University of Dallas - Crusader Yearbook (Irving, TX)

 - Class of 1985

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University of Dallas - Crusader Yearbook (Irving, TX) online yearbook collection, 1985 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 176 of the 1985 volume:

WWW , 'Vv- .umuuuuoI-nv.-MW W uw-m tn University of Dallas presents "Crescendo P000 3 P000 'j 1985 The University of Dallas. in its relatively few years of existence. has become one of the most respected academic institutions in the state and the nation. This reputation did not come about as a result of facts and figures, but the efforts of the staff and the students of the University in conjunction with much support from the community. This year has seen the culmination of the construction of the Chapel of the Incarnation, our Universityis new spiritual center and the Patrick E. Haggerty Science center. These new buildings are merely outward manifestations of the internal growth that has been occuring at the University since its inception. The choice of the theme "Performing in concert, crescendo poco a poco", then in the case of Our University is not only fitting but practically defines the progress of the school as an academic center, and as a place where we as students can live and grow emotionally. Our own personal growth as well as that of the University has not been completely smooth. Without the hard times the good ones w0uld not be appreciated, so in that spirit one can only hope that we have had patience with ourselves and patience with the University as these growing pains are still occurring. At the close of this l984-85 schoolyear it will be good to be able to look back and remark that we did indeed uperform in concert" with each other and "crescendo, poco a poco" or rather "grow little by little." "q Wt? WE mnm-q , 25?;qu i??nirn :E. 5, YOu have by this time heard and heard againi-of the f-elicities of a core curriculum and of a liberaleducatioh, and your presence here today indica'tesithat in Some way or the other you have been persuaded. For many of you that means four years of your life and a not incon- siderable expenditure of money. The rhetoric must have indeed been powerfully ipersuasiVe. Let me remind you once morefthen of what has been; said to you as a rec0nfirmatiOn of that enterprise which you have. we hope. chosen wi-thithe most careful delib- eration, It is always good to say something to the ,, troops before the battle begins i. As I was thinkirIg of what to say to yOu, I rummaged through some old UD brochures and catalogues and found this descriptiOn of the University in a letter supposedly sent to entering members of the freshman class: You will find that the school is fifteen minutes by air from - downtoWn Dallas. and that the - property consists of i000 acres of flat hills and rolling plains among the Sierra lrving 7 Mountains, all kept carefully by landscape crews in as bad a state of disrepair as is hu- manly possible . . The purposes of the Curriculumare then Succihctly stated: - l. A mastery of the phllo'r sophical principles which will enable them to use undefina- ., ble terms and to know the es- sence of all Being Uncluding - God' st ' 2 A comprehension of the- ology which will enable them to be social successes at any Hungarian seminary or cone vent in the country. One gets a further idea of the character of the Uhls versity from the description ofbthe academic depart- ments. Here, for instanee. is that of the Departmentof ATI: I l I -, L Located in a quaint gully. i this Department '. . . 'com- 9 - pletely respects the freedom i of the aI'tiSt not toybe an art ist. And here is that of English; I The Department of English . assumes that the student has a certain grasp of formal grammar and is prepared to read 42 works of classical lit- erature in their entirety, in the original. during three specified days in Orientation week All students are re- quired to take 36 lawn of Up- ' per Division English regard- less of maior. l should explain that this letter was written by the -' Senior Class of 1967. and only a deep-dyed UD' er could a possibly have written it. The genuine UD strain shows through: the emphasis on theological truths and philo- , sophical principles. the freedom of the Art Department. : the centrality of the readings in literature to the cur- riculum. and of course the somewhat austere physical I surroundings. I One must add to the above the l967 Senior Classis underStanding of interdisciplinary graduate programs, especially the cane in Agriculture and Literature. staffed by run- away agrarian poets: ' The Agriculture andiLitera- ture'Program is designed to filla need that has arisen due to an aCute shortage of highly articulate Agricultural Human- ists. We believe that the great traditions of Western AgriCul- mm are in danger of being lost to future generations. - And of course one of the most important courses in this program was the Bovine Literary Tradition. 2 it is always easy to satirize academic communities. I because there always seems to be such a great gulf I between that which is said and that which is. between I "aspiratiOn aIId actuality. that the enterprise seems to - be ludicrously comic. We all tend to be Don Quixotes In the academic Community, but we also seem to be al- ways acto'mpanied by Sancho Panzas Cortsider, for instance, this place in Texas which, until the invention of the air conditioner, was never : thought to be humanly habitable. When I first saw; the l University of Dallas. it was in June and the temperature was IIO". The barren hilltop was and is a sun-blasted landscape of stunted trees and limitless sky -- and someone decided afterwards to magnify the effect of the sun by; constructing airlong shadeless undulating piazza of broken bricks. One cannot come to UD for the pleasant delights of the senses; that is forbidden in Texas. No teInptation can draw you here sate that of the austere; pleasures of the mind. One does not come , to this University for something extraneous to learning. Knowledge. opportunity and. yes. power arewhat are offered. God's, Providence works in strange ways and for- some mysterious reason He has determined that the possibility of philosophic inquiry exists in Irving. Texas, .and not. say. in Santa Cruz, California twhere my family used to IiveL which is a far more beautiful and pleasant place. But there insanta Cruz. the students Ijspoke to , felt themselves lost, for what they had learned from their studies was that there was no significance to anything they did. i What then makes the University of Dallas a special place would seem to rest entirely on the promise of the education given here. The life of this University is especially to be found in the classroom. What made possible such an education in this raw frontier. which a few decades ago was a wilderness? I always look 'for a founder, for the greatest things seem to be the work of a single soul and in our case I think one must finally come to the .zvision and courage of the one soul in the Cowans; for Without them I veryimuch doubt that we would have had either a core curriculum or an Institute of Philosophic Studies e- and without this I doubt that there would be very much distinctive ' about the University of Dallas. We must be aware of the pervasive nihilisIn which infects the thought of the whole of our educational system - from the lowest to the highest ranks. I would . guess that the University of Dallas is one of a yery few educational;institutions of some standings which de- clares. "unabashedly." that there is an intelligible order of being. of truth; that there, are, to quote from Sopho- cles' Oedipus iRex: GawsI Iofte-footed. begotten in the heavenly regions of the- ,. sky. nor did any mortal nature of men engender them. nor should oblivion ever lay them to sleep; divinity is great in them and does not a grow old. ' That our inouiry 'is into these divine laws is what saves us; for it gives to all our studies an energy. a vitality. which in itself provides its OWn justification. It is the peculiar characteristic of the modern intel- lectual thatthe chooses to believe in the weakness of reason and in the power of necessity or chance. That is because the modern intellectual sought to liberate him- self and find the simply human apart especially from the divine. But as Sophocies reveals. the simpiy human is finally monstrous. for theihuinan being is not simply human. Paradoxically. then. the fully human comes to light in and through that which is not human. The human being will always be discovered to be either half-man and haIf-divine. or he will be haIf-Inan and haIf-beast. The Ifirstl differentiating characteristic then of a U0 education is that innocent faith which is at thehksame time the natural and commonsensical experience of human beings - that there are divine and natural laws and that the truth of what is; of; the structureof being. is that which is finally mosttpowerful. Excerpt afrom the Fall Convocation AddressaAugust 28. I984; Dr. Leo Paul S. de Alvarez FRESHMEN : q - 7 9$wa 7621le in!!! , .L i v . , T . I luauliud. .. ail xwxxw uzmmw '1 The Rome program is one of the many reasons that students choose the Uni- versity of Dallas over other Universities. Not only is the program an extended vacation for the hardworking student, but in itself it is a learning experience. The liberal arts education is surely put to the test when the student is con- fronted with cultures which are foreign to him. The student who truly captures the idea of the liberal arts will be able to maintain him or herself in any academic or cultural situation. Rome, in many ways, is perfect for the Universityls site abroad. Vatican City. the center of the Catholic faith is within the city of Rome. Much of modern civil- ization still follows Roman Law. The goals of the University, then, are strengthened by the program, rather than lost in an idealized vacation atmo- sphere. Trips to the many churches and Basil' icas in Rome and the other cities toured by the students give not only a religious, but a historical perspective to the Rome experience. The majority of the students who have traveled to Rome with UD's Rome pro- gram will say that it was one of the most rewarding experiences of their lives. 3:: .ur . ... The Presidential Address The l984-I985 academic year will be remembered as one of the most im- portant in the University's history. Following years of planning and a successful capital campaign, the University celebrated the opening of two new buildings, The Chapel of the Incarnation and the Patrick E. Haggerty Science Center. On these occasions in the Spring of l985, the entire community e stu- dents, faculty, staff, clergy, alumni, trustees, and friends from through, out the metropolitan area e joined together to recognize the Universi- ty's progress and to affirm our common purposes. A major bond issue approved in l984-l985 will allow the University to continue to improve its educa- tional facilities. Funds from the bond will provide for the renova- tion of our dormitories and instruc- tional buildings. This also was the year the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools tSACSl reaffirmed the Uni- versity's accreditation, thereby recognizing the quality of Our cur- riculum, students and faculty. The Board of Trustees approved a new Constitution of the University Council and Faculty Senate de- signed to increase faculty partici- pation in University policy deci- sions. The Facultyis study of the coherence of the University's core curriculum, underwritten in part by a grant from the National Endow- ment for the Humanities tNEHl, is contributing to our efforts to im- prove education at the undergrad- uate level. These elements e- the new buildings, the reaffirmation of accreditation, the improvement of facilities and landscaping, and the constant effort to improve the cur- riculum e will contribute for gen- erations, to the pattern of excel- lent teaching and study which characterizes life at the University of Dallas. Sincerely. Robert F. Sasseen President President And Administration James Bellinghausen - Vice President for Administration Mark Jordan - Associate Provost and Graduate Dean Sybil Novinski - Registrar John Paynter - Provost and Dean of the College Joseph Rice - Director, University Relations Linda Sweetman - Dean of Students Legare Van Ness - Director, Development 17 X A ; . 4., z W ,. y X 4. .y .2 ,gg, Ow, .. X Z? XXX X y 2, XXVX X f . , i a X X V X ,5 X X .4, X. 3X7 , .. IXMVXM H; X. XXVX XX XX X 5X XV w .. , 1 X xx L X r, .wzz. I xx w? ? And Administration 44444444, L, L . , , L, .. . , L4 4:444: 4,444 ,4 .. 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Art Departmentts High Standards "A High Note For University The University of Dallas Art Department has established a solid presence as an important institution of art education in the cultural community of North Central Texas. The professional accomplishments in all programs, both undergraduate and graduate, meet the highest standards. Successful alumni represent the department well on the local art scene and in many universities across the nation. Art 1;: As uSual, progress was made and some exceptional events crowned the academic year l984-85. There were no personnel changes, although an acting chairman was appointed from the existing faculty while the department chairman took a one year sabbatical; an art historian joined the staff for that period. The end of the Fall semester was highlighted by the show of recent faculty works in the Haggar Gallt ry. For students, the Fall semester culminated in exhibiting their best works in the Haggerty Gallery of the Art Building. The inauguration of the "Chapel of the Incarnation" was held in March of I985. Several faculty artists contributed to the creative appointments of the unusual ecclesiastic structure. Faculty of the Art Department keep representing the institution far beyond the local region. They are participating in exchange programs with other university art departments here and abroad. Some of these connections reach out as far as Glasgow, Scotland. Two members of the art faculty were among seven recipients of the University of Dallas Research Awards, provided by the King- Haggar Faculty Development Fund. Fruit Flies Have An Ear For Lawrence Welk The Biology department, like knowledge in any science. has been growing little by little since its inception. It sounds corny, but it couldnit be any other way. Science, like good music, takes time, as any bio lab veteran can testify. The key to success in a Biology major is to take lots of notes and develop a sharp awareness for the harmony between minor details and the grand scale. This school year saw the screening of teachers for a position in the Biology department. The freshmen seemed more interested in Dr. Doe's next test than a new teacher. The old ones were already enough: Professor Pulich in Developmental, Pat Sinatra in Virology. Sr. Clo in Neurobio and Dr. Doe in Genetics. The upperclassmen cut the chord from freshman year and picked up the tempo. Sr. Clo, Dr. Doe. Pat Sinatra and Mr. Pulich intoned the mysteries of General and "Baby Bio" as the students tried to measure up to the bar. The labs weren't extremely difficulty, just a bit tedious. And somehow it is hard to appreciate the beauty of biology when 24 hours of lab work have all come to naught. Only man can appreciate the intricacies of a theory or a musical composition, although we've heard that fruit flies have an ear for Lawrence Welk. This year's activities reached a forte with the dedication of the new science buiding. Now not only do we have well equipped facilities in which to work but also a newly inspired rhythm which canlt decrescendol The Overall Goal To Provide A Unified Understanding Chemistry is an amazing subject. It attempts to understand the objects we see as being composed of very small objects which we cannot see. In studying these small objects, which we call atoms and molecules, we strive to provide a basis for understanding the physical world as a reasonable world. Within the field of chemistry there are many branches. In our depart- ment the chairman Dr. Towne is a biochemist, Dr. Eaker is a physical chemist, Dr. Hendrickson is an or- ganic chemist and Dr. Young is an inorganic chemist. Though each branch examines a different area of chemistry, there is an overall goal to provide a unified under- standing of chemistry. We are very excited about moving next year into the new Haggerty Science Building. This building of- fers us the opportunity to improve the science education of our stu- dents by providing new equipment, new laboratories, and new opportu- nities for research. This building is the result of hard work and dedica- tion by a large number of students, faculty, alumni, administrators, and trustees. We are honored to serve the Univer: ity with these new facilities. ?Students Offer Behind The Scenes View "In my high school we flipped on fluorescent lights for our stage lighting system; we drove to Richmond WM to buy costumes, the basic Iset' changed only once every five years. At UD there's real theater work! We build different sets and design new lighting plots for each show; every actor wears custom-made costumes designed for specific shows and built by fellow students. There's serious work here .. not just some kind of club activity. My advice to any freshman interested in studying Drama: gain as much experience in all aspects of the theater backstage as well as onstage .. as you can; otherwise, you're going to miss out on the real learning experience." John Wooding, freshman from Warsaw, Virginia. "The sophomore year is about finding out that you are free to make mistakes. The atmosphere in the Drama Department is much more tolerant than I might have expected it to be last year when I was a freshman. Here you are encouraged to experiment a and fail, it need be - in order to learn." Lee Honeycut, sophomore from Cypress Spring, Texas. "I came to UD thinking I had done a lot, theater-wise, in high school, especially in terms of process. I mean, somehow or another you just got a show done! But by my junior year I came to know how much more there is to the interpretative art a how much more literary research and textural analysis there is to the pre-show l preparation. lid say that the keys to success in this very demanding major are dedication and responsibility." Janet Sanders, junior from Holmdel, New Jersey. "My senior year has made me realize how much I don't know a the amount of research needed to stay ahead. My advice to my successors is to read, read, read! It seems to me that the key to success for a Drama major is to remain open to new ideas and techniques. As a graduating senior I can say that I have finally learned how to learn." Mathew Rodriguez. senior from San Antonio, Texas. "Law School was, of course, nothing like college: lots of reading, writing, worrying, and very few laughs. Looking back I'd say my drama experience was just as valuable, if not more so, than any other major. Everyone here can write well a that's absolutely necessary to being a good attorney. But for anyone planning to go into litigation work, as I am, the ability to communicate well and appear comfortable in front of an audience is a must. And that's something only a few students can do." Drew Greenspan. UD alumn tCIass of '83 Recent graduate of University of Maryland Law School. rama Economics For The Pursuit Of Variety Like the University in general, the Economics program in Constantin College has progressed from its infancy to its adolescent stage. The Economics major has evolved steadily from its beginnings as part of the Politics department to an independent and securely liberal arts oriented program. Faculty research specializations within intellectual history make possible a curriculum and pedagogy informed by the broadest understanding the history and role of the discipline Economics of Economics. The educational background and interests of the faculty also enable the presentation of the most significant theoretical developments and policy disputes of the subject in the wide contest of liberal learning and the Western intellectual tradition. Thus, the department contributes to the overall purpose of the University while fulfilling its own more specific goals of encouraging majors to prepare well for their future roles as intellectual leaders within their chosen careers. Students majoring in Economics have increased in capabilities, interests, diversity and accomplishments during the past decade. The UD chapter of the International Economics Honor Society, Omicron Delta Epsilon, was reactivated in I98! and has seen a steady increase in membership each year. In addition, student post-graduate choices have become increasingly heterogeneous. Economics graduates now pursue a wide variety of paths - from immediate employment in managerial positions with a diversity of business organizations, to public school teaching, careers in government, and graduate work in law, politics, business, and economics. Truly, the Economics program at the University of Dallas is following the l985 yearbook theme of "crescendo poco a poco." A Teacheris Influence Never Stops How we teach matters as much as what we teach. Hippocrates' observation, A teacher affects eternity. He can never tell where his influence stops," suggests the magnitude of the teacher's responsibility. At the University of Dallas, the education of the prospective teacher to his greatest potential is accepted as a challenging and joyous experience. Teacher education at the University is thought of as a continuum. The bold hypothesis that "any subject can be taught effectively in some intellectually honest form to any child at any stage of development" echoes the idea of Pestalozzi, Comenious, Barzun and Bruner. This is a bold hypothesis and an essential one in utilizing the liberal arts as a basis of teacher education. Prospective teachers are encouraged to use their education to enhance the process of intellectual development. Student involvement in the Department of Education is noteworthy. Kappa Delta Pi, an honor society in education, and the Association of Texas Professional Educators are two student organizations actively promoting the professional aspects of teaching. Two students serve on the advisory board of the University of Dallas Teacher Center. The best teacher is one who inspires others with the desire to teach. The Department has the honor of encouraging and leading future teachers in becoming responsible, articulate teachers with strong academic preparations, professional attitudes and a level of competence that meets the needs of children and young adults. Housed in the Department of Education is the ChildrenNoung Adult Library. HOused in the collection are over nineathousand books recognized as the finest examples of literature for children and young adults. Each Fall, four noted authors andtor illustrators come to the University campus to lecture and work with students in education. Also housed in the ChildrenTYoung Adult Library are those authored by the University students. The volumes range from picture books to trade books and are catalogued under appropriate classifications for circulation. Education Intense Study Leads To Mastery Of The Language " . . . since both Roman and Greek gave Such divine names unto it, the one of prophesying. i the other of making, and that indeed that name of making is fit for him, considering that where all other arts retain themselves within their subject, and receive. as it were, their being from it, the poet only, only bringeth his own stuff, and cloth not learn a conceit; since neither his description nor end containeth any evil, the thing described cannot be evil; since his effects be so good as to teach goodness. and the delight learners of it; since therein tnamely in moral doctrine, the chief of all knowledgesy he doeth not only far pass the historian, but, for instructing, is well nigh comparable to the philosopher. for moving, leaveth him behind; since the Holy Scriptire twherein there is no uncleannessl hath whole parts in it poetical, and that even our Savior Christ vouchsafed to use the flowers of it; since all his kinds are not only in their united forms but in their t M ' $$$$$ng W W 3ft: severed dissections fully commendable; I think, and think I think rightly, the laurel crown appointed for triumphant captains doth worthily, of all other learnings, honor the poet's triumph." From: Sir Philip Sideny, The Defence of Poesy 0593 as reprinted in William Hebel, Hoyt H. Hudson, Francis R. Johnson. A. Wigfall Green, and Robert Hoopes, eds. Tudor Poetry and Prose. New York: Appleton- Century-Crofts, lnc., l953, pp. 820-2l 1 Quality Of Students Gives Department Reason To Boast Although the last few years have seen the Department of History grow in numbers of students served - in the core in majors, and through electives .. and in the number of faculty, it is not quantity in which we find our e justification. The quality of our students' contributions, our majors' theses, and our faculty service of the academic community have given us reason for pride. The Department offers introductory courses in Western Civilization and American Civilization to provide all students with an understanding of the distance man has come and the routes he has traveled. Advanced courses treat times and movements in sufficient detail to permit close analysis, the development of theory, and to provide practice in techniques of the historian. In the senior year the history major undertakes an independent research project in which he or she must evaluate sources and materials, place problems in contest, and make judgments. Training in history is excellent background for graduate study in political science, public administration, journalism. teaching, and the law. History Ultimate Goal: A Resounding "Fortissimo" Western Civilization is not an abstraction - it is embodied in the different languages of the diverse peoples who forged it over the centuries. Our students become acquainted with at least one the major cultural traditions of the West on its own terms. in the language in which it developed. The study of a language is a rewarding enterprise which takes place "poco a poco," hopefully "crescendo." with the ultimate goal of a resounding "fortissimo." To that end, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures stages a series of activities every year. varying with each individual program. in the Fall of l984, the Spanish program Fo am, a hosted the renowned actress Paloma Lorena in a recital of poetry and drama by Lorca, Neruda. and Mistral. Several students of Spanish contributed guitar music to the event. The Spanish program also affords students the opportunity of spending one summer month in Barcelona, Spain, where they can study Spanish language and culture at its source while at the same time developing their teaching skills. The French program produced, also in Fall, the major lonesco play La Cantatrice Chauve with tremendous success. The cast not only had a good time, they also learned a lot in the process. During the Spring semester, a "Table Francaise" has been meeting once a week to the delight of all participants. They are planning a French Fete before the semester is over. The German program offers a German feature film each month. In addition, a visiting lecturer from the University of Frankfurt, Dr. Barbara Koenneker, spoke about the Renaissance poet and Humanist W x W me wag i M wit? . k m met??? 434mg? Ulrich von Hutten. Each Spring a German city is commemorated with a lively program of skits, music. and visual presentations. ln l984. it was Nurnberg; in I985 we saluted Berlin as it was in the "Golden Twenties." The Classics Program again sponsored its Summer Program in Greek and Latin Languages and Literature with great success. An important goal continues to be the preparation of teachers to meet the growing demand for the study of Latin in middle and secondary schools. Before Christmas, all language students join hands and voices in our Advent Caroling program. It is a celebration of holiday customs from various lands. Beginning with solemn texts in Greek and Latin, we hear Christmas songs in many languages and finally sample international delicacies. This joyous event has become a popular tradition for the University of Dallas community. Music at UD, is offered for enjoyment, artistic expression and most especially, cultural enrichment of our students. One's education is not complete without exposure to and knowledge of all of the Arts. It is a fact that the core curriculum -- in its philiosophical approach - takes care of challenging the intellect and fostering a scholarly attitude. Music, on the other hand, offers the opportunity for individual expression and creativity. This outlet is as essential in the development of balanced human beings as is the other; and, it is Our responsibility to make it available to all students. In keeping with UDis insistence on excellence in all aspects of education, we stress quality rather than quantity in the courses that are offered. In the coming years as our department expands, we intend to find the very best instructors that we can afford, as well as select the courses most valuable to the students. It is our intention to use every means possible to encourage the appreciation of music, and to give it a prominent place in our campus life. In addition to the constant upgrading of regular courses each semester, we continue to reach into the professional music world to provide "live examples" of what our classroom study can offer to only a limited degree. The discipline of mathematics is defined as much by its methodology as it is by its content. Indeed, it is this methodology which unifies the different areas of mathematics. The Department of Mathematics seeks to involve students at all levels in the thoughts and methods of mathematics in an active, alive way. Math All students at the University are required to study some math. The goal is to strengthen the studenfs imaginative and deductive powers through the discipline imposed by rigorous mathematical thinking. The precise use of language and logic characteristic of mathematics is developed in the courses which the student may select. Mathematics opens many doors. Many math students go on to graduate work in fields such as mathematics, computer science, statistics, physics, economics or biology. Others pursue business, actuarial science, linguistics, medicine, law and teaching. Mathematics study helps to see the world in a creative, beautiful and profound way. Seeking A Futsion Of Philosophy And Christian Wisdom Through its strong presence in the Core curriculum and its role in the graduate Institute of Philosophical Studies, the department of philosophy stands at the center of the University's purpose of recovering and renewing the Western tradition of liberal arts and Christian intellectual tradition. Its faculty has a strong international flavor with degrees from Paris, Budapest, Salzburg, Tiibingen, Madrid and Buenos Aires, as well as from Chicago, Penn State and Marquette. All of its permanent members can lecture in at least two languages, some in as many as five, and all have competence in classical languages. They are traditional in great textual traditions, from the ancient Parmenides, Plato and Aristotle, to 20th-century thinkers like Husserl, Heidegger and Wittgenstein. Guided by the fundamental concerns of modern Continental Thought and animated by a deep respect for early Christian and medieval attempts at a philosophy that is informed by revelation, the department seeks through dialogue a fusion of philosophy and Christian wisdom. In keeping with this orientation, the philosophy curriculum is organized around great tests. To ensure basic philosophy literacy, but even more to penetrate to the heart and the soul of what is and what is thought, the Core courses and the core of the graduate programt concentrate on foundational works of the ancient Greek and the Medieval, while the major courses extend the philosophical horizon to embrace modern and contemporary thinkers. Moreover, regular extracurricular colloquia bring together faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate majors in the careful reading and lively interpretation of great texts. With the recent addition of faculty members specializing in philosophy of science and in hermeneutics, and with a newly redesigned Institute of Philosophic Studies as an interdisciplinary program in Literature Politics and Philosophy, the department hopes to play a central role in the life and dialogue of the University; ; M ;Phi:I0sophyg Science Lectures The High Point Of The Year The history of the Physics Department in the year l984-85 was highly influenced by the activities of the physics club under the sponsorship of Dr. Baksay. On November ll, l984 during a banquet, a local chapter of the Sigma Pi Sigma EH2 was established within the SPS by the initiation of five charter members, M. Hanafee, K. Harkin, E. Heflin, R. lrlbeck. J. Riley. Invited lecturers Gncluding l0 outsidersl and weekly meetings kept the students busy with club activities and planning. The students received the Benedix Award 6695i supporting their participation in Dr. Baksay's "Double Sense Wire Current Division Drift Chamber," experiment and the Narsh W. White Award 6135i pays the expenses of video-taping "A Random Walk", a project to popularize physics. Four of the student members presented papers on their plans at the Spring Meeting of the Texas Section of the SPS in Houston. The enthusiasm for research continues into the summer, ten students will be involved this summer with research all over the world: D. Meany, M. Hanafee. K. Harkin at Central Research for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary. J. Reilly at the Physics European Center for Nuclear Research. CERN, Geneva. Switzerland, E. Heflin at Brookhaven National Accelerator Laboratory, Long Island, New YorWColumbia University, S. Di Marco at the Center of Quantum Electronics at North Texas State University. J. Stasko. R. lrlbeck at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Tennessee. Knoxville and M. Rouse, T. Williams at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. University of California, Berkeley. We graduated three majors this year. E. Heflin received an assistantship at Columbia University and D. Rajcic at NTSU. D. Fisher plans to teach science at the high school level. The faculty, also, was very busy this year. Mr. Toten continued his dissertation work at NTSU with the hope of completing it this summer. He presented a paper on his work "K-K Electron Captire Cross Sections" at the Eighth International Accelerator Conference at Denton which was accepted for publication. Dr. Baksay spent the Christmas and the Spring Break at NYU doing research on neutrino physics and gave lectures on his work with the High Pressure Vessel at APS meetings in Houston, Santa Fe and Baltimore. Dr. Olenick is still on leave at Caltech through the summer as co-director of The Mechanical Universe tTMUl, a public television project. The first half of it a 26 half hour sequencel will be shown this Fall. His accompanying text "TMU An Introduction to Mechanics and Heat" will be published in July by Cambridge U. P.. the corresponding more advanced text is expected to come out in August. Richard Olenick is presently working on the second volume of both texts. He was busy through the whole year preparing video material, teaching aids and texts which all resulted from last summerls NSF funded institute. He hopes to put in the teacher's hands his book "TMU: Adapted for Use in High School" published by Southern California Consortium, soon. Besides all of this activity he kept up with his old interests presenting two papers at Toronto; one on "Synergistic Hysteresis", the other on "Classical Limits to the Charge of the Universe". The dedication of the Patrick E. Haggerty Science Center on March 30, within an exciting week of science lectures was the high point of the year. The five McDermott lectures, especially Dr. S. Weinberg, a Nobel Laureate. speaking on llPhysics in Higher Dimensions" and the panel discussion on "Fission and Fusion of Scientific Disciplines" with the participation of all under the chairmanship of Dr. F. Seitz. gave us a new insight into science as an important part of human experience. Program Fosters Citizenship, Leadership, 8 Learning The program of the politics department constitutes a return to the classical tradition of the study of politics w a tradition which formed the great statesmen of America's past, but which has been largely abandoned by contemporary political science as a whole. The program seeks to present a comprehensive way of understanding politics, both in its theoretical and its practical aspects. Beginning with what is most familiar to the students, the political order of the United States, the introductory course aims to show that familiarity is not knowledge and that contemporary opinion does not grasp the subtlety or depth of the principles underlying the United States. The student is shown that his country is based on a more or less comprehensive view of man and his city atmw $2.; 4 Avg: and is led to see how he may begin to understand that view and its strengths and limitations. He comes to understand politics as an activity whose end is the complete human life and the study of politics as philosophic discipline concerned with the range of human actions found in the city. In the sophomore year the great politics of the West es Sparta, Athens, Pagan and Christian Rome, and the modern state e- are studied to reveal the fundamental alternatives of political life. As he begins to see these alternatives, the student broadens his experience of political possibilities, develops his ability to analyze regimes, and comes to understand that the fundamental choices men must make in political life cannot be wisely made without a deep understanding of human beings and their life in cities. In the junior and senior years students study the major works of political philosophy. These courses grapple with the major issues of political life as understood by the greatest minds of the pagan and Christian West. The program as seeks to awaken the student to the prejudices of today and to the possibility that someone else thought more clearly and saw more deeply into the fundamental political alternatives than we ourselves have done. The Western tradition is not regarded as it is at so many schoolsi as a series of quaint opinions from a superseded past. but as a pathway which may lead to the truth about human beings and their cities. At the same time the student continues his studies of his own country and contemporary politics in general, seeking to see the fundamental issues facing political life in our own time and circumstances. The program culminates with a study of statesmanship, the highest possibility of political life. Political and philosophic speech are compared and students are led to a fuller understanding of the possibilities and limitations of political life in particular circumstances. The Politics program is conceived in a spirit that seeks to foster good citizenship, true leadership, and liberal learning. Politics Scientific Study As Liberal Art The Psychology Department of UD is one of a growing number of academic departments that approach psychology as a liberal art as well as a science. This new approach is a break from the tradition of American psychology which throughout this century has concentrated itself solely with finding scientific explanations for the mechanisms of behavior. When psychology was first becoming a science, breaking away from philosophy and other nonvscientific investigations into the human realm, it took on the approach and methods of natural sciences Such as physics and physiology. According to this approach, the scientist can only legitimately study that which can be directly observed. in psychology, this led to the development of behaviorism - a psychology that deals only with patterns of observable behavior. This kind of science demands the reduction of all human phenomena to Psychology objective facts. devoid of consciousness and human selfhood. Strict behaviorists either deny or ignore the existence of human experience, consciou5ness. intentions, meanings, and feelings. not to mention human freedom and dignity. More and more psychologists have realized that, in order to be faithfulto human phenomena. either a new type of science has to be invented or the definition of science as it has traditionally been understood has to be revisioned. The significance, purpose, and interpersonal meanings of human experience simply cannot be studied by means of the available procedures of the natural sciences. The program at UD is devoted to the development of psychology as a human science. It is a positive attempt to incorporate the insights of the great Western tradition into psychology. with a special interest in contemporary Continental thought. With its focus on the lived experience of human beings trather than the observed behavior of laboratory animalsy phenomenological psychology broadens the scope of scientific psychology to include the "subjective" dimensions of both the researcher and the researched. The psyche is precisely what makes us more than biological entities. so it is necessary to develop a psychology whose description of human events is adequate to the nature of those events. Scientific reductionism strips human experience bare of its personal and interpersonal significance, and tends to view people as nothing more than disposable containers for DNA, that is, as entities whose behavior ultimately serves- and is governed by biological events at the molecular level. A human science. psychology, seeks to be faithful to the phenomena of the human realm in such a way that freedom and dignity are not lost from the picture, Indeed, the aim of this psychology is to release human beings individually and collectively to better assume responsibility for their own destinies. through an appreciation and enhancement of the human capacity for choice. 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Brigderi Thao Bui Mary Alyce Buck Susan Burkel Robin Cala Kevin Calva Chase Chandler Veronica Couniha Smita Duta Leonard Deal Anne Den Doover Alan DeSalvio Geneviere Dessommes Mary Devlin Virginia Dominquez Sean Duggan Laura England William Fagan Yvette Fallour Jim Federer Karen Ferns Margaret Ferris Paul Feuerborn Robert Foiut Elizabeth Fonseca Melissa Geronimo Kelly Gilchrist James Gilman Eric Graf James Graham Suzanna Gray Elaine Gwasclz Carla Hahn Eric Hamm Shalen Haribhai Howard Harder Eileen Healy Elizabeth Heeb Jannine Hebert Patricia Hintz Eileen Hogan A. Hollingsworth Richard Husseini Vicki Johnson J. Kaltenbach Samantha Kasnet Angela Katsuno Grace Keane Peter Kenny Susan Kenny Gus Killough Ken Koeneman Rowena Linosnero Paul Loftus Joe Loiacono John Lynn Coby Lyons James Maleady 43 44 Suzy Marmo Kathleen Miggins Ann Miller Brian Mitler M. Montemayor And. Montonati Robin Morgan Carla Moseley Laura Nicodemi Terry Oakes Patrick Osuii Ashley Parker Mary Piozker Matt Pittman Cindy Potter M. Ramirez Teri Reed Bob Rooney Tim Schroer Johnnie Senna Scott Smith Andrew Smyth Geoff Snyder Tess Solomon Todd Stephen Jim Swan Adam Swanson Tran Thu-lan Justine Trout Donna Volgt Tamara Volk Peter Weldon Jana Winsworth Joan Woeltje Lisa Yager Jeff Yap Freshmen at work HCTwme DAY 5 Student Gmit. NGGDS YOU! Freshmen making an attempt to appear responsible. 45 ,WM, I n, 4w, yz a .3 3 7 W p Z 4;; Z. . M z 7 I V a Xv w: . ,, 2W? 4 , a , K Mark Avery Marsha Bergkamp Angela Broderick Sharon Carr Beth Chitty Mary Costello Theresa Darcy Michael Dunnigan Patrick Edgerton Daniel Finley Mark Grayson Julie Groschen Allan Harzewski Leah Higgins Joel Jacover Terese James Bernard Johnson Eileen Kampman Anne King Sally Krampotich Judy Kupiec Elizabeth Lachowski Laura Rosalinda Tom Lawlor Debra Lockhart Mike Marciano Dan Meary Franc Mickelson Thaddeus Mosqueda Jennifer McDonald Rose Pamalyn Michael Rouse Jim Rutan Jung So Trachele Thomas Sherri Trahan Renee Walend Anastasia Zaruba Gail Zimmerman 49 The Hills Are Alive Enthusiastic as always. before'the; And Rubber Ducky you'r: lhe 0g anything so , . ridiculous? UD Welcomes I4 New Professors In the l984-85 school year, the Uni- versity of Dallas welcomed l4 new professors onto the campus. Among these l4, five are on tenure track. The new professors include: Dr. Ann Paul - Art, Ms. Pat Sinatra-Biol- ogy. Dr. Donald Bennett-Drama, Dr. John Davis-Economics, Mr. Richard Ebeling-Economics, Ms. Zohreh Emami-Economics, Dr. Saul Gellerman-Graduate School of Management tGSMl, Mr. Danial W. Marsh - GSM, Dr. Robert P. Ames- GSM, Dr. C.S. Shen-GSM, Mr. Bill Shoemaker-GSM, Dr. Joseph Law- rence-Philosophy, Mr. Arvil Toten- Physics, Dr. Narayan Ramasubra- manian-Associate Professor. Institute To Be Ree Opened On Thursday April II, the Board of Trustees of the University of Dallas approved a proposal for the refor- mulation of the Institute of Philo- sophic Studies, the organization which sponsors most of the doctor- al study done at UD. This marks the first major step towards the rees- tablishment of doctoral-level teaching at UD. The proposal draft- ed by a committee of faculty mem- bers headed by Fr. Gilbert Hardy, Graduate Dean, calls for a consoli- dation of previous degree pro- grams. The Institute formerly awarded doctorates in 5 fields: lit- erature, philosophy, politics, psy- chology, and theology. Under the new proposal, the Institute will award one degree, Doctor of Phi- losophy with a concentration on one of 3 areas: literature, philos- ophy or politics. This program, ac- cording to the committee's report, "represents on the highest intellec- tual level, the University's general purpose of cultivating moral and in- tellectual virtue." Hardy echoed this idea saying ill think this is a very distinct program, and one which reflects very well the nature of UD as a Catholic University and a University with the highest intel- lectual aspirations in the Liberal Arts." -by Buck Downs The University News iiNews" Rates First Again For the second consecutive year, the University News has received a "First Class" rating at the National Critical Service of the Associated Collegiate Press. This recognition of merit for Spring l984 reflects how the University News compares with other college newspapers in its classifications. In addition to an overall "First Class" rating, the University News received three marks of distinc- tion for ucoverage and c0ntent," "opinion content," and "design." Revising The Core The Core curriculum is approxi- mately 70 credit hours of various courses that can seem imposing, if not overwhelming, after a cursory examination. It is designed to give the student a firm foundation in Western Thought, that is, in the Greco-Roman and the Judeo-Chris- tian traditions. The Core Review Committee tCRQ came abOut as a result of the Uni- versity's recent self-study. Over the next two years the core will be examined with an eye to revision. Says Dr. Andrew Berner, a member of the CRC, the purpose is "to build something that works and is still beautiful, something with a right- ness to it." The current review is being pri- marily financed be a grant from the National Endowment for the Hu- manities tNEHi. In the form of out- right donations and matching funds, the CRC will receive $270,000 to complete its study. The money will be used in areas of fac- ulty development, faculty colloquia. the bringing in of outside consul- tants and travel of committee members to other campuses for firsthand study of the success of their curricula. The committee is chaired by Dr. Samuel Bostaph, with Dr. Francis Swietek as project director. Dr. Bostaph believes that the review may be able to come up with a method of teaching the core, which will better integrate courses. The Committee includes three Sen- iors, Scott Barker, Robert Reeb, and Jim Wiley and fifteen faculty mem- bers one from each academic de- partment. The twenty-seven month project is scheduled to end in August of l986. UDls Eagle Takes Flight The Beldger Adjustment Piece, po- pularly dubbed "the Eagle," was hauled away by artist Mac Whit- ney, Tuesday August 7, l984. The piece of sculpture had been on loan to the University for seven years but, "because of the new science building and the new entrance to the campus from Tom Braniff Drive," says President Sasseen, "we thought it no longer fit in." The artwork was constructed of steel plates, was 24 feet tall, and weighed l0,000 lbs. The University provided transportation for the re- moval of the "Eagle," which de- spite its mixed reviews, will be missed by the students who knew it as a familiar symbol of the "UD ideals" and what the University "stands for." Baby Boozers Sing The Blues The Federal Law calls for the with- holding of Federal Highway funds from any state not having a drink- ing age of at least II. The loss to Texas would be more than IO7 mil- lion dollars during the next bien- ium, beginning September first. The measure was approved on a voice vote in the Senate and passed the House with little opposi- tion. Mark White signed the mea- sure into Law it it will take effect in October of l986. UD Honors Faculty For Service And ExceHence The Outstanding faculty at UD was the center of recognition this year with an honor given by the Carl B. and Florence E. King and Mrs. Ed- mond R. Haggar on February 2, l985. Much of the faculty was recog- nized for their dedication to excel- lence. Among those receiving spe- cial recognition was Sr. Clodovia Lockett, who received the first King Fellow Award. Paula Ann Hughes was presented with the Mi- chael A. Haggard Fellow Award. Seven other awards were extended by the King, Haggar Faculty Endow- ment Development and, these con- sisted of: Dr. Robert Kugelmann Dr. Robert Romanyshyn Dr. Katherine Sorensen Dr. Ben Thomas Dr. Charles Coppin Mark Lavatelli Juergen Strunck During the l984-85 school-year, the University also honored Fr. David Balas, Fr. Thomas Caine, Hazel Ca- zorla, Fr. Moses Nagy and Associ- ate Professor Rudolph Zimanyi, O. Cistercian. Retiring professor, Sr. Francis Marie Manning was also honored this year for outstanding service. 58 For the third consecutive year. tuition for the Constantin College of Liberal Arts will increase, starting with the Fall l985 semester. The new amount, $2275 per semester, represents a llm, increase over the l984-85 tuition. There will also be an increase in room and board for students living in the dorms. A dOuble room with l9-meal plan will cost $II5 more next year, an 83$, increase over the l984-85 school year. However, student apartment rates will not increase and the General Fee is expected to remain the same. According to Dr. Robert Sasseen, President of the University, this increase will help to improve the state of the school's operating budget, particularly in two areas: StanFaculty salaries, and student financial aid. Sasseen said, "We hope tin financial aidl to be able to meet each student's financial need." One large part of the school's operating budget is monies given back to students in the form of scholarships and financial aid. Recognizing the importance of meeting each student's financial need, Novinski said, "One thing we need to do is wean ourselves away from merit-based aid." Both Novinski and Sasseen stressed finding new sources of income for the University. "I think we are too tuition-dependent," said Novinski. While pointing out that UD is less tuition-dependent than many other Catholic universities, Sasseen admitted the need to mobilize additional revenues. Referring to recent efforts, he said, "We have done a good deal. but we still have a lot to do." UD news Buck Downs President Ronald Reaganls I986 budget proposal will have an effect on UD stu- dents. Reagan has recommended a 25h, cut in federal financial aid to students. If the proposals go through, no student whose family makes more than $32,500 per year will have any opportunity to receive a guaranteed federal loan. When asked about the possible cuts in aid, Betty McDonnell, the director of financial aid at UD, said, "These cuts in the Guaranteed Loan Program alone will affect I52 students at the university. Also, the government will no longer take into account the size of the family or the number of children in college in the Pell Grant Program. However, at pre- sent, these are only proposals. There were even more drastic proposals in l98l and they never appeared. I would advise students not to panic but to stay in- formed of the situation." McDonnell predicts that the $32,500 ceiling for fed- eral loans will not go through and a $40,0001imit is more likely. One thing that McDonnell would like to see reviewed is the $30,000 loan ceiling for graduate students. u30,000 is too high. A single graduate student living on his own and making $29,000 is given a loan, no questions asked. A student should have to prove need." She said a more likely limit could be $25,000. The new Secretary of Education, Wil- liam Bennett, has suggested ways for students to absorb the cuts. Students should not waste money on stereos and cars, he said. Further, Bennett noted that more caution should be exercised before spending $20,000 on a college education. He made special reference to a report from the Association of Ameri- can Colleges which says that the bache- lor's degree has lost much of its value. "More of us might start thinking about that lcostl with the same sort of care we think about when we buy a car: kick the tires and drive it around the block," he remarked. "That kind of scrutiny and deliberateness on the part of the con- sumer w0uldn't be a bad thing." 'UD news Pat Hajovsky The Cost Of Education Because of the high cost of education, more and more students are working MARGARET JONSSON THE UNIVERSITY OF DALLA October 23 x November 3, 19 The Playwright Pierre Carlet de Chamblain de Marivaux 06884769 French dramatist who wrote chiefly for the Comedie ltalienne, originally a commedia dell'arte troupe brought to Paris by Louis XIV. In his own day Marivaux had none of the preeminence accorded him in France at present. His work, which renounced the help of intrigue and conflict, substituting for them psychological and emotional action and reaction, stands a little apart from his time, which preferred the rearful comedies of La Chaussee. Unlike Moliere, Marivaux confides his chief roles to women, and his plays are adapted to the needs of a sheltered, cultivat- ed, subtle society such as developed just prior to the Revolution and crept back again in the following century, when Marivaux's plays were successfully revived and had much influence on Alfred de Musset, again a dramatist who was in advance of his time. The best of them contin- ue to be revived tnotably by Antoine Vitez and Jean-Louis Barraulty. The Guest Designer Since designing the set for UD's The Good Person of Setzuan last fall, John Arnone's work has been seen in the East tBrecht's Happy End and Shakespeare's The Tempest at the Arena Stage in Washington. D.CJ and in the West Shakespeare's As You Like It for the La Jolla Festi- vaD. Previous credits include work on Broad- way done Star and Private Wars by James Mclurey, Off-Broadway Wanities by Jack Heifnes and Buck by Ronald Ribmani. in the regions at the Mark Taper Forum Los Angelesy, the Guthrie Theatre iMinneapolisL the American Conserva- tory Theatre Gan Franciscoy, and on television for Bill Moyer's Creativity TPBST. The Director Patrick Kelly is chairman of the Dra- ma Department and co-founder of the University Theater. Recent credits in- clude assisting Garland Wright on his Arena Stage tWashington, D.CJ produc- tion of Moliereis Imaginary Invalid and Wil- liam Gaskill on his London staging of Balzac's Crimes of Vautrin tadapted by Nicholas Wrighti; directing Brecht's The Good Person of Setzuan and Infernal Machine Uean Cocteauy at UD and John Oliveis Standing on My Knees at Stage Jifl in Dallas. Following Indidelities, Mr. Kelly will return to Stage M to direct Lanford Wilson's Angels Fall. CAST Arlequin John Bolding Sylvia Karen Brady A Lord John E. Smith Trivelin Donald Hailer Ladies of the Court Shawn Alis Seay Prince Christopher Welch Justine Trout Flaminia Marion Bantum Courtiers James Cabeen Lisene Lisa Warner Paul Starr J OSEPHIN B: THE MOUSE SINGER by MICHAEL McCLURE Directed by PATRICK KELLY Set and Lighting Design by DONALD BENNETT Costume Design by KELLI ANN BENNETT HaUIE Sound Design by SCOTT MILLER MARGARET JONSSON THEATER UNIVERSITY OF DALLAS April 9 - 20, 1985 Franz Kafka tGerman-Czech. l883-l924l was born in Prague of Jewish parentage. In l908, Kafka, a doctor of jurisprudence, obtained a position with the Prague office of the government accident insurance bureau. Here he continued to work until his health failed shortly after World War I. Kafka has left us only three novels tAmerika, The Trial, and The Castle; all unfinished at his death and all published posthumously, and a number of short stories and sketches. The world of Kafka is a vague and uncanny one, permeated with a Characteristic atmosphere which Kafka has made uniquely his own. The locale is always uncertain, the details of economic and social environment are lacking and the very characters seem like wraiths. A minor theme in Kafka is his preoccupation with the similarities between men and animals. Several tales are related by animals, and in other cases the reader is never sure whether the protagonist is animal or human. Yet Kafka's works have a convincing reality, one which proceeds from a contact with certain universals rather than from documentary accuracy. It is the reality we encounter in Dante rather than the reality of the naturalists of our time. from Heiney. Contemporary Literature CAST Narrator John E. Smith Josephine Lisa Sue Warner Baby Tom Wehrle Mice Marion E. Bantum John Bolding Sean Duggan Lee Honeycutt Mary Prado Shawn Alis Seay Christopher Welch John Wooding Spiritual ' Life Even though the building of the new "Chape! of the ln- camation" has created a physical center for spirituai Iife at the University, many wili remember when most of our private petitions and daily masses were held in the St. Thomas Aquinas Chapel between Anaelm and Augustine Halls. This year the Crusader wouId like to Hilight an integral part of our spirituai lives. the St. Thomas Aquinas Chapel. Alook at a wake mcaess scholars attracted 198 cDermott 3; Wk m5vc Mkagy hm Touimin, bIeEBXieii jay Cream Lam met :3 cm: bins: ma Lamina Univcxsmg, kcturcii cm ?oumiazieg:56 Saimt uiific Change and the Tammmic , Vi gw, M57 mg: Woigct ' 9:35 wman keeps 3:: 3y: rm Step 339 of tin: Megamou Exams Saim. his book Gerrade! Doughs anhmkher, wha w$n she Mae: ?tize in $863 E2: Escher, 3:155 Ar: Emma; 605221: 87426, immsdxm Re132iansbips bcwiem mi Scieacc. ?hom by: mass wipe; Tim Samrday mmmiag miiaquium gava students and faculty 3 r Aesthetic jadgcmem a r 7 end; Semi ?re$u1cnt Emeritus 3f Rackefaliet tUmvcrsity aaci kcxxggtim: frktxd the dmiimgary addrcass g, f the Science: Center. 68 of ihe Haggariy yfamgg gave 9 Sage! dimiig the mii 0433mm WING ED? 93 Wih i'm: jghryw gmgd aghifikifSI ?imzse b'e 33pm iaahnsmi The' Eugene ,McDermott Lectureship, established in I974gmemori- ralizesi the late scientist, businessman, patroniof the arts, 'and civic L leader widely recognized for his encouragement of quaiity in education. This year' s McDermott Lectures and Coiioquium attend the open- ing of the Patrick E Haggerty Science Center. The four scientists and phiicISOPhers participating this year were: Steven Weinberg. Stephen Jay Gould, Douglas Hofstadter, and Stephen Toulmin. Dr. Frederick Seitz. who gave the dedication address for the Hag- gerty Science Center. participated In the Saturday morning Collo- qIIium. "Fission and Fasion of Scientific Disciplines." McDermott Professor Weinberg is the recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics 0979i. Eight colleges and universities have awarded him honorary degrees. He was an Alfred Sloan Fellow from 196I through l965 and received the J. Robert Oppenheimer Prize in 1973. He has lectured at universities throughout the world. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philoe sophical Society, and a foreign member of the Royal Society. A past consultant on US. Arms Control and the Disarmament Agency, he is a member of the Council of Scholars, The Library of Congress, and a member of the Board of Overseers of the Superconducting Supercollider. Dr. Weinberg is author of more than I70 scientific articles. His book, The First Three Minutes-A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe, has been translated into l7 languages. Stephen Jay Gould teaches geology, biology and the history of science at Harvard University. His research is in evolutionary theory. He is author of The Mismeasure of Man, which won awards for nonafiction in 982-83 from the National Book Critics Circle and the American Research Association. His books include Ever Since Darwin and Ontogeny and Phylogeny. The Pandais Thumb won the AmeriCan Book Award in science for l98l. He writes the column, uThis View of Life" in Natural History magazine. Among Gouldis awards: Discover Magazine, Scientist of the Year 0980; Medal of Excellence, Columbia University 0982i; Distinguished Service Award, American Humanists Association G984i; and the Silver Medal, Zoolo- gical Society of London 0984i. Professor Gould has been a member of the advisory board for NOVA iPBSt since I980, and is the presidenteelect of the Paleontological Society. Professor Hofstadter began his career in physics and moved his research interest to artificial intelligence and philosophy of mind. He is author of Godel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize in non-fiction and the American Book Award iboth l980i. Before accepting his position in the Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Hofstadter was Associate Professor of Computer Science at Indiana University, and visiting Scientist at the Artificial intelligence Laboratory, Massa- chusettes institute of Technology. A former Guggenheim Fellow, Dr. Hofstadter writes the "Metamagical Thomas" column in Scientific American, He reads and speaks French. German, Spanish. Italian, Swedish, and has some knowledge of Polish. Russian and Chinese. Lectures l985 The second volume of Human Understanding in press, Stephen Toulmin stands at the apex of a remarkable career. Internationally recognized for his work in the philosophy of science, he has been a counsellor at the Smithsouian Institution, a Guggenheim Fellow and a Phi Beta Kappa National Lecturer. Stephen Toulmin began his career as a Fellow of King's College in Cambridge. He has taught at Brandeis Universi- ty and Michigan State University, and served as Provost of Crown College, University of California-Santa Cruz. He has been at the University of Chicago since I973. Among Touimin's books: The Place of Reason in Ethics, The Philosophy of Science, The Use of Argument, Fore- sight and Understanding, Knowing and Acting and The Return to Cosmology. He wrote these books with June Goodfieid: The Fabric of the Hea vens, The Architecture of Matter, and The Discovery of Time. These books he wrote with Allan Janik: Wittgenstein's Vienna and An Introduc' tion to Reasoning. 1 - L Dr. Frederick Seitz is a distinguished physicist and educator who has held key government posts for more than three decades. He received the National Medal of Science in l973 for his contributiohs to the modern quantum theory of the solid state of matter. He also is the recipient of the VannevarvBush Award, presented by the National Science Foundation, and the R. Loveland Memorial Award of the American Coiiege of Physicians. Between l978 and l983, he served as vice chairman of the board of trustees, the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. He is currently a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Committee to Maintain a Prudent Defense Policy, and the Board of the Center for Strategic and International Studies of Georgetown University. He has served as chairman of the United States delegation to the United Nations committee on Science and Technology for Development. Frederick Seitz holds the Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University, where he and his teacher, Professor Eugene P. Wigner, developed the Wigner-Seitz method for calculating the cohesive energy of a metal. In i940, he published the Modern Theory of . Solids, a book generally regarded as being a prime influence in the development of solid state physics, including the development of transistors. An editor and consultant to numerous scientific publica- tions, he is consulting editor in solid state physics for the Encyclope- dia of Science and Technology. Dr. Seitz served as president of The Rockefelier University from I968 to I978. Under his leadership new research programs were started, the Field Research Center of Ecology and Ethology was established, the University built several laboratory and offices complexes and a joint M.D.-Ph.D. program was initiated with Cornell Medical College. 1;? :1. .: Elizabeth Allen Brian Bournival Greg Brown Eric Caron Veronica Cazorla Joanie Christopher James Clardy Janet Cvitanovich Janet Cyr Danette Daltoso Carolina Esteva Laura Felis Michelle Felis Eleanor Ferris Ronetta Gaycos Karen Germany Mark Hanafee Mary Hansen Kathleen Harkin Lee Honeycun Randy lrlbeck Kevin Jones Stephanie Kronenburg Peter Mangum Tom Miovas George Moninger Louisa Mox Daniel Muller Sean McGuire Toietta LaBooth W Mrm z$5f Jeanne McQuade Taito Nakagawa Erin O'Brien Margaret O'Shea Sherman Orr Mary Ostermann John Reilly Patricia Riordan Rochelle Rosche Jeff Rossborough Steve Schoendienst Mary Stepnowski Stanley Tom Jack Walker James Walrath Rodney Walter Fran Williams Kenneth Wright Harold Young 75 Well. I'm sorry Janet. but how was I supposed to know that she was writing the check on your account? Via Raymund King. the Break City Rockers dance trOupe performs for Charity week l984. Marie, Kim and Julie present the new student. Ray Afaisen, "The Wet Look"! Vivian Palmer is a "sweeping" success! ... And if you thought that one was funny, wait 'til yOu hear the one abOut the chicken that crossed the road. Melissa Marsh gets a lift. These Junior cuties display the wares that they're selling in the name of charity. 77 Above: "Legalized all the way." Left: Danette and Mary exhibit what can be done with a little intellect and a little snow, and we mean a little. Far Left: Mario and friends take a bit of the grape. Upper Left: "The Silver Dollars" Barbership Quartet performs for Parents Weekend '85. Members include: Dan Jette. Rick Drexelius, Joe Bregande, and Raymund King. hswoh Fashion could, in fact, be termed "Art in Hid- ing", especially at UD. Because of the many different states of residence and the influ- ence of travels abroad, UDers are privvy to a type of "chic" unknown in other locales. Each person or group of persons seems to take an individualistic, almost artistic route to their clothing. In other words, they use clothing as an artistic expres- sion of how they feel or how they would like for yOu to view them. At U.D. no one can really be sure. as to "what's hot" and "what's not". The U.D. male who realizes that androgeny is in, can adapt to practically any fashion situation. For some. "fashion consciousness' borders on the unconsciousness. Accessorizing The Accent this past year in fashion was on accents. Large accessories like wide belts and costume jewelry were used to dress up simple clothing. Dresses whether long or short tended toward the padded shoulders, remiw niscent of the forties and the dropped waistlines reminis- cent of the twenties. Hair was worn "fashionably" short irecalling the "bob"; This year as every year, shoes were a major accessory, usually matching the jewelry. In the Spring "ready-to-wear" was very popular on campus. Jeans, tank-tops, shorts and polo shorts were the things that one would see everyday. Replacing the standard fur this winter were women's coats which were actually copies of traditional men's winter wear. Long pea-coats and trench coats carried the day. In the late Winter and early Spring, the emphasis was on color and size. Oversized sweaters in bright fluores- cent colors were at the height of fashion. Also at the peak of fashion were bold prints. Kamali and Barboglio creating oversized dresses and pants with oversized print on the fabric, to match. 83 I The Capuceino Bar of the places on campus where students and pro- fessors go, to wind down. The "Bar" was the brain-child of professor Lyle Novinski, who dur- ing the l98l schoolyear was able to convince the UD Community of its in- herent benefits. The Cap. Bar would serve as a special reminder to all of those who participated in the Rome program, as capuccino was the main- stay of almost every diet. tToday, not only does the "Bar" serve as a remind- er of Rome, but also serves international teas, hot chocalate, crois- sants, tarts and other types of pastries. The "Cap. Bar" is a place where people come to unwind. Because of its location, in the front of Haggar, the "Bar" Is always teeming with the traffic of people moving fr m class to class. Karla strolls through the "Cap. Bar" on the way to her next class. ' us-xsmnza qwussrw M Mark Massullo takes advantage of his time at the Capuccino Bar. for extra studying. The Capuccino Bar is a place where students and faculty get together. informally. 87 Well, the word Rathskeller is derived from the name for an out of the way place where drinks are held or "Rat Cellar", thus the natural progression of things would dictate that we be served "Rat food", which. in most cases, we are . . . Are you kidding? I hate beer and cigarettes, but the girls can't resist a man with that rugged bar-room appearance. The Rathskellar is one of the major places at the University. Thanks to the many new additions, eating there is actually pleasant. With the installa- tion of ceiling fans, a big screen TV, and a pool table - in conjunction with ARA's foodservices the 'Rat" has really come into its own. Even Dr. Sasseen, President of the University, takes time out to meet with students at the "Student - Faculty" Happy Hours, in the "Rat" 89 The i985 Yearbook saiut Warrior". This Spring, tweive of he UD aies w 0 at every partyi deeded to ame ature with Piatomc Diaio a the Socratic method. Our iist of brave young souis includes Greg Kioehn Hoahn Tran Ed Hefiin Brian Heriihy Marty White Dan Kubaia Joe McDonough Jerry Jacobs Crosby Gernon Raiph Fitzgeraid Mike addock Jim O'Hare This "dirty dozen" without the assistance of heiicopters, televisions, radio communica- tion or an ounce of common sense, set out on an 8-day excursion to raft the Rio Grande, 92 in Big 94 The proceeds received from UD Charity Week l984 totaled $l3,3l8. While this sum is less than that of previous years, changed procedures and rules were responsible. Unlike other years, no admission was charged at the last mini-groundhog or Charity Week movies. Also, hampered by county gambling laws, the Casi- no Night raised only a fraction of what it had in previous years. Charity Week I984 was a great success. With collection of proceeds nearly completed, the Junior class. organizers of Charity Week, distributed these monies to various local charities. Already, $3,8l0 of this amount, combined with $l,340 collected from the University Parish, has been pre- sented to the Diocese of Dallas, in fulfillment of the Bishop's request. Also, as is traditional, approximately $7,000 will be given to Notre Dame of Dallas School, the University's western neigh- bor. Of the remaining money, approximately $2,500 will be dis- tributed by Charity Week organizers with the counsel of the UD staff and student body. An open meeting will soon be held at which suggestions concerning the presentations of remaining funds will be received. Charity Week Treasurer, Todd Kitten, indicated Scottish Rite Hospital and the Ronald McDonald House will most likely be included among the recipients. 96 One of the unscheduled; occurrncees of Charity Week, unpredicted even by the perpetrator, was the use put this year to the President's parking space. The space was sold at the Charity Auction, Sept. 30, for a week. Dell Hall, secretary to Dr. Sasseen. said, "The President's parking Space has been sold in past years, but this is the first time it has been put to creative use." Sophomore Mark Grayson, after a fierce bidding with Joe Calger brought, the space for $80.00. Grayson said, "I didn't realize that this was going to happen. I just got all caught up in it. The auction was quite exhilarating. After I'd bought the place an idea came to me like a flash of divine revelation that was hairbrained and crazy and fabulous and beautiful." Overnight, a bed and desk appeared in the wilderness of the semicircle drive just beyond Lynch and Carpenter. For the duration of the week, Grayson slept, studied. and lived here amidst the open sky and his necessary belongings; a candle-stick, tape- recordings of Handel's "Messiah" and Anton Dvorak. Each day new items were brought or donated: a rug, bookshelves, an extension cord from Lynch, a tarp just in case of rain. The action has caught the imaginations of many and commentary has been diverse. nIt's the most ingenous and creative use of a parking place I've ever seen," said Dr. Robert Sasseen. Grayson participated in the theme of Charity Week with this activity, demonstrating the Greek ideal of hospitality. Grayson said, "People come by to sit on the bed, to talk. to study. It is perpetually open house here". If, the decorationskcan't sell the doughnuts. then nothing will! L ' : I can't deadegwmch oner hohtd I drihk first? I -' :ul HtH"5 ummumma n mun; nmum VHHH Carnevale d1 Colombella umwmuurmn u v mmmmm .- nmuwn mu h "'09? I1 NV . l3 CARNEVALE IN ROME Photograph by Francesco Ruggeri, Altenzione . , , . , . . . ,. . 9 o . ., . ,,r , zwr r . .. ,, x a . A, u ,. 2 1 ' I g r , K .. f: V g? ., . i.. k7. , .,. ,.,.: : 1 . 1: . iii: . , ., an ,1 . 1: .. , .102... y , .., 0.1. J, 'xr: ., . Y J. V . . O1 x. ., y .4 Albert Alexander Biology Randall A. Beele'rk Engnsh Michele Breganae Philosophy Timothy Alan Bush 6 English Sharon L.VClank : ' Constantin SchOIars - I02 John M. AItbmar6 Biyology George Mr BehIingeI I Biology I Caronn Anne Brodish Chemistry vaunanIJ Butterfield Hist6ry ' I CC. JarhesCOakIeY EPsychOIogy Mary Katherine I Alvarez Biology Amy Lou Bolk Biology Tony6 Ren6e Br6wn I Biology 156th J. Cohen Enconomics' W Robert E. Amorello Politics Gina M. Bonanno Elementary Education - Cheryl Diane Bryant LI EconoInics LPam6I6 CeIarattI IJenniI6r P.ICoyle IfMathe'matic's Charles Baumann Philosophy Rasana E.BbuHon History Mary Ann Buddenberg ' Ehglish vvunahIJICernos6k. Jr. Mathematics :11 Ernesto LELCruz, Jr. Ps'ychol'ogy ' Patrick Dahaher Politics Christina M. DaVis , Teresa Jf peItzk 'Art HIS'tory ' - I Mathemancy L . I - Secondary, Education Sakah Domhin Elementary . Education Lon ArIrI Finn E Onomics I nthQny ;-M :Fraan Politics Karla Gig! PSyChology Linda Derdeyn V Elementary , Education ' I r DeboI'PahiE; Dryden :4 Mathematics Trevor GobdchIId :i English , Samiyry'Haqu'eE ; 'BIoIoqu ' . Va'IerieS. JpIinS'dn 7, Elementary L EdUcatIoII ' Nadine Rowena King Economics 104 7 Eric 8.: Gray ; I Bridget C Grover Secondary Education I I Mathematic 7L amass: Hem '- Physics , Margaret Jonon PoIitics fChri'stophErfM. I 9 I 1 Kelly KIihe Kis'IIngr I '7 7 j English English , I I y; ' Daniel :J.' Kubaila? I vMathematic'Sf EIemen a'r Elizabeth A Kelly Elemen ary , ,lEducation Lacorte: ' Mary Gisele LeMire Mary C. Lovera Stephen Lafferty L LeslierL. Lamensdorf John Philip Lang Biochemistrw Elementa Philosophy Politics : ; , Politics , . , , Chemistry Educatgn v7 3f . , , Anthbny F. C L , Gregory A. , ., . . Stephen A. Lowke Macchiaroli Macdonald LibbeyJ. Maddox Lectha Malloy' Classics ; Economics ,, - History Biology Philosophy Amanda Ann Jeanmarie E. Mans Luz Marie Manzano Marcisz , James F. Martin - John RrMartin English Economics Economics Secondary Education Philosophy -- .. . 9:41:13 away: :1 Joseph A. Lawrence E. 7' Susan Marie . V . . . McDonough Ill McGauley Jr Metzger Norgen P. Mlgglns L D-aVld R. Mlssmw Chemistry Psychology L French -Engllsh BIOIOBY , Robert H. Mitton Laura G. Moore John Edward Morris Mary Ann Murphy Rafael A. Mutis Biology Biology - L Politics , Elementary Philosophy , . - - ' EduCation 105 Vincent R. Pawlowski English ,g." 'V E Jennifer L. Muzyka Michael R. Novinski James M. O'Hare Elecia OEHearn Chemistry History E Politics Politics ersr fr - J d'th An Pehl 7 E L ' ETerLentar: Margaret A. Pelon Patrick 5. Petit Alice M. Pincus Education Philosophy E German Drama Mathematics Michael M. Probus Potrzebowski Jr, E Biology Politics Andrew W. Quinn Joseph Quinn E John R. Randall Psychology - Economics Politics Melanie R. Reagan L E . , Elementary ROI?" Lee Reeb John E. Richards Mrggxgsez Mary Joyce Rossi Education Polmcs E History Drama English Scott J. Rubin Edward N. Rueswald Rosemary Schempp - Donna J. Schneider E Joah E. Sendelbach Mathematics Economics L Biology E Biology L 1' Mathematics 106 J. Laura Sewickley Andrea L. Sexton Biology Politics Kathleen E. Silvani Jeffrey D. Smith Psychology Politics Julie A. Szczesniak Elementary Art Education ; , maTywrM , z Hoahn Viet Tran Chemistry Philosophy r Caryn Maureen Jennifer Wall Voskuil Secondary Education Politics VPafr'icia M. Stanton Luong Quang Tran Elizabeth L. Turicchi Spanish Biology 4- hpym Q A; , v Scott Sexton IEDlonna tL Shappell Jon W. Shelburne English emen aTY Secondary Education Education V , r L Rosemary E. Suprenant History Melissa M. Stewart English English Clifford c. Tenner Michael D. Biothemistry Eng'eigfnova Lucy F. Thomas Economics Mary Ann Turk Thomas P. Voorhies Philosophy English History . , 4,. k m k y Michael E. Wehrle Jonathan Walsh Jim Scott Wiley Classics $reem 107 Lorraine L. Wiley John Wright Secondary Education English , Manuele Fernandez Keith Lepak Spanish Biochemistry Those not pictured: Royce Allen - English Wayne Ayers - Psychology Scott Barker - History Susan Becker - History James M. Behan - Art Cheryl D. Bender - English Jean E. Boos - History Francis R. Botello - English Frank A. Bravo: Secondary Education Ros'e Anne Churey - Spanish Ann L. Clark English Eric J. Coligado - Chemistry Lelia Joy Davis - Economics Sophia DeCleva - History Timothy Duyka - Art Irene Isabel del Corral - Art Harriet L. Ellison - History David Erinakes - Psychology Edward Espinosa - Philosophy Kathleen Farrabee - Psychology Jeanette Galvin Psychology Shellie Goad - English Lisa M. Gontis - English Melanie E. Gross - Economics Edward Gumnick - Politics Thomas Handloser - English John Heniche - History Stephanie Howard - Art Marie E. Huff - English Michael Johnstone - Biology 108 Marqueza Zaldivia I Jeanmarie Zufall Sam J- Rini Jr. History J , Philosophy Yoko Kakimoto - Mathematics Gregory C. Kloehn - Biology Fritz W. Lauster - Economics Michael L. Maddock - BioIogy Guadalupe T. Manriquezr- Spanish C. Mark Massullo - Psychology Paul D. Mattox Economics Edward Mc Ginley - Psychology Mary C. McQuillan - Economics Fredrick Miller - Economics James A. Nedved - English Tankhoa $igc0 Ngo . Chemistry Luis A. Ortiz - Spanish Ralph P. Ostermann - Secondary Education Deian Raicic - Physics Tadashi Sakakihara - Economics Paul Sauberer - Politics David J. Secord Jr. - Philosophy Barbara Seymour , German Yeang Irene Shitah - Economics Paul D. Sikes - Philosophy Dona C. Sloan - Art History Teresa E. Smith - Biology Marti Szalai - Drama Jerry D. Tennison - Economics Joseph A. Vacanti - Economics Theresa Vollmer-Konig - History Paul L. Weinberger - History Kyle Wendeborn - English Paul V. Wilson Biology Kazufummi Yoshida - Psychology Peggy has developed the unique ability to metamorphose into a complete conversation pit group. 1 It really cracks me up when I do this. They know a secret, but nobody cares. Ed and Fritz engage in yet another debonair contest. , i- ,5 e , . m . " Senior, Tim Bush. single -handedly, durlng the Summer of l984, took it upon himself to add some color. and creativity into the dorms. Each dorm in the West Quad, now bears a scene from one of the classics we are required to read in Lit Trad. In the East Quad all of the dorms have not been completed and rumor has it that O'Connell will continue to retain the mural of the hawk lor is it an eagle?l in its lounge. The most beautiful of the murals painted by Tim is undoubtedly the congregation of the gods, which can be seen in the upstairs lounge at Augustine Hall. Each mural however, is a work of art in itself and emanates its own beauty. We of the Yearbook would like to take this opportunityl to say Thank you to Tim Bush for his outstanding service to the University. Most Likely to Succeed Dan Kubala Hennifer Muzyka Biggest Brown-noser Ralph Fitzgerald Laura Moore Best Politician Jim O'Hara Biggest Clown Joe McDonough Best Conversationalist Dennis Fisher Best Looking Bill Butterfield Bridget Grover Best Drinker'BIotto Award Mike Novinski Best Athlete Bob "Rocky" Mitten Alice Pincus Sexiest Legs Bill Butterfieid Lori Finn Nicest Chest Sam Cohen Rosalia Boullon Best Dancer Danny Garza Linda Derdyn Baby Boomers Eddie Ruesewald Judy Piehl Fantasy Girl Bridget Grover Fantasy Guy Bill Butterfield Game Show Host Jim O'Hare PDQ Manager Jon Sheiburne Most Likely to go Bald Eddie Ruesewald Biggest Flirt Jim Martin Joy Davis Biggest Gossiper Jean Marie Zufall Best Kisser Joe McDonough and his Frog Mary Lovera Dated Most: Jon Shelburne Jean Marie Mans Best Couple Eric Coligado and Gigi Ngo Space Cadet Noreen Miggins Best Imagination Tim Bush Diamond H's Owner Lucy Thomas Most Easily Embarrassed Georgr Behringer Friendliest Peggy Potrezbowski Mary Lovera Most Unique Laugh Monica Flynn Most Cynical John Richards Most Likely to Remain Unmarried Julie Szczesniak Most Likely to Commit an Axe Murder Trevor Goodchild Most Obnoxious Jim Martin Gift of Gab Peggy Potrezbowski Dennis Fisher Most Likely to be a Nun Julie Szczesniak Most Likely to be a Priest Mike Terranova UD Lifers Jon Shelburne Mike Novinski Jean Marie Mans Funniest Peggy Potrezbowski Joe McDonough Best Dressed Ralph Ostermann Melanie Gross Biggest Lips Joe McDonough Mike Wehrle Time Wrap Award Hoanh Tran Scott Barker Sportsmanship Award Scott Barker Wild Socks Larry McGauley Most Charming Mike Wehrle Most Victorious Studs "Spectre" This year at UD, 3 record 40 students were elected to Who's Who in American Colleges. They are in alphabetical order: Randall Beeler Keith Lepak James Behan Libby Maddox George Behringer Elise Mercer Cheryl Bryant Susan Metzger Mary Ann Buddenberg Robert H. Mitton Timothy Bush , Laura Grace Moore William Butterfield Jennifer Muzyka William Cernosek , Mike Novinski Sharon Clark James O Hare Eric Coiigado Judy Pehl Joy Davis Michael Probus Teresa Joan Deltz Robert Reeb Monica Flynn Edward Ruesewald Angela Fritzen : , Jon Shelburne Robert Gawedzinski Paul Sikes Eric B., Gray Christopher Swan Edward Heflin Julie Szczesniak Julie Hosinski Cliff Tenner Nadine King Michael Terranova Daniel Kubaia Jim 5. Wiley 116 This Page Is Dedicated to Spectre. In the History of the University, Spectre is the only team that has maintained a 4-year winning streak. Under the leadership of Sam Cohen, the team has won the softball intramural. Championship a total of four times; Spring of l982, '83, '84, and '85. With a record of 40 wins and no losses, Spectre is undoubtedly the most successful team at UD, thus far. The Yearbook and the Senior Class of l985 would like to salute some very special Senior Superlatives, the guys of Spectre. i: Samuel J. Cohen David Missimo John E. Morris Jon W. Shelburne Clifford Tenner Christopher Swan Tito Cruz Mike Wehrle Scott Barker Joseph Quinn Jerry D. Tennison Daniel Kubala Jim Martin t team captain 118 apartmentg-received the Facufty Medat for highest 4 yearxgrade t average; 34.4959 ciut 'of alposisibie 4.00 Runnie plans to attend antificial GregqrianwuniverSity :in Rome. Uhgology; nee htOwa'r'ds qrdinationrtd the P esthood fdr MDioceseOfMAustl : , Mz-RonhiriB-gJehkiknksk. Z names54'0ut3t5hdi.hg ,eniorviby 4th SYChOlO ry nt, recipienth,-of .the' GiffcrdekHil! ,Esk, A 4 ,4 L MvedgtheMiFaCuItyMedai for :eamin - yeafkaVefag, , thegigssvgradpating-class; L 00 Cheryl Is 'a: member; 0f, OmicMrQnDeitaf Hanger Sociew 4 4' How do I get dates with such beautiful women? It only takes a little brains, a little charm, a little guts and the limosine I rented. Don't Toi with me Mike! A match made in Heaven. Isn't that what the "H" in Diamond H stands for? Sam exhibiting his best chest. tsee page ll4t Steppin' out with my "one and only." I swear Ann. if you ask the band to play the Hokey Pokey just one more time What kind of deadbeats do you think we are? Of course we paid to get in! You did remember to buy the tickets didn't you Melanie? The ultimate fate of those who attend too many UD h functions. Theresa Beach Party I985 And who says only girls will go crazy 'bout a sharpldressed Well, if , Toilet t' Issue d , A A . . on home Without it! t leave er, lightning or in When will we two meet again. 'In rhund n? Or maybe 'In Lynch Auditorium? mi 125 The "material girls" perform for UD's Airband competition Mike Dunnigan, Bob Carlton and Monica Flynn give a stirring performance as Crosby, Stills and Nash. Steve DiMarco and Mike Novinski starring in 126 "Rabble without a cause." 85 Airband, "The Ing :1 Winners of the Spr ial Girls Mater Sheik, sheik, sheik your booty. Sports etics fund drive Fund :aising and 2: fm the new Asstximion drawing fur a on juiy 28. Thu? pica: with a five air ' Barrett Chane; mnge fmm FM 359 for rim Varsity mcmbcr Wm mch a nwmbcmhip and wimduw decai a2; writ as five fer the: at kicks 0 w dimmed m 21hr: Memhemhip amii $zxpp0ri 9f UBAA i3 21mm m mmrrmniiy ' ' mm im gcmis 21H: m impmwr nus; Operming imckgm vi! mama. N85 Mammary Chaiymma aml Uaim Cuwimf; Rwiwn , tmmi :th mxgxartatm: M" R xthimiy pmgmm 3m; :mymg! Uniwmisy M L 11km hm; mad: i: f0: mm m whims my MM" 1mm! gm? Amiem hm gym me: 112:: kklim mttvttmi. i , m mft, Greg mmmmm Rabin! Newhuum, Umma Svchaaider, Mica ?iacus, Tim Kciiy, Rmky Mimm. Pam : St. jacque, and Ralph Fiimgemid whim W35 Vaiks ?agmn imcm. bu e an d an 50 t av t on w efmlte me ove mg of e season." S De b aws said the he '8 ted a ospec for next year. Da Vls ha spent e tim c thr bout the state and sen Iette to co p y all over he nation. "Th re ar couple of k Id really a like to see here next Face h h ey hear abou a place re h an p! y y er and still attend good sc 0 I l ciaIA p em fo some d l hop do t lose p I ause f It," he said. I Coach Davis said that not lower he standards of the chool at all " wan s t II tea ith a good G P ow quality t d etes are ard to find. ou not f: 0 any h pI07 of their cla who r d t sp h avis II not play th 33 ecogm eems t e set on ard- sed kld they're losing. " 132 Captain 1 A. W00 y 81 I11X . C Skull Men 1C3. Physms Dept. Pa", Loftus ' 1 . A115010g1CaJMeza - v Dr. B k5 V Physlctans a say . '1 , 1. , 31101 'akagawa g NUH 561 J01"? Herrick; 1 5.0.13, Tom 21p 1 5 per H. 8017mm Mike Donovan 1 HTS jim Federcr Raul MoraJcs Intramural Soccer Schedule Fall 1984 Time 11:00 12:30 my 2.00 CvD 3330 EVH 5:00 1114 11:00 12:30 CV1: 3'00 EvC; :1 W Dvl 1115 31:"; B 1 . Dallas Baptist Home 14; 11 v . . 1110 4 00 NH Oct. 27 Arllngton Baptlst Away Oct. 30 Northlake Home Nov. 2 Navarro College Home Nov. 3 Wiley College Marshall, TX Nov. 5 Concordia Lutheran Home Nov. IO Eastfield Away 1117 um Dvl: 118 4 111'! 11x1 11111 1 00 BM 11:011 1: M MD 2 11 1 ' , , 1:00 1111 Nov. 13 Paul Quinn Home 3 W Nov. 16 Navarro College Away 1W 13W 0 Nov. 17 Springfield Alabama 123,8 11:13 Nov. 20 Bishop College Home 3250 m Nov. 27 Paul Quinn Away 5:00 Nov. 29 Dallas Baptist Away H112 4:100 3V5 Dec. 1 Bishop Tourney Away 1111: :88 BVP Dec. 3 Bishop College Away 11115 4200 BvH Dec. 5 NTSU Home 11116 4:00 BvG Jan. 26 Cameron College Home 11117 11100 Jan. 29 NTSU Denton, TX 12:30 AVE Feb 2 Open 2323 CVG Feb. 5 Concordia Lutheran Austin, TX 5:00 Feb. 9 Open 11118 11:00 Feb. l2 Arlington Baptist Home 12330 CV1 Feb. 15 Wiley College Marshall, TX i328 EJS Feb. l6 Open 5200 Feb. 22 Lubbock Christian Lubbock, TX 4:00 Wayland Baptist Plainview, TX 133 m 1 m a Freshman Mike Hahertv and Saphummc Steve. Puma mm up in daublvs in a recent match. Results P1113111 by Kim jnhxmm Tennis Pincus 3nd 1985 University of Dallas ins: took .mree ??flfff.: 11w: doubxesfvic-I Tennis Schedule u Berke! tennis xcam O'Brien com B 13de Du . bygoepx for spimg break:C pastmomh' mmy jeannc Feb. 15 at Austin College xc ' . m1 . victories. action has 136611 heavzw have m0Ved SEnglf: matches. . - c t' During 6115 um: I whih? me Men havc 5mg Garcia 62" . cm to 7-61 Joanna Sig mm red 0 6 13 matches E1160 1 . , droppe singles wm. Sherman Adington Feb. 21 at University of Tcxas-Arlington Feb. 22 McMurry 0011ch Feb. 24 University of Evansville Ondj UD March 2 Southern Arkansas University UD March 6 Austin College UD mare: 8 at Eviidvlvlcstcm State University Wichita Falls an: 9 at out cm Arkansas University Tyler has been J: nugget one poskiqn. 5:: can 8901501121525 max: 10 Harding College 1ArkJ UD 'n m 1 c 11.2 in smg ' doubles VIC ' arc 12 NW Missouri State Universit UD giyioipned reciifrfn fared WC - n a BlomSKCL 31;: Oancagibeckcr and Gar March 13 Kansas State Univcrsity y UD The wgmctkfcsy beat 6-3322? and Bevdlsicdeil; a doubkfs victOW March 14 Emporia State University 1Kanj UD momh's ume SI ary'S 0 cia 3150 P1c March 26 at Texas Woman's University Demon 1 st I 15d the March 29 at Ingaxrnatc Word University San Antonio ncsoxa7-2-ng; 111;.mityJV 1-8. and the Mens resum? Qosby 0:33:25: M an March 30 at Tnmty Umvcrgnty 0V1 San Antonio Kapsas $13 0f 111'm015 0-91 en with gix smgks V wins in the Marfh 30 at Texas A8d Umv'crsuy San Ammio Umversny gregande plcked up 5316 T1 mKe11ey, Apr111 Bcchcl College 1anj UD 9.0 111$me h one andt : Shem, an wok Apr1l 3 St. Mary's College UD Men beat Dmdt T1; Natiolfs xougn jones- and NM: 1 ?1 11031;,13151'1'0n Apnl 4 Parisjunior College UD Thd 9-0 and chrisx F01 1511 dwcstem ch in kgmauhcsKeV111 two. Bre- April 10 Weatherford College UD ?voStw 1 They 1ogtgukonhwwc; Eat; aid hvan Farringgged for three April 20 Trinity University 0V1 UD nsu - - . - 1 om 1 . . . oo,Nort 11111niiidaa mm 4 1 andC and. 110ng53 Lemon and K611691- 2m: :2 27 gm TDgggm Ummw UP . Mnssoun 11 ' Con Emporia 51316 ' doubles Wms ?5 1 ed in three dUUb CS pH 1 CT B chhxra Falls Kansas S1 0.7, A 0-9. at e Hahem was mvoV ith K , Cuong CHAMPIONSHIPS Tx'mitY W 09' Texas; 30 win51 once eaah- WSmlc Pucci TBA NAIA NATIONAL Kansas City. Mo. Concgc 4-51 and Pan Tnhm wd Jongs-gdndc and Fanjngmn CHAMPIONSHIPS 11 Matt f6 ' 1 . UP Wk . . . . mcus C3? n5- mdudt fin O'Brien for doubks W Personal results mtcd six singles vmones. Athletics Questionnaire In conjunction with the Umberszky New: the UD Athletic Department presents this questionnaire in an attempt to find out what the students think about sports and recreation On campus. This is a golden opportunity to present your emest and thoughtful opinions concerning intramurals, intercollegiate sports. general recreation, and sports or activity instruction. Crude attempts at humor. invectivc. and general non-senso are neither helpful not appreciated. Please fill it out and return it to the Athletic Director's office in the gym or to one of the two boxes provided in the cafeteria and out- side the University New: office. 1. Have you participated in any activities, intramural or otherwnse. 1n the current school year? Yes No lfnot;why? 2. Are you satisfied with the following Athletic Department aCthlthSZ a. Intramurals Yes b. Intercollegiate c. General Recreation d. Sports Instruction 3, How do you feel intramural athletics can be improved? a. different sports b. more gameshwhat sport or sports? 6. less gamcshwhat sport or sports? d. improved officiating 4. Are you satisfied with the current intercollegiate sports offered? Yes No Why? 5. What. intercollegiate sport would you like to watch andlor play at UD? 6. What type of recreation activities would you like to see offered by the Athletic Department? 7. Would you like to see instruction of- fered m a certain activity or sport? 8. Would you like to see professional sports on campus? Examples include: Pro Tennis, US. Volleyball Association. Pro Wrestling, Pro Basketball. No Sports Info I The UD Crosstountty team has faired well in unofficial preescason action. The team went out to the Dallas Autumn Equinox Road Race on Sept. 15. Coach Harry Hall said he was plcasn-d with the results and men- tioned the performance of newcomers Rocky Mitton. Ben Johnson. and freshman jcan-Marie Fecdham who came in first in her age group. Hall said thatjuniox Ray Hcipp ran '1real good" and rccotded a time of 54.14 for the 15.000'mctcts. I Volleyball entries are due Sept. 26. I A Freshman team won the Watcrpolo competition on Sept. 15 and 16. I Flag football results. In mcn's action: Whatk thc Point? 39. KMB 6; GHAC 31. Hale's Angels 6; You Got 1! 3L G-mcn 14; SOD 6. Halels Angels 6; You Got It 41, KMS 0; What's the Point? 39. SOD 0; GHAC Z5. TDS 7. ln women's action: TBA 14. Pink Panthers 6; Schmitz Faced 6. Toxic ShockyO; Schmitz Faced Gt TBA 0. 0. Would you like to see a student committee formed to deal with issues in- volvingthe Athletic Department and its activities? Yes No. Volleyball Results Men2s Final Intramural Volleyball Standings Division 1 Division 11 hkchnkauyjunkxs 3 5 133M "22 4- 2 G M2F Drink and Slam 0-6 They Felted Us HTS Gtcmlins 2- 4 HTS HA" Team Puniors:k 3-1 Wazoo s Volley This Re1um 2- 4 Apcthclics 3-1 GHAC 1122: CH AC 1? 1 2'2 Champions Women's Volleyball Final Sxandings Seniors and juniors . 1121 J ' ' 1, 1 . m Semen; took the title? eff m the 80cm: Intmmuxal Championship Th - c P1113113 by lkn jahnsun Mud Puppies 4-5 Millca's Mix Up? 1-5 Vanity 2.4 This 15 11 +5 .E Ou1Thc B 0- LEAP I. JTO QED2 Champions 4 Alumni Guls 0- Mox's 1:011:52F 2-! MON ? 2'1 denoms playoff team our C - 1 O exerc15e rlasseg are now in "swing" 57:37: W555 0140' W602 mew Cf g?tyaz . m 25'?qu 4M A GUY EWWvEss T SHIRT TO REGISTER MqLL RELEIVE A :FREE-: GUYS,YCII' LLCETAZOZDISCIIJNTIFYQI RFBISIER W""' 1 CkASS TIMES: m. w. KIR 9:00am M. w. Fr. 12:00pm T. Th. 5:15pm Sat only. 10:30am for more info call ext. 5207 136 Guest Speakers Dr. Barbara Konneker ..... ' .......... f . . .. I38 . Peter Matthiessen ....................... I38 Dr. Philip Thorek ....................... l39 Dr. William Owens ....... ..... . . . f ...... I40 Dr. Erik von KuehneIt-Leddihn ............. MI 137 Matthiessen's visit intended to bring recognition to the libraries of Irving during National Library Week. Matthiessen was selected to initiate this new lecture series on the basis of his outstanding contri- butions to American life and let- ters. Matthiessen was educated at Yale and spent his junior year at the Sorbonne. In the early I9SUs he and friends living in Paris founded the sliterary magazine Paris Review. In this period he wrote short stories and his first novel. In I956, with support from The New Yorker, he began a three-year travel and study trip that resulted in Wildlife in America. Peter Farb called Matthiessen "one of the three or four most articulate and impassioned nature writers of our time." Atlantic Monthly's Ed- ward Weeks called Far Tortuga 'la sea story the like of Lord JimX'Ter- rence Des Pres in The Washington Post characterized The Snow Leop- ard as "fiercely felt and magnifi- cently written." Matthiessen won the National Book award in I978 for The Snow Leop- ard. His novels, especially At Play in the Fields of the Lord 096$ and Far Tortuga 0975; have received critical and popular acclaim. A re- spected naturalist, he is author of Wildlife in America G959l, The Cloud Forest: A Chronicle of South American Wilderness 0960, Under the Mountain Wall.- A Chronicle of Two Seasons in the Stone Age 0963, The Shorebirds of North America 0960, Blue Meridian: The Search for the Great White Shark 0970, The Tree Where Man Was Born: The African Experience 0973, 2nd Sand Rivers 0980. Recently Matthiessen has written major books on American Indians: In the Spirit of Crazy Horse 09830 and Indian Country- G984l. -Jean Boos The University News The University of Dallas welcomed Dr. Barbara Konneker on October 9 for a lecture about the prominent German humanist Ulrich von Hut- ten. Konneker is chairman of the department of German Language and Literature at the University of Frankfort a.M. Her lecture ex- plored the roots of German nation- alism in the writing of Ulrich von Hutten. Konneker has published several books about the Reformation peri- ad in Germany. Her visit to the University was sponsored by the Department of foreign languages and literature, with the support of the Student Government's Lecture and Fine Arts Committee. American novelist, essayist and naturalist Peter Matthiessen vis- ited Irving April I5 and I6 as the guest of Library Associates Hoof the University of Dallas, Friends of the Irving Public Library and Northlake College. He spent a half day each with faculty and students from UD and Northlake and with patrons of the Irving Library and also deliv- ered a free evening address in the Irving Center for Cultural Arts, 350I N. MacArthur Boulevard. Dr. Philip Thorek, a clinical Profes- sor of Surgery at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chi- cago, spoke on "The Press, The Physician and the Patient" on No- vember l4, as this year's Health Professions Lecturer. "I am not trying to start a vendetta against the press," said Thorek. "They have done some marvelous things. They did a marvelous job of informing the public about the dan- gers of smoking, air pollution and improper dieting." "But we all have foul balls, and the press is no exception," Thorek said, pointing out the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Jimmy's Story", a news article which was later dis- covered to be untrue. "I gave a lecture similar to this one at a meeting in Chattanooga, and the headline of the story about my speech was 'Doctor Blames Press for Mistrust of Medicine! Only at the very end of the article did it mention that I had applauded the press' coverage of many issues, such as smoking," "Another time in Shreveport, I told the reporter that l was the son of a Surgeon, and that l was a specialist working with intestinal obstruc- tions and abdominal surgery. The story he wrote said that l, Philip Thorek, was the son of a Dr. Tho- rax, and was a specialist in interna- tional obstructions, and that l was an abominable surgeon." "The purpose of the press is sup- posedly to inform. but I would say the purpose of the press should be to inform and to instruct. I give kudos to the press for educating the public with their coverage of Baby Fae and Barney Clark." However an article announcing a cancer "breakthru," which had tested perfectly in a new treat- ment is misleading, ilbecause it doesn't say anything at all about which one of the 200-300 types of cancer this was." "When I was in residency, I knew I knew all the answers. I was so ego- tistical, I wanted a group picture of myself. Now, I know there is much I just don't know. I don't always know exactly how long a patient is going to live." "So many things cause cancer it seems as if life may be a fatal dis- ease," Thorek said in reference to articles that claimed that low cho- lesterol was also hazardous to one's health, and that decaffinated cof- fee may cause as many problems as regular coffee, and that margarine may cause more hardening of the arteries than butter. "The University of Oklahoma did a study about a little town in Penn- sylvania called Rosito. All the peo- ple drink wine and eat very fatty foods, yet there are no heart at- tacks. Everybody is taken care of, and everybody helps each other out, and there is little or no stress. I believe that stress, if uncontrolled, can be quite dangerous." "Imagine being Betty Ford, and waking up the day after the masec- tomy operation to read headlines that said iBetty's Radical Surgery Un-necessary, Study Says.' Why is there reporting like this?" uThe surgeon has been doing sur- gery for his whole life. so how does the reporter know what is right and wrong better than the sur- geon? If there are five possible op- erations, the patient often can't decide which would be the best, and the doctor must decide, if only to protect himself, which would be the best one." "When my father was a doctor, and he walked into a room, the pa- tients felt as if God had arrived, because they trusted him with their lives. Now, they ask if the operation is necessary and I am forced to tell them everything that could possibly go wrong." "Some patients actually turn down care because of misunderstanding or mistrust, because of what some of the press and some of the law- yers have done," Thorek said in reference to an article which branded doctors as licondescend- ing high priests of an elite sacro- sanct mafia who are exalted and deified by an obsequiOus public, who lost their common touch long before their training ended." "AlthOugh I may offend some peo- ple by saying this, there is no such thing as 'Toxic Shock Syndrome.' There is no pathology without sta- sis, and as long as an orifice can empty itself, there will be no dis- ease. Disease can only occur if you plug it," Thorek said about a law- suit of $l0.5 million dollars in which the plaintiff claimed that a strep throat that led to streptococcal scarlet fever was caused by "toxic shock". "Thorek said of a news story about a gallstone removal without $ur- gery "I still get patients who call me back. asking why I operated on them if they could have undergone this new treatment, Why didn't the article tell them that this may work, why didn't it talk about the tremendous cost, the years that this treatment takes, or any of the side effects?" The headline of another article read "Respirator Unplugged-Two Doctors Held for Murder." Thorek said, III used to know what death was, because it was when the heart stops. Now they say death is not until there is a flat brain wave, but flat brainwaves can be caused in living patients. Science has moved a lot in the past few years, but I'm not sure it is moving in the correct direction." "A very beautiful statement about this issue is 'When God has His hands on, I take mine off.' When I operated on cancer patients, I would remove the cancer factory', and I would tell the patient that if the good Lord had given them a good immune system, they would live, and if not, they might die. The T-cells and B-cells of your immune system stop all diseases . . . unless they are stopped." I39 140 Dr. William Owens, a retired Co- lumbia University professor and "lifetime citizen of Pin Hook, Texa as," spoke on "The Creative Pro- cess" on October II at UD at this year's Texas Writer's Lecturer. Owens, who grew up on the rural frontier of northeast Texas, has published twelve works, most of which deal with his experiences on the frontier, or with the folklore of the region. According to James Venniga of the Texas Humanist, "through his works, William Owens helps us to understand the American frontier experience, and through that, our- selves." "Drawing upon his own exper- iences as a writer, Owens was able to demonstrate some of the con- cepts he believes to be essential for the initial phases of good writ- mg. "The writer must have a desire for knowledge: y0u are constantly fill- ing the bucket, but it runs dry too fast," said Owens. After rising out of rural poverty through education, Owens spent much of the Depres- sion travelling across Texas. gath- ering folk music and folklore, an experience which was later chroni- cled in his book Tell me a Story, Sing me a Song. "After Pearl Har- bor, I joined the United States Army, and I served as an in- telligence officer for three and one-half years. D u r i n g t h e course of that time, I saw all kinds of people and places. all of which drove me towards writ- ing." Owens read a section from his most recently written book. which is still un- published, Running in Place, which deals with his wartime. exper- iences. "Once the war was over, and I went to Columbia. I had to write about my experiences, about death and desolation and compassion for the human condition. In writing, you try to fit into words, symbols and images, the feelings and exper- iences of humankind. However, form is needed to support and ex- pand this material. The artist needs to mold his material into an artisctically appealing form. Owens found a form for these ex- periences in dealing with interra- cial situations, first in his book on the Slave Mutiny. his "dramatic re- telling" of the slave revolt aboard the schooner Amistad, and later in Walking on Borrowed Land, which was about racial tension in the Southern town. Like the war, "Seg- regation was a waste of human be- ings and of talent." "Writing is useless if it is mindless, and does not plan to teach the reader anything. It must be a syn- thesis, in which one makes a boint. There is no reason to deal with things that have none of this po- tential." "I drew on my experiences in col- lecting folk material of all ethnic groups, and tried to put the folklore into a novel for both black and white, so that they might under- stand each other's predicament a little more." Owens also emphasized the impor- tance of distinguishing between re- ality and imagination, which he de- scribes as "reshaping reality into things I can use. As opposed to fic- tion, in a factual account, you must stick closely to the event, stepping back and studying reality as you go." Often in his autobiographical works such as This Stubborn Soil, "some of my kinfolk had to straighten me Out, fortunately be- fore I published." "I considered myself a Texan in Nyack, New York," where Owens lives. "I am an expatriate, and they are not popular in Texas. They ITexansl, do not realize that I could not have written Walking on Bor- rowed Land had I stayed in Texas. The only reason for my regionalism is to make it an opening onto the universal." In This Stubborn Soil, Owens says, "I am from Pin Hook and Pin Hook is part of me. All of my life has been a flight from it, but now, after many returnings, I see that it has overtaken me at last." -Mark Grayson The University News Speaking on the topic of American Foreign Policy and the founding, Dr. Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn gave two lectures at the University on October 2 and 3. Dr. Kuehnelt-Led- dihn was the guest of the Politics and English Departments and the Intercollegiate Studies Institute. Kuehnelt-Leddihn was born in Aus- tria and educated on the Conti- nent. He has spent about l6 years in the United States, not concurrent- ly, most of the time travelling and studying in America. He taught at Georgetown and was head of the History Department at St. Peter's College in Jersey City during the l940's. He returned to Austria in l947 to devote himself to reading and writing and further studies. He is a frequent visitor to America, having travelled through each of the states at least once. Kuehnelt-Leddihn takes his per- spective of America from his visits and his reading of the great books about the American character. "It is only the foreigner who under- stands a country well, never a na- tive," he says. llAll the great books about the great nations have been written by foreigners." Reflecting on the American sentiment, he says, "The American heart is isola- tionist. You must realize that this heart will always be that way. But you also have to remember, of course, that intellectually connec- tions will be known. Ideally, the brain should rule the heart." He believes that the founding of the colonies, essentially a religious one, was also an aristocratic one. "America is essentially an aristo- cratic republic, but in the whiggish, British tradition. All great govern- ments call themselves republics, he said. He noted several aristocrats who came from the Continent to aid the Americans, not because they supported democracy, but be- cause they believed in the republi- can ideals of the great European states. llThe first time a man who calls himself a democrat enters the White House in l928, Andrew Jack- son. That was a watershed in American History. One speaks of an America before l828 and an America after l928." Considering the place of political parties in foreign affairs, he says "Immigrants, because they are poor, have the tendency to lean to the parties of the left . . . and so, finally we get in America a situa- tion that international affairs in the past have become the agenda of the American left. It is one of the great guilts of the right not to oc- cupy itself with foreign relations. The Democratic party is the party of foreign adventures, while the right has been concerned with making treaties that don't create a lasting peace." The other problem confronting per- sons who wish to effect foreign af- fairs is the problem of information. "There is an ever growing abyss, in every country, between the amount of knowledge generally available, including foreign policy but also in all political affairs, and the amount really necessary to give a legitimate judgement," he said. Kuehnelt-Leddihn contributes a foreign correspondents column to The National Review as well as es- says to Several European publica- tions. He has just published the book Intelligent American's Guide to Europe as well as Die falschges- tellten Weichen oder Der Rote Fa- den. Kuehnelt-Leddihn enjoys the American scene and the perspec- tive from the Continent. He of- fered a lively consideration of many questions and topics of inter- est to Americans and Europeans. -.lean Boos The University News 141 Albert 6. Alexander lll 9l8 Delaware Shreveport LA. 7II06 Royce H. Allen 9948 Mountain Bend Circle Dallas TX. 752I7 John M. Altomare 3863 Pleasant Ave. Allentown PA. I8I03 M. Katherine Alvarez 20I3 Estrada Parkway $5 237 Irving TX. 7506l Robert E. Amorello 95 School Street Shrewsbury MA. 01545 Wayne A. Ayers l4837 Knollview Dallas TX. 75248 Scott T. Barker 335 Barker rd. Pittsfield MA. 0I20I Susan M. Becker 666 West End Avenue New York NY l0025 142 Randall A. Beeler PO Box I67 Melcroft PA. l5462 James M. Behan 90I Austrian Grand Prairie TX. 75050 George M. Behringer 22-30 76th St. Jackson Heights NY "370 Amy L. Bolk 804 Del Mar Dr. El Paso TX. 79932 Gina M. Bonnano l53 W Lido Prom. Lindhurst NY II757 Jean E. Boos I985 Evergreen Ct. Roseville MN 55ll3 Senior Francis R. Botello 423 Waring San Antonio TX. 782I6 Rosalia E. Boullon DR Fgrreras Valenti 29-3I Barcelona, Spain 0806 Frank A. Bravo 922 Chamberlain Irving TX. 75060 Carolyn A. Brodish PO Box 27269 San Diego CA 92l28 T. Renee Brown 63I6 Capella Ave Burke VA 220l5 Cheryl D. Bryant PO Box 399 Midlothian TX 75065 Mary Ann Buddenberg l5l7 Skyline Dr. N Little Rock AR 72ll6 Timothy A. Bush 400 Hurst Drive Bay Village OH 44l40 Directory William J. Butterfield 22ll Trawood El Paso TX 79935 Robert L. Carlton Ill 8433 Lazy Creek Court Springfield VA 22l53 Pamela J. Cefaratti 270I Rossiter Ave Roslyn PA l900l William J. Cernosek Jr. l506 Charleston 7 Garland TX 7504l Ann L. Clarke I23 Third Street Rome NY l3440 Sharon L. Clarke 2000 Lexington Pl Bedford TX 76022 C. James Coakley 4960 Old Dominion Drive Arlington VA 22207 Eric J. Coligado 7 Altamira Dr Borger TX 79007 Jennifer P. Coyle III Forest Ave Ambler PA l9002 Ernesto "Tito" Cruz PO Box 3425l Fort Buchanan Puerto Rico 00934 Mary A. Davin 46D Saul Rd Kensington MD 20895 Christina Davis 929 Evergreen Dr Seymour IN 47274 L. Joy Davis Rt l Box 234 Hooks TX 7556l Roger DeBrantes He Fresne Authon France 4l3l0 Sophia Decleva l0737 Park Village Pl Apt B Dallas TX 75230 Irene Isabel Del Corral 3449 Country Club 2l30 Irving TX 75038 Teresa J. Deltz l8 La Mesa New Braunfels TX 78l30 Heriberto '3Bert" Diaz Jr. PO Box l60309 Irving TX 750l6 Sarah M. Dolphin Plaza E 5172 I90 Cottage Grove Cedar Rapids IA 52404 Deborah E. Dryden 22l2 Huntington Dr Fort Worth TX 76ll0 Timothy B. Duyka 485l Cedar Springs Apt I76 Dallas TX 752l9 Harriet Ellison 4963 Mill Run Rd Dallas TX 75234 Karla M. Endres 402l Bucknell Drive Garland TX 75042 David F. Erinakes l Roaring Springs Drive Joshua TX 76058 143 Edward P. Espinosa Sunshine Canyon Boulder CO 80302 Eugenia "Ginnie" Espinosa Sunshine Canyon Boulder CO 80302 Kathleen Farabee 2633 Avenida Loop Irving TX 75062 Manuele Fernandez 9600 Golf Lakes Trail "07 Dallas TX 75062 Lori Finn l622 Longmeadow Glenview IL 60025 Dennis J. Fidher 3IO Cottman St Cheltenham PA I90l2 Ralph Fitzgerald 3429 Ohenry Garland TX 75042 Monica M. Flynn 230 Sumac Dr Monroe WA 98272 George K. Francis III I770 E. Northgate 2l40 Irving TX 75062 144 Angela Maria V. Fritzen 5830 Meletto Lane Dallas TX 75230 Jeanette M. Galvin 646 Evelyn Ave East Meadow NY "554 Daniel Garza Jr. 582 E. Palfrey San Antonio TX 78223 Robert W. Gadwedzinski 3404 Glenrich St Louis MO 63l29 Crosby L. Gernon 5l4 Pawnee Hiawatha KS 66434 Shellie Kay Goad l809 Green Oaks Irving TX 7506I Lisa M. Gontis 5224 Ironwood Dr Albuquerque NM 87ll4 Heriberto V. Gonzalez I629 Driftwood Dr Dallas TX 75224 Trevor S. Goodchild 68I2 Broyhill St McLean VA 22I0l Eric B. Gray l00l W Gandy Denison TX 75020 Melanie E. Gross I0 Pintail Point Rockwall TX 75087 Bridget C. Grover 6527 Buffalo Spdwy Houston TX 77005 Edward F. Gumnick 933 W Outer Dr Oak Ridge TN 37830 Randall L. Hajovsky PO Box l60309 Irving TX 750l6 Patricia L. Hanson 7608 Westwind Dr Fort Worth TX 76I09 Samir Haque Haque Estate Warner-Gulf rd Holland NY l4080 Edward G. Heflin 48! ArlingtonrAve Elmhurst IL 60l26 Mary Michele Heinbecker ll893 Shallowbrook St. Louis, MO 63l46 John Alexander Hettich 648 Christopher Rd Chapel Hill, NC 275l4 Lora Brigid Higgins 42945 Whitestone Ct. Northville, Ml 48I67 Margaret Ann Higgins I23 Tahlulah Lane W. Islip, NY II795 Grace Marie Holub I774 E. Northgate 2I4B Irving. TX 75062 Judy Kathleen Horak I224 Chippewa Richardson, TX 75080 Julie Ann Hosinski l0I5 Neville Jonesboro, AR 7240l Stephanie Jill Howard 3456 Beltline 5452095 Irving, TX 75062 Marie Elizabeth Huff I762 E. Northgate 9452I22 Irving. TX 75062 Ronny Edward Jenkins PO. Box I60309 Irving, TX 750I6 Catherine Elizabeth Johnsen 3038 N 8I Place Scottsdale, AZ 8525l Valerie Susan Johnson I740 Mapleton Drive Dallas, TX 75228 Michael Andrew Johnstone 2339 Healey Dr. Dallas, TX 75228 Yoko Kakimoto 2580 Hinase-Cho Hinase Wakegun Okayama Japan 70I32 Mary Therese Kayser PO. Box l4l7 Kenner, LA 70063 Timothy Andrew Kelley 920 Queens Dr. Yardley. PA l9067 Elizabeth Anne Kelly l045 Devonshire Drive Jackson, MS 39206 Nadine Rowena King 50I NW 49 Avenue Plantation, FL 333l7 Christopher Martin Kisling 660l Pharaoh Corpus Christi, TX 784l2 Kelly Lynn Kline 2430 N. Dodge Apt. B2l9 Tucson, AZ 857l9 Gregory Kloehn I305 Helene Drive Brookfield, WI 53005 Danile Jerome Kubala 990 Goodhue Rd. Beaumont. TX 77706 Daniel La Corte 40 Prospect Avenue Pompton Plns, NJ 07444 Stephen Anthony Lafferty PO. Box l60309 Irving, TX 750l6 Leslie Lamcinsdorf 35 E. 35th St. 8K New York. NY l00l6 .6 Fritz Werner Lauster I9I4 Estrada Pkwy 495265 Irving. TX 7506l Mary Gisele Lemire 3l05 Redwood Drive Beaumont, TX 77703 Keith Austin Lepak 4629 N W 34th Oklahoma, OK 73I22 145 Mary Christina Lovera Box 3l3 95 West Jackson Krebs, OK 74554 Stephen Andrew Lowke 54l7 Calumet Dr. Plano, TX 75023 Noreen Patricia Miggins 2405 Kingston Drive Houston, TX 770I9 Frederick G. Miller Jr. l5700 Belmont Drive N. Biloxi, MS 39532 H2 Rollingway 4 Anthony Francis Macchiaroli Peekskill, NY l0566 Gregory Allen Macdonald I365 Winding Brook Cir. $H97A Dallas, TX 75208 Michael Lawrence Maddock l500 Postbridge Ct. Arlington, TX 760l2 146 Libbey Jean Maddox 5945 Woodfield Kernersville, NC 27284 Cecilia Marie Malloy I309 Savannah Dr. Irving, TX 75062 Guadalupe Ruiz Manriquez 4440 Image Lane Dallas, TX 752" Jeanmarie Mans 205 Voltz Road Northbrook, IL 60062 Luz Marie Manzano 3535 Park Lane Dallas, TX 75220 Amanda Ann Marcisz 5423 Pine Arbor Houston, TX 77066 James Frederick Martin 26297 Bell Ave. Elkhart, IN 465l4 John Randall Martin PO. Box l60309 Irving, TX 750l6 Mark C. Massullo 3442 W. Country Club 352 Irving. TX 75062 Paul Douglas Mattox U.S.A.D.L.S.E. Box 6074 A.P.O.N.Y., NY 09224 Joseph Aloysius McDonough Rt. 5 Rte. 5 Box 259 Amarillo. TX 79ll8 Lawrence Edward McGauley PO. Box l60309 Irving, TX 750l6 $ Susan Marie Metzger 267 Twin Hills Dr. Mt. Lebanon, PA l5228 David Richard Missimo 3l0l Ruby St. Bedford, TX 7602l Robert H. Mitton l0626 Brudine Houston, TX 77096 Laura Grace Moore Route l Box 390 Roland, OK 74954 John Edward Morris 364 Paulette Drive Newport News, VA 23602 Mary Ann Murphy 4425 Willow Way Fort Worth, TX 76l37 Rafael Arturo Mutis PO. Box l60309 Irving. TX 750I6 Jennifer Louise Muzyka 3000 Trent Irving, TX 7506l James Albert Nedved 923 Turtle Cove Irving, TX 75060 Tankhoa Thi "Gigi" Ngo 538 Shadowcrest Coppell, TX 750l9 Michael Raymond Novinski ll0l Owenwood Irving, TX 7506l James Marc O4Hare 54l9 Meadow Lake Ln. Houston, TX 77056 Luis Antonio Ortiz 2609 Gayle Dr. Garland, TX 75042 Ralph Paul Ostermann PO. Box 72 Windthorst, TX 76389 Vincent Roderick Pdwloski W" Wood Haven Branden, FL 335" Judith Ann Pehl Rt. l0 Box I25l Tyler, TX 75707 Margaret Ann Pelon 23607 Longacre Farmington, MI 48024 James Norman Pettigrew 3829 Treeline Dr. Dallas, TX 75224 Alice Marie Pincus 22l2 Crescent Drive Hampton, VA 2366l Peggy Marie Potrzebowski Rt. 2 Box 322 Mukwonago, WI 53l49 Michael Maurice Probus 3339 Overland Dr. Plano, TX 75023 Andrew William Quinn I5 New Read Street Pequannock, NJ 07440 Joseph Michael Quinn 3I9 Driftwood Circle Slidell, LA 70458 Dejan Rajcic I778 E. Northgate 2l55 Irving, TX 75062 John Robert Randall 5800 Preston Oaks Rd. IO62 Dallas, TX 75240 Melanie Renee Reagan Rt. I Box A56F Hawley. TX 79525 Robert Lee Reeb 63l Elm Ave. Barstow, CA 923" John Edward Richards 5 West Street Fair Haven, VT 05743 Sam Joseph Rini, Jr. I604 Canyon Oak Irving, TX 7506l Mathew Ray Rodriguez 233 Hermine San Antonio, TX 782l2 Mary Joyce Rossi 69l4 5. Knoxville Ave. Tulsa, OK 74l36 Scott Jeffrey Rubin 49" Willow Lane Dallas, TX 75234 Edward Nicholas Ruesewald PO. Drawer 220 Garwood. TX 77442 147 Tadashi Sakakihara 2-8-45 Minamihonmachi Joetsu Niigat Japan Rosemary Schempp 3365 Runnymede Pl. N. W. Washington. DC. 200l5 Donna Jean Schneider I54 Place Rd. El Paso, TX 79927 Joan Elizabeth Sendelbach 8275 Wednesbury Ln. Houston, TX 77074 J. Laura Sewickley 83 Saranac Youngstown. OH 44505 Andrea Elise Sexton U of D Box 527 Jerome DIOO Irving, TX 7506l Jeffery Scott Sexton U of D Box 32l Irving, TX 7506l 148 Barbara Ann Seymour 3208 Community 4240 Dallas. TX 74220 Donna L. Shappell I3l Park St. Westfield, NJ 07090 Jon Wesley Shelburne 34I9 Clearwell Amarillo, TX 79l09 Paul Dean Sikes, Jr. PO. Box I60309 Irving. TX 75016 Kathleen Elizabeth Silvani 6720 E. Montevista Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85257 Dona Clay Sloan 429 E. Union Bower Irving. TX 7506i Daryl Lyn Smith 3l2l Park Lane "67 Dallas. TX 75220 Jeff D. Smith I2I4 Arrowhead Irving, TX 7506l Teresa Elizabeth Smith 4526 W. Northgate 292 Irving. TX 75062 Cheryl Bender Stampley 906 Town Creek Dallas. TX 75232 Patricia Margaret Stanton l5 Mountainview Avenue Pearl River, NY l0965 Melissa Marie Stewart 25l4 Vega Grand Prairie. TX 75050 Rosemary Eileen Suprenant 3840 Wilburne Avenue Seaford, NY "783 Christopher Michael Swan I520 Villanova Austin, TX 78758 Martha Frances Szalai 6055 N. Kostner Chicago, IL 60646 Julie Ann Szczesniak 4900 Crest Drive Arlington, TX 760l7 Jerry Duane Tenison 35l3 Esplandor Irving. TX 75062 Clifford Carl Tenner ll5l9 Wickersham Lane Houston, TX 77077 Michael Darius Terranova 2805 Oak Cliff Lane Arlington, TX 760l2 Lucy F. Thomas 8I3 N. Pearl St. John, KS 67576 Hoanh Viet Tran 720 Camp Sulpher Springs, TX 75482 Luong Quang Tran P.O. Box l60309 Irving, TX 750l6 Elizabeth Lynn Turicchi l32l7 Emily 1'45 3204 Dallas, TX 75240 Mary Ann Turk 5605 EM. 47IN San Antonio. TX 78253 Joseph Anthony Vacanti I3l6 Paisley Dr. Arlington, TX 760l5 Teresa Vollmer-Konig 2436 Wingren Rd. M020 Irving, TX 75062 Thomas Parkerson Voorhies P.O. Box l60309 Irving, TX 750l6 Alba Elisabeth Vosburgh 3462 N. Beltline 2ll4 Irving. TX 75062 Caryn Maureen Voskuil 4I00 Prospect Lane Plano, TX 75075 Michael Edward Wehrle 282 High Ridge Stamford, CT 06905 Paul Leslie Weinberger PO. Box I60309 Irving, TX 750l6 Kyle Ross Wendeborn 4l20 W. Red Bird Dallas, TX 75237 Jim Scott Wiley 4l38 Briton Ct. Grand Prairie, TX 75052 Lorraine Lee Wiley 36l9 Winston Rd. Fort Worth, TX 76l09 Any questions concerning the whereabouts of any of the members of the class of l985 should be addressed to: Estelle Jewell Alumni Director, UD Irving, Texas 7506I Paul Vincent Wilson 6606 N. W. 30 Terrace Bethany, OK 73008 Debra Diane Wright 2I04 Dugald Dallas, TX 752l6 Kazufumi Yoshida 4-2-l4 Kanaoka Higashiosaka Osaka, Japan 577 Marqueza Zaldivia l5 Greenbriar Road W. Warwick, RI 02893 Jeanmarie Zufall 500 Cadman Rd. West Islip, NY "795 149 Sights Of U.D. Bring Fond Memor Building Through Growth And Academic ExceHence Granted. you'd just as soon have us take out your tonsils Angela. but we really just want to take your picture. J .13.: '4: ml . $ .q It's hard to be humble when you have to dress up so that the w MK 1 fans won't know you in public .. . See what I mean? No Sheriff. I'm not going to look. I want to guess . . . now is 151 it bigger than a bread-box? , a . a 55 K5: M ; , f ; 4m, 4w. ,r 4", 4M. ? , v a v .5. a3 .., 24, W9, 5 g 5. .w 4. a ,y ,7. a A? 4C .5. : ?. a . 4 a g a : a .. a, , a a w; wig : 231g g ?4 g $g ... r . I L a , aduation Grand Finale BACCALAUREATE Joy Davis awaiting the start of the "MothepDaughter Tea". Mary Rossi also present at the "Mother Daughter Tea". Award. 156 And they all said that it couldn't be done! The commissioning of John Edward Morris as 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps. 157 Each year at the University, the Foreign Languages Department sponsors the. now traditional, Christmas program. It is an opportunity for those who study one or two languages to actually try their hand at one or two others, which are completely foreign to them, during the portion of the program when Christmas carols from each language are sung. It is quite a sing-a-longl It reveals the diffi- culty of mastering a foreign language, and gamers a respect for those who, despite the difficulty, manage to achieve that mastery. This year, the Foreign Languages De- partment was privileged to have as its guests Paloma Lorena th0 can be seen on the following paget and Dr. Barbara Konneker tp. l38t. Through these and other guests, the Foreign Languages De- partment keeps the cultural life of the University alive! Nadine. $ You've come a long way Baby! We 30x19 yen and are proud af WU 732M ymr mmmbmwng w 23w Umiwrsiw 5:? 8:4ng during the past mm years. you have prawn thmugh your pemewmme am aiatermmmgn mg amiity m gmw , . . Eittie by iitzlew Ymur Crescendo has mnw gust Mgm. A dedication of love from; Mom, Dad, Natalie, Nanette. Nikki and Nichelle 160 As I graduate from college and reflect upon my We thus far. I fee! a special need to thank my parents for allowing me to walk its path with two wonderful companions. Love, dennis Index Adorable, Benedicto ..................... 76, 95 Buddenberg, Mary Ann .................. IO2. l57 Afaisen, Ray ............................... 76 Bui, Thao ................................... 42 Ahlert, Jeff .......................... 8, 46, 50 Burkel, Susan ............................... 42 Ahne, Peggy ............................ 72, 77 Bush, Timothy Alan .................. IO2, "3, I49 Alexander, Albert ....................... IO2, I47 Butterfield, William J. ................... IO2, I47 Alkhiyami, Husam ........................... 42 Byrd, Beth ................................. 52 Alkhiyami, lsham ........................... 42 Cabeen, James ............................. 60 Allen, Elizabeth ............................. 74 Cala, Robin ................................. 42, Altomare, John M. ................. . ..... 94, IO2 Calva, Kevin ............................... 42;; Alvarez, Kathy .......................... IOI, IO2 Cangelosi, Robert ........................... '50ng Alvis, Dr. John ............................. 28 Carlton, Robert ......................... IO2, I48 2' Amorello, Robert E. ..................... IO2, I42 Caron, Eric ................................ 74 Arnold, Paul ................................ 76 Carr, Sharon ............................... 48w: :, Arguendegui, Rebecca .................... 49, 53 Carroll, Fr. Thomas ......................... 524' ' Aslakson, Carla ............................. 42 Carroll, Katie ............................... 20," Authier, Sharon ............................. 42 Cazorla, Dr. Hazel ...................... 30, 58;: Avery, Mark ............................... 48 Cazorla, Veronica ........................... 74-! , Baker, Paula ................................ 42 Cefaratti, Pamela ........................... IO2 Balas, Fr. David ............................ 37 Cernosek, William J. .................... IO2, I433 Bantum, Marion Y. ........................ 62. Ill Chandler, Chase ............................ 4,2ij Barker, Scott .............................. I49 Chellis, Matthew ..................... 47, SI. I23: Bartscht, Dr. Heri .......................... 22 Chitty, Beth ............................... 48 Bartscht, Dr. Waltraud ................... 2I, 30 Christopher, Joanie .......................... 74f ', Bascon, Fabius ............................. 42 Ciardy, James .......... . ................... 74f , Batto, Fr. Bernard .......................... 37 Clark, Sharon .............................. I02 , Baumann, Charles ....................... 36, IO2 Clodfelter, Dr. Cherie ....................... 27 " Beeler, Randall ............................. IO2 Coakley, C. James ......................... IO2 , i Behan, James .............................. I42 Cohen, Samuel J. ....................... IO2. I227," Behringer, George M. ................... IO2, "4 Coleman, Dr. Heidrun ....................... 30 - Belan, Michelle .......................... 4!, 42 Coligado, Edwin ............................ SI Bennett, Dr. Don ........................... 25 Costello, Mary ............................. 48' I Bergkamp, Marsha .......................... 48 Couniha, Veronica .......................... 42;; Bessomes, Genevieve ....................... 42 Coyle, Jennifer P. Bhullar, Rick .. . . . . . . , ; ...... .7 . . .' ...... 42 Crosby, Dr Blythe, Anita , . . Z . . . 42 "C , '1 ,, Balding, John . . ; .. Bolk, Amy Lou ......... Bonanno, Gina M; ....... . . y, Bonno, Denise , ' . .. - , Bookaklm, Giselle I ,, , L, Borders, Jennifer ..... . .. , 1" , , :r ,, ' .. 4. BOStaph, Dr. Samuel . ; .1 . ,, D I ' ' Bqulion, R0 Dolphin, Sarah ............................. 103 Dominguez, Virginia ........................ 42 Doover, Anne D. ............................ 42 Downs, Buck ............................... 79 Drexilius, Richard .................... 77, 94, I21 Dryden, Deborah ....................... 103, 109 Duggan, Sean ............... 8, 36, 42, 36, 62, 77 Dunnigan, Michael ................ 48, 96, 126, 158 Dupree, Dr. Robert .......................... 28 Duta, Smita ................................ 42 DeAlvarez ............................... 7, 35 deBrantis, Roger ........................... 103 DeSalvio, Alan .............................. 42 DiLorenzo, Raymond ........................ 28 DiMarco, Steven ........................... 103 Ebeling, Mr. Richard ........................ 26 Edgerton, Patrick ........................ 48, 96 Edwards, Pam .............................. 20 Elmer, Monsignor ........................... 37 Emani, Zohreh .............................. 26 Endres, Karla M. ............................ 103 Endsley, Hardy .............................. 5 England, Laura .............................. 42 Escobeda, Christine ......................... 77 Espinosa, Eugenia "Ginnie" .................. 103 Espinosa, Ed ............................... 109 Esteva, Carolina ............................ 74 Fagan, William ............................. 42 Fallour, Yvette .............................. 42 Farrington, Evan ............................ 36 Faulkner, Maria ............................. 78 Federer, Jim ............................ 42, 95 Felis, Laura ................................ 74 Felis, Michelle ............................. 74 Ferns, Karen ............................... 42 Ferris, Eleanor .......................... 74, 123 Ferris, Margaret ........................... 42 Feuerborn, Paul ............................ 43 Finley, Daniel .............................. 48 Finn, Lori Ann .............................. 103 Fischer, Fr. Don .......................... 11, 21 Fisher, Dennis J. ........................ 103, 115 Fitzgerald, Ralph ........... 92, 93, 94, 103, 115. 128 F1ados, Vicky ........................... 75, 80 F1aherty, Joe ............................... 77 Flaherty, Mike .......................... 36, 134 Flannigan, Chris ............................ 77 Flynn, Monica ....................... 103, 126, 143 Fojut, Robert ............................... 43 Foltz, Dr. Bruce ........................... 33 Fonseca, Elizabeth .......................... 43 Fougerousse, Dr. ............................ 53 Fougerousse, Mrs. .......................... 53 France, Tony M. ........................ 101, 103 Francis, George K. 111 ....................... 103 Franzen, Julie .............................. 76 Fritzen, Angela Maria V. .................... 103 Gadwezinski, Robert W. ..................... 103 Garza, Daniel Jr. ...................... 4, 87, 103 Gaycos, Ronetta ............................ 74 Germany, Karen ............................ 74 Gernon, Crosby L. ........ 92, 93, 94, 103, 123, I44 Geronimo, Melissa ........................... 43 Gigl, Karla ................................ 103 Gilbert, Patti ............................... 86 Gilchrist, Kelly ............................. 43 Gilman, James .............................. 43 Gonzalez, Herberto V ...................... 103 Goodchild, Trevor ......................... 104 Gould, Dr. Stephen J. .................... 68, 7O Graf, Eric .................................. 43 Graham, James ............................. 43 Gray, Eric ................................. 104 Gray, Suzanna .............................. 43 Grayson, Mark .......................... 48, 96 Gregory, Dr. Eileen ......................... 28 Groschen, Julie ............................. 48 Gross, Melanie ............................. I23 Grover, Bridget C. .......................... 104 Gruntmeier, Marie .......................... 77 Guay, Don ............................. 78, I21 Guia, Auri .................................. 4 Gwasclaz, Elaine ............................ 43 Haque, Samir ............................... 104 Hahn, Carla ................................. 43 Hailer, John ................................ 60 Hajovsky, Patrick ........................ 50, 51 Hajovsky, Randall ........................... 104 Hale, Ken ................................... 78 Hamm, Eric ................................ 43 Hammet, Dr. Dan ........................... 22 Hanafee, Mark .......................... 73, 74 Hansen, Mary .............................. 74 Hanson, Patricia L. ......................... 104 Hardy, Fr. Gilbert Haribhai, Shalen ............................ 43 Harkin, Kathleen ............................ 74 Harper, Howard ......................... 43, 97 Hartwig, Rev. Michael ....................... 37 Harzewski, Alan ..................... 47, 48, 53 Hayakawa, Melissa .......................... 94 Healey, Eileen ............................... 43 Heater, Michael ............................. 21 Hebert, Janine ............................. 43 Heeb, Elizabeth ............................. 43 Heflin, Edward ......................... 92, 104 Heinbecker, Mary M. ....................... 104 Herlihy, Brian ........................... 92, 93 Hernandez, Sr. Maria ........................ 30 Hettiche, John ......................... 109, 120 Higgins, Leah .............................. 48 Higgins, Lora B. ........................ 104, I45 Higgins, Margaret A. ........................ 104 Hindes, Lynn ............................... 47 Hintz, Patricia .......................... 43, I49 Hofstadter, Dr. Douglas .................. 68, 70 Hogan, Eileen ........................ . ...... 4 3 Hollcraft, Charles ........................... 104 Hollingsowrth A. ............................ 43 Holub, Grace M. . .3 .......................... 104 Honeycutt, Lee .......................... 62, 74 Hosinski,Julie ......... 104,145 Humphreys, Tracey .......................... 21 Husseini. Richard ............................ 43 lrlbeck, Randy ............ 8, 72, 74, 78, 94, 97, I21 Jacobs, Jerry ......................... 51, 92, 93 Jacover, Joel ............................... 48 Jakulbak, John ............................. 130 James, Therese ............................. 48 Jelly, Fr. Frederick, ......................... 37 163 164 Jenkins, Ronny E. ........................ IO4, ll9 Jodziewicz, Dr. Thomas Johnson, Bernard ............................ 48 Johnson, Catherine ......................... IO4 Johnson, Valerie ............................ I04 Johnson, Vicki ............................. 43 Jones, Kevin ............................... 74 Jones, Margaret ............................ IO4 Jordan, Dr. Mark ........................... 33 Kaltenbach, J. .............................. 43 Kampman, Eileen ............................ 48 Karakekes, Ted ............................. I44 Kasnetz, Samantha ....................... 43, 77 Katsumo, Angela ............................ 43 Kayser, Maty T. ........................... IO4 Keane, Grace ............................... 43 Keane, Rev. Robert .......................... 37 Kelly, Elizabeth ......................... IO4, l52 Kelly, Judith ............................... 25 Kelly, Patrick ............................... 25 Kelly, Timothy A. ................... IO4, I28, l52 Kenny, Peter ............................... 43 Kenny, Susan ............................... 43 Killough, Gus ................................ 43 King, Anne ................................. 48 King, Nadine .................. 5, I04, IO9, I52, I60 King, Raymond .......................... 78, 66 Kisling, Christopher ..................... I04, I52 Kline, Kelly ................................ I04 Kloehn, Greg ............................... 92 Koeneman, Ken ............................. 43 Konneker, Dr. Barbara .................... 2I, I38 Krampotich, Sally ....................... 48, 99 Kronenberg, Stephanie ....................... 74 Kubala, Daniel ................ 92, 93, I04, I09, "4 Kuhns, Pat ............................... 46, SI Kupiec, Judy ................................ 48 Lachowski, Elizabeth ........................ 48 Lafferty, Stephen ........................... l05 Lamensdorf, Leslie .......................... I05 Lang, John Philip ........................... I05 Larsen, Laura ........................... 49, 52 Latour, John ........................ I2l, I30, 73 Lauster, Fritz .............................. I09 Lavatelli, Dr. Mike ........................... 22 Lawlor, Tom 6 ................................ 48 Lehrberger,Fr.Jim 33 Lennie, Gerda ........................ 8L I2I, 122 Limosnero, Rowena ......................... 43 Lockett, Sr. Clodovia ..................... I3, 23 Loeber, Fred ............................ 72, ll! Loftus, Paul ................................ 43 Loiacoco, Joe .............................. 43 Loukrezis, Frank ............................ 50 Lovera, Mary .............................. IOS Lowke, Stephen ............................ IOS Lynn, John ................................. 43 Lyons, Coby ............................... 43 LaBooth, Toietta ........................ 97. I22 LaChance, Robert ............................ 2l LaCorte. Daniel ......................... IO4, I45 LeMire, Mary Giselle ........................ 105 Macchiaroli, Anthony .................... IOL I05 Macdonald, Gregory A. .................. IOS, I28 Mackal, Mike .............................. I30 Maddock, Michael ................... 92, 93, I46 Maddox, Libbey J. .......................... IOS Maddux, John S. ............................ 3O Maguire, Rev. Robert ........................ 28 Maleady, James ............................ 43 Malloy, Cecilia ............................. I05 Maloney, Jennifer ........................... 36 Mangini, Juan .............................. SI Mangum, Peter ............................. 74 Manning, Sr. Francis Marie .................. 28 Mans, Jeanmamie ....................... IOS, I46 Massulo, Mark .............................. 87 Manzan, Luz ............................... IOS Marcisz, Amanda ........................... I05 Marini, Dr. John ............................ 35 Marmo, Suzy ............................... 44 Marsh, Melissa ............................. 77 Martin, Jim .................... l05, I09, "4, I44 Martin, John R. ............................. IOS Martin, Kathleen ............................ 27 Matthiessen, Peter ......................... I38 Mattox, Paul .............................. I09 Medina, Arturo .............................. 5l Menocal, Martin ............................ 53 Metzger, Susan M. ...................... lOS, I46 Meyer, Lisa , ................................. 53 Mickelson, Franc ........................... 76 Miggins, Kathleen ........................... 44 Miggins, Noreen ..................... I05, II4, I46 Miller, Ann ................................. 44 Miller, Denise ........................... 36, 72 Missimo, David R. .......................... IOS Mitler, Brian ............................... 44 Mioras, Tom ............................... 74 Mitton, Robert "Rocky" H. . , . . I05, "4, I20, I28, I47 Moninger, George ....................... 74, I36 Montemayor, M. ............................ 44 Montonati, And. ............................. 44 Moore, Laura G. .............. 97, 87, IOS, l52, I48 Morgan, Robin .............................. 44 Morris, John E. ............................. I05 Mosely, Carla .............................. 44 Mox, Louisa ................................ 74 Muller, Daniel .............................. 74 Murphy, MaryAnn ......................... I05 Murphy, Patricia ......................... 75, SI Murray, Judy ............................... 99 Mutis, Raphael ............................. I05 Muzyka, Jennifer L. ..................... 106, I43 McAfee, Jennifer ......................... 8, 36 McDermott, Eugene ......................... 69 McDermott, Hazel .......................... 27 McDonald, Jennifer .......................... 99 McDonough, Joseph A. ..... 92, 93, IOS, "2, HS, I44 McGauley, Lawrence .................... IOS, I46 McGee, Pamela ............................ I28 McHenry, Kimberly ...................... 76, 77 McKinney, Kim .............................. 8l McQuade, Jeanne ........................... 75 Nagy, Fr. Muses . . . . .3 ..................... 3O Nakagawa, Taito ..................... 75, 78, I2! Nardoni, Rev. Eugene ....................... 37 Newhouse, Robert . .3 ........................ I28 Nguyen, 8Duke" ........ f. ................... 78 Nicodemi, Laura ..................... , ....... 42 Novinski, Lyle ........................... 22, 80 Novinski, Michael R. ........... 7 ...... l06, IIS, I22 Schnader, Donna Schoendist, Steve Schofieid, WiiiIam Schroer, TIm 3-Seay; Sean Alis. . I , ,- --I:I'ISeitz,I Dr. Frederick . . . . . . Sendelbath Joan I SIenna, JohnieIrI Sepper, Matthew Sewickley? Larua Sexton, Andrea I Saxton, Scott I Shappeil, Donna Sharp, Bill I Shelburne, Jon W ISIlvanI Kathleen I I mqu, Mary . .I Sinatra, Dr. Patric II I Smith, Jeff D -. I. ..... I. '. Smith, John". . . . . . . ..I ..... Smitqh Scott . .I Smyth Andrew I I Snyder, Geoffrey Soloman, Tess -r Sommerfeldt; Dr I Sorensen, Dr. Kathleen. ,I Stanton, Patricia I II Starr, Pau I I Reagan, Melanie Reeb, Robert .: I II Reed, Terri I Thurow, Dr Glenn ................ Reilly, John I Tom, Stanley Richards, John I I I Riordan, Michael Riordan, Patricia II I Robinson, David I: Tran, Hoahn Vlet Rodriguez, Matth w :I Tran, Luong Quang Rogers. Kevi : Rooney, Bo Rosalina, RosborouI Voorhies, Thomas P. ..;.. . ; . . . . . . . . ; . . :07 Voskuil, Caryn M. ... ........... 50, SI, 107, I49 , Voss, Kevin ............. , .......... 40, 72, 77, I2! Walend, Renee Walker, Jack Wall, Jennifer Walrathy, James, .......... , ..... , . . . .".' . '. . V. I 75 Walsh, Johnathan . ; .2 ....................... IO7 Warner. Lisa 5. ............................. 44 Wasco, Ann ............................... 2l Wehrle, Michael ......................... I07, "5 Wehrle, Thomas ............................ 62 Weinberg, Dr. Steven .................... 68, 70 Welch, Christopher ...................... 6l, 62 Welch, Dr. June ............................ 29 Weldon, Peter .............................. 44 Wellman. Dr. ............................... 53 West, Dr. Grace ............................ 30 West, Dr. Thomas .......................... 35 White, Martin ......................... l4, 5l, 92 Wiley, Lorraine . .4 ......... , .................. l08 " Wilhelmsen, Dr. Fritz ........................ 33 Williams, Fran .......... ,. ................... 75 Whayngtong, "Tina Wilbraham. Francis 3 , , Wiley, Jim 5.: '; ; i ; '.' ................... IO7, I49 Wilhelmsen, Dr. Alexandra . . : . ........... 30 Winsworth, Jana ............ , ............ 44, 39 Wood, Dr. Robert ........ i .......... ' ......... 33 Wooding, John, .r ............................ 62 Wright, John ............................... IOS Wright, Kenneth ............................ 75 Yager, Lisa ................. ............... 44 Yap, Jeff .................................. 44 Young, Harold .......... , .................... 75 Zaldivia, Marqueza ................... 3, l08, I39 Zignego, Ann .............................. I23 Zimany. Fr. Rudolph ......................... 30 Zufall, Jeanmarie ....................... IO8, I24 Credlts Editor-in-Chief: Nadine R. King Photography Editor: Daniel Garza " Administrative Editors: Amanda Marcisz I - John Morris Assistant Photography Editor: Marqueza Zaidivia Index Editors: Nichelie R King , Anthony Macchiaroli i CopyIEditors Nicheile R King ' , Nikki R King Daniel Kubala 5 John Morris Julie Hosinski Rome Photographers: Caryn VoSkuil iFaiD Renee Walend CSpringi I I Head Staff Photographer. Cheryl Bryant ' Staff Photographers: Fritz Lauster , i I Lucy Thomas , L Hoahn Tran Contributing Writers: Jean Boas 4 , Scott Barker Patricia Hintz 5 Mark Grayson Contributing Photographers I , Tina Whangtong I Eric Coiigado Edwin Coligado i i i 1 Ben Johnson Rob cangeiosi - : . Rase Suprenant Patrick-Petit I U Noreen Miggins A : Lori Finn 5' ', I Greg Kioehn Senior Editor: Tankhoa "Gigi" Ngo i Junior Editors: Jean McQuade Janet Cvitonovich I Sophomore Editor; Patrick Kuhns Freshman EditOr: Colleen Donovan A special Thank You goes out to The University News for the countiess articles - and infarmation we gathered from their publication 7 I I I I , . , , IVA'nother Thank You goes to the Faculty of the University for Imbmiteting Departw mental articles for the Faculty and Administration section of the Yearbook The largest Thank You goes to the University Studehts. Faculty, Staff and , II , Administration who all gave up valuable time to attend the Yearbook's photo ,f sessions For all these things we Thank You and hope that I984- 85 was as ,- productive a year as it was for us II Sincereiyy Nadine R King: 5 EditorvineChief I 198485 Crusader f" 9:175; n' I984-85 The University of Dallas 5;? "Crescendo P000 8 P000 '1 H, g1984 1985 .s. Emit. iv? p: F. .9?!


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