 90 151 168 81 116 51 Freyman, David B ..................... 120, Fricker, Edward O ................. 100 101, Friedl, Armella ......, 83, 184, 185, 192 346, Friedl, Mary E..116, 188, 192, 204, 234 7135, Friedericks, Harry A ...... I ................. Friske, Joseph .... 88, 182, 183, 257, 265 342, Frost, Mabel E .......................... 88, Frumveller, Aloysius F., S.J ............. 27, Fulgenzi, Andrew J ........... ----- Fuller, Esther ......... . . . - - - - Funnie, Emmett ....... , . - - Furbacher, Frank M ..... -- Futterman, Charles ....... - - Gabriel, Edith C ........... .-,,. Gage, Edward A ,..... .... ------ 1 Gagnier, Albert J .... . - -120, Gahagan, Marguerite. . . , , - -33. Gahagan, Donald L .... . - -120, Gajewski, Alfred ..... .......,.......... Galazin, Edward B ......................... Gaibo, John A .... ....... 1 10, 113, zoo 244, Gallagher, Earl M ...................... 151. Gallagher, James C .................- .... 1 41, Gallagher, William J ..... . . .120, Gallup, Asa O ........ ,------ Gambert, George W .... . . .118. Gamble, John H ....... . . .127, Gamma Eta Gamma ...... ----- Gancer, Walter ............ .---,-- Gapczynski, Edward M .... . . .141, Garbarino, Arthur A ..... . ---- Garcia, Alexander ..... ---- Gardner, William J .... ---- Gareliclt, Martin ...... ---- Gariepy, Bernard F .... . . -1155, Gartner, Albert ..,.... ...,., ........ Garvey, Lawrence M .... .............. 1 35, Gary, Curtis. . . ..... .... . . ...... 50, 362, Gassel, Sidney .,... ...50, 220, 221 358, Gates, George .... ...... 5 0, 139 336. Gatilao, Pacihco G .... ................ Gaugh, Clarence R .... . . .100, 101 332. Gauthier, Joseph G .... ............. 8 8, Gaynes, Lloyd M ..... - - - - - Gebauer, Albert J, . , . - - - 1 - Gehrig, Robert A ..... . ..,... 79. Gelb. Seymour .,........ .......... Gelmine, Bert J ........... ........... Gendernalilc, Nicholas H .... . .. .147, 1423 Genter, Ralph R .......... George, J. J ,.... ...... . 165 Georgetown Football Game ..... .... 3 1. Georgetown Golf Game ..... ........... George, Edward J ........ . . . .,,...... . . . George, Joseph J. ...... ........... 1 35, Gerardi, Jasper ..... .... 2 9, 51, 332, Gerber, Samuel G. . . . ......... . . . . Gergle, Charles G ..... ....,.... 9 9. Gerich, A, Charles ..... ..... Gerston, Milton ....... . . . 141, Gervais, Harold V. ...... . . .135, Gettinger, Edward XV ..... ..... 8 5, Gettin er Francis A . . .1-ll. g , .... Gettinger, Harry ..... Gcttleman, George J. . . . Gibbs, Joy F. ......... ............ . Gibbons, Irving J ..... ....... 8 9, 90, 342. Gibbons, John G ...... .................. 7 9, Gibbons, Leon C ..... .... 8 5, 87, 350, 351, Gies, Charles E ..... .............. 1 51, Gies, Joseph H .... ....,. ........ Gigante, Samuel .... ........... 1 64, Gignac, Angela M .... ...132, 133 164, Gignac, Vi7i1fred L.... ...141, 142, 346, Gilbert, Don YV ...... ..........,.... Gilchrist, Edwin F .... . . . .... . . . . Gilewski, John P ..... .......... Gilhooly, John J .... ...92, 93, Gill, Matthew J .... ..... 1 10, Gill, Robert A. .... . . .120, Gillen, Daniel M ..... ..... Gillett, Lawrence F .... . . .135, Gilmore, David P ..... . . . . . . .29, Ginsburg, XVilliam R ..... ..... 1 10, Giovannini, Giovanni ....... ............. Girardi, Albert H ...................... 151, Girardin, John B .... 132, 133, 168, 170, 236, Gladden, John N .................. 119, 129, Gladfelter, William E. ...., . .,.......... . Glaser, Paul J ........, ............ 1 51, Gleason, Jack W ......... . . . 142, 146, 209, Gleason, Russell J ......... ............... Glicksman, Benjamin H .... . . . ..... 108, Glossman, Eli ........... . . . 142, Glynn, Michael J ....,. . . .151, Goetz, John F ...... ..... Gohl, Clarence A .... . . . Golchert, George ....... .......... Goldberg, Manuel R .... .......... . Goldberg, Morton ........ . . 164, 165, Goldenberg, Moe M ..... ...... 1 48, Goldenburg, Natan N .... ..... 1 51, Golds, Harold S ........ .,,., Goldstein, Miriam L ..... . . .142, Goldstein, Rosaline ..... . . . 142, Golf ............. ,,,,, Golf Manager ..... ,,,,, Golf Season ........ ,,,,,,, Golrn, Theodore P .... .. .151, 276 92 134 274 310 110 221 333 164 100 128 142 140 87 142 100 168 136 352 80 375 154 120 165 347 342 11,3 110 317 112 125 163 140 332 114 312 155 237 124 100 159 322 151 110 209 157 136 128 340 110 166 151 157 51 144 144 311 251 310 155 Goodenow, Ray L ..... .. . . . .. 151 Goodman, Milton J. ....................... 100 Goodnow, Nathan B. 76, 77, 88, 89, 182, 232, 233, 257, 262, 267, 322, 323, 324, 342, 343 Goodrich, Frederick L .................. 141, 142 Goodrow, Charles A ........ .............. 1 68 Goodrow, Fred J. ....... .... 1 68, 316 Goodspeed, William H .... ...., ..... 1 5 1 Gordinier, Ralph E ....... ............ 1 20 Gordon, Aubrey ..... .... 1 00, 358, 359 Gorman, Donald G. .... ....... 1 68, 172 Gorski, Stanley A ..... ......... 1 68 Goscinski, Francis L .... ....... 1 10 Gould, Howard S .... ......... 5 1 Gould, Leo E ...... ..... 9 2, 340, 341 Gracy, Edward F .... . .............. 142 Grady, Edward J .... ...51, 326, 327, 357 Graeife, Edwin O .... .............. 2 8 Graffius, Catherine ..... ........ 1 42, 144 Grammens, Oscar M ,.... .... 1 68, 170 Grand Rapids Club ..... ...... 3 77 Grant, Max A ......... .... 1 18, 120 Grantham, Edward T.. . . .... . . 136 Granville, Raymond H, .... .... 1 20, 125 Grates, Victor S ........ .... 1 09, 110 Grebb, Bernard J ...... . ...... 136 Green, James H .... .... 1 41, 142 Green, Nat ........ ...... 1 51 Green, Sydney H .... ...... 7 9 Green, Willis J... .... 151, 160 Greenberg, Louis .... . . . ...... 142 Greenberg, Ruth ....... ........ 1 42, 144 Grecnburg, Allen ....... .... 1 28, 129, 358 Greenspoon, William .... .... 1 00, 358. 359 Greenwood, Bruce F .... ....... 1 48, 151 Gregory, Louis J ................ ......... 7 9 Gregory, William B. 51, 171, 176, 182, 183.192, 208, 322, 323, 324, 325, 366, 382 Gregg, Carlton E .................. 142, 151, 160 Greifzu, Alfred ......................... 98, 100 Grendzinslci, Leo A .... ......... 1 10 Grenier, George L ....... .... 9 2 Gribben, Anthoncy E ..... . . . 100 Grieshamer, Ralph C .... .... 1 16 Grillin, F. H ............ ...... 2 S Griffin, George E .... .... 1 51, 158 Griffin, John M ..... ....... 1 16 Griffin, Robert XV .... .... l 49, 151 Griffin, Thomas A .... . . . ..... 51, 310 Grimaldi, Louis J .... ................ 5 2, 357 Grix, Arthur R ..... ......... 7 9, 80. 192, 214 Grix, Merrill A ,........ 132, 133, 168, 236, 384 Grobc, Maiirice ........................... 52 Groesbcck, Howard V .................. 136, 137 Grosc, Russell ..... 96, 97, 100, 101, 2-10, 332. 333 Gross, Mark S., S.J ................ 27, 178, 179 Grossberg. Max ............... ...... .... 9 2 , 93 Grostick, Raymond J .... .... 1 28, 129 Gruber, Earl L ......... .... 1 27, 128 Gruss. Elmcr XV ...... . ...... 143 Guarnicri, John A ...... .... 1 10, 31-1 Guarnieri, XVilliam A .... .. .... 79 Gucfa, Andrew F ,..... ...... 1 10 Guerin, Cliflorcl O. .... ....... 1 51 Guina, 1Villiarn E .... .... 1 43, 209 Guines, Thomas ....... ...... 1 28 Guiney, J. Owen ....... ..... 8 9, .--12 Gumblcton, Vincent E .... .... 1 63. 169 Gurslci, Joseph ............ . .... 151, 153 Gustaitis, John ............. .,... ....... 5 2 Guswilcr, Eugene F. 106, 107, 1211, 123, 23-l, 235, 330, 331 Haas, George M. ......................... 110 Hackett, John P ,..... ........ 1 52, 157 159. 276 Hackett, Vincent A.. . . ........., . ,R3, S-1 1-lacala, Peter ...... .52, 357 Hadraja Club ..... , , . 378 Haenggi, John A ................. ....... 1 21 Haflncr. Herman G ..... ................... 5 2 Haggerty. James A. 106.107,116,117,190,192,234 2-13, 357 Hahn, Alfred C .... ....................... 1 01 Haidy, Louis ..... ............. 1 00, 101, 102 Haight, Roland S ,... ......,.., 1 68 Haines, J. Carl ....... ,,,,,,,,,, 1 15 Haldeman. XVilliam F .... .... S 5, 86, 370 Hallta, Edward A ...... ,,,,,,,,, 1 10 Hall, Gilbert ......... ..... 1 67, 168 Hall, Wendell .......... .......... 1 79 Hallahan, Gerald H ..... .... 1 44 148, 152 Hallbcrg, Frank H ..... ........ 1 00, 102 Halvorsen, Harcourt . . .............. 163 Hamilton, John L ..... ...... 8 3, 84 116, 340 Hamlin, Russell ........ .... 1 00, 101 152, 177 Handloser, Albert G .............. 110 113, 354 Handloser, Anthony E ........ 164, 165 348, 349 Haney, Richard M ...... ......... . .79, 80 Hanjosten, Katherine .......... 26 Hanley, Lawrence J .... ,,,,,, 5 2 Hanlon, Wilfred T .... ......... ..... 1 0 0, 334 Hannigan, Martin G ................... 110, 114 Harbrecht, Paul P .... 29, 180, 181, 248, 282, 310 16-1 165 gardies, garold E .... ................. , arman. hristian ............... 133, 152 155 Harpham. Richard J ..... .. .... ....152: 209 Harrigan. George R ..... ...52, 242, 326, 327 Harrmgron. Dan N ..... ...... 8 3, 242, 327 14181 Harrington, William B. 52, 176, 177, 190, 192, 194, - 230, 231, 322, 340, 357 Harris, Francis J .......................... 168 Harris, Herbert L ....,. .... 1 11, 114, 345, 378 Harris, Lloyd R ........ ............ 1 49, 152 Harshbarger, Robert .. ........... 121, 122 Hart, E. T .......... ................ 2 8 Hart, Irving .............. 136, 139 Hart, Louis L ...... ...78, 79, 257, 261, 334 Hart, Pyrle .... ..... .............. 1 4 3, 276 Hartman, Catherine .. .......... 143, 144 Hartman, Waldemar ............ . 157 Hartman, Arthur A .... .... 1 35, 136, 152 Hartsough, Frank G .... ........ 1 00, 101 Hartgell, Victor F .... ......... 1 43 Haskell, Paul G, .... ..... 1 52 Hatch, Edward G ..... ..., 5 3, 357 Hatie, George D... .... 143, 146 Hattar, Martin ........ .... 1 67, 168 Hatten, Manford E ..... ...... 1 52 Hauck, John T ...... ........ 1 68 Hautau, Charles F ...... .... 1 18, 121 Hautau, Llewellyn A-.. .... 152, 153 Haven, Harold R ..... .... 1 43, 145 Haverstock, John L ..... .... 1 52, 157 Hawkes, 1Villiam H. .... .... 2 7 29 Havas, Alfred ....... ...... 8 5 Hayes, Edward W .... .... 1 36, 352 Hayes, John ....... ...... 1 11, 368 Hayes, John H ...... ....... 1 7.1, 122 Hayes, Lawrence .... ............. 5 3 Hayes, Stanley C. .... .... 1 09 111, 352 Head, Bruce M ..... ............. 1 28 Healy, Daniel J ..... ...88, 89 342, 343 Heapby, Hilary H ...... ................ 1 63 Heatherson, James J .... .... 5 3, 144 352, 353 Hebestreit, Walter .............. 128 Hedges, O. W ....... ............. 2 8 Heglin, Edward K .... ................... 1 43 Hegwig, George .... ..................... 3 2 Hein, Frederick H ....... 116, 143, 221 238, 357 Heiden, Frederick O ...... ............. 1 43, 146 Hejnowslre, Stanley A .... ......... , .... 5 3 Helmar, Elaine ....... 83 Henderson, Cecil F ...... ...... ........ 1 4 3 Henderson, Kenneth E ........ . ............. 53 Hendricksen, William ..................... 92 Henk, George E ...... ...86, 87, 330 331, 381 Henkel, Caspar ...... .......... 5 3 324, 325 Henkel, Ferdinand J ..... ......... .... 9 8 , 100 Henn, Benedict A .... .. --.--, 116 Hepp, Donald ...... .... 1 21, 124 Herdwig, Harold ------ 116 Heric, Moten J ..... ...... 1 43 Herley, Mark H.... ,-.-,--- 53 Herr, Norman P ,... .. -,,- 136. 159 Herryman. Arthur J .... -,---- 1 68 Hersch, Alvin D ..... .... ..... 3 1 Herscovitch, Saul ................... .. S6 Heslip, Charles F ........................ 83 8-1 Hess, George L ,... .... 1 16, 117, 23-1 2-13, 357 Hess. George W. 53, 176, 177. 230. 231, 32-1 325, 357 Hcssler, Robert J ............... ....... 1 51. 151 Herrick, Lamar R ..... . . .... 1-18,152 Hibcrt, Charles L. .................... 152, lvl Hickey, Charles L...5-1. 202, 320. 321 348, 3-19 Hickey, James L ........ ................... 5 -1 Hickey, Mjlbum ...... ... . .... 116, 360 Higgins, George J .... .... Z 9. 221 Higgins, John ...... ........ 3 2 Higgins, Louis W .... .... 1 00. 101 Highfield, Frank A.... .... 100. 101 Hill, Kenneth P .... .... 1 52, 156 Hill, Stanley NV ...... ...----- 1 63 Hill, Thomas E .... .. .... 152, 156 Hillcbrand, Paul YV ..... ...... 7 9, S0 Hillebrand, Victor C .... .... 1 36, 137 Hind, Roland S ...... .... 1 52. 156 Hindelang. Edwin C .... .... 1 68, 169 Hints. John U .... .,.. 135. 135 Hines. 1Villiam N.... ....... .. 32 Hinnicks. Herbert ......... .. 54 Hinz, Clarence XV .... .... 9 2 169, 340 Hinz, 1Valtcr E ...... ......... 1 69 Hipkins, Harry F ..... .... 1 52, 155 Hird. John A ...... .. 164. 165 Hirschman, Julius .... ...... ....... 1 2 S, 129 Hirsimaki, Aaron YV ................. 121, 125 Hoban, James ..... ..76, 77, 83, 84 199, 357 Hockey .................................. '309 Hocking, Richard R. ......... ........... 1 36 Hocxtcr, Samuel J ...... ....... 3 2, 336 Hollman, Bernard J ..... ....... 1 47, 152 Hoffman, Donald ..... .... 5 4 348, 349 Hoilman, Henry A ........................ 54 Hofstettcr, John H ................ 136 137, 276 Hogan, E. Vincent .... 85, 86, 201, 332 333, 38-1 Hohnhorst, Anthony A ............... .... 1 00 Hoizington. Ed. C ..................... 121, 122 Holihan, Alfred T. .... .... 5 4 251, 310 Holihan, Archie F... ........... 54 Holland, John F ..... .,.............. 1 36 Holland, 1Valter J .... .... 1 11, 114 352, 376 Hollow, Robert .... ................ 1 69 Holmes, Chester .... .............. 1 50, 152 Holstein, Alvin R... ............ 169 170, 316 Holwedcl. Stanley R .......... 109, 111 360, 361 Homant, Lemuel J.. ...121, 124, 360 361, 368 Honorihc .......... ................... 2 23 Hoofs, My Dear... .............. 208, Hope, 1Villiam E .... 79, 80, 176, 177, 188. 189, 192, 193, 232 Horgan, Dan J. ....... .54, 192. 326. 327 Horkkey, Clarence R. .... ................ 1 65 Horkey, George S ...... .. ...... 88. 89 Horn, Alfred C ........ .... 1 00. 136 Hornick, Norbert J ..... ......... 1 21. 257 Horrigan, Albert .... .... .... ..... 2 6 3 Horst, J. J., S.J .... ............. 3 24 Houck, Clarence 100, 101, 332, 333 Houck, W. .....,... ............. 1 00 House, James H ....... ............. 1 36 Householder, Earle C. ................. 148, 152 Howard, C. Scott 83, 182, 183, 184, 188, 192, 194. 232. ' 233, 243, 250, 257,326,327 357 Howell, Byron ....,...................... 86 Howell, George N ..............,..... .143, 276 Howick, Raymond A ..... ...... 1 65 Hsu, F. H, ........... ...... 7 3 Hubbard. John D ..... .... 1 51, 152 Huck, Edgar P ...... ...... 1 00 Huck, Walter P. .......................... 100 Huetteman, John XV. 55, 198, 208, 320, 322, 323, 324, 325 Huffman, George H .................... 152, 154 Hughes, Henry R. ..... .......... 5 5, 342, 343 Hughes, XVilliam M ..... ..,... 1 21, 123 Huhn, Carl 1V ....... .... 1 36, 139 Huhn, Jerry F ...... .. .... 121 Hull, Francis M ..... .... 1 20, 121 Hunt, Daniel J.. .,.. ......... 1 69, 170 Hunt, Gayles S. ..,. .............. 8 4 Hunt, James J. ..... ...88, 89, 348, 349 Hunt, Ruth A. ...... ......... 1 43, 144 Hunter, Francis V ..... ........... 1 52 Huntt, Harry ....,. .... 1 21 Hupp, Robert C ,... .... 1 21 Hussey, Martin L. ..... ...... 7 3 Hutchins, 3Villiam H ....... .... 1 43, 146 Hutchinson, 3Villiam E ..... ...... 1 50, 152 Hutmacher, John J ....... ,...... 1 47, 152 Hyde, Leonard F. ........ ...55, 357, 366 Illig, Harold ........... ..... 8 8, 89, 348, 349 Illinois University Relays. . .............. 303 Ilmoni, Matt ........... 169 lnch, Keith . ....... . . . .... 169, 171 Ingram, James ........ .......... 1 28 lnterfraternity Council . .. .,.............. 320 lota Fooleries ......... ................. 2 44 lrvine, Roy A ........ 121, 242, 326, 327 Isbitsky. Jacob S ....... ................ 1 16 lscnberg, Charles .......... 136, 34-1 Isenberg, David XV .... ..... 7 9, 82, 344, 3-15 lvers, John .......... .............. 1 69 lzydorczyk, Frank J ..... ............ 1 52, 160 lzzo, Daniel S ............ ...100, 102, 362, 363 Jablonslci, John H. ....1.................. . 136 Jabro, Lewis ........... 169, 170, 236, 237, 316 Jackson, Newton . . ...... . ............. 143 Jacobs, Maurice .... ....... . ..... 1 21, 221 Jacobs, XVade P ....... . ...... 128 Jacobson, Herman H ,... .... 1 69 Jaegers, NVendell C .... .. . 128 Jager, Victor E ........ . . . 55 Jakovich, Nick D ...... .. .... 153 Jabubowski, 1Valter S ..... . . . 98, 100 James, Cecilia . ........ .... 1 28 James, Charles E .... ....... . 336 Jaminct, Aloysius F ..... .... 1 49, 153 Jaminct, Carl J. ...... ....... 1 69 Jamison, John .... 152, 153 Janecelc, Louis J ..... ...... 1 21 Janes, Simeon ........ ....... 2 8 Janisse, Dennis R ..... ......... 2 7 Janjatovich, Boydon .. ,...88, 89, 348 Jannisse, Lyle L ..... ......... 1 53 Janosky, Cyril V ..... .... 1 65, 166 Janover, Harvey H.... .... 88, 89 Janson, Stanley G ..... ...... 1 69 Jarvis, Francis E ..... .... 1 43, 146 Jasionowski, Leo L ...... .... 1 36, 139 Jasnowski, Charles H ..... ...... 1 36 Jaworski, Chester W, . . . . . . . . . . 8 Jaworski, Stephen . . ....167, 169' Jedezalc, Martin ...... ....... 9 2 Jeffery, Bennett H.. . . .... 111, 112 Jenkins, Charles ...... ...... 2 09 Jenkins, Elwood A ............. . . . . . . . 111 Jenney, Frank E. 76, 77, 83, 84, 182, 183, 188, 189, 194, 195, 2.32, 233, 238, 320, 321, 324, 357 Jenney, Fred O ....................... 143. 146 Jenuwine, Frank C ........................ 55 Jesters ............ .... 3 79 Jewelsky, . ........ ...... 1 08 Jewell, Tilford .... 100, 103 Jicha, Emily ....... .... 1 28, 239 Jilbert, Clyde ....... ...... 2 O9 Jilinsky, Vserolod A.... .... 153 Jimencz, Abelino ..... ...... 1 69 Jobin, Erwin D ....... . ...... 136 Johannesen, Ralph . . . .... 153, 158 Johnson, Austin E, .... ...... 1 43 Johnson, Bradford J .... .... 1 53 Johnson, Clair C ...... .... 2 9 Johnson, Lloyd R ..... ...... 1 69 Johnson, Raymond H .... .... 1 01, 133 Johnson, Richard F .... .... 1 33, 153, 157 Johnson, William H .... ......... 8 , 101 Johnson, William ..... ............. 8 Johnston, George R .... .... 1 52, 153, 236 Johnston, John G ...... .............. 1 46, 153 Johnston, Leon S .......................... 27 Johnston, Ralph C. 76, 77, 79, 176.188, 192. 193, 214, 221, 225, 245, 324, 338, 339, 352 Jolicoeur, Clarence L ............. ...... . .. 55 Jondro, Vera ........................, 133, 169 Jones, Albert W .... .... . ......, 1 21, 122 Jordan, Jerome J ..... 107, 127, 128, 234 Jorgensen, John A .... .............. 3 2 Joscliak, Felix J. ....... ............. 1 11 Joskovitz, Joseph A .... ........... 1 63 Joyce, W. Kelly ..... ............. 3 2 Joyce, 3Valter M .... .... 1 07, 127, 128 Junior Class ..... ----------- 7 5 Junior Council .-.----- -- 76 Junior Prom .......... ............. 2 32 Junkcr, Alex ...... .... .............. 1 2 1 Jurlriewicz, Francis F ...... ...79, 82, 328. 329 Kachnowslci, Edmund A .... . ........ 101, 103 Kaczor, Stanley F ........ .... 1 11, 320, 321 Kadaver Klub ......... ........... 3 80 Kadushin, Jacob .... ...------- 1 53 Kahan, Oscar .......... .... 1 53, 160 Kaiser, Martin F .......... ...... 1 11 Kalamazoo Fencing Meet ..... .... 3 12 Kaller, Joseph ........... . ..... 169 Kallio, 3Villiam J .........,............ 101, 102 Kaluzynski, Andrew M ...... . .............. 111 Kammer, Noel 1' ....... 36, 37, 55, 252 362, 363 Kane, Edward T ............... ....... . 165, 357 Kane, J. Gerald .... ............ 8 9 342, 343 Kane, John A ....... -...-.---- 1 69 Kane, Thomas L .... . ---- 135. 136 Kanter, Oliver ..... .-..-- 1 28 Kaplita, XValter A .... ..---.---- 1 35 Kappa Sigma Delta ...... ............. 3 50 Karczmarzyk, Anthony .... 165 328. 329 Karl, Robert J ........ .... 1 11 113, 354 Karr. Mark ......... ........... 1 65 Kzise, John A ,..... ---.--- 9 8. 101 Kathrein, Ernest E .... .--..- 1 69 Katz, David P ...... ---- 1 41. 141 Katz, Morris ........ ---- 1 53. 160 Katz. Reuben L ........ .--.-- 1 53 Kaufman, Jack ......... ------ 9 6. 87 Kavanagh, Thomas M .... ...- 1 11. 113 Kavanaugh, Harry ---- 111. 114 Kayser, Josephine ---- -- 92 Keal, Harry M ..... 29 Kean, Owen A. .... 111 Kean, Harold A .... ---- 1 53 Kearns, James XV .... -.-.--------- 7 Keating, Edward .... ................ 1 28 Keele, John V ........ .............. 1 43, 221 KCC,-mn, XValtcr M .......... .100, 101 332, 333 Kehoe, Kathleen M...55, 192, 320, 321 3-16, 347 Keith, Andrew . ...................... 169, 171 Keith, Colin .......... ..,. ............. 1 2 7 Kelleher. Marshall C ..... .... 5 6 322. 323 Keller, Louis ......... ..... ........ 1 2 1 Kelley, Eugene T ..... ....--.-.--4- 1 01 Kelley, Frank J ...... ..78, 80 146, 209 Kelley 1Villiam J ..... ........... 7 8, 80 Kelly, Alva.. ..... ................. 3 so, 361 Kelly, Francis J. .......................... 79 Kelly, Lawrence E....37 230, 231 342, 343 Kelly, Raymond J ........ ................. 1 43 Kelly, wake, ...... .... 1 oo 111, 352 Kelly, XVayne H.... ..... 8 143, 155 Kelly, 1.Villiam E .... ....... . .. 135 Kempf, Rupert J .... .-.... 1 01 Kenna, Thomas R .... .... 1 47. 153 Kennaly. James M ..... ...... 7 3 Kennaugh, Jack P .... . . .... 86 Kennaugh, John ..... .. ............. 30 Kennedy, Harold T .... .............. 1 47, 153 Kenney, J. Francis ........... 116, 117 257, 259 Kent, Alfred L ........................ 143, 146 Kern, Charles A....10l, 103, 221, 332, 333, 373 Kern, Raymond G .......... ,.............. 8 6 Kernohan, Delmar ..... .................. 1 69 Kerr, John C .......... -.------ 1 01 Kerstein, Norman A.... .......... 121 Kertesz, Theodore ........ 121, 124 Kerwin, James J .... .... 5 6 324, 325 Kerwin, Philip J .... .......... 1 36 Keves, Henry 1 .... ................... 1 21, 125 Keyes, James S ............................ 121 Keyes, Vincent M...56, 2 308, 322 323, 357 Kiang, Chang ............................ 56 Kidder, Violet H ......................... 126 Kiefer, Levi D ........ .... 1 43 300, 301 Kilbane, Michael J .... .... 1 10 111, 352 Kimball, D. Eugene .... ....... 1 53, 157 Kimball, Donald M .... .......... 3 3 King, Claire D ....... .... 3 46, 347 King, John ........ ..---. 9 2 King, Paul H .... ........ .. 31 Kinggo, John C ...... ........... 1 69 Kinney, Flavius N.... .... 56 348, 349 Kinsley, Peter F ..... -.---.---- 3 3 Kirchner, Leo J. ....... ........ 1 36 Kirshner, F. Bain ....... .----- 1 O1 Kirchgessner, Eugene V ..... .... 1 43. 146 Kirk, Lester K .......... ---. 2 3. 357 54191 Kim, Fred J ........ ...118, 121, 360, 361 Kirwin, James E ...... ........... 1 21, 125 Kishkorn, William S ..... .... 1 15, 116 Klebba, Albert ....... . ....... 92 Klebba, Earl E. ....... .... 1 43, 146 Kleehamcr, Harold F .... ........ 1 01 Kline, Frances M ..... .... 1 43, 144 Kline, William L ....... ...... 1 53 Klinglesmith, Dan A .... ...... 1 21 Knight, Albert J ..... .... 1 is, 157 Knohelsdorf, Harold .. ...... 127, 128 Knyzewski, Henry R, .... ....,.... 1 48, 153 Kobetitis, Richard F.. .... ...,. 1 63, 336, 337 Kochanslti, Stanley A ..... ........ 1 48, 153 Kockx, Martin ........ .......... 9 2 Koelzer, Gregory L ,.... ....... 1 53 Koessler, Harry J ..... .... 1 53, 155 Koessler, John E ....... ....... 1 21 Kohlmeier, George F .... ....... 1 16 Kolb, Raymond C .... .... 1 15, 116 Koldon, Arnold E ...... ........ 1 53 Kolehmainen, John 1 ...... .... 1 53, 159 Kolodzieski, Leonard F ..... ....... 1 36 Kolpack, William C ..... . , ...... 92 Kolznak, George A ...... .... 1 53, 159 Konczalski, Chester F ....... ..... 1 54, 157 Kondratovicz, Monica M .... ,...143, 144 Kopko, John M .......... ...e121, 123 Kopowski, Ignatius M .... ..... 8 6, 87 Kosal, Leonard J ....... ,,,,, 5 6 Kosel, Herbert O ..... .... 9 7, 101 Koski, 'Theodore A .... ,,,,,,,, 1 43 Kosman, Victor ....... ...... . 101 Kowalczyk, Edward G... ...136, 328, 329 Kowalski, Florian F ..... ............ . 165 Kowalski, Roy G .................. 83, 340, 341 Kowalski, Valentine J ............... 56, 165, 329 Kownacki, Peter M ...... 165, 320, 321, 328, 329 Kozdroi, Chester A ............... 111, 328, 329 Kozlinski, Anthony A ....... ......... 1 35, 136 Krabach, Fred C ...... ..... 1 36, 137 Kraft, Allen N ....... ....... ....... 8 3 84 Kramer, Earl 1.. .......................... 154 Kramer, Frederick A ....... 80, 82, 320, 321, 354 Krantz, Paul J ......... ..... 1 16, 121, 124 Krasinski, John E ..... .......... 1 19, 121 Kraus, John H. ...... ...... 5 7, 111 Krause, Gerald F ..... ...... 1 47, 154 Krause, Harold L ...... ...136, 137, 141 Krause, Herbert J. ...... .......... S O Krausmann, George NV. .... ...116, 140, 146 Kraushaar, Fred J ...,..... ............. 5 7 Krebsbach, Sigmund J. .... ....... 8 3, 221, 357 Krcklow, Joseph L ...... .... 7 9, 80, 326, 327 Kremer, Edward J ..... ....... 8 8, 89, 348 Krempa, Joseph J ..,.. ......... 1 19, 121 Kroha, Lawrence A .... ............ 2 7, 80 Kmnk, Anthony J .... .... 8 0, 166, 334, 352 Kronk, Joseph J ...... 76, 77, vs, so, 334 Kronk. Martin A ..... ........,....... 1 65 Kropik, Nelson YV .... .. .,.... 154, 157 Krug, Joseph ...... ...... 1 00, 101 Kuenz, Joseph A ....... .... 8 0, 82, 312 Kukielka, Martin L ..... .... 5 7, 328, 329 Kulaski, Edward W .... .......... 8 3 Kulick, John H .... .. .... ..... 1 54, 157 Kulinski, Edward E .... . ......... 135, 137 Kull, David E ........ ..... 1 37, 139, 276, 300 Kulsea, Joseph J. .......................... 116 Kummer, Clarence J. 233, 245, 322, 333, 338, 339, 352, 353 Kundrat, Alexander ....................... 80 Kunkle, Charles P. ............... .. 122 Kuretic, Stephen F .... .... 1 37 Kushler, Chester R.... 122 Kuzara, John E ...... .... ....... 1 6 9 Kwence, Joseph L ........... . .. 154, 160 Labadie, Gerald O .......... ............ 7 8, 165 Labadie, John B ...... . . .80, 220, 221 300, 302 Labadie, Ora A ..........,.......... 78, 80, 382 Labinski, Leopold A ..... ............. 1 43, 146 LaBoe, James C ......... ...1.52, 154 LaCharite, XVi1fred J .... .... 8 0 Lachover, Abraham .... .... 1 65 LaCourse, Aloysius J .... ...154, 162 LaCroix, James E ..... ..... 7 LaDriere, James C .... . ...... 80 Laethem, Jerome H .................... 149, 154 Laethem, Richard H .... .. ,.... ...... . .91, 92 LaFaive, Earl H ....... 88, 89, 322, 323 348, 349 Lafiery, J. Maxwell ............... 111 234, 352 LaFramboise, Dougal .... ............. 1 54, 159 Laige, Joseph J ...... ........ 5 7 Laige, Norman J ..... ............ 1 26 Laird, John .,....... ............. 9 2 LaLonde, Gerald H .... . .... 83, 84, 357, 368 Lamb, John A. ......... ........... 8 3, 84 LaMeasure, T. James .... ...116, 127, 128 Lamers, G. F ........... .......... 8 6 Lampard, Royal C ........ . ..... 153, ,154 Lamphere, Gordon W. .... ...132, 133, 165 Lamsens, Orval A ....... .......... 1 69 Lamsens, Oswald J .... 169 Landers, Edward J .... ....... 1 11 Landers, Michael J .... . .... .165, 348 Landers, Thomas B .... .......... 8 0 Landon, Norbert J .... t ........ 116, 117 Langel, Edward R. .... ...134 137, 221 Langlois, Ovila E .... .... 8 0, 81, 354 237. 259. SOS. Lanigan, Alfred E ..... ...12I, 122, 27-1 Lansky, Mandell . . . ............. 135, 137 Lantz, Edward S .... . ................,. 137 Lapham, Byron ..... .................... 1 65 Laramie, Daniel ...i7, 320, 321, 342, 343 L31-der, Lloyd C.. . . ............. 154, 178 Lardner, Merril T .... ,...84, 277, 274, 340 LaRou, Lawrence V..,. ........... 148, 174 Larson, Stanley C ..... ........ 1 43, 146 LaSalle, john H. ..... .. .154, 162, 194 Last, Marvin A ....... ...... 1 37, 140 Lathrem, Charles I ...... . ..... 148, 174 Lacourella, joseph F ..... ....... .... 3 3 Lau, Edward T ......... ...167, 336, 337 Laurencelle, Charles A .... ....- ---. 8 0 Lavine, Louis .......... .... .... 1 4 3 Lawrence, George .... .......... 8 6 Lawrence, Russell E ..... --.- 7- 9, 334, 377 Law Sodality ........ ..... .... 2 0 2 Layman, Carl ...... ....- 1 67. 169 Lazar, Nicholas M .... - - ---- 86 Lazowsky, Jack .... . - -174, 152 Leach, Donald A ..... ---- 1 16 League Dance ..... ----. 2 39 Leahy, David A .... .--117-1 209 Leamon, Francis I ..... ........ ,... . . . 122, Leary, Gordon J ........ ............. 1 54, 177 LeBarge, Kenneth F. .... ..... 8 6, 146, 350, 351 LzBarge, Leonard L ..... ............. 8 O, 82 LeBarre, Maurice Y ..... ............. 1 16 Lebedeff, Olseis M. .... - - -112, 114 Lech, Arthur I ....... -...- 8 0 Leckncr, Glenn G ..... ---154, 153 Lee, Roy ............ ..... 1 69 LeFevre, Grace W ....... .... S 7, 383 LeFevre, Margaret I ..... ....... 9 'L Legal, Walter R, ...... . . .127, 17.8 Lehancc, C. I ......... ...101, 103 Lehman, Charles F ..... . . .137, 140 Lehman, Ralph I ..... ..-.. 3 6 Lehr, Edward G ..... . ..l22, 124 Lehr, George I ........ ..... 1 69 Lginer, Charles B .... . . . .1'i0, 154 Leion, Robert ......... ..... 1 37 Leitenberger, William . . . . . . . S7 Lemcreaux, Bob ...... .... 2 O9 Lemke, Joseph ...... ..... 5 7 Lemmer, Harold L ..... . . . ...... 148, 174 Lenfesty, Edwin G ..... ............. 1 12, 354 Lennert, Anthony G ......... 76, 77, 91, 92, 357 Leon, Edgar D ........ ............. 1 54, 155 Leonard, David A ...... .... .......... 1 2 2 Leszcynski, Frank I .... . . . 136, 137 Lettvin, Fred ....... ..... 9 I, 92 Levin, William ...... . . .137, 139 Levine, David M .... ...135, 137 Levine, Louis S .... . .. ..... 135, 137 Levy, Marvin B, ..... ............ 8 Z, 112 Lewis, Raymond I ..... ...l33, 133, 174, 334 Lewis, William T ..... ........... 1 74, 177 Lightner, Ralph H ..... .......... I 47, 154 LiHy, Paul IK .......... ...11s, 340, 341 Lindsay, Walter R ...... .......... 8 O Lingeman, Harlow J ..... ..... 1 36, 137 Linsenmeyer, Francis J ..... ..... 3 0 Lipscomb, lack P, ........ . . .1-49, 154 Lisowski, Benjamin . . . . . . . . . 137 Listman, Albert E ....... .. .170, 174 Lipsinski, Andrew F ..... ..,.. 1 12 Lipinski, Stanley L,. . . ..... 80, 82 Lloyd, Kenneth B. .... .... 9 9, 101 Lloyd, Myron B ........ ..... 1 46 Lombardini, Alnerc W .... . . . 122, I2-I Long, Benjamin J. ................... .... 1 01 Long, Harvey I. 36, 37, 57, 176,177, 230, 257, 258, 261, 377 Longnoord, Iohn A ........................ 128 Longton, Hazen A .................... .... 9 2 Lorangcr, Louis . . . . . . , . . 128 Lord, Ralph R ....... . . . . . . . 36 Lorenz, Arthur ....... .... 9 2, 93, 317 Losoncy, William A .......1 .......... .... I 0 I Lottier, Lawrence F .... ......, ,........ 1 O 1, 373 Loughrin, Joseph ID...132, 133, 137, 236, 237, 276 Loush, Mark ............. 1 .............. 92 Louisville Football Game ................... 7.62 Love, Max .............. , . 122 Love, Wilfred E ......... . , 154 Lowery, James R ..... ,, 80 Lowrey, Bernard A ...... . ......, . . 169 Lowry, Dorothy L. ...,.......,....... .... 1 43 Loyalty Award . .................... .... 2 27 Loyola fNew Orleansj Football Game ....... 264 Loyola University Basketball ............ 291. 294 Loyola University Debate ........... .... 2 15 Loyola University Golf Game .... . . . . . . . 310 Lubinski, Joseph A. 107, 132, 133, 137, 138, 236, 237, 282 Ludden, Donald L. ,............... . . . . . . . 58 Lukasiewicz, Henry J... . 1 ..... 80, 328, 329 Lundgren, Einar A .... ...... I 49. 175 Lutchin, Harry G ....... . . . . . . . 137 Lutomski, Edward G ..... . . . . . . . 169 Lutz, Alexander I ..... 146 Luyckx, Joseph A .... Lynch, Arthur P ..... Lynch, Edward N .... Lynch, Joseph A ,..... ......l-13, 180 .28. ..........163, 342 1 Lynch, Raymond I ..... ...... , ..89, Lynch, William H .... ...l63, 164, 336, Lynn, James F ...... ....... 5 8, 324 Lyon, Andrew C .... ............. Lyons, David .... .... 1 69, 181 112 165 369 343 337 325 128 171 Lyons, Fred W. .... ---169, 172 Lyons, Ray J ..... ........ .... 9 I , 92' McAndrexv, Georgej ................... 175, 158 McAulifk'e, Vincent F. .... ...58, 320, 324, 325 McBrady, Robert T ..... .............. 1 69 McBrayne, Ross C ..... ........ 1 48, 155 McCabe, Patrick F ..... .-.-- 5 3, 377 McCallum, Frank R .... .... 1 ZZ. 17-4 McCann, James J ..... .... 1 48, 155' McCauley, Leo J ....... ...... 1 63 McCausey, Raymond ..... ...... 3 0, 58 McCaus1ey, Russell W .... .,.. 1 37. 7-7-1 McCarran, Lester I ....... ....... 3 3 McCarthy, Bernard I ..... .... 1 55, 160 McCarthy, Charles G ..... .... 1 36, 137 McCarthy, Elinor ..... ...... 1 16 McCarthy, Frank I .... -.-. 7 8 McCarthy, James D ....,. 342 McCarthy, Joseph A ........ ......... 5 8 McCarthy, Raymond A. .... ............ 8 1 McCarthy, William E ..... . ............. 169 McClear, Ernest V ..... ....... 1 10, 112, 352 McCIear, Gerald I.... ...89, 164, 165, 348 McCIear, Louis W .... ....... 3 1, 33, 181 McC1ear, Robert D ..... .... 1 64 165, 348 McClellan, Donald ..... 59 348, 349 McClellan, Lee W .... ........... 9 8, 101 McClounie, Joseph .... .............., 1 22 McClure, Herbert F ...... .... 8 5, 86 332, 333 McClure, William L ........ ......... .... 1 5 5 McConnvil1c, Francis Tl... .... .... 1 55, 161 McCorn1ick, Francis W ................. 143, 146 McCormick, George D. 36, 37, 79,176,177,182,l83, 200 230, 231, 320, 321, 324,321 362 363, 375 384 McCormick, Thomas T ............ 143 146, 360 McCurry', C. E ...................,....... 28 McDonald, Charles T, .... ......... 3 3 McDonald, Edward J ........ .......... 1 52, 155 McDonald, Franklin E. 132, 133 143, 148 236, 237 McDonald, John H ........................ 92 McDonald, Robert C ...................... 137 McDonnell, Lawrence J .... .... 1 16, 215 McDonnell, Marion F .... ...... 1 55 McDun11ell, Patrick I ..... ...... 1 28 McDonough, Jos. ...... .... 3 40. 341 McDougall, Bernard A .... . ..... 175 McEIligutt, Edward C ..... ....... l 69, 172 McElroy, Philip I. ..... ............ 3 36 McEnalIy, Vincent L .... .... I Ol, 332. 333 McEnhill, Drew ..... ........... 1 22 McEnhilI, john E .... ...., 1 ii, 156 McEvoy, joseph E ..... .... 1 57, 138 McFadden. Harry E .... ...... 9 Z McFarland, Joseph L .... ..... I il, 155 McFam'n, XVilliam A .... .....,... 1 37. 310 McFaxw'n. Fred S ...... .... l 16, 117, 310 McCann, Edgar P, .... ........... 1 69 McCarty, Joseph T .... ......... 1 69 McGarvah. Mary E .... . ...... 59 McCauley, Leo J ......... .... 3 36, 337 McGeary, James L.. S.I ..... ...... 3 0 McGinn, Oswald T ...... ...... 3 48 McGinn, W'iIliam ...... .... l 67, 170 McGinnis, Iohn ...... , .... 89, 3-42 Mccirl, Iohn J ......... .... l ii, 157 McGlaughin, Nicholas . . . .... 137, 221 McGlynn, Francis j .... .... ...... I 7 0 Mcconigal. Joseph L ......... ....... 1 73, 161 McGox'ern, George A., SJ .......,....... 16, 32 McCox'ern, John ,....... ....... 3 6, 37, 59. 343 McGrath. Arthur L ........ .............. 3 3 McGrath, Helen ......................... 132 McGrath, Thomas L. 132, 133, 136, 137, 236, 237 McGrath, Vernon J. ...................... S1 McGrau', Francis A ...... , ........ .... S 6, S7 McGraw, Sheldon W .... .... l 42, 143 McGregor, Chester B .................. I44, 357 McGuigan, Eugene ....................... 200 McGuigan, Vincent A. 96, 97, 101. 102 369, 384 McGurn, Herbert R ....................... 122 McGurn. XVilliam ........................ 203 McHardy, David S .... 109. Ill. 352, 353 McHugh, Clyde L .... ........... 1 10, ll2, 352 Mclntosh, Patrick A ....................... 170 Mclntosh, Thomas I. 106, 107.129, 234, 237, 241, 340 141,372 McIntyre, Everett ........................ 170 Mclntyrc, James ,I ..................... ISS, 161 McIntyre. Ronald E ..... .... 8 3, 84, 3-40, 3-H McKeough, Thomas C .... .............. 7 McKeoxvn, Gregory M .... ............... 1 22 McKillip. Daniel B ........... . ..... 83, 8-I. 340 McLaughlin, Charles N ...... 164. 165, 342, .143 McLaughlin, Fred C ..... . .............. 83. S4 McLaughlin, Robert N,. . . .......... 144, l-43 McLean, Harry W .... . . . ..... . 137 McLeod, Robert ...... ,.,, 1 57, 176 McLeod, Thomas .... 157, 178 McLoon, James E ..... ,,...,, 1 16 McMahon, James D .... . ..... 87, 116 McManman, Peter B ...... ...... 1 22 Mclvfanmon, Joseph C .... ..... 8 5, S6 McMillan, Miles ...... ..,. 3 48, 379 McMullen, Clecus C .... ,,,122, 123 McNabb, Louis A ..... ,..., , 122 McNally, John G ..... ,,,, 3 3 14203 McNicho1s, Iohn P., S.I ..... .. McNish, Samuel D ....... McRoberts, J. Fred ...... McSweeney, James .... McTaggarr, Angus R ..... McWi1li'ams, George E.. . Mabley, George R ........ Macali, Tranquilino L .... .... 136, MacDonald, Hugh W .... 139, 147, 155, MacGillis, Daniel J ...... Machczynslcu, Thaddeus . Macholiski ........... . Mack, Sigmund J. .... . . Mackert, Raymond . . MacLaine, John A ...... MacLean, Harry W. . . . MacLel1an, John A. .... . Maddock, William A.. . . Madigan, john H. ..... . Madigan, Gerald ..... Madigan, James ..... Magi ......... . ...... Magi Scholarship Key ..... . Magnan, Henry ....... Magnet, Richard Magrath, Howard A .... Mahalak, Alfred F ..... Maher, Francis G.... Maher, ,Iohn . ..... . . . Maher, Milton ,I ....... Mahoney, Howard I.. .76, Mahoney, Marjorie ..... Maier, Constance T ..... .l76, 177, 184, Maier, Elizabeth M ...... Maisane, Joseph ....... 77, 91, 92, 93 Matjcwske, Edward E ................. Maledon, William J. 27, 79, 176, 177, 192, 198, 209, 324, Maley, Iohn R ...... . .59, 193, 257, 274, Malik, Edward A ............ 112, 113, Malis, Louis A .............. 127, 128, Malley, Iohn s ..... 112, 114, 1813, 190, Malone, john D ............. 101, 103, Malone, Michael ..... . Maloney, Edward I. 60. 177. 257, Maloney, Steve ....... Malotc, Forest I ......... Ivfancewicz, Stanley C,.. Mandel. joseph R ...... Mancr, Francis ...... Mangold, Charles Maniere, Anthony T... Maniere, Robert R ..... Mannebach, Fred C. . . . . . Manning, Avon E ....... 260, 275, 282 .........l-43 ....l67. . ...163 Manning. Robert E., S.I .... . Manure, Harvey A ...... MansBeId, George A .... Mansield. Robert Manteutfcl. Florian J .... Mancz, Robert W ..... Maramcnc. Archie .. Marcero, joseph L. .... . Marco, Paul G. 112. 114. Margolis , lsadore ....... Iviarin. James F. ..... Marine, Ernest D ..... Marion. Charles E..., Marks, Louis V ...... Iviarlcau, Lucicm A ...... Z3-4, 326, 327, Ivfarlowa, Hortcnse E .... Marquette University Baskctball... . MarqL1cttc University Dcbate .... MJfqLlCECC University Track Meer. Marr, Iohn S ....... . . . . Marston, George H Marrhcn, Bernard Martin Mm-:in Harry M ..... J. Russell .... Martin. ,Iames F .... Martin John H ..... Martin Joseph A, ..... Martin, Marry, Ralph I ...... . . Stanley ..... Massacck, Charles. . . ffld Masaitis. Bradley M ..... Mason, Edward R ...... Mason, Stewart S ...... Massucci, Arthur j. .... . Masrcrson. Clarence B. . . Masura, Paul .......... Matgen. Marcella M .... Marousek, Steve ....... Matthexvs, M. Albert .... Mattson. Ethel .... Mattson, Gertrude Matyas. Joseph ..... Mntzcn, Donald W... lvlnvis. Gcorge H .... . May, John J .... ...... Nfayrosc, Herman E ,... . lvfayrosc, XViIliam ..... . . .16-L 165 ..'.'.'1'1232' 1- X . . .hJ. 54, I '.'. '. '1551' Mayvillc, Anthony C ..... Ivlayvillc, YV1lliam C, .... .. Mazur, Michael J. .... .. Mcad, Dell E ........ Mead. John ......... Meade, Jack T. ...... .. Meade, XVilIiam H ..... Means, Cyril XV ...... Meier, Joseph A .... ....60. .26, 202 122 120, 122 100, 101 137 137, 276 144 101 148, 203 122, 127 120, 112 ...... 122 ...... 144 155, 157 113, 122 .... 136 112, 114 .... 144 360, 361 167, 170 116, 170 226, 352 .... 224 .... 59 .... 155 121, 122 aio, 351 .... 144 .... 33 .ao, 300 340, 341 .... 170 187, 346 .... 59 112, 114 .... 122 327, 374 1oo,3i7 328, 329 358, 359 192, 235 332, 333 .... 92 283, 357 122, 124 144, 276 1501 155 .... 137 .... 334 115, 116 144, 14s 178, 179 356, 337 150, 155 .... 374 .... 60 ..a6. 87 170, 172 .... 144 148, 155 .... 340 .s4, 237 335, 339 si, se .... 101 155. 161 152, 155 144, 146 144, 147 143. 144 236. 293 .... 216 .... sos 330, 591 .... 31 .... 199 348, 349 .... ss 100, 101 1is, 161 ..7s. S1 .... 121 .... 122 340. 341 .... 60 149, 156 144. 141 277, 269 .60.'3i7 170, 317 143, 144 153, 156 164, 165 170, 239 170, 171 .... so 310, 341 136. 137 170, 316 .30. seo .... so .... 276 .... 144 176, 139 144, 145 170 122, 114 .... 73 322, 323 10s. 112 ....3S, 144 163 128 156 172 366 Meininger, Henry L.. . . . . . .120, Meisner, Stanley A .... ...,.. Melnik, Joseph A ..... .... 1 12, Mendelson, Abe .... .... 1 19, Merckling, George H ..... .... 1 22 Mercurio, Michael A ...... .... 1 54 Merriman, A. Samuel J .... .... 1 22, Mersman, Oscar M ....... ...... Mertz, Louis F ......... ...... Mesina, Eutaquio ........... .......... 8 6 Meskcll, James A., S.J. 26, 180, 181. 198. 199, 201 Messenger, Howard ....................... Metric, Norman J ........... ..... ....... Metzger, Charles H., S.J ................... Meyer, Frederick A., S.J ,..,.. .... ,... ..... Meyer, Harry A .... .....,............. 1 20 Meyer, Martha E ........ 133, 132, 141 237, Meyers, George A. 78, 81, 338, 339. 352 353 Meyers, Margaret E ,..................... , Meyncr, Gustave H ..... ........ 1 50 Michael, George J ...... .... 1 70 Michalak, George F ..... ...... Miehalak, Joseph ...... . . . . . . . . . Michalski, 1Valter J .... ,.... .... ........ Michelin, Arthur L .................... 148 Michigan A. A. U. Track Meet.. ......... . Michigan State College Basketball Game..287 Michigan State College Football Game.. Michigan State College Track Meet .... .... Michigan State Fencing ............... .... Michigan State Golf ....................... Michon, Armand F. ...... .... 1 63 336, Middleton, Milton L. .... ......... . . Miller, Charles NV ..... ......... Miller, Edward J... ...... .27 Miller, George .... .... 1 19 123 Miller, James J ...... ..... 1 44 Miller, Marcel V .... ............. Miller, Max ........ .... 1 15 116 Miller, Raymond J .... ..... 1 37 Miller, Victor J ..... ......... 1 4-1 Miller, W'alter G.... ........ .156 Miller, 1.Villiam H... 123, 163 336 Millman, George . . . ......... 121 Minch, Helen ..... .............. Mindak, John P. .... .. . Minne, Ric-.hard .... ........ Minor, Clarence J .... ..... 1 44 Mitchell, Francis T .... .... 1 12 114 Mitchell, James ....... ..... 1 27 Mitchell, Victor X ...................... .. Mitterdorf, Abraham C ................ 141 Mittig, Arnold J. 96, 97, 101, 102, 201, 2-10 332 Mittig, Leo S. 36, 37, 60, 199, 230, 231 357 Mixich, Robert T .... . ................ 170 Moag, Edwin S ........ . . . .... 61 342 Moberly, 1Vinson ....... ............ Modjeski, Thomas S ..... .... 1 56 162 Modlinski, John D ..... . ...... Moenhart, Frank .... ...... 1 56 Mohan, Philip .......... .. .... 167 Mohardt, Paul NV .................,... 112 Moloney, J. Lawrence 61. 202. 348. 349 352 Monaghan, Bernard .. ................... . Monaghan, Edward A. , 106, 107, 110 112, 215 225 Monaghan, James B .... . ........... 79 Monaghan, Peter J ..... ........ Monahan, Thomas A .... .... 1 65 Montgomery, Elizabeth . .... 144 Montgomery, Jack W.. . . . . . . . . Montreuil, James E. .... ...... 1 16 Moody, George ...... ........... Mooney, John H .... .... 1 34, 138, Moore, Elbert ..... .... , ......... Moore, Ralph VJ ..... ......,...... 9 2 Nloore, Robert C. .... ...... 8 5, 86 332 Moran, Francis P ,... .... 1 01, 102, 332 Moran, Leo L .... .... ............ 1 2 3 Morell, George D.... ........ . .118, Moreau, Harry W ..... .... 1 63, 336, Morgan, Powell C ..... ........... Morrey, Charles J ..... ,, , Morril, Edward R ...... .... Morrill, Hugh J ......... ...... Morris, Charles E. B. .... ....... . Morris, Clifford R ...... ...... 1 44, Morris, George B ..... ........... Morris, George F ..... .... 1 36, 138, Morris, Harlem H ........ .... 1 23, 330, Morris, Richard J ......... ........... Marrissey, John P., S.J .... ...... 3 0, Morsey, Charles J ........ .... 1 50, Mortell, John T., S.J ..... ...... 2 6, Moses, John B. ........ ....... 1 56, Moskowitz, Oscar .... .... 1 69, 170, Motok, Earl R ..... ........... Mott, Arthur H ....... . . . . . Motz, Donald C ......... . . . Mount Clemens Club .... , , , Mouseley, Leon L ...... Mousseau, George E. . . . , , , Mowett, Joseph A. . . . Moyer, Frederick C. ..................... .. Moyers , 1Valter R ...... Moynihan, Daniel J. . .28,. I Mulfat, Joseph A ......... 86, 232, 233, 367, 122 81 114 122 123 156 257 138 33 376 200 170 116 27 27 122 236 380 144 92 138 123 156 303 292 270 304 312 310 337 126 112 , 30 124 145 144 144 138 145 160 337 123 128 128 89 145 378 128 28 1-14 333 172 357 170 194 112 158 170 276 353 92 234 ,81 31 166 239 170 144 92 322 128 170 333 333 125 123 337 170 8 102 156 170 146 102 209 331 81 375 156 194 157 316 144 156 170 381 123 144 61 170 102 361 384 Mulcahy, John V. ........ . . . Mullaney, 1Villiam XV ..... . . . Mullen, Frank W. ....... . . Mulligan, Phillip T .... Mullin, Thomas M. 36, 37, 61, 203, 230, Mullins, Joseph F ............. .. Mullins, Ryan F ......... 116, 257, Mulvaney, Robert J ............... lvlunro, Hazen H ....... Munson, Robert A ..... Murdock, Gerald T ..... Murga, Murphy Murphy Murphy Joseph ...... , Arthur J ..... , Denis W .... , Earl A ..... Murphy, Francis J.. . . . Murphy, Francis X .... Murphy, Gerald A .... Murphy, Henry T .... Murphy, James P. . . . 156, 135, 231, 2321 162. .147-, 138, 317. 156, 340, 149. ...79, .61. . ..... 99, .168, ...123, ...79. 194 138 156 221 372 157 341 123 170 156 166 81 357 102 170 125 81 Murphy, James T ..... ..... 1 28, 129 Murphy, Joseph A ..... ...... .... 6 1 Murphy. Joseph C ..... .... 8 9, 342. 343 Murphy, Leo J ....... ...... 1 44, 146 Murphy, Louis J ....... ............. .... 1 4 4 Murphy, NVilliam P. 106, 107, 119, 123, 200, 234, 252, 362, 363, 367 Murray, Harry J ..................... .... 8 9 Murray, James V. ..... .. .... 61, 362, 363 Murray, John D ....... ...... 1 53, 156 Muske, Benjamin F .... ..... 1 35, 138 Muske, Paul H ........ ..... 1 35, 138 Muttaler, Fred S ........ .......... 1 44 Murtkowski, Richard A .... .... 2 7, 181, 346 Muttschall, Richard A ..... .......... 1 70 Myers, Edwin S ....... ..... 1 56, 160 Nlyers, Lynn J ..... ..... 6 2 Myers, Max L .... ..... .... 1 4 4 Nader, Anthony E ............ 115, 116 257, 365 Nader, John M. .... ............ 8 1, 82 Nader, Joseph J. ................ 134 138, 308 Nagler, Albert J. 138. 139, 190. 192. 194, 210 236. 237 251, 276, 282, 300, 382 Nanry, L. Clancy ........................ 126 Naumann, Donald J. ............ ..... 1 56, 158 Naumann, Harold G ...............,... 149, 156 Naumes, Joseph K. ........................ 73 Navin, Ray T. ..... , .... 84. 243, 257 263, 357 Nebel, Joseph 1'l.... ................ 144, 145 Nehel, Louis M. . . .,....... 149 156, 210 Nehus, George ....... ....... 8 4, 144 Neff, Lloyd R. ......... ............ 6 2 Neibauer, Harold M. .......... 156. 157 Nelius, Mary L. ..... ............. . . 144 Ncllis, James F. .... .... 8 6. 87 362. 363 Nelson, Clifford .. ..... 129 340, 341 Nelson, Harold ...,....... . 144 Nelson, James J. .... ............ 1 28 Nelson, Joel O. ........ ...ll6 117, 144 Nelson, Ralph J. ....... .......... 9 2 Netherland, Maurice A .... . .... 119, 123 Newman, Jessie ........ .......... 1 44 Newton, Benjamin E. .. ...112 146, 215 Nickel, Marjorie ...... .......... 1 44 Nichels, Albert ........ ..... 1 38, 354 Nickodemus, John P. ..... 113, 334 Niedzielski, Henry F.... ....... R6 Nill, John B .......... .... , ....... 6 2 Nizinski, John . ..... ...102 103, 328 Nolan, Benjamin A .... .......... 7 Nolan, Peter J ........... ..... 1 64, 166 Noonan, John T., S.J ..... . ..... 27 Nordstrom, Carl ........ ..... 1 53, 156 Nork, Arthur P ....... ............. 1 70 Norris, Edward J ...... ............... 6 2 Norris, 1Va1ter T ............. 101, 102 362, 363 Northwood, Clarence J. .................... 156 Northwestern University Debate ............. 216 Notre Dame University Basketball ....... 284, 296 Notre Dame University Debate ............. 215 Novak, John S .... ..........,.... . ...... 8 6, 87 Novak, Stanley R. ................ 111 113, 354 Novak, Lewis J ....... .......... 1 70 Nowack, Joseph L ....... ...... 1 38. 140 Nowaezyk. Stephen P .............. 81 328, 329 Nugent. Floyd 1. ...................... 153, 156 Nurse, George O ...................... 137, 138 Nussey C. C"rro1l..116, 117, 188, 189 192, 239 Nutt, James D ........... 85, 102, 103, 332, 333 Oakes. Clcon A. ........... ............ 1 38 Oberst, Gregory ......... ...123, 125, 221 Oberlin College Debate.. .......... 216 O'Boyle, Cecil ....... 170 O'Brien, Edwin G ........ .....,......... 8 1, 79 O'Brien, Joseph S ............ 168, 169, 170, 171 O'Brien, Patrick H. Hon ........ ....... .... 3 1 O'Brien, 1Villiam E. ...... ...... .. 170 O'Brien, William R. .... ....... 1 70 Ochenduszko, George .... 171, 163 O'Connell, Gilbert P .... .............. 6 2 O'Connor, Arthur J ..... .... 6 2, 192, 338, 339 O'Connor, Donald J ..... ...... 1 42, 144, 145 54213 O'Connor, Gabriel .......... 141, 145, 146, 209 O'Connor, Roger P ...... 132, 133, 164, 192, 210 O'Donnell, Dennis P ...................... 170 O'Donnell, Edward J ....... ............. 8 9 O'Donnell, James ...... 92 O'Donnell, Peter H .... 171 O'Donnell, Thomas W ..... .... 1 23 Ofer, Daman N ....... .. .. 138 Ofer, Joseph E. ........ ...100,102 O1Gorman, Clarence J ..... 156 O'Gorman, J. Charles ......... ..172, 171 O'Halloran, William J ...... .164, 166, 257, 270 Ohanisain, Gurgen C ................. .... 1 38 Ohio Weslyan Golf Game ....... 310 O'Keefe, Francis .......... .. 86 Oldani, Joseph ......... .... 6 2 O'Leary, John F ..... ..... 8 4 Oleniak, James M ..... ...115, 117 Oles, Frederick W ..... ...138, 368 Olmstead, George S... ..... 138, 354 Olschefsky, Edward J .... ............. - .... 8 1 Olshove, Vincent ..... 257 267, 357 Olson, Clarence .... .......... .... 1 5 7 Olson, Luther C ...... 138 O'Malley, Joseph E .... ..... 1 01, 102 Omega Beta Pi ........ ..... 2 66, 354 O'Nei1, Albert J ..... 124 340,341 O'Neil, Bernard D .... . 102 103, 308 O'Neil, Theodore H... ..... 157, 158 O'Neil, William J ..... ...,. 1 38, 227 O'Regan, William B .... .33 180, 181 O'Reilly, James T .... . ..... 153, 157 Organizations ........ ......... 3 65 Oratorical Medal . ....... . . . .... 225 Orlowsky, Stephen M .... ............ 1 71 Orrin, Phil ........... 138 140, 145? Osborn, Don A. ..... .92 340, 341 Osborne, Ralph .... .......... 6 2 O'Shea, Frank ....... ......... 1 71 Osterman, Merlin XV .... .... 1 57 Oswald, James ........ ............... 9 2 Otermat, Ezra M ...... ..... 1 48, 157 Ottenbacher, Edmond J. 77, 76. 92, 190 203, 317 340. 341 Otter, Carl H .......... ............. 1 27, 129 Otting, Henry W., S.J .... .... 7 , 336 Otting Memorial Key 224 Otto, Carl .......... .. 111 Ourt'lettf' Noris H .... .... 1 38 Owen, Mary ...... ...... 1 85 Ozar, Clarence G.... .....99, 123 Pacevich, Adeline ........ ..... 8 9, 166 Paddock, Elmer J ......... .... 1 51. 157 Padzieski, Francis C ....................... 138 Paek, Stephen ........ ..... 1 54. 157 Page, Robert E ...... 80 81 352, 353, 354 Paiot. Clayton J ...... ...-...-. 3 0 Palagi, Stephen A ..... ..... 1 42.145 Palisoel Joaquin C. .... -.-- 8 7, 86 Pallister, lrene ..... --.- 9 3 Pallister, Roy ...... ...... 9 3 Palmer. Edwin B .... ---- 1 18. 123 Pann, I1Vm. M ..... .... .1 Papo, ouis ........ ...... . Papp, Andrew S ......... . ............ 157, 159 Pardo, Mateo ............ ......... 1 02 Parent, Camille ..... 63, 210, 324, 325 348, 349 Parilla, George, Jr. .................... 128, 129 Park, Anthony .... ......... 3 1 Parker Harold . ..,.. 141 145. 276 Parker Harry C.... .------ S9 Parle, Jerome ...... ----- 1 47. 197- Parr, Russell D. .... ---- 1 55. 164 Parsara, Robert ...... ...-- 1 45. 7-76 Partridge, VN7eldon T .... ...---- 1 47. 157 Pasieczny, Adam l .... 113 328. 329 Pasko, Arthur M ...... --.-- 1 52. 157 Passarcll, Oscar L ..... --.------ 6 3 Patil, Pandharinath .... .... 8 6 Patterson, Robert J ..... -- 145 Patterson, Walter P. .... .. 17-9 Paulick. Margaret .... .................. 9 3 Paye, Phillip H ..... .................... 1 38 Payea, Russell K ........ 120, 123, 190 192, 195 Pearl, Albert ....... . .................... 123 Pearson. Charles N .... 133 145, 276 Pease, Ruth ......... .... 8 3, 84 346, 347 Peltier, Clifford J ..... .............. 8 4 Peltier, James B ..... ..... 1 20. 123 Peltier, lohn L ..... ............... 1 63 Peltier, Rosella M ..... 239 346, 347 Penflergast. John E ..... ....... 8 9. 90 Penfield, Paul L ........ .... ........ .... 3 3 Pennel, John 1 ......... ..... . ..157, 149 Penrose, John C .............. .... 6 3 Penn State College Basketball ..... . ....,... 283 Pequegnot, Lucie R. 36, 37, 63, 176, 177, 184, 185, 192, 204, 346, 347 Perfield, William J. 85, 86, 363, 362, 367, 375, 381 Perkovxki, Joseph ................... .... 1 38 Perlinski, Leon A .................... .... 1 45 Permen, Adele C ......... 63, 192, 346, 347, 383 Pernes, William ..................... .... 1 45 Perreault, Oliver H .... .... . .. .... .... 1 Perrin, Clifton. O ..... Perry, Kathleen R ..... .... 1 43, Pcssolano, james R, . . . .... 155, Peter, Fred C .......... ...... Peters, Christopher S ..... .... I OO, Peters, Michael F ...... .......... 1 38, Peterson, Clarence ..... ............... Peterson, Gunnar C ..... ................. Petix, Samuel A ...... .... 1 12, 113, 244, Petracci, Angelo ....... ....... 1 13, 114, Petrimoulx, Arthur I ..... ........... 6 3, Petrane, Louis I ........ ......... Petrovitz, Andrew J ..... . . ....... . . Pettit, Robert C ...... ................. Petty, Charles H ..... .... 1 23, 124, 362, Petz, Anthony J ..... ....... 1 17, 257, Petz, John T ......... ......... 8 4, Petzold, Herman S. . . . ..... . . . . Pfeffer, Norman F .... . ...1l8, Pfeilfer, Edwin C ..... .... 6 4, Pfister, Kenneth L .... . . . ............. . . . . Phelan, 1. Francis 89, 90,177, 232, 257, 261, 264, 280, 282, Phelan, Joseph L ........ .............. 1 38, Phelan, Paul V. ....................... 80, Pheney, John ........ .... 8 9, 90, 342, Pheney, Slyvester I .... ............ Philomathic Society . . .......... . . Phillips, Homer A .... . . . .1-17, Philips, Hugh ...... ..... Phillips, Joseph I ..... .... Phillips, Robert W. . . . . . Phillips, Walter L.. . . . Pierce, Don E ..... .. Piercy, James E, . . . ,, Pierson, Morris R .... ,,,, Pierson, 1Vamer YV. . . , . . . . 30, Pi-I-Pirate Ball .... ...... Piklor, Stephen .... ,.,,,,, Pilon, Ray A ......... ...1i7, Pilon, Raymond O ..... . . .139, Pincler, Walter R ..... ...... Pipp, Alfred ....... ..... Piorrowski, Bernard . . . . . . 167, Pirrs, Isadore I ...... ...12l, Plasko, Phil .,...... . . .157, Ploe, Edward H ....... ..... Poisman, Harriet E. ..... ..... . . Pomaski, Arthur J ........ ,..., 1 17, Poniacowski, Stanley I. . . ..... . . . . Pont, Joseph .......... .... 1 23, 282, Poole, Harry XV ....... ....... 1 57, Pooler, james S ...... ............ .... Porter, Charles F. . . . .............. .1Z1, Portnoy, Harry .. . ............. S-l,s35'8, Purtnoy, -Morris ...6-4, 320, 321, 348, Posner, Charles ...... . ........... .... Potoezak, Walter L .... .................. Potts, Francis I ..... ...81, 209, 210, 322, Potts, Harold XV .... ..... , ......... 1 00, Potucek, Francis J ................. 79, 179, Pouliot, Ifrancis H ..................... 121, Powers, joseph A. 81,192, 216, 335, 338,339,331 Powers, Lula E ...................... . . . . . Prefjunior Class .................... .... Pre-junior Class Officers .... ,,,,,,,,, Prefjunior Class Dance. . . ...... . . . . P1-enart, Charles N ...... ,,,,, 6 4, 362 Premeau, John M .....,. ............ l Prendeville, David O..,. .... 110, 113, Preston, Otto I ....... ......... B 1 Price, Bernard G ..... ......... l Price, Furman O .... , , l Printz, Leon I ...... , Prokopp, George J ..... , , -157 Protaise Brother ..., , , , 109, Pfalf, Edward P .... ,..- 3 fy Pumpkin Dance ..... ,,,, ' Purcell, George R ..... ,,-. EUFCEH. .THIIQCS F. ....... ,,,,, l urc aS, Wiliam I., r .... . . . ' Purvis, 1Vi11iam A. . .... , , , Pulte, Omer H .... . . . , , I ' Pung, Clement M ........ , , , PYtlevicz, Anthony P. ...... ,, QUib6l1,Earl .... Quick, E. E ....... . . . .......... . .99 Quick, Robert E .... .... 1 oi, 102 332' Quillimm, Jack C ..... ........... ' Jes' Quinlan, Harold W ..... .............. l 8UiHlan,FJohr1 M. .... .............. . uinn, rancis X .... ...8-1, 244, 32 Quinn, I- Gerald. .. ............ Quinn, Thomas D ..... ............ Quinn, Thomas F, ....... ,,,, 8 7, Radlinski, Harr F .... .... ,,,., Radner, Irving .... , , Radner, Ralph R ,... ,,,,,,,,,, Radner, Roy ...... ,,,,,,,, , 64 Radom, Max ....... .... 1 71 344, Radzikowski, John . . . ..... l. . . . Rager, Ebert ....... ,,,,,,, 1 71 Raleigh, Joseph E .... ..... 6 S, 340' Rambaldi, Ernest ...... ....... 1 39, Rammacher, Joseph I .... ....... 9 1, Rampe, Paul . ....... ,,,,, l , Ramstrum, Erik . . . 156, 145 152 63 102 277 209 86 354 234 216 171 93 157 363 273 340 64 123- 377 171 342 276 113 343 138 382 221 171 138 145 138 157 157 102 86 245 117 156 140 163 340 171 123 159 128 171 115 113 294 158 'ZOS 123 359 349 B6 157 323 102 162 123 373 90 95' 97 250 363 139 352 SZ 157 157 157 161 374 81 239 145 139 157 198 157 64 145 171 171 333 166 158 113 327 64 123 86 331 139 129 358 345 93 172 341 140 93 145 158 Rancourt, Cyril Rankin, John W .... Rantanen, Viner Rape, Maynard Rashid, Joseph G .... Rassel, Richard Ratcliffe, john A. J .... T .... ....65, 330, 106, 107, 117, 116, 209, 234, 235, Ratke, Clement I ,.................... Rama Parlchi, K. M .... Raya, Edward I ..... Rayder, Theodore N .... Reaney, 1Villiam H .... .. Rebain, Roman P ....... Rechcvsky, Samuel ..... Reckling, Normand A.. Redden, R. Roy ....... Redick, Frank M .... Redmond, Joseph H .... Redmond, Robert L .... Reeser, Edward I .... Reese, Rollin ....... Reeves, Harry NV .... Regan, john ...... Reich, Gustav I ..... Reiden, Wm. P ..... Reilly, John L. ...... . Reilly, M. Catherine... Reilly, Paul M ....... Reilly, Thomas L,. . . Reilly, vvrilfd S ..... Reisdorf, Paul F ..... Reiscr, John B ...... Rcisncr, Saul B, .... Reiss, Rollin K ..... ....6s, zoo, ....1Ss, 161, Reive, Bert ......... Religious ............. Reno, George L., S.,l... Rcschke, George Retzlaff, Charlcs A .... Reynolds, Eugene ..... Rheaumc, Eleanor L .... Rice. James ........, Rice, Lewis O ......... Richard, Frank A ....... Rickcnhaclc, Clarence H. XV ..... Rickcnback, Roy A ..... Riddell, William M .... ....117, 239, Rieden, 'Nilliam Rigncy, Charles Rigonan, Pio C. .... Riley, Gerald F,. . . . Riley, Lawrence G. XV .... P .... .....89, 90, 30, 76, 77. 37, 182, 133. 192, 70 1 1 312 31 15 Z-17, 3. , T2 , f, '.3, 33', Riley, Thomas F, ..................... Riley, Wilbcrr H ............ . . . . . . G ..... Ringholz, Lapier Rissman, Carl l.. Ritter, Daniel F. 67 . 178, 179, 138, 210, 250, 282, 326, Rivard, Aurelius I ..................... Rivard. Cecil J. ...... . ......, .. Rivard. Melvin L .... .... 6 S, Rivard, Thomas E .... .......... Roach, Nlclvin I .... ............ Robb, Charlcs D .... .... 1 01, 102, Roberts, Donald F,... ....... 141, Roberts, Enos A ....... .......... Robertson, john M ........ . Robertson, Lawrence A .... .. Robins, Kenneth D ....... .... Robins, Max .......... ..., Robinson, Daniel 1V.... Robicnillc, joseph ...... ,,., Robitcll, Clarcncc A ,.... .. Rockcll, Frank H ...... ....... Roclcctt, John E ........ ........ Rochester, Bernard P .... .... 1 24, Rnden., Thomas M ...... .... R 1. Rodman. Jack ,I ......... ...... Rodrigucz, Horacio R .... ....... Rochrig, Henry L ....... .... 1 71, Roemcr. Charles, 3.1 .... ....... Roh, Edmund V ........ .......... Rohl, James R ,...... . ........,.. . Rohlancl, Kurt M ..... . .... 86, S7. Rohrig, Ignatius A-.. ......... Rollins, Lco S ...... ............... Roncy, Charles ,I .... .... S 1, 277, 239, Roney, Eugene H ....,.... 81, 294, 352, Root, Willard G. 106. 107, 123, 124, Z3-l, Rosario, Hipolito Dcl .................. Rose, Eric ............ Rose, Henry M ....... Rose, Russell I ,... . Rosen, Meyer ........ Rosenbaum, Manuel .... Rosenshine, Abraham j.., Rosenthal, Irwin M .... Rosenweig, Maurice Rossie, Frederick A ..... Rosingana, George L .... Ross, Charles M ...... Ross, Duncan D.... Ross, Lawrence F.. , . . Ross, Samuel ...... Rossman, Barr D. ...... . Roth, George E .......... Rothenberger, Carl H. 106, 107, 123, Roty, Charles V ......... ...76, 77, 39, ....1-ii, 276, ......12'l, .........l4Z, .........11s, 124. ,w 78, 81 33 331, 360 147, 158 123, 125 123 243, 377 .... 65 65 iss, 119 142, 145 .... 7 113, 114 138, 139 .... 123 .93, 157 168, 171 122, 123 .... 102 .... 171 ... 340 .... 158 ...... 340 .... iss 134, 139 171 .... 145 362, 363 132, 133 .... 30 iss, 161 .... 141 .... 139 117, 129 .... 28 .... 197 . 26 ... 123 31 .... 93 546, 347 352, 373 103, iss .s2, 141 169, 171 .... iss .... sv .... 276 342, 343 .... 87 ..s4 ss 201, 232 339 .... 123 118, 221 147, 195 .... 123 327,357 110, 171 170, 171 210, 216 ..x: sv .... 17L 332, 333 149, 109 .,:s 33 .... iss .... iss .... 115 139. 'is 159, 276 130, isa .... 93 157, iss .... 340 332, 335 113. 209 142. 145 ..s1, 67 172, 116 .17, Q74 149, iss .... 90 332, 313 iso. iss 149, 276 232. 334 353. 354 330,531 .as, 976 90, 190 .... 149 .... ss 156, iss 170, 171 .... 66 .... 173 ..s9, 90 .... 113 14s, iss 100, 504 .... los 124, 121 .... 113 145, 209 131, 139 330,-331 124 54223 Roudoy, Victor A ..... Roulier, Rodolphe E .... Rountree, John J ..... Rowe, NVil1iam G .... Rowland, Dudley H .... Ruben, Russell ..... Rubenrire, Harry ..... Rubenstein, Leslie L .... Rubenstein, Philip I .... Rubin, Myer ........ Rubin, Nathaniel H ..... Rubinstein, Nathan D.. .. 139, 132, 133 158, 156, ".'.E19, Ruedisalc, Slyvester P ......... 66, 317, Ruedisueli, Charles A ..... ........... Ruedusuiali, Theodore A. . . . . . . . Ruffing, Clarence L ..... Ruhlin, John C ......,... Ruhlman, Franklin D .... Ruiz, Rudolph Z ....... Rundels, James W ..... Rushbrook, Leslie H .... Ruskin, Louis M ..... Russcll, John A .... Russell, Lyle W ......... Russell, Miriam L. 66, 183, 191, 192, -...'.1.1.7.,. 3116, 2352 157, ....87, 346 Ruyssar, Henry A ......... . . . . ..... . Cornelius Daniel O .... Eugene J ........ . Ryan, Ryan, Ryan, Ryan, Ryan, Ryan. Ryan, Ryan, james H .... Harry B ..... 115, James A ........ J .......... 117, J. L.. ....,..... .... . Ryan, Ryan, Ryan. Ryan. Ryan, Ryan, Rypcl. Rypsa Saari, John E ..... John j. . . Joseph C, . . Katherine . . Leo Francis. . . Thomas ,I ..... Stanley A ..... in, M. joy... S Olaf ....... ....... Sablacan. Fred 1V ......... Sailer, Lawrence A ......... Sailer, Roman L .............. Sr, Xavier Basketball Came .... St. john's Baskccball Came... St. Louis Football Game ..,. Saliva, Marcel A .......... Salsinger, H. G ........ Sampcy, Hazel M .... Sampey, Mills H .... . Sampson, Anna F ...... Sampson, Edward K .... Sampson. Harold .... Sanccn, Ezekiel Sands. William G.... Sanford. A. Howard .... Santos, Barrholumc .. Sapcrsrein, Alben .... Sapsowirz. ,loscph D .... Saravolatz. Nicholas . . . Sam, joseph ....... Sarvis, Norman H .... Sass. Thomas ,l ..... Sauber, Sruarr R ..... Sauk, John vl .......... Sax-ignac, Eugene Sazcr, Samuel ..... . M .... Scala. Fred F ........ Scallcn. Edwin J ..... Schachcrn, james .. Schafcr. Paul I. .... . Schafer, William Scharf, Lawrence Scharmn, Arr, ........ Schayowitz. Max Schcafer, A. Howard .... Schccter, Karl P ....... Schcel, John R ...... Scheidt. Michael .... Schcifclc, Aldred .... . Schclkc, Arthur I ........ Schenk. John A., Jr .... . Schill. Bcniamin A .... Schiller. Carl L ...... Schilling, Donald Schimcr, Harold C ..... Schintzius, Chester A .... Schlagcr, Robert W .... Schlcsingcr, Esther .. Schlussel, Irving ...... Schmidt, Arnold R.... H .... A.... . I. 1.6M 3.0.2 Francis . . .................... 320. 321 .....109 ....s4 ..'.'ii9 120, -124 . . . . .124 81, 103, 33, 138, 347, .99, 158, ..89, 300, .84, 360, 113, 128, 1352 144, 340, 1211 .e6, 330, 125, 159 122, 289, '1 120, 1321 171, 195, . ...l.l.3.,. . . . . . . . . .163 114 ...139 ...154 ....S2 ...17S, Schmidt, Edmund AU.. .. 143, 145, Schmidt, 1Vil1iam C ..... ............. Schmitt, Norman L .................... Schmiuer, Charles R ....... S1 SZ. ISS, Earnest Schmirrcr. Schmitz. Arthur ...... .. Schneider, Al .......... Schneider, Charles G .... Schneider, Nicholas I .... Schneider, Ralph ....... Robert I ..... Frank R ..... Schneider, Schnezzlcr, Schocnbocm, Carl Scholl, Louis H.... Schorn, Carl F ..... .s7. iss. 341, 336, 161.. 1592 127 116. 11:. bib, ..SJ, 159, 159, .S2. 159, 139, 128, ..92, 194, izs. 5511 1891 IH, 151' 102, 111 66 160 129 30 124 158 102 145 90 139 139 341 171 82 171 268 82 66 158 166 120 336 139 190 102 192 90 sos 310 361 171 312 129 113 266 146 141 341 114 124 346 331 221 162 12-1+ 297 290 268 139 256 1-17 1'l-1 90 159 326 114 179 66 376 1:9 '45 9 337 129 129 159 102 329 113 113 102 126 1-li 276 129 159 171 11-1 66 322 67 1-H S4 161 161 113 160 209 147 221 129 67 67 93 207 120 113 313 221 129 171 139 317 S7 124 166 171 172 140 Schreiber, Fred J ..... 87, 332, 333 Schreidell, Lawrence . . ....---.- 133. 139 Scbrein, Norman F ........ ..,...... 8 7 Schroeder, Benjamin A ..... ....... 1 71 Schroeder, Charles H ..... .- .159. 161 Sehuecler, George F ...... e .... 119, 124 Schuett, Bromley B ................... 153, 159 Schuett, Charles A., S.J 198, 199, 200, 201. 202, 203 Schuler, Stewart J. ........................ 87 Schultz, Arthur W. .... .......... 6 7, 340, 341 Schulte, Frances R .... ..... . .90, 92 Schulte, Gerard J ...... . . . 136, 139 Schulte, Henry J., Jr... .... .. 171 Schulte, Leo G ,... .1 ..... 171 Schulte, Leonard J.,,. .. . 93 Schuman, Arthur . . . . . . 221 Schutt, Erwin H, .... .. 67 Schwartz, Arthur J ..... 159 Schwartz, Edwin T .......... . ..... 159 Schwartz, Norbert G ................ .. ..92, 93 Schweineherg, George S ................ 132, 145 Scott, James F ...... 106, 107, 114, 234, 352, 353 Scott, Ralph B ............................ 124 Seehaldt, Edward A .... ........... 8 0, 82, 374 Socbalclt, Otto C ..... . . .106, 107, 110, 114 Seehollcr, Carl H ..... .......... . 28, 348 Seeler, Richard H .... ..,.... . 156, 159 Segwalt, Jack W ...... .... 1 45, 171 Seichtcr, Frank R .... ...... 1 02 Seifert, Eugene V .... ..... 1 45 Seifert, Lulu B ..... ..... 6 7 Scin, Ralph ..... ...... 1 72 Seitz, C. Grove... .... 100. 102 Seltzer, Louis .... .... 1 49, 159 Senecal, 1Varren . . . ...... 129 Senior Ball ......... ..... 2 30 Senior Class .......... . 35 Senior Class Council ..... . 37 Senior Girls' Club ..... , .... 383 Seth, Charles M, ..... .............. 1 39 Sevald, John E ........ .,.............. 1 14 Sezauer, Glennon E ..... .............. 1 59, 221 Shafer, Gus U ....... .... 1 17, 300, 303, 304 Shank, Leroy S ...... ............. . .. 103 Shapoe, Fred ....... ........,.. 1 22, 124 Sharkey, Bernard H ..... .-.. 1 2-1. 127 Scharrock, George O ..... ...... 1 56. 159 Shattuck, Albert E. ..... ....,.. 1 19, 124 Shaughnessy, Mark J .... ......... 1 42, 145 Shaw, Charleton G .... .... 1 29, 241, 340 Shaw, David ...... ........... 1 63 Shaw, Wlilliam .. ----------- 342 Shea, Daniel G .... . ...36, 37 67, 230 Shea, James C ..... ......... .. 90 Sheckler, Duane V ..... ........ 1 59 Sheets, Frank J ...... ..-- 1 -17-. 146 Sheeran, Edward . . . --.--- 129 Sheehan, Carl T .... -.--.--- 6 3 Sheehan, John R, .... .... 1 42. 145 Sheilcrly, George H ..... ...,.. 1 59, 162 Shelby, Sidney ........ .... 8 7, 330, 331 Shephard, Harvard W ..... ......... 1 39 Sheppeck, Mike ....... . . . .159, 161 Sheremeta, John ....... .... 1 53, 159 Sheridan, George F ...... ,. ..119, 124 Sherwood. Richard ..,....... . 163 Shields, Clement A ..... ......... 1 53, 159 Shires, Charles ..... ...80, 82, 192, 334 Shook, 3Vil1iam J.. .1 ......... 139, 140 Shortt, James M. ...... . . . ............ . 159 Shreder, Raymond J .... ................... 1 59 Shubnell, Leo T. 79, 82, 176, 177, 188 192, 195, 210, 308, 379 Sidle, John C. ........................ 100, 103 Siedlaczek, Edward S ........ ...,......... 1 14 Siegal, Max .......... ......... 1 17 Sierant, Henry N .... ........... 1 39 Sierra, George ....... .... 1 17, 340, 343 Sigler, Howard R .... ., ......... 124 Sigma Kappa Phi .... .,.... 2 26, 356 Sigma Phi Lambda... ...358, 359 Sihler, John ........ ...... 1 03 Silverman, Joseph M .... .... 1 58, 159 Silverman, Milton . . . ..... . 139 Silvers, Gertrude B .... .......... ...... 1 1 7, 239 Silverstein, Isadore ........ ..........,.... 8 2 Simek, Carl E. .......... 87, 232, 233, 334, 335 Simmons, Barney H ..... .................. 1 39 Simon, Edvin P ......................... 91, 93 Simons, Henry A .........,... 158, 160, 338, 339 Simon, Waldo J ..... 166, 217, 334, 335, 352, 353 Simon, XVa1ter 'W .............. Z. ......... 159 Simonich, Virgil F .... ..... 1 49f159 Simpson, Thomas I ..... ......... 1 46 Simpson, William C .... ....... 1 70, 172 Simpson, William J .... .... 6 8, 348, 349 Simsiek, Raymond J .... ....... 1 18, 124 Simms, Manuel ...... .... 1 01, 103, 221 Sinclair, Frank D ..... .... 1 56, 160, 221 Singelyn, Frank J .... ....... 1 45, 146 Sirwaitis, Frank J .... ........ 1 24 Siterlet, Earl A ........ .... 1 28, 129 Skalitzky, William J .... .... 1 42, 146 Skalski, Stanley ....... .... 1 00, 103 Skehan, Francis E .... .... ...... 1 3 9 Skinner Debate Medal .... ...... 2 25 Skorupski, Edward .,.. 117, 328 Skorupski, Henry J ..... .... 1 38, 139 Slaggert, Alfred N ..... ........ 3 3 Slater, Joseph C ....... ..-..147, 159 Slattery, William J ..... .... 1 38, 139 Sledzinski, John J ..... Slimmon, Russell C, .... .. Slonaker, Homer C .... . . . 170, 172, Slowinski, H. F, .... .. Slusser, George C. .... . Slykcr, Francis J ......... Smetclc, Ladislaus F ..... Smith, Albert ....... Smith, Alfred J ...... Smith, Bernard J .... Smith, Francis Smith, Frank E .... Smith, George W... Smith, Glen A ...... Smith, Harry C ......... . Smith, J. Lancelot ........... Smith, James D ............. . Smith, Leonard B ..... 96, 97, Smith, Marshall O. ......... . Smith, Michael .........., Smith, Milford H ..... Smith, Reginald L .... Smith, Walter I ..... Smyth, Robert .... ........ Social ................ Society of Automotive E Sodalities- A, and S, ....... . . C, and F. ...... N. C. and F,... Day Eng. B ..... Law .... Eng. A .4 ...... Sokup, Soleau, 6S, 209. 210, 320. Soleau, John T. 101.103, 210, Louis C. ....... Bertrand S. .68 192 336 . .... 153 .....110 , .... 117 H83 ,84 ...136 idif 'z'4'd,' 5' Q' . 3 .68 340 ngineers. . . . 321, 334 240, 320, Solomon, Sidney R ....... Solovich. Charles D ......... Somers, Arthur E ....... 166 Somerville, Bruce .......... Sonnhalter, XVi1liam E ..... .. Sophomore Class ...... Sophomore Council . . . . . Sophomore Snow Ball . . . Sorensen, Henry P.. . . . Snron, Joseph ...,..... Sosnowski, Stanley M, . . . Spagnuolo, Dominic .... . . . Spa rks, James ............ Sparling. Jack 106, 107. 120, 12-1, Spector, Maiirice Spencer. Herbert Spcns, Paul NV ....... 141 Spey. Herbert ,l ......... Spickett, 1Villiam. lr.. . . Spillane, 1Villiam M ..... Spilman, llie ......... Spindler, Orville J .... Sporer, Conrad ..... Spredlin, Aubray .. Sprague, Lawrence . .. Spruit, Nicholas P .... .. Sprunger, Arlo H. .......... . Squires , Robert D ....... Stack, XVilbert E ..... ........ Stackpoole, John D.. .. Stackpoole, Philip NV. 190 132, 133 .....123 335 111 142 2.15 352 334 146 H138 342 ..142 ..106 ...160 , 234, 308. .....160 362 ......18 .84 360 ......12l 146 143 ..'.lnis' 151 146 339 .102 328 336 .146 190, 339 160 113.114, 188, 192, 210 333 Stahl, John T ...................... . Stanezak, Stanley V .... . ..... 164 166, Stanlield, Lionel J.. . . .... . . . . . Stankey, Lester B.... ..81 Stark, Edward K ,.,. . 163 Starr, Louis F ...... ......... Starr, Martin G. ........ . .......... . Starrs, XV. Joseph 76, 77, 80, 82. 183. 210, 250, 300, 333. Staub, Alvin F, ................. ,154, Stawski, Francis. Jr ...................... Stawski, Stanley F ..... . . . St. Clair, Ann ...... St. Clair, Ethel... ...., .... Stead, Charles ........ . . .103 Stedman, Gerald E .... Steenkist, Henry Stefane, Frank M ..... Stefani, Raymond T ..... Stefanowski, Robert A, . . . . . . Steger, Bernhart J ...... 326 .,...119 109 Stehle, Edwin XV. .... .......... . Stein, Allen E ..... 114, 320, Stein, Sol I .,........ .........., Steinberg, Samuel Steiner, Arthur E .... Stelmaszijuk, Stanley .. Stenger, Edward A .... . Stenger, John O ..... Stephan, George A ..... Stepanski, Gerald J. ...... Stephens, Charles H ..... Stephenson, William, . Stern, Leonard H.... Stern, Morris I .... Sternberg, Henry .. Stevens, Delos H ..... Stevens, Eugene B .... Stevens, Gordon H ..... Stevenson, John D .... A 54253 ..81 114 143 321 . 209 146 ..122 344 ..142 .84 .87 146 ..l26 160 210 332 155 135 ...158 ...152 124 129 195 337 167 114 160 172 146 360 194 160 139 103 140 91 103 333 140 146 140 160 341 93 229 384 198 199 203 202 201 200 124 353 335 209 140 343 140 146 105 107 234 161 146 160 117 183 363 161 172 114 68 361 124 160 322 7 172 31 103 160 160 87 192 352 103 329 103 221 337 S7 276 192, 209 160 160 93 93 327 33 124 172 352 3.60 360 124 345 146 160 166 161 357 333 160 140 155 68 140 124 160 164 68 160 124 Stevenson, John M .... ..85 87 Stewart, Fred O ...... .... 1 29 Stewart, George W ,... ...138, 140 Stewart, Harry .... ...167, 172 Stich, Jack P ............ .... 1 40 Stilwell, Marie .,........... .... 1 72 St. John's Basketball Game .... .... 2 85 St. Louis's Football Game .... ....... 2 68 Stockton, North J ....... ...114, 300 Stone, Frank J ............. .... ..... 1 1 7, 357 Storen, William J. 37, 81, 242, 273, 282, 285, 326, 327 Stoody, Ralph ....................... .... 3 0 Sterbenz, George A ......... .... .... . . .83, 84 Strable, William E ....... .. .... 146- Stroebel, Mark NV ............,., ..... 1 19, 124 Struzck, Stephen S ................... .... 1 60 Student Athletic Managers ............ .... 2 50 Sturm, Frederick B ...... 107, 123, 124, 234, 330 Stuttle, Charles S ......................... 103 St John of Toledo Golf Game... 310 SE Viator College Debate ..... .... 2 16 St. Vincent de Paul Society ........... .... 2 05 St. Xavier Golf Game ..... , ............... 310 St Xavier University Basketball Game...269, 297 Suarez, Miguel A ...............,..... .... 2 7 Subora, Clifford A .................... 118, 125 Sullivan, Emmet J ..... .... 8 6, 87 Sullivan, Fred L ..... .,.. 6 9, 348 Sullivan, Harold J ,... .... 3 48 Sullivan, Hilary J ..... ...342, 343 Sullivan, Ignatius D ..... .... ..... 1 4 2, 146 Sullivan, James .,.... ........... 1 42, 146 Sullivan, John G .... . ............ 136, 140 Sullivan, John J ...... .... 9 8, 101, 326, 327 Sullivan, Joseph F ..... ........... 1 36, 140 Sullivan, Marie C .... 172 Sullivan, Norbert J .... ,..136, 140 Sullivan, Norvell M ..... . . .168, 172 Sullivan, Richard J ...... .... 9 0. 232 Sullivan, Stanley H ..... .... 8 4 Summer, Bernard J .... .... 1 46 Sunday, Daniel M .... . ..... 27, 69 Sunders, Singh ..... ...119, 125 Suppes, Fred .,... ...167, 172 Surowitz. Harry .... - . .122, 125 Sussman, Ben ........ ...148, 160 Sutherland, Harry G ..... ---159, 160 Sutyak, Andrew P. .... ...157, 161 Svoboda, Cyril P ........ ..,149, 161 Swearingen, Victor C .... .... 3 3 Sweeney, Bernard J ..... . . . . . . 140 Sweeney, David ...... .... ..... 1 6 9, 172 Sweeney, Edward T. 132, 133 140, 230, 237, 352 Sweeney, George G, ............ 78, 82, 352, 353 Sweeten, Donald .......... ............ S 5, 87 Szczsniak, Harry J ..... ....... .... 1 6 1 Szczudlo, Julian C .... .... 8 2 Szejcla, John C ....... .. 114 Szlachetka, Edward M .... ...164, 166 Szurpick, John .......... .... 9 2, 93 Tabor, Saul E. ,... ...... .......... ,... 1 6 1 Taiple, Frederick P.... ..,. 80, 82 352, 353 Talbot, Charles L ..... .,................ 6 9 Tamplin, Ernest 182, 183, 221, 334, 335. 338, 339 Tanner, Frederick G .... ................. 7 8, 82 Tannian, Philip A .... .. .... 125 Tapert, Julius C ..... -.-- 6 9 Tapny, Ralph YV .... .. .... 30 Taulbee, Russell L .... ....... 1 61 Tavarozzi, Albert ..... . . .171, 172 Tavarozzi, Lucille A .... . . .171, 172 Tayler, Frank J ........ ...124, 125 Taylor, Edward ..... .... 9 3 Taylor, Hanley ,...... 83, 84 Taylor, Lloyd ...... ....... 1 27, 129 Taylor, Nordon J .... ........ 1 19, 125 Taylor, Otis A ...,.. .... 9 7 101, 103 Taylor, Ralph C.... ......... . 125 Teagan, Robert J.... ..... 90 166, 342 Tech Ball .......,. .......... 2 40 Teeole, Lloyd M ...... ......... 1 17 Tegler, Lawrence T ..... .... 1 03 Telma, Eugene E ...... ............ 1 03 Tcmchin, Max W ...... ,. .,..... .1-42, 146 Tepley, Joseph, S.J ..... .............. 3 0 Tepper, William E .... ...92, 93 340, 341 Tetmarsh, Jack R ..... .... 1 24, 125 310, 311 Teubert, Jack W .... ....... 1 42 146, 209 Thaler, Ford A ..... ............. 1 03 Thayer, Delbert J ..,................... 100, 103 Theeck, Eldridge C ........................ 87 Theisen, Edwin C. 166, 176,' 177, 234, 334, 335, 342, 343, 352, 353 Theisen, Harry XV. ........................ 140 Theisen, Leo ............................ 172 Theriault, Walter G .... ...152, 161 Theta Alpha Sigma ..... ..., 3 60 Thihodeau, Robert E ............... ...... 1 61 Thiefels, Francis M, ...................... 87 Thill, Walter E. 69,' 176, 177, 330, 331, 338. 339 Thoeming, William H .................. 156, 161 Thomas, Carl W ...................... 151, 161 Thomas, Robert H .... .... 1 63, 336, 337 Thomezek, Alfred G ..... ..... 1 53, 161 Thompson, David D .... ...1-42, 146


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