University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL)

 - Class of 1898

Page 1 of 346

 

University of Chicago - Cap and Gown Yearbook (Chicago, IL) online yearbook collection, 1898 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 346 of the 1898 volume:

rv." , F 1 F U 4 CD6 CGD and Gown DlIl!liSh0d di IM UIIIVQYSIW Qf QNCGQQ IIIIGQI' the dil'NIi0ll Of the 0l'd2l' Of the 'IYOII mdSk H00 U79 fbifd Wlllllli 011 lieigbfeill l7lllldl'2Cl dlld llillilvfiigbf. Ailen County Pubiic Library 900 Webster Street PO Box 2270 Q Fort Wayne, IN 45801-2270 C . ' ' Q X ' V -1. ,.,::..,X, 'X X' X gh XX ', ', X- X, 'w.'-. ' XX, X X XX XX , ,X - 1 . , X ' . I Q lx Y S' .S X .X,XX ,, . f X X .U-M' ' , X I n X.-XXX I2 .X .X, X X 1 - " ,. . . X .X XX ' . X ' X Wg.. X X X X ,X X, X, . Y .X X . , . - , X J: rn . . X .- X A . ,,.- XXX. ' .1 4 X, X . .,:. ,XI I 'V X . - X X 1 "' x ' ..X X .X an " X.' Q ' . AXX ' ' 74 "QW .. i' ff. ., ' na -' .EX 'X .ug .1 , X .-'Qz..'. . ., . ' X X -X - XX.X W .xv ,jf cn CX. ,X Xu: . ,-QXA . tl ., .Ulf "X4':'?- .Xt 'rx X1 . X, A .,,. . "vi XX , X .1 r , "il P.. ' X.. EI X ' X ,NM XX 'Xa 1. .r-X' .'C'-'- ' ' QW: ' ..X'A .QX 3 .,H.i41f,' 1 1 if ' WS' , . .. -1 L XX.. , 2 1 1' 1. ' L 4-XX j. Xia., 'I V ' to . 3 milflill H. RDCYSOII President of the 'Beard of trustees this DOOR IS A Respecttttlw Dedicated. 'VS'?'il'75 ,ill -3 ' f F - Q . E, ' ' ' Qwkgp g A i XG fs: f'mlYfIi'J:x'fxf949' -a xg LNEA X' - D KL . il ' 'f In Zap and Gown again we stand 3 - , Ilnd welcome all with outstretched hand, 34,9 0ur greetings here we now extend 5 N Jlnd to the world we would commend ug--f ziijb 0ur hrter account of college-land. 3 ,, ln oaln would words ol ours expand fe the iovs ol life at our command, Q ,gg ' 1 ' - 4 For here our iovs and trials blend M. 'III ifllfb, WUI' humble SCl'il!0S have DIMIIRCI L. . 'Co answer future vears' demand , 36, , I Jlnd make this hook a worthv friend is when college davs are at an end, . 5. Jlnd even then make life seem grand 1- ,r ln Zan and Gown. , tl .. f .- s 'viii . 't':' r . , .. e -. t T -,-l g I . I ,by-. -n 1 A V .uf 11 ' Aff 'i"'5Q1f :ff Q f :Q ' " " P n ap an own Q I Z d G . 1 9 x U76 BOGTCI of Editors managing Ediwfi ARTHUR SEARS HENNING WILLOUGHBY GEORGE WALLING Jlssistant mdlldgiltg GGINI' THOMAS TEMPLE HOYNE BllSillQSS mdlldgit' ALLEN GREY HOYT .'HSSiSidlll BIISHIQSS mdllllgtl' ERNEST HAMILTON DILLON Jlssociate Editors MAURICE GORDON CLARKE RUFUS MAYNARD REED MARJORIE BENTON COOKE EDWARD MAX BAKER WILLIAM FRANCE ANDERSON ETHEL KEEN RUTH ISABEL VANDERLIP WILLIAM FRANCIS MACDONALD CHARLOTTE ROSE TELLER CARL HOWELL SAWYER 5 HE CAP AND GOWN is greatly indebted to the following artists for the illustration of this volume .af MR. WILLIAM DERRICK RICHARDSON MR. PERCY BERNARD ECKHART MR. B. ENGLEBERT KEY MISS EDITH A. ELLIOTT MR. MARTIN FISCHER MR. JOHN T. MCCUTCHEON MISS GERTRUDE FULTON MR. ROBERT G. ELLIS MISS NOLIA V. GILCHRIST MR. DoNN CRANE Miss EFFIE GARDINER MR. RALPH LE ROY Pncx IMR. CHARLES EDWARD CONGDON The Landscape Photographs were contributed by MR. JOSEPH EDWARD RAYCROFT MR. EMORY COBB ANDREWS PROFESSOR MANN 6 C . ' ' Q X ' V -1. ,.,::..,X, 'X X' X gh XX ', ', X- X, 'w.'-. ' XX, X X XX XX , ,X - 1 . , X ' . I Q lx Y S' .S X .X,XX ,, . f X X .U-M' ' , X I n X.-XXX I2 .X .X, X X 1 - " ,. . . X .X XX ' . X ' X Wg.. X X X X ,X X, X, . Y .X X . , . - , X J: rn . . X .- X A . ,,.- XXX. ' .1 4 X, X . .,:. ,XI I 'V X . - X X 1 "' x ' ..X X .X an " X.' Q ' . AXX ' ' 74 "QW .. i' ff. ., ' na -' .EX 'X .ug .1 , X .-'Qz..'. . ., . ' X X -X - XX.X W .xv ,jf cn CX. ,X Xu: . ,-QXA . tl ., .Ulf "X4':'?- .Xt 'rx X1 . X, A .,,. . "vi XX , X .1 r , "il P.. ' X.. EI X ' X ,NM XX 'Xa 1. .r-X' .'C'-'- ' ' QW: ' ..X'A .QX 3 .,H.i41f,' 1 1 if ' WS' , . .. -1 L XX.. , 2 1 1' 1. ' L 4-XX j. Xia., 'I V ff" ,-ff" " -5-v mr- :ann -- C D I If f . v fl I xl I -- ,. x I X ,' xx X' A 'KV ' ' 1 I , 4. , V I x 'X V i ,K 'I 1? I K' jy I V! ' ' ' -V' X ' I, Q gf 2.7 'X 'ix M Q' H 1 1 , 'V .' 1-J x P ,jj 1 I fi 'nf -if 5 fgjsxax 4 ty ' E A231 . -1 lg f .r. 1 I r Afgqggguku. ii K, 1,7 5 5 . ' - ,faqaefiv , 1 1 53' '47 S , - 1 . . '- , 2? a i 2 'f A X 4- EP15? N? M' f? -'- - K F 1 His., '43-44. 555 ,- U?-fi, " 'bf 'H 59 0,77 ', 4 1 '2r'4v,w..:q7g, Eggs' .0 f L " 1, p - 1 , Ji:-Qf' 351- rl?-.:.-gf, 1 ,- f -.nf 44 - , .. '4.-.ff ---f- V .. ,i 71.59 fl!-A-1,120 ....-Q., -- X , r:-v - 5 i f: I I ,J I fr - .I WE F, J ff i' if N1 12 I , L 'Q ' .,,, L .l .l 7 5 f 41 .fa I , 'Pl rf mg ,ls 4 ' A4 - J fffFfJfvff12yf--- 4 I-IUGIGIICC Backward BEING A CHRONICLE 0F HIE PROGRESS 0f IIIE UNIVERSITY f0R TH! PAST TWO YEARS A up HE University has at last reached that degree of vine-clad dignity where i it has a Past. From that time all glory datesg in that atmosphere A traditions flourish. Already members of the Class of '96, the first 21 regularly graduated class, are returning to regale the students of the present with tales of "the old days" and wonder if the fun now can compare with the larks of '94 or the wild freedom of '93 before the Midway was cleared away. They stroll about the campus in quest of old-time haunts only to start and stare at a massive pile of austere gray suddenly looming up before them. Occasional visitors go into ecstasies over our " stupendous piles " and tell you what an education they would have had if they could have read Homer in red-roofed buildings. Then they tell you how much of the University could be seen tor, rather, was not to be seenj from the Ferris wheel. The nightwatchman will tell you over his mid- night pipe how his boy used to shoot ducks where the gymnasium now stands. Why the boy's sport should have been spoiled for the sake of the present building is a mystery known doubtless only to the President and to the Senior Class. Notwithstanding this example of apparent retrogression, the growth of the University in the past two years has been phenomenal. The four Biological buildings in Hull Court, with their well-equipped departmentsg the Yerkes Observatory at Williams Bay, Wisconsing the elaboration of the system of aiiiliated institutionsg the widening of the scope of the University Extension, and the international expeditions in which the University is a coiiperator, mark a development unequalled by any other institution of learning in the world. December 14, 1895, Miss Helen Culver of Chicago presented to the University property valued at fl,000,000, "the whole gift to be devoted to the increase and spread of knowledge within the field of the biological sciences." A part of this large contribution was intended to further endow the biological departments, a part for the erection of buildings, a part for sustaining an inland experimental station and a marine laboratory, and a part for sustaining on the West side of Chicago, University Extension lectures on biology, particularly on the advances of science in sanitation and hygiene. This contribution is a memorial of Charles J. Hull, who was a trustee of the old University of Chicago. The corner-stones of the buildings were laid July 3, 1896, during the Quinquennial celebration. Work was pushed rapidly 8 throughout the following year, and they were formally opened at the ceremonies of the Nineteenth Convocation, July 1, 1897. The zoiilogical, botanical, anatomical and physiological departments now have equipments that place the University in the foremost rank of institutions for the study of the biological sciences. The other provisions of the gift are being carried out as rapidly as opportunities permit. The Hull Gate, and also the buildings, were designed and planned by Mr. Henry Ives Cobb. The Yerkes Observatory is a work of which the University is justly proud. With the largest and most powerful telescope in the world and unparalleled means for using it to the greatest advantage, we may, with all modesty, expect to make the most valuable contributions to learning in the field of astronomy for many years to come. The Observatory was founded in 1892, through the munincence of Mr. Charles T. Yerkes, of Chicago. In Ehat year Mr. Alvan G. Clark undertook the construction of an object-glass of 40 inches aperture, for the principal telescope of the Observatory, and Messrs. Warner 81 Swasey were given a contract for the equatorial mounting. The latter was completed in the following year and exhibited by its makers at the Columbian Exposi- tion. An important feature, employed for the nrst time in this telescope, is a system of electric motors by means of which the various motions are effected. The object-glass has been tested by Professor James E. Keeler, who acted at the request of the Director as the "expert agent" called for by the contract. The definition was found to be fully equal to that of the Lick telescope, while the light gathering power is considerably greater. The for- mal dedication and opening took place July 2, 1897. The University Press has achieved a national and international reputation for the journals and books which it has published during the past two years. Each department of the University has a periodical in which appears the latest contributions fb JW J, 0-sw P 1 ..f NN 95 v an' W: " f NJ. 2.: 4 y f u 1 cl '01, 3 1,x v 'F-J' I 1" " Win' i ...vfgf-P fee + "f 'zu -1' 26" .,,::"9,'.vf" r 1 B W, rl pg I- '7 C' if wi: il' "' tg N Th.iZmb111-s .S qzrggik -sn,5,v.: ' .x,,.x' 1- - 1 Ll 'X it " is :',."Q'1'-' '23 .xxx -Q,-g':,,,2t' aw. , A J' Wi" "xl-.Cv '51 sfax Ng 1:51 S2 L az V 'lib-if-2 X'-,sf ..." 1 V' ilfw ,IFA :.,g., Q,-45.1.-.-Val:-. ,I 5 A I .- -is-eww-Q.-se.-A ' ' --'Hi M.. "u-.u1vr::.:'.'2e1::L -.'1:h?.f:..::.3'a.-----:"'- -f'?.3:Efi':1"' ' b J "..--rms: '- . za-:gn-.-.r3.-.afar-1 H. .,..- .:1'g-L.:-2-:.-.5.. -'asm-.2'.i-ffsgg-zzz, ' -1 ':- '2.b.4h:51ag22f.:-'iq'111-:ca :'2-.faivizvfza-'rig' ta'-124: 'f5.1ffr.1,1'.5:1':. -r.f.a--:-:--:-.:-- . - 7.55-.'f4f3z-s':e:.q,:-'i'c M' " r' ...:::s-fav 1 :fy - t, .aasE?24..'. T .- -- r -.- - " - 9 . ..-1,-..' 4.12.----.wg .55 - --'-ytffgi. , -. 11-Q 6:3 fiiiilgiiif?-i':?2f5Ei5? ":2-figf?S:f:5i:5,11X., -V 'E--'rn-.' '1'1-f?.3-Jr!" Iwi:-425-'r-, 1-.-Spare? 1-1:-741. ' -.- - - - KN-J'-i'.' .mem --- -::-.--:sw-1 '-: 5:5 2,,. .--9 g- ,1 ..,..-.1-,."1 ..,- 'f.- 4-L-mfg,-.:.' -, .5-.N-. g Q: . , .-.q3q,g::z-, 4-':l-.5:.'-"L1.':.-sq' gt' :-.2251-,-:.'-,."-1',Hn-:'.-r ' - in-:::-5:5-'s'gf.5aa:,f7.1.g: ri:-1 ..t--, uv .-'f- fn- '--1 '- :-nu ., ... , . . .s.:s:.-N- . , ,.:-L. M: : ,,n.':q.n 1, ,I 'fain ,i...'l2.,xE.k 'haze' I7-'.,?52i'g5:.jijfitg1:E1q,l: , l.'-l- ' .. - :lin 5- -'34s 123:-15Ev-':'S57EqgE.5z.- . . 5-'ala'-3:-2"f":'5y:'?' -1:1-q,:2,:5,3-, ::m'i- -xg , -f ., j'.-.41Qflr3"- ' . --1'.-, 4,.-su: .7 -5.5 4, .Quiz Y.,-,I .IQ .11 333' Q27 '--'v -14s?'b.5 EB 5- "QS-,46f4""t-.-F - -.- . . 1, . 1. . -.l - 'I . :M .... f 'L+'-':'f-,.,.,t1:t'EZx'3 2.53.4-' 1355 1.1 gf ':"v.i.f! ,tus -:Ln , 'V ,gi ' 'link I n' D I ,KN --V. :...-- -'i-' if -1 ":- -' - . . I, 4 . , 1 -I ' it Q , E.. ....:i'-Q" E., hs.. p?'l2::,eJQ. -t . . .gm -,.-.1 J: 5-1 75:4 fat, 3-,' af Xi'-qw: ' 1-'ww fe. -- -ggwv-ps 'g -I 5' vb '15,Z',.'.'. .', 'Qt- ' ' . ' v n 'n - 1 - --- . -.1 -'.'.'.. . .v 1, .., . - . , -,, ,M..:-'-1-- --. .- 5 I IH vu is-2 ' " A f If g 'Sp 'v, 'F f 'Y 'n ' -,t " q . . .r 1 .3 .4 Q U nie E ST? to its own special field of knowl- I N 1 edge. In addition, books published under the direction of the departments and from the pens of professors pursuing individual research, have attracted the close attention of the scientiic and literary world. Plans for a large building adequate to the demands of the Press are complete, and work has already been commenced. The building will be located on the corner of Ellis Avenue and Fifty-eighth Street. It will contain the offices, composing 9 rooms, presses and mailing department. The latest machinery for making a great publishing house will be put in, and the scope of the department widened. The University might well be content to be known only through its Extension Department, which has brought its many advantages for culture and instruction to people who are prevented by circumstances from living on the campus or within daily reach of the quadrangle. During the year 1896-97 the department maintained 95 active Extension centers, with 141 courses in progress. Eight states were repre- sented. The total attendance at the Extension lectures was 29,344, and at the Exten- sion classes 17,382. Twenty-nine lecturers were engaged for the work of the year. In addition to the regular work the department has organized a system of traveling libraries that the student may obtain the necessary reference and text-books recom- mended in the various courses. Beyond our national boundaries the University has made a most creditable show- ing. Polar and Oriental expeditions of discovery and research have all had represent- atives, while our professors in the astronomical, geological and biological departments have been leaders and organizers of parties for furthering investigation in their res- pective realms. The Barrows Lectures, endowed by Mrs. Caroline E. Haskell, were delivered in India by john Henry Barrows, D.D., Professorial Lecturer for the University. Probably more exemplary of our astonishing growth than any other feature is the increase of the number of books in the libraries. For the two years ending with April 1, 1898, the additions have amounted to more than 25,000 books. By no means a minor feature is the organized system of afliliated institutions which cooperate with the University. The most important one aiiiliated during the period covered by this chronicle is the Bradley Polytechnic Institute at Peoria, Ill. This institution had the advantage of starting under the general supervision of the University. The opening of the school occurred October 8, 1897. As far as building is concerned the campus is changing as rapidly as the most lin-de-siecle co-ed could desire. The gods from the faculty room on Mount Olympus continue to decorate this little domain in large patches of cold gray and 'fiery red till the effect is most striking and bewildering. But where, oh where, is the landscape gardener to add a softening, inviting touch to the scene? This criticism is, We believe, common only among the men-the women care not a whit for the landscape so long as the trees in front of Kelly are strong enough to support a hammock and old enough to maintain a discreet silence. College spirit, about which so much has been said and written since the iirst student registered at Cobb Hall, is steadily growing. For a long time keen observers thought they saw manifested among the students that insidious germ which for want of a better term we call Harvard indifference. A second glance, however, proved 10 the trouble to be not indifference, but the lack of a past. The undergraduate spirit is keeping pace with the march of tradition. A few attempts have been made to manufacture the latter precious article, but though partial success has attended these efforts, it cannot compare with the natural growth, evidence of which we begin to discern here and there. The youth of the institution must always be borne in mind. Six years may seem a long time to the student who has droned through his Greek and Mathematics, but it is a short time for such an eternal creature as a tradition. Wrinkles are not natural to the babe's brow. If we see them there the child looks worn, pinched and ugly. Why, on our walls the vines have reached only the first- story windows. The students here now who are trying to put the Glee Club, the Cap and Gown, and the Oratorical association on a paying and successful basis 5 who are trying to rouse more enthusiastic support for the athletic teamsg who are trying to start literary magazines, daily papers and other enterprises-these students are pion- eers. Wait till the ivy has reached the second story casements. Let tradition go its own natural pace and college spirit will take care of itself. . JY-46 ,NZN4 T yi? 51635, xx? X '- ff' . V-' f,:x i "fuk" 471 459' H' exff lil Q will 'gif X I' J-Si X x f X l A l 55 pi W I it E , Q itll l ' l l ly f 3 I 'Jig J ir XX Q B, l'.-lqunnf ig' 1 1 CD6 Board or CYIISIQQS 0ffiCel'S MARTIN A. RYERSON, PRESIDENT ANDREW MCLEISH, VICE-PRESIDENT CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON, TREASURER HENRY A. RUST, COMPTROLLER THOMAS W. GOODSPEED, SECRETARY m2mbQfS F. T. GATES CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON EDWARD GOODMAN ALONZO K. PARKER WILLIAM HOLDEN FERDINAND W. PECK FREDERICK A. SMITH ELI B. FELSENTHAL MARTIN A. RYERSON WILLIAM R. HARPER DANIEL L. SHOREY HERMANN H. KOHLSAAT XVILLARD A. SMQITH GEORGE C. WALKER. CHARLES C. BOWEN DAVID G. HAMILTON WILLIAM B. BRAYTON THOMAS W. GOODSPEED JESSE A. BALDWIN ANDREW MCLEISH JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, JR. I2 0ffiC2l'S Of ll1SIl'llCIi0ll and fldl1lilliSIl'2lIiOll WILLIAM RAINEY HARPER, PHD., D.D., LL.D., President of the University, Head Professor of the Semitic Languages and Literatures, and Director of Haskell Oriental Museum. GALUSHA ANDERSON, A.M., s.T.D., LL.D., Head Professor of Horniletics. GEORGE WASHINGTON NORTHRUP, D.D., LL.D., Head Professor of Systematic Theology. NVILLIAM CLEAVER WILKINSON, A.M., D.D., Professor of Poetry and Criticism. FRANKLIN JOHNSON, D.D., Professor of Church History and Homiletics, and Dean of the English Theological Seminary. THOMAS WAKEFIELD GOODSPEED, D.D., Secretary of the Board of Trustees, and University Registrar. ERI BAKER HULBERT, A.M., D.D., Head Professor of Church History, and Dean of the Divinity School. HERMAN EDUARD VON HOLST, PHD., Head Professor of History. THOMAS CHROWDER CHAMBERLIN, PH.D., LL.D., Head Professor of Geology, and Director of the Walker Museum. JOHN HENRY BARROWS, D.D., Professorial Lecturer on Comparative Religion. CHARLES 0. VVHITMAN, PH.D., LL.D., Head Professor of Zoology. 13 RICHARD GREEN MoULToN, Pn.D., Professor of Literature in English. CARL GUSTAV LAGERGREN, A.B., D.B., Professor Qin the Swedish Theological Seminaryj of Systematic Theology, and Dean of the Seminary. JOHN MERLE COULTER, PHD., Head Professor of Botany. WILLIAM GARDNER HALE, AB., LL.D., Head Professor of Latin. HARRY PRATT JUDSON, A.M., L.L.D., Head Professor of Political Science, and Dean of the Faculties of Arts, Literature, and Science. CHARLES RICHMOND HENDERSON, A.M., D.D., Professor of Sociology in the Divinity School, and University Chaplain. SHERBURNE WESLEY BURNHAM, A.M., Professor of Practical Astronomy. CHARLES FREDERIC MILLSPAUGH, Professorial Lecturer on Botany. CHARLES CHANDLER, A.M., Professor of Latin. WILLIAM H. HOLMES, A.B., Professor of Archaeologic Geology. EMIL GUSTAV HIRSCH, PH.D., LL.D., Professor of Rabbinical Literature and Philosophy. H. GUNDERSEN, A.M., D.D., Professor fin the Dano-Norwegian Theological Seminaryj of Systematic Theology, New Testament Interpretation and Biblical Literature, and Dean of the Seminary. 14 J. LAURENCE LAUGHLIN, PH.D., Head Professor of Political Economy. ALBERT MICHELSON, PH.D., Head Professor of Physics. FRANK BIGELOW TARBELL, PH.D., Professor of Classical Archmology and Greek Epigraphy. DANIEL GIRAUD ELLIOT, F.R.S.E, Professorial Lecturer on Zo6logy. OSKAR BOLZA, PH.D., Professor of Mathematics. ERNEST DEWITT BURTON, D.D., Head Professor of New Testament Literature and Interpretation. ALBION WOODBURY SMALL, PH.D., Head Professor of Sociology, and Director of the University Affiliations. JOSEPH PAXSON IDDINGS, PH.B., Professor of Petrology. EDMUND JANES JAMES, A.M., PH.D., Professor of Public Administration and Director of the University Extension Division PAUL SHOREY, PH.D., Head Professor of Greek. BENJAMIN S. TERRY, PH.D., Professor of Mediaeval and English History, and Dean in the Senior Colleges. JOHN DEWEY, PH.D., Head Professor of Philosophy. HENRY HERBERT DONALDSON, PH.D., Head Professor of Neurology, and Dean of the Ogden QGraduatej School of Science C. R. VAN HISE, PH.D., Non-Resident Professor of Pre-Cambrian Geology. 15 GEORGE BURMAN FOSTER, A.M., Professor of Systematic Theology. ISAAC BRONSON BURGESS, A.M., Academy Professor of Latin. ROLLIN D. SALISBURY, A.M., Professor of Geographic Geology, and University Examiner. OLIVER CUMMINGS FARRINGTON, PH.D., Professorial Lecturer in Determinative Mineralogy. FRANK FROST ABBOTT, PHD., Professor of Latin. ELIAKIM HASTINGS MOORE, PELD., Head Professor of Mathematics. JOHN ULRICH NEE, PHD., Head Professor of Chemistry. RICHARD ALEXANDER FULLERTON PENROSE, JR., PHD., Professor of Economic Geology. SHAILER MATHEWS, A.M., Professor of New Testament History and Interpretation. EDVVARD EMERSON BARNARD, A.M., sc.D., Professor of Astronomy and Astronomer of the Yerkes Observatory. GEORGE LINCOLN HENDRICKSON, A.B., Professor of Latin. ADOLPI-I CASPAR MILLER, A.M., Professor of Finance. WILLIAM H. GOODYEAR, A.M., Professorial Lecturer on Art. JOHN M. PALMER, Professor of Military Science and Tactics. s .J si 13 Hi' ' W 2111... esmf! " Au flill CHARLES EDMUND HENVITT, D.D., Secretary of Divinity School. FRANCIS ADELBERT BLACKBURN, PH.D., Associate Professor of the English Language. JULIA E. BULKLEY, PH.D., Associate Professor of Pedagogy, Dean Cof Womenj in the Colleges, and Head of Beecher House. HEINRICH MASCHKE, PH.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. JOHN WILDMAN MONCRIEF, ALI., .Associate Professor of Church History. WILLIAM DARNALL MAQCLINTOCK, A.M., Associate Professor of English Literature, and Dean in the Junior Colleges. OLIVER JOSEPH THATCHER, PH.D., Associate Professor of Medimval and English History. GEORGE BAUR, PH.D., Associate Professor of Comparative Osteology and Palaeontology. IRA MAURICE PRICE, DB., PH.D., Associate Professor of the Semitic Languages and Literatures. JACQUES LOEB, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology and Experimental Biology. CLARENCE FASSETT CASTLE, PH.D., Associate Professor of Greek on the Edward Olson Foundation. ZELLA ALLEN DIXSON, A.M., Associate Librarian. MARION TALBOT, A.M., Associate Professor of Sanitary Science, Dean Cof Womenj in the Graduate Schools and Head of Kelly House. 17 GEORGE STEPHEN GOODSPEED, PH.D.. Associate Professor of Comparative Religion and Ancient History, and University Recorder. STARR WILLARD CUTTING, PH.D., Associate Professor of German. FREDERICK STARR, PH.D., Associate Professor of Anthropology, and Curator of the Anthropological Department of Walker Museum. ROBERT FRANCIS HARPER, P1-LD., Associate Professor of Semitic Languages and Literature. JAMES HAYDEN TUFTS, PH.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy. SAMUEL WESLEY STRATTON, S.B., Associate Professor of Physics. CARL DARLING BUCK, PH.D., Associate Professor of Sanskrit and Indo-European Comparative Philology. CHARLES HERBERT THURBER, A.M., Associate Professor of Pedagogy, and Dean of the Morgan Park Academy. CHARLES ZUEBLIN, PH.B., Associate Professor of Sociology. EDWARD CAPPS, PH.D., Associate Professor of Greek and Dean in the Junior Colleges. EDWIN HERBERT LEWIS, PH.D., Associate Professor of Rhetoric. AMOS ALoNzo STAGG, A.B., Associate Professor and Director of the Division of Physical Culture. GEORGE E. HALE, SC.D., Professor of Astrophysics, and Director of the Yerkes Observatory. 18 MARTHA FOOTE CROXV, PHD., Assistant Professor of English Literature. ALBERT HARRIS TOLMAN, PH.D., Assistant Professor of English Literature and Senior College Examiner. WILLIAM I-IOOVER, PELD., Non-Resident Assistant Professor of Mathematics. FRANK JUSTUS MILLER, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Latin, and Examiner of Aiiiliations. GEORGE EMORY FELLOWS, PH.D., Assistant Professor of History. FELIX LENGFELD, PELD., Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chemistry. MYRA REYNOLDS, PH.D., Assistant Professor of English Literature and Head of Foster House. HENRY W. ROLFE, A.M., Non-Resident Assistant Professor of English Literature. H. SCHMIDT-WARTENBERG, PH.D., " Assistant Professor of German. ERNST FREUND, J.U.D., Assistant Professor of jurisprudence and Roman Law. oLoF HEDEEN, A.B., Assistant Professor Qin the Swedish Theological Seminary, of Practical Theology and Exegesis. FRANCIS WAYLAND SHEPARDSON, PH.D., Assistant Professor of American History. WILLIAM MCRTON WHEELER, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Embryology. 19 GEORGE HERBERT MEAD, A.B., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. FRANK M. BRONSON, A.M., Academy Assistant Professor of Greek. EDVVIN EARLE SPARKS, A.M., Assistant Professor of American History. sHo WATASE, PAD., Assistant Professor of Cellular Biology. NVILLIAM ISAAC THOMAS, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology, and Superintendent of Departmental Libraries. GEORGE EDGAR VINCENT, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. GEORGE CARTER HOWLAND, A.M., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, and junior College Examiner. ALEXANDER SMITH, PH.D., Assistant Professor of General Chemistry. JACOB WILLIAM ALBERT YOUNG, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. CAMILLO VON KLENZE, PH.D., Assistant Professor of German, and Head of Graduate Hall. EDWIN O. IORDAN, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. F. L. O. NVADSWORTH, S.B., E.M., M.E., Assistant Professor of Astrophysics. JAMES D. BRUNER, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures. '20 JULIUS STIEGLITZ, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. CLIFFORD H. MOORE, A.B., PI-LD., Assistant Professor of Latin. JAMES ROWLAND ANGELL, A.M., Assistant Professor of Experimental Psychology. ROBERT HERRICK, AB., Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. WILLIAM HILL, Assistant Professor of Political Economy. ROBERT MORSS LOVETT, A.B., Assistant Professor of English. SOLOMON HENRY CLARK, PH.B., Assistant Professor of Public Speaking, RENE DE POYEN-BELLIsLE, PH.D., Instructor in Romance Philology. FREDERIC JAMES GURNEY, A.B., D.B., Examinefs Clerk. PAUL OSCAR KERN, PH.D., Instructor in German. WILLIAM MUSS-ARNOLT, PH.D., Instructor and Assistant Recorder. PORTER LANDER MACCLINTOCK, A.M., Instructor in English. KARL PIETSCH, PHD, Instructor in Romance Literatures and Languages. WARDNER VVILLIAMS, MUs.Doc., PH.D., Director of Music. 21 of so . is , WN. I 1 gif W '- ay l ,l ,L-...-... THORSTEIN B. VEBLIN, PH.D., Instructor in Political Economy, and Managing Editor of " The journal of Political Economy." CLARK EUGENE CRANDALL. D.B., PH.D., Instructor in the Semitic Languages. LUANNA ROBERTSON, PHD., Academy Instructor in German. THEODORE LEE NEFF, A.M. PH.D., Instructor in Romance Languages. WAYLAND JOHNSON CHASE, A.M., Academy Instructor in History. MASSUO IKUTA, PH.,D., Instructor in Chemistry. HERBERT ELLSWORTH SLAUGHT, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics. FREDERIC IVES CARPENTER, PH.D., Instructor in English. JAMES HARRINGTON BOYD, Sc.D., Instructor in Mathematics. HERBERT LOCKWOOD WILLETT, PH.D., Instructor in Semitic Languages and Literatures and Dean of the Disciples House. NVILLIAM AUGUST PETERSON, D.B., Instructor fin the Swedish Theological Seminaryj in General History, Church His- tory, and the Swedish Language. CHRISTIAN IORGINIUS OLSEN, Instructor Qin the Dano-Norwegian Theological Seminaryy in I-Iomiletics, Church Polity, and Pastoral Duties. DAVID J. LINGLE, PH.D., Instructor in Physiology. 22 IRA WOODS HOWERTH, A.M., ' Instructor in Sociology and Secretary of the University Extension Class-Study De- partment. HARRIS HANCOCK, PH.D., Instructor in Mathematics. KURT LAVES, PH.D., Instructor in Astronomy. CHARLES PORTER SMALL, M.D., Examining Physician. ERNEST LEROY CALDWELL, A.B., Academy Instructor in Mathematics. WILLIAM BISHOP OWEN, A.B., D.B., Assistant Professor in Greek. WALTER A. PAYNE, PFLB., Instructor and Secretary of the University Extension Lecture-Study Department. JAMES HENRY BREASTED, PH.D., Instructor in Egyptology and Semitic, and Assistant Director Of Haskell Oriental Museum. CLYDE WEBER VOTAW, D.B., PH.D., Instructor in New Testament Literature. THOMAS J. JACKSON SEE, PH.D., Instructor in Astronomy. FERDINAND SCHVVILL, PH.D., Instructor in Modern History. OSCAR LOVELL TRIGGS, PH.D., Instructor in English. ALBERT C. EYCLESHYMER, PH.D., Instructor in Anatomy. KATE ANDERSON, S.B., Instructor in Physical Culture. 23 NELS SORENSON LAWDAHL, Instructor Qin the Dano-Norwegian Theological Seminar-yj in Church History. Instructor RALPH CHARLES HENRY CATTERALL, A.B., Instructor in Modern History. IOSEPHINE CHESTER ROBERTSON, A.B., Cataloguer. VVILLIANI VAUGHN MOODY, A.M., Instructor in English and Rhetoric. NEWMAN MILLER, PI-LB., and Secretary of the University Extension Correspondence-Study Department. FREDERIC MASON BLANCHARD, A.M., Instructor in Public Speaking. LINDSAY TODD DAMON, A.B., Instructor in Rhetoric and English Composition. JOSEPH EDYVARD RAYCROFT, A.B., Instructor in Physical Culture and Head of Snell House. VV. H. RUNYON, K Q. ig! I Instructor in Science in Academy. ELIZABETH VVALLACE, s.B., , Associate in Romance Languages. EDWARD C. PAGE, A.B., Associate in History. BRADLEY MOORE DAVIS, PH.D., Associate in Botany. CHARLES MANNING CHILD, PH.D., Associate in Zoology. CHARLES RIBORG MANN, A.M., PH.D., Associate in Physics. 2-l u i L1 I N. I H I E 1 II. f J 11 - . ,M ' 1 . al' " r -nw RSI-1. II ,WI 1,5 .IIIIJI 'r ,.m5- w ' .. . 'fl-v1-L' me.. 'Q 'fi 1 if ' " "AX" 1' f . ,. an ,F 1- 3 . 'ug' I o ,I :?1I,f,:IEZ 'f - '1' I- 1- S- .fn ".f H Q xv. : II.I .,I,.. .. ,I IMI L '- ' 1" .4 :-'-- -- . lf .g,-. 1 'Q , I, 4 . I ,x ' 4' I I rI 5 .1 I I.. ' ,' .I 1 ..: -,'-'I., ' 'f.-.1,, "-H, II-I'rI 1, 1 . I- Iff' ,1L,::IiI1II.QIEvgIII11: .1 ' .' ., '- I . ' 1 r - -. ', ,,- -fn'--I 1- , ,, ,..f. t--- I. I I II . , .. III,-,.:'I.III:gvIIII.,. IW ,1,, wig- 1' - 1 . -1 - - ,, I , 113954-5"'x' ' TU: - 2 'l '. I-"0 A 1 I iff.. "..1,' H 1 ' ' pC.J"", ,N . ', 1 . 12 -' L., 'E-W' ugf,"1I"'k r V 1 V Y,"' . "F", ,. 1 ' " .1 vi: N 1 ..II I . AI, 11 1, - I,I.I.i, 1154.115 -I I I II II 1 'I-I vII,il,I 'H' .5 1. I. I. .I -. I . I. . 1 I .., .. - 5- 1 1 H- ' , eq , - '1 1 'I 1-D ' ' : II' .1 ,fwfr .1 1' 1+ 1 1 III.. -. f 1 I .gII ' 1 I I I .1 QI Ij..III1I. -4- K" ,. v1 . "b: ' - I .I ' If 1:2 , , C '1I , Q 11 .. 'V I . . . I II: II , 1 I I I I I , Ir., ...I bg"'I -M. . .1 ' .'2fi1., - .1 fwri. :W S 1. .,,, . ., g., 125' I . I-I I I I T.,- I1 I. M .F1 II , I . IIII fI 1. I , . f.- .1. Y , 1 1 1 , ,-. 1 1 1 III I 1 I I ,III I - , I 1. I P-54.1 ,. ' p ' I ' 50 I ' 3.1 ' ' L in-' . I ' 1. -" I! I .4 '.--11 A . I. , I 1 I ' - 19 " ,5"rw.11,wi .II IIII ,II . I .III,I.yII5 ,I .v - .. I , .- I ' ' 1 1 1511. '-1 - ' " .' 5 .4 . "1 I .I I. sn. ' I, '1.'-5' N : ' I 1' , - 5.111 lg .I ' PI ze- 'A T .II1 if I nf ' ' " " . . ' '- "3 .1 .1 ' .,. I I , . I. I, . III 1 II..,3Is Ng" , ' .lg f,I '11 ,f. 11 .551 --2 .Ig .. - '-IJ-I-"uf .-'- . ' ' I 1-11 ' 1 I 1. - 1. 1- ' WH ,1,'-, - 1' 5 1- , -' - --I ..,.. 1. 1 -- ",v'1f..",.1,q 1- -- . 'X 'RYE 1 - ,. ,' -:-- ' I Il ,1f, I ,,1 I, 1I4,,.---. ::-1-1 - - I. . 2 1- - --1-,-. Ju 11, .. 1 , 1 ,'. 1 'f ,, :II I -,V ""v . L- 'f ,. I "J ': ' UI -613 , --VI j .. I - 1 I ' .. . I ,f,I QII " II- -I1 .. ,S , I 3, A . I ff, .I I I 1!LII.I ,IA I - H.: , Ir. 3.3 1 . 1 1 H ' . 33 . I1l:11. .-NL 'W' - ,. 1.1. - , - - , .1.. ' .-2 . ,1 :IIIIIIII -AI I,, - . I . N II I I - I IIN 1 .,, 1. I Q I U I I-If I I I 1- '1 . " 'z ' ' -" F ' I , s..I,9cm.: ' ., .11 . Q. 1.11 1' 1 . "' 14' ff 1 fn " , 'Jai WA ,,wIf.1'f' . , . . 1 II ,,, ,I , Jimi' A' ' rf l I A f I 'I 1 1 1 in 0 ,1 mfklg ' 1 rp 4- 1 IJ. --. 1, -5.5 4-1-. .. , .: I. 5? I1141-2 Ye. ADDISON YVEBSTER MOORE, A.M., Associate in Philosophy. JAMES NVESTFALL THOMPSON, PH.D., Associate in History. ROBERT E. MILLIKAN, PELD., Associate in Physics. EDVVARD KENNARD RAND, A.M., Associate in Latin. GORDON F. HULL, Assistant in Physics. ALFRED WILLIAM STRATTON, PH.D., Assistant ill Sanskrit. FREDERICK EBY, A.B., Academy Assistant. F. DAY NICHOLS, A.B., Academy Assistant in English. JAMES H. RANSOM, Assistant in Chemistry. VVINFRED E. GARRISON, Assistant in History, and Head of Disciples' House U. F. BUCK, Laboratory Assistant in Psychology. CLARENCE ALMON TORREY, PH.B., Inspector Departmental Libraries. CORA BELLE PERRINE, A.B., Head of Accession Department. WILLIAM DAYTON MERRELL, A.B., Laboratory Assistant in Botany. 25 GLENN MOODY HOBBS, S.B., Assistant in Physics. FREDERICK WILLIAM SHIPLEY, A.B., Assistant in Latin. HENRY CHANDLER COWLES, A.B., Laboratory Assistant in Botany. WILLIAM FREDERICK YUST, A.B., Loan Desk Assistant. OTIS WILLIAM CALDWELL, S.B.. Laboratory Assistant in Botany. STUART WELLERQ S.B., Assistant in Palaeontologic Geology. FOREST RAY MOULTON, A.B., Assistant in Astronomy. JANE ETIA DOWNEY, A.B., Laboratory Assistant in Psychology. CHARLES J. CHAMBERLAIN, Assistant in Botany. JOSEPH GEORGE BROBECK, S.B., M.D., Director of the Gymnasium and Assistant in History and Mathematics, Morgan Park Academy. EDN A L. GOSS, Assistant in Academy Library. HERMANN BENJAMIN ALMSTEDT, LI't.B., PE.B., Reader in German. ALICE NORTHRUP SIMPSCN, A.B.. Reader in Latin and Greek. EDITH BURNHAM FOSTER, PH.B., Reader in English. 26 CARL EVANS BOYD, PH.B., Docent in Political Science. EDMUND BUCKLEY, PH.D., Docent in Comparative Religion. AGNES MATHILDE WERGELAND., PB.D Docent in History. W. FITE, Docent in Philosophy. ul1iWl'SiW EXYCIISNII l:0Cflll'Cl'8 NATHANIEL I. RUBINKAM, PH.D., Lecturer in English. AARON HODGMAN COLE, A.M., Lecturer in Biology. W. M. R. FRENCH, A.B., Lecturer in Art. THOMAS GRANT ALLEN, A.M., Lecturer in Chemistry. GEORGE L. SCHREIBER, A.M., Lecturer in Art. AUGUSTA CHAPIN, A.M., Lecturer in English. LORADO TAFT, M.L., Lecturer in Art. IENKIN LLOYD JONES, Lecturer in English. LATHAN A. CRANDALL, D.D., Lecturer in American History. 27 GEORGE AMOS DORSEY, PH.D., Lecturer in Anthropology. CHARLES ALEXANDER MCMURRY, PH.D., Lecturer in Pedagogy. HORACE SPENCER FISKE, A.M., Lecturer in English Literature. MERTON LELAND MILLER, PH.D., Lecturer in Anthropology. HANNAH BELLE CLARK, PH,D., Lecturer in Sociology. JACOB DORSEY FORREST, A.M., Lecturer in Sociology. Instructors Hmaointed for the Summer Quarter, ls97 CHARLES RUBUS BROWN, PHD, D.D., d Co nate Langufwes in the Newton Theological Insti- Professor of Hebrew an g C g tution. LESTER F. WARD, LL.D., Professorial Lecturer in Sociology, Smithsonian Institution. THOMAS DAY SEYMOUR, LL.D., I-Iillhouse Professor of Greek, Yale University. EDWARD BAGNALL POULTON, M.A. qoxony, ERS. qLond0ny, Hon LL.D. qpnucetoily, F.L.S., EOS , E.z.S., F.E.S., Hope Professor of Zoology, Oxford University. WILLIAM BENTON CHAMBERLAIN, A.M., Professor of Elocution and Church Music, Chicago Theological Seminary. HENRY INIORSE STEPHENS, M.A., Professor of Modern European History, Cornell University. FRANK MCMURRY, PH,D., Lecturer in Pedagogy. 28 GEORGE HEMPL, PH.D., Professor of English Philology and General Linguistics, University of Michigan WILLIAM HERBERT PERRY FAUNCE, A.M., D.D., Pastor of the Fifth Avenue Baptist Church, New York, N. Y. FREDERICK BANCROFT, PH.D., Lecturer on American History. QWinter Quarter, 1897.j JOHN CALVIN METCALF, A.M., Professor of French Language and Literature, Georgetown College, Ky. FRANCIS ASBURY VVOOD, PH.D., Professor of German, Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. EDGAR ODELL LOVETT, PH.D., Instructor in Mathematics, Princeton University. HUTCHINS HAPGOOD, A.B., Assistant in English, Harvard University. FRANCIS NEWTON THORPE, PH.D., Professor of American Constitutional History, University of Pennsylvania. SAMUEL T. DUTTON, Superintendent of Brookline, Mass., Public Schools. 1 Deans or Jlffiliated 'll1Sfifllli0llS JOHN J. SCHOBINGER, The Harvard School. JOHN C. GRANT, Kenwood Institute. ARTHUR GAYLORD SLOCUM, Kalamazoo College. HERBERT LEE STETSON, Des Moines College. 29 LAURA A. JONES, The Maynard School. WILLIAM PARKER MCKEE, Frances Shimer Academy. HIRAM A. GOOCH, Princeton-Yale School. EDWARD OCTAVIUS SISSON, Bradley Polytechnic Institute. WILLIAM RIGGS TROWBRIDGE, The Rugby School. HENRY H. BELFIELD, Chicago Manual Training School. HOMER J. VOSBURGH, A.M., Wayland Academy. WILLIAM BISHOP OWEN, A.B., D.B., South Side Academy. oibkl' 0i'fiC2l'S and HSSiSfdlllS WILLIAINI RUFUS ARMSTRONG, Bookkeeper, Comptro1ler's Office. ISABELLA BLACKBURN, Clerk, University Press Division. HORACE BUTTERWORTH, Assistant, Physical Culture. ANTOINETTE CARY, Assistant to Dean of Women. MARY E. CLARK, Stenographer, University Press Division. M. RENA COBB, Stenographer, Pre-sident's Oiiice. CHARLOTTE F. COE, Assistant, Library. , HARRIET CROSSMAN, Stenographer, otlices Comptroller and Secretary ROBERT B. DAVIDSON, Assistant, Examiner's Oilice. CHARLES V. DREW, Bookkeeper, Comptroller's Oflice. LOUISE DICKINSON, Assistant, Library. FERDINAND ELLERMAN, Assistant, Astronomical Observatory. HENRIETTA ENoENsPERoER, Stenographer, University Press Division HARRY J. FOX, Storekeeper. 30 CHARLES A. FRANCIS, Mechanician, Physical Laboratory. MARILLA FREEMAN, Assistant, Library. ALMA F. GAMBLE, Stenographer, Examiners Office. JAMES B. GARNER, Laboratory Assistant, Chemistry. MARGARET HARDINGE, Assistant, Library. CHARLES H. HASTINGS, Assistant, Library. KENKICHI HAVASHEI, Artist, Zoological Laboratory. HARRY D. HUBBARD, Clerk, Dean of the Faculties of Arts, Literature and Science SAMUEL JOB, Registrar, Morgan Park Academy. JULIUS A. JOHANNESEN, Mechanician, Physical Laboratory. ANNA KAYLER, Bill Clerk, Comptroller's Office. JOHN LAMAY, Assistant, Physical Laboratory. JAMES CARTWRIGHT LOGAN, Clerk, Comptroller's Office. ERNEST LORENZ, Mechanician, Yerkes Observatory. ESTELLE LUTTRELL, Assistant, Library. ROLLIN E. MALLORY, Clerk, Registrars Otlice. MERTON L. MILLER, Assistant, Walker Museum. SARAH E. MILLS, Assistant, Morgan Park Academy Library. JOHN W. MITCHELL, Proof Reader, Printing Department. RICHARD G. MYERS, Assistant Engineer. GEORGE M. NAYLOR, Accountant, Comptrol1er's Oiiice. ALBERT O. PARKER, Chief Engineer and Superintendent. N. J. PETERSON, Steward, Morgan Park Academy. OTTO R. RYERSON, Clerk, University Press Division. BENJ. J. SIMPSON, Purchasing Agent. ANNA SMITH, Clerk, University Press Division. GUY SOUERBRY, Clerk, University Press Division. GERTRUDE SPRAGUE, Stenographer, University Extension Oflice. BERTHA STIEG, Assistant, Women's Gymnasium. ARTHUR STOCKS, Advertising Solicitor, University Press Division. GEORGE TUNELL, Assistant, Examiner'S Oflice. MARTHA VAN HOOK, Stenographer, Recorder's Oflice. J. WILLIAM WALKER, Foreman, Printing Department. ESTELLE VVETMORE, Stenographer, University Extension Office. ELOISE C. WOODFORD, Stenographer, Morgan Park Academy. ELIZABETH YEOMANS, Manager, Women's Commons. 31 Cbt Quadrangle Clllb 0111605 1897-l898 ROBERT FRANCIS HARPER, - - President GEORGE E. VINCENT, - - Vice-President EDWARD CAPPS, - - Secretary Jos:-:PH PAXSON IDDINGS, - Treasurer J. M. G. GLESSNER SHAILER MATHEWS FRANCIS W. SI-IEPARDSON The Quadrangle Club is instituted for the association of members of the faculties of the University of Chicago and other persons interested in literature, science or art. It has one hundred and ninety resident and forty non-resident members. The club-house, Lexington Avenue and Fifty-eighth Street, which was partially damaged by fire twice during the early part of the year, was burned on the morning of December 25, 1897. The original structure has been restored and an annex added on the east side. To the north two hundred feet of adjoining property have been purchased. During the season of '97-'98 the following entertainments were given by the club: SMOKE TALKS: Mr. Charles L. Hutchinson, Mr. D. G. Elliott, Mr. Ned Arden Flood, Mr. john Henry Barrows, Mr. Frederick Starr, Mr. F. B. Tarbell, Mr. William Kent, The Glee and Mandolin Clubs. RECEPTIONS: Ladies' afternoon receptions, january 13, February 10, March 10, April 14, May 12, June 9, November 3, Ladies' evening receptions, july 14, Septem- ber 9, Settlement benefit reception, March 6, Chamber concert receptions, June 5, October 15, November 12, December 9, January 7 Cin President's housej, February 11 fin Kelly Hallj, reception to Mr. Marion Crawford, November 15, to Mr. Anthony Hope Hawkins, December 1, to the Faculties of Rush Medical College and other affiliated institutions, February 4 Qin Haskell Oriental Museumj. GENERAL ENTERTAININIENTSZ Exhibition of Fancy Shooting, April 30, Poster Exhibit, May 5-8 , Chamber Concerts: June 5, the Spieriug Quartette and Mr. George Ellsworth Holmes, October 15, the Spicring Quartette and Mr. George Hamlin, November 12, the Spiering Quartette, Mr. Hans Bruening and Mrs. Dudley Tyng, December 9, the Spiering Quartette, Mr. W. H. Sherwood and Mrs. Minnie Fish- Griiiin, January 7, the Spiering Quartette and Mrs. Ella Dahl, February 11, the Spiering Quartette and Mr. NValter Ames. Informal ladies' evenings: Thursdays during the Summer and Mondays from October to December. 32 ',,.,,.. I ' , . - if W 5 3 9. 5 L-KJ, , U ,A . . I - - X Q! .CV K PL.. y ,cg I897-I898 FQIIOWS EDGAR WILLIAM ABBOTT, PH.B., Romance. 1 CL XVILLIAM CLINTON ALDEN, A.B., Geology. f XVILLIAM HARVEY ALLEN, A.B., Political Economy. ERNEST ALANSON BALCH, A. M., History. EDXVARD AMBROSE BECHTEL, A.B., Latin. HENRY CHALMERS BIDDLE, A.M., Chemistry. SOPHONISBA PRESTON BRECRENRIDOE, PH.M., Political Science. HERBERT MORSE BURCHARD, A.M., Greek. THEODORE CHALON BURGESS, A.M., Greek. FRED LEMAR CHARLES, S.M., Zoology. LISI CECILIA CIPRIANI, PH.M., Romance. FREDERIC ALBERT CLEVELAND, PH.B., Political Science. FULTON JOHNSON COFFIN, A.M., Comparative Religion. HERBERT JOSEPH DAVENPORT, A.B., Political Economy. HOWELL EMLYN DAVIES, A.B., Chemistry. KATHERINE BEMENT DAVIS, A.B.,lPolitical Economy. CHARLES EDWARD DIRON, A.M., Latin. ALBERT THOMAS FREEMAN, S.B., Sociology. JOSEPH C. FREEHOFF, S.B., Sociology. HENRY GORDON GALE, A.B., Physics. THEODORE ARTHUR GESSLER, A.M., Semitic. EMILY RAY GREGORY, A.M., Zoology. MICHAEL FREDERICK GUYER, A.M., Zoology. JOHN CHURCHILL HAMMOND, S.M., Mathematics. IRVING HARDESTY, A.B., Neurology. INIARY BELLE HARRIS, A.M., Latin. FRED BURTON RENNIE HELLEMS, A.B., Latin. 33 ANNE BATES HERSMAN, A.B., Greek. GEORGE WILLIAM HUNTER, A.M., Zoology. KARL DETLEV JESSEN, A.B., German. EDWIN SHELDON JOHONNOT, JR., S.B., Physics. JOHANNES BENONI EDUARD IONAS, A.M., German. PHILEMON BULKLEY KOHLSAAT, PH.B., English. JAMES LUDWELL LAKE, A.M., Physics. FREDERICK BROOKS LINDSAY, A.M., English. HENRY LLOYD, S.B., Mathematics. WALTER FLAVIUS MCCALEB, A.M., History. HERBERT NEWBY MCCOY, S.M., Chemistry. JOHN HECTOR IMCDONALD, A.B., Mathematics. EDVVARD SHERNVOOD IWIEADE, A.B., Political Economy. DANIEL PETER MCIVIILLAN, A.B., Philosophy. KATHERINE MERRILL, A.B., English. WESLEY CLAIR MITCHELL, A.B., Political Economy. ERNEST CARROLL MOORE, A.M., Pedagogy. FRED NEHER, A. M., Chemistry. GEORGE NORLIN, A.B., Greek. WALES HARRISON PACKARD, S.B., Zoology. JOSEPH YVILLIAM PARK, A.B., Sociology. ADNA WOOD RISLEY, A.B., History. ARTHUR KENYON ROGERS, A.B., Philosophy. W'ILLIAM RULLKOETTER, A.B., History. CLAUDE ELLSWORTH SIERENTHAL, A.M., Geology. HENRY LAWRENCE SCHOOLCRAFT, A.B., History. HELEN MCGAFFEY SEARLES, A.M., Comparative Philology JOHN M. P. SMITH, A.B., Semitic. WILSON ROBERT SMITH, A.B., Botany. MARY MATTHEWS STURGES, S.B., Zoology. WORTHY PUTNAM STERNS, A.M., Political Economy, HELEN BRADFORD THOMPSON, PH.B., Philosophy. CYRUS FISHER TOLMAN, JR., S.B., Geology. MALCOLM VVILLIAM WALLACE, A.B., English. 31 OLIVER BIILES YVASHBURN, A.B., Latin. FRANCES YVILLISTON, A.B., Biology. XVILLIAM DOUWES ZOETHOUT, A.B., Physiology. CLEMENT EUGENE ROOD, Astronomy. THOMAS KAY SIDEY, LATIN. XVARREN PALMER BEHAN, D.B., Church History. GEORGE CROSS, A.M., Systematic Theology. EDGAR Dow VARNEY, A.M., New Testament Greek. SCh0ldl'S SENIOR COLLEGE SCHOLARS. FREDERICK IVIAYOR GILES, Philosophy. GRADUATE SCHOLARS JOHN PRESTON MENTZER, Political Economy FRANK WINANS DINNAN, Comparative Philology. CHARLES LINDSEY BURROUGHS, History. EMILY CHURCHILL THOMPSON, Greek. JENNIE HALL, Greek. SUSAN HELEN BALLOU, Latin. IRENE INGALLS CLEAVES, Latin. GILBERT AMES BLISS, Mathematics. PEARL LOUISE HUNTER, Romance. HYBIAN ELIJAH GOLDBERG, Chemistry. LIINNIE LESTER, German. CECIL V. BACHELLE, Zoiilogy. ARTHUR VVHIPPLE SMITH, Mathematics. MABEL AUGUSTA CHASE, Physics. ARTHUR TABER JONES, Physics. MAX DARYVIN SLIMMER, Chemistry. EIIINIICC SCb0ldl'S l897 SUMMER AUTUMN FRANK D. A. FOGLE FREDERICK DENNISON BRAMHALL MAURICE FAIRMAN JOSEPHINE BURNHAM lB98 WINTER SPRING LAURA AMELIA THOMPSON EDWIN GILBERT KIRK PHILIP GORHAM WRIGHTON 35 Che SCIIIOI' 0l'3I0l'lCill COIIIQSIS I897 Spring first prlge JENNIE HALL Umlnners of Scholarships JAMES E. TUTHILL HARRY FULLER ATWOOD ALLEN BURNS CHARLESILEDERER RALPH IANSSEN IENNTE HALL Summer first lprtge HARRY FULLER ATWOOD 'llmluncrs of Scholarships CHARLES BUSHNELL IVIARCUS PETER FRUTCHEY HARRY FULLER ATWOOD FRED HACK Autumn jflrst 1Dri3e EDWARD MAX BAKER 'llllllnncrs of Scholarships CHARLES BUSHNELL EDYVIN CAMPBELL WOOLLEY QEORGE SAWYER l898 Winter iflrst Dri3e EDWARD INIAX BAKER AMOS EBERSOLE HARTWELL WILLIAM WEBB 'llllllnners of Scholarships EDWARD MAX BAKER JOHN FRANKLIN HAGEY AMOS A. EBERSOLE CHARLES LEDERER JOSEPH EDWIN FREEMAN HARTWELL WILLIAM WEBB 36 Cb! JUIIIOI' DCCIGIIIGUOIIS IS97 Spring first Drigc ERICK MUENTER Winners of Scholarships ERNEST SCROGIN CHARLES BEAN INIARJORIE BENTON COOKE ERICK MUENTER CLARA WELCH Summer first Dri5c BIARILLA PARKER Winners of Scholarships NOTT WILLIAM FLINT BENJAMIN TARANELS MARILLA PARKER MIRRIAM FADDIS JOHN JAMES VVALSH AINSWORTH WNHITNEY CLARK Autumn first Drljqc MARJORIE BENTON COOKE 'winners of Scholarships WILLIAM FRANCE ANDERSON PAUL BLACKWELDER MARJORIE BENTON COOKE GRACE BUSHNELL JAY SHOENMANN PATEK l898 Winter first Drl3e ARTHUR EUGENE BESTOK Winners of Scholarships ABRAHAM A. ETTELSON ROY BARTLINO TABOR HARRY NORMAN GOTTLIEB GEORGE AMES BEERS ARTHUR EUGENE BESTOR 37 COIIDOCRIIOIIS THE QUINQUENNIAL CELEBRATION The University Campus, june 30 to July 5, 1896. PI'0QI'3llI June 30. The Annual Dinner of the Associated Alumni. july 1. The Graduate Matutinal. july 2 july 3. july 4 july 5 The First Presentation of the Synagogue Service of the Times of Christ. Luncheon to the Associated Alumni. The Convocation Chapel Service. Business Meetings of the Associated Alumni. Music - First Regiment Band. The Exercises of the Fifteenth Convocation. The Second Presentation of the Synagogue Service. The President's Reception. Dedicatory Exercises of Haskell Oriental Museum. Laying of the Corner Stone of the Hull Biological Laboratories. The National Holiday. Presentation of the National Colors by the First Infantry, Illinois National Guard. The Convocation Sermon. The Convocation Vespers. THE SIXTEENTH CONVOCATION Graduate Quadrangle, October 1, 1896. ADDRESS: "Modern Tendencies in Theological Thought," President Augustus H. Strong, D.D., LL.D., Rochester Theological Seminary. THE SEVENTEENTH CONVOCATION The Auditorium, january 1, 1897. ADDRESS: " Lafayette," Mr. Henry D. Estabrook, Chicago. 38 TIIE IIIGIITEENTII CONVOCATION The Auditorium, April 1, 1897. ADDRESS: "The University and its Effect upon the Home," Her Excellency, the Countess of Aberdeen, Ottawa, Canada. f0llIlCICl" S Celebration The University Campus, June 30 to july 2, 1897. June 30. Alumni Day. july 1. Founder's Day. THE NINETEENTH CONVOCATION Hull Court. ADDRESS: "The Church and the University," Bishop John H. Vincent, D.D., Topeka, Kansas. July 2. Inspection of the Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, Wisconsin. TIIE TWENTIETII CONVOCATION University Congregational Church, October 1, 1897. ADDRESS: 'A The Unity of the World," The Rev. Amory H. Bradford, D.D., Mont- clair, New Jersey. TIIE TWENTY-FIRST CONVOCATION The Auditorium, Ianuary 3, 1898. ADDRESS: "Public Leadership," Hon. James H. Eckels, Comptroller of the Currency TIIE TWENTY-SECOND CONVOCATION University Congregational Church, April 1, 1898. ADDRESS: " Poetry and Science, Their Aiiinities and Contrastsf' Professor William Knight, St. Andrews University, Scotland. 39 lllllDQl'SiID Guests MR. JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER. PROFESSOR IVIOISSAN, L'Eco1e de Pharmacie de Paris. PROFESSOR D5RPFELD, German Archwological Institute, Athens. MR. H. DHARMAPALA, Ceylon. MR. JOSEPH JACOBS, Cambridge. COMMANDER BOOTH-TUCKER. DR. IWIAGNUS, Berlin. REV. O. P. GIFFORD, Buffalo, New York. REV. CHARLES A. BERRY, Wolveringhamshire, England. PRESIDENT B. L. XVHITMAN, Columbian University, Washington, D. C. MR. RICHARD MANSFIELD. HON. RICHARD OGLESBV. MR. SOL SMITH RUSSELL. PROFESSOR TRAVAS PEABODY, Harvard University. HON. GEORGE R. PECK, Chicago. REV. AUGUSTUS H. STRONG, Rochester, New York. HER EXCELLENCV, THE COUNTESS OF ABERDEEN, Ottawa, Canada. M. PAUL DU CHAILLU. BISHOP JOHN H. VINCENT, Topeka, Kansas. REV. AMORY H. BRADFORD, Montclair, New Jersey. CRA- HON. JAMES H. ECKELS. PROFESSOR WILLIABI KNIGHT, St. Andrews University, Scotland. M. REN15. DOUMIC, Paris. MR. GEORGE ADAM SMITH. f 1 40 sq. j f 7 r f,..x 'r 'fx s Che lllarsballs ISQ6-I891 HEAD MIARSHALL WILLIAM SCOTT BOND ASSISTANT MARSHALLS JAMES SCOTT BROWN GILBERT AMES BLISS DONALD SHURTLEFF TRUMBULL I :ff K ' 'jl,. , , X . -C' N I ,IH KK ff 'J In fr' 119 'F fffff 91 Qs cf , "' 97.4.2 ' Wil 'Jn kv Ag- I, I 2. 2 " ,FQ H .Q , I. 'j MQ , 11415 :f"9-:ma 7 J V,a'qf9'f 1. 14" " w FRANKLIN HERMANN GESELBRACHT WILLIAM PIERCE LovETT Q IS97-I898 HEAD MARSHALL NOTT WILLIABI FLINT ASSISTANT INIARSHALLS WILLOUGHBY GEORGE WALLING -1 FRANKLIN HERMANN GESELBRACHT IWIARCUS PETER FRUTCHEY CLARENCE BERT HERSCHBERGER 41 SEMI -f :fwwc QFFICIA Que THE GEOLOGICAL CLUB, THOMAS CHAMBERLAIN, President THE POLITICAL ECONOMY CLUB, JAMES LAURENCE LAUGHLIN, President THE GERMANIC CLUB, KARL JESSEN, President THE BOTANICAL CLUB, JOHN COULTER, President THE ENGLISH CLUB, :LVIARTHA FOOTE CROW, President THE MATHEMATICAL CLUB, ELIARIM MOORE, President THE SOCIOLOGICAL CLUB, ALBERT THOMAS FREEMAN, President THE PHILOSOPHICAL CLUB, ARTHUR RODGERS, President THE NEW TESTAMENT CLUB, EDGAR JOHNSON GOODSPEED, President THE SEMITIC CLUB, ROBERT FRANCIS HARPER, President THE CHURCH HISTORY CLUB, XVARREN PALMER BEHAN, President THE POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB, CARL EVANS BOYD, President 42 Che HSSOCMIQG Hlllllllli General Committee THEODORE M. HAMMOND IRA M. PRICE CLIFFORD W. BARNES Che Zollegidtt Jllumni Hssociation JOHN EDWIN RHODES, '76 - - - President EDITH B. FOSTER, '96 - - First Vice-President FRED W. C. HAYES, '80 Second Vice-President EDGAR A. BUZZELI., '86 - - - Secretary FREDERICK D. NICHOLS, '97 - Treasurer the Divinity fllumni Hssoclation C. E. TAYLOR, '72 ---- President C. H. D. FISHER, '77 First Vice-President C. N. PATERSON, '82 - Second Vice-President F. R. SWARTOUT, 'E-8 - Third Vice-President IRA M. PRICE, '82 - - Secretary and Treasurer EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE C. R. HENDERSON G. S. GOODSPEED I. M. COON CM Gfddlldfe .Hlllllllli .'HSSOCidli0ll E. H. LEWIS, '95 ---- President F. W. SANDERS, '95 - Vice-President F. I. CARPENTER, '95 Secretary and Treasurer 43 Che UHIDCTSIID JOIIYIIBIS THE BIBLICAL WORLD Edited by William Rainey Harper. A monthly magazine devoted exclusively to biblical study. THE SCHOOL REVIEW Edited by Charles Thurber. A monthly publication of high-school and academic work. THE BOTANICAL GAZETTE Edited by john M. Coulter. A monthly journal devoted to the science of botany. THE JOURNAL OI' GEOLOGY Edited by T. C. Chamberlin. A semi-quarterly devoted to the interests of geology and the allied sciences. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL Edited by George E. Hale and James E. Keeler. An international monthly review of spectroscopy and astronomical physics. THE JOURNAL OF POLITICAL ECONOMY Edited by I. Laurence Laughlin. A quarterly publication promoting the scientiiic treatment of problems in practical economics and also containing contri- butions on topics of theoretical and speculative interest. THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF THEOLOGY Edited by the Divinity Faculty. THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Edited by Albion W. Small. A bi-monthly journal. TIIE AMERICAN JOURNAL Of SEMITIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES Edited by President William Rainey Harper. A quarterly. THE UNIVERSITY RECORD A weekly containing articles on literary and educational topics, the convocation addresses, the quarterly statements of the President and ofiicial report of the affairs of the University. 44 Che Chicago Alumni Club PHILIP ALLEN, - - President VVILLIAM SCOTT BOND, First Vice-President RAYMOND CARLETON DUDLEY, - Second Vice-President HAROLD LECLAIR ICKES, - - - Secretary DONALD SHURTLEFF TRUMBULL, - Treasurer FREDERICK STEIOMEVER, - Historian -. ,QQ v.L.- u-'l':.1. I- . 2 t , ,, I. ' N, .1 ring .J I J '22, 2'-H1 nfhllzliill 'P " - - 2.1. ,mmap- , . , .. 1 'xx Q., no .. .- 5 . 1:-' ,LIL , '. 1 I J "fi 'T f AS, 33 ,xl ' I gr? ia 7' fu ,-Y 'L X' 5 1-7 v fd Z0 e Q' Ei me :J of fs. . f,gI.,Xg. -. e he 9-1. avi- K-.X J . .I O X 4 5-3 ,Af 9:42, fd M E u " X I in f , 1 L I l tt K X Cf, , , 1: , ' u -x txgqux n-. W J -'ff -1-N g,. - U'-ri'Q':""' ' '- U I G l '1'-Y: . ', . fl ,,,cQ..v . ,,... WL., 1 . . -sq., rl,.. . '.-t- . T . ., When' ,fvfbl t--he A A,,. , , .. 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V ,.... 4'---.-.2 gx. - xr, 1 . , . if .N e, ,, . ,N- ' '. lv :xr 1 xr .. ,.,. ' nflii 4, n. '-.t::5 X ' 5' 4 .,., j --r . E H - -. - QQW7, WF! fa: tu' ff- -2. - - , 1.-,.?- ,fi-:ik - . fflffy. f-1 . A f . .,-..: ,,,.e, ,. .-,., ,gn ,- .5 Af.,-e ' -:ii 'i'.:f-,'r- '19 ' 1- Lfi:':45l'eLe'-'-f.':?.fat- J . Li, ,,r - if-77:1-ff-'-111-aan, l rf, .x . :Q X . E . . , . na, E U:-gm. 31-e ' 'Il II ll g n II I -X 'Z' Cb! DODDQI' Of DQEIII7 :H student knocked at the fiery gate. and the devil Stuck Oil! his 'Ride " new is il well V011 SDOIIN COIN 10 hell WMI! WI! Ollgbf tv he in bed?" "0 Devil," the student he answered uv, "I have not come to stay, But I must pass in Prof. Uincenfs class, and this is the only way, l'm sent to investigate hell," he said, "and hrlng hack a lull report." the devil grinned as he snapped the vin, " Zome in," he sald with a snort. U R6l112li1l32l', fb0ll8b, if V011 D358 this 0100? WIVH hdfdlv gel bdtk outside: the dll' IS bad f0I' 3 QTOWHIQ lad," and bk flllllg the Dvffdl wide. the student laughed as he stevved within and volitely removed hls hat: "I worked three years in our gym," he sald, "and what's hell alter that?" ,iw ...e ..' . 15, ."r,l ... , . 1 A Ff fri -' L -- 'V " t-' x.,-- ' ' -s .. - tv.. - - ..v 'Q K-gsigvu ,-.1 -A ' " 4 .g '. H- - '. '- . A gi-,ed -4 .-J-1 - A'-. -, 1 me it Q . I fu n - L-. wp. ' .- z: "-" '. .. l-ffllfit-.Q 1-' zwf' '- -- P3 1-'lf' '. .4 .53 ff?-f..' ,. -' ' , A W are ., ,gtg--t ' j a, 71 ...eff-fi. .t-A, ,--Wlv, --- -,,-,-M'- . Q. 1. 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IIUNOR SUCIETIES THE OWL AND SERPENT THE ORDER OF THE IRON MASK THE THREE QUARTERS CLUB UPSILON IOTA OMEGA NU PI SIGMA 48 SOCIETY Tl! m2lll0I'idlI1 fl'6ClQl'iCk 5966 f3lDl'Ql1C2 Glass ot l90I Died Jlvril zz, :sos Della KEIDDG EDSHOII Phi Theta Xi Sigma Gamma Psi Chi Upsilon Kappa Lambda Eta Pi Iota Alpha Alpha Omicron Epsilon Rho Tau Mu Nu Beta Phi Phi Chi Psi Phi Gamma Phi Psi Omega Beta Chi Delta Chi Delta Delta Phi Gamma Gamma Beta Theta Zeta Alpha Chi Phi Epsilon Sigma Tau FOUNDID IN 1344 ROII of Zbavters Yale University Bowdoin Colby Amherst Vanderbilt University of Alabama University of Mississippi Brown University Miami University Kenyon College University of Virginia Dartmouth College Central University of Kentucky Middlebury College University of Michigan Williams College Lafayette College Hamilton College Colgate University College of the City of New York University of Rochester Rutgers De Pauw Wesleyan University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Adelbert College Cornell University University of Chicago Syracuse University Columbia College University of California Trinity College University of Minnesota Massachusetts Institute of Technology 50 mm W mnfmwkww , l l 1 I 1 N W Delta Kappa Epsilon TIIE DELTA DELTA CHAPTER EBTABLISHKD BECEMBIR 15, 1393 'Fratres in llniversitate GRADUATE COLLEGES Henry Gordon Gale 'fl Herbert Morse Burchard Gilbert Ames Bliss V" Fred Toirer Galpin Adna Wood Risley Elmer Tilson Sterens UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES William Simmons Broughton Frank Henry Harms Julius H. P. Gauss joseph Edwin Freeman Willoughby George VValling William France Anderson V' Percy Bernard Eckhart V Clinton Luman Hoy f' Ralph C. Hamill f Ralph Curtis Manning William Thaw Gardner Roger Wilson Kimball I Robert Gordon Gould 1' Harold Eugene Wilkins 5' Curtis Rockwell Manning Walter Lawrence Hudson V Hugh Lafayette McWilliams V Donald Saxton McWilliams Q Frederick Hyde Lawrence 51 PM KBDDB Psi Roll of Zhapters Pennsylvania Alpha Pennsylvania Beta Pennsylvania Gamma Pennsylvania Epsilon Pennsylvania Zeta Pennsylvania Eta Pennsylvania Theta Pennsylvania Iota Pennsylvania Kappa New York Alpha New York Beta New York Gamma New York Epsilon New York Zeta New Hampshire Alpha Massachusetts Alpha Virginia Alpha Virginia Beta Virginia Gamma NVest Virginia Alpha District of Columbia Alpha South Carolina Alpha Ohio Alpha Ohio Beta Ohio Delta Indiana Alpha Indiana Beta Indiana Gamma Illinois Alpha Illinois Beta Michigan Alpha lVisconsin Gamma Iowa Alpha Kansas Alpha California Beta Nebraska Alpha Washington and Jefferson College Allegheny College Bucknell University Pennsylvania College Dickinson College Franklin and Marshall College Lafayette College University of Pennsylvania Swarthmore College Cornell University Syracuse University Columbia College Colgate University Brooklyn Polytechnic Dartmouth College Amherst College University of Virginia Washington and Lee University Hampden-Sidney College University of West Virginia Columbian University South Carolina College Ohio Wesleyan University Wittenberg College Ohio State University De Pauw University Indiana University Wabash College Northwestern University University of Chicago University of Michigan Beloit College University of Iowa University of Kansas Leland Stanford, Jr., University University of Nebraska Institute 52 F Q 'il , Y f. ,sag x ' . .,. 4-1: , . ,V 1 5 . 1, 1 s w l -A ' u , .wif 1 1.4, , -'ng- ,,, .f14"1x ,. - 1"'-1' . 17. 1 1- w. 1. X 11: .41 1. ,1.1, ,1 r1.1 . 1,r - '11 1 1' 1111I1,'i ,11 D-... x 1. ,..- ,, x 1 . 111, 1 1 ,-1 1 QU.. n H1114 'c ,V 1 1 ,111 -1 5 -x .' C. 11, M K . .13 1 12 K. .1.,, K1 1 '1 V1 11 I. :" my 1 ,V my A5 4 15.2, , 1 1.11 WK 1' , 14' 1 . . 1 H '11."l1b1 ' 1 1."f L ,1,5 t 1 1 F. 41 '4' ' 'll 1..,. . ,.1 L, 11 Q' W "."1 ',-lf.,11g1. .:":'V '. 11Q.,.:1fM .111 11.31 "' .- 1.1. ,..., 1.13" M111 11 .y,1H 1,1 " .11 .? 11.-'MY' 1., 12. 1 1 - 1 -1 1.1.1 'yi' . .11 '11-"T 4. r TA! "ff 1 .',- ,ay J 'V is-:wuz 'N .,-f1,L'Ayf 1- ' ' 111, ' 1.1. .1151 I-.. .-1" ..'1111'1 1" 11" ' 1-,- ,'1':1111 n, I" . 1 1 1-1-'U 1 U R. 10.1 ' fuk- I . .Ll 171, L, 11, ' ,W 1,1 , -1.-, I 11' u . 1... 1 'I 1 1,.,. .-L1 1 . il ' - .1 v.111 1,-Q'." ug, 1. A. ly 'N 1 1' ' 'bla lk "11 -If 2' ':. 1 ' Q5-"nz W 111114. . 1, Em .wi ., 11 " .. .11- .111 ,. 1 ,11 1 '-7' 11.111 111 ... 1 A-i 1.11 1 . 4" 2. 1. 1.9, - 'Q 1 111k1 111' 1 .1 .11 11- '1',f ..- , ,.., f . J." 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Y 31 Vp .Ai Pm KGDDR Psi THE ILLINOIS BETA CHAPTER 'Fratres in llniversitate GRADUATE COLLEGES Frederick Albert Cleveland Ora Philauder Seward Robert Bailey Davidson UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES joseph White Campbell ' Harry Coy Eugene Ryan John james NValsh Thomas Temple Hoyne ' John Andrew Howard Frederick Bradley Thomas Walter james Cavanagh Otto Fitzalan Hakes Frederick Edwin Reeve Parke Ross 4' Cecil Page 1' Edwin Campbell Woolle Dan Brouse Southard H' Walter Stokes Sharpe Clarence Whitaker Richards James McClintock Snitzler -f Fred Sass J" Francis Baldwin 53 Bela CDQIG Pi Roll 01' ZMDIQYS Miami University Ohio University Western Reserve University Washington and Jefferson College Harvard University De Pauw University Indiana University University of Michigan Wabash College Centre College Brown University Hampden-Sidney College University of North Carolina Ohio Wesleyan University Hanover College Cumberland University Knox College University of Virginia Davidson College Beloit College Bethany College University of Iowa Wittenberg College Westminster College Iowa VVesleyan University Denison University Richmond College University of Wooster University of Kansas University of Wisconsin Northwestern University Dickinson University Boston College Johns Hopkins University University of California Kenyon College Rutgers College Cornell University Stevens Institute St. Lawrence University Maine State College Colgate University Union College Columbia College Amherst College Vanderbilt University University of Texas Ohio State University University of Nebraska Pennsylvania State College University of Denver University of Syracuse Dartmouth College University of Minnesota University of Cincinnati Wesleyan University University of Missouri Lehigh University Yale University University of Chicago Leland Stanford, Jr., University 4 , M A. , Wffx 95,599 BOT! awk? . ,,3f?aes ea, 6 5 5 ei is +' .L - . 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'.1,,,, v , ,'.-gf-If ' "IT ' "itil .1 ,v.,,f- -7 '. -, . -,..' I " -,.,-' Q- . -nz L. 1,-, ,,. - A ' .' 7,-', ' ' . " . ' ' "J, ' ,".,"'.-. x ' " . uv" 4 .. , , ,,,, , , 1 ,,4 ,.N ,"',,J" wr, 'lv 'll u "Ur ,. ,,, , "J .,.+- 'Y I 42, I 4'4lvf Klub BQIB Child Pl THE LAMBDA RHO CHAPTER ISYABIJBHID JANUARY 25. IBD! Francs in Universitate GRADUATE COLLEGES Aaron H. Cole Warren P. Behan Horace G. Lozierf John Coulter 2' UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES Harry J. Smith Soren M. Russell' Theodore H. Patterson Herbert B. Mulford Martin I. Harris Franklin E. Vaughan Roy C. Griswold Michael B. VVells L Allen G. Hoyt .f Arthur J. MacDonald Van S. Pearce Alvin L. Barton 5" Lawrence M. Jacobs Ernest H. Dillon Glenn P. Hall Roy B. Tabor H' .v,,' Paul Blackwelderv Leroy T. Vernon v Albert S. Russell George P. MacDonald Charles B. Davis Eliot Blackwelder -fi George G. Davis P William F. 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I .. .- .4444-4 Dv' 44414 '- fe- 41' '-,,4'u'4 4 .4 4- ,4 '4'44 .4,II,4, . uni '."4 I'-" :4. ,, 4: .1 . 4. 4 4 4 -.4 4 ,44II.--,' .I III I . ' -4. .I ,.,. '41-: II..4. . 4, 'I -4 Ui' ,9- Q Hlpbd Della Pbi THE CHICAGO CHAPTER ESTABLISHED MARCH. IEBS GRADUATE COLLEGES Edgar johnson Goodspeed Cecil V. Bachelle Albert Thomas Freeman George Drillio Ireland Henry Magee Adl-:inson James Weber Linn if UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES Clarence Bert Harschberger Fred Merrifield Nott lVil1iam Flint Norman Kendall Anderson Charles Lindsay Burroughs Charles Verner Drew vf Maurice Gordon Clarke Roger Throop Vaughn XVa1ter Scott Kennedy W' Lewis Carleton Pettitt Harvey Malcolm MacQuiston Paul Donald MacQuiston Howard Pendleton Kirtley NVarren C. Garrell Elliott Salstonstall Norton if Samuel Northrup Harper Sigma Chi RMI of ZMDKQT8 Columbian University Pennsylvania College Bucknell University University of Pennsylvania Lehigh University Pennsylvania State College Dickinson College Washington and Lee University Roanoke College University of Virginia Randolph-Macon College Hampden-Sidney College University of North Carolina Miami University Ohio-Wesleyan University Denison University Kentucky State College University of Cincinnati NVest Virginia University Ohio State University Centre College Indiana University De Pauw University Butler University Hanover College Purdue University Northwestern University University of Michigan University of Illinois University of Chicago Beloit College Illinois Wesleyan University University of Wisconsin Albion College University of Minnesota University of Nebraska University of Kansas University of Missouri University of Mississippi Tulane University Vanderbilt University University of Texas University of California University of Southern California Leland Stanford, jr., University Hobart College Dartmouth College Massachusetts Institute of Technology Columbia College Cornell University J,-.... 1. . .. - -V ,gl pw. ,, nh 1,1 sp,-' K , r , , .. A w '.',f?'lT. qw -.fn Huy.. kr, T. 6c'. 'f -'- . , Lljfg ,155 :gr , W. 2151 .gi '4 ' :' .5Tg,4.:i1 - V ,.'r +,,a', rn ' Ui' .ya -, V 1 '. M MT. -.,1,,,',L 1 x., 1 " J..-. , ,.'n,g, . . Milf ,- ,.,4 v JT.. ., ,,., ,W 1- 1, 4 I ,, ..x. 1' ,, I-,, , .4-f, '.Q.A1, .rp Sigma. Chi THE OMICRON OMICRON CIIAPIER ESTABLISHED .uuuunnv za, lss1 'Fratres in Universltate GRADUATE COLLEGES Russell Burton Opitz UNDERGRADUATE GOLLEGES Fred F. Steigmeyer P. Merrill Griiiith Charles Foster Roby V i XVillian1 Francis McDonald Herbert Alonzo Abernethy Lawrence De Graff Melvin Edward Coleman V Victor Washington Sincere af" Ray Prescott Johnson V Marcus McC1ellen Plowman john Patrick Moran lf' Clarence Alvin McCarthy Warren Maclntire "V 59 Pm Del I3 Cbetil Roll or Zbavters University of Miami Indiana University Center College Vvabash College Vfisconsin University Northwestern University Butler University Ohio VVesleyan University Franklin College Hanover College Michigan University University of Chicago De Pauw University Ohio University University of Missouri Knox College Georgia University Emory College Iowa VVesleyan University Mercer University Cornell University Lafayette College California University State College of Michigan Virginia University Randolph-Macon College Nebraska University Gettysburg College Washington and jefferson College Vanderbilt University Mississippi University Alabama University Lombard University Alabama Polytechnic Institute Allegheny College Vermont University Dickinson College Westminster College Minnesota University Iowa University Kansas University Hillsdale College University of the South Ohio State University Texas University University of Pennsylvania Union College Colby University Columbian University Dartmouth College University of North Carolina Central University VVillia1ns College Southwestern University Syracuse University Washington and Lee University Lehigh University Amherst College Brown University Tulane University VVashington College Leland Stanford, Jr., University Illinois University Purdue University Case Institute v- . X N, . S, fbi X A, 52 i""' 'fix A. 44 - .M S v Q. f w X X 4 v a I I E: X f . 1, . 41 bv f ..Tf" , r :gi v y y . , 'af 'I H Lv 1 W' -'I ....' I an ' 'Ml " 1 ,, ,Ll Mfg.--'rl H 5"'3,rl'A' V 'N Q ll, ,ku ,w - 1. :WF Af-.15 . ,r :" M .g1,"., V , v- ' ".' nf' 49. . . . ' 1 "0 f, , L' , ' , 1 4 ,. ,M 1-.: ,41- ' ' .u-'-'- 15, 1 -vi un' V w ,, ., 23' 'f'.jg"'E ':1,gl':l'.- I-' . . ,.-:,.,ii,'M-A14 :V ' ' " . 9uN""Kn".!" J':Fn, 'lr"9- siif1:'V.'f' :W 9 .WH ""' .., .X "-ln' ' "im "w -fi ,'..-- . 1.1 V ' -4 L' 5 Mid. 5.5.5-. 'rf hi -1'F2':"' - mn, in . . , Q-,.',,- ' 1, ' ""'. 'N H f.: W. n' 'L' . 2, ..3 , ,. gm . 'tf"f.: .,' 1f",,.-. ..,' -1-' ,.! 4, -.ax A." I ' 1 'Wg ' 3' 'H:,,, 1 'Mi w lv. r. ', . .T'7,' 'ig " am., .L .,.,,.:1. .-1,-4 1. ,.. ww ,.,, .'... ' x . ,lv 'r mn ,Y lr- J,, n 7' 1 ww? lf PH R .MH -J ' A H., 5, ik 'ii ,L -9- I . M 0 v -, .fi . cv-If .H- U LF ' + I J' L .x H V W-ff" -If '7": 4, M' J I J Qsgx, .-.,,Q::5"lfEv-HJ, ft ' 4, I .I ' is'- t .ff- 'vp Phi Della CDQIEI TIIE ILLINOIS BETA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED FEBRUARY 1B, 1897 Fratres in Universitate GRADUATE COLLEGES Homer Franklin Harsh Harold LeClair Ickes Samuel Mounds Coulter jesse Fowler Smith Stacy Carroll Mosser 'vf Clarence Macon Gallup Rett Elmer Olmsted UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES Knight French Flanders Clarkes Francis Stockey Robert Emerson Graves Fred Harvey Gall Calhoun George Henry Garrey Charles W'arren Chase Carl Howell Sawyer Earle Crayton Hales George Alembert Drayton XVillian1 Everton Ramsey V! 61 Theta Delta Beta Sigma Gamma Zeta Lambda Kappa Psi Xi Upsilon Iota Phi Pi Chi Beta Beta Eta Tau Mu Rho Omega PSl ISDSIIOII Roll of Zbapters Union College University of the City of Ne Yale University Brown University Amherst College Dartmouth College Columbia College Bowdoin College Hamilton College Wesleyan University University of Rochester Kenyon College University of Michigan Syracuse University Cornell University Trinity College Lehigh University University of Pennsylvania University of Minnesota University of Wisconsin University of Chicago 62 W York N45 115 .?f,.,, N7 -X ' , 1 ', A . , -lv A' I , ,nu 'V ! '1 .1 A. .f.,xI - :II . :III .- Y .1 ..,1II:9m..IgIb.g.::,I I IMI, .-. '3'y1 1 . . ,W .- -5,-'S , . 1.19, '. , ..-...I.,., I 1' x s n"'.' 4. J J " l'iifB.r+1ff 'RHI-P -.. .H ..-. rr. 1 H . 'I I "".'r ': - ..+.. I -IIIUIIIIJIII .3-II' .IIj1:'xgI -ug . .:. I I I PIIg.II. ISWIIIIIIQ -AIIIII..If.IiI1IIIu-IIQI: I ... .:I:.,I,.I IIII . viva 21 ' ...J Q -'...L.."-"' "". -..' ff. ..f'.a1111,.:.fa1-'1' ' .L ' . x ,II':I7.IIII. I III -gIr.:'IgIII xllr II ,I III . II mn III IIIIIIII ..IIIIIII.:I.I..v " W. 'RQ in ee' 1" ' .., W 2-I - . 'n . - ... .v .. y- lg - '19 -51' ' ., 9 .32 ,' ' 5. 'Iflj T'f'5?1"' 'X'f1 1' ' is 115+-. ,"f,4'v-:""' " fu '51-1,2 1341 ...--'rw . . I...--1' 1- . , .1., .- I ..,, - 1 . III! IIIII 1r, III. g,-.- II.-I - I 2Iv " I I I ,?v"1I.3'1....I4-I 11 'I Ig:-I I.-: ...I . fx - -ff uf-2:55 . .1741-1 2:1 .. IW' II IISEIILIIIIII . III.g,i,j:'In ', ,x . " '1 Iwjgx ' HV' 51Q.'?fI,Qf5ll1Q -fi " . ' . '. . II- Is.--1" -"RIM I '. . I I .I ' . .I'."3 Ilr:'7',I -',f:r?t1Y. .111 1' HI, .1 H514 vl'51,e',5 - ' .OIC "+1l'--'l..'-,.'- 3,11 U ' H 1 'I-" '. .Q'f'f.Qf-5 1 , 1' 1,1 1 . yin.: I I-fi1.mf.'Tf.-1331:-1v'51-:3-. 1 "Ni '15 II 'gif .QI I.?w5kII,II,..T . fn' III .I:I.II, I-.I 1 ....,,QgvIQj?:II'I wI1.IiII- .1 .,.. 1.. - ,gif f.-.xr 1 -- Hz--4 "fn-. 3' -fa 11? III, JH . ,g..5Hf1!1..' 5' ar'-1 fi 'In Jw . QIJ .If . . '.,,1 :A 3.31 1 , " 1 -" . . , - .. II.I1. ' I --.1'-I v. .,.II,I 1 .hw I If .I' I r 'g I..f9eT"I1-ff. lf. ..' I, 'I' XL .-51-4.5-Z ...I . q,I- 1 .I-. . J I 1 -' II. --1", LMI, I'1 .... ..I 1 . ., .-. Ii..1.- I I ""' . , J1.. I 4 .VA ' j",' f ,Inf I Ijfu "il" I-1: ' '3 "-5. .. 1 ,.1.,1I I - ' 'I ' ' I ,1.. W ' "gg ' v -' , .. -r .. I. II . .. . I 1.I.' 4. . , . . I 1 II 1 .I. - "' "W ,u.'.' :L I1o.j4.. 1 ... - ix 11- 1-: -I ' I... !. ig I , I . 1.. I.. L - .. - . .. .mga-' . I+ W ' Iv. ' .I, ' 1? ' I I.II:fI I. ,. 1. -N . I M I 1 ' - "J .1 I 'I IQ LI- I I. I.:,,. .I .- - g , .I ' 5. ...., I. ' , 4 I ' -.1 . PM ' . Y. I . IIIIg.4y 'I .1-I. .III I . .,I ' I I "II.I' Nj' ' 'I"h. ' I . ' " ' ' - Ir' z" .. '1 U."-1 ' ' - ". . .Jr ,'1' I . , 2... . I II .Im I .. -g-e.gI.I. ' . -.-.- I a ' I I -.0 I .Ii . 'ws '., I. I -I ... I I I , '... I -in . ' I, I I6 II I . . . I I . r -I . - I - . W, , 1' L H W , .III I . .I f . , - QI ,. V3 ' ' ' I . it . 'I ,J --. 'P ' w- I . . Iv, , ,- - :f f. I . ' 4. ' II ! 'II sir ' . I I I Q- .1 II I .. . I I I 1-1 A . . -I ' I . . . I . I . +I IIIII .- .. I Q-. Q' .I - I. III I . 'A IPA .M " ' 1' .1 '3.. . I., 'II . IIIII I ' . .qw- . ' . W " .,' .u g.. II ' . . ,-' ' I .II -I .I . .-4 1 .. ..II I 'sI,.II,.II . I Q ,I II . I, .'Y.' .'l'v- I'. - II. . 4..IIIIuIIjl ....,I, . I - . . .I,I.l I . I I .I , II, ...I F Mc. I 1" H i ' . - . J ' Hof.-.1 1 ' -.' ' W ' ,. , I , .IIA . I... ..m:f' III?QII. II' II 1" - A. .1 'A' ' if , 751' ' .52 II, II ,.. PSl ISDSHOHI THE OMIGA CHAPTER IBTABI-IBNID NOVIMBEI 24. IBD? Fratres in Universitate GRADUATE COLLEGES Ernest DeKoven Leiiingwell Theodore Arthur Gessler UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES Moses Dwight McIntyre Byron Bayard Smith VV, Arthur Sears Henning Donald Angus Kennedy William Derrick Richardson Walter Joseph Schmahl 'Q Charles D. Wrenn Halsey Edwin Lee Poulson Spencer MacDouga1l Brown 1. Emory Cobb Andrews Benjamin Bates Felix Philip Schuyler Doane I. Herbert Paul Zimmermann V, 63 Della call DRUG Beta Gamma Omicron Beta Eta Beta Kappa Beta Pi Beta Rho Beta Tau Beta Upsilon Gamma Alpha Beta Omega Lambda Pi Phi Beta Delta Beta Epsilon Beta Theta Beta Xi Beta Delta Epsilon Zeta Kappa Mu Chi Beta Alpha Beta Beta Beta Zeta Beta Phi Beta Psi Alpha Gamma Rho Upsilon Omega Beta Lambda Beta Mu Beta Nu Beta Oniicron Beta Chi Beta Iota YOUNDID IN 1856 KOH GT Zbapters University of Wisconsin University of Iowa University of Minnesota University of Colorado Northwestern University Leland Stanford, jr., University University of Nebraska University of Illinois University of Chicago University of California Vanderbilt University University of Mississippi Vllashington and Lee University University of Georgia Emory College University of the South Tulane University Ohio University University of Michigan Albion College Adelbert College Hillsdale College Ohio XVesleyan University Kenyon College Indiana University De Pauw University Butler College Ohio State University NVabash College Allegheny College Washington and jefferson University Stevens Institute of Technology Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute University of Pennsylvania Lehigh University Tufts College Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cornell University Brown University University of Virginia 6-1 V' af Y I in -:Rf Bm I AS -z111- 173. .'1h.' , -1 , 15 1 a 1,1 1,1 ,J 11' 1, 14 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 , 1 -5.1. 1 1 1'2" 1 11,41 1 , . ' 1 111. 1 ' ' 1 ' '11-'11' 1. J 1 . 1 1 1 .- 1 -, 11 1. 1 r -1 1 -,1. 1- '1- .-'11-.1-11.112 1: ,'1'l' 1.MrY111111- 1- 1'z' -1111-1 i, -1 ,1'1.1, V' 5 1g1,'u1.1:-1 'L T A: J 1 Ji I 1 '1.1-:.1-"," v- 1.111 ...11,1,,g1," . :ML .- WZ1 ' Jr., ,111 .. , 1 1 V LW 1 '1 1' x 1 V, 1 '14 111, -I 14" IA. 1 , 1 -1 11,14 ,111 '11 1. ,. 9:41. 1......,1, 1' , ..w,!1.vf .M,- 1 1 , Q1 14 I 1 ' I 1 1 1 , . - -11 414011, 1 1,,,: : .1,..,I11U 1. 1 '.' .11 315111. 1 :I .ml Ax. 1 ,,1,'N, 11 . .11 1. A 1 11-1111111111 '. 1'9w": .15' I 'j' W 1 ,11 1 ,z . 1'.'111." '1 -, A ' 1 1 nf xV1',l5i" -1 :U 11' .-',,'g- ' 414,114 -..f" 91,11 111 W 1 1 1 S Della Call Dtlld THE GAMMA ALPHA CHAPTER LQTAELISHKD MAY, 1308 Fratres in Universitate GRADUATE COLLEGES Frank Cummins Lockwood Nelson Curtis Field Virgil Everett McCaskill XVi1liam Shattuck Abernethy UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES Ernest Arthur Scrogin Fred Charles Hack George Loring White Carl Diamond Greenleaf Frank Russell VVhite Elim Arthur E. Palmquist Halbert E. Payne Thomas Clayton Wiley Mogg Thomas Venard Graves Charles Edward Carey Ernest Edward Irons 65 Che Q. v. Fratres In llniversitate GRADUATE COLLEGES XVilliam Harvey Allen Arthur Thaddeus Pieukowsky UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES Marcus Peter Frutchey john Franklin Hagey ef "V, Ralph Leroy Peck Michael Francis Gallagher John Preston Mentzer Charles N. Crewdson Rowland Thumm Rogers 'U' Ainsworth Whitney Clark George White Sawyer Newell Montague Fair Arthur Whipple Smith Rufus Maynard Reed William K. Hodgkius Harry C. Collin V 66 rm YQ xi:-of L 1.124 .,.' 11111.---' . .11 1 . J". 1.1 15 .,.1. 1' ., , 11 .,1.4., .1 ' 1 MQ:- Jnllvti . L.. . .Zn 211 4. mg.. '1 .1 .1., V.. .r 'rw 1-.1, 1" I ' 1.,1.1 1 15 1: W: ' 1 -.1.1- up 1 i 11..q1. 1 1 11, ,1,1 I. 1 11.1 1 ..,,1. . wr.. . , f 1. 1 .9 .1 .,,1 - F "VH" ' ..-.' QA . I I 13'-.x , x 1' ...W . W.. ,.k.1. t jr IM',,..' 1 ,M 1 , , . - 1 ,..1. ',1.'. 1 ...' f. . 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' 5 :iff-1 P' ,. ,aw , , V 5 --ff:-ilws. -' I :, -X Y ,iw 53 W - . . X '-A.. Q- M. W, , i . C .X ,Q Q " Q mam., f ,N rf A Mii 'C 1 f, 6 yu 0 : 'M-Q. " , he R P' gifs, ff? W4 4 h f X gt f P f in 1' KW 'F X. M 2?-sl' ' ':.,.:.. Qs , . A ' i A 1 x wax ,Z ., 'X mV' . R + J , 4 x .55 X 0 if' 1 Q, S -bl' X J X' K ww S9 Jn if , x Mx Q Q X l 'N Q X ' SN , A . A , .. ,.J , . W X X ' if Sf' , ,QL , . , X , K. if . , vs vm-axg x 2 XSS, ,M 5, ,ee-f' Q a -Q s... ,Sri 3 A,- Q N fl' ,Q -N KM X gl ial vu., - - if 'A ' 5' N Qxgsi 'tt - . 59253 wait-.Q CD2 m0l'I3l' Board IUTIBLIIHID NDVIMIIR. 1884 Helen Bradford Thompson Eleanor Lauder jones Sarah Elizabeth Butler Alice Austin Knight Charlotte Rose Teller Demia Butler Jessie Nea Spray Sarah Ellen Capps Helen Demarest Taylor Mary Nickerson Lakin Edyth Merritt Kohlsatt Mary Kirk Rider Sallie Harkness Corning 67 CD6 ESOIQNC Clllb ISTLBLIBNED IN 1 HONORARY MEMBERS Mrs. George Vincent Miss Edith B. Foster Sarah Munson ACT! VE MEMBERS Ruth Vanderlip Florence Skeffington Grace Eberhart Mabel Alice Runner Mary Judson Averett D. Madeleine Harding Davida Harper Mabel Nassau G8 YQ. '24 as fi Q rf? 4: x -rr' ww., '- Imax -1 'sm . X N -- if? YQ-'21, -, 3 5555, 5 g ' --?T': ' W - 'T-S tix? X N , I . ,,,. , ,W + 'Q fvf ,C A jing' 4'- 'i- M.: -, L X f x , ' A V N ' 5 1. 1 -. M :V Q .. U Q E Q, . TM 2 K 1 :K :Q "3f5'Za2ei:.r 15' J f' K , 4+ " 4 y fy 4 E X 4 r . I 52 n ,, H li 2 5 1 4 2 9 ,. 5 in I: . F A .4 Q, gl fl v ,J J E ,A 5 c 5 5 'J Che Quadranglers Edna Stanton ISTQILISHID IN 1895 Mary Winter Daisy E. lViser Annie Bowland Reed Josephine Turner Allin Ethel Keen - Sarah Addams Blanche Wiser Marion Farwell Tooker Florence jenkins Sarah Amory Katherine Hamilton Lahm Anne MacWil1iarns Olive Warner Anna Locke Hull Marion Calhoun Edith Baxter Mary Gertrude Fulton Katherine Sayles Barton 69 CDC Sigma Clllb Grace Coulter Mary Elizabeth Reddy Mary Louise I-Iannan Anne Stearns Root Sarah Osborne Cornelia Osborne Katharine Paddock Florence I. MacMahon Elizabeth Buchanan Charlotte Briggs Capen Augusta Stuart Ruth Hill Isabel cfmy Marjorie Benton Cooke Glenrose Bell Margaret Coulter Katharine Paltzer 70 LZ ' ,-VLQJYQ T.r"L":li1F!lllI U. 3 I QI, ' 'J ' "'- Y 7 f- , QIQQH 5' -.41 I II Ll, I E1 ufyg in I. .I ,J -.. '- I, '- A . no 0 Q . , I . . F11-L . I - L Q.,-I H 'BI I I7 I FI ...I r' bf HI- . ' ca? i.1I-',!.1,-gs. I .71 -I .' L -Q..-M - lg :.1'gU . . A Q I H an-D -M I I"1 I . 12. 'SILT'-. ' I 4' 1 I I II 4 1-L 72 F-TT!!! .I - .If-'ZQCQA II'1EiI "TL 1- L .gf ' '1 I -N' .. . 1 I ' IIW'-' X -..I.-l ILFIJ I'-II,' 7,2 :"-LE'-- .15 'fxilf "W f' . A-If ' I --i,-- FQ- H '-J? -vlqff Qf.'TI'IIn,l1I-f"I,LsU'vI!Q' 145'-1' H ' ' .?+effIf. L7 -nvff. fi--If I-JI I. - 4 LI ...1 I-A l'I LL.. 435:-lkwgz .I W F ... QEI- ' I ,YIF 4 Y - f- if - '.'-. ..I - 1 I , fx, E' ' I'-2 U- -V "N ..' - ffl'I-- I I 2 Gi I. , . ,U la? 34 I- 'I I 1 5 uIII4ITIYI III-Eg-'Il ...I II. 4: III! 'UIII IIUCE' I ILT' Qui I ? 9 fb 'a-Q90 PT , -I I' iifmifr I'I',.'K ,Q ,Liz it QC' : 'I1' M. Y' Hz. -1 I , ,ML ,,., ' "I I Init! 1-r-w 4- Lw.if.-,I'r.I.I'.gj,.!g-2 LI,,,i.:ELX,1-AL4',7qTi1i,v-.gk-F I 91511 JI-,.,. .3-,ZFIQZIIHI il,-. 317712 I1 EVN-rw 4 .- - HI.--UI .rv J ' - . . 4 "-,mi " .." ' ' " J .. ' , 'Q-' , - I I , I - , I fl!! M AL -,I I -I V n.. f -y. If I In. , .ri J' A . M- . 4 LIS! 4- -L.-I I'.I.I-. ' IPF JH' I .I U 'Teva' I III 'h I - r. 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I .,. , -53' I 'I I-'W - W .. 2 -fa m 3 aw- I . -I 335 L I' It-. H l ' .1 III . It' . M '.. 'Y , 'II Rf : F 3, tv ' 1' at., ILM'-I 'V' 'I . I. " " ' f' 'II iq" A --inf' I II r 'I I "9 . I IH I"'I'I1I 4 II I IIII+' II " IIIIi'I'II III I AI "II'IIIJIIIIt JEITITI II I' I I - - f -. L - .2 --L -'I- , - '. 1 i , T' III Y + 'I I' I.x.I'I ci: , '1-If 5-F .II Iiil--VIII I-II-Liv-II L A . Y I . I 1: .. '. NIJ- -: III' 'III E 13 1, - J:-H all 1 7TIIZ2I'5..i' '-lI'I'I- IJ: I. fig- ' JI' " ni-Y' P , I - H' ., I I f .1"- I . I-- L Y I wifi I .sl-f3I. 1 U.J1-I..-If ff1H.ILf I-.-I I QQ,-,' '-,ai 'I 35.1. T321 - ,..g 5' I . , 1 ., I .1-'F t , ,Ji "'If' W I-' Q,-I il ,JI -Il' N Is."-1.,,.'r' P -4II'L'fI,'J"1' Q-IP. " PIII, Ii' V In ,I HIJI 'II , "' I, .- .. . .II 'If - jf' -' -fi 'q E1 "1" .I . Egg- -11, . .I 1. '-'-cr 'Im . " F. p H. I'III'f' -H. Irwg.. I -I I 1:-L L:-' , F 4 2' '?I'!f I" . , 'L ' Q '-r I " In Z --I VMI-I I H JI, HJ -I H. L: -V. i I. In I . . .. .fl I. I., 'I U9 . 'Wi 1 'F 3.-I E 22 T-I--W II-, 4- lj' fi-,rrglg gi' ln .III I. 491 i al . . I. 4 . 4, ,Ib I "ITIL: .I" EIIIIIII-, JI EI j. I7-:QQ 'YI 'iiikiri 6 :IN IIII E-4 'F I 0 II .In ff1'." If.: :'.,I"f.j-I4'ff...,...Q .fgaf A 'lv gg -- IL. f .5 --I .. s '- .m I '9' vis? 'J J" of? J, F- iQ 25. -uv".-F I I 5 A -ia ,wg Aw I 'I' I " ,.I.u I 'W .Ig '1IITIgi'Id -H I.'g.s,-prim ,M I li JI. If jf -I Cb! 001233 PN SOCRID Clara Welch KBTIILIONID ll D9 Marietta Norton Fannie Taylor Helen Gardner Nellie O'Brien Jennie Coon Florence Shields Grace Sellon 71 Cb! 0lDl dlld SQTDCUII SENIOR SOCIETY Marcus Peter Frutchey IITIILIBHID 1390 Clarence Bert Herschberger John Preston Mentzer john Franklin Hagey Moses Dwight McIntyre Franklin Egbert Vaughan George Hoyt Sawyer Joseph Edwin Freeman Nott XVi11iam Flint '72 ,ww X 4 T f 1 f . ,. 1 . . I. ,. H 1 I f ,w X I, 1 T HE 1: I-' 1' f x-' --' I l lj 5- fill - T D yllnlnlnnfllnqlu j ,fl i X FH -A iw l V . W ll - in f i dll JUNIOR SOCIETY ISTABLISHID JUN! IZ, IBO l898 Moses Dwight McIntyre Fred Cameron Vincent Joseph Edwin Freeman Maurice Brown Lee Clarence Bert I-Ierschberge John Preston Mentzer N ' ull' " l ' iff' if ihlllhh lil, I lb? H 1 ll :fl I lwillllll 'l l ll 'till ' uv nl r Theodore Hiram Patterson Forest Grant Cecil Page John Franklin H I899 Allen Grey Hoyt Thomas Temple Hoyne Maurice Gordon Clarke Donald Angus Kennedy Percy Bernard Eckhart XVilloughby George Walling john James Walsh Ernest Hamilton Dillon Rufus Maynard Reed Arthur Sears Henning 73 agey' William France Anderson 4 'umfki -1' '--Q.,--N L my V S x ' ' SCN ' lx ' 1052:-511, O . - X O - 'D X ...... an QL! f M f f W , x f ,... 2 -u V S ! f . i , FN ' , FRESHMAN SOCIETY ICTABLISNII YIBRUARV. IBB! H i899 William France Anderson Clinton Lunian Hoy M. Gordon Clarke Arthur John Mullen Thomas C. Clendenning Carl Sawyer William Burgess Cornell Willoughby George Walling Percy Bernard Eckhart john R. Walsh Lester B. Fulton joseph M. Wilbur Ralph C. Hamill Harvey T. Woodruff l900 Walter James Cavanagh Morell Law VVil1iam Thaw Gardner Lewis Lee Losey Lawrence Hamill Ralph Curtis Manning Roger Nelson Kimball Ralph Hubbard Norton Frederick Paterson Lachniund Walter joseph Schmahl l90I Francis Baldwin Donald Saxton McWilliams George Gilbert Davis Hugh Lafayette McWilliams Robert Gordon Gould Elliot Norton Samuel Northrup Harper Douglas Ray Walter Lawrence Hudson Clark Scammon Reed Fred Hyde Lawrence Kellogg Speed Curtiss Rockwell Manning lValter S. Sharpe Herbert Paul Zimmermann 74 Mg I i 1 5 i 1 I I I 5 y 1 i 1 x S -. I 1' J , Q ,:'I ,Xi 1 1 , . 1 ...4 UDSH011 1013 0111633 Marcus Peter Frutchey William Otis Wilson Harold LeClair Ickes Harry Delmont Abells George Hoyt Sawyer Stacy Carroll Mosser Henry Magee Adkinson 75 llll Pi Sigma UND! -I UARY IE B Charlotte Briggs Capen Sarah Elizabeth Butler Mary Elizabeth Reddy Susan Grace Harding Demia Butler Grace Allen Coulter Alice Austin Knight Marjorie Benton Cooke Helen Bradford Thompson Eleanor Lauder Jones Edith Burnham Foster Mary Nickerson Lakin Grace Josephine . 1 V +?m'Iilr F uw -gf 'I 'I' f J' X 1' y lu 'mx .-af h 5' fsi VF I , 1 Eiliar Qs 5 , j, ag , , if ETff1!:f1, ' il' :WT fi'i'7'1Q1i1?E3E' -IE ' F ifllff' 'W' 'I iii iai 'Lili':A'1",l.- 4 1 efusff ' li 1 L' , - tit. ll A75 76 Eberhart 1, J f :LJJQ . .' X X .251 -T, "1 ,, , I., iff- - A, A i 1 sk . , ,. Q if W, QRX Q I ' 12:6 , - m S hw ig, I, ,- ,, . ,. 1 ..-. mg' ,:f..x,, , ' N... 'lffj 5 2. ,f"" Zzfsv' ' 'L f y w ,Y- N ! W' ve, - 193 1' ilu"-T E... 1 m?r ww I J . A, 15 'fi' Q. 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I I 1 ' V ,rM5f63fZf g?'gjf,f .fm 5 ,I ,N P gf E 0 I Tfim I lsgelzin LN, as v A. N omcm JOHN FRANKLIN HAGEY, FRANKLIN GESELBRACHT, CHARLOTTE TELLER, BANKS JOHN WILDMAN, - - President - Vice-President - Secretary - Treasurer EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE EDWARD MAX BAKER, Chairman EDWIN CAMPBELL WOOLLEY MARY FRANCES WINTER KATHERINE PADDOCK MARGARET RAMSEY IIRIIIDCYS HERBERT ALONZO ABERNETHY, E X, '95 Track Team, '96 and '97g "Reserves," and '9Sg The "Scrubs," '9'7. YVILLIAM HARVEY ALLEN. EVA ELLEN ANDERSON. HAROLD ERNEST ANDERSON. SWEN BENJAMIN ANDERSON. ELIZABETH APPS. TREVOR ARNETT, A HP, Treasurer Debating Society, Spring '97, Secretary of Debating Society, Autumn '97. HARRY FULLER ATWOOD, First and Second Annual Oratorical Prizes, '94 and '95, Scholarship in Public Speak- ing, Spring and Summer '97, First Prize in Senior College Debate, Summer '97g President of Oratorical Association., '93 and '95: President of Northern Oratorical League, '96 and '97. DELIA AUSTRIAN. HAROLD LUCIUS AXTELL. FRANK BACHINIAN. EDWARD MAX BAKER, Representative in Chicago-Iowa Debate, '95, President University Debating Club: President of Junior Council '96g Associate Editor "USED and Gown," '98, Chairman Executive ommittee Class of '98, Repre- sentative in Chicago-Michigan Debate, '98 5 Scholarship and First Prize in Senior De- bate, Winter '98. FLORENCE FIELDING BALL. HELEN HUNTINGTON BALL, Artist on " Cap and Gown," '96. FREDERICK ROBERTSON BARNES, Glee Club, '97, MAX BATT. ADELAIDE STEELE BAYLOR. ETTA FULCOMER BEACH. ARTHUR EDWARD BEERS, Basket Ball Team, '96, ESTHER BENNETT. 78 THOMAS BROGDEN BLACKBURN, QI' A, The Omega Club, The:Ben Butler Club, Junior College Councillor, Sprmg '97, Chairman J un1or.College Council, Summer '97 , Assistant Editor " Weelkyf' '97 , Asso- ciate Managing Editor " eekly," '98, Pitcher for Reserves, '96 and '97, Pitcher on Consolidated Team, '97 , Substitute on Football Team, '95. ALBERT WILLIAM BOLT. ALICE BOOMER. JACOB WILLIAM BRAAM. ALBERT E. BROENE. ROWENA BUELL. ALLEN TIBBALS BURNS, Basket Ball Team, '95 and '96, CHARLES JOSEPH BUSHNELL, Entrance Scholarship, '94, Scholarship in Public Speaking, Summer '97. DEMIA BUTLER, The Mortar Board, Nu Pi Sigma ' .The ' Idlers, Weekly Board, '92 and '93 3 UJHIVBF- sity Choir, '92 and '93 , University Chorus, '92 and '94, Vice-President of first Fresh- man Class, Autumn, '92: Member of Ac- ademic Day Committee, '94 , Junior College Councillor. FRED HARVEY CALHOUN, CP A 0, Captain of Track Team, '98, University Mile Championship, '96. JOSEPH WHITE CAMPBELL, if K NP, Glee Club, '93, Tennis Team, 93, Prome- nade Committee'94. CHARLOTTE BRIGGS CAPEN, The Sigma Club, Nu Pi Sigma, Women's Mandolin Club. '96. SARAH ELLEN CAPPS, The Mortar Board. ZELMA ESTELLE CLARKE. IRENE INGALLS CLEAVES, Vice-President Class of '98 , Captain of Women's Basket Ball Team, 97, Scholar- ship in Latin, '97. MELVIN EDWARD COLEMAN, EX, Glee Club, '94 and '97, Secretary Glee and Mandolin Club, '96, President Glee and Mandolin Club, '97, Junior College Coun- cillor, Leader University " Sings," '98, Chairman Constitutional Committee, '98. GEORGE EDWARD CONGDON, Artist on University Publications. MARION VERNON COSGROVE. HARRY IRUS Cov, 'P K 111, Football Team, '94 and '96: Halfback, '94 and '95 , Mandolin Club, '97 and '98, Sen- ior College Councillor, Track Team, '95, LAWRENCE DEGRAEE, E X , Chairman Finance Committee Washington Promenade '98 , Glee Club, '92-'93-'97-'98, University Choir, Spring and Summer, '97 , Junior College Councillor, Chairman Sen- ior Council, Winter '98. ERNEST HAMILTON DILLON, B O II , The Order of the Iron Mask, Chairman Junior Council, Fall '97, Chairman Ar- rangement Committee Washington Prom- enade, '98' Assistant Business Manager " Cap and Gown." '98 ' Assistant Business lggnager Glee and Mandolin Club, '96- FREDERICK WILSON EASTMAN, A Y, Leader Glee Club, '93-'94, Manager Glee Club, '98 -94, President University Chorus, '93-'94 and '97-'98, University ChOir,'98- '94 and '97-es, Glee Club, '97-'9a. IESSIE LEE FELGER. KNIGHT FRENCH FLANDERS, fb A O, Mandolin Club,' 97-'98, "Scrubs ' Foot- ball, '94. NOTT WILLIAM FLINT, A A fb , The Owl and Serpent, The Lion's Head: Colfee House' Dramatic Club, '97 -'98, Head Marshall, '97 -'98, Football Team, '93, '94 and '95, Assistant Editor Weekly, '97 and'98, Associate Editor " Maroon," '95 , Ivy Orator. '94, Scholarshi in Public Speaking Summer '97, Scholarship in Debate, Winter, '98. MARCUS PETER FRUTCHEY, The Q.V., The Owl and Serpent, Upsilon Iota Ome- ga, Chairman Junior Council, '96, Chair- man Mock Democratic Convention, '96, Marshall, '97' Associate Editor " Weekly," '96 and '97, Managing Editor " Weekly," '97 , Prize in Public Sgeaking, Summer '97: Representative in hicago -Illinois De- bate, '96, Senior Scholarship in Debate, March '97, President Y. M. C. A., '96, General Secretary Y. M. C. A. '96, Man- ager Glee and Mandolin Clubs, '97-'98, President Philolexian. LAURA GANO. ADA MASON GARDNER. BLANCHE GATZERT, Sgvlxolarship in Public Speaking, Autumn GEORGE HORACE GASTON. FRANKLIN HERMAN GESELBRACHT, Lincoln House, Scholarship in Physics, '96-97 ' Marrball '97-'98 , Chairman Senior Council. Autumn '97 , Vice-President Class of '98, Track Team, '95. HIRAM GILLESPIE. LILLIAN GOLDSMITH. GEORGIA GOWEN. EVA BRONSON GRAVES, HELEN MABEL MARTIN, The Idlers. Women's Basket Ball Team, '95-'96. JOHN FRANKLIN HAGEY, The Q. V , GEORGE MCDOUGALL. The Owl and Serpent, ThevOrdefof the Iron Maslf Dramatic Club, Base Ball Team. '97, President Class of '98, file? Club,'96-'97 ' President Glee Club,'97-'981i' President The Forum, Junior Collegf Councillor, Senior College Councillogf JI? nior Ball Committee, '96, Washington Promenade Committee, '97 and '98, Schol' arship in Senior Debate,Winter '98, Repre- sentative in Chicago-Michigan Debate,'98 , Leader University Sings, '98. SUSAN HARDING, The Esoteric Club, Nu Pi Sigma, The Idlers, Women's lalee Club. FRANK HENRY HARMS, A KE, Executive Committee Class of '98. JULIET HARRIS. CLARENCE BERT HERSCHBERGER, A A fir, The Owl and Serpent, The Order of the Iron Mask, Football Team, '94, '96 and '97, Base Ball Team,'96,'9'7 and '98' Track Team, '95, 96, '97 and '98 ' Junior College Couucigoii Saengor College Councillor, Sec- retary . . . HERSCHEL VINCENT HIBBARD. LUTHER BOONE HILL. LULA MAY HOUGH. JOHN ANDREW HOWARD, CPKIP. CHARLES LEO HUNLEY. JOSEPHINE LILIAN HUTCHINGS. ISAAC BARNEY HYMAN, Track Team, '95 and '96. RALPH JANSSEN. HARRIET JENKINSON. o JOHN HARRIS KELLEY. XVILLIAM CASPER KERN. FLORENCE LA TOURETTE. PAULINE LA TOURETTE. CHARLES LEDERER, Oratorical Scholarship, Spring i9'7. NELLIE BLANCHE LENINGTON, President of The Idlers, '97-'98, Secreta- ry Y. W. C. A., '97. ANGELINA LOESCH. FLORENCE MAY LYON. WILLIAM FRANCIS MCDONALD, E X, Associate Editor " Weekly," '97, Master Properties Dramatic Club, '97, Assistant Editor "Cap and Gown," '9S. 80 HARRY LAVERGNE MCGEE, University Chorus, '95. MOSES DVVIGHT MCINTYRE, 11' Y, The Owl and Serpent' The Omega Club, The Order ofthe Iron Mask, The Ben But- ler Club, Assistant Editor " Weekly," '96, Associate Editor "Weekly," '97, Manag- ing Editor " Weekly, '98, Assistant Editor " Cap and Gown," '96, Assistant Editor " Maroon," '96, Junior Promenade Com- mittee, '98, Secretary Oratorical Associa- tion, '96, Senior College Councillor, Chair- man Entertainment Committee Washing- ton Promenade, '98, FRED BIERRIFIELD, A A '11, Vice-President Y. M. C. A. , Baseball Team, '97-'98, Treasurer Class of '98, Senior College Councillor, Spring '97. JOHN PRESTON MENTZER, The Q.V., The Owl and Serpent, The Order of the Iron Mask, The Ben Butler Club, Scholar in Political Economy, '97, Assistant Man- ager Glee and Mandolin Clubs,'97-'98, Member of the Athletic Board, '97-'98, Assistant Editor " Weekly," '96-'97, Exec- utive Committee Washington Promenade, '97, Senior College Councillor, '97, Exec- utive Committee Class of '98, Executive Committee Junior Day, '96, Secretary- Treasurer Assembly Club, '94-'95. WILLIAM LLOYD MERCER. J ESSIE LOUISA NELSON. RUSSEL BURTON OPITZ, EX , Artist- on University Publications. SARAH NICOLL OSBORNE, The 'Sigma Club, The Idlers. CECIL PAGE, 'iv K 111, The Order of the Iron Mask, Junior Day Committee, '96 , Junior College Councillor, Correspondent Chicago "Journal," '96, Glee Club, '96-'97, Bnsmess Manager Dra- matic Club. '97 and '98, Chairman Dra- matic Committee Junior Day, '97, Wash- ington Promenade Committee, '98, Senior College Councillor. CATHERINE DIX PADDOCK, The Sigma Club, The Idlers ' The Mulberry Club 5 University Choir, Women's Glee Club, Executive Committee Class of '98. EVERETT JOSEPH PARSONS. WARD BEECHER PERSHING, Correspondent "The Chicago Evening Post." NELETTA PETTIT, Women's Glee Club, '97 and '98. GEORGE PFIRSHING. ALICE PEIRCE. GENEVEIVE PENDLETON. ARTHUR THADDEUS PIENKOWSKY, ., Secretary Oratorical Association, '96-'97 ,-l President Morgan Park Club, '98, Secre-" tary Chorus, '97-'98. 1 GRACE GIBSON PINKERTON. N BIARGARET PIPER, Women's Basketball Team, '94-'97, INEZ DWIGHT RICE, The Idlersg Secretary Women's Glee Club, " Cap and Gown " Artist, '96, Senior Col- lege Councillor. ALICE MARGARET RANSOBI, Executive Committee, Class of '98. ELBRIDGE WASHBURNE RICE. DAVID MOON ROBINSON. JOHN JACOB RAPP. LAURA LOUISE RUNYAN, Junior Scholarship in Social Science, '96. D. M. SCHOEMAKER. ERNEST ARTHUR SCROGIN, Scholarship in Public Speaking, Washing- ton Promenade Committee, '98. MARY LYDIA SHERMAN, The ldlers , Senior College Councillor, Ex- ecutive Committee Christian Union. MAX DARWIN SLIMMER. ARTHUR WHIPPLE SMITH, The Q. V. HENRY JUSTIN SMITH, B O H , Glee Club, '93-'96, Tennis Team, '93, Senior College Councillor. MARY CHASE SMITH. CARLTON HOSMER SNASHALL, EDNA STANTON, The Quadranglers. CHARLES FRANCIS STOCKEY, 41 A G, Glee Club, '96-'97 and '97-'93. LINIUS LEHMAN STROCK. CHARLOTTE TELLER, The Mortar Board, Vice-President Y. W. " C. A., '96-'97, Vice-President Economic Club '97, Executive Commitee Class of '98- Valedictorian Class of '98, Senior College Councillor, Assistant Editor " Cap and Own," '98, Secretary, Class of '98. CLARA ALBINA TILTON, Women 'S Glee Club, Women's Basketball Team, President Y. W. C. A., '98-'97, Secretarg Economic Club, President Eco- nomic lub, '97-'98, Women's Tennis Team, '96. ROBERT NEWTON TOOKER, JR., 111 Y, The Omega Club, The Bismarck Club' Coifee House, Substitute on Football Team, '94, Guard on Football Team. '96, Catcher on Reserves, '97, President Banjo Club,'94g President Academic College, '94. FRANKLIN EGBERT VAUGHAN, B O H , The Owl and Serpent, Associate Editor " Cap and Gown," '96, Mandolin Club, '95-'97' Leader Mandolin Club, '97-'98, Senior College Councillor. ANNA LOUISE WARWICK. IVAN CALVIN WATERBURY. HARTWELL WILLIAM WEBB. OLIVER ELWIN VVELLS. BANKS JOHN WILDMAN, E A E, Financial Secretary Forum, Spring '95, Winter, '96 , Treasurer Class of '98. ALICE VVINSTON. MARY FRANCIS WINTER, The Quadranglers , The Women's Mandolin Calgib, '96 , Executive Committee, Class of EDWIN CAMPBELL WOOLLEY, -iv K YP, Assistant Editor " Weekly," '97 and '98, Managing Editor " Weekly," '98 - Ivy Poet, '96 and '97 , The Mulberry Club, Executive Committee, Class of '98. LAURA MAY WRIGHT. 5 ' Mf- l896 - l897 HORACE GILLETTE LOZIER, - - Manager ERNEST HAINIILTON DILLON, GILBERT AMES BLISS, - JAMES TYLER CAMPBELL, - Assistant Manager - President - Secretary Che Klee Zlub JAMES SCOTT BROWN, - HORACE GILLETTE LozIER, - STACY CARROLL MOSSER, FIRST TENORS Horace Gillette Lozier Charles Coombs Macomber Melville Edward Coleman Charles Francis Stockey FIRST BASSOS - - President - Leader - Secretary SECOND TENORS Henry Harwood Hewitt William Burgess Cornell john Tyler Campbell Paul Blackwelder SECOND BASSOS James Scott Brown Stacy Carroll Mosser Charles Lindsey Burroughs Cecil Page TENOR SOLOIST Glenn Plumb Hall 82 John Franklin Hagey Herbert Hewitt Fred Bradley Thomas Pearle Merrill Griffith BARITONE SOLOIST Robert Bailey Davidson H ares. . - X Gigi? 1 ' l 'J-'I' K Z 2 1 "if1lligi9f , Z " 9" f X w -2 X .Z 0' CD6 llZdlId0llll Clllb I896 - l891 WILLIAM SCOTT BOND, - - - Leader EDWARD CANFIELD LACKNFR, Secretary FIRST MANDOLINS - SECOND MANDOLINS William Scott Bond Franklin Egbert Vaughan Gilbert Ames Bliss Knight French Flanders William Hayden Jackson Frank Leland Tolman Byron Bayard Smith GUITARS Henry Wheeler Stone Edward Canfield Lackner Morgan Park, Ill. South Chicago, Ill. Blue Island, Ill. Riverside, Ill. Oak Park, Ill. Frederic Frank Stiegmeyer Roy Battling Tabor Marion Clyde Weir Concerts Kenwood Club, Chicago. Hyde Park Club, Chicago. Hinsdale, Ill. Elgin, Ill. Freeport, Ill. Central Music Hall, Chicago. Vincennes Club, Chicago. Waterloo, Ia. Sioux City, Ia. 83 Council Bluffs, la Omaha, Neb. Des Moines, Ia. Marshalltown, Ia. Mt. Vernon, Ia. Clinton, Ia. I U72 Glee illld m3IId0lllI CIIIDS I897 - i898 X 'M I :MARCUS PETER FRUTCHEY, - - Manager ' xi JOHN PRESTON MENTZER, - Assistant Manager ., INIELVILLE EDWARD COLEMAN, - - - President A 7, Rov BARTLING TABOR, - Secretary AL! y pfilfl INKMEIF, g7,,.,.,. JOHN FRANKLIN HAGEY, - - President CHARLES FRANCIS STOCKEY, Secretary STACY CARROLL MOSSER, Leader ' FIRST TENORS SECOND TENORS Melville Edward Coleman Paul Blackwelder Charles Francis Stockey Harry Beverly Ward john McA1lion Brosius Louis Sampson Ward Clarence Sydney Spaulding Frederick Robertson Barnes Paul D. McQuiston FIRST BASSOS SECOND BASSOS Frederick Wilson Eastman Stacy Carroll Mosser James Herbert McCune john Franklin Hagey Albert Simpson Russell Carlton Hosmer Snashall Charles Lindsey Burroughs Laurence DeGraff SO LO ISTS Glenn Plumb Hall Victor Washington Sincere Robert Bailey Davidson "' 84 Carl Howell Sawyer 0 Che mandolin Club IS97 - I898 FRANKLIN EGBERT VAUGHAN, - - - Leader BYRON BAVARD SMITH, - Secretary and Treasurer FIRST MANDOLI NS Byron Bayard Smith William Everton Ramsey sf Franklin Egbert V Emory Cobb aughan Andre ws Knight French Flanders SECOND MANDOLINS Rowland Thumm Rogers Henry Hirsch X George Gilbert Davis Roger GUITARS Edward Canfield Lackner Robert Gordon Gould Frank Williamson Duke james Wolke Ross MANDOLA Harry Coy ZOIKCNS Kensington, Ill. Lakeside Club, Chicago. Aurora, Ill. Edgewater Casino Club, Edgewater, Ill. Oak Park Cycling Club, Oak Park, Ill. Morgan Park, Ill. Peoria, Ill. Clinton, Ia. Des Moines, Ia. Nelson Kimball HARP Roy Bartlin g Tabor FLUTE Wilber Wheeler Basset VIOLIN Alvin Lester Barton Cedar Rapids, Ia. Maquoketa, Ia. Abingdon, Ill. Davenport, Ia. Central Music Hall, Chicago. Oakland Music Hall Hinsdale, Ill. Lewis Institute, Chicago. Highland Park, Ill. Hyde Park Y. M. C. A., Chicago. 85 .5 V " N l g '- iw .7 I -...X Che Banjo Club ROBERT GORDON GOULD, - - President HUGH LAFAYETTE MCWILLIAMS, - Treasurer PAUL DONALD MCQUISTON, - - Leader BANJOS l ' .57 91 ,wks- ., or 4- J xx jx ,Wg QM e U3 .f X H s K M"'a. e J' X . . Winn' 'fl ,J -I Eiiiilllllll igllllwlw lililll1 k3 m o X 'Wumwiiih an wm1.,, D Paul Donald McQuiston Roger Nelson Kimball Hugh Lafayette McWilliams Harvey Malcolm McQuiston M Williams Donald Laxon c Curtiss Rockwell Manning GUITARS Robert Gordon Gould Ralph Curtiss Manning Emory Cobb Andrews MANDOLIN Gilbert Ames Bliss TRAPS Charles Lindsey Burroug 86 hs 4 51 v 5 ? Q Vu .I H K 1? 3' E. 31 1 E Ni Q E a f f,4rv-', f v 'S xv 'Hn l.Q:,-- ,- Cx f.. 71-'N v Siam 1.1 -.., - , .Vg Wig: Wa... i f , .,-, QQ IFE' 'pq' I iq, ' W Wx. ,g:,-y "' ,yl!f f',:i Ni l azz? A , - AW., ,4g TXX -X bl L.W'Tr1jf we-1ll+ ff fl 4 if M' 1 ww- 1' mum if 2 me mm liifr-H J' U 1... ,L..... . .. , l "" l ' ' "iblf"' - H H ....,,,,,,.. 4 ,,.. ' .ae www ml 4 lx -ull' HJ" ln. Mifflin A i,ll.1lX, lgllllui naUUMr1 lf,L it w"Q'Wj'lf flllw flll -4 Q QL: R . R i t fb -L E r- f f I - f ' ESTHER XVALLACE STURGES, - President MARY Lou1sE HANNAN, - - Leader GRACE ALLEN COULTER, - - Secretary m0mbQfS Anne Root Grace Allen Coulter Greta Irwin Blanchard Grace jose hine Eberhart P Mary Lincoln Florence La Tourettei Helen Marot Margaret Coulter' Mary Louise Hannan Esther Wallace Sturges Laura Love Inez Perrin Susan Grace Harding Clara Albin Tilton 1'da Pettit Neletta E 1 Che Womerfs mandolin Club IESSIE NEA SPRAY, - - President and Leader PEARL LoU1sE HUNTER, - Secretary and Treasurer Alma Yondorf - 4 --. Alice Austin Knight ry! I Alma Le Duc ' mf, , O gy fllqaim Marion Farwell Tooker i 'A' Ruth Hardy 1 I X I . - ' ock Si er""'F-1,-f..A " ':fJ "'7-1, V'-.1 -3. " Z 'Zia U" Catherine Dix Padd I A 277' 1 , Nflil Al lrlswffgj will X ease, NNY 'QA:r,1,,,t 'N Qrlvfiui ly - , V I-if U rw ,., , h ' 4142" , 4 jf-QQ! - V 1,5 Lf' , ,QL -.La 74? ' ' 1 l . " 1.1 ff I -:J ' l :iff ' .-- , ' ' ' X 9 gg:-12 'Y J ra 0fiiCCl'S l896 - I897 YVILLIAM D. INIERRELL, - - President ARTHUR T. PIENKOWSI-LY, Q - Secretary and Treasurer I. FRANK XVOOD, ---- Librarian HIRS. HERBERT E. SLAUGHT, - Pianist YVARDNER WILLIABIS, - - Conductor l897 - I898 FREDERICK W. EASTMAN, - - - President ARTHUR T. PIENKONVSKY, - Secretary and Treasurer HUGH G. LEIGHTON, ---- Librarian MRS. HERBERT E. SLAUGHT, - - Pianist XVARDNER WILLIAMS, - Conductor Che Choir Paul Mandeville Maurice Mandeville Frederic Place Arthur Stocks Charles Stockey Frederick Eastman Glenn Hall Stacy Carroll Mosser 88 V. L 151.11 ijl:.,Vf',- Q. ,U . , vfptll ,kiwi 3.4 -,-'15,,f w-fai n ljfgngf, A 54' 'E-Y4r'V-5,1 VH' -- 1 iir'SG'f4F . f.'.V. f.,'-W' -wp.: 'P Fin"-1.13: -4... -' rg, f'izVQ.!-ggi1iea V Six. ' if-. V .5-,L ' '1, '. --5,-Vg' ,. -V .3 5,'57-'VqiLV.-,diva-ity 37 - ' .172 ,gy ::f7:.i1,fix'Q'D'fVlfg? N",iQ,g'f!1,' ' A - 'Q-1'a'-VM?.-.V:-V-.V2s-"'--'VVz--"'- 853914 Vgf!'V'. -?3fj'r.,gV-., - .1952-f,f3-V-V . '-, V 31"-1 54- fx"g:"'f' 'M -: '-W." 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X Q L w Q N X P X bhi, : Q -I I WILLIAM F E A E - Pre d t Sfilfiiig, fiilllfii Xa mimbifi William France Anderson james Weber Li Roberf Gordon Gould one Hal, Nott William Flinr Arthur Sears H g 1 Ceclifiielsernard Eckhart DOn?J:1?1i:f1uF M D John Franklin Hagey Marjorie Benton Cook olm Coulter, r. Ma Kirk R d I Lawxgtlielgaiogj rilicis 31 1tK K ght Q f jogephine T All' R-Q 5 89 Che lllulberrp Club nlCl'llbCl'8 Mrs. Martha Foote Crow Catherine Dix Paddock Charles Raymond Barrett Henry A. Palmer Anna T. Beardsley Charles Sumner Pike Colinda D. Bishoprick Elizabeth Porter Mary Bowen Alice Edwards Pratt Agnes Spofford Cook Vernon Purington Squires Eme A. Gardner Florence M. Walker Arthur Sears Henning Ida Ashborn Weeks Arthur Willis Leonard LeRoy Titus Weeks Frederick Brooks Lindsay Florence Wilkinson james NVeber Linn Frank W. Woods George L. Marsh Edwin Campbell XVoolley Marjorie Benton Cooke A 'D' HE Mulberry Club is a group of verse-makers, nearly all of whom are il H: students in the University of Chicago. When of a Saturday morning A the spirit moves thereto, those that will, repair to the south side of the ze - ' Pine-tree Isthmus, an idyllic spot in Arcady, which borders on Bohemia, but is farthest from Philistia. Here no emporium chimney can be seen- the pines take care of that-the water is blue to north and south, the forest is thick to east and west. The rules of the club are few but inexorable : I. The club shall meet not regularly, but occasionally. II. Each member shall read to the others his latest verses, aud read them twice without reprieve. III. The Sacrosanctum Ypocras Theologicum Mori shall be quaffed. - The Mulberfjf Club Book. 90 ' gf -f Q I I as - 2' C3 S' , V . .raaiiisss .. 5 if-is " -4 " 5 :ei-.'?' HE'-:l - 'in' f + .- .. -, 2-1 ' 2 ?: - - - - .... .tvs 1 "E E1i Q ' - "' 'g V M sf ' - " at as - '77 - 1 - A . 1 h S ' rw 'AP NELLIE BLANCHE LENINGTON, President CLARA DELIA HULBERT, - Secretary Edith Foster Elinor Flood Vinnie Crandall Daisy Lenington Evelyn Matz Sarah Elizabeth Butler Elizabeth Coolidge Helen Thompson Eva Graves Sarah Osborne Susan Ballou Cornelia Osborne Augie Loesch Inez Rice Lucy Johnston Eleanor Jones Lila Fish Clara Hulbert Susan Harding Demia Butler Charlotte Foye Mabel Runner Kate Anderson Ruth Vanderlip Alice Clark Mary Sherman Davida Harper 91 4f5..'- UIICOIII house PROFESSOR GEORGE EDGAR VINCENT, PROFESSOR WILLIAM ISAAC THOMAS, FREDERICK MAYOR GILES, - FRANKLIN HERDIAN GESELBRACHT, HENRY STEAD DAVIDSON, - I ,NI "" R Patronesses MRS. W. R. LINN Head Of House Councillor - Vice-Head Secretary Treasurer MRS. GEORGE EDGAR VINCENT MRS. WILLIAM ISAAC THOMAS IIICIIINYS Frederick Mayor Giles Hiram Gillespie Clyde Buchan Walker Fred Charles Hack Reuben Giles Stowell Henry Stead Davidson Albert Ellsworth Hill Franklin Herman Geselbracht Clayton Wiley Mogg Charles Joseph Bushnell David Moore Robinson Frank Russell White John Paul Ritchey Ormsby Elroy Pettet Harry Orrin Gillett Erich Muenter William Schnoonover Harman Roy Batchelder Nelson Swen Benjamin Anderson Charles Jonas Boyer 92 Alfred Charles johnson WGSNIISIOII 50052 PROFESSOR RALPH C. H. CATTERALL - - Councillor PROFESSOR EDWIN E. SPARKS - - Head HALBERT PAYNE THOMAS - Vice-Head BANKS JOHN WILDLIAN Secretary HUGH GUTHRIE LEIGHTON - Treasurer members Earnest Arthur Scrogin Clifton Oscar Taylor Elim Arthur Palmquist Louis Thomas Foreman Vernon Sirvilian Philip Earnest Edward Irons Arthur Eugene Bester Amos A. Eber-:Ole Fred G. Mutterer CD2 Graduate Club FREDERICK ALBERT CLEVELAND - - President OTIS WILLIAM CALDWELL - - Vice-President ANTOINETTE CARY, ELIZABEFH FAULKNER Secretaries HENRY MAGEE ADKINSON - - - Treasurer The Graduate Club entertained the Federation of Graduate Clubs at its Third Annual Convention, December 30 and 31, 1897. Mr. Jacob Dorsey Forrest of the University, is the president of the Federation. 93 CD2 Btll Blliltl' Clllb Charles Newman Crewdson, '98 Philip Rand, '97 Moses Dwight McIntyre, '98 Arthur Sears Henning, '99 Donald Angus Kennedy, '99 Walter Joseph Schmahl, '00 Rowland Thumm Rogers, 'OO john Preston Mentzer, '98 Thomas Brogden Blackburn, '98 Spencer McDougall Brown, '00 Cbt DYOYSGII Park Clllb 0ffiCQl'S ARTHUR T. PIENKOWSKY - - President CHARLES E. CAREY First Vice-President WILLIAM S. HARMAN - Second Vice-President Miss MARGARET MORGAN - - Secretary CARL D. GREENLEAF - Treasurer members Alice Hepburn H. S. Hollis H. F. Hollis A. F. Holste Margaret Morgan Robert Lyman Ruth E. Morgan R. S. McClure Eliot Blackwelder H. H. Nelson C. E. Carey E. A. Palmquist G. E. Congdon A. T. Pienkowsky C. D. Greenleaf C. W. Richards VV. S. Harman J. E. Webb ' 94 1 1 A M W Y K K 'i I X wx lx L... Pl'0SiClCiIfS EDWARD BRANSON, Autumn, '96 JAMES GWIN, Winter, '97 HARRY GRISWOLD, Spring, '97 JOHN FRANKLIN HAGEY, Autumn, '97 FRED CHARLES HACK, Winter, '98 m0mb2fS John Franklin Hagey Ernest Edward Irons Carl Diamond Greenleaf George Edward Congdou Ernest Arthur Scrogin Howard Pendleton Kirtley Frank Russell XVhite I Charles Edward Carey Elim Arthur Palmquist William Kelly Wright Rufus Maynard Reed Fred Charles Hack Banks john Wildman Fred Merrifield Ainsworth Clark 95 H 1- X 0fflCQl'S l896 HARRY FULLER ATWOOD - FRANK ZIMMERMAN - - ARTHUR THADDEUS PIENKOXVSKY BURT BROWN BARKER - - i897 RIICHAEL FRANCIS GALLAGI-IER NELS JOHN SENNES - - ARTHUR THADDEUS PIENxcOws1-Iv FRED CHARLES HACK - - President Vice-President Secretary - Treasurer President Vice-President Secretary - Treasurer CD6 UlliUCl'SilD DCIJBUIIS Club l897 Winter FRANK ZIMMERMAN, - CLYDE BUCHAN XVALKER GEORGE CARROLL CONE - Spring BURT BROWN BARKER - GEORGE SIKES - TREVOR ARNETT - Autumn MICHAEL FRANCIS GALLAGHER TREVOR ARNETT - - - GEORGE YWATSON - 90 President - Secretary Treasurer President - Secretary Treasurer President - Secretary Treasurer Che CIIICGSG-I0lD8 DQDGTC AT KENT THEATRE, FEBRUARY 5, I897 THE QUESTION RESOLVED, That American municipalities should own and operate their own street railways. Tha Affirmative The Negative UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO UNIVERSITY OF IOWA FRED C. HACK E. G. MOON EDWIN S. MEADE H. W. HANSON FRANK CLEVELAND J. R. FRAILEY Decision in favor of the negative. wIIlII0l'S Ili IIOYTIIQYII 0l'di0l'IC8I BUSH? ZQIIICSI l897 AMES, Michigan, ---- " Castilar " WILE, Wisconsin, - - Hjingoism " GALLAGHER, Chicago, " The New Social Spirit " CD6 IIZICIDISGIISCDICBSO Debate AT KENT THEATRE, APRIL 29, l897 THE QUESTION RESOLVED, That the English system of cabinet government is better adapted to the wants of a democratic people than the American congressional system. The Afiirmative The Negative UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO UNIVERSITY on MICHIGAN BURT BROWN BARKER CHANDLER RICHARD VAUGHAN SATHERS GEORGE WATSON CARMODY Decision in favor of the afiirmative. CD6 COIllmbI2l:CbICil30 Dtbdlt NEW YORK CITY, MARCH 25, I898 THE QUESTION RESOLVED, That the policy of increasing the United States navy is wise and should be continued. The Affirmative The Negative UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY EDWARD SHERWOOD MEADE BERNARD ERNEST CHARLES ALBERT FREDERICK CHARLES FREDERICK WHEATON MICHAEL FRANCIS GALLAGHER JOSEPH MEYER PROSKAUER Decision in favor of the negative. 97 ,.,.....: fi Il rl 1' X r I 7 f X? f A" ,. '-- X xii. Cf W' ., "lj if I, 21' I L.,,-1 , I trrrftq, . 5 W V ' .' 1. ' ' ,Zi f"'f ff' ff . 1,1 1 ll-31 5 ,, xx A i A1 ,I , n il N-A -. 1 . 1 r LLQQ l k ,L-'A' , L7'T"' " 'HX 3 ff' ,L L, N, , .L , ' 'ff--f7"f? ff.,- 'lr fi 'swf H 'I 1 ' 1 C K ' 1' f p ,x x ll!! I ' Aiuh E E Xi., ,, .R-'I I" X Lise- ,R Y--ff ' yuyy j X in if-L., xp A g ,gy . ..- -ws ,uxxjrilh SCIIIOI' College I896 Autumn WILLIAM PRENTISS DREW james Watson Gwin Donald Shurtlei Trumbull Alice Winston Edith Capps Clarence Bert Herschberger I897 Winter Spring L. BRENT VAUGHAN, Chairman FREDERICK DAY NICHOLS, Chairman Charles Byron Williams Stacy Carroll Mosser William Simmons Broughton Clarence Bert Herschberger Allen Tibbals Burns Fred Merrifield John Preston Mentzer john Franklin Hagey Jessie Nea Spray Laura May Knight Summer Autumn ALLEN TIBBALS BURNS, Chairman HARRY FULLER A'rwooD, Chairman John Harry jokish Inez Rice Moses Dwight McIntyre Mary Lydia Sherman Frederick Thomas Charlotte Rose Teller Ralph LeRoy Peck Frank Russell White George Henry Garry Charles Lindsey Burroughs Franklin Herman Geselbracht lB98 Winter LAWRENCE DEGRAFF, Chairman Harry Coy Joseph E. Freeman Robert E. Graves Alvin Lester Barton Charlotte Teller Frederick Augustus Brown 98 Che Junior College Council I896 Summer Autumn FREDERICK DAY NICHOLS, Chain-nan EDWARD MAX BAKER, Chairman Demia Butler Frederick Day Nichols Marcus Peter Frutchey Max Spiegel Cecil Page Annie Peterson Maurice Brown Lee William Burgess Cornell Abraham Alcon Ettelson Abraham Alcon Ettelsou Dudley Grant Hays Charles Braden Davis IS97 Winter ROBERT LAW, Chairman William Otis Wilson Fred Charles Hack Ralph Hamill Walter Joseph Schmahl Robert Gordon Gould Spring RALPH HAMILL, Chairman Robert Gordon Gould William Thaw Gardner LeRoy Tudor Vernon Earl Dean Howard Fred Charles Hack Julius Henry Gauss Walter Joseph Schmahl George Sawyer Paul Blackwelder Edwin Lee Poulson Summer THOMAS BROGDEN BLACKBURN, Chairman john James Walsh Earl Dean Howard Edwin Lee Poulson Albert Simpson Russell Paul Blackwelder Aaron Cahn William Thaw Gardner Melville Edward Coleman Lawrence DeGraff Autumn ERNEST HAMILTON DILLON, Chairman Robert Gordon Gould Esther Sturges John James Walsh Abraham Ettelson Albert Simpson Russell Charles Dutiield Halsey Aaron Cahn LeRoy Tudor Vernon Clark Scammon Reed Kellogg Speed Walter Lawrence Hudson Winter CLINTON LUMAN Hov, Chairman Ernest Edward Irons Ella May Norton Rowland Sherman Rogers Ruth Edna Morgan 99 CD6 Gfddlldlk C0llllCll I897 Autumn OTIS WILLIAM CALDWELL, Chairman Anne Bates Hersman Frederick Albert Cleveland E. A. Freeman Johannes Benoni Jonas Winter JOHANNES BENONI Joins, Chairman William Clinton Alden Florence Lyon Anne Bates Hersman Herbert joseph Davenport CD2 DIDIIIIID COUIICII IS97 - l898 Autumn - Winter ORLO JOSIAH PRICE, Chairman Edgar Dow Varney De Silva Edgar Miller John M. P. Smith Frank Woods john Gallup Briggs, Jr. Franklin Davenport Elmer Howard Spilman Galt Warren Palmer Behan 100 A i F4 F l Pi 5 fa 1 Q I C -1 3 1 H I che mvnmp school xl g CLASS 0F I897 fra: 0 in 0fl'iCCl'S BOWER REYNOLDS PATRICK, - - President WARREN PALMER BEHAN, Vice-President RALPH RENSSELAER SNOW, - Secretary mCmbCfS Warren Palmer Behan Edwin Bruce Kinney Rudolph Michael Binder Elisha Moore Lake Edwin Howard Borden Charles Augustus Lemon William Everett Chalmers Arba John Marsh Daniel Israel Coon Charles Henry Murray Jerry Tinder Crawford William George Oram Robert Bailey Davidson William Pleasants Osgood Lawrence Dykstra Bower Reynolds Patrick Winifred Ernest Garrison john Thomas Proctor Theodore Arthur Gessler Harry Edward Purinton Edgar Johnson Goodspeed Theodoro Geraldo Soares jullien Avery Herrick Ralph Rensselaer Snow Ralph Waller Hobbs Elmer Tilson Stevens Hugh Henry Hurley joel Franklin Wood Francis Chester R. 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'51, ,J,:.fl TK-I hw . ,, .il"lLr:,,,.,! I xhxy. l!5.:.t-Qigiinx , ,ws -. In ,J ,,.. U, ,Av '.,,:,. K ,- V . " - ff . ' 'f-f'v-'- z-:W FHM W ' - 'vm my Q . V-nm '.-1' "1 ,1 x. ."Prh . yi ' 7 "H" VPU ,I '-'31 '4L'.L-"H, ' :QL aww' :L j.- ' ' , V r gm- 14,1 .x ir, W-Ankle. ,V Jazz' U, L.. t A X 4 , E , . . . , . ,. .. .L , ., , Y: 5 J 4 I Lu0,,,q3r'9-K .,, , .ff 1. V CD6 lSlliUCl'SiID OI Chicago Weekly SIXTH YEAR MOSES DWIGHT MCINTYRE, '98 - - Managing Editor CHARLES H. GALLION - - Business Manager FREDERICK BRADLEY THOMAS, '98, - Associate Editor Ilssistant Gdi!0l'S EDWIN CAMPBELL WOOLLEY, '98 RALPH LEROY PECK, '98 ALLEN GREY HOYT, '99 NOTT WILLIAM FLINT, '98 WILLIAM FRANCIS MCDONALD, '98 JOSEPHINE TURNER ALLIN, '99 FLORENCE MCMAHON, '99 , THOMAS B. BLACKBURN, 98 , JOSEPH E. FREEMAN, '98 Rtilftd Gdl!0l'3 in KM UIIWCYSIW MARCUS PETER FRUTCHEY, '98 STACY C. MOSSER, '97 GEORGE A. SAWYER,-'98 JAMES WEBER LINN, '97 ARTHUR SEARS HENNING, '99 ESTHER STURGES, '98 JOHN PRESTON MEN'rzER, '98 ' 103 CDC CGD Blld GOIDII l898 mdlllgilll GUINYS ARTHUR SEARS I-IENNING WILLOUGHBY GEORGE WALLING Hiilndlf mdlllllllg Gdlwf THOMAS TEMPLE HOYNE BIISHICSS manaief ALLEN GREY HOYT HSSISIBII! BRSIMSS mdlldgtf ERNEST HAMILTON DILLON Jlssociatc Gdl!0l'S MAURICE GORDON CLARKE ETHEL KEEN RUEUS MAYNARD REED RUTH ISABEL VANDERLIP MARJORIE BENTON COOKE WILLIAM FRANCIS MACDONALD EDWARD MAX BAKER CHARLOTTE ROSE TELLER WILLIAM FRANCE ANDERSON CARL HOWELL SAWYER 'Former Zap and Gown Editors MANAGING EDITORS BUSINESS MANAGERS l895 PHILIP RAND WALTER ATWOOD CHARLES SUMNER PIKE OSWALD ARNOLD lS96 PHILIP RAND FREDERICK DAVIE3 104 T 1 l V X 3 x w I 1 'H 'x- ,pg 3,5111 J. U. - PAY' v- 'v 4' .. '-1. I - I Q31-fr wx- s....,1,-.V 1, A1 -'11-L" - . A b, H.. .,,. 1 .r,:,,. 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' , i Q1-5, v-"1 1. -' ,fy,L'.. .11 -W' - --w .. 11, - 'Jr' -1' --,..::'1' E . . ' - y Y- S.. lf: fr.: , I . .. . . ,H .-1' V . f-" . ' ' . N ' ' " ' mf". ' - 11 ' ,.. 1 - '- :-:.,- . . j,.,f':5f ' . ' - 1' . 1 n -1 - - - - , 2 " 9.1 ' I 1 Ajrl'-I. .-, .Un ti.. N461 1 ,:. . r , 1 1 1 . A , I ' . A 4, s .vr N, .f .Q . A1 '35 r. 'J L., l.. 8 ...QI Ki' N. v 'HUG . . ---' 5' 'V ' 'J 1-v .' . . .1 ... .. , , 1- ,.'.,1e. ff-A , X rl. - , , H , . 4 N . 1 u , I ,. ' I I , J.. 1' H . 4 L . .s., 4.. ,.'- , " H' Pull' Q .-1' Q.. -- .., ' - ..,., . . . . . ., . ' .M .' ' ' " . - H" -. " x -' ' ,. . . ...1 .., V 1, 1 . ,, . A TW: 1. I 4,1 V 4 rn!! . ' 155,13 ' - -" Q ,, -, k 'F . 1' ' ' 1 .11 . 1:55. 1.3. ,gr , I -: , .. , , .,. 'cn A.-wa. 1"" ' 4 Y ' f' - . : - ae1..,J..' .1-1,1.-,",, ,., ' -. 4, 5, . ,""" 1H'1.. 1.- 1....f.L1ff1m. fr.-,,..-... ., 11.a.,..j, 'ig I : ,,. '-'17 ,H .- - ... U' 5, .5 :QM H -"1 f.. . 1. Q .ff-.. 1-.-1 .:, - 11 - .f-M1 'gg ,. ..,-. . H-. 1 af A 7 'i 9 ' A , ,. 'ifgffxw-'gi ,.- IQ, 'I" ..fii"1' -f ,fa ,. - .,. H 4. . .Y I M1 V ...Vg 3' .-,. ..,,-A , 5"...,P. 1' N14. 1 ' 'mn .,g,, '..u.1,. ef' ' f. fs '1 " if , .f-Q' 'E-ff. ' j 2.5, A .f1.". 1411!-. , .Arr---.14 ' "'..i.Y . ' :-- 11' 'L' rg-1'-., .. ' 1 '. :", 11- 0- ' " 'L 7- ' . '-,'h.L,Q"" . '. :1yf..j+ , ,, . 11 '.,- ag-JJ ' v .. I.. .WLM If Che Encblridlon Published by the Class of 1897 PHILIP RAND, Chairman ,J l EUGENIA RADFORD STACY CARROLL MOSSER lr-11-21 A -iL.,'5 QQ l 1 431221 IIIQQQT im cm mummy club B00k fi A C4 4? ... Published annually by the Mulberry Club and printed privately at the Wind tryst Press, Chicago, Ill. l898 Editorial Zommlttee MARTHA FOOTE CROW CATHERINE DIX l-'ADDOCK ARTHUR SEARS HENNTNG EDWIN CAMPBELL WOOLLEY CD6 ISIIIUQISIID SOIIS Book Published by the Glee and Mandolin Clubs I897 IHIIIGQCYS HORACE GILLETTE LOZIER JAMES SCOTT BROWN STACY CARROLL Mosszn 105 J . 15,7 a ' . E g 1 ug 2 5 - 6 ' L J . .. ff- i .v ,A..-- 3 - ,QE , -' 1: I f " , J - 7 6 aff. , ff 4 5 F3 5 - - iziafdw -1 .Ia - affffa f f - lf ff? . : at 2,2 x 4 2 1. aj f MA . f 6 2 ' Lf g n ' ' Q . 'I ur ALPHA DELTA PHI HOUSE, 5700 Monroe Ave. Councillor, Associate Professor G. S. Goodspeedg Head, Dr. Ferdinand Schwill. BETA THETA PI HOUSE, 5714 Kimbark Ave. Councillor, Assistant Professor F. W. Shepardsong Head, William Bishop Owen. DELTA KAPPA EPSILON HOUSE, 5859 Washington Ave. Councillor, Assistant Professor J. R. Angellg Head, Henry Gordon Gale. PHI DELTA THETA HOUSE, 5738 Monroe Ave. Councillor, Associate Professor J. W. Moncriefg Head, William O. Wilson. PHI KAPPA PS1 HOUSE, 5737 Monroe Ave. Councillor, Professor E. R. L. Gould, Head, George Tunell. SIGMA CHI HOUSE, 5716 Kimbark Ave. Councillor, Assistant Professor S. H. Clark, Head, Newman Miller. THE Q. V. HOUSE, 5744 Monroe Ave. Councillor, Associate Professor Starr W. Cutting, Head, Walter A. Payne. PSI UPSILON HOUSE, Graduate Hall. Councillor, Assistant Professor George Carter Howlandg Head, Moses Dwight McIntyre. SOUTH DIVINITY HOUSE. Councillor, Dean E. B. Hulbert, D.D.g Head, Her- vey Foster Mallory. MIDDLE DIVINITY HOUSE. Councillor, Head Professor E. D. Burtong Head, Edgar DOW Varney. GRADUATE HOUSE. Councillor, Head Professor A. W. Small, Head, Assistant Professor Camillo von Klenze. SNELL HOUSE. Councillor, Head Professor H. P. Judson, Head, Joseph Edward Raycroft. BEECHER HOUSE. Councillor, Assistant Professor F. J. Miller, Head, Associ- ate Professor Julia E. Bulkley. KELLY HOUSE. Councillor, Head Professor J. L. Laughlin. Head, Associate Professor Marion Talbot, NANCY FOSTER HOUSE. Councillor, Associate Professor W. D. MacClintockg Head, Assistant Professor Myra Reynolds. DISCIPLES D1v1N1Tv HOUSE. Conncillor, Associate Professor W. D. Mac- Clintockg Head, Edward S. Ames. CUMBERLAND PRESBYTERIAN D1v1N1Tv HOUSE. C ' Head, W. C. Logan. ouncillor, Ira W. Howerth, 106 8.1 . ., kj- .AA 3 D -Q 'J .- - if , '9 . A was 'A X - K B - .. V 9 ,ive-544 4 ' , . .I -' , ' .L ,I . 'J V K U ' ' ' " -,.' "W ' ' 4 :J sl - - -+':-:G-"" ff? Che Christian Union PROFESSOR JOHN COULTER - - - President HENRY LLOYD - - - Vice-President GEORGE SAVVYER - Secretary and Treasurer Che Pbil3llfl7l'ODiC COIIIIIIHIQC PROFESSOR GEORGE HOWLAND - Chairman and Treasurer GEORGE SAVVYER ---- Secretary 107 U76 YOURS m2lI'S Cbl'lSIi3ll HSSOCIGIIOII FRANKLIN ELMER - - - President CHARLES BURROUGHS - - Recording Secretary GEORGE SAWYER - Corresponding Secretary CHARLES TORREY - - - Treasurer HOWARD GALT - General Secretary CD6 YOURS WOIIIQIYS Cbl'iSli6ll HSSOCIGUOII l897 CLARA ALBINA TILTON CORA BELLE JACKSON - HELEN WHITNEY BACKUS MARY SUSAN MILLER - CAROLYN LADD MOSS NIARY SUSAN MILLER CHARLOTTE TELLER ELIZABETH LINGLE - HARRIET CLARK - LUCY JOHNSTON I898 108 - President - Vice-President - Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary - - Treasurer - President - Vice-President - Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary - - Treasurer .1... 2 2 5' EE 2 -gre vi rg: ,,,. .- 9 5 'X' J ' lj: ' H ' y . ------ l f' fl 'P' ,X-if ff' "', ,.,. I :UI Q? ffl, , ,.. . - - ' F M - rr ---- Ii E-5 55 UQEEEE JU V flf-g 1 Ulummmn A 1 I- 'of t ll! alll, use: IECTEEE J- p 'L t l " ffffgzg, ft, w--,xi rl 'Vx P UU U la' lf fnnnnu W W W fl H15 'ff u 'Q lf ll' ' 1 N x X 5- Z 4-1 X 19" I 1 .Q' l WU ' 'V 9' P P YM l ,p P lt p l N5 Ja R B 4 --- Che Primrose may --- p '. P' 1 X A W' hrough woods where the y,,,,,, 7 l' wild rose hldes .al By the 4 fE"t'E?fff6fmn ' K Q river that runs away of .at ' ,fg in :A where the round moon l """' .st draws the long tides .st ll where lieth the Primrose wayw .sl the X path ol the hurrying breeze .al the road ry where the children play at 0r simply a lite of ease .st how what is the Primrose I lvaywwl Know you, you men or wiwt ' X' "H l tram' Jlught or the problem, pray? .sl here see ""- +A-r... . the answer writ .at this ls the Primrose " '- way x I Urffvffffw' X W llll jllll' I ,Nl mp. FOR THE FRATERNITY 11:- gag v-1' I ., T- 1 1 MAN gon THE ATHLETELN- FOR THE LOAFER ge'-, 5 is Nxxffff, 3 -- "T i rg H N . mf WS 2 2 ' 3 v L VT Q 'E 5, 6 f 'Q 041, ik A ' G3 'YQ 'SQ E4 5 ' CH OFALLK FOR THE rAcuz.TY FOR THE GAMBLER Q3 YT - -, i s Z, A --jf "f, T f I T -,ss I 94 su A ' V ag Q Q 1 HOLES X TIEMIPUS IFUGIITC' x K X , pw: CLMZJQA 'rogm 1 FoR THE MANAGING EOR THE GRINAD I EDITOR SOME 'VARSITY ESCUTCHEONS FOR THE SOCIETY MAN I 1.'1-s. I. EI II.. I . A,.I,Ih.I up x lf- I-1..fI'f , :.-:.. .HI-IIIII -IIIII II - -. II-.-. I I. -.'. A ' 'I' Aff I'-' . II,, I II. .I . . 'II. .i.:'. I. 1 I f I il-1,-A :. I. I II' IL '5.g.I-jl,I' .'I'-75,1 I' ' If 5.1: . '.1. 'TI' ff- I'-I- '.. . :xi ' .5vg".I! . . Q I I"I1-III I I 1 f Y.-QZjI..ffIfI .. I If' ' .' ,III . I:-IIIIII',..,I '- 'l,,,iIM..' I I nv- KIII -...I-,IIII -, I,I-.I. rfg. :..-,I III: 351, ,.' -' I' Im-Iq...I'III.yII I-.n 'I,I' I : IAQ: ' I II II.II,I f. Al'II"'!-Y?",'I ..I' JIIIHA: Zinn." ll. Q" In ,Y gi' I '.II-II-I I' I. 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M-ll:'I"..fXJ'1'f.'461.-1.-'"QWWIIINV-"' I .- - II'-TIL' NI, ,I II . II,I.I..III II ,,.5III .I...!, I., GZIIIIIIQII Il I-,CI I: ' ' "er va".-!'-, ,I Q-I., I' II...I5,f7Ijq.kII Q. J--I'II j'.-'.',.'If'II.I.'- Iu.I.--I ,. .- , . ,gg I-n. T7 J .A5fI.i 'fI'i?I'fv9--1...-I--'7'.I,mf' MT' 2- '-I iq I I r.'j'L - I.. ..' .' 'XQMMIQ II, I " ' E I:125'.:3IIIII 'LI' -I ,, I -. III 2 -I-.I.II.5m, IIIII-. .ax K .I ..I f'V' 'I ...I I" u!f'f'5I ' . I Img . I .I-,Ir I ,I . I I I,I I, III I ..IIL,I' ,I I X' IJ. ,. ..I.-II, N" :IN III I' W i 51 r ' I9 L I ! If ' Z p L .X Li E r' W A rv' F . X -N 1LL,ENo.co. cm. M ,r N x. -xx f. 1 P B f x XM X N S if 'Sf -a Q' 2 --EE, 1 4 wwf V:.S1 F' 5 IHNCIOI' Of .HFDIQIICS AMOS ALONZO STAGG b Zoacbes CHARLES ALLEN ' HENRY GORDON GALE CHARLES FOSTER Ronv JOSEPH EDWARD RAfCROFT HORACE BUTTERWORTH - A 5-R ! L J. CDO Hfllliik RQPYQSQIIIGIWQS The Graduate Schools The Divinity Schools The Senior Colleges The junior Colleges The Graduate Schools The Divinity Schools The Senior Colleges The Junior Colleges - l897 IS97 - I HENRY TEFFT CLARKE, JR. - HAVDEN EVAN JONES - XVILLIAM SCOTT BOND - FREDERICK DAY NICHOLS 898 HENRY GORDON GALE - ROBERT DAVIDSON - JOHN PRESTON MENTZER LEROY TUDOR VERNON ,pg fail if I 4-. V It-j if Q jill N- I OJ M, ff NNER5 A? 9 . 1 I - 1I, I:pfff55A-I-w,j ,' I 2 Hrgfm, " I , , A I I ' - ff Zi , 1 I f X f X' IK j K JJ A J f N V J K . if U . A ,I , A A A . I fk 092 'O 6-. HENRY GORDON GALE FRANK CLAYTON CLEVELAND HARRY IRUS COY WALTER JAMES CAVANAGH ERNEST DEKOVEN LEFFINGWELL JONATHAN EDWARD WEBB HERBERT MORSE BURCHARD THERON XVARE MORTIMER YVALTER SCOTT KENNEDY RALPH C. HAMILL CLARENCE BERT HERSCHBERGER GEORGE HENRY GARRY CHARLES FOSTER ROBY KELLOGG SPEED VVILLIAM THAW GARDNER AUSTIN CRAIG BOWDISH BIAURICE GORDON CLARKE NORMAN KENDALL ANDERSON IIAYDEN EVANS JONES THEODORE HIRAM PATTERSON HENRY INIAGEE ADKINSON HARVEX' FOX HARRYZDELMONT ABELLS HUGH GUTHRIE LEIGHTON GEORGE HOYT SAWYER FRED MERRIFIELD ALVIN LESTER BARTON LEROY TUDOR VERNON GEORGE LOUIS WHITE JOHN FRANKLIN HAGEY NOTT XVILLIAM FLINT CECIL VINCENT BACHELLISQ FRED HARVEY CALHOUN GILBERT AMES BLISS CHARLES LINDSEY BURROUGHS BYRON BAYARD SMITH CHARLES FIRTH CARTER VAN VLECK BROWN ROBERT NEWTON TOOKER 114 4 ' i,... I ,via 5 L, rf 1 x .' 1 ' ll! . - as-.4 5 fa- -'Zi 3- rf D Fig'5?f5ja,-41' -ga.-f 'Q gg 3--'j l A 1 t lf' 3' f ' -5' TES: 5: E -?L- f , 3'---.lil 2 s 2 gi- 2 , 1 Pr sim" , ' E ' ri 2 5 5- E A53 ' E f-1 if ri ,ss .-1: Qfj ' E 5-I-5---'1" --5' 1 v 1-1'a'-'W --Z : -2. .--..- 'E 'Lf whtlt- E 5 '-J. E E liutilfxli- zz .5 gg E E 5.3 . .T-99552, -.if 5-IE -5- -5 tml'-,A ' :. 3 E 5 " -E is 1.-.f 5- J 5 ,T 1 in rg. 3. 1 , , ' ' ,f her place in the foremost rank Our team has gained the honor of being able to look forward to having their opponents in every game playing 4 with the stimulus and desperation which the deciding game of their season alone can give. To account for this success in so young an institution as the University We call attention to the fact that We are supported by the two things which young colleges are supposed to lack: members from vvhich to draw material for a team N FOOT-BALL Chicago has by continuous good work deservedly earned and spirit to back it. Especially We are fortunate in having a system to our coaching, as opposed to the method employed in other Western colleges, by which players are compelled to unlearn each year what was knocked into them the year before. For the same reason our future in foot-ball is assured, as the alumni coaches under Mr. Stagg are slowly recruited from the victorious teams of the present. The records of the two seasons, 1896 and 1897, though marred by two defeats in 1896 and one in 1897, is one of which We may be proud. During the two years we were victors in more hard fought games with those teams struggling for the Western Championship than any other college, and while we cannot claim the championship for ourselves we deny the claim of any other team to it or to an equal record of victories. ilwlkii V Cm 1896 Ceam CHARLES Fos'rER Ronv, Captain CAVANAGH, Center WEBB, Left Guard TOOKER, Right Guard K ENEDY Left Tackle Ronv Right Tackle LIORTIMER ' FIRTH Left End HAMILL, Right End LEFFINGXVELL CLARK, Quarter Back HERSCHBRRGER, Left Half Back COY, Right Half Back GARDNER, Full Back SUBSTITUTES HENRY CLARK, NEEL, SINCERE, DAVIS, CLEVELAND, BURCHARD CHlCA60'S f00T-BALL RECORD FOR I896. September 12, Marshall Field Chicago, 24 Englewood High School September 15, Marshall Field Chicago, 24 Hyde Park High School, September 17, Marshall Field Chicago, 12 Englewood High School, September 19, Marshall Field, Chicago, 43 Wheaton High School, September 26, Marshall Field Chicago, 48 Eureka College, October 3, Marshall Field Chicago, 43 Monmouth College, October 7, Marshall Field, Chicago, 34, Hahnemann Medical College October 10 Marshall Field, Chicago, 6 University of Iowa, October 14 Notre Dame, Chicago, 18 Notre Dame, October 17, Marshall Field, Chicago, 30 Oberlin College, October 21 Marshall Field Chicago, 36, Armour Institute, October 24 Marshall Field, Chicago, 6 Northwestern University, October 31 Marshall Field, Chicago, 12, University of Illinois, November 7 Madison, Chicago, O, University of NVisconsin, November 10 Marshall Field Chicago, 0 Lake Forest University, November 14 Evanston, Chicago, 18, vs. Northwestern University, November 23, Coliseum, Chicago, 7 University of Michigan, Seventeen games were played, of which fourteen were victories for Chicago, two defeats and one tie. The University scored a total of three hundred and sixty-one points to its opponents' eighty-two. 116 nm ,ul ,: i' ' -, ,1.-r., 13, NALEZ ,J-21. ,A w i. 1,-.V K v. li 4 . 5 -. ,. .m- . 4.. ,,a. , ,. ,F7.-'T".,'e'15-.f 'V . :AAT ga .,- 73. N . ,u .fa . ,N .-4 4,1 -,.y,-..,.' .,,,.4 f. 'Iliff-. 4 , 1.34 'Y 4 .i'5" ,',x, -w,,. 'I-'b5.'. ww . 1. I 7 U V" 'h'wrK.'xfQ .,. ,, 3 ,M - .1t'.'nq,1 N.. "'u-,Eff -H'y,f.w w ,A 1 f -.-u f-.r '.- .'.,, 4 1 1 I, .u Jn. - nu .. ,w-...gm ' -if . -. . V ,, VL, , ig ff' CN 4 X, fn-I 141 . 1 , 5 ' , ..'.,..--' .,":l- ,q Mrk" FS- " ' I j- HCM . Nl 't:'.g."q-.3 va 1 '- ' vr ' ,. ,, my .i I I ., ' JL . Ji" .., -' v -44.0 sf ' ' 1 .... 1 X," In .P A f ,. . -'I f fi!" f if 4 .' I 4 . 1' ' " ' vig .u lig 4" . ow. J. 'nl fi ., ,1-.- , ,I-qv, ,.t.g - .' . gf.: ,ff lv.,.Q-.,.- '. .. ., f J. -... .,,. . -P.,-- V' -.., v g mix" U ' an rl v 47 D 1 w..'-YP. ' 3 r 'v . ,,,- , I ,Y , . . VW- v, nh, , -F43 .v f " " , . 4-A,,.',y, an T W, A 5 -1.1-.Urn ,A .pg ,EN 4-1.:. 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VL ' 1 0 4 5 XQW xv ,E I Y Y, g 3' , z ' 4 f, .1 CD2 1897 Ctdm CLARENCE BERT HERSCHBERGER, Captain CAVANAGH, Center SPEED, Left Guard BOWDISH, Right Guard MORTIMER, Left Tackle WEBB, Right Tackle GARREY, Left End H.-xM1LL, Right End CLARK, Quarter Back KENNEDY, Left Half Back HERSCHBERGER, Right Half Back GARDNER, Full Back SUBSTXTUTES Fox, PATTERSON, ANDERSON CHICAGO'S FOOT-BALL RECDRD FOR 1897 September 18, Marshall Field, Chicago, 22, vs. Hyde Park High School, 0 September 24, Marshall Field, Chicago, ll, vs. Hyde Park High School, 0 September 25, Marshall Field, Chicago 21, vs. Englewood High School, 0 Gctober October October October October October November November November 2 9 12 16 23 30 5, 13, 25, Marshall Field 7 Marshall Field, Marshall Field Marshall Field I D Marshall Field, Champaign, Marshall Field, Marshall Field, Coliseum, Twelve games were played, D 7 Chicago, Chicago Chicago, Chicago, Chicago, Chicago, Chicago, Chicago, Chicago, of which 1 Monmouth College, Lake Forest University Armour Institute, Beloit College, Northwestern University, University of Illinois, Notre Dame, University of Wisconsin, University of Michigan, Chicago won eleven and lost one. The University scored three hundred and forty-one points during the season, to its oppon ents' fifty-six. ll? CD2 1897 SCl'llbS LYMAN Center LEIGHTON MANNING, Right Guard DUKE, Left Guard CLARKE, Right Tackle YVALLING, Left Tackle HoLs'rE, Right End DAVIS, Left End BROWN, Quarter Back KIMBALL, Right Half WALKER, Left Half SCHMAHL, Full Back SUBSTITUTES PETTITT, GOULD, ABERNETHY Scrubs Scrubs, Scrubs Scrubs Scrubs 5 ! SCHEDULE Of GAMES 4, vs. Armour Institute 12, vs. Central Y. M. C. A., 6, vs. Lewis Institute, O, vs. Morgan Park, ' 22, vs. Illinois Scrubs, 1 The Scrubs played five games, winning three, losing one, and tying one. vi -- -- vfif rr X? , ,,,A', 4 V -ffxaegp-fliyfll if , Jf i ,Mgt aww in f ' lbw? Q E 4 yet track work has not gained the enthusiastic support which Q? Q greets other forms of athletics. This is the case throughout all the k V West, and in spite of the fact that our western records are undenia- 7-R bly good, even at the Western Intercollegiate meets the crowds are small considering the number which a contest between almost any two of the colleges in base-ball or foot-ball would draw. It is not to be wondered at that spectators fail to appreciate the wearisome succession of heats and the poor- ly managed and long drawn out field events. The same fault which permits the field events to lag until nightfall and spectators to enter the field is responsible for the lack of well sustained rivalry throughout all the program. Another reason is in the newness of the recognition of track work as a 'first class intercollegiate sport. Dual meets offer more excitement, as the rivalry is more focused, but even here the con- tests are too new to attract the attention they deserve. Our own meets gain more and more attention on the campus, and there is no reason why, with the increased spirit, and with the meets well advertised, we should not be' both victorious and successful financially. CD2 1896 C2301 CECIL V. BACHELLE, Captain Theodore Hiram Patterson Henry McClenahan Frederick Franklin Steigmeyer Carr Neel Ernest Gundlach Charles Raymond Barrett George Louis White Clarence Bert Herschberger Fred Harvey Calhoun Earl Peabody Earl Williamson Albert Logie Harry Chase Harvey A. Peterson Edward Lee Poulson Charles Lindsey Burroughs 119 Cbica3o's CHICK RQCOYG TOI' T896 On February 29 the University in dual meet defeated Lake Forest at the Gym- nasium. Jackson, of Lake Forest, tied the world's record in the 35 yard dash, at .0-15. 1 x The points : University of Chicago, 56 g Lake Forest University, 33. The University gave its first annual invitation meet at the First Regiment Ar- mory, March 14. Chicago won easily, with 20 points to the First Regiment's 10. April 18, occurred the First Cup Meet, remarkable for the first appearance of Peabody in bicycle contests. With a handicap of 50 yards he defeated Bachelle, scratch, in the mile event. On May 4 he again defeated Bachelle, both starting from scratch, and ten days later repeated the victory. Attention was immediately centered on this wonderful young rider who had appeared so unexpectedly. His rise in ama- teur cycling was rapid. During the remainder of the year in college and without, he added victoryjafter victory to his record. In 1897, however, his iirst year out of college, his achievements on the wheel became phenomenal. He steadily refused to become a professional, though several times he showed himself equal to the cleverest riders of that rank. At the close of the season his victories outnumbered Zimmerman's ama- teur record. Nothing can speak better for Chicago's athletics than Peabody's cham- pionship of the cause of amateur cycling. The Triangular Meet, held in Marshall Field, May 30, 1896, resulted in a victory for Chicago. The summary: TRACK EVENTS 100 Yard dash Potter, N. W. D. H. Jackson, L. F. Patterson, U. of C. 102 Mile Run Cragin, L. F. Alcott, L. F. McClenahan, U. of C. 4,555 120 Yard Hurdles Steigmeyer, U. of C. Neel, U. of C. Bettis, L. F. .18 Mile XValk Gundlach, U. of C. Anderson, L. F. Barrett, U. of C. 8.052 220 Yard Dash Potter, N. W. Patterson, U. of C, D. H. Jackson, L. F. .222 440 Yard Run Potter, N. W. G. L. White, U. of C. YV. F. Jackson, L. F. .53E 220 Yard Hurdles Perry, N. W. Herschberger,U. of C. 1.1. Jackson, L. F. .27E 880 Yard ,Run Cragin, L. F. Calhoun, U. of C. Gates, N. W. 2.07 One Lap Bicycle Peabody, U. of C. Bachelle, U. of C. Moore, N. W. .372 Two Mile Bicycle Peabody, U. of C. Bachelle, U. of C. 5.55E Relay Race Lake Forest Northwestern Chicago 3,402 FIELD EVENTS Running High Jump Holmes, N. W. Steigmeyer, U. of C. Herschberger,U. of C. 5 ft. 3k in. 16 Pound Shot 16 Pound Hammer Running Broad Jump Pole Vault Williamson, U. of C. Perry, N. W. Woolsey, L. F. Perry, N. W. Perry, N. WV. Lee, L. F. Neel, U. of C. Chase, U. of C. 120 Steigmeyer, U. of C. 34 ft. 52 in. Logie, U. of C. 103 ft. 62 in. Steigmeyer, U. of C. 21 ft. 3 in. jones, N. VV. 9 ft. Chicago carried off a total of sixty-three points, with Eve iirsts, ten seconds, and eight thirds 3 Northwestern, forty-four points, seven iirsts, two seconds, and three thirds, Lake Forest, thirty-six points, four iirsts, four seconds, and four thirds. June 6, Western Intercollegiate Track Meet, at Bankers' Athletic Club Field. The summary : TRACK EVENTS Events First Second Third Time 100 Yard Dash Maybury, Wis. Rush, Gr. Potter, N. .10 Mile Walk Bunnell, Minn. Gundlack, U. of C. Peterson, Wis. 7.31l 120Yard Hurdle Richards, Wis. Jackson, L. F. Schucardt, Wis. .162 440 Yard Run Rush, Gr. Downer, Wis. jackson, L. F. .502 Mile Bicycle Burton, Minn. Peabody, U. of C. Spaulding, Gr. 2.372 Mile Run Cragin, L. F. Palmer, Gr. Fellows, Gr. 4.33 220 Yard Hurdle Richards, Wis. Clark, Gr. Schucardt, Wis. .272 Half Mile Cragin, L. F. Fellows, Gr. Calhoun, U. of C. 2.052 220 Yard Dash Maybury, YVis. Rush, Gr. Potter, N. .223 FIELD EVENTS High Jump Liegler, Wis. Mason, Wis. W. France, Wis. 5 ft. 7 in. Shot Put Cochems, Wis. Finlayson, Minn. Williamson, U. of C. 38 ft. 95 in. Broad Jump Neel, U. of C. Perry, N. H. France, VVis. 20 ft. 9 in. Hammer Throw Cochems, XVis. Von Oven, U. of C. Lee, L. F. 113 ft. 6Ein. Pole Vault Wilson, N. Herschberger,U. of C. Coffeen, U. of I. 10 ft. 6 in. POINTS University of Wisconsin 46 Lake Forest University 15 Grinnell College 22 University of Minnesota 13 University of Chicago 16 Northwestern University 10 5 University of Illinois 4 June 13, Dual Meet with the University of Michigan, resulting in a victory for the latter. Gundlach, U. of C., broke the VVestern Intercollegiate record for the mile walk in 7255. The summary: Events 100 Yard Dash 220 Yard Dash Quarter Mile Run Half Mile Run Mile Run Mile Walk 120 Yard Hurdles 220 Yard Hurdles Mile Bicycle Relay Race C955 Yardsl TRACK EVENTS First Patterson, C. Thomas, M. Meining, M. Calhoun, C. Peterson, C. Gundlach, C Steigmeyer, Ayres, M. Marsh, M. Michigan 121 C. Second Thomas, M. Patterson, C. Heald M. Ivoodruff, M. Tryon, M. Neel, C. Chubb, M. Peabody, C. Chicago Time .105 .222 .542 2.263 4.522 7.255 .172 .28 2.395 1.442 i f gs F93 Q, 'X FIELD EVENTS Running High jump Vernor, M. St. Clair, M. 5 ft. 595 in. Running Broad Jump Le Roy, M. Neel, C. 21 ft. 10 in. 16 Pound Hammer McConl-rey, M. Bennett, M. 106 ft. 65 in. Pole Vault Herschberger, C. Tryon, M. 10 ft. 16 Pound Shot Williamson, C. DePont, M. 34 ft. 11 in. Michigan won sixty-seven points, with eight firsts and nine seconds, Chicago fifty points, with seven iirsts and five seconds. Che 1897 Ceam THEODORE HIRAM PATTERSON, Captain George Louis White Charles Lindsey Burroughs Byron Bayard Smith Isaac Barney Hyman Fred Harvey Calhoun Carter Van Vleck Brown Clarence Bert Herschberger Cecil V. Frederick Patterson Lachmund Alvin Lester Barton A William Scott Bond, Jr. Bachelle CHICAGO'S TRACK RECORD f0R I897 George Alernbert Brayton Harold Le Claire Ickes Harry Bartlett Campbell Newell Montague Fair Frederick Augustus Brown The indoor work or the track team would have been uneventful, there being no important meets, but for the controversy between Mr. Stagg and the Amateur Athletic Union. In order to spur the members of the track team to greater efforts and to give them some experience in actual contests. Mr. Stagg arranged a dual meet with the First Regiment, to be held March 12, 1897. However, about a week before the appointed date, Mr. Stagg received a letter from Mr. R. E. Fishburn, President of -the Central Division of the A. A. U., informing him that all participantsin the meet must register with the A. A. U., under penalty of disqualification. Mr. Stagg determined to test the matter and to iight the question out with the A. A. U. He accordingly announced in the papers of the city that he would hold an open meet and invited all who wished to contest. The meet was held and Mr. Fishburn published a statement that all who have taken part in it were disqualified and debarred from all further con- tests held under the rules of the A. A. U. But Mr. Stagg received no otlicial notice of his wholesale disqualification. The Universities of Minnesota and Illinois publicly upheld Mr. Stagg in the stand he had taken, while the University of Wisconsin and Northwestern University supported the A. A. U. The Manager of the Northwestern base-ball team, in obsequious haste to do the bidding of the A. A. U., called on Mr- Stagg and declared that Mr. Stagg must submit to the A. A. U. and register his men or Northwestern would refuse to meet the University of Chicago on the diamond. Mr. Stagg replied that, so far as he himself was concerned, the A. A. U. had nothing to do with the case, he had taken his stand and would not recede from it. The justi- fication of Mr. Stagg came shortly after when the A. A. U. admitted its defeat by receding from its position and removing its ban from our track team. 122 L,---f -uv' v- is A .fy ,AW 1" k fa F---.... i-, 'F .A .q . . .- .J ,Ulf 3 ' "' .,x4.,, Y- H N 03- 14.-,lin ,, av 'rf' k x .1 I s 1 ' n , 4 I . x 1 I Uh X .l179" ' f , ' mis, V '-4 4 'l,,7 X c s 1 .Im iw! I W m"i:rs.", , C .' "V-LQV s A v 1. s, el, 1 1 jiyh '. .1 ' ,-if .34 J. ,,- x 'w .J . v p , . A '- I In the Dual Meet with the University of Illinois, at Champaign, May 11, Chi- cago was easily victorious, with 77 points to her opponent's 43. The summary : Event 100 Yard Dash 220 Yard Dash 440 Yard Run Half Mile Run Mile Run 120 Yard Hurdle 220 Yard Hurdle Mile Walk Mile Bicycle Half Mile Bicycle Hammer Shot Put Broad Jump High jump Pole Vault TRACK EVENTS First Burroughs, U. of C. Burroughs, U. of C. Mills, U. of I. White, U. of C. Smith, U. of C. Calhoun, U. of C. Calhoun, U. of C. Hoagland, U. of I. Bachelle, U. of C. Bachelle, U. of C. FIELD EVENTS Von Oven, U. of I. Prickett, U. of I. Herschberger,U. of C. Byrne, U. of I. Herschberger,U. of C. Second Time Patterson, U. of C. .102 Hyman, U. of C. .232 Cabeen, U. of I. .55 Smith, U. of C. 2.072 Brayton, U. of C. 4.572 Porter, U. of I. .18 Clark, U. of I. .282 Ickes, U. of C. 8.142 Brown, U. of C. 3.042 Breburger, U. of I. 1.142 Enochs, U. of I. 120 ft. 5in. Herschberger, U. of C. 35 ft. 6 in. Campbell, U. of C. 20 ft. 3 in. Lachmund, U. of C. 5 ft. 5 in. Coffeen, U. of I. 10 ft. 391 in Chicago made a total of seventy-seven points, with ten Ersts and nine seconds Illinois a total of forty-three points, with Eve irsts and six seconds. The second Dual Meet with the University of Michigan at Detroit, May 29, re- sulted in a defeat for Chicago. Michigan scored a total of 94 points, Chicago 46. White did especially good work for the University, winning two hard races, the quarter and the half mile. The summary: TRACK EVENTS Event Second Third 100 Yard Dash Burroughs, C. Thomas, M. Patterson, C. 220 Yard Dash Thomas, M.' Burroughs, C. Thompson, M. 440 Yard Run White, C. Batterman, M. Fair, C. Half Mile Run White, C. Barton, C. King, M. Mile Run Wood, M. Smith, C. Burns, 120 Yard Hurdles 7f1cLean, M. Calhoun, C. Ayers, M. 220 Yard Hurdles , Chubb, M. McLean, M. Calhoun, C. Mlle Walk ,M Tryon, M. Woodruff, M. F. Brown, C. Quarter Mile Bicycle Turner, M. York, M. Bush, M. Mile Bicycle Tiuner, M. C. Brown, C. York, M. Relay Racef880Ydsj Michigan Chicago 123 Time .102 .222 .522 2.07 4.382 .162 .272 8.041 .36 2.37 1.345 FIELD EVENTS High Jump Vernor, M. Flournoy, M. Herschberger, C. 5 ft. 91 in. Broad Jump Reynolds, M. Vernor, M. Bond, C. 21 ft. Shot Put Lehr, M. Herschberger, C. Oliver, M. 36 ft. 2 in. Hammer Throw Bennett, M. Oliver, M. Herschberger, C. 104 ft. 61 in. Vault Herschberger, C. Tryon and Adams, M. 9 ft. 9 in. Michigan won a total of ninety-four points, with twelve lirsts, nine seconds, and seven thirds, Chicago a total of forty-six, with four nrsts, six seconds, and eight thirds. The Western Intercollegiate Meet was held at the Bankers' Athletic Club's Field, June 5. Four western records were broken, Maybury lowering the time in the 100 and 220 yard dashesg Richards in the 120 yard hurdles, and Bunnell of Minnesota in the Mile Walk. Burroughs pushed Maybury hard, his wonderful form for his Sophomore year promising greater things for the season of Event 100 Yard Dash 220 Yard Dash 440 Yard Run Half Mile Run Mile Run 120 Yard Hurdle 220 Yard Hurdle Mile Walk Mile Bicycle High Jump Broad jump Shot Put Hammer Throw Vault First Maybury, XV. Maybury, W. W. F. Jackson, L. F. Brennan, Minn. Copeland, W. Richards, W. Kraenzlein, W. Bunnell, Minn. Bush, Mich. Kraenzlein, W. Dole. L. S. Jr. Cochems, VV. Von Oven, Ill. Dole, L. S. jr. Wisconsin Michigan - Minnesota Chicago - Illinois - - TRACK EVENTS Second Burroughs, C. Burroughs, C. Fox, W. G. L. White, C. Wood, Mich. McLean, Mich. Chubb, Mich. Hoagland, Ill. Taylor, W. FIELD EVENTS Vernor, Mich. Gaines, Minn. Roller, De P. Cochems, YV. Leland Stanford Jr. - 2 0 Lake Forest - Grinnell - De Pauw - Northwestern '98. The summary: Third Time Potter, N. XV. 93 C. Stevenson, Minn. .215 Mins, 111. .512 Fellows, Grin. 2.062 Fellows, Grin. 4.382 Armstrong, Grin. .152 Richards, VV. .252 Tryon, Mich. 7.26 Turner, Mich. 2.365 XValler, W. 5 ft. 9. in. Brewer, W. 21 ft. 31 in. Brewer, N. W. Enochs, Ill. Herschberger, C. Coffeen, Ill. Firsts Seconds Thirds Points 7 3 3 47 - 1 4 2 19 2 1 1 14 - 0 4 0 12 1 1 3 ll 1 10 1 0 0 5 - 0 0 3 3 0 1 0 3 - 0 0 1 1 40 ft. Ill in. 122 ft. 1 in. 10 ft. 6 in. On june 11, to close the track season, the Annual Chicago Meet was held on Marshall Field. Five local records were lowered. Burroughs ran the 100-yard dash, paced in 10 seconds, F. A. White, the half-mile in 2.0713 B. B. Smith, the mile in 4.463 Bachelle, the two-mile bicycle in 5.17E, and the half-mile bicycle in 1.09l. 124 100 Yard Dash 220 Yard Dash 440 Yard Dash Half Mile Run Mile Run 120 Yard Hurdles 220 Yard Hurdles Mile Walk High jump Broad Jump Shot Put Hammer Throw Pole Vault Mile Bicycle WCSIQFII lllI2I'C0llCS1illQ meets 1895 1896 1897 1895 1896 1897 1895 1896 1897 1895 1896 1897 1895 1896 1897 1895 1896 1897 1895 1896 1897 1895 1896 1898 1895 1896 1897 1895 1896 1897 1895 1896 1897 1895 1896 1897 1895 1896 1897 1895 1896 1897 Crum, University of Iowa . - Maybury, University of Wisconsin - Maybury, University of Wisconsin Crum, University of Iowa - Maybury, University of Wisconsin Maybury, University of Wisconsin - Hodgman, University of Michigan - Rush, Grinnell College - - W. F. jackson, Lake Forest University Palmer, Grinnell College - - Cragin, Lake Forest University - Brennan, University of Minnesota Clyde, Grinnell College - Cragin, Lake Forest University - Copeland, University of Wisconsin - Dyer, University of California - Richards, University of Wisconsin - Richards, University of Wisconsin Torrey, University of California Richards, University of Wisconsin Kraenzlein, University of Wisconsin - Mervin, University of California - Bunnell, University of Minnesota - Bunnell, University of Minnesota - Clark, University of Illinois - Leigler, University of Wisconsin - Kraenzlein, University of Wisconsin - Woolsey, University of California - Neel, University of Chicago - Dole, Leland-Stanford University - Cochems, University of Wisconsin - Cochenis, University of Wisconsin Cochenis, University of Wisconsin - Edgren, University of California - Cochems, University of Wisconsin - Von Oven, University of Illinois - Culver, Northwestern University Wilson, Northwestern University - Dole, Leland Stanford University - Bachelle, University of Chicago - Burton, University of Minnesota Bush, University of Michigan - 125 - 5ft 5ft -5ft 21 ft 20 ft 21 ft as ftfl 38 ft 40 ft 123 ftff 113 ft 122 ft: 10 ft 10 ft 10 ft -9 'y TIME .10 .10 .092 .22 .222 .213 .502 .502 .511 1.592 2.052 2.062 4.382 4.33 4.382 .162 .162 .152 .272 .272 .252 7.312 7.315 7.26 9 in. 7 in. 9 in. 9 in. 9 in. 31 in. 105 in. 91 in. 111 in. 95 in. 62 in. A in. 6 in. 6 in. 6 in. 2.46 2.372 2.362 I1 x , A ll , 2 f .Q f S' lx Ea HE BASE-BALL season of 1896 left us, after a season extending from "' 00 sl K March 31 to july 2, during which thirty-three games were played, with U an undisputed title to the western championship. Sixteen western :fs college games were played, in which we made 127 runs to our oppo- nents' 80. In the series with Michigan, Chicago won three out of Eve. All the other games we won. A well contested game was played with the Chicago League team, and we had the pleasure of seeing Capt. Anson struck out by Henry Clark. Indeed the season's work was so gratifying that an eastern trip was taken. En- thusiasm in the University stimulated by this inovation ran high, and we waited breathlessly for those telegrams signed A. A. Stagg. Excitement had reached its height when the crowd gathered around the bulletin board on the afternoon of May 27. And then as we gradually realized that it wasn't a practical joke, we went home. However, the team was as successful as we could expect, considering the extremely hard trip. Of the four college games played we won from Cornell and Pennsylvania, and lost to Yale and Harvard. As an appendix to the eastern trip came the series with Brown on our own grounds. The games were all that could be asked for, the crowds big, the weather lovely, while the spectators were held breathless, and victory was undecided until the last put-out. It is greatly to be hoped that Mr. Stagg can close negotiations with Brown or some other eastern college, as a climax for the sea- son of '98. The eighteen ninety-seven season was much shorter, lasting only about two months. Fourteen college games were played, of which we lost three. As for the championship, Illinois and Chicago won from each by the same score, but the records of the two teams point very much in our favor. All other championship contestants were defeated, although we lost to Beloit by a score of 11 to 12. 126 Che 1896 team HARRY DELMONT ABELLS, Captain HENRY TEI-'FT CLARKE, Pitcher HARRY DELMONT ABELLS, First Base HENRY MAGEE ADKINSON, Second Base JAMES SCOTT BROWN, Left Field FREDERICK DAY NICHOLS, Pitcher CLARENCE BERT HERSCHBERGER, Center Field THOMAS SWEET, Short Stop HAYDEN JONES, Catcher CHARLES WINSTON, Third Base GEORGE Hovr SAWYER, Right Field MAURICE GORDON CLARKE, Short Stop CHARLES SUMNER PIKE, Left Field 1 es Games Zrnrllat Nichols 30 123 Jones 27 120 Sweet 27 111 Winston 25 94 Adkinson 23 84 Abells 29 119 Sawyer 6 22 G. Clarke 22 88 Brown 30 114 H. Clarke 25 78 Herschberger 25 96 Pike 14 36 Jones, c. Abells, 1 b. Nichols, p. Pike, r. f. H. Clarke, p. Herschberger, Adkinson, 2 b. Brown, 1. f. Winston, 3 b. G. Clarke, 3 b Sawyer, r. f. Sweet, s s. THE BATTIN6 AVERAGE FOR l896 - Home Thre Two le HHS Runs Runs Baggess Baggers age? Average 50 49 7 5 13 28 12:2 406 37 28 1 1 4 24 308 33 34 0 1 7 20 297 28 27 1 3 6 14 296 24 24 1 4 7 17 285 29 12 0 1 2 13 243 5 5 0 0 1 " -2 227 20 14 0 1 3 5 227 25 25 0 1 2 18 219 17 18 0 2 4 10 218 19 13 1 4 4 7 197 7 12 1 1 0 57 194 FIELDING AVERAGE FOR I896 Accepted Chances Errors Average 197 9 956 260 18 935 90 8 918 36 5 878 49 7 875 c. f. 48 7 872 82 13 862 72 13 847 83 17 830 56 16 777 12 4 750 99 35 738 127 .3 fi? AE Sllmmafp or the GGIIIQS, 1895 March 31, at Marshall Field, Chicago April 6, at Marshall Field, Chicago April 8, at Marshall Field, Chicago April 11, at Champaign, Ill. Chicago April 14, at Marshall Field, Chicago April 15, at Marshall Field, Chicago April 16 at Marshall Field Chicago April 19, at Marshall Field, Chicago April 21, at Marshall Field, Chicago April 24, at Marshall Field, Chicago April 25, at Marshall Field, Chicago April 29, at Marshall Field, Chicago May 1, at Marshall Field, Chicago May 2, at Marshall Field, Chicago May 4, at Marshall Field, Chicago May 7, at Marshall Field, Chicago May 9, at Marshall Field, Chicago May 11, at Marshall Field, Chicago May 13, at Marshall Field, Chicago May 16, at Marshall Field, Chicago May 18, at Marshall Field, Chicago May 20, at Ann Arbor, Mich. Chicago May 22, at Ithaca Chicago May 23, at Orange, N. J, Chicago May 25, at Philadelphia Chicago May 27, at New Haven Chicago May 28, at Cambridge Chicago June 4, at Ann Arbor, Mich. Chicago june 11, at Ann Arbor, Mich. Chicago june 13, at Marshall Field, Chicago june 27, at Marshall Field, Chicago June 30, at Marshall Field, Chicago july 2, at Marshall Field, Chicago Hyde Park High School Englewood High School North End University of Illinois Illinois Cycling Club City League Lake Forest University Whitings Rush Medical Blackburn University Whitings University of Illinois Chicago National League Northwestern University Illinois Wesleyan Rush Medical University of Michigan Detroit League University of Michigan Indiana University Iowa College University of Michigan Cornell University Orange Athletic Club University of Pennsylvania Yale Harvard University of Michigan University of Michigan University of Wisconsin Brown University Brown University Brown University . A.-. 5 1 if 3 rl F f 1. I ,L I, 111 SE s X f I ' ' ' e., .4 .:-,:, 1Q, X X, f. ' . , ff. . , ::5:,,. .gm 1 1 ...E f, , I' . A ' u 1.5wav-wwf?Ref-asm-QfsefxwiaA2KQ'M" 2 W 1 i ' - v 3 -.4 'L qv i X- VL' WWW. ' Q ,Qfw u as 1 9 1 liil 2 'Il I II ull 'I iijlllfsl, I 1 W' LW' 1 W -' IIA 0941597 mm ., ,,,,,,,t , , ,,,,, A Im, Im HENRY TEFFT CLARKE, Captain ' if . HARRY DELMONT ABELLS, First Base . :I-, 2, . FT,-55' t HENRY MAGEE ADRINsoN, Second Base ...Q JAMES Scotrr BROWN, Left Field ' Gnome Hovr SAWYER, Right Field CLARENCE BERT HERSCHRERGER, Center Field Henry Clark, Gardner. c. Abells, 1b. Adkinson, 2b. Merrifield, 3b. Vernon, ss. Brown, lf. Herschberger Sawyer, rf. Hagey, lf. Leighton, c. G. Clarke, ss. P. MAURICE GORDON CLARKE, Short Stop WILLIAM THAW GARDNER, Catcher LEROY T. VERNON, Short Stop G If ,Vi I FRED W. MERRIRIELD, Third Base ,fl y Elf P 2 W W X '56 X XJ JOHN FRANKLIN HAGEY, Left Field HUGH GUTHRIE LEIGHTON, Catcher BAITING AND FIHDING AVERAGES, I897 Stolen Passed 9 17 6 8 11 10 9 19 0 1 FIELDING BATTING G3r1?l1CS Chances Errors Avx'ge ht Bat Hits Avfe Bases Balls 16 62 6 903 90 28 311 13 21 167 9 947 92 33 358 20 197 4 979 76 22 289 8 51 4 937 34 12 353 22 100 16 840 85 23 271 17 75 12 840 59 15 254 13 33 4 878 51 14 275 cf. 22 45 8 822 96 31 323 22 28 6 786 78 30 384 9 11 4 636 34 5 147 4 25 1 960 14 1 071 15 62 13 790 57 14 246 129 10 I N4 J a. 1 I K L I I p'I 2 A Z. uf . af IJ," - '- Q ff- If'-' ' A R ,,, . . - I ,- .... I.ru-inm.1-nunm1vum.:muurf1mm Q N if f., .-r i ,gs U7 6' E .E N 4.f.:'Af47 Al I' M", , Q jm, .1, MflE'1,f'P' W!!! wiffif' rc' W1 5 EI, I! Lagjq ,JM ,Y -E n ' 9 I: Um rvign, Spf 9 ' 7 77, 15 K X X Sllmm3l'D Ol' GBIIIQS FOI' 1891 X April 14 April 15 April 17: at Marshall Field April 9, , , at Marshall Field, at Marshall Field, at Champaign, Ill. 1 , ,, , . - .E-7 April 20 April 24 April 26, April 30 May 1, May 4, May 5 May 8 May 12, May 15, May 18 May 20 May 24, May 29 May 31, June 5, june 7, june 12 7 1 at Marshall Field at Marshall Field, at Marshall Field, at Marshall Field, at Marshall Field, at Madison, Wis. , at Beloit, Wis. , at Marshall Field, at Marshall Field, at Marshall Field, at Marshall Field : at Marshall Field: at Marshall Field, at Detroit, Mich. at Oak Park, Ill. at Marshall Field, at Ann Arbor, Mich. at Oak Park, Ill. Chicago Edgars 1 Chicago Hyde Park High School 3 Chicago Edgars 5 Chicago University of Illinois 9 Chicago Cranes 4 Chicago Lake Forest University 3 Chicago Rush Medical 5 Chicago Alumni 8 Chicago University of Illinois 5 Chicago University of Wisconsin 0 Chicago Beloit College 12 Chicago University of Michigan 3 Chicago University of Michigan 1 Chicago Notre Dame University 2 Chicago Oak Park 6 Chicago University of Nebraska 2 Chicago University of Iowa 6 Chicago University of Michigan 5 Chicago Oak Dark 13 Chicago University of Wisconsin 2 Chicago University of Michigan 3 Chicago Oak Park 16 Total Games Played, 22 7 Won, 18, Lost, 4. Runs by University of Chicago - Runs by Opponents - - - 234 - - 114 Total College Games, 145 Won, 11 g Lost, 3. Runs by University of Chicago - Runs by Opponents - - - 127 - - 58 Total Games in Championship Series, 83 Won, 6 g Lost, 2 Runs by University of Chicago - Runs by Opponents - - - 73 - 28 Che lSlliUQl'SiID RQSQYDQS TOI' 1897 D. A. KENNEDY BREEDEN BOND BLACKBURN GRIFFITH R. HAMILL L. HAMILL RAND SCHMAHL WRIEDT REED - HOLSTE GARREY - SCHEDULE 0F GAMES Reserves, 18, vs. Princeton-Yale, 5 Reserves, 9, vs. Hyde Park, 6 Reserves, 23, vs. Ashlands, 8 - Catcher Pitcher - First Base Second Base Short Stop Third Base Left Field Right Field Center Field Reserves, 6, vs. Auburn Park, 12 Reserves, 12, vs. Morgan Park Five games were played, three won and two lost. v-,Q -. , . Xi: rf -ov ,D -r f. 04,t1,0v? A. ,f 3099 ' -'w ,. We :- ,- I . .. I, .,.,,... ....,,, , 1i" '5 I , - - -N - Ha:-us, ??!l'1l,"gl!g' - - L wr t I 5 1 Ji -14 fl pigs ig :mg v w,i5?:i.'Z.figfij .f Q 1 33 4+ -Tm " I ui I win, F- po as not the prominence Q R of track, base-ball, or foot-ball, yet our representatives have gained international renown. We have reason to be proud not only of having -1 3 always held the Westem Intercollegiate Championship, but also in having our representatives in the past two years win the Western Women's Champion- ship, the Western Championship in singles, and the national championship in doubles. With the uniformly victorious team, with Mr. Neel, Mr. Bond, and Miss Pound to speak for Our interest in tennis and its result, we look for continuous success in 'E LTHOUGH tennis as an intercollegiate s rt h 'a 83 - tennis. WN, it A . CD6 1897 C6lllllS team .5 A . i , N, 'IQ' ' l 1 PHILIP RAND, Captain ",i'l',Q',,l" - ' HAROLD LECLARE ICKES, Manager ' WILLIAM SCOTT BOND f il F 5 CHARLES DUFFIELD HALSEY X j i WILLIAM FRANCE ANDERSON ' 1- " 1 ,fi aa' I EDWIN LEE POULSON - A Mm PAUL BLACRWELDI-:R E " I HARRY NORMAN GOTTLIEB 4 ' .- ROBERT GORDON GOULD A ' sp , 132 if R' awfvfliff- 'Mm I A Q f -u, 'sy:'f.,-my ,V , ll 1' I r 10 U ,lf- I 711. I, .. .S L. 1 4 - La ?' A ma' Yr " "jg L., 5? . ,.,".l Q 'x "' -V 'v:::f4f'aA , .u I ' . M- vff- .' r I ,, 11, , " E fn.-.wg 'mg-' 'Q-If H Q , ..?-:ffl-"':1-t Y I . 4 ,Ag 4?,,ufq3.f, ox .. N - 4 119- -Rn ' ' "- ff' 5 Q ":G7'f4. ,l1,,'x',Rg' A 1 K, "Q, gf. ,. ' ,"'i:3r M. .'QaEf,,.'-'Aw' .1-'QL Twig fy- - --Vu Ia'R51fi5wf'5.,o. V' :'T,1'1 fa' f M L ww V. . Q-I '3Q,l:. Q 'QQ' .,qHQZi'1 qA,..,.i' fflrii- , 9. 132 K? .1 - ...,'-'fag infli' 1. 5 ff' 1,'F':,i'5:If, .wp U L' .1 . Q: l.-vw, LJ '- r'r1-gwlyl E. nuffi ., :V wif 111 -' W,--'.-,' fxfifg Q:-'hqf. ,,-f,f3gf.?1 .',5. fe, 99'-.,,,'-. .Y mf ,: .. ...fm "af'1R',- 'w .H '.., ,, . L.-. af , ,. , . ,- a.-vw 3, 1. ,r,,,",'r-- . ww-'2,. 'lfiv' 'K .. f,. " '55 iii. - G ,. .m,Rf',1,I-1. -- rl hw X, V 1, . W..-a w :dh 414'-'gt ,W 14:83 P C --1061 A I: N, -M42 , lglizlaiii L ' V N xX , ,,,. ' 7, A 9 6 i Chicago s tennis Record lor 1892 as f ,Q The first series in the Annual Dual Tournamentfwith Northwestern 6 ' 7 ' University was held on Chicag's courts, May 22. The University was ' I victorious in both the singles and the doubles. In fthe former Bond, V ,XT Backwelder, Poulson and Gottlieb won four of thelsix Amatlzhesg in the y, N K latter Bond and Rand and Blackwelder and: Gottliebfwon two of the ' I 'Ex X three. The summary: f X5- SINGLES " ' Bond, QCJ defeated Johnston, QNJ 6-23 6-1 ZX X Blackwelder, QCJ defeated McGrew, CN.J 6-4, 7-5 McCaskey, QNJ defeated Rand, LCJ 6-2, 2-6, 6-4 Poulson, ICJ defeated Gates, QNJ 6-4, 6-1 Orchard, fN.j defeated Bateson, fC.j 7-53 1-6, 6-1 Gottlieb, QCJ defeated Pendleton, QNJ 6-13 6-1 DOUBLES Bond and Rand, fC.J defeated Johnston and McGrew, fN.j 6-15 6-4 ., ' :H - A il -ff' , f - If A R fyalfafpr McCaskey and Ward, CNJ defeated Poulson and Gould, QC.j 4-6, 6-4, 6-4 Blackwelder and Gottlieb, QC.j defeated Gates and Orchard, QNJ 7-5, 6-4 On May 28 at Ann Arbor was held the Annual Dual Tournament with the University of Michigan. The matches were hard fought on both sides. Chicago lost ground in the singles but carried off all the honors in the doubles, bringing the tour- nament to a close with a tied score. The summary: SINGLES Bond, CCD defeated Herrick, QMJ 2-6, 6-4, 6-1 Danforth, QMJ defeated Blackwelder, QCJ 6-4, 6-3 Russel, CMJ defeated Halsey, QC.j 4-6, 7-5, 7-5 Lamb, QM.j defeated Gottlieb, fC.j 4-6, 8-6, 7-5 DOUBLES Bond and Anderson, CCJ defeated Danforth and Lamb, QMJ 6-45 6-2 Blackwelder and Gottlieb, QC.j defeated Harvey and Herrick, QM.j 6-4, 5-73 6-2 The second series in the Dual Tournament with Northwestern was played at Evanston, June 7, and resulted in an overwhelming victory for Chicago. North- western won only one of the seven matches in the singles, and one of the three in the doubles. The summary: 133 If ' .om SINGLES J, Bond, QCJ defeated Johnston, QNJ 4-65 6-45 6-2 2 If .1 Rand, gay defeated Mcofew, qN.y 6-05 6-0 Q, ' Gottlieb, fC.j defeated Ward, QNJ 6-35 6-1 f i-X, ,, tif - Blackwelder, QC.j defeated Orchard, fN.j 6-45 6-1 I 'Lima f'f' ff Brewer, QNJ defeated Anderson, QC.j 6-45 6-3 p., 11:9 In Poulson, fC.j defeated Barnard, QN.j 6-25 6-O Q , Halsey, fC.j defeated Orchard, fN.j 6-35 6-4 f 9 Q i 'Hwy , fifi 'N i XJ :jj , ff 1 Ji y X X DUUBLES Bond and Ra11d, ICJ defeated Ward and Orchard, QNJ 4-65 6-35 6-1 Orchard and Johnston, QN.j defeated Blackwelder and Gottlieb, QCJ 2-65 6-15 6-0 Poulson and Anderson, QCJ defeated Barnard and McGrew, QN.j 6-15 6-0 The Western Intercollegiate Tournament was held on the courts of the Quadrangle Club, June 3-5. The Colleges represented were: Albion, Knox, North- western, Wisconsin, Michigan and Chicago. The matches were exciting and hard fought, though it was foreseen that the final struggle would pit Michigan against Chicago. Bond, however, had little trouble in carrying Off the championship in singles in three straight sets. Bond and Rand also won the championship in doubles. The summary: SINGLES MCLEAN, W. DANFORTH 1 DANFORTH, M. ,I 6'25 6'2 1 BOND DIAYVVOOD, A. 'p 1 i 6-2, 6-4 LIAYWOOD GREEN, K. A 6-416-0 1 P BOND BOND, C. tl BOND NVARD, N. 6-15 6-0 J i B D6-1 6-2 CUSHING, K. H CUSHING 1 SANBORN, W. j 451642 63 HALSEY 1 L HALSEY, c. n HALSEY ' 6'193'698'6 BURNETT, A. J 6-31 7-91 64 J P Hsnsrugx 6- 9 -1 J HERRICK, M. H HERRICK JOHNSTON, N. 4'656'336'0 J 134 DOUBLES SANBORN AND MCLEAN, Wisconsinl I DANFORTH AND LAMB 1 P 6-4' 8-6 DANFORTH AND LAMB, M' DANFORTH AND LAMB ' WARD AND JOHNSTON, N. 635 62 . PBOND AND RAND 6-1, 6-33 6-3 BOND AND RAND C. BOND AND RAND W CUSHING AND GREEN, K 6-42 6-4 I BOND AND RAND 6-4, 6-1 ,I MAYWOOD AND BURNETT, A. j BOND'S RECORD f0R I897 During the season of 1897 William Scott Bond received the following honors in tennis: Winner of the singles and doubles in the Western Intercollegiate Tournamentg second place in the Chicago Club's Invitation Tournamentg second place in the Western Championship Tournament, winner with Myers in the doubles in the Northwestern Championship Tournamentg winner of the West Superior Invitation Tournament, winner in singles and second with Budlong in doubles in the International Champion- ship Tournament held at Niagara-on-the-Lake. Miss Louise Pound won the Women's Western Championship by defeating suc- cessively: Miss Mary Steele, 6-Og 6-0 Miss Mabel Wager, 6-25 6-1 Miss Edith Parker, 6-43 6-3 Miss M. E. Wimer, 7-55 1-65 6-4 Miss Juliette Atkinson, 6-4, 6-lg 6-3 Miss Jennie Craven, 7-53 6-35 5-2 . ha 1,4 - ' "' f K c f , pt- f, rf, A N I V , 4 , J 135 Che CCIIIIIS HSSOCi3Ii0lI OLIVER JOSEPH THATCHER, - - President WILLIAM FRANCE ANDERSON, - Secretary and Treasurer Executive Zommlttee OLIVER J. THATCHER CHARLES WRENN HALSEY WILLIAM FRANCE ANDERSON HENRY ADRINSON MRS. STAGG 136 B., rf, A L vhfwfw f7 fif- J A A +R, mx, 41 .L1,- ,ummm fp 1,5 Q31 U A FREDERICK HELLEMS, Master ARTHUR SEARS HENNING KNIGHT FRENCH FLANDERS JOHN MENTZER DANIEL HULL PHILIP RAND WALTER JOSEPH SCHMAHL HENRY TEFFT CLARKE JOSEPH EDWARD RAVCROEI' DONALD ANGUS KENNEDY GEORGE SOMERSET STEWARD 137 ' ff- N x., x X-" I 'A-X X' D17 m - ff gi, c Y Q : , 2 X.,-, mb ,Y QL , X 'eye 1' di X J X 1 X HE I HES ING ga., Q Nc ,nc tl TL. , 1 re ' J' GX xv A ' . 'E 5? . IN cf fi fs 3, A 563' ,sf LJ -f' 1 N iiixs-1 .Af THERON YVINFRED MORTILIER GEORGE GARREY GEORGE DAVIS WILLIAM FRANCE ANDERSON l5dlld'B3ll COUYIIGIIICIII The Second Annual Hand-ball Tournament was held during the summer of 1897. The standing of the three highest teams : Games Won Lost Per cent. Watson and Samuels - - - 27 22 5 .815 Beers and Spiegel - 28 19 9 .678 McIntyre and Blackburn - - 29 19 10 .654 138 w N . ze I -5:J5fh:26f"'P1- ' , ' false f fm rig? ,Q W, -sf., I x " ji X ff LAS Lf? 1 ff ' I. , 91: l f 'ff' Qian? f' sg 75 ' f 4, Yu: 1 , 1 , , K gg' W fig Wa F I, if gt +muH,J. ly i f ! i,ifilf'.:-1,1351 ,W .iifcifzz s 1514, .- ,,, ' F mm Eg gp 1 "1 lg:::W?QMa5y:HaH':,gi5,7Lz'- 1 . r .May I896 - l897 HORACE BUTTERXVORTH ---- Coach HUBBARD - - QCaptainj Right Forward GARREY - - - Left Forward WRIEDT - Right Center SCHMAHL - - Center ALSHULER - Left Center BURNS ' Right Guard RUSSELL - Left Guard SCHEDULE OI' GAMES University 26 vs. Pullman Athletic Club - 8 Univeraity 16 vs. Pullman Athletic Club - 14 University 8 vs. Hull House - 14 University 16 vs. Hull House - - 6 University 12 vs. West Side Y. M. C. A. - 18 University 22 vs. North Shore Athletic Club - - 13 University 14 vs. University of Iowa - 8 Seven games were played, five won and two lost. 139 ,, , Rx L,-,-, ,f 1, 1 , ' ,, , 9 .L '1 ff 11 1 . f' ,gy we L M i Pounds VVALTER SCOTT KENNEDY, - 3835 CLARENCE BERT HERSCHBERGER, - 3714 CHARLES FOSTER ROBY, - - 3655 YVILLIAM THAW GARDNER, 3468 THERON WINERED MORTIMER, - 3448 OLE HALLINGBY, - - 3143 HENRY' GORDON GALE, - 3119 ERNEST DEKOVEN LEFFINGWELL, 3118 JOHN YVEBB, ---- 3114 FRANK CLAYTON CLEVELAND, - 3041 I K Ex I I f 1 1 - 5 li . S E Sh. 3? E re Pi 5 M Q14 if , fff . ,. , YV 4 Ax Q. If 1 X ff' N, W JVN KOR-ADAY env-lI"12'-if-4 VN! VERSK ,,,...--' X. .- . , 1141 ' 1 ff? 1 ,,,f"X . , , ,, ,, . f ' V' 1- f. igwx- ' '-ICDOOP' F1 E2 n fr' CH O ' uv' ww, N ,mv ' . - Xsw-Mm, ' . . 1'3""2',- X A V, Kg... - Q 'E xg, 2 Y if fg, TYM K i ff ,f X P, 1 S Q NJ X ' Tam , ,Q ' mx ' ' S? I PRICE IO CENT . I Q SITE wwf M wifi fy, 4 2 -- 4 WEEKLY z - "rim , 3 .x. 'N K-, . Y-fx vf H xx ,xl 3. -.,4w-,-,.3,k,L4--x' ' :- f 7 X A f' .4 , vow u Nvnsemx if nANKsowuNof ro bAY+++ .- ,X MQQQ! VF. K , N Q- Fa. MMA ' ,X :F- lax ., fsmrfs QNX xi-N31 - ,QQ , Xxx Qi Q si N Q X S NX ! :KH 3 - 1 . si fir , V531 V. x X 'wi w -M. Q1 L 'ip 0 H af - -safari: E N I .'., It I N ii" 2 t 4 ,.-, , r as 1 'X . l897 - I898 manage!! VVALTER JOSEPH SCHMAHL ROGER NELSON KIMBALL CHARLES BRADEN Davis SllDSCl'lb0I'S Robert Newton Tooker Ralf LeRoy Peck john Preston Mentzer Ralph Hamill Cecil Page Edwin Melvin Coleman Arthur Sears Henning Moses Dwight McIntyre Donald Angus Kennedy Roger Nelson Kimball John Franklin Hagey William Alexander Gordon William Francis McDonald Charles Braden Davis Edwin Lee Poulson Clinton Luman Hoy Philip Rand Howard Darst Casey Herbert Paul Zimmerman Rowland Thum Rogers Rufus Maynard Reed William Thaw Gardner Maurice Gordon Clarke Nott William Flint Thomas Brogden Blackburn Harry William Beliield Charles Ward Seabury Ray Prescott johnson Kellogg Speed William France Anderson Byron Bayard Smith Allen Grey Hoyt Walter Joseph Schmahl Van Sumner Pearce john Joseph Walsh Morton Harris Spencer McDougall Brown Arthur J. MacDonald Williamson Frank Duke Ernest Hamilton Dillon Emory Cobb Andrews joe Davis F. Egbert Vaughan 142 , .ln , A 7 ga' X J B DEMBNEK 5' ,. f f N e K ' eaaooeoe-eeeeoenu accuse:-so neeuemasuoeono 'L -lssssassewua-ss ssssseseee'-was f Q 0 4 -1 - 2 - 1. f if- ?.g lffe ff I 'a1Sff:iFTie11.'f- 1--3113 are T 'L s Z :' ' 2 1 L' sl- : : -sf ' 1 '-:I+ va -5 ,.'i-.'-'seex'-'1'v. X , 1'- .-I 1-'1 :T ' '-',. '-V - 'ra :K Aff 'g z -41 fi '-if fi --'91-SW 'i 1' 7:?YTj-' -'-2 ' 1115- - - iffi ii -if-i :L'i.,5-ft' 'im-if ri? g.,.,a maesseous re name-:masse ssqeeoem L -wonoeeussnnnou ooeauouev s mae-sag.-aooooua oo n , ... ,. ' ' r J' 4 ' 'E I897 January 9 Glee and Mandolin Clubs returned from western trip. January 11 Kelly Hall reception. Idlers entertained at home of Miss Matz. A dress rehearsal of " Babes in the the Woods" was given. January 16 Christian Union reception at Haskell Museum. january 18 Foster Hall reception. January 23 University informal at Rosalie Hall. Miss Capps initiated into the Mortar Board. Dr. Alexander Smith entertained the Canadian Club at the Del Prado. January 23 Delta Kappa Epsilon held a smoker in honor of alumni. Louis Sass, Eugene Ryan and joe Campbell were delegates from local chap- ter at the Phi Kappa Psi installation at Madison. Mrs. Edward Roby tendered her third annual banquet to the Foot-ball Team. january 25 Snell Hall reception. Miss Merrell of Beecher gave a dinner party. January 27 Quadranglers gave a dinner party at Kelly. January 28 Nu Pi Sigma gave a dinner party in Kelly. Annual banquet of Alpha Delta Phi alumni at University Club. Mrs. Harry Rockwood entertained members of Delta Kappa Epsilon and their friends at the Lakota Hotel. Ianuary 30 Musicale given by Mr. Seeboeck at Foster. February 1 John F. Hagey elected to Iron Mask. February 2 Misses Winter, Hull and Marine entertained at Kelly. Alpha Delta Phi initiated W. S. Kennedy, C. L. Burroughs and C. W. Drew. February 4 Professor and Mrs. George E. Vincent entertained in honor of the Eso- teric Club. Miss Allin gave a dinner party at her home. 143 K February 11 Third annual assembly of Delta Kappa Epsilon, at the Chicago Beach Hotel. Patronesses: Mrs. H. P. Judson, Mrs. A. W. Small, Mrs. F. A. Abbott, Mrs. G. E. Vincent, Mrs. J. R. Angell, Mrs. A. W. Moore. February 12 Lincoln's Birthday. Graduate Hall held open house. February 13 Installation of local Omicron Omicron chapter of Sigma Chi fraternity at the Masonic Temple. The Idlers entertained at Kelly Hall. February 14 Middle Divinity reception. February 15 Foster Hall reception. February 16 Annual Central Music Hall concert of Glee and Mandolin Clubs. Ladies' day at Quadrangle Club. C. B. Herschberger elected captain of Foot-ball Eleven for 1897. February 22 Fourth annual Washington promenade, at Chicago Beach Hotel. Pat- ronesses: Mesdames William R. Harper, George M. Pullman, John C. Rand, Samuel W. Allerton, john R. Adams, George E. Vincent, Robert E. Jenkins, George C. Walker. Committee: English Walling, - chairman. Philip Rand, chairman of general arrangements, G .1 , if Miss Messick, Miss Spray. Robert Meloy, chairman reception .Ju,,, ., Q committee, William S. Broughton, john P. Mentzer, Miss lift! Agerter, Miss Capen. L. B. Vaughn, chairman finance commit- ru : i 4: fl. tee, H. L. Ickes, A. T. Burns, C.W. Williams, V. W. Sincere. Jig?" - Omega Club Dinner Party at Chicago Beach Hotel. 4 s Phi Kappa Psi house party. At the exercises of Washington's Birthday at Kent, Mr. Robert M. ' 1 1 N M. Lafaette delivered the address. I fl., , F. F. Steigmeyer initiated into Sigma Chi. dsx A. l , Sigma Nu initiated Messrs. Reed, Gwin, Shipley, McLain, and Galla- gher. Harry D. Abells Wearing Owl and Serpent pin. Miss Eva Graves entertained at Foster. February 24 The Illinois Beta Chapter of Phi Delta Theta installed. The ceremonies took place at the Great Northern Hotel. February 26 Foster Hall entertained " Octave Thanet " at dinner. Armory Athletic Meet. February 27 Mortar Board gave a " Black Cat Party." Phi Kappa Psi tendered a smoker to city alumni. Robert Law gave an informal dance at Delta Kappa Epsilon house in honor of Miss Drake and Miss Allen. ' 144 March 6 Settlement Benefit at Gymnasium. " Masterpieces of Sculpture," "Gibson Pictures," " Marionettes," Michelson's Marvelous Anthroscope, Poster Sale, Lecture by Robert Law. Reception at Quadrangle Club. March 8 Kelly reception. March 10 Miss Faulkner and Miss Clarke entertained at dinner. March 12 Annual Concert of the Women's Glee and Mandolin Clubs at Kent theater. The Quadranglers, The Mortar Board, The Esoteric Club and The Sigma Club gave a reception in Walker museum. March 13 Senior reception at Kelly Hall. Miss Alice Knight gave a reception. March 15 Foster reception. Delta Kappa Epsilon musicale. We ,bl March 18 Junior College reception in honor of those taking certifi- '- cates was held in Haskell museum. , ' Junior iinals. ' March 19 The Esoterics gave areception at Mrs. Vincent's. Mrs. 3 Vincent, Miss Foster and Miss Flood received. Home oratorical contest at Kent theater. First place won M, by M. F. Gallagher, second place by E. Muenter. Presi- dent's reception to Senior Class. ' The Three-Quarters Club card party. Senior iinals. March 20 Miss Kane and Miss Messick received at Kelly Hall. Mr. Gallion entertained Weekly board at the Del Prado. April 1 Receptions at Haskell and Kelly, tendered to Lady Aberdeen. ' Harold L. Ickes elected managing editor, and John P. Ment- -, ' zer assistant editor, of the " Weekly." a.v.....g..-v-...I-37-'L Spring Convocation g address by Lady Aberdeen. April 2 W. J. Cavnagh inititiated into Phi Kappa Psi. April 3 Beecher Hall received. Phi Delta Theta held a smoker for city alumni. Delta Kappa Epsilon held an informal dance at the Chapter house. Beta Theta Pi initiated Carl Davis, '00, and Paul Blackwelder, '00. The Quadranglers initiated Miss Blanche Wiser, Miss Edith Baxter, Miss Sa- rah Addams, Miss Katherine Barton and Miss Edith Calhoun. Miss Ethel Miller elected President of Y. W. C. A., Miss Charlotte Teller Vice-President. 145 'N r K, " x 'X 'tv 'f' . f f'1:f:Z. cliff? 'A ' 'f - fm' -fx' l , 53- x ' Xl X l I fi I X April 9 The Mortar Board initiated Miss Margaret Weirick, Miss Alice Knight and Miss Helen Taylor. April 10 Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. receptions at Haskell. Luncheon for Women Fellows at Foster Hall. Miss Kane gave a dinner in honor of Miss Kennedy, '96, and Miss McWilliams, '96. April 12 Kelly Hall receives. ,- The Omega Club initiated T. B. Blackburn, G. S. Steward, E. L. Poulson, C. W. Halsey, and W. J. Schmahl. The banquet was held at the Victoria Hotel. April 17 Sigma Chi initiated R. B. Opitz, '97. The Three Quarters Club elected Roger Kimball president, and Walter I. Schmahl secretary and treasurer. Miss Harding entertained at Beecher Hall. Miss Updegraif gave a dinner party at Foster to Vassar graduates. Mr. Vaughan, Mr. Barton and Mr. Tabor gave a box party at the Apollo concert. Base-ball: Illinois 9g Chicago 5. April 22 Mass meeting in Kent Theatre in interest of the Greeks in the Grecian- Turkish war. Mr. T. H. Patterson elected captain of the Track Team. April 23 Messrs. Woods, Binder, Briggs, Slater, Clough, Price and jones entertained at South Divinity Hall. The Misses Paddock entertained at 5402 Cornell Avenue. April 24 Delta Kappa Epsilon initiated W. T. Gardner, '00, Ralph Manning, '00, and Roger Kimball, 'O0. Base-ball : Chicago 11 g Lake Forest 3. April 25 President and Mrs. Harper gave a reception in honor of Bishop Vincent. Miss Osgood gave a chaiing dish party at Beecher in honor of her sister. Last University informal. April 27 Base-ball : Chicago 6 g Rush Medical 5. May 1 Base-ball : Chicago 9, Illinois 5. Oratorical Association benefit at Rosalie Hall. Popular readings by Professor S. H. Clark. Informal dance. Committee z Robert Law, Willoughby Walling, John P. Mentzer, Fred Steigmeyer, Allen T Burns, Philip Rand, Nott W. Flint, Robert B. Meloy, Knight Flanders, Fred B. Thomas, Theodosia Kane, Davida Harper, Marjorie B. Cooke, J essie N. Spray. May 2 The Ben Butler Club entertained at Graduate Hall. 146 ,.f4:F:g5gI1?-33. , ...vpn f ' --zf-51-1 ff' -f 1:24 ' ,, .,. . jj 4I-- .4 ' ..- .-L ,. ..., J.. X, .f 'If .2:i',.' 1 " 'QE 'e ' - 2.:f"'.f - .' ,z:vw,1, . -'.,,. '. . 5 1-11. E . V.. . . I fli- fi, -" ii F-' ' ' 1 ll: AM4!-2" ' . N we . fi -+v- - . -'X . -yr-fy' .H HI - ..,,.,55.. . ' ' I1 1: :- ' . " gn' ,UA Ugzlff , .. ly -': -' '- 'M 4 f , .f .I ' w .Qin 'I 92' 1 1 .1 J . ' . - . N" -' ' .-'C 1-f .. .' ' : A -Qfwffq 'Rf ' " f' ff' .4 , Y .' f"1 -5 'L 1. .1 - . 4. .v p 4 b rig? 2 Eidg- L i ff .S 'ff?:"" -- 2?G5 . . -5 I .: if .- 'yci ': .a ? :H-f 13-L 5 -' ,1 . + 5 3 1-' , - L 1971. ,lf . 1- ff fi.. '- ..s!n'l """-. Uk- 'f' f . .mm -- . . - I, ,I I- .',..2,,,,: ,3,..5-M. . N. .V .,.l .,.Q' . iff., if f "-.7x'x. ' 3 - Q-.. ,e f - - - ' i elf- i. W Y J. iff, E. 5. H. ,gg .- 1 . :.- T., .1-, pg- ,. ,. Q-, - .f ali. . L -- -QQ -1. 1. X., .LJ .. f "1'4'w 2 -Lv, --71' .' 'Y 1.1-. I .P It f- ,... If- ff P- ..' A. + 1 Hx.: ' .w -' f - ,I - - 'if'15 Rgfi.. , 2 w 51 . ,C . , 1 pl gona MMV: ., 1- ' . Y .-.5 If I A b f-,f m in R Q WEE' I ,ggi . 4 5' Q' A -'4" h""7fff-?f3l '. i-1" H ' 'Vi 'H' 355 : v'1i.1:f'1n ,Y - - ,. -, jx 4 4-1' 35P?'if5-'rf?.3z1" x '- 'NT 5:51 ' fi li 'Z ' ,fqggfj fggfm ' " sg-Tx: fq if E-: -f :'-Q"'r'.x1." 49.53 gf if -E Q f iz' S151 f M12 Mi' 4 IE ' - . '41 L' :,-,vw - T,-V JN., : , . . 3 P. 3 2. ,-fy ,pf-E if s mx", 1 51.3 " ' 1 2 , It . - .' 'f-'ff-.f.. ff! ' '. 3 ple - , I ai? . :U " QP.-' v E gl '- if if ii? .1 Pi .3 '-3 ef' if .4-f '. y vs- .ff :Sf Q: Q 5 Lf -'1 a - ".' ..': . '- F f 4' -. ' 'f 1' A ,nf ,V 515.3 55 jg- p 55: -L f ' If g f I "" 2 ' 1 f' .3 fi K - , 311.5 5 -2 ZW. " .fP"'.' iii ' 57?ff..a:'. 7 ie , Reverie lla the IIICISIIIWCSS, Til'-IWW IOOIIHII MI' WCS- Is ll NY HCMS dlld 15550315 dlld NWC!!! Zi! fbi B053 Nu IDCIYCISQR NI' TNS, I UNT!! 'FOI' DOORS Mid Qfbefkdl fillllii ol fb! wise. 18 if f0l' Wiffllfki, Ol' hifi, Ol' BOW!!! vf IBQCSI1 ol' If INN 3 llldll ill me IMCSCIUC SWIM SUNG MMI' Bm WCM! ill I PCCKICSS WW? BV me MCISIYCICSS, Ill'-ZWBV look Ill bil' WCS? May 4 May 5 May 6 May 8 May 10 May 11 May 23 May 14 May 15 May 17 May 18 May 19 May 20 May 21 May 22 May 24 May 26 May 27 May 29 May 29 May 31 Base-ball Chicago 55 Wisconsin 0. Base-ball: Beloit 125 Chicago 11. Base-ball Omega Club 185 Beta Theta Pi 8. Sigma Chil95 Phi Delta Theta 17. Base-ball Chicago 55 Michigan 3. Miss Susan Harding and Miss Ruth Vanderlip initiated into the Esoteric Club. Base-ball: Alpha Delta PhiI175 Phi Kappa Psi ll. Sigma Nu 235 Delta Kappa Epsilon 15. Dinner and Informal at Rosalie Hall given by Mr. M. D. McIntyre and Mr. Philip Rand. Dual Track Meet: Chicago 775 Illinois 43. Base-ball: Chicago 45 Michigan 1. Poster Exhibit at Quadrangle Club. I .fa f ff XX 5' if L 0 f ,f ,L I'x f ff f 1. ., ll we la X ' M" f' "R -M" P , a A 1 X QTP L - xx f fi Base-ball: Chicago 105 Notre Dame 2. Miss Faulkner entertained at Foster. ' ' Q' -'1 T? XA Annual public session of the " Forum." , 5, 5 , . , if . " ' ' ' Base-ball: Chicago 125 Oak Park 6. -I!! ,. Nu Pi Sigma initiated Miss Grace Coulter, 5 ' ' Miss Susan Harding and Miss Demia .4 -,.qg,3j5"2,'f'F ' Butler. ,V N? -Q' Sigma Nu Dance and Lawn Party. ' 'ii k l - W! J Base-ball: Chicago 45 Nebraska 2. Alpha -"A Delta Phi 35 The Omega Club 2. X, - Beta Theta Pi annual assembly at the Chicago Beach Hotel. Patronesses: Mesdames F. W. Shepardson, F. O. Lowden, J. H. Tufts, P. S. Grosscup, C. F. Castle, H. E. Slaught, H. L. McCormick, W. H. Fairbanks The University Tennis Team defeated the Northwestern Team. Base-ball: Chicago 105 Iowa 6. A smoker given at the Phi Kappa Psi House in honor of Mr. Chester Barnes. University sing on Haskell Steps. Alpha Delta Phi initiated Fred Merrifield, '98, and Louis Pettitt, '00. Snell Hall open-house. "Smoke Talk" at Quadrangle Club. Story of the Elgin Marbles by Pro- fessor Tarbell. Base-ball: Michigan 55 Chicago 3. Messrs. Blackburn, Rand, Linn, Henning, Kennedy, Schmahl and D. Ken- nedy gave a coaching party to Edgewater. Base-ball at Oak Park: University 245 Oak Park 13. 148 I .jfs 1 T A Y :Pew ,f -- -f - va ,Crea X 31 311.5 pu, .1 . Q , 1 , tx K , ll ij? A - XXX' 4 -- june 3 Quadrangle Club smoke talk in honor of Rev. john Henry Barrows. 5? June 4 Western Intercollegiate Tennis: Bond won the singles, Bond and Rand the doubles. - ' l University settlement, entertainment for children at Kent Hall and lawn party. June 5 Twilight party given by the Mortar Board at Foster Hall. f Base-ball: Chicago 18, Wisconsin 2. ' - Quadrangle Club Musicale under direction of George Ellsworth Holmes, Walter Spray and the Spiering Quartette. June 7 The Chicago Tennis Team defeated Northwestern team. Base-ball: Chicago 245 Michigan 3. l June 9 Ladies' day at Quadrangle Club. Exhibition Tennis. 1' X Second annual Dramatic Club entertainment at Rosalie Hall. 1' V june 10 Second annual party of the Quadranglers at Kenwood Institute. Miss Talbot, Miss Kane and Miss Messick received. University Chorus rendered " Elijah" at University gymnasium. The following members of '99 wearing Iron Mask pins: Hoyt, W. G. Clarke, Echart, Walsh, Reed, Hoyne, D. Kennedy, VV. VValling, Dillon, F. W. Anderson, Henning. june 11 University spring track meet: Burroughs made record in 100 yards dash of .10 Hat. White establishhed record of 2.075 in half mile run. Smith estabshed record of 4.466 in mile run. Sigma Nu initiated Mr. N. M. Fair, '98. June 12 The Mulberry Club spring meeting in Washington Park. Kelly Hall picnic in Washington Park. June 13 Mr. George H. Sawyer elected captain of Base-ball Team for 1898. Mr. F. H. Calhoun elected captain of Track Team for 1898. Mr. H. M. Adkinson, '97, and Mr. S. C. Mosser initiated into Upsilon Iota Omega. June 14 Miss Mary Lakin initiated into The Mortar Board. Professor Starr entertained his classes at his home. June 16 Mr. M. P. Frutchey, '98, and Mr. C. B. Herschberger wearing Owl and Ser- pent pins. University sing on Haskell steps. Sigma Nu entertained. J une 17 Alpha Delta Phi reception. Sigma chi gave a trolley party to South Chicago. june 18 Senior finals. 149 Q.-..,............-..-. -...--.-,..,- . -4- Y. . , 3. , Q Athletic Meeting: Wisconsin 47, Michigan 195 Minnesota 14, Chicago 12. W fi JllIli0I' COIIQSQ Day, jllllt IS, l897 COMMIITEES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Ralph C. Hamill, Chairman J. H. P. Gauss E. D. Howard E. L. Poulson F. C. Hack G. H. Sawyer W. J. Schmahl P. M. Blackwelder L. T. Vernon R. G. Gould W. T. Gardner ATHLETIC COMMITTEE William T. Gardner, Chairman DRAMATIC COMMITTEE Cecil Page, Chairman M. G, Clark Donald Kennedy Eugene Ryan Mary Rider PRINTING COMMITTEE Percy B. Eckhart, Chairman W. J. Schmahl A. G. Hoyt IVY COMMITTEE BALL COMMITTEE Marjorie B. Cook, Chairman joseph M. Wilbur, Chairman Grace A. Coulter W. F. Anderson Edith Baxter Ethel Keen Arthur Sears Henning DECORATION COMMITTEE Alice A. Knight, Chairman N. W. Flint Annie B. Reed PI'0Ql'dllI of iii? Ddlj Track Athletics Dramatic Reading " Merchant of Venice," Act I, Scene 3, Robert Law, Jr. H Courtship with Variations "' Virginia, Marjorie B. Cooke Ernest, John Coulter H Topics oi the Day " By Mary Winter and James Weber Linn Ethel Dyche - - V Harriet Rew Robert Owsley W. France Anderson A Maid, - - - Percy B, Eckhart Ivy Exercises Junior Promenade 150 June 18 Messrs. C. L. Williams, Wisconsin, '94, F. H. Ball, lVisconsin, '95, and C. W. Seabury, Michigan, '98, initiated into the Omega Club. june 19 Death of Mr. George VV. Darrow. Nott W. Flint elected Head Marshall, and M. P. Frutchey, '98, C. B. Hersch- berger, '98, and Willoughby Walling, '99, Assistant Marshalls. Dual Track Meet : Michigan 94 g Chicago 46. Chicago defeated Michigan in Dual Tennis Tourney. E. C. Hales, '99, and George H. Brayton, '00, initiated into Phi Delta Theta. Robert N. Tooker, Jr., '97, and Miss Tooker, gave a house party at Fox Lake to Misses McMahon, Cooke, Allin, Kane, Fulton, and Messrs. N. Flint, Messrs. F. D. Nichols, Fred Merrifield, Cutler and Tuttle, represented the M. P. Frutchey elected managing editor of the "Weekly", M. D. Mclntyre elected assistant managing editor. "The Enchiridionh issued under editorship of Philip Rand, Eugenia Radford, Stacy C. Mosser. Summer Convocation. Manager Gallion gave a dinner to the Weekly board. President and Mrs. Harper gave a dinner to mem- bers of the Summer faculty. Phi Kappa Psi initiated Otto F. Hakes, '00, and held an alumni smoker. Kelly Hall tally-ho drive. Quadrangle club fire. The Mortar Board gave a lawn party in honor of June 20 Baccalaureate sermon in Kent. june 21 President's reception to Senior Class. June 23 Miss Kane entertained at her home. june 25 Rand, Linn, D. Kennedy and J. Flint. University at Geneva Y. M. C. A. Conference. 'W 'gy-X.. July 1 V, , iam . I lil iiii iiii 4 Tai. x iii' :ia -iw hl fgl ,ia-,g,bt. www? its 7 m i' W l-'i,,l1Q,if"' '.i,'l'i gs' 5i,"1llfii1.z will li, f .x July 11 I' Ii, ,til ' x -.4 ' We gi .. July 12 f M iii I- 'Tix 'N Y -1 M' " -it xi 'l't-.ll " IW dl ... .pr qi" 'ig-mp' "F , ' ,i gli my 16 Mui ' ' ' ' I, JJ I4 is it ll, nl July 20 ' I ' I . il '3.2-Leu. . ig,lLn Miss Laura Graves. July 23 Miss Mary French Field gave a reading in Kent Theatre. July 24 Miss Paddock entertained at dinner. july 25 Beecher Hall tally-ho drive. Lawn Party given by the heads of the Women's Halls. Sigma Nu party at the Fraternity House. Professor F. I. Carpenter gave an Afternoon Tea to his classes. Miss Vanderlip's house party at Millhurst. The University guests were Miss Terry, '00, Messrs. F. H. Harms, '98, Cornell, '99, and Dillon, '99. 151 OIR DCD Oll the CZIIIIDIIS HCCOTGIIIG I0 U70 Ddllv PMN!! Another 1VIillionaire's Sympathies in the Cause of Education. KELLY HALL IS BURNING With Envy of Foster-Cause Unknown. DEAN CAPPS SUSPENDED Three Students Yesterday for Giving the Yell on the Campus. PROHESSORS IN H rum Of Enthusiasm for Cuba Libre. 'VARSITY STUDENTS ARRESTED The Spread of Flames in the Vicinity of Lake Avenue. WOIVIEIEII Fs11luQPENTshsTRuKE SEVEN PROFESSORS FOUND GUILTY Of Entering Beecher with Intent to Marry. August 3 Western Tennis Tournament. Entries from the University: Carr Neel, '97, Bond, '97g P. McQuiston, '99, H. McQuiston, '99g Halsey, 'O0g Gott- ' lieb, '00g C. A. Torrey, Anderson, '99, Blackwelder, '00, Glen Hobbs. August 5 Beecher Hall held a musicale. August 10 Dean Bulkley entertained at dinner. ' A. T. Walker entertained at Graduate Hall. '1:?6?ff Phi Delta Theta entertained at the Del Prado. 2 ' August 20 P. M. Griiiith and Newman Miller, delegates to Sigma Chi Q, Convention at Nashville. Banquet tendered Professor Ward of the Smithsonian Institute at Wellington Hotel. September 2 Junior finals: Miss Parker won Peck prize. 5 3 5 A JN' 1323 September 3 Alpha Delta Phi gave an Afternoon Tea in honor of Mr. fi W, U James K. Hackett and Miss Mary Mannering. '1 M.. Q5 September 7 The Omega Club entertained at a Smoker. ' ' , E r i Miss Pound won Woman's Western Tennis championship. Mrs. Stagg and Miss Felton also represented the University. September 9 Senior Bnalsx Mr. H. F. Atwood won Brst prize. September 14 Watson and Samuels won Hand-ball Tournament, with Beers and Spiegel second, and Mclntyre and Blackburn third. October 1 Twentieth Convocation. Address by Rev. Amory H. Bradford. Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. reception to incoming students. October 2 University Extension four o'clock tea. October 8 Foot-ball : Chicago 76g Lake Forest 0. Dedication of the Bradley Polytechnic Instituteg Lyman J. Gage delivered the address. The Esoteric Club luncheon at Foster Hall. Beta Theta Pi initiated Leroy T. Vernon, '00, and Albert Russell, '00, at Vic- toria Hotel. October 14 Delta Kappa Epsilon stag party at Chapter House. October 13 Foot-ball : Chicago 393 Beloit 6. The Omega Club initiated Ernest D. Leflingwell, Philip S. Doane, Spencer Brown and Emory C. Andrews, at the Victoria Hotel. October 17 Graduate-Divinity debate. Joseph Leiter prize won by S. A. Roberts. October 20 Mass meeting prior to the foot-ball game with Northwestern. October 21 Foot-ball: Chicago 27, Northwestern 6. Dedication of Yerkes Observatory. Prof. I. E. Keeler delivered the address. October 27 Richard Wagner Society formed. 153 A will l ia e of Mr. G. S. Steward to Miss Kathryn B. Carter. October 28 Marr g Phi Kappa Psi smoker. November 4 The Omega Club initiated Mr. Ben. B. Felix and Mr. M. O. Gale. November 12 Quadrangle Club concert. Informal dance at Delta Kappa Epsilon House. November 13 Foot-ball: Madison 235 Chicago 8. Dance at Kelly Hall. Phi Kappa Psi stag coaching party to Foot-ball game. " Week!y" Board coaching party to Foot-ball game. Alpha Delta Phi initiated E. J. Goodspeed, H. M. McQuiston, P. D. McQuis- ton, W. C. Gorrel, H. P. Kirtley, R. T. Vaughan. November 15 Foster Hall reception. November 18 Miss Kane gave a reception at her home. November 22 Delta Kappa Epsilon Convention. ,, Delegates entertained by local chapter. November 23 Annual promenade of the Delta Delta Chapter of H Delta Kappa Epsilon. Sigma Nu initiated R. T. Rogers and R. W. Clark. E November 24 Delta Kappa Epsilon Convention banquet. Q Installation of the Omega Club as the Omega Chapter of P : Psi Upsilon at the Auditorium. K Q , Dinner party given for Miss E. Butler. 5 November 25 Thanksgiving Day. TH E OR IGIN M- H ORSE - a : a - Fooiiill-HIS 23.tif.fifiiilh.Qf.1Z.io.fi1L.NiZ12f5an Of TH F ILTAD November 26 Alpha Delta Phi smoker at the Chapter House. Mortar Board dance at Kelly. November 27 Informal at Rosalie Hall under the management of Messrs. Schmahl, Kimball and C. Davis. Luncheon in Kent Laboratory given by Dr. Smith. December 3 Sigma Chi initiated Lawrence DeGraff and Ray P. Johnson. South Divinity reception. December 4 Mr. Ben. B. Felix gave a dinner to friends from the University and to the Foot-ball eleven. Miss Talbot gave a dinner party to Misses Winter, Perrin, Addams, Stuartg Messrs. Schmahl, Eckhart, Hagey and F. E. Vaughan. t the Chicago Beach Hotel. Board Banquet a December 8 " Weekly " 154 December 9 The Quadranglers gave a tally-ho ride to the North Side and areception at the home of Miss Stanton. December 10 Sigma Club musicale at 4455 Grand Boulevard. December 11 Three-Quarter's Club banquet. The initiates were: F, Baldwin, J. Davis, R. G. Gould, S. N. Harper, VV. L. Hudson, F. H. Lawrence, A- R. Manning, D. S. McWilliams, H. L. McWilliams, E Norton, D. Ray, C. S. Reed, K. Speed, VV. S. Sharpe, H. P. Zimmermann. Beta Theta Pi gave an informal at Kenwood Institute. December 18 Dramatic Club at Rosalie Hall. f THE I LI AD HANDY TRANSLATION THE MODERN ONE H COURTSHIP WITH VARIATIONS " Virginia Berkeley, Widow Marjorie B. Cooke Ernest Archibald - john M. Coulter, Jr. BARBARA " Barbara - - - Mary K. Rider Dorothy Alice A, Knight Cecil - John F. Hagey Finnicum - - - Robert G. Gould " CUPID'S TOUCHDOWN " By james VV. Linn, '96 Mildred Evans Grace Magruder The Maid - Arthur Howland G. Howe Faste Frankleigh Dull Ethel Keen - Alice A. Knight - Josephine T. Allin - Nott W. Flint - - Percy B. Eckhart - William F. Anderson William F. MacDonald, Master of Properties Some people are born women, some acquire women, and some have women thrust upon them. In bygone days when heroes bold Sat making merry 'round the fire, A harper sang of deeds of war But now long past are those old days, The minstrels fast are waxing fatg And though our Harper no more sings, Yet still he plays-the diplomat. And as he sang, he played the lyre. 155 Hs It Was Seen Telegraphed on the Spot by the Cap and Gown's Dramatic Critic The annual performance of the Dramatic Club took place at Rosalie Hall, Decem- ber 18, 1897. A triple bill was given, consisting of a curtain-raiser "Courtship with Variations," " Barbara " by Jerome K. Jerome, and " Cupid's Touchdown," a local play, the work of James Weber Linn, '96. The curtain-raiser made no pretensions as to plot, but the incidents were original and the dialogue interesting. Miss Cooke's work was marked with its usual finish and pleasing individuality. As the charming widow, Virginia Berkely, she won the honors ofthe evening. Mr. Coulter's work in this play was good, but his characterization lacked dash. Jerome's " Barbara," although it ought to have been shelved decades ago, was very well given by Miss Rider, Miss Knight, Mr. Hagey and Mr. Gould. As " Barbara," Miss Rider entered into the spirit of the part thoroughly and did some extremely strong acting. This is the irst time that Miss Rider has been given a part worthy of her efforts and she showed herself deserving of still better things. Mr. Hagey, the embarrased lover, acted with an unmistakable and almost suspicious realism. jerome's impulsive, light-hearted Dorothy and impulsive, light-hearted Miss Knight made a happy combination and added a much needed bit of vivacity to the dialogue. Mr. Gould's excellent make-up was, perhaps, the best part of his accurate presentation of Finnicum, the typical stage " legal-adviser." " Cupid's Touchdown," a skit based upon two popular themes-love and football, was, without doubt, the hit of the evening. It was thoroughly up-to-date in that its action was rapid, its dialogue bright and its plot nearly, if not quite, impossible. Miss Keen, with both dash and delicacy, gave a very acceptable presentation of collegiate Miss Evans. Mr. Nott Flint, as Arthur Howland, "the best 'tickle' the team ever had," managed to say the most impossible things in a most plausible manner and also looked the part to perfection. Miss Knight made Miss Magruder a distinct contrast to Miss Evans, and in so doing filled all the requirement of the part. Mr. Eckhart, otherwise known as G. Howe Faste, brought down the house in more ways than one. Not only was each violent entrance greeted with a round of applause but it was only the valiant efforts of the stage manager that saved the scenery from a general collapse after his last headlong exit. Miss Allin, the maid "who was inci- dental," was "incidental" in the extreme, but by virtue of her regulation Kelly Maid's costume added a bit of local color to the production. Mr. Gould, disguised as a dude, did his duty manfully and his insipid, drawling Frankleigh Dulle, side by side with the bustling clubman, G. Howe Faste, served as a tribute to Mr. Linn's excellent handicraft. In short the warm reception given this play proved conclusively that a good local production is not only not an impossibility but an accomplished fact. 156 1. ,- December 23 "Weekly " Board box party. . ' k ,- R Ca December 25 Quadrangle Club Christmas illumination. . December 30 Wellesley Club reception. K ' "'i-aff -1. F V' ' " :ses E M W I vffw 3 1 january 1 Sigma Club reception. 4 7. jg 1 A '- 4 u F Y january 3 Twenty-Erst convocationg address by Hon. J. H. Eckels. Sfcgwillg' january 4 Psi Upsilon annual promenade at Chicago Beach Hotel. Patronesses: V Q 4 K' Mesdames William R. Harper,William A. Bond, James P. Gardner, jiijggy. fi , john C. Rand, George C. Howland, Robert N. Tooker, Henry H. ,I Donaldson, Henry C. Bannard. Ushers: Philip Rand, '97, M. F D. McIntyre, '98, A. S. Henning, '99g W. J. Schmahl, '00, Z JSI - S january 6 Glee and Mandolin Club banquet and dance at the Beach Hotel. ii X if 1 x 5, S 'UI january 7 Quadrangle Club concert. ' January 8 The Sigma Club initiated Miss Crilly and Miss Root. Q 5 R ff. 7 January 10 Sigma Chi initiated Mr. Marcus M. Plowman. X QWRNR if Kelly Hall reception. I 'M' fret ... L , January 13 The Quadranglers initiated Misses McWilliams, Tooker, Jenkins, f' -,. C7Qi. Lahm, Amory, Warner. q , january 14 Delta Kappa Epsilon gave a stag party. f ix Informal at Rosalie Hall. - f A Mortar Board initiated Miss Mary K. Rider and Miss Sallie H. Corning. Q J ' X -Q I 1' :I fs lu? V , ' n. ff ,- january 17 Foster Hall reception. ' A january 21 The Quadranglers gave a dancing party at Kelly. Northwestern Alumni of Delta Kappa Epsilon gave a banquet. Q Beta Theta Pi informal dance at the Chapter House. in January 22 Mr. B. B. Smith gave a dancing party at his house. idx fi ' E january 24 Snell Hall reception. 2 ,IM t ' ' , - January 25 Sigma Club dramatics. A January 27 Day of Prayer for colleges. X LV LYJN A january 28 Mortar Board gave a Salamagundi party. C -'J Miss Talbot gave a dinner party. February 4 Dinner party at Kelly Hall given by the following members of the M1 195 i Quadranglers: Misses Allin, Calhoun, Lahm, McWilliams, Tooker. I N. Quadrangle Club reception. February 7 Beecher Hall reception. 157 'WA .Ms ll. I3.......'. 151. February 8 Annual Central Music Hall concert of Glee, Mandolin and Banjo Clubs. February 10 Gibson tableaux and informal at Rosalie Hall. Those taking part were Misses Bell, Warner, Hamillg Messrs. Blackburn, Kennedy, Andrews, Flint, Schmahl, Coulter, Brown, Henning, Hamill. Quadrangle Club concert. Alpha Delta Phi convention at Toronto. February 11 Delta Kappa Epsilon initiated Harold E. Wilkins. February 12 University Informal at Rosalie Hall. Lincoln House reception. February 14 Kelly Hall reception. February 18 French and German dramatics. Our dramatic critic reports the enter- tainment to have been a great success. Everybody was there, and not an undergraduate has been found who could pick a Haw in the accent of a single character. February 19 Indoor Dual Track Meet. Northwestern 47g Chicago 39. Phi Kappa Psi alumni dinner. Miss Paddock entertained at luncheon. February 21 Foster Hall reception. H x . l dw Q-we-. 158 filth fllllllldl WGSDIIISIOII PYOIIIQIIGGC Chicago Beach Hotel, February 21 Patronessos Mrs. William R. Harper Mrs. George C. Howland Mrs. George E. Vincent Mrs. John I. Glessner Mrs. George C. Walker Mrs. Henry H. Donaldson Mrs. Ferdinand W. Peck Mrs. Harry P. Judson Mrs. Henry M. Wilmarth '11 A fit 3' I.: 'W ' Aa... Committees Joseph E. Freeman, General Chairman COMMITTEE OF ARRANGMENTS Ernest H. Dillon, Chairman M. Gordon Clarke Knight French Flanders RECEPTION COMMITTEE M. Dwight McIntyre, Chairman John F. Hagey Cecil Page FINANCE COMMITTEE Lawrence DeGraH, Chairman Frank L. White Ernest A. Scrogin 159 ,X K I ' Q ,fa E fi ,S .f:4f1'- Q AP' rfll'-, 'V ,!"g,. la, W1 FY .jk f J. '1-lf 'er IE V' " 'fra ff' 25115 'aqsk S 5' . ' . 'E ,. -.1 .X I A Y, in N A A Febmary 22 Messrs. J. F. Hagey, G. Sawyer, F. E. Vaughan, J. P. Mentzer, M. D. McIntyre, J. E. Freeman, and N. W. Flint wearing0wl and Serpent pins. Graduate Hall musicale. Washington House reception. February 25 Sigma Club open meeting. February 26 Beta Theta Pi stag party. Alpha Delta Phi initiated E. S. Norton, '01, and S. N. Harper, 'O1. February 28 Snell Hall reception. March 3 Morgan Park reception. March 4 Three Quarters Club dance at Rosalie Hall. Reception to visiting athletes. Graduate Club banquet. Middle Divinity reception. March 5 Western Intercollegiate Indoor Athletic Meet: Chicago first place, Wis- consin second. March 7 Beecher Hall reception. March ll The Ben Butler Club initiated Messrs. S. M. Brown, J. P. Mentzer and T. B. Blackburn. March 12 Ben Butler Club informal at Rosalie Hall. March 14 Beta Theta Pi Alumni Smoker. March 15 Sigma Club Musicale. March 16 Psi Upsilon Smoker given to city alumni. March 17 Graduate Hall open house. Che Stage The Cap and Gown desires to call attention to the unprecedented excellence and variety of the theatrical attractions oliered on and about the campus during the season of '97 and '98, Among those on the boards at present are: Mr. Walter Schmahl in " Romeo and Juliet. NOTE.-The management announces that a different actress each week will be cast for the role of Juliet. Robert B. Davidson in " The Little Minister." Thomas B. Blackburn in " The Girl I Left Behind Me? Charles L. Burroughs in "The Fast Mail." Mr. Percy B. Eckhart in " His Foster-Sister." Mr. John Coulter in " Never Again." 160 Bkilfd Oll the CBIIIDIIS The man sat on the sofa, talking of the weather, The co-ed close beside him-they oft sat thus together. The maid was in the parlor turning out the light, The man, the girl, the darkness-oh, lordy, what a sight ! If it is fiction, we call it Romance g but if it is fact, we pronounce it Scandal. The man who most enjoys the play called Life, is he who can sit comfortably in in his seat and watch himself act his part in the drama. Whatever creeds there may be rest upon the stars. Therefore it is easy to shift about beneath them. Flattery is like a dinner of empty pate shells to a hungry man. A man never makes so great a hit as when he strikes the bottom of his grave. Epigrams are axiom like utterances, which the maker knows to be untrue. There are more beautiful women in one volume of poems, than there are in all the world. Fortune is but a ickle coquette, whose smiles are not lavished without reward. " Where are you going, my pretty co-ed? " " I'm going to gym, sir, now," she said. " And may I go with you, my pretty co-ed? " " As far as the door," she archly said. Profanity is foolish, sinful and satisfying. Hunger for knowledge like physical appetite is frequently sated with poor food. 'Tis better to have loafed and Hunked than never to have loafed at all. Why do you begin the word FHKUIU' with a capital letter? All words referring to Omniscence begin with capitals. Prexy be nimble, Prexy be quick. Hunt up some more millionaires you can stick. Sing a song of six pence, and half a dozen Hunks, Forty-'leven notices-a quarter full of Hunks. When the door was opened, " Young man," exclaimed the Dean, " It's plain to see you've spent your spring a gamboling on the green ! " 161 'III milllbfidlll PROFESSOR OLAUS DAHL, died March 10, 1897 MR. GEORGE DARROYV, Head Bookkeeper, died June 14, 1897 MISS ETHEL MILLER, '98, died January 11, 1898 Miss ADELAIDE IDE, '96, died February 19, 1898 MR. FREDERICK HYDE LAWRENCE, '01, died April 22, 1898 X W ff , M W fsgwwwwwkgfwf A ,, f AIT, , gig f" 'f S3 W ifr' Af 'K if X 1 .. ll--v -x"N N3 ""qX ZZ- ,X 'za Vu X , xxx' -'-"' '.A :X , ,.,f ' -'L , ,flux - .. ,,,,f- 2-N Vx Q'..b5 4' wx" " ' --4 fff lf' 4. - .Wi H' V - W , . ft-'xx ' ' f , -fx ix ,Q , ff NIL- ' -l37- 4? X ::l5?lS3iF52r,g1, E ,l' ' M H lffryyff X xxx yn 49 f .--- ' ' ix Tl , If-My I 321 f X' sl WW W JA if Aiz' -5 X if N . H "" Ima, 111211 ' ' W: -3 , 'fff VZ' ', 'f ,. mx my X . .,.. - , ' f I jccwfwf NN QQ hm ff X- 4 In . QXMXWWM 1 Zonmbutors to the Literary Pages NOTT WILLIAM FLINT THOMAS TEMPLE HOYNE ANNA BOOTH SIMMS ETHEL KEEN EDWIN CAMPBELL WooLLEv LEROY TITUS WEEKS EDWIN H. LEWIS FLORENCE WILKINSON EDNA STANTON WALTER DEFFENBAUGH MARTHA FOOTE CROW CHARLES RAYMOND BARRETT AGNES S. COOK GEORGE Q. MARSH IDA ASHBORN WEEKS FRANCES AYRES MURPHY THEODOSIA KANE FRANK W. DIGNAN PHILIP RAND EFFIE.A. GARDNER JOHN WEBER LINN 5' fn 5 if V -1 -1 W if 1, ii 1 :i .jf VE: K 1 4, 1 E N ,. J 1 3 M H V .3 f. is Z1 . 'L vii' ffl X Q!!! 17 fl X ffff ff' ff! ff I H Girl Ol' 2dZiSI3ll WAS only a girl of Lazistang In his veins the blood of the Sun-God ran. He plucked me out from the soil of the street, He called me the rose of his garden retreat. I was his fountain that laughed in the sun, His star that glittered when day was done. I was the jewel that lay on his heart, Mine was the shrine where he worshipped apart. And I was a girl of Lazistang In his veins the blood of the Sun-God ran. He loved me, he kissed me, he lay on my breast, And I was the bulbul that sang him to rest. Into his arms I would melt for repose, as rlla f 141' I if , In g . i.'Q2.li'l W ii -x o f H . And he would enfold me as leaves do the rose. I was only a girl of Lazistang In his veins the blood of the Suu-God ran. 'I -X '39 'X' They came in the midst of the dark fragrant night, And the almond-tree blooms fluttered down in aEright Of a sudden they swooped, like sorrow they came, And they blasted the flower of our love as with flame. Those purple-clad Parsis with arms waving wide, " Woe, woe to the follower their law who defied." For I was a girl of Lazistan, In his veins the blood of the Sun-God ran. And now they have come to take me away, Yet we loved and we kissed but yesterday. They say the Eternally Pure decree Doom, for lovers who loved as we. For him, in the Tower of Silence a bed, And Parsi prayers at sunrise said. For me, to be hurled like refuse far Into the river that runs by Istahr. The Eternally Pure have decreed in vaing We care not, not we, for death and its pain, For the souls become one, of lwo lovers slain,- Even mine, a girl of Lazistang And his, whose blood from the Sun-God ran. Florence Wilkinson. 165 C3l'di3C COIIIDHCGHOIIS I closed the folio with a sigh. "Well, I am at your ladyship's service," I said, "any Herculean task that you care to impose." Betty by this time was hang-ing out of the window inspecting the night air and, incidentally, corrupting the mature mind of Foster by graphic imitations of Anna Held's carolings. " Oh, it's not much," she said, drawing her head in again, " just to help me with a little note." " Which means, I suppose, the solitary and unaided composition of the same and its meek submission to the editorial rulings of the severest and most refined of critics." Betty pouted. " Oh, if you're going to be nasty about it! " I knew my part. I besought, protested my readiness, willingness, in fact, burn- ing aud insatiable desire to compose notes to anybody, everybody-and was in due time forgiven. I pulled out some paper. " Who is it to?" I asked. " To Grahme Brown," said Betty. " My dear! " " Well ?" she queried. Her innocence was delicious. " I'll answer your faculty summons, your family letters, respond to your bills, even, but how can I write your love-letters? " Betty laughed. " Oh, most any way. Say what you think will please the man." " But I won't feel it-it's sheer hypocrisy? I was indignant. "So it would be if I wrote it-I don't feel it-tonight." And she hummed a bit from the "Belle of New York," and crept farther into the pillows. So I wrote: " I don't know how you will take this letter, but you have so often corresponded to my mood of the moment, that I write to you now out of the fullness of my heart-" " Beautiful start," said Betty, reading over my shoulder, "go on! " " ' Out of the fullness of my heart,' " I mused, " 'out of the fullness of my heart-.' Betty, can't you suggest something? " The tapping on the window stopped and Betty turned and looked at me. Suddenly the satire of the thing struck us, we laughed and laughed. When she had her breath, Betty reached for the Physiology: "The heart is a valvular pump which works on mechanical principles, the motive power of which is supplied by the contraction of muscular fibres," she read aloud. In the white heat of such knowledge of organs and functions our English meta- phors should be revised. And, now, when I meet a certain tall friend of ours, my mouth twitches at the recollection of how I once wrote to him, " out of the fullness of my heart." 166 fllllld mdlkl' REVISED VERSION 'Conight we gladly sing the praise 0f her of whom we are the sons. 0ur loyal voices let us raise, Jlnd bless her with our henisons. 0f all fair mothers fairest she, most wise of all that wisest be, most true of all the true, say we, ls our dear Hlma mater. her mighty learning we would tell, though life is something more than lore She could not love her sons so well liooed she not truth and honor more. we praise her depth ot charity, lier faith that truth shall make men tree, that right shall lioe eternally,- llle praise our Illma mater. 0 fair young mother, throned ln grace Beside the azure inland sea, the mother of a mighty race 0f peaceful conquerors thou shalt be. Beyond the ages lift thine eyes to where thy sheltring walls yet rise Beneath the hope-lilled western skies, Still our dear Jllma mater. Words by E. H. Lewis, '94 Music by P. N. Mandeville, Rochester il m0dCl'll fall? Cdl! x , ll, IS name was Johnny Thornton. He was big, good-natured and thirty, Q Q L 5 with gray in the thin hair about his temples, and wrinkles at the corners If of his eyes, flecking the dark, permanent shadows beneath them, that ,' 'I' 'g conscientious chaperones might recognize and point out his wickedness ! to their charges. But in addition, there was a whimsical upward twist ,L to the corners of his mouth, which these ladies did not point out, nor did they explain the merry dancing of his eyes and the fair maidens who looked and saw these things without their guidance, could only wonder and dream- who knows what dreams. It was a winter night and he had come to his bachelor hearth, a little tired, rather cold, and more than a little blue, so that the ice he took from the chest to cool vari- ous long drinks was much diminishd before the corners of his mouth curled again and the frown faded from over the once more merry eyes. What he had thought is sacred because his mood faded away from the world, with the coals that glowed with its bitterness and deadened as it departed, and only what happend with the return of the mood all his world knew and shall be recorded. He was smoking his pipe when it happened, sitting before his tire, with a glass in one hand and his long red gown wrapped comfortably about him. The world had returned to peace with him, as everything did before the sun had half circled around it and all was well everywhere. I-Ie heard a fluttering of airy things behind him and thought he might be going to sleep, when a little wee voice that sounded like the scent of an Egyptian cigarette said: " I am come to do your bidding." He looked up quickly and then jumped to his feet. Turning to the ire, he looked into it for a moment and then drained his watered whiskey. She was still there as he turned slowly around. He looked at her steadily, but she did not disap- pear or even falter under his stare. I-Ie wet his lips and recovered himself. " How the devil did you get in here with those clothes on?" he asked sharply, for she was wearing a gown a little less tangible than chiEon and a trifle more durable than a dawn-shot mist. " I am a fairy," she said and the star in hex' hair twinkled. " I have no doubt of that," he replied, " but I thought your company was play- ing in Washington this week." 168 " I don't know what you mean. The fairy queen sent me to serve you. It is your turn now. You have not commanded one of us since you were a little boy in Egypt a thousand years ago. What are your desires?" " My desires are many," he faltered, for he had never talked to anyone quite like this before. He did'nt know what to say next and she was staring about her in won- dering contentment. " Have a drink," he suggested as he pushed the bottle and glasses across the table toward her. She looked at them curiously. "They are pretty," she said, " but what is this in the bottle? Is it a sleeping potion ? ' ' " It is for some people, if they drink enough of it." ' ' I am afraid it is an evil spirit." " Indeed it's not. It's the finest dew of all Scotland's hillsides." " It is like dew, but what is it ? " " One of my best friends and you must be cold." He poured her a glass of it and let the soda seeth and nibble about the sides of the long glass as he handed it to her. She raised the glass and drank the liquor with a queer little wry face and a grimace of terror intermingled. He smiled at her and she set it down, reassured, as she smiled back. " It makes me warm," she said. The fairies of Scotland must have worked long iilling your potion with mystic heat." He started to laugh, but didn't and she went on. " I was cold. We don't often venture out in this weather and our winter gowns of white mouse skin are all worn out. You see there is so little doing in our line, we cannot afford new clothes." "I'll arrange that at once," he said. " Here, take my lounging robe," and he slipped out of it quickly and wrapped it about her slight figure. He wheeled his big chair around closer to the tire and snuggled her into it. " Great Scott ! haven't you any stockings? " " Oh, we are very poor now. Everything is so dull. The queen actually hasn't had her crown brightened for ten years and she is so proud, she won't leave the palace." " Dear me ! You don't say! " he observed and poured out another glass for him- self. " Won't you have some more-a-dew." " Really, I don't think I'd better. It makes me feel so queer in my head." " Bless your little head, of course it doesg it's a way it has. But are you sure you are quite comfortable? " "Oh quite," and she laughed a contented little chuckle, as though she were a waif of a kitten, purring in new found luxury. " But you must be hungry. Can't I send out for a cold lobster, or some chicken or something?" 169 .I i l 0 . K ,W 7 , 3 " Oh, we never eat. Only mortals do that." " How lovely! It is an earthly habit. I suppose you have no stomachs, but have you any hearts among you? " She nodded an affirmative, "To be sure. I suppose your hearts take up the space our stomachs do. Do you ever really love? " " W'e love everybody." " How unfortunate ! You really can't enjoy it. The only fun there is in loving, is the excitement of keeping but one face at a time locked up in one's heart. Do you kiss all the people you love? " " I don't know what you mean." " My child, don't jest. How old are you? " " Nearly a thousand years, I think. I've forgotten exactly. I'm almost of age." " I should think you Were, but I shall have to remedy your deplorable lack of a proper education." He perched himself upon the arm of the chair and began his lesson. "Oh, is that kissing? " she interrupted. " I've seen lovers do that. You do it very nicely." He proved her words. " I know what you want me to grant you, it's a sweetheart. But, oh yes, I remember, you have one and she was rude to you. I shall arrange all that tonight, for she is a foolish girl. D0 you love me as much as you do her? " This ending to her chatter brought up a delicate question and he was explaining its distinctions when he became aware there was an earthly male comrade of his mid- night hours standing at his elbow, and his lounging robe was hanging over the back of the chair. MORAL He had not been asleep, and the next day she wrote him a note saying she was very sorry. Walter Dejenbaugh. .Hn old saw with 5 new - vt I-IE saying goes, " there's many a slip 1 Between the cup and the ruby lip," But the wise old sage forgot to say Q What kind of a slip they used in his day, However we guess, as drinks are few, 'Twas an orange slip with a cherry too. 170 SIIGD Shots H, XVilly, Willy, you incorrigible idiot, Willy! Think I can't read between 2 the lines? Think I don't know what "worthless life" is the exponent of, E and can't translate your " loneliness, so sad and strange ?" It is older than of Cicero, dear boy g more men have studied it, and rendered into plain Eng- , lish prose, it means-a girl ! I can even guess which one, unless some Aph- rodite, new-risen since I left, emerging from the waves and dripping nakedly, has found you on the shore. But that I do not believe. Is it the red-haired one, Willy ? Confess it, the maiden, to be poetic, with sun-gilded locks, divinely tall and fwoe is me lj most undivinely freckled. Or is it the little girl, black-haired, coquettish, roll- ing asrto her eyes, who told me once I was so fresh and blooming? Inaudibly I ans- wered she was so blooming fresh, and now perhaps she has snared you in the mesh of her low-lidded glances. You are not the first, nor will you be the last. Or, may be I am unjust, and it is not she. May be it is-but this is prof-itless work, guessing. Tell me who, at once, and let me comfort you, only never write to me again about a "worthless life," because you saw her in the chapel with another fellow. f' ,E-. 5 ." ' O O O 0 We talked till the fire in the grate burned low, and the shadows in the corners crept to our feet. XVe talked of suicide, and Bentley argued that a man's life is his own -to take or to keep. "And it is log-ical that one may go voluntarily," said he. " just as some men will to sleep and to wake and accomplish it, so, I believe, some men die by a self-imposed death sentence-yet without violence." We argued long, and final- ly he said : " Before I go, get a note that you'll find in Hegel and read it. Do not wait till to-morrow, but get it now." I thought it a strange request, but I had learned that all Bentleyis whims meant something, so I crossed the room and found the note : " Good-bye, I have always known I have this power. The time has come. I shall miss you, for I have always loved you. Good-bye. " A chill fell upon my heart. I turned to Bentley and touched his hand. It was cold, and when I looked at his face I saw that he was dead. G O 0 0 Fledgely is a friend of mine with whom I like to discuss things, or rather with whom I discuss, for I do not like it. We always get heated, and I lose my temper, and come away angry with Fledgely and disgusted with myself for being angry. The truth is Fledgely cannot argue. He is a clever enough fellow, but his mind travels in a circle, and you never can pin him down to a point. When you think you have him, away he goes around the curve and you have to go over the whole argument with him again. The other night we sat on the porch and talked politics. Fledgely is a strong gold-standard man. He has not studied the subject much, but his prejudices are all in favor of the capitalists and the moneyed men, so I tried to give him a few facts from economics that would help him. As usual he kept dodging the question, and inally refused to see a point when I had made it as plain as day. Somewhat nettled, I left him and came to my room. A moment later, I went out to get my cane which I had left on the porch, and heard him say to Judson, "-- good fellow, but he can't argue. He never sticks to the point. " nu "171 1 1 v, 1 .," uw 1 ' , f , I vi' f ' ,fly "1 K U , , - Eb "X 250373 D 'W P55 iff Y len YS -19: fd fx WS A Words by H1-homes Mm HoveyounoT5eenTheT1m1dTear W HQWTLGUYOH 5157? 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A - ,IM Xl 1 1 g I v 'al 42 P fn Lfqfm fwf- Ssf , , , R Q51 1,1 - M1 Q fx W A 4 K ftfmizf IV ,ff , M AQ, ,sf fx Q22 'vv d 1 'r 210121 Mm Have younoTseenTheT1m1dTeur WHe,,,,e,mm,On V x1 , n if . 5 r 51'-Q' .P .P .P 1' - 2 -D 1' - 1 I 3551! V I 0'gr, 7 gill my FTB yuff ry: 7 A , IM. I Lvwyfm :Zig Y -.25 . ' 2' i., :E 71 I. il , :L F 1 I T' . .ry ' i ' ' -' -- 1 iw? efyiwf-E ' . fl 7 ll ' ' I ' 'P QW A ,uw , ' rx I A b ull opmy. 72 E, -' 9 ' E. we - JL .P l ,ian "Wm," fll blue 10?"iQ""l J" UI Ha, your FIABII. and ifgafgli v 5 J . H'n15E,fiif. 9 K -- ff if fu Y , K P A H A 'I Zgg . ml. X fi ""' -- -7,-f 1 , .. ffl f' ' -' D gl f W . . gig' is 4: Hf ' Jef Ap D 'TSE7 NI., lx Qu f 9 HY q'P'PlI D703 PW H C44 , I M BCI? Bild CNN t"' , - -' PQLPIRIT ! No lack of College spirit here. Plenty of it if you go where it is to is ' ' be found. Same thing you find at Yale or Princeton, strengthened alittle " ' 7 'IO . . . - . Q H- J by Chicago climate. Same old spirit toward college bills-their slze and immutability. Same complaints about the work-this course is dead easy-no use to work-this one is stiff and you'll get sliced-no use to bone. Complaints about the professor's jokes and about food and drink and the landlady and the tailor. Same old search for a rattling good time-without paying for it. Go where college men do congregate and you will iind the atmosphere charged with these vapors which con- dense and are precipitated easily and often. They make up the true college spirit- localized, indehnable and yet permanent. 0 0 O O This theme is about a strange little man with a great red beard, who came out of the Romance library yesterday afternoon shaking his head at the world. H O-h-h-h l " said he. " The head-ache which is mine ! " " Oh, these head-aches, " said I, with ready sympathy. " Is it the bad air? " " The bad air? " he answered, throwing up his arms. " No, it iss that man Kan-n-t, such a fellow ! Hegel is nothing to him, nothing. It iss the-what iss it in the English-the Pure Reason ? O-h-h-h ! Is not that it ? First there is the connection in the brain-the logic-and then above that there iss this Pure Reason. For hours I have study it, no wonder then if I have an ache! " Down the hall came a library girl, old and dry and wrinkled like the covers of her respectable books, and waving his hands Herr Rothbart rushed up to her. "Who is he, Phil? " said I to the biggest man in the University, who happened by just then. " Reddy, eh? " Phil said. " He's some fellow or other, there are dozens about." 0 G 0 0 In one of many classes, at the first assembling of the quarter, there were perhaps twenty men and no woman. There are arguments in plenty to prove co-education is ideal education, but for me the feeling in my own heart as I looked around the class everlastingly refuted them all. A sense of freedom, as if shackles had been stricken oi, was included in it, a perception of closer touch with teacher and classmates, and a realizaiion Qf expanding fonjdence and power. And then the door opened, and Eve entered, Eve, the eternal, dragging the serpent. She was elderly and ugly to be sure, it was sadly evident that she had dressed in the dark, but had she been the youngest and prettiest of all the college girls it would have made no difference. We were men together before she came, and then we were twenty men before a woman. Perhaps I imagined the rustle of disappointment that went around the class, but I dare swear I saw Doctor M's hard ,mouth grow harder, and I know my back suddenly bowed as if under a burden, all the heavier because for a little time thrown off. 175 vf ' - -4- . . 5 M 1 I ri vv 'r f D F 'r B ,W A 5 A 155: dural? of fbi-1 n lcfofubom g dye S Q . A ib S V i 5: m ag, occ ee 'ree 'Q' , n ic Ugcefeafzy awag T0 roam.,- T du. al em o fr lea. C I be X QUX n fb2 gunvw gftcfcb fajgizdlg if , I . - wm cswe gragges ge , 'X V, 5 CH- CNSC crirng' igbarlow c . 7-f J .' CC Ing xi wngf E: -Ta... fl f xi We X l f' 'mf 15 Bemis. Ugg ixacljv, .K 'I I if fauvfhn Mlcbae ma? qlcugies nal X 1, ff emi watt alvj tread.. 1 X N xxiaggf g ,,.. l Hou 13 or ape 01 ecgouib-wmQg marib ' "ff I, 4' ml. I ,e o na, , xx Jeibg5ei'f.22gMiiM 1 .X Adj fw ec. QN "x lzfgwe, To tve. N P Ek ' ' XX .final 25 j- r , - ff. Efese ZI.6HRDNEQ. ,ooo ,eo ll Y so llllll llll T f W2 f T ilX ' ' vnu uv ii ' in f N , , .' T X 'ffff 7" UQ-' or-i?i.'. y W fl I I T bf Xb C 1 ,f ' " ZDff1faf9fFf 1 A' HE Colonel's house stands on the right bank of the Mississippi, about il twenty miles north of Keokuk, and just outside of Onawanda. The l A building is of grey stone, and turreted like an iceberg. Back of it a planted wood, covering Eve acres, lifts through hazel brushg before it a green lawn runs down to the edge of the bluff, ninety feet high, steep as a wall, and standing sheer from the river. Over this bluff Ned had hurled the only dog he ever owned, a spotted fox-terrier six months old. He teased the little beast till it bit him, and in an excess of anger he threw it over. For a week Roxy would not speak to him, and the Colonel never gave him another dog. The Colonel was the best known man in Onawanda, and the richest. He was tall, taller even than Ned became, when his black hair used to loom in a line-up an inch above everyone else. The Colonel's hair was white, though his mustache was still darkg and in his forehead were three deep wrinkles. One came when his wife died and left him Roxy to bring up as best he might. The second and third Ned had given him. The Colonel stood as stitlly as a major general as far up as his shoulders, but he habitually carried his head bent forward, and did not always raise it even when he spoke to you. The Colonel loved both Roxy and Ned, but it could hardly be said that he approved of Ned. Ned-his full name was Edward Fitzgerald Carter-was the only son of the Colonel's sister, Emily Frankland, and Edward Fitzgerald Carter, Sr., a gentleman of Kentucky. Ned's mother died soon after Roxy's, and the Colonel almost immedi- ately invited his brother-in-law to live with him. The two Edward Fitzgerald Carters accepted the invitationg but the older did not accept it for long. The death of his wife was for him the beginning of the end. He lived in the Onawanda house for two years. Then one day, Ned being nine years old, his father died. The Colonel him- self tied the crape band to Ned's hat, and they followed to the grave together. 177 Edward Fitzgerald Carter, Sr., had been a quiet man, undemonstrative, fonder of a cigar than conversation. But neither his son nor the Colonel ever forgot him. Nothing was saidg and Ned continued to live at Onawanda. For nine years more he and Roxy grew up together, and the Colonel gave the same attention to eachg but their characters developed differently. Roxy was a quiet little maid, ive years younger than Ned, and as fair as her New England ancestry justified. She did much as she was toldg but she worshipped Ned openly and loyally, who did little as he was told, and grew into a reputation that only the Colonel's prominence kept from being notorious. He was at the same time reckless and strong, fearless, and with a dash of cruelty, and he got into more fights and won them more gloriously than any other young man in the vicinity of Onawanda. At eighteen he was tall, very dark, with a New England grimness of face and southern softness of proiile that eternally contradicted each other. He could put the sixteen-pound shot thirty-tive feet, he could run a hundred yards in eleven seconds, and the half-mile in two minutes moreg and he could swim the three-quarter mile of yellow Mississippi that swept the Ona- wanda bluffs three times in an afternoon. As for the things he could not do: he could not enjoy the poetry of Browningg he could not move in a drawing-room without upsetting a table, and he could not dance. About this time the Colonel began to think of college. When the Colonel grew worried he grew absent mindedg and when he grew absent minded he used to spit in his spectacle-case and throw his glasses into the Ere. Two pairs melted before he decided to send Ned up to the Universityg but the decision 'dually come to, the Colonel acted in haste. Three months after his eighteenth birthday, Ned was regularly enrolled as a student at Chicago. It was on a day in early October. The field, with the green of summer still upon it, and the haze of a hot sun over it, seemed a setting all out of keeping for the fig- ures it framed. Foot-ball, when the heat of the year is not yet passed, is a very unpleasant game to practice, and a good bit of a farce to watch. The men are untrained and soft, and after every line-up lie about helplessly and pant. There is a deal of desultory kicking-even a green man thinks he can punt, and, a little later, drop-kick. The veterans, the men who are practically sure of their positions, the men who after Thanksgiving will be put on the all-western team, loaf and " give the scrubs a chance." The head coach, who will in a few weeks become so vigorous and dog- matic, smiles and allows the discipline to become lax. He knows the result of over- work when the thermometer stands at eighty degrees. The sub-coaches and the cor- respondents on the side lines swear, now softly, now loudly, and honestly believe that there is no enthusiasm anywhereg and the correspondents take notes for the first of those discouraging reports that would convince the country that the standard of foot- ball is sinking year by year, only nobody ever believes them. Along the side lines, in the pleasant sun, stand hundreds of students, expressing their loyalty because they 178 have nothing better to do. Later, when the season becomes cold and rainy, the prac, tices will not be so well attended, but there are many out in these sweet October days. On this particular afternoon, the first of his attendance at Chicago, Ned Carter stood with the rest along the track beside the rope. He was one of a little group of four men-the other three all older than he-and was very much the center of inter- est. His size and his beauty made him conspicuous, and though he possessed in a large measure that self-confidence and aggressiveness that is called " freshness," it only added to his prominence. The other three men, representatives of a well-known fraternity, had marked him for their own, and according to their different temperaments they were endeavoring to win his conti- dence und good will. Never is there better opportunity for the early display of the qualities of a successful politician than in the .. " rushing " game, and these three men, Alan Dale, Tom Carruthers and Phillip Mann, were three of the best "rushers" in the University, and and the three who had done the greatest deeds in the struggle that marked the rise of their fraternity from the second to the first class. They clung closely to Ned now, they X appealed to him and subtly flattered him, they forebore to praise X him openly and so disgust him, they talked to him frankly and A. X. X, made him one of them. X "Why don't you go in for foot-ball, Carter? " said Dale, the slenderest, frailest, most intellectual looking and "foxiest" Q, 31 NSE'-EBE Junior in college. " You certainly look to have the build." if ry Ned laughed. " Don't think I care much for the game," he said. "Those fel- lows look too hot and dirty to be comfortable." " Oh, well, this weather Won't last long " said Carruthers, a man as black as Ned himself, with an open, laughing face, and an air of cordiality that never left him. " VVait till the east winds begin to come in off the lake. Foot-ball is the only thing that will keep you warm then. And it's the greatest thing ever invented for giving a man standing and credit in the University. Study isn't in it. Look at me-never 'failed to lead my class, and yet get no credit because I'm not big enough to play foot- ball." " You lead your class backwards into temptation, Tom " said Mann, the third of the trio, thin almost as Dale, plain to ugliness, with a big nose but eyes full of lurk- ing twinkle. Mann had never yet failed to find humor in anything. "If you want Mr. Carter to play foot-ball, tell him it is his duty to the University. If he doesn't do it then, tell him it's a better way to get gym. credit than running around a dirt heap in grey underclothesf' Ned laughed again. "I read in the papers," he explained in a cheerful loud 179 voice, "that the coaches kick the men when they didn't obey orders, and if a man kicked me I'm afraid Pd get mad and make a fool of myself." " That's a Yale custom that we haven't learned yet," said Carruthers. " All the kicking here is incidental, and mostly aimed at the umpire. So is the slugging, except occasionally-as, for instance, there ! " The hot weather had made the players cross and irritable. There were a suspi- cious number of ugly falls on the scrub side, and the 'Varsity complained constantly of holding. Suddenly, after a scrimmage, and just as Carruthers spoke, two men faced each other in quick anger, there were two swinging blows, and then the eye of the coach fastened itself there, and in another moment the two men, ruled off for the afternoon, were walking together across the field. "Coburn and VVray-Coburn lost his head again," said Dale contemptuously. But in Ned's black eyes the joy of battle smouldered. " Is that in the game? H he said. " Very much in it," laughed Mann. " The universities are trying to legislate it out, but human nature is tough." " Well that must be a pretty good game," said Ned. " I believe I'll try it." Dale looked at him curiously. " Sluggers don't make good players," he said. " Oh, I don't know, said Ned, cheerfully. The next day began the career of Edward Fitzgerald Carter, sometime guard of the University of Chicago eleven-a career that, had it followed out to its natural end, would have remained as unparal- leled unto this day. VVhat it was, you remember, and it comes unto this story only slightly. A full account of it will never be written, but anyone who is curious may go to the head coach and ask, and if the head coach is in a good humor on that day, and has discovered a possible new phenomenon, and is convinced that he is not talk- ing for publication-the conviction must be pressed home to him, and that is not easy-then he will unfurl his mind and set out zig-zag over a sea anecdote, and reminiscence, and dry philosophy, until he reaches the port of lost opportunities in Foot-ball, and there he will drop anchor and rest, sayingfwith a regretful sigh-"Yes, that was Ned Carter - " Hoss " Carter-and if I had had him four years instead of two-5" and then you must go away very softly, for the head coach will have forgot- ten you, and it is not well to interrupt his musings. It was a year later, at the beginning of his sophomore work, that Ned began to go out in University society. His position there was from the first pretty irmly estab- lished. His freshman triumphs in foot-ball and on the track team would have been enough in themselves to secure him a " bid " from most of the fraternities, his good looks and the Colonel's money brought the rest into line. Ned was the "hardest rushed " man of his year, and had known the joy of refusing many bids. Dale, Carruthers and Mann never let him go, and in the spring, when he was eligible, he l8O was initiated into Alpha Kappa Pi. They urged him at once to go to those receptions and teas that are for the Freshmen the Introduction to the Study of Society, and though he resisted successfully for three months, he succumbed in the fall, and " did " where he was " bid." As I have said, he was at once a success. It is true that Ned Carter never learned the art of making pretty speeches. It is true that he was never a graceful dancer, though, after a fashion, he learned to dance. It is true that his voice was unrnodulated and harsh, and that his laughter had a touch of the crackling of thorns. But if he did not say the right thing, he did not say the wrong, he openly admired the girls he met, and there is much in that, and he was " certainly," as even the Seniors admitted "a very good looking fellow." He went out, ard he went out, to teas, to dinners, to receptions, to everything that was con- sistent with the strictest of training rules. He admired every one impartially, and told his thoughts freely to the men of his fraternity. One day, day, however, he met Miss Carnegieg and from that time he spoke his thoughts no more. He went on with his foot-ball playing, adding ever new laurels. Against Northwestern he played well, against Wisconsin better, against Michigan best of all. A story might be written about every game. The old romance of the knight and his lady is as fresh to-day as when lances lay in rest and armor glearnedg and Alsace Carnegie, by or against her will, inspired Ned Carter to worthier efforts every time he saw her. He bore a charm and was never hurt. When he had the ball he never stopped running, and on defense he never considered the possibility that anyone else might tackle the runner. He won the heart of the head coach, and always, between halves, he looked about for Miss Carnegie. She usually came to the games in her drag, with sometimes one man, sometimes three, attending her. She took her place at the end of the East grand stand, where the earlier carriages always moved to make room for her. There Ned would look for her, and when he had found her he would play harder than before. Passion is more effectual than ginger tonic. The position of Alsace Carnegie in the University had never been satisfactorily settled. The women indeed did not definitely aprove of her by offering her the shelter of a club, and so she remained an " independent." There were also, of course, those rumors, whispered of between dances and in the clink and clatter of teas, that always hang like a haze over a pretty girl not like all the other pretty girls. Men said of her that she was " nervyg " occasionally that she was " easy." Plenty there were bold enough, and fond enough of beauty, to take her to dances, and to ride on her drag to the games. But she had few callers among the men of the University. Her record as a student was above criticism. That was established by the evidence of the dozens of people who were curious enough to look it up. She was neither very dark nor very fair, her eyes were as grey as a cloud, she was rather small than short, and slen- derly built. Her feet and her waist were the admiration of one half and the envy of 181 the other half, of the University. She could not sing, nor play, and she danced only poorly. But such as she was she appeared before Ned Carterg and he thought her a goddess, and worshipped her-not reverently, but passionately. From the day in early November when he first met her, he steadily hurled his attentions at her, and in less than two months he had asked her to marry him. Consider now what he was. Edward Fitzgerald Carter, aged nineteen and one- half years, sophomore at the University of Chicago, on the outside tall, strong and dark, on the inside a bundle of impulses and passions, uncontrolled and successful, joint heir-to-be with Roxana Frankland, of all the land and estate of Colonel William Prentiss Franl-:land-and that not little. Alsace Carnegie laughed in his face. He asked her again, and she refused him point blank. He asked her again and she left the room. He took his hat and coat, went out of the Hall and across the campusg and the same light smouldered in his black eyes that flamed there in a game. " I shall ask her," he said to himself, " until she consents-or until I kill her." That was just after the Christmas vacation, and he had still in his pocket the photograph of Roxy she had given him. He had known, when he was in Onawanda, that when he came back to Chicago he should ask Alsace Carnegie to marry him, but he had not thought it necessary to tell either Roxy or the Colonel about it. In a dim and misty way he had sometimes thought the Colonel wanted him to marry Roxy. He took her photograph out now and looked at it, then smiled and put it back. "Roxy, little girl," he said, "there isn't enough of the devil in you." Which might be taken as a reflection on Miss Alsace Carnegie. The next part of the life of Ned Carter and Alsace Carnegie might have been called the " hare and hound," except for the popular estimate of the character of those animals. Ned saw Miss Carnegie at receptions, concerts, dinners, dances-the whole round-and always he asked her to marry him. He called on her, and they talked of the same thing. Sometimes, in the depths of the carriage, returning from a dance, they two alone, Ned's passion would almost master him, and he would grow HCYCC and demand. But Miss Carnegie could be as cold and hard as he was eager and angryg she was emphatically, in spite of the rumors among the men that she was " easy," a girl who could take care of herself. She was always and everywhere on her guard Q she fenced well, and she kept herself out of danger. And usually Ned's question "VVill you marry me ? " was quietly put, he asked it so often, that winter and spring, that it grew almost formal. They two were always together. The University gossiped, as the University will, when other men dropped away, and on the campus and off the campus Alsace Carnegie and Ned Carter were sufficient for each other. But Ned cared not a bit, and Miss Carnegie seemed to be as little bothered. january and February drifted away, and March blew itself out. The rains and breezes of April made the yard soggy and unpleasant, and May dried it up again and 182 wrote across it in great yellow letters that to the uninitiated looked like splashes of sunshine, " Spring." There were again the beginnings of tennis, and the track men got out of the gymnasium with cries of joy. Nobody ever crossed the campus alone. It was the halcyon season of a co-educational university-the season when no one studies books, and even the deans look life in the face and smile g when the lake finally puts away the grey and dons the blue that lasts the summer through 3 when Seniors grow sad and freshmen merry g when the year is almost done. A new fraternity had come into the University, and celebrated its advent with a dance. As usual, Ned Carter " took " Alsace Carnegie 5 as usual he asked her to marry him 3 as usual she laughed. After the dance, when it was very late, the two came home in a carriage together. KVhen fhey reached the college yard the dawn was in the air. The driver turned as usual up the road to the halls, but Alsace stopped him. " Ned," she said, " tell him to drive straight across the campus to the Ellis Avenue entrance, we'll get out there." " What are you going to do, Alsace? " said Ned, curiously. " Never mind," said Miss Carnegie. The carriage crunched across the dim yard, and stopped beside Cobb, grim and heavy and bulky. The two got out. " T hat's all right," said Ned to the driver, and the obedient Irishman whipped away. Then she faced him under the grey sky. " We'll walk across the campus and talk it out, Ned," she said. " What do you men?" he asked stupidly. Alsace laughed. " You have been asking me every day, sometimes twice a day, for the last four months, to marry you," she said. U You think you know what you want, but you don't at all, and I'm going to prove it to you right now." Ned smiled pleasantly. "Go on,'l he said. "What do you mean when you say you want me to marry you?" asked Miss Carnegie. " I mean," said Ned slowly, " merely that I want to marry you." " When ? " she said abruptly. " Now," he answered as promptly. She curled her lip. " If you mean," she said, that you want to be engaged to me-to touch me, and hold my hand, and kiss me, to fondle me, and have me brush your forehead, and then throw me over and wait for the next girl, you are wasting your time. I'm not that kind of a girl. If you want to marry me-marry me now-you can. 1,111 willing. Your good old uncle won't approve, and you'll probably get into all sorts of trouble with the Faculty. As compensation, however, you will have me. You don't know anything about me, who I am, or who my parents are, or anything at all. I don't propose to tell you anything. I shan't even tell you whether I am honest, as girls go. I say just this: If you want to take me up to Milwaukee and marry me there, 183 all nice and comfortable-you can. I shan't make an objection. There's a train that goes at half past two this afternoon, we can go up on that. Otherwise, you stop, for- ever, asking me your question and seeing me." " There is a boat," said Ned, " that leaves at nine this mornin gg why shouldnt We take that ? " She stopped in her walk-they had been slowly drawing near the Hall--and looked at him. Her face was pale, and her grey eyes looked very large and almost black by contrast. She was so little and frail and fair in her ball gown, in the gloom under the trees that line the 1 walk-her hair curling away from her forehead like a halo-that she must have seemed like a 4 spirit to Ned. Then she said: " D0 you mean it?" " Don't talk nonsense," said Ned. He may be forgiven. It was a strain that twenty-year old nerves are not meant to bear. She bowed her head, and when she looked up she was cry- ing. At the instant a shade, a faint wave of light, slipped over all the east. The sun was rising over the quadrangles as Ned took her in his arms. But she struggled free. " No, Ned," she said, " no, it Won't do, even if-if-we are going to be married." Between her tears and laughter she was almost hysterical. "There, the sun's V,-U1 , I V up and the watchman is looking at us. Get me over to the Hall quick, before any- one else sees us. I've got a key. I rnusn't have a bad reputation if I'm going to marry you, Ned." At the door of the Hall she paused only a second. " It will have to be the train, Ned," she said. " I'm afraid I can't get ready for the boat. Meet me at one 0'clock on the XValker steps. I Won't have a satchel." Then she slipped inside, and left Ned alone. He walked again across the campus, light now, but absolutely still and sleepy, and found the Watchman sitting in his chair at the door of Cobb. The old man looked at him curiously, and Ned remembered that he was in evening dress. " Do you smoke? " he said. " Will you get yourself some cigars with this, and- if you say anything you may get two very nice people into trouble." 181 I " All right, Mr. Carter," said the watchman, who was not too old to wink. Then Ned, with very strange feelings in his throat and chest, walked to the fraternity house. There were four men there sitting around a table playing seven-up and trying to make up their minds to go to bed. All of them were, like Ned, in evening dress, and all had been to the dance. Three were Dale, Carruthers and Mann, who, more than any others, had induced Ned to join Alpha Kappi Pi. The fourth was Morris Atkin- son, a fellow of Ned's own class. When Ned entered they greeted him with a mock cheer and pounded on the table. " With a ho, ho, ho, see the gay Lothar-io ! " hummed Carruthers. " Let's see, Ned, whom did you take last night? " The others laughed. Ned frowned. " Hurt your little feelings, old man?" said Carruthers. " Well, don't hurt me. She's a very nice girl, and she gave me a dance to-night, which was good of her, though she did step on my toes three times. We sat out the encoreg I think I hurt my ankle, or something," and Carruthers winked. Ned took the cards and shuflled them in one hand, resting lightly on the edge of the table. "When a fellow," he said, " Isn't enough of a gentleman to know when he is oifensive, we show him- like this, " and he threw the pack into Carruthers' face, sharply. They fell and fluttered to the floor, and every man was on his feet. " What do you mean ! " cried Mann, startled out of his humorous composure. Nobody else spoke. Carruthers slowly plucked a card away where it had caught the edge of his waistcoat, and his face reddened and then paled again. Ned's hand still rested on the rim of the card table. At last Alan Dale broke the silence. " I think you must be drunk, Carter," he said, in his high, even voice. " You would better apologize at once, and then go and sleep it off." Ned's voice rose like a torrent. " Apologize? " he said. " Apologize to a man who has insulted a girl, better than any of his sisters ever dared to be? A man who has insulted me-a man who hasn't the courage to resent a blow ! I'll see him damned first-and you, too? " Carruthers stood as still as a stone. Dale spoke again and there was a note of wonderment in his voice. " You are certainly drunk, Carter," he said. " Carruthers did not insult you or any one else, as you know. He made a perfectly harmless speech, such an one as would be delicacy itself, contrasted with most of yours. You have insulted him now, past apology, unless you are too drunk to know what you are doing. Tom, you shut up. Carter presumes on his physical strength. XVe'll try something else." Dale and Carruthers left the room. Atkinson sail, " Shall I help you up to bed, Ned? " Ned gave no answer, and Atkinson followed the others. Mann alone stayed, and stared at Carter. 185 " What's the matter, old boy? " he said. "Are you engaged to her? " " None of your damned business," said Ned. " Oh, yes, it is,"said Mann. " It is the business of every man who is as proud of you as I have been. It's the business of every man in this fraternity, you know. You're not drunk 3 that's too easy. I want to know what the matter is." Ned came round the table to where the other stood, and faced him, towering above him. "Phil," he said, "old man, I'll tell you something. I'm going to be married this afternoon to Miss Carnegie. Do you think I'm going to let any damn man talk about my Wife, Phil ? " " For God's sake ! " said Mann. " That's right, Phil. We agreed on it only half an hour ago. I came straight home, and heard this fellow abusing her. I suppose he said a lot of things before I came. He'd better not say any more while I'm here." " Have you made up your mind about this thing? "rsaid Mann. Ned nodded. " You know it means expulsion from the University, and-forgive me-all sorts of nasty talk." " I suppose so." "You know, if you don't apologize to Carruthers, it probably means expulsion from the fraternity?" " I don't give a damn," said Ned. " NVhat time do you go? " "Leave here at one. I'm going to bed now. Good night." Carter turned on his heel and left. Said Mann : " Oh, you damn, damn, damn fool ! " And again, " What can I do?" That same day, by a Methodist minister at Milwaukee, were married Edward Fitzgerald Carter, aged Qnearlyj twenty, and Alsace Carnegie, aged twenty-three. Immediately afterwards Ned sent off two telegrams. One, to Colonel XV. P. Frank- land, Onawanda, Iowa, read as follows 2 "Married here this afternoon. Shall we come home? Will probably be ex- pelled. Ned." The other, to Philip Mann, contained the one word " Done," and was signed E. F. Carter. Properly there is no more to the story. But the head coach, who has since vis- ited Onawanda, will tell you differently. He went out a year and a few months after this, when September was shading into October, to induce-secretly, but without the offer of money, which constitutes the crime-to induce Ned Carter, sometimes guard on the eleven, to come back to his old place. The University had forgiven him, said the coach, and would gladly take him back, he could go and complete such a reputa- 185 tion in foot-ball as the West has never yet rung to. To the coach's mind, that seemed reason enough for anyone. But Ned laughed. "Fm an old married man, now," he said. "I have to look after the Colonel's property, and he couldn't spare me. Besides, if I came, Alsace would have to come, and how could the Colonel and Roxy spare Alsace? Besides-let me show you some- thing." And then Ned opened a case that hung against the wall. What was in it the head coach will not tell you, but this it was: Two letters, two pins, and a motto. One letter, signed by the president, and pinned by the college pin, was the notice of dismissal from college for a year. The other letter, signed by the secretary of the chapter and pinned by the Alpha Kappa Pi pin, was the notice of expulsion from the fraternity. And running around and between both letters was the motto: " VVhat God hath joined together, let not man put asunderf' james Weber Linn. Evening Down western slopes the sun has climbed full slewlv, the breezes murmur that the day must die, the breath ef night, like incense faint and holv, Rises to heaven, darkening the skv. the little ripples on the sand-shore waking whisper together of the distant deep, Zhatter together, the calm silence breaking, whisper again, and so sink back to sleep. the UIIYDIQ QNOIII, ZICNSS IM W3l'Ql"S CMIIIIQSS, 531135 llllk 3 Cllfidlll, till dll llllS00ll bind Draws if Midi, dlld, ChdI'i0fQd ill stillness, UR white l1100ll rides Olll 0'Cl' Ill? shadowy ldlld. From the Mulberry Club Book, printed during April, 1898, at the Wind-Tryst Press. 187 Stlliol' DiviSIOlI lllttiillg 'llllllllllllll f 'EXT X HE time has come," the Prex he said, 1. " To talk of many things : ' rf, , f ' if Of Law-Schools, and. the Man who Hates Emir, ,gm And why the choir SlHg5, AR And of our frequent cabbage-heads ' Who take themselves for kings. " Division-meetings, and debates, And gym suits gray and queer, Of all the funny brood of Deans, And why we have them here. fThe student dropped upon the ground A sympathetic tear.j " Of what the teachers' salaries are, And what they really get, Of what John D. remarked to me The day that we first met Q And how I grasped his nether limb- I'm pulling at it yet. " Of how myself and Mr. Stagg Are working for the West Q Of correspondents for the press, Who are our chiefest pest, And why the dances close at one, just when the fun is best. " Of these, and many other things Which-may I say-concern The Student Body as a Whole, Your time has come to learn. Present your questions one by one, I'll answer them in turn. LL But first, our time just now is up, My secretaries say, And next week, too, I see I must fI'm sorryj be away. This chat we'll-shall we say-postpone Until some other day." 188 People lllbo Pose GAINST the white glare of the electric lights the trees cast inky shad- Y? Q F ows g the gray buildings loomed up vaguely on the campus, and Q' Q 3 across the soft spring air came the sound of foot-steps, leisurely or .J 3 hasty, and an occasional burst of laughter. A girl in a second-story window, peering out over the quadrangle, turned from her survey to call " come in," in answer to a rap on the door. Another girl entered, tall, slender and graceful, as could be discerned even in the dim light alforded by the distant lamps. " Oh, it's you Madge! " The girl in the window moved to make room for the new-comer beside her on the couch. " That's right, make yourself comfortable. So, he's gone at last." " At last." " Bert P" " Yes. Yonder he goes." Together they watched a solitary figure in a light suit, swinging across the campus towards the men's halls. Then the nrst girl turned to her companion with a questioning expression. " Madge," she began, " tell me honestly, do you like Bert very much ?" " N-no." " I thought not. I've been thinking about it all evening--ever since I found you'd gone walking with someone, presumably Bert. Now Bert's a nice fellow-good looking, plenty of pocket-money, and all that, but he's uninteresting as another wo- man's troubles. And you know it, yet you grant him loads of time and attention, while I -" " While you ?" " Am nice to people that I really like. Madge, what do you do it for?" Madge sat for a moment, chin on hand, as if pondering the question. Then, " Well," she said, slowly, " I believe it's my pose. Everyone has one, and since I came I've posed as the girl who is equally nice to everyone, and so-well, I have to be nice to a lot of uninteresting people sometimes." She spoke indifferently, but with a sudden interest looked at her friend, in a quizzical fashion. "You have a pose," she remarked, " yes, you. And it's the ' sincere' pose. Well, you have your reward. Mr. Rankin said the other day that ' By Jove ! to Win Agnes Farrel's friendship was to win the genuine article! " " He paid me a charming compliment 5 he couldn't have said a kinder thing." 189 " Ah-ha, Miss Agnes, see how pleased you are! You feel a compliment like that to be the reward of conscious merit, the reward that comes after labor. Oh, don't get mad. Everyone poses. Tene, for example. Innocency is her watch-word, so she opens her brown eyes very wide, says 'H0nes!Lv, do you mean that ?' and refers to her mother as ' my mammal " " And Louise?" " Oh, Lou is worldly-wise and 'spierencedg vide three broken engagements. Poses, in both cases. Louise voluntarily shouldering the blame for that late Wednes- day revel, shielded about six people. Tene was so shocked that she had to spread the thing all over college, just to explain how shocked she was." " Do you think the men pose?" " Rather, and without so much finesse, " As Madge spoke the sound of retreating footsteps made her look out of the window. "There," she exclaimed, "there goes one of the inveterates. His is the poster pose. His sentences are splotches of color g his general attitude pseudo-dramatic. Admire him? Of course I do. He is clever and original. But I'm being epigram- matic. Now,', thoughtfully, " there's Billy-Billy McKee. He's sympathetic, if you like. If you have the blues, he's been there himself. If you are jubilant, the World's too small for him. If you want a lark, you're just the girl, and if it's short stories you crave, why a grate-re, an interesting book, and an interesting girl, as he conn- dentially assures you, are the summum bonum of existence." " You are simply horrid. I think Mr. McKee is lovely." " Yes, he is. But he's human. And did you ever strike him in an off mood? Well, you have something exciting in store for you. " " How about Iackf " jack?" Madge laughed. " Oh, Agnes, Agnes. I knew you'd ask. Jack, the worldly-minded-jack the spiritualist-Jack, the paternal, who gives you advice about things you told him yourself 5 Why Jack is delicious I" " Don't prejudice me until spring is over." " Prejudice you ! Jack is a darling, but - Well, see here. Isn't he-doesn't he- isn't it all foo rich!" " Rich! I should say so! Why, Madge, he-" " Don't tell me. I know all about it. I've gone with him myself." 190 5 -. ...i....-l., .11-4.1-. JAMES H. ECKELS, President D. VERNON, 2nd Vice President JOHN C. MCKEON, Vice President Jos. T. TALBERT, Cashier ommercial ilflational JBank Gbicago, 1Ill. Capital, - - - 51,000,000 can Surplus, - - ' 51,000,000 DIRECTORS FRANKLIN BIAC VEAGH. N. K. FAIRBANK. ROBERT T. LINCOLN. JESSE SPAULDING. NORMAN WILLIAMS. JAMES H. ECKELS. WM. J. CHALMERS. JOHN C. MCKEON. CAPITAL, - - 52,000,000 The Continental National Bank ni Chicag CORNER ADAMS AND LA SALLE STREET CHICAGO, ILL. JOHN C. BLACK, President ISAAC N. PERRY, Vice-President. GEORGE M. REYNOLDS, Cashier. IRA P. BOWEN, Assistant Cashier. BENJAMIN S. MAYER, Ass't Cashier DIRECTORS JOHN C. BLACK, ROSWELL MILLER, WILLIAM G. HIBBARD, GEORGE H. WHEELER, HENRY C. DURAND. HENRY BOTSFORD, JAMES H. DOLE. J. OGDEN ARMOUR. ISSAC N. PERRY, BERTHOLD LOEWENTHAL. ERNEST A. HAMILL. President FRANK W. SMITH, Cashier CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON, Vice President JAMES P. HANKEY, Ass't Cashier The Com Exchange National Bank OF CHICAGO cAPl1'Al. - - 51,000,000 SURPLUS, 51,000,000 DIRECTORS SIDNEY A. KENT, JOHN H. DWIGHT, CHARLES H. SCHWAB EDWIN G. FOREMAN. CHARLES H. WACKER. EDWARD B. BUTLER. B. M. FREES. BYRON L. SMITH. ERNEST A. HAMILL. CHARLES COUNSELMAN. CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON. IIERMAN fElSENII'IAl, President K. G. SCIIMIDT, Vice President FRED MILLER, Cashier BANK OF COMMERCE 184 La Salle Street Capital, - - - 8500.000 I D I Temple Building, CHICAGO DIRECTORS JACOB BIRK, Capitalist, formerly of the Wackcr LEOPOLD POPPER, Wholesale Wool. dz Birk Brewing Company. K. G. SCHMIDT Vice-Pres't Bank of Commerce. ELI B. FELSENTHAL, Attorney. CHARLES SEECERS, Pres't Crescent Linseed HERMAN FELSENTHAL, President. Oil Company. l S. M. FISCHER, Pres't Street's Western Stable ADOLPH SHIRE, Wholesale Cigars. Car Line. FRED W- WOLF, President Fred W. Wolf Co., WM. GIFFERT Furniture Manufacture. Ice Machines. g ADOLPH LOEI3, of Ad. Loeb 8. Son, Fire Ins. SAMUEL WOOLNER, President Atlas Distilling FRED MILLER, Cashier. Company, Peoria. 192 Che WOTSI PMI Of U76 GBIIIQ the 'Varsity came tumbling over the ropes " Brindle " Brown felt that he had to make a tear. For yesterday he was only an ambitious sub rather under weight, but today found him regular quarter-back with a responsi- bility upon his shoulders that Napoleon might have envied. Yesterday, when he heard one of the coaches say the captain, U If young Brown will only interfere hard, he'll do," he walked away with stiffened shoulders and a pugnacious chin feeling very sorry for the other side, but today as he trotted out among the ive-yard lines his courage was so mixed with nervousness that he had to stop and prove to himself by logical reasons that courage really had not left him in the lurch. Nor could he keep his eyes long away from the other end of the field where they were. He'd no idea they were such big fellows, they looked like all out-doors 3 and they seemed so terribly unconcerned as they passed the ball about. And now he stood, fascinated with interest, staring at them while a queer, leaking feeling passed down his spine and settled at the pit of his stomach. " Brown! " "Brindle" jumped at the word, for the captain's voice rang sharp, "Come and handle the ball ! " He began passing to the full-back, every now and then stealing a look down-Held just to see what they were doing. "1 may get a line on their play," he murmured to himself in case he needed an excuse. And then the cheering in the grandstand began for the individual players and that caught his attention. Would they cheer him? he wondered hypocritically. He bated his breath to hear better. How smooth he felt when they rolled out: " Rah! Rah! Rah! Brindle Bro-0-own! " " 'Varsity this way, " sung out the head coach, and as they gathered close to- gether listening to the incisive last words the little quarter-back found the arm of one of the guards, a senior, about his shoulders. He looked up with conscious pride into the brown eyes that smiled and winked at him as the head coach said: " Now every man to his place, and remember, fellows, play like bhzzes! " The other side scattered down field like the men on a well broken chess-board, while the 'Varsity lined up to kick off. The full-back fussed with the ball with vexin g deliberation, as though he was merely trying to make it look more artistic to the grandstand, and " Brindle " again began to feel that queer, leaky feeling settle upon him when the referee's clear voice rang out: " Ready Northwestern? Ready Chicago? Play ball ! " Then the little quarter-back's muscles grew tense, he set like a sprinter, and as he raced down under the kick he had to shut his teeth upon the joy that leaped up within him. The grandstand, the cheering, his own mental state, the whole world, had been left in the center of the iieldg he could see and think of nothing but that one, purple-legged half-back into whose outstretched arms he saw the shiny, sailing oval would descend. 193 zto address or call upon 11112 and ElldOll5ll1QllI IIISIIYZIIICQ. NDOWMENT INSURANCE IN THE NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. OF MILWAUKEE may be secured by healthy men in amounts from 51,000 to 575,000 By keeping up the annual premiums Qless dividend reductionsj a man may beas absolutely certain of receiving his Endowment at the end of the fixed period, or that it will go to his estate in case of previous death, as if he were the owner of a U. S. Bond for an equal amount. Right here, see how much more accessible and available a NORTHWESTERN Endowment policy is than a Government bond. Suppose you say you will buy a Government bond for 510,000 What does it cost? Anyway 511,000 You are 25 years old and just married. You cannot afford to pay any principal sum for investment or protection, and you need at least 510,000 Life Insurance. Now, less than 375 on 310,000 at 'drst Qand less than 25 annually before you get throughl Will buy 510,000 Life Insurance-just as good as a Government Bond-containing an absolute guaranty of cash to yourself at age 55 if you live till then. In the one case, you pay 1105 of the principal cash down. In the other you pay less than 2555 a year in the average until you receive the principal, with promise that if you die even the first year the whole amount goes immediately to your wife, and the remaining 29 installments of premium payments are cancelled. Where in all the financial world can you pur- chase a contract equal to this, a contract containing so many guarantees and advan- tages with so litte outlay of money? Men do not now say that they " Do not believe in Life Insurance," or that they "never expect to take any." VVhat they do say is, that they "are not yet quite ready," or have not yet "decided upon the company." Of course, the best time to get Life In- surance is when we are sure we can pass examination. Even tomorrow may be too late. The "best company" is the one which the consensus of opinion of men insured for years in all the leading companies, pronounces the best. There area number of ex- cellent companies. Patrons of all commend the company they are in. The difference in testimony is this: Of other companies they write H They are good." Of the North- western they say, " It is best." Such testimony from personal experience of men who have carried policies, in all the leading companies for years is worth money to YOU. Bishop William Stevens Perry of Iowa, just deceased, carried for years a number of policies in the Northwestern. In an autograph letter he recently said, " My experi- ence with the Northwestern has been so satisfactory that I wish all my insurance was in that Company." Hundreds of others say the same thing. Before insuring your life send for the pamphlet "Over Their Own Signatures." containing several hundred fac-simile autograph letters from leading men, giving their experience and policy records in the Northwestern and other companies. Sent pre, paid to any address. Men desiring information about policy, or young men of integ- 1rity, tact and good address, not yet established inbusiness, and with disposition to hunt for a thing instead of staying in an office and waiting for it to come, are invited A. W. KIMBALL, General Agent. C. D. NORTON, Ass't General Agent. Sth Floor Chicago Stock Exchange. 194 Co IRD Cbum jimmy, old boy, there is a lot Of so-called poetry extant- A lot of sentimental rot And sickening, melancholy rant- All about girls-or " maidensn, rather,- And "love' ' and ' 'lips" and "slaves" and And all such soft, insipid lather. You know, and I know what it means g It means the author's versifying Just to amuse himself or pass The time. It sometimes means he's lying. It mostly means that he's an ass. And if a fellow thinks that'a fun, All right. But, J im, it makes me hot To read real poets and to run Against this omnipresent rot. For even Byron, you will find- But whoa ! I'm getting off the track g I didnlt start to write a grind. queens, " Where was I at? Hemi!-let's turn back I made a slight animadversion Ou certain poets' watery brew To introduce my main assertion, NVhich, jim, old boy, refers to you. Girls are all very Well to josh And dance with, I admit that, Jim g But as for being friends, it's bosh- You might as well try cherubim. And so, old boy, I quickly tire Of soft effusions on affection And damn the poet for a liar And drop him from my recollection. For, jim, I like you, and I swear Of no girl can I say the same. I like to meet you anywhere, At any time, in any game. I always feel at home with you, Perfectly unconcerned and free. I know the converse too is true- You could come back with this at me. You think you're good friends with a girl QI know how 'tis and so do you knowj, When suddenly around she'll whirl And get as mad as mamma Juno. What for? You said what isn't proper. It's always "propers" "rights" and "wrongs"! You always have to have a stopper And handle her with sugar tongs. So I choose you. Your paw, old boy- And also, please, a cigarette. My turn to buy the festive brau, Or yours? Which is it? I forget. Well, what's the difference? Here you go.- Ho ! Busse, iill 'em to the brim. This is the girls-this foam I blow, And now, here's looking at you, Jim ! 195 RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE N. E. Cor. Wood and Harrison Sts., CHICAGO FACULTY DELASKIE MILLER, A.M., M,D., PH.D., I Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Children. EPHRAIM INGALS. M.D., Emeritus Professor of Materia Medica and Medical Jurisprudence. DANIEL T. NELSON, A.M., M,D., Emeritus Professor of Clinical Gynecology. EDWARD L. HOLMES, M. D., L.L.D., President. Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 31 Washington Street HENRY M. LYMAN, A.M., M.D., Treasurer, Professor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine. 100 State Street JAMES H. ETHERlDGE, A.M., M.D., Secretary. h Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 31 Washington Street WALTER S. HAINES, A.M., M.D., n D Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy and Toxicology. Laboratory in College Building JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A.M., M.D.. Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases, IOO State Street NORMAN BRIDGE, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Diagnosis. Rush Medical College ARTHUR DEAN BEVAN, M.D., Professor of Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical. 100 State Street NICHOLAS SENN, M.D., PH.D.. L.L.D., Professor of Practice of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, 532 Dearborn Avenue E. FLETCHER INGALS, A,M., M.D., Registrar. Professor of Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest. 34 Washington Street DANIEL R. BROWER. M.D., Professor of Mental Diseases, Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 34 Washington Street JOHN B. HAMILTON, M.D,, L.L.D., Professor of Principles of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, 100 State Street JOHN M. DODSON, A.M., M,D., Professor of Physiology and Histology. 34 Washington Street SANGER BROWN, M.D., Professor of Hygiene and Medical Jurisprudence, 34 Washington Street TRUMAN W. BROPHY, M.D., D.D.S.. LL.D., Professor of Dental Pathology and Surgery, 126 State Street W. T. BELFIELD. M.D., Professor of Bacteriology and Lecturer on Surgery. 112 Clark Street ALFRED C. COTTON, A.M., M. ,D, Professor of Diseases of Children. 677 Jackson Boulevard LUDW IG HEKTOEN. M.D., Professor of Morbid Anatomy and Director of the Laboratories of Histology, Pa-- thology, Bacteriology and Hygiene. The curriculum of this school of Medicine requires a proper preliminary education. Students will be required to take four years of study in the college, devoted to laboratory, didactic and clinical instruction, to recitations and to manual training in the uselof instruments and appliances. Instruction is given in two capacious, well-lighted editices. The new building contains tive large laboratories, in which are conducted the practical laboratory courses in Anatomy, Physi- ology and Histology, Chemistry, Materia Medica, Pathology and Bacteriology. The old building is devoted to instruction by clinics, didactic lectures, and by numerous impor- tant practical courses in manual training in manipulations and in the use of the instruments employed in medicine, surgery, obstetrics and specialties. Manual training in all departments of medicine is a special feature of the instruction in this college. Systematic recitations, conducted in five commodious recitation rooms, are regarded as a most important means of teaching. 1 With over seventy professors and instructors and with ample room and appliances. this school is able to furnish its classes with the most approved systematic education in medicine. Physicians and medical students are invited to visit the laboratories and to inspect the educa- tional appliances of this school. For further information and for announcements apply to the College Clerk or to the Secretary, J. H. ETHERIDGE, M.D., 31 Washington St., Chicago. 196 'FTGIICQSCZI IUSEPPE was like the sunshine of his own Italy, but gossipg rumbled that he smiled to much upon Magda the wife of his brother, Antonio. Now Antonio was morose, had a surly temper and was often away from his wife for days together while Giuseppe owned the most engaging smiles, didn't know how to get angry, and besides was always by to lend a cheer- ful hand and help speed the dingy hours. And in these facts-I learned them after- wards-lies Magda's whole excuse which you may, or may not admit according to your moral training and your knowledge of the people, and the judgment these demand. On this particular Sunday I swung round the corner into the Italian neighbor- hood remarking how the sun lighted up the ugly, squalid street: thinking Giuseppe a picturesque figure as with a red kerchief tied loose about his throat he sipped at a huge bowl of saffron colored risotto and waved his spoon and smiled up at a window where I could see only a red geranium bowing to the sun and I was smiling too when suddenly and noiselessly a little darker man passed me from behind like a chill shadow. Ignorant of the issue I kept still, gay and unconsious of fate Giuseppe waved his spoon at the fiower when a quick scream from its window caused him to drop his bowl and turn. But it had scarcely smashed upon the pavement before he fell, stricken beside it while Antonio after flinging a stained knife at the window where the red geranium nodded ded up the garish street. When the ambulance came Giuseppe was quite dead. The morbid crowd fol- lowed on after the corpse, leaving but two of us where Giuseppe had lately stood, myself Wondering about the Window and a starved cur that eyed me suspiciously as it greedily lapped up a pool of yellew risotto that had collected in the gutter. i N. W. F, Htl Qld fone In the days when I was a little, little boy, thought my grandfather the oldest living man, and felt a vague uneasiness lest after all the teamster round the corner should be a stronger man than Sampson, and when I grew a little older and barked my shins climbing the big walnut tree in the side yard, and a little older still and made atwo-pronged "sling-shot" and killed robins with it, right up to the time when I began to wander with " Harry Castleman H and " Frank " in an enchanted, adventure-haunted land, and so put away childish things-in brief, that is, from my nfth to my eighth year, I was in love. With an angel. Her name was Gracie Tit- comb. I have forgotten what she looked like, though she must have been dark and chubby, for I was slim and fair. But I remember I loved her long and faithfully, and when yesterday, rummaging through my boxes, I found a little card with a faded, straggling inscription " From Gracie, Christmas 1883, H I let my cigarette go out think- ing of her. Then I went down to write my daily letter to Marie. 197 SIQQDD time The shadows deepen on the hill, I hear a lonely whippoorwill. The twilight heals all labor scars, Above Craigxs Mountain peep the stars. The purring leaves, the breathing herds The hushing croon of brooding birds, The drowsy hum of insect flight, The downy footfall of the night, Are breathing secrets in my ear, They tell me Sleepy Time is nearg They tell me thou art coming soon, With all thy train, O summer Moon. A dreamy peace swims in my brain, Like breath of woodland after rainy My sou1's at rest, hushed on the sea Of undisturbed tranquility, The knotty problems of the day Melt into mist and fade awayg Time's roaring wheels no longer jarg I hear the dream-bells from afar. My eyelids droop, all burden's lift, My hands relax, my sou1's adrift. Dream crowds on dream, while Love and Hope Shift the bright kaleidoscope. I lose my way, and grope and guess In slumber's mazy wilderness, I weave on childhoodts glorious loom, Or wade knee-deep in clover bloom, Or float on Lethe' bosom deep, A Wanderer in the land of sleep. Leroy T. Weeks 198 GIIIBEIUO GOIIGUB Ol DGIIIBHI Surusru The New Building occupied by the Chicago College of Dental Surgery is, in all its ap- pointments, one of the most perfect and complete in this or any other country. ANNOUNCEMENT The next annual winter course will begin Wednesday, October 5th, 1898, and continue until April 5, 1899. The statements made below as to conditions, fees and courses of lectures relate to the year ending April 5, 1899, only. FEES AND EXPENSES. The course fee each year is 510000. Board, including light and fuel can be obtained at a convenient distance from the college at from 52.50 to S-1.00 per week. THE FACULTY The faculty consists of twenty-four members. Each member is especially adapted and qualified for the department for which he is chosen. In addition to the regular faculty there are twenty-two instructors and demonstrators, and twelve recitation masters. DR. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, Dean, l26 State St., Chicago, III. 199 HARVEY MEDICAL COLLEGE Harvey Building 167-169-171 South Clark Street Telephone Express 284---3 ' ' ' Co-Educational Regular School of Medi- Clinicsliat Cool? ,gounjg-7. Igospital cine, Four Years' Graded Course, Di- - - - - Very rl 3.Y 12' t ' ' ' ' plomas recognized by the Illinois State Bedside Obstetrical Practice. Board of Healfh'fe'v9'v9'-P'-"e':2'v9'e'e'v9' xt BACTEHIOLOGICAL LABORATORY. Medical Lectures from 7 to I0 o'clock every Weekday evening. Hospital and Clinical Attendance and Operative Surgery for Seniors during the day. Out-Practice Calls at all hours. This division of time is superior to the usual programme of student life, and insures practical Work to every graduate. 200 Che f0llllI2llll just a drop At the top, Like a beautiful gem In the pearl diadem Of a nymph of the sea, With her hair wild and free, Streaming back through the mist In a multiform twist, O'er the white robe of spray That encircles alway This dream-world of laughter and song. And at last in the marble-edged pool It dallies, deliciously cool, Where the sunbeams are drowned in the waves, And the gold-ish in idleness laves, And the breezes dream all the day long. A drop with a How And a strange undertow That sucks the drop back To be drowned in the black Labyrinth of confusion and vortex of night 5 Hid from the manifold life-breath of light g Lost to the life of the dew on the lea, To awake in the larger, the life of the sea. This life is a flow With a strange undertow 3 With a rainbow and pearl, And an unending whirl Of laughter and tears That combine through the years The turmoil of the sea And the peace of the stars With the mountain rill's glee And the frenzy of wars 5 Ever leaping from basin to pool, out of breath, To be tranquil at last in the valley of death. A drop At the top, Like a dew-pearl alone On the top of the mountain And close to the throne 9 Millions united, then ripples, then rills That were braided together on star-hovered hills, Leaping in cascades and mad cataracts Till they reach the low valleys and sleep in the sod, To awaken again in the likeness of God. Leroy Tilus Weeks orthwestern niversity lim SCHO0L . . FGCIIIW. . HENRX' IVADE ROGERS, LL.D., President of the University. HON. PETER STINGER GRosscUP, LL.D., Dean. HON. HARVEY B. HURD, LL.D. BLEWETT LEE, A. M., LL.D. EDWARD A. HARRIMAN, A. B., LL. B. EDWIN BURRITT SMITH, A.M., LL M. JOHN H. WIC-MORE, A. M., LL. B. IULIAN W. MACK, LL.B. this naw SCIWOI recognizes that the study of law should properly follow the completion of a college course, and that the law school is, in its nature, a graduate school. The School is conducted, not as a commercial enterprise, but as a regular department of the Northwestern University, with a permanent faculty of specialists. The work expected of students is essentially university work. Over one-third of the students in the Law School possess academic degrees, among these are thirteen graduates of the University of Chicago. The Law School course covers three years, but special provision is made for college graduates who study law in college. College graduates may receive credit for college work in law to the extent of one-half year's work in the Law School. Students entering with with such credit are permitted to complete the course in two years. For circulars or other information, address the Secretary, 7Il MASUNIC TEMPLE, CHICAGU, ILL. Northwestern Tjofthwffstern University... nwersdy w0MAN's MEDICAL SCHOOL t'01Iloman's meblcal College of Gblcagol 09.25.25 Its standards have always been the highest, and its rank the best. , . . . For circulars of information address the Secretary . . . DR. N. s. DAVIS, JR., 2431 Dearborn St., CHICAGO, ILL. 202 333-339 South Lincoln ST., CHICAGO Claims to give as extended, as complete, and as thorough a course of instruction in medicine and surgery, in all branches, as is given in any medical school in this country which admits women. Unsurpassed clinical advantages are had at the Lincoln Street Dispensary, the Cook County Hospital, the 'xVoman's Hospital, the Wesley Hospital, the Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, the Chicago Free Dispensary, the Mary Thompson Hospital for Xvomen and Children, and the Home for Destitute Crippled Children. For circular of information, address DR. JOHN RIDLON Giorrcsponblng Secretary I03 State St., CHICAGO Cbt SDRIICTQG EIODQIIICIII A Novel in Two Chapters, by Blue Jeans Libbey CHAPTERL THE MEETING Regynold Hotfoot Clubbige stood at the corner of two lonely streets. The gloom was heavy about him, and the cool autumn wind blew the dust in little eddies about his feet, and brought down the rustling leaves upon his shining silk hat. He drew his handsome, forty-dollar top-coat more closely about his manly form, and beat ner- vously with his foot upon the unsympathetic pavement. Suddenly a neighboring clock struck ten. " The time has come," he said. And, as if in answer to his words, a voice in the darkness cried out :- " The woman is here ! " A moment later Adelaide Glittering, the daughter of the haughty millionaire, was clasped in his strong arms. K " Papa is busy signing checks," said the beautiful heiress, " and will not discover my absence until he finds out that I am gone. But let us hasten." Hurriedly they stepped into a waiting cab and were driven to the house of a cler- gyman. CHAPTERIL lNIAN!S DECEIT The ceremony was about to take place. Already the groom stood with hand out- stretched to receive the blushing bride. Suddenly, as if stung by a serpent, the proud beauty drew back, and cried with a look of unutterable scorn:- " Regynold Hotfoot Clubbige you have deceived me! " " Deceived you. How ? " came the trembling question. U You ask me how! You! who have come to marry me dressed in a sack coat and wearing a silk hat." And turning imperiously on her heel she swept from the room. Regynold staggered a few steps after her. Then his emotion overpowered himg and, throwing his hands up in the air, he fell back into a swoon and the arms of the disappointed clergyman. 09 College of Physicians and Surgeons OF CHICAGO. SCIWOI of medicine, Unlvefslty or Illinois ' ' -- '-OPPOSITE COOK COUNTY HOSPITAL ------ FOUR years graded course. First two years largely laboratory work, last two years largely clinical work. Laboratory and clinical facilities unsurpassed in the United States. Six annual scholarships of the value of 5100.00 each are awarded to the stu- dents in the college. Students interested in medical education are invited to investi- gate this college. For information apply to .... DR. WM. ALLEN PUSEY, Secretary, 103 STAT: S'rn:l:'r, Cn-nomo THE BENNETI COLLEGE OF ECLECTIC MEDICINE AND SURGERY A FULL FOUR YEAR CDURSE 0I' EIGHT MONTHS EACH IS REQUIRED. Advanced standing allowed students who have taken preparatory medical work in literary colleges. Women admitted on equal terms with men. For catalogue and full information address ANSON L. CLARK, A.M.,M,D. N. A. GRAVES, M.D., Sl:cnr:1'AnY Dann. 412 FULTON STREET INCORPORATID, MARCH 1888. Ebe Chicago Ophthalmic College H School of Bpplieb matics ants wpbtbalmic ...ltccbnlcs for physicians anb wpticiansn.. 'Ghz Chicago Ophthalmic 'lJoepitaI...For Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat. Optical School for Db?galclans...... I I Get out of that rut It will pay you to post yourself thoroughly lnot merely superficxally as is too often the casej in applied Ophtha mic Optics, Ophthulmoscopy, Retinascopy, and the tech- nique of the Ocular Muscular System. -Learn to know that it is a fact that the majority of patients suifering from Cso-calledj functional nervous disease do so from eye strain. Investigate and you will know that the Ophthalmic College stands first in America in this special line to impart the desired knowledge. Write or call. H. M. MARTIN, M. D., President .,.. .. W. T. KEENER Meezias ,... BOOKS... CHICAGO 204 Che Pl'0C6SSiOll HATS the use of living? Care is on the wayg Skies so bright on Monday, Tuesday will be grayg We must die to-morrow, Why not die to-day? VVhat's the use of loving? Man with woman mates As the world swings onward- Thinkest thou the Fates, With their shears and distati, Care who loves-or hates ? What's the use of hating? Hate is only love With the rough side outwards, Like a cast-off glove. Hate or shrug your shoulders Matters it above? What's the use of thinking? Running in a ring? After all your logic, Life's a piece of string. Tangle it with thinking- Gain you anything? What's the use of moaning ? Say the world is bad- Keep the rotten apple When ripe can't be had. Circumstance is crazy? Very wellg go mad ! What's the use of dying? March will turn to May 3 Hell may take to-morrow If its bright to-dayg Go and drown your sorrow- That's the only way ! 205 'Tu . 1 f il Q, t l 5' I lNl ill lf I f Ix fff tl -V ,'I11l?W'f?t " J M .F ' 1 l . ull is 1 1'l "lf EGWW If so-lil I if -R ,W U W - M A4 -Ll-P Nj E Ch'cago Law School DAY AND EVENING SESSIONS The Under-graduate Courses lead to L.L.B. and admission to the Bar. Post-graduate Courses in jurisprudence, Constitutional Law and History, International Law and Political Economy, lead to the degrees of LL.M. and D.C.L. the SVSWI11 employed by the chicago law School is that known as the "institutional method," a plan that has received the approval of the leading legal educators of the day. It is upon this method that sientilic studies generally are now pursued, and its essential features are equally well adapted to the study of law as a science. This method .contemplates : First, the developement of abstract legal principles as a basis, second, the illustration of the principles by reference to cases: and. third, the practical application of principles to given facts in school courts. In this way the student is educated rather than instructed, and having first acquired the tlzeory, is afterwards inducted in the practice by the application of abstract principles to establish facts. ...FACULTY... GEORGE W. WARVELLE, LL.D., Dean, Professor of Constitutional Jurisprudence. JAMES DE NVITT ANDREWS, LL.M., Professor of Legal Procedure. AMERICUS B. MELVILLE, LL.B., Professor of Pleading and Equity. ANDREW J. HIRSCHL, A. B., LL.B., Professor of Law of Corporations. D, J. TONE, A.B., LL.B., Professor of the Law of Contracts. A. A. BRUCE, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Administrative Law. JOHN J. TOBIAS, LL.B., PH.D., Professor of Political Science. GEO. MCA. MILLER, A.B., LL.B., Professor of the Law of Torts. CHARLES E. POPE, A.M., LL.B., Professor of the Law of VVi1ls. EBEN F. RUNX'AN, LL.B , Professor of Common Law Pleading. JOHN A. BENSON, A.M.. M.D., Professor of Pyschological Law. FRANCIS W. WALKER, LL.B., Lecturer on Corporations and Corporate Trusts. HON. SAMUEL S. PAGE, LL.B., Lecturer or Pleading and Practice. E. VV. ADKINSON, A.M. LL.B. Lecturer on the Law of Eminent Domain. WILLIAM S. FORREST, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer or Criminal Law. LEROV A. GODDARD, A. B., Lecturer on Banking and Finance. HON. C. PORTER JOHNSON, LL.B., Lecturer on Legislative Powers. HON. L. D. CONDEE, LL.M., Lecturer on Municipal Corporations. ....ADVISORY BOARD.... HON. B. D. IWAGRUDER, Justice of the Supreme Court of Illinois. HON. JOHN D. CRABTREE, Justice of the Appellate Court of Illinois. HON. SHELBY M. CULLOM, United States Senator from Illinois. HON. XV. H. SEAMAN, Judge of United States Circuit Court. HON. RICHARD S. TUTHILL, Judge Circuit Court, Chicago. HON. R. W. CLIFFORD, Judge Circuit Court, Chicago. HON. JOHN C. BLACK, United States District Attorney, Northern District, Illinois. REV. S. M. INIERRILL, D.D., LL.D., Bishop M. E. Church, Chicago. C. M. HIGGINSON, President Chicago Academy of Sciences. REV. CHARLES H. TAINTOR, PH.D., Secretary of Congregational Church Building Society. REV. S. A. STEELE, D.D., Secretary Epworth League Society M. E. Church. JACOB. S. SMITH, LL.B., President Indiana National Gas S.: Oil Co., Chicago. For Catalogue address JOHN J. TOBIAS, Secretary, IIS Dearborn St. , Chicago 206 Caught on the wing HAT an advantage little Saul and his fellows possess over Gamaliel ! The advantage of numbers only, yet inestimable. January and June , Gamaliel sits within the same four walls, imparting instruction, -hx unchanging, monotonous. Though his pupils are always different, ' they are never differentiated, he sees them, in the mass, not indi- vidually, he passes them or flunks them in bunches, he cannot distinguish them. This quarter is always the same as the last. A pleasant path enough, but he knows its every turning. To Saul however the opening of each quarter is the discovery of a new world. In the past three months he has exhausted a subject, he has plumbed a teacher's intellect. Now he comes fresh and confident to new fields. Sitting demure and safe in his multiplicity he narrowly observes Gamaliel, who is necessarily alone and prom- inent. He feels, with a smile, the ,old familiar thrill as the hard work before him is discussed. That thrill ceased long since to influence him. He notes Gamaliel's individuality in every lecture, in every sentence, and in every mannerism, and judges his character from an inconsiderate word. On the University books Gamaliel marks him, but he, on the tablets of his memory, with far greater accuracy records Gamaliel as " passed," "passed with honor," or, it may be, U failed." il- 'X' i X- I was Writing a particularly hard thesis. I was to discuss certain economic ques- tions that had never been settled by mortal man-and what could one woman do with them? My pencils were sharpened, the "authorities" were on a shelf before me, and notes, as numerous as ballots on election day, were all around me. But still I did not get on, and when Professor 1- came into the room I told him the difliculty. "Wait a moment," said he, "if it's wages you're writing about, maybe I have something will help. An ' Economist ' was sent me to-day, and I noticed it had an article on wages in it." A minute later he brought the U Economist." We cut the leaves, and found on page 73 a poem. This was the opening line: " The wages of sin is death: is ge ee I met him a day's journey from the Earth, and we traveled on together. " I see by the sign," said I, " that you are one of the came-without-being-called. Tell me how you did it. I often wanted to, but never had courage." " Oh, it was easy," said he, " laudanum, I had been married just nine days." " She was not true to you, then? " " Well, she was not the right one. She made doilies. I found them everywhere, under the dishes, and under books and bags and boxes. At last she put them under the legs of the chairs, and under my feet when I sat down. Then I came away. She read the ' Ladies' Home Journal,' too." " Oh," said I, my heart going out to him. After we had gone a little farther, he said: " And you, what brought you here? Married ? " " Pneumonia," I repliedg " I would have been married the next monthf' " Lucky man! " said he. " If it is not doilies and the 'Ladies' Home Journal,' maybe it is afternoon teas. Some women do that." And we journeyed on together. 207 THE CHICAGO CLINICAL SCHOOL FORNIKRLY CALLED THE HWEST CHlClGO POST'GRAUATE SCHOOL AND POLYCLINICH' EI 22 51.5iiE.i'.ii f'sE5BIS?EiTNT' -349, 819 W- Harrisvn Sf-, Chicagv FACU LTY SURGERY-D. A. K. Steele, M.D.g J. B. Murphy, M.D.g T. A. Davis, M.D.g Chas. Davidson, M.D.g E. H. Lee, M.D.g Wm. Cuthbertson, M.D.g F. R. Sherwood, M.D.g J. N. Bartholomew, M.D.: W. A. Kuflewski, M.D.g F. Kreissl, M.D., Genito-Urinary Dept. Instructors-F. J. E. Ehrmann, M.D.g W, M. Burroughs, M.D., A. J. Behrendt, M.D.g C. W. Barrett, M.D.: Jno. S. Nagel, M.D.g W. S. Royce, M.D. ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY-Alex. Wiener, M.D. Instructors-M. F. Clausius, M. D.: U. G, Darling, M.D. EYE-W. L. Noble, M.D.: Oscar Dodd. M.D. Instructors-J. R. Hamill, M.D.g W. O. Nance, M.D. GYNECOLOGY-S. G. West, M.D.g E. L. Moorhead, M.D.g M. Corbet, M.D.g Geo. W. Newton, M.D. ' H. P. Newman, M.D., H: T. Byford M.D. Instructors-J. J. Moor- head. M.D.' W. E. Miller Eunice Bertha Hamill, M.D. ELECTRO-THERAPEUTIC! B. Pirosh, M.D. CHEMTSTRY AND TOXICOLOGY-John A. Wesner, M.D. INTERNAL MEDIGINE-R. Michel, M.D.: J. H. Hoelscher, M.D.' Geo. F. Butler, M.D.g Jos. Hawley, M.D. Instructors-G, M. Silverberg, M.D.g H. H. Forline, M.D.g H. W. Banks, M.D.g C. D. Pence, M.D. NOSE, THROAT AND EAR-G. F. Hawley, M.D.g J. Homer Coulter, M.D. Instructors-J. B. Littlejohn, MD.g O. Berg, M.D. DERMATOLOGY-A. E. Bertling, M.D.g F. H. Monlcgomery M. D, RECTUM-J. M. Auld, M.D. NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASES-H.N. oyer M.D. Instructor-F. L. Glenn, M.D. OBSTETRICS AND DISEASES OF CHILDREN-F. B, Earle, M.D. Instructor-Jenny Lind Phillips, M.D. CLINICAL MIOROSCOPY-G. H. Weaver, M.D. ANATOMICAL DEMONSTRATIONS-W. T. Eckley, M.D.g S. G. West, M.D.g E. H. Lee, M.D. DISEASES OF THE STOMACH-W. B. Metcalf, M.D.' WEST SIDE HOSPITAL OF CHICAGO. 819 WEST HARRISON STREET Newly constructed building, centrally located and easy of access. Well arranged wards for pa- tients of limited means. Large, well-furnished single rooms at reasonable prices. Proiits from pay patients used exclusively for the maintenance of free beds. The privileges of the hospital extended to the profession in general, who can bring cases to the institution and treat them as though they were in their own homes. Most competent nursing furnished by the training school attached. The medical staff in composed of the following gentlemen: Surgeons-D. A. K. Steele, M.D. 3 J. B. Mur- phy, M.D.g T. A. Davis, M.D.g Charles Davison, M.D.: E. H. Lee, M.D. Gynecologist-H. T. By- ford, M.D. 5 H. P. Newman. M.D.g S. G. West, M.D.g G. W. Newton, M.D. Orthopedic Surgeon- Alexander Wiener, M.D. Oculists and Aurists-Boerne Bettman,M.D.g W. L. Noble, M.D. Inter- nal Medicine-Ralph Michel, M.D. For further information address the Secretary, S. G. West, M.D., B19 West Harrison Street, Chicago. Telephone West 975 Long Distance. THE MARION SIMS SANITARIUIVI 438 La Salle Avenue, Chicago. HIGH CLASS PRIVATE HOSPITAL for the reception of Gynecological cases and for Abdominal Surgery. Centrally located in one of the best residence dis- tricts ofthe city, this institution oifers accomodations which are superior in every respect and combine the comforts and luxuries of the home with the strict appoint- ments of modern sanitary science. The apartments are light and well ventilated, heated by an improved steam and hot-air system. Hardwood floors throughoutg furnishings elegant and appropriate. Trained nurses of superior skill are in charge of the patients and the diet is the best. The operating rooms are specially fitted with all modern appliances for aseptic surgery. A competent physician in attendance at all hours. CHAN N I NG W. BARRETT, House Pu-uvslclAN CFormerly House Physician Harper Hospital, Detroit.J For further information address HENRY P. NEWMAN, A.M., M.D., Sunazon IN CHARGE, 1oa s'rA'rs smear, cr-ucmso. 208 Tv1E.SP,xs all '20 CYQSDEISSHIS AIR PHYLLIS fenced her Maiden heart Against all base intrusion, For she would pass her life apart In virginal seclusion. She wrought her Wall both stout and high And set a warning notice nigh: " No trespassing." But Cupid, Hitting by one day, The fair enclosure spying, Flew o'er the wall with laughter gay, And found poor Phyllis sighing. She gave him welcome and he staidg But still the Warning notice read: " No trespassing. " I saw the rogue and ventured too. Sweet Phyllis eyed me coldlyg But Cupid proved an ally true And pressed my wooing boldly, So Phyllis bade us both re maing But set the notice up again: ' " No trespassingf' 209 C R. Barrei, '97 The Chicago Laboratory Supply and Scale Co. Successors to W. A. Olmsted Scientific Co. 31-45 WEST RANDOLPH STREET Manufacturers and Dealers in Physical, Physiological and Psychological Apparatus Send for Catalogue ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF LAW Regular session opens September 5tl1. College Lecture Rooms, Library and Oflice, 5th Floor Journal Building, 180 Washington Street Summer Law School opens First Monday in june and continues eight weeks. LL.B. Course, Three Years: Post-Graduate School Elective Courses, One Year's study, LL.M. degree: Two Years, D.C.Q. degree: Three Years, Ph.D. degree. FA CULTY Howard N. Ogden Ph.D., Dean, Comparative Jurisprudence, Evidence and Equity: John G. Hen- derson, LL.D,, Crimes and Wills: Roswell Shinn, LL.D., Pleading and Practice and Damages: J.W. Smith, LL,D., Equity, Pleading and Practice, Receivers: J. T. Long, LL.D., Contracts, Quasi- Contracts, Legal Ethics: Carl Evans Boyd. Ph.D.. Roman Law, Comparative Constitutional Law: Alva E. Taylor, LL.M., Real Property, Corporations, Commercial Paper: Carlos. S. Hardy, LL. M., Sales, Agency, Partnership, Bailmentsg Charles A. Denison, LL.M., Constitutional and Inter- national Law: James Ewing Davis, A.M , LL.B., Domestic Relations: H. Stewart Derby, LL.B., Insurance Law: Hugo Palm, LL.B., Ph.B., Torts: Lugwig Zeisler, LL.B., Guaranty and Surety- ships: Herny Watermann, LL.B., Ph.B., personal Property. SPECIAL LECTURERS John H. Roemer, A.M., LL.B., Negligence Cases: Taylor E. Brown, LL.M., Patents, Copyrights, Trademarks: William J. Donlin, A.M., LL.B., Eminent Domain, Special Assessments, Taxation: Louis Boisot, A.B., LL.B., Mechanics' Liens: Daniel W. Heffron, A.M., LL.B., Admiralty and Maritime Law: W. Harrison Hipp, M.D., Forensic Medicine. For further information, address the Dean, Journal Building, 160 Washington St., Chicago. DAKWOOD SPRINGS SANITARI U M This Sanitarium was designed for the special care and treatment of those afflicted with diseases of the mind and nervous system. It was built at a cost of over S100,000, and offers all the comforts of a delightful home, with such treatment as wide experience and able counsel can give. S. B. Buckmaster, M.D., Superintendent and Resident Physician in Charge. For- merly Superintendent ot Wisconsin State Hospital for the Insane, and Prof. Elecro-Therapeutics and Adj. Prof. Physiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Chicago. Oscar A. King. M.D.. Chicago, President and Attending Physician. Prof. Neu- rology, Psychiatry and Clinical Medicine. College oL.Physicians and Surgeons, Chicago: Patholo- gist and Consulting Neurologists to the Wisconsin State Institutions for the Insane. CONSULTING PI-IYSIOIANS Dr. Daniel R. Bower, Prof. Mental Diseases, Materia Medica and Therapeutics, Rush Medi- cal College: Prof. Nervous Diseases and Clinical Medicine, N. W, Univ., Woman's Medical Col- lege, Chicago. Dr. Archibald Church, Prof. Mental Diseases and Clinical Neurology, N. W. Univ. Medical College: Prof. Neurology, Chicago Polyclinic, Chicago. Dr. Henry M. Lyman, Prof. Practice of Medicine, Rush Medical College: Prof. Mental and Nervous Diseases, Chicago Polycllnlc, Chicago, REFERENCES-BY Permission. Dr. Frank.Billlngs, Chicago: Dr. E. C. Dudley, Chicago: Dr. Fernand Henrotin, Chicago: Dr. Henry B. Favill, Chicago: Dr. John H. Chew, Chicago: Dr. L. H. Frankenthal, Chicago: Dr. Sid- ney Kuh, Chicago: Dr. W. H. Palmer, Janesville, Wis.: Dr. A. E. Hoadly, Chicago: Dr. Otto Schmidt, Chicago: Dr. Henry Lewis, Chicago: Dr. J. B. Herrick, Chicago: Dr. D. W. Graham, Chicago: Dr. H. B. Stehman, Chicago. For further information, terms, etc., please address. ' DR. 5. B. BUCKMASTER, Lake Geneva, Wls., or DR. OSCAR A. KING, 10 State Street, Chicago 210 fone Gila I We keep our watch together, Love and I, In the golden dreamy weather When June holds in fee the sky. XVe Watch the rainbow in the blue, Armfuls of roses for us two, We know our dreams will all come true, Love and I. VVe keep our watch together, Love and I, In October's mournful Weather 'When the winds go moaning by. Our eyelids strain against the sleet, But no inch will We retreat, XVe will hold at bay defeat, Love and I . We keep our watch together, Love and I, In the dark and stormy Weather, Under winter's shuddering sky. A mound between us heaped with snow, Ice in our hearts, yet We'll not go, We'll keep our watch and perish so. Love and I. We keep our watch together, Love and I, In the dreamy, dreamy weather, Under heaven's eternal sky. VVe watch the dross turn into gold, We watch all loveliness unfold 3 And each other's hands We hold, Love and I. LeRoy Tilus Weeks. 211 ,iff if fs iq X sf SWK Ag", Rx, i-lik 'K N Casual Comederates F THIN blue ice-sheet crusted the board walk. 67 Q With balancing arms poising a big tiger ' ' Q n1uff.at arms-length, Marilla slid along. ga qc I Her progress a ripple of exclamations, little .1 3 shouts, bubblings of laughter. Her body slanted forward to the drift of the motion. The man at her side walked along heavily. He wished she would even her gait. Impossible to adapt any pace to her irregular motion. Her appreciation of his discomfort was an amusement. " You're hating me, now Q" this with nose and chin buried in the muff, and a delicious demureness of the lifted eye. " Oh yes you are. I could tell you exactly the way you feel." 4ADo'H "No, It wouldn't amuse me, I know, and you know. So what would be the good. Besides, they're not pretty thoughts." His annoyance grew. An irritable jar substituted for his usual appreciative re- sponse to the little coquetries of which her manner was an aggregate. When they reached the house they were to dine at-her brother's-his friend's -she changed to the serious. "We are playing each other's parts, to-night," she said. " You mean-" "That I arn the genial good-natured one, and you the moody. Which our friends would not believe. But do point your grievance. For the life of me, I'm blind. Granted I have found you in a rather cheap subterfuge. Haven't I been charming about it? A very little modifying you see, served me. I always believed you a liar. But accept my bon-hommie. You really better had. And you know I shan't talk. Now rouse up, and don't spoil your own hand. I shall lead up to your trumps, and if you play the game, may still respect you a bit. Here-colors to fight under." And tip-toeing to reach his height, she pinned half her violets to his coat, with a little caressing touch and a Hash of blue eyes up to his. Then she stepped into the door. G 0 G O Every one about the campus knows him-at least by sight. He is rather good- looking, has literary and dramatic aspirations, dresses well, practices economy when with men, and is considered a good fellow generally by women. I once heard him describe himself in a newspaper oflice as a "free lance", but among the social out- casts he is always spoken of as the Immaculate Deception. He is well fortified against the unpleasant jars of life by a self-possession born of conceit. I never saw him confused or embarrassed but once, that was the other afternoon on the down- town express train. Contrary to his usual custom he rode in the smoking-carg and as he stood leaning gracefully against the ice-Water tank, he looked particularly well in his new' double-breasted coat and his sharply creased trousers. When the train stopped at the Hyde Park station, a drunken laboring man noisily entered the car. He walked up 212 ITIIIQIIIG HIGI-I-SPEED PRINTING PRESS se .se L- es or 1.-1 or-he-.A E 'FEW ZW WN' WIN' The Mlehle Leads ii3n1tI?f13fI3Li'5.05l?fi,5.1Q?Ifiil.'i1. 55135315IRISQIISFI.'iR52i1i'ZIBTL'lIF3.'liH well. It produces the tincst grades of printing in an superior nialnner and a, daily product unatttuined by any other printing press. The :iccouipnnying cut shows the press with our new sheet delivery. WIIICII delivers the sheet prififed sifle up or flown. :is the pressnizin finds it expedient in the production of various kinds of printing, The Miehle is the only press built possessing these most valuable features. which mill but small cost to the niairhine. The Miehle press has many other points of superiority over other uinlces which will gladly be made liuown by correspondence with us. THE MIEHLE PRINTING PRESS AND MFG. 0. CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, U. S. A. MAIN OFFIFE AND FAIVIIIRI. For. Clinton K Fulton Sts., CHIC.Ilitl. EINIERN OFFICE, Ill! Reade St., NEW IURII t'I'I'l'. SIIUTH SIIIE OFFICE. 274 Dearborn Street, FIIICAUII. LIINIIIIN lIFI"It'E. 29 New Bridge Street, E. C. gl ff THE HAHNEMANN fffv f!-5 H , :Eel -I-I,p:t.f. 'SME In 'S 'HI-ifi'f.. 7'7' ' "fi Q- 'iff-55:5 I - I .. .5 and liosmtal - .. I Lg.: f 12 1 III '4 -E.: 1 :I nl Q., ,, , of Zlmdgomm , A ' H- I nsl. I 2 . k,,. LEM Ei. gi up -I-j' - :W Four Years' Course Obligatory. u n i. 1 ,2 Q L 'B.L..,. ' Vraduates of Vniversity Science Courses for Students new Zonege and Bospital Intencling to Studi' Medicine p Adinitterl to Advanced Standing. Erectedat a'fCost of SISUJIUU U9 Maguiticeutly Equipped and Furnished THE LARGEST HOMEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGEANITHOSPITAL IN THE WORLD Kbe Ebtrtx2:'II'lintb Etnnual S655-ton Opens September 13, ISQB LINICAL and Dissecting Material in abundance. Large, well equipped Labor- atories, Museum, Library, Reading Room, Smoking Room, and Ladies' XVaiti1ig Room. Steam Heat and Electric Lights. For aiinouncement and further particulars, address ..... IOS. C. COBB, IVI.D., Registrar, 281i Cottage Grove Avenue. 213 32323HKZRZRHKSHKBKHKZBHKZKH QW MARSH a GRANT Printing S , Company 0 QT I ' DESIGNERS, ENGRAVERS.al..al .anal PRINTERS AND BINDERS S S f 359461 Dearborn St. 13, i 1' Zor. Harrison St. A f Chicagoaaww This Hook is a Sample of Our.... COIIQSQ Hllllllal lllOl'k Correspmulullce Solicited ..... C7 ly Wm fo' our Booklets: "ADVERTISE AND BRING BUsxNEss" KRHRHRHRHRZRKSRKHHRHRKREFER to the Immaculate Deception and asked for a match. Then, with all the volubility of intoxication, he plunged into a detailed account of his past life, producing from his pocket letters and money as evidence of the truth of his story. The Immaculate Deception, in his superior, aristocratic way, enjoyed the situation very much. It gave him an opportunity to make bright remarks and to ask clever questions. And the innocent replies of the drunken man, and his utter ignorance of the fact that he was being made fun of, were very amusing to the other passengers. At last, having received a match, and having lighted his stump of a pipe, the drunken man drew back a step or two and scrutinized the Immaculate Deception from head to foot. Then he said in a voice of hearty admiration, and with the evident intention of con- veying a compliment : "You're a good-fellerg and I always like to meet a good-feller." Then, after another moment of careful scrutiny, " I bet I know what you do. You work in a ho- tel g I can tell by that cigar and uniform." O O O 0 It was late at night, and the long street was almost deserted. The screens in the window of a saloon were lowered. It was warm and bright inside and men were drinking and playing pool quietly enough. Out in the dark, on the slippery side walk crouched the miserable igure of a man, his hat over his eyes, hands in his pock- ets to keep from freezing, his face close to the edge of the broad plate glass, looking in over the screen. He was already in spirit inside, enjoying the warmth and good- fellowship with " the boys," though the lack of a dime for a drink kept his wretched body out in the rain. The head-light of the cable-car flashed over his rusty hat, bent shoulders and huddled figure, and left him in the same position, motionless. Ill Plll'Sllif Over me lioatest thou Radiantlyg Long in pursuit have I Followed thee. Others with earthward gaze Treasures have gained, Empty my hands of wealth, Thee unattained. Yet I shall follow thee, ,I This is my fate- e 1 Nay, do not pity me, ' Able to wait. X Ida Ahlborn Weeks. X i K NAS Xi f 215 -. wi 49 L MDN I , inn i 2 f .Q BTABLISHED iaeaarav 5 .f'!7. 7 INCQ QRAT 1888 gr" p5.E.f'l' tiQRiE-ljABE"Ej f RP ED . 1'-znirrfh' -zrffitf me e" f . :f fd' LIBBY, MCNEILL 8a LIBBY Packers Bild Pl'2S6l'D2l'S Of meats Canned Meats, Smoked Meats, Barreled Beef, Extract of Beef, Canned Soups, Condensed Mince Meat. Horns SUPPLIED wmi Cuts or Bm, Pomt, Munon, VEAL, Pouumr, Etc. sible manner . - . , " """" """'v...,, .... W """ " ""b.... UNION sTocK YARDS 4 , 1:-E E n i.sfA2tZQ4! Pr: E R Q --,a warm sue! 'H 9 ,a Yi i wnrrn su ,I jg CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. f7 "'iQ1R1fiJ' M , ,,.. - -,,, 'vu ,,,,,., ,,...... 1--' "I-um , ,,,,,,,.,,, ' Is a general Sanitorium handsomely located on the shores of Lake Gen- eva. It is equipped in the best pos- tor Medical and Sur- gical treatment. It is open for all proper cases. No cases of insanity, inebriety orother objectionable cases, however, are admitted or treated. For healthtulness and beauty the location is unsurpassed. The rooms are very large, with handsome fireplaces and large windows from which one beholds the loveliest ot views. The training, skill and etiiciency of our nurses and masseurs, as well as the equipment for baths and hydrotherapy are not surpassed by any other institution. All physicians of the staff are in active attendance. The charges are moderate. MEDICAL STAFF. HENRY P. NEWMAN, M.D., Chicago, Operations in Gynecology. JOHN B. MURPHY, M.D., Chicago, Operations in Surgery, J. H. ETHRIDGE, M.D., Chicago, Operations ln Gynecology. OSCAR A. KING, M.D., Chicago, Attending Neurologist. HENRY T. BYFORD, M.D., Chicago, Operations in Gynecology. HENRY B. FAVILL, M.D., Consulting Physician. MATTHEW CORBETT, M.D., Chicago, Attending Gynecologist. JOHN E. HARPER, M.D., Attending Occulist. THOS. A. DAVIS, M.D , Chicago, Operations in Surgery. N. S. DAVIS, Jr., M.D., Chicago, Consulting Physician. WM. BALLENGER, M.D., Attending Rhlnologist and Laryngolist. JOHN H. CURTIS, M.D,, Attending Phgsician. F. H. SKINNER, D.D.S., Attending Dentist. WALTER B. METCALF, M.D., Resident Physician in Charge. For further information or circulars, address OSCAR A. KING, M.D, 70 State Street, Chicago, or, WALTER B. METCALF, M.D., Lake Geneva, Wis. 'Ebe 'Lake Geneva Sanatorlum should not be confounded with the Oakwood Springs Sanitarium located also at Lake Geneva, but devoted exclusively to the treatment of mental and the severexi forms of nervous diseases. In organization it has no connection with this Sanatorium. 216 1893 Words by Air, "Benny Havens O P FRANK STEIGMEYER, '97 Arr. by M. E. COLEMAN, Oh, we came here in the autumn of eighteen ninety-three, A half a dozen buildings had then the U. of C. Cobb Hall was then the only place where We could daily flunk, And in the dear old Drexel " Dorm.," was the only place to bunk. CHORUS: O Chicago, Chicago, how great you've grown to be, Since first we cast our lot with thine in eighteen ninety-three. Oh, there were more Profs. than students, but then we didn't care, They spent their days in research work, their evenings at the Fair, And life upon the campus was one continual swing, We Watched the Ferris wheel go 'round, and we didn't do a thing. Oh, the commons started up that year, this was their bill of fare: Sauce with mold, Weak cofee cold, and a hunk of grizzly bearg " And the man who caught the most roaches, at breakfast or at tea, Was deemed the hero of the hour, thereafter wore a C. Oh, the girls were mostly twenty-eight, and after " Ph.D's," They took four hours in those old days, there were no extra fees, And the men were mostly married, which proved a great hoodoo To all society events: What could the poor girls do? Oh, the Glee Club took a trip that year, they made it in a day, The second stop was Downer's Grove, the 'first was Aurora, But now we feast and dance and sing, through distance fast we're whirled And when the Glee Club's air ship's done, we'll tour around the world 217 5336 C3Il6l'lD'S Ruse 0r the Foiling of the Pirates-A Tale of Adventure on the Sea Beyond the Three-Mile limit "Pipe all hands to the main quarter," cried the captain of the Bounding Lass, as he stepped down from the bridge. Instantly the clear, shrill notes of the bo's'n's. whistle split the quiet air, and the blue-jackets came rushing up from the fo'c's'le. When they had ranged themselves abaft the wheel, the captain addressed them : " My men," said he, "there is a low, close-hauled brig lugging in the starboard ofiing. I like not her look, for unless I am mistaken she is a pirate." A ripple of suppressed excitement ran along the line of sailors. " At a time like this," continued the captain, "four or live heads are better than one. If we are caught not a man will live to be interviewed by newspaper corres- pondents. Has anyone a suggestion to offer?" For several minutes there was a painful silence, broken only by the musical humming of the wind in the rigging, and by the rattle of the binnacle. Then, youthful, manly figure separated itself from the group of tars, and a boyish voice rang out : " Captain, I will save the ship !" "Shiver my timbers," said Old Tom, the bo's'n's mate, nudging the man next him, "if that ain't Jack Tatterly, the cabin-boy." The captain looked down sharply at the mere lad of about thirteen years, who- had offered to hazard so much. " You are young," he said, frowning hoarsely. " Yes," replied our hero modestly, "but so was Napoleon when a child." A fiattering mutter of approbation from the sailors made jack fiush slightly. " I shall leave everything to you," said the captain after a careful survey 'of the- lad. " From now until we reach port you may consider the entire crew, myself inclu- ded, under your command." Night and the pirate ship had been rapidly approaching g and by the time that the darkness was complete scarcely a league intervened between the Bounding Lass and her pursuer. After a few hurried preparations Jack Tatterly with Old Tom, the bo's'n's mate as his only companion, manned the captain's gig and silently rowed away over the black, oily swells in the direction of the pirate vessel, Half an hour of' hard work brought the low, rakish brig into sight, and under the direction of jack, Old Tom pulled the gig under the bowsprit. It was but the work of a moment for the lad to throw a ratline over the spar and pull himself up hand over hand. Quickly 218 P 1, X. T . D. Bl Sw--A. l ,N X 'T fit rv-5 gg,-.sm . 'If ,Ms 1,.m2M:- '13 . fl X Q. -.Ml X . Aj: if ' ff! i 'AV 6" W,-ff I Y 1 k W N ' . l Ax T N Q' ,. 4 , .fiwi . ' ' ,.,. . - ' V.. - I "at .- - '.V . Aqgfwfe LM... . W .-14 - J::m5"" lg ta l 'Iw i lg , if . 7 ,. 2 i ' . Q., . im' A - 4 A. .f l-r 5- I .. .- I-.At 'iw 1" , -Lf, ll- FQY-. .. ' . 5 ,rf fwfxilcbli' 'Q tt' 5 Q,-4,241 '. Qi 4' :Wi . .. -fi I me : 1 - ,.,. ..1,,vy2 -. .' ., Y, , '. .. I ' " Q-N ffl: St9vif+' : l , -A --S--s. . - day' fy , .X 1 .,- V ., ,W , W ,,,. ..:, . . i .1 .rw .f'-.ta-.ffl-. :Ns if-1" in ,' f' 5,-r,'3,'-'- ,7 r.. -::. 4 ...Fiat . eg..5'.-" 1 Q ' - . ,iA1:::- 133 -5 I 1... Q,-2,-qi I.. - x.. W. . ,xv x To Buyers of Rich..... CUT GLASS FINE CHINA BRIC-A- BRAC and BEAUTIFUL AND ..... ORIGINAL LAMPS We extend il vor- iliul invitation to inspect our line. All Eleraferl Trains Stop ai OIII' Door .... STATE 8: LAKE Pnxm at Bnooxs REIAILIRS 0f FINE CHINA Intercollegiate Bureau and Regis- . . . try of Academic Costume . . . COTRELL 81 LEONARD 472-478 Broadway Albany, N. Y.-4 Makers Qf the Caps. Gozvns. and Hoods to the Urzirerslty ,A- . 5 I I 3' A' s To University of Michigan: Uni- sota. University of Nebraska.Uni- versity of Kan- sas. University of Missouri, Har- vard. Yale, Prin- ceton. ilOll1IDlllil. Bryn M awr, TYPI- of Clzicago. versity of Minne- Y- 'Y' Q if I lesly, Radclilfv. and a hundred others ...... Illustrated bulletin. samples. etc., upon application. Rich gowns for the Btfllfh, the Pulpif and for Mr. W. I'. Korn our i'liit':1g0 Agent at the University of Chicago. JAMES SMEETON, M.A. MAs'r:n oF Anvznvismo ron CAP AND Gown 'se PNDTOGUAFI1 BV HARRISON ARRISON'S TUDIO Central Music Hall Platinum ...Finish Professional Photos The... Finest Photos yen... Produced a Specialty Breast Pin, Ballon, Cap" Butfon and Scarf Pin... Photographs in all the Latest Styles and Superior F i nish. l'lARRISON'S STUDIO i Cor. State and Randolph. IlllliulilllillllilllI1llll1llll1.lIll Hydlolmlqf l'lllL5l'QYCLITTQlL14' Giugcrgle. ' Root P-acl' Birch Lcmou .3 : ,JA U, ,. , . , , 1 . 1 6,5,.,f9" .Q lx , 9-MMA-fm "" .xx A mQ.o0f'3UMhn5 , ff 1 ff, CO M FA N-Y A h fl ' y lffmrfazz Eliihi- ry 1 41 , A , h R " fx- , , A' vi t ig-Y ,.f'1fi:- ,. -P . M- F yKx , , K V,--.U - QW ., ,-.sgff .4 6-I IIXC L K 15113 ga - - - 4 W, X I ' 'I B Ak! ,MQ M x x X I , N - 2 A NNUBU PUQ5 NND A LD ,AAFQ ATED L sw V www mn GU ,Q Old Tom passed a twenty-foot boom up to him, and our hero rapidly and securely lashed it to the bowsprit. Then taking a dimly lighted ship's lantern from under his coat he carefully worked his way out to the end of the boom, and there fastened the lantern. Almost immediately the lookout on board the pirate ship sang out : " Ship ahoy !" " Where away P" roared the pirate captain. " Dead ahead, sir," replied the lookout. " Ay ! ay ! I make her out," cried the captain. And then he euphoniously added, referring to the commanding oflicer of the Bounding Lass: "The damn fool has lit a light." Jack, laughing quietly to himself, dropped from his perilous position into the strong arms of Old Tom. Together they swiftly rowed back to the Bounding Lass. The good ship was put about, and made off on the leeward tack, cutting like a knife through the water, and throwing tons of spray against the heavens. All night long the pirate ship pursued the ever-distant light. And it was only with the coming of gray dawn that her barbarous captain discovered the clever ruse by which Jack Tatterly had saved the lives of himself et al. T . H. 4,12-:'lT CD6 S0l'l'0V0flll SITQHIII In the Land of Life it Howeth and tloweth, The Sorrowful Stream. And through its waters each mortal goeth, However he dream He will never reach the pitiless beach Of the Sorrowful Stream. There are some, and the waters but lap their feet, Of the Sorrowful Stream, And some 'gainst whose breast the billows beat And the foam-Crests gleam. And others there be, like wrecks of the sea, Washed away by the Sorrowful Stream. Florence Wilkinson. 221 ..Price 52.50 and up.. We are the only manufacturers in the Unitecl States who make all kinds of Turkish, Russian or Medicated Vapor Bath, Hot Air Apparatus, etc.. for Home and Hospital use..a'-.a'..9'-.a'..9'..a'..9"..s5.a'.al Catalogue Free. Also a copy of Journal of Chronic Diseases if DeSired..2'.2'J.2'.25.9'.i'J.z'.a9.2'-25 .FRANK S. BETZ 81, CO.. 78 STATE STREET. Hospitals and Chemical Laboratories. We supply Medicinal Substances, Chemicals, Surgical Dressings and Requisites at favor- able prices. We will be pleased to submit quOfafi0HS if 1'Cq11CSfed- Monmsun, Piummfn 8. co. WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS. CHICAGO. The Latest Acknowledged Standard Western Bank Note Mme, ml PRESIDENTS SECRETARIES, C-1'Y .2.srfJ.2sS5smsz1EN' And everyone In anyway conneczted with pub- llc life or corporate bodies. is G I' Cl' cl l 9 P-3jfso11" Bong?-I Reed s Rules of Order Ti, , IIC p THE HON. THOMAS B. REED, Speaker of the t House of Representatives. SAEETY TINTS. PARCHMENT AND SAFETY PAPERS. Lithograph Stationery For Manufacturers, Merchants and Bankers. First-class Designs and Engraving. L' tabl th St k Exchan f N is e on e oc ges o ew York and Chicago. 222 " I commend the book most highly." WILLIAI1 MCKINLEY. President of tha United Stat " Reasonable, right and rigid." J. STERLING NORTON, E11-Secretary af Agriculture. CLOTH , 75 CENTS, LEATH ER, 51.25. RAND, MCNALLY 8: C0., Publishers, CHICAGO. Il UIOIIIGII fl'0lIl S0lll6lDl7Cl'6 A woman entered the parlor of a Philadelphia hotel and seated herself in a rock- ing chair. She was middle-aged and stout, and the chair creaked comfortably as it swung to and fro. She had been sight-seeing and was warm, and tired, and glad to rest. A man sat at a table, near by, making a memorandum in his notebook, as he put the book away, he glanced toward her, and she immediately addressed him: " Did you ever see so many people? They come from every part of the world, too. I'm from Chicago, myself 3 I suppose you know where that is? " The man bowed with grave politeness. "Yes," he assented, "I know where Chicago is." " Everyone doesg" said the woman, plying her palm-leaf fan with vigor, " that's the reason I always say I'm from Chicago, I get so tired of explaining. I'm really from Aurora, a town near Chicago. I don't Suppose you ever heard of Aurora, though, hardly anyone has." The man's eyes twinkled. "Oh, yes, I have been in Aurora, a thriving little city." The woman stopped rocking and regarded her auditor with a kindling interest. " S0 it is," she agreed cordially, " we can get almost anything there we want, there's where we go to do our extra trading, it's our nearest large town. You see we don't live exactly in Aurora, our home is at Shabbona, a few miles from there. It's only a little town, just a station on the railroad. Of course, you never heard of it, nobody has." " 0f Shabbona? " inquired the man, smiling, "yes, I know where Shabonna is. Years ago, I saw the old chief, too, for whom the town was named. Shabbona is a pleasant village." The woman nodded cheerily and looked, with friendly eyes, toward the man. " just what I think every time I go there," she asserted, with approval. H XVe're not precisely in Shabbona, you understand, that's our postofiice, though. Our farm is just a few miles east." 223 Chicago Photo finishing Co. ...BORDENS... USE and pay out good money for a poor article of so-called milk, Skimmed, Watered and otherwise adulterated in various ways to resemble what it is not, when you can obtain BORDEN'S ABSOLUTELY PURE MILK AND CREAM From the very best dairies In the State of Illinois. Put up in steam cleaned GLASS BOTTLES and hermetically sealed at the Company's own Bottling stations at Elgin and Belvidere. Expressed-to the clty in Refrigerator Cars and delivered to custo- mers in patented Refrigerator Wagons. This Company also supplies BORDEN'S CELEBRATED CONDENSED MILK KUnsweetened and Sterilzed.J Put up in Half-Pint Glass Jars. Orders by Mail or Telephone to the following offices will have prompt sttontion. 546-554 West Van Buren Street. ...... Telephone 856 West. 617-633 East Forty-Seventh Street. ..... Telephone 503 Oakland. ILLINOIS BRANCH OF THE N. Y. CONDENSED MILK CO. ' ---ooofi2aoa-i-ouo-n-1ooo- n sooo- 1 sooo-4-nom : -oooQ p BOOT JACK! Peculiarly suited to E l ATHLETES 5 SPORTING MEN MEN:ABOUT:TOWN. s A Handsome Aluminum Pocket Case for 5 Tobacco sent free to consumer returning to 3 us 36 strips from 5-cent cuts of Boot Jack. e , Order of any Tobacconist or of 3 JOHN FINZER 6: BROS., Manufacturers 0 Louisville, Ky. ' uno one maj is Printed C R rtbwestern fine 1f'1f'1f' TO ALL POINTS NORTH AND NORTHWEST l?.:ez'.e.'2fJP1l..'I.E9EI'1 MUVEMENT CURE. Experienced application of swedish move- Chas. EIIQII JODIISOII 55 CO. 99 HARRISON ST. 1f'1f'1f'CI-IICAGO Developing and Finis ' for Amateurs!!! h-mg IIOCIZRS, Bild ZBIIRYGS, IDOIIQITY, SOICI, exchanged Bild RCIIWCI. PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS Mail orders solicited. Catalogue and Bargain List on application.-::::::::: Bpeoisl discounts on Cameras. 609 Champlain Bldg., CHICAGO. ments, manual and mechanical massage to chro- mc forms of disease a specialty. Especially applicable in case of C ronic Rheumatism. Paralysis. Sciatica, General Debility, Spinal Gurvature. Stiif Joints, Gout. Muscular Atrophy, Imperfect Circulation. Cold Extrernitiesi Swollen Glands, Dropsical Swellings, Hfemorrholds Con- stipation oi Bowels, Torpidity of the Liver, Dyspepsia, and forms of indigestion, Asthma, Pulmonary Weakness, Nervous aiections of all kinds Neuralgia. Sleepnessness, Diseases ef the Female Pelvls, Displacements, etc. For these affections it is a radical cure. Chronic Catarrh, Chronic Headache, and a host of minor ailments h b d' th' . S d f ' ul . ave een cure in is way en or crrc ar JOHN G. TRINE, M. D. Champlain Bldg. Rooms 710-719. SCIISQ, Ellld ROIISCIISQ, CII WDCQIS The two spun forward smoothly, side by side. " Oh, the delicious spring rnoming," said the Sentimentalist, taking a deep breath. "Yes. Warm for April, isn't it?,' answered the embryo summer girl, who was still chrysalissed in broadcloth and a gray fedora. A robin piped triumph from a fence, but two south-going cyclists passed, and he Hew to an elm. " Did you notice?" cried the Sentimentalist ecstatically. " Plucky little soul to brave it out so early ! " " Yes. But I must say, shirtwaists in April seems rushing the season." " Shirtwaists ? " " Yes. On the girl. Wasn't that what you meant ? " A dividing puddle cut off the explanation. As he again glided to his place beside her, they passed a patch of starry dandelions. He was about to exclaim, but she interrupted: " Have you ever eaten any of the vile salad they concoct from those little yellow things? You get it abroad, at little country places. Nasty stun' ? " He hadn't. He was in luck, she said. They rode ou. " See that slope of pines by the farm there? It reminds me of a bit of road near Ocean Beach. Do you remember? " " Yes," she said again. " What a poky old place Ocean Beach was ! Thank heavens, I have persuaded the family to go to Bar Harbor this year. I'm dying for a jolly timef' "And you'll have it there ? " "Oh dear, yes! There are no end of things one can do there, you know. I'm dreadfully busy these days, planning all my gowns. You see there's tennis, and golf, and yachting, and riding and wheeling, besides the bathing and the going out. But I do love the country !l' " So do I." He was happy that they agreed for once. A stretch of woodland lay before them. The sunlight played across the ruddy pine-strewn path in patches. The underbrush was tipped green. Little creeping creatures ran to and fro, forgetting their winter lethargy. She struck a root and her wheel swerved. " Oh to have all these roads asphalted ! " she sighed. " Let's sit in the shade and rest," he said. 225 NCGDQSIYD PdillIilISS.. 38 Artists Employed, Including Gold Medalists from the Paris Salon. 'wall llbapers New styles, designed by gold medal artists. From 10 cents per roll up. Send 50 cents to prepay express on large sample book and drapery. A quantity of last year's paper, il and 352 per roll, now :oc and 256. Will include drapery samples in package. See our Zlletallic French Pressed, and lida papers, which harmonize with all kinds of woodwork and carjzbels, and we have sperial draperies to malflz. By al! means see these fhings. Special silk draperies made at our Broomheaa' Illills, Paferson, N. j. Eapestry materials We manufacture tapestry materials. Superior to foreign goods, and half the price. Books of samples, 10 cents. Send Sr.5o for trial order, for 2 yards of 50-inch No. 6 goods, worth 33.00. Eecorations Write for our color schemes, designs, estimates. Artists sent to all parts of the world to do every sort of decorating and painting. We are educating the country to color-harmony. Relief, stained glass, wall paper, carpets, furniture, draperies, etc. Pupils taught. Send S25.oo for a color scheme to decorate your home. Eecorative Elbvice . On receipt of 51.00 Mr. Douthitt Will answer any questions on interior decora- tions color-harmony and harmony of form, harmony of wall covering, carpets, curtains, tiles, furniture, gas fixtures, etc. 3. jf. E utbift HISfil3iZfiESiEi'iSE2" 226 She leaned her back against a rough pine trunk, drawing up her knees, and press- ing two deliciously audacious looking little feet, booted high in brown, into the soft, elastic' moss tufts. The Sentimentalist sat opposite. He adored her this morning. She was certainly very seductive, with that fresh, crisp, youngness of hers, that matched the season. She seemed to embody it all, its subtle suggestiveness, the full promise of the young year, its wholesome spontaneity. He looked at her eyes-yes, and its enigma, its delicious mystery. Looking up she met his gaze. " Do you know, Mr. Allerton, what would be simply ideal now? " " Tell me." "Well, if we could have two splendid big ice-cold glasses of beer. Wouldn't it taste good ? " By which he perceived that the summer girl, like nature, whom she embodied this morning, was after all at heart a gross materialist. Edna Stanton. Wl'iIilIS 3 verse fRondeau with acknowledgements to Dobson.J To write a verse I'm asked to try. The one who asks I can't deny, Her pleading tones I can't refuse- I know I'll irritate the muse, But what does that, pray, signify ? She bids me write, and though I die I must attempt to glorify Erato. Pshaw! It gives the blues To write a verse. But then, here goes ! List now a sigh, Imagine tears bedixn my eye, I'm growing faint ! What, no such ruse Avails? Then I am sure to lose My wits. No wonder when I try- To write averse. G. L. Marslz. 227 Wylie Camping Company Yellowstone National Park A New Method of Caring for Tourists at at at Our camps are permanentg no more moving of tents. Excellent cooks at all campsg steel range cook stovesg dining and other tents heated with stoves. Large compartment tents. Woven Wire springs under fine wool mattress bedsg no sleeping on ground. Provis- ions best market affords. Our ticket includes the steamer trip on Yellowstone Lake. Meet train every day. Fine covered buggies to ride in. Longer time at points of interest than any other method gives. . . Price of seven-day trip including every expense 535.00 No extra charge for side trips. ........ . Make a special feature of caring for Wheelmen at 52.50 per day. Send for illustrated descriptive folder . - Address ' W. W. Wylie Gardiner, Montana Cllemainder of Yearl 228 H Cdlt f LEE' f IV-L f 'UI OW gather 'round me one and all, I 1 I A story for to hear. LMI -. .. i i 'x..,..,...... 1-1:1 1 J TI 1. - g 'fi P ' r- "" ?'mk'r'JP1" 'hm Q ...l...l.uljM '., I 1 . 1 NL A wondrous tale it isg so lend A most atttentive earg And if it is not wise, or new, or true, at least it's queer. 'Twas in the early far-OE days When first the world begung The earth was in the workshop yet, But it was nearly done. How it was made I need not state Csee Gen. I, 1 J. There hung the globe, quite fresh and new, And everything was thereg Lake Michigan and Lincoln Park, With every single bear, And Potter Palmer's residence, and Hooley's, and the Fair. Darne Nature stood and eyed her work With a complacent smile. " It's all done but the paint," she saidg " I'll let it dry awhile, And then I'll put the colors on and fix it up in style." And so she got her paint-box out All ready to begin fThe kind you buy for fifty cents, The cover is of tin, And there are little china plates to mix the colors in.j Dame Nature dipped her brush, and mixed The colors in a triceg And oh! the pains she took to lay Each color smooth and nice. For desert sands she used garnbogeg the trees were all green bice 229 Tapestry an rt Schools . . Six 3-hour tapestry-painting, china or miniature lessons, in studio, 35.00. Com- plete written instructions by mail, 31.00. Tapestry paintings rented, full-size draw- ings, paints, brushes, etc., supplied. Nowhere- Paris not excepted- are such advantages offered pupils. New catalogue 125 studies, 25 cents. Send Sl.00 for complete instructions in tapestry painting and compendium of l40 studies. The Goddess of Atvatabar A trip to the Interior World. "jules Verne in his happiest days outdone." 318 octavo pages, 44 illustrations, price 32.00, postage pre- paid. Paper covers, 50 cents. Manual of Art Decorations The art book of the century, 200 royal quarto pages. 50 superb full- page illustrations Q11 coloredj of modern interiors. Send 52.00 for this 35.00 art book. Goblin Printed Burlaps e 25 cents a yard-36 inches wide. Lids leather paper at S2 oo per roll. Goblin Art Drapery To match all sorts of papers, from 10 cents per yard up. In order that we may introduce this line of new art goods, we will send one yard each of 50 different kinds of our most choice patterns for 87.50. . . UTH ETF near 30th St.:'New York American Tapestry and Decorative Co. 286 fifth Ave Open evenings until 10, to discuss decorations with business men 230 ' 7 I .2 ,gg - f.. . 'ix' ln v So color after color came, All in the nicest taste. She tipped the mountain peaks with snowg Each curly stream she traced, d ls ra and solitary waste. And then she made ol Ocean g y Now one paint only was unused, It was her choicest one, " Whell I have found a place for that," She said, " I shall be done." C'Twas all in silver paper wrapt, to keep it from the sun.l " But what is fine enough," she thought, " For this imperial hue? " The lily and the rose she tried,- The little violet toog She tried the maiden's blushing cheek, but that would never do. She tried it on the summer cloud, And on the sunset sky, The little stream was much too low, The mountain was too high. " The thing must be just right," said she, " that wears this royal dye." Then lo ! What is it takes her eye, Far in the rosy west? A banner bright that waves and leaps Like to a warrior's crest ! Ah, that shall have the lovely hue to mark it for the best ! And to this day, at misty morn, Or in the golden noon, Or mellowed with the sunset glow, Or 'neath the quiet moon,- lor is-maroon ! The banner waves, and to this day its co F. W. Dzgnan 231 . Asif' .t , 1 r-fy: f aot- x in' . Wi ,S - ' .K y K' is x2 . . C , , Z- r'- 5' . . f' ' I-fs,-.iQ ,N 2 .. f ff 3 5? 39 A M?U, f 5' Q ,fly " . x,J:," if '- -12 -NNN. 4vw...f-uiunsrx sap 42 gL ,-wa! T -if L".f'::s+2:e: :.-I -, H - f, .. 'X .E '.' A , ..f ' R If ..?""' Q ., ,-- - A - T-.. fifsewaiish :'I1::r'?fhf:m ., ,H u Ill l n u an n -ffl --""""" .fxrkfrv 4-ii" 'nw-'-f,r,: J . ,.,f.,3.1 1 ' ifiilifrrmilii Ff??1:AfS5EI vvllguii meij ' 55552. ' - -r ' " -A f L. A ,. f ...,,,, :.,. .. - j,,g 'J I ' " 1-52.2. 4-vrsifi 'msn ' A. F3959 :. -A4 -A -: YH .. -iw ' It- f- T' ' -i f i . , ' -'H'71i"'f"1'fW-EEE--3 -'R-.....,. ' " ,,, e-fge- .- ,A ..,---effgefag, gfvgtez :Lf 'yt' -- "' "ii.'Tf1f?S: " fhf f 3- i f zz- E-Ai -T Wil 1 Ty gi: A ' R ifjlii i 2. iif ' W i NA ? ii-f 1113? i '- 5 "H 5 :5 - ' i :gl AffS?g , N v e H A gllgi' if M fle?me-?3"'eemiN1 ' Gail? "53i l - " A 'V :: Tfxifieeei-3 vifigf-gi R 2531 J- A - ST - SRX ,Q j3.i,:a+- QLR T,. E Xgg-5 kff fif5m. i:E-X AQ. 1 S- E -QI om,,g"1Q--l ? egf' ' ffwfnlffkcmfiy -I, S 12:1-sse , 5 Xxxiifxi' X fi-fr., '-'V R4 A T 'gi'- TllSf N g - -- f:4L.- THE CHICAGO BEACH HOTEL GEORGE B. ROSS, Manager On the Lake Shore and Fronting 51st Street Boulevard, Chicago A SEASIDE RESORT With all the Advantages and Amusements to be derived from proximity to a large city Demonstrated to be the most delightful ,abiding place the year around in Chicago 1ooooFEET OF BROAD VERANDA -iso OUTSIDE APARTMENTS ' zzo BATH ROOMS .9 .R Eight minutes from Van Buren Street by Illinois Central Rapid Transit. Send for Souvenir Booklet. 232 SCYQIIGCIC Che Depths or DQDTGDUD " Gad! that's a stunning bit," said I. Loie had pinned up the new poster, and against the peacock coloring on the wall the ambers and golds were warm and deep. Loie settled herself contentedly in the big chair. " She's awfully depraved," she exclaimed delightedly. " Yet fascinating," said I. " That's the attraction," she asserted. " Oh, not the depravity," said I, but her experi- T ence of life, that perfect assurance." "You can have that without necessarily getting fl' such a mouth," she said. " Don't1et's point it to the mouth," I besought. We went to the eyes, the lift of them, the ener- vated forward droop of the shoulders. "Yes," Loie repeated, " you can have no end of experience without anyone, anyone, ever reading it in ,Wh your face. " I looked at her. Her features were sharply chiseled and her coloring strangely exquisite. She laughed. " I'll tell you a story," she said. Her color deepened, and for the time of the tell- ing the gloom of her eyes was gone. I suppose there was nothing unusual in the story, but I am conventional and it seemed appalling. She laughed again when she had finished. But it ended in a sob and I took her little head in my arms to com- fort her. Then I wondered, was it true or was the little girl enjoying to the full the effect of a dramatic impulse? Soft stars shining, Clouds reclining On the lining Of the blue. Roses feeling O'er them stealing, Softly o'er them, Mists of dew. My love lies sleeping, O'er herfcreeping, In God's keeping, Dream-wings light. O, starlight beaming, Through lattice streaming, Enwrap her, dreaming, Through the night. LeRoy Titus Weeks. QWW' Wwfmav Qmefwfwmff qaflfom. A26 fgeufvgofmm gifted, Qflmcaglg M, fwmwuw.. 'lzlmball1ball. :::: 243 Wabash Rv. glumuo af ...Special 'Rates ta 5fllD6I'lf9.-. 1 233 , Q 3 ,TL r fl' r" FL , I' .fl L ..-ff' this SQGSOII 'VE loved before: A score, Or more. Girls, fair, and fresh, and dainty. Oft, as I sit They 'round me flit -Risky, or coy, or saintly. I've challenged fate To skate With Kate, Or go with Polly wheelingg Maud at a ball Held me in thrall, And Ethel's voice thrilled feeling. But now I swear QEyes fair Gold hairj, At golf, May claims surrenderg Plaid skirt and hose Neatly enclose A figure round and slender. A mile or two, fAnd you Would too lj Around the links I follow With ratio, same As in her game, I ind life fair or hollow. Edna Stanton. 235 1' fx W N ,-21.1.-,T", flm 1 LV., X-,,:. 7 " ' , ,, ' S. F4 2 ,, . Z ' ly, ff? ,' 1?':S?jq:'1'M . I , 1-mt.-' :wwf ,, ,.,,b.m,g . -1. , f1-lxg:0.- - --' ' 1 ,, f . -v - .17 Qt. .-4 .1 L- K 72? L 'K I ' ' I L v. i ,. QF' .. I . ' - r I Xl li -1-. JOHN J. MAGEE 9Q,UGGIS7W Telephone Oakland 464 AND Cor. 57th St. and Lake Ave. CHEMIST ...CHICAGO JACKSON PARK STABLES Telephone Oakland 552 273 E. 57th Street 5. 1-1. KINTZ Pnopmsron HYDE PARK AND CHICAGO BEACH STABLES a 5:20 Lake A . . . CHICAGO 'I' I ph eOeklandI099 W like THE RISWOLD W Wg n GYQLE. 60. A R Z l ives ' e rices o S N .H-1 it ,? S, Snqdenng of the n QXWMMX E Unlverslnu of Gmcago The On such well-known B-cycles as " emmgton Standard Typewrltefs 5 New Models draw old fnends closer and attract new ones, by the power of mherent ment and 15 unfa1lmgserv1..e .1 E WYCKOFE, SEAMANS 81 BENEDICT 321 Broadway, h Y ls .Q , it I I .n,- 'I' ', 1 ,f . if Ol unnulluw ' ' 1 , 5 gf- 1111 ff ...ye Xxgdlllllllllw l A Z, ' Q- . NHTIONHI.. GRISWOLD IROQUOIS 0 0 PIERGE. IVBI' Johnson HHH BGFIIGS WhilZ6 FIUGI' HE GRISWOLO CYCLE CO. . . 3Ist St. and Michigan Ave. Che Instructor in Chapel V cially, if he would not attend chapel now and then, in order to let the students see the enthusiasm for religious instruction that prevailed throughout the faculty. The instructor, amiable though slightly blase, decided, half cynically, to consent. He remembered the chapel services at his own college, dignified, as even the Freshmen were, intellectual, as comported with the reputation of an institution whose half-backs wore eye-glasses. Therefore, the in- structor, with a slight warmth in his heart, put on his cap and gown and Went as he Was asked. His unfamiliarity with the routine placed him in some doubt as to what to do with his cap. He attempted also to sit down at the Wrong time, but his knees sprung straight 'again as he saw his colleagues still standing. There was a poor song, a short reading, a shorter prayer. Then the scholarly president jerked out a few notices, which met with more attention than the prayer. It was over. The instructor, in the black gowned row, filed out, feeling vaguely as one who had found bread- crumbs in the holy of holies. HE president wrote the instructor a little note, asking him, quite unoffi- 6 O O O She was a dear old soul, and she used to try to convert me. She approved of all that I did, but I believe she thought I held heathenish and pagan notions on religion, and it troubled her. Usually I evaded her when this subject came up, but sometimes she Was gently persistent, and then she would look grieved at my answers. One day we talked about the future world. My tongue ran away with me, and I explained at some length my conception of heaven and hell, as states of consciousness, forgetting that such an idea would be offensive to the little Woman who listened. VVhen I was done, she said: "And you don't believe in a hell? " If 'll " Pray for light, my dear. Pray for light." 0 G GJ O - V, YRON took down a photograph from the mantle. He held it with a gentle, f V. loving admiration. W iQ, " She was an artist," he said, "a great artist." I 127 " She had glorious hair," I ventured, looking over his shoulder. " She had imagination"- ' "And what a throat ! "- ' " She had a soul-a point of View-a conception of life." " But who was she, what did she do? " I asked. E9 U "Her life was her art," he answered. "A series of dramatic impulses. A.. Of perfect poses. She had a genius for lying, a master mind. And the audacity of her truths was most illuminating." " Where did you meet her, Myron? She looks foreign." He studied the photograph for a while, lost in thought. Then: " I knew her in Venice, long ago. She was a little Russian girl. Her name was Marusha Anatofff' 237 i Ii Vg i fn? 0 are THE I W ffm IIIIII 2 the' I I Arr1va1ofTh-I I .eir 99111-ENG I TRUSSFRAME Ap r or 'T-heproductions -'-cI-IIcAGoMAKERS ILLINOIS of Welsh Nara I etsoni?Qo.a:I Ehreoe Middl- etonGCo. Alle -n Solly 6 Com LONDONENG ae A' x DO you wif' 6,0 'F' JZ'6W1:'aQ 00 the u!liWl'SiIV Of ZNCGQO weekly ? If not, you miss some good things each week. All the news of the University and many of the best literary productions are given in each issue. Subscription price, Quarter, 75 centsg One Year, S2.5O..al..s'.al.a'The University of Chicago Weekly, Office, Basement Cobb Hall. .al .al .al .al .al J- .al .al .al J 238 Il Fbllntdilt Pen The best made, is given Free With... a paid in advance year's subscription. ROIICCBIIX I0 ONICI' if HEN she had passed-oh, happiness divine, . Rarer and sweeter than the Chian wine yi fi God Bacchus brewed Apollo, long ago- V Hifi H fThe iigure's Hat, stale, profitless, I know, fy ' ie- Used since the Muses first hung out their sign: 'N W 'f'- LW' lf ' ' " Rhymes furnished to young poets-prices low And figures gratis. Yours to serve, The Nine."j- But here I must return to my first line:- When she had passed, My dull eyes sparkled to a livelier shine. My cold heart warmed again, and I, in fine Woke to new life all suddenly, as though Electrically shocked, forgot my woe And in that instant knew the pot was mine, When she had passed. WOIIIEIII and Whit Woman, and Wine ! I wonder who First sung the glories of the two? Who bound them in the immortal phrase. And whether both he meant to praise And which the more-I wish I knew. Without them, what would poor man do? Work dully through the dreary days, Walk dumbly down the dusty ways- Wonian, and Wine ! What if the headaches would be few? And what if wine its thousands slew, And woman her ten thousands slays? " In equal honor, equal praise. Still, still I hold, till life be through, Woman, and Wine ! 239 ...N-qfxi -2 Q NL E ' if ilr Sf , f 1' f P' 'lf , lx ' :Qfl f ,, i X fifl' fg, Nt- 2-TES? .- - ' X wi ' I 3 N . fx X , 3 N- -ffzff' , Ne N- f Sivie .4 if -3 . S I s l to 'f .ff ' ',,9' ex X f f ff x ,K ' l Mi Q 'Y E, 3- ESX? -4 , X x li XW T - i XS. ' 5, x RX y-gk f xx? X is S NN m xx 9 N x X 110,49 X. , ski, ffm 5 .2 0' nl Il 4 75 .V xg A V wzk x R gig f' a-1, ' 4 ' 411 -X 'T' let, v X .lim Mc? X - V-A "-Qi - ..- X a 52 -fag! i3l,5f . . -N an :S , - - s- 5-wrriyi' ' X - Q X w I: 1,44 X ii 1 " " .QL Fix' ff 1 PR IQ , I' ffff i ir S I - tw f 'Lf xx N , .. ' -.v I QI - X i . Y 1 - Q E sig V af. ASEE-N175-QW f CHICAGO SCALE Co. Q .IfI'.'ll'51il'2Si'.-3 U - - Standard H ...Scales ..' ' Also Dealers in Thousands ll A T fi? fe- gzihlggig made of Specialties, including Family + . .g 3 1 0-00 Sewing Machines -Tu- ALL VARIETIES AT LOWEST PRICES Ti 2 - , E - Eillijii gs fgs mg 'ifgf fully' Warranted I II . A-Si 5- Q lg' . I+g:1'- 5-':"2 ' -' , - 'X-flrffi " 3 -gr- BICYCLES .. .. . . fi 55 3' 'I 'P' , Qi" We also For all Ages 'rf ,vj A'vg ..sell 2 5 ,, , f PIAN LOWEST: Pmcfs 4 OS .M oR6ANs ' Busclfs Send for Catalogue 3 f and Circulars... fpgiiff' 1 if-N Q . Q Q . Avqw ' 117- HARNESS ' 3 Q: . . XL'3 - AFES Chicago as Y SS SSSRR 1,8 Sgale u E MI. CQ. 292-296 Jackson Boulevard, CHICAGO, ILL. 240 ' CD2 Seasons Oh, tell me a tale of the Kelly girl, In the days of the driven snow, Of classes and theses and musty tomes, X Cf the study of people who have no homes- " To train the brain," you know. With a ho, ho, ho, for the midnight oil, 'Q And the daughter of horrid, wasting toil, And here's to her massive brow! U L A ,, ,LJ .J 2 .7 ' , , 'ea dopdbbov if 5,5 5 Cf- v ,at tcfgv gg sr U :fog - Q 0 " 'F fl -x x4 U C ir Q V v 60.5 Ja O , o'oCu-J., A U LO HJ, O 6 Q 116-Lx.: "bo O ' 'O Vq?c A 0 C 4 o L L gf, Q 6 11, ,Q nv 6 Cfda J '?,yg I oL'-Qoubgaith I 'ff ' sfo v is H? zf 1. 6 0.0 6 z ! Q , XX .. . 0 0 ogf. of ri, q69'1 D 0 J 2 Q' X3 '- o 09 D o aa f 04 a W 6 I 0 Z, ,Q 56 04-44 4 uv G .ago 'll 1- Cavan 47 oioaaddfo cao-1 ' - V' 9DU fl 0 0:06 060 o"oG'o'G L or 1. 0 CE ,O 5- , o ., w X , 4--5 F Q 0 66 0 bonds, Q y nijf iqo 4 do ,U X 0 Z O V112 L 1 1 " - . , -- 4 duo elJ6f6!1 6 ccljldi gage F 5'j,f1fg6 gif, 'O 0 ff 6 C afynyfyf- 'lf-' "N, Q ' 6 Q in 29014 mu oo, 5 dj Q 0449 06 6 ckQ 6 9 L '.g VH P35-5--.-3 6 . r, , 'bqvoad ' SC. ac O " Mom V QI' ' A 6 0 L, .DS Then troll me a stave of the Kelly girl , LA. ir, . 5135 T21 Nz' Q Q A Q . 0 'da 25' ? l C 6 ,s Q Q, S In the days of the Summertime, ' X' ' 9 , "ki ,f, ' . 0 3 G Q L 4 yu f. Of " cuts" and strolls and drives and balls, 1 ix as -- ' f ,i ,.,-T . VZ. 2 X6 qu . . - . ME N 1 og, Z6 ,, Q Q Of pink shirt waists and parasols, 45,9 T, ' . ' X if if we All strung to a lover's rhyme. 'fif' li? iff: Is-, - 6' " . . . "' " fr 1 I '4131 X XX e 5 ef 6 With a ho, ho, ho, for frivolity, gf, - . . . . 4 ' ,,,,B'k2fjx - 1 H, ix '. G Q And the daughter of rollickmg Jollity, ,QQ "9 YQ, A+ 1 And here's to her flashing eyes! if f mix ff 4, ' 0 BARBER SHOP AND CI GAR STORE COR.. JEFFERSON AVE. AND 51TH STRIET. I employ only the most skilled barbers, I offer for sale Ugbacco anb Gigarg of the magma annum. 0 J I 'A 11 ,. M1 I 1 0 th ' t d t th liyiii?-l'?d0f13E5ffrSf?n 3 Q? . . . . . CHAS. LEE. someunooooaousaoonnnunosaoap-nnauonouoo nnsuuoonnanoann ualit Rather I han antit y r y. Pres. Ehbt of Harvard, says : " The International is a wonderfully compact storehouse of accurate information." The International is Scientific .f f ffl, It is the School-Teacher of . : .U . and Practical. 'Q-J J ly the Republic. ' Words are easily found. Pronunciation WEBSTER'S The International and its abridgments is easily ascertained. Meanings are easily are in general use in the colleges and pub- learned. The growth of words is easily NTERNATIONAL lic and private schools of the country. traced. and excellence of quality rather DICTIQNAW Should you not give the students access than superfluity of quantity characterizes to the same Dictionary in the home that its every department. they use in the schoolroom? BFSpecimcn pages and. testimonmls from om-ment persons and publications sent on applzkfatifm. G. 81: C. IVIERRIAIVI CO., Publishers, Springfield, Mass., U. S. A. I I I I fy fix' XXX f-ff ' 4 'Yi xml ""- 5- 1,2 W ' Wa co' - 7 ' 2 2 .av ' il sw l V I. t - ' I N wi l f my if ND0U iw Jo CLUB6 ., 5 DANWNO USP-me -11 K e- my . - .y 6 eeneosan l W . lf-yf sme' thanselvcs insuperlativeterms , . , when they speak of the satisfaction dc- ' , '- Agzis, rived fromthcuscofthcseinstrumcnts. ff! 'i1'.',7 iyou: cr not ow 'lf them, we will send you an as- 'Gel lm ' sortment to select from. Illus- 5- L: .. I ll me cm: Free."7.'Z,.",'2'Z- is i LvoN a0gHuElu.v, Chicago. '? ' X . 1 tw - .Q " Q ml. , . . .N h e ,,,::gt V 1 mx -,, - 5 1 R l' .:.gP1:..lfl ' Y X l"1f1f'-Fil' J: L. .17 : A: l W ' X, 242 H BRIO The curtains were closely drawn over the windows so that the room would have been dark as night but for the dim light from a shaded candle. Stretched on the bed lay a young man. His face and brow tiamed with fever, and his eyes stared wildly out of their hollow sockets. Muttering in delirium he tossed restlessly to and fro, seeming to expend in useless energy the little strength left to him. The clean, pun- gent odor of disinfectants, the grave-almost clerical-physician, and the array of bottles on the little table near the head of the bed, all gave evidence of the critical condition of the patient. At last the invalid grew calrnerg the clear light of sanity came back into his eyes, and he seemed to comprehend the seriousness of his condition. NVeakly raising him- self on his elbow he glanced around the room. " Mother! " he spoke in a strained, almost inaudible whisper. " Mother ! " A gentle, tired-eyed woman rose from her seat beside the bed and bent over the suiierer. " Mother, if I should die to-night promise me-promise me that you will send a withdrawal card to the Dean." Then he sank back on the pillows, and fell into a placid sleep. He had done his duty. T H. "We are Great in Prices, not in Words.' T1-IE SENTINELae..e Clipper, Andrae 2621929 and Iroquois... THE 1898 BACON AT 325.00 IS A WONDER. We Carry Everything in See Our Complete Outfit for 50 Cents. SUNDRIES Very Cheap. MEAD CYCLE Co. 287 Wabash Avenue , 595 West Madison St. 159 Wabash Avenue BRANCHBS' 130 Michigan Avenue 243 f C f B lm' 5'-.ef Erma 1- mr -3 x'5..:S-if W 'ss if :U MDA awilb-f III! I STREET CEICHGD ERE COIZIPIIIQ v -w .4 -"sf :Q 1 qu' :ga xr 'Lug K' Q9 -:'9"'5'e ffl ' Vi ' ':"' W'?'v'f25'-N' 133531 'f"v"1"'-F"v1-.. W? '51 Z7 fs f-an Q K N w V .1 , ,f A 16315-dsfvh 4 5 , A la 1. V rx' we-va-N mx 1,1-Bfvygk 1'- V v x,-,rx 'lu H 'fl -E. al: A 5? r itifvsw-,. Tlr '1 " 5 'wwxns 1 2, Xu 7 1' v 5 4 LLJ3rQ'..75tCxb"5,,L::I :nw-,,,,,-:N n fi E'I?g"f 0 '1' V. ,ex 1 344411535 I ,aff NFHQ 5121 9 ' as .5 .if 4 -. 21 'f7 da, ff, ,lg av az' IQ ' A 'J ag 6 'f1"':Z.,J- A Medi 1. iff' xi -wx 'S 5,-451a3'prv" 2sV3i3VyEf-V55 IQ 3 Vw 5 if-f-V25 if Jf,w?:1f' Z--a W X Rig? lk' "' ' 1 ,N 'ik' 01.-.1 -fs. l l :YY .' ' af' wx 'NH , Q 1 .n . 1 , , -,, .. 'ww -A --134' :A- , ,V. 1 4: si- 9 . V R, . V h N L ry, . . -V . . 4 1-5: J., J, X yvog. N "VF-." 'Y W, U :rs af V 1 Q .gig if 253135 .,,, Napq-, iii, f'-glggiiqggic me-M4 sig' L 4 ' ii--5 " 'I-5 '. . V . V V'-V ,. 'f 3, 'Z 1' ' '14 1.2.4. :1l?:,1f,z-:il TE f ' 1" ' ,1:T'V1V,-iz' :V -1 QV: ., ' -I -' V' ' A , 5m - ' .::-.- 5, .1-. ff --3. , k-4.- 1 .M -, :jf-1 V05 ,L-' V-"., . i 1'-.54V+f -- V V .f'iE"A4:f,YsLf?j,,.-.,Q,:iYp4:,1yL31:if,g . , V V Y .- at -4,f:.'-1-1-0315 3 .fg- 1 :fill ,Vu 79-,,,--1:-Wir:-V-,'-lar-.1f,1.'-6up.1 f V-M. wg-uf . V XV - - -. 1: - ,fm .Ah . 'zu.4,111Y1"43?+Ev+E'fakw+'g4m.---cfwgl-Rn....a1'JL-"3'ivf4mf2,a3i'?-iff'y-Q5m-a-gg!-. ,. V , . V -- 4yg'.y.s'f-4513 ' ,..,.- 3,-LL-. f ,, 4. ,.. A .. V...,. lf.. ,, - , - .. , Vi- -V. -. .. Vf. ,, ., . .-, -. .-V 1 -,m.. - -Ftfmffff. 4. V :V -,I J V.xf.4vf,.--- -, ,nz-...if-J Ma- -.fn V.-ff -V --' "-"21:':4-.1:' 1- irzcgr err 6'lll1u0af01J of Book Magazine and general mercantilelhlhlications .fpedhl dltezzlionxyirefz to mlkgefj .frlmol Word V 4 nr l 7 I 350'D65lllBORl2' . . : N . 'X ' --'zzz-ff1es' -1912---1: 2f1'w"':gce-:f:,V 7 .ful -' 21--"lr Va"-" H- -rf-+-W "'-1V'f:f'.2r.-Vwwv-1 1-.m:s1""tV -1 331541-, 'gf-f5pGf.,-,.:,1 f 55e.g1ffw' 'E:f'::e, any: :wg -H-..1.' ffl e- 'V 55... ,V-'T ?:"'f'?f:f'l P21251 .cg',.t1,,,,mg,f:Yg.,is-V5V.,,f,f5-1 .fgtgsf 1asir',-'qs-,.'.:,,,+ " 2131-iiff, ,.'1fgJ::'37-,si-I1 nl, -Q,ggihi"-zg.fa,1.-.ff-1'hV4'1Cf1meEf: ..,.1hw .LJ-...Ll-:Q-1-3:-,egg -7, ' 4 fp- 5 .. L .1gqg'f4+:fL-,'-.al fgSa5:f,+sf '-..fV.,?r.-- e:f-,,:,+-- V 'ig ir-,?.:f'-Tr1'g?? -. ' w- Q -.,, .x,.,,,,V,-. ,QA . , -,.. ,, 1. , ' zz:-V5-fp -va' ir 1' ,V1'-:- .WH 7 :TJ-2241 33' ':5fiE5lisL'Vf.5:.f's?1f1f , A REE? X 1. 'Va-+'41,ff:2'-4? ls' , . l ' 4"5E55:'i5.::Vi,,: "fr , , 2 , J. ' 132 -. if 'g5.g,J.55,f-,zfvv I . - X 11. .-.H 553:-Iii -1 L. ,V 1 1 Vw ,r .. A 1- :'7fJ'- " 'P' ' 1 ,.'-' ' -1 .- ' Vf if MFE 'f"i , iii-T ' , ' -q.-5122, Mm- A 'tfv-s J .j 3 .Ever-f A V r if - A eil fi is :veggie igffg-.gel k X 21'-N V5 age: ' ,Q .-,.. , .f.1- , 1. ,,1'- f -,L - . - ,Ah ,. - . . I E 24:50 Egfr.-ZQIA J I , r 1, 1 :. 1 1 K. 2 . -sf A 0 . A l , -,A ' ,, -V W .- r 4 . 1 ,V - V A- .V .-' E 1.1 2" f -157' - ' ' ' J 5? V 1.44 w fra-V" . ai. l -- -1 329, eg, el 1 N951 u- li" P 4 ' 7 N if ' -1, tl J ln- . Q 5523: 4 Q Q -A 67 1 4 -, , Q 9 Q 4 Ll gt. F 1 '- ' , . ,. ,VI 2 ll f V . , -iii' - V ,Vx 'K R N EJ - 1 'L' 3' 1 ft? " ,I 5 I -V Ac' . fav. A- . 1 f N5 -5 - P -" r . V 1 L -ar - - H 1 , f f ,f V wr , - 0' ,,, .f - , , , . " ,W Q . um Hui' " I 1 'r atv 'I A , 5-4 . ,Q 1 . Dl'0dllCll0llS or INS COIIIDGIIDNESUIIIRICS illld SDQCllllCllS Sill! llD0lI 3DDIlC3Il0ll"""' I be lllllSll'3ll0llS lll CBD alla G0lDll dl? lbe I I P .tai 74 ., - , t firfzfzzfn , ,f ' N. F" ,X f ' 1 .r s., ll X fl Wjywgs f 'I 1 Q,-ill' -lltlili' J " -if .ful r, ,4 l""'l' 'Ml-if , ,,,, , '7 I All ...I 'il ,fr .. N ' l 'o If ly, r "' 1 1. ,Af ' HJ, , 1 , ,. fy. ,, . ,. i f ,, , rf! X 11:3 Z II PRR fl'0!ll U72 IIZGIIZISNIIQIII Our story, by no means, we think to end, Till We tell you with what We have had to contend. We have been slaving by night and by day, With the object in view of making this pay. 'Gainst obstacles greatest we've had to buck, We've met mith some of the Worst kind of luck. Much you have done with your plunk and a half, But we've had to raise a small golden calf. What, another one still ! " the business man cried, When to advertise here, to induce him we tried. Then We found in dismay, some eight magazines, VVhich the 'Varsity Press fills with ads. and with dreams. On account of all this, we're out, like the book, As plainly is shown by the way accounts look. One favor we ask to make next year's work light, So the management then will be spared such a fight. the Plea Give to our ads. your careful attentiong To our advertisers the most of your trade. When going to them the " Cap and Gown " mention, They've turned out the bookg they deserve to be paid 245 323942323232 be zap and Gown tor :sos has been compiled and ed- lted at the maison des Uagabonds in tbe Unt- oersitv ot Zhlcago, and bas been done into woe and bound bv messrs. marsh 8 Grant at their print-shop in Dearborn street, Gbicago, Illinois 'ZMMMM5' 246 . -- .--111-,.,g"". ' .:.3. ' mi ,1'7sg0'Qq ,. ,,,..I f .1 I. 1. 1. 1 ...af rug.. ..g'I-,1".'L.'.q2LP. N H-1 ' H :iw fr.. "f .' I 5' " ' r25.1?7:"."1 -.-Q ' , I' "Iv --. I-I. .I.:1 1.,fII1,L,. Z 1' 1:11 -' .. 1 WI, 11.j-I 1 I ...rpg ...,I.' 4 si- ,. 1: ,I, V , . . 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