University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL)

 - Class of 1903

Page 1 of 418

 

University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL) online yearbook collection, 1903 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 418 of the 1903 volume:

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN BOOKSTACKS ,-1 K ge I NOTICE: Retum or renew all Library Materialsl The Mlnlmum Fee for each Lost Book is S50.00. The person charging this material is responsible for its return to the library from which it was withdrawn on or before the Laiesl Date stamped below. Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books are reasons lor discipli- nary action and may result in dismissal from the University. To renew call Telephone Center, 333-8400 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN DDEQ MJMIEIISS rr, W' ' 11"-'1 " 0 ,1 1 ,' , l ,1 1 .- , - 1 1 7 1 my 1 lf! 1 I 2: ' V1 1 ' I'-.,"r'f' , r 1 1 ' . I I 1 1M, 1, '72, , 1 1 1 I 11 1 1 1 1 .. nr", 1 x 1' I 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 Mgt S-1 l".! I . 'I H V 5 11- ' 1 I 1 l"1 51. K . qv. 11 1 .ur- 1 11 1' 1 , ,1 I 'I 1 Q W ' 1 1 4,4 1 JM111., h 'P I ' 1 1 is 1 ' 1' P . 11 .1 V Q H 1 J' Y P f " gl , ft. 1 .1 41 -11 'Mft' .-1-14 7,' .1 ' ' . 'f ' , 11f ' 1 ,' 51 11f, ' 1 N 1 ' V 11 . 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I ' ff N am I- - ff -XX' Nw ff fikl The CAP and GOWN 1903 .M Volume VIII J! Published Annually under the Direction of the Order of the Iron Mask of the University of Chicago Go CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON The donor of the Commons and a loyal trustee of this University this book is respectfully o Dedicated Fi t J s , QD S W1 R i f Q T S S sswtesw l iles X S R as X S Q E S Q 9 31 me osx. s s s s Q R st X R ,X M U., 'mm v X Wes XNW5- XNKNK O yr sv X' SX x Jmx N. N -TQ' -N M, we 5 xt, f N s X t X J H es as New N K see O thou the lofty, thou the strong, Brigh'st wrestler of this tithe of years. Sent from our hand through hopes and fears To hurl the darkness and the wrong Yet lower from the light,-we greet Here on the threshold of a tithe More boon yet, yet more bright and blithe With promise, thee, and at thy feet, Lay this last noble page of strife, The record of one more year's moil, The prelude of ten more years' toil, The paeon of thy stalwart life. , "5 --"mmm VA 14 x Y , lf J ,,,,1...f"'ff-YW" , XX-Q ' 'iff , swf! f 335-ATTTZ' . -f 1 f f? KX ffffkfaw f-gl-Q 4 fx LU 1 X mzrUff3aXf Nagy, X 2'-s--- :7 - ij Img: ,,,. 1 ::.-..'k...:uA,TX,,:02, 317 fwrr1Ufs:PMy-fxlffxg' :AMI "flj,EIF'-2f1U'M7QO'fAR,DJ"3lFf-,agjmr , 1 r' ,.. , Nik V' fl .LxQLLaEpff0f51,'T'5wg5531fjfiffgaffg , , I 'YQ' 5 8 Nffxasvcmff W ji f 'J - A Y 'M gifakfeiimjiififaxfg 0 1 WH? Q, ' 1 'lj -u Xx'xf,i3Q5'fx5fxrfls5 fin! 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I b ' - L1 1 W . ,, f I -f " ms:-f f ' I .n -4 , If 5 G X " ' . -I 'fzsav 1-' 05 -'1":.'Lf 'ff cf . . rf 512' .,:f:fJ ' ' 1 " A - '-, 2 iff ' 1 ...V-gs' ,- .- . .gov ,ff L . .f '5, ' .3,,,,-..-:.,:.::::p '5 .AE5-ff ' ' : 19 , 2555122225 fifflgfif ,fi :, ' - is - ,,g.,.gff:,5.f-' 'Jain' - . - j ' 'J ':bg.f:Q:,-' ,,- f51Q17'Q.'.Q":jj-1 - - -f -.1 :fun ' 1 -1 ' .ff2.?sf:-New 15 - - 1 , ,5ggg:2f3I5:1:E:Z: f fffff' mi " -fl ::f 'K ': L-'-5:sf'u'!!f f:2 - 1 qu? X15 b X -. 1' :ff , 1' ' Q : A , -EW A 1 X , ze. 1 'fffi-7fI,xii.A' - ' g 1' -- ' ' . F, - A ...A G +r Q B 0 -s. .9 ly' I QE? U 5 TE X A N A Tiilaffn Officers MARTIN A. RYERSON . . . President ANDREXV MCLEISH . . Vice President CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON . Treasurer THOMAS W. GOODSPEED . . Secretary WALLACE HECKMAN . Business Manager TREVOR ARNETT . . Auditor Members Class I. Term Expires in 1903 FRED T. GATES FREDERICK A. SMITH CHARLES L. HUTCHINSLJN HOXVARD G. GREY EDXVARD GOODINIAN ADOLPHUS C. BAR'I'I.E'1"r FRANCIS W. PARKER Class II. Term Expires in 1904 ELI B. FELSENTHAI. IIAROLIJ F. MCCORMIQK WILI.IAAI R. HARl'ER MARTIN A. RVERSON FRANKLIN DIACVEAGH XVILLARIJ A. SMITH GEORGE C. W. WALKER Class III. Term Expires in 1905 JESSE A. BALDXVIN ISAAC W. RIACLAY ANDREW MCLEISH ENOs M. BARTON DAVID G. HAMILTON FRANK J. LLENVI-ILYN JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, JR. 9 W. I W ax' ' af W M 11 W' ' J- - rj -L' Q ' , - "IP ' un ch G3 " E Bnvuc'IH'i"3 Q J'-'av' i g 86135 , 1- A .R Q88 if XA Q0 X L-J H v' Q : Y i ll H XQJQ , xx, - ,nl Li 41 -I 4, i - 0' S -4: , J M 5 -u 'T' xx f T o 'P i fiiffiiki EA Q is Q N l . FX . 7 o yy 1 - .lf - Q . . ' mrs 13 3 A P yi A, film FRANK FROST ABBOTT, PH.D., Professor of Latin HARRY DELMONT ABELLS, S.B., Instructor in Morgan Park Academy. YVALTER SIDNEY ADAMS, A.M., Assistant in the Yerkes Observatory. G. W. S. ADAMS, Lecturer in Political Economy. PHILIP SCHUYLER ALLEN, PH.D., Assistant Professor of German. EDWARD SCRIBNER AMES, A.M., PH.D., Instructor in Philosophy. GALUSHA ANDERSON, A.M., S.T.D., LL.D., Professor and Head of the Department of Homiletics. JAMES ROWLAND ANGELL, A.M., Associate Professor of Experimental Psychology. TREVOR ARNETT, University Auditor and Instructor in Political Economy. WALTER WALLACE ATWOOD, S.B., Associate in Geology. R. F. BACON, Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry. THOMAS PEARCE BAILEY, JR., PH.D., Assistant Professor of Education. SUSAN HELEN BALLOU, PH,B., .Associate in Latin. LEWELLYS F. BARKER, M.B. EDWARD EMERSON BARNARD, A.M., Sc.D., Professor of Practical Astronomy and Astronomer in the Yerkes Observatory. CHARLES REID BARNES, PH.D., Professor of Plant Physiologyg Dean in the Colleges. STORRS BARREWS BARRETT, A.B., Secretary and Librarian of the Yerkes Observatory. EDWARD AMBROSE BECHTEL, PH.D., Instructor in Latin. ROBERT RUSSELL BENSLEY, A.B., M.B., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. HENRIETTA KATHERINE BECKER, A.B., Assistant in German. ARTHUR DEAN BEVAN, M.D., Professorial Lecturer on Surgery. FRANK BILLINGS, S.M., M.D., Professorial Lecturer on Medicine. FRANCIS ADELBERT BLACKBURN, PH.D., Associate Professor of the English Language. II FREDRICK MASON BLANCHARD, A.M., Assistant Professor in Public Speaking. OSKAR BOLZA, PH.D., Professor of Mathematics. JAMES HENRY BREASTED, PH.D., Associate Professor of Egyptology and Semitic Languagesg Director of Haskell Oriental Museum. SOPHONISBA P. BRECKINRIDGE, PH.D., Docent in Political Science. HENRY R. BRINKERHOFF, Professorial Lecturer on Military Science and Tactics. FRANK MELVILLE BRONSON, A.M., Assistant Professor of Greek, Morgan Park Academy. ROY HUTCIIINSON HROXYNLEE, Lecture Assistant in Chemistry. ROBERT XVALTER ISRUERE, A.M., Associate in Rhetoric. CARL DARLING BVCK, P1-LD.. Professor and Head of the Department of Comparative Pliilology. EDMUND ISUCKLEY, PH D., Docent in Comparative Religion. ISAAC BRUNSON BURGESS, A.M., Professor of Latin, Morgan Park Academy. SHERBURNE VVESLEY BVRNHAM, A.M., Professor of Practical Astronomy and Astronomer in the Yerkes Observatory. ERNEST DEWITT BURTON, D.D., Professor and Head of Department of New Testa- ment Literature and Interpretation. NATHANIEL BUTLER, A.M., D.D., Professor of Education, Director of Co-operating XVork. ERNEST LEROY CALDWELL, A.B., Instructor in Mathematics, Morgan Park Academy. EDVVARD CAPPS, PH.D., Professor of Greek. FREDERIC IVES CARPENTER, PH.D.. Assistant Professor of English. CLARENCE FASSET CASTLE, PH,D., Associate Professor of Greek on the Edward Oleson Foundationg Dean of the junior Colleges. CHARL1f:s JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN, A.M., PH.D., Instructor in Botany. THOMAS CHROXYDER CHAINIBERLAIN, PH.D., LL.D., Professor and Head of the Department of Geology. CHARLES CHANDLER, A.M., Professor of Latin. HENRY PORTER CHANDLER, An., Associate in English, Assistant Head of Hitchcock House. WAYLAND JOHNSON CHASE, A.M., Assistant Professor of History and Dean of Morgan Park Academy. CHARLES MANNING CHILD, PH.D., Instructor in Zoology. LISI CECILIA CIPRIANA, PH.D., Asso- ciate in Romance Languages and in Literature Qin Englishl. I2 "5'x SOLOMON HENRY CLARK, PH.B., Associate Professor of Public Speaking. CLARA COMSTOCK, Assistant in Physical Culture. JOHN MERLE COULTER, PH.D., Professor and Head of the Department of Botany. HENRY CHANDLER COWLES, PH.D., Instructor in Botany. WALLACE CRAIG, S.M., Assistant in Zoology. HARRIET CRANDALL, Reader in English. JOHN CUMMINGS, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Political Economy. STARR XVI LLARD CUTTING, PH.D., Professor of German Literature. CHARLES BENEDICT DAVENPORT, PH.D., Associate Professor of Zoology and Embryology, Assistant Curator of Zoological Museum. BRADLEY MOORE DAVIS, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Botany. IRA H. DERBY, Research Assistant in Chemistry. JOHN DEWEY, PH.D., Professor and Head of Departments of Philosophy and Educa- tiong Director. School of Education. LEONARD EUGENE DICKSON, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. FRANK WINANS DIGNAN, A.B., Assistant in Greek. ZELLA ALLEN DIXSON, A.M., Associate Librarian. JOHN MILTON DODSON, A.M., M.D., Professorial Lecturer in Medicine, Dean of Medical Students. HENRY HERBERT DONALDSON, PH.D., Professor and Head of Department of Neurology. GERTRUDE DUDLEY, Instructor in Physical Culture. ELIZABETH HOPKINS DUNN, A.M., M.D., Technical Assistant in Neurology. RICHARD B. EARLE, S.D., Assistant in Chemistry. FERDINAND ELLERMAN, Instructor in Astrophysics at the Yerkes Observatory. DANIEL GIRAUD ELLIOT, F.R.S.E., Professorial Lecturer on Zoology. ALBERT CHAUNCEY EYCLESHYMER, PH.D., Assistant Professor in Anatomy. HERMANN F. FISHER, Volunteer Research Assistant in Astronomy at Yerkes Observatory. WARNER FITE, PH.D., Instructor in Experimental Psychology. ROY CASTON FLICKINGER, A.B., Assistant in Greek. NOTT WILLIAM FLINT, S. B., Associate in English, Critic Teacher, The School of Education. GEORGE BVRNHAM FOSTER, A.M., Professor of Systematic Theology. CHARLES SHATTUCK FOX, A. B., Assistant in German at Morgan Park Academy. TENNY FRANK, A.M., Assistant in Latin. EDWIN BRANT FROST, A.M., Professor of Astrophysics and Astrophysicist in the Yerkes Observatory. IDA FURNISS, Assistant in Physical Culture. HENRY GORDON GALE, PH.D., Instructor in Physics. I ,li 4- X X I ERRETT GATES, D.B., Assistant in the Disciples' Divinitv House. ' T5 ix ,x EDGAR JOHNSON GOODSPEED, PH.D., Instructor in Biblical and Patristic Greek, Assistant Director, Haskell Oriental Museum. GEORGE STEPHEN GOODSPEED, PH.D., Professor of Comparative Religion and Ancient History, University Recorder. THOMAS VVAKEFIELD GOODSPEED, D.D., Secretary of the Board of Trustees, and University Registrar. WILLIAM GORSUCH, A.B., Associate in Public Speaking. HENRIK GUNDERSON, A.M., D.B., Professor fin the Dano-Norwegian Theological Serninaryj of Systematic Theology, New Testament Interpretation and Biblical Literature, Dean of the Seminary. FRANK VVAKELY GUNSAULUS, D.D., Professorial Lecturer on English Literature. WILLIAM F. E. GURLEY, Associate Curator in Palaeontology. FREDERICK JAMES GURNEY, A.B., D.B., Assistant to the Recorder. WALTER STANLEY HAINES, A.M., M.D., Professorial Lecturer on Toxicology. GEORGE ELLERY HALE, S.B., SC.D., Professor of Astrophysics, and Director of the Yerkes Observatory. WILLIAM GARDNER HALE, A.B., LL.D., Professor and Head of the Department of Latin. CHARLES CUTHBERT HALL, D.D., Professorial Lecturer on the Barrows Lectureship. ELEANOR PRESCOTT HAMMOND, PH.D., Docent in English Language and Literature. ROBERT FRANCIS HARPER, PH.D., Professor of Semitic Languages and Literatures. WILLIAM RAINEY HARPER, PH.D., D.D., LL.D., President of the Universityg Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Semitic Languages and Literatures. BASIL COLEMAN HYATT HARVEY, A.B., M.B., Associate in Anatomy. SHINKISHI HATAI, Assistant in Neurology. HENRY RAND HATFIELD, PH.D., Assistant Professor in Commerce, Dean of the College of Commerce and Administration. OLOF HEDEEN, A.B., Assistant Professor fin the Swedish Theological Seminaryj of Practical Theology and Exegeses. LUDVIG HEKTOEN, M.D., Professor and Head of Department of Bacteriology and Pathology. CHARLES RICHMOND HENDERSON, A.M., D.D., Professor ofSociology in the Divinity School, and University Chaplain. GEORGE LINCOLN HENDRICKSON, A.B., Professor of Latin. ROBERT HERRICK, A.B., Associate Professor of Rhetoric. JOHN CHARLES HESSLER, PH,D., Instructor in Chemistry. CHARLES EDMUND HEWITT, D.D., sriideiit Secretary iii the Divinity schooif WILLIAM HILL, A.M., Assistant Professor of Political Economyg Assistant Dean in University College. EMIL GUSTAV HIRSCH, PH.D., LL.D., L1T.D., D.D., Professor of Rabbinical Litera- ture and Philosophy. I4 GLENN MOODY HOBBS, S.B., Instructor in Physics. WILLIAM H. HOLMES, A.B., Non-resident Professor of Archaeologic Geology. WILLIS B. HOLMES, PH.D., Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry. IRA XVOODS HOVVERTH, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology fUniversity Collegej. GEORGE CARTER HOWLAND, A.M., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures. ERI BAKER HULBERT, A.M., D.D., LL.D., Professor and Head of the Department of Church History, Dean of the Divinity School. JOSEPH PAXON IDDINGS, PH.B., Professor of Petrology. EPHRIAM FLETCHER INGALS, A.M., M.D., Professorial Lecturer on Medicine. CHARLES INGBERT, A.M., Assistant in Neurology. MAXIME INGRES, B., es lettres Assistant Professor of Romance Languages and Literature. ALLEYNE IRELAND, LL.D., Professorial Lecturer on Colonial Politics, History, and Commerce. JOHN FRANKLIN JAMESON, PH.D., LL.D., Professor and Head of the Department of History. THOMAS ATKINSON JENKINS, PH.D., Associate Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures. FRANK BALDWIN JEWETT, A.B., Research Assistant in Physics. JAMES RICHARD JEWETT, PH.D., Professor of Arabic. FRANKLIN JOHNSON, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Church History and Homiletics. HAYDN EVAN JONES, PH.D., Assistant in Latin and History, Morgan Park Academy. LESTER BARTLETT JONES, Director of Music. LAUDER WILLIAM JONES, PH.D., Instructor in Chemistry. EDWIN OAKES JORDAN, PH.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. HARRY PRATT JUDSON, A.M., LL.D., Professor of Comparative and Constitutional Law and Diplomacy, and Head of the Department of Political Science, Dean of the Faculties of Art, Literature and Science. NORTON ADAMS KENT, Assistant at the Yerkes Observatory. PAUL OSKAR KERN, PH.D., Assistant Professor in Germanic Philology. CARL KINSLEY, A.M., M.E., Instructor in Physics. EDWIN GARVEY KIRK, S.B., Assistant in Zoology. FRANCES ADA KNOX, A.B., Assistant in History. WALDEMAR KOCH, PH.D., Assistant in Pharmacology. PRESTON KYES, A.M., M.D., Instructor in Anatomy. CARL GUSTAV LAGERGREN, A.B., D.B., Professor fin the Swedish Theological Seminaryb of Systematic Theology, and Dean of the Seminary. GORDON JENNINGS LAING, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Latin. THOMAS LARGE, A.B., Assistant in Zoology. CHESTER WALTER LARNED, Assistant in the Morgan Park Academy. 15 JAMES LAWRENCE LAUGI-ILIN, PH.D., Professor and Head of the Department of Political Economy. KURT LAVES, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Astronomy. NELS SORENSON LAWDAHL, Instructor Qin the Dano-Norwegian Theological Sem- inaryl in Church History. ARTHUR WILLIS LEONARD, A.B., Associate in English, Morgan Park Academy. DEAN DEWITT LEWIS, A.B., M.D., Associate in Anatomy. FRANK RATTRAY LILLIE, PH.D., Associate Professor of Zoology and Embryology, Assistant Curator of the Zoological Museum. DAVID JUDSON LINGLE, PH.D., Instructor in Physiology. JAMES WEBER LINN, A.B., Associate in English, Assistant Head of Hitchcock House. BURTON EDVVARD LIVINGSTON, S.B., Assistant in Botany. H. LOUISE LIVERMORE, Assistant in Physical Culture. ROBERT MORSE LOVETT, A.B., Assistant Professor of English, Dean in the Junior Colleges. ELIAS POTTER LYON, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Physiologyg Assistant Dean of Medical Students. ARTHUR CONSTANT LUNN, A.M., Associate in Applied Mathematics. FLORENCE MAY LYON, Associate in Botanyg Head of Beecher House. HERVEY FOSTER MALLORY, A.B., Instructor and Secretary of Correspondence, Study Department. JOHN MATHEWS MANLEY, PH.D., Professor and Head of Department of English. CHARLES RIBORG MANN, PH.D., Assistant Professor in Physics. HEINRICH MASCHKE, PH.D., Associate Professor in Mathematics. ALBERT PRESCOTT MATHEWS, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Physiological Chemistry. SHAILER MATHEWS, D.D., Professor of New Testament History and Interpretationg junior Dean of the Divinity School. GEORGE HERBERT MEAD, A.B., Associate Professor of Philosophy. CHARLES E. MERRIAM, PH.D., Associate in Political Science. JOHN JACOB MEYER, PH.D., Associate in Sanskrit. ALBERT ABRAHAM MICHELSON, PH.D., SC.D., Professor and Head of the Depart- ment of Physics. FRANK JUSTUS MILLER, PH.D., Associate Professor of Lating Dean of Affiliations. MERTON LELAND MILLER, Associate in Anthropology. NEWMAN MILLER, PH.B., Director of University Press Division. ROBERT ANDREWS MILLIKAN, PH.D., Assistant Professor in Physics. CHARLES FREDERIC MILLSPAUGH, Professorial Lecturer on Botany. 16 mixiienirv X , ai ss saws-miss EUBEKBGQMQI gm? FQBQSQQHBIAQQ, ,SMA HE gm , l QL1? 1 L' Smal new W Q -H V 1 Gigli Sas mmgwgg X 'UW ' W1 0 4 SHE QE was , , W , X " ---'- MENBEQ5 QE as r i f,V " f -1 " ' '-Af'-ff1 vv.. ,H 4 F1215 X Q , , , ,A fl ,.yll , lllll, l lllllf X X Ea ?V W 'T"' I X 'Wg 3 X Dwmamgwwnrmuswm W W - K ,Q-. Y ,M , 555522-9, Z KX MKII g J I -XXV , r l I x gulllull mm AMS M II W S f Q ? A g,,1n1"" Nm Q b ,f ' X V! jf' , Q, -Iffw ' 'mill' mi f K fy X Q M633 ? 5 X f mi? ,u N Mm , , , -., Z Q2 1- L' ug A mm 7WN"53QHfT ' f - f f f k nllmw 5? , mu ,I f , Q X QR . nm ?QQQgCgxQFQQ ' Ig 1 . ' f: . .1 ga 7 ' f W W- Wk ' . kmiagafeweesgggy f X f wif 'f L : ,f ,, ' 4 f , G? RWEHL ag? ii PAUL NICOLAS MILYOUKOFF, PH.D., Lecturer, Russian Life and Literature, on the Crane Foundation for IQO3. JOHN WILDMAN MONCRIEF, A.M., Associate Professor of Church History. WILLIAM VAUGHN MOODY, A.M., Assistant Professor of English and Rhetoric. ADDISON WEBSTER MOORE, PH.D., Assistant Professor in Philosophy. ELIAKIM HASTINGS MOORE, PH.D., Professor and Head of Department of Mathematics. FOREST RAY MOULTON, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Astronomy. RICHARD GREEN MOULTON, PH.D., Professor of Literature tin Englishj. WILLIAM MUSS-ARNOLT, PH.D., Assistant Professor and Assistant Recorder. WILLIAM DARNALL MACCLINTOCK, A.M., Professor of English Literatureg Dean of the University College. HERBERT NEXVBY MCCOY, PH.D., Associate in Chemistry. MARY E. MCDOWELL, Head Resident of the University of Chicago Settlement. JOHN ULRIC NEF, PH.D., Professor and Head of Department of Chemistry. THEODORE LEE NEFF, A.M., PH.D., Instructor in the Romance Languages. CHARLES HUGH NEILSON, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. BERTRAM G. NELSON, A.B. Assistant in Public Speaking. CHRISTIAN JORGINIUS OLSEN, Instructor fin the Dano-Norwegian Theological Seminaryl in Homiletics, Church Polity, and Pastoral Duties. WILLIAM BISHOP OWEN, A.B., Associate Professor of Greekg Principal of the University Elementary School. ANNA SOPHIA PACKER, A.B., Accession Assistant. BENEDICT PAPOT, Instructor in Romance Department. ALONZO KETCHAM PARKER, D.D., Professorial Lecturer on Modern Missions in the Divinity School, Librarian of the Divinity Libraryg University Recorder, Head of Hitchcock Hall. JOHN ADELBERT PARKHURST, S.M., Assistant at the Yerkes Observatory. WALTER A. PAYNE, PH.B., Assistant Professor and Secretary of University Extension Lecture Department. RICHARD ALEXANDER FULLERTON PENROSE, Jr., PH.D., Professor of Economic Geology. fOn leave of absence.J CORA BELLE PERINE, A.B., Head of the Accession Department. WILLIAM AUGUST PETERSON, D.B., Instructor Qin the Swedish Theological Sem- inaryj in General History, Church History, and the Greek and Swedish Languages. 18 KARL PIETSCH, PH.D., Associate Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures. IRA MAURICE PRICE, D.B., PH.D., Professor of Semitic Languages and Literatures. MAUDE LAVINIA RADFORD, PH.M., Assistant Qin Englishj University Extension Department. JOSEPH EDWARD RAYCROFT, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Physical Culture and Ex- amining Physician of Men's Department. JEROME HALL RAYMOND, PH.D., Associate Professor of Sociology. FRITZ REICHMANN, PH.D., Assistant Manual Training, Morgan Park Academy. DANIEL GRAISBERRY REVELL, M.B., Associate in Anatomy. MYRA REYNOLDS, PH.D., Associate Professor of English Literatureg Head of Foster House. HOWARD TAYLOR HICKETTS, S.B., M.D., Associate in Pathology. GEORGE WILLIS RITCHEY, Instructor in Practical Astronomy and Superintendent of Instrument Construction at the Y erkes Observatory. JOSEPHINE CHESTER ROBERTSON, A.B., Cataloguer. LUANNA ROBERTSON, PH.D., Instructor in German, Head of Kelly House. CHARLES G. RODGERS, A.M., Assistant in Physiology. JAMES FRENCH ROYSTER, Librarian of Modern Languages. ROLLIN D. SALISBURY, A.M., Professor and Head of the Department of Geography and Dean of the Ogden School of Science. HANS M. SCHMIDT-VVARTENBERG, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Germanic Phi- lology. MARTIN SCHUETZE, PH.D., Associate in German. FERDINAND SCHWILL, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Modern Historyg Assistant Head of Hitchcock House. CHARLES WILLIAM SEIDENADEL, PH.D., Docent in Ancient Greek Authors on Music. NICHOLAS SENN, M.D., PH.D., LL.D., Professorial Lecturer on Military Surgery. GEORGE E. SHAMBAUGH, M.D., PH.B., Instructor in Anatomy. FRANCIS WAYLAND SHEPARDSON, PH.D., Associate Professor of American His- toryg the President's Secretary. JOHN WILKES SHEPHERD, Laboratory Assistant and Lecturer in Chemistry. PAUL SHOREY, PH.D., Professor and Head of the Department of Greek. BURTON JESSE SIMPSON, M.D., Curator of Scientific Equipmentg Assistant in Anatomy. JAMES ROLLIN SLONAKER, PH.D., Research Assistant in Neurology. I9 -If 4 W K f gf, L fg f Z f Cf' fpff '11 Inq' M , I Kitt' i I J x . ? X X l ,MQW 1 ALBION WOODBURY SMALL, P1-LD., LL.D., Professor and Head of Department of Sociology: Director of University Affiliations. CHARLES PORTER SMALL, M.D., Examining Physician. ALEXANDER SMITH, PH D., Associate Professor of General Chemistry, Dean in the Junior Colleges. GERALD BIRNEY SMITH, A.M., D.B., Instructor in Systematic Theology. JOHN M. P. SMITH, PH.D., Associate in Semitic Languages and Literatures. EDWIN ERLE SPARKS, A.M., PH.D., Associate Professor of American History. AMOS ALONZO STAGG, A.B., Professor and Director of the Division of Physical Culture. FREDERICK STARR, PH.D., Associate Professor of Anthropologyg Curator of the Anthropological Section of Walker Museum. GEORGE NEIL INNES STEWART, MA.A., D.SC., M.D., D.P.H., Professor and Head of the Department of Physiology. JULIUS STIEGLITZ, PH.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. SAMUEL WELSEY STRATTON, S.B., Professor of Physics. REUBEN MYRON STRONG, PH.D., Assistant in the Morgan Park Academy at Morgan Park. MARION TALBOT, A.M., Associate Professor of Sanitary Scienceg Dean of Women and Head of Green House. AMY ELIZA TANNER, PH.D., Associate in Philosophy. FRANK BIGELOW TARBELL, PH.D., Professor in Classical Archaeology. BENJAMIN TERRY, PH.D., Professor of Mediaeval History. OLIVER JOSEPH THATCHER, PH,D., Associate Professor of Mediaeval and English History. WILLIAM ISAAC THOMAS, PH.D., Associate Professor of Sociology and Superintendent of Departmental Libraries. JAMES WESTFALL THOMPSON, PH.D., Instructor in European History. ALBERT HARRIS TOLMAN, PELB.. Assistant Professor of English Liter- ature. FRANK LELAND TOLMAN, PH.B., Loan Desk Assistant. CLARENCE ALMON TORREY, PH.B., Inspector of Departmental Libraries. OSCAR LOVELL TRIGGS, PH.D., Instructor in English. JARED G. CARTER TROOP, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. JAMES HAYDEN TUFTS, PH.D., Professor of Philosophyg Dean of the Senior Colleges. 20 fl wiv: ll ' 'fi f I ,fl ry- l H I Z 'H , I, W ?"-i I 'ia a, f ,fArgx.yil il ,F , ,N r yi f fl ii' Wim ii 017 i iii Iii IW ridfvi i w' fl It I M l.IJf.f'-"Wal ii.. JAN:-3 X Nl .i AW- My ' CHARLES RICHARD VAN H ISE, PH.D., Non-Resident Professor of Structural Geology. THORSTEIN B. VEBLEN, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Political Economy, Managing Editor of the journal of Political Economy. GEORGE EDGAR VINCENT, PH.D., Associate Professor of Sociology, Dean of Junior Colleges. CAMILLO VON KLENZE, PH.D., Associate Professor of German Literature. CLYDE WEBER VOTAW, D.B., PH.D., Assistant Professor of New Testament Literature. , ELIZABETH WALLACE, S.B., Instructor in Romance Languages, Head of Beecher House. , JOSEPH P. WARREN, PH.D., Assistant in History. RALPH WALDO WEBSTER, PH.D., M.D., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry. STUART YVELLER, S.B., Assistant Professor of Palaeontologic Geology. HARRY GIDEON WELLS, A.M., M.D., Associate in Pathology. AGNES MATHILDE WERGELAND. PH.D., Docent in History. WILLIAM BUCHANAN WHERRY, A.B., M.D., Associate in Bacteriology. HARRY NICHOLS WHITFORD, S.B., Assistant in Botany. CHARLES OTIS WHITMAN, PELD., LL.D., Professor and Head of the Department of Zoology, Curator of Zoological Museum. ALFRED REYNOLDS WIGHTMAN, A.M., Associate in Latin, Morgan Park Academy. WILLIAM CLEAVER WILKINSON, A.M., D.D., Professor of Poetry and Criticism. HERBERT LOCKWOOD WILLETT, PH.D., Assistant Professor of the Semitic Lan- guages and Literatures, Dean of the Disciples' Divinity House. SAMUEL WENDELL WILLISTON, M.D., PH.D., Professor and Head of the Depart- ment of Palaeontology. HIRAM PARKER WILLIAMSON, A.M., Associate in Romance Languages and Literatures. JOHN GORDON WILSON, M.D., Associate in Anatomy. JOHN DORSEY WOLCOTT, PH.D., Assistant in the Classical Libraries, Instructor in Latin, University Extension Division. GHEN-ICHIRO YOSHIOKA, PH.B., Docent in japanese. CHARLES A. YOUNG, PH.B., Lecturer in Biblical Literature, University Extension Division. JACOB WILLIAM ALBERT YOUNG, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematical Pedagogy. ' CHARLES ZUEBLIN, PH.B., D.B., Professor of Sociology. 2I H71 , QV f QS? fiW?iSX We K F-If !f4-f'W sz V X 0 , YY: xx f I WX' X if' x Skim 'itgl X X ' me , ...af fe ' . ' G... 1 A , Y a - - , . I u X " A ' ' X l ' W C u es: 1 fx . . A 4. ff' ' 4... s Q 1 U'lfl775qfdEl ga S VVILLIAM RAINEY HARPER, PH.D., D.D., LL.D., President ofthe University. JOSEPH HENRY BEALE, JR., A.M., LL.B., Professor of Law, and Dean of the Law School, Harvard Law School, 1882. ERNEST FREUND, J.U.D., PH.D., Professor of Law, University of Heidelberg 1884, Columbia College Law School. HORACE KENT TENNEY, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law, University of Vermont, University of Wisconsin Law School. BLEWETT LEE, A.M., LL.B., Harvard Professor of Law, Harvard University, 1887, Harvard University Law School, 1889. JULIAN WILLIAM MACK, LL.B., Professor of Law, Harvard University Law - School, 1887. CLARKE BUTLER WHITTIER, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law, Leland Stanford Jr. University, 1893, Harvard University Law School, 1896. JAMES PARKER HALL, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law, Cornell University, 1894, Harvard University Law School, 1897. FLOYD RUSSELL MECHEM, M.A., Professor of Law, University of Michigan. Lecturers a HON. HENRY VARNUM FREEMAN, A.B., A.M., Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence, Yale University, 1869. FRANCIS WARNER PARKER, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Patent Law, ShurtleH College, 1878. GEORGE RECORD PECK, A.M., LL.D., Lecturer on Railroad Law. FRANK FREMONT REED, A.B., Lecturer on Copyright and Trade Marks, University of Michigan, 1880, University of Michigan Law School. CHARLES EDWARD KREMER, Lecturer on Admiralty Law. SAMUEL WILLISTON, A.M., LL.B., Lecturer on Federal Jurisdiction, Harvard Uni- versity Law School, 1888. JOHN MAXCY ZANE, A.B., Lecturer on Mining Law, University of Michigan, 1884. 23 H Jcbool of Education WILLIAM RAINEY HARPER, PH.D., D.D.. LL.D., President of the University. ANNE ELIZABETH ALLEN, Critic Teacher Kindergarten. LORLEY ADA ASHLEMAN, Associate in French fSpecia1j. ZONIA BABER, Associate Professor of the Teaching of Geography and History, Prin- cipal of the Elementary School. ZOE SMITH BRADLEY, Teacher of Music. ANNETTE BUTLER, Assistant in Manual Training, Wood and Iron Sloyd. CAROLINE CRAVVFORD, Associate in Physical Trainingg Anthropometry and Cor- rective Work. ANNETTE COVINGTON, Teacher of Drawing and Painting. VIOLA DERATT, Teacher of History. JOHN DENVEY, PH.D., Director. JOHN DUNCAN, Associate Professor of the Teaching of Art. MARTHA FLEMING, Associate Professor of the Teaching of Speech, Oral Reading and Dramatic Art. WILLARD CLARK GORE, Teacher of Philosophy. ANTOINETTE HOLLISTER, Associate in Art, Clay Modeling and Painting. MARY HOWELL, Assistant in the Kindergarten. WILBUR SAMUEL JACKMAN, A.B., Dean, and Professor of the Teaching of Science. CARL JOHANNES KROH, Assistant in Physical Culture. ADELE LACKNER, Assistant in First Grade. ELIZABETH EUPHROSYNE LANGLEY, Assistant in Manual Training, and Sloyd for Primary Grades. CLARA ISABEL MITCHELL. Critic Teacher, Second Grade. IRA BENTON MEYERS, B.E , Instructor in the Teaching of Natural Science, Curator of Museum. GEORGE VVILLIAM MEYERS, Teacher of Mathematics. ALICE PELOU BET NORTON, A.M., Assistant Professor of the Teaching of Home Economics. BERTHA PAYNE, Special Kindergarten Instructor. ROSE PHILLIPS, Assistant, Fourth G1'ade. EDUARD PROKOSCH, A.M., Associate in German. MARY REED, Critic Teacher, Sixth Grade. EMILY JANE RICE, Teacher of History. ELEANOR SMITH, Teacher of Music. KATHERINE MARION STILLWELL, Critic Teacher, Eighth Grade. GUDRUN THORNEfTHOMAS, Critic Teacher, Third Grade. GERTRUDE WAN HOESON, Critic Teacher, Fifth Grade. IRENE VVARREN, Librarian. ELSIE AMY WYGANT, Critic Teacher, Seventh Grade. ELLA FLAGG YOUNG, PH.D., Professor of Education. 24 , 9 E I in it . , . , un lltllll fun 1 1 4 run all 1 if vu .l H' trim " M" f .... 1 l e ilzlutltui 25 as . ,. , r1 r1 1 . 1 . 1 , l l I iigillviiligwllglbll i i 1 A a,liV,j,w1fM'1 ' - U min umm itil il it 1 i l l . li f . w ' 1 ll inuuuui .iru irq in f I 1 1 u . lm 1.M',H1l:,,ljH!,,ijH5,I111111.91111 nm11llnlr,lzluu"1lnnlilnggilviii ulillynluliw I NT1QHM, gi wJwhTiT lHm,wWnWWr5J lwlintlfi In H ,,,!1r,', f'i.1 I ' lli ii i l l x lillllllliliiiililill i ii! VM :jar l VIE? if llfllllliwf naaeaam 1, ill itll L If P' ,ll U ,i IW! X I ffl i I X ml !1lM1'li1'yI, i ' I Hlflf nl "Jaw Y lim , T EWU? X ' 7 I Nwim, jf ml 9 f +pwWr if Hww T . ,I vi, -l 11, iii. 'Il f fl g 'lf ' ill . 1 ,1 v:1.'.. 1111'1 1.. f'J1W 1lS11 fi li 1, kdm .VWVWWWW'hHidV MM W h W Lmml' M J ii i i i 1 1 1 ri 1 i HROUGH the University Extension Division the University attempts WAX to bring, as far as possible, its many advantages for culture and l instruction to people who are prevented from going to the University itself. It makes its appeal not alone to those whose educational dl advantages have been limited, but to every individual who wishes to ' K establish or renew relations with the currents of thought and aspira- ? tion which flow into, through and out from, the University. The value of the work is attested by the gradual growth of the respective departments of the Division. Under the auspices of the Lecture-Study Department, centres for the extension of University Teaching are organized and in these centres courses of lectures and instruction are given by members of the University faculty. During the school year IQOI-02, 190 courses of six lectures each were delivered in 140 different centres. Reports for the corresponding period of the current year show an increase of about 20 per cent over the above figures. During the six months closing April ISt, 1903, there have been nine members of the University faculty devoting their entire time to instruction by this method and fifteen others have devoted a portion of the time during each quarter to University Extension Lecturing. Through the Correspondence-Study Department any one anywhere may take the courses of instruction which are given in the University class-rooms and secure credit toward the degree. In addition to these courses of a college and graduate grade, many of an elementary character are oifered so that one may prepare for, as well as continue, a college course. Each year has witnessed a larger enrolment in this Department. The enrolment for 1902-03 has been about 20 per cent greater than that of the preceding year. Approximately Q0 per cent of the students are teachers in different parts of this country, although many vocations and every quarter of the globe are represented. While the majority do not take these courses for credit purposes, the number of those who have been in residence and who are working toward the degree has been rapidly increasing. This is due in some measure, no doubt, to the fact that the University now allows a student to take the examination on a correspondence course immediately after finishing it, at his home, under approved supervision. 25 Jpecial University Extension Lecturers and Instructors JENKIN LLOYD JONES, Lecturer in Literature. LATHAN A. CRANDALL, D.D., Lecturer in American History. NATHANIEL I. RUBINKAM, PH.D., Lecturer in English Literature. HORACE SPENCER FISKE, A.M., Lecturer in Literature. W. M. R. FRENCH, A.B., Lecturer in Art. THEODORE G. SOARES, PH.D., D.D., Lecturer in Old Testament Literature. WILLIAM A. COLLEDGE, Lecturer in English Literature. AARON H. COLE, A.M., Lecturer in Biology. FRANK K. SANDERS, PH.D., Non-Resident Professor of the Semitic Languages and Literatures. GEORGE RICKER BERRY, PH.D., Non-Resident Professor of the Semitic Languages and Literatures. XVILLIAM HOOVER, PH.D., Non-Resident Assistant Professor of Mathematics. GEORGE LINNEUS MARSH, A.M., Associate in English. AMA ELIZA TANNER, PH.D., Associate in Philosophy. YVILLARD KIMBALL CLEMENT, PH.D., Non-Resident Reader in Latin. HOWELL EMLYN DAVIES, M.D., PH.D., Non-Resident Reader in Bacteriology. LAETITIA MOON CONARD, PH.D., Non-Resident Reader in Comparative Religion. FREDERICK OTTO SCHUB, PH.D., Non-Resident Reader in German. MINNIE MARIE ENTEMANN, PH.D., Reader in Zoology. THOMAS ALLAN HOBEN, PH.D., Non-Resident Reader in New Testament Literature. OSCAR TUNSTAL MORGAN, PH.D., Non-Resident Reader in the Semitic Languages and Literatures. DANIEL PETER MACMILLAN, PH.D., Non-Resident Reader in Philosophy. FRED HARVEY HALL CALHOUN, PH.D., Non-Resident Reader in Geology. KATHERINE ELIZABETH DOPP, PH.D., Non-Resident Reader in Philosophy. WILLIAM HARVEY ALLEN PH.D., Non-Resident Reader in Sociology. SARAH FRANCES PELLETT, A.M.. Reader in Latin. NINA CATHERINE VANDEWALKER, PE,D.M., Non-Resident Reader in Philosophy. FRED WARREN SMEDLEY, PH.B., Non-Resident Reader in Philosophy. EDITH BURNHAM FOSTER FLINT, PH.B., Non-Resident Reader in English. RALPH GRIERSON KIMBLE, A.B., Non-Resident Reader in Sociology. MERRITT LORRAINE HOBLIT, A.M., Reader in Spanish. iw 71 ' ,mg ff -L' -Livlw-l?illWlQ51l1f,l . 2 if lf J .... R wg-ix X 4. VAA. -1 1, f f 'xx ...' l 26 Instructors Appointed for the Jammer Quarter, 1902 U HENRY CARTER ADAMS, PH.D., Professor of Political Economy and Finance, Uni- versity of Michigan, Iowa College, 1874. WILLIAM BENTON CHAMBERLAIN, A.M., D.D., Scoville Professor of Elocution and Sacred Music in the Chicago Theological Seminary, Oberlin, 1875. FRANCIS ASBURY WOOD, PH.D., Professor of German, Cornell College, Mt. Vernon Iowa, Northwestern, 188o. JAMES BOUGLAS BRUCE, A.M., PH.D., Professor of the English Language and Literature, University of Tennessee: University of Virginia, 1883. WILLIAM MACDONALD, PH.D., LL.D., Professor of History, Brown University, Har- vard University, 1892. FRED B. R. HELLEMS, PH.D., Professor of Latin, University of Colorado, University of Toronto, 1893. JAMES H. VAN SICKLE, A.M., Superintendent of Public Instruction, Baltimore, Md., University of Colorado, 1895. WILLIAM H. HUDSON, Professor and Lecturer in English Literature for Leland Stanford Jr. University and the London Society for the Extension of University Education. GEORGE WASHINGTON PASCHAL, PH.D., Associate Professor of Latin and Greek, Lake Forest College, Lake Forest, 1892. THEODORE C. BURGESS, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin, Bradley Polytechnic Institute, Hamilton College, 1883. CLARENCE WILLIS EASTMAN, PH.D., Assistant Professor of German, University of Iowa, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1894. CARL EDGAR EGGERT, PH.D., Instructor in German, the University of Michigan, University of Iowa, 1886. JOHN PAUL GOODE, PH.D., Instructor in Geography, the University of Pennsylvania, University of Minnesota, 1889. WILLIAM HENRY SCHOFIELD, PH.D., Instructor in English, Harvard University University of Toronto, 1889. ARTHUR CHARLES BROWN, PH.D., Instructor in English, the University of Wis- consin, Hobart College, I893. WILLIAM DOUWES ZOETHOUT, PH.D., Assistant in Physiology, Hope College, 1893. HORACE G. BYERS, PH.D., Assistant in Chemistry, Westminster College, 1895. RUSSEL D. GEORGE, A.M., Assistant in Geology, McMaster University, 1897. IRVING KING, A.B., Assistant in Philosophy, Earlham College, 1896. OSWALD VEBLEN, Assistant in Mathematics, University of Iowa, 1898. ELIOT BLACKWELDER, A.B., Assistant in Geology. CHARLES CHRISTOPHER ADAMS, S.M., Assistant in Zoology, Illinois Wesleyan University, 1895. EUGENE HOWARD HARPER, PH.D., Assistant in Zoology, Oberlin College, 1890. EUGENE PAUL SCHOCH, A.M., Assistant in Chemistry. FLORA J. COOK, Pedagogy, School of Education. ELEANOR SMITH, Music, School of Education. JENNIE HALL, Assistant, Grammar Grades, School of Education. 27 IIIUIII !j'l'l'l. r 4 .l'l'lUllI'l'l"l'1i1il'IUIVIVIUIUIUIVJUIUIUIUIUIUIUIUIUIUIUIUIUIUIUIUIUIUID i . AN- 4 115546 -ALOQX laik! 1:0 ldf 03,8 ' '1 Unzverszty Preachers sw I D 5.81 E Ei 'EA 1-!4-if -' 6 ' N l. I' I, I D' QQXQIQ Q bfim! - .Kittie-fi-S-F'-V1. , Jo-f'2..x ,4xb+.f, Znfhigwyg g E 5, -ummm! KIHIQIllllilQlllQl.flflilIllIllQlllQlQlllQTilQl'il'.liIlIIIQIIIQIIQQ .Qt i I.-IQIIII TN wget!! H.l.l.m: 356' E f - g, , ' fy - ,: ' ' i ' 1 5, , . n A . ' . ,- 5.g?S6ga.1?4f -RJ IX b15'4iz-??"61 'mPs27xsQw.sg-Q-i s E j-f . . C ' I 5 J A in : i'i5'. . . . - ' i ' Y I 'Q Spring Quarter The Reverend AMORY H. BRADFORD, D.D., Montclair, N. J. The Reverend EDXYARD EYERETT HALE, Boston, Mass. Jammer .Quarter The Reverend HERB1-:RT L. WII.LETT, Chicago. The Reverend ALONZO K. PARKER, D.D., Chicago. The Reverend FRANK GLlNSALTI.l'S, ILD , Chicago. Professor GEORGE BARKER STEVENS, PH.D., D.D., Yale University. Bishop CHAS. BETTS GALLOWAY, D.D , LL.D., jackson, Miss. The Right Reverend JOHN LANCASTER SPAULDING, D.D., LL.D., Bishop of Peoria, Ill The Reverend FRANK CRANE, Pastor of the People's Church, Chicago. The Reverend Professor HENRX' C. KING, A.M., D.D., of Oberlin College. The Reverend Bishop JOHN HEYL VINCENT, S.T.D., LL.D., Zurich, Switzerland. .Autumn .Quarter The Reverend DE VVITT ITYDE, DD , President of Bowdoin College. The Reverend WM. GRIFFIS, First Congregational Church, Ithaca, N. Y. The Reverend EDWARD JUDSON, Memorial Baptist Church, New York City. The Reverend H. W. THOMAS, Chicago. The Reverend NENVELL DXVIGHT HILI,IS, Plymouth Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. Winter .Quarter The Reverend LYMAN ABBOTT, New York. President RICHARD DAVENPORT HARLAN, Lake Forest College. The Reverend CLELAND B. MCAFEE, Chicago. 28 an ew? as ff ft I 1 an , W O , if Deans of Affiliated Institutions a HENRY H. BELFIELD, PH.D., The Chicago Manual Training School, Michigan ave. and I2tl1 st. JOHN J SCHOBINGER, The Harvard School, I25 E. 5ISt st., Chicago, SCOT BUTLER, A.M., LL.D., Butler College, Irvington, Ind. A. F. FLEET, A.M., LL.D., Culver Military Academy, Culver, Ind. JOHN COXVLES GRANT, A.M., LL.D., Kenwood Institute, 40 PZ. 47th st. .ARTHUR CB.-XYLORD SLOCUM, A.M., LL.D., Kalamazoo College, Kalamazoo, Mich. JOHN F. FORBES, PH.D., john B. Stetson University, De Land, Florida. JOHN MILTON DODSON, A.M., M.D., Dean, Rush Medical College, Chicago. FRANK BILLING5, SM., M.D., Dean, Rush Medical College, Chicago. WILLIAM PARKER McKEE, A.M., D.B., Frances Shimmer Academy, Mt. Carroll, Ill. ANNE R. H.AIRE, A.B., University School for Girls, 22 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago. IQIVXVARD OCTAVIUS SISSON, S.B., A.B., Bradley Polytechnic Institute, Peoria, Ill. FREDERIC SHURTLEFF COOLIIIGE, AB., M.D., Dean, Rush Medical College, Chicago. XVILLIAM BISHOP OVVEN, PHD., University Secondary School 1South Side Academyl, 5467 Lexington ave., Chicago. WILLIAM RIGGS TROVVBRIDGIC, A B , The Rugby School, Kenilworth, Ill. GEORGE DYRXYARD ADAMS, A.M., lJ.D., Des Moines College, Des Moines, Ia. PAYSON SIBLEY AVILIJ, A.B., Princeton Yale School. GEORGE NEXVTON SLIQIGHT, A.B., B.Ild., Elgin Academy, Elgin, Ill. EDXVIN PUTNAM BROXVN, A.B., Wayland Academy, Beaver Darn, Wis. EVELYN BIATZ, PI-LB., Dearborn Seminary, 2252 Calumet ave., Chicago. CLIFFORD XV. BARNES, M.A., Illinois College, jacksonville, Ill. 29 Fellows Appointed for 1902-1903 11 WALLACE APPLETON BEATTY, S.M.g Chemistry, Loewenthal Fellow, Kentucky Uni versity, 1896. CHARLES HENRY BEESON, A.M.g Latin, Indiana University, 1893. ELIOT BLACKWELDER, A.B.g Geology, University of Chicago, IQOI. ORVILLE HARRX' BROWN, A.B.g Physiology, State University of Kansas, 1901. WILLIABI MCAFEE BRUCE, A.M.g Chemistry, Central College, 1896. PAUL GUSTAV ADOLF BUSSE, A.M.g German, Northwestern University, 1899. WILLIAM HENRY BUSSEY, A.B., Mathematics, Northwestern University, 1900. HARVEY CARR, S.B., Psychology and Education, University of Colorado, 1901. VVILBERT LESTER CARR, A.M.g Latin, Drake University, 1898. LUTIE REBECCA CORWIN, S.T.B., Semitic, Hartford Theological Seminary, 1894. NORMAN WENTWORTH DEWITT, A.B.g Latin, University of Toronto, 1899. WALTER FAIRLEIGH DODD, S.B.g Political Science, Florida State College, 1898. JAMES ALLISTER DONNELL, A.B.g Political Economy, Queen'S University, 1902. SAMUEL CHARLES EMLEY, A.B.g Pathology, Kansas University, 1899. WILLIAM HARVEY EMMONS, A.B.g Geology, Central College, 1896. FRANCIS LEV1 FAREWELL, A.B., Political Economy, University of Toronto, IQOO. ROY YALDING FERNER, A.B., Astronomy, University Of Minnesota, 1897. MAYO FESLER, PH.B., History, University of Chicago, 1897. MARJORIE LUCILLE FITCH, PH.M.1 Germanic, Northwestern University, 1899. BURTON LEE FRENCH, A.B.g Political Science, University of Idaho, 1901. FANNIE CORNELIA FRISBIE, A.B.g Physics, Rockford College, 1899. CHARLES GOETTSCH, A.B., Germanic, University of Chicago, 1901. KATE GORDON, PH.B., Philosophy, University of Chicago, IQOO. ELMER CUMMINGS GRIFFITH, A.M.g History, Beloit College, 1895. WILLIAM CYRUS GUNNERSON, A.M.g Sanskrit, Northern Indiana Normal School, 1893 WALTER LVILSON HART, A.B.g Mathematics, University of Chicago, 1901. AUGUSTUS RAYMOND HATTON, PH.B 3 Political Science, Franklin College, 1898. ARCHIBALD HENDERSON, PH.D., Mathematics, University of North Carolina, 1898. JAMES FLEMING HOSIC, PH.B.g English, University of Chicago, IQOI. CLIFTON DURANT HOWE, M.S.g Botany, University of Vermont, 1898. FRED ALLISON HOWE, PH.M.g English, University of Michigan, 1890 ROBERT FRANKLIN HOXIE, A.B., Political Economy, University of Chicago, 1893. FREDERICK LEROY HUTSON, A.B.g Greek, Denison University, 1896. CHARLES INGBERT, A.M., Neurology, University of North Dakota, 1895. CHARLES SHERMAN JACOBS, A.M.g Greek, Albion College, 1893. ROBERT SLIITH JENKINS, A.M.g Romance, University of Toronto, 1893. MARCUS WILSON JERNEGAN, A.M.g History, Brown University, 1896. HERBERT EDWIN JORDAN, A.M.g Mathematics, McMaster University, 1900. MARX' JACKSON KENNEDY, A.B.g Latin, Belmont College, 1883. IRVING KING, A.B., Philosophy, Earlham College, 1896. HOWARD PENDLETON KIRTLEX', PH.B., Physiology, University of Chicago, 1900. HARLOW LINDLEY, A.M.g History, Earlham College, 1898. JOHN ROBERTSON MACARTHUR, A.B.g English, University of Manitoba, 1892. WILLIAM RAY MANNING, A.B., History, Baker University, 1899. JOHN T. MCIVIANIS, A.B.g Education, Leland Stanford Jr. University, 1897. AXEL LEONARD MELANDER, B.S.g Zoology, University of Texas, 1899. GENEVA MISENER, A.M.g Queen's University, 1899. ROBERT MORRIS, A.M.g Sociology, University of Nashville, 1897. EBEN MITMFORD, A.B.g Sociology, Buchtel College, 1896. ROY BATCHELDER NELSON, A.B.g Sanskrit, University of Chicago, IQOI. GEORGE TYLER NORTHROP, A.B.: Romance Languages, Williams College, 1897. MOSES MILTON PORTIS, M.D.g Pathology, University of Chicago, 1898. CHARLES ALBERT PROCTER, A.B.g Physics, Dartmouth College, 1900. FRANKLIN PIERCE RAMSAY, A.M.g Semitic, Davidson College, 1879. KELLEY REES, A.B.g Greek, Leland Stanford Jr. University, 1902. 30 GEORGE FULLMER REYNOLDS, P1-1.B,g English, Lawrence University, 1898. THOMAS JAMES RILEY, A.B.g Sociology, Baker Vniversity, I9oo. XVICKLIFFE ROSE, A.M.: Philosophy, University of Nashville, 1890. ROBERT KEABLE Row, A.B.g Education, Queen's University, 1897. GEORGE SENN, S.B.g Physiology, University of lViscOnSin, 1901. ALFRED OGLE SHAKLEE, S.B.3 Chemistry, University of Chicago, 1899. GEORGE HARRISON SHULL, SB., Botany, Antioch College, 1901. LEATITIA MORRIS SNOW, A.B.g Botany, Woman's College of Baltimore, 1895. LOUIS NEII,I, TATE, S.B.g Anatomy, Knox College, 1901. JOHN LITTLEFIELD TILTON, A.M.g Geology, Wesleyan Vniversity, 1885. OSXVALD VEBLEN, A.B., Mathematics, University of Iowa, 1898. JOHN BROADUS WATSON, A.M.g Philosophy, Furman Vniversity, 1898. PAUL EMIL WEITHAASE, A.B 1 Germanic, Bucknell College, IQOI. FRANK HOWARD WESCOTT, A.B.g Physics, University of Chicago, 1897. IWIURRAY SHIPLEY YVILDMAN, PH.B.g Political Economy, Earlham College, 1893. J. GORDON WILSON, M.D., Anatomy, University of Edinboro. ROBERT BRADFORD WYLIE, SOB., Botany, Upper Iowa University, 1897. II. Divinity Fellows XVILLIAIXI HENRY ALLISON, AB., Church History, Harvard University, 1893. JOHN XVILLIAM BAILEY, A.B., New Testament, Franklin College, 1898. ALLAN TIBBALS BURNS, A.B.g Biblical Theology, University of Chicago, 1897. XVILLIAINI DUNCAN FERGUSON, D.B.: New Testament, Oberlin Theological Seminary, 1894 XVILFRED CURRIER KEIRSTEAD, A.M.g Systematic Theology, University of New Bruns wick, I8 8. THEODORE WOOZS NOON, A.M.g Church History, Yale University, 1896. ELBERT RUSSELL, A.M.g New Testament, Earlham College, 1894. ALBERT SHERXVOOD YVILSON, A.B.g Systematic Theology, University of Toronto, IQOO. 1 X J - Jn. A ,- :.::,. ,.... lp 609, 11 5 la . i my , adm, , A fl T- ' ifwm 7 '-H--- '--' f f IWW' M , gzii C ,f 5 V , , QM' - .F ,", ff 1 1 ..., , ,,,... fr 7 ff EZ: 7 -on pn, N x fllllllia :ai , P f W .LQ Z Y If I ' ll I 0 SW I as -.,, 1 2 - Riel , N, If NSI Alb' .w 31 The Forty:second Convocation ,G Held in the University Quadrangles, june 17, 1902. Convocation Chaplain ...... C. R. HENDERSON Convocation Address-"The Service of Science to the University, and the Response of the University to that Service," by President HENRY SMITH PRITCHETT, PH.D., LL.D., of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Fortydhird Convocation Held in the University Quadrangles, August 29, 1902. Convocation Chaplain ...... C. R. HENDERSON Convocation Address-"The Crisis of Democracy," by CHANCELLOR ELISHA ANDR1-zws, D.D., Ll, IJ., of the University of Nebraska. The Forty:fourth Convocation Held in Studebaker Theatre, December 16, 1902. Convocation Chaplain .... The REv. PRoF. GRAHAM TAv1,oR Convocation Address-"The American Teacher," by MR. XVILLIAM HENRY MAXWELL, A.M., Superintendent of Schools, New York City. The Fortyififth Convocation Held in Studebaker Theatre, March 17, IQO3. Convocation Chaplain . . REV. XVILLIAM M. LAXVRENCE, D.D., of Chicago Convocation Address-"The Heroism of Scholarship," by REV. FRANK YVAKELY GLTNSAULITS, D.D,, President Armour Institute ofTecl1nology. 32 The Quadrangle Club E Officers of Club SHAILER MATHEWS . President ALEXANDER SMITH Vice President HENRY G. GALE . Secretary NEWMAN IVIILLER Treasurer Councilors . LEWELLYS F. BARRER FREDERICK I. CARPENTER CAMILLO voN KLENZE CHARLES L. HUTCI-IINSON GEO. M. ECKELS Entertainments During Past Year Concerts November 3: GEORGE J. HAMLIN. December 2: MISS AUGUSTA COTTLON. january 9: MR. FREDERICK W. Roor, assisted by MISS LAURA A. RICE and MR. LESTER B. JONES. February I3: MR. W. H. SHERNVOOD. March 6: MISS ALPERT, MR. WEIDIG, and MR. STEINDEL. Receptions December 26: MADAME ELEONORA DUSE. October I6: MR. THEODORE THOMAS. Smoke Talks, one each Month. Club Dinner and Shop Talk by a Member, one each Month. Ladies' Day every Mondayg Hours 2 P. M. to I2 P. M. Special Ladies' Day and Dinner, every gd Monday. 33 1ln fllbemoriam Che 1Revereno 3ohn 1henrQ :Barrows Soeepb JBono Riva 1bowaro JBrQan Gharles linosap :Burroughs 1belen Gregg Gamhbell llhag 3onas Zliililliam Gasper 1kern Zlheooore Ilhahan 1Rimbal Er. CB. HIS. Iamherteon Tbugh Guthrie leighton :lfreioa Tirene llheper llhrs. Elice Jfrecman llbalmer Dr. B. 11111. Stratton l Q 5 O those who knew Charles Lindsay Burroughs, the shock of his death Z remains unsoftened by time. His memory remains among us with a 4, 'K' + personality, as if the living man had left us for an instant, and would up t W ,sz in an instant more return, with all his odd bluntness of manner, his 4' quick, nervous speech, his unfailing, obvious, manly earnestness and .5 ' friendliness. t'He was good," said a man who had known him well. 4 iii There were two or three in a little group, coming away from the memorial service held in the winter quarter. "And it wasn't the kind of goodness that means feebleness, either." "No," said some one else, "there never was anything undecided about Charlie Burroughs. He knew what he wanted, and he wanted it hard." As an athlete, he never entered a race without the intense purpose of winning if he could. Unfairness he resented immediately. He knew that he would take no advantage, and he did not mean to give any. As a scholar, he was enthusiastic and keen. No pains were too great to take, if he might win to his end through them. Yet his scholarship was sympathetic, too. He was not the sort of man to spend his time looking for Haws in the work of others. Respect is a splendid tribute to secure fron1 the world. No man despises it, though some affect to. But respect, after all, is cold without friendliness and affection. It is not as an athlete, not as a scholar, not as a doer, that we miss Charlie Burroughs, for there are other scholars, and athletes and workers who will fill his place. But his place asa friend, who can fill? Who can give us the sanity, the independent honesty, the common-sense, and with these the loyalty, the spirit of sacrifice and kindness, the dreamy tolerance, which made up the comradeship of the man who is gone? It is for these we miss him more and more. He was a good friend, as he grew older, he would have grown a better friend. Is it a wonder that the voice sinks and hesitates to frame the last "Good-bye? " ' Guests of the University D JAMES H. HYDE . . . . President Alliance Francaise in America BARON DE SCHLIPPENBACH . . . . Russian Consul at Chicago LIEUTENANT COLONEL PASPOPOFF . Russian Embassy at Washington OWEN RIDLEY .... . University College, Reding, England GENERAL WILLIAM BOOTH i . . Commander-in-Chief, the Salvation Army H. R. H. MAHA VAJIRAVUDH . . . . The Crown Prince of Siam PROFESSOR J. H. GORE . . Columbian University, Washington, D. C. ELWELL S. OTIS . . . . Major General U. S. A. fRetiredJ EDWARD EVERETT HALE .... ...... B Oston MR. AND MRS. JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, JR. . . . New York PRESIDENT NICHOLAS MURRAY BUTLER . . Columbia University PRESIDENT EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN . . Tulane University PRESIDENT H. L. STETSON . . . Kalamazoo College GRAND DUKE BORIS VALDEMAROVITCH . . . Russia M. XAVIER TORAU-BAYLE ........... Paris G. H. KNIBBS . . Commissioner of Education, New South Wales CHARLES H. HULBURD . . . President Elgin National Watch Co. DAVID J. HILL ..... . . Assistant Secretary of State CHANCELLOR E. BENJAMIN ANDREWS University of Nebraska PROFESSOR ALBERT BUSHNELL HART . . Harvard University PROFESSOR GEORGE B. STEVENS . . Yale University PROFESSOR HENRY CHURCHILL KING . . . . Oberlin College PROFESSOR KUDIETARO SASAO . . . Sendai College, Sendai, Japan RT. REV. JOHN LANCASTER SPALDING . . Bishop of Peoria, Illinois REV. LOUIS H. JORDAN . . . . Cambridge, England BISHOP JOHN HEYL VINCENT . . Zurich, Switzerland M. URBAIN GOHIER . . . Editor L'AurOre, Paris M. J. J. JUSSERAND . . Ambassador of the French Republic MR. HENRY VAN DYKE . . . Princeton University 36 STUDENT' O Q. L C: ,A X N ff f Z 3 5 , W ? ,...-p-K, , ,f ' .. 'J N, p V T O N S + I X WN WERE TT' -1- I REI-IALLE Q A M A flo J. Former Head Marshalls 1893-1896 JOSEPH E. RAYCROFT 1899-19OO YVALTER JOSEPH SCHMAHL 1896-IS97 WILLIAM SCOTT BOND IQOO-IQOI LEROY TUDOR VERNON 1897-1898 NOTT WILLIAM FLINT 19OI-1902 WALTER LAWRENCE HUDSON FRE 1898-1899 XVILLOUGHBY GEORGE WALLING Head Marshall JAMES MILTON SHELDON Assistant Marshalls PLATT MILK CONRAD CHARLES ROLAND HOWE CHARLES BUTTON ELLIOTT FRANK MQNAIR ALFRED CHARLES ELLSWORTH HOWARD JAMES SLOAN DERIC ARTHUR FISCIIEL ADELBERT TURNER STEWART HARRX' YVILLIAM GETZ ARTHUR GEORGE THOMAS THOMAS JOHNSTON HAIR H.-XX'W,-XRD D.-XRE XVARNER THEODORE BALLOU HINCKLEY CHARLES JULIEN WEBB 3,8 ' 4A , fQ,f,, Wf f f f ' f lg , 7 I ,,,V :ll LA ,Tl 'lf' V x ! , xi ' I " u i " xr ll i xi? X Q Mgfzlk x 'la-. W W ,x X f f 1 w"L-xrsffgg 'hw yu 'W V Zlulllllmiwum 11 u ll I ll - w ly xx I' "l f V QL 45 Q"ff2fz.1:2f 14: f .,., ,, ,'l, In H ' F ? fffffff PRESIDENT VIC' P OVCPTTHHY TRVASUFQER -.-H ..,-Q Class of 1903 0 Officers THOINIAS J. HAIR . . President CHARLES B. ELLIOTT Vice President JULIA C. HOBBS . . Secretary CHARLES M. HCGELAND .... Treasurer Class Colors: OLD BLUE AND WHITE Class Yell .- Hoo-rah, HOO-ree, Rah-rah, Naught-Three. Committees Executive Committee MARTHA E. LANDERS AGNES R. WAYMAN FRANK MCNAIR ROY W. MERRIFIELD FRANCIS F.TISCHE Committee on Class Colors EMMA DOLFINGER, Chairman LAURA M. HOLTGHTON DONALD A. KENNICOTT Committee on Class Yell CHAS. W. COLLINS, Chairman JANE MUNROE ROBERT S. STARBIRD Committee on Class Jongs and Jings CARL VAN VECHTEN, Chairman JANE IVIUNROE WALTER E. FRANCIS Committee on Class Day STEPHEN A. CAPPS, JR., Chairman EDITH E. BARNARD MILDRED CHADSEY WALKER G. MCLAURY MILTON G. SILLS LORENA-KING Committee on Class Gift FRANK MCN.AIR, Chairman MILTON J. DAVIES FREDERICK A. FISCHEL EDITH BROWNELL GERTRUDE L. CAswELL ELIZABETH S. WEIRICK The Executive Cabinet is Composed of the Class Officers and the Executive Committee. Former Jenior Class Presidents 1894 HENRY C. MURPHY 1898 JOHN FRANKLIN HAGEY 1895 THOMAS W. MORAN 1899 CHARLES LINDSAY BURROUGHS 1896 JOSEPH E. RAYCROFT I9oo HOWARD PENDLETON KIRTLEY 1897 QJAMESJ SCOTT BROWN IQOI ARTHUR E. BESTOR 1902 HERBERT E. FLEMING H History of Class of 1903 a N the fall of 1899, as in many other autumn quarters, some hundreds of reluctant, indifferent and complacent Freshmen entered the University of Chicago. They felt no particular interest in the place, for they had no particular reason to do so. But behold the change! The end of the quarter saw these same Freshmen, howling enthusiasts to a man, congratulate each other luslily on their Alma Mater. Football did it. The spectacularly successful season of ,QQ had its due effect in starting unconscious '03 in that career of loyalty to the Uni- versity in which it has since waxed strong. Many more things contributed to the inception and development of the devotion, not to class alone but to the 'Varsity itself. To the Class of '03 was given the rare privi- lege, probably not to be enjoyed in the next decade, of seeing a serene and unploughed Campus. In those halcyon days, it was prosaically safe to hurry to and from classes, or to stroll about in the pleasant but demoralizing Spring time. Not being distracted by a corner-stone here, a new walk or a yawning tunnel there, or a bit of landscape gardening somewhere else, we were able to spare some otherwise anxious moments in forming acquaintances, and interest in each other, which in four years pleasant passing, have expanded into friendship and appreciation. This bit of history may not degenerate into mere chronicle lest glory of 'o3 and list of innumerable great deeds well done grow into immodest proportions. But some facts must be mentioned, significant of the place of the Class in the University life. Chief among them is the successful organization of '03 in its Sophomore year. This was the first class which founded itself while yet in junior college. Side by side with this, is the yet more signidcant fact of the unprecedented proportion of the Freshman class, which still stands with '03, in Senior year. Early organization from an inchoate mass into an unilied body led to its inevitable outcome,-greater college spirit and the faint beginnings of class spirit. Results are constantly seen in the success with which later organization has been effected, in the ease with which elections are managed, in the general interest in everything pertaining to 'O3. The class has always supported with enthusiasm our small hoard of traditions. It has indulged in inter-class contests in which, incidentally, it has always been more mag- nanimous than glorious. It has initiated Freshmen into the 'Varsity life through the lamented Freshman conventions. It has frolicked through Senior-day games and it has sentimentalized over the ivy planting. It has looked in at past Senior exercises with patronizing approval and will soon, with a pleasurable sorrow, say its own farewell. In short, it has done all the things that a good class should do, and is pleased with a modest consciousness of virtue. For its stars of varying magnitudes have shone in literary heavens, in "VVeekly"-general and segregated editions, in " Cap and Gown, " in " Monthly," it has sparkled in athletics, and in society its light has not been hid. Business and domestic spheres have been illuniined by its members, who, though departed, are followed by '03 with friendly solicitude. They are claimed by the bonds of early sympathy and the common pains of the intricacies of first registration. No chronicle of events seems necessary to this class history. Each has his thousand memories, and should memory fail, the "Cap and Gown" lies ready to the hand. Should these tentative notes rouse in a stranger's mind a natural interest in lo3, it is but necessary to turn these pages to find our faces and our deeds disclosed, a fair and an impartial record of an unblemished career. 42 lg ,,.... H N 1 w W 1 , pmfzw' ' -'-nun? iiii wunrylvv P ul . ' ,a . . b . f 0, Q I . 4.1. ' - nu A M.-Q. - ' . 'J J 4. :P ' , -Z.-Y. a - .. I' I -1 ' 'n sex 'QI-v' l J' 4 4' -1.3 .v A I .,, f-. ,. 4 .1 xl. -1 . ' rs I vid". ,ln ,., . Q ' , 'I 1,5 'il' Q. I X... 'h f'.,.,'LuJ 07' . .1 . fb . .dl A-"' ' Q 'r Q 'fsl , M. ILM? ,i,.: 1 . X . 1 , Q 6' 1 I.. 'Oulu ', ' nu . :Y rl 5.1 .xg l"'v'l .X I 4 , I A . I -JV A 5,1 ' 1 I -5 ' v I I in 4- Q! . ' ,f ' 'J ,Z y D I 1 v . - 1 4 052.5 ' v -:AA k' x t,n', Juiv.0'i'0 .A ' yr 1 Jenior Class Roll a Figures in Heavy-Faced Type Refer to the Numbers on the Class Photographs .U ALFRED AMBROSE AMBERG. St. Ignatius College. FLORENCE ASHCROFT. Hyde Park High School, Chicago. NELLIE LovE BALDWIN. Des Moines College, Iowa. RAE CASENA BALDWIN. 36 Morgan Park Academy. EARL BROWNELL BABCOCK. 53 Hyde Park High School, Chicago. EDITH ETHEL BARNARD, fbBA. I 13 Englewood High School, Honorable Mention, junior College, Member Senior College Council, 'o3. FLORENCE C. BARBER. 5 Lake View High School, Chicago. EDITH RosALIE BEHRHORST. Wellesley College. HARRY R. BEERV. 79 LYNNE JOHN BEVAN, AY, CPBK. 27 Atlanta High School, "Academic Alchemist," Honorable Mention, Junior College, Band, 'oo-'ogg Mandolin Club, '02-'03, Cross Country Club, '03, EMILE LIDEON BEVTALI.. EDITH BICKELL. 49 Helena QMontanaQ High School, Honorable Mention, Junior College, Senior Basket Ball Team, yO2. FRANCES MACLEOD BOXVMAN. DOLORES BROCKETT 86 MARY RUTH BROCKWAY. I2 Macomb QIll.j High School. 45 T. HARRIS BOUGHTON. 40 FRANK WILLIAM BENNETT. 60 EDXVIN BOEIIMER, WPY. Quincy fIll.j High School. H.-XROLD C. BRUBAKER. Bradley Polytechnic Institute, Intercollegiate Prohibition League. FRANCIS EDWARD BRIMBLECOM. University of Michigan. EDWARD VAIL LAPHAM BROWN, AAQP. South Side Academy. MAURICE BUCHSBAUM. 1 19 University of California. CHRISTINA LOUISE BURNS. ALFRED J. BUNTS. ROBERT SPRING BUTLER, ATA. 10 Sophomore Football Team, 'oog Students' Club House Commission, Senior College Council, 'ogg Chairman Senior College Council, '03, Chairman Washing- ton Promenade, Treasurer Junior Class, South Side Academy. STEPHEN REID CAPPS, JR., AAQIP. 102 Illinois College, Senior College Council, '02-'ogg Chairman '03 Class Day Exercisesg "Case is Altered," Decoration Committee, Washington Promenade, '03, GALE HORTON CALMERTON. 15 FRANCIS DENIS CAMPAU, WY. Order of the Iron Maskg Score Clubg Three-Quarters Clubg Banjo Club, '99-'02, Leader Banjo Club, 'oog Tiger's Head, Cap and Gown Board, 'O2Q Weekly Board, 'ozg junior College Council, '99, Ivy Committee, junior Day, 'oog Grand Rapids High School, Michigan. LILLIAN CLARK. Radcliffe College. GERTRUDE LEIGI-I CASWELL. Lewis Institute. MILDRED CHADSEY. 67 Morgan Park Academy. MARX' A. CHAMBERLIN. 98 Gloversville High School, New York. 46 1...-- " 3 '94 I '.Y 9 gun qv 1131, N . , , 1 . A A r ' 1 . ,J A - o I, 'J' I L . . dan ' A. 1' W A v rf! N. .-.. fx.. , .'- , 9 , , ' . 1' i:. all . . 30 ' A UMVIL .1 A , ' .5f"""', ' wth I L 1 .-,.,. Q, f n va' ' s f e , - 4 4 I Q W. - V f., . . - 1 J N is it 4 ' 1 vu" ,. 1 - . , . ,J v 4 .dp I FD! ' vi I Q Jia lp . ' 1 2. 1 gl 5 i'?n1v,v? -r H' AJ, 4 1 If: w :ff ' ' 1 1432: ' V '4' Q' 'Lf D. "4. -735 I P Q V 54 1 5 . W. 1 ' L 1 if , -P .S . L t A .e P x , ' 4 .1 , 4' F' .-:nf A '--fl ":i'f, , :34i ,p f ' ' 'f"'3 M' Q - wi- ma.: u' QQ, 3 1 V N 1 Y ,I n ha- v I -1. Y I 0 ' .Hx . iz. ' gp. A,':1,' :Vt l qv D A O vs , ,1- a " ' +4 -X y , ,.n9 I1 v ., ,A Qtr 'w , 1 nv, 5 A .0 1' .g'.f. '. Na-11 'ml.!lfm:lA.- N v 1 fn x vr I Q i N9 4 I n , 4 X V lb I J' 'Q A-, .. 9 T I 'J. 1 X- ' v . .:. - 4. K, ,sw 1 +. I I 1 'r . . 1 L If s, I w 1 . 5 .fx ' 1 41 -,1 -G I wx, I v . 5 I- I 'Q ' ' s s ' I , I , 1 I ' O P -.,, , - . . ,C . L x . xl 9 ' ' 5 ' ' I n J qi 'U ' , .vs "' 0 Q' A u rl Mun ROLAND T. CHAMBERLIN, 'IPI'A. 45 Ilyde Park High School, Honorable Mention, junior College, Chairman Chess Club Executive Committee, Handball Championship, ,O2. MARY ELIZABETH CHARTERS. I 18 Cornell College. GEORGE CLEAVER. 40 Albion College. EDITH CLENDENEN. 21 Morgan Park Academy. CHARLES WILLIAM COLLINS, XXII. 43 Hyde Park High School, junior College Council, 'oog Assistant Editor University of Chicago Weekly, 'oo, Associate Editor, 'OIQ Managing Editor, '02, Board of Organization, the Daily and Monthly Maroon, Associate Editor Monthly Maroon, 'O2-'03, Editor Weekly Decennial Souvenir. DIARY OLIVE CONRATH. PLATT MILK CONRAD, BGII. 73 University School, Owl and Serpent, Order of the Iron Mask, Three-Quarters Club, Football Team, ,OI-'02, Class of 'O3 Football Team, Marshall, 'oo-'03, Manager of University Informals, 'oo-'oxg Chairman Junior Promenade, 'oI, Decoration Committee, Washington Promenade, '02, Chairman Finance Com- mittee, Washington Promenade, '03, Executive Committee, Sophomore Class, '02, Business Manager Cap and Gown, '02, Advertising Manager Daily Maroon, '02-'03, Chairman Committee on Organization of Officers and Committees for Student Club House, '02, Chicago Manager for the Inter-Collegiate, 'o3. ADA BEALL COX. Baltimore Woman's College, Maryland. MARX' M. CONLAN. 1 17 Basket Ball Team. RENA CRAWFORD. ELLA M. DANNEHY. 38 Lewis Institute, Chicago. MARGARET DAVIDSON. 69 Lake High School, Chicago, Honorable Mention, junior College, Senior College Scholarship in English, 'oI. MILTON JUDSON DAVIES. 50 Bucknell University. Sl FRANK XVALBRIDGE DEWOLF, QAO. 64 South Chicago High School, Manager Dramatic Club, 'o3. ETHEL DEWEY. Ferry Hall Seminary. EMMA DOLFINGER, QIPBK, the Esoteric. 31 Assistant Editor Weekly, '01, Chairman Ivy Committee, Junior Day, 'OIQ Junior College Council, '01, NITE. ' ELEANOR DoHER'rv. Lyons Township High School. GUs'rAvUs PARSONS DRUECK, JR. 59 English High and Manual Training School, Chicago. CHARLES B. ELLIOT. Class Officer University of Chicago Orchestra, "As You Like It," South Side Academy, Charter Member, Band, Vice President Class '03, University Marshall, '02-'o3. CAROLIN FORD EDWARDS. AUGUSTA EVELVN ENGELS. 80 Stratford QOnt.J Collegiate Institution. CARL WILLIABI EISENDRATH. 55 Chicago Manual Training School, Honorable Mention, Junior College, Honorable Mention, Senior College, Special Departmental Honors in Chemistry. ELSIE FLERSHEIM, QBK. Englewood High School, Honorable Mention, Junior College, Senior College Greek Scholarship. WALTER FULLER. Bradley Polytechnic Institute. HERBERT S. FOREMAN. 116 University of Illinois, University Choir. WALTER EDWARD FRANCIS, ATA. 110 Joliet High School, Entrance Scholarship, Three Quarters Club, "Academic Alchemist," '00, Arrangements Committee, Junior Promenade, '01, Finance Senior Promenade, ,022 " The Case is Altered," '02, Songs Committee, Senior Class, '03, FREDERICK ARTHUR FIscHEL. 18 South Side Academy, Junior College Scholarship in Public Speaking, Com- mittee on By-Laws of Student Club House Commission, Senior College Council, ,02 and '03, Associate Editor of Cap and Gown, '03, Annual Oratorical Contest, Second Prize, University Marshall, 'o3. 52 1 1 4 W ,, ll-l-1 'U'W2'f" .' . . 1-AQI. QL J, v ,N v . in ! df, .,i' ' A- .l5',gf,i" . ,- .A . 5,15 Tl., sm-L . -. I . 4 -. , 54- . ' J, ,-.j --.', F' ' ..v ' A . A f - ,"L, I 1' ' n Q . 2,4 'l . , N , . A .- . . v I . l ' ' n . . Q- - . H i ' :W J "rf,- . Q VN 5-, , ' I uv, ,xx .1 I ' ' -,rl ,A ' J "W , N V : , -Al f- N, A . .fu-I " 1, 'K n 'J ' I ." N114 2 :V 5 0 , ' V ,' 5 1l"'r"a, I 4 s '. ' .,,2 , w-,Q I U ,I - X iyqbi- ggi, -, - AQ, I af-P x 4 Q . . 4- ' . - ' r R r .-A 4 ' " 5 f - .J 4. l , 4 ' A . A . f' 1, ' 'J , . ' 3 ' A ' n . F V k -I . Ar ' " A m . Q ,, , . :4 r - I.. U , w. n - ' ,- .Q' . . E, 4, . 'tv' , 5' , 'If' ' 1 a 4. , .. .V . Y I v sw ' ' W " V 1 N .-'. l V. ' 1 pl , ,. D fl" 5' , ,, " - 2' X I t . ' - I-, A 1, -1 ' ,ni. I 1' 'X1' , .'l:U ' I' , 1 . 'An ,nl 9- . 'v . t . nv . - . I ' ' v .V 1 ' " , l I 8' 4 1 V . - -, ' 'G U 4, V I -A ,P ' k.:k.j Q A5 1 w L 'H N - 4 ' T - 'L"' - f I , - .' x if '4 , . ,IJ- ' , A " 4 " ff, L n , , 5,4 1 'M xl' f , L . 4 v . ' S X.. l 1 lf.,-4 1' 4!!l r 1 xg f n ' :ful I QA- - . T' '14Ig- A I! W I. V 1 X .. ..gf'1 'I LM, my 3,6 A I I HA- ut WVNNE NORTON GARLICK. 48 Washington House, Puget Sound University. EMIL GoETTscH. Honorable Mention, Junior College, Member University of Chicago Military Band, 'oo-'03, Davenport tIa.j High School. CARL H. GRABO. 24 Glee Club, Washington House, Cross Country Club, '02, Lyons Township High School. WILLIAM ALFRED GOODMAN, JR. 32 Lewis Institute. ALICE MABEL GRAY. FRANK South Division High School, Chicago. LOXLEY GRIFFIN, QBK. 3 Washington House, Entrance Scholarship, Topeka High School, Kan, ELI P. GALE, EX. 54 THOMAS J. HAIR, AKE. IENNIE Illinois University. Class Officer Hyde Park High School, Three Quarters Club, Score Club, Order of the Iron Mask, Owl and Serpent, Instructor of Freshmen, Freshmen Convocation, 'oog Chairman junior Day, 'oI, Associate Editor Weekly, '01, Cross Country Club, '01, Managing Editor Cap and Gown, '02, Reception Committee Washington Promenade, '02, junior Class Representative to Receive Senior Bench, '02, Chairman Arrangements Committee, Washington Promenade, '03, University Marshall, 'o2-'03, President Senior Class, 'oj,. ELIZABETH HALL. 29 State Normal College, Texas. NELLIE MARIA HALSTED. Armour Institute, Chicago. J. EDITH HARDING, QBA. 1 I John Marshall High School, Honorable Mention, junior College, Senior College Council, 'O2. FLOYD EVERETT HARPER, QAGJ. 35 HELEN Baseball team, 'oo, 'OI, '02, '03, Captain Baseball Team, '02, 'o3, Captain Reserve Football Team, 'oI, Morgan Park Academy. GENEY'IEX'E HAYNER, QBA. 20 john Marshall High School, Entrance Scholarship, Scholarship in French, Honorable Mention, Junior College, Senior College Council, 'o2. 55 NOBLE SPROAT HEANEY, QFA 81 Knox College. CLEO HE.ARON. JOHN HENRX' HEINEN. 104 Ambia Qlndianaj High School. WILLIAM H. HEAD. 90 Lewis Institute, Dramatic Club. AGATHA DRAPER HEQUEMBOURG. 103 Vassar College. RACHEL HENTON, Sigma Club. 96 St. Mary's Institute. ANNAS HIGGINS. ' HERON C. HARFORD. 1 1 1 Benton Harbor College. WILLIS S. HILPERT. 58 "As You Like It," Lincoln House, Lake View High School, Chicago. HELEN HITCHCOCK. 72 Cedar Valley Seminary, Iowa. CHARLES MURFIT HOGELAND, IIIY. Class Officer Owl and Serpent, Order of the Iron Mask, Score Club, Class Football Team, '99, 'oog Comic Opera, 'oog Decorating Committee, junior Promenade, 'OIQ Reception Committee, Washington Promenade, ,02Q Senior College Council, '02, Associate Editor Cap and Gown, 702, Chairman Membership Committee, Students' Club House Commissiong Treasurer Senior Class. CAROLINE L. HOPPS. 93 Kalamazoo College, Michigan. JULIA COBURN HOBBS. The Mortar Board. Class Officer Indianapolis High School, Secretary Junior Class, Secretary Senior Class, Asso- ciate Editor Woman's Weekly, NITE. LAURA MADGE HOUGHTON. Oshkosh Normal School, Wisconsin. RAY T. JOHNSON, EX. 52 Morgan Park Academy, Sphinx, ONE, Substitute Football Team,'97g Glee Club, '98, Chairman University Informals, '98. Tiger's Head. 56 s 5 . 4 'K '. 'Args' . 1 ' ' v I, 1 ' I f .A 1 'Q ' .qs I 3, I?- N I ' ' ,FP-'s 3 :kia A" as' ' slit' 1 " 7 gn 4 X ' gh. ".. 0' Jil. r 1 n 1 1 vu hw!! 1 Io .I ml' 1 JN 4. s W. I X 'Q Aj, fir.. 'sf .' ,mg,L7. ' I T s hm .A ., L W . ,'.,, .N v.. u. .'. 1' I ' 44 '.' ,. ll, '.' W A Q " Q I . Q Lx af J , . . ' F' Q "Mi 'Q 5 Ht I" .H-"". fq 'x 1 . S :T fp, fixziy fr wx-'V VI... ' 5 - Pf.i'2g 1 , J 4 1 tg' ' 'A , 11' ' . ..1 1' I 1 .Lv I U 1 ' D' , ..-.I..q. Y 1 . lr v i:.1..A nh! I ' . ff, ff. ' 4 1,89-fi-1 - fp ,5 ,vs .K I. :il qt 1 H, H .,..:'w . I ,x -'l,'.f. ' '--'-' 'V '. . 1 V ""-"f"- 'A . n ...rl -' - " af f. - '. AN. lf. .1 s W9 0' , gl- gl vw ,-' .vw , 'V 'u ".' 1 4,.,,t-- ' , .nfl - A 1. 31 . , , . , '?" w , Q . I ' . .sf 5 , F .I 1 I ' ay.. . , . QT .7 .gy ' n 0'l Fw , L9', 7 ,h -',.o'-' sf I ' A . ,f., . .53 u 1 , Wg, ' ?'v71fQ1',a . lu Q. - O ' 1 QI- in 3" .N LS, . X I I .'. DJ, 'Jw A- A ,b J . - . - - . ,V A . i I .-L. 5 L", -M. A -1 O X ' 0 v A . Aw 'fx , I 'rl- n . .f I -. , K n ..- f l S I Y , A 4 O I H . ix . 1 V Us . 1. Y p 1 - 'LN I .QT 'a. .P , ,5- v X rr -. l4,. 'lb X 7 5 1 n 1 W. iq! I N , - -5- fi f .-.3f'-m..f me -1- ' ' WILLIAISI F. JOHNSON, QKWII. 4 Order of the Iron Mask, Score Club, Three Quarters Club, Cap and Gown Board,-Arrangements Committee, Washington Promenade, '02, Freeport High School, Ill. J ESSIE LoU1sE JONES. 25 AGNES JOSLYN KAUFMAN, Lewis Institute, Chicago. ANNIE ALLEN KELLOG. 19 DONOLD KENNICOTT, ATA. 105 Hyde Park High School, Three Quarters Club, Band, 'OI-'02, Mandolin Club, '01, Cap and Gown Board, ,O2-'03, Monthly Board, 'o3. WILLIAM RALPH KERR, JR., AAGID. 97 Morgan Park Academy, Order of the Iron Mask, Score Club, Three Quarters Club, Dramatic Club, Glee Club, '99-,OO-,OIQ Mandolin Club, '99-'00, Weekly Board, 'OI-,025 Associate Editor Weekly, '02, Junior College Council, 'oog Senior College Council, '02, Associate Editor Cap and Gown, '02, GEORGE KINNEY. 13 LORENNA C. V. KING. Dramatic Club. LUTHER Lvcunous KIRTLEY, AACP. 74 Peoria High School. SIEGRID ANNA LAGERGREN. 44 Morgan Park Academy. THOMAS B. JACKSON LARKIN. 1 14 Oberlin College. MARIE ANNA LAMB, CPBA. 42 Hyde Park High School. MARTHA ESTHER LANDERS, Sigma Club. 95 Cap and Gown Board, '02, Decorating Committee, Junior Promenade, '01, Girls' Classical School, Indianapolis. MAURICE CHAUNCEY LIPMAN. 30 North Division High School, Chicago. JULIA E. LORING. Jacksonville C Ill.J Academy. W. J. LYNCH. 76 Wisconsin University. 61 HEDWIG LOEB, QBK. 9 North Division High School, Honorable Mention, junior College, Honorable Mention, Senior College. WILLIAM RAYMOND LONGLEY, fPAG 75 Noblesville High School. BLANCHE GRosBEc LOVERIDGE. 39 DAIsv DEAN LUcAs. HARRY' J. LURIE. 41 joseph Medill High School, Freshman Debating Team, 'oo, Junior College Schol- arship in Public Speaking, University Orchestra, 'oog Band, 'oo-'03, Mandolin Club, '02-'03, Advisory Board Musical Clubs, 'oz-'03, "As You Like It,'oI," "the Case is Altered" '02, Second Prize Annual Oratorical Contest'o5, Alternate to Northern Oratorical League Contest, '02, Treasurer Northern Oratorical League, ,OI-,021 President sanie, '02-'03, Alternate to Chicago-Northwestern and Chicago- Michigan Debates, '03, Finance Committee, Washington Promenade, 'o3. GENEVIEVE MELODY. South Division High School. HARRY ALBERT MCGII.L. Ohio Normal University. RALPH HIERRIAM, EAE. 47 Lincoln House, Atlanta High School, University Debating Team,'o5, First Prize Annual Oratorical Contest, '03, CARL SHELLEY MINER, QAG. Cedar Rapids flowaj High School. MRS. CLARA ADELLA BTESERVEY. 77 Shepardson College, Granville, O. GENIEvIvE ANTONETTE MENSCH. Louisville fKy.J High School. JOHN MACCLEAR. 108 Hyde Park High School, Cross Country Club, 'O2. Rov W. MIQRRIFIELD, AAQP. 61 Three Quarters Club, University Baseball Team, 'oo-'03, junior Council, y99, Sophomore Relay Team, '01, Captain Sophomore Baseball Team, ,OIQ junior Council, 'Ol-'O21 Executive Committee Senior Class,'o3, OttawatIll.J High School. AMORY RAYMOND MITCHELL. 88 Hyde Park High School, Member Lincoln House. 62 .L -5 I ' 'Y' q lv vIw vq x , v y. C' ' R ' F ' . Q. I . 4 t "n Y . -in A " ' . ' , . -'. sg - 'F 1 , . 5 .?. '. , 1 - N 4 u. . s ' '. Q. .I I! 1 K I-Va' I 4 I ',' , I. . II I." I L4-1, ,WC I .I .3 I ,I I .fr .. Q ' . . . .AIQ - . 0' .' -' :I -5 ' ',.' A'I .n , f ., ' .I I . .4 5 A I I -. I' I., I ' M Q . 1'- ' 'v ini . f? . ' .II1 X - ' I . Z.: -. r 'pg -. .I I . .'f.. I 1, ,II.II,1 II . IIIHI., ' I 7 f Mir-'.' 'f ' II.. i . II JI II'I.-I ..-I .. I I I . .. . f . 1-A.. .. ,u fi .1' x 1' ' 1. . 1 4. . I 'II . e jf. '-'av L - 'f . 1 55- ' V - ' x -. ,'I - . ' .5 I!-ff .Nu S g . , A Y I '14 .'. . 'v f f . ' . Q 't 1 1 .' L ' 'JU' wi II N , -- I I 4 in ff Q . 4' ' 1 J II I' - I 9 , 'H , I ' T... 3 : ' r"'- Q .f 4 .fv H ' ' 1 .. mx ' . lx ' L n ,J Q ' ,f ' I x ,., - ii- ' " . .' .,.,.--. l,II...'.fI..7t" in, ' , - . A .. ,' Wu ' - H ' . IJ' .AME .ug .. .. A, .X - -1, ...v-5, -rg . I, ' -. ' ' 3, .'1r."?'e..".. ' ' ' ' '. 'uvql' 1,.' 1.:'.,'. 'I' ' I a 'YN . 1. . .I I I I .YI II W. .' ' 7' . 'Jig ... 'QQ 1 . .- 4' -f '. 2, 4IlI'V .I n.- I n m . "V I.I'I"! I .gil Xe if 5, V1 WI" s . ll! . A ' X - ".'3.,,..fI II . I -,If ' I " II . . f751Ik,YA5- wi I I I I I .I-I 'IIIII I I ,I'II.I.: .II,,II.,,II I .. 4-'I II . ' I . , N, I IIN .UIIIILIII I I I P, I I ..II I I e I.- ..,. I :X-'gif' N' 1 K Y Y 'UFNN U .4 I Y . 4-'IL "lf-. ' "-.. . " ., I- ' . '. ' '. 5 - ' . ' ' T' ".T':.1 ' fIg': ' , .. .- ' :uf .4 I rr.. ' .1 N: ' ' YL " 'IL 916.3 -Nfl' n f,- . . ' "If,!xmf5' av.. I 'gb 'nz ' 1' ' --S I. ,If -II II -,I I I IH. Wa, .TTL F " 1 . C W f,. 1 , v , L ' " '1 ' 'x .0 '. 5 '5 L' 1 . 'Q E52 l , : , - f .x e u 'A ' 4 Unify- . - ' r ' I . if . . - Vu .. v Q. :. ff..." N. 1 ' 'WG ,M ' ' 'v. ' Q 3 0 - . .... :I 1 " ' N.. . l . . . .I II I ., cI I I ' .- . . 1 ' '4"im. '.- .. 11. W..-'bfifini .mi-6A...:AJ. . :I , -, 'lx' 1 ' 'I.sA 3 H - ' n' . II. . f - .' ' J ,lf v f' . , - .. ,I 'J . , 1' ' I E Y v fI . ,.I,51', J. . , 14.0, X, ',j'i,fj" 'I -. .ru .' ' 1 'V' '.J"3Ig' Q 743 'VL SQ '.. '1 I f , s . , , 1. .I -. Q., N.-'z n.:,4.,I- 1 - fi' ' ' 'Q ROBERT MCBURNEY' MITCHELL. 22 Seattle QWash.j High School. BERTHA E. MOORE. 57 McPherson College. JANE MONROE. The Esoteric. 91 Joliet fIll.l High School, Cap and Gown Board, '02, HARRY E. MocK. 51 STELLA EVELYN MYERS. 39 VVALKER GAILEY MCLAURY, WY. 107 Owl and Serpent, Order of the Iron Mask, Score Club, Three Quarters Club, Managing Editor Cap and Gown, '02, Dramatic Club, 'oo-'03, Manager, 'oI, President,'o2-'03, "As You Like It," 'org "The Case Is Altered," '02, Banjo Club, '99-'oo, Cross Country Club, '02, Students' Club House Committee, '02, Weekly Board, '00, "Old" Daily Maroon Board, 'oo, Board of Organization and Editor The Daily Maroon, '02, Chairman Reception Committee, Junior Promenade, '01, Chairman Printing Committee, Senior Promenade, 'o3, Senior Class Day Committee, '03, Junior College Scholarship in Public Speaking, 'oog The Ken- wood Preparatory School. FRANK M. MCKEY, ATA. 28 Princeton-Yale School. FRANK MCNAIR, AKE. 17 Three Quarters Club, Score Club, Order of the Iron Mask, Owl and Serpent, Senior College Council, '02-'03, Senior Representative on Athletic Board, Chair- man Finance Committee, Washington Promenade, '02, Committee Students' Club House Commission, Associate Editor Weekly, Summer, ,O2, Associate Editor Daily Maroon, '02-'03, Executive Committee Senior Class, '03, University Mar- shall, '03, Associate Editor Cap and Gown, '03, Chairman Football Mass Meeting Committee, '03, Lake High School. RICHARD CONES NEPTUNE, fI2K'1f. 78 Three Quarters Club, Finance Committee, Junior Promenade, '01, Memphis University. CASH ALBERTUS NEWKIRK, QPBK. 100 Honorable Mention, Junior College, "The Case Is Altered," Senior College Scholarship in English, Morgan Park Academy. LAURETTA IRENE OCTIGAN. Wyvern Club. 34 Cap and Gown Board, '03, Weekly Board, '03, Chairman Decorating Committee, Washington Promenade, '03, Senior College Council, '02-'03, Secretary Senior College Council '02-'03, South Division High School, Chicago. 65 ELLA MAY PARRETTE. Benton Harbor College. GEAN MARIE LOUISE PIRSCHER. MERRITT BERRY PRATT, AY. 70 Morgan Park Academy, Tiger's Head, Class Eleven, Class Relay, Class Nineg Glee Club, '02-'03, Band, 'or-'03, Senior College Council, 'ozg Special Marshall, Summer Convocation, '02, Cross Country Club. LoIS ELLA PRENTISS, CPBA. Calumet High School, Chicago. ALFRED DEsHoN RADLEY. Bradley Institute of Technology. GRACE OLIVE RANDLE. ALICE AMELIA REITERMAN. Northwestern University. LOUIS RICH. HESTER RIDLON. Associate Editor Won1an's Weekly, 'OIQ Northwestern Academy. LILIAN G. ROBINSON. OLIVE L. ROGERS. Hyde Park High School, Chicago. BURCHARD H. ROARK. ALICE MARIAN ROHDE. South Side Academy, Chicago. HANNAH VERONICA RYAN. South Division High School, Chicago. ERWIN F. SCHERUBEL. Wayland Academy. HERMANN I. SCHLESINGER, QBK. Chess Clubg Lake View High School. FRANK J. SEITER. NVashington House, South Division High School. VICTOR ERNEST SHELFORD. University of West Virginia. FLORIAN E. SCHMIDT. Englewood High School, Chicago. EDITH RANSDALL SHAFFER. The Mortar Board. Sign of the Sickle, Monticello Seminary. 66 26 56 92 99 109 112 66 62 87 65 14 .4453 -c 'u ' y ,. 4M Xt, b' P T - V Q, 'fuzz-' k"5f"-1 3 :hi .,g- 1 l ,' 0 -' . '. Qji u I I - AA I ig' ,QPF ..'?'r'4 .Lg ' --fl' M . Az- ' ' , 71 f i . I J' 1' ,J ' 3 :I uf ' ' . Q- , Ju I . 5., .. ,, . - W wx- , . V. " r ' if ld S K v Ax, 5 I : .K , - gg," ,- I 1- " '41 -- 4 4, X x -5 Y 'I qntfgkgik' Y -. H tr" 4' 1 x wa. ,., ,J nxiw el-0' 4 .Ll -y r I Q u , 5 r , X . - Wa-' .g' ' rp- .R . 1. ' '- ' .if 119. .' 317, N X , 'N 231-- , ' if , . 3, ,f 's -, ' Y MJ . , . L ,' ..Prv', Nd -Y H A X, Ji! J hx 11.1. -A 4 .,, AL' 9 .v in I l ,,' a . ii P - 4 ' ' -r '-A' 'M V 1 . ' ,ww . r ' . ., 1, 6 ,' . p . X .fx 1 .1 ' .. , . , , Quai 'LAN' . Uk I 1 .r -, - -1 A 11 ' 1 ii, , ' ' r ' ' ,u , X 4- 'E " 'f' 4 U 1 gr' fggwif x " 1 B. ' v 4 w x. Q . 3' S, 'w ' -v f 1 n 4 1. A 4- U ' - A '. ' v 1 s 4, ' '.'I WV. S I .. nn- ' Af m .1- 1: 96 5 if LOUISE LYDIA SORINGER. 6 MrLToN SILLS, AKE. 63 Weekly Board, '01-'02, Associate Editor Weekly, '02, Dramatic Club, junior College Council, 'o2: Freshman Presentation Orator, '00, Three Quarters Club, Ferdinand Peck Prize, Public Speaking, '02, Honorable Mention, Junior College, Senior Scholarship in Philosophy, Ivy Committee, '02, Hyde Park High School. MORRIS W. SIMON. 83 Rock Island High School. LAVINIA ALTHEA SMALL. University of Colorado. CORNELIA SIMRALL SMITH. Wyvern Club. 101 junior College Basket Ball Team, '99, Editor of Woman's Weekly, '00, '01, '02, Editor University Weekly, 'OI, '02, Editor Daily Maroon, '02, '03, Associate . Editor Cap and Gown, '02, Dearborn Seminary. MYRA VIRGINIA SMITH. St. Paul Central High School. ROBERT STINSON STARBIRD, AY. l 15 Honorable Mention, junior College, Colonial Dames History Scholarship. IRA D. STEELE. 89 Morgan Park Academy. ANNIE WINN STEVENS. Normal School, Milledgeville, Ga. WELTHY STEPHEN. 2 Rusheville High School. FRED F. STOCKING. 46 SAMUEL NoEL STRAUSS, QPBK. Hyde Park High School. CHARLES H. SWIFT. 94 Washington House, Louisville Male High School. MRS. FRANCESS CONDON TEMPLE. Northwestern University. RUTH TERRY, TBA. 82 Cap and Gown Board, Calumet High School. ARTHUR GEORGE THOMAS, ATA. 106 Wauwatosa QWis.j High School, Three Quarters Club, Sophomore Relay Team, '01, Glee Club,-'01-'02, Senior College Council, '01, Chairman Senior College Council, '02, Summer Marshall, '02, University Marshall. 69 CHARLES OSCAR THORNBERRY. ll Union Christian College, Butler College. HARRY M. TINGLE, AKE. 8 South Side Academy, President Three Quarters Club, President Junior Class, Junior College Council, '02, Associate Editor Weekly, 'org University Informal Committee. FRANK FREDERICK JOHN TISCHE. 33 Lincoln House: junior College Council, 'org Printing Committee, Junior Day, 'OIQ Men's Club House Committee, Glee Club, ,O2, '05, '04, Cap and Gown Board, '02, Associate Editor Daily Maroon, ,02-'03, Executive Committee of Class of '03, Austin High School. BERTHOLD LoUIS ULLMAN, QBK. 23 Northwest Division High School. ALBERT Ross VAIL, EAE, QIDBK. 16 Morgan Park Academy, Honorable Mention, junior College, University Debating Team, 'o3,. CARL VAN VECHTEN, IIIY. Cedar Rapids QIa.j High School. JOHN 1. VOLLERTSEN. 87 Northwest Division High School, Chicago. I-IAYWARD D. WARNER, B011 68 Lincoln House, University Marshall, '02-'03, Track Team, '02, Captain Cross Country Club, '02, "The Case is Altered," '02, Senior College Council, '02, Chairman Finance Committee, Y. M. C. A., 'o5. AGNES R. VVAYMAN. 71 Dramatic Club, '01, '02, '03, Captain Junior College Basket Ball Team, ,99, '00, '01, Captain Senior College Basket Ball Team, '02,-'03, "As You Like It, " Maroon Editorial Board, '03, Executive Committee of Senior Class, Entrance Scholarship, Calumet High School, Chicago. ELIZABETH SOPHIA WEIRICK. ' 37 Bradley Polytechnic Institute. EDITH LAVINIA WOODMANSEE. Hammond Hall, Salt Lake Academy. MoRRIs YVALLBRUN. 84 OSCAR G. WAHLGREN. Council Bluffs High School, Iowa. 70 . ,u l 3 XA fi aw f'?f4g3S-.W L l' ' an 5 xx few I7 ' - Ei' 3:5 '15 "Q f " J W Q- ,f I. fl Ad, K Av' f ' K. ' 'I f ' rig.. N 53 A E153 Ee ,L I , J ggggwy. ' E V M 'fa-315 -w: , ...... ,-.---- - -- --. 1 +I I K : .. F110 QXJQ zi1 1' i'5'f yff .X J ,X " -:S -S 'N X Q5 3 J '-1. '1, X '- f lf C X! J . ' . 'VI n 1. 7' ' X I . nhtgx u' ' N If 1 an .4 n .ski ik 'Sf' I Wa Rl PM PZ' 2 M x -, :mg Q' Q I X 1-46?-1 W' V5 n ...N , 061.44 'QW -Q? W Q I Vu g C ' "' Q 1. X' 'A L.-'N "e. C . Ng s N. .5 f x-,,.Af.- .,:,. 1 X,q.'-39 -514 - ag., ew W SZ W 'oQ1'1,w 'QR nib V94 fi V, 1' I N an xemfsmuvm 17 i zn If X lx, , Dt. . ECR53-I-PXFQNK 'FRE-A5 Class of 1904 a ARTHUR E. LORD . ADELBRRT T. STEWART MARIE McEvoy . . . ALBERT W. SHERER CHARLES F. LELAND Class Colors: BLUE AND GOLD Class Yell: "Hul1a, baree, barah, baroar! Hulla, baree, barah, baroar! . President Vice President . Secretary . . Treasurer Sergeant-at-Arms Who roar? VVe roar, Naughty Four." 72 .i V, eb X . ' ,X A E S "NB , f X N 1 " 7, I 4 K! 1' X ' ill N 'f f'+t"lxl eq' fi Z.,i',fiiii'iiii it fav lllx fzflilllllf a EW? 1 ,C t ' E yr We C9 ' 9 "iD 'J Q 1 vi , ' l likfii'x-7 ' 'Aip 115117 'Fifa if' ' fe 51, F.7- 2 History of the Class of 1904 E7 gil v2:f.5Q?Z u TRANGE as it may seem, the proud and noble Class of IQO4, which now occupies the envied position of "The Juniors," entered the University one bright October morning in the early part of the present century as mere Freshmen. Although fresh as the average, we were nevertheless ambitious: and as ambition is the greater part of success, we were bound to make a name for ourselves. We im- mediately began to get together and tell one another how good we were, the class of naughty-three to the contrary notwithstanding las they say in booksj. In order to make the Class feel its impor- tance, we decided to organize. So we met in chapel one morning, and elected the follow- ing oflicers, who were to hold down their positions until the good old summer time: Samuel F. Fellows, Presidentg Bertha Iles, Vice Presidentg E. J. Downey, Secretary: F' , N 5' . ,ll 1' at li A .l ww 1 Q ag ,TW Q f fiwflf' " ff! WH' XV lv W ,W , it S lib ,gg Frank R. Adams, Treasurer, and L. A. Hopkins, Sergeant-at-Arms. We would have elected half a dozen more to perform the arduous duties of class management, but the bell rang, and we all rushed off to our eleven o'cl0cks. It is plain that we had not then learned the joys of cutting, or we would not have gone to class at all after having completed such a momentous action as that of organizing. We all felt so buoyant and "what-the- 1 -do- we-care-ish" that under the leadership of Cliff Gaylord, Stanley Rich and L. A. Hopkins, we hung a maroon banner, bearing the defiant numerals "O4,,' to the flag pole where it continued to flout the sky for fifteen hours, just to let the Sophomores know that we were around. In the course of time a crowd of unaesthetic '03 men tore the flag down, and after a friendly bout with our class succeeded in getting away with their lives-and incidentally with the banner. Our revenge was not long in coming, however. Soon after the rally round the flag we sent a polite little note to the Class of '03, telling them that if they would climb into eleven football suits and stroll out into the "Campus Martins" we would be delighted to give them a few practical lessons in football as she is played. In a moment of boldness Z-5-X! 0715 anoffir Vivvf the Sophomores accepted our invitation, with the re- sult that we not only made them bite the dust, but by using our Captain Backhous as a battering-ram, actually succeeded in pulverizing an amazing number of our opponents' line men. The game ended in a decisive victory for '04 by showing '03 the small end of a 6-0 score. This should have been sufficient to squelch the arro- gant Sophomores, but the Sophomores refused to be squelched and continued to plot darkly for a means of downing us. U They gave us a Freshman Presentation which we all en- joyed immensely-principally because the clever and witty attempts on our foes' part to show us our proper place were so skillfully turned back upon them by the '04 champion, Milton Sills. The Presentation ended up in a free for all iight on the Campus, in which 'teverybody had a good time and a very pleasant evening was had," with the possible exception of the unfortunate ones who mussed their clothes in such a way that jood We 1-fffe " 73 xy" Q, xx sv QF' 4- P' Z ' 1 "' ' .D MQ W. vs ,, if 1 , J f N if A f lfliy' lx MAJ-0 L ' xl 5 'F .2 1" , Z I 5 E1 g K I L ,Iv - . f H- J 6 ' P4 gil 'NLVQII wirffc Qfs fain. ,A ,ni Q F' ll l-fy eg ? 1-I'-r .04 f' i 3621 list? ', ' We . .Lgbxi I ftsiiaar X if fi' : they were no good afterwards. The fight, of course, was segre- gregated, but the Presentation was not. VVe had hoped to close our first year of University life in a blaze of glory, but it was not to be. The 1903 relay team did their httleibest, and -succeeded in running away from. our men in the race ID the Spring of 1901. This was the first time that 'o4 was ever made to see the possibility of another class being as good in any line as we were. Shortly after this defeat college closed .for the vacation, and we all flocked out to our summer pleasures, feeling H justly proud of ourselves-simply because we were men and women from the best in the west, the University of Chicago. . When we returned in the Fall we were different than a year gp previously. It was '04 who had become the arrogant Sophomores ,il to replace 'og who had moved up a step. And we found.a new T , class of men and womenwho were just as fresh and ambitious as we hid been bint a gear sincea Siichf spirit seemeld cpresumptigus now o us, an we e ermine to oo upon it wit is ain. ut as we wanted to act disdainful as a body, we reorganized and elected a new group of officers with this result: H. W. Ford, Presi- dent, Walter johnson, Vice President, Marie McAvoy, Secretary- ' VI, J' NMI-,. f I rr' 1 5231! . I 1 W x 'll3,tf'7r - ZEQJ mr. lr?-T vr 2321 get Kid. 'Y 'Q Q 1 X ,A 1,4 14. E' ' "f . , qv rr. ' lb ng .rx W fr-rl f I . 1 V9 1 f hw, Nr I 7 N, I xg Wg I Yifxx f ,1 . ix:x:? fl Jig: Sf: 1 Q' f" ig 77, X4 mn J N Treasurer, and W. Carey, Sergeant-at-Arms. 'E ' 1 'S U Early in October three enterprising Freshmen-jennison, Speik 1 and Magee- determined to let us know that they had arrived and 5 ' 27 were th1rst1ng'for a fight. On Hallowe'en they climbed to the top bro: rad bfi' of the new power house chimney and dropped their fiag to the most 1I1aCCGSSlblE and at the same time most conspicuous part of the structure, to wave defiance to the class of 'o4. The next morn- ing occurred the most memorable rush of the University's short but troublous history. Indeed, ferocity and hard feeling reigned supreme. Three of our men, after much delay, succeeded in gaining the top of the chimney and dislodging the "fight provokerf' '04 withstood '05 at entrance with a display of true Chicago spirit. The enemy rushed our position repeatedly with but scant effect, and few casualties. QNo lives lost.j During the excitement the Sophomores above, by employing true Napoleonic tactics, managed to escape with the spoils unmolested. The fight was then transferred to the walk in front of Cobb, where the 'o5's found us invincible, and soon retreated, leaving us in proud possession of the victory. No one was seriously injured in the battle, beyond the painful infliction of a mostrunfortunate number of Cuts Qij Several weeks after this we again humbled the neophytes on the gridiron. and crushed them with the overwhelming defeat of 27- 5. Captain Louer led the music for '04 at this delightful occasion. Our next set-to with the new students came in March when the '05 track team showed us what they had in them. We suffered a bad defeat here, and looked on meekly while our J ' if ' x opponents trotted gaily off with decisive victory. C ,- , ' , X A -ll, Even the doughty Hopkins, our track captain, LL .J 5 ' ,Wgx could not stem the tide of defeat. '- WL -Qi, Mtlftli Although we couldn't run, we soon showed QS ywl the Freshmen that we were able to stand and fight f 'P by displaying our prowess in debate soon after. ',qOfl: W Arthur E. Lord, H. P. Miner, and H. W. Ford A I composed the '04 debating team that won from , ,, L ..syfi,i ',,r the Freshmen. It has been said that after Miller '- i E E f ' had finished talking one of his ' We 65152 J opponents found that his right arm m n il 0-+ st- 1 iw was utterly useless. ,X X QYSZR Q, 4 Our last conflict with the Fresh- W e iw X39 men occurred late in the Spring. ' Qwlff ,aw M131 f ' It took the form of a series of base- ,V X Q , I yy ball games, only two of which were K , Q, I f played off because of inability to W,-f"Qi:"f',, 'fn flu arrange dates. With the end of our Sophomore -,r -r -4 g-f .E ,le G6 1 in X r f f- .f a year came the close of our career as a fighting class, and in the fol- lowing Fall Naught-four, having entered upon its junior year, began .r ' , - ' to look upon University life with a N77 bV5 U! ""'f'Zf CU ffplrl it more serious feeling, and became ' ' imbued with the true college spirit 61.5 opp as 2 of 'fa C fa SS' -fflfff TL- as opposed to class spirit. jilla. Painfuf fracas: of bEC'0l?Tli'j ll Wlf 4? f x A is QL 7, K ., RX il .tw f R-Y gf? If Y 5 M W"PfT if 3 5 lyj x ' 'I it QV' Ch , Z! -'I if my ' AV ,lgy if 'A f ,, .g -mm NVQ! 1 T., 3,1135 f many ra? ,li NL N X llcq- it' Q5 I e 2 2 I X Qfgr E 4 Xxglyyx , xl 1 PKI MORTIMER L. CAHILL FREDERICK A. SPEIK CORINNE CAMPBELL LOGAN A. GRIDLEY . lib-1 Class of 1905 Officers 76 Q.. 4 , '-35131 sim ef' r .M.y.........u.- R' 'T'fefiA:3uf . President Vice President . Secretary Treasurer 1905 Class History U 0 V HE Class of 1905 was organized early in October, 1901, with the follow- O ing oflicers: Clark Jennison, President, Frink Lovell, Vice President, J 6 0 G 0 this true. Fred A. Speik, Treasurer, Miss Ruth Reddy, Secretary. Early in its Freshman year the class showed that it was going to make its mark in the history of the University, and subsequent events have proved On Hallowe'en, with great daring, some members of the class hung the class flag from the top of the power plant chimney. It hung there defiantly until noon next day, when after the fiercest class rush known to the college, the Sophomores succeeded in making way with the emblem. The first athletic event of the class was the Freshman-Sophomore football game which was unfortunately lost by a score of 5 to 27. , N 1 W M . PM i in 1 if 1' Ll W This score is not as discreditable as it may seem, for ten Freshmen were at the training table, which under the rules disqualified them for participation in the game, while the same was true of only two of the Sophomores. On March Sth, 1902, a dual track meet with 1904 resulted in a decisive victory for the Freshmen. The score was 58 to 41 in their favor. The class organized a "Freshman Debating Club " under the encouragement of Mr. Chandler, which was altogether a new departure, for hereto- fore no debating club had ever existed in any of the classes of the University. It is an excellent ' . place for foundation work 1 H, , 1 , K for those who are striving W . Q ,Ny f K fr XX X A ,WX gil, . Q' tif-'Ai 'iff' tt bike . -'illflg ,f f M ' . 'I 5 f 'l ' MAX fp xv ,J LJ A 1 fr L , M 'f'Al V5 I to prepare themselves for any- li D21 inter - collegiate debates, -xx .1 , and as such deserves the " T' J KUVW success and support it has received. W In October, 1902, the LJ: 9 mal new Sophomore class was reorganized and new officers were e l e c t e d. These were 1 Mortimer Cahill, President, Fred Speik, Vice President, Miss Corinne E. Campbell, Secretary, and Mr. Logan A. Gridley, Treasurer. Monday, November 17th, the Freshmen met the Sophomores in the annual football game, Before the game the Freshmen were conceded to have the odds all in their favor because of their many excellent players from preparatory schools who were not on the regular team, while many Sopho- mores were on the training table. The boys of 1905 showed their spirit and pluck by playing a game which not only left the score a tie, but which was brilliant and spectacular in individual 77 LJ if was 3001-j 'M' 'waht ku A Rx Nga Y rv-'Z' l'1! ,X -A U ll .11 xt in fb at Fi l 7 lf? 4 wiv? ALF! Ejciffzrtf lnfac 5229? X-N sig" ivffif 4 fy- 'fxf ' ? , f , ,A I Y-- H' J yy .hy If 1 ' , ,rw Elli 'M ,V K I 1 Nifir I li iq l 'sf-V .sl - lf' ' it cr ., '5S'.f-'f?11'l,fM ,f . ,A . J. In 1. , its 'af f Wal ' We 'f ' cg., f p -lt 2 ul "' - KG 2325 J , l'.- r"' ' ll flgrirw 31 1 FW? , I 11- 1 f A JLDY' JLDV11 cfdffrio I1 wg V- 1 ' , if - - i .. wil ly Wi. , Aly px X5 14 e ,.f',2 NW ' M I T ff M lf f line work. Early in October the boys of 1906 painted the sidewalks of the Campus with the flaring motto " 'o5 Beware 'o6." This challenge was speedily followed by notices, posted on fences, cafes, billboards and walls, which contained rules of behavior and commands from the Sopho- mores to the " green and verdant Fresh- men." These rules were evidently just what were needed by the entering class, because after that nothing more was heard from them to back up their challenge. The debating club was reorganized as soon as college reopened, as the "Sopho- more Debating Club," and Mr. Paul A. A M fi ,ls lt. i Q itil! S. N ian f .l,?,.k xvxihll Ffa t if? Mi if 1" 'rE,, N SW' ' Xilyi fy! Q' 4 , .N , . X NN 1' , N J ffl? L ofa!! Iii' hifi' H W'alker was elected President. The Freshman Debating Club was challenged, and on December 15th they met in joint debate. The work of the participants was excellent and the benefit of a close decision was awarded to the Freshmen. The class prospects are in every way of the brightest, both in scholarship and in athletics, and the members are full of all that is best in true, loyal, college spirit, all that is needed to promise a brilliant and successful future. 78 f Z ' X 1 1 Q7 ig' I X: will N lx, ilxyli l 6 ff, Qai ' X o lb ' v 'FQ ,R 10 uw? N like Wi W' ' tl TN qt itll- 'Mini Q sl! Malibu 6,1 dx 1, ffis -Lielfff.-fl' V ,ravi A bYIy!I6tl'l 'f' fu uv'S I, Il K. Q M x fc X lE"""1ff , H Q + W? xmni' AI S XS!! NI fwf V X X DN WW W li Q1 f KU, MIM ' Z7 N1 jj , Wjf 'xx R 5 KW fy ' WX M I MJ Nm 7f YX5 U 'X Q, f 1 My , 44 L ,A ,Y xff- v , -- - Class of 1906 ,U Officers BARRETT C. ANDREWS . President MARK CATLIN . Vice President LILLIAN STEPHENSON . Secretary HUBERT ELLSWORTH Treasurer 4 LMOST within the first week of its entrance into college, the Class of 1906 - Q began to make itself felt. On Wednesday morning, Oct. 8th, the following it announcement appeared on the sidewalk between Cobb and Kent, and was Y. conspicuous other places about the Campus: Y " '05, Beware of 'c6." ,t. Then the wise ones began to look for trouble, but the Sophs made no move till on Tuesday morning, Oct. 'x4th, the students of the University were surprised to find numerous hand bills posted on fences and windows, addressed " To Those Verdant and Unsophisticated Freshmen." The bills contained a set of rules to be followed by the men of lo6. It took the Freshmen just one day to reply to this proclamation, for on the next morning the following notice was posted on the bulletin board: "Those verdant and unsophisticated Freshmen, to the most noble and illustrious Sophomoresf PJ . "We are tired of living, kindly name time and place Where you will relieve us of the burden." But alas! Prexie's order against an inter-class meeting, and his threats of dire punishment for any and all who should take part in such a fracas, had their effect, and neither side made further movement against the other. The Class of 1906 is the third class in the history of the University to organize in its Freshman year. Urged to such a move by President Harper, a class meeting was held 80 on Thursday, Oct. 16th, and Barrett C. Andrews was elected President after a lively contest between himself and the three other nominees, Fred Hall, Dickerson, and Clarence Buckwalter. So much time was occupied in naming the President that further elections were postponed till later. A second meeting was held in Kent on Thursday, Oct. 23rd. Here Mark Catlin, Miss Lillian Stephenson aud Hubert Ellsworth were elected Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer, respectively. The President was invested with the power to appoint a committee to draft a constitution for this class. This was done and in a short time an entire organization was effected. Because of the fact that they were not permitted to give vent to their feelings of hatred for one another in the usual informal way, the members of both classes had to be satisfied with letting a few of their strongest representatives fight for supremacy in the annual football game. When satisfied that they were able to do the deed, the Freshmen challenged. Immediately the Sophomores accepted, and the contest took place on Marshall Field on Monday, Nov. 17th. Though the day was dark and gloomy, the adherents of both sides were undaunted and fiocked in generous numbers to the side-lines to support their heroes. Urged on by shouts of encouragement and rah-rah-rahs for '05 and 'o6, the twenty-two husky men shoved and banged one another from side to side and up and down the field for thirty-five long minutes. Now luck was with one side, now with the other, but when the whistle sounded the end of the last half neither team had scored and the ball was in the center of the field. Thus the score of enmity stands equal, and the members of both classes anxiously await the time when they will meet again in contest in events of the track and field. In the matter of athletics the Class of 1906 has attained more distinction than any other Freshman class since the founding of the University. Its football team was the nrst to play any outside college or school, when it met on the gridiron, Harvard School of Chicago and the Freshmen of the University of Illinois. In both these games the team, lead by Fred Hall, did well, tieing the former, and being defeated by the latter by the close margin of 5 to o. The Freshman track team had the honor of being absolutely the first team to meet representatives of the University of Illinois in an indoor dual contest, which it won by four points. Most brilliant amongst the stars in this meet were Taylor, Catlin, Hall, Kelly, Carroll, Maxwell, Parry, Gale and Buckwalter, all of whom, besides many other good men, will prove valuable additions to the 'Varsity squad. ln football, '06 contributed many of the men who proved of such worth and ability throughout the season. Most prominent among those men were Schnur, Wightman, " Big " Maxwell, Ivison, Tripp, Parry and Catlin. Again 1906 is distinguished in that it is the first Freshman year to have pictures of its football, baseball and track teams inserted in the " Cap and Gown." But the ambitions of the first year men do not bend to athletics alone. Five of them are members of the board of reporters for The Daibf Maroofz. These are Messrs. Leroy A. Van Patten, Charles L. Darst, Edgar Ewing, E. D. F. Butterfield and Edward M. Kerwin, and all have shown themselves of such ability that the present editors of the paper have no fear for its future success. Moreover, there is a Freshman debating club, which was organized in October, and meets regularly every Tuesday night. As A FINAL WORD : Here's to 1906, and may it be as successful in its last years in college as it has been in its first. S1 STM ENT' A V EDIR sqm 4 , 1 fr 1 k J PHILIP ALLEN EDWARD A. BECHTEL F. M. BLANCHARD ROBERT W. BRUERE EDKVARD CAPPS XVARNER FITE HENRY GALE H. R. HATb'IELD WM. HILI, G. M. HCBBS D. S. LINOLE C. E. MERRIAINI R. D. SALISBURY FERDINAND SCHXVILL H. PARKER WILLIAMSON J. W. A. YOUNG 82 The Dramatic Club ff Probably of all student activities the one from which the members derive most pleasure is the Dramatic Club. It has succeeded in bringing together, during the past eight years of its ex- istence, a host of most con- genial people. Membership in the club is elective. The election is based upon the candidate's showing of "dramatic merit" in the reg- ular club trials, which occur each quarter. Most of the members, however, had never done dramatic work of any kind before election to the club. The membership is limited to thirty, Hfteen men and fifteen women. The Dramatic Club gives at least two large performances during each college year. These productions are always looked forward to as the chief event of the quarter in which they occur. The midwinter dramatics usually come in januaryg the other appear- ance is on Junior Day. Besides these regular public exhibitions, the club has a social meeting each month, at which the members give vaudeville sketches, readings or a little farce, and then gather around red hots and coffee, or have an informal dance. The principal performances during this year were staged under the direction of the club's professional coach, Mr. Bartley Cushing, and were cast as follows: Junior Day Dramatics Matinee, Friday, June thirteenth, nineteen hundred and two, The Convocation Tent on the Campus of the University. Bilseris Bill A Comedy in Three Acts Fred Ossian, a young blood .... WALKER G. MCLAURY Andrew Strong, his dzum ..... CASPAR G. LARSEN Hiram Green, zz relired merclzazzt, WILLIAM A. AVERILL Barrington Green, his 5011 . . FRANK W. DE WOLF Nathaniel Bilser, a lailor . . . . HOWARD WOODHEAD Coddle, flze butler .... THEODORE B. HINCKLEX' Mrs. Stuart-Dodge, an arisfocral of Phz'!aa'e!phz'a . MISS lil.-XRTHA LANDERS Miriam Stuart-Dodge, her dazzghlef' . . Miss LEONA CANTERBURY Susan Green, flfZ'1'Z.lZ7ll,5 fbum . . MISS FLORENCE MILLER Mrs. Ossian, F7'ed's 7lZ0f1l67" . . . MISS LENA HARRIS ACT I-GREEN,s FLORIDA HOME ACT 11-THE SAME. THE FOLLOWING EVENING AcT III-GREEN'S SUMMER COTTAGE. THE NEXT JULY 33 The Midwinter Dramatics Evening, Friday, january twenty-third, nineteen hundred and three, The Music Hall, Fine Arts Building. Esmeralda of the Jouth A Play in Four Acts "Old Man" Rogers, a Norlh Carolimz farmer . . WILLIAM H. HEAD Lydia Ann Rogers, his wg? . . . . MISS LORENA KING Esmeralda Rogers, his dfzzqghtvr . . . MISS FRANCES CLENDENNING Dave Hardy, a young Norlh Ca1'0lz'1zz'an . . MILTON G. G. SILLS Harold Estabrook, zz mah of leisure . . THEODORE B. HINCKLEY Jack Desmond, an Azfzerztazz affix! in Hzris . HOWARD L. WILLETT Nora Desmond, h 1- Y SZ-5,675 . . . . MISS AGNES WAVMAN Kate Desmond, it . . . MISS VIDA SUTTON George Drew, an Ameriazn speculafoz' .... FRANK DE WOLF "Marquis" de Montessin, a French adz.'en!u1'c'r . WILLIAM R. KERR, JR. ACT I-THE ROGERS' CABIN IN NORTH CAROLINA ACT II-THE DESMOND'S STUDIO IN PARIS ACT III-THE RECEPTION ROOM IN ROGER'S PARIS HOUSE ACT IV-SAME AS ACT II Officers . WALKER GAILEY MCLAURY . . . President LORENA C. V. KING . . . Secretary FRANK W. DE WOLF Business Manager FRANK .SARDAM PAUL Ai WALKER . . V . . . Property Men Members Sidney Ethel Bock Edith Brownell Gertrude L. Caswell Frances Clendenning Narcissa Cox Lena D. Harris Bertha L. Iles Lorena C. V. King Frieda Kirchhoff Martha Landers Anne McGoorty Vida Sutton Agnes R. Wayman C. Arthur Bruce Frank W. De Wolf Charles S. Hayes William H. Head Theodore B. Hinckley William R. Kerr. jr. Caspar G. Larsen Jerome P. Magee Walker G. McLaury Frank J. Sardani Albert W. Sherer Milton G. G. Sills Paul A. Walker Howard L. Willett Howard Woodhead Foster Hall Dramatics " The Course of True Love " VVritten and staged by Edith Brown- A ell, and given February I4, I903. . The Cast V- X Miss Phyllis Redheart . MISS GRACE NORLETT 1 ' ' Miss Daphne Dovecote X5 4 MISS ALICE BALDWIN ' Chloe, a maid A MISS EDITH BROWNELI. l':l if james, ajafzifor' Q, N MISS CLARA PRIMM ' gi Mr. Adonis Lovewell 'Lf ' MISS CLARA WHEEI.ER '1 ,L f Mr. Launcelot Bowknot ., i . - MISS LORENA KING fi ,WM Mr. Smith I 1 MISS ANNA YYOUNGMAN Z , Mr. Brown ' 'cf 1 , MISS AGNES KAl'FMAN f ' 5 -- 3..!'.hir- ' . 4, ,,-gf.a.ZfQ. CLUB THE DRAM ATIC l ......L.1.L.I.L SHI- u ll Il III N . .. ... ... ...- III I funn 1 ll! l FTA K of,J,, Musical Organizations THE GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUBS THE FRESHMAN GIRLS' GLEE CLUB THIN: GIRLS, MIANDULIN CLUB THE UNIVERSITY CHOIR ',,, TIIE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MILITARY BAND f xx-XX ff ,F , , W- ' ,il X ',' 3 x X mg " E' 11,51 ' -l--i1 f '- " " 4? f 3 I gf The Glee N I f ,ffl , l Officers of the Combined Clubs FOREST G. SMITH Law O4 . President in CHARLES R. MCMILLAN Law 05 Manager "xr Q figs, AY A ' X ' , rf I 'lf if 'lil Z7 fl , Z I r f- - f Elf' gl: x fugg, and Mandolin Clubs X ' ' ' xxuu uw , gl' 1 , 1 ' A f "5.??. ' ' ' t -62 Wg ,Y 1f'5"W'N HENRY D. SULCER 05 Assistant Manager The Glee Club ERNEST WILSON MILLER, '03 .... . Leader HALBERT BRUSH BLAKEY, '03 . Accompanist FRANCIS F. J. T1scHE, '03 . . Secretary CHARLTON T. BECK, '03 .... Librarian Executive Committee Hiram Parker Williamson Ernest Wilson Miller Adelbert Turner Stewart First Tenor Francis F. J. Tische, '03 Herbert V. Mellinger, Medic, '04 Burt Parker Richardson, Grad. Huntington Badger Henry, '06 Jecond Tenor George McHenry, '04 Carl Judson Bevan, '06 Adelbert Turner Stewart, '04 Felix Turner Hughes, '06 Charles Alanson DeLong, Medic, '05 First Bass Ernest Wilson Miller, '03 Henry Durham Sulcer, '05 Merritt Berry Pratt, '03 Herbert L. Miller, '06 Second Bass Charlton Tisdel Beck, '03 Henry Elmer Walsworth, '04 Homer Allin Hill, Grad. Arthur Evarts Lord, '04 Joloists H. Parker Williamson Ernest Wilson Miller LESTER BARTLETT JONES . . Director 37 The Mandolin Ciub D HENRY DURHAM SULCER, '05 . Leader Executive Committee Henry Gordon Gale Henry Durham Sulcer Harry James Lurie First Mandolin Henry Durham Sulcer, '05 Frederick Richard Dapprich, Grad. Forest Garield Smith, Law, '04 Hollis Elmer Potter, Medic, '06 Jecond Mandolin Dudley Kimball French, '05 f-DEW William Henry Hatfield, jr., '04 'ill 'Q' ufm Frederick Payes Pritchard, '04 , 'Q Edward Mayberry Cornell, '04 Gene Meyer, '06 N 1 - If , ,... ,M J 'r G 'r I' D 'rm 1 ut ar xg X , Harry Clendennin Cobb, '06 N 9 o XX ' 1 Wilbur C. Harris, '05 ' I 7 Frank Sherman Lovewell, '06 X Violin Harry james Lurie, Law, '05 Charles D. Berta, '06 Flute Lynne john Bevan, '03 41505 88 THE GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUBS T-Mm if ff ffm, I gras!! U ' 7.56-KY ff S I .Q"."-,.l,'4 , X 1 2 f' f':L -QW! , fy vw N 'S L 1 gf ., 4 ,I Nh.. ' x A QQ Q , L 7 fl X Z SVA? 9 I, f Z ,v 1,1 Mull G slum S Sd1,?N.',3v '4 0 "M JF "" 'S"7l Hin d' 2 .. Tw, -H"-R X 'X .f I' f W "1 .J - l , , ,fy 4 Q ul ..-X . 'I Km H' n x 'f ki "W -- -""" 1' ' lim H all - V Q mx 7 iw V' M. 0, f-.uuall I ' X X I . -vkvfg . K ll lf- hul X J , Q nm YQhlNx1.,, I Xs X x.- ' . vb - pk - 3,1 , H ill T. - pi , nf UJQWDLJ The Tiger's Head CHonorary Musica! Jocietyl E CURTIS ROCKWELL MANNING WILLIAM RALPH KERR ERNEST WILSON MILLER FOREST GARFIELD SMITH WILBUR CONDIT GROSS ADELBERT TURNER STEWART ARTHUR EVARTS LORD HENRY DURHAM SULCER MERRITT BERRY PRATT EDWARD GOODE WOODS LUMEN HOWARD MACOMBER 90 A iii I 36551 0 j ,if reshman Gzrls Glee Club I! ff I R. LILLIAN STEPHENSON . . . President ALTHINA ARNOLD .... Secretary and Treasurer First Joprano LILLIAN STEPBENSON FRANCES CHANDLER JENNIE HUGHES MARION KELLOG, QUEEN WILLAN MAUDE HART Jecond Joprano NELLIE YORTY HELEN RONEY EDITH THOMAS HAZEL VALENTINE First Alto ADA GIMBEL ALTHINA ARNOLD GERTRUDE KUEHNE EUGENIE DOvI,E Jecond .Alto KATHERINE HEN FLORENCE VVILLLIAMS GRACE HOLMAN AILEEN FILKIN LESTER BARTLETT JONES . . . . Director QI Girls' Mandolin Club EDITH FRENCH, '06 E FRANCES CHANDLER, '06 . EMILY B. Cox, '05 FRANCES CHANDLER, '06 ADA GIMBEL, '06 First Mandolin CECELIA JOHNSON, '06 Jecond Mandolin . President . . . Leader Secretary and Treasurer CORA JOHNSON, '05 MARGARET MCC.-XRTHX', '06 WINIFRED PIERCE, '05 EVELINE HAYDE, '05 ,Mandola EMILY B. COX, '05 Violin LUCY PORTER, '05 VIOLET MILI.IS, '05 Guitar EDITH FRENCH, '06 HENRX' DURHAM SULCER, '05 . . . Director 92 LESTER BARTLETT JONES Dmrector ANNE EI ISABETH FLOYD . Accompamst HUNTINGTON B. HENRY HOBART G. TRUESDELL LOUIS W. RAPER BURT P. RICHARDSON HENRY SMITH HERBERT S. FOREMAN ERNEST W. MILLER FRANCIS S. PARKS GUSTAVUS P. DRUECK, JR HENRY D. SULCER EDXVARD B. KREHBIEI. ARTHUR E. LORD ROSCOE S. FAIRCHILIJ 93 :QQ X ,X M X . fix' Q 7 by l f, i 'hawk f Qibf l fi - . I ia., f , f .. - ' 1 tfghg-af is gi . b .Suk ,L f 1l-Q r"r To f ' I. ff ,v .A-- ,A yi f XXXLXM f Url f A 'X ESX X11 Z 'lilly "7 X.11 K 1g:f:f3i':TW5',Ii N Nl. ', f,f, ily ' V: Al .Nu W1 ' W "X 4 ,N j 'i ", mf! vi ' I, f E' R. I I . ,f ll f "I I .'llll3Hsf Y " ' ' J L!! LNIXN in i Y XI! J, 'J1 nk " ,ly 11, fy?"V' H Y! W MU " I Nl wf ' Tfiafffy LWg.5r3' 0 .. , ll ml If 1,ql,,sLgN I fl, N 3 N-QQ kg X6 I gpm ,- iw HA! X2 I - if 1 ,X T-S1 322 ,- f xk, A, -Y if .p J Y 'Af T ' 'F x l X. 172' University of Chicago Military Band WILLIAM RAINEY HARPER, Honorary Member GLENN MOODX' HOBBS . . . . . . . Director THOMAS W. THOMPSON ADELBERT T. STEXVART . . Eb Clarinet . . EMIL GOETTSCH Solo Bb Clarinet . CHARLES GOETTSCH Solo Bb Clarinet . EDWARD D. TAYLOR First Bb Clarinet . F. ALBERT SCI-IMIDT First Bb Clarinet . RALPH MERRIAM Second Bb Clarinet EDYAVARD C. MINCER Second Bb Clarinet . CHARLES W. HILL Piccolo . . . JOHN A. DEAN Oboe . . . LYNNE J. BEVAN Alto Saxophone . F. EDWARD SCHMIDT Solo Bb Cornet CHARLES B. ELLIOTT Solo Bb Cornet . GEO. B JACKSON First Bb Cornet ADELBERT T. STEVVART First Bb Cornet . EARL D. HOXVARD Second Bb Cornet HORACE M. FRANCIS Mascot . . . . Leader . . . . Secretary First French Horn . MERRITT B. PRATT Second French Horn CHARLES E. SMITH Second French Horn . CARL J. BEVAN First Tenor . . J. H. W. MEYER Baritone . . FLOYD E. BROVVER Baritone . CHARLES J. CHAMBERLIN First Bb Trombone ALBERT B. GARCELON First Bb Trombone . MARTIN I. OLSON Second Bb Trombone . HARRY C. COBB Bass Trombone . Jos. E. PECHAUSEK . . OVID R. SELLERS . . . MARK J. POTTER RALPH R. FERGUSON . CHARLES N. ALLISON . . HARRY J. LURIE Eb Bass . BBb Bass BBb Bass . Snare Drum . Bass Drum ROBERT JOHNSON 'Ig - ff' THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MILITARY BAND I I K x 1 l mu kk' - s 'uf . A Q , -'43 - X H21-"T 1 , B' l I 1 . Q ,, 4 H ,o J, ' 1 ff., , Wu- I Q 7 J K Y '. s o it N 1 Q I 1 IA Y I , , 5 I 4 ' f. " 'x Q Q -,QQ Q . 1 5. , Q I ' " 4 4' 'Y Q. '..4-.505 QU Y f :li 5. ' . 35 .'v Q' P - ' ' ' Y U. 1 , ,- ' u 4 'T f . 9, V , ' 1 n 'f1 H il . f,4 6- A O fl is N- L?v, N4 7: IJ' ' e :'uiL'L"'4'. T Egfr 1 , V I -Q, .5 hi ' 2 fbi K. fXt the AVDITDRIVIVI PLAYE-HOVSE A Plciafant Comedy The Cafe is Alt6rd. BEN.IoNsoN , . .- ff f -"N L X W N ,ff ,f ,11f"'1, X. -xwrgf -1144 5' A3 -:xxx'xx lg AJ: x---5 Kxxss- -gg Q 'M' 'xii' sxxx-M " fx ,5 - li"--. 4 lv. C L C 1 1 09?---'2:::2" '-."--..- ' l XS A f f Qabbpggjlf 'Jn A 1 nmmmmwmmiki? . u,,,,'5q, ,y K ,gf C W - 5 mn C ' ,jg-35 , ' Jgff' gwf, - ,Xl E N ' . x. .fi ' -C , - . .-.- iii, - thug A X, L"1K"'v 1' ' wx XSS XX 'QM " Q1 N f'X QRSSS . . X XX"""X fagf XXXX gi KY i s,f! N xi!! 'qu F021 S X-' '!1'..9 F7il1 rf- 5, i 4 N! 'P l .4 Publiquely acfied by Students in the VniV6rSiti6 for 726 MZZVKi?fZZZfipfffE!7Z6'Wf Saturday Maya Seventeenth UW. DC C C C. ll , HEN the Public Speaking Department of the University annonnced that the annual i theatrical production for 1902 would be a " 'I presentation of Ben Jonson's "The Case Is Altered," much interest was awakened, especially when it became known that the play would be, as nearly as possible, a reproduction of the Elizabethan manner of staging. It is believed that the University performance was the first public presentation of this nature in Chicago. It is well known, however, that such productions have been witnessed at Yale and Harvard, as well as other colleges. As was to be expected, a large number of applicants for parts presented themselves. Professor Clark, who selected the cast, and got the play under way, devised the plan of handing the various contestants for parts copies of the play and permitting them to choose what parts they would. This method of select- ing the members of the cast met with entire satisfaction. The players aimed at presenting the Elizabethan theatre in ,. lv H 213, all its details, and that they were successful is the unanimous verdict of all who were present at the play. From the flag which hung from the tower of the play-house to the minutest details of staging, all was reproducedg the rabble crowding into the pit in trained disorder, followed by the more elegant tradesmau and nobles, who took their places of distinction on the stage, the flower-girls and orange-girls vending their wares before the play, and between the acts, the trumpeter to quiet the throng and announce the prologue: and, finally, the quaint actors to please the crowds. The production was given under the stage-direction of Mr. Bruce Short of New York City. To him, as well as to the members of the Public Speaking Department and the members of the various committees, much credit for the success of the players is due. For tl1e successful business management of the play, credit must be given to managers and their committees. The complete cast of the play was as follows : QS 'A ,fir Yi' 'ff .Q , to ' .J mf.--,,f ff, t,: , , MP. ,, W, ,t V, ra,,.t5q',-f ' 5 "1 'f '-7? 74, tv 1 .,,, ., Mil' it Dramatis Personae E Count Ferneze, lord of Milan ....... WILLIAM A. AVERILL Lord Paulo Ferneze, his eldest son, and soldier with Maximilian, in love with Rachel .......... EGBICRT T. ROBERTSON Camillo Ferneze, supposed Gasper, a younger son, long lostg protege of Chaxnont . EMIL GoErTsCH Maximilian, General ofthe forces of Milan . . ARTHUR P. SOLBERG Angelo, gentleman and friend to Paulo ...... CAsPAR G. LARSEN Francisco Colonnia, agentlt-man of Milan ...... LEON P. LEWIS Jaques de Prie, a beggar and miser, really Melum, and formerly steward to Chamont's father .......... DAVID A. ROBERTSON Antonio Balladino, pageant poet CAnthony Mundayj . . CASH A. NEWKIRK Christophero, Count Ferneze's steward . . . VVILLIAM J. SHERMAN J Sebastian . . . . HAYXVARD D. YVARNER His Servants Martino . . FREDERICK D. HATFIELD ll Vincentio . . HARCJLD N DENNIS Valentine, servant to Colonnia ...... . MARK R. JACOBS Peter Onion, groom of the hall ....... HOWARD VVOODHEAD Juniper, a cobler and retainer to Count Fernezeg a malaprop . . HARRY J LURIE Pacue, page to Gasper ......... SI-IERLOCK B. GAss Finio, page to Camillo ......... ALBERT R. VAIL Aurelia 1 HERBERT V. MELLINGER Phoenixella Daughters to Count Femeze ' ' it FREDERICK D. BRAMHALL Rachel de Prie, supposed daughter to Jaques, really Isabel, sister to Chamont Sewer, Messenger, Servants, et al. JOHN H. WEIJDELI. Men Doorkeeper . . . CARL H. GRABO Court Poet . . XVALKER G. MCLAIIRY Prologist . . . . NIILTON G. G. SILLs The Man with the Song CLARK S. JENNISON Toslin, Merchant . . . S. B. TERRY Trumpeter . CARL VAN VECHTEN Court Jester . . . . CQULTER CRAIG Jtage Jervants John James Van Nostrand, Jr. H. C. Hulbert Ignatius Barnard Edgar L. Strauss A W. Henry Elfreth T. XV. Brophy Eli P. Gale J. L. Brorle Dudley R. French Adelbert T. Stewart John S. XVrigl1t Tradesmen XValte1' Parker XY. ll. Smith Gallants R. M. Gibhoney Frank McNair Samuel Salingfr Harry XY. Getz ll. H. Bates lf. Nl. Horton Thoma-z J. Hair G. E. Goodrich Charles M. Steele Richard Wellington Charles R McMillan li. Vincent Quimby Stephen R. Capps 99 Julia C. Hobbs Anna Lazear Laura Ward Women Court Ladies Lorena King Grace Warren Alene Williams Flower Girls Marguerite Crofoottj RuthlCohen Grace Darlington Edith Brownell Faith Latimer Ethel Claire Randall., Vida Sutton Florence Evernhan1 Esther Salter Edith Simpkin Dorothy Duncan Gladys M. Bray Narcissa Cox Orange Girls Jessie Sherman Leona Canterbury Zerlina Hirsch Jennie Thompson Clara Bessie Fralick Margaret Wilson Margaret G. Coulter Fannie Lenore Benson Marian Schwarz Flora B. VVei1 Marian Bigeler Edith C. Bellamy Phoebe Ellison Ivy S. Brown Tradetuomen Jane Munroe Mary E. Thompson Emily E. Dobbin Florence Morrison Mabelgwhiteside Rena Hooper Mabel Pain Margaret Donnan Hazel Buck Anna B. Jenks Mary Truesdell Edith Shaffer Margaret Wade Marian Lyons Martha Landers Ethel Dewey Bertha Warren Jane Walker Sarah Morris Louise Brown Agnes Wayman Frances Taussig Deo Whittlesey Florence P. Hood Ye Maydes of ye 6'beatre Martha Allerdice Anna Goldstein Catherine Osborn Isabel Baker Belle Halsted Sarah Osborn Katherine Barton Davida Harper Katherine Paltzer Minnie Beckwith Alice Hepburn Jennie Rattray Emily Bradley Madge Houghton Anne Reed Gertrude Caswell Grace Johnson Lina Small Eleanor Culton Louise M. Just Lillian Stevens Edith Dymond Hope Kimball Ruth Terry Ethel Foster Agnes MacNeish Mattie Tschirgi Fannie Frisbie Anna Marshall Ruth Vail Helen Gardner Katherine McDonnell Nina Weston Harriet Going Helen Whitehead Myrtle Miller IOO Business Managers Mr. Samuel N. Harper Mr. Adelbert T. Stewart Finance Committee Mrs. Frank Asbury johnson Mrs. james Rowland Angell Mrs. Charles Porter Small Miss Susan Peabody M rs. Mrs. M rs Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs Mrs. Mrs. Committee on Tickets Mr. Henry R. Hatfield Mr. james R. Angell Mr. Shailer Mathews james R. Angell Box Committee Mrs. William Gardner Hale Poster Committee George Edgar Vincent Costum Heinrich Maschke Isidor G. Levy Starr Cutting Carl Darling Buck james Rowland Angell Shailer Mathews Albert Moore e Committee Mrs. Miss Mrs. Mrs. M rs M rs Mrs. M rs. Mrs. Paul O. Kern Glenn Hobbs Susan Peabody Maxinie Ingres XVillian1 Hill Richard Moulton Newman Miller Martin Schuetze lot Harry Pratt Judson 'WWF' WJIIIIUII SQ. liillltiil'IIIU-111''lllvitlllvlilUlfIVIUIUIUIUIUIIIUIUOWIUliivlilinvpUggm, Hut Q - r aaxx .ally ae as 4X 1 gig : 35' E p . N4 02 Class Day sti- D , Qin g9g i - - 1 X . .. 501 Q Ev G t Q 6 1 Xlytly -I. I I ' .QQXYJ5 , ,mg - s5E.4:-.xse -s- - -12.12-. :..-a.- sr , 2.1mm 1 E g, .ummm mm1inlmlsmlantdaiiiinimlelmminllumiim'ii'miilimgumnllig :hge mmmti 3-it Wai. gmgmhi E . - y , - Q - 5.:fH5i?t'?-4f +J - -4- 5 ii' .v - ! hi A i i f '. , . . . ' 1 v. 1 -.Iv- " , -1' .0 F? 5 NIQUE Class Day exercises, both humorous and serious, held by the my 55 4' Q Class of 'oz on June 16, make the recollection of that day thoroughly 1 ..., f pleasing. Many pictures, bright with college color, are in the minds GW. of 'o2's and their friends. More than i5o members of the class, ici, arrayed in cap and gown.. were together on the Central Quadrangles IQ? J from early forenoon until nearly' 5 o'clock in the afternoon, and t l J G C, Q during' the day the word farewell, in some form, was said 6,650 times, JL- P1 according to the count of a mathematics student. At Io:45 the class formed in a large " C " around the flag pole. Dean Tufts gave the reasons why the University had set aside a day for the class, and spoke of the significance of emblems. Then, while the members were singing " Vive la Naughty-Two," Miss Jessie E. Sherman, the Class Vice President, pulled the rope which raised a large maroon Hag, lettered " lQO2," to the top of the tall pole, where it floated until sundown in recognition of the day given over othcially to the class graduating from the Senior college. C The spectators hurried across the quadrangle to secure seats in the gymnasium, and the class, in solemn procession, slowly followed to carry out the " '02 Bene Vale to the Old Gym." This was a mock convocation. The sombre Seniors marched into the gymnasium chanting their ponderous "Bene Vale Dirge," a sad stanza in Latin. As the members reached the seats reserved for them at the front, those in the audience realized that the tune for this processional was "Yankee Doodle." After valedictory addresses " The Award of Class Honors" and degrees was made. The members of the class who had won distinction in baseball, track athletics, football, tennis and women's athletics were led by the marshalls up narrow steps, six feet high, to a platform at the north end of the gymnasium floor. There the various deans, arrayed in significant paraphernalia, presented the candidates. Mr. Herbert E. Fleming, the Class President, prompted by Mr. Benjamin G. Lee, who whispered audibly through a large tin megaphone, gave an imitation of President Harper at a convocation. ln conferring the novelties called degrees, upon the various candidates he read the following Latin address, written by Miss Sherman and Miss Josephine Lackner: Yos juvenes, up to me. qui per longibns tempores classibus cuttibus-may I say- et conrsiotum flnnkibus frequentissimormn in baseballorum rtracknm. footballorum. tennis ballnm, cnltus physical COE'CllCRll0IllSl ex-kcllunt, cnin anctoritate-on the one hand-high mnckimnckibus of the classo Uno Thousand Nine Centnm et Duo. et-on the other cum auctorilate Prexibus Universitatis Chicagoensis, maximam deservit. In cujns rei haec testamonium-take. In conclusion, Professor Stagg was ushered to the plat form, and a special honorary degree, Summa Cum Laude, was conferred for the class upon the respected director of athletics. This was the degree, B.A., " qui significat Boss of Athletics." The platform was cleared and the most comic performance of the day was given. This was the presentation of "The Case is Altered," a pathetic tragedy in one act. written by Mr. lVilliam A. Averill. who took the leading role as a professional funeral director. On many counts the Old Gym was sent down the "elevator " to Satan's realm of flames, making way for the new Bartlett gymnasium. The Old Gym was affection- ately referred to as "Gymmy " The farewell ode, in which a light-footed chorus of IO2 'S 'it lu towel girls" fMessrs. Robertson, Jayne and Grossj, led the entire cast, was sung to the tune of " Dolly Gray," and ran as follows: Goodby, Gymmy, we must leave you, though we hate to have you go. Something tells us you are needed for fuel down below. Hark. your elevator's goingg you cannot stay longer hereg Goodby, Gymmy, we must leave you, goodby Gymmy dear. After the recessional, in which 'oz took its last lap around the Old Gym track, the members of the class and their relatives gathered in the Convocation tent at the center of the campus for luncheon. An inspiring procession about the quadrangles attracted attention to the afternoon exercises. Headed by the University Military Band and followed by a large company of friends, the long double column of men and women, in academic black, moved from building to building for "The Quadrangle Farewell." A feeling of pleasant sadness came to the members of the class during the opening exercises on the lawn in front of the Wornen's Halls, when Miss Margaret Donnan, speaking the farewell words, said she was trying to smile and be cheerful for the same reason that a man whistles to keep up his courage. Appropriate exercises were held in Hull Court, near the Class Ivy, at the door of Kent Theatre, and at Cobb Lecture Hall. By the time the procession reached the steps of Cobb a large crowd had gathered in the semi-circle of seats under the trees around the Senior Bench. The members of the class took the chairs reserved nearest the oblong mass of gray stone, and there the Class Day exercises established in University tradition were held. In the introductory address Mr. Fleming expressed the gratitude of the class for the many gifts its members had received from the Universityg and above all, the gift of university spirit, which was interpreted to be the universal spirit. The Class History, by Miss Mabel K. Whiteside, was received with most enthusiastic applause. The history was written in the style of Czcsar's" Commentaries," and referred to Dr. Harper as Ciesar, with such delicate cleverness, that the President, sitting near the historian, appeared to be greatly amused. Miss NVhiteside said that Caesar, while in " winter quarters at Morgan Park," heard frequent rumors " that a conspiracy was being formed against our womeng " and that " Caesar, being much moved by these reports, came back as soon as thc-re was a supply of grass in the spring, and endeavored by sweet persuasion to conciliate the women." The class gift, a window for Mandel Hall, was presented to the University by Mr. Bertram G. Nelson. President Harper responded for the University, and as he left the exercises the members of the class rose and waved their handkerchiefs in "a salute to Czesarf' The class poem, entitled "College Doors," was read by Miss Clara Kretzinger. Finally the Class of 'oz surrendered its position of seniority. Mr. David G. Robertson presented the Senior Bench and Miss Josephine Lackner the Senior Cap and Gown to the Class of IQO3. Mr. Thomas J. Hair and Miss Narcissa Cox gave the responses for the Seniors of this year. All joined in the U Alma Mater" and the 'O2 Class Day exercises were ended. At the l'resident's reception that evening, Dr. Harper made members of the graduating class very happy by saying, concerning the events of the day: " IQO2 has set the pace." Class Day Program Io:3o A. M. Io:45 A. M. IIZOO A. M. Class of 1902 The University of Chicago 4 WITHIN THE QQU.-XDR.-XNGLE5, TNIONDAY, JUNE SIXTEENTH MEETING OF THE CLASS Cobb Lfffflll? Fla!! RAISING OF THE 1902 FLAG . . The' Ffzlgf' Pole Opening of the day . . THE CLASS PRESIDENT Address on Behalf of the University PROFESSOR JAMES H. TUFTS, Dean of the Senior Colleges Raising the Class Flag . . . MISS JESSIE EVELYN SHERLIAN Song, " Viva la ,XY4Z1!'gfI4'I'-T200 " ...... THE CLASS 'o2 BENE VALE TO THE OLD GYM . Thr Gjfillfldjilllll Procession- YM' H5115 ITIXE' Diljgf The Choir The Class The Candidates The Officers and Speakers Valedietory for the Men . MR. LEON PATTISON LEXVIS Valedictory for the Women . MISS MARTHA SELMA ALLERDICE Award of Class Honors and Degrees . . . BY THE PRESIDENT Baseball-Dean, MR. EGBERT THOMAS ROBERTSON G111Il1'a'I1f4's.' Charles M. Van Patte11, Lees Ballinger, T. Burton Smith Track-Dean, MR. FREDERICK DENNIS-ON BRAMHALL Gz11n'1'd11!f's.' Zellmer R. Pellet, Robert L. Henry, Jr., Ernest E. Perkins, Jerome P. Magee, Milton H. Pettit Football-Dean, MR. ALBERT E. MERRILL C1Ifl!fI'tI'tIfF5.' Ernest E. Perkins, Zellmer R. Pettet, Alvin B. Snider, Benjamin Strauss Tennis-Dean, MR. WILLIAM HENRY ELFRETH G111dz'dfzIe's.' Joseph Walter Bingham, Jerome P. Magee, Henry XV. Belneld, Paul MacQuiston, Harvey MacQuiston. Women-Dean, MISS GRACE JOHNSON C'lllltZ'Z'!2Itlf6S.' Martha S. Allerdice, Cecile C. Bowman, Ruth E. Moore, Hazel Buck, Helen Brandeis The Special Honorary Degree of B A is conferred upon AMOS ALONZO ST.-XGG. 1o4 Presentation of " The Case is Altered " QA Pathetic Tragedy in One Actl, By MR. YNILLI.-XM A. AVERILL Dramatis Personae Sulphur H. Brimstone, Envoy Extraordinary of his Satanic Majesty, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MR. FOREST G. SMITH Mr. Dense Black Black-Plumes, a professional funeral director . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . MR. 'WILLIAM A. AVERILL Hotfoot Bunion, a butler .... . MR. GEORGE A. YOUNG Mr. H. Prologus Hotair, the prologue cuss . . MR. LEON P. LEWIS I. Earlyfall Flunkem, the recorder ...... MR. MARK JACOBS Old Pushem Shover, the stage hand ..,. MR. WILLIS L. BLACKMAN, JR. The Voice XVithin . CORPORAL HERBERT VERSATILITY TERPSICHORE MELLINGER The Gymnazabethan Audience ...... MR. EARL D. HOWARD CHORUS T116 Sbafv Girls - Mr. R. Homer Smith, Mr. Warren B. Smith. Mr. Henry E. Smith The Towel GZ'I'f.Y-MT. David A. Robertson, Mr. William R. Jayne, Mr. Wilbur C. Gross Servants Finale Chorus by the Class Recession- The Bene Vale Dizjgje 12:30 P M. LUNCHEON OF THE CLASS .... The C1U71Z'0l'LlfZ'07l Ten! 2:oo P. M. THE QUADRANGLE FAREWELL Q Processionals by the University of Chicago Military Band The Hall Girls' Song-Chorus of Naughty-Two's from the VVOIIISILS Halls Farewell to the VVOIHQIFS Halls . . MISS MARGARET DONNAN The Farewell Song . . . . . . THE CLASS Farewell to the Class Ivy MISS LEONA CANTERBURY The Farewell Song . ..... THE CLASS The 'O2 Hull Gate Song ..... THE CLASS Farewell to Kent Theatre MR. GEORGE ALEXANDER YOUNG The Farewell Song . ...... THE CLASS The Cobb Bells' Song ........ THE CLASS Farewell to Cobb Hall . . MR. ROBERT LLEWELLYN HENRY, JR. The Farewell Song ........ THE CLASS 2:30 P. M. SENIOR CLASS EXERCISES 7-lZ6'St'7ZI'01'B6lIfh Introductory Address, MR. HERBERT EASTON FLEMING fx , Class History . . Miss MABEL KATE YVHITESIDE f' ,X ' Class Poem NIISS CLARA JOSEPHINE KRETZINGER XT Mfifen Presentation of the Senior Bench to the Class of 1903 . f . . . . MR. DAVID ALLAN ROBERTSON ww? N Response for the Class of IQO3 MR. THOMAS J. HAIR X' q I Class Song, by MISS MARY MORRISON THE CLASS Qt, l X, Presentation of the Senior Cap and Gown to the Class K of 1903 . . MISS JOSEPHINE LACKNER ' 6 Response for the Class of IQO3 MISS N.-XRCISS.-X COX if R Presentation of the Class Gift to the University . 4 ' . . . . MR. BERTRAM G. NELSON Response on Behalf of the University . . . DR. WILLIAM RAINEX' HARPER, THE PRESIDENT University Song, "f1!1mz MtZf6l", . . . . . . . . . THE CLASS AND AUDIENCE I O5 W K 'N The-...... Class Day Committees a Executive Committee The Officers of the Class HERBERT EASTON FLEnrNo . . . . President JESSIE EVELYN SHERMAN . Vice President MARGARET GARRITT COULTER .... Secretary EARL DEAN HOXVARD ....... Treasurer HAZEL BUCK ALBERT BERTRAM Cv.-XRCELON ZELLMER ROSWELL PETTET ON MORNING EX!-.RCISES XV. R. Jayne, C7ltIIil'lIltZ7Z C. A. Huston F. G. Smith Jessie E. Sherman Phrebe Ellison Marguerite Crofoot Hazel Buck ON CLASS GIFT A. B. Garcelon, Cxhdliflllllll E. D. Howard Charles S. Hayes Lily Belland Phoebe Ellison ON INVXTATIONS VVilbur Gross, Clmzhlnzzz E. D. Howard Margaret Coulter Margaret Donnan Jennie M. Rattray ON LUNCHEON Phoebe Ellison, Cylllffllldll Marguerite Crofoot Florence Morrison Jerome P. Magee Alfred E. Merrill ON ARRANGEMENTS Zellmer R. Pettet, C7ZlI1'l'IIIlNI F. D. Bramhall VV. H. Elfreth Hazel Buck Matilda Gibson Mary Morrison ON CLASS SONGS Josephine Lackner, C'btII.l'I1lll7l Benjamin G. Lee Douglas Sutherland Florence Morrison Mabel XVhiteside Martha S. Allerdice Mary Morrison ON DIRoE Florence I. Morrison, CFhlII'1'l1ItIlI Minnie A. Beckwith ON CLASS FLAQ: Marguerite Crofoot, C7IlII'l'7lItI7Z Ethel Remick Roxanne Langellier Cecile Rovi man Harriet Going CLASS DAY CHOIR Grace Hayman Grace Myers Margaret Coulter Florence Miller Wilbur C. Gross Albert E Merrill R. Homer Smith Henry Smith FACULTY COMMITTEE James H. Tufts, CVIIYIAI 111011 J. l'. lddings J. Stieglitz E. Freund Ella F. Young Marshalls William R. Jayne L Yllss l'f'!f.' Hoo Rah Roo, Chicago, Chicago, Naughty-Two. Hoo Rah, Hoo Rah, David A. Robertson Bertram G. Nelson Leon P. Lewis Har.: Colors: IVIAROON AND IQLUIC Uass Gift: XVindow for Mandel Assembly Hall Class F!uaf61'.' American Beauty Rose '02 llflzszlzlf HW: VVah, hoo, NVah, hoo Old Naughty-Two, We stand by you, You het we do. Old Naughty-Two Officers of the Northern Oratorical League For Year 19024903 HARRX' J. LURIPI, Chicago, Ill. EDWARD SQNNENSCHEIN, Ann Arbor T. A. VI-:I,DRY, Minneapolis, Minn. ROGER DENNIS, Evanston, Ill. . FRANK VINCENT, Oberlin, O. M. B. OLBRICH, Madison, Wis. . GALE D. GREEN, Iowa City, Ia. Ghe Annual D President , Mich. Secretary . . . Treasurer . First Vice President Second Vice President Thirrl Vice President Fourth Vice President Oratorical Contest Kent Theatre, Feb. 26, 1905 FREDERIC A. FISCHIQL H. C. HRUBAKER RALPH TNIERRIAM Ercxzxrz PIEUIBAUER G. D. BAKER P. A. BHNDIXEN . M.-xRc:AR1eT D.u'msoN . . . . "5hylock" "The Independent in Politics" . . "The Race Problem" . "The Passing of an American" "The liconornic Problem of Tom" "The Triumph of Nationalism" . "Child Labor and the Reform" Mr. Ralph Merriam won tirst place, carrying with it a scholarship for three quarters and S50 in cash. He will represent the University at the annual contest of the Northern Oratorical League at Minneapolis. Mr. Fischel was chosen alternate, securing a schol- arship for two quarters and 525. Miss quarter. Davidson won third place, a scholarship for one I H M 4vfv1s,,5A If Q . gi- ,, I 1 5" as an QQ ga 'fffttt . .MTN '9 5 . , .M R we , A , QUSWGQ3 Wil! e li ll' ,M 6.4! ' qi, ',',,lQ,,,, ,ZAR ,, ' I n A -if M Q T M f P is i itfgiiriita-.arg ' .- X 57,4 'Y df4171lW IU7 I University of Chicago Debating Team Ralph Merriam Albert R. Vail Edga A1,TERN.1.Tr:-Harry J. Lurie Central Debating League J'emi:Final Debate UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN vs. UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO Music Hall, Chicago, January 17, 1905 RESOLVEI1-That party candidates for elective offices within the State should nated by direct vote of the parties. r F. Rile5 be nonii .UIFIRMATIVE NEGATIVE I ilII.Z'El'5I'4lf Qffllllfflllgftlll I '111'z'e1'sz'L1f of C-71l'L'tIQ'0 Benjamin A. Morton Albert R. Vail Edwin J. Kenny Edgar F. Riley Edward G. Hofman Ralph Merriam Decision in favor of the negative. The Annual University Debate Kent Theatre, December 4, 1902 RESOLVED-That party candidates for elective offices within the State should nated by direct vote of the parties. A1-'FIRMATIVE Forest G. Smith Charles V. Clark Albert R. Vail NEGATIVE Ralph Merriam Edgar F. Riley Harry J. Lurie Decision in favor of the negative. IOS be nomi- Class Debating Clubs 4 Jopbomore Debating Team George O. Fairweather Paul A. Walker Vernon C. Beebe Freshman Debating Team Thomas Meek Herbert C. Lust Lester L. Falk ALTERNATE-Edward Kerwin Freshman Debating Club LESTER L. FALK ...... President GR.-XCF: XVILLIAMSON .... Vice President BESSIE C. HOLT . . . Secretary VERNON A. WOODWORTH ..... Treasurer The second Freshman Debating Club of the University was organized last October by Mr. Chandler. Those entrusted with its management during its infancy were: President, Lester L. Falk: Vice President, Miss Grace Williamsong Secretary, Miss Bessie C. Holt, Treasurer, V. A. Woodworth, fifth member of the Executive Committee, Ivan C. Vogt. The object of the club is to foster debating in the Freshman Class, and the members of the club seemed decided to waste as little time as possible to attain this object. At the second meeting of the club the constitution was adopted, and four mem- bers of the club engaged in a spirited debate. This meeting bore out the promise of the first, it showed that there was an interest in debating in the Freshman class, and that the members of the club were determined to make the Debating Club a useful reality and not a fanciful dream. One of the first evidences of the Freshmen's power in debating was manifested in a joint debate with the Sophomores, in which the Freshmen were successful. Mr. Joseph Lewinsohn and Miss Bessie C. Holt represented the Freshmen in this contest. Early in the spring quarter the annual Freshman-Sophomore formal debate is slated. The Fresh- man team, consisting of Thomas Meek, H. C. Lust and Lester L. Falk, was selected by competitive trial, similar,to the trial for the 'Varsity team. From the past experience of the Freshmen Debating Clubs we may well say that these clubs have come to stay. Jopflomore Debating Club Among the many recent manifestations of increased interest in University debating, the progress made by the Sophomore Debating Club is not the least important. Organ- ized by the members of the Class of 1905 in the winter of 1902, the society. after com- pleting a brilliant career as the "Freshman Debating Club," perpetuated itself by the formation of a Sophomore organization. With this change came a new Freshman Club, the membership of which is composed of '06 students. Thus the plan devised by Mr. Henry Porter Chandler, for maintaining a "debating spirit" in the Junior colleges, was realized in its completeness for the first time. The past history of the club is a record of earnest effort, punctuated by occasional departures from its routine path into enlarged fields of activity. The club, which met every week in its first year, now has regular semi-monthly meetings, at which prepared debates are heard. These contests are characterized more by an attempt to sift the evidence and present sound argument than by a struggle to master oratorical ability: but the force of persuasion, of course, is always sought in addition to the weight of logic. Current topics in politics, literature and science furnish interesting questions for the "verbal battles," and not infrequently subjects of local color that concern themselves with University matters afford appropriate resolutions for debate. Under the auspices of this club a Freshman team was chosen to meet the Sophomores in debate last year. It is worthy of note that the three Freshman debaters who were chosen-George O. Fairweather, Paul A. XValker and Leo F. Wormser-were all mem- bers ofthe clubg a fact that seems to argue well in behalf of the work which the club did, since its members were successful in competition against other Freshman debaters who were 11ot members of the club In this connection Mr. Chandler deserves praise as one who is not only largely responsible for the formation of the club, but who also has aided its every undertaking. Junior College Finals a Jp ring, 1902 Pl'l'lI'I'lld7Itf ll '. HTA' H'i:e C. S. Jennison St'lZUftlI'ShIf5 Fannie Benson G. O. Fairweather C. S. jennison F. O. Torxney M QThe Summer Declamation Contest has been discontinued.j M' Autumn, 1902 f'2'1'Cll1'lIlI1Id' I1 '. l?fk l'1'1':0 Thomas J. Meek 5l'fI0flII'ShI77S Paul A. Walker Amelia B. Ganser Thomas J. Meek Schuyler B. Terry Winter, 1903 1 - N E'l'tf1'1IlIl1tf W. llffk l'1'1',:'z' ' 3 Paul A. Walker Leo F. Worniser 1 lf '1':C D1'z'1'dr'dJ 1 f 4 Sl'fI0fll1'5h ips X lL 1 l Joseph L, Lewinsohn Albert J. Hopkins, jr. M.. .J x i I Charles C. Parsons XY. H. Hatfield 7 6 ' X ' f n W 4 4, f wma. , . lil 12 3 l-Luiiep ir 'ul "1-lilikl IIO J'emi:Official Clubs J BOTANICAL CLUB PHILOLOGICAL SOCIETY ENGLISH CLUB ROMANCE CLUB PEDAGOGICAL CLUB PHYSICS CLUB MEDICAL CLUB GEOLOGICAL CLUB NEW' TESTAMENT CLVB CHURCH HISTORY CLUB GERMAN CONYERSATIONAL CLUB GERMANIC CLUB SPANISH CLUB BACTERIOLOGICAL CLUB THEOLOGICAL CLVB ZOOLOGICAL CLUB ZOOLOGICAL JOURNAL CLUB HISTORICAL CLUB POLITICAL SCIENCE CLVB SOCIOLOGY CLUB MATH EMATICAL C LUB SEMITIC CLUB .IG x K 1 I g AX C 3 'nhnfmav , . 6. u-:"'f5'0 I1 X I 4 W1 W 1 Tjqh YN , N X v I I 7fu V .f W xx' Lincoln House E DR. NATHANIEL BUTLER . Head JAMES XVRIGHT LAWRIE . . Vice Head AMORY RAYMOND IWITCHELL . Secretary XVILLIS STOSE HILPERT . . Treasurer Henry S. Davidson Harry O. Gillette Howard Woodhead Frederick D. Bramllall Bertram G. Nelson Lynne J. Bevan Hayward D. Warner john A. Black Edward L. Cornell Francis F. J. Tische Ralph Merriam Sherlock B. Gass Benjamin W. Robinson Edmund T. H. Schmidt Vernon C. Beebe Eugene B. Bliss Dudley K. French Howard L. Willett Paul T. Ramsey Patron esses Mrs. W. R. Linn Mrs. Nathaniel Butler Mrs. J. H. Boyd Mrs. George E. Vincent II2 I-ISDOH N'IODNI'I Washington House D DR. EDWIN ERLE SPARKS . J. J. VOLLERSTON T. R. WAKELEX' C. H. SWIFT G. A. Barker N. A. Fuessle H. S. Klein E. Klein . . VV. Friend C. H. Grabo J. L. Lewinsohn E. L. Quinn M. C. Lipman . Head Vice Head Secretary Treasurer F. L. Griiiin G. B. Hallet L. Klein M. B. Louer O. H. Sample J. J. Oppenheim F. J. Seiter H. B. Street H. F. MacNeish F. C. Meucl J. D. Steele II4 F. F. Stephens C. D. Taylor B. F. Ullman HSHOH NOLSNIHSVM Jpelman House U Inorassoa EDXVARD CAPPS . . . House Councilor Active Members Marian Biegler Gladys Bray Florence Goddard Harriet Going Gertrude Kuehne Faith Latimer Geneva Misener Mary Murphy Jennie Rattray Josette Spink Esther Salter Jennie Thompson Laura Ward Alene Williams Margaret Wilson 116 Head HSHOH NVWTHJS , . .5 f A S C ' ' A I N 1 ' '-' C O n , I v ' Y'- ' -0 . v .- 'r .,. .I : 4.- ' , H . 1 w Y Y . 1 j,1"' s " " ' ' . -. ' ' ' f:l .fl Ag .,-s fy 1:4 I 1' V " V',,' .2 -. x 5- . . -45 1 'a ll t Q1 -, ' Jia I lt A. ,yy -4: YI Ff ,Q-. V K, X I v. r 1 A 'J , 0 , .SQ S A .- . . 1- I u 1 -of ,f ' Alumni Association The University of Chicago M Officers EDXVIN G. COOLEV, '95, Chicago . . President ELIZABETH FAULKNER, '85, Chicago . . Vice Piesident XVILLIAM S. BOND, '97, Chicago . Second Vice President RALPH C. HAMILL. ,99, Chicago . . Third Vice President MAYO FESLER, University of Chicago . . General Secretary Executive Committee 19004903 1901:1904 Harry D. Abells, ,97 Edgar A. Buzzell, '86 Darius R. Leland, '66 Mary Ii. Reddy, '98 Alice Winston, '98 W. France Anderson, '99 1902-1905 Howard P. Kirtley, 'OO Edith M. Kohlsaat, 'Oo . Chas. S. Pike, '96 Officers of Local Clubs Chicago Alumni Club ' DONALD S. TRUMBULL, '97, President HOWARD P. KIRTLEY, 'oo, Secretary Chicago Alumnae Club ANGELINE LOESCH, '98, President IDA T. HIRSCHL, 'Oo, Secretary Eastern Alumni Club FRED P, POWERS, '76, President PAUL MONROP2, Ph. D., 97, Secretary New England Alumni Club CHAS, S. EATON, 'OO, President EARL C. HALES, 'oo, Secretary Nebraska Alumni Club CHAS. H. GORDON, Ph. D., '95, President BELLE VVILSON, Secretary Indianapolis University of Chicago Club H. E. PALMER, President lNlARG.-XRET DONNAN, '02, Secretary V1 University of Chicago Club at Harvard v' CHAS, 5, EATON, President EARL C. HAI.ES, Secretary 119 X 4 . U iz. . . 2 , Q14 N ,..-as -,f4..- .5-ix lgdgggigas . 3 0 n . . f 'Jawa Wise, 1 : 'gf' E 2 fy lwflllf I " 4f'B'f ,,1Zjlut 5 A 1' 7: EK 1 lyfhgg K ' :fQ.ttq:ft.-M. J ' are V W' 'x . .25 NYSE ii 0 cv " K SNA! aa on i . NNN v QU hxyix X I Ga ff A QNQXIQ V ,V i i ' . 1'0" ' Nxt!! XV? Dill Y Naiex as vi Y NWA- N ' 5 7 ? -QNX ' 3355? 1, 6 . AWA. lb Q36 M i U . Q i C, XXX The Chess Club has just entered upon a period of rapid development. It has had two matches with experts from the Chicago Chess Club and more such matches are being arranged. Negotiations are under way to bring about tournaments with the Northwestern and Wisconsin Universities. The Chess Club has a membership of about twenty-five regular players, and some men who only enter into occasional tournaments. It has a room in Graduate Hall where boards and men are kept. The growth of the club and the improvement in the material for a chess team has been marked since the first simultaneous match. Officers FRED R. DAI'I'RICH ........ President ITERMANN I. SCHLESINGER . . . Secretary and Treasurer Members N. A. Fuessla S. E. Stout A. A. English H. F. MacNeish E. R. Smith N. Blair O. R. Sellers F. Hornstein A. E. Layman E. A. Davis W. E. Calley G. D. Birkhoh' J. S. Billikopf F. R. Dapprich S. B. Terry R. T. Chamberlin H. C. Lust H. I. Schlesinger Gbe Catholic Club The Catholic Club was formed in June, igiz, to bring together the Catholic students in the University and Rush Medical College for social and religious purposes. It meets on the second Saturday of each month. There are between forty and fifty members. Officers M. S. lJoN1mANV1I.LE . . . . President M. J. O'lJlIiRN . . . . Vice President MARY K. SYNON . . Secretary Rosie MCHUGH . Treasurer fl! 1r ,V "l5tl"3i 41,5 c HBV? X .xxx She 'sz Us kj wggsgj ' If Cqggav ll f f C422 Established February S, 1901. DR. C. HUGH NEILSON . JOHN W. SCOTT . GEORGE SENN . Chas. lngbert C. Hugh Neilson john W. Scott P. P. Bruce john Adams R. K. Keech Rolvix Harlan C. V. Russell O. XV. Allison Officers Members J. E. Retherford M. A. Chrysler C. J. XVilson XV. XV. Charters . President . Vice President . Secretary W. E. Whaley A. L. Nickerson H. G. XVillard D. IJ. Peele T. L. Comparette Fred H. Tracht G. L. Melton F. W. Leaton C. H. Van Tuyl XX'. E. Fehliman Burton L. French L. G. Yenericli J. A. Jones XX'. R. Hatfield Frank XX'. Metcalf Homer XVoolery Albert Jones XV. S. Bixler F. M. Wilson Geo. Semi l2I .' aw 6341! u fx: Q2 lr ,AVI ' s U W ln mr WBESQ The Canadian Club w U ff . a ll is fr' ' vi W N G Officers L A -"J ' will Z L ALEXANDER SMITH . . Honorary President ff' Fjjtgio Dy WILLIAM B. L. HOWELL . . President f GENEVA NIISENER . . Vice President f 'S lg MARX' E, HAWKINS . , xl , it jp HERBERT EDWVIN JORDAN . , j Councllol-S 5? WERRETT VVALLACE CHARTERS . . Secretary-Treasurer - ttf' 4 4, The Canadian Club is composed of students, instructors and otlicials of the University who are of British birth or parentage. Its objects are to bring its members into social Contact and to fittingly observe Canadian national holidays and events. It has a mem- bership of about sixty, nearly all of whom are in the graduate schools. All the Canadian universities are represented and all the Provinces of Canada, Several members are native-born English or Scotch. Fellows Club U Officers .-XIYcsUs'1'Us RAYMOND HATTON tPo1. Science, . . . President WM. C. GUNNERSON QSanskrit and Indo-Europeanj Vice President CHARLES INGBERT tNeurologyj . ' . . Secretary-Treasurer The Fellows Club was organiied during the Autumn of IQO2. Students appointed Fellows may become members at any time after their appointment by signing the consti- tution of the Club. Persons who have held Fellowships and are still in residence as sfzzdwzfs may become members by a majority vote of all the members of the Club. The purposes of the organization are to promote social intercourse among the Fellows of the Universityg to broaden the outlook of each member by bringing him in Contact with men working in other lines than his own: to give the Fellows such an organization that they may be more useful to the University, to the graduate students and to each other. Meetings are held once each month and are intended to be largely social in character. However, matters relating to graduate study are discussed and such action taken by the Club as seems to be in the interest of graduate students in the University of Chicago and elsewhere. 122 5.01.54 Ly ,Q ""' 'f r' x 99 ' The Jouthern Club 5 H X Z Established 1898 'Qi I WILLIAM GoRsUcH, Virginia . . . President LAETITIA M. SNOXV, Maryland . . Vice President ,Y q':'.,. 5 DANIEL C. WEBB, Tennesee . . . Secretary . WADDY W. BATTLE, Texas . . . . . Treasurer !Y?ikmS,,ti:5fllN'A, JESSII-I L. JONES . . . Corresponding Secretary . iv -it ' 'I YV I fr The Maroon Literary Society gali5,tll,1 I ff tl I Officers for the Winter Quarter, 1903 f A awry! YVILLIAM HARRY lsll-EAD ...... President Q , U41 SYLVESTER VERNON XVILLIAMS . . . Vice President idx- ii'5l2:1'i.'. :XMBROSE VVESLER ARIXIITAGE . . . Recording Secretary R B RUTH ELEANORE SIMONSON Corresponding Secretary M ANNA ALLEN IQELLOGG . . . . Treasurer HAROI.D C. BRUBAKER . Chaplain , 'f ALBERTUS VICTOR SMITH . . Marshall I XJ ' H MARGARET DAVIDSON . . . Literary Critic wtfflf? CHARLES OSCAR THORNBERRY . Parliamentary Critic Active Members Ambrose Wesler Armitage Mrs. Neff Kuyper Bakkers Frederick Denison Bramhall Harold C. Brubaker Charles Arthur Bruce Margaret Davidson Augusta Evelyn Engels Sherlock Bronson Cass XVilliam Harry Head Herman Gustavus Heil Fred Hornstein Charles Andrews Huston George Edwin Ivison Anna Allen Kellogg Edward Michael Kerwin joseph Louis Lewinsohn Theodore Spear Lewis Herbert C. Lust Thomas jones Meek David Derrick Peele Ruth Eleanore Simonson Albertus Victor Smith Paul Steinbrecher Charles Oscar Thornberry Sylvester Vernon XVillianIs. This society was organized during the XVinter Quarter, IQOS. Its purpose is to do the work of a general students' literary society. The founders felt that there was a distinct need for such an organization in the University, and they hoped that it would become a permanent feature of the student activity. Any student of the University is eligible to membership. The aim of the society is to supplement the work of the class room by giving its members not only the practice of writing and reading, speaking, declaiming and debating from the platform, but also the benefit of each other's criticisms. The meetings occur regularly, Friday evenings of each week, and an effort is being made to secure suitable, permanent quarters. An unique feature which is at present under discus- sion, and will probably be adopted is a "chapter of honor." Members who have attained distinction in a literary or oratorical line may be elected with the sanction of a large majority of the other members to the honorary chapter. Such persons are entitled to wear a distinguishing badge of honor and to appear in the annual program. The mem- bership of the society is limited to 4o. I23 7-.E ,I 1-'-0 Q Ghe Young Men's Christian Association U RALPH MERRIAM . . . . Department Secretary WILLIAM J. SHERMAN . . . . . . President PAUL A. WALKER ..... . . Secretary The Cabinet The Department Secretary The President The Secretary PAUL A. WALKER .... Chairman of Committee on Religious Meetings LYNNE J. BEVAN . . . . Chairman of Committee on Membership CARLOS M. DINSMERE . . Chairman of Committee on Mission Study HAYWARD D. WARNER . . . Chairman of Committee on Finance THEODORE B. HINCKLEY . . . Chairman of Committee on Local Events Committee of Management Dr. john M. Coulter, C'hai1'man. Hon. Henry V. Freeman Associate Prof Amos A. Stagg Mr. Harry D. Abells Mr. Charles A Marsh Dr. Nathaniel Butler Mr. William J. Sherman Mr. Edwin B. Smith Mr Walter A. Payne Mr, Paul A. Walker The Association is responsible for the management of Snell Hall, in which are its parlors, club room, and the office of the Department Secretary. Young Women's Christian Association A7 ISABELLE VVEBSTER . . . President BIADGE HOUGHTON . Vice President HELEN FREEMAN . . . Secretary MARTHA TARNOW ..... . . Treasurer Miss FRANCES WILCOX ..... General Secretary Committee Chairmen MADGE HOUGHTON ....... Membership MARY BRISTOL . NELLIE MERRIAM EVELYN HAYDEN DIARTH.-X TARNOW CLARA PRIMBI . BERTH.-X WARREN Prof. Shailer Mathews Dr. john Coulter Mrs. Geo. S. Gooclspeetl Mrs. J. W. Thompson Religious Meetings . Bible Study . Reception Finance . . . . . . . . Missionary . Publication and Intercollegiate Relations Advisory Committee Mrs. L, W. Messer Miss Marion Talbot Miss Gertrude Dudley Miss Anne Reed Miss Miss Miss Miss Davida Harper Isabelle XVebster Martha Tarnow Frances Wilcox The University Jettlement House 4638 Ashland Avenue .0 - ' HE U11iversity Settlement is situated on Ashland Ave., near 47th St., in one of those districts where such an institution is most ., needed, can do most practical good and is at Hrst least appreciated X -the Stockyards' district. Beginning humbly in one modest little are building with but a handful of faithful workers, it has grown until qkmfut' . ' now, occupying the whole of four flats, it is really what the name indicates-a Settlement-a little center for higher social, civic and indirectly a higher religious life. The principal work of the Settlement is carried on in two buildings, the Settlement House and the Gymnasium. At the House live the main workers, about eight in num- ber, all of whom pay their own board, and are expected to remain at least six months. Here also meet some of the classes in English and composition, as well as some of the musical clubs, but most of the active work is carried on at the Gymnasium. The Gymnasium, on Gross Ave., near 47th St., is simply a neighborhood club house, a common meeting place for people of all nationalities and creeds on a common brotherly footing, aplatform for free discussion of all labor and social problems, and a place for recreation of mind and body. An attempt is made in the many opportunities offered to reach all classes of people, from the lowest up, irrespective of creed, social standing or intellectual ability, to aid them, interest them, cheer them, and above all, to give them a chance for self advancement. It is a most delicate task, and one requiring pluck and energy, and a never ending supply of patience. As a result many kinds of classes and clubs have been organized, both for old and young, men and women. There are classes in music: The Mandolin Orchestra, Children's Chorus, Sky Lark Chorus and the Orpheus Chorus. There are classes in manual train- ing, design, and dress making. For men and boys athletically inclined there is the Alliance Athletic Club, and the Working Boys' Gymnasium Class. For the girls and women there are two classes in regular gymnastic work, and one in basket ball. The clubs are many and interesting. Among them are: The Little Neighbors' Club, the Recreation Club, the Bohemian Mothers' Club and the Children's Hour. No person can become a member of more than one club, and each club n1ust have some educational end in view, with one purely social evening, not more than once a month. Of late a class of people have been reached which never could before be touched, the girls who work in the Packing Houses in the Stockyards. These girls started a Labor Union about a year ago with a mere handful, and now that same Union is 975 strong, meeting at the Gymnasium. In connection with the settlement, but not supported directly by it, are several affiliated interests. For instance, at the Gymnasium, the Public Library has a station, at 48th St. and Ashland Ave. is a dispensary with two women physicians in charge. Perhaps the reader wonders where the money comes from for the support of the Institution, and the query is easily answered. The Gymnasium cost about fl I,OOO, and was the gift ofa few Chicago men and women. The expense of lighting and heating the Gymnasium does not devolve upon any one person, for each class pays its own share of the heating and lighting from a very small monthly fee. The expense of the rent, heat, light, and salary of the head president, Miss McDowell, and the janitor is met by the University of Chicago Settlement Board from voluntary contribution. Almost all the instructors are University students who contribute their services. No one can estimate the length, and breadth and strength of the work that is being done in that district, and of the good being done. It is surely G0d's own labor, and as such should have all the support we can give it. Glue Woman's Union MONG all the student organizations at the University none has ever been so far reaching in its benefits, so practical in its advantages and so democratic in spirit as the Womanls Union, organized in january. 1902, "to unite the women of the University for the promotion of their common interests," Starting with a mere handful of faithful and enthusiastic workers, including both students and women of the Faculty, the membership has grown until now the books show a list of almost four hundred, and names are being constantly added. But the success of the Union is not measured or represented by the length of its registration alone, for the benefits derived from membership are varied and along several lines. Formerly all women connected with the University who did not live at the Halls or near the Campus brought their lunches with them, and the only accommodations for eating them or for resting were in the cloak rooms and recitation rooms. Now all that is changed. In the Union Rooms, which are at Lexington Hall, the new Woman's build- ing. on Lexington Avenue, lunch is served every day from 12:00 to 2:00 p. m., and for a moderate sum, soup, chocolate, sandwiches, fruit cake and pickles may be obtained. Other special accommodations are a rest room and reading room, in which may be found the daily paper and all the late magazines. Here, every day, from fifty to a hundred girls meet to eat, and chat, and rest. It is one of the unwritten laws of the Union that no stranger be allowed to eat luncheon alone, so that the Union, while offering material advantages, is also doing a great work along another much needed line. It is fostering and developing a spirit of equality and democracy which gives promise of a bright future. Other attractions are the informal receptions held every Wednesday afternoon, at which there is always some special feature, and where, over a cup of tea, the girls have a chance for many a delightful chat with women of the hour. Thus the girls enjoy not only the advantage of becoming acquainted with each other, but also the privilege of meeting the wives of the Faculty and other women, A word as to the management of the Union. The rooms are open daily from 8:00 a. m to 6:00 p in., and during these hours a woman custodian is always in attendance. The actual work of the Union is carried on chiefiy by committees organized under chair- men, and the chairmen of these various committees, together with the president, vice president, treasurer and secretary, meet as a council which transacts the general business '7 6 F25 i i of the Union. At the annual election held on january 14, IQO3, the following ofhcers were for 1903: Miss M. TALBOT . . . . . President Miss C. CoMsTocK . . Vice President Miss M. RICHARDSON . .... Secretary Miss R. HARDY ......... Treasurer MISS G. DUDLEY .... Chairman of House Committee Miss S. R. BRECKINRIDGE . Chairman of Membership Committee Miss T. B. WEIL . . . Chairman of Hospitality Committee Miss ISABEL WEBSTER . . Chairman of Finance Committee Miss FRANCES TAUSSIG . Chairman of Philanthropic Committee MRS. R. G. MOULTON . . Chairman of Music Committee MRs. C. KINSLEX' . . Chairman of Lunch Room Committee elected One of the most important and effective committees is the Philanthropic Committee, whose work is organized along three lines. In the first place, it attempts to administer, as far as possible, to all of the community of the University who are ill or in distress. In the second place it tries to furnish workers for the University Settlement. It was especially of service along this line during the summer months, and its efforts are being directed at present toward awakening an interest among the members of the Union in behalf of the Consumers' League. Along business lines the Union has not only been self-supporting, but has to its credit in the bank a sum amounting to 326773. Miss M. Richardson, in her annual report, summed it up well when she said: "It has given us a sympathy for one another, and has brought us closer together. Nor by 'us' do I mean the girls who have always known each other, but the members of the Union, friends and strangers alike." The Jtudent Volunteer Band Of the University of Chicago qgpqiifiiteifaq Qfgg g -3-4443 , , . . . . 'f-. K . - fu HE Student Volunteer Band of the Lniversity of Chicago is one of the ' many Organizations of its kind scattered throughout the various schools I , of this city, and found in the many universities, colleges, and profes- -- .. sional schools in the country at large, The ritual which binds these A fi bands together is this motto: "The Evangelization ofthe World in A U A this Generation." Membership in the Band as it exists at the University is eligible this purpose in life: "It is 1ny purpose, if God permits, to become a " There are at present twelve members i11 the University. Meetings are held on every second week at which times programs are rendered that are intended to be of individual benefit in strengthening the convictions and enlarging the plans for the future life-work, and of mutual benefit in consolidating the work as it may be carried on now at the University. The Band is especially desirous of presenting itself favorably to all those who have not yet decided upon their life-Work and are interested, with earnest purpose, in this world wide movement. In the near future a movement may be started to select and support a missionary who will represent the University of Chicago in the foreign field. to all those having foreign missionary. Members flfisses Margaret C. Davis H. F. Frances M. Wilcox C. M. Della Gandy D. R. Louise Scrirnge S. A. Clara L. Primm W. J. R. H. Jllessrs. Rudd Dinsmore Wickes Boggs Eyles Goheen Jcholarships for Excellence in Preparatory Work For the Morgan Park .Academy JAMES DVVIGHT DICKERSON For Affiliated Jchools Doing Preparatory Work Chicago Manual Training School ...... Dearborn Seminary Princeton-Yale School . .r I Wayland Academy QColby Scholarshipsj . . Q Austin . Calumet . Englewood Hyde Park . jefferson . Lake . . Lake View . john Marshall . Robt. A. VValler Northwest Division South Division . South Chicago . For the Chicago High Jchools NORlNI.AN A. CARROLL FLORENCE SHUTZ F. E. WILLARD ALLAN P. JOHNSTON ABBIE F. LEARNED EVA R. PRICE ERWIN SCHERUBEL WINFIELD S. SMART EVA C. ERSKINE MVRTLE MCLELLAN BESSIE ROSE ELLA MAV JONES MARION R. KELLOGG ELEAZAR MYERS BESSIE C. HOLT DOROTHY VISHER BESSIE ROBERTSON HANNAH FRANK FLORENCE ELLIOTT WM. E. WRATHER Co:OperatitJe Schools Outside of Chicago Bloomington High School fIll.j . . Blue Island High School fIll.j . Dayton High School lOhiol . Denver High School fColo.l Elgin High School QIll.j . . Ft. Scott High School fKan Q . Goshen High School QInd.l . Helena High School fMont.l . Kansas City High School lMo.j . LaPorte High School QInd.J . . Louisville lGirlSj High School tKy.j Lyons Township High School 1111.9 . Moline High School 1111.1 . . Pueblo Central High School CColo.J . Richmond High School fInd.l . Rock Island High School fIll.J . St. joseph High School lMich.J St. Mary's Hall, QMinn.J . . South Bend High School fInd.j Wheaton High School 1111.1 . . Auburn High School QInd.j . . i . Aurora fEast Sidel High School QIl1.J . Aurora CWeSt Sidej High School Qlll.j . I . . . . CLINTON J. DAYISSON ,LAURA WHITE . JOHN YVORLEY, JR. EVALINE I'. DONVNING . ROY W. BABCOCK ETHEL HALL ' lTHOs. B. TAYLOR - PAUL H. DODGE ALVIS FISKE . CHAS. A. BRUCE ETHEL HAGGARD . EVA KAHN ANNA J. ENKE . ETTA BEAL 15 ISA L. REED lJAS A. EDMUNDSON . MAY BURKE . ANNIE MONTGOMERX' 1 ZENIA BROWN lPEARL FOLTZ DOROTHY R. MILES . WINIFRED E. MACK ROWENA BREWSTER . WM. J. CUPPING . . BURTON GALE . . . GRACE HOWARD Jelz Jcholarship CJUNIOR COLLEGESJ Myrtle Irene Starbird Anna Pritchett Youngman A Scholarship in the SENIOR COLLEGES for excellence in the work of the junior Colleges is awarded to each of the following students 1 EDWARD EAGLE BROWN . . . . . . Political Economy FRANK WALBRIDGE DEWOLF . Geology GEORGE EDMESTON FAHR . Chemistry ANNA GOLDSTEIN . . German AGNES BURNETT MACNEISH Mathematics RALPH MERRIABI . . . History CASH ALBERTUS NEWKIRK . English MILTON GEORGE GUSTAVUS SILLS . . . . . . Philosophy MYRTLE IRENE STARBIRD . Greek BERTHOLD LoUIs ULLMAN . Latin GEORGE WINCHESTER . . Physics A Scholarship in the GRADUATE SCHOOLS for excellence in the work of the Senior Colleges is awarded to each of the following students . JOSEPH BAER . . . Physiology MINNIE ADA BECKNVITH . Latin FREDERICK DENNISON BRAMHALL . . . . . . . History EMILY ELISABETH DOBBIN Astronomy EVELYN SHEWELL HAYDEN . Physics JENNIE E. RATTRAY . . . Latin ROBT. H. GOHEEN . . . Medicine GEO. L. MELTON . . History HARRY CLAYTON LEEMON . . . . . . Political Economy HARRIS FRANKLIN MACNEISH . . SIDNEY KLEIN . . . Anatomy ..... Mathematics ANTHONY L. UNDERHILL Mathematics DAVID ALLAN ROBINSON . Greek A. S. OLIVER .... Medicine WALTER GEORGE SACKETT Bacteriology GIDEON BENSON . . . Medicine LYDIA MARIE SCHMIDT . . German MYRTLE IRENE GIBSON . . Greek Additional Scholarships awarded to students of the SENIOR COLLEGES. Charlotte D. Smith Theodore B. Hinckley Chas. M. Steele Albert R. Vail Milton J. Davies Fannie Fisch Alice M. Rohde Arthur G. Thomas Hannah V. Ryan Ralph S. Starbird Additional Scholarships awarded to students in the GRADUATE SCHOOLS z Margaret Davidson Luella M. Sloan Lee Osborne Scott Blanche Watkins Scholarships awarded to Students of the LAW SCHOOL 1 John R. Cochran Geo. P. Hambrecht Wm. R. Jayne Walter A. Lybrand Forrest G. Smith Jtudent Councilors U Graduate Council ADAM FREEMAN HENDRIX ...... Chairman Jessie Allen Augustus Raymond Hatton Charles Andrews Huston Charles Ingbert Divinity Council ARTHUR FRANCIS PURKISS ...... Chairman Eugene O. Neubauer Albert Sherwood Wilson Albert Eugene Patch John M. Linden Harry Booth Hazen Eudorus Neander Bell Raymond Griiiith Pierson Herbert Ferley Rudd Jenior College Jpring Quarter 1902 LEEs BALLINGER ..... . Chairman H. D. WARNER ...... . Secretary J. W. Bingham Oscar Olin Hamilton Benjamin Griffin Lee Edith -I. Harding VV. R. Kerr, jr. M. B. Pratt Douglas Sutherland C. M. Hogeland Frank McNair Jummer Quarter 1902 BENJAMIN GRIFFIN LEE . ,,.,. Chairman LAURETTA IRENE OCTIGAN . . . . . Secretary Oscar Olin Hamilton Edith J. Harding W. R. Kerr, jr. M. B. Pratt Henry Ernest Smith Hedwig Loeb - Arthur George Thomas Frederick Arthur Fischel john Henry Heinen Autumn .Quarter 1902 ARTHUR GEORGE THOMAS ...... Chairman LAURETTA IRENE OCTIGAN . . . . . Secretary Edith Shaffer Stephen Reid Capps, jr. Frank McNair Narcissa Cox Robert Spring Butler Harry William Getz Hedwig Loeb Frederick Arthur Fischel john Henry Heinen Winter .Quarter 1903 ROBERT SPRING BUTLER . . . . . Chairman LAURETTA IRENE OCTIGAN . . . . Secretary Arthur G. Thomas Edith Barnard F. A. Fischel T. B. Hinckley Frank Adams Harry William Getz Frank McNair Stephen Reid Capps, Jr. Alfred Burnham IZQ Jtudent Councilors a Junior College .Spring Quarter 1902 RALPH NETTLETON . ELLA GARRIGUE Sophia Berger C. M. Steele A. T. Stewart L. W. Maxwell G. E. Goodrich Walter johnson S. F. Fellows L. A. Hopkins Harry W. Getz Jammer Quarter 1902 CHARLES MOORE STEELE .... JULIAN LAFAYETTE BRODE . . Sophia Berger A. T. Stewart L. W. Maxwell G. E. Goodrich Ralph Nettleton Theodore Ballou Hinckley Walter W. Hamburger Henry D. Sulcer Herman Gustavus Heil Joseph Louis Lewinsohn .Autumn Quarter 1902 HENRY D. SULCER CORINNE CAMPBELL William F. johnson Robert H. Murray Strong Vincent Norton Lillian Ethel Vaughn Arthur H. johnson julian LaFayette Brode Herman Gustavus Heil joseph Louis Lewinsohn Winter .Quarter 1903 ADELBERT T. STEWART .... STRONG VINCENT NORTON .... Robert H. Murray Lillian Vaughn Arthur H. johnson Eli P. Gale joseph L. Lewinsohn Martha Powell 13,0 Chairman Secretary Chairman Secretary Chairman Secretary Chairman Secretary University Houses a SOUTH DIVINITY HOUSE E. B. Hulbert, Councilor XV. C. Kierstead, Head MIDDLE DIVINITY John W. Moncrief, Councilor T. W. Noon, Head GRADUATE HOUSE lN0rth Hallj james Westfall Thompson, Councilor H. J. Davenport, Head SNELL HOUSE Dr. I. E. Rayroft, Councilor 1 A. R. Hatton, Head BEECHER HOUSE F. J. Miller, Councilor Elizabeth Wallace, Head KELLY HOUSE G. S. Goodspeed, Councilor Miss Robertson, Head NANCY FOSTER HOUSE F. I. Carpenter, Councilor Myra Reynolds, Head HITCHCOCK XVilliam G. Hale, Councilor A. K. Parker, Head A. S. Underhill, Assistant Head LINCOLN HOUSE Professor Nathaniel Butler, Head WASHINGTON HOUSE E. E. Sparks, Councilor F. R. Moulton, Head SPELMAN HOUSE Edward Capps, Councilor Gertrude Dudley, Head GREEN HOUSE Henry H. Donaldson, Councilor Marion Talbot, Head ISI MAROON HEIGHTS QFifth Floor, Middle Divinityj William R. Harper, Cou11cilor W. E. XVhaley, Head DELTA KAPPA EPSILON, 5754 Woodlawn Avenue J. R. Angell, Councilor Shailer Mathews, Head PHI KAPPA PSI, 5635 Lexington Avenue George L. Hendrickson, Councilor D. J. Lingle, Head BETA THETA PI. 5805 XVasl1ington Avenue F. XV. Shepardson, Councilor XVilliam Bishop Owen, Head ALPHA DELTA PHI G. S. Goodspeed, Councilor I. E. Raycroit, Head SIGMA CHI, 5723 XVashington Avenue S H. Clark, Councilor Newman Miller, Head PHI DELTA THETA, 5719 Monroe Avenue john W. Moncrief, Councilor Bruce McLeisl1, Head PSI UPSILON, 6106 Woodlawn Avenue Robert Francis Harper, Councilor George C. Howland, Head DELTA TAU DELTA, 5731 Monroe Avenue Alexander Smith, Head CHI PSI, 6028 Kimbark Avenue XValter A. Payne, Councilor H. E. Fleming, Head DELTA UPSILON, 6018 Kinilmark Avenue R. W1 Lovett, Councilor james Westfall Thompson, Head PHI GAMMA DELTA, 341 East Fifty-third Street john M. Coulter, Councilor XVilbur S. Jackman, Head PHI ALPHA DELTA, 5702 Drexel Avenue William R. Kercher, Head SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON, 6118 Lexington Avenue A. R. Hatton, Councilor F. G. Smith, Head PHI RHO SIGMA, 5657 Washington Avenue E. P. Lyons, Councilor E. F. Ingalls, Head 13,2 The Cap and Gown Lb , if V44 gf sm' 1 J, , The Cap and Gown 4 Managing Editors Arthur Evarts Lord ..... Howard james Sloan Business Managers Aclelbert Turner Stewart . . . . Henry Davis Fellows Associate Editors Frank Ramsay Adams Edward Reid Ferriss Mabel Narcissa Cox Frederick Arthur Fischel Dorothy Duncan Newman Lee Fitzhenry Samuel Francis Fellows Eli Pike Gale Earle Fleming Theodore Ballon Hinckley Gaston Burr Hallet George Pullen jackson Walter Murray johnson Roy Dee Keehn Harry Ingle Raymond, jr. Marie Anna Lamb Grace Reddy George McHenry Grace Warren Max Louis Mendel John Henry XVeddel1 Lauretta Irene Octigan Oliver Brown Wyman 135 Official Publications JSI Periodicals THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SEMITIC LANGVAGES AND THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF THEOLOGY THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL THE BIBLICAL WORLD THE BOTANICAL GAZETTE THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER AND THE COUR THE JOURNAL OF GEOLOGY THE JOURNAL OF POLITICAL ECONOMY TI I, I I, A Iwipyfligf, 3 THE MANUAL TRAINING MAGAZINE AS .I ' GTI? iii HSN AL, .R H ' K . U ' THE SCHOOL REVIEW . I 'ii .fl i TI-IE UNIVERSITY RECORD ax I I JY' 136 LITERATURES SE OF STUDY EIJITORIAL BOARD, SUMMER IQO2 The University of Chicago Weekly Jpring, 1902 Board of Editors DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND, '02 .... Managing Editor MILTON G. SILLs, '04 ..... Associate Editor BYRON G. MOON ..... Business Manager Assistant Editors W. R. Kerr, jr., 'O3 H. lVilkiI1sOn Ford, 'O4 Robert L. Henry, Jr., '02 Leon P. Lewis, '02 Oliver B. XVyman Women Editors Miss Cornelia Smith, '02 Miss Corinne Campbell, '05 Jammer, 1902 Board of Editors ROBERT L. HENRY, IR., 'O2 . . . Managing Editor H. VVILKINSON FORD, '04 . . Associate Editor BYRON G. MOON ..... Business Manager Charles R. Howe, '05 Assistant Editors Charles M. Steele, '04 Samuel Fellows, '04 I Women Editors Francis D. Campau, '03 ulian L. Brode Miss Lauretta Octigan, '04 Miss Grace Reddy, 'O4 T37 fx The University of Chicago Weekly U Decennial Joutlenir Edited By ROBERT L. HENRY, JR. CHARi.rgs W. COLLINS Publisher BYRON G. MOON The University of Chicago Weekly, which was founded October 1, ISQ2, the day the University opened its class rooms, and which served as H11 outlet for student journal- istic and literary ambition for ten years, closed its career October 1, 1902, to make room for its successors, the Daily and Monthly Maroon. The means it chose of making an end were, however, worthy of its long and honorable career and a fitting way of cele- brating its tenth and last birthday. It was, naturally enough, with a souvenir issue that the Weekly passed away-a Decennial Souvenir, containing IOS pages of reading matter and cuts, handsomely made up and carefully edited, chronicling the history of the University and of the VVeekly from the beginning. The Souvenir was planned and edited by Robert L. Henry, jr., 'O2, managing editor of the Weekly during the summer quarter, '02, and Charles VV. Collins, '03, managing editor of the Weekly during the winter quarter, 'O2, while Byron G. Moon, business manager and owner of the W'eekly, acted as business manager and publisher. The book was divided into six sections, each of which was profusely illustrated, viz: A history of the genesis of the University and Campus, description of each of the buildings, biograph- ical sketches of prominent members of the Faculty, a history of the Weeklyg student activities, and afliliated institutions. 3 0 54 1 I ' H L .II 4 A. L im 1, s Las ,ot .si .ii 4, 4 v. 1. I t l!Qi -it - J a 'G'-IF . O' Ri' --'S Y 4 - ?2::!w2"' f- .2-' in C., R65 i ' if T 1 O jg, g- eg , x T A . 'ie tfw The Daily Maroon .-'S' AW-. JRS Q., 1-4 -4 ,- -. -L. ARI! BO TH E The Founding of the Daily Maroon E Board of Editors HERBERT Ii. FLEMING ..... Managing Editor OLIVER B. XVYMAN . . News Editor ROBERT L. HENRX' Athletic Editor Associate Editors Francis F. Tische Frank McNair Eli P. Gale Austin A. Hayden Adelbert T. Stewart Frank R. Adams Walter L. Gregory Women Editors Miss Cornelia Smith Miss Agnes Wayman Jtaff of Reporters Thaddeus I. Merrill Ernest J. Stevens Albert W. Sherer Ralph P. Mulvane Eugene Kline Edward M. Kerwin Leroy A. Van Patten Edgar Ewing E. D. F. Butterfield Miss Lena Harris Miss Ella R. Metsker Charles L. Darst Business Staff The Daily Maroon The Monthly Maroon BYRON G. MOON . . . . Business Manager JULIAN R. BRODE . Assistant Business Manager PLATT M. CONRAD . . Advertising Manager J. W. SWIFT . . . . . . Rush Medic Manager . " The Daily Maroon, Founded October 1, 1902" , fbdmi i HESE words, standing at the head of the editorial column in the University of Chicago newspaper which has been published every University day si11ce the opening of the autumn quarter, record the inauguration of a student activity which is quite generally considered to be the most universal in interest established during the University year. The Daily Maroon has come as the result of a de111and felt and expressed with growing force ever since the founding of the University. This is the need for some medium through which the varied interests in the institution may find expression and the many groups within the Quadrangle com- munity brought together in a common feeling of University solidarity. Three attempts to meet this demand have been made in past years. The Hrst daily, named The University News, appeared October 17, I892, and continued nearly until the close of the University's first year, suspending publication April 19, 1893. The second effort was undertaken by means of a tri-weekly. In adopting the University color as the name for that paper-The Maroon-the publishers made a contribution which has come down to the publications of the present day. The first appearance of the tri-weekly took place on May 15, 1895, and its last on March 20, 1896. The third endeavor was made in 1 it -4 34 X -41 ve ggi, h I4I the spring of 1900, when an attractive newspaper called The Daily Maroon was published from May 7th to gthg suspended by the Faculty Board of Student Organizations, resumed publication May 2Ist: and discontinued june 19th. During that spring most of the men who have shared in establishing The Daily Maroon of today were in college, and the present managing editor and one of the associate editors were appointees on the reportorial staff of the attempted publication. Consequently the experiences in connection with that endeavor have proved to be valuable lessons. The paper, edited and owned by Earl D. Howard, '02, was so popular that the universality of the demand for a daily was emphasized. The temporary suspension, justified because the editors were duped into printing a supposed scandal, has fixed for University of Chicago student-publishers the principle which assures daily loyalty to the best interests of their Alma Mater. All three of the attempts enforced the vital point that to live the daily must be thoroughly organized on a business basis and as a student activity. The immediate movement which has resulted in The Daily Maroon, now established, originated during the fall quarter of Igor, At that time Herbert E. Fleming, '02, Uni- versity correspondent for one of the city papers, and managing editor of the University Weekly for that quarter, proposed to Byron G. Moon, business manager and owner of The Weekly that some plan be devised for developing The Weekly into a daily newspaper and a monthly literary magazine. They prepared separate documents containing sugges- tions and together submitted them to President Harper. Both stated that some scheme of business management which would insure stability was the imperative requirement. The managing editor suggested ofiicial University business management, such as is carried out successfully in student athletics. The business manager proposed that the University grant a subsidy. These proposals were sent by the President to the Board of Student Organizations, A thorough faculty discussion followed. Professors who had been editors of student papers at Yale, Harvard and other institutions gave many valuable suggestions. The result of the discussion was a definite expression of the sentiment that the University must never officially subsidize the organ for student opinion nor exercise a censorship over it. The papers were withdrawn and the movement was apparently dropped. Toward the close of the winter quarter in that year, however, ten men, on invitation from Mr. Fleming, joined in a determination to undertake the financial and editorial responsibility for publishing a daily newspaper during the next college year provided the student-body would give them authority to do so. These men were: Herbert E. Fleming, '02, Robert L. Henry, Jr., '02g Charles W. Collins, '03, Walker G. McLaury, '03, Harry W. Ford, '04, Oliver B. Wyman, 'o4g Frank McNair, '03g Francis F. Tische, '03, john F. Adams, Medic, Adelbert T. Stewart, 'o4. They posted notices calling a mass meeting to be held May 15, "for the organization ofa new student activity." The object of the proposed mass meeting was explained to the Seniors by Mr. Fleming, the class president, and the ,O2'S were the first to go on record for the project. They unanimously adopted a resolution to attend the mass meeting as a class. The notice aroused considerable curiosity as the day for the meeting was approached. I Q 1 - In the meantime Mr. Moon had been working individually on plans. He had asso- ciated with himself Platt M. Conrad, '03, and julian L. Brode, '05, in a stock company organized for the purpose of expanding The Weekly into a daily and monthly. Hence there were two movements on foot simultaneously but without avowed antagonism From time to time, President Harper had shown great interest in suggestions for a daily. He had promised to attend the mass meeting and had been announced as one of the speakers. On the day before the meeting he invited Mr. Fleming and Mr. Moon to his office and pointed out the evident advantages of combination. CQPY5 . The obstacle to be overcome lay in the fact that the ownership of mfs., ",, I The XVeekly was vested in Mr. Moon, who had a Considerable sum of capital Clogs- ' 142 ' W ' ,ll involved. In the early days of the University, it had been found advisable to permit the sys- tem of private ownership for The Weekly. The ten men working for the establishment ofa daily held that the student body as a whole should own its publications, and they were un- willing to buy The VVeekly. But it was known to them that for some time Mayo Fesler, Secretary of the Alumni Association, had thought of proposing Alumni responsibility for a daily. He was appealed to as the man holding the key to the situation. Mr. Fesler expressed the belief that the Alumni Association would purchase The Weekly from Mr. Moon. The mass meeting was held the next day, May I5, as announced. The students filled Kent theatre to the doors. They adopted a resolution offered by Allan Burns, the cheer leader. Bv this resolution, the student-body requested the Alumni Association to pur- chase The Weeklyg gave the ten men who had called the meeting and Roy D. K66hU,'O2, and Eli P. Gale, '03, whose names had been added to the list, authority to become the board of editors for the publications during one year and to select their successors on the merit basis, and recommended that the Alumni Association name Mr. Moon as business mana er. Tfiiis plan did not meet with favor among the Alumni, but its tentative consideration served as the means for progress in the movement. On Alumni Day, a Committee of Fifteen was appointed by the Association to consider the plan. Toward the end of the summer quarter, after many meetings, this committee was about to send out to the Alumni membership an adverse recommendation. Mr Moon thereupon withdrew his proposition to the Association and made a .generous offerito the board of editors, in this proposal he assumed the risk of regaining his invested capital from possible net profits to be earned by the proposed publications during the first two years. On july 31, with Henry Gale, '96, of the Alumni committee acting as advisor, Mr. Moon and Mr. Fleming, representing the editors, framed and signed an agreement which is the working basis for The Daily Maroon and The Monthly Maroon. This provides that the publications are the property of the student-body, held in trust by the combined board of editors and the business manager. The financial responsibility is equally divided between the business manager and the board. The agreement provides explicitly that future boards of editors shall be selected on the merit basis, after competition open to all students in the University. This board through an auditing committee, has access to the books, and elects the business manager, the retiring business manager nominating. With the execution of this agreement The Daily Maroon and The Monthly Maroon are self- supporting student activities. The first election was held and a general plan of editorial organization adopted at a meeting of the board june 13. Mr. Keehn and Mr. Collins were elected executive editors for The Monthly, severing editorial connection with The Daily, The first executive editors elected for The Daily Maroon were: Herbert E. Fleming, managing editorg Harry W. Ford, news editor, Eli P. Gale, athletic editor. It was provided that the other members should be associate editors. The first seven associate editors were: Robert L. Henry, Jr., XValker G. McLaury, Oliver B. Wyman, Frank McNair, Francis F. Tische, Adelbert T. Stewart and john F. Adams. In September Mr. Ford resigned to accept a professional editorial position. Mr. Wyman was elected news editor and Frank R. Adams, ,O4, was elected to the board as associate editor. Mr. Gale resigned as athletic editor but continued as associate editor. Mr. Henry was elected athletic editor. Mr. John F. Adams resigned and Austin A. Hayden, y02, and a junior at Rush Medical College, was elected as associate editor to fill the vacancy. As authorized in the mass meeting, the board provided for representing the women students. Miss Cornelia S. Smith, '03, and Miss Julia M. Hobbs, '03, were elected as the first women editors. During the year several changes have taken place in the personnel of the board. At the opening of the winter quarter, to fill vacancies caused by the resignation of Mr. McLaury and Miss Hobbs, Walter L. Gregory, '05, was elected an associate editor and Miss Agnes Wayman, '03, to be one of the women editors. Volume I, Number I of The Daily Maroon came from the press-room in the new building of The University of Chicago Press at 4 o'clock October Ist. The type-setting and printing have been done at The University Press allyear. Until March I, a force of twelve compositors on the fourth fioor was ready to drop all other work and set type for The Daily Maroon. This spring a linotype and an additional printing press have been added to the equipment of The Press to facilitate publishing the paper. From the first issue the typographical appearance of the paper has attracted very favorable attention. In fact The Daily Maroon has been printed in much better than newspaper style. The 143 arrangements between The Maroon and The University Press are on a strictly business basis, and this fine printing has made the expense of publishing The Daily Maroon greater than that of any university students' newspaper in America. The University has given The Maroon, as a student enterprise, an ofiice at Room 7 on the main fioor of the 1-'ress building, and this has greatly facilitated editorial work. The University has pat- ronized the paper as an advertiser at regular rates, but has not exercised a censorship over it either directly or indirectly. The plan in editorial management has been to adapt the system of metropolitan dailies as far as possible to the conditions in the University field. The general principle has been to have as large a number of workers as possible with a minute division of labor every day. This is urgent because in issuing an afternoon paper the editors have found that all other considerations must give way to the necessity of rushing the copy up stairs. The news editor makes the assignments for general university newsgathering and edits manuscript: the athletic editor does the same for his field and writes editorialized critiques on the athletic situationg the associate editors divide the work of copy-reading- that is, editing manuscript-writing editorials, and conducting departments. The manag- ing editor's duty to co-ordinate these efforts. The special departments have served to give variety to the paper. The "Garg0y- lettes," an editorial page section containing a daily grist of jokes, has attracted a large part of the Maroon's constituency and compares favorably with the best humorous column in the city papers. Mr. Adams has edited this department and contributed the larger part of the "Gargoylettes." Mr. Tische has edited " The News From the Universities," a department which has kept Chicago students in touch with American college life. He has also done the proofreading. Mr Hayden has edited " The Rush Medic Notes," sending news from the West Side so toned as to aid in the incorporation of Rush Medical College student life into that of the University. Mr. Gregory, besides editing manuscript has directed the make-up. Associate Editors Gale, Stewart and McNair have Written editorials and edited copy. Miss Smith has been the Society Editor and Miss Wayman has edited the Women's athletic news. The Majors and Minors and Punts from the Bleachers, departments in The Weekly, have been kept up in The Daily. The members of the first board have united in an endeavor to lay a nrm foundation for building up The Daily Maroon as an institution. To this end they have held weekly board meetings Tuesday afternoons. At these councils each member reports criticisms he has heard from subscribers and makes suggestions. The board's actions on all questions of policy in reference to news and editorials are binding on the executive editors. In order that future boards may have whatever permanent benent these discussions afford, a book of records is kept. Francis F. Tische was elected secretary. Competition for membership on the staff of reporters and the board of editors began with the first day of newsgathering. To increase the interest in this competition the editorial board invented the Maroon star, a small five-pointed button finished in maroon enamel with gold border alld backing. The rule adopted is that any student making the staff of reporters may wear the star during his term as a reporter, and that a reporter winning a place on the board may keep his star It is planned to have an annual social affair for those who have the badge. During the autumn quarter there were twenty candidates whom the editors call Hustlers working to win the star. The staff for each quarter is to be comprised of twelve reporters, at least two of whom shall be women students. Those who won places on the first staff are named in the list at the head of this article. Their stars were formally presented at a Maroon Smoker, held in the Chi Psi Lodge January Io, the first Saturday in the winter quarter. At that time the upper class men on the staff made speeches declaring their determination to continue in the work so that The Daily Maroon shall live. The business manager and his assistants have done effective service. They have found the business men in a well-worked advertising field appreciative of The Daily Maroon as a medium for reaching the students in the University of Chicago world. " The Maroon Daily World" was a name proposed for the journal of today at the time of the sanctioning mass meeting. On further consideration, however, the editors and business manager concluded that they had no fear of the name developed in the experiments of the past. As the paper has gone on in its growth toward the completion of Volume I they have often expressed the conviction that The Daily Maroon will continue to be "Published Afternoons by the Students of the University of Chicago During the Four Quarters of the University year," as long as there are University days and University years. 144 JI -Jai . X fr ' WU I ,wa 1 421 p f, T 11 f ' '- A - ,wa-' , LN 4 TL 'f '- f 'I EiLi" f 7'4" I f 11,41 f , ami, 5f1fbef'f,'?t4 'B' '.e?fa'2rfii -- . ,..fL,'fff.?f' 22:74:12: Ea -I-g"j.lg:!t3 . .,-cr' .' ..,, 1 11-. , -'-L-L-1 - ' - ' f' .' -: ' A ' 'A --, ' ' f 46' Effiffvf ,V 137' , fi 4 X 7 W , .ei Nix' Q g , g ggff ,, s - 'L '-' T221 eg A - 2 gals? sa 3 get ,, R g '3-5? ii .3 f , J- I The Monthly Maroon .U Rox' D. KEEHN . . Editor-in-Chief CHARLES W. COLLINS . , . Associate Editor Assistant Editors DoNAL11 KENNIQOTT CHARLES A. KENT FRANK ADAMS IUAYID A. ROBERTSON ,U ESOLUTIONS giving a committee of thirteen men, chosen for experience in editorial work, authority to proceed with the organization of a daily newspaper and a monthly literary magazine, and to conduct the editorial work of these publi- cations for one year, were passed before the student body, assembled in mass meeting May 151, 1902. The two publications were to be under the same business management, Byron G. Moon, business manager of the University of Chicago VVeekly, being entrusted with that function. The papers were to supplant the Weekly, of which they were the logical outgrowth. A meeting of the joint editorial board was held june 13, 1902, for the purpose of organization and election of officers, Roy D. Keehn, '02, was elected editor-in-chief and Charles W. Collins, '03, associate editor of the magazine. These two men were given authority by the other members of the committee, who preferred to work on the Daily, power to provide for the editorial management of the paper, and to appoint a staff of assistant editors, to be chosen on a merit basis. The two editors began vmork on their 145 first issue, which was to appear in the first week of November, as soon as college opened in the fall. After a long discussion it was decided to call the magazine The Monthly Maroon, in view of its close connection with the Daily, which had already been baptized The Daily Maroon. The first issue, for November, containing sixty-three pages of reading matter, was a decided success and was welcomed heartily by students and faculty. The exchange editors of other college journals waxed almost poetic in gratulatory comments. An editorial policy of interest and vivacity combined with literary merit could be read between the lines of the first issue, and has been maintained through the later issues, each of which has been equal or superior to the initial number. As a consequence of this policy the expositions and literary criticisms which make most college monthlies a joy for the pundit, a thing of awe to the frivolous undergrad and a target for the jokes of the comic paper, have been few in number, while clever fiction and breezy articles of timely interest have taken the leading part. In make-up the Monthly has followed the models set by such magazines as Ainslee's, McClure's, and the Smart Set. No cuts were used in the first number, but in the December issue the policy of illustrating the leading article with a frontispiece and several half-tones was instituted and has been maintained. A distinct departure from the beaten paths of college literary journals was made in the January issue, when a short story in French was printed. The wide interest shown by the student body in the study of French suggested the idea to the editors, and by the help of Professor Maxime Ingres, a number of sketches in French, by student-authors, of genuine literary merit were secured. This feature of the magazine will be continued through the year. A new cover design has been used each month, the editors planning to get out as attractive a magazine as possible. The artists who designed the covers for the first four numbers are: Donald Kennicott, Novemberg Strong Vincent Norton, Decemberg jane Walker, january, Benjamin Cohen, February. After the january issue the appointment of Donald Kennicott, '03, Frank Adams, 'o4g Charles A. Kent and David A. Robertson, '02, to the rank of assistant editors, was announced by the editor-in-chief and associate editor. The choice was made upon the merits of contributions to the first three numbers. This election does not complete the staff of assistant editors, and other candidates may be appointed as their ability is demonstrated. An alumni department is an important feature of the magazine. Until the Alumni Association is able to edit a magazine devoted solely to alumni news and interest The Monthly Maroon will serve as its ofiicial organ. Each issue contains from eight to ten pageslof 'V reading matter of interest to alumni, following the literary section of the magazine. Edward G, Woods acts as alumni editor. A list of contributors to the first four numbers of the magazine follows: Charles W. Collins, Donald Kennicott, Frank Adams, Susan Grant, Benjamin Nicholson, Laura Bliss Lane, Charles A. Kent, Edith Brownell, Edward G. W'oods, David A. Robertson, Maurice C. Lipman, William Chambers Meyers, Frederick Dennison Bramhall, Charles A. Huston, Ethel Claire Randall, Margaret E. Burton, Bennett Epstein, Rae Baldwin, Jefferson D. Blytliing, Marie 47. im ea, , t G. Ortmayer, Mary Mills, Robert Stinson Starbird, Strong Vincent Norton, William W. Sheppard, Theodore B. Hinckley, Eugene Kline, Mary Ella Robinson and Genevieve Tomlinson: for the alumni: ,f Theodore M. Hammond, '85, Eugene Parsons 'S3. l , .xx I46 ' it iil. 1 ff L l THE UNH 'VJEJRS HPTY ME HC5, Class of a Officers JOHN Iitism' URX' . . DON HEXRX' P.xr,MER . JOHN I':1NIERSl7N In-:Rm'sn1R1c uI.Ix'ER AI.I.IiN BICINTOSH . Ifr,m'1f MQKENNAN BAI.1m'1N JOHN XVII.I.1,xx1 IJRIQYER . . . XY1!.I.IruI ROBERT C.XI,lJliRXYOOD HARRY ANTHONY IQEENAN . 1903 . President First Vice President Second Vice President . Third Vice President . Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretarx . . Treasurer Sergeant-nt-.Xruis JAM:-is Bkvsox Roma Valedictorian LNHARLICS BR.xiwEN DAVIS. . Iissayist CLINTON Ex.mcR'1' SPICER Historian CH,xR1.1is IimlnN1f Se1'x,I,iN . Prophet GMO. BIINUR ANDERSON . . Poet QTILLIE 01.11A ZELEZNX' . Chorister !.LOx'1: E. NIQWQOMIQI4 Chaplain Class of 1904 U Officers 1XI.xR'1'1N SHIQRMAN DONDANVILLE . President Iimxxxklm JOHN BUQKLEX' . , . Vice President II.xkI.1H1x' Ross COLYI-:R . . Secretary LOQKE H-OHQHTON CARPENTER . JOHN Ilowsmw MQCLURI-2 J CII.kRI,liS W. ERWIN K . . Treasurer Sergeants-at-Arms N XX ff 7 F2 2 -T ' J VY? I 63:1 ,li ,V is-4 fa:-X ' if - ,- S' 14s Class of 1905 E Officers MR. EVFIRETT E. PADOETT . . . President MR. RAYMOND S. BROXVN . Vice President MR. Lotus N. TATE . . . Secretary MR. JOHN J. KLICK ..... . Treasurer Jocial Committee MR. ALFRED S. OLIVER, Chairman Mr. Newman L. Fitzhenry Miss Bonnie Little Mr. Raymond S. Brown Mr. Robert H. Goheen -'Z A Wg, arab .ga gf 9 H9532 A Asv X, Miss Leda Stacy Reporting Committee MR. IXIENVMAN L. FITZHENRY, Chairman Mr. Harry G. Willard Course at the Universits of Chicago Their arrival on the Campus marked a new era in the affairs of Rush Medical College It vias like starting a new school and it fell to the lot of the 5 s set the precedent for the forthcoming students of this new school- the Medical Department of the University of Chicago. Thus far , E HE 'O5 Class of Rush Medical College stands apart from any former E'-'iffn"55""'g class in that they were the hrst students to take their Freshman ' ., ' K y ' 5 'Tivo ini' 'N i 54' 3 . C J, - tl1e desks and tables, class organization. they have shown themselves amply capable of the task. Early in the Autumn Quarter, 1901, the class assembled in one of the laboratoriesg the men perched themselves in the windows, on or any other article of furniture handy, and proceeded to effect a Each man was ignorant of the other's abilities so the class cast about to select the best looking man for President. Mr. Sidney Klein was elected lapologies to the classy. Mr. joseph L. Baer was elected Vice President, and Mr. Charles Freytag, Secretary. Before the meeting adjourned a rumor spread through the assembly that the Sophomores, who had learned their tricks at Rush, were lined up in the hall ready to devour or Otherwise annihilate this infant organization. A whispered consultation was held, and although some advocated escaping by means of the fire escape, it was finally decided to brave the storm. At a given signal the door was thrown open-and then the 'o5's "got busy." Hats, canes, coats, collars and neckties soon occupied the upper strata of the atmosphere in the hallway, While below a surging mass of humanity moved slowly but surely toward the steps. and down and out into Hull Court. The Sophs went first but unwillingly. The Naughty 'O5's had won their Hrst victory. At the end of the year the class was probably the best organized Freshman Class Rush had ever had. Too much cannot be said of President Klein for his untiring efforts in raising the standard of the class to such a high grade of excellence. Nearly every man returned this year. The class has raised a hospital fund for the benefit of any of its members who may be confined in the hospitals. Thus a strong bond of brotherhood exists throughout the class. and up to the present time the class bids fair to be one of the strongest Rush ever turned out. R 92 'P' 'V . Ee .5 .QM . ',jI'1f'i:?!.9' 1 ,,:1!j.f-iv 5 faffi 1' m -'E 1 'Sv' .Un lnresiclcrxi- .. .. V i-...Kfsan-A x A,,,.,,-A-X as l me i'Dres.fXerxT' Class of 1906 121 Officers CLAUDE V. RUSSELL . . . . . . President WALTER W. HAMBURGER . . Vice President LLOYD C. AYERs . . . . . . Secretary and Treasurer Medic Councilors U First Year Orville L. Adams Fred F. Stocking james F. Churchill Harry R. Beery john X. Sundwall XValter W. Hamburger Second Year LEE OSBORNE SCOTT, ...... . Chairman Sidney Klein Everett E. Padgett Robert C. Menzies William H. Schwingel Raymond S. Brown Third Year Charles Hicks Gephart Michael J. O'Heru George Gilbert Davis Fourth Year Philip Arthur Reppert Edward Frederick Law C. Hugh McKenna 150 '93 Alpha Beta Gamma Delta Epsilon Zeta Eta Theta Iota Kappa Lambda Mu Nu Xi Omicron Alpha Kappa Phi Rho Sigma Tau Upsilon Phi Chi N u Jigma Nu Fomm'1'd ill 1.982 JE Roll of Chapters University of Michigan Detroit College of Medicine Medico-Chirurgical College Western Pennsylvania Medical College University of Minnesota Medical Department of Northwestern University University of Illinois University of Cincinnati Columbia University Rush Medical College and University of Chicago University of Pennsylvania University of Syracuse University of Southern California University of the City of New York Union University Washington University jefferson Medical College VVestern Reserve University Cornell University Cooper Medical College University of California University of Toronto 151 C. B. Davis C. F. Siefert H. L. Howell E. Rugh E. E. Irons A. L. Hoyne R. T. Vaughan C. Brown VV. E. Post R. O. Scott B. Stewart C. D. Dore D. M. Schoeinaker Nu Jigma Nu a THE KAPPA CHAPTER lisfablished in 1395 U Fratres in Unitlersitate H. A. Rheinhard J. F. Duane E. B. Bradley T. B. Smith J. G. Hayden Kellogg Speed J. H. P. Gauss G. G. Davis E.V . DePew L. A. Beaton H. B. Murdock I. C. Hill G. E. Goodrich Colors: GARNET Axim Wnrrrz 152 G. W. Bauder H. J. Polkey F. B. Moorehead G. B. Smith Bayard Holmes, jr. R. W. Bliss H. P. Kirtley R. H. Goheen A. B. McNab A. H. Curtis J. Hunter R. Wellington Alpha Beta Gamma Delta Epsilon Zeta Eta Theta Iota Kappa Lambda Mu Nu Xi Phi Rho Jigma fbnnded in :Ngo D Roll of Chapters Medical Department of Northwestern l'niversit5 Medical Department of Vniversity of Illinois Rush Medical College and University of Chicago University of Southern California Detroit College of Medicine Lfniversity of Michigan Creighton Medical College Hamlin Medical College Medical Department of Vniversity XVestern Reserve University Medico-Chirurgical College Iowa State University Harvard University johns Hopkins University l S3 of Nebraska Phi Rho Jigma 4 THE GAMMA CHAPTER Eslablishea' 1593 4 Fratres in Universitate R. R. Burt G. S. Chapin F. R. Clapp G. A. Darmer C. F. Eikenbary W. A. Gordon C. W. Gorr J. B. Jackson D. John F. K. Koltis J. W. Marchildon D. H. Palmer W. G. Reeder P. A. Reppert B. H. Roark E. J. Rowan C. H. Taylor R. S. Allison H. A. Childs T. J. Clutter H. J. Davis M. S. Dondanville C. E. Traunfelter F. M. Lowe G. W. Mosher M. J. O'Hern W. E. Showers C. Smith G. Steeley W. H. Witherstine J. F. Adams J. D. Bartlett A. F. Barnett XV. H. Hays R. L. Sensenich H. R. Beery J. F. Churchill H. B. Blakey E. W. Miller Colors: MAROON AND OLD GOLD 154 . -. "'v '- -lv ui x:u'-,h'E'- wb rift v' . - ' ' ,lu 'tf . 'S .. ' ' ' V' , . . -, u Va A a,,". 1 , .- N' I 4'-.1 J" ,- A iv V , ' ' U, AN' 'f- ri. 7 , ,',',f'.',.,1v rv " ' - . 1. " k- ",-J 4 1. 4 - - L, . ..v.lN'..,,w, 4 V-1 .. Y , ' V I :Vg-V --1' - 'X ' ' H , . 1. - ", -12,96-: . ,V 1. . I, ,- V. VV,-1,-.fvi,fVa,.1 . c. -. 5 A - '-- U' "':."'-USN ' - " .H v 1- ' - Z 'f , - .-' 1 ."l".,'n'4:" 1.3, .- 1 Z, --5 ."! QMS: ' J. . . , V,. y. . ... il , . ' ' ,rsj -".'.,Vv,,'.f,,'. , , - ' A , V . - 3, gg. V - , ' . HV, 42-. :.,' -,I I -. V I 4.1-, .':.s,,, , I V ,.,..1.?wa ,Q E-.R 1.,,. 8513.915 i-1,55 A V , ' 'f1-fV'5- .' ' -51-f'-' f: 'QE' 1 Y , - 4 ...wfv-.w .V .1 .V-,. - 5' ,V. V ..-,1 .-,,,.,,Vv,',,l.., , -- .Lu . , 1 .'. 4- . ' '-Mfr A a . .V -1. . - , .-1, Y -, . 1 . .f ,, wth. -,Hx ' 4V..: 1iM, ',.-V,..H1..,, WL.. . 'V ..V2YV' . 1 47 5 -5' .',v,, 5-'G 'V ' .-- , v -, ':,- '1 Q -LJ "" MVS, " Pd- 1-. 5- +I" '-. . sl 5' L 'A 'ii'-1 0 524 : V ., ' X 'L' 'VV-, LF." , I ' . ." I 'I' ' Q", .,' Q., lg I IQ.-'4 A-4,11 V .' V - S, . 1 v4'w"1"L'3fiLg -K - I.- V ' . 'i 'L " I 11- T".1,. V ., L v , -V , ,?,4.,.Wv.!... .-.' ' e 1 - Q." , 'af 7x4- . ' ' I V . 1 " ' 1' 1- 4 '1 L4 ' F " "Q . "lib, 'V','f '.-4" e"In'. - . - ' ' .,-. 'Q . ,, iq -- ,'- 0 ly -,. ov' nv-I , , JJ- 5. ' 'l-Iv. "'.l 5: F -:.x.- " ' .3 A .5 , Q- ' V 1+ I 4 . ILV.. AVN'--.1-T! .A . Z .g - , :4 . 'Q ,l - ,-' g., U, FV vVh".- V- : . uf-I ' , ' 4'.v. . - f. ., 'H' ' V ' . gpg 44'7-N . ..' ,--A I, R. , -J l r '. ., . - , - +"L M ". ,' , 'ii ,U-,, ' , 3 - I J., - - -V 'ji 3 . .'.- "- -Q ' "" WT1' A m-1 I ' 'Q . ' ". ' I : , -4 gl . X, U- 1.4. - , I 'V , J. , ' 4.-' - L, :- . V' A ,-- I v -A .'- ' - 4- Vw' .', -v1y.,'-.15 , .. ,'d U' 4 ff . L-0 V ,V -.ug ,I ' lrv - -L H . 4- in I. 4. X N. . YI. F . Q, . , -. V f y , ' 1V ,I 1 ' P' ' ' J' ' ' - , . ,-I V , . -' , .' v A ' v ' V 5 V Y A- . -- '. lu- Q " -- .- L ' ' - 'gs -P' 1 -J. 1 A I- - Y ' '1','- X ,' .-v T '47 . 1. ' 1 .-3-V ' ' . ' - - 1 -V ,, ' JJ ' 5' .1 ur' V, 1 . 93' ' , A I A ' ' NX W- In --In I .1 V. x V "' L I' A V V WF-4' 4, fn z- it , ,, f., N .fa I N J. Y' ',, - . e.! x . Q5 , A ,, 2 ., H -'-r . - - :VI 'hr ,' uk' ,,' Y "9 .I V GH, ., ! - 1.14 .Qui E ,. 'V rv-, X ' Q . ' 'te' . ' I ' , r- 'H 1 'Q fi , ' ,., , V , . , -- 'hp' , 2 'V ' '- 2 , . 4 ' - -. 4 'V' ,Q '-, ', ,,1 -473 A , 5 ' V V '. 'F-ll' 'JV ,A t 5 1 X X " W' 1 ' 2: . . ' - .f , I ' ' I - ' ' -NV .. . A . , -LV f v Y MA ' - ' u H ,', -1 . V. 4' U . -I, , . 7'-v , K , .. I I 'Lu nv ,-: tgp!!! ' V -.' , ' . 'O : x, , ' A It 'yi.f,,ff'- .P Jig. -.r - " L 9 ...J ' V' 9 " . ,. " 1 ps I ' .1 Q1 , Cf: A '4 Q u' 4 4- 'r - T 'A .4 -I' lx J .X ll- ' ,. . Lv W-. 'ups K ' -T - 1 x' ' a ls., Q 'lf' M4 ..A 1 . Ay, P l SVA 1'-J' .' 'Al by 1' v x JJ V Q -V u , N I -. W V . 1 w 3 L, , ' I s A 1' v ,f n ' ' 1 5' A f D- ' l YO r .N n Q , , - ', Ji' .,I . I+-, n ' 4' in Illklmk - v:i.lr Af- C. 'I ,vit ll I I .A I . .., 'u I , -P V -Af' A I A ' ' 5 - '-' J 4. I U! it l v Alpha Kappa Kappa Alpha Gamma Delta Zeta Theta Psi Beta Sigma Eta Iota Epsilon Kappa Lambda M u Nu Xi Omicron Pi Rho Upsilon Phi Chi Omega U Pbzmdfzz' in INSA' H Roll of Chapters Dartmouth College, Hanover Tufts College, Boston Vniversity of Vermont, Burlington Long Island Hospital, Brooklyn Bowdoin College, Brunswick University of Minnesota, Minneapolis Physicians and Surgeons, San Francisco University of California, San Francisco Physicians and Surgeons, Chicago Vniversity of Syracuse, Syracuse jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia Milwaukee Medical College, Milwaukee Cornell College, New York City University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Rush Medical College, Chicago Northwestern Vniversity, Chicago Miami Medical College, Cincinnati Ohio Medical University, Columbus Drake and Denver Vniversity, Denver University of Oregon, Portland 'Vanderbilt University, Nashville University of Tennessee, Nashville University of Nashville, Nashville f57 Alpha Kappa Kappa ,U THE NU CHAPTER lislablished Afzril 27, 1901 D Fratres in Unitiersitate XVilliam LaFayette Freeman Claude George Dickey Ora Frank Parish Kirk Shawgo john Charles Bridgrnann ' Floyd McKennan Baldwin Roy Graharnf ' Ernest Tibbetts Manning Orville Harry Brown Lucius Marchand VanDruff Harry jacob Wertman Orville Lewis Adams Erestus Talbot Hanley Robert Clarence Shanklin Noble Sproat Heaney Ulises Marchial Sanabria Galen Addis Fox Hazen Lorenzo Avery Spencer Stoddard Howe Claude Bernard Lewis Francis Edward Dent William Bernhardt Fehring john Walter Huston Walter Dederic Fischer Frank Tuthill Potts Leon Alva Baldwin Elmer Harvey Ellsworth Harry Crandall Moffett Harry Edwin Clay Herbert Arthur Breyfogle Ausby Lyman Lowe Lloyd Clark Ayres Harry Cullen Kariher james Gibson Omelvena flbeeeased Colors: VVHITE AND GREEN 158 Thomas Redmond I tv , w A J . 4 I - I ' v, v ' v y' -'Q '. '. K 1 ,A 'Q X. '1 .. 0 - 3 il-1. '- gh. U: . - 3' -C K. . - I .NL lb ' wx :If . ,,' A v I 'flf-1: , . N -, N ful!! . , V 'V , 3- I 4 -.X ' o ' .nv ' lr! .tw . A . mv "I '4 'Q ' 2 ' S fl 2, Y X . X ' 1 4 1 -' K. ', s , 0 Q Y . ' ,W ' 1 Q I ,N V ,4 D. T!- , -4, , . . , ,' - I 1 1 , A I o n I - A w - 1 .1 . 1 , Y I L ,, .- X .f s.: . A3 I f ' ' -a wh , IZ' - s' 1 - 1 1 l I "U " if I I .1g' ,l' . .. s - fi Phi Beta Pi Fozmdfd al I'11z'zf6r5z'!y of llfeslerlz l?7IIl.S',j'fZ'flllI'tI, 1891 Alpha Beta Gamma Delta Epsilon Zeta Eta Theta Iota D Roll of Chapters University of Western Pennsylvania University of Michigan Sterling Medical College Rush Medical College McGill University Baltimore College of Physicians and Surgeons Jefferson Medical College Northwestern University Medical School University of Illinois 161 Phi Beta Pi W THE DELTA CHAPTER Esfablislzed in 1901 E Fratres at Rush Henry Otto Bruggenlan Charles Laurentine O'Brien Harry Oscar Delaney jesse Howard Briggs Walter Bernhard Schouchow Thomas james Mullany Robert Burroughs Fields Charles Henry McDonald Milo Goss Sloo Edward Pane Fick John Dill Schinnick George Henry Scheer, B. S. Lloyd Emerson Matter Maurice LaBlott Henry Ishani Flanders Roy Latham Watson Roy Seymour Watson Edward Day Taylor Carroll Lawrence Storey Walter Bayard Huey james Atwood Mackintosh Albert Andrew Weber Christian Ludwig Neubert john Francis Lewis Edward Warr Banker Fratres at Chicago Richard J. Gleysteen Charles Newton Allison Claude Vernard Russell Walter Wile Hamburger Alfred Ransom Autrey Colors: GREEN AND WHITE 162 Y Alpha Omega Alpha QHonorary Medical Fraternityj Illinois Alpha Illinois Beta Illinois Gamma Ohio Alpha Pennsylvania Alpha Pennsylvania Beta ,U Roll of Chapters College of Physicians and Surgeons Rush Medical College Northwestern University Medical College Western Reserve University Medical College Jefferson Medical College University of Pennsylvania Medical College 164 Alpha Omega Alpha Organized Aifgzzff 25, 1902 E7 Honorary Members Nicholas Serin James Nevins Hyde Frank Billings James B. Herrick Ludvig Hektoen Walter S. Haines Lewellys F. Barker A ctitve Members Kirk Shawgo, AKK Burchard Hayes Roark, QKWII, QPE Charles B. Davis, BGII, NEN john D. Scouller, Jr. James Bryson Robb J. Clarence Webster Ferdinand C. Hotz Jesse Howard Briggs, QKNII, fI1B1'I John William Dreyer Philip Arthur Reppert, QPE Hugh James Polkey, QBK, NEN Carl Siefert, NEN George Alexander Darmer, EAE, 'PPE John Charles Bridgman, AKK Milo G. Sloo, QBH Claude Bernard Lewis, EE, AKK Don Henry Palmer, 'PPE William L. Freeman, AKK John Busby Ury G. Hugh McKenna, EX 165 Gayfree Ellison Ralph Elliott Rugh, NZN Q1 The Ground Hog 4 511' Heizzrifh Hez'11: Illzzslx-ated lglf C. D. Gzbesuuze 4 The ground hog staid Comes out of the shade Of his lair in the cold, cold earthg He looks in the sky No sun is nigh, With a smile he gives vent to his mirth. Va r l O sa. HH He changes his gaze To a look of amaze, And disgust his features streaks, For the sunlight crowds Through the heavy clouds, So he sleeps for another six weeks. w il -Da Z'L'lf'Lflf1I roof: I 66 wif ,1"N . N 1 L Q 'X 10 1 I ' fl! . f 'IVVM 'Wi . I V 151' 1 , x' W. N x V 1 w g' THE NEVV LAW BUILDING The Law Jchool 17 HE Law School of the University of Chicago is a member of the Ag 0 Association of American Law Schools and has a high standard of requirements for admission and graduation. It is essentially a an cm? , graduate Law School, an academic degree being required of each G i' candidate for the degree of j.D. Q-juris Doctorl, while the degree of 0 0 LL.B. is to be conferred upon those who are not college graduates but have credits amounting to a required standing. The course of study pursued under the " Case System " is divided into three years of work. There is a prescribed course for the first year, while the student may have some choice in the arrangement of his work during the second and third years, but must at all times carry three majors of Work, which means that he must have from twelve to fifteen hours of class work each week. At present the Law School is occupying quarters in the Press Building, and although these quarters are occupied only temporarily, they provide ample facilities for the present needs. Eighteen thousand volumes have already been purchased for the Law Library. A new building is being erected for the exclusive use of the Law School, at a cost of two hundred and eighty thousand dollars. The plans provide for a gray stone building, after the English Gothic style, to be located in the main quadrangle of the 168 University, and connected by covered passages with the main library of the University and with the building of the historical departments. The basement of the building will contain smoking and conversation rooms, toilet rooms and lockers. On the first floor there will be two large lecture rooms, capable of seating one hundred and fifty men each, and a number of smaller lecture rooms, class rooms, oflices, etc. The library stack room will be on the second floor, with space for one hundred and twenty-five thousand volumesg and here also will be desks and work rooms for the professors, and rooms for the administration of the library. On the Hoor above will be a large reading hall, one hundred and eighty feet long by fifty feet wide, modeled after the great English Academic Halls, with timbered roof and clerestory windows, This room will furnish wall space for a large number of law books, and will be the general work and assembly room for the law students. On the same floor will be the office of the dean, also a large lecture room seating two hundred and Hfty men. 11 .v , p ,.s . it X h is 6 Class O rganiza tions D Jenior Class Officers EARLE H. FLEMING .... . President ALDEN RHODES HICKS . Secretary Junior Class Officers NV. M. KEELY .... . President JOHN R. COCHRAN . Vice President RALPH C. PUTNAM . Secretary-Treasurer Freshman Class Officers JAMES M. SHELDON . . President LEON P. LEVVIS . Vice President V. A. BICGEORGE . . Secretary J. C. WITT . . Treasurer 170 Ghe Presidenfs Visit a ,lj Q-'igiggig 6 N April 2, IQO3, President Roosevelt visited the University of Chicago to receive the degree of LL. D., which President Harper conferred l 1 h upon him, and to lay the corner-stone of the new Law School Build- Lk Q, J ing. It was the most eventful day in the short history of the Law Z School, and signally emphasized the prosperity which that depart- ment of our University will enjoy in the future. On President Roosevelt's arrival he was escorted by the convocation procession across the Campus, which was massed with students, who cheered him lustily u11til he passed into Kent Theatre. Here prayer was offered by the University Chaplain, Charles Rich- mond Henderson, D.D. A statement by President Harper was made at the conclusion of the prayer. The band then played the "Pleyel's Hymn," as it did on the occasion of President McKinley's receiving his degree from the University. Dr. Harry Pratt Judson, Dean of the Faculties, made the convocation address. As an authority in political science, Professor Judson spoke on "Leadership in Democracy! ' He characterized President Roosevelt's leadership as ideal, and concluded by saying it was for that reason he presented President Roosevelt for the degree. When the ceremony of conferring the degree had been concluded the procession reformed and moved to the site of the new Law School Building. From a staging erected for the speakers near the suspended corner-stone, President Harper read his statement, and Dr. Goodspeed announced the articles which would be placed within the stone. Presi- dent Roosevelt then delivered a short address, and completed the exercises of the day by laying the stone which had been prepared for the touch of his trowel and maul. The articles placed in the corner-stone are: Photograph of President Roosevelt. Photograph of the founder of the University. Photograph of the Law Faculty. Photograph of the building. The last Annual Register of the University. The Law School circular of information. The Law School number of the University Record, October, 1902. The Law School annual announcements. First year's list of students in the Law School. The Chicago daily papers. Decennial souvenir edition of the University of Chicago Weekly. . Copy of the Daily Maroon of Wednesday, April 1, 1903. Copy of the Monthly Maroon of March, 1903. 171 X-'x PHI Fraternities PHI DELTA PHI DELTA CHI ALPHA DELTA 1L0ca1J 172 Kent Benjamin Booth Story Cooley Pomeroy Marshall Jay XVebster Hamilton Gibson Choate Waite Field Conkling Tiedeman Minor Dillon Daniels Chase Harlan Swan McClain Lincoln Osgoode Fuller Miller Green Comstock Dwight Foster Ranney Langdell Brewer Douglas Phi Delta Phi W Founded in 1869 U Roll of Chapters Law Dept. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Law Dept. Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington Northwestern University Law School, Chicago, Ill. School of Law, Columbia University, New York City St. Louis Law School, Washington University, St. Louis, Hastings College of the Law, San Francisco, Cal. Law School of Columbian University, Washington, D. C. Albany Law School, Union University, Albany, N. Y. School of Law, Boston University Law School of the University of Cincinnati Dept. of Law, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Mass. Yale Law School, New Haven, Conn. Department of Law, New York University School of Law, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. Law Dept. University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. Law Dept. University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Dept. of Law, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis Buffalo Law School, Buffalo, N. Y. School of Law, University of Oregon, Portland, Ore. School of Law, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. Law Dept. Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio Law Dept. State University of Iowa, Iowa City, Ia. College of Law, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. Law School of Upper Canada, Toronto Chicago College of Law, Lake Forest University, Chicago Mo Law Dept. Leland Stanford jr. University, Palo Alto, Cal. School of Law, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas College of Law, Syracuse University New York Law School Law Dept. University of Indiana, Bloomington, Ind. Western Reserve Law School, Cleveland, Ohio Law Dept. University of Illinois, Champaign, Ill. School of Law, University of Denver Law School of University of Chicago 173 Phi Delta Phi a STEPHEN A. DOUGLAS CHAPTER Esiablislzed April 14, 1903 .U Fratres in Facultate joseph Henry Beale, jr., A. M., L. L. B. Floyd R. Mechem, A. M. Ernst Freund, J. U. D., PH. D. julian William Mack, LL. B. Clarke Butler Whittier, A. B., LL. B. james Parker Hall, A. B., LL. B. Charles E. Kremer Fratres in Unilversitate Jeniors Juniors Earle H. Fleming W. M. Keeley Rowland T. Rogers XV. R. Jayne Ralph C. Manning Curtis R. Manning Roy D. Keehn First Year Class james M. Sheldon Edward R. Ferriss R. L. Henry, jr. Thaddeus J. Merrill Walter A. Lybrand A. B. Garcelon 174 1 . ' ,'a"'.'7 ig." '-',':-www , I . - , 1 ' . 4 .Q ,Ive . 4 ' - 'v- ' ' ' 'Q-I . If a '-' M , I 0 5 XII? . v .,, , 1 . . . -"vi . s , -1... II I 1, W 5:,. . ,, . Y, ,I I I. I , . , ., , I . I ,, ,. ,,,I I ,.7 . ..I ., 1'f- M - , I Y:-1I. I -- II I . I A- v I'Jf II I' . 5 II - ' ' .f-fy U3 1 ' .' 0' ' , . 1 ' . .N -'5 . I ..,g W'-,-V I' ,0 ' H 7 ., - J " Ak "' . I I . I,. A -' ' ' - -'M 'mx . , H .. ' , , I ' 0 few - : ' ..'- ff X553-7 1'.'. -M" ig ' w , v ,A 0.5, - II 4: I I ,III ,I Q ,f v ' ' " . A sa. X . 3 gin I -: AII ', It " ' I ' - v 5 ' l V . 1 'A ' f - 'N .!-'. - X I ' If". I' , ' 'I , If ,Q ' ' Ip . , X O ,. , - ' . .v 1' 2- ' N vi AM' ' I , " - ., ' I 1, . I I ld' -II I , In-II: , II , 'JI A . ' '. am-1 '-' 4: 'IN ' 1 '4 I 4, . I' Q .Q . ,, N g r ' - .-' '.',"f .' '-f ' Jf f w..: Q 'r ' -' 5 I I. I Iwi I I. If 5 III. ' Q '.l H ' . - ,,. I 5, II . ,I . Y .I , I-I ,YI I,I5:-A -: .0 V' 1 1' x .' A '.,q1,o as 'dup u . - . . In , ,-I I I . Y - II , ., I, 1, ' - ..- I: f " " ' 5 ' s ,, 1- , .'-' . ' . Q , 1 f ' In 1 . . I I Ix .. III T I .5 ' " ' I . : K .Iv I , 1 - H O . , . V - ' 3 ul, . ,X , , 5 T. -, I ' I , I I . .. ,B I .." . I4 7 " ' ' -' Us , . ',v V I,II , , , .' I I 0 ,, .,' . ' 'g' -4 I. . 1 -- . ' -n u ,- ' .fa .nh I ,Y , 5, I . 9 I ' - Qs ' 1 ' . 1 ' X ' v . p . 71 IJ' 5 ' . 2' ,i A 1. . fr -- - ,Q gr! - . ,Q -Q g . , , -'-P+ J-- A ,. . l rl , " ' Ig !!,.4 X 4 1 , . w "' v , , .. .4 4 . N -v I ,N I , ' '4 - MNH, I wr, ,, '."? , I 4 1 ' ' I! I n,,IIw :iIIoI , V I I.IIlI I ' v ' . - 'vw -' , II II . 5 ' I ' P ' "aff . .,.. , I 5 . . I ' 1'II . m . ' 14 . - . ' - In V , II-wx. ' 1' : W ' . 22:4 -,:.-I-, ' - Y 9-5- 1 2 ' ' , ', 2, . . . , V . .,. ., l ' v ' 4 ' ' 1 I I I - . I , ,- V , .I 1 ' : f' " , ' , I - . I .I A , fo . ,Sw-,., xr .,I. II. A . 3 , nj ' If 'Q , ,L '. ' '-'Q . - . . 5 ,- ' . If 1 I I ' n-YI -.If "' ' 1 . - . .., . sf ' 5- 1, , XI.. I r T ,I . - I - '-A .41 ,mf-F. ,I n I '. -' -4,5-P -, i If L. I .. ' .I , I IJ -Z , . I, " I ' .. 1' A 1 . 4 "- S 'A- I . I. f-,, ' .,l- , L I ' I J . , .4-Q . . r , .I . ' , I . V -V ' . T" 4 ' f ,. , - ., -., ,,-A - A 1. A M f' '. V' " ' I ' 1-47. '- G "Q, 'I' Bjji ' 1-7 -f -:bn -.-1..":1.g:g Delta Chi Foznzdrd Odober I2 D , 1.390 Roll of Chapters Cornell University New York University University of Minnesota University Northwestern University Chicago-Kent College of Law of Michigan Dickinson College of Law Buffalo Law School - Osgoode Hall-University of Toronto Union College of Law University of West Virginia University of Ohio New York 177 Syracuse Law School Law School University of Chicago Delta Chi ,U THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHAPTER Esiablislzed Hlay 1903 U Fratres in Unitlersitate Orville Elbridge Atwood Frank Joslyn Baum joseph Walter Bingham john Robert Cochran Frederick Dickinson Sidney Jennings Dillon George Philip Hambrecht Ota Patty Lightfoot Charles Ralston McMi11e11 john Carlyle Moore Henry Williams Stiness Maurice Wallbrum Colors: CARDINAL AND BUFF 178 , ,if xg fjf-,j : ga - vfj 9 .21 I X 97171, rl' f 54: , -f 1 " W ' fi, Q ff' V gf igfggzk, 1g3??? "l"""'X i ig Z, - 'a.7-ig A Warning a Jo bone, that when thy summons comes to fill The little yellow books with knowledge, In that mysterious realm where each shall search His flunk note on the silent walls of Cobb, Thou go not like some slavish dig at night, Jcourged to his texhbooks, but sustained and soothed By an unfaltering trust, approach thy doom Like one who wraps the drapery of his cap and gown About him and lies down to pleasant dreams. Du 17 y Maroon Phi A lpba Delta 27 Esfablislzrd al the U7ZiZ'EI'Sl'4l' Qf Cf11'fIlg0 Defember 3, 1902 ,G Fratres in Universitate William George Bopp Charles Nickerson Cadwell Alden Rhodes Hicks William Haines Fielding XVilliam Corbett Healion Verne Adrian McGeorge William Rudolph Kearcher Gustav George Schmitt 2 john Charles Witt T Milli i If---0:3 V5 B il" ilk," 'F,1 "'-2 ...MN . ' I ,......-.,...... , X - - -...M-N' , FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE ' ' FELICITATIONS' ' 1 V lliifkolffisaf. -. .Q ,1 f' ' 'W - f bf awp f 7 A IGILEETICS na w mm if 7 4 f Q 9245 XX " I p x 5 9 0: W x 0 0 0 13, ' 0 Q 'Q D W f mr' U' W ' 'QQ Q 8. 0 is ,gr - . R N fzf. l W gj., . X WI L . V W1 - X ' 2 .Finn-rt -. 4. . sn'1h-'.' 1'-51X'."r' 4 ---,.-.gt 'w 5 L. 1. . . 1.541- 911 .- ,:y-.- .f::g'1,.-' 5.-' Lfgfzfl 1f5A'.i'1- g-.. -, -,. ,. Ju ,vi 1 ,QM-4 '1.Qf."i-"hd gg :gv s' FW: if- 'J' -4 ' '. qt' .1 5- .:"125'N"'f'-elf! WS? 35 'vita-."E!:l . ,,, 'Agn . 1 .. 1 'ls-I - f ia, S Q-91 A -.52Q,i12' .'sW?i5i'a-!2Z:4.'-1 -P' N- e rf-.y ,W eiafgzlgs . f' laifva-iwrffrlfr. Sf- gxwmf 1,-5 31411 , ,,13:.5.15.,sgg5,i 1 4' Eggers 1 Q Qi 'Q - Airs, 2:24-529 'nn' 2501- 2' 'f- ' . ' ' FQFEU' f',' D., '1'.,.H- T352-is 1'-W ire: PI'-Q 5 - '-A . A 2 2. -+1 ' 54? gp-.1 aa ,ix M 'QYVWSXM - -111 1 xg- Kr? -fr-, --- -1 r- -.af Q ' . ' ' V L' -'ffqijw ,, g5:f,i'!f-21 ybfvfzfflj-if Lift, -' Yzf 4' ' - - 'W2'1- ' 1 1- V ff' wg'-1:2 -1 N 0- 1- - ' ri w'+f"gg.' -rm 2 if f 1 4 if V .,6'2+'1s'. -' " ', - 1 ' " LR: CQSQV W-X ' 'Lx 1 '2' 'fa,.,f!- 1 ' ' 1 - f M - A-'fel' - L- --QP 1 -4 - 4 swf" frxv' f f .ifilw " 1 - - . - 4- .-1 ft- -A' 44-Q 'K -. ' z 1' -- - firms 1:'2P'a2M:1.ff? :F+fif-w- - t - ' ,. -fa 1 .. y,,A,x,:- at--Ag.. ' ' 11541 33241 if 13151-',:1'-Jff'11:,'1.': A E Bezdek '06, Football, 1902 Blair '05, Track, 1902 Cahill '05, Track, 1902 Catlin '06, Football, 1902 Conrad '03, Football, 1901 Farr, Football, 1902 Friend '05, Track, 1902 Ivison '06, Football, 1902 Koehler, Football, 1902 Mathews '05, Track, 1902 jennison '05, Football, IQOI, 1902 Patrick '05, Baseball, 1902 Rooney '05, Baseball, 1902 Schnur '06, Football, 1902 Terry '05, Football, 1902 Tripp '06, Football, 1902 Harper'03, Baseball, 1900, 1901, IQO2 Henry, Law '05, Track, 1901, I902 Howe '03, Baseball, 1901, 1902 L. Maxwell, Football, 1901, 1902 F. G. Moloney, Track, 1399, 1900, 1901, IQO2 Merrifield '03, Baseball, 1900, IQOI, 1902 Sloan '04, Baseball, IQOI, 1902 Perkins '02, Football, 1900, IQOI, 1902 Speik '05, Football, IQOI, IQO2,Tf3Ck, 1902 R. Maxwell '06, Football, 1902 MacClyment '03, Baseball, IQOZ Quantrell '05, Track, IQO2 Wightman '06, Football, 1901 Horton '03, Track, 1900, 1901, Baseball, 1901 Sheldon, Law '05, Football, 1899, IQOO, 1901, 1902 Ellsworth '03, Football, 1900, 1901, 1902, Baseball, IQO2 187 Athletic Representatives JAMES F. ROYSTER JAMES W. I-IOAG FRANK MCNAIR . PHILIP SUNDERLAND AMOS ALoNzo STAGG . GEORGE H. GARREY . ORVILLE E. ATXVOOD . TURNER BURTON SMITH . Athletic JAMES M. SI-IELDON FLOYD E. HARPER . JEROME P. MAGEE J. W. BINGHAM . PIOYVARD J. SLO.-KN a Coaches . The Graduate Schools . The Divinity Schools . The Senior Colleves 25 . The junior Colleges . Director of Athletics Assistant Coach, Football Assistant Coach, Football Assistant Coach, Baseball Captains 19024903 ISS Football . Baseball . Track . Tennis . Golf WTQACYX Athletic Captains and Coaches Yx f lllls A Review of the Jenson 1:1 OR the University of Chicago the football season of 1902 was second in glory only to that of 1899. In that year we had a championship EJ team. The team of 1902 did 11ot win that honor, but it was a team G that gave a great deal of satisfaction to its coaches and supporters. W'hen college opened in the fall it was little suspected what glory was in store for Chicago on the football field. With only six men of - ES E the previous year's team back, prospects did not look very bright. The men were: Captain Sheldon, Ellsworth, Lee Maxwell, Iennison, Perkins and Speik. Conrad returned a little later, but in a short time discontinued practice. This was all that was left of the team of IQOI, an outlook rather unpromising. It seemed as if it were impossible for Chicago to keep men, as fast as they were developed by Director Stagg they would leave college. It looked as if Chicago would never get on her feet again after the past two disastrous seasons. Our salvation lay in a very large squad of green but promising Freshmen. We began to feel there was some hope, and that with the material on hand Stagg would build up a team which the year following, or in two years would win the championship. Chicago men hardly dared to hope for success in 1902, the task of rounding into a team of so many new 111en seemed insurmountable. But as we watched day by day, week by week, everyone saw progress, and with the steady improvement our hopes and expecta- tions rose proportionately. Still the schedule loomed up in huge proportions. XVe felt that although our team would be a good one the schedule contained too many games. Knox, Purdue, North- western, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, looked like a series which would certainly trip up the strongest team, an insurmountable obstacle for our Freshman 191 aggregation. Wisconsin and Michigan both had had championship teams during the previous year and had defeated us easily. Both had nearly all their men back and were sure to be stronger than before. At a distance they seemed impossible. Yost, of Michigan, had said that the season would be a great one, as there were tive great teams in the West, Michigan, Wisconsin, Northwestern, Illinois and Minnesota. We were not on the list, but four of these teams were on our schedule. As the season advanced our prospects advanced also and we defeated all but one of our opponents, showing Yost, of Michigan, that despite his choice of the best teams in the West, we were still in the championship class. Knox we managed to dispose of, 5 to o. As Knox was a small college, critics put us down very low in the list. Then came the terrible game with Cornell College tIa.J We won, but the poor exhibition of football shattered many of the aspirations of loyal Maroons. Those " on the inside " were not discouraged, and yet they could hardly keep down a feeling of fear for the following games in the schedule. Purdue, it was said, had one of the best teams in its history, and fresh from a 40 to o victory over DePauw, came to Chicago, confident of winning. The Hoosier rooters were even betting that Chicago would not score. Our 33 to o victory was not only a surprise to them, but to us also. Joy spread throughout the Maroon camp and for the first time we dared to raise our heads and proclaim that we were in the championship race. Northwestern was disposed of, I2 to o, in spite of Sanford's coaching. Then came Illinois, confident of victory, and fell before our team of " coners" by a score of 6 to o. The Michigan game was the only disappointing contest of the season, not only because it was the only game we lost and because the score against us was large, but because we do not think that the score gives a fair comparison of the two teams. It is always disagreeable to make excuses, and we do not complain that we were not fairly beaten, but we were caught at a disadvantage. Mr. Stagg and nearly everyone else attributed the loss of the game to the injury to quarter back Lee Maxwell a few days before the game. This made it necessary for a man not accustomed to the position to play quarter back. and to a certain extent the team was disorganized. The season ended x gloriously with our II s , , , , 1 to o victory against Wisconsin on Thanks- giving. One pleasant fea- ture of the season was that our 't Little Cap- tain " Jimmie Sheldon was able to pla y in v 1 ' every game. Several of the men were picked for positions on the all-western team, the most unanimous decisions c o min g to "Dad" Farr and " Shorty " Ellsworth. The Football Team 1902 if-fl i i RREY QCOACH GA LER KOEH AHLSWEDE TERRY PERKINS SCHNUR HTMAN WIG R. MAXWELL TRIP? WORTH APTJ ELLS DON QC EL SH SPEIK ARR 3 F Acc Ccozxcnj ST IVISON JENNISON L. MAXXVELI. BEZDEK CATLIN '02 Varsity POSITION Right End Right Tackle Right Guard Center . Left Guard Left Tackle Left End Quarter Back Right Half Back . Left Half Back . Full Back September 21 September 28 October 2 October 5 October 8 October II October I8 October 25 November 1 November 8 November I5 November 27 The Football 1902 E NAME . M. L. C.1'rL1N . . E. W. FARR . . R. W. NIAXXVELL A. C. ELLSWORTH 1 H. F. AHLSVVEDE li S. B. TERRY . fl. P. KOEHLER . ' -L R. C. TRIPP . . F. A. SPEIIC . . LEE XV. MAXWELL S' Cv. E. SCHNUR . - H.BEzD111K . . . JENNISON ic S CJ. M. SHELDON . ' G. E Iv1soN . 5 E. E. PERKINS . 74, S. H. WIGHTMAN Team Record of Team for 1902 . Lombard . 6 . Chicago Monmouth . . o . Chicago . Fort Sheridan . 0 . Chicago Knox . . . o . Chicago . Cornell College . 0 . Chicago Purdue . . . o . Chicago . Northwestern . o . Chicago Illinois . . o . Chicago . H Beloit . o . Chicago Indiana . . o . Chicago . Michigan . . 21 . Chicago . . XVisconsin . . . o . Chicago Points won . Chicago 249 . Opponents 27 Games won . Chicago II . Opponents 1 195 XYEIGHT . 177 2oo . 232 186 . 196 194 . 188 196 . 175 156 . 156 169 . 163 156 - 173 168 . 17o 27 . 24 53 - 5 2I - 33 I2 . 6 18 - 39 o . II Left End The Scrubs 1902 E 10 H. HUGHES . - XVRIGHT l HATI-'IELD A Qfl Flungin-9 fy: x A t ' -- 7 N 5 5. xx xg' ,R A, it ff 9 4 -QQ QZ fHalfB0,gK, ' 1 fl jf, 1 1 YE , 1 ' Ulf, ' L V . Q lx " ff N ..-X A f 1 , ms X X t ' ' . "5 .P t Ji xii! 0 1. Q4"a, f s. ' . ' ss 'xsifes I' .2 f ,fl Xe' I M f if A ' r ' wx x K 1 Fl .lx Tx ' X6- X STAIB il I ,,' Left Guard . . 2 IXEVILLE gy? X r-'gfgff 'xii'-Gy - , t PARRY .. I jx K 1 :'W-'- X 11 f f 'X Left Tackle ' 1 WYALSWORTH QS H l i:?1e1gf?? cg,?a4NSi Center ' Btirilllfmxvs. ik" , --J" ' X' A ' .cw s x efa 5- 1 m g., f 5 -Q BUCKIJQX' f' ES' 5 TOT . . . -" Q 2'3" Right Guard FLEMING 2 r,g5ruf-gf? Svlxqwr ERNW ,hw Y V ,lzlifvi-: 6725 7 Er, - ,iq Right Tackle 5 I If Ol ' Qi . 1 NIEFFORD Right End ' l H. H. ELLSWORTH Quarter Back . HITCHCOCK Left Half Back . QESIRTSN . Y J. HARPER Right Half Back . MORRISON BEACH Full Back OLIVER GRANBERG uk 1 v 'KN1 Record of Jcrubs, 1902 ji 'Q It ,I Sept. 28 Hyde Park . o Scrubs 5 f ,rf -'X 5 Oct. 4 South Division o Scrubs 5 1, 1 'w . . A X Oct. 7 Joliet High School 6 Scrubs I7 ie s ?" " f"' ' A "V - - Oct. II Racine . . o Scrubs 23 hx f " f N 'lf Oct I7 Armour Institute II Scrubs 0 ,lc x f M 571: f ' , ll Oct. 20 Northwestern . 5 Scrubs I5 g 6,0 Oct. 25 Culver . . IO Scrubs o . ' sk ' V 7 - N ' 5 Games played, 7 ci I of fx X f J Qx 1 7 Q, M 6 Won, 52 lost, 2 - if 5 X fy z X IQ , Tb-271i Q! NM 'XX If . 1 lp, sf CMLII WAR OUVUIHD a OOH L,sz1G1J. LLDHS NO IAIOSTINVHJ, zo61 'Avu UN The Sophomores FRIEND JAMES . . XV.-XTERMAN PATRICK . GR11n1,1cx' . BURR1 :WS J1 m11Nsc mx . HA.'1'1fI 121.13 BICICIZIC . MAc:1c1c . Annual Fresbman:J'ophomore Game fMo11day, November 17, IQOZH J . Right End . . Right Tackle . Right Guard Center Left Guard . Left Tackle . . Left Ellfl . . Quarter Back . . Right Half Back . Left Half Back IHQAC11 Lcuptainj . Full Back . Ilarvxml School Illinois Freshmen 6 SCORE: Sophomores, og Freshmen, o Record of Freshman Team 4 . . H Freshmen Freshmen !. K 193 Freshmen . HUGHES . ELLSXVORTH , LODGE HALL Qcaptainj . . GALE . STAIB . XVRIGHT ANDREWS . HARPER 1 BUCKXVALTER l BIEFFORD . OLIVER . 0 ll ueuxqsaag llffqlooil meal ' L , 1 J - v 4 1 I 1 . il 0 -6 Q L:f'1Tl41 I I A l 1 1 - - ' - A 5 u it 'x . - - T -'R' : A 4 .- I, , , if . - 1' ". ' ': 4 5 - X I-Am up " - ..,. ,QSM !v.',. .II - I II.-MII., .qw , 55 " . 1 .I Ugg.: ZJ", ' - . ' -' f ' . ' "Q 1: 'ir ,rf ' :-'- .. rw M., v I . ..I. Im, , -I-I-.,7,gag.,f .' -",'U- -.1 f if - '- ' If ,,j,'99f - .w..:-9-'. ,. gu."IL'I :Mr II-4' ' I , -I 1- 5'-I.I -T 'I I :fri .192-', gx.'.,9t,:, w 'ri .if 'JW A-"'?41 5.Illfi,Q4 ',',.'. ' -1 av-J-1 J .:':' -. - -. "4 - .- .,:ff.. ' .fc cfm- . l' 15, ' '..:'J 'ik ,. , .fi gs.. Q". , QQ - I.: f ,I Iv! ' 2,1501-I .,IQII.II -5 .n.w,f,q.f.dqfg5wgAi 1. f QV- -f VE' '1"'.i, :I . N' '-"'.,.4: . 54 "":' v..'-4 5-.MG Tw .,,,i,,-,, .- . , . N I . Q., I- I 'A gv . Q, . , . r... ,, , . , N . ' In MHS' E "J inf-"CL LX' -."-. f- -.". f.v:' ' .fx f'.'i.J..1.'4 .ff"..,:3..-ii. . ' U' AAC ki MVT, . . U,."'-A'.., I' A1-lfyus, - gg 1, C- ,J .- . .L Ip- ,Ia 7.93: . If. 'I' 1- If J tg... , QI- Qi I .If ' .xv .nl I-L4 1' -I .': . M --.,Kh-ugu' , I ,,, , ,:aIl. 07. I ' 1 ' "X ' ' l1T'.A. !4' L.,- n . . 5 '. f' afll"' .- -' - X -. g If 'Ir V -1, fn u u ' . 1' I ' ' 1 '-Q ' 4- .-' V 'If' . , , ., L" 5 45.0 -". ' -gi ...,, Iv I , w-.K ' I -5- ' . N- , 1 . , ' M ,,, G-Lu'i,n'. I . , ..u -. -.U Ia., .,.. . I I . . J. , ' v. ' ' .U 'N A I . , . -.Q , 'i '. .. " ,4 P. IA, . -, I s gy I I I . 2' ' -.' ' . ., . - .. ' . ,I. II'. : . I ,II so .., , I ' -.' o ' " I, xr , Q- 1 . - I'hlf"L-. I 'If I - . .II .,.x-Mich I - A hx, , II.. .I..I ,, Q - 1 Hz: ' ,.,, ag. .' x X ...I-o " "x, ' I Um. A T .1 .3 H, ' 4 ' f, F . if' . :'t,f'.il I I, I ,.I, gh, N , 14,5-.lf-V.. I v r .IIII If I I .I AI .TI " ". .,n f: ' X 4"-I fy. " 'A' , ' , ...rf N ' I :N .5 k. g,".,"? ' f 'w -. ' U' T1 gr' . I- 'nl . J . H r' P "5 '5 , ,. ' n '5'. - . 9 I I -' 'c ' Ig. JI. . , ' ,fy 1 I . . I l 1 4 . I sl-V J- . 3 1 '. I 4 . -.,w , . , ,1 Y ,. I A 'I , .1 .-eI f ' 1 s,"f'5 YI 1 - X ' - u ,. a x ' 1 ' r lib? XM-4 -me A Review of the Jeason a Nl HE VVestern inter-collegiate. baseball season of 1902, as has often been the ,F case when incomplete series of games have been scheduled failed to . 4 n bring out a team witha clear title to the championship. Chicago, by . winning ten out of the eighteen inter-collegiate games played, established a legitimate right to third place in the XVest, even though Northwestern secured an even break in our series with them-each team winning two xi games. It is in point of other games won that we can make good our claim over the Evanston School. Probably the most signal victories won by the team during the whole two over Illinois. "HuiT1e's" Champaign aggregation, for two seasons previous to 1902, succeeded in taking every game played with lhe Maroons in baseball. So strenuous, however, were the efforts, and so good were the intentions of our last year's team, that at one stage of the season's record we stood in the lead for the VVestern championship Qbarring Wisconsin, whom we had not then playedj and with a record of two victories to one defeat with Illinois. Unfortunately for us the two remaining games were scheduled at Champaign, with which town the team could not seemingly familiarize itself, and resulted in victories-for the "Illini," The latter team subsequently made a tour of the Eastern states, winning the games with Princeton and Yale, and only losing to Harvard by one run. The Illinois team certainly deserved, we believe, the title of "XVestern Champions." A review of the contests of the season proves that Chicago was equal to the task of ' 4' X. -E- Q season were the 20I ill bringing home the scalps of many former victors. Michigan was defeated in the initial game on Marshall Field, I4 to 7. This defeat proved to be the forerunner of two others which the 'Varsity administered to the Maize and Blue. A fourth defeat for our worthy foes was probably prevented by the welcome sign fto theml of "wet grounds." The record of winning the entire Michigan series is one which has not been equaled by any former 'Varsity nine, that of the '97 team being three victories and one defeat against the Wolverines. Northwestern, after losing the first game in the series to us, captured the second and third. The scores, 3-2 in the first, 2-4 and o-I in the second and third, indicate how bitterly the games were contested. The final game in the series was played on Marshall Field on Alumni Day, June 14. before a large assemblage of visitors attendant at the Decennial celebration. Chicago, by decisively winning the game, II-2, tied the series, but we shall always feel that the last game more than "evened" the two defeats. We suffered unmitigaled defeat only at the hands of Wisconsin. The Badgers unkindly took both games of the series from us by the narrowest of margins, 8 to 7 and 5 to 4. The Chicago-Illinois series brought out the largest crowds of the season. The games on our home grounds-two out of the Eve-were won by the 'Varsity, 6-5 and 342, the second victory being recorded only after ten innings of intensely exciting play. Erratic tenden- cies characterized the work of our men in the games scheduled at Champaign, while the Illini, cheered by its home crowd, showed championship form. Hlld took the three games and the series by rather decisive scores. During the season Chicago crossed bats with Indiana, Purdue and Beloit in single games, and with Oberlin in two contests. Beloit, only, succeeded in defeating the Maroons in any one of these games, and Chicago seemed to have little trouble in humbling the lesser lights of the "Big Nine," a fact which caused much joy among us who had witnessed previous defeats by these "little'l colleges. Mr. Stagg arranged no games with representatives other than of 'Western colleges, and no extensive trips were taken, but the schedule was a difficult one, and the efforts of the team were worthy of our sincerest appreciation. Chicago Baseball Record for 1902 U April I2 . Culver . . . 5 . Chicago April I4 Michigan .... 7 . Chicago April 16 . Lake Forest . . . 2 . Chicago April I9 Northwestern at Evanston 2 . Chicago April 23 . Wisconsin ' . . . S . Chicago April 26 Illinois .... 5 . Chicago April 30 . Illinois, at Champaign . IO . Chicago May 3 Illinois .... 2 . Chicago May 7 . Illinois, at Champaign . 7 . Chicago May I4 Indiana .... I . Chicago May I6 . Purdue, at Lafayette . 5 . Chicago May I7 Illinois, at Champaign . I5 . Chicago May 2 1 . Northwestern . . 4 . Chicago May 22 St. Albans . . . 4 . Chicago May 23 . Oberlin, at Oberlin . . I . Chicago May 24 Michigan, at Ann Arbor 4 . Chicago May 28 . Wisconsin, at Madison . 5 . Chicago May 29 Oberlin . . . ' 6 . Chicago june 4 . Northwestern, at Evanston I . Chicago june 7 Michigan, at Ann Arbor . 7 . Chicago june I4 . Northwestern . . 2 . Chicago June 16 Beloit .... 5 . Chicago Points made: Chicago, 152, opponents, IOS. Games won: Chicago, 14, opponents, 202 The Baseball Team 1902 Q., -.. X ,FAH 4. V F. 4, . Xe 5 EE ? iff S gi Q 5 it X S1 is X, , 5 , gf., L S, .P ' 59 COACHJ C AGG ST TH MI S ALLINGER B LLS WORTH E SUNDERLAND ROONEV 'CLVMENT M E HOW OAN SL KCAPTJ AR PER H PLACE IFIELD ERR RI CK TRI PA 'CD2 Varsity F. E. A. C. C. R. LEES P. A. G. R. XV. A F. W A. W H. J. H.-XRPER QCaptai11l ELLSWORT1-1 HOWE B.-KLLINGER SUNDIQRLAND MACCLX'INI 4NT Room-Lv . PATRICK . PLACE . . SLOAN . . R. W. MERR11f1E1.D W. E. SMITH Baseball Team 4 l 1 J! Batting and Fielding Averages Place, l. f. . MacCly1nent, 2nd b. . Ellsworth, p. Merrifield, r. f. Harper, c. and Capt. Rooney, S. S. . Patrick, 3rd lm. . Smith, r. f. . . Sloan, c. f. . Sunderland, ISt b. . Howe p. . . Ballinger, p. . Baseball 1902 4 Games At Bat Hits 14 48 21 li 47 I3 I2 44 II IQ 68 17 21 77 18 20 77 17 2' 74 15 20 71 I2 2I 82 I3 'I SS I3 6 IS 2 5 17 I 205 Per Cent Put Outs Assists -437 .276 .250 .235 .234 .221 .202 .169 .158 148 , 111 .058 I9 25 7 43 94 29 30 I 26 35 221 7 7 Catcher Pitchers . First Base Second Base Short Stop Third Base Left Field Center Field Right Field Errors Pe-rCe11t 4 .840 I3 .g22 3 -95' S .562 S -935 16 814 25 -735 I2 .SZI S S26 IO .969 1 .963 2 -937 A Pastoral a QBy Malcolm Gervaise de St. Trevorj How pleasant it is when the sunset glow Is gilding the west a harvest tone, In a bark canoe with a book or so, To float alone. But when the winter winds are high, And cut you straight to the bloomin' bone, And you owe for your beard, then it's fierce to try To float a loan. 1741 111' Ma Yoon The Reserves L. W. BI.-XXWELL G. E. GOODRICHI M. B. PRATT I ' W. J. SHERMAN 2 R. B. BLAKE ' O. W. JOHNSON. A. L. Yovxo . M. B. PRATT . FosTER E SCHULZ ' ' W. K. SMART Q. O. B. XVYM.-XNl N. C. ROGERS . April 5 I2 I9 April April U Baseball Record, Reserves 1902 Hyde Park . . Hyde Park . . Northwestern, 2d . April April April May May May May May May June 23 2-I 30 3 5 15 24 28 31 4 Morgan Park St. Ignatius Colle Morgan Park Armour Institute Medics . . St. Ignatius College . Northwestern, 2d Lewis Institute Northwestern, 2cl Armour Institute Alpha Delta Phi Phi Kappa Psi Beta Theta Pi Sigma Chi Chi Psi Phi Delta Theta Delta Kappa Epsilon Delta Upsilon Psi Upsilon Delta Tau Delta I S . . Reserves 3 . Reserves 2 . . Reserves 20 . . Reserves 2 . Reserves 2 . . Reserves S . . Reserves 2 . . Reserves 2 . . Reserves 4 . . Reserves 6 . . Reserves 9 . . Reserves I . . Reserves . Catcher . Pitchers . First Base Second Base Third Base Short Stop Right Field Center Field Left Field - 7 . 2 - 3 . . II . . IO -w ' J - 7 - . 3 Inter:Fraternity Baseball L Alpha Delta Phi AI 21-I 7 'I Sigma Chi I 22-4 -N Phi Delta Theta 4, I I-lo .9 Phi Gamma Delta i Delta Upsilon AI I8-16 WI Psi Upsilon I 17-I5 I Phi Delta Theta won the Banner 207 Sigma Chi 3-4 Phi Delta Theta I 15-2 I I Psi Upsilon 7-6 I - 4 - 4 - 7 - 5 I I l. I Phi ' Delta Theta 34-I I I 1 Phi Delta Theta 24- I 2 TWXQKY 'fm FUELU A Review of the Season JET ' 7 HE track season of IQO2 was very sucessful, and although we did not win the Conference meet at tl1e end, we secured second placeg il Michigan, whom we had beaten two weeks before in a dual meet, In being first. fs During the indoor season we had four meets, in which we suc- Ll ceeded in bringing out an abundance of new material from the new freshman class. Blair, Quantrell, Speilc, Friend, Cahill and Granberg being the most promising. On Feb. I, we met the Chicago Y. M. C. A. in our gym- nasium and defeated them by a score of 62 to 33, in spite of the fact that we divided the points of Friend, Granberg and Speik, who had been members of the Y, M. C. A. during the previous year. The nrst of our two dual meets with NVisconsin on Feb. 15, resulted in a victory for XVisconsin. This meet was one of the most closely contested meets ever held in our gym- nasium, and although the score shows Vklisconsin winner by a comfortable margin, every event was hotly contested and four records were smashed. Senn and Blair tied the wor1d's record in the 35 yard dash, Fred Moloney made a new wor1d's record in the 40 yard hurdles, Magee broke the western indoor record for the pole-vault, Carpenter, of Wisconsin, broke the indoor record for the two-mile run, and Bredsteen, of Xllisconsin, broke the gymnasium record in the mile run. On March 1, a full team entered tl1e Amateur Athletic Championships at Milwaukee 205 and easily carried away first honors with 44 points, the team getting second place scoring but half as many. The return Wisconsin meet held at Madison on March I5 resulted in another defeat for the Maroons, the score this time being 422 to 255. Our first outdoor meet was on April 26, at Philadelphia. Only three men were entered in this meet, Capt. Moloney, Magee, and Blair. These three men were successful in getting one first, two seconds, and one third against the Easterners. In the 100 yard dash Blair and Moloney pushed Duffy of Georgetown to his limit and forced him to equal the w0rld's record of gg seconds to win the event. Moloney also took first in the 120 yard hurdles in the excellent time of ISQ- seconds, Magee secured second place in the pole-vault by clearing the bar at II ft. 5 in. On May 3, the team held a dual meet with the University of Illinois on Illinois Field and defeated them by a score of 65 to 61. In this meet Magee vaulted II ft. 9 in., which broke all inter-collegiate records ever made in competition. The next week our team won the dual meet with Northwestern at Evanston by a score of 77 to 35. In this meet Chicago won every track event, only allowing North- western to win events in the discus, hammer throw, high jump, and broad jump. The day was raw and no astonishing records were made. On May 17, Chicago won one of the most hotly contested dual meets ever held in the west, by defeating the University of Michigan. Captain Moloney was easily the hero of the meet and captured four firsts. in three of them beating out inter-collegiate point win- ners. Speik also did good work by getting two firsts, in the discus and hammer throw. Friend won the broad jump by making tl1e longest jump of the season, 22 ft. 8 in. In the Conference College meet on May 31, we secured second place with 25 points. This was Fred Mol0ney's last appearance in inter-collegiate meets and he entered it with all of his determination of four years brought to a climax. After taking third place in the Ioo yard dash and winning the 220 yard dash and 120 yard hurdles, he strained a tendon and was unable to compete in his other event the 220 yard hurdles, which he had won in the two previous inter-collegiates. But in spite of the fact that he was dis- abled, Captain Moloney scored more points than any other man in the meet and was awarded the individual championship medal. The last meet of the year was held on Marshall Field with the University of Cali- fornia on june 7. Our team was handicapped by the absence of its captain, who was still suffering from the injury which he had sustained in the Conference meet, but in spite of this we secured eight out of a possible thirteen firsts. jo f F'l QJ 6-25 apr . e 1 GEANK , QQ-3 135, Y ffl RY-Q5 Q 9, .Wit 209 5 xt .x-Mi! XWWIK, E 4, 5 3 2 .Q "-b,.:,4:11y:,,-?,,-- 1 '- 5 f- f: iv -2-'HQ xl ' Z' fy - ,af fm? -T ' . ,Swv EH ij i E M' V4Qfj"' ,ff x'SR'ii5':" ' ' A' ' -' " 'A EG -' ' ' T 1' ' i 'JJCl'xu'rt,lx 9? 'LM u 4 it 4' Members 1902 fam if 1 325 il 4 FREDERNK G. Mo1.oNEx' . Captain ll gif E Alfred VV. Place Ernest E. Perkins il ll J X G Jerome P. Magee Robert L Henry, jr. ' It Zelmer R. Pettet Lambert A. Hopkins in Mortimer L. Cahill Richard H. VVellington Clyde A. Blair Hugo Friend Eli P. Gale Frederick A. Speik XVillian1 R. Jayne Ernest E. Quantrell Ernest W. Miller Forrest G. Smith William G. Matthews Hayward D. Warner Xenophon B. Kalamatiano Oscar E. Granberg Individual Track and Field Scores, 1902 tv E . "" an 1 . 5- 5 U - .Z C! U ,E A -9.5 1. 2 a 2 If E E 3 il fe E Q a 4 a a E 2 2 8 a fi Moloney . . S S II 5 9 16 I3 20 II IOI Blair . 3 4 5 5 4 ro ro 4 8 SI Magee 3 5 5 5 3 5 5 I I 43 Speik . 1 Il II I3 41 Henry - 5 5 5 5 3 31 Friend . 7 , 1 3 6 6 29 Cahill . 5 3 5 3 20 Hopkins . I o 4 5 20 Perkins . . 3 3 1 3 1 3 2 16 Matthews . . I 5 3 15 Pettet . 5 3 3 I2 Gale . . 5 5 IO Horton . 3 3 , 9 Warner . . 3 5 1 9 Quantrell . 3 3 1 1 8 Kalamatiano . 3 5 1 7 Senn . . 2 4 6 Jayne . . 5 5 Wellington . 1 3 4 Miller . 1 4 Smith . I I 210 UA 5319.4 Z0. - V M '-I '-I I 'E 'I QI HOV 'LJVQJAHNOHOW 1 NOJRIOH HCEISVW 'I'II I-IVD HIVCIH ? "I '2 -- -.4 sm KHJVOJ 1J:Jv.Ls APINHH vf NOLUNYI IPIJOH SN :I PU v-4 R11 CIN SNIXH?Id H3'I'IIN H NA ONVI,LVNV'IVI'I 'l'IEIH,LNVf1'6 5-VIV9 'IEIAA HEI NHVAA H.LI NS BI IEIJS OHEIHNVH9 ,. A A .. s ,- , I A FV V ,av 5 A, 7, 'N-..., N ax V ri X uf ,N NZ' Mg! g .9 Q 'P M I A I 'rsh 'W V J' we.. H l 11- ,1- f. . by I 'X lf, X t . x , " mu .. ,r I -' ... s"N Y , 3" gf! 41 fi Ti' H13 vf9W-. QM 6 e fig. LAX-.qi "--he 'Tn K EH W? Q 3 A D 1. ,Q 5? 9,1 D, 1 r "" ,.,' . M441 4' I ' ii 1. ew' ' 4 -4 49 YP-' .4-. fl 4 , 5 , W... , 41- '2 f A---1" 4 'K---f r I . ' fi. 4 u ' 4 U. Q . .ve ' - 1 ' G .. ,' 9 'I 1, 5 I N ' W. . I ' A v .- , . 4 s - .. I I N .' I v ' ""k'l I . I 1 ' 1 :'5, o . ' ' 0 , . .' ' 'Wa 1 'I-bn v 3 - ll P u .K i.. Av 1 1 ,F 'L' Q., vra' . .L Af N. . H f , , - r , , u - -'. E 5 , ri' 's ' A. e! . J, -. 4 , q' lf K' x I 1-. s 'B' ' ,. -' Ln. - .CQ ,J ' Y. .-Pg, 3 "av, , .1 T4 .u' 4 A ' 4p.,. vs 4, ' ' v , Q .NAI --V ,v:- ., J ,' ..... 5' av ..vx5'Jr A ,147 Q 1 O NI. .:,7 ,1, 'Q . Tv ' N , u- wa Vu aff' 1 " Wv,L'.' ,T .M R 4 H . lr . . .-'f,,Qn 2 5 'ff' 1'?'.', A., 0. ,VI ' -L-,. .SJ ge , .v, , gl if -v mf "vlL',J 1 v E - Y N x , 1 ' Pl". wk. - l 1 u 1 . " , u 3'4- . 'U ' . 5 'N vw . . - ... ,l .04 . .lwfbzj .. W rr V. ' ZH. ,, f edlf- X 'J Q .. K1 . ,I . .Y . n w . .A I . . . I ,- r ,f'. I ' ' ' .pta , , d . ., -'Tv . i ' I . sf... , Q Y . I . 4 -.Lg-. ,Q , -- - ." l V -. , P' . -.4 'N Z l , - '- n 72: I -x ..' la. ' 'HL ' 1 ' W . . . 4 J A 'AA ' o n ' I .'x 'sh' AU", A A V " ' 1 JA., A Q f ILL' . M .... -4:., H-inn 'wiv M' 'n im .v - JW, 1 15- nl 100 Yard 1 20 Hurdles Pole Vault 100 Yard 120 Hurdles 440 Yard One Mile 220 Yard Two Mile 880 Yard 220 Hurdles Discus High jump Shot Put Broad jump University of Pennsylvania Games .April 26, IQOZ .1 First Seton IZ' 772 im' Time A. Duffy 1Ge0r1fet0w115 1 C A. Blair 1C.5 1 . , U 1F 0. 111010ney 101 1' Tied 0093 F. G. Moloney 1C 5 E B. Milburn 1Y.1 A. B. Sherwood 1Pen11.5 0:1552 L. H. Gray 1Penn.5 j. P. Magee 1C 5 D. G. Horton 1Princ.5 11ft.Sin. 11ft 5111. Dual Meet with Illinois At Champaign, May 3, 1902. First Serofm' T11 im' Time Blair 1C.5 Moloney 1C.5 Ingham 11.5 0:10 Moloney 1C.5 Freeze 11.5 Ratcliffe 11.5 o:15f Cayon 11.5 Pettet 1C.5 Lindsay 11.5 o:515 Henry 11. 1 McCully 11.5 Matthews 1C.5 4:3542 Blair 1C.5 Moloney 1C 5 Cayon 11 5 0:22 Henry 1C.5 Ketzel 11.5 Gilkerson 11.5 IOCIJ3 Herrick 11.5 Cahill 1C. 5 Lindsay 11. 5 11595 Moloney 1C.5 Freeze 11.5 Wellington 1C.5 0:2111 Field Events Hammer Throw Pole Vault 100 Yard 220 Yard 440 Yard 830 Yard One Mile Two Mile 120 Hurdles 220 Hurdles Discus High jump Shot Put Broad jump Hammer Th Pole Vault l'O NV Speik1C.5 112 ft 51 in. Keator 11.5 5 ft. 7 in. Rothgeb 11.5 39 ft 91 in. Thompson 11.5 22 ft. .11 in. Bear11.5 11911. 81 in. Magee I1 ft 9. in. Rodman 11.5 112 ft. .15 in. Quantrell 1C.5 5 ft. 6 in. Speik1C.5 591.1 81111. lfriend 1C 5 22 feet 45 111, Speik1C.5111ft.51i11. Black 11.5 IO ft. 3111. Chicago, 653 Illinois, 61. Dual Meet with Northwestern At Evanston, May 9, 1902 Lon 5 . Fa1riveatl1er UJ5 ft' 5 m Perkins 38 ft. 115111 Hopkins 1C.5 2l ft 6 in. Granberg1C.596 ft. 1031 in. Smith 11.5 10811. 65 in. I Granberg I ft K1 Miller 1 IO First Serena' Time Blair 1C.5 Moloney 1C.5 0:0932 Blair 1C.5 Scheiner1N. 02232 Cahill 1C. 5 Davis 1N.5 0:5332 Matthews 1C.5 Stahl 1N.5 Zfljsg Warner 1C. 5 Hanmer 1 N. 5 42562 Henry 1C.5 Burke 1N.5 1112345- Moloney 1C.5 Friend 1C.5 111165 Moloney 1C.5 Wellington 1C.5 0:61 Field Events A. Baird1N.5112ft.5in. Speik1C.5 Smith 1N.5 5 ft. 5' i11. Quantrell 1C. 5 5 ft. 6 in. Speik 1C. 5 39 ft. 7111. Davis 1N.1 21 ft. 95 in. Perkins 1C.5 Friend 1C.5 A. Baird 1N.5 Magee, 10 ft 7 in. Carey 1 C. 5 Grandberg Score: Chicago, 77Q Nor1l1western,35 213 Dual Meet With Michigan May 17, 1902 Hopkins QC.l 104 ft. i11. E. G. BrewerQM.j5 ft. 9 Firs! Srrond Ioo Yard Moloney QC. 1 Hahn QM. 3 220 Yard Moloney QC J Blair QC.j 440 Yard Nufer QM. l Pettet QC.l S80 Yard Foster QM. j Cahill QC. l One Mile Perry Q M. l Matthews Q CJ Two Mile Kellogg QM.i Henry QC.l 120 Hurdles Moloney QC. J Barrett QM. J 220 Hurdles Moloney QC.l Nufer QM.l Field Events Discus Speik QC.l IOS ft 45 in. High jump Armstrong QM.l 5 ft. 105 in. Shot Put Robinson QM.l 39 ft. 75 in. Broad jump Hammer Throw Pole Vault 100 Yard 220 Yard 440 Yard 880 Yard One Mile Two Mile 120 Hurdles 220 Hurdles Friend QC.j 22 ft. S in. SpeikQC.l113ft.11i11. Fishleigh QMJ II ft, 5 in. Speik QC.j 39 ft 32, in. Fishleigh QM.j 22 ft. 4 i1 Reid QM.J 112 ft 5 in. Udell QM.J II ft. Score: Chicago, 653 Michigan, 61 Conference Meet May 31, 1902 Robinson QM J g T11 ird Time Blair QC.j o:105 Hahn QM.j 0:22 Rebstock QM. 1 0:52 Harpharn QM.l ZZOIQ Warner QC.J 4145? Kalamatiano QC.l 10:31 Friend QC 5 0316 .1 O 255 Perkins QC.j 90 ft. 5 in. 5 in, Quantrell QC.J 5 ft, 8 5 in. Perkins QC.l 39 ft. I5 in 1, Hopkins QC.j 22 ft. 5' in C. M Brewer QM.J 109 ft. 95 1n Magee 1C.1 Il ft. Fin! Serond Hahn QM J Blair QCA Moloney QC, l Blair QC. 1 E. Merrill QB,l Nufer QMJ Breitkreutz QXV.j Foster QM 7 Keachie QWJ Kellogg QM.l Molo11ey QC.l Bockman QMi11n.l Perry QM. j MCE3Cl16Ol1 QW, l Bockman Qllllllll J Nufer QM. l 77' Iifd Time lVI0lOIl6y l 0510 Merrill QB J 05225 Tibbetts Q Minnl 0:50. Daniels Q W. l 2 :oo5 141 Discus High juinp Shot Put Broad Jump Hammer Throw Pole Vault Swift Qlowaj IIS ft. 9 in. Snow a11d Barrett QM.j tie Kirby QN. lJ.l 41 ft, S5 in. Hopkins QC.J 22 ft 45 in. Bell 1Drakej 137 ft. If in. Chapman QDrakel ll ft, 65 i11 Field Events Baird QN.J 114 ft. 15 in. for nrst at 5 ft. 92 in. Snow 41 ft. Ii in. Keator QI.l 22 ft. Long QW.l 119 ft. 5 in. . Dvorak QM.J ll ft. 15 in. Michigan Chicago Wisconsin Drake . Minnesota Ju m m a ry Pain is 36 Beloit . 2 5 Illi11ois . 1 9 Iowa . IO Notre Da111e 9 Northwestern 21 He11ry QI.l 45515 Ketzel QI.J 10:07 Saridakis QXV. J OIISE Merrill QB l o:25g Place QC. J 112 ft. 85- i11. Quantrell QC.j 5 ft. Qi in. Merrill QB.j 40 ft. 55 in Hueffner QW.l 2I ft. IO Bear QI.j IIQ ft. Magee QC.j Il ft. 45 in P0 S 6 5 - 5 3 5- in :fs Dual Meet with California june 7, 1902 .1 .1 , . U .: -3 First .Yefond Time ' 4' ICO Yard Blair 1C.1 Se1m1C 1 0 10 xx. 7 220 Yard Blair 1C.1 Cadogan 1Cal.1 0 22 A .140 Yard Blair 1C.1 Pettet 1C.1 o 543- S80 Yard Cahill 1C. 1 Sewill 1Cal.1 21032 One Mile Henry 1C.1 Redewill 1Cal.1 J,:47! A Two Mile Matthews 1C.1 Kalamatiano 1C.1 101353 '44, . 120 Hurdles Cheek 1Cal 1 Friend 1C.1 0:16 ii' 220 Hurdles Cheek 1Ca1. 1 Powell 1Cal.1 0262 Field Events Q High jump Powell 1Cal.1 5 ft. S5 in. 3 Qgsggiirfgaggd it gift? Shot Put Plaw 1Ca1.1 .11 ft. in. Speik 40 ft. 25 in. Broad jump Hopkins 1C.1 2l ft. Il 'Q i11. Hussey 1Cal,1 21 ft. HX i11. Hammer Throw Plaw 1Cal.1 1.16 ft. Speik 1C.1 100 ft. Pole Vault Magee 1C.1 ll ft. Wilcox 1Cal.1 IO ft. 6 in. 100 Yard 220 Yard 440 Yard S30 Yard One Mile Two Mile 120 Hurdles 220 Hurdles Discus High Jump Shot Put Broad lump Score: Chicag0,Sg California, 5. First Blair 1C.1 Blair IC., Merrill 1Mil. A. C.1 T. Webster 1 ISt Reg. 1 Holton 1Y M. C. A.1 Hall 11st Reg.1 Herbert clSt Reg. 1 Herbert CISt Reg.1 QO11ly lirsts were counted. 1 Central Association A. A. U. Championship at Ravenswood june 21, IQO2 Seton fl' 771 Ill 'fl' Timg Smith llSt Reg,1 Merrill 1Mil. A. C.1 0 IO Slllltll 1 1st Reg.1 Pettet 1C.1 0 22g Smith 1 ist Reg. 1 Halleck 11st Reg.1 0 512 Ulfendel 11st Reg.1 E. Eckersall fist Reg. 1 2 O7 Henry 1C.1 T. Webster 11st Reg. 1 J, 45g Holton 1Y. M. C. A.1 Matthews 1C.1 9:16 Friend 1C.1 W. Magee 1C.1 0.16 Merrill 1Mil. A. C.1 Halleck 11st Reg 1 QZLZQ Field Events H. Webster 1 1st Reg.1 112 ft. Sin. Kaecke 11st Reg.1 5 ft. IO in. H.XVebster11st Reg.139ft. if in. Hopkins 1C.1 20 ft. 7y5 in. Hammer Throw Merrill 1 Milw. A. C.1 128 ft. 4 i11. Speik 1C.1 Clapper1Y. M. C. A.1 Merrill 1Milw. A. C.1 Blair 1C.1 20 ft. Z in. H. Webster 11st Reg 1 Hopkins 1C.1 Dupee 11st Reg.1 Speik 1C.1 1 Kaecke 1 lSt Reg.1 20 ft. Speik1C.1 120 ft. 1 in. Pole Vault Magee1C.1 ll ft. S in. Miller 1C.1 Booth 1Y. M. C, A.1 Jummary lbinls Hlliflfl' First Regiment . . 56 Milwaukee Athletic Club , I7 University of Chicago . . 45 Central Y. M. C. A. . . I3 215 'Q Q9 Q9 Q 'vu 'hh VJ G S O 'Q Q ll L First Annual Inte 1902 67 jun vu n.:.,..: -1-uzmez-rn EO:-f,xCLO?l2'kD Q:,:1?!EfUQE0: OCvN"T'O gc ic- L-AEA EE 5 ':"j,.4 'A'-x 5 fQgQd 2 :vs N. E Oivoz C 'x5vv GJQJCU'-mg, 'gjwllfvicgb moo-4-J? 302:53 52510 443 2 ' '-v-1 L- 2535222 1 ' 'bL::"' QZZCNEEQ ixvvmrffw. millvlljif 35?"s.3 0.204-+':..q-5' .23-'Z-'jCIJcu.'1' 35".3'ofi4r-115' 335503 AQQQEU 'ci cd A- U - ft' I-l.SE'iA, Efmgiif gUmEQQE i--w .. v:5:I-EZZE O Y., cu,V '- DL :sg :paul-100.-. Qmu,.- arg.-45512 5u'5SE fdoo-A :I::f'4v-.f-1-H --A Q 5:9 5 NCCQAAQ 300-gnu illbcc' as-:Omg 23f3"2 ww """'- :nbL.138',9' ggg.2.25 qammmi U1 GJ P-4 v-4CU"" 222255 55552: 222222 -Ng-QQO.-. 3 fi :2S J 0 Moline erg omb Str I FB. fEldo M ore l T3 YO Au XV ll Acad 1 Catli lz 4Mi1w Helmho rdles 220 Hu Field Events 'I r-4 -1 .,.., Glxln idfimkt :M -053,5 HvgA-2 5:3552 2mcs2A A, ,. A234x5 'QED .gg CU . ' 559215 1-owfjmj gJvl45gLd--. 583233 OT-HOILAM A -- .:: "".E,.I.-wi" rc-rv-m.,'1 ,v-wr: is-rT:LEc.S Wioowg 8W"-t AOQZ OX Tuff--T :ow-"'bcA :LC-QOQQQ 53-55- 595555 , 9, 'H 505331323 wok ws -wg ' qw... 93"- v-4O "' EMOQEO EAdA "?E"'5a: Alnoxfd-I" 14-4 NJHCAQ 50+-""'-.. ...S ONLHQ 4-Ju-4 Anrv-"O""" J Jcu Oy Q53-gf s-..'-- 559:25 ffl:-2734.9 Sgfmiw ,a,.'.-g-5- ':fUv2Uv. .EO"CU'QJ .-.wo.:45n.z ESESQE UBUQQQ F 3 . ': . A252 5 SSM? gdggit 'H .o ow swam?- gH4Jr'QJ-'J OW-'-F.::A'U fm-SSA :'.gb1:,8Q Q'r.'1',,,vE., 'TZ-'gulavmvi C: V mi-1 --HH D oo- 03... U 'UU 391821 Qom we 123.5260 I-4QQNn.E 2- 3 H r: H 'EE 32322 Q CH'-UEUV "'.2'e-I Sgcoogafd -P-'H.::i.f'5o Qtlirncnio. O 3 Englewood, 3 Chicago Latin, 1 I5 ision, iv Gr nnell, 233 South D inuers tW -.- Poin Four Highest eets, Chicago Us. Illinois Indoor 903 14, 1 VY Februa yumasium. G Chicago At -ms:-nn: -v: xv: Nu: F: d CTM: 5f5f?XEQ?.,.Xg.:... S-lj ooo-?o"V6i'j5'fl6 'ti ,JC O '-4-4 2 mf 'O : O U GJ UI 5-1 A 3 A U Q ET - Au-H jU57:f41Q -Cv Hoo'-1. as E'mv'-P-45 ggi?-4-la,x. :rival f-10'-':L4qJf3.1-Nr-4 gE.i05f'5E:E5' f --Q. .:: n4L41SUILDmQ,'Q:n 5 J 3 Q U : rd A 5 ,T u-4 --Au--:-4 - f ' 'T ig'-1'Z,U,SU'E- H , V . '5go:'5's2bLq,:,'l'9 ---HD fvnHo. O 5.120.215-QHZE mmsvoogggob O - A5 A2-QA UlJT:5'iEQC'-Q0 X"'t'13v,..gv-4533-van .':5'fjggEp43:'..l'o Btsmgdgizi mmmm42uw2o U7 U Q 3-4 E 53:32 : mop! M 5 QEMM mgog Q 12221522 222'-222:25 cu:up12g'C4p.,..Pia VII' 006' ""0-1" wnogi-G3-5gJ'9'b'E'-5 m-r-:rOI-'IIJUJCECMDG 603 Illinois, 26 cago, i Ch esult: R inal F Chicago Us. Wisconsin at Chicago February 2l, 1903. Fin! Second 35 Yard Dash Blair 1C 1 Poage 1W.1 40 Yard High Hurdles Friend 1C 1 Manning 1C.1 440 Yard Run Taylor 1C 1 Poage 1W.1 One Mile Run Post 1W.1 Hahn 1W.1 S80 Yard R11n Cahill 1C.1 Hall 1CA.1 Two Mile Run Hall 1C.1 Smith 1W.1 Shot Put Glynn 1VV.1 Speik 1C.1 High Jump Sullivan 1C 1 Abbott 1W.1 Pole Vault Magee 1C.1 Mucklestone 1W.1 Relay Race 35 Yard Dash 40 Yard High Hurdles Two Mile Run Shot Put 440 Yard Run S80 Yard Run High Jump One Mile Run Pole Vault Relay Race 35 Yard Dash One Mile Run 40 Yard High Hurdles Shot Put 440 Yard Run Two Mile Ru11 High jump S80 Yard Run Pole Vault Relay Race Chicago Wisconsin defaulted in Relay race. Final Result: Chicago, 491 Wisconsin, 28. Chicago vs. Wisconsin at Madison March 14, 1903 Fifi! S1650 H 11' Poage 1lfV.1 Blair 1C 1 Poage1W.1 Catlin 1C.1 Hall 1C.1 Sn1it11 1W.1 Glynn 1W.1 Speik 1C.1 Taylor 1C.1 Poage 1W.1 Breitkreutz 1W.1 Vried Cahill 1C.1 Todd lW'l gfiigiiltrxiifi Tied Post 1W 1 Hahn 1W.1 Miller 1C.1 Mucklestone1W.11 f Hueffner 1W.1 1 tied Won by Chicago Final Result: Wisconsin, 422, Chicago, 345. Chicago Els. Illinois at Champaign Ffrsi Kern 1l 1 Hall 1C.1 Friend 1C.1 Rothgeb 11.1 Taylor 1C.1 Matthews 1C.1 Sullivan 1 C. 1 Cahill 1C 1 Sheppard 11.1 March 21, 1903 Second Friend 1C.1 MCCully 1l 1 Catlin 1C.1 Smith 1I.1 Kern 11.1 Hall 1C.1 Sheppard 1l.1 1 . Quantrell 1C 1 nirrled Herrick 11.1 Post 1I.1 Tlzird Taylor 1C.1 Western 1l.1 Fairweather 1I.1 Fairweather 1I.1 Buckwalter 1C.1 Melin 11.1 Moore 1C.1 Miller 1C.1 Won by Illinois Final Result: Chicago, 451 Illinois, 41. 217 Time or Dfsl. o:04g 0:052- 03442 4i-17? 2 106g 10:o9Q 38 ft. IOQ in. 5 ft, 972 in. 10 ft. 4 in. Time or Dzsl. 0:0413 O. 2 .0557 92562 39 ft. 12 in. , 0:5535 22035 5 ft. 7 in. 43402 9 ft. IO in. Time or Dfsi. 0 2043 4145? 0:0515 40 ft. S in. 0353? lOI2331 5 ft. 8 in. 2:06fg IO ft. .1il'1. 100 Yard Dash 220 Yard Dash 440 Yard Run SSO Yard Run Mile Run Two Mile Run 120 Yard Hurdles 220 Yard Hurdles High jump Broad jump Shot Put Hammer Throw Discus Pole Vault Relay Inter:Fraternity Track Meet Firsf Hopkins, B. T. P. U Uunior Day, 19021 St'C0lld Sherman, A. D. P. - Hopkins, B. T. P. Tled wright, 11. G. D. Sherman, A. D. P. Hook, P. D. T. Tschirgi, Chi Psi Tschirgi, Chi Psi Magee, A. D. P. Miller, P. D T. McLeish, P. D. T. Blair, D. T. D. Ahlswede, P. D. T. McNab, Sigma Chi Erwin, Sigma Chi Magee. A. D. P. Alpha Delta Phi Phi Delta Theta Alpha Delta P11i Sigma Chi . Chi Psi . Beta Theta Pi Delta Tau Delta Phi Gamma Delta Phi Kappa Psi . Delta Kappa Epsilon Psi Upsilon . Gross, B. T. P. McKenna, Sigma Chi Ellsworth, P. D. T. Brown, Chi Psi Sutherland, P. G. ID. McNah, Sig111a Chi Wellington, D. K E. Garcelon, Phi Kappa Psi Blair, D. T. D. Ewin, Sigma Chi Raymond, Phi Kappa Psi Horton, A. D. P. Phi Delta Theta Jummary 218 Th fra' Johnson, Chi Psi johnson, Chi Psi Craig, Chi Psi Brown, Chi Psi Quantrell, P. D. T. Bingham, P. G. D. McNab, Sigma Chi Sulcer, Psi Upsilon Time 01' Disi. .I2g .235 .563 2.20-E 5-295 11.58 .164 5 .283 Kohlsaat, D. K. E. 5 ft. 53 in. McMillen, A.D. PQ Ellsworth, P. D. T. 21 ft. 45 in. 2I ft. 35 in. 20 ft. 7:5 in. 34 ft. 9 in. Ellsworth, P. D. T. 102 ft. Ioin. Magee, A. D. P. Hair, D. K. E. Chi Psi 29 28 20 . 18 I2 8 7 6 5 1 Q7 ft. 55 in. IO ft. -1 gs ' Q . , Q 9 - A . J F,-flllwf , 1 1 I ll all X ,g,.1,2 c o rds , L., W , -5-" Western Inter:Collegiate Records J Time or Distance Name College Date I H. V. Crum 1 Iowa June 1, 1895 100 Yards If .Io C. L. Burroughs ?Chicag0 June 3, 1899 ,l Hahn el MiCl1lg3D june 2, 1901 220 Yards .22 ll- V' Crum Iowa June If 1895 lC. L. Burroughs f Chicago june 3, 1899 120 Yard Hurdles .ISE F. G. M01011Cj' Chicago May 31, 1902 'I A, Q, Kranzlein - Wisconsin June 5, 189' 220 Yard Hurdles ik .252 G, MQIOHQ3' Chicago june 1, 190i 440 Yard Run u .J,9g E. Merrill Beloit, June 1, 1901 880 Yard Run 2.59g L. R. Palmer Grinnell June 1, 1895 Que Mile 43515. Keacljie VVisconsin May 31,1902 Two Miles 10:07 Kellogg Micbiaall .IUUC 2, 1901 . . . . P . N t D " Rulmmg Hlgh Jump rl 5 ft' H in L owers 0 re anie June 3, 1699 , A Louis ! Iowa June 3, 1899 Bffiad Jump I 22 ft. 75' in l j. A. LeRoy Michigan june 1, 1895 P916 Vault U ft- 61 in Chapman Drake May 31,1902 Dlscus Throw IIS ff- 9 in Swift Iowa May 31, 1902 Shot Put 41 ffl 35 in Kirby Notre Dame May 31, IQOZ Hammer Throw 156 ft- 3 ill Plaw California June 2, 1900 219 University of Chicago Records M 72.2115 01' Disfafzfe Cbl1Zf76fI'f01' . A. Bl ' 35 Yard Dash O4 , C an G. Senn 40 Yard Dash .042 C. A. Blair C. L. B rl 75 Yard Dash .072 -l urfouk is i C. A. Blair 1 C. L. Burroughs l l , lf 100 Yard Dash .IO 4 E Dek' Lemmon W. A. Moloney 1 C. A. Blair 1 C. L. Burroughs 4 H. B. Slack 220 Yard Dash .22 4 F. C, Moloney i C. A. Blair 440 Yard .492 W. A Moloney S80 Yard IZ5Q:f W. A. Moloney One Mile 4:33 B. B. Smith Two Miles 92565 Fred Hall 40 Yard Hurdles 05g F. G. Moloney 75 Yard High Hurdles .IO F. G. Moloney 75 Yard Low Hurdles .OSEY F. G. Moloney 120 Yard High Hurdles .I52 4 F. G. Moloney 220 Yard Low Hurdles .242 ii F. G. Moloney Shot Put 40 ft. 5 in. R. W. Maxwell Hammer Throw 140 feet XY. Carey Discus 112 ft. Sl in. A. W. Place Running High jump 5 ft. 93 in Running Broad jump 22 ft. Sl in. Pole Yault ll ft. 9 in. A. M. Sullivan L. Hopkins J. P. Magee 220 'e PftIl'6 l7,f'fd llgfg U.ofC. Gymnasium Wisconsin Gym. l'. 0fC. Gymnasium First Reg. Armory Milwaukee Milwaukee Marshall Field VV. I. A. A. A. Meet Marshall Field Marshall Field Champaign Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Champaign, Ill. Marshall Field Philadelphia Ann Arbor Marshall Field XVisc0nsi11 Gym. U.0fC.Gymnasiu111 Milwaukee Milwaukee Louisville, Ky. Marshall Field Louisville, Ky. U. OfC.Gj'1I1Il3Si31I1 Marshall Field Marshall Field V. ofC. Gymnasium Ann Arbor Champaign 2 5 .Pg l i. 1 Z S Z 1 Feb. March Feb. Feb. jan March June June May May May june june May May May june April May june March Feb. March March Oct. May Oct. Feb. May May Feb. May May 1902 1902 1902 IQO2 1899 1902 1898 1399 1900 1901 IQO2 1902 1898 IQOO 1902 IQO2 1902 1900 IQOI T898 1903 1902 1902 1902 IQOI 1902 IQOI 1905 IQOI 1902 1903 1901 IQO2 University of Chicago Indoor Records 3 5 Yard Dash I Lap 220 Yard Dash 2 Laps 440 Yard S80 Yard One Mile Two Miles 40 Yard Hurdles Pole Vault Running High jump Running Broad Jump Shot Put University of Chicago Gymnasium -1 -1 -5 -Q E Length of Track, 143g yards Time 01 Dislanfe Compelilar Trial 01' C0mpe!z'!z'01z Date C. A. Blair Competition Feb. '04 G. Senn Competition Feb. C. Smith Trial Feb H. B. Slack Trial Feb .152 Q W. A. Moloney Trial jan. F. G. Moloney Trial Jan. .243 W. A. Moloney Trial jan. .32 W. A. Moloney Competition jan. ,543 T. B. Taylor Competition Feb -53g W. A. Moloney Trial Feb 1 2:O5: M. L. Cahill Trial Feb l 23563 M. L. Cahill Competition Feb 4536 F. Hall Competition Feb IO:Q9? F. Hall Competition Feb .51 F. G. Moloney Competition Feb II ft. 5 J. P. Magee Trial Jan. 5 ft. 91 A. M. Sullivan Competition Feb 21 ft L. A. Hopkins Competition Feb 40 ft 5 R. W. Maxwell Competition Feb. 22I IQO2 I902 1900 1900 IQOO 1902 IQOI 1899 1903 1900 1903 1903 1903 1903 1902 1902 1903 1901 1903 Qs D xi Il -J 'K- 3 5 Yard Dash 40 Yard Low Hurdles 40 Yard High Hurdles 220 Yard Dash 440 Yard Run Shot-Put Q1 2 lbs. D SSO Yard Run One Mile Run High Jump Running Broad jump Relay Race 35 Yard Dash One Mile Run 40 Yard High Hurdles 440 Yard Run 16-lb. Shot Put Two Mile Run S80 Yard Run High Jump Relay Race Pole Vault reshman Track Team Chicago '06 Team vs. Hyde Park, First Eckersall QH. P,D Catlin QC.D Catlin QC.D Eckersall QH. P.D Buckwalter QC.D Maxwell QC. D Parkinson QC. D Hall QC. D Carroll QC. D Wightman QC. D Freshmen Englewood and South Division january 31, 1903 JE Srrafza' Third Taylor QCD Lehman QS. D.D Abbott P.D Kelly QC.D Keely QC.D Abbott QH. P.D Taylor QC.D Ellsworth QC.D Ivison QC.D Levison QE.D Gale QC.D Parry QC.D Frume QS. D.D Anderson QS. D.D Coyle QH. P.D and Mannigan QS. D.D tied Ransom P.D Hitchcock Q C. D Woodworth QC. D Kelley QC.D Indoor mile record lowered from 4:46 held by Eli Gale. Final result: Chicago, Q'o6D 663 High Schools, 32. Chicago '06 Us. Illinois '06 at Champaign Fin! Kern QLD Hall QC.D Catlin QC.D A Taylor QC.D Maxwell QC. D Hall QC.D McCully QI.D Carroll QC.D Illinois Post QLD january 23, 1903 Second Taylor QC.D McCully QI.D Kelly QC.D Miller QI.D Parry QC.D Melir QLD Buckwalter QC.D McLaughlin QLD Chicago. Sheppard QLD Time ar Dist o:o4g o:o5 o:o52 02242 O. Z -572 42 ft. 7 in. 2:15 4244 it 5 ft. 3 in. 20 ft. IO in 3125 Tlzird Time or Dist Crill QLD 02045- Melir QLD 4:45 Rohkam QI D 0105? Horovitz QC.D 0:55 Gale QC.D 38 ft. 9 in. Franklin QLD 1o:33g Fuller QLD 2:1353 Wood QLD 5 ft. 6 in. Kelly QC.D and IO ft. 2 in. Buck walter QC. D tied Final result: Chicago, 45g Illinois, 41. 222 meal qoeal uvwqsaag Flood. Cross Country Club M Officers for Autumn Quarter, 1902 II,xx'wARD D. WARNIQR ..... Captain Iilnxmilzir Ii. BROXVN . Secretary-Treasurer Officers for Winter Quarter, 1903 EDXVARIJ E. Bkowx ..,.. Captain WILL1.xx1 G. INIATTHI-:ws Secretary-Treasurer Members of Cross Country Club 1902203 Eugene H Bliss Inghram D. Hook Iidward E. Brown Edward M. Kerwin li. Il. Branch Maurice C. Lipman Lynne J. Bevan William G. Matthews George E. Fahr Theodore XY. Moon Newton .X. Feuisle Sterling li. Parkinson IJ. K. French Merritt B. Pratt Eli P. Gale Hayward D. XVarner Fred Hall George R. Sylla Robert Hanna Robert L. Henry, Jr. 224 9'-IJ. .nunog ssoag qnlo 4 -qs" in It , IX f I egg f I as R fl Xregf Ijgggjwhvtmg ? J T 04 I' raw? RfWiQI gm "" 5- I V I ' K , QA -5'!,w INK, I -. I Ig- II - 4 I .-'4 -,, ,,,,., I E ""' ' Q 1 S I I II , H ' "I Q,-.. I"F?5'7 QI, xl I '2fIQfIH2"3Qf' I ,Alf IIE? AXIA Q 5 E mm num Pie 51:2-rr 'WI I "F ' I "I2rrI"":::I.'."''vw I I I I I lc' ,,4H'uzuauuuuIl1 Ifpff MII IIII mm' II ill' .I .. LS' , Nj" lx 1- VLH- '55 . I, IIIIII " IIIIIIL1 Illlllw JIII N won IJIIIIIX u IIIIIIII w4q.WM,'M I 'Q IIWIIwPfg5W 1' ' . I , Wy ",,- III L' N I IIIIIIH 'I "W f 7:-:V gc I ,I I Y lg X I nn - II," ip- QIIEEIIIIII I I I I IIIIIIIW. 1 77 f' -' , ,,,,,..f, ' KQV' IQ, -'l'.2-I -I 'I s Ilsx G , III Y II' Egan I-I 5 , ':wmww ,M IwWffwImIWWIa?M' 'ig II -El.:4,:?+-i?929i -if ' - -,Wm IIJIIIIWUIIIIIIIIIIIIII ITIII If I -Ei. 3, I r I X I 15-1 F I . SWWWIHIIIXIIIXIIIIIII 'I IIII I II III II I-I I III IIIIIIII III-I II. II If II I I I I ,IIN III- IIII.. GNIIIIIIIXIIIIIIII MIIWIIIIIIIIIIIIII , I I I fl:-I I I I I II I II IIII I IIJ IIII IIIIII II I I II 'QI' I I II II I I ,- I III EHISUH - fl, 'I I I' 'I I I ' I' I II4II""'I'f' I . I l'Il'I'J-'- I www, NI I ' II I 'ixggfals I . VY IIIQQQ I I The Tennis I I I ' Team 1902 II' :II I 'I I . 4 jj. Ilifflf dll 'OL IW, I ,XI ' Joseph Walter Bingham ,,f-,..- I I, I' III I .AIA 'ff-vfgiifz., Captam 'P'-:ln-.'f'1'.m II""' III I W-I F'IQI,,5',i'.' .Amir , I' I Iv I' Will.-A Charles Proctor I'I!'l,'lr 'o""x' .x ll' 'yII I'I 'P'1xl.-X 'I' :Q'I"I'K'fu':'glII'lII 'I ,I Mffffiri' Harry Wlilliams Belfield -mi--.I.v21 an III II I Aubrey Percy Nelson I II I ure' LVI II I I ' ' I L -- :AH 6 LI WIII' I Allen Frake Xx if ,I WLC, I if If xfll II' I Q -- . I I Elbert Russel II x x J' 'x ' - x -il? N, 13 5 -i 4 x N 4.44 Officers of the Western Inter:ColIegiate Tennis Association 1901:1902l J IRVING SEAMAN, University of Wisconsin . President C. S. HAMMOND, Armour Institute . . . Vice President J. XVALTER BINGHAM, University of Chicago . Secretary HARRX' P. WHERRY, University of Michigan . . Treasurer Qitfgfsfgfisgggl HE season of 1902 was a very successful one for college tennis in the SLB X. Middle-West. More contests between teams of the larger Universities , ' took place than in any preceding year, and the general average ability I A shown by the players was higher than for many seasons past. From P- . the standpoint of victories the year was not one of which Chicago can boast. The team, though stronger than that of 1901, was weaker 3 , ' than Chicago teams of preceding years, and succeeded in winning only one of the four dual inter-collegiate tournaments played. Throughout the season, however, the team improved in skill and knowledge of the game, and in the western inter-collegiate championship the last week of May, Proctor, by consistent playing, reached the final round in the singles, where he was defeated only after a hard tight by Danforth, of Michigan. Michigan won the championship in both singles and doubles, duplicating its record for 1901. The season opened for Chicago in April, with the usual spring try-out for determining the personnel of the team. H. W. Beltield, Allen Frake and J. W. Bingham, of the team of 1901, retained their places. Charles Proctor, A. P. Nelson and Elbert Russel were the new men who obtained the right to represent Chicago in tennis contests with other colleges. Then followed a practice tournament with the Quadrangle Club, which the professors won haudily. The first inter-collegiate match was with Wisconsin on the Quadrangle Club courtsg Chicago won the doubles, Wisconsin the singles. Matches with Albion and Michigan and the Western Inter-collegiate followed. A dual match with Iowa also had been arranged to take place immediately after the inter-collegiate, but owing to lack of time on the part of the Iowa players the contest was called off by mutual consent after three matches had been played. During the Summer Quarter the usual summer tournament was held under the direction of Dr. Joseph E. Raycroft. Hays, of the Divinity School, carried off the prize in singles, and Hays and Russell won the doubles. At the opening of the Autumn Quarter in October, the annual tournament for the University Championship, which had been postponed from the preceding Spring Quarter on account of wet weather, was played. Charles Proctor won the singles, defeating Bingham in the finals 7-5, 6-I, 6-3. Moorehead and Bacon proved a surprise in the doubles, defeating Proctor and Bingham a hard five set match in the final round, by steady, consistent playing. Tournaments Western Inter-Collegiate Tournament Held on the courts of the Kenwood Country Club, Chicago, May 26, 27, 28, 29, 1902. WINNER CHAMPIONSHIP SINGLES: Henry Danforth, Michigan. WINNER CHAMPIONSHIP DOUBLES: H. P. Wherry and M. St. John, Michigan COLLEGES REPRESENTED: Chicago, Michigan, Wisconsin, Northwestern, Iowa and Armour Institute. SCORE ON THE TROPHY CUP To DATE: Chicago, 5 points, Michigan, 4 points, Albion, 1 point. Necessary for permanent ownership, 7 points. 227 Jingles Pl'Z1IAl2Il'll0lj' Round Ffrs! Round' Semi'-Finals Finals Danforth IM.3 I Danforth IM.3 I I Beye IW.3 I 6-4, 6-4 I Bingham IC.3 I E. Bailey II.3 I I Danforth IM.3 I - ro E. Bailey II.3 I 10-12, 6-3, 6-3 , E. Bailey II 3 I 6-3, 6-2 ..a so johnson IN.3 I Johnson IN.3 I 6-2, 6-4 I X 5 1-T Watkins IA 3 3' 6-4, 6-4 I I I is 5 so Moore IN3 I J. T. Bailey II 3 I I '5 is J. T. Bailey CLI 6-5, 6-2 I Proctor IC.3 QE Il Proctor IC.3 ' Proctor IC.3 I 8-6, 6-4 I Proctor IC.3 5 :F Hammond IA 3 i 6-o, 6-0 I I 5-7, 6-1, 6-1 sb St. John IM.3 I Helmholz INV.I I Helmholz Iw.3 I' 6-4, s-6 I 3 Doubles P?'Z11'7lIZ'7ZG7f1' Round Sevzz'-Finals Finals Wifmgrg Proctor and Bingham IC.3 Danforth and Wherry IM.I I Danforth and XVherry IM 3 I Danforth and Wherry IM 3 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-1 I Hammond and Flinn IA.3 3, 6-3116-3, 6-1 St. John and Wherry IM.3 I St. John and Wherry IM.3 Helmholz and Beye IW.3 Moore an. johnson IN.3 . , . I' 0-6, -6, 6- , 5-. I 6- Moore and johnson IN.I I 6-4, 6-4. 7-5 E' Bang, agd-I'T'1Za11e-V IIA I 3 3 7, 4 13. Bailey andJ.T. Bain-yI1 3 'ft "- 5'7' 'I 3 Dual Tournaments CHICAGO vs. QUADRANGLE CLUB--Played on the Quadrangle Club courts, May 3, 5, 6, 7, S, 9, lo. Won by the Quadrangle Club. CHICAGO vs. W1sCONs1N.-Quadrangle Club courts, May 16, 17, 1902. Score, VVisconsin, 4: Chicago, 2. Summaries: Jingles Helmholz IW.3 defeated Proctor IC.3 7-5, 6-4. Beye ICapt. NV.3 defeated Bingham ICapt. C.3 6-4. 9-7. Seaman IW.I defeated Belfield IC.3 6-4, 7-5. Morley IW.I defeated Nelson IC.3 6-2, 5-7, 6 3. Doubles Beliield and Proctor IC.3 defeated Helmholz and Beye IW.3 8-6, 6-O, S-6. Bingham and Nelson IC 3 defeated Morley and Seaman IW.3 5-7, 6-4, 6-2, 6-4. CHICAGO Vs. ALBION.-At Albion, Michigan, May 22, 1902. Score, Chicago, 6, Albion, o. Summaries: , Jingles Proctor IC.3 defeated Hunt ICapt. A.3 7 5, 6-4. Bingham ICapt. C.3 defeated Gill IA 3 6-1, 6-2. Belfield IC 3defeated White IA 38-6, 6-4. Nelson IC.I defeated Rufus I.-X.I 6-2 6-4. Doubles Proctor and Belfield IC.3 defeated Hunt and White IA.3 6-4, 7-5. Bingham and Nelson IC.3 defeated Burke and Engstrom IA. 3 6-2, 6-4. CHICAGO vs. MICHIGAN -At Ann Arbor, Michigan, May 24, 1902. Score, Michigan, 5, Chicago, 2. Summaries: Jingles Danforth ICapt. M. 3 defeated Proctor IC. 3 7-5, 6-4. St john I M. 3 defeated Bingham ICapt. C.3 1-6, 6-3, S-6. Wherry IM.3 defeated Beltield IC.3 6-o, 6-2. McNeal IM.3 defeated Nelson IC.I 6-4. 7-5. Doubles Danforth and Wherry I M. 3 defeated Belfield and Proctor IC. 3 6-5, S-6, 6-4. Bingham and Nelson IC.3 defeated St. john and McNeal IM.3 9-7, 6-2, 3,-6, 6-4. CHICAGO vs. IOWA.-Quadrangle courts, May 31, 1902. Hull II 3 defeated Frake IC.3 Nelson IC.I vs. Marsh II.3 7-5, 5-7 Iuniinishf.-dI. Proctor and Frake IC.I defeated Marsh and Hull II.3 E. Bailey and J. T. Bailey ILI defeated Bingham and Nelson IC. 3 Itournament unfinished 3. 228 tuea1,s 6 N .UPQL 'IEISSHH HOCLDOHJ NOSTHN VHUNHI W 'LJVD fx C HHVHH Hgh WM iw, i H x wNX,,,t MQW W 4,9 K ' wvamawf , , O s 5 o I 1 f 4 .'3ri'7lUA-1' 6.-. a ' is g T 4, o -1 , -f . . ,. .' , I.. 'Ajeigf 'J ' '. , ' VWNQ , -r f- - A . - 1 . - . l 1-,.. - ,- . . 7 , 1 ' -v Q ' - Q I s"' L' " 'lf- I x ' ' I Q-'sup ll, ' e- l . r QA . A"-- , iii V? 4 3 4' . .1 . ': I ' ' '- I ' 'f Q Rl A v' laufi . z, .il , 1 sy 3,.,, - H- .- v ' s " gl ,r . 4V3',' I Q Y . 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J, - 25-r-Levi' , 'I , ,.L21f246'Efiifz2fFz,?tE'Ef51,9X-It-s e 4 "WW X O 2-. ' - M, 1 1 HE devotees of Golf in the 'Varsity were exceedingly grateful last year in seeing the game at last raised to the "inter-collegiate" stage of match play. In former years desultory tournaments have been held, offering small inducements to our best players, in that they were usually handicap affairs which are unsatisfactory at best. Mr. Stagg, however, realizing the needs and also the aspirations of those interested in the game, "started the ball rolling" for a 'Varsity Golf Team by arranging two matches with the University of Michigan, one to be played at Ann Arbor during the fall quarter, the other at Chicago during the spring quarter. The interest raised by the scheduling of these matches was shown by the large field of entries in the preliminary tournament to pick the team. This was held on the links of the Homewood Country Club, which very graciously extended the courtesies of the Club to the Univer- sity, October I6 and 17. The course is an ideal one and the scores made in the preliminaries were very fair. The team which was picked as a result of this preliminary play, to represent the University against Michigan, consisted of Fred Pettit, Ashley C. Dixon, Howard J. Sloan, XVayland Magee and Boeuf Pettit. Howard J. Sloan was elected captain of the team and on October 24 and 25 led the team against a picked tive from the University of Michigan on the links of the Ann Arbor Country Club. The links were strange of course to our players, differing much in their layout to the home links, but without offering excuses we may say the team played well under the conditions and held itself even with Michigan on the second day after losing four down the first day of play. The return match with Michigan will be played on the Homewood links May X . as 22 and 25, when we hope to regain the laurels lost at Ann Arbor. Chicago:Michigan Match at .Ann .Arbor October 24 and 25, 1902 MICHIGAN UP CHICAGO UP Smoot . . . I F. Pettit . o Bloomfield, Captain . . IO Dixon . . , o Berry . . . o Sloan, Captain . 9 Felker . . . 5 Magee . . . O Trueblood . . . o B. Pettit . . 3 Total .... Ts Total . Q Michigan 4 up. 231 'Team Tournament Foll0wi11g was the result of the preliminary tour11a111ent to pick the team : Fxrsl Day ,Nkromf D111 Tolal Store Fred Pettit . . S1 QI I72 A. C. Dixon . S4 90 174 H, J. Sloan . . . Q5 Q7 190 Wayland Magee . Q2 Q9 191 XM. C. Craig . 100 Q4 194 B. Pettit . . . lO2 93 195 J. Carroll . 101 98 199 S. R. Capps, jr. QQ 101 200 H. Hibbard . . . H12 Q9 201 N. Buck ..... . . loo 101 201 9' M. C. Craig was debarred from the team because of a condition, and B. Pettet substituted. Handicap Jammer Gournament 1902 Handicap l711,1'w'5 Slrokes l7a,1fe1's Sirokes A. A. Stagg . Scratch W. Gand . . 6 E. A. Miller . 2 C. R. Howe 7 W. Magee . 2 H. G. Gale . . S A. G. Thomas . 3 H. M. Tingle IO I. G. McCleary 4 C. Eisendrath . . IO C. W. Eastman . 4 R. H. Murray IS N. D. Buck . 4 C. XV. Sills. . 18 G. Northrup . . 6 G. A. Oliver 18 Stagg ln Stagg Tingle l 5 up, 4 to play Stagg 5 Eisendrath l Thomas 6 up' 5 to play Thomas li 7 up, 5 to play I Stagg I Buck l Buck IV 4 up' 3 to play QQ' Sills 55' 4 up, 5 to play Buck E4 Northrup 5 Miller 4 up' 2 to play l :J Miller 5' S up, 7 to play 5 bo gl I' C0-:gr Magee 5 Magee I 53 Oliver 5' By default Magee 5 Murray 5 Eastman 6 up' 4 to play Eastman 5 9 up, 7 to play l Magee McC1eary l Howe K I up lm holesl 5 Howe 5 1 up Howe Gale .5 Gand By default 75 Gand 5' 3 up. 2 to play 232 NM!! L N! X ii I 1 f 5 .1 1 University Jtrong Men Total Strength Strength of Legs Strength of Back Strength of Triceps-push Strength of Biceps-pull Strength of Chest Strength of Right Grip Strength of Left Grip Lung Capacity Men in the University Robert Wallace Maxwell Sherburne H. Wightman Frank G. Burrows . Laurens L. Simpson Ernest Earl Perkins Charles julian Webb . Edwin Eugene Parry George D. Buckley . William Richards Blair Frank McNair . . Iames Milton Sheldon Arthur Ward Greenwood john W. Jones . D' Jtrength Test Records Q 2714 pounds, Qtlld Systemj Frederick Day Nichols 4511 pounds Walter Scott Kennedy 1 lValter Scott Kennedy ISOO-l-pounds 'L Alfred 'William Place 1253 pounds Walter Scott Kennedy 690 pounds Walter Scott Kennedy Frank Louis Slaker 590 pounds William Alexander Gordon 270 pounds Alfred William Place Lambert Arundel Hopkins 200-I-pounds William Carey 165 pounds 430 cubic inches George D. Buckley Lambert Arundel Hopkins Charles julian Webb Who Hold a Record of Three Thousand Pounds or Otler Herbert Frederick Ahlswede . Clarence W. Sills . Ferdinand Mosely Horton Robert XVallace Maxwell Strongest Freshman 233 4083 pounds 3421 pounds . 3317 pounds 3302 pounds 3240 pounds 3217 pounds . 3215 pounds 3187 pounds 3152 pounds 3141 pounds 3140 pounds 3090 pounds . 3079 pounds 3038 pounds 3022 pounds 3005 pounds 4083 pounds ai?-'J C X b ca 4- Q, I f l 40 089 1 ' ff Q We v 6 A 13' P f, .J 1 3195 0 5 L 1 Gbe Cadet Corps U XVILIXIER CARLYLE HARR1s . . Captain ROSCOE SIMPSON FAIRCHILD . . Lieutenant FRANK B. HUTCHINSON, JR. . . HAROLD C. BRUBAKER . . First Sergeant Second Sergeant JAMES PATTERSON . . . . . Corporal PAUL PORTER BOLIVAR BROOKS . . Corporal EDWARD EARLE BUTLER . . Corporal CARL E. LEAF . . . Corporal FRED E. FLEET . . . Corporal HE year of 1902-O3 has spelled success for the Cadet Corps. The forty men on the roster have taken up drill and manual with energy and precision. Colonel Brinkerhoff has given each week a lecture on a vital military subject, and a movement has been started towards giving credit for work done in the theory of tactics. Target practice has excited good natured competition for the handsome medals presented by Lieutenant De Sombre, former Captain of the Military Company. Lieutenant Wrightson, who succeeded Lieutenant De Sombre as Captain, has followed the example of his predecessor, and has entered the U. S. Army, being appointed a Lieutenant in the infantry. 23-1 W Ng. 'E N- ll F JUNIOR COLLEGE BASKET BALL TEAM Women's Athletics HE athletic life of the women of the University has had many ' encouragements this year. Most important of these was the new field which was opened in May by five hundred enthusiastic girls T and their friends, the occasion being the first junior-Senior Basket e - - Ball Contest. Then the women were given the new School of Educa- , tion Gymnasium, which made the possibilities of training very good, and in the spring they moved into their own gymnasium in Lexington Hall, adjoining which is a small field. Besides the usual junior-Senior basketball contest for the cup, and baseball games, there was held a second winter indoor meet, where prizes were offeredg class contest in hockey in the spring, and a golf tournament at the Auburn Park Golf Club in the fall. Systematic instruction in fencing, and rowing, and tennis was also included in the sports. This year the annual basket ball banquet was enlarged into an athletic banquet, and one hundred basket ball, baseball and hockey enthusiasts were assembled. Basket Ball Teams, 1902 Jenior College Team NARCISSA COX ....... . Manager AGNES WAYMAN . ...... Captain Center-Madge Houghton ' Ada B. Cox Forwards 31513311 Guards Ruth Moore C e Helen Brandeis Substitutes-Caroline Hopps, Mary Conlan Junior College Team HELEN FREEMAN ...... Manager KATHERINE MCDONNELL ....... Captain Center-Martha Tschirgi Katherine McDonnell Anna Goldstein Forwards M. Louise just Guards Julia Swadener . Bertha McCloud, M. Dodge, E. Munson, Substltutes Alice Rhode, G. Sedgwick, A. McGoorty iz! . .,.,., , , . A A , . .-..... Eli, en, A . SENIOR COLLEGE BASKET BALI, TEAM Games April 24 Seniors vs. juniors May 8 . . Seniors vs. Juniors May I3 . . . Seniors vs. Juniors Gymnastic Contest March 17, 1902 Events Ladder Running Broad jump Running High Jump Work on Horse JVame Events Entered Points Iliad? Alice Rhode 4 I7 Rena Hooper 2 IO Katherine McDonnell 2 8 Ina Grifiin 3 4 Katherine Golden 1 3 Frances Taussig 1 3 Olga Vondraeck 2 2 Edith Harding 2 2 Katherine Bones 2 1 Agnes Wayman 3 1 Golf Tournament Autumn, 1902 M L just M Mf Kiiedaisch ' Just I xzilgglyan A. VVayn1an I if 2155515 iA' B' COX 5'15E?eiEer ifR. Hooper ii. 2332135 :A H- M. just 1 ir A. B. Cox I I 2 up A. B. Cox ,I 236 ummm FRATERNAL TIONS. Jecret Jocieties at the University of Chicago 11 Men's Organizations Undergraduate Colleges DELTA KAPPA EPSILON PSI UPSILON PHI KAPPA PSI DELTA TAU DELTA BETA THETA PI CHI PSI ALPHA DELTA PHI DELTA UPSILON SIGMA CHI PHI GAMMA DELTA PHI DELTA THETA SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON Medical Department NU SIGMA NU ALPHA KAPPA KAPPA PHI RHO SIGMA PHI BETA PI Law Department PHI DELTA PHI DELTA CHI PHI ALPHA DELTA fLocalj Women's Organizations THE MORTAR BOARD THE SIGMA CLUB THE ESOTERIC THE WYVERN CLUB THE QUADRANGLERS PHI BETA DELTA Honor Jocieties PHI BETA KAPPA THE SCORE CLUB ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA fMediCa1j THE THREE QUARTERS CLUB THE OWL AND SERPENT NU PI SIGMA THE ORDER OF THE IRON MASK THE SIGN OF THE SICKLE THE KALAILU CLUB 238 Sggffxxax Qlpfxax KEYS-lim A 5 ,EVN dia VQPFALP I Some Fraternity Houses , v,.1.p - . " 4 ,,eJ4 l 0 ,. . f ' f,' .5- - ,. 'u . -, l '. ,a .f .P 92 3 'W , I M .' '2- f., 'ZX , ,,1A.L.4 , -, . . ' It 'gl'-...Q . I 4- A rw ' 1 -' ,',v" b - n '- " " " - ' . y ." - 1 .4 ' ' - ' 's'..,. ' 5 T' I HL Q -nxt, I2 . X Y: 1 .Q Wx yn .0 'nts' " . gulf!! Viv. KM' W. 5 ',, ,lj ' - " '1 vu? ' 2' .U 4 A .fha . . v 'J' A ,Hn 9 M A, ,. 'V-'-.,2'Qf44 ' ,I ,.Q.l',l -yr. 1. 4. Y- . -' .' 'QQ' Q5.'.":fF"'i'f'-' . Q.. - v Wg o. 1 -- ,:.., gf, . H xffrfy. An 4 ,f . ' SJ N' ". PM .'1 . " ll "ff QUT"-." Tl- ,-, , ' .':Jf. - 1l,n'1',l4 y ,A bkgfiuf. I 1-I 7 U.. .r7, .' 'r I 7 ' '-"f . - ,5 ' Q 0 WU I .u q:-- ',,'l .1-.' . '-xi .ra-,.', ,jw - ,K ,-.JJ-- ."r :,.I I-1' 1' , rl O 1 54' . M v:'f.'1'5 ' l -, I .'- If I I 0 ' " Q " ', ,Se - ,r -'A ' I. 4 w. , . , A 'I v o ' ' ' I . - A . ff' A R , " . Z . , , A . . Q , s . ' . ' . , . ' J, I 4 n - - :- f 1,r.r . I, .x..' 4 x ' I K . , . l 1 iq. ' M.. I ' -Q A- '+V '31 -. 7' 1, , , v .P ,, .7' . , A-"P K1 a xg, 1 ' A -.1 , "x K . N 'tv' - ,' Ju. , V . . - ,. ' . '., i. A .1 D ,'- ,. . 'N 9 ' .. . V h -34' ,v .-1 ' A 1 'f . T, ' v ,. . ...si ' ' --fi" 'UXAQ ',. vbx ,.. . . .l ' 4 - : . ' r My ll ' 'jul X -li " aw f , 'Qf1' ' N ,-,f 4 , mwW Z llzi , A 'H ,W I -"yt 4, ' I "I Q I. ,' ,S I . .f,. -g' 9 I V L. ' Q , Q Q, 1 . J' .-1 M, ou , ' , .y' w ff. .. . .: , -'H - Q 4, - A -r .I uw ..:!v". J rl V 'r w ,74:fCW 'i4'.: ' 1 , MV. ,- ,, N, ' LJ 4, ,-' , - A. ' " ' v , S W W , Q x l . w 7 J v. .Q-I QI, r .,."q4.f r V " W 4-1'4" 1. , . .Nuo , ,we ' 4 n,z U wy 1 1 W ' 1 I ..- , , 1-X X' I r ' .L ,"4.'- 'w I 1 r a l , ,I .- . 1 F , Tw o, A 1 4 ' g k . ,1 , X v Q I I 0. ...j. A v M., + H .Q-..., sl " Ar I' pil.: -. Delta Kappa Epsilon f'd0IHld6'lf af Yale 1vl.7l'Z'EI'SI'41' ISN Phi Theta Xi Sigma Gamma Psi Chi Upsilon Kappa Lambda Beta Eta Pi Iota Alpha Alpha Omicron Epsilon Rho Tau Mu Nu Beta Phi Phi Chi Psi Chi Gamma Phi Psi Omega Beta Chi Delta Chi Delta Delta Phi Gamma Gamma Beta Theta Zeta Alpha Chi Phi Epsilon Sigma Tau Tau Lambda Alpha Phi Delta Kappa Tau Alpha Sigma Rho 4 Roll of Chapters Yale University Bowdoin College Colby Amherst Vanderbilt University of Alabama University of Mississippi Brown University Miami University Kenyon College University of North Carolina University of Virginia Dartmouth College Central University of Kentucky Middlebury College University of Michigan Williams College Lafayette College Hamilton College Colgate Vniversity College of the City of New York Vniversity of Rochester Rutgers College De Pauw University Wesleyan University Rensselaer Polytechnic Adelbert College Cornell University University of Chicago Syracuse University Columbia University University of California Trinity College College L lfniversity of Minnesota Massachussetts Institute of Technology Tulane Vniversity University of Toronto Vniversity of Pennsylvania Magill University Leland Stanford University 241 Delta Kappa Epsilon nr THE DELTA CHAPTER Eslablzklzed December, 1893 E Fratres in Universitate Faculty Nathaniel Butler, Colby '73 Robert Herrick, Harvard '90 Frank Frost Abbot, Yale '82 james Rowland Angell, Michigan '90 Walter Wallace Atwood, Chicago '97 Charles Darling Buck, Yale '86 Ernest LeRoy Caldwell, Yale '87 Henry Gordon Gale, Chicago '96 Preston Kyes, Bowdoin '96 Eri Baker Hulbert, Union '63 Addison Webster Moore, DePauw '90 Shailer Mathews, Colby '84 Albion Woodbury Small, Colby '76 Adolp Casper Miller, California '87 Charles Porter Small, Colby '86 Frank Bigelow Tarbell, Yale '73 Hiram Parker Williamson, Middlebury '96 George Edgar Vincent, Yale '85 Ralph Waldo XVebster, Chicago '95 Chas. Otis Whitman, Bowdoin '68 Graduate Colleges Carlyle Moore Charles A. Proctor Wm. M. Patterson john M. Linden Curtis R. Manning Ralph C. Manning Undergraduate Colleges Thomas J. Hair Frank McNair Harry M. Tingle Howard J. Sloan Milton Sills Clark S. Jennison Robert H. Murray Logan A. Gridley Ashley C. Dixon Frederick B. Pattee joseph E. Hora Richard H. Wellington Edward R. Ferriss Clarence W. Sills Albert W. Sherer Wade Hulette Daniel C. Webb t Lagene L. Wright Earle H. Fleming Will M. Hough Colors: GULES, AZURE, OR . . ,rv W "' "Y."' r ' V ' . A X .Q ,v wr. ' 59 .l lwlgt 1, ' O , V. ., 4 ,-. A -. W . 'Y' ' , . V ' 1 - 7 '."'7T., , is Lilly, ' I f 1 I " P' . r "" ,UA W . .1 - A , . " " n. 77 L ' , .., , . I., A f A ',m . 'S A- A Axf, f M. I . r" v , 15. 'L A ' W' I NA v..,,,.gL .J - F4 ,L W J I: AA, , , . ' 'A-,Q jj A - -' 'A ' ff, rf., -, ,QA A 1 - - '-.-ff ' ' 7' I . Y f,'.'.4'.., ""':'y:C:sf M, ' ' ' ,A ' A ., , 'six -'U o ' r . I' NX A gf-K ' .P lr 1 V luv? -" ' ' '- '. 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'x N X - I-,I L'-XJ, nip" ,,"' ' , " 4 ,JV '.".' ,.v .1 'g' 1 g,.f- A . J: Q . l 'Q . Q' j5.1"7w51' 7' " V .f J. -4 ' N h . - 'L' " ' - 11 ' 5' W. Ln' 'IV I ' Y- - -f - wb J: , . M. fs ' 1. F.g'.S.' TT, ' , . rf-.-'ref-. HH' 'xx Auf . F. l-g .-. fn' '. 'fx 19. ' - v . . - Hu, .C+ 8 4 .M 15' . QQ ,z f 1: 9,2 ff, S l X1 ill M, A, -,b Q1-:Q - ix Qi? ZIES 2222 :zu x 5, 1:35 7 2? 02 11'f V' 1 :mi 'ff!,f1 f ffm f 1' f" ' 'wxf 'O 'if A af, '. . - LQ , ,.- ..A 5 .r 4 J,D,.' . A u -, 3 YN , -'11, I. .,5VM 5 U I ""f7T , 'AI ' ,- YL!- ' 9 Lyn ,. .Q s-- ' + ',' MQ . '- . .s A ' 'i,p..,7 su M W--aa - . svvuygtg I .. why I ". 4.'. KU .'A. I '41 :A ' 13,1 . ' -Lf-,J -, ,V ux' . V 'A JAQ-... . A J" . V ' 1 Y. Y-yi, A , w ,' 'Zn 4 K 1.' ,- "X V . --1 , I. A ' . . 5: 311 ' -x '. I 1 t ' ' P. - . al ' , 1- r " ' I "le i w, .a.- . - . ' r 'fx' ' fl Ya. 1 I' ' s . -xx ' i , :Q ' ' ' v , X ' - 3 j 0 . as , ' 1 ' n 1 e 0 ' s . gr -4. .. ' '- I V r ,' ,Wv'.' . ,L . , , , .. 5. f . Jr 'Q I .I .'l ,. W 'z . I 'A' . D P -f 'ai3e . -1, , , A '- Wx" 1 1 f A- V ' 4 ' 1 f- ' "Afwt 1. ' ' " ill, .. f , IL 1.-' P E ,sry 3" f-l ?u.fh .4 , . an 1-I, ii' .- A .p r '-I "' "KW" nQ,."1' ' 1 'mr' 1' if' Phi Kappa Psi E Founded at Wlzshingfon and jeijfersozz College, 1852 Dz'5!1'z'rt I. Pa. Alpha Pa. Beta Pa. Gamma Pa. Epsilon Pa. Zeta Pa. Eta Pa. Theta Pa. Iota Pa. Kappa N H. Alpha Mass. Alpha Rhode Island Alpha N. Y. Alpha N. Y. Beta Y. Gamma Y. Epsilon N. Y. Zeta N. N. Md. Alpha Va. Alpha Va. Beta W. Va. Alpha Miss. Alpha Tenn. Delta Ohio Alpha Ohio Beta Indiana Alpha Indiana Beta Indiana Delta Illinois Alpha Illinois Beta Michigan Alpha Wisconsin Alpha Wisconsin Gamma Minn. Beta Iowa Alpha Kansas Alpha Nebraska Alpha Cal. Beta Cal. Gamma Washington-jefferson College Allegheny College Bucknell University Gettysburg College Dickinson College Franklin and Marshall College Lafayette College University of Pennsylvania Swarthmore College Dislrifl lf. Dartmouth College Amherst College Brown University Cornell University Syracuse University Columbia University Colgate University Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute Dislrict III. johns Hopkins University University of Virginia Washington and Lee University University of XVest Virginia University of Mississippi Vanderbilt University Dz'sl1'z'ct I V. Ohio Wesleyan University Wittenberg College DePauw University University of Indiana Purdue University Northwestern University University of Chicago University of Michigan Dz'sz'1'z'd I '. University of Wisconsin Beloit University University of Minnesota University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Nebraska Stanford University University of California 247 Phi Kappa Psi ,G THE ILLINOIS BETA CHAPTER Esizzblishfd pwllllltlljf 71, 1894 D Fratres in Unitlersitate Faculty George Lincoln Hendrickson, Johns Hopkins, '87 David Judson Lingle, Chicago, '85 Theodore Lee Neil, DePauw, '33 Oscar Lovell Triggs, Minnesota, '89 Graduate Colleges Albert Bertram Garcelon William Chambers Meyers Roy Dee Keehn Undergraduate Colleges Dean Swift Howard White Johnson William Franklin Johnson Richard Cones Neptune William Walter Johnston Harry Ingle Raymond, Jr. Joseph Charles Neptune Harry H. S. Van Velsor Edward Goode Woods Fred Robinson Pettit Julien Lafayette Brode Richard C. Root Lawrence Mortimer Haarvig Guy Drummond Randle Frank Von Tesmar Albert Jarvis Hopkins, Jr Robert Volk Bertholf Marsh Pettit Hugo Ernst Martin Phelps Cornelius Joseph Abijal Sibley William Howard Thomas Wayne Defries Mitchell Wilbur Carl Hibberd R. B. Kelley Alfred H. McAdoo George Edwin Schnur Colors : PINK AND LAVENDER 248 A n f 'wflQg17:5.'.vw . args v ' 1 I' 1 , -5 L I N , n , ' ., ' -, r u . ' 7 w xl I. 'v ,, ' s . 4 1 'Mgr I . 5 w x A , 1 Q 1 1 I . Y , W1 C 2' V 1 X I A I 1 ' A I 1 1 ml K , 4 Q U . N K I v , I4 1 I D 6 4 I H l A , ' V I F "5. nf! I ' . 1. 1 f' I 4 1 "' - '.-1 Li J if BOH L LJ? U nf 14' 'I' X.. ,T ny ,qc 1 .DIJIIM , , '?'7"-"'Wf' 377l'6ffQ+-f:?f ' H+.-I . . -' ': . V f 4, yr "gfq.L ug " ' 11" Tar- ,-,R+ ' .n w x' , , Y , ' I- ,'.,'i . ,' " A""i.lH, 7 g',, B.l.1'H 1 , ,f-T' 1' f"' ' 1 L - ,fl ' 1 s ' . Wk -.rg N 'N z.J fMg , -V , - f -,.:',..-gy I ' M' I., ax, I, , , H Um, I l 'lb 5 i, lu I. xr ' ' , :yi ' . 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JE Beta Theta Pi Founded at Ilfiami U1ziver5ity 1839 27 Roll of Chapters Miami University Ohio University Western Reserve University Washington and Jefferson University DePauw University Indiana University University of Michigan Wabash College Center College Brown University Hampden-Sidney College University of North Carolina Ohio Wesleyan University Hanover College Knox College University of Virginia Davidson College Beloit College Bethany College University of Iowa Wittenberg College Westminster College Iowa Wesleyan University Denison University Richmond College University of Wooster University of Kansas University of Wisconsin Leland Stanford, Jr. University University of West Virginia Northwestern University Dickinson University Boston College johns Hopkins University University of California Kenyon College Rutgers College Cornell University Stevens Institute St. Lawrence University Maine State College Colgate University Union College Columbia College Amherst College Vanderbilt University University of Texas Ohio State University University of Nebraska Pennsylvania State College University of Denver University of Syracuse Dartmouth College University of Minnesota University of Cincinnati Wesleyan University University of Missouri Lehigh University Yale University University of Chicago University of Colorado Bowdoin College University of Illinois 251 Beta Theta Pi W THE LAMBDA Rl-IO CHAPTER ESfl7bfI'Sh6tIl,ftZ7ll1lZljf 25, 1894 Fratres in Unitlersitate Faculty Edward Emerson Barnard, Vanderbilt, '87 Charles Reid Barnes, Hanover, '77 James Harrington Boyd, Wooster, '85 Clarence Fassett Castle, Dennison, '80 John Milton Dodson, Wisconsin, 'So William Gorsuch, Knox, '98 Frank Wakeley Gunsaulus, Ohio Wesleyan, '75 Henry Rand Hatfield, Northwestern, '92 Charles Richmond Henderson, Chicago, '70 William Bishop Owen, Dennison, '87 Richard A. F. Penrose, Jr., Harvard, '84 Jerome Hall Raymond, Northwestern, '92 Rollin D. Salisbury, Beloit, '8l Francis Wayland Shepardson, Dennison, '82 Herbert Ellsworth Slaught, Colgate, '83 james Hayden Tufts, Amherst, '84 Charles Zueblin, Northwestern, '87 Graduate Colleges Eloit Blackwelder jeiierson Duddleston Blything Robert Harold Goheen Thaddeus Jasper Merrill Undergraduates Platt Milk Conrad Harry Albert Evans Henry Davis Fellows Samuel F. Fellows james Sheldon Riley Dudley Eugene Bard Harvey William Getz Frederick W. Powell Pardee Francis Wayland Patrick Ovid Rogers Sellers Arthur Ralph Gray Hayward Dare Warner Frederick Charles Drew Charles Neil Thomas Robert Franklin Trumble David Earl Nichols Le Roy Alfred Startzman William Hugh Hatfield Cala:-.v: PINK AND Lunar BLUE 252 xv 'gj Vwtidff 1 1 1 W ' 1 W 1111, 1 1' 'g.11117'1 ffg'l'QSWFW"W 1 1 1 , 11,,,A. 111 f-+1 :X 1' ' W' X 1 XX111' 4 1 , A 1-' -1, 1 - if Wu. 3 U 1 1 'H ' 11 A ' ' V 1 31 1 J WT1 1"'-XW f 1 1 . 1 -121111. 'K X 1 , .Y.c11 1 X 1111 X 1 1 ' AXX.X1,11 1.1: 1X 11 1 1 Q1 A nl 11 YA , 1 1 f1,,.t- 1 f .1.'11 W '11 t I ' 1 r. .1 1X 1 11,1 1 11 1 1 1 11' ' 11, 1 W 'Wx' A41 1 , 1 1j' WW ug,-LW 1 Qt, 1 ...A eff ..- 1 -4- .,1 'AJ 1 1- ' - 1 - " L . -' '- 11.-W-1 . .311 1 1. 'V 'AX 87.5 1 1.51 1 .'. I1 , 1 1 11 17 71 11 1,11 1? 1. W ll ' .1 XXYX 1111- ' - . iw - 11 , fp' W . 0 -0 ' 1. , M11- . 1 . '1 11 1 1 1 1 11 W 1 1 1 1, 1 X .X1 ,X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X. 11 W1 I YW 1 1 1 1 1 1,1 11 .JW 1 1 1 1 A 1. 'i '1'X"1. 11'-.X Xl 111.X. 1 . X , 1' WQ!XX,1..X1f1 W 1-1' AX X A 111' ' W WW -1' " 11- 1u ' 1' 1117 " 1 1 WW111 1, .I-' J 1- .X1 1 11 X - "1 'L 1 -.15 5 . '1 :!'1'll '111 'f 1' 1g1fW"1, 1XXXX11XX 1 swf' . X J.Q,1X1XXX,l11:,,, 1 111Xg1,g-3'-QL, "L-1' '- 4111? A - vii"-'Ml - 1.1.11 1.1. .XX- ,hX-. - Jfugii 1.T'. . 1 .1111k'1111 ,X1,11.1.:1:' 1 ' 1- 'Y '1 '.1 'Q '51 1-- .11-1- .4-,T V""'?1'.11'.1,X uv 'W fit 1. Q- . 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' ...X X .:X , . -1, - Q, + A" 3 -51,5 :Jw " x - li lA!! 'sg ' J ..:X ,, - ,X , . F ' L ' '! w, ' 1 " ,UTI 'Fu A X A r X' Y,, .Lf ul - Y .- F, 'f af! x uf ,-0. 5' , ' .4 , Q' 'X ., - f Q,-X L s., -' f, tqf-,X NX ' 1' , 5' ' 1 Q AX, -. 4' 1.- N , . 5 ' . ,w .nu W ' , . 3 , . I , ' U v W, V A ,Q a' 'I X, X A ' A 'G l., ' a . ,, X'71,, Vw , J ' , XX ' , X K X -X,X ,f',rv. - - ,X ' ma ,-:M ' 'f . . 9- ,u,yvN.4' ' , , , , 1:J4'0"3' - Q 'X 1 Y ". " H - ' bw , , 1 '- " 'g 1 , 1 XX . it-N' r , . ,,, v. , . K v , Q, , ,, -9 I. - , . , Q9 fu- ' Xm , ,U 1, X ,v JXX X qf':fX7XXXX: ,", ' 4 . 'A X " ' '- ' '.1 Wi, , 'Q '- ', ' . A, : ' , , , ' , A , ' , , 4, , , , X X' , ' W , ' ,X I ,X 3, ,, ' . " ' ' ' , 4 ' , ,, Pr' ' ,. ..' ' - ' , ,, , , , ' X ... " nj "XA . 1 , , X R ,bv X V . 4 . a If ' 7 V ' . "I ' ' ,ws '." ,X " -, ' ', " V ' .., , X . , X, - .X , ,- X ' W "',',',' f,uI,"" of-1"y, "WI, 'lfilh ', ' A - v ' N , , 0 ' 'u , '. 1' 1 s, " , X ,- i , I X, Vt '. X , 3 X , ,X ,sf X, ,,,-, ,ww n' I ' ." ' .' X.: . , X ,. 4 Q .X . Q 4 . X , , , , Nz- .U Q X'iX . X , . u , ' nX, 'vw a I I f ' . N, ."' , ,XX ' I, u 1 Q " L , 1 1 , - 5, , ' 13 4 " 11 , X 4 N 0' " , " If I - ' v 5, X I , 9 , 0 v u u . , , , Y X ,.,,iXX- a - , I ,,1 : ., X1 " f 1 b 'JL' 1 iv ' j V4 I" X 1. . 'O' "N-J4 ,uf n o '- H ,, .. XXXXXX v , .' 'L,.:f"..4k. ' Alpha Delta Phi .0 Founded al flamillon College, 1832 ,U Roll of Chapters Hamilton Columbia Brunonian Yale Harvard Amherst Hudson Bowdoin Dartmouth Peninsular Rochester Williams Manhattan Middletown Kenyon Union Cornell Phi Kappa johns Hopkins Minnesota Toronto ' Chicago McGill Hamilton College Columbia College Brown University Yale University Harvard University Amherst College Adelbert College Bowdoin College Dartmouth College University of Michigan University of Rochester Williams College College of the City of Ne Wesleyan College Kenyon College Union College Cornell College Trinity College Johns Hopkins University University of Minnesota University of Toronto University of Chicago McGill University 255 W York A Ipba Delta Phi 127 THE CHICAGO CHAPTER Eslablished Illarch 20, 1896 ,U Fratres in Universitate Faculty Thomas VV. Goodspeed, Rochester, '63 George S. Goodspeed, Brown, 'So Gordon J. Laing, Johns Hopkins, 'QI Joseph E. Raycroft, Chicago, '96 Alonzo K. Parker, Rochester, '66 Ferdinand Schwill, Yale, '89 Edgar J. Goodspeed, Chicago, '90 James VV. Linn, Chicago, '97 Nott W. Flint, Chicago, '98 Graduate Colleges Jerome Pratt Magee Edward Vail Lapham Brown XVilliam Reynolds Jayne Undergra dua te Colleges Roy Wilson Merrifield William Ralph Kerr, Jr. Edward Clayton Eicher Ferdinand Moseley Horton Frank Joyce Sardam Adelbert Turner Stewart George McHenry John Orlo Backhouse Alfred Ward Greenwood Stephen Reid Capps, Jr William James Sherman Schuyler Baldwin Terry Robert More Gibboney Wayland Wells Magee Strong Vincent Norton Charles Ralston McMillen Luther Lycurgus Kirtley Charles Arthur Kirtley Charles Lowell Darst Arthur Howell Johnson Barrett Clendenin Andrews Henry Sibley Putnam Arthur Gibbon Bovee Edwin DeForrest Butterfield Julius Thompson Benedict James Dwight Dickerson James Madison Hill Walter Scott McPherson Ralph Hubbard Norton Ralph Sears Cobb Cblurs .- GREEN AND XVHITE 9 X: 256 A , . qrri,-,. i'1' 1"W-'fvvx 11 -'1 N.. 1 ', 1 vu, 'E dv J . - . ' i , . 0' 1 - I n 1 , 'O A 1 . W V I - ff! 4 1 4 55 -01' ' nl1 . . . A .1 JJ . '1 1 .' Q , ,q 1 '1 4"'fQ'y:',!5:6,, '-1.- '1:1' 'tv-g:'H 1: 11 1 ,1 1 r ,lv-' 1 - 1 1 1 - 4 iv' - 1 1 Q 2 1 ' 1 - 1 1 1 w . , 11.,:41,1.1,11,.l:,. 1 1- 10 m,1."1. .Z ,inf 'h qi . ", , ' 1 1, dv, 4 "3 N 4. 11. fi! fl 1 1. 1r rr :'1 'f1,"', , 1 , - ,- 'Q 1 1. - . ' ' 11,41 - 1' 1 -a A , - 4 -Q ,. ,H Z ,, .ui ' :I 15' ,IW 1 1 i Y W.: v ,X - - 4 ' 2. ,-' Q' 51, 9 ' 1 - - 9 , -1, 2 1 ,1 L ' ' 4 Y ie's'1l'A'f1 , 1 1 . I if .f- fl' ' J' ' '01 ' 13- 1 I1 " l D 1' 1 1, ' -' 1 ,111 ' " 'P' 1 'a '. , 1, 1 Q 1 I' 1 1 '1. 1" fu X QL ,'f'.. ' 11 '., 5 I 1 1 . 9 1 w 1 1 . , lk, 1 A , ' V , , Q - x1 F' I 4 1, 1 , 11 ' ,f ' 1 n J .- I, l 11 A .1 1 1 ' .-:1 1 "V w " 1 1 ' -if' 1 1' ' ' 1 ,111 5. , 'I r 1. 11 , .1 , , L , 1 i X 1 ' ' A N f A , 1 1 I - 1 1 1 1 ' I - if 'Sf n 1 1 Q1 V 1 1 I 11 , 1 1 O, 1 , - 1 - 14 . 1 1 - I . A I , ,sw , , 31 I? , '.'L'1+. -sn, , 'S I I I . 1 1 I ' Ns. . . 11251. " H1103 ' I 1" ' - . 41' 1 ", ' U, , ,.' '1 4 b1:"':1 L , ' W in ruin ,2.1:f',.I,. 1114 11" 1 1 . . , 1 -1: .1 ,sf 1-1. ' ig, 1 ZW? 'QQFL , . v L lin k. , 54. FIR-EDGE-. , Z 'gffgf UJVP4 WW .yo , y'x. ,i 'Cb 53 on A A-v'-I i N r ' U? .U -I-N. "' ' : J ' ' 0 . ' Q : N J ' V ' '1 'l Q, u I , , Q. ' -"3 H V ' J ' r x X x I -'X ,X sv , ,"" - . Q. .rv-.F"' '- VI' fr i' L' 1 '-I 0 .4 Y A .ij-H K I, .JN ' 'V ' 2 ' ,- -Qf A 4. ., V ,, I ,' 'N' 'ff :j J., . ' ' ' ..,, m F V 'YH ' 'cn 1 wk "S,- , .2 ..a .N ,- ' '-'Mun H . pf. .H A. H , 4 t , 1-1. E ,. -,ff v ' ' ' :1.'..'Lj . dm ' xv '- I v . . 4, QI naw Q! -1 , nf! n ' f ' - 2'1- ff , Nh., s g ' 1 , A 1 .., I , P X . D V - ,. ' . I.. " :y H g '- .'. -,Q v .QI I ' Jigma Chi Founded ez! Jlfiami Univeffsizfy, 1855 Alpha Beta Gamma Epsilon Zeta Eta Theta Kappa Lambda Mu Xi Omicron Rho Phi Chi Psi Omega Alpha Alpha Alpha Beta Alpha Gamma Alpha Epsilon Alpha Zeta Alpha Eta Alpha Theta Alpha Iota Alpha Lambda Alpha Nu Alpha Xi Alpha Omicron Alpha Pi Alpha Rho Alpha Sigma Alpha Upsilon Alpha Phi Alpha Chi Alpha Psi Alpha Omega Delta Delta Zeta Zeta Eta Eta Theta Theta Kappa Kappa Lambda Lambda Mu Mu Nu Nu Xi Xi Omicron Omicron Zeta Psi Rho Rho Phi Phi .0 Roll of Chapters Miami University University of Wooster Ohio Wesleyan University Columbian University Washington and Lee University University of Mississippi Pennsylvania College Bucknell University Indiana University Dennison University DePauw University Dickinson University Butler College Lafayette College Hanover College University of Virginia Northwestern University Hobart College University of California Ohio State University University of Nebraska Beloit College University of Iowa Massachusetts Institute of Technology Illinois Wesleyan University University of Wisconsin University of Texas University of Kansas Tulane University Albion College Lehigh University University University of Minnesota of Southern California Cornell University Pennsylvania State College Vanderbilt University Leland Standford junior University Purdue University Centre College of Kentucky Dartmouth College University of Michigan University of Illinois State College of Kentucky West Virginia University Columbia University University University University University University of State of Missouri of Chicago of Cincinnati of Maine of Pennsylvania 259 Solomon Henry Clark Earl Dean Howard Ray Prescott johnson Jigma Chi 4 THE OMICRON OMICRON CHAPTER Es!ab!z'skea'jamm1jf 23, 1897 4 Fratres in Universitate Faculty Newman Miller, Albion College '93 Graduate Colleges Lindsay Alexander Beaton Undergraduate Colleges Eli Pike Gale George L. Yaple, jr. George Camillo Gazzolo I A. john Gazzolo Harry Stillman Spencer Charles Morgan McKenna Buchan Robinson Charles Edgar Hunsberger Oscar Emil Granberg Alexander Blake MacNab Burton Pike Gale George Meyer Claude B. Dore Arthur Elliott Lodge Arthur Frederick Brown Cbfors: BLUE AND GOLD 26o George Schmidt --ww "'R1 1 I 1 mf ,l ' l ,A . 555' 1' . H v ,v -.' 1 A- l l' 1. 'DIN' . 'mg.?' , 1 , ', Qlf, 5- u - gh. - QW' I. ', -. ' 'V -- 7, ' 1' v 1 -,va 51 . V' 5. '. ' , ,. Q! sv - ' , ' a- ' ' , "-,r ' . .f QT' N 'Q A x ' I W - Hu , :Af -A -,1- -4 A ri ' ,g-' ' A ' 'l , . 'f 'N . '?'.-, . -, ' . .pw Q :xl Q . .v T' , .f 'I i. S Y . I ' f , a , . ,. f ' S F' . ' r A f I ' 4 K-u t , - 'S X f - Ai. ' .gin 5' 0 ,., Y V, ' '--.1 I . .V Q - af.. ' '- ,, I' 45- lk f za, " f Q. - f L ' fx - . 53 ,Q 3- H . 4.01, ,Q Hit y Q . K, V . l . 4. . ' ' I . A . Agxl Phi Delta Theta 0 Founded al Zlliezmz' University, 1848 U Roll of Chapters Colby College . Dartmouth College . University of Vermont . Williams College . Amherst College . Brown University . Cornell University . Union University . Columbia University . Syracuse University Lafayette College . Pennsylvania College . Washington and jefferson College . Allegheny College . Dickinson College . University of Pennsylvania . Lehigh University . University of Virginia . Randolph-Macon College . Washington and Lee University . University of North Carolina . Central University of Kentucky . Kentucky State College . Vanderbilt University . University of the South . University of Georgia . Emory College . Mercer University . University of Alabama . Alabama Polytechnic Institute . Miami University Ohio Wesleyan University Ohio University Ohio State University Case School of Applied Science University of Cincinnati University of Michigan Indiana University Wabash College Butler College Franklin College Hanover College DePauw University Purdue University Northwestern University University of Chicago Knox College Lombard University University of Illinois University of Wisconsin University of Minnesota Iowa Wesleyan University University of Iowa University of Missouri Westminster College Washington University University of Kansas University of Nebraska University of Mississippi Tulane University University of Texas Southwestern University University of California Leland Stanford Ir. University! University of Washington 2 Phi Delta Theta a THE ILLINOIS BETA CHAPTER Established Ffbflldflf 18, 1.997 ,U Fratres in Unitlersitate Faculty John Wildman Moncrief, Dennison, '73 Graduate Colleges Waddy Wingfield Battle William Morton Keeley Clifton Howe , William Raymond Longley Charles B. Campbell Undergraduate Colleges James Milton Sheldon Walter Archibald Lybrand Bruce McLeish George Richard McC1yment Frank Walbridge De Wolf Ernest Wilson Miller Halbert Brush Blakey ' Carl Shelley Miner Floyd Everett Harper Ralph Clarence Putnam Alfred Chester Ellsworth - Herbert Fredrick Ahlswede Ernest Farr Oliver Brown Wyman Walter Keene Earle Ernest Eugene Quantrell Frederick Adolph Speik Inghram Dickson Hook Walter Fred Eggemeyer John Henry Smale Clarence Jandt Buckwalter Fred Taylor Hall Huber Hurd Ellsworth Mark Leavy Catlin Q Qzlfeiait X , Auburn Ray Nowels Franz Emory Solier Marcus VVilliam Lumbard Glenn XVorthy Putnam William Arthur Sumner Chester Alfred Eignns Colors : AZURE AND ARUENT 264 r' 3 vb , H" - -- , no - Yr.. . V! A V , ' 4 Fw. . 1 xl , ll ' 0 F.. K I . Q. 1 'I . v '14 , u I 4 ,,,,f', rg., S f . n' I . 1' .'.A,'QHN.r - Hd Yu' u ' ll I 1 , llc' . . 1 41 0 - 4 .A . " a., ' , V mil! v X I V! .pn 1- , gl ' Q -' I I . U U . A ' V ,x I 4 4 K. Q. Q 'v , . mi Lifr ' 'QD' hmqflf f , Rfk kk as Y W ig 9 S if ggsf, id TJ O 'W 1 cn g I n 1' A Q X, . . . , I '1- 1 :A -f 1 mu" "' H n ,rg ., yi Psi Upsilon Founded cz! Union College, 1833 Theta Delta Beta Sigma Gamma Zeta Lambda Kappa Psi Xi Upsilon Iota Phi Pi Chi Beta Eta Tau Mu Rho Omega Epsilon Beta U Union College University of the City of N Yale University Brown University Amherst College Dartmouth College Columbia University Bowdoin College Hamilton College Wesleyan University University of Rochester Kenyon College University of Michigan Syracuse University Cornell University Trinity College Lehigh University of Pennsylvania of Minnesota of Wisconsin of Chicago of California University University University University University 267 ew York Psi U psilon ,H THE OMEGA CHAPTER Esfablished Nozfember 24, 1397 .G Fratres in Uniflersitate Faculty Francis Adelbert Blackburn, Michigan, '68 Henry Herbert Donaldson, Yale, '79 Robert Francis Harper, Chicago, 'S3 Charles Richmond Henderson, Chicago, '70 George Carter Howland, Amherst, '85 John Franklin Jameson, Amherst, '79 Eliakim Hastings Moore, Yale, '33 Amos Alonzo Stagg, Yale, '88 Graduate College Ernest De Koven Leffingwell Undergraduate Colleges Walker:Gailey McLaury Ernest James Stevens Charles Murfit Hogeland Arthur Evarts Lord Carl Van Vechten Allen Frake Edwin Boehmer Roland Clyde Foster Charles Ferguson Kennedy Mortimer Llewellyn Cahill Ralph Bayard Nettleton Henry Durham Sulcer Walter Leon Gregory James Vincent Hickey Edward Vincent Quinby Howard Levansellaer Willett Matson Bradley Hill William Thomas Harsha Charles Cutler Parsons Walter Wright Colors: GARNET AND GoLD xi .f X 268 ' f"s1 .'.. I v , P . . I 1. -Us J ' ' 4 0 1, O Y. v. Q 1 ,O V - Q u A' Q . ,L a, I1 f , Q 4 1 ,Q 1 O ,..7 . ' A s 'li' I OI- I' O! 'aft I , . . F . ' . , Q f-.Q 5 V.. I Q W ' u 7 .59 .. ,J 5 1 la t p - -Q A" I A ' 1 f iff, 4.1 -fu 9 W - - ' i , 'Q vu ' ' I ' X Q a Y s gh 14 1. - -1 - 2 " 5 ' I o .. Q 4 vw . V - . . l., 5 , . JA" l-Gr ' . I' 0 ' sx' M' '... X . ' , fl 9 r 'Q " .pf n ' ' ' w '. vb ' ',Y v f Q . Q wi ' A. P I . 5 I A' P Nh wx ' Q' 4 ' ' sf, J -- Q - G3 1" , 0 " ' .I. . . I ' ff' ', fa A ., 'T I- c ., ,O I . n 5 . I. 5 ' . .5 . 1' ,.'. ' - v N 13 l . v 4- ', -. t. ' -, .. . 1 g l ' 8.99 5 'L if - A..f.' X V I A gli 52 ? - 29 3 f I, J 'IIIII fullllllllblh -1 V ' V' AAlI 1 xg - ieix 'flx vrvr ' 11, ' ', ,M . 660 ,f ' xml, qff J X? X I7 - 4 V1 J, z-' M.: p . Q 0 -4 I, 1 v o N 1 I ' v Q 1 4. . a 1 I. gal A 5 4 y . ' n . Cd ' ' J . I 4:.rH' 'g M N ujyfnof 'N aff, 'I' . 'I"" ', ' A ,' L' 'Z , - ff - ,,1'i.' K ,ff Ar -, .., . 4 V' '. .- fl' ,' , . ll: 'J' A1 ' " .Xa r V-,Hi Q' 'f I :it Q ' W ' - 4 ,, . , 5- I 5, , , , .. - "' 'f -:,wj "-f +1 -, , v . I , .Q I . . - QW, . . v.x',,1' . 4 - , I , L- - -l LF ' h X- t V A 1 n 1 1 . hi r X A X X J 1 W ,, 1 ' xv ' . ' .1 i M , ' X. . . 1 H ,. - ' 1 '. df' .1 nt". .A : ' ..' D ,. , f ' . Q' , X' - 1. l 'H-I A-' n l '11 r' ., ' ' A 4 w 4 Qt 'Q g ax 'Ax' . , 'N 'f 4 a g 'UJI' .1 ' V V Y' ' uc . 1, I F . I-A . 1 -' : . ' x . . r.'4 A I - ,1 e1,4y-.. C f' ' 1 " r : X ' m ','lf"1!,'x.t X ' ' , xf! , " 1 w 42 , x -J' 1, I , - .' r--1 1 A' 1, ' - 1 ' 4' . 1 I -,' .f- 1 V 1 1 I I 4 O. - 1 Q ..z ' 5, VL. JF- rasgfgfffi 'gutsy Delta Tau Delta Founded ai Belhany College, 1860 H Roll of Chapters Beta Gamma Lambda Omicron Beta Eta Beta Kappa Beta Pi Beta Rho Beta Tau Beta Upsilon Gamma Alpha Beta Omega Pi Phi Delta Beta Epsilon Gamma Beta Beta Theta Beta Iota Beta Xi Mu Epsilon Zeta Kappa Beta Chi Beta Alpha Beta Beta Beta Zeta Beta Phi Beta Psi Alpha Gamma Rho Gamma Delta Upsilon Omega Beta Lambda Beta Mu Beta Nu Beta Omicron Beta Chi Gamma Gamma Gamma Epsilon Gamma Zeta University of Wisconsin Vanderbilt University University of Iowa University of Minnesota University of Colorado Northwestern University Leland Stanford Jr. University University of Nebraska University of Illinois University of Chicago University. of California University of Mississippi Washington and Lee University University of Michigan Emory College Armour Institute of Technology University of the South University of Virginia Tulane University Ohio Wesleyan University Albion College Adelbert College Hillsdale College Ohio University Kenyon College Indiana University DePauw University Butler College Ohio State University Wabash College Allegheny College Washington and Jefferson University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute University of West Virginia Stevens' Institute of Technology University of Pennsylvania Lehigh University Tufts College Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cornell University Brown University Dartmouth College Columbia University Wesleyan University 271 Delta Tau Delta D' THE GAMMA ALPHA CHAPTER Eslablishm' Jlfay, 1898 ,U Fratres in Unitlersitate Faculty Herbert Lockwood Willett, Bethany College, '86 Gradua te Colleg es Joseph Chalmers Ewing john Howard McClure Ernest Edward Irons Benjamin Grimn Lee Undergradua te Colleges Walter Edward Francis Arthur George Thomas Robert Spring Butler Donald Kennicott Frank Michael McKey Theodore Ballou Hinckley Harvey Dakin Trimble Charles Moore Steele Frank G. Burrows Channing Wallace Gilson Clyde Amel Blair Fred Everett Fleet Thomas Barnett Taylor Homer Earle Watkins Nelson Leroy Buck Charles Forest Leland Rowland Barney Anthony Edward Earle Butler Albert Blaine Enoch Albert Culbertson Trammell Constantin Ludwig Rixson William Martin Hunt CUf0I'S.' PURPLE, WHITE AND GOLD 272 I 7 ' 'W. ' 7 1 - - . , N ' , ' :xii fp qu' .fgfg ' ' P W 'fling ' ' ' - S f, A . . I, .s'PO h A - . 1 - 9 KA. bf' A , .. . Q 1 ,V .4 . 3 - , ' QA Q.: ' ' ' i ' V" 'Q' . " - U f ',. "4 '. ..- f - ' 1,1 ' 1, xw..,,1'. ' 6 9 ' . kj 0 .- 'n 1 -. Q? -. . 1 ' Q 9. 4 ' , '.,-1'-if , 1' ,-, .Q .. . - .v1.l 'i f-of , ' 4 I v . Ft... . , 3.5 , ., 9 - , . n- ,, .f.v- -Q - . -- ': - ' - L - - it QV: . ' . l ,Y : ,' -I . - , -1 Y 'H , Y - v . o .MI - I 0 ' ' ' 1 f ' . ,L -N - ,F' 5a1 f- W A ' ' -ff - . 4 s . - -. 1. ., ff ' A . -Q . " . , , .. .Tay -- 1 ui, " T1 .. -' .I '-7 in' Y . ,gs ' F' . . Y , - . , O 2- 4 71 -gt 'N n - ' I 1 , ' ,U 1 r - - fi.. .....'o' v. , -, - -- - , Y 'n s 4 'T' -Y :w".V' ij' --34 -1 ' " bf. 1" ..' 4 , ' Y - 0 , - ' 5 ' '. -J-117, - a- iff. ' . 1. . - .J --' 6 ,. N.. - , - 5 J ew' N 4 s '-A - J' -is ' zi' ...g I 17-1 V ox ,-' 'Arg '- W T' Q' . -'.i':13" F u . . - s . ,' '-"1 W1 A . ' - I a V .ft Y. . - - X 0. , - '5 n. ' J ' a A . - 1, I' P Q f . - s ' ' . 7 . , - O 9 W s I -I 0 . ..-E F . Af' -fi ' r 1 R . ii WA' .Q YY , sq. A. 0,-' vp S - A "' " rj- ' ,,V I ' l 7,1 ' H,,s v. A . l '- " .f Y n q.. v s ' .M 1' . 'B ' . I A f . .. -1, a ' -', " .- . l 1 , .I -.- Q 1 ' 11" 1 . . f H - -,-. :y ' 5:-V .J ,. , " .. 1 . I ,i A . .A I A .N , X Q , .-X . I 1 N L, 1 . ' .v ,X . 1 , , O . '. 9 ' 4 , 5 , ' " Q t ' . 1. 0 - ,. , ' 0 Jq . , ' "- . "'. A2 ihuknnk 1 17 J-ICIMK' W -, tr ,An f LQ:-QZLHQQP M pda T .1 fp' 4 -11 . r f 'Q' A .' """'-1 - . . In 4 . - - I . , r . V fi - V " -- 11' h ci L .' , .MJ N ',ir'.-.V - 4 , T- ' x' L . 'I 1: ,Lila Q , V ' y V One. - , I -,.., 1 , . . "' -' . , - O . A- if ,Q ' . A L' , ' ar 0 v . '.. , 1 ' ,. ' 4 1 . - 1 o - ' -Q. 'Isl A ' f. V it' f ' A n I - ' u q. I . 1 , ., -va X If s ' ,A ' , . P. " ' A . . f ' ' 1 -5 V ' , ,sv ' 1 , A 4 ' . .' , ' 1 1 . " ma, H ,' 1 1 .Te -mn 1 .mf X H . 4 'W' 31' A 1 "':' . I N 't v4 X +1 5 l 1 , - '-1 V , 1 . df ,,i!0"?11. T451 " - I- - " M ' , J .I .J M. lun' W11, M IX, ' ,'.., 1 V , -,. , , A 4, ,, 1 :uk L -A . ' '14 -I 1 . lvlb, A Nd.--Vg ,r Y , I 'M ' ' sA I flung' ,tl ' 4 N ,F fx! 1 MV! u - 5' a. if .p:4,fr'u" .t 'I I . ' . ..f,Nh ',g, - .- . an! L., . ' ' agua ,H v . .Lfms fm' ' -1 up K I, . e , Y, an . , s-1 ., fyiz., 1 . , .', fl' , 1, ' nl A , 0 A . i V , . - , ' 5 c X57 - ! Y Y ' A . I . 4 - " - avi I . , 1 Q W' W . ". A ln, . A .r 11 , V ' -- ' . T ' -A l"f'u' If , I. n '45 A- 1' ' 5 1 4 Chi Psi Founded at Union College, 1841 Pi Theta Mu Alpha Phi Epsilon Chi Psi Tau Nu Iota Rho Alpha Beta Gamma Delta Epsilon Xi Delta Delta Delta Delta Delta ,U Union College Williams College Middlebury College Wesleyan University Hamilton College University of Michigan Amherst College Cornell University Wolford College University of Minnesota University of Wisconsin Rutgers College Stevens' Institute of Technology University of Georgia Lehigh University Stanford University University of California University of Chicago 275 Chi Psi D ALPHA EPSILON DELTA Eslablislzezz' NOZ'6I7lb6I' 25, 1898 U Fratres in Unitlersitate Faculty Charles Manning Child, Wesleyan, ,QQ Lauder William jones, Williams, '92 john Mathews Manly, Furman, '83 Graduate Colleges Rowland Thumm Rogers Robert Llewellyn Henry, Jr. Herbert Easton Fleming Undergraduate Colleges Charles Roland Howe Walter Murray Johnson Carl Walker Sawyer Arthur LeRoy Young Moses Coulter Craig Edward Eagle Brown Oscar William johnson Charles William Collins Lee Wilder Maxwell Huntington Badger Henry Edgar Adlair Ewing joseph Earl Collins Stirling Bruce Parkinson Henry Clay Wood james Franklin Carroll Colors: PURPLE AND GOLD 276 'Y '. -'FUI 5' -' 1'4" , ws. , lo ' Q ,gb w '1 , 4 f,. 1 Q I K . 1. 1- '. .vu 3 J .V VS. . 3 .V 's . ,pl l ' x 1 2 1 ' 'U . 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' ' -,S ' I I ' ' , 'ff' Q' , Y- Ce- A s f' 4. . ab"-" - ., . 5. , - 1 Y r.' -iffy, . . .., , . - , if 4 ., tl.: .. f. x '- , fy". , ' 4 - .' ' 'rio . , - Y . Y s ,J A-r ' ' A .-J' J' Q. -' . - - 'Q' X , - J,..i.:Jg- 1 - -' - -,' -:.V 1 ' b 5 'al' I E -avi.. -g ,, , a . .' .'3 'I Ln A . 3-, .,." li I' - r , si nb . N' 'I ' :'. , 4 ,. 1 Y. 'J .- -'.' Q . ., ,. .4 ' ' ' ' I f' I A - '-' .2 - , H - A ,Q wa F '- ff" ,fx J , .n ' ,,v.4 1 , ' ...A -L ,J . 'W .2 4' .. 1.1, " " 'L -' . - . " ' - ,' ' 'x '9L"' ,-J:?' . ' 0 1.'A '-"Q5C- ' " 'F . .. N- --.,, -, . 1M. 4 I H 'KIA 1 V n l L' 4 I. , . N .- . -N V ' .'. .si . ' .LF 4 ' , 'P, . . , 1 X., "-J ' ' ' ' - . A v -., 5 V " -fr ' , A, A '. ,, ,. .3 5, b A ' , ' 5 A ' 'ia . 1 , 4 I- ":. .Ll , , 7 f ,- ,XVI :T ' 1 1 -4 Y . 1. , J ' . . ,' 1 W' "f 1 - 41 4, ,. 1 - . X 't I, v ' 5 I ' V 'N v, , . l .- Q '- 4 ' ss " - ' 3 -V . . NR -V t' lb v ."' A , ' P ' . 1' V ' . ' 1 . -1.11, l 1 , f M M: :gy . 3 - -' ,- - 4 ,, . A .',- x - I - ,ann . , In - . n . ' ' ' N ,I I n X 5 I av . . C ' ' . . -. . .L K . 4 ' , ra . . . - V h 'A Q i , xi K 'J""V 2 W '. T v ' . Q . 'xi , ,f f . - ' 'n ' . ,' .X . QI 4, ',..4 - s. - f'. . -L 1 . -f' F' "J hw ' - . "7 ,j s- " M' 'Z U1 v- - 4? 37 - . . Y - T' .- A, - 'aj ., i ,by .sul R .5 ' '66.7'.. ' .542 .0 0.4 I Q A -.- P . I , .-'.,n - , - . . -4 - 1,,,s Q - 1, rf..-- v C - Q. L A H, gs. 'f, ,D I , x A g -.1 .Livi- -Y'V Delta Upsilon Founded al Williams College, 1834 D Roll of Chapters Williams Northwestern Union Harvard Hamilton Wisconsin Amherst Lafayette Adelbert Columbia Colby Lehigh Rochester Tufts Middlebury DePauw Bowdoin Pennsylvania Rutgers Minnesota Brown Technology Colgate Swarthmore New York Stanford Cornell California Marietta McGill Syracuse Nebraska Michigan Toronto Chicago 2 Delta Upsilon D THE CHICAGO CHAPTER Esfablishedfzzfzuary 5, 1901 ,U Fratres in Uniiversitate Faculty james Westfall Thompson, Rutgers, '92 Trevor Arnett Philip Schuyler Allen, Williams, '91 Benjamin Terry, Colgate, '78 Camillo Von Klenze, Harvard, '86 Hervey Foster Mallory, Colgate, '90 Robert Morss Lovett, Harvard, '92 Charles Edmund Hewitt, Rochester, '60 William Vaughn Moody, Harvard, '93 Thomas Atkinson Jenkins, Swarthmore, '87 Bertram G. Nelson, Chicago, '02 Isaac Bronson Burgess, Brown, '83 Frank Melville Bronson, Brown, '84 Wayland johnson Chase, Brown, '87 Harold Hayden Nelson Charles Henry Van Tuyl Gerald Birney Smith, Brown, 'QI Graduate Colleges Raymond Scott McCurdy Galen Addis Fox 9 Arthur Hale Curtis Undergraduate Colleges . , 1903 ' , Orville Elbr1dge Atwood, jr. Merritt Berry Pratt Lynne John Bevan Charlton T isdel Beck Robert Stinson Starbird , 1904 james Wright Laurie Charles julian Webb Frank Ramsay Adams Willard VValter Wynekoop Frank McDonald Lowe O l 1905 U Wilmer Carlisle Harris George Rennngton Beach, Jr. Herbert Ira Markham jesse Robinson Kauffman 1906 John Worley, Jr. Frederick Eugene Willard Evon Zartman Vogt Lester McGregor Linton Elmo Cameron Lowe Felix Turner Hughes Edwin Eugene Parry Carl Huntley Hitchcock K, Charles Arthur Bruce Colors .- OLD GOLD AND PEACOCK BLUE 280 A 1, -.I A '., v A g?""v!v 4 . . , .- h n . J '. R g'. Q I , . , If . , mfg ' hi 1 ,.,.1-. Vip ag v of- 'QA A S 5 Q I. 0 ,Q . 1. U sri" Vx v r L 5 I ' . ef ' x 1 . , - 'X I 1 Jw. , . 0 .4 R, gLs.,.u .i1Lu .b' I. I 1 I I v 4 ll. X, 02 ,0- ,o' X .0 x K TFA 'a mpn.. X 0 Q", K S x . X 1 X s wx ' ' f ,J x ,gf mn' X Af' 1ff,,,, u J a 4- l"1-:if4- ' 'C , 27-.F r' -1 " -v - -'r- ' ' .- ' , 1 N . - . .f v - 2'-' ' ' N if . ' . ' 5 v ' 5' A , 1 ' ... f , , 0 Q lv , -A ' .K 1? A "ml ' - x is 'vq - 1 , - W r' f I . - . r ,- . - A -v .A lg .Q " v4 A, , , V- 451 g 4 -'v W 1., . + A , 9 . . 16 ' 5 1 . ., - D . ,, - 11. V Q - 2: x . f, it ne- - A :.-3'-E 5 -X le. , 1 . L: 1 -U .,, iv- , ' W .- , 1 - - " V. L . 'wk A, -Y J .A ' dm A .rt 'lil o 1, -. 1. . nk t ' Sv I A nu .. 'ZS I 4 . r"' 'r . ' f , Q I 'ox , ., . . '27 ' ' , . - . ,VU ' S5153-" Pg... 'A . -N 'u lu- .f .- H n .u -' ' ,Y Q '. .V . . ,n 'W I - .Q if . , ,A I . , . I L SZ' ' -. , H. ' -4 :A , , ll Y ' I D J xi 5 . . O " C . .,, f . .1-' ' ,, .9 , ' 0 , 'S ' Q 4 - - '. . 44' 4 ' , 4 A ' K. , Q '-141, Y, uv' ' .Y 4 I , I . 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Phi Gamma Delta Founded at Waslzinglon afzdjeferson College, 1848 4 Chapter Roll I I I Section I I I University of Maine Worcester Polytechnic Institute Brown University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Section II Dartmouth College Amherst College Trinity College Yale University Section III Columbia University New York University College of the City of New York Section IV Colgate University Cornell University Union College Syracuse University Section V University of Pennsylvania Lafayette College Lehigh College johns Hopkins University Section VI Bucknell University Gettysburg University Pennsylvania State University I I I I I Section VII University of Virginia Roanoke College Hampden-Sidney College Richmond Washington and Lee University Section VIII Washington and Jefferson Allegheny University Wooster University Adelbert College I I I Section IX I Dennison University Wittenberg College Ohio State University Ohio Wesleyan University University of Michigan I I I Section X I I Indiana University DePauw University Hanover College Wabash College Purdue University Section X I University of Tennessee Bethel College University of Texas University of Alabama Section XII Knox College University of Illinois Illinois Wesleyan University I I I I Section XIII I I I University of WISCOUSIH University of Minnesota University of Chicago Section XIV William Jewell University of Missouri I I Section X V I I University of Kansas University of Nebraska I I I I Section X VI I I I University of California University of Washington 285 Phi Gamma Delta U THE CHI UPSILON CHAPTER Eslablished Illczy 19, 1902 H Fratres in Unitlersitate Faculty John Merle Coulter, Hanover, '7o joseph Paxon Iddings, Sheffield, '77 Wilbur Samuel Jackman, Harvard, '84 ' Graduate Colleges Walter joseph Bingham David Allen Robertson Aubrey Percy Nelson William Alexander Gordon Casper Gray Larson John Edwin Lind Le Roy Harris Harvey jesse VVOI'ti1i11gt0D johnson Noble Sproat Heaney Leon Patterson Lewis Ansby Lyman Lowe l Undergraduate Colleges Max Louis Mendel Erinine john Phillips Rollin Thomas Chamberlin Herbert Arthur Breyfogle john Stephen Wright Vernon Chadbourne Beebe Herman Mendel, Jr. Le Roy Andrew Van Patten William Jacob Cuppy Robert Bain Hasner Calor .- PURPLE 284 Harry Lorenzo James A, " ' Yi 1 :yv xi KF ' ,'i'l-4' 'R gfj, 3 X ' 1' V X" l ' "' Q -l I .1 ' ' . 4.1 1 t f .A W 0 A . N .71 M V. psqlv 'Ulu .' s ' . . 1, ' K . a.Tt ' A .1 . r O ' .. . 5.1 no: ,- v 1 l, 'I , .P ' b A-,rn . f " .' C Y . M - . Q A'f'- Q C J ' I I 11 A '. NY 1, h rl ' , Y o '. 1. 1 . v .. 6 E -Af. V5 ' , 4 an 1, ..f,, I .34 ur W Q. n . .V ' -.f '. f .41 .S ' 'a 3' ' 1 ' X g 1 , v ' , ' 1" ' I "li 1? .' i 's u . "vii " af' , N, I li a ,s l-' ' ag. ' W . bl -' X- . 3- ' 4 -,u , . -L44 4 ' anti. - u ' 4 df' , '.x fl, , , 1 -4. N 1 A - I. l 0 'l x ' '.',, f -, u Y A o Q , ' . 1 , 1' ,xx 1 V N .A W , a v f 9 I 1 . W W vl 1 r - 6 X. X . I - 1 1' Y . 4 A . . W , S f ' L., , V 1 W ,, I . N l I Q I .1 . ' U, U 4' ' 7 . 4 . , 4 'Hx,K ,f . , .f QA if f a . , . I l 7- . 'v ' an ' . . u H ' ' I ,J -P 's mg N sw v . . 4, N J Q ' ' , lr ' az.. :' ",-1' . .' ' 4 .f .- 0 r Afgx' aux . "' . I ' q L At' . u."1'..f A '4 4 Q ' u Jfomm-ax, 4 W 4 , 'xikf' A N F J ,i i Q , 4 'V'!' X 5 - 1, 1, r 7 i51:wfif 2 5N ,,, A J K kglfig X f I Y Z 4.4557 1 + L-2. ay D X 1 ' , If NN VH: Z 7 ty- ff-. QV! 1 ' V v "X ILIL E ff l ff:3Q1'QHQ' X X 'H -'1 nr 5. S r 'B Q' un ,- S - 9 , . . I ' ,. '4. 5 I . K : .. 'J . '- . .. X. ,' I o - :If-.L . F, . . Iv. .1. , ' ' 'O u . F' 'A v . Aa I A '. - I ' .1 V Q V - ' XA ' ' 1 , 'V . ' ' ' , I -1 v , , . . V . , V , I I ' 't -1 Q. . ' . - , jun ,- Y - I. , .1 . ' ' 'Q' w , 1 r 2 y -1- ' .1 ' ' I -V. - . ' ,' A , ' - v i Y ' an ", I , X . 'T .- 1 1 VV YV t- ' ' Y up '. Y , fu ' - ' , , - V u , ar A I A , , : . v - . 1 U I A . l - A W V! I . ' . W Y Y . 4 - ' or 'x . ' I . Q I . A, . A . 5 . . , 7' ' ... N. -R- . - ' - . 4 Q P u ' -, . ' F I ' w sn I I .' 2 I .14 1 -1-.I .. ' .s...6 ish-3'kH.Q Jigma Alpha Epsilon Founded al lhe University of Alabama, 1856 H Roll of Chapters University of Maine Boston University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Harvard University Worcester Polytechnic Institute Cornell University Columbia University St. Stephen's College Allegheny College Dickinson College Pennsylvania State College Buchnell University Gettysburg College University of Pennsylvania University of Virginia Washington and Lee University University of North Carolina Davidson College Wofford College University of Georgia Mercer University Emory College Georgia School of Technology University of Missouri University of Nebraska University of Colorado Leland Stanford Jr. University Louisiana State University University of Mississippi University of Wisconsin Virginia Military Institute . University of Michigan Adrian College Mt. Union College Ohio Wesleyan University University of Cincinnati Ohio State University Franklin College Purdue University Northwestern University University of Illinois University of Minnesota Central University Bethel College Kentucky State College Southwestern Presbyterian University Cumberland University Vanderbilt University University of Tennessee University of the South Southwestern Baptist University University of Alabama Southern University Alabama Polytechnic Institute Washington University University of Arkansas Denver University University of California Tulane University University of Texas University of Chicago University of Kansas Colorado School of Mines 287 Sigma Alpha Epsilon .M THE ILLINOIS THETA CHAPTER Esfablished Jllarrh 9, 1903 M Fratres in Universitate Graduate Colleges Augustus Raymond Hatton joseph Zerbe Rowe John Ralph Voris Zenephon de Blumenthal Kalamatiano Forest Garfield Smith Werrett Wallace Charters Kelly Rees I Edwin Arthur Pearson Undergraduate Colleges Harry Edgar Mock Ralph Merriam William john Waterman Paul Atlee Walker Alfred DeShon Radley George Pullen Jackson William Gorham Matthews Hollis Elmer Potter Edward Wi1liamiWorkman Guy Freeman Wakefield Laurens Luther Simpson Clinton Joseph Davisson George David Burkhoff George Owen Fairweather Colors: ROYAL PURPLE AND OLD GOLD 288 Jw' O' .-I 'Q 4 N WNW 3 1 Z f 5 'M .,B75'?:Q!o'vi" we ':'?iL2ii3':zf " ' ' 0' 'f at ' 'Z 5 :"ix1'.,,-va ,ova . is fqagtvi' 5 ' L 1 :'g'. - ff A X ' gg! - Q ln 'Vai' 6 " -v ,V ,dmv 5 4 :xo Q ,ff "'mV:.g:if'ixXW , Gil. ff ff 3 '. ,f 3 - f gl lu, . W, ' - f A li M in f 5, ' - :au f 4' - Q 0 U I gli I 4 ,yr 2 . f 0.21 m I w Q Jag P ' 6 1 , ,: 5. ft. f ' f ' ' "gif W 6 1' Q fn' J' gr 4, .. xx . f My H". Y N, o rg!! , ' .du . .ff . ,yi v , NR Women's Organizations ' I The Mortar Board Eslablislzea' N0zfe11zbc1', 1894 ,U Graduate Colleges Cora Roche Howland Edith Ransdall Shaffer Undergraduate Colleges Georgia Mae Wheeler julia Coburn Hobbs Grace Howard Darlington Alice Cary W'-ood Martha Anne McPherson Wood Dorothy Duncan Lillian Gertrude Noble Elizabeth Maria Munger Edna Louise Simpson Edith French Matheny Elizabeth Casey Grace Williamson Lulu Morton Louise Murray Anna Tracy Waughop Colors: DARK BLUE AND GOLD 293 The Esoteric Esfzzblished 1894 5 Honorary Members Louise Palmer Vincent Elizabeth B. Wallace A ctilve Members Emma Dolfmger jane Munroe Edith Bradford Wiles Helen Alden Freeman Ethel Guest Foster Anna Pritchett Youngman Elizabeth Calhoun Theodate Nowell Margaret Burton Grace Beal Marie Chambers Colors: GREEN AND WHITE 294 ?"4'q T Annum... a " . Y V Y ' wt? ,wf-.1 r f. H r ' . ' ' F mf A N.. 9. .. 4,01 I 4 ,O ,equ 61 ,, U v A. V V f x Q J . ' ' ' . +9 'Q ' , f I 4 l, ' 'Cn--. 4 4 .4 fJ- aw A 117 4 , .LO ., 0 Y O 1, .Q , 4 X1 A ' I , X-. if 'N 0 1 V , 1 -5 1, A .v ' 1 , .27 X af' f P l I N' r ' 1 u, I I 1 4 f . " I ff " , . 1 W! ,. ' , 'A ,ff q x 1' X 1-1 Y' A W l w 'Jw 1 .',' 'A4!.-',-,I ., '..u s ' f If f , 7 1 . .n lg ' A , W im ' . 'll - 1 .4 I l . A14 .1 lm ' H + 'i , 35? v .Y .'-Y J: fy ::fS:'A In .. v J' I 4m-. Us 1 y .1 '1' A 4 . .11 .1 5 .4 1 J 'I , 1 "'.J- 4 q Qqfiaj 'M ,. ' ' I - 1-Y 5' 4 4. na' I ltai QA japanese Form5 U Low beneath the tree Cherry buds dimple the stream Jweeter they to me Than all the flowers of the tea, Jweeter than life is its dream. Hangs the moon at rest, Herons fly darkly under: Paused the old worId's quest, The air is still with wonder. Knotueth the stream any rest? -s -YZ 'V--.. ml' 1 wavy., Gbe Quadranglers Eslablislzm' lanuaajf, 1895 D A ctive Members Edna Robinson jane B. Walker Lilian Lane Isabel Webster Leila Ahrens Irene Moore Mary Spencer Grace Beed Anna Payne Wells Genevieve Tomlinson Stella Moore Grace Warren Cofors: BLACK AND VVHITE 299 The Jigma Club Esfablishfd Oflober, 1895 D Honorary Member Mrs. Edgar Johnson Goodspeed Active Members Grace A. Reddy Rachel Henton Martha Landers Marie P. McEvoy Bertha Lillian Iles Augusta Stettler Martha McDonald Blanche Caroline Felt Ruth Marie Reddy Frieda Muench Kirchoff Florence Elsie Booth Martha Louise Powell Chloe Davidson Edna M. Simpson Edith C. Lawton Elizabeth Curtis Jane Russell Lillian Stephenson Caforsx LIGHT BLUE AND BLACK 3oo -.R-V V I 1 Q ,D 4 1 3 Q it 4 ' .x K 'f ' ' L o 9 g H- T' , 'L L F V: 0 .,, 'll I Pg L l . n ' . ' - fs- . - . I , ' .' I ' 'A - . ' ' A ' af. ' 1' V' 1 ,, V .. ' In . V .U ' ' ' - ev' , U .A r ' 1 . ,- . I V' V ' v, . l - A 1, - . - 1 V e V 1 v 1 lx- ' . 1 3 I . , , , '- A -I ' . 4 , I 4 p O I - '. ' . ' - vl - ' . I W l .V . . , Q I- ll ' u , N . 1 ' W A - I ' ,, ' 1' H 4' , 4 " , ' ,' 'i ' , . A h P M N . I , , . , , .W N F x A A . Q , M . N . ,," 2-J , 'l ! I , ef K , , ' -, y . If W ,I N -1 ,' A. I , . I n A W , . .. 0 3" N 4 i 'X . , ' . x I P X , . . 4 I , , l '- 1, i - ,, , ' Y . ' ' . fx, ', 5 ' ' W 1 . ' Y W N V ..- I N . 4 . . ' c I' , 1 J V X! " A- x , - ' ' '. 9 D I . ' nl ., I ' I . s " A . . ' 1 Xu r ' ,, l f N 1 f ' ' ' 1 -4 ' F-Vi . - , V, ,f W 1 '. 2 ',f" V 3 A , is 1' ' . . , -nf A mf I , 6 . 1--, gf - zo: ' A Prayer a Give me to see: Help Thou my blindness Make me to be Filled with Thy kindness. The Wyvern Club Esiablished 1899 U Graduate Colleges Charlotte Dillingham Smith Undergraduate Colleges Cornelia Simrall Smith Lauretta Irene Octigan Frances Helen Ashley Corinne Estelle Campbell Margaret Persis Brown Ella Collier Garrigue Melissa Rachel Ingalls Mary Elton Barker Harriet Bowen Florence Marie Williams Florence Elma Speakman Edith Marion Williams C'0l0rs.' YELLOW AND WHITE 305 Phi Beta Delta ESftZbliSll6dfll7lllll711', 1900 H A ctitle Members Ruth Terry Edith Harding Genevieve Hayner Ruth Simonson , Marie Lamb Agnes MacNeish Edith Barnard Carrie Currens Irene Engel 01101-,vx YALE BLUE AND GOLD 6 6' 30 J My un """'-5 Q All ! , by' AX levi X X .fm M Li'1fF N ,- H7 " ' f LX W-jxlm! 1' n Nf, , Phi Beta Kappa Founded' af Hylilflitllll Roll Alpha of Maine Alpha of New Hampshire Alpha of Vermont Beta of Vermont Alpha of Massachusetts Beta of Massachusetts Gamma of Massachusetts Alpha of Connecticut Beta of Connecticut Gamma of Connecticut Alpha of New York Beta of New York Gamma of New York Delta of New York Epsilon of New York Zeta of New York Eta of New York Theta of New York Iota of New York Kappa of New York Alpha of New Jersey Alpha of Pennsylvania Gamma of Pennsylvania Delta of Pennsylvania Iota of Pennsylvania Kappa of Pennsylvania Beta of Ohio Alpha of Indiana Alpha of Kansas Alpha of Illinois Beta of Illinois Alpha of Minnesota Alpha of Missouri Alpha of Tennessee 's and Mfz1'1f's Collage in 1776 Of 4 Chapters Bowdoin, Brunswick, Me. Dartmouth, Hanover, N. H. University of Vermont, Burlington,SVt. Middlebury, Middlebury, Vt. Harvard, Cambridge, Mass. Amherst, Amherst, Mass. Williams, Williamstown, Mass. Yale, New Haven, Conn. Trinity, Hartford, Conn. Wesleyan, Middletown, Conn. Union, Schenectady, N. Y. University of the City of New York College of the City of New York Columbia, New York City Hamilton, Clinton, N. Y. Hobart, Geneva, N. Y. Colgate University, Hamilton, N. Y. Cornell, Ithaca, N. Y. Rochester University, Rochester, N. Y. Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. Rutgers, New Brunswick, N. J. Dickinson, Carlisle, Pa. Lafayette, Easton, Pa. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphi Lehigh, South Bethlehem, Pa. Allegheny College, Allegheny, Pa. Kenyon, Gambier, Ohio DePauw, Green Castle, Ind. State University, Lawrence, Kan. Northwestern, Evanston, Ill. University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill. State University, Minneapolis, Minn. University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. 309 Phi Beta Kappa F THE BETA OF ILLINOIS CHAPTER 0lQglZ7l?'Z6d April 4, 1899 5' Officers for 1902:1903 WILLIAM GARDNER HALE . . President GEORGE EDGAR VINCENT . . . Vice President FRANCIS W.AX'LAND SHEPARDSON . Secretary-Treasurer Undergraduate Members Lynne john Bevan Ruth Cohen Emma Dollinger Elsie Flersheim Frank Loxley Griffin Robert McBurney Mitchell Cash Albertus Newkirk Herman Irving Schlesinger Berthold Louis Ullman Albert Ross Vail 310 I. vzwwlg 1 J 1 ' -ui N, 1 11" " TV " . , ',-4. . , 4 . I it . . .f r . .. 2 . H , 1, , ' In ,, 1-" . - ' - . -"' A , A A . I I ' 3' - w- 0 ' i Y Q Y 4 ,-ur ,Vg ' - ' .I . 'Q 5" ' .- Af . d ' 1 I' ',' 1 A ' 6 5 r N P s 1 I w u I , l s I Q 1, ', A 4 Y' 'K 1 9 4 A I V! B. 1 6 .,- . 'fam' ' ,,-'H"'1 4 , f'..L ' - . w. 1 A ga ' U.. w,,, Vf. I v " tl A X V w r J. ' I ing: xi . 1 Q A -,: I ' 1 1 - - Y' . U S. , . ' ' ! , 2: ' .T , vv' nm, . L5 -A 2. v Q u ' """ I- X --Q-gg X , , Y ' w ' I .4 M nl' s,v . .0 ' 0 I ri W 1 r Q V . Q .' Ju it V . v. I s ' ' R . 41 'i'1 .fy '94 S 4 www 4 .eg I I 'f , X .l lk . Emi -' ' I K 2 . I 4- n 6 A . W ' I Q vue? J V Q' A J I It K 5 K V , O ,A jf, iv:-t EM' 1 4 y 65. ,ix , I. . ,.,-, - Q" n ' P. J. T 'fin ,FQ Qs- ,. f151ff"t 5' ffH3,t9iafv,ga1 . Z' ! J I ., . . . M ,. we ' 4 , I ' 'F " ,I H-7 A. A g 1 ., 3, -A... wiahlh-.--Y 4' 'AFA 1 wry, 4' A The Owl and Serpent J! Jenior Jociety Esfabfislzed 1896 JE Active Members Thomas Johnston Hair Walker Galley McLaury Platt Milk Conrad Frank McNair Alfred Chester Ellsworth Charles Roland Howe Charles Murfit Hogeland 313 Gbe Order of the Iron Mask .6 Junior Jociety Eslablzishea' june 12, 1896 ,G Active Members Walter Murray johnson George McHenry Harry Ingle Raymond, jr. Arthur Evarts Lord Samuel Francis Fellows Philip Armour Sunderland Henry Waller Howard james Sloan Henry Davis Fellows Adelbert Turner Stewart Color: BLACK 314 The Jcore Club .E SOPHOMORE SOCIETY lisfablished Afozwzzbvr 29, 1901 .M Clyde Amel Blair Julien LaFayette Brocle Mortimer Llewellyn Cahill Logan Asahel Gridley VVilmer Carlisle Harris Clark Saxe Jennison Frink C. Lovell Oscar William johnson XVayland Wells Magee Ralph Bayard Nettleton Ernest Eugene Quantrell Lee Wilder Maxwell Robert Heffron Murray George Buchan Robinson William james Sherman Frederick Adolph Speik Henry Durham Sulcer Schuyler Baldwin Terry Robert Volk john Stephen XVright 1 Colors: BLACK AND GOLD SFT Ghree Quarters Club U FRESHMAN SOCIETY Esiczblislzed February, ISQ6 David Earl Nichols id Edgar Adlai Ewing Charles Neil Thomas Carl Huntley Hitchcock Ashley Dixon LeRoy Alfred Startzrnan Martin Phelps Cornelius Lagene Lavassa Wright Clarence J. Buckwalter Huber Hurd Ellsworth William Hugh Hatneld LeRoy Andrew Van Patten Frederick Hall George E. Schnur Huntington Badger Henry james Madison Hill I. Earle Collins Arthur Howell Johnson Hobart G. Truesdell Harry Lorenzo James Henry Phillips Conkey Frederick Burleigh Pattee Mark Leavy Catlin Barrett Clendenin Andrews William Thomas Harsha Charles Lowell Darst Stirling Bruce Parkinson Wilbur Carl Hibberd Robert Wallace Maxwell William Martin Hunt Colors: CRIMSON AND PEARL GREY 318 w Cbfoz 5: N u Pi Jigma Esfablishfd Ilhzy, 1896 4 julia Coburn Hobbs Emma Dolfinger Dorothy Duncan jane Walker PURPLE AND PALE Y 3,20 EL LOVV Gabe Sign of the Jickle Eslabfzkffezi JVuzfe11zf1f1', 1901 E Elizabeth Calhoun Blanche Felt Helen Freeman Bertha Iles Martha McDonald Elizabeth Munger Lillian Noble Bertha Warren Grace Warren Edith Bradford Wiles Cafors BLUE 321 The Kalailu Club OKL'dlII'S6d April 2, 1903 U Members Honorary Member MRS. EDGAR GOODSPEED Active Members Leila Ahrens Elizabeth Casey Margaret Burton Louise Murray Theodate Nowell Grace Beal Beniti Allen Edith Lawton Lillian Stephenson Martha Powell Alice MacLennon liclna Simpson Grace XVillia1nson Anna Waughop Lulu Morton Frances Chandler Mary Spencer Elizabeth MacFarlancl Florence Wells 3,22 6 Fraternity Conventions U Delta Kappa Epsilon Memphis, TGH11., Nov. 12, 13, 1.1, 1902 Delegate Robert H. Murray Phi Kappa Psi Pittsburg, Pa., April 2, 3, 4, 1902 Delegates R. C. Neptune A. B. Garcelon Dean Swift Beta Theta Pi Lake Minnetonka, Minn., july 8, 1902 Delegate Platt M. Conrad Alpha Delta Phi Montreal, Canada Delegates Wayland Magee S. V. Norton john O. Backhouse Sigma Chi Chicago, November 19, 20, 21, 1902 Delqgate Ray Prescott Johnson Phi Delta Theta New York City Delegate Archibald Lybranrl Psi Upsilon New Haven, Conn., May 1, 2, 3, 1902 Delegates XVa1ker Gailey McLaury Henry Waller Delta Tau Delta Milwaukee, Wis., August 21-23, 1901 Delegates Walter Edward Francis Benjamin Gritiin Lee phi Psi Schenectady, N. Y., May 14, 15, 16, 1902 Drlegale Ralph Crissrnan Brown Delta Upsilon Marietta, Ohio. October S, 9, lo, 1902 Delegales Lynne john Bevan Frank Ramsey Adams Herbert Ira Markham Phi Gamma Delta , Put-i11 Bay, Ohio, August 6, 7, S, 19112 flflzgdlfx XValter J. Binghani Donald R. Richberg Jigma Alpha Epsilon XVashingt0n, D. C., December 22-29, 1902 Uz'lcfg'rllc'5 joseph Zerbe Rowe Edwin Arthur Pearson 323 . Q rr , ec' s 0 v S!! f a 9 Members of Fraternities and Jocieties Not represented by Chapters at the University of Chicago LLOYD CLARK AvREs . ARTHVR FRANKLIN BARNETT HARRY R. BEERY . . WILLIAM R. BOOSE . ORVILLE HARRX' BROVVN. JAMES FORREST CHURCHILL EvARTs YAINE DEPExv . JOHN P. GORDON . . ELIAS POTTER LYON . CHARLES HUGH NEILSON . GEORGE CARROLL SMITH . 4 ilpha Tau Omega Ohio State University University of Illinois Ohio State University University of Kansas University of Kansas University of Illinois Hillsdale College . Ohio Wesleyan University . . Hillsdale College . Ohio Wesleyan University . University of Illinois Kappa Alpha ftfouthernj JOHN BROADUS XVATSON . HERRI-:RT EARLE BUCHANAN STEWART RALPH ROBERTS . . . . . . Furman University Arkansas University . . . . . . . Emory College Kappa Kappa Gamma STELLA B. STERNS . . CLARA ICINGSXYELL WHEELER MARTHA WOOD . . . ROBERT MCBVRNEY MITCHELL J. W. HARLEY . . . JOHN DONNINGTON B.-XRTLE'1"l' FRANCIS SQUIRE PARKS . XV. M. BRUCE . . W. H. EMMONS . HARRY E. XVALSXVORTH . CLARA E. BIESERVEY ADA BEALL Cox . MARIE ELEANOR XYAsT University of Minnesota . . . Northwestern University Jigma Nu - . . . . Northwestern University . William Jewell College Lombard College . Indiana University Central College Central College Phi Alpha Pi . Emory College Pi Beta Phi . . . . . . Boston University Tau Kappa Pi . . . Woman's College of Baltimore . . WOman's College of Baltimore 324 -"1 "ff: x 'U -w A KC! mfjwfx,x Q ff . wk. mf N J lv, ! f f ff X 5 5 XX N' nf! Q w V gl.:-j '.-'- ,'v':,', ' ' f X1 at., if if 4'-. J' g xg ZQRX ffz' 'ik S , Z ff ,K fa V! X X G M K1 XR X 5 HW' LENDNK Q0 NIQO 1. 72 fx- 1 e, ' g "l.,'--""'f" QNX I i' X ' 1' 1 in Y f ' 1 X . O DD Elms y qluniiifi N ffm WK i f h 'X W QBQ M12 'f Annual Alumni banquet of Beta Theta Pi at Kinsley's Reception at the home of Miss Leona C'anterbury for Mrs. Logan qMiss Edith Ienkinsj Cross Country Club banquet at the Bismarck. Wyvern Club luncheon and theatre party. Alpha Delta Phi informal dance. Farewell dinner, given by Mr. lValter Payne, to the Active Chapter and Alu II1 ni of C hi Psi. Farewell luncheon for Miss Elizabeth Clarke, of the XVyverri Club, given by Miss Cornelia Smith. Phi Beta Delta entertained at luncheon by Miss Ruth Terry. Mr. Robert Volk initiated into Phi Kappa Psi. The XVyvern Club entertained by Miss Ella Cfarrigue at an old fash- ioned candy pull. Alpha Delta Phi informal dance. Delta Kappa Epsilon. The Order of the Dragon's Tooth entertained by Mr. Guck at dinner at the Audi- torium. Mr. Vernon Beck and Mr. E. T. Sehmidtinitiated into Lincoln House. XVashington House theatre party. Score Club banquet at the Bismarck. Annual promenade of Delta Tau Delta at the Chicago Beach Hotel. Phi Kappa Psi informal dance. Sigma Club luncheon at the home of Miss McDonald. Kelly Hall annual dance. Athletes from Culver Military Academy enter- tained by Beta Theta Pi. Mr. Clyde A. Blair initiated into Delta Tau Delta. Dr. Francis W. 9 K if 7 ' C 13 ' if . W 2- 1 U X im w .- - ff' iii? I A Lf 'P 'FW ' Q fl nib 4- 1' K , X i 5- f i AQ i .I I -Shim 'X PM it ' r. I' ' ' ' I , 4. 11 " l 7- , - , rw W "Di Q N 9- . V, , pf all A T' T lt- 'W' F" ff .L my V Mr. Logan A. Gridley initiated into ' I i,. I .fri m to 1 if ii 4 it Alix, ibllf if Il- . ix, ,V ii Li-l, ,Lf , f 1' f ft ,' ff nfl i g A in ,501 M ' f " U' f 12+ 'li is M "fa-' le . C ' .- - f It' Shepardson entertained at a smoker by Beta Theta Phi. Ig-LCG Matthew Ryan initiated into Phi Delta Theta. 19-Wyvern Club entertained by Miss Persis Brown ata dancing party. Visiting high school relay teams entertained by the fraternities. Misses Anna Belle Jenks, Alice Cary VVood, Elizabeth Munger, Mary Laekersteen and Lillian Noble initiated into The Mortar Board. Phi Delta Theta informal dance at Rosalie Hall. o-Class of 1902 informal dance and musicale at the School of Education. Misses Stella Moore, Genevieve Tomlinson and Louise Bearse initiated into the Quadranglers. Sigma Club Alumni dinner. 21-Messrs. Lumen Macomber and Charles Van Tuyl initiated into Delta Upsilon. Beta Theta Pi smoker for chapter alumni. -Tiger's Head annual initiation and banquet. 25fPsi Upsilon Smoker. Washington House reception. ' 26-Pan-Hellenic smoker given by Phi Kappa Psi. Mrs. Edgar Goodspeed and the Misses Ruth Forbes and Florence Stewart initiated into the Sigma Club. 27-Sigma Club dinner and theatre party. 25-Phi Delta Theta smoker for Merrill E. Gates 29-Annual Sigma Club dance at the Washington Park Club. Miss MacDonnell initiated into The Esoteric. . 2-Annual dance of the Quad- ranglers at Kenwood Institute. 3-Foster Hall reception and I dance to the class of IQO2. Delta Kappa Epsilon smoker at the fraternity house. Qfslglllil Chi smoker to the grand othcers of the fraternity. l Phi Delta Theta smoker and mock marriage for Mr. Eric 5, M. Lubeck. Spelman House informal at the School of Edu- cation. Psi Upsilon informal at the chapter house. io-Chi Psi matinee party. Psi l'psilon reception to parents. Beecher Hall reception and dance. German Club Recep- tion at Foster Hall for Consul Wever. . . l2w-RICSSTS. George Atherton and I XVilliam LeBaron initiated into Psi Upsilon. Kelly Hall tally- 4 Q -'A - -'il L t f , f L 4 N L X. I ' ho party. - .M . i 14-The Order of the Dragoon's Tooth box party at the Audi- , . - torium. Gamma Rho organ- . . , ized to petition Sigma Alpha I Epsilon for a charter. Alpha A X x N, Delta Phi reception for the ' , ' Rev. Edward Everett Hale. ' N 15-Psi Upsilon informal at the Y 1 I chapter house. The Quad- ' A ranglers gave a tea at the home r of Miss Edna Stevens. ' N ' 16-Phi Kappa Psi informal dance. J' The Mortar Board annual " X3 dance at Ken wood Institute. J 5,-b.:x 'ij ' , 17-Chi Psi theatre party. "The l " ii . il Case is Altered" given by the ' i Department of Public Speak- is ing at the Auditorium. 1 f-,414 i IS- Phi Beta Delta box party and 'gh ' Lv ' luncheon. The Order of the ' Dragon's Tooth installation into Phi Gamma Delta. .Ns r , 21-Delta Kappa Epsilon recep- - , - i - 'C HNUREVJ5 9, tion to parents. - 'li - ' 23-Eighth annual promenade of Beta Theta Pi at the Chicago Beach Hotel. First annual "Medic" promenade at the Forum. Phi Delta Theta informal dance at Kenwood Institute. Delta Kappa Epsilon alumni smoker. The Mortar Board entertained by Mrs. F. E. Vaughn, '98, Annual Basket Ball Team banquet. VVyvern Club luncheon and theatre party. Mr. james Xllright Laurie initiated i11to Delta Upsilon. Mortar Board reunion at the home of Miss Alice Knight, '99, -Messrs. XY. G. Matthews, Xenephon Kalamatiano, Ralph Merriam, F. G. Smith and XV. YV. Charters initiated into Gannna Rho. The Mortar Board entertained by Miss Marian Schwarz. -Beta Theta Pi smoker to brothers visiting the inter-collegiate games. Phi Delta Theta smoker for visiting brothers. Delta Upsilon alumni smoker at the chapter house. Second annual white duck informal dance give n by the Score Club at Rosalie Hall. Vllyvern Club lawn party at the home of Miss Ashley. 397 3--The Mortar Board entertained by Mrs A. W. VVales, ex. 'o2. 4- Albert Ralph Gray initiated into Beta Theta Pi. 5f-Beecher Hall beach party. 6-Vlfashington House s m o k e r. Phi Beta Kappa initiation. Sigma Chi night at "The Sul- tan of Suluf' fSigma Chi re- ception to George Ade at the Auditorium. J 7-Delta Upsilon ' ' a t h o m e ." Delta Kappa Epsilon dinner to Morgan Park Academy track team. Phi Delta Theta annual smoker. 9-Mr. Fred E. Fleet initiated into Delta Tau Delta. ro-Phi Kappi Psi commencement dinner to Roy Keehn and A. B, Garcelou. I2-The Esoteric annual dinner and dance at the Homewood Coun- try Club. I3-junior Day. 14-Psi U p s i 1 o n commencement banquet. Alumni Day. 15-Phi Beta Delta boating party and supper at jackson Park. Psi lfpsilon informal dance at the chapter house. Presidents reception to candidates for degrees. Beta Theta Pi alumni smoker. Annual address and dinner of Phi Beta Kappa. John Wright initiated into Phi Gamma Delta. Miss Marian Schwarz initiated into The Mortar Board. -VVoman's Ifnion reception for summer students. 328 gl-l'l'l.g II vs-Ein Ni !1""" ggi: iwlivililwqlglgnguvigwlyltwill!lllvliwlglyvimlvlllllvwill! :ummm E .- ' ' ' ' . o' I . P ' n .r0n'pY5'l..lf'Q?!..'?5- !l2gf' LHk'lk 4- Q ' in 3 ' fbi l IIN : 52? , 'gl l Suki- 1 1551 ilu I uk - iff! lf' :ei 22' Junior Day .I 4'- 'H . - . . ., . ! E - , ' 1" ' E I I - E - . lo ' j :-. ' -.9--:T D. .1-4, ' ' ' '.t,V -a g ig? A!f0lXGqa17 lv9PAi:g6..iKX'1 : Z--'rfizimgvgla , G x ' 1 .' ' - 1 - 4 S ""'-,4-"lf Q- SQ? 1' ' 331' Z's22'f"l'5-39-' I J- ?Q,- mmm1-anmmammnmmmmmmmmfmgmc-mn-lm-mms-mmmamnmamp ,ig llllillfh mmm. Friday June 13, 1902 J VVALTPIR M. JOHNSON ......... Chairman of the D215 Athletic Committee PHILIP A. SUNDICRLAND, Chairman OL1x'1-:R B. XVYM.-XN ..... ADELBERT T. STEWART Ivy Committee Miss MARUH: MCEVOY, Chairman Miss ED1TH WILES ....... BIILTON G. SILLS Committee on Printing GEORGE INICHENRY, Chairman IVIERRITT B. PRATT ..... CHARLES F. LICLAND Committee on Dramatics FRED M. BOHO, Chairman Miss JANE XVALKER .... THEODORE B. IIINCKLEY 3:30 a. in. Program of the Day as Inter-Fraternity I .Athletic Meet on Marshall Field l. Inter-House 1 1O:3O a. m. School Of Education Exercises 12:OO in. Planting Of the Ivy at North Entrance Of XValker Ivy Orator ..,..... PI.-XRRY W. FORD Presentation of the Spade ..... FRED M. BOBO 3:00 p. in. 8:30 p. in. 1Miss Genevieve Tomlinson is custodian of the spade for 1902-O33 University Dramatics in the Tent on the Campus "BiIser'.s Bill " junior Promenade at the Chicago Beach Hotel MR. HENRX' FELLOws ........ General Chairman Reception Committee ARTHUR L. YOUNG, Chairman LOGAN A. GRIlJLl'IX' ....... HQXRRX' W. FORD Committee on Arrangements ERN1':sT W. ll'IILLER, Chairman ARTHVR E. LORD ....... EDXVARD G. WOODS Decorating Committee Miss MARJORIP: STANDART, Chairman Miss f3RACE DARLINOTON . . . HARRY I. RAYMOND, JR. Finance Committee RICHARD BLAKE, Chairman H. P. MILLER Patronesses MEsDAM1f:s W. R. HARPER ..... H. H. DONALDSON A. W. SMALL ...... . . J. H. BOYD G. C. HOWLAND . . . H. G. GALE C. F. CAsTL1a . . G. E. VINCENT vi i M i Qi? ff ' 4 I . .I it 2 'L I 4"wNff.15fM at-X ss-2 fu., .. u3s"9+25-flii -fzkx mf- .6 f I Y 2 i"' u4Hf.?i sv' A ,A r.. " lil s'?..f- .1 '-fw4+" " I 1 xii-55' 1, lx I U . . L' " , . -kt. A. 1,4 ,wp ji 1. x , X' -. . .. .e,, MI" - Y. sa' N' .-,.v:.':'t Em:-,ff 1 Nga., "',4.':f,-ffij'-2 1 jf . --fs x fi 4 V.'T--':'.- 4 A 'V . K! .,.1-qi' "'w'fag"g.' ff' 4, Q' - ' ' iff' is t t . it 1 s i X ' i - " ,,. X . 43 ' .. , ,L lr 'i I ,W . - ' Zi' 1 , fish! 1 , ': . P- ., - 'I - ., Q . ' 1 4 -a- H- '.fL , ' . . , 1 f.. .- s.- 'ci-1' -- I , .- -. - .-... . ' .. ,u.f,,A4-W.. Jeff, if gf,-,H :. .. xv v.,.,,.... .iw .I A., 5.31.1 ,w,5.'..' g. 5, 4, -.. ' .'-- -.:.. 1- -,- 1,- f :.- 4 ' . ' 1' f. 7-. we -,-2. -2. -' 4 .:.f-"' l. e"-- , , ,.- 4 ,. ., . -Hp ,-,. ...ml U 4.1 5, Y .. 5 ...xii 'rl V., Y ., .J , .HMT he 1 vv. Ll. I if ,' ' 1 ' ' f. 'V 111 -I 1 .'.'T',-'J'-fx.e':: -auf-f-,'f:' ' L' 1 V. . 'fx -.. 51--,, ii' r"5'f?i:l'Tfff1""' q7:'f-'2-fb? 'Y in-V: ' Q , ' A . 5, ' f.-. V. ff f, - I Mfg gf up-'iife --.5.zh- Hts, , .. 19, . Y-V nw-1. K-sm. ,.xg,v-1 -f ,. 'f fx ,L .-1.1 sr .gfgf "-Y '- 1-'.1-fwfr 15 4-4'f.,-- , ., . .V .A , I i ,vnu V' .-.-.- wi -,er .3 HIV.-v x,-in . v- , l X F '-' ":,-J.gf-5f'af1gfQ.'Ls,.rSxf 5sj".y."5g.?'11.-5-5" .fg--I -5 Amt -Lt .-.X ,gl41.TX'S'e "Mi-.fi Leif: 7vi"-,fart 'Il .,- 0' t . f, t ,U X . .rf-. 4 -...f---'Q 1,1-.n ,-Q. .sf . . . . .-A - Q -Q151. .. - A-sz gag,-.-,4,-1 E.-, : fy' j".F- J ' nl' "UV '7 153' ' "ff if l'i'5f'tf -+e7 2'?5L --J "V I " ,- r Q f. 1 'iff 1,.,,j'g v 1' 1-,f--'f - : 'Q tg' " L 1" ' - , Vx. ' fl-7 -1?:s2,',-Efairjfiiiwgl 'zf'5'ff'2l 1.1. .4-SHT . , ,Y r . r t J 1,311.3 f.j-it mg,15fy5f 1.-:A -.ff lg 1 g H. b y, ' -,Q 45.1 v,V,3, ...,m,g'4 x,1Y"A..vf .-N.-71, -J.,.A,,,,A5 ' V , ...J r X" K . - . ,- A.. P1 -5-:R " ' 'bfi 3:213- sx- ' -, 4- L ' ' 'I' "'f' "X ' 'Y wfir. 'Ln ' 'ith . .f . , N ,J fr , . Y 5. V JK . nc,- . N . ,Q .rfb-v., . J., -s. W , Af, 1- , -g U lug 11258: 1 U. .1 'I 5 i , rr-i 3 ' ' ff J ' Y' .-' N- - G' - mfg: I MF , '.f 3 , .15 .jf 'T '- ' f P., 'tl n ,v V' . n 'V ' -.i 1 ' hgh. . V" Sf J"fifi ,xl a A 4 1 G , . . .sr N11-y ' , E . fl I . i . , , jg,-b - ,. 'fl' l J w ' V' ' V " ' ' "N July 3-Phi Kappa Psi opened its new house with a smoker to the alumni, 5-Psi Upsilon informal dance. 7YM8SSfS. Donald Richberg and Homer Guck initiated into Phi Gamma Delta. IO-l5fThC Mortar Board house party at the home of Miss Edna Simpson at Round Lake. 13-Beta Theta Pi house party for delegates coming home from national convention. 17-Phi Gamma Delta entertained by Mr. Donald Richberg. ' 18-Georgia Club reception. 22-Iowa Club picnic and launch party at jackson Park. Cumberland Presbyterian reception at Middle Divinity Hall. Texas Club tallyho ride and luncheon. 23-QZYCCH Hall dancing party. 24-Mr. XVilliam Vocke entertained by the German Club. 26-Excursion to Lake Geneva. Chi Psi smoker at the chapter house. Psi Upsilon summer reunion. Indiana students' excursion to Milwaukee. 29-University informal at Rosalie Hall. Reception to senior graduates. Sl-POI'Cll party at the home of Miss Garrigue. A ugust 5-Lincoln House summer banquet. Mr. Raymond Scott McCurdy initiated into Delta Upsilon. 7- Wyvern Club lawn party at the home of Miss Garrigue. 12-Delta Tau Delta farewell dinner to Mr. Robert Manley. 19-Chi Psi smoker at the chapter house. Psi Upsilon summer reunion. 22-Psi Upsilon informal at the chapter house. 23,-Phi Kappa Psi stag party. J' ep tember I7-Phi Beta Delta ping pong party at the home of Miss Edith Harding. NVyvern Club luncheon at the home of Miss Corinne Campbell. 25--Cobweb party for the XVyvern Club at the home of Miss Garrigue. 27 -VVyvern Club card party at the home of Miss Octigan. l 'l fl 25- 26- 30- gi I -w O 4 S k X X 7 .xx nl irflolwl H . MXN. E " Q N5 gag: -eq ,V 'wx . ff V L i , .-1 4 lv ' ' 4 ' 20-- l L i ii ,, ...Q it- V V A X N' Jil' 22 N ' ' .. J-L '- i 'V ' '-.U 07, gi: 1- .1 - 1 - --A -- : ex " OC I OBER' I . ll Iii 'llil-'ll'ifli1l'lfi'- if in . lyflbfl . -f f '- l - an 4 .tw xv 1 lf.-7 i fd NX- X' 6. 1 . Q Q 4 lf Q ' I' I0 'ii . T ill' lip lp X A ' N' w , fl T 7 an H H, l D ' I2 i P Oo QL V, l l o B S G T il l MB iii 0 "'l is il i L' N l ' I6 ln i J 1 " 0 I o X 'I .7 l l l f IS l Delta Kappa Epsilon smoker at the chapter house. Sigma Club smoker to the Alumni. -Delta Kappa Epsilon smoker at the chapter house. AMr. H. D. Radley initiated into Gamma Rho. The Esoteric entertained by Miss Harper. 3fDelta Kappa Epsilon smoker at the chapter house. Messrs. Edwin Boehmer and Vincent Quinby initiated into Psi Vpsilon. Lincoln House banquet. Delta Vpsilon smoker at the chapter house. Card party at The Delta Tau Delta House. Phi Delta Theta informal dance at Rosalie Hall. Sigma Club open meeting at the home of Miss Blanche Felt. Psi Upsilon smoker at the chapter house. Gamma Rho Smoker. Beta Theta Pi Alumni smoker. Phi Gamma Delta smoker to visit- ing brothers. Sigma Club tea at the home of Miss Charlotte Leonard. Mr. G. D. Birkhoff initiated into G a mm a Rh o . P s i Upsilon informal dance. Gamma Rho reception to Mr. C. D. Levere. XYashington House initiation. Beta Theta Pi smoker for the chapter at Northwestern Vniver- sity. Alpha Delta Phi informal dance. NVyvern Club dance at the home of Miss Smith. Miss Edna Stevens entertained The Quadranglers. Sigma Club tea at the home of Miss Margaret Coulter. Mr. Caspar G. Larsen initiated into Phi Gamma Delta. The Misses XVood entertained The Mortar Board at a chrysanthemum tea. Phi Delta Theta smoker for Mr. XVilliam O. Wilson. 23 -Phi Beta Delta luncheon. Dramatic Club trials for new members. 24-Psi Upsilon informal dance. Foster Hall dance for the incoming students. Delta Upsilon informal at Rosalie - Hall. Beta Theta Pi smoker to the chapter at Illinois University. Kelly Hall party for the incoming students. Delta Tau Delta dinner for the Beta Upsilon Chapter. Sigma Club luncheon at the home of the Misses Reddy. u Messrs. E. A. Pearson and and Kelly Rees initiated into Gamma Rho. The Ouad- ranglers entertained by Miss XValker'at luncheon at Kelly Hall. N Kelly Hall Halloween dance. The Mortar Board party at the home of Miss Edna Simpson. Sigma Club tea at the home of Miss Bertha Iles. -Beecher Hall presented an original play. Sigma Chi entertained at the home of Mr. C. F. Roby. Dancing party at the home of Miss Smith. 331 Ll A v gftqoxr 1 fflflfltjf 1 4. I' +-J ,. i v 1 v Q i i 1 . . 'EY -K ' s. , 4 1 1-re, 1 1 gr' 4 J 1-The Esoteric Alumnae entertained at luncheon 09 Q Q ,'g,f'd YQ: 44- paxil rn: ln ab-.xl x, fjlifl nnlvl A 1 , ll!-WLLKVN It A tix wi? L V1 5 S was 1 H A ffrg, L Q ' G ' sfQg x xl wi. qvgyx bw by Miss Helen Freeman. Beta Theta Pi smoker to visiting brothers. q-Messrs. Eugene B. Bliss, Dudley French and Howard Willett initiated into Lincoln House. Recognition tea given by the XVomen Students' Christian League. Sigma Club party at the home of Mrs. Edgar Goodspeed. 7 ' "'53l'l' -v X 4-Mr. W. J. 'Waterman initiatedinto Gamma Rho. .L.i. 'Q l 1 fl t 1 e-1-Q 3 I N ri. .Qs . BER' 5-Delta Tau Delta card party at the home of Mr. Butler. Sigma Chi reception and dance at the home of Miss Anne Martin. -The Mortar Board entertained by Miss Lillian Noble. Messrs. Guy VVakeHeld. H. E. Potter, L L. Simpson and C. J. Davisson initiated into Gamma Rho. 7-Foster Hall dance given by the new students to the old. Phi Kappa Psi informal dance. , , 5"s"'1,, S-Psi Vpsilon smoker at the chapter house. The Esoterics gave an informal dance at Kenwood Institute. Misses Sidney Bock, Frances Clen- denning, and Messrs, VV. H. Head and Howard XVillett initiated into the Dramatic Club. 9-Foster Hall reception, Chi Psi theatre party. lo-Phi Beta Delta musieale at the home of Miss Ruth Simonson. Beecher Hall dinner to -Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lovett. Sigma Club luncheon at the residence of Miss Martha McDonald. The V ' Quadranglers entertained by Miss Alice Judson. I2 -The Mortar Board entertained by Mrs. Howland. iq-Delta Upsilon smoker to Dr. Griffith. s r"'a's, x if 'J' 1 6 w.. A. 'C . W l 1 I er wir me 22+ xi ' C' f . I 14-Psi Upsilon hurdy-gurdy party. Delta Kappa Epsilon smoker. . 15-Alpha Delta Phi informal dance. Sigma Club musieale at the home of tl1e Misses Osborn. Beta Theta Pi smoker at the chapter house. , The Quadranglers entertained by Mrs. Robin- son at luncheon. I7-Gamma Rho theatre party. , :S -Alpha Delta Phi reception for the Rev. Edward Judson. Messrs. Paul A. Walker and E. VV. VVorkman initiated into Gamma Rho. i 15' P .. l vs- . 1 i ' V 14 ij .59.ga?"'.T'1 'hT:31JeEf',i 'ell , - 1 Q 6 4' lm "7FiLi2-10:-,I s ',. ' V' fi? KL f-f' j- .JN 'V-YFQF sk ' ' y' Fm! 'Eli f., av: 2 - + Yifarwl fl . ,- ' ' .' . z 'f -. rf Q N. nu'-i n E:-.J ,,'-1.55 'Mg .f .5 -7- , 'L . .,vg.,d'v. -- V71 ,- Y P l ,1' ', A Ln,-X'-' yvxayv.. u - Sl,-' -Ill.: Ii f . i ,J -' rf --wr '1 - iii' .- Q' 2.4 -.o ':.3gr- . ,, It , ,' gif- ' z.a.z:Jg..,l,t J.,-jg V.: , xi! 1 .y. - H: T, ,Q A' ,' Lib- 'If -- .xg g.x.P'5kL tan' N- is .ull :f , , gg 1 sg- , . - ,,r.'n, 1 ' Q , -.I .i--,I I , ,. f . , - , ,,-5:-1... ,.1,-:W Q ,ml ri fl ' .-'., -,fig 1g,.e,e-- ',-'w A- .gr r i... li. .,.V.o,,t,,.,.v5g:i ' :M . E:y::xiata:ff:3.' 1, P sk.- . i' 9 -. g., ..gJ,s..'Jt V- rj, et "JIU 'Q'-4' Til' 4-'12 lg'3fLAf5Tf'5.'-:ff-" f'i-T-:Yeh 4 .1 i.. -A uh sr., , J., 4....--,.,..sL. :..4.:f5:s:lXi,'-,:.' ,,4,i3::k A afpxk' ,.: D. v W? I i-3 7-.:'."-1.3-5 Jr. ".. fs' -13390 ' " . 5' 1 l 'Lg - --L -.-.: greg-4-,r.t.9Rg.:g'..g5g.:sl'l ibqzziig ' . .A . 13. ,. f.. Lf'1fvrQ'1 fi! if -' -Y - , - -..-.t.,,,f,..,,i.,4..w. , . 51.1:..xg.:,g:'i..,, . , "arty-1--3. .21-e -1 f . - -- n-xt...:..--: . . 1' ' ,.. "FC .Au l '11w1'-3- v l1fi,.J' .' ' f R ' .ffji l ,h , , .-M B.. 1' .'3,.',f5.qf ... -- -a -H.-the T.- it ,as - - "1-f ggskwsz "1 2' 'A-Y' " 'vbli-EU ' .' 4 1 k 'K": ff if if--. Z.'y,,s', ,-mae 'I at ,,,- fe- sw.-.. 1 Q. .i ' 1 ' -3: ' 1 " i2lg'iAg:' qui 4' . gig w :. 3 . -- Af1,l,v .. ll ry 3!?J7.'.L'f ' 'fit . 1- pg 'lim ' ..il'1X:-L'a:L.'s,' 13.1, v-. 1 I xv:-Pt!-z.f7wgQi:-. It 'kr I l..fvI'i4. H-X' -ff" 'ti ik: ' thlkultz- i-.I X . I . . 'qu u ' ' Q, '.-,V ss- gylz l 2, 's l il 3 Za "' t S .1 l 1- J l , '15 . 9, 'P I J i I l v , X 20 2I 22 25 26 27 25 29 - -f 5- 19-Open literary meeting of The Mortar Board at the home of Mrs. james Westfall Thompson. The Sigma Club entertained by Miss Katherine Paltzer. -Beecher Hall dinner for Mr Hamlin Garland. Breakfast at Hull House given by Miss jane Adams for the Quadranglers. -Sigma Chi coaching party and reception to convention delegates. Beecher Hall vaudeville. -Spelman House entertained by Miss Laura NVard. The Mortar Board entertained at luncheon by Miss Edna Simpson. Chi Psi Using." Delta Kappa Epsilon smoker. -Beecher Hall di1111er for Miss Lyon. -The Mortar Board Alumnae entertained at a tea by Mrs. Howland. Mr. Vernon C. Beebe initiated into Phi Gamma Delta. Informal of the Quadranglers in Kelly Hall. -Delta Tau Delta di1n1er to the chapter at XVisconsin Vniversity. Eighth annual reunion of Beta Chapter of Phi Kappa Psi. Beta Theta Pi smoker at the chapter house. Chi Psi smoker for the alumni. Delta Upsilon smoker for the chapters at Michigan and Wisconsin. -Sigma Club luncheon at the home of Miss Elsie Booth. Phi Kappa Psi informal reception for President Woodrow Wilson, of Princeton, and President Edmund J. james, of Northwestern Vniversity. -The Esoteric entertained by Mrs. Vincent i11 honor of Miss Eberhart. Phi Kappa Psi entertained by Mr. H. C. Ernst. The Quadranglers entertained by Miss Alice Judson. 2-Psi Vpsilon informal dance at the chapter house. ' 5-Mr. john H. Smale initiated into Phi Delta Theta. 6-The Esoteric entertained by Miss Cox. Beta Theta Pi in- formal dance at Kenwood Institute. Chi Psi dinner at the Bismarck. S-Phi Beta Delta theatre party. 9-Phi Beta Kappa initiation. IO-Slglllfl Club luncheon for plecles at the home of Miss Marie McEvoy. I2-VV8Shll1g'LOl1 House theatre party. Kelly Hall initiation and Christmas party. Delta Upsilon informal dance given by the alumni of the faculty at the Yendome. I5-Pill Delta Theta smoker to the city alumni. Lincoln House banquet. Delta Kappa Epsi- lon entertained by Mr. and Mrs. Henry Gale. Dramatic Club informal evening for the members. I5-Beecher Hall Christmas party. Messrs. Hayward Dare VVarner and Frederick Charles Drew initiated into Beta Theta Pi. I6-Miss Payne XVells initiated into The Quadranglers. I8-The Mortar Board entertained by Miss Lulu Morton. Phi Kappa Psi commencement din- ner for Mr. R. C. Neptune. Phi Gamma Delta theatre party. Delta Kappa Epsilon smoker for the Hyde Park high school athletes. Delta Tau Delta entertained by Mr. Channing Gilson. Gamma Rho granted a charter from Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Sigma Club luncheon at the Auditorium Annex, given by the pledges. Spehnan House entertained by the Misses Spink and Latimer at the home of Miss Spink. 333 1 - Tgnrz--. -+1 .izl TSX 5-Spelnian House entertained by Miss 'i,. Q 0 ff X Dudley at Kelly Hall. Dr. Lyman . . Abbott entertained at Green Hall. . Lnfy X 6-Messrs. Vogt, K au f m a u n , Linton, W A, 1, vlgzmi-NX 'l Hughes, Worley, Jr , Willard, Crusin- S berry, Beach and Lowe initiated into fs 255552555151 Zi a? 1 Delta Upsilon. Cross Country Club i R Eu- ' H ng :sw im banquet at the Bismarck. Beta Theta l E l i' P1 entertained by the alumni at the i ' 51 1 N ji l Hamilton Club. 'lg' X i i 7-Woman's Union reception to incoming I tg' , ,Xi Q students. il i ll i 9- Phi Gamma Delta party for the pledges. 'X .X ' Q, I Io-Misses Rachael Inffals, Mary Barker i ,f 5' and Harriet Bowenbinitiated into the 5 i i , . VK li Wyvern Club. The law students en- l : 3 .5 tertained by Beecher Hall. Second , E 1 X l university informal given by the Score . 'U' ' I 'N , Club at Rosalie Hall. anuar meet- -E l i i . . . . Y . E ' E I ' ing of The Universit Alumni Assocla- - E 1 i ll I . y , i C in X X E . tion at t h e Art Institute. Messrs. i 4 Charles Thomas, Robert Trumbell, i E , l i David Nichols, LeRoy Startzman and IX i ' William Hatfield initiated into Beta li, , , i Theta Pi. I Fl ii E i ,li 1 12--Receptions at the Won1en's Halls. 1 y i 14-Opening of the Hitchcock Hall break- l ff., fast room. X gil V . i A 15-Initiation banquet of Phi Gamma ini i , '-- 1, Delta at the Sherman House. Messrs. '1 X i f -1 H Ashley Dixon, William Houglnjoseph S l i I "fb Hora, Lagene Wright. Frederick Pattee X E ' i 'g il ,f and Earle Fleming in i t i a te d into I E I 1 l Xe! Delta Kappa Epsilon. - 1 ll 1, I6n'SigIIl2l Chi initiation at the chapter i ll 1 l, I house. Annual ball of Psi Upsilon at X' I 4.2. X 'l X the Fine Arts Building. XVashington Sl 1 ' House initiation ban uet. 4 .1 i i . . q. it , l i .gr XX f l'ff.XI1lll13l Michigan-Chicago debate at ijj l ' 'Ri A. the Studebaker Music Hall. The i, I Vi I i 'ink' Sigma Club entertained at luncheon at Xi "U . the Auditorium by its pledges. T' T' 'iw 2l+lYlllSlCEilG at the Woman's Union. l 2,3 f via 22-Promenade of the medical students at ' -55 1 . the Forum. The women's clubs en- i ' 4' ' ti tertaincd bv Miss Freeman in honor of X X ' Miss Paxsoin. ,X 5, ,,,,,,,,f,,f, 23-" Esmeralda of the South " Xproduced N f- -- -- .-. 2'-.f by the Dramatic Club at Music Hall. 24-Initiation banquet of Chi Psi at the Sherman House. S eliiian House rece ytion at the home of Miss ennie Thom son. . - . I . . . . , p 25-Misses Davidson, Curtis. Powell, Lawton, Simpson and Booth initiated into the Sigma Club. Misses Casey, Morton, XVilliamson and Matheny initiated into The Mortar Board. 26- Delta Vpsilon reception at the fraternity house. Hitchcock Hall reception. 2S+TllQ University Dames entertained by the Woman's Union. Miss Edna Robinson entertained for Miss Belle Halsted. ,o-Beta Theta Pi informal at Kenwood Institute. Amnial assembly of Delta Upsilon at the Chicago Beach Hotel. X 31'-LHW students, smoker to the law faculty. Beecher Hall animal reception. Recep- tion by Prof. Small for his classes. Spelman Hall cotillion at Kelly Hall. -Annual initiatory banquet of Psi Vpsilon at the Victoria Hotel. Messrs. Matson Hill, jr , W'illiam T. Harsha, james Hickey, Charles C. Parsons, and Howard Willett initiated 'XIr W H Thomas initiated into Pln kappa Psi Ouarterls dance of the School of Education training class Annual assembly of Chi Psi at Bournique s Beecher Hall sleighing partx Annual Ixellx Hall dance IJUIYSYSHX inlormal at Rosahe Hall gn en D5 the Score Club Reception to the LIllVCI'S1tV Dames at tl1e home of Mr and 'Urs W A Hadlex Monthlx reception at the XX omen s Halls Annual 1flllI18l101l banquet of Pln Rho Sigma at the I nion The Xoung Women s Christian League entertained by the cabinet at Foster Hall Marriage of Mr Frank Perkins Barker and Miss Belle Hal ted at Trinity church Ann ual assemblv of Sigma Ch1 at the Chicago Beach Hotel terly partv The Wyx ern Club entertained br Miss Rachael Invals M1 ses Agnes McNe1sh Irene Engle and Carrie Ixuhrens initiated into Pln Beta Delta Messrs Buckwalter Hall Catlin Soher Lumbard Putnam Sumner and Ells worth initiated into Phi Delta Theta at the Restaurant Italia Lincoln House banquet and theatre party Annual assemblx of Delt kappa Epsilon at the Colonial Club The Quadranzglers entertained bv Miss Edna Stevens. Green Fall mlentint partv Alpha Kappa kappa entertained ft Beecher Hall 'fr' '- " s ... XX Cs! ?i ,- -l ---- - it . p I if fV ff! if A JC Rm, V 7 - 1,7 ' C s, 1 N .. ' fe . , 1 ,W-' 'N N 'xy 'A .V . v. f v .' i l f ,ll sl y . v' , 7 K 'xx xr - . f . . 1 , . v ,f l . I' . . . M ' ' , - v 1 'Y l ' ii 'l il l . . . i- l f' ' It l 1 l , , 'I 1 5' A I Y. . ' ' , Nia X I . A - l g if ' . - A y. .L ffl: lf - -, , .VA V I, fuk - l ' . 5 i fi! 1 ,lp , - 1 ' A I 'P 1 X l -Senior students' second quar- l 'lg' fx , 'K ' ,f . . - Y . I Q1 g J I ,H p q 1 .Q B- 1 .Q in q, Ala , is ' A 'K ' 0 ' v l I . J y f 1 . ' 0' f ' l Y I i i ng ji, , s . . -. . . q A . jf. I . I ..x-n. y xl y v 1 1 i A 1 ,Hi 1 I u ' . lf! ' ffl . ' ' 5- . -3 - -'I ' 5 fn I 5 - B Iwi' l,l 1 4 Atrxx gg 1 r K l I Q X It L., '-, I 1 I U t A 4 L or K . ' 1 i' .1 M -b Messrs. Bruce and Sherer and Miss Brownell initiated into the Dramatic Club. Martha XX'ashington tea at the School of Education, Tenth Annual Washington Promenade at Bournique's. Mr. Berta initiated into Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Beecher Hall dancing party. Informal of the Quadranglers at Kelly Hall. Hitchcock Hall reception. Wyvern Club sleighride. Reception of the Y. M. C. A. and VV. S. C. L. at the Woman's Union. Phi Delta Theta annual assembly at Bournique's. Reception of divinity students in Haskell Hall. Snell Hall Reception. Psi Upsilon informal at the chapter house. Dancing party of The Mortar Board at the home of Miss Morton. W Tenth Annual Washington Promenade Bournique's E February 20, 1903 E Committees ROBERT SIIRINI: BUTLER, General Chairman Reception XVALTER RIVRRAX' JOIINSON, Chairman MISS GRACE H. DARLINOTON MISS EMMA DOLFINGER IIENRY DAVIS FEI.LOwS RIQIIARII H. WELLINGTON Finance PLATT BTILK CONRAD, Chairman HARRY JAMES LIIRIE RORERT STINSON STARBIRD Arrangements THOMAS JOHNSTON HAIR, Chairman ERMINE JOHN PHILLIPS VV.-ALTER XVILE HAMRIIROER LDWIN XF7 mmx ELI P. GALE i ITIOXY.-XRD JAMES SLOAN nn Decorating H1155 LAIIRETTA IR ENE OCTIGAN, Chairman MISS GRACE XVARREN MISS AGNES XVAYMAN STEPHEN R. CAPPS, JR. ORVILLE ELRRIIIGE ATWOOD Printing WALKER GAILEY MQLAURY, Chairman ERNEST XVILSON MILLER WILLIAM FRANKLIN JOHNSON Patronesses MRS. WILLIAM R, HARPER MRS. ANDREW' MCLEISH MRS. ALBION W. SMALL MRS. JAMES W. THOIIIPSONQ Wifi, J MRS. DAVID G. HAMII.TON: MRS. HARRX' P. JUDSONJIT 'iii fp' LA MRS. GEORGETE. VINCENT 6 J J L -A '?w5y,Q Q lg- I-Dr. Parker introduces innova- tion of Sunday afternoon teas for residents of H i tc h c o c k Hall. 4-Senior Class C035 Book appears. 6-Hull Court medical students give annual smoker in Haskell Hall. Law School gives smoker in Hitchcock Hall. Score Club gives fourth Uni- v e r si ty informal at Rosalie Hall. Psi Upsilon upper class- men dinner for informal part- ners at the chapter house. -Theta chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon formally installed at the Auditorium. I I -"National Democratic Conven- tion," meetingin Cobb Chapel, nominates Pattison of Pennsyl- vania for presidency of tl1e United States. Annual concert of the Glee and Mandolin Clubs at the Music Hall, Fine Arts Build- ing. Annual banquet of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity at the Auditorium Annex. 14-First banquet of the University congregation at the Auditorium. Misses Emma Dolfinger and Ruth Cohen, and Messrs. Robert Mitchell and Herman Schlesinger initiated into Phi Beta Kappa. 17-Forty-fifth convocation at Studebaker Theatre. 337 FACULTY ALPHABET LSELECTIONS FROMl is for Allen, we all call him " Phil," VVe sit in his class and hear him Hgespielf' He growls and rumbles till out from the mass We can hear a few nouns and German verbs pass, And when we leave class we all say "Gee XYhiz! Was ein guter alt Deutscher unser Phil ist." rw is for Castle and also for Clark, XJ This last one namecl is at speaking a "shark," He can make Daniel Webster and H. Clay look cheap In fact, he could prob'ly teach "Prexie" to speak. is for Flint, he's hard as a "Nott" XYhen in English 3 we Hounder about. But he cloesn't write books ancl whatever they say We'll stick to N. Flint for we're glad he's that way. is for Goodspeecl, a sterling old rooter, Whom no one can beat as a varsity "hooter." He cheers just as loud for the team in defeat But he hates like the rlence to see us get beat. has to be for Harper of course, And we think that perhaps he's been taking to "Force For the building we all hope soon to be in Is the pile that we're going to call "Sunny Gym," is for Smith, for Stagg, and for Starr VVho's relatefl to Inelians near anml afar. But he's generous too, in the last extreme For he furnished the varsity men with ice cream. is for Thompson, the history man Who'll Hunk with delight a whole class if he can. So beware ye Freshmen, for if you would pass Always wear collars, not sweaters to class. 33S EIAIAIAAAIAIQIAIAIIHDIIIMJIIAIA ummmmImnmmmInlmnmemnmnnnnnqannnnnmanm.mnmnmmznl XANKXWXW f j xfpixfi I K in f"' ' I noi 'IW Z 'mx Mn I " I 'Rf I A v vga. ,I 3.5 4 f Q- Q' Iv qi if ,I ,x gas' Ju -elf I J D f 991- I X jgf . 711 iid in 1 qi lb n lbw! A 4 f L M Art Contrzbutors JOHN HFNRX WIRDIIIII Art Ef1ltO1 DONALD A IXFWNICf,TT VINCFNT 'STRONC NORTON DAVIID AI I AN ROIsFRTsON BARRMT C AIx1mRExxs HENRX SIBIPX PLTN xM -XI ILI1 I STI-'LIE Bu Du IN JOHN STEPHIRN WRICIif EI LILEN AI LIL FREDERICK RICHARD IJAI I RICH FIISON B. COOKE RAI IH PHINJIAS MH V.-INE JAMES DOI'c'I.xs III OOIJ Q J L I IIN f - J M W' 9 :F QE If 45 ' Y, W HL V R, NA J: k I S 5 IW K ,Ax I I - aw QQMAR A 42205292 31 5 l x, KX Adam. I AAFP! 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H ' 1 , B 1 V N 2 , ' ,T : -E E - II , 5 A - A , 1 ' 2 ' - A e gdfd ' ' A 'f' f L3 I 9 G I I 7 , ,, J ,, is 9 IH 9 Q I Q 1? , ,H f XIII - I-I .I . I. I , I J I Q L f f W 5 N ' x l 5 ,I ' If ' , I S - 01 D' RQ X I f Q .. I M f If I X fl I , D Q C Q3 I K gf Q5 4 N I L S S 0 f f E ! J, . .. . a - . , , ,, I.I-- .. ,IIAI ,I.. . .. .... , . .,.A . . .-.-. IM. .III-II..... I-I III-II .. 'ICFIWWTlflllflWIQIUIWIWICIIWICWWITITIWIWIUICITIWIUIIWIWITIUIUIIWIUIWIUIWI ID Jfr-nvveucra LI.- I-Iv LITEFQXRY gow-rmsurorg I ! f V ,X 1' I . 4 E f ' ri s. 7 ,213 ge K W W Q. 1 Contributors to the X A , 1903 Cap and Gown 1 , f , f X 'W , M NN N PI.-XRCISSA Cox , , FRANK R. ADAMS I M V If Vg.AjXriIN1gqS0N L-,jx D ALD A. KENNICOTT 0 C RLES W. Co1,L1 5 ' ' D TC-LAS SUTHERL Q' , H E. F . M .TQIIQT DAQ' C 3 MILTON G. SILL C. A N A ' 4 4 ERNE5?XTIixIi?EiS STE vs 1. EDXVARD M. IQERVVIN , f ' JULIA C. Homes ' IW ll Q I' X lr !4l ll.msu lm'I ,. C W In -L N f . ' f o C my .mf ur' Ml N -L - 4KL,yg?Ym, 'W l K XA JMQJMNM QPCEQJE 'V N600 e QQPLET j g--x 1 -if-n Sf'-s , ,N 5 ji S ' v Q xx N 1 K N Q Q ' l G Q FIN 0 gs-5 7 X X -4 M so feggf ssp b if-dm id ' 1' ' '! X Si ' f JL 'X A N I N lb ,, "NH, J . M a is .An Operatic Extravaganza in Three Acts and a Curtain Jpeecb Book 111' G. xl. Zubae. fif7lS1.l'ffl' ll. lf. lzdqjii. U Dramatis Personae PREXIE YARPER ...... Head of the house of Capulet GARGOYLETTE . Also of the house of Capulet, in love with Marooneo BTAROONEO . . . . A member of the rival house of Montague DENE XVUNCENT .g . . An evil spirit, in league with Yarper DENE CHASSTLP' l i His assistants DENE CZSCHMITH 3 """ 1 The Queen of the good fairies, who Cll- il deavors to bring about the union of affinities Students, Professors, Janitors, Fairies and Evil Spirits. ACT I. SCENE: A public place in front of Castle Cobb, the stronghold of the Capulets. Students are walking about. OPENING CHORUS OF STUDENTS. Merry, merry students we, Members of the Varsity, All our studies are a lunch, And we're a very joyous bunch At the glorious U. of C. LADY STUDENT: This co-education certainly is the thing for my money. I never saw so many eligible and handsome men together at once before in all my life. GENTLEMAN STUDENT: Hist! Someone cometh. ANOTHER STUDENT: Aye, 'tis the gentle Marooneo with the lovely Lady Gargoylette. Let's hence. FIRST STUDENT: Yes, let's all hence in a bunch. fExeunt Students. Enter Marooneo and Gargoylette. l MAROONEO: What sorrow speakest thou? Is it so worse As this? Pray, love, but ope your lips to say This is a pipe. DENE Tovczns .... E T7 ' E if .s e a U' ' at In Q-I ,W-,wi 91,9 . no 9 -N' Ii .1 ii 9 A ' ,QUNQ fiiqgv 'ml iff K V ? ' N -57 .4 . YY1", f ' I 1 egg V... ' Y A ' . l 1 . Q ' fig-i M V , W ig A 1. W -, is I T E s ores HWFWH' 1 T ft in tr J 2 E' I-2 ew . a 'Q Y . 3 ,4 . ff : 5 'G W i? A iw Pi' if X 2 O- Tif f . 'f eiikwu he 5 ' lu, Xxx ,ga . fri , , , Vfxllfl r .ixgim 'agp ,, Hui. EP f- , , 11' 2. 4. 11, 43? "' 'H I- ll 5' ff If 5, Mft GJM W . , I eg'J,,..I -41..i"':xl'iZ.!""b-f'4, if i Nl' X 582 1 .V i 4 9 -'pix wins' ' I ,.yI1, ,, EZ ll, I' ,ly,.u.:'v!f1Q L .. x , ,I ll Q -a Q' f ' i2?fg umlun' 1 1, , ' Q, iill"""uQEEfi' H , -5' ' W , i ijt! 4 -'-, au li- W, 3 Elma ,. 'S- 7. - , A AQ A XX 'A if st ' .- iii? S 4 J --- e I l-.,e- - , - ,i T 4+ Si I Qt, E Ira 7 K ,xx.il4k:HUf? fl :mania-' .., ' Y Sis . 'ee ,1n..Q"""fl , like -" - --N ., swixa-as 1 if MEIN' lx -' 1 GARGOYLETTE: Alas, I fear 'tis true. Prex Yarper hath just spake the word that parts Us in the hey-day of our love. Farewell. MAROONEO: Sweet love, say you not so, but bid me hope. But bid me hope, and against the Dene himself I'd fight and brave high heaven for your love, KA bell rings.j GARGOYLETTE: What noise is that ? M.-xRooNEo: List! 1 Bell rings again,J Ha! Again, It is the recitation bell. We part For one long hour to meet again beneath The clock. Till then, farewell. fThey embrace and exeunt severally. J 1Enter Prexie Yarper stealthily while the orchestra plays a spaghetti movement. He wears a long black cloak, with which he covers his shape. Advances to front and sings. Air, " Dolly Varden."l PREXIE: I am Prexie, Prexie Yarperg I'm no bunco Or card sharper, just watch me. You will see Yillainy fsuch as never was before. l PREXIE: I sang in grand opera once-just once, that's all. But now to commune with the evil spirits. QHe makes mysterious motions and finally draws a circle on the stage as he chantsl First I draw a circle thus, And make therein a magic fussg Then a small libation pour, On the grass or on the floor, By my command you're summoned here Foul fiends and denes, you must appear, QThunder and lightning. Dene Wuncent appears accompanied by Denes Chasstle and Czschmith. Dene XVuncent stands with folded arms. J DENE XVUNCENT 1 Breathing firel: What would you, Master. Speak but one small Word, And earth shall cough up its dearest treasures. PREXIE: Hist! No word of this. DENE YVUNCENTZ Our lips are sealed. DENE CHAssTLE: And stamped. PREXIE: Be still, till you're addressed. But list, Two lovers fond are wandering loose about Yon stately ruin. They must be segregated XVithin the hour. Away, the task is thine, Begone. Go seek them out, away, away. fDenes vanish in a cloud of smoke.l PREXIE: 'Tis plain that Fm the works. Ha! Ha! QSings. For I am Prexie Prexie Yarper, etc. , CExit Prexie, singing. Enter students chatting and after them, Marooneo and Gar- goylette.l BIAROONEOZ Once more the clock hath circled around the hour And still we live and love. GARGOYLETTE: But still I fear, What, I know not. But take me once again Within the restful haven of your arms, And kiss me once. tHe kisses herl-and once again tHe kisses her againp-Oh- CGargoylette faints as the Denes appear in a flash of red fire.l 342 INIAROONEO lNot seeing the Denesj: XVhat is't? XVhat see'st thou? tHe sees Wuncentj Ha! Who art thou? Art tl1ou bird or beast or devil? Come speak! Thou hast a tongue. If thou art XVuncent, Tell a funny story. Anything, but gaze Not at me so with glittering eye. If I have flunked, why, out with it! Oh speak! tllauseg no reply. J XVhat want ye here? XVhy tarry? Shall I provoke Thee? Would'st thou scrap? Shall I then biff thee one Upon the kisser, or bat thee in the lunch? Or would'st thou don the mitts, here on the swarrl, To spar a round or two? QNO answer. Enter Prexiej BIAROONEOZ What Y Another! PREXIE: Ha! ha! Thou'rt safely in my clutch at last: Seize them, nor let them go till crack of doom. MAROONEO: Ah, thou canst speak. Then tell me fiend most fell In human form: tell 1116 our fate, PREXIE: Segregation! MAROONEQ: Say you not so. O spare us, or at least C Grant that we die not apart. Hear me I PREXIE: Nay, nay, me heart is steel. Take them away ! Let her be kept in Lexington and he Shall grace the darkest cell of Castle Cobb. 4 Gargoylette, weeping, is carried off at one side, and Marooneo, struggling, is taken out at the other. J CURTAIN. ACT II SCENE: Exterior of Lexington Hall: moonlight. feA meeting of the Fairies. Fairy dance, at conclusion of which Deue Toughs, the queen of the fairies, enters. He carries a wand surmounted by a diamond tBarriosj str. Song: QAir, "Michael Roy."! DENE ToUoHs: A mighty persouage am T, For I'1n the Senior Deneg My word is law to man and sprite And I'm the Fairy queen: And if you want to graduate You'll have to make a call On the Senior Deue in the dinky room At thirteen Haskell Hall. Chorus: For oh! For oh! Behold the fairy queen If you're in Woe just come to me For I'1n the Senior Dene. tBallet Dance.j ALL: Hail to the fairy queen! FIRST SI-RITE: Thou guide of love's Frail bark, we greet thee ! SECOND SPRITE: joyous spirit, We welcome thee! DENE ToIioHs: I thank you gracious subjects. XVhat work is doing for tonight? Pray put Me next! FIRST SPRITE: We would save the lovers, Marooneo and Gargoylette, now segregated three months past. DEN142 Totvczus: Ah, they are in the power of the arch iiend Ilene Wunceut. I fear my sway will not avail. Were they but in the Senior College, then- But no-I can do naught-But wait, perchance- I have a thought. Anon I will inform you Of its purport We must away. QFairies vanislrj tlinter a youth forlornly picking out an air on a mandolin j IUAROONEOZ Ah, here could I sigh out my very soul TF, Beneath her window when the night is still. 1, jf- QGargoylette appears over wall 5 lin, ',,, 5 GARGoYr.E'rTE lsoftlyj: Ah! Marooneo, where- , 'ff fore art thou Marooneo? Q 'rl A rose by any other name would smell as Hifi sweet. E INT.-XROUNEOZ Ah! 'Tis the east and Gargoylette ,fS,.-,,,' f is the sun, 6 " ,, fig' Q Arise, fair sun, and make the 1nOon ' X saws. X l appear l, -als l Like thirty cents. N 0 X - l GARGOYLETTE: How I have longed for thee. I o IWIAROONEOZ And I for thee. Alas can we no more K X I Behold our love's young dream. QDene Toughs appears as in a vision.l N DENE TOUGHS: Stand not aghast. I will thee good, my ' friends Would'st thou co-educate once more? Trust me ! MARooNEo AND G.-xRoovLET'r1e: Aye aye, we would. DENE TOUGHS: Then list most carefully. fProduces bottle. J Here is a potion which if you but take, Will put you in a Rip Van VVinkle new Lasting two long years and when you awake, Your sorrows o'er, you'1l find yourselves XVithin the sacred pale of Senior College Work. Will you partake? IWIAROONEO AND GARGOVLIQTTE: We will. Anything. MARooNEo: Give us the dope. tDene Toughs gives potion. They drink and fall asleep.l CCurtain descends and the orchestra plays a lullaby.J ACT III. SCENE: Interior of Castle Cobb, showing the junior rack and the clock which has stopped and is covered with cob-webs. Everything is dusty and looks as if it had not been disturbed for a long time. Motionless figures are sitting, standing or lying around the stairs, the floor, and everywhere. Among them are Marooneo and Gargoylette. Chorus of Janitors is discovered. tChorus. Air: "Heidelburg Stein Songfl IIere's to a life that's bold and free, Here's to the knight of the brooms, Here's to the job that just suits me, Sweeping the dirt from the rooms. Never before could I raise the dust, lint now I have " Mun" for fourg I'll take it all and go on a bustg Here's to the janitor. 4Dance D FIRST JANITOR: For two long years, these weary wights have sleptg Nor breakfast nor eight-thirty class has woke Them from their slumber deep. 1 Enter Prexie wearing a scowl. l PREXIE: Begone, scullions! l Exeunt Janitors. l l'RExlIi: The years are up me time l , ias come to foil Dene Toughs. His charges are forgotten quite And while he naps, once more they'll be my prey. 4 Stamps foot violently upon the floor. I Denes appear! I have work for thee! 1 Enter Denes Wuncent, Czschmith and Chasstle in a burst of flame. I PREXIE 1I'ointing to Marooneo and Gargoyle-ttelz Make them awakeg the hour has comeg the time is ripe. DENE XVITNCENT 1Touching Marooneo' and Gargoylette on their shoulders 3: Awake! HI.-XROONEO 1Turning over nz Gwan, I'll snooze yet another hour. I'll cut the blooming class this once for luck. 1 Marooneo sits up and begins to comprehend the situation. I Oh, I remember, I'm the Sleeping Beauty and the Beast. The prophecy is now Fulfilled. XYake, gentle Gargoylette. PREXIE: But stay! You're in my power, l1Ot Toughs': you 1111lSl1 obey My rules and segregated be. You're mine! lDene Toughs appears. J DENE TOUGHS: They're mine! PREXIE: They're mine! Seize them! fXVuncent and his assistants start to lay hands on Marooneo and Gargoylette. 5 DENE Tovonsz Stand back, I say, 'Till ye have heard Illy word. fTo Marooneo and Gargoylettej Take these, I pray, A charm against all evil spirits. lHauds each a title of Associate.b MAROONEO AND GARGOYLETTE: We're saved! PREXIE AND DENES: Foiled affain! G-xRCox' . , fLETTE: Marooneo! b IVIAROONEOZ Gargoylette! lThey fall int 0 each other's arms as the recitation bell rings for chapel hour.r CURTAIN. F f 'X H 4 I . .257 K Slim 3131, ., x ,-ry+'?Z' ' 5 In if 7 55 aa 2 Irma- YQ? , 5 ff' 0 Z I lik X . ' 0 1' 'Q Q' 'ff ,-- 0 0 5, a 0 3 T ig mis 0 X70 0 . P Z a n X 7 0 0 0 ,l, '-T SLN il,flSli1.' Q! X I N- ' E, F In.. X f FQ j QQ 3 Q2 'qNA,g'e , il' TO ALL BUYERS OF Eagrafwags aaa' Colle o Afaaaaly or publications of a like nature, we offer our services. This is a special branch of our business-We know exactly what is Wanted, and to the newly elected Boards We are a great help. It has taken us years to gain the enviable reputation which we now have for doing this line of Work, and We are ever ready to give any information that may be asked of us. Write us for complete booklet giving many necessary ideas to the Business Managers and Editors-in-Chief. This book is a sample of what We are doing. Mario 55 Gran! Company E1zgra1'er.r, Przaforf and BZ-7llfc'7'f 3716 fo 350 Dearborn Street Chicago, U. S. A. w N I -5 i I JVAQ -- X gg' Ya Q 1393! Q 44' 'Q 'M 4 Brothers, it is long indeed Since our forms have graced a boardg O'er our crypts full many a bead Has been told since we adored The Saints on Saints days-other times lo ,A XX .. 4 - b 1 . I l . mf R5 ' no E g ll 1 f , fbi- 0. 99 I X 9 4 .11 : 5 ' I ., I '. 1 vvvvv. :vv'4' H K 5 2 5 ovv- 40 9 I I Y f-X, I vf N--' L-til Q N it ff X ,s.- ax iii' Qs, ,ff fa Y -' Nha J ,XX -xl C' . 1 . A '43 5.- ff.-1,1---z-5 1,',p.'.Eg-f 1 'Q 4,-,r 4. N I " LM.. .95 7 -- w N A 1 I lx it it fl X t X The women fair, O Lord! We were such jolly sinners then! VVell, well, let's fleet the time Ere in our chancelled cots again We hear the matin chime. The priory's still a genial place, And we, friends, are the same, -Though somewhat thinner i11 the face As when we took our name. Then brothers to a mouldered rout, And if your shapes be lean Let voice and manner be as stout As they have ever been, And, Brother Pius Pietas, Do you, the first, begin?" iBrother Pius Pietas Speaks as chanting Holy Mass.J Though naked in my bones I sup, liereft of cowl and gown, Brothers, iny sockets still look up, My jowels still look down." CBrother Robin ScarIet:Eyes Speaks in lightly jesting wise.l Earthly toil and pain are o'erg XVe shall feel them both no more. As for l'urgatory's hre- We know that can mount no higher Than the falt'ring soul of man Squirming on the frying-pan OfLa hypocriticjltope. Thus we've cause for fear nor hope. Real pain flees when once we're deadg Shall we have champagne instead? -Do not rattle ine I prayg I speak sober dry today." 'Xfxt Mx Ei ,st 533 wife if X K l llf f all A N T' ,Q 1 .-ei'-ax 6' - "2 -" Xi ., C w, 5 , E ' -: QQ' fs we I 2. -14 X l l til 3 1 ee f 9 'I f x K s , LThe Abbot inte rposeth here x And bids prepare some blither cheetah I Nr tw N36 N , '!- ,, . . . V . W -' ' ' , " lhe hint IS tnnely, brother 11111141 L I JT' Come, I3ott'ler, to your task! - f , -1 , 4 'R ' I , -W " ' Though you have lost your stately lme 5 ' V71 You still can tap a Cask." v 4 Y -'N y is I J- v gfl. :Q tThe Bottler without mirth or passion Q Respondeth after his slow fashion.J J f'aae1' , '17 if? 7 xx "True, I have lost the pompous curve I gloried in of yore, Yet still my spine, you may observe, Leans backward as before. r., . Brothers, let each but hold his cup X, .. K And I shall gladly pour." x X 'N CBrolher Robin Scarlet-Eyes X Tott'1-ing, cup in hand, doth rise.r -- fd L' , .N x . - Vruj' "Drink black death unto the Popeg ui. . ' Death to Saints and death to hopeg J .fl But a health unto our bones 'K ' T u ., f ,Ll .lVIOl1l1l'I'lllg here beneath the stones wiv! , Happy were we, brothers rlear, 'N yy , ff Hao we but 1 -Q35 ' 'bee heref See here! W - Of your foibles cease to prate. by I uf Your words are like your bones, I fear, fe i ' I x -, f Somewhat inarticulate. iff i -Harlc the Illiltlll bell 'gins ringg 5" 1 We must hasten, brothers dearg llach become a silent thing, X I I, , vt' , Iiach one in his proper grave." Xxx, 349 3 ' l s'-147 " ' Q33- i , ,Sie ff' If McDonald C3 Spann 185 DEARBORN STREET 420 ADAMS EXPRESS BUILDING CHICAGO buf Jtytzts Artistic Clothes The Great Idea J ,Q T first Foster Hall could not imagine why Miss Leigh cared to waste any of Q her time with such an insignificant man. She was a Senior, the recog- 'Sfifv , nized leader of one of the most exclusive clubs, and prominent in college , society. VVhat social value the friendship of a Sophomore, to whom the S' men referred with a superior intonation as a "barb" possessed, the gossips ' could not conceive. But, ill spite of the fact that even her "club sisters" Q5 were talking about it disapprovingly, Miss Leigh kept her own counsel, for independence was one of her many virtues, and was as cordial toward him as ever. She had never been a recognized social leader-she was too discriminating for that, but she was nevertheless a Power. All the strong men in college circles, leaders of the leading fraternities, athletic captains, 111611 who made Iron Mask, and Owl and Serpent, were friends of hers, some even open admirers. But she was tired, just a trifie tired, of the commonplaces of her college world. She had no definite ambition to keep her from getting bored, and there was hardly a one of her masculine acquaintances who interested her. So when the Great Idea came, she hailed it with joy, and carried it through, as became a Power, to a successful climax. She first noticed him in English 4, or, to speak more accurately, Erst noticed his eyes, for if it had not been for them it would never have happened. They were brown, a tender, romantic brown, with very long lashes, and in some way, she could never tell just how, they reminded her of her younger brother. The rest of him seemed to be ordinary enough-height, average, shoulders, narrow, clothes, slouchy. He was very unlike the kind of college fellow she knew-the clean-cut, confident, carefully groomed fraternity man. But because his eyes reminded her of the Little Brother, who was then ill his Senior year in prep-school, she looked over in his direction oftener than she would have considered proper if he had been one of the other kind. The instructor was reading themes that day and asking for criticism from the class. "What do you think of this, Mr. Drayton ? " he asked, after a lurid bit of realism. The man with the eyes blushed, hesitated, and then stammered: "The author seems to take things rather seriously." She liked his voice, there were unrealized possibilities in it, she liked theremark, it seemed to indicate a sense of humor, she liked his name, it carried a connotation of good breeding. But best of all, almost better than the eyes, she liked the smile which the next theme, a clever bit of comedy, brought to Drayton's lips. It showed a regular, comely set of teeth, and had a quiet sort of a charm. She afterwards tried to describe that smile in a daily theme, but after ransacking her brain for adjectives during half an hour, she gave up the attempt, she could not accomplish the impossible. There was something shy about it, and something frank, something winsome and something reserved, some- thing humorous and something a bit sad. The next day she passed him o11 the campus, and suffered a slight disillusion. He was plodding patiently to class, there was no spring to his step, no jauntiness in his carriage. His face was pale, he was dressed carelessly, and was rather unkempt. He spoke to no o11e, in fact, seemed to have no friends. His eyes were fixed on the side- walk, his hands in his pockets, his shoulders stooped. There was an air of lonesomeness, a lack of self-assertion, a want of confidence, an appearance of inehdciency about him But in spite of it all she could not forget the eyes and the smile. 351 V - - -Af-.L.,:" fs' ft -fit. . - 'Y ' ,,- ' ' , "'- r-ws.14"'L-'J .f ,-bf" if An up .to date mercantile lnouse. Slioppmxhscjnter gr Clfucagovs lbest people. 1 . A p ace re style finds correct interpretation I Where time quality standard ever advances Where tlme new continually replaces tlfre old And wliere moderate Pricing is a. recognized Policy , C, Suclr a store IS ours. Clfefzggfezyjlfqye .. H5107 E. C. Dyer and 11 R B adlex 5 P opr el rs ., V! 'Q . , j i "Hotel Del Prado," Chicago, Illinois A select family and transient hotel situated on the Midway Boulevard, which is considered the most beautiful Boulevard in America and adjoins the Chicago University grounds on the West, on the East, jackson Park, Spfria! mlm to gufytx and parfiff i'am1fftfa'zoitf1 the Chifago Ulli7!Ef.fif'll. Some weeks later the instructor distributed the day's papers about the room and asked for written comment, as a little lesson in the development of the critical faculty. Miss Leigh happened to get Drayton's and opened it with a little flurry of interest. It was a short piece of description, handled with a sure, practised touch. She wrote a flat- tering sentence across the back, and a few minutes later was asked to read the theme and her criticism. She obeyed with a very good will, and then glanced at Drayton to observe the effect. At the end of the hour she returned the theme to him, and said, on the impulse of the moment, "Mr. Drayton, I think this is the best thing that has been read this quarter." The remark elicited only an embarrassed, barely audible, "Thank you." From that time on the affair had a gradual but steady development. From bows on the campus and in the class room, it progressed to short chats and the shop talk of a theme course. She was skillful enough to draw him out of his shell of reserve, and was rewarded by finding that his ideas about his favorite poets and novelists were mature and refreshing. He talked interestingly, and when his self-consciousness was completely shaken off, with flashes of insight that aroused her admiration. It made her quite cheerful to discover that the boy-he must have been two years younger than she-had some genuine stuff in him. She also felt a very natural satisfaction when she at last awoke to a realization of the fact that a lively admiration of her was developing in him. Finally, when he plucked up audacity enough to ask if he might call, the Great Idea flashed upon her, and she, being as has been said before, a Power, at once set to work to realize it. Now all this happened in the fall quarter of his Sophomore, and of her Senior year. The means by which she worked the transformation will always be more or less conjecture. Perhaps it was largely sub-conscious suggestiong perhaps the resemblance to Little Brother made her bold enough to drop skillful hintsg perhaps it was more due to his own subtlety than to any action on her part, perhaps it was all only a manifestation of that World-Force-the regenerating influence of the Feminine over the Masculine. These things are hidden, but it is certain that Drayton began to emerge from the chrysalis stage and to take on butterfly wings with amazing swiftness. The way in which he came into his own was a beautiful thing to see 3 and Miss Leigh had the delicious sensation of knowing that she was prime mover and sole spectator of a great event. He began to acquire confidence in himself 3 his voice took on the intonations of assurance and poise, he groomed himself into presentable shape, he squared his shoulders and walked with a fetching swing g he learned how to make an entrance into a room full of people without growing faint and tripping over his own feet, he took dancing lessons until he became proficient. It was a splendid burgeoning. However hidden and esoteric may have been the forces behind the Great Idea, its consummation is historic. It came about in this fashion. One evening close to the end of the quarter, Dick Vanbrugh called on Miss Leigh, on a diplomatic mission. Dick was a leading spirit in the Zetas, a fraternity which Miss Leigh particularly affected. This was only natural in view of Miss Leigh's discrimination, for the Zetas were a patrician lot Being a diplomat, Dick did not come to the point at once. At last, after many con- versational flourishes, he dropped his voice to a confidential stage whisper, as being the proper tone for one entrusted with a mission, and revealed the fact that there was a Freshman whom the Zetas wanted. Now usually whatever the Zetas wanted in the way of Freshmen, they got-this was a fact 1 Dick did not mention it, but any one who heard him could have made the inference. This Freshman, however, was a special case. He had an elder brother who was an alumnus of a chapter which pushed Zeta very hard. Perhaps this chance of relationship might have so prejudiced the Freshman that he could not see things in their proper relations, namely, that it was in accordance with the eternal 353 WILLIAM SACHEN TAILOR 320 blast 55th St. S, We Carry a Stock Complete in Every Particular fitness of things that he go Zeta. And, i11 short, would Miss Leigh, as a friend of Zeta, a personal friend of his, a friend of the Freshman, and as the most sensible and attractive girl in the varsity, use her influence? This sort of a thing was not a novelty to Miss Leigh. She had helped the Zetas before, and they had even returned the compliment. So she merely said, " lVell, Dick, I'll do what I can. But I've only met the boy once." " XVe'll fix it so that he'1l take you to the informal," said Dick with alacrity. "And now, listen," she continued. " Do you know Mr. Drayton ? " 9? 96 it- if -JE 54' The Freshman took Miss Leigh to the informal, and appeared a few days later wear- ing a Zeta pledge-button, much to the consternation of the Hated Rivals. And the next Friday night Vanbrugh happened to call on Miss Leigh, as also by a strange coincidence did Drayton, and wasn't Vanbrugh glad to see him, and how well he remembered him! After that, strange and pleasant things happened to Drayton, which are also behind the Yeil, and in the end he too became a Zeta. The morning after his initiation, Miss Leigh received a bunch of violets, tied with the Zeta colors, and some verses. She wanted to laugh at the boyishness of it, but she put the verses away carefully, and came down wearing the violets when Drayton called that night. Thus was the Great Idea realized. 'X' 96 -K ii' 96 -39 XVhen for a lack of anything better to do-the next best thing was to accept Dick Vanbrugh, and that, she had decided, was impossible-Miss Leigh came back to college the next fall for graduate Work, she found that her influence as a Power had vanished. Most of her best friends had left college, and " grads " are always out of the game any- way. She felt a little bit lost at first, but soon grew used to it and applied herself dili- gently to some very uninteresting research work. Drayton in the meanwhile had become a bright and shining light. The latent talents, detected by Miss Leigh, had blossomed even beyond her hopes. The smile and the eyes and the sterling qualities beneath had made him a man to be held up as a model before Freshmen aspiring to win their spurs. That winter the lack of a Senior candidate and some clever political manipulation by the Zetas secured for him the chairmanship of the Senior Prom. There were some who criticised his choice for a partner, Miss Leigh being only a "grad," a decadent Power. But there were others who, having an inkling of the Great ldea, thought it a most exemplary thing to do. Especially as it was well known that Drayton would have given his right hand to take a certain Freshman girl. The " Prom " was given at Bournique's that year. As they began the grand march, he turned towards her with his Winsome smile and said, with just a shade of tenderness in his voice, " If it hadn't been for you-" lt was her reward 3 she felt happier than she even confessed to herself. But later the happiness burned out and turned to ashes. While she sat waiting her partner to claim her for the next dance, she noticed Drayton,-who had grown taller, and had acquired a poise of the head which made him well worth looking at, talking to the Freshman girl. He was looking at her very earnestly,-too earnestly, she thought, and there was a light in the brown eyes which had never been there when he talked to her. So she turned away and tried very hard to remember how much his eyes reminded her of Little Brother. And when Dick Vanbrugh took her for the next waltz, she did a very foolish thing. It was foolish of Dick too, but then it was the fifth or sixth time, and he was growing used to it. For Women and Men in the Latest Fashions at the Lowest Prices OMENS and lVIen's Furnishings to be satisfactory must reflect the very latest fads and fancies of fickle fashion and it is always our aim to keep pace with every change in the varying vogues. For this reason you can always come to us to do your shopping, and we want you particularly to see our splendid assortments of Women's and Men's Gloves, Women's and Men's Neckwear, Women's and Men's Hosiery,Women's Shirtwaists, Men's Shirts and other articles comprehended in the term Haberdashery. About our prices we have but one thing to say and the statement can easily be confirmed if you will compare prices and values-we always sell Furnishings at much lower prices than exclusive demand for same qualities. CARSON PIRIE SCOTT 63 CO. WRIGHT, KAY 8: CO. TRAIERNITY EMBLEMS FRATERNITY JEWELRY FRATERNIIY NOVELTIES ERATERNIIY STATIONERY TRATERNITY INVITATIONS ERATERNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS FRATERNITY PROGRAMS Send for Catalogue and Price List Special Designs on Application I4O-l42-I44 Woodward Ave. DETROIT, MICH. STUDEBAKER BROS. MFG. CO. 378 TO 388 WABASH AVE. CHICAGO Carriages, Harness Equestrian Outfits EQUIPMENTS for ALL CLASSES OF DRIVING Many of the leaders among the students of the University of Chicago were prepared for college at its Academy at Morgan Park, Ill., commonly known as The Morgan Park Academy ...Li For Boys ii...-..T.1 It is a constituent part of the University though situated eight miles from the University Quad- rangle. By its location in a beautiful suburb all the many advantages of a country environ- ment are obtained. The Academy stands for high ideals and has the men and equipment with which to realize them. Forfurllzer information appbf fo DEAN VVAY LAND CHASE W7 WENDELL ea COMPANY r Manufacturers of Fine FRATERNITY BADGES CLUB PINS, ATHLETIC MEDALS Q ia' as if eff' ll T' 7,,1,?fN'Sif Agate. ' K f' Q- Egg? 2? If 1 glfwng 501 iii! :QE . gi auilib i5"'9Til?i ing f2, ,.,.,5Qf 'egg AQ H -' - Af able! U. OF C. FLAGS, BUTTONS, FOBS. ETC. Special Designs Cheerfully Submitted W... 57 Washington Street CHICAGO A , Rx. ! if 'V ji, ,K Nw! XX f If I 1 i Nxfgx Q A Q 'A ru 1-.Z L MF.SI:I!l1!ljlII'H C3-D Q 7 , F GFSl:I.l,Ol'-IEIS - P i e q in f s 2 ,iw .ara i . ,...,A, , ,O glmiigqfgii 5' x . , gf mffij fii i F, L l it P ' lille is Sz A p P Gi L 'TTT' -tv "' .19 Eiilxfilvqpx X gf! .xixjir 2 uv' .,,-.a..,:z .1..A. 1 +. -'..- 2 T -tag -mn . .f: l avi 1,-YV ' ...,X,,. f l B l ' 1 ,,1i "1'x' V i X .ll - HY - , lg fi ,G J . ZX R Q 2 P 1 1 l l l2 ixtL Bouttf Q O iii-Q 2 S '3' - K 947 Qmeee were Ni MD X Alo- it liiltiliq 1 Sl O X :f i he 5952!-A ' D. LAMO T P AI N T I N G and INTERIOR DECORATING 4004-06 Cottage Grove Ave. ' Tel. Oakland IIZO Fred L. Porter Sanitary Plumbing Tile Drain age lron and Gas Fitting 4004,-6 Cottage Grove Ave. ' 'lleleplione Oakland IIZO MARTYN University Photographer and Miniature Artist Maroon Studio 5705 Cottage Grove Avenue Indoor and Outdoor Work Platinum and Carbon Finishing by all Processes Portraits, Water Artistic Framing Colors, Porcelains Special Rates to Students W i g N HILE the Professor of Mathematics was taking a walk i11 tl1e country N u- , , ., , ' , W he sat down 011 tl1e st11111p of 1 tree All at once he saw approachmf 4 r-' . B . . K ' A . M 'N ' 9 W ' 111111 a queer hgure wearing a robe lllafle of circles and triangles woven ' G ': , . , to tether like chain armor. I 3111 Axiom One," said the creature. Ah! lhcn I know you already, said tl1e Professor. Slightly very slightly," snapped the Axiom. "Come witl1 me ., F X 'P v A 1. M , I or .. .. .1 U 7 and I will show yo11 a few things." They walked along for awhile, and then tl1e Professor 11oticed in tl1e distance a sort of high toboggan slide. TLT 41475:-1 f X IA 'I A y. Q I I W If 'ly' F AT P' PS4 0531? zqllf .W 9' X4 el' IO :fi 1 f 4 N5 'F 411,155 fl! M lnfgfl A51 v I . I X ' Elgru Q ll V ' B on 1' :I llllaiiiiff I D 'f'AP g '-'50 v CAVJQW' if f f if Efwf fiaaril 1:7 f I 1349 .,'Zvf-W ' f f ' 'x .0 I fl nag ,I f M i NQLI4, A W 4l. ,Q 'ln 1 Ch' 'H ff' I V Q. 'Q fl r 1 Q of 5, ES? C-.I s fi Wg BE 4" 1 451.9 f fight l ,H -pfev1'4Qrs'.g . Q l,f1.-:Q I .y lfifg 'vusijiae - L I:"",frz5 'Ii fs' 'ff ,Tifif?1l 21417 ai?-"!' gs, ,V 4,1 , ' -, , gr , ,pa 161 .ALy1Z'. 'lfif ff' , ' l.-'f. Qi Msziafff' f .1 I ' Jgla N253 lf urliili 1 ii fl.. U Mia, f 1 nf-f':'..1q.1 1- AL-E Lv' 'WW f ' 7 ,gm -. C ' f ' f 1' . lv' I 'A y l.'4f 1 1 , all :Mfr .1 ' fl ' 'Kg .yy 1 agp. '-f : 1 2 .fel K' If i "wf'f,z-'I f hug: f' . 'H "What is that?" he inquired. 'That," said tl1e Axiom, "is where the Trajectories of SIIlOOtl1 particles of 111atter are sliding tlOWll smooth chords of conics." "Ol1! yes," cried the professor, UI wrote a thesis on tllelll once. XVhat do they really look like when they get through sliding?" "Look like? What do you suppose you'd look like if you slid dOVVll smooth chords of conics? It isn't easy work, I tell you." "It must be al111ost as hard as writing the thesis," remarked tl1e Professor i11 a humbled tone. "It's almost as hard as reading it," was the answer. "And you are a very presuming person to write of such things just as if you knew all about them. Why, I don't suppose you ever saw a Trajectory in yo11r life, and yet you must come prying into things that are away outside of your knowledge. RUBBER-NECK!" professor. t'SIR!!" cried the "Eh? O, I wasn't talking to you. It's that Variable tryi11g agai11. I stopped him to approach the Limit just in time." The Professor looked ahead and saw the Variable coming toward them. It was impossi- ble to discover his size, for he was made entirely of india-rubber, and was never two 111inutes alike. This constant contortion gave his face a curiously mobile expression. At sight of the Professor the Variable writhed more tl1a11 ever, and exclaimed with a sob 1 " Did you see that? I got almost to the Li111it that time, alld then he had to yell at me and scare llle again I " He led the Professor to a path at tl1e end of which stood tl1e Limit, a11d a post painted like those in front of barber shops. " Now you see," he COHtlllllCll, "I want to get to that Limit, but I Call only go half the remaining distance at every r11n, and it's hard work, and then Vlfhell I get almost there, o11e of those Axioms comes sneaking around and yells "Rubber-neck" at me, and I get 359 J aclison Parli Stables J. H. KINTZ, Proprietor 273 East Fifty:Seventh St. Jackson Park Livery 8z Boarding Stables 173 E. 57th Sr. Tel. Hyde Park 552 Telephone:-Hyde Park 552 CHICAGO 12 Veils 'P Kintz's Annex Boarding Stable II2 E. 57th St. Private Wire Vendome Livery 8: Boarding Stable 6401 Madison Avenue Tel. Hyde Park 1660 .- J , 5 can Z. 'W 2 - 'l!'2?v' , V N MM , The bonu' gf the I ' ' fill Coffege flfleu S771d7'ff'H Cfotbfs 1 Pulmni-ze in tmwz ' X ' fbi: siore 1 .fi rgik 3 XX 7 7 Yfiose H Sfozzchy, Cczrefess Coffege Sllliff are dere--Sfzorf Coat, Peg Top, Wz'de-Sealed '19'0mers-- IQ 1:0 MOSSLER CO. 121 MONROE STREET Andrew McAdams Zlilnriat anim Brrnratnr 5 3rd St. and Kirnbark Ave TELEPHONE HYDE PARK 18 rattled and have to begin all over again. Yo called " Rubber-neck," be-be-cause its-true!" Here the Variable broke down and wept u see it-it hurts my feelings to-to be so bitterly that the Professor was quite unnerved. " But what do you want to get to the Limit f - f fj for?" he inquired. "Aren't you all right here?" p " I should think not ! " cried the Variable, I l controlling his feelings with difficulty, "All p ll l 4' N the Fixed Quantities make fun of me and call i , 92 r me namesg I want t0 get to the Limit and be a 1 Xi Eg-fi p Fixed Quantit 'too." ' 2 41-, Q mf " I'LL fix you," said the Axiom grimly. i I .. l ,snag "just listen to me, whispered the Professor, ' - 5 7 X who wanted to get the better of the Axiom. Z mai " Try it again. and when you get close up to the f 4 "qQ9lfA f N Limit jump for it instead of running a little at KL 5' A 6 a time. Never mind if he does say things to '7 if 'I you." f A Q The Variable squirmed all over with rapture ' 2 ff and started for the path. He ran half the 6, I Y' Z distance, then half the remaining distance, and V ' l , 5 then jumped at the Limit. But he had hardly Y touched it when the Axiom was upon himg and pi although the Variable held on to the Limit with migggygqf J 17 his arms and legs the Axiom grabbed him .- around the waist and began to pull on him, Z1 while the Professor stood paralyzed with amaze- Jizz 691 hh! ment. He soon understood everything how- X ' '- ever, for when the Axiom had stretched the X WI 5 Variable almost to the breaking point he uttered I xv Z? a laugh of fiendish triumph and snapped him at ,al , A fjf the Professor l j 9' fi ' Qgggtv' if- f ff ,IbVfEELL. ag -1 -,114 'qu-L -L' -Livlilsylwllglyfrl 2 me -9-new ..,. t gr S A l r . A' ffwv " j 4 'i W' . i". I H 7 l . K 4 ..,. .-f 'K ' c ", l 361 The Business M an's Attention Solicited I offer you Well made and strictly up-to-date garments equal to the high priced tailor and in many instances better. If you consider getting A FULL DRESS SUIT A SEMI DRESS SUIT A BUSINESS S'UIT You Can Save from S10 to S15 by investigating my prices OVENU, the TAILOR Edwin Eagle 63 Co. FLORISTS Decorations a Specialty 273 East 57th Street Telephone Hyde Pa K 262 A Vacation Without a Kodak is a Vacation Wasted 44 KODAKS S5 to S75 Kodak Developing Machines need no dark room. Kodak Supplies. Eastman Kodak Films. Developing and Printing for the Amateurs. The best Work, the Lowest Price. JJ CHESTER K. FROST QSUCCESSOR TO MATHEWS 8: FROSTQ 209 East 57th Street CHICAGO Telephone Central 888 C. EverettCIark Co. Contractors General and Builders Suite I405, Title and Trust Building l00 Washington Street CHICA GO, ILL. College Caps and Gowns Made to order and rented. Pennants for all colleges and fraternities carried in stock. Class and college pins and ' W pillows. Class and team caps. Ban- ners and medals for athletic awards. SEND FO R CATALOGUES The W. C. Kern Company 411 E. 57th St., Chicago Dining Cars ONE of the celebrated restaurants in New York or elsewhere in America offer a service more dainty and attractive than that on a Burlington Route Dining Car. ll. istinctly high class. Service 21 Ia Carte Our Dining Cars are run on the " pay only for what you order " plan, so much better than the old " dollar a meal " system. Good Dining Car Service and cook' ing is our hobby. We maintain large greenhouses just to supply roses and other flowers for the tables and the character of our linen, glass and china is d' ' ' " r Burlington Hnute UR R200 miles of rail- road reach out from Chicago, Peoria and St. Louis to all the important cities in the west and north- west such as ST. PAUL MINNEAPOLIS OMAHA KANSAS CITY DENVER If you are going to any of these plnccs or to the Pacihc coast, kindly let me send you time tables and other informa- tion about our train service. P. S. Eusris, Pass. Traf. Mgr., C. B. R Q. R. R. CHICAGO. ILI... 28 TI-Ili Kenwood Institute if o R o 1 R L s An AHiliated Academy of the University of Chicago +o E. Forty-seventh St. C H I C A G O Miss Annice E. Bradlord Butts, A.M., Principal lncnrpomtctl Xugust IOIII, 1856 Londonderry Lzfizzkz Wafer MOST WHOLESOME DRINK jbr SUMMER Pure and Sparkling Rattlesnakes E uf: 5 E toiled up the sandy road through the wild strangeness of the pine fb woods, following the KICVIOLIS windings ot the wagon track. The birds eg 5'x' 2' fluttered noisily in the scanty underbrush, and started up with swift, un- I 5 expected "swishes" from among the masses of low palmetto leaves. The if J road was over-grown with grass in two broad lines down the middle QQ' G where the infrequent wheels and feet of mules had left it untouched. The crickets chirped Warily in the brown grass. XVe stumbled along nd, at each crack of a twig, heavily in the deep sand, glancing about at each bird sou and peering among the masses of close-set leaves in the hollows about us. Each moment we expected to look into the glittering eyes that we feared,-to hear the mysterious rattle, once heard, never to be forgotten. XVe neared a clump of half-grown palmettos. A curious noise came fro111 beyond them. Could was not fearful. My nerves, on edge for an forward. A bent old white woman sat on a log a dry stick, tap, tap, tap, on the log beside her. "Do you often see rattlesnakes about here?" I demanded bluntly. She looked up at me slowly. Her colorless, wrinkled face smiled with difficulty as though unused to the exercise. "O yessum." she answered. "But law, honey, you alls won't come on any 'thout warnin'. They allus rahr up un jah ther rattle, afore the' strike." I laughed again, nervously. "VVe thought your pounding was the rattle," I said. She scarcely noticed rne. She was already falling back into l1er apathy. "The' do sound that way, some," she said. that be the dreaded sound? In itself it hour, could stand nothing more. I ran lazily hulling pecans, pounding them with In llly relief l laughed. Autumn Like tired lids the leaves drop down, Earth drowsy grows, and on her breast, Beneath a blanket red and brown, The weary year lies down to rest. c '9Ql I- K -Nl fff il :gs Ts , g lv X l f'YTlCEj 'V' I, Qi, ' 7 N X ' vfsifftjc-PQ 'Eff S If 365 AMP AKK CDL- 4'4:x"T"4E7'Q2EQ'ZX2VT XiXXlfxllfxll--S-P46-LfxI-9- WZ BWI F T TNZN X Nl! VVABASH AVENUE AKE 'CAGO SBK STAT: o N E RY ip A T Qllass, gfraiexmziig ,NW-I-A-,-I ONS -'OB bgnrnxihg muh ANNOUNCEMENTS - ATQ Tzxzazws M M A ""'-E-'9'JP3XlElN'1ElIIIIilBZCD AX-nm-'Nui-'?:Jb3f'?n?133lv1Q'M TAYLOR C,X'l'IiRlNG TO Parties .AND Dances FRAPPE A JPECIALTY 5852 Rosalie Court Tel. 5808 Hyd P 'k FOR TAILORING UP:TO:D ATE MEN'S FURNISHINGS and HATS .....G0 TO FAMOUS O C Tallorlng Co. 346 EAST 55th STREET NEWBERGER 6 DEBROVY Props. H L7 Phone Blue 3223 For their good work and fair treatment they are well liked by students and professors The Root Studios FRED D. FOSS, Manager PORTRAITS BY PHOTOGRAPHY 243 WABASH AVENUE QKIMBALL HALLJ PHONE HARRISON 201969 SHAVE YOURSELF ' W,THAN,,O.M.,, Chemical Laboratory and Hospital Supplies Berlin ffl-lollow-Ground" We will furnish estimates on Drugs, Chemicals, Surgical Ma- , , terials and Alcohol, if requested. See our line of Wosteiiholiii s We handle the best grade of I-X'L'P0CkCfQUdeVY goods and our pricesare u niformly reasonable QUALITY H -We , , gust If i f M fr rip 'ivy- ,V l TRADE MARK . T Morrison, Plummer a n d C o m pa n y 7 l'73 Randolph Street WHOLESALE oRUGGIs'rs::cH1cAGo THE FINE ARTS BUILDING CFOUNDED BY STUDE BAKER Bragg CHARLES C. CURTISS Nos. 203-207 Michigan Boulevard Director CHICAGO For fbi' zzfralmflofffltioll of Artirtif, Lff6'7'r17il' and Effunzfiozmf Izzlerfrtf fxr!11Jif'ffI'. NOW OCCUPIED IN PART BY-The University of Chicago Teachers' College and Trustees' Rooms, The Caxton Club, The Chicago VI'oman's Club, The Fortnightly Club, The Amateur Musical Club, The Dial, the Anna Morgan School of Dramatic Art, the Mrs. john Vance Cheney School of Music, The Sherwood Music School, the Prang Educational Co., D. Appleton X Co., etc. Established 1866 R S BLOME Co FORMERLY STAMSEN 6: BLOME 7 Every Branch of Concretei Construction, C anim noon, uurrv BLDG. CHICAGO. Dormitory Doggerel a I. A man who resided in "Grad," Once acted up terrible bad: His morals he scrambled, For he drank and he gambled, Till he lost all the sense that he had. II. The ladies who live up in Green Are the smartest that ever were seen: Just why they're so bright, Is 'cause their diet is light: They eat matches and drink kerosene! III. The young men who once lived in Snell, Quite regularly used to raise H-. Since the Y. M. C. A. Has come there to stay, It's as quiet as life in a cell. IV. Once up in a small room in Beecher, There lived a frail, timorous creature: Her manners were meek: She took Ethics and Greek. And finally married a preacher. V. A gazabo who lived up in " Hitch " Got a bun on exceedingly rich: He stood bowing to Snell, And exclaimed with a yell: I'll be fhicl hanged if I know-which is-Chic? Hitch! VI. A young woman whose first name was Nellie, Once lived for a quarter in Kelly: She ate ice cream and cakes Till at night she saw snakes, And had terrlbleipains in her vermiform appendix. VII. A cadaverous man in Divinity, When asked if he thought he was in it, he Replied, with a smile: "Just give me a trial: At eating, my limit's infinity." VIII. A maiden, a native ot' Gloucester, Had a room on the fourth floor ot' Foucester: She jilted a man On the installment plan: Q Now he's sorry that he came acroucester. 369 MR. DAVID FRIEDMAN, salesman for D. H. Arnold 81 Co., 217 E. Van Buren St., residence, 842 W. Washington Blvd., permits me to use his name as a guarantee that every garment built by us is first-class. amy G. Swzzrker 302 ATWOOD BUILDING CLARK AND MADISON STREETS Suzff and 0776760013 to Urder 525.00 and up Saffmzefz Manager Cyfzgry jacob Swartz B. L'heureux Max Schwartz C. Highfield Dave Kantorwitz Geo. A. Touzalin A, Lamal-re PHOTOGRAPHER 70 State Street C H I C A G O .+. 9, '..ff.-i ni 'Eg if 119+ --:,v1g'v+fL'-:--"' 2-193 1 117' 1 ilktiiil ig: . 7 Special prices to students, groups all college work in the latest Styles at reasonable prices an C. W. Longdon GoldSmith'S Orchestra - I. GOLDSMITH Director OFFICE Room 6 . . . 59 Dearborn Hours, I2 to 3 P. M. TELEPHONE, STATE 55 RESIDENCE 1833 Arlington Place Hours, 9 to ll A. M., 4 to 7 P. TEI.EPHONE, BELMONT 1393 Street M. A n Acknowledgment a HE editors of the IQO3 Cap and Gown are under obligations for the following contributions, and deeply regret that lack of available space prevents their publication : "Evils of Betting." A reprint of chapel address of November 25th, by Dean Tufts. "Football Etiquette." Staib, 'o6. Original song, "Reaching for the Cake fice-cream, etc. J. Words by W. G. McLaury. Music by "Big" Maxwell. Arranged for trio by Fred Hall. "My Opinion of The Daily Maroon Gargoylette Editor." Compiled from various sources, including Professors Thatcher and Starr. fVVe intended to publish this, but the "copy" took fire before it could be put in type.J "From Hyde Park High School to Senior Class Presidency." Thomas Johnston Hair. QSoon to be published in book l-OTHI., fi ef? eg ffl-7 ,ia ' 7 gi fl -f a ll .. :ar f , V ' F - '- ig MJ'- 'Q 1 " ... , 0 lil 'X l r iffl' in it i. X X ' 1,32 N. it ll' i 1l1H ifll" NXN A? ! NSW, ggi M' I. 9, a t ' I f 'Xef X-X, ' "Q, Q f N" . 'f ff Q -- . .21 H - MEZZ, gnfw PHI 1nEI,'1'A THETA MOCK XVICIJDING QDrawn from lifej 371 Men's ,aug Carlton P. Abernethy Designer and Builder of Men's Clothing 901 Cable Building 28 Jaclison Boulevard, East Morning, Lounge, Frock and Dress Juits Chicago Exclusive British Fabrics I ames A. Miller 81 Bro. Slate Tin Tile and Iron Roofers . Galvanized Iron and Copper U Cornices, Bays Skylights, etc. Special Attention .... to Large First-Class Work Fully Guaranteed QQ-lxll South Clinton Street Chicago Russmore Furniture get-tm titf MARK, The beauty of the rich brown color of Russmore Furniture is unequaled by that of any other dull finished furniture, and its simple designs appeal at once to the cultured taste. It is not only a beautiful furniture. It is honestly built-made by hand-and will stand hard knocks. It is made in big easy chairs and couches, tables, bookcases, buffers, desks, etc. We give careful attention to orders received by mail, and out-ofetown customers can make selections from our catalog, sent FREE. The Tobey Furniture Co. C h i c a g o The World Likes Prosperous People Be sure vou are correctly dressed-it will make you feel brighter and better and tom ev the impression that your brains are paying dividends sat , 'x ' s ' , P b Em u JERREMS TACOMA BUILDING IZQ-l3l LA SALLE STREET C HIC A G O PHONE 178 ZUAIN Our Prescription Department ln prescription xx orlt we constantly adhere to the principle that only the PUREST and BEST DRUGS and MED- 1c1N15s should be used. We are ever seeking to improve our facilities and to render better service. We have to do this to accomodate our growing business. 'l'here's no tell- ing when you'll need prompt, reli- able prescription service. Bear us in mind. Phone Hyde Park 175. J. J.GILL Chemist and Pharmacist 274 57th St. J Near Washington Avenue The FOX Typewriter Qs Displaced More Good Typewriters than Any Other Typewriter Made It is the culmination of 25 years of typewriter building. Examine the distinctive features of other typewriters and compare them with 4' The Fox " point for point. It has been just such comparisons as these that have resulted in the adoption of' 4' The FOX " and the displacement ofother machines. Business men realize now as never before that they cannot afford to use anti- quated methods or machines, the buf is necessary to secure the best results, and UThe FOX " is The Good of the Old with the Best of the New The Fox Typewriter could not have displaced these typewriters that have been on the market for years, did it not prove when put to the test to be superior in con- struction, capable ofimore and faster work and decidedly more durable. Any business man or firm in good standing no matter where situated, can make a practical test of the above statement by using a Fox Typewriter in their ofiice for IO days without incurring any obligation. A proposition that is at least worthy ofinvestigation. A hint to us is all that is necessary. Fo X Typewriter Co. Z lLIMITEDl f General Ofiice and A S y 470:g70 Front Tiff' treet ' ill SW' HHQ WM ' 'da lurin g ' GRAND if V if ---- 111 :,s T'f'f., Y' 'V .... tif ,j I ,iff usgg f - Q Q fhgf sf RAPIDS sgggjj fllj if' sae - ' A-rj' a 1 iapf+,f1feifi f ,f a A , t if trrf f A 1 + a a s f av ,fiff ws am! Akgt'r1rie,t 1 X i Primifuf Cflfiu "Icc1, Beatis Nunc .drabum Intlzdes From the Latin. 4 Ah, Iccius, dost thou envy now The gold of blessed Araby? Dost whet a sword, with angry brow, 'Gainst Persia's dauntless empery? Art forging chains? What savage maid Her lover slain, will be thy sport? To pour thy Wine, thou roystering blade What gaudy princeling from the court? -When scholar Iccius puts on sale His rolls of philosophic lore, To buy a Spanish coat-of-mail, We all shall be astounded more Than if the yellow Tiber's waves At flood should suddenly grow still, Or yonder mountain stream that raves Down the steep cliff, turn back up hill. -Mozzfhly 1114170011 375 PITKIN BROOK v x AT RETAIL 4 I X .L f""ff5,X 1 , L y, ?. f V wx 'f l I xi W: ,RN x 3 1EwXfi5f""' L' .Q-r l,,gg,Y,1,.f' " wx ' xgiiiq -4 v 1 . ', .Q X ,ily WEDDING , 1,525 'rf, 'lRig Y rl: . 1 lv ,fx v ,lx-xx ,A I P RESE N TS , K, A "13'?Mll'i363XQ.i3jVi3, I ' .Q 'Relay ef' A , Ei 'Pu' 9 ' " If p,I,,, 1 glllll ,I ,ll,. 1' 'g-Q' ' BRILLIANT RICH CUT GLASS K ,l '!ssxlv V FINE TABLE CHINA, ,flf" W ,'V,.l 5' NOVELTIES, BRIC-A- ,llfmlllll ! , , ,' BRAC, TABLE GLASS- f ,f,g' , I a s WARE, VASES, NEW ff ',j ,, -,gill lj ll di ,iff , j ..f lffA I M PO R T A TI o N 691- 1'IR - fwfr BEAUTIFUL FRENCH 'A I BRONZES .9E',,f ,T: . QivQ , PARIS III , "Book Ldftlinu' is all very well, as far as it goes, but you must also know that The Consolidated Qrocers of America at its Various stores, sells more groceries for less money than any other concern Main Office 90 Wabash Ave. Stores at 19:21 Randolph St., l26:l28 East 43rd St., 313 to 319 East 55th St., 550 East 63rd St., Peoria, Galesburg, etc. HENRY' E. XNYEAVER, P ldent C A Bxcl-cE'rT S c y and Treas COAL 6' COKE CO. MINERS, SI-IIPPERS AND PRODUCERS Weaver Foundry and Furnace Coke Maryland Jmokeless Coal CHICAGO EXECUTIVE OFFICES: Marquette Building, Chicago Telephone Central 1724 New York-Bowling Green Bldg. Milwaukee-Planlinnton Bank Bldg Detroit-Majestic Bldg Buffalo-Prudential Bldg PittsburghfConestoga Bldg St. Louis Century Bldg Toledo Spitzer Bldg SEND T0 The Chicago Beach Hotel FOR ITS NEW ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET GOLF . M' BATHING BOATING M' FISHING ETC. THE FINEST WINTER AND SUMMER HOTEL ON THE GREAT LAKES -4.4-L. Reminiscence 4 Tl1e racing wind and the soaring skies Conspired with the magician sea To enchant-or was it her dark, dark eyes? - I kept this flower you see, Fragile, faded, waxen-pale, Frail token of a love more frail. Treasured awhile, forgotten soon, My romance of an afternoon Is withered now and dead. These ashes of its phospher flame In ghostly words proclaim That one more dream is fled To Maya, whence it came. -sjlfonthly MHl'007l. In the Evening Z HE train stands panting to be off again, a great moving city, teeming with people of the cities, throbbing with the impulse from the centers of the great world. The door of the little station is open to the soft, damp, Florida air. Inside, the Hrelight flick- ers on the rough wooden boxes and a backless wooden chair close in front of the logs, which lie glowing, flecked with little patches of shadow, white ash, and fluttering flames, in the great, blackened fireplace. In the shadow of the chimney corner sits a darkey, his head poised in a dreamy attitude, his body bent restfully over, one foot on the rung of the chair, the other beating time noiselessly to the low thrumming of the banjo in his hands. Gently the melody rises and falls, changes from gay to grave, still the soft monotonous throbbing of the banjo in its quaint, gentle melodies, still the half closed eyes, deep with the spell of the music, the rhythmic swaying of the body, and the steady quiet beating of the foot. Apart from the restless hurry of the world, knowing little and caring nothing for its passions, the man sits content in the warm, mellow, flickering darkness. Jerenade L:s1ooRIsHl The lilies are sweet in thy garden, lady, The murmuring housetops are still. A window looks down on thy garden, lady, Cloud shadows cover the hill, Ah, the lilies are sweet in thy garden, lady. 379 Fritz Jchoultz W.J'cbeidelc'5'Co. 6' Co. HISTORICAL COSTUM ERS Costumes rented for PLAYS O PERAS TABLEAUX ETC. The largest and most complete stock in the United States 258 Wabash Avenue Chicago, Ill. I7 1:1 73 East Randolph St. CHICAGO, ILL. TELEPHONE MAIN 1766 . - G gli, lx W A 'P -Ein W f ig, :Q 'lt' at 'gli my lr 'fligl M rflmt 2 lr. -1 l' ,E f sl ESSENTIAL Construction Protected by Patents. We manufacture coils for X-Ray purposes to be operated on any class of currentg also High Frequency Coils for external and internal treatment of infectious and malignant cllseases. QThe doctor's success is our success.j Fully Guaranteed. Write for Catalog. The Charm of Travel T all seasons the Col- orado mountains are attractive. The air is crisp, the sunshine is brilliant and the coloring changes with every mood of nature. The Qinlurabn Wliblanh Railway By reason of its unique location gives the traveler grander views of peak, canyon and snowy ranges than any other line. PAST and convenient service of chair cars,tourist and standard Pullman sleepers, from Denver and Chicago to the Pacific Coast, via Great Salt Lake. Ample stopovers on through tickets given at the many charming Colorado resorts. We Will Gladly Send You Our Attractive Literature H. C. BUSH C. H. SPEERS H. W. JACKSON Traflic Manager Gen'l Pass. Agent General Agent Dsiwisa, COLO. DENVER, COLO. Marquette Bldg. CHICAGO , , 7 130- . -:.: a- " f ATT . , D nr' -. ..- -- 5? at " if uvuu 1 A J N 7, V, ..,., ",V A T' of Yo u H ' fi.H'e B B 5 gg' W i s H3 BE D 'ggfgric fri' ll' bl " 'ln ,Y " I-In fl if 3 E V ' ' EE ,-'-r H R: mm E ' 'fffi if f 1:34 Ef' H' ll: n u w w ? 2 5 I 1 IIB f iff" .4 12' af ,,, s . -..A A . . ce.e D 'el H- fiyfi r' ,A I My ' i g fjggij e -g irli e . 1.5 ,- E..- :. . gg i- L :i e up D' -'2"fjjeiir':'5"jjej iff- Jager-:f--,,x,,,gf - ' ' ' ! V: -., r liggj i! i --fe' Y Northwestern University EDICAL SCHOGL lChicago Medical Collegel DR. N. s. DAVIS, JR., DEAN DR. W. s. HALL, JR., Dm Four Hospitals, with Soo beds. Ward walks daily for every Senior. A Dispensary treating 25,000 patients a year. New Buildings and Equipment. A Superior Faculty. A Reputation as a Leader in Medical Education. For Announcements and Particulars, Address Dr. Arthur R. Edwards, Secretary 2431 Dearborn Street, Chicago INDEX Athletics tlllustrationj . . 185 Athletic Captains . 188 Alpha Kappa Kappa . 157 Alpha Omega Alpha . 165 Alumni . . . 1 I9 Artists . . 339 Alpha Delta Phi . . 255 Baseball . 201 Beta Theta Pi. . . 251 Band .... 95 Cap and Gown Board . 7, 134, 135 "Case is Altered" . . 97, 101 Class Day Exercises '02 102-106 Canadian Club . . 122 Chess Club . . 120 Chi Psi . . 275 Cadet Corps . . . 234 Cross Country Club . 224 Choir . . 93 Convocations . 32 Delta Chi . . . 177 Daily Maroon 139 Dramatic Club . . 83 Decennial Weekly 1 38 Debating . . IOS, 109 Delta Tau Delta . 271 Delta Upsilon . . . 279 Delta Kappa Epsilon . . 241 Deans of Adiliated Institutions . 29 Esoteric .... 294 Football .... 191 Freshman Football Team . 198 Freshman Class . . . 79, 81 Freshman Girls' Glee Club . QI Fellows Club . . . 122 Fraternity Conventions 323 Faculty . . . 10, 21 Freshman Medics . 155 Fraternity Houses Qlllustrationj 241, 245 Fraternities Q Illustration J Freshman Track Team , Fellows 1902-1903 . Glee Club . . Girls' Mandolin Club Guests of the University - 239 . 220 30, 31 . 89 92 36 Girls' Athletics . 235 Golf . . 231 Greeting .... 6 Hiitcliinson, Charles L., Portrait 4 In Memoriam . 34 Iron Mask 314 Junior Class . . . 71-74 unior Colle e Finals 1 IO 8 alailu Club . 22 K 3 Law School . 168 Lincoln House . 112 Literary Contributors . 340 Law Faculty . . 23 Masonic Club . . 121 Maroon Literary Society . 123 Medics . . . 147 Mortar Board . . . 292 Members of Societies not at e University . . . 324 Musical Organizations . 86 Mandolin Club . 87 Marshalls . . . 38 Northern Oratorical League . 107 Nu Sigma Nu . 151 Nu Pi Sigma . . 320 Ofhcial Publications . 1 36 Owl and Serpent 313 Phi Beta Pi . . 161 President's Visit . 171 Phi Delta Phi . 173 Phi Alpha Delta 182 Phi Rho Sigma 153 Phi Beta Delta . 306 Phi Beta Kappa . 309 Phi Delta Theta . 263 Psi Upsilon . ' 69 Phi Gamma Delta . 283 Phi Kappa Psi . 247 Qaclranglers . 298 Quadrangle Club . 33 Records . . 219 Reserves . 207 Semi-Oflicial Clubs . Spelman House D Southern Club . Student's Councilors . Sigma Club . . Sophomore Medics Score Club . Sign of the Sickle Social Calendar . . Sigma Chi . . . . 111 116 . I23 129 . 3oo 149 . 316 32I - 325 259 Sophomore Class History and Officers 76 Student Advisors . . Student Organizations . Senior Class . . School of Education Summer Instructors . . . 82 37 . 40 24 . 27 Tliree Quarters Club . Tennis Team . , Track Athletics . Universit5' Settlement University Houses . University Vveekly . University Preachers . Volunteer Band . Vvearers of C. . . Washington House . Woman's Union . . Wyvern Club . Women's Organizations . Y.M.C.A . . Y. W. C. A. . INDEX TO AD VERTIJEMENTJ Abernethy', Carlton P. . Burlington Route . Carson, Pirie, Scott 8: Co. Clark C. Everett Co. . Consolidated Grocers of America Chicago Beach Hotel . Colorado Midland Railway . Del Prado Hotel . . Eagle, Edwin Sz Co. . . Franklin Engraving S Elect. Co. Frost, Chester K. . Famous The, Tailoring Co. . Fine Arts Building . . Fox Typewriter Co. . GC'ldsmith's Orchestra . Gill, 1.1. . . Jerrems . Kintz, J. H. . . Kern, W. C. Co. Kenwood Institute . Lanlant, D. . . Londonderry Lithia Water Longdon, C. W. 372 364 356 363 376 373 381 352 363 347 363 366 368 374 370 373 373 360 363 364 1 355 364 370 Marsli 8: Grant Co. McDonald 8 Spann Morgan Park Academy . Martyn . . . Mossler Co. . . McAdams, Andrew . Metcalf . . . Morrison, Plummer X Co. Miller, Jas. A. 81 Bros. . Miller, Dr. G. A. . . Northwestern Medical School 1 Ovenu, The Tailor . . Orr Sc Locket Hardware Co. Porter, Fred L. . . Pitkin K Brooks . Root, The Studios Schlesinger and Mayer Sachen, William . Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Co. Smith, L. M. 8L Bro. . Smucker, Harry G. . Schoultz, Fritz 8 CO. Scheidel SL CO. . Taylor . . . Tobey Furniture Co. right, Kay 83 Co. W Wendell 83 Co, . Weaver Coal SL Coke Co. . Washington Shirt Co. . 1 X -J gk N lla' K is 5512- i' A l k 7-JV ' . 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