University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL)

 - Class of 1932

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University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 352 of the 1932 volume:

THE CAP AND GOWN COPYRIGHT, 1932 GILBERT FOVVLER XVHITE EDITOR VVILLIAM J. CUSTER, JR. BUSINESS MANAGER DOROTHY SCH VLZ WOMEN'S EDITOR THE CAP AND GOWN THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO FOREWORD This, the thirty-seventh volume of the CAP and GOWN, records and reviews For the undergraduate the activity and progress of the year nineteen thirty-one - thirty-two CONTENTS THE UNIVERSITY ......... Page Seven Leadership in Education, The Divisions, The College, Professional Schools, Affiliated Institutions, International House, Alumni. UNDERGRADUATES ....... Page Forty-tive Student government, Social events, Publications, Dramatic and Musical organi- zations, Social Service and Religious organizations, Womenls organizations, Military Science. RESIDENCE HALLS . . Page One hundred and one ATHLETICS ....... Page One hundred and eleven Men's Athletics: The Field House, Compulsory Gym, Football, Basketball, Track, Baseball, Gymnastics, Wrestling, Swimming, Tennis, Golf, Fencing, Freshman Squads, Intramurals. Women's Athletics: Hockey, Basketball, Baseball, Swimming, W. A. A., Minor 4 Sports. ' HONORS ...... Page One hundred and seventy-nine Marshals and Aides, Honor Societies, Degrees with Honors, Prizes, Honorable Mention, Scholarships, Fellowships. DEGREES ........ Page Two hundred and five Bachelors degrees awarded, Seniors in the Divisions and in the School of Com- merce and Administration, Seniors in the Law School. CLUBS . . Page Two hundred and Hfty-three FRATERNITIES ..... Page Two hundred and seventy-one Interfraternity Council, Social fraternities, Commerce and Administration fra- ternities, Legal fraternities. CAIVIPUS MISCELLANY ..... Page Three hundred and seven ' Officers of Administration, The Shadow, The Travelling Bazaar, A Campus 1 Calendar. INDEX ..... Page Three hundred and thirty-two Advertising, Subject, Personal. THE UNIVERSITY D n ROBERT M. Hurcnir-is' Prcsidenl of the Unz-verrzty LEADERSHIP The University year Nineteen Thirty- one-Thirty-two was distinguished by tremendous progress in original research, far reaching adjustments in administra- tive organization and was most signifi- cant as the first year of operation of The New Plan. Administrative oflicers struggled with the intricate problem of balancing the budget, without retrench- ment, in a year of depression, scientists maintained the institution's reputation as an investigative body amid increasingly IN EDUCATION strong competition, while the eyes of the educational world were turned with critical intensity upon The New Plan as it Worked. Although the practical success of the plan would only be demonstrated by several years of ex- perimentation, it was immediately evi- dent that whatever the ultimate result, the University had assumed a place of pre-eminent leadership and responsibility in the field of higher learning. Page 8 U I5 FREDEMC Woonwmw Vim-Preridmzt and Dean of Facilities LEADERSHIP Although the diflicult administrative task of reorganization was faced first by the College, the faculties of the various Divisions and Professional Schools labor- ed through the year with the general problem of adjusting their existing set- ups to newly emphasized educational ideals. As the new programs took shape during the Winter and Spring quarters it became evident that certain of the groups, especially the Law, Medical, and Commerce and Administration Schools, had developed radically changed curri- IN EDUCATION cula and requirements. Here, too, Chi- cago was providing leadership for its contemporaries. During this period when leadership within the University was at a premium, the services of its most important admin- istrator, Frederic Woodward were lost. Vice-President Woodward, who had seen The New Plan through the long tedious period of its formation was absent on leave as a member of the Gen- eral Education Board's commission to study mission activities in the Qrient. Page 9 i HAROLD H. SWIFT BOARD OF TRUSTEES OFFICERS HAROLD H. SWIFT .... . . President THOMAS E. DONNELLEY . . . First Vice-President ROBERT L. SCOTT . . . Second Vice-President EUGENE M. STEVENS . . . Treasurer JOHN F. MOULDS ....... Secretary J. SPENCER DICKERSON . . Corresponding Secretary APPOINTIVE OFFICERS LLOYD R. STEERE ..... Business Manager GEORGE O. FAIRWEATHER . Assistant Business Manager NATHAN C. PLIMPTON HARVEY C. DAINES SEVVELL L. AVERY CHARLES F. AXELSON HARRISON B. BARNARD LAIRD BELL W. MCCORMICK BLAIR WILLIAM SCOTT BOND THOMAS E. DONNELLEY CYRUS S. EATON ELI B.FELSENTHAL H.ARRY B. GEAR CHARLES H. HOLDEN CHARLES E. HUGHES SAMUEL C. JENNINGS FRANK H.LINDSAY . . Comptroller . Assistant Comptroller FRANK MCNAIR DR. VVILBUR E. POST ERNEST E. QUANTRELL EDWARD L. RYERSON MARTIN A. RYERSON ROBERT L. SCOTT ALBERT W. SHERER DELOSS C. SHULL GEORGE OTIS SMITH EUGENE M. STEVENS JAMES M. STIFLER JOHN STUART HAROLD H. SWIFT JOHN P. WILSON HONORARY TRUSTEES J. SPENCER DICRERSON HOWARD G, GREY AIARTIX A. RYERSON E, J, FELSENTHAL U D JULIUS ROSENWALD ' 1862-1932 THE PASSING OF A GREAT FRIEND The death of Julius Rosenwald in January caused world-wide mourning, but it was on the quadrangles of the University of Chicago that this loss was felt most keenly. For thirty years an interested and generous friend of the University, he was one of the far-seeing builders of the institution. He gave not only with splendid generosity, but with intelligent consideration of the needs of the University. As a member of the Board of Trustees he was a stimulating, capable and beloved fellow-worker. Jul- ius Rosenwald never wished his philan- thropies to be monuments to himself. The buildings, scholarships, and funds which he established will not be the chief things to be remembered about him. Rather he will be known for his interest in and sym- pathy for humanity, an interest so wide that it embraced all races and creeds, and a sympathy so deep that it under- stood the needs of all. It was entirely fitting that one of the two public memorial services for the great merchant and philanthropist was held at the University Chapel. President Hutchins ofliciated, reading two of Ros- enwalds' favorites-a psalm and Rudy- ard Kipling's Ulf." Dean Gilkey ex- pressed the Universityls appreciation of a great friend whose Uhigh estimate rested not only upon his wealth, his busi- ness genius or his generosity. lt rested even more upon his civic sense and pub- lic spirit." Page 11 lj D THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES FRANK R. LILLIE Dean of Biologital Sciences As in the past, the biological scientists at the University continued their excep- tional worlc both in the classroom and in the laboratory. Much research was done in the past year as was seen by the work of Chamberlain in Botany, Carlson in Physiology, Wells in Path- ology, Carr in Psychology, and Bailey in Surgery. The various investigations made by the departments under the Bi- ological Division were of significance to both the layman -and scientist. The Biological Sciences, headed by Dean Lillie, adapted its work to suit The New Plan. The Division required the student to take a majority of Work in one department with the related work to be approved by the department of spe- cialization. The general course offered in the Col- lege was conducted by the most compe- tent men of the Division. The course was concerned with the variety and re- lationship among living -organisms, study- ing plant and animal Icingdomsy the dy- namics of living organisms, emphasizing the physiology and psychology of man in health and diseaseg organic evolution, heredity, and eugenicsg and ecology, studying the relation of living organisms to their environment and to each other, as Well as a consideration of the problem of social organization in lower organisms. W A N . .M -T . ,,.. ,... , . '. . 3' 7 ' icuii. iret ' ' . "H Jw. I I ,, , In " 'U',,,, i I I 1 I 1, X ,Pg 1 I. ig' 2'i,Ljf.4g1ff I I I ' . A . fn , I "'jpf'i14 ,Ol . ' N .. rag? W I V. f .' ., ff- . - "1LH5i,"yn'zQ' f , . ,..,. .E ff' +-.ifriff-G 'I .. l"5y,,fl1' PII 1 A W' ,Q F3851 1 AQ! 1 - - - "IN ' V , -E I" " 'W' I ' 45.1. f- , . . , 92.5, 1,7 - . Q ' M, ja. , Q- is if ' ,.' ,,, lg. 1 151-.1 'Jag .WV -. P" Asflaig.. " f.f 4+f -' J. ' ' 'wid . 'I f- ,555 .. fee-if 5 li ' 3jIfFi.F!',:2'- - - I .hi . ?Vffgg' Q.,3I .,-ff ri - Q V L, rg' . . f -ity, V ,ram ' , ,f, fa ai? fra, gf .. nw, . . .41 .uh .,- . i, . .Ski t-Ja, - 1. . . i,- -y I I 1.1. 11 ff. . .- If JL . jf ' Q 'Q g.'f1gQ'i,gf-,ff f -s --8 fl -ew - - if "7 .'." ff l,Qffi:L"M ""H'2i'1+ 2145 F " " - .4 .. 'I"'.1f,ll'7" ' i ' , . gl-,EF . v.- -- " ': . ..-.Q 'J '-2 " V' ' New Iirimxx' Bun.u1 xo Page I2 I 1 I Y CHARLES J. QHAMEERLAIN ,Professor Emzfrztus of Boiany ALFRED E. EMERSON flssoriate Praferxor of Zoology THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES ...CYCADS . . . TERMITES . . . EDEMA . .. George K. Link, of the Department of Botany, spent the past year investigating the pathological features of virus diseases and the relationship of those diseases as illustrated through experiments with plants. Professor Chamberlain continued his collection of the existing cycads. These plants, one of the last relics of a past geological age, have been calcu- lated to be about five thousand years of age. Dr. Chamberlainls collection. housed in the New Botany Building, is the largest of its kind in the world. Dr. F. R. Lillie, chairman of the De- partment of Zoology, studied the biology of sex in fowls which were carried on in close collaboration with the Department of Physiological Chemistry. Dr. H. H. Newman extended his studies on twin- ning to man. One of his most interest- ing projects concerned an attempt to find the degree of similarity between identi- cal human twins which were separated in infancy and reared apart. Dr. A. E. Emerson focused his studies upon the biology of the highly social termites with the view of analyzing their ecological adjustments. Dr. Robertson studied the cause of pneumonia and succeeded in producing lobar pneumonia, experimentally. Dr. Hastings' research dealt with the cause of edema and the factors concerned in bi- ological oxidation. Experiments showing the influence of ultra-violet rays on the tubercle bacillus were made by Dr. Bloch. in Iii OswAi,o H. ROBERTSON Proffuor and Acting Qhqzrrnan Df'par11nmt of Ilflcdzrzrze Page 13' F. CONRAD Koen Professor of Plzysiologiml Chvmimfy HARRY G. WELLS Prafznvsur and Chairman, Department of Pathology THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES . . . ANATOMY . . . PATHOLOGY . . . PHARMACOLOGY . . Investigations in the Anatomy De- partment Were carried out under the di- rection of Dr. Bensley and Dr. H. H. Donaldson. Dr. Bensley, chairman of the department, was primarily interested in microscopic structure and function of the glands derived from the alimentary tract. Dr. Bensley has in the past de- veloped methods of dissecting out the islets of Langerhorn for the study of in- sulin production. He continued his stud- ies on the technique of histological ex- amination of the digestive glands. Dr. Donaldson devoted his main research to the embryological development of the nervous system. Under the direction of Dr. Harry G. VVells, nationally acknowledged author- ity on pathological technique, the depart- ment of Pathology has extended its field of research. The Department col- laborated with the Otho S. A. Sprague llemorial Institute and the National Tuberculosis Association in their re- spective research studies. lliss Nlaud Slye, under the auspices of the depart- ment and the Sprague Institute, investi- gated the relation between heredity and the occurrence of cancer in a given fam- ily. No definite results were obtained but considerable light was thrown on the problem as a result of this Work. Dr. Esmond R. Long, the outstanding au- thority on tuberculosis in the country, in conjunction with the National Tuber- culosis Association and Dr. Florence Seibert studied tuberculosis from the standpoint of the relation of its proper- ties to the natural defense mechanisms of the body. The Department of Physiological Chemistry and Pharmacology under the direction of Dr. F. Conrad Koch, con- tributed an unusually large amount of valuable information on the reactions of the body from the chemical standpoint. Dr. Hanke of the department investi- gated metabolism of food in mammals. Dr. Koch directed studies on the assay of the male and female sex hormones. Further work in the department includ- ed a chemical study of the hormones of the pituitary body and the isolation and analyses of the proteins in citrus seeds and nuts. Page I4 U an ANTON 1. CARLSON Profmvor and Chazfman, Dej1artrm'nt of Physiology HARVEY CARR Professor' and Chairman, Department of Psychology THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES . . . PHYSIOLOGY. . . PYSCHOLOGY . . . SURGERY. . . Dr. Carlson, physiologist and eminent authority on the function of the digestive tract, continued his studies on the diges- tion and motility of the large intestine as observed in animal experimentation on dogs. He found that extirpation of the pancreas incre-ases to some degree the mo- tility of the colon. Dr. Luckhardt, who discovered the anaesthetic power of eth- ylene, extended' his research studies on this gas in an attempt to make it safer for surgical use. The value of this dis- covery can hardly be measured at the present time. University Psychologists through their brilliant research, have advanced their department to a position unsurpassed by any other group of psychologists in this country. Dr. Harvey Carr and Dr. A. G. Bills through the medium of tests given throughout the country studied learning, space perception, and mental aptitude. Professor Thurstone in his investigations of racial feeling in social attitudes devel- oped several interesting factors. In the Department of Surgery re- search was developed along several inter- 1 esting and vitally important lines. Dr. Bailey studied the changes brought on by brain tumors and the resultant factors as indicated by changes in the body. Dr. L. Rothman investigated the develop- ment of nearsightedness and Dr. C. Dev- ney studied the refraction curve in my- opia or nearsightedness. Peucivat BAILEY Proj'L'.uor of S1U'gL'l'y Page I5 THE HUMANITIES Goimor: LAING- D Dfan of the Hmnanzizcr Under the leadership of rotund Dean Gordon Jennings Laing, the Humanities Division developed new standards, new curricula designed to liberalize the new student's program of study. Funda- mental to this revised plan of study, how- ever, was the organization of a sound basic course in the College and the con- tinuance of advanced research with the view of furthering investigative tech- nique. Along all three of these lines the Division showed distinct progress. By adopting the system of comprehen- sive exams for all degrees, and by spread- ing the amount of required work among several related departments it became possible for the first time for the ad- vanced student to either specialize in a particular language with a broad inter- est in adjacent fields, or to spread his work out in a horizontal plane across all languages with the emphasis on liter- ary forms or philology. It thus became possible for an individual to take a doc- tor's degree in -a. field covering the gen- eral material covered by a number of departments, in contrast to the old plan under which work was definitely con- centrated in one department. This same broadened outlook charac- terized the College course as prepared by Professors Schevill, Keniston and Scott. Using the succession of the great civil- izations as a framework for the presenta- tion of the literature, art, philosophy, and religion which have contributed most conspicuously to the sh-aping of the con- temporary outlook on life, these men sought to provide a solid, liberal back- ground for further study. Swift Hari. ,xxu Boxu Cufwei. Page I6 U m THE HUMANITIES . . . CHAUCER . . . AMERICAN ENGLISH . . . BREASTED . . JAMES Bnmsrizn Chairnzaiz of the De- flll'flIlI'7lf of Oriental Lafzgzzayzfr and Lifera- t1zrc.f. In the fields of research, Humanity scholars were outstanding as leaders in the development of new disciplines and new techniques. While studies such as those by lVIanly, Nitze and Taylor were valuable contributions to special fields of knowledge, they also constituted type studies of tremendous precision which exerted a great influence on the methods of succeeding investigations by others. The Chaucer project, which was car- ried on simultaneously in both London and Chicago by a group headed by John lVIatthews lVIanly, was near completion. Careful, wisely directed research was making the new edition of the first great English poet undisputedly authoritative. The appearance of specimen pages of the new American-English Dictionary prepared by Sir William Craigie was evidence of the progress of another in- vestigation of similar magnitude. Co- ordination of individual activity in group enterprises was further demonstrated in the work of Ronald S. Crane and George Sherburn, who were engaged in the edit- ing of anthologies of the poetry and prose of the eighteenth century. The quality of undergraduate teach- ing in English was distinguished by the reorganization of the elementary courses under Nlrs. Flint, and by the popular- ity of Thornton Wilder as a lecturer. Mrs. Flint and assistants were primarily concerned with adopting the college courses to the spirit and method implicit in The New Plan. By experimentation in methods and through testing at vari- ous levels, courses suited t-0 the special interests and capabilities of different types of students were built up. The year saw the formal dedication and opening of the Oriental Institute- a building which above all else recog- nized the remarkable intellect and initi- ative of a single man, James Breasted. Raymond Fosdick at the dedication de- clared that, "If there had been no Breasted there would have been no Ori- ental Institute, and without an Oriental Institute, the story of the rise of man would today be far less vivid and far less complete." It was in an attempt to salvage the remaining original evidence of human civilization in the east for the compilation of a new and fuller Pfistory of Civilization, that Breasted had field Joi-IN' M. MANLY I Distinguished Scrfvlce Profmsur of Enylzrhg Hrad of the Di'parl11zrnt Page I7 5 D 'GER'I'RUDE SMITH flsxofzatt' Professor of Greek THE HUMANITIES . . . HOMER . SALUDATO . . . CORINTH . . . expeditions working from the Black Sea to the Upper Nile. At the home Insti- tute, the tedious work of preparing the discoveries for study continued. Here, too, Edward Chiera carried on the task of compiling another great dictionary, The Babylonian-Assyrian dictionary. The Administration of Justice from Homer to Aristotle, by Professor R. J. Bonner and Miss Gertrude Smith, was the most important piece of work com- pleted by the Department of Greek in the last few years. Faced with the problem of reconciling an enormous amount of research with a slight en- dowment, the authors persevered and published their book after three years of work. Two projects of major importance in research were conducted by the Latin Department, but they will not be fin- ished until sometime in the future. Pro- fessor B. L. Ullman was abroad com- pleting his study of the works of Caluc- cio Saludato. Charles Beeson, of the Department spent last year in Rome as annual director of the American School of Classical Studies. At the same time he gathered material for his investiga- tion of the history and influence of Irish script. During the past year many members of the Art Department completed note- worthy projects. Not least among them are the first two volumes of Professor J. Pejoan's monumental work, Ifistory of Art. These volumes deal with the art of primitive peoples. Professor Franklin P. Johnson published The Sculpture of Corinth, the result of re- cent excavations in Greece conducted by the American school at Athens. Of major concern to Dr. Shapley and his Department during the year was the progress of the plans for the new art building to be built from funds given by lkiax Epstein. Although the needs of the young, growing department were pressing, construction of the building was delayed by controversy over the site. Page I8 U n WILLIAM A. NITZE Professor and Head of Department, Romance Language: and Literature.: EDWARD S. AMES Profesror and Chairman, Dejzarlmerzt of Philosophy THE HUMANITIES . . PERLESVAUS . . . BALZAC . . .THE PIROVERB . . . RIGA . . Of outstanding signihcance to research workers in the field of romance lan- guages and literature were the published results of the careful investigations car- ried on under the direction of William Nitze and T. Atkinson Jenkins on the Arthurian romances. In Lancelot and Gzzenervere and in Perlesfvaus, these two scholars contributed authoritative ma- terial relating to the origin of European romantic literature showing the profound influence exerted by earlier forms. They further demonstrated the profitable use of new scientific technique in the study of literature. lt was fitting that during the year the University as possessor of one of the finest collections of firsts, and ma- terials relating to Balzac, in the world should be responsible for careful analy- sis of the more important aspects of that genius. Edwin P. Dargan in his Studies in Balzzzcfv Realism produced a piece of literary criticism of the first rank. Withiii the Department of .German- ics the chief objects of interest were likewise medieval. Phil Allen pointed the way for further research in a hither- to untouched field in his examination of The Medieval Latin Lyric. Archer Taylor published a specimen study for students specializing in folksongs and fairy tales, and a more general interpre- tive book on Tlze Proverb as a literary form. Carl Goetsch treated in detail a small piece of philological minutia cen- tering about the Low German dialect of the city records of Reval and Riga in the llfliddle Ages. Edward Ames, of the Philosophy De- partment, was particularly occupied with the philosophy of religion with special emphasis on the interpretation of mysti- cism and the reference to God. Symbol- ism, logic, and logical theory were the research fields of Professor Charles lilorris. He conducted his general work in symbolism in conjunction with Mr. Moore. At an early date, he expected to publish his new book, Six Theories of llffinfl. Page 19 U D PROGRESS IN THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES -A x . HENRY GORDON GALE Dcan of the Physiral Scienre: ln the development of research tech- niques and in the uncovering of new facts and relationships University physi- cal scientists retained their leadership among educational groups in the United States. But many of these same men whose investigiations have given Chicago its World reputation turned the major share of their attention during 1931-32 to the formulation of more efficient teaching methods and organization. Thus, While some were preparing the new College courses others were carry- ing on their research in nearby labora- tories and in distant parts of the World. In famed Ryerson Physical Labora- tory members of the 'Physics Department made significant contributions to the knowledge of molecular and atomic structure. Robert S. Mtllliken was en- gaged in- the determination of the prop- erties of molecules as demonstrated by band spectra, While Samuel K. Allison attacked the same problem as related to atoms by measuring the intensity of X- rays. Artheur J. Dempster continued his prize-Winning work on the measure- ment of the Wave properties of protons. Dean Henry Gordon Gale, although mainly concerned with the administra- tive duties of co-ordinating departmental Ecximxr HALL. Page 20 U U THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES ....COSMlC RAYS... instruction and research was able to de- vote some of his time to a study of the spectrum of light atoms in extreme ultra- violet light. A research project which attracted world-wide attention during the year was the cosmic ray investigation conducted by Nobel Prize VVinner Ar- thur H. Compton. Dr. Compton car- ried on preliminary measurements of the intensity and variation of these short wave rays during the summer in Colo- rado and Switzerland. Prime object of these investigations was to determine if possible the origin of the cosmic rays. In that fact would lie, many physicists believed, the clue as to whether the universe is growing or disintegrating, and of more economic significance the preliminary step for the ultimate release of atomic energy. In the proof or disproof of the theory advanced by British scientists and origi- nated in part by W. D. McMillan, that the universe is dehnitely a disintegrating unit there were involved philosophical implications of profound influence. The scientists working in Kent Lab. were vitally interested in the educational departures inaugurated with the enter- JULIUS Sriacurz Profm-.vor and Chairfqan, Dejlartmenl of Chemistry .INSULIN .... ATOMS.. A . .ARTHUR -H. COMPTON Dzstznmzzxhfd Serfuzre Profexmf of Physics ing class. Professor Schlesinger, with Professor Lemon of the Physics Depart- ment, was designated by Dean Boucher to organize and direct the new general course in the Physical Sciences. Syllabi for the first year courses in general and elementary organic chemistry were pre- pared by Hermann Schlesinger, Mary M. Rising, W. C. Johnson, Adeline Link. In conection with the research of the department, Professor Kharasch pre- pared insulin of a very high degree of quality from its extracts, far more read- ily and simply than by older methods. He also obtained very interesting results on the effects of traces of iron and cop- per in cell activity. Professor Harkins proved that emulsions of oil in water are kept stable by a film of molecules surrounding the droplets, which has a thickness of only one molecule. Pro- fessor Stieglitz, a member of the original University faculty and an international- ly famed chemist, continued his investi- gations concerning the electronic insta- bility of specihc atoms, and molecular instability which led to molecular rear- rangements. Page 21 D D I. HARLEN BRETZ Profe.r.mr of Geoloyy Enwm B. Fizosr Prafc.v.mr of !l.fIroplzy.rif.r THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES .. GEOLOGY...PALEONTOLOGY ASTRONOMY .. Geologists of the University whose in- vestigations in the past have carried them far afield found, in at least two in- stances, the materials for valuable work without venturing far out of the city limits. Under the direction of Har- len Bretz, best known among under- graduates as an instructor of great abil- ities, an intensive geological survey of the Chicago region was brought to com- pletion. At the same time, Dr. Carey Croneis acted in an advisory capacity in the installation of geological exhibits in the new lyluseum of Science and Indus- try. Other workers in Rosenwald, Ed- son S. Bastin and R. T. Chamberlin, worked on materials collected by Held expeditions during the summer. Pro- fessor Chamberlin developed geophysi- cal concepts of the mountain-making processes displayed in the Rockies, and Professor Bastin studied the ores of a number of the mining districts of liex- ico. ln nearby VValker Kluseum Alfred S. Romer, paleontologist, continued his tedious work of preparing and classify- ing remains of Permian vertebrates col- lected by the Department's South Afri- can expedition. With a full understand- ing of the specimens he was in a position to recreate for the first time a previously unknown chapter in evolutionary his- tory. The Astronomers at Yerkes Observa- tory conducted a very extended investi- gation of the double star Epsilon Auri- gae which makes a complete rotation every twenty-seven years. Thus, once during this period, one star revolves about the other producing an eclipse. This phenomenum occurred two years ago and the results of this event are now about to be published by the University Press. These records have been com- piled by Professors Frost, Struve and Elvey. Other interesting projects now being studied are the rotation of the stars and their speed of axial rotation. Professor Struve, the fourth generation of a fam- ily of astronomers, and Professor Elvey are particularly interested in this work. Professor Frost, leading authority on astrophysics, is well-known for his work at Yerkes Observatory. Page 22 GRIFHTH TAYLOR Prafesxor of Geography GILBERT A. Buss Profrrsof and Chazrmaa, Dz'fJa1'lmenl of Mailzemalzcs THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES HGEOGRAPHY . The activities of University Geogra- phers ranged from the reorganization of educational methods at home, to the conduct of research in the field in dis- tant areas of the world. ln Rosenwald Hall, Chairman Harlan H. Barrows brought to completion his comprehensive study of the character of the graduate training provided by the University. It was especially significant that this de- partment, which has stood out for years as foremost of its kind in the country, was thus alert to any new opportuni- ties for improvement of its work. That such improvements were taking place was demonstrated by the sophomore course in geography developed by Wel- lington Jones, and the first American course in the geography of the Soviet Lands offered by John Nlorrison. At the same time, others in the de- partment carried on and published the results of detailed field investigations. Griffith Taylor, authority on Austral- asia and Antarctic regions, made recon- naissance studies in southeastern Europe and advanced the case for scientific na- tion planning in a paper before the Brit- ish Association. Henry lVl. Leppard di- MATHEMATICS.. rected a series of intensive investigations of British industrial and agricultural areas, and brought back with him valu- able additions to the University Map Division. Charles C. Colby tested cer- tain aspects of reconnaissance technique employed by the department with an ex- perimental traverse across the southwest- ern U. S. Publications of these men dur- ing the year included Taylorls Climate of Australia, Colby and Foster's Eco- nomie Geography for Secondary Schools, and several detailed reports by Robert S. Platt on Held studies in South Amer- ica. Over in Eckhart, Gilbert Bliss, Chair- man of the Department of Mathematics, had much to be proud of during the year. In the first place, National Research Council fellowships were awarded to eleven University of Chicago graduates. This exceedingly large number chosen from one institution was definite proof of the superior quality of instruction provided. ln the second place, Dr. Bliss edited Contrilmlions to the Calrulus of Variafion and thus saw public recogni- tion come to the important work of some of his more advanced students. Page 23 D D THE SOCIAL Bafxknsusr RUML' Dean of the Saczal Science: The importance of the Division of Social Sciences was tacitly proven When with its creation, Beardsley' Ruml, influ- ential member of the General Education VY 1 P' SCIENCES Board, consented to head up its activi- ties. The Division sponsored a series of lectures throughout the Wiiliter and Spring quarters. During the Winter, 'Wvilliam E. Dodd spoke on Reconstruc- tion, North and Southj Social Disinte- gration and Secondary Solidarity, 1856- 1877. Alfred R. Radcliffe Brown had, as his subject, Social Integration, While Louis R. Gottschalk lectured on Revolu- tionary Oriains of Modern France. In the spring, the speakers and subjects were: Charles E. lWerriam, .History of American Political Theoriesj Charles H. Judd, The American System of Educa- tion as an Experiment in Social Adjust- inentg Harold D. Lasswell, Psychology of International Politicsj and John U. Nef, The Coming of Industrialisrn in France. This series of lectures met with unqualihed success, and because of this, the Division intended to continue this practice in the future. P , ,.., ,E 1 9 a l t BLAIXE HALL ' Page 24 U n THE SOCIAL SCIENCES ...LAFAYETTE...LANGUAGE...MAYAS... Members of the Department of His- tory, still not quite certain Whether they Were in the Social Sciences or the Hu- manities, contributed several outstanding pieces of investigation. William E. Dodd, best known as an authority on the South, Worked on his three volume history of the Qld South, while Ferdi- nand Schevill published his Ifistory of the Rennaissance in Italy. Louis Gott- schalk, having collected some five thou- sand La Fayette letters, prepared to pub- lished the first volume of them in an ef- fort to give a correct picture of the Frenchman's position in United States history. Publishers planned to take 10 to l5 years to publish as many volumes of the letters. The study of the racial characteris- tics of the human organism was the ma- jor research objective of University An- thropologists. Dr. Robert Redfield in studying the cultural contacts of Yuca- tan, observed groups that have not as yet been touched, by civilization as con- trasted to those which are in contact with it, thus determining how civilization af- fects these peoples. Dr. George Herzog made a study of the ethnology and lan- guage of the Djabo tribe of Eastern Li- WILLIAM E. Dopn Profz's50r and Clzairnzan, Department of History ROBERT REDFIELD Axsuciate Profcxmr of Antlzrojwlogy beria. Dr. Nlanuel Andrade Was doing linguistic Work among the Mayas of Yucatan and Guatamala. He expected to learn the origin of the various dia- lects which will be of value in establish- ing the exact origin of the Maya people. Dr. Fay-Cooper Cole and other mem- bers of the department continued their Work on excavations in central Illinois. An lndian Culture of probably 2000 to 4000 years old was uncovered along with many other illumniating finds. Page 25 lj D THE SOCIAL SCIENCES . . SCIENTIFIC EDUCATION . . . SOCIOLOGY . . CHARLES H. Juno P1'0ff'.f.rof, Dfarz, and Head, School of Education Greatest material addition to the pro- gress of the division during the year was the construction of the new Graduate Education building Csee page 325 . There, members of the Department of Educa- tion, under Dean Charles Judd, found space to expand their effort to place con- temporary educational methods on a firm, scientific basis. To this end, Floyd Reeves conducted a survey of colleges and universities, Karl Holzinger was engaged in an analysis of the statistical presentation of information, and Henry C. lllorrison investigated relative values of various teaching techniques. The trend toward the scientific study of edu- cation was perhaps best exemplified by Guy Buswellls photographic study of the eye movements of pupils. By recording the movements involved in various men- tal processes, Dr. Buswell was able to predict the mental habits of the pupil while thinking. Professor Ellsworth Faris and his as- sociates, had a very diversified research program both at home and abroad. Pro- fessor Faris made a study of punishment under a grant from the Local Commun- ity Research Fund. Professor Ogburn was engaged in directing research for the Presidentls Research Committee on Social Trends. Professor E. H. Suth- erland made a study With Professor C. E. Gehlke, of Western Reserve Univer- sity, of social trends in crimes and pun- ishment. Professor W. E. Burgess, di- rector of the Behavior Research Fund, was active in the Work of the Institute for Juvenile Research, and was engaged with Mr. Cottrell in an attempt to pre- dict success or failure in marriage on the basis of the factors present at the time of marriage. Professor Herbert Blumer was in France making a study of the history of fashion in France as an index to the changes in social customs. ELLSVVORTII FAIQIS Pruffuor and Chalrmzuz, Dejzarlrnent of SUHOIIIVI' Page 26 D I! THE SOCIAL SCIENCES ..SOCIAL SCIENTISTS . . .TAXES . . . CIVIC AFFAIRS.. Activities of members of the depart- ments of Economics and Political Science were mainly centered in their own "back yard," the metropolitan area of Chica- go. ln a year when the schools faced closure, when the. Tax system seemed entirely out of adjustment with land values, and when the local governmental agencies were helpless to correct these disorders, let alone enforce the law, citi- zens found some satisfaction in the knowledge that University men were conducting a scientific analysis of the problem with the view of making prac- tical recommendations for reconstruc- tion. Such an analysis was represented by Chester W1'ight's study of Chicago land values, Simeon Leland's survey of the taxation problem, and the regional government study directed by Charles E. Merriam. Professor lVIerriam, for long a prominent figure in civic affairs, saw the solution for the seemingly hope- CHARLES E. Msmrmm Profuiwr and Qliz111'1narzl, Dz'fJarlmc'nZ of Polzlzcal Srzcntr , HARRY GIDEONSE iflrsaczate Professor of Economzrr f less tangle in the substitution of a re- gional government in place of the 1,700 independent and conflicting ones in the area. Through Steadman's work on the Public Health Qrganizations, Le- pawsICy's work on the Courts, and Par- rott's work on the School Units, the factual material relating to the prob- lem was laid out in part for the first time. With the analysis to be complet- ed in the near future, prospects for im- provement were far from dim. Two other social scientists, Paul Douglas and Harry Gideonse, stood out over and above their work as research men as teachers of great popularity and strong leaders in the political movements of the day. Dr. Gideonse, who was en- gaged in a study of international gold movements, also found time to promote the third party at the University. Dr. Douglas, whose trend of real wages studies were outstanding, lent his help to the Socialist cause on campus. Page 27 Cl D HARRY A. BIGELOW Dean of the Lafw School THE LAW SCHOOL The belief has always existed both in the Faculty of the Law School and in its Alumni body that the men who have received their formal degrees from the Law School and entered into the prac- tice of law still remain a vital and valu- able part of the Law School organiza- tion. The Alumni have many times in the past given evidence of the strength of this belief. This year the faculty took a step that manifested its attitude. By arrangement with Dean Huth of the University College, the Law School of- fered four courses in the down town di- vision of the University. These courses took the shape of two hour conferences held once a week through the quarter. The subjects were those of live interest in the profession. ln the Fall Quarter the subject of Taxation, which is of such importance at present, was covered by Professor Kent. The courses were open only to prac- ticing lawyers and were devoted to a careful and intensive study of difficult problems of day to day practice in the particular fields that they covered. In order to give the personal contact and individual discussion that was regarded as being one of the most valuable ele- ments in the courses they were limited in numbers and preference was given to the Alumni of the Law School. ln all the courses, the registration was in ex- cess of the number permitted. The suc- cess of the work was so pronounced that other courses will be given in the same way next year. On the campus the process of careful selection that has been undertaken in the Law School began to show its consequences. It was the gen- eral feeling of the Faculty that the qual- ity of the members of the school was distinctly improved. This conclusion was borne out by the sm-aller number of men who were dropped from the school and the higher average of work in the hrst year class. Page 28 U ci I HAROLD G, SHIELDS Alsszslant Dean af the School of Cunzmerce and Aa'r11i1zis.'ration THE SCHOOL or COMMERCE AND ADMINISTRATION With William B. Spencer, Professor of Business Law, as Dean, the School of Commerce and Administration experi- enced r-emarkable success in all phases of its activities. ln research the faculty contributed much valuable material. Professor J. L. Palmer directed a series of studies on chain store operations and problems of both local and national scope, some of which studies Were re- cently rele-ased by the University Press. Professor John H. Cover conducted, in codoperation with the United States De- partment of Commerce and Yale Uni- versity, a study of brankruptcy statistics. A book entitled, Business Cycles and Forecasting, by Professor Garfield V. Cox will soon be on the market. T. O. Yntema continued his statistical research project in the stock market activities. James W. Young, the man Who popu- larized the personal indorsement in ad- vertising, and the most recently acquired member of the faculty, has begun a monograph on The Advertising Agency Commission System. Professor Greer prepared a study of customer turnover among the meat packers, and of the busi- ness mortality rate of retail meat dealers in Chicago. Professor O. McKinsey, a man famous in business organization policies and procedures, was engaged in a series of management case studies. Associate Professor R. W. Stone's personnel studies of Chicago as a Labor Market will soon be available in book form. Pro- fessor R. B. Alspaugh studied the prob- lem of adjusting merchandising policies of menls clothing stores to the business depression conditions, and the special sales practices followed by Chicago De- partment Stores. Assistant Dean Har- old G. Shields was engaged in educa- tion in economics and business in junior colleges, and in senior high schools. The technique of determining accounting needs of a specific business was Assistant Professor Willard I. Grahamls latest project. Page 29 ' iii gil ' V -fffzf EDITH ABBOTT Dcan of the Graduale .Sclzoql of Sofia! Sfrwice Adminutralzon THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SERVICE ADMINISTRATION This year of depression has offered new problems to the Graduate School of Social Service Administration. Their work was increased and intensified be- cause of the social disintegration which has taken place in many families and communities throughout the country. The School published fourteen social service monographs, two of Which, Smndarrls of Living of Unskilled Labor- ers in Chicago by Leila Houghteling, Pojmlntion Trends in the Chicago Re- gion by Helen Jeter, are of particular interest to Chicagoans. The research of the School during the last year, dealt with many interest- ing projects. One of the most important undertakings, was done in cooperation with the Governor's Commission on Child lVelfare. Ruth Colby, a Fellow of the School, served as Secretary of the Commission, and the report led to the introduction of twenty-eight bills in the Legislature and the continuation of the Commission until the meeting of the next legislature. Another important re- search undertaking was a statistical re- port, and various other studies on the subject of crime and the foreign-born, prepared under the direction of the Dean of the School. The Public VVelfare Series, under the direction of Miss Breckinridge was continued, and one new volume, Public Pffelfare Adnzizzistration in Louisiana by Dr. Elizabeth Wisiier was published by the University Press. Another pub- lic Welfare undertaking was a study of the Cook County Almshouse. llfliss Breckinridge served as a member of the Special Citizens' Committee and pre- pared a report on the administration of the almshouse together with case studies of inmates prepared by Ruth Powell. Page' 30 5 D - DoUcLAs WAPLES Amng Dean of Graduate Library Schoal THE GRADUATE LIBRARY SCHOOL The Graduate Library School was of- ficially opened in October, 1928, with George A. Works as dean of the School. The School, now under the leadership of Acting Dean Waples, was established in response to- the insistent demand of the library profession that the study of librarianship be advanced to the univer- sity level. It was an entirely new idea as far as Library Schools were con- cerned. The 'aim was to carry the work forward from a point Where other Li- brary Schools left off. It was believed that the whole field of librarianship had scarcely been scratched for research ma- terial. With that fact in mind, the School decided to give only higher de- grees-Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy, and to -admit only those stu- dents Who had had at least a year's ex- perience and training at some Library School beyond a Bachelor's Degree. Numerically, the Work of the School is still microscopic in comparison with that of the other professional schools of our University. For the present its stu- dent enrollment is limited to fifteen and its faculty to four members. During the three years of its activity only Hve grad- uates have attained the Master's De- gree and three the Doctorate. These, like all of the non-degree alumni, have successfully established themselves in professional practice. But these figures fail to reveal the quality of the School's real accomplish- ment. Though its task was one of pio- neering, time has been found to estab- lish a successful periodical, to publish reports of research, and for faculty mem- bers to serve as consultants in numer- ous professional enterprises. Next au- tumn Louis R. Wilson is to assume the deanship of the School. Dr. Wilson not only served the University of North Carolina as librarian since 1901, but he also served as director of its library train- ing school, and editor of its university press. Outside the University he played a leading part in many movements for library extension and improvement and has. participated in the councils of the National Association of Librarians. With his coming, the School promises to enter on a wider field in its activities. Page 31 sf I ,rg GRADUATE EDUCATION BUILDING THE NEW SCIENCE OF EDUCATION The Graduate Education Building was erected with a part of the 1,500,000 dollars given to the University by the General Education Board for the sup- port of the scientific study of educational problems. This Board selected the Uni- versity of Chicago as a center for devel- opement of the science of education for two reasons. First, the Middle West has in recent years been more vigorous in educational experimentation, in en- richment of the school curriculum, and in reform of methods of teaching and of school administration than any other part of the civilized world. Second, the contributions of the Department of Edu- cation of the University of Chicago to the science of education have been so conspicuous as to justify fully the ex- pectation that increased contributions to this science will be insured by added equipment. The Department of Education con- ducted two laboratory schools-an ele- mentary school and a secondary school. These schools were the trying-out grounds for the new plans of organiza- tion and administration and for new courses of instruction. Whenever a new enterprise is undertaken in the Labora- tory Schools, trained experts from among the members of the faculty of the de- partment test the results of the innova- tion. The new Graduate Education Build- ing of the University of Chicago showed that an entirely new idea with regard to the science of education was beginning to be accepted. This building has a statistical laboratory, a fully equipped apparatus workshop with a skilled me- chanic, dark rooms for photographic work, laboratory rooms, record rooms, work rooms for members of the staff engaged in school and college surveys and other studies in the field of school and college administration, and a library with work space for two hundred stu- dents and stack space for 100,000 vol- umes. The stack now contains 60,000 volumes on education. There is a spe- cial-collection room, where reports of school systems and colleges are made available for students of educational ad- ministration. Page 32 U D THE COLLEGE PLAN CHAUNCEY S. Boucuisra Dean -of ffm College of Arts, Lzinralurc, and Srimce During the past eight months the University has been engaged in carry- ing out in practice a new educational idea. New-not in each individual pro- vision-but, in its far-reaching applica- tion of methods not generally used in higher education in this country. The outstanding single factor con- tributing to the success of the Univer- sity's new plan is the core around which the details have been executed. This is, simply, the fact that the objectives of higher education -have been defined. The University, With its excellent facilities and trained personnel, has studied and more critically than has any other like will continue to study these objectives institution in the past. Not satisfied with just defining the objectives sought after in a college education the Univer- sity undertook to find the best ways of measuring achievements secured once the objectives were defined. Once the ob- jectives of present day education were defined the task of putting a system in- corporating the new ideas into effect was relatively easy. The reorganization of the University necessitated a general house-cleaning in the College. The curriculum was scru-- tinized by a staff of capable men who de- termined What place each course had in the College. Some courses were added to the curriculum and some were re- moved, where it was decided that they were out of place in the new arrange- ment. The emphasis which has been placed on the curriculum of the College is in part an answer to what the University has attempted to do in redefining a gen- eral education. ln the past, for exam- ple, the number of courses in some de- partments has been multiplied almost at will, ,with no regard for what is best for the student. Educators have come to the conclusion that an unguided browsing into any number of courses, no matter how good, was not the best way to secure a general education. In solution to the problem the Uni- versity instituted the survey courses in the four fields, the Biological Sciences, the Humanities, the Physical Sciences and the Social Sciences. These general courses span the scope of general educa- tiong and they are followed by a series of second-year sequences courses which offer preparation for divisional courses in addition to completing the general education of the College. The University of Chicago has taken the initial step in changing the outlook on higher education throughout the country. The initial success of the new plan will only be amplified as time goes on and the workings of it are manifested in more and more ways. The result can be nothing but-higher education on a much more sound basis. Page 33 U D l Geoizcs A. VVORKS Dmn of Sludzrnts COORDINATING STUDENT INTERESTS Although the chief task of the Dean of Students lay in the coordination of the great number and variety of student agencies and activities, Dean WOl'kS and his assistants accomplished much in the way of creation of new interests during the process of reorganization. Greatest single advancement came in the strengthening of the advisory service in the College. With the college student so largely responsible only to himself for the completion of advised Work, and with the formation of large lecture groups, the necessity for personal counselling from experienced advisors became ex- tremely important. Under the direction of Dean Aaron Brumbaugh the coun- selling staff was increased in size and scope of activity. Klore effective con- tacts with the students were made, while the student reaction to the New Plan and to the Freshman XVeek Program was carefully canvassed with the view of adjusting them to student require- ments. Of special importance to undergradu- ates vvas the initiative assumed by the Office of the Dean of Students in the coordination of student group activities. Although the burden of much of the ac- tual realignment of interests was accom- plished through the Student Committee on Student Affairs, many of the ad- vances in student organization were di- rectly supervised by the Office. Thus, Dean VVilliam Scott and Social Director Damaris Ames were chiefly responsible for the creation of the three underclass councils and for the fine work executed by the Social Committee. In these in- stances the intelligent guidance of spe- cial activities by administrative officers resulted not in a decrease of undergradu- ate initiative, but rather in an increase in the amount of responsibility the stu- dents were willing to assume. Page .H U in I ROBERT C. VVOELLNER Exfcizlzw Secrelary, Board of Iforaiional Guidance 1 AID FOR THE GRADUATES The present economic depression in this country has presented to the Board of Vocational and Placement a problem more serious than any that it has had in a number of years. At the present time the large business firms of the country are laying off experienced men in order to balance their budgets and, as a result, very few of them are making any ad- vance toward securing college graduates to train in their departments. This con- Xdition of course makes it difficult for the Board to find positions for the gradu- ating seniors. As a matter of fact many of the graduates of the class of 1931 are still without jobs. In a statement published this spring the Board of Vocational Guidance and Placement indicated that the number of available positions as compared with the pre-depression period would be reduced by almost two thirds. Of equal signifi- cance is the fact that the concerns who are taking new men are becoming more critical of their requirements and are hiring only those who show unusual promise for future development. The type of positions which are fall- ing off most rapidly are the research and scientihc ones. The large technical houses are reducing their research staffs in view of the falling production and as a result the technical men who are grad- uated this year will either have to con- tinue graduate work or do private re- search. The only jobs which are offered in any abundance at all are sales posi- tions on a commission basis primarily. Even these positions are few and far be- tween. The Board, under the direction of Robert C. Woellner, hopes to place every member of this year's class if busi- ness conditions become more favorable during the next few months. Page 35 U U ' lg. lj .. H A I lkg Rx INTERNATIONAL House THE INTERNATIONAL HOUSE Students from other countries have come to Chicago in steadily increasing numbers and have found in genial Bruce Dickson and his International Students Association a strong, guiding center of interest. This gift of John D. Rocke- feller, Jr., recognized at once the im- portance of Chicago as a focal point of World education, and the high value of the work performed by Director Dick- son. The International House will accom- modate five hundred and twenty-four students in its Hve hundred and ten rooms. The east wing of the House has three hundred and thirty-three dor- mitory rooms for men, while the West section has one hundred and seventy- seven doromitory rooms for women. The rest of the House consists of social rooms, with lounge, reception room, library, dining room, and assembly hall for the entire membership of the House. Directly opposite to the main entrance but on a higher level is the admission office, cashier's office, and the offices of Director Dickson and his assistants who manage the social activities of the House, as Well as offices for the Business lVIan- ager and his assistants who attend to the business of the House. The assembly hall is placed along Dorchester Avenue, with a separate en- trance from the street, so that the hall may, if necessary, be used by outside groups. The assembly hall is designed to accommodate five hundred persons on the main floor and an additional two hundred in the balcony. The balcony also contains projection booths with equipment for showing of motion pic- tures. This hall Will be used for the numerous social events that the Associa- tion will sponsor. The floor of the as- sembly hall is constructed for dances and the stage is the largest on the University campus. Page 36 BRUCE VV. DICKSON Hdfuifor of .Foreign Student.: THE INTERNATIONAL HOUSE The International House, erected in the interests of foreign students, acts as a centralizing agent between various na- tionalities and races. Similar organiza- tions exist in New York, Paris, and Berkeley, California. The purpose of the House is "the promotion of inter- national friendship and understanding among the students of the world who are studying in Chicago and vicinity," and their motto is "that brotherhood may prevailf' The International House will be the headquarters for all international stu- 'dent activities in Chicago and a com- mon meeting place for all foreign stu- dents and their friends. In order to encourage contacts with the community it has been decided that associate or non- resident members will be admitted to certain activities in the House. Speakers will be sent by the Association to clubs, conferences, churches, and by arrange- ment students will be entertained in the homes of faculty members and others in the city. One of the most important factors of the International House is the activities which will be carried on there as they have been in the past by the Interna- tional Students' Association. This as- sociation, which was created by Mr. Dickson, will now be able to carry on its activities under his direction in an ideal environment. The activities of the group may be summed up as follows: The interming- ling of students day by day in social rooms, dining room, or coffee shop, the Sunday suppers, with addresses and mus- ic, followed by discussions and group meetings, national and international night programs which give national groups the opportunity to present to the whole group some aspect of their culture in the form of music, drama, costumes, folk dancing, and national customs, and national group meeting in the national rooms for the purpose of promoting ac- quaintance and better working relation- ships between the members of the group. Page 37 fl SHAILER Mari-news Dean of the Difuiniiy School THE DIVINITY SCHOOL During the past year, the Divinity School was extremely active in research in all fields of religion. The Church History department sponsored Work in Asia Where investigators were collecting material for the special use of this de- partment. The Department of The- ology released Behavior Situation of Young People Not in College, a subject which necessitated a great deal of in- vestigation and, upon its publication, a great deal of comment. The entire school has, during the past year, been preparing the second and third volumes of dllzerirrzn Clzurrlz Plistory, the first volume of which was recently printed. Nelson and Hoelschur of the school, published flledinez' Haba Reports, a study of an old temple of Kledinet Ha- bu. This report contained many plates and photographs of varied interests. lylany individual projects were car- ried out by various members of the school. Shailer llflathews, dean of the school, published the Growth of the lrlerz of God. This book presents a vivid and new approach to the conception of God. J. M. P. Smith and Edgar J. Good- speed released An Arneriran Translation of ilze Bible. This work is a translation of the Bible done in a more lucid and comprehensive fashion. The book was Well received both for its religious and literary value. Other publications by members of the department were: Religion and the Next Generation by E. E. Aubreyg The lllnrlyrs by D. VV. Riddleg Strange Nou' Gods by E. Goodspeedg and Bibliogmjvlzirzzl Guide to ilu' llistory of Clzristianiiy by S. -I. Case. Page 38 U n CHARLES W. GILKEY Dean of the Unifuezzvity Chapel THE BOARD OF SOCIAL SERVICE AND RELIGION As a co-operative body composed of equal numbers of faculty and students having responsibility for the general oversight of the religious life of the University, the Board made distinct progress during the year. Perhaps the most outstanding step forward was the development of a new policy governing the selection of Chapel speakers. The choice of prominent men as Henry P. Chandler, Harry Chase, Glenn Frank and C. C. lVlorrison dem- onstrated the Board's determination to make the University Religious Services a more representative series. Beyond its usual participation in stu- dent affairs Cfor details see pages 80-833 the Board sponsored several types of programs in the Chapel which met with fine response from the University com- munity. Chief among these were the afternon half-hours of organ music. During the Christmas season the Chapel was the scene of a new departure in dramatic presentation. A mystery which placed emphasis on the dance was illus- trative of this willingness to experiment with new religious forms. The high quality of the Sunday Vespers programs and especially the Episcopal Acoyltes service brought city wide appreciation of the abilities of llflack Evans, Director of the Choir. With the generally depressed condi- tions it was only natural that members of the Board and its executive officer, Dean Gilkey, in particular, should play leading roles in the development of the Settlement program and in the organi- zation of the faculty and student relief drives. Page 3 9 LI ,KX rx 1 r-. if 5 4 .-T 1 fi 'tif 'fxtazimlfl' is I M.. -fx... Q 1-K -i,,rq,i.3 fl ' ,lllilmgi jj Q 335- -fgif -Q il i .4 , A ' .... -1 ' is i ' Ia . . Q- 2 . T T if fir - s Ji -- J 2, 1, .-g,., i i J rs" fsff'eq2 121'-' il . . . . i - .. - ' i 5 - ? . n g. . f f' - "e" f3:ri'.:ff'i1ii.l:' 'half . 'iff' .MI fr --.f- ,1g,,5,9y .- . Bal :Q 1 -43,1.,!t- -avi A-.....iai,-.-1 ll .5 .' 732-. , wif- , ,,' ' 'f :"'- A, ,",.' -Li. L, 'L ' ,, -- ' .91 .-1, 'Q fr: H QI ' 1 lp' , ,V ..w, 1 dh. ,I-fn. , 1 .3 . f 3, 'Ii' LN, j,- M H 3155: V 'Ar 'Jr'-Mi ' . . . ' . ..., '..,,iVl,,mnmmnW1.hia,3,,, LLMM I "eff....-T....,--. H .. ,, ,,. .-vl xv. V - W or THE SEMINARY THE CHICAGO THECLOGICAL SEMINARY The past year at the Chicago Theo- logical Seminary was marked by an ex- pansion in the direction of larger world interests by the addition to the faculty of Dr. Charles Clayton Morrison, Edi- tor of the Christian Century, in the ca- pacity of Lecturer on Problems of Con- temporary Life. His courses were: "Preaching to the Public Mind," given in the autumn quarter, and "Christian- ity and VVorld Peacef' in the spring. Dr. lVIorrison, the author of The Out- lfrzw-y of War, was closely associated with Salmon P. Levinson in the move- ment which culminated in the Kellogg- Briand Pact. VVorld-wide Christianity was also em- phasized at the Seminary this year by the presence of Dr. Clifford llflanshardt, head worker of the Nagpada Neighbor- hood House of Bombay, India, who gave a course on "Trends in hlodern Nlis- sions" during the winter quarter. Dr. Klanshardt is an alumnus of the Sem- inary and has his Ph.D. degree from the University of Chicago. The other outstanding new develop- ment of the year was the initi-ation of an institute for Congregational pastors of the middle west called "Ministers' Week." This was held January 25th to 31st and drew an attendance of one hundred and fifty active pastors for four days intensive study. Lectures were given by faculty members during the morning hours and the afternoons were devoted to personally conducted tours to Chicago's social and religious institu- tions. Qutstanding books written by Semin- ary faculty men this year included: Karl Barth: Prophet ofa New Christianity?, by Wilhelm Pauckg Jonalhcm Edwards, by A. C. NIcGiffert, Jr., and Paths to the Presence of God, by President Al- bert VV. Palmer. Nlatthew Spinka was made editor of the newly founded Church History magazine. Page 40 U D Divimrr House DISCIPLES DIVINITY HOUSE The Disciples Divinity House was founded in 1894. Some six hundred stu- dents have been affiliated with it during their professional training for religious work. The new building, completed only a few years ago, houses many of the Di- vinity students in its spacious quarters. The m-ain floor is given over to the Her- bert Lockwood Willett Library, a lounge, and a chapel. A large dining room in the basement is the scene of Weekly meetings of the Disciples Club and the lVIen's Club. No classes are held in the Divinity House, but courses are given regularly by W. E. Garrison and special courses and lectures by Professors Willett, Ames, Bower, Faris, and Park in the University class-rooms. Students are at liberty to specialize in any department of the University whose work is perti- nent to their training. Besides those enrolled in the Divinity School and the Chicago Theological Seminary, members have majored in philosophy, classics, sociology, literature, education, and the library course. The Divinity House has proved itself a liberalizing agency, con- necting one of the large American de- nominations with the University of Chi- cago in an institutional way. W. E. Garrison spent the Spring Quarter in Mexico where he continued his research work. His recent book, Re- ligion Follows the Frontier is an out- standing piece of work in the history of the Disciples. Page 41 U D CHARLTON T. BECK Alumni Secretary THEALUMNICOUNCH JOHN P. MENTZER, '98 VVALTER L. HUDSON, '02 MRS. MARTHA LANDERS THOMPSON, '03 HENRY D. SULCER, '06 HAROLD H. SWIFT, '07 MRS. PHYLLIS FAY HORTON, '15 ELIZABETH FAULKNER, '85 HERBERT P. ZINUVIERMAN, '01 PAUL H.DAVIS, '11 DANIEL P. TRUDE, '02 MRS. JESSIE HECKMAN HIRSOHL, '10 MILTON E. ROBINSON, '12, ID. '14 FRANK NICIXIAIR, '03 HERBERT I. NIARKHAM, '05 RENSLOW P. SHERER, '09 MRS. MARGARET HAASS RICHARDS, '11 JOHN A. LOGAN, '21 ARTHUR C. CODY, '24 Pagz' 42 U ta HENRY D. SULCER Chairman, Alumni Council THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION No accou11t of the University would be complete without a word about its more or less finished product-the alum- ni. Forty years ago the University opened its doors with a small body of ready-made alumni, taken over from the old Chicago University. These people legally accepted their new Alma Mater and lead the way in organizing the Asso- ciation of Alumni in June, 1893, the close of the new Universityls first year of instruction. With increase in num- bers these alumni organized additional departmental associations and as they left the cloistered halls for the world of business, local clubs were formed where old friends might meet and old loyalties be renewed. The forerunner of the half hundred clubs that now dot the map was the Chicago Alumni Club, organized in 1898. Its immediate suc- cess was assured under the able leader- ship of William Scott Bond, 197. As the departmental associations and the local clubs grew in number, the need of a central body which should have charge of all matters affecting the alum- ni in general became so evident that in 1909 the Alumni Council was formed. It was originally composed of delegates from the associations of the College Alumni, of the Doctors of Philosophy, of the Divinity and of the Law Alumni, from the Chicago Alumni and the Chi- cago Alumnae Clubs, with one repre- sentative of the University faculty. ln 1907, the alumni undertook the publication of a journal and the first number of the Chicago Alumni Maga- zine appeared in March of that year. A year and a half later, the name was changed to The University of Chicago Magazirze. The Alumni Council is Hnanced through the annual dues of the mem- bers of the component associations, but receives no part of the annual dues paid to the local alumni clubs. In addition to the annual dues, the Council is the proud possessor of an Alumni Fund, amounting to nearly S120,000.00 made up of Life, Sustaining, and Endowment Memberships, paid in by the alumni. Unquestionably, the greatest alumni achievement of the past forty years was the contribution of more than two mil- lion dollars by more than eleven thou- sand alumni at the time of the Develop- ment Campaign-a most significant evi- dence of their continuing interest in the University. Page 43 MILLS UNDERGRADUATES l Ti-na CAP AND GowN OFFICE i - -4 - ti 'T-YZQM 'f 3 ' f ,gnu I .A 4 K 5,5 F L. W, -A f L ni! '1 6' i - ' ,Hg , 1 Y- t. .. am. ff,.,gps., - ' 2 1 , -- A 9? T1 -. W ' F f- .- 1 fl' 1 - ' ' -..-...ig" .z..x::g 2.a,..2fL.. A' "YL A . 41 1-7 icuii .5 Q H1 f ,V - Hg 1 ' ,1 4' .f t ,,,. ,-fs-, 34--1 if 2 'V f ,, A aa but atgiggg gi , TW .--5 xp: 1' u - tt' i X- i w -. A A it , s J ' "- 1 f i " Q 1 - 1 ,' 0 if .. , 'Sig-5 , ji.. 'fy .V 11,h:.NV Q. ,,,- -- -I gh' 1 , f .2 A , .4 . ' . '97'f4'rt' 'N wi- 9 i N it A 7.5 . , ' ' . 'mg Tns Fixisii or Tris Sxxiuk Mcsmcne RACE A YEAR OF CHANGE The administrative centralization of student interests in the Qfice of the Dean of Students and the initiation of a new educational plan stimulated an un- precedented amount of change and re- adjustment in undergraduate affairs dur- ing the year '31-'32. Numerous new student groups were organized, one com- mitted suicide, several changed color, and most felt a renewed energy co-inci- dent with the coming of the class of ,35. The abolition of the Board of Student Publications Exhibitions, and Organiza- tions resulted in the death of the Under- graduate Council and the creation of the Student Committee on Student Affairs. This group working with the Dcan's Office developed increased co-ordination among student groups through the cre- ation of the Social Committee and the oflice of the Publisher, although both of these were not organized until the Spring quarter. Class organization experienced a dis- tinct rejuvenation in the hotly contested Senior election, in the creation of sep- arate class councils and in the Frosh- Soph contests and the Senior llustache Race escapades. Page 46 THE DAxLY MAROON OFFICE IN UNDERGRADUATE AFFAIRS The proms and balls all drew inter- ested crowds, lost no moneyg while the old Social Committee expanded its re- sponsibilities in the promotion of new dances, teas and gatherings of distinct so- cial value in a University sadly lacking in such contacts. Although none of the major publica- tions showed large profits for the first two quarters activities, all underwent change in organization and in two in- stances the office of Director of Publica- tions asserted itself for the avowed pur- pose of improving personnel. The Phoe- nix merged with La Critique, the lVIa- roon changed its constitution, while the Cap and Gown after tedious contro- versy adopted a format more soundly adjusted to the size and character of the student body. The Dramatic Association experi- mented successfully with new forms and types of productions with the Wildei' plays, Playfest, and Rosmersholm, while Blackfriars changed their director and character of show. The lhlenis Commission abandoned its formal functions, most of which were assumed by the Freshman Program Committee and the new Settlement Board. lklusical interests on the campus were co-ordinated for the Hrst time in the Symphony Orchestra and through the introduction of student orchestras in the llflirror and Blackfriars. The year was thus one of radical change, whether or not that change was a sound begining. Change of this sort reflected a vigor- ous undergraduate body and an inter- ested, intelligent administration. For a day by day account of the more signijinant events of the year see the CHIIZPZIS Calendar beginning page 324. Page 47 U U A T T I T VVILLIAM E. SCOTT THE STUDENT COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS LAWRENCE J. SCHMIDT, Chairman MARGARET EGAN, Secretary CHESTER LAING ELIZABETH TVIERRIAM EUGENE FOSTER RUBE FRODIN,-IR. ROSEMARY VOLK GRADUATE MEMBER JAMES A. ETCDILL FACULTY MEMBERS VVILLIAM E. SCOTT FRANK HL'RIiURT O'HARA CARL BRICREN Page 48 THE STUDENT COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS Most significant change in student affairs during the year was the abolition of the Board of Student Publications, Organizations, and Exhibitions and the creation in its place of the Student Com- mittee on Student Affairs. This change was important in that it was the First and basic step in a series of readjust- ments, a number of which were initiated by the Student Committee, and in that it marked a new and more intelligent relationship between students and fac- ulty in the supervision of undergraduate extra-curricular life. The Committee as appointed by Dean VVorks consisted of three non-voting fac- ulty members, one graduate student, two sophomores, two juniors, and four sen- iors nominated by the two Senior Hon- or Societies. This group undertook to exercise general supervision over all student affairs and to act as advisory body for the office of the Dean of Stu- dents in all questions of policy. Prime concern of the Committee dur- ing the first two quarters of its existence was the co-ordination of undergraduate activities through the organization of four subsidiary boards or offices with whom would lie the direct responsibility for the administration of special projects. Two of the old boards, the Board of Womeiiis Organizations and the Board of Dramatic and Musical Organizations were allowed to continue as in the past, while a new Social Committee intended to direct all activities of a broad social nature, and the oflice of Publisher were created. By refraining from engaging in the execution of any single enterprise the Committee maintained a situation better suited to the initiation and super- vision of broad policies. Thus for the first time at Chicago, a student group exercised broad control over all activi- ties, and for the first time activities with common interests were encouraged to co-operate along constructive lines. That this change would have taken place without the leadership of the Uni- versity Administration, and Dean Wil- liam Scott in particular, was highly im- probable. The Administration never anxious to meddle more than necessary in student affairs did assume a positive attitude. Page 49 TGP-RIDENOUR, SMITH, CIIANNER, FORBRICH, RICHMOND. Mzddle-FRANKLAND, FRIEDEMAN, C. SCIIMIIJT, TRESSl,ER, THOMPSON, SMITH. Bottom-L. SCHMIIJT, LAING, STINNETT, VVHITE, TROYER. SU On the evening of February 28, the body of the Undergraduate Council lay in state at the Terrace Gardens of the lVIorrison hotel. Sitting up with the corpse were fourteen prominent under- graduates, bound no longer, alas, by the tie of common interest in undergraduate administration, and in varying states of torpor induced by the splendid dinner served at the wake. Don Pedro, Prince of Personality, and his boys played hymns and negro spirituals, While Rosie O'Day several times obliged with a torch song. B-Iaslcing their real emo- tions, many of the mourners actually danced-danced desperately in the effort to forget the great and very real loss they had suffered-danced with tC2ll'S in- their eyes. Chief mourners were Enos Troyer and Alice Stinnett, the departed's best friends in life. Pennies were placed tenderly upon the eyes of the corpse by Gilbert VVhite, and a short address on the virtues of the deceased bringing ICI DE tears to the eyes of all present, was made by Chet Laing. Chief among the floral offerings was a large casket spray from THE DAILY lV.lAROON, with the inscrip- tion: "What will we Write about now?" The body was interred in the Circle by Louis Ridenour and Alice Stinnett, pall- bearers. During the last years of its existence, the council passed legislation regulating the number of offices a senior in the University shall be permitted to hold- rules for the enforcement of which no machinery now exists. It sent Enos Troyer to Nashville to get ideas con- cerning activities in which it could en- gage, and when he came back empty- handed, it was despondent for some tiIne. It was this despondency, intensified by the appointment of a newcomer, the Student Committee on Student Affairs, to take over many of the functions of the council, which resulted finally in the tragic suicide of the Undergraduate Council R6'QllfI'A'lYll in fmrzf. Payr 50 U n ALICE STINNETT ENOS TROYER THE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS ENOS TROYER . . President ALICE STINNETT Serretary-Treasurer IVIEMBERS JOHN BARDEN FRED CHANNER T.T1ARY LOUISE FORBRICH STILLTVIAN FRANKLAND SYLVIA FRIEDEMAN CHESTER LAING HERBERT RICHMOND GILBERT WHITE LOUIS RIDENOUR,-IR. CHARLES SCHINIIDT LAWRENCE SCHMIDT JEANETTE SMITH GERALDINE SMITHWICK WARREN THOMPSON LYDABETH TRESSLER Page 51 U D S'rn.1.MAN FRANKLAND Tun SOPHOMORE CLASS CouNc:L CLASS SPIRIT REASSERTS ITSELF A renewed interest in class activities on the part of both students and admin- istration was of notable signiHcance dur- ing the year. First sign of this new spirit came with the keenly contested election for the Presidency of the Senior Class, which was followed by the appointment of a Senior Class Council. Then, large- ly through the efforts of Dean Scott and Damaris Ames, other class councils were appointed which actually functioned. In the Fall some 166 seniors regis- tered to vote for class president. Cf the 150 votes which were correctly marked 59 went to Stillman Frankland, 39 to Bernie VVien, and the remaining votes went to Joe Temple and Paul Stephen- son. Frankland, who before the elec- tion had not figured in campus affairs, owed his election to an organized inde- pendent and Commerce and Administra- tion faction. To serve in place of the old minor officers, Frankland appointed ten seniors to aid him in the collection of money for the class gift and to plan Con paperj a social event for the spring quarter. llflembers were: Nlargaret Egan, Edgar Fagan, Sylvia Friedeman, Sam Horwitz, Jane Kesner, Elizabeth llerriam, Everett Glson, Louis Ride- nour, john Test, and Alice Stinnett. Of the new under-class councils the Freshman Council was the Hrst organ- ized and accomplished the most signifi- cant work. Although they directed sev- eral social functions, outstanding of which was the Freshman Formal in Ida Noyes, their chief job was the organiza- tion of a general survey of the reaction of the class of 1935 to The New Plan. The University was thus furnished with an important gauge for the work of the College. The committee was composed of Grace Graver, Gertrude Lawton, Violet Elliot, Ethel Swanson, lvlargaret VVashburne, Charles Greenleaf, Wil- liam O'Donnell, John Barden, Chaun- cey Howard, and Charles Nierrifield. Similar groups whose functions were largely social were organized for the other two classes. llflembers of the Sophomore Council were Burt Young, Frank Nahser, Wally Crume, Peg Hol- ahan, Howard Young, Eugene Foster, jean jordan, Ruth Works and Mary Voehl. Nlembers of the Junior Council were Bayard Poole, Ross VVhitney, john Holloway, Mary Lou Cotton, james Porter, Nlargaret Graham and Eleanor VVilson. Page 52 J' ' . N, 9- ,J .f HASKELL HALL THE COMMERCE AND ADMINISTRATION COUNCIL The students of the School of Com- merce and Administration, always a compact and unified group, carried on a large and varied number of extra- curricular activities under the efficient management of the school Council. The Council sponsored weekly teas which afforded the students an excellent opportunity to become better acquainted with each other and with the instructors. About fifty persons attended each week to chat, drink tea, smoke, and play bridge. Once every quarter a dance was given for the members of the school and their friends. These affairs were successfully carried out and acclaimed by the stu- dents as being high lights of the year's social calendar. With the aid of the oifiice the Council presented outstanding figures in the business world at monthly assembles of the school. hir. Filby of the President's omce welcomed us to our new home in Haskell Hall in the autumn. Other speakers were lVIr. T. C. Powell, presi- dent of the board of the C. 31 E. I. Rail- road, and hir. John Benson, president of the American Association of Adver- tising Agencies. These talks were ex- tremely interesting and quite informa- tive and met with the popular acceptance of the students. A quarterly publication known as the Balance Sheet was printed and dis- tributed by the Council near the end of each quarter, containing C. Sc A. news, short articles by professors and students, and jokes of a more personal nature. The foremost event of the year was the annual C. 5: A. banquet held in the spring, at which many notables of in- dustry and business were present. Page 53 U D Top Row-ROSENBERG, MERRIFIELD, HURNLEY, KAHN, MACKOFF. Bottom Row-JAcoBsoN, MCDOUGAL, RUBICOFF. LAW SCHOOL COUNCIL BoUToN MCDOUGAL . W p . .President JOE MACKOFF . . Secretary-Treasurier The oldest organized student governing body on the campus, the Law School Coun- cil, last year assumed a progressive role in the conduct of Law School affairs. A new "anonymous" examination system, proposed by the council and approved by Dean Harry A. Bigelow and members of the Law School faculty, was adopted at the end of the Winter quarter. Both students and faculty pronounced it a distinct success. The purpose of the plan was to keep the identity of each person taking an exam secretg each student was given a number which he placed on his examination books, and the instructor reported a grade for an examination book bearing a given number. The names and numbers were later correlated. The annual Law School Dinner, sponsored each year by the Council, was the most successful in years. Over two hundred students, faculty, and alumni attended. Frank I. Loesch, president of the Chicago Crime commission was guest speaker, and enter- tainment, in the form of skits and acts, was furnished by students in the Law School. Throughout the year the Council constantly proved itself a vital and signihcant Hgure in Law School affairs, and fostered a growing spirit of cooperation between students and faculty in the school. Page 54 JACK TEST THE STUDENT SOCIAL COMMITTEE The University Student Social Com- mittee, with Jack Test as chairman, in the second year of its existence, ex- panded its activities to include almost every phase of undergraduate social activity. During the fall quarter a series of Friday afternoon mixers were held in Ida Noyes Hall. A Hallowe'en party, with fortune tellers, scare-crows, cider and doughnuts, and appropriate decora- tions, and a Christmas party with the singing of carols were two of the out- standing mixers. The committee also sponsored a series of Tuesday evening acquaintance dances during the Fall and Winter quarters. The dances Were very informal and planned especially for the benefit of graduate and transfer students. During the Winter and Spring quarters, the committee together with the Ida Noyes Auxiliary, held a series of Student-Faculty Teas on Wednesday afternoons. The purpose of these teas was to afford the students and the faculty an opportunity to meet each other fin a less formal atmosphere than that present in the classroom. Perhaps the most significant project sponsored by the Social Committee, how- ever, was the Student Art Exhibit, which was the first of its kind ever held at the University. About one hundred oils, charcoals, etchings, water-colors, and photographs were hung for a Week in Ida Noyes Hall, after having been admitted to the exhibit by a committee consisting of Mrs. Maude Phelps Hutchins, Thornton Wilder, and Ed- mund Creisburt. The interest in such a venture that was evinced not only by the undergraduate artists but also by the student body in general insures the success and continued existence of such an exhibit in years to come. Plans were made to introduce chamber music to the students of the campus through the appearance of a string quartet, so that, with the closing of the school year the Social Committee had covered practically every Held of Social activity. Page 55 ! TILE GRAND MARCH AT 'rms Inrnarkainrwiix' Baci, THE INTERFRATERNITY BALL After consulting fashion plates and tailors, approximately five hundred people hied themselves to the opening formal of the season, the Interfraternity Ball. Sleepy Hall, accompanied by his big banjo and his snappy syncopators, was at the llfledinah Athletic Club to furnish the dance tunes. Herbie Kay was at the ball lon eno h t h l D .g ug o e p orothy Faris and Charles Schmidt. leaders of the right Wing, and Barbara Cook and Jack Test, leaders of the left wing, with the distribution of the couples in the grand march. An unusually large number of alumni Were present. The Ball was a complete success as the gala opening of the formal social season of the University of Chicago. THE WASHINGTON PROM On February 19, "Old Klan Depression" hid his face long enough to permit about two hundred and fifty couples to enjoy the Washixigtori Prom. Sylvia Friedeman and Louis Ridenour together with Alice Stinnett and Scott Rex- inger, led the grand march, after which, according to campus tradition, the Alma Nlater was sung. The inimitable Herbie Kay and his versatile orchestra furnished the tunes to which the couples swept over the ballroom floor in the Drake Hotel. Bliss Doris Robbins was Herbie Kay's able entertainer. Page 56 U D Fmsnmmx, Rmawouiz, STINNETT, Rxaxmcsk THE WASHINGTON PROM At midnight, the music ceased long enough to permit everyone to partake of a din- ner served in an adjoining room. The leaders of the ball, together with the "big" men and Women on campus, and faculty sponsors presided at the head table. Grouped around were smaller tables which had been reserved by football men, fraternities, clubs, and other organizations. The balcony above was also filled with tables. During the dinner, singers and entertainers furnished amusement for the diners. THE MILITARY BALL It has almost become a tradition that the lVIilitary Ball should be held at the South Shore Country Club. The tickets were priced lower than any university formal of the season, and that enabled a large number of students to be present. VVith a dignity and impressiveness not to be denied, an arch-way was made by women with roses and men with their sabres. Through this archway the leaders of the ball Walked with the rest of the couples following. Betty Parker and Robert Garen led the right wing of the grand march and Jackie Smith and Keith Parsons led the left Wing. Page 57 U D Conn HALL AT xx O'CLocK CLASSES ON CAMPUS? YES, AND... Animated groups in cozy corners of the Coffee Shop dallying over schnecken . . . a certain little lassie who indulgesf in egg drinks in the morning and beer Crootj in the afternoon . . . a certain big laddie who frightens away everyone with roquefort cheese . . . and the sissie who orders cream cheese and jelly . . . potential Shaws and O'Neils arguing with intellectual spirit . . . heated disputes over the possession of a cellophane wrapper . . . the attempt to start a "Morpiana" riot. The "CH bench and those who sit on it . . . the tennis match and those who saw it from Rosenwald, Eckart and automobiles . . . poker games in the bowels of the Law Building . . . the mock political convention . . . midnight prowling and caterwauling. Parties and more of them . . . the long Psi U stag line at the Skull and Crescent dance . . . Ida Noyes transformed into a Balloon Room for the Freshman Formal . . . the Cloister Club importing a bit of the Gay White Way for the Sophomore Cabaret Party . . . evidences of other parties . . . roses for the lVlilitary Ball, a military ball for the lllilitary Ball . . . VVashington Prom propaganda. dutuzznz . . . tea dances and mixers and theater parties for the bewildered freshmen . . . the football season . . . hilarious pep sessions destructive to larynx and listless- ness . . . the "Qld lXlan" leading a grand march and band around the campus . . . a huge roaring Ere in Stagg Field . . . good old Chicago songs sung in every key all at the same time . . . Shy lines of watchers at the mixers at Ida Noyes . . . later no shy lines of watchers at the mixers at Ida Noyes . . . fraternity tea dances and house parties. lfirzrvr . . . the formal season . . . downtown hotels . . . country clubs . . . banks of flowers at the Beecher formal . . . a certain "genmun" who accompanied a dowager chaperon hourly to the Hfth floor, the fourth floor, the third floor, the second floor just in case . . . Payr' 58 U D THE S1Nc IN HUTcHxNsoN COURT f Students chummily hobnobbing with austere professors at departmental teas . . . Settlement baskets and stockings being prepared for the back of the yards . . . Dramatic Association tea and the celebrity guests . . . black magic, discovering the Lindberg baby at the Intramural Carnival. Spring . . . cut classes and more of them . . . spring afternoons . . . following the ball team and the band . . . studying botany from a boat on the Jackson Park lagoon . . . Will Rogers coming to campus for lnterclub . . . the brawl at Bartlett and the 'fgenmunl' who broke the bank at the Jamboree . . . the fuzz results of the two weeks moustache race . . . the inevitable mud slinging on the part of those unfortunates dumped in the botany pond. Dobbin pounding the pavements for f'Whoa Henryl' . . . Blackfriars' tire covers mysteriously changing from car to car . . . roller skating on the Nlidway . . . Thurs- dayleyeiaiiig serenades . . . bright lights of lnterfraternity Sing. The best part of dates consisting in the pleasant intervals spent at fMariels, Jerryls, Tom's, llflacls . . . spiced food at Ravenna . . . spaghetti at Roma. INTERFRATERNITY SING Over a thousand alumni and fraternity men gathered to outnumber and outsing each other in the lnterfraternity Sing of 1931. lt was the twentieth anniversary of this lbiig-upheld tradition. N The Sing meant much to the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity for they gained permanent possession of the cup given for the best singing, having won the trophy for three consec- utive years. Psi Upsilon gained temporary possession of the attendance cup by having the largest number of alumni and fraternity men present. Page 59 U D 1932 CAP AND GOWN . GILBERT F, VVHITE , This thirty-seventh volume of THE CAP AND GOWN represents a consider- able amount of concentrated effort on the part of a staff handicapped by a delayed start and poor business condi- tions, but it represents more importantly an attempt to adjust the character and format of the book to the special de- mands of the undergraduate body in as sound and economical a manner as possible. Predecessors of this volume have been elaborate in design, always expensive and rarely profitable. Critics of past productions have branded them as uninteresting in editorial content and format, insufficiently supported by the student body and not dependent upon student initiative. This year's staff with the Director of Publications, carefully considered these objections and finally decided to publish only after having agreed upon certain conditions. The first step was to determine the actual student demand by an intensive circulation campaign. Some 700 or 253 of the undergraduate body responded, thus driving home two significant real- . .A CRITICAL YEAR izations, l, that the student body of about 2700 was equal to an average sized city high school, and 2, that the per mjritn drfnzmzd was only slightly less than that of the average Big Ten Uni- versity student body. It was further agreed that all phases of the work of publishing would be handled by students with the full knowl- edge that this would cut the advertising income about 66fk. The drop in advertising income meant that the staff had the task of putting out a book at a little more than half the cost of previous books. In making the necessary reductions in production cost the editor proceeded on the following suppositions: that halftones of familiar University places are preferable to three color section pages illustrating the domestic life of Third Dynasty Egypt, that 352 pages in black and white are preferable to 310 with colored borders, that 352 pages in a simple cover are preferable to 336 pages in a handsomely stamped cover, that pictures and names of people are more important than ex- tended writeups, and that it is prefer- able to sacrifice page spacing and layout if what was previously put on two pages can be squeezed on to one page. lt has been the greatest regret of the staff that while it has been able to make the articles more readable and to place the usual amount of editorial and pic- torial material on an unusual number of pages while eliminating the art work, it has been unable to extend the amount of new pictorial materials. lf the under- graduates will accept this for what it is -a commonsense record and review of the year from the undergraduate view- point-and will continue that support, then this and many other improvements will not be long in coming. G. F. XV. Pagz' 60 DOROTHY SCHULZ CROWLE-,' VVEIR 1932 CAP AND GOWN JUNIOR EDITORS H.ARRIET ANN TRINKLE . Arr Editor Editorial HELEN ARlX1IN EILEEN HURTISTON JOHN CROWLEY CYTHERA SNYDER JOHN WE1R Business MARY LOUISE COTTON ,TOHN HARNE ELAM TVIILDRED HACKL Ross WHITNEY ARMIN SNYDER I-Iumlsrox Page 61 D D VVILLIAM CUSTBR 1932 CAP AND GOWN EDITORIAL Sojnhomores FRANKLIN CARR HAROLD JAMES ELSIE LEVINGER LAURA HULL EMILY KUH CATHERINE REITER Freshmen JOHN BARDEN MYRTLE LOHNER CHARLES OLIN SETHNESS ELSIEGAY BLACK JOHN LOGAN EVELYN SIRIS BETTY COMSTOCK LILLIAN NASH WALDENAR SOLE DEXTER FAIRBANK CURTIS PLOPPER CHARLES TYROLER PAUL HEINECK SUE RICHARDSON WILLIAM WATSON Cpprr R019-REITER, HULL. Bumun Rau-I-IIJLL, CARR, 1.EvIxcER. Pagr 62 Louis N. RmENoUR HERBERT H. JOSEPH THE DAILY MAROON To collect and publish all available campus news in an interesting manner was the aim of the 1931-32 Daily Maroon staff. To the staff, the results were more than satisfactory, for a good paper was turned out in a poor year. There was a change in the Daily Maroon policy, for many new features were added to the paper. Special weekly articles on the different departments and departmental activities, and special features devoted to Hmi-lady" were the most notable. To the 1932-33 staff, the old staff delivers a newspaper with a wide and interested reading public and a satisfied circle of advertisers who will continue to advertise. - 3 The Ea ,P .Marianne if l7'i.""".,,p,.,",,".,'1 'f5.:"'EE.L12:.': i7E f5Il'lff1lff.:i2'fEf52 -. 'HW U-PH' "f""4"U1?P Y zvtwam' we vicrdfvow-f umm ,',2',f"f,Q,",3l,s,L'Q- 2'ffI"i'ff,'C"f'Q'?'fff?1f5k .Kindlcs imc-M1 in 1'l1ank,gavsvg , mf term Q Four-'L!'nyl.'3.votyvflgl'nunxanvu1ix -f 'HM-SP-M iffiir' TSW' L"'ff-0135 Tiiff1'11Y'J:'r: ""' ,"f"i72T:2Z"'A.wiw:tar..frM'.::x-x:, ' if-fe """" ' ' -ff-:IJ wi:-fy,-yj.,g ', .Ama-nys:-wam1:n.m.r.,-::::1:r r: miuvmu 5 - ' .sfsieisfi 2:3-"-a::.1-:me Lag ' :em--ie I . '- '--A 1' " .1 fa ,jeg A -' Q-.Til -e :s'j7,4fr-: f. Wm, -,.:g1:,:5:,' ,,..,..n...,E1, Lg rr.1.iiEiE-:lisa 2 f:f'f:.:fi i.v.2'. ' ,u1.:11z,:g1:- :J 15-'vf-Q'-rw --1-w-Vey, gf:-fV15"Qg-3-5 Page 63 U D JANE KESNER MARGARET EGAN THE DAILY MAROON THE BOARD OF CONTROL LOUIS N. RIDENOUR, JR. ..... Editor-in-Chief IVIERWIN S. ROSENBERG . . . Business .Manager MARGARET EGAN . Assistant Business flfanager JANE IQESNER ....... Senior Editor HERBERT H. JOSEPH, JR. . . . Sports Editor JUN IORS Editorial R4AXINE CREVISTON BION B. HOWARD WARREN E. THOMPSON RUBE S. FRODIN J. BAYARIJ POOLE ELEANOR WILSON JAMES F. SIMON Business JOHN D. CLANCY EDGAR L. GOLDSAIITH Top Roc:-ll v'.x'uI, I'nm.E, Cmxcv, GuI.I1sx4I'rH. Bottom Rau-Fnonw, XVILSUS, TIIQMPSON, CREvIs'roN, SIMON Page 64 MERWIN ROSENEERG THE DAILY MAROON ROBERT ALVAREZ BERTHA BAKER JANE BIESENTHAL SOPHOMORES Editorial BETTY HANSEN ROBERT HERZOG DAVID LEVINE MELVIN GOLDMAN MARGARET MULLIGAN WILLIAM GOLDSTEIN B usiness STANLEY CONNELLY WALTER MONTGOWIERY VVILLIAM A. IQAUFNIAN EDWARD NICHOLSON EUGENE PATRICK TASULA PETRAKIS ROSEDIARY VOLK JANE WEBER VINCENT NEWMAN EDWARD SCHALLER Page 65 Cl D Orzm Tovizov JUNE RAFF JAMES MCMAHON THE PHOENIX Emerging somewhat singed, the PHOENIX has proven in the last year that it can survive ordeal by fire just as well as its namesake-the ancient bird, the phoenix. The "Old-birdu has tried some new tricks with success. First, it has used the best fiction obtainable from the composition classes. The staff was in- creased to three times its former size. The most important step, however, was the merger with the "La Critique," the result being a well-rounded journal Some Issues XVERE NUT . . . with meat for the carnivores and pastries for the vegetarians. Judging by the evident interest of campus and by attending publicity, the PHOENIX attained its goal of urbane eclecticism. The staff underwent a nominal re- organization during the Spring vacation when Orin Tovrov resigned as editor in protest against administrative censor- ship of the "True Story" issue. Tovrov was succeeded by june Rafi, who deftly whitewashed the suppressed issue and had it back on sale on campus with tho beginning of the Spring quarter. Al- though Ex-editor Tovrov maintained an oHicial separation from editorial duties he continued to exert a strong in- fluence on the magazine. In spite of the purported cleanup of the book by Editor Tovrov, the Inter- club Council continued its ban on the Phoenix and the women accordingly boycotted all the issues as far as buying them in public was concerned. The October issue opened the season with a burlesque of football and a few clean jokes. The November issue was harm- less and the December book claimed a purity factor of 99 8: 44-flOU percent. But, it was not until the middle of spring quarter that june Raff succeed- ed in obtaining the official sanction of the Board of VVomen's Organizations. Page 66 U D E ditor, HAROLD LAUFMAN VVILLIAM QUIXLAN MAURICE K.ADIN THE PHOENIX THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS GRIN TOVROV . Managing Editor JOHN SMUCKER . Assistant Editor WILLIAM QUINLAN . Assistant Editor JAIVIES MCMAHON Business fbfanager HAROLD LAUFMAN . Art Editor XJUNE RAFE . MAURICE KADIN GORDON ALLEN GABRIEL ALNIOND MAURICE BAME ROBERT C. DODSON PHILIP ABRAMS SONIA BLACKNIAN HAL JAMES S priizg Quarter. Wom en's Editor' . Advertising fllanager EDITORIAL STAFF SIDNEY HYMAN ROY JONES MAURY LORBER HARRY MORRISON SAM NEIVELT BUSINESS STAFF FRANK CIMRALL ESTHER FEHRM WILLIAM GOODSTEIN ART STAFF NATHAN KREVITSKY VIC LORBER MILT OLIN BILL PETERSON DAY PERRY JOSEPH T. ZOLINE JAMES IQELLOGG JOSEPH REID ELIZABETH ZEIGLER Page 67 U D MINOR PUBLICATIONS That campus record of exams and 'fdatesf' of phone numbers and addresses, and of the campus notables, The Stu- dent Handbook, was the outstanding publication success of the year. This vest pocket encyclopedia which was the Hrst publication to greet faculty and stu- dents in the autumn had a circulation of fifteen hundred copies and showed a net profit of more than six hundred dollars -a record breaking balance for a minor publication. The twenty-third edition appeared under the auspices of the lVIen's Commission Cwhich collected half the 55 , The CFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE ' Dmecrom VV V I E 1 1 EEIXRQ I931'Ei 1932 profits? and was edited by Warren Thompson. Thompson was assisted by Dan lVlcGuigan, Carl Bode and Eugene Patrick. Another i1.dispensible publication of the University was the Official Under- grruluate Directory. lt listed the uni- versity addresses and telephone numbers of the twenty-six hundred university students as given by them in the univer- sity information files. The second edition was edited by VVilliam Custer. Page 68 U D GILB ERT VVIVIITE THE BOARD OF DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS The Board, functioning as a co-ordinating group under the Student Committee on Student affairs, carefully planned the years dramatic season in advance so as to prevent any wasteful conflicts of student time. Of greater significance was the action of the Board in assuming custody of stage lighting equipment. By establishing joint owner- ship of materials purchased by preceeding students, the members not only effected better utilization of their equipment, but recognized their responsibility to the students at large in making an undergraduate heritage available to all undergraduates. I MEMBERS GILBERT VVHITE . . . . Chairman CHESTER LAING Blackfriars JACK TEST . Blackfriars PAT MAGEE Gargoyles ALICE STINNETT . Gargoyles BARBARA CooK . Jllirror JANE KESNER . lllirror GILBERT VVHITE LoUIs GALBRAITH Tower Players Tower Players Page 69 D U EE AN ASSOCIATION BOARD MEETING THE DRAMATIC ASSOCIATION THE JOINT BOARD GILBERT WHITE .... . . . President HENRY SULCER . . Treasurer GEORGE VAN DER HOEF . . . . Business Manflger GARGOYLES PAT MAGEE ...... . President ALICE STINNETT . . . Vice-President JEROME JONTRY CECILIA LISTING TOWER PLAYERS GILBERT WHITE ..... . . President LOUIS GALERAITH . . . . . lfice-President JOHN HOLLOWAY . . . . Secretary-Treasurer JAMES HENNING STODDARD SMALL MIRROR BARBARA COOK ...... Production Mnnrzger JANE KESNER ...... Business Mfznrlger BETTY PARKER JACKIE SMITH ALICE STINN ET Page 70 I I THE "To MEET THE PRINCEH CAST AT DRESS REHEARSAL f THE DRAMATIC ASSOCIATION TO MEET THE PRINCE Fall of '31-Crowds of freshmen in- vading the Tower Room. Frenzied seniors trying to answer their questions. Gil White extending Welcome. O'Hara looking pleased and busy. Preparations Linder way for season's work. Business department putting on a mammoth sponsor drive with resulting three hundred sponsors. Van der Hoef look- ing pleased and important. Rehearsals begin for To Meet the Prinee. Pat Magee as the Prince. Alice Stinnett, Jerry Jontry, Norman Eaton, Katherine Hogle, Hester Ann Thomas as staid Britishers, Betty Parker as the English rose. To Meet the Prince goes on. Makes history with a three night run. Reynolds Club timbers creak under the weight of the audiences-more sponsors added to the list. New production announced-a world premiere of three one act plays by Thornton Wilder. Re- . . . . A WORLD PREMIERE hearsals begin on The Long Christmas Dinner, The Queens of France, The Plajnpy Journey to Trenton and Camden. Wilder attends rehearsal, Wilder on stage, Wilderian gestures and gesticula- tions. The show goes on. Special per- formance for the President-diamonds, emeralds, society, literati, a four night run, calls for author. Wilder sliding out of the back door-reception in the Tower Room. All time record broken for Reynolds Club audiences. Winter of '32-A new year, a new Playfest, innovations-three Hrst acts of student plays. Fred Sills, Ed Levi, Carter Johnston make debuts as playwrights. Broke, Call I-Iinz Joseph and Re-Trial enthusiastically received. Downtown in- itiation dinner at the Cliff Dwellers, Dongehy speaks. Celebrities visit Tower Room-Beatrice Lillie, Fritz Leiber, Sr., and lVIrs. Leiber, Guy Robertson, Page 71 EI U Is r is so forecasts ' . I' I fmg.1932 I I I In la Annual Aufcozzege Revue ' 2.6 qndi27 .ia The '-University' f, ,V . k:.,.,: V MIRROR I. BEATRICE Litun rx 'rim 'I'owER Room THE DRAMATIC ASSOCIATION ...THE MIRROR FORECASTS ALL'S FAIR... Whitford Kane. llflirror gets under Way. Bardy Cook and Jane Kesner head lblirror activities. Berta Ochsner di- rects ballet with Miniia Schmidt de- signing costumes, Mack Evans and Carl Bricken assisting with the music, and William Carroll doing the orchestra- tion. The lliirror Revuers with Jane Kesner, Sara Jane Leckrone, Ronny lvlorse, Jackie Smith, Alice Stinnett, Norman Eaton, Hal James, -Terry Jontry, Fritz Leiber, Ir., Pat lVIagee, George lklann, Francis lVIayer-Oakes, Ray Vane, Gil White and other stars- the llflirror Ballet among whom dance Cordelia Crout, Lita Dickerson, hilary- ellen Falconer, Jerry Smithwick, Betty Parker, Jane Sowers, Harriet Ann Trinkle, Lorraine Watsoxi-the llflirror Tappers with Bardy Cook, Peggy Hola- han, jerry Nlitchell, Peggy lloore, Blargaretha hloore, Virginia Russell- the Klirror Percussionists, Harriet Cowles, Beatrice Dulkin, Amelia Jacobs. Back stage are Rebecca Hayward, Leone Baily, lvlildred Hackl, Dorothy Duna- Way, Harriet Ann Trinkle, Frances Alschuler, Eleanor Wilsoii, Ingred Peterson and hlaxine Creviston. A7!!'s Fair produced February Z6 and 27 in llflandel before capacity houses. "Fair Architecture," "At the Acquarium," f'Sea Anemone," "Renaissance," "The Gypsy in Us,'I "A Theater Guild Pro- ductionf' "Fritz in the Orient"-all score a big hit. Spring of '32-Shore Heres to follow Uncle Tom as the annual revival of an old American favorite. Rehearsals be- gin with a cast of twenty-four. Pat llflagee plays Uncle Nat in the fortieth anniversary performance of Herne's great roleg Alice Stinnett, Georg Mann, Elliot Schryver, Jerry jontry, Lois Cromwell, Francis Nlayer-Oakes play prominent parts. Jane Kesner and George Van der Hoef make their Hrst, last and only stage appearance. Napier 'XVilt,s, Frank UIHara's and Klinna Pnyr 72 HSHORE ACRESH HAS Irs FIRST READING THE DRAMATIC ASSOCIATION . . . SHORE ACRES . . . ROSMERSHOLM . . . CURTAIN . . . Schmidt's class work illustrated by production. Technical staff faces grave problems. Robert Schoenbrun, James Henning, Gifford blast head technical staff to produce nineteenth century realism. A ship in a storm at sea, lead- ing a horse to water and making him drink, two of the most interesting prob- lems. The show goes on April 28. Everybody attends, horse behaves well but doesn't drinkg ship saved from the rocks, mortgage on the farm redeemed -cast happy, everybody happy-curtain. Lloyd Lewis writes notice in Daily News.- . . . "Shore Acres,', as given by the pupils of Prof. Frank OlHara, was staged and played seriously in an effort to recapture the mood of the l89O's. However comic the audience thought the costumes and the language of the historic day, no actor thrust a tongue in a cheek. The scenery was that of the '90ls, huge rural landscapes, a ship toss- ing on a sea of waving gauze, farm- hands carrying pitchforks, wheelbar- rows and watering horses at pumps. . . . One scene wherein the bland and droll Uncle Nat attempts to show the womenfolk how to cook a turkey is as amusing today as it was forty years ago . . . and for Frank O'Hara for making sound research a pretty lively affair, one of the toughest jobs in education." The old order changetlz - Shore Acres a part of history, the season for- mally closed-another innovation. Spe- cial presentation for sponsors. Fare- well production by graduating seniors. Fritz Leiber, Jr., directed all star cast of Ibsen's Rosnzerslzolm. Cordelia Crout, Fritz Leiber, Pat lylagee, Betty Parker, Alice Stinnett, John Tiernan, Gil White tread the boards for the last time. Election of new officers, initia- tion banquet-no speeches, Alumni Re- view-curtain. Pagr 73 D U THE BOARD OF SUPERIORS BLACKFRIARS1932 H CHESTER LAING ENOS TROYER JOHN TEST . ROBERT WALSH . WHOA, HENRY" JUNIOR MANAGERS HENRY SULCER . ALFRED JACOBSON LOUIS GALBRAITH . RALPH WEBSTER . SOPHOMORE MANAGERS ORA PELTON . . ROBERT RENEKER ROBERT SCHOENBRUN JAMES HENNING . CARL AAGARD . . BURTON YOUNG . KKDUKEH HUTCHINSON JACK LOER . . VVILLIAM PHILBROOK WILSON TUTTLE RIELVIN GOLDBIAN . STROTHER CARY . FRANK REICHMANN GENE FOSTER . XVILLIANI KAUFMAN ROBERT SHARP . Abbot . Prior Ifospitaller . Scribe . Technical Business . Publicity Company . . . Properties Costumes Lights Scenery . Program Advertising Box Offiee High Schools Newspapers . Posters Radio . Chorus Ushers . Cast fllusie . Tickets Page 74 U D CHET LAING, Bon BALSLEY, AND DIRECTOR SCHOOLEY BLACKFRIARS1932 THECAST ROBERT BALSLEY E. B. BROWN, JR. . DONALD KERR Clarice . Pete Smith Tommy Fraser Van Der Bush MILTON OLIN Heizry Van Der Bush FRED WITMER . , ffymie DAN GLOMSET . Dena WAYNE RAPP . fllr. Arbeiter ALBERT TEN EYCK Charley ROBERT STORER . . Joe JAMES PORTER Gus Edwards EDGAR FAGAN . . . Sylfvano CHARLES MERRIFIELD . Beggar NORMAN PANAMA . V. Bailifj' NOEL GERSON . . Rena JOE SALEK . Dixie Moore PHILLIPS . . . . . Sadie fClerkj RICHARD LEE HOOPER BRADLEY . .Miss Benton LAWRENCE GOODNOW . . . . Belaseo Froman Page 75 D D 3 cB.L.A.Q EEBUQBE isih Annual Shi g 1 1 1932 U. A-!.IlIE..I.I,,I'! t il T W W sT6P15aEEs1P T gi w-'N' 'Mitts ,. 'U , 5.3,-if f 1 ' ,,. -r Q'ffI'QJ V9 ' T, , - .. -g.g.1f- i- 'if l'1tf1-, ig, 45 1- --1 -.-ff, 1-.N , I hi We , , 1 . 3 . 1 ' gy rw' ", I , , it . 1, hi s . it i , ' .51 , if V z 1 , ',,,! ' uf' I I . gl, , I g'Af m'lf3jnzI---- an Ewa il l'EE.ifl i P-rfiii W H O A , H E N R Y This year's Blackfriar show was con- ceived without benefit of clergy and dedi- cated to the proposition that boys will be boisterous. lt pointed out no moral, it criticized no mores, and it taught no lesson. The play began with a curl of the lip and ended criptically. ln its course it touched lightly on this and that, on politics and business and sin, but ever gently and genially, with wit and bon- hommie, and with never a care for the more serious things in life. An effort was made to create a show quick-moving, worldly and gay, of light- ness and laughter all compact, a show in the tradition of such delightful things as "The Front Pagef' 'flune Nloonf' "Beg- Y7 if gar on Horseback, Elmer the Great," "The Country VVife," Hlolanthef' and "The Taming of the Shrew." To this end all other considerations were sacri- ficed, and every talent was devoted to the creation of jocosity and whimsy. That these virtues are n-ot incompatible with a Blaclcfriar show, 'WVhoa Henry l" proved. On the production staff of hlr. Sam Arbeiter, impressario extraordinary, is Pete Smith, an Omega alumnus. He is in love with Clarice Van Der Bush, sou- brette in Arbeiter's "Lovely Lady," a musical comedy in rehearsal. He is ap- proached by Tommy Fraser, an Umega still at the University, who wants Pete to take charge of Henry Van Der Bush, Clarice's brother, a stage struck fresh- man. Pete, an old Qmega, is in the show business, besides, Henry will be safe from the rapacious Omicrons, who are also trying to pledge him. Pete agrees, with a bad grace, but no sooner is Henry installed in the rehearsal room than he Page 76 U D Jos SALEK, DON Kami, AND lVlILT Oux WHOA, HENRY is kidnapped by Omicron through the wiles of Dixie lVIoore, a veteran vaude- ville lady. In the meantime, the "Lovely Ladyl' rehearsals are going very badly indeed. With Henry's kidnapping, Clarice turns her wrath on Pete, who is so distracted he can neither rescue Henry, console Clarice, nor help out on 'KLovely Ladyf, The vehement Arbeiter prays for a hunch before opening night-anything to save the show from being a Hop. After two days of no news from Henry, and with opening night just three hours away, Henry appears with Dixie Moore, and announces he has an act for sale. The curtain comes down on Arbeiter's demand to see the act. The last scene takes place the follow- ing night. HLovely Ladyu is a success, and the hit of the show was the team of Henry Van Der Bush and Dixie Moore. Clarice effects a reconciliation with Pete, and all the other lovers strewn through the action are also brought together at a party Arbeiter gives to celebrate. However, Henry still hasn't chosen between Omicron and Omega. They confront him, but before he can make a choice a campus cop ap- pears and graduates him under the New Plan. Everybody's happy, and that's all till next year. The libretto was written by Orin Tovrov. Edgar Schooley directed the production, and H. George Stone was in charge of the music and orchestra. Page 77 U D CARL Biucxerx M U S I C A NEW DEPARTMENT-A NEW ORCHESTRA The musical activities in the past year were a source of great interest to campus habitues. Nlany students enjoyed a quiet and restful hour as they listened to the per- fect harmonies created by Mr. Frederick Stock and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. There were three programs of especial interest. One was given February 2 when Eric De Lamarter conducted. The- other two special re- citals were given by Yvonne Gall, Soprano, and Hans Kindler, cellist. The most important event, however, was the creation of a Department of lyiusic under hir. Carl Briclcen, the first instructor of music at the University. One result of this act was the Welding of the campus orchestral talent into a University of Chicago Orchestra. Due to the energy of the conductor CCarl Briclcenj and the hard work of the stu- dents, a series of concerts was presented. The orchestra, composed of students, faculty and employees, developed rapidly and came to command the respect of the university community not only as a source of concert music well executed, but as a functioning group having a common interest in the intelligent interpretation of great music. Pagr 78 THE BAND ON STAGG FIELD THE BAND Informal musicaround campus was supplied by the band, under the direction of Palmer Clark. lt played a very im- portant part in the principal athletic events of the year, and was one means of stirring up enthusiasm at the pep ses- sions. Besides being noted for its vocal choruses, it was famed for its Fine figure formations. Vocally speaking, the University Choir Was the center for campus "song- birds." Although not a "student ac- tivity" in the ordinary meaning of the phrase, the choir continued as a really THE CHOIR significant group to a large number of students. Almost entirely through the efforts of energetic, likable Mack Evans, Assistant Professor of Music, the stu- dents Who participate in the choral serv- ices at the Chapel derive pleasure from Working together as well as from the interpretation of fine music. Thus, at the Christmas season, Director Evans not only staged a new and distinctive Christmas mystery or dance in the Chapel, but also saw to it that his choir thoroughly enjoyed itself at the regular Hkoffee klot," in Dean Gilkey's home and by singing the traditional carols. Page 79 U D CHARLES W. GILKEY THE BOARD OF SOCIAL SERVICE AND RELIGION All of the organized social and re- ligious Work of the University is repre- sented on the Board of Social Service and Religion. Representatives from the Men's Commission, Y.W.C.A., Chapel Council, and Student Settlement Board, are among its members ,as well as the chief social worker at the University Clinics. The Board has general supervision over policies in its field. It considers and acts on questions pertaining to ac- tivities in the Chapel, it recommends to the President of the University the uses to which the Chapel offerings shall be put, it co-operates through individual members of committees with such social agencies as the University Settlement and the social work at the Clinics both in respect to financial needs and of other such undertakings as the campaign for funds for student relief undertaken by the Chapel Council, and it encourages consideration of social and other ques- tions by student groups. Page 80 U D BETTY TRESSLER, JACK TEST, HENRY SULCER, DAN MCGUIGAN A TI-IE IAMBOREE COMMITTEE TALKS IT OVER THE STUDENT SETTLEMENT BOARD The Student Settlement Board was organized late in Fall quarter to control all student activities connected with the University Settlement. There are three purposes of the Board: to arouse and to foster general student interest in the Settlement, to organize those students willing to do active work for the Settle- ment either on campus or at the house itself, and to raise money for the sup- port of the Settlement. Under the direct control of the Board, three benehts were given: the concert by the University Symphony' Qrchestra, the Student Night of the Spring Play Festival, and the Settlement Jamboree. The Student Board also had oversight of the benehts of other interested or- ganizations, and directed the inter-class competition for funds. In addition every effort was made to give the student body a definite idea of the purpose and work of this principal philanthropy of the University. Thus, for the first time all student interests in the Settlement were co- ordinated under one central group and for the first time a project for keeping the student body informed on Settlement affairs Was developed. The response of the undergraduates was sincere, and was in part due to the revised administrative structure and in part to the increasing social consciousness of intelligent stu- dents in a year of economic depression. HARoLD B. DUNKEL, Chairman CAROLINE E. BROOKS DAN F. MCGUIGAN SARAH R. TVIOMENT ELIZABETH lVlUDGE H. EUGENE PATRICK TVIARGUERITE L. POTTS LAWRENCE J. SCHMIDT Page 81 EI EI VVin'rn VVINSLOW Tnompsow THE MEN'S COMMISSION ON SOCIAL SERVICE AND RELIGION OFFICERS NATHANIAL W1NsLow . . President GILBERT WHITE . Ifmf-Preyidmf WARREN THOMPSON Sefremry DAN MCGUIGAN . . For several years the lVIen's Com- mission on Social Service and Religion has been active as the sponsor of a Fresh- man orientation program each fall, the publisher of the Student Handbook, and the promoter of student interest in the University Settlement, student-faculty discussion groups, and various other social relations between men of the University. With the reorganization of student activities this year, the lVIen's Com- mission has been pleased to see the various projects of this nature which it has initiated taken over by specialized groups better equipped to administer them. Consequently, the Commission has now seen fit to reshape its own pro- gram and formal organization for the coming year. The Student Settlement Board, and the various divisions of the new Student Committee on Student Affairs have recognized the importance of special groups charged with the care of matters begun by the Commission, . . . Treasurer making unnecessary at present the con- tinuance of the formal organization of the lVIen's Commission. However, it is planned that a group of members from the Commission will continue the Freshman and Transfer student work-two of the major pro- jects of the group-while other "func- tional" committees of the Commission will themselves care for such remaining projects and interests in the Held of social service and religion as may arise. These groups will operate under the authorization of the Board of Social Service and Religion. llleanwhile, the Commission members have decided that their organization shall be changed into an informal dis- cussion group of men interested in com- mon values, which will meet at frequent intervals and which will be available to carry forward any project or interest which may come to their attention on the campus. Page 82 Barium RGQULVVATSON, FRIEDEMAN, GRENIER, JOHNSTON, RADCLIFFE, REDMOND, MERRIAM. Middle R010-SCHMIDT, STINNETT, FEUCHTWANGER, DEAN GILKEY, ABELLS, STRONG, MILLER, SAMUEL. Top Rafw-MERRIHELD, DAVIDSON, Bona, SPROWLS, VVHITE, THOMPSON, WILLIAMS. 1 THE CHAPEL COUNCIL The Chapel Council is an honorary organization of student and faculty members appointed by the president of the University. The most outstanding activity of the council during the past year was the sponsorship of the Student Relief Fund drive, resulting in the raising of over a thousand dollars for the relief of needy students. This drive, in response to a widespread need which could not be met by the existing student loan or- ganizations, was participated in by most of the organizations on campus. Aside from this, its greatest Work of the year, the Chapel Council provided guides at various functions held in the chapel and constituted itself as an in- formal discussion group led by some prominent speaker at the chapel or some member of the University community. Among the speakers on the Council's program for the past year were Professor Quincy Wright, an authority on in- ternational relations at the Universityg Mr. Paul Douglas, of the economics department, Professor lVIaX Carl Otto, philosopher at the University of Wis- consing and Ben Cherrington, president of the University of Denver, who re- turned recently from the international disarmament conference at Geneva. Page 83 U D ANDERSON CLUB This student organization offers congenial fellowship and informal social contacts to all members of the Episcopal Church. It received its name from the Right Reverend Charles P. Anderson, a much loved friend of youth. The Reverend E. S. Wliite, rector of the Church of the Redeemer and student chaplain, is the sponsor. The meetings usually took the form of a supper followed by a social gathering. lVIrs. Behler was the hostess at these suppers, and she occasionally entertained the group at Brent House. The speakers at the various meetings in the past year were especially fine. The most outstanding one was the Right Reverend George Craig Stewart, foremost Bishop of Chicago. Inspiring messages were also brought by the Reverend Leslie Glenn of Cam- bridge, Massachusetts, a leazder in young people's work and the Reverend Harold Holt of Grace Church, Oak Park, well known for his work in the field of social service. A eucharist was held in the Thorndike Hilton Memorial Chapel during the Lenten season, under the auspices of the Anderson Club. Page 84 Top RUM'-KELLER, NASH, Goerz, HULL. Bottom Row-STILLMAN, HOLMES, VVASON,fOLlVER. VVILLIAMS. ASTRATRO OFFICERS HELEN WASON . President RUTH QLIVER . . Vice-President PHYLIS WILLIAMS . Secretary MARY ELIZABETH HOLNIES . Treasurer The Astratro club of the University of Chicago is for lVIethodist Women. It was organized in nineteen hundred and twenty-five, as a secret organization. In nineteen hundred and twenty-seven it was reorganized and opened to all Methodist Women on campus. The sponsor of the club is an older Woman who is elected by the members. To stimulate friendship is the main purpose of Astratro. It also tries to pro- mote religious and social activities. Among the numerous luncheons, teas, bridges, and dances, the annual Christ- mas dinner-dance stands out. It is an opportunity for a reunion of all the old and new members of the club. Page 85 U CI GERTRUIJE DUIJLEI During the past year the Women's University Council underwent a change in personnel and policy. The change in personnel occurred when Mrs. Adeline Link was appointed acting Chairman of the Council to succeed Mrs. Edith MIss GERTRUDE DUDLEY . THE WOMEN'S UNIVERSITY COUNCIL Foster Flint who resigned in order to be free to give all her time to organizing the Work in English Composition for the College. As an advisory body the WOmCl1,S University Council considered the plans submitted by the Commons for the reorganization of Ida Noyes Refectory, and the plans for the new residence halls for Women. The policy of the Council from then on was advisory, as the administrative and executive work which it had for- merly done became part of the Work of the Office of the Dean of Students. Chairman MEMBERS Miss EDITH ABBOTT Miss S. P, BRECKINRIDGE MISS MARGARET BURNS MISS RUTH EMERSON Miss SHIRLEY FARR MRS. EDITH F. FLINT DR. MARGARET VV. GERARIJ Miss FRANCIS E. GII.I.EsPIE MRS. FLORENCE M. GOODSPEEIJ Miss ELISABETH HAsELTINE MISS I-IAZEI. KYRK MRS. AIJELINE D. LINK MRS. MAYME I. LOOSIJON Mlss HILIJA L. NORMAN Miss FLORENCE POPE MISS EDITH RICKERT Miss MAUDE SLYE MISS BEULAII M. SMITH DR. GERTRUOE E. SMITII Miss LILLIAN STEVENSON DR. RUTH E. TAYLOR Miss EDITH VVRIGHT Page S6 SYLVIA FRIEDEMAR RUTH L-,MAN THE BOARD OF WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS OFFICERS SYLVIA F RIEDEDITAN RUTH LYMAN ELIZABETH MERRIABI FLORENCE ANDREWS MARGARET HILL LEONE BAILEY RUTH ABELLS . ALICE STINNETT . BARBARA COOK DOROTHY SCHULZ GRACE GRIAVER . MARGARET EGAN . REBECCA HAYWARD JEANNE HYDE LORRAINE NVATSON MEMBERS . . Chairman Seeretary-Treasurer President Y. W. C. A. . Secretary Y. W. C. A. . Presideni W. H. A. . Secretary W. A. A. Chairman of Federation . Secretary of Federation Draznaties Representative Publications Representative Freshman WOIYZEUIX Club . . fllember at Large Hfleznber at Large . flfenzber at Large Ilfenzber al Large Page 87 D D , N4 4 , - f f Tap Raw-HAYWARD, ABELLS, BAILEY, FRIEDEMAN, MBRRIAM. Middle Rafw-STINNETT, ANDREWS, SCHULZ, HILL. Boliom Rofw-Coox, EGAN, VVATSON, GRAVER, HYDE. THE BOARD OF WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS The Board of VVomen,s Organiza- tions, composed of representatives from all the Women's major activities and of members-at-large representing all under- graduate women, unites women's activi- ties with the Women of the university. To accomplish this, evening meetings were held twice each quarter with the VVomen's University Council, at which subjects requiring special attention were discussed. l'Compulsory gym" served as food for much thought and discussion at these meetings. One of the most important functions of the Board was sponsoring a luncheon for all Freshmen Women during Fresh- man VVeek. This luncheon brought to- gether as many Freshmen as was possi- ble, and introduced them to the heads of the various women's organizations and representatives of other campus groups. This was the only activity di- rectly sponsored by the Board. How- ever, with the 1flen's Commission it sponsored campus tours during Fresh- man VVeel-c. The Board aided various school func- tions such as the Student Relief Drive, teas, and other affairs which concerned student activities. Page 88 U D THE FEDERAT ON OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 1931-1932 Owing to the number of new institu- tions established this year in the Uni- versity, the Federation of University Women held a position of even greater importance and signihcance than before. With The New Plan, which put Fresh- men so much more on their own re- sponsibility and consequently made Uni- versity life more difficult for them, the members of Federation found many opportunities for being of service. Among the first preparations for this yearis activities was the dinner given last Spring for prospective upper-class counsellors, at which President and lWrs. Hutchins were guests of honor. At this dinner instructions and general information regarding their duties for the year as well as faculty encourage- ment and suggestions, were given the counsellors. The administration showed itself very willing to help in all plans, RUTH ABELLS . . advising both upper-classmen and Fresh- men and lending their experience and wisdom. Freshman Week was an outstanding success as a means of accomplishing the purpose of Federation. Freshmen wom- en were given a chance to acclimate themselves to the University and its ac- tivities by living together for a week in the dormitories. Parties and teas were held for them, the time-honored custom of counsellors was taken up with re- newed enthusiasm and success, every effort was made to acquaint the Fresh- men with each other and their new and at times puzzling environment. In addition to this Federation served in many other capacities. One of these was as instigator of a transfer student counselling system, and as an aid in vocational guidance and placement. . Chairman ELIZABETH TRESSLER Secretary ELIZABETH PARKER ..... Treasurer lXfClARGARET EGAN REBECCA HAYWARD MARTHA NIILLER SARAH MOMENT ALICE STINNETT RUTH VVILLARD Page 89 AGNES ADAIR LORRAINE ADE CHARLOTTE ADLAND CATHERINE ANDERSON CAROLINE APELAND FLORENCE ANDREWS MARIAN BADGLEY LEONE BAILEY HORTENSE BARR MARJORIE BECKER ROSEMARY BECKER JANE BIESENTHAL CATHERINE BIERQUIST VIOLA BOVVER GOLDE BRESLICH CLARA BRESLOVE ELSA BROIDA DOROTHY BROSI EDITH BROVVN MARGARET BRUSKY ADELE CAHOON JANET CAMPBELL JANE CAVANAUGH ALICE COOK MARY LOUISE COTTON MAXINE CREVISTON LOIS CROMWELI, CORDELIA CROUT MARGE CROWLEY CLAUDIA DORLAND SLAYA DOSEFF DOROTHY DUHNKE SHIRLEY EICIIENBAUM ZVIARY EI.I,IsOx fJERTRL'DE FENXEMA ALICE FRIEND ESTIIER FEUCHTWANGER ELMA fl.-XXSEVOORT UPPERCLASS COUNSELLORS ELEANOR GERBER ELIZABETH GONIGAN ISABELLE GOODGOLD MARGARET GRAHAM GERTRUDE GRAY JULIE GRENIER MILDRED HACKL MARY ELIZABETH HAGEMAN MARJORIE HAMILTON BETTY HANSEN BETTY HARLAN MARILEE HARRIS MARGOT HAUSCHNER CAMILLE HEINECK ROSA HEINEMAN BETTY HEMPLEMAN ELVA HENICKSMAN MARGARET HILL JEANNE HYDE BLANCI-IE HYNES CALISTA JACKSON SYI,vIA JOSHEL JANET KALVAN BERTHA KAPLAN MARION KEIXNE HELEN KELLER JANE KESNER LOUISE KILLIE CI-IARI.OT'I'E KLEIN MARY ISIREVITSKY EDNA KRUX1HOI.Z DOROTHY LASCH MARGARET LAPEZ CECILIA LISTING CECILE LOYYRY CORNELIA MCCLINTOCR GWENDOLYN IVICPHERSON ESTHER MARETZ MIRIAM MASSEY ELIZABETH MERRIAM ELIZABETH MILCHRIST JOSEPI-IINE MIRABELLA ROSAMOND MORSE GRACE MYERS MELBA OSBORNE INGRED PETERSON ISABEL PETERSON MARGUERITE POTTS ANDREA RADCLIFFE PAULINE REDMAN LUCY RIDDELL MARY' ROCRWELL VERA RYAN VIRGINIA SANNER FLORENCE SARISKY RUTH SCI-IURMAN HARRIET SIDER ELEANOR SLUSSER CYTHERA SNYDER LOUISE SORENSON MARY SPENSLEY BETTY STEERE HELEN S'1'OI,,I, MADEIIINE STRONG HARRIET ANN 'FRINKLE MARY' VOEHI, ROSEMARY VOLR HEI.EN VVASON LORRAINE WATSON MARY E. VVEBB ESTIIER VVEBER CATIHERINE VVIlilJI'ZNllUliFl' ELI-IANOR XVILSUN RUTH XVORKS BE'VI'Y VVRIIHVI' Page 90 D U D ELIZABETH MERRIAM ANDREA RADCLIFEE THE YOUNG WOME'N'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OFFICERS ELIZABETH MERRIANI . President ANDREA RADCLIFFE Vice-Prexidenz FLORENCE ANDREWS . Secretary JULIE GRENIER . Treasurer FIRST CABINE CAROLINE APELAND IXTARGARET BRUSKY MARION HARKINS JEANNE HYDE CORNELIA IITACCLINTOCK T ELIZABETH MILCHRIST RUTH OLIVER IVIADELINE STRONG MARY EVELYN WEBB RUTH WORKS SECOND CABINET AGNES ADAIR IITARION BADGLEY EDITH BURKE JANE CAVANAUGH SLAVA DOSEFF RITA DUQUETTE GERTRUDE FENNEMA BEATRICE GUTENSKY SALLY FISHER IYIARION KEANE HELEN KELLER DOLORES MACROEERTS MERCEDES OFFICER PAULINE REDINIAN FLORENCE RUCH IYIARGARETTA STRID ESTHER WEBER IYIARGARET VVILLIS ELEANOR WILSON Page 91 U D FLORENCE ANDRI-:vvs JULIE GRENHER THE YOUNG WOMEN'S The opportunities which come to an individual through Work in the Y. VV. C. A. are many. Through it a student may utilize many talents, and through group activities learn new skills and en- large social attitudes toward people of different races, and religions. lllany Women Were engaged in social CH RISTIAN ASSOCIATION Work during- the year. Approximately seventy-five students were engaged in volunteer service at the University Clinics, and about twenty Women worked regularly at the University Settlement. The nine interest groups provided activity for every member in- terested. Page 92 U D Top Rolw-CARR, GOLDMAN, NELSON, SWANSON, ELLIOT, RITTENHOUSE, PRITCHARD. Nlzddlc RUMLGWIN, VVALKER, , WEBSTER, , MORLEY. Bottom Row-VVASHBURNE, HIETT, GRAVER, LAw'roN, VAN Knut. THE FRESHMAN WOMEN'S CLUB The Freshman Women's Club Coun- cil, invested at the beginning of the Autumn Quarter with the responsibil- ity of directing the social destinies of the class of 1935, startled the University with a highly successful mixer. With the task of acquainting the Freshmen with each other begun, a program of well organized and varied events fol- lowed, enabling the class to Hnd a defi- nite place in life on the Quadrangles. The original group of twelve girls un- der the guidance of lVIary Voehl, chair- man of last year's council, was enlarged into a self-governing body of twenty- four. The sponsored activities of the year included a splash party and a buffet sup- per at Ida Noyes, an afternoon bridge, volunteer service at Billings Hospital, a skit for the Carnival, and a series of informal acquaintance parties and dis- cussion groupsg and in collaboration with the Freshman Men, a series of mixers, and the Freshman Formal, the first event of its kind in the history of the University. Not only did the Freshman Women's Club Council provide social opportuni- ties for class members, but it proved a factor in the academic orientation of Freshmen students by furnishing class organization. OFFICERS GRACE GPVWER . . . President GERTRUDE LAWTON . Secretary HELEN HIETT Treasurer Page 93 D CI Tap Rau-STRID, ,APEIA-XND, LOTTMANN, FENNEMA, Bnusxv, MCALLISTER, GERBER. Middle Row-ANI1REws, CONNOR, FISHER, BROIDA, STEVENS, HUMISTON, DEGEN. Bomnn R0flL+FOSTER, PETERSON, TITTERINOTON, KAMPFER, MATIIIS. THE KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY CLUB EXECUTIVE COUNCIL LUCIA DOWNING ALICE TEMPLE . LEONE BAILEY ETHEL FOSTER TVTARGARET IQAMPFER The Kindergarten-Primary Club in- cludes faculty, aIId graduate and under- graduate students in the Kindergarten- Primary department. The purpose of the club is to bring the girls together through social activities and functions throughout the Year. The executive council managed most Faculty Reprexentazfifue . Faculty Azlwisoz' RUTH TITTERINOTON Lois TVTATHIS TSABEL PETERSON of these affairs, and assumed the respon- sibility Of having at least one large so- cial get-together each quarter. In addi- tion it sponsored the club teas, dinners and social events for the entire depart- ment. This year the members of the council acted as hostesses at the weekly teas of the educational department. Page 9-l . . . My ws 21" 'K -Z1'f5f"" T .1222 'eiif I ' 4.32 .Y 5 . , '.,..,i .wg 21 Tistfl 0 IDA NOYES HALL ADVISORY COUNCIL FACULTY MEMBERS MRS. ALNIA P. BROOK . . . . . Chairman MISS M. L. CLARK MRS. A. LINK MRS. W. E. POST MISS GERTRUDE DUDLEY MRS. J. F. MOULDS MRS. A. W. SHERER MRS. EDITH F. FLINT MISS HILDA NORMAN MRS. L. R. STEERE MRS. H. B. LEMON MRS. J. W. THOMPSON STUDENT MEMBERS PATRICIA BONNER EILEEN HUIXfIISTON LYDABETH TRESSLER RUTH BARNARD CORNELIA NIACCLINTOCK MARY' VOEHL ADELE FRICKE MOLLY lVLASON ' ROSEMARY VOLK HELEN R. HOLMES RUTH STRINE RUTH WILLARD Un the retirement of lVIrs. George S. Goodspeed who held the position Since the building was opened in 1916, lVIrs. Alma P. Brook was appointed as the Director of the Ida Noyes Clubhouse. It is her hope that the continued use and enjoyment of the building will give to succeeding classes an increased pleas- ure in the Hall. Ida Noyes Hall is dedicated to the life of the women of the University, and is open to all women of the University without fee. lt provides adequate and beautiful facilities for all women's ac- tivities including a clubhouse, gymna- sium, and refectory. The various WOmen's organizations have their headquarters in this building and hold their meetings and most of their social events here. A s-elf-appoint- ing group of some twenty women act as student hostesses for the building. For those individuals Whose activities are not included in the larger organized wom- enls groups lda Noyes Hall Offers much in its equipment for small or large luncheons, formal or informal parties, lounging or studying space and enter- tainments of all types. Page 95 REGULAR OFFICERS THOMAS J. JACKSON CHRISTIAN Major, Field Artillery, United States Army, Professor and Head of the Depart- ment of Military Science and Tactics, Graduate U. S. Military Academy, Served in Cavalry, Philippines and Mexican Border, Commandant R.O.T.C. Unit, Colorado State Agricultural College, Captain, Major, Lieutenant Colonel, Field Artillery, World War, Commanding Officer, Madison Barracks, N. Y., Brigande, Fort Hoyle, Maryland, Graduate, Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, Member Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity. JOHN M. WELCH Major, Medical Corps, U. S. Army, American Expeditionary Force, American Forces in Germany, World War, U. S. Military Academy and Army and Navy General Hospital. Graduate Army Medical School, Washington, D. C., and Medical Field Service School, Carlisle Barracks, Pa. NICOLL FOSDICK GALBRAITH First Lieutenant Field Artillery, U. S. Army, Graduated from Carnegie Institute of Technology, Served in Cavalry, Field Artillery, Air Corps, Mexican Border, Hawaiian Islands, Air Corps Primary Flying School, Field Artillery School, Ass. Professor in lVIilitary Science and Tactics, University of Chicago. ERNEST CALHOUN NORMAN First Lieutenant, Field Artillery, U. S. Army, Graduate U. S. Military Academy, Graduate Battery Officers' Course, Field Artillery School, Fort Sill, Okla., Ass. Professor in Nlilitary Science and Tactics, University of Chicago. Page 96 U U MILITARY SCIENCE CADET STAFF Leif B. Erickson, Cadet Major for the year 1931-1932, was elected to this position in the fall and served the entire year. This is the highest post on the staff and is awarded to the cadet officer judged to be the mo-st capable during his previous years in the Corps. Paul Cooper was chosen Cadet Captain Adjutant. The Field Artillery Unit and the Medical Unit in the annual inspection by the War Department received, as usual, an excellent rating for its efficiency and ability. During the summer months the officers of the Corps attend at six weeks camp in Sparta, Wiscorisiii and Fort Snelling, Miniiesota. Here approximately fifty students receive practical training in field artillery and medical work. Pagz' 97 U B Back RUQL+DONALD BIRNEY, BURT DOI-IERTY, EDGAR Fiuani-rum. Baltam Rofw-KEITH PARsoNs, PAUL Coovmz, Romekr GAREN, LEIF ERICKSON. CROSSED CANNCN The Honorary lVIilitary Society at the University of Chicago is Crossed Can- non. Included in its membership of twelve, are the officers of the cadet staff who have shown marked ability in Mili- tary Science and have the qualities of an officer and a gentleman. The oflicers in the Society for the 1931-1932 period are Robert Garen, Commander, and Keith Parsons, adjutant. Crossed Cannon was organized by the Nlilitary Science Department to uphold the highest ideals of the department and to promote and sponsor its interests. The only social function conducted by Crossed Cannon is the Military Ball held in the spring quarter. This year's Ball was di- rected by Robert Garen. HA man's appointment as an oflicer shows appreciation of his ability by his superiors, and his election to member- ship in Crossed Cannon, that his efforts toward advancement of the corps are ap- preciated by his brother officers." Page 98 U D COOPER, ERICKSON, HEPPLE CADET OFFICERS Cadet Major LEIE. B. ERIOKSON Cadet Captains P. COOPER J. NARDIN R. C. HEPPLE T. D. WASON G. J. GLASER Cadet Ist Lieutenants R. H. BLOCK E. L. COHN B. H. DOHERTY W. ERICKSON R. H. ESHBAUOH B. D. EVANS J. L. GOODNOW Cade T. M. ANDREWS D. H. BIRNEY D. CLARK H. P. CARSTENS J. C. DINSMORE L. E. FREIDHEIM H. H. GOLDSTINE M. M. GLADSTONE H. W. HUFFSTETER W. H. HUGHES R. A. HOLLANDS C. E. HOLTSBERG C. S. NIELSEN E. G. SCHALLER D. SEIFER t Zna' Lieutenants G. E. JOHNSON W. C. MORTON S. B. MANDELBAUM D. STOK D. SUTHERLAND H. T. SULCER D. I. SOEEER L. SCHULTZ M. Page 99 Q .L 4 u QI 5 A Y -YI 1. K LANGE RESIDENCE HALLS RESIDENCE HALLS Life in the Dorms? . . . rooms of spare brown furniture magically transformed over night . . . cautious preliminary investigations of one's immediate neighbors . . . friendships formed on second sight . . . animated meals at small friendly tables . . . anxious deliberation over the food situation . . . solutions in midnight suppers and spaghetti parties behind bolted doors. Showers that were too hot . . . Hreplaces that wouldn't burn . . . pop-corn that wouldn't pop . . . fudge that sugared. Floor rivalries . . . firecrackers exploded from upper stories . . . the first snow ball fight and the organized pillow brigade . . . smashed Gothic windows and collapsible beds . . . midnight sallies that ended disastrously. Congenial groups about a roaring club room fireplace on a winter night . . . a little group of serious thinkers arguing over Comptoifs attack on casuality . . . a discussion over the latest play. The formal dances and dinners . . . Countess Tolstoi answering questions . . . holi- day festivities and the excited last minute borrowing of accessories. Scarlet fever scares that quarantined one for ages . . . lost house keys at three A. IMI., and not a light in the house . . . anxious huddles, memorizing math formulas . . . typewriters clicking in the wee hours . . . budding authors in the throes of inspiration. An anxious nine o'clock wait for that popular mailman bringing checks from home . . . Life in the Dormsl Page 102 U D 'i-, f ra ' - -n . . . , ., .,', J. 'ff i ' .. Af-11 ' i , g A A, M4 ...X H . . . x , ,, 1 F , ,J ,ww-1 ff 411- wi f "" """'1"',P' 'J 'S ' .X "' ff-1vy!9ff qg,w,':' A ,W A K , .- V5-.. . ,- , il , to .7 l:,F1,:-fu-rl'-at ,, .1 11a1"7 b ' ' 2 :'- -' ."TL5--kv Lf' . M fi V P' 'T' " "mul , ' ' ' ' . 1 . -1 'fm 241: -'1" ' 'fl' f - ,ai -. 1 -' 4"L..1 g. 'k-4,-.W Q1-.6 , .,.. , iq-?'L. ..,,,,,i,, -N ,V PX ? - 3 FN ,V ,,,,,4z..,'f.F:., M 1. 1 ., ,, ,. . ,,,, . " M , - Q 1.1: ', " Z' - -f 2-iff .,f1-R rr his A -- -"1"i'LLL,1-a":7 ff" 4" 2 ' 4 C 9" 5 ' 'V'-' M-,. Z?'f'i -'-f, .1-"iii ii" :W I I l-.. ' . :4f4gT5ga,z,f:aM?ifg2 L fi ff 72 I ,,: i ff, - iii' 2 , gr... . fz ii' 5 " '1gp.,,- ' " 'L'?:"f"':1,'."1i5' '-:':z:,g.f.- .'::fv' 72 , "1 K -"""1 '-i . , g f J. . ., li vr- , 1 ,4 .a - V- ' w if.: mfg- f-,f--9 .4 -- , ap? -- ...r - -.r rm-.,g:-4 " "FEP 352,39 'lf-7297 ' . fT'fN,:'Rg " V1 I-,adj so? f,ff:f1'fl iazlfifi A 1 . :FM T . """' ,VY x ' ??T:'?ief5 A a-'sri-irffva .. A 214' 11 if 3 ll ' Q: " g, M My as A 1 E my - -1: H'------Nr:-- .: .... ... -, WOMEN'S RESIDENCE HALLS The University Residence Halls were organized, in accord with the views of Earnest rmitories but as places of humane educational residences, planned with a view of uniting the two lines of influence-namely intellectual activity on one hand and friendly contact with persons on the other . . .H P. Burton, "not as mere do Each Hall is organized into a House directed by a Head who is appointed by the University president, and a committee elected by House members. Each House is also under the social directorship of a councillor chosen from the Faculty by House members. The House membership is composed of student residents who have undergone a prerequisite period of residence and pledgeship. Initiation to membership is a formal ceremony of much pomp and privation, but it carries with it many privileges. Each House has its own constitution and social customs, and is self governing under the general control of the university. With the opening of Burton and Judson Courts to the University of Chicago Manhood last autumn, the two residence Halls, Gates and Blake, which the men 3 vacated were immediately remodeled and pressed into service as WOmCl1lS Dormitories, to the great embarrassment of many uninformed masculine friends of former residents. Page 103 U D I H W GATES BLAKE - BEECHER Since they were both temporary and new, Blake and Gates Halls had little formal organization or group activity. The Halls had no dining service. Gates Hall was Very popular among the more serious graduate students who wished to have complete freedom and quiet for concentrated study and research. There were but few undergraduate residents. A banquet and bridge party late in October, and a house party early in December were the only formal activities, but impromptu bridge "gabs" and informal Sunday afternoon teas occasionally relieved the strain of too much of a good thing. Blake Hall, on the other hand, was largely undergraduate, and as such was formally introduced to the Campus at a "high tea," late in January, having as guests of honor, lllrs. Brooks, lylrs. Dudley, and llfliss Ames. Although there could be but little group activity, impromptu gatherings were all too frequent. Beecher Hall, long established, and bound in tradition, claims to be the most genial and active of the VVomen,s Dorms. Foster Hall, equally respected, emphatically denies this. No non-resident has yet had the temerity to settle this age old dispute, and unfortunately the opinion of residents must be discounted. The Beecherites traditionally gave two annual formals, a dance in VVinter and a dinner in Spring. House and floor parties and meal times brought all the women into one compact group, while house pledgship gave them all some extremely un- pleasant duties. Pledges are accepted once a year, and must undergo both a formal and informal initiation. Faculty dinners were given throughout the year, to bring about more friendly relations between instructors and students. Page 104 U D FOSTER KELLY GREEN Foster sponsored an informal dance in the VVinter quarter, and three faculty dinners in the Spring. Each Wednesday night, the residents were allowed to entertain friends or facul- ty members at dinner. House ac- tivities closely approximated those of Beecher. Kelly Hall eschevved a planned formal activity for spontaneous in- formal gatherings, last year. A Faculty Tea Was given in the Autumn, and another in the Spring, but no greater concessions were made to tradition. Green Hall, is one of the most in- teresting of the University residences. For several years, it harbored grad- uate students exclusively. Residents from all corners of the globe were found here. Students from Syria formed friendships with students i i from Kalamazoo. Every Autumn, a little compilation of biographical data was obtained and placed in a collec- tion labeled "Who's Who in Green Hallf, Almost every field of human endeavor Was represented as vvell as almost every University in the World. The fact that the residents were graduates did not mean that life in this Dorm Was entirely devoted to pursuit of science and higher learn- ing. The Halloween and Christmas parties were as gay as those of the Undergraduates. The faculty din- ners Were all interesting. A Faculty party, an annual event of the Winter season, at which Prof. and Mrs. Compton and a grand array of deans were guests of honor, was a huge success. Countess Tolstoi spent an entire evening hereg Sylvia Thompson, prominent authoress, an entire week. Page 105 U D DREXEL HOUSE .... MAISON FRANCAISE A most unusual residence hall is Drexel House, a co-operative Dorm for sixteen women students. All of the housekeeping, including the preparation of meals was done co-operatively by the residents, who prided themselves greatly upon their skill. No casualities have as yet been reported. In the midst of all of this, yet a little apart, is another quaint residence hall for women-the lVIaison Francaise-, with its quiet continental atmosphere, an atmos- phere purposely created and pervaded even to the most inimitable detail, with a dis- tinct charm and restfulness. The creation of the atmosphere can be attributed only to the founder of the House. Nllle. Dorcas I. Perrenoud was decorated, in March with the Palrnes d'Ofhcier d'Academie in recognition of her service to the French Cause. It was ll-Ille. Perrenoud, also, who proposed to the French House residents that one pioneer meal be served each week. Only French is spoken during meal times in the lx.l3.lSOIl Francaise. The residents are very active, Benefit bridges and Halloween parties and dinners for distinguished guests, among whom were Professor Landre of Brown, and Yvonne Gall, followed each other in quick succession during the past year. Page 106 U D BLACKSTONE HALL Blackstone Hall, set in a niche of its own, a distance from the other Women's Dorms, is very popular among the co- eds. It serves as a residence, not only for students of the University but for alumnae of the University Who are ac- tively engaged in the various fields of commerce and industry in the city. The Hall has all the advantages of a modern hotel combined with an atmos- phere of college life. During the Uni- versity quarters, it has fulfilled its pur- pose of being a home planned for both study and for recreation. The attractive dining room, instituted Within the last two years, has become an interesting place to sip tea and visit with friends and classmates, as Well as enjoy the reg- ular mealtime periods. It is a unique tearoom with its natural panelled and natural stained walls. C0-eds have found the rooms to their tastes for they are cheerful and comfortably furnished in double suites of many types Fresh air lovers and sun worshipers have found their "mecca" in the solarium Where they can play ping pong with their guests to their heart's content. Page 107 U D 1 y c ig a ' .. 57 lklf A , A Hrrcneocic HALI. MEN'S RESIDENCE HALLS Dormitory life for University men, is spent in all its eventfulness and complexity within the walls of five residence halls. Of these, Snell, Hitchcock and Goodspeed have long been established, but the men of 1932 carry on the old traditions and spend their evenings and the wee hours of the morning deep in the intricacies of all games of chance. Burton and Judson Courts have just completed their first year as residence Halls. They were built to H11 a need long felt for private three room suites with fireplaces, showers, private alcoves, and accommodations for valet-a-la Mirror. The first year? . . . September, 1931 . . . the residence halls opened . . . Freshman Week . . . the steak-eating football squad . . . anxious fathers and mothers establishing the son and heir amidst the splendor . . . suitcases, trunks, radios, victrolas . . . un- packing . . . ties, pennants, pictures, of home, mother, and the girl-friends . . . Dean VVorks addressing the assembled Freshmen on their opportunities and obligations . . . the talkie of President Hutchins and the scholarship students . . . first issue of the Burton Cozzrtier. Arrival of upperclassmen and graduate students . . . the first constrained meals with utter strangers . . . new classes . . . new textbooks, new teachers . . . the terrifying sight of universal knowledge condensed in four syllabi . . . the first letters from home . . . the shifting breakfast hour . . . ping pong and billiards in the Playroom. Sophomore-Freshman rivalries . . . the Botany pond . . . hir. Nlillett telling groups of excited Freshmen in the Quad to quiet down and go to bed . . . the first snow . . . the second snow . . . the snowball Hghts with to the victor belonging the spoils. Page 108 U D 'H 1-,VE WK., 5 '-' f H" , 12,-5-eb'-,+.'.i,f ' 5' V f 'M 5:1-. ja-'i,,, ',f MEN'S RESIDENCE! HALLS The embattled intelligentsia commanded by Harry Moore . . . alluring fire-gongs and their disappearance . . . Mr. Shaw's little group of serious thinkers . . . lVIcMillen and the starry universe . . . the reminiscences of Carlson . . . psychoanalysis according to Campbell. The first guest night . . . the petition concerning women-guests in the halls . . . Leonard and Chappel wrangling in Council meeting . . . the student relief dance . . . the freshman dance . . . the dinner for Mrs. Burton . . . Chi Chi Chi in combination dinner and sport clothes . . . Tyroler's system of contract bridge . . . Thornton Wilder eating pecan rolls . . . Beardsley Ruml climbing the five flights to his tower . . . Ketchum playing Gilbert and Sullivan on the ancient grand piano . . . Bruno Salterls Germanic hospitalities . . . the beauteous Miss Sawin granting seconds on dessert . . . a trombone solo directed at the rainy quadrangle . . . Hart explaining to Mr. Mather incognito the shortcomings of the Halls . . .the problem of locking the gates . . . the problem of drying towels . . . a set of lockers on the quad lawn . . . the hegira of Bean and Silverthorne toward Tahiti . . . the "housewarming" on the second floor of 300 . . . the Heads in inquisitorial session . . . the intellectual aristocracy of Krolik and the Florys . . . the scarlet fever scare . . . lVIr. Shields and the 500 entry in semi-quarantine . . . Mers morose over the R. O. T. C .... the cacophony of rival radios across the quad . . . Dr. Reed distributing clinical thermometers to the Heads. Luke Galbraith shouting "Junior" . . . Billie Aronoff's midnight sallies . . . free seats for the baseball games on Greenwood field . . . spring and spring fever . . . the ominous approach of comprehensives . . . solemnity of finals . . . trunks, suitcases, radios, victrolas . . . the open air garage dispersing . . . summer holiday. Page 109 W? ATHLETICS U Cl UNIVERSITY or CHICAGO Fuzw HOUSE STAGG'S FIELD HOUSE IS OPENED In November, 1925, Amos Alonzo Stagg turned the first bit of soil that was to mark the start of construction for the new University of Chicago Field House. A start and that was all for several years untilg lo and behold, construction was actually started last summer and the seemingly gigantic structure Was completed in the latter part of December. Mr. Stagg and that boss of all trades, Mr. Touhig, then took chargeg Jimmy caring for its upkeep and Lonny, Jr. looking after the business end. Under the watchful eye of Jimmy, who has cared for Chicago "byes" and their athletic equip- - ment since Mr. Stagg was pitcher on the baseball nine, the basketball and track teams moved in and took possession. The Field House itself has an un- obstructed interior, with a clear Hoot space 368 feet in length and 165 feet wide. It is sufhciently large to ac- commodate the portable basketball Hoor, an eight lap to the mile clay track, and still leave room for a tennis court and bleachers. The present seating capacity is about 3,500 with additional arrangements for a balcony of 2500 seats. The Field House is a permanent tribute to the loyal service that Nlr. Stagg has given the University in the last forty years and to the ideals of sportsmanship that he has established here. Crmcn Amos Atoxzo Sracc Page 112 Price Cent. Final Count in Compulsory Gym Poll Shows 2 to 1 Majorityof Student Bod s Fawalbrs Abmition S " Boucher Will Present FINAL RESULTS OF GYM POLL 1 . A - 1 Result of Vote . . Tnri l I For Abolition For Retention To Faculty ' ' Men women ' Higfimvvailifiai I 'BY J- BAYARD FOO'-E . - 1 The Daily Maroon poll an Com- . FRESHMEN 221 I I9 60 44 l pulsory Gyrnis over and the results., , ------------W --------- '--'T-- --v- -- .-.- .VVV 2- .-.-- ....-. ..a....-. 2. . icompilefl last. Friday afternoon nf- SOPHOMORES 149 ' 71 66 45 Lter the ballotmg had endedg reveal- T 1 JUNIORS 1 1 142 g'MFE'-willli75imi'M'5i5 1' iiaihllfiiif liiifieiflfidlllilnlnllf IMiSlTlCllCTlS-Mymmk-WTl51hTwitiZ2'-MMSTZHigliiiimilioiliwii 1 3ggglnrgngpwdogoggcgvgg me fe ' , - ' a o ion 1 p ry gym re- ! . TOTALS 624 331 283 186 NN .,., quirements by more than a 2-1 ma- """""'-T . xl' ijority. The compiled results will be I' 955 I 472 S 3 presented to the faculty of the col- "' ""' """"' W' """"""-f "'Lf"e'-em'-H '-'e-A-------f'-H-E -'-- -' '--- - E leges by The. Daily M21'00n With the V TOTAL VOTE CAST 1,427 ' frecommendation that compulsory W 1 be abolished in the colleges: a z,.,,,-..wmw,.,I.,+:,... mm.-11 sa Anahafai., COMPULSORY PHYSICAL EDUCATION-A HISTORY Until 1921, the University of Chicago had in effect a ten quarter requirement for compulsory physical education. At that time, largely through the efforts of the Daily lVIaroon, the requirement was reduced by the University to six quarters. ln the Spring quarter of 1931 the Committee on Curriculum for the new plan recommended that the University Senate change the compulsory education require- ment to allow the new plan students the privilege of choosing their exercise as they saw Ht. The Athletic department under the direction of Mr. Stagg and the Nlilitary Science department under the direction of lVlajor Christian published a thirty page pamphlet on the advantages of compulsory education and circulated it among the faculty. When the Senate met, the question was decided in favor of the Athletic department and the present system was continued. A 'V!f'f, at .f-. " The Daily Maroon reopened the question in the 1 I Winter' quarter, 1932, by conducting a trial vote among the student body in order to determine their sentiment on the subject. The first vote was 3-1 in favor of abolishing the compulsory status, but was not I , large enough to be representative. The second vote q y 5 j' represented over half the undergraduate body and was 'i 2-1 in favor of abolishment. These results were sub- ," ' - - .--- g i...1 .-i' 'ffflffw e mitted by the Daily llflaroon to the Executive com- ,.,,-: , ,, mittee of the University for consideration. 'tj1MMx"' Toumc Page 113' CAPTAIN SAM HORVVITZ AND COACH Amos ALoNzo STAGG STAGG'S FORTIETH SEASON Stagg's fortieth season reflected, in a way, all that the "Old Mari" has brought to the University in the Way of athletic ideals .... The 1931 team Was not a champion but it did display fight and grit . . . true sportsmen who fought consistently. . . . A fitting tribute to Stagg's years of service .... Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago xChicago 5fChicago Big Ten Conference won by Purdue' THE 1931 SEASON STAGG'S 40-YEAR COACHING RECORD . . . Cornell College 0 Total games played .... 383 - Hlllliflale 7 Total games won 252 ' ' I ' gf21fe'gan Total games lost . . 10+ t Q Indiana 32 Total games tied . . 27 . Purdue 14- Big Ten games played . . 218 - - Afkaflsas 13 Big Ten games won . 12-1- ' ' Illinois . 6 Big Ten games lost . . 78 . . VVisconsm 12 . , I , Iowa 0 Big Ten games tied . 16 . . . Indiana 6 Northwestern second. Vfhanksgiving Day Tournament games. Page YI! U n THE PLAYERS CAPTAIN SAMUEL HORWITZ "Sam,' is the biggest loss that the team receives this year .... For three seasons he continuously outplayed his opponents and piled up opposing backhelds .... Sam was a star in his high school days and an out- standing Big Ten guard after entering the University .... ln each of his three years on the varsity he was consistently given mention on all-star teams of the Big Ten Conference .... Sam's spectacular play in the first half of the Yale game, after being severely injured, will always be the epic of this season .... Followers of the game re- member hovv Thistlethwaite congratulated Sam on his excellent performance under a blistering sun at Madison in 1930. BERNARD WIEN "Bernie" for three years has won the ad- miration and praise of Chicago rooters with his consistent play at end .... He seldom let his opponents box him and was constant- ly in their baclcfields upsetting their best plays . . . an all around blocker and tackler and an A-l pass receiver in Stagg's new passing attack .... Pagr 113 T H E P L A Y E R S DONALD BIRNEY "Don,'l captain elect of the 1932 football team, was an all around back- Held player in 1931 . . . an excellent blocker, a good field general, and a fair ball carrier .... VINSON SAHLIN "Vin" was the maroon backfield star in the 1931 season . . . the Qld lV1an's 'iGeneral.,' . . . lllinois will remember Sahlin flashing by them .... PETER ZIBIRIER 'fPete" was, is and will be the best blocker on the squad . . . remember how he ran back a punt 80 yards for a touchdown against Iowa. PAUL STAGG Paulls last year at quar- ter . . . just a chip off the old block .... Paul has an enviable record of never failing to catch a punt .... -' asm.,-" -v STANLEY HAM B RRG Hamburg finished his last season on a Nlaroon football team with con- sistent all-around play in the line .... "Ham" in- tercepted a pass and ran it back for a touchdown to win the lllinois game .... KEITH PARSONS Keith was the mainstay and center post of the 1931 team .... a brilliant cen- ter and fast on defense .... PHQI' 116 U n THE PLAYERS BOB WALLACE Bob was one of the lightest and trickiest men in the backfield . . . made many of our long gains in the 1931 season .... ALLAN SUNIIVIERS Allan played in the backneld .... He was an excellent blocker and tackler . . . but his shining performance was on de- fense. . WILLIAM CASSELS "Beveridge" . . . a steady lineman and a big help to the team . . . a fast charger and fast on defense .... EUGENE BUZZELL f'Gene" was the track star of the backfield .... He ran so fast they lost him . . . especially in the Indiana game .... POIVIPEIO TOIGO HCurly" . . . was shifted from guard to tackle to end and played them all Well .... He likes football and plays as though he did .... RAYIVIOND ZENNER "Ray" . . . found him- self this year at center . . . outstanding in the Illinois game .... He's small but mighty and trims many a larger man .... Pagr 117 U D JOHN SPEARING Hjacki' is one of the Old lblanls pupils .... 1931 was his Hrst year as a regular varsity tackle .... Jack ripped right in and played like a veteran .... He was a bulwark in the line and broke up lots of plays behind the opponents' line .... THE PLAYERS ROBERT WALSH "Bob'l . . . played in the end position . . . alter- nated With Toigo . . . there Weren't many teams that boxed Bob or ran around him . . . he was fast and shifty Ca track manj .... When We nearly upset Purdue, Bob really upset their backfield .... Many a Purdue back started and found Bob stop- ping him in his steps. JOSEPH TEMPLE "-loel' . . . the 1931 sea- son marks -loe's last appear- ance in a maroon suit .... His brilliant playing was somewhat handicapped by in- juries .... ln spite of a bad leg, Joe managed to play for a few minutes in most all the games and played hard. Page 118 U D 1- QI' WF ff J , . ,f 1931 FOOTBALL SEASON September 27 .... Today was our first ga1ne. It was pretty warm and dusty but all in all a fair day for a start. We jumped right into the path of glory by defeat- ing Cornell 12-O and then tired out from the heat and handicapped by the loss of Page, lVlackenzie, Lou Kanne, Walt Trude, and Maneikus we tumbled off our pinnacle of glory and lost to Hillsdale by a lone touchdown. A tough ending for a perfect day, but then we've plenty of time to make up for it. October 10 .... VVe're at Ann Arbor this week but our bad luck came right along. Paul Stagg is hurt, Vin Sahlin injured his back last night and Page and Trude are definitely out for the season. It sure looks like we're going to take a trimming today. VVell it wasn't so bad. In spite of our depleted backtield we managed to hold Michi- gan to 13' points while we outfought to score seven. Not the walloping we expected at the hands of a team that is a potential Big Ten Champ. A moral victory in spite of the score. October 17 .... What a week! Practicing till our backs broke and our tongues hung out, and then hours of pep talks and strategy. If the newspapers mean any- thing, the boys from old Eli are a pushover .... The newspapers were wrong and Yale was right. At any rate Albie was right in there running so fast we couldn't even see bim. What a score, 27-Ol The only consolation the Old lVlan has is that we held them until Yale caught on and even then we fell fighting .... Page II9 I5 D WE FINISH OFF ILLINOIS IN A HURRY... October 24 .... Indiana, our traditional game to win arrives today and we only hope that they don't discard the tradition .... Well it's discarded along with the rest of the University ideals and we are down in the depths as a result of the worst drub- bing a Maroon team has ever taken from Indiana. With the usual Chicago technique, we started like a house afire but Indiana arrived in a hurry to put it out, and score two touchdowns in the first half. The Old Man poured on some oil in between halves and we galloped back with plenty of fire. We scored and then went out for the rest of the game. Eventually they finished us off to the tune of 32-6. October 31 .... Stagg fears Purdue .... So do we but we are going to do our best to lick 'em today .... We did four bestl but it wasn't quite good enough. The first half We surprised Purdue and the rest of the world by scoring after playing Purdue off their feet most of the half. Bob Wallace slipped away for a long run but was called back. This kinda made us sore so we just up and gave Sahlin a hole in the line and he ran through it for a touchdown. As usual we tired out in the last half and Purdue ran through our weak side for two touchdowns to win, 14-6. November 7 .... After that game today I feel almost too sick to write. We let our only chance to win a game slip through our hands. Arkansas took advantage of our last quarter weariness and tied us, l3-13. November 14 .... Down to battle the old Illini again and "Zup's" team is given the usual pre-game advantage. I hope we upset the dope .... We did it .... We BEAT Illinois . . . and we outplayed them .... Boy oh boy how Sahlin did sift through the holes in their line .... Good old Ray Zenner played a bang up game and starred in the line. In fact, we all played hard and won, 13-6 .... November 21 .... The badgers are here and they look like mountains and run like deer .... Whew, what a game . . . Hrst we swept down the field, scared the badgers to death, and then scored in a blaze of glory, after Wien recovered a fumble on the nineteen yard line. But Wisconsin returned with a bang and after a poor kick which lfVisconsin recovered on our thirty yard line, they scored their first touchdown .... They soon followed with another to win, 12-7. No-vember 26 .... Something new in the way of tournaments .... We played Iowa and won when Pete Zimmer ran back a punt 80 yards for a touchdown. Indiana beat Illinois and played us in the finals. They scored first and won on it although we made more first downs. Thatls the end until the banquet .... Page 120 5 D First Row-R. E. ZENNER, C. E. BUZZELL, VINSON SAIILIN, P. G. TOIGO, VV. E. RAPP. Second Raw-R. G. WALLACE, S. H. HAMBERG, S. J. HORWITZ, PAUL STAGG. Third Row-B. H. BIRNEY, J. H. SPEARING, G. E. SCHNUR, R. B. SIIAIJIRO, B. J. JOHNSON, R, E. WALSH. Fourth Rafw-B. J. VVIEN, ALLAN SUMMERS, K. I. PARSONS. Fifth Rau-W. E. BERG, W. A. BELLSTROM, VV. B. CASSELS, J. M. TENIPLE, R. VV. RENEKER, F. W. TIIOMSON, G. E. MAIIONEY, PETE ZIMMER. Sixth Row-S. C. WEISLOW, A. A. STAGG, J. K. ANDERSON, H. O. PAGE. THE FOOTBALL TEAM WINNERS OE THE "C" SAMUEL JAY HORWITZ, Captain ALLAN MAXWELL SUMMERS, JR. JOSEPH MARSHALL TEMPLE POMPEO GIOCOMO TOIGO ROBERT GEORGE WALLACE, JR. ROBERT EDWARD WALSH BERNARD JOSEPH WIEN RAYMOND EDWARD ZENNER DONALD HADfIILTON BIRNEY CHARLES EUGENE BUZZELL WILLIAM BEVERADGE CASSELS STANLEY HAROLD HADIBERG IQEITH IRVING PARSONS VINSON SAHLIN JOHN HENRY SPEARING, JR. PAUL STAGG PETER ZINIMER VVINNERS OF THE OLD ENGLISH HC" WAYNE EMERSON RAPP GEORGE EDWARD SCHNUR, JR. ROBERT BENJAMIN SHAPIRO FRANK WILLIAM THOMSON WARREN ALBERT BELLSTROM WILLIAM ERNEST BERG CARL CHRISTIAN GABEL GEORGE EDWARD NIAHONEY WINNERS OF THE "C" BLANKET ANDREW JACKSON BRISLEN WALTER ALLEN KNIJDSON GILBERT WAYNE CASSLE ROBERT ARTHUR R-'IYACNEILLE THOMAS COWLEY ERRET ISSAG VAN NICE ALVIN DAVID REIWITCH Page 121 U D NORGREN AND ASHLEY ASHLEY. . . STEPHENSON . . . AND NORGREN Captain Harry Ashley finished his third and last season for the maroon basketball team with the close of the 1932 season. Ashley's normal position was guard but he was often shifted to forward to meet any especially formidable forwards on the opposing teams. Regardless of Where Norgren shifted him he continued to play a bang-up game and to drop in many points. 'fAsh" was fast and shifty, had an eye for the basket and could play a man for man defense as well as anyone in the con- ference. Paul Stephenson was Ash's running mate for the three seasons and as capable a man as any captain could ask for. Steve was one of the stellar forwards in the con- ference and a leading scorer. Norgren has often said that if he had a team of' Stephensons he would have an unbeatable combination. All Chicago fans will re- member Steve breezing down the floor, dribbling through the defense, and dropping in a quick shot under the basket. He seemed to hit that old hoop regardless of Where he shot from or how he shot it. When Paul was hot, the team was hot, and that was a hard combination to beat. Nels Norgren, coach of basketball, continued in the 1932 season to prove his rare ability for coaching fighting teams. In spite of a serious handicap in the size of his squad, Norgren managed to develop a team that was full of fight and old maroon spirit. "Norg.,' in his undergraduate days won letters in every major sport. Page 122 CAPTAIN HARRY ASHLEY "Ash" . . . all around guard and occasional forward. . A. . He proved his ability at guarding in the man for man defense this season when Norgren shifted him to meet the fastest forward. PAUL STEPHENSON Hstevel' was the real forward on the team . . . Norgren would have liked a whole team of Stephensons .... He staged an individual rally in the Purdue game and gave the champs a scare .... STEPHE S0 ASHLEY SCORES OF THE 1932 BASKETBALL SEASON Chicago ........... 32 Bradley .............................,,....,......... 29 Chicago ..,.,...... 24 Western State Teachers ....,, 36 Chicago .,......... 29 Carleton .....,...,.......,........................ 33 Chicago ...,....... 39 Carnegie Covertimej ............ 40 Chicago ........... 21 Marquette .,..........................,....... 36 Chicago .,......... 14 Minnesoata .................................... 22 Chicago ..,..,..... 18 Wisconsin .. ...i....... 24- Chicago ........... 20 Illinois ............. .,........i 3 O Chicago ,..,.,... ........... 2 8 Minnesota .... ....i...... 4 0 Chicago ...i......, 25 Iowa ,...,,.....,.. ........... 4 3 Chicago .,,,,,,., ........... 2 7 Purdue ......,.. ,. -i0 Chicago ........... 29 Ohio .............. ........... 2 6 Chicago ,,,,,,,,,,, 23 Wisconsin .. ,...,...... 34 Chicago .,...,..... 31 Ohio ......... ........... 4 0 Chicago ,,,,,,...,. Iowa .... ....,...... 4 6 Chicggg ,,,,,,,,,,, Illif10iS ........... Chiqjgvgg .,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,... Purdue ..............Y............. ........... 5 3 Conference won by Purdue, Northwestern second, Chicago last. Page 123 Scuurka AND REXINGER JAMES PORTER Jiml' was the regular guard on the 1932 team .... He was consistent in his Hoor play and was well known for his ability to sink long shots from the center of the floor or to dribble in for a shot under the basket .... H KEITH PARSONS Keith was the giant of the 1932 squad and played center .... His height was a valuable asset to the team and many a point was made from his position as pivot man under the basket .... I SCOTT OREXINGER The 1932 season was HScot's" last and best on a lklaroon basketball team. . . . He alternated at forward, where his speed was an important factor in work under the basket. . . a consistent shot and an excellent dribbler .... LOUIS SCHLIFKE "Lou,' a veteran forward . . . played a fast game with notable suc- cess in his floor work . . . he was an excellent dribbler and Could, if the occasion presented itself, drop in a basket or two from most -any part of the Floor .... Ponrma ,xxn Paxsnxs Page 124 U cl 1932 BASKETBALL SEASON The 1932 basketball team, while it had several excellent individual players, was as a unit very poor, Winning only two games out of seventeen. The squad was out-classed in height, speed and team play. In spite of these adverse odds they still managed to fight and do their best to come through with a win. They opened the season with a victory over Bradley and then followed this brilliant start with defeats until they found their stride against Ohio and Won the game 29-26. In spite of repeated defeats the squad as a Whole continued to play a hard game and to fight out each point to the last minute. Offensively they were almost a total loss. lndividually again, they were capable of hitting the basket but apparently could never decide to get together and push the ball down under the basket. Stephenson and Evans both had their usual "hot" nights but at no time in the season did they manage to get together and hit the basket in the same game. "Steven staged an individual rally in the second half of the Purdue game at Chicago but the rest of the team apparently could not muster up sufficient speed and ability to support him and his efforts went to waste. Evans found the mark in the first Qhio game and was largely responsible for our victory over them in that game, scoring hfteen of the twenty-nine points. Norgren tried every combination on the squad but Was unable to find one that Was Worth a second trial. Finally in despair he resorted to a system of long range shooting that was at least as good as any. Page 125 U D VVIEN AND EVANS KENNETH FRAIDER Fraider in his last year on the squad alternated at guard. He was quick in taking them off the backboard and brought the ball up the floor fast .... Has been known to make some long shots .... MARSHALL DZIUBANIUK "Blush"-a fast forward with lots of action and good Hoor work. He had an eye for the basket and could work the ball in under it .... BERNARD VVIEN "Bernie, finished his collegiate bas- ketball career with the close of the 1932 season .... hflany a Chicago fan will remember how Bernie would come into a close game and sink a long shot almost on the first play .... He alternated at guard .... BYRON EVANS HChiz" played his Hrst year of var- sity competition in the 1932 season and was easily the outstanding sopho- more on the squad .... He was a brilliant forward with lots of speed and a good eye for the basket .... :nl FRAIDER ,isp DZIUIXAN Page 126 Firxt Rofw: REXINGER, WEONER, STEPHENSON, IASHLEY, SCHLIFKE, PARSONS, FRAIDER. Secqnd Rafw: PORTER, PAGE, VVIEN, NORGREN, DZUIRANIUK, LANGFORD, EVANS, Thzrd Row: BEEKS, OFEILL, CARR, JADWIN, RICHARDSON, FARWELL, KERR, PITCHER. 1932 BASKETBALL TEAM WINNERS OF THE "CH HARRY DEARIWOND ASHLEY JAMES VVILLIAM PORTER BYRON DUNBAR EVANS SCOTT CLIFTON REXINGER KENNETH PETER FRAIDER LOUIS JOSEPH SCHLIFKE KEITH IRVING PARSONS PAUL DONALD STEPHENSON BERNARD JOSEPH WTEN VVINNERS OF THE MAJOR OLD ENGLISH "C" HAROLD JAMES VVEONER Page 127 El D CAWAIN Rox' BLACK AND Cofxci-1 MERRIAM ROY BLACK'S THIRD SEASON Captain Roy Black of the 1932 team will have completed in the 1932 season his second year of competition in indoor track and his third year of outdoor competition. Black has been a consistent winner in the indoor high hurdles, and could always be counted on to place in the low hurdles. ln his seasons here at the University, he has developed perfect form in getting over the hurdles-high or low-and he well desewes the honor of the track captaincy in what amounts to his last year of competition. Roy was a winner of the "CU in his Junior year, and his work in the 1931-32 season surpassed his record of last year. Another consistent performer this year was John Brooks, a Sophomore. Brooks did remarkably well in the dash events, the low hurdles, and the broad jump. As a Freshman, he won the all-around laurels in Freshman Track. Brooks should rank high in the Big Ten in the next two years. Don Birney, Captain-elect of the 1932 Football Team, has been averaging over twelve feet in the pole vault. Jerome Iontry, another Junior, has been doing well in the four forty and on the mile relay team. Roberts, a Sophomore, has two more years to develop in the pole vault and the high jump event in which he has shown much promise. Wallace and Haydon did creditable work in the dashes and hurdles, respectively, and both have another year of competition. Page 128 U U RAMSEY, NicHoLsoN, CAMERON, CoLvxLLE, BROOKS, RECORD OF THE 1931 TRACK SQUAD INDOQRMEETS Chicago 47 ........,.......,.,...,,...........,,,,.....,4,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,A,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,A,,,,,,,,, Loyola 39 Chicago 52 ............ ..,......................... P urdue 33 2X3 Chicago 36 1X3 .......................................,.....,..... Michigan State S8 2f3 Chicago 30 .............................................,.,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,, Iowa 56 Quadrangular Meet-Chicago-Third Place Cl'11C9.gO 22 ....................................................,.... lVI1ch1gan UHlVCfSlt57 73 Indoor Conference Meet-Chicago-Third Place OUTDOOR MEETS Chicago- 25 1X2 .......................... 1 ..........,.....A..,.....,..............,.... Iowa 109 1X2 Chicago 17 ..............,............... Wisconsin 86 ..........,....................,.,., Iowa 62 Pennsylvania Relays-Chicago-Third Place Quadrangular Meet-Chicago-Third Place Qutdoor Conference lVIeet-Chicago-Sixth Place SCHEDULE OF THE 1932 SEASON April 23 Michigan Normal at Ypsilanti April 30 Drake Relays at Des Moines May 7 Purdue University at Lafayette May 14 Chicago, Northwestern, and Wisconsin at Stagg Field IVIay 20-21 Conference lVIeet at Evanston May 28 Marquette, Loyola, Illinois State Normal, and Chicago at Stagg Field June 1 Illinois State Normal at Normal Page 129 I5 D BIRNEY, VVALLACE, HAYDON, BROOKS, JONTRY. THE 1932 INDOOR TRACK SEASON Varsity, 86y2Q Freshmen, 2825 Alumni 11 Chicago, 83 5 Loyola 12 Chicago, 52Mg Purdue, Sly? Quadrrzngular: Pentangular: Ohio, 50 Indiana, 44 Wiscoiisiii, 46 Minnesota, 34M Chicago, 21 Chicago, 17M Northwestern, 15 Northwestern, 8 Chicago, 295 lVIichigan, 66 Purdue, 522 Indiana won the Indoor Conference llfleet, held at the University of Chicago Field House. The only Chicago man to place was Captain Roy Black who took a third in the sixty yard high hurdles. The Chicago mile relay team won fourth place. Page 130 Roy BLACK AND JOHN ROBERTS TRACK SEASON OF 1931 We started our season very creditably with wins over both Loyola and Purdue in dual meets. In the Purdue Meet Dale Letts began his great 1931 career by breaking the half mile record for Bartlett Gymnasium, covering the distance in 1157.9 seconds. In the same meet Brainard won the mile event with the fast time of 4:26.9 seconds. In the next meet with Michigan State we did not do so well. Letts was absent from the line-up, as he was competing elsewhere, but Captain East easily won the dash and Black took both the high and low hurdles. Out at Iowa City, although individually successful in some events, we were not able to pile up enough points to beat the Iowans. Letts won the mile, Brainard took the half mile, and East equalled the Field House record in the 60 yard dash Q63 secondsb. The Quadrangular Meet saw Letts and Brainard take first and second respectively in the mile run, and Birney, for his best performance of the year, pole vaulted twelve feet to tie for second place. At the Conference Indoor lVIeet held at Wisconsin, we turned in the best perform- ance we have done for several years. Dale Letts won both the mile and the half mile. His time, 4-:21.6, set a new Conference record in the mile. We placed third in this meet, upsetting strong teams from Wisconsin, Ohio, Iowa, and Indiana. lVIarch 19, we entered a relay team, Cameron, Jontry, Brainard, and Letts in tht Bankers Relays. This team, in a close, thrilling race, upset strong teams from North- western and Notre Dame. At the Illinois Relays our medley team established a new American indoor record. Running for Chicago were Cameron, Herrick, Brainard, and Letts. With the outdoor season looming before us, Coach Merriam had difficulty in filling the gaps left by ineligibility. Cameron, distance runner, Birney and Offil, pole- vaulters, and Trude, Held events, were lost for the rest of the season. Badly handi- capped by these losses, we had a poor outdoor season, although Dale Letts continued to add to his string of victories in every meet. In the Penn Relays our teams scored a third place, two fourths, and a fifth in the national competition. Later, in a Big Ten Quadrangular meet, we edged out Northwestern 15 to 135 for third place. Finally, in the Conference meet at Northwestern, we took sixth place, and Dale Letts finished his Big Ten career by winning the half mile. Page 131 Tvp Row-N. A. MERRIAM, LEVIN, KELLY', KADIN, GOLDBERG. Barium Rau-SANTEN, SIMON, KELLY, JOHNSON, MOORE. THE CROSS COUNTRY TEAM WINNERS OF THE 'fc' ALFRED HINSEY KELLY Ca fain Y WINNERS OF THE MAJOR OLD ENGLISH C IYIAURICE ICADIN JAwII:s SIMON WINNERS OF THE MINOR OLD ENGLISH C LOUIS GEORGE GROEBE ROWLAND L1:IcH IQEIIY GERALD THOMAS JOHNSON JOHN HOWARD NIOORL' October October November November November WILLIAM VAN SANTEN RESULTS OF THE 1931 SEASON 17 Chicago vs. Loyola 20 24 Chicago vs. Northwestern 2-I 7 Chicago vs. Iowa 30 14 Chicago vs. Ill. Teachers 36 21 Conference meet at Iowa Indiana lst, Chicago Sth Page 132 v Tap R01L+K.ADlN, LOVVRIE, GOODRICH, VVALLACE, RAMSAY, GRIMES, FRTED, FINK, HOLT. Bottom Row-N. A. IVIEILRI.-XM, I-IERRTCK, NELSON, BLACK, EAST, LETTS, BRAINAKD, Liss. f THE TRACK TEAM WINNERS OE THE "CH ALLAN C. EAST, Captain ROY R. BLACK DALE A. LETTS LAWRENCE R. BRAINARD BERTRANI NELSON, JR. WINNERS OF THE MAJOR OLD ENGLISH "C" WILLIAM L. GRINIES ALFRED H. IQELLY WALTER D. HERRICK, JR. EVERETT M. RANISAY JOHN B. HOLT ROBERT G. WALLACE, JR JEROME M.JoNTRY JULIAN D. WE1ss WINNERS OF THE MINOR OLD ENGLISH "C" ROBERT L. BIEE, JR. RAYMOND K. FRIED DONALD H. BIRNEY THOMAS P. GOODRICH GEORGE CAMERON EDWARD M. HAYDON ROBERT S. COLVILLE DONALD C. LOWRIE MILTON I. FTNK POMPEO G.TO1OO "C" BLANKETS AWARDED JUNE, 1931 LAVVRENCE R. BRAINARD DALE A. LETTS ALLEN C. EAST BERTRAM NELSON, JR. Pagc 133 U .D i lf- l 1 CAPTAIN WILLIAM OLSON AND COACH HH. O." PAGE COACH PAGE RETURNS TO THE MIDWAY "Pat" Page, coach extraordinary of baseball and former University of Chicago star, returned to the Midway for the 1931 baseball season. He took over a mediocre varsity squad, injected a large dose of old time lVlaroon spirit into the team, and turned out a Winning baseball team that played ball with all the old Zip and pep of the teams of Page's under- graduate days. "Pat" formerly was a star on the Maroon football team and for three years pitched the Maroon nine to many a glorious victory. Following his undergraduate years, he coached football at the University of Indiana where he produced a strong fighting team. He returned to the University of Chicago staff in 1931. Captain Bill Olson played Hrst base on the 1930 and 1931 teams and accompanied the squad on the trip to Japan in 1930. 1'Stuff" was a heavy hitter and many a llflaroon baseball fan will remember his two and three base hits and his fast fielding at first. Pagr' 134 D D Tap Rofuig-DECKBR, RATNER, Lewis, Cmusria, OFFIL, STRASKE, Bscics LANG on R MARVER R P AGE, J ., AGE. Baztanz Rofw-GEPPINGER, HENSHAW, JOHNSON, MAHONEY, TEMPLE, How D Wu. INS BUZZLL LYNCH RICHARDSON, STACKLE R. f SCORES OF THE 1931 SEASON April 19 Chicago vs. Illinois April 20 Chicago vs. Lake Forest April 23 Chicago vs. Western State April Z4 Chicago vs.Wisconsi11 April 29 Chicago vs Illinois May 2 Chicago vs Iowa May 9 Chicago vs. Michigan May 11 Chicago vs. Iowa May 16 Chicago vs. lVIinnesota CDouble I-Ieaderj lVIay 23 Chicago vs. Indiana IVIay 26 Chicago vs. IVIichigan State June 6 Chicago Vs. Wisconsin June 11 Chicago VS.AlLlIH11i Page 135 fi'X 'C qs-qM1Ag - Jfi 1, gm? :f 'T'::f: .4- 3 .- -.--.ff. :.4 , iw, , , 4, i f' V f f.j1n"aif Ig 3 V, A .Q fr, ,j,':,g- .. - ,. ag 7, we Jia' ' I., 1 f l f V A 1 ya: .- it-' ff! " f- I zt:1:::'f- if 7, ...f " "ii Z W -'7' . 'at' ,4 ,, , Q if , . 100 Wxuzviz URBAN Blu. OLSON fx !,1 X , ,-. I. N , 5 W, 4, v wi X fl 3 ii lg, X1 'Q , . 1 , 4 Q5-I fi 5 5. ,153 4 ,ag A' CHARLES FISH 1931...OFF TO A FLYING START... The 1931 baseball season with H. O. Page as the new head coach was one of the most successful that the University of Chicago has enjoyed for a num- ber of years. At the beginning of the season with only three "C" men eligible for competition the outlook was naturally anything but bright. As the season progressed, with the noticeable improvement of a number of the Junior players, Chicago loomed as a possible contender for the Big Ten title along with llli- nois, Wisconsin, and Northwestern. The rather inauspicious start of the team with two early defeats at the hands of the powerful Illini team, temporarily shattered the previous hopes of the llaroon fans. In a complete reversal of form, however, they succeeded in crushing eight other Conference foes, thus putting Chicago and Wisconsin in a tie for first place. In the Hnal and most colorful clash of the season, be- Pagf' 136 U U -I .ivan ,W I M? . , ., ,. , ...gi f Em, . ,.,'g 'X' ,al , , -fffj.,l -g, 'Sita , f, TM ' ' 2, tlaggssiigf , ni ,Q 2 121.9 ., 'ii 1' lf! -2 QW ' " ' -5' I lf' if ,, It I V -:ali Verge, 4 2, 'I -"9 , "fi, " jyqggz if 'f , Q53 'fx' 2 y 4. ., , A' 1" , '-iniffilii - 'I 'WH ' ' , I ', ,,-, 'sTfo: iE' ,' -, ' - Q-P 1-'ft + 26 -- ff V. wt: s "" . ' 5 Lil ... . EUGENE Buzzei, ROY HENSHAW ARTHUR CAHILL WE FINISH IN A SLUMP... tween the two teams, Chicago seemed to go haywire, and was forced to take a 5-0 drubbing, thus losing its opportunity of seizing the Conference title. The hitting strength of the nine was centered primarily about Arthur Cahill, catcher. The spectaular pitching of Roy Henshaw was largely responsible for the inability of the opponents to run up any very high scores. In the outfield Buzzel, Hal Johnson, and lVIahoney achieved distinction through rendering valuable service to the team, While Fish, C. Johnson, Urban, and Olson, all infielders, played consistently brilliant ball in most of the major games. Although the team did not elect a captain until the day of the last game, it was apparent that Urban was the logical man for the position. His faithful- ness and co-operative spirit Was responsible for a large part of the team's suc- cess, and his presence in the lineup always had the tendency to steady the en- tire infield. Page 137 D D 23 .5 ' K' af -, .i ' X "Hi ' , X Vis g Q or V, A. 2 L 3 I "A' 73 A .. 1-'1 5 zl . 214:46 3 f af ."" 1 1" stri L A HAL JOHNSON GEORGE MAHONEY CLARENCE JOHNSON BASEBALL SCHEDULE FOR 1932 April 9 Chicago 5, Lake Forest 1 April 16 Chicago O, Notre Dame 3 April 23 Chicago 3, Ohio State 2 April 27 Chicago 6, Notre Dame 6 April 30 Chicago 2, Wiscoiisin 6 lVIay 3 Chicago vs. Purdue Cawayl Nlay 7 Chicago Vs. lVIichigan fat homeD Nlay 13 Chicago vs. lVIir.nesota Qawayj Nlay 14 Chicago vs. Nlinnesota Cawayj Nlay 18 Chicago vs. Illinois Cawayl May 21 Chicago vs. Purdue lat homej llay 28 Chicago vs. Nlichigan State Cawayj june 3 Chicago vs. VVisconsin Cawayl June Chicago vs. Alumni Cat homeD Page' 133 T0flc1EJ0'w1ANDERS0N CAssistant Coachb, JOHNSON, MAI-IONEY, WILKINS, OLSON, BUZZELL, HOUSTON, H. O. PAGE Ioachj. Bottom Ro-w-MANDERNACK, O,MEARA, JOHNSON, FISH, CAPTAIN URBAN, TIPLER, JUCIUS, HENSHAW. THE BASEBALL TEAM WINNERS OF THE HC" WILBUR JOHN URBAN, Captain CHARLES EUGENE BUZZELL CLARENCE L. JOHNSON ARTHUR RIPLEY CAHILL HAROLD CORBELIUS JOHNSON CHARLES MARSHALL FISH WILLIAM JOHN OLSON ROY HENSHAW WINNERS OF THE MAJOR OLD ENGLISH "C" MICHAEL -JANIES JUCIUS ARTHUR C. O'MEA1u ROBERT JOSEPH JOHNSTON TIPLER WINNERS OF THE MINOR OLD ENGLISH UC" EDWARD ROSS HOUSTON LOREN EDWARD IVIANDERNACK HAROLD WILKINS Page 139 U D USHORTYH OLSON AND COACH HOFFER T H E G Y M T E A M The Gym team came thru with its eleventh conference title in gymnastics for Chicago 111 the last th1rteen years! Although beaten by Miiinesota i11 a meet earlier Louis A1.v.fuz1az in the season, We were able to nose them out in the conference meet. Captain Everett Olson was the outstanding star for the lvlaroons in the Big Ten. George Wrighte, Marooii sophomore, seems likely to succeed in his stellar capacity. It Was chiefly due to the Work of these two gym- nasts that Chicago was able to triumph in the con- ference. Earlier in the season, hampered by Hu and colds, We fell before lylinnesota who were seen as perspective conference winners. Chicago, llflinnesota, and lllinois were the leaders of the conference, and in a close Hght for supremacy. They took first, seco11d, and third in the order named. VVith VVright back a11d much promising material among the sophomores and juniors, Coach Hoffer has good prospects for next year, CVCI1 though he is losing Captain Olson, whose work for the last several years in all events, and especially the flying rings a11d hori- zontal bar has been outstanding. Pays H0 Tap Rom-YOUNG, ALVAREZ, I-IOFFER, TAYLOR, MURPHY Bottom Raw-I-IANLEY, VVRIGHTE, OLSON, ADLER, Sci-IERUBEL. THE 1932 GYMNASTICS TEAM WINNERS OF THE HC" LUIS ALVAREZ SUMNER EASON SCHERUBEL EVERETT CLAIRE OLsoN, CAPT. GEORGE HAYDEN WRIGHTE WINNERS OF THE OLD ENGLISH "C" EDWARD ALFRED NORDHAUS PAUL MORTON ADLE11 THE 1932 SEASON Points Point? Chicago . ...... 1,018.75 St. Louis Y.M.C.A ............ ,... 8 89.3 Chicago ....,.. 1,169 Ohio State ,.,........... .............,........... 9 48 Chicago .....1. 974 Miniiesota ....................,.,,...........,.., 1,061.5 Chicago ...... 1,145.75 South Chicago Y.M.C.A.... 966.5 Chicago ........................ 1,157.5 111inois ....................,...... 1,159.5 Michigari ....,.,........,,.... 976.5 Conferenre flleet Chicago ..........,.... 1135 points 1VIiunesota ......... 1126.3 points Illinois ............... 1124.7 points Captain Everett O1son of Chicago won the A11 Around. Rehor of Illinois was second. ' George VVrighte of Chicago was third. GEORGE XVRIG Pagz' 141 CAPTAIN CARL GABEL AND COACH Vokiuzs A STRONG WRESTLING SQUAD With his usual knack at turning out First rate teams, Coach Vorres built up a squad in the 1932 season that earned a mythical third place in the Conference and defeated several of the best teams in the East. Due to the unusual advance in wrestling at the University in the last few years, two hard schedules for Eastern trips were arranged for this season. The second one called for three meets in twenty-four hours. The squad evidently enjoyed a touch schedule for they won from Westerri Reserve on the first trip but lost to the strong Penn State team. On the second trip East they defeated Rochester A. 85 llfl., tied the Harvard squad, trimmed Brown 22-8, and lost to Franklin and Marshall. On this trip Bion Howard came into his own by defeating Crandon of Harvard by a fall. According to Vorres, Crandon was a potential champion. ln the Conference, the Wrestling squad defeated lllinnesota and Wiscoiisiim, tied lowa and lost to lllinois. This record gave them a claim to third place in the Con- ference. In the Big Ten meet Gable took a second and in the A. A. U., Heide won a third place medal. The team as a whole was strong with Sherre and Lewis starring in the lighter weights. Page 142 T071 W: D. Bark Raw-VORRES, M. BERNSTEIN, RAPP, BARGEMAN, HEIDE, B. HOWARD, HUBBAR Ho F t Row-J. BERNSTEIN, SHAPIRO, VVHITE, GABEL, SHERRE, FELTBEIN, R. Ho XR 1 THE WRESTLING TEAM WINNERS OF THE HCA' CARL C. GABLE, Captain FRED WONG LOUIS JOHN JACOB HEIDE BURTON SHERRE WINNERS OF THE MAJOR OLD ENGLISH "C" JACOB BERNSTEIN BION BRADBURY HOWARD JOHN STEINHARD HORN ROBERT BENJAMIN SHAPIRO RESULTS OF THE 1932 SEASON January 16 Chicago vs Iowa Teachers 3 29 January 22 Chicago vs VVestern Reserve 19 11 January 23 Chicago vs Penn State 8 24 February 6 Chicago vs IXIinnesota 17y3 IOM FCbTu21ry 11 Chicago vs Rochester A. R IVI. 20 I0 February 12 Chicago vs Harvard I6 I6 FCIJYUZITY 12 Chicago vs Brown 22 8 February 13 Chicago vs F. R NI. I1 17 Febfu-QTY 20 Chicago vs Iowa 16 16 February 27 Chicago vs Illinois 3 Z3 MafCh 5 Chicago vs Wiscoiisiii 19 11 M3fCh 11 and 12 Conference meet Chicago 3rd, Indiana Ist. Page I-13 El D EARLANDSON, COACH MCGILLWRAY AND RI'I'1'ENHOUSE SWIMMING AND WATER POLO WINNERS QF THE HC" GORDON RITTENHOUSE, Captain of Water Polo RALPH CJ.EARLANDSON,C6ljDl'lZi71 of Swimming JAMES J. McMAHON,JR. JOHN NIARRON VVINNERS OF THE MAJOR QLD ENGLISH "C" DONALD BELLSTROM JOHN H. ELAM STANLEY W. CONNELLY JAMES L. GOODNOW SEARING W. EAST HAROLD LAUFMAN Page 144 Top Row-ELAM, RITTENHOUSE, JAMES MARRON, Levi, COACH MCGILLWRAY, SACHS, STEIN, EAST. Boztam R010-LORBER, BELLsTRoM, JOHN MARRON, CAPTAIN EARLANDSON, CONNELLY, Goopsrvow, NAHsER f THE SWIMMING TEAM THE SEASON The swimming team was not as successful this year as in former years, yet none of the above scores indicate complete shut-outs. Under the leadership of Captain Ralph Erlandson, the team struggled against stronger schools who had better luck in getting material than Chicago. However, the season was not without a bright spot. Indiana was blanketed in almost every event by the Nlaroon swimmers. Captain Erlandson, Stanley Connelly, Gordon Rittenhouse, and Bud Marron all placed Hrst in their respective events. Con- nelly was high point man of the meet, as well as the season, winning first place in the 440, and 220, as well as swimming on the winning relay team. Prospects, according to Coach lNIcGillivray, are better for next year. Six sopho- mores and several juniors will report next year, and the freshman squad has several promising members. February 12 February 20 February 27 Nlarch 11-12 RECORD Chicago vs. Ohio State 26 49 Chicago vs. Indiana 54 21 Chicago vs. Illinois 22 53 Conference meet, won by Nlichigan Page 145 U Cl Top Row-Levi, ,Tor-:N MARRON, COULSON, JAMES MARRON, SAc1-is, STE1N. ' Serond R010-LORBER, KAUFMAN, SCHOENBRUN, CoAcH IVICGILLIVRAY, EARLANDSON, NAI-ISER, Goonauow. Bottom Raw-CHOLEX, CONNELLY, ELAM, CAPTAIN Rrrrnm-louse, EAST, BBLLSTROM, LAUFMAN. THE WATER POLO TEAM THE SEASON Captained by Gordon Rittenhouse, the Water Polo team had a very creditable sea- son in 1932. Although they did not capture the conference title as has usually been the case with Coach McGillivray's teams, they won two out of three of the big games with large scores, and made Illinois work hard and worry a great deal in the final tussel. The teams for each game were from the following men: Rittenhouse, Erlandson, Elam, Connelly, Laufman, East, Goodnow, Marron, Stein, Lorber, and McMaho1i. MCNIZROII was credited with the lone two goals for Chicago in the Illinois game, while Rittenhouse, as a roving guard, performed notably, and most of the plays were built around him. Laufman was steady and dependable at goal guard. Connelly, Erland- son, and Elam gave good support and were fine defensive players. The games with Qhio and Indiana were too easy, and did not serve to prepare the team for the final clash with Illinois. The game with Indiana was cut to half time, and still the Nlaroons managed to average almost a goal a minute. RECORD February l2 Chicago vs. Ohio State ll l February 20 Chicago vs. Indiana ll 0 February 27 Chicago vs. Illinois 2 3 Page 146 El U TOP-LONNIE, SCHMIDT, ZOLXNE, Ruzs Franz-HEYMAN, REXINGER, P. STAGG TH E TENNIS TEAM WINNERS OF THE "C SCOTT CLIFTON REXINGER, CAPT HERBERT HUGH HEYMAN PAUL STAGG WINNERS OF THE MAJOR OLD ENGLISH C STANLEY ABRAHAM KAPLAN LAWRENCE SCHMIDT Ap ril IVI ay IVI ay IVI ay M ay lVIay NI ay lVI ay NI ay IMI ay IVI ay HERMAN ELKAN RIES WINNER OF THE MINOR OLD ENGLISH C JOSEPH ZoL1NE RESULTS OF THE 1931 SEASON Chicago Chicago . Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago vs. Northwestern vs. Hillsdale vs. Iowa vs. Ohio State vs. Lake For-est vs. lVIichigan vs. lVIinneSota vs. Illinois vs. Northwestern vs. Wisconsin , 29, 30 Western Conference Tennis Tournament Sin gles-Won by Rexinger Chicago Doubles-won by Rexinger and Heyrnan Chicago Page 147 U D GOLF SQUAD OF 1931- T H E G O LF T E A M WINNERS OF THE MAJOR OLD ENGLISH ucv IVIILTON P. KLEIN SAMUEL C. PREST ROBERT S. BOHNEN W. H.L1TTE1.L RESULTS OF THE 1931 SEASON IN'Iay 8 Chicago vs. Wisconsin 7 11 Ilfiay 11 Chicago vs. Purdue 5 13 lVIay 14 Chicago vs. Iowa 13 5 Illay 18 Chicago vs. Illinois SM 122 IVIay 21 Chicago vs. lVIichigan 32 HM llay 29, 30 VVestern Conference Golf Tournament at Ann Arbor Team Standings-lst, University of Illinois Individual Standings-lst, R. Klartin of Illinois Paye 148 Top Rau-ELSON, YOUNG, COACH MERRILL, PETTIT, SPAULDING. Botlom Rom-RATCLIFF, ALMOND, CAPT. VAN DER HOEF, GILLIES, IULIAN, EIGER f THE FENCING SQUAD THE 19326 FENCING TEAM WINNERS OF THE 'KCI' GEORGE THOMPSON VAN DER HOEF, Captain WINNERS OF THE OLD ENGLISH "C" GABRIEL ADAM ALMOND ORMAND C. JULIAN DONALD REITER GILLIES BURTON HUGH YOUNG THE 1932 SEASGN Chicago 5 bouts - lVIichigan 2 bouts Chicago 6 bouts - llflilwaulcee Y.lVI.C.A. 10 bouts Chicago 3 bouts - Ohio State 4 bouts Quadrangular lVIeet-Chicago, Illinois, llflichigan, Northwestern. Chicago l bout - Illinois 6 bouts Chicago 7 bouts - lvlichigan 4 bouts Chicago 13 bouts - Northwestern 3 bouts Conference lVIeet: lst-Illinois with 15 points. 2nd-Chicago with 6 points. Pagf' 149 U D 1931 FRESHMAN FOOTBALL NUMERAL WINNERS WINNERS OF FULL NUMERALS ARCHIBALD HUNTINGTON ALLAN JOHN LOUIS BAKER KENNETH JOSEPH CAPOUCH FRANK NICHOLAS CHORVAT MAURICE GORDON CLARK, JR. EDWARD R. CULLEN THOMAS EDWIN FLINN CASPER HENRY HILTON JOHN WENTWORTH HOWE ROBERT JOHN KEENAN ROBERT JASUA LINDAHL MERRETT MARWOOD LOVETT ELLMORE CLARK PATTERSON CHARLES CRANE ROBY FRANK SPEARING BARTON SMITH LOUIS TURLEY JOE HERINIAN TOMIE BARTLETT PETERSON CECIL LIONAL STOREY WILLIAM VOORHEES JOHN ROBERT VVONIER VVINNERS OF RESERVE NUMERALS LEROY JUDSON AYERS ALBERT JAMES BONADY FRANCIS MITCHELL CAYOU ROGER STANISLAUS GORMAN DAVID MAX LEVIN ROBERT LESTER ALBERT F. SAIKLEY FRANK HART TALISSIO Page 150 Top ROQLR-ANDERSON, AYERS, CULLEN, PATTERSON, PYLE, PATTERSON, CIMERAL, REED, PAGE. Sammi Row-ELRINS, COLE, LOVETT, VOORHEES, GOTCHALL, Moss, ROSENCRANS. Bartow Row-WEHLINO, FLINN, ELLIS, SAIKLEY, MORRIS, ,MERRIFIELD. FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 1932 WINNERS OF FULL NUMERALS LGIAURICE GORDON CLARK,JR. ELLMORE CLARK PATTERSON ROBERT WELLINGTON ELDRED PAUL SHAW PATTERSON MARVIN GALLOWAY ELKINS, JR. VVILLIAM ROBERT PYLE THOMAS FLINN NED ROSACRANS NIAURICE MARTIN GOTSCHALL ALBERT F. SAIKLEY CHAUNOY CARY HOWARD EARL SEAEORO MERRITT MARWOOD LOVETT VVILLIAM VOORHEES HAROLD MORRIS RALPH JOSEPH WEHLING REVIEW OF THE FRESHMAN SQUAD The freshman team of 1932 had good balance, a fair amount of speed, but little in the way of heighth. There Were a few promising men in the squad. lvlerritt Lovett is a clever player at forward, and will probably Hll in at the forward position left vacant by the graduation of Stephenson. Robert Pyle, a six foot, three inch center from Vincennes, Ind., will add heighth and help out Parsons next year. lklaurice Gotschall and Earl Seaborg show promise at guard, and William Voorhees from Long Beach, Cal., is another possibility at forward. Page 151 Top R010-PAGE, ANDERSON, LEWIS. Sefand Row-KEOGII ALBERT, GILL, DRAINIE, BERKSON, IACOBSON, CHRISTIE, COMERFORD, ROTNER, KERR. , Bottom Row-EPSTEIN, OFFILL, SLICER, STRASKE, HARRIS, BEEKS, LEVY, BURNS, EISENIIERG, DECKER. FRESHMAN BASEBALL 1931 1934 Nunzerals EDGAR BLESSING BEEKS JAMES JACK LEWIS WILLIAM ARTHUR COMERFORD VVILLIANI GARB JACOBSON THEODORE S. DECKER ASHLEY GFFILL THOMAS ANDREW GILL A. L. SLICER ROBERT S. LANGFORD STEPHEN BARNEY STRASRE Reserve 1934 .Nunzerals TVIICHAEL T. BURNS XVALTER EUGENE IQEOGH G. C. CHRISTIE RIORRIS BENJAMIN LEVY GEORGE EISENBERG HARLAN ORVILLE PAGE,-IR. GERALD ROTN ER Page 152 El D First RUFLG-'TUTTLE, CLIVER, MOORE, ESPENSIIADE, CALKINS, NICHOLSON, VVI-IITIIER, LEVINE, IQELLEY, BROOKS Back R0'LU-'COACH APITZ, TRESSLER, PERLIS, GROEBE, JOHNSON, GOLDEERG, PARHAM, Bock, FRODIN. FRESHMAN TRACK 1931 1934 NUMERALS JOHN WILLIAM BROOKS EDWARD WHEELOCK NICHOLSON TRACY HARRIS CALKINS JOHN GAITHER ROBERTS GERALD THOMAS JOHNSON HENRY LEA YARNALL DAVID CHARLES LEVINE LEWIS GEORGE GROEBE 1934 RESERVE NUMERALS ROBERT HOWRY ESPENSHADE ROWLAND LEIGH KELLY SEYMOUR GOLDBERG FRANKLIN JOHNSON IVIOORE ALONZO SOULEIGH PARHAIVI ALL-AROUND VVINNERS, WINTER QUARTER, 1931 John Brooks Scored a total of 5650 points for Hrst place. john Roberts scored 5310 points. Tracy Calkins, 4730 points. Edward Nicholson, 4560 points. ALL-AROUND WINNERS, SPRING QUARTER, 1931 John Brooks Won Hrst honors by Scoring 9497 points. Tracy Calkins, second with 5948 points. Lea Yarnall scored 4250 points. james Harris Scored 3836 points. Cups were awarded to Winter Winners and medals to Spring winne1S Page 153 5 D P I J fig' ,.4 V, M, fm f f QV W N fe V WM PLAYGRQUND BALL CHAMPIONS ' Pm KAPP.A Psi KfXPPA Nu Bowling C!I1lIl1pi07l.f Horsrshoz' Chzunlis Page 155 EI D FREDERICK D. CHANNER LAWRENCE J. SCHMIDT FOREST S. DRUMMOND THE SENIOR BOARD FREDERICK D. CHANNER . FOREST S. DRUBIMOND LAWRENCE I SCHMIDT, Chazrnzmz JUNIOR MANAGERS RIELVILLE LYNCH ..... . Fa!! Sports HENRY SULCER Wirzter Sports ROBERT HOWARD ....... Spring Sports BOB Ilmmzw Mm.v1r.I.E Iffxcxi Ilrivlu' SUACER Page' 156 S0f?h07!l01'c"J-SHANEDLING, CARR, HEPPLE, REED, EDMONDS, GILL, SCHOENBRUN, GRAFF, ZUKOWSKI, F1-erhfncn-ALDRIDGE, HOWARD, CURTIS, PALMER, AUSTIN, SMITH, SMILEY, HUTCHINSON, S. SMITH, LA RUE, TEN EYCK, LARsoN, IYIECHER, SOLF, GRDSSMAN, PORTE, LEVENSON, HARRIS. f RESUME GF THE YEARS WORK The trend of Intramurals during the past year has been towards higher all-around efhciency in all its phases. New programs have been added, greater participation has been accommodated, fewer forfeits have been suffered, finer men have become interested in the work, and the budget has been decreased. Intramural Sports are now substitutable for required physical, culture, while, on the, other hand, the Intramural spirit of play has pervaded the physical education classes, in that two hours of voluntary play are now offered by the Department of Physical Education. Since the beginning of the Year, Intramural athletes are also being offered training by the varsity coaches in wrestling, boxing, track, and swim- ming, resulting in greater skill, better conditon, and fewer injuries from over-exertion. One of the disappointments of the Department is the lack of interest shown by the new lVIen,s Residence Halls in Intramurals. An average of only 20 men out of the 200 residents, have participated in the programs of the Department. There seems to be a general apathy among the residents in spite of much promotion work by their sophomore general sports manager and the Department. Looking to the future, there is possibility of good work by the Department in offer- ing a sports program to the members of the faculty, in having appointed a permanent sports executive at the new dormitoriesg in offering student help to the University Settlementg and in encouraging unattached men to take advantage of the socializing benehts of Intramural Sports. LAWRENCE SCI-INIIDT, Senior Chzlirnzan. Page .757 PHI DELTA TH ETA HIGH PGINT WINNERS SOPHOMORE MANAGERS PHILIP SHANEDLING JAMES EDMONDS FRANK CARR THOMAS GILL ROBERT HEPPLE ROBERT SCHOENBRUN RUFUS REED MEYER GRAFF EDWIN ZUKOWSKI Jf 1 . -A J' . . FORBRICH, PIII I7ELT.X TIIETA, INIJIVIDUAI. POIXT VVINNER K.u'P.x XL'-VVREsrI.Isc Cn,xMI'Iuxs Pa-qc 153 Cl D Psi UPs1LoN-TOUCHBALL CHAMPIONS THE 1932 INTRAMURAL CARNIVAL The eighth annual Intramural Carnival was held in Bartlett Gymnasium on March 3, 1932. All around track honors were awarded to Delta Kappa Epsilon with 52 points. The Ramblers were second with 45 points and Psi Upsilon, third, with 34 points. Wrestling finished with a four Way tie between Psi Upsilon, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Beta Delta, and Kappa Nu. The Ponies Won boxing. zrr Q Hows ,mn STREICPI-GOLF CHAMPIONS Karim SIGMA-FREE Tinzow Cn,xMi-rioxs Page 159 D D THE WINNERS In organization points Phi Delta Theta was first with a total of 554-Zi points. Delta Upsilon trailed the first place winners by One point to take Second honors and Tau Delta Phi, Phi Sigma Delta, Kappa Sigma, and Phi Pi Phi followed in the Order named. Individual point Winner was Louis Forbrich of the Phi Delta Theta House. During the 1930-31 Season he gathered a total of 496 points to beat out Greenberg, Kappa Nu, who took second with 448 points. GOLF Hozce ana' Streiclz FENCING . . . . Julian TOUCHBALL CHAMPIONS . . . Psi Upsiloa SWIMMING CHAMPIONS Delta Kappa Epsilon HORSESHOE CHAIVIPIONS . . Kappa Nu "AU BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS Ponies "B" BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS . . . Mars FREE THROW CHAMPIONS . . Kappa Sigma BOWLING CHAMPIONS Phi Kappa Psi HANDBALL . . Graham of the Ponies WRESTLING . Kappa N u INDOOR TRACK CHAMPIONS . . Phi Pi Phi PLAYGROUND BALL CHAMPIONS . . Phi Beta Deira OUTDOOR TRACK CI-IARIPIONS Delta Upsilmi OUTDOOR CARNIVAL CHAMPIONS . . . Delta Upsilon TENNIS .... Bartz: and Ball of Gzznzma Alpha CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPIONS Psi Upsilaa Page 160 Page 161 WOMENS ATHLETICS D D GERTRUDB DUDLEY DEPARTMENT OF WOMEN'S ATHLETICS Play for Playfv Safe is the slogan of the Department of Physical Education, and during the past year the members of this department made steady progress in their efforts to give the Women of the University an athletic program which, while highly constructive, was basically devoted to play. Through the medium of numerous personal conferences with the students, the members of the faculty Were able to place each woman who could meet the required standards of health in the sport in which she was most likely to excel. The year was featured by an unusually interesting and varied program of sports events in some phase of which every student found an op- portunity to satisfy her athletic fancy. VVith the co-operation of the Women's Athletic Association, the department sponsored tournaments and club activities in almost all of the year's sports. Page 162 Srrxun, BURNS, THoMsoN, VAN TUYL, VVARNER BALLWEBBER, DUDLEY, VVYLIE WOMEN ON COMPULS-ORY "GYM" The question, "Shall compulsory gym be abolished ?" has recently been agitating the student body and yet remains to be settled. With the advent of the new plan in academic requirements, many of the old restrictions and compulsions have been re- moved. There is a growing feeling that the governing powers are inconsistent in making attendance obligatory in Physical Education while permitting it to be optional at lectures. The agitators seem oblivious to the fact that although the knowledge required for credit in a given course of science, literature, or language may be obtained by outside reading and discussion, no such independent route is open to one who would acquire an increased lung capacity or a strong and supple musculature. Reading about correct posture does nothing to strengthen weak muscles or insure proper balance. Only the actual exercise in class or its equivalent is of any value. llfloreover one cannot cram in physical a-ttainments as is so often done in other fields. They need regular, even daily attention to be of any value. The University attempts to insure the academic standing of its products by a com- prehensive examination. The student is compelled to gain a certain knowledge and reasoning ability by one means or another. It has no standard, however, the attain- ment to which acts as a compelling force in inciting a student to physical activity or improvement. If compulsory gym is abolished, that will be left entirely to the whim of those concerned. It is safe to guess that with the exception of those interested in competitive sports and those energetic individuals least in need of what the department has to offer, very few will overcome their natural lethargy and indifference to physical welfare and take advantage of the opportunities available. Pzzyz' 163 U D ' Top-VAIL, FEUCHTWANGER, FRIEDEMAN. Middlf-GOETSCH, ESPENSHADE, MERRIAM, JOHNSON, Bunn, STUCKHART, ALsc1-IULER. Bottom-D1ERssEN, RANDALL, LYMAN, FRICKE, Coox. HOCKEY If the degree of enthusiasm displayed for the game is used as a measure of success, the nineteen thirty-one hockey season was the most successful one to date. There was an unusually large turn-out for the teams, the Freshman-Junior practice being large enough for the formation of five teams. The Weather was ideal, there being hardly a day when practice was impossible. In the interclass games the Seniors, under the able guidance of Ruth Lyman, were easy Victors. They breezed through their six interclass contests without the loss of a game. However competition was keen enough to make the contests highly interesting, and in several of the matches the Seniors were hard-pressed to keep their slate clean. The captains were Ruth Lyman, Seniorg Esther Feuchtwanger, Juniorg Katherine Dierssen, sophomoreg and Ada Espenshade, Freshman. Because of the large number of outstanding players who participated in the inter- class matches, the Honor Team was larger than usual. In addition to the regular team, there were five capable substitutes. This team played against the alumnae and crowned an outstanding season by piling up a mountainous score for an easy victory. HONOR TEAM SUBSTITUTES FOR VVINNING TEAM GOLDE BRESLICH MARY BUDD BARBARA Cook AADA ESPENSHAOE ESTHER FEUCHTVVANCER AOELE FRICKE SYLviA FRIEDMAN RUTH LYMAN RUTH Moss HELEN RANDALL PATRICIA VAIL HONOR TEAM FRANCES TARLSCHULER KATHERINE DIERSSEN MARGARET GoETscH DOROTHY JOHNSON ELIZABETH MERRIAM RITA STUCKHART MARY Bunn BARBARA Cook CLAUDIA DORLANIJ ELLA FIETZE 4ADELE FRICKE SYLVIA FRIEDMAN MARGARET HILL RUTH LYMAN ELIZABETH MERRIAM JOSEPHINE lVlIRABELl.A IsAuEL PETERSON Page 164 U D Top- ROCKWELL, Moss, LYMAN. Baztom-Doi-IENY, FEUCHTWANGER, FRICKE, DIERssEN. BASKETBALL ln one of the fastest series of games ever seen on Ida Noyes floor the seniors wrested the interclass championship from a scrappy junior team. This is the second year that a Senior team has carried off the interclass honors in spite of stiff competition. The final game between the Juniors and Seniors was packed with thrills from the starting whistle to the final gun. The lead see-sawed back and forth until the last quarter when the Seniors, lead by Captain Adele Friclce, went out in front to stay and clinch the championship. The Juniors fought until the last gun but they were powerless before the onslaughts of the Senior sharpshooters whose plays worked with the precision of a well-oiled clock. The Juniors and the Seniors each placed five women on this yea1"s Honor Team. The rest of the members were taken from the two lower class teams. The game between the Honor team and the Alumnae team was the hardest fought of any played here recently. The final result, 17-16 in favor of the Alumnae, came only after an overtime play. HONOR TEAM VVINNING TEAM MARY BUDD KATPIERINE DIERssEN CATHERINE DOHENY ESTHER FEUCI-ITWANGER LADELE FRICKE ANNE HARRIS LAURA LIEBERMAN RUTH LYMAN RUTH Moss HELEN PILLANS MARY VIRGINIA ROCKVVELL ESTHVER VVEBER MARY BUUD ADELE FRICKE ANNE HARRIS MARGARET HILL RUTI-I LYMAN DOROTHY MOIIR ISAEEL PETERSON HEI,EN PILLANS FRANCES ALSCIIUI FR ELLA FIETZE Page 165 BASEBALL ' The 1931 baseball season was a very successful one for the girls of the University. Good weather and the appreciated facilities of Dudley Field made regular practice possible, hence all the teams were in good form for the inter-class tournament. Due to the expert coaching of M-iss Burns and Miss Warner, the tournament games were hard-fought, and displayed a kind of cooperation that makes for good teams. The Juniors, under the leadership of Ruth Lyman and Barbara Cook, co-captains, won all their games and the class championship. The Honor Team, selected from the best players of each class, participated in two extra games, one with the Honor Team of the University High School, the other with the Alumnae Team. Winning both games comfortably, the University Honor Team closed a successful and very enjoyable season. Honor Team Pyinning Team EDITH ALTMAN BARBARA COOK GOLDE BRESLICH ADELE FRICKE VIVIAN CARESON MARJORIE HAMILTON BARBARA COOK ADELE FRICKE RUTH LYMAN KATHERINE MCD.ANIEL ROSALIE LOWENSTEIN RUTH LYMAN KATHARINE MCDANIEI, DOROTHY BIIOHR DOROTHY MOHR NIARGARETHA MOORE EVELYN SHANE EVELYN SHANE AMELIA WEII. Substitutes for Honor Team DELIGHT BABCOCK RUTH FLETCHER PAULINE REDMONIJ ABIELIA WEIL Page 166 U D SWIMMING Swimming in the Ida Noyes pool has long been one of the most enjoyable and popular of the athletic activities offered to the University women by the department of Physical Education. Though the relaxation and pleasure derived from the sport are important features, undirected play and leisure have not been the ultimate goal of the department. Excellent instruction has benehted both timid beginners and all skilled swimmers. Following a quarter of instruction and whole-hearted co-operation, class teams were chosen. After a period of keen competition between the four teams, the sophomores led by Gertrude Fox emerged victorious. An Honor Team was then selected to compete with the Alumnae Team, the former taking the honors of the day. HONOR TEAM WINNING TEAM GrER'I'RUDE Fox - AGNES ADAIR MARIAN HARKINS RUTH BARNARD HELEN RANDALL LAURA COOK BERNICE RICE GERTRUDE Fox JUANITA SACHS HELEN RANDALL RUTH SHAW BERNICE RICE ANGELINE WILLIAMS ANGELINE WII,LIAMS Page 167 MINOR SPORTS Archery-Every fall and spring the spirit of Robin Hood reappears on Dudley Field, conjured up by the archers with their bows and arrows. Bowling-The women bowlers optimistically call themselves "The 300 Club," although the perfect score still remains just an aspiration. Tennis-To University women "The Racket" means the tennis club and not front- page stuff for the newspapers. Horseback Riding-"Pegasus" is a fitting title for the riding club, which furnishes perhaps the most exhilarating and thrilling fun on campus. Outing-Hiking through beautiful scenery to restful places, Cooking juicy steaks and "Cheese Dreams" out-of-doors, staying over night--these make up the outings. i , ' . 1 u. --1 Q V - 1' I I K i : T . 1 . WM . .i ,. A mfg Q F353 Page 163 MINOR SPORTS Rhythms-Those nymphs and sprites seen dancing about Ida Noyes garden in the spring are members of UOrchesis.H Fencing-Aspiring d'Artagnans may quench their thirst for foil knowledge under expert tutelage. , Golf-The "C" annually Won by the woman golf-champion of the University always represents a hotly contested victory. Volleyball-Those wild women out on Dudley Field jumping up and down trying to keep one round pig-skin on the other side ofthe net are Working towards their "VB" emblems. ' Captainball-Everyone likes captainbaill, even the Hnon-athletic" type who can be just as good a player standing still as she can running around. Pagf' 169 D L HILL TRINRLE BAILEY PETERSON THE WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OFFICERS MARGARET HILL ..... . President HARRIET ANN TRINKLE . . Vice-President LEONE BAILEY . . . Secretary ISABEL PETERSON ...... . Treasurer ADVISORY BOARD, 1931-1932 MISS GERTRUDE DUDLEY ESTHER FEUCHTWANGER . MARION BADGLEY . KATHERINE IWCDANIEL GERTRUDE FENNEINIA . BARBARA COOK . ADELE FRICKE . . IVIARY VIRGINIA ROCKWELL BETTY HANSEN . . RUTH LYINTAN . IMIONA HODGE . MARTHA IVIILLER ELEANOR SLUSSER ESTHER WEBER LAURA Coox Faculty Advisor . Plorkey . Basketball . Baseball Minor Sports . . Golf . . Outing Social Chairman . Publicity . "C" Club The "300" Club . Orchesis . . Pegasus Racket . Tarpon Page 170 U n TI-IE Anvisoizv BOARD THE WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION In looking over the events of the past year, the Women's Athletic Association may well be proud of its accomplishments, for in addition to the usual exciting athletic tournaments, sports' banquets, and interclass competition the Association ventured into new fields. Realizing the need for a University Christmas card, the W. A. A. Board presented to the students a dignified card in black and white, bearing the University seal in actual color and depicting the stately cloisters symbolic of the University. The enthusiastic reception which greeted the card insured the success of the venture. After the closing of the refectory in lda Noyes Hall, W. A. A., regulating the prices in keeping with the spirit of the times, served luncheon each week on Tuesdays, in order to accommodate the large number of students who had previously availed themselves of the luncheon facilities of the refectory. The hockey season met with its customary success, as did basketball in which Competition was even more keen than usual, while the swimming pool was particularly turbulent. Now, prospects of a thrilling baseball season are in view. These athletic activities, the foundation of the VVomen's Athletic Association, will continue faith- fully, and combined with the newer ventures serve to produce a Well-rounded program. Page 171 BABCOCK, SHANE, Aescr-IULER, JIRINEC, Armin, Golzrscx-1. SOLINSKY, Moss, CAMP, N1KoL1cH, MERMAM, FRICKE, Coox. HACKL, CARLSON, Feocx-1TwANc1sR, LYMAN, BRESLICH, H.-xnxms. THE WOMEN'S "C" CLUB OFFICERS RUTH LYMAN . . . . President ESTHER FEUCHTWANGER . Vice-President GOLDE BRESLICH . Secretary-Treasurer Those women who are on the honor teams in the major sports and those who have won cups in golf and tennis are eligible to membership in the "C" Club. It is a social organization and meets on the hrst Friday of each month at the homes of the mem- bers. An initiation dinner is given each quarter to Welcome newcomers into the organi- zation. Under the enthusiastic guidance of Ruth Lyman, the president, the organiza- tion grew in the number of actual attendants to include most of those eligible to belong. During the year the club unselfishly lent its co-operation to the Physical Education De- partment by providing volunteer assistants to supervise the work on optional gym days. The club took an active interest in furthering the aims of the University Settlement. lt was one of the first organizations to offer support other than financial. This year the club gave cups to the winning teams in the Settlement Volleyball and Basketball Leagues. It sponsored groups of girls at the settlement and furnished coaches for short athletic periods and counsellors for club-periods following. Page 172 U D TARPON CLUB OFFICERS HARRIET GERBER' . . President HELEN STOLL . Vice-President ELEANOR SLUSSEP, . . Secretary lV,lARION HARKINS . Treasurer LAURA COOK . . . . Mernber-at-Large Tarpon, recently gaining a popular foothold among the athletic activities offered, is the swimming club for University women. Entrance to the club may be gained by passing a "Tadpole" test-the simplest of swimming trials. By passing more difficult ones, the "Frog" and "Fish" tests, members may raise their status in the club. During the fall and winter quarters, team competion for the most part made up the program for the club, in order to improve the swimming standards. The club divided itself into three groups, captained by Ruth Barnard, Pearl Foster, and Esther Webe1'. Near the end of the winter quarter all three teams competed in a swimming meet, in which Esther Weber's team Hnally emerged victor. In the spring of l93l, the yearly Tarpon exhibit, the spectactular culmination of the year's activities, took form in 'Tour Nights with King Arthur," an exhibit based on the medieval days of Arthur. Page 173' MILDRED HACKL. Esruen FEUCHTWANGER. HIGHLIGHTS 0F THE YEAR SPRING BANQUET The climax of the year's activities in W. A. A. is reached at Spring Banquet. At this function all University women are welcome, and faculty guests and distinguished alumni are present. At the 1931 banquet greetings and messages of Vice-President Woodvxfard, the guest of honorg Barbara Cook, the Toastmistressg Mr. Robert Lovett, representing the facultyg and Miss Mary Courtney, the alumni speaker, centered about baseball, the motif of the evening's program. This "heavy-hitting line-up" was interspersed with "Safe at First," "Double Play," and "Home Run," designating the presentation of the usual W. A. A. awards, class banners, individual cups, honor pins, and lVIajor KICYS fl TOURNAMENTS A tennis tournament is held each spring to give the women of the University an opportunity to compete for honors in this, a favorite sport. ln the spring of 1931 Olga Nilcolich won the advanced tournament with Esther Feuchtwanger running a close second. In the beginners class Natalie Washburn won, with Helen Davis as runner-up. The annual golf tournament was held last spring on May 23 at Cog-Hill with about Hfty contestants. The players left Ida Noyes in the morning in cars and the last participants returned about 7:00 P.lVI. The final results showed Mildred Hackl as winner and Jean Searcy as runner-up. The contest was particularly exciting be- cause these two players had vied for honors for several years past. The bowling tournament of last spring was held under the auspices of the Bowling Club, one of the newly affiliated clubs of W. A. A. The tournament was the first to be held in recent years. The winner was Ethel Franzen with Eileen Humiston bowl- ing the second highest score. Page 174 U I5 THE 1931 AWARDS IVIILDRED HACKL . OLGA NIKOLICH IUOROTHY ICAMIWERMAN MARGARET HILL KATHRYN MCDANIEL RUTH CAMP IQATHERINE DIERSSEN MARGARET HILL MARGARET MORRIS KATHERINE DIERSSEIY DOROTHY FOX VIRGINIA BOWMAN MARION HARKINS LILLIAN PETERSON CUPS . -. . . . RIBBON CHICAGO "C" HONOR PINS BASEBALL BASKETBALL HOCKEY SWIMMING . Golf Tennis Bowling RUTH LYBIAN EVELYN SHANE RUTH Moss ISABEL PETERSON HELEN STOLL ESTHER 'WEBER RUTH Moss CORDA PALMER HELEN RANDALL JUANITA SACHS ESTHER WEBER Page 175 U D -Af-ff - '4 ff' Q I ALL ' lf? ' 4Q-E51 , U ig? Page 176 DELTA UPSILON OUTDOOR TRACK CHAMMONS 1 5 ' ' f Page 177 Page 178 HONORS D D Tap R0Q01TROYER, RIDENOUR, VAN DER HOEF, DRUMMOND. Fm! RUM'-LAING, ROSENEERG, OLSON, STEPHENSON, VVHITE. COLLEGE MARSHALS AND AIDES MARSHALS GILIZERT F. WHITE, H end Marslzfzl FORREST S. DRUMMOND CHESTER W. LAING EVERETT C. OLSON LOUIS N. RIDENOUR, JR. S. ROSENRERG 1X1ERW1N PAUL D. STEPHENSON ENOS E. TROYER GEORGE T. VAN DER HOEE AIDES RUTH ABELLS VIOLA BOVVER SYLVIA FRIEIJEMAN, Senior A-1ARGARET HILL JEANNE HYDE JANE KESNER CECELIA LISTING RUTH LYMAN ELIZABETH IVIERRIAM ELISABETH PARKER Aide Pagfr 180 U n Top Roma-LYMAN, PARKER, KESNER, ABELLS, HILL, HYDE. Bolzom R010-FRIEDEMAN, Bowen, LISTING, Coox, MERRIAM. COLLEGE MARSHALS AND AIDES From fifteen to twenty members of the Junior class are appointed Marshals and Aides in June of each year by the President to assist the lliarshal of the University in the conduct of the public ceremonies of the University. They are selected on the basis of scholarship, hon- orable participation in college activities, qualities of independence and leadership, and the personal traits that make the nominees fitting representatives of the University on ceremonial occasions. The President designates one of the men as Head lkiarshal to supervise the work of the entire group, while the retiring Aides choose one Woman for the unofficial post of Senior Aide. Each group has the traditional privilege of making recom- mendations for its successors. When they are invested in the Cap and Gown at the Interfraternity Sing each spring, the President explains that their ap- pointment is based on "qualities of high intellectual attainment coupled with leadership in non-academic activities." Page 181 OWL AND SERPENT ! N Q 6 5515. HARRY DE ARMOND ASHLEY ROY RENN BLACK VVILLIAM JOSEPH CUSTER, JR. SAMUEL HORWITZ CHESTER VVILLIAM LAING ROBERT FFYRRELL JVICCARTHY EVERETT CLAIRE OLSON VVILLIAM JOHN OLSON SCOTT CLIFTON REXINGER CHARLES EDWARD SCHMIDT LAVVRENCE JOSEPH SCHMIDT ENOS EDWARD TROYER GlI,BERT FOVVLER WHITE BERNARD JOSEPH VVIEN Owl and Sffrfmrzt is Ihr lmzmr S0l'iFfj' for Swzior men Pngf 182 NU PI SIGMA ,wg I, , W 2 1 lg If' RUTH .ABELLS MARGARET EGAN SYLVIA FRIEDEMAN NIARGARET HILL AIEANNE HYDE RUTH LYMAN ELIZABETH NIERRIAIXII ELISABETH PARKER JEANETTE SMITH ALICE STINNETT Nu Pi Sigma is the honor .variety for Senior woolen Page 183' IRON MASK S? V Fx .4 GARDNER ABBOTT VVARREN BELLSTROM DONALD H. BIRNEY ROBERT BOHNEN JOHN D. CLANCY RURE S. FRODIN, JR. BION B. HOWARD ROBERT C. HOWARD ALFRED E. JACOBSEN GEORGE E. IVIAHONEY IQEITH PARSONS JAMES VV. PORTER HENRY T. SULCER VVARREN E.THOBI1'SON ROBERT G. NVALLACE Ross WHITNEY, JR. Iron fllask is the honor society for Junior men Page 184 SKULL AND CRESCENT . mg, S L ROBERT AUFDENSPRING VVILLIAM BERG FRANK CARR BYRON D. EVANS JOHN HORN HAL JAMES DONALD KERR VINCENT NEWNIAN EDWARD NICHOLSON MILTON OLIN JOHN HORN W. ALVIN PITCHER H.ARLAN PAGE WAYNE RAPP JOHN ROBERTS VINSON SAHLIN JOE SIBLEY FRANK SPRINGER WILLSON TUTTLE PETE ZIMNIER Skull and Crescent is the honor society for Sophonzore men Page 185 ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA , . ' 5 N N' ' P DAN DYSART BAKER ZACHERY ABRAHAM BLIER GEORGE EISENBURG HENRY NELSON HARKINS CLAIRE ELIZA HEALEY ELEANOR MANY HUMPHREYS GIEAXDYS KINDRED-DOLAN VVILLIAM JAMES IQIRBY GENE HAVELIAND IQISTLER JAMES POE LOVETT -JOHN DAN MCCARTHY GEORGE MORRIS MCCLURE HERBERT LEON IVIICKEL ABRAHAM MINTZ FRED HOWENSTINE JVIOWREY VVILLIAM FRANKLIN PEACOCK IALFRED JACOB PLATT ALEXANDER HERB'IAN ROSENTHAL .ALCIDE LOUIS ROSI ISRAEL IRVING ROTTER VVILLIAM GEORGE RURIK REO NIISKIMEN SWAN ALBERT ASBLIRY TERRY JOHN NICRIASTER WAUGH CHI CHECHIEN VVEN Iwezzzbcrs are alerted io Allfvlm Omega zlljrlzrz for rxrfllrzzrc in the work of the Junior fzrzfl Senior years at Rush Jwedifal College Pagz' 186 U U CROSSED CANNON if K umi- . DONALD BIRNEY PAUL COOPER BURTON DOHERTY IJEIF ERICKSON L. EDGAR FREIDHEIM ROBERT GAREN HENRY SULCER RAY VANE Crossed Cmzzzon is an honor sofieiy for studenls in the Reserve Ojffifers' Corps Pzzgf 187 EPSILON ALPHA Q ,gg 1 2 1 W . A-,,r1.3:f1v55' . ffaiffii . all 35295 FS' 533 1. If? ""'5l?gf f ' "4,g2g,,.z f'f" VE., NORRIS BROOKENS ABRAHAB'I CHERNER JULES CONIROE LEON COMROE HTIGUEL IJROBINSKY RICHARD EBERT L. GLADSTONE A. HAOTILTON IXJAURICE KADIN HAROLD LAUFNIAN C. LEVIN SAM LISSITZ F. NIEDB.AL.4 PHILIP VOGEL SEYMOUR VVEISBERG JOIIN WEIR Epsilon Affplzzz is the honor Sflfiffjf for fnre-nzedirzll stzzzlmzls Pzzgf ISS ETA SIGMA PHI ilrffv -"- ---3 - 'I .,. ' If ff: "' . '8- Q RI EQQA W ff" ,LJ L-,L JANE ALLISON CHARLES RAIN EUGENE BOROS PATRICIA BONNER V'IOLA BOWER ESTELLE DIARISH ALICE DAVIS HAROLD DUNKEL ISABELLE GOODGOLD GEORGE GREGORY, JR. NIILDRED JOHNSON INIARIE LEIN VVILLIAM LESI-IER CHARLOTTE IWCOREHOUSE JOHN PLETZ THEODORE PSILOLIHNAS MARGARET RAVENSCROFT GLADYS ROSENBAUM JEAN RHYS CLEO RYBOLT ZORA SIEGEL JANE SMITH LLOYD STOWE GLADYS UREIKANEK RUTH VVEINIAN RUTH YOUNG .ll-femberslzzp in Ein Sigma Phi denotes excellence in Classics Page IS? GAMMA ALPHA Itb' B. O. BARNES HAROLD BATHO FRANK BARTA JOHN CLEMENS D. T. HUNTER NV. G. IMBT H.AYDON JONES VVADE IVIARSHALL JOSEPH NIULLIN RALPH GESTING ' LYMAN PARRATT GEORGE SMEKSER J. G. SCHUETT R. J. STEPHENSON VVILFRED TANSLEY PAUL WENAAS FRANK VER W1ERE Grznznm flljlhzz is the fratfrnity for students in the .vrienliffr departmzfrzts of the lj7Zi7Jf'fSil'-1' Page 190 KAPPA EPSILON Pl Rx SQ JACK APPEL ELYVOOD ATHERTON JOSEPH BORDON W. G. BENNETT PAUL DUNN EDWARD ESPENSHADE BRUCE FREEMAN BRANDON GROVE J. H. GLASGOW ROY GRAHAM ARNOLD HOFFR'IAN JACK HOUGH MILTON HRUBX' I DAVID T. HUNTER JOHN M. MILLS VVILLIAM IMBT WILLIAM IQRUNIBEIN HAROLD P. LUCY W. B. MATHER VV. G. IVIOXEY JOHN MCCORMACK E. C. OLSON FRANK POTTER JOHN RIDGE GORDON RITTENHOUSE LEWIS C. ROBINSON GEORGE RUST HARRISON W. STRALEY JOHN SVATIK EDWARD H. STEVENS H. W. SCOTT VVILFRED TANSLEY RANDALL XVRIGHT fllezlzberslzip in Kappa Epsilon Pi zlenotes exfnlfmzrc in geofogiml fzcorl' Page 191 KAPPA MU SIGMA 5 . 331: I HELEN ALDRICH MRS. MARY BLAUCH ELEANOR BARTHOLONIEW MRS. MARY BRAUDWELL RUTH COMROE HENRIETTA DA COSTA ELIZABETH FORD RUTH GRISXVOLD A1ILICENT HATHAWAY LEON VIVIAN IOB MARTHA JOHNSON ROSALIND KLAAS DR. IDA KRAUS-RAGINS IQATHYRINE KNOWLTON SYLVIA 'IQRANINIER DR. ADEI,INE LINK :NIAXINE LICHTENSTEIN KTANICE LEVINE RIINERVA MARCY DR. ELOISE PARSONS DR. MARY RISING ALICE RYDER MRS. RUTH SCHWARTZ ANNE STACK CAMILLA STEPHNES BCIATTIE TIPPET NAN THORTON RUTH WATTS MARY ALLEN XVALKER Kappa fllu Szgma Is an honor .variety for u'omfzz 'who hafvc nmr,-'red exrfllence in ChFllliXffjY Pagz' 192 ORDIER OF THE COIF M 'W' E 11 COW' 1931 WILLIAM GRADY BURNS FRANK HALL DETWEILER IRVING EISENSTEIN JOSEPH ELNIORE GREEN CARL NEI.SON HOWIG GERHARDT SAMUEL JERSILD DONALD BIARD MIACGUINEAS HERBERT' FREDERICK ZORNOW 1932 LESTER ASHER BEN ATWOOD PAUL SPRAGUE DAVIS VVILLIAD1 REINHARDT ENGELHARDT ROBERT ARTHUR FRANK FRANK GREENBERG CHARLES EDMOND HERZOO GEORGE F. JAMES JR. EDWARD LEWISON CHRISTOPHER BOUTON NICDOUGAL RUTH WEYAND fllemlrers are elected to the Order of the Coif by the Faculty of the Law School for high distinction in the professional work of the Lau' School Page 193 THE ONE EVELYN CLAIRE BAILEY VITALIS LEWIS BASSIE FLORENCE ROSALIND BROWN BARBARA MAYNARD COOK BENJAMIN GREENSTEIN BLANCHE MUSE HYNES HUNDRED SIXTY-THIRD PHI BETA KAPPA BETA OF ILLINOIS CHAPTER ,,..,,, .,,..-.I fi . if mf? f' 1 9. TS, pg 'Q I if 5 " Az ALFRED HINSEY KELLY FRITZ RICHMOND LEIBER,JR. GEORGE HERMAN OTTO JEAN ELIZABETH RHYS ,MERWIN STANLEY ROSENBERG RUTH ELIZABETH SHIRE CONVOCATION ALFRED JOSEPH STAWARTZ JOHN PRESCOTT THOMPSON WALTER MATHIAS URBAIN CHARLES EDWARD VVEIR GILBERT FOWLER VV!-IITE SAMUEL ZELKOVVICH THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FOURTH CONVOCATION EMMA LUCILE ALGER TONY ALIC DAVID BODIAN VIOLA KATHRYN BOWER BENJAMIN MANDEL BRODSKY PAUL MIRO CADRA VVILERED CARSEL ROSE ZOE CHARNOW LLOYD JOHNSTON DAVIDSON DOROTHY ELIZA DAWSON MIGUEL DROEINSRY VVILLIAM HAROLD ELLIOT ELLA ELIZABETH FIETZE EDGAR ALBERT GREENWALD LYLE DONALD GUMM JOHN HUGH HARDIN JOSEPH ALLYN LANDRY LILA MARIE LEAVER DALE ALLEN LETTS SAMUEL LEVINSON JOSEPHINE DEMOSS MATSON RALPH MARTIN MCGRATH ELIZABETH MERRIAM SAM NEIVELT LUCILE WINIERED PEAENDER STEPHEN WILLIAM RANSON JEANNETTE FRANCES SEARCY CHARLES HENRX' SEVIN MILDRED SHAFFER WILLIAM SHAPIRO LAWRENCE BEALL SMITH BESS SELTZER SONDEL ABE HASKEL TAUB MINNIE PEARL TPIIGPEN ELAINE THOMAS PAUL ELLSWORTH TREUSCI'I ANNA BERTHA TULL DOROTHY CLEVELAND TYI,ER GLADYS CAMILLE URBANEK ALICE BEATRICE VONKEISLER SARAH ELOISE VVEBSTER MOSES ZALESKY THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FIFTH CONVOCATION RUTH HELEN ABELLS MARJORIE LENORE MARCY EARL FLOYD SIMMONS HAROLD NAPOLEON GOLDSTEIN ALICE MARGUERITE PITTMAN RUTH KYRK STRINE THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SIXTH CONVOCATION SUZETTE CAUUET DORTI-IA MARIE JOHNSTON JUNE TAMARA RAEE MILDRED ANN EICHOLZ FLORENCE MARION LAIRD DULANY TERRETT THE ONE HUNDERD SIXTY-SEVENTH CONVOCATION LUIS ALVAREZ MARTELL MAURICE GI.ADSTONE ELEANOR CUPP RAYVLINGS HERMAN SAMUEL BLOCH CLARA FRANCES BRESLOVE PHYLLIS EILEEN JOSEPH MARIE ELIZABETH LEIN LILIAN MAE RIPPLE NORMA AUGUSTA ROOKER NORRIS L. BROOKENS HELEN ELIZABETH MCCARTIN MAX WALDO SCI-IMIDT HAROLD BAKER DUNKEL FLORENCE AMY MCCULLAGH SAM ISAAC VVEISSMAN SAMUEL JOSEPH EISENBERG ELIZABETH STEPHANY MARY MILIS LEE ROY WII,COx ESTHER REGINA FEUCHTWANGER MABEL CATHRINE O'DONNELL SIDNEY ZATZ Iblenzbors are eflfctad io the Bela of Illinois Chapter of Phi Bela Kappa on nomination Unzfverszly for Mperia! dislindzon in general scholarship in lhe Unifvernly. Page 194 by the U D SIGMA XI BETA OF ILLINOIS CHAPTER C, vi X, .MI 'fl THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-THIRD CONVOCATION BRODA OTTO BARNES MARY ADELINE BLOODGOOD EMILY MCCOY CHANDLER WILLIAM ALBERT DREYER BRUCE CLARK FREEMAN FREDERICK HOELZEL DARELL STEPHEN HUGHES HAMPDEN CLISBY LAWSON ARNOLD LEO LIEBERMAN EDMUND LEROY LIND JOHN LOCKWOOD LINDQUIST WADE HAMPTON MARSHALL RUTH GLIDDEN MASON FRANK REA MAYO ADELAIDE MCFAYDEN JOHNSON BRUCE JONES MILLER MATAZO KUME CHARLES EDGAR MONTGOMERY GLEN HENRY MOREY DAVID OSCAR ROSBASH GRETCHEN SHAW MORRIS FRANK STUBBS WILFRED TANSLEY FRANCES CHUSCH VAN PELT AUSTIN BIRDINE WILDER WILLIAM HOLDER ZACHARIASEN THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FOURTH CONVOCATION WALLACE RICHARDS ATWOOD CLAYTON GARRETT BALL SIMON BENSON JAMES EDWARD CASE MARIE CHRISTIAN D'AMOUR PAUL HEANEY DUNN ETHEL VERA EVERETT ROBERT HENRY KING FOSTER IRA BOWERS HANSEN MAGNUS RUDOLPH HESTENES KUEN-SEN HU RALPH HULL RALPH DUNCAN JAMES ADOLPH WILLIAM KOZELIQA CHING CHEN LI WILLIAM MARKOWITZ ISAAC JAMES SCHOENBERG THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FIFTH WILLIAM LONG CURTIS H. WARD FERRILL SEVILLE FLOWERS GEORGE WEST GRAVES RALPH AUBRIE HEFNER THEODORE EPHRAIM HEINZ DEWEY KATZ AARON BAKER KENDRICK HUBERT WHATLEY MARLOW LEON PULASKI OYHARA CHARLES HAMILTON SEEVERS FLORENCE LEO SULLIVAN ABRAHAM MORRIS TARGOVSV YUAN-YUNG TSENG BERT JOHN VOS, JR. EDWARD WILLIAM WALLACE HORACE EDWARD VVHEELER YUE KYEI WONG, CONVOCATION DONALD VINCENT SHUHART EDWARD NATHANIEL TORBERT JACOB JOHN WESTRA, JR. KARL STANLEY WOODCOCK HENRIETTA LOUISE ZOBEL THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SIXTH CONVOCATION ELWOOD AUCUSTUS ATHERTON WALTER SIGMUND GUTHMANN GEORGE VVASHINGTON AYERS, JR. RAYMOND WRIGHT JOHNSON HARRIS MILLER BENEDICT ROBERTS COZART BULLOCK ISIDORE GERSH THOMAS PARK FRANCIS MILTON PARKER ALBERT WILLIAM RAAB JOHN HENRY SHROYER GEORGE KEISER SMELSER LIU-SI-IENG TS,AI ORAM CLARK WOOLPERT PATRICK PAUL YOUTZ GREENVILLE D. GORE BORIS BENJAMIN RUBENSTEIN THE ONE HUNDERD SIXTY-SEVENTH CONVOCATION NIEL FREEBORN BEARDSLEY ROBERT BARTON DIENST PAUL GERSON SAPER THOMAS MILTON BECK KNUT LEOPOLD BENGT HAMILTON VIRGIL BROWN SCOTT ARTHUR LAVVRENCE BENNETT ROSALIND AMELIA KLAAS WILLIAM BURROWS ROBERT SAMUEL CAMPBELL JOHN HENRY CLOUSE GARMAN HARLOW DARON PAUL SIDNEY DELAUP ALFRED CAMPBELL LEDOUX ROSE LEDIEU MOONEY LYMAN GEORGE PARRATT JULIUS DOWNES PORSCHE TRUMAN SQUIRE POTTER ROBERT SAMUEL SHANE DANIEL SHELDON STEVENS HARRISON WILSON WALTHALL DONALD ALBIN VVALLACE CHARLES JUNIOR WHITFIELD GEORGE ELLIOTT ZIEGLER Memberx are elected io Sigma Xi on nominalion of the Department: of Sfience for efuidence of ability in research fworlz In Sczenee. STRALEY, III Page 195 D D S I G M A X I ASSOCIATE MEMBERS THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FOURTH CONVOCATION BETTY ANNE BLAIR INTORRIS EDWARD OPI.ER CLARENCE GEORGE FAWCETT CIUST WEBER SCHIMI1-PE SAMUEL SYLVESTER FREY EDVVARD HUMPHREY STEVENS ALDEN GATES GREENE ELLA OPHELIA VVILKES PAUL RANDALL WRIGHT THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FIFTH CONVOCATION NEVA LOWERY LYONS SULO VICTOR ROTERUS LOUISE IQNIGHT ROTHA JOHN VOSS, JR. LINA WEBB TSU-KIANG YEN HARRIS MILLER BENEDICT IVIARY BRANNOCK BLAUCH FRANCES RANNEY BOTTUIVI LILLIAN LEONDRA BURWELL LEONA VrIVIAN IOB ALIS LOEHR THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SIXTH CONVOCATION CHARLES CLIFTON AIRD WILLIS HARfIILTON MILLER HELEN FISKE ALDRICH ROBERT JAMES MOON JOHN MATHEWS JACKSON JOHN DREW RIDGE JOHN GILBERT NICALLISTER ROBERT MOXKIRY ZINGG THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVENTH CONVOCATION HELEN ELIZABETH MCCARTIN FLORENCE AMY IVICCULLAGH GORDON RITTENHOUSE JOSEPH JOHN SHONKA GORDON HAMILTON STILLSON FRANCIS CARTVVRIGHT TODD BRUCE BURTON VANCE EVERETT CLAIRE OLSON LOUISE BOSWELL RACHEL S. COMBIONS JOHN CRYER THOIINE DEUEL EDXNARD BOXNMAN ESPENSHADE FRANCES ELIZABETH GRASSLEY VVILLIAM CLARENCE IIXIBT Jssofiate members are elected to Signzrz Xi on nonzinrztion of two defmrtm scienre for e'via'enee of promise of ability in resenrfh work in scienre enta' Page 196 THE AWARD OF HONORS THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE WITH HONORS: THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FOURTH CONVOCATION IN THE COLLEGES OF ARTS, LITERATURE, AND SCIENCE IAIEROL ARNOLD, English BEATRICE M. ROBERG,E7zgli5h FRANCIS C. GALE, Political Science ROSALIE L. SABATH,English ABRAHAM I. GANS, Philosophy BESS S. SONDEL, Comparative Litera- EDWIN HERMAN LENNETTE, Hygiene ture and Bacteriology JOHN MANSEIELD STEVENSON,E71.QZi5ll JEANETTE I. NIELSEN, German ABE H. TAUB, llflatheinatics ROBERT R. PALMER, Ifistory DOROTHY C. TYLER, English LUCILE W. PFAENDER, English ALICE B. IQELLER, Art IN THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION EMMA L. ALGER ARLINE M. FELTHAIVI FLORENCE B. CAIRD IQATHERINE M. RUMMEL LUCIA G. DOWNING ELSA WOLF IN THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND ADMINISTRATION ABE L. BLINDER CHARLES H. SEVIN Rf.IICHAEL J. JUCIUS PIAROLD G. 'TERITTAAT ROBERT E. MCIQITTRICK FERMINO IJtI.ZANCANARO THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FIFTH CONVOCATION IN THE COLLEGES OF ARTS, LITERATURE, AND SCIENCE IVIABLE HIXLL SCHAMP, Chemistry JESSE BEAVER SCHREITER, .Mathematics IN THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION KATHLEEN HELEN BORDNER H.4NNAH MATHILIDA LINDAHL ANNA DURNING ALICE MARGUERITE PITTMAN MARY EDWIN ENTSMINGER ALICE EVELYN PRATT LEONE GERTRUDE HERDTANN MABEL IVIARY TREDENNICK ARTHUR WILLIAM WALZ IN THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND ADMINISTRATION ROSE ANNA HOCH THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SIXTH CONVOCATION DORTHA M. JOHNSTON, French JOHN P. THOMPSON, English EIJNA M. W. ZALDIVAR, Education THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVENTH CONVOCATION NORRIS L, BROQKENS, Chgmigtry FLORENCE A. IYICCULLAGH, Botany CYNTHIA COHEN, Sociology ALFRED JOSEPH STAWARZ, .Mathe- EDWARD H. LEvI, English warm BURTON B. LIFSCHULTZ, German INATHANIEL M. VVINSLOVV, Chemistry Page 197 THE AWARD OF HONORS HONORS FOR EXCELLENCE IN PARTICULAR DEPARTMENTS OF THE SENIOR COLLEGES OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION EMMA L. ALGER, Art ARLINE M. FELTHAM, Education EMMA L. ALGER, Kindergarten-primary ARLINE M. FELTHAM,Ifi7ldl'l'gl1ffL'7l-IWIllllll'-1' MARVALENE L. DAY,Ki71Li6fgdffE71-1J1'I7Hdfy GRACE L. FOSTER, Education LUCIA G. DOWNING,Klndffgdfffn-PI'1lnafy ELSA WOLF, Education ELSA WOLF, Kindergarten-priinary FOURTH-YEAR HONOR SCHOLARS, SELECTED BY THE DEPARTMENTS FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE WORK OF THE FIRST THREE LUIS ALvAREz, Physics VIOLA K. BOWER, Latin ELSA G. BROIDA, Education CYNTHIA COHEN, Sociology ROBERT C. COLWELL, Economics LLOYD J. DAVIDSON, English ELEANOR J. FRANK, Psychology NORMAN N. GILL, Political Science HAROLD N. GOLDSTEIN, Anthropology ANNA K. HARRIS, Home Economics JEANNE K. HYDE, Art ISADORE A. AARONS HERMAN S. BLOCH RALPH B. BOWERSCOX CLARA F. BRESLOVE HAROLD B. DUNKEL RICHARD V. EBERT MILDRED A. EICHHOLZ MARJORIE M. HAMILTON ELENORA JOHNSON AARON M. ALTSCHUL CHARLES D. ANDERSON CLARICE C. ANDERSON LOU E. BAILEY DAVID LBLUMENSTOCK VVALTER BROOKS RICHARD E. CLARK VIRGINIA COVICI HERMAN J. DEKOY'EN KENNETH DEMB SHIRLEY J. EICHENBAUM MARY ELLISON MERTON M. GILL SEYMOUR GOLDBERG DAVID GORDON MARY E. CRIER CHARLES C. HAUCH CARROLL JOHNSON JANET R. KALVEN ROWLAND L. KELLY YEARS OF THE COLLEGE COURSE: BLANCHE M. HYNES, Romance ALFRED H.KELLY, Political Science LAVERNE LARsON,HonIe Economics FRITZ R. LEIBER, Psychology FLORENCE A. MCCULLACH, Botany ELIZABETH MERRIAM, History CHARLOTTE F. MOREHOUSE, Greek IDA NOVAK, Get-manics MILDRED SHAFEER, Zoology ALFRED J. STAVVARZ, Mathematics GILBERT F. VVHITE, Geography TH IRD-YEAR HONOR SCHOLARS JOHN M. LYNCH CHARLES NEWTON RALPH M. PERRY HAROLD J. PLUMLEY VIRGINIA R. SANNER OSCARLEO SCHERR SAM SCHOENBERG SAM I. WEISSMANN LEE ROY WILCOX SIDNEY ZATZ SECOND-YEAR HONOR SCHOLARS FREDERICK J. LESEMANN JACK W. LOEB VICTOR LORBER EDWARD VV. S. NICHOLSON WILLIAM O. PI-IILBROOK HERBERT PORTES MINNIE M.RAvENsCROFT RUEUS M.REED VVILLIAM S. SADLER MELVIN L. SCHULTZ MALCOLM F. SMII.EY LEWIS T. SOFFER JACK T. SZOLD HAROLD TORNHEIM PHILIP F. TRYON ROSEMARY H. VOLK ROBERT VV. VVADSWORTH LORRAINE WATSON SYDNEY VVEISBERG CIIDEON R. VVEI.I.s RUTH A. YOUNG The Lillian Gertrude Selz Scholarship: BERCIT VENNESLAND Page 198 U U THE AWARD OF HONORS JUNE 16,1931 The Civil Government Prize is awarded to CLARENCE Louis CADE,jqf5f ABBOTT BENNETT LIPSKY, second The Joseph Triner Scholarship in Chemistry is awarded to VVILLIAM PTENRY SEFRANEK The New York Times Current Events Prize is awarded to ABRAHAM JACOB AARON,fl'5f RICHARD BERNARD PoLLAK,.vecond JACOB BEEDERMAN, third The Florence James Adams Prizes for excellence in artistic reading are awarded to CHARLOTTE ALICE STINNETT NATALIE JOYCE GORDON The John Billings Fiske Prize in Poetry is awarded to IRv1Nc JACOBSON The American Daughters of Sweden Honor Entrance Scholarship for the promotion of the study of Swedish is awarded to ETHEL DOROTHY SWANSON The Conference Nledal for excellence in athletics and scholarship is awarded to DALE ALLEN LETTS Page 199 HONORABLE MENTION FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE WORK OF THE COLLEGE THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FOURTH CONVOCATION CHARLOTTE ROSLYN ADLAND DONALD JEREMIAH BECKER MARJORIE-LUISE BECKER BAZIL BILDER CARL JULIUS BODE CLARA FRANCES BRESLOVE EDVVIN NEVILLE COOPER VIRGINIA COVICI HARRIET ELIZABETH COVVLES HAROLD BAKER DUNKEL RICHARD VINCENT EBERT MILDRED ANN EICHHOLZ SAMUEL JOSEPH EISENBERG WALLACE ALFRED ERICKSON GERSHON BARNETT FERSON ETHEL CATHERINE FRANZEN HERMAN WILLIAM HAMERSTROM MELVIN ALBERT HARDIES CAMILLE HEINECK CHARLES LESTER HOPKINS, JR. IRVING JACOBSON JUNIOR MELVIN KERSTEIN MICHAEL LAMPOS BERNICE MYRA LANGERT MARIE ELIZABETH LEIN NOAH LEVIN DAVID MAX LEVY STANLEY DAVID LEVY DAVID ABRAHAM LIVINGSTON JOHN MELVILLE LYNCH WALTER MANEIKIS CHARLES LINCOLN MATTHEWS EDWARD GREGORY NEIDBALLA VIRGINIA OELGESCHLAGER KEITH IRVING PARSONS RICHARD BERNARD POLLAK LOUIS VVILLIAM RIENDEAU LOUIS EDWIN ROMBERG ROBERT BENJAMIN SHAPIRO RUBIN SHAPIRO LAYLE SILBERT BURKE SMITH,JR. BERNARD STODSKY RITA DOLORES STUCKART RUTH VVILLARD BEATRICE VVOLBACH BEULAH ODELLA VVRIGHT ELIZABETH MASON ZEIGLER RAYMOND EDVVARD ZENNER MARTELL MAURICE GLADSTONE ROSAMOND MORSE THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FIFTH CONVOCATION CLARICE SHIRLEY AARON ROBERT FRANKLIN BALSLEY JULIUS FRANKLIN BOSEN RALPH BERTRAM BOWERSOX MAX LOUIS CHILL JULES BELASCO COMROE LEON BELASCO COMROE MARJORIE FULLER CROWLEY BERTHA HENRIETTA ERRANT SAM GARRICK GEORGE DEVATENOS GREGORY, JR. ALFRED EDWIN JACOBSEN SOL JAFFE SIDNEY KAPLAN DAVID KARASICK PHILIP CHARLES LEDERER ISABELLE HICKEN MARSHALL YARMILA ANN MULLER LEO RABINOWITZ EDITH RIEDL ESTELLE MARJORIE SANDER BERNARD SANG VIRGINIA REED SANNER MARY SILVERMAN PHILIP VOGEL ERMA ELLIS VVHITE THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SIXTH CONVOCATION JACOB ADLERBLUM MARGARET LUCY BRUSKY GRACE MARIE BURNS RICHARD EDWIN CLARK AVISE ETHEL DARGAN DANIEL MACABAEUS DRIBIN WILLIAM BORIS ELSON, JR. CLARA MAI FUOUA ALBERT JAMES GALVANI WILLIAM EDWIN HEATON THE ONE MELVIN AVRAMI RUTH IRENE BARNARD MARILEE BERNSTEIN WILLIAM HIGGINS BESSEY PATRICIA BONNER WALTER BROOKS MARY JANE COHN LOIS PAULINE CROMVVELL EMILIE JUDSON FERMIER SYDELLE FLORENCE FINEMAN JEANNETTE MELANIE GEISMAN MERTON MAX GILL MIRIAM ROCHELLE GINSBERG MELVIN LESTER GOLDMAN HERMAN HEINE GOLDSTINE HOBART VVILSON GUNNING BEATRICE GUTENSKY DORO'I'IiX' LEONORE HAMPTON CHARLES CHRISTIAN HAUCH REISIIA RIJTI-I HELLER MONA VIOLA MAE HODGE MILDRED HANNAH CECELIA JOHNSON HARRY KUPERSMITH MYRON WILLARD LARSON VICTOR LORBER MARY AGNES MURDOCK FRANKLYN CARL W. OLSON VIRGINIA NICHOLAS PLATT PORTER M. POWELL JOHN PARKER PRESCOTT MINNIE MARGARET RAVENSCROET DAVID MOORE RITTER WILLIAM SAMUEL SADLER, JR. RUTH SARISKY SAM SCHOENBERG PAUL SELIGMANN REBA KOVENOCK SVVIREN JANIS ADELE VAN CLEEF AGNES VVIAIITMARSH H UNDRED SIXTY-SEVENTH CONVOCATION SHIRLEY LOREL JACOBSON ROSE JOSEPHINE JIRINEC JANET ROSALIE KALVEN MARTIN DAVID KAMEN FREDERICK JOSEPH LESEMANN DAVID CHARLES LEVINE DONALD PATTEN MACMILLAN JESSIE MORSE MAGUIRE MYRON E. NELSON EDWARD W7HEEI.OCK STEELE NICHOLSON RICHARD DOVVNING PETTIT HOWARD VVILLIAM PICKETT HELEN LOUISE RANDALL ALBERT CARI. RENSTROM CLARENCE REX'ZAN w7II,I.IAM SAMUEL SADLER, JR. FRANCES XAIILEY SI-INESCU PHILIP SI-IANEDLING MEYER SHERMAN WINSTON GOULD SLATER GERALDINE SMITIIVVICK PHILLIP JOSEPH STEIN ROBERT GRAHAM STUART ELEANOR DOROTHY SVATIK HYLTON ARMANI! THOMAS HAROLD TORNTIEIM PHILIP FREELANID TRYON STEPHEN PETER VANCO BIRCIT VENNESLAND KIRSTEN VENNESLAND SUZANNA JOANNA VILIS ROBERT WOODMAN VVADSXVORTII LORRAINE VVATSON SYDNEY ROCKHILI, VVEISBERC IRVING VVILK MARY ADELE PERMIILIA VVIMIIERLY VICTOR ROBERT VVOLFE BESSIE ZABELIN Pagr 200 FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS ISABELLA ADAMS RAYMOND ANNES BERNICE ARMIN REVA ASHER HOVSVARD BAKER NORMAN BECKER RUTH BEN-AMY SIDNEY CIRCLE THOMAS EADIC LEONARD ESLICH HELEN FLEITZ NESTOR FLODIN ADELE FREDRECKSON VELIA GARCIA FRESHMEN ENTERED ON SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE COLLEGE ON THE BASIS OF COMPETITIVE EXAMINATIONS NOEL GERSON MILDRED GLASS JOHN HAEEELE JULIUS HANSER RONALD HENDERSON HOWARD HUDSON DONALD JEFFREY TRUMAN KIRKPATRICK FANNY LEVALIN GRACE LOGAN GERTRUDE MAGIE EDMOND MARZEC ALLAN MCCAULAY IRA MCGILLICUDY ROBERT MILOW ELI OBOLER EVERETT PARKER EVELYN RIITENHOUS WILLIAM SAILER TED SAVICK EVERETT SCHLINKERT JUDITH SCHOENBERG JONAS SCHRAEDER WILLEAM SMILEY SOPI-IIE WEINSTEIN LUCILLE WOLFSOHN JACK WOODS FRESHMEN AWARDED ONE YEAR HONOR ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS ORVILLE BERNS MARGOT BOERTLEIN HELEN BROWN DOROTHY CLENDEMEN FRANSULA CLEVELAND ADA CRAVER GEORGE DASBACH LILY MAY DAVID ESTHER FEHRM GRACE GRAVER HERBERT HANEAX HELEN HEITH FRESHMEN AWARDED CARL BERNDTSON ERNEST BROWN ROBERT CONKLIN GEORGE DONOGI-IUE NOEL ELLIS , IN THE COLLEGE LOIS HOLZWORTH JOHN HOWE EDWIN HUDFIELD GERTRUDE LAWTON HELEN LEAVITT HENRY LEDERER HELEN LERITTE ALICE LUDBERY MYRTLE LOHNER GRACE MARSHALL ALICE MURRAY BETTY ANNE NELSON SPECIAL ONE YEAR HONOR IN THE COLLEGE IRVING ESCURRAZ ALBERT KLEINSMITH GIFFORD MAST DUGALD MCDOUGAL LOUIS MILLER HERBERT NEWMAN HAZEL OLSON IEANETTE RICHARDS FRANCES ROBBINS HELEN ROSIER WALDEMAR SOLF HILDA SCHUMM ELOISE TILLOLSON MARGARET VANDERSCHAEGH LEROY WALTER MADELINE WHITE ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS AURELIUS PARENTI PAUL PATTERSON WILLIAM REYNOLDS RICHARD WRIGHT FRESHMEN AWARDED TWO YEAR HONOR ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS ROBERT ANGLE LEROY JOHNSON AYERS JOHN BARDEN ALBERT BONADY G. LAWRENCE BROKATE ROBERT CALDWILL MARVIN ELKINS JOI-IN ENGBERY THOMAS FLINN EVERETT GEORGE RALPH GODDARD HARRI' HARMTKN IN THE COLLEGE KEITH HATTER WILLIAM HENRY CHAUNCEY HOVVARD ROBERT LESTER MERRILL MAY HORACE MCGEE WALTER MOCHEL WILLIAM ORCUTT EUGENE OROSON RALPH PERKINS CURTIS PLOPPER FRANCIS PORZEL BOYDE RABEN DONALD ROLSTON EWALD RODECK NED ROSACRANS ALBERT SAIRLEY BARTON SMITH BRUCE STEWART JOSEPH STOLAR ALBERT TEN-EYCK FRANK WALSH EMERY VVEBER SIDNEY VVEISS RAYMOND VVHITNEY The last selecliorz i5 made on the basis of Teholarxhijr, leadership, and personality, -wilh spe- cial regard to lhe refommendations of alumni throughout the roznzlry. Page 201 D L UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS FELLOWSHIPS AWARDED IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES DIVISION G. H. DARON, S.B. ISADORE GARSH,A.B. HARRIS BENEDICT, A.M. STEPHEN DEXTER, PH.D. SEVILLE FLOVVERS, A.M. BONNIE DYSART, A.M. ANATOMY RUTH HALTON, A.B., S.M. TRUMAN POTTER, M.D. BOTANY CHARLES HOFFMAN, S.M. ERVIN HOPKINS, PH.D. TSU-KIANG YEN, S.M. HOME ECONOMICS MARY JENK1NS,A.NI. BACTERIOLOGY AND HYGIENE JORGEN BIRRELAND, M.S. SARA GOODLOE, A.B. LUDWIG ROLAND KULIN, S.B. FLOYD S. MARKHAN, A.B. FRANK RUBOVITS, S.B. CHARLES F. SEILTON, S.M. BERTHA K. SPECTOR, S.M. LESLIE A. STAUBER, S.B. JOSEPH STRITER, S.B. E PEDIATRICS MINERVA MORSE, PH.D. PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY ABRAHAM A. BASS, S.B. BRODA O. BARNES MILDRED E. JONES, S.B. JOSEPH S. BUTTS, S.M. PAUL B. DONOVAN, S.M. PHYSIOLOGY HAMPDEN C. LAWSON ARNOLD LIEBERMAN MARGARET' M. KUNDE, M.D., PH.D. BORIS B. RUBENSTEIN, A.M. JOHN C. ANDERSON, A.B. LEMUEL F. CLARK, S.M. GERTRUDE EVANS, A.M. FELLOVVSHIPS AVVARDED HELEN F. ALDRICH, S.M. THOMAS M. BECK, A.B. JOHN CRYER, A.M. CHESTER W. HANNUN, S.B. JOHN M. JACKSON, S.B. ROBERT J. MOON, A.B. PAUL H. DUNN, A.M. ROY GRAHAM,M.S. JULIA W. BOWER, A.M. ROBERTS C. BULLOCK, A.M. RALPH HULL, A.B. DONALD S. BOND, S.B. LOUIS E. JAFFEE, S.B. PSYCHOLOGY WILLIAM T. MCDONALD, A.M. ZOOLOGY JAMES H. MILLER, A.B. HELEN SWEET, A.M. IN TI-IE PHYSICAL SCIENCES DIVISION F CHEMISTRY FRANCIS M. PARKER, A.B. JUI.IUs D. PORSCHE, S.B. DAVID O.ROsEOsH, S.B. GUST W. SCHIMPFF, S.M. JOHN H. S1-IROYER, A.B. ALBERT E. SIDWELL, S.B. NANNIE V. THORNTON, A.M. GEOLOGY HAROLD W. SCOTT, A.B. JOI-IN SVATIK, S.B., J.D. MATHEMATICS RALPH D. JAMES, A.M. FRANCIS H. VVIANCKO, A.M. PATRICK YOUTZ, S.M. PHYSICS ROSE L. MOONEY, S.M. LAYVRENCE N. MORSCIIER, S.B. REOINALD J. STEPHENSON, S.M. FOR 1931-1932 OR 1931-1932 Page 202 El D UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS FELLOWSHIPS AWARDED IN THE HUMANITIES DIVISION TOR 931 1932 ART ORIS ELLERY, A.B. COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY JOLIANNES J. LUND, A.M. COMPARATIVE RELIGION HORACE J. NICKELS, A.M. ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE PORTIA BAKER, A.M. MERRITT C. VVILLIAMS, A B SAMUEL A- FRIEDMAN, A.B. MARY M. WILLIAMSON A B GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES CARL COLDITZ ' GREEK GLADYS M. BALLANTYNE, A.M. HARRY L. STOW, A.B. MARTIN FRANZMANN, A.B. VVINIERED E. WETU, A M HISTORY WILLIAM P. HOTCHKISS, A.M. JAMES B. ROSS, A.M. ROBERT K. MEAD, A.M. FRANK G. WILLISTON, A M SAUL K. PADOVER, A.M. CHARLES R. WILSON, A M LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE ROSAMOND L. BOROI, A.B. RUTH E. MOORE, A.M. PHILIP W. HARSH, A.M. DOROTHY M. SCHULLIAN A B NEW TESTAMENT AND EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE ALFRED E. HAEENER, A.B. MARTIN REST, A.B., A M FRED C. KAELTHER, A.B. ALLEN P. WIKGREN, A B A M ORIENTAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE WILLIS W. FISHER, A.B. NEJLA MUSTAPHA IZZEDIN AB VVALTER G. VVILLIAMS, A.B. PHILOSOPHY HAROLD E, HAYDON, A.M. DAVID L. MILLER, A.B. STEPHEN C. TORNEY, TH.D. ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES LAMBERT S. ARTON, A.M. JOHN A. VERDIER, A.B FELLOWSHIPS AWARDED IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCE DIVISION TOR 1931 1932 ANTHROPOLOGY JOHN PROVINSE, LL.B., A.M. ECONOMICS OSCAR L. ALTMAN, A.M. MARJORIE LINFIEI-D, A M BENJAMIN COPLAN, A.M. ALBERT G. HART, A.B. MINNIE GIESICKE, A.M. G. DONALD HUDSON, A.M. h WILLIAM B. BALLIS, A.B. HARMON P. HAYES, A.M. ROBERT J. MYERS, A.M ROSWELL H. WHITMAN AB EDUCATION GUY A. LOCKEY, A.M. GEOGRAPHY HUBERT L. MINTON, A B WENDELL L. PERKINS, A.M. POLITICAL SCIENCE V. O. KEY, ELEANOR M. WHEELER, A.B. SOCIOLOGY EARL S. 10 CHARLES H. YOUNG, A.M. A.B. HNSON, A.B Page 203 DEGREES CANDIDATES FOR BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN COLLEGES HARRIETTE LOUISE BROWN EDGAR ALBERT GREENWALD CASIMIRA STELLE ABRATOWSKI GERTRUDE ADLER ABT CHARLES FRANCIS ADLER JACK CHALMERS ANDERSON OTIS LEONARD ANDERSON MILTON SAMUEL APPLEBAUM DOROTHY NORMA ARKIN AEROL ARNOLD NORMAN HILL ARONS GERTRIDE AXELSON BESSIE GENEVIEVE BACON SUE ELLEN GAY BAISCH JACOB BAR BARNETT WILLIAM BASIL BASILE ROSE BETTY BASKIND EUGINIE GAUTIER BEARNS FREDERICK GEORGE BERCHTOLD ARTHUR CHARLES BERGHOLZ MARIE CLAIRE BERNARD JANE BLOCKI FRANCIS AGNES BLODGET1' SOPHIA BLOOM JOHN TEAL BOBBXTT DAVID BOHOLUB MARX' BOHNET SAvILI.A LOUISE BOLSINGER EDITH STUART BOND BRANT BONNER BONNIE MAY BOOKVVALTER MARGARET FRANCIS BORN ERNELLE BOWLERS MARY ARTELIA BOVVNE ROBERT SAYER BRADSHAW MARIAN FRANCIS BRAXELTON BENJAMIN MANDEL BRODSKY RUTH SAVVERS BUDD ANNA LAURA BURKE BOYD BYRON BURNSIDE FRANKLIN GOOGINS BUTLER PAUL MIRO CADRA ARTHUR RIPLEY CAHILL MARJORIE CAHILL FRANK PAUL CALLAGHAN,JR. JUNE 16, 1931 BACHELOR OF ARTS FLORENCE ELIZABETH ROTHGERBER GLADYS CAMILLE URBANEK BETTY ANNE SCHEERER PATRICIA LORENA STEVENS RUTH VVIENMAN BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY MABELLE HILL CAMPBELL RAMONA HANSEN CAPENER MYRON LAWRENCE CARLSON DOROTHY MAY CARR WILERED CARSEL JAMES FRANK CASMIER PETER JOHN CHAMALES ROSE ZOE CHARNOW ELISE DIRY CHAUVET MORRIS CHERTKOV HARRIER MABELLE CLEMENS VVILTON SHIRLEY CLEMENTS HERBERT HENRY COBB STANLEY JOHN COFFEY BENMANIN ROBERT COHEN LEONARD MAYER COHEN EUGENE LIONEL COHN CICELY CONE HELEN LORENA CORBIN JAMES RONALD COUPLINE WILLIAM RUSSEL CRAWFORD JANET CUNNINGHAM ROBERT MARIS CUNNINCHAM, JR. 'WILLIAM RUSSELL CUNNINGHAM HEISEN VALENTINE DAVIDGE DOROTHY ELIZA DAWSON HOLLY LAURA DAY GAETANO DEFILIPPIS MARIE DBROOUE EONA DEVERE LORETTA AGNES DOWNEY HELEN ALICE DRUECK INEZ ESTELLE DUKE JOSEPHINE BIZER DUNLAP MYER BUTLER DUNN LILLIAN ADELINE DURNION FRANK JOSEPH DUSAK HELEN ASHLEY DYER AI.LEN CLAIRE EAST THEODOREA NINETA EASTES HELEN ELIZABETH EATON ROWLAND JOHN EDWARDS MARJORIE OLGA EIGER LOIS FRANCES ELDER EDWARD ELLENBOI-IEN DOROTHY LOIS ELLIS HENRY ENGELBRECHT WILLOWMINE EPP LEIF BERNARD ERICKSON FLORENCE LILLIAN FERGUSON MILTON J. FINK LAFAYETTE FISHER JAMES HENRY FITZBUTLER, JR. RICHARD DBLEON FLETCHER, JR. DOROTHY ELIZABETH FOX RAYMOND VVILLIAM Fox WILLIAM I'IUMPHRY FRAZER RAYMOND KERMIT FRIED DOROTHY FUHRMAN MARY ELLEN FULKS FRANCES CANDEE GALE ABRAHAM ISAIAH GANS ELSIE CLARA GASPERIK VVINIFRED SARAH GETTEMY MARJORIE MARION GLAVIN HELEN ADAMS GLOVER EUNICE MAURICE GOLDBERG MARK QSOLDSTINE, JR. ELEANOR MARY' GOREDKI ANGELINE MARIE GORKA SARAH SCOVEL GORRELL BEARTICE ILLORA CSOULD RODNEY CHAMBERLAIN GOULD ELIZABETH HELEN GRAIJER ROBERT JOSEPH GRAE, JR. OSCAR HARRX' CSR!-ZEN KATHERINE KEI.I.AR GORMAN BRIMSON GROW LYLE DONALD GUMM WILLIAM JAMES GUY FRANCIS REDEIELD HALLINAN AISEXANIJER FREDREIC I'!ANDEL JOHN HUGH HARDIN ELEANOR MARGARET HAYER GEORGE LOUIS HECKER ORVIS TADDEUS HENKLE, JR. Page 206 U E BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY CCOIILJ VVALTER DWIGHT HERRICK, JR. GEORGE NEEMES HIBBEN GERTRUDE HIL1'POLD JOHN BRADSHAVV HOLT ISABELLE MUIRHEAD HOUGH ARTHUR JOHN HOWARD HENRY PHELPS HOWLAND, JR. MARGARET WILSON HUSBAND RUTH WILHELMINA IHLE AT,P'RED WILLIAM ISRAELSTAM JULIAN JACOB JACKSON TPIERESA HELENE JAFFEE ELSIE KATHRYN JOHNSON ALVIN KABAKER JOHN MORRIS KAHLERT FRANCES RUTH KAMINSKX' STANLEY ABRAHAM KAPLAN RUTH LEONA KEENAN NANCY JANE KENNEDY MAY HALL KENT DAVID CLARK KENYON FLORENCE MARION KERBY WILLIAM MACLEAN KINCHELOE HELEN ZQE MARHQEFER SUE EVA KINSEY CECILIA MARY KIRK HELENE AIMEE KITZINGER ABRAHAM FRANK KLASS MILTON PAUL KLEIN STANLEY ROY KORSHAK RICHARD BZLARVVEDEL KORTEN MARY ALICE KRAHL FANNIE KREVITSKY RAYMOND JOSEPH KRIZ HAROLD KRULEWITCH ROSALIA KUSIN DOROTHY LAKIN RUTH VIOLA LACKRITZ HESTER KATHERINE LAMMEDEE JOSEPH ALLYN LANDRY VIVIAN FLORENCE LANDSTROM BLOSSOM MAE LANE RICHARD OTTO LANG HAROLD LESLIE LANGDON BERTHA MAUD LARSEN CLARA MARY LAWIN MARY MATILDA LEAMING LILA MARIE LEAVER MARGARET ETHEL LEDDY RUTH ADALADE LEE MORRIS IRVIN LEIBMAN GRACE DREHER LENNARTSON DALE ALLEN LETTS CHESTER VINCENT LEWIS DOROTPIY VIRGINIA LEWIS EDWARD LEWISON DOROTHY LINDENBAUM HARRIET CAROLINE LINK JOHN NABL LINK RENA LIPSCHITZ XVILLIS HARRISON LITTELL PIARRIET LUCILLE LLOYD EDITH LOEVVENSTIEN CECILIA CATHERINE LOHRLEIN HERTHA DOROTHY LUCKARDT CORNELIA HEILE LYONS VVALTER DAVID LYONS VVINIFRED REDDING MADDISON MARY CAMPBELL MAIZE MARY-ELLEN MALLOY FRANCES MAFY MANION SYLVIA JANET MARLAND MILDRED HENRIETTE MAROUISON MARIANN MARSHALL KATHERINE MARTIN OLGA MASSIAS JOSEPI-IINE DEMOSS MATSON MARGARET ALEXANDER MATSON GEORGE VVARREN MCCANDLESS THOMAS EDVVIN MCCUNE HELEN MARGARET MCDONALD HELEN EUGENIE MCFRANCIS RALPH MARTIN MCGRATH DON CAPLINGER MCMILLAN MARGUERITE MCNALL MARGARET RITA MCNICHOLAS JULIA JENNIE MELE HAZEL EVANGELINE MELIN RUTH HORTENSE MERLIN BETTY IRENE MESSINGER BENJAMIN SAMUEL MEYER HARRY YABRAM MILLMAN LUCILLE CATHERINE MINERVA WILLIAM ROBERT MING, JR. ALICE MIONSKE MARY GRACE MOREY FREDRICK BARSTOWV MORIARTY MARGARET FITA MORRIS MERDITY MOULTON RAYMOND WILLIAM MUNSTERMAN MARY ANN NARIC JOHN R. NENNINGER JEANETTE INGRI DORKAS NEILSEN ALBERT EDGAR NOEL HELEN GRACE O,BRlEN BLANCHE OCASEK ARTHUR CARROLL O'MEARA ANNE IOSEPHINE ORMSBY CHARLES AUGUST OVERMEYER ROBERT ROSWELL PALMER STUART SAYLES PALMER JAMES ANDERSON PARKER CHARLES OSGOOD PARTRIDGE ESTHER GOLDTHWAIT PAUL BERT PERKINS CHOLITA AGNES PETERSON FLORENCE ELOISE PETZEL LUCILE WINIYRED PFAENDER MARK WESLEY PISTORIUS JULES JAMES PLUM WILBUR RICHARD POND LULU GRACE POOL ELEONORA MILDRED POPE CORA PRENDERGAST LAWRENCE JEROME PURGGER STEPHEN EILLIAM RANSON DAVID RAPPAPORT JOHN REINHARDT, JR. GEORGE WILLIAM REINKE BEATRICE MARY ROBERG IRIS RUTH RUNDLE HELEN SIEGEL RUSKIN PEGGY RUSSELL DELBERT OWEN RYAN GERALD FRANCIS RYAN JANE RYNO ROSALIE LOTTE SABATH LAURA CHARLOTTE SAEMANN SYLVIA MARY SAIDL GEORGE WINTHROP SANFORD ALLEN WHITE SAYLER JAMES EDWARD SCHEIBLER, JR. RUTH INA SCI-ILEY REGINA MIRIAM SCHULTZ JEANNETTE FRANCIS SEARCY Page 207 D D BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY qCCm.p LEON BERT!-IOLD SECK LOUISE SALKA SEMAN ROBERT LEE SHAPIRO GILBERT SHATZ ILA MAE SILBERC RUTH JANET SILVERMAN LOIUS SROLNICIQ RACHEL TURNBULL SMILEY CLARENCE VVALTON VVILBUR S DONALD BURDETTE SMITH GENEVIVE SELINA SMITH LAWERENCE BEALL SMITH PHILIP BRAWLEY SMITH HANNAN MIRIAM SNETT BESS SELTZER SONDEL ANNETTE ELIZABETH SETIN SARAN STEIN GLADYS KORSAN STENSLAND GLADYS LOUISE STEVEN JOHN MANSFIELD STEVENSON DONALD HUBERT STEWARD VIRGINIA ELISABETH STOKES HERBERT VICTOR ACKERMAN BERNIECE ESTHER ARONSON DONALD HULLINGER BELL BETTY ANNE BLAIRE DAVID BODIAN SAMUEL IARVIS BOLONIK KEITH CHAPIN BOWERS LAWRENCE ROBERT BRAINARD MAURICE SAUL BURDICK CHARLES BURKE VVILLIAM HENRX' CLAY NORMAN ROY COOPERMAN ERNEST CHRISTIAN DAY SYDNEY ALFRED DIAMOND CLINTON MILFORD DOEDE ETHEL LOIS PIARDAVVAY MITH LESTER SONE JEROME BERIRAM STRAUSS ESTHER STROTE LENORE SUDER ANNA SURCHEK ELEAZAR ISAR SZADZIUMSKI FRANCES DOROTHY TAYLOR JOSEPH JULIUS TICKTIN MARIE LORETTA TIERNEY FRANCES LEE TOLLERTON DAVID LOY TRESSLER ROBERT WHEELER TUCKER ANNA BERTHA TULL DOROTHY CLEVELAND TYLER MARIE LOUISE VACCO ROBERT CLIFTON VALENTINE ERRETT IVING VAN NICE ALICE MARIE VLK ALICE BEATRICE VONKELLER ELSBETH BEATRICE VVAGNER GRACE HENRIETTA VVALKER NATALIE CHADVVICK VVASHBU BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DONALD EDWARD HOCPISTEDLER EDWARD JOHN HOPKINS ALYCE LOUISE HORKOCKS EDMUND HYZY JULIA VAWTER IGERT FRANK ALBERT JANECEK MARTHA JANOTA ARTHUR ISRAEL JANL'S HAROLD CORNELXUS JOHNSON LENT CLIFTON JOHNSON, JR. KATHARYN KELLOGG LOUISE SIDNEY KLEIN FRANK LOUIS KORANDA ARTHUR EDVVIN KOTT BURTON DUFFE AGNES CLAIRE DUNN BEN SEYMOUR VVATTENBERG ETHEL CURTIS VVATTS MARY ELIZABETH VVATTS DOROTHY EVELYN WEBER SELMA HARRIET VVEBER JOAN VVEIL FANNIE FAJEL VVEINBURG EDVVARD MILTON VVEINER JULIAN DONALD WEISS LUCILLE JEANETTE VVELTER MARIAN ELISABETH WHITE NADA LORRAINE VVI-IITE THELMA CHRISTINE VVHITE ALICE TWICHELL WHITTAKER PHYLLIS CLAIRE VVILBUR FREDA CHARLOITA VVITI-IERS CECELIA WOLF MARTHA TERRELL YAEGER SIDNEY YATES WILLIAM F. ZACHARIAS LAWRENCE EDWARD ZEITZ RN FERMINO MOIDESTO ZANCANARO JULIETTE MELAINE ELISCU VVILLIAM HAROLD ELLIOT ZACHARY FELSHER EMPHIA MARGARET FISHER LOUIS RICHARD FORBRICH CAROLYN NORTON FRENCH MURIEL KLING FULLER GILES VVINFORD GARRETI' EDRED EARL GREEN JAMES SCOTT GRIFFITH ELLA ISAIIEL GUZE DOROTPIY RUTY I-IAGEMEYER HOWARD BENNETT HAMILTON SYLVIA KRAMER PETER MICHAEL KRAUCZUNAS Page' 208 U D SALLY LASKIN EDWIN HERMAN LENNETTE LOUIS SAMUEL LERNER SAMUEL LEVINSON KATHERINE LOEWY BACHELOR OF SCIENCE CCODLJ LILLIAN ALICE PETERSON FRANK MICHAEL PETKEVICH HERBERT MORROW PHILLIPS FRANCES MARIE PITNER ELLA NYGARD RECKNER ELIZABETH PATRICIA LYNSKEY ANNE ELLEN REDMOND GORDON DANEORTH MERRICK FREDERICK MORRIS SILVER GERTRUDE CLARA MEYER JANET LAVERN SMITH JOSEPH LEGGETT MILLER, JR. MARIE ANTOINEITE STEIMMETZ LUETTA RUTH NEIMAN EDWARD LIUMPHREY STEVENS BERTRAM GRIEEITH NELSON EMMA HELEN STRIMIC ABE HASKEL TAUB KENT HANTHORN THAYER MINNIE PEARL TI-IIGPEN CECILIA RAE VASLOW EDMUND NELSON WALSH SARAH ELOISE WEBSTER NORMAN DOUGLAS WILLIAMS HAYDEN BLACKWELL VVINGATIE MADELINE AUDREY YOUNG MOSES ZALESKY BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION EMMA LUCILE ALGER LOUISE BARRON OLIVE VIOLA BELSLY HELEN LOREDA BULLOCK. FLORENCE BARBER CARD CLAIRE CHURCHILL MARGARET LOTTS COLLINS LOUIS THEODORE COOK MARVALENE LUCILLE DAY WELBORN S. DIMMETT LUCIA GRACE DOWNING ALBERTA MARION EISENBERG ARLINE MAY FELTHAM GRACE LAURA FOSTER LEE RAY FOSTER MYRTLE LOUISE FREY MARIAN LUELLA GARBE RUTH GENEVIVE HANTZ FRANCES MARION HARRIMAN KATHERINE ANNE HAYEORD JESSIE LOZIER JEFFERS JULIA CHARLOTTE JENSEN ELIZABETH ANN KEEFE MARY FREEMAN KING HORTENSE KLEIN ANNE Y.KUDERNA MOLLY CLAIRE MAILICK ADELAIDE MARY MCLIN FLORENCE MITCHEL CATHRYN MORPHEW NEWMAN DELLIS LUCILE ORKIN MARTHA POWELL ETHEL SEARL REED MAUDE ETHEL REED ROSALIND GRACE ROSEWATER KATHERINE MARGARET RUMM MILDRED HARRIER SCHEFF GRETA SVVANSON ELSA WOLF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN COMMERCE ABE LIONEL BLINDER DON MILAN COOPERIDER THOMAS COWLEY DONALD LEE CURLESS ESTHER JEANNETTE DONNELI.Y ARTHUR ABRAHAM ENGEL IVAN EVALD ERICSON MELVIN REINHART ERICSON HARRY PALMER GORDON EARL WILLIAM HARDER DOROTHY JANICE HEICKE JOHN SPENSER HENDELES JOSEPH FRANK JURT WILLIAM JANCIUS MICHAEL JAMES JUCIUS JOHN CORR JUDGE LOUISE WILHELMINA KLING CARL SIEGFRIED KNUDTEN VIRGINIA LOUISE LOCKWOOD VINCENT PIERCE LONG LEE JULES LOVENTHAL II HUGPI ROSS MACKENZIE, JR. MAX HENRY MAUERMANN ROBERT ELWIN MCKIITRICK RICHARD SCHAAF MELVIN ERNEST HOMER MILLER DONALD JAMES MOORE LILLIAN PLAVNIK DAVID DEVITT POTTISHMANN ROBERT LAUCHLIN PURCELI. BESSIE ESTHER REAM MORRIS SCHONI-IOLZ CHARLES HENRY SEVIN JEROME SOLOMON FRANKLIN EUGENE STREICH HAROLD GERARD TERMAAT HERBERT J. VOELZ DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SERVICE ADMINISTRATION ROSE APPELBAUM VERA LUCILLE DUNCAN GRACE ELIZABETI-I VVHITE GEORGE ASHBURN ANNE LAURIE SAPERSTENE ESTHER VICTORIA ZUMCAHI, EL Page 209 CANDIDATES FOR BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN THE COLLEGES AUGUST za, 1931 BACHELOR OF ARTS ELFRIEDA MARIE BREDE CLAIRE BEATRICE CHAT'I'ER'1'0N ELIZABETH CHRISTINA MCCLINTIC JAMES JOHN ANDERSON NELLIE ELIZABETH BEHM DOROIHY LATHAM BENSON NORMAN LEE BRADY MIRIAM DARLEEN CITTERMAN MARTHA CATHERINE CLARRIN DAVID KIPLING COCHRANE MILTON HERMAN COHEN HENRIETTE WAMSTED COLLINS IRENE MARY COLLINS ALEXANDER COUTTS MARY ELIZABETH CROARE RUTH CROTHERS FREDRICK OWEN DICUS LOIS VIRGINIA DODD HANNA S. DOLE ELIZABETH ANN DUCEY NELSON DUNFORD EDGAR WARD DUNKIN BERNARDINE AUTIIENRIETH MARGARET LOWE FREEMAN GLADYS FREDORA FREESTON LAVERNE GERTRUDE GENTER RODERICR ALDRICH GINSBURG JULIA MILLIAN GODDEYNE MARY MARGARET GOODFELLOW WILEERD GORDON LII LIAS JANE GRANT ALICE CATHERINE GREEN JOSEPH HACKEMAN THERESE M. HASTERLICK NAOMI HILDEBRAND LOUISE HIRSCLI CHARIOTTE CLARKE HOIRNE FAXON ABBIE PEARL BROWTH VVEI LIANG CHOW MARSHALL COHEN CATHERINE ROSE DALEY DONALD HENRY' DALTON .ANNA CLEMENTINE DOLAN GRACE LUCILLE ENGEL PAUL EDWARD FELDMAN CHARLES MARSHALL FISH DANIEL GLAZER ETHEL GOLDBERT ELIZABETH CLARE GREGG IQ.-XTHANIEL BOUTON CIUYOL BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY ALDEN HINKLEX' HOWE HELEN ANNE HRACPIOVSKA CHARLES HARRISTON HUMPIIREY EVELYN MARGARET KATZ JULIA IRENE KEMP CAROLYN HENRIETTA KLUTEY ALLEN EVVING KOLB PIIILIP KOLB ROBERTA MILLER LAREW FRANCES JOHN LARRIN JEWEL LEITZMAN GEORGE DEVVIN LEWIS LUCY ANNA LEWIS KATHERINE SELMA LINDEN EMMA CHARLOTTE LUNDGREN KENNETPI ALBERT MACDONALD SELMA GRACE MAPEL HARRY MARCUS ROBERT BLOOM MAYER JOHN CORNELIUS MCCURRY KATHERINE MCDONNELL FRANCES ELIZABETH MCENERY ROSAMOND MARTIN MCGILL MARY ELIZABETH MCKEON GEORGE OTTO MEIERDIERKS HARRIETT VAN VALKENBURGI-I MERRILL DAVID MICAH MILLER ALICE VIRGINIA NEIL MARY VVELLS NOYES GENEVIVE ALPIN OIHARA JOHN ONUFROCK JANE JOSEFA PALCZYNSKI BEATRICE CLARA PANCOSKA CARLOS FRANCSIS PEVERLY BACHELOR OF SCIENCE HEINZ OTTO HOFFMAN JEROME JACOB HURVVICK ORPHA KATHERINE JOHNSON SAMUEL KATZ JOSEPH ALRINGTON KISSINCER HAROLD JAY KOCH ARI'IAIUR RAYMOND KOISDERUP DEONARAYAN OMAH MARARAJII RUTH LUCIA MANNING MARJORIE LENORE MARCY ROBERT CRAIG MCCORMACR FRANK NEUVVELT LORETIA HELEN OICOXELL CORA MAE POOLE VVESLEY UBO RIEDEL PHILIP ITIENRY RILEY BERTHE MARGARET RITTSCHOE VIRGINIA MAY ROTH ANGELA ANITA ROUSE LILLIAN SCI-ILESINGER HUBERT SCHNUCH HILDA ELISE SCI-INOLI, CELIA SEGERMAN IDA PEARL SHANK MARGARET SHANNON ARTHUR SHAPIRO LOUIS PACEY SI-IAPIRO VVILHELMINA SHIVERLY LIN FRANCIS SHOBLASKE LUCILLE ANNE1'l'E SHOWER HARRIET IVIARTI-IA SMITH JEANETTE SMITH MARIE LOUISE STEINER RUTH KYRK STRINB LEONA THOMAS SARA AUGUSTA TPIOMPSON RAYMOND EMMET ULVIZRLINC CYRUS WEBER WALKER FLORENCE WALTER MILTON CARAS WALTERS EUGENE CLYDE VVEAFER CJILADYS KATHLEEN WEVER ELEANORA MERCEDES VVICKS1 ROVI HEI.EN ELIZABETH WILLIAMS JANET COEPER WORKS EDNA ELIZABETH YOUNG HAROLD RAYMOND OHI.sON NORMAN IRA ROSKI PAULINE SAEADOSH MABLE HALL SCI-IAMP SAM SCHOENEELD JESSE BEAVER SCIIREITER DORIS MIRIAM SPERTUS JOHN WALLACE S'I'AS'I'NY DELIE RUTH STODDARD VESTA THOMPSON ROBERT J. JOHNSON TIPI,ER VVILBUR JOHN IIRBAN LYDIA DOLORIES VON DRASEK Pagr 210 El U BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION IESSIE HELEN AITCHISON PRISCILLA ANN BISHOP KATHLEEN HELEN BORDNER IDELLA BRADLEY ELVIN GLEN BYERS ELIZABETH NEWCOMB CASTLE MAE HENRIETTA CEKAN HATTIE JONH CRAWLEY MAMIE JOSEPHINE CUSTER RUBY JOY DUEL ANNA DURNING MARY EDWIN ENTSMINGER BIANCA ESCH MAY ESTABROOK ESTA FAY FILBEY LEONE GERTRUDE HERMANN IRENE FRANCES HEVENOR DORA HIRSCH IENNIE CECILIA HOGAN ELLA IOSEPHINE JACOBSON IRENE INEZ JOHNSON VIOLA ESTHE JOHNSON ELIAS NATHAN LANE HANNAH MATHILDA LINDAHL HELEN AGNES MACK JAMES LEO MCCABE ANNA EDITH MULHOLLAND RUSSELL LEROY PALM ALICE MARGUERITE PITTMAN VIRGINIA MAUDE POND MAGGIE MAY PRENTICE KENNETY LARRIEU PRESTON GERTRUDE EVANGELINE REED ERESTINE LORA SEEDORFF MABEL MARY TREDENNICK LORETTA ROSALIE VORWALD ARTHUR WILLIAM WALZ MARGARET AGNES WEST ANGELA MACSWEEN WHEELER RUTH VIVIAN WHITAVER EDITH DWYER WRIGHT EVELYN ALICE PRATT BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN COMMERCE FRANK JOSEPH CLAVIN MARY AGNES CLARK JOHN HENRY DONOVAN ROSE ANNA HOCH DESSA MAE HUDSON CAROLINE ALMA HUBERT CHARLES STUART KENDALL ANN LEVIN CHARLES STEWARD PHILLIPS EDWARD K. STACKLER ETHEL LOIS STEPHEN ESTELLE MARIE VOELKLER CANDIDATES FOR BACHELOR'S DEGREES SARAI-I NAOMI ANDERSON GEORGE ROBERT BARTLETT HASTINGS HAMUZU BANDA MARK THEODORE BARNETT HELEN T. BORUKE MARTINE ABNER BOWERS HOWARD ABNER BOWERS HOWARD PINSON CLARKE DECEMBER 22, 1931 BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY HARRY ELvOvE JEANETTE FRANK X JOSEPH LESTER FREUDENTHAL MAUDE ETHEL GEARY LEONARD GEORGE GESAS WILLET NOBLES GOHRAM ROSE GIBLICHMAN MILDRED IRENE GOODRIE ISABELLA LORRAINE CRUICKSHANKBERNICE GRAWOIG GERTRUDE BROWN CURTIS GARNETA TIBBS CARLISLE LOUISE ELAINE CARNAHAN SUZETTE CAUUET ALICE MARSDEN CRAIG HELEN ELIZABETH DODD LESLIE WILLIAM DAMON MARIE EUCENIA KARGAN GEORGE JEROME DIETA ALICE MARY DOLAN JEAN ELISABETH RHYS BLANCHE VIVIAN SCHAEFNER ROSA HENGEN SCHULZE EMELYNE IDA ASHLAND ELI LEROY BORKON MABEL JEAN BLAKE EVELYN GOLDIE BLOOM HELEN MARGARET GRUNER RAYMOND MARCELLUS HXLLIARD HERBER'F HUGH HEYMAN HELEN HUMISTON NORMAN ALLAN IMRIE JEANNETTE WARREN LAMB LA VERNE SHIRLEY LARSON ALLEN RUSKIN LEVIN ESTI-IER LEPUNSKY BACHELOR OF ARTS GORDON KENNETH SMITH SAMUEL ETHELBERT STEWERT VIOLA GRACE TILLINC ANNA TAGGART BACHELOR OF SCIENCE VERA MAZOR ROBERT WILLIAM MOLLENDORF ELEANOR DURBIN MURDOCH EVELYN IRENE PHELAN DOROTHY ELEANOR CRAWSHAW SIMON POLLACK EMILY DESYLVESTER DALE DEAN DOROGELOH ARTHUR CHARLES HORNUNG LEVVIS ROBERT ROLL MARY P. SCHAEFER RICHARD PRESTON SWIGART EDITH MYRTLE MCCHESNEY JANE ROSS MCLIMANS MICI-IAEL M.MINKIEWICZ SHOSHANO S. MANUSSOVICH HERBERT YING-PAUNG MOY ALMA HARRISON NASET ALFRED ELDERFIELD OSBORNE NICHOLAS PAVIA COLBERT HUBERT PEARSON CHARLES ANTON POLLAK SARAH ELIZABETH PORTOR ALFRED WILLIS PRESKILL MORTON REISMAN HEDWOG W.REICHHOLD CECILE MARGARET RUDIN MARY AGNES SCOTT DOROTHY JANE SWINEY DULANY TERRETT JOHN PRESCOTT THOMPSON GAYLORD FRANCIS WILKINSON CARL FREDRICK SCHOEDER LAVVRANCE ELLSWORTH SI-IINN ALDEN BRADSHAVV STEVENS MARGARET HELEN STOLL VICTOR PAUL STRAUCH ELEANOR JOSEPHINE TATGE CAROLYN ELISABETH VVILLS Page 211 U D BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION ROSE ADELAIDE APPLEBY ELMA GANSEVOORT OLIVE BEATA GROTH GERTRUDE ROSINA HIRSCH THEODORE J. C. KUEHNERT HATTIE ANNA MAROUARDT MELBA GEORCINA MAURICE HELEN IDA RICHTER LOUISE SIDONIE SCHOENBERG CARMEN FRANCES VVOLF EDNA MARGARET VVURTZ ZALDIVAR BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN COMMERCE ROBERT BERNARD ANDERSON MORRIS COOPERMAN HARRY BRODIE RUTH MANOVITZ FREEMAN YAFFA SONIA BARAKAN JAMES KENNETH KLOEHR GERTRUDE NORRIS DOUOHLAS HASDRUBAI, TIIIEMANN CANDIDATES FOR BACHELOR'S DEGREES MARCH Is, 1932 I. IN THE DIVISION OF THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY JOHN HAWTHORNE BISSELL ALICE MAY FRIEDEMAN MARY SIEGEL PHILIP FEIVESON FLORENCE MIRIAM SARISKY FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE: ESTELLE ANIS HERMAN CHARLES MASON RICHARD EDCARD SOMMA KENNETH PETER FRAIDER FLORENCE AMY MCCULLAOH DUNCAN MACLAREN THOMSON IRVINC FLESHAM LAUMAN ADOLPH ROY NACHMAN MII.DRED MARIE URBANEK MAURICE LORBER ALICE EUCENIA PALMER MARGERY' SARAH WILSON ARTHUR KARL PETERSON II. IN THE DIVISION OF THE HUMANITIES FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY: ROBERT ELLER ASHER ALICE MARY JORDAN ERNEST CALHOUN NORMAN ALYCE GENEVIEVE BARNES PHYLLIS EILEEN JOSEPH MABEL CATHERINE OyDONNEI.I MARJORIE JANE BERNINC FRANK MATHIAES JUSTIN ELEANOR CUPE RAWLINOS YVONNE BLUE JOSEPHINE KOLAR ALICE DEGRAEEENREID RHEA ELIZABETH CATHERINE BLYTHE CLARENCE ARTHUR KURTH NORMA AUGUSTA ROOKER MARY CATHERINE BUDD VVAYLAND VVALLACE LESSING EDITH AMELIA SCIIULZ BARBARA MAYNARD COOK EDWARD HIRSCH LEvI BLANCI-IE SREBELSRY CLARENCE ELDREDGE Fox, JR. EDNA MARTHA CHANONON LEW!-IRENZ HELEN CRISTINA SWANSON SYLYIA Fox BURTON BENJAMIN LIESCHULTZ ESTELLA SICRID SWENSON IALFRED VICTOR FR.-XNKENSTEIN HALLIE ERMA LINDER HARRIET-ANN TRINKLE HATIIE B.-UTY HEDINIAN OLIVE HUTTON LUCAS FAY ANNABELLE VVEINBERG ELIZABETH ORTON JONES ELIZABETH STEPHANY MARY MII,I.lS Page 212 U U III. IN THE DIVISION OF THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE: LUIS ALVAREZ NORRIS L. BROOKENS EDITH LOUISE BROWN EARL JOHN CONWAY WILLIAM WURSTER DYER BEATRICE HORWITZ ABRAHAM WOLF MARCOVICH HELEN ELIZABETH MCCARTIN FRANK BERNARD PIETROWICZ GORDON RITTENI-IOUSE C. MYRTLE SCHLUNZ OGDEN KERFOOT SMYTH JAMES MATTHEW STAPLETON ALFRED JOSEPH STAVVARZ RALPH HARRY STEINBERG CHARLES EDVVARD WEIR CHARLES ERMONT WILSON NATHANIEL MORTON WINSLOW BENJAMIN THOMAS WOODRUFE IV. IN THE DIVISION OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY: MINNIE LOIS BERGH MORDECAI LOUIS BRILL RICHARD TAIT CHILD CYNTHIA COHEN CARL CRAVVFORD CROMER FRANK PATRICK CROWE MARJORIE CULVER DEWIRE ANTOINETTE DOLARK VIDA MARION GANS ELIZABETH FLORENCE HILL JOHN RICHARDS HUNTER GRACE ANNE JOY LOUIS EDGAR KANNE JOHN WARNER MCCONNELL WILLIAM RANDOLPH MICHELL MIRIAM STERN NUDELMAN LORETTO ANN PHALIN CARL SOLOMON POMERANCE WILLIAM ALLEN QUINLAN LILIAN MAE RIPPLE LOUIS JOSEPH RUFFOLO MAX WALDO SCHMIDT MATHILDE SCHUTZBERGER HELEN RITA SEMMERLING ISABELL SI-IAPERA 'THOMAS HARRY SLUSSER, JR. LILLIAN TEPLITZ WINNIFRED FRIEDA VVEINEERG SAMUEL ZELKOWICH FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION: GERTRUDE CHRISTINE BRINKMAN CHRISTINE MAY HEINIG EDD B. WETHEROW ESTHER GEORGIA HENDERSON CALVERT EMILY MILDRED JULIAN JAMES ORVILLE WOOD ESTHER LINNEA NELSON V. IN THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE AND ADMINISTRATION FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY: LLOYD WALLACE GERMANN DOROTHY BOXLEY JENKINS STODDARD JOHN SMALL JAMES FRANKLIN HARTLE FRED WONG LOUIS ABRAIIAM LINCOLN WOLPSON ANN HAYES SAMUEL CRAIG PLUMMER, JR. MAURICE ADAM ZOLLAR HAROLD PRESS Page 213' Cl D RUTH HELENE ABELLS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Psychology College Aide, Nu Pi Sig- ma, Phi Beta Kappa, Federation of University VVomen, Chairman, Chapel Council, Honor Commission, Secretary, 4, Interscholastic Examina- tion, Co-Chairman. JACK .ABRAMS Detroit, Mich. S.B., Spring, 1932 Physiology Fourth Year Honor Schol- arship in Physiology. PAUL M. ADLER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Gymnastic Team. HELEN ALCOTT Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Advnbzis- tration TONY ALIC Gillespie, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Conznzerce and ffdminis- tration GORDON ALLEN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Englixh Phi Gamma Delta, Phoe- nix, Dramatic Associa- tion g Interfraternity Coun- cilg Blackfriars. Luis Auzxkez Rochester, Minn. S.B., VVinter, 1932 Plzyxics Skull and Crescent: Phi Gamma Delta, Gymnastic Teamg Order of the "C", Phi Beta Kappa. DORIS ANIJPIRSON Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Home Economic: Wyverng Freshman Class, Vice-President, Under- graduate Councilg Fresh- man VVomen's Club, Presi- dent. FLORENCE ANDREYVS Chicago, Ill. PEB., spring, 1932 Edufation Es'rEL1.E ANIS Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Bactnriology CARo1.1NE AI'El.fXND Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Kina'z'rgar1en-Prinzary EMELYNE Asllmxla Chicago, Ill. S.B., Autumn, 1931 Botany Page 214 PAUL ASHLEY Winomac, Indiana S.B., Spring, 1932 Zoology JOSEPH JENNINGS ATWELL, IR Chicago, Ill. A.B., Spring, 1932 Greek Alpha Kappa Psi. LEONE BAILEY Oak Park, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Kindergarten-Primary Chi Rho Sigma, Board of Women's Organizations 3 Mirrorg Kindergarten- Primary Club Councilg W.A.A. A. VERNON BAKKERS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History HASTINGS K. BANDA Kasungu, Nyasaland Ph.B., Autumn, 1931 History Alpha Phi Alpha, Inter- national Students' Associa- tion. HTAFFA S. BARAKAN Tel Aviv, Palestine Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Social Ser-'vice Alclminis- tration International Student's Association. STUARTA BARAT Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and fldminis tration Chi Rho Sigma, Mirror Dramatic Association g C0 mad, Y.W.C.A. MARIAN LoU1sE BARKER Indiana Harbor, Ind. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Social Sorfvice Aldminis- tration ALYCE G. BARNES Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Winter, 1932 English IRVING E. BARNETT Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Larw Wrestling Team. PEGGY BARR Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English WILBUR BAUMGARTNER Chicago, Ill. SB., Spring, 1932 Pr'e-Medical Page 215 MARJORIE BERNING Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., VVinter, 1932 Art Deltho. CATHERINE BERGQUIST Chicago, Ill. S.B., Autumn, 1932 Biological Sciences CORNELIA M. BERRY Louisville, Ky. S.B., Spring, 1932 Clzemistry LOUISE F. BIELENBERG Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Matlzematics Delta Sigma. HARRIET BILLINGS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Summer, 1932 Home Economics Rox' RENN BLACK, JR. Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Geography Owl and Serpent, Delta Kappa Epsilon 5 Track Team. ARTHUR O. BORG Des Moines, Iowa Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Religion Athliated from Univ. of Mich. and Chicago Y.M.C.A. College, Chapel Council, 4. V1o1.A BOVVER Oak Park, Ill. A.B., Spring, 1932 Laiin College Aideg Eta Sigma Phi. CLARENCE GORDON BRADEN Louisville, Ky. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Aiiiliated from Univ. of Louisville and Harvard, Dramatic Aosociationg Chess Club 3 Bacteriology Club. ROXANNA BREEN Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Geography Deltho, Interclub Coun- cil. MARYFRANCES BRENNEN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History Delta Sigma. MORDECAI BRILI, Indianapolis, Ind. Ph.B., VVinrer, 1932 Hislory Avukah. Page 216 BERNARD BRQDIE Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Philoxophy ELSA BROIDA Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Kindergarten-Primary Senior Honor Scholarship in Education, Pi Lambda Theta. WERNER H. BROMUND Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Chemistry Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Gamma Delta, Order of the."C", Gymnastic Team NORRIS L. BROOKENS Topeka, Kansas S.B., VVinter, 1932 Chemistry Epsilon Alpha DOROTHY BROSI Coatsburg, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Education Chi Rho Sigma, Upper- class Counsellor, 4, Mir- or, 3, Y.VV.C.A., Inter- national Club, 3. MARX' CATHERINE BUDD Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., VVinter, 1932 English College Aide, Phi Beta Kappa, Chapel Council, Board of VVomen's Or- ganizations, Women's "C" Club, VV.A.A. Board. EDWARD HENRY BUEHRIG Minier, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History ROBERT A. BUSSIAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B.,A Spring, 1932 Political Science Beta Theta Pi. CHARLES EUGENE BUZZELL Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration HELEN ADELE CAI-IOON Fort Worth, Texas Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Deltho, The Circle. TRACY H. CALKINS Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Physics CHARLES CANNAM Omaha, Nebraska Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Page 217 LAURENCE CARR Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Plzysics Delta Upsilon. SUZETTE CAUUET Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Autumn, 1931 Romance Languages FREDERIC W.D.S. CHANNER Glencoe, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Political Science JULIA CIBULKA Berwyn, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History SYLVIA COBB Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Languages Aychud. PAUL F. COE Maywood, Ill. Ph.B., Summer, 1932 Comrrzcrcc and .-Idmi11is- lraiion Alpha Kappa Psi, Phi Kappa Sigma. DOROTHY P. C01-IEN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English PIERZI. COHEN Racine, VVis. S.B., Spring, 1932 Chemistry Phi Beta Kappa. RUTH COHEN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History JOHN COLLINS Chicago, Ill. A.B., Summer, 1932 Lafw ROBERT S. COLvn.Lrz Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Com marco and ffdminis tralion Track, 2--lg Football, 3-4 ROBERT CoI,wrai,i. Chicago, Ill. Ph.l3., Spring, 1932 Emnonzirs Delta lfpsilon. Pngr 218 NORA LOUISE CONNER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Kindergartc'n-Primczry Dramatic Association, Kindergarten - Primary Club, Y.W.C.A. BARBARA COOK Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Winter, 1932 Romance Languages College Aide, Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma, Univer- sity Social Program Com- mittee, Dramatic Associ- ation, Board of VVomen's Organizations, Women's "C" Club. PHYLLIS COPLAND Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Languages ROSE E. CRAPPLE Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English CORDELIA CROUT Milwaukee, Wis. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Upperclass Counsellor, 3- 4, Dramatic Association, Mirror, Gargoyles. FRANK P. CROWE Chicago, Ill. , Ph.B., VVinter, 1932 Political Science Tau Kappa Epsilon, Blackfriars, R.O.T.C., Swimming. THOMAS CROWLEY Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Chemistry WILLIAM I. CUSTER, IR. Chicago, Ill. S.B., Summer, 1932 Geology Owl and Serpent, Chi Psi, Cap and Gown, Blackfriars, Settlement, 3. WOODROW DAGNEAU Stevens Point, Wis. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- iration Alpha Kappa Psi, Intra- mural Sports, 3-4. MARY HELEN DALY Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History Arrian, Tarpon, 2. RALPH E. DAREY Arkansas City, Kansas Ph.B., spring, 1932 Commerce and fldminis- tration LLOYD J. DAVIDSON Louisville, Kentucky Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Phi Beta Kappa, Kappa Sigma, Fourth Year Honor Scholarship, Co- Editor of The Circle, Chapel Council. Pagr 219 VVII-FRIso DAVIS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Sociology Green Cap Club, Lambda Chi Alpha, Blackfriars. AGA'I'HA Ross DEGEN Chicago, Ill. Ph,B., Summer, 1932 Kindergarten-Primary Kindergarten-Primarv Club, Y.VV.C.A., VV.A. A., German Club. GERTRUDE JANE DEMPSTER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Home Economics Undergraduate Home Eco- nomic Club, President. MARY DEVINE Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Phi Beta Delta Rosa E. DIRECTOR Portland, Ore. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Economics Social Science Council. ALICE MARY DOLAN Buffalo, N. Y. A.B., Autumn, 1931 Humanilifs Della Sigma, Federation of University Vvomen, Calvert Club, Educational Club. CI,.xUIiIA DORLANII Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 ROIIHIIIU' Ldllfjllllflllf Le Cercle Francais, 3, 4, Federation of University W'omen, 4-, Hockey Honor Team. OSCAR DRELI. Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw MIGUEL DROBINSKY Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Chl'llliJI'l'-V Phi Beta Kappa, Epsilon Alpha, Kent Chemical Society. FORREST S. DRUMMOND Elmhurst, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw College Marshal, Iron Mask, 3, Phi Kappa Psi, Men's Commission, Cap and Gown, 1, 2, Vice- President of Freshman Law Class, Intermural Manager. MILIJREIQ L. DUNIIAM Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Social Szvfuirff fldminis- Iralion College League for lnde- pendent Political Action, Socialist Club, Student Volunteers, Religious Education Club. JESSAMINE DuRAx'I'I2 Chicago, lll. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Ellyliffl Secretary of Freshman Class, Cap and Gown, 1, 2, I'IIdergraLlu:Ite Coun- cil, 2, LaCritique, Circu- lation Manager, 3, Mir- ror, 2, 3. Page 220 MARY M. EFFERTZ Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History MARGARET EGAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Nu Pi Sigma, Student Committee on Student Af- fairs: Daily ' Maroon, Board of VVomen's Organi- zations. SYLVIA EISENBERG Waukegan, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Social Ser-vice Aolminis- tration Affiliated from U. of VVis. CHARLES ELSON Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Art Dramatic Association, Blackfriarsg F e n c i n g Team. JOSEPHINE EMERY Mobile, Alabama Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Social Scrrvicc flalminis- tration CLARENCE ENGDALL Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English JANE E. ENSMINGER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Languages Affiliated from Colleges Montmorency and Sor- bonne, Federation of Uni- versity Women, Gar- goyles, Gli Scapigliate Club. EDGAR J. FAGAN Chicago, ni. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration Green Cap Club, Order of the Grail, Senior Exec- utive Council, Black- friars. MAURINE FALKENBURG Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English VVyvern. PHILIP FEIVESON Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Winter, 1932 Psychology SOL E. FELDBEIN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw Alpha Epsilon Pi, Black- friars, Daily Maroon, Varsity VVrestling. ELLEN E. FIETZE Chicago, Ill. Ph,B., Spring, 1932 Hisiory Phi Beta Kappa, VVom- en's "C" Club. Page 221 I5 D Emra FISCHER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History WALLACE C. FISCHER Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Chemistry Green Cap Club, Politi- cal Science Council, Elec- tion Commission, Fencing, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. RAE FISHER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Kindergarten-Prirnary Kindergarten-P rim a ry Club. EILEEN FITZPATRICK Hillsdale, Mich. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Languages Kappa Kappa Gamma, Calvert Club, Interna- tional Club, 4, Gli Scapi- gliate Club. ELEANOR F. FRANK Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Pryrlfology ALFRED V. FRAxKENs'rExN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., VVinter, 1932 Englisfz Awarded john Billings Fiske Poetry Prize, 1929, Daily Maroon, l'niversity Orchestra. S'rn.1.MAN M. FRANk1,..xNn Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerfr and fldminis- tration Alpha Kappa Psi, Senior Class President, Under- graduate Council, Com- merce and Administration Council. CORINNE FREED Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Psyrhology Affiliated from North- western. ADEl.E M. FRICKE Oak Park, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Psyrflology VV.A.A. Board, 1, 2, 4, Treasurer, 2, Women's "C" Club, Hockey, Bas- ketball, Baseball. SYLVIA FRIEDEMAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Languages Senior Aide, Nu Pi Sig- ma, Quadrangler, Chapel Council, Undergraduate Council, Board of VVom- en's Organizations. IIARVEY GEORGE FRIEIMANN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw Dramatic Association. I.x'm.x FIJRNEY Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Larw Page 222 I5 D MARY GEANNES Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Summer, 1932 Romance Languages LLOYD W. GERMANN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Winter, 1932 Comrnerce and Adminis- tration Alpha Kappa Psig Zeta Psi. JANE GESCHWIND Cleveland, Ohio Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Home Economics Home Economics Club. FRANK M. GIBBONEY Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Cmnrnerce and Adminis- tration Phi Pi Phi. HELEN BERENICE GIBBONS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Home Economics NORMAN N. GILL Milwaukee, Wis. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Political Science Phi Beta Kappag Cosmos Club, Avukah. DONALD R. GILLES Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerrc' and Adminis- tration Intramurals, Fencing. VVILLIAM EDWARD GIST Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Comnzerre and Adminis- tration JOHN GLETZ Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Eta Sigma Phig Lutheran Club, 4. MARVIN GOLDMAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration Tau Delta Phi. ROBERT MAURICE CEOLDSTEIN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Afhliated from Univ. of Mich., Pi Lambda Phi. VVILLIAM GRAHAM Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Clzernistry Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Pi Phi. Pagf 223 U D VVILLIAM E. GREY, IR. Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw ROBERT B. GREENMAN Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Cherrzisiry JULIE GRENIER Cambridge, Mass. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Sociology Honor Commission , Chapel Council, Federation of University VVomen, Inter- national Club, Upperclass Counsellor, Calvert Club, President. HELEN GRIFFITPI Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring. 1932 Sofia! Serwifr' filflmivzis- tration Deltho. MARX' CSRISXVOLIJ Robinson, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Kindcrgarien-Primary. OLIVE GROTII Jackson, VVis. Ph.B., Autumn, 1931 Education University Choir. EvEI.I'N A. HAIsIIAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History Dramatic Association. S'rANI.EY H. HIXMBERG Oak Park, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commeruf and Jdrninfs- tration Phi Gamma Delta, Fresh- man Class Council, Order of the HC", Football. WILLIAM M. HARDY Athens, VVest. Va. Ph.B,, Spring, 1932 English ANNA KATHERINE HARRIS Whiting, Ind. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Home Ecozzomics JANET LOUISE HARRIS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Sociology 'I'HEonoRE IIARRIS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Band. Pngf 22-1 JAMES F. HAR1'LE Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Winter, 1932 Conznzorco and Adminis- tration Delta Upsilon, Blackfri- ars. GILBERT W. HAYES Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Philosophy Delta Upsilon: Historv of Religious Clubg Fencing, 3. JOHN VINCENT HEALY Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English and Philosophy Sigma Chig Poetry Club. LOWELL S. HEBBARID Ishpeming, Mich. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Aldminis- tration MARY HEGKTN Peoria, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Difoinity ELVA FAY HENTCRSMAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Languages VVyverng Mirror. MARLYS HENNING Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Poetry Club. JOSEPH AUSTIN HERR Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Chemistry MARTIN J. HERRMANN St. Joseph, Michigan Ph.B., Summer, 1932 Economirs Alpha Kappa Psi. MARGARET E. HILL Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English College Aide: Nu Pi Sig- mag Chi Rho Sigma, W.A.A., Secretary, 3g Board of Womenis Organ- izations, Z-4g Women's "C" Club, Y.VV.C.A., Second Cabinet. ROBERT S. HINDS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerre and Adminis- iration Alpha Kappa Psig Tau Kappa Epsilon, Band. MAMIE G. HOFFMAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring. 1932 Biologifal Sfionfc D L THOR HOLTER Rhinelander, VVis. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Aldminis- tration Honor Student, C. and A., Phi Pi Phi. GENEVIEVE L. HOLZPIAUER Peotone, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English EVA GERTXRUDE HORT'0N Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Autumn, 1932 English Afliliated from U. of Illi- nois. FRANK R. HOWARD Oak Park, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Economics Baseball, Gymnastics, Blackfriarsg Psi Upsilon. HELEN E. HULTS Sterling, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Matheznatics KATHERINE E. HUNTER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romanfz' Lalzgzzagfs HAROLD E. HUNZIKER Niles, Michigan Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Arfhiterfurr RUTH A. HURD Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romana' Lalzgzzagm Phi Beta Delta. JEANNE HX'DE Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Art College Aide, VVyverng Mirror, 2g Board of VVom- en's Organization, 3-4g VV.A.A. Board, 25 Y.VV.C.A., First Cabinet, 3-4. BLANC!-IE M. HYNES St. Louis, Mo. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Languages Phi Beta Kappa, Pi Delta Phig Dramatic Associa- tion. Joi-IN B. INcm.1.s Oak Park, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Geology Phi Kappa Psi, Blackfri- arsg Varsity Cheerleaderg Intramuralsg Green Cap Club. HARR1E'1'r C. JACKSON Florence, Alabama Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Englixlz Chi Rho Sigma, Dramat- ic Association, 3, Mirror, 3, Vpperclass Counsellor, Y.VV.C'.A., 1-4. Pngz' 226 I5 El DOROTHY B. JENKINS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Winter, 1932 Commerce and fldminix- tration Comad Club. WILLIAM H. JEWELL Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Political Science Alpha Tau Omega. JANET JOHNS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Hrt Mortar Boa rd. PAUL E. JOHNSON St. Paul, Minn. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Philosophy STEPHEN S. JOHNSON Minneota, Minn. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw DORTHA MARIE JOHNSTON Frankfort, Indiana Ph.B., Autumn, 1931 Romance Languages Phi Beta Kappa, Le Cer- cle Francais, El Circulo Espanol. HERBERT JOSEPH Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration Daily Maroon. SYLVIA JOSHEL Geneva, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Mathematics ELAINE JOST Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Englixh Cap and Gown, 1-2. BLANCHE KAHN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Languages PIERBERT C. KAITSCPIUCK Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Matfzematics RUTH KAN1'OR Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration Affiliated from Univ. Of Ill., Comad. Page 227 D D BERTI-IA KAPLAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History Upperclass Counsellors VVomen's "C" Club VV.A.A. SARA KARL Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History RUTH P. KAY St. Louis, Mo. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Social Serfvice Adnzinis- iraiiorz Dramatic Association. STELLA KERN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History JANE KESNER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English College Aide, Senior Ex ecutive Council, Upper-- class Counsellor, Dramat- ic Association: Mirror The Daily Maroon. MoR'1'oN KESSEL Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lnfw Louisa E. KII.I.lE Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Bolfmy Achotli, Y.VV.C.A., Uni- versity Choir. ICI..-XAS Maple Park, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 C fm m istry ROBERT C. KLOVE Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 .El'07l0IIlif5 Band, Maroon, Fencing Sigma Alpha Epsilon Political Science Council JOSEPHINE KOI.fXR Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Ezzglisfz CHARl.O'I'l'E KREBS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B,, Spring, 1932 Hislory FRED A. Kiuxxixc, JR. Eveleth, Minn. Ph.lS., Spring, 1932 Con1m1'rz'r and .li1'minis- lrulinn Delta Sigma Pi. Page 228 U D HARRY KROESEN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerre and fldmizzis- tration Phi Kappa Sigma. VVILLIAM KUIYINS Dayton, Ohio Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History FLORENCE M. LAIRD Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 ' Hisiory Phi Beta Kappa, VVyvern. JEANETTE W. LAMB Hinsdale, Ill. Ph.B., Autumn, 1931 English DOROTHY A. LASCH Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 riff Senior Executive Council, Mirror, 2-35 University Choir, 4. HAROLD LAUFMAN Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Pre-Illcfdifal Epsilon Alpha, Phi Sigma Delta, Phoenix, Art Edi- tor, U. of C. Symphony Orchestra, Concertmeisterg Water Polog U. of C. String Quartette, Principle. CALVIN H. LEAVITT Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Hixtory Phoenix, Beta Theta Pi. MARJORIE LEE Harvey, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Delta Delta Delta, Sigma Delta Phi. EDWARD F. LEWISON Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 P1'e-Medical Phi Sigma Delta, Daily Maroon. JOSEPH LIEBENSON Chicago, Ill. Ph.B.. Spring, 1932 Germanic: HALLIE E. LINDER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English EVELYN LINSTRA Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Hixfory Page 229 BYRON LIPPMAN St. Louis, Mo. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Political Science Tau Delta Phi, Hand- book, Editor 2, Dramatic Association, Blackfriars. ROSEMARY LIVINGSTON Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Languages ELEANOR LOEB Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Psychology MARJORIE LOEWENSTEIN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Art JANE S. LOEWENTHAL Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Anthropology CECILI.-1 LoI-IRLEIN Chicago, Ill, Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English FRED Woxo Louis San Luis Obispo, Calif. Ph.B., VVinter, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- Iration Settlement Night, 1, In- ternational Club, 3, Choir, 1, VVrestling Team, 1-3, Order of the "Cf, OLIVE H. LUCAS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Winter, 1932 English Wyvern. NORMAN L. LUSTER Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Physics RUTH LYMAN Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Geography College Aide, Nu Pi Sigma, Board of Wom- en's Organization, Secre- try, W.A.A. Board, Women's "C" Club, Presi- dent. HAROLD LYPSIQI Chicago. Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw Green Cap Club, Tau Delta Phi, Freshman Law Class, Treasurer, Freshman Wrestling Team. CORNELIA M.xcCI.,1NTocIc Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Social Scrfuice fldminislration Federation of Universitv XVomen, Ida Noyes Coun- cil, Hospital Auxiliary, Y.VV.C.A. Paar 230 U D DOROTHY MACK Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Summer, 1932 English Circuo De Espanol. GWENDOLYN MACPHERSON Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Phi Beta Delta. ETA MARKUS Shavli, Lithuania S.B., Spring, 1932 Mallzematics MIRIAM MASSEY Chicago, Ill. Ph.B.,, Autumn, 1932 Art JAMES MAYER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration ' WALLACE A. MCCAULEY Lawrence, Nebraska S.B., Spring, 1932 Chemistry Delta Upsilon. EDVVARD L. McCLoUD Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration Delta Sigma Pig Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Black- friars, 3, 4. FLORENCE MCCULLAGH Chicago, Ill. S.B., Wintei', 1932 Bolany PhiBeta Kappa 3 Sigma Xi g Botany Club, Y.W.C.A.g W.A.A. KATHRYN MCDANIEL Oak Park, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English W.A.A. Board, Women's "C" Club. JAMES McMAHoN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Summer, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration Alpha Tau Omega, Phoenix, Swimming. DOLORES MCROBERTS St. joseph, Mo. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Psychology NATALIE H. MELAMERSON Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Matlzeznaiifs Page 237 SARAH MELN1cK Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Psychology Psychology Club, Social Science Administration Club. ELIZABETH MERRIAM Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History College Aide, Nu Pi Sig- ma, Phi Beta Kappa, Pi Delta Phi, Y.W.C.A., Delta Phi, Y.W.C.A., Interclub Council, Senior Executive Council. FRED M. MERRIEIELD Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Political Science Phi Beta Kappa, Chapel Council. C1-IARLOTTE MEYER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Elf! Wyvern, President, Mir- ror, W.A.A., Y.VV.C.A. VVILLIAM R. Mlcl-IELL Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., VVinter, 1932 Sociology EI,IzABE'1'H MILIS Chicago, Ill. A.B., Spring, 1932 GL'l'll1l17llCJ Phi Beta Kappa, Inter- national Student's Associ- ation, Hindustan Stu- dent's Association, Secre- tary, 3, German Club, Y.VV.C.A. MARTHA DoRorHx' MILLER Henry, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Elzglirll IOSEPHINE M1RA13E1.r.A Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Rorncuzce Lcuzgzzagos Y.VV.C.A., Italian Club. D0Ro'rHY R. MonR Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Matlfcznczlics Junior Mathematics Club, VV.A.A., Treasurer, VVomen's "CU Club, Tar- pon, Honor Hockey and Baseball Teams. ERNEST VV. MoLoT Cicero, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Comnzercc and Jldminis- lrallon Delta Sigma Pi, Alpha Sigma Phi, Intramurals, Basketball. SARAH Mo1v1EN'r Oak Park, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Psychology Federation of University VVomen's Council, Mir- ror, The Circle, Student Settlement Board, Secre- tary, Dramatic Associa- tion. CI'IARI.O'I'l'E NIOREIIOUSE Rensselaer, N. Y. A.B., Spring, 1932 Lczlin Eta Sigma Phi, lN.A.A., Tarpon. Page 232 VVALTER G. MOXEY Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Geology Alpha Tau Omega. ELIZABETH MUNCASTER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Art FRANK W. MURRAY Mitchell, So. Dakota Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration Delta Sigma Pig Uni- versity Choirg Student Mgr. of the Commerce and Administration Banquet. GRACE MYERS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Federation of University Women, Y.W.C.A. Louis MYERS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Language: ADOLPH NACHMAN Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Physiology Tau Delta Phi. ERIKA NOACK Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Gcrmanifs Intern ational Association 3 German Club. IDA NOVAK Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Germanic: Senior Honor Scholarshipg German Club. MAURICE OLENICK Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Clzemistry WARRENE OLIVER jasper, Texas Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Languagex Pi Delta Phi. EVERETT C. OLSON Hinsdale, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Geology College Marshal, Owl and Serpent, Phi Kappa Psi, Gym Team. HAROLD ORLINSKY Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw Phi Sigma Delta. Page 233 El D ALICE PALMER Chicago, Ill. S.B., Winter, 1932 Pre-medical ELISABETH PARKER Oak Park, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Education College Aide: Nu Pi Sigma, Honorary Colo- nel, R.O.T.C., Federation of University Women, Treasurer, Mirror Board, Freshman Women's Club Council, Dramatic As- sociation. ALMA PATTERSON Pompeii, Mich. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English ALICE PETERSEN Kewanee, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Economics ISABEL J. PETERSON Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Kindergarten-Primary Phi Beta Deltag Kinder- garten-Primary Council, VVomen's Athletic Associ- ation, Treasurer, Upper- class Counsellor, Y.W.C.A. SONIA BARBARA PETTERS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Languages French Club, German Club. CLYDE E. PIIELPS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commern' and Adminis- tration ALAN PIERCE Canton, Ohio S.B., Spring, 1932 Chelnisiry Phi Pi Phi, Band. JOHN C. PLETZ, JR. Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English SAMUEL C. PLUMMER, JR. Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Winter, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration Affiliated from North- western University and University of Illinois. ADELINE POLAYES Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History JOHN Posr Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Pre-mzfdiral Delta Upsilon. Pngr 23-1 HAROLD PRESS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration Bachelors Degree with Honors , W1'estling Team. GERALD F. PRICE Elgin, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Social Serfvice Adminis- tration Military Club, Presi- dent, 3. BEN PRITKIN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration JOHN A. QUEHL Forest Park, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Mathematics Sigma Alpha Epsilon. WILLIAM A. QUINLAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Winter, 1932 Social Sciencex Sigma Chi, La Critique, Phoenix. ANDREA ELEANOR RADCLII-'FE Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 , Geology Y.VV.C.A., Vice-Presi- dent, Chapel Council, Ida Noyes Auxiliary, Upper- class Counsellor. JUNE RAFF Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Englixh Phi Beta Kappa, Phoenix Womanis Editor, 3, Edi tor, 4, Poetry Club. EVERETT M. RAMSAY Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Economic: Track, Football. FORREST N. RANDOLPH Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration Phi Kappa Sigma. RANDOLPH V. RATCLIFF Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Geography Psi Upsilon, Football. GENEVRA B. REID Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Botany MORTON REISMAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Autumn, 1931 History Page 235 U D ARTHUR RESNICK Indiana Harbor, Ind. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration Blackfriars. ALICE D. RHEA Memphis, Tenn. Ph.B., Winter, 1932 Alpha Kappa Alpha. LUCY ELLIS RIDDELL Oak Park, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Art Hospital Auxiliary, 3, Mirror, 3, Upper Class Counsellor, 4. LoU1s N. RIDENOUR, JR. Evanston, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Physics College Marshal, Alpha Delta Phi, Daily Maroon. ELDON RoBsoN Chicago. Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Aldminir- Iratian HENRY L. ROI-IS Chicago. Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Chemistry NORMA ROORER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Wlinter, 1932 Romance' Lzzngzzages Eta Sigma Phi, Senior Honor Scholarship in Spanish. MERWIN S. ROSENBERG Chicago Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Political Science College Marshal, Phi Beta Kappa, Pi Lambda Phi, Daily Maroon, Busi- ness Manager, Law School Council g Blackfriars, jun- ior Manager. RUTH RosENrELs Chicago.. Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Anthropology RUTH F. ROSENTHAL St. Louis. Mo. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Englixlz ADOLPH ALLEN RUBINSON Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Political Scicnce Dramatic Association, Blackfriars , Winter Carn- ival, Manager, Social Science Council, Chair- man, La Critique, Busi- ness Manager, Phoenix, Assistant Editor. FLORENCE Rucu Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw Choir, 1-3 ,League of XVorr.- en Voters, Vice-President, Tarpon, 1-2, Opera Club, Cosmos Club, 1, W.A.A. Pagz' 236 VVALTER M. RYAN Oak Park, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Chemistry JUANITA ETHEL SACHS Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Iblathefrzatics Mathematics Club VV.A.A., 3-43 "C" Club JOSEPH SALEK Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerre and Hdminis- tration AARON SALTZMAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History MAY SALTZMAN Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Home Economics Home Economics Club. Louis C. SASS Denver, Colo. S.B., Spring, 1932 Geology Phi Kappa Psi. Pegasus, 3-4, Vice-Presii dent, 45 Tarpon, 3-45 Swimming Honor Team. CARL Scmzrn Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., spring, 1932 Commerce and Adfninis- tration Calvert Club, Vice-Presi- dent. RUTH A. SCHENKER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History JOHN SCHIBOR Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History LoU1s JOSEPH SCHLIFKE Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw Basketball. CHARLES SCHMIDT Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Economics Green Cap Club, Skull and Crescent, Iron Mask, Owl and Serpent, Delta Tau Delta, Interfraternity Council, President, Black- friars. LAVVRENCE SCHMIDT New Albany, Ind. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History Gwl and Serpent, Phi Pi Phi, Honor Commission, Undergraduate Council, Student Settlement Board 5 Intramural Department, Varsity Tennis. Page 237 El D MARGARET I. SCHMIDT Marysville, Kan. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Social Serfuice Adnzirzis- iration Honor Commission, Social Science Council. WILLIAM G. SCHMIEDERER St. Louis, Mo. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Sociology HELEN L. SCHNELLER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Arriang Mirror, VV.A.A. Board, Bowling Club, Vice-President. RUTH E. SCHONEMAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romanre Languages FRANK SCHUBEL Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Zoology Honor Scholarship, 15 Henry Strong Scholarship, 4, Track, 2. DoRoTHY SCI-IULZ Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Germanits Delthog Cap and Gown. ,gk EDITH SCI-IULZ Berwyn, Ill. Ph.B., VVinter, 1931 Germanic: RUTH LOUISE SCIIURMAN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Autumn, 1931 Englislz LAMONT R. SCI-IVVEIGER Milwaukee, Wis. S.B., Spring, 1932 Bacteriology EDVVARD R. SCRIBANO Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw LED SEGALI, Chicago, Ill, Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw Tau Delta Phi. DM: SEIFER Chicago Heights, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Englixh Pago 238 HELEN SEMMERLING Bessemer, Mich. Ph.B., VVinter, 1932 Political Science MILDRED SHAFFER Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Zoology LUCILE ANN SHARFF Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Social Serfoice Aldminis- tration Affiliated from Northwest- erng Settlement Night. MARY SHEEAN Galena, Ill. Ph.B., Autumn, 1931 Education JOSEPH SHERRY Grand Rapids, Mich. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Aldnzinis- tration Delta Sigma Pi, Com- merce and Administration Council, SHERMAN K. SHULL Chicago, Ill. S.B., Summer, 1932 Physics Green Cap Clubg Order of the Grailg Tau Kappa Epsilong Interfraternity Councilg Daily Maroon, Blackfriars. LORAINE M. SIEGEL Washington, Pa. Ph.B., Autumn, 1931 Psychology MARY SIEGEL Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Winter, 1932 Psychology BLANCHE SKEBELSKY Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., VVinter, 1932 Romance Languages CARL M. SKONBERG Paxton, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and fldminif tration Phi Kappa Sigma. MARIE SLEPICKA Oak Park, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Botany Calvert Club g Basketball Archery. MARY ELEANOR SLUSSER Norwood Park, Chicago S.B., Spring, 1932 Geology Delta Sigma 5 Interclub Councilg W.A.A. Board Tarpon, 1 - 45 Pegasus Swimming Team, 2-4 Page 239 Cl D STODDARD J. SMALL VVilmette, Ill. Ph.B., Winter. 1932 Commerce and Adminis- Iraiion Psi Upsilong Green Cap Club, Skull and Crescent: Iron Mask, Dramatic Association, Cap and Gown, 1-3. JANE ELLEN SMITH Blue Island, Ill. Ph.B., Summer, 1932 Latin Eta Sigma Phi. JEANNETTE SMITH Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English LUCILLE M. SMITH Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Latin MARION C. SMITH Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Y.VV.C.A. JACK N. SMUCKER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Cornfngrff and Adminis- tration 'Xlpha Kappa Psi, Phi Gamma Delta, Phoenixg Balance Sheet Staff, -lg Golf, 1, Varsity, 2-4, Swimming 15 Varsity, 2. DOROTHY SOLOMON Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Sociology SOL SPECTOR Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History Green Cap Club: Black- friarsg Cosmos Clubg In- tramural Basketball. MARY ALICE SPENSLEY Dubuque, Iowa Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Psychology Esoteric, Dramatic As- sociationg Mirrorg Tar- pon, Upper Class Coun- sellor. PAUL STAGG Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Geography Iron Maskg Skull and Crescent, Green Cap Club, Psi Upsilong Foot- ball, 2-4, Tennis, 2-4. ESTIIER STAMM Galesburg. Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Alliliated from V. of Ill. ALFRED JOSEPH STAVVARZ Chicago, Ill. S.B., VVinter, 1932 Jlallfzfrnzilifs Phi Beta Kappa: R.O.T.C. Pagz' 2110 RosE STECK Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 History Aychud. PAUL STEPI-IENSON Elkhart, Ind. S.B., Spring, 1932 Geography College Marshal, Green Cap Club, Skull and Crescent, Iron Mask, Phi Kappa Psi, Basketball, 2, 4. ALICE STINNETT Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Sociology Nu Pi Sigma, Phi Beta Delta: Undergraduate Council, Gargoyleg Board of Women's Organiza- tions, Executive Council of Senior Class, Mirror Board. GIZELLA W. STODOLA Hammond, Ind. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw Campus League of Women Voters, Secretary-Treas- urer. MARGARET HELEN STOLL Blue Island, Ill, S.B.. Spring. 1932 Matlievnaiirs Pi Delta Phi: Tarpon? W.A.A. MARION STONESIFER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Mirror, 3, 4. VICTOR PAUL STRAUCH Chicago, Ill. S.B., Autumn, 1931 Physifal Sfiences ALVIN SUGAR Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Malhematics ROYAL L. SVVANBERG Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Adminis- tration Psi Upsilon. HELEN DOROTHY TELFORD Washington, D. C. Spring, 1932 Psychology Dramatic Association, Mirror, Choir, journal Clubg Tarpon. JOSEPH TEMPLE Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Geography Psi Upsilong Order of the "CHQ Football, 2, 4, Base- ball, 2, 4, Basketball, 2. JOHN E. TEST Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Green Capg Senior Execu- tive Councilg University Student Social Committee, Interfraternity Council, Secretary, Interscholastic Commission, Blackfriars. Page 241 ELAINE THOMAS Jamestown, N. D. S.B., Spring, 1932 Pre-Medical Phi Beta Kappa, Chan- ning Club, VVestminister Club, VV.A.A. ROBERT L. THOMAS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 CZUIIITHEITL' and ,4drr1ini5- tration Green Cap, Phi Delta Theta, D a i l y Maroon: VVrestling, 2. JOHN TIERNAN, IR. Green Bay, Wis. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and ffdnzizzix- trzziion Dramatic Association, In- tramural Athletics, Ram- hlers. JULIA RUTH TITTERINGTON Kansas City, Mo. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Kindfrgarfolz-Primary Kindergarten-P rim a ry Council, Chairman. Okm Tovkov Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Philosophy Phoenix. HARRIE1' ANN TRINKLE Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Vifinter, 1932 .417 Vpperclass Counsellor, Mirror, Cap and Gown, Art Editor, VV.A.A., Vice- Presidentg Urchesis, Presi- dent, Y.VV.C.A., Second Cabinet. Exos E. TROYER Indianapolis, Ind. S.H., Spring, 1932 1111111 hz' 111 ali FK Beta Theta Pig Black- Iiriars, Prior: l'ndergradu- ate Council, President. Gi.,xm's M. TRUE Chicago, Ill, S.B., Spring, 1932 Home Ef0Il0ll1il'5 Affiliated from V. of Arizona. MILDREU Makin VRBANEK Chicago, Ill. S.B., VVinter, 1932 Bolany MARJORIE J. VANS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Hisfory l'iI.ANCl-IE J. Voov.-num Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romanfl' Lllilflllllylkf jonx li, X'ol.1.laR'1'slax Chicago, Ill. Ph.l5., Spring, 1932 Poliliml Sriwzfe Page 2-I2 GENEVIEVE N. WALKER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English ROBERT WALSH Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Geography Iron Mask, Blackfriars, Board of Superiors, Or- der of the "C", Freshmen Council, Football, 2-4. MAEEL C. WALTZ Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Autumn, 1931 Commerre and ffdminis- tration CHARLES EDVVARD WEXR VVashington, D. C. S.B., Winter, 1932 Chemistry Phi Beta Kappa ANDREW I. VVELLEMEYER Klemme, Iowa Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commtfrce' ana' Hdminis- tration Alpha Kappa Psi. JOSEPH E. VVEST Peru, Ind. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Lafw Iron Mask, Order of the Grail, Blackfriars, Wres- tling, Cap and Gown. M. R. VVEST Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Romance Languagfs GILBERT FOVVLER WHITE Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Geography Head Marshal, Owl and Serpent, Phi Beta Kap- pa, Alpha Delta Phi, Dramatic Association, Menls Commission, Pres., 4, Student Handbook, Editor. BERNARD I. WIEN Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Pro-Medical Owl and Serpent, Inter- scholastic Commission, Order of the "C", Foot- ball, Basketball. FREDRICK R. VVILKENS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerci' and Adminis- tration Alpha Kappa Psi, Secre- tary-Treasurer, Commerce and Administration Stu- dent Council, Band, 1-3. HAROI,D E. VVILKINS, JR. Chicago, Ill. S.B., Spring, 1932 Geography Delta Kappa Epsilon HELEN VVILKINS Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English Mortar Board. Page 243 U D FLORENCE VVILLETT La Grange, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English PAUL H. W1LL1s, JR. Chicago, ni. Ph.B., Summer, 1932 Commerce and Aidmirzis- tration Phi Kappa Psig Black- friarsg Track, 1, 2. CHARLES E. VVILSON Chicago, Ill. S.B., Winter, 1932 Geography NATHANIEL M. WINSLOW Bloomington, Ill. S.B., VVinter, 1932 Chemistry Phi Beta Kappa, Chapel Council, Wrestling, 2. RICHARD L. W1'r'rY Chicago. Ill. Ph.B. English Dramatic Association. RALPH VVOHLBERG Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerfe and Jdminis- Zralion NATHAN VVOLFBERC Chicago, lll. Ph.H. La-w Intramurals, Manager of the Ponies. ABRAHAM L. VVOLFSON Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., VVinter, 1932 C0!l1lI1F7'CF and ,-1d111i1zi5- Iraiion JANE WoLFso11N Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Englixh BENJAMIN T. VVOOIJRUFF Chicago, Ill. S.B., Winter, 1932 Chmzzistry Phi Pi Phig Blackfriars. Em'1'H D. VVRIGI-IT Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Summer, 1931 Edufalion SAMUEL ZELKOXVICII Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Vvintcr, 1932 Hislory Page 244 D D ROBERT ZTEOEL Aurora, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Comvnerce and flflnzinis- tration Sigma Nu. MAURICE A. ZOLLAR Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., VVinter, 1932 Commerce and Aldnzinis- tration Alpha Kappa Psi, Tau Kappa Epsilon. PAT MAGEE Chicago, Ill. Ph.B.. Soring, 1932 Pfziloxophy Skull and Crescent, Iron Mask, Dramatic Associa- tion. GEORGE THOMPSON VAN DER HOEF South Bend, Indiana Ph.B., Spring, 1932 English College Marshal, Lambda Chi Alpha, Dramatic As- sociation, Daily Maroon, Order of the HC", Fencing Team, Sing Chairman ,31. Throughout the Senior Section, the convocations are referred to as: Autumn-Dec. 22, 1931 Winter-March 15, 1932 Spring-June 14, 1932 Louis T. ZISKA Berwyn, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Commerce and Hldnzinis- tration EDITH BROWN Milwaukee, Wis. S.B., VVinter, 1932 MHfh677ZGfiC5 Upperclass Counsellor, 3, 4, Freshman Women's Club Council, Ida Noyes Auxiliary, 1, 3, Mathe- matics Club, Y.VV.C.A. Cabinet, 2. EDVVARD K. STACKLER Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Summer, 1931 Commerce and Hdvrzinis- tration Page 245 V U D LEONARD P. ARIES Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicagog Wig and Robeg President Senior Law Class, 1932g Gradu- ate Student Councilg Law School Council, Phi Sig- ma Delta. LESTER AsHER Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicagog Wig and Robeg Order of the Coifg Civil Government Prize' Phi Beta Kappa. 1 GEORGE HUGH BARNARD Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 DANIEL L. BERNSTEXN Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 PHILIP S. CAMPBELL River Forest, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicagog Delta Upsilon. HOVXVARD CLARKE Duluth, Minn. LD., Spring, 1932 RAYMOND COHEN Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 L. L CONNER Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Alpha Phi Alpha. FRANCIS COOPER Chicago, Ill. LD., Autumn, 1931 Delta Sigma Phi 5 Phi Alpha Delta, Order of UCI!! PAUL SPRAGUE DAVIS Chicago, Ill. LD., Summer, 1932 A.B., cum laude, Har- vardg Order of the Coifg Delta Theta Phi. LOMMEN DONALD ELEY Des Plaines, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Yale. VViI.L1AM R. ENGELHARDT Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicagog Phi Beta Kappag Order of the Coifg Law School Coun- cilg Phi Alpha Delta. PIIQF 247 l'1ENRY D. FISHER Waukegan, Ill. J.D., Spring, 1932 Law Review. rFHOMAS FITZGERALD Beloit, VVis. f.D., Spring, 1932 Phi Delta Phi. ROBERT A. FRANK Chicago, Ill. I.D., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Order of the Coifg Phi Beta Kap- pa, Nu Beta Epsilon, Civil Government Prize, 1927g Raymond Scholar- ship, 1932. HERBERT B. FRIED Chicago, Ill. j.D., Spring, 1932 lViIL'li0N L. GOLDBERG Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Delta Zeta Mu. ROBERT MAURICE GOLDS1'EIN Chicago, Ill. Ph.B., Spring, 1932 Elzglislz Affiliated from U. of Mich., Pi Lambda Phi. FRANK GREENBERG Chicago, Ill. j.D., mm laude, Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Order of the Coif. CHARLES HERZOG Chicago, Ill. ID., VVinteI', 1932 Order of the Coifg Law Review. VICTOR E. HRUSKA Omaha, Nebraska LD., Spring, 1932 Lows ISAACSON Denver, Colo. j.D., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, 'Wig and Robe. BEN GOI.IJMAN Chicago, Ill. -LD., Spring, 1932 fiEORCE F. JAMES, JR. Chicago, Ill. j.D., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Order of the Coifg Phi Beta Kap- pa, Delta Vpsilong PlIi Delta Phi, Law Review. Page 248 D D ALVIN KABAKER Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Pi Lambda Phi. VVILLIAM H. LEIGH Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago. GORDON M. LEONARD Kansas City, Mo. LD., Spring, 1932 Phi Delta Phi, Delta Tau Delta. ART LEWIS Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 DAVID M. LEWIS Indianapolis, Ind. LD., Spring, 1932 A.B., De Pauw, Delta Upsilon, Phi Alpha Delta. EDWARD LEXVISON Chicago, Ill. LD., cum laude, Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Vice- President Senior Law Class, Order of the Coif. MORRIS A. LIEBERMAN Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Nu Beta Epsilon. BENJAMIN LONG Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago. JAMES MALDNE Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 HARRY MARCUS Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Delta Zeta Nu. Joi-IN F, MCCARTIIY Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Law Re- view, Student Editor. C. BOUTON MCDOUGAL Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 A.B., Princeton, Law Re- view, Order of the Coif, Phi Delta Phi. Page 249 U D ROBERT TODD MCKINLAH' Chicago, Ill. I.D., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Phi Del- ta Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, La W School Council. JOHN THOMAS MOORE Chicago, Ill. J.D., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Tau Kap- pa Epsilon. VVILLIAM G. NAVID Chicago, Ill. I.D., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago. NORMAN NACHMANSON Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Wlig and Roheg Zeta Beta Tau. ALFRED VVILLIS PRESKILI. Chicago, Ill. j.D., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Delta Zeta Mu. CSEORCE M. REED Rensselaer, Ind. I.D., Spring, 1932 Ph.B,, Chicagog Phi Al- pha Delta, Alpha Sigma Phi. FREDERICK Sixss Denver, Colo. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Phi Delta Phi, Phi Kappa Psi. JACOB M. SHAPxRO Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicagog D e l t a Zeta Mu. IRWiN VV. SILVERMAN Chicago, Ill. J.D., Spring, 1932 SHERMAN CANTY Peoria, Ill. QLD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Bradley Polytech. H. L. TAYLOR Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 VVILLIAM Ii. 'I urmas Omaha, Neh. -LD., Spring, 1932 A.li., Nebraska, Iiela Theta Pi.. Pllffl' 250 JULIUS TOWSTER Chicago, Ill. j.D., Summer, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago. EDVVARD WEINER Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., chicago. RUTH VVEYAND Chicago, Ill. J.D., cum laude, Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Order of the Coif, Kappa Beta Pi. WILLIAM T. WILSON, JR. Jacksonville, Ili. LL.B., Spring, 1932 Phi Delta Phi. SIDNEY Hass A Chicago, Ill. J.D., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Pi Lamb- da Phi, Phi Beta Kappa. LEONARD SCHRAM ...,., Chicago, Ill. J.D., Spring, 1932 MILTON SILBERG Chicago, Ill. LD., Spring, 1932 Ph.B., Chicago, Nu Beta Epsilon. Page 251 '42, Q -mm... WOMEN'S CLUBS D D Berry' Tiuassteu Mnzmm M.-xssm' THE INTERCLUB COUNCIL lnterclub Council is composed of the presidents of the social clubs on campus. This group prides itself on having no rules, and it reaches decisions by unanimous agreement. During the last year the decision that freshmen may not be rushed until they have been on campus three full quarters, and that transfer students may not be pledged until after one quarter, proved a successful solution to the pledging difficulties. As a result of the deferred rushing plan, many more friendships are encouraged between upper classmen and freshmen. The elapse of three quarters before a decision as to club preference has been indicated enables the freshmen to thoroughly establish friendly relations and contacts with the women of the University. The elimination of the formal week of rushing with its hectic program of teas, dances, luncheons, and general whirl into hasty pledging fosters the making of contacts through the medium of campus organizations and a more rational voicing of club preference. The council eagerly awaits the fall pledging week as conclusive evidence of the complete success of their experiment. Other business of the year included the admittance of a new club, Arrian, and the sponsoring of club pledges to the Student Relief Drive. Pagz' 254 U D TQP-SCHONEMAN, BARAT, KREVITSKY, HEINECK. Mzddlf'-MERRIAM, IXAEYER, S'r1NNET'r, SLUSSER, SIEGMUND. Bdfllllll-TRESSLER, MASSEY, BAKER, BREEN, Jorms. f THE INTERCLUB COUNCIL BETTY TRESSLER MIB,IARfI NIASSEY . RUTH SCI-IONENIAN ELINOR SIEGMUND MARY IQREVITSKY STUARTA BARAT ELEANOR SLUSSER ROXANA BREEN BETTY TRESSLER . JANET JOHNS . ELIZABETH RIERRIAM ALICE STINNETT . CAMILLE HEINECK HZELEN BAKER . M IRIAM PJASSEY CHARLOTTE MEYER OFFICERS REPRESENTATIVES President Secretary Hchoth . flrrian . Aychud . Chi Rho Sigma Delta Sigma Deltho . Esoteric llfortar Board . Pi Delta Phi . Phi Beta Delta Phi Delta Upsilon . Quaalrangler . Sigma Wyverrz Page 255 D U Top-SCHONEMAN, HENNKE, KILLIE, JUNGERS. B0f10771-JOHLER, VVOODWORTH, APELAND, SPENSER. ACHOTH SENIORS CAROLINE APELAND LOUISE KILLIE I JUNIORS MARX' ELIZABETH HAGEMAN ELSEETII 'JOHLER ' SOPHOMORES RUTH HENNKE FRANCES RUSSELL ' MARY ROSE JUNGERS -EVELYN SPENSER I Fazzndfd 1915 RUTH SCHONEMAN JULE PORTER VVLADISLAVVA SZURIK LoI.ITA WooI:woRTI-I Kg ' ', ,Q 'o 1 5.11-Xtfx . - ,. :' X.' 4' K' I ,u 'ol Il-'X we fifnfo "nv Page 256 U D Top Rau-SCHNELLER, SC!-IWAEGERMAN, DALY, SIEGMUND, OsTRoM. Mzddle Rofw-SCI-IMIDT, HUMSTON, GUODMAN, FRANZEN, KELLER, SNYDER. Barlow: Rofw-REITER, ALLISON, HULL, HODGE, KUEI-IN. MARY DALY JANE ALLISON ETHEL FRANZEN JANET GOODMAN LAURA HULL N i'Q, in Q 2? NL- J, ,Q Q1 ., ff., gat.. is Low- 5 ARRIAN HONORARY MEMBER MRs.WIL1vIA KIRBY-MILLER .SENIORS JUNIORS MONIA HOIJGE LOIS KELLER INGRID OSTROM RUTH SCHMIDT SOPHOMORES CATHERINE REITER PLEDGES EILEEN HUMISTON Founded 1931 HELEN SCHNELLER RUTH SCHWAEGERMAN ELEANOR SIEGMUND CYTHERA SNYDER ERNA KUEHN Page 257 U D SYLVIA COBB BEWY FELDMAN ISABELLE Gooocow FLORENCE KAHEN TOP-FELDMAN, Conn, SAUNDER, Gooocom. Boiron:-ZERNES, STECK, KAHEN, Snus, Kknvrrsxv. AYCHUD SENIORS JUNIORS SOPHOMORES EVELYN Suus PLEDGES Founded 1930 Rosa STECK MARY KREVITSKY DoRo'1'm' ZERNES Es'1'EI.LE SAUNDER n ! . "M 13 -' 21,5 Pagz' 253 MRS. C. DAWLEY STUARTA BARAT LEONE BAILEY GEORGIA AUBUCHON JANET CAMPBELL SALLY FISHER CHARLOTTE FOSTER I Tap-F. GERWIO, CAMPBELL, BAILEY, MILCHRIST, SOLENEERCER. Middle-HILL, BARAT, ROCKVVELL, JACKSON, BERGQUIST, BROSI. Bollam-FISHER, L. GERWIG, AUEUCHON, DURANTE, FORERICH. f CHI RHO SIGMA HONORARY MEMBERS MRS. E. KENDALL SENIORS CATHERINE BERGQUIST DOROTHY BROSE JESSAMINE DURANTE IUNIORS MARY L. FORBRICH FLORENCE GERWIC LOUISE GERWIC SOPHOMORES MARY' ROCKWELL FRESHMEN FRANCES HUBBARD PLED GES ELIZABETH FREEMAN Founded 1903 COURTNEY MONTAGUE MARGARET HILL CALISTA JACKSON ELIZABETH MILCHRIST GER1'RUDE RALSTON JOSEPHINE HOLMES MARY SOLENBERGER Lf, :J 3 E 'W Page 259 U D TDP-DOLAN, VENTON, BRENNAN, BIELENBERG, CAVANAUGH. B0lf01H-MCROBERTS, HOLMES, FLYNN, MAWICKE, W. SLUSSER, E. SLUssER. MRS. E. A. BURTT DOROTHY ARNOLD LOUISE BIELENBERG MARY BRENNAN GRACE O'BRIEN JANE ELLEN CAVANAUCH D E L T A S I G M A HONORARY MEMBERS MRS. W. ScO'1'r GRAY Mxss M. E. HAYES SENIORS ALICE DOLAN ELIZA FERNANDEZ MARY FLYNN MARGARET LOPEZ JUNIORS SOPHOMORES BETIY HOLMES PLEDGES ANNE FINNEGAN Founded 1915 MRS. D. B. REED DOLORES MCROBERTS ELEANOR SLUssER JUNE VENTON VVINIFRED SLUSSER MARY' MAWICKE FD R59 Page 260 D D CHARLOTTE FOYE MARJORIE BERNING ROXANA BREEN BETTY BENTHY EDNA BURKE Top-WOOD, LEVINGER, MCHART, CAI-IOON. BDIZUIH-TIGUE, BERNING, GRIFFITH, SCHULZ, BREEN. f DELTHO HONORARY MEMBERS EDITH MOORE SENIORS ADELE CAHOON HELEN GRIFFITH JUNIORS RUTH MCHART GERTRUDE SMITH DOROTHY SCHULZ FRANCES TIGUE JEAN PARKINSON MARGARET WOOD SOPHOMORES DOROTHY JOHNSON ELSIE LEVINGER wiv Tvly 511 Hifjmfv Founded 1905 vfilxn , fi-" 'fQ,v,.:-143' Page 261 U O .V T015-MASON, SPENSLEY, RANDALL, HANIILTON, HEMPELMANN, BROOKS, BELL. Mlddlt-TRESSLER, DIXON, HARLAN, HAYWARIJ, SAUCERMAN, SMITI-I, REYNOLDS. 30110771-VVORKS, RUSSELL, HEMPSTEAD, COTTON, BRESLICII, MUDOE, BOWER. EDITH FOSTER FLINT VIOLA BOWER BARBARA BELL GOLIJE BRESLICH CAROLINE BROOKS ELIZABETH MUOOE DORA DIXON H ESTER HEMPSTEAD E S O T E R I C HONORARY MEMBERS DOROTHY D. HEINRICKS OLIVER Cox HENRY SENIORS ELIZABETH REYNOLDS JEANNETTE SMITH JUNIORS MARY LOU COTTON MARJORIE HAMILTON BETTY HARLAN REBECCA HAYWARO SOPHOMORES H RANDALL PLEDGES MOLLY MASON Fuundfd 1894 DOROTHY R. MCLAUOI-ILIN MARY SPENSLEY BETTY HEMI-EIMANN LYIIAEETI-I TRESSLER MARJORIE SAUCERMAN RUTII WORKS MEL RUSSELL HOPE TQURNER Pagf 262 U E JANET JOHNS MILORED HACKL DEBORAH LIEEY Top-HOLAHAN, SCHMIDT, LLEBY, CHAPLINE. Q S 3 Bynum-WILKINS, STEVENSON, ZEIGLER, I-IACKL, JOHNS. MORTAR BOARD SENIORS MARIANNE STEVENSON JUNIORS I'IARRIET'I'E MILLER BETTY ANNE SCHMIDT HEI,EN WILKINS M ARY SCHULTZ ELIZABETH ZEIGLER SOPHOMORES MARJORIE CHAPLAINE MARGARET HOLA1-LAN MAROARETHA MOORE PLEDGES FRANCES DEXTER PIESTER ANN THOMAS ELEANOR VVELCH PHYLLIS FERRY ELLEN VVESTPHAL XX " X 'P-5 J Foundzd 1894 1 A W Page 263 J 15'-A D D Top Raw-HEITMAN, ELL1soN, STINNETT, HOLMBOE, M. BECKER. Mzddle RDQLP-DEVINE, MACPHERSON, FURNEY, HURD, BELL, BARR. Bottom RUM'-HERRIO'VT, STEERE, MERRIALI, PETERSON, R. BECKER. MRS. JUL1Us HEss PEGGY BARR MARY DEVINE LYDIA FURNEY MARJORIE BECKER PHI BETA DELTA HONORARY MEMBERS SENIORS V1oLA HEITMAN RUTH HURD JUNIORS NATALIE MERRIAM PIELEN ROACH SOPHOMORES ROSEMARY BECKER MARX' ELLTSON JANET HERRIOTT PLEDGES Foumlnl 1898 MRS. JAMES MCKINSEY CYVVENDOLYN MACPHERSON ISABEL PETERSON ALICE STINNETT CI-lARI.0'I'TE SUTH FRI ANID BETTY STE!-IRE IQAREN HOLMBOE bg "x ggfp f, 9? Q11 ' n Page 2641 GRACE DAILEY ANNETTE BAKER T012-JERSILD, BAKER, PEDERSON, GIBBS. Bottom-RAvENTos, DAILEY, LECKRONE, HEINECK. PHI DELTA UPSILON SENIORS CAMILLE HEINECK JUNIORS ADELINE KOEHLER LOUISE PETERSON DOROTHY LILLIAN SHULZ JESLYN RAVENTOS SOPHOMORES MARJORIE GIBBS SARA JANE LECKRONE MARTAN PEDERSON ESTHER JERSILD FRANCES Pxzzo PLEDGES DOROTHY DUNAWAY VIRGINIA MOLLOY Founded 1915 'J X ,,, A , J A V J Page 265 U D MRS. S. DIXON RUTH BAOBY BLANCHE HYNES LOUISE BOYNTON DORIS EMBERSON IC.-XTHERINE DEN RITA DUKETTE HARRIETT CHILD H ELEN CHITTICK TOP-SOPER, GILASON, DURETTE, FI,EAR, FOSTER. I I I .fl I jliddfl'--PETERSON, CHITTICK, HYNES, STOLL, DENNING, VVILLE'I'l'. BUIIOIIZ'-VVILSON, MERRIAM, OLIVER, LISTING, BAOIIY, EMEERSON. P I D E L T A P H I HONORARY MEMBERS MRS. A. DORSETT MRS. F. HESS SENIORS CECILIA LISTING ELIZABETH MERRIAM MARGUERITE POTTS JUNIORS ETHEI. FOSTER SOPHOMORES ELAINE FLEAR NING PLEDGES PEARL FOSTER IALDALINE GILASON MRS. A. HALSTEIJ HELEN STOLL FLORENCE WILLETI' INOREIJ PETERSON ELEANOR WILSON ROSA HEINIzIvIIxN MARY SUPER M.-IROARET MULLIC WARREN E OLIVER ---11'- -V-, o'viT. '1' if I X . Founded 190-I X' 7.5, x A Pagc 266 U D MARION BUCKS HELEN BAKER BETTY CAsoN GRACE CHETHAM VIRGINIA BOONE A.. Top-RICHARDS, VAUGHN, BAKER, PRICE. Middle-LINDEN, GIKEENE, CRUME, CHETHAM, DICKERSON. 80110111-FRIEDEMAN, PLATT, MAsoN, BooNE, CASON. 1 QUADRANGLER GRADUATE STUDENT MARY MCKEON SENIORS SYLVIA FRIEDEMAN JEANNETTE LAMB JUNIORS ELEANOR MAIZE KATE MASON SOPHOMORES WALLACE CRUME LITA DICKERSON JOAN GREENE PLEDGES FRANCES LINDEN JEAN PRICE f"-, -N X GERALDINE MITCHELL VIRGINIA PLATT MARTHA VAUGIIAN LORRAINE WATSON BETTY RICHARDS I . x Founded 1895 J E sill I X ni, xr! , Pagr 267 D D MRS. EDGAR J. GOOIJSPEED BARBARA COOK LORAINE ADE HUBERTA BROWN TOP-MASSEY, ADE, COOK, JONES, GLEASON. Bottom-GRAY, GRAHAM, COOKE, YOUNG, BAEDER SIGMA HONORARY MEMBERS MRS. JOI-IN RHODES SENIORS JUNIORS ALICE COOKE MRS. LoIs C. RADCLIFF MIRIAM MASSEY RUTI-I FELLINGER GER'I'RUDE GRAY SOPHOMORES CATHERINE GARLICK ELEANOR CPLEASON MARGARET GRAHAM ELEANOR YOUNG PLEDGES MARJORX' BAEDER BE'I'I'Y JONES ELAINE CONNOLLY MARY ANN PAGE T7 , -7 Foundrd 1895 Pagc' 268 U U T012-HENICKSMAN, MUNCASTER, JONES, LUCAS, SMITH. Middle-ANDERSON, DIERSSEN, EDWARDS, HYDE, SMITHWICK, LAIRD. B0fl07H-TURNER, HUNTER, MEYER, PARKER, RUSSELL, SOWERS. DORIS ANDERSON ANN HAYES MARTHA HARRRIS MARGARET FRANK KATHERINE DIERSSEN VIRGINIA RUSSELL WYVERN SENIORS ELVA HENICRSMAN JEAN HYDE ELIZABETH JONES MARION LAIRD JUNIORS ALICE EDWARDS SOPHOMORES DOROTHEA SMITH GERALDINE SMITHWICK PLEDGES MAURINE FELHENBURG FAITH FITZGERALD Founded 1898 OLIVE LUCAS CHARLOTTE MEYER ELIZABETH MUNCASTER ELIZABETH PARKER JANE SOWERS BELLE TURNER KATHERINE HUNTER f 'T- 5465 Page 269 342-3: ATERNIT U U THE INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL OFFICERS CHARLES SCHMIDT .... . President EVERETT OLSON Vice-President JOHN TEST . Secretary ROSS WHITNEY .... Treasurer MEMBERS LOUIS RIDENOUR . JOHN VOLLERTSON . DALLAS PATT . ENOS TROYER . ROBERT WALSH . ROY BLACK . CHARLES SCHMIDT . ROBERT COLWELL . SIDNEY STACKLER . RALPH ERLANDSON . GEORGE VAN DER HOEF ISADORE NELSON . ROSS WHITNEY . GORDON ALLEN . EVERETT OLSON . CARL SOHROEDER . NATHANIEL WINSLOW SAMUEL HORWITZ . JOSEPH WEST . FRANK HOWARD . JOHN TEST . RICHARD WITTY . . GEORGE TVIANDERNACK SIDNEY GOLDBERG . SHERMAN SHULL . BERNARD VVIEN . . Alpha Delta Phi Alpha Sigma Phi . Alpha Tau Omega . Beta Theta Pi . . . Chi Psi Delta Kappa Epsilon . Delta Tau Delta . Delta Upsilon . Kappa Nu . Kappa Sigma . Lamdlna Chi Alpha . Phi Beta Delta . Phi Delta Theta Phi Gamma Delta . . Phi Kappa Psi Phi Kappa Sigma . . Phi Pi Phi . Phi Sigma Delta . Pi Lambda Phi . . Psi Upsilon Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . Sigma Chi . . Sigma Nu . Tau Delta Phi . Tau Kappa Epsilon . Zeta Beta Tau Page 272 TEST Scnmrm- A UNIFIED FRATERNITY FRONT Although handicapped by a tradition of inaction and impotence, the lnterfraternity Council made distinct progress in the handling of fraternity problems and asserted itself as a positive force in undergraduate affairs. This renewed alertness of fraternity interests was due in part to the challenge made by the administrative authorities in their adoption of a policy of deferred rushing and in part to the capable leadership furnished by Charles Schmidt and Jack Test. The Council was faced with the initial responsibility of framing an entirely new set of rushing and pledging rules, a change necessitated by the University announcement that beginning in 1932 no freshman might be pledged until the seventh week of the spring quarter. Thru a committee headed by Sam Stewart and Lou Ridenour a series of regulations were produced which in addition to being highly adequate, displayed a thorough analytical understanding of the bases for fraternity affiliation. Further activities of concrete value were the administration of the pledging bureau and the promotion of the Interfraternity Ball. But of more far reaching significance was the unined and introspective character of the fraternity front. ln a year when the University thru its deferred rushing policy, thru the opening of the new Residence Halls and thru the operation of the new plan was causing a profound rearrangement in the social structure of the undergraduate body, and in a year when two fraternities QAcacia and Delta Sigma Phil became inactive, and another Cljhi Pi Phil moved to the Residence Halls, the Council began to face the all important problems of the future more squarely. It turned on one hand toward closer co-operation with the Alumni councilors or Greek Council, and on the other to Deans Chauncey Boucher and William Scott for discussion of the actual values and probable future functions of fraternal organizations on the campus. Page 273 D U Top Rom-BOVEE, ABBOTT, P. VVHITE, HOOKER, FAIRBANK, CLARKE, DILLE, BEINARAUSKAS, DOIIERTY, LENZ. Third Rau-MAGEE, STEWART, REUL,'MClNTOsH, MERRIEIELD, THOMAs, ALLEN, VVHITNEY, RIDDHLL. Snwnd Rum:-GROEBE, HUGHES, LESEMAN, AUSTIN, CARY, VIssER, VVALLACE, KERR, VVITMER. Builam R0'w-CASSELS, NEWMAN, HARDING, ANDERSON, RIDENOUR, STEVVART, CHANNER, G. VVHIT E, SCHUCIIARDT. ALPHA DELTA PHI FACULTY COUNCILOR JAMES WEBER LINN MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY ARTHUR BOVEE, Chicago, '08 E. V. L. BROWN, Chicago, '02 EDGAR J. GOODSPEED, Chicago, '90 CHARLES O. GREGORY, Yale, '24 SAMUEL N. HARPER, Chicago, '02 ROBERT M. HUTCHINS, Yale, '21 GORDON J. LAING, Toronto, '91 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 VVILLIAM CASSELS LOUIS RIDENOUR, JR. WALLIS AUSTIN FREDERICK CHANNER JOHN SCHUCHARDT FRANK HARDING GILBERT'WHITE BURTON DOHERTY JAMES W. LINN, Chicago, '07 A. C. MCLAUGHLIN, Michigan, '07 FRED MERRIEIELD, Chicago, '98 WALTER PRESTON, JR., Yale, '25 FERDINAND SHEVILL, Yale, '96 ROGER T. VAUGI-IN, Chicago, '09 THORNTON WILDER, Yale, 21 Class of 1933 IVIARSHALI. NEWMAN PETER BIENARAUSKAS THOMAS REUI. GEORGE SCHN UR ROBERT VVALLACE Class of 1934 FREDERICK LESEMANN FRANK NAHSER HARLAN PAGE, JR. LEONARD VIssI-:R ARTHUR BOVEE STROTHER CARY VVILLIAM HUGHES DONALD KERR ARCHIBALD ALLEN GORDON CLARKE STANLEY CONNELLY JOHN DILLE DEXTER FAIRBANK RICHARD HOOKER DONALD LENz HORAGE MAGEE ,....... ...... L Charlfred al ' X Thi' l,'IIl4'U6'l'JllJ' of Chicago 1896 A Tfwf'nly-.fa-vrn National Chajblerx Class of 1935 ROBERT MCINTOSII CHARLES MERRIFIELD CHARLES RIDDELL BRUCE STEWART AI.,I,EN THOMAS PHILIP VVI-IITE RAYMOND VVIIITNEY FRED VSIITMER Foundfd ai Hamilton College 1832 Pagf 274 Top Rau-CAPOUCH, M. TOLMA N, PETERSON, VVALTON, SOTEK, VLCER, LAMAC. S6-607111 RofwjMOLDT, STOLEA, FENTON, MCBEAN, GAREN, RUUD, ACHESON. Fzrsz Raw-VOLLERTSON, REED, FREIDHEIM, BRISLEN, CROMER, SORRIS, HOAO. ALVPHA SIGMAPHI FACULTY COUNCILOR ADOLPH C. NOE MEMBERS CHARLES J. CHAMBERLATN, Oberlin, 88 HENRY C. COWLES, Oberlin, '93 BRUCE VV. DICKSON, Carson-Newman, '06 JAMES B. EVERLY, Nebraska, ,153 MEMBERS IN Class of 1932 CARL CROMER ANTON VLCER ERNEST' MOLDT JOHN E. VOLLERTSON ARTHUR PETERSON Class of 1934 CHARLES ASPIER LOUIS HOAG JESSE BEITEL ALBERT RUUD FRED BOWMAN x Us ' Chartered al The Unifuersity of Chicago 1898 IN THE FACULTY KURT B. LAvEs, Chicago, '91 CHARLES 0. MOLANDER, Chicago, T14 A ADOLPH C. NOE, Chicago, 'OO HARRY B. VANDYRE, Chicago, '18 THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1933 RICHARD CORRIS EDGAR FREIDHEIM WALTER FENTON ROBERT GAREN Class of 1935 ARTHUR ACHESON LADDIE STOLFA KENNETH CAPOUCH MASON TOLMAN GEORGE LAMAC STANLEY WALTON ARTHUR MATSON JOHN RUSIN EDWARD SOTEK Founded at Yale Unifversity 1, 1845 I EN E Q , .H , Thirty-lhree National Chapters Page 275 D D Top RUM'-GCJTTSHALL, BODE, EAGLETON, PYLE, DUNNE, LEWIS, TILTON. Second Rau-GLEASNER, IVICGUICAN, DOOLEY, HURST, RUND, BERO. Fzrxt Rufw-PATT, SOKAL, D. PATT, WARD, PETERSEN, TOME1. ALPHA TAU OMEGA FACULTY COUNCILOR ARTHUR H. COMPTON MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY ARTHUR COMPTON, Colby, '13 ELLIOT R. DOWNTNG, Chicago, '89 LEVVIS SORRELL, Colgate, '11 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class 0f19.?2 DALLAS E. PATT ADOLPPI RUND MAX SCHMTDT GLENN TILTON BARLOVV HURST RALPH LEWIS JAMES MCMAHON Claxs of 1934 VVILLIAM BERC LEONARD LAIRD Clzarlered at The l,'nifuz'r:i!y of Chicago 1904 Class of 1933 WTLLXAM JEWEL! DAN MCGUIOAN JOHN PETERSEN KENIJRICK SMTTT-1 JOSEPH SOKAI. CARL BODE RAYMOND DUNNE RICHARD EAGLETON VVILLIAM GI.EASNER Class of1935 VVILLIAM DOOLEY CARROLL PA'x'r MAURICE CEOTTSHALI, ROBERT PYLE E , X'A h.f1 Founded at Virglnza Nlxlzlary lnslziule 55" '4 1865 Ninfly-tllref' National Chaplfrs Page 276 U D l Tap Rau-LARUE, MARQUARDT, BUSSIAN, STOLAR, HEINECK, HowE, KELLOGC, CLARK. Second R '-SADLER EBERT EVANS CARR P K S P . , ow. , , , , IC ETT, HELLEY, LCPPER First R0fw-VANNICE, VEATCH, DUNKEL, TROYER, WEIR, OLsoN. B E TA T H E TA PI MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY CHARLES M. BACON, Beloit, '10 ARTHUR F. BARNARD, Beloit, '84 ARTHUR R. COLWELL, Chicago, '19 MERLE C. COULTER, Chicago, '14 CARL DAVIS, Chicago, ,OO JOHN M. DODSON, Wisconsin, '80 CLIFFORD G. GRULEE, Chicago, '95 ESMOND R. LONG, Chicago, '11 NORMAN MACLEAN, Dartmouth, '24 HERBERT E. SLAUCHT, Colgate, '83 SAMUEL R. SLAYMAKER, Beloit, 86 KELLOGG SPEED, Chicago, '01 J. C. WEBSTER, Mt. Allison, '82 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class of 1933 CALVIN LEAVITT ENOS TROYER WILLIAM OLsoN JAMES VANNICE NED VEATCH Class of 1934 SYLVESTER BACHMANN HOWARD PICRETT FRANKLIN CARR WILLIAM SADLER BYRON EVANS RICHARD SHELLEY Chartered al . The Unifvfrsity of Chicago A 1894 R in 'Rc f RICHARD BRADLEY DANIEL CLARK HAROLD DUNREL PAUL HEINECK JAMES KELLOGG ROBERT LARUE Eighty-sefumz Nalional Chapters RICHARD EBERT RICHARD MARQUARDT JOHN WEIR, JR. Class of 1935 CURTIS PLOPPER GUY ROBBINS JOSEPH STOLAR .Founded at Mzzzlni Unifuersily 1839 Page 277 E5 C5 Top Ra-w-REED, TURNER, ELAM, LIEDTKE, ScHM1Tz, BOHNAN, DONOGHUE, MAHONEY. Third Ra-w-REICHMAN, SHUTE, HORN, CONSTANTINE, BROWN, RENECKER, FRIEDEMAN, TRAX'NOR. Second Raw-ABRAHAMS, AYRES, DASBACH, TENEYCK, MCMAHON, LESTER, PREST, DODSON. I-'im-z Rum-GILL, TRESSLER, HENNING, GRADY, BERGHOFF, WALSH, CUSTER, PORTER. CI P1 I F9 ESI MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY CHARLES M. CHILD, VVes1eyan, '90 CLARK W. FINNERUD, Wisconsin, 16 WALTER A. PAYNE, Chicago, '98 MEMBERS IN TI-IE UNIVERSITY Class 0f19.?2 JOHN BERCHOFF VVILLIAM CUSTER ROBERT VVALSH Clay: of 1934 HAMILTON AERAHAMS HARRY BROWN ' GEORGE CONSTANTINE PAUL CLIVER THOMAS GILL JAMES HENNING JOHN HORN EDWARD LEIDTKE VINCE NT NEYNIMAN RUEUS REED FRANK RE1cHMAN ROBERT RENEKER CHARLES TREssLER C!1az'lerz'd al Tfm l'71ifL'1'r5i1y of Clzitago 1898 Twenty-ffvr' Nali Class o ROBERT BOHNEN ROBERT DODSON JOHN ELAM RICHARD FRI-IIDEMAN Class 0 LEROY AYRES CRAIG BROOKS GEORGE DASBACH GEORGE DONOGHUE BERNARD GRADE' ROY LARSON E' 'GB F1 pgs, Jn 41 'il 1 In ' . r . fi ".ff-fridgi A'51'E525? af I Aer' 1' . ba. F -:::LSU'44b onal Clzajrlns f 1933 LOUIS CTAI,BRAI'I'l-I GEORGE MAHONEY JAMES PORTER SAMUEL PREST f 1935 ROY MCMAHON ROBERT SCHMITZ ROBERT SHUTE ALBERT 'FENEYCK VVTLLIAM rI'RAYNOR THOMAS TURNER Foundml at Union Collfgz' 1841 Pagf 278 Top ROQLTBENSON, ROBERTS, ZIMMER, VOORHEES, GUNDRUM, HARRIS, PETERSON, GALE, VV. SILLS, SMITH, BARDEN Second Row-DEE, BEISEL, WATSON, HELLER, JACKSON, STOREY, TODD, FOSTER, FARWELL, PELTON, RAPP. First Rofu,-JONTRY, HEATON, BALSLEY, VVILKINS, BLACK, RIDDLE, COYNE, VVEBSTER, HOWARD, F. SILLS. DELTA KAPPA EPSILON FACULTY COUNCILOR RUSSELL WILDER, MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY DONALD P. ABBOTT, Chicago, '07 GILBERT A. BLISS, Chicago, '97 CARL D. BUCK, Yale, '97 F. N. FREEMAN, Weslayan, '04- EDWIN B. FROST, Dartmouth,'86 HENRY GORDON GALE, Chicago, '96 ROY BLACK THOMAS COYNE BRUCE BENSON JOHN FARVVELL EUGENE FOSTER ORA PELTON ELMER L. KENYON, Harvard, '90 PRESTON KYES, Bowdoin, '96 WELLINGTON JONES, Chicago, '07 CHARLES H. IUDD, Weslayan, '94 FRANK MCNAIR, Chicago, '05 SHAILER MARHEWS, Colby, '84 JAMES H. MITCHELL, Chicago, '76 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class of 1933 Class EMMONS RIDDLE HAROLD VVILKINS of 1934 VVAYNE RAPP JOHN ROBERTS HOBART TODD PEIER ZIMMER Charlered at The Unifversity of Chifago 1893 R, ,- QE!! Q 'H' ROBERT BALSLEY EUGENE BEISEL WILLIAM DEE HOWARD GOWDY WILLIAM HEATON BION HOWARD RICHARD JACKSON JEROME JONTRY FRED SILLS RALPH VVEBSTER Class 0f1935 JOHN BARDEN BURTON GALE FRED GUNDRUM JOHN HARRIS HOMER HELLER BARTLETT PETERSON WILLIAM SII.LS BARTON SMITH CECIL STORY WILLIAM VOORHEES WILLIAM WATSON f w .,f V Foundad at Yale University 1844 Page 279 U D First Row-BERGENER, BROWN, GRIMES, ABBOTT, CALDWELL, PETTIT. S d R V F S G L . M ' econ aw- ETTE, AUST, TRASKE, REENLEAF, OGAN, OULTON. Top Rofu.-MOLLENDORE, WOLFENSON, F. SPEARINC, CORPE, Scnmnrr. DELTA TAU DELTA MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY ' ERNEST E. IRONS, Chicago, '00 HERBERT WILLETT, Bethany, '89 J. PAUL GOODE, Minnesota, 89 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class of 1933 JOHN BERGENER CHARLES SCHMIDT GARDNER AEEOTT MICHAEL CLEMENT VVILLIAM GRIMES LAURENCE SHINN FREDERIC CALDVVELL JOHN SPEARING Class of 1934 Class of 1935 CHARLES BURT RICHARD PETIT ERNEST B. BROWN Enwm IRONS JACK FAUST STEPHEN STRASKE KENNETPI CORPE JOHN LOGAN MERWTN MOULTON CHARLES VETTE CHARLES GREENLEAF FRANK SPEARINC ROWLAND WATTS, IR. Chartfred at Tln' Uni-versity of Cllirago 1898 EDVVARD VVOLFENSON 1 Founded al Brllzany Collrgf K 1854 R f S!"L'l'7l1j'-ffllf' Naiional Clzaplrrs Pagz' 280 Top ROM'-MOULDS, JONES, TAYLOR, HEPPLE, BECK, GUNNING. Sqcond R010-COLVVELL, KEOGH, DINSMORE, TOBEY, STEVENS, VVALSH, Fu-,rl ROM!-'I'IARTLE, CARR, MILLS, SCI-ILESINGI-ZR, FENDIG, CRAWFORD. - DELTA UPSILON FACULTY COUNCILOR BERTRAM NELSON f MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY PHILIP ALLEN, Williams, '91 JOHN COVER, Ohio State, '15 FAY-COOPER COLE, Northwestern, PAUL DOUGLAS, Bowdoin, '13 CHARLES GILKEY, Harvard, '03 KARL HOLZINGER, Minnesota, '15 HILGAR JENKINS, Chicago, '23 THOMAS ENKINS Swarthmore '87 J ! SIMEON LELAND, DePauw, '18 HARVEY LEMON, Chicago, '06 LYNDON LESCH, Chicago, '17 ROBERT LOVETT, Harvard, '92 I'IERVEY MALLORY, Colgate, '90 WILLIAM MATHER, Chicago, '17 JOHN MOULIJS, Chicago, '07 BERTRAM NELSON, Chicago, '07 HAROLD NELSON, Chicago, '07 WILEUR POST, Kalamazoo, '98 HENRY PRESCOTT, Harvard, '03 CONYERS READ, Harvard, '95 JAMES THOMPSON, Rutgers, '78 GEORGE WORKS, Wisconsin, '04 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class of 1933 ROBERT BECK JAMES HARTLE CHARLES BORST RICHARD SCHLESINGER LAWRENCE CARR CULVER JONES JOHN DINSMORE WINSTON SLATER ROBERT COLWELL VVALLAGE MCCAULEY FREDERICK FENDING ALLAN SUMMERS JOHN POST l JOHN MILLS, JR. CHARLES TAYLOR Clam 0f1934 Class of1935 HOBAR'F GUNNING EUGENE KEOGH EDWIN BURLEY JOHN MOULTON ROBERT HEPPLE DONALD LOWRIE PAUL DAVIS, JR. FRANK WALSH JOHN MOULDS, JR. 1a46're ChllI'iL'f6d tl! EQ Fgundgd gi The Unifuersity of Chicago lVilliam.v Collage 1898 1334 Fifty-Six National Chapters Page 281 D U Top RWLLLSCHVVARTZ, STAR, ODELI., MILLER, DWORIN, LEIRERTIIAL, KADIN, RUIIIN. Second Rau-ISRAELSTAM, DAVIDSON, BARNE'IT, STRAUCH, STICKLI-Ill, ARRAMS, SARNAT. First Rafw-GREEN, BAKER, VVEISBERC, STACKLER, GOLDEERG, PERLMAN, GREENBERG. KAPPA NU FACULTY COUNCILOR E. L. MINTS MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class 0f1932 BURTON LIFSCHULTZ LAWRENCE PERLMAN IRWIN POLAKOFF I'IERBERT GREENBERG SEYMOUR VVEISBERG VVALTER BAKER SIDNEY CHESTER A EMANUEL GDLDMAN Class of19361 HERBERT ISRAELSTAM HERMAN ODELI, RALPH RUBIN PHIL ABRAMS MAX DAVIDSON JACK DwoRIN Charlrrfd az' f The LYIZifiJL'I'Si1jV of Cllifago ' 1921 ' ' P2 ,Af 95, ,-f -.. Vi Nu, .l' v ,PV Sixlfrrz Nalional Clluplers Class of 1933 HERBERT BARNETT MAURICE KADIN JACK LIEEERTHAI. EDWARD MILLER BERNARD SARNAT SIDNEY STACKLER HAROLD STICKLER Class of1935 The 1.211 JACK SCIIVVARTZ HYNIAN STAR IRVING STRANCII Foundrd al Ifufrsily of Rnfhrsffr 1911 Pagf 282 Top Raw-BARTON, W. JOHNSON, ROWE, PRATI, B. JOHNSON, A. OFEILL, G. TOOLE. Sqcond Rau-BADMGARTNER, J. TOLE, RAMSEY, ESLICK, GLOMSET, DAVIDSON. Fzrst Row-DAVIS, ANDREW'S, EARLANDSON, BUZZELL, L. OEEILL. f KAPPA SIGMA MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY G. W. BARTELMEZ, New York, '06 L. C. M. HANSON, Luther, '92 EDWARD A. DUDDY, BOWDOIN, ,O7 JOHN L. PALMER, Brown, ,19 VV. A. THOMAS, Chicago, '12 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of1932 Class 0f1933 VVILEUR BAUMGARTNER LLOYD DAVIDSON THOMAS ANDREWS LAURENCE GOODNOVV EUGENE BUZZELL JOHN HAWLEY RALPH EARLANDSON LAWRENCE OFEILL EVERETI' RAMSEY JOHN ELLIOTT JOHN PRATT Class af1934 Class 0151935 THOMAS DAVIS WALLACE JOHNSON THOMAS BARTON JOHN ROWE BARNEY JOHNSON ASHLEY OEEILL LEONARD ESLICK GEORGE TOOLE DANIEL GLOMSET JOSEPH TOOI.E iif'," ' 5 Q 4, Founded at Ql1a"ff"'fd at , , ,',,ff'f1 The University of Virginia The Unzfvcrszty of Chzmgo I .Sg7?fTy ,g- 1869 1904 , 1 ' I One Hundred and Fifve National Chapters Page 283 Top R0fw-VARKALA, MILLS, NICHOLS, GABEL, KNECHT, BERZINSK, PHILERICII, MARTIN. Suomi Rnfu-N. SMYTH, Voss, NEBEL, TAYLOR, MACAULAY, DAvIs, VVINNING. Fmt Rww-POEOEL, O. SMYTII, VAN DER HOEF, ERICSON, HARDER, BOCR, STOK. LAMBDA CHI ALPHA FACULTY COUNCILOR F. A. KINGSBURY MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY S. K. ALLISON, Chicago, '21 F. A. KINGSBURY, Central, '09 DONALD BOND, Chicago, '25 FRANK LILLIE, Toronto, '09 CHARLES PARKER, Rush, '91 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Clan of 1932 Clan o VVILFRED DAVIS GGDEN SMYTH CARL GABEL LEIF ERICSON GEORGE VAN DER HOEF J. ROBERT NEBEL Clan of 1934 Class o WALTER BOCK EARL PARK EDVVARD BEDRAVA ERNEST KNECHT VVALTER Voss WILLIAM BERZINSKY CAMERON DX'S'FRUP ALLAN MCCAULAY JOHN MILLS f 1933 LEONARD POEOEL DAN STOK f 1935 RUSSELL NICHOLS NEWTON SMYII-I SIDNEY SMITH EVERETI' SCIILINKERT JOSEPH VARKALA Charlerrd at 6 Fozuzdrd at Thx' Uni-vfrsily of Chicago P I Boston Unifvrfsily 1920 Ln, .N 1909 f,,., .QQ "- Eigllly-Ifwo Nalional Chajrtfrs Pzzgz' ZS! Tap R010-FRIDUSS, GRAPE, S. WEIss, M. FELDMAN, BIIELICK, PORTE, PRINCE, GELLER, LITOW. Second Rofw-T. VVEISS, SCHONBERG, BLOCH, BAROEMAN, APERIN, MARVER, SCIIINDLER, WALD, LEES. Fira Row-SI-IAPIN, COIIEN, FUCHS, NELSON, J. WEIss, I. FELDMAN, MINTZ. PHI BETA DELTA FACULTY COUNCIL6R MARSHALL M. KNAPPEN MEMBER IN THE FACULTY SAMUEL H. NERLOVE, Chicago, '22 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class HERZYL COHEN FILMORE FRIDUSS IRVIN FELDMAN MOREY FELDMAN ISADORE NELSON ALLAN MARVER KENNETH PRINCE Class Class of 1934 MARVIN BARGEMAN SIDNEY LITOW MEYER GRAFF LEROY MINTZ MILTON SCHINDLER NORMAN GELLER TED BLOCK MILTON GELLER WILLIAM LEES of 1933 SAM SCHOENBERG MILTON SHAPIN of193'5 IRVIN VVALD LESLIE WALD FREVOR VVEISS SIDNEY WEIss NED PORTE VVILLIAM ZUCKERMAN : li QRTQ - Chartered at if f - pounded at Thi' Uniqffffify of Chifago 'fu f A Columbia Unifversify 1920 1.5 gi' 1912 0 . 2? ' 'iid maj ' .w National Clzapterx Page 285 El D Top Rnfw-THOMSON, HARPER, LARSON, ELDRED, G. JOHNSON, SCOTT, BELLSTROM. Third R0fLU-'ROU'I', LUCKHARDT, BREEN, CIMRAL, MARKS, VVILSQN, P. JOHNSON, AUFDENSPRING, l'IENDIiRSON, Roxw Second Rau-CAMPBELL, VVHITNEY, VVIIITE, HASTINGS, COMERFORD, PELZEL, SCI-IUMAKER. First Rau-CLARK, KUHNS, IHNAT, PORTER, LEE, SPRINGER, SCHIED, TI-IOMAS. PHI DELTA TH ETA FACULTY COUNCILOR CAREY CRONEIS MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY CHARLES R. BASKERVILL, Vanderbilt, '96 EDWARD VV. HIN'1'ON, Missouri, '90 CAREY CRONEIS, Dennison, '18 GEORGE T. NORTIIUP, Williams, '97 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class of 1933 MICHAEL IHNAT TRUSTEN LEE VVARREN BELLSTROM MYRON LARSON VVILLIAM KUHNS JAMES L. PORTER CARI.. SCHIED Class of 1934 HAROLD JOHNSON HOVVARD MARKS CLIFFORD ROWE EDVVARD SCHALLER FRANK SPRINCER ROBERT AUFDENSPRING GLENN BREEN CLAUDE HAZEN GILL HOPKINS GERALD JOHNSON DAVID CAMPBELL DAMON FULLER ELI MESSENGER CURTIS OAKES CARL GEPPINGER GARLAND ROUT CHARLES HENDERSON IRVIN SCOTT BERNARD JOHNSON FRANK THOMSON PAUL JOHNSON FRANCIS CIMRAL ORIN ECKERT ROBERT ELDRED Ross WHITNEY, Clasx of 1935 ORIS HASTINGS HILMAR LUCKIIARDT JOHN PELZEL EDWARD SCI-IUMAKER JAMES VVILSON JR. WILLIAM HARPER RICHARD w7PlITE N. Af -if 219156 " , QM 1 ' nj.:-A . Charlprpd 111 A ,FOIl7ldEff ll! . Thr L'fzifver.vily of Chifago Gm " A-..' M'a'n' U""Uf'ff'U' " ' A ' 1 , 1891 157 1348 Payz' 286 U D Taz: R010-SOUTHERLAND, MULLIGAN, VVILES, SMITH, SEABORG, DYER, VVEGNER, CALDWELL. Thu-d Row-MORTON, IGERT, HARDIES, BAILEY, PARKER, BEARDSLEY. S dR S B R A S D ' ' B B ' -eran au- MUCKER, UcK, . LVAREZ, AUER, EwEi, AIRD, ARER. uazinm Rau-L. ALVAREZ, PETERSON, ALLEN, MERCIER, HAMEERG, SGHERUBEL. PHI GAMMA DKELTAA FACULTY COUNCILOR LENNOX GREY MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY R. T. CHAMBERLIN, Chicago, '03 N. SPROAT HEANY, Chicago, '03 KNOX CHANDLER, Texas, '20 WILLIAM NITZE, Johns HOpkirIs,'94- GEORGE DOWNING, Chicago, '24 FRANK H. O,HARA, Chicago, '15 LENNOX GREY, Chicago, '22 B. E. SCHMIDT, Tennessee, '94 . ROBERT REDFIELD, Chicago, '20 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class of 1933 GORDON R. ALLEN GORDON A. CHISSOM EDGAR BURTIS ARTHUR MERGIER LUIS ALVAREZ STANLEY H. HAMBERG MELVIN A. HARDIES SUMNER SCHERUBEI JOSEPH VV. BAILEY WILLIAM W. PETERSON DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND, JR. JOHN N. SMUCKER Class of 1934 Class of 1935 ROBERT ALVAREZ WALLACE DYER ROGER BAIRD GERALD PARKER HARRY BAKER WILLIARD MORTON JOHN BEARDSLEY RAYMOND SAUER DUDLEY BUCK,JR. HAROLD WEGNER JAMES CALDWELL EARL SEABORG TAYLOR WHITTIER LOUIS IGERT BURKE SMITH MERLE MULLIGAN BRADFORD WILES DOUGLAS MODE Founded at Cl ' d t . . The Urzifzlgxgye 0faCl1icago 1 1 Ifashzrzglon and Jefferson College 1902 1843 N, Sefuenty-Ihree National Chaplers XA. .IITA Xgvififfi Page 287 D U fup Row-REED, BIRNEY, FARWELL, VVALLING, CARR, BELCHER, MORRISON, ROE, MAUERMANN, KOLB. Tlnrd Rofw-NICHOLSON, MILLER, S. JONES, O'DONNELL, AUSTIN, PALMER, R. JAMES, H. JAMES, KIENZLE, INOAILS, HEIDE. Serond R010-'GEAGAN, SMITH, CI-IAPIN, CLANCY, FRODIN, BOWMAN, R. JONES, YOUNG, OLIN, LESTER. Bottom Row-WILLIS, SASS, DRUMMOND, OLSON, TKOWSLEY, ASHLEY, REXINGER, LINDLAND, STEPHENSON. PHI KAPPA PSI FACULTY COUNCILOR ALFRED S. ROMER MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY CHARLES H. BEESON, Indiana, '93 DAVID J. LINOLE, Chicago, '87 ALGERNON COLEMAN, Virginia, '01 THEODORE L. NEFF, DePauw, '83 VERNON C. DAVID, Michigan, '03 ROBERT PARK, Michigan, '87 ALFRED S. ROMER, Amherst, '17 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class of 1933 HARRY ASHLEY FORREST DRUMLIOND JOHN INGALLS RICHARD LINDLAND PAT MAGEE JOHN MCCONNELL EVERETT OLSON MILTON PETIT, JR. SCOTT REXINOER LOUIS SASS PAUL STEPHENSON FRED TOWSLEY PAUL 'WILLIS Class of 1934 FRANK CARR CHARLES CHAPIN ROBERT CUMMINCS EDVVARD HARRIS JOHN HEIDE ROBERT JONES EDVVARD MAUERMAN EDVVARD NlCHOI.SON MILTON OLIN ROBERT SHARP DONALD BELCHER DONALD BIRNEY JOHN CLANCY, JR. JOHN COLTMAN CHARLES FARVVELI, RUBE FRODIN THOMAS LESTER VVILLIAM WALLINC Class of 1935 'WILLIAM AUSTIN RICHARD CARLE EDWARD GAEGAN ROY JAMES SAM JONES ROBERT LEWIS HARRY MORRISON W7ILI.1AM PALMER JOSEPH REED CHARLES SMITH HAL JAMES HOWARD YOUNG, JR. vqlldfffffd al 1 S I f Foundgd al Tm' L'11'W'f-'HJ' of Chlfaw ' ,"A',Q,',ff ll'ashinglon and Jrffrrsnzz Collfge 1894 K K 1- 1.952 Page 288 Tap RUM'-MOORHOUSE, COE, SEAMAN, JOHNSON, KROESEN, CONWAY, B. RANDOLPH. Second Rolw-DENNE, BANE, HAVEY, TURNER, MURPHY, CROWLEY. Fzrst Ro-w-SRONEERO, HUGHES, MATTHEWS, RITTENHOUSE, SOIIROEDER, F. RANDOLPH PHI KAPPA SIGMA FACULTY COUNCILOR CHARLES C. COLEY MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY HILLER L. BAKER, Chicago, '15 GEORGE F. HIBBERT, Chicago, '18 CHARLES C. COLBY, Chicago, '08 JAMES O. MCKINSEY, Chicago, 21 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class of 1933 PAUL F. COE GORDON RITTENI-IOUSE JOHN CROWLEY HAROLD MURPHY EARL CONWAY CARL SCHROEDER CHARLES MATTHEWS RICHARD SEAMAN HARRY KROESEN CARL SKONEERO FORREST RANDOLPH RAY VANE Class of 1934 Class of 1935 CHARLES BANE ARTHUR DENNE JOHN HAVEY JOHN ROURRE BUELL RANDOLPH WILLIAM OLSEN ELIO SCOTTA WAKEMAN TURNER SQFQITNEJFT I ,- . Cfzartzfred at . Fofmdgd at . The UniW,,.J.il.y of Chicago ,1 The Umfverszty of Pennsylfvanza 1905 ., -:ggi 1850 ' ,eg-JEAN-,Q ' , Thirty-eight Naiional Chapters Page 289 D D Top R0fw-BRADLEY, KLOUCEK, VALENTINE, THAYER, CRAEMER, PIERCE, SAERANEK, BAILEY. Sm-and Row-HOWE, LENNETIE, ZUKOWVSKI, MCDOUCALL, HUNT, JORDAN, ESCHEAUOH, BEAuvAIs. Fzrst Row-HARRIS, HOLTER, WOOIJRUEI-', BIGELOW, GRAHAM, VVINSLOVV, SCHMIOT, ROHS. PHI PI PHI FACULTY COUNCILOR A. EUSTACE HAYDON MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY JOHN C. DINSMORE, Chicago, '11 WILLIAM C. GRAHAM, Toronto, '12 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class of 1933 VVILLIAM BICELOW ALAN PIERCE CHARLES HOVVE JOHN LYNCH FRANK GIBBONEY HENRY ROIIS THEODORE HARRIS LAWRENCE SCHMIDT THORVSYALD HOLTER BENJAMIN VVOODRUFF NATHANIEL VVINSLOVV Class of 1934 Class of 1935 ALBERT BEAUVAIS WILLIAM GRAHAB1 JOHN BAILEY DUCALII MCDOUCALI KEITH CALDWELL CHESTER HUNT LAMBERT CRAEMER WII,I,lAM SAFRANIEK RICHARD ESCHEAUOI-I ERNEST JORDAN EIIWIN ZUKOYYSKI Charlrred at Tlu' Cnifversity of Chicago 1923 JEROME KI.0UCEK Tim xiii' , Q . Tfwtnly Nalional Chaplrrs XKYALIJEMAR SOLE Founded' al lvlZl1'l'I'51lj' of Cflll4!l,00 1914 Page 290 D D Top ROW-WILK, ZOLINE, PORTES, SMITH, SHANEDLING, MARKS, WOLF. Second R0'LL2-KAUFMAN, LEWISON, ROSENTHAL, ORLINSKY, E. OysON, SCHMIDT, GLICK, LEvINsoN. First R010-ZACHARIAS, MOSK, L. OvsON, HORWITZ, ARIES, SCI-ILIFKE, ROESING, REAVEN. PHI SIGMA DELTA MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 MARK BARNETT EDWARD LEWISON ALBERT KAUFMAN SAM HORWITZ AUBREY MARCOVICH JEROME MARKS HAROLD LAUFMAN ADOLPH RUBINSON MOREY MOSK IRVING LAUMAN LOUIS SCHLIFKE STANLEY WEIL Class of 1934 MARVIN BERKSON HERBERT PORTES MARVIN GLICK JUNIOR KERSTEIN AVERY ROSENTHAL JOHN LEVENSON HAROLD ORLINSKY PHILIP SHANEDLING ROBERT OSHINS IRVING WILK .ng Clzarterod at lf ,gg - The Unifversity of Chicago " J 16? 1921 -A . J I lfilk. Tfwenty-lfwo National Chapters Class of 1933 LEO OVSON BERNARD WOLF JAMES ZACHARIAS JOSEPH ZOLINE Class of 1935 EUGENE OVSON JOSEPH SCI-IMIDT SIDNEY SMITH Founded at Columbia University 1909 Page 291 D Top Row-POLLACK, LOVENTHAL, JADWIN, SAMUELS, BERGMAN, GRossMAN, LEDERER, HERZOG. Second Rufus-SIGMAN, HASTERLIER, LAWRENCE, GOLDSTEIN, SCHENKER, YATES, BAME, RosENBERc, EXGER. First Rom-GOLBMAN, MENDELSOHN, DEUTSCH, WEST, BoRc:Es, MARGOLIS, KAUEMAN. PI LAMDA PHI FACULTY COUNCILOR PETER H. HAGBOLDT MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY RALPH GERARD, Chicago, '21 Lows LEITER, Chicago, '21 EARL ZAUS, Chicago, '20 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class of 1933 MERwxN ROSENBERG JOSEPH WEST BERTHOLD BORGES ROBERT GOLDSTEIN Class of 1934 MAURICE BAME ROBERT HERzoc MELVIN GOLDMAN DAVID JADVVIN CHARLES LAWRENCE ARTHUR MARGOLTS HERBERT SCHENHER Chartered at The l,'nifvz'rsiIy of Chicago 1919 Nineteen VVILLIAM KAUFMAN RICHARD DEUTSCH ROBERT EIGAR Class W1LL1AM BERGMAN ARTHUR GROSSMAN ROBERT HASTERLICK '3 X N .V X, X, National Clzaplers DAv1o MENBELSOHN EnwARn SIGMAN of 1935 WxLLxAM LOVENTHAL HENRY LEBERER ROBERT SAMUELS Founded al Yale Ufzilwrsily 1895 Page 292 D D Top Roluh-YOUNG, BEEKS, SIBLEY, TUTTLE, J. BAKER, PARSONS, LANGFORD, CULLEN, C. HOWARD, ALDRIDOE, SMITH Third Row-MUNN, CURTIS, HILTON, DOERR, TODD, LINDA:-IL, LANE, K. RATCLIFF, HUTCHINSON, PALMER, I-IOLLOWAY. Sefovzd R0'w-LEWIS, PATTERSON, ASKEW, CHRISTIE, SULCER, GUBSER, SCI-IWIND, LovET'r, KENNEDY, FLINN. Bottom Row-ZENNER, R. HOWARD, JEFFERSON, SMALL, LAING, B. RATCLIFF, F. HOWARD, HOAGLAND, STAGG, TEMPLE, E. BAKER. S. B. BARRETT, Rochester, '89 PERCY H. BOYNTON, Amherst, '97 H. M. GOSNELL, Rochester, '18 JAMES B. HERRICK, Michigan, '82 GEO. C. HOWLAND, Amherst, '85 FRED G. ADAMS EDWARD C. BAKER ROBERT HOAGLAND FRANK HOWARD CHESTER LAING RANDALL RATCLIFF JOSEPH TEMPLE STODDARD SMALL PAUL STAGG ROY SWANBERG Class of 1934 WARREN ASKEW EDWARD BEEKS GEORGE CHRISTIE EDWARD R. CULLEN FRANK HUTCHINSON CARL JEFFERSON JAMES LEWIS BURTON Chartered at 1896 KENNETH LANE ROBERT LANGFORD EUGENE PATRICK KENNETH RATCLXFF GEO. A. RICHARDSON JOSEPH SIBLEY WILLIAM TUTTLE YOUNG The University of Chicago Q P S I U P S I L O N MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY H. C.fMORRISON, Dartmouth, '95 ELIAKIM H. MOORE, Yale, '83 EDWARD A. OLIVER, Kenyon, '05 PAUL OLIVER, Michigan, '99 GEO. W. SHERBURN, Wesleyan, '06 A. A. STAGG, Yale, '88 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of1932 Class of 1933 EUGENE GUBSER ROBERT HOWARD EDWARD M. HAYDON KEITH PARSONS JOHN HOLLOWAY HENRY SULCER RAYMOND ZENNER Class 0161935 FRANK ALDRIDCE JOHN BAKER GUTHRIE CURTIS JOHN DOERR THOMAS FLINN RALPH GODDARD CASPAR HILTON CHAUNCEY HOWARD FRANK Www , f., "ll," ,235-. if A-mr' , 724 .4 " - .F Pr :LQ i H4155 I-P, r J Az. -,Q wr' ff . A., 1 . ' 7'-f, 'Lf ' 'fill 3' K Tfwerzty-.vefuerz National Chapterx EDWARD KENNEDY ROBERT LINDALL MERRITT LOVETT WALTER MOCHEL NED MUNN PERCIVAL PALMER ELLMORE PATTERSON BURTON SCHWIND TODD Founded at Union College 1833 Page 293' Top Row-FISHER, PITCHER, KLOVE, MCCLOUD, AAGAARO, QUEHI., RAMALEY. Sqrond Rau-KIENZLE, TOOIvIEs, MAYO, JOHNSON, FILBROOK, PARKER, SAIILIN, HORN. Fzrsl R0w1TEECARDEN, COUNTRYMAN, FOREEN, TEST, POOLE, BLOCK, RAI.sTON. SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON FACULTY COUNCILOR MAJOR T. J. J. CHRISTIAN MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY FRED S. BREED, Allegheney, '98 MAJ. T. J. J. CHRISTIAN, V. M. I., '11 GEORGE O. FAIRWEATI-IER, Colorado, '06 ERNEST HADEN, Southwestern, '25 NED A. MERRIAM, Chicago, '09 WILLIAM F. OGBURN, Emory, '05 C. E. PARMENTER, Chicago, '10 DURBIN S. ROWLANO, Harvard, '13 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 EDVVARD MCCLOUD JOHN QUEHL JOHN TEST WALLACE FISCHER STANLEY JENKINS ROBERT KLOVE of1934 ALVIN PITCHER VINSON SAHLIN CALVIN COUNTRYMAN FARRELL TOOMES VVILLIAM PHILBROOK ELWYN WII.cOx Class CARL AAGAARD RAPHAEL BLOCK Cllarlercd at A Thr L'Tl1'7Jl'l'511-1' of Cfzirayo , 1903 Clam of 1933 MARSHALL FOREEN H. T. V. JOHNSON BAYARD POOLE JOsEPI-I TEEOAROEN ELTON 'TIEGREEN Clay.: of 1935 HADLEY HERRICK JOHN HORNE JUSTIN KUZELL Thr' Om' Hundred and Six Nalional Clzaplcry STANLEY MAYO EVERETI' PARKER EVERETT RALSTON Fourzdfd al Unifwrsily of .-llalzzuna 1856 Pagz' 294 I5 D Top R010-ANGLE, CAMERON, ROBINSON, ROBIE, MORRIS, JACOBSEN, MCNAB, VAN, SCI-IAICK. Third Rofw-W. JOHNSON, PATTERSON, MINER, HEALY, WAKEFIELD, EADIE, CHAMBERLIN, KING, WHEELER Scmnd R010-COULSON, MOORE, R. JOHNSON, SMITH, HUEBARD, MONTGOMERY, SCHRYVER, ORCUTT, BOAND Bottom Raw-MCCARTHY, WEHLING, GUY, WOODRUEF, WOODY, BEAN, ENGBERG, CALDWELL, CONRLIN. SIGMA CHI FACULTY COUNCILOR DR. CHARLES E. SHANNON MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY CARL F. APFELBACH, Chicago, '17 CAREY CULEERTSON, Northwestern, '95 WILLIAM HARKINS, Leland Stanford, '00 FREDERICK H. KOCH, Illinois, '99 Class JOHN HEALY DONALD MCNAB Class LEONARD COULSON WALTER MONTGOMERY WILLIAM Chartered at The Unifvcrsity of Chimgo 1897 of 1932 ROBERT MCCARTHY RICHARD WITTY of 1934 GEORGE ROBINSON MALCOLM SMILEY WAKEFIELD f I . . A ., , Q 4 ' 2 fi-.V E ROLLO L. LYMAN,Beloit, '99 HORATIO H. NEWMAN, Chicago, '05 CHARLES E. SHANNON, Chicago, '23 EUGENE F. TRAUT, Chicago, '17 VVILLIAM E. VAUGHN, Chicago, '27 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1933 GEORGE CAMERON ARCHIE HUBBARD ALFRED JACOESEN HARRY MOORE Class of 1935 ROBERT ANGLE EDVVARD BEAN CHARLES BOAND ROBERT CALDWELL EDGAR CHAMBERLIN ROBERT CONKLIN THOMAS EADIE CHESTER ELIAS RALPH Ninety-one National Chapters JOHN ENGBERG WILLIAM JOHNSON HUGH MCKENNA SAMUEL MINER WILLIAM ORCUTT PAUL PATTERSON CHARLES ROBY ELLIOTT SCHRYVER VVEHLING Founded at Miami University 1855 Page 295 Top R0'w-IVIALUGEN, RICE, SMILEY, HENRY, SPAULDING. Sqrond Rofw-MORS, BARTHOL, ZIEGLE, HORTON, SIIROCK. Fzrsz Raw-FINNEOAN, JULIAN, MANDERNACK, MANN, GEORGE. SIGMA NU FACULTY COUNCILOR D. JEROME FISHER MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY EDSON S. BASTXN, Michigan, '02 LENARD E. DICKSON, Texas, '93 WILBUR L. BEAUCHAMP, Kansas, '13 D. JEROME FISHER, Chicago, '17 FRANK BILLINGS, Northwestern, '81 JOSEPH L. MILLER, Michigan, '93 JOSEPH CAPPS, Illinois College, '91 GEORGE E. SHAMBAUGH, Iowa, '19 HARVEY A. CARR, Colorado, '01 QUINCY VVRIGHT, Lombard, '12 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class of 1933 HUBERT MERRICK JAMES STAPLETON FRANCIS FINNEGAN LOREN MANDERNACK DAVID RICE ROBERT ZIEGLE IVAN HORTON WALLACE Mons JACK MALUCEN VVILLIAM POTIER JUHN SIIROCK Class of 1934 Class of 1935 ORMAND JULIAN DAVID SPAULDING J. BAXTER HENRY GEORG MANN W. CLAUDE HENRY WILLIAM SMILEY EVERETT GEORGE ROBERT I'IlI.LARD Chartered at . N L6 5? l ' .Foufzafd al . The Urlifversity of Chirago , Ifzrgzma Mzlztary lnslzlule 1904 'I ,, 7,4 ' 1869 Ninety-sefvcn National Chapters Page 296 Top Rofw-S. GOLDBERG, BICKSON, GLABMAN, L. SILVERSTEIN, R. LEWEY, BARNARD, POMERANCE, D. LEVY, KLEINEN BERG, BRONNER, NACHMAN. Sqcand Rofw-GREILSI-IEIM, L. LEWY, BECKER, SI-IERWIN, SMITH, LIPMAN, SCHVVAB, RICH. Fzrxl Row-L. LEVY, SEGALL, GOLDMAN, GOLDBERGI, SIMON, SILLMAN, LIPSKI, GOODSTEIN. f TAU DELTA PHI FACULTY COUNCILOR DR. CHARLES GOETSCH MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of 1932 Class of 1933 SIDNEY GOLDBERG HAROLD LIPSKI ARNOLD BEHRSTOCK RALPH SHERWXN MARVIN GOLDMAN 'ADOLPH NACHMAN MARVIN SIMON LEO SEOALL Class of 1934 Clays of 1935 SEYMOUR GOLDBERG BEN RAGIR NORMAN BECKER HOWARD RICH WILLIAM GOODSTEIN LEONARD SILLMAN JEROME KLINEBERG ARNOLD SCHWAB DONALD GLABMAN LEO SILVERSTEIN DAVID LEVY MORRIS BRONNER LEONARD LEVI PAUL SMITH HENRY' GREILSHEIM LAWRENCE LEWY IRWIN BICKSON Chartered at WX Faundfd, af The Uni-versity of Chicago 5 The College of the Czty of Nefw Yorle 1921 9,350 1910 Sei! uv' Twenty-tfwo National Chapters Page 297 Cla.r.r of 1935 Top Row-WEIR, ODELL, VVRIGHT, YOII, HEDERT, MECIIER, SCHENDEL, IVICCARTI-IY. Third R040-ALLEN, MALCHESKI, MOORE, SCHUYLER, JORCENSON, BESSIE, JOHNSON. Sfcond R010-SOMERS, ZOLLAR, DAREY, RYAN, TAMBONE, REYNOLDS, GORMAN. Bottom Row-THOMPSON, HINES, RICHMOND, CAYOU, VVAHLGREN, MIKESCII, SCHWAEGERMAN. TAU KAPPA EPSILON FACULTY COUNCILOR MERRITI' W. PARKINSON MEMBERS I ' f T. GEORGE ALLEN, Be oIt, 09 PAUL R. CANNON, Milliken, '15 MACK EVANS, Knox, '23 WALTER HEEERT, Chicago, '29 IN THE FACULTY N. PAUL HUDSON, Milliken, '17 HAROLD D. LASSWELL, Chicago, '23 ' MERRITT W. PARKINSON, PHILIP RUDNICK, Chicago, '24 HAROLD A. SWENSON, Northwestern, '22 MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Class of1932 Class of 1933 VICTOR BAER ROBERT JORGENSON JOHN HINCKI.EY' LESTER ODELI. FRANK P. CROWE SHERMAN K. SHULL G. ELVVOOD JOHNSON JOHN RYAN RALPH DAREY GERALD SOMERS ANTON MIKESCH HAROLD WAS ROBERT HINDS LOUIS HUNTER ERIK WAHLGREN MAURICE ZOLLAR Class of 1934 VVILLIAM BESSEY H EREERT RICHMOND W7ILLARD SCHENDEL CHARLES THOMPSON OSBEY VVEIR ARTHUR ALLEN HERBERT BRUSH FRANK CAYOU ROGER GORMAN FRANK MECHER GEOR Charlfrrrl at :S :I Tlzc L'nifL'crsi1j,L of Cllirayo A ' 1911 A 442 Tllirly-six YY '45 :U 1-R . Nalional Chafrlvrx VVII,LIAIv1 REYNOLDS GEORGE SCHUYIIER M.JOsEPH YOII JOIIN TAMEONE RICHARD VVRIGI-IT GE SCHVVAEGERMAN N Foumlfd al Illinois llfrxlryalz 1899 Pagf' 298 I! D Top R0fw-KORATZ, SCI-IOENERUM, FRANKEL, BLOCK, GERSON, M. RIES, LIVINGSTON, COLE. Third R010--DECKER, HASSENBUSCH, WEIss, WEINEERO, FRANK, HIRSCH, MARIN, H. SIMON. Second Row-H. RIES, ROMBERG, FREEMAN, FREEI-ILINO, KUTNER, PANAMA, STEIN, KRAMER. First R010-FISHER, LEVY, LEDERER, WIEN, GOLDSMITH, FREUDENTHAL, 1. SIMON. ZETA BETA TAU MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY - Class of 1932 Clays of 1933 DAN SEIFER BERNARD WEIN MARCUS FREEMAN ARTHUR LEVY,IR. EDGAR GOLDSMITH HERMAN RIEs,JR. PHILIP LEDERER LOUIS ROMBERG Class of 1934 HERBERT FREEHLING ALLAN MARIN ROBERT SCHOENBRUN HERMAN STEIN STANLEY WEINEERG PHILIP COLE TED DECKER HERBERT FIELD JOHN FRANKEL Chartered at I I ' 'Rx The Unifuemity of Chzcago V5 IJ 1918 If I 1 I '95 ,- 13 E A ' ' ' AL . , :is 9 HAROLD BLOCK NOEL GERSON MARVIN FRANK HERBERT HIRSCH LEE HAssENBUsCH JAMES SIMON Class of 1935 ROBERT LIVINGSTON DAVID KUTNER NORMAN PANAMA MILTON RIES HAROLD SIMON ROBERT WEIss Founded at The College of the City of Nefw York 1898 Thirty-four National Chapters Page 299 Tap R010-COHENOUR, BROMUNO, HALLEES, DACNEAU, MILLER, WELLEMEYER. Scrond Rafw-SALEK, ZOLLAR, GEACEN, FRANKLAND, MATTIIEWS. Bottom Row-HINDS, COE, GRAHAM, WILKENS, DARBY, Z. CISKA. ALPHA KAPPA PSI FACULTY COUNCILOR WILLIAM N. MITCHELL MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY JOHN H. COVER WILLARO J. GRAHAM VVILLIAM N. MITCHELL THEODORE O.YNTEMA DWIGHT A. POMEROI' I-IAROLU G. SHIELOS RALEIGH VV. STONE MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY Senior: PAUL F. COE VVOOOROW W. DACNEAU RALPH E. DAREY STILLMAN FRANKLAND ROBERT HINDS Juniors VVALTER BROMMUND EUGENE T. HALAAS ROYAL L. SVVANBERG Chariered ai A I Tlw lfnifzmrxify of Chicago 1928 .52 . is Fifty Nalional Clmplers MARTIN HERMAN ROBERT R. JORGENSEN ANDREW VVELI.E:vIEYER FREDERICK R. VVILKENS LOUIS T. ZISKA CHARLES IVIA'l"I'l-IEVVS JOSEPH SALEK III Foundrd al Nefw York Unifvf'r5il5 1904 Page 300 1928 IT D D Top R010-SALVESEN, FENTON, SMITH, STADI-IEIM, MCCLOUD, MOLDT. Second R0fw-BOUDRO, ELDER, MASCHAL, KOUSSER, STEPHENSON, Fin: Row-KRINNING, DAVENPORT, LIILLARD, SHERRY, GALVANI, MCKITFRICK. DELTA SIGMA PI FACULTY COUNCILOR J. O. MCKINSEY MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY RALPH ALSPAUGH J. O. MCKINSEY MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY JOSEPH KOUSSER FRED A. KRINNING Seniors JOSEPH R. SHERRY EINAR BJORKLUND WILLIAM BOUDRO JOHN D. DAVENPORT THOMAS S. ELDER CURTIS W. FENTON ALBERT J. GALVANI Juniors HENRY T. MASCHAL ROBERT E. MCKITTRICK ROBERT L. HILLARD EDWARD L. MCCLOUD ERNEST MOLDT FRANK MURRAY J. KENNETH SMITH OTTO A. STADHEIM Chartered at h The University of Chieago If-,F J Founded af Nefw York University 1907 ie" '75, ' l l Wi. I 'Q 'X ge!! f I- f "., "5 an -Aw 4..l.!. Fifty-tfwo National Chapters Page 301 D D Bark Rofu.--JOHNSON, FENDER, JONES, Baooxs, MALM. Front Row-ASHEY, T1-xoMAsoN, TENER, PARKHILL, STEWART. GAMMA ETA GAMMA MEMBER IN FACULTY WILLIAM I'IOMER SPENCER, Honorary RoLLxN FENDER E. RoscoE JONES THERON ASHBY JOSEPH Bxoofcs Graduate Sludcnt MEREDIT'H GII,PA1'RICK Seniors BRUCE PARKHILL Juniors LANE THOMASON ALBERT J. TENER F resllmen If P' JOHN MOORE HARRY A. MALM STEPHEN S. JQHNSON FRANK A. S'1'Ew,xR'r I" -Iv., la K3 CifI!lI'lf'f6'Lf ai U Fmmdgd M :gl A 3 Thr L7ll'LItf'I?5?b0f Chlfagd b The Unilvqggi of Main? 9,. g I Naliolzal Srlzolarxlfip .fffward - 1932 Tfwnnly-srlwn Naiional Chaplcrs Page 302 I5 D DELTA ZETA MU MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY CHARLES ADLER MILTON APPELBAUM JOSEPH BARTH BERNARD D. COHN JOSEPH COLLICK MILTON L. GOLDBERG HAROLD KAMM Founded at The Uniwmrsify of Chicago 1926 Ulgawcnmgfg Z0-T1F"gH ...Oxwg 5: swf.-,rn,43',., v-V005 5:-' rl-:mg gt-apr. SZ. ggmg :nE'UE02g :wowgC:G,5 C: gazing'-I Z E E rf r- fifix f 4' , ' f'i'4 x'FRf?Q'i5 .hav Page 303 U U Top Row-HUGHES, TINRHAM, DANEORTH, MATTHIES, BROWN, MCMURRAY. Serond Row-REED, ONUFROCK, MERRIFIELD, LEWIS, BASILE, BOAND, DAVIDSON. Fzrxt R0'Ll2iHRUSKA, JACQUES, ENGELHAROT, BLACKMAN, LENINCTON, FARIS. PHI ALPHA DELTA MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY HARRY A. BIGELOW ERNEST VV. PUTTKAMMER KENNETH C. SEARS MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY ROBERT BARRETT WILLIAM BASILE JOSEPH BLACKMAN CHARLES BOAND CHARLES BOMEERGER JACK BROWN SHERMAN CANTY PETER CHAMALES FRANCIS COOPER GEORGE FARIS CHESTER HAMSON VICTOR HRUSKA JOHN HUGPIES THALES LENNINGTON DAVID LEWIS ROLAND MATHIES GEORGE MCMURRIXY' FRED IVIERRIFIEIIIJ VVILLIAM DANFORTH LORN DAVIDSON JOHN ONUFROGR JOSEPH TINKHAM CHARLES VVOODRUFF Founded al Kcnl College 1902 1897 Chartered at The L'nifuc'rsity of Chicago , .5 .x Fifty-onz' National Chajrlfrx Page 304 PHI DELTA PHI MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY ROBERT DOVE Senior: THOMAS FITZGERALD GORDON LEONARD C. B. MCDOUGAL NORMAN EATON CHARLES FOX WILLET GORHAM JOHN HARDIN JOHN ANGRO 1. BAILEY F. T. BARRET JOHN BONNES E. H. CASSELS ROBERT CHANNER Chartered at The Lnzfuersity of Chicago 1903 VVILLIAM WILSON J union Freshmen DON VVENTWORTH f The Sixty-one Nalional Chapters WILLIAM PRICE ROBERT MCKINLEY ROBERT OAKES JOSEPH WELLS GEORGE HIBBER VVALTER LYON ROBERT O,BRIEN ARTHUR O,MEARA F. C. CRUMPACKER ROBERT DEWEY BENJAMIN FAIRBANKS WILLIAM MCDAVID J. R. SHARP FRED STEADRY Founded at Unifveryity of Michzgan 1869 Page 305 :rl 'm 11 . .., -I - 1... mlb, if Q V -2 -i pg if 3-.,w:,-.:,w::-.Ivy Q -'ww 'f H "-x mfr r. Qju 5 , 1 ' f CAMPUS MISCELLANY D D ADVERTISING INDEX Associated lvlilitary Stores Blackstone Hall . Braniff Airways . Cable Piano Co. Caroll Ice Cream . Commonwealth Edison Daguerre Studio . . Daily News Publishing Co. Durand-lN1cNeil-Horner Co. . George Erhardt 51 Sons . Feilchenfeld Bros., Inc. . . General Electric X-ray Corp. Illinois Book Exchange . . Jahn Sc Ollier Engraving Co. . Kinsrnanls Golf X Country Club . Kleenex . . . Kroch's Bookstore . . . Lasker Boiler and Engineering Corp. Remington Rand, Inc. . . John Sexton and Co. . Sharp X Smith . Hotel Shoreland ll. Shinderman Swift X Co. . . University State Bank . . University of Chicago Book Store VVestinghouse Electric . . Hotels lVinder1nere . VVoodworth's Book Store VVright's Laundry . 315 313 327 313 329 319 331 333 321 319 315 321 317 325 313 323 315 319 317 319 321 321 317 311 329 322 317 315 329 317 Pagr 308 U D APPRECIATION The Staff wishes to express its appreciation to: The fraternities, clubs and other student organizations Whose prompt contributions made publication possibleg Louis N. Ridenour for intelligent treatment of CAP AND GOWN problems in the editorial columns of the Daily Marooiig Miss Valerie Wickham, Editor of University Publications, and lyflr. Carleton T. Beck of the Alumni Office for the loan of cuts, Charles Reyburne, Charles lVliller and Arthur Haushner for their co-operation in the handling of engraving, printing and photography, Rube Frodin, Jr., for the article 'on page 335 And to Walt Pire for the fine typography and who will be very much peeved if this page of copy doesn't reach him by May 18th. ' I PHOTOGRAPHY All photography in this volume is by lVIr. Dyer of Daguerre Studio with the follow- ing exceptions: Photographs on pages l, 3, 8, 13, l5, l9, 23, 29, lll, and ll3 by Robert Lange. Photographs on pages 45, 71, 72, and 73 by John lWills, Jr. Photographs on page 46 by the Editor. Photograph on page 81 by John Frankel. Page 309 OFFICERS OF ADMINSTRATION 1931-1932 ROBERT BIAYNARD I'IlLTCI-IINS, President of the University FREDERIC WOODWYARD, Vice-President and Dean of the Faculties LLOYD STEERE, Vice-President and Business llflanager EMERY T. FILBEY, Acting Vice-President and Dean of Faculties WALTER GREY PRESTON, JR., Assistant to the President ROY WHITE BIXLER, Registrar of the University HARVEY C. DAINES, Assistant comptroller J. SPENCER DICKERSON, Corresponding Secretary of the Board of Trustees BRUCE VVESLEY DICKSON, Advisor of Foreign Students GEORGE OWEN FATRWEATHER, Assistant Business Manager CHARLES WHITNEY GILKEY, Dean of the University Chapel LYNDON HENRY LESCH, Assistant Secretary of the Board of Trustees HERVEY FOSTER lV.lALLORY, Secretary of the Home Study Department VVILLIAhl JOHN MATHER, Bursar, Assistant Secretary of the Board of Trustees JOHN FRYOR MOULDS, Secretary of the Board of Trustees NATHAN C. PLIMPTON, Comptroller JAMES NI. STIFLER, Chairman of the Committee on Development of the Board of Trustees ROBERT CARLTON WOELLNER, Executive Secretary, Board of Vocational Guidance and Placement GEORGE ALAN VVORKS, Dean of Students and University Examiner THE COLLEGE AND THE DIVISIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY FRANK RATTRAY L1LLiE, Dean of the Division of the Biological Sciences GORDON JENNINGS LAING, Dean of the Division of the Humanities HENRY GORDON GALE, Dean of the Division of the Physical Sciences BEARDSLEY RUML, Dean of the Division of the Social Sciences Cl-LAUNCEY SAMUEL BOUCHER, Dean of the College of Arts, Literature and Science XVLLLIAM HAY TALIAFERRO, Associate Dean of the Division of the Biological Sciences DONALD SLESINGER, Associate Dean of the Division of the Social Sciences BASIL COLEMAN HYATT HARvEY,.Dean of Students in the Division of the Biological Sciences. including lledical Students .AARON JOHN BRL'MBAUGH, Dean of Students in the College of Arts, Literature and Science Page 310 ECAUSE the flavor of Swift's Premium Bacon, its mildness and savor, are uniquely deliciousg because its tender meat is so evenly proportioned with fat and leang because it can 54471 Swi!t's Premium seal-a mark which identifies a complete line of foods of highest quality e ,Jaw flue 50" ' f' be bought, in sanitary wrappings, in any of the three convenient ways shown here-these are some of the reasons why two generations of careful housewives have asked their dealers to "Be sure it's Premium." 'VW ' .5229 Pr f, , 1 ,-liq0.rh . :s'2'w, i JM SWift'S Premium ams and Bacon BB SURE IT !SSWIFT'S PREMIUM! The new Pmmium "sam,-me" Ham. ,May cooked in me S1-1-:Ea wnmm , bmw me lnmmu, mu., Pu-m.'.lm1nbe1.Tne un- eaokw rm ms and hmm carry on-ef iuennlymg mmkuswell-mewom swf: in blown dar, down me lmgm or tha ,fav-me mummy, an lhc ,mu .mdpmenmem wmppm. Swift Br. Company Page 311 U D SOPHONISBA PRESTON BRECKINRIDGE, lVlERI..E CROWE COULTER, LENNOX BOUTON GREY, JEROME GREGORY IQERWIN, ADELINE DE SALE LINK, WILLIAM EDELFSEN SCOTT, LILLIAN STEVENSON, HAROI,D A. SWENSON, ROBERT CARLTON VVOELLNER, Advisers in the College of Arts, Literature and Science CARL FREDERICK HUTH, Dean of the University College THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS IYVILLIAIVI HOMER SPENCER, Dean of the School of Commerce and Administration SHAILER NIATHEVVS, Dean of the Divinity School CHARLES HUBBARD JUDD, Dean of the School of Education DOUGLAS WAPLES, Acting Dean of the Graduate Library School IELOUIS ROUND VVILSON, Dean of the Graduate Library School HARRY AUOUSTUS BIGELOW, Dean of the Law School ERNEST EDWARD IRONS, Dean of Rush Nledical School EDITH ABOTT, Dean of the Graduate School of Social Service Administration THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES LABORATORIES AND CLINICS M. LLEWELYN RANEY, Director of the University Libraries EDWIN BRANT FROST, Director of the Yerkes Observatory FRANKLIN CHAMBERS l.VQlCLEAN, Director of the University Clinics THE UNIVERSITY PRESS GORDON J. LAINO, General Editor ALBERT C. ll'1CFARLAND, llflanager, Nlanufacturing Department DONALD P. BEAN, hflanager, Publication Department FRED H. TR.ACHT, hflanager, The University of Chicago Bookstore If rlppoinizzzeni ejfeflifw Sfptwnbcr I, 1932. Pagr 312 U D ' ' Zglzrrkatnnv B311 Brnuih es - - -Solarium for Bridge After Luncheon, and Dinner Parties. -Ultra modern, inti- mate rooms. -Proximity to Bridle paths, Golf Courses and Beach. -Tennis courts. rior. i tail. TEH ROOM, jvaneled in natural finixh southern pine, Matiny eighty- ,ber- Jonr. Here Jelert foods, expertly prepared, are Jerlvcd al moderate price.:- a-la-carte or table d'hote. Fariliiies for special limclzeom and partiex. WE INVITE YOU TO ENJOY BLACKSTONE HALL AS A HOME ' S748 BLACKSTONE AVENUE "It Identifies You" KINSMAN'S ' GOLF ana' COUNTRY A MASUN CLU B Gr HAMLIN nthemostperfectcxample I4-3 rd and Parker Road of the piano makers art. CABLE PIANO C0. 301 So. Nvabash at Jackson RATES Weekdays ...,.............,............ 31.00 Saturday ................................. 1.25 Sunday ..... ......... 1 .50 PHONES : Golf Course-Orland 4 City-Stewart 1370 Page 313 -Refinement of inte- -Beauty of Gothic de- E5 D THE SHADOW'S LETTER TO COMMENCEMENT TIME: I-Iullo, you folks gettin' out of our college in slzort order, but order not so short as some of these smarties under this here new system, maybe, and hullo to all you others who are interested in the ones who are saying fhy to us toujours pretty soon now, on account they're gonna be graduated into the world, with all its higness and roldness and rirhness and poorness, hullol Leaving it to frankie harding to fll up spare about some of you seniors, I'm gonna try to give you a few slaps about underelassznen you may care to peek at one winter night-live, twenty, Hfty years from today-when you sneak up the dusty old stairs into your dusty old attic and choke from the stuffy, lifeless air while you grope around in a trunk and pull out a dusty old 1932 cap and gown, and do it down the stairs again and find a place for your hands and feet in the warmth of your hreside, and for what else but such a night is a college annual put together, I ask you, and if you are a lofty, nasty, brainy philosoph maybe you'll answer me with a disdaining smile, and I won't rare a danzh, 'cause I won't see you. But on that far-away day I want you to see if you can remember these kids who used to think you were pretty hot stuff because you were a year, or two years, or three ahead of them in school . . . think you of dot ehapline, the pretty freshman girl who came along to H11 in jerry n1itchell's place in the eyes and dreams of so many of the admiring rabble, and think of her sister inargie who came a year sooner and who al- ways had franh earr and bradshaw and jizn porter at her command if there was any- thing she really wanted, and remember how jean jordan, who transferred from south dakota, reminded ever'one of hay francis of hollywood, and told a lotta men a lotta line and got away with it just like the girls in the magazine stories, and remember what a terror little vin sahlin was upon yon gridiron, and what a sweet girl donnie herr made as a blackfriar leading lady, and what a handsome leading blackfriar man was bob lnalsley, even if he did go up on his toes and down now and then in the middle of a line. Try to picture the old coffee shop patronage, you sitting in a corner cynically taking it all in . . . in typical senior manner, with betty casoin and wallie truffle and lorraine watson making up a fairly familiar trio at that table with maybe three or four males to H11 in with sage remarks about classes and instructors and such rot, while yonder elenore srheel and lnadalene rurnnzler and jane hemplenzan and betty hruesrher . . . and maybe harriet henneberry and ginny eyssell and ile earr and mary dean and lonita hloss . . . giggling and talking about last night's flames or male personalities in general, and mary lou eotton and hester hempsted and caroline brooks practicing a trio vocal in preparation for a winter carnival program, or a settlement jamboree, or a some such, and hap suleer and holloway and hal james forming a more or less willing practice au- dience at the fourth table down, with james tossing red-headed remarks right over the heads of all the in-between people, and holloway doing the same, and sulfer just grin- ning as good practice audiences often do. llaybe you'll remember how once in a while I'd run a crack in my phoenix rolmh about what a lovely lady I figured mary shultz to be, at this party or that, 'though l've never met her, but just seen her eyes when they've smiled at the lurhy man of the evr- ning and heard nothing but the best about her, and maybe the expression of "greeter" attached to the name of the ambitious publicity boy labeled galhraith will come before Page 374 D D '25 x 33" , U-I . 'A '91,-Y- i, ,.:,., MH! If . I ' elf- gif, - '4-1 A . vifiqf'-fg?5?. 1s giia ' .' Qfiflf ' ein .-fl fa.--T -' 1 - t J-if, - 4 ' ' .qnmvmqiwrvgtislqgffi -, E W 143 'A l 1 wh-J-sladkjjf..':'fT1v"'g5fi:,, Jqp.-Luk'-4' - f'-, ff 7 " ,jg -f:-1-:1- -.G .,-Us--T Hi ' ,ff .gf , , Ma-wtf 454. - '--f-,.- . ' .4""' ,- ' ., ' ----..,,,,.,--r -- F. ., . I -- rdonrmco som-H or-4 .ucksoq num Q E" Mu nun Mo me ...ar - Whether you are planning a brilliant social function for two hundred, or a quiet dinner for two, Why not top your plans off with the noted food, beautiful atmosphere and meticulous serv ice of Hotels A indermere hicago 'WARD B. JAMES 56th Street at The Lake Manager Fairfax 6ooo THE ASSOCIATED MILITARY STORES Uniform Equipment for U. S. Army Oflicers IQ West Jackson Chicago, Ill. KROCHS INTERNATI ONAL BGDKSTORE 206N.MlCHIGANAVE. CHICAGO, ILIL FEILCHENFELD BROS., INC. Quality Meats and Poultry Markets all over Chicago Offire: 1200 East 63rd Street Phone: Plaza 834-0 Page 315 U U you when you think of him, and you'll remember what a helluva time young pat page seemed to have staying eligible even though his old man 'was a big shot, and he a damb good kid, and you'll recall the gorgeous beverly strange and her unfortunate automo- bile accident during last xmas vacation when she visited home down arkansas way, and and though she's not in school at this particular session you won't forget her 'cause she gets around to campus things just the same, and you'll remember how -virginia boone kept pansy haznburg . . . the oakparkgiant . . . so much in love during his senior year and he developed a wave in his hair andeverything. Even if you donlt, the big old grays covered with vines . . . and the circle . . . will remember peg holohan's cars as long as anyone else's, and pretty peggy seems to get a new one every year, regardless of how many jordan smashes up for her, the lucky! . . . and they will remember gert gray and kitty garliek and bobby belle, who at different times walked in and about them with her own particular heart-throb, for a long time . . . with gertie it Was keith parsons, with kitty it was ehuck farwell, and with bobby it was don birney, and who in all this wide, wide campus could ever forget freddie ufitnzer's magic on anybody's piano keys? and you are damb lucky you were in school at the same time as he even, methinks. Although perhaps you never knew him personally, you will think on that far-off win- ter night of roy henshafw, who was an all-american pitcher on our maroon nine, what with his doubleheaded winning performances of more than one sattidy morning and afternoon, and of frank springer, who acted for the dramatic association and himself, aspiring to the big things that pat niagee stood for over in the tower and elsewhere, and of tiny sarah jane laekrone, who played little efua in "uncle tom's cabinf' when the mandel stage was full of live bloodhounds and mouse tobin's pennies, and you will think of pete zinznzer, the modest sophomore of your day, who turned out to be a helluva swell halfbark. And maybe your train of thought will carry you back to the friday afternoon soeials in ida noyes, and to the mirror shows, and blaekfriars, and the settlement doings now and then in bartlett gym where you went and saw a lotta people you had seen never before, and into your classrooms in eobb and all the other plares and you will see the faces of so nzany nzore young 'uforthies who have not been mentioned here for no better reason than any writer's old sag about lark of space and such, and maybe you'll see even the faces of a few of your good old instructors, and you may get up from your warm chair and ask the helpnzate to give you a kirk in the pants because you didn't ever fol- low up some of the potentially wealthy friendships among the big and little professors . . . but probably not . . . and then you will yawn and mumble about being damb glad you went to chicawgo even though it wasn't what the newspapers dote on calling 'col- legiate' and you will swear by its liberalism . . . being a good thing, y'know, and all . . . and then you will go to bed after another yawn and the next morning at breakfast the helpmate will say l wish you'd keep your dusty old books in the trunk where they belong, instead of strewing them all over the sitting room floor, and you will kiss her and put on your lzat and roat and go out and try to sell whatever people u'on't seem to be buying-five, twenty, hfty years from today. flu ret-oir, then, at the fireside .... W C' at ,!. 1 Page 316 I Hs easy to restore serfvite as to operate a fwall .vfwztcfz NOW' FLIPONS make 6zzz'lafz'fzg.f FUSELESS Westinghoiise Flipons, the tinker- proof protection for home wiring cir- cuits, talce the place of all fuses. Flip- ons eliminate the annoyance of fuse replacement-a mere flip of the han- dle restores service. They are cali- brated to permit monetary overloads, but open the circuit Without fail be- fore the Wiring can be damaged. A benefit to all concerned. stinghouse M. SI-IINDERMAN CLEANER For Service Call "Shina'y" 1 1 I4 East 55th Midway 6958 WRIGI-IT'S LAUNDRY 1315 East 57th Street Special Attention for University Students Remington Rand, Inc. announce the NEW DESK MODEL A refined typewriter especially adaptable for professional and commercial requirements. IT'S NOISELESS EVERYTHING IN LAW BOOKS Especially Student,s Text and Case Books. Send for our Catalogue. lVIailed on Request. ILLINOIS BOOK EXCHANGE 337 W. Madison St., Chicago, Ill. Page 317 D U THE CHRISTMAS TRAVELLING BAZAARN By Franlz Harding VVith a happy turkey passed by we would now like to give the proverbial Christmas goose. VVe wish a merry Xmas to: Bud Radcliffe for being the new kingg Ginia Plait for always being where she should not beg Jerry Jonlry for many bad punsg Stan Hamberg for that appalling noiseg Jerry Mitchell for no good reason at allg Milt Olin for having sung his song nowhere that we were this yearg Miriam Massey for being more in adcord with the roundersg lfinnie Nefwman for not being the sophomore Hashg John Hollofway for talking dry and acting wetg Jean Jordan for looking so much like Kay Francisg Bill Cassels for giving three of his teeth for his Alma Materg Bob McCarthy for finding a way to get out of examsg Janet Johns for never doing anything we can write about, or at least keeping it quietg Jim Porter for never giving upg Chuek Schmid! for finding a way to get to New York at the student's expenseg Ed Goldxnzith for always suggesting Colemanlsg Marge Chapline for going to Lewis when she did not have tog Bob W'alIaee for empty Iugsg Rox Coyne for cutting even more classes than we dog Jack Text for being on the social committeeg George Vanderhoef with hopes of another moustacheg Jeanelle Lamb as the sweet girl graduateg Red Riddell for having such a good "sponse"g Roy Black fofr having never learned to croong John Clancy for making such a steady go of itg Lube Galbraith for the old glad handy Mush Nefwman' for being the iron mang Joe Green for the much better looking hairy Bob Langford for making us late to every' nine o'clockg Bob Balsley for not know- ing that it is not polite to be a big shotg Sam Stefwart for a better and longer Key Chaing Ingred Petersen for having lost the ring but not the fellowg Hap Suleer for the Groucho Marx featuresg Pat Magee for insisting that we are anthropologistsg Sirother Cary for the Will Rogers effectg Jane Kesner for being ffrleules' opposite, always liking a showg Ralph IVeb.vler and Red flndrefws for the excellent systemg Doctors Alllen and Petersen for being lucky enough to be our contempo- rariesg Bernie W'ien for being such a bear with the other sexg Carl Jefferson for being such a good dancerg Ed Baker for so well understanding Toby Eno: Troyer for having such an enjoy- able iirst nameg Len Visser for his milk drinking propensitiesg Betty Caron for a literal applica- tion for her nameg Burt Doherty for the amazing brand of literature he indulges ing Bayard Poole for being the best dressed man in school Uonlry please notelg Merfwin Rosenberg for Horatio Alger rise from Mg. Editor to Business Managerg Virginia Melllullin for making too many apologiesg Ifvan lValsh for always worrying whether or not the Chi Psi parties are going to be brawlsg Kitty Garliele for the faithful sucking around in front of Cobbg Johnny Rourke for so well protecting our friend Stewg Cal Leafvilt who convinces his mother that he studies and whose mother in turn convinces our mother that we should studyg Eleanor l'VilJon for liking the odor of our pipesg Joe Temple for having put away his Campus cordsg Peggy Holohan for wrinkling of her frecklesg Bob Hoagland for having successfully managed to get better than passing grades and stay ineligible four yearsg Margaret Egan for so successfully making T. V. and the others performg Gordon Clarke for his prize Dunhill story Cspelled without the "g"jg H. illorrixon, T. Ilfilder and H. Sfwcnson for the HAS" we are not going to getg Helen Dodd for being about to follow the way of her sisterg Brute Slefwarl for having a girl with a bustlcg Dorolhy Chajnline because we ought toy Bill Tuflle for telling the wrong girl the right thingy Gilbert lf"hite for being head of everythingg .Mary Maize for having missed her last weekg Nebe illahoney for being the hero of the Campus MoviegTfu:irp Hofward for having pledged 22 out of the Psi lf's 253 Jim Simon for an appalling articleg ilrlargy Moore and Don Kerr for the combinationg Lyn .S'hollenberger hoping he spikes the nextg Fred llfilmer for a theme song. fBy courtesy of The Daily Maroon from the issue of December 18, 1931. Page 318 U D Let Electricity ......, Serve E YO11 .,,,, eg g . I For Information.Te1ephone Randolph 1200, Local 535 COMMONWEALTH EDISON ELECTRIC SHOPS 72 West Adams Street and Branches Qfbwe ED PHONES-KEDZIE 3186-3187 GEORGE ERHARDT 86 SONS Incorporated CONTRACTORS FOR PAINTING, DECORATING, WOOD FINISHING AND LACQUERING SPRAY PAINTING OF ALL KINDS FURNITURE FINISHING 3123 VV. LAKE STREET LAFAYETTE 3700 Lasker Boiler AND Engineering Corp. BOILERMAKERS AND STEEL PLATE ENGINEERS 3201 SOUTH LINCOLN ST. CHICAGO Page 319 A FOURTH OF JULY TRAVELLING BAZAAR Br Fnaiwx HARDING And then Fourth of July greetings to a lot more, hoping they all have unpleasant summers: To Louis Ridenour for the compulsory gym poll hoping it isn't abolishedg Don Birney for refraining from getting married, for married feetballers are never any goody Archie Allen for the calmness with which he shaves himselfg Lonita Bloss for the peculiar habit she has of usually looking the other wayg George Cameron for so much resembling the Indian Princeg Grin 'Fovrov for a long string of lovely Phoneysg Bill Scott for another long string of Phoneysg Chet Laing for being responsible for another Tovrov output, and may he not be blamed too muchg Helen Baker with apologies for having forgotten her the last timeg Al Nlarin for a long line of lousy jokesg Pat Page, Jr. for getting eligible which is really somethingg Herb Joseph for having sense enough not to take the Maroon seriouslyg Betty Patterson for having never told us all those things she knewg John Mills for keeping Berniels hat out of the picture. And why not the girl? . . . Tom Reul for a lot of stiffs, dead if you pleaseg lVIarianne Stevenson and if she'd like a larger cigar we have ity John Robert for an excellent racketg Betty Schmidt with thanks for the roseg Dan lVlcGuigan for the double cross that made him what he isp Kay Trees for always having someone in towg llflillie Hackl for taking the bird so vvellg Frank Nahser for selling his car for so much but the labor wasn't worth itg lVlary Lou Cotton and Hester Hempstead for that amazing list they compiled, rather revealing to say the leastg Chiz Evans for the cleanup he made on Jamboree nightg Wallace Austin for Wilder coursesg Libby Reynolds and may she keep Bob in tow for some timeg Allan Thomas with intense manifestations of surprise on the matter of the bushesg Rube Frodin and may he not take the breakaway too seriouslyg Big Boy Peterson for that dive he and Red were supposed to have cleaned upg Bud Trude and may he last as long around here as we do-Eve or six yearsg Helen VVilkins for helping us hold down the Art Dept.-donit know what we'd do without itg Chuck Newton for a little too much Freud and an idiom which we can't seem to get rid ofg Dexter Fairbank for what he was trying to bite at the Washington Promg Fred Channer for being the smallest guy with the greatest amount of noise we knowg Hal VVilkens for never wearing a tie-and by the Way he has a nice adam's appleg Lorraine Watsoii for being the B.W.0. representative at large, and just what is that? . . . Betty Ziegler for the way in which she seems to manage the D.U and Phi Gam boysg Paul Stagg because his father makes such good facesg Jackie Smith for also hav- ing a finger in every pieg Ralph Lewis for ushering at every University affair we have ever attendedg Caroline Brooks for the nightingale voice and 'lYou Beautiful Son of a Gunng Chuck lllerrifield for trying to cut in on a tabooed gameg Gertrude Gray for always looking so wellg Bud Richardson for being, with perhaps one exception, the guy PW 320 Headquarters or University Affairs! Year after year Hotel SHORELAND has been accorded the privilege of serv- ing outstanding University Clubs and Societies-groups and individuals, Here are most attractive facilities for lunch- eons, dinners, dinner-dances, meetings -beautiful private rooms for from 5 to 500 persons. And a catering serv- ice that provides ideally for every oc- casion. HOTEL SHORELAND 55th Street at the Lake-Chicago Plaza 1000 M. D. GRADUATES Sharp Sc Smith wishes to take this op- portunity to offer you congratulations on gaining your coveted degree. Now for a period of internship and then- practice! If your internship will take you out of Chicago, we suggest that you visit the Sharp 8: Smith store be- fore you leave. You will Hnd this house eager to give you personal serv- ice and the utmost cooperation. Per- haps there are some instruments you desire to obtain now. If so, and your Finances are limited, our monthly pay- ment plan will enable immediate pur- chase. May we expect you-Doctor? SHARP 8: SMITH 65 E. Lake St. 427 S. Honore St. CHICAGO, ILLINOIS The Victor Line X-Ray Apparatus Medical- From the small outfits for Physicians' offices up to the specialized equipment as used in the hospital for complete diagnostic and deep therapy Work. Dental- "CDX"-the 100W electrically safe dental X-ray unit of modest dimensions. Coolidge X-Ray Tubes Supplies Physical Therapy Apparatus and Electro-Medical Specialties High Frequency Ultraviolet Quartz Apparatus Lamps- Medical Diathermy Air-cooled - VVater Surgical Diathermy Cooled Wave Generators Radiant Heat Lamps Sinusoidal-Galvanic Incandescent-lnfra Muscle Training red Hydrotherapy Apparatus Equipment Vibratory Massage Bakers Apparatus Infant lncubators Electrocardiograph Electric Centrifuges DURAND-MCNEIL-HORNER COMPANY Importers Manufacturers and Wholesale Grocers l GENEEAE Q EEECEEEC 25,315 E, Gmd AVC, XJRAY CORPORATION 2012 jackson Boulevard Chicago, Ill.,U. S.A. C h 1 C ago, I I FORMERLY VICTOR X-RAY CORPORATION Page 321 C1 D to be seen in front of Cobb the mostg Ilo Carr for what seems to be the first prize smile in the schoolg Dick Hooker for we have some lovely old beer bottles we would like to sell himg Wally Crume and would she make up her mind which of those two fellows it is she goes withg Jack Dille for being perhaps the laziest guy next to our- selves that we knowg lVIaXine Creviston, and was it a nymph someone said she looked Iike?g Bill Custer thinking it a darn shame that he couldn't arrange for another Bohemian party--just another good tradition gone to hellg Eleanor hlaize and we've forgotten what that was she asked us at the Quad partyg Betty Hansen and may she get what she seems to be looking for all the timeg Ray Whitiiey for being surprised at rushing tacticsg Barbara Cook and may they next year see her out or we'll put her in a class with Louis Engelg Bob Dodson for being another one of those fellows that have the instructor under their thumbg Norm Jorgensen for having most successfully dropped out of sightg Kate Mason for the first prize southern accentg Harriet Henne- berry for getting a friend of ours to church, an achievement which we still can't get overg Bob McIntosh for getting more loveletters than anyone we have ever known. A Jooh U4 Month for your Permanent Library As you leave school and begin earning for yourself, why not put books in your regular budget? Own such timeless works as Anna Korerzina, .lean Christophe, Story of Philosophy. Outline of History, The Golden Bough? Sophofles' Plays, Divine Comedy, and many others of varied appeal. Let us send you suggested lists, or catalogues of new reprinted titles as they appear. CONTINUE TO Sl-IOP at the UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO BGOKSTORE 5802 ELLIS AVE. Pago 322 D D For handkerchiefs-for removing cos- metics-for a dozen uses every day KLEENEX ' TISSUES Page 323 CAMPUS CALENDAR AUTUMN QUARTER SEPTEMBER IOTH, 1931. Preparations 'for the entrance of the class of 1935, the first students to be subjected to the New College Plan, approach a climax. SEPTEMBER 24TH. Freshman week begins. SEPTEMBER 26TH. Maroons open football season by defeat- ing Cornell-Bow to Hillsdale. OCT. IST. Four hundred entering students partici- pate in twenty orientation groups under prominent upperclassmen. OCT. ZND. The studies of Professor Arthur H. Comp- ton, Nobel Prize Winner, reveal new facts about the nature of cosmic radiation. OCT. 6TH MCU book drive under way. Sixty new faculty appointments. Football team drills. OCT. 7TH. Student relief fund planned by Chapel Council. OCT. 8TH. 303 freshmen to accept bids to 28 frater- nities. Psi Upsilon heads list with- 25 pledges. Field house corner stone laid. OCT. 9TH. Max Epstein elected a member of the Board of Trustees. OCT. 10TH. Football team makes commendable show- ing against Michigan. Loses by only one touchdown, thirteen to seven. OCT. 13TH. Rebecca Havward and Kenneth Mulligan head relief drive. Eight University men seek Rhodes Scholarship appointments. OCT. 14TH. The Phoenix breaks record in initial issue sale. Inter-club council rules that rushees must buy their own meals. OCT. 16TH. Preparations for invasion of Yale con- tinue. Freshmen defeat Sophomores in greasy-pole class rush. OCT. 17TH. Chicago suffers defeat administered by Yale. OCT. ZOTH. All student relations with the University are centralized in the office of the Dean of Students. OCT. 21ST. Alice Stinnett, Cordelia Crout, Rosamontl Morse and Francis Mayer-Oakes are choosen as the student directors for the three fresh-- men plays which are scheduled for Novem- ber 17th. Lief Erickson appointed cadet major. OCT. ZZND. Alma Brook succeeds Mrs. Goodspeed as head of Ida Noyes Hall. OCT. 23RD. Freshmen discover that physical culture is not optional. OCT. 24-TH. Maroons defeated by Hoosiers. OCT. 27TH. Professor J. M. Powis Smith and Dr. Ed- gar Goodspeed complete modernized version of the Bible. OCT. ZSTH. Hutchins appoints eight undergraduates to honor commission. OCT. 29TH. Anonymous undergraduate publicly at- tacks Stagg in Maroon. OCT. 30TH. Captain Sam Horwitz defends Stagg. "I'm for the 'Old Man' and so are the rest of his players." OCT. 31ST. Chicago's early lead wiped out by Pur- due. NOV. SRD. Faculty pays respects to the late Dr. B. S. Terry. NOV. 4TH. Phoenix and La Critique merge. NOV. STH. "To Meet the Prince" opens the Dramatic Association season. NOV. 6TH. Stillman M. Frankland, Paul Stephenson, Joe Temple, and Bernard Wien are the can- didates for the presidency of the Senior class. NOV. 7TH. Skull and Crescent dance opens social sea- son. NOV. IOTH. Student relief fund campaign launched. NOV. IITH. One-fourth of all students receive Univer- sity financial aid. Stillman Frankland elect- ed president of the senior class by votes of organized independents. Page 324 5 D l xl OUND managerial policies and long successful experience have provided us with sufficient equipment adequate personnel, and ample resources to render dependable service as artists and makers of fine printing plates. That you will be secure from chance, is our first promise. JAHN 8: OLLIER ENGRAVING CO. B17 West Washington Blvd., - Chicago, Illinois ln the foreground f Ft. Dearborn referected in Grant Park on Chicago's lake front. lllustrauon by Jahn G- Ollier Art Studios. Pzzgc 325 l NOV. 12TH. Hall engaged to play for inter-fraternity ball. NOV. 13TH. William E. Scott named to head all pub- lications. NOV. 14TH. Chicago wins its first Big Ten victory by defeating Illinois. NOV. 17TH. Freshman plays are produced by the Dra- matic Association and are well received. NOV. 19TH. Cap and Gown resumes publication, The collective staff of the yearbook agrees to bear the Hnancial responsibility. NOV. ZOTH. Campus movie shown followed by Ted Weems and his band in person. NOV. 21ST. Freshmen celebrate depression in a ninety- eight cent dance. VVisconsin downs Maroons. NOV. 24-TH. Practice for charity football games begins. NOV. 25TH. The Inter-Fraternity ball. Jack Test, Charles Schmidt, Barbara Cook and Doro- thy Faris head the grand march. NOV. 26TH. Indiana wins charity tournament. DEC. IST. john Mills named production chief for Wilder plays. DEC. ZRD. Don Birney elected Captain of the foot- ball team for 1932. The three Thornton Wilder plays are produced before President Hutchins and distinguished audience includ- ing Edna St. Vincent Millay. DEC. 4-TH. Goal of S1000 will be reached by relief committee if all pledges are paid. Three way party in Medinah Athletic Club. DEC. STH. Editor of the Cap and Gown announces that 610 subscriptions have been obtained by the business board. Professional symposium held. VVilder, Mathews, Smith and Carlson speak for charity drive. DEC. 9TH. Dale Allen Letts, George Van der Hoef and Allen Ewing Kolb receive Rhodes scholarship nominations from Illinois, In- diana and Arkansas respectively. Enos Troyer elected to the Undergraduate Council to replace ex-president Robert Mc- Carthy who recently resigned. DEC. 11TH. Settlement board work started by intra- mural office. Military department is host to campus at the Polo Hop. DEC. HTH. Grace Graver elected president of the Freshman XVomen's Club. DEC. ISTH. Carl Sandburg reads his poetry and sings his songs in Mandel Hall. Ivory Soap Phoe- nix appears. DEC. 16TH. Six initiated into Phi Beta Kappa. Frank- land names ten senior class members to ex- ecutive council as advisory group. Hutchins tells freshmen that they are in a school of high standard of scholastic accomplishment. "Eight hours a day, live days a week. The forty hour week, in class and out of class. No work on Sunday, no work on Saturday, no work in the evenings." DEC. ZZND. Examinations rule the campus. DEC. 24-TH. The Quadrangles are deserted. WINTER QUARTER JANUARY STH, 1932. Initial session of the Daily Maroon fresh- man training class meets under Editor Louis M. Ridenour. Forest Ray Moulton, world famous scientist, predicts that The New Plan will be unsuccessful. JAN. 6TH. Warren Thompson named to manage an- nual Washington Prom. Julius Rosenwald, University donor, and member of the board of trustees, dies. JAN. 7TH. Freshman tryouts for the Cap and Gown held. Eugenie Leontovich, star of 'lGrand Hotel" visits the Tower Room. JAN. STH. Traynor, Bowers, Lea, Schlinkert, Moul- ton. Kellogg, Kirtpatrick, Oboler, Mast, Mc- Dougall, Porter and Robbins receive highest grades on freshman scholastic aptitude test. All men! Club women re-affirm boycott on Phoenix. "VVe cannot read it." JAN. 12TH. Hans Kindler, cellist, gives recital in Man- del Hall. john Barden elected as the fresh- man representative to the Undergraduate Council. 351,072 distributed for student aid by the Student Relief Fund. JAN. 13TH. Dean VVorks announces creation of a Board of Examinations headed by Professor Louis Thurstone. Mirror in rehearsal. Ban on smoking in Cobb Hall upheld again. JAN. HTH. Annual trustees dinner attended bv 500 members of the University faculty. JAN. ISTH. Dean Scott announces that scholastic re- Pngfr 326 : inS FET . FQ-E-f: V5.1 V5 I5 f'1Sl CI-IICAOO 9 F- l The fastest and most comfortable way to travel! GO by air! Luxurious 7-place Lockheed Vega ST LOUIS Cabin Planes. Cruising speed I5O miles an hour top ' g speed l8O miles an lwoun The modern way to travel. A 0 NEW LOW TARIFFS NOW IN EFFECT o IO fo REDUCTION FOR ROUND TRIP ACTUALLY LESS THAN RAILROAD AND PULLMAN FARES TO THESE POINTS V Chicago Kan. City Tulsa OkIa. City Omaha St. Louis! Q TULSA -Kansas City. 321.00 .,....,... 811.00 516.50 812.00 812.00 Dm:-EY Tulsa ....... 32 .00 su .00 .......... 5.50, 23.00 18.00 vim Bff5E'if'iif1Tfff22 Okla. City... 37.50 16.50 5.50 .,.... 28.50 23.50 OK CITYE 1 gzuthbound-Read Down TIME TABLE Northbound-Read Up E 2:05 P.M. 10:00 A.M. ......... Lv Chicago , .. ......... 5:30 P.M. "'8:00 A.M, 1, "'8:10 A.M. 1:00 P.M. ,...,... Ar. Kansas City ......... 2:45 P.M."'8:00 P.M. 1 9200 A.M. 1:15 P.M. ...... ,. Lv. Kansasciry ......... 2:30 P.M. 6.30 P.M. 1 10:45 A.M. 3:00 P.M. . ....... Ar. Tulsa ...... ...,..... 1 .00 P.M. 5100 P.M. pr,wQRTHOQDN-l-AS 10:50'A.M. 3:05 P.M. 5:30 P.M. Lv. Tulsa ..... 9:15 A.M.12:45 P.M. 4:45 'P.M. : I 11:35 A.M. 3:50 P.M. 0:15 P.M. Ar.0k1a.Cicy.. 8:30 A.M. 12:00 M. -4:00 P.M. 5 2 Y ' 'Via Railroad. : 1 5 Lv. st. Louis 12:15 P. M. FOR TULSA AND OQLAHOMA cu-Y. Ev. OKLAHOMA crn' 12:00. : I M., TULSA AT 1:00 P. M. F'0R 511. LOUIS .... st. LOUIS Fon KANSAS crrir LV. 3:30 P. M. : 1 KANSAS CITY FOR sr. Louis Lv. 5:30 P. M. : 1 5 F F TICKET OFFICES o CHICAGO, PHONE GROVEHILL I4oo QAUSTN 1 ST. LOUIS, PHONE BRIDGE B700 o KANSAS CIT! PHONE GRAND I33O 3 HOUSTONI TULSA, PHONE 6-3513 o OKLAHOMA CITE PHONE 3-8700 GSM ANTONIO Q WOl?LD'5 Page 327 IRLINE D D quirements for initiation into fraternities are non-existent under the New Plan. JAN. 19TH. Twenty-two take bids to seven clubs. JAN. ZOTH. Undergraduate council condemns Physical Education requirement. Dan McGuigan se- lected as head of Settlement Board drive. JAN. 21ST. Board of VVomen's organizations upholds compulsory gym. JAN. 22ND. Daily Maroon launches referendum of compulsory gym. Tickets for the Wasliing- ton Prom placed on sale at 35.50. JAN. 26TH. Foes of required gym pile up 3 to 1 ma- jority. Fraternities lose over one hundred pledges as only two-thirds of original pledges are initiated. Louis Untermever speaks as Moody Lecturer at Mandel Hall. JAN. 28TH. Sophomores challenge freshmen to basket- ball game for benefit of settlement. Plav- fest presents Work of Johnston, Levi and Sills. A Dramatic Association production. JAN. 29TH. Freshman class host to campus at formal dance in Ida Noyes hall. FEB. 2ND. Improved version of campus movie shown. FEB. SRD. George Morgenstern defends New Plant attacks Moulton. FEB. STH. Gilkey announces that pledges to the Uni- versity Relief Fund total S27,000. FEB. 7TH. Julius Rosenvvald honored in chapel ser- vice. FEB. 9TH. Profit from freshmen formal announced to be 51.05. Betty Trcssler named Intra- mural Club Chairman. FEB. IOTH. Lorado Taft speaks on sculpture in Moody Lecture at Mandel Hall. Cap and Gown threatens to discontinue publication if addi- tional pledges are not redeemed. FEB. 16TH. Alumni contribute skits and music for Mirror in addition to undergraduates. FEB. 17TH. Carl Bricken to conduct student orchestra for Nlirror. FEB. 18TH. Comprehensives scheduled for June Sth, 9th, 10th and 11th. Stillman M. Frankland forms "Horner for Governor" club. Phoe- nix backs Hutchins for president. Platform is Uyouth, progress, liberty and beerf' FEB. 19TH. VVashington Prom held. Hutchins ad- dresses Senior class on subject of the Alumni fund. FEB. ZSTH. Mirror announces publication of novel program with song hits of previous years in addition to those of this year. To be given free to the entire audience at each perform- ance. FEB. 26TH. Mirror's "All's Fair" produced under the sponsorship of the Dramatic Association. Dean Works names New Student Committee on Student Affairs to replace the Board of Student Publications, Organizations and Ex- hibitions. MARCH IST. Announcement of the self-abolishment of the Undergraduate Council is made. Coun- cil wills all power to newly-created Student Committee on Student Affairs. Blackfriars announce the selection of "VVhoa Henry' by Orin Tovrov as the 1932 book. MARCH ZND. Blacl-:friars announce that Edgar L. Schooley will direct production of "Whoa Henry." MARCH 3RD. Intra-Mural carnival held. Lawrence Schmidt elected chairman and Margaret Egan secretary of the Student Committee on Student Affairs. MARCH STH. Kerwin explains function of Student-Fac- ulty honor commission. Alumnae publish humorous map of campus, for sale at 31.00. MARCH 9TH. Twenty-one named to Phi Beta Kappa. Millett presides and Adler speaks at initia- tion of new members. Student Committee on Student Affairs reaches tentative decision on proposed plan of activity organization. MARCH IOTH. Deferred rushing rules unanimously passed by Inter-Fraternity Council. Frankland, president of Senior class, in letter to Hut- chins, states that "Owl and Serpent and Nu Pi Sigma, the senior honor societies, should not rule school." Settlement plays given. MARCH 11TH. Daily Maroon announces intention of con- ducting second student poll on compulsory gym. Trials held for B' Ten Track Meet. 16 freshmen receive full numerals for basket- ball. SPRING QUARTER MARCH 29TH. Examination board publishes set of sam- ple comprehensive questions on work of au- Page 323 CARROLL ICE CREAM Serfve It and You Please All 50 Wggt 60th Stfggt Phone Normal 1700 "CHIZ" EVANS-Campus Representative-Beta House Any photographs or cuts in this volume may be obtained by addressing the Editor, Box 280, Faculty Exchange. 9-5.1'ryo :?94Hl glllu. AO LJ SUPPORT Sql jg?-4 'Sgt u.,,jg,jf,,.nl O0 YOUR STUDENT W 1 CONGRATULATIONS PUBLICA1 TONS TO THE GRADUATE! DAILY MAROON And - appreciation for all the business you have given us in books, stationery, type- PHGENIX Writers, and sporting goods. STUDENT HAND BOOK WOODWORTH'S UNDERGRADUATE BOOK STORE Open Evenings DIRECTORY Phone Hyde Park 1690 1311 E. 57th St., near Kimbark CHICAGO A BANK OF PROVEN SAFETY S UNIVERSITY STATE BANK 1354 E. 55th sf. A CLEARING House BANK cor. Ridgewood Cf. Page 329 El U tumn quarter to aid freshmen in preparing for the final comprehensives which will pro- vide the basis for their grade in the course. MARCH SOTH. Appoint Hutchins to the Advisory Council on Radio in Education to fill vacancy left by the death of Rosenwald. MARCH 31ST. Many students charged with fraudulent registration for primary elections. H. Allen Stone appointed musical director of "Whoa Henry." Distinguished members of faculty join "Horner for Govenor" club. Cloister club opened in Ida Noyes Hall. APRIL 1ST. A keg of beer for every twenty votes of- fered to campus fraternities by various po- litical factions. One hundred and thirty University fellowships granted. APRIL STH. Balloting on second gym poll starts. Gar- en, Parker, Parsons and Smith selected to lead Military Ball. Seventy tryout for cast and chorus of Blackfriars. APRIL 6TH. Students vote 522-257 against compulsory gym in first day of poll. Maxine Creviston and Robert Balsley chosen as co-chairmen of annual scholarship exams. APRIL 7TH. Professors Kerwini, Linn and Smith in ad- dition to Dean Spencer and the Hon. Henry Horner share rostrum in Mandel Hall. "Why I Am for Henry Horner for Gover- nor of the State of Illinois." Cast twenty-three students in "Shore Acres," annual revival of the Dramatic As- sociation. Specht's orchestra chosen fo-r Military Ball. APRIL STH. All-University jamboree held. Final vote tabulation in gym poll shows 2-1 majority against compulsory physical education. Ma- roons defeat Lake Forest in season opener, 3-1. Henshaw goes full route. APRIL 13TH. Announcement of 115150 profit on the all- university jamboree. APRIL 14TH. Inter-fraternity council elects Ross Whit- ney as next year's president. Gardner Ab- bott received the position of vice-president, Francis Finnegan that of secretary and Dan McGuigan that of Treasurer. University group leads nation-wide group to aid Ken- tucky miners. APRIL 15TH. The Board of Examinations today decided that no students would be admitted to the comprehensive examinations without identifi- cation by photographs which will be taken previously to the examinations and filed at the office of the recorder. Seven parties planned for week-end. APRIL 16TH. Alpha Tau Omega gives novel "Bowery" party. Sophomore Kabaray Hop. APRIL 19TH. Freshman Class Council submits question- naire on New Plan for final Faculty ap- proval. Baseball team defeated Notre Dame, 3-0. APRIL ZOTH. Blackfriar issue of the PHOENIX appears. APRIL 21ST. Campus mourns death of Emmons Riddle, Senior and President of Delta Kappa Epsilon. APRIL ZZND. Military Ball held at South Shore. Robert Dodson appointed chairman of the new social committee. APRIL 26TH. Blackfriar Tabloid startles campus and alumni. Ohio State defeated 3-2 by Page men. APRIL 27TH. Maroon baseball team battles Notre Dame to eleven-inning tie, 6-6. APRIL 28TH. Dramatic Association produces Short' .flcrtxr by James A. Hearne on its fourtieth anni- versary. Lonny -Ir.'s tennis team defeats Loyola, 6-0. APRIL 29TH. Robert Millikan, President of California Tech. lectures on "The Changing World" in the University Chapel. The tennis team again wins by defeating Iowa, 5-1. MAY STH. Dean of Students reafhrms method of ap- pointing Student Committee after objection by Stillman Frankland. Wilfred Davis wins Senior Moustache Race and goes in Botany Pond. VVelcher Patt also takes enforced dip. See page 46. Tennis team beats North- western, 5-1. MAY 6TH. "VVhoa Henry" in Mandel Hall. MAY 9TH. Charles Newton appointed new Student Publisher. MAY 10Tl-I. Chicago, 113 Lake Forest, 10 in baseball. MAY 11Tl-I. Tennis team trounces Notre Dame, 6-0. MAY 19TlI. C. 8: A. Banquet at Burton Court. MAY ZOTH. The May King Festival. MAY 21ST. Alpha Delta Phi Plays. -IVNE 1S'1'. The 1932 CAP Axo Gowx appears. Payf 330 5 D DAGUERRE STUDIO 218 So. Wabash Ave. Ofjkzdl Pbofogmpber of Cap and Gown, 1932 Sp cial rates Zo all U of C. Stzldents P 331 G U D A Achoth ...,.........,,...,..4.,......,................. Alumni Association ............... Alumni Council ........,..,....... Alpha Delta Phi ...............,,.... Alpha Omega Alpha ..,,,,....., Alpha Sigma Phi ............,... Alpha Tau Omega ,....,..,..., Anderson Club ....,......,..,.. Arrian .......................,.... Astratro ...,....,....,................ Awards of Honor ........,..... .......,... B ''AAAA''M''i59l'i5Efi'6'5'fEoo Aychud ....,.....................,..............,... ........,................,,...........,. 2 58 SUBJECT INDEX Disciples Divinity ................. Divinity S Drexel H0 1 8 6 ' chool ..................,....,,.,. Dramatic Association ............ use .......................,..... E Education . ................ ..,....,..,,,., Eta Sigma 8 S Federation Field Hous Epsilon Alpha ...,......... ,.... Esoteric ..........,.,.....,.,....... ,..,, Phi .....,...................,.,,.............,........ F of University VVomen .......... Fencing Squad ...,............., C ............................,.........,...,......,.......,.. Football ....,......................,.....................,............................ Fourth of July Traveling Ba Baseball ...,........,.......,... ZHHF ........ Basketball ......i ,i...,...... ,.......... Football .......................... Scholarships ..,.......,...,.... Track for 1931 ..........., Football Team ...........,...........,.,..,........,..... Freshman Women's Club i..........., Gamma Alpha ................................. Gamma Eta Gamma .,......,, Band ....,.............,........,...................,... ....................... 7 9 Baseball ...,....,....,,,,,....i......i.....,........,......... . . .....,........ 134--139 Freshman Baseball Review ...,..,.....,,..,,.,,,........................,....... 136-137 Freshman Baseball Schedule for 1932 .............. ,..........,........ 1 38 Freshman Baseball Team .,......,.........,....................... ............... 1 39 Freshman Basketball Team ............................... .......... 1 27 Freslxman Basketball Review ....i........ ..,..,....,.............,..... 1 26 Beta Theta Pi ............,..........,. ,,.. ......... , . ..,................. 2 77 Biological Sciences .........,...............,.,...........,.. 12-13-14-15 Blackfriars ..,,...........................................,........................,,. 74-77 Board of Dramatical and Musical Or- ganizations .,.....................................................,................ 69 Board of Social Service and Religion ...... 80-39 Board Board Board C Cadet Staff .................................i.. of Trustees, .,...,.,...............................,..,.....,...... 10-11 of Vocational Guidance ..................,........,..... 35 of Women's Organizations ..,.......,,... 87-88 Campus Mlscellany ......,............,.. ........,..... 3 07-330 Candidates for Degrees ............ .............. 2 09-213 Cap and Gown ,.,...................,........ .............,. 6 O-62 Chapel Council ......................... ........,... 8 3 Chi Psi ..............,..............,....,..................,.............. ........,...... 2 78 Chi Rho Sigma .......,.,............,,....,.,....,..............., ...i.....,..... 2 59 Chicago Theological Seminary .....,.,...........,.......... 40 Class Organization .................................,.......................,.,... 52 Coach Page Returns to the Midway .....,.,.... 134- Colleges ...................,,...,,............,....,................,,...................... e .... 33 Commerce and Administration ,,.. .....,.4.........,........ 2 9 Commerce and Administration Council .,.... 53 Compulsory Gym .....,...,.,........,,.,.,..,..,...........,,...........,..,...... 113 College Marshals and Aides ...,.,.......,.......,.. 180-181 Cross Country Team ,...,...................... ..........,......... 1 32 Crossed Cannon ................................. ,.........i. 9 8-187 D Daily Maroon ,...............,.,..., ...... Dean of Students ..................... Delta Kappa Epsilon ....,...,,.... Delta Sigma ..,....,.......,....,.....,...... Delta Sigma Pi ..,.,....,.,...,,...,t Delta Tau Delta .........., Delta Upsilon ..... ,..,..,.., Delta Zeta Mu ,........... Deltho ,........ ....,..........,.. ...............63-65 ,, ,........... 279 .i..-.....,..260 03 Golf ...,.........................................,....,.......,.., Graduate Education ............................ Graduate Library School ............. ........... Gymnastics Team .A,.............,...,......, H Highlights of the Year ......... Humanities .....,.................,,........ Hockey ...,.., ,... ..... Honors .......... ...........,... I Ida Noyes .,.......,....,...................... Interclub Council ........,,........ Interfraternity Ball .4.......,....,..... Interfraternity Council ..,,..,,...,.. Interfraternity Sing ............. International House ...,...,............... Intramurals ,..........,.,.,..................,.....,.,. Intramural Junior Managers ......... Intramu ral Senior Managers Iron Mask .,.................................,............... . .J Junior Class Council ...... ,.,,. K Kappa Epsilon Pi ...................,. Kappa Mu Sigma ........,....,..... Kappa Nu ............,,,.....,,,,.............,..,......, Kappa Kindergarten-Primary Club L Sigma ......,.......................,........... Lambda Chi Alpha ,........,.............. Law School ..,..,..............,..,. , ...,,.., Law School Council .........,.,. ,..,.,....70-73 ......,....106 ...........1S8 ...........Z62 S9 .....,.....1-19 12 1 1+-121 .,........,320 52 S1 50 ....,......201 53 ...........1Z1 ...,.......190 .,.......,.302 ......,....148 . .,,.......... 31 1-I-0-141 74 ,,.,..16-19 ..,.,.,....164 180-196 2 54-255 .,.........272 .,....36-37 156-161 56 56 8 + 91 92 M282 ...........283 ......,....28+ , ......28 . .... ,. 1.5-1- Page 332 X W m mM K ZZZ ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ Z Z , ,ff yff "I ff WZ, -f ff! if fff W W ff f Z ZZZZf4fffwj'W if ZZ! fZf '5fZW'fZZff ff M mfr, f Z!! ff Qff? Z ZXUZZ, 7 X f fa wmv ffwffmfwfffmW m f my 1 X by f Z f f If Z! ,f f ZZZZZZZ ZZ ZZ f X ZWIZZ fWZZ f WZZ ZZZVZ fffff' Z! ZZZZWN Z Qfff Wx ZZZWVCX ' ff! 2 X W W XZ!! I QZZZZZWZZ ZZ?!ZQf7 W I Z!! y 7 1 L 1 Z' m 1 f 1 f f f f f Wwwxf WWW wwf ff fffff M f y Z ff!! TI-IIS ANNUAL was printed by tlwe Daily News Publishing Co., and reflects tlie typographical attractiveness ancl liiglw quality of Worl4 turnecl out lwere . . . -lliis organization special- izes in magazine printing,catologue printing and liiglw grade color f M X' -1 , , ' Z7 Z 'f 4 Z Z if N . N ' stxxx vrxwssgsf M S N . W .SX X Xxx N X. c X 5 "TAN ww X N NSS, ..---- ' Q ,qxarxw x. x A X is W N X X - X' X U a a T O 2 U' O' "" o Z W 3 33 Q Q O 2. :S -D 01 ' N XXXQ o'. w N - w Z ff' o . " - rn m Q, 9 3 A fx I- -D Q. ' Q 1-'T' NES XS s 6 N N4 0 -HU xg Wit N O 3 S E E- 3 C Q gf Q. n w T -F' O C 2 : 2 is 5 3 Q. 2 an 2 -N 3 -D Z 5 TQ Q 3 2-in 5 gif 'o g 2 Z AQNW N4 3. C - O D 21: 91 5 X XXXQ C 1-f -' SXXQ n -. '1 O 5 3 5' 3 2- ' rr N 7 i X ss s X QQ-A X ,sg Z Zfff ZZ 6 ff If X W W W XWWHM M77 ZZ! ZWZZQKX ZZ! ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ fff ff! ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ xy! ZZZ ZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ f ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ X X ZZZ ZZZ I 'bf ' Air' .:f,fZ'- f ff ff Z? f X A 1 55252 if W ZZ,,y4, ,, "'ff W ff Z , ffff Z MHZXZQ fff ff Page 333 D D M Maison Francaise ,.,.,.............,,.. Men's Commission .,........,... Military Science .....,........ Minor Publications ........... hiortar Board ..,....................,,. Medicine ...,....................................... N Nu Pi Sigma ....,.,...,..,.,,........,....,,.. O Officers of Administration .,........... Orchestra ...,,.............,............................... Order of the Coif ....,.,..................,. Owl and Serpent ................. P Phi Alpha Delta .,........,..,...... Phi Beta Delta ............. Phi Beta Delta ..........r.. Phi Beta Kappa .......... Phi Delta Phi ........................ Phi Delta Theta .,.......... Phi Delta Upsilon ............ Phi Gamma Delta ............,. Phi Kappa Psi ..,,.,.........,r. Phi Kappa Sigma ..........., Phi Pi Phi ..,,...............,..... Phi Sigma Delta ..,............ Pi Delta Phi ...............,.,.,.. Pi Lambda Phi .........,... Phoenix .........,.............,........... Physical Sciences ................... Professional Schools .........,... Psi Upsilon ................,.,.r........,,. Q Quadranglar ........, ..........., ..,,,.. R SUBJ ECT INDEX CCont.7 nmmmm106 ..r.........,,96-99 nmmw12 183 308 ...7S 193 182 304 285 264 194 305 286 265 287 288 289 290 291 266 292 ,.,,.........66-67 .............20-23 Residence Halls ..................,........,,..,........,....... .,..,,........ 310 293 267 102 Review of University Year ...,......,. .............. 8 -9 S Scores of 1932 Basketball ........,,, Seniors .....................4..,.....................i...... Shadow's Letter .......,..................... Sigma ...,...,,............,,,,..........,........... Sigma Alpha Epsilon .,,,,.,.,. ....fffffff2i'iI 123 251 314- 268 294 Sigma Chi ..,........ Sigma Nu .......................... Sigma Xi. ..,....,,.....,,........,,,.,.. .. Skull and Crescent ............. Social Affairs ...................,,. Social Committee ..................,..............,.. Social Sciences .............................,,.,......., Social Service Administration .... Spring Banquet ..,,........................................... Stagg's Fortieth Season ........,......,.... Student Committee on Student 195-196 ..,.......56-59 ..............2-4--27 l Affairs .............,,...................................................... T Swimming Team ...........,........,,....,........... Tarpon .....,............,................,... Tau Delta Phi ........... Tennis Track ...............,.........................,.....,. Track Season for 1931 .......... Track Team ,.,. ............,.................. Tau Kappa Epsilon ......,,.............. U Undergraduate Student Council ............ University Settlement ..........,..i........,,,...........,...... University Fellowships .............,...... Upper Class Counsellors .............. W .......,.,178 14 .....,4-8-49 14+-14-6 ,....,.,..l73 .,.......,.297 ....,..,...147 128-133 .......,...131 ..,.......133 ........,,298 ......S0-51 202-203 ........,..1-16 Water Polo ............................. ,.........,,,.,.......................... Women' Women' 's Women Women's Women' 's Women Women's Women's Women' Women's Athletic Association .... Athletic Awards for 170-171 1931 ........,... 175 Baseball ...................................,........,...............r..... 166 Basketball ............,...r...,......A.............,..........,....... 165 "C" Club ........i...., .. Hockey ...,,............,............... Minor Sports ,........,,..,,... Residence Halls ...,....,.. Swimming ....,.........,...,....... 72 ..........164 ......,..,168 .,....,...103 67 Tournaments ...,..r..................,...............,.......,. 174 Women's University Council ......,,......,..................,.. 86 Wrestling Squad ...,...,.,......,.,.,.,,....,,..,...,,,.,.,,..,.,.,,.,,., 142-143 Wyvern ,.......,.......,....,.........,...........,..,....,....... .,...,.......,....,. 2 69 Y X. W. C. A .......... .,...........,....... ....r..... 9 1 -92 Z Zeta Beta Tau .,...,....,.,,...,....,,.. ........, 2 99 Page 334 Aarons, 5 D Aagard, Carl ..,................,........,. 74 294 Aaron, Abraham jacob .....,.,....... 199 Aaron, Clarice Shirley .................. 200 Isadore A.,, ....,.................. 198 Abbott, Abbott Donald P ...............,............ 279 Edith ............. ,..... ...........,......... , , 30 Abbott: Gardner ...............A.. 184, 280 Abells, Ruth ...........,....................,............ 87, 88,180,183,1941,214 Abrahams, Hamilton ...............,,.... 278 2.14 Abrams, jack ..........,.,...............,,......... Abrams, Phil ...,.,....................... ...,......... 2 82 Abratowski, Casimira Stelle..,206 Abt, Gertrude Adler ..............,...... 206 Acheson, Arthur ..................,.............. 275 Ackerman, Herbert Victar .,,... 208 Adair, Agnes ...... 91, 1167, 172,173 Adama, Fred G .......,.,.......,................ 293 Ade, Lorraine .,................................,....... 268 Adland, Charlotte Roslyn ......... 200 Adler, Charles Francis 206, 303 Adlerq. Paul M .....,............................... 214 Adlerblum, jacob .............................. 200 Aerol, Arnold ..,......................,. 197,206 Aird, Charles C ................,,............. 196 Aitchison, Jessie ..........,,.......,...........,,... 211 Alcott, Helen ...,..,......................,...,........ 214 Aldrich, Helen ............ 192 , 196, Aldrige, Frank ............ 156, 159, 202 293 INDEX OF NAMES Angro, John ..................,.......................... 305 Anis, Estelle .....,..................,..... 2,214 Annes, Raymond ...,,,........................... 201 Apeland, Caroline ,.............. ............... 9 1, 92, 214, 256 Apfelbach, Carl F ......,........,........,... 295 Appel, Jack .........,..........,.........................., 191 Applebaum, Milton Samuel 206, 303 Applebaum, Rose ..,..................,........ 210 Appleby, Rose A .........................,..... 212 Aries, Leonard ..,......... 247, 291, 306 Arkin, Dorothy Norma ..,,........... 206 Armin, Bernice .........................,.......... 201 Armin, Helen ................. Arnold, Aerol ........,............. ............ 1 97 Arnold, Dorothy ...............................,, 260 Arons, Norman Hill ....,................... 206 Aronson, Bernice Esther .........,.. 208 Arton, Lambert ,....,.. ..........................., 2 03 Ashburn, George ............ . Ashby, Asher Asher, Asher, Asher, Sheron ...........,..... "'Ei1Q'Q,IQ'1'L5'QffffQffQf ...., Reva ....,.....................,,..... Robert Eller ............ Ashland, Emelyne I .,,.... Alger, Emma Lucile .,..1.,........... 194, 197 198 209 Alic, Allen, Allen Allen Allen Allen Tony .............,...................,.. Archibald .......,.......... , Arthur ...,.,..............,,..... Gordon R ....... 215, Ph1l1p .......,......,............... , T. George ..........,....... Allison ane ..........................,,., y J' Allison, S. K .....................,.,.... Alschuler, Frances 164, Alspaugh, R ......,..................1,. Alspaugh, Ralph B .......,..... Altman, Edith .......,.,.....,.... .. Altman, Oscar L .......,.............. Altschul, Aaron M ............. 194, 214 1 5 0. 274 ..,........,298 272, 287 ...287, 19 ............298 189, 257 ......21, 284 165, ...29, 172 301 1 6 6 .......,....203 9 8 Alvarez, Luis .................,...............,..... 194, 198, 213, 214, 287 ............210 .....,......302 ............214 .........,..275 ..........,,201 .....,......247 211,214 Ashley, Harry ...........,...,......,............. 122, 123, 127,182, 288 Ashley, Paul ..,............,,....,,,......... ' ...... 215 Askew, Warren ..................... ..,... 2 93 Atherton, Elwood A ....,.. 191.195 Attwell, Joseph J ................,,............. 215 Atwood, Wallace R ...........,..,...,...... 195 Aubrey, E. E ............................ Aubuchon, Georgia ............ ............259 Aufdenspring, Robert ....,, 185,286 159 Austin, Wallis ....., , ..... 156, Alvarez, Robert .,...................... 65,287 Ames, Edward ..........,..............,........,....,.. 19 Anderson, Charles D ..............,.... 198 Anderson, Clarice C ......,.,,....,......, 198 Anderson, Doris .....,.,,............ 214,269 Anderson, jack ........,..1......................,, 206 Anderson, James John ......,,.......,.. 210 Anderson, John C .......................,... Anderson, Anderson, Anderson, Andrade, Andrews, Andrews, Angle, Robert ........................... 201, Otis Leonard ,... ....,.. Sarah N ..................... Manuel .......,,.........,.......... Florence ...,.,....,...,,........... ss, 91, 92, Thomas ,... .....,... ............. .202 .206 Robert B ....,...,...,,..,........ 212 .211 ....25 87, 214 .283 295 , 274 Austin, William .,,,........,..................,. 288 Avery, Sewell L ......,....... ............... 1 0 Avrami, Melvin .,.............. .......,,... 2 00 Axelson, Charles F ............. .......... 1 0 Axelson, Gertrude ...,......,.............,., 206 Ayres, George W ..........,.......,,........ 195 Ayres, Leroy .................. 150, 201,278 Bachmann, Sylvester .......,,........,... 277 Bacon, Bessie G ............,.................. 206 Bacon, Charles M ..,..,......,.........,..... 277 Badgley, Marion .1....,..... 91,170,171 Baeder, Marjory ........,,,.,.................... 268 Baer, Victor ................,, .........,,......,.... 2 98 Bagby, Bailey, Bailey, Bailey, Bailey, Bailey, Bailey, Bain, Baird, Baker, Baker, Ruth .....,.........1....... ................. 2 66 Evelyn C .............,..... John ....................,,,....... ............194 290, 305 Joseph ..........1....,,.......,....,..,,..... 287 Leone ..........,.,...........,.... ss, 170, Lon. E ......,..........,....,.. Percival ...,.......... ........... Charles ........,... Roger ............... Annette ..........., Dan D .......... 171, 215 198 13,15 89 ............287 ........,...265 ......,.....186 Baker Baker, Baker Baker Edward C ..,........... .,.........,293 Harry ....,....,,......,.. ,, ......,,.....,. 287 Helen .............. Hlller L ..,.,...... .....,.....255, 267 Baker, Baker, Baker, Baker, John L ......,.......,.......,.. 150, Howard .....,.,....,....,.,,,.............. Portia .1...............,. .................. Walter ..................... ....,....... 201 293 203 282 Bakkers, A. Vernon ........................ 215 Ball, Clayton G ...............,.................. 195 Ball, Ruth ............,......,.,....,,.......,...........,... 173 Ballantyne, Gladys M ..............,, 203 Ballis, William B ...........,.........,...... 203 Ballweber, Edith ,................................ 163 Balsley, Robert .........,.. 75, 200, '279 Bame, Maurice ........................,......,.... 292 Banda, Hastings H ,..........., 211,215 Bane, Charles .................................,..,.,... 289 Barokan, Yaifa S ....,.......,,..... 212, 215 Barat, Stuarta ............ 215,255,259 Barden, John ............ 51,52, 201,279 Barker, Marian L ..........,......,,...... 215 Barnard, Arthur F ....,...........,........ 277 Barnard, G .....,.......,.........,...................,.. 247 Barnard, Harrison B ...................... 10 Barnard, Ruth ..........,,... 167,173,200 Barnes, Alyce G ........,.......... 212,215 Barnes, Broda O ....... 190,195,202 Barnett, Herbert ....,.....,...................... 282 Barnett, Irving .,,.,..................,............ 215 Barnett, Jacob B .,,.....,...................... 206 Barnett, Mark T ..,,,.....,........ 211,291 Barr, Peggy ...............,, .......,... 2 15,264 Barran, Louise ....,,.,,,. ............,,.... 2 09 Barret, E. T .....,......... ............ 3 05 Barrett, Robert .............,..,. ...,.....,.. 3 04 Barrett, S. B .............,............,................ 293 Barrows, Harlan H ...................1..... 23 Bartelmez, G. W ............,.................. 283 Barth, Joseph ........................... .... ........... 3 0 3 Bartholomew, Eleanor .,................ 192 Bartlett, George R .......,.. 1 Barton, john .........,,......,...............1..,........ 51 Barton, Thomas ......,,.,...,.............,..... 283 Basile, William B ............. 206, 304 Baskerville, Charles R ....,........... 286 Basklnd, Rose B .........................,..... 206 Bass, Abraham A ....,........................,. 202 Bassie, Vitalis L .........,.,..........,1.......... 194 Bastin, Edson S ..........,,..........,.. 22,296 Batho, Harold ..,...............,....,............... 190 Bauih, Sue E. G ............................... 206 Baumgartner, Wilbur ....., 215,283 Bean, Edward ..,,.........,....,...,....,..,........ 295 Beardsley, John ............,..... ............, 2 87 Beardsley, Niel F .....,,...... ............. 1 95 Bearns, Euginie G ......................... 206 Beauchamp, Wilbur L .,....,............ 296 Beauvais, Albert .....,.....,..,,......,..,,...... 290 Beck, Charlton .................. ,...,........... 4 3 Beck, Robert ..,.............,.. .......,.......,.. 2 81 Beck, Thomas M ...........,.... 195,202 Becker, Donald I .......,..... Page 335 El D Becker, Marjorie ....,............. 200,264 Black, Roy R .,...,,..,.........,.,......,. ......... 1 28, Buswell, Guy T ............ .......... 2 6 Becker, Norman ..,,.,,,,.4,,A,,,,.,, 201 297 129, 131, 182,216 272 279 Butts, joseph S .....,.....,. ,....... 2 02 Becker, Rogemarfr ,,,A,,,,,,A,,,,,Y,,,.,,,,,,,,, 254 Blackman, Joseph .,...,...,........,........... 304 Buzzell, Charles ......................,.......... 217 Bedrava, Edward .....,.,,. ......,,......, 2 84 Blair, Betty A ........,...........,.....,,............ 196 Buzzell Eugene ................................. 117, Beederman, Jacob .,........,.........,.,......, 199 Blair, VV- lV1CCOrrrliClC ................l.... 10 121,137, 139, 283 Beekg, Edward B ,,,,,4,,,,,,,,.. 153 293 Blaire, Betty Anne ..,............,.........,, 208 Byers, Elvin G. .,........,.......,,,...,.,......,.. 211 Beeson, Charles r,,,,,,,rr,,rr,rrr,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,r 238 Blake, Mabel I .....,...........,.,.......,.,....... 211 Cade. Clarence Louis .............,..., 199 Behm, Nellie E .....,.....,,.... .,,..........,. 2 10 Blauch, Mrs. Mary ....,,...,,. 192 196 Cadra, Paul Miro .,..,.,,..,....... 194,206 Behrgtock, Arnold ,,,.,.,.,, ...,.,,,,,.,,,, 2 97 Blier, Zachery A ...,.......,..,.,.............. 186 Cahill, Arthur l............,. 137,139,206 Beisel, Eugene ,,............, .....,........ 2 79 Blinder, Abe ...........,............ , ..... 197 209 Cahill, Marjorie ,...,..............,......,. ..,.. 2 06 Beitely Jesse ,,,,,,,,-,,,,,,,-,-- '-"--"-,w.,Y' 2 75 Bliss, Gilbert A ..............,.......... 23 279 Cahoon, Adele ..........,..........,,..., 217,261 Belgher' Donald ,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,',,,,, 2 gg Bloch, Herman ,,,,,,,,...,,,,,,,,,,,., 194 198 Caird, Florence B ...............,,........,.. 197 Bell, Barbara ,,,,,,,.,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,-, 2 62 Bungie, B,eIrnard ..,..,........,..........,.l........ 217 E,3giVVCE, Kiflijh ..............,...,..... .,... 232 Bel1,DQnaId H ,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 03 ro ie, arry .....................,..,...,...,....,, 212 a We , 0 ert ....,........,.... - 1,2 Bell, Laird ....,...,.,..r..,... rrr,...,.,r...r... 1 0 Bwd1ky,Benj1m1n M ...,... 194,206 Calkins, T. H ..l.l................,i.. 152.217 Bell, Lomta ,.',-.,..--.YY.,......,..,.-.,.....,,.,.., 264 Brmda, Elsa G .........,,...,.......... 198 217 Callaghan, Frank Paul Ir ...1... 206 Bellstmm, Warren '-',,,.....---,--,I.I..4-A, 121 Brokate, G. Lawrence ,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,, 201 Calvert, Esther Georgia Hen- 144,145,146,184, 286 BI'0l'I'1I'1'1LlI1C1, Vvfllter ............,........... 300 derson --,-----w,---,---------.-------i-..------,---..---. 213 Belsly, Olive V ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 209 B1-Onner, Morrls r,,rr,r,r,,,,,.,rrr,r,r,,,r,,,,e, 297 Cameron, George .,,,.......,...,.. 132,295 Ben-Amy, Ruth ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 201 Brooks, Caroline .......,......,......... 81 262 CHYUP- Ruth, --4------'-----------'------------- 172.175 Benedict, Harris M,195, 196. 202 Eroo,ks, ,Crane .........,... ...,........,.... 2 EEHIUPL-ICH, ,Janet .... ....,......... B n A, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, roo's, osep ......,.,,.. ......,.......,..,,.,. a mp e , llp ...........,. ' , 1 Bggnziff Wfhrsi r,rr ,B.,,reerr,rrrrrrerr,sr,rrrr 1 35 1. W .tetrttrrtttlettet,t,..,,,,, ,tl.tt.,l,l,,t, Bensky, Robert R ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 14 Brooks, Walter .................,,..... 198 200 Campbell, Robert S ,..,.....,,.........., 195 Benson, Bruce, ,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,, Brookens, Norr1i9E...,5.,,, ,... gannam, PChi1rl1is E ....,........,,,.. , ,, , annon, au .r..........,....,......,..... . 322222, Igpgztgy L .........,........ .......... 2 Brosi, D0rOthy..,f .......,..,............ 217,259 ganty, ,?hiZman...,, .... .,......... 2,171,301 ' """t"""""'"'A""""""""' Brown, E. B. Jr .............,,.....,,,..,,...,..,... 75 apouc , ennet osep ..,,.. 150, dBe,Qi?Qn5'1En """ """""' 3 32 Brown, Edith ,,............. ..,.....,........ 2 13 275 Berg Vgfilqgan-, ,,,,,,,,,,,, 121 "" 276 Brown, Ernest .................,.,,,,. ...,. 2 01,280 gapener,J,Rarnona Hansen ....., r 1 Brown E, V, L ,,,,,AA,AAA,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 274 apps, osepi ............,....,...............,,,.., 1I37iErg1:?f1Jfin,'1?!1r11J ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 3 Brown, Florence R ...........,,....... .... 1 94- Card' Flffrence Barber """""AA-A' 209 Berghoff John 278 Brown, Harriette L ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 206 Carle, Richard, ..........,,.,,.................... 288 ' """""""" """""""' B rown, Harry ........,..,...,...... ....,.,..... 2 78 Carlisle Garnetta Tibbs ,..1..,.. 211 lgiigruigg """"""""""' Brown, Helen ............,,..,,.. ..........,. 2 01 Carlson: Anton J .,..................,.,,....... 15 Berkson 'Marvin """"""""""' 291 Brown, Huherta ........... ............ 2 68 Carlson, Myron Lawrence ...... 206 Bernard Marie """"""""""""" 206 Brown, Jack., ..............,...... .. ......... 304 Carlson Vivian ............,,,.. , ....., 1 66,172 Bemdtsgr, Car, '""""""""'A"'A" 201 l1f3,row,,Th,I-ikblale P ,.r,...,,,,,,,,,.,,.,,.,,,,,,,, garnahgn, L,sJu1T,,Ela1ne ,,.,......., 2,12 , 1 , '""""""""""""""" rus , er ert .................,.................. arr, orot a ....,..............,,, ..2 Bemmgr M,afl0f1e 2121216 261 Brusky, Margaret L. 91,92,200 Carr, Frank ..... ..,1.,,...... 156,185,288 ggfgiieigfgfglggg --------r---r----------------------- T21 Buele, Carl D ...,.,,.....AA.A,,.......,.,........,... 279 gm, Iganklin ,....... ,...,,,.,...,....,,,.. 6 2,277 . ' 5 """""""''7""""""""" Buele Dudl ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, arr, arvey -l.. ....15, 296 Befflsfflfh Mafllee -----------------"'------- 200 Buelrg, Marignhi ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 225 Carr, Lawrence ,....,..,............ 218, 281 56111515123 '77"AA"7 1 """'--'--'-"'-'-"-'-'------7-"-"' 247 Budd, Mary ,.r,,,,,, 164,16S,212,217 Cafsel, Wilfred -.l----.-.,.--,-.-,-- 194.206 fffyr. Omeha ---- 1 -"-"r-r'-r'--"'--"---'-'--' 216 Budd,Run, s .........,.,..........,..1.......,....,,... 206 Cary, Sfforhef .......-.l-.l. ,.....l.,.. 7 4,274 gefqfllst Cafbfflne -A---A--AAAA'---A----"- 216 Buehr1g,EdWard H ,,,,-,,,-,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,- 217 Case, james E ......,....................,....,.,.. 195 BHZIQS 56.11571 1111? 99--9e--------- 55---232' Bullock, Helen L ...........,.........,....,.... 209 Case, s. J .....,......,....,,..,,.,,,.....,..........,,..,,.. .as Biiaeyk bl lam """"""' 2 12 Bullock, Robert C ......,......... 195,202 Casmier, james Frank .................. 206 1 ' 0 ertj """"""""" "A""""""""' 1 32 Burdick, Maurice S .,.................... 208 Cason, Betty .............,...........,..........,..,...,. 267 Bfcksonf Irwm "'A' 3 -"4----'---"--A-------'---'-'- 297 Burgess, Ernest W ...,.,............,, -.-..26 Casseles, E. H ,.....,.,........,,......,........... 305 g:Z1g1l?,i,rsfi,,SL05iE-2 ---"----"' 216, gurlge, anna? L ......,........ ......,..... 2 06 Cassels, William Bevaridge , - '--"-"--4'-44"--"-A' ur e, ar es ..........., ......, - ...208 117, 121, 274 1319599111311 line '41-1--'r-414 -'-44-1--1i11 5 5 Burke, Edith .......,.. .........,,,... 9 1 Canner, Suzette ............ 194,211,218 Bjgelow, Vvllllam -4-4---i--r-A-- ---------- 3 90 Burke, Edna .................... ,.....,..... 2 61 Cavanaugh, jane E ....,,....... 91,260 Bfgel0W1 Hf1ffY A ----rr-'-A44- ----4'144--- 2 8 Burley, Edwin ,..................,.. ..........., 2 81 Cayou, Frank M ..........,...,,... 150,298 B11d,e1'1 Bull ---------44--f---r--'r'f-- "'--"- 4-4--f 2 0 0 Burns, Grace Marie ............,...,.., -1200 Cekan, Mae H .,...,,,,.,,.,,.....,..............., 211 B1ll1ngs, Frank ,.,........,..... ..... - ....,.. 2 96 Burns, Margaret ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 163,166 Chamale, ,Peter John ,,,,,, 206,30-l Bn1,nnS, Hefner .,............ ...,...1-.-1-1 2 16 Bunn, M. T ...........,...,,.,,. .,..,...,......., 1 53 Cham11en11m, Charles 1 .......... 275 1331151 Arthur ----------------- ---"'-11-'- 1 5 Burns, VVilliam G ...,..,.,.. ..,......... 1 93 Chamberlain, Edgar .,.,,,., ,..,,..,..,,., 2 95 Bjfkeland, Jvfgen -------,,,.,-,,,,---..-.-----, 202 Burnside, Boyd B .,,... ,....,.. ,.........., 2 o 6 cnnmlrerlnln, Rollin '1' ..,.,......,.... 13, BIFUCY1 Donald ------e----e--re----e-------e-----ee 1151 Burrows, XVilliam ,,......., ..,......... 1 95 22,287 l 121, 131,132- 13411371233 Burt, Charles ...,.,......,..,.... ............ 2 80 Chandler, Emily McCoy ..,....,.... 195 B15l10P, Priscilla --------. - ,------ - ,.-i -.- e---1-- 211 Burtis, Edgar ....,............... ..,..,.,.... 2 87 Chandler, Knoxw.. ,. . 287 B15Sfll, ,l0l'lI1 H --ef .--,-e-----------e--------..--.1 2 12 Burwell, Lillian L ,....,..... ,...,,,,..,. 1 96 Channer, Frederick ...,.,........ .....,.,.,.. 5 l, Bjorklund, Einar .---1-.. -........ S 01 Bussian, Robert A ..,,.,.,...,...,,,..,..,. 217 157,218,274 Pugff' 336 5 D Channer, Robert ..,,..,..,.... ..,.,..,,..... 3 05 Cole Fay-Cooper ............,........ 25,281 Crawley, Hattie J ........,.. ....,,...... 1 21 Chapin, Charles .,........................,......,,, 288 Cole, Philip ..,.........,......,,.....................,,. 299 Crawshaw, A. E ....,.,....... ..........., 2 11 Chaplaine, Marjorie ....,..,............. 263 Coleman, Algernon ...........,..,......... 288 Creviston, Maxine ,,............. .......... 6 4 Chai-now, Rose Zoe .....,..,.,. 194,206 Collick, Joseph ..,.......,......................... 303 Crout, Cordellia Jane .................. 219 Chatterton, Claire .......................,.., 210 Collins, Henrietta W .A,,,4"---,...4--' 210 Craver, Ada ....,.....,....,,..,........,,,,......,.,, 201 Chauvet, Elise Diry ........,........,...... 206 Collins, Irene Meryl ,---,-A-.4"----.Q-.-'- 210 Crowe, Frank' .........,....,................... 298 Cherner, I ........,....,... J ..,......,...........,...., 188 Collins, John F Uln-A--lV"---l-'.-'----l---'.'---A-- 218 Crawford, Wllllam Russell.,,206 Chartkar, 'Morris .....,..... ,............. 2 06 Collins, Margaret Lotto errrnnlleeer 209 Croake, Mary E ...,....................,.,.... 210 Chester, Sidney ..,......,.. ..,.,....,.... 2 82 Coleman, John IIrrelenArewerernlnreereennrerlevrneleb 233 Cromer, Carl Crawford ,.....,,. 213, Chffthamr Grace ----r.--- 4-e----e1-A--. 2 67 Colville, Robert ..................... 132,218 , , 275 Chlera, Edward .....,........ .....,........... 1 7 Colwelly Arrnnr R .AVI.-.---rr,',-v----.'.-'-- 277 Cromwell, Lois Pauline ............,.. 200 Chlld, Charles M ...,,....... ,.....,,...... 2 78 Colwelly Robert C -lerrnrellrreerneneerleee 193, Croneis, Carey ....,................,.,...... 22,286 Child Harrltte .,..,.,.......,,.... ..,........... 2 66 218,272,28l Crothers, Ruth ,...................,...,.............. 210 Child, Rioliortl Tait .,...........l.,,....l.. 213 Cooiorfortl, W. A ..............,...,l..,,...l 153 grow? Ffjlflllf Patrick ----'- Chill, Max Louis ..,.....................,..... 200 Commons, Rachel S ...................,.. 196 WW eyv 0 H -----'--'-"--------AA----"-- 1 Chissom,'Gordon A .......,..........,.,.... 287 Compton, Arthur H .,.. 20, 21, 276 Crowley, Marjorie Fuller ...... 200 Chorvat, F. N ..............,...... ..,.....,,..,. 1 50 Comroe, J ....,.............1.................. 188 200 Crowley, Thomas ............................., 219 Chow, Wei Liang ........,., ....,..,...., 2 10 Comroe, L ..,....,..l....,.......... ,......,,.. 1 88 200 Cruickshank, Isabella L ............. 211 Christian, T. J. J ...,....,.........,,........ 294 Comroe, Ruth ....,......,.......,...................... 192 Crume, Wallace ........................ 52,267 Christie, G, Cr ................,........,. 153,293 Cone, Cicely ,,,.,,,,,,,, 1 ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,, 2 O6 CrL1f1'1paClI61', F. C .........,.....,,..,...., 305 Churchill, Claire .,.....l. .......,.....,..... 2 09 Conklin, Robert .,..,l,.,,......,.... 201,295 Cryer, John ...............,................. 196,202 Cibulka, julia ........., ....,,.,,..,., 2 18 Connelly, Stanley Warren ,,,,,, 65, Culbertson, Carey ......................,....... 295 Cimral, Francis .......,.... ............. 2 86 144,14-5,146,274 Cullen, Edward R .,.......,... 150, 293 Circle, Sidney ..............................,......., 201 Conner, Nora Louise .......,............. 219 Cummings, Rfbert ................,..,....... 288 Citterman, Miriam .....,...,......,.......... 210 Connolly, Elaine .....,.,..,....,. ,,,.,,,,,, 2 63 Cunningham, anet ..................,...,,,.. 206 Clancy, john D ............. 64, 184, 288 Connnr L' J. N U n nnnrrle 247 Cunningham, Robert Maris...206 Clark, Daniel .....,...,...........l.........,.......... 277 Consranriney nerlhlerl rlrl N273 Cunningham, William Rus- Clark, Lemuel F ,..........,................... 202 Conway Earl John 215 sell ........,.......,,.......................................... 206 Clark, Maurice Gordon ..........., 150, C lr lg b 87 Curless, Donald Lee ..................... 209 151,274 Dogg,1535122ji'i70,i"17'1,"'175,"'174: Curtis., Guthrie .,,..,.,...,,,.,,....... 156, 293 Clark, Mary Agnes -'--.--------------.--A- 211 194, 212, 219, 268 Curtis, Gertrude Brown ...r........ 211 Clark, Rwhafd E-' ---t--'t---t 1931200 Cook, Laura ..r,..... 167,170,171 173 Curtis, William L .,.,.,......,..,..,........, 195 Clark? Howard RIUSOU 2111247 Cook, Lonio T ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 209 Custer, Mamie I .....................,,........ 211 Claflfmft Martha C --tt--tr-t------t---rrr-t 210 Cooke, Alice ....,.,,...,....................,..........,. 268 Custer, Wuliam Joseph, 11. 621 Ilgiph --t-r---------- "'--- 3 gl Cooper, Edwin Neville .,.,......,. 200 D C H l 1S2,219, 1 1 m UTY ----------------t- . - , a osta, enrletta ......... , .....,,....... Clemens, Harrier Mabelle ...... 206 gsggsf' 135351615 """"""""" 'NZ47' Dagneau, Woodrow ......... 219,300 Clemens, john ...............,.,.....,......,........ 190 ' """ f7 """Ai"" """' ' ""' '212 Dailey, Grace ,...........,,. .... ,..... ................. 2 6 S Clement, Michael ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,..,,,,,,,,. 280 Cooperman' 01.115 """""""'4'i"4""'i Daines, Harvey. C ................,...r......,.r 10 , , Cooperman, Norman Roy .r....... 208 . Clements, Milton Shirley ............ 206 Conlan Benjamin 203 Daley, Catherine R .....................,... 210 Cl d , D ' tl .............,....... 201 y . M """"i"i "'i 'i"""i D a lton, Donald Henry ,.,.,.......... 210 Clgselegign ,r,,,,,,,,,,,.,,.,,,, 201 C0P1?f1d1 Phyllls ----------t--t--t-t---ttt'-----t- 219 Daly, Mary .......,..,.......,....,..........,, 219,257 Oliver Paul ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,...,,,.,,.. 278 Corbm' Helen Lorena """"A""""' 206 Damon Leslie William .,............. 211 Clousd John ,.,., ,,.,,,,,,...,,,,,,., 1 95 C0rPeY Kenneth """" """"'"""""4""' 2 80 DyAm0il1l Marie C .............,.........., 195 Cobb, ,Herbert Hobry ,......,...,..., 1206 C0ffiS1 ,lsrchaffi ----'- 1 t--------'-"'-----'-t------ Danforthl William ..,.....r..,.....,,,......, 304 Cobb, Sylvia .....,,..,...,..........,..... 258, 218 30201, Lma 3836 '--'tt-'---- 52 36 Darby, Ralph E ......,.,, 300, 219,298 Cochrane, David K ......................... 210 O f9 ll SGH Y ''""'i"'""""""""' Dargan, Avise Ethel ,..................., 200 Cody, Arthur C .......,...,..........,,....,..... 42 Coulson' Leonard """""""' """"" 2 95 Dargan, Edwin Preston ...........,... 19 Coulter, Merle C .,....,........ ,.......... 2 77 - Coe, Paul F ......,............ 218,289,300 D Darlsh, Estelle ..............,..................... 189 Coiiiey Stanley J ............................... 206 Countfymafh Calvin ------r---r-----4----t-- 294 Daron, Gorman H ......,..,.,............,,., 195 Cohen, Benmanin Robert ,,,,,, 206 gggagenmfexglrggi """""4"""""""""' Dasbacll, George ...........,...,..... 201,278 ' 1 '--t----------'---'----"----t 1 b D .,,,.....,.......,i.,, 301 223223 SZF5iii3'ii'i1'ggiif?T7.tftifi,.ZiZ Covtfi 1010 ttrt , -1111111t-tt111r 29,281,300 B3l?51"iEiyi0r3 .,,,.,r.tr.,,,,r.tt.,,,,,t.tt.,., rot Cohen, Eugene Lionel ..................,.. 206 Cowell Virginia """"'i"""""' 193 200 David, Vernon C ...,........................... 288 Cohen Herzl .......,..,........,,.,..,................ 218 Coway' Eallz """""""' Q """""""""""" 289 Davidge, Helen Valentine ...... 206 Cohen, Leonard Maver .,..........,.. 206 Cowles! Harriet Ehzabeth "" "200 Davidson, Lloyd Johnston ...... 194, Cohen, Marshall .....,,.. Q ...,...,,.,,,..,..... 210 COWWS1 Henry C -'---'tt"-----"'- 13 275 198,283,219 Cohen, Milton H ,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 210 Cowley, Thomas ,........... ...i....... 2 09 Davidson, Lorn ,.....,,,,.......,.............,.... 304 Cohen, R ........,.................., .........,... 2 47 COX1 Gaffleld V --1---111---- -r11-----11--- 2 9 Davidson, Max ........,.,......................... 282 Cohen, Ruth ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 18 Coyne, Thomas ..........,....,.... ........... 2 79 Davis ,,,..,,,..,,,,,......,,,...,....,., ......,...,.. 2 47 Cohn, 'Bernard ,,,,,,,,,,,,.....,,,,,,,..,......... 303 Craemen, Lambert .,..,............,............ 290 Davis, Alice ...........,,. .....1....... 1 S9 Colin, Mary jane ..,...,...,...... ,.,.......... 2 00 Craig, Alice Marsden ,,,.........,..... 211 Davis, Carl ......,,.......,.... ....,............. 2 77 Colby, Chnl-leg C ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 23,289 Craigie, William ......,...................,,..... 17 Davis, Helen .,.........,.............,.........,...... 174 Colby, Ruth ..,,,,............,.. ......,...,........... 3 0 Crane, Ronald S ..........,,... .,............ 1 7 Davis, Paul H ...,..........,..........,., 42 281 Colditz, Cal-l ,,,,,,,,,,,,, ....,,,....... 2 03 Crapple, Rose E ........., ..... , ,.... 2 19 Davis, Thomas ........ ,...............-. 2 83 Page 337 - Cl D Davis, VV1lfred .,......,..........,.... Dawson, Dorothy Eliza 220 194- Day, Ernest Christian ,........,,.... Day, Holly Laura ........................ Day, Marvalene L ......,.,.,.. 198 Decker, T. S ...............,......,........ 153 Dee, VVilliam ....,.......................,. De Filippis, Gaetano ,,.,.......,........ De en A atha Rose 82 v S ---, De Koven, Herman ..........., De Laup, Paul S ..,....... 284- 206 208 ...206 209 299 ,........,,.279 .206 ..,,,.,,,.,.220 ...,.....,.,198 ...........195 Dosefli, Slava .............. ,....,............... 9 1 Douglas, Paul ....,....,,,...............,.. 25,281 Dove, Robert .........,,,..........................,... 305 Downery, Loretta Agnes ............ 206 Downing, Elliott R ..............,,......,.. 276 Downing George .,,.,.,,...............,...,,. 287 Downing, Lucia G ........,..,.,.....,..... 9-1, 197, 198, 209 Drell, Oscar .,.,,...,,...................,.,............. 220 195 Dreyer, William Albert ....,.,..... Dribin, Daniel Macabaeus ...,.. 200 Elder, Lois Francis ......,. ......., 2 06 Efferty, Mary M ....,.,..,.....,.........,..... 221 Egan, Margaret .,.................,....,.....,...., 48, 52, 6-l, 87, 88.. 221 Eichenbaum, Shirley J .,..........,..,... 198 Eicholz, Mildred Ann ,...,......... .... 1 9-1, 198, 200 Elgar, Robert ............,...,,.................,...... 292 Eiger, Marjorie Olga ...........,.,.... 206 Eisenberg, Alberta ,......,...............,... 209 Eisenberg, George .,................ 153, 186 Demb, Kenneth ,... ..,....,...,................... , 198 Droblnskyy Mlguelmlssy 19-ll 220 Eisenberg, Samuel joseph ,.,,,. 194, Dempster, Arthur J --'----w----------------- 21 Drummond, Forrest S ..........,,.... 180, . . 200 Dempster, Gertrude jane ...... 220 157,220,288 Eisenberg, Sylyia ....,.........,...........,... 221 Denne, Arthur IJ.I--D---AI-UVV..w.A,A.-.,.,4v."----- 289 Ducevy Elizabeth Eisenstein, Irving .......................,...... 193 Dennlng, Katherine -"--,----A-A-44.---.--. 266 Duddy, Edward Ah luul Elam, John Harvey .............,......... .1-14, De Roque, Marie ...........,...........,.,.... 206 Dudley, Gertrude ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 162, 145 146 278 De Sylvester, Emily -..,'.v-----'---'--'--A4 211 163,170,171 Elder, Thomzls S ..................,............ 301 Dgtweilery Frank ,,,-,,,,,,,,,,, Duel, Ruby Jay .-"'-.'...-..'-.'-----4---A.-.A.-.. Eldredv W ------''---------------4---- 151 Deutsch, Richard .',444A'V,lII4444"'--,.-'..----w 292 DUHIC, '.,., H208 Eley ................... ,,,,. .,..... ,,... . ...,...,....... . , . ,247 Devel, Thorne ..............,................,.... 196 Duke, Inez Estelle A,,,''.,',',-.,----,'--.4w. 205 Elias, Chester ...,,.........,............,.......,... 295 De Vere, Corn .---------.,- --..,-,..........---. 2 06 Dukette, Rita. ,,.,,..,,............,.......... 91 266 Elisfu, Julielfe M '-e-aQ-A-AA-'--AQ-QAA,r'---Q,-- 208 Devine, Mary ..e-.-...---..-,--,A--AA.e. 220 26+ Dullcic, Beatrice ,...,........., , ...........,... 173 Elkins, M- G -'----e-.ee----ee--,--.----.-4- 151 201 Dewev, Robert ...,....,...,....................,,,... 305 , Ellenbohen, Edward ..,........,............ 206 Dewire, Marjorie Culver .,,,,,,,, 213 Dunaway' Dorothyf """'4""""""""' 265 Ellery, Otis ........,...,..,,....,,.........,........,... 203 Dexter, Frances ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 263 DUHCHH, Vera Lucllle --r'-----e'4-ee--- 210 Elliott, Violet .,.,...,..,,,..,,,....,...............,...... 52 Dexter, Stephen ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 202 D1111f01'd, Nglson --'------'-'---e--'-----------'-' 210 Elliot, -lOl111 ..,.......,,.....................,,............. 283 Diamond, Sydney Alfred' 'A---'---A, 208 Dunham, Mildred L .......,.......,.,.... 220 Elliot, William Harold 194 208 DiCkel'50n, Liter ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 267 Dunkel: Harold Baker '-----e-------- 81' D01'Otl1y ....,................... 206 Dickerson, Spenser ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 10 I 189119411981200,-277 Ellis, Noel .,.,................................,...,,...... 201 Dienst, Robert B ...,.,,......,......,,......... 195 Dunkin' Edgar,W """ g """"""""""' 210 Elllsnni MUY ----------'44'-- ------------- l 98 264 Dieta, George Jerome ............,,,... 211 Dunlalh .l0SCPl11nC,B1ZCf ---------1-- 206 Elson, Charles .........................,,......,.,... 221 Dickson, Bruce W ....... 36, 37, 275 Dunn, Agnes Clalre ------11-,..-..---,.- 208 Elson, William Boris .,,,.,....,.......,.. 200 Dickson, Lenard E .,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,, 296 Dunn, Myer Butler ,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 206 Elnave, Harry ....,.............. ...,,........., 2 11 Decus, Frederick O .,,.,,.,,,,,,,,,.,,,,, 210 Dunn, Paul H ....,......., 191,195 202 Elvey, Christian J .....,.,......,..,.,.,...... 22 Dierssen, Katherine .,................ 164, Dunne, Raymond ................,............. 276 Emberson, Alvus ,...........,.......,,..,,,,,, 266 165,175,269 Dui-ante, jessamine ,,,,,,,,.,,, 220 259 Emery, Josephine Richard ....., 221 Dille, John ...,.......,..,..........,,...................,. 274 Durning, Anna ........................ 197 211 Engbery, John --.411.11-------,---.-,,--- 201,295 Dimmett, Melborn ........,.,.. ,,...,........... 2 O9 Durnion, Lillian Adeline ......... 206 Engdall, Clarence .,......,.....,........,... ,221 D11n5fn0fC, .i0l1n ------------1--1-'-'- 231-290 Dusak, Frank joseph .....,.,,,,,.,,,.. 206 Engel, Arthur Abraham, ........... 209 D1reCt0r,R0Se E --,,,.,--,----------,-----11-111-- 220 Dworin, Jack . .........................,,...,,,.... 282 Engel, Grace Lucille ......,......,..,..., 210 D1X0n, Dora -------c--1 3 ------------1------------'------- 262 Dyer, Helen Ashley .....,.,........,..,.... 206 Engelbrecht, Henry .,.....,........, ,..... 2 06 D0dCl, Helen Ellzabetn -c--1---------- 211 Dyer, Wallace ,.,,,.,..,..,,.,,,.,...,,.,,,,,,,,,, 287 Englehardt .,..,,..,........,..........,..,,,,......,...... 247 Dodd, Lois ..........,...,.,..,,.........................,. 210 Dyer, William Wurster ,,,,,,,,,,l,,,, 213 Ensrningerl Jane E ,ll,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 221 Dodd, VVilliam E ...............,..,.,. 24,27 Dysart, Bonnie ....,...,,.............,,..,..,...,. 202 Entsminger, Mary E ......,.,.... 197 211 Dodson, John M .....................,.,....... 277 Dystruys, Cameron ............,1............. 284 Epp, Willomine ....,...........,..,...,..,,........ 206 Dodson, Robert ....................,.............., 278 Dzuibaniuk, Marshall .,,..,.,.,........ 124- Ericson, Ivan E ..,........... ,.,..... ...... 2 0 9 Doede, Clinton Milford .....,.....,... 208 Eadie, Thomas .,,,,,.,,,..,.....,.,...... 201 295 Ericson, Melvin R .......,,...,..,,.,.,......, 209 Doeland, Claudia ..............,...,....,,...,. 164- Eager, Margaret DlIllIIII,,,,,,,,,,,,,l,,,,l,,,,, 183 Erickson, Leif ,.,....................,.,.,.. 187,206 Doerr, John ...............,...........,.,.....,............ 293 Eaglegon, Richard ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 275 E1'lClfS0f1, Wallace Alfred ---,----- 200 Doheny, Catherine .........................,,,,. 165 Earlandsony Ralph gsm, ,,,,,,,,, 14.4, Errant Bertha Henrietta ......... 200 Doherty, Burton ..,.,................... 187, 27-1 145,272,283 Eschbaugh, Richard ,......,.,,.,......,,,.. 290 Dolan, Alice ..,........,....,..,............. 220,260 East, Allen ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 133,206 ESCUYFHZ, Irvine: ',-----,-------f------,---f------ 201 Dolani Anna Clementine ------------ 210 East, Searing Ward ...,..,,,,,.,,,,,,,., 144, Eslich, Leonard ....,,.....,..,......,,. 201 283 Dolark. Antoinette ..,,,..............,....... 213 145 146 Espensliaile, Ada ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,, , M164 Dole, Hanna 5 ---------------- 44-411----- 2 10 Eastis, T. N .,,....,.............,................,.... 206 Espenshade, Edward B -....,..,....,.. 196 Donaldson, H- H ---------- -------------- 1 'l' Eaton, Cyrus S ..........,.,.,.,,,.............,.... Espenshade, Robert ..,....,,......,,....... 152 Donnelly, Esther I ........, .,........, 2 09 Eaton, Helen Elizabeth ...........,.., 206 EStHbr00lC, May ...-,...-........,...,,.,..-.-,...,, 211 Donnelly, Thomas E ..............,.,,..,.,.. 10 Eaton, Norman ,.........,,.,.,.................... 305 Evans, Byron Dunbar ,....,... ..,...... 1 25. Donovan, Paul B .....,.,....................... 202 Ebert, Richard 184, 198, 200,277 127,277 Donovan, john Henry .......,...,....,, 211 Eckart, Carl ...................................,............ 21 Evans, Gertrude .....,,..... .,.....,,,,..,.,.., 2 02 Donoghue, George ,.............. 201,278 Eckert, Orin .....,...,,.....,,..............,..,...,..... 286 Evans, Mack .,.,,,...........,... ..,., ..... ...,, Z 9 8 Dooley, VVilliam ...,......................,...... 276 Edmonds .....................,................................ 156 Everly, ,l2imCS B -,---- -,-..1---.,,.,-,---.-,-, 2 75 Dorland, Claudia ................,. 168,220 Edwards, Alice .,.......,....,.,.,.,...,,......,... 269 Fagen, Edgar ......,. .,...... ,..,.. 5 2 ,75 221 Dorogelak, Dale Dean ,,,1..,,,,,.,,..,. 211 Edwards, Rowland John ,,,,,,,,,,,, 206 Fairbanks, Benjamin ,...........,,,..... 305 Page' 338 Cl D Falrbank, Dexter ......,.....,..,,............. 274 Flint, Edith Foster ...............,.............. 17 Fuller, Muriel Kllllg, ,..4,. .,....-..----- 2 O8 Fairweather, George O 10,294 Flodin, Nestor ..,.................................... 201 Fllqual Clara Mai .................,....,.... 200 Falkenburg, Maurine ..............,... 221 Flowers, Seville ,........,........... 195 202 Furney, Lydia .......................,... 222,264 Faris, Ellsworth ,...........,.......................... 26 Flynn, Eunice ........................,...,.......... 173 Gabel, Carl ..,...... 121, 142, 143, 284 Faris, George ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,...,,,,,A ,,,,,,,,,,,, 3 O4 Flynn, Mary K ..,,,,,...,.............. 173 260 GHCQQHH, Edward ..........,...............,...... 288 Farwell, Charles ...........,. ....i....... 2 88 Forbrick, Louis Richard ...........1... 203 Galbraith, Louis ----.--1-------,-------- 74,278 Farwell, 101111 ,,,,,,,,,,,44,,,,,,,,rA,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,., 279 Forbrich, Mary Lou .,.......l.............. 51, Gale, Burton ..l..................,.................... 279 Faulkner, Elizabeth. ,,,....................,.. 42 172,173,259 Gale, Francis C ..........,......,.... 197,206 Faust, Jack lhvkvll,------...---'-".I.4.,' ------'..-- 2 30 Ford, Elizabeth .......,..,......,.................. 192 Gale, Henry Gordon...20, 21,279 Fawcett, Clarence ....,,........ .......,... 1 96 Foregll Marsllall """""""'AA""4A"""' 294' GHlSbCl'g, M --'----------------'------'--------4------- 215 Faxon, Bernardine ......................,....... 210 Foslllckv Raymond D """"""""""" 17 G21lValll, Albert 1311965---200,301 Fehle,,b,,,g, Maurlne ",.-'...,..-..-.-q-, 269 Foster, Charlotte ...........,..,.................. 259 Gans' Abraham 1 ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 197,206 Felumy Esther ..,4.',----Q-nnnnn----,-.4'4".-44..------ 201 Foster, Ethel ...,...................,...............,.. 266 Gans, Vida Marlon ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 213 Fliveson, Philip .....,..,............... 212 221 Foster- Eugene """"' 43152174 279 G21llS9V00ff, Elma ----------- -------------- 2 12 Feldbein, Sol E ........,........,...,.,,.,,,.. Foster, Glace L ----"'-----'--"----- 198,209 Garb-e, Marian L ..,.....,.......,,.....,.,...., 209 Feldman Betty ..44,'-,-,.-- ".-,.4.',,.,,- F Osfefr Lee RHY -----------------4-----'---------A-- 209 Garcia, Vella ....,,.....,.,..,,....,........,......,,,. 201 Fellingelf, Ruth'-A ,v.. ----- 111051912 Iliellrl ------------- -11--"----- 1 73 Garen, Robert., ..,...........,. 58,187,275 Felsemlwla EH B -1"1l7-sslessleelesssssss-sss r3iteia,,,?,5NiQi'ii'ii' 'i"'iiiiiii3iiliiis,, fgiilgih' 215221020 "rer ilililliii, iilliilvifisiw 3191106 ,E 'e'esese1sr-eeeeerer 1 115111352 G1ffiCl4,S1qHf eeers 5, Eeseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 232 Fender, Rollin -,--- ----'--v'---,--..,,.. A A .w',--'-- F335 Gilt-Pudlg ----r---------'-- h 344167 Gasperlc sie ala .......,.......,, ,210 Fending, Frederick .........,,............... FOX: Raymond William ............ 206 g233,,Hl61, ,,,,,,I,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 211 Fennema' Gertrude 91' 1701171 Fox, Sylvia ,,...............,...,....................r...., 212 Geisman, Jeanette M, ...,........,.......,. 200 1961110111 Waller --A--------------------- 2751301 Frnider, Kenneth ,,,,,, 125,127,212 Gennnes, Mary .................................... 222 FUW11, Roberta --'1e-4------------------'---'--4-4- 172 Frank Eleanor ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,11,. 198 222 George Everett .............,... .............. 2 01 Ferguson' Flfnence Lillian """ 206 Frank, leanetteli ,.......,...... .....,,,..... ,211 Gelllke: C. E .....,,.,,......... .,,......... 2 6 Fefmleli Emllle Judson --------------- 200 Frank: Margaret ,,,,,,.1,,,,.,.,....,.,,......... 269 Genter, LaVerne .....,........ .....,........ 2 10 Felllalldezl Ellza '-''"-----'---'--'-'1"""""' 260 Frank, Marvin ,..,.................... 215, 299 George, Everett .........,....... ....--,-...--- 2 96 Feffllli H- Ward ---,'-n'--'--'-"-'---l------- 195 rranleel, 1,-,nn ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,1,,.1,1,....,,...,. 299 Geppinger, Carl ....,........ .,....,....... 2 86 Ferry, Phyllis ...--.....l.l............... , ........ al.. 2 63 Frankenstein, Alfred ......,....,......... 212 Gerard, Ralph ..,,.11...,,.11 .......,...... 2 92 Fersollif Gershon Calllerllle -'--" 200 Ffafllilaflflr Stillman ------------ l -------"-- 51' Gerber, Harriet ..........,,................,....... 173 Feuclllwallgerv Esfhef Re' 52, 222, 300 Germann, Lloyd W ..........,.. 213,222 gina164,165,170,171,172,174, Franzen, Ethel 174, 17S,200, 257 1, adore lq,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 195,202 Field Herbert., .,.1....,..................,.......... 299 Frnnzman, Martin .,,,,,.,................... 203 gi1,SSO',,,IS Nogl ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 75.201, 299 F1CtZC, Ella Elizabeth ...,,.,........... 164, Frazer, William Humphrey 206 Ge,-Wig, Florence ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 259 - 165,194,221 Fredreckson, Adele. .,..............,......... 201 Gerwlg, Louise ,,,,---,----,,,-, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 59 gllgey, EEmelly -.--.,-..,.-.-.l..--.-,-...-.-.------9. Freed, Corllmi .....................-.......----l9 Gesds, Leonard G ,,,,1,,,,,,. .......1..,... 2 ll 1 Cy, sta ........,,,..............,.............. Freehling, er ert ...,.,..................... eschwind ane -hl,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,-,,,,,--,,,, 222 Fineman, Sydelle Florence .....1 200 Freeman, Elizabeth .......,...........,.,.. 259 gettemy, Vlfllmfred 5 ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 206 Fink, Milton ............................,.... 132, 206 Freeman, F. N ..,.....,.....,..., 24, 26, 279 Glbboney, Frank ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 222, 290 Flnnegan, Anne., ,.........................,..... Freeman, Marcus ...................ll......... 299 Gibbons, Helen B ,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,1,1,,,,,,,,1,, 222 Finnegan, Francis .................. .......... F 1-eeman, Margaret .....,.,.........,,,....... 210 Gibbs Marjorle ,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 65 Finnernd, Clark .111,..,,...,....,.,...1,....... Freeman, Ruth M -----------e-ee9--e-eeeee--e.'- 212 Gihliehrnsn, Rose ........ ..., ............... 2 1 1 Fischer. Wallace ...........,,................... FFCCSWU, Gladys F '------------------------ 210 Gicleonse, Harry D -.......... ..-Y-.-----. 2 5 Fish, Marshall .,--..----.--., 136139, Freidheim, L. Edgar ....,..., 187, 275 Giesielre, Minnis .,.........,.,...,......1...,.... 203 Fischer, Edith ....,,................................ French, Carolyn Norton ..,........,... 208 Gilason, Adeline .......................,.......-- 266 Fischer, Wallace E ......................... 222 Freudenthal, joseph Lester...2l1 Gilkey, CharleSMW ------- 39,30, 231, Fisher, D. Jerome .....................,....... F1-e , M rtle Louise .......,..........,..... 209 Gill, Merton, .................,, 198 20 Fisher, Emphia Margaret ,..... 208 Frei? Sarlhuel .,.......................i..........,......., 196 Gill, Norman N .....,,.,............. 193 227 Fishery Henry .A.4.,D--AAA--,'---'----,-----v--,-,'---,. 243 Frigke, Adele ,,.,,,,,,,,,..,,,,,,,.......,............. 164, Gill, T. A .......,..........,.......,,, ,.......1-.... 2 23 Fisher, Lafayette ......,..... ...,....... 2 06 165, 166,170,171i172i222 Gillies, Donald R .,............,,.............., 223 Fisher, Rae ,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,. ,...,,.....,,,,. 2 22 Fried, RHYm0U.d --r--------- 1321 206,215 Gilpatrick, Meredith ...................,.... 302 Fisher, Sally ............,....,.....,.,....... 91,259 Freideman, Alice May .......,........., 212 Glnsbergy Miriam Rochelle ,,,,,, 200 Fisher, Willis W ,....,......................... 203 Friedeman, Sylvia --.---...--.--,.---,-.-,.----- 51, Ginsberg, Roderick ........,....,,........,... 210 Fitzbutler, James Henry ---,--,---- 52, 57, 63, 164, 130, 181222, Gisr, William E ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,...,.,...,., 223 Fitzgerald Faith ..............,.......,.....,.... 269 , 267 Glabman, Donald .,............................ 297 F- Z ' m ----,-.',,'- 248 305 FI'ClClm3l'lIl, Harvey Ge01'gC---222 Gladstone, K .............,...,.......,..........,...... 183 'lgllneerals ,Ml--222 Freideman, Richard ......................,. 252 Glasdtone, Martell M ,,,,,,, 194,200 Flear, Elaline ...,...................................... 266 Friedman, Samuel A """"""AA"""' 2 Glasgow, J. H ....,.,.............,........,,..,... 191 Fleitz, Helen .............,.........................,..... 201 Frodin, Rube S. 48, 64, 184, 288 Glass, Mildred., ..,....,............ 2 ............. 201 Fletcher, Richard De Leon ,.,... 206 Frost, Edwin B ......................... 22 279 Glavin, Marl-orle MHFIOU .,.,.. 206 Fletblmr Ruth ,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,, 166 Fuhi-man, Dorothy ,..,....................... 206 Glazer, Daniel -------------,--e--------f--'------- 210 Flinn 'Fhomas Edwin .................. 150, Fulks, Mary Ellen.. .,.,..,..,............,.. 206 Gleasner, William .,........ .,,....... 2 76 , 151,201,293 Fuller, Damon ..........,....... ,.......... 2 86 Gleason, Eleanor .,..,.,... ......,.,. 2 68 Page 339 D fl Gletz, John ........,.....,,,,,.,,,,,,,,A,,..A,.,A4,,4.,.,4A 223 Grawlig, Bernice .......... .211 Hamson, Chester ....,,.................... I ...... 304 Glnmset, Daniel ,A,,AA,,,,,,A,,..,4,,,,,,., 75 283 Gray, Gertrude ...............,. .268 Handel, Alexander Frederic, 206 Glover, Hglen A ,,.,4A,ll,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,l,, 206 Gray, Willlam E ..,........, 22+ Haneax, Herbert ..,.....,.,..,................... 201 Ggddard, Ralph l.,.,,,l,l,,,,,,,,, H201 293 Green, Allce C ..,,..............,.....,...... .210 Hannun, Chester WL ...,....,...,..,.... 202 Goetsch, Charles .,..,.......,........ 19,297 Green, Edred Earl .................,...... ,208 Hansen. Betty ...,...,........,. 65,170,171 Goetsch. Margaret ........,.,,,,, 164- 172 Green, Joseph Elmore .,.....,,......... 193 Hansen, Ira .B ......,........ .......,..,......... 1 95 Goldberg, Eunice M .,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,, 206 Gree, Sscarlll-Ialry .,................... ganser, ldullgs ..,...,...... ....,..... 2 Goldberg, Milton L .-',,,lw-- 248 303 Green erg, Cl' ert ...,...,.... 24 o anson, . ..............,,.... ...,...... .. 3 Goldberg, Seymour 152, 198 297 Greene., Alden .......,............................ .196 Hantz, Ruth G .........,..... 1 ...... ..,..,.... 2 09 Goldberg Sldnevim -,'- ----- ,272 297 Green, joan ........................., ..... ,,,,. .... 2 6 7 Hardaway, Ethel LOIS .......,.......,.. 208 ' ' f Charles ......,........... 52 280 Harder Earl VV ........,.....,...,.,.......... 209 Goldberg Ethel ""'A"""" '4" 210 greenlea ' Rob rt B ,224 Hadiesl Melvin Albert 200 287 Goldman, B -ar-rrr--eee---'-el+r'a-4-rrs -eee----aees 2 42 eiZ2i12'ZZl'k Heilamggiiiiiiiiiiiiiiig191 Hardinl roll Heel, l.ll,l f l.,,i .l,.... T 194 Goldman, Emavuel -'--A--""-"---'--'-'- 282 Greenwald, Edgar A ....... 194 206 l 206 305 goigman' mafV.ln"ii """""" 223 2957 Greer, Howard C ......................... ..... 29 Harding, Frank .........,.......,...,,.......... 2.274 0 man' e vm "" "" 92 Gregg, Elizabeth Clare ...,........ 210 Hardy, William M ..............,.......... 224 Goldsmith Edgar L ' 64 Gregory, Charles O .,........,.........,. 274 Harkins, Henry Nelson ............... 186 Goldstein ' """""""""7 548 Gregory, George .............,.... 189,200 Harklns. Marlon ............,......,......,...... 91, Giliireir., Harold NaP0i9419S Eiiilfllfmllil53iff.TZ3iiii1331l1'j521331 Harkins, W1?l?ll,f7lifif..l,Z?'LZ? 'J ''''"'''''''"""'""""""""""' L "'7 Grey, Howard G ...........,................... 10 Harlan, Betty ...,...,........,...,.. ,.......... 2 62 Goldstein, Herman Hema """"' 200 Grey, Lennox .............,........ . ,............. 287 Harman, Harry ,..... ........... ........... 2 0 1 golgsfffml ,goblift r----""--'---'e' 223 Grier. Mary E .,...,.,,,,..,l,..l....l.......ll.,,, 198 Harper, Samuel N ..........., .......,.r. 2 74 G0 dsl?-P alt lf -2'-'-'r'---'--- gg "'- 280 Griffith, Helen .....r..,,.,............ 224,261 Harper, William .......r......,..........,....... 226 00 Cr - all ----'--444---------'44-----'-- G 'ff'th, S tt ,.,.................. 208 H ' , F ' M .........,...... 209 G00dCYUEl Julia M ------"-"-4A----------r 210 Giiimles, gsirlliismjii ........... .. 280 I'I:i.iigTaAnnaral2iT..,165, 198, 224 Gvodfellvwi Mary M --e-e----------rr-- 210 Griswold, Mary ........,,,.................,.,..... 224 Harris-, Edward. ,.... ,......... ,........... . .,.. 2 S 8 Cgoodiliold, gsabelle .......... 2 ...,.. 189, grisvgoldi Rath .............,.............,........ Harris, Janet Louise -,,,,,,,-,-,,,.,,,'--,,. 224 oo oe, ara ...................,.........,......... roe e, . . .,.........,............... - H 2, h wu,,,,,,.,-,..,,,-,---,,,,,,, ...--,.---, 2 79 Goodman, janet .....,....,............,..,........, 257 Grossman, Arthur ,..... 156, 292 l-liz:-iz, Jlelali-tha ,,,,,,-,,,,,--,,,-,,.-,,,.-,..,-,,,, 269 Goodnow, james Lawrence ...... 75, Groth, Olive B ......................... 224 Hari-is, Theodore ,,,,, .,,-,.,-,,,,--,,,.,,,.,, l 56' 144, 145, 146, 283 Grove Brandon ..............,......,.........,.... 191 7 , r 159, -24, 290 Goodrich.. Thomas ,,.. ...........,........... 1 32 Grow, Brimson ..,........ .....,...,.. 2 O6 Hai-Sh Phillip liiiiI--,,--,,-,,-----,,-.,,,,,,,,,,,-, 203 Goodrie ...............,,,..,.........,.,...,................. 211 Grulee, Clifford ......,.....,... ......r..,.. 2 77 Hai-t 'Albert G., ,,,---,,,,, M W-H203 Goodspeed, Edgar J ......,.,,,,. 24,274 Gruner, Helen M ................ ...211 H tl llll ,213 G00dStClUl William ------,,---- 65.297 Gubser, Eugene ............,........... ...293 ar el James mn m 225,281' Gordon, David ...................,,,.............. 198 Grimm, Lyle --e-------------r-----------r---- 206 Hassenbusch, Lee ,... ....................... , ,299 Gordon, Harry P ........................,...... 209 Gufldruml Fred -----------er-r------r-- -1-279 Hasterlick. Robert ......,...............r.... 292 Gordon, Natalie Joyce ........,,........ 199 gunning, ligobart W -----ere-- -235 Hasterlick, Therese ......,...........,........ 210 Gordon, Wilfred .,,............,,............. 210 Utfms Yi Catrlce -----------e-re 20 Hast' , Alb t Bai d ..,,,............. 13 Gore, Greenville D .....................,... 195 Guthmarlnr- Walter S ------- ---195 Hastihii, Orisi ............... ........,.......... 286 Goredki, Eleanor Mary w-,---...-..,.. 206 GUY, Wllllam JHFUCS --------------------- 206 Hathaway, Melicent ..........,........,,.,. 192 Goldsmith, Edgar .,....,...,,,,.,,.,.........,. 299 guyOl'EIillathIamel Bouton """"' 253 Hatter, Keith ....................,,........,........... 201 Gorham, VVillet ,,....,..,.,,,.,........ 211,305 uze' 2 '""''""''"'"'"'A"""""""""" 2 Hanch, Charles C ...........r.... 198,200 Gorka, Angeline M ......,.....l.........,.. 206 Hackelr Mlldfed rrr-rr" -----e-"r 1 -r------ 172' Haydon, Edward ..l,.. 131,132,293 Gorman, Katherine K .........,......... 206 H d E 74' 751231 Havey, john ......,,,,....,,,..,,,....,...,...,.......... 289 Gorman, R. S ...,.4................... 150. 298 Ha Fri' mist "'"""''"""""""""""""" 701 Hawley, John ...........,,......,.., ..,........ 2 83 Gorrell, Sarah S ............. ..............., 2 06 Hggfieell 23,325 "" "" """""""""' ' N503 Haydon, A. Eustace, ,.,..............,..... 290 GOSI1Cll, H. M ................,... , .......,,. 293 ' '"""""""""""" " Haydon, Harold E ,,,,.,.,,.....,.,,....,.. 203 Gottschalk, Louis R .....,.,......., 24,27 33352125 liffgij, """""""' Hayer, Eleanor Margaret ,,..., 203 Gottshall, Maurice ............... 151,276 Hagemeyer' Ddmthy Ruth-M208 Hayes, Arm .......,,.....,...............,., 213 26 Gould, Beatrice I ...,.,....,,,............,.. 206 Halsman Evelvn A 27+ Hales, Gilbert W --r-----rr---r----r------'-- 225 Gould, R. C ...,....,..,.................. ...,.,...,. 2 06 Halaas 'Eugenk T ' """ N """""' H350 Hayes, Harmon P ........,,.......,.......... 203 Gowdy, Howard ..............,,.......,......... 279 Hallimin Francis Hayford, Katherine A .....,.......... 209 Qfaderr Elizabeth H ---e-ee------------ 206 Halton, ,Ruth ,,,,..,,,.,..,,,.,,,,,,1,,,,,,,.....,..... 202 Haywardvy Rebecca-2 '2"" 37,83 262 Grady Bernard ,,,,ll,,,,,,,,,,,,-,,,--,,,,,,,,,,,, 278 Hamburg, Stanley H "',.'v,,.44..4.'-, 116, Hagen, Claude .....,. 1 .,.,,,.,..,....,.........,.. 286 Graf, Robert -I .,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 156,206 121,224,287 l'lCZllC5', Clillfe Elma ----------r--- ------ l 36 Graham, Margaret ....,,............ 52,268 Hamergtrgm, Herman William, Healey: .lolln Vlllcellt e-r--- 225,295 Graham, Roy ,..,,...........,..,.......... 191,202 200 Heany, N. .Sliroat ,.............. J ...,..,....... 2 87 Graham, VVi.lliam ..,...,........... 223,290 Hamilton, A .........................,..... - ,......... 183 Heaton, Wllllam Eflwm ...----r. Zllfl. Graham, lflflllard J ....,.,...........,... 300 Hamilton, Howard B .........., , ...... 208 H bb d I H S Grant, Li ias, ,...,......... ,..............,,... . ..210 Hamilton, Knut ................................1... 195 C Hr, 10W9 -rr-re'-f'-'-rr----e- GI'HSS6l65', FFZIHCCS E ................... 196 Hamilton, Marjorie ,.............., -,..166, Hebert- Waller '------- ---er 5 --'-- "-'--2-'-A 2 9 8 Graver, Grace ............ 52, 87,824,201 198,262 Hecker, Gwrzff Lowe- r-er-r-r---e 206 Graves, George VV ..,,........,,........... 195 Hampton, Dorothy Leonore,200 Hedman, Haltle B-.. .........212 Page 340 El D Hefner, Ralph A ........., ......,.... 1 95 Hoch, Rose Anna, ....,............ 197,211 Hudfield, Edwin ...,.........................,... 201 Hegkin, Mary ....,....,..,,,.....,...,.............. 225 Hochstedler, Donald Edward Hudson, Dessa Mae ....................,... 211 Heicke, Dorothy j ................,........... 209 208 Hudson, G. Donald ........................ 203 Heide, john .......,,,................,.,.,,. 143,288 Hodge, Mona...170, 171,200,257 Hudson, Howard -,--4,',..--..- A-----v....-' 2 01 Heineck, Camille ....., 200,255,265 Hoffer, Coach ..... 5 .................................... 140 Hudson, N, paul -A-..------,',, ..4.,,,'---A- 2 98 Heineck, Paul ...,....,...,,...................,........ 277 Hoelzel, Frederick ..,.....,.........,,...,...... 195 Hudson, Walter .I4A.HAhlhul---.---..--.'.,-',------ 42 Heinigl Clirisrifle MHY 4---,-444---'----- 213 Holcfmab, Arnold ,.,.,,.,...............,......... 191 Hughes, Charles E ....................,,...... 10 Heineman, Rosa ..,,...,,...,....................... 266 Hoffman, Charles S. M ......,...... 202 Hughes. Darrell Stephen 4-'---4-A-.. 195 Heinz, Theodore E ..,,...,,11..,.,.,.,,.,., 195 HOHITIZIII, Heinz Otto .......,.......l..... 210 Hughes John bbrllh-------I..--,-,--"v-'--.-..vv....4. 304 Heith, Helen ,,,...,,............,..... ,.......,.. 2 01 Hoffman, Manice G ..,,.................. 225 Hughes: William E-4-,-nnnuulnnnnnnlnnnunllllwn 274 HCiUr1HH, Vi0l21 ------------4.- ---,-...... 2 64 Hogan, Jennie C ---------'---------'----------' 211 Hults, Helen E .......,...,............,............ 226 geller, 1I1Iqnlcer..i ...... is ......,. ........... 2 79 goijinev 2510--i 1--a------ H -------' -.--..-1---.- 2 Humiston, Eileen ..,...... 61,174,257 e en. EIS a ut ..,,,...........,..,.... 200 0 CU, Hires -----------------"--------- - Hendeles, john S .,....,,..........,............ 209 H0ll0WaYl loilll -'---------------------- 52,293 ggrsilslgggl P26121 "'''''"""","""""""" Henderson, Charles ......,.r.,,......,,A,,l 286 H0lf1'1b0C, Karen -.--.A---A --,-----------.--- 2 64 Humghrezg E'lean'glQ """""""""""" 186 Henderson, Ronald ..,.l...,........,.,.... 201 Holmes, Betty .,...,...,...... ..,....,...., 2 60 Hunt Ciisstei-sn ""A"""', llll i -290 Henicksman, Elva Fay...225 269 Holmes, Josephine ,AAl,,r,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 259 Hunts, D' T ."' Henning, James ,,,,.,l,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 74 278 Holohan, Margaret .....r......... 52,263 ' - ' Hennings, Marlys ,,,.,,.,,,,,,..,.,,,,,,r,,r 225 Holt, John .........,...,...,.......l............. 132.207 iilfgeilfgard e1'1" Hennke, Ruth .......................... ,....,,.... 2 56 H0lrCr, Tl101'W3lli 4------------,---- 226. 290 Hurd, 'Ruth """"A""" 226264 Hempelmann, Betty ,.....,r,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 262 H0l2ll21UCr, GCr1CViCVC L ------------- 226 Hulse Barlgw """'""44"""'A'A""" '276 Hempstead, Hester ..... ,,,,,,.,,,,..,..,,,,,, 2 62 Hvlzinger, Karl .,,.4..-,,,4-.---------- 26,281 H,,,W'lCk Jerogg ""' 'gang "t""""' Zio Henry, Baxter. ..,............................. 296 HOlZWO1'ti1, Lois .,,,.,.,,,..,,,,,..,...,,,,,,,,,. 201 Husbands Margaret Henry, William .....,............,.. 201296 Hooker, Richard .... ,,..... ....................,. 2 7 4 Y 207 Henshaw, Roy ..,,,.........,............ 132 137 Hopkins, Charles Lester ,..,,....... 200 Hutchins Rube,-t M innnnilluliunnnninl 3 274, Hcpplc. R0berf ..................,.,...... 156 281 Hopkins, Ervin ..............,....r....,.,,,,.,.... 202 H t h. l D k i 74 Herman, Martin ,.,.....................r...,.... soo Hopkins, Edward Jenn ............,., 208 Fling "i"" 1 gg "" l 35-593 Hermann, Leone G ,,,,,,,,,,,,, 197 211 Hoplfms, Glll -,.-,4----------,.i,----------.....4.,.--. 226 ' """ ' ' Herr, Joseph Austin ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 225 Horn, John ,..,,..,,,. ............. 1 43,1ss, 278 Hullii Carl F ----1-'-------------------------1----A----- 23 Herrick, Hadley I,,iinii-,-,----,,,-,,,,.-----iiiiii 294 Horne, John .......................,........,............ 294- Hyde, Jeanne ----------------'- 371 831911921 Herrick, James B .1................,.......,.... 293 Hnrnnngl Arlllnr Cll3l'l95 --------- 211 H 1SO'183'198'22O'269 Herrick, Walter Dwight, lr. Horrocks, Alyce Louise .,,,.........., 208 ymes' Blanche Mazen "" . 133 207 Hortan, Ioan .,.............,.,............,.,.....,... 296 H Z Edmund ' 208 HCFFIOIY, Janet ....,.................,.............,.. 264 Horton, Eva Gertrude .....,,........... 226 I y Z' 1. V """' "'''""""""""""""' 208 Herrmann, Martin J ..,,.,.......,,.... 225 Horton, Phyllis Fay ,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,. 42 Igel l in 1.a aw er """""""""""" 87 Herzog, Charles .....,..,...,,,....,.,,. 25 248 Horwitz, Beatrice .,,,.,,.,,,,,,.,,..,,,,l,,,,,, 213 gen' omg """""""A""""'""' """"""" 2 Hess, Sidney ..........................................,.. 250 Horwitz, Samuel .......,,,,.,....,,,,,,,.,.,,,,,,,,, 52, lille, Rntll W ------1---- ----------ee-- 2 07 Hel-zeg, Robert ...,,..,................... 65, 292 114,115,121,182, 272, 291 lli8affLMlCll2Cl --"-e-'-- -'e--------' 1 Hestenes, Ma nus R ,,,r,..,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 195 Hotchkiss, William P ---f---l---l------- 203 0 ' eorlai """"""""'""""""""" Hevenary ,lei Hougln Isabelle M,,1,.1,e,,d nqlill 207 Irnbf, William .,,,.,,........ 190,191 196 Heyman, H. H ........,.......,,.1................. 211 Hough, lack .,,.....,...........,...........,......,,.,,. 191 lrnnef Nnrrnan Allan -ll--l--------------- 211 Hibben, George Neemes ............ 207 Houghteling, Leila ...,............,......,....., 30 Ingalls, lnnn "1-1-----------------'------' 226,285 Hibber, George ..............,......,.,..,......... 305 Houston, Edward .......,...................... 139 Irons, Edwln ---------''-----"'-"rr------------------ 230 Hibbert, George F .........,...........,...... 289 Howard, Arthur John ..,............... 207 Irons, Ernest E '""'1-----'1"------""---1-'-- 280 Hildebrand, N .....,.........,,,....................., 210 Howarfll Bifm B -----'--------l----'-e-"--------- 641 israel' IrV"fnR'li 't" nn':'i'i'1 """"'i" 186 Hill, Elizabeth Florence ..,.....,,.. 213 1431134 279 me sraml re r lam 207 Hill, Margaret E .,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 87, Howard, Cllnllncy -------n-------"----------'-- 52. Issaeion """' Q """"""""""""""""""""""" 248 gg,154,165,170,171, 175, 1550, 151,156,159,201 293 Izzedln, Nella Mustopha ......... 203 183,225,259 Howard, Frank R ..,. 226,272 293 Jackson, Harriett C ...........,,.......,.... 226 Hillard, Robert .,.,...,................ 296, 301 Howard, Robert .,.,.,...,,............. 157 293 Jacobsen: Allred E '--'-'r--1--------------' 74- Hilliard, R. M ........, 2 .22 ,.,.......,.,,,.. 211 Howe, Charles .... ,.,.... ......,........... 2 9 0 13412001295 Hills, John M ........,....,............,,............ 191 Howe, Alden ................... ,...........,......,... 2 10 Jacobsen, Ella, I '-""'-'-"-'--'r-------rr-"--" 211 Hilton, Casper H ..,,,.......,...... 150,293 Howe, John ,..............................,, 150,201 Jacobson, lrnlng ""------------' '--- l 991200 Hiltford, Gertrude .........................., 207 Hnwigy Carl Nelson ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,i,,,,- 193 Jacobson, Snlrley Lorel --""-----' 200 Hinckley, John hssssliigi-A'v-Y'w--'."..-.--.."""' 298 Howland, Henry Phelps, Jr. Jacobson, W, G .,.,..................,........... 153 Hinds, Robert ......,,....... 225. 298, 300 207 Jackson, Callslfl ------------------4--e-------------- 229 Hinton, Edward W .,..,.....,.........,.... 286 Hoyt, Frank C .........,............,,.........,......... 21 -laclrsnnl Jullan -l '"''''r-"-'----'-'--"'----'- 207 Hirsch, Dora .,.....,................,................. 211 Hrachovska, Helen A .......,........... 210 .laclrsnnr lnlln M "-r"rr--r-'------ 1961202 Hirsch, Gertrude Rosina ......... 212 Hruska, Victor E ..,.,.. 215, 24-8, 304 -lacksnnr Rlcllafffl ------'-'--"--"-'-----"-"'--- 279 Hirsch, Herbert. .,,,.......,............,....,..... 299 Hruby, Milton ..,........,.........................,. 191 lanwlnv Dnvlrl ----------'-r" -----r"------ 2 92 Hirsch, Louise .......,,......,,............,......... 210 Hu, Kuen-Sen ..................................,.... 195 -lalrerv Lonls E '-----------'---'--'----""1-------' 202 Hirschl, Jessie Hickman ............... 4-2 Hubbard, Archie .................,...,........... 295 Jaffe, Sol ..,.,,........,..,,,,.,.....,............,............ 200 Hoag, Louis ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 275 Hubbard, Frances ......,,....,,....,........... 259 laflree, Theresa Helene, ,............. 207 Hoagland, Robert ...,.....,..... ......,.,. 2 93 Hubert, Caroline Alma .......,....... 211 james, Hal ............,...........,........... 185,288 Page 341 James, Harold ..............,,,.......,,......,..,...... 62 joseph. Herbert ..,......,..,...........,.,....,,... 63 Kesner, Jane ,....,...... 52,6-1,180,228 jancius, VVilliam ........,....,.,..........,..,A.. 209 joseph, Phyllis Eileen ..,... 194,212 Kessel, Morton ...,......,,.....,,..,,..,,......... 228 janereck, Frank Albert ............,.. 208 -loshel, Sylvia ......,..........,.......,.........,... 227 Key, V. O .......,..,..,....,.....,.,,.,................... 203 Janata, Martha .........,.......................... 208 -lose, Elaine .......................,............,,....... 227 Kharasch, Morris ......,...........,.............. 21 Janus, Arthur Israel ......,.....,........ 208 joy, Grace Anne ..........,... ,.....,....... 2 13 Killie, Louise ......................,.,...., 228,256 jarnes, Roy ...,,.,....,,.,............. ..........,. 2 88 jucius, Michael J., .........,..,.........,, 139, Kincl1loe, VVilliam M ....,.........,. 207 Jeffers, Jessie L ..v.-4'.,-.' -'----.-,"- 2 09 197 209 Klndred, Dolan Gladys ...,.,...... 186 .lol-for-Son, Carl ,.l4.4,..--,,, -------.-.-- 2 93 Judd, Charles H ............. 24, 26 279 Kring, Mary Freeman .................. 209 Jeffrey, Donald ""'-...-.--,,NI4----------w------- 201 Judge, john: ................ I ..... , .......,....,.......,... 209 Klngsbury, F. A ......,.........,....,..,,...,.,., 2S-l- lenkinsy Dorothy B .-.,----..w,- 213 227 nlullan, Emily M1ld1'Cd ,,,,...,....... 213 Kinsey, Sue Eva ....,...,..,. Z ....,,,............ 207 Jenkins, Hilgdr ,,.,-I-I'..4A-AA-A,..-A---,--A------ 281 Jullan, Ormond .........,..,,..........,........... 296 Kerby, Florence MHYIOH .,,......... 207 Jenkins, Mary 4,,4...--,,,4-l" --A.,,------ 2 02 jungers,-Mary Rose ........,............... 256 Klrby, VV1.ll.1am james .................. 186 Jenkins, Stanley --"'.-A-A-A..l,l.AA-x--------,----A 294 Qlurt, W1ll13m.r ........r...............,............... 209 Krrk, Cecilia Mary .....,.......,,....... ,207 lenklns, Thomas A ,---A-,-,------A 19 231 Kabaker, Alvin ......,................. 2071, 2429 K11-k'patr1ck, Truman.: .....,.,.,........ 201 lonnlngsy Samuel C Ul--,---'--,---,--,.1-,,w 10 Kadln, Maurlne ,...............,................... 61, Klsslnger, joseph All'1HgfOH 210 Jensen, julia Charlotte ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 209 133,188 282 Klstler, Gene Haveland ............ 186 Jer-Sildy Esther Ill-----------,------l-1-14.,,.-'-4--,. 265 Kaether, Fred C ..............,............. .203 lgIfZ1l1gCl', Helene Aimee ......,.. 207 Jnrsildy Gerhnrdt Snmnnlrrr-M193 gallon, Flolxenclsi .....,... 1 .....,...,,.,........ llglass, rgbraham Flank .........,..... 227 Jeter, Kai elt, Jo 1n orrls ,4................ 1 ass, e en. .............,............,,,,..,. ....,...22.8 ,Ewell wrillinm--WM '-l-"4 A-227 276 vahn, Blanche ..,,......,,..,...,...,,.....,,........ 227 Klaas, Rosalind A .,...........,..,......., 115 '- - ' - 1X.31f5Cl1llCll Herbert C ....,,,,..,.,... 227 Klaucek Jerome ................,....,......,,,.. 290 JIFIHCC, Rose Joseph1ne...176 200 ' I ' 1 Elohler, Blshorh 4ll44l---l-w'---------lllllhlllhllhl 256 Kalven, Janet.R ..,........,.. 2 ....... 198 200 Kleltman, Nathaniel ...,.................... 15 Johns, 'loner ,uunlllnnnnuulnnnnlnn 227,255 263 Kamen, Martin Davld .,............. 209 Kleln, Hortense .,.................. ..,,.,...... 2 O9 Johnson Adelaide M .-,--l------------- 195 Kamlnsky, Frances Ruth ............ 201 Kleln, Lolnse Sidney ..........,...,.......,, 208 Johnson Barney AruI..-----l'-'w'-'--------..-r.. 283 Kamm, Harold .............,..4................... 303 Kleln, MlltOH Paul ,..,....,.. ..,,,...... 2 07 Johnson Bernard ullnnnrolllrv ...."-----. 2 S6 Kanne, Louls Edgar ....44l........l..... 213 Kl?lI1Smlll1, Albert ........... ,...,...... 2 01 Johnson Carroll llllllllll' 4,..l-"---'----l 1 98 Eanlor, lguthi ......,.....,,...,,..,..............,.... Qllnebeig, -Jerdrvne .......................,... , ap an, ertla ........................,........... ing. OUISC .,,,,......r......,..,,......., 1322222 Sl3I31T1i?Qjiiiijiigiiiiiiiiiii iii ,fgerlani 213,968 Abfaham"'e'1335 5i0e,'U'1,1agne Kewl 11'e4'-11e---ee 212 Johnson Elenora ........,,..,,....,,,.....,...... 198 Ka? 311' 1 1161 "t'"'""'"""""A""""""' 'Ole' Olert ""'""""""""""" 223 294 Johnson Elsie Kathrvn-mu-M0207 Vaiasick, Dalvld .,,...r......... 1 ..........A..... 200 Knecht, Einest .........,..,,,............,.,,,...4.,, 284 Johnson Franklin P' 18 lgarigarg Marle Euggenla ............ Eluteyl, Cargyrl H ....,......,................ 210 , ar, - now ton, atlyrine....,.....,......,...192 Johnson G' '''''''"'""''""'4"""'4""""" 291 Kass, Rosalind ,........,. .......... 1 92 Knudten, Carl S ....,........,....,...........,... 209 Johnson, Gelald ....,,... 133 152 286 , Katz Dewev ,-----,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,, 1 95 Koch Fred Conrad ...,,..r..........,...,.,., 14 Johnson' Halold 'A""""' "" 'nglzgggg Kami Samrfel ,,,,,v,,-,,- --,,-,-,,---,,- 2 10 Koch, Frederich H .....,,.........,........ 295 Johnson H. T. V '-----.-.'-.1 Allrrrrlllllrr 294 Katz, Evelyn ....,.......,,.,...,...................... 210 1500111 Harold lay ----'-------4---4,-','--'4A 210 Johnson Irene -l--,,,--'.-r.-"l.,lrl--r...'.-"-"'- 211 Kau1liman,Pr7llJol't ...,.......,... ...... Koehler, Adeline ......,.......,......,....,.,. 265 . 'au man, i iam ....., ,7 ,2 Kolar, osephine ...,......,.,.....,,. 212 228 lslssss tttttt,,,t,tr,rtrr,r,r,rrrtrt,.,y,,rrrrr,, E rrtr yt,,rrr,,,yyyttorrrrrt,,,t,.,,,r, - """""'""""""""""" ' 'eane, anon ....,.........44.........,..,..,....... o , 11 ip .........,.......,......,.....,..........,... 210 1322382 """""""""""' Keefe, Elizabeth Ann ,........,........ 209 Kolderup, Arthur Raymond.,.2l0 Johnson Ornnn """ 210 Keenan, R. I ........................................... 150 Koranda, Frank Louis ..,,...,.......... 208 Keenan, Ruth Leona,.............,.........207 Korshak, Stanley Ray.4....,..,......,.,,.207 JOIIHSOH Raymond ----'----f-"-'-4A--e------ 195 Keller, Alice B ..,..,,,.........,, .......... 1 97 Kortenl. Richard M .....,,r...........,...., 207 lolmson 371515116133 S --------rr--1 227 Keller, Helen ..,......,....,,,..... ............l 9 1 Kott, Arthur- Edwin l,,ll.,,,,,,,,,,,,,.l,., 2011 Omson 10 3 ""'44-A'------------'44--4--- Keller, Lois 4.......,......,....,.- .-......-..-.-. 2 57 Kousser, joseph ..........,.....,........,......, 301 johnson VVallace ,,,.......... .,...,.,...e 2 83 Kellogg, James ,,,,,,-,,-, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 77 Kozelkai Adolph VV lnrluuvlullnrlnlolllll 195 1011115091 Vvffffffn ---4----'--'-----4--AA------'--e---- 21 Kellogg, Kathryn .................,............ 208 Krahl, Mary Alice ......,..............,,..., 207 Jolmsonr Wllllam ----------e- 1 --re------------- 295 Kelly, Alfred H ............,l,.......l........ 194, Krammer, Sylvia ,,,l,,,,,,,l.,l,,, 192 2011 Johnston' Dortha Mar1e"1'n'n"1292'1'n 132,133,198 Krauczunas, Peter M ..,....,,....,, 208 Kelly, Rowland L ........,..,.,.. 198 . , Krrrbuvrlrrhlvllllrrlrhlr K2 ..'----e--r---- ----------------, 3 Eirlndpzrlgunirmlrnn ,.... Q .Enron ...l....l... lllllllllllllllvl llllllll 2 QS , ' .,....,...........,....................... l , ,,-,,,,,,,,, r. I 1 . 0 long? Ellgltbsiille ..,...,......,....... Kendrick, Aaron B .,,,,,. - ................ 195 llqllilorllulhlllr 255 552 Jnnen Haydon """"""""""' ' '190 Kenlston, Hayward .,.,,,...,.,.................. 19 Kriz, Raymond joseplln ,..,.,..,.,,,., 207 ' g """"""""'""""""""'A"" Kennedy, Edward .....,................,.,...., 293 K1-inning, Fred A ...........,..,. 301,228 1011551 Mddfed E ---'------A- ----1------ 2 02 Kennedy, Nancy jane .................. 207 Kroesan, Harry '...,. .,,..,..,...,r..,. 2 89 229 101165 Sggiff ---' 4'--- "4'------------'----------AA- A Kent, May Hall.. .,,.......................,,.. 207 Krulewitch. Harold., ,.,.....,,......,. 207 01195 ' S 11113 on "--"---'-----------'--e--'4- - Kenyon, David Clark .......,.......... 207 Krumbein, Vllilliam ,,.. .....,.,,. 191 10115133 lnromil -'-------- 131,133,323 Kenyon, Elmer L ......,......................,. 279 Kuderna, Anne ..,...., . .,...,. 209 Or 2111, A owe 1 My ,4--e--....-.-4f---144.' - - Keogh W. E .......,.,l..l.l...,,.,...., 153,281 Kuehn, Erna l,,,l,,4,,r1,l ,,,,,.l,.er,,1e,r,,,1,,, 2 57 ilorf-13111 1311951 1-"-'----1-----"- "'--'--e---""' 2 90 Kerr, Donald ....,...1...,........ 75, 185,27-1 Kuehnert, rI'l1COLlUl'C j. C ...,,,, 212 jordan, ,lean ,,.,, .,,,..,.. ..,..,................,....,.,.. 5 2 Kerstein, Melvinm., .,,...., ,..200, 291 Kuh, Emily ',.,., ,......, .,...,.,,.., , ,,,,.,,, , , 62 -l0I'll'6fl5Ol1, Robert ..,.,,..,....,,... 298,300 Kern, Stella .,... ,.,,.,,... ,,.........,.. 2 2 8 Kuhns, VVilliam. .,., 229, 286 Page 342 Cl D Kulin, Ludwig Roland ...........,...... 202 Leiter, Louis .........................,.................., 292 Lindahl, R. I ..,......,,.........,.......... 150, 293 Kume, Matazo ....,.........,........,.....,....,.,.. 195 Leitzman, Jewel .,,............................., 210 Linden, Catherine S .....,.............,..... 210 Kunde, Margaret M .............,........ 202 Leland, Simon .,,...,...............,. 24, 25 281 Linden, Frances .................,...,,..........,.. 267 Kupersmith, Harry ,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,A,,.,,,,,,. 200 Lemon, Harvey B ................... 21 281 Lindenbaum, Dorothy .,.,,............. 207 Kurth, Clarence Arthur. ..,,....... 212 Leonard, Gordon ..................... 249 305 Linder, Hallie Erma ..i..,... 212,229 Kutner, David ..............,.,,...,................. 299 Lennartson, Grace Dreker ...... 207 Lindqu1styJ0hn Lockwood -,,-,,--, 195 KYCSHPIYSYUU '-'------A' 1 V----V-----4-----'A----------- 279 Lennette, Edwin H ..,...,,,.,.. 197,209 Lindsay, Frank H, ....................,,......... 10 IEfaf3k1'11ZbhRuth V10151 -------------------- 3211087 Lennington, Thales ,,,,,,,,,,A.,,44,,,,,,,, 304- Linfield, Nlarjorie .......................,... 203 amgi ester --------------'--1--4-------------4---- i Lenz Donald ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, A,,,,,.,,,, 2 74 Lingle, David J ...... ................,.. .288 , 51,75,130,182,293 Leppiard, Henry ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 3 Link, A. ner .rrrr,....lrr,..... ,, ..r...r.. 192 Iiafngi gffdofl 4441ef-------4, ','------,"-- 4--4------ 2 7 Lepunsky, Esther .r....... ..,.,.r,,,, 2 11 Link, George K ....,..............,,................ 13' aff , OFCUCC ---------'--------'.---------A------ 22 Le Ritte, Helen ,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,, 2 01 Link, John N ..,.,....,......,.,.........,........... 207 Lalfdi LCOUHIT1 ---------------------'------4---------- 275 Lerner, L. S .,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,.,r,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 209 Link, Harriet Caroline .,.,.,....,,.., 207 Laird, Marion .,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 194 296 Lesch, Lyndon ....,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 281 L1Hi21Hd, Richard ,...,..... , .........,....,....... 288 Lakin, Dorothy ....,,.....,,...,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 207 L V F- d .' 1'--193 200 274 LIIIU, James Webel' ,.....,.. 274- Lamac, George ............,,.,,..,....A,,,,,,,.,,, 275 Liigjliji gycfillfzilii ------------ ---.w---.,' 1--139 L11'lSU'H, Evelyn .-----.........- .......... 2 29 Lamb, Jeannette .....,... 211,229 267 Legsing, Waiiand Wallace ,,,,,, 212 Lgppman, Byron -.-.-----.- 230 Lamrnedee Hester l.....,.......,..,..,......... 207 L - R1 L1PSCh1f2, RCI121 ---4----------------- ----...... 2 07 r ester, o and ........,.,......,......... 150, 201 . . Lampert, Philip, ................................... 303 L,-35161-, Thomas --,-,,,--LI-.,--,------,,,,,--.,-,-- 233 1I:1P511i1i Ilgiswldn 444n4-----4--444----------A---n------- 297 Lampos Michael ,..,,, ,.........,, ............,.. 2 O 0 L y D11 ---,,,----- 133 194 199 212 IPS Y, b0trB1-rnnerr -------------.---. 199 Landry: Joseph .....,..,,.,............ 194,207 Litiltin qgann " ' '201 Lissitz, Samuel, .,..,.......,,........,............ 188 Landstrom, Vivian Florence...207 L 1 ly """""""""""""""""" Lfsfmgi CCC9113 nnn444-----A---n----- 180, 266 Lane BIQSSQU1 207 evtnsoni 50111 -----e--'--- 15611599 291 Linen Winn Haier-nnn ii............. 207 Lanef Elias ,,,,,,,,, li1:Zim-----W-71:11:1211 ,LEW I11dWa1Q11 """"'ee'1-4"'-e'--4-4' 197212 Livingston, David Abraham.,,200 Lang, 5Riithard ..... . ,........ ,,,,..,,,, 2 .07 Lev? 291131 ii "e"' ,Qs 44""""-"-""4""e' 291 Livingston, Robert .....r..........,.......... 299 Langdgn, Harold' ,,,,,,,,.. ......,,.,..,,. 2 07 LEE? Amin Us 111' "4"""""'e""' Livingston, Rosemary .......,.......... 230 Langert, Bernice ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,..,,, 200 - ' """ """""' """"" """""' L 1 0 yd. Haffief Lucille .................. 207 Lan fo,-d R S 153 293 Levin' CHQ """'ii'i""4"'4"""" """""' 1 38 Locker, GUY A -nnn-ff------------------n----------- 203 g ' ' '""""t"""""""' ' Levin, David Max ,.,,........,. ,........,. 1 50 L k d V' - ' L LareW, Roberta .....,....,....,..,................. 210 Levin Noah ,OG Yocbwgii lfgmla '-4-------A----n--- 209 Larkin, Francis ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,-----,--- 210 . 1 . """"""i"""' """"""i"""""' H 1106 , ' C3n01' .,,---.,........... ,...................... 2 30 Larsen, Bertha Maud ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 207 Levmet Davld Challes ""' 151, "" 2 6056 L0Cb, FYHHCCS .---. -.,....-VV...-r.i..-..-....,,,...... 1 73 Larson, Laverne ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 198,211 Levine Janice " 'UZ Loeb, Jack -----n----------n----A-n4---44A-.-----n 74,198 La,-Sony Myron W111 d 4",,,--- 156, , 1 , 'A'4"""""e-e'-AA--"4---------'-Ar Long, Benjamin ...,.,............,i................ 249 15912 200,286 Iievfnger' 111516 """"""""""tA' "'A 6 2 261 Loventhal, William ........................ 292 Lai-Son, Roy ,I,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,---,--,,,,,,,,..1----.,.---.,- 273 LEXQEZZE' Sgalgflrglp """"""' Loehr, Alis ,..,.... ................,......,. .......... 1 9 6 L R , R b ,,,,,1,,,,,, 156,159,,27" ' I """"""""" Loewenstein, Edith .......................,... 207 Lisehtle Dnggcigi ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,-,, N223 ECW- RIHVE Max --nn4'---11---- --4200 227 Loewenstein, Marjorie ................ .230 Lggk' , S311 ,,,...,,.,,,.,,..,,....,...,,-,.-.-,--.-,- 209 WY, - ---4--'---'-'4-1-1----1-4'-1--111------------- 1 3 Loowenstein, Rosalie .......,.........,,.. 170 Lasswell Hyarold ------- 298 Levy, Stanley .....,....,.....,.....,................... 200 Loewenthal, Jane S ,,,,,.,,,, ,,,,,,,, , ,230 Laufmani Harold .................,........... 144. Lewfirenz' Edna Martha """"t"' 212 Loewyi Ka111e1111e ---'-'---- ---------' 2 09 14,5,146,1887 229, 291 Lewgs, Art ---1------1--1------ 1 ---.,-------,..44-------....., 249 Logan, Grace ,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,, ,,,,,,,.,, 2 01 Lauman, Irving ,,........,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 212,291 iewfsv 13165151 Vmcent ---------'--'-' 207 Logsdfmr MaYmC 1 ----f----n---n-------------- 23 La e , Ku t, ,,.,,...,,,,,..,,r,..,,,,,,,,,,.,,.,,,..,,,,,,, 275 eW1Sf aV1 -------------------------4'--- 249 304 L011Uel', Myffie ---------------nn4---'-4-----'------ 201 Lazvf, C1218 Mary urllln Lew1s, Dorothy V .......................,.... 207 Lolirlein, Cecilia Carrier-ine Lawreilce, Charles ,...,,......,.............. 292 LEWIS, George """""""""""""""""""' 210 L E d R 230 Lawson, Hampden Clesly ....., 192, 1-CWiS, I. I -----------.---- ---------i---- 1 53 293 Ong, Qmon --------n-----4---- 277 212 Lewis, Lacey .,,,,.,,,,r, ,,,r..,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 10 LOI1g, VIDCCIIL P ......... ....i........,. 2 09 Lawton, Gai-irride ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 52,201 Lewis, 11221111 ........,,...... .........,. 2 76 LOPEZ, hlilfgaret ...,.,....... ............... 5 :EQ Leamin Mary Magda -----------, 207 Lewis, 0 err ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,, 288 or er, aurice .,,.,,....,...,,,.....,.......... - Leaver,g1Lila Marieui ....,.,,. 194,207 Lewison, ECiWiifCi -------.--,-----1-.-,,--,----- 207, I1j01'12e1'iFVfZiCt01' -----------------A-------n- 193 L avitt, C l 'n ..,.,..,,..,.,........,. 229,277 229, 249, 291. 303 011151 fe ------'----'-------n------4--n--- Lgavitt, H2155 ,,,,,.-,,,,,,,Q,,,,,-------,,---,--,-,, 201 Lewy, Lawrence ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 291 Lovvsenstein, Rosalie ..........,.,........ 166 Leckrone, Sara Jane .,,.,................... 265 L1. Cheng Cilefl --------n4---,- ,---------- 1 95 Louis, Fred Wong ....,..... 2,230 Leddy, Nlargaret Ethel .......,....... 207 L1blEyi D9bOE6I11 "" 3 """""""' """""' 2 63 L0Vf3Ufha1r LCC J ----------------4--1--n -----4-- 2 09 Lederer, Hen,.y.,4". .rllll '--- -201,292 L16 UEIISICIII, HXIHC .,...................... 192 Lgvetty James ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,126 Lederer, ,lllb . .---- L1CDSI'1'la1'1 ,, ................,.........,...... ,.......... 2 16 Lovett, M .-,,,,,,,..,1-'- Ledoux, Alfred ------ A Vbrr ----,... mm-H195 Liehenson, Joseph ..,,...,.....,.......,........ 229 Lgvetty Roberr M ,,,,,,,,,, 17 231 L , Ma-' -'e ,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 29 Lieberman, Arnold...195,202,249 Lowrie Donald .....,.................. 281 LEE, Trusltieixvi --,-,-------,,,,,,,,,,,,,,-,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 286 Lieberman, Laura ,,,r,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 165 Lucas, 'Olive ....... ,,,,........,, 2 12, 269 Leibei, Fi-itz, ji- ,,,,,,,,,,,,,r,,,,,,,, 194,198 Lieberthnl, Jack .......,...,...,,...,.....,...... 282 Luckhardt, Arno B ..,....,...,..,. .... 1 5 Leibman, Morris Irvin ,.,,,..,..,.... 207 Lifschultz, Burton B ..,,....,,....,....... 197, LUCkharCit, Dorothy ............ 207 Leidtke, Edward ...,.................,......,.... 278 212 282 Luckhardtr Hilmfm ---n------1- 1236 Leigh, E .....,,r.,,....,. .....,..,.........,.............r.... 2 49 Lillie, Frank R .................., 12,13,284 Luckenbill, D. D .......,... .... 1 7 Lein, Mary Elizabeth ..,....,...,,.,... 189, Lind, Edmund LeRoy ..,....... ,. ..,...... 195 Lucy, Harold P ............., .191 194,200 Lindahl, Hannah M ..,,....., 197,211 Ludbery, Alice ..,....r...... .201 Page 343 Lund, Johannes J ..........,.........., - ..,. 203 Marks, Jerome 4....................,...............,. 291 McCormack, John ......,..,,..,..............., 191 Lundgren, Emma C .......,,..,............. 210 Marland, Sylvia Janet ............... 207 MCCullagh, Florence Amy...194, Lyman, Rollo L ......4...4....................... 295 Marlow, Hubert YN ...........,.,........ 195 196, 197,198, 212, 231 Luster, Norman L ................,..........,.,. 230 Marquardt, Hattie Anna ......... 212 McCune, Thomas Edwin .,.......... 207 Lyman, Ruth ......... 87',88,16-1-,165, Marquardt, Richard ..,,.....,....,...... 277 McCurry, John C .,........,........,,...,... 210 166,170,171, 172, 175,180, Marquison, Mildred Henrietta McDaniel, Kathryn ...,.........,....... 166, 3, 230 207 170,171,175, 231 Lynch, John M ......,..,.....,....,.....,.......... 157, Marriom, Charles ................................. 24 MCDaVid, VVilliam ,... ....................... 3 05 198,200,290 Marron, John ............... 144,145,146 McDill, James R ........,......................... 48 Lynskey, E. P ...............,,.....,..,....,.,.......... 209 Marshall, Grace ........,,....................... 201 McDonald, Helen Margaret 207 Lyons, Cornelia Heile .................. 207 Marshall, Isabelle Hicken .,..,. 200 McDonald, VVm. T ................,..,.,... 202 Lyons, Neva L ..,..,.i,...,,.,,.,,,,,.,,,,,,,,..... 196 Marshall, Mariann ...,...,.....,..,,,..,..... 207 McDonnell, Katherine ..........,......, 210 Lyons, Walter David ......,,. 207,305 Marshall, VVade Harnpton.,.190, McDougal, C. B .,,..,,...............,........ 249 Lypski, Harold .,.,.............................,,, 230 195 McDougal, Dugald ...,,....... 201,290 Mac Clintock, Cornelia ...i......,.,.. 230 Martin, Allan .....,.,.........,..........,............. 299 McEnery, Frances E .,.................... 210 Mac Donald, K, A I,,,,,--,---,,-,-,-,,,,,, 210 Martin, Katherine, .........,,......,,...... 207 McFrancis, Helen Eugenie ...... 207 Mae Guineas, Donald B ,,,,,,,,,.,,, 193 MHFZSC, Edmfmd --------'--------------'-----'--- 201 McGiffe1-r, A. C ...............................,,..., 40 Mac Leon, Norman .........,... ,.......... 2 77 Maschal, Henry .,,.....,,......,,,.............. 301 McGill, Rosamond N ..,................ 210 Mac Limans, Jane Ross ..,,..,,,.., 211 Mason, Herman Charles ..........,. 212 MCGilliCudy, Ira .....,..................i..... 201 Mac Millan, Donald Patten...200 Masonl, Kate ......,......................,..........., 267 McGillivray, Coach ..................,,..., 144 MacPherson, Gwendolyn ......... 231, Molly, Mason ...........,..........,.......,,.......... 262 McKittriek, Robert E ..,.,.............. 301, 264 Mason, Ruth Glidden ..........,....... 195 209,197 Mac Roberts, Dolores ..r.........,,,,,,..,,., 91 Massias, Olga ,.................... ...........,. 2 07 McGrath, Ralph Martin ,..,.,... 194, Mack, Dorothy ..............,..,...........,...... 231 Mast, Gifford ......,,..........,......,,...........,... 201 207 Mack, Helen ,......,,,................................... 211 Massey, Miriam .,.............,....,............ 231, MCGuig21rl, Dall ...,.......,... 81,82,276 Maddison, Winifred R .....,,......... 207 254, 255,268 McHart. Ruth ....,....,.......................,,.,..... 261 Magee, Horace ...,,........,.......... 201,274 Mather, W. B .,,,.,.........,.,........., 191,281 McIntosh, Robert .................,.........,.. 274 Magee, Patrick .............,,... 69, 245, 288 Mathews, Charles Lincoln...200, McKenna, Hugh ...,...,.....,,i........,...,.... 295 Magie, Gertrude .,.....................,......,.. 201 300 McKinley, Robert T ...,...,,. 217,305 Maguire, Jessie Morse .......,.......... 200 Mathews, Shailer .,,..,...,..,..,................. 38 McKinsey, James O ........,,.., 29,289 Mahoney, George E ..........,........ 121, Mathies, Roland ,,.,........,..................,. 304 McKeon, Mary E .....,.,.....,.,............ 210 184, 273 Matson, Arthur .....................,......,....... 275 McKenney, J. O ......,....,.,........,....,...... 301 Mailick, Molly Claire ...,,.....,....... 209 Matson, Josephine De Moss McLaughlin, A. C .......,...,........,.......... 274 Maize, Eleanor ..,,.....,...........,.............. 267 194,207 MCLin, Adelaide Mary ............... 209 Maize, Mary Campbell ............ 207 Matson, Margaret Alexander McMahon, James John, Jr. Mallory, Hervey ......,........,.........,.,..,.. 281 207 66, 67, 144, 231, 276 Mallnv, Mary Ellen ,,--,-,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 207 Matthews, Charles .....,....,,....i....,..... 289 McMahon, Roy .,,..................,.,...,....,... 278 Malm: Ha,-ry A -,,,-,-Y,,,,-,-,,,, ,,,,,---,, 3 02 Matthews, Shailer ......i......,... ,..........., 2 79 McMillian, D. C .....,,........................ 207 Malone, James ,,,,,l,,,,,,-----, ,,--,, 2 49 Mauermann, Max H .......,.,......... 209 McMurray, George .........,.............. 304 Lqalugeny Jack ,lwnnnlnnbnnnnlklnnnlnlul,,,,,-,,------ 296 Mauerman, Edward ......,............., 288 McNab, Donald i......,,,............,,......... 295 Mandernack, George .........,..... - .,,. 272 Mauflcef Melba G ----'44-----------A-----' 213 McNair, Frank ..................... 10, 42, 279 Mandernack, Loren ,,,,,,,,,,,, 139, 296 Mawlckey MHTY 4-f-',',-- ------------- 2 60 McNall, Marguerite ...,.....,.............. 207 Maneikis, VValter .,,,,...............,......... 200 MQW, Mefflll 4---- -------- -4--f4---4--- 2 0 1 McNichols, Margaret Rita ...... 207 Mann, George ....................................... 296 Mayer, James ...,,...,....... ............. 2 31 McRoberts, Dolores ........................ 231 Manning, Ruth Lucia ,.,,,.... ........, 2 10 Mayer, Robert B ............. ....,,,...... 2 10 McRoberts, Dorothy ........................ 260 Manshordt, Clifford ............,.,,.,......... 40 Mayo, Frank Rea .........,.. ........,,... 2 94 Mead, George Herbert .................. 19 Manly, John M ...........,...,..,,,.........,,........ 17 Mayo, Stanley ........,......, ..,......,.., 2 94 Mead, Robert K ....,.....,..............,......,, 203 Maninn, Frances Mafv ,,,,,----,,-,-, 207 Mazor, Vera ,.,.......... ........... .,,....,.,... 2 1 1 Mecher, Frank ............... 156,159,298 Manussoxricll' S, S ,,,,,,,--- ,--,----,,-,,,,,, 211 McAllister, John G ........,.r,,.......,,.., 196 Meierdierks, George O .,.,......,.. 210 Mapel, Selma G ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,-,,-,,,,,,,,,,,, 210 McCabe, James Leo ..,,.,...............,., 211 Meites, Gilbert .,.............,....,.,.....,....,,. 303 Mara,-alln Dennarayan Oman McCandless, George W ........,.... 207 Melamerson, Natalie H .....,.,..... 231 210 Mccaffhfl 10110 F ---,4-4------------------ 249 Melee, Julia Jennie ..,...,,,,...,,......... 207 Marcnvlcn, Al,ral,n,-n Vvnlf 213 McCarthy, John D ..,.....,,,....,......... 186 Melln, Hazel Eyrangeline ,,,,,,,,, ZQ7 Marcovich, Aubrey .,.,,,..............,,.. 291 McCarthy, Robert ...... 180,182.295 Melnick., sarah ,.....,......,....,.,....,..,....... 232 Markus, Etu ........,.,..........., ,............,,....... 2 31 Mccaftlny Helen Elizabeth---19+ Melvin, Richard I ............,..,...,r.... 209 Marcus, Harry .........,.. 210,249,303 I 196,213 Mendelsohn, David ..,......,....,.......,. 292 Nlarcy, Marjorie Lenore ......... 194, MCCIXESUCY1 Edlfh M -------'--44---A-,4 211 Mentzer, John P ,.....,.,........... .......,.... 4 2 210 Mccllnficv Elizabeth C --------'A'-"" 210 Mercier, Arthur ..,.. ,,.- ..,,,.... ........,.,.... 2 S7 lviarcy, Minerva ,..,,,,.,......,.,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,. 192, NICCIIUYO'-Tk' Cornelia -'4------------ 91-92 Merlin, Ruth Hortense ,...... ......., 2 07 Margolis, Arthur .......,.....,......,,........ 292 McCloud, Edward ...294,301,231 Merriam, Charles E ....,,....,,...,... Marhoefer, Helen Zoe ...,...........,.. 207 McCaulay, Allan .,,......,,...,... 201,284 Merriam, Elizabeth ........1 48, 52,37. Markham, Floyd S ...............,......... 202 McCauley, VVallace ........,... 231, 281 88,91,164, 172, 180,183,194, Markham, Herbert I ..,.......,.,.,.......... 42 McClure, George M .,.,..,,,,,,,,r,,,,,,, 186 198,232,25S,266 Markowitz, 1Villiam ................,.... 195 McConnell, John VVarner ...... 213, Merriam, Natalie ....,.....1....,.....,.. - ..., 264 hdarks, Howard .,... ...,... ...,.. ..., - .,,. 2 8 6 288 Merriam, Ned. ,....,... ...... 128,294 P!lfl!' 3-If El D Merrick, Gordon D ......................... 209 Moore, Harry ...,,..................................... 295 Neilson, Jeanette .........,,....,...,.........,,.. 207 Merrick, Hubert .,,,..............,.........,.... 296 Moore, John .........,.......,... 133,217,302 Neiman, Llletta Ruth ...--,.,.------..--.- 209 Merrifield, Charles .....,,.. 52, 75, 274 Moore, Margaretha ........,... 166, 263 Neivelt, Sam .............,v........................... 194 Merrifield, Fred ......... 232, 274,304 Moore, Merritt Hadden ............... 19 Nelson, Bertram ......... 133,209 281 Merrill, Harriette V .............,,....... 210 Moore, Ruth E .....,.............,..........,...... 203 Nelson, Betty Anne ........,............... 201 Merrill, Robert Valentine ............ 19 Morehouse, Charlotte .................. 173, Nelson, Esther Linnea .................. 213 Messenger, Eli ,,,,4,,,,,,..,,,,,4,,,,AA,,,,,,,,..,,,, 286 189,198,232 Nelson, H. H ................................., 38,211 Messingerl Betty Irene ..,,.,--..--.-, 207 Morey, Glen Henry ......,.....,,....,..... 195 Nelson, Isaelore ......................,............. 272 Meyer, Charlotte ,Ittt,,-------..,-.--,.----YY' 232 Morey, Mary Grace ...............,........ 207 Nelson, Myron E -.......... ............ 2 00 Meyer, Beniamin Samuel --t-.,,-- 207 Morgan, Helen .rr....,....,.........,................ 173 Nennlnger, John R ...................,,.... 207 Meyer, Gertrude Clara -r,.t-,,..Y--'- 209 Moriaty, Frederick Barston 207 Neuwelt. Frank .............................1...... 210 Miehell, William Ranelolpli Morris, Charles ...................,,..i.,...,....., 19 Newman, Cathryn M ................... 209 213,232 Morris, Harold .....i.............,................ 151 Newman, Herbert .............................. 201 Miekel, Herbert Leon rrtriieererleveiiv 182 Morris, Margaret ,..... 175,179,207 Newman, H. H ......................... 13 295 Milreseliy Anton Yt-iiltttlliiillitltlliiiiliiliiitit 298 Morrison, Charles C ...................,..... 40 Newman, Marshall ................,.......... 274 Milenrist, Elizabetli ttniit 91, 92,259 Morrison, Harry .................,....,..,....... 288 Newman, Vincent ......,,. 65,185,278 Mills, Elizabeth srepliany Mary Morrison- H- C -4..e--,--i4------------.----i--i---- 293 Newton, Charles ........................,........ 198 194,232 Morrison, Henry C ...o-e-.-.. .A-iir.-.--- 2 6 Nickels, Horace J .........,.,.,......,,...... 203 Miller, Bruce Jones ,,,,,,,,,.,,.,,,,,,,,,l, 195 Morrison, John A -------------' ---A------A- 2 3 Nichols, Russell .................................... 234- Miller, David L .............. ............ 2 03 Mors, Wallace .....................,........,........ 296 NilfOliCl1, Olga ----e---.--,--- 172,174,175 Miller, David M ....,......... ........,,.. 2 10 Morscher, Lawrence N ...,............ 202 NiCl10lS0n, EClWH1'Cl---65,152,131 Miller, Edward ...,,,..,.,.,. ,,l.,.,,,,,, 2 82 Morse, Minerva ,.......,.........,......,.,..,.. 202 193,200,233 Miller, Ernest H ....,......... ............ 2 09 Morse, Rosamond ,,............................ 200 Nietlbfila, F ------...----..-.--......---................,- 133 Miller, Harriette ,...,,,.,.,,,,,,,.,,,...,,,,,,,,, 263 Morton, Williard ...,,...,.....,.....,,,.....,, 287 Nielson, Jeanette 1 .,.................,..... 197 Miller, james H ..........,.................... 202 Mosk, Morey ..,........,,.................,,.......... 291 Nitle, William Albert ...... 19, 287 Miller, 'losph Leggett, Jr ....... 209, Moss, Ruth ............ 164,16S,172,175 Noe, Adolph C ...........,......................... 275 296 Moulds, John F ......l.................. 10,281 Noel, Albert Edgar ........................ 207 Miller, Louis ..............................,........... 201 Moulton, john ..,,,....,.,......... .......,...... 2 81 Norgren, Nels ....................................... 122 Miller, Martha ..........l...,....,.... 170,171 Moulton, M ......,............,........,......,.......... 207 N0rfI'121U, Emesf C9-ll10UI1 ------'-- 212 Miller, Willis H ......................,......,, 196 Moulton, Merwin ....,....,,............,.,..,, 280 Norris, Gertrude ...................,............. 212 Millis, Elizabeth S. M .....,.......... 212 Mowreyq, Fred Howenstine ,...., 186 Northrup, Emily C ............................ 19 Millis, Harry A .......,....,..,,.,,.,...,,l.l.,,,,,, 25 Moxey W. G Iiinlnlnrlrtinnitiilllrllr, 5191 233 Northrup, George T ........l.... 19,286 Millman, Harry Abram ,,,,.,,,,,,, 207 Moy, Herbert Ying Ponng--I-,211 Novakq, Ida .................................... 198 233 Milon, Robert -...--..--...-iii...........,......,...... 201 Mudge, Elizabeth ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 81,262 Noyes, Mary W .l,....,.,,,...,,.,..,,,,,,,,,,,r, 210 Mills, John, Jr ---------,---.,-,,.---.,--.-..-.iil-- 281 Mulhelland, Anna E ,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 211 Nudelman, Miriam S ....,...l.l...,.... 213 Mills, John -------------------------------1------A--------' 234 Muller, Yarmila A .......,................. 200 Oakes, C1lI'tiS -------..--...-,-..--..-.....-,.,......... 286 Mlnefv Samuel ------'--1----------A-------"-------4- 295 Mulligan, Margaret ...........,,.. 65,266 Oaliei, Robert .-..--.......... ........... 3 05 Minerva, Lucille Catherine,,.207 Mulligan, Merle .,..........,.................... 287 Obefg, Knieneo -.-------- ---.----i---- - 25 Ming, William Robert, jr .... 207 Mulliken, Robert S .......,.................... 21 OlB0l61', Eli ---i-i,---..---------...-...- -l..-,----- 2 01 Minkiewicz, M. M .....,...........,..,.... 211 Mullin, joseph ............,.........,........,....... 190 O'BfieI1, Grace ,------------.--,-i.---..--.i-i-.... 260 Minton, Hubert L .....................,,,....... 203 Muncaster, Elizabeth ......... 269,233 O'BfiCI1, Helen GYHCC -f------4A-A-A---- 207 Mints, E. L .............,........l. ,.,,,,,ll,,. 2 sz Munn, Ned ...,.........,.,.,.,..........,...........,...., 293 O'Brien, Robert .......... ................r..l.... 3 05 Mintz. Abraham ................ ..,......... 1 86 Munsterman, Raymond William 0C2Sel4, Blanche ------------------,--.-,.---,------. 207 Mionske, Alice ,.,,,.l,.,.,.,.,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,, 207 207 O'Conell, Loretta Helen ....,...l... 210 Mirabella, Josephine .,....... 164, 232 Murdock, E. D ....,....,...,.................,........ 211 Odell, Lester --------------------4l-------4--------l-4- 293 Mitchel, Florence ............. ..........., 2 09 Murdock. Mary Agnes .....,......... 200 O'D0IH1Cll, William .--4. ,------...---------,-- 5 2 Mitchell, Geraldine ....... .,.......... 2 67 Murphy, Harold .....,,........,..................., 289 O'D0i1UCll, Mabel Catherine Mitehell, James H ............................ 279 Mufrayv Alice ----- --'-"--------------'-A---1----" 2 01 . . . 1941212 Miteliell, W. N -.-,,-,..,--t"""----,Vilqneelrt 300 Murray, Frank ....,.............,...., 232,301 Oelgesnhlngor, Vlfgmla -------'---- Zoo Mochell Walter -'-.--"-V-...l-,---- 201,293 Myer, Charlotte ........ ,............... 2 55,269 Oeotlllgi Ralph --------------------------------------- 190 Mode, Douglas ..............,.....................,.. 287 Myers, Grace ............,..... ...,.......... 2 33 Oglclelli Mercedes """""" """""" ' 91 Mohr, Dorothy ,.,.....................,......,,...,.. 164, Myers, Robert .I .................................. 203 Olcfill' Ashley """"""""""' """""' Z 83 165,166,232 Myers, Louis i..............,............,..........,,. 233 Om, Lawrence -'-A"-1"-A---l'1-ll1'i-'------"'- 283 Molander, Charles O .......,........... 275 Nachman, Adolph Ray ....,....... 212, Ogbnrn, ifvllllam F --1-1---i------- 26 294 Moldt, Ernest ...,...........l.l 232,275,301 233,297 O,Hnra, Frank H -.,,,-..-r......... 48,287 Mollendorft Robert William 211 Nachmanson, Norman ........,...,...., 217 0'Haf21, GCf1eViV9 --------------------------'--- 210 Molloy, Virginia .......,.,.............,......... 265 Naliser, Frank ......,......,l....,,. ..... 52,274 Oll'1af21, Leon P ---------r----rr-----------.-rr-----r 195 Moment, Sarah .............,............. 81,232 Naric, Mary Ann ,..........,..........,....... 207 0l1lSQU, H2f0lCl,R2Ym0I1Cl --------- 210 Montgomery, Charles Edgar Naset, Alma Harrison .,,,..,.........., 211 OlPU1ClC,' MHUFICC ---------r----------r--r----r- 233 Montgomery, Walter ..,..,.,,... 65,295 Navid .,,..........................,..,.,...,..................... 217 Ol-lil, lV11lf0D ------------,--------r-- 75,135,233 Moon, Robert J ...........,,,........... 196, 202 Nebeli. J. Robert ............,,..,........,,..,...... 284 Oli-Vefi Edward A ----------------r-------------- 293 Mooney, Rose L ............,.,....... 195,202 Nei, john U .....................................,........... 24 Oliver, Palll -r--r----l--------- --------r------'----- 2 93 Moore, Donald J ....,.... ,................ 2 09 Neff, Theodore L ................... -.-.-.-.288 OllVe1'L Ruth --'------------- ------------r- 9 1,192 Moore, Eliakim H ............ ...,....,.. 2 93 Neidballa, Edward Gregory 200 Olrver, Vlialffeiie 4----r--------------- 233, 265 Moore, F. I ....................,,., .,..,,...,.. 1 52 Neil, Alice V ......,..........,...,,,.............,..... 210 Olsen, William -11-4f---- ---------1------ 2 39 Page 345 Cl D Olson, Everett C .,........ 52,1-l0,141, Patterson, Ellmore Clark ...,..... 150, Pollack, Simon ,,.... ..... ,..... ..... ,..... . 2 1 1 180,182, 196, 233, 272 151, 293 Pollak, Charles A ..............,.........,... 211 Olson, Evererr S .A,.,ll-,.,----.,4, 191 233 Patterson,-Paul S ....... 151,201 295 Pollak, Richard B ..,......,,...., 199 200 Olson, Franklyn Carl --,-.l.'------l,ll 200 Pauck,VV1lhelm ,.......,...... I ......,...........,., 4 0 Polayes, Adeline ...,....,,. ,..............., 2 3+ Olson, Hazel AA.AIVA-IVllI,llVA.,------,....-.-.ll--,., 201 Paul, Esther Goldwalt .......,......,.,. 207 Polakotf, Irwin ..,,.............. ,..,......,.. 2 82 Olson, Vvllllanfl llV,-ID-Illl,----,----,l.Y--l--l-... 134' Pavla, Nicholas ............,................,...... 211 Pomerance, Carl S .,.............,......... 213 136,139 277 Payne, VValter A .................,.,........... 278 Pomeroy, Dwigllt A .,,.....,...,,.......,.., 300 Oflvlearal Artllur Carroll r-,--, 139' geacock, Xciyilllliaml-1? ......................... Ilioncl, X1rliiniaRM ..,....... ....,,....... 2 11 207 305 earson, .o ert ...,,....,............... ont, 11 ur .,.......... , ,...,.,.......,.. 207 Onufrockl John ,--r..,- --.4.-,-r.r 2 10 304 geliersonb Marian .......,....,,,...... .,.... 263 Ecole, Efora .,.... ..,.................... 2 10 , - e ton, ra .........,..,......, .....,........ ll- 7 oo e, . Bayar .,..,.. ,... . ..,62,6-1,29-tl 313132 Mvfflflfallljjjfffljjjffjffjljgnl "" Pelzel, John .r.,.. , ...,, ......r.....r,.,.. 2 so Pool, Lulu Gl'3CC. A.......r.rrr.,.,...r...,.... 207 Orkln ' Dellls Lucille 209 Perkins, Blrt ......,......,,,..,,,. ............. 2 07 Pope, Eleonora M .,.,............,,...,...... 207 Orllngky Harold """"' Perkins, Ralph ,.....,........,,..., .......,..... 2 01 Porsche, Julius D ......,......... 195,202 Y ' "4AAi"4A"4 Q' 'i"" Perkins, VVendell L ............,.....i....., 203 Porte, Ned ............,....................... 156 159 grmsby. EAnne Josephine ............ Perry, Ralph M ..,.....,....... ,..,.......,. 1 98 Porter, James L .......,....................... 286 Orgsfln' Xfffned "" """"""""""""" 11 Petersen, Alice .......,...,.... ...,...,..... 2 34 Porter, James VV .....,........,................ 52, OS,?"1e1R b fe ----'-11-1------"r-1' 9391 Petersen, Ingred ,,.,,,..., ...s.,....... 2 oo 75, 123, 124, 184, 278 Elms' 0 e.rt """"""""""' """"""' P etersen, John ...,...,.,. ...............,...,... 2 76 Porter, Jule ....,.1........,,......,....,....,,....,.,... 256 gSff0fglngf1d,, ""' L '"'''"""""""""""" 537 Peterson, Arthur ..,...,.............. 212,275 Portes, Herbert ....,........,.......... 198 291 tw' eorge Hman """""""' ' 4 Peterson, Bartlett ......,......,,,.. 150, 279 Portor, S. E ..................... .,............. 2 11 Ovefmeyefl Cllal'lC5 August---207 Peterson, Chalita Agnes .... ....... 2 07 Porzel, FranCiS .......,. ............... 2 01 8130111 lillgefle ----------------,,',----'e--A-----4-4-- Peterson, Isabel, ..,................,............, 164, Post, Jolm, ,..,....,,......,... .....,,,... 2 34 281 VSOH, S0 ...------,-,-------A-,,,,,-4,.,,,,,--.-.-,..-..- 165,170,171,175,234 Post Wilbur E., ..,..... .....1.,....,. 1 0 281 gadovell Slaul 5 ------ gl ---1---'--l-ll---l1"' l 25033 Peterson, Iillifm ..............,,,..,,.., 1751209 Potter, rl-ont ..,....,,,.,.,.,.,. 1.,.,,.,,,,..,, 1 91 age' ar an " r """"""""" ' Peterson Louise ...,............,.,,,..,..........,. 265 Potter, Truman S --....-,-..-.,,-44- 195 202 P H O 185 Peterson, William W .........1 ,,...... 2 87 Porter. William ......................i,....i.... 296 P3321 Mar 'llllll """"" "'-"'--'---'--'r 2 68 Petit, Milton, Jr ......l........,.,,.....,........l 280 Pottishman, David D .......,.......,... 209 Pallgm' Rusgell ""'5"" """"""' 2 11 Petkevich, F. M ........,.. ,,,,.,.,.,,,,,,,,, 2 O9 Potts, Marguerite .,.,......,.......,.. 81 266 ' """"""""""""""'""""" Petters Sonia B .....,.........,.................. 234 Powell Martha ....,,............ ,......... 2 U9 Palmer, Alfred W ...,,.,........................ 40 . ' . ' , Palmer' Alice Eugenie.,-212 234 Pettit, Richard D .............,...., 200,280 Powell, Portel M .,.. ,.... ..... ,...,. . . 2 00 , Petzel, Florence E ..............,....,.,..,... 207 POWC11, Ruth .--.-- ....,....-.. Y ...........1.....,,,. J 0 Palmer, Colda .,.,.....,...,.,,...............,.,.... 175 , P, l Al- E 197 all Palmer James 29 Peverly, Coreas .........,...,,.. ...............,,. 2 10 121 I, lCC ...--..,. ........... .. Palm lj, h L ""A' M583 Pfgender, Lnelle W,194,197,207 Pratt, John ...1....... , .,.,.,........,... ...,...., . 2123 Palmgr' lferrglvgl "i""""""""ii Pahlin, Loretto Ann ............,.........,. 213 PI'CHdC1'g3SfS. Cora -44-t'.-----.,,..--,-r---,---- 207 ' """"""""""' Phelan, E, I ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,, 211 Prentice, Maggie M ....,.,..,...,........ 211 Palmer' Robert R ---------------' 197 207 Pneloo, C11-tle ..,..................,...,,.,...........,l 25+ Prescott, Henry W .--.,-..-t-e-t., 13 231 Palmefo Sfllflff Sayles --------'----"--- 207 Pnlllnoolt, Wllllnnn o .....,.......,...., 74, Prescott, John P .............,,...,lll,......ll 200 galmell,1N11ll1zlm ......... .............. , .... 198,294 Preskill, Alfred W ......,.,.... 211 303 amos. at 63.1106 am """"1 ' Pl1illiPS1 Cl121flCS 5 --.----,----,.4.o-,-----. 211 Preskill, G. W ...,.....................,.,....,..,. 217 gflfimll Ajllfeglus ------'--------ttt-ttt--"'----t' 201 Phillips, Erwin ,.........,.............,,......,... 75 Press, Harold .....,...,.....,........,.. 213 235 Parkamllt I' """"""' """"""' 1 52 Phillips, Herbert M -l--ee.e---'l------Al---' 209 Prest, Samuel ..,..,....,.,.....,...,.,.....,,.,. ,.,. 2 78 al' 1 al' -----t'--------- --------'--l 2 34 Pickett, Howard VV ---------,o.- 200,277 Preston Kennetv L .,,.,.,....,,,,,,,,.,,,,, 211 P3131 Robert -------.,- ----.------, 2 33 Pierce, Alan ..........................,....., 290,234 P- -1 1 VV It 1 ' ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 27--1 Park- Tl10m3S --l--e----e---l---e- --...-,----. 1 95 Pierce, Bessie L ..............,.,,..,.,.............. 24 P:ii:Z,0rC1eral3d ,... ...,..,..... .235 Parker, Q11fiYlCS --ee-----..-o.-o---------.--..,,- 284 Pietrovvicz, Frank B ...................... 213 Price, Jean ...............,.... ,,.....,,. . .267 Parker, Elizabeth ..,,,.,,......,...,..........,,,. 58, Plloanl rloseplll-Mm lllllll Prlcel Vvllllam lllllllllllll ,,-", W llll' 3 05 Parker EVerett180,183,3gT13gi p111a,,,, Hahn ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 165 gI'lfl'C1I1,. Benl ..................,,....., ............. 2 35 1 t'--"---'----"-------- 1 ' -' T " ' 5, ..,............,.........,...,..,,.,.l. -03 ljofllof, gratings M ................ 195,202 EQf,fgf,',f'S',.,lff,,'lf lrlr Ylnjjjjjjjjjjjjjfg521 Plmiillllleleloqflletleote .................. 189 Parker' 'era "" """ f """"""""" 287 Pittman, Alice M ,...... 194,197 211 Purcell, Robert L ..........,,. .....,....,.., 2 09 Parkgll-llames D erbon """t""' 207 Pizzo, Frances ...............,...,.1................. 265 Purgger, Lawrence J .......,.....,,,,,. 207 ar 1 ' NCC """""'""""""""t""'ttt"t 302 Pitner, Frances Marie .................. 209 Pvle, VV. R ....,, .,.,. .,.,,,....,..1,..,,.. 1 5 1 276 P5ll'l5lll50Vl1 195111-l -------l-1---l-l-----1l---1111l-V- 251 Platt, Alfred J .....,...,....,.................,.... 186 Quantrell, Ernest E .... ........, . ., .,.., .10 PPlVl5ll'l50lll Mefflff VV -e----------------- 293 Platt, Robert S ................................,,..,... 23 Quehl John ..........,......,.,..,,,,.,..... 235 294 lgilfmellfffllll C- .l...11.-"-4l----41-- Platt, Virginia .,,..........,............. 200 267 Quinlan, VVilliam Allen ,........... 67, Hrrfrf, Nman 3 -..,.......r .01 ,1 5 Plavnik, Lillian .,...........................,... 209 213 235 Parsons, Eloise .,..................................... 192 Pletz, John ....,....,.,...........,............ 189 23+ Raben, Bovde... .,.,.,...,. ....,..... ,,.......... , . 201 PHVSOUS1 Keith -l--'-e.1-lll---44-1,-t ----------------1- 5 3, Plirnpton, Nathan C ...,..,...,.............. 10 Rabinowita, Leo.. ..,,...... .,,.......,,...,... 2 00 110, 121. 12-1-, 127, 18-I-, 200, 293 Plopper, Curtis ,.......,..........,,.,. 201 277 Radcliff, Andrea... ,.....,.....,,,... 91 235 PHFY-ridge. Cl1Hl'lCS O -,o,oooo,...,--. --207 Plum, JulesJ ......,.....,. ,. .....,..,...,.......,.... 207 Radcliffe, Brown A. R... ........ 1.2-1 Patrick, H. Eugene ......... 65,S1,293 Plumley, Harold J ....................,..., 198 Ralf, June... ...... ....,... 6 6, 67, 19-1,235 PSU, C21l'F0llefl -l---e- -,-------e------ --eteet 9 "-, 2 7 5 Plummer, Samuel C., Jr .......... 213, Ragir, Ben... ....... ....,..... ..,....... . . ..,....297 Pant Dallas E --eo -- 'le-ll-- 272,276 23-l Ralston, Everett... .. . , 29-1- Patterson, Alma ...... ,. ........ 223+ Poegel, Leonard. ........ ...........,.,.... 2 84 Ralston, Gertrude. 259 Pagt' 346 U D Ramsay, Everett ......... 132. 235,283 Riendeau, Louis W ....... ....,........,,... 2 00 Rudin, Cecile Margaret ..,...,........ 211 Randolph, Buell ..... ,........,........ .......,..... 2 8 9 Ries, Herman ..................,.,.. .............. 2 99 Rudnick, Philip ,,,...,l,,l,,,,,,l,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,. 298 Randolph, Forrest .................. 235,289 Ries, Milton ....,,.............. .r............ 2 99 Ruffalo, Louis Joseph ..,.,,...,,.......... 213 Randall, Helen .....,.............................. 164, Riley, Philip .....,,....,..,......,..........,.........,., 210 Ruml, Beardsly ...........,........,,.,....,,,,,..,.., 24 167,175,262 Ripple, Lilian M ................... 194,213 Rummel, Katherine M. 197,209 Ranson, Steohen W .,.........., 194,207 Risings, Dr. Mary .................. 21,192 Rund, Adolph ..,,....,.,,.......................,...... 276 Rapp, Wayne ----,A,w, 75,121,185 279 Rittenhouse, Evelyn .....,........,.,....... 201 Rundle, Iris Ruth ..........,........,.,..,...,. 207 Rdnnanortl David I-,,AA----1w----------,,.-.--- 207 Rittenhouse, Gordon ...................., 144, Rurik, William George ............... 286 RHICllif, xKCHHCfil .....,.....,......... , ......., l 1 195, 213, Ruslrrl John "-"""""' T '-""''--'-'4-----------'"--'- Ratcliffy Randall -,,,,,.,,,-,..-,,,--, 235,293 Ritter, David M .................................. 200 Ruskin, Helen Siegel ...,................. 200 Ravenscroft, Minnie M ............. 189, Erttiehglb Bergriae ---------------4-----'---'------- Russell, rlclalrees -4'----4-44'---A----- ,-'-'----- 3 198,200 oa , ert .......,....... .............. u sse , e ........................, ....,,,,., 2 Raventos, Jeslyn ....,............................ 265 Roach. Helen ...,.,.........,..,,... ......,....... 2 64 RUSS-dl, Peggy -------------- -"------- 2 07 Rawlings, Eleanor C ....... 194,212 Robbins, Frances ...,.....,,,, ..,,,,,.,..... 2 01 Russell, Virginia ............. ,...,,..., 2 69 Read, Conyers ........r.............................. 281 Robbins, Guy ......,.................,..,,.,,...,...,.. 277 Rust, George ..,.............,......,. , .,,...... 191 Ream, Bessie E ..............,.. ............ 2 09 Roberg, Beatrice M ......................... 207 Ruud, Albert H ................... ....,,..,, 2 75 Recliner, Ella N ,,,,,,--1--,,--,,--,,--,,,--,.11-, 209 Roberts, John ,...,,,...,,.,... ...................... 1 29, Ryan, Delbert Owen ...............,......,. 207 Redfield, Robert -,-,,,,,,,,-,,,,,--,-,,, 25, 287 R b O 1il,I1I52, 185, 273 Ryan, Clielald Francis .... .,,............ 2 O7 R d dy A E ,-,I,,,---,,---,.,-,,,-,,,,, 209 o ertson, swa ...,....,,............ yan, om .........,.......,......,...,.... , ...,,.,., 208 Redrligid, pnarlilne -,-,--,,,,--,-,,-- 91,166 Rolginson, LGeq1'gei ....,., ,..................,.. 2 lliygnl Wglter M .....,........ .,,,.,.... 2 37 d Eth l S ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 209 o lnson, ewis ...........,.......,,.....,. y 0 t, eo .......,................ .,.,..,.,, 1 8 R R b' M'l E 4 R d Al' ee ,e - o inson, lton .,.......,. ,....,...... ' 2 y er, ice ......,.....,..,.,........... .......... 1 92 E223 Cjiiruliie' Evangeline Robson, Eldon ..,,........., ..,..,......... 2 36 Ryerson, Edward L ..........,,..............., 10 Reed Maudpe """''''"""""""""""""" 209 Roby, Charles .,...,.....,..,.,,..... ,.,..,...,,... 2 95 Ryerson, Martin A ...,...,................,.,. 10 Reed' Rufus """""' Roby, C. C ...............,..,.,,,.......,,.......,.,,,,.... 150 Ryno, Jane .,,....................,,,,......,,.............. .207 ' """"" ' ' Rockwell, Mary V ....,,.,.,............... 165, Sabath, Rosalie L .,..,,,.,,,,,,,, 197 207 52555,-in FEZSWZZ'wgQ3gQi1Qi1iii1gQ1119i1 1701171 259 Sabadoshi P-111111111 -111-1111111111111111111111111 210 Relchmall Frank' 74 278 Rodeck, Ewald .........,,.......,......,..,.,........ 201 Sachs, Juanita ............,.. 167,175,237 Reid Genevra """"'i""""""" '235 Rohs, Henry ......,........ .,..,.,....,, 2 36 290 Sadler, William S .... 198,200,277 Reinhardt, -lolllll i'i' ""' Roll, Lewis R ....,..,.....,,, ....., ,............ 2 1 1 Saemann, Laura Charalotte 207 1 olston, Donald ,....,............l..,.......l...... 201 Safranal, William ..............,...,....,,,,,,, 290 Reinke, George W ...,..,.................. 207 . , . . Relsman Marlon Zll 235 Romberg, Louis E .......,........ 200 299 Sahlln, Vinson ............... 116,185 294 - , ' ,- """"""""" ' Romer, Alfred ..................,.. 20, 22,288 Saidl, Sylvia Mary .............,............. 207 Reiter, Catherine ......................,, 62,257 Rocker Norma 19+ 21? 236 Salklev A D 150 151 201 Rencker, Robert ...,..,..,....,,...,.... 74,273 R ' ,xl """""" ' "' , " ,' I """""""" ' R Hom Albert Car ZOO osacocus, i e ,........,.........,.... 151 201 Salle,-l Wllllaln ,,,,I.-l.-l,l---,---------.uulllllhd 201 em. r , """""" ""'t R osbach, David Oscar 195 202 Salek, joe ..,,....,...,...,,...,........ 75,237,300 ggiiilciliplaligfliirur ''''''""""""""""""""" Rosenbaum, Gladys ,,.........,.,,,........... 189 Saltsman, Aaron ......,.................,..,,,.., 237 Reul' Tllomag """""""""""' """""" 2 74 Rosenberg, Merwins ,...,.,,.,.....,,,.,.,.. 65, Saltsman, May ,...............,........,...,,,,,...., 237 ' """"""""' """""" 1 so, 194, 236 292 Samuels. Robert ........,...,.........,..,,,.,,,,,,, 292 gagging CgligfFCe6 '""""""""""""" 250.70 Rosenfels, Ruth .....,..,...,...,...,.,.........,,.. 236 Safldef, Estelle M21iOfiC 1,1.....-.-11-- 200 ge ' Rosenthal, Alexander ..................... 186 Sanford, George Winthrop .... H207 Re Holds Elizabeth 767 Rosenthal, Avery .....,.,,,....,.....,,,,......... 291 Sang, Bernard .........,,...........,.............,.. 200 Reynold ' William """""" Rosenthal, Ruth .,...,......l..,. ........,..... 2 36 Sarmer, Virginia R ...,.,....... 198 200 Rlya Asllce """""""' 215236 Rosenwald, Julius ,.,,..,.....,... ........,... 1 1 Saper, Paul ..........,..,,......,,.................,.,...,. 195 Rags' lean """""""""' l'g5"'l9ll'2ll Rosewater Rosaline ..,,,..,..,,.,,,,....... 209 Saperstine, Anne Laurie .,.......... 210 , ' , ""'4"""""e" ' ' Rosi, Alcide ..,........................, .............. 1 86 Sarisky, Florence Miriam ......... 212 Rreel Berfrree -----'--"--------""-'--'--------'------ 167 Rosier, Helen ........,... ........,...,. 2 01 Sarisky, Ruth.. ...,,..........,,..,,.....,............... 200 Rreei Davrd ----------------11'-- ----- ---1--1"-1- 2 9 ev Ross, James B ..,,.,..,.. .............. 2 03 Sarnat. Bernard .....,.......,...,.....,,,,,........ 282 Rrehv Howard ---1-1----"----- -'--1'--"1' 2 9' Roterus, Sulo .,..,.....,i,,, .....,........ 1 96 Sass, Fred ......................,,,............,...........,. 217 Rrerrerd51 Berrf' ---'1111'-'-"----- ----"-"'-' 5 67 Roth, Virginia .......... ,..............,....,........ 2 10 Sass, Louis ............................,.,..... 237, 288 Rrehardsi Jeanette '---""-""""""-" -""' ' Og Rotha, Louise ....,........,............................ 196 Saucerman, Majorie ..............,,...,,l., 262 Rfehardei Margaret H '------"------r--' 4: Rothgerber, Florence Eliza- Sauer, Raymond ...,.,.....,........ .....,..... 2 87 Rrerrardsorrv George A -""'-------'-- 291 beth .,..,.........,,........................... ,...........,... . 206 Sannderl Estelle Dnllllllwlllnnn 'nnnnlvlhvl 2 53 Richmond, Herbert ..,......... 51, 293 Rotner, Gerald ........................,........,.. .153 Savlekl Ted -l,l.."l,,,,,.-llllllllllllllll lllllllllll 2 O1 Richter. Helen I .......,,,...,........,........ 212 Rourlce, John ..................,......t ,,......,,.... 2 89 Saylel-V Allen Wnlte -.----'.,.--..ll"l-. 207 Rliddell, 'Charles .....,.... r.. .......,... 274 Roski, Norman Ira .,,.....,..,..,,........... 210 Schaefer, Mal-y p Unbnnnlnllln nlnlllllnll 2 11 Rgddell, LUCY E '-'------rrr ------r-'-rr 2 36 Rouse, Angela A ........,,.,.,. .............. 2 10 SchaFFner, B. V ..,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,, 2 ll Rlddrei D- VV ----'----'--1----- -'--'--------- 3 8 Rout, Garland ........... ....,......... 286 Schaler, Edward ............ .....,....,,...,. . .65 Riddle, Emmons ,.........,... ........... ,,.. .... 2 7 9 Rowe, Clifford ,....,.,..., .............. 286 Schaller, Edward ,,,,........................,..., 286 Ridenour, Louis N ......................... 51, Rowe, Jolm .......,.,.......,.,,........................... 283 Schamp, Mable Hall ....,.... 197,210 52, 57, 63, 180, 236, 272, 274, Rowland, Durwin S .,,,.,,.,,.,,...,,....... 294 Scheerer, Betty Anne ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 206 316,318 Rubenstein, Boris B ...,...... 195 202 Schefire, Mildred H .....,.......,........,.. 209 Ridge, John ..........................,...... 191,196 Rubinson Adolph ......,,....... 236,291 Scheibler, James Edward Riedel, VV. U .....,..... .,.,............ 2 10 Rubovits, Frank .................................... 202 Jr. ,.....,... .............,..... ,............,,....,, ..,.......... 2 0 7 Riedl, Edith ,,,,, ,,...., ,.......,... 2 0 0 Ruch, Florence .............. ......,... 9 1,238 Schendel, Willard ,,....,,.,,.,. ,.,,....., 2 93 Page 347 El U fn Schenker, Ruth A ..........,.... ........,,... 2 37 Schwaegerman, Ruth ...................., 257 Shields, Harold G .....,.....,....,,..,......, 300 Schenher, Herbert .,.,,....... ....,........ 2 92 Schwartz, Jack ......,..,..,.........,. .......... 2 82 Shinn, Lawrence E ............, 211 280 Scherr, Oscar Leo., .......... .,........... 1 98 Schwartz, Ruth ....,.,.....,....................,,. 192 Shire, Ruth E .....,.,...,....,.......................... 194 Schibor, John ...,..........,...,........ ..........., . 237 Schweiger, Lamont R .............r........ 238 Shiverly, VV .....,.,....,........, , ............... 210 Schevill, Ferinand .....................,........ 27 Schwind, Burton .....,..................,.........,. 293 Shoblaski, L ...,.......... .,..,...... 2 10 Schied, Carl .....,...,,,..................... 237,286 Scott, Arthur P ......,.,,.,...........,..........,.. 27 Shower! L. A ...........,..... ,.......... 2 10 Scherubel, Sumner ......,.,.................. 287 Scott, H. VV .......,,,,.................... 191,202 Shrock, John ........,..,.. ,......... .,,........ 2 9 6 Schimpff, Gust Weber .,,,.. 196 202 Scott, Irvin .....,,.......,.................,............,,. 286 Shroyer, John H ...,,............. ........... 1 95 Schlesinger, Hermann I ...,.......,... 21 Scott, Mary Agnes ....,......,...............,., 211 Shuhart, Donald V ..,.......,............., 195 Schlesinger, Lillian .,.........,............ 210 Scott, Robert L ......,,.....,,.. ..,.......... 1 0 Slinll, Doloss C 'IAAAAI,DQI--',,l,Q,,,.,,.,A,,A'-'.l, 10 Schlesinger, Richard ........................ 281 Scott, Virgil B ............,.,,. .,..,..... 1 95 Slinll, Sherman K, 239,272,298 Schley, Ruth Ina ................................. 207 Scott, William E .,......... ............. 4 8 Slniro, Robert ,,,,,,,,-,-,,,.,.,'..,,.....--,,....',.',I,,. 278 Schlifke, 1-01115 12511271 237, 291 Scotta, Elio ....,,.............,.........,.................. 289 Sibley, Joe ...........,.,,...............,....,.....,...... 293 SCh11f1kC1'f, Everett ---'----'-'---4 201 234 Scribano, Edward R ...................... 238 Sidwell, Albert E ......,...,..,.....,.,......,.. 202 Schlung, C- Myrtle --..4---.--4A.-------4-- 213 seaborg, Earl ,... ....r....,...........,,,., 1 51 287 Siegel L. M ..r.,.,.........,...,.......,,..,r.,,.,s....,,,,, 239 SC11m1df, BCUY Anne 44-e'e "---4-4e 4f'-eA ' ' -253 Seaman, Richard .........,,............,......... 289 Siegel, Mary ............,.........,...,... 212 239 Schmidt, B. E ..................................,,. 287 Searcy, Jeanette ....,. 174 194, 207 5iogol,Zorn ---,Y-,"",--.,.A--'A'-.',...44',.v-1.-"'-,4,' 139 Schmidti, Charles Edward ......... 51, Seck, Leon B .........,..............,.................. 208 Siogmiind' Eleanor 'I."'..,.,rr'. 255 257 182, 237, 272, 280 Seedorff, Ernestine Lora ............ 211 Sigman, Edward -r---"'-'. ,,-.,,-.-"-,..-r 2 92 Schmidt, Joseph ..............,.......,...,...,.. 291 Seevers, Charles H ........,...,..........., 195 Siloorg, lla Mao ,.,.,-,-,., ,..v-".,I,, 2 08 Schmidt, Lawrence Joseph ........, 48, Sefranek, William Henry ......... 199 Silbeigr Milton ,',,-',---., ,--rrr-.,,-, 2 50 51, 31,151 132, 237, 290 Segall, L60 ---------------44-----f'-11--------- 231 297 Silbert, Layle ....,.........,,,...... ,.,..,. ...., 2 0 0 Schmidt, Margaret J ....,,,,.............. 238 Segerman, Cecilia ......,....,.........,...,,,.. 210 gills, Fred ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,-,,,,.',,-,--'-' ,,,r-,-..-,- 2 79 Schmidt, Max Waldo ..,...,....,...... 194, Seibert, Florence ,.....,,...,....,,.................. 14 Sills, William ,-.,,,rrr---l-','.---....,,,-.-l.-"...,,, 279 213l. 276 Seifer, Dan ...,................................ 238 299 Silver, Frederick M .-ll..,Q----.Vvl4-44-rrll 209 Schmidt, Ruth ,.........,....,,..........,. ............. 2 57 Seilton, Charles F ....,......,.......,.......,.,, 202 Silverman, J, W ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 17 Schmieder, William .,.........,..,......... 238 Seligmann, Paul .......,,...,....,............... 200 - , Schmitz, Robert ...,,,...........................,,. 278 Seman, Louise S ..........,....,........,......... 208 3532232 liaIuiily'3 """""" """""" 3 Schneller, Helen ......,.........,....... 238, 257 Semmerling, Helen Rita 213,239 Simon Jaines """""""""' Schnoll, Hilda E ..........,,......,........,... 210 Senescu, Frances Wiley ...,.........,, 200 Simon, Marvin """"'i""'A""""""" 297 Schnuch, Hubert ...,.,................,........,, 210 Setin, Annette E ................t....... ,,,...,... 2 08 Simmgns "" """""""'i ' 194 Schnur, George ....,...........,,...... 121,274 Sevin, Charles Henry ..........,. 194, Siris EVM n ' """"""""""' 253 Schoede, Carl Frederick ....,..,.... 211 197,209 Skeiigeisk """""""' Schoenberg, Isaac J ..............,.,...,. 195 Shaffer, Mildred .....,... 194,198,239 Skonber y'Ca,i """""" 239 289 Schoenberg, Judith ...,............,,..,....,. 201 Shambaugh, George E ............. 296 , g' """""""""'"""" Schoenberg, Louis Sidonie ,..... 212 Shan, Gretchen ..........................,,,......,.., 195 Skolnlclcl 179915 -"'--""""-"'-""-'A'A'A"-""-' 203 Schoenberg, Sam ..................... 198 200 Shane, Evelyn ......,........... 166,172,175 Slater, Wlnston Gould '-"" 200 281 Schoenbrun, Robert 74,156 299 Shane, Robert S ................................., 195 Slaylnaker' Samuel -'-""""""-""4'A"" 277 Solioonfeld, Sain -,,,.--------,",I",,..rr----'-,4.- 210 Shanedling, Philip ...... 156,200,291 gkplckek hrfi ..........................,., ............ 2 Solionoi-nan, Rutli -.r,.- 255,256,238 Shank, Ida P ............,,.,..............,.,........,, 210 Sllceri El ""' """"'""""""""""""'4"-" Schooley, Edgar ................r.......,,,......r.. 77 Snnnnnn- Charles E -----"--4---11---------1 295 mer' efl7li0i'i'i "" 5 'io tt" 5 'i'i"12760,i Schreiter, Jesse Beaver r...........,.. 210 Shannong Margaret ............ .,.,....., 2 10 Siusser Harrv'T ' ' 'ZH Schroeder, Carl ....................,... 272,289 Shapera, Isabell .....,....,.,... ,......,....... 2 13 Slugger' Vvinifreci """"""""""""""" 260 Schroeder, Jonas .......,...........,,,,..,....... 201 Shapiro, Arthur .................,..........,,...... 210 Sriimali Leonard """"""' """""" 2 97 Schram, Leonard .,,.,,..... ............ 2 50 Shapiro, Jacob ...........,............... 217,303 , ', """""' """""A ' Schryver, Elliott ...,...... ..,........, 2 95 Shapiro, Robert Benjamin...121, Sllvelstelllf Len 4"---- ""--A '-"- '-"------" 2 9 7 schubel, Frank ..r......,.,.......... .,.....,,.., 2 as 143,200,208 Slye- Mend ---------------------e1e'-'t-r""1-f---1------1--e 14 Schuchardt, John ................................. 274 Shapiro, Rubin ..,.....,.....,.,.......,,.......... 200 Small, Stoddard -ldllll """""""' 213' Schuett, 1. G ......,,,,,..r.......,,..,,......r......... 190 Shapiro, William ...,.......,.......,,.....,...,.. 194 , 240-295 Schullian, Dorothy M ,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,. 203 Shapley, John ......,.,.,......,.... ,..,..,.,.... 1 8 dmdserv George K '"""""""""""" 199 Schulz, Dorothy ..,,.,.., 61, 87, 88, 261 Sharff, Lucille Ann ..........,........,....... 239 Smlley' Malcolm """"""""""' 193-295 Schulz, Dorothy L ...,...,....,,.. 238,265 Sharp, J. R ........................,...,.....,,,............ 305 Smiley, Rachel T ...........,.,..,.,...,,..,.. 208 Schulz, Edith Amelia ,,,,,, 212,238 Sharp, Robert ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,, 7 4,288 Smiley, William .,..........,..,,................ 156, Schultz, Henry ..,,..........,,....,...........,.....,... 24 Shatz, Gilbert ........,... ...,........... 2 08 159, 201, 296 Schultz, Mary .....,.......,.,....,,....,...,......., 263 Shaw, Ruth "'4--'----------- ----"--'- l 67 Smltll' Barton """" Q """' """"""""""' l 50' Solinlrzy lylelvin L '--.'.,,,l.r.r----l----l..v. 193 Sheern. Mary' ,,,,,,,,,,.,..,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,, 239 ' 136,159,201 279 Solinlrzy Regina Miriam ..,.....r,..rw4 207 Shelley, Richard .............,.......,.,......,.. 277 Smith, Burke .........., ..... . .. . .. 200, 287 Schulze, Rosa H ..,....,,.,..............,...,.... 211 Sherburn, George Wiley 17,293 Smltllv Clarence VV ""' """""""l"'t Z Us Schumaker, Edward ....,.......,,........., 286 Sherer, Renclow P .,.,,.....,,................ 42 Smith, Dorothea. .. .. .,..,,., .269 Schumm, Hilda .........,,.............,........... 201 Sherer, Albert VV .,,...,...... ............ 1 0 Smith, Donald B. .........208 Schurman, Ruth L .....,...,,,..........,..,.. 238 Sherman, Meyer ..,...,......... .......,...,... 2 00 Smith, George Otis. . . 10 Schutzberger, Mathilde ............... 213 Sherre, Burton.-. ....,,., ,,..,,...,....,..... 1 -I-3 Smith, Genevive.. ....,.,.... ......... . .208 Schuyler, George .......... ..,.................,. 2 98 Sherry, Joseph ..,,,. . ....,........ 301,239 Smith, Gertrude .13 Schwab, Arnold ..... ..,.. . .,.,.............. 297 Sherwin, Ralphd.. ,,... . ,... ........,,.,, 2 97 Smith, G. K.-. Zll Schwaegermann, George ......,..... 298 Shevill, Ferdinand ......,... .......... 2 74 Smith, Harriet. ..... 210 Page 348 D D Smith, J. M. P ...,,..........,,.............,.., .... 3 8 Steck, Rose ....,,,,,,.... ..,,,.,...,, 2 41,258 Struve, Otto ...........,.,..............,.........,.....,,.. 22 Smith Jane ......,,..................,......,.. 189 240 Steere, Betty .,.,. ..,.......,.,,. ....,....,......... 2 6 4 Stuart, Robert Graham ....,.......,.. 200 Sm1th Janet Lavern ........................ 209 Sreerey Uoyd R '------Ab---I...v".....-..-4-.--..-4 10 Stuckhardt, Rita .t,.......,.......... 164,200 Smith Jeanette .......................,.......,..,..., 51, Steimmerz Mar1eA D-------'--AA----'------' 209 Suder, Leonore .......,.... .......,.....,,.... 2 08 58, 125, 210,240 262 Stein Hdman 299 Sugar, Alvin ,,.. ...... ,...t....., .t.t,......... 2 4 1 Smith J. Kenneth ..,..,....,...,........,...... 301 . ' . . """""""""" """"""A' S 1 H D I.A.--'-'-4"AA--A4AA..-. 42 43 Smith Kendrick .....,.........,.,,......,..,.... ,276 Stein' Phlhp Joseph ''"A""""""""""" 200 Sulcerl Henry T 174 I Stein, Saran ,.,,.,.........,,.................,.,........,.. 208 U Cer, EUTY ---'-'---------------A4-------' 1 2m1t11 Lawrence B ............. 194 208 Sterrrberg, Ralph Harry ------...,----- 213 1 157,184 187, 293 m1t1, Luclule M ..............,.......,.,... .240 Stemer, Mary L ..II-VAD-4'-,4--AA-..A.,,--------- 2111 Sullivan, Florence L .......1,.........,... 195 Smith, Marlon C ............................ .240 St nl d G1 d K 208 Summers, Allan ............ 117,121,281 Smith Sidney ,.,..,............ 156 159 291 Ste ,ian 1,111 IHLY? Gsm ------ 211 Surchek, Anna ,....111.11......1.1..,.11,,......,,... 208 Smith, Paul ......1...................................... .297 Stgghgggon iauflig """""""""""" 52 Sutherland, Charlotte ...............,..... 264 Smith Philip ,......,........,....,......,.... ......... 2 08 ' '""""""'t""""" ' S h 1 d Ed ' H . 1 , I 12311271 180, 241, 28g ut 61' an , WIII ...................... 26 Sm1thW1Ck1 Gefaldme -----'--------e------ 51- S 1, Svatik, Eleanor Dorothy ........, 200 tep enson, R. J ................... 190,202 , 200 269 . svetik, jenn .,,,...................,,.,.,.,.. 191,202 Smucker John N. 240 237 Stephnes, Camilla ............................,. 192 emyni, 'Newton ...ttt 31iiQ1i11iigiiiQgi ...,,.... .224 Steven, Gladys Louise ................,. 208 2Wa111JR99 5 '--------------- 11-1-1-1,1-1-133 St 1 B d h ",--- wan efg, oy .......,.... , , Smyth- O' K' "'i" ""ii""""""""" 2 13 281 31332, Danigi ,,,, ,,,, ,,,,,, 195 Swanson, Ethel D ....tt,..,...ttt... 52.199 Snydefv Cythera -A--A-'-AAA---------------- 61 257 Stevens Edward H 191 Swanson, Greta ........,,.......,.,................ 209 't"' ""A"' ' ' """"""""' 1 196,209 Swanson, Helen C ...,....,..............,.... 212 Solentierger,Ma1ry111.11i:l111111111.1111259 Eurelje E '------'------ 1 -21'-113 gyvggfgoljelrggde,-1'--1 nn--tt--- -44----'nn-t9-- 5 gg S lf, W ld .,.,.............,.,............. 156, CVCUSOU1 0 11 ---------'4-- 1 ' "''"""'A"""A""A"" O a emar 159, 2011290 Stevens, Patricia Lorena ...........1 206 gW93S01E1 Hif101If1IA '-----------'--AA1- Solinskyy Edith nunun-,,,--,------'.,-,,,,,-4-'.4,., 172 Stevenson, Marianne .,..,......,....,.... 263 W1 1 319 -----A------------------- 5- 7 Solomon, Dorothy ............. ............ 2 40 Steward Donald Aubeft -----------e 203 Swfgart' Rlchard P '"""""""""""" 211 Solomon, Jerome ..1........ ............ 2 09 Stewart, Bruce ...........,............... 201,274 SW111eY1RDg1012Y Jane -----'--'------"- - wlren, e a ..............................,.,.... Somma, Richard E ........... ..,...,..,.. 2 12 Stewart, Frank A .............,.....,....,....,, 302 Szadziumskiy E16aZarum-mm--208 Sondel, Bess Seltzer ...........,............ 194, Stewert, S. E .................,...... ....,......... 2 11 SZ 1d Ja k 198 197,208 Stickler, Harold .......,...... ............. 2 82 O C """""''""""""""""""'"""""' Sone, Lester .......................,..1......,,..,....... 208 Steiglitz, Julius ......,........., ......,..... 2 1 '"""""'""""""""""' 1 """ 3 Snelt, Hannan N .............. ............ 2 08 Stifler, James M ............,........,.,....,..... 10 ' '""""'""'9"""""""""""9 Somers, Gerald .............. ............ 2 93 Stinrlett, Nlitle ............,.......................... 50, ?am?O11e1Vg,1i?11'11 """' "" Soper, Mary .......,,....,.... ,..... ,..... 2 6 6 51., 52, 57, 87, 88, 183, 199, 241, 3115 ey' 1 116 """ I v Sorrell, Lewis ...,.........,..,,.. ...,........ 2 76 255,264 Ta1'g0W1 Abraham M -----'t----At-----' 195 Sotek1 Edward .............., ........... 2 75 Stillson, Gordon H ......................... 196 ?at11e1A11JleH1110f J ---'- 1 Sowersi Jane 1-,..1--1-AA--A----- 1--1--1-- A 269 Stoddard, Delie Ruth ,...............,.... 210 1111 1, C '----""------- 1 11 Spaulding, David .........,..............,,.... 296 Stodola, Gizella W ........,............,... 241 Tauwg' F' H "'9"9'5''55"""'"5""'5""""5" 159 Spearing, Frank ..................... 150 280 Stodsky, Bernard .............. ............. 2 00 1351011 61161161 ---------------- --------------' Spearing, John ............ 118,121 280 Stok, Dan .............,,..,....,...,,.. ........,.... 2 84 ay 011 111 '35 ---------------------------------'-- gpffcfof, 1?-irtha K -.-t-t-t-'.99.9999--t-t-9--- seekee, V. E .............. ,..,...,..,,,,,,,, .,,... 2 0 2 Ff3f1r11f,ff1ihD '"""-"5""""""""- 22? P99105 0 -5--'--54-------------------------Af--'------ - Stolar, Joseph .,........... ............ 2 01, 277 ' """"""' """""" Speed, Kellogg ----,-'-,---------..-----,------..., 277 Stolfa, Laddie ,.,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 275 Taylor H' L '--'---'-----'-5-'--"' "'-'--"""" 2 17 Spencer, William H .....,,....., 29 302 Stoll, Helen .....,.........................,...,......... 173, Teefafdeni l0SePl1 ----e-------'-------------- 294 Spenser, Evelyn ,.,........,......,...........,,,... 256 175, 211, 241, 266 Tel 0fd1 Helen -----'-'-'-'---------e---------eee----- 241 Spensely, Mary Alice ...... 240 262 Stone, H. George ......................,,.,....... 77 Te111P1ev Joe 521 1181 12112411293 Spertus, Doris Miriam ,.,.. ....... ,... . . 210 Stone, Raleigh W ....,.,,.,......,, 29, 300 Tenebaum, David ....................,......,.. 303 Spinka, Matthew ................................. 4-0 Storer, Robert ....................... ...,....,....... 7 5 Tener. Albert J .................................. 302 Springer, Frank ..,,...,............. 185286 Srorresifery Marion -.v,-'.'"-'-'-1.'.A----411 241 TenEyck, Albert .,........................,...... 75, Staok. Anne ------.....-.--t-.-t...-..--------------.---. 192 Stgrey, C, L ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 150,279 1 1 I 156,159,-201,273 Stackler, Edward K .,..,,.,................. 211 Stow, Harry L tl---ll---I--'-",.'1---'-'-'-....... 203 Teplltz, Lillian .................................... 213 seaeleler, Sidney ...,..... 245, 272,282 Stowe, Lloyd .........,..,..........,.....,............ 189 ?9fMdHtbE1af01d ------e------1--'e Stadheim, Otto A ........,,...,.....,...,,... 301 Straley, Harrison W .....,, 191,195 9119 1 uany ----------"------------ 1 Stagg, Paul ,,,, ...., 1 16, 121,240 293 Stranch, Irving .....,...,,..........,,,.,........,.... 282 Te11'Y1 A111911 ------------------------'----1---1-'--- 186 Stagg, Amos Alonzo ............ 112, 293 Straska, S. B ...,,...,..............,...,,.. 153, 280 Test, Jack 52, 55, 74, 241, 272, 294 Stomm, Esther .,.........,..,,,,,......,,.,.......... 240 Strauch, Victor Paul .............,.......... 211 Thayer, Kent H .,..........,.......,............. 209 Stapleton, J. M ......................... 213 296 Strauss, Jerome Bertram 11,-,,,,',,, 20g Thiemann, Douglas H ..............,. 212 Star, Nyman ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,ll,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,.,,,,,,,, 282 Streich, Franklin E ....,,.,.....,........ 209 Thigpen, Minnie P ............. 19-1-,209 Stastny, .John Wallace .....,..,.,.... .210 Strid, Margaretta .........................,....... 91 Thomas, Allen .,..................................... 27-1- Stauber, Leslie A ................,.............. 202 Strimic, E-. H ........................................ 209 Thomas, Elaine .................,...... 194, 242 Stand, Elva ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,...,, ,,....,,.... ,..,..,... 1 6 3 Strine, Ruth Kyrk .................. 194,210 Thomas, Hester A ......,.,,,,............. 263 Stawarz, Alfred Joseph ............ 194, Striter, Joseph ............... .............,...., 2 02 Thomas, Hylton A ....,......,..,.......... 200 197,198, 213,240 Strong, Madeline ,....................... 91, 92 Thomas, Robert L ...,........,.,............. 242 Steadry, Fred .......................................... 305 Strote, Esther .................. .............. 2 08 Thomas, Leona ................... .......... 2 10 Page 349 D D Thomas, W. A ..,.,..........,,,.... 217.283 Turner, Belle .,........,...... ...... , ....... 2 69 WValker., Mary Allen .... ,,.,..........,..... 1 92 Thomason, Lane ......... ,.......,...........,... 3 02 Turner, Thomas ....................,............ 278 VVallace, Donald A ....,......,,.,..,,... 195 Thompson, Charles ........................ 298 Turner, Wakeman ...,.........,,,,.......... 289 VVallace, Edward YV ..........,........ 195 Thompson, James ....,..,.......,..........,... 281 Tuttle, VVilson ....,..,........,, 74,185,293 VVallace, Robert G ...........,..........,.. 117, Thompson, John P ......................... 194, Tyler, Dorothy C ...,... 194, 197, 208 121, 131, 132, 184, 274 197,211 Ullman, Berthold L ....................,,,.. 18 VValling, Vifilliam ..........1..,...,...,,..., 288 Thompson, Martha L .,..,......,.......... 42 Ulverling, Raymond ..,....,...,.,,,........ 210 VValsh, Robert .....,,,......,.,...,...................., 74, Thompson, Sara .....,........................,..... 210 Urbain, Walter M .....................,...... 194 118,121,2-I-3,272 278 Thompson, Vesta ............,........,........ 210 Urban, VVilbur ............ 210 VValsh, Edmund Nelson ..l..........., 209 Thompson, Warren E ................... 51, Urbanek, Gladys C ............,......... 189, VValsh, Frank ........,......,..,.,..,..,... 201 281 64, 82,184 194, 206 VValter, Florence .....,.....................,.. 210 Thomson, Duncan ................,......,...,.. 212 Urbanek, Mildred M .....,. 212, 242 VValter, Le Roy ,......,,.. .......... 2 01 Thomson, Frank W ..,.......... 121 286 Vacco, Marie L .,................................ 208 Walters, Milton ...........,...,,......,,.,... .210 Thomson, Orsie M ..,..........,,,,........,.. 163 Vail, Patricia ,........,......, 4 ....,,..,............ 164 YValton, Stanley .............................,... .275 Thorton, Nan ...,..,......,.............,.. 192,202 Valentine, Robert C ..,................,., 208 yvalzi Artllllr VV- 1971211 24,3 Thurstone, Louis L ......,,,.........,..,,.. 15 Vance, Bruce B .,..........................,.....,.. 196 Wablesi Douglas A-4A-A-A...-.4'.'l44-A-.-l.A"'.V 31 Tecktin, Joseph I .,..........,. .....,...... 2 08 Van Cleef, Janis Adele ,.,............ 200 Warnei.' Marion '4.44.-,,,l..AA.-' 161166 Tiegreen, Joseph ......,,.,..r,.. .294 Van der Hoerv George T '-----' 130- Was, Harold ....................,.,................... 298 Tierman, John, jr ........... ,242 , 2451272 Washburne, Margaret ,...,.,..,..... .... 5 2 Tierney, Marie L .....,........ .....,...... 2 08 Vianderschargrrv Marr?-arer -"---'-' 201 VVashburn, Natalia C. 174 208 Tigue, Frances ......,....... .261 lan Dyke, Harry B """-'-""-r"'4"' 275 VVatson, Lorraine ......,.............,,..... ..87. Tilliiig, Viola G iiiiiiiiiiiiin '--i'....ii4 2 11 Vane, Ray ...,...............,..,..,.....,...,.........,.,... 187 881' 198,200 267 Tillotson, Eloise .............. ..,,........ 2 01 Varlgov Stephen P ------------ ---4---'-'---A 2 00 Watson, William ....,,...,..,.................... 279 Tilton, Glenn ....,..,,.....,.. ,..,...,,,,, 2 76 Vann, Marjorie .,.,.......... ...,,......... 2 42 VVattenburg, B. S ..,,......................,..,. 208 Tinkham, Joseph ......,.,.. ..............,.. 3 04 Var1NiCe, Hrrett .............. .............. 2 08 Watts, Mary E .,,,..,...,... .. .... 208 Tipler, Robert .,,,,,,...,, ,,,,,,,,,. 1 39, 210 VanNice, james ,,.............,. .........,..,. 2 77 Watts, Rowland ............... ,,.........,..,, ..... 2 8 0 Tippett: Mattie .....,..,,,,,.........., 192,193 VanPelt, Frances C ................,........ 195 VVatts, Ruth ............,..,,,..,,.,,......,......., ,... 1 92 Titterton, Julia R ...,.,...............r,...r. 242 VHUSHUTCU, William -4--,--,----4----------- 133 VVaugh, john McMaster ...,...., 1186 Todd- Francis C -A------------ ------------ 1 96 Varrrruyl- Marian ---'-------4---4-4r--AA--A--r- 163 VVeafer Eugene ....,............,.....,......... 210 Todd, Frank .....,.,..,......,...........,.......,,r.. 293 Varkala, joseph ,....,.........,, ...... . .... 2 84 Webb ,Mary Evelyn iilllliiiilvlll 91 92 Todd, Hobart ....., ,,,. ...........,................,... 2 7 9 Vaslow, Cecilia R ...,.................,... 209 Webb' Lina ilillID-llililivIilliliiviirliiiiiiliulliiinilii i96 Toigo, Pompeo ............ 117, 121,133 Vaughn, Martha ....A....................,....... 267 Webei Dorotliv Evelvn iinlnnrvi' linl 2 Q8 Tollerton, Frances Lee ....,......,...... 208 Vaughn, Roger T ...,.,..... ............,...... 2 74 Vveberz Emeryf llvliillliiiirll liiiniiillllnnninli 201 Tolman, Mason ............,.....,.......,.,......, 275 Vaughn, William E ......,...,..,......,. 295 Weber Estbei. --ii-A'4-'''-".....-".-'Vii-i---ii ...ii 9 1' TOm1C, Joe H ...................,... ..,......... 1 50 VC3.fCl'1, Ned ..... .........,.,,..........,............... 2 77 Y 170,171,l73'17S Toole, George ........,,.. .....i...... 2 83 Venneslarrdv Blrglr' 4--------"-'A 193,200 Weber, Jane ..,...........,..................... .......65 Toole, Joseph .................... ...283 Vermeslandv Klfsfen --'---"------A-----4--- 200 Weber, Selma Harriett... .....208 Toombs, Farrell ................ ............ 2 94 Yenwnw June -''4-A4------'-4--AAA-----A-i- 173-260 VVebster, J. C ........,...,..,.....,,..,.........,.... 277 Torbert, Edward N ....r..rr......,......... 195 Wfdlef- John A --ii-------'-'44--------- ---.203 vvebsref, Ralph ...,,,,,,.........,.r.,,,.. 74,279 Torney, Stephen C .........,............... 203 VerWiebe, Frank ..,.,,...,. .............. 1 90 Webster, Sarah Eloise 194 209 Tornheim, Harold ............... 198 200 Vette, Charles .,........,,.,, .............. 2 80 Wegner, Harold ....,.,,......................... 287 Touhig, jimmy ,..,,,.,,,......,,...............,.. 113 Viles, Suzanne I ...,...... .............. 2 00 Wehling, Ralph J ....,.....,.. 151,295 Tovrov, Orin ............ 66,,567, 77 242 ViSSer, Leonard ............ .............. 2 74 VVeil, Amelia ,..................,...................... 166 Towsley, Fred ,.,....,,.,.,.,.,,,..,.,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,. 288 Vlcek, Anton ...,.........,............ ......,....... 2 75 Weil, joan ...........,. ..... .,......,..,,..... 2 0 8 Towsor, Julius ,,.rr,..,,.,,,,..,,,,, ,,.,,,,,,,,, 2 18 Vlk, Alice ,...........,....,....,................,........... 208 Weil, Stanley ,.....,.,,.......,............. . ...291 Tram, Eugene F iiiiiiiiiillin iiiiiiiriili 2 95 Vodvarka, Blanche -I .................,. 242 Weisman, Ruth ...r,................ .. .,.......,. 189 Travbor, William ''--v-iuviiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir 278 Voehl, Mary .,..,.,.................,..,..........,...... 52 Weinberg, Winnifred F .......,,,... 213 Tredennick, Mabel M ....... 197 211 Voelkerv Estelle M '----'--'-'--4--A----'-" 211 Weinberg, F. A ........,,,.........., .. ,..,212 Tressler, Betty ..,... 51,254, 262 Voerzv Herbert -1 --A''--r-------A4'4----4--4---A 209 Weinberg, Stanley .,.,,,,... . ..,. ....299 Tressler, Charles ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 278 Vogel, P ........................,............... 188,200 Weinberg, F. F .....,.,............,., ..... 208 TICSSICTI David L ,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 208 Volk, Rosemary ........,........, 48, 65, 198 Weiner. Edward M ............. 208, 218 Treusch, Paul E ..,.........,.... ..,...,,,.,. 1 94 Vollertson, john E ..,.........,.r.....,.... 242, Weinstein, Sophie .............................. 201 Trinkle, Harriet A ..........,,,..,,,....... 272 275 Weir, Charles Edward , .,,,....... 194. Troyer, Enos E .,..,..,,............... ..S0, Van Drasek, Lydia D .....,............. 210 213 243 51, 7-I-,180,182,2-l-2, 277 Von Keller, Alice B .,..,,. 194,208 Weir, John M ...........,.,.. 61,188 277 Trude, Daniel P ......,.,....,...,..,,.............., 42 Vorrhees, Coach .........,...,................... 142 VVeir, Osbey .......,......,,...........,.... ...,........ 2 98 Truce, Gladys M .,,,.,,...,.,,,,,,,,,...,...,,. 242 Voorhees, VVilliam 150,151 279 VVeisberg, Seymour ........,.,. ., .,.,.... 282 Tryon, Philip F .............,..... 200 Vorwald, Loretta R .,,,,...,,,.............. 211 Weisberg, Sydney 188,198 200 Tryon, Rolla M .....,,.............,....,........... 26 Voss, VValter ....,..,,..........,...................... 284 Weiss, julian .............,..............,. 132 208 Ts'ai, Lin Sheng .....,. ,,,... ..........,. 1 9 5 Wadsworth, R. VV ...,,......., 198 200 VVeiss, Robert ....,......,...........,.....,,. M299 Tseng, Yuan-Yung ,...,.,,.. ,..,.....,., 1 95 VVagner, Elsbeth B ...r............,..,,.... 208 VVeiss, Sidney .,,..,..,,.....,. ,....,,,........ 201 Tsu-Kiang, Yen ...,....... ...,......., 1 96 VVahlgren, Efick ............................., 298 VVeissman, Sam Isaaq,19-1 198 Tucken. Robert VV .,.....,..,.....,,...,...... 208 VVakefield, VVilliam ,.,.,,,.,,.,.,.,...,.,,. 295 Welch, Eleanor .,........,,.,............... 263 Tull, Anna B .................,....... 208 VValker, Cyrus W ..........,....,.,,......... 210 VVells, Gideon R .,.. .,.... ....,. 1 9 8 Turley, Louis ....,.,........ ,................ 1 50 VValker, Genevive ........... ,............. 2 -1-3 VVells, joseph. ,.... ..., 3 05 Page 350 CV C1 Welter, Lucille J .....,.........,,......,,A... .203 Wen, Chi Chuchien .........,...........,.. 182 Wenaas, Paul ,...................................... 190 Wentworth, Don ..,,,,.,.,....,,,.........,,.. 305 West, Joseph ..............,... 243,272,292 West, Margaret Agnes 211,243 Westphal, Ellen ......,..,..,.....,.......,,,...... 263 Westra, jacob J .................,................ 195 Wetheran, E. B .............. .......,....... 2 13 Wetu, Winifred E ............. .......... 2 03 VVever, Gladys ..................,,. .....,,.210 Weyan, Ruth ....,...,............,....,............... 218 Wheeler, Angela M. ..,.,..............,. 211 Wheeler, Eleanor M .....l.,........... 203 Wheeler, Horace E .....................,... 195 Whitaver, Ruth Vivian .......,.,..... 211 White, Erma Ellis ...........,............... 200 White, Gilbert F ......,............,........... 51, 60, 69, 825180, 1s2,'194, 198, 274 White, Grace E .........................,........ 210 White, Madeline .....,.... ,.......,.,... 2 01 White. Marian E ...,....... .........,.,... 2 08 White, N. L ......,..........,... ............,.. 2 08 White, Philip. .,....,....,.... ,,.....,,.,,... 2 74 White, Richard ....,..,,.......... ...,,,.,,....., 2 86 White, Thelma C ....,.,...,.,.,.,.,.,,...... 208 Whitfield, Charles I ..,,................,. 195 VVhitman, Roswell .,................,.......,.,. 203 Whitmarsh, Agnes ...,..... . .,.,...,............ 200 Whitney, Raymond ,,.,........ 201, 274 Whitney, Ross 52,184,272, 286 Whittaker, Alice Twitchell 208 Whittier, Tajylor .....................,.,.... 287 Wiancko, Francis H ................... 202 Wickstrom, E-leanora ..,.............., 210 Wien. Bernard Joseph ............,..... 52, 115, 121, 125, 127, 182, 242, 299 272, Wienman, Ruth .................,...,..........,... 206 Wikgren, Allen P ..,...........,....,......., 203 Wilbur, Phyllis C ...........,............. 208 Wilcox, Elwyn ,...........,....................,.. 294 Wilcox, Lee Roy .................. 194,198 Wilder, A. B ,.......,,..,.. ..,..........,...... 1 95 Wilder, Russell .........,. .......,............ 2 79 Wilder, Thorton .,..................,... 17,274 Wilesi, Bradford ............. .............., 2 87 Wilk, Irving ,,........,.....,.....,....... 200,291 Wilkens, Frederick ....,.......... 243,300 Wilkens, Harold E. jr ...........,. 139, 143,279 Wilkens, Helen ................,....... 243,263 Wilkes, Ella .....,..,........,.........,,......,.,.... 196 Wilkinson, Gaylord F ................... 211 Willard, Ruth .....,.............,.........,.,,......... 200 Willett, Florence ....,................ 244, 266 Willett, Herbert .............,................... 280 Williams, Angeline .........,. 1 ............ 167 Williams, Helen E ......................... 210 Williams, Norman D... .............. .209 Williams, Walter G .......11............. 203 Williamson, Mary M ...,.,.....,....,.. 203 Willis, Margaret ...,..,...,..,,......,........... 91 Willis, Paul .,...............................,.. 244,288 Williston, Frank G ......................... 203 Wills, Carolyn. ......... . .............,.............. 211 Wilson, Charles Ermont .......,.... 213 Wilson, Charles R .....,..................,... 203 Wilson, Eleanor 52, 64, 91, 266 Wilson, James .................,.................. 286 Weilson, john P ...,.....,,.., .,....... . 10 Wilson, Louis R ............,,.................... 31 Wilson Margery S .....,................... 212 Wilson, William .....,.............,.......... 218 Wimberly, Mary Adele ............ 200 Wingate, Hayden B ..,...................... 209 VVinslow, Nathaniel ...............,........ 82. 197, 213, 244,272,290 Wisner, Elizabeth ...........,.......,.......,.. 30 Withers, Freda C .,........,.....,.,.,.......... 208 Witmer, Fred ......,.......,...,,........., 75,274 Witty, Richard ............ 244, 272, 295 Wohlberg, Ralph .......,......................... 244 Wolbach. Beatrice .....,.... .Q ..,,,,,... 200 Wolf, Bernard .,..,......... ............ 2 91 Wolf, Carmen .,,.,.,............................,.,. 212 VVolf, Cecelia ..................,....................... 208 Wolf, Elsa ...,.......,,.........., 197,198, 209 Wolfberg, Nathan .............................. 244 Wolfe, Victor ..............,....,.......,...,......,... 200 Wolfenson, Edward .....,.................. 280 Wolfson, Abraham ....,..............,.... 244 Woellner, Robert C .......,.....,........... 35 Wolfson, Abraham .......... ............ 2 13 Wolfsohn, Lucille ............. .,..., ..... 2 0 1 Wood, james O ..........,, ............ 2 13 VVood, Margaret ......,....................... 261 Woodward, Karl S .......................,. 195 Woodruff, Benjamin T .... 213,290 Woodruff, Charles ...................,.......... 304 Woods, Jack ............................................. 201 Woodward, Frederic ...........,...... 9,174 Woodworth, Lolita ....,..... ............ 2 56 Woolpert C ..................,..... ............ 1 95 Wong, Yue K'ei ........... ............ 1 95 Works, George Alan...31, 34, 281 Works, janet C ......,.,.......,.............. 210 Works, Ruth ,.......,..,..,... 52, 91, 92, 262 Womer, John Robert .....,...,........... 150 VVright, Beulah Odella ,.............. 200 Wright. Chester W .........,.....,...,......,. 25 Wright, Edith D .,,.............,., 211,244 Wright, Quincy .....,......... 24, 27, 296 Wright, Randall ..................... 191,196 Wright, Richard ....,......,,,,....,. 201,298 Wylie Alma J ........................................ 163 Yaeger, Martha T ........,................ 208 Yarnall, H. L ...... ................ ............ 1 5 2 Yates, Sidney ....................................,...,.... 28 Yen, Tsu-Kiang S. M .........,......... 202 Yntema, Theodore O .,........ 29,300 Yoh, M. Joseph .,,,......,,..........,......,.,,,.. 298 Young, Burton .,,,........,......,, 52, 74,293 Young, Charles H ............................ 203 Young, Edna E .....,,.....,.,..,................ 210 Young, Eleanor .........,......,,.....,............ 268 Young, Howard, Ir ...,,.....,., 52 141 Young, james W .............................,. 29 Young, Madeline A ......,.......,.,,..., 209 Young, Ruth .,...,......,...........,...,. 189,198 Youtz, Patrick P ........,........., 195,202 Zabelin, Bessie .............................,.....,,.. 200 Zacharias, James ....,.......,.,..........,.... 291, Zacharias, William F ................ Zachariasen, William H .....,.. Zaldivar, Edna M. ............ 197 ...208 ..21. 195 212 Zalesky, Moses .............,.......... 194,209 Zancanaro, Fermino M ........,.... 208 Zatz, Sidney .....................,........... 194 198 Zaus, Earl ..,.....,.......................................... 292 Zeifler, Robert M ....................,.......... 245 Zeigler, Elizabeth ....,......,...... 200 263 Zeitz, Lawrence E ....,..........,......... 208 Zelkowich, Samuel 194,213 244 Zenner, Ray ......... 117, 121, 200, 293 Zernes, Dorothy ..............,..........,. ,....... 2 58 Ziegle, Robert .......................................... 296 Ziegler, George E ....,.............,......... 195 Zimmer, Peter ...116, 121, 185 279 Zimmerman, Herbert P. ............ 42 Zingg, Robert M ....................... .,.... 1 96 Ziska, Louis T ......................... 245 300 Zobel, Henrietta L ............. .. ,.......... 195 Zoline, Joseph ,.................,..... ........... 2 91 Zollar, Maurice A.213,245 298 Zornow,, Herbert F ............. ..,.. .193 Zukowski, Edwin .................. 156 290 Page 351


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University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

1927

University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

1929

University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Page 1

1930

University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL) online yearbook collection, 1934 Edition, Page 1

1934

University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

1939

University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL) online yearbook collection, 1945 Edition, Page 1

1945

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