University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL)

 - Class of 1899

Page 1 of 350

 

University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL) online yearbook collection, 1899 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 350 of the 1899 volume:

f ez, 1' L' . Q11 milf , rf ,A sf ik- jf. ff. .QA i ..' 19 4-, 5.2 ,kggx Y -. 'M' A Bef . W ,sl - ! -SJ n X 5. u 4: I v V ..-, 1 , A w V , 'ff' cb? CGD illld GOUJII 1 VOL. IV i PllbliSl72d .nlllllldlw lllldil' IM dil'QCfi0ll Of IDC 0l'dQl' of tht TNI! mdSRlGQOf Th? UllWQl'SiIl,' of QbiCdQO'H20EiQhfQQli hlllldl'6Cl dl1d lIilIQW:l1illQ Nbr! COUIM Publ' 900 Webster Sires P0 Box 2270 Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270 f ez, 1' L' . Q11 milf , rf ,A sf ik- jf. ff. .QA i ..' 19 4-, 5.2 ,kggx Y -. 'M' A Bef . W ,sl - ! -SJ n X 5. u 4: I v V ..-, 1 , A w V To WILLIAM MCKINLEK L,L.D. This book is respectfully Dedicated Q 'EN FS 'A Q .,- -"An I, ' MJ' ff "'::'4 ,I .. -I Q 'E ,, ,Q'E?'5-2'J '--sv 5:3 or T he GTQQUIIS Wifh hearfy Iofve, 0 Sllofherl Thee 'Ive greef WWI: fhis, fhe record of fwhaf 'Ive halve done, The chaplef of fhe Iaurels we hafve 'hmm The roll of honors fwe hafve found so sbeef. Alfhough for as no drums of fame hafve beaf, Before as ha'be no frembling capffbes run, Our 'balor and our planning end in fun, Yef somefhing fwe'?2e accornplishedg and 'fis meet Thaf sornefhing here fwe bring unfo fhy feef, With hearfy Io-ve. -P ..-, o c? .e.e .f f A ' 0 F 11 ,. Q Mb 9 B0al'd or EdiI0l'S managing EUIIOTS YVALTER JOSEPH SCHIIAHL RALPH CURTISS BIANNING Business managers LEROY TUDOR VERNON CHARLES BRANDEN DAVIS Jlssociate Editors RALPH C. HAMILL EMORY COBB ANDREWS ELIZABETH EARNIST BUCHANAN CHARLES XVARREN CHASE ERNEST EDWARD IRONS CLARENCE A. MCCARTHY MARION FARWELL TOOI-:ER HARVEY MALCOLM MCQUISTON HARRY NORMAN GOTTLIEB PARKE Ross CHARLES SCAMMON REED HELEN DAVIDA HARPER JESSIE NEA SPRAY. T B0dl'Cl or ill'IiSIS B. ENGLEBERT KEY, Artistdn-Chief WILLIAM DERRICK RICHARDSON PERCY BERNARD ECKHART DONN CRANE X DAVID A. ROBERTSON C. I. NEWMAN EVERITT LOVVRY OTTO J. SCHNEIDER D. J. LAVIN FRANK HOLME JOSEPH CARLL 8 Che Board or Crustees of the University of Chicago 0fficers INIARTIN A. RYERSON, President ANDREXV MCLEISH, Vice-President CHARLES L HFTCHINSON, Treasurer HENRY A. RUST, Comptroller THOMAS W. GOODSPEED, Secretary members 0111.23 1. Term expires in 1599 CHARLES C. BOWEN WILLIAM B. BRAYTON JESSE A. BALDWIN ENOS M. BARTON ANDREXV INICLEIS-H JOHN D. ROCIQEFELLER, JR. DAVID G. HAXNIILTON Class 2. Term expzfes in 1900 FRED. T. GATES AI.ONzO K. PARKER WILLIAM H. HOLDEN CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON FREDERICK A. SMITH FERDINAND W. PECK EDWARD GOODMAN Class 3. Term exllires in 1901 ELI B. FELSENTHAL BIARTIN A. RYERSON XYILLIAM R. HARPER If DANIEL L. SHOREV HERIXIANN H. KOHLSAAT XVILLARD A. SMITH GEORGE C. WALKER 'F Deceased Q 1 Presiden Oiticers ot Instruction and I-ldministration WILLIAM RAINEY HARPER, PH. D., D. D., LL.D., of the University, Head professor of the Semitic Languag tures. and Director of Haskell Oriental Museum. t es and L GALUSHA ANDERSON, A. M., S.T.D., LL.D., Head Professor of Homiletics. GEORGE XVASHINGTON NORTHRUP,'D.D.. LL.D., Head Professor of Systematic Theology. YVILLIAINI CLEAYER XVILKINSON, A.M., D.D., Professor of Poetry and Criticism. ANDREW MARTIN FAIRBAIRN, D.D., Professorial Lecturer on the Barrows Lectureship. FRANKLIN JOHNSON, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Church History and Homiletics. THOMAS WAKEFIELD GOODSPEED, D.D., Secretary of the Board of Trustees, and University Registrar. ERI BAKER HULBERT, A.lNI., D.D., Head Professor of Church History, and Dea HERINIANN EDUARD VON HOLST, PELD., Head Professor of History. THOMAS CHROXVDER CHAMBERLIN, PH.D., LL.D., Head Professor of Geology, and Director of Museums. JOHN HENRY BARROXVS, D.D., Professorial Lecturer on Comparative Religion, CHARLES OTIS WHITMAN, PH.D.. LL.D., Head Professor of Zoology. RICHARD GREEN MOULTON, PH.D., Professor of Literature Qin Englishj. 10 itera n of the Divinity School. CARL GUSTAF LAGERGREN, A.B., D.B., Professor fin the Swedish Theological Seminaryj of Systematic Tl ieology, and Dean of the Seminary. JOHN MERLE COULTER, PH.D., Head Professor of Botany. NVILLIAM GARDNER HALE, A.B., LL.D., Head Professor of Latin, HARRY PRATT JUDSON, A.3I., LL.D., Head Professor of Political Science, and Dean of the Faculties of Arts, Literature, and Science. CHAR Professor of Sociology in the Divinity School, and University Chaplain. LES RICHMOND HENDERSON, A.M., D.D., SHERBURNE XVESLEY BURNHAM Professor of Practical Astronomy. , A.M , CHARLES FREDERIC MILLSPAUGH, Professorial Lecturer on Botany. CHARLES CHANDLER, A.M., Professor of Latin. WILLIAM H. HOLMES, A.B., Professor of Archzeologic Geology. EMIL GUSTAV HIRSCH, PH.D., LLD., Professor of Rabinical Literature and Philosophy. HENRIK GUNDERSEN, A.M., D.B., Professor Qin the Dano-Norwegian Theological Serninaryl of Systematic Theology, New Testament Interpretation and Biblical Lit t era ure, and Dean of the Seminary. JAMES LAURENCE LAUGHLIN, PH.D. Head Professor of Political Economy. ALBERT ABRAHAM MICHELSON, PH.D., Head Professor of Physics. FRANK BIGELOW TARBELL, PH.D. Professor of Classical Archaeology and Greek Epigraphy. DANIEL GIRAUD ELLIOT, F.R.S.E., Professorial Lecturer on Zoology. ll FRANK WAKELEY GUN Professorial Lecturer on OSKAR BQLZA, PHD., Professor of Mathematics. EST DEVVITT BURTON, D.D.. SAULUS, D. D., Engl ish Literature. ERN N' Head Professor of New Testament Literature and Interpretation. ALBION XVOODBURY SMALL, PH.n., Head Professor of Sociology, and Director of the University Affiliations. JOSEPH PAXSON IDDINGS, PH.B., Professor of Petrology. EDMUND JANES JAMES, A.M., PH.D., Professor of Public Administration and Director of the University Extension X Division. CHARLES REID BARNES, PHL., Professor of Plant Physiology. PAUL SHOREY, PH, D., Head Professor of Greek. BENJAMIN STILES TERRY, Professor of Mediaeval and English History, JOHN DEWEY, PHD., fessor of Philosophy. and Dean i PH.D., n the Senior College. Head Pro HENRY HERBERT DONALDSON, PH.D., Head Professor of Neurology. CHARLES RICHARD VAN HISE, PH.D., Nou-Resident Professor of Structural Geology. A.M., GEORGE BURMAN FOSTER, Professor of Syst einatic Theology. GEORGE STEPHEN GOODSPEED, PH.D., ' ' ' and University Recorder Professor of Conipara tive Religion and Ancient History, ROLLTN D. SALISBURY, A.M,, Ceolo y, and University Examiner. Professor of Geographic 1 g 12 OLIVER CUMMINGS FARRINGTON, PH.D., Professorial Lecturer on Determinative Mineralogy. FRANK FROST ABBOTT, PH.D., Professor of Latin. ELIAKIM HASTINGS MooRE, PH.D., Head Professor of Mathematics. ISAAC BRONSON BURGESS, A.M.. Academy Professor of Latin. JOHN ULRIC NEF, PH.D., Head Professor of Chemistry. JOHN MATTHEXVS MANLY, PH.D., Head Professor of English. RICHARD ALEXANDER FULLERTON PENROSE, JR., PH.D., Professor of Economic Geology. SHAILER MATHEVVS, A.M., Professor of New Testament History and Interpretation. EDXVIN BRANT FROST, A.M., Professor of Astrophysics. EDWARD EMERSON BARNARD, A.M., SC.D., Professor of Astronomy and Astronomer of the Yerkes Observatory GEORGE LINCOLN HENDRICKSON, A.B., Professor of Latin. ADOLPH CASPAR MILLER, A.M., Professor of Finance. I-IAZLITT ALVA CUPPY, PH.D., Director of the University Press Division. GEORGE ELLERY HALE, SC. D., Professor of Astrophysics, and Director of the Yerkes Observatory, NED ARDEN FLOOD, A.M., Director of the University Press Division. 13 JOHN MCAULEY PALMER, Professor of Military Science and Tactics. CHARLES EDMUND HEYVITT, D.D., Secretary of Divinity School. FRANCIS ADELBERT BLACKBURN, PH.D., Associate Professor of the English Language. JULIA ELLEN BULKLEY, PHD., Associate Professor of Pedagogy. HEINRICH MASCHKE Pi-LD., Associate Professor of Mathematics. JOHN XVILDINIAN BIONCRIEF, A.llI., Associate Professor of Church History. YVILLIABI DARNALL BIBLCLINTOCK, A.M., Associate Professor of English Literature, and Dean in the Junior Colleges. OLIVER JOSEPH THATCHER, PH.D., Associate Professor of Mediaeval and English History. GEORGE BAUR, PH.D.,+ Associate Professor of Comparative Osteology and Palfeontology. IRA MAURICE PRICE, D.B., PAD., Associate Professor of Semitic Languages and Literatures. JACQUES LOEB, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology and Experimental Biology. CLARENCE FASSETT CASTLE, PELD., Associate Professor of Greek on the Edward Olson Foundation. ZELLA ALLEN DIXSON, A.M., Associate Librarian. MARION TALBOT, AM., Associate Professor of Sanitary Science, Dean of XVomen, and Head of Kelly House STARR XVILLARD CUTTING, PH.D., Associate Professor of German. 3kDECC3SCd. 14 FREDERICK STARR, PHD., Associate Professor of Anthropology, and Cur ment of Walker Museum. ROBERT FRANCIS HARPER, PH.D., Associate Professor of the Semitic Languages and Literatures. JAMES HAYDEN TUFTS, PH.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy. SAMUEL WESLEY STRATTON, S.B., Associate Professor of Physics. CARL DARLING BUCK, PH.D., Associate Professor of Sanskrit an CHARLES HERBERT THVRBER, A.INI., Associate Professor of Pedagogy, and Dean of the Morgan Park Academy ALEXANDER SMITH, PH.D., Associate Professor of General Chemistry. CHARLES ZUEBLIN, PH.B., D.B., Associate Professor of Sociology. EDWARD CAPPS, PH.D., ior Colleges. Associate Professor of Greek, and Dean in the Jun EDWIN HERBERT LEWIS, PH.D., Associate Professor of Rhetoric. AMOS ALONZO STAGG, A.B., he Division of Physical Culture Associate Professor and Director of t FRANK LAWTON ULCOTT NVADSNVCRTH, S.B., E.M., M.E., Associate Professor of Astrophysics. ator of the Anthropological Depart- cl Indo-European Comparative Philology. Elle PAYS Donator lllmqper -4 5 Fl H To make ' " - Us In M 'sz .5 1,5 it In-ow .S ik er. N L. , , .. , '-f W Z", . rp M' y'J' y, 'jlllllllllll 93' 4 X1 ff , X I ' 6'-f- , ' . 4, - an-4 A Qs- 1 f V?-fi 1 ' Q i X 1 1 Y in i .-"wily 1 ff fxX.. H . i . A -. . W 1, iii sfxbgy ll .' ' f ' N ' ,' " . f flu i 'lf -rv l "'- ' A 'E' I ' ' 'N' -"'l'.i,' ' 'f"1..r:., ,fa XL 1 , R j 'es - , K ' 1 ' QWZOFI gs. V iiir.. yell 4 S X' gg 15 MARTHA FOOTE CROW, PH.D., Assistant Professor of English Literature. ALBERT HARRIS TOLMAN, PH,D., Assistant Professor of English Literature and Senior College Examiner VVILLIAM HOOVER, PH.D., Non-Resident Assistant Professor of Mathematics. - FRANK JUSTUS MILLER, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Latin, and Examiner of Affiliations. GEORGE EMORY FELLOWS, PH.D., Assistant Professor of History. FELIX LENGFELD, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chemistry. MYRA REYNOLDS, PHD., Assistant Professor of English Literature, and Head of Foster House. HENRY W. ROLFE, A.M., Non-Resident Assistant Professor of English Literature. HANS M. SCHMIDT-VVARTENBERG, PH.D., Assistant Professor of German. ERNST FREUND, J.U.D., PH.D., Assistant Professor of Jurisprudence and Roman Law. OLOF HEDEEN, A,B., ' Assistant Professor Qin the Swedish Theological Seminaryj of Practical Theology and Exegesis. FRANCIS WAYLAND SHEPARDSON, PH.D., Assistant Professor of American History, the President's Secretary, and Acting Recorder. WILLIAINI MORTON WHEELER, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Embryology. GEORGE HERBERT MEAD, A.B., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. FRANK MELVILLE BRONSON, A.M., Academy Assistant Professor of Greek. 16 EDXVIN ERLE SPARKS. A.M., Assistant Professor of American History. SHO WATASE, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Cellular Biology. XVILLIAINI ISAAC THOINIAS, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology, and Superintendent of Departmental Libraries. GEORGE EDGAR VINCENT, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. GEORGE CARTER HOWLAND, AM., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, and Junior College Examiner. JACOB WILLIAM ALBERT YOUNG, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematical Pedagogy. CABIILLO VON KLENZE, PH.D., Assistant Professor of German, and Head of Graduate Hall. NVILLIABI BISHOP OWEN, A.B., Assistant Professor of Greek. EDXVIN OAKES JORDAN, PHO, Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. JAMES DOXVDEN BRUNER, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures. Jt'Lu's STIEGLITZ, PHD., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. JAMES HENRY BREASTED, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Egyptology and Semitic Languages, and Assistant Director of Haskell Oriental Museum. CLIFFORD HERSCHEL MOORE, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Latin. JAMES ROYVLAND ANGELL, A.M., Assistant Professor of Experimental Psychology. ROBERT HERRICK, A.B., Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. 17 WILLIAM HILL, AII., Assistant Professor of Political Economy. ROBERT INIORSS LOVETT, A.B., Assistant Professor of English. SOLOMCN HENRY CLARK, PH.B., Assistant Professor of Public Speaking. RENI1: DE POYEN-BELLISLE, PAD., Instructor in Romance Philology. FREDERIC JAMES GURNEY. A.B , D.B., ExamiIIer's Clerk. PAUL OSKAR KERN, PI-LD., Instructor iII German. WILLIAM MUSS-ARNOLT, PH.D., Instructor and Assistant Recorder. PORTER LANDER MACCLINTOCK, A.M., Instructor in English. KARL PIETSCH, PH.D., Instructor in Romance Languages and Literatures. THORSTEIN B. VEBLEN, PH.D., Instructor in Political Economy, and Managing Editor of the journal of Political Economy. VVARDNER WILLIAMS, MUS. Doc., PH.D., '1 XXV 'I . . Instructor and Director of Music. CLARK EUGENE CRANDALL, D.B., PH.D., Instructor in the Semitic Languages. LUANNA ROBERTSON, PH.D., Academy Instructor in German. THEODORE LEE NEFF, A.M., PH.D., Instructor in Romance Languages. WAYLAND JOHNSON CHASE, AM., Academy Instructor iII History, and Academy Recorder. 18 'QE -T NK ' ' 4 MR . MASSUO IKUTA, PH.D., Instructor in Chemistry. HERBERT ELLSWORTH SLAUGHT, PELD., Instructor in Mathematics. FREDERIC IVES CARPENTER, PH.D., Instructor in English. DAVID JUDSON LINGLE, PI-LD., Instructor in Physiology. L IRA woons HOWERTH, PHD., Instructor in Sociology, and Secretary of the University Extension Class-study Department. JAMES HARRINGTON BOYD, Sc.D., Instructor in Mathematics. HERBERT LOCKWOOD VVILLETT, PH.D., Instructor in Semitic Languages and Literatures, and Dean of the Disciples' Divinity House. WILLIAM AUGUST PETERsoN, DB., Instructor Qin the Swedish Theological Seminaryj in General History, Church His- tory, and the Greek and Swedish Languages. CHRISTIAN IORGINIUS OLSEN, Instructor Qin the Dano-Norwegian Theological Seminaryj in Homiletics, Church Polity, and Pastoral Duties. HARRIS HANCOCK, PH.D., Instructor in Mathematics. CHARLES PORTER SMALL, M.D., Examining Physician. KURT LAVES, PH.D., Instructor in Astronomy. ERNEST LE ROY CALDWELL. A.B., Academy Instructor in Mathematics. WALTER A. PAYNE, PH.B., Instructor and Secretary of the University Extension Lecture-study Department. 19 CLYDE XVEBER YOTAXV, D.B., PH.D., Instructor in New Testament Literature. WILLIAM H. RUNYON, AAI., Academy Instructor in Natural Science. THOMAS JEFFERSON JACKSON SEE, PH.D., Instructor in Astronomy. FERDINAND SCHWILL, PH.D., Instructor in Mode rn History. OSCAR LOYELL TRIGGS. PH.D,, Instructor in English. ALBERT CHAUNCEY EYCLESHYMER, Instructor in Anatomy. PH, D., KATE ANDERSON, sa.. Instructor in Physical Culture. NELS SORENSON LANVDAHL, Instructor Qin the Dano-Norwegian Theological Semiuaryj i11 Churc CHARLES MANNING CHILD, PHD., Instructor in Zoillogy. ADDISON XVEBSTER INIOORE, PH.D , Instructor in Philosophy, and Head of University Houses. RALPH C. H. CATTERALL, A,B., Instructor iu Modern History. JOSEPHINE CHESTER ROBERTSON, A.B., Cataloguer. BRADLEY MOORE DAVIS, PH.IJ., Instructor in Botany. HENRY RAND HATFIELD, PH.D., Instructor in Political Economy and Political Science XVILLIAM YAIIGHN INIOODY, All., Instructor in English and Rhetoric. FREDRIC INIASON BLANCHARD, A.M., Instructor in Public Speaking. 20 History LINDSAY TODD DAMON, A.B., Instructor in Rhetoric and English Composition EDWVARD KENNARD RAND, A.M., Instructor in Latin. JOSEPH EDWARD RAYCROFT, A.B., Instructor in Physical Culture, and Head of Snell House GERTRCDE DUDLEY, Instructor in Physical Culture. ELIZABETH WALLACE, S.B., Associate in Romance Languages and Head of B eecher House ALFRED XVILLIAM STRATTON, PH.D., Associate in Sanskrit and Indo-European Comparative Philolovx EDVVARD CARLTON PAGE, A B., Associate in History. CHARLES RIBORG MANN, A.M., PH Associate in Physics. GLENN MOODY HOBBS, S.B., Associate in Physics. ROBERT ANDREWS MILLIKAN, PH Associate in Physics. JAMES XVESTFALL THOMPSON, I'H.D. Associate in History. ALFRED REYNOLDS XVIGHTMAN, Academy Associate in Latin. AMY ELIZA TANNER, PH.D. Associate in Philosophy. STUART WELLER. S. B., A.llI Associate in Palzcontologic Geology. FOREST RAY MoL'LToN, An, Associate in Astronomy. 21 .D. .D., CHARLES JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN, AM., Assistant, a FREDERICK DAY NICHOLS, A.B., Academy Associate in English. HORACE BUTTERVVORTH, Associate in Physical Culture. ALICE NORTHRUP SIMPSON, A.B. Academy Assistant in Latin. PH.D., Assistant in Botany. CLARENCE ALMON TORREY, PH.B., Inspector Departmental Libraries. HERVEY FOSTER MALLORY, A.B. nd Secretary of the Correspondence-study Department v ALBERT FRANCIS BUCK, A.M., Laboratory Assistant in Psychology. EDGAR JOHNSON GOODSPEED, PH.D., Assistant in Biblical and Patristic Greek JAMES H. RANSOM, A.M., Lecture Assistant in Chemistry. CORA BELLE PERRINE, A.B., Head of Accession Department. VVILLIAM DAYTON INIERRELL, A.B., Assistant in Botany. ELLA ADAINIS INIOORE, PI-LB., Assistant in English. LAUDER WILLIAM JONES, PHD., Assistant in Chemistry. FREDERICK VVILLIAM SHIPLEY, A.B., Assistant in Latin. HENRY CHANDLER COWLES, PHD., Assistant in Botany. XVILLIAM FREDERICK YUST, A.B., Loan Desk Assistant. 22 vl"U6f'. A" W WWW IS WILLIAM AL W .LL, ia., ' W or e D F s KW Eglin' is Assistant in Botany. 31: - - -we HERMANN BENJAMIN ALMSTEDT, LiL.B., Pe.B., 1 Assistant in German. ' JUNE ETTA DOWNEY, A.M., Second Assistant in Psychology. 1, FREDERICK EBY, A.B., Academy Assistant in charge of the Introductory year. JOSEPH GEORGE BROBECK, B.S., M.D., Academy Director of the Gymnasium and Assistant in Mathematics and Science. EDITH BURNHAM FosrER, Pn.B., Assistant in English. SYSAN HELEN BALLOU, PH.B., Assistant in Latin. ELEANOR SHERXVIN, A.B., Reader in Latin and Greek. WILBUR SAMFEL IACKMAN, A.B., Lecturer in Pedagogy. ELLA FLAGG YOUNG, Lecturer in Pedagogy. CHARLES WILLIAM SEIDENADEL, PH.D., Docent in Ancient Greek authors on Music. EDMUND BUCKLEY, PH.D., Docent in Comparative Religion. GEORGE B. HUSSEY, A.M., PH.D., Docent in Greek. EDSON LEONE WHITNEY, PH.D., LL.B., Docent in Political Science. AGNES MATHILDE WERGELAND, PH.D.. Docent in History. WARNER FITE, PH.D., Docent in History. 23 SAMUEL A. MATTHEWS, M.D., Docent in Physiology. CARL EVANS BOYD, PHD., Docent in Political Science. XVINFRED ERNEST GARRISON, PH.D., Docent in Ecclesiastical History. ELEANOR PRESCOTT HABIMOND, PH.D Docent in English Literature. LIZI CECILIA CIPRIANI, PH.D., Docent in Literature Liu Englishj, NATHANIEL I. RUBINKAM, PH.D., Lecturer in English. YV. DI. R. FRENCH, A.B, Lecturer in Art. LORADO TAFT, ML, Lecturer in Art. JENKIN LLOYD JONES, Lecturer in English. LATHAN A. CRANDALL, D.D., Lecturer in American History. GEORGE AMOS DORSEY, P1-LD., Lecturer in Anthropology. CHARLES ALEXANDER MCMURRY, PH. Lecturer in Pedagogy. HORACE SPENCER FISKE, A.lNI., Lecturer in English Literature. MERTON LELAND MILLER, PH.D., Lecturer in Anthropology. JACOB DORSEY FORREST, A.M., Lecturer in Sociology. JOHN G. CARTER TROUP, University Extension Lecturer in English. 24 Instructors Jlwointed for the Summer Quarter, lsos NOAH K. DAVIS, A.M , PELD., LL.D., Professor of Moral Philosophy, University of Virginia. CASPAR RENP: GREGGRY, PH.o., D.D., Lian., Professorial Lecturer in Biblical and Patristic Greek. BERNARD MOSES, PH.D.. Professor of History and Political Economy, University of California. GASTON BON ET-MAURY, D. D. , Professor of Ecclesiastical History in the Protestant Faculty of Theology University of Paris. CHARLES ALEXANDER MCMURRY. PH.D., Lecturer in Pedagogy. FRANCIS ASBI'RY XVUHD, PH.D., Professor of German, Cornell College, Mt. Vernon, Iowa. FREDERICK TURNER, PH.D., Professor of American History, University of Wisconsin. ARTHUR TAPPAN XVALKER, A.M., Professor of Latin, the University of Kansas. HOMER H. KINGSLICY, AB., Superintendent of Schools, Evanston. Ill. THOMAS XVALKER PAGE, A.M., PH.D., Professor of History i11 Randolph-Macon College, Lynchburg, Ya. ,ai-7----R: ' wif, .R be N-. 1 ' if P , N Q.-Ji-' , . ' is T - ,R-by 1. - NF R- fH1-are N --5 A - ,b N f ,g. .X -i"i A I f mv ' jimi ,aiu 'lee iff RW is 9 9 tp fciagib x Kfg, Qi"" N fxfag Q., Qi. f 1 21.11 gli YQ ' ' tak,-Laziff if Home-E Fort gunna, ttf ' 25 in the : L, Y, , K, ea f gg-its A 4 lf i Nr. X., , 3 F :.p -La. sn' ' I Senior Dea L GEORGE ABRAM MILLER, PH.D., Instructor in Mathematics, Cornell University. FRANK A. MANNY, A.M., Supervisor of Public Schools, Indianapolis, Ind ALBERT LINCOLN SMITH, PH.D., Lecturer in Bacteriology, JOHN PAUL GOODE, S.B., Assistant in Physiography. WALLACE WALTER ATWOOD, s.B., Assistant in Physiography. HENRY W. THURSTON, Lecturer on Sociology. Deans ot Jlftiliated Institutions HERBERT' LEE STETSON, Des Moines College. ARTHUR GAYLORD SLOCUM, Kalamazoo College. JOHN F. FORBES, A.M., PH.D., john B. Stetson University. HENRY MUNSON LYMAN, ii, Rush Medical College. JOHN MILTON DODSON, junior Dean, Rush Medical College. WILLIAM PARKER MCKEE, Frances Shinier Academy. EDYVARD OCTAYIUS SISSON. Bradley Polytechnic Institute. XYILLIAM BISHOP OWEN, South Side Academy. 26 l QFIQ .W.wwv.wH .. V Ib f. ..IIILI:,III fIIIIIII.III,,-. III , . Y . ... -- 1" .lf -. '-' "NNN .wh 4 f I . I -. .r 1. at . f :I 5. I. I,III . .. ...II-. II II ... II I I.I g 'IIIIII-. I I II map. . . . .. - , II III IxI I I ., , ,.,IIII U "J-'H mg.. ' .-if Ln--"ik-'.f.'., , 5fiSFwff' ff.. .1 -.:" -"I-.. ' '-J .. WI, IIS. - I IW., 4 I., . II ,IQ I-,Im I x , I . II II I. I II , I, ,I ,.. I -, 5 II. I"v-51.1. ' qw. " WL, . "Mr ' "TUV .rlMv"IfII .'. IIII, 1iI:IIII..II I IQI?I. I4 ...I IIIQIIIIII I,IIpI.I IIN-S., II. vr, II . III.III I II I.q I MKII II IE I III .., I... VII . III. .. - .IRQ II I I.III .Q ,nav 4' , .Ws..:,, - QI'-gf ... .,f. . ' .1 ' . -ww. . . u I I-I .-II 2, :II-XII Qfvvh. I: ig! ,. 1 II. 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' ' I lhl ' v I " "' 0' . . . - -". I' will I .' . 1- , .. . t ' ' ..g, ', ' . 1 . .I' . - 4 ' .... "" .7.' "l"4.'. M. l v I 4 'X' Yip UV. . ' ' .T I n IQIISIVXI .3-Ih,II,I IIII I II I 1 I s I.. I 'I .. 3.I..I .K ..I I n II . . .I II.II,.,.. , I. I I SI Iv:'QI.3:I?'Q ' ' -QE, 'Q' .1 ' ' .I J . ,III . ' ' nf ' - .. t'.:..19I7I.FIIl I ' II-I n ' Mg ,I'.I.II .. ..-JI .J LW.-'PM 1' 'itil ' ' rmg . 'n H U 1 .. G II J. v I.,.,II- I , . .13 . .'. .I I " 'r '.. ,IIoI.,,', r. ..' 'ef ..lIIJ .., . .I .. .-.- ..III .- ..I III -1. f.,..f r..f.'- - I NH.-. 's1" wg... ' .Lp III . Iv., Y 2" T:I...I .1n.v.",",' .. .I ,., 5 I 'xr TL" I x W6 'M . fl' 5, .I,f'... q I h I- , Ph W u' 4 . ,. I . Im. I , , f I "fi I1 4w.vp..w., IIA I PII ',.a .IIl,II.,-NI: .. - ... H. .. fs.. . H... I III Q.L.:IIIIIII I I I I av... .?'...' .l' 'I "" '.:?2'13,F 'LI .'.ww:n:"1+fH' ', w,,.:g., .If ' 1 XY. x'lx W eg 'if-'f i g ,,, ..,A W 'lee xv 5 if J M JOHN J. SCHOLINGER, The Harvard School. HIRAM ABIFF GOOCH, Princeton-Yale School. JOHN COXVLES GRANT, Kenwood Institute. HOMER JEROME VOSBURGH, XVayland Academy. LAURA A. JONES, The Maynard School. YYILLIAM RIGGS TROXVBRIDGE, The Rugby School. HENRY H. BICLFIELD, The Chicago Manual Training School. A. F. FLEET, Culver Military Academy. Follows and Scholars Hvpolntod for l898:99 'Fellows I. Ullfzlersify Fellows. EDGAR XVILLI.-XM A1iizOT'r, PH.B., Romance. SOLOMON FARLEY AGREE, SM., Cliemistry. HABIILTON FORD ALLEN, Biblical aiifl Patristic Greek. BIYRON LUciUs ASHLEV, Pi-LM., Philosophy. ALOIS BARTA, A.M., Semitic. HENRY HEATH BAWDEN, AAI., Philosophy. EDXVARD AMBROSE BEQHTEL. All., Latin. XVILHELM ALFRED BRAUN, A.B., German. SOPHONISBA PRESTON BRECKINRIDGE, PH.M., Political Science ISABELLA HRONK, PH.B.,ROlIl3I1CE. PERCV BENTLY BURNET, A.M., German. FREDERICK ALBERT CLEVELAND, PH.B., Political Science. ELTING HOUGHTELINL? COMSTOCK, SB., Mathematics. OH GRACE PATTEN CONANT, A.M., English. HOWELL EMLYN DAVIES, A.B., Zoology. CHARLES EDWARD DIXON, A.M., Latin. ERNEST GREEN DODGE, A.M , Greek. WINFRED NICHOLS DONOYAN, A.M. Semitic. ARTHUR WILLIAM DUNN, A.M., Anthropology. CHARLES ELLWOOD, PH.B., Sociology. JOHN WELLINGTON FINCH, A.M., Geology. JOSEPH C. FREEHOFF, S.B., Political Economy. HENRY GORDON GALE, A.B., Physics. XVALTER EUGENE GARREY, S.B., Physiology. RUSSELL GEORGE, A.M., Geology. I HYMAN ELIJAH GOLDRERG, S.B., Chemistry. CHARLES ELMER GOODELL, A.M., Political Science. EMILY RAY GREGORY, A.M., Zoology. BIICHAEL FREDERICK GUYER, A.M., Zoology. IRVING H.ARDESTY, A.B., Neurology. MARY BELLE HARRIS. A.M., Bucknell Fellow, Latin. AMY HEWES, A.B., Sociology. GOTTFRIED HULT, A.M., English. JOHANNES BENONI EDUARD IONAS, A.M., German. DELOS OSCAR KINSMAN, L.B., Political Economy. RALPH GRIERSON KIMBLE, A.B., Sociology. PHILEMON BULKLEY KOHLSAAT, PIIB., English. DERRICK NORMAN LEHMER, A.M., Mathematics. RALPH STAYNER LILLIE, A.B., Zoology. FREDERICK BROOKS LINDSAY, A.M., English. HENRY LLOYD, S.B., Mathematics. XVILLIAM NEXVTON LOGAN, A.M., Geology. FLORENCE IYIAY LYON, S.B., Botany. WALTER FLAVIUS MCCALEB, A.M., History. WILLIAM MCCRACREN, A.B., Chemistry. JOHN HECTOR MCDONALD, A.B., Mathematics. HARRY ALVIN MILLIS. A.M., Political Economy. SAMUEL CHILES IVIITCHELL, A.M., Political Science. VVESLEY CLAIR DIITCHELL, A.B., Armour Crane Fellow, Political Economy. HORATIO HACI-:ETT NEYVMAN. A.B., Zoology. GEORGE NORLIN, A.B., Greek. CAROLINE LOUISE RANSOINI, A.B., Archaeology. FRITZ REICHMANN, MS., Physics. ADNA WOOD RISLEY, A.B., History. CLEMENT EUGENE ROOD, PH.M., Astronomy. CLARENCE FRISBEE Ross, A.M., Greek. MARION SCHIBSBY, A.B., Indo-European Comparative Philology GEORGE CLARK SELLERY, A.B., History. 30 CHARLES HENRX' SHANNON, PHD., Indo-European Comparative Philology. THOMAS KAY SIDNEY, A.B., Latin. CLAUDE ELLSWORTH SIEBENTHAL, A.M., Geology. GEORGE REUREN SIKES, A.B., Sociology. MAX DARXX'IN SLIMMER, S.B., Chemistry, JOHN M. P. SMITH, A.B., Semitic. YVILSON ROBERT SMITH, A.B.. Botany. XVORTHY PUTNAM STERNS, A.M., Political Economy. FRANK HENRY EDGAR HELEN BIALCOLM XVILLIAM XVALLACE, A.B., English. FRANCIS VVILLISTON, A.B., English. DELONZO TATE XVILSON, A.M., Astronomy. LINCOLN STEVENS, M.S., Botany. WALDGRAVE STUART, PH B., Philosophy. HOWARD STURTEVANT, A.B., Comparative Philolog BRADFORD THOMPSON, PH.B., Philosophy. Divinity Fellows. HENRX' THOMAS COLESTOCK, A.B., Church History. ELIJAH ABRAHAM HANLEY, A.M., Systematic Theology. THOMAS ALLAN HOBEN, A.M., New Testament. Y fuselage 'rl1a1r1a+. , se' Ar Qgiwgi ieupfrv CXO C .. ,Lo A A ,I+ 31 Scholars Senior' College Sc'l1olars.I598-99. LYDIA BRAUNS, German. ROBERTA IRvINE BROTHERTON, Chemistry. CHARLES VVARREN CHASE, History. JOHN JOSEPH CLARKSON, French. JENNIE LOUISE COON. Mathematics. CHARLES VERNER DREW, Geology. ABRAHAM ALCON ETTELSON, English. ERNEST EDWARD IRONS, Zoology. ALICE LACHMUND, Philosophy. BIARY CHAPMAN INIOORE, Greek. JULIA LILIAN PIERCE, Latin. BIARIE WERRIIIEISTER, Physics. Grarluate Scholars. 1898-99. TREVOR ARNETT, Political Economy. HELEN ADELAIDE BALDXVIN, Latin. MAX BATT, German, CHARLES JOSEPH BUSHNELL, Sociology. DEMIA BUTLER, English FRED HARVEY CALHOUN, Geology. FREDERICK KIAYOR GILES, Pedagogy. :XNGELINA LOESCH, Philosophy. DAVID HIOORE ROBINSON, Greek. ARTHUR XVHIPPLE SMITH, Mathematics. EDWIN CAMPBELL XVOOLLEY, Political Science 32 lll1ivQl'SiID Rlllillg Bodies 'Che University Senate THE PRESIDENT, Chairman. Professor GEORGE STEPHEN GOODSPEED, Recorder. Head Professor GALUSHA ANDERSON. Head Professor GEORGE XVASHINGTON NORTHRLTP. Head Professor ERI BAKER HULBERT. Head Professor HERBIAN EDUARD vON HOLST. Head Professor THOMAS CHROWDER CHAAIBERLIN. Head Professor CHARLES OTIS XVHITMAN. Head Professor JOHN ILWERLE COULTER. Head Professor XVILLIAM GARDNER HIXLE. Head Professor HARRX' PRATT IUDSON. Head Professor JAMES LAURENCE LAUGHLIN. Head Professor ALBERT ABRAHAM BIICHELSON. Head Professor ERNEST DEVVITT BURTON. Head Professor ALBION WOODBURI' SMALL. Head Professor PAUL SHOREY. Head Professor HENRY HERBERT DONALDSON. Head Professor ELIARIM HI-XSTINGS DIOORE. Head Professor JOHN ULRIC NEF. Head Professor JOHN DEWEY. Head Professor JOHN BIATTHEXVS IVIANLY. Director EDMUND JANE5 JAMES. Professor CHARLES RICHMOND HENDERSON, Representing the Divinity Alumni. Professor FRANK FROST ABBOTT, Representing the Graduate Alumni. Associate Professor ROBERT FRANCIS HARPER, Representing the Collegiate Alumni. The University Senate includes Q15 the Presidentg C25 the University Recorderg 13j the Heads of Departments of Instructiong Q-lj the University Librariang Q51 the Director of the University Extension Divisiong C65 Members of the Faculties elected by the Congregation. The Senate holds stated meetings monthly to consider general questions relating to the educational work and policy of the University. 33 S the University Zouncil THE PRESIDENT, Chairman. Professor GEORGE STEPHEN GOODSPEED, Recorder. Professor CHARLES RICHMOND HENDERSON, Chaplain. Head Professor ERI BAKER HULBERT, Dean of the Divinity Faculty. Head Professor THOMAS CHROWDER CHAMBERLIN, Director of Museums. Head Professor HARRY PRATT JUDSON, Dean of the Faculties of Arts, Literature, and Science Head Professor ALBION WOODBURI' SMALL. Director of the .Affiliated Work. Professor ROLLIN D. SALIsBURY, University Examiner. Professor BENJAIXIIN STILES TERRY, Dean in the Senior Colleges. Associate Professor BIARION TALBOT, Dean of Women. Associate Professor AVILLIAM DARNALL MACCLINTOCK. Dean in the Junior Colleges. Associate Professor EDYVARD CAPPS, Dean in the Junior Colleges. Associate Professor CHARLES HERBERT THURRER, Dean of Morgan Park Academy. DR. THOMAS AVAKEFIELD GOODSPEED, Registrar. Professor EDMUND IANES JAMES, Director of the University Extension Division. NED ARDEN FLOOD, Director of the University Press. Assistant Professor FRANK JUSTUS INIILLER, Examiner of Atiiliations. Head Professor GALUSHA ANDERSON, Representing the Collegiate Alumni. Professor SHAILER MATHEXAVS, Representing the Divinity Alllllllll. Associate Professor ROBERT FRANCIS HARPER, Representing the Graduate Alumni. DR. HERBERT LOCRWOOD AVILLETT, Dean of the Disciples' Divinity House. 34 President HERBERT LEE STETSON, Des Moines College. President ARTHUR GAYLORD SLOCUM, Kalamazoo College. President JOHN F. FOR1sEs, John B. Stetson University. Senior Dean HENRY' MUNSON LYMAN, Rush Medical College. Junior Dean JOHN MILTON DODSON, Rush Medical College. Principal XVILLIAM PARKER NICKEE, The Francis Shimer Academy. Principal EDXVARD OCTAVIUS SISSON, Bradley Polytechnic Institute. Principal VVILLIATAI BISHOP OWEN, The South Side Academy. Principal JOHN J. SCHOBINGER, The Harvard School, Principal HIRAM ABIEF GOOQH, Princeton-Yale School. Principal JOHN COWLES. GRANT, Kenwood Institute. Principal HOIIER JEROME YOSBURGH, XVayland Academy. Principal LAURA A. JONES, The Maynard School. Principal VVILLIAM Rroos TROWBRIDGE, The Rugby School. Director HENRY H. BELFIELD, The Chicago Manual Training School. Superintendent A. F. FLEET, Culver Military Academy. The University Council consists of flj the Presidentg Q25 the University Chaplaing 135 certain University Otiicers, viz.: Examiner. Recorder, Registrarg ill the Deans of all Schools, Colleges, and Academiesg f5J the Director of the University Extension Division: 161 the Director of the University Pressg C73 the Director of the University Libraries, Laboratories, and Museums, Q85 the Director and Examiner of Afliliationsg Q93 Members of the Faculties elected by the Congregation. The Council holds stated meetings, monthly, to consider matters relating to the general administration of the University. 35 Otber Ufficers and Hssistants WILLIALI RUFUS ARMSTRONG, Bookkeeper, University Press Division. ISABELLA BLACKBURN, Clerk, University Press Division. ANTOINETTE CARY, Assistant to Dean of Women. DIARY E. CLARK, Stenographer, University Press Division. M. RENA COBB, Stenographer, President'S Otiice. CHARLOTTE F. COE, Assistant, Library. HARRIET CROSSMAN, Stenographer, oflices Comptroller and Secretary. ROBERT B. DAVIDSON, Assistant, Examiners Oiiice. CHARLES V. DREW, Bookkeeper, Comptroller'S Office. LOUISE DICKINSON, Assistant, Library. FERDINAND ELLERMAN, Assistant, Astronomical Observatory. HENRIETTA ENGENSPERGER, Stenographer, University Press Division. HARRX' J. FOX, Storekeeper. CHARLES A. FRANCIS, Meclianician, Physical Laboratory. INIARILLA FREEMAN, Assistant, Library. ALMA F. GAMBLE, Stenograplier, EXa1niner's Office. MARGARET HARDINGE, Assistant, Library. CHARLES H. HASTINGS, Assistant, Library. IQENKICHI HAYASHEI, Artist, Zoological Laboratory. HARRY D. HUBBARD, Clerk, Dean of the Faculties of Arts, Literature and Science SABIUEL JOB, Registrar, Morgan Park Academy. . JULIUS A. -IOI-IANNESEN, Mechanician, Physical Laboratory. ANNA KAYLER, Clerk, University Press Division. JAMES CARTWRIGHT LOGAN, Clerk, Con1ptroller's Ofnce. ESTELLE LUTTRELL, Assistant, Library. ROLLIN E. lN1ALLORY, Clerk, Registrars Office. MERTON L. MILLER, Assistant, Nvalker Museum. SARAH E. MILLS, Assistant, Morgan Park Academy Library. JOHN W. MITCHELL, Proof Reader, Printing Department. RICHARD G. MYERS, Assistant Engineer. GEORGE M. NAYLOR, Accountant, Comptroller's Office. ALBERT O. PARKER, Chief Engineer and Superintendent. N. J. PETERSON, Steward, Morgan Park Academy. OTTO R. RYERSON, Clerk, University Press Division. BENJAMIN 1. SIMPSON, Purchasing Agent. DONNA SMITH, Clerk, University Press Division. EMILIA A. TIBBETTS, Stenographer, University Extension Oflice. BERTHA STIEG, Assistant, Women'S Gymnasium. ARTHUR STOCKS, Advertising Solicitor, University Press Division. BIARTHA VAN HOOK, Stenographer, Recorders Office. J. XVILLIAM WALKER, Foreman, Printing Department. ESTELLE YVETMORE, Stenographer, University Extension Otiice. ELOISE C. XVOODFORD, Stenograplier, Morgan Park Academy. ELIZABETH YEOMANS, Manager, Woznen's Commons. ' 36 COIIDOCZIUOIIS the Cwemv-third Zolwocation Held in the Graduate Quadrangle, July 1, 1898. Convocation Chaplain, - - - REV. ALONZO K, PARKER, D.D. CONVOCATION ADDRESS: Hon. William L. Wilson, Lexington, Virginia, President of VVashington and Lee Vniversity. the Cwentv-Fourth Zonvocation Held in Kent Theatre, August 2, 1898. CONVOCATION ADDRESS: " The University of Paris," Professor Gaston Bonet- Maury, D.D., the University of Paris, Degree of Doctor of Philosophy conferred on Elizabeth Jeffreys QCheniistry l. Thesis: On Urethanes. Ernest Carroll Moore QPhilosophyl, Thesis: The Relation of Education to Philos- ophy i1I Greek and Early Christianity. m Che twenty-'Fifth Convocation Held in Studebaker Music Hall, October 1, 1898. Convocation Chaplain, - REV. HENRX' .L. MOREHOUSE, D.D., New York. CONVOCATION ADDRESS: "Some Essential Elements of the True Academic Spirit," The Reverend Charles Cuthbert Hall, D. D., President of Union Theological Seminary, New York. 37 E A Z viagfw- ' . f - 9X V. , f I ' X ' fe' 9 . '-. S3 xii ' ing: ' - ya - , if W- as Q 9 fp A U 1, 4 ' M32 i9 o WTxX Q W X i , 7 7 Q-1575! KX 1 " fx' X , QNX 0545, E ' x f X X ,N f N b' ,S 4 E ,Q x l w X! X X ' Qi, ' X J SG 1 A 5 Q Q f 3011.2 ii ff M N ' . W . x X X jf' ' X"T J ff! KKK' if W ,f f HX A LW! f' ff ff xx' M, - R f f J W f 7 gf ... .x.nI the twenty-Sixth Zonvocation, mid-Hutumn Held in Kent Theatre, October 17, 1898. I. THE CONVOCATION PROCESSION. II. THE PRAYER: The University Chaplain, The Reverend Charles Richmond Henderson, D.D. III. THE ADDRESS: On behalf of the Trustees, "The Firm Foundation of National Peace." The Reverend Alonzo Ketcham Parker, D.D. IV. SONG: "An1erica." V. THE ADDRESS: Ou behalf of the Congregation, Head Professor Albion Wood- bury Small, PH D., Vice-President of the Congregation. VI. THE CONFERRING OF THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LAws UPON WILLIAM MCKINLEY: In recognition of the wisdom and skill shown in conducting public affairs in a great international crisis. VII. THE BENEDICTION: The University Chaplain. VIII. THE RECESSION. the CWQIIW-SQWIIIIT ZOIIUGCZUOII Held in Studebaker Music Hall, January 4, 1899. CONVOCATION ADDRESS: "American Imperialism." The Honorable Carl Schurz, New York. 'Che twenty-Eighth Zolwocation Held in Studebaker Music Hall, April 1, 1899. CONVOCATION ADDRESS AND SERMON CApri1 25: Reverend Henry Van Dyke, D.D. BACCALAUREATE ADDRESS CMarch 195: 'Dean Hulbert. 39 Che Quadrangle Club GEORGE EDGAR VINCENT, President SHALER IVIATTHEXVS, - Treasurer FRANK FROST ABBOTT, - - Vice-President ALEXANDER SMITH, - - - - - Secretary Council CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON FRANCIS W. SHERARDSON XVILLIAM BISHOP OXVEN Y The opening of tl1e Club House, as re-built and re-modeled since its burning in December, 1897, occurred on June 20th, 1898, On that occasion Mr. Leopold Godovvsky gavea Complimentary Recital, which did much to launch the club upon the career of success it has so uniformly pursue l since that time, and to show that it fills a most necessary part i11 the life of the University. At present its future seems certain. Now and then protests are heard at the attempted total exclusion of the under-graduate body from its precincts, yet it is said that from the point of view of its members this constitutes its greatest success. By so much more then ought those of us who have been favored, on rare occasions, with admittance to concerts and dances to feel grati- tude to our graduate friends, and to resolve to " know them better " in the future. During the Autumn Quarter the following persons spoke before the members of the club: Professor Karl Budde, of the University of Strassburg, on " The Political Situation in Alsace-Lorraine. ' ' ,, Mr. I K Boyesen, on "Norwegian Realism." , K ,,:: ,,'. up Mr. George Horton, formerly American Consul at Athens, on the "Village Customs of Modern Greece." - Mr. J. P. Iddiugs. on " The Yellowstone National Park." Mr. S. VV. Stratton, ex-Lieutenant, TX. S. N.. on " Experience of a Volunteer A is ,",ll, in the Navytl, At the same time the privileges of the Club were extended to ladies on each Monday after four o'clock, and many informal dances and receptions were held on these evenings. On Monday, December 19th, the club entertained the University Glee, Mandolin and Banjo Clubs. The third Chamber Concert of the season by the Spiering Quartet was held on january 6th, Vlfednesday, january 18th was set apart as a Special Ladies' Day. On January 20th, a reception to Mr. and Mrs. Martin A. Ryerson was held, following a paper on "Sicily," read by Mr. Ryerson. The third Club Dinner for members was held on january 27th. The Club Calendar for February included: February 3d: An address by Mr. John Graham Brooks. February 9th: The Fourth Chamber Concert, followed by dancing at 9:30. February 15th: Ladies' Day. February 2lst: The W'ashington's Birthday Club Dinner, followed by ashop Talk. February 27th: Ladies' Night. Mr. G. H. Mead gave a talk, illustrated by Lantern views, on Hawaii. 40 '... 'L I K 'Q 11 X . 1' 1 L ,1 ' x' , 1 f ' X' lm F K" r ' : 0110 1 ft"""2,11, -- 1 ' 1 1 " 1,1 : 11 L i' 1 I , 1 1 1 1 A,.,1 I 'J I 1 00 J V-Im' I.. s R1 1 1 41 K?-,.. ,h.,,, lf,.1. .95 ' 1 1 1 A -1 -I1 . , 14. 1 '.' V A ., . , x nw- 1 .1 1 ,J . 'r 1 IQ x.,.:l':". Y 1' M ,. .V ' LU . A 'f' f 1 ' ' '-'v ' ,L in rf 11 ' '51.,r"-. J' 4 . 1 ., 1,1'X'w1.-I m . .frgff '-5 x :pg w .14 Q 151' , ,-,-... ' 41 V, 'k'YY'Hg':v ,ll 1' .'1 .. ,IW '55 . I "". 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'1 ,'f,..i--M-Q. ., 1 I ,W 11,1 . 1, -,1Vs,,-511: -,'1t-.'- X' .s,.p31.,' ,V , 144-,,b,, .rw-1-.,: I 1 .,.5,, xl 'll v 14 !F'l.,1 Lewssal Che marshals X Bead mdfShdl XVILLOUGHBY GEORGE XVALLING Jlssistant marshals YVILLIAM FRANCE ANDERSON CHARLES VERNOR DREW WALTER JOSEPH SCHINIAHL RALPH C. HAMILL CHARLES LINDSAY BURROUGHS 'Former Head marshals JOSEPH EDXVARD RAYCROFT, 1895 WILLIAM SCOTT BOND, 1896 -li! NOTT WILLIABI FLINT, 1898 S6mi:OfIiCidI Clubs THE PHILOSOPHICAL CLUB, MR. ASHLEY, President THE PEDAGOGICAL CLUB, MR. GLASCOCK, Chairman of Executive Committee THE POLITICAL ECONOMY CLUB, I INIR. TREVOR ARNETT, President THE POLITICAL SCIENCE AND HISTORY CLUB, THE HISTORY CLUB, MR. EDWIN C. XVOOLLEY, President MR. GEORGE M. SELLERY, President THE SOCIOLOGICAL CLVB. PROF. GEORGE Ii. VINCENT, President THE SEMITIC CLUB, DR. BREASTED, President THE THE ROMANCE CLUB, NEVV TESTAMENT CLUB, DR. YOTAXV, President THE PHILOLOGICAL CLUB, PROF. CUTTING, President MR. HOWLAND, Head THE GERMANIC CLUB, DR. ALLEN, President THE ENGLISH CLUB, TH E PHYSICS CLUB, MISS MYRA REYNOLDS, President THE MATHEMATICAL CLUB, PROF. INIOORE, President MR. M ILLIGAN, President THE GEOLOGICAL CLUB, PROF. CHAMBERLAIN, President THE ZOOLOGICAL CLUB. PROF. WHITMAN, President THE BOTANICAL CLUB, PROF. COULTER, President 44 Che Chicago illumni Club XVILLIAM SCOTT BOND, - - President RALPH WALDO YVEBSTER, First Vice-President MARCUS PETER FRUTCHEY, - Second Vice-President WILLIAM OTIS WILSON, - Recording Secretary STAcv CARROLL MOSSER, - Corresponding Secretary C. R. BARRETT, - - - - Treasurer F. F. STEIGBIEYER, Historian Zommittees J-Irrangements BIARCUS PETER FRUTCHEY, Chairman R. C. DUDLEY IIARRY XVILEY. membership RALI-H XVEBSTER, Chairman ld,-XRRY MZAGEE ADKINSON F. F. STFIIGBIEYER In january, 1898, the present Historian of the Club sent out circulars to Alumni, asking their opinion regarding the formation of a Club for the advancement of all the best interests of the University of Chicago. All answered Q but many, regarding the Alumni Association as all-sutiicient, were adverse to the proposition. However, a second circular announced a meeting of all City Alumni, at Cobb Hall, O11 the evening of February l4th. It was a stormy night, and only fourteen " loyals " were present-but they were " 93-ers," cvery one, and proceeded to temporary organization by appointing a committee to draft a constitution to be submitted two weeks later. The second meeting at Cobb was equally small in numbers, but more enthusiastic. Upon discussion it was decided to make a iinal eifort to arouse the enthusiasm of all, and the adoption of the constitution was postponed two weeks. In the parlors of the Great Northern, the third meeting took place. Everybody was there, and everybody had a scheme for the good of the proposed Club. The Constitution was unanimously adopted 5 initiation fees Were paid by all, and the vari- ious officers elected and committees appointed. Ever since that eventful meeting, the Chicago Alumni Club has been a great success. t' They banquet, entertain, toast, and sing the old songs until another day." The membership of the Club now exceeds one hundred and fifty. In one year of existence its success has become a recognized fact among Western Alumnig its failure, an impossibility. The University athletics and University clubs have already been made to feel its powerful influence. There is no organization, directly or indirectly connected with the University, that is as essential to the welfare of the Alma Mater as " The Chicago Alumni Club." 45 Che llniversitp or Chicago Settlement Q Directors JAMES R. ANGELL. President ROBERT M. LOVETT, - - Secretary FRANK B. TARBELL. - Treasurer W. R. HARPER C. L. HUTQHINSON MISS INTYRA REYNOLDS 1. M. COULTER E. H. TXIOORE MRS. CHARLES ZEUBLIN C. R. HENDERSON A. C. HIILLER MRS. MONTGOMERY MISS M. Ii. DICDOXVELL MISS JOSEPHINE BLINN The University of Chicago Settlement was incorporated January 28, 1898. The membership is composed of regular contributors and their representatives, and affairs are under the control of the board of directors. The board Of directors acts as the Philanthropic Committee Of the Christian Union, and thus retains a connection with the University. Incorporation was necessary in order to acquire title to real estate. The Settlement now Owns a lot of lOO feet in Gross Avenue, near Ashland Avenue, and hopes to erect a building in the near future. XVOrk at the University Settlement is under the innnediate supervision of Miss McDowell, the Head Resident. The societies regularly contributing to the support of the Settlement are, THE UNIVERSITY SETTLEMENT LEAGUE THE LOOKOUT CLUB THE SERVICE CLUB E N .. HQ ' :fm , 'wiv f f -E 1 ti it ', sq gs QQ A , if cj Si ' . vw.. J ,V 5- X e ri- mi. S-. .:.s4,.,.qi,:,-L, .Y ., -Y iiii QC, 5 ml m: ryan,-4. yi ES I '--Y. tl 111, X'-sup H9 . L it tg' Q ' XM la? -1 'f 'ri :i Q5 ' exit T. i ge x 1- L V i l 415 lSllivcl'SilD PllbliCdIi0lIS:::0ffiCiEll UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO JOURNALS Che Biblical world Published monthly. Che School Review Published monthly Qexcept July and Augustl. Che Ilmerican journal of Sociology Published Bi monthly. Che journal of Political Economy Published quarterly. Che j0lll'lldl of GQOIOQV Published semi-quarterly. Che Hstrovhvslcal journal Published monthly Qexeept july and August J. Che Botanical Gazette Published monthly. cm HIIIQNCGI1 j0llI'lldl of SQlI1lllC KGIIQIIGQQS dlld Elf0l'dflll'Q Published quarterly. Che Jlmerican journal of Cheologv Published quarterly. 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M, mn- f I V Mn, my M: ' "Ml 4 Q , ,mu o t u ' u lelrtmmt. l', ,xwvzl 4 I ,hw SCCYQI Societies ill U76 l5lliD2l'SiID or Chicago Fraternities DELTA KAPPA EPSILON PHI DELTA THETA PHI KAPPA PSI PSI UPSILON BETA THETA PI DELTA TAL' DELTA ALPHA DELTA PHI CHI PSI SIGMA CHI PHI BETA KAPPA DNR' Societies THE MORTAR BOARD THE ESOTERIC CLUB THE QUADRANGLERS THE SIGMA CLUB lionor Societies THE OXVL AND SERPENT THE ORDER OF THE IRON MASK THE SPHINX THE THREE QUARTERS CLUB NU PI SIGMA 51 DQIIH KEIDDEI EDSll0l1 Roll of ZDRDIQYS Phi Yale University Theta IZ-owcloin Xi Colby Sigma Amherst Gamma Vanflerbilt Psi University of Alabama Chi University of Mississippi Upsilon Brown University Kappa Miami University Lambda Kenyon College Beta North Carolina Eta University of Virginia Pi Dartmouth College Iota Central University of Kentucky Alpha Alpha Middlebury College Oniicron University of Michigan Epsilon XVilliams College Rho Lafayette College Tau Hamilton College Mu Colgate University Nu College of the City of New York Beta Phi University of Rochester Phi Chi Rutgers Psi Phi De Pauw Gamma Phi Psi Omega Beta Chi Delta Chi Delta Delta Phi Gamma Gamma Beta Theta Zeta Alpha Chi Phi Epsilon Sigma Tau XVesleyan University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Adelbert College Cornell University University of Chicago Syracuse University Columbia College University of California Trinity College University of Minnesota Massachusetts Institute of Technology 52 N x fl. P16 'V gf, ' 'bm 1 E me ix 4 f' gm 'Q v . . 1 , - 45 . fiuvirfg mx ,. .+.Qay "'Eu:. Q5 ,J X 'Nz is 'Y ' 4 fm - " J " W?:f:g w f4gf rIVlTM , bA W l" M V n. ,.--rl'-l.,,.Q. '3 ,J ' .' '.-" rrnjl gf rr.. 1 , .- .ka .v .4 f.,kfKN.,A ." "' .WJ V1.3 - gl f- .'.' , ,,-:.,.' . ' F- - 'J 3.4.15 -J A." A '41 r '-s s. Y- Jr U Lx P 'f u 1 in., lv I 1,'C'.' N.. ll. K 1' A9-'jk f- I 3 1 . 4 ,n':'l vu' J I9 I 1 ' .., 1 " A . 1A'f'.", I f 1- , " .- N 1 -M.,w4u'. rip .r ,gg .7 W1 ,JV Sv 14 ' Ju! 1 .f 1'0 I A L s 1 ,Q J s, x V. If 2 1 ' -.- ln' 1 1 u r 1 gc. m M, iff' '-If, . pf -'-'1""'.' :.. -' I , It .4 "' ,Jjif .-- 4 .1 4.4: sump-yjzffy .. , I HRV: L' ' ' :J ,lx J! . Un . 1 an 4. I xN , .44 nh f1 I - ," ,J . :I -av' li.- 'rl 1" 444' K, 'figlevu v 1' .v'Ujf?'L'.'v11 '- ,W ,, -Y' '?,-ffm' 4. Fl . T-ff..-. ,I -. +L.'f ' y .1 " w pn .x N L-r x" 1 fl F 15 w 1 ,,.' Y' 7 'ff' 'V -' ,":1Z, I ' :sv ,r- Ji' 1. , H' Amr, .aff V W , .,, yy, ,fr M '-6 jf N EN?- 543' Liiivf ,- '4 4 M.. 4 Hr., .-.- 4,- I-Rg ',f, ',.,,gh,,h,4 , .Qwl ' -gl lr., A YW, J.-N W.. Q 'I aL,.,'gff' f.' " ..1" Y-4-4 1. 5 's '- :H ' . ,yy f ' R? 1V-'- ffxl' "yn ".-1351 ':,.1.?,."' ?l?',,Qgvf' w.g ':"14fe'9',gx :,q,, ..?'iq-gain 'wg 4 W,-1 1. ,QW ,,4'.- mg. .' W, I, mg 5'-',.f.,"ni w H' 1.-, r',.1-N 4. .brijfs -f'..LR- -g -M503-A LI E Ja- I. V-Lv, 'm :Av .aim- .,n f,--' .4 . - ful- V' I ..,-., I., - 1 , v fuwlh :1,.,:6 V- , "'. . '1. ' ff'V 'far' -'V ' 'fungi , V -.Vi .I-1 I ".y,,.,,..,,1 ,V 'aff-' ,.. '- f.-'w-Sli: :Vx 1, .tile '.7?1wf ., uf. N I1v V4 1 . ,- -gy... 1 lvl ' ' r. .. nw Delia KZIIJDG EDSHOII THE DELTA DELTA CHAPTER Fratres in llniversitate Gfddlldle Zolleges Ralph Waldo Webster Henry Gordon Gale Samuel Sweeney MacClintock William English Walling Gilbert Ames Bliss Herbert W. Burchard Adna Wood Risley Christopher H. Coleman Marvin Gaylord John NVellington Finch Roy Avery Richardson ulld0I'gI'ddll3I0 Zolleges Willoughby George Walling William France Anderson Thomas Carlyle Clendenning Percy Bernard Eckhart XVi11iam Burgess Cornell Clinton Luman Hoy Ralph C. Hamill Ralph Curtiss Manning Harold Eugene Wilkins Curtiss Rockwell Manning Walter Lawrence Hudson Hugh Lafayette McWilliams Donald Saxton McWilliams Daniel Trude Philip Tompkins Smith Lewis Patton Hornberger Mortimer Brainard Parker Edward Christian Kohlsaat Vernon Tiras Ferris Charles Lewis Woodruff, Charles Eri Hulbert Charles Sumner Hayes Perley L. Freeman Maurice Mandeville 55 Phi Kappa Psi Pa. Alpha Pa. Beta Pa. Gamma Pa. Epsilon Pa. Zeta Pa. Eta Pa. Theta Pa. Iota Pa. Kappa N. H. Alpha Mass. Alpha N. Y. Alpha N. V. Beta N. Y. Gamma N, Y. Epsilon N. Y. Zeta Md. Alpha Va. Alpha Ya. Beta Ya. Gamma W. Va. Alpha Miss. Alpha D. C. Alpha Ohio Alpha Ohio Beta Ohio Delta Ind. Alpha Ind, Beta Ind. Gamma Ill. Alpha Ill. Beta Mich. Alpha Wis. Alpha XVis. Gamlna Minn. Beta Iowa Alpha Kan. Alpha Heb. Alpha Cal. Beta YOUNDED IN 1852 Roll of Zhavters Dist1'1'c't I Washington-Ietlerson College Allegheny College Bucknell University Gettysburg College Dickinson College Franklin and Marshall College Lafayette College University of Pennsylvania Swarthmore College District II Dartmouth College Amherst College Cornell University Syracuse University Columbia University Colgate University Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute District III johns Hopkins University University of Virginia XVashington and Lee University Hampden-Sidney College University of XVest Virginia University of Mississippi Columbian University Distrivt IV Ohio VVesleyan University Wittenberg College University of Ohio De Pauw University University of Indiana XVabash College Northwestern University University of Chicago University of Michigan Dirfrict V University of XVisconsin Beloit College University of Minnesota University of Iowa Vniversity of Kansas University of Nebraska Leland Stanford, jr., University 56 A . 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K H r 5 H u :vm IK: J' ' I ' .uf lv I'- ,MJH :"f.'1 4 5 4' , ,'f err fx. f, . ty, -,EM-, ,v - . 1' af. ff X-1 1' ',v1j1,'.Q g aww- 1M1 Phi KBDDG Psi THE ILLINOIS BETA CHAPTER Fratres in lluiversitate Gfddlldik Zolleges Percy Bently Burnet Robert Bailey Davidson Edwin Campbell Wooley Aladine Cummings Longden Frederick Albert Cleveland Ora Philander Seward Frank Lincoln Stevens Ul1d0l'gl'ddll8f2 ZGIIQQQS Frederick Bradley Thomas john james XValsh Thomas Temple Hoyne Walter james Cavanagh Parke Ross Fred Sass james McClintock Snitzler XValter Stokes Sharpe Dan Brouse Southard Dean Swift Francis Baldwin Chester David Barnes Milton Howard Pettit Howard Sloan Young Albert Bertram Garcelon Clarence Whittaker Richards Charles Pelton Jacobs 59 Beta Cbeta Pi Roll of Zhapters Miami University Ohio University VVestern Reserve University Washington and Jefferson College Harvard University De Pauw University Indiana University University of Michigan VVabasl1 College Centre College Brown University Hampden-Sidney College University of North Carolina Ohio YVesleyan University Hanover College Cumberland University Knox College University of Virginia Davidson College Beloit College Bethany College University of Iowa XVittenberg College XVestminster College Iowa Wesleyan University Denison University Richmond College University of XVooster University of Kansas University of XVisconsin Northwestern University Dickinson University Boston College Johns Hopkins University University of California Kenyon College Rutgers College Cornell University Stevens Institute St. Lawrence University Maine State College Colgate University Union College Columbia College Amherst College Vanderbilt University University of Texas Ohio State University University of Nebraska Pennsylvania State College University of Denver University of Syracuse Dartmouth College University of Minnesota University of Cincinnati XVesleyan Fniversity University of Missouri Lehigh University Yale University University of Chicago Leland Stanford, Ir., University ' lf A ga 63 bf M039 Q95 4 1 '- ff W ev ESL" 3 Q vip ' Q SQ o g .Z ' :gwf .1 .1 .,,,,- aa x hw: 1 ' I r.. 1 n , ., "1-11"111 5 r 5 -.1 b . 1 I 1, 'ir 1 . 1 A ,1.,. 11 W W W, '. 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QVQW ll Beta Cbeta Pi THE LAMBDA RHO CHAPTER ISTAELISMID JLNUARV 25.1894 Fratres in Llniversitate Graduate Zolleses Horace Lozier John Gaylord Coulter Ulidtfgfddudle Zolleges Michael Billman XVells Charles Branden Davis Allen Grey Hoyt YVilliam Franklin Eldridge George Gilbert Davis Roy Coleman Griswold Kellogg Speed Alvin Lestor Barton Morton Harris Yan Sumner Pearce Eugene Harvey Balderston Watson Lawrence Merton Jacobs Glenn Plumb Hall Roy Bartling Tabor Leroy Tudor Vernon Albert Simpson Russell 63 George Perry MacDonald Eliot Blackwelder Herbert Mulford Fllphd Della Phi Roll of Zhapters Hamilton Hamilton College Columbia Columbia College Brunonian Brown University Yale Yale University Amherst Amherst College Hudson Adelbert College Bowdoin Bowdoin College Dartmouth Dartmouth College Peninsular University of Michigan Rochester University of Rochester Williams Williams College Manhattan College of the City of New Middletown Wesleyan College Kenyon Kenyon College Union Union College Cornell Cornell University Phi Kappa Trinity College johns Hopkins johns Hopkins University Minnesota University of Minnesota Toronto University of Toronto Chicago University of Chicago McGill Montreal, Canada 64 York P 3 N , gQ'Qz,:Q1. l 4, ' 4 f 1 , . 9, , if Y t " ' if n F 01 13 4 , ' 1 ' 'Q H s i . 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V I Hlpbd Della Pbi THE CHICAGO CHAPTER ISTABLISHED UAICM 20, IBB5 Fratres in llniversltate .GYBCIIIMQ ZOIIQQQS Henry Magee Adkinson James Weber Linn Nott William Flint Clarence Bert Herschberger Fred Merrifield Ulld2l'gI'ddlld!2 ZOIIQQQS Charles Lindsay Burroughs Maurice Gordon Clarke Charles Verner Drew Roger Throop Vaughn Walter Scott Kennedy f Harvey Malcolm 3IacQuiston Paul Donald MacQuiston Howard Pendleton Kirtley Granville Hudson Sherwood 'Warren C. Gorrell Elliott Salstonstall Norton Samuel Northrup Harper William Arthur Maloney Turner Burton Smith Charles Scribner Eaton Bert james Cassels Harry Preston French Jerome Pratt Magee 67 Sigma Chi rOuNu En UN 1555 Roll of ZHBDIQYS Columbian University Pennsylvania College Bucknell University University of Pennsylvania Lehigh University Pennsylvania State College Dickinson College XVil5l1l!lgtOH and Lee University Roanoke College University of Virginia Randolph-Macon College Hampden-Sidney College University of North Carolina Miami University Ohio-Wesleyan University Denison University Kentucky State College University of Cincinnati West Virginia University Ohio State University Centre College Indiana University De Pauw University Butler University Hanover College Purdue University Northwestern University University of Michigan University of Illinois University of Chicago Beloit College Illinois Wesleyan University University of Wisconsin Albion College University of Minnesota University of Nebraska University of Kansas University of Missouri University of Mississippi Tulane University Vanderbilt University University of Texas University of California University of Southern California Leland Stanford, jr., University Hobart College Dartmouth College Massachusetts Institute of Technology Columbia College Cornell University rr-'W W 1 ' x'X X .UV A --F 5 1 Q : SA Xgjfine-23 f ff-urnorefijiff N-is.f'l5LXGIQ'l'7 'gf,f1,-ww' 'fy .ga - Ia ,- - -ln. 4 Iv -I . .It'4 ki II II' "TQ Vi1.Ql'i:I..:I rl- "4 f ul. 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'Q' " '-f N, . - 1.,' 3-.4-.. :I ,.- I, '.,.I I.,+'II',I' ' ' 'Q' -:. If -5- v " ' . II I , IIIII. II . , II.III,II,I,,,., ., .I II I .f A wx! 5. 1-0 3 r P I X! .,q.' . " , glv.. 1' N. " ' ..f '-. I 1. - f ,... . , , . .. -V . Sigma Chi THE OMICRON OMICRON CHAPTER ESTABLISHED JANUARV 23. 1597 'Fratrcs in llnlversitate Charles Foster Roby Undergraduate Zolleges Herbert Alonzo Abernethy John Patrick Moran Guy Reed Bell Ray Prescott johnson Clarence Alvin McCarthy Warren Mclntire NVi1liam Thomas Kirk Willett Lindley Allen Mark A. Cleveland Earl Dean Howard Henry Berry Stark 71 Phi Della CDQIB Roll of Zbapters Miami University Indiana University Center College Wabash College University of NVisconsin Northwestern University University of Indianapolis Ohio Wesleyan University Franklin College Hanover College University of Michigan University of Chicago De Pauw University Ohio State University University of Missouri Knox College University of Georgia Emory College Iowa lVesleyan University Mercer University Cornell University Lafayette College University of California University of Virginia Randolph-Macon College University of Nebraska Gettysburg College XV3.Sh1I1gtO11 and Jefferson College Vanderbilt University University of Mississippi University of Alabama Case School of Applied Science Lombard University Alabama Polytechnic Institute Allegheny College University of Vermont Dickinson College Westminster College University of Minnesota Iowa State University University of Kansas University of the South University of Ohio University of Texas University of Pennsylvania Union College Colby University Columbia University Darmouth College University of North Carolina Central University Williams College Southwestern University Syracuse University Washington and Lee University Lehigh University Amherst College Brown University Tulane University of Louisiana Washington College Stanford University University of Illinois Purdue University University of Cincinnati : -7 7'- x We 5 V - 1 gas 532, , QlRQw?ggf?feQF2 lE2i3 wNFwg gig? i?ii 3254 N X'gEE? 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IJ' u '1 1g ':'T1:f,, fm """vG-2 ' HQ? PM-r gym. ,tA,N, ti-v . -wh'-"lu ' 1 V X ' Q r w 1 w' . M., -, 5' -a nn, ., r ug, X ,vw r ' 'pf' w .. 2, X ,. . 1 ws f, 'V' ., 'f Phi D2 lla Cbeta THE ILLINOIS BETA CHAPTER 'Eratres in Universitate Gradua Samuel Mounds Coulter Clarence Macon Gallup It ZOIIQQQS Ralph Harper McKee . Stacy Carroll Mosser john William Bailey Underara Charles Warren Chase Clarence Frisbee Ross Fred Harvey Calhoun eluate Zolleges Harvey Trunkey Woodruff Earl Crayton Hales David Aubrey Morris William Everton Ramsey james Milton Sheldon George Alembert Brayton Guy Carson Kinnaman Lafayette Wallace Case Austin Young Hoy Eric Martine Lubeck Frank Walbridge DeWolf 75 Theta Delta Beta Sigma Gamma Zeta Lambda Kappa Psi Xi Upsilon Iota Phi Pi Chi Beta Beta Eta Tau Mu Rho Omega Psi ISDSHOII Roll of Zhavters Union College University of the Yale University Brown University Amherst College Dartmouth College Columbia College Bowdoin College Hamilton College Wesleyan University University of Rochester Kenyon College University of Michigan Syracuse University Cornell University Trinity College Lehigh University University of Pennsylvania University of Minnesota University of Wisconsin University of Chicago T6 City of N ew York 7 . . 69 'U v - fi'. , ,A Sgi XW5? V-fv . Y , Ska ki? fi gk? 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"I-NI" V HL . . 41 A . 4 Q V rg, Vw 'VV IVV V :,VV V V x 4 VVV f Psi l5DSil0ll THE OMEGA CHAPTER 'Fratres in llniversitate Undergraduate Zolleges Arthur Sears Henning Byron Bayard Smith XVilliarn Derrick Richardson Paul Eldredge XVilson Emory Cobb Andrews YVa1ter Joseph Schmahl Spencer Mac Dougall Brown Charles Dufheld XVrenn Halsey Edwin Lee Poulson XValter Irving Martin Herbert Paul Zimmerman Wilson Shannon Chapman, Jr. james Ronald Henry Benjamin Franklin Buck George Snow Gaylord 79 DQIIG Call Della Beta Gamma Omicron Beta Eta Beta Kappa Beta Pi Beta Rho Beta Tau Beta Upsilon Gamma Alpha Beta Omega Lambda Pi Phi Beta Delta Beta Epsilon Beta Theta Beta Xi Beta Delta Epsilon Zeta Kappa Mu Chi Beta Alpha Beta Beta Beta Zeta Beta Phi Beta Psi Alpha Gamma Rho Upsilon Omega lleta Lambda Beta Mu Beta Nu Beta Omicron Beta Chi Beta Iota FOUNDED IN 1559 Roll of Zhavters University of Wisconsin University of Iowa .University of Minnesota University of Colorado Northwestern University Leland Stanford, jr., University University of Nebraska University of Illinois University of Chicago University of California Vanderbilt University University of Mississippi Washingtoii and Lee University University of Georgia Emory College University of the South Tulane University Ohio University University of Michigan Albion College Adelbert College Hillsdale College Ohio VVes1eyan University Kenyon College Indiana University De Pauw University Butler College Ohio State University Wabash College Allegheny College Washington and Jefferson University Stevens Institute of Technology Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute University of Pennsylvania Lehigh University Tufts College Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cornell University Brown University University of Virginia 80 xi ' , o5f,QffI1':I' 'SKY ',-. 3 52292. 7 gx ...nalllllllll 'lbs-' ,fff X , ,Q ,D W, x,Q,v,,fT-.. lf -JT , ixwli 4 Q -I-XP I f .. ,af --I L'-4: -7 Z 5?A.,..H IZ., A I '12 'J '. -. ... ,W i,"-'fu Q .' 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Palmquist Thomas Venard Graves Vernon Servilian Phillips Robert Samuel McClure William Schoonover Harman Edward Allen Sibley Frank Perkins Barker Benjamin Griffin Lee Frank Louis Slaker Albert Langworthy jones Joseph Chalmers Ewing 83 Clii Psi FOUNDED IN 194 Roll of Zhavters Alpha Pi Alpha Theta Alpha Mu Alpha Alpha Alpha Phi Alpha Epsilon Alpha Chi Alpha Psi Alpha Tau Alpha Nu Alpha Iota Alpha R110 Alpha Xi Alpha Delta Beta Delta Gamma Delta Delta Delta Union College Willianis College Middlebury College Wesleyan University Hamilton College University of Michigan Amherst College Cornell University Wofford College University of Minnesota University of NVisconsin Rutgers College Stevens Institute of Technology University of Georgia Lehigh University Stanford University University of Chicago 84 .1"'f'.4'-"" Q ' 7, 74? -2,1 i l -'ff--I L ' --'J ff if-' THQ,-. 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N N 'V '.i ' 1 '.",1:11 ' 1: 1. 1 1 111,. 4 , 1. 1 ,. . .1 1-1 up 11, 1 B Q J-fx, 1 1' -'He-5 15.9 ii' - " T . 11..1 .1" 1 1 1 , -R' 1 1 -F' C 1 -.1 ,1 1 1.11,1 'T1 1 1 .1 1 , -1'e.4u 11, ,v i . i I i I 2 fi.: Cbi Psi ALPHA EPSILON DELTA CHAPTER fI'dfl'QS lll ulllWl'Slfdl0 Gfddlldik Zolleses john Franklin Hagey Arthur Whipple Smith Marcus Peter Frutchey UlId2l'Ql'ddlldf2 ZQIIQQCS Michael Francis Gallagher Ainsworth Whitney Clark Newell Montague Fair Rowland Thumrn Rogers Clarke Scammon Reed Edwin George Allin Harry Williams Belfield Willis Henry Linsley 87 Franklin Ackerman Bogue Lees Ballinger Pill Bela Kappa Roll of Zhapters Alpha of Maine Alpha of New Hampshire Alpha of Vermont Beta of Vermont Alpha of Massachusetts Beta of Massachusetts Gamma of Massachusetts Alpha of Connecticut Beta of Connecticut Gamma of Connecticut Alpha of New York Beta of New York Gamma of New York Delta of New York Epsilon of New York Zeta of New York Eta of New York Theta of New York Iota of New York Kappa of New York Alpha of New jersey Alpha of Pennsylvania Gamma of Pennsylvania Delta of Pennsylvania Iota of Pennsylvania Beta of Ohio Alpha of Indiana Alpha of Kansas Alpha of Illinois Beta of Illinois Alpha of Minnesota, Bowdoin, Brunswick, Me. Dartmouth, Hanover, N. H. University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt Middlebury, Middlebury, Vt. Harvard, Cambridge, Mass. Amherst, Amherst, Mass. Williams, Williamstown, Mass. Yale, New Haven, Conn. Trinity, Hartford, Conn. Wesleyan, Middletown, Conn. Union, Schencectady, N. Y. University of the City of New York College of the City of New York Columbia, New York City Hamilton, Clinton, N. Y. Hobart, Geneva, N. Y. Colgate University, Hamilton, N. Y. Cornell, Ithaca, N. Y. Rochester University, Rochester, N. Y Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. Rutgers, New Brunswick, N. J. Dickinson, Carlisle, Penn. Lafayette, Easton, Penn. University, Philadelphia, Penn. Lehigh, South Bethlehem, Penn. Kenyon, Gambier, Ohio De Pauw, Green Castle, Ind. State University of Lawrence, Kan. Northwestern, Evanston, Ill. University of Chicago, Chicago. Ill. State University, Minneapolis, Minr. 88 Phi BQIG KGDDG THE BETA CHAPTER OF PHI BETA KAPPA IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. ORGANIZED APRIL William Rainey Harper 4. V599 m0mbQfS Harry Pratt Judson Benjamin S. Terry John Ulric Nef Albert Harri Eliakim Hastings Moore Thomas Chrowder Chamberlin s Tolman XVilliam Gardner Hale Albion XVo0dbury Small Paul Shorey 89 Che mortar Board Helen Bradford Thompson Deinia Butler Charlotte Rose Teller Mary Nickerson Lakin jesse Nea Spray Alice Austin Knight Edyth Merritt Kohlsaat Virginia Wynne Lacl-:ersteen Marcia Stuart Hargis Cora Roche Howland Caroline Parsons Ellsworth Mary Georgiana Sloan Mary Moody Smith Katharine Childs Marsh Carlotta Mabelle Willett 90 X '-'Zig 1'1" 'K' ...,,..-. I . ?Iyf'Ie"'. :C .7 .'1'v I:II If 1 . .3 ...,.- I 7, 'QI ...' . gI..,.I,c.1K-g'I , ...- . IVF: . . ull.. IH I ..5':7' - ' ' I..,,f.I.. r'II I Q 'Ka .w , S "BI:bk"f I' ,I .-III.IIIn ., . . II .IIN .W-.'.I. . .I. , ..f ,Ip .I, ylhiwf - f u I II,,i 5 .1. Il,II .. 2 I Pu I Q J' I jf. ,U 'B YM I N. 4' xv dvr' Isa If rl j1f.,IIg. 1-qi I, II .5 I ,. Q Au .gh I I' i' ..I.'- .I fi.,-I,-J' - no .II I-I. I IIII: I., I . . . . , .. -II U. 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Vincent mtmbil' ill fdfllliy Edith Burnham Foster .HCIWQ mQmbQfS Elinor Douglas Flood Helen Davida Harper Ruth Isabel Vanderlip Susan Grace Harding Grace Josephine Eberhart Mary Judson Averett Rebecca Madeleine Harding Carolyn Apperson Leech Irene Cook Mary Ethel Freeman Agnes Eleanor Chambers Rhoda Jeannette Capps 95 Che Qll3dl'3lISl2l'S ESTAEUSHEDJANUAHV Anne Howland Reed Josephine Turner Allin 1595 Sarah lVeber Addams Edith Daisy jenkins Marion Farwell Tool-:er Bdeta Bobo Leona Canterbury Sarah Ois Amory Eunice Dana Follansbe ' Bell Upton Halsted Nellie Julia Malone Alice Clymer Macfarlane Ester Margaret Linn 96 Bertha Vlfiggs wg. E . 1515 g. -fu, x ..,-:- Q, fm 2 - ,. . ,.-. Hits "T, .. . . -4.3 mc' 4 rw' ' g' iff 1- 'Q . uv Bili 1. ijt- If Pri , J, , F 1. ai?" .w - .qv ' 1- 4 , . 1 , 1 .,'1111g,, 1 1 '- 1 W1-1 11 1 ,.-,1..'1' 1, '1 1' " , .1. "1, 1111 ,, 19.1 ' 1 1 ,. ,, A .1 .1 Q H 1. . ' ' 1 '1 .",,.1r 21' 1 1.1 ,.,w' , ,' 11" 1 .' ,'1,1, 11 11 "1 --111 1 , 11. 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M-"-rrfP'P""'M -13" - , 'N x. i, . ..,,,.- . , If CD6 Sigma Clllb Marjorie Benton Cooke Grace Allen Coulter Elizabeth Earnist Buchanan Cornelia Osborne Katherine Paltzer Margaret Coulter Edith Mable Dunning Maude Franklin Sperry Edith Eoff Louise Hooper Shailer 101 CD6 UID' alla SQFDQIII SENIOR SOCIETY FOUNDED i996 William France Anderson Charles Lindsay Burroughs Ralph C. Hamill Maurice Gordo11 Clarke Charles Verner Drew Arthur Sears Henning Allen Grey Hoyt Willoughby George Walling 102 -.., 1 " V-PJ' 'A' ' 1 U , ,w If fi? Q ' ' K I-fs 5 ,QQ tif? .- ,. va' .. ,.1 uf N A fin: '. i 23' -,Q-' . 4. - - Qi:-: ..:,v.-3'3" 4 4 Aa ,N -. 4- , L,. fi-,L I i n i X XX 1: qi' r-,. ' Niiir .' , , mfg., X , ,A ff is we ','7TJqiE-3 lbw' - 42772 h is OV Thi ' f- l f, 455:15 ' i2L' ,g4mJlr!I'f I f W A '1l,,f."1'7. f'! ' M "U lp' l' Q R ' l I we I I ll. :N X ll g lil l l l W l K' X 1 R R l f 'lill L ll Xxl ' A ,N will ' f J M' U lx! . li JUNIOR SOCIETY .IHCUDC mQmb2fS Leroy Tudor Vernon Ralph Curtiss Manning XValter joseph Schmahl Charles Branden Davis Emory Cobb Andrews Ralph C. Hamill Rowland Thumm Rogers 105 Spencer MacDougall Brown Che SDD ilIX SOPHOMORE SOCIETY FOUNDED DECEMBER ls, lass Leroy Tudor Vernon James McClintock Snit zler George Gilbert Davis Parke Ross Francis Baldwin Kellogg Speed Ray Prescott Johnson Clarence Alvin McCarthy Clark Scammon Harry 1015 Reed XVi11iarns Belfield Charles Scribner Eaton I y .5 if-A ,N :iff 1 -di, -4 Ji ,Jn A '- 'I t . - . . . ' a-- ' .-.-: " I - J-I "1 H' .mr1w"L'1' - 4 1: w - 1 . . H . . --9 -f' .. , 1 11?-rA-191 f ,I 11.1 I 0 ' 1 , I '. -- ,J u ' ' 1. -A11 . sz-f", ,1 1355'+i.,,1 ' Ll'-VF? 3AI:,1Q.QE-1Jj'h, ' I I ,.- , If: '- I.II , I,-q1IIgI. 'i, III .I III- ,119 1,'if'I,1gQIQI3 1 ' JJ' ' nf"1' " J' -" 'JF'7'f-"".P', 1 -IQ, , rg. 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H .1 ,fr ' ', 1 ,,4,,1-1 '- v .1,1.'.' ,, X' .1 ':. -,1 11 11111 '71 .r 1 Y, . 1 r11,' '15 111 , 1 ' 1 11 .1 , ,, 1-12,11-" Ig- ' 2 , .. , ,, ,. -1 , 1M ..,c.1 . , X , " ....... ---- A L 6 ' xx.: A-l""" 'Pt aw f f' , ,ff 5 5 f .-4 U 0 N ZS me 0 , 5 W O Q 0 wi Q 60' Y , 18 96 A President - - - Secretary and Treasurer WILLIAM ARTHUR INIOLONEY HOWARD SLOAN YOUNG - Jlctive members Oswald Hinton Gregory Perley L. Freeman George Snow Gaylord Edward Christian Kohlsaat Wilson Shannon Chapman, Jr. Lees Ballinger Charles Sumner Hayes Harry Preston French Charles Pelton Jacobs Willis Henry Linsley Lawrence Woodhull Osborne Milton Howard Pettit Charles Lewis Woodruff Charles Eri Hulbert Vernon Tiras Ferris Jerome Pratt Magee Fredrich Graham Moloney Harold Sayre Osborne Engene H. B. Watson George Alexander Young William Arthur Moloney Howard Sloan Young 111 Sew,- t X' ,IN -A.Q,w.- mafia' if , " -R "um, ff! WEA W Ill! Pi Sigma if A 'n it-1 '.gX, '5 gy fg ff 9' QTY? P 132:11 f X : q.'l, .'f' ,M l -1 ,fl l l ISTBB SHED J UARV Edith Burnham Foster Helen Bradford Thompson Demia Butler Grace Allen Coulter Marjorie Benton Cook e Mary Nickerson Lakin Alice Austin Knight Grace Josephine Eberhart Elizabeth Buchanan Edyth Merritt Kohlsaat Anne Bowland Reed Marion Farwell Tooker , Ruth Isabelle Vanderlip 112 Jeanette Capps ,. 'ir Xanga s Uwnl . v' .., , . 1 . 3- r ' . ...,7. A ,' w 3 . l - 1 11. '- , -' '-.. .4 .. 1 3 , ' L ', .I V inf , ' , ' 2 ..-. ..5 :L -v ,.. , 4 -U. ,' , 3 U.'1,, fraternity Conventions sg Delta Kappa Epsilon . Z it qi Detroit, Michigan, November 17-20, 1898. W ill, , V Delegates: "' J f Q 1' Clinton Luman Hoy Harold Eugene Wilkins If , f, ' f ff, I" 4- - Phi Kam Psi , .7 I. - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 15-18, 1898. will f f I 1 'i n "' I' I Delegates: H l uli, l U Eugene Ryan john Andrew Howard ' J, john james Walsh f' ,F p, Beta UNM Pi -2- . Cincinnati, Ohio, July 12-15, 1898. Delegate: Paul Blackwelder A mm mm Phi Toronto, Canada, February 10-14, 1898. Delegates: Nott William Flint Norman Kendall Anderson Clarence Bert Herschberger james Weber Linn Sigma Zhi Nashville, Tennessee, 1897. Delegates: Newman Miller P. Merrill Griffith Phi Delta Theta Ev Columbia, Ohio, November 21-27, 1898. Delegate: X Charles Warren Chase PS1 119511011 Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 3-6, 1898. Delegates: Moses Dwight McIntyre Arthur Sears Henning E Dklfd Call Delta 4,39 Chicago, Illinois, August 25-27, 1897. We ' J ' ixivf No Delegates. 15 I ,I A , ' ,-l i Zhi Psi WSJ., Washington, D. C., February 28-March 2, 1899. lm M .N llrnil .ml Delegate: , ll. Mfwmj Ainsworth Whitney Clark. 1 'M , 4 l s - fi 115 ' VAS' Fraternity Members not Represented by Local Chapters. Phi Gamma Delta William Kelly Wright CAmherst Collegej Louis Thomas Foreman QColgate Universityp Charles B. Dirks QDeuison Collegej KZIDDG Hlpbil Francis Williamson Duke 1Richmond Collegej ffl? g li, 5, -,H1L"j'ip'L:,,51-.J ,1 , QQ, fiki .'7'Lx-'viii-3 i ,.,...,, NT , --- , qt , -'E " , -1 , , w if f iif"m i- ,fd A Wi. f ff x 44444677532 H. - X lif..ii'ifT YV f""'fXf li, iii ' 4' 'X-ft vag i, 'f if i,-il? gg: .- ff i W if y,1..'i'i'iuvl lf'fi'li,"l"i ' 0 . 1 ll A, " I, .- - I i I-1,2-:Hs-,' 1' , l" um, I X' -'H 5 i ,N W N f F'i'?i"' Q ii v ii iii ii J l l f 1 .A if f -' v -iw ffl , Q i g,,Q A 'a-Xxxna-' 'Hi ','iiixliiJ1iZ"r blwiiiwmmnr' J' I V -fi 'ni 0-fliw Z7 N f hy X fiwami. liilillffiii - ,, Y- T I XAVXN 'NX ak X MRM : 7 , -,xx In .. 'Hiaf ' 116 1 W x , I K-X Quafiemu Ulm ws Uiiiiii I - 1 X x X 1 ggi 'ig FJ, E, Uijgbvk wig yy is H' EUmmWL....f .- N' ' L 12724-2 EI m EI mm mmmqqggm ' V .V mmlmmmfnmmmmnummm A Y 'hz I , X . 61 W1-if 0 H EEE ' " M ' if' 'L X Q f Ni XE 1 V ZV. :ff J 6 X Q Q, V.'fL1 A ' ' f Q wwff fe Q , QQ ,, ' U Q ." 1 I X S 1 ,IL .5 :vu v 1 vi I, , 'U' 'Q . .. , , ry W , ' J 1 ' ' H .-' +- 4 s 1 7, . ,, , 4 w 1 1 , . .,x 1. NL-'g , . . rl , v 1 ' ,,4.L-M41 ' ' . a "' I ' . 3. ,ug s ' r . , I x in . B . , - 1 Wfp.. I . v N,-9 . . .j.l -. .Q vita. 'V . T., ' :Qf5"Sla4 f .ala 1 V 'u 1 I " ,. U4 A .L , ' ' "F 'FH ' xii 1 -V, F' ,. 4,- I 1 V I . - I w 4 X A 1 . 1 A m A I ,- ' 1 ' ' u 1 , A , ' 1 ' 1 x' o . 4 . v i.v" v.,,. ' .""x' '- f. . u .1 Q 4 4 f I 1 . Q' .- . '. , I f gf .QE g , v I. ffi . S 2 ,Ihllf ,WH ' .-4 r' f 4 I. ,..r in , ,,-. 1 . , ' -. , A ff , , "IL 'w 4" '.-fwv X: ,'. ' 1. ' X F.-Q25 . Y Y fb . ,. --lv Qi. " 1 '-f - ' V. c 5' J' ,V gx..,: 4 I . -, r- 'f . H fer, 4, -.317 w. u-1 . ,lamp Q q. I9 f 'A f 7412-'i 60 'S' mm- J X f' ft ef' H '-A w ,ei ft , ,ff ,ri 4 ?f,fL.:, v I at ff 1-if--' 4- H 5 ' u J A gf Xi I 7 Mill: 1" X ' '-' wr is - 'T - f " XX :f J. . . ,Mwst . . "x N w if on 3 I -. f X S ' . Y X, ' -is ..f 2 V XX 7 X X q 1 la .ad - Y- - vi gd' imp. In December, 1898, it occurred to Prof. G. H. Vincent that if the entertainment for the benent of the University Settlement, which has come to be an annual atfair, might this year take the form of a comic opera, to be written and presented by Uni- versity talent, a form of amusement novel at Chicago might get a start here. Although the idea, when he iirst suggested it, met little favor, he clung desperately to it g and in January of this year called a meeting of about twenty men promi- 1 nent in under-graduate life, and laid the plans before them. They received it enthusiastically, and at once elected a committee of arrange QM, ,' ments. At that time it was decided for various good reasons, to allow -Q 1 only male actors in the cast. ,ff In the next three weeks the opera was Written, around an idea which gAW " 'A . was the joint production of Mr. Vincent and Miss Elizabeth XVallace. 'fi g These two collaborated with Prof. F. j. Miller, Linn '97, Barrett '97, and I Miss Cooke '99, Rehearsals began early in February, and by the tenth JI K of March, through the really tremendous efibrts of Mr. I Lfqf x XS - and Mrs. Vincent, Mr. H. G. Lozier, and Mrs. Wallace and the unexpectedly hearty enthusiasm of the cast y " The Deceitful Dean" had been whipped into shape and D was presented in the gymnasium. Its success was aston- ishingly complete. On the following night it was repeated with even greater smoothnes. The expense of Q, if J lf resentation reached 7503 the net roiit to the Settle- ,WH T l5 I' tc p P bi" Ulluul Q X ment, 511300. L 70D S Old favorites Qlllr. Staggj and new fFreeman '02jg 7 fy, good singing QPayne's, '01 l, and bad QAdkinson's, '96j 3 acting fGay- 7 4 0 . lord's, GJ and "horse" CI-Iagey's, '98j 3 beauty QAndrews '0Uj, and NU . mm 1 I tg . y y V +2 'wzsffflvffiff U N xg ' fv ibfx J" L ' ref I fewer i M I '5Qf51s.q QQ E si I if 119 gf ,gg in fi Vljij .Wil ffm - 2390 the reverse CSchrnahl '00j 3 grace fCornell '99j, and disgrace I ms fthe Dean'sj 3 energy tEckhart '99l, and languid elegance QLozier 'UGJ -all these combined, with forty or fifty more, into an F R D 0 entertainment that made even the gynnasium endurable, and is L K W likely to inaugurate a new form of amusement at the University X of Chicago. Whisper ! but the plot of next year's opera is already ' N thought out 5 if you don't believe it ask Prof. Vincent. . 3 1 xN X ' i CC 'iii I . -R L "Che Deceitful Dean " BOOK by Mr. J. XV. Linn, Mr. C. R. Barrett Miss Marjorie Cooke and others. SCORE by Bizet, Sullivan, DeK0ven, Engliinder, and others. East of Zharacters Reginald Blondin, the Deceitful Dean - - - MR. PERRY J. PAYNE Harold Heartbreaker, Captain of the Football Team - MR. VICTOR W. SINCERE G. XVhizzer, a confidential friend of Heartbreaker MR. PERCY B. ECKHART 'L -X A. Bludsucker, a wandering Registrar - . MR. H. M. ADKINSON Ja ij R. W. Piper, the popular President - MR. HORACE G. LOZIER Lawrence Lowmarker, the exacting Examiner lim MR. A. W. RISLEY Piccadilly Strutter, a Head Marshal - llIR. RALPH HAMILL ' 'I H Adonis Ambler, First Assistant Marshal - - MR. C. WEBB "Wil fl- fl XVi1lie XVa1ker, Second Assistant Marshal MR. H. H. NEWMAN James Hawkins, butler of Mary Jane Hall - MR. JOHN XVEBB Senor Aguilar y Anthropofygo, President of the Q University of Iloilo Qaffiliatedj - MR. H. M. ADKINSON Martin Dooley, Extension Lecturer - MR. FRANCE ANDERSON Charlie Chanter, a modern Minnesinger - MR. A. 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P I Sandy Sawedoff, a wounded Hero - Cosimo Cosine, a merry Mathematician Bromley Bromide, a cheerful Chemist - Cato Gerundive, an inflexible Inflector - Oscar Oratund, an electrifying Elocutionist Winnifred Worthington, " Queen of the Quad." Polly Plunger, confrdante of Winnifred - Tabitha Teachem, Head of Mary Jane House Members of Mary Jane House: Sylvia Sansouci - Ethyl Van Rensselaer - Belle Archer - - Josie Jessup - Eveline Montmorency Betty Brown - - Mirabel de Lancey - Mary Clancy - - - Vivian Vassar, a graduate student - Tillie Tiptoe, Ph.D., Doctor in Dancing - Samantha Snaggler, interested in annexation Nettie Nicegirl, an unclassiiiable student - MR. BASIL MILLSPAUGH - MR. GLENN HOBBS - - MR. F. W. DUKE MR. WALTER SCOTT KENNEDY - MR. H. M. ADKINSON - MR. NIARVIN GAYLORD MR. STACEY MOssER MR. SCOTT BROWN - MR. W. B. CORNELL MR. WALTER J. SCHMAHL MR. HAROLD WILKINS - MR. ELIOT S. NORTON MR. HOWARD WOODHEAD - MR. PERLEY FREEMAN - MR. J. F. HAOEY MR. CLARENCE MCCARTHY MR. EMORY COBB ANDREWS - MR. PERLEY FREEMAN - MR. HORACE G. LOZIER - - MR. JOHN L. COOK Members of the Chorus: Messrs. Clarence B. Herschberger, Henry Gale, M. Gordon Clarke, R. Johnson, F. A. Brown, Guy Kinneman, M. B. Parker, A. T. Stewart, Samuel N. Harper, H. P. Kirtley, Eliot Blackwelder, George A. Young, VV. A. Maloney. Members of the Band: Messrs. E. G. Dodge, C. B. Elliott, W. H. Fuller, A. B. Fogle, E. D. Howard, A. F. Naylor, P. Rhodes, and H. E. P. Thomas. Students, University Band, University Military Company, University Glee Club, Pages, University Janitors, University Buildings, University Faculties, and other supernumeraries. EXECUTIVE STAFF. MEssRs. W. VVALLING and A. G. HOYT - MR. HORACE G. LOz1ER - - MR. CLINTON L. HOV ---- MESSRS. R. C. MANNING and EDWARD C. KOHLSAAT - MR. WILLIAM HILLIARD - - - MR. R. G. MEYERS - - 125 General Managers Chorus Master - Stage Manager - Master of Properties - Stage Carpenter - Electrician Llniversilp men in the Spanish War Harry Fuller Atwood Henry T. Chase XV. E. De Sombre Knight F. Flanders John Harris Kelley Henry Lloyd Horace Lozier Ernest De Koven Leflingwell iiPaul Le Maitre E. Xvhitney Martin XVard B. Pershing XValter Sharpe Alfred Sayles Northrup Cecil Page XV. T. Smith G. E. Steveson S. XV. Stratton C. F. Tolman, lr. Tllumni Major E B. Tolman, lst Illinois Infantry D. D. O'Dell, Chaplain Died of fever, at Siboney, Cuba, August A, INS. 126 ' ' .1 ' ' f 'Clit ' f 7" ' QW nm un DEI U U UU U mu uw - I X X f -. - -y 7 - - . I I f " ' xiAalin' f - 'f. 153. E- X x"" N' U + M 4 X M ?Mf ff ' ' ! ,Z 'WZ f Ei -11 : li 552 -G:-if -..--v1-C224 , N , ff? 1- - ,- ,iii-H-li? l X- ,,,, ,,,W,4? - ffff If '45, E fi FN 2 Wil! ' W Z IX: Q Ei , 1 , X L- , ze -xx, f A , I ,, x W -'Ib , - 1 x 'wx 1 X. , .sg M, 1 ' ' : ..- 5 J NW 5 :nf Q Z 1: ?' 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K 5 wi V .. .-. .X - X Krli I 3 I wi , IL -ff 'if f f lm T I Isyvfif' 7 fu f N x , 'K , ,fi , I if S f . g f X' f ' ff X X xx ' X ' Q 1 Z ,r, ,: g f' 2' f ,uw-A Wm , GIQQ, Dldlldolill and BdtIj0 Clubs MARCUS PETER FRUTCHEY - Manager CLARK SCAMMON REED Assistant Manager Che Gltt Club ALBERT SIMPSON RUSSELL Leader and President VICTOR WASHINGTON SINCERE - - - Director FIRST TENORSZ Clarence Sidney Spaulding W. H. Jones Charles Sampson Freeman Perry J. Payne SECOND TENORSZ William Burgess Cornell 1 Ray Prescott johnson Clarence A. McCarthy Henry Scott Hollis FIRST BASSOSS Albert Simpson Russell Marvin Gaylord Eliot Blackwelder SECOND BASSOSI Frederick A. Brown G. P. McDonald - john Franklin Hagey Carlton Hosmer Snashal Oswald Hinton Gregory Howard Woodhead TENOR SOLOIST BARITONE SOLOIST Lester Bartlett Jones Robert Bailey Davidson 128 .4 ,, , M 1Ls,j5.' 1. - - . lv v ,I U ,- " 1 11,2 1 W-' . 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'PZ' Ki-1 I 3 ' II Y LIQQII1 I1I.' 1 .I.'III11Ig11-I,II1111.':,'1. I 1 . 1- 1 - 1 , I 11,,?Iz'.---II-' -IM 1 1 - ,.. K I 14' we KEIIC' ' ,I .1I ,1" 1: .If '1 -'YJ1 1--7, 1.-. ,az , .. -N1 ' 11 1' --, 1, 1-mga. ,I 'I I 1. In , , 'I1', '1I, 1 ,'III11'2 11 11 "' T11-IIJIII 1,jIf ' - I. 'I .1 II. - I ' 1' ' '1I J'-I, ' ' .Y 'X I '. '- F-, 117 'V . . 1 -1 1 1 -1., - ' 1 15' ' - . '..1 - 1.1 . - ' '1-1 I J' .' 11: -' .C 'V I .sa . 4, I ,I II I I I 1II ,I ..-.. 1. - . 1 1 . vi' . .EE "1-1 1 3 ' ,41:.,1 L .'1M 11. ' 1 X "' 6 I 1 II - 1,1 .- -I 1, - -- I -11. Ii I 11.-1 1 . ' 1 1 -.1'- ' I "' " ' 1-1 1 ""1:,1.'. D 11.11 1 Che m2lllCl0liIl clllb tx Y X BYRON BAYARD SRIITH - Leader WILLIAM EVERTON RAMSEY Secretary FIRST MANDOLINS Byron Bayard Smith Emory Cobb Andrews Henry E. Hirsh XVillia11I Everton Ramsey William jackson ,ff SECOND MANDOLINS A ,,,,, Paul E. Wilson George Gilbert Davis Forrest G. Smith INIANDOLA VIOLINS Jerome Pratt Magee Perley L, Freeman Aiffeti F. Beifeld V FLUTE XVilber XVheeler Bassett fi eo GUITARS Frank Williamson Duke Walter joseph Schrnahl Hugh Lafayette McXVilliams James XVo1ke Ross Ralph Curtiss Manning TRAP5 Perry J, Payne 131 Che BBIUO Clllb HUGH LAFAYETTE IVICXYILLIAMS Leader FIRST BANJOS Hugh Lafayette McWilliams Donald Saxton McWilliams Frank Williamson Duke GUITARS Ralph Curtiss Manning Verncn Tiras Ferris James Wolke Ross Emory Cobb Andrews SECOND BANJOS Curtiss Rockwell Manning Harold S. Osborne MANDOLIN Byron Bayard Smith 132 lllllD2l'SilD of Chicago miliIdl'D Billld GLENN Moony HoBBs, Leader soLo Bb CORNETS Glenn Moody Hobbs Frederic Mason Blanchard Charles Button Elliott Earl Dean Howard FIRST Bb CORNET Eb CORNET Adelbert T. Stewart Francis VVayland Shepardson PICCOLO William Dayton Merrill CLARINETS Ole Hallingby Ernest Edward Irons Augustus Francis Naylor Emory Cobb Andrews SOLO ALTO XVillian1 Harvey Fuller ALTOS Ernest Green Dodge Frank Russell White Solomon Farley Acree Frank KVilliamson Duke TENORS Pierre Rhodes Halbert Elmer Payne Thomas EUPHONIUM Charles Joseph Chamberlain SLIDE TROMBONES Michael Frederic Guyer Albert Bertram Garcelon Vernon Sirvilian Phillips Eb BASSES Arza Bracken Fogle Leroy Ellsworth Yiets SNARE DRUM BASS DRUMS Clarence Mason Gallup Robert Bailey Davidson Byron Bayard Smith 133 ' :fu ' r' " rum t V1 V l' in N M y w FQ if iQ W LE A L fait Z f lgrasn jf 3 XJ?-Li! Xxflt M X Roma Hattie Adams Frederick Augustus Brown J. M. Brosius Greta Irvin Blanchard Bertha Ella Clark Edward L. Colebeck Harold Bennett Challiss Marjorie Benton Cooke Grace Allen Coulter Amos A. Ebersole Perley L. Freeman john Christopher Gustafson Josephine Frances Hazelton Mary Olive Hunting Jacob Gish Haniaker Rebecca Madeleine Harding Lester Bartlett Jones L. May Love Florence La Fourette Anna Mary Marrow George Washington Muhlenian Harry Lachlin McNeill Katherine Childs Marsh Edna Dianah Ohrenstein Edith Sylvia Patton Frank Welborn Pickel Orrnsby Elroy Pettet Grace Elizabeth Peabody VVillian1 Levi Richer Esther Wallace Sturges Clara Albina Tilton Dora May Wilbur 134 CD6 lllIiD2l'SiID Cboil' FROM JULY 1. iss Roma Hattie Adams Greta Irvin Blanchard Marjorie Benton Cooke Grace Allen Coulter Bertha Ella Clark Rebecca Madeleine Harding Josephine Frances Hazelton L. May Love Mary Olive Hunting Anna Mary Marrow Florence La Fourette Edna Dianah Ohrenstein Grace Elizabeth Peabody Katherine Childs Marsh Esther Wallace Sturges Clara Albina Tilton Dora May Wilbur Frederick Augustus Brown Edward L. Colebeck Harold Bennett Challis J. M. Brosius s Amos A. Ebersole Perley L. Freeman Joh jacob Gish Haniiaker Lester Bartlett jones n Christopher Gustafson George Washington Muhlernan Harry Lachlin Frank W. L. Recker 135 McNeill Welborn Pickel Orrnsby Elroy Pettet !'L?L,f X., V, .' 5 ,:f X X gif ' . w gixigi' Y 1 'EX Jil, fl VN ll ll 5 l B i 'FR L QL A , 4, J Aff . -- xgm' " FQ on ts' fs A- WN ,bil Y Yf fl ,,,, f ..--,I A Q Mx ' -3 Yr uf.fxW ': X 41 L v A-. W lv asia? 55 GN 17,-axis? ix'-wi.. i s , B lv ' QF? ' . ' M Xxx "f Wawl' 1 X li J f Y E 24.9 Q gi I' 'K ,lg i X U Xu iv 7 ' xx lx, N X fi 4 9 f fs li U Xi' if wx lm Vx J Xxx Che ciSQl"S 5260 Frank Williamson Duke Byron Bayard Smith Wilbur Wheeler Bassett Emory Cobb Andrews Ray Prescott Johnson Paul Eldredge VVilson Clarence Alvin McCarthy Walter joseph Schmahl Ralph Curtiss Manning Albert Simpson Russell 136 1 , U.. 1-, 1 4 m ' X ff. 4, J. 1 1 A JI.. 1 .1-U -I f.,' .A ': ,v ..x. , M., 5 1 1 ,H ,M . 1 m , li' 11 ,v .1 'K , Q ..4 is ,. . ,, ,cfm wr .," .H . I .9 V . su Ui ,, A n Lv . , 'MJ I 4 ,MS xx N X A V ME Milli MKG who PERCY BERNARD ECKHART - - President EXQUIIWC ZOMIMIIQQ XVillian1 France Anderson Marjorie Benton Cooke Arthur Sears Henning m2mb2fS John Coulter, Jr. James Weber Linn Nott William Flint Arthur Sears Henning William France Anderson Marjorie Benton Cooke Alice Austin Knight Josephine Turner Allin Lawrence Merton Jacobs Edith Daisy jenkins Ralph Curtiss Manning Marvin Gaylord Thomas Carlyle Clendenning Charles Scribner Eaton Maurice Mandeville Clarence A. McCarthy Claribel Goodwin Virginia Wynne Lackersteen Margaret Coulter Elizabeth Buchanan Leona Canterbury 139 UIICOIII BOIISQ' ASSISTANT PROFESSOR GEORGE EDGAR VINCENT - - ASSISTANT PROFESSOR WILLIAM ISAAC THOBIAS ALBERT ELLSWORTH HILL - - - - ERXVIN VVILLIAM EUGENE ROESSLER - HARRY ORRIN GILLET - - members Frederick Mayor Giles Albert Ellsworth Hill Charles joseph Bushnell Clyde Buchan Walker Head Councillor Vice Head Secretary Treasurer john Paul Ritchey A. C. johnson Harry Orrin Gillet Erich Muenter Swen Benjamin Anderson William Schoonover Harman Roy Batchelder Nelson Frederick Dennison Braulhall Arthur Taber jones R. XV. Pattengill J. T. Goodenow G. L. Tenney Charles Walter Britton David Moore Robinson H. S. Hollis Robert Samuel McClure Harold Hayden Nelson Oliver Leroy McCaskill Erwin VVilliam Eugene Roessler Ray Rickoif Boruil Trevor Arnett Charles Edward Congdon Howard Woodhead P. G. Wrightson Franklin Davis Barker Benjamin Griflin Lee Jerome Pratt Magee 140 lUZlSbll1SI0l1 501152 PROFESSOR EDWIN E. SPARKS - PROFESSOR RALPH C. H. CATTERALL WALTER H. BUHLIG - - CLIFTON O. TAYLOR - HALBERT PAVNE THOMAS mQmb0fS Halbert P. Thomas Banks J. NVildn1an Walter H. Buhlig Arthu J. Fred Miller Yernon S. Phillips Clifton O. Taylor - Head - Councillor Vice Head Secretary Treasurer r E. Bestor Louis T. Foreman J. XValter Bingham john D. Sutherland Frank L. Slaker H. R. Street Donald R. Richberg A. P. Nelson XValter Soderliug Alex. G. McKnight R, H. Rea Paul I William E. De Sombre Hugh Leighton Charles M. Barber . FOX Norman M. Chiver Alvin B. Snyder f .X 141 jellmer R. Pettet f l ll Ji X SDQIIIIEIII House Founnsn MAY 1995. PROFESSOR EDXVARD CAPPS - House Councillor GERTRUDE DUDLEY - - - Head ANNA LOCKXVOOD PETERSON Secretary and Treasurer House Zommittee Jennie Louise Coon Elizabeth Chamberlin Elizabeth Hathaway Lingle Anna Lockwood Peterson lnQl11bQl'S Mary Elizabeth Abernethy Helen VVhitney Backus Lilian Carroll Banks Otie Eleanor Betts Lydia Brauns Mary Elizabeth Casteel Yashti Chandler Elizabeth Chamberlin Jennie Louise Coon Louisa Carpenter De Cen Adelle Easton Julia Metcalfe Finney Helen Gardner Lucie Hammond Grace Hayman Ruth Isabel Johnson Elizabeth Hathaway Lingle Minnie Lester Clara Lilian Mooney . Edith Leavitt Neal Marietta Norton Nellie O'Brien Laura O'Brien Bertha Adelia Pattengill Anna Lockwood Peterson Mable Porter Grace Edith Sellon Ella XValker Katherine Anna lVaugh Clara Morton XVelch Marie lVCYlll1lElSlCl" Nina Estelle XVeSton Belle XVilso11 1-12 Grddlldle Club 0fficers of uses-99 HENRY M. ADKINSON - - - - President VVESLEY C. IIITCHELL - - Yice-President DIARY B. HARRIS - - Recording Secretary HELEN B. THOMPSON - - Corresponding Secretary ADNA W. RISLEY - - - Treasurer EXQCIIIWC C0ml11iIIOQ Elizabeth Faulkner Susan VV. Peabody Frances Williston Henry Lloyd lVilliam E. Vifalling Thomas K. Sidey Malcolm XV. XVallace George Norlin VV Howell E. Davies lVilson R. Smith The Graduate Club of the University of Chicago was organized March 11, 1295, being a successor of the University Union, an association of departmental clubs. The active membership of the club consists of graduate students of the University Who have been elected after recommendation by the Executive Committee. The present membership numbers two hundred and fifteen. During the years 1898 and 1899 the club was addressed by Mr. Sol Smith Russell, Miss Mary McDowell, Hon. George E. Adams, Mr, Richard Mansfield, Prof. E. B. Poulton, Oxford Cniversityg Prof. Henry Morse Stephens, Cornell University 5 Prof. Francis N. Thorpe, University of Pennsylvaniag Miss Olga Nethersole, and Major E. B. Tolman. 143 CD6 IIZOYSBII Park Clllb. OIGANIZIID 1B9'l 0ffit6l'S WM. S. HARBIAN - . - President CHAS. E. CAREY First Vice-President BLANCHE L. TRUE Second Vice-President JEAN A. LESLIE - Secretary HAROLD H. NELSON - - Treasurer mQl11bQl'S. Arthur Pienkowsky Chas. E. Carey Vxfm. S. Harman Margaret Morgan Carl D. Greenleaf George E. Congdon Eliot Blackwelder Alice Hepburn Harold H. Nelson Robert Lyman Robert S. McClure Ruth E. Morgan Clarence VV. Richards Fannie H. Hollis jonathan E. Webb Elim A. E. Palmquist G. A. Dudley Olive M. Hand Florence Parker Clara L. German Blanche L. True Clinton L. Hoy B. K. Kniper jean A. Leslie R. C. Gilbert Ward A. Cutler Byron B. Smith Horace V. Bogert Paul Blackwelder Albert L. Jones Chas. E. Hulbert Margaret Selby Gilma'n YV111. E. De Sombre Arthur J. W'alters Eva M. Cleveland Frank P. Barker Lucy L. Osgood Carrie S. Gilman XVill R. Jayne Ben Straus Benj. G. Lee Samuel N. Harper Helen D. Harper Ella Linn Henry S. Hollis 144 f0l'llm fiI6l'dl'D SOCRID Meetings: Tuesdays at 8 P. M., Y. M. C. A. Room. Ufficers GEORGE EDWARD CONGDON - ARTHUR EUGENE BESTOR HUGH GUTHRIE LEIGHTON WILLIAM ALEXANDER QQURDON mCmb2fS George Edward Congdon Arthur Eugene Bestor - President Vice-President - Treasurer - Secretary Ainsworth Whitney Clark Frank Russell White VVilliam Alexander Gordon Hugh Guthrie Leighton Thomas Venard Graves jay Schoenman Patek 'Vernon Sirvilian Phillips Halbert E. Payne Thomas Hyatt Elmer Covey Harry Bennett Anderson VVill iam Hiddleson Andrews Ernest Edward Irons 145 XVilliam Kelley Wright CD6 Pbil0l2XialI Meetings: Wednesdays, 8 P. M., Cobb Hall ROBERT SAMUEL MCCLURE HAROLD HAYDEN NELSON - WILLIAM SCHOONOVER HARIVIAN v ALBERT HENRY' BEIFIELD - m0mbQfShlD Jonathan Edward Webb Eliot Blackwelder Charles Eri Hulbert - President Vice-Pre sident - Secretary - Treasurer Earl Crayton Hales William Schoonover Harman Benjamin Grifiin Lee Robert Elliott Graves Lewis Gustafson Harold Hayden Nelson Henry Scott Hollis Frank Perkins Barker Charles julian Webb Edward John Green Albert Henry Beilield Henry Wellesley jones Robert Samuel McClure 1413 Che 0l'dIOI'iCdl flSSOCidIi0ll 1898 - 1599 FRANK RUSSELL VVHITE - - President ERNEST EDYVARD IRONS Vice-President TREVOR ARNETT - - - Secretary HOWARD PENDLETON KIRTLEY - Treasurer Hdvisorv Zommittee GEORGE NORLIN - ' - Graduate Council HENRY THOMAS COLESTOCK Divinity Council CHARLES FOSTER ROBY - Senior Council ROBERT SAMUEL MCCLURE - Junior Council llortbern Oratorical Contest ANNUAL PRELIMINARY CONTEST Kent Theatre, February 24, 1899 WINNER ARTHUR EUGENE BESTOR - Wendell Phillips, the Agitator ALTERNATE LAXVRENCE M. JACOBS - American Statesmanship EVERETT J. PARSONS - Gladstone THOMAS C. CLENDENNING - National Ideals CHARLES F. YYODER- The Supremacy Of the Spiritual HYATT E. COVEY - Alexander Hamilton 147 THE DEBATE. ' 'su X 'fllllllll -X , -7 VI I 'Q 4 ii V Viv A J N 'FZWZQREQ 2' " if- A am 'F RESOLYE Che Cl71C3S0:millIl2S0lEl DQDEIIQ Kent Theatre, January 13, 1899 D-That a constitutional amendment should be secured by which United States Senators shall be elected directly by the people. AFFIRMATIVE NEGATIVE A. J. Finch Thomas C. Clendenniug M. Vvaldron Lawrence Merton Jacobs M. Jerome Maurice Mandeville Decision in favor of the negative. CD2 ChiC6SO:miCbiS3H DQDBIQ Chicago April T, 1899 f l 1 raduated income tax, admitting it to be constitutional RESOLY'ED-That a ec era g is desirable in this country. AFFIRMATIVE NEGATIVE Thomas C. Clendenning Charles Simons Lawrence M. Jacobs Sigmond Sanger Maurice Mandeville George Kingsley Decision in favor of negative. 148 Uarsitv Debating teams Ir,I I .I .IQ .,,-, .I I ?.,IIII 'W , - 1. . ' . GI, ., I,,I-.- b . ,I .. - IL-' . ,. Q. J 4 f...I, ,. ,,.II'II' gf' 4 -I, im, .5 .iff Lg vw' 'M'- .- -'igfpfv 7 P , . . Y Y 4' -I: k 1 3' X 2- 1-'.L', 1 11: ,1'wfw4gffwsw . :Ju . Iwi' I rm . Q, 4... I, .H .. ,4- ' 'JL N. ,wr -,III :cf ' -4 HP L I F7 MH I . gf,- , ,.u Amin . , I "W .:,' .,' Y ' li A., Q' mx .- AYA- x L1 A ro x .. , , . -" WW -' -.v . "",".: .. 'J u 'F I' -, T5 W ' .H ', ,fl " '19-I .Y 5' .A .- "1f.5 . V .. "2 . .. 'fx Clif. Q .QI mu! -4 .VII '. , "' I II II It I, g,:fw!I,' WL, '- - .J rg 'ig -'L .vA,','5"5 Q ' '7"'3p.f2-'.V if is. 'N 1 .ff .- UQ., I I .. III, III?-JI.-'eg -.-:rpg . .lf-Iv I , J. II- 'I '-.,qI.: , . yr.. 7. .P -' .X v 2? I I L I, . , .. , I . . .I '.. f I Yi'r"5 ' -bis '.'Pi','- IIu?- II ' I I II ' I 1. V I Q, I . - - ...I fu lr 4. ., nf' 'T I, ' " ' ,. Pm' 11-. 'fi . +- , I vu 5 . ' H .1 ' ' V' . : A .N . ,A Y " ' . ' ', 'I ' -vs ' 1 1 ' ' Hg.. 1 - 'f ." 0 'rn .gf I - vb "' . I. I "' u .L I ' II I '.'. Q Arai: ' ., I 1: ,J -' , . .- , .nm 1, - - 'Pr .Q . I ,III , nr . I II. I. Ig JI I I. Jig V II I-W!1...II.,II,I . Rl ' I . n I I ' ' 'A -"U I . ,I - ' A ' . Q5 'f 1 , . ,, , I Y II IQIIII ' II .ni .. ' ' 'f psf- ."" '-f '1f', V v g I.- -. . Y. A - '.. ' '.f. I. I '1,.I.,I -- . 'L ,.f'9"vf' ' ,. . ' Ii. 'r' I .' . I I I I gf . II . A I ., IF III I . A f.:,-. -- .f"' -' , ' ,' " - 'I I . ' .I ll we f I I,,I T. . .I . I 1 . III II, I I , I ...o ,I -v-- I fy-I YIII I ' I . , II- , I 2 . I I., I: -- 4 -. ' I' ' "wi - ' - ,, . - ' - ' ' .-J., ' " ' T .. I.. T " " L. 1 ' . . I . ' va. ' f ' -. - - IEW . -I In I . ' I ,. I Y ,,I , ., J -f j I III .I I II III.. W I II. ' - ',:,' . l ' ' .- W ,,' 'ir,f5" fi n'.f.' ' , II 52.3 . I, .I . I IP u, I I" Y ' I I , " -I' I 4' I .' M. ' IM. ' N .. I I - - 5. " :lj ,I -'M 'r II: II, ' I I ' e r. - I -.- I I. - L- ,.o - II f . '-f-1 . II I - 1 I II III' 'gI.II- ,-.--1 f s :F 31- "' 'E st' I, . YII II . I ' I ' WA "QV" . ' . ri . f -'- ,, ,. ' ,. ' .1 ' 2' !3Twg+ I .I YE, ' .- 18, a --f .' - r.e.,.f.', .'-w 1. V -. , f - .gg- Iq..f-w.H, I II . .5-'E ' 35' 5 I N.-'V ' ' .4 '35, . 5, v. A I ' - 4 Y 1 A 4' . .I, .sr II I II .II IIIIIFII A Q , ' T13 .- -' , ' -'ge . . . ,- . ,, , .. if 9 'pq I..-. -J '.. v Q' " I ."a:I,..f1 I . . II ' I U 5 5 , ,' I J I .. , 'V 1 ', I .. -. I ,ff I, 1 -f -'I.. 5 j J- I ., fg'vI.A ' , -fw'- ,.t .www JWWFJYV Al, ' P , Xl. . . -' ' ' 2 I II. .- .p ,vvgn ox 4 ,W Q 'f' J . zn ,f fl -V ,.. '-Q".-is 51 f ,I,,.,..,. , - 1 . 9- r w -1- -31" ' ,'.-f- ' J: -I. , .I I I,VV.n-Q. ,, ..I.I..y':'.Iv.,.II,.w. .... II- .sf . , ' . w '. , ' r ' ' o IT' L 7, TI LIW? . I .f Q-IQI, f ' - I IIC I..I.II I .EIII . I-.N f 'N' Gl'ElClllilIQ-DllJllIlID Debates 1598 WINTER First Prize C Divinityl Samuel Rowland Robinson James Luther Bynum SCHOLARSHIPS Samuel Rowland Robinson Milo James Lovelace James Luther Bynum SPRING Walter Flavius MCCaleb First Prize fGradua.tzl Edwin Maxey XVillia1n Buck Guthrie john Franklin Hagey Prize for the best debater: Edwin Maxey SCHOLARSHIPS Henry Thomas Colestock Eban Mumford Edwin Maxey Edward Charles Kunkle YX'illiam Buck Guthrie ISHS SUMMER john Franklin Hagey First Prize I Graduatel Hugh XVilliam Hughes Martin Singer Eugene M. Yiolette Prize for the best dehater: XVilliam XVallace Reed SCHOLARSHIPS William Wallace Reed E. XV. Allen Hugh William Hughes William Ross Schoernaker Eugene M. Violette AUTUMN: lNo 151 Martin Singer debatel S6lIi0l' College fllldlS 1898 SPRING First Prize Edwin Campbell VVoolley SCHOLARSHIPS Ralph Leroy Peck Edwin Campbell W'oolley Percy Bernard Eckhart Joseph Edwin Freeman Marilla Zeroyda Parker SUMMER First Prize Allen Grey Hoyt joseph Edwin Freeman Michael Billman Wells scHoLARsHIPs A Elbridge L. Heath joseph Edwin Freeman Allen Grey Hoyt Michael Billmau Wells Maximillian Morgenthau Elim Arthur Palmquist AUTUMN First Prize Charles Francis Yoder SCHOLARSHIPS Samuel Hope Thompson Lawrence Merton Jacobs Charles Francis Yoder Thomas Amiss Stamp George Balderston VVatson RESOLVED, " That the Income Tax, AFFIRMATIVE Willoughby George VValling Harry B. Newman Charles Lindsey Burroughs WINTER 1899 Debate Marjorie Benton Cooke if it were constitutional, would be advisable." NEGATIVE Harry N. Gottlieb Lawrence Merton Jacobs Thomas Carlyle Clendenning Decision for the Negative. The Universitv prize for excellence in debate was given to Harry N. Gottlieb. 152 ,1lllIl0l' COIIQSQ fll13lS 1898 SPRING The Ferdinand Peck Prize of 550 was awarded to Vernon Sirvilian Phillips SCHOLARSHIPS Lindley XVillet Allen Vernon Sirvilian Phillips Edith Daisy jenkins Roy Batchelder Nelson julian Frank Goodenow Clarence Alvin McCarthy SUMMER The Ferdinand Peck Prize of 550 was awarded to Maurice Mandeville. SCHOLARSHIPS Anna McCaleb H. E. Thomas Frances Burling Maurice Mandeville H. VV. Jones AUTUMN The Ferdinand Peck Price of 350 was awarded to Robert Samuel McClure SCHOLARSHIPS Charles S. Eaton Robert Samuel McClure jay Schoenrnann Patek Oliver Leroy McCaskill Grace Switzer C. J. XVillian1son WINTER SCHOLARSHIP The Ferdinand Peck Prize of 550 was awarded to M. R. Myers. Miss M. K. Lincoln Miss Alma Yondorf O. S. McCaskill M. R. Myers C. J. YVil1iamson 153 ffl. X Aff: lcf f'Jffl 'fllfllf lixldlxxfl fl l rf' 'x wLEH'JiW A fx f'x .f I I W lx FX re lf nl in fP7m ra wma iIlfuiL,MwnIQ-Q gl Senior Zollegc SPRING WEN Rohert Elliott Graves Cecil Page Ralph C. Hamill joseph Edwin Freeman Roger Tliroop Yauglian Norman Kendall Anderson Franklin Hernion Geselbracht SUMMER NORMAN lil-ENDALL ANDERSON George Hoyt Sawyer Erich Muenter Charles Lindsey Burroughs Roger Throop Vaughan Ralph C. Hamill Pearl Hunter Franklin Hermon Geselbraeht AUTUMN AVILLOUGHBY G. AVALLING - Erich Muenter David Guy Hurlhurt Michael Billman XVells Roy Coleman Griswold Margaret Maria Choate Charles Foster Roby Ralph Curtiss Manning WINTER CHARLES FosTER Roux' - - Roy Coleman Griswold Frederick Augustus Brown David Guy Hurlburt Ralph C. Hamill Howard Pendleton Kirtley NVilliam France Anderson Ralph Curtiss Manning Clinton Lunian Hoy 154 Charlotte Rose Teller Alvin Lester Barton Frederick Augustus Brown Charles Lindsey Burroughs - Chairman Charles Foster Roby Michael Billman XVells Margaret Maria Choate Chairman XVillian1 France Anderson Pearl Hunter Clinton Lunian Hoy Ralph C. Hainill - Chairman Ainsworth XVhitney Clark Charles Branrlen Davis Willoughby George Walling Parke Ross ,junior college Co 1598 SPRING ERNEST EDWARD IRoNs - - Clinton Luman Hoy lllltil ' Chairman Allen Grey Hoyt Rowland Tliumrn Rogers Glenn Plumb Hall Ella May Norton Clara Morton lVelch Ruth Edna Morgan Robert Samuel McClure Fred Sass Roy Page SUMMER ROBERT SAMUEL BICCLURE - Allen Grey Hoyt Herbert Paul - - Chairman Zinimerniann ni. Schoonover Harman Russell XViles Clarence Alvin McCarthy - - Chairman rainarrl Parker Glenn Plumb Hall - Anna 1XIcCaleb Clara Morton XVe1ch W Fred Sass Roy Page F. P. Barker AUTUMN ROBERT SAMUEL BICCLURE - Herbert Paul ZlH11'I1E'I'I112lI1I1 Mortimer B XVn1. Schoonover Harman Russell XViles Roy Batclielder Nelson Kellogg Speed Harold B. Challiss Clarence Alvin McCarthy F. P. Barker john Manly Clendenning Frank L, Slalcer 1899 WINTER - Chairnian LEROY TUDOR VERNON - Geor e Gilbert Davis Roy Batchelder Nelson g Kellogg Speed Harold B. Challiss Frank L. Slaker 155 Leona Canterbury Howard Young C aj I Divillilp COUIICII M98 SPRING-SUMMER ELIJAH ABRAHAM HANLEY - - Chairman William Geschger Theron XVinfred Mortimer Fred Delisle Finn Charles Edward Fingley Howard Spilinan Galt Clarence Mason Gallup Edward Charles Kunkle XVilliam Ross Schoemaker 17598-1899 AUTUMN-WINTER HENRY Tnoixms COLESTOCK - - Chairman Walter Scott Goode john Gallup Briggs Eban Mumford Peter YV. W'right Julian Emmet Yates james Robert Pentuff XVillia1n Henry Garlield Robert Bailey Davidson Gfildlldlk C0llllCil lotblj WINTER-SPRING JOHANNES BENONI ,Toners - - - Chairman William Clinton Alden Florence May Lyon Anne Bates Hersnian Herbert joseph Davenport SUMMER EDXVARD AMBROSE BECHTEL - - Chairman Malcolm XVilliarn Wallace Sophonisba Preston Breckenridge Florence May Lyon Harry Alvin Millis AUTUMN GEORGE NORLIN ---- Chairman Malcolm XYillian1 XVallace Sophonisba Preston Breckenridge Florence May Lyon Harry Alvin Millis 156 UIIIUQYSIID Houses SOUTH DIVINITY HOUSE. Dean E. B. Hulbert, Councillor. E. A. Hanley, Head. MIDDLE DIYINITY HOUSE. Head Professor E. D. Burton, Councillor. james Robert Pentuff, Head GRADUATE HOUSE. Head Professor A. XV. Small, Councillor. Asssistant Professor Camillo von Klenze, Head. SNELL HOUSE. Head Professor H. P. Judson, Councillor. Henry Gordon Gale, Head. BEECHER HOUSE. Assistant Professor F. J. Miller, Councillor. Elizabeth XVallace, Head. KELLY HOUSE. Assistant Professor Robert Morse Lovett, Councillor. Edith Burnham Foster, Head. NANCY FOSTER HOUSE. Associate Professor VV. D. Mac Clintock, Councillor. Assistant Professor Myra Reynolds, Head. LINCOLN HOUSE. Assistant Professor William Isaac Thomas, Councillor. Assistant Professor George Edgar Vincent, Head. WASHINGTON HOUSE. Instructor Ralph Charles Henry Catterall, Councillor and Head. SPELMAN HOUSE. Associate Professor Edward Capps, Councillor. Miss Dudley, Head. GREEN HOUSE. Head Professor Henry H. Donaldson, Councillor. Associate Professor Marion Talbot, Head. The following Houses outside the Quadrangles have been recognized by the University: CUMBERLAND PRESBYTERIAN DIVINITY HOUSE. Ira IV. Howerth, Councillor. XV. C. Logan, Head. DISCIPLES DIVINITY HOUSE. Associate Professor W. D. Mac Clintock, Councillor. Edward S. Ames, Head. ALPHA DELTA PHI HOUSE. 5700 Monroe Avenue. Professor G. S. Goodspeed, Councillor. Doctor Ferdinand Schwill, Head. BETA THETA PI HOUSE. 5757 Madison Avenue. Assistant Professor F. W. Shepardson,Council1or. Assistant Professor XVilliam Bisnop Owen, Head. 157 DELTA KAPPA EPSILON HOUSE. 5826 Washington Avenue. Assistant Professor James Rowland Angell, Councillor. Professor Shailer Matthews, Head. DELTA TAU DELTA HOUSE. 5661 Xvashiuglon Avenue. Director Ned Arden Flood, Councillor. Associate Professor Alexander Smith, Head PHI DELTA THETA HOUSE. 5750 Madison Avenne. I Associate Professor J. VV. Moncries, Councillor. Doctor Otis VVi1liam Caldwell, Head PHI KAPPA PSI HOUSE. S737 Monroe Avenue. Professor George Lincoln Hendrickson, Councillor. Professor Edmund Janes James, Head. PSI UPSILON HOUSE. 5660 Madison Avenue. ' Associate Professor Robert Francis Harper, Councillor. Assistant Professor George Carter Howland, Head. , SIGMA CHI HOUSE. 5714 Washington Avenue. Assistant Professor S. H. Clark, Councillor. Philemon Bulkley Kohlsaat, Head. CHI PSI HOUSE. 5833 Monroe Avenue. Associate Professor Starr W. Cutting, Councillor. Walter A. Payne, Head. BYVQUBYUCDV ' We , 631 I' Q-ff , Q to .HAT pm- V ig K 2 ilrfiiiliir il X W Wil ll.-xl I 1 ll. I PF li N l i' p my l lm, 32 ,-N ' K X' g Q 1 H . ,Aw Q - gg sg A "iii: if ii li 41. 1205, ll l l 4 l 061150 3 .F 'l iigidb I A L T i f l C ' ,.C Cyl militias... ' The Christian Union has charge of the organized reli- gious and philanthropic activities of the University. At present the organizations represented are the Young Men's Christian Association. the Young Women's Christian Asso- ciation, and the Philanthropic Committee, which has in charge the University Settlement. In addition to its rela- tion to these organizations, the Christian Union has charge of the University Yesper Services, held each Sunday afterooon. The Executive Committee of the Christian Union is composed as follows: e.1'-qfj'irz'o members: President and Chaplain of the University, and oiiicers of the three organ- izations already mentionedg members by election: President, Vice-President, and a representative from each of the great divisions of the University fjunior College, Senior College, Graduate School, and Divinity Schoollg member by appointment, the Secretary. The Executive Committee for the current year is as follows: PROFESSOR JOHN M. COULTER - - - - President CHARLES F. YODER - - - Vice-President F. C. CLEVELAND - - - Secretary and Treasurer members Dr. William R. Harper Dr. Charles R. Henderson R. lil. Lovett ' Fred Merrifield Howard P. Kirtley C. M. Gallup C. M. GALLUP H. P. KIRTLEY E. C. KUNKLE A. E. BESTOR C. B. COLEMAN C. J. BUSHNELL Amos A. Ebersole Anne Bowland Reed Grace Darling Anna McCaleb Beads of Gommittees - - - - Religious Meetings - A Bible Study Missionary - - Membership - Intercollegiate Relations - - Reception XV. A. CUTLER - Finance, Board and Rooms F. BARKER - - Employment Bureau 159 YOURS m2ll'S Cbl'iSIidII HSSOCi3li0lI. THOMAS C. CLENDENNING - - President M. R. MYERS - - - - Vice-President C. F. YODER Corresponding Secretary H. P. KIRTLEY - Recording Secretary E. H. STURTEVANT - Treasurer FRED BIERRIFIELD General Secretary YOURS WOIIIQIYS Cl7l'iSIi3ll flSSOCidliOll ANNE B. REED LUCY M. JOHNSTON HELEN BACHUS EDITH BULLIS ANNA MQCALEB Edith Zommiltees DEVOTIONAL Neal MEMBERSHIP Lucy Johnston PHILANTHROPIC Grace Bushnell MISSIONARY Joanna Barber PUBLICATION Mary Pardee FINANCE Helen Backus 160 - President - 'Vice-President - - Treasurer - Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary Grace Darling fn .5 .fl bv QQ. Q r' Sltbv Rm Q 1 S ' it IIIIF W X R :F + R -'J SN, bf' fllr M 3 lv 3 Q f:l' if NN ' , H l, EEDUJW u NfWfQ1, ,f 'W y ' I A14 c QD, tkl, a 2 s t I Z 0 E 5 il 4, .73 'Qi Jw 2, ,.' .Q-.,. Au' I . -'i E' . L, -, Alf ll . .- 1"- I .x P-3' lv.. 4" L v' A . ,. 6- , . ,IW L-. ll' O V.. .,x' ' . ...Z 5. .' A-f 1""1 ff 4+ "-" c-5. ' 3 1-. y."1r. V' 'f lvl "uf,-1. -' 'f ., bI'1!j , ,yn A. :J,' 5 ' ' ,. 'V ' A.. ' H , 0 f ,,.. , G-.-,..-. . -s ' -'- ' ' - 'f ." 'f.',: .1 ' - ,, - ff " ,f',:. . : 'M' :-.':. if-'WJ g' ' 1-.J 2--"fl-53 'J ,. z..-af.. 14--I - " rr:i- .' 1 ' fu" , , wijfh- ,, T, A X. - l ' Yr!! I x V I' 'Q ,'kVf,b,.M.p ! 'N ."' ' ., ,A ..- W . -4. 1 ',g "N Y' ' in -ff" 1 1 " n ' l ' . 4 I " . 'Aft' . 'ga - ' . f -H ,A - !5:'-.L,vHAJ,' f' '3i'af1f' -1. T-, 3 ,Nuys . 'I - 1 is , fi. .,.l. 5-44 1 ' . wg- ' w I , u.,,.:s!g 2 Q: .'l'J' s 1 Y I +A ' , -. . 1 9 + x f '.,.". V. . .1 .,-4. 1 "Uv . -fix' ' A 91332.-fy ' .1 1 way'-' 1 '. L .I ' ' ' r . .. , . - S I. .1 I, J, u .. . Q' . In M 4. it , H' ' . 4 1'-x ' 4 . , .- A " , S 'V "ibn : 1- . fail 'MIL . .i 3' V 'AC l', , I ' ? ' . . 'P 5"Q'4i'4.',Q' 1 . - 5 ? .5 f- -' - Q M, 1 1 . . ,. A 1 il Q. W.- X J , . . .H - , ... . . "7 W- V- 'ff -. 'lg ,"' I :lil Che Llniversiip oi Chicago Wttklp SPRING 1898 Edwin Campbell VVool1ey, '98, Managing Editor Joseph Edwin Freeman, 98, Assistant Managing Editor Charles H. Gallion, Business Manager Jlssistant Editors Ralph Leroy Peck, '98 Allen Grey Hoyt, '99 Nott XVil1iam Flint, 98 William Francis McDonald, '98 Josephine Turner Allin, '99 Florence McMahan, '99 Rowland Thunim Rogers, '00 Walter joseph Schmahl, 'OO Leroy Tudor Vernon, 'UO Frank B. Rae, jr. SUMMER 1898 joseph Edwin Freeman, '98, Managing Editor Allen Grey Hoyt, '99, Assistant Managing Editor Gharles H. Gallion, Business Manager Hssistant Editors William Simmons Broughton, '99 Van Sumner Pearce, '98 Frederick Bailey Thomas, '99 William Burgess Cornell, '99 Lewis Lee Losey, '00 Herbert Paul Zirnmermann, 'l AUTUMN 1898 Allen Grey Hoyt, '99, Managing Editor William Burgess Cornell, '99, Assistant Managing Editor Charles H' Gauion' i- Business Managers Horace L. Burr, i D Jlssistant Editors Van Sumner Pearce, '99 Josephine Turner Allin, '99 Thomas Carlysle Clendenning, '99 XValter Joseph Schmalil, '00 Leroy Tudor Vernon Lewis Lee Losey, '00 Parke Ross, '00 Robert Samuel McClure, 'UO Herbert Paul Zimmermann, 'Ol Harry VV. Belfield, 'Ol 163 g Jl WINTER 1899 William Burgess Cornell, '99, Managing Editor Walterjoseph Schmahl, '00, Assistant Managing Editor Charles L. Gallion Horace L. ' Business Managers Burr, 11551513111 Editors er Pearce, '99 Josephine Turner Allin, '99 Thomas Carlyle Clendenning, '99 Leroy Tudor Vernon, '00 Lewis Lee Losey, 100 Parke Ross, '00 Van Sumn Robert Samuel McClure, '00 Herbert Paul Zimmermann, Harry Williams Belfield, 'Ol Charles J. Bushnell Former 0fficers of Board mdlidglllg EC1lf0l'S E. M. Foster 1896, Frederick Day Nichols 1893, E. M. Foster 1896, G. W. Axelson 1893, H. L. Burr 1896, W. O. Wilson 1893, H. C. Murphy 1897, W. O. Wilson H. C. Murphy 1897, H. L. Ickes 1895, T. W. Moran 1897, M. P. Frutchey 1895, Frank W, Woods 1897, M. D. McIntyre 1895, Frederick Day Nichols 1898, M.D. McInty 1892, 1894, 11551513111 111811691119 Gdil0l'S 1894, T. W. Moran 1896, H. L, Iekes 1895, William Pierce Lovett 1897, J. P. Mentzer 1896, William Pierce Lovett 1897, M. D. McIntyre 1896, W. O. Wilson 1897, F. B. Thomas 1896, H. L. Ickes 1898, F. B. Thomas BIISIMSS mdNdQQfS 1892, XV. F. Durno 1895, C. H. Gallion 1592, c. s. Pike 1896, c. H. Gallion 1892, P. B. Kohlsaat 1897, C. H. Gallion 1893, C. H. Gallion 1898, C. H. Gallion 1894, C. H. Gallion 151551513111 BIISHIQSS managers 1895, XV. M. Kelso 1896, XV. M. Kelso 164 '0 fe I w L u, .... Q., v A .Y V' -1, Y. M. ,- .-.1-,. 'l' -.: .. WU' ' "Ji":. 'E' vin :H ,1 ,Q 13. I x . H- .c 1 H 5 -6 1. A,. bf. . , Q-3 . 7 JM .. .5 f 1'-1' . , s,.. , L- A H' , .W M, , A .,,, -.6 Q ' "MA, .. I. -r 4- 4 ,. x,"f,::g. 4 -:,..1. ' - ',5..' 1 ' - . -f -- ' . 1 I ,. . .gs wif 'N-.' W..U if Y. .1 A' ,:. W , " -'U 1 4"'- p, ..-' ,, T ' A . .414 4-, n .I-, . ,.. ,Iv 1 I' f - .... .1. -n., ,. 'll V1 lf Il' i'. ". ' 1' J-,gv . . " . 1-I... . qu. hw- .,'.,, s. . V 1-1 ...A , I... W1 ' 2 v . . 'l'. . 'A' -V 4 r. 1 FJ :' 1, , ' . J- h 23' if .'.-- I-'gig fligft .. .,1iV".. , ' ,r . . ,' V-: '-'. '.I' 'rf-' 'L' --"5 4 :, 7-',-'H' ': N "- if ff 1 'M , '4 -1 ik- '-' 4- H21-A-.f ' -"' 1'- -' 1' .- , ',: Fgf '..'Q,r'. :gf -. , . , 1 , . ' if -743 f'5?f"-'.a'f..2-V11 - ,if ,x.:j""" 'Q' n'."','T,- .. 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' , - . -, ',:'1 in Luz, w' wi- gi., ' "1 - f' 'C' ' -w'fm.wfQfff " I.. " .' '.5'm-','..'4'..rf--"' 'S 4- 2 L' . rm- ' .:' '.,l: '55-1-Q'f.? 'IW' ' . Z .- JH. .. :Ml . , - -4.-' f -, .- ,. ,gn-.-..-. r-N - . ' nf ' ., .z-' ,". . ',' "-513 . , It ,'4,,.'-1 ' 'J w ,'r'g-'. ." 1 -5. ' Q. , 4.7.2 2 .I jk Jvikv. ',-v . r--. sf' . , is '1"" .la, . g,..W,,, ,fJ,', ",.:,4. . . . '1'.",'4 -'z "mx V ..', . In ' -I LMI . .. ., "gn , f. U. ... 51-,' 'w' v ,.4 ,F--. x , U.. -r "11lI'i?f1N, ,: 'J '1 .. , .,,,. x ,.. ,Q . f"11,,. " .l",. 12: . ,A 1.-1 1: 11 11 ' 1 1 - . 1 A, 1 -,441 ,Q 41. 111 r1'1 7,11 W ,1 1 1 1 1x1 1 -115,11- ,,,1 111 51 1 1 4- .1 1 , 1 , .1 1 - 1 1 1 1 1 - x 1 ,1 1 Y 'u 11 1111' P... S4171 rf, 1 Q 1 4 1 , 1 1 '. 1 1 I A's . 1- If M 11. . J I Y11'. 1" . ' A "1 ' n , I 1..,,1,j 1. - 7.1 J, 1 11 1 1'-1:4,1 1 an 1 1 ' 1 1 . 111 ' Jn '11 34' ' 1 ' 111. I ,I 5,113 1- I- , 1 1 61521 Msn, 'R 1 Rl fxf 114 1 I 1 '1 H14 1r. .vi F n.'.::' Q4 341 153, 1 1... "K 1151 ,M Q.-1 A lj - I' F 1 , 1,11 V49 -, 111 Qing rf Cdl? 31161 600.511 managing ediI0l'S VValter joseph Schmahl Ralph Cnrtiss Manning BllSinQSS managers LeroyQTudor Vernon Charles Branden Davis HSSiS1dnf edif0l'S Ralph C. Hamill Emory Cobb Andrews Elizabeth Earnist Buchanan Charles Warren Chase Ernest Edward Irons Clarence A. McCarthy Marian Farwell Tooker Harvey Malcolm MacQuiston Harry Norman Gottlieb Clark Scammou Reed Jessie Nea Spray Parke Ross Helen Davida Harper 'Former 0fiicers of Board MANAGING EDITORS BUSINESS MANAGERS 1895, Philip Rand 1895, Walter Atwood 1895, Charles Sumner Pike 1895 Oswald Arnold 1896, Philip Rand 1896, Frederick Davies 1898 1898 , Arthur Sears Henning , Willoughby George XValling 1898 1898 Allen Grey Hoyt Earnest Hamilton Dillon HSSBUIII managing Ed1f0l'S 1898, Thomas Temple Hoyne 169 A 15 We e I K- ii- I ' MH,i.eYr,m 'oz 0ffiCers CHARLES LINDSHY BL'RRou:Hs - - President ANNE BowLAN1u REED - Vice-President CHARLES YERNER DREW Secretary RALPH C. HAMILL - Treasurer Executive Zommittee Grace J. Iiberhart Esther W. Sturges Irene Cook XVilliani France Anilerson XVilloughby George XValling LiNDLEx' XVILLETT ALLEN, E. X. JOSEPHINE TURNER ALLIN. The Quaclranglers: Member of the I'niversity Chorus, 'H61 Secretary of the Acaileinic Colleges, 'US-'UGQ Assistant Editor of the Weekly, 'SIG-'99, XYomen's Glee Club, '96, Iivecutive Conimiuee, Junior Day, 'Wig Class Custodian of the "Ivy Spade", 'SNS-'97, Dramatic Club, '97 929. WILLIAM FRANCE ANDERSON, A K. E. Owl and Serpent, Oriler of the Iron Mask: Three Quarters Club, Marshal, 'SN-'Uflg Dramatic Club. Presirlent '97-'EJSQ Tennis Team 'Ui-'97, XVrestling team-Light XVe-ight, 'SIHQ Senior Council 'HHQ Boaril of Editors, Cap anrl Gown, 'EIHQ junior College Scholarship in Public Speaking, Assistant Man- ager of the Musical Clubs 'UT-'HSL General Chairman of Washington Prome- nade, 'USL KATHERINE ANDREWS. IiLizARETH FLORENCE AvERv. FRANK PLTTERBAUGH BACHINIAN. HELEN XVHITNEY BACKYS. BIARGARET BAKER. 170 ALVIN LESTER BARTON, B. GJ. H. junior College COuncillor,'1Senior College Councillor, Mandolin Club '96A'98, Track Team '97-'98. EDNA BEVANS. RAY RICKOFE BORUFF. Lincoln House, '97, Basket Ball Team, '97, HELEN BIERCEDES BREHL. FREDERICK AUGUSTUS BROWN. Track Team, '97 and '98, Senior College Council, '98-'99, Glee Club, '98-'99. CHARLES LINDSEV BURROUGHS, A. A. fb. Owl and Serpent, Track Team, '95, '97, '93, '99. Relay Team, '98, Glee Club, '97, '95, Senior Council '93, Marshal '98-'99, Senior College Repre- sentative on the Board of Athletics, '98-'99, Honorable Mention, '97, History Scholar, '97-'9P5. SARAH ELIZABETH BUTLER. Mortar Board, Nu Pi Sigma. LUCY HAMILTON CARSON. CHARLES PRESTON CARY. ELIZABETH CHAMBERLIN. CHARLES XVARREN CHASE, fb. A. 0. AINSWORTH WHITNEX' CLARK, X. mlf. President, The Forum, '98, Scholarship in junior Declamations, '97, Finance Committee, XVashingtOn Promenade, '99, Senior College Councillor, '99, Scholarship in Senior Debate, '98, NIAURICE GORDON CLARKE, A. A. 42. Owl and Serpent. JOHN JOSEPH CLARKSON, junior College Scholarship in French '98-'99. GEORGE EDEVARD CONGDON, The Forum, Lincoln House, Morgan Park Club. lVIAR-TOR IE BENTON COOKE. WILLIAM BURGESS CORNELL, A. K. E. Three Quarters Club, Glee Club, '95-'97 and '98 '99, junior Day Committee '96, Philolexian, '95, Weekly Board, '98-99, Managing Editor, Winter, '99, GRACE ALLEN COULTER. 171 CHARLES NEWMAN CREYVDSON. JOHN JACKSON CRUMLEY. VVARD AUGUSTUS CUTLER. HELEN KELCHNER DARROW. JOSEPH ALMOND DIXON. DANIEL XVEBSTER DORNSIFE. CARLETON ELLSWORTH DOUGLASS. CHARLES VERNER DREW. A. A. df. Owl and Serpentg Marshal, '96-'99g Geology Scholarship '98-'99, AMOS A. EBERSOLE. PERCY BERNARD ECKHART, A. K. E. Order of the Iron Maskg Three Quarters Clubg Dramatic Club '96-99 Presi- dent '98-'99g Weekly Board 'Wig Artist Cap and Gown, '96, and '98: Senior Scholarship in Oratory, Spring, '98g Junior Day Committee, '97. ABRAHAM ALCON ETTELSON. Junior and Senior Councillor: Scholarship in English '98-'99, Scholarship in Declamation, '98. NEWELL BIONTAGUE FAIR, X. YP. Track Team '97-'98, Relay Team, '98, Junior Day Committee, '98, "Re- serves" '96, SARA FEILCHENFELD. JULIA IVIETCALFE PINNEY. LOUIS THOMAS FOREMAN, 41. I'. A. EDWARD FRANTZ. JOSEPH EDXVIN FREEMAN, A. K. E. Owl and Serpentg Order of Iron Maskg Managing-Editor the XVeekly Sum- mer, '98g Scholarship in Senior College Debate Summer, '98, CARRIE ELLA FREUDENTHAL. JULIUS HENRY PHILIP GAUSS, A. K. E. ROY COLEMAN GRISWOLD, B. G. II. ALICE HAIGHT. SYBIL XVERNE HALL. OLE HALLINGLY, JR. JACOB GISH HAMAKER. 172 RALPH C. HABIILL, A. K. E. Owl and Serpent, Order of the Iron Mask, Three Quarters Club, Junior College Council '96-'97, Chairman of junior Day, '97, Senior Council '98-'99, Marshal, '98-'99, Foot-ball team '96, '97, '98, LOLA BIARIE HARMON. JEROME BENJAMIN HARRINGTON. ELLA MARTHA HAYES. JOSEPHINE FRANCES HAZELTON. WILLIAM M. HENDERSON. ARTHUR SEARS HENNING, WP. Y. Owl and Serpent, Order of the Iron Mask, Associate-Editor "Maroon," '95- '96, Literary Editor, "Weekly," '96-'97, Managing Editor, "Cap and Gown," '98, Dramatic Club, '97-'99, Mulberry Club '96-'99, Junior Day Committee, '96,-'97. ALBERT ELLSWORTH HILL. HENRY SCOTT HOLLIS. Lincoln House, Morgan Park Club, Glee Club, '98-'99. ALLAN HOPKINS. Charter member of the Forum. CORA ROCHE HOWLAND. Mortar Board. ALLEN GREY HoYT, B. G. H. Owl and Serpent, Order of the Iron Mask, President of Class of '99, Business Manager, "Cap and Gown," '98, Weekly Board '97-'98, Managing Editor, '98, Chairman, Junior Promenade, '98, Junior Councillor, '98, VVinner of Prize in Senior College Debate, '98, Junior Day Committee, '97, CLARA DELIA HULBERT. PEARL LOUISE HUNTER. Women'S Mandolin Club, '97-'99, Senior Councillor '98, Senior College Scholar in Romance, '97-'98, DAVID GUY HURLBURT. WILLIAM HAYDEN JACKSON. Mandolin Club, '94-'97 and '98-'99, Scholarship in Latin, '96-'97. LAWRENCE MERTQN JACOBS, B. G. H. Dramatic Club, Oxford Club, Senior College Scholarship in Public Speaking, Dec, '98, Chicago Minnesota Debate, Jan. '99, Senior College Debate, Mar. '99, Chicago-Michigan Debate, Apr., '99, Winner of Second Prize, Oratorical Contest, Feb., '99. 173 RUTH ISABEL JOHNSON. LUCY MARIAN JOHNSTON. Charter Member of the Idlersg Honorable Mention in Junior Colleges. BALFOUR IOHNSTONE. EMMA CHRISTINE JONAS. ARTHUR TABER JONES. Lincoln House, '98-'99g University Chorus '95-985 Senior Scholar in Physics '97-'98, FLORENCE RACHAEL JONES. BIABEL AVERY KELLS. ROBERT IWCDONALD KIRKLAND. CHARLES KLAUBER. Entrance Scholar, '96, ALICE AUSTIN KNIGHT. Mortar Board, Nu Pi Sigma, Dramatic Club, XVonIen's Glee Club, '96-'97 XVonIen's Mandolin Club '97-'98g Junior Promenade Committee, '97, MARY NICKERSON LAKIN. Mortar Board, Nu Pi Sigma. ALMA DE LALANDE LE DUC. IRWIN LESTER. DIINNIE LESTER. ELIZABETH HATHAW'AY LINGLE. MARY XVINIFRED LOUGHRIDGE. VVILLIAM PIERCE LOVETT. Glee Club '94-1153 Editor of sity Choir. OLIVE IWAGUIRE. CLAUSINE MANN. PAUL MANDEVILLE. MURIEL ANNETTE BIASSEY. DIORTON ADOLPH IWERGENTHEIM. ANNA ELIZABETH HIILLER. DIARY SUSAN MILLER. CLARA LILIAN MOONEY. XVeekly '94-'96, Assistant Marshal '97, Univer 174 glib . fl. S 1' ,. I i lu , vnv- ,f I gg, , 3 A , 'Lf ,V A-, 7 R f ., fi ,f I I-,Mi xx X ff I fqife- W' ' My ,J -'.3'.d,. 5.51-5 7 iff, A if 4' '5' .. Z' .1 ff - E ,F rdf. If .M0 7771 is hi , W I DIAXIMILIAN MORGENTHAU, JR, .. ,El ,. f, I A, f 'W iii f .5 rf gs ,' ERICH INIUENTER. '- A, tt.: -,Q I-.X fi 14, , . g., "lm 'EJ nf ELIZABETH ill.-KRGARET INOLL ' N' X--' 'PZ' 'ff - 1 , ft, CORNELIA STEVV.-KRT OSBORNE. rw f rg' f Sigma Club. ' "XX , 'Ar : 794 C P P . I..- X. Y E - -Ai ,rf ,,f- I-,r IA! X QAROLINE ,oI.I.Es ADDOLR. ' ,g,,.f hum ARTHUR EUGENE PALMQUIST. ARMY k - 1, ' J BIARILLA ZEROYDA PARKER. liz, 1 Q . EVERETT JOSEPH PARSONS. ff' ' Ti XYAN SUAINER PEARCE, B. G. H. XVeekly Board, Assistant Editor, 'HS-'UHQ MarSlIal's Aide at the Mid-Autumn Convocation, '95 RIETTA L. PERSONS. ANNA LOCKXVOOD PETERSON. Spelnian House: Oxford Clubg Economic Clulig junior Council '96, Senior Council, '98, HUGH JAMES POLREY. R. M. RARB. BIARTHA BINFORD RAILSBACK. ANNE BOXVLAND REED. Quadranglersg Nu Pi Sigmag Vice-President, Class of '99g President NV. C. A., '98-'993 Xl'Ornen'S Mandolin Club, 'SNS-'HT. RUFUS BIAYNARD REED, X. XII. FREDERICK EDWIN REEVE. CHARLOTTE LOUISE REICIl3I.-KN. KATE CLEMENTINE RISING. JAMES XVOLKE Ross. Mandolin Club 'HS-'9U. GEORGE HOYT SAKVYER. HIARY BLANCHE SIMMONS. SEPTIIIUS SIssON. FRED YVARREN SMEDLEY. BYRON BAYARD SMITH, III. Y. of Y. Mandolin Club '95-'99g Leader '95-'99g Track Team 'HS-H03 Captain '99, Tiger's Head, University Band. NETTIE SPENCER. 175 IESSIE NEA SPRAY. Mortar Board, Senior Council, '97, Washington Promenade Committee, '97, Women's Mandolin Club, '96-98, Leader '97-'98, "Cap and Gown" Board '99, "Valedictorian," Class of '99. JOE CECIL STONE. ELIZABETH MARGUERITE STRAUCHON. CHARLOTTE ROSE TELLER. Mortar Board. CATHERINE TORRANCE. WILLIAM RORERT TYNDALE. ROGER THROOP VAUGHAN, A. A. -if. Councillor, '98, Honorable Mention in junior College. CLYDE BUCHAN WALKER. WILLOUGHBV GEORGE WALLING, A. K. E. Owl and Serpent, Order of the Iron Mask, Three Quarters Club, President of junior Day, '96, Managing Editor, "Cap and Gown," '98, Marshal '97-'98, Head-Marshal, '98-'99, Chairman of Senior College Council, Autumn. '98. JOHN JAMES WALSH, fb. K. III. Order of the Iron Mask, Three Quarters Club, Junior College Scholarship in Public Speaking, junior College Councillor, Junior Promenade Com- mittee, '97, JONATHAN EDWARDS WEBB. University Chorus, Philolexian, Foot-ball Team, '96, '97 and '98, CHARLES WEBER. ELLA CORLETTE WEICHARD. CARL FREDERICK WEINBERGER. MICHAEL HILLMAN WELLS, B. 0. 1'I. Senior Councillor, Scholarship in Senior College Debate. MARIE WERKMEISTER. Senior College Scholar i11 Physics '98-'99. WILLIAM KELLEY WRIGHT, 111. F. A. CHARLES FRANCES YODER. Senior College prize in Oratory, '98, Vice-President of the Christian Union Corresponding Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. ALBERT NORVAL YOUNG. 176 Ill m2lIl0l'idllI JUDGE DAN1Er. L. SHQREY, died March 4th, 182151. ASSISTANT PRQFESSOR BAUR, died June 25th, 1898. Miss SUSAN CUTLER, died February 24th, 1899. MR. PAUL LEBIAITRE, died August 3d, 1898. MR. JOHN BIANLY CLENDENNING, died December 29th, 1699 n u'S"" .y "ug , .- ,, , K. .1 nv. 1' .4 ' wyp. uh' :ew -, -1.4.1 L ",:1Vf,H -.L MV: me 1 I I 1. ..5.,xI I f. .. Q, F-',1..,. . I Q "'.1 V , IR.-MII I '- IJ-f'L,,QI I I. I I -.-- : 3 K II '- . . II ff.. -f. I I,. ,II II ,,III5I,III.II.I I I I w 1 if '. .I I ..iIII.IqIlII5ff, QI IIIII15 II IIIIIII .r If "1 If-. ,- N.. II:I ' f n I 1' .M , '.' -V. -3 -1 'r 'I 355- I . I III'.i..i .ilu-..II IIIIIIIIIIIIJ II III I I . 'M 'Iff'.III IIIPV I.I,I. II-. I ., III .I I I I .QLITI ix-:I .' ,.. - w- ,I pg' - U., .- ,I ,I - ,I ,,.IrgIIIII I.-,Q bn-1, ,I G- . . ' ,. . -, 4.5 FV " . " A 255.--. . . ,. - I-' . hz' ' I. ff?'- '. ' . ' 'ff ..' f 'lfvff I 9-. . . ' I ' f I , ,... II V-.',3I. - in up ' ."Qs - " 'Q gf ' ' I. ,I QI - v . 'II II ,j,fI.:,,' f1f:,'.',. 4, " 9 .. :I, - I I " I ,II I . 9 2 I . I II II. 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N V -:I I I." -I A, W' -. -, . ,I 5' 53, ff7K't'1QQ-' ' - '-5 E: -Epi' ui" uf' , 2' I ' .. .3 I ,. f' " ' 2 f' "1 '. ,N-Y1f1Iif'.1ffg'..I" -.,.. gb I A , ,M 1 . Ik ,, I , - , - I of--.-9 NI: , I I I I FII. 1-I, I , Q I , . t' I A H , , pg, .5 . I 1 . -.- . - U -I A . .-,LI ,'-,I -A ' Ir--I I V- . - ,I ,A w. I, .,-1 I , -.+I . ,S . IQ I Vg' ,"-I.. ,- ., Q-'II', f W -, xr "f MIL ,N . - Y-.rf ,711 -Q, I A FIS- I 45 .I-.QI I, ,I igj ' hx..-A I hV',I5f'k XI . --I I ,. -, , - . I f, . Ji. ,I I, I, In . l Il '.'Y I-HI In i1,- ' ' H -- f, - J: 1I,Inr T - 4 1 5 21, M - 21' ilwhu.. ilk:-U. A 'lx-. ,-tk:-,g ,' t V t I 'U' 4.'v.,n. "W 'z. L" L .r I 3 . ' ' 1 ' I I I- J:-,' 4 l ' , I "9"' ' . 5.51,-Irw , I , I, ,.,.,. .2 I -.I . -... ,u.,,, ff- ' ,' ff f'-.' A ' I- I-' -,-II, . .1-,J A .A,,"1, 54:41 ,b' Q ' I' -.I ' .Q : I 'F -'g..II. ' , , ' ' ' - . 14'-.I-1.-:I I--J-Q, t' I. I, - .y . , , .I ' I ,"' . -' . I . ,. K ' ' I :I , I I J I I '-ji il I4 I i.. A 'AFL' , .4 V, ff- .I 1 -I -I -V I , :MII2-' '5 gf -N' ?. 37' '- '. . - wa W. Wm' ' f ' J' 'I I. Wm-if V 3 ,I W1 -M ,,.l'1g f:Ij3" , U' gf ' '- II. --1" In ' iw? -V553 , ,, 1 .- ,g?i"- . H' Jaw: . ,' If 1 E " 'I ,.,,.,,i:"',Q' i ,gil . I -HI "uf, ,. -. .zu N .,-,-- H I PM .1,."Q12 ,- XII?" , ,H 1 .1 I-. --MU .iyPygqn. :Y.'I, J". fg7"ff:'-NH 4 F ', If MLN'-" . .-, , ,, . . D--JI ----:-.4 1 I I II 1 v ' .I:ig':c.5II " . -9 I'. 'I.-'.',I IJL- , LH, T' , gi: tw 4 AMOS ALONZO ST.-XGG Director of Athletics. Li ,u, . "QQ-.A u, .- , ,. 'Tia V. .LL U, M FQ A, 1' ' 1 4' O A 4 - FP' E. H F, 90. 1 -'V B v L , P Q '. 5 L -r" W - ilu ,v. ll F. J . Y. lr ml,- ,- A. 3 T., ,f'f.'5' , "!fT."7?'? Q i i " 5-r-- In X Q , .. ,. ..,',.J X Y y "' Qlx 1 1 ,I- -I 4 w 5 - . - I ."l' , . 1 1 . 1 . L 1 Q I - I I n.,-K' .rw J'l' Lv ,,, If I S 4- 1-,'-v Q L ' v J 4 W A r n ,'. 1 , I .1 .. ':. ..,,, ,qu r nays- , : . 5 A ' vi' ' i v "P W . . I wi, ' Us The The The The fllblelic Representatives Graduate Schools - HENRY GORDON GALE Divinity Schools - ROBERT BAILEY DAVIDSON Senior Colleges JOHN PRESTON MENTZER junior Colleges - - LEROY TUDOR VERNON Zoacbes AMOS ALONZO STAGG HENRX' GORDON GALE CHARLES FOSTER ROBV HORACE BUTTERWORTH 183 l K- ll! iffy: f-f- fc-s'f'f Ugg ff rx, NL :gif -,fi f f X 44 Ceglgffifis Z f Wffcfft ff r N Q 'l,suNQ'X,4 LEA ' . '. , 'Ill'-F U An! fir? P L 3 ' of or J Q Wy lf j ,rye A -- - ' ,ts Q V 'ZH few ' ' If '- ' C . -L' l huybiiig ff f X MU l l X 1 l i i f if , J, Xq if i ' N . ,Q . ogg' 1 111 QP 'V J L X v VV F I - ,L is f',,' f 'yfffytlv as lg 1 it , - M! f. -i v ,W X x tj ? llflllyr , k 1 KQ X K U 4 f J 1JflLi4f'7ilwls7l5ilfM X , 1 X W f twig ' ' Ti fffyl H. SSW ,gt :Xi':,,1f si-,fi 1 X ff feflh US 6X-if 'fflifsll if "r- 77nY q YT I fflfueso ' XValter Scott Kennedy Charles Foster Roby Maurice Gordon Clarke Fred Harvey Calhoun Charley Lindsey Burroughs XValter Joseph Schniahl Mark Asa Cleveland jonathan Edward XVebb Ralph C. Hamill Kellogg Speed Hugh Guthrie Leighton Fred Merrifield Leroy Tudor Vernon Byron Bayard Smith Carter Brown Milton Howard Pettit Newell Montague Fair Mortimer Parker XYillian1 Arthur Moloney james Ronald Henry Frank Louis Slaker lirlwin George Allen Julian Frank Goodenow Arthur Edwin Beers joseph Chalmers Ewing Bert James Cassells Orville Silyester Burnett XValter james Cayanaugh Alvin Lester Barton Baudinot Gage Leake lVillian1 Hiddleson Andrews lVillia1n Thaw Gardner Turner Burton Smith Dan Brouse Southard Ernest August XVriedt Hall Mac Elree Paul Donald Macfluiston Charles Dutlield XV. Halsey Harvey Malcolin Macgjuiston IM Vtll' TH V V' ' 4 Ar- 1Q'V',rV.' . V-VV V VQV H,-V VVVIV- . -1, V' V V: . -'V' 2713! vl' ,- V :V Vw V ..+- ,V:: VV. ,. '.V V-',VV 1 : VVVV EVA" V tV,"'-V V, V-' .-VV VT V W, VVAV V V. V ,V 7 IV . . 3. " V " ' ' '- V V"-"VN, 1' Z VV , 'V X f V, ' V V. V :.' .' "V V'V 1 V V V V ' ' V, A-VV 1' V . ,V - VV - S ,V .V - Q-gf I '- V . V.. X -VV . V" V-. V-,V .Vw VV-V , 5. VVI' V -VV A" V4 vw ,.. .V V ,,VV V V. ..V V',.'.V VVVAV V OV V, ,, V.' - V ma' V V UVM , V, .o, 'V' VV V V ,.., V V 1 f 'VV V V-3' V ,iw .V V.: V tvl s I '- VV V.I V V V n-V. V . W' V V ,V ,VVVV V. V ,Vw VV V ' 'V' ,NV.,A V -..:VV'- ' '-.V V - V-, ,V .V H -V V V VV., VU. .V. V V XV, . V V 1. V, V. VA, V V, VV V - VV' V. J ' V W V V . V 1 V V V V V. V V V . V V . N V V V ' , ' V 'V 1. VV V 'V- V Y V V V V V V V V- '1.,..L,V' ' V V .V V VV: '..f' VJLLVPVV VM 1 VV,ym,',.', . .A V V . , Ill- - .if ,rig f'V,V:AVn1,l -.Vg-,VV '-9,511 4' "V..M'Vf' 'FYI fm ,V, Vx,-VNS? V . VNTVI 4 . VM J ' . VV1. -.Vi V VV -T 1. , V 'V-'j V -Vw W4 V. VV ' 9 .'ve EV VV. Hg V 55 V 9.1 V J! Z ."Lg:V 'nf :VWQV1 , , 'A' -, a 'V ,-r '55-56 5 .,,4 L4 A Zi K XY-I Tig' I J r X wan, ........,.,..v . f00I:Bdll-SQBSOII 1898 Several events conspired to make the foot-ball season of 1898 especially noteworthy. The schedule practically made three distinct goals to be reachedg viz: to make a good showing against Pennsylvania at Philadelphia on October 29, on the occasion of the first trip ever made to the East by a University of Chicago foot-ball teamg to get back at Wisconsin, who had defeated Chicago the previous year and with whom there had been waged a bitter contention re- garding the professionism of Maybury and Cochems g and to win the championship of the West from Michigan on Thanks- giving Day. The first two Chi- cago gloriously accomplishedg the latter she was prevented from securing by only the nar- rowest margin in a game in which all of the accidents of the day were plainly in Mich- igan's favor. With the passing of this sea- son comes the retirement of a number of men who by their splendid playing and loyal de- votion during the past three or four years have been largely responsible for bringing Chicago to the top in foot-ball. To Herschberger, Clarke, Hamill, Mortimer and Cavanagh, the University owes a debt of grat- itude. ,Silt WD R-.ti-wav-A.Sc.Tx L K0 QIVE than M to receive. JJ 1 git is more blessed 'V ' 2 '-r. .' G J I-,ir N3 'Zrf.,fg.. l 4 .3 tr - A . V " J , A- 'u ' '. , '1 my . -uw" - -4451 D v. :X - a , Q . 1 'Pa Qs A I .- 4--r . ' J A - C . ' U . V 1 ' 'nf 7, .- , , . J A I A A If . .zmlm f tt'mAx',::1L. , . Angela . A . .4 1-an Vi-' " ii? lf J X! F' , 'Q K M is 6 44 s X41 A t vm 1 1 X' X ,JG Fir- 11 .-.,. ...,..-'x ' TL Center Left Guard - Right Guard Left Tackle - Right Tackle Che Ceam KELLOGG SPEED ' XVALTER JAMES CAVANAGH ORVILLE SILVESTER BURNETT - CLARENCE JAMES ROGERS - - THERON YVINFRED - JONATHAN EDWARDS WEBB WALTER JOSEPH SCHMAHL .K Left End 3 JAMES RONALD HENRY CWX Right End - - - RALPH C. HAMILLC' C J Quarter Back - VVALTER SCOTT KENNEDY fCaptainj , X Y c BIAURICE GORDON CLARKE Left Half ' ' JAMES RONALD HENRY' Right Half - CLARENCE BERT HERSCHBERGER If BA Full Back - - - - FRANK LOUIS SLAKER fic!-Sch? SUBSTLTUTES : 'gg Mark Asa Cleveland Bert James Cassels Joseph Chalmers Ewing Edwin George Allen gg, X- ,Z l - Peter kuolla -RSX fl Record ofthe team for :sos Ll F gf.-ff ll! September 24 Chicago vs Knox College, Marshall Field 22-0 September 28 Chicago vs. Rush Medical Coll., Marshall Field 8-0 -:rLff-if J, ' October 1 Chicago vs. Monmouth College, Marshall Field 24-0 ZW October 5 Chicago vs. Coll. of Ph. and Sur., Marshall Field 22-0 ly Q- October S Chicago vs. Iowa State Univer'y, Marshall Field 38-0 , October 15 Chicago vs. Beloit College, Marshall Field 21-0 1 X ,fi X October 22, Chicago vs. Northwestern Univ., Marshall Field, 3 l-5 EVA-IF , October 29 Chicago vs. University of Peuna., Philadelphia, ll-23 JJ! November 5, Chicago vs. Purdue University, Marshall Field, 17-0 if f November 12, Chicago vs. University of Wis., Marshall Field G-0 if November 24, Chicago vs. University of Mich., Marshall Field ll-12 1 l J J X lf fl ll F A' 111-24. lf. . t- x Total points scored: by Chicago 214, by opponents 40. Number of games won, 93 lost, USN CD2 1898 SCl'llbS The Scrub team had always been a variable quantity up to 1897, when the num- ber of candidates out, warranted some organization. The 1898 scrubs were the best scrubs up to date, and undoubtedly could have " licked " the 1897 scrubs all around Marshall Field. The life of a " scrub" is a hard one. He is beaten and " cussed" on the field, and off the field receives no recognition. To the " Subs," the " Scrubs," and the " Dubs" the 'Varsity team owes much of its glory. the 'Ceam Center - Left Guard - Right Guard Left Tackle - Right Tackle - Left End - Right End Quarter Back Left Half - LEIGHTON AND C. YVEBB - SNIDER AND GREGORY - BUHLIG AND XVRIEDT GAYLORD AND VVALLING - ELDRIDGE AND RICH - CLENDENNING - SMITH AND OSBORNE BROXVN AND HOLSTE - KIRK AND WALKER V I Right Half - SHELDON AND GOODENOXV Full Back FREEMAN AND HUNGATE l Schedule of Games Scrubs vs. English H. S. - - 5-5 jf waging 4-- ll 1 v ' Scrubs vs. Bennett Medical College - 12-6 1f"""': U X Y . If -'1 Scrubs vs Morgan Park Academy - 5-22 I E15 Scrubs vs. East Aurora H. S. - 11-18 1 I 51.- A + 1 Aeegllfr c D E , l is A ll 189 Ivxu i f- eeif A C KU? fox J I X I K 'J Y? - ' lk , xx., QW 'Y A 5 ' , , - N i L -ww R ' ' 54 i'dislXX , K. ' , ,OL .ffff uf ', A- ! : ' Q 'ff lf aff X X f'f.Tl,f'. k 'IT I ff . f 1' 1' A L I ' f ' V N " IC, ,f I , -17 f . O I sw Of' 2' Ji" , '-.L 'I '-s ef. 'A Y , . Y 'v - z- . X 14- 1211. . -fri -W" XJ: ' ",f - C ,, 1 -Fw ifvxj ' ' fvvijlfit if tw J , - W7ff",f-' P' JQQQQIFYS-T-1 ' 4' ee To A -Y 4d 'Cy' ' f T L. f fE5Wny7f,7Uf5jQ'ff 'T Season l898 There was DO Championship decided in base-ball in 1698. Chicago, Michigan and Illinois each had an equally poor claim to the l1OnOr. Chicago won all four games of the series with Illinois, and was in turn beaten in three Out Of the tive games With Michigan. Michigan was twice shutout by Illinois, losing her series and Championship claims. Chicago had the highest percentage Of games won. Che team VVILLIAM THAW GARDNER Catcher TURNER BURTON SMITH Pitcher VVALTER SCOTT KENNEDY lst Base DIAURICE GORDON CLARKE - - 2d Base FRED DIERRIFIELD - 3d Base LEROV TUDOR VERNON Short Stop DAN BROUSE SOUTHARD - Left Field CLARENCE BERT HERSCHBERGER - Center Field GEORGE HOYT SAXVYER tCaptain5 - Right Field Substitutes ERNEST AUGUST XVRIEDT HUGH GUTHRIE LEIGHTON HALL BREADEN MAC ELREE 190 g 3 . " .525 ' Sigh " i u 1. .454 1 I fi 1 I -J UGYSHV HGSCDBII CQEIIII ,.,. J- Mal' 4 in . 'Y' 73" F' A .1 -J',w.',Qt1'Am L' Y ,.' ., '11-, : J. " ' ' ' -.,, 1-I .I. , ' ' .1 . f,,' .if I'l"1I' ..f-" ifbl' :Qs .4 pw -. N' L' ' -fllifffzl' '-I gf". -'vs U nk ing' 'yu' Hn ,II - 45" 16:45, :"w lu' . .v v . :flllff ' "5'.3g1' va ' U -- 'e 521. 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Mc'-'-I-5 1 ,,.,. -- u u vs. Rush Medical College April Chicago April Chicago April Chicago April Chicago May Chicago May Chicago May Chicago May Chicago May Chicago May Chicago May Chicago May Chicago May Chicago May Chicago May Chicago june Chicago june Chicago june Chicago June Chicago Summary of Cl7iC2lSO'S Base Ball RQCOTCI FOI' 1898 vs. Beloit College, vs. Northwestern University, vs. XVhitings, vs. University of Michigan, vs. Northwestern University, vs. University of Michigan, vs. University of Illinois, vs. Northwestern University, vs. University of Michigan, vs. Beloit College, vs. University vs. University vs. University vs. University vs. Vniversity of Illinois, of Illinois, of Michigan, of Notre Dame, of Illinois, vs. Lake Forest University, vs. U. of Chicago Graduates, vs. U. of Chicago Graduates, points: Chicago, 1323 opponents, 90. Chicago, 123 opponents, 7. Marshall Marshall Marshall Marshall Field Field Fieldi Field Ann Arbor, Evanston, Ann Arbor, Marshall Field Evanston, Marshall Field, Marshall Field Champaign, Champaign, Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field, Games won: 4-3 10-3 1-2 22-4 4-5 6-1 4-2 12-9 8-1 2-4 1-4 6-5 13-4 1-4 9-12 2-1 7-1 5-12 15-13 The batting and iielfling records for all practice and chanipionsliip games were as follows: Games bat Gardner, C. Smith, p. Kennedy, lst b. Clarke, 2d b. Vernon, s. s. Merrifield, 3d b. Southard, l. f Herschberger c. f. Sawyer, r. f. XVriedt, sub Leighton, sub. McElree, sub. Times 2 3 at base base Home Er- Aver- Hits Average hits hits runs Chances rors age 77 21 312 4 5 1 1 16 b 948 87 27 310 1 1 1 '71 9815 951 38 384 9 6 2 343 11 968 86 32 372 7 0 0 104 971 86 21 244 5 2 0 131 22 639 95 29 305 8 0 1 106 924 72 17 236 2 2 0 42 T813 95 41 432 8 2 3 35 8251 250 25 284 4 1 1 23 GEM 32 6 187 0 0 0 1 1 616 38 9 237 1 0 0 97 945 32 8 250 1 0 0 36 UI l 193 g, QQMM , A 4 ' . Q i F " 5: 13 If I,-I QI .ii 9 ,,--' ,- gl , ,f fwa fx it I . fi f FQ? 1 4' 5 f' n fa ' Vg A . tt es? 4, E , ,- , t my ' -f , ff' , . 4 ng ,I '1 4' ,f r , X- ? 4 5" A ' 'if' 1 , --FP wx- ' X X, rf. - :IEj5:-ne, , if'fVfgZ?Wf5"'?" ill-W 'ff' " X JQVZZZ44' - ' -' X . L ff, .-..::g.1:3::, gas' 4 ' ,ul '- -'f H N ,.,g,,,. ,,,,, V , Ln 15? Cas-ii: ,-'Z ,ice 'V'--. .:::-Q " 1:.::e!15a?5q'5fyo'3' ' "1f'I "" ',M f- Jfivlci ogergap 'QL ' ' ' ,A SEASON 1898 That track athletics in the VVest have shared with other college sports a rapid increase in popular favor, is evidenced by the great numbers in attendance at the more important meets from year to year. From a position of obscurity, track athletics have rapidly risen to a plane where they share, in a degree only slightly less, the interest bestowed upon foot-ball and base-ball. A parallel improvement in methods of coaching and training has gone on meantime, and records have been cut again and again. The year 1898 was marked by three events Worthy of more than passing notice in the world of athletics. Pursuing a chronological order, the first to be considered is the Athletic and Gymnastic Tournament, given under the auspices of the University of Chicago, at Tattersall's, on March 5th. This meet, far surpassing in extent any- thing of the sort ever before undertaken in this section, was successfully run off under the direction of Professor A. A. Stagg, the grade of the performances being especially high. Besides the regular track and field events for colleges, high schools and acad- etnies, gymnastic fencing and wrestling contests were decided. Perhaps of greater importance from a national stand-point, was the representa- tion of Chicago and Michigan in the college relay championship race at Philadelphia on April 30th. It was tl1e first tin1e the West had ever been represented at this meet, and the highly satisfactory showing niade, especially by My 7-A Chicago, is certain to result in a more cordial recognition of western skill and sportsmanship. That Chicago should have won on a foul is unfor- , ii X 'il '-N tunate, but there is some compensation in the knowledge that Without ll 1 the foul, her chances of victory would have been at least even. if The last of the significant features of the year was the secession of ll . in K Chicago, Michigan and Illinois from the lVestern Intercollegiate Associa- 191 -v 'tm rl -I U. tion, followed by the holding of a triangular meet on Marshall Field on June 4th, at the same time that the annual championship meet of the association was being decided at Parkside. Maybury and Cochems of Wisconsin had been charged with profession- alism by Michigan and Chicago, the charges being supported by apparently indisput- able athdavits, in spite of which the men were exonerated by the Graduate Executive Committee, on the night of june Sd. The secession followed at once, Illinois standing by the two who had brought the charges. The YV. I. A. A. A. attempted to retaliate by suspending from competition the men who competed at the trian- gular meet, and was upheld by the Amateur Athletic Association, an M allied body. The triple alliance was too strong, however, 3 mandates , Nga' , of the opposing association were passed over unheededg and a linal retraction of obnomous measures and a reconciliation was the inevita- g ble sequence. This was brought about at a peace conference held at IT7 X ,b the Auditorium on September 28th. Meantime Maybury and Cochems ' -' " N had been adjudged professionals by the Wisconsin Athletic board, so 1 ' ffl Qi, l that all cause of dissension was gone. u ,. , . w . , 2 , Zhicagvs Record for :sos , I X Ui ' During the year Chicago, contested in seven intercollegiate meets, A 4, J-Vt winning three outright, tying one, and losing three. The first meet A 0,25 QL ,-,4 of the year, an in-door dual contest with Northwestern, went to the f 5 visiting school by virtue of Stagg'sconsent to the proposition to strike s from the list of events the mile run and the mile walk, for which Northwestern had no men entered. The Tattersall's carnival followed, when Chicago led the nearest competitor by twenty points. The performances of smith, White, Burroughs and Herschberger at this meet are especially noteworthy. On April 30th came the relay championship at Philadelphia. The Chicago team led from the start, and until White was run into and QT, is . s practically brought to a stand-still by Hoffman, the prospect for the meet was with Northwestern on May 7th. Burroughs, over-trained from his work with the relay team, could not win the sprints 3 White l and Fair of the relay team were also in poor form after their trip east, and one by one the points went to Northwestern, until enough had been gathered for a complete victory. A week later, matters were evened up by an easy victory over the Illinois team, whose advent had been awaited with apprehension. Chicago's usual weakness in field events, together with the non- entry of Herschberger, Kennedy and Moloney, cost her her chance of winning in the Triangular meet with Michigan and Illinois on June lowing Saturday, a litting climax to the successful season was reached by a tie with Michigan in the annual meet at Detroit. Sea 4th, and she could do no better than win second place. On the fol- S m 1 t til.. maroon to finish in the lead was excellent. The first outdoor dual K w ls Q 5, fi KW 195 ' f?-ff. J' 2 -,Q CD6 1898 Ckilm FRED HARVEY CALHOUN - Captain Byron Bayard Smith George Lewis White Carter Brown Charles Lindsey Burroughs Newell Montague Fair Clarence Bert Herschberger Alvin Lester Barton Frederick Augustus Brown Arthur Edward Beers Boudinot Gage Leake William Arthur Molor Mortimer Brainerd Parker iey Walter Scott Kennedy Theron W'infred Mortimer William Hiddleson Andrews NValter joseph Schmahl Donald Randall Richberg Herbert Sa I muel XVall-:er ulian Frank Goodenow Milton Howard Pettit Elbridge Lionel Heath David Edgar Fogle 196 A E tl 'will UGYSUV 'Cl'dCk fedm '.'. 1-1 P 1 ' N -' .."-' .1 1 . ...Nfl 'V Y- "11'- 'p.g'T3 14 I If . ..' '- f' ' . , II I , .II I II '1 -.fr..IX. .I" 1 ll-' .I-.. l N I '-' V. , . I , F --.LI-'.: - .1- 1 IIIII I. Ez In XI .1 . '1' ,1 X - ' .I III: IIl.I I I IXII1 it. 5 fzifcf . 1- .-Q ,111 1.11" .."'Z" 'I 45:12 1' .1-1.. . ' 'J ' - . NZ' -. 1,-3. 1 gk I ' I.E,x..j 'F v'?"' ., 1'-rw. 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Sturgeon, N. W. Webb, C. .562 880 Yard Run Smith, C. Barton, C. Cowgill, N. W. 2.112 Relay, 12 Laps Northwestern Chicago 3.4512 Field Events Shot Put Brewer, N. XV. Perry, N. W. Herschberger, C. 38 ft., SM in. High jump Perry, N. W. Schmahl, C. Mantor, N, W. 5 ft. 39g in Broad Jump Perry, N. W. Leake, C. Hunter, N. W. 19 ft. 9 in Pole Vault Herschberger, C. 8: Leake, C. jones, N. W. 81 Wilson, N. W. 10 ft. 54 in Northwestern carried off forty-seven points, six iirsts, four seconds and five thirdsg Chicago, thirty-nine points, four Brsts, five seconds and four thirds. 199 CD2 CBIIQFSZIII Cdfllllldl March 5, under the auspices of the University of Chicago, was given an athletic and gymnastic carnival at Tattersal1's. Chicago Won easily in the college events The summary: 75 yard hurdles, 220 yard dash, 440 yard dash, 880 yard run, Mile run, Half mile walk, fl'dCk EWIIIS T5 yard dash, Burroughs, C. jones, N. XV. Herschberger, C, Burleigh, I. Fox, W. Burroughs, C. O'Dea, YV. Jackson, N. XV. lVl1ite, C. B. B. Smith, C. Smith, C. Beers, C. Hoagland, I. Parker, C. Shot put, High jump, Pole vault, Chicago, XVisconsiu, Relay race: Chicago, Northwestern, Cochems, XV. Powers, N. D. Powers, N. D. Firsts 5 3 Northwestern, 0 Notre Dame, 2 Illinois, 1 'Field Events Brewer, N. W. Mason, XV. Herschberger Score bv Points Seconds 5 l 4 0 I 200 ,c. Maybury, XV. Brown, N. XV. Farley, N. D. Fair, C. Mosely, XV. Henry, XV. Hartman, W. Illinois. Powers N. D. -ll ft. Byrne, I. 5 ft. Leake, C. 10 ft. Thirds Total 2 4 1 2 -J ... OS 10 '24 52 05 37 'S 96 .4 'I in 9 in 9: in 1 r 1 , , 1 '. 1 ' u , x 1 4 , '.1. I ,', .,' : w, A , M. Q'nM"f' l, ,w ,Q va, ,X ,., X , 4 Jr , Q 1 MJ: - L :WL WHL' rl." Ari Q4 ' r..,. K- ' 'A 1,- '4 1" HJ, .,, 4.1 ' 1 1 Q X . . .1 , R, :z ' 'n . 1 wr X. .5 .' Q V1.3 . .55 rg ,V :-,fs , vp.. ...LA Udl'SiW RQIZW C0801 G 'Sf I G in an ry W 9 Q? X W nl' Che Relay Race M ,, 'Q " Ii -xx? fl a gy At Philadelphia, April 30, Chicago won the relay champion- 0 f ,, X N ship from Pennsylvania and Michigan. Hoffman of Pennsylvania T yi-fl l l finished first, by ten yards, but was disqualified for fouling White. " 'iii X A L. Zee Che teams Chicago Pennsylvania Michigan Burroughs Bastian Thomas Fair Wilson Hayes Moloney Tewkesbury Teetzel White Hoffman Hatch the Race by Qlldl'f2I'S Burroughs, .53 Fair, 512 Moloney, 512 White, 51 Bastian Viiilson Tewkesbury Hoifman Thomas Hayes Teetzel Hatch 203 Che llortbwesternxbicago meet The hrst out door meet of the year was held on Sheppard Field, Evanston, May 7th. Contrary to expectation, Northwestern won easily. The summary: Crack Events 100 Yard Dash jones, N. W. Burroughs, C. 220 Yard Dash Jones, N. VV. Burroughs, C. 440 Yard Run Moloney, C. jackson, N. XV. 120 Yard Hurdles Brown, N. VV. Herschberger, C. 220 Yard Hurdles Perry, N. VV. Brown, N. XV. 880 Yard Run White, C. Smith, C. Mile Run Smith, C. Beers, C. Mile Walk Parker, C. Pease, N. W. field 6021118 Shot Put Brewer, N. W, Perry, N. W. Hammer Throw Levings, N. W. 1fVilson, N. VV. Discus Throw Herschberger, C. Mortimer, C. Broad Jump Perry, N. W. Leake, C. High jump Perry, N. YV. Hunter, N. VV. Pole Vault XVilson, N. VV. Jones, N. W. Elliot, N. W. .ioa Moloney, C. Fair, C. .532 Calhoun, C .162 Hunter, N. W. .282 Barton, C. 2.12 Gates, N. W. 4.503 8.052 Kennedy, C. 38 ft. 2 in Mortimer, C. 103 ft. Rodman, N.XV. 92 ft. Mantor, N. W. 20 ft. 5 in Schmahl, C. 5 ft. 4 in Leake, C. 10 ft. Northwestern took seventy-one points, with nine firsts, seven seconds, and five thirds, Chicago, fifty-four, with tive Hrsts, seven seconds, and eight thirds. 204 CD2 Cl7lCdSO:llllll0lS IDQQI The annual Chicago-Illinois dual meet was held on Marshall Field, May 14 Chicago winning by a score of seventy-four to fifty-four. The summary: 253 100 Yard dash Burroughs, C. Fair, C. 220 yard dash, Burroughs, C. Moloney, C. 440 yard dash, Moloney, C. Fair, C. 120 yard hurdles, Herschberger, C. Burleigh, I. 220 yard hurdles, Andrews, C. Moran, I. S80 yard run Barton, C. Smith, C. 2. Mile run, Smith, C. Beers, C. 4. Mile walk, Hoagland, I. Richberg, C. 7 jf mile bicycle, Mehaney, 1. Thompson, 1. 1 mile bicycle, Brown, C. VValker, C. 2 'field Events Shot put, Sweeney, 1, Moran, I. 36 ft. Hammer throw, Von Oven, I. Enochs, 1. 1275 ft. Discus throw, Sweeney, 1. Moran, 1. 102 ft. High jump, Byrne, I. Schmahl, C. 5 ft. Broad jump, Moloney, C. Keator, 1. 19 ft. Pole vault, Herschherger, C. Armstrong, 1. 9 ft Chicago scored seventy-four points, ten firsts and eight seconds four points, six firsts and eight seconds. 1 P: Ll fa' ly :'s ' .1 -aft f I4 ,, 3 A' 7 . . V . sq- . I 1 qi ' . I 1 R I A I i , X i , , lf lt ,Y '1', X aw Y L9 205 10' 23 51" 17 285 112 1 545 54 35? 8 in. 11 in. 5 in. lll in. ll in. Illinois lifty WCSIQTII COIIQSMIQ m62I june 4, Chicago, Michigan alld Illinois, the seceders from the Western Intercol collegiate Association, held a triangular meet Chicago second, and Illinois third. lU0 yard dash, 220 yard dash, 440 yard dash, 120 yard hurdles, Burroughs, C. Burroughs, C. Teetzel, M. McLean, M. Summary 2 Crack Events Thomas, M. Thomas, M. Fair, C. YVebster, M. 5 White, C. and H80 yard run, Hatch, M. I Hayes, M. Mile run, B. B. Smith, C. NVood, M. Mile Walk, Hoagland, I. Brookfield, M. If mile bicycle, Brown, C. Pettit, C. Mile bicycle, Baldwin, M. Thompson, I. 'Field Events Shot put, Sweeney, I. Moran, I. Hammer throw, Von Oven, I. Mortimer, C. Discus throw, Mora11, I. Caley, M. High jump, Flournoy, M. Said - S Keator, I. andl Broad Jump, McLean, M., -I Russell, M. I 1AACl3!'I1S, M. 1 ' Pole Vault, - Baker, M. and - i, Leake, C. l Points Firsts Seconds Michigan, Tlx, 5:3 Chicago, 415 41,5 Illinois, 4 3 2013 at Marshall Field. Michigan won XVestphal, M. Thompson, M. Thompson, M. Calhoun, C, Beers, C. Tryon, M. Thompson, I. Goodenow, C. Enochs, I. Enochs, I. Mortimer, C. Thirds Total 524 T0 mal, 41 4 33 J .102 .22 .513 .162 2.025 4.33 7.112 .34 2.402 36 fr. 130 ft. 103 ff. 2111. aft 115 in 22f1 35 in 10 ft. 100 Yard Dash 220 Yard Dash 4-10 Yard Run 120 Yard Hurdles 220 Yard Hurdles 880 Yard Run Mile Run Mile Walk ,bf Mile Bicycle Mile Bicycle Shot put, Hammer throw, Discus throw. l1ZiCbi32lll:CI7iCdS0 Dual IDQQI The annual Michigan-Chicago dual meet was held at Detroit, June The teams were very evenly matched, and the result was a tie. The summary: cfdfk EWIIIS Burroughs, C 1Vestphal, M. Thomas, M. .101 Burroughs, C. Thomas, M. Thompson, M. .212 Moloney, C. Teetzel, M. Fair, C. .512 McLean, M. Herschberger, C. Kennedy, C. .165 Webster, M. McLean, M Calhoun, C. .272 Moloney, C. Hatch, M. Hayes, M. 2.003 1Vood, M. Smith, C. Beers, C. 4.395 Tryon, M. Brookfield, M. Brown. C. 8.11 Goodenow, C. Pettit, C. Brown, C. .372 Pettit, C. Turner, M. Baldwin, M. 2.21 Field Events Lehr, M. Kennedy, C. Herschberger, C. 37 ft. 9in. Mortimer, C. Herschberger Bennet, M. 122 ft. 11 in. Heath, C. Fogle, C. Dye, M. 96 ft. 8in. Flournoy, M . Tryon, M. X- 5 ft. 6 1n. Highjump, Broad jump, Pole vault, McLean, M. ,l Runnels, M. Russel, M. -1 Baker, M. 'lv C' ' ' l, Leake, C. n Herschberffer C McLean, M. 20 ft. 10 ft 9 in. 2 in. Chicago took nine Ersts, six and one-half seconds, and seven and one-half thirds g ,X ' f fl ln , l l w -.x 1 lp 7:9 'X' ull 1 Michigan seven firsts, nine and one-half seconds, and eight and o11e half thirds. Each " ' scored seventy-two points. 207 ,g fe' l e -B f'.l.9.. 'T .L , ,jf ..Lf,,Q1 l TC A-2 5.- l5lliD2l'SiID of Chicago RQCOYGS, 189144898 100 Yards Dash 220 Yards Dash 440 Yards Run SHO Yards Run 1 Mile Run 120 Yards Hurdles 220 Yards Hurdles 1 Mile Bicycle Shot Put Hammer Throw .105 :23? 2.091 ,- 4.-la! .19 2.39 36 ft. 78 ft. Running Broad jump 21 ft. Pole Vault 35 Yards Dash 100 Yards Dash 220 Yards Dash 440 Yards Run 880 Yards Run 1 Mile Run 120 Yards Hurdles 220 Yards Hurdles 1 Mile VVa1k 1 Mile Bicycle Shot Put Hammer Throw 10 ft. .041 :10 123 :52 2:13 5:13 :l8 -'xo 1:05 2:32 33 ft. T3 ft. Running High -lump 5 ft. Running Broad jump 20 ft. Pole Vault 35 Yards Dash 100 Yards Dash 220 Yards Dash 410 Yards Run 880 Yards Run 1 Mile Run 120 Yards Hurdles 220 Yards Hurdles 1 Mile XValk 10 ft. .04 .10 0 9 .54 2.162 4.52 17 28 7,252 I 3 in. 91 in. 9 in T in 5 in 21 in ti in 1894 F. Mandel j. Lamay C. Sherman Holloway Sass Barrett M. VVyant M. Wyant Y. Church A. Ewing 1895 H. Patterson H. Patterson H. Patterson Holloway XV. Peabody C. Johnson Sass B. Herschberger johnson, Jr. Y. Bachelle C. B. Herschberger 'l'. Neff B. Herschberger F. Steigmeyer B. Neel B. llerschberger 1896 L. Burroughs G. XVo0ley H. Patterson L. Burroughs H. Patterson W. Peabody A. Peterson F. Steigmeyer C. B. Herschberger F T. Gundlach 208 C. A. A. Field C. A. A. Field C. A. A. Field C. A. A. Field C. A. A. Field C. A. A. Field C. A. A. Field C. A. A. Field C. A. A. Field C. A. A. Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field C. A. A. Field Marshall Field Marshall Field C. A. A. Field C. A. A. Field U. of C. Gymnasium Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field 1st Regiment Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field june 2 May 25 May 25 May 25 May 25 june 2 May 25 May 25 june 2 june 2 May 10 May 10 May 10 May 10 May 10 May 10 May 10 May 10 May 10 May 10 April 13 May 18 May 10 May 13 May 18 june l Feb. 29 June 13 May 30 May 4 May 4 June 13 June 13 May 30 June 13 6' JM Jlthletic Zaptains 'II I','. . .- ,I A ,p . , .QU , ' If ' 756. A 1.-"f'.1"- -- .. .Ig GI I I,,, HI- 'I.- . . I N795 s II- LI II .. 'gf' I In 'I " I-5 J". .I I I . QIIIIEIF IW,- -e- 5 II Ak' .. 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II,' jp-I-I . .H IS V' 'JI ,u QI, 'I"4'F'g7'!I-I ' I. , ,.., In .II -III, i . I I VI I . ., I I ,. I . . In ' IL ' , I vig" -Iiu - I In I. I I fi? 9 I' f -' .II Q--ff. ..'I' I7:I- ' ' 1. I I If,,g " AZIIIIQ ,I 'I I ' I. " I '.1 I J. ,.I' ' I I , ESI I .."F5 , s.I3IgzgI24-.'.-' 'HI 'I I Q '. I ' 95 IIV II, " --gill?" ' 'JVIW' 'i. I-'fM..I'-f.I." -- T I I 1' " I I-- 9 - I v,I?-41,34 'I' '-'p,'PgT eI!'.5I:v- I' -. I ,I'. , 'I' ,I I II f I, ." 445 fn-I, 'III ' IIP.: , 4-Iyg --.,II. . . 5: JVI I --I-.'If.,I -If. .I-XIIIII ,I s .II Q I- -I 1,1-I I' Q lm 7? 'I 1. r.,g,II1I' II I I II 'I - I ' -.Inu -I - I II? ' .II .I -, I.-fp 1 .. . - A J ,IW15-If I-.-I I: La". .I-. ' ,. ' JI? 1:1-gf, II 'I "sp I' II I ' -' .- 'V 16 Q-I -' ' Ufkrlrs' I ' - Ie- .'-. g 'I ' ' 'I . 'Iq,I ' I I?I I - ' 5 In , Wa! I. :L QUIK DT x .. .-F' .I I .,., ,, I.-P1 .' . - ..-- I, v I. I'lI,'..., "- ' 'W .-V' I' ffm: ' " C? 'I' fi--1 . . -Q "f' ' -I .7iI.11'A-T' "TI Pj'-' 'I'-QE., 'ii' .5 H.--'Il 'Q:,'.f3 IH13 III Nc, f III In ,Ii ILII .,uI. 7II I.: :IIII II I I. I- E-.I I 1. 1 ,I II -I .In-II.I I ' 4.3 , a 'gf I- II z II IIII- II. 5' - 1: R -,If I has ,I -'a QIL.tf'!-If I .I II' .I ., I, I wg: I , A..-III -I If.- I' IIIII' -Ily III.. Q. ' -.'I:.1 I .IL II ,I .I I.. - I I' I . W . 'QI Q. IIIIII-.. II 'I' K I:--:Irv I 0I1III.'3-III. I,g,,- ':I ' ,I I -'12 ' ' In-Ia: I-..'.I I,:. . ,I 'IrI-1,,I,,-.I.I.-I' IIg-1'-2- I - I . ' 'I'-!--.III-I 1.-I .I I-.I. III' '1'I1s.I.-.I,I-.,II':I,H.I'.II'.I L , I Us I II: , .I,m.II. II II I ,.IgI:.IfqfIIIIIIIIIIII III: IqIII,II:IIItIIIII,,IIII.I:II.II III II - ' I., ' "QM k ' G - ' if "iq ' 'X I' I' I'E'I:'3"f:7.fIfH21-I I 1 ' Q - I 5, 'I I I ,I gIIIx.'f'4I!III,1II-jfIIIa:::If4'I,I I . I . H I,. . , . .MMI I::.,..IIIII III.. I I . ,L'- ..'- I.- ' .III . .-.1 I .- ,I , ' ' H.. 'I',,.If" ' 'JII' E J I-L7 F' 2' I. 'I ,-III . II: 'Tlu'II'I 'II .' ' II IfI.If:'I-.r... k II I-Y 4 I III'.II , I I. I,I III IIII I I I Leaf! "..'I5,I . - I .wr Iifr I .I A ...jf -I ' IA 'dui'-I' II".I'I-ffg.5i.fIf.?',f IIHII5 'I ... KI I I , IIIJIIH I. II. ' III Ir, Q-.IIIXII .:-.,.,, -, I I .I I -L I III.IIIIIIIIIIIPIIIIIIIII.I.IIIII.I t ? '- .'- '.II1 I gf. IIL' 5-I III -,",1' yr-H -II I I I II II ,I.I.II.I.IIIIII-.IIIILI I, IIII-IIINII I ' ' 'I III1' ' ' II'-,5"I I ,I-I I- f, 'I 1. I . . : I ,'Q..' ,4I. ' l, I I ,I . I I Q "V, 'r. I" L. - ' Ig. ,-2 ' I K' 5. 5 4 1 1 Mile Bicycle 2.29 E. W. Peabody Shot Put 36 ft. 9 in. E. V. Williamson Hammer Throw 102 ft. 3 in. C. B. Herschberger Running High jump 5 ft. 43 in. F. F. Steigmeyer Running Broad Jump 21 ft. 2 in. C. B. Neel Pole Vault 10 ft. C. Herschberger 1897 35 Yards Dash .042 C. L. Burroughs 100 Yards Dash .10 C. L. Burroughs fTrial for recordj 220 Yards Dash .235 C. L. Burroughs 440 Yards Run .522 G. L. White 880 Yards Run 2:07 G. L. NVhite 1 Mile Run 4:46. B. B. Smith CTrial for recordl 120 Yards Hurdles 1175 C. B. Herschberger 220 Yards Hurdles 1282 F. H. Calhoun Z Mile Bicycle 11092 C. V. Bachelle tPacerlj 1 Mile Bicycle 31042 C. V. Bachelle 2 Mile Bicycle 51174 C. V. Bachelle qPacecl1 Shot Put 35 ft. 5 in. C. B. Herschberger Hammer Throw 86 ft. 1 in. C. B Herschberger Running High jump 5 ft. 4 in. gtggggiifger Running Broad jump 20 ft. 3 in. C. B. Herschberger Pole vault 10 ft. 7 in. C. B. Herschberger I898 35 Yards Dash .042 C. L. Burroughs 100 Yards Dash :l0.. C. L. Burroughs 220 Yards Dash 122 C. L. Burroughs 440 Yards Run :51.. VV. A. Moloney 880 Yards Run 21002 W. A. Moloney 1 Mile Run 4:33 B. B. Smith 120 Yards Hurdles .17 C. B. Herschberger 220 Yards Hurdles .282 XV. H. Andrews 1 Mile VValk 8105i M. B. Parker X Mile Bicycle 234 C. V. Brown 1 Mile Bicycle 2:08 C. V. Brown tl'acedl Shot Put 35 ft. 6 in W. S. Kennedy Hammer Throw 122 ft. 11 in T. VV. Mortimer Running Highjump 5 ft. 65 in XV. j. Schmalil Running Broad jump 19 ft. lllin W. A. Moloney Pole Vault 10 ft. tif in C. B. Herschberger Discus 96 ft. 9 in T. W. Mortimer 2ll Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field U. of C. Gymnasium Marshall Field Marshall Field U. of C. Gymna Marshall Field Champaign Detroit Detroit Marshall Field Champaign Marshall Field Champaign Marshall Field Champaign Detroit U. of C. Gymna Detroit Champaign sium sium lst Reg't Armory U. of C. Gymnasium Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Detroit Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Evanston Marshall Field Marshall Field Evanston Marshall Field Marshall Field Marshall Field Tattersall's Marshall Field May 4 May 4 june 13 Mar. 1 13 13 june june Mar. June 13 ll 11 29 29 11 May May May June 11 11 May june 11 ll May June 11 May May 29 13 29 ll 20 Mar. May May Feb. Feb. 19 june 4 june 4 May 14 june 11 june 4 May 14 May 14 May T june 4 May 14 May 7 june 4 june 4 M ay 14 Mar. 5 June 4 Ul11D21'S1ID of CNCEISO ll1:ClO01' RQCOTCIS 35 yards dash, T5 yards clash, 410 yards run, 880 yards run, One mile run, 40 yards hurdles, T5 yards hurdles, 880 yards walk, Shot put, 16 lb. 52.05. 41 8 56 4,27 5' 101 1- 3.141 Ft. 36 Runningbroad jump, 19 Running high jump, rm f+Standing broadj ump,10 Pole Vault, tObsolcte event. 50 yards dash, 100 yards dash, 220 yards dash, 140 yards run, 880 yards run, One mile run, 120 yards hurdles, 220 yards hurdles, One mile walk, One mile bicycle, Shot put, Hammer throw, 10 52 10 90 1-.1 51 2.00 4.33 17 28 7.25 2.8 Fr. 36 122 Running high jump, 5 Running broad jump, 21 Pole vault. Discus throw, 10 96 made 111 2011196111011 T. H. Patterson, C. L. Burroughs. N. M, Fair, G. L. xvhite, B. B. Smith, C. B. Herschberger, C. B. Herschberger, M. B. Parker, XV. I. Schmahl, XY J. Schmahl, L. Byrne, F. F. Steigmeyer, C. B. Herschberger, un1UQl'S11D 01 Chicago olltzdool' RQCOYGS made in Zomvetition C. L. Burroughs, C. L. B urroughs, C. L. Burroughs, W. A. Moloney, W. A. Moloney, B. B. Smith, C. B. Herschberger, W. H. Andrews, E. T. Gundlach, C. V. Brown. A. M. Wyant, T. W. Mortimer, W. J. Schmahl, C. B. Neel. C. B. Herschberger, T. W. Mortimer, 212 U. of C. Gym., Tattersall's, U. of C. Gym., Tattersall's, Tattersall's, U. of C. Gym., Tattersall's, First Reg. Ar., U. of C. Gym., U. of C. Gym., U. of C. Gym., U. of C. Gym., First Reg. Ar., Marshall Field r Marshall Field, Marshall Field, Marshall Field, Detroit, Marshall Field Marshall Field, Marshall Field, Marshall Field, South Side Gr. Marshall Field, Marshall Field C. A. A. Field, Marshall Field y v Feb. 22, Mar. 5, Feb. 19, Mar. 5, Mar. 5, Feb. 18, Mar. 5, 'Mar. 25, Feb. 18, Feb. 18, Feb. 18, Feb. 29, Feb. 20 April 18 June 11 june 4 May 1-1 June 11 june 4 May 14, ltlay 14, June 13 May 25 june 4, June 4, June 1, june 4, v 1 v 1895 1898 1898 1898 1898 1899 1898 1899 is-M 1899 1899 1895 1897 1896 1897 1898 1898 1898 1898 1898 1898 1896 1891 1698 1898 1895 1898 100 yard dash, 220 yard dash. -140 yard run, 120 yard hurdles, 220 yard hurdles, 880 yard run, Mile run, Mile walk, Mile bicycle, High j urnp, Broad jump, Shot put, Hammer throw, Pole vault, western Intercollegiate Records 1 4. T 2 5 ft. 22 ft. 38 ft. 10 22 50 151 25 59 33 26 ..f 25 .4 1 I. V. Crum, J. V. Crum, YV. E. Hodgman, I. R. Richards, A. Kraenzlein, L. R. Palmer, H. B. Cragin, F. S. Bunnell, P. H. Burton, , , QA. C. Clark, H in , PA. Kraenzlein, TZ in. J. A. Leroy, 105 in. H. T. Cochems, 123 ft. 92 in. R. XV. Edgren, ll ft. A. H. Culver, 213 University of Iowa, University of Iowa Michigan, Wisconsin, XVisconsin, Grinnell, Lake Forest, Minnesota, Minnesota, Illinois, VVisconsin, Michigan, Wisconsin, California, Northwestern, 1895 1995 1895 1H9T 1597 IH95 1H9G 1897 1896 1895 1H97 1895 1x95 1995 1H95 The first inter-fraternity meet was held on Mashall Field june l5. All of the ff I 'I 1 ffl ff fji fx ' lv: X ,F f"".ffi i Millfw wiihlllhliii 1 V1-l f f" T i L-' P! U 4' J If -ew 5' ff x x of ffl f is T. X Q 'V up ,im ! fljgw W 5 , 7,11-llif7"' Lf- in fl J, fraternities were represented, and good contests resulted. Men who had ever Won points for the University were barred from competition. The summary: 50 Yard Dash-Hamill, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Poulson, Psi Upsilon, Gould, Delta Kappa Epsilon, 01060. 100 Yard Dash-Merrifield, Alpha Delta Phi, Hamill, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Gard- ner, Delta Kappa Epsilon, 01112. 220 Yard Dash-Merriheld, Alpha Delta Phi, Vernon, Beta Theta Pi, Hamill, Delta Kappa Epsilon, 0:23i. 440 Yard Run-Hamill, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Coulter, Beta Theta Pi, NVhite, Delta Tau Delta, 02605. 120 Yard Hurdles-Reed, Q. Y., Poulson, Psi Upsilon, Manning, Delta Kappa Epsi- lon, 0:21. 880 Yard Run-Coulter, Beta Theta Pi, McCarthy, Sigma Chi, Rogers, Q. V., 2:l82. Mile Run4Case, Phi Delta Theta, McDonald, Beta Theta Pi, Richards, Phi Kappa Psi, 850 Yard XValk-Ross, Phi Kappa Psi, Eldredge, Beta Theta Pi, Freeman, Delta Kappa Epsilon, 4:05. ,bf Mile Bicycle-Ross, Phi Kappa Psi, Eldredge, Beta Theta Pi, Pettit, Alpha Delta Phi, 0.:a4s. Mile Bicycle-Ross, Phi Kappa Psi, Elrlretlge, Beta Theta Pi, Davis, Beta Theta Pi, 2:-LS. Shot Put-Roby, Sigma Chi, Speed, Beta Theta Pi, Coulter, Beta Theta Pi, 33 feet. High jump-Yernmi, Beta Theta Pi, Poulson, Psi Upsilon, Vaughan, Alpha Delta Phi, 5 ft. 3 in. Broad jump-Poulsou, Psi Upsilon, Vernon, Beta Theta Pi, Drew, Alpha Delta Phi, 19 ft. 525 in. Pole Yault-Drew, Alpha Delta Phi, Anderson, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Russell, Beta Theta Pi, 8 ft. 9 in. Beta Theta Pi scored thirty-tive points, Delta Kappa Epsilon twenty-one, Alpha Delta Phi twenty, Phi Kappa Psi sixteen, Psi Upsilon fourteen, Sigma Chi eight, Q. V. six, Phi Delta Theta tive, and Delta Tau Delta one. 21-L 1 fi fi if ff pil: , - I fi' I I A V rl' if F? I ll ,N "f' Y' Y 'ffl V X if . 6 fi 'L iii I ji A X la g nfl!! y H y ,mill nnf-lil Q N H 'Alf fb' ' dll X34 :A VI The year eighteen ninety-eight witnessed a change in the management of tennis aifairs. The old associati ' d' T ' on xxas 1SJ3I1d6d, and tennis was placed under the super- vision ofthe director of athletics. As a consequence it assumed greater ixnportance at the University. The method of choosing the team to represent the University was the same as in former years. The director selected the players but each of them was b' , su ject to challenge. An interesting tournament between those challenged and their Challengers determined the final composition of the team. The members were : CHARLES DUFFIELD XVRENN HALSEX', Captain HARX'EX' HIALCOLM MACQUISTON PAUL DONALD MAeQU1sToN HARRY NORMAN GOTTLIEB PAUL BLACKWELDER EDWIN LEE POULSON HARRY XVILLIAM5 BELFIELD ROY PAGE 2l5 The first tournament of the year was played on Saturday, May 7, and resulted in a victory for Chicago. A picked team from the Kenwood Country Club was the 'Varsity's opponent. The summary : Singles H. M. MacQuiston QCJ defeated Turner QK. 5, 6-3, C-3 Halsey QC.l defeated Carter QK.j, 1-6, 6-2, 6-1 Belfield QC.j defeated Seabury QK.J, 6-4, 6-2 Doubles Condee and Turner QK.j defeated MacQuiston brothers QC.j 6--1, 6-3 Blackwelder and Gottlieb QC,J defeated Carter and Seabury QK.j 6-3, 6-3 The first dual tournament with Northwestern was held on the courts of the Quad- rangle Club, Saturday, May 21. A high wind seriously interfered with the play. Chicago won without great difficulty. The summary : Singles H. M. MaCQuiston QC.j defeated Condee QN.j, 7-5, 6-2 P. D. MacQuiston QC.j defeated McConnell QN.l, 6--1, 6-4 McCaskey QN.l defeated Gottlieb QC. D, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4 Brewer QN.j defeated Halsey QC. J, 6-8, 6--1, 6-4 Blackwelder QC.J defeated Gates QN. J, 6-3, 6-4 Poulson QC.j defeated Judson QNJ, 6-2, 6-2 Doubles MacQuiston brothers QC.b defeated McCaskey and McConnell QN.j, 6-4, 6-3 Halsey and Poulson QC.j defeated Condee and Gates QN.j, 6--1, 3-6, 6-2 Blackwelder and Gottlieb QC.j defeated Judson and Brewer QN. j, 6-4, 6-4 Totals : Chicago T 1 Northwestern 2 The second tournament was held at Evanston on the following Friday. It was played under more favorable conditions, and showed the true relative merits of the teams. Northwestern had the strongest team in its history, but each of its players found a little more tl an his match in his Chicago opponent. Rain prevented the completion of two of the double matches. The summary 3 Singles H. M. MacQuiston QC.j defeated Condee QN.j, 6-2, 6-1 P. D. MacQuiston QC.j defeated McCaskey QN.J, 6-3, 6-2 Gottlieb QC.j defeated Ashcroft QN.j, 6--L, 4-6, 6-2 Halsey QC.j defeated McConnell QN. l, 6-2, 6-3 Blackwelder QC.l defeated Brewer QN. J, 6-4, 6-1 Poulsou QC.l defeated Pendleton QN. l, 6-3. 6-l Beliield QCJ defeated Judson QN.j, 6-l, 6-3 Gates QN.l defeated Page QC. H, default Doubles lNIacQuiston brothers QC.j defeated Condee and Ashcroft QN.j, 6-2, 6-1 McCasl:ex' and McConnell QN.l vs. Halsey and Poulson QC. J, 3-2, unfinished ' Brewer and Judson QN.j vs. Blackwelder and Gottlieb QC.l, 6-3, 2-6, 3-O, unfinished Totals: Chicago 8, Northwestern 1 3 unfinished 2 216 Uarsitv tennis team '?',L"' nEgQ,5'32c'f' - Q I ,:1 Wx , 'f 'f',,l' ' "' .-' , a, t -x ' AM,-.L 1 bmi' T ' HH- ' .-5 I-'rv ' sn, 1 4' . , ' wif.. , 5,1 ' ' Q1 rv " , .1 ,. it in - . Q' 7" ,. ii " YA- , ' 1' 1 . M 5, ,. xg w-g '4 I1- sin .M 53, ,,,. .5 Tm up 1, ,. Sm.. , ,gr tgfm , 'X v ,.1y, ' , - ' - w 1 v f +,..,. 1 I MVK 1, -. - ' ifwfl ,.: j"l Wm. ' 12- H . ,, V.. ni. I, N. v:'., 5 1' '-uf V1 A .,.' vi, if ,, 1, .- -1 , ,,., " .':,J. 2.1. A, Tp' E X 1 ': -, ,' A -1 1- - . . ww '1 Q 1 .. 1 1 , ,I -. . U.. 1. n x ,, M516 W. '4 V7 '." :- tx.- i, ,H ,K .0 . " - A?':Q.,.".1I ., V ,mx 1 'M , ,- f,',:. I. I V' -vu uf -x qv 'Q1'-:F H10-4. ., . - ff.. , 1 A K ,.,. -33 '. vr ...."l.', . xr' 'U , mu .7.1... ' .. 'A ,lrfr . - v .YY .gl-V-1 ...WN-I .-," ,: 1, ,Aff 4-nf?-fit., . .. , ,1 X " T"T'. - 5' 1 J r I . -.'.1 k.,,1 -f , ,Q rg' , V v ' , . z.. ., ' N," -.Af -". A"",. A, ' W ' .J ' ual-f '14 " 'Hn NIE: , ,wwf ,-,Q-.v 1-., ff .H-.'.., :,, . uf. ' ..n V ww. "-1, ' :H 1 ,1A:a'I,f 0 . - s, ':. 'E "u 'v H .A . i ,., M: ,V .-., .e -Ogg.. f Wu-f -.v , . . "f:+2 'W , ..- A , 'Jr' 3 ,'a'."f iv .....' rfiffwux ' W5 HES'-.J fh- "' -f-1' 372' Q "',v"',- . ..- f, J, ,w t, ,.. 4 'L r The annual tournament with Michigan was held at Ann Arbor, Friday, June 10. Fate seemed to decree that the result should once more be a tie. The singles were played off without mishap, Chicago winning three matches out of the four. Before the doubles were completed, however, a sudden rain storm stopped the play. Black- Welder and Gottlieb still had a fighting chance in their match 3 but they were com- pelled to default. The MacQuiston brothers and Herrick and Danforth agreed to continue their match in Chicago the next week, In the continuation the MacQuis- tons failed to display the same form as at Ann Arbor, and lost two straight sets. They retrieved their defeat, however, in the Intercollegiate tournament a few days later. The summary : Singles H. M. MacQuiston QCA defeated Danforth QMJ, 6-3, 6-2 Herrick fM.j defeated P, D. MacQuiston QCJ, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 Gottlieb QCQ defeated Ripley QM. J, 6-2, 6-3 Blackwelder ICJ defeated Mee 1M.j, 9-7, 6-O Doubles Herrick and Danforth fM.J defeated MacQuiston brothers fCl, 6-8 in Ann Arbor, 6-3, 6-3 in Chicago. Harvey and NVilber QMJ defeated Blackwelder and Gottlieb CC.j, 6-1, 2-6, 5-3 Totals 1 Michigan 3 3 Chicago 3 Chicago still reigns supreme in the domain of Western Intercollegiate tennis. That this holds true is due to Harvey Malcolm MacQuist0n. His record for the year proved him a worthy successor of Carr Neel and William Scott Bond. By his steady, consistent play he defeated his every opponent in the dual tournaments 3 and, then crowned his season's achievements by winning the Western Intercollegiate Champion- ship in singles. His opponent in the finals was Condee of Northwestern. The score was 6-1, 6-3, 6-2. I11 winning the championship in doubles his brother, Paul Donald MacQuiston was his able partner. The Michigan representatives, Herrick and Danforth were de- feated in the finals by the score: 6-4, 7-5, 6-2. I QA fide-lfrl in 1 be-Iss? ' . l ll I N wives DPI 1 al.. X? 9' '-t 'V EN'-DkD'7'EU!' ' QP A i SFRDKE 219 .A- Dlviltlw School tennis There were twenty-seven candidates for the championship of the Divinity School. The tournament to decide it was of the "round-robin" character, and all spring was required to play it off. P. P. Bruce gained the title of champion by winning all of his twenty-six matches. S. R. Robinson was second, losing only to Bruce. Summer tennis There was unusual activity on the courts during the summer quarter. Many of the students substituted tennis for the regular gymnasium work, and as a consequence the courts were in use the greater part of the day. Three tournaments were held. One was a woman's invitation tournament in which several of the best women players in the West participated. Miss Louise Pound, Who with Miss Clara Tilton, represented the University, was the winner. Miss Pound and Prof. Hussey secured first place in the "mixed" doubles tourna- ment which was held at the same time. The third tournament was open to all men in the Tjuiversity, professors and students alike. None of the members of the 'Varsity team were in residence, and consequently the student representation was not very strong. Prof. Angell won the singles, and Prof. Angell and Prof, Thomas, the doubles, xl ll 'y T . T tj J, f X J 1 . : " 9 Pi Y , nw 1- lv c. 9 .3 f0l'llIQl' flI171QI1C CZIDIHHIS Football 1893, R. E. W'yan'r 1894, C. W. Allen 1895, C. W. Allen 18943, Q. F. Roby 1897, C. B. Herschberger 1898, XV. S. Kennedy Baseball 1894, F. D. Nichols 1895, H. D. Abe11s 1896, H. T. Clarke 1897, G. YV. Sawyer CHICK 1895, Harry Holloway 1896, C. V. Bachelle 1897, 3 F. F. Steigmeyer T. H. Patterson 1898, F. H. Calhoun f0l11I1S 1895, C. B. Neel 1896, NV. S. Bond 1897, P. Rand 1898, C. D. Halsey 221 434 ,,fTX g:t NJ! A v Q X fidff X ifjfibjdggllb wt r f fi eel f M y mst fm f he 'N' Q5f" m WW W of J . 1 wx' Xwxgjs.-XX ' 2 ,5 :gg wr. 45 X Else lm ' Al 'llllll n emi Gif-1 X if Y Ulm, :Qi 331,514 ,'G Walter Scott Kennedy Charles Foster Roby - Frank L. Slal-:er - XVi1liam Thaw Gardner Theron Winfred Mortimer XV.A.Ckndon - James Ronald Henry - John YVebb - - Frank Clayton Cleveland - Kellogg Speed - - 777 POUNDS. 3835 3655 3480 3468 3448 3293 3173 3114 3041 3027 fxk S+ M E53 in wx J . I 5. a 1 8 . , ,Q " f' Q E.. Z 13 H a 's M mfr., .aw Vw grit' Ash 'Mm N Ja Q1-ig 2 C13 X13 'lf ' 1f. 11,'X :un .XXXX X 'x 1 ..',. ,, 1, X Xu:- 7-X711 .. Y 1. . - ',1 " 1 rw 1 . f' 1' ' ' 1111.1 - .1 .-Ha" I. .X .-X 9' X' :gt ,.,1 :. '.- iq 1 ' 111' 1 '1,. . .. ., 1 , -.Y 111.13 X1 A I . NJ.,-. Q . 1 x. "IDX 1 '- ,-.'. . Q ., fl ve, K-11' bf.. . .1 X- 1 'fl-I' .1- A-'. -1. . 21.1" ... 55' 1 112,53 1.1 ",1l"' 11. - f ' HX.. W1 pf' '.-.-' , XX ,Q ' 9'5" . 01" . X ' 1 1 I' 'l'l .1 1 -.- XJV1 ' , le - XX,-X., ,.. 1L .b ' ' 1: Iv '1f1. X f' . .x H4 :Mb 1 I 1 .5 i 1-21,1 I ,Ji . , - 11'l?rX 3 L ,1 ,df 5,11 ,IX, if 1 .1 . ' : 'nv 1 X - 1 ,- 1 ci A . . .Xa , . - - .'.- ..- 3 1 1 1 4 -f.: - 1 1 . X. ,XX1 0 11.1 'A ..,, A - 11,1 "'f:vf'-, , . A... :AX 4,151 1' . -1',,-'. 1. - v ,H 1 X5 A 11,41 1 AV1' ' X1 .1 . . . 1. , 1, I ,.X. . f1 X.X . ' 1- -,. .1 .1 .1 13 11.1 1.NZ1"n .H V 1 . ---., M 1 .. X 1. .fs 1 ... .,,1, 1,-.1 . ,. , 1 " ' 11 ,X,X1X,-1 X. -'.' 111' .X ,XX X, 1 79' ze 11, V Y 1 f twat if ff? '?'XfP Nl ill f K 2 . ii x 1 eff ,' .JIJEAC f U U f mise? k Wrestling became of intercollegiate importance in eighteen ninety-eight. A series of bouts formed a part of the programme at the athletic carnival held at Tattersal1's in the spring. Chicago's representatives Were: T. W. Mortimer, in the heavy-weight classy C. B. Davis and W. F. Anderson, in the lightweight. They were defeated by their more experienced opponents from the University of Wisconsin. In a competition held during the fall quarter, T. W. Mortimer won the cham- pionship ofthe University, in the heavy-Weight class, J. M. Sheldon, in the middle- weightg C. B. Davis, in the light-weight, and G. G. Davis, in the feather-weight. l5illlCl:B2lll Hand-ball has more devotees at the University than any other form of physical exercise. It is seldom that the courts in the gymnasium are not in use. The usual summer tournament did not take place in eighteen ninety-eighty but in its stead a tournament in doubles was played in the fall. A. P. Nelson and D. R. Richberg were the winners. 225 WOIIIQIVS Baskel Ball teams Glass teams CAROLINE PADDOCK, ---- Captain Elizabeth Avery. Edna Bevans Maude Bates Grace Bushnell, Helen Brehl Louise De Cew Carrie Freudenthal V Alma Le Duc Edna Ohrenstein Louise Roth Alvena Reichman Ella Robinson Alma Yondorf MARY PARDEE - - Captain Fanny Burling Lilian Buck Clara Comstock Grace johnson Louise Sherwood Mary Shirely Blanch Simmons Cornelia Smith Corrine Unland Louis Vincent Agnes Wayman Martha XVhite MARGARET GILBIAN ---- Captain Cecile Bowman Edith Bullis Grace Crukett Blanch Earhart jean Leslie Ella Kahn Anne Roby Rose Rosenberg Gertrude Scott Nettie Spencer Florence Strauss Frances Thoma Mary VVeber junior College team Grace Crocket, f. Lilian Buck, g. Agnes XVayman, c. Grace Bushnell, f. Anne Roby, g. Substitutes Cornelia Smith, f. Margaret Gilman, c. Grace johnson, g. Senior Zollege team Eda Ohrenstein, f. Helen Brehl, g. Edna Bevans, c. Alvena Reichman, f. Caroline Paddock, g. StlbStitllteS Elizabeth Avery, f, Mary Pardee, C. Carrie Freudentha1,g. 226 fs. xnxx A SA E 5 i YXXX x X X fig x M , K lm J I LQ ' w 1 ' I l-9. y ' v , Mir? NX X ' V ., 2 g lf, l 5 fl X EL I f my li! The fencing club had a thriving existence during 1898. Under the able tuition of Fred Burton Hellems some of the members became exceedingly skillful with the foil. One of them, XVilliam E. Linglebach, won the intercollegiate fencing champion- ship in the tournament held at Tattersall's during the athletic carnival. The mem- bership of the club was considerably increased at the opening of the fall quarter. The following were members at some time during the year : VVilliam E. Linglebach Knight F. Flanders John Preston Mentzer Ralph Leroy Peck Charles Newman Crewdson Ainsworth Whitney Clark William Everton Ramsey Jerome Pratt Magee VValter J. Schmahl Lees Ballinger Xvilliam Henry Linsley Franklin Ackerman Bogue Charles Christopher Catron Lafayette William Case A Harry XVilliam Belfield 227 I I I I 'HH fi- U A L 'W J 1 -T it O ,. 'S' K .aim T. ,W 4 I E 2 'I f T JN -X rfli1EVlfl"7 il tg v'::mr X -1:i:ffiIi1li:vll'ti 52, i, , A Qi R T .T ,nveixn ,P Xp. R Tw WARREN C. GORRELL HOWARD KIRTLEY - INIAURICE BIANDEVILLE JOHN RIILLS - - EDXVARD WRIGHTSON ELLIOTT NORTON - Zorporals ERNEST E. IRONS H. H. NELSON V First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant - First Sergeant Second Sergeant - - Third Sergeant FRED BRAMHALL 228 R. S. IVICCLURE Che Bunting or the Stag 'Twas in the merry, merry springtime, Bold Bayard srnote his knee: "A year, a year," he cried amain, "A year, and likewise three, We have endured the tyranny Of this foresworen one 3 If this goes on another year Bold Bayard's job is done." He hied him to the Northern lake And found a Fisher there. " Have you a heart, and stand his pranks? Revenge, fierce Fisher, swear." Fierce Fisher winked his dexter eye, He winked them both, I trow, He grasped his rod in both his hands And poised him for a blow. Bold Bayard ducked a clever duck, " Forbear, forbearf' quoth he. Fierce Fisher staid his hand eftsoons, But stood confusedly, " Last year," quoth he, H you said I was A rascal and a gent 3 Nor wherefore come you to my lair On talk of friendship bent? " " You called me a professional, And said hard things of rne.'l Bold Bayard grasped him by the hand- " That was last year," quoth he. " Now we must pledge eternal peace Until revenge we get On the proud Stag who roarns these woods Or he will do us yet. So leave your suckers, fierce Fisher, But bring along your bait. We'l1 drink confusion to this Stag, Who now has grown so great." " Revenge, revenge," fierce Fisher swore, And likewise several d-ns, He left his suckers on the shore, And eke he left his clams. 229 " A Fisher have I been," he quoth, And took a little drink, " But I will turn me Hunter now, And chase the Stag, I think." They hunted him both high and low, But ere the hunt began, " A scheme, a scheme," bold Bayard cried "I have a cunning plan." " Proud Fisher, ere we hunt the Stag, A little dog I know, Who, when we whistle loud and clear, Will follow where we go. His nose is sharp, his scent is keen, He long the Stag has known, And what is more, he'l1 be content XVith one small marrow-bone." " Good, good," fierce Fisher cried in glee, " Your plan is good, my boy." So up the little doggy ran - His name was I-s. They hunted high, they hunted low, W'ith telegrams all armed 3 They lay in ambush cunninglyg Still Coursed the Stag unliarmed. They tired a lot of paper-balls, The dog he howled and barked, But to the hosts who watched the hunt, The Stag appeared unmarked. " His hide is tough," quoth fierce Fisher, I've hunted him before. His hide is tough, his horns are sharp," Fierce Fisher loudly swore. " He charged upon me long ago, Up by the Northern Lake: I thought I'd done him then, but oh, That was a bad mistake. My biggest fish from Sturgeon Bay, He snatched away from me, My Homes he tried to devastate, He ate my May berreef' 230 " Yes, I was there," quoth bold Bayard, " They were a cheesy lot." " How's that? how's that? quoth fierce Fisher. Quoth Bayard, U I forgot." " A plan, a plan," quoth bold Bayard, He quoth right hastily, For he was 'ware that fierce Fisher Had blood within his e'e. " A plan, a plan," quoth bold Bayard, " A right good plan have I, A silver bullet we will shoot, And to the stag shall die." A silver bullet they did mould, A bullet and eke three, One for Bayard, and one for Fisher, And one forthe little doggee. QBut here I have a sad tale to tell, For in financial drouth, The little doggy stopped to drink, And his bullet fell out of his n1outh.l " Now on, now on," quoth bold Bayard, "The hunt is up," quoth he. They found the Stag on a windy plain, And they shot right carefully. They had him penned to north, to north, They had him penned to south, Or they would have had, but the silver bullet Fell out of the little dog's mouth. They had him penned to north and south And west 3 but ah, the beast Kicked up his heels and got away, For they forgot the east. " Now this is your fault," quoth bold Bayard. Fierce Fisher quoth, " Not at all," And they both swore loud at the little doggy ' XVho let the bullet fall. Bold Bayard cursed Fierce Fisher then, Fierce Fisher he cursed too, And a prophet can divine by the fall of '99 W'hat the pair of them will do. JAMES WEBER LINN 231 wx X , X , J M! lifg t 1 fig X55 N, lf TP T QQ 71? MAE gimiy A a""'lUmWl QA ff rm l 1? V . QU 333: 'L' . " U I w U BM 'Q ' Q W WWW fi? A "" ::57fi45 X 4? f ffff' Iwi f LE W 5 ?f',5 iff Z X 'xzf Tgbon w D .RkO3f- rv E . ' . af' in 3. Qu- 'TFT' lf- . 5.-,.1. l 'f v IA wal- , , 5-H. y. Jr.. - 'i KVF' J' ,SQ 1179: 13, Fwd. "KS ik, V., .QA Gigi E. J - '-v .. :i. kgs.- ulu -. .J 424-75. ...Y n L.. SM- my I 1 i : , ..'. j, N151 f. vfilw- 4 I: . .M. Q ri. 'gr aw. wr., -T :':.-' mp. 1-v ,Lf 'ffff ' 5... -. u:.f'.-.. . '-.,v' . . mi' ,I-ry.. 5 mg- 43. .rf- . . u... .1-7 .- 1 . v . . ,f . .41 . f . K. . 1 . X.. 1.7 1, P, I Ml., J-"x fu' . , - .. L' ...x2:'f' " -11, 'V ff-.a, -A. .,.:,g. .-in ii' '-1 1 ' F.-'.,'i'g.-4., ' - .Q 'ji -F'-j.a."2, H' H 5" v ,dvi .'.5,25.1f if.:-. . ,' ' . .V , u. . ml. . .L .., . .. , V. - WL H., . ' .A . ..4.:, .L "' " '-:"'-5 E .v ' Y- 5- 1 .. v - - ' 1 A., ' H .' f-I-.' ' ' 1 . ,. . ,wc .. , .. V . 5. 'sg-Q - ,-' C. I lf: 'T 2 ' 1 ' -' 1.1 ' ' ., V 5? .' if t ' N .- . ' A, - .t .- , gg. 1. A .- . ,I 'W . 4-, 11 Y. I x .r r . .Y , 5 .1 . ., , ,...A.! w". V " riff: 1, Aw- -5 41' I. . -1.55:-5335: 3445 Qhxri, 1 ul. ,X , ,V -'.:,...'-.df Q... .124 . ' '.' ' 1, a .-,,.L5:-,p ,15- . V. 2393- -Tfrifmfz-'l"f? 1,,,, Q". . . "-f -I !.u,5g,Q..f.:nAf, bf - '., . .L :f,,'g-. .. v -w ' 1,1-!: -,jf ,, Lf. 5-:jf ' '-.u-1.94. J I' :ff c, ' .s ' - I, 3. .1 li...,!..-ly, A , s - -0 1.. 5. ' - . 1:-31.-' V' if A-25.1 !h..'i:-V'.,: V ,"zi'.",f ' QQ 1 5.1 'L J." .,. Che Hssemblp Iniormals I 8 9 8 - I 8 9 9 MRNBQCYS Morton D. Harris Ray Prescott johnson Herbert Paul Zimmermann SllbSCl'ibQI'S Maurice Gordon Clarke Arthur Sears Henning VVil1ia1n Thaw Gardner :A - ' ,- . A 'fu 1 Yan Sumner Pearce '23 la .Ll Robert Newton Tooker GS-tx N , MXN, Edwin Lee Poulson X . gl 'kj 7 'L "T'L'm Q, v ill? kellogg Speed mg, -H G V-,fi ,. . Y ' iw!! i w Frank Williamson Duke f A Y A f , X Byron Bayard Smith Morton D. Harris Thomas Brovden Blackburn o li ,ii 'J it George Gilbert Davis N R Emory Cobb Andrews Allen Grey Hoyt !E",f H ,g W WLM Z Vi Ll ' my 1 , ' li ilfiwxl x it N' X Q il 7,2 3 it it f I: , ' i in f Walter Joseph Schmahlu I NAM . X , ly 235 r l l Leroy Tudor Vernon Ray Prescott johnson Charles XYard Seabury Oswald Hinton Gregory Harry XVilliams Bellield Herbert Paul Zimmermann Samuel Northrup Harper George Allen Elliot Salstonstall Norton Wilson Shannon Chapman, jr. James Ronald Henry Lawrence Osborne George Snow Gaylord Harold Osborne Fred Sass Parke Ross Charles B. Davis John Gaylord Coulter George P. MacDonald lVilliam F. Eldridge Franklin Egbert Vaughan Michael B. Wells William Moloney Clarence Alvin McCarthy Guy Bell Clark Scammon Reed XVebster T. Smith 236 5 .ag sl K V1 Z-2? INXS!! t l..:J ,.- ,j tic' APRIL 2. Dance at Kelly Hall. Kellogg Speed, Eliot Zgfq fa f f rf .7, ai' f lf Blackwelder, George Gilbert Davis, William Franklin Eldridge and George P. McDonald initiated into Beta Theta Pi. APRIL 6. Clarence Whitaker Richards, Walter Sharp, Dana iel Southard, Fred Sass, james McClintock Snitzler and Francis Baldwin initiated into Phi Kappa Psi. f N, it X X APRIL 8. Lafayette VVallace Case and Boudinot Gage Leake X ,X 1 I X ,f initiated into Phi Delta Pheta. I J -'fig APRIL 9. Herbert Paul Zimmermann initiated into Psi X MZ., ,i . Upsilon. ,f w fb - ' P Q APRIL ll. Beta Theta Pi smoker. I 7 -,fr f 7 APRIL 14. Professor Sparks entertained members of Wash- Z I ington House. K 'K " X - x xV"fl f APRIL 16. Curtiss Rockwell Manning, XValter Lawrence V Qjfyfyji'-" ' pf Hudson, Hugh Lafayette McWilliams, Donald Saxton ' , McWilliams and Frederick Hyde Lawrence initiated I into Delta Kappa Epsilon. Banquet of the Ben Butler M ff ff , ,ff Club at the Grand Pacific Hotel. Y -. f 'f f , . . ' X , f, ,ff APRIL 20. Psi Upsilon smoker. . ,f ff f' APRIL 22. April meeting of the Graduate Club in Haskell. 4 ' ' A i APRIL 23. Marjorie Coulter, Katherine Paltzer and Marion ff! Morgan initiated into Sigma Club. X" fi APRIL 30. University Informal. Madeline Harding and .f ,f' I Mary Averett initiated into Esoteric Club. Rose Thorne 1 it .. 17 I lu 05 JJ ' 1 Sweet, Jessie Benning VVaite and Yirginia VVynne Lackersteen initiated into the Mortar Board. 237 .5 'Q Pi f C Qgafywb-, f-'RZ-JJ' Y-11 , s W 8 PC, 17 he faq -sl is xx mga' " "lim X dl Cf W7 Y X.. MAY DIAY MAX' MAY' NIAY HIAY MAY MAY lWAY MAY 'Ui , M' CJ 1. 'I 2 2 ' . ' """'- J' I 2- f fl it it l tu ,.. kj ' . dh H l Y 2 n 2' BIAY 4. First banquet of the Chicago Alumni Club at the Pullman Cafe. 6. Beta Theta Pi stag informal at chapter house. 9. Sigma Club open meeting in the gymnasium. 11. Reception at Washington House. 14. Phi Kappa Psi smoker. 19. Reception by Mrs. Vincent to Esoteric Club. first spring " sing" on Haskell steps. 20. Meeting of Graduate Club in Haskell. In- formal dance given by the Quadranglers. 21. 23. XVa1ter I. Martin initiated into Psi Upsilon. Snell Hall " open house." 26. Second senior " sing" on Haskell steps. 27. Edwin George Allen, Harry XVillian1 Belfield and W. Lingleback initiated into Q. V. Qf' , I, wig 238 x., 1X I ,sl Aff Sl f f Q..AJ W . x UNF? l' 1? 2 -3 if Q9 ' I AQ..-431,-NQD W 9" -.3-,. Q4 J ,Q XL X , - I .9 X, sl X ,- x. - 1 lb H. JUNE 2. Beta Theta Pi informal dance at Kenwood Hall. JUNE 6, Swen Benjamin Anderson initiated into Delta Tau Delta. JUNE 7. Initiated into the order of the Iron Mask: Wal- ter Joseph Schniahl, Spencer Mac Dougall Brown, Otto Hakes, Rowland Rogers, Le Roy Tudor Vernon, Emory Cobb Andrews,Ralph Curtiss Manning,Charles Branden Davis, Ralph C. Hamill. JUNE 11. JUNE ll. JUNE 17 JUNE 20. JUNE 21 Mortar Board dance at Foster Hall. Political Economy Club picnic at NVildwood. " Junior Day.'l Quadrangle Club reception. " Class Day. " 9:30 A. M. Class sing in chapel. 2:00 P. M. Class picture tal-:en on Haskell steps. 3:00 P. M. Class poem by Mr. Edwin C. NVool- ley. Handing down by Mr. Hagey, pres- ident of the class, ofthe gown to Miss Jessie Nea Spray, '99, and of the stone be11ch to Mr. William France Anderson, '09. Pre- sentation of memorial drinking fountain to the University by Mr. Edwin M. Baker. Response by President Harper. 8:00 P. M. Tally-Ho party. JUNE 21. Informal dance at A. K. E. House. JUNE 22. Mr. Guy Reed Bell, '01, initiated into the local chapter of Sigma Chi. JUNE 24. Miss Carolyn A. Leech initiated into Esoteric club. jlllllm' Div film? I7, l898l COMMITTEES OF THE DAY. ROXVLAND T. ROGERS - General Chairman ofthe Day L. T. VERNON, N. M. FAIR - Athletic Committee XV. J. SCHMAHL, Chairman P. D. MAC QUISTON, H. E. P. THoMAs, Printing Committee FRED Sass, Chairman 239 lla iw ,Ag , A M Eiga ,1-Lf I " -- -f S-5' , ,it .MI ff . . immlfmzfi Nt m,z:,,, I, 'IH g QE 3 ag.fNe.-es.,1...5-wer--k.,,....,.., i f - ,S-F! 4 '-' 1 xt ., A , W CPS ' -.F UN -AQ-QA X 'I f'f"':':"::'rI7' 1 It iii? f A 5 A' "' 0 Ai 1 Y ' . 1 5,9 i , - Mifnavw--1?..f Y.- - X . 3 5 XX 5 Q A539941 , 5 QQ 5 ' X-S082 ,L WWWH4 mxlHllWXx,W- C ' ' " f'ffm,I-iwv"l- A! 0 I if-' K 1 MIss E. E. BUCHANAN, R. S. MCCLURE - 111155 C. M. WELSH, Chairman - - Dramatic Committee - - Decorating Committee Miss BIARION TOORER, MISS M. J. AVERETT R. G. GOULD, Chairman IXIISS R. E. BIORGAN --.-- Ivy Committee E. E. IRONS, Chairman PI'0Q1'dl11 of the DRY 8:30 A. M. Nu Pi Sigma reception and dance at Foster Hall. 10:00 A. M. Athletics on Marshall Field. Base-ball: 'Varsity, 15 5 Alumni, 13. Relay race: Won by the Senior College team Over the junior College team. 2:00 P. M. Dramatics in Kent Theater: 1. A MATRIMONIAL PREDICAMENT. CAST. Etrj3EnGgi?:u a newly married couple - AIESEVIAAUIEEIE' Gertie CFrank's cousinj - - - JOSEPHINE T. ALLIN Stella this sisterj - - EDITH D. JENKINS Norah fa maidy - - - IVIARJORIE B. COOKE Mrs. Glynn QFrank's motbei-5 - FLORENCE MCMAHAN Ed. Asbury fFrank's college chumj - - - PERCY B. ECI-:HART II. A PAIR OF LUNATICS. CAST. He Cotherwise Tom Fielding! - XVILLIAM FRANCE ANDERSON She fotherwise Daisy Mannersj - - - - ALICE A. KNIGHT III. HECTOR. CAST. Mrs. Long - - Mr. Long - Mr. Von Bergman - Oscar, the poet Mr. Watson - - August fa servantl - Fanny fthe maiclj - Hector - - MARJORIE B. COOKE - ROBERT G. GOULD IIARCUS M. PLOXVMAN LAWRENCE M. JACOBS RALPH C. LIANNING HUGH L. MCWILLIAMS SUSAN G HARDING - ANONYMOUS 240 -,V:g,,p-ones. an . -'Q L. .1 - 'PE ,, . .fr ,, - - '--uw HN T - . ffl . , - .i ,.,f,:,TJ. . A 'SI'--he Q., ' " 'A K in 'BA 'M' is f'-wir' -, ' . '- r . . fx. - -'59 -3' 'VFW QQ .N 'fV f 4114 R V I r , I . , -, " 2 . -- A . ,ef ' fmmh , . ' , , 'sw -,Jw-"'-" "' . V ' V 5' I . 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N, uf. 'Wm "'5'B7fNf1i?f 1, f- ,, -: . , ..-3:1 .Ve fl. Jiiggv - 5653 , 'EM -'M 5.-,IKM F -, 3 g 1" 5. 111' 4.-' "XX-P T I, ,fs , . ff' ' ' HPLC' lszfwgfwgk y 281- 3 .' Q -2, fjigif-1 -Z" , 5 - E 'X"fM.,,,,' "J ww' ,vfff 4. - I f ' Y nw 1 ' HW .gy '. ' 1 -1 V V WF -- ' - - f A ' V - ng f r-A 'a -5,5 . A aa 4,1 - . v ' ,, -ff . vw: w J .. J, , ,, F5 , , . nv. ' . '. 1' wk I, W . -V.:'I .. , W , . . ,. ' .l-u .1 -R, dir, . , 41 A , o 4 'Q ' 4-a' f. I. .lr - '.' -' 5 1-"'1'-5' A., lf? .i-.. X , 1' Y, r'li, , . -WJ .' '-mt "v..2':". .f1.,l,.f' ' ,wa4"'f I, " As' '. f N, fi, Q, ,' L11 I 'V 4 1 v'6'.,,,' ,. 1 wr, pf .-4 ,-'. 'f ,.- J.. ,b H. uv, ig 15. I.: 4 . 41143 .1v' JN, ' - "-T: ,n ' 'E' L .1,x:lr,, if ,. avr. ,4 3 x ,, '-I-'f -', A iv A ,A - 1- ., mm iv? 1 : A 'ww ' 1: - 'ij . Jig .Cv-1, '.-lf :,.,'f"1'T'.f.''Q-A-,5??lf.liM,U if- 3:00 P. M. Ivy exercises east of Haskell. Orationz Mr. A. E. Bestor. Planting of ivy: Miss Madeline Harding. 4:30 P. M. Reception on lawn by members of wOmen's halls. 8:30 P. M. junior promenade at Chicago Beach Hotel. ALLEN GREY Hovr - ---- General Chairman KELLOGG SPEED, RALPH C. BIANNING - - - Reception Committee EBIORY COBB ANDREXVS, Chairman LOUIS CARLETON PETTIT, RAY JOHNSON - Committee on Arrangements GLENN HALL, Chairman ELLIOTT NORTON, PARKE Ross - - 5- - Finance Committee VVILLIAM THAW GARDNER, Chairman PATRONESSES Mrs. William Rainey Harper Mrs. A. A. Sprague Mrs. Philip D. Armour Miss Elizabeth XVallace Mrs, I. W. Shepardson Mrs. Ferdinand XV. Peck Mrs. Noble B. Judah Mrs. G. C. Howland Mrs. Charles D. Hamill Mrs. George E. Vincent Mrs. A. J. Earling Mrs. Cyrus H. McCormick 243 K 'QR A - J i K 5 'W f f ' 6' xx Q19-Z1 P 4 'Q 32 li ffiilflllzff ' f' ff ,411 fd "mg x 1 lxgm X '5 il 4 -fdxl ffd Xb LM a ,, mv , I K. , . 'V P, ' x , sflf 1 . T van ., J . , f 1 fda Vw vb X-,I 'AED 'U Kc J Zi EJVESLC- Xbmfm? KO m' JULY 2. Luncheon given by President Harper at the Quad- rangle Club for Hon. William L. Watson, the convocation orator. JULY 5.-ALUMNI DAY. Program of the Day. if . . . 1 8 1 P. M. Pres1dent's luncheon in Haskell, 2 P. M., business meeting in Kent Theater, 3:30 P. M., Parade of various classes, '69 to '98g 5:30 P. M., sing on Haskell stepsg 7 P. M.. dinner at the Quadrangle Club. Dr. D. S. Riggs, '78, acted as toastniaster. Toasts were responded to by President Harper, Galusha Anderson, E. A. Buzzell, '86, Miss Agnes Cook, '96, Henry Love Clark, '96, James VVeber Linn, '97, G. S. Bond, '97, and Henry Tefft Clark, '94s. JULY 8. Reception of Georgia Club in Haskell. JULY lf. Concert at Kelly Hall. JULY 23. Dance at Foster. JULY 29. Reception by members of wonien's halls. AUGUST l. Reception in East Quadrangle. AUGUST G. Informal dance at Kelly. Salmagundi party at Beecher. AUGUST 8. Professor Starr's reception for his classes held in Haskell. AUGUST ll. Reception by President Harper at his home after Junior finals. AUGUST 24. 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A ',5--.....,-- 1--'..-157:,5'..!.,yg.-55:'i'4 ,554-fy-11.-, 2 Zrjiv, ., .,,u,'ga' him, wfs' ..,.-ffwiwi l' fi .H 1 'W' 1' '....azSeH4'!'i'i355"d'gi'W4i!9i432Q.. . N p A ai f A... 'Tl"7lf?7,zxf:5Z'4i"i1' ...... -:.::.- -' ' H .3, ' .ffffijf ,f'""2?1"'Wvwrff512sQses. . , 3-sf . A -. tim, , :im-.f1iQ,i5.gg,., , P A. . ..Nl ' I , WL, Vi' Pr I , . ..,,. it W.: . if? 1 if V . if . .,,:. . sw., 'ffhi + ' ' - j..fF.f' .si iikfwlwut 32.5--., .4 . , ,. . r, . :JA ,-,.,: : , ,,j-A.?:1,yh,,,-.l:.,A5f,.:5x. :H.,r:.:.A .5-..,..5. Wigs:- iflf .' . . ' ,.- "Q Sr: X I . v ' .- ' ..f5fs."f151g.a.:,- 1 .1 .fs-.4.'f.-' ::44:5gw:.+,. ..:::qg.g-gr-L.2.ni1--2' N. f x V : X- .Z EL1 Q. f CMOCTOBIE N ,tc Xu'-fgsi ,-xx?-X I 2- L0 t' I xJlp VL IIS N 'W 1 ill! 1 M x X w . .1 leg rr x V .- u -1 itil, Q13 kg, SN Li V . will f . L ll 55 -is 1. All . L- W l fi ' Q. I X Ei , iii- OCTOBER l. Chester A. Barnes and Milton Pettit initiated into Phi Kappa Psi. OCTOBER 2. Yanclerlip at " Millhurstf' Esoteric Club entertained by Miss Ruth Isabel OCTOBER 5. Informal Dance at Rosalie. OCTOBER 7. Receptions at women's halls for new members. OCTOBER T. Sigma Club reception. OCTOBER 8. Victoria Hotel. Chicago Alurnnze Association luncheon at the OCTOBER 14. Annual Y. XV. C. A. in the chapel. Miss Talbot gave a channg- dish party to the Epsilon stag party. reception of the Y. M. C. A. and members of Kelly. Delta Kappa OCTOBER 17. Lincoln House supper. OCTOBER 22. Psi Upsilon smoker. OCTOBER 24. Freshman presentation and torch-light proe cession. OCTOBER 23. Miss Wallace gave a dance at Beecher. Reception given by Graduate Club. OCTOBER 29. Kelly Hall, HalloWe'en party. Foster Hall, HalloWe'en party and., dance. OCTOBER 31. Snell Hall, " open house." 247 JUNIOR PRESENTATION I O., The First Annual Reception of the Fresbmen ...Info fhe Sfudenf-body of fbe Unibersify... Concert - - Under the Direction of the JUNIOR COLLEGE COUNCIL IQENT TI-I EATRE Monday, October 17, 7:30 p. rn. 63 Pl'OSl'dllllIlQ lVhat Music Requires Of the Freshmen Duty Of the Freshnien under CO-education Song - - Address of Welcome XYhat the Freshmen Should DO for Athletics Football - Song - - Presentation Slieech - PULLMAN BAND MR. VERNON S. PHILLIPS Miss EDITH D. JENKINS - DR. W. R. LIARPER - MR. LEROI' T. VERNON UV. KENNEDX' KC. B. H1-IRSCHISERGER MR. ARTHUR BESTOR Presentation Of Symbols MR. RLHDILRT S. INICCLURE, Pres, J. C. C. Reply of the Freshmen MASTER Song - - Torcli-light Procession JOHNNY CLENDENNING Bonfire and Music lay the Band. 24S xvf: . T9 WOVEN BE iff ,S 1 ' f 'TXVQ L7 9---iii' QM, ' i NOVEMBER -1. Spelman House reception. NOVEMBER 4. Mr. Eli M. Lubec initiated into Phi Delta Theta. NOVEMBER T. Beecher Hall reception IQOVEMBER 10. Professor and Mrs. Yincent gave a reception to the members of Lincoln House. NOVEMBER ll. junior College Finals in Kent. Dinner party at Kelly in honor Of Miss Talbot. Beta Theta Pi informal at Kenwood Institute. NOVEMBER lil. Mr. and Mrs. Vincent entertained the Oxford Club, NOVEMBER 21. Foster Hall reception. NOVEMBER 23. Professor and Mrs. Vincent gave a reception to the members of the foot ball team. NOVEMBER 25. Mortar Board Dance at lfoster Hall. NOVEMBER 25. Installation of the Alpha Epsilon Delta Chapter of Chi Psi, followed by a banquet at Masonic Temple. NOVEMBER 26. First assembly informal at Rosalie Hall. NOVEMBER 26. The Mortar Board gave a breakfast in honor of several alumnae who were in the city for a short time. ' NOVEMBER 25. Receptions at Snell and Green Halls. NOVEMBER 30. Professor Smith gave a dinner at the Quadrangle Club to the local chapter of Delta Tau Delta. 2-lt! x yr c ' f9Y Sfbylxdi 4" su I-5 ' 4 , I ,v In X fi 3 cf N 'fy of 3, 'vA " ---.J I K J7 'f . 'NTT-N. DECEMBER 2. Delta Tau Delta initiation. Taka D 4 211 - . Q l7:,4-3 jc! DECEMBER 3. Three Quarters Club initiation at the ' - 'X L Palmer House. . rr ' 1 N - , . 'Z AMIM 6 bm ' ft Theimtiates were: Q7 1 1 ig 5 XVillian1 Moloney Charles Hulbert 7 x 11,5 ' I, f ,", Edwin .Kohlsaat Harold Osborne if 6 A' .5 Charles Hayes Eugene 'Watson 6- 0 ' Charles Magee John M. Clendenning L LW . I i' Perley L. Freeman William Chapman. kQ sf-4 4 X QV Lewis Vllooclruff Vernon Ferris P xl, -' gl V , Lawrence Usborne George Young. S, LX' X Harry French George Gaylord X X ' ff Lee Ballinger Charles Jacobs X, Oswald Gregory Fred Moloney ' ffff V I, George Linsley Howard Young ., 4 VX, ,ff Dance at Kelly hall. ' X DECEMBER 8. Beta Theta Pi informal musical. A DECEMBER 9. Delta Kappa Epsilon informal dance. X DECEMBER 9. First Annual Supper of the Morgan X Park Club. in DECEMBER 10. Deltafliappa Epsilon "war" smoker. f my , Chi Psi inforn1al:dance. Delta Tau Delta house L T party. 1' ,-wif?" X M, K Cf DEQENBER 16. Senior Finals in Kent Theatre. .-1-, C, ,. Y - ra DECEMBER 24 250 ". Informal dance atllfoster Hall. ag' ,S Q? , --"' ,fi li--'L ' Y f-A-f ..-G1 ' "' at X , 2 1 Qffx N s 4-5 N K3 7 IQ-1 xv Ll 0 b ,I .. 5 r . . . . R 4' JANUARY 2. Psi Tfpsilon initiated George Gay- . 35, 17, -JI lord and Benjamin Buck. K '-QL' .1 JANIYARY 9. Guy C. Kinnaman, J. W, Sheldon I 'L and D. A. Morris initiated into Phi Delta el X, I ,ANT Theta. Varsity informal. Psi Upsilon Xb ' dinner party. . JANUARY 9. Howard Young initiated into ' Phi Kappa Psi. JANUARY 14. Varsity informal. Delta Kappa yx x Epsilon initiation and banquet. lnitiates: m I Yij' ' Edwin Christian Kohlsaat, 'Vernon Tiras ' p .' ' n Ferris, Charles Eri Hulbert, Charles Surn- J 2513 ner Hayes and Charles Lewis YVoodruff. I .Cr Alpha Delta Phi initiated Bert Cassells, , , ' " - I N Burton Smith and Charles Eaton. Alumni 9"'rf11IJQ4iiii'Tii smoker at Phi Kappa Psi house. W pil JANUARY lfi. Beta Theta Pi initiated Eugene Watson. Alumni smoker at Chi Psi House. JANUARY 20. XVashington House luncheon. 5 od Delta Kappa Epsilon smoker. xxx JANUARY 21. Chi Psi initiated Lee Ballinger, ki I A Wlillis Lindsley and Franklin Bogue. X MIANUARY23. Receptions at Snell and Green . 1 ? Halls. X 1 JANUARY Quadranglers initiated julia Ma- X Alai lone, Leona Canterbury, Eunice Follansbee i and Brieta Bobo. ggi :gf Q If ily l 251 x, Ag -. A fx, . .N.Nf,..,- Jr- - fa..-,fue .. Q, N ' 2 2 L 1 if Q no I , , J lg S Y., LC-:J JK IN , f 1 ,A m Wt 'l tt W w 6 C 0 Qu Gcfl wt M! J l v Q I ii V Nl I X D k ,f' . N A gf' .' - N A Y , A M' ,.., .I E1 4" Q .. A X. Q S L 1 K x . ffl? L s I L "A Cry :R tf . to l f S D :Ky I. FEBRUARY 1. Psi Upsilon smoker. Phi Kap- pa Psi initiated Dean Swift and Albert Bertram Garcelon. FEBRUARY 2. Delta Kappa Epsilon Assembly at the Chicago Beach Hotel. FEBRUARY 4. Glee Club dance at Foster. Third University informal. Phi Kappa Psi smoker. FEBRUARY 10. Informal dance at Kelly. jun- ior Finals at Kent Theater. FEBRUARY ll. Phi Delta Thetainforrnal dance at Rosalie. FEBRUARY 13. Receptions at Kelly and Grad- uate halls. FEBRUARY 14. Annual concert of Glee, Mane dolin and Banjo Club at Studebaker Hall. FEBRUARY lT. Annual reception and banquet of Graduate Club at Chicago Beach Hotel. Delta Kappa Epsilon chafing dish party. Lincoln House supper and initiation. Delta Tau Delta initiation. FEBRUARY 20. Foster Hallreception. 252 FEBRUARY 21. XVashinglon Promenade. Committees in charge: , W'illiam France Anderson, General Chairman. FINANCE. Charles Branden Davis, Chairman. Ainsworth XVhitney Clark. john James XValsh ARRANGEMENTS. Clinton Luman Hoy, Chairman. Gordon Clarke. Emory Cobb Andrews. RECEPTION Roy Coleman Griswold, Chairman. Ralph C. Hamill. Arthur Sears Henning. PRINTING. Parke Ross, Chairman. Herbert A. Abernethy. Allen Grey Hoyt. Patronesses : Mrs. Harry Pratt Judson Mrs. George E. Vincent Mrs. james Rowland Angell Mrs. William B. Owen Mrs. George C. Howland Miss Wallace FEBRUARY 22. Sigma Club, XVashingt0n tea. FEBRUARY 27. Receptions at Snell and Green halls. A ' 3 - . Q. jr f sf f ff' 'I "-'nl 3 :L ' - V S, 11 ,I-5 I , ' '- ,Z , -rs , 1 rw . I 2224 gf 2 ffilf' ' I I L S -' 4 I J i Y 211' -,.-,g".'.. if ---si T uf- fy sa , ii 153,211 ra ' fl I- . f. n"SqLs!iiii3,wL.tL . 'lj , r 4 " A ' Ln K Gif ' .gl if b qi. Q I . U., I E 1 If N Mn. . , -. ,. .KJ ,. 253 A Y , ff-v P J' 3293 K lm, KU " 4 rl 7 ,, N sr CcNi' f C ' wJ X' 5 . 40 1' fs C f' ' 'IJN Y ' '7 D gf' BIARCH 3. Alpha Delta Phi initiated Harry P. gl 'Nb French and Jerome P. Magee. Delta Kappa Epsilon initiated Maurice Mande- ville. ll'lARCH 3. Miss Olga Nethersole addressed the Graduate Club in Kent Theater. BIARCH 4. Varsity informal at Rosalie. lll.-ARCH 6. Beecher Hall reception. llfl.-ARCH 10 University Settlement Bement- Coniic Opera-"The Deceitful Dean," in the gymnasium. MARCH ll. Phi Kappa Psi smoker. MARCH 13. Annual dinner of Oxford Club at Hotel NVindermere. Kelly Hall reception. Spelrnan House entertained the President and party. lllARCH 17. Three Quarters Club dance at Kenwood Institute. Senior Finals in Kent Theater. IIARCH l8. Dance at Green Hall. Phi Delta Theta smoker. MARCH 20. Foster Hall reception. ill.-ARCH 27. Receptions at Snell and Green Halls. 251 KLA X L W 4 H gm .,g-N524 V f g f Q, g , ,ug f , ,,zfz'X.??a f ,A ,. 3,1 ,Av ly ,ff -' ,1?P?1!4f 5, X 'FB f!'x Z, M If My x fi, ' I A512 .f f , , 1 ff A f M mf Y N Xx x," "WW" , fff fx 5 ik ffpf H "- W f f f X V! fl gwiixxyf wr X N 'gf'5 71' QLIISTQ E' l 1 ! lf W XX VN fx MY 52 " K K RX? E l f ? ,fy X590 'f ,N , O V Efbffgs RA' Av 5 xx Q bij Rx 3 lvl fa g? A K K pf Q Q Y ff ws- - - 1 A--as I ful' Xu N , XMvff1 ,, Q Y K I f 7-27 " Zf mfq -mxmxwxx N Q 7 1 I . I lm xmm W fyf, X X"fw mug' X 2 f- X75 - ix ,fl -.,,.,, 5? x,. I hu :H 1 rrp, , .L ww' WF. . , '. if-'.' f. G.. ,fm .nm .. Qin, 5. i 'Y Jw., 5 , W' ,4 5, .,-1, .JIHK rw 'u I - .v I, s nl- .- my A S, 3, .ff 'ffl 4 WI , 'I Iliff .IU j .V .af U, 4 . A, v, in -4. ' u-' Ma .m 5. uw, , V.- wr " X. p 1 xx, '14 1, ' .A, i. l.Y Ni I: "I -',..', , 1: a.. ,,v .'.-yr . A Vg-gr .. - 21' I -g 1 -Y 1 I, , , . .s 0. J . 1.-1 A. .v I. ..', In r E, P.. 1 ,, hm 1 , , . .,.. I .I x , I --V Q 1 J I , ,. W '. ...Tv J" I ' I ,,,j e, " . L' 1' HV 1 .1 N f f 1 . f.xJ H .' 1' + 1 1 , ,v X 'U cb? WSHGIII FTER the Old College, which had so long staggered under its burden of debts, had finally given up the struggle and relieved itself of its load by lying down forever-after its Hnal collapse, the buildings stood for agreat while, as we count time nowadays, empty. The lapse may have been for eighteen or nineteen years. The Old College had been a labor of love to its builders, and the most exquisitely careful work had gone into the erection of these piles of brick and stone. Not that they were beautiful-that, the city's new civilization made too much to ask, nor deli- cate-there was no time for delicacy when tive hundred young men were waiting on the steps to be educated. But the buildings were strong, magnificently strong, horri- bly strong. They stood deserted and alone in the midst ofa city that bustled and hurried about them, and in the midst of a life that constantly grew old and revived, turning from raw newness into shabbiness, and then into a kind of mocking age, that presently fell into itself and gave way to raw newness again-in the midst of all which unpleasant and commercial senescence and rej uvenation, they bade a proud defiance to decay, standing stilily and unruined. Even the window-panes seemed to bear some charm against theft and breakage, and the windows looked on the world with none of that gap-toothed senility that vacant easements show. The dust that one wind blew in, the next blew outg rubbish there was noneg a great clean emptiness hung round the place, and seemed to garnish it. It was for this very stanchness of the buildings that their owner let them stand, thinking it a pity, and bad policy besides, to waste such care and value as had gone into their construction. They hung heavy on his hands, however. He made many attempts to sell them, or to rent them, but either the memory of the past, Or a want of industries that could use their big bare spaces, kept them from the attack of business. Men looked them over and went awayg the rush of business, swirling by, left them unengulfedg the city spread thinly and then thickly past, and the clang of cable-cars re-echoed under their very gables, and rang through their still old rooms, and yet nobody would pay the price for them. They stood on, undestroyed, undishonored, and finally their grim and obstinate refusal to give in to Time was rewarded. They, who had been college halls, were to be college halls again. The New College, walking in the footsteps of the Old, adopted them. It seemed to some a foolhardy thing to try to establish a college where others had tried and failed. But times had changed since the old institution had given up the iight, friends were more numerous and enemies less bitter. There were promises of support from high quarters, and substantial gifts to push under them for a foundation: and chief among these gifts was the one that determined the site of the New College, the gift of the buildings and grounds themselves. He, the owner, the very man so roared at and execrated in the old days for his hard handy now richer than ever and with a kind of desperate longing for public approbation that grew upon him with age, like his white hairs, and that he, poor fellow, dignified with the name of "philan- thropy," he now saw his opportunity at the moment when the movement for the New College had reached the very crest of desire, and paused, waiting for circumstance to decide whether it should push forward or fall back, to reap the harvest of approval he had not sown: to give away the cake he had already eateng and so he made his offer. It was accepted with eagerness. v 257 And yet the situation had been an odd one for a college even in the old days, and it was still more odd now, with the incongruous hurry and intemperate excitement of the great city so very near. This oddness was as nothing in the sight of the promot- ers. They clapped down new buildings, with "modern improvements," among the old ones, they adapted and furbished up the latter. But straightway these showed their cross-grained and mulish natures in a fresh light. For just as they had before refused to grow old, now they refused to be made young Paint them and tinker them as one might, their age looked unhappily and incongruously ont. Their hard- wood Hoors, though polished to a gleaming brilliancy, squeaked protestingly under foot. Their quaint mouldings, in spite of ammonia and water, looked as they were, out of date thirty years, all the cleaning in the world served only to widen that space of years. The narrow casements, with their shining panes, glimmered anachronisti- cally. The old places clamored inaudibly for the old peace. But their ungratefulness -for what destiny half so good dared they have hoped ?-passed unheeded. Pres- ently the old recitation-halls became new recitation-halls, and the old dormitories new dormitories. Vigo roomed in number 21 of the East Hall, a corner room, which he had chosen because it was slightly larger than most of the others, and because its windows-of which there were two-fronted south on the pale lawn of the quadrangles, rather than north on the busy street. A comparatively quiet side street ran by the east end of the room, which was also the end of the buildingg and was bricked up solidly, without windows. The room was, for a dormitory, spacious-perhaps eighteen feet long and ten feet wide, with little angularities and irregularities that appealed to Vigo's taste, and made it easier to arrange his furniture and draperies than if it had been square and boxlike. He fixed l1is bed in a niche near the Windows, where it modestly re- treated behind the jutting wall. His book-case was opposite, in such a position that he could lie in bed and read the titles in his library. The divan and the dresser, were equally easy to place. When it came to his desk, Vigo thought that he should have more trouble: but as he stepped back to take a final survey he saw the very spot for it, in one corner, perhaps a trifle too near the gaily-painted bunch of iron pipes that were to furnish heat some day. but convenient to the light, and out of the way of every- thing else. He planted it resolutely down there. He got up his last curtain, drove the last tack into his photograph holder, and then, getting the effect with his head on one side, found it very good. When he had completed his examination he sat down at his desk and pleased himself by looking backward to the time, nearly twenty years before, when his room had been last occupied, W'ho had the former tenant been? Vigo had been sufiiciently curious on this point to inquire of the official of whom he rented the room, but that gentleman could tell him nothing. The books of the Old College, he said, had been either lost or burned, he did not know which: the old affairs had been completely set- tled up, and now, for such minor details as who had lived in a particular room, there was no source of information except tradition. Vigo could surely, the official thought, discover somebody who had studied at the Old College, able to enlighten him. Vigo resolved that some such man he certainly would look up. Meanwhile, he wondered over the room, and let his imagination play as it chose. Had the old tenant been a freshman like himself, or somebody of weight and importance in the college? Perhaps he had been an athlete, as athletes went in those days -a mighty runner on l 258 occasion. More probably, if he was a man of account, as Vigo felt sure, he had turned his attention to oratory and debate, and made this very room echo with firey practisings of "Webster's Reply to Hayne," or "My honorable opponent, the last speaker on the affirmative, is pleased to impeach the veracity of my honorable col- leage. But, Sir, I can tell him"-pouring it out in a Hood, sweeping quite away the honorable opponents, and landing the speaker and his honorable colleague high and dry upon the shore. Vigo's eyes flashed as he thought of the impetuosity of it. As he pondered on it, it seemed to him that he could see the Other Man-dark-eyed, dark-haired, with straight, thin lips and a look of vast determination- no nonsense about him anywhere. Vigo himself was small and fair and frail, imaginative and sensitive, and he admired the other type according as he felt himself to fall short of it. He wondered what the Other Man was doing now-a doctor, a minister, more proba- bly a lawyer or even a statesman, thundering away at opponents as he used to do, always right and always winning. Vigo imagined him in a thousand different careers, ever the same, thin-lipped, eager. pressing. But strangely enough, it never occurred to Vigo that the Other Man might be dead. As Vigo sat at the desk, imagining these things, ty 3 'W his eyes fell upon a break in the papering just above 1 X f the level of his face. He reached out and felt of it 5, K ' fig? with his finger. It was the head of a nail, where i f the workmen had carelessly left it protruding ,fa i through the new paper which had been put on OHV? over the old. Vigo looked at itcuriously. It was an li l i old nail, and rusty, though still strong. It had 'X HQSQEXE.. evidently been in the wall a long time. Suddenly Vigo knew that that nail was the one link binding e if V him to the Other Man-the man who had last occu- A I xv , , pied number 24. Twenty years before, the Other gif? ,nic ' Q- , W? Man must have driven that nail where it now stood. e v. ,gg X I And why? It was low-more than half way down I ' yi iw ,V , the side of the roomg and it was off in the corner, 4 X j , It came to Vigo in a flash that for these very rea- U s gg -2 sons, and for the marvelous exactitude with which Hi ,IQ f it fitted above the very middle of his desk, that the 'Ei i ff" , 'I Other Man, too, must have seen that this spot MX 1' was the only one for the desk, the Other Man must ---iff Q! 'N iv have sat time and again just where Vigo was sit- 'FK ting now, and looked long at whatever hung from f K xi i i the nail. Vigo wondered what it could have been. V , N ' i A picture of course, but whose? Meanwhile Vigo, :MVK W ' after scraping away the paper from the edge of the 2-5 ' nail with his finger, took a photograph, in its fair little blue frame, from where it stood on his dressing case, and fitting a wire tolit, hung it from the nail. It was Her picture, just her face smiling up at him. He sat down and looked at it again, and blushed, and laughed to himselfg and then kissed the tips of his fingers to it, and said " Good-Night-dear Y" and went to bed. 259 He awoke suddenly with a feeling of effort. His lips were dry and his heart beat- ing hard, and he was listening intently. He had not dreamed, yet every fibre in him was strung up like a runner's when he is waiting for the shot. The room was quite black and dark. He did not know what time it was, but he felt sure it was late, for the humming of the cable in the street outside had ceased. , The only sound he could catch was the barking of a dog in the other street, the one to the east. The animal was howling steadily and persistently: a long bay: silence, and then another bay, another silence, and another bay. It came as regularly as the ticking of a clock, or the hammering of one's pulse. There was a note in it that Vigo could not recognize, which seemed neither anger nor warn- ing, suddenly, in one of the pauses, it came to him that it was fear. In the same breath the howling died away into a long smothered whine, and Vigo heard footsteps in the hall outside his door. Though they came uncertainly, as though the man, whoever he was, was not sure of his ground, if 4 there was no stealth in them. Not that they were md heavy, for Vigo could scarcely catch them, with his fiercest attention, but they had a kind of firmness in them that told Vigo the walker did not mind who heard him. They came slowly down the hall, and paused outside Vigo's own door, which shook a little, as though the wind rattled it. His impulse was to cover up his l1ead with the bedclothesg but he reflected unsteadily that he was nineteen, and that the dormitory was full of peo- ple, so he jumped up instead. He laid his hands on the matches where he always kept them at the head of his bed, lit one, made his way quickly to the door, flung it open, looked out, and saw the empty hall. At the same moment there was a gust of wind from the open window, and his match flared and went out. The dog outside resumed his howling. In a trembling that he could not explain Vigo rushed back to bed and covered himself up. In the morning, as his custom was, as soon as he got up he went over to greet Her picture. He pattered across the room in his pajamas, but when he reached the desk he stopped with a little "Oh E" of dismay. The nail was empty, the picture had fallen face down upon the desk, and lay there. He picked it up hastily but carefully, and was relieved to find that not even the glass of the frame was broken. It seemed to him rather surprising that the picture could have fallen, even a few inches, upon the hard top of the desk, and sustained no damage. The nail was still in place and the wire was unbrokeng it was evident that the wind had merely shaken the photo- graph off. He put it in place again, and bade it an apologetic good-morning. When he had finished dressing he went to breakfast, where he found one of the men who roomed on his own floor. - "Hullo !" Vigo greeted him. " That was a high old wind last night, eh?" The other man laughed. "Wind? You must have been dreaming, Vigo. There wasn't wind enough last night to lift a feather." 260 Vigo Hushed and did not answer. The other man went on: "Did you hear that confounded dog, though?" Vigo leaned forward eagerly. "Yes: did he bother you, too P" "Bother me?" The other appeared to think. "He kept me out ofmy beauty sleep for half an hour, if that's what you call bothering. I'd have bothered him with a brick if I could have got at him, I need my beauty sleep." 'tHe kept me awake, too," agreed Vigo, "he and that fellow who was walking up and down the hall." "What fellow?" "Didn't you hear him?" "I heard nobody." Vigo relapsed into silence. NVhen he got back to his room again he re-examined the picture. Not even a crack appeared anywhere. It again seemed to him extraor- dinary that the photograph could have fallen, without sustaining the least damage. He looked about the room, pondering, and then for the first time noticed that the desk was so shut off from the window, by the dressing-case and one of the projections of the wall, that no wind except the strongest, could reach it. The discovery settled one thing in his mind: the wind had not blown down his photograph. It occurred to him that he must have left it lying on the desk the night before. "And yet I would have sworn I hung it up," he said to himself, thoughtfully. He went about his college duties, but all day he revolved the question in his mind. He could not shake himself free from a sense of wonderment over the experience of the night. When he came back to his room in the evening-for this first day had been so busy he had not had time to return before-he glanced at the photograph, and was relieved to see that it hung where he had placed it. He perceived in himself more than half a fear that it might have fallen once more. That night he studied a long time, in fact it was nearly twelve o'clock when he said good night to Her and went to bed. Even then he lay awake a while, thinkingg but finally he fell asleep. Nothing disturbed him, In the morning, however, when he went to look at the picture, he found it again lying face down upon the desk. This time the glass of the frame was cracked across. He removed the broken glass and kissed the picture tenderly before he set it back on his dresser. Later in the day, however, he got a new glass and put it in place, and then he took the wire and wound it round and round, and tied it with a peculiar knot he knew, twisting it till he felt sure it would defy any one to take it off without breaking the wire. In the evening he asked two or three of the men on the fioor to come into his room for a while. They were all freshmen, young like himself, strangers to each other and to the city. Vigo, with his eager desire for companionship, felt his position as host keenly, and in one of the pauses of the rather solemn conversation, anxious to enliven matters, he began to mention, somewhat shyly, his ideas about the Other Man, who had last lived in number 24. Half laughing, he described the Other Man, as he had imagined him, and he pointed out the nail, the only relic that the Other Man had left, He was rather sorry that he had done this, afterwards, because it in- volved an exhibition of the photograph that seemed to pointed, so much so that he could not help blushing a little as they looked at it. But they were polite, and did not chaff him at all, and so he grew not to mind. They were agood deal interested in the picture, and the nail, and the Other Man, and finally one of them said: 261 " Haven't you thought, Vigo, that the Other Man probably had a picture hang- ing where yours is hanging now ?" "Yes," Vigo agreed. "I had thought of that, in fact it was mos'ly that that made me put my picture there." " The Other Man would probably be jealous if he knew," said one of them. " Oh, I hope not." Still, Vigo took the idea under consideration. " What do you suppose the Other lXIan's picture was like ?" somebody wondered. " NVe-ell," pondered Vigo, "he must have been dark, so she was probably fair, and I have been thinking of him as a big fellow, so I imagine her little, I suppose, little, but with big eyes, with a smile in them. I don't believe her mouth smiled much, though, because he wouldn't care for the doll-baby face at all. Of course she must have been young, because he wasn't very old himself." Vigo broke off, with the sudden consciousness that he had been describing Herg and the others, with their eyes on the photograph, were conscious of it, too, and laughed a little, which made Vigo blush again. Then he smiled that smile that always forced people, even those who thought him soft, to believe in him, and said, pointing boldly at the photograph: " Perhaps she was something like Herg I hope so for, for the Other Man's sake." The others left presently, but before they went away they all shook hands and vowed to be good friends throughout college. Vigo went promptly to bed, and had a strange dream. It seemed to him he lay in bed broad awake and staring, as he had lain the other night, and he heard the same curiously soft, determined footsteps come slowly down the hall, and saw the door of his room open and the Other Man conie in. The Other Man. was in Vigo's dream, just as he had imagined him-tall, dark, thin- lippedg with a face all of whose lines seemed to lead to the eyes: a concentrated face. The Other Man stood in the doorway a moment and lookcd at Vigo with a determined stareg then he stepped rapidly across the room to the desk. Now the desk was behind the jut of the wall, and Vigo could not see it from his bed, yet he was aware somehow that the Other Man was fumbling with the knot of the wire by which the photograph was fastened to the nail. Yigo, in this curious way, that was not seeing, and yet was, knew that the Other Man found difficulty with the knot, could not unfasten it. Fin- ally he seemed to Yigo to leave off trying, and take hold of the nail as though he would pull it out. But before he had even stirred it he stopped and stood uncertainlyg then turned the picture up and slipped Her photograph out. He looked at it, it seemed to Vigo, savagely for a moment, as though he would tear it, but then he laid it down. From somewhere he took another photograph, and stared at it regretfully, and then slipped it into place in the vacant frame, turned to Vigo a pair of burning eyes lit up with triumph, stared again a long, long time at the photograph in the frame, took up Her picture, and with his direct, light step, went out of the room and down the hall again. It seemed to Vigo then that he himself got up, all in a nervous hurry, and crossed over to the desk, and seized the picture to discover what was the changeling photographg but with a grateful sigh discovered that in his dream he had been dreaniingg that the picture had not been changedg that Her eyes still looked out at him. Then he thought he went back to bed and to sleep. In the morning, when he really woke, the remembrance of the dream was still so distinct in his brain that he sighed gratefully again, as he assured himself in the cold daylight that the picture was the same as it had been. Then he smiled at himself. 262 It was three or four days later, when the three boys he knew best were once more all gathered in his room, that he told them about his dream. One of them, who in- tended some day to be a psychologist, explained it with a wisdom that would have been more lucid if he had not continually forgotten his terms, and been forced to fall back on " Well, brain-waves, you know," or, "Well, that's what Mr. Williams said." Somebody asked, at length: " Did you see her face, Vigo-the Other Girl's, I mean ?" They called them the Other Girl and the Other Man, now, to distinguish them. " That's the curious part of it," exclaimed Vigo. " It seems to me I did, and yet, when I try to remember, I can think only of the one face-as if they were both alike, you know." They agreed that it was odd. One of them went over and looked at the picture closely, then he said: " Hullo! You've changed the photograph yourself, haven't you ?" " VVhat do you mean?" asked Vigo. H Why, the one you showed us the other day had a green mount, and this is black. How many pictures of Her, have you, Vigo P" They all laughed. " VVhy,"-Vigo began. Then he checked himself and crossed over. " I didn't re- member that the mount showed at all in that frame." The other held the picture towards him. " It doesn't, usually. The corner slips out when you jar it. I remember it did the other day, when I noticed it was green. Here, I'll shake it back." He did so: the corner of cardboard disappeared, but Vigo had time to notice that it was black, as the boy said. Vigo said nothing. He wanted time to think it over. Again there was a space of three or four days, during which came no develop- ments in the case of the Other Man, unless it could be called a development that for a week nothing happened, after a space of three nights, in each of which had occurred something inexplicable to Vigo. Meanwhile, Vigo wrote to Her, telling her, under pledge of secrecy, of the odd transposition of Her photographs, and he found out from the registrar the address of a man who, the registrar thought, would remember something about number 21 in the days of the Old College, and wrote to him, too, a letter that cost him a great deal of thought and trouble to compose. While he was waiting for answers to these letters, Vigo studied indiiferently, and slept scarcely better. He dozed only to wake vi ith a start, listening for the coming footsteps down the hall, he got up in the night to examine the photograph, and assure himself that it had not been moved. In his days he thought of the Other Man, and of his own dream that the photographs had been changed-a dream so oddly realized: and he found himself coming constantly back to the look of triumph in the Other lXIan'S eyes. In reason, if reason could be applied to what was wholly unreasonable, the Other Man must have been satisfied that in some way he had outwitted Vigo, but how was it to outwit him, simply to change one picture of Her for another? Vigo puzzled, and still nothing happened that could confirm him in any way in the belief that he had been allowed to see what is hidden from most people. He began to wonder if he was on the edge of brain fever, without knowing it, and more than once he was on the point of telling the others all he knew. But he was shyg and what had he to tell, to justify his wild wonder, except that the photographs had really been transposed? They would tell him that somebody was playing a joke on him, he 263 thoughtg and then he would determine to wait a little longer, at any rate until he heard from Her, and from the graduate of the Old College. Meanwhile, Vigo was in a fair way to be ill with Worry. One afternoon he came into his room hurriedly. He had been doing so miserably in his work that to-day he decided not to go to his afternoon recitation. As he threw open his door he saw a man sitting at the desk, his back to the door staring intently at Her picture. At first Vigo thought it was one of the boys he knew, but almost at once he was aware it was a stranger to him, and he wondered indignantly what the ff-llow was doing there. He gave a little cough to attract attention, and the man turned his head. They looked into each other's eyes, and Vigo saw that the stranger was tall, dark, thin-lippedg with a face all of whose lines seemed to lead to the eyes: a concentrated faceg the face of the Other Man of his dream. The same flash that burnt the recognition into his heart showed him that this man was not alive, that he might not speak, or understand. They looked at each other with a tremendous silence. Outside some boys were playing ball and shoutingg on tl1e other side of the building a cable-car rumbled along and then stopped With a jangling jar. They looked at each other till the two clangs came that signalled for the car to start, and then suddenly the Other Man was not. But there fell on Vigo's ear the sound of footsteps, muffled, yet direct, that passed him and went down the hall-the empty hall. He crossed the room and looked at the photo- graph, as the Other Man had looked at it, in an ectasy of attention, and his eyes were opened as they had not been before. He saw by a thousand signs that it was not Her picture. The likeness was marvelous, but the picture was not Her's. The arch of the eyebrows Was more rounded, the mouth mlrooped a little at the corners, the cheeks were thinner-a thousand things were different. He understood everything at once. This was the photograph that, years before, the Other Man had hung. The glance of triumph l13.Cl been justiliedg the Other Man, who had fought so hard to keep his little shrine sacred, had succeeded-had outwittefl him. Vigo stripped the photograph from the frame, and took it in his hand as if he would tear it to piecesg 264 then he remembered his dream, and stopped, and looked at it, and laid it gently on the desk, face down. This was not Shep but the Other Man had loved her. It seemed odd to vigo that he was not afraid. He felt a choking in his throat, and a kind of lightness about his heart, as though he had been running for a long time, as one is afraid when he feels a sense of impending danger, and looks about for help, Vigo was not. He sat down at his desk and wrote again to her, saying nothing of his last experience, but enclosing the photograph, and asking her whether she could in any way explain the likeness. Then he wrote a telegram to the student of the Old College, asking him to send at once any information he might have. He did these things as simply and naturally as a man puts out his hands to save himself in falling, it never occurred to him that he might do anything else. When he had posted his letter and sent off his telegram, he came back to his room, and though it was only the middle of the afternoon, he took off his clothes and went to bed. He felt hot, and his head ached. When they found him he was delirious. Your letter and telegram are at hand, asking for information as to the man 'who roomed in number 24, College Hall, at the time of the breaking up of the Old College. In reply I may say that strictly speaking nobody roomed in number 2-1 at the time you mention, and for this reason. A young man named Clements had roomed there a short time previously. He was a most brilliant young fellow-too brilliant, in fact, for in an attack of brain-fever superinduced directly, as it was supposed, by overwork, he died in that room. To the best of my knowledge, no one could be found to take the room in the few months between his death and the time when the Old College went to pieces. In regard to this man Clements' personal appearance, concerning which you ask, I cannot speak so positively. As I remember him, he was tall and very dark. His eyes were particularly bright, I believe, though indeed I may be Confusing him with some one else, and so cannot say with certainty. I am afraid that I cannot furnish you with the address of any of his family, for, as I remember it, he was alone in the worldg I think his burial was superintended by the college author- 1 ies. t This is all the information I am able to furnish you with at this time. Trusting that it may be what you wish, I remai11-- Before I begin to answer your letter I must make a confession. It was so odd, and puzzled me so much, that I felt absolutely compelled to break the promise of secrecy you asked of me, so I showed it fthe letterl to mamma. She said, of course, that some one must have been playing a trick on you. S0 much I felt sure of. But she could not tell, any more than I could, what picture of me the "someone" could have got hold of. When the photograph came this morning, however, she understood it at once. She recognized it as one of herself that she had had taken a long time ago, just before she was married, in fact. She disliked the style at the time, and had only two of them finished, one of which she still keeps. The other she supposed, of course, lost long ago, until to-day it dropped out of your letter. The curious part- though of course it explains the transposition of the photographs-is, that this picture must have lain in your dormitory ever since it was taken! Mamma gave it, nearly twenty years ago, as I said, to a young man named Clements, who was a student in the Old College. Mamma says she remembers very little about him, except that he was dark, and had exceedingly bright eyes. Papa, however, says he was a very hand- 265 some fellow, "and a great rival of mine for your mother, my dear!" Poor Mr. Clements died a long time ago, while he was at college, in fact. It certainly seems stran e that his photograph should turn up now, and in such good condition, to be g made the basis of a practical joke on you. I suppose one of the boys there had it and noticed the likeness. There is really nothing wonderful that you should not have noticed the difference, for I have the two before me as I Write, and, except for the mounting, I find them exactly alike. I feel very proud that I look so much as mamma did-people have so often told me she was a great belle I JAMES WEBER LINN. 6466446-56+ When Chis moon Was new XVhen this moon was new, I looked up through the night, And sent out all my soul in white, Pure stars of hope, and said 'twould be The harvest moon of love to me. But 'twas not trueg The night had drowned hope's twinkling stars, And gleams with lurid lightning scars, Since this 111oon was new. When this moon was new, I dreamed a sweet face bent above me, And sweet lips murmured low, " I love thee." I said 'twould be so ere this moon was old, And o'er and o'er my pearls of joy I told. But 'twas not trueg Broken is hope's golden bowl,- Love's joyous bells have learned to toll, Since this moon was new. Ln Rox' TITUS WEEKS. f ' W8Z1 t.B.Q Zf' 5nW3Z Q I 1 . I WI, QHGG T 5 HCOMPANY TE C OLLE GE E A A ' 5 ,I in ANN UALJ' 5 ge II II NDL NG Of A CONIRACT FOR A J COLLEGE NNUAL ROM INCEPIION I0 E A I I FINISH IS OUR SPECIALTY. DOING THE A F V ENGR VING PRINTING AND BINDING S COMPLETE IN OUR OWN ESTABLISHMENT. WRITE FOR INFORM O AND PRICES.aQaqessa I 2 65 T0 71 PLYMOUTH I PLACEQ-: CHICAGO? basis!-wvazralmsaaasamnarsamawavp mv' :vit 1 VL' '-'ax 3' 9' 1 :ful 'VN ,, F W' ' f Q N 49.5 4, 11 ., if -Vg I "R, ' 'E' 'jfs-5512. I-it ' -tf I H l H I 1' A 1 14 r Q , A .Mi .M f-X .N 1' - m , , . -.V , , 1 .x X r 4 N, . ., ,L A , f 51 W' . 1 L in 1 ' :7"A' lb I I ..4.,.Q,'E N ,Y N. ,, . , . r , , , fm , 'r'? 'EZ 'r' kff' I, ,,. ..,, ,. , - . ,4 ,Y ' ' .2 wil . . - 3.2, '-.-, , -, Q-, ,-e X . 1 1 f ug -1 tm, 4 . w ' ., , .. ,5 , -2, ,. . Dis SOITOID No women, except Miss Randall and myself, were in the long room of the Public Library Building. All about ns sat men reading foreign papers, trade journals, and magazines treating the industrial arts. Most of the readers had the deadened look of men accustomed to hard, monotonous lives. He who sat across the table from Miss Randall was plainer, more hopeless than the others. He was trying to read, but his Weak old eyes gazed oil' into vacancy 3 he saw nothing in the pages before him. Like a homesick dog, he looked timidly about the room. At last his eyes fell upon the open, sympathetic face of Miss Randall. Feeling his gaze, she looked up and smil- ingly half-nodded to him. He leaned toward her and said in a low voice : " She died a week ago to-day." FANNY BURLING. T fha el 'ffaiigll t 4 as l ,1 . Tzfy, 5 'f of Qfi " 'Y 4 , .yi -sa -- 'iifklin-i ii .- .j 70? mf -- W s ei. J H 'ff ' , ' ,f My 1 W' ' ' ibm? z -' -2- flf S s ' , , "Wal l L II IIIW 'awww 1 if . . Xlvlfrmmw! it WJ., S0-ta' f l " ,Xt 1' 5' K Snell ll 5 ' v - W' ' -if f f V bl L if x ik-5 ' 'T' ii .N i pf- ft, . 7'-iw' gall ' fi' ' 'b 267 Regllldl' Season BOQlllS BDO!!! the ISI of UCWNT. min '1 IllilIOiS SCDOOI of DQllIiSIl'D Chicago, Ill. CSCSCSCSCSCSCSCSCDQSCS63C5C5C365C565C3C5C5C3C5C5C5 RQCIIIWQIIIQIIIS fOl' flClmiSSiOll CSCSCSCSCUCSCSCSCDCSCSCS SATISFACTORY evidence of a good English education. Both sexes are admitted on equal terms. Graduates of Pharma- ceutical and undergraduates of Medical Colleges, and also grad- uates of Veterinary Schools, are admitted to the second year's course. 1 : : ' ' 1 : Pl'lZQS Beneficiaryof'FacultvPrize...T1ie student showing the highest average in all departments and good deportment will receive the General Ticket for the next vvinter's course free. There are two of these prices-one each to the Freshman and junior Classes. For cata- logue and information address : 1 : 1 : : : 1 : : : Dr. frank R. Brown, Dean, loo State Street, Chicago, Ill. 2458 1 l xx xx NX X X X x .- I . X- ' I X, X X , if Ti " We a X JQXXK 5' sy A CD2 Bifilld HERE'S a curus bird, Thet, ez fur's I know, 'S never had a word Uf praise, high or low: Never's had a verse Of all the poets sing : Clare if I ain't the first X.' M4 X 2 -'57 f f, 6, My we W ly I i' f 1 :Y ,qv fre' um, if . X I f I' fi Jr fl ig. QC-.5 .11 .iq , ...QQ-Qgg i in as f L9 Ez thought of sech a thing. I 'most Wish he had Sum other kind o' name, Makes me sort 0' mad, But he ain't to blame. What I want to tell 'S jest about this size, He knows mighty well What he prophecies. Of'n when the night jest turns towards the day, 'Fore a streak of light Gets here on its way, jest at twelve o'clock That bird flaps his wings, Feels the dayspring's shock 5 Lifts his voice and sings. 'T ain't much of a song, Cock-a-doodle-doo : Mighty short and strong 3 Mighty sure and true : I've thought till thought grows Most too much for me, How that Rooster knows Twelve o'c1ock from three. I don't allus know, Thinkin' in the night, That the dark will grow To the morning bright 3 But that fe11er's call, When he says he duz, Helps me bear it all, Now and things thet wuz. 269 ITITICAGO ENTPTWESTERN RAILWAY C.S'If P M.6'c ORY EE.6il:'lIY. RR P S.C.8c NUM? I THE PIONEER LINE WEST AND NORTHWEST 0F CHICAGO. I 20TH CENTURY TRAINS NORTH-WESTERN LIMITED ELECTRIC LIGHTED T0 ST. PAUL AND MINNEAPOLIS THE COLORADO SPECIAL ONE NIGHT T0 DENVER THE OVERLAND LIMITED CALIFORNIA ,mo onroon IN THREE ons THE DULUTH-SUPERIOR LIMITED AND ST. PAUL EAST MAIL. THE BEST OE EVERYTHING. W. B. KNISKERN II R M CULLOUGH, adv P as I. M. CHICAGO, Ill- G I1 ark Ag 270 Mebbe he's jest glad He's got one more day 'N he might hev had To live and feel gay. Mebbe it's jest pride, And a wild delight That some rooster died 'Stead o' him last night. Mebbe somethin' more, Mebbe somethin' less Ails him than comes o'er Me in my distress. But his sense of time Fore there's light to see Ez worth this much rhyme, Er seems so to nie. ANSTISS C. GARY. BRI' Wild OEIIS INNER had been quite a success that night. The usual endless discussions of pedagogical methods, the morality of modern novels, and the Philippine question had given place to animated recitals of boarding-school yarns. At length there was a lull in the merriment, and the graduate student said : " Well, girls, I think I'll tell you about something I did once. It was the only scrape I ever got into at school, and in my senior year, too I" The Fellow across the table looked up in some alarm, The three undergraduates were visibly surprised, and settled back in their chairs for the unfolding of meek little Miss Brown's iniquity. " I went to school in a small VVisconsin town," she began, taking excited satis- faction in her listeners' attention. " just across the village was a boys' military insti- tute, and of course our rules were in consequence extremely strict. I had always been a model scholar, but in my last term I was given rather a gay young room-mate. One fine winter morning, at her suggestion, I obtained permission to go sleigh-ridingg and as a special favor we were allowed to go without a chaperone. Now wha! do you suppose we did ?" " Do tell us, Miss Brown. We can't possibly guess," murmured the table. " We took that sleigh and drove straight to the institute !" she announced in an awe-struck tone. " And ilzen we made a tour of the entire grounds !" " And the boys came out and gave you a good time F" suggested the Freshman after an etfective pause. " Oh, no, it was recitation time, so they didn't see us." 271 Q Q in Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q9 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q QQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQ R Q 11 Y A l fj l tixi .Kill A lklfff "The mill will never grind again with the water which is past." Im- prove the present opportunity to order your autumn and winter gar ments. The Edward Ely Com pany, Tailors, Chicago. . TERMS:-Ten days, 10 per cent discount. L cscacacsfscscbiiscacscsfsciaiciwmcscacacacaca FINE TAILORING AT MEDIUM PRICES TI-IE EDWARD ELY C0. TAILORS 163-165 WABASH AVE. .... CHICAGO Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q in Q Q Q Q Q Q Q' mv QQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQ -1--J P0illIS or WMD X V I 5 n , Y DEAREST DOROTHY: lt's your turn to write, but never mind, l'll forgive you, and this is onlya note to remind you of your promise to visit me this month. ., Now, why can't you come next week? Monday's Kelly reception day, and on Tuesday, the fifteenth, comes the biggest hop of the year- the Delta Psi ball. My brother Jack's coming up for it, and will be de- lighted to look after your program. IQIII going with Grant Lorimer g of course, he is still to the fore. Those two men, Grant in particular, are mighty good about getting up little special games. Now, you'll be sure to come, won't you? Wear your newest gown, your sweetest smile, ,N , and look your prettiest, and we'll try to give you such a good time that VRD t 1 , v M xi you'll want to enter the " U " next fall. ,f 5 . V V . f .. U f 'i til f 'itimwizl . ul, , I H 5 Things are rather dull here now, though, generally, I manage to make alittle excitement when none looms up of its own accord. Have you read " Over the Horizon? " Quotable. But what a peculiar point of view. I detest that type of woman, don't you? Have you ordered your shirt-waists yet? Benson's have some stunning patterns this year. I must close and run to a ten-thirty. Good-bye. VVrite right away and say you are coming to see, Yours with love, Lois. Kelly Hall, Monday, April T, 189- When the writer finished the foregoing note, she rose from her desk and stood by the window, looking out across the campus and waving the paper to and fro to dry it. It was brown paper with a tiny gilt monogram at the top, and indefinably, it suited the personality of the girl poised evenly, erectly, in her correct tailor gown. The room, too, seemed to indicate not her individuality perhaps, but her type. The green walls were hung with photographs and frat-pictures, mostly in black frames, with here and there a poster of Bernhart, Dust- or Hardy. There were quantities of pillows on the couch, all covered with maroon, or green, or deep orange, and cur- tains at windows' and book-case, oriental in pattern, rich of tint Everywhere warmth, and deep tone color 3 no pink, no blue, and not a drape to be seen. A final wave and the letter was slipped in its envelope, sealed, stamped, and di- rected. The girl walked over to the mirror and began dabbing at her front hair. " I hope she'll come," she said half aloud. " Dear Dorothy ! How will she take it all, I wonder? Wish they would let her come here. Good gracious! that clock! it's never right," and she hurried out of the room, slamming the door. Dorothy came as a matter of course. At the ball she wore a beruiiled white gown, with a big sash round her waist. She looked as prctty as most, and prettier than many, and jack Marsh pronounced her a "smooth little girl who knew how to dance." Two men she met took a second dance with her, and one of the two, Fletcher Holward, asked for a third. Dorothy herself, in the excitement of her 273 ulendell 65 Company ol, xy o Makers of f l i .V - A ,. it ,io 1 i ' Y -o I 1 ' V 9 - is oi V NA 1 l g fl'ill2l'l1ll!-7 Suit to Order Pills... HIl7l2IiC ll2CClZllS Class PWS 0ua..2ig2fg.r1:'.i:':.1L5,,'::.:'s5afi.i::1.z:3?.r.:2fm- and mfhlfff 1.2125 if f3i?i.l0'I1if2iQlTall7a'l RlllSS... tem' .Lid f,lSf1l2ZaS"'pe5' isnfet Order of Us and Get Your Moneys Worth mmpiai.. c'l'cf'30 SIX 2 LITTLE 1 TAILORS Bldg. 78 Munson sr. Haffisgn Clothes DTDQYS MAKIQS STIECIE-Illll A52 6000 GAS PICTURES E i t' - "' 11"'tll Ir you are dissatistied with your present photographer try .... Harrison... CENTRA L 1UlfSIC HA L L He Knows How. ' V Every Picture a work of art, or Read Thls ' you dou't have to take it. Every sitting must please you, if not, you may sit until it does. Every Student gels a discount, if this publication is mentioned. 0 17p 'rw ,F .fi '. L .-Tv-r' , " J ' L , 5 1,1 ' T. f ff? ' ' , I ', .win-.. :.:, o,., ,,,.i .4 ,,. lie - flgizff ., .gtg V4 I' ' ., ',! ' " Qlriij 2-2-z, , .iii f ": 6.3 .2 in il! mf., H.. fl, if' Q I. -. 1- .I .Y7:',i-Af .' 42155, V432 iliieiis-,1.'. -Ll.i, C :gg -35 7 ...- 'F y . , 4.-1' ..,, ,,,,, 'ii ,,, 72- .. f g il l wwf l' , ' Lil: 15, -g , ite ff? n w iiwsfzr ' " L3,ia,,t.s gtg,-1,1 ,gl-,A ,W 4:.g:Q.g,ugf" 1 S115 This cut shows Combined Dryrr and Stove. 'For Residences, Flats and Public Institutions Estimates promptly furnished, bend for Illustrated Catalogue. Chicago Clothes Drper Wks. os S. Zanal Street, Zhicago. Eastern Headquarters, l123Broadway,New York . first fratfball, was radiant. She liked everybody and everything, and found the men in general and the Delta Psi's in particular, splendid. " I suppose," she ventured, looking up at tall Fletcher Holward, " I suppose Delta Psi is the finest fraternity in the world." Fletcher smiled genially. " We think so of course," he admitted. " And I assure you, without prejudice, that we are certainly second to none. All men speak of their own fraternity ' without prejudice' " Dorothy beamed an "of course," and it was a few minutes later that Fletcher asked for a second blank extra, and frowned to find everything "gone to the seventh." During the evening, Dorothy looking about for her friend, observed that Grant Lorimer seemed on the fair road to the monopoly of Lois' dances. tHe had taken three with her to be sure, but then she was Lois' guest.j At supper they all laughed and talked together, but Grant's most pertinent remarks were addressed to Lois. Except when courtesy demanded he looked at her, and the conversation of the two was so full of reminiscences-those dear delights of intimate friendship-that Dor- othy began building a little romance. In the carriage going home she looked and listened, talking little and attaching hidden importance to everything Grant said, And, when at Kelly door as they said good-night, she heard them planning for " to- morrow," she thonght with a little sigh how lovely it would be if she, too, were "like that." Upstairs the girls talked it over. "fm glad you had a good time," said Lois, throwing her satin gown over the back of a chair. "May I see your program?" She took the card and glanced down it. " Five regulars and an extra with jack-nice, proper number-three with Grant, two with that Mr. Simms, and two with Fletcher Holward. Simms isn't very much 3 in fact"-gravely-" he's a criminal. How did you like Mr. Holward?" " A crimnal! Lois ! " " Yes. He's commonplace-that's criminal. But tell me, did you like Mr. Hol- Ward? " Lois, before the mirror was brushing out her long hair in comprehensive sweeps. "Yes," shyly from the yougcr girl. " He seemed charming, and he was lovely to me. He asked for three dances." " He is lovely, lovable and dangerous. He is self-centered and generous. He is never in earnest, and he always thinks he is. He is sympathetic, and he never un- stands, yet for all that he's one of the smoothest men in college, and, Dorry, dear, for him to have taken three dances was a worth-while compliment. " Do you know him very well," queried Dorothy, pleased. "Know him!" hastily, "yes, I know him," finished Lois quietly. " We all know each other here to a greater or less degree. May I sit here? Don't move. This is all right." She drew her dressing gown closer about her, shivering in the chill of the early morning. The braids of heavy hair hung about her in a loop: her gray eyes looked big and soft. Altogether she seemed so gentle that Dorothy gathered courage to lean against her and whisper, 275 FREDERICK P. BAGLEY AND CO., WHOLESALE DEALERS AND WORKERS IN MARBLE, EIGHTEENTH STREET VIADUCT CHICAGO. LUTHER L. SMITH. TV. R. GIVINN .IAMES DAIUBY President and Treasurer Secretary UNION FOUNDR1' TVORKS Architectural and General Foundry Work FIRE ESCA PES OFFICE : TVORIIS : 417 First Nat. Bank Bldg. M 76th St. LE Greentvood Ave . .Telephone Express 399... CHICA GO FRATERNITY STATIONERY Q COLLEGE ANNUAL INSERTS Q COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS PROGRAMS, ETC. announce ENGRAVED IN THE LATEST e STYLES 1i. WM. EREUND Sr SONS HE faculties of modern houses of learning recog- nize the fact that good venti- lation and an even tempera- ture are essential to the health and working powers of the occupants of school rooms. THE JOHNSON SYSTEM OF AUTOMATIC TEM- PERATURE REGULA- TION insures the even tem- perature. It is adapted to any system of heating. JOHNSON TEMPERATURE '74476 GONT ROLLING GOMPH NY tuna 4lI Dearborn Street oPP. PALMER uousf. CHICAGO, ILL- 27 " Will you tell me something? " " What is it? l' " May be I ought not to ask, but-are you engaged to Mr. Lorimer? There ! If you don't want to say so, never mind, but I do want to know, and I won't tell, and I hope you are! He is so big, and fine, and clever QU this with fervor, "and he cares so much-I am sure of that I why, he called twice since yesterday I-that I couldn't help wondering and planning a little.' Dorothy ceased speaking and timidly searched her friend's face for the reply. It came. From the beginning of Dorothy's questioning Lois had been smiling, and at the end she laughed softly. " Engaged?" she said. "My dear girl, no. In lore! No. just friends." Dorothy looked her incredulity. " I don't believe it," she announced. " If any one as nice as that were as found of me-" " You'd bowl completely over? Yes, I believe you would. That's your type." 1 " My type ? " . " Yes, we are all types, you are one, I am another. That staid little woman Without stay across the hall who goes in for Kant and Hegel, and the girl at our table who disapproves of Kipling and adores Lillian Bell-they're types. You don't un- derstand, do you? If you were only down here and could get the point of view ? " " The point of view? " " Yes. That's what you gain at college-a point of view-the point of view-an appreciation of others- Oh, that sounds like ' Alice! A mouse, to a mouse-Oh, mouse?" H I don't understand very well, but please about Mr. Lorimer ? " "Oh, Grant?" Well I'll try to explain." As she spoke Lois began twisting her rings about her fingers, while on her face there grew an expression of analytic scrutiny. " W'e go together because we please each other aesthetically. We like the same books and people and things to eat, and we laugh at the same things. Be- sides," her voice softened suddenly, " I am very fond of him," she said simply. " Then, Lois, dear, what is the difference between this and a reality? Why don't you make it amount to-to--something ? " " We can't. Why Dorry, it would mean many years of waiting-yea1'5g and I don't trust myself-or him. When it comes to things like this, now is the accepted time, and dealing in futures is uncertain business. I care now, and he does too, and he's always making absurd propositions. Nice of me to tell you all this, isn't it? But honestly, Dorry, do you know," laughing, " I believe if I took him seriously he positively would be worried to death." " Oh ! Lois, how can you ! He's not that way, I know." " That way? XVhat way P " Lois pointed to a bundle of programs hanging from the gas fixture. " Most of the X's opposite the Erst, and last, and supper dances stand for Grant's name. Those frat-pictures-he gave me four of them. On the pin cushion are three of his frat pins-a Delta Psi among them. We are awfully fond of each other now, and it will be mighty hard to call things off in juneg but call them off we must, and then I'll go abroad with Aunt Alice, have a gay time, and forget everything. I-1e'll forget, too--first." " Forget? " Are you sure ? " breathlessly. 277 JQHN J. MAGEE DRUGGIST ......AND....... CHEIVIIST Cor. 57th St. and Lake Ave. t'5Zlf1E2Z?f.464 CHICAGO Q Celebrated... . 6 5 CANNED 'T A MEATS are Universally acknowleged to be the BEST - EVERY CAN IS GUARANTEED Condensed Minced Meat Ox Tongue twholel m.omp1'eL-,sed Oorned Beef Pork and Beans Lunch Tongue Potted Beef, Ham and Tongue Peerless Shced Beef Sauerkraut and sausage Vienna Sausage Boneless Chicken Lambs' Tongue Turkey and Tongue Extract of Beef Veal Loaf, Soups, Etc. PUT UP BY TT L'bb M N 'II L'bb ' O ussv I Ya C el I Y 124: CHICAGQ ILL i " A ED BE , . 1 lx 'eJU9a1 S i New Y'T ET' -A '-57'CM'3 SOLD BY ALL GOOD GROCERS ---fy Our new booklet. "How to Make Gmul Things to Eat" maileil on application. Ji, The desire- ul the niedical profession for better electrical apparatu- has so materially increased i??:i21i?f'if?f "" our business that we are now enabled to offer K, , j f them the same.ffi1m1'ini!ifnirfify of goods at rf' ' 5 from to per cent X 'fm A will Q I 0,1-2? '1,.L. J ui " Ax Q Ourllltlicditiuricatalogue.iustissuechcontains new n'if1n'rt1' prices, new literature and Shows the newest apparatus. lt will be mailed L0 physicians upon request, posiptzid, 1:-iibuzzl 2222! zhrzrgf. Write for it. MCINTOSH BATTERY AND OPTICAL CO., 5Zl:53I Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO, ILL 278 "Tolerably. I have past experience to draw from. You asked me if I knew Fletcher Holward. Yes, I used to go with him in pretty much the same way-and there was some one before him, and that's all long ago, so I ought to know. Good night, Dorry." She moved toward the door, then turned, came back and stood irres- olute. Something in Dorothy's face troubled her, and stooping down with a little caresing gesture, she kissed her. " Does it seem hard to you-this new philosophy? Don't let it trouble you, dear. Forget it, cling to your code of believing all things and hoping all things, and, perhaps," slowly, " you may find your Kingdom of Heaven all the sooner for not having sought out and mastered 'a point of view.' " 5656-iii-E-G++ N front of Haskell Museum the convocation procession formed. Members of faculty, students about to receive degrees, marshals, the orator of the day, a brass band,-all turned their backs on the president's ofiice and took up the line of march to the platform which had been erected in front of Graduate Hall. I had secured a good position to watch the pageant pass. The music stin1ulated me pleasantly, and when the president marched by with stately dignity, I felt for him, in spite of certain jarring memories, an almost kindly respect. " There goes a Doctor of Laws ! That's what President McKinley and General Miles are," explained a cosed near me to her friend, some poor, illiterate ignoramus who probaby knew more about making bread than about building a Roman bridge. Two by two the chief dignitaries iled past. Then came a man all alone, the head of a body of students. A man whose mind was cast in Grecian mould, and whose oracular ambiguity of speech would have made the pythoness of Delphi blush with envious shame,-the father and friend of freshmeng a young patriarch, with a frank, jovial face inviting confidence. A man as pleasing as wine and as dangerous. Dignity oozed from his every pore, his very gown was redolent of power. Suddenly the respectful silence that had fallen on the spectators was broken. " Mamma, is that God ?" asked a childish voice. Except the great man himself, those who heard the question coughed guardedly, he, however, passed on with a strange expression on his face. I had expected him to laugh good naturedly at the sweet innocence of the child, but he did not so much as smile. His face had llushed as if the situation embarrassed him, but yet he did not act as if embarrassed. I seemed to know his feeling, but was unable to put the finger of my consciousness upon it. At least ten days after the convocation exercises, the following peculiar psycho- logical phenomenon took place. On my way home in the evening I purchased a news- paper. There was nothing remarkable about this act except my lavish generosity in allowing the newsboy to keep three cents change. However, on opening the paper a head-line introducing some bit of sensational news, caught my eye. In an instant I recalled the convocation procession, the child's question, the strange expression of the great man's face, and then in a Hash, I knew what that expression meant. All was made clear to me by a single line of glaring type. The head-line read, "Insulted by a Child." THOMAS TEMPLE HOYNE. 279 mqggsgonesieesnll other viaqgilsgi-l0l1Q" lIISfl'lllllQlllS SM The "CRowN' PIANO enihodies zz the highest attain- iuents in the art of piano makiugg is the highest type of the modern piano- furte, and is iu :lcv cord with the best ideas of piano cou- structiou. Its 1: :: piano qualities as to tone, touch, de- sign, Huish, and :: material, arc uu- surpassed. zz The mauy tone Capabil- ities give it range and capacity above and beyond all :Q :: others. It is truly iu a sphere of its owu, and attracts 2: and pleases all pi- anists and vocalists who hear it, :: 1: WW .vgi .S , , ...A 1...5"f,',7 . ,.-,. ,T ' 5226? 1. eff ' B ':f1?fjy.:::'3'7fi t is .,,. ... f ' T f-- T -"' i we M-ffwalia Tfliltl .T qgpi. , 7 ig 4, QW i'-1 X .... l New va iii .Qiigautga X fl asv- -' " " 1 tar- -e x2x-f""" """Q' ' If x ' ,-.. My .N ,WM .-,-,, , W s Q saw T QW S T e !?'!Vf W SM The Angelus Orchestral, the marvelous self- playing iustru- :: ment, plays any 1: :: :: music on any pianogcoutaiustwo sets of organ reeds, so it cau play the organ aloue, the :: piano alone, or :z 2: both together, pro- iluciiig varied and cl1aru1iugciTects. 3: WW' GEO, P. BENT, MANUFACTURER at 209Wt""S"B'?,Y.ElHE,...,tH.fiG0 We have Doubled , ' Hub our waxy of proving tbc merits QQ 'UIH6 15611606 111 X of sucb a DOIICYI has bccn shown --- 0 0 9 in our ucw store. Uur Capacity and expect double the trade. As a matter of fact we had to expand somehow. A growing trade made us feel more cramped every season. Singular though, our prices have not expanded with the size of our business, our stock, and our great new store. They are just the Same ZS CVCP. Suits 520.00 and up. Trousers 55.00 and up. Ofuercoafs 315,00 and up. NICOLL . . . THE TAILOR CLARK AND ADAMS STREETS 250 Cl'2lllSSl'QSSlOlldl VVith apologies to Rudyard Kipling in particular, and ex ery one ln general Head of our college, mighty Prexg Greater than any man of old,- We beg of thee, most gracious Rex, Print all degrees on cloth of gold, Make learning still more costly yet, Lest we regret-lest we regret I Tell us, O Czar,-our puny brain Can't grasp the greatness of thy Ways Does student loss mean college gain? Do we pay fees because it pays? Explain the rules about us set, Lest we regret-lest we regret 5 Mightiest One, we pray, make clear That registration has no ills. Disperse the rumors that We hear: Explain that, like most bitter pills, Red tape will make us better yet, Lest we regret-lest we regret Y Pardon another question, please, 'Tis asked without a bad intent,- Must those who seek for LL.D.'s First fill the chair of president? O free us from Doubt's tangled net, Lest we regret-lest we regret ! O Almus Pater, that 'tis true XVe are but noughts and thou the one XVho standing Hrst dost give unto Our nothingness its worth, we own. But, though We're zeros, don't forget Each makes thy greatness greater yet Amen. THOMAS TEMPLE Hox NIE if. . , 7' ig 4 ... l,1gzg5qm'?. ge, "lM:lfl -firaf? Y if ,L - . fab. 9 545495-2 ,297 ' ,, W- yd" at 69 'fi H! -Nl, ffyyf NW, Mg all , N by P, ' yn 1.3.5 M f, ' 'T in g. I V X X ,ffv , f , 1 f of so f f T 3' f ' 1 frqn wx- f it 22 FRONTING JACKSON PARK AND LA-XIiE AIIGHIGAN 56TH ST AND CORNELL AVE. cl-ncAc.o n'HHVI"'IfI'Illii1wH'H45F f."XHW1l1Hg11sf" """ '1"lJmrHg 'twwlbyrfll We ' My It If I I Af' -r' 'W M1I,'l.,Z'Q fi gi . - Imp Lv IA A, I 'X IQLATL 41gI1:iA1U"'fn: AA A uMA.Nf AA I A, - W UH!! -K ' . . f 2 !'NtIwI'N,fff 7211, A A ' ' -2 V3 z '-f,, A A A, , ts A ,-,AQWV uf W! It ff 'X tt ,A ' t ,,f1 I A ff JA, I if WN" li. A A A .Q A - 4: elif:----.-9 .1 1 Sf-fr' N- ls li-Staff--A A, it 1, L44 S ,AM 35 It A '-A . 5 WE ff tif Eii ' ' H SHEQAISTIXA f' W , R S2 'K-ifiQsqQ5A:23l2igg A -he 2 If ' S -,A AA f c i niat EE ' ft A 1 - Is la -- A gif! -. it A I '.-TLV . - LW' -Q 'ffi '-Le' :.1,11--- " if 555- 'llw ' -AHSK I ---be O v.tufetf22?'5W'ffEm" 'I ff? 1 -le V, -A U jj. , il KRS - V .wwmumummm A N isa-nvuulflbyrglig -- W 53 A QA- I f" 11 E RTW A f''W1-vtwwtwmnrwutfzifffME ' M, .,,,-A12lA- +A' 5- -. A Y, FAMILY HOTEL OF Special facilities forf-if THE FIRST GRADE Banquets: 'TlTL Receptions, etc. 6-Mm F.J. BAlLEY,MANAGER The We is f I I f ATTRACTW,5iF?E':,12L HEALTHFUL this is a Statement of Fact. It is like 10,681 for::cRE51DENCE' STZISEOFFICE did CHICAGO EDISON COMPANY 282 Che Doctors Hwakening H Z0-Qdllfdfimdl Episode HE he was taking a course in biology. Not that she was particularly fond of science, but the hours of the lectures happened to suit her, and she had the feminine fondness for working out details in the laboratory. It was there that he saw her for the first time. She was different from any one he had ever seen in Soperville. He felt almost abashed before her warm, vibrating personality. The clear tones of her voice thrilled him, and made him remember vaguely the way he felt on drinking his first glass of apollinaris. He was tall, with loose-jointed arms and legs, like the expressionless limbs of those wooden toy igures that tiap about on the least provocation. He was sandy, with large, pale blue eyes, and a thin red beard that hid the lower part of his face. His coat had two shiny spots on the rounded shoulders, and his large hands dangled from the short cufliess sleeves. He always wore gray striped trousers of heavy, coarse material that emphasized the thinness of his legs, his boots were blacked only on the toes. He toiled unceasingly in the laboratory 3 he was making a special study of the eye, and his own blue orbs had an introspective look, as though they were examin- ing themselves. He made few acquaintances, and seldom talked with the other fellows. They had dubbed him " Doctor," and chaffed him occasionally. Once he aroused a ripple of interest when he turned to a group of young men who were talk- ing tiippantly on some religious topic, and said viith a gleam in his pale eyes. "You're talking of something you don't know anything about 3 Wait u11til you're converted " Then with sudden hesitation, "Are any of you Christians?" They shook their heads half nervously. "Oh! why don't you come to Christ? You can't find truth until you find Him. He'll comfort you in life and make death easy for you." The Doctor spoke with a nervous passion, which suddenly died out as he realized the unsympa- thetic and curious faces before him. A slow red wave crept over his faceg his eyes took on a shamed look, and he turned away awkwardly. " I wonder if he's a crank or a fraud I" exclaimed one of the young fellows. " He's a queer duck," said another, " but Bilhl thinks that what the Doctor doesn't know about physiology isn't worth knowing. " They advanced various theories concerning him, but the one generally accepted described him as a country doctor making the precariousliving of general practitioner, and possessed ofa slow, determined ambition. He had probably managed to save a little each year, and now, when he was nearing the forties, had come to the University to make up for the deficiencies of his early and hard-earned education. His admiration for her increased the second time he saw her. She had a calm, unconscious way of entering the laboratory, and of greeting her two or three friends there. He did not always catch what she said, but he heard the clear, golden tones of her voice, and the quick laughter that followed her remarks. For the first time he experienced the strange ache of loneliness at his heart g he found himself watching eagerly for her daily coming, and listening intently to hear what she said. He felt a dull envy for those who could speak with her. 283 ERNEST A. HAMILL, President, FRANK W. SMITH. Cashier CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON, Vice President JAMES P. HANKEY, ASS't Cashier The Corn Exchange National Bank OF CHICAGO CAPITAL, 51,000,000 Q99 SURPLUS, 51,000,000 DIRECTORS SIDNEY A. KENT JOHN H. DWIGHT CHARLES H. SCHWAH EDWIN G. FOREMAN CHARLES H. W .AICKER EDWARD B. BUTLER B. M. FREES BYRON L. SMITH ERNEST A. H.-ABIIIIL CHARLES CoI'NsEI,nAN CHARLES L. HU'1't'HINSON x - College Lectur' Rooms, Library and Office IIIIIIOIS COIIQSQ of E310 FIFTH noon Joumui suiinnio, leo WASHINGTON smfn Regular Session Opens September sth Summer Law School opens First Monday in june, and costinues eight weeks LL.B Course, Three Years, Post-Graduate School Elective Courses, One Years study, LL.M, degree: Two Years, D,C.L. degree: Three Years, LL,D. degree. FACULTY-Howard N. Ogden, Ph, D., Dean. Cfmipamtive jusisprndence, Evidence and Equity, john G. Henderson, 1.L.D , Crimes and Willsq Roswell Shinn, LL.D.. Pleailing and Practice and Dam- ages: JAY. Smith, LL.D., Equity, Pleading and Practice. Receivers, J. T. Long. LL, D.,Contracts, Quasi- Contracts, Legal Ethics, Carl Evans Boyd, Ph. D., Roman Law, Comparative Constitutional Lawq Alva E. Taylor, L1..M,, Real Propertsy, Corporations. Commercial Paper: Carlos. S. Hardy, LL.M., Sales, Agency, Partnership. Hailmentsg Charles A Denison, LL M., Constitutional and International Lawg james1iwingD:ivis, .-XM., I.L.B,, Domestic Relationsg H, Stewart Derby, LL.B., Insurance Law: Hugo Palm, I.L.B.. Plrli., Torts: Ludwig Zeisler, LL.B., Guaranty and Suretyships1 IIenryYVaterman. LL.B., Ph.B.. Personal Property. SPECIAL LECTURER5-john H. Roemer, .-Llvl.. LL.B., Neg' ligence Casesg Taylor E, Brown, LL.M., Patents. Copyrights, Tradenirrksg XViIliam J. Donlin, I-LM.. LLB.: Eminent Domain, Special Assessments, Taxation, Louis Boisot. A.B.. LL.B., Mechanics' Liens: Daniel XV. Heffron. A M., LL.B.. Admiralty and Maritime Lawg XV, Harrison Hipp. M.D.. Forensic Medicine. For further iiiformation, address the Dean, journal Building, I6iIXVfl9hll'IQ'tO1l St., Chicago. THE KE WOOD INSTIT TE ron GIRLS 1 AN AFFILIATED ACADEMY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO RADUATES of the School are received, fuzrhozzz' f.ra11z1'1zafz'a11, on certificate of the Principal at the University of Michigan, the University of Wisconsin, Vassar College, Smith College, and Nileslesley College. Similar arrangements may be made with any college which receives students on certificate . : : 1 1 1 1 : : MISS ANNICE BRADFORD BUIIS PRINCIPAL 40 Dist romv-SEVENTH smtrr CHICAGO 284 One day one of her friends came into the laboratory with a guest and introduced him to her. The Doctor felt a sudden anger that she would smile on a stranger while he, whose thoughts had been on her for so many days and nights, could not claim a look. And then it came over him with a sudden illumination, that he too might have that privilege, he could get Jones, who knew her, to present him. The pencil with which he was tracing a delicate drawing trembled, and for a long time he did not go on with his work, but sat staring out of the window over the snowy campus, with pale. unblinking eyes. Next day it was done. He hardly knew how 3 but after an agony of irresolution he found himself bowing awkwardly before her. He worshipped her for her gracious smile, and saw in it not a trace of amusement. For a moment he struggled hope- lessly to remember one of the score of elaborately planned talks that he had gone over in his mind during the sleepless hours of the past night. It had all seemed so easy then, and he had felt sure of a quick, responsive sympathy on her part. Now he was standing before her, stammering in his confusion, and forgetting his beauti- fully turned sentences. His wandering, embarrassed eye caught the work of a neigh- boring student who was studying the spasmodic movements of a frog from which the brain had been removed. HD Y b 1. . V. . . ,,, o you e ieve in uvisection. he asked with anxious earnestness, pointing toward the quivering reptile. UI? no," she answered, following his glance, while a quick look of repulsion passed over her face. " I'm only a dabbler here, and it would be positively wicked for me to torture poor things for all the contribution I could make to science. I sup- pose it's all right for those who make biology a life work." " No, no, it is not right for anyone," he broke in with brusque vehemence. " The whole system is cruel and wrong,-to make the innocent suffer,-and no good can come of it. Knowledge gained in that way will bring only pain and suffering. You must believe that, do you not?" In his eagerness he had come close to her, and a look of annoyance showed in her eyes, but she answered him gently, and then making some light excuse turned and left him. He worked no more that afternoon. The faint odor of violets which clung about her had intoxicated him, it followed him everywhere. Over and over again there came before him the image of her tall rounded figure, he saw the black hair that waved lingeringly away from the white softness of her neck 3 the steady look in her deep eyes g the gleam of her teeth when she smiled. That evening Margaret Edgerton, junior, was seated luxuriously in her bachelor maid's apartments at the University, talking with the few choice spirits who were wont to gather in her room of an evening to discuss, over the chafing dish, the excit- ing events of the day. i 't Girls, I've met him at last,-the man with the red beard,-and he is even more homely and awkward than I supposed. He gave me a sermon on vivisection, and looked at me so reprovingly that I fancy he is going to pray over me to-night." " How did you happen to meet him, Margaret P" demanded one of the girls sett- ling herself comfortably on the cushion end of the divan. And Miss Edgerton, in- spired by a sympathetic audience, gave a detailed and spirited account of the affair. 285 Che CNCEISO Beach BQIQI George B. Ross, manager ,c ,r' --- Q-i ,K -V' ' ' 'fi '-L . ,?, . - , -- . K: - -,- e,- fdljifj? :SRA 37' f , .S e ries :ZW it A I k fe -ffl We 'HV W - .lrrifflfi S '- T ii-'Si i Ex il e -, vn x,u33,,, i gg gg gv - E , W efeee B-ef, H , - -i ' w 1mfY"' j3. 5QI4,'fFf- Vtl 'L ' ' S 'A 1455 4 , ' re- .a ..., . " ' A . ' fig 1 Aw Clpe Chicago Beach fg X Germs: B.Russ,MnNAsfR.,f, ffl ,L-s..g-,. 0n the llake Shore and Sl Street Boulevard, Ehicago. 1 FQQHSIGQRNFI VVith all the Advantages and Amusements to be derived from proximity to a large city : 1 : Demonstrated to be the most delightful abiding place the year around in Cliicogo : : : z : : : l000 FQQI of Bl'03d Vefillldil 450 0llfSlCl6 HD2ll'lm2llIS 220 Bdlb ROOIIIS Eight minutes from Yan Buren Street by Illinois Central Rapid Transit. Send for Souvenir Booklet. 2756 While she was in the midst of her story a maid knocked at the door, and handed her a note. Miss Edgerton tore it open hurriedly and a gentleman's visiting card fell out of the large business-like envelope. It read, R. J. Dow, M. D., and on the reverse side was written in a small, cramped hand, My dear Miss Edgerton : May I have an interview with you to-morrow morning between half past eight and nine? Please reply by bearer. Yours respectfully, R. J. DOW. " just listen, girls !" cried Miss Edgerton. And without any tweaks of conscience she read the few lines to the expectant group. " What shall I do PM she concluded, with the air of a general addressing his council of war. There was no lack of speculation concerning his motive in writing. Some laugh- ingly suggested that he wanted her to join an anti-vivisection clubg others that he only wished to exhort her to forsake a frivolous life. Finally she wrote the follow- ing reply : My dear Dr. Dow : I shall not be able to see you at the hour you name 3 but as I am always in the laboratory from two until three in the afternoon, you can deliver any message you have for me then. Very truly yours, IVIARGARET EDGERTON. 'i I consider that perfectly non-coinmittal, and at the same time coldly dignified," said Miss Edgerton as she read her composition critically. " It's a shame to discuss him though, and make so much fun of him," she added, with sudden compunction. " He's queer and awkward and ignorant, but he has feelings, and Whatever he wants to say to me will be the result of conscientious convictions. " " But, Margaret, you'll promise to tell us what he says, won't you?" asked one of the girls coaxingly. "I don't know. It depends on whether or no he extracts a vow of secrecy," answered Margaret gaily. " And if it's a religious talk I really cannot make fu11 of him. His reproachful blue eyes would follow me ever afterwards. He's pale and ghastly enough in reality, but as a 'harnt' I really couldn't stand him? Next afternoon when Miss Edgerton's room-mate came in from a walk she was immediately siezed upon by Miss Edgerton, who pushed her into an arm-chair and said in a low, awful voice, " Harriet, do I look like the pale and agitated heroine of a ' Duchess' novel?" Then, with a change of tone, " XVhere have you been? I have been dying to see you and tell you all about it." Having suiiiciently aroused her room-mates curiosity, Miss Edgerton assumed a dramatic tone and told her story. "I went over to the laboratory as usual, little dreaming what was to happen. Suddenly, before I had begun work, that red bearded figure loomed up before me, and said in a deep voice, ' May I have a few words with you Miss Edgerton ?' I ans- wered in a careless and pre-occupied tone, 'Yes, indeed, Dr. Dow, as many as you Wish.' He waited a moment, and I glanced up and saw him looking around in a rather embarrassed manner. ' Can't we go over by that window ?' he said. ' There it will be more quiet.' As there were only four people in the laboratory I thought it a rather needless move, but assented as gracefully as possible. I perched myself on 287 THE onsumeng ompnngs 'Llnequallcd cAluzonATfn WATEIQ AND BEVERAGE6. YOX ' Hyd Mic. II-1 GIUQBQQV - 0 HJ"..Pi2!2a'm lgifiififw Q 7 r? ' 13evemQc,s. WECOIISUNERS Cormmn ButIcr5tred:55"'fo5G'b5I5.CHlcAao ., 288 the window sill and he stood opposite me leaning against the casing. I looked out over the campus and said to myself, 'Now be firm g if it's the anti-vivisection club, say no.' just then he spoke. 'Miss Edgerton, I feel that I must ask you if you think it worth While for our acquaintance to go any furtl1er.' His voice was low and hesitating. I could't imagine what he meant, so I said in a loud clear tone, 'Really, Dr. Dow, I don't understand you.' 'I mean that,-that-I must ask you if there is any hope for me ?' " Fancy my feelings, Harriet ! I had only met him once and here he was almost proposing to me! For a moment a wave of indignation swept over me, and I had almost made up my mind to say something that would crush him utterly, when I looked up and saw his lip trembling. Then the ungainly ngure assumed a certain pathos, and I said quite gently, 'I am very sorry, Dr. Dow, but if I understand what you mean, it is hopeless, and our short acquaintance had better come to an end.' He grew positively white, and said in a still lower voice, while his lingers worked nervously, ' I can at least be glad that I have met a noble woman.' " Don't you see the pathetic side of it, Harriet?" concluded Miss Edgerton, as she noticed her room-rr1ate's interested but unimpressed face. " No, I don't," answered Harriet, judicially. " It seems to me he was guilty of unwarranted impertinence. He had no right whatever to thrust himself on you in that way." " But don't you think he did it because he is so intensely honest? He is proba- bly one of those simply-constructed persons who follow out an impulse immediately, without getting entangled in a net-work of complicated motives. He saw me and thought he liked meg and then he decided that the only fair and honorable thing for him to do was to tell me his feelings. I think he had only the highest motives, and if you had seen that tremble of his lip underneath his thin red beard, you would have felt as I did, that here was a man transparently and uniquely honest." " I don't agree with you," answered Harriet, untouched by the picture. "I don't deny that he may be perfectly honest, but I can't see the pathos of it. If every man who feels a sudden spasm of admiration for a handsome Woman should think it love, and tell her of it, and demand that she decide whether or not their acquaintance continue, there would ensue a most uncomfortable state of affairs. These simple- minded, unconventional men are Well enough in books, but in real life they make no end of trouble. I think Dr. Dow should be taught a lesson, and I think you have missed a beautiful opportunity of reading him a lecture on elementary social forms." " But, Harriet, if you could see his shabby coat and his baggy trousers you Wouldn't talk of 'social forms' in connection with him." " Next morning Miss Edgerton received from her quixotic admirer a letter which read : " May I ask you to send me some little token, a bit of ribbon that you have worn, or a pressed flower, that I may keep it as a remembrance of you? I feel happier to- night than I have for months, for although my hopes are blasted, I know I am a better man for having known you. Sometime, perhaps, I may be allowed to tell you a long story, but now, good bye. I trust you will greet me as if nothing had hap- penedf' On hearing the contents of this letter, Harriet said : 289 43' X QQ' Q X C Q5' Qs , NL Ky! Q5 f' o O X, f' 60 Oy X ses QIQX vyv Qxg Qbx, vo ge' o 6' W o . K '21 ,fy 5 lf! , I +65 W 4 x ,f x f Y' O QS' go VS? Q3 O WESTERN BANK NOTE COMPANY CHICAGO ENGR ' RS --A. D- PRINTERSOF Bonds, Stocks, Diplomas BANK CHECKS AND DRAFTS, SAFETY TINTS, PARCHMENT AND SAFETY PAPERS. Lifhograph Sfafionery for :9Warzufacturers, Wercbanfs and qBZf'lk2fS. FIRST-CLASS DESIGNS AND ENGRAVING. Lisfable on the Stock Exchanges of New York and Chicago. 01 -1 CANDY!! CANDY!!! SEND 51.25, 52.00 or 53.50 FOR A SUPERB BOX OF FINE CHOCOLATES OR CANDIES, Express prepaid east of Denfver or fwesf of Nefw York. Assorted CEllll!l6S and Chocolates packed in euquisl'-t boxes or baskets to the value of any amount of money enclosed, pre- paid to its destination. A pleased customer is fhe besf adfvertrserrzenf. G R GUN THER, C ONFE C 71 ONER, 212 State Street, CHICAGO. " That's just the way with this kind of man. He will make your life a burden unless you thoroughly annihilate him. He will keep gazing at you with a look of patient grief, until you are driven to be nice to him 3 and then you will have to go through with it all again. Take my advice, write him a note in which you give him to understand that he is impertinent and presuming, and then you will have no more trouble." " But, Harrietfprotested Margaret, "don't you think it seems dreadfully cruel, when he thinks he is acting from the highest motives. If he wasn't such a crudely innocent sort of man,-if he had shown a shred of policy in the matter,-I should feel different." " If you don't teach him a lesson somebody else will. He will have to learn sooner or later that people can't go around making these remarkable disclosures of their feelings. It isn't Arcadiaand I think that he is a great goose, and that he ought to know better. Now I'll tell you what I'll do 3 I'll compose a letter to him and then if you don't want to send it you needn't." Margaret agreed, and in a few minutes Harriet handed her the following : I must beg of you not to make a11y further effort to continue an acquaintance, Which, to be frank, is distasteful to me. And may I add that a Christian gentleman should have more consideration than to annoy one whose work makes it impossible for her to avoid him. U I don't know," she said doubtfully, as she finished, " but I suppose it will be good for him to realize how his conduct strikes a disinterested spectator." And she copied the note and sent it. A reply came very soon 3 a dignified note apologizing for any annoyance he may have caused. A postage stamp was enclosed and a request that his notes be returned. Even the relentless Harriet was touched 3 but she only said to the rather conscience- stricken Margaret, " lVell, I'm glad he had the sense to see the error of his way, and I'rn sure the next time he falls in love he won't be so effusively honest." The following day Margaret noticed that the Doctor was not in the laboratory. Nor was he there the day after that. Her conscience pricked her as she wondered, rather romantically, it must be confessed, if he had been too prostrated by the blow to recover. She was sure of this a few days later when one of the young men who had known him said to her z " Did you know that Dr. Dow had gone home?" Her heart gave a guilty start and she said carelessly, " No, was it bad news P" "Yes, rather," answered her informant. "His wife telegraphed him that the baby was dying. Poor old chap, he seemed terribly broken up." 291 6lll6ilU0 GOIIBUB or Dilllllill SllI'U6I'U DENTAL DEPARTMENT OF LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY WA , .J K U te. .. I. 'nit 1-gag: - IH- , 0:5432 r. 1.-1 l .in 2 an I win-L: .1-,sz-,ref . p A N ,avi .,,.f E 'I-""" 1 .W ,:,i..i. V- - ,1 :w.',,eff--' I 4 , e 31' E - ZF., 5 1 Sit? 151'-1 2 --Y-my xl, jun- -- 'girl TV 2 s1.---r- nl? -A all '- . fi Q ENE iii? - 1-Q' 1 Nwww gn, . H' f ,.,. Q V -sf LM- .-:N V . rw RRRW . . .. i T T'TTT l at-1, Q or l iifgigyggfiie 75:2 1: ie , FW my 'I EMT' W "":' ill. f2f'l'll'7'llTr"li" .mi ' ' ll.. ' ' .iff--Q, .lllvl till ll y y will L . islam ,A.. -.,.. . 3 ii it V "M" '- Mi "NN i " ' E Mil 'iff' - ., if il t ll .,... Y mf. xiii! The New Building occupied by the Chicago College of Dental Surgery is. in all its ap- pointments, one ofthe most perfect and complete in this or any other country. ANNOUNCEMENT The next annual winter course will begin about October Ist, 1899, and end about April lst. 1900. The statements made below as to conditions, fees and courses of lectures relate to the year ending April 5, 17499, only. FEES AND EXPENSES. The course for each year is S10ll.00. Board, including light and fuel can be obtained at a convenient distance from the college at from 3 2.50 to 324.00 per week. THE FACULTY. The faculty consists of twenty-four members. Each member is especially adapted and qualified for the department for which he is chosen. In addition to the regular faculty there are twenty-two instructors and demonstrators, and twelve recitation masters. DR- TRUMAN W- BROPHY, Dean, 126 sme sn., chicago, lu. 292 Dis BOIIOI' H ROIIIBIIUC Episode of the Dark H905 HE sun was setting. XVoolly clouds maculated the sky, reflecting with ruddy glow the last light of the declining orb, as if Dame Nature had thrust her mighty paint brush into a lake of glittering color and then swung it above her head, spattering all the heavens with blotches of gold. Finally the light faded from the skyg and night spread her damp mackintosh over the earth. The sun had set. Gloomybuff castle loomed up in the coagulating darkness like a pile of giant pepper boxes. Innumerable shafts of light from the countless windows pierced the the gloom. In fact the darkness about the castle looked like an enormous sieve. In the Grand Hall of the castle Countess Enlor Walbiik von Heavyfoot leaned gracefully against the antique mantel-piece. "You have mistaken my feelings toward you, Prince Yladiminj' said she in a well-trained contralto voice. " Also you forgot thatl have a husband." " Then may I not press my suit ?" asked the agonized prince, twisting his fingers among the decorations on his breast. " As for that," replied the countess, "please yourself. Far be it from me to attempt to dictate your domestic policy, but as a friend, I should suggest that you send it to a tailor." And a faint smile chased itself across her face. " Before the countess finished speaking, Prince Vladimin flung himself onthe fioor at her feet, and seized her hand. "just at this moment Count von Heavyfoot parted the magnificent portierres that concealed the entrance to the hall. He was a man of large, muscular build, with shaggy eyebrows and a bald head. His high forehead betokened the man of deep thought, " My husband Y " murmured the countess starting. H No, your lover," replied Prince Yladimin, who was still ignorant of the Count's presence, and did not wish to be misunderstood. " Ha! Ha! " thought the count. This was a portion of the deep thought of which he was. U have never been able to gather the rest of this romance. The extreme delicacy of the situation in which the Count found himself may well be imagined when one remembers that he drew his salary from the prince. The question is, what did the Count do ?j Tnonms TEMPLE HovNE. 293 W3 ,nk " 'WW I '!--'f 'S Hifi!! 'Z ga 4' 'Nt 'NSW Nwmg it ig ISS . rw- .- ' - ,tasjgag l f'12'1",,cggPA., lf11 1 . ,gte'm.f4.,4,.:13ts:,g.r,,1.-.mfplaf-1. .I ff ii f .f?.- Agri i -- ' ,-2-5g::s:fP'F:"i1.A' -- sg " es 'T fi'-s, 'lr ,x.e:'.'-:P-is ggga.,fu..' t.:.4 :gg tQ.-fQf:a?- f:a':1-w s. :A I -. ' . t w 4. -'otr f .1511-.wear I e 4 1. . , , '-f-f'w,-w - .- gee si- '- 4 1. J-is :s we, .-L.: '-5:z32:,,,5sg:l. 5-2 A- A F :ft X- 15 'it-:,' . also-w-'fi"' a:--Ibis! .E W A , as .cr . ,, .,bf4.,.2i fri. 5 - .,. fi51:- ms 515 ' E 'V ""?'f 'xi w ' 11' ST- " 1fl2'51.. if ir- t i IS? Q S gt . fi, h .Er A . out 5' me-.-..i-,...,, . Ht., is ,gt 1-gf: tzgevfff lt i ' ,, ,, u nw. ,Qu W - 1.5. 3 x,.,x.,- -.54 , :gy M - .A .V 'T YE-'?'ifi217I,Q'fM' . -'-fig? . W H iii ii il nil? ' ' 'iifiiffif tx X N fi ,l tl fu, lmyillnnltyi we L X I I x 4 -it miiirilf v v-'sc --: 'Mm vxmswg, assi Saw- X g X. x-'exm 9 ui X . QM, , ,,,,:Vblq,- 1 A X .M ..X..x K '- 'ffffww , -' x-if MS, XQW3 .-gg,-gr.,-re 5.27: ::.E'- .J- faeof. -:s-.:-.'-'f':v-ri:w ' o-- - ssan,t..s::m,.. A --1 ..-.,.,xSi.5SSSA::Ss,:. 1:51a-s . THE HAHNEMANN 6lll6dI olleue and Ilospllal Of ZMCOQOMQQ Four Years' Course Obligatory. Graduates of University Science Courses tor Students Intendiug to Study Medicine new College and Hospital Buildings Erected at a cost of5l5ll,llll0 Magnilicently Equipped and Furnished THE LARGEST HOMEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL IN THE WORLD Ube Jfortictb Zlnnual Session QDCIIS September 12, lS99... Admitted to advanced Standing. CLINICAL and Dissecting Material in abundance. Large, well equipped Labora- tories, Museum, Library, Reading Room, Smoking Room, and Ladies' Waiting Room. Steam Heat and Electric Lights. For announcement and further par- ticulars, address ...... The Registrar, IOS. C COBB. lVI.D., 2811 Cottage Grove Avenue. C. H. VILAS, NLD., Dean, 254 East 47th Street. Hospitals and Chemical Laboratories. We supply Medicinal Substances, Chemicals, Surgical Dressings and Requisites at favor- able prices. We will be pleased to submit quotmnsiffequestedq MORRISSON,PlllMMillllllllMPllNY WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS. CHICAGO. Cameras Bought, Sold, Exchangeci, and Rented. Chicago Photo Finishing Co. eases Dealers in eases Photo Supplies ior Jlmateur and Pro- tessional Photographers AMATEUR FINISHING OF ALL KINDS FIRST-CLA-IQSTWOlI?AI?DEANDug GUQRAN- Champlain Bldg. TEED NO O .del 5.29 aide! CHICAGC 294 CD2 POQI dlld IDR KRD NCE, when the world was hard to understand, there lived in the very hardest part of it, a man. The people of the world called him,-when they thought of him at all, which was seldom,-" The Poet." The man often felt that he did not want to be a " Poet." He would rather have been fashioned in the mould of those about him. Had the chance been offered him, he would have become a banker, or have accepted the position of president of a flourishing pork packing or grain industry, not altogether from mercenary motives, but because of the longing in his nature to understand men and be understood by them. But this chance was never offered. So he continued trying to make men hear the music that was so distinct to his own ears. After awhile, when he could not make them hear it, he grew discouraged. Not that he doubted the reality of the music, or that all men would be happier if they could hear it, it was only that the solitude in which the music was best heard, and understood, rendered him isolated from all the interests of the world. You see it was quite an undertaking,-this endeavor of the Poet to make the world corne to his way of thinking. The world had not the least idea of doing it. " What does the man mean?" people would say, when they had time between coach- ing parties and golf tournaments, dinners and balls, to read the poet's rhapsodies. " Why is he harping all the time about music? We know the rules that govern the making of verses. It is all feet, you know, and that sort of thing. There is no men- tion of his " music " in prosody. Those of us who have graduated from Harvard, or Yale, or some other college, are not going to be taught anything by this " Poet." He is mad, there is no doubt of it. Why does he not go to work and make a fortune, or have one left him like the rest of us? He ought to be shut up somewhere-had any- one time to attend to it. He is really getting to be quite annoying." flt is hard to be considered annoying when one is trying his utmost to make the world happier and better.j One day, while the Poet was thinking earnestly upon all these things, he per- ceived in one of the walls of his house a strange door. The Poet knew all the walls of his house, because it was a small house and the walls had often seemed to stifle his asperation for the beautiful, but he had never seen this door in the wall before, of that he was certain. He went close to it, and examined it, and tried to open it. It was a singular door, it was made of silver and gold, of iron and many other metals that the Poet knew. There were damp places on it, as if made by tears that some one had not time to wipe away, There were many such places on the metals. Also there were semi-transparent places in it. The Poet could not tell what they were made of, it seemed as if they were openings in the door that had become clouded over with the breath of doubt and disbelief. There was no latch, nor any way of opening the door, save a small key-hole that the Poet could not see through, although he tried very hard to do so. NVhile trying, he felt a presence near him, and, turning saw a friend standing beside him. The Poet had never seen the friend before, but he 295 SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES. ae 22nd Vw' Enfer any firne. Sllmmel' Diploma in SCDOOI Graduate 0543? Sfablish f Zellrse, "ll D 1, ' two Q 5 ua 77 Q Years. ELOQUENCE . W Q 0 0 IS o o F in mmpmaiiviiriig Q i ii! Poshtiraduate 'L rant 6. ' R Diplomas EGFQ mum' and Q Q three or Your Qqnfgf T YQdl'S. Degrees. :AC ELOCUTION, DELSARTE, DRAMATIC ART, LITERATURE, RHETORIC, XYOCAL AND PHYSICAL CULTURE, BIBLE READING, PROFESSIONAL COURSE, FORSENIC AND SACRED ORATORY, MUSIC, AND PARLIAMENTARY LAW. DEPARTMENT DIRECTORS: H. M. SOPER, Oratory. MISS E. H. DENING, Delsarte and Physical Culture. MRS. M. L. RAYNE,IOllX'I1allSIH. MRS. J. F. PEASE, Literature and Rhetoric. Miss HIAUD PECK, Piano. MRS. ANNA DIORSE-CRANE, Vocal Music. MR, BENNETT GRIFFIN, Yiolin. Long experience has given the management chance to test theories and methods of instruction, and to sift out all that is standard and practical in this progressive age. Entertainment and Lecture Course Through the Year. Department Directors may be engaged for Readings, Lectures and Concerts outside the city. 'SEND OR I LUSTRATED CATALOGUE T0 HENRY NI. SOPER, President, , v Tenth Floor, Steinway Hall, Sm' 5 'm'l22'."Z'..fi.'f""' ' '3 Nos" I7 East Van Buren sam, CHICAGO 2116 felt as if he had always known and loved him, He began to talk very fast. He tried to tell his friend all that he had been endeavoring to dog all that he had felt and longed forg all that he hoped to become, and that he hoped the world would become, until at last he broke down and cried and could not talk any more, but could only smile through his tears and be happyg Oh, so happy! because everything that he had always wanted and been denied was changing into a perception'why he had always wanted and been denied these things. Although the friend had not said one word, somehow, every- thing was becoming very plain to the Poet. He wanted to ask this friend to forgive him for his life-long hunger and thirst for the beautiful-the while he knew that because of this hunger and thirst the friend stood beside himg-he wanted to ask the man to forgive him for his doubts and despairs,-although he perceived that because of these things was the answer vouchsafed him. Altogether the Poet was working himself into such a transport of gratitude and remorse and understanding that the visitor had to put a stop to it. He took the Poet's hand and held it in silence a little while. NVhen the Poet looked at his hand afterward he saw, lying on his palm, a little shining key. " That will ope11 the door that leads to your rightful place in No-Man's-Land," the friend assured him. " You may have to try several times. Even when you are accustomed to using it, it will not always answer to your need and open the door at your com- mand. But it is the only key that can open the lockg and it is the only aid we can render man to enable him to enter his rightful place in the Soul Country. I cannot explain why this door is necessaryg I can only assure you that wl: en a man begins to batter holes in it, although he does not perceive it, he is capable of doing some damage: and We always show him the error of his way, and offer him this key. Men are not always capable of using itg as I said before, it will not serve you at all times equally. The hole in the upper corner of the door was made by your discontent. It is n xx? ' the occason of my present visit." ii 2 L' The Poet looked up and there was quite an opening in that portion of the door. " If I had gone on," said he, " could I have destroyed the door, and would all mankind have been able to enter with me P" The visitor shook his head and smiled gently. 'BX Q V7 f' ' l -. Kb- .gk .. N . x. -X exam.. i",x 'aj - f N- 3 ji xx ,tif Y 0 , Q xwxl 1 N if Katt vkii 4,x 1 'ff QM X 1 I' XX jf! XX Seyffl Y I 1 EWU! X M fi L ll-. fxif fi e dffyf f 'if' 1 g.5?fg-,isif '14 ki N .l.313., qrxl ,av N . Qi? -'rift ff, -. . fs t Mg X ff' 2 . V X A Ar:-.s WW iff?" 'is K" . f ,I :fi ,ff' , , , 41,24-.A,,' yi J 'f 'frffazi if Y r ' 5 aj 4,1 .' it 16 7:X5 ' ' rs 1' , N K - - 'rl f, II ix di! fix lil f T iiflqgiiiix V . Tv fl -' ,wa W lx 1 Lf ,Z X. 'X v" If Vx if f 77 if XX Y' 'J 'f it f. ll .E " You could not have destroyed the entire door," he replied, , " because before you had succeeded the destroyer of mankind would have overtaken you. Many men, from many motives, seek to destroy this door. At the present stage of human thought the good motives and bad are equally destruc tive. The time is not yet for the leveling of this door." 4' But if men understood I" cried the Poet, " if they united in a common impulse if enough believed!" 297 CHICAGO SCALE C0. U, S. X YY C Official :six :ik-M R ,:', Jk, Standard Wogfilgaf Scales ' W :-2 d O 13123 Best Quality Q 55 ag a atm ? P xposition Lowest Prices f a 1998 Cur "New Banner" Wheel...1399 Model A Fm?- 2519.20 , A n 7 D 1 , W ' M , , -... ,,,. , P- """""" "' sf "" . 'v Xxf1f.. QW X ifwfe-sgfffw 3 eess 1 f I Y X 'h-M.. if Cfw' . , X, e C, --e'A M 52223 so ggwggg 7 'iimiffilfafii ac mes uSeYi'1h3Jli1l2?I'gSg0i.dg Safes Send Carriages ,.s,.. L Ghicago Harness X 5 ' I pianos , - Sea e Co: organs A 292'61aEif1ii . Chicago, Ill. 098 " Then," answered the visitor, U if the door were flown there would be found nothing on the other side of it. The time is not yet." " What is the key called ?" asked the Poet humbly. " Look and see," the friend replied. The poet examined the key carefully and perceived, although there was nothing to tell it to him, that the name of the key was Imagination. But when he turned to thank his friend the latter Was no longer present. The Poet tried the key, and, after many efforts, was successful It made no diiier- ence in the action of the key whether it was winter in the world outside, and the snow was falling, and the cold blasts of winter were rattling at the doors and case- mentsg or Whether it was summer and the songs of birds and the scent of iiowers . . CN.. 1 WG Vrf A .X .. X. 7 2 ' e Wil' 1 : f e P1- F rf' l2lllwlllSixXf" alll f Tillie? .4 H' llv1.7 pcf25 i--- . , l , W ef' l Q V llli Hill '... v W1 Q .li s i ll N wlfl I ff M i lli, ll r r u N ,, Mllllll 'Q' it A t . X- .-use X- 'fo ' f f. lllllllllll fr l - - vt- -". J' I sim 'n , ""t A- xzlillgigi-:itilA--'Q' - Y Y K Fefe 5- 3' xt gulls wi. Sr Sl .xxqssr ,UMM LL, 'hwlllffifll aywwh M57 9 1 U Ifind a Company that issues a Policy under which ll all my rights are absolutely protected by law. ' The Statutes of Massachusetts relating to life insurance protect absolutely ec In e the policy-holder's rights. . t Undmhese statutes the Berskshure life Insurance Co. 0 of Pittsfield, Mass , issues all its policies. Its policies are sufficlent in variety to cover the need ol every insurer. It has FORTY-EIGHT YEARS EXPERIENCE. It is one ofthe largest DIVIDEND-PAYING Companies. It numbers among its policy-holders, men prominent in all the high call- 2 ings of life. My 2 For information and tor figures exactly adapted to your age, mail date of . S birth and address to said 5 FRANKLIN WYMAN, Special Agent, prominent Mgfchant 602 Title and Trust Building, 100 Washington Street, CHICAGO. Fsnbh sherl 1866 STAMSEN 6: BLOME HIGH GRADE Every Branch of Concrete Conslruclion, enum noon, um-rv Brac. l CHICAGO Write to us for information regarding our new form of contract for ectric Li COMMONWEALTH ELECTRIC COMPANY 5502 South Halsted Street J. G. IVICCARTHY COMPANY Cliontractors 1131gg:1g1l3:1,1QING 262-263 Wasllqington Eoulevard 42-44 outh organ treet , T . 3i'EE1'5LTEE'NG E C CHICAGO 300 came through the opening windows. The Poet could open the door, as far as such things were concerned, and enter into his rightful place. But sometimes the key was very obstinate indeed. When there was any sense of injustice in the Poet's heart, when he had been wearing a coat two or three seasons longer than any one in the world has any right to wear a coatg when bills for coal and light and food came in with a celerity only equaled by the manner in which these commodities went out, then, sometimes for days, the key would stick in the lock and would not turn or come out, or do anything at all, but make the Poet wish that he had never seen it. It was so provoking to know what that key could do and would not do. But, after awhile, the Poet would feel that perhaps it was partly his own fault. Then he would take the key reverently, with such love and longing in his touch that it could not be ob- stinate any longerg and then, all in a moment, the Poet would be in his rightful place in the Soul Country. The door would be closed between him and the problems of light and heat, the waiting bills, and the world's sentiment concerning his coat. On the other side of the door was a clear, soft, shining light, In this light was shaped everything that the Poet desired. By it he read all the great thoughts that come to men, and as he read he perceived that men are nothing, but thought is all. The friends whom he loved best were there, and the friends whom the world calls dead were there, with the long lost love of his youth. And when the light shone on their faces there was no need of speech. Sometimes there was only a great stillness: and then, in the glory and awe of it, the Poet would see his own soul. And so the Poet came to understand why his soul loved him,-and how the strength the Poet won from cold, and hunger, and loss, was reverenced by his soul. Then, when he fully understood the meaning of the union between tl1e soul that never knew uncertainty, and the man whose certainty was reached through the doubt of worldly darkness and tribulation, he ceased to grieveg neither did he longer care be- cause by man he was misunderstood. He told all about his wonderful mystery in his songs, and every now and then, some one in the world of men reads the songs and hears the music, and to every such one the Poet lends his key. ANSTISS C. GARY. l 4 1 1"lffffp,i'I p il iii' ii' lilwillp,,A,l3.llil li,iii,Wi1 l ,X-1: f f' 'f'i': "N Q iifoaffj Lai ff m ? li 'W 5 301 'Y N -. , gp. Fx lisp ' 'fwxz t-iv -v " ' 'U H' "' first K 5. X, N F ,LJ 173' - . C, X , I -N, lx .H X ., of will FV Re ld! f- ' 's-fl: '.'- ' ' 14-4+--' Sl I AZT I F'l'fj': I 'gym -4-2 ,1-5 ','- 211, -we - f u ' "4-xfff wig -A , I ll? Ti,-If ' I T-f-: , ','r ' XX MJ- --,.X',. - ' if: A 1525353 5 I fe fl I V fgfi Q, q 5 A 'A ifggfjgegt, I, - 2 tl A 1 nl? 3 ,,., ., I 'I SIX F nf? NN ' mtwfe.. I I ll 'auf lla '- I F flltll ' it , +1 A IWW ww ia V ,Aww f?w,ff if ,A , 4 31: I FX -g " ,QA - h cur A Wmwmfgi Q + - ' Fine China BEAUTIFUL at Brig-ir AND ' ORIGINAL fsu Brac TO LOVERS OF THE BEAUTIFUL We extend a cordial invitation to inspect our line. All REIAILERS Of Elevated and FINE CHINA 153512 our door like StS- ORR 86 LOCKETT HARDWAR CO. 50 State Street and 71 85 73 Randolph Street Manufacturers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers We make a specialty of FINE BUILDERS' HARDWARE df HIGH GRADE CUTLERY, POCKET KNIVES, RAZORS, Etc. .al J' ef .al THE BEST OF EVERYTHING AND THE LOWEST PRICE FOR THE QUALITY SOLD IS OUR RULE. 31 t2 FI PSDCb0l03iC FGIBCD That one must think before one acts In Psychology I was taught. But this does not agree with facts For I took the course before I thought. T. T. H. -it liis Phildnlropbp tk ,t 13 wp..-1, 4 , mhz..- ' f A A ESCOTTVS avocation and vocation were consistent One was the sci- if ence of reading character from hand-writing, and the other was reading themes at the University of Chicago. He began his work with corres- pondence courses in the summer. Instead of the daily package of themes being a burden to him, however, it proved a source of amuse- ment g for he had made such a thorough study of hand-writing that he was confident he could describe the character of persons whose themes he read. There were one or two ambitious men from small western towns, who apparently were trying to increase their vocabulariesg there were a few university students who had minors to make up, there was a large class composed of women--probably school teachers. A l In one of this last class XVestcott became especially interested. ,f ,II 7 From her hand-writing, he conceived her to be a woman about thirty- rxdl live years old, eager for an education and working for it against ter- rible odds. Her style confirmed his theory 1 and he corrected her themes with master-like indulgence. As time passed, Wescott became concerned about this woman. He sympathized with her very few attempts to write about the merry side of life, which, he reflected, she had seen through the small ends of opera glasses. She roused his pity so, that by the end of the summer he felt it his duty to cheer her up. After some considera- tion he wrote on her last theme: "You are much too apt to see the sombre tintsg you must remember that even from the most cruel thistle there floats thistle-down." One must know that Wescott was only twenty-six, and one must make allowance for the years he had not lived. Finally Wescott wrote a letter to Miss Edith Sedgewick, Newtonville, Mass., offering her financial assistance. It was November, and though Wescott had received no answer from Miss Sedge- wick, he still nourished the theory that she was a most unfortunate woman. VVhy she had not written was clearly told by her proud, straight chirography. Wescott determined to send her money unasked. He drew a check, enclosed it in a note to Miss Sedgewick, and went out to post it,-glowing with philanthropy. As he slouched across the campus with one of the students, he asked conver- sationall y : " Who is that girl who passed? " 303 HARVEY MEDICAL COLLEGE OPENED this winter with the third lar- gest Freshman Class of all the Medical Col- leges Qllj in good standing in the city of Chicago. Has been given a First Position on the attending staff of Cook County Hospital. Senior Class given instructions at the bed- side in Cook County Hospital. Sophomores, juniors and Seniors attend one evening each week Medical and Surgical Clinics at Cook County Hospital. Seniors given bed- side instruction in the houses of the poor. Seniors given clini- cal instruction in the evening at the college. Laboratories W e l l equipped for individ- ual instruction. Laboratories not ex- celled in quality and quantity of individual outtits. Send for illustrated announcement . Frances Dickinson, M.D. Secretary. LEf'lD?N ANATO MY ALL IN True 5cnooLs cmmuo sv one Hunoneo Houns. HARVEY BUILDING 5,,5N,N6 169 50.CLA1QK sr. .SCHOOL CHICAGO. Dissecting Class, 1897-513. 304 'A I forget her name," said his friend. "But she's acorker. Comes , i from a small Massachusetts towng-Newtonville-is that the name? Has bee11 out in society a couple of years,-in Boston, I believe- Lives in Kelly." "By the by," said XVescott, as he left his friend. "W'hen is the next Kelly reception? " And resolving to meet the girl and find out lf she knew Miss Sedgewick, he put the letter he had written back into his pocket. Monday afternoon the Kelly girls received, XVescott showed up, although as a rule, he did not hunger for receptions. He had come with a purpose, and his eyes followed one girl about the room. His philantrophy, he reflected, had driven him to tea. Finallv some-one introduced hin1 to the yOL1IlU'l3dV who occu ied . s . P all his attention, and he sat down with 11er in a quiet corner. He s found her uncommonly agreeable: she was pretty and jolly, a perfect M example of the girl whose life is "one round of pleasure." The young IIl3I1'S philan- trophy was forgotten. The power of a girl's mirth had laid it low. Time slipped by and W escott when he rose to go was surprised to learn how late it was. "May I call, Miss?-? " He hesitated expectantly. "Sedgewick," she said, coming to his assistance with a humorous s111ile. "Its so hard to understand names at these wholesale introduction affairs! But I caught yours at once, Mr. Wescottf' .aff ,, . - b PM 305 USH EDICAL COLLEGE jfactlltp. DELASKIE MILLER. A. M., M. D., PH. D., Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Children. EPHRAIM INGALS, M. D., Emeritus Professor of Materia Medica and Medical Jurisprudence. EDWARD L. HOLMES. M. D., L. L. D.. President, Emeritus Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D.. Trearfzi-er, Professor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine. VVALTER S. HAINES. A. M.. M. D., 31 Washington Street 100 State Street Professor of Chemistry. Pharmacy and Toxicology. Laboratory in College Building JAMES NEVINS HYDE. A. M., M. D.. Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M.D.. Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Diagnosis ARTHUR DEAN BEVAN, M. D.. Professor of Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical. NICHOLAS SENN. M. D.. PH. D., L. L. D.. Professor of Practice of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M.. M. D.. Registrar, Professor of Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest. DANIEL R. BROWER. A. M.. M. D., L.L.D.. Professor of Mental Diseases, Materia Medica and Therapeutics. JOHN M. DODSON. A. M., M. D. Professor of Physiology and Histology. TRUMAN W. BKOPHY, M. D., D. D. S., L.L.D., Professor of Dental Pathology and Surgery. VV. T. HELFIELD. M. D.. Professor of Bacteriology and Lecturer on Surgery. ALFRED C. COTTON. A. M.. M. D.. 100 State Street Rush Medical College 100 State Street 532 Dearborn Avenue 34 Washington Street 34 Washington Street 34 lVashington Street 1215 State Street 112 Clark Street Professor of Diseases of Children. 677 Jackson Boulevni ii LUDWIG HEKTOEN, M. D.. Professor of Morbid Anatomy sind Director of the Laboratories of Histology. Pathology. Bacteriology and Hygiene. 306 . ed with N old man, rough in appearance, his common blue overalls begrim loam from the plow, his shoulders bent under a heavy sack, made his way alongadusty road. His every movement expressed hopeless bodily weari- k t hxed on the ground, for the most ness. His eyes sunken and sullen, he ep d th n when some other farm-hand passed him. Other- part only raising them now an e . ' ' on track through which he tramped. Wise he was perfectly oblivious of all but the wag l r in all the Hery splendor of a heavenly City. The The sun sank lower and owe man saw it not till as he neared the summit of a little hill, he dropped the sack with a sigh, and paused to rest in the glowing light. "Gosh, that's harnsomej' was all he saidg but for the moment he was a poet. 'I rgxffflll ,i f gag F 4 I I U 307 CNCZISO lfdlb SCDOOI. B0dl'Cl of CNISICGS. HON. RICHARD S. TUTTHILL, President, Judge Circuit Court, Chicago. HON. SHELBY M. CULLOM, United States Senator from Illinois. HON. C. W. CLIFFORD, Judge Circuit Court, Chicago. HON. JOHN G. BLACK, U. S. Dist. Attorney, Northern Dist., Illinois. GEN. JOHN C. SMITH, GEO. W. WARVELLE. REV. S. M. BIERRILL, D.D., LL. D., Bishop of M. E. Church, Chicogo. REV. CHAs. H. TAINTOR, Ph. D.. Field Sec. of Cong. Church Building Society, Chi. JACOB S. SMITH, Pres. Ind, Natural Gas and Oil Co., Chicago. O. M. POWERS, A. M., Pres. Metropolitan Business College, Chicago. REBS L. PHELE-s, A. B., LL. B. WM. J. PRINGLE, A. B., LL. B. THERON M. BATES, Treasurer. JOHN J. TOBIAS, Secretary. Faculty. GEO. W. WARVELLE, Dean, Professor of Constitutional J urisprudence. D. K. TONE, Lit. B., LL. B., Professor of the Law of Contracts. JOHN J. TOBIAS, LL. B., Ph. D., . Professor of International Law. GEO. MC. A. MILLER, A. M , LL. B., Professor of the Law of Torts. A. B. MELN'ILLE, LL. B., Professor of Equity and Crimes. A. J. HIRSCHL, A. B., LL. B., Professor of the Law of Corporations. Lonrs Borsofr, A. B . LL. B., Professor of Common Law Pleading. CHARLES E. POPE A. M , LL. B., Professor of the Law of Wills. Enwr L. REEVES, LL. B., Professor of Practice in Seminar. A. A. BRUCE, A. B., LL. B.. Professor of the Law of Bailments. FRANCIS W. WALKER, LL. B., Lecturer on Corporations. HON- L. D. CONDEE, LL. M., Professor of the Law of Municipal Corporations HON. SAMUEL S. PAGE, LL. B., Lecturer on Pleading and Practice. E. W. ADKINSON, A. M , LL. B., Lecturer of Eminent Domain. WVILLIAM S. FORREBT, A. B., LL. B., Lecturer on Criminal Law. WM. O. BELT, LL. M., Lecturer on Trade Marks. Preparatory course. Day and evening sessions. Undergraduate courses lead to LL. B., and admission to bar. Post graduate Courses lead to LL. M. and D. C. L. FALL TERM BEGINS SEPTEMBER 6. Students can be made self-supporting during the time of the law course. Club Rates for CBo.ara' from 51.50 fo 52,50 per fweek. SCDOOI of Pltddlllg dlld Practice. Mefhod gf Ingfrugfion, This course, supplementing the work of the undergraduate years, is designed to exhibit the practical application of the principles of law to the ordinary affairs and business transactions of life. From the nisi prius court appeals lie to the Appellate Court, giving an opportunity for practical worlc in the procedure by appeal or writ of error, the preparation of bills of exceptions, briefs and arguments, and other details of practice necessary for a proper presentation and final disposition of a case in the courts of last resort. For catalogue address J. Tobias, Secretary. 115 Dearborn Street, - CHICAGO, ILL. 308 HEY were sealed opposite each other at the tableg the Philosopher of Kelly and the Tease,who respected neither God nor man. The talk drifted to architecture and the Tease had just said emphatically that she loathed cold, dark churches even when they did have pointed roofs," when the Philosoper remarked in her dreamy way: " Do you know a curious idea came to me in English class yesterday. Did you ever notice that Professor jones looks like the Hull gate?" Even the Graduate Student looked up in some alarm at this statementg While the Tease, taken of her guard for once, could only gasp feebly, " XVhat?" "Yes," said the Philosopher, rather surprised at her listeners, dismay. "You know architecture has a certain eifect on you and so have people. I only mean that those two affect me exactly the same way. Theres something about the dragons' heads-yes, there certainly is"-and she lapsed into dreamland. The Tease saw her opportunity and began with animation: " That is something like an experience I had Tuesday night. I woke up ill the dark with a strange sense of a soul-truth upon me. S0 I searched around in the re' cesses of my mind avshile, and tinally discovered what it meant. Do you know"- impressively-" that the house cat is the image of my chaiing-dish? They effect my emotions just the same, I mean." She glanced naively at the Philosopher. H VVhat an odd girl you are," the latter remarked. ff ? y . 'wif ll 309 K III C IIQSQ Of Qillll MARSHALL D. EWELL, LL.D., M. D., DEAN. fZlCllllD. MARSHALL D. EWELL. A. M., M. D., LL. D., F. R. M. etc. Dean, Professor of Elementary Common Law and Medical Jurisprudence and Principal of the School of Practice. THOMAS E. D. BRADLEY, LL. B., Professor of the law of Contracts, Evidence and Equity Jurisprudence . GRANT NEWELL. M. S., LL. B., Professor of the law of Corporations. Real Property, Agency, Damage and Torts. JUDGE CHARLES G. NEELY, Professor of Criminal Law and Constitutional Law. FRANK HALL CHILDS. LL. B.. Professor of the law of Bailments. Domestic Relations, Personal Property, Partnership. Sales and YVills. JAMES H. VAN HORN, A, M., LL. B., Professor of Statutory Law, Code Pleading and Negotiable Instruments. GEORGE J. TOBIAS, M. D., LL. B.. Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. WM. ELMORE FOSTER, Professor of Statutory Law. QQCIUYQTS. HON. R. M. WING. - ---- Lecturer on Practice HON. W. S. ELLIOTT. JR.. - - Lecturer on Legal Ethics JOHN - 5LeC:1:.if:.33f-'iairssis1sr.z2llD5:::Fm of DR. .I AS, G. KIERNAN. - Lecturer on Forensic Psychiatry DR. HAROLD D. MOYER. Lecturer on Railwav Medical Jurisprudence DR. H. FRANK LYDSTON, - Lecturer on Criminal Anthropology Three years' course leading to the degree of LL. B. IMPROVED METHODS VNITING THEORY AND PRACTICE. THE SCHOOL OF PRACTICE IS THE LEADING FEATURE. Evening sessions of ten hours a week for each class. STUDENTS CAN BE SELF SYPPQRTING XVHILE STVDYING. For Catalogue and information, address WILLIAM F. MOMEYER, LL. B., Secretary, -3 6I8:6I9 Ashland B'ock, - 1 - CHICAGO, ILL. 310 97111 x A ' Fx i If 'fly' 'W 4'-,, - 7 'H I 'N gf' lil 1 , 1 . V, Q T glagsu ahflleautiflul day, bright, clealr, crisp, just cold Y . I E QTL, F . L0 Q L g o ma e one energetic, an. altogether perfect ' .X ff ' enough to make one glad to be living. I was walking v -.' ' briskly down fifty-seventh street, dreaming happy I V L' A i U dreams, when a loud whistle suddenly brought my thoughts iq to the realms of the material. The whistle was repeated. I 1 I X l if Who is that? " I thought, "a Psi Chi Beta? " Then I heard J A I I 1 i Xu X it again. "No it is a Delta Pi I believe." My so-considered j 3 pursuer whistled once more, but changed his tune. " Why J ff I there must be two of them, "I said to myself," for that was ff , Alpha Phi Epsilong but I wonft turn around to see." And X proud of my power of resistance, I walked on. Just then the 'bus, the "University Fare"' Bus, drew up at my side, and the driver called out." Hey, lady, I've been-a-w'istling tryin' .K to make you look. Unless someone else 'as got it, your pocketbook's a lyin' on the sidewalk, two blocks back." E+ ii- 9? 55 HE sat where a tender lamp-light bathed the graceful folds of her gown, and lit up her well-chiseled profile. Her head rested on one hand, and the deli- cate face, full of life, was lifted a little as she talked earnestly to the man who leaned over her. Her eyes were bright with feeling 3 her voice quivered. She was young, passionate, lovely. And the man yielded. +.' i ' 'S .lgll ,-. 1- ffl " if ,'vf-f n A Ml. ,., U lf? 'W '--" M lbw Xi' - X v pf x ,g. 1fL.,,,,,la V -j -A z VE. .f 7 I fygf-N J 'W a fm? f f if if I l--will ff72f ff :iw rfffif' f I 'TEIPI ff!! ,fjf ,In f ' Q Flill is . , . ff , ' Igglilli -f I ici' ff f" f-2: ...'. . , '-,r:-'ia' - 'C e QEiiE'S221'iga 3ll Established in Chicago Sept 1867 -. ' M 5 ron TH: . u 9 f er' rl 0 I S jfnffll , . . .W Movement-Cure lnstltute M . . . l. -In l - . . "P AL,-'VV azmznuu. APPl.icrrioN or Manual and Mechanical Massage and Specialized Swedish Movements. These methods will cure Chronic Rheumulism. Paralysis- S:-iatlcn, Imperfect Circulation. Cold Exlremlties,Constipation ofthe Howels, Ha-morrlmuls, Dyspepxm and all forms of lncligestiun, Torpidity of the Liver, Astnnm. Pulmi-n.ir3 Weakness, Nervous Ploslrwtiou, Neulnlgln, Sleeplessness. ilmlt. Spinal Curvature, Qtlff Joints, Drrmsucal Swellmzs, Exve-s of Far and all forms of UrerineCongest1ons. For weakly children those opercltmns are indispensable. As an hygir-:uc measure these trenlmenls :ire of the gli-latest inlpoimnce, and are a perfect substitute fl-r exercise. Being largely passive :ill undue effort and fatigue are axcnnleil. hence tothe aged, the delicate and weak, and lo brain workers, are supplied :l form of exercise of incomparable utiluly Call :md lm-estignle or send for rlrculur . . . Suite 7I0:7l9 Champlain Bldg., IZ6 Stale St., Chicago. Explanation of'Processef frc-elv elven. Hours for Exalllillarloll and Tri-.xtmenlz LADIES ANI! CIIILDKEN I-'IHHI 9 'I'0 l. GEN'l'LFf!lFN FROM 2 T0 6. CHIC G0 COLLEGE OF LAW. law Department of Lake Forest University. ATHENAEUM BUILDING. HON. THOS. A. MORAN, LL. D., Dean. afy,-25,-5-yfxfxfxf-Nfxf-N., Degree of Bachelor of Laws conferred on those who complete the three years course satisfactory to the Faculty. College graduates who have a sufficient amount of credit in legal studies may be admitted to advanced standing. Summer course during months of june and July. For further information address the Fecretarv, ELMER E. BARRETT, LLB., I50l, I00 Washington St. CHICAGO. 312 HE was rather small, a pretty girl, young and thoroughly natural in manner' This I noticed as I watched her from a distance at the Kelly reception. Soon I met her and was able to study her at closer range. " I am very glad to meet you, Miss XVi1liams," she said with a nod of her head. "Are you in this University too? " I am a freshman, and so don't know anything about the people I rneet. Oh I four years? then you're a senior ! My ! I'm afraid I don't treat you with the respect due your gravity. I suppose you feel terri- bly learned, don't you? Oh, don't you? isn't that odd? Iam sure I should. Illl have to look up to you anyhow, shan't I? Freshmen always do. I don't consider a freshman's position a normal one, do you? lVe have to do so many odd things? Oh, there is Frank XYeston 3 do you know him? Awfully nice freshman. He was down to call last evening, and did such an entertaining thing. He talked in rag- tinie-just as good as music. Did you ever hear anyone do it? Yery pretty? I wish I could do just one jvarlar fl'7't'A', as I call it-something to make people notice me and think me bright. Oh, I'ni F61-jf glad to see you, Mr. XVeston. I was just telling these girls about your rag-time. Have you seen Marion since -" And We, now unnoticed by her, melted into the crowd, sighed and wondered if all freshmen were alike. L- A Lp M H F4 N., i 4. ai ' I WSE.. iii?-il-gg x , , r pa . rl' m e I. 7 . 'ii-' l '7l'1lEss'f-fm! if X f- m A XI gh! M W - ,I hi yy I-Mt J .QEjlymm, , lr7r '- ,Qdliyyvsx X I 'i " 9 , ,if 1.1"-, I ' ,T -- g f fgar,,if.i'frli,igi its fi Eye I It i w 2, ' "' illiifu- fir '. ,il, R. M' 1,1 XX 4.QAF.i1:?'f'ff.ivfiiElfIA '65 'iii-ii MV, fu" -' ,jj yW yj-iQ'I,' fin. 'u , f A' i l, X fi i.f'Wif!l .4 ff!! f FT fi' ' at will mlm. .,'. - yi I2 Hi, fix 1' gg y ', .iziv"' ,V ,Ji '- .1 it - 'f' i MW? ,III ,uv L 1 . My .ily . it "P f. rilfwill . 'ft' .ny ' f I Lx iii , I 1 'J Y 'i. mi .IW ,gil4j,f.- Vg.. ,, f ' l""fd:ll .ii "fag -27335 ' nivfjjh ' L' , if NNE, :Galle-'fr ' ' - ' -Ni-Xx 635,71 f ,ffji ' v, f' ,id JAMES H. ECKELS, President D. VERNON, 2nd Vice-President JOHN C. MCKEON, Vice-President Jos. T. TALBERT, Cashier A C mmQl'CiEll Dali Ilill Bdllk CHICAGO, ILL. cAPrrAL, - 51,000,000 suRPl.us, . 51,000,000 .N Directors. FRANKLIN MAC VEAGH. N. K. FAIRBANK. ROBERT T. LINCOLN. JESSE SPAULDING. NORINIAN YVILLIAMS. JABIES H. ECKELS. XVII. J. CHALINIERS. JOHN C. MCKEON. CAPITAL, - - 52,000,000 The Continental atinnal Bank of hicaeo conuzn ADAMS AND LA SALLE STREET CHICAGO, ILL. JOHN C. BLACK. President. ISAAC N. PERRY. Yicc-President.. GEORGE M. REYNOLDS. Cashier. IRA P. BUVVEN, Assisnaln Cashier. BENJAMIN S. MAYER. Ass'L Cashier. DIRECTORS. JOHN lf. BLAVK. ROSIVELL MILLER. XVILLIAM G. HIBBARD. GEORGE H. VVHEELER. HENRY C. DVICAND. HENRY BUTSFORD. JAMES H. DOLE, J, OGDEN AKMOUR. ISAAC N. PERRY, HEHTIIOLIJ LOEWEN1 HAL. JOHN A. LYNCH, President. VV. T. FENTON, Vice-President. and Cashier. I H PANIEROY I H' KENT' ' 'gAssistauL Cashiers. H. M. BIvli1NNEY. - - Sd Assistant Cashier. be Ilflational JBank of the 1RepubIic. CHICAGO, ILL. CapiLaI, ' ' 31,000,000- DIRECTORS. FRANK O. Lowmtx. Lawyer. JUHN A. LYNCH. A1.Ex,xNI1ER MAu1i.xx'. W. T. IFENTON. IQ. H S'1'RwN1.a, of thv late mm of Foxx, Su'-Ju: .Q Co. J. B, GRHENHUT. C:v.pira.11st Lows F Swufr. of Swift S: Co.. 1':u-here, A. M. R0'rHvHII.Lv, of A, M, Romchilq .Q Co. HENRY SIEGEL. of Siegel, Cuopv,-r X Cu. '1'RAvx' C. DRAKE. of Alfred L. Banker x Co. 314 Che War President in Peace Client Theatre, University of Chicago, Oct. 17, 1898.5 "And may you at K if in the days to come, as in the past cherish the Repub lic and defend her.'l-President William R. Harper. From War's grim council-chambers freed at last, From vain regret o'er heroes' blood-stained fall And tropic fevers that the heart appall, Calm-eyed he Waits the unknown issues vast. Above, the symbols of his country's past,- The shield protective and the Hag that call On freemen's hearts to break inhuman thrall, And right the wrong e'en at the truxnpet's blast. And round about, the symbols fair of peace,- Gowns academic and the earnest calm Of scholars seeking aye for war's surceaseg- Till, rolling full, ascends the nation's psalm, The lips of eloquence his praise increase, And learn!-d laurel mingles with the palm. HORACE SPENCER FISKE. C00 Crue " Don't drink, my son," the father said " Or you will never get ahead." " You're wrong," replied the son with scorn, " For when I've drunk, I find at morn Ou rising from my drowsy bed That I have always got a head." T. T . H. Hlllllmll QQEIDQS Ye are prophets of death, of the grave and its cold 5 But ye whisper of peaceful sleep under the mould, Of sorrows forgotten in heaven's warm fold 3 And ye shower down on me God's love with your gold. LE Rov TITUS-YVEEKS. ReCipl'0CiID Mindful of Chicago's founder Through our four long years of toil, lVe, appreciative students, Burn up quarts of midnight oil. T. T. H. 315 orthwestern niversit ---imw SCHO0L ..fdCllIW.. HENRX' WADE ROGERS, LL.D., President of the University. t HON. PETER STENGER GRosscUP. LL.D., Dean. HON. HARVEY B. HURD, LL.D. BLEWETT LEE, A. M., LL. D. EDYVARD A. Hi.-LRRIMAN, A. B., LL. B. EDWIN BURRITT SMITH, A.M., LL.M. JOHN H. XVIGMORE, A. M., LL. B. JULIAN W. BIACK, LL. B. HON. NATHANIEL C. SEARS, LL. D. FRANK C. LOXVDEN, A. B., LL. B. this naw SCIWQI recognizes that the study of law should properly follow the completion ofa college course, and that the law school is, in its nature, a graduate school. The School is conducted, not as a commercial enterpriseyhut as a regular department of Northwestern University, with a permanent faculty of specialists. The work expected of students is essentially university work. Forty-two per cent of the regular students in the Law School possess academic degrees, among these are many graduates of the University of Chicago. The Law School course covers three years, but special provision is made for college graduates who study law in college. Col- lege graduates may receive credit for college Work in law to the extent of one-half years' work in the Law School. Students entering with such credit are permitted to complete the course in two years. College graduates may also retain the degree of A, M. for advanced work in law. For circulars or other information, address the Secretary. l55 LA SALLE STREET, CHICAGO, ILL. Northwestern ::: University ::: Medical School or Its standards have always been the highest, and its rank the best. 257' For circulars of information address the Secretary DR. N. S. DAVIS, JR. 2431 DEARBORN STREET CHICAGO, ILL. 9 U Northwestern University WOMAN'S MEDICAL SCHOOL f'CUlonisni's flbcbical Collcqc of Cbicagol 333-339 South Lincoln St. CHICAGO LAIMS to give as extended, as complete, and as thorough a course ofiustructiou in med- icine and surgery, in all branches. as is given in any medical school in this country which admits women. Uusurpassed clinical advantages are had at the Lincoln Street Dispensary, the Cook County Hospital, the YVoinan's Hospital. the Wesley HOsp1tal.thellliuo1s Eye and Ear Infirmary, the Chicago Free Dispensary. the Mary Thompson Hospital lor Xvomen and Children, and the Home for Destitute Crippled Children. For circular of inforniation, address DR. JOHN RIDLON l03 State Street ,q-x.,-CHICAGO BllSillQSS Dress mOl'l1ilIS Dress HIIIIIIIICQIIIQIII to the Faculty and Students or the liniversitp of Chicago that mp Smbone Spring Stock, 420 NC... Dearborn gg 0 9 'fverrgrhins sneer u t e Chicago ordinarp, llothing but IIDQ QEIIQSI. " Di. h. l77cCarthD merchant Cailor af' Hfternoon Dress Evening Dress 31 H. ZEIS5 6: Tel ph Oakl cl 55 8 United 154 LADIES ...AND GENTLEMENS Y COMPANY Q S lgz, Q. ef FINE TAILORING . . 9 E 47th Street Near Kenwood Illinois C I S g1 e This Cap and Gofwn is one of a limited edition, 'which -was printed in the month of May, Eighteen hundred and ninety-nine: compiled and edited at the University of Chicago, and printed and bound by SWARSH E3 GRANT at their College CBook Shop in Chicago .al 320 W 5 1-1 1 9 "WV G3 '51 Q.. .312 1 M41 1, ha, 'lil I W mm- 5 . 111 1 Hi.. .F V' ,hh V, .,'3 'rx W1lf4f'x Q, 1.1 . L, Q, 45.41 - ujm. nh., ,. ,1,.. I-' ' Y ef, 'r' '1 'sf .X 1. ,ri 2 15 ,. 4, n C '1' 1 rv Y 1- 5' ' , , V4 1 1 vi .U ..,u. Q 1 .1'g'w. 1 1 1 , - , s , 1 ww 1 ' 1 , , 4 4 , , , 1 1 ,1 11, 1. 1 5 -1 1.:.,!. ,. f 1 , V 14 ' 5.4 Q 1 . -1. ' :K J , ,f ,xg 1 .. 1. 1 4 -. 1 . A..,4Q,,. ,. X .1 ' . L f R ,. . X . ,. . . , 1 .s. 1 4 . 14 v 1 x L 4 I, 1 1 , 1 ' 1 1 - n -M14 , A f N f 1 '- ' ,f, ' 'M ,, .1 i 1 X 1 1 1 ' 1 41 1 , 1 5 --1, . .. 4- .. 9 s 0 K PJ x.x.n J U llw 'W' u A 1 W7 U ,Q ny


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