University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA)

 - Class of 1972

Page 1 of 488

 

University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1972 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 488 of the 1972 volume:

1972 LA CUMBRE Ricardo Freeman, Editor Gretchen Hewlett, Managing Editor University of California, Santa Barbara, Vol. 52, Associated Students, Publisher sings F. 5 Ye e Jw- eff' Q.-A wa, Q. -xwe A E, V 5312 WS Este, ,L ff M1 A " 3 S 'JK 5 'FQ Those pines standing in rows, how like my own people: they stood just so as I came out to bud them farewell. Anonymous Ag' wr- 4 , 'v CONTENTS THEME .................. . . . POLITICAL E VEN TS ........ CULTURAL EVENTS, , , , , , CALLER Y ............. ACADEMICS ,,,,,, UNI VERSI TK ,,,,, SPORTS ............. AN ANALOG Y ........ EN VIRONMEN TS, , , SENIORS .......... IN M EM ORIAM ,,,, ...6 .26 .60 . 98 130 I 70 200 248 264 342 404 . . . And, asl think of it now, school itself was a distraction. Although I have become, among other things, a teacher, l am skeptical of education. It seems to me a most doubtful process, and I think the good of it is taken too much for granted. It is a matter that is overtheorized and overvalued and always approached with too much confidence. It is, as we skeptics are always discovering to our delight, no substitute for experience or life or virtue or devotion. As it is handed out by the schools, it is only theoretically useful, like a randomly mixed handful of seeds carried in one's pocket. When one carries them back to one's own place in the world and plants them, some will prove unfit for the climate or the ground, some are sterile, some are not seeds at all but little clods and bits of gravel. Surprisingly few of them come to anything. There is an incredible waste and clumsiness in most efforts to prepare the young. For me, as a student and as a teacher, there has always been a pressing anxiety between the classroom and the world: how can you get from one to the other except by a blind jump? School is not so pleasant or valuable an experience as it is made out to be in the theorizing and reminiscing of elders. ln a sense, it is not an experience at all, but a hiatus in experience. Wendell Berry, 1 965 A ur 1. B . . , ,, 1 ,Q x ,,5., Q - , 1 'K e -. - !o!4'.,h:u 2 v ii ' 42, 51, 5 . A N ' x V' 4 fi. .wig . .. x f J vu " gy 1, - - if ' Q I ZW in 51 'MA f?bifN 4' .11 ...-uns-f No-. :sawn ,W ,W W- ' ' ,Q-H A mm ,,vf,,-no-'fav in ' Vffmcw MW' W-'-M',1...,..-.-A--lim ' -WM ...mf , A ' 1 'L V ' N,,,,,,. , Main A 4:10051 Hqndbvvwf ' ' 'mul-W 'xg'- , 1 AW,- Vw...- I think we are well advised to keep on nodding terms with the people we used to be, whether we find them attractive company or not. Otherwise they turn up unannounced and surprise us, come hammering on the mind's door at 4 a.m. of a bad night and demand to know who deserted themfidwho betrayed them, and who is going to make ame s. Joan Didion x F 8 J And so once again My dear johnny, my dear friend And so once again you are fightin' us all And when I ask you why You raise your sticks and cry, and I fall Oh, my friend How did you come To trade the fiddle for the drum. joni Mitchell Well therefre so many sinking now you've got to keep thinking you can make it through these waves, acid, booze, and ass needles, guns, and grass, Lots of laughs, lots of laughs . . . joni Mitchell 5 2 f s N - I 've beard of a man wbo says words so beautdulbl tbat be onbf .yneaks tbeir name women give tbemselves to bim. If I am dumb beside your body wbile silence blossoms like tumors on our lips it is because I bear a man climb stairs and clear bis tbroat outside our door. Leonard Coben Real friends are those who, when y0u'1fe made ez fool of yoursei cz'on't feel that yon'1fe done n permanent job. f 15 53 QW Q f I how many warm hooks lie virgin upon the shelves unseen, waiting to he touched thy accident! introduced and then, hurriedhl returned to their places. Freeman 18 Take what you can and let the rest go by Ken Kesey xiii ',u 1 ' , s I 3 We share our lives with strangers now while lzfey it toys with us. We fill the vacant places when time ana' love permit. We offer out our fragile gifts, tenacles to friends, like hrittle dantlelions in warm ana' sullen winds. x K . n r w A Si I X iz 2 i 2 5 5 E s 22 I shall tell you the secrets of secrets .... Mirrors are the doors hy which death comes and goes. Dou't tell this to auyhody, just watch yoursem all your life iu a mirror and you will see death at work, like hees in a hive. Cocteau W.. .Q ,W- uw 'Mv- ' L. 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V' " V VV V V V ' I H,VV51gVz1V5gq119V1VgYyyQ,VgVVVV-VV V VVV,V41VVV1,VgeVVg"w2'VVfm-VVL4Vw VVVVV1, VV,V11V1V14V?M-VVQVQVV, ' Vf1V'VzVf VV Vg,'VfVgVvV1VgVVVVVeeVVV:V Vw ' V "'V'V'-V1VVVVVfVVV V: VV.VV11VVVcVffgwVVVsVV1VVVVVVVVVWVVV V- VV V VVV VVV1VVVVVVVVVVVVVV11VVVVV-VV11VVVVf VVVVVVVVVVVVVV-VV VV V- VV V V VV V f- HVVJ' 'NVUAQZE' 'jg-Q -LV' E"yV"Ri VA VV 'Y WWVVQV'Q-uLL"L?1ff4jE,-V'Wm ff7:tV'V6 zi1gyw'eyfVVVVVVV-VV'l 1'V'4'VVifVV'IV'1"lVS7 V '1'VVf"VVVt'Wi 'V 'VVLVZVZ4 4 V V mf' S V' ' ' 3 "i11LfJ'ViXVf1'5V4,V VE VV- E23VLvsv4fVV:wgg',' ' V,'5iV4wiVi,g'W'V Vw ,jgf,,5f"4fi?'VV V ' T' V7lQ1ELi'V' jj" V VV,,V VV VVVV Vx - VVVVVV: V VVV V ,H , 5 J Q I mn-y DOUIZICAI EVENTS A child born today stands a ten times greater chance of being admitted to a mental hospital than to a university and about one fifth of the mental hospital admissions are diagnosed as schizophrenic. This can be taken as an indication that we are drivin our children mad more effectively glan we are educatin them. Perhaps it is our way of educating tfem that is driving them mad. 28 Ml I have a yearning for my beautiful country, and I love its people because of their misery. But if my 'people rose, stimulated by plunder and motivated by w t they call 'patriotic sgirit' to murder, and invaded my neighbor's countriya t an upon the committing of any atrocity, I would te my people and my country. Gibran H U E, VIETNAM- Vietnamese woman waits for digging team to uncover the bod y of her husband, killed in U.S. war against Asia. A 'H gm ff: .UA 1 TOKYO, JAPAN - Riot police fire tear gas at two buildings occupied by radical students on the campus of Waseda University. .. MM , if "When he's in prison, he's not supposed to talk back, when he's out of prison, he's not supposed to talk back, especially he's black . . . . The maior obstacles to c ange are ignorance and apathy. " Mrs. Jackson Mother olfIGeorge and Jonathan Nofv. 23 CSB "We need a coalition of the Blacks, Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, youth, poor and xrogressifoe labor to speak to the minorities of t is country. The 19 2 election will be the most critical election in our history, and it may be our last. " Reverend Ral h Abernathy Rims. 9 UCS walten hlCkel. GCE. 26 1 M ,gi 4431 ws., 'F Jw N U' ,., f" 'Evil 'vs' g"""QPhu msg , 1 1 X-r FOREIGN AID .. 'QWIXSRWERWES LA-GI-IILI-RIBITSIBERVED V 554233357255 farms, - -5 - wg 1 aw S 2 2 E '." X 'fig A WS' .5 W. Q, S 5. E R v 3? .sg A Xe .gm-. QL.. .E 5155, ' Slifewzfs ew. 1- 'il A :QQ .K M. X. i ,. ik' Vin" . :-. E5 AIX ' L ii- iii' ff: iflfilf' f 'iz . s Q? "9 -fm .Q ' . .... .. . .... if N-.Q sg --y-. 4:54. v - 315'-lx by .. , . ..., W.. .,.. . -. .LSL .L M 'Xl .. SAR? I-IL-.gzf p. .mn ww.: f .5 - gig. .. 1 .-w11.S- - -' -..QQg.:..:N.-w.. ...... ..L. . ,.L.. A ..A-..--..-. x..X f mf. .- -, - .f ..,.. . 1....:-'3f'?if:i'Q - "iii f. i?-QQ? - V M Sv M73 -K Qfffwi- 1 xftlifgp.. AQ-5? k :1fi.w,f. 9. 1 S . .-1... .451--1, wrap, v . . .Q Q ii . . . . H :QW . .Y 11- 'G P' S 1, as QA rf 1 pw M A M, ,,,:-,' sf? J". i ' W .,L, f f 2 an 1 bf? kk,fk xg x ,ET N " S11 2. was lb XL ,Q ' Pkg li , AW. . f .- X fs bEww's m ik 5,f'eQ 'F Q w M 2 ww S N aa We up NVKL i , ' Hwgwsxi Q af .F Q ., Mena in Mfgpx Tm W N is ,Q 3355? if K X K .. . s y - RSA Q l 5,2 ,mE ?i Xwg Q .ii5 ' ' AL ,Q T J . ,, kj K. . W 'JA be-fig. 19 - .: is . i ' 5 , i if - ,. ' ef mf 5 . Q ,E Q ,Q wif N w , ' . ' Lm.- f " 5 , if Q 2gi?FQ ,!., is in tj Sw av-fn R , HE -f h Q f ,, . CEQ A ' is N 3' 3 425 Q S 1 , 'B' , Q Q Q Wk N g Q 2 ig '- , , ' .z -"' Q ,,., i-' 51.21 , .,' 1 im W "" ' -,-' m h ' W- Q f, .. - - '1',' 1 fi J! iii un 'ggi 'Q' sg A 3. R A E Q f . Lf . ' G:-.vs HGVEIUBGI2 7, 1972 "I am not the candidate of Black America, although I am black and proud. "I am not the candidate of the women's movement in this country, although I am a woman, and equally proud of that. "I am the candidate of the people and my presence before you now symbolizes a new era in American political history." Rep. Shirley Chisholm UCSB January 1 5, 1 972 - ik I - lr' - , 1, ' -I, w, ' , 5 K if ' lv - H ,tu if X ,vt 5 f' ,lf - M., - ',,.,q Mi' Li A W X K 's m. if-.. . 'W 3 fr' it fi 'X SE! X f Q 5 In the Mzddle of cz Screw Vote Nzxon m 72 Don 't Switch Dicks Z' X "gig-""'17 1 332' s n is R sf ,QM 555973 'wifi .. , Qs L. Q . gli, i, , ,gg g s gp X' QS Wim SS , S X X5 in E M x Q wir g 1 .1 Q '- 2-sf? 1 TM, S 2 i S 2 i R E Q qu V4 'Q W Q 2. .wma N 'V 3 433- 3 A , A f - ' g . 5 THE DISAPPEARIN G ACT Milton Mankoff Cbelowj from Sociology, Allan Krass from Physics, Richard Harris frightj from Political Science, Martin Legassick from History, and Andrew Winneck Cbelow riglhtj from Economics are leaving or have left CSB. The particulars in each vary. They include such issues as the administrationls alleged dissatisfaction with these teacher's political views, the teachers' dissatisfaction with the increasing emphasis on research rather than teaching, and the growing mediocrity of the University environment. 5- M - ii ' .hir . H, -i fx.. yr- . . N N.. if tiny 'ff sa Ronald Davis, Cleftj brother of Angela Davis, calls for action in a speech concerning Angela's present incarceration. The speech was one of many events sponsored by the BSU during Black Culture Week. "I am a political prisoner. The government intends to silence me, to prohibit me from further organizing my people, to prohibit me from exposing this corrupt, degenerate system by conlluicting me of a crime had nothing to do 'wit "In my defense, I do not want one ounce of energy drained from the defense of other political prisoners." Angela Davis ... ..,,W.,-- , - 'Q 'Xf':M"'ET'TXs -- a-f.,-.vas--.nf-..f.. . ,.. ...,, y We , ' 'E 7 il W K A' - - --. K.,.Q-...-W 531. A 38. L W ,- .J W . in lf! A -"' . , V' , .. . . ,, , , 'K.,-.rpg--i.:L17-534-.41-1-A-1wf15...g-1.5 -524 fn ,: gf,-1 uwgggfkgfgwk -S. . ..,,wM.:w:4Lf, ,fy-. we . A-4 im... .L . :ir:-'2.f:g:'-a2gifiSl'. -sw, nuff '-1 931:-f-.l"-H' K I'M FREE. I CAN VOTE. I CAN SMOKE. I CAN KILL. KEL VIN AL TA UCSB FRESHMAN, 1 972 DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau I mmap ro me gp ms IM Emp "I HH aoffvs 722 WE7WFZM Army keckunfk rom! ,5 czbqz you fm-gg aj For Mon by Fon APPLE HECME 0F My mrc- W ON! z ,vane our me nw C1 50 774,41 My exfenffncs 1: CAN 5qRY,.,, po A usr OF zoom-wie Mm-E cfm snow 3 LEAVE mi wfrfvnrf me esnsavs up STEDN6 Alva ,ww nv rw roamed . you umrvr ro V 5 DN SHTWPHV. 60 72, ,,,m,,,,.,7 ' My A azfnr mfvn Fefe OF , f NAWKALLY is K X W X ' COH VNISHXHND TYRHNNM 00 e , f 5 Q fa- 0: ja. 61 3 .ff v- if E ' ' V N 'Kei N' ' Z N- - 'Z N' ' 42, : aff " ' f Z? -' ij 5 " , f ' ns ' 9 - O .. O Q 1 "The right to vote, or equal rights may be good demands, but true emancipation egins neither at the polls nor in the courts. It egins in woman's soul. History tells us that every oppressed class gained true liberation from its masters through its own efforts. It is necessary that woman learn that lesson, that she realize that her freedom will reach as far as her power to achieve her freedom reaches. " Emma Goldman 1 91 1 4 f , if , 4' O , gf , ,- ,. Y. n 11 . .W ' A V M' af " 7 Q MH ,, H ff M, A f 4' Mfg, . ' vw 9.3m q if if ' www Wa - m-ew-M fi , r W an + mb nwmvwv . Amis? 1 53 X ef -S wg 9- sv-fat-.Emmys .,.. Q VV XA.kV . . K iff z , .. l eiwglde gf . .f-. ., ,.,- 1 xi h'k.'- ig? - 2'1" X ,f -L' :Sf 2 1 E? ' its Q , 2 55.222324 ' . , F'i'9'Lv' '2E.L'.,,.- -,cw , V , , as nw- f, az' , i5i1,5sZft3g,s1'iL f ' l ..... s i i .9 4 N Y me U, Q 1 L. nfs rzf - 1.-.ww-Q ia .X A. . A ,gzgsfw-, -weave., c f f, -wi. - X- .sea ,pt-.iitsgws if . 1, . Q. . .. 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' gg- .. i hwymmumlm awe- vas, I-U-ISN! nnmucss , -V fi 1 :?.T5.2Jf.i1fg K -- ' R . - The Power of Sisterhood Unites Isla Vista's Women's Center Set up last year by local women, the lsla Vista Women's Center serves an increasing number of women both on and off campus. The center's activities include self discovery groups, auto mechanics classes, carpentry classes, abortion counseling, a health collective, an inter- national Women's day program, films, and a women's political group. The center is run collectively and every member is urged to help in directing and organizing it. Many women active in the center's government, such as co-ordinator Jan Butz fright abovel hold office hours during the day to explain the center's services and just to rap with anyone who comes in. 4 v M, f mf' 333, AI iz, was , W V M -. ,M , f s a, 'x .X Q 3 if 1 , 9 W4 wig5S2.Ws1' msg-QRQCT 'K .wif . li sail 3 ,fx Hi .- 1- S Q Q ,. 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X ,sm 5 5 X W , A I Q,, if t fig: 22 Wild child Full of grace Savior of the Human Race Natural child Terrible child Not your mother or your Father's child You're our child Screamin' wild With hunger at her heels And freedom in her eyes She dances on her knees Pirate Prince at her side Staring lnto The hollow idol's eyes Wild child Full of grace Savior of the human race Your cool face Your cool face Your cool face jim Morrison 1 Q, Q Q ff Y 'if ,QR ,W Yi, v 1,6 ,L Ya ff- :gpm Y -,535 'Q 3 fa Z ,,,. 1, ' F AQ V7 ie , 2 T' K? ,134 LV if Q Q33 ., si' 5 W4 . , . , I ,A ,,, 54,,x.a- ,, . fm ,L 5, 1 X , 2 , .,v, ,, W4 CUIITURAI ANC SDCIAI GVGHIS Stretching about me was the beloved floor, the classic empty floor. It waited for the blow, the caress, answering the striking as a musical instrument answers the players. I put miy hot and readied foot on the wood and I fe t the power up my leg and in my ready back. I felt with my toes and my strong instep and my heel supported my spine and my lifted head ----- and from the heel I pushed. The floor pushed back and the instep held like a wing suspended in the air and my arms were released: my throat and my back ached with the good pain of sunzporting and my body was strong enough a held. Agnes De Mille M211 If you practice an art, be proud of it and make it proud of you . . . . It may break your heart, but will fill your heart before it breaks: it will make you a person in your own right. Maxwell Anderson Do not the most movin? moments of our li-ves find us a l withoutwords? Marcel M arceau The most awzul thing for a painter is thew ite canvas. Pablo Picasso Dance was once the wacy people communicated with od and godliness in people. Since when did dance become a pasted-face exhibitionism of dancers on the spotlighted stage? Can you not communicate if it is totally dark? Yoko Ono Lennon is J -dig .wr Maur . sl-if lv . I f "w3'1!Y-A . -l- ,, ,,, QL Amen. grgiiq-yy it ,-nur., , .'. .1 M: ,V as .N 'K--as .l 2.40 ,Lg 4 .W f , .5 , Rav CUIIIUI2 The act of creation is the closest rgaoz should get to behaving like AndreLe Guerre They never comprehended. They endured. hat is the history of Modern Art. Braque Dance is the only art of which we ourselves are the stuff of which it is made. Ted Shawn Art is an absence of complexity, a -vacuum through which you are led to a state of complete relaxation of mind. A iter that you ma y return to the complexity of life again, it may not be the same, or you may never return. Yoko Ono Lennon A picture is a poem without words. Horace if Q Miz 1 ng an ' . I 4 -5 ,X . t , Q A,:, - , , 4, 'X h, n X, , uf jf -W 'V A if 'Rf f Y " X J' V 5 . " ' k , A GN. .J 5 1' 1 x, V, I 'N S Q N V is , , ' I W 7' I , . f 5' bmw- mgH'Bnothe GCI. I0 eco festival ofjapan ITIUSIC, CANCG AHC DAUIIOITIIITIG CCI. 16 1 r if Q, 9 ., MJ 'WW -A""""'w e.t.c:Q, m xp la mgxma MW 4 I f! -. 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X - xv A I sf-5 w f 1 Z WW V,-ft-4-, 5, I if W 2 X 5 n x wi " ,fqa Q, I A ,P it , Y K , s Ja-L K-M JANET BAKGR Jan. 8 3' fm V 2 X xx x - xx 'Q I' "mn A ITISUSIAV I20SU20DOVlCh Jan. 24 mABOU ITIIHGS Jam. 12 52' . H., ' we 4 4 'N W , k'JftI 2? its ,v,,. M 1 ., 12 M mi 25 K 5 x,SQ'?.0 . , i '?i4'-53 ' - - AL-- - f H wg, " -f: r E-.Z .. ..,.A ,E .Ig - -- - , . , . ix . - I 1 ' 1 ' M fig rf -. ' .-Lu fi., ,k-V fri -'sw Y zu . -R, ,-fs - 'Sf fig. j , Y : '-" is is ' Q K, . V ,Yi . - A QS 1 L5 . S kyl' JN- A L A K A Y L- i 32 sa ,.' ' w ,1,,,.-f E W . " ? 'Q iwi Arm Eggga sg. I DRA leon 6 DANCE Q Qmpan JAH. 1 China Week For this new year, the year of the Rat, the Chinese Students' Association put together an impressive panorama of Chinese culture. Starting with China Night, China Week encompassed a wide variety of subjects in Chinese culture, ranging from classical Chinese music and dances to Tai Chuan, the Chinese system of meditation in movement, exercise and self-defense. lt culminated with the Chinese banquet on Jan. 30 supervised by George Liu, the instructor for Chinese cookery at the Adult Education Center. China Night also was the first time that a Chinese music and dance concert was held at UCSB. A well-renowned virtuoso of the pi'pa and chin, Tsun Yuen Lui, and a cast of professional musicians and dancers presented a varied program of Chinese instrumental music and dances. This program was followed by one of the top examples of Asian cinema, "Beautiful Duckling," which received top honors at the 1965 Asian Film Festival. SCHEDULE Jan. 22 - China Night Jan. 24 - Beginning of lecture series. Phillip C. Huang, assistant professor of history at UCLA talked on "The Chinese University in Revolution." Alexander C. Soper, professor of Asian Art at New York University, spoke on "Profundities and Paradoxes in Buddhist Art." jan. 26 - Chauncey S. Goodrich, associate professor of Claissical Chinese lectured on "Modern China and its Cultural Past." Jan, 27 - Demonstration of Tai Chi Chuan, the Chinese system of meditation in movement, exercise and self-defense given by CSA member Felice Sigman. Jan. Z8 - Film series presented by the Asian-American Alliance dealing with the Asian experience. Jan. 30 - Chinese Banquet. Chinese Association officers, Sharon Jang, David Wong, and Susan Tai, Ctopj work out the final details on their week-long plans for China Week. Dr. Goodrich ggghtj illustrates point in his lecture on ina. Mi? KHZNA iii! 2 Student Ctop leftj purchases tickets for one of the many events sponsored during the week as exemplified by the students attending' the film festival fleftj. Yvonne Chiang C top right! poses after being named First Princess in the Miss Chinatown, USA contest. She will now attend Double Ten ceremonies in Taiwan. The CSA members pose after a hectic week Cabovej. Betty Jones SL fmtz luom Jan. 28 DAUl sanasanoo GAUGE C0 IIGB. 19 We ought to play God, and it is more rnoral by far to exert control over our human condition than to leave it all up to chance and sexual roulette. Joseph Fletcher Energies coming to the earth from various parts of the universe are enough to create unimaginable wealth. The future of man is using technology to do more with less in order not to kill but to create a sound life for everyone. R. Buckminster Fuller the llutull of m n s me E S What is needed now is a con- f certed effort by all elements of our society - private and i Q governmental i alike - to assure S that the arts can K make the con- tribution of which they are capable to the uality of life for all 5 Americans. i Nancy Hanks Our culture has produced the science and technology it needs to save itself. It has the wealth needed for effective action. It has, to a considerable extent, a concern for its own future. B.F. Skinner aw N A gif? ,. ,A ,f E wma af? 'H' ' , xl 5 W, H I xii lm ' Q W , gn ' ff f "W , M ' LA A v 'V my "'. 5 if A 1, g M N f 73' Q I 7 ' 'CTA 5, fr- Q ? Q , 4 T , warg: m y A 1: 7? ' M29 ff f ,ff Q V7 3 . 1 x ew If Q ,QQ Q nf 1 x Z 1 qi! QA . W 2 A , Va ff, ,, Q1 wi if v M 1 ,Av X 5 A. , d V ,V ,Mi ww V dxf? ,A Wa if f-ffkfif , , My QQ 5 V f Wy, g , ,gf A 3 W -H ,',,, 7 f ,W f K f 48, .40 as ,. , 42 ww ,, n Aw. ., A A J ' W ww' ,Q ln f - if W f aff. . Z2 1 6' X .,,L M N :KK , 4, - af ' T if f ' 9' ,ga 'ff .2 L A ,Q L -it 1? 1 Q Q ' 'f A 5 l x X' f 1-.f -:gag ' 1 if N 5 13 my fk W ' k 55.5, Ugw.a1f" ' I jg ffk . x pry 3 w V :-v -XZ ii HM ' ' 6 ,K , 'fseyg Vyw. Q 5 'V A if X .5-fl ? We 46:5 w P E ,EQ is Z . t B wiv , ! 4 gi V? X if fag : wi m A ml 1 3? figf 4 .W-lt? lf - b ' '35 1 :ff-. fi , i Q fm- f 7 ,ig A 9 S-1 3 XG. -::.., ,, I' --n,- ,v 4 iw W-'f :jf L f S ig A v . .. ,,,., 5 : ,Q H w 6 was N. rv, 'K 7: ig , 'NJ f - ,"k T ,555 ', Nm 4' my ,I A V i..a-5 f u ' ' ,f 'W' 5 J fx. Q X Q " E hw rf Jllllah BRGAITI malzch 16 'X W 1 4 X Q , s.,'.N 6 Ouke GHIDQIGH liens. 27 X 45- 2 1 d lows falco Oance company Apml 19 Q-X.: jk Q QR Six, bex, 1 "5 Hi i qu ai? if .52 ' f 2 'S V 5 49 '3 gi S ig 5 55 ' F? f, k Aa if .ax ,L F. gg . L, 5-Q- si ,A 54 . 3, J i V ' L. yl wig gg? 5 X 5 K Qgijfi xi 5 3 uwq -1 , . ,f ,ug 'af C3All6l2y The 1972 LA CUMBRE asked different artists, essayists and poets for their impressions and reactions to their experience at UCSB. Many replied with illustrations of what theTy had done or seen while attending UCSB. he following pages reflect a diverse picture of who we are, why we think we are the way we are, and how we see ourselves. Lorelle Browning Lorelle Browning graduated in March of this year with a major in English, and an emphasis upon Drama and Theatre. She has been active in Pill ZPG and chairman of the Student Advisory Board for the Student Health Service. This year she was a co-administrator of the Isla Vista Medical Clinic, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Isla Vista Community Service Center and a reader for Dr. Bearman's psychology class on 'Human living and working in Isla Vista, I am Lili' I leaving with mixed emotions. My com- munity and campus work has simultaneously frustrated and satisfied me. As my personal phil-I sophy has evolved, I have come to believe that if Isla Vista and UCSB ruled the world, we would be in a continual state of war and anarchy. This has been evident in the weekly meetings of the IVCC, the Regent's Program Committee, the Associated Students' Leg Council, the IVCSC Board of Di- rectors, and all the other organizations which rely upon mutual cooperation. This past year however, the progress of these various groups has been sub- stantial, relatively speaking. There are a number of Isla Vistans and University staff members who have demonstrated their faith in the Isla Vista com- munity through rational, cooperative decisions, coupled with human compassion. I believe the sin- cerity of these people indicates further progress in Isla Vista. On the other hand, most UCSB students have become actively apathetic this year, since the fright- ening memories of the riots have faded. The ex- treme lack of volunteers on A.S. and Chancellor's committees has led me to believe that either we are content with our present situation fi.e., the con- tinuing war in Southeast Asia, unemployment, a "bankrupt" University system, and unresponsive administrators and politiciansl or that our present self-interest is more important than improving the Sexuality. " fter four years of attending UCSB and . J environment within which we exist. I honestly have no answer to the problems we all face. My personal philosophy is that each indi- vidual must work for those goals in which he be- lieves, with a combined objectivity and compassion for others. My education in the last four years has stemmed from my interaction with people, not from University classrooms. The intellectual and spiritual potential of UCSB and Isla Vista is infi- finite, but the complex structure of the University faculty and administrators not only creates an im- personal atmosphere, but also does not stimulate the free exchange of ideas and knowledge. How- ever, I feel I have emerged from this University maze with one important knowledge: I have found that learning is a communal, as well as a personal and classroom, activity. For thisl am forever grate- ful to William Shakespeare and Murph Swanderg they are an credible combination. Vernon I. Cheadle Chancellor and Professor ofBotany at UCSB since 1962, Professor of Botany and chairman of the department, Acting Vice Chancellon UC Davis,- member, California Academy of Arts and Sciences, former president, Botanical Society of America. n our ever-changing society, the Univer- sity IS something of a paradox -- it must attend to the need for advancing new knowldege, at the same time taking care that the truths of the past are preserved and transmitted to future generations. It is within the University that the basic critical needs of thinking men have been met throughout our history, and it is here that many of the social movements to improve the human condition are conceived and brought forward. Thus, the Uni- versity must be an instrument of change, but one whose roots are imbedded in traditiong a place where civilized society is conserved, yet advanced. In the process of fulfilling these missions, the University often becomes a battleground where the forces of truth are pitted against those of ignor- GOWARO mARIlnl ance, repression of ideas, irresponsibility and in- humanity. Painful as these encounters may be, they must be continually waged and won, for therein lies our hope for posterity. The exchange of confidence and mutual trust between students, faculty and administrators is essential to the nature of a free, intellectual com- munity and an invaluable tool in meeting our obli- gations to society. With these human resources combined, the University can release man from his fears of the unknown and devote itself to creating a climate in which he can flourish. Donn Bernstein A 'veteran of eight years as UCSB? sports infor- mation directon Donn Bernstein, 36, is a crew- cutted anachronism who digs people, places, and things with the exception of campus parking au- thorities who dri-ve little carts. lthough I am disturbed to see classrooms , swelled to over-flowing proportions, distressed to see the parking lots crammed inch-to-inch with vehicles and frustrated over the congestive crossroads that have spoiled the simpli- city of our once quiet and leisurely campus by the sea. . . I still love the place. Why, I don't know, for as a traditional establish- mentarian, I miss the echoes of the brass band playing its Friday noon concerts, miss Homecoming and sports rallies, miss the carnivals, water fights and push-carts, miss the likes of Bill Cosby, Mort Sahl, and Peter, Paul and Mary doing their thing in Robertson Gymnasium before capacity crowds, miss the spirit of the last hurrahs in the football stadium, miss the Friday T-Gls and quite simply, I just miss all those little things that were fun and frolic and perhaps even stupid, but were still a part of what the campus spirit was all about. I still, however, love the place. Love offering a "good morning" or "good day" to the many passers- by. Love arguing against athletic adversaries and love convincing my colleagues that Isla Vista isn't really all that bad. I love the seashores and lagoon and the sprawling lawns where kids retreat to read, nibble on a sandwich, and discuss the issues of the day. I love the pulsebeat of the campus. It has been a campus of change. Our political complexion has changed drastically and campus controversies which made school paper headlines five years ago, rate no more than a sentence - if that - today. Social awareness, ecology, the economy, the war and academic freedoms have dominated the scene, leaving that fun in the sun somewhere far behind. These changes, for the most part, have been healthy, envigorating and productive. Indeed, l miss the old days and traditions, but recognize- at times with agonizing difficulty- the signs of today's campus world. lt's an alive place. The spirit is there, it's just that it's been channeled into new horizons. I like to see a smiling campus, not an angry one. Issues are important .... but so is Fun! Mr. and Mrs. Cuellar f wtf: Cuellar's Pastries in Isla Vista at 6565 A Trigo Road opened for business September 24, 1966. Elf y husband, Joseph Cuellar'Sr., and I have Ijxyaf immensely enjoyed working the .past 5 -if-X f. U2 years in Isla Vista. During this time our iiii E hildren, whose names are Joseph Jr., John, Bob, Nancy and Sylvia, have worked for us. We feel that we couldn't have been more fortunate to have 5 out of our 7 children working for us. They are all fine bakers. Even though we have worked very long hours, we have enjoyed baking for the students. They have enjoyed our pastries and have been very courteous and honest with us. We specialize in Danish and also get large orders for birthday cakes, donuts, cookies, cinnamon sticks and our 'famous' brownies. Among the favorites in the cookie section are Fruit bars, Chocolate Chip, Coconut macaroons, Mexican Wedding, etc. .Vx N gfi DANC DOUGCI4 The students have traveled to Europe with our pastries and have distributed them amongst their friends because we have received post cards and letters stating that no one has pastries like ours. They sent cards from Switzerland, London, Spain, Mexico, Germany - wherever they go we get them. We are so proud and happy that they respect us. Our friend George, a pilot with Air West, has traveled throughout the world with our pastries and sent us letters from Tahiti, Australia, Japan, Canada, etc. to inform us how his acquaintances enjoyed our pastires. We sincerely appreciate your business and will always be ready to serve you. Sheldon Tarre YQ. t's kind .of ironic that in the overall picture, the University appears to be a monolith, .Si in its powers over the student, when in fact it is the student that comprises the University and without the student the University would not exist. When the university recognizes this paradox the student as a whole will become less restricted and confined in his education. The system of education that the University employs is definitely limiting. Students should be aware of knowledge on all levels, not just listening and reading. Education here must involve a more total process, stimulating all senses of the student. Being a Freshman and enrolled in classes involving more than 100 people, it is apparent that the Univ- ersity only provides the guidelines for a certain course. This type of learning can be accomplished on one's own initiative. Teacher student lines rarely cross in this type of setup. It seems as though the T.A.'s shelter the professors so that they might get on with their own research. As a freshman, new to the realm of the Univer- sity atmosphere, it seems as if the student is being smothered. Mainly this is due to the fact that I have yet to learn the channels to lodge complaints against the system. Butl have yet to be convinced that the University exists solely for the welfare of the student. The University appears nebulusg diversified to the extent that it can confuse the student. The University must tend to be more flexible to the aims of the student and not be con- cerned with maintaining its status quo. Tim Owens l!uq,l Timothy Owens, former General Manager of KCSB-FM is now the station's Community Af- fairs Director. lick-on. A gff 1 .l Ahem! Mayl have your terminable aware- 55325 ness for one moment. Today marks Death to History. "Sound-off, one, two." "Three, four," in unison "one, two." "Three four," Together. She whispered gently and sadly to his unlistening ear. His stare roamed over the desert sand, to the horizon. Embers of the setting Sol were fading. Below the Horizon, the last soldier wandered in, never to bid strange acquaintance again with a re-birthing land. There is but one guide-post, wrong or right. "Sign here, please," the Wax Museum care- taker uttered in a monotone. The man authored his signature. "Are you most certain that the amount is correct, that the arrange- ments are set," puzzled. "All is in order, sir." "Thank you," whispering relief in soliloquy, "At Last." "You said. . . ? "lt's right," smiling freely. "Right?" awed by his uncouthness. "Yes, everything's all right, taken care of." Now playing, caretaker, "Ahhhh. Right, Right." A twitching smile of satisfaction crosses his face, "Enter Here." Click! "Ladies and Gentlemen, you will kindly bear Y! Jenemy qnaves IOITI IENCIHQ stephanie lam witness to this - the malignified mind. Notice the finest of features." Aside to one young faceless woman, "of Tailored taste." "Upon my command, this apparatus will sti- mulate the flexing of tissue to the workability of bolting the immobile screw. Together with thou- sands more, they manufacture-You! Applause. Silence. "Control, control, control! What is there after the mind, Herr Hitler?" He who has not sold-out. "My life is shaken to its roots, sleep has left, the deadliest terror sits by me at all hours of the day and night." -Robert Louis Stevenson "There's nothing left to struggle for, and there are too many distractions and entertainments. Do you realize that everyday something like five hun- dred hours of radio and TV pour out over the various channels? No wonder that people are be- coming passive sponges-absorbing but never creating. Soon people won't be living their own lives any more." -Arthur C. Clarke "Control, Control, Con ........ " Silence. Applause. ln his stare he peered at nothing. "Control, Contro .... "' Her whisper faded. "Con ..... " "Sleep has left." "Herr Hitler!" "I can't breath, deadly, terr. . . " Hsigy! Applause, silence. Click! "Survival is the ultimate goal. The point being, Mr. Orwell, is being. ..Given the stimuli of the media message, and given the receiver, man can adjust his fine tuning for total acceptance of thought, word, and deed. Finite, George, finite. Or, man can use it wisely as a tool for nearing total consciousness." Click. Musac. Reg Spittle 'Nm' , higher learning a place where students Q- .fi expand their horizons into the realms of discipline and intellectualism. To reach this peak, it requires listening attentively to lectures, cram- ming books into your mind and getting rid of emotion that might make you identifiable with ordinary people. The University carries on the American capital- listic tradition of instilling the sense of competition in all its subjects in order that the country reach new highs in technological advancement. But what is all this worth in a world filled with hate, fear, and hunger? In my view, the University is an extremely valu- able part of our world, but not these ways. It is a place where we can learn to understand people, not only the type we identify with or like, but also people we might otherwise condemn. We study different cultures, political systems and individuals and through this we gain an under- standing of the world in its present state. This is the basis for revision - we cannot bring about ef- fective change without understanding what we want to change. But perhaps the most valuable part of life in the University is the constant contact with people and the opportunity for involvement in a variety of ex- periences. This is the University - a place where books and classes play a secondary role to people meeting and enjoying each other. 91. fi deally the University is an institution of if LF" ' Judith McClellan f one chooses to become a politically active gif-limi' student, who intends to bring about con- 45-l5i structive change in the University, he must realize that his life will be one of constant struggle. The primary reason for this is that the University was structured to repress anyone who has a progressive way of implementing change in the educational system. Therefore, a politically ITIIKG GOROGI1 active student must be aware of some of the main obstacles that are set up to deter any type of move- ITICIII. As one can see from the events that have taken place over the last few years, this University in- tends to remain a conservative structure. For example, many students who were politically active tried to use student government as a means of implementing programs that would bring about change. However, due to the conservative atti- tudes of Leg Council members and student apathy, this was not permissible. Although this past year's Leg Council represent- ed a large range of interests, they failed to work together and bring about constructive input. The conservative members spent most of their time working to overthrow the radical elements and their programs. The minorities on Leg Council had some political consciousness of how they fit into the system but no political sophistication, there- fore, they spent their time accommodating so they could gain more funds for their programs. On the other hand, the May Coalition members realized there were no hopes for Leg Council becoming a progressive government such as Berkeley so they lost interest and removed themselves into other areas of interest. Other radicals, rather than lose interest, resorted to the alternatives they felt avail- able to them. Even though we must acknowledge those radical elements that tried to work for social change, the problems and their solutions lie with the student body as a whole. Their conservatism, as well as their apathy, have been the main contributing forces that have hindered the movement for progress. It is not only the students that pose a problem in the movement, but the administrative structure of the University of California as a whole is the pri- mary obstacle. Not only is it essential that a politi- cally active student recognize that the Regents are the main controlling factors of the University, but also realize that, functionally, the Chancellor, who is the chief administrator on each campus, is ap- pointed by the Regents to administer the organi- zation and the operation of the campus. In addition, his views must reflect the interests and the ide- ology of the Regents. According to President Hitch "the university is a place of lofty goals and high aspirations, a place where students and teachers join in a search for the truths, judgments and values that shape our life." But in reality, when politically active students organize collectively to reflect their true values and judgments, the Chan- cellor moves in to either pacify them or eliminate them because what they want to do does nor re- flect the interest of the Regents. The question then becomes, what do you do when the odds are against you from the start? Do you conform? Do you violently revolt? Do you allow yourself to be co-opted into passivity? These are questions that all politically active stu- dents and potential politically active students must always be aware of. Let your conscience be your guide. Dave Bearman I'm a person who is starting to mellow out and allow it to be. Over the past two years I've been involved with the Isla Vista community and with the .University as a lecturer in psychology in courses on human sexuality and another on drugs and so- ciety, faculty advisor to the UCSB Red Cross,- representative-at-large on the Isla Vista Com- munity Councilg doctor at the Isla, Vista Open Door Medical Clinic, writer of a medical column in the Nexus, and speaker on a variety of medical problems on a weekly KCSB radio show. W, , -4 seeds of change We are a part of an era -r 'A 1 4 which is making societal and institutional changes in line with all the real changes which have taken place in the last hundred years. It is our gen- eration which is in the midst of rectifying the dis- parities of cultural lag of what was with what is. We are at the dawn of a new era. An era which holds great promise, but this promise will not be achieved without a struggle. Each of us is a seed for a new form of human existence. Each of us has an obligation to ourselves to make the ground as fertile as possible so that the seed may grow in lush creations. These seeds can burst into a new dimension of human existence. An existence where the priorities are people not machines, where the rape of the earth is abhored, in which all people are free -- free from oppression, free from want, free from exploi- tation, free from prejudice. It is within our grasp to turn the world around, to realize the principal of universal peace and brotherhood in an ecologi- cally sound world. This calls for a non-movement movement. A movement made up, not of leaders ff, rg, ime is dictating change and we are the fu' . . . ' . . . . OAVIC ROWS and followers, but one in which all of us are seed people. Dave Rudhyar once said, "We therefore need men of great vision, men who are not specialists fgeneralists as they are sometimes called todayl, men who have the vision and the courage to wait, and to, in some way through their lives, through their example and through whatever they leave after their deaths, to become seeds of the future world. That's of course the great choice we have all to make and we all can make it." As seed people we should create a world in which we have learned from the mistakes of the past. A warm, embracing world in which people are allowed the right to do their own thing. A world community in which the terrible calamity of Vietnam, Chicago, Kent State, and Isla Vista can never be repeated. Steve Stills said it this way: "But you know if we can't do it with a smile on your face, lf we can't do it with love in our hearts Then children we ain't got no right to do it at all, yeah, Cause it just means we ain't learned nothing yet. Cynthia Tollette ,A -., ,...i 1, ith Graduation rapidly approaching four A years of experience at UCSB are drawing to an end. Being a Black student on this campus my experience has been a unique one. Coming from Los Angeles and attending predomi- nately Black schools all my life, UCSB in 1968, with a Student Body of nearly 14,000 and only 40 Blacks on this campus was quite a change for me as one of 45 blacks that entered this University Fall 1968. A positive characteristic that developed from being tossed in a "sea of whiteness" was a sense of identity with other Black people and a sense of unity among us. There was always time for your brother or sister. We would always be glad to see another Black person. Reflecting back on some of the experiences over N 537' . , V, fi 3 J QQVQQVGU the past four years. . .there were 30 Black EOP Freshmen lmyself includedl that came to UCSB during the summer 1968. That summer was really a beautiful experience. lt was love at first sight! The campus was on the beach, modern, the weather pleasant, and the people friendly. We lived to- gether, worked together, socialized together, and went through some changes together . . . ln winter 1969, the Malcom X Hall take-over occurred, which was an act of dramatization protesting the overt racism practiced by some of the members of the Athletic Department. This act encompassed a great majority of the Black population on this campus. During this time there was a high level of political consciousness on this campus. This event was followed by the firing of Bill Allen . . . Angela Davis's appearance at UCSB .... The burning of the Bank of America . . . and an esca- lation of political activity. UCSB has served as a training ground for my development politically and enabled me to actively involve myself in community activities. My ex- periences here have been instrumental in my ob- taining the viable skills necessary for me to become a productive member upon my return to the com- munity. This campus has provided not only an academic education but also an education in life and inter-personal relationships. The casual, easy going atmosphere on this campus has been a source of compensation for some of its shortcomings in other areas. All in all considering the relationships l've made with different individuals, the good and not-so-good experiences that l've learned from, and the knowledge that l've obtained in my four years here, l consider my college career to have been a valuable, beneficial experience. Paul Orfalea Paul Orfalea has owned and operated Kinko's since September of1970. He has stated that he finds the majority ofpeople that he deals with better people then he meets in the 'outside'world. Y .1 7,4115 ff1Il',',11,"47'."n1-14I'JIf 4,rif '3,j.,f A , .' J 4. nv J ', 'r Q s ".H'-Fff' IV 1' 3,1 Q la lxrlifflartf ,f 3131, 4.42513-tJ,,,f,g'?.r3 E9 ,ff 1 ff a. ,,, + p r,r,, .Q gf 5 Ji ,i16f,Cf3"ff" ff 4gff!:'51'1fxg'f+.,ffff1.f,4f1f ' Hiff.!1.'f,'1,f 14Jwf,wgi-gg.v,,-?f,f:,3q,,g?s 545 'if 4' ' ' Ii Adi., ,gqgf f',1,fJi:.QQ41Q,!4a7 l l Q 1 ' Q' "ffl: C Q 4, 4 2' fivfff 081,346 g,'9, if E1fl!0 lJ',lIaY1"4,'fgT-"1 gf:1',4,.'f ,ff 4 , . ,' ,Lu-3' Lp.. ' 1 5. , ff, , Kff 1. 1, f.f+f X f,arl,,. t ,Hgfff Q if +'.'f4jf.491 Q f qv'i:f,,'?',1f+f,-'.f,I7w,,w',f+f .Wig 4f,f.ff 1 1' .MEF .df 4,3 - Q,.w 1. mfg, af'-fx" rl. "J, .. ff, ,.fff+f"-", K' -'ft' 'gin 3-.rv J fp, "4 '4 .nkifff V'f'Q"':i'f'.f+'?'5'w-,1"Lfp'- 1.-.4 'fy' 'ff JM'-'Q ',01'!,9' 1' 'lfgzly-Ld. '3..,'." 4-?'wa" 5733 t- ' XV,f f f 0 . , .Ma nf'-,'f,' 'uf X 'lffffg ' ff15.','f1Z 'Qt 2'f'.fr'7g,,:',-'f,.3j1g. 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'Fx is l K8 g'bw"A '4f1.:1 ' "'l"7 fi F02 3. +-fl-I 7lL ff f .1 'i.f J- A. 4XX 5 x P. 'lQvlV.ik'4'fT.xUi1Vr 12" '-5' O Rllah 113 KEVIN mUl2Dhy , . f Qg'.49:",, hmm w "95'6cf-, Jug 1, ,, A g I fry' 3A'1 : sffffgg Sn, 4 '.' 751' 'U 'wv.i:uiii a 354 ff, ,,lt., .W v flkihiljx 4' i 1 445' .W w 'h if r .34 '. VAX! it G :fidg- V411 ' 1 , X QM, "H f' f."'hz1 Q. in ., ANDREW mlll " T sla Vista is a grat place to grow up in. As .si Q it S I Q? IJ 'ae ' i- I jffl a transition for the student between the .es parental home and the "real world" it is perfect, because it has elements of independence in a sheltered environment. Young people can experi- ment with social roles, government, and self-sub- sistence among people their own age who are critical, but understanding. IV is also hypocritical in some ways. People talk about tolerance, but are suspicious of short- haired outsiders. They talk about "getting it to- gether" but are often too stoned to communicate deeply on a subject, and have the volume on their stereos too high to be heard anyway. This is probably a function of the insecurity felt by young people who are unsure of their place in the scheme of things. I think that with places like IV as a training ground, people will be better able to handle the "real world" when they find them- selves in it. Margaret Becker Margaret Becker states that this is a personal view of the library. She has -worked at the UCSB library since September 1 960. f he Library has come a long way from the fgeuggi, informal shelf of cookbooks and carpentry manuals belonging to the Anna S.C. Blake Manual Training School in 1891 to a collection of over 860,000 volumes in 1972. Cookbooks and carpentry manuals are still included in the collection, but the growth of the library has been academic categories, an obvious necessity for a modern academic institution. The student who frequents the library has chang- ed as well, especially within the past three years. The most obvious change is the informal mode of dress and the more relaxed manner of conduct. Unusual clothing and hair styles are the status quo rather than the exception. There are also many more students here than in the past, and many now bring their canine friends to the library to assist them with library transactions. Bicycles clog the entrances and bike bags, knapsacks, and back packs rather than just purses must now be checked at the turnstiles when patrons leave the building. The acrid smell of grass is sometimes noticed in the lobby, but fewer people seem to be using the smoking room. However, there have been more subtle changes in the student, changes that reflect the evolution of society as a whole. Student awareness of social and ecological problems has brought demands for courses on these matters and thus the library has made necessary additions to the collection. The Oil Spill Information Center, the Map Room, and the Black and Chicano Studies collections have been set up to accommodate the student by pro- viding the necessary resource materials for their classes and for their personal interests. Whether or not the student is reading more than his counter- part in the past is difficult to evaluate. Perhaps the average student today is less concerned with strict academics and more concerned with political, social, and environmental turmoil. With so much being written on these subjects, the library has tried to keep up with the fast pace of a changing world and the changing student. Barbara Voorhies Dr. Barbara Voorhies holds the distinction of being an assistant professor who is also a woman. She received her Ph.D. from Yale in 1 969. y impressions. of UCSB after more than a Ijxjyf year of participation in campus life consist MV-.ca of some observations which combine to make me aware of how different this campus is compared with other campuses with which I have been associated. The primary difference is that UCSB as an institution lacks the zest of a place dedicated to the principle of free exchange of ideas. One indication of this is that students often give the impression of being blasi: and not able to feel or at least express excitement over the discovery r F - K -f S ,pf- of new ideas. Clearly many students expect to be entertained while at the university and design their four years of schooling with that primary goal in mind. Students are often admired by their peers for their ability to maintain a "Gentleman's C" average rather than to pursue intellectual interests in a full or meaningful manner. These student at- titudes contribute to the sporific ambience of this campus, but of course, are not its total cause. The faculty also contributes to this circumstance, pri- marily by a collective failure to communicate to the students certain expectations of standards of performance and encouragement toward inde- pendent thinking. Also the onus to maintain an active discourse on all possible topics within the university devolves by default largely on the faculty. But collectively we seem timid and un- certain about our obligation concerning the tenents of academic freedom. The administration is also involved in this general pattern by maintaining an unsteady policy concerning the development of the university. Therefore, in my opinion all of us who are a part of the university must reevaluate what we expect out of this involvement and how we can guarantee that our expectations will be fulfilled. What is it that makes a university a special place? Ideally of course, it is a place where ideas can be debated without fear of reprisals from segments of the society with contradicting views. ln reality this ideal is never full realized by any institution, although there are strikingly different approximations among American universities at this time. Most universities, however, are more tolerant in allowing diversity of opinion than the larger society of which they are a part. ln addition to the university's uniqueness in its tolerance of nonconformity, it traditionally offers the student little preparation for the work- a-day world of our society. What then is the justi- fication for encouraging a large proportion of the population to temporarily share in a university experience? The answer, l think, lies in the fact that the diversity of topics and frequency of ideas which can be encountered by the interested stu- dent provide a milieu for possible personal enrich- ment. The university provides a place and a way for people to consider a wide range of intellectual pursuits which thus increases the possibility that they will lead fuller lives than would be possible otherwise. In addition, these experiences during a short period of one's life often set the critical foundation for further education for the rest of a lifetime, so that personal enrichment can be a con- tinuing process which counteracts tendencies toward stagnation and dogmatism. I don't intend to argue that intellectual head tripping- to adopt a current phrase- is the only means of personal enrichment which is either de- sirable or necessary but only that other means, when exclusively pursued, will lead to the develop- ment of dull, uninteresting people who deny them- selves much of their own abilities and possible sources of personal growth. The university is a traditional seed bed for the nurturance of such growth and it is important that all of us who are members of the UCSB community seek, both indi- vidually and collectively, to realize that potential for our own campus. Louise Andrews During the 1970 Isla Vista riots, Louie gained local recognition when she cut offpart of her left ear to protest police brutality. ,tively University of California with a B+ grade QW!-'l average and a gold tassle in her cap. She was then able to go out into the world and secure a position as a veterinarian's assistant cleaning vomit and urine off the linoleum floors. For this she makes S200 a month. The End. nce upon a time a girl graduated from the Dr. Brian Fagan M Aw if -X 2 X' V V XJ fW Q W M , XX N fold!! 'QE 1,911 we K X I ,bf K ! x W U, if N X X Q Q 4 x N X 9 x xx N 9 X Z! ! X X X X X Xl X ff If xg. Xxx X! L i YV M Mm Q XP' ,Ml 'f ' f i-E X ' -- ff , 7, H ,, 'T-:u?i E I. ff X ' Q ' ,. ,A -x X S . W V i X f ' - 7-35155 .f fbi- 'T Q ' , ' V , X . iff.-. . 4 1- Q i -K X .2 if ' Q Qt, x l I X . J - D. ' 1 . ' 5'7" 1.-2-ti-'-:wp ,-'14 ' lk ' V 7 Y' Ni- 7-.P " 'N' f' ."i'5""?'fe'Zf- "" - 4 E X A iff' ' ' ff' 'f ' 'V 'K' xx x -' .lf 'f- f H f..f5F. ,,,.,- 'f , 1 " 44. 'I . .:'x,A..: ,Q X I ny -.113-N '1 v -U A:-J 5--- :ui X X539 -, ex "i g g 1 "QA -WN, , ' 1, , U ' ,..w'1. , v x., V n -4 l f.'x :.'X X xx :ffi iN' ,T Ngggf- 5 . I V -'ZXX NX rl., Y : 1 .4 ,il If---:ig X25 ', X x Af." ' '11Hj'U'f.'Z N, 'T TL"-" 'y X W 1 x W N .. - HY 11 , f I xxx :Al ,,. Img-'-,"g'!l:: '. QW' Q- 74 H 'Z L, X '2--5 I ', I ' . 'C .. N l 'Qg.'L.'., K I. . I , 'f 6, .I fi "-ijt 1-. I ., ,'-' ' !! - ' ixx 'X' If in .' ',... V4 '. ,i.. ff lj- --J. j , 1.1 if-' rj f-ff" , 1 s A T ' ' X A Ax ', ,,J"-.I-I" 'V '- ,,l v,. A , AQ h x Q I - ' s-- ii.. .Xxx-,NX-N xv y r I -.iv-.gg X f I X I!! . A I vrqlrlrr .L Q- I V ,X . . . X I, V' 1 4 ix fm X' - if A ' f - - -,A.,-xx-X. .. 4 ,,,. xx , C, , . I I -.,...Mk 5 h 4, 'I' i, ,454 X., X 'Apt ,gtk I x vu ,. , X ,Q - -A if, V - Mm A A Ak :V .Ti 4 V:-Q ' z K., . -5' - SUSAN je gg Brian Fagan came to UCSB in 1967and is current- ly Professor of Anthropology and Associate Dean of the Graduate Division. Educated at Cambridge University in England he specialized in African Iron Age archaeology and history and has been working for some time on innovative approaches to undergraduate education. 9 find themselves and give themselves the rig sort of education they would like to have. I guess I feel that a university education is what you make it. It's a pity that spoon feeding and grades are such a feature of our lives. CSB should be a place where people can Anonymous Q' about this university, I am inescapably 55.22 confronted with the burden of freedom. Certainly, it is a heavy weight to assume. It is difficult to criticize with the necessary clarity of mind and openness of thought, butl shall try. Most of us are familiar with the cliche com- plaints about this particular university and the entire university system: puppet student govern- ment, irrelevant general requirements, the imper- sonality of an established order, the reinforcement of mediocrity and the consequential stifling of creativity, etc. These inherent aspects of the uni- versity have touched each of us. Yet I believe that there are certain attitudes which lie at the base of these problems, attitudes assumed by the faculty, administration, and students alike. I believe that the prevailing attitude of teaching involves a faulty assumption. That is, the as- sumption that today's youth attends the university in an attempt to learn the basis necessary to per- petuate the current forms of social, political inter- action. The obligation of a new generation is not to perpetuate a system, but to learn the basis of responsible criticism. I am not interested in per- petuation, I am interested in change and only a few exceptional members of our faculty have be- gun to show me the tools necessary for the analysis of problems and concepts. fbi? f I must assess and articulate my feelings .Q f , N e Secondly, we are bound by our attitudes toward solutions. I came to the university in order to understand fundamental, not total, solutions. I have been fed total solutions by my peers and the faculty for three years, and no one's absolutes have ever sufficed in alleviating my personal situ- ation or the overall situation of the university. We all lack the ability to say "I was wrong." We are conditioned to succeed and we will not admit failure. Constructive change is suffocated in such an atmosphere. Thirdly, we are all victims of the immediate. We refuse to see beyond ourselves, our concern for the masses often boils down to righteousness, and the only things we seem to share in common are our trials and tribulations. Why not share purposes? One of my professors once said, "If you know what you're looking for, you needn't search." We are searching blindly, it seems, and all the more blindly because we lack the ability to criticize, we lack the tools for arriving at fundamental solu- tions and we lack the courage necessary to trans- cend the immediate. Let us not bewail our situa- tion, let us all fadministrators, faculty and stu- dents alikel admit that we have each failed in our own way and begin anew. Andy Michrina K, , 55' Center is a U S Postal Service branch of Q54 the main Post Office in Santa Barbara. It is staffed by four people, a supervisor and three clerks all of whom have at least fifteen years ex- perience in the Postal Service. All services rendered by a first class office may be obtained here with the exception of purchasing International Money Orders. You may purchase stamps, stamp books, stamped envelopes, cards, and also programs. Also send certified, registered or insured mail, and receive such mail. he post office located in the University Fiji y h - - Q , fi 6 K ,ww K W- H- Q ,. ff1?, ik X X in K -Isalgvll 'ei pi' fm , a N g ax Q? . m x'.v.w . . M Q X N X X saga QV X K, H it vw W wfy .,,. Q .wx as W IX . N ,fgfw 3?-:fb S5 -im , k X mi 5 K , UW , . ,M .MM milton . olm, Jn KEITH JONES pank We have 2288 mail boxes to serve the stu- dents of UCSB. May I take this opportunity to explain to the more recent students attending UCSB, that should you change dormatories or rooms during the school year, you will keep your same box number, but should you move off cam- pus or return to your home, please fill out a "change of address" card with us so that we may process your mail properly. We are well pleased with the conduct of the students and find that 99'Zn of the students are courteous, thoughtful, respectful and cooperative. David Rowe I- high school counselors always told us we .fi-2144. would be. My father filled me with years of nightmare gaspumping visions if I failed. As children we were allowed to imagine, now the University requires us to declare a major or prin- cipal interest. Does anybody not wonder why they are here or why they stay? The rational computerized university, each student carrying a regimentation card and thinking they have to sound intellectual. Bullshit engulfs UCSB. Coming here as human beings, the longer people stay here the more they get caught up in the game. We seldom touch each other in class. The university fails to teach us about relating to our feeling or to other human beings and leaves us isolated and alone with a headfull of memorized useless facts and ideas. We don't learn about the important now things inside of people instead of books. The guy who lived next door to me in my dorm put Thoreau's "most men lead lives of quiet desperation" poem on his door, went down to the beach, took some poison he had made in his chemistry lab and died uneducated by this institu- tion of higher learning. This is my last quarter here. I have spent the last two years of my life here escaping conscription into the murdering corps of the Amerikan govern- ment lsince being "educated" here is considered in the best interests of the Amerikan governmentl. ere we all are in the University where our ggi 5 They have been two lonely and painful years. I have been unable to find trust or love. This is due in part to my own hangups but to a greater extent on the structure of this university and the larger society of which it is a part that keeps people from being human. lives become careers Children cry out in fear "let us out of here!" Henry Silverman V37 have been asked to speak my mind on the gagliga nature of things asl have seen them dur- ,L ,Si ing my brief stay here by the shore. This should be a simple task, but asl spend more than a few moments thinking about it, it becomes more of a chore than a joy. The immediate question, is, of course, why? The answer, unfortunately, is neither so immediate nor distinct. For asl pause to recollect this most recent chunk of my life I begin to see perhaps what I knew all along- that is, that there is so much in so little time that it is almost impossible to place it in any order. This may sound like the easy way to not think about the University or its residents-some permanent, some temporary- but I truly am at a loss to ex- plain it in any other way. Of course, there has been the usual catalogue of experiences but glancing back at the time I have spent here I seem to find something else. It is my misfortune to be unable to describe it in concrete words but, at the risk of sounding trite, it is as permanent and as transient as the wind. Yet if there is a common factor in these three years, it is this. And, I suppose that it is within this framework that I must see things and more importantly, myself. It is also in this con- text that I mold my relationships with the world. From this, I have become, within this University, both involved and alienated, in any event ending up more confused-but perhaps that is what edu- cation is all about, and when the myths are dis- solved the reality is as shaky as if it ever was. But where do I go with it and what do I do? Now I ,Nur 1260 ITIYERS am beginning to ramble to the abstract, and I can only, in these few lines, afford to place things into sets of concrete realities. Yet, as these are unclear, I shall be forced to leave the perspective to another time. Dick Lane .4. have been asked to write my opinion about this campus and the University and all that. Well I just really don't know where to begin. It's really all so neat and every- body's so swell.I've got just a swell bunch of profs. They're always glad to see me and help me when I have a problem and when I talk to them I really get the feeling that they understand what it's like to be a student, and gosh, that's really important. I also think that the administration has always been so keen and ready to help me. Gosh, there's hardly been a time when I've had a problem and they couldn't bend the rules. I really think that the people who say that all that those people do is think up ways of adding new volumes to the policy manuals really don't know the individuals. Some of the ladies who work there are really so nice and sincere and that's really important in this world of plastic values and phoniness. They all really believe in what they're doing and are a great bunch. Another group thatI think has done a really out- standing job is the student government. I mean that is one of the things that has really impressed me. After all we. can expect academic excellence, fine facilities, etc. in any branch of the Univer- sity, but rarely can you find that kind of spirit and real dedication. Moreover they have had a lot of bad things said against them which I think are really unfair. I have found that it is not true at all that everybody from the top down is throwing themselves bodily in the way of providing student services. This is to speak frankly a pile of manure. Look at all the great concerts we've had like Duke Ellington. Look at some of the really worthwhile groups we've supported like the Negroes and Mexicans. Those minorities really need the help because they are at such a disadvantage but, I didn't really want to get in this subject. I should add that the criticism that AS is so well organized that it is strangling in its own bureaucracy is really phony too. A lot of people who wouldn't have otherwise had the chance to participate are now working hard on any number of committees making really important decisions. Gee, I guess I'm running out of space. I just hope that you don't get the impression that I'm one of those guys who always goes around finding faults with everything. I think that after being here for more than 10 years that I am just finding out what a neat place this is, and this would be the kind of place you'd really want the whole world to be like, on the whole. Sure there may be some bad parts but when the Nexus is gone you'll never hear about them and people will be a lot happier. Anonymous CSB is a unique experience. It has been keg-5 home away from home, a place to acquire .1 J QQ- new friends, new values, new ideas, and a more broad-minded view of life. Our university and the community of Isla Vista are isolated from the "real" world, butI believe the things that I've learned here will help me to plan and live my life a little better because of the wide variety of people and experiences with which I've become acquaint- ed. Friends are the most important part of my life at the university because they are the impetus for going on when discouragement of all kinds sets in. Classrooms, lectures, professors, books study- ing and finals are my reasons for being at UCSB, although my degree won't be the opening key of any golden door, I'll be a better educated more mature person than I was when I began. J. pnucence gif 55.2122 Nw fwm 55 sg. ii gg :J '..' -fi: 'HY' A.,:. Q v"i 4,1 s H"fQ.2A- ' '.. . ,avi - va' N -ic' 5 iki ' 33: I " 'A td' L, r D ". I...-4- .:'z,.5P 'X 'Egg +5 - ' V! ' '- -H - ,"" - 4 '..f'. Qi if nf' ' I -HM ' 34, - ' ' 'ff-..' '5'- . ' - '.." 5 v A ' ' ' ' V f'5 :F H1' Q' ... 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F 3 .v -4 x 1 ,.,,. 5 x 245, 4 ' rkfi- . A. W 14 :A 5 ,, . Mi. -.Q - 41... f 'KQA9 ' ,' . -- ' .V f iff , v f " ' . 2 gr. Q-11,53 T' ff.. 'ff . , 551: -ae ,. 3. '-aa' " 1- r .,, ' - . ' -ff-i i A - - ' . .L-. ' .gf-, MQ- 1 PJ ,""'N' -'iff -ff' gif. '--1+"- .-3,, ' . " ' V an .',,-149' , ga, gg ,--2 .v 15'5c. 175145.- M.f5,- ,gf wk -. -. 2 . :xv ,rw K- Q ,33 9 - ' sg rv H. i- . ' F! I N 1:-limi' ., "P"s:24b. CQ -., -.-, nv, H , ,1. U4 K- 'f-A Y. 'A Lf, xlgr 12:22 . 'x . . is 15' Q. Q sgsfggcr-fw'??? ggi" V-r .-19.1, . .A, .s rv.,-, ,vi , .Q .q...1.- 9155 I r '-. -'Y' .. 'LO if ,- .QS eg 'H ' 5.41. . 6. l. " .'1a.ks x- fvflg - 4 ly- 1. xxi 35 I f"?9'i:..5Q' gf, Q. , 1 on .exif , '1 vfafuf 'O 1" ' ' . 4 , V el A. , - . s-1. A 4, W ,R ' - 14' v- 5 .L 1 I. S ' 4,7 , ar.- 'P x 3 r , C f I ' 1, 'ffm - . , 4, iv Iv., ' 'af- . pb, v. my . 'T '-' x x 1' . . l 1. ls'-.. -Q,. 1f"',. iff' Si QQ-j,j:,i".,, 654 gm '32 K 2 Tf K - .2 we P. X Qi if X X , Q i XX gggrfasgx fs.fi:.1yzf ,F 5 x .J J. 1 .Q 1 ,E ? xi N , S if 2 .X ,A ,, 5 is 4 -qiifi ' 1 of -s if 5,M,?i,?r N spqggf sw ogr- . ss E-3' b L lifiiy . . x K . ACACEITIICS let him begin by teaching himself before teaching others: and let him teach by example before teaching by words. For he who teaches himself and rectifies his own ways is more deserving of respect and reverence than he who teaches others and rectifies their ways. Gibran S ,fm,:..-L:.-g,N,.. 'q,- Fi - 5' X, A 53 'Q b M X i N is www? 5. x, , R Sim. J z , 'K a lg ' , R W 'V . . X Nwwas - X .ssl ww: , W -QQ -- 4 Y RN Q K wx K " . Hi v ali, u i! Q51 4 ' X Q UR ' ' X . Ag wmv kj ' t " Q ' Q T. V Xi' DY .. Fi P: a.' . av, S45 - fig, -- .f f 1 A QQQF .ji Q, 1 S N- A kk 1 sl A x xx 4 ANTHROPOLOGY "Archeologly sounds like dull sport in five sy ables. It isn't. It's the Peeping om o the sciences. It is the sand box o men who care not where they are Sing: they merely want to know w e every ody has been. " J im Bishop Leslie A. White, renowned cultural anthropologist and former president of the American Anthropological Association, was a visiting professor this year. ln his class on the evolution of modern culture, and in a speech given as one of the Afternoon Talks, Dr. White discussed the relationship of man to his culture. He stated his belief that behavior is determined by cultural influences rather than man himself. Dr. White indicates that man's uniqueness in the animal world stems from the fact that his behavior is determined by culture rather than biological factors. Women's Liberation infiltrated the Anthropology Department with the establishment of a course entitle Female of the Species. Students in the class followed the cultural evolution of women through the ages. A second course, Primate Behavior, was also added. I Dr. Leslie A. White fleftj, a leading anthropologist in the theory of cultural determinism lectures as a 'visitin professor. Dr. William Madsen ftopl, ll witchcraft speciaist and Jerome Cybulski K above 2 an expert in physical anthropology, represent two of the interests in the Anthropology Department. ART "Motivation is Perception" Zen Philosopher With a return to interest in technical aspects of the various art disciplines, much competent work was produced by students in the department. Among those who instructed were guests, Larry Rivers, an internationally known painter, and John Margolies, often seen on NET's "Great American Dream Machine", whose emphasis was 20th Century Architecture. A former student, Jerry Kearns, whose major interest was sculpture, 'returned to campus after spending two years in Rome. Along with two other members of the department fVarner of painting and Dunlap of paintingl, Kearns displayed "Happenings" around campus and in Santa Barbara. Irma Cavat A student I top leftj sculpts, while another paints in reaction to a problem presented by her instructor. With great precision a potter Cbottomj throws on the wheel. The cheerful and attentive staff C below J of the Arts Librariy is always ready to aid muddled Art istory students. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES "If there is one way better than another it is the way of nature. " Aristotle UCSB was fortunate in having on its Biological Sciences faculty a botanist who is not only one of the top scientists in her field, but who is also considered one of the 75 most important women in the United States. Dr. Katherine Esau, professor of botany, emeritus, is known the world over for her research relating virus activity to the ultrastructure of plant cells. During the year she was further honored by election to the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences, an exclusive organization known for its awarding of the Nobel Prize, and including only 25 Americans in a total membership of 271. Dr. Katherine Esau frightj makes extensive use of an electron microscope in her work. The Zoology Museum, associated with the Natural istory course on vertebrates, is directed by Jodi Bennett flower rilghtj, the Senior Museum Scientist. isitors to the Marine Biology Lab Cbelowj are amused by a grad student's technique of handling crabs. Students are guided in their search for understanding of the Black experience by Bishop Edward Crowther Cabo-vej and Mr. Gerard Pigeon C top leftj, and find further otpportunity for expression of the needs of t e Black Community in the Center for Black Studies Ccenter and below leftj, directed by Mr. Abdulhamid Akon: Cleftj. BLACK STUDIES 'Thapeculiarity of our place in the wor isn't to be confused with anybody elses. " Aime Cesaire Initiated by student action and demands, the goal the Black Studies Department is to inform and serve the needs of the initiators by pouring into the academic environment subjects that have too long been neglected. The subjects covered by the department are all in direct relation with the Black experience and are not restricted to the United States. Because the diaspora caused by three centuries of slavery and more than a century of colonization has completely alienated the Black people from their culture and from themselves, the Black Studies Department has as its goal the reconstruction of the true universal entity of the Black man by putting together the pieces of that culture, scattered by the trade winds, and buried under the white sands of modern civilization. Gerard Pigeon CHEMIS TR Y "Science seeks to reduce the connections discovered to the smallest possible number of independentelementsl' Albert Einstein Innovations in the Chemistry Department this year included an experimental section of the organic chemistry class, Chemistry 130, taught by Dr. Robert DeWolfe. The class was kept small in order to provide more opportunities for individual instruction. Students had access to a study room in Sycamore Hall where they could do supplementary reading, discuss problems over a cup of coffee, or obtain help from Dr. DeWolfe or the teaching assistant. Professors continued to expand their research projects under various grants and Dr. Peter Ford, an assistant professor of chemistry, was awarded a 525,000 grant from the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation. The grant was to be applied to education or research programs developed by Dr. Ford. Two other chemists, Dr. Pierce Selwood and Dr. Ernest Bickerdike, retired this year after many years at UCSB. Dr. Bickerdike was an analytical chemist i while Dr. Selwood was an inorganic chemist whose specialty involves catalysis of para-hydrogen conversions. Dr. Selwood ftoz rightj inspects the apparatus necessary for research on para- ydrogen conversions. Special glassware for such experiments is often prepared by Horst Becker frightl, who does the glassblowini for all of the science departments. Dr. DeWolfe fabofoej wor s with an organic chemistry student. The University makes dual demands on its professorsg first that they teach, as Dr. Young of Classic does with grad students Cleftj and secondly, that they continue their own research which Professor Miller of Chemistry illustrates C below J . CL ASSICS "The poet learns from another poet. That's how it was in the old days and is now. " Bacchylides Devoted to the concept of a liberal education, the Classics Department, as well as offering a Classics major in the study of Greek and Latin literature in the original, has inaugurated during the year a new inter- departmental undergraduate major in Classical Civilization. The new major encompasses a liberal arts curriculum that includes the study of ancient literature in English translation, history, philosophy, religion, and art. ai we f 1 " Bs wt' fr , an I K . .Q ,,. . , t ...kk 1 T'3'h'- , cz:-f-1 rQ"'4-. :lb- 5 d'.t 'Q NX t gl Q-gi. t . t . . ' N: -Rfk . 'Ni' r 1 1 s+32?"'i'i get is x X is 5 5 ., A4 A' 'M 5. H A k 5 X 5 5 Ik an , . A w-. 5 f Ng 'J X 5 K fn N 6 ji' ,mud kt I 1- if w X 1 .nl J. Q .K ML, wfvxk A it ip 0 ik V, x 5-wx-: . 'F-., , swim xg'-G3 wi . -gg. gxfx 3893 YK Ig 5 K 'Fig U. X V , vii , V N. an Dr. Roderick Nash fabovej, co-chairman of the environmental studies program, demonstrates water-samplmlg in the lagoon for Chancellor Vernon . Cheadle and General Electric Regional Vice President Harry M. Lawson. Concern for the environment is strongly reflected in the appointment olf Jodi Bennett Iriffhtj as an environmenta evaluation consu tant. ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES "It is the capacity to predict the outcome of our own actions that makes us responsible or them and that therefore ma es ethical iitldigement of ,them both possible a necessary. George Gaylord Simpson The interdisciplinary Environmental Studies program was the recipient of a 530,000 grant from the General Electric Foundation this year. The department intended to use the award to expand the curriculum and to further develop areas of field study and audio-visual instruction. Two courses added to the curriculum and open to non-environmental studies majors were Principles of Environmental Law and Intermediate Physical Environment. The expansion which the grant supported greatly aided the purpose of familiarizing students and the community with their environment. ii, ERGONOMICS 9 r i Whether by force or choice, man adapts to environmental stress. ww'-0-from Q-f7C"1C,4 gg,-.:3NgD" 'UFDD-.Q-n-10 4-rg Cm Ff S-05903 Z'Drn2QhF Qoi o - "f-mE,'f',"" 1' FY Dba' wcrrktn 1-r D Qi S-5om,.,,,,, ss: 2:5232 manga-33 O,,1r'biQ-fb Bw-o-. 03 'Ogcf-rag FHDQ--15' 1-ran-' A: ann- 55:1 CO 3225.252 :r' 5" o e"UQ93s. 3995? '-1D-r'brbO.-N . www W A year undergraduate program will have a i knowledge of the principles of human movement, functioning of the systems of the body, principles of skill acquisition, the physiological and psychological principles that influence man's adaptability to environmental stresses, factors that affect man's health and efficiency, and the social and psychological factors that influence man's interaction with other humans. The staff is continuously engaged in a variety of research to derive these principles and concepts from the most recent evidence available. I have completed recently a study to elucidate the role of the peripheral circulation in determining the maximum aerobic capacity of an individual. Presently, we are studying the biochemical and enzymatic changes that take place in response to various stresses, particularly, the capacity for aerobic metabolism. R. H. Rochelle V-ng iff Bruce Montgomery Ctopj monitors Rex Gray's minute heafvy work load on the bicycle ergometer. physiological parameters such as blood flow, heart Rex faboznej is monitored by Ed Azakian for the same rate, and core and skin temperature during his two parameters while he recovers from his exercise. 14 French students Cabofuej discuss 1 7th Century Literature, while Richard Blakely K top rightf addresses his film study class. FRENCH .AND ITALIAN "Les langues, riees avec les societes, n'ont sans doute ete d'abord qu'une collection assez bizarre de signes de toute espece. ' d'Alembert Continuous expansion of language and literature programs in the French and Italian Department gave evidence of the increasing importance of foreign culture studies. Although the development of reading and oral tracks in second-year French was a major addition to the language curriculum, more extensive additions were made in the areas of literature and interdisciplinary studies, including involvement in.Medieval Studies, Comparative Literature, and Film Major programs. One of the department faculty members, Dr. Andre Malecot, directs the Phonetic Research Facility, where yet another aspect of language study has been developed. Specialized equipment and research techniques have contributed to studies in areas that directly affect speech therapy and communication sciences. Research in the Phonetic Research Facility infoolfves the making of x-ray films Ccenterj and the use of the speech synthesizers. Professor Malecot fabofvej analyzes recorded conversations. FMM- Moow GEOGRAPHY "I believe the earth on which we stand is but the vestibule to glorious mansions, to which a moving crowd is forever pressing. " Joanna Baillie The geography program, which has still not become a department due to the lack of senior faculty members, has an environmental orientation and offers areas of study in urban systems and remote sensing. Professors specialized in areas such as environmental defense, oil spills, and the impact of water on land in California. Two new courses were Geography 101, Spatial Analysis, and an interdisciplinary course, Introduction to Urban Ecology. Dr. John Estes lleftj examines a map on a light table in the Geography Department and discusses the surface geography of the farside of the moon with research geographer Les Senger I below 1 . GEOLOGY "There is a wide country before us, though the horizon is mist and shadow. " Sir John Buchan Dr. Preston E. Cloud, an outstanding biogeologist in the Geology Department, received the Paleontological Society Medal as a result of extensive research on the origin and evolution of life on the primitive earth. His research has involved work on stromatolites, in conjunction with Dr. M.A. Semikhatov of the USSR Academy of Sciences, and investigation of lunar dust under the support of NASA and NSF grants. One of the specialized research labs on campus, the Biogeology Clean Laboratory, was constructed in order to provide the proper facilities for his work. Equally important, however, was Dr. Cloud's concern and involvement in conservation of the earth's diminishing resources. Fortunately, this trend has become increasingly evident not only among geologists, but also in many other natural and social sciences. The North Urals provided the settirag for summer field work conducted by Dr. loud and Dr. Jovan Stocklin frightj, a United Nations geolo 'st at Tehran, Iran. Lunar dust Cbe owl from the Apollo flights 11 and 12 was examined for evidence of life but was found barren. The particles were of interest for study of weathering processes on the moon, however. Dr. Cloud and his colleagues K top leftj doing field work in Russia where -many stromatolites were collected. A greatly magnified iparticle of moon dust I above J was photo ci-phed with the specia equipment in the Biogeology Clean Lair r. Stuart Atkins K top rightj assists a student in his class on Goethe's Faust, one of many courses dealing with German literature. GERMANIQ SLAVIC "If the stud of two maior world cultures - the Germanic and the Slavic - are relevant in the lives of educated American citizens, then to that extent the academic programs of this department are 'relevant. "' Germanic and Slavic Dept., UCSB The Santa Barbara campus is still predominantly a liberal arts campus, providing a major role for the Humanities, of which the Germanic and Slavic languages are a part. In an effort to provide students with a broad, adaptable curriculum a number of new courses were added. Students preferring to concentrate on reading rather than oral skills in a language took advantage of a "two-track" series of courses in second-year German. This program was introduced together with several new Literature-in-Translation courses dealing with three Nobel Prize winners: Herman Hesse, Thomas Mann, and Alexander Solzhenitsyn. An additional course, Truth and Fiction: A Century of German History in Literature, was offered in conjunction with the department of History. One of the department faculty members, Dr. Stuart Atkins, received the highest recognition which his profession can give: the presidency of the Modern Language Association for the year 1972. HIS TOR Y "Seek ye counsel of the agid, for their eyes have looked on t faces of the years and their ears have hearkened to the voices of Life. Even if their counsel is displeasing to you, pay heed to them. " Gibran Perhaps due to the realization that history offers more insights into the entire spectrum of human experience than any other discipline, students flocked to the department in greater numbers than ever before. With nearly 1,000 majors and approximately 5,000 students enrolled in history courses per quarter, the faculty was hard pressed to find ways to most effectively deal with such numbers. New courses were added, most notably The History of American Women. Professor Graham enlisted the aid of two of his colleagues, Drs. Pursell and Brownlee, in an experimental team approach to Recent American History. Other faculty members utilized Learning Resources materials to broaden their coverage and to change the character of their courses. New innovations were in the wind for lower division offerings as the department sought to meet the shifting interests of students. The department was highly honored this year as three of its members won awards for outstanding publications. The Chairman, Professor Hsu, and Professor Stephen Hay won silver medals from the Commonwealth Club for their books, MODERN CHINA, and ASIAN IDEAS OF EAST AND WEST respectively, while Professor Remak won the Higby Prize for his article "The Healthy Invalid." Professor Oglesby was named the Great Gaucho Prof for the academic year 1970-71, following in the footsteps of Professor Golin. Richard Oglesby Richard Oglllesb y Ctopj renowned professor of estern American History, reads the final exam of one of his students. Frank Frost Crightj, who wrote Greek Society, is noted for his lectures in Western Civilization 4A. Although Linguistics and Mathematics are two com letely different fields, Linguistics, instructed by Charles Li ltopll when -viewed more abstractly, bears a relation to certain Mathematical concerns, such as automata theory and Boolean algebra. These mathematical concerns are part of what mathematics professor Adil Yaqub I below J deals with in everyday instruction. LING UISTICS "Dico, ergo, cogito" Cartesian Apocrypha As far as anyone knows, language is the unique property of man. It is a subtle instrument, and is used for all sorts of purposes-from lying to love-making. As a system of symbols, it appears to be radically different from anything like animal calls or bird songs or dolphin bleeps-different both in its power of naming and in its inner complexity. Yet a child seems to have little difficulty learning such a system that is restricted enough to be learned by a three or four-year-old, and yet is the well spring of innumerable expressions and thoughts. Behind the range of systems called Human Language lies a unique ability or bundle of abilities: this source of power with its peculiar limitations is also our concern. Arthur Schwartz MATHEMATICS "A scientist worthy of the name, abo-ve all a mathematician, experiences in his work the same impression as an artist: his pleasure is as great and of the same nature. " Henri Poincare The Department of Mathematics has been active in revising its program to keep it up- to-date. As one example, students in Biology and Economics now need to know much more mathematics than formerly, so the mathematics courses for them have been undergoing considerable change. The program for prospective mathematics teachers has become particularly strong because of recent changes. The department has been experimenting both with an honors program for mathematics majors, and an innovative program in calculus instruction. Student input in encouraged in departmental affairs by inviting all interested students to attend and participate in the meetings of both the departmental undergraduate and graduate committees. Adil Yaqub Captain Wesley Taylor Cabofuef, watches as the Rangers K top rightf are briefed before mofoing out on a patrol. The 'vigorous training often leads to commissioning as an officer K center rightf, and participation in the program can also include such actifvities as marching in the Veteran's Day parade in Santa Barbara C bottom right f . MILITAR Y SCIENCE "The opportunity is hereg the challenge and responsibility will be yours." William F. Brand Fighting a general feeling of hostility towards military organizations, the UCSB ROTC continued to attract a good cross section of students, including six or seven coeds who attended the Military Science classes. Activities in the ROTC program included a trip to Fort Grd during the Spring break for training unavailable on campus, a visit to the confinement facilities at Port Hueneme by the Military Justice Class, and the annual Military Ball at the Officer's Club of Port Hueneme. A major change which took place in the department was the retirement of Colonel William Brand and his replacement in January by Colonel George F. Otte as the department chairman. E I , M - .A ez: I' v K gf' K ff 5? 5 Wm. 2'-Q gi, .fl ,X 1 'Y' is ' QQ. K, , f 'E M N' 13 W 1 Q2 Q A . Y fgq it i l f M ',, 3 Ym,f'F'-Tn' 3 L tg- . V W , 'V at i 21 M' 'v ', , ' it 4 5, ,Q 4, W v Y g- wi Q 3 5' 5 fix! ' W' f f" I , , fl 5 ' ' X K K Y V. ,ark W5 V 1.3 JFK VW , My 2 VK' ,Zi ag by X , ,M 3 - Ns, 'fl ,,n.,lf? sf fL'W ' ff W if ' X 1 3 L! . ,...r W A , ,, WM ,MMF I Y, , 1 11 Q, ,H PHILOSOPHY "Be a philosopher: but amid all your philosophy, be still a man. " Hume Visiting professors from Harvard, Brown, and London Universities and the Univeristy of Toronto enriched the Philosophy Department by introducing new slants on philosophical treatises and theories. Students also benefitted from new methods of directing discussion sections in Philosophy I. In both the Fall and Winter quarters a type of personal tutorial meeting was substituted for regular discussion groups. Professor William Macomber Crightj counsels a student for his introductory philosophy class. Discussion with professors and teaching assistants is 'vital for complete understanding and involvement in philosophy studies, and is aided by use of the coffee room Cbelowj where students and staff can meet to hash o-vez any questions which arise in their wor . , va- 1 , f WD' , gi if Students C top Q learn techniques of modern dance and freshmen Cleftj participate in an elementary 'volleyball class. PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES "A sound mind in a sound bodyg if the former be the glory of the latter, the latter is indispensable to the former." Tryon Edwards Saber and foil fencing, taught by a master Hungarian fencer, Zoltan Von Somogyi, and the japanese form of wrestling, judo, taught by black-belted Kenji Ota, awaited students who discovered the extensive curriculum of the Physical Activities Department. With its curriculum and staff, many of whom are involved in writing and coaching activities in addition to teaching, the department was prepared to offer such specialized courses as Women's Self- Defense and those courses leading to certification as a coach in California Innovative studies were being developed in conjunction with Learning Resources so that students could make use of films and tapes for self-evaluation. PH YSI CS "Within its depths I saw ingathered, bound by lofve in one 'vo ume, the scattered lea-ves of all the universeg Substance and accidents and their relations, as though together fused, after such a fashion that what I tell of is one simple flame . . . " Dante An ever-present need for interdisciplinary training in modern research instru- mentation resulted in the creation of a unique new graduate program in the physics department. Students from any field of natural science or engineering can now obtain a Master's degree in scientific instru- mentation in preparation for industrial work or further graduate studies in an experimental science. The department is also activein faculty research. Two UCSB physicists, Dr. James Hartle, an astrophysicist, and Dr. David Caldwell, an elementary particle physicist, are conducting research under a Sloan fellowship and a Guggenheim fellowship, respectively. The research of another physicist, Dr. David Cannell, represents the high quality of work performed in this department. He has studied the scattering of light from fluids at their critical points, and the precise, ingenious nature of his experimentation has revealed details of the mechanism not previously known. ff' PP l Laboratory courses play a maior role in the study of physics, both for lower difvision students K bottom leftj in electronics labs, and for physics majors in the senior labs. Students working with liquid nitrloigen 1 below f have already gone through hours of lectures a consultation before embarking on research projects, but explanations are still required as work progresses C bottom 2 . E Associate Professor Robert Noel I below Q demonstrates the use of the POLIS laboratory. Legislative Council Cbottomj puts political theory into practice as they carry out A. S. business. uhh S W. 'N will x N x x , , Xgxxx XX... xx xx . If ll!! POLITICAL SCIENCE "Every political question is becoming a social question. " R. T. Ely Funding and final plans for UC Santa Barbara's School of Law were completed during the 1971-72 school year. The original proposal, co-authored by three Political Science professors, Thomas S. Schrock, C. Herman Pritchett, and Stanley V. Anderson, in cooperation with Laurence Houlgate, a UCSB professor of philosophy, provides for training for graduates in law, but also is meant to Hreinfuse the ethos of law into the education of undergraduates and promote a recognition of the relationship between law and society in certain graduate programsff Further advanced study in the field of political science provided for students in UCSB's Political Institutions Simulation laboratory, POLIS. With access to closed circuit television, microphones, tape recorders, telephone systems, and a computer, the student allowed to simulate congressional voting, and confrontation situations in areas ranging from urban ecology to international relations. PGLIS is not confined solely to the UCSB campus, but may also be used in corroboration with other campuses having similar facilities to those here. Dr. Comstock Crightl prepares for his course, Myths and Symbols. Dr. O Dea Cfar rightj emphasizes a point of extreme importance in his History and Theory of Religion seminar. Dr. Larson Cbelowj, chair- man of the Religious studies department, lectures to his class about Indian Yoga traditions. RELIGIOUS STUDIES I "Religion . . . is an adventure of the Spirit, a flight after the unattainable. The death of religion comes with the repression of the high hope of adventure. " Alfred North Whitehead The Department of Religious Studies seeks to promote the scholarly study of religious phenomena as they have appeared in human cultures throughout the world. Students of religion are introduced through departmental offerings to fruitful techniques of investigation and analysis that have been devised by sociologists, psychologists, historians of religion, philosophers and theologians. A faculty of eight full-time professors plus several instructors and visiting scholars provided a thriving undergraduate program that offered courses in both eastern and western religious traditions. The department also offered a program for the degree of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. Dr. Raimundo Panikkar, a noted scholar in the study of both eastern and western religions, joined the faculty as a full professor. A noted European linguist, Dr. Geo Widengren, also taught for one quarter in the department. ln these and other ways the department continued to grow and to improve in effectiveness as a scholarly medium through which the fascinating forms of religious activity can be explored. Richard Comstock To the residents of Isla Vista fleftj the study of society gains a greater importance as they try to create a society of their own. The students of Sociology 101 Cbelowj learn the necessary fundamentals. SOCIOLOGY "You have the 'vanity to belie-ve in two worlds, but that is your vanity. There is but one single world for us. We are men and must follow the world of men continually. " Don Juan The Sociology Department at UCSB, besides being one of the most popular departments on campus, is very interested in testing, evaluating and comparing social fact with social theory. This can be illustrated by Dr. Richard Flacks' group study class, Sociology 194. Dr. Flacks states that the course consists of several projects orientated toward research and innovation in the community. Under his leadership, each class meets and functions separately. The projects that the class is involved in range from the Devereux Child Care Center, to the Santa Barbara Community School project, to the Law project. Each of these projects allow the students to gather first-hand data and then to evaluate it. An important by-project of the Community School project is the aid that the UCSB students give to the Community School in the form of academic help and interpersonal counseling. I While students may often feel that the experience at UCSB are really a perverted psychology experiment Cleftj, actually the real research is expertly carried out by professional psychologists K below J PSYCHOLOGY "We do not agree, really, on very much because we do not propose to confess 'very much about what is going on in our heads David Cort The UCSB Psychology Department is dedicated to the purpose of educating students interested in gaining a firmer foundation in the understanding of the human mind and the behavior related to it Though the department is directed more to experimental over clinical research, it offers a multi-level approach to the study of the functioning of the mind Last year the department gained recognition through the accomplishments of Sarah, the chimp, and Dr. Primack. As reported in "Psychology Today," Sarah had 'learned' a vocabulary of l25 to 130 Words. Unfortunately, with Sarah's reaching sexual maturity, the research was discontinued because it became too dangerous to work with Sarah. The departments's graduate department is directed to preparing students for careers combining teaching and research while offering learning, perception, personality, physiological psychology, and ,social psychology as fields of specialization. nwumvrW" 'Yi get iz: The Speech and Hearing Clinic offers students the opportunity to be initiated into the procedures and situations involved in handling speech and hearing disabilities K top J . The Forensic Club I middle J discuss the importance of a well-structured opening argument. A scene from last yearls activities C bottom J illustrates the lessons learned from the Speech Department. SPE E CH "Never.rise to speak till you have something to sayg and when you have said it, cease." Witherspoon The Speech Department offers a unique merger of higher education and community service in the form of the Speech and Hearing Clinic Where future clinicians are trained with youngsters whose oral skills and auditory perceptions are faulty. Dr. Theodore Hanley, professor of speech and head of the clinic, explains that Clinical practice begins for our students in the senior year, that is, under varying degrees of supervision, they participate in diagnostic sessions and remedial work with children from the Santa Barbara area with speech and hearing defects. The UCSB student clinicians also gain experience in identifying potential future clients through diagnostic screening at Laguna Blanca and Delores Schools, in two Headstart programs and at Camarillo State Hospital. While the undergraduate students are expected to become competent in dealing with both speech and hearing disorders, graduate students may specialize in a chosen field. For example, Mary Goldstein, graduate student in audiology, is attempting to devise methods of detecting hearing problems during the infant's first three months of life. The Speech Department is also dedicated to areas beyond dealing with speech and hearing problems, it is also interested in the improvement of the individual's efforts in public speaking and debate. The UCSB Forensic Club which is composed of undergraduates from all majors learn and refine the important aspects of persuasive speaking, the use of well chosen Words in speaking, and the necessity of clarity in communications. r Seminar classes fabofvej allow students to explore subjects in more depth than is possible in large, impersonal lecture courses, and individual instruction is also readily available in art classes such as lithography fleftj. CREA TI VE STUDIES "Men should be taught as if you taught them not, And things unknown proposed as things forgot. " Alexander Pope The College of Creative Studies, a separately staffed and administered undergraduate college, offered a special curriculum to a select group of students during the past year. Students were enrolled on the evidence of demonstrated talent in one or more of the fields of study offered by the College. The instructors, a group of artists, critics, scholars, and scientists, assisted the students in tutorial and seminar classes arranged with the intention of directing the student as early as practicable toward advanced work in his field of study. Majors were offered in Art, BiologY, Chemistry, Literature, Mathematics, Music Theory and Composition, and Physics. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING "Science is built up with facts, as a house is with stones. But a collection of facts is no more a science than a heap of stones is a house." . . I Jules Henri Pomcare Senior mechanical engineering students continued to publicize the well-developed curriculum of the College of Engineering by securing awards in the 1971 Engineering Student Design competition. The competition was sponsored by the James F. Lincoln Arc Welding Foundation of Cleveland, Ohio. Sharing the awards were the Mechanical Engineering Department and Dr. Robert Roemer, instructor of a course involving the senior design projects. The award-winning designs, a special treadmill constructed to aid the Institute of Environmental Stress, and a wheelchair seat designed to prevent pressure sores, are only two examples of student projects this year. Faculty research projects also had pragmatic potential, as evidenced by the exploration of the kinetics of air pollution, and pesticide distribution and degradation in aqueous systems. Electrical engineers researched the use of lasers and sound in combination to detect tumors in human tissue and the use of laser holography to view objects on the ocean floor. avi' Q 55" QQ' K LV: ',,2"ni5,s.f xr y gm . gl if x . M x,,imMQ4vv '-5 E' , R Q Ni' E - ' xx af" Via 599 wif--" A 5- ' N s3Af'if i - 3 za M, ? X. Ss - 'w gi. K k it Q 'N Q Q rwir 'F s ,- -1----N -- - -W ----------H SCHOOL OF ED UCA TION "If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of ci-vilization, it expects what ne-ver was and what never will be." Thomas Jefferson In 1971-72 the Graduate School of Edu- cation achieved its goal of balancing ad- vanced degree and teacher preparation pro- grams. The latter received full re- accreditation for five years following an unprecedented second review instituted by the State Board of Education. The report of the second review team unequivocally confirmed the highly positive re- commendation of the first visiting team. Grants from the U.S. Office of Edu- cation of approximately S180,000 enabled the School to conduct an experimental training program for supervising teachers, who work with student teachers, during the two-year period, 1970-72. Some fifty supervising teachers from the area partici- pated in the training program. Ford Foundation funds of 5311000 helped to establish a new program in "Con- fluent Education," which aims to integrate the affective, or emotive, domain of learning with the more traditionally em- phasized cognitive, or intellective, domain. Faculty and students in this program established working relations with schools across the nation as well as in the local area. A third major grant was received from the National Science Foundation for a special summer masters degree program, offered jointly by the Departments of Edu- cation and Mathematics, for a group of fifty teachers of mathematics who come from all parts of the U.S. These teachers came to UCSB in the Summer of 1971 and will return to complete their programs in the Summers of 1972 and 1973. They also pursue special projects related to the program during the intervening school years. Norman Boyan Student teaching Crightj requires deter- mination and persistence just as a regular teaching fob does, and is often just as frustrating - or rewarding. A graduate student in chemistry Ctopj can testify that his research requires an equal amount of labor, though it lacks the contact with undergraduate students. il""Ull- N, 'K Since its inception two years ago, the Graduate Students Association has proved a capable and valuable link between students and administrators. The meeting fabovej discusses grievances. The Graduate Division aided the events of University Day by giving special guided tours and short lectures on the different types of research and studies being done at the University. Graduate student Cleftj aids youthful guest in his inspection of astronomical formations. GRAD UA TE DIVISION "Intellect and industry are never incompatible. There is more wisdom, and will be more benefit, in combining them than scholars like to believe, or than the common world imagines, and its happiness will be increased by the union. " S. Turner Though often accused of merely being professional students and the faculty's shield against real interaction with stu- dents, the Graduate Division is comprised of men and women who have demonstrated academic excellence and a desire to con- tinue their education beyond the mere four years of undergraduate work. Many of the graduate students serve the University in the capacity of TA's. Though often ma- ligned, the TA's serve a very important role. Without their efforts and abilities the very functioning of the University would cease. The Graduate Division Association since its inception has served as an organized body that deals with University and graduate interactions. Presently it is in the process of evaluation of two studies. The first is the results of Chancellor Cheadle's task force report on the appointment, use, supervision, orientation, and problems of Teaching Assistants. The second study involves the Graduate students morale. One of the significant finding of this study is that 75fZn of the students enrolled in the sciences, the social sciences, and humanities who plan to enter teaching or teaching related areas consider the training that they have received for teaching to be insufficient. Also generally thought to need improvement is the quality of advising in areas such as departmental requirements, strategy of graduate study, and financial aid. 9 Q, 72345 lbw, ,, Q., , 'YAY , a wx lun. I L5 , , , , ug 4? 1 "2 ,f 1 -5 fa ,Wg R X I K, E., HW., ' e w U Aww? .wo- iw-Qrvl' TQ ,LVV IVKV V . H ir, M W'-Ilnnnw.-.4 ' 9 V V ,M V' V ww, 2 My "W 2 Y' e ' ,Q.:.i,-:V .. fe-V M..-wg is 5' :V .. We make our own destinies by our choice of gods. WMWWWMM. 'W WWMMW UHIVGRSII We are waking from the American Dream to realize that it was a dream few Americans lived in their waking hours. Gerard Piel Are you a governor looking down on those you govern, never stirring abroad except to rtfle their pockets or to exploit them for your own profits? I f so you are like the tares upon the threshing floor of the nation. Gibran It does not follow, however, that because our society is organized as a Isolitical democracly that its other institutions should be simi arly organized. his does not excuse such institutions, however, from being sensitive and responsive to the views of those they serve. Vernon I. Cheadle 4 Ki 1 nun-:uma z, mums. 1, ,:11samf11mwmmmff:..gym,Y4 ,'.., L 1 ffff. wg ..,,,- ,., , M f E.. ZOMALT Women Cy. 'EK 'l Y, 7 ,E qi ELLEN BOWERSE "1 Dean of Worpen IUKQRYIQU in was mam' ' RENEWALS RYYIIRNS ,LA ,MQW V 223 swf ' ' , Ji r - 2 ,Z 4 1 si! The Reserve Book room constantly groves an invaluable service as needed books may e obtained the following day fleftj. Fees were accepted at the Cashier's gffice in the Administrative Building. The Campus ookstore supplied almost every need imaginable. 'W mu "5 -M N-N Q31- Q. nffidfnflrwwy 12"-J-ff-s I ik, 'I V' Q- n We Involved in community proiects, students have the opportunity to experience, to understand, and to grow, and eventually to become the agents of social change. Robert Garcia This year an active attempt was made by the Legislative Council 00112. under the direction of Robert Garcia, to increase communication between students and the counciL Meetings such as the one pictured above in San Rafael dorm, were held at various locations on campus and in I. V. The Judicial Board labovej, chaired by D'Anne Pierce, deliberated on cases ranging from student discipline to constitutional issues. Two new members were added to Finance Board frightj this year since Chairman Judy McClellan's proposal to ensure adequate minority representation was passed unanimously. SECRSIIARIGS Providing invaluable assistance to Chancellor Cheadle is his executive assistant, Madeline Joyce Kugger leftj. Always essential to the operation of the UC student government, June Olsen I middle leftf, the Associated tudents secretary, can be found on the third floor of the UCEN. Cleo Givens I lower leftj, the receptionist for the office of financial aids, assists the many secretaries and consultants who help inform and provide students with financial assistance. The secretaries for Housin Services fupzeer rightj are just one of the many staffg' working on t first floor of the Administrative Building. You will alwaiys find the ladies at the Cashier's counter ready with a ollar fabovej. They provide a convenient check-cashing service for students. COITIITIUHICAIIONS The 1971-72 Communications Board, under the leadership of Chairman Henry Silverman, took the lead towards new ideas and directions. As in the past, the Board remained the publisher of the Nexus and La Cumbre and the license holder for KCSB-FM. Unlike the past, the Board began to take an active interest in the affairs of the ten operations under its control, with combined budgets of nearly a quarter million dollars. Significant decisions reached early in the year included major policy for KCSB stereo operation, and approval of experimental Friday issues of Nexus. Rulings were handed down concerning underhanded activities of KCSB staff members. Included within these prime decisions were budget cuts which were proven necessary due to the decreased enrollment. One of the major projects undertaken by the board involved the authority to retain and spend budgetary credits. This radical proposal was incorporated within the Associated Students by-laws and as a result, 52,300 was released for badly needed equipment purchases by the major media. As in past years, the Board chose the editor of the Nexus and La Cumbre, and the General Station Manager of KCS B-FM. Henry Silverman Communications Board, the unifying media organization, was comprised of publications representatives, AS officials, and administrative personnel working to establish relevant policies. GA YLE 'uertising The three major UCSB media, working in the only exclusive student communications building of its kind in the United States, have provided the campus community with exceptional journalistic services in recent years. More than 120 student journalists were involved with the media. The Nexus, in its fifth year as a daily operation, finished the first quarter with a record of 548 printed pages. The La Cumbre published its seventh consecutive major size yearbook of 400 pages or more. KCSB sought to expand its broadcasting operation. Communications Director joe Kovach foresees a continued expansion of the student media. "With a strong financial arrangement, the nationally recognized campus media could enhance its programs considerably. The Nexus could publish a larger issue each day or attempt a regular weekend edition. KC BS's potential in stereo and greater coverage is unlimited. The prestigious La Cumbre rated number one in the country in 1968, faces an uphill struggle to regain the needed campus support," concluded Kovach. 2 f ' 182 KCSB-lim Another year of the same old thing? Hardly. Bigger, better, cleaner, and more efficient, that's how many described KCSB- FM's new image. During the past year KCBS continued to alter its program schedule to reflect increasing community interest in Santa Barbara's only noncommercial electronic medium. One of the most noticeable additions was the institution of a morning concert of classical music in supplement to a more information oriented daytime schedule. Other changes included a weekly series of live music broadcasts from Isla Vista, live broadcasts of the Saturday Afternoon matinees of the Metropolitan Opera at Lincoln Center in New York, concert transcriptions of the Boston Symphony, locally written and produced radio plays, and increased state news coverage from the Pacific Coast Radio Network. Many of these programming changes were enacted as a direct result of a listener survey taken in July, 1971 which showed both extremely strong student listening response, as well as listening response from the greater Santa Barbara community. Based on this survey, KCSB-FM was found to be one of the two most listened to radio stations in the area. Not only did the rock music programming draw a large youth audience, but the classical music and informational programming attracted significant numbers of adult listeners, with the evening classical program being the most listened to program in its respective time slot. All this made a delicate balance in programming between the University community and the larger community necessary, causing KCSB to even more firmly commit itself to block programming. For the future, KCSB is looking forward to instituting full stereo operation, rather than the limited stereo broadcasts characterized this year. With a full revamping of studio facilities, KCSB will be ready for full stereo operation, one more step towards serving its listening audience. R. Gordon Lane Station Manager KCSB-FM Staff members-Chuck Artigues, Mike Aydelott, Barbara Bohm, Barbara Burns, Maxine Cass, Greg Christopher, Steve Colley, Carol Cuzner, Bob Dedrick, Eric Diesen, Bob Edwards, Michael Garrison, Greg Hepp, Ed lsenberg, R. Gordon Lane, Al Lazarus, Steve Logan, Leonard Osborne, Kathy Pardee, Diane Pettingill, David Rowe, Steve Sellman, Rocky Siegel, Craig Stewart, Mike Sugarman, Ted Ware, Don Whiteside, George Wood and friends. GXS One of our primary aims this year was to be innovative in working with the newspaper. Perhaps our first innovation was having two editors-in-chief, a precedent at UCSB. The dual editorship has had its trials, but overall we are satisfied with the results. Another innovation was altering our traditional layout midway through fall quarter. Turning the Friday issue into quasi-magazine style was also new to the Nexus. This year we have been striving to effectively communicate to large numbers of the campus community. We wanted to present honest and accurate coverage of news events and yet adequately interpret these events for our readers. In-depth reporting, rather than superficial coverage has been our goal. In line with this goal has been the Friday issue, containing one or two lengthy articles on topical subjects of concern to students. Our reporting has not always been appreciated by those who were reported, but then, our first obligation is to our readers. Hilary Kaye Mike Grossberg NEXUS Staff Members-Barbara Brooks, Mike Callahan, Skip Rimer, Melinda Finn, Dave Carlson, A. Van Cline, Hilary Kaye, Mike Grossberg, Rich Procter, Dave Handler, Travis, Lee Mcliachern, Terry Braasch, Phyllis Grifman, Philip DeMuth, Mike Gordon, Rich Eber. xg: nm, i .-.4 -W- X ri 2 N:XJ5 if ,WEB ci U 1 s A E 5 wi .xy vlhuuocs K I' .V -Nw . W, WF .4-P JA NZ.. K Q? - sm. . 1 . J 1 ,BSN-X . .. Q taxa xxx 5 f'.- ' X Mx 5 Q52 :Ri if si - " we S i 'S,'i3'T 1 ' si 7 -x a 1 N, .9 XX K wyg Q X Xiu ,Q X X XXX X64 Q QQ f XXX X85 55 WX X x Q Q 'Q N Q .mf 5'-Ie . X -51 . 1. . fx .W wx wr: Q L N 5 53513 Q 9155!-. wb -. 1 'SW' s.HX.:'i-6 - I X. X X 1 . kxffk Q3 .. - X Wx iw 4 X I ,S K E-PX. x .s,. ivk X 'wk K xiii? w bmw 'S 2 Llvxx Xbgew WW Q M N ,Q RFQ X kg? bmiggsifi-is WSW X 5-15 .K . 1 X-wi Q f 1 gags bf Q-' X S Aix V xx, ASQAEQ X Q X Sf' gg Q . - - . . X A i Q X , A 5 I if - ff' NNN H3 it f Q 1s5:q::"" fm.-A - - f -W---1. 1:1 W . .wfiwzlff Q K --.- X Y---. Q - .L- L f ' Q e 1 L N fzf 5 Q32 X L 1 5 f Q i gaqy m figiz- f WX- GS? 'X - 9 -'fl Qin? . i:.i'1ffsa."'f!f .JU -X1 - Q , ., r ,. ... Q. N A k X 2 5 K 5 K is N N ,M x lA CUIHBRG It has been the job of the 1972 La Cumbre staff to produce an informative and entertaining book. The effects,'illusions and statements that you see on these pages are the result of their efforts. Due to some financial restrictions, price freezes, and faulty leadership on my part, the La Cumbre was somewhat restricted in its goals, but its success is pictured in the book before you. I am grateful to and because of this staff. Ricardo Freeman Editor La Cumbre Staff members-Extreme left: Ricardo Freeman Qcenterl, Marilyn Miller ftop and moving clockwisej, Ned Martini, Gayle Hornberger, Katie Ordung, Reg Spittle, Crystal Nicol, Sheldon Tarre, Gretchen Hewlett, Marsha Berger, juris Dumpis, Patty Chadwick. Left: Celeste Plaister. Bottom: john jostes. Below: Stephanie Lam, Lorelle Browning. CHIMES MOR TAR BOARD To Discuss, To Serfve - - Aims of Honorary Clubs Chimes is the female honorary club of juniors attempting to aid the community. Chimes came to life through many experiences: a return to nature at College Cabin sans the modern conveniences. . . tantalizing the tastehuds of customers at bread booths on Market Days . . . guiding blossoming young Saturday morning artists at the Child Development Center . .. an overnight trip to Hearst's Castle . .. and publishing an entertainment guide to prove there really is something to do in Santa Barbara. To be chosen as a member of Mortar Board is one of the highest honors a senior woman can attain. This year 15 women were made members of this national honorary organization. Throughout the year many potluck dinners were given. These were highlighted by speakers from various campus departments. Some of those featured were Betty Huber fsociologyj discussing the problems of being and educated woman, Charles McClintock lpsychologyl on competition in school systems, and a discussion with the University Affiliates. as X MORTAR BOARD-left to right: Gloria Moy, Lynne Miller, Jackie Carmichael and Eva Lippman ffrontl. MORTAR BOARD-standing left: Sue Davis, Sandy Black, Pam Nelson, Judi Bloom, Miss Farwell Cadfvisorj, Lorelle Browning, ani! seated are Debbie Grayson, Mary Johnson and Randi El man. CHIMES-FRONT ROW: Jan Humfeld, Joan Glover, Margo James, Lori Zink, Sharon Venatta, Annie Lochead. SECOND ROW: Sally Small, Nancy Bugg, Connie Williams, Judi Krevis, Linda Schamp, Maureen O'Hagan, Laura Scharff lpresidentl, and Lynda Tuttle. S.A.U.C.E.R. Front Row: Dale Griffiths, Tim Geddes, Debbi Powers, Dafoe Cooper. Second Row: Howard A. Boylan, Peter Geddes, Pat Washington, Peggy Hoelke, Tom Thompson. Top Row: Paul Sakakihara, Gail Meadows, Dave Marchesi. SA. UfC.E.R. Ufologists Earn Funds To Explore Space Life SAUCER is an organization that studies any and all phenomena of the universe. Particular emphasis is placed on the possible existence of life in outer space. The initials SAUCER stand for the Society of Amateur Ufologists for the Certification of Extraterrestrial Reconnaissance. Throughout the year members took advantage of the telescopes located on top of the Physics building to observe outer space. However, SAUCER uses all the branches of science in its effort to advance ideas and theories regarding the time-space continuum and beyond. The members of SAUCER were busy throughout the year with various money- raising and interest projects. In January they sponsored "200l: A Space Odyssey." The money raised was used to buy jackets identifying the group. During Spring quarter they also presented a series of free films with outer-space and fantasy type themes. George Soluk, and Terry and Dennis Randall fabowej ponder the existence of UFO's. SAUCER Crightj sold out Campbell Hall with their big money raiser of the year, the mofoie 02001: A Space Odyssey." H ONE YBEARS Girls Greet Visitors At Games, On Tours From giving campus tours to visitors and students to selling programs at basketball games, the Honeybears serve in various ways as the official hostesses for UCSB. As a volunteer organization their services also include hostessing at campus or community functions. Acting as advisors for the Honeybears are the Howdybears. Faculty and staff, a congressman, and members of the Santa Barbara community form their membership. Memorable Christmas and Valentine parties were just two of the occasions the two groups got-together. The girls in blue and gold indeed form a useful part of UCSB campus life, and what's more, they enjoy it! -,ii iff. fi' v- .: ' ., ' K' f 3 . f i -1Qf.f.'1'--f' f 4 , Z H, ' ' ff, sr: -ff-' alicia:-f .gy lglgjy 9 , in A f Ann Albright Sue Anderson Nancy Banker Nancy Beyers Kristine Borglin III 'ii' K ff, I Af S Stephanie Brown Cathy Buckley Nancy Colwell Debbie Dodd Barbara Fujikuni s r -Lsrsez zfw ff 1Sf1Q3e225'fs11.'1z ' "fQ53E55E32' Q: V. f 'Q S 0. Diane Harris Patti Harris Priscilla Hobson Marlene Jensen Amy johnson Cornering a prospective customer, Barbara F uiikuni I top J tries to sell a basketball program. On one of the more enjoyable campus tours Cabofvej, H oneybears Margaret Streed and Debbie lifdd gave a local third grade class a firsthand look at college 1 e. we N, -"1"MB.6 --u "" Honeybears Kathleen Muleady and Jan Nelson Cleftj act as hostesses for the Faculty Exhzbitzon held m the main art gallery. 12 ? 4 if 4' A E I Lyndell Johnson Judi Krevis Carmen LaGory Linda McWilliam Katie Menees Linda Mitchell Kathleen Muleady Betty Neuman Randy Nixon Kathy Perkins Peg Peterson Barb Rawicz Q25 if -6' Q ll 'f s i ,E 5 5' E , lll t . ,. I V Mary Rayden Sally Ruthroff Susi Sandall Valerie Sauban Debbie Simpson Shiela Staley Margaret Streed Lisa Thomas Vicki Von Bergen Nancy Wittmeyer COMMUNITY AFFAIRS BOARD Providing Assistance One Objective of CAB Student 35349556 is now enrolled in 9560- 01-00, and 4548-01-00, and . . . Isn't there any human element left in this University? If you had happened to travel up to the third floor of the UCEN anytime this year, you would have discovered some people very much interested in students, not as numbers, but as humans. The Community Affairs Board QCABJ works with people. It is comprised of students who are concerned with helping people to know that somebody cares for them. Through CAB over 800 UCSB students gave of themselves and their time by participating in one of 19 different community projects. And the number of projects is increasing as the number of people willing to help, and to try something new increases. just this year two new ideas were realized. Though faced with a shortage of funds, a group of pre-law students, under the direction of Santa Barbara lawyers, offered para-legal aid to members of the community who otherwise had no means of getting advice. Another new project provided tutors who worked with a class of deaf children at Foothill Elementary School. These two added to the already existing programs which included tutoring at various elementary schools in the area, turning little kids on to nature and helping them develop important and basic survival skills, and working with Indian people in an effort to educate the Anglo community in the realities of native American life today. These were just a few of the ways CAB asked students to be and to give of that which is most human in each of us. Under the Carpinteria roiect Josie Sanchez frightj, one of,60 children involved in the program, arrives on campus every Saturday morning to receive a hot breakfast and special individual help from her tutor Katie Dennis. Debra Davis Imiddle rightj offers academic assistance to a young girl, but like all CAB volunteers, her most important gift is companionshi . Teachers at Ho lister School asked for UCSB volunteers who would work in calpacities ranging from tutors, as Anne Wil iams I far rig tj is here, to assembly speakers and "Big Brothers and Sisters." mg, . 2-, 1 5 , iii ' 2 E, ""1, 5 z ,ay ZF, , M 5 is , tw 1 xgyk- + ,ck 4-. QW, .fy sy 7 if' 'W U, f I ff "1 gg, wif ja if 5344, if j 'gZ I V ' k f, , Hwfat AN, Nav ,W E fhfjqw :',jL 3 f f v Q , ,lfzzfyif :,V,. v A , ,Q in 9 Q f 52 f p x 4 4 5 , , wh. Www F 3 SHELL 69' OAR, SURF Surfers Take Malibu, Crew Takes Women This year the UCSB surf team came back bigger and better with the experience of a third-place finish last year in the Western Surfing Championships behind them. With victories over SFV State and UCLA, the UCSB surfers proved prime contenders for the twelve-college title at Malibu. But competitive surfing was only one aspect of the surf team's program. Striving for new "highs" and a lot of fun, the surf team was one of the most mellow athletic teams ever at UCS B. On the somewhat fresh waters of Lake Cachuma, the UCSB Crew team could be found. They confronted new competitors as they traveled from Orange Coast College to Corvallis and Santa Clara. Accompanying the guys were the Women's Crew and the ever faithful female rooters, Shell and Oar. As secret sisters and hostesses at regattas, Shell and Oar kept Crew's morale high. SHELL AND OAR-STANDING LEFT: Robin Yerkes, Karen McCart, Jeannie Palmer, Lori Gronich, Kathi Noss, Robbie Roth, Jackie Rogers, Claudia Tighe, Celeste Criswell, Robin Marion, Sue Stelling, Andrea Bertram, and Gayle Stahl. SEATED: Roberta Lem, Randi Ellman, Joyce Baldwin, Paula Wiest, Lisa Ross, Tina Rochlin, and Leslie Halpern. Not pictured- president Merrilee Fellows. Crew gathers on the dock at Lake Cachuma Itopj after another practice. The guys are there at 6:30 A.M. but practice isn't ofver until the boats are stored. V "yur" -rr 1 ya, - ,, f 'pf I , ,..,,.W,'i1v-"t""-. , , ga:5 , W ' ,fn-.WA 'Alfa-My ,, Y, , -was .Ave-W' ' , ,,,,,f..'iL' , f , v as 'N tis, W" ikzrtil- Q I Y i .. in '7 we t Y' ' ,MQ , -J .. i N A- " ,W ' 'f .f ,X , , QM, A. W ,.s','i1"T'P"',,a,,, ne w ' -Y ,mf h M ' , A it -447 f. , ,, f-ff ' V jg, .. ' A. . M- A ,M vm -gx...,.' ,ms It ,,,,X,,, , 'M I - s 'WTS , 35- Nw, , - ,. 'W --mv-A Q R M6 , r , t. W , . ,., With fine style the UCSB Surf Team topped its division Ctopj. They are John Guild fleftj, Brad Baker, Dennis Anderson, Lee Barthel, Larr Boyer, Mark Hixon, Arthur Leonard, BillK1ng, Fleet White, Baal Gillane ffrontj, Bill Kendall, Greig. Armer, Cathy Meade, Tom Adler, David Allen, David Nakas ima, .Ion Courtney, Yvonne Harvindeguy. FIRE DEPAR TMENT Dedicated Men Give Rescue, Fire Service The UCSB Campus Fire Department, as one would expect, extends major fire protection over the campus and the married student housing. The twenty-man force is composed of eight student and twelve full- time professional firemen who are on call twenty-four hours a day. Their services also include various emergency responses. This coverage ranges from caring for sprained ankles in Intramurals, responding to false bomb threats, to helping in cases of drug overdoses. Also, upon the request of community protection agencies, the fire department extends emergency ambulance and rescue responses to the Goleta Valley. These same services are automatically available to all students. Due to the excellent work and endurance of the entire force, the campus and Isla Vista were safer places. These six student firemen pictured left-Neil Andren Cleftj, Steve Hull, Brad Owens, Tim Ball, Neil Gedney, and Rick Mulhaupt - work with a force of 14-others to protect UCSB and its students. Pictured above, Gedney demonstrates rescue techniques as interested scouts eagerly wait to take their turn on the stretcher. REC DEPARTMENT Variety of Leisure Actifoities offered UCSB is unique, having a separate department on campus providing leisure programs designed specifically for college students. The department began in 1963 when it was acknowledged that recreation was an important part of campus life. From a one man department operating in a strictly advisory capacity, the department has grown to a staff of 115. ln the summer of 1969 the department began a community program to involve the Santa Barbara community during the months when the student population was at a minimum. A day camp, swimming, riding, golf, and tennis lessons normally offered to students were offered to the community. Over 65 programs were available this year and over 70fZp of the students were involved in some organized activity on campus. The Surfing team ftopj, sponsored by the Recreation Department, maintained its excellent style in 1 972 after earning third in the Western International Surfing Championship last year. Photography lessons and use of the black-and-white darkroom fmiddlej were offered to any aspiring photographer. Working on her fourth preparation before again dying her cloth, this student Cbottomj is creatin batik. Student enioys pottery lbelowg whether it be punching, throwing or molding the clay into earthenware. , f ffevfwvmfcefwf-Lg'Y 75,4 'Q 1,, 3 , , k , ga-w:L,u:,:4W,lgsff,,f1'fff4N4ff'-'M V' 'A"'w:g,Z.ff'Gwww.V:zzfszxgvazgszgsugzstifig,emits,ww ,ff:gm,gg,.,i.f V QW V, , 4 ' , . 'I-V 'z 'T ' My K 1'i,f51ff2'l6"-7 -it ,, f f Z,lf','fV!4E5j? ,lg .ffl 19 AHF,zf:'f.Q3?3?i5YQ.f2,g'?:'iiljwilf 'IT' 'THEM fl , 525 gif' jzgfl giggfxgtf Q QW EQ'?iw.i , ii i t V if U Z A e A WWW V 1. ' ' ' in M ,,1 , - K- , , ' 1, w,Vqglf1, "' V , I , ' ' 'L :'ff,1ff:ezyf:,fm-H, ws V ' ., fg-:gf ' lr, ' " W vw , f nf V ' ' ' I k,,,,7W,f' -f - ' . ' A , Y 71634, AMW 1, fu, . , fb f .ga Horseback riding provides needed solitude Cabofoel. It was possible through rentals and lessons offered at UCSB's West Campus. Kites, a Flying Junior Ileftj or a twenty-six-foot Soling were available for weekend sails in the Santa o at Barbara Channel V After a 38-hour course to receive basic i scuba certification, a diver can enjoy l exploration of Channel marine life on one of the Rec-sponsored trips to the Islands Cbelowj. Again hosting the Southern California Rugby Union Championship, the UCSB team Cleftj was out to prove that California rugby is by far the best. was Through cooperation and early-morning training on Lake Cachuma, the UCSB Crew team Cabovej maintained its winning style, with three major championships. Courses in finger-picking, blues, country, and classical guitar were among those offered through the Living Arts program. fleftf V Hg! K fikggx as ,s 5 'O ' QL Q ' . X . 'B : .. iv E his ri K 5 spomts A failure is not always a mistake: it may simply be the best one can do in the circumstances. The real mistake is to stop trying. B.F. Skinner P0 f S if W J - 1 : 5 ww N 1 ' - N .. .fe -Q - . " L Lm.L Q Ti 'XSNW iw? A . A I .1555 - - " --HMN R - X- L- in S X f 'Q X. vig Y X 5 Q 1 2 S m ,gg :N K 4 xx X Nm.. .1 .. X ik K 1 ma, SQ? K W Q. u p Nw k we .Q 5 -3 2. SSX Q 'Q giqw Qmfiiffx' N X at x 5 3 1 ,xx-f S 1 YRS - 4, ,Q x 3 if 3. .X 5 K f , ,few .. w L Wax. .. it , . ., . . Mais - Xxx- , -- --ii - Wx... M5 is WW .Rs-iniilp -L L.., . ,. v 4 A - www. -.S-. . . Q - .g - :mg X R ff- - 'X ' -my -W., mg .5 W ,,..,X 'W-W. -as . xiii'- , . Wi A. fi -53. N- X lil... . - Th- .M NWN 0 . N wh-.:. ,.. - m5fE.:- ,Ai 'G ,- ,. , -.,-A, K 3 QS LA, :V H S 7 ggi .' 1 A .SF " f it .Q ,sf -. L .igs-is f Q W if .-f .. as- SS -. Q Q. if 885? x QS sv .if sa in . . K- fy .ff f-Q ff -Nr fl .1 f Q' 3 X --' .-i?-- -- -Y -. ' - -QQ - .---1 . , J .Q S -Q. -. .nigg- K- Q , - . 1- -1- 7 .Q .1-ff f -gf- A - . . - -.K - , . Kg: . .- ,:. ,ww Q,-' . , -f A. -- -L gf . .Lf -.WN SM., 5 ,gk-Wg ,- - if Jw - s Y K - ,. Av gh A,-fe' ,wi-953. QS' 'Q Ax gb-,if-N .f -- - ' ,gi : lm ,gf 1 ,af -. W Q A i was Q 4 ATHLETICS Football Dropped Due To Low Attendance Chancellor Vernon l. Cheadle called the end to five decades of Gaucho football in a December press conference, blaming a high financial deficit as the primary cause. The UCSB footballers, while gaining national recognition in games against highly- ranked powers Tennessee and Washington, couldn't attract UCSB students through the gates and the low home attendance contributed to a Sl00,000 loss. Cheadle said he had no choice other than to drop the sport, because the University simply could not continue financing at such high cost an activity for which there was so little enthusiasm. The chances of football ever returning to UCSB, Cheadle said, depend almost entirely on an increase in student demand. "lf there is a lot of enthusiasm for starting another program," he commented, "then we will consider returning football to UCSB, but only on a much smaller scale than it has been in the previous two seasons." Meanwhile, officials claimed that the elimination of football from the intercollegiate program would not affect the non-income sports and it was hoped that the UCSB athletic department would maintain its overall stability. Chancellor Cheadle frightj tells the press about the can- cellation of the UCSB football procgram while Vice- han- cellor Stephen Goodspeed listens. UCSB ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT' FRONT ROW: Assistant Athletic Director Ed Swartz, Athletic Director Jack Curtice. BACK ROW: Trainer Harry Callihan, Sports lnformation Director Donn Bernstein, Soccer Coach and SCISA "Coach of the Year" Zoltan Von Somogyi. FOOTBALL Gullotti S tarsg Gaucho Football Goes Big Time In their final year, the Gaucho gridders entered big time football, playing nationally- ranked Washington and Tennessee and losing 65-7 and 48-6, respectively. There were few bright spots on the 3-8 Gaucho log, but one was the surprising play of QB Steve Gullotti, who was fourth in the Pacific Coast Athletic Association in passing, with 1,098 yards. UCSB nearly pulled off an upset win over perennial power San Diego State-in the home opener. UCSB, behind three field goals by specialist Tony Ventimiglio, led in the third period, 23-7, before losing 27-23 in the final period. The three victories came over Pacific, 21- 7, LA State, 26-0, and Santa Clara, 28-22, making a 2-3 record in PCAA play. SCOR If BOARD UCSB Opponent 7 University of Washington 65 6 University of Tennessee 48 21 'University of Pacific 7 14 San Fernando Valley State 15 Z3 'San Diego State 27 I0 'Long Beach State 31 14 University of Hawaii 23 26 'Cal State Los Angeles 0 3 Cal Poly San Luis Obispo 9 28 Santa Clara 22 10 'San jose State 55 'PCAA game. Defensive back Dave Faulkner fleftj attempts to thwart Washington pass play. Valley State halfback tefve Minter gbelowj goes nowhere as Gauchos Dennis oreman and Steve Gudeli apply the clamps. Ken McBride, S tefoe Gudeli, and Wendell Williams combine to halt powerful Wash- ington running back. VARSITY FOOTBALL- FRONT ROW: Steve Gullotti, Andy Everest, Richard Rigali. SECOND ROW: Ken Turlow, Bill Hinds, Ken Jackson, Gil Reyes, Dave White, Tom Woodring, Mike Anton, Rogan Thompson, Tony Ventimiglio, Dennis Foreman. THIRD ROW: Tim Shade, Mark Zaslow, Mike Ponczocha, Dale Gomer, Steve Gudelj, Mike Martz, Mike Williams, Joe Predisik, Pete Janovich, Al Selander. FOURTH ROW: Steve Evangelist, Tim Oppezzo, Steve Barron, Tony Frye, Al Nicassio, Brian Henry, Steve Roussin, Greg Manosar, Randy Thomas, Kent Pederson. FIFTH ROW: Randy Palomino, Jim Mitchell, Jack White, Phil Erbez, Greg Bass, Max Riley, Wendell Williams, Bob Mount. SIXTH ROW: Bill Hammer, Neil Van Dyke, Steve Huntsinger, Dave Crocker, Bob Schmidt, Kim Olsen, Phil Boskovich, Steve Phillip, Bill Wild, Dave Ogden, Ken McBride, Jim Volarvich. SEVENTH ROW: Trainer Harry Callihan, Ron Cote, Dan Rodriquez, Don Turner, Bud Chadwick, Steve Moore, Larry Brandenburg, Lon McConnell, Clay Goodman, Bob Rapanut, Ron Smeltzer. UCSB's Kent Pederson fleftj makes diving catch of a Steve Gullotti aerial. Terry Metcalf of Long Beach K below leftj is stopped by Gaucho linebacker Bill Hinds. Head Coach Andy Efverest I below j watches as team blows 23-7 lead against San Diego State Aztecs. Quarterback Steve Gullotti Crightj scores against conference champ Long Beach State. Randy Palomino fbelowj eludes a Washington pursuer. ffcw, i -f,.. -- is 13 Defensive Back .I im Mitchell Cabofvej makes diving tackle of Washington run- ning' back. Kicking special- ist ony Ventimiglio Ileftj hits on 41 - Bard field goal against San iego State to gwe UCSB 16-7 ead. O Gaucho M VP Neil Quinn Crifhtj moves in for a shot in game against L State. Quinn Cabofvej scores past the Diablo goalie. WA TER POL 0 UCSB Takes On Tough Schedule, Finishes 13-1 1 While playing the top five teams in the nation at least once each, Coach Rick Rowland's young water poloists slumped to a 13-ll record, the worst mark in seven years at UCSB. The Gauchos highlighted the season with third place finishes in the West Coast tournament and the Pacific Coast Athletic Association championships, which were hosted by UCSB. In regular season play, the Gauchos finished second in the PCAA standings behind San Jose State with a 4-2 record. Phil Bowin and Neil Quinn, both juniors, were first team choices for the All- PCAA squad. Goalie Mike Mirkovich gained honorable mention while Chris Gammons and Don Randall received second team honors. VARSITY WATER POLO- FRONT ROW: Ken Brown, Brian Drygas. THIRD ROW: Rich Chris Gammons, Neil Quinn, Rick Jones, Craig Sperberg, Steve Johnson, Dave Dobrusky, Steve Bowman, Mike Murkovich, Al Smith, Eric Sorensen, Moore, Jeff Lopes, Corey Stanbury, Bill Parrish, Dave Almquist, Rick Rosenquist. SECOND ROW: Chris Wilson, Bill Haywood. BACK ROW: Paul Lance Norris, Bob Gibson, jim Mortroni, Ron Gray, Rick Rowland. Ludekens, Don Randall, Phil Bowen, John Remy, SCOREBOARD UCSB Opponent 6 'San Diego State 7 5 USC 14 24 Cal Poly ISLOJ 0 5 UCLA 18 15 Alumni 6 7 USC 12 6 Cal State Fullerton 7 8 Stanford 12 16 'U. of Pacific ll 6 'San Jose State ll 13 'Cal State LA 2 9 'Cal State Long Beach 8 10 Cal Poly lPomonaJ 9 9 'Fresno State 8 'PCAA games. UCLA's Greg Arth makes determined effort to stop ass attempt by Gauchos' Cphris Gammons. R NTRY Berryessa S htnes But Gaucho Harriers Lose Jeff Berryessa highlighted a long cross- country season with a fifteenth-place finish in the PCAA conference championships at San Diego. Berryessa, who holds the UCSB course record of 24:44, gave Sam Adams' struggling runners fifth place behind league titlist Cal State Long Beach. UCSB opened the season with a 28-31 victory over the Santa Barbara Athletic Association but then lost four successive meets to UCLA, Berkeley, Fresno State and Westmont. The Gauchos concluded their campaign beating arch-rival Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, which gave them a 2-4 season log. Several Gaucho harriers fight for the early lead in meet against Westmont on the UCSB course. But they later fell to Westmont's powerful team. VARSITY CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM-FRONT ROW: Rick DeLanty, Mike Macy, Mike Jamsa, Jim Warren, Joe Hannan, Roy Cohen. SECOND ROW: John Ogle, Brian Shank, Frank Cermeno, Carl Gans, Jeff Berryessa, Steve Bushley, Gary Wolfram. Xl ZS 'Sz2w2fzf3fm. 4 SOCCER Gauchos Win Crown: Kolling Best Goalie The Gaucho soccer team, which placed five players on the all-league list, outdistanced all other fall sports at UCSB by winning the Southern California Intercollegiate Association title with a 7-0 mark. Sopho- more Mark Kolling was named the conference's top goalie as UCSB dominated the circuit by scoring 28 goals and allowing just five to the opponents. The season's highlight came in the All- Cal tourney when the Gauchos took second place, their best finish ever. UCSB edged UC San Diego and Berkeley before losing in the finals to NCAA runner-up UCLA. UCSB's Bruce Hahn uses his head to control pass against UC San Diego while teammate Doug McKibbin moves in to give assistance in the offensive drive. SCOREBOARD UCSB Opponent 4 'University of Loyola 0 3 'U.S. International University 1 3 'UC Riverside 1 9 'Chapman College 0 3 'Fresno State 2 2 'UC San Diego I 4 'Fresno Pacific 0 2 UC San Diego 1 1 Berkeley 0 0 UCLA 6 I Westmont College 4 - indicates Southern Calif. Intercollegiate Soccer Association game. VARSITY SOCCER TEAM-FRONT ROW: Mark Kolling, Peter McG1vern SECOND ROW: Robert Loscotoff, David McKibbin, Mike Cunnane, Larry Miller Pat Ferre Mike Bradley. THIRD ROW: Manuel Unzveta, Sam Horton, Peter Watkins Head Coach Zolton von Somogyi, Kenneth Reeves, Gary Andersen, Bruce Hahn, Mark Pugh BASKETBALL Tschogl Sparks UCSB To Big Winning Year Senior forward John Tschogl, named to the All-Pacific Coast Athletic Association team for the second time, led the Gaucho basketballers to a creditable 17-9 record and a 5-7 finish in the fourth toughest conference in the nation, according to an Associated Press poll. Tschogl topped the team in scoring with a 17.7 per game average and was third in rebounding. Also receiving all-league recognition was guard Ron Allen, who poured in 14.4 points a game. The highlight of the season was UCS B's 63-56 uphill victory over 20th-ranked Pacific, a win that capped an eight-game Gaucho win streak. A week later, the Tigers upset sixth-ranked league champions Long Beach, 104-86. lt was also the year of the senior for UCSB, as four of five starters and a total of seven players Were participating in their final collegiate basketball season. The Gauchos' 6-9 senior forward Earl Frazier fleftj sets for a long range jump shot against Iowa State. Scoreboard UCSB Oppon 72 Cal Poly-KSLOJ 78 88 Stanford University 71 71 Arizona State 91 85 lowa State 70 69 UC Riverside 66 80 Montana State 48 46 University of Montana 43 97 University of Arizona 63 108 Chicago State 56 73 San jose State' 67 63 University of Pacific' 56 64 San Diego State' 73 57 Long Beach State 75 71 Montana State 57 66 San Diego State' 69 78 Loyola University QLAJ 75 81 Fresno State' 69 71 Cal Poly fPomonal 64 110 Los Angeles State' 81 67 University of Pacific' 80 63 San Jose State' 65 79 Fresno State' 76 75 Westmont 65 66 Long Beach State' 80 69 San Fernando Valley State 67 70 Los Angeles State' 72 '- PCAA Games. UCSB VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM-BACK ROW: Team Manager Mike Cosentino, Keith Shumaker, John Radford, Dennis Rector, Steve Rockhold, Earl Frazier, john Tschogl, Ron Allen, jerry lace and Head Coach Ralph Barkey. FRONT ROVV: Assistant Coach Billy Jones, ,lim Edmond, Bob Schachter, Steve Haskett, Kent Petersmeyer, and Assistant Coach Adrian Buoncristiani. ent Gaucho center Steve Rockhold tallies crucial basket in final minutes of UC Ri-verside contest which UCSB won, 69-66. All-PCAA star John Tschogl connects on a left hand hook shot o-ver sticky defense of UC Ri'oerside's Al Evans. The senior forward was named to the all-league team for the third con- secutwe year. Ron Allen C above I drives through four Chicago State defenders for a lay-up in 108-56 UCSB victory. Reserve Steve Haskett K above rightj scores two at the end of a fast break and little Bob Schachter Crightj outduels three Samford giants for an important rebound. .bw ' il-Qs-fv Senior reserve guard, Jim Edmond Cabovej is checked closely by UC Riverside's Lee McDougal as UCSB's John Tscho l hustles to give aid. Tschogl Clegtj takes to t e air to prevent Montana State opponent from getting fast break pass, while Steve askett defends. Sophomore reser-ve Jerry Lee fleftj scrambles for possession in Montana State game while teammate Earl Frazier C below leftj scores against highly-regarded Cal State Long Beach. Senior guard Ron Allen C below 1 lays it in o-ver Iowa S tate's Wayne Williams after successful Gaucho fast break in 85- 70 victory. JUDO AND AIKIDO Once again Judo enthusiasts formed the largest club on this campus. This year it became the Judo and Aikido Club. The philosophy of the organization is to use its mental, physical, and moral strength for the good of mankind. The club also held a big dance party at the end of each quarter for its members. Ota Sensei I top rightj demonstrates a self- defense technique of Aikido by throwing two would-be attackers at one time. Members I top leftj practice the shoulder throw fseoinagej technique. Diane De Franco Crightj illustrates the style that earned her the distinction of being the first female club member to receive a lack belt in iudo. The club dance Cabofvel represents one of its less 'violent activities. The club also offers lessons in ballroom dancing. UCSB VARSITY WRESTLING SQUAD-FRONT ROW, with individual marks in parentheses: Sid Jordan I6-61, Scott Harris 112-73, Co-team Captain Doug Amstutz Q14-61, Bob Ybarra I5-l2l, Victor Garza 10-OJ, Larry Andrews 10-01, PCAA champion and C0-team Captain John Feeley 120-31, and Bob Telleria 11-151. BACK ROW: Assistant Coach Manuel Valdez, Head Coach Bill Hammer and Assistant Coach Dan Thomas. WRESTLING Feeley Paces M atmen. Wzth Tourney Victorzes Senior Co-captains John Feeley highlighted an otherwise dismal UCSB wrestling season when he won the 167-pound classification in the Pacific Coast Association championships. Feeley, a three-year letterman from Lompoc, was praised by Head Coach Bill Hammer for his consistent and fundamentally sound performances which netted him two other tournament titles, one at Biola and the other in the All-California meet. The Gauchos, who ended play with a 2- 12 mark, were hurt by two crucial injuries at the beginning of the season. UCSB was forced to forfeit several individual matches each meet because of a lack of wrestlers. Hammer said he is looking forward to next season when Scott Harris and Doug Amstutz return along with several other outstanding grapplers. Scoreboard UCSB Opponent 18 San Fernando Valley 30 14 Long Beach State 32 0 Cal State Fullerton 48 l5 San Diego State 37 24 Los Angeles State 26 9 Stanford University 37 21 Biola 30 37 Cal State Hayward 18 30 Los Angeles State 21 15 Arizona State 39 l l UC Los Angeles 44 0 Cal Poly QSLOD 48 9 Fresno State 39 12 San Jose State 37 Gaucho Co-captain and PCAA champion John Feeley Cleftj works on Cal State Hayward opponent in 167-pound class. Gauchos topped Hayward, 37-1 8. 224 POLL OCK AWARD Tim Bonynge Named Top UCSB Athlete Tim Bonynge, a three time All-American volleyball player who never competed in the sport before coming to UCSB, was named the winner of the David A. Pollock Memorial Award for 1971, given annually to a Gaucho athlete for the best individual achievement of the year. Bonynge, who is the second UCSB volleyball player to be cited with the award, was honored for his outstanding performance in May 1971 in the National Collegiate Athletic Association championships against UCLA's top-ranked team in Pauley Pavilion. Although losing to the Bruins in the finals, Bonynge's overall superb play and leadership "could not go without special recognition," according to his coach, Rudy Suwara. Tim Was a starter on UCSB's 1969 collegiate championship team, was a regular on the 1970 team which finished third in the national tournament and spearheaded the Gauchos throughout their successful 1971 season. The award is an annual one which was originated in remembrance of David A. Pollock, who starred at UCSB as a quarterback on Coach "Spud" Harder's 1935-37 football squads. Mrs. Myrna Pollock fabofoe rightj presents a plaque to Tim Bonynge while Assistant Director of the Alumni Association Ray Bosch looks on. Bonynge Krightj is seen in action in the 1971 NCAA champ- ionships at UCLA's Pauley Pavilion. NH ! 3 -. UCSB's Rex Anderson Ileftj swims a tough 100- yard butterfly against San Diego. SWIMMING Gaucho Tankers Shock Experts, Win PCAA Rick Rowland's underdog Gaucho swimmers picked for third place in the Pacific Coast Athletic Association meet, pulled off an explosive triumph in defying all experts while winning the conference championship at Long Beach. UCSB, led by gold medalists Ron Ludekens, Bill Haywood, John Bower and Chris Gammon, rallied on the final day to nip Cal State Long Beach, 446 to 445. The University of Pacific was third with 443 points. "It was the greatest thing to happen in the history of swimming at UCSB," enthused the Gaucho head coach. Several school records fell and most of the UCSB swimmers set new lifetime marks. Bower, the team captain, went on to the NCAA championships where he captured 12th place in the breaststroke in a record 59.7. UCSB SWIMMING TEAM, with PCAA trophy-RIGHT ROW, front to back: Dan Twogood, Jim Oberg, Mike Jefferson, Al Smith, John Bower, Wayne Wollert, John Allan, Bob Gibson, Rick Jones, Craig Bowman. LEFT ROW: Phil Waterhouse, Scott Simmons,-Mark Worden, Ron Ludekens, Ken Brown, Steve West, Randy Steigely, Corey Standbury, Bill Haywood, Chris Gammon, Dick Zimmer. Coaches are Paul Gray fleftj and Head Coach Rick Rowland. TENNIS Senior N etmen Shine With Early 1 5-7 Mark UCSB's unsung tennis team joined the highly successful Spring sports program, jumping off to a 15-7 record and 6-0 in Pacific Coast Athletic Association play. Seniors Ray Rockwell and Dave Grokenberger ignited the strong Gaucho charge which overtook Long Beach 9-O, Colorado 5-4 and San Fernando 8-1. Coach Ed Doty's team was scheduled to meet San Jose State for the league title and the veteran mentor said he expected a tough battle with the Spartans. Doty also praised sophomore Ed Shrader and freshman Kevin O'Neill for their outstanding efforts. Gaucho tennis star Ray Rockwell Crightj easily returns opponent's serfoe and Ed ghrader C below J hits successful scoring rwe. 4 5 lllivhtss-u-Q-.N VARSITY TENNIS TEAM-FRONT ROW: Mike Ong, Rich Lee, Bernie Goldfine, Craig Fllgley Josh Frank, Steve Rugles. SECOND ROW: ,lay Jacobson, Curey Miller, Pete Sanford, Rich Gearhart, Ed Sharader, Dennis Trammell, Chris Agruss, Kevin O'Neill, THIRD ROW: Lee Tofanelli, Tom Sutton, Greg Patton, Dave Grokenberger, Jeff Haas, Ray Rockwell, Head Coach Edward Doty, Assistant Coach Bill Fleming. QAQEBALL Sizzling Streak Lifts Club into PCAA Lead Hot-hitting freshman surprise Tony Torres, who batted .398 in the Gauchos' first Z5 games, sparked Coach Dave Gorrie's squad to an incredible 10-game winning streak and the PCAA lead with a 6-0 record. UCSB, 19-6 overall, swept consecutive three-game weekend series from Fresno State and Cal State Long Beach to take the conference lead by three games. The Gauchos continued their domination of defending NCAA titlist USC by winning two of the three games with the Trojans. Steve Ross, who hit .375 and pitchers Larry Hold, Rick Dierker and Marshall Gates were also pointed out by Gorrie for their fine performances. Senior power hitter Gary Nolan, who broke his foot in UCSB's first game, was expected back for the Gauchos' remaining 17contests. Gorrie said the toughest portion of the league battle was behind the Gauchos and the veteran coach predicted they would win the PCAA crown and enter regional playoffs. Freshman star Tony Torres Cleftj awaits afgaroaching pitch. Torres hit .398 in U S B's first 25 games of the season. Scoreboard USCB Opponent 4 Cal Poly QSLOJ 3 USC 4 Loyola I0 Loyola l - '-A 'sph' UClrvine 5 4 5 6 4 5 UC lrvine 7 5 USC 4 6 USC 9 2 UCLA 9 6 UCLA 5 1 UCLA 5 7 San Fernando Z 10 Westmont 6 4 Loyola 3 1 Cal Poly flaomonaj 4 5 Cal Lutheran 2 5 Westmont 4 l Fresno State' 0 9 Fresno State' 5 I0 Fresno State' 3 6 U. of New Mexico 4 7 Westmont 6 5 Cal State Long Beach' 3 5 Cal State Long Beach' 4 3 Cal State Long Beach' 2 '-PCAA games. VARSITY BASEBALL TEAM-FRONT ROW: Bob Franco, Tony Torres,'Craig Clark, Gary Nolan, Steve Ross, Bill Bourgaize, Greg Murphy. SECOND ROW: Assistant Coach Dick Baldizah, Scott Brown, Dave Powers, Mark French, Craig Park, Mike Patterson, Marshall Gates, Rick Dierker, Assistant Coach Tom Jackson, Head Coach Dave Gorrie. THIRD ROW: Cary Hansen, Paul Lee, Sven Ostrom, Larry Hold, Dave Kuehn, john Picone, Mark Littelfielcl. 'il 227 Q i 5 228 wi F ef mia: , 41 wmmzQw'f5avmg3? ff mf Y ',,, bn' V' , , if 2.4 .4 1 WY- nw w Aw- ,fm-Lp ' fM -'zzww W A 53352 L. 2+ 3 ffm, .-. .6 .Y fm. rd 23 0 TRACK Improved Season Seen For Adams' Trackmen Although losing three of their first four meets of the year, Head Coach Sam Adams' Gaucho tracksters looked forward to an improved season in 1972. Adams praised David Moch, Dan Madden, Kevin Bailey and Wayne Snyder for their 440-yard relay time of 41.5 in an 89-56 loss to PCAA favorite Long Beach. The time, just a tenth of a second off the school record, was expected to improve as the season developed. Also singled out were John Tobin in the javelin, Bud Stanton in the intermediate hurdles, Carl Gausin in the mile and pole vaulter Bill Hanson. "We have a much-improved team with better balance than last year," said Adams. "But We're still thin in the field events. Long iumper James Randolph Cabove rightj grimaces after attempt against Long Beach. Champion iavelin thrower John Tobin Cabovej hurls one 234 feet, seven inches and David Moch Crightj is seen in the first leg of the 440-relay. is gi 5 S qs, .Iv if is sl N r ' 6 5 1 ak Shot putter Maury Dance fabove leftj puts everything into important try against Long' Beach. Bill Broad ead fabove rightj clears bar in pole vault. UCSB's Kevin Bailey Cleftj hands off to Wayne Snyder in mile relay and Steve Lounsbury Cabovej hurls the discus. 1 R ,. -, , , ,t-lgttgeffs - - , . ,ti-gp-zyf ' '- ii ' . K Randy Neuman Cabovej tries to keep S 1 , from falling back after jump attempt. aapp p B i Gauchos Carl Gans and S tefoe Bushey p Crightj trail49er runner in 880. reee A K 1. VARSITY TRACK TEAM- FRONT ROW: Dan Madden, Ken Barczi, James Brian Shank, Wayne Snyder. BACK ROW: Assistant Coach Gerry Moro, Nick R21Hd0lPh, MHC? Mfirlm, David MOCh, Jeff BCVFYCSSI1, David Pourc, Rilrldy Rarig, Kevin Bailey, Bob Garcia,,lol'in Tobin, jim Warren, Dan Danache, james Nguman. MIDDLE ROWg Grcg Ratliff, joe Hannan, Mike Lamsa, Mike Tolbert, Steve Lounsbury, Maury Dance, Frank Zermeno, Bob Bryngelson, Carl Macy, Bill Broadliead, Bud Stanton, Gary Wolfram, Bill Hanson, Steve Busht-y, Gans, Ken Light, Dan Vvroblivgky, Coach Sam Adams, . wg .i , . s.-. ..-, A . s RUGBY Gauchos Defeat UCLAQ Tie For League Crown Player-Coach Mel Greg0ry's Gaucho rugby team, while marching to an ll-6 overall record and 5-l in the Southern California Rugby Union, was the only team to defeat national champion UCLA in 1972. Gregory called the 28-25 conquest of the Bruins the "finest rugby game we've ever played." UCSB found itself in the hole, 15- 0 and 21-6 at the outset but the Gauchos rallied to victory in the final minutes. Other victories included a 47-6 win over San Diego State, a 36-6 walloping of San Fernando Valley State and a 26-12 victory over the USC Alumni. UCSB had a tough time with powerful Berkeley, losing narrowly twice, 26-24 and 6-0. Team Captain Pat Preston, a former Stanford grid star, Tom Dimmitt and stand-off-kicker Peter Raven were credited by Gregory for their "excellent play." UCSB's 5-l mark in the SCRU tied Cal State Los Angeles and UCLA for the conference title. UCSB player-coach Mel Gregory Cabofoej grabs a Berkeley runner and California's Ned Anderson Ileftj goes up high to get possession of ball in contest at UCSB. Gus Mee fabofuej gets hard spike attempt over Chart House defenders and Chuck Burdick Crightj makes a pass on a serve. VOLLEYBALL DeGroot Leads Suwara's Pack to Winning Season Sophomore Captain David DeGroot, the only starter back from 1971's NCAA runner-up team, sparked Rudy Suwara's Gauchos to a 17-9-1 overall mark with the regional championships remaining on the schedule. Suwara said it would take a "super performance" from every Gaucho to give UCSB first place in the tourney at San Diego State and an NCAA playoff birth. The highlight of the season was a 15-10, 15-13 victory over top-ranked UCLA in the All-Cal tournament, which UCSB won. The Gauchos won 10 straight games and five matches in a row to garner the coveted crown. Freshman Jon Roberts, sophomore Chris Kane and junior Gus Mee also led the inexperienced UCSB team which, Suwara claimed, will develop in the next two years into a championship contender. VARSITY VOLLEYBALL TEAM-FRONT ROW: John King, Marshall Savage, Brad Gentry, Skip Allen, Jack Collins, Assistant Coach Bob Tolleson. SECOND ROW: Captain David DeGroot, Jon Roberts, Craig Johnston, Chuck Burdick, Chris Kane, Gus Mee, Head Coach Rudy Suwara. VARSITY GOLF TEAM-FRONT ROW: Bob Skaggs, jerry Van Ee, Brad Fleisch, Rick Martinich, Head Coach Newell Breyfogle. SECOND ROW: Individual Leader Mark Frolli, Larry Austin, Greg Ross, Mike McGinnis and Bob Dickey. GOLF, GYMNASTICS UCSB in Hot Tee S tartg 2 Gymnasts in NCAA Coach Newell Breyfogle's golfers broke out to their best start ever in compiling an ll-0 dual match record through the season's midway point. Mark Frolli, Larry Austin, and Mike McGinnis sparked the Gauchos to a pair of wins over UCLA and one conquest of California. Frolli was UCSB's top golfer, sporting a 75 average in 13 rounds of play. Breyfogle, who said this is his "best team yet," warned that the tough part of the season was yet to come while predicting his team had a "good chance" to win the PCAA. UCSB gymnasts Brian Kolb and Jim Borg won individual titles in the PCAA championships and earned the right to compete in the NCAA meet at Iowa State. Kolb was victorious in the sidehorse while his teammate Borg took the honors in the high-bar competition. Art Aldritt's squad finished third in the league meet behind champ Long Beach after compiling a 7-2 overall mark, 4-0 in PCAA dual meet competition. VARSITY GYVINASTIC TEAM-FRONT ROW: Randy Molina, Gary Duran, Jerry Bertteta, Mike Pfarr, Bob Henderson, Howard Graham. Not Berlant, Brian Kolb, Steve Pfarr, Mike Cox. SECOND ROW: Head Coach Art PiCfUl'Cd aff? Capfain Tim Caflffm and James W3Ym3H- Aldritt, Assistant Team Captain jim Borg, Greg Pierce, Roger Rapp, Frank E . i., if -- Eos,-11 A -' syn X is 19135 iw? iii A S WW' ff ,f-xwwfii . - Esiidifl' K , Lawn ,. -w H ff,-wwsuff .M-fe X, -f .vgf:wfJ'.x -2533112 asus 5? iii- 1 H B-iw. 1-z,m.,.,,f1.-1-f -' 'fi.sw., , N,r,.w,,..r,.., X -naw, we Aff - f,W-Q,sf',fmf's:51gie g ....-., c. .,.,, . ,...,...f.....,.s. v,., IDU2AlTIl1l2AlS Sweet recreation barred, what doth ensue but moody and dull melancholy, kinsman to grim and comfortless despair: and at their heels, a huge infectious troop of pale distemperatures and foes to life. P Shakespeare Q f . fkis 53. 'Vg ,V K v f, a pi Jzfif? zkrtg f N 'fxyf' f ,- .,,....nm94:,.w'r , sw. 7' if wife ' fe D i Ll Nw UCSB INTRAMURAL STAFF-FRONT ROW: Intramural Director Sandy Geuss, Patty Falk, Leslie Vogt, Larry Miller, Harry Bloom and Sandy Lucas. BACK ROW: Phil Singer, Jim Clarke, Vic Adams and Tom Walsh. 40 Some of the 31 girls C top Q who participated in the First Annual IM Turkey Trot are off and running. Stamina helped these two competitors Cabo-vej finish among the leaders over the one-mile course. A sticky situation frightj develops in a coed football game. IN TRAM URALS 52 Sports Stimulate Record Participation Once again, the UCSB Department of Intramural Sports established itself as one of the top IM programs in the country during 1971-72. Under the expert guidance of Director Sanford L. Geuss, a six-year veteran of IM athletics, activities and events included over 52 sports. Larry Lopez, in his second year as Men's Director, brought many innovative ideas into the program along with a great deal of enthusiasm. Sandra Lucas, the new Women's Director, restructured many sports and expanded old activities to give girls a chance to participate more and compete on all levels of ability. With these three leaders, Intramurals climbed to outstanding heights of participation. From Fall Quarter to Winter Quarter entries rose 18 percent in the realm of male competition, 38 percent in the women's world, and reached an all-time high in coed sports, entries increasing 60 percent. This was quite a record, considering the enrollment drop, which was of major proportions. Fall Quarter saw the largest-ever gathering of flag football teams: 105 altogether. Women's volleyball entrants were so numerous that extra nights were set aside for competition. Coed bowling attracted such excitement that over 50 students got in on the action. Officiating underwent major overhauls: all referees had to go through strict clinics, wear uniforms, and pass exams. All in all, the autumn days were filled with energetic students swarming over the athletic fields and gyms, laughing and showing off their skills. Winter Quarter brought 19 different activities, with three new additions to the already jam-packed calender of events: men's judo, women's free-throw contest, and coed inner-tube water polo. Literally hundreds of students entered each sporting event, scheduling games and matches so more than one sport could be played daily. A coed tennis player Cabofve leftj attemlpts tough backhand shot while coed foot all participant fleftj is stopped cold. sax' M WWE' is ,MHQWMQQW Q-or gm?" QW ..--'rw' If v- M5 X wa 1 T' 4 ' 25 2 z I :gm lg f sf is 'E fx , uf' 2 I ,V fx, ,QS as . , ip .H , 3 ev, YH 2 RZ, .. 1 'rs ii Q , , , L52 at zg 2 ' 1 Y sd 7 55 , ff ffl Z f , Exif' ff 5 sz fi55Qf5,?. fy 4 'GJ 5 mglgi, 'if I me 25,45 3 - 5 x f , 27 , I ,, ,kj -,af Q f' Av 1 I 4 N1 5.1 A A , Z f . ,, Q ' gf, fixfgk' 1 H, Q 3 , " 1 5-gyfz 'iff 2 4 , W fwggif al 'xy' Q .Y X-3' Q minfd, as f wwe 0 mx A? wggF'df,I 40 W . ,. ,, ,af 1' H W - Small waves fabofvej hampered intramural surfers during competition at Campus Point. IM basketbal enthusiasts Cleftj battle for a rebound and K below J attempt a long shot. 244 It's bottoms up fright! in coed inner-tube water polo game. Soccer participant Ibelow rightj loses his balance after head pass while woman fuolleyballer C below I makes bump pass to teammate in foreground. Female football enthusiasts play for keeps in coed football Cleftj and soccer players K below leftl fight for possession in a rug ed game. 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Free throw line jump fleftj is executed with winning form. IM RES UL TS Theta Delta Chi Wins M en's Football Crown ,..,-rv'- In the Intramural Department's most successful year, powerful Theta Delta Chi won the coveted Class 'A' football crown with an impressive 8-1 record. Tropicana, in marching to a 9-l slate, took the honors in Class 'B' competition. The Fugawi Braves, who went undefeated in IM basketball play, were crowned the 'A' champs while Kool and the Gang zipped to a 10-1 record and the 'B' title. Elsewhere, Sigma Chi romped to the soccer championship and GBAC captured the coed football title. Pam Blair highlighted the biggest year to date in women's competition when she won the first annual Turkey Trot, a cross- country race. The Pi Beta Phi women coasted to the volleyball championship and Fontainebleu was named winner of the basketball tournament. s fa, . . Q ' '1' E 1. 1, 1 , ,lf K3 as ww Y 1 ' I , , ma, ' 4 . 4,-1 . Q . 'Q 9, A ,. J 4 . "if . . ll It , A . Q ,l M k E . 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I HHHII M. sg - I H H U Q H 4 1-A. s""' Iii? J may 31 gi'-'I'- liiill gunman Q gg!!! liiill QQ111 asf 1 llllll -'Jails 8 395' llllll V111 gf, K z-Q : 4 ,-,ff FQ-- Qffva k gi I----I ax Q , .Q -.ny i ve i -4 ,..- A ji 2 GIWVIRCIIITIGHIS I had by all obiectifve accounts a 'normal' and a 'happy' family situation, and yet I was almost thirty before I could talk to my family on the phone without cryin after I had hung up. We did not fgght. Nothing was wrong. And yet some nameless anxiety colored the emotional charges between me and the place that I came from. I .Ioan Didion 265 V1 -' ,W J ma 'M' 4 fy? ,K ' ' ' J I I -A ,W qi . .V M41 i,f7,Qytg,if'1g, fp Q15 - 'ff' ' " 'V fm, V: Mi, f ' , -, I ,,f ,, : ,, g g f1,gv 'f ' m,1, V,-, ,x W,p,ef - . , NPI" , K. K V, H 4 ff - ,,,, W 4- -' Wig, ' ' " I :' ' 'V ,, ,- ,. gfgfgg- 1 ff L, I ,, -V 'VJLW' 1 7 ,, wwf ,AL 1' . 5 1 'fi T 'f-1'nQ f- , "V Ja 4, , , . M m., ' WW HQSQQ , , V . 'WWW 7 fy 1 f ' M " ' ' ,V V. 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W i ..,....- ,.,,- , 1 K ' ...1 , X Q K R :,:N V H 3 Q A f l ' lm Q ku QQ!! 2 X T3 L2 - X Qi ' 7 ?iigf22s :::1ew:Af.- f -fam ' - W X 1 1 - we 1 X x1"QRfQEfl"-- ' 2 1 If :Wa --., Q Q S 3 2 Q52 Y ..k.,k-. - -Q , 451 ag , . S., ifs. xr: W -7 . . . .. if Qi, u 3' 1 34 324' XL S Stal 229 fn: K ,A .555 gy., ff 'f E+: , X N x ' . m, x . NNE wg K sf Mx.. xc- ,. -W ,A . 3 ' ' sr: EY .. . mtv Q I 23 -1 -Q: E- 'T , x ,Q 2 .2 1555 x Hi: '. :V Wil I - 6 xv K VZ'12?iQf ' 'Y ,1 "F 6 6 f 'M M fy ' ' 1 1 5ff,l'. f- 1"X'4f'555?"5'3'T?f fi'e "ill . . Ai f WW W 1.14, ,K A wi, 'F Mar .H M q-'ff N I I , ,nr ,' fa:-f. . w W N, QP , Q, .M , f y fn- wf 5 :iw ,I M ,aww W :3K,g:g1:anw,.n5X ' " " 'm frm-Q M M, -mmm 2 wha f W ,Y Jw.-f , o AM 'f' I A SQ? A My f L A m, Q? .. ws if if ik, ' 'KOH-uw fo kM.m.W,N fm Nw-as if , X.fp,.-.. --rf if , .I ,fa ' iff " L7 f" . A ,lf dim, 3 Q : rin ,CQ 1' li V '-'gg ., ,Mgr I' ,' 4,, 4 wifi ,J .731 , 1 " iew? Pg ' CM? ,- ,ff 4 x 1 ,M , 4 f I '23 jfffx , V ,-5 ,W N. A Q, V by 'gg . Q 'A V .f 'f H' I K ,JW -..,,, ff-iw w4:,if"Z'i3, i Q ia. F2 fr 5 s.-sr 3835 '. A sw I f 11-S ,silt au , ,Ra mi- mkz. -- ,mahaaf , as 1 Q f . V We 5 ' 3' 45 Ein A Ma i z., M 4 Nm -av F' SNQUWW iv' " k . x k .N Q x x M. .. A K mga' K Ny N ., H 1 ks . A ,- fa jwvlw, Nw - - A K . ,... sv- GM. QP x r xfs ax uw 53 QQ K A k A Qf A A 'Ny i Q he sf ,-mga, n ' ' wfwsj i , 'A -,.,Zi'Q-. 2 I fx . .X Q . . wr X auf, X' ,J QWH f 1: Q' 'H . K 5, 4 , gh f 5 'M B3 1 Birgit? , I 'ay Q V? W Z . is 3 ff 3 is N. "wwf K, gl. 5 , 2 ....- ,ag 1 . ,nf 'W-L' 1 im .1 ff my x va Q. Q2 we-'ff A23 fiiislv V w if RRY 5 1 5' ii S v Sri f12i,fl59 Q if Q fi W W ,Z +1, M Q EL ...WMM x ,fvfkww f Jas' I' rf' ff 1-95 , i ,J , fl" r Qi' ar h Q ,SN -x 3 f-L f 'Q , L S' if ' N 1' is K Qtr' ,Ng ..- Rha Roommates barge into your life unannounced, destroy your privacy and sanity, and leave 'you shaken and violated. They teac the simple lessons of friendship and make sharing a commonplace event. They prepare you for marriage. You learn to love and hate at the same time. Freeman 1 QV Q , 7? ' fx ,lf ly, , 'V SQ-efgkzffrfk lif 4, W gm .1 f d ff' . I Ly may gf. I ' my '3 1, :fill ' Ii, 4 5, w4wEl'V if if , A 1 f, fm, f 4 , V-iw ""99ffHrfVfSliL Y Mjfii gs ' 'mi tJ5fiiiZ?Zl - I 3 ' 4? S 2zsQQg,fx?fUs'fs'21-H K lffggiw 2 Qf'ffl7Y!5i,f, ' P '.fglI'?'f P S ' f gg T25 ii ' :sf 'af ' 93, SQ QSM ug, :M I I know that my parents didn't send me here to shatter all my childish dreams or to learn some hurting truths or to find new ways of questioning them. But I did. I learned to make foolish mistakes and blame no one but myself: to sit up lonely nights and wonder what I 'm doing here, and knowing that I have no other place to be. I learned the fallacy of pla 'ng childish games, the delicacy of adult relationships, and the pain ofddult responsibilities. I have stumbled my way past three agonizing quarters of dull reading, listless T.A.'s, and iust missed office hours. I guess thatI have waited in the slowest lines, asked the most redundant questions and gotten lost in Ellison Hall as man times as anyone else. I ,have been done in by arrogant professors, fatal grading curves, and missing' library books. I have felt that terrible awkwardness of not fittinlg in, of not reall knozviglug anything about anything and not having t ose special friends to con ' ein. I have learned to avoid Saturday classes, the bookstore at the beginning of the quarter, and classes where books cost 850 or meet at 8 o'cloc Monday through' Friday, and my roommate. I have learned to stomach dorm food, to remember my sheet day, to lock my bike, to crash classes, and not to accept blind dates. I have learned the awful responsibility of independence, the danger of quick iudgments and foolish enterprise, and the cost of damaged egos. I have paid the admission price for coming of age at UCSB. vi ,n ir ffl f, A. 301 COROLINA AND MARISCO ISANTA ROSAI FRONT ROW: Dennis Kemp, Dale Edwards, Charlene Holmes, Karena Mike Di Rosario, Lucie Rideout, Robert Dingler, Ted Celmer. THIRD ROW: Wedaa, Clixie Green, Dana Coff, Greg Kendrix, Mike DePangler. SECOND Todd R. Eastham, Jesper Rasmussen, john S. Blackman, Anna Burns, jacquelyn ROW: Angela Look, Cary Straatsma, Corky Sassard, Celia Goechermann, John Glokenspiel, Mindy Mark, Patti Brouillard, Debby Crooker, Arlene Waldbaum, Minervini, Sally Fuller QRAJ, Lindsey Turner, Bill Groener, John Capaecio QRAJ, Megglio Parker, Pat Byrne, Debbie Wasbin, Don Frisco. w sw . su ..- www ix . : ' ' - W V Ry 135. A: Mm SS Q" SX Mgg .fi ' K -1 g HN ww RQ L Q 2 " 'wiv' 2 'mf Hn ' ff' 'Af-Wbw,,,, J, www Awww. Mfwww Yi :X f .. g s, 1 'L i Q , f wk. N I 5 Q .,, ? Lf. .,,. AQx,5,5g . we X - - -:fr S -S ,tin . :gg f LZ S' Q,-Vp I ,Lf :if -mg-, .5 ff. 1: A ' 5- E rm 4 -B4 I . 12559- , L .Xin 3' s X 1' V x xt! Y ff ggi! , we if fx... ' X " max i v x . , ,k:,:.. ...,,,.ii..., . , , Mm My X . ., ,, . B 'E Wall One har-vest from thy field Homeward brought the oxen strong: A second crop thine acres yield Which I gather in a song. Emerson 5 PRIMA VERA KSANTA CR UZ! FRONT ROW: Zenola Cochrane lRAJ, Cathy Sachs, Kathryn Buchanan, Katy Laura Altounian, Didi Orrick. THIRD ROW: Corrine Campbell, Barbara Hall Elliott, Kim Weir, Margo Olson, Nancy Clifford, Susan Berry. SECOND Janie Butler, Patti Page, Lola Low , Andrea Bertram, Suzanne Finocehio ROW: Jennifer Try, Maria Ortiz, Lori Jones, Kathy Moore, Sally Redford, Mareva Daniels, Molly Pfau and friend. Sandy Strunk, Carol Stewart, Angela Viviano, Yvonne Adame, Sandra Jernigan, 308 309 ..- NX -,...,,, gn ey an 88 ,.,v:...,fU..,. ,. --H-Q I A A i s . . n 1 t .4 s . .nav-sur-5 v3.92-... ff N ,Aq. ,, Q A X W ,,h, 5 g gg g 1 f ffg, 3 i !,,5, VTVV i,r V X X Am" my H M ' 'ff1,' YL' I A ' k 1 W H smR'Jn.mvu.A-and-iwkvwnn M ,mm ' V ' f Y f f f'A"'W"' z7"" , , , ,M wkqk J , Q 42 ,, 117 . W K f 3 I I - 1 5 x , .. W ' 5-5- -unkfuii all M ll il' my If r-ff W i I .5 ag: I 'L , , if ' " n :f-- ,. "" L 1 M 4 wf5" W' 3225 4'-fl. 5,1 """--.. W wi XS 'S' 'N ii k 3 gf N,H. l'N 1 -.Alu ' 'Www -9 -sw 4 xl 5? X S u QQ Y Q 1 ,Q I tw 'wr ,mm ff 4 f 1+ 4' V G J My , ,4 1 . .zli A.,,Wi , W,. fit fm W fi? wM4 My I R12 'Wanna' mn.. 167 'fx' . ,. , r 'Q jf fr ,E , .K , ig, E yfifiw, 0 15, 4 Y W ,. J' . :ff . X. .iff by V GREEK WEEK i-Qu gf-AF: nf , v- qneeks PANHELLENIC COUNCIL "This matter of sisterhood is often regarded slightingly, as a mere accessory of life-a happy chance if one falls into it, but not as entering into the substance of life. No mistake can be greater. Sisterhood is not a thing of glass threads of frostwork, but the solidest, the most beautiful thing we know. . . " This year Panhellenic and IFC worked in close conjunction on many projects. We moved the freshmen into the dorms in the fall and had a barbecue dinner for them and their parents. We sponsored a movie to help to finance the barbecue. Fall Rush was held during Registration Week bringing new members to all the houses. Rush raps were held throughout the year to inform students about rush and Greek life. Greek Week was held during winter quarter featuring an exchange dinner and wine tasting party, a boxing match, the proceeds of which were contributed to the Child Care Center, a street dance, a Trash- In in Isla Vista, the Duke Ellington concert, pushcart races, and an all-Greek T.G. Panhellenic had a picnic and playday at Stow Grove for Isla Vista children. Sack lunches were provided by local sorority alumnae. Panhellenic's annual banquet was held at Hobey Baker's at the end of winter quarter. New officers were elected for spring, fall, and winter quarters. Under the leadership of these new officers, spring quarter was a time for change and innovations. Another movie was sponsored to eliminate the burden of the cost of Fall Rush for rushees. A retreat was held later in the quarter which strengthened our beliefs in the Greek system. ln the year to come, we hope to continue our growth and to strengthen our ties with the university and the community. xl Mies A 'ir an q if if f 4 E W if if Lynn Sillman Vice President Pi Beta Phi Cindy Wood Community Service Chairman Kappa Alpha Theta " 1 WY" INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL "Fraternity is a time for personal development. It is the education of self in relationships with others in society. One learns not only how to care, but to share, and to gifve of himself." The lnterfraternity Council, comprised of UCS B's six national fraternities, played an active role in campus life during the '71-'72 academic year. Seeking to build a greater spirit of co-operation and understanding among all Greeks, IFC, in conjunction with Panhellenic, initiated a variety of community projects and social events that served as a basis for Greek unity. Through their continued participation in every aspect of the university, fraternity members again showed themselves to be among the most active and diverse men on campus. Chuck Loring Lance De Gooyer lm Comerford ohn Sexton Lou Obertreis Fergus Thornton President Administrative Vice President Fxecutlve Vice President Secretary Treasurer Fraternity Representative Phi Sigma Kappa Sigma Chi Phi Delta Theta Theta Delta Chl Sigma Chi Lambda Chi Alpha AX ALPHA CHI OMEGA "And in the sweetness of friendship let there be laughter and sharing of pleasures. For in the dew of little things the heart finds and is refreshed." The Prophet With a great fall pledge class and an enthusiastic group of big brothers, the girls of Alpha Chi Omega began another year of activities. Fall quarter's events included a fireside and house picnic with the Big Lyres and were highlighted by a cocktail party at the Timbers. As an annual philanthropic project, the Alpha Chi's celebrated Christmas with the children of Hillside l-louse. During winter quarter the fathers joined the girls at the house for Dads' weekend. The traditional formal and Senior Banquet were held, rounding out the school year for the Delta Psi Chapter. Alpha Chi's are pictured above with their "Big Lyres" and at their Fall cocktail party with the Lambda C hi's I below rightf . Ann Albright Susan Anderson Barbara Baldwin Darcy Boesel Catherine Buckley Patricia Burr Sally Butler Diane Buzzini Laurie Campbell Liz Carter Stephanie Cetti jane Conway Marty De Laveaga Sandy Denhart Janet Fiedler, Noreen Fiore SF . t e s 'IQ ', .. Q A jf' at f Margaret G3l'Ci3 Carol Griffin Nancy Hesch Linda Higginbottom Eileen Johnson Karen Johnson Beth KNOW Carmen La Gory Karen Larsen Kris Laun Karen Mayers Cathy McCarty Katie MCHCCS Linda Mitchell Patrice Morasch Janet Okazaki Karen Pappenfus Carol Pike Mary Rayden Joanne Seargeant Janis Schmitz Sue Shields Lynna Simonek Nancy Smith Margaret Sffeed Shirley Tacoma Deborah Uchida Sharon Venatta Laurie Winthrop Rosemarie Yuranovich Judith Krevis Lorie McGuinness Cindy Quinn Judy Staschower Diane Zearbaugh , ,S-5 , R Qt 5 v Q E ' if , 1 my Q A a Qs? nf ff si M M K? E K ,dwg i 1, . 'Q fb, ,Ev - -S1 Sf' , X Gig, A W 1 ,N,iq,, ,fl V 1' J 'Y' ff ,. f Lg. I ,ff L, ,A.. , . W . L. X 1 fzsiz p ,Q fu .. ik ' , 4--L,f , 1 - 5 .LA. K wus: X if , 71 .. , A. .wffju R ' 172, ' ., M gg- -- ii . , ,. lm? Ai nf 1: , -:-.:- f -. 7 .- if - . , X' TX " -. x 1 1 X. ' --Ki ..,,:.gf,q .5 - 5 .. 5325? ' - Wx W K ' N-F31 -paw- Xa , Mew iff we - WA . W t W 5 , A S- ,MW-, -Q .X is I K . ww-X. A. QQ? I , - ' , X , V Xilwiwv K ' A , X K Y +1 Ku. 1:.'. :-fix K 5 .- X .f 51 N-M-1 .LS 31, ,.., ,QQ ' ' - 3 - ifslf f , ' 'Www .. Li .:l!'1.1rv IQ, " " - ,rife x ' 1 if , .2 f- " if - -Q" 4--, mqzqsz- 4 f A. W ' - . ,. 1 ' .esE,g1gig W, N gag :wiq iga WWSS ii . ..,..,,.., 5. Jay Arrott Tim Carlton John Gadsen John Houston Mark Miller Alan Stein .. f , 9 9 rg, R Q H ' W' Q Q r fiat .bl 2 M ew 1 w if 4 K , Q K I I V s M 43? f 3 gg , ff , ,S 6 Lf v 1' -wgfki ,V . . , f 9, f Wy . qt it r S ,ie JE 3 1 ee E 3 pgzw , E ik 3 , , 'll' V Q fa , ' ,.,, if ,swtvw ,V - ', o oon t t,m ,V,i. , X5 ',',, ' ' 92 "" . ff-ff if - r : 'w nsfizqllfx 'K' Bob Barnwell Rich Clark Steve Gieselman Steve Jeffries Pat Nelson Stuart Stinson pw: " if 'fs , . 1 ., ' - -: r-v,f,:r:f:-H .:W.,-,.m 2, .. f f-f- M, f as Q, 1 , , Q - . lwviafiw Sfieiilhl? ,, ge-V-H., L- . aww 1 'E - 'viiwgiggfggfw ig- t Q1fzbgw1ir:.fi12e:wg -nszlwiw 5943449272521 zfstgasir-figfsgfaffkggze new-' ef ,lgaz1's,wg:a mlwwsl. V--:em we W 114553, azwiiiijifif1?izs'.a2ge3Q7gQsz7115? Sie? W. M ,, .,,.r,,w :fewgyreiisgrfifkfwfexe' A 5 w,4eggf5ggQ9:1ff.mg5 me I A, rr-, ,Q,g6gg9,s,,gw,g3,g, -warg. , -,-5. . V :wmv 'aeifzf ::ekg5:+:.':f':u:12: 1 Ed Betts Mark Didinger Bruce Hammett John Knight Gary Pellecchia Jeff Trant 75 3 Q he 3 S S rw 1 SA X K5 A ng m Vw-.W-. f-,wafer -V .z 4' yi... , W ...,5,,,E,.r,S ,J -g , M ..,,, , -,,.,.. a1,M' , ,. er A we Q 5 wx 45,5 Y v as get 3 2 LQ' 2 'X 2 3 S S 6- Q7 f 's my ? 35" if l ' X' V if tg X if ae WT if i as W , 1 :... :,vA - Z-if ,, 42f9lQf?l',z' ' " S55 W? QS S A, X 4 S SEQ? 6 in H 5 bn H, we 'C ,S ,ag -Q, W ,em or 2 K Q , szfz:e, . ,E Q 4 M 1, V A 4, .. -5, A :,..,, . ii J if sf .Y 2 41 2 4 'fm , , 54 TJ' 3 fVQI5.2 , 3 ' , , Q 3 if 4 it Allen Bush Tyrone Flanagan Jack Holland Jim Kuhn Mario Silvestri Mike Warner ZBT ZE TA BETA TA "Live hand-in-hand and together we'll stand on the threshold of a dream." Graeme Edge We, the members of Gamma Xi Chapter of Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity believe that fraternity is a rewarding personal experience. The goal of the university is the development of the individual as a responsible and mature member of society. We sincerely believe that fraternity offers to the university community a unique, desirable and successful means of achieving this goal. AAII ALPHA DELTA PI "A friend is someonewho dares to dream your dreams with you." A D Pi's began the year by pledging fifteen girls in Fall Rush. Fall quarter was highlighted by a date party at El Paseo. During the year, activities with the sorority's philanthropy, St. Vincent's School, kept the house busy, including making presents for the girls during the holiday season. Finding time for many outside activities, Alpha Delta Pi was well- represented in such organizations as Honeybears, Shell 8: Oar, Gaucho Christian Fellowship and OCB tutoring. Winter quarter found the A D Pi's making plans for a formal at El Encanto. Dad's Weekend was also held during the winter. The year was ended with a Spring date party, and during the last week of school, the seniors made plans for the Senior Banquet. ,f32?,,:zG:.g::',?1'jg, - 1 yn , 2' fad fr a 571 B 1 am 191 f V ,ln Pt :E ' 1? 4 ,aa mf fx ja S r 5, " f ' ff 91,4 Q ffiffjf J 4' W: V 1 f .. ,Z ZW Y My vi if -V' . A Francie Allred Elizabeth Bailey Judith Berrett Nancy Beyers Lynn Bishop Janie Butler Pamela Clark Chris Coolidge Deborah DeBow Karen Frame Stacey Griffith Debbie Hanke Patti Harris Cynthia Henderson Barbara Hill it S P N ,,.. -Q 1 ,5 ss- 'libs NF dll' K WH R33 ft Q as a X 1 538 + 3' S' - lgT1s5-:f:i:- i ' . I- M f f: if K ., ....,,.M M V - - - -V -fe f. waewe:swsf1,e:sfvfilfkiiu-fili-'ff'-fff.2f.'iF:'.s 1' 5 We BminL.,fa..s.,.,,.m,r4f,,:M.si-iw.wH:-':f:.- izmmfw -if-fifwiefw U - if 71.ff-.ezgwwfsz .lmz,L-.Wi--lazf. -'.- 1 in 3,,,,,.,.,. -M. 5?iizi?2Ef3Ef:33f2si?1Sff15?4s1 wS's5s,S:.Q?ffv fwnst . f- .11?:vsK+s54PSiy' 'H e ,.,U,k,, ,M as -,,:,f5.ee!1f51e1,v - sz1sm5i4ef14?is1-f 5155.-535Q1'53f1Sfl555i?57' 'Q 145955i2essf23?l.s':-i,'l my-ifeigffl'?isii'fl f3zz5ii??ififi:f"- 2QTi1SfNf"9Xi?Zfs- - ,g5y1s.fm- fa. . an 'ms we Mf,f,,.m . ,ff - f - , W- .- wwwffw f wwf ifefwfsfsg 1 , . , -Fiiifigfwffige ' . 22,51 7 ,, '. . H55-,141-" .2 +us'rx,Sfggg53g:- , 3 Fil ' ' .Lg,. iff K tx? 3 if 4 X We ' 2 S ,, 3 if ,ga r X i Q 2 'P ,Q hiv We V . ,xasw i . 1 .- ia' 1: SEA! isiijfi 'f15',-'i,Q5ffy- 1 . Us E+ .ffjvf-'Q-- ,ie 3frQ?r532issr,.f':1 --11 , . F Marlene Jensen Carolyn Kelly Carolyn Kreston Gail Lazarus Karyn M cCart Laralee Medlin Quenby Morrow Betty Neumann Randy Nixon Kathy Panovich Carol Pearse Leslie Peck Gail Pospisil Leslie Pospisil Gail Rogal Ginger Roth Teri Schmidt Andrea Schwartz Debbie Simpson Joan Wilson Patti and John danced fleftj, while others watched I below 2, at the A Pi Winter Date Party at the El P0860 Restaurant. fi C 1 glass? ,E gy W 'ex rf fx 4 " ki, Q Ng a ? N , i 'Q f ' 9 K 2 f F? Z! xx Z Q 3 Q f P I ZW, fs z ' qs: if 55 5? S if x .E ff 5' wif Q gk Q i' m , ,XZ 5 3 .. S 3 iv f, ff 3 L 4. f f Q ,K 2 ' - Q . . , 5 5 fi vi 72- ,Lk Z, fx Q 5 if Gary Barber Andy Cesare George Gundersen Dave Kuehn Ron McElhany Steve Bellefeuille William Bradshaw William Briggs Jim Cesare Daniel Downey Robert Doyle Larry Holcl Michael Holzer Rodney-lohnston Gregory Lagana Neal Lewis Paul Logan Gino Mazzanti Hank Oltmann Neil Snowden J! Russell Campagne Richard Ferreira George Klouda Rick Lyding Glenn Stanton III "iz, 41 , V im E' ' ,. '32-gg Steve Campbell jack Graham Don Kohlmann R. Patrick McDonald Fergus Thornton ...X 'Y' N m E ? R SF 1 X X SQ My X X. v.., Q. L S . RN ffl-T551 .- 1 'N M. .uk -s Nw , Q3 xg'-:ff if k itfslfi fl. - . 1 . E. Q , if-S ff 'N i x .. ,-A. f . S3 f A ' K L Q x Q. ,Q S.x'f Q 2 ww 'Q K A ik Sig ff: if x . A Q M ,M Q88 . f- Sm X '.Si fv- li , ,f 4 ,M nswf wwf' 'un' I x .. .www- , ww- Q1 i Q Sw . fi: 3 Q3 mn Q X EES, .sg 2 E .Qs aff ?- .5 R ! N is .sf tix QE .Q is Y wrap Qs .A K .5 gr :El 1 K , :avi ' K x ' 1 4 ' ALPHA PHI "Friendship improfves happiness, and abates misery, by doubling our 1oys, and dividing our grief. " Addison College is a unique opportunity for each of us to enrich every aspect of ourselves. We, as Alpha Phis, have found that we cannot learn all that we need from books alone. We want to learn to understand and be tolerant of others by sharing experiences and exchanging ideas. We can only do this thru interaction with many different people. lt is through this exchange of experiences, feelings, and learning that we can hope to improve ourselves as well as the world, not only as a house, but as individuals. Alpha Phi celebrated its hundredth anniversary this year. Some of the centennial activities included a luncheon for all California Chapters at the Century Plaza Hotel in Los Angeles and a nation- wide convention in Washington D.C. We also initiated a Big Brother program called Ivy Men. We had a casino party, a Christmas tree decorating party and various other functions with them. We held a party for disabled heart patients, instead of collecting money for the Heart Fund, our philanthropy. Alpha Phis also participated in student teaching through CAB and Honeybears. At the El Paseo Restaurant for their Fall Formal, Al ha Phis and their dates built a pyramid fliar leftj. Karen Jensen and Sheila Staley Cabofvej, practiced their routine. , ,Q ffl, 4 A M Q ,, L, igggg ,H f Q .Wg ,I ,:,:' xi' ,M ,ww V .., R- an . x gg-. 5,2 my Jw ,, W' 551: fig kkkkk , as 'M kr .. K A U 7 RR ,.-: Q . 1 5 Qt Jw 4? 1 X QM k Q 2 Q. K. X H. N S A qv ff? x iw ' af iii wk mi Swizsmssww M 5 Q? E ki iw-,E V g ' f.: . ' "':, A , , M .VX Q Xi ,WE Mfg A Nw , 21 1 is Y 5 ai as X ' X The highlight of fall quarter for Chi Omega was the Gold Rush Party I pictured above and lower-leftj. Mrs. Ashcraft, Val Warner, and Marlyn Jenfvey fleftj , trimmed the house Christmas tree. The girls fbelowj enioy an after-dinner bridge game. Greek life supplies many alternati-ves for the active member. CHI OMEGA "Don't walk in front of me- I may not follow Don't walk behind me- 1 may not lead Walk beside me-and iust be my friend." Camus The Chi O's had a very successful year in public and social service activities. They started the year off with a "Gold Rush" party and had a great winter formal at the El Paseo. The Chi O's involved themselves in philanthropic activities such as volunteer work at the Larry Adams Blood Drive and work at election polls. They participated in various campus activities such as intramurals, Honeybears, and drama productions. Chi O's are known for their individuality yet still maintain a unified spirit. KA KAPPA ALPHA THETA "Now-may the warmth of friends surround you as you go down paths of light and laughter where the happy memories grow. " The Thetas began the year by entertaining rushees with a comic melodrama skit in an old-fashioned ice cream parlor atmosphere. Rush, in bringing the house together, inspired the girls to take on many new chapter activities. Many of the members were involved in the pre-professional student teaching program and other volunteer activities in the communityi We are especially proud of Patty Jones, IVCC Representative, and Jeanette Kaji, Sorority Representative to the A.S. Legislative Council. The Thetas became acquainted with the Santa Barbara Alumnae through a progressive dinner, Christmas gift exchange and Founder's Day luncheon. Other activities this year included a retreat with the San Diego Theta Chapter, caroling at convalescent homes, scholarship banquets, a Christmas formal, parent's weekend and finally, senior week in June. Two Thetas C left J find welcome solitude from the hectic sorority life while attempting to understand the aerodynamtcs of keeping a kite afloat. V ff 4 'ii ii Q Lg -K Lmmfwfww LL iii?-' dwg ---Q1 iff L - 5 AL 5 mg A1 LL, ' ' N' ' 1a?fM:"""WB'3'V MSM ' -fx My M mf ge af ,S L fa AA f' L f .,.A 5 L --x. Lf gf Zi' In ' 5 LQ V L L LL L L EL L- L a L 5 L, L4 QL, V Li, w ii X Y. ,L 3, " L 'FL-Si NL fiiv f .L L WL m Y is 'fL ,L ""' L 5 .. L 1 - L -L -A :L --L.a. M:.gNm.-FL. L.Q3f..L -s:L,m. L - x L Q xx L L, L, 1 L L A K if -'M L QL 4 ' L L S S ,f - L J L L 'If Q Q-f fx L- M34 W .L 'W L f ww gf- L - :--L. wif. Lg ,L , L,L , Fw Msn A L gy-1 5 L - Le f- ff 1 QA ,+ V V- .L - f I L X 1 ' 'W M W5 .- 1 ' L X' . Aw M Q Q ky Q qi Li L W L LL Rf R L 8963? -LSL- -W ,L.. L LL L L- L- " - A L fffgf, L, L . S' + AL - .- T 1 f 4 - 1 4 X 1 N L Xa X sf" W -:-r.LLf- K W QL, 'Q YL sg XX 334 Jim Borg, UCSB's co-record holder in the high-bar repre- sented the Gauchos in the NCAA gymnastics championships. Neal Cole Terence Cuddyre Steve Dunne Dennis Eagan john Elder john Harper Terry Jackson Dave Johnson Rick Martinicli Harry Matsinger Peter McGivern lan McNeil Thomas Powell Richard Reynolds Dennis Russo David Stewart Roger Swartfager Jeff Vesely Ford Williams Dwight Wrench Stephan Barber Douglas Bauer john Belden james Borg James Burnham Bradford Channing si f 'Z ,H K2 is f 5 CD69 PHI DELTA THETA "Whatever profits one rrtan profits others as well as himself. Marcus Aurelius The Brothers of Phi Delta Theta enjoyed a successful and rewarding year. They exhibited their brotherhood by participation in service projects, social activities, and intramurals. Throughout the year they made a unified attempt to better adapt to the ever-changing UCSB community. The Brothers took part in their National Fraternity's Community Service Day and continued financial support of their adopted child in Mississippi. For the third consecutive year, Phi Delta Theta ranked highly in academic achievement. The Brothers worked together in sponsoring "The Point" as a fund-raising project. They also enjoyed themselves at the many parties put on by the fraternity. The Brothers participated in all the intramural sports and their teams went to many of the playoffs, beginning with flag football in the fall. AI' DELTA GAMMA "The time to be happy is now. The place to be happy is here. The way to be happy is to make other people happy. ' Robert Ingersoll This year marked Delta Gamma's 100th year. Along with Delta Gamma chapters all over the nation, the girls at UCSB and their Santa Barbara Alumni Chapter, celebrated the Centennial through service to the community. As their Centennial Project, they decorated their entire house as "Delta Gamma Land," with many of the Disney characters, and then bussed underprivileged children of the Santa Barbara community to visit the house. It was a special day for all the children and all the girls. The DG's started the year with Fall Rush, highlighted by a Creative Night. The girls and rushees made hand-crafted goods, which were later sold to raise money for piano lessons for their blind "little brother", Tommy. Other activities during the year included Parents' Weekend and the Pledge Dance in the Fall, the Winter Formal, and the traditional Luau and Dads' Weekend in the Spring. Throughout the year, the girls participated in intramural sports, including volleyball, basketball, and DG Strings powder-puff football. A father enio ed the opportunity to dance with his daiighter Ileitj during igarents' weekend. Delta Gamma's Pledge ance 1 below and below rightj was fun for everyone. Q .ph kkaiggyk - -:.,,, Q., f-'- Q-f M ...f N 5 -- A- - ,,.. f i u se gg-Q33 -' 'i s tiff "" Q -. - 2 """ :gjg,g,,, ..,, .. . .,, . ,. ,. ,,.. I A fs .M ,. ,. ,ws -A . .,-. if V -if? ,... E 5 ' ' '- fi 1 Nancy Banker Gail Bei Barbara Blackshear Pam BYOWQ Christy Chittick Joyce Cima Kathryn Davies DCb0l'-'lh DICIKSOH V Si rg. Liz Gooder Nancy Langstaff Susan Palmquist Colleen Sawyer CDEK PHI SIGMA KAPPA "Damn glad to be Phi Sigs!" Phi Sigma Kappa is a home that is unique among college residences. The dynamics of our brotherhood offer each man the opportunity to realize his own worth and potential as an individual. In addition, the fraternity encourages the warm exchange of different backgrounds, ideas, values and activities, a social life charged with novelty, excitement and comradeship, and the experience of life-long friendships and a way of life which will be remembered and cherished for years. f1"w' . fm 3 I , g 52 :f,QiM.i ' ii I J, A V- J! va i 'i ' Ti,i'Ii,,,, in 'i '- - .. 'i 1 N ' , ,lf If X. Ig A I at K yy t , J' , 1 1 .aa-.aa-' Jeff Anderson Doug Blois Karl Doolittle Jim Evans Sam Gingold joe Gutierrez Lin Loring Walt Low fi an 3 V QE? V 'av A . f 'f 3 N fl, 5 is if at 1 to '. 1 lry if 1 is Kurt Bottoms Mike Fahey Ken Harris Larry Mauer Q ,.,f, W , S, V ,Vxv X 4 Q I V ff ' t 1 , i"e i 'P 'I V V L . gi 2 ttti 'L if ' llzii K J? Chris Browder Mike Burke jim Darling Bob Gin Fresca George Fulco jim Gazdecki Chuck Loring Marc Hayes Steve Heath jim Jaworski Jere Nolan Mick McDiarmid Dan McGuire Tony Moreno X7 yi f The Phi Sigma Kappa Fall Cocktail Party ffar left and abofvej was at the Santa Barbara Inn. Two Phi Sigs Ccenterj are seen with team members and Hillside House resident Phil 'l:Voml:ile at the UCSBfSanta Clara game they oste . 14' , ivy A WM 0 55' Q K P A . ' ' 5 in ' ' 4 in ln' , L 1 J V if .fi 4 ,xii i l 44 if J P . H V f I 1 ' , i 4 Y R 2 V '12 .- L L ' i H i , ' f , i . I 3 'tiki I 2 4 51 4' - fr ' 1 4 ' ll , to ' t 1? gs' l X S. l . ' S i f'?4e2sf+" ,fm f Q was i X P ew M' t l 3 Q A I '- I .,. H , ' 6 ff' my ,lt C2 - ' 1 f at , we , y'i, 1! we l K u C " I W Q sb AQV4 gd if K , s an - Q 'V' 5 M ' 1 L , Q ' so H .,v, Steve Powell La.rry Prager Tom Putnam Bacardi Von Rusnel Bob O'Holloren Jim Pasternak Craig Peterson Bob Skinner Chris Smith Bill Steiner Pete Stevens Art Pettersen Wes Phelan Riek Pierce Pere Watkins Dave Werner Bob White joe Williams Vern Rye Ethan Samples Mike Shire Scott Tracy Bill Yankie Steve Turner Glen Ybarrola Craig Vernier Larry Zarasosa :J iff Whiz mx ev 4' ,J , sf, , W :iff fr. A is- L M4 - f ff K ' 9 A Q 423 egg? K, I 'Eh ,, 5 Ugg, 1 3' 'ig 5 ggi. ay? ' 'L .52 2 A D Q ,gy H ,Mfh H3 I ff? f f . qw 7 ""' J 1 9 i f if Q Q 4 12, if 1 " if? W 1 Y is A f Re Q W 3 'H Q VT sf g 1 E z . iv pmf - 14. Av nik i . ., . ..,. 3 'R -5-.-.......W, K' g DM-. .. , . .2 ,..x ea N Q Y 3. T .--SQ: -5515. kg . ., f.. R M I! 2, s ,, , A4 M K ' ,irn ff .fn 1 P S 1 'ag af 4 Cindy Abbott Candy Blackford Susan Colvin Anne Geary Marianne Michky Bonnie Poore Sheila Stuart . as wa g 2 4 ay? , ,X ...ff z . LV, ,. , ,. i -. 6+ . A U , :ui " Q A 1 ' f' wx 1 1 12115713 V ' - f f ij' , ' is 4 i gig- L, 5 A A Janet Arnold Cathy Buck Janie Davies Marcy Head Susan Minkley Marilyn Roy Chris Utsumi Ann Barber Laurel Byer Lynn Duffy Laura Leslie Gayle Norton Carolyn Sandeen Carole Wade W iz Lark Baynton Paula Christiansen Dale Edwards Wendy lVlcQuade Pamela Orth Lynn Sillman Debby Wright 34 if fy I V , 0 ,W ,, M , ummm mf UIORS . . . if the counter culture is going to li-ve up to its name it's Eging to have to shift from the role of critic to t t of producer. It's oing to have to produce 'viable examples of wlgat it s asking for --- or else invalidate tts discontent. Wendell Berry 343 ,wwf W"""? V , A Z if , QL an it V4 Has it been four years already. How many books and papers does that make? And how many petitions signed or open registrations have I attended? And most of all-what have I gained? I know that I've lost. I have lost my high school identity, my innocence, and my sense of security at understanding the world. I have lost may .complacency, but perhaps I have only traded it for an e ucated apathy. I have learned, or at least thy Karents hope, that I have learned to survive in the wor , ow to adapt and change with and in these times. But I have also learned how to evade both necessary truths and obligations, to write term papers on a weekend, to BS my way past the secretaries in the administration building, and to borrow notes that I missed due to my own negligence. I have read far more books than I have had time to understand and have memorized more meaningless facts for 7 a.m. finals than I care to remember. I now own a collection of impressive books which I will never read again. And now I fear that I have not been totally equipped to 'make it' in the real world. Sure, I can quote Freud or Durkheim or debate the effect of culture on the individuaL I can use history to prove anything and philosophy to disprove it. But have I learned four years' worth of knowledge? Have I spent 810,000 on something valuable, or was it a waste of mug? Was college not a stepping stone but a detour in my 1 e And what kind of person have I become and does it matter to anyone else but me? I have more questions without answers now than I had before I entered college. 34 346 When I was younger I heard stones about the play school by the sea the college wtth a prtvate beach, etc When I arrtved here the bank was tn ashes General Motors was camped on our doorsteps and offshore Mother Earth split open In rebelhon to drilling rigs that sucked her dry And over tt all was the shadow of the war Play school? Hardly My frtends and I rolled up our sleeves and got to work Harry Boyd Htstory If the Umverstty teaches you to doubt even for an mstant the mstntuttons whuch surround you tt has accompltshed its mission. Gregory Alexach Htstory With all the knowledge and wtsdom all the dreams and tdeals that there are on this campus and indeed on many other campuses tn thts country tt ts really sad to see how httle ts done with these gtfts So much stupidity tgnorance and mtolerance still remam among us who have come here to learn to know better We can only hope for a better future HenryA Lavagmm Htstory The Untverslty ts like a into at I was only a transfer student But without the love and frtendshzp of the Phi Delts who added frtvoltty to the quarters and good roomtes who taught me about apartment living I never could have stood the pressure And I was lucky massed the rtots had ftnanctal assistance from my parents and lived two years on the beach wtth the ocean as m back door I love UCSB tt s 1ust too bad that I came here as a ome Ec mayor otherwise this campus and IV have so much to offer Thanks for showing at a to me Cris Blozan, Nutrition sewer You get out of lt what you put What do I thmk of the Umverslty? What s to think? It would be dtfftcult to tmagme UCSB located elsewhere It seems tts educanonal qualtt and appeal are augmented considerably the environment t the conclusion of my sentor year I see the ntverslty as somethmg enlightening to do whtle hvtng in a beautiful resort Rick Foster Hnstory Andy Malls Art The Umverstty is like a screendoor things flow rtght on through. Joseph Goldstem, Honors B10 Sci ' I D , . . . . . , u I l . . : - . 4 9 . ' ! . . . - .. . , 0 -u . 7. Y ! 9 . 5 . , : . . . . 0 0 . , , ' l Gretchen Hewlett, Philosophy . . n . , . . . . , I ' ! . , . .I . , . ., . If '. . ' . . . , . 1 D : . . I S L L L L, .L ,, , LLLL L L . L MM. LW-L S 3, LL .-N f., .1 cfm.0.wgvsvx-:5f:'m"Sa:1k,p,.,-.rr Q , . ,, L, . 14 J L-:Q ,-,,,Lg..,:5.,5+- 5555:-gil:.Legg-135:352:3-gg,5.j:::,.-In , aqigfrgx fs. ih:g:3:iL:,:Z 5 L ,,L 1-'-' f:L' L L...-L , v:w,,,, f:- w Las:':Lf. W 0 -H-+'+-fm?"-M y -- V- 1 5 i 48 Dogs keep the students and faculty honest They speak up tn class when the lectures get too heavy They express emottons we try to hide When I see someone who IS too engrossed with his self :mage I thmk of the dogs The English say a man who does not know dogs and horses cannot know humamty UCSB has both. Blll Boyd History Someone yust asked me how I survtved four years at thas untverstty with my samty preserved I rephed What ever led you to beheve I m sane? Too many people go along wattmg for something to happen to them not realzzmg that everything that IS happemnlito them ts worth something No one sto s to thank Now w t has that expertence done for me? hey 1ust go along wautmg for somethmg to hut them like they are trymg to fmd a direction. If Lorelle Browning English they watt the dtrectton Just mtght fmd them It all works out Danny M cCool, Social Sciences I have watched two of my friends o crazy another one get hooked on heroin, and few more find od tn order to live with the pam inside I only wonder what things would have been like if they hadn t come here It couldn t have been worse Rtcardo Freeman, Anthropology This place has tau ht me three lessons C12 Don t expect ltfe to be sample 122 on t expect friends to understand And 131 Don t buy dope from strangers Ruby Mere Psychology I m tired of my ma1or my minor MWF classes and the Dazly Nexus I m gomg home Robert Patge Geology I was ttred of ftghtmg the fuckin system so I came back to school. Now I fmd myself ftghtlng t ts system Name Wtthheld I used to thmk that it was my fault that I couldn't make tt tn the Umverstty untll I met about 50 other people who had the same problem. I now reahze that thts place ts fucked and the only knowledge that I have acqutred ts how to avoid its pitfalls. I would have rather been educated. Maman Schiller, Sociology . . . , . . 7 ..'.. . ...Q 9 ' I 'i !! . i I ' '66 , - . I . . . ! 9 . . . ' 5' ' . . ! . ! ,. . - ' P ! 7 ,. , . 7 E. . 349 if you can transfer do so If you can graduate early then by all means do so If you must make excuses to your father for leaving this place then begun to make those excuses Get away from this place by an means necessary or you will ltve to regret lf Thus Umversnty st ently kzlls part of ou eborah Walters Spamsh Thus really as a rzghteous place I dag the vtbratzons that I get from the sun the surf and the groovy eople that I meet Whenever I get uptight I 1ust go to the beac and am guaranteed that I wall soon be mellowed out Bill Edwards H :story This place makes me sick Carol Shannon, Art In the new Cahforma you can fmd the old When I couldn t stand to study another minute I would go outside the ltbrary and sit under the eucalyptus trees and look up into thetr swayzn them tn my hands and smell the fralgzance For some reason nt made me thtnk of a tame when all t land about me was once wheat ftelds and marshes Harry Boyd History All my dreams hopes and a tratnons have been fulfilled I fmd myself reborn with the quest or knowledge College has enabled me to fmd myself and now I am grateful. Louis Jackson Math When I came here I was lost so I fotned a sorority and there I found myself good friends new values and a lot of good fun I love the Greeks Kath: McKenna History All things must pass Lo1sMalovos Anthropology I came here not knowzng what tear gar was It has been an educanon ln many ways Susan Bradford English They lted to me They told me that I would be a better erson because I went to college I doubt if I am anything but o er and dtsnllusuoned Diplomas like everything have become devaluated Fred Gabriel, Soctology B , . branches ........ Sometimes I would pick a few leaves, crusg F SX xxx., .K an 4 RN KKK xx NMR an "wi ' ' I 1 , .jf -,A . V W , V 'Mx " A' ' I W U' "' ,C ' M k ' 'F f W ' 'K 5'0" "' ,mi , 'f .M W. M, ,s W ' ' -.qw -wr A. Q, g, f .,...-,. W-'T' Y ' 1. -.... - 3 5 A , V . , I , . .,,vwvPA 9 MM., 'Q f V. , ',1,e7.,: , ,.,,.w , V U gy ' if -1 A Ag M ,gg ,, MN-. 1 m , ' ., r.. f r .f . f Q '- q f fm A 'i , 'j " 7 ,A -' 419 M5G"j' xvm .V ,WQQWWA-f 5, A ,ww wnxw ,1,,,.,.m7.,A I-775, iv , 1 - ' "1 ' , 1 V , v in c 1 f V f ,,amf,.,M ,. ...., An Open Letter to the Truly Evasive Dean of the College of Letters and Sclences February 23 1972 Mr Dear Dean Pompous I have recently been mformed by your offlce that there IS a posslbxlnty I may rece1ve my Bachelor s Degree 1n Engllsh this quarter lf I satlsfactorxly complete my present classes I am honored that your secretary was kind enough to inform me of thls fact slnce the lssue of my graduatlon has been so long pendlng When I flrst came to speak wlth you last spring I was at one and the same tlme lmpressed and appalled as are most of my fellow students upon flrst encountermg your deanshlp I had hoped to graduate ln England last summer howeverl needed to take twelve umts ln Summer School here as I am sure you well remember Your denial of my rlght to attempt twelve umts even though I had successfully taken the same number the prevlous summer confused me and yet confirmed my worst expectations Smce that time I have come to understand your positron Our common bond has always been the fact that Shakespeare changed both our llves As you told me lt was the great old bard fto use your words who led you to your present honorable and enlightened posltlon Had you not been selected from your nxnth grade class to reclte Shakespeare at UC Berkeley you probably never would have attempted hxgher educatlon as your many slbllngs failed to do I how Shakespeare had affected my llfe You also denied me the prlvxlege of explalnlng my reasons for desmng to graduate early This treatment frustrated me becausel had never spoken wlth a dean before Is not a dean s1r a man who makes blind declslons before the observant eyes of students and one who avolds the present vltal questions by grasping for relevant answers from the past? The reahzatlon of our common Shakespearean bond would have been welcome had lt come at another t1me However I am now grateful for your obstlnacy In splte of your llmlted v1ew of educatlon and th1s mass productxon University I have successfully learned the way to learn I hope lt IS not offensive to confess that through your refusal to understand me I have come to understand myself and the value of learnlng Having come to thls reallzatlon wlth so llttle a1d from any office of the Unlverslty I shall not be dlsappomted wlth this one achlevement of learning I have now awakened from my false dream that the UHIVCYSITY IS the only hope of hlgher educatlon It IS wlth this knowledge thatI wlll leave these concrete walls and your College of Letters and Sclences Your Deanshlp s most confldent and dlsobedlent servant Lorelle Brownmg 7 , . . . l , . .. . u i . i Y Y , . A , 1 0 J Y ' . ! Y KK 7? ' . ' CC ,Y . ,I U I 7' . . ' Y ,, . . ,, . . . am grateful for this insight into your background, butI found you extremely unwilling to know ' 1 , . , . . . . . . . ,, ,, ' ' fl Y, ' . ' 9 , . - , , Y 7 I . , . . . WW if an Q. 5 Q v V Sm ga' n, if ri: M Lv ,qu iwvgvnf , Ya Z Qi' g,+"s' E., frfawuf 'el I ca' Q Q 'Y 1 1' 1 T 'Q , f ie 4 W. . 35 4 4234 Ridgeway Drive San Diego California 921 16 February 1 1972 Mr Ricardo Freeman Editor 1972 LA CUM BRE P O Box 13402 UCSB Santa Barbara California 93107 Dear Mr Freeman You have asked your 1972 Seniors to express ideas perspectives and conclusions about UCSB As parents we too have experienced a delightful change as we observed our daughter s progress from an intrepid Freshman through the traumas of Subject A street people the riots friendships Nexus letters and articles dropping football etc to the honor of the Dean s List a mature young woman now able to separate the wheat from the chaff Her understanding of human behavior compassion and sense of proportion have increased manifold She has brightened improved and regenerated our outlook significantly Her faithful letters home have kept us abreast of the multitude of events within your caldron as well as her indlvldual experiences Undoubtedly academlc excellence could have been obtained elsewhere but the unique experiences evident at UCSB and environs fesp lsla VISIH make hers an especially poignant and significant education Honor and renewed vigor have been brought to our family we truly are proud of our graduating 1972 Senior Marjie Moody Sincerely Robert 8: Edith Moody , Y ' 9 . . , , ' 1 Y . . , Y Y ' ' ' IK YY n Q Q I I , , Y 7 Y Y ' , . The trials and tribulations of Marjie have faded into oblivion as she has developed into n . l I . , . , I u 0 I 7 , , ' a n I 0 l I, : J . s 7 ' I Q , . Y 14:wm..,,,.f .,:. . sf x ,K We-Q.fezw,H-,--, ' SENIOR STEPHEN ACKER pasadena, political science SHARI ADAIR los angeles, art WILLIAM F. ADAMS santa susana, sociologyfanthro. ALEX ADELEKE lagosy nigeria biological sci. JOY AHLGREN altadena, mathematics ANNA AIELLO concord sociology ANN ALBRIGHT van nays, history DAVID L. ALLAN pebble beach, ar! SHARON ALLSUP newhalh french STEVE AMANO sun valley, political science ADRIA ANDERSON whittien art history CONNIE ANDERSON danuille, cultural anthropology RICHARD L. ANDERSON xenia, ohio, psychology N EAL AN DREN cupertino, biological scijeno. stds, ROBERT W. ARCADI santa barbara, psychology NANCY J. ARMSTRONG stochton, historyfanthropology CARLA ARNOLD los angeles psychology JAMES ARROTT altadenm zoology ANDREW AULL santa barbara, history W. MICHAEL AYDELOTT san rnaleo, political science MARIA T. BACANI n. highlands, spanish RUTH E. BAETZ hacienda heights, sociology JAMES BAILEY long beach, english DEAN V. BAIM walnut creek, econjpoli. sci. SUSAN BAKURA rnarina delrey, frenchfpoli. sci. ALAN M. BALCHER los angeles, political science BARBARA BALDWIN granada hills, home economics JOYCE BALDWIN san leandro, frenchfsoc. sci. MICHAEL BALICE burbanh, economics GREG BALL larkspun social science LORELLE BANZETT huntington beach, sociology STEPHAN A. BARBER los altosy economics KENNETH BARCZI mountain view, mechanical engr. MARION BARNARD san diego, french MARK BARRALL bahersjield electrical engr. CHARLES BARRINGER san gabrieL histjrelig. studies SHARON BARTHELMESS el cajon, psychology STEVE BEAL van nuys, sociology REBECCA BEAM ER w. covina, physical therapy KAREN BEAUMONT portola valley, speech and hearing GLENDA BEDWELL oceanside, sociology WENDY BEESLEY manhattan beach, history GAIL BEI burlingame, mathematics GAIL BELAS santa monica, spanish SUZANNE BENDER n. hollywood sociology BRUCE BERCOVICH oakland political science MARY BERGMAN portland oregon, history BRUCE BERRA bakers-field political science 1-J: W: f ' K 35 . fo- 3.122 in 1, , zizwfmf. if tim Q if-1'VVi1 ' yo 'f"'effiLz4L1'V1 fi Q sm-,V..-l .,. HV, if A... Vwfgxi .Vt ,-:,,,, 1 ,ff,, A ,ma ---- ,zggmbiffihii ' ,V f5es'?z,VV:i I Y V 5' 1 ...zpfm-211' iw: -om fj,gsV3wV A Y its 3 .. ' I .. ,Visa Aw , ,nw ,uv -.. 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I - :iv 1 S HIORS JUDITH BERRETT menlo park, english RICHARD BEY far rockaway, n. y., dramatic art NANCY BEYERS burbanh, mathematicsfeconomics PAULA BIGGS pleasanton, spanish ROGER G, BILLINGS ventura, mathernaticsfeconomics DONNA BLACK ventura english SANDRA K. BLACK compton, history ALAN BLANE sanjose, sociology ADELE BLANK hayward sociology RONALD L. BLANTON haywafal history JOANNE BLEGEN fremorm mathematics JAMES M. BLODGETT hillsborough, history JUDITH ILENE BLOOM canoga park, history ROBERTA BLOOM woodland hills mathjeconomics CHRISTINE BLOZAN riverside, nutrition KATHY BOARDMAN goleta, political science BOOKER T. BOBBITT chicago hts., ill, histjbll. studies HOWARD BODENHEIMER los angeles, political science PAM BENNETTS BOHL tracgo english BARBARA ROHM pittsburg, economics GERALD BOLAS alhambra, english RUTH BOLLING manhattan beach, spanish HANK BONIN redlands, psychology ELLEN BOOTHROYD tracy, social science ALLAN BORDEN alharnbrm biological sciences KRISTINE BORGLIN bakersfelni social science HARRY W. BOYD arcadia history HOWARD BOYLAN riverside, environmental biology -' Q., f 91 ,sd ,gs S 4 1 wi fm N go w 4 in :eil N' E X Q W V gg H K ,i W Rig: si E? wi W S, A W is si 2 Q Ibigfyf 'ri Q D 2 K' an Q M rl S .sw --tt 2 : L fffiif '-"- szrfiwfsfli ' -"' , 15,11 -. ,-.-: ' -A '- ,. ,k,,w f f ww fs? 'N M X X - :iw oak f' 211'-fi gg, it-g,si, 2 ' . Q, .1', f-ffl' I - SGHIORS MICHAEL BOYLE goletm psychology ELIZABETH ANN BRASHEAR pacwc grove, social science CHERYL BREETWOR goleta, english BETSY J. BRENEMAN huntington park, culturalanthro. BUD BRIDGERS carpinterill, Spanish ANGELA BROWN cumberlani hy.. S0fl0l0!Iy I HUGH BROWN los angeles, biological sciences MARIA BROWN elsinore, historyfpoli. sci, DENISE BROWNLEE san diego, biological sciences BRIAN D. BRUM BY diamond ban political science ,, V-sv ROBERT BRYNGELSON ventura, mechaniealengineering CATH ERINE BUCKLEY mercei biological sciences 'aw wow' I so-M . , M- , , To lovers whose bodies smell of each other, Who think the same thoughts ovithout need of speeph, And babble the some speech without need of meaning . T.S. Elliot sUE BUCK huntington bch., spch. and hearing LILLIAN BUCTON arroyo grande, history DORIS BU LL far rockaway, n.y, biological sci, BRAD BUNKELMAN santa maria, Zoology SUZANNE BU NKER balersjieli history CATHERINE BUONO :an diego, cultural anthro. BARBARA BURDETT oakland sociology MICHAEL BU RKE san pedro, biological sciences ,IEANETTE BURNS elcajon, environmental studies PATRICIA BURR malibu, economics EMILIE I.. BURSIK sherrnan oaks, environ. studies PEGGE BUTLER tracy, anthropology SALLY BUTLER whittier, music DIANE BUZZINI giboy, speech and hearing I SGYIIORS YVONNE L. BYRNE santa barbara, sociology MARK BYRNE couina, biological sciences FRANK M. CABRAL goleta, sociology ROSALIE CALDERONE flushing. n.y., economics -IUDY CALLAHAN n. hollywood sociology BERNARD CAMBA guadalupr. eleclr-icalcngr. ELSIEHIOY CAMERLENGO reseda, speech and hearing SARAH CAMPBELL san clemenle, art history CHERYL CAPES carpenleria, sociology MARY ANN CAPPA couina, english STEPHEN CARDELLA temple cily, history ERICA CARLSSON san luis obispo, Pali. sci. -IACQU ELINE CARMICH AEL tulare, englishffrench GARY CARNAHAN goleta, mathematics CATHY CARSON akmo, culluralanthropology ANTHONY M. CARUSO los angeles, sociology M. COLLEEN CARY wilmington, english BRIAN L. CASTLEMAN bakersheli history -IANICE CAVE bakersfield physical anthro. BRUCE R. CHADWICK santa barbara, nuclear engf. PATRICIA A. CHADWICK santa barbara, anthropology ROBERT CHAN hong kong, zoology BRADLEY L. CHANEY gilroy. geography LYNNE CHASE san clemenle, physicalanlhro. ROBERT CHAVEZ santa paula, economics LESLIE A. CHEEK fair oaks, speech and hearing CHARLIE CHEN altadena, cultural anthro. N ELSON CH EW su nnyoale, economics DI AN E C HI L D northridge, history D AVI D C H U RC H golela, sociology MARGE CLARFIELD san leandro, comparative lit, JENNIFER S. CLARK palo alto, sociology HILARY COATES san pedro, speech IDA F. COCHRANE pacoirna, sociology CHARLES COCKERILL goletd, historyfpoli. sci. KATHY COCK ERI LL goletn, english JULII-1'I"I'ECOENEN glendora, sociology , , f ir i?l5?,?i3:5" 'i7l2?i?557:TfYf1' , ,, ,4 f 5. I.. e, .. , .. V rw 12 , , ..... -.,.., I W 1' of f an 2' if 2 ef? . 4 eg ...Q . . 5 SZ 12' fe if ef of . A-ff .fag 1 2 i.' iA 1 f, erin Y sm- . ... . ...,. KW It is all one to me where I began: for I shall come back here again in time. Parmenides ,W qi U 5524, " wwf QA-an .528- I V- 5, .ggfg l 3,35-3 52 5, .K W -if Q - Vg 1 352 ,szi,,Q,23'2Sg-.fs A .. .Nw--L:Q . :wa 1 4' SGUICRS We, too, the children of earth, have our moon hases all throug any year, the darkness, the delivery from dark- ness, the waxing and waning. None lifves, except the mindless, who does not in some degree experience this, hours of despair followed by hope or, perhaps slow adjust- ment, times of fear, efven panic, and then light, however small. Faith Baldwin SHIRLEY M. CRAIG monterey, speech and hraring LESLIE CRISWELL palos verdes, art RUTH CRIVELLO navato, anthropology JERRY CRONIN santa barbara, social science RICHARD CRONK alhambra, economics ROBERT CROSBY clarcmonl, geography CRAIG R. CUMMINGS palus verdes, nuclear engr. CAROL I. CUZN ER healdsburg, social science ROBERT DAHL novato, zoology DONNA D'ANGELO glendale, sociology JAMES DARLING yreka, enwronmrnlal biology JACK DAVIS golela, political science STEVEN B. DAVIS sherman oaks. elertricalengr. SUSAN BARR DAVIS fresno, psychology BOB DE GROFF goleta, polilical science SHARON DE GROFF golela, sociology DEBORAH DEL DUCA santa barbara, sociology ARTHUR DELGADILLO santa maria, history V, , " 5 271 1' I Si , . iszifsazfli V " lff 1' W 532551gwifgzasI1eI?gg1fi?2Qsi4ssYfi5ewv1fIvf4SL42I zggfzgf ,f H:-12::2.235:gg2,gg4Pag,g5' Mffmffe, eff: , 1 . I ..z s?gfg25Ef,go? V- was -z wsggszilgilzwzz ' I f 537537555 ffif , jfjlE7!i9 Q7i5I W yfel My ff I of fwfffzif2l+,1J,'f4 ' 'am' -1 V f' 1 ' " Eiga: A , I ,fy 3 1,535 -ff,.-:,::g,3j'::j :e a51,gg,4asz,f'szfy, ., 8 Is 'liaififof-ffisss s M,2fwQ,i:5,z:Qa:a af I t 1 . IQ, o me m I ml . 7, Y, .sw-48 It '15 ,annul - A-flew H I , , j 71, 3 ,mg V f. ' ' 'N-f' E' f sf 1 I 'F 5 5 , I A ' s :N I r Q Ig , . ll ,cm mwgmw , . . ., " . ' ,qs jg ay W,,. 33: 4 I' 'fs .2 ,if -'fkfwh , W, fm , , ' fog... Q? gif . ,M-Q... .... WM? 52? Nl ff SGHIORS JOAN DENMAN losangeles, sociology CHARLIE DENSE redding, economics JUDY DEVENISH manhattan beach, spch. and hearing CATHY DE WALD w. sacramento, sociology KATHLEEN DIAMOND reseda, political science NANCY DIERDORFF concord psychology KAREN DINKINS losangeles, sociology ANNETTE DI POL china lake, hislory JANICE IJIRDEN los angeles, englishfafro. areas ERIK DISEN placcnlia, history DANIEL R. DOIRON rivcrside, nuclear engr. STEVE DOLOWITZ pelaluma, culluralaathro. ROBIN DONOGH UE sanla barbara, historyfpoli, sci JONNA DOOLITTLE santa monica, sperch DEBBIE DORNEY la canada, history ROBERT DOYLE anaheim, hisloryfbiological sci. ANN DRAPER menlo park, geography DAWN DRAPER monterey, speech and hearing DOUG DRAPER glcndale, history STAN DRECKMAN long beach, political science ALAN H. DRULEY ueniura, economics DAVID W. DUCHARME sanla barbara, french JANET DUDLEY granada hills, sociology CHARLES DUFFY woodland hills, political sci. PATRICIA A. DUFFY napa, political science 4 PETER DU FFICY woodacrr, english JANICE DYO so. pasadena, sociology DALE EBERLE palo allo, psychology MARLENE ECKER golettl, anthropology JAMES EG LIN sherrnan oaks, poliliral science JOHN ELDER santa barbara, biochemistry STEPHEN ELLINGTON mrrcei biological sciences RANDI ELLMAN em-inn, physical education 64 SGHIORS GEORGE ELVIN petalumm history DONALD ENDICOTT garden grove, mech. engr. JO ENGLISH redlands, sociology JUDY ENGSTROM lomita, psychjsociology MERRILL EVERETT atherton, psychology JONATHAN W. EYMANN pala alto, psychology SCOTT FARMER san marina, religious studies TERRY FARRIS sacramento. socfrelig. studies NANCY FASH glendale, spanish JEFFREY FELICIANO san luis obispo, bio. sci. JOHN FENN goleta, historyfsociology PATRICIA A. FERNANDEZ santa paulm english TOM FICKEISEN burlingame, history JONNIE FINCH balzersfield poli. sci.fsocial sci. LIANE FINK san mateo, italian HOWELL FINKLE saratogq political science NOREEN FIORE couina, sociology KAREN LEE FISCHER narthridge, cultural anthru. WILLIAM G. FISHER san luis obispo, biological sci. RICH ARD FISK palm springs electrical engr. VICTORIA FLECK escondido, history BRAD FLEISCH san luis obispo, history JEFFREY FLETCHER bellrose, n.y. mech. engr. ROSE MARIE FLETHEZ san bernardino, spanish MICHAEL FOGARTY greenbraa economics LINDA FOOTE los angeles history CATHERINE FORD long beach, history DENNIS FORD santa barbarm psychology MARGARET FORD santa barbara, Physical anthro. RICK FOSTER northridyn history JANET FREAS los angeles, french DEBORAH FREDERICK frernong social science JEFFREY FRIED sherman oahsy history HOWARD FRIEDMAN woodland hills, zoology BETTY C. FULKERSON santa barbara hispanic civil JO ELLEN FULLER san luis obispo, spanish LINDA GAINZA stoclzton, history JAMES R. GALVAN elmonte, english ELIZA GARCIA oxnafi english JANICE GARRETT sanfrancisco, biological sci. ANNE GEARY altadena, social science TIM GEDDES santa ana, history SALLY GEIGER sanjose, english OZZIE GERVER tanana, political science M ARGERY GIBSON glendale, history JACK GILLOOLY sepulveda, cultural anthro. LAI LUN GIN santa barbara, mathematics SCOTT M. GITLEN santa monica, sociology ova.. wa-5. 5 I as we .12 shi' fmwitr W Aff -f -wzlwvf YS,1s"' ArwggJs21sofLSi+Q:zz,t7f .M ,,,. ,gg , V- 5 .L,.,,t,-.nw mzwwviaw Lies? ,, i-ff www . fi- ,fm My -nmoo, .. 321-,axi :Sago-f ig? gg V ef 2 M Q it is S S PM is K NWA if J X ,S .9 S32 2 lic I? V sfifwffww .,-- 11:1-,,,.,, 5,Wg.-,mf Q Mn. zesiisfsiiyig Q, 5 'ZW , 9 W as is EXW 2 15 no M S4 f. if K f 1 Q A it We gb MM wgfzfezm, af' -Z sw 16 Wei gg? sis V.-H ., Ma., ,,,,..m ,,,. W.-lg .,., ,M -owls: 1 ,.,, me zsi '- as ,, of its ,Z nw 52. Q , 15-wait? ,J we ,mc t. Q fs- in h . ff M:-a::,'l5,i-2,44 ' wfwjj -:ffiIf'fj .fn - ,ff fa S is Q 14 X 'HL Ei 5 L is If ,.,, W, .- 9 3 55 ss 63 sv K 2 ,Q-,J 5 se 2 be mf' S S X, J ,B ,,,. so Q, .,,,,, ,,, , My -. ,f,v,,. ,. -:mmffwfwsvisiiigfzi s Wmigygiezsgmss iwssv-1, fw ,rg 2 ...a A sah- iii' no 1- 5 Y' A me it 135 1-Wim -I swiss? 'fi is to 1'-fi yy? wan -,tif V ,2 We. .Q K' ..",., :- .iii W - f , f 5. tg ,, . ,, ,igeezfn , I W fm ,, on I LS! if me . mg ,,.v,.,P7,w .. . " 1 . om? ,S 6 .3 19 W f X X mv A .nz I f' if af Q , I f I ,N ig," ,- I 3, I fe, ., -' - ,. SGDIORS Listen to him first . .. listen to what he means, which may be hidden in what he says, . .. It will be a sobering and maybe even. humbling experience. Louis B. Lundborg JAMES E. GOLDMAN sierra madre, economic: DENNIS GOM ES huntington beach, english DAVID GOM EZ laxangelex, latin amer, studies DARLA GONZALEZ gokta, pryrhology D'RIECE GOOD xunnyvale, phyx. education BERYL GORZYNSKI canoga park, music CAROLE L. GRAFE saratoga, economic: DENNIS S. GRANDLE lakewooi chemistry HELEN GREEN los angeles, engfblack xtudies ROBERT R. GREEN corona delmar, economics WILLIAM GREEN glendara, economics DIANAH GREENLEES .van diego, sociology DENNIS L. GREENWALD wextport, conn., poli, sci. ROBERTJ. GREGORY san berna-rdinu, hirtory WILLIAM GREY cupertino, biological ici. DEBORAH GREYSON whillier, anthropology JOHN GRIDLEY newhaIL chemistry JULIETTE GRIFFING palas verdes, phyriral anlhro. N k gg, , Q f RK X31 X Km X in lp R3 M rg 1 ggi ix .1 . Q? Wim 1. W-Q 4 Q x X x K M5 , Av-'iW""8:. . 'a Y., i ff 'H f , , if S525 Tim' .1 ,,,.,,, , f A. . ,. ..., ,. f Mi , ,M f .A ,e 324 if ,Elie , of , off if G 9' I2 'FQ 2 3 ,wrzm 2 ,it 03457 2 , gn, K wif, It 4 vi J 1' I As 'V ,if f .!:'f'w ' , , ' , 5,1735 9 'I' Wi 7595 WL. 54:5 4- Wa- . 1' Q L ' " Nfi:1'1f': , 'M esffeafieifsif' .- ' ,' .1 Mim e , we fitiiffwg 2 :wm,1 :' , ,X r- .wil aww? f X: - ,i,,., ,V Taxis . . 1.35 -5 .f'..' : .f V. s , ,ta fi ,, 1, 5. A ., ,. . . Qzlszsfefz ,este Q. ,. V , 1,5395 .F 1- f,,,,eW 2 , f , L." ,U ,1 , ,,., : fl ,. -. .- , , '7t',f,':?:Q:ffALT" " 'gr' 49 f . , . -'wif' ' 'A -we so 7 f-fest' ' ,gr " 'M wf' M 1 .' 5 ' 5 , 1' , lfigfbii - faewwkf' ,: J , .EH'm11'a5.:' 'fig , 'A4'w1:1e1tff,f, -' if God could not be everywhere: therefore he made mothers. Arabian saying SGDIOQS MARTHA HARRIS sahnas, speech and hearing MAUREEN HARTE san bernardino, bio. sci. RAGHBIR HAYRE muysville, english BR EN DA H EE fresno, speech and hearing STEVE HEINSOHN long beach, history JOH N H ELM ER fallbrook, geography CYNTHIA HENDERSON los altos, anthropology RANDY HENSLEY indio, history CAROL A. HERAUF goleta, mathematics MICHAEL HERAUF goleta, english CANDICE S. HERN garden grove, art history ADELA HERNANDEZ beaumont, history MATT H ERNDON bakersfeli economics KATHLEEN HERRI NG san diego, history LESLIE HERRMAN la canada, english TERRY HIDE anaheim, Psychology KATHLEEN HIGASHI san jose, anthro.frel studies BARBARA HI LL sierra madre, home economics BARTON H. HILL visalim economics DAVID HILL los angeles, biological sci. SUZANN E HILL valencia, economics BRUCE HILLMAN woodhnd, sociology DOROTHY HINDS oxnard bilingual education JOHN R. HINES vacaville, art IRENE HODSON santa monica, anthropology JERRY HOERAUF paramount, economics DANIEL HOFFMAN san jose, history DOUGLAS HOFFMAN saratoga, computer science JIM HOFFMAN so. sanfrancisco, economics JOAN HOFFMAN arcadia, social science THOMAS HOFFMAN san rafael, sociology PHILIP G. HOFSTEE Visalia, economics DIANE MARIE HOLMES santa monica, geography JOHN HONEGGER oakley, economics 68 SGHICRS TERRI HONG sanfrancisco, psychology ROBERT HOOK goleta, electrical engr. FRANK HOOPES oceanside, geography BARBARA HORROCKS so. pasadena, sociology ROBERT HOSACK pomona, history RICHARD HAROLD HOUGARDY hawthorne, social science LINDA HOWARD warden, mont., zoology ANITA HOWRY la mesa, social science REGINALD HSU las angeles, sociology WILLIAM W. HSU rosemead chemical engr. JOSEP H H U ANG redwood city, zoology FRANCES R. HUBBARD san francisco, english CAROL HUBERT san pedro, cultural anthro. CHARLES HUCKEBA goleta, art SHERYL HUGHES w. covina, zoology LEONIE HULTQUIST santa barbara, french KATHERINE HUMMES los angeles, speech and hearing RENATA HUNDLEY goleta, history JOHN A. HUNT redwood city, enoiron. biology BRENT HUNTER la mesa, economics THERESA THOMPSON HURD goleta, cultural anlhro. SUE HUTCHISON tarzana, art history KATHLEEN IKOLA yorba linda, sociology KATHY INDERMILL bakersfielaf social science SUSAN IRWIN napa, cultural anthropology RANDALL ISM AY santa barbara, biological sci. GLORIA JACKSON nouato, speech and hearing PAM JACKSON vandenberg afb, home econ. ROSE ANNE JAMES sanjose, history JU DITH JENKINS sacramento, home economics ALLEN JOHNSON santa barbara, envir. studies BEVERLY D. JOHNSON oakland historyfpoli. sci. BRITT JOHNSON santa barbara, history DAVID JOHNSON santa barbara, political sci. 1 lfifig FH- 525535 Efqfffjk 5 .. .. ...., 1. 1 ' iw 'IQ' Q , 19 ,S an 'Q' 91 xi if 5 V m 1, is is Q S If ss 5 ,i2f2?t Q2 fr ., my E , ,,, we . . 1 c, .. 2 Sfggamgsv wsafw 1' We '1 , . , ., V.,,,. 3 H FZKZK- 3593 M , if ,Jizz .,, yi, Mg is S ge iff' 3 K ss A we Ky H, se 5 11,,, .51 1,ww5sL'm 1 - 1, 1- ,W L 1 ' I, -,ff sms, ., ,ll , ,I 1 1, ,,,,. , .11 .1 .1,,11,,.11 .Q .- .31f,. 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A is 5 eg If f HES M 5 We V , if Y 3. f ,, iff' is HW W- W is is any ic s P L 3 s an H ,W 1 1 4 J A. , 1 J V 5 I v if is v ima 4: stag aa his "'?'?5-Www-v u ,7 sem, aqui' 1 m11.sggcgw1. w axy 11 141.1 151' ways 1 I f11sw1s1,a',1 w1 ' 1,1, 'sw f mssfggsm .s g51ii2.1s11So .., 55313, 3,Lgi5f,j,5?EZik5 life' Q -ww-121 1f,'..saf--V .gf 511357, .. :rw 'Mg' ''.1iz,,,::,.,:,g.-:-,'.,n ,I 1 125 f3Qf:s?Y1f723s'W 553253: 4.1, 11.,-4.1, .1 eegf wg wifes ' . 1 P ,g K0 e.e. cummings at l .. QP , 5 E Q . ,.x, . ..,.,.:, A Ek XA Q Wx 1 k 'Hal Q g ef "xx .I 1:19 W . .N Q 4 ,, i 5. f .... f f 'Vi .,. SS L2 P. if-FS 3. 7,:. , Ez: SN' Q, W 'W wi Kr - f wg fu ? .- . F, ,am 3? -wi' MESH . K 1 -AF X! X 1 GQ N ...fy . .... X , six api-3? 9:3 -1 , an x A lgi . J. -,fi ,.. iq - - . , -, . - . "N m - f -N sh ,J I k,. 1 if M +V if Y 'X N QQSJ' UIORS DAVICJOHNSON bakerxfield, rrunorniry DEBORAH S. JOHNSON paso rnblef, xnriuluqy FILEEN JOHNSON santa Susana, snrmlugy JUDY L. JOHNSON fourtlnnd, ar! hrrmry KI-IN JOHNSON newpurl brarh, anlhmpuloqy LYNDIfl,I,-IOHNSON ronforaf :fren h rummunwationx M.-KRYJOHNSON walnut rreei. hxstnry ROBIN JOHNSON xanta ana, art SH HLA J OH NSC DN vuallejo, Jann STEGICR JOHNSON hillsboruugh, pxyfhnlngy ART JON ES berkeley, m,1,.,,,N SHARON J. J! PN ICS los angeles, hiytury TIMOTHY li.JONI-18 los angflrx, .mrinlngy P.-XL'L.LlL'I-1I,Kl'. la mirada. anlhrnpnlngy CHRISTINE J l'R.'X glendalf, sufiuluyy KAREN A. KMSHR whirzief, binlnqfml wi JF.-XNE'Ix'I'I-1 T. KAJI liifingxlon, :fwfr h and hearing EILFEN KALK redondo bearh. qrugmphy 36 70 SEDIORS PEARL KANESHIGE canon, mathematics SUSAN M. KATZ bahersfeli spanish MARK KAUFMAN northridge, sociology REGINA GAIL KEELAN haymoon bay, english JAMES KEELING las vegas, nw., poli. sci. VICKY KEES whittier, history FRED B. KELLER lompoc, geology MICH ELE KELLETT chico, litjcreatioe studies KATHLEEN KELLEY newport beach, sociology CAROLYN KELLY menla park, sociologyfanthro. MEGAN KELLY santa barbara, zoology KATHERINE KENNEY new canaan, conn., phys. ed CHRIS KIM BALL cooina, history JAMES KIMURA concorzL mechanical engn ROBERT KINDEL laguna beach, economics MICHAEL KINWORTHY chula vista, history KRISTEN KJERULFF palo alto, psychology DIANE KLEIN santa clara. sociology GAIL KLEIN whittien sociology WILLIAM KLEINHOFER long beach, elec, engr. JAMES T. KLINE lalewooi english KATHERINE KNABKE san martin, political science JANICE KNICKERBOCKER palos verdes, anthropology DON KO HLM ANN redwood city, enoiron. studies PHILIP J, KOHN los angeles historyfpoli. sci. DIANA KOHNERT san matzo, biology LEANNE KOLVITZ lompoc, music CHARLES KORSON wan nuyn economics JAY KOSOFF norihridge, history CAROL KRAM ER santa barbara, socjcultural anthro. DONALD F, KRELL murristown, 11.11, geography ANNE KREYMER santa susana, sociology RHONDA KUCKEN BAKER hollisten french DEBORAH KURILCHYK santa anm Political science BARBARA KUWAHARA gardena, sociology KATHY LAFLIN thermuL history .-'ao' 7 1 Q, Q swf ww- ' 'fasoseiizmmsfegomgmzmgggefgggaz4 1 f Q- :M-ft-it-1fz11wrgaa4z11a,fromawle, 1 ff ,ww 2,s,7xff-K' 4' oommzsz?,7fa2f,ge?f4ze: 'W' ' ' ' " ' i' "As SIL-fxeileu. Wren: -M. f:1.w,cL,,w21X,11o: V fMf,.w,f ,ww M WW. ? X3 Q 2 J Y ' fs' 3 3 gi S '-4 ,LM K fl F if 22 L, of f 'f 1,25 ew Qisfffi 1,21-of 'ffirzi ms2gsm2,szzg3 ' 4 I Y V f 31 4 , Sf, I 9 if A, 5 3 S sos vi' J jyesoza 9 H516 f sf ,,,, ' V-ZZ 'f 11,21 fewfszf ,f . ,ffwow upto., f ,.., ,, K A H Y., M E 1 is 2 ' 2? 25 u 'C 1 W 1, Il -5 . at Q R ,, . gy gl Wim r -nl 3 iojg' W giiiyw' X 1, 5 S V Wi W7 il V Slemwemzzzara sn"o'fsv'W'as?'fHA mllufgz of ,1 , ,3,i..f:1fV:1s'f"1' 'C 'hi wiawff f5E,.57fsffsx V .,i5mCsg, 1y,' " f15'1zQ.e:g?re .. - ,: 'mf fmww .,'-,.. ,5m,.yf.,4., V fm.-:fft:4c,' 74 -- I ,gt . 3, f X2 'bf .,'g,T,:f?g?fg15,g. gogggifi .if of IPn:ff,1fs,f, W:,?l4.QiQ1i 94,1 .- -A ..,.,mf33 MJWML .to 2' w Wf, " M52 if K mf 5 2,555 et ,M 'P A 'fe if, N - flax :'..".r- full .. ' gif ,W ., , . . , . 9' Q3 Y' 11 I fx EQ wr ti ox 1 if 1.1 If? 3 in "QQ, JE t ,E f S X 1' 4' f 5? S ig I Q' 9 -1- 5.3 if 4 ,Jafar 1 '15 s 2 if Q ,Q K Jim 5 'Est Haj ,Sf S mmf ,G S 32,52 if if y W M,-.. 5,5 wif goof, .,,,,+ M, of 1 lYLivEYLz 'if 1'2zIQesvfQ,is?f52i2g? 4 5,:,,,5,, ,,,,.gf ,-f- o,.,..w,ff, ff meson so " 7 L Vfiiiiift ,I , fFg?wmo:, . f gif' ,f ,..,. . My 5 .,.., J, if 5 'YWSVQSZ , ,IEW 42 ? Al lin: wg If I had never seen him, never heard his voice, I would not have cried. 2324? Q'-- 'Q 1. --:.. ,ff ef' 'SZ fb yaXfZ5',7VS of 11 ii W J . Wg. an fs 42 X3 Mfr , J 25 ' ,Q , . 'T Mi: Lf , xp Q s I is 1 A 153 I 22, 5, I 4 1 I fi .3 I -,A yi! 1 1 51 ' V 'VIEW "N, 15, fl armenia: WE' Wafwf 3 f H i - . :Fifa 'ZQX V K QT' . ,wl.""T ,, I A 2 : ' iff-f ,ffl ' . ' ,,,'NW,4v5','L :LH7 n?Q53Cl"N .L U, -, w xg LW 1 ..,-sifwfsz o ous, W I' in UU7' "" " ., f ' HF ' .ff - f x -' V, ' f .90 -A 521 C A L I 2' ff 'fw 6, . M I ' N Tha! in My og :fin + r f IRI? .1 yi I SW, tht, 1 sl W 1, aw HIORS GREGORY LAGANA rcseda, palitiral science IRWIN S. LAGUSKER xepulveda, economics STEPHANIE T. LAM mill valley, fpanishfanthro. DIANE LAMPHERE fullerton, rociologyfhistory ,IER RY LAN DES los gator, :oology LESLIE LANGDON altadena, sociology HENRY A. LAVAGNINI los angrlzs, history STEVEN LA VIOLA fort let, nj., biologiral sci. JANENE LAWRENCE los angela, english JOHN MARCUS LAY o1H,zcanomics ALLAN LAZARUS menlo park, history LINDA LAZZARO millbraz, sociology OLIVER LEE galelm biological sci. VICKIE LEE storhton, physical therapy STEVEN A. LEIBO santa alarm history RANDELL LENCIONI menlo park, sociology HARVEY LEVIN reseda, poliliral science MICKEY LEVY palos verdtt, econfpoli. sri. CH ERYL LEWIS beverly hills, psychology JAM ES R. LEWIS tustin, poli, :cijgeography WILLARD M. LEWIS, JR. inglewaod, mzrhanical engr. PATRICIA LIERLEY golzla, anthropology BARBARA J. LILEK chitago, ill. phys. therapy MARK LINCOLN samloga, historyfnwiron studies BARBARA D. LIND ozntura, sociology MARGARET LINDEBERG anaheim, biological sciences EVA LIPPM AN lorrance, psychology 2 SGHIGRS MELANIE LITE van nays, anthropology PAUL M. LOGAN carmichael history RONALD E. LOPEZ los angeles, sociology CHUCK V. LORING losgatos, speech E. LINWOOD LORING goleta, anthropology JUDY LOUIE sanfrancisco, mathematics WALTER C. LOW arroyo grande, electrical engr. MICHAEL LUCHETTI san rafael sociology WILLIAM J. LUECKE los angeles, sociology TERISA L UGER tonance, religious studies VICTORIA LU KENS bakersfieli sociology DAVID C. LUNA santa paula, social science KRISTINE LUND saratogd, political science MARY MMGLASHAN arcadia, social science PAULA K. MADISON compton, political science CHRISTOPHER MANKE carmeL zoology ANTOINETTE MARKS banning, history MICHAEL MARON long beach, biological science ,:.s I 1 ..', as I I I ::gm:ssIss.s:fU-iif,- s g: gems' . -,Q . qgyiigtgii-5-1: -42151222 ' .1-1:-W?i?LEif iff-'5-,i ' .1-fre 1Q11,Wf5gggQg151:se I ssh: :ag A 1s2iS:fg:s:sf::-- :if-msg' V, A I - , t Y, Q.. , , V 2 ,ff 5? Ii' Q as W shi' A f '5 I W W Q z 52 ' gf 44 Ln! avi' W V -f :, all A -owne, H , A' of A , - is of C 5 if I W., g . lg! ...cg 'f t f fe I ! ' A N .: ,A,1J:A, .2 P A f I , T It 5 'Y . ,. ,,. Q . ,mag os., ...g . 3 ., -. - ,, , U , , ,h, , .,Z , . ., ., -MW . - -if 'i',.-vga f.'7'5tfktH'5'? fi',-if ' "" A ,W - I I: ,LLAW,Lfz , if nz 3, t'?.g..a-.,5f-2. And I asked myself about the present: how wide it was, how deep it was, how much of it was mine. Vonnegurt HICI2 KATHLEEN MARSH ALL lajolla, art history LOUISE MARSH ALL walnut creek, sociology IDA MARTINELLI fairfax, spanish KATHRYN MASSON pacmc palisades, anthropology LUIS MATA, JR. carson city, electrical engr. HARRY MATSINGER san rafael biological sciences LARRY M A U R E R goleta, economics GINO MAZZANTI lajolla, political science KAT H Y M ECK camarillo, spanishfilalian KATIE M E N E ES sherman oaks, cult. anthro. KENNETH M ERIDETH santa barbara, economics MARGARET M ERIGIAN fresno, english MARCIA MEUDELL san rnarino, sociology MICHELLE M. MEYER saratoga, cultural anthropology CELESTINA MEZZETTA mountain view, frenchfilalian MARIANNE MICHKY fountain valley, physical ed. DAVID MI ER placentia, economics GAR Y MIL H AN whittier, political science DEBORAH MILLER redwood city, sociology JAMES CURRY MILLER san anselrno, english LON MILLER goletd, history PETER MILLS san anselmo, physical ed SUSAN MINKLEY arcadia, music BARBARA MOE sacramento, history MARJORIEJ. MOODY san diego, sociology MELANYE MOON anaheim, mathematics CHARLES MOORE goleta, engineering VIRGINIA MOORE ventura, sociology DENNIS MORDECAI santa rosa, speech and hearing PAM MORELAND west covina, sociology MARJORIE MORGAN visalia, sociologyfanlhropology R. SCOTT MORGAN solvang, economics ROBERT MOSS goktd, art DAWN MUHLEMAN riverside, portuguese 37 4 SGUICRS KATHLEEN MULEADY manhattan beach, culturalanthro. DIRK MUNTEAN costa mem, environmental bin. SANDY MURPHY oceanside, history DON MYERS :anta barbara, palitiral sri. NANCY ANN MYERS long beach, sociology STEVEN MCADAM lafayette, hixtory DAVID MCANDREWS sanjom chemirtry BRUCE MCCALL sacramento, physical therapy SAN DRA MCCARTHY claremorm .voriology TOM McCARTHY northridgq political science CATHY MCCARTY malibu, english .IUDITH MCCLELLAN goleta, poli. srijblach studies DAVID MCCULLOUGH sacramento, economic: E. SUE MCDADE oceanside, economic: Y Ms 'ez Rfb 5 f 5 F531 ,'I'?x ':: 1 I Z e f , , gee. gee., . , Peace is when time doesn't matter as at passes by. Marai Schell -'a,.::.,- ' ,f,Q.51- ..g ,if wg, - , wggef' - cw 1 , A 555 1, ' 55 9 K' rv? 41, af' K Si 1- ,v 'IMA E 5 1 115 XJ ,gf 1, 1 nf Qx ,. , ,, , . V , .,.. A we Q K pe S sv 321 2 t 25 7,31 3 2 5'- K EW 12 25 i, hw ,wx .5,.u .. S1533 nf Aww rl' FV Y 4-. M M SGUICI2 PATRICIA MCDONALD piedmonL ergonomic-B Phys. ei CHRISTINE McDOWELL millbrae, psychology LORI MCGUINES morgan hill. speech and hearing MICHAEL MQINNIS san rafael, social science ROBIN J. MCINTIRE fremonh history WILLIAM MCINTOSH la crescentm history RAYMOND McKEEFERY ventura electrical engn BRIAN MCKEN NA sanjoxe, anthropology ANNE MCLAUGHLIN martinez, physical therapy JENNIFER MCLELLAN henilwonh, ill, bio. sci. CHARLIE MCMONAGLE palu alto, mechanical engr. TERI MCNAMARA bahersjield music IAN MCNEIL los angeles, history VIRGINIA McNEILL pacific palisades, sociology KIM McPEAK sacramento, political science ROBERTA H. McREYNOLDS modesto, german BRIAN NEGIN pasadena, political science DAVID R. NELSON sacramento, political science DAVID W. NELSON arcadia, music TH OM AS NEW san gabrieh economics DEBORAH NEWQUIST encino, sociology THUY MINH NGUYEN saignn, niet nam, elec. engr. ANN ETTE NIBLEY los angeles, anthropology DEBBIE NISHI altadena, social science JERE NOLAN yreha, psychology LINDA NOLTE oxnard. historyfpolitical sci. STEVEN NORDEEN inglewood physical anthro. EDWIN NORDSTROM glen ellen, anthropology SUSAN NORTHRIDGE newport beach, art SEI-II NOZAKI lodatsuno, hanazawm japan, poli. sci. ELIZABETH OAKES san francisco, historyfpsych. LOU OBERTREIS san diego, mechanical engr, CA TH Y 0'BRlE N ahmo sociology KEVIN O'BRIEN galeta, zoology THOMAS O'BRIEN moraga. mathematics ROBERT W. O'CONNOR lahe oswego, ore., history GARY OGILBY hi habfa, history GARY ORDWAY seal beach, physical ei STANLEY OROPESA anaheim, english LEIF ORTEGREN pleasant hilL economics DIORS HALINA OSINSKI los angeles, frenchfpoli. sri. RICHARD OSTRIN la ereseenta, psychology JIM OTIS berrian springs, bio. sri. STEPHEN BUTLER PAGE panfic palisades, anthro, SUZANNE PALM ER danville, social seienfe SUSAN PALMQUIST oceanside, soeiologyfanlhro. GAIL PAPAC pomona, physiml zhempy SARAH PAQUETTE burbank, anthropology GEORGE PARSONS burbank, historyfanlhropology DALE PATTERSON balboa, speech and hearing CAROL PEARSE costa mesa, sociology NANCY PEARSON las vegas, news, sociology 1 if fx KW eo f V, L' 6 Af ,,.' EK alive? M. Identity crisis: he does not recognize the person he once called "I". B. F. Skinner 1- ,,, ,M.w, , .Q MK: J, you when A rw 351212 A wafwfjggis + ...M SPM ,Ww w ii V ,lg " W I " --k -W? :I WIKI' flag ,. ,.g2Li!f'y ' S45 Manual ' ' ,wo 51, Az, , ,wg ' 525562 ,I - I A X. ,AF, -s , ', -' ,x .1 :-u:s3', -I ,,1, Z5', ', :',5vf,,.E 3is?7 ?1Sl54i7f?f'?f7, A 2 U, .- w i f, ' if ? 5513 ,as ,fr as K' 1 11 an ,tif 451, Mft f f , ga ' s is Q7 so 5? ' ,ae -1 A ,sw,7g11i1',: . 4 Q W, Mu. , fm, at . My , V, ,,,,i,,..,,,,.W,fes.S,,:,Q 1 5 iff' tc . : 595' " 3I55Ie,I5755?5ai7n I : mf, fy f, L ' - a wzayl , I E , , s I, ' ma: time t egg, - . , M a f 1 Q 3 2 to ,Q -w, ' , , -'szfaifzgf'zwxgf,,g-,, 5 . . V 1, ta - f:k' f I 7 ,A,- ??s'?f7 , U'-: ,,.,. i1, i 4, Q :GW s , ,JV ' I - A ' 'I I W 'T i ,. 1, 11 cw ,, SGFIIQRS ROBERT W. PERLIS apple uallcy, political sci. SUSAN PERRONE march afll, speech and hearing SH ERY L PERRY northridge, psychology JANET PERUCCA fremont, anthropology JANICE PETERSON santa barbara, speech MICH AEL PETERSON stochlon, mechanical engr. JOA N P H EL PS llisalia, sociology TOM PHILLIPS bakersfield electrical engr. BET H PIERCE san carlos. history LY N N PI E R SON rolling hills, sociology MARILYN PINDROH san carlo-L sociology MARK PIOZET los altos, history ARTHUR PITTS goleta, music JOHN PLAXCO sanla clara, economicsfsoc, ROGER PLOCK fresno, anthropology CHRIS POEHLMANN san bernardino, bio. sci. DEBRAH POLITE los angeles, political sci. NANCY POLLOCK golettl, art NORMA PONCE salinas, sociology CHERYL PONCINI mt. view, political sci. JAYNE POULLOS san la barbara, spanish DENISE PRAGER san bruno, psychology CHARLES F. PRATT sanfrancisco, chemjbiochem, STEVE PRIZMICH san pedro, socialpsychalogy CYNTHIA QUAN los angeles, economics ROSS QUIGLEY gokta, economics JAM ES RAGSDALE san marina, english LELAND RAMSEY salinas, economics MARY RANDLE garden grove, hispanic civiliz. SUSAN RANSOM lakewooi history ROBERT RATCLIFF beverly hilln nuclear engr, GEORGE RAY encino, political science ELIZABETH REED sierra madrc, ergonomics KEN REEVES woadside, history CATH ERINE REFVEM burlingame, historyfenglish JEFFREY REISS playa del rey, environ. CIN DY R H watsorwille, history DOUG REYNOLDS palos uerdex, biological sci. SUSAN REYNOLDS berkeley, speech and hearing GARY R. RHOADES la crescenta, zoology MARGUERITE RINDGE alpine, nj., biological sci. JANET RIVERA sanjose, anthropology BARBARA ROBBINS panorama city, mathematics LINDA R, ROBERTS san bernardino, history KATHY A. ROBINSON santa paula, cultural an thra. PAUL ROBINSON losgatos, physics JAMES A. ROBISON lajolla, economics STEVE ROCKI-IOLD sanla cruz, psychology HIORS 1 fo RAY ROCKWFLL lafayettr, politiral sri, IfLIZABI'ITH ROGERS ranla barbara, political sri. HIQLICN ROSEN no. hollywood. sofiology KICNNITTH ROSENI-'I-TLD no, hollywood art DONALD ROSS san marina, envirunmental bio, DOUGLAS ROSS llmq bearh, history VIRGINIA ROTH northridqe, polilifal Sri, IOM RUTH EN BERGI-TR fullerton, philuxophy LYNDA ROWAN glendale, hixlaryfpuli. Sri. IVIELVIN RU Bl-I fresno, politifal sfienu' RALPH RUDSIQR wan nays, gmloyy LARRY RUNKLIC ranla barbara, politiral srl. VICKI RUSSELL oakland hixlury DENNIS RUSSO sim: valley, Psychology DOLOR ES S. RYAN santa barbara, rconumifs KIfNNI'I'I'I-I SAKAGUCHI lanrasler, rfunomirs CONNIE F. SANDBERG mouniain view, .rofiology DUNN.-X LEE SANDLER hunolulu, hawaii, fnglirh .Mir . gjiilw Q . , fm- K ,Y f H A 6 ,x g I 'g x I S , 5 N 'Qs ff ...k,B,. ia I fra I Q as 1 is I Hi . ,, as I N , V' s, as -2 is I X.. , X 2 -,... M is ii' in Ez? .I , ' ij A 73 . . ..., A I IEZE , 44 . ,. t . , l J . ' ,ee ' A., . is t ,--A I -, m u -7 - -,. " fig, 2 ,, .. msg A I 1. ,Z in : 4, One of the best ways to persuade others is with your ears-by listening to them. Anonymous i ,. W, , , at f , 'Y , .sy ...JH 1 ' 5 N 2 .wg My , W F Ae an UW ..l 3 Ii f ii H ,- . ,isis-V, V sg? i K I , K K A 1 9 53 f. 3 sw A' 553 , n ik H, .,,, .,,, . , ,". I Mui i,t.s,,. 'fifgify .. ,. gg25Ii:h?Qi?1atH ' W is If . 4 uf-Mez fx '-V' ms 2 ft' 321,43- f 1 ,,,, W, W F1522 V 1 I i . , : W, it lim ,,.. A rsts is his s E H U t 'Ee HIORS VALERIE SAUBAN mantrose, political science BARBARA SAYERS san lorenzo. english BARBIE SCHMIDT sepulveda, historyfpoli. sci. TERESA M. SCHMIDT haywari psychology WILLIAM SCHMIDT reseda, english RICHARD SCHNEIDER newport beach, psychology BRET SCHREIBER malibu, anthrofeconnfbio. sci. MARK SCHREIBER northridge, history REBECCA SCHUMACHER bakers-Held, social science SUSAN SCHUYLER san carlos, mathematics ROBERT SC H WARTZ losangeler, historyfpuli. sci. ANA MARIA SCOTT danville, social science JOYCE SCURR pasadena, physical education HELENA SERPAS belmont, spanishfdance JOHN SEXTON san bernardina, biological sci. KEVIN SHANNON costa mesa, mathematics JOHN SHEHORN westlake village, poli. sci. GEOFEREY SHIELDS grand rapids, mich., poli. sci. TOSHI SHIMIZU los angeles, physics YOUNG JUN SHIN seoul korea, electrical engr. MICHAEL SHIRE bakersheld, mechanicalengr. LY N N SI LLM A N las vegas, neo., history BR U C E SI LVA bakersjield political sci. CH ARLES SIVLEY colu sa, english JANET SKLADAL sunnyvale, biological sci. BRENDA SMITH clarernont, sociology ELIZABETH SMITH balboa island physical ed. PAUL SMITH pasadena, engineering JAM ES SNOOK concord sociology ROBERT SNOW chico, zoology DIORS GEORGE SOLUK las angeles, electrical engr. EUGENE M. SORKIN lox angeles, cellular bio. ALAN SOULE lafayette, mechanical engr. JOHN SPECIALE las alias: economics JANICE SPELLMAN baker:-field english CHRISTINE SPENCER hkewood, sociology KARIN SPRAGUE santa barbara, history A. DAWN STAFFORD whittien english SH EILA STALEY lapuente, hispanic ciuiliz, GLENN STANTON III visalia, political science MARK STASINIS northridge, economics SUSAN STECKI whittier, english KATHRYN STEEN goleta, historyfanthropology PAMELA STEGEN van nuys, cultural anthro. BETSY STELES calabasas, history GREG STEMPEL san rafaeL economics JOY STEPHENSON mountain view, sociology DIANE STERLING los angeles, psychology JIM STEWART so. sanfrancixco, economic! BARBARA STONE los angeles. social science SALLY STOUT burlingamt, dramatic art SHARON STRONG piedm0nL history KENT SULPRIZIO Mfayettc, mechanical engr. CAM Y SUMOWSKI torrance, sociology SUZANN SWEENEY sunnyvale, history ROBERT TA BER sunnyoale, economics RICK TAKAHASHI san mateo, history 92 NW wie, 24 iw Long the summer day . . . Patterns on the ocean sand . . Our idle footprints. Haiku Poem 4-Q5 if iii SGHIORS PETER TALMACHOFF whiltier, rlectricalengr. LEWIS TANNER duarte, psychology BARBARA THOMAS redwood city, english HOWARD THOMAS folsom, mechanical engr. VIVIAN THOMPSON rednndo beach, english MILLIE THROWER pacwc palisades, history RICHARD TILLEY edwards, nuclear engineering DON TIMMER san rafael linguisticsfanthro. RAYMOND J. TISCHER II sanla barbara, music EDWARD TOATLEY so, sanfrancisco, history LAURIE TODD santa cruz, history JUNE TOKUSHIGE west covina, history CYNTHIA TOLLETTE los angeles, socfcult. anlhro. KATHLEEN TON los gatos, anthrojpsychology JOHN TOON van nuys, engineering SCOTT TRACY whitlien economics TERESA TRESCOTT glendara, history NEIL SNOWDEN upland history. SGHIGRS STEVE TURNER tarrance, mechanical engr. BEVERLY VALENCIA goleta, english RICHARD VALENCIA lompoc, sociology MICHELE VALENTE los angeles, psychology PAUL VAN NOORD belylowen social science STACY VAN VUREN napa, history ANTHONY VENTIMIGLIO pleasanton, english JEFF VESELY burbani, mathematicsfecan. MARGARET VOLESKY ojai, social science PETER VREDENBURGH chala vista, history BETTY WAILES fremont, historyfrhetoric ELIZABETH WAITE ventura, home economics BARBARA N, WALKER san carlos, social science BARBARA E. WALKER pasadena, history M ARY WALSTEN san bernardino, english BEVERLY WANTER saratoga, psychology PETER WARD lafolla, political science WILLIAM WARD redwood city, history BLAIR WARDLAW san rafael sociologyfpsych. GARY WASHAUER san carlos, economics STEVEN WAWRYCHUK west Covina, economics JAMES WAYMAN studio city, mechanical engr. SYLVIA WEBSTER oxnard, sociology CAROL WEEKS golela, anthropology CHARLES M. WELCH. JR, concord history SUSAN WELLS moraga, history KENT WESLEY thousand oaks, histjpoli. sci. OLA MAUREEN WESTERMAN sequxm, wash., sociology SUSAN WEXLER los angeles, social science GAYLE WHITE saratuga, aft JERRY WHITING pleasant hill, french WILLIAM D. WHITNEY san mateo, english LANG WHITTON newport, marine science JANET WICTORIN bakersfieli physical ed, H1177 f .V .f,, gwyfvgf-V, ,,,fsf,,,sWf,f x ,, 1,-v:f,,z,sJ,,,., , i , ,. lb: ' M,,,m M f, Avi-, Ms. wfwni, . A , - - 11 . m.f9.7i?'fY? 2 -,V .wi ,--f i. V. 'ii N, ,' K 1 -..- W. gg s,,, . s Y ,APY My F J, k we, 'UAW X if I 4 I fy f ceq, .. W, ,, af N 2 1--mv 0.0 P It Ae 3 1 3- is M -fy . " af I e 2 ss ,J M Q Q? y fi Q :ff- M5 . , g 1 X Tell everyone Now, today I shall sing beautifully for my friends' pleasure. Sappho NIORS PAULA WI EST sacramento, ergonomicffphys ed BETTY WILSON redwood city, french CYNTHIA WILSON cincinnati, ohio, sociology SUSAN WILSON newport, anthropology JERRY WINDOM long beach, political science RALPH WINN santa barbara, biochemistry MICHELE WTSOTSKY los angeles, social science NANCY VVITTMEYER Ian luis obispo, history ROBERT WOLF sunnyvale, sociology WENDY WOLTERDING sausalito, social science DWIGHT WR ENCH lajolld, mathematics JEFF WRIGHT san clemente, economic: MELISSA VVYATT san clemenle, sociology KATHLEEN YATES folsom, history LAUREEN YOUNG waimanalo, hawaii, spch and hearing BET H ZE BB pasadena, physical education CAR L ZEI G ER long beach. biological sci. SUSAN ZI EMANN san jose, physical anlhro. Wm aff. 'K+ ii 4 fa I thought the children Were going to play jacks Or jump rope Or skip , And go naked. I did not know they Were going to play Revolution Until I saw The Blood. William Eastlake 386 INDEX A Abbott, Cindy 341 Abernathy, Ralph 35 Acker, Stephen 356 Adair, Shari 356 Adams, Sam 230,232 Adams, Victor 239 Adams, William 356 Adams, Yvonne 306 Addison, Michael 141 Adeleke, Alexander 356 Adler, Thomas 195 Agruss, Christopher 227 Ahlgren, Joyce 356 Aiello, Anna 356 Aitken, David 143 Akoni, Abdulhamid 137 Albright, Ann 190,318,356 Aldritt, Art 237 Allen Allen Allen: Jonathan 225 Allan, , David 195,356 Ronald 215,218,221 skip 234 Allman Brothers 65 Allred, Frances 322 Allsup, Sharon 356 Altounian, Laura 306 Amano, Stephen 356 Amstutz, Douglas 223 Andersen, Gary 214 Anderson, Adria 356 Anderson, Connie 356 Anderson, Dennis 195 Anderson, Jeffrey 338 Anderson, Ned 233 Anderson, Richard 356 Anderson, Susan 190,318 Andren, Neal 195,356 Andrews, Laurence 223 Antigone 73 Anton, Mike 206 Arcadi, Robert 356 Armer, Gregory 195 Armstrong, Nancy 356 Amold, Carla 356 Amold, Janet 341 Arrott, James 321,356 Artigues, Charles 183 Ashcraft, Mrs. 330,331 Atkins, Stuart 149 Aull, Andrew 356 Austin, Lawrence 237 Aydelott, William 183,356 Azakian, Ed 145 B Bacani, Maria 356 Baetz, Ruth 356 Bailey, Elizabeth 322 Bailey, James 356 Bailey, Kevin 230,231,232 Baim, Dean 356 Baker, Brad 195 Baker, Janet 82 Bakura, Susan 356 Balcher, Alan 356 Baldizan, Dick 227 Baldwin, Barbara 318,356 Baldwin, Joyce 194,356 Balice, Michael 356 Ball, Gregory 356 Ball, Timothy 195 Ballus, Patricia 333 Banker, Nancy 190,336 Banzett, Lorelle 356 Barber, Ann 341 Barber, Steve 325,334,356 Barczi, Kenneth 232,356 Barger, Ramon 320 Barkey, Ralph 215,220 Barnard, Marion 356 Barnwell, Robert 321 Barrall, Mark 356 Barrett, Stephen 328 Barringer, Charles 356 Barron, Stephen 206 Barthel, Lee 195 Bass, Gregory 206 Bauer, Douglas 334 Baynton, Lark 341 Bearman, Dave 110 Becker, Horst 138 Behman, Gerald A., Jr. 320 Bei, Gail 336 Bellefeuille, Stephen 325 Belvin, John 334 Bennett, Jodi 136,144 Berger, Marsha 187 Bergman, Mindy 330 Berlant, Gary 237 Bemstein, Donn 204 Berra, Eruce 320 Berrett, Judith 322,358 Berry, Susan 306 Berryessa, Jeffrey 214,232 Bertetta, Gerald 237 Bertram, Andrea 194,306 Betts, Edward 321 Bey, Richard 358 Beyers, Nancy 190,322,358 Biggs, Paula 358 Billings, Roger 358 Bishop, Elvin 65 Bishop, Lynn 322 Black, Donna 358 Black, Sandra 188,358 Blackbum, Elizabeth 333 Blackford, Candace 341 Blackman, John 302 Blackshear, Barbara 336 Blair, Pamela 247 Blakely, Richard 146 Blanc, Alan 358 Blank, Adele 358 Blanton, Ronald 358 Blegen, Joanne 358 Blodgett, James 358 Blois, Douglas 338 Bloom, Harry 239 Bloom, Judith 188,358 Bloom, Roberta 358 Blozan, Cristine 358 Boardman, Kathy 358 Bobbitt, Booker T., Jr. 358 Bodenheimer, Howard 358 Boesel, Darcy 318 Boggs, Steven 328 Bohl, Pam Bennetts 358 Bohm, Barbara 183,358 Bolasm, Gerald 358 Bolling, Ruth 358 Bonin, Henry 358 Bonynge, Timothy 224 Boothroyd, Ellen 358 Borden, Allan 358 Borg, James 237,334 Borglin, Kristine 190,326,358 Borror, Suzanne 304 Bosch, Ray 224 Boskovich, Philip 206 Bossin, Debra 193 Bothwell, John 328 Bottoms, Kurt 338 Boughton, Don 141 Boulton, Lynn 326 Bourgaize, William 227 Bower, John 225 Bowers, Ellen 175 Bowin, Phil 210 Bowman, Craig 211,225 Boyd, Harry 358 Boyer, Larry 195 Boylan, Howard 189,358 Boyle, Michael 359 Braasch, Teri 184 Bradley, Michael 214 Bradshaw, William 325 Braly, Corinne 330 Brandenburg, Larry 206 Brashear, Elizabeth 359 Bream, Julian 94 Breetwor, Cheryl 35 9 Breneman, Betsy 359 Brewer, Wendy 304 Brewer, William 320 Breyfogle, Newell 23 7 Bridgers, Bud 359 Briggs, William 325 Broadhead, William 231,232 Brooks, Barbara 184 Brouillard, Patricia 302,333 Browder, Christopher 338 Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown, , Christine 322 Angela 359 Hugh 359 Kenneth 211,225 , Maria 359 , Nevin 193 , Pamela 336 , Scott 227,229 Ste hanie , p 190 Browning, Lorelle 100,187,18 8 Brownlee, Denise 359 Brumby, Brian 359 Bryngelson, Robert 232,359 Buchanan, Kathryn 306 Buck, Catherine 341 Buck, Susan 316,322,359 Buckley, Catherine 190,3 18,359 Bucton, Lillian 359 Bugg, Nancy 188 Bull, Doris 359 Bunkelman, Brad 359 Bunker, Suzanne 326,359 Buoncristiani, Adrian 215,220 Buono, Catherine 359 Burdett, Barbara 359 Burdick, Charles 234 Burke, Michael 338,359 Bumham, James 334 Bums, Anna 302 Bums, Jeanette 359 Burr, Patricia 318,359 Bursik, Emilie 359 Buschmann, Susan 330 Bush, Allen 321 Bushey, Stevan 212,232 Butler, Jane 306,322 Butler, Pegge 359 Butler, Sally 318,359 Butz, Janet 54 Buzzini, Diane 316,318,359 Byer, Laurel 341 Byme, Yvonne 360 Byrne, Mark 360 Byme, Patricia 302 Byron, Carol 304 C Cabot, Joyce 175 Cabral, Frank M., Jr. 360 Calderone, Rosalie 360 Calhoun, Rebekah 193 Callahan, Judith 360 Callahan, Michael 184 Callihan, Harry 204,206 Callow, Marjorie 326 Camba, Bemard 360 Camerlengo, Elsie 360 Campagne, Russell 325 Campbell, Corinne 306 Campbell, Janice 333 Campbell, Laurie 318 Campbell, Sarah 360 Campbell, Steven 325 Cannon, Frederic 320 Capaccio, John 302 Capes, Cheryl 360 Cappa, Mary Ann 360 Cardella, Stephen 360 Carlson, David 184 Carlsson, Erica 360 Carmichael, Jacqueline 188,360 Carmilla 67 Carnahan, Gary 360 Carson, Catherine 330,360 Carter, Elizabeth 318 Caruso, Anthony 360 Cary, Mary 360 Pinky 333 Cass, Maxine 183 Castleman, Brian 360 Cave, Janice 360 Cavin, Shari 140 Celmer, Ted 302 Cermeno, Frank 212 Cesare, Andrew 324,325 Cesare, James 325 Cetti, Stephanie 318 Chadwick, Bruce 206,360 Chadwick, Patricia 187,360 Chan, Hobert 360 Chaney, Bradley 360 Channing, Bradford 334 Chase, Lynne 360 Chavez, Robert 360 Cheadle, Vemon I. 144,204 Cheek, Leslie 360 Chen, Charles 360 Chew, Nelson 360 Chiang, Yvonne 87 Child, Diane 333,360 Choreographic Spectum 69 Chorica 71 Christiansen, Paula 341 Christopher, Gregory 183 Church, David 360 Cima, Joyce 336 Clartield, Marjorie 360 Clark, Craig 227 Clark, Jennifer 360 Clark, Pamela 322 Clark, Richard 321 Clarke, James 239 Cleary, Coleen 330 Clifford, Nancy 306 Cloud, Preston 148,149 Coates, Hilary 360 Cochrane, Ida 360 Cochrane, Zenola 306 Cockerill, Charles 360 Cockerill, Kathrine 360 Codington, James 328 Coenen, Juliette 360 Coff, Dana 302 Cohen, Roy 212 Cohn, Paula 361 Cole, Neal 334,361 Colgate, Vicki 326 Colley, Stephen 183 Collins, Jack 234-236 Collop, Sandra 330 Colvin, Susan 341,361 Colwell, Nancy 190,361 Comegys, James 328 Comerford, James 317 Comstock, Richard 158 Concertus, Musicus 68 Conger, Cynthia 361 Connolly, Jane 361 Conway, Jane 318,361 Cook, Teresa 361 Coolidge, Christine 322 Cooper, David 189 Cooper, Judy 361 Cords, Carolyn 333 Corliss, Donald 361 Cosentino, Michael 215 Cote, Ron 206 Courtney, Jon 195 Courtright, Kerry 361 Cox, Michael 237 Craig, Shirley 362 Crinklaw, Susan 326 Criswell, Celeste 194 Criswell, Leslie 362 Crites, Robert 328 Crivello, Ruth 362 Crocker, David 206 Cronin, Jerry 362 Cronk, Richard 362 Crooker, Debra 302 Crosby, Robert 362 Crowther, Bishop Edward 137 Cuddyre, Terence 334 Cuellar, Jose h Sr. 102 Cummings, Criaig 362 Cunnane, Michael 214 Cunningham, Katy 333 Curtice, Jack 204 Cuzner, Carol 183,362 D Dahl, Robert 362 Dahlgren, Pat 193 Danache, Daniel 232 Dance, Maurice 231,232 D' Angelo, Donna 362 Daniels, Mareva 306 Darling, James 338,362 Davies, Jane 341 Davies, Kathryn 336 Davis, Debra 192 Davis, Jack 362 Davis, Ronald 49 Davis, Sue 188 Davis, Steven 362 Davis, Susan Barr 362 De Bow, Deborah 322 Dedrick, Robert 183 De Franco, Diane 222 De Gooyer, Lance 317,328 De Groff, Robert 362 De Groff, Sharon 362 De Groot, David 234 Delanty, Rick 212 De Laveaga, Martha 318 Del Duca, Deborah 362 Delgadillo, Arthur 362 De Muth, Philip 184 Denhart, Sandra 318 Denman, Joan 363 Dennis, Kathleen 192 Dense, Charles 363 De Pangher, Michael 302 Derrah 1 13 Deutsch, Barbara 175 Devenish, Judy 363 De Voe, Deborah 326 De Wald, Cathy 363 De Wolfe, Robert 138 Diamond, Jeffrey 328 Diamond, Kathleen 363 Dickey, Robert 237 Dickson, Deborah 336 Didinger, James 321 Dierdorff, Nancy 363 Dierker, Richard 227,229 Dimmitt, Tom 233 Dingler, Robert 302 Di Pol, Annette 363 Di Pol, Loretta 304 Dirden, Janice 363 Di Rosario, Michael 302 Disen, Eric 183,363 Dixon, Robert 328 Dodd, Deborah 190,333 Doiron, Daniel 363 Dolby, Susan 330 Dolowitz, Steven 363 Donoghue, Robin 180,363 Doolittle, J onna 363 Doolittle, Karl 338 Domey, Deborah 363 Doty, Edward 226 Downey, Daniel 325 Doyle, Robert 325,363 Draper, Ann 363 Ik, fi ,,.-nw 7 I 5 M ' ' , ,I',r S , " , X j E f M 1 , 6 :E A Q Ei fk , .A H , . XL ' as A W ii-2 fs W ...Q 'M E 7' M 2 M! 10 5 - n , ' E J i L ' o 3 Q 4 , L g, .. .. U 3 A - , Avyi f f"' 5, gf ,E T '5 "4 fm 31 wr. Y- 'M' ,P WW Xb Q 5 Q ff Em Q . N M. . 4 2' H I I , A 2 'E' rf , '-4, - -4 , ,at . '-,ual Mow - ' r .la ui sq 7 1 L ..., 1 . D ,L . mr I N ' 5 -4 Q lA 2 4 lr Q I I ,, 4 ,, 7 l 5 I 1 , 1 Ford, Dennis 364 Ford, Margaret 364 Foreman, Dennis 205,206 Foster, Rick 364 Fox, Susan 304 Frame, Karen 322 Franco, Irene 304 Franco, Robert 227 Frank, Josh 226 Franklin, Coleen 140 Frazier, Earl 215,220,221 Freas, Janet 364 Frederick, Deborah 364 Freeman, Ricardo 187 French, Mark 227 Fried, Jeffrey 364 Friedman, Howard 364 Frisco, Don 302 Frolli, Mark 227 Frost, Frank 150 Frye, Anthony 206 Fugle, Craig 226 Fujikuni, Barbara 190 Fulco, Jorge 3 38 G Gammon, Christopher 210, 211,225 Gans, Carl W., Jr. 212,230, 232 Garcia, Eliza 364 Garcia, Margaret 319 Garcia, Robert 232 Garcia, Robert R., Jr. 41,178 Garnes, James 174 Garrett, Janice 364 Garrison, Michael 183 Garza, Victor 223 Gates, Marshall 227,229 Gazdecki, James 338 Gearhart, Richard 226 Geary, Anne 341,364 Geddes, Peter 189 Geddes, Timothy 189,364 Gedney, Neil 195 Geiger, Sally 364 Gentry, Bradford 234 Gerver, Ozzie 364 Geuss, Sandy 239 Geweke, Deborah 333 Gianelli, Jolm 220 Gibson, Lee 320 Gibson, Margery 364 Gibson, Robert 211,225 Gieselman, Stephen 321 Giles, Dana 322 Gillooly, Jack 364 Gin, Bob 338 Gin, Lau Lun 364 Gingold, Samuel 338 Gitlen, Scott 364 Givens, Cleo 179 Glenn, Stanley L. 141 Glokenspiel, Jacquelyn 302 Glover, Joan 188 Gluck, Kedra 322 Goeckermann, Celia 302 Goldberg, Sara 304 Goldfine, Bernard 226 Goldmann, James 365 Goldstein, Mary 161 Gomes, Dennis 365 Gomez, David 365 Gonzalez, Darla 365 Good, D'Riece 365 Good, Mary 304 Gooder, Elizabeth 337 Goodman, Clayton 206 Goodrich, Edwin 86,142 Goodspeed, Stephen 204 Gordon, Doreen 333 Gordon, Michael 184 Gorrie, Dave 227 Gorzynski, Beryl 330,365 Grafe, Carol 365 Graham, Howard 237 Graham, Jack 325 Grandle, Dennis 365 Grant, John 193 Graves, Jeremy 105 Gray, Paul 211,225 Gray, Rex 145 Grayson, Deborah 188 Greathead, Janette 316,3 30 Green, Clixie 302,337 Green, Helen 365 Green, Robert 365 Green, William 365 Greenlees, Dianah 365 Greenwald, Dennis 365 Q 38 Gregory, Mel 233 Grey, William 365 Greyson, Deborah 333,365 Gridley, John 365 Griffin, Carol 319 Griffrng, Juliette 365 Griffith, Jon 328,366 Griffith, Stacey 322,366 Griffiths, Dale 189 Grifman, Phyllis 184 Grimes, Patricia 366 Groener, William 302 Grokenberger, David 226,366 Grokenberger, Marian 366 Gronich, Lori 194 Grossberg, Michael 184 Gstettenbauer, Gregory 320 Gudelj, Steven 205,206 Guild, John 195 Gullotti, Steven 206,208 Gundersen, George 325 Gutierez, Joseph 338 H Haas, Jeffrey 226,320 Hahn, Bruce 214 Hall, Barbara 306 Hall, Nancy 366 Hall, Suzette 316,326 Halpem, Leslie 194 Hamilton, Michael 366 Hammer, Bil 206,223 Hammett, Bruce 321 Handler, David 184 Hanke, Debra 322 Hankins, Hesterly 366 Hanley, Theodore 161 Hanna, Patricia 366 Hannan, Joseph 212,232 Hansen, Kathleen 366 Hansen, Melissa 337 Hanson, Cary 227,320 Hanson, Michael 366 Hanson, William 230,232,328 Harbison, Jeffrey 366 Hardie, Arthur 366 Hargis, J ack 366 Harper, Christine 330 Harper, John 334,366 Harper, Randall 366 Harris Harris Harris Harris Harris, Harris, Harris, , William 320 Harris Diane 190 366 :John 320 ' , Kenneth 338,366 Martha 367 Patricia 190,322 Richard 48 Scott 223 Harrison, Tony 141 Harrop, John 141 Harte, Maureen 367 Harvindeguy, Yvonne 195 Haskett, Steven 215,218,219 Hassebrock, Barbara 326 Hatlen, Theodore 141 Hayes, Lindy 333 Hayes, Marc 338 Hayre, Raghbir 367 Haywood, William 21 1,225 Head, Marcia 341 Healy, Christine 141 Heath, Steve 338 Hee, Brenda 367 Heinsohn, Steve 367 Helmer, John 367 Helvey, Mark 328 Henderson, Cynthia 322,367 Henderson, Robert 237 Hensley, Randy 367 Hepp, Gregory 183 Herauf, Michael 367 Hern, Candice 367 Hemandez, Adela 367 Hemdon, Matthew 367 Herrera, Ralph 174 Herring, Kathleen 367 Herrman, Leslie 367 Hesch, Nancy 319 Hewlett, Gretchen 187 Hide, Terry 367 Higashi, Kathleen 367 Higgin, J oleen 33 3 Higginbottom, Linda 319 Hill, Barbara 322,367 Hill, Barton 367 Hill, David 367 Hill, Suzanne 322,367 Hillman, Bruce 367 Hinds, Dorothy 367 Hinds, William 206,207 Hines, John 367 Hixon, Mark 195 Hobson, Priscilla 109,337 Hodge, Rebecca 337 Hodson, Irene 367 Hoelke, Peggy 189 Hoerauf, Jerald 367 Hoffman, Daniel 367 Hoffman, Douglas 367 Hoffman, James 367 Hoffman, Joan 316,322,367 Hofstee, Philip 367 Hogaboom, Kathleen 326 Hogan, Susan 333 Hold, Lawrence 227,325 Holderness, Deborah 333 Holland, Jack 321 Holmes, Charlene 302 Holmes, Diane 367 Holzer, Michael 325 Honegger, John 320,367 Hong, Terri 368 Hook, Robert 368 Hoopes, Frank 368 Homberger, Gayle 187 Horton, Samuel 214 Hosack, Robert' 368 Hoshin, Diane 142 Hougardy, Richard 368 Houston, John 321 Howard, Linda 368 Howry, Anita 368 Hsu, Reginald 368 Hsu, William 368 Huang, Joseph 368 Hubbard, Frances 368 Hubbard, Freddie 77 Hubert, Carol 368 Huckeba, Charles 368 Hughes, Sheryl 368 Hull, Steven 195 Hultquist, Leonie 368 Humfeld,,J'anet 188 Hummes, Katherine 368 Humphrey, Susan 333 Hundley, Renata 368 Hunt, John 368 Hunter, Brent 368 Huntsin er Steven 206 S , Hurd, Theresa Thompson 368 Hutcheson, Michele 181 Hutchinson, Susan 368 I Ikola, Kathleen 368 Imrie, John 328 Indermill, Kathy 368 Irwin, Susan 330,368 Isenberg, Ed 187 Ismay, Randall 368 J Jackson, Gloria 368 Jackson, Kenneth 206 Jackson, Pamela 368 Jackson, Terrance 334 Jackson, Thomas 227 Jacobson, Jay 226 James, Margo 188 James, Mike 212 James, Rose Anne 330,368 J anovich, Peter 206 J aworski, James 338 Jefferson, Mike 225 Jeffries, Steven 321 Jenkins, Judith 368 Jensen, Karen 326,327 Jensen, Marlene 190,323 Jensen, Susan 119 Jenvey, Marlyn 331 Jernigan, Sandra 306 Johnny Otis Show 76 Johnson Johnson Johnson Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, , Judy 369 Johnson, Johnson, ,Lyndell 191,369 ,Mary 188,330,369 Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson Johnson Johnson , Allen 368 , Amy 190 ,Beverly 368 Britt 368 David 334,368 David 369 Deborah 369 Eileen 319,369 Karen 319 Kenneth 369 Robin 330,369 Sheila 369 Steger 369 Steven 211 Johnston, Craig 234 Johnston, Rodney 325 Jones, Art 369 Jones, Kent 122 Jones, Lorinda 306 Jones, Omar 129 Jones, Patricia 333 Jones, Richard 21 1,2 25 Jones, Sharon 369 Jones, Timothy 369 Jones, William 215 Jordan, Sidney 223 Jostes, John 187 Joyce, Madeline 179 Juelke, Paula 141,369 Jura, Christine 369 Jurewitz, Claudia 304 Justiniano, Nancy 326 K Kahn, Judy 326 Kaiser, Karen 369 Kaji, Jeanette 333,369 Kalk, Eileen 369 Kane, Christopher 234 Kaneshige, Pearl 370 Kates, David 320 Katz, Susan 370 Kaufman, Mark 370 Kaye, Hilary 184 Keam, Deborah 333 Keam, Devon 333 Kearns, Jerry 135 Keefer, Lynn 326 Keelan, Regina 370 Keeling, James 370 Kees, Vicky 370 Keller, Frederick 370 Kellett, Michele 370 Kelley, Kathleen 370 Kelley, Marta 306 Kelly, Carolyn 323,370 Kelly, Megan 370 Kemble, Susan 304 Kemp, Dennis 302 Kendall, Gregory 302 Kenney, Katherine 370 Kerr, Gayle 180 Kezani, Tom 165 Kilpatrick, Alan 320 Kimball, Christopher 370 Kimura, James 3 70 Kindall, Carolyn 333 Kindel, Robert 370 King, B.B. 80 King, Betsy 337 King, John 234 King, William 195 Kinworthy, Michael 370 Kjerulff, Kristen 370 Klein, David 370 Klein, Gail 370 Kline, James 370 Klouda, George 325 Knabke, Katherine 3 70 Knickerbocker, Janice 3 70 Knight, Cynthia 333 Knight, John 321 Knopke, Terry 326 Knorr, Mary 319 Koester, Kathleen 3 3 3 Kohlmarm, Donald 325,370 Kolm, Philip 370 Kohnert, Diana 370 Kolb, Brian 237 Kolling, Mark 214 Kolvitz, Leanne 370 Korson, Charles 370 Kosoff, Jay 370 Kovach, Joe 181 Kramer, Carol 370 Krass, Allan 48 Krell, Donald 370 Kreston, Carolyn 323 Krevis, Judith 188,191,319 Kreymer, Anne 370 Kropf, Susan 304 Kukenbaker, Rhonda 370 Kuehn, David 227,3 25 Kuhn, James 321 Kulvin, Lori 333 Kurlichyk, Deborah 337,370 Kuwahara, Barbara 370 L Laflin, Kathleen 370 Lagana, Gregory 325,371 La Gory, Carmen 191,319 Lagusker, Irwin 371 Lam, Stephanie 107,187,371 Lamphere, Diane 371 Lamsa, Michael 232 Landes, Jerry 371 Lane, Dick 126 Lane, Gordon 183 Langdon, Leslie 371 Langstaff, Gordon 328 Langstaff, Nancy 337 Larsen, Karen 319 Larson, Gerald 158 Laun, Kristine 319 Lavagnini, Henry 371 La Viola, Steven 371 Lawrence, J anene 371 Lawson, Harry 144 Lay, John 371 Lazarus, Allan 183,371 Lazarus, Gail 323 Lazzaro, Linda 371 Le Blanc, Joan 304 Lee, Jerry 215,221 Q55 Lee, Paul 227,328 Lee, Richard 226 Lee, Vickie 371 Lees, Allyson 330 Legassick, Martin 48 Leibo, Steven 371 Lem, Roberta 194 Lemman, Barbara 337 Lencioni, Randell 371 Leonard, Arthur 195 Le Roy, Terry 333 Leslie, Laura 341 Levin, Harvey 371 Levit, Donna 304 Levy, Mickey 371 Lewis, Cheryl 371 Lewis, James 371 Lewis, Neal 325 Lewis, Willard 371 Li, Charles 151 Lierley, Patricia 371 Light, Kenneth 232 Lilek, Barbara 371 Limon, Jean 304 Lincohi, Mark 371 Lind, Barbara 371 Lindeberg, Margaret 371 Lippman, Eva 188,371 Lite, Melanie 372 Littlefield, Mark 227 Littlejohn, Fred 328 Lloyd, Charles 77 Lochhead, Laurianne 188 Logan, Paul 325,372 Logan, Stephen 183 Look, Angela 302 Lopes, Jeffrey 211 Lopez, Ronald 372 Loring, Charles 317,338,372 Loring, Linwood 338,372 Loscotoff, Robert 214 Louis Falco Dance Co. 96 Louie, Judy 372 Lounsburt, Steven 231,232 Low, Laura 306 Low, Walter 338,372 Lucas, Sandy 239 Luchetti, Michael 372 Ludekens, Ronald 211,225 Luecke, William 372 Luger, Teresa 372 Luhr, Kathryn 337 Lukens, Victoria 372 Luna, David 372 Lund, Kristine 372 Lyding, Richard 325 Lystrata 72 M Mabou Mines 84 Mac Glashan, Mary 372 Macomber, William 154 Macy, Michael 212,232 Madden, Daniel 230,232 Madison, Paula 372 Malecot, Andre 146 Manke, Christopher 372 Mankoff, Milton 48 Manosar, Gregory 206 Marceau, Marcel 62,78 Marchesi, David 189 Margolies, John 135 Marion, Robin 194 Mark, Mindy 302 Marketter, Cindy 3 33 Marks, Antoinette 372 Maron, Michael 232,372 Marshall, Kathleen 373 Marshall, Louise 373 Martinelli, lda 373 Martini, Edward 101 Martini, Ned 187 Martinich, Richard 237,334 Masson, Kathryn 373 Mata, Luis, Jr. 373 Matsinger, Harry 334,373 Matthew, Kollamala 175 Maurer, Lawrence 338,373 Mayers, Karen 319 Mazzanti, Gino 325,373 Mc Adam, Steven 374 Mc Andrews, David 374 Mc Bride, Kenneth 206 Mc Call, Bruce 374 Mc Cart, Karyn 194,323 Mc Carthy, Sandra 374 Mc Carthy, Thomas 374 Mc Carty, Cathy 319,374 Mc Clellan, Judith 41,108, 178,374 Mc Connell, Lonnie 206 Mc Cullough, David 374 Mc Dade, Elizabeth 374 Mc Diarmid, Michael 338 Mc Donald, Patricia 375 Mc Donald, Patrick 325 Mc Dougal, Lee 219 Mc Dowell, Christine 375 Mc Eachem, Lee, Jr. 184 Mc Elhany, Ronald 325 Mc Fadden, Leslie 333 Mc Ginnis, Michael 237 Mc Givern, Peter 214,334 Mc Guinness, Lorie 319,375 Mc Guire, Daniel 338 Mc Innis, Michael 375 Mc lntire, Robin 375 Mc Intosh, William 3 75 Mc Keefery, Raymond 375 Mc Kenna, Brian 375 Mc Kibbin, Douglas 214 Mc Laughlin, Ann 375 Mc Lellan, Jennifer 375 Mc Monagle, Charles 375 Mc Namara, Teresa 375 Mc Neil, Ian 334,375 Mc Neill, Virginia 375 Mc Peak, Kim 375 Mc Quade, Wendy 341 Mc William, Linda 191,337 Meade, Catherine 195 Meadows, Gail 189 Meck, Kathryn 373 Medlin, Laralee 323 Mee, Gus 234,236 Menees, Katherine 191,319 373 Meredith, Kenneth 373 Merigian, Margaret 373 Metcalf, Terry 207 Meudell, Marcia 373 Meyer, Michelle 326,373 Mezzetta, Celestina 373 Michky, Marianne 341,373 Michrina, Andy 120 Mier, David 320,373 Milhan, Gary 373 Miller, Barbara 326 Miller, Curey 226 Miller, Deborah 373 Miller, James 373 Miller, Larry 214,239 Miller, Lon 373 Miller, Lynne 188 353, X at Miller, Marilyn 187 Miller, Mark 321 Miller, Nancy 333 Miller, Susan 330 Mills, Andrew 115 Mills, Peter 328,373 Minervini, John 302 Minkley, Susan 341,373 Minter, Steve 205 Mirkovich, Michael 210 Mitchell, James 206,209 Mitchell, Linda 191,319 Moch, David 230,232 Moe, Barbara 373 Molina, Randolph 237 Montagna, Emses 328 Montgomery, Bruce 145 Moody, Marjorie 373 Moon, Melanye 373 Moore, Charles 373 Moore, Kathleen 306 Moore, Stephen 206,211 Moore, Virginia 373 Morasch, Patrice 319 Mordecai, Dennis 373 Moreland, Jennifer 333 Moreland, Pamela 373 Moreno, Antonio 338 Morgan, Marjorie 373 Morgan, Scott 373 Moro, Gerry 232 Morrow, Quenby 323 Morse, Barbara 333 Mortroni, Jim 211 Moss, Robert 373 Mount, Robert 206 Moy, Gloria 188 Mueller, John 328 Muhleman, Dawn 373 Muirhead, Richard 328 Muleady, Kathleen 191,374 Mulhaupt, Rick 195 Muntean, Dirk 374 Murkovich, Mike 211 Murphy, Gregory 227 Murphy, Sandra 374 Musselwhite, Charlie 77 Myers, Donald 374 Myers, Nancy 374 Myers, Theodore 125 Myrabo, Laurie 337 N Nakaoak, Janet 304 Nakashima, David 195 Nash, Roderick 144 Negin, Brian 375 Nelson, David 375 Nelson, Janet 326 Nelson, John 191 Nelson, Pamela 188 Nelson, Patrick 321 Neuman, Randy 232 Neumann, Betty 191,323 New, Thomas 375 Newlon, Molly 337 Newquist, Deborah 375 Nguyen, Thuy 375 Nibley, Annette 326,375 Nicassio, Allan 206 Nicol, Crystal 187 Nigro, Katherine 333 Nishi, Deborah 375 Nixon, Randy 191,323 Nolan, Gary 227 Nolan, Jere 338,375 Nolte, Linda 375 Nordeen, Steven 375 Nordstrom, Edwin 375 Norris, Lance 211 Northridge, Susan 375 Norton, Gayle 341 Noss, Kathleen 194 Nozaki, Seiji 375 O Oakes, Elizabeth 375 Oberg, James 225 Obertreis, Louis 317,328,375 O Brien, Cathy 326,375 O Brien, Kevin 375 O Brien, Thomas 375 O'Connor, Katy 326 O'Dea, Janet 158 O Donnell, James 320 Ogden, David 206 Ogle, John 212 Oglesby, Richard 150 O Hagan, Maureen 188 O Hollaren, Robert 339 Okazaki, Janet 319 Olin, Milton 121 Olsen, June 179 Olsen, Kim 206 Olson, Deborah 326 Olson, Glenn 328 Olson, Margo 306 Oltmann, Henry 325 O Neill, Kevin 226 Ong, Michael 226 Open Theatre 97 Oppezzo, Timothy 206 Orchard, Kristine 333 Ordung, Katherine 187 Ordway, Gary 375 Oropesa, Stanley 375 Orrick, Elizabeth 306 Ortalea, Paul 112 Ortegren, Leif 375 Orth, Pamela 341 Ortiz, Maria 306 Osborne, Leonard 183 Osinski, Halina 376 Ostrin, Richard 376 Ostrom, Sven 227 Otis, James 376 Owens, Bradley 195 Owens, Tim 104 P Pabst, Gwen 337 Page, Patricia 306 Page, Stephen 376 Palmer, Jean 194 Palmer, Suzanne 376 Palmquist, Susan 337,376 Palomino, Randolph 206,208 Panovich, Kathleen 323 Papac, Gail 376 Pappenfus, Karen 319 Paquette, Sarah 376 Pardee, Catherine 183 Pareto, Cynthia 337 Park, Craig 227 Parker, Meg 302 Parrish, William 211 Parsons, George 376 Partridge, Joyce 330 Pasternak, James 339 Patterson, Michael 227 Patterson, Dale 376 Patton, Gregory 226 Paul Sanasardo Dance Co. 89 Pearse, Carol 323,376 Pearson, Nancy 376 Peck, Leslie 323 Pederson, Kent 206,207 Peel, Leslie 304 Pellecchia, Gary 321 Pembleton, Valerie 304 Perkins, Katherine 191 Perlis, Robert 377 Perrone, Susan 377 Perry, Sheryl 377 Persinger, Wendy 304 Perucca, Janet 377 Petersmeyer, Kent 215 Peterson, Arthur 339 Peterson, Craig 339 Peterson, Janice 377 Peterson, Michael 377 Peterson, Peg 191 Pettengill, Diane 183 Pfarr, Michael 237 Pfau, Molly 306 if Wd? w My NR 335 A 8 , 595' Q wi QQ ai X ,, W' XXI-24 Hi 1,, if MF 4 Reiss, Jeffrey 377 Remy, John 211 Resh, Cynthia 377 Reyes, Gilbert 206 Reynolds, Douglas 377 Reynolds, Lyle 175 Reynolds, Richard 334 Reynolds, Susan 377 Rhoades, Gary 377 Rideout, Lucie 302 Rigali, Richard 206 Riley, Mark 206 Rimer, Skip 184 Rindge, Marguerite 377 Riordan, Mary 326 Ristau, Leah 333 Rivera, Janet 377 Rivers, Larry 135 Robbins, Barbara 377 Roberts, John 236 Roberts, Jon 234 Roberts, Linda 377 Robinson, Kathy 377 Robinson, Paul 377 Robinson, Robert 320 Robison, James 377 Roche, Cynthia 304 Rochlin, Tina 194 Rockhold, Steve 2l5,2l6,220, 377 Rockwell, Ray 226,378 Rodriguez, Daniel 206 Rogal, Gail 323 Rogers, Elizabeth 378 Rogers, Jacqueline 194 Roller, Paul 320 Romano, Marinel 326 Rose, Gary 328 Rosenfeld, Kenneth 378 Rosenkranz, Lois 326 Rosenquist, Richard 211 Ross, Donald 378 Ross, Douglas 378 Ross, Greg 237 Ross, Lisa 194 Ross, Steven 227,229 Rostropovich, Mstislav 83 Roth, Roberta 194 Roth, Virginia 323,378 Rothenberger, Thomas 378 Rowan, Lynda 378 Rowe, David 124,183 Rowland, Rick 210,211,225 Roy, Marilyn 341 Rube, Melvin 378 Rudman, Kelly 304 Rudser, Ralph 378 Ruggles, Steve 226 Runkle, Larry 236,378 Russell, Vicki 378 Russo, Dennis 334,378 Ruthroff, Sally 191,337 Ryan, Dolores 378 Rye, Vemon 339 S Sachs, Catharine 306 Sakaguehi, Kenneth 378 Sakakihara, Paul 189 Saldin, Cathy 304 Samp1es,'Ethan 339 Sanchez, Josie 192 Sandall, Susan 191 Sandberg, Constance 378 Sande, Rona 140 Sandeen, Carolyn 341 Sandler, Donna 378 Sanford, Peter 226 Sassard, Carol 302 Sauban, Valerie 191,379 Sauers, Lawrence 193 Sauers, Mike 193 Savage, Marshall 234 9 6 A me XQN "' gfiiafg-gin-,algae X-fvvwa' .M,xs,,r"l'Xd.s.-.. A wg ' ' me . Q, ,av ,,.- Iii- x - D 3 f,f,,ggg5?s.gg,,,ZWggi--gig..-535,6 arp? , -- K HW . , . , -ev .7 -"' " 1 a ii' t N , ,M H h , 1 , M . ff, ,sw ff J . ,. sa, , in wer' Wy, ,Q ,. ,,,. -,ye fem- dm .W-V. me . New , .f, . , my .., - -9 fr . ' 'is' , 'K fl ' , 4 .....-: ' T usijf.. ,V , , 1 4, , ,,7,:qs-f ,f a Q'-if ., if . TVC4 I, . ,,.,, X . V K ,. K X TU 4, 0 gg. M W esp: ,, , Fee: 4 vs: 7 J i f 7 5 'A "3 , w , lsr! f' yvzf' is if "lik, " A K aj 4, .' 5 91 ' ' A 2F!,' . - - .- - M ef p. -... -3 . -f Mae- f M w .,..w,...s..-L :gd a. ' 'K Q' , " 5 ' 1 -51, ,swear -qu, -ev , aww-Z, ,. , Sims? .Q Z.--we 55:.:,.ewTe .arse X f ,me-W. E Ky l it FFF Sawyer, Colleen 337 Sayers, Barbara 379 Schachter, Robert 215,218 Schaefer, Dorothy 330 Schamp, Linda 188 Scharff, Laura 188 Schmidt, Barbara 379 Schmidt, Robert 206 Schmidt, Teresa 323 Schmidt, William 379 Schmitz, Janis 3 19 Schneider, Ann 330 Schneider, Richard 379 Schorr, Rebecca 304 Schott, Christine 337 Schreiber, Bret 379 Schreiber, Mark 379 Schuler, Catherine 316,337 Schumacher, Rebecca 379 Schuyler, Susan 379 Schwartz, Andrea 323 Schwartz, Robert 379 Schwecke, Donna 330 Scott, Ana 379 Scurr, Joyce 379 Seargeant, Joanne 319 Selander, Allen 206 Sellman, Steven 183 Senger, Leo 147 Sensen, Ota 222 Serpas, Helena 379 Sexton, John 317,320 Shade, Tim 206 Shank, Brian 212,232 Shannon, Kevin 379 Shehorn, John 379 Shelton, Becky 337 Sheriff, Mrs. 326 Shields, Geoffrey 379 Shields, Sue 319 ,3 Shimizer, Toshi 379 Shin, Young Jun 379 Shire, Michael 339,379 Shrader, Edwin 226 Shubert, Mark 320 Shymaker, Keith 215 Siegel, Rocky 183 Sierra Leone Dance Co . 85 Stillman, Lynn 316,341,379 Silva, Bruce 379 Silverman, Henry 124,180 Silvestri, Michael 321 Simmons, Scott 225,328 Simonek, Lynna 319 Simpson, Deborah 191,323 Singer, Philip 239 Sisson, Margaret 304 Sivley, Charles 379 Skaggs, Robert 237 Skinner, Robert 339 Skinner, Sherry 330 Skladal, Janet 326,379 Slater, Deborah 326 Small, Sally 188 Smeltzer, Ron 206 Smith, Alexandra 211,225 Smith, Brenda 379 Smith, Christopher 339 Smith, Elizabeth 379 Smith, George 174 Smith, Marc 140 Smith, Marcy 326 Smith, Nancy 319 Smith, Paul 379 Snook, James 379 Snow, Robert 379 Snowden, Neil 325,381 Snyder, John W. 174 Snyder, Wayne 231,232 Soluk, George 189,380 Soper, Patricia 330 Sopp, Laurie 333 Sopp, Terri 333 Sorensen, Eric 211 Sorkin, Eugene 380 Soule, Alan 380 Spagnuolo, Irene 330 Sparky 123 Sparrow, Patricia 140 Speciale, John 380 Spellman, Janice 380 Spencer, Carolyn 333 Spencer, Christine 380 Sperberg, Richard 211 Spittle, Reginald 108,187 Sprague, Karin 380 Springer, Joan 326 Stafford, A. Dawn 380 Stahl, Gayle 194 Staley, Sheila 191,326,380 Stanbury, Corey 211,225 Stanley, Sheila 327 Stanton, Bud 230,232 Stanton, Glenn 325,380 Stark, Susan 330 Staschower, Judith 319 Stasinis, Mark 320,380 Stecki, Susan 380 Steen, Kathryn 380 Stegen, Pamela 380 Steigely, Randall 225 Stein, Alan 321 Steiner, William 339 Steles, Betsy 380 Stelling, Susan 194 Stempel, Gregory 320,380 Stephenson, Joy 380 Sterling, Dane 380 Stevens, Peter 339 Stewart, Carol 306 Stewart, Craig 183 Stewart, David 334 Stewart, James 380 Stewart, Randall 141 Stinson, Stuart 321 ,:.. - X sgjfS?Q? .- - -,534-, ,gf ' L w is r,',1fw.5,7..r s k gs , .sag tl , .' if - " fgfga P 5- -' '- -' 'lf--' f1X:1fasgr:Q.fee2i Q,:.aSgYea.r--gears,-.1f1f tix, ,. . . .. ., .. t A 6 W' it R 1 +1--b' XA 'K , NK 3 rc X F. -,lvmlw -s. dwrivw . '4 in K., X. .,.. 'Ff..+,xs.-,,v-gf, is asf? ,t Lil' . -. 3 ' - 3 " we - eesmfafrr-1t,w, . arf. iii ,wifthfreiwfi Qisglfpwg, of .Q 5 W f tp ,,t. . r , f :ss K X '- ' 1 - , Stocklin, Joven 148 Stone, Barbara 380 Stout, Sally 380 Straatsma, Cary 302 Streed, Margaret 191,319 Strong, Sharon 333,380 Strunk, Sandra 306 Swartfager, Roger 334 Swargz, Ed 204 Swauger, Kerri 304 Swearingen, Carrell 328 Sweeney, Suzanne 380 Stuart, Sheila 341 Sugerman, Michael 183 Sullivan, James 143 Sulprizio, Kent 380 Sumowski, Camilla 380 Sundstrom, Linda 337 Sutton, Thomas 226 Suwara, Rudy 234 Taber, Robert 380 Tacoma, Shirley 319 Tai, Susan 86 Takahashi, Ricky 380 Talmachoff, Peter 381 Tanner, Lewis 381 Tarre, Sheldon 187 Taylor, Wesley B., Jr. 152 f Telleria, Robert 223 Thomas, Barbara 381 Thomas, Daniel 223 Thomas, Howard 381 Thomas, Lisa 191,330 Thomas, Randy 206 Thompson, Gail 337 Thompson, Katherine 326 Thompson, Marcia 330 Thompson, Rogan 206 Thompson, Vivian 381 Thomson, Tom 189 Thornton, Fergus 317,325 Thrower, Mildred 381 Thurston, Pamela 326 Tighe, Claudia 194 Tilley, Richard 381 Tillman, Sue-Anne 333 Timmer, Donald 381 Timora 320 ., , ,- -,,f. r ,-,ns K Tischer, Raymond 3 81 Toatley, Edward 381 Tobin, John 230,232 Todd, Laurie 381 Tofanelli, Lee 226 Tokushige, June 330,381 Tolbert, James 232 Tolegian, David 198 Tolleson, Robert 234 Tollette, Cynthia 381 Tomlinson, Dale 174 Ton, Kathleen 381 Toon, John 381 Torres, Anthony 227,229 Tracy, Cheryl 381 Tracy, Scott 339 Trammell, Dennis 226 Trant, Jeffrey 321 Trescott, Eresa 381 Troedson, Mary 333 Try, Jennifer 306 Tschogl, John 215,217,219 Tuazon, Turlow Renato 328 Ken 206 Turner: Dan 206 Turner, Turner, Turner, Henry 174 Lindsey 302 Steven 339,382 Tuttle, Lynda 188 Twogood, Daniel 225 U Uchida, Deborah 319 Unzueta, Manuel 214 Utsumi, Christine 341 V Valdez, Manuel , Jr. 223 Valencia, Beverly 382 Valencia, Richard 382 Valente, Michele 304,382 Van Dyck, Neil 206 Van Er, Jerry 237 Van Noord, Paul 382 Van Vuren, Stacy 382 Varner, Miles 135 Venatta, Sahron 188,319 Ventimiglio, Anthony 206,209, 382 Vernier, Craig 339 Vesely, Jeffrey 334,382 Vviiano, Angela 306 Vogt, Elaine 330 Vogt, Leslie 239 Volarvich, James 206 Volesky, Margaret 382 Von Bergen, Vicki 191 Von Somogyi, Zolton 204,214 Vredenburgh, Pe ter 382 W Wacthel, Albert 143 Waddell, Joanne 330 Wade, Carole 341 Wailes, Betty 382 Waite, Elizabeth 382 Walker, Barbara 382 Walsh, Thomas 239 Walsten, Mary 382 Wanter, Beverly 382 Ward, Peter 382 Ward, William 382 Wardlaw, Blair 382 Ware, Ted 183 Warner, Michael 321 Warner, Valerie 331 Warren, James 212,232 Wasbin, Deborah 302 Washauer, Gary 382 Washington, Patricia 189 Watanabe, Patricia 326 Waterhouse, Philip 225 Watkins, Peter 214,339 Watts, Karen 333 Wawry Chuk, Steven 382 Wayman, James 237,382 Webster, Sylvia 382 Wechter, Robert 193 Wedaa, Karena 302 Weeks, Carol 382 Weir, Kimberly 306 Welch, Charles M., Jr. 382 Wells, Susan 382 Werner, David 339 Wesley, Kent 382 West, Stephen 225 Westerman, Ola 382 Wexler, Susan 382 White, David 206 White, Fleet 195 White, Jack 206 White, Robert 339 Whiteford, Helen 330 Whiteside, Donald 183 Whiting, Jerry 382 Whitney, William 382 Whitton, Lang 382 Wictorin, Janet 382 Wiest, Paula 194,383 Wild, William 206 Williams, Ann 192 Williams, Constance 188 Williams, Deborah 326 Williams, Ford 334 Williams, Joseph 339 Williams, Michael 206 Williams, Wendell 206 Williamson, Patricia 330 Wilson, Betty 383 Wilson, Cynthia 383 Wilson, Joan 323 Wilson, Susan 383 Wimpress, Cecily 304,337 W K ,' H? , 5: Q 'f My fu fi ' " FM 5 Q Y . X L. L: vi ' , . N 1 v l- ,.:-:', :C ' i ,pi if ,.. f . fr, I wanted to create masterpieces but spent my time watching this dream crumble I was blocked by bureaucracy ractsm, and mter medta backstabbmg I settled for second best and demanded less than I should have I spent lonely deadltnes proofing pages and feelmg that my book was betng sabotaged by my staff I blamed friends and made enemies because of my own paranota and butlt an ego that could withstand the attacks of the year I watched tncompetency pollute those tn power around me and was foohsh enough to belteve thatI could avoid tt To those people who helped make this book I am grateful To Sunny who taught me to accept my fatlures and shortcomtngs and made my ex ence with La Cumbre as pamless as possible she change my ltfe To Gretchen who never learned her lace and always challenged me I thank her for this a will be forever grateful to her Wtthout her strength and support there would be no book I love this lady To Henry Stlverman who I have unsulted, beltttled and neglected I now thank publicly for has humor his knowledge and has tolerance He atded and educated me more than almost any person this past year I only wtsh we could have been frtends To Michele I needed someone to conftde tn and share media tntrtgues with someone who was not on my staff who dtdn t backstab but who knew where the bodtes were burted. I thank you their sktlls and their tngenutt eg knew more than I could teach hum Kane was a whtz wtth Greeks Juris dtd mtrac es wtth no-llght pictures Gayle and Crystal were never replacements they were superstars Lorelle alwa s knew what she was dotng Celeste and her understanding made our ostttons bearab Marilyn and Sheldon were the most talented freshmen on my staf amela Melvin, my model and cover gurl, ts a very talented and beautiful Black woman. o Andy s sktll with the Isla Vtsta section, Patty s knowledge and Ned s perseverance I thank you all. There were so man that I used and abused, so many mistakes thatI made To those people that I care about w o I offended, I ask your forgtveness To those thatI hurt who hurt me I ask nothing of you And lastly to those peo le who helped me make at throu h the past year Joe Kovach lwho ave me the freedom t t I needed and allowed me to uve wtth my mtstakesj John Zant usan Jensen Barbara Davies Milton Oltn Jeanne Stevens the Freemans The Cummings the Sktnners David Rowe Patrice Saville Eugene Keyes Gretchen s roommates Mark Steinberg Jams of the Mountains and Ltnda of Berkeley J ont Mitchell, Roberta Flack and the Paktstan people Ricardo Freeman 1 972 Editor Im - . f ' ' - , - mf - Myistaff has caused me so much ,pain and so much delight. I am grateful to their talents, . ' ' . . . . , . , . . ' l Q . a . . ,z- F , . ' . . . ' ' , a, t f Q , . , J Q , o o, , I u 1 404 m m momam Nancy S. Bain Dr. Bernard R. Baker Kefvin Barry Harold S. Bowen Thomas R. Cormier Idalia Escamilla Peter G. Gibbs Barbara D. Gross Sandra F. Hines Betty Ingram Ernesto S. .lose Mary E. Miller James E. Neil Kirk D. Phillips Robert P. Rauch William C. Rudloff Karen A. Signore Mark D. Steward Thomas M. Storke Luana F. Thomson Earl M. Weinhaus Ronald J. West and for all those who died in silence, who we ma have overlooked, we 37 dedicate this page. ' f ' , ' 1- . - -2 A ,. ,A . ' ,2f 555 :,fg9'Pfr ., , .aws- There are some men who should have mountains to bear their names to time. I had a friend: he lived and died in mighty silence. and with dignity, no book, son, or lo-ver to mourn. Nor is this a mourning-song but only a naming of this mountain on which I walk, fragrant, dark, and softly white under the pale mist. I name this mountain after him. Leonard Cohen 40 406 A.P. 206t Mike Aydelott Artwork 74, 101 Bryon Baughman 198t Brooks Institute Ken Gatherum 207b1, 208, 215, 218, 219t, 221bl Jim Simpkins 208b, 209 Mike Smith 165 Cotton 292tr, 293 Juris Dumpis 67, 68, 70, 71, 81, 86, 87, 95b 85 lr, 117, 104, 1101r, 1161, 124, 133b1, 135c, 137b1, c, 138t, bl, 139, 140t, c, 142t, 146t, br, 150, 151lt, b, 153b, 154b, 155, 156, 157t, 161, 166, 174br, 175, 179t, 1, 191b1, 193tr, 203, 212, t, 221bl, 224, 225t, 229, 230, 232, 236t, br, 240b, 241, 243, 244, 248, 250, 254, 255, 314, 315, 329b1, 344, 355, 373, 376, 382, 384, 385 Fox 275, 290, 291 Willie Gibson 34b, 35, 76t, cr, 174, 184 Frank I-lalberg Cover and Division pages Life 28, 29 1 John Jostes 39t1, 76b, br, 132 cr, br, 135t1, l36tr, 142b, 1431, t, b, 158t, 168, 187, 360, 366, 370, 374, 387, 380 Stephanie Lam 13br, 1301, 267, 296, 298, 302t, br, 303br, bl, 304, 306, 307, 308, 309, 311 Tom Lendino 49, 106, 242tr Rafael Maldonado 207 Peter Moore 84 b Nexus 32b, 44r, 50, 65b, 67, 69, 114, 209b, 309br Ned Martini 11, 13, 24, 25, 36t1, 46bl, 65t, br, 76b, br, 101, 133tr, 136b, 146tr, 147, 149tr, 181tr, l87br, ggigt, 192br, 195tl, 204b, 223, 245br, 362, 357, Andrew Mills 1, 5, 10, 16, 17, 49b, 102br, 108b1, 112bl, 1l8t, 132t1, l33t1, 170, 252, 253, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 266, 267, 268t1, 269t, b, 271t, b, 272, 274, 276, 277, 279, 280, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 294, 295, 347, 349, 351, 353, 402b, 406, 408 Bob Ponce 228, 241 t, 244t Art Roger 239, 245t Alan Savenor 239, 245t T.L. Swalling 138, 144t, b, 164 U.P.1. 30, 31, 32t, 34t, 38t, 39b Fritz Weaver 278tr Sharon Zinc 386 For those of you, who out of our negligence or yours, are not credited on this page - 'we acknowledge you and are forever an your debt. 40 f p iw K 12 if 'Qi 1 W f, A?sKfL1v4Qf.s:1:gL,g,ja WEE ffm- , 0 H xxx' in L ,zJfT1"1'1"1'1"1'a'w ,,,, - A 2 , 3 "1f V '- -V 4 'ar '1 fs '1 'Q 'fa '-: - , wif! 'Q '1 '1 '1 '1 .. W1 H1 1 -1 fx 'S x W aff? '," Nw- 4 H , 2 . w-1-M-.f..,.,. what can I say CD69 PHI DELTA THETA "Whatever profits one :gan P70515 others as well as himself. Marcus Aurelius The Brothers of Phi Delta Theta enjoyed a successful and rewarding year. They exhibited their brotherhood by participation in service projects, social activities, and intramurals. Throughout the year they made a unified attempt to better adapt to the ever-changing UCSB community. The Brothers took part in their National Fraternity's Community Service Day and continued financial support of their adopted child in Mississippi. For the third consecutive year, Phi Delta Theta ranked highly in academic achievement. The Brothers worked together in sponsoring "The Point" as a fund-raising project. They also enjoyed themselves at the many parties put on by the fraternity. The Brothers participated in all the intramural sports and their teams went to many of the playoffs, beginning with flag football in the fall. Al' DELTA GAMMA "The time to be happy is now. The place to be happy is here. The way to be hapfpy is to make other people happy. Robert Ingersoll This year marked Delta Gamma's 100th year. Along with Delta Gamma chapters all over the nation, the girls at UCSB and their Santa Barbara Alumni Chapter, celebrated the Centennial through service to the community. As their Centennial Project, they decorated their entire house as "Delta Gamma Land," with many of the Disney characters, and then bussed underprivileged children of the Santa Barbara community to visit the house. It was a special day for all the children and all the girls. The DG's started the year with Fall Rush, highlighted by a Creative Night. The girls and rushees made hand-crafted goods, which were later sold to raise money for piano lessons for their blind "little brother", Tommy. Other activities during the year included Parents' Weekend and the Pledge Dance in the Fall, the Winter Formal, and the traditional Luau and Dads' Weekend in the Spring. Throughout the year, the girls participated in intramural sports, including volleyball, basketball, and DG Strings powder-puff football. . W, ..... ,Y .?..?........?, A father enjoyed the opportunity to dance with his daiighter fleftj durin Parents' weekend. Delta Gamma's Pledge ance 1 below and liilow rightj was fun for everyone. Ga 4555 Nancy Banker Gail Bei Barbara Blackshear P3-ffl BFOWQ Christy Chittick Joyce Cima Kathryn Davies Deborah DICICSOH "li ' " .: : - -'Piss tg ,Q x 1. iffy: SL Q ,tx r lI!Egg5ii !4 his '-?N , , , Fr 1 w J. In R ,,. f l in .wr 5 x s is l J ,x rf I, ,w .. , . . . , SV 41 s Q.. 3. s e A.,. 'l X ' in X. Liz Gooder Nancy Langstaff Susan Palmquist Colleen Sawyer up K Clixie Green Melissa Hansen Priscilla Hobson Becky Hodge Barbara Lemman Kathi Luhr Linda McWilliam Laurie Myrabo Cyndee Pareto Patti Piper Patty Preston Barbara Rawicz Becky Shelton Christine Schott Cathi Schuler Linda Sundstrom .Silt Q2 a f --:- - - 1 ,f 5? K MY ,slings EX 2 5 E Betsy King Molly Newlon Sharon Ready Gail Thompson Deborah Kurilchyk Gwen Pabst Sally Ruthroff Cecily Wimpress if if y WJ f Jeff Anderson Doug Blois Karl Doolittle Jim Evans Sam Gingold Joe Gutierrez Lin Loring Walt Low PHI SIGMA KAPPA "Damn glad to be Phi Sigs!" Phi Sigma Kappa is a home that is unique among college residences. The dynamics of our brotherhood offer each man the opportunity to realize his own worth and potential as an individual. In addition, the fraternity encourages the warm exchange of different backgrounds, ideas, values and activities, a social life charged with novelty, excitement and comradeship, and the experience of life-long friendships and a way of life which will be remembered and cherished for years. ,Ha W .,,. W- .K M gg Q ltlv A -6 . g iz- gy K . ' X : H M135 e.i, , ivl- t i- t t Q- 5' ' 7' ' Vrk , i ' ,, D , ' , - i n , ' f ",.f ' - A i 4 I E i A L , ll ill N ,c 4 - .. ' i I ..,- e L ,rci ' a r i r . a A 4 ,-, L i L' c ' ff c i , traic fr f of - V f f 'vll 1 . ' if A" ' V 'AAA I " A , ' A I I 5 12 , is fi ii" f -w "t' R .Hyip ii U .'-v- ii 'E' Af" if ,V , I H V' .L , X X Z 1 3 Vkk.' ki, MA v-:., , ' Q? 55 '., ' . ,. V, rc, ,iis K , " ' 1 g J 'S fi 'i 1 f ff-- me 3 . 3' Rf 4 gg ,aar a ' W5 f ilk lli Kurt Bottoms Mike Fahey Ken Harris Larry Mauer .5 ef , Q A 2 W at y, is Z Z' if Y 5 2 Hi if ' 5 1' r 'i ,fr ,.. ,ga " rf Chris Browder Fresca Marc Hayes Mick McDiarmid Mike Burke Jim Darling Bob Gin George Fulco Jim Gazdecki Steve Heath Jim Jaworski Dan McGuire Tony Moreno f , 'A if Chuck Loring Jere Nolan The Phi Sigma Kappa Fall Cocktail Party Cfar left and abo'vej was at the Santa Barbara Inn. Two Phi Sigs Ccenterj are seen with team members and Hillside House resident Phil xVomlZile at the UCSB! Santa Clara game they oste . t , yif i . ff , U ' V33 .it eee l 1 1 it f' ile . K . l K - ... t ""M77,5":k Q, -9 PM K my K' V-.,.,rW - ij' 4 1 M I i j" J " , V A Z A-' ,W Ei' t P ' lltti it it l P ' I ,h v fj ',. . V. I as , if ' are ,i"' X X lif' Q r za? W ,l at at 5 f V 4 v fi Tom Putnam Bill Steiner Bob White - y l , 5 f' Y f y , ie, P x 5 1 Bob O'Holloren jim Pastcrnak Craig Peterson Art Pettersen Wes Phelan Rick Pierce Vern Rye Ethan Samples Mike Shire Scott Tracy Steve Turner Craig Vernier Bill Yankie Glen Ybarrola Larry Zarasosa L M5W' 3 LQ,g '22 ,gy V , A e 2 2 1 fi is? 12,1 -df., if 4 'wifi l ' ,, I W if 1253 V f,,' , Q 8 We C Zi 39' T Z , W Q 'QE 3 ' fn ii gif, I , 5 3 8 ig K iq Q X .Av di ' W1 may " A .. ' . A f ., - - -1 A 1 :gig . 1 fi' Q" .,?m:ifif:71-'I Q f 1 - 451 If 11 X -Ari,-ff'-555-Y5fE?5iN.X9 X X.l?iz5T1. A px: .1 f . ,k A wig? M f iY.fi'1',-'YS s'i3xJf:5Xirl . i.5?Y5 mziffikkfqi. fji ?i.i'1-'J' SJiSl:ii.:fS.'nL:- if 11 ei TQ-Q SQEXQH fgf fi- WSE- VS- 'fzf-:?:iQs,5fX ' K' l A if- HRX A .A.- g-1,Q i -,wif Q 1 ,. L 'ig ff , ef if ww? ,A 2 n 'f 3 Q3 -v-1,521 K5 n SXSISE7.. Tizifizif 1' . x 'Nas : X sas ..kk 5 . 5. .0- 29' NN 'lf S355 nf' 'QQ 2 ff , 3' -4 if , , y o if L' X. gig, , f Cindy Abbott Candy Blackford Susan Colvin Anne Geary Marianne Michky Bonnie Poore Sheila Stuart aa i L if Janet Arnold Cathy Buck Janie Davies Marcy Head Susan Minkley Marilyn Roy Chris Utsumi X 'X ,vw , . ,L 4 nr Rf we e sf ' fl' ew A Ann Barber Laurel Byer Lynn Duffy Laura Leslie Gayle Norton Carolyn Sands-en Carole Wade W i L' Lark Baynton Paula Christiansen Dale Edwards Wendy McQuade Pamela Orth Lynn Sillman Debby Wright 2 f W 'VM -, A 7? K5 f"z f, Q, , I 1 45, Q ,Q J A W 7 VU Ayzyry .f, nrr , W wif HIGHS . . . if the counter culture is going to live up to its name it's going to have to shift from the role of critic to t t of producer. It's going to have to produce viable examples of w t it s asking for --- or else invalidate its discontent. Wendell Berry 34 m""'1 A? E' Za Y 2 Has it been four years already. How many books and papers does that make? And how many petitions signed or open registrations have I attended ? And most of all-what have I gained? I know that I've lost. I have lost my high school identity, my innocence, and my sense of security at understanding the world. I have lost may .complacency, but perhaps I have only traded it for an e ucated apathy. I have learned, or at least ray 'parents hope, that I have learned to survive in the wor , ow to adapt and change with and in these times. Butl have also learned how to evade both necessary truths and obligations, to write term papers on a weekend, to BS my way past the secretaries in the administration building, and to borrow notes that I missed due to my own negligence. I have read far more books than I have had time to understand and have memorized more meaningless facts for 7 a.m. finals than I care to remember. I now own a collection of impressive books which I will never read again. And now I fear that I have not been totally equipped to 'make it' in the real world. Sure, I can quote Freud or Durkheim or debate the effect of culture on the individual. I can use history to prove anything and philosophy to disprove it. But have I learned four years' worth of knowledge? Have I spent 810,000 on something valuable, or was it a waste of firne? Was college not a stepping stone but a detour in my 1 e And what kind of person have I become and does it matter to anyone else but me? I have more questions without answers now than I had before I entered college. 34 When I was younger I heard stones about the play school by the sea, the college wtth a private beach, etc When I arrived here the bank was m ashes General Motors was camped on our doorsteps and offshore Mother Earth spht open tn rebellion to drtllmg rags that sucked her dry And over at all was the shadow of the war Play school? Hardly My frzends and I rolled up our sleeves and got to work Harry Boyd History If the Untverstty teaches you to doubt even for an instant the mstttuttons which surround you If has accomplished tts mtsston. Gregory Alexlch, Htstory With all the knowledge and wtsdom all the dreams and :deals that there are on this campus and indeed on many other campuses tn this country tt as really sad to see how little IS done with these gifts So much stuptdtty tgnorance and intolerance still remam among us who have come here to learn to know better We can only hope for a better future HenryA Lavagmm History The Unlverszty ts like a mtott friendship of the Ph: Delts who added frtvohty to the quarters and good roomtes who taught me about apartment ltvmg I never could have stood the pressure And I was lucrkdy mtssed the riots had ftnanctal assistance from my parents a lived two years on the beach with the ocean as m back door I love UCSB tt s mst too bad that I came here as a ome Ec ma1or otherwise this campus and IV have so much to offer Thanks for showing tt a to me Crts Blozan, Nutrttton sewer You get out of It what you put Gretchen Hewlett Phtlosophy What do I thmk of the Umversttyf What s to thank? It would be difficult to imagine UCSB located elsewhere It seems its educattonal qualtt and appeal are augmented considerably the environment t the concluston of my semor year I see the mverstty as something enltghtentng to do whtle ltvzng tn a beautiful resort Rtck Foster History Andy Malls An The Umversnty as lzke a screendoor thtngs flow right on through. .I oseph Goldstein, Honors, Bio Sct ' I 9 . , u 0 0 . . : f . 6 ! 0 ' I a c n . .1 0 , s 1. o ,n ! 1 . 5 . , : . . . . u 1 . , , ' 1 ! I was only a transfer student .... Butwithout the love and 0 , s a , I . ! . , . .l . , . . . . , . I ! : . . ' ' 'N - " ., , x' V. -. - A ,. . , ...,,. g. .X .. xl 5 i s 2 4 5 t 34 48 Dogs keep the students and faculty honest They speak up tn class when the lectures get too heavy They express emotions we try to hide When I see someone who IS too engrossed with has self lmage I thank of the dogs The English say a man who does not know dogs and horses cannot know humamty UCSB has both Ball Boyd History Someone yust asked me how I survtved four nears at this umverstty wtth my santty preserved I replted hat ever led you to belteve I m sane? Too many people go along waztlng for something to happen to them not realizing that everythtng that ts happenin to them ts worth somethzng No one sto s to thunk Now wlgat has that experience done for me? hey 1ust go along watttng for somethmg to hat them lake they are trying to ftnd a darectton If Danny McCool, Soctal Sciences Lorelle Browning Engltsh I have watched two of my friends o crazy another one get hooked on herom, and few more fmd od in order to ltve wtth the pam tnstde I only wonder what things would have been like if they hadn t come here It couldn t have been worse Ricardo Freeman, Anthropology Thts place has tau ht me three lessons fl J Don t expect ltfe to be sample 122 on t expect frtends to understand And C52 Don t buy dope from strangers Ruby Mere Psychology I m ttred of my ma1or my minor MWF classes and the Daily Nexus I m gotng home Robert Paige Geology I was tlred of ftghtmg the fuckm system so I came back to schooL Now I fmd myself ftghtmg t ts system Name Withheld I used to thmk that tt was my fault that I couldn t make tt an the Umverstty until I met about 50 other people who had the same problem I now realaze that this place ts fucked and the only knowledge that I have acquired is how to avoid its pitfalls I would have rather been educated Marian Schiller, Soctology they wait the direction,iust might find them. It all works out. . 'K wif iff, Q Wa f 2 gwgg is nr -if fy gm 6 af xi fp Q W X, if you can transfer do so If you can graduate early then by all means do so If you must make excuses to your father for leaving th1s place then begm to make those excuses Get away from thts place by an means necessary or you w1ll luve to regret tt Thus Umverstty st ently kzlls part of ou eborah Walters Spanish Thns really as a righteous place I dag the vtbrattons that I get from the sun the surf and the groovy eople that I meet Whenever I get uptnght I mst go to the beac and am guaranteed that I wtll soon be mellowed out Ball Edwards History Thus place makes me suck Carol Shannon, Art In the new Cahfornta you can fmd the old When I couldn t stand to study another mmute I would go outstde the hbrary and stt under the eucalyptus trees and look up into their swaym them tn my hands and smell the fragrance For some reason tt made me thmk of a time when all t e land about me was once wheat fields and marshes Harry Boyd History All my dreams hopes and as tratzons have been fulfilled I ftnd myself reborn wtth the quest or knowledge College has enabled me to fund myself and now I am grateful Louts Jackson Math When I came here I was lost so I 1o1ned a sorortty and there I found myself good friends new values and a lot of good fun. I love the Greeks Kath: McKenna Htstory All thtngs must pass Lo1s Malovos Anthropology I came here not knowing what tear gar was It has been an education an many ways Susan Bradford Enghsh They hed to me They told me that I would be a better erson because I went to college I doubt 1f I am anything but o er and dzstllusuoned Daplomas ltke everything have become devaluated. Fred Gabriel, Soczology . .. ' 3 . g I ,Q - n 5 . 5 , - I . 7 . 5 ' ! ., 3 . . . , o , .1 1 0 , c 1 0 branches ........ Sometimes I would pick a few leaves, crusi I , fp . . . . , . ! l ! ! ! P , , ' nr- qfpslnvf-qw-1-gran 14 ,W Sk . A f W. ? X an 5 VA M Z. i .N , W ,V 1. .1 gg- J 'fn'4"f'ff?'q' gf ' Q ' ' 'iqiffbfg - ifmww. X - .nwgpvff ,yy gl' ,Q--3.55 ml-., ., N, , 2 2,-a j ' 2 - A 4 M QF' 'L A 1-- ,,, ,. F K ZAR V I ' ' A-ff v 43 f-Z' Q, M,55ew-f- V, .Mi ,Q ,V , .A y. Y - ,,.W,1,,' '. Y An Open Letter to the Truly EVHSIVC Dean of the College of Letters and Sclences February 23 1972 Mr Dear Dean Pompous I have recently been lnformed by your offlce that there IS a posslblllty I may TCCCIVC my Bachelor s Degree rn Engllsh thus quarter nf I satnsfactorlly complete my present classes I am honored that your secretary was k1nd enough to lnform me of this fact slnce the issue of my graduatlon has been so long pendlng When I flrst came to speak wlth you last sprlng I was at one and the same tlme lmpressed and appalled as are most of my fellow students upon first encountering your deanshlp I had hoped to graduate ln England last summer howeverI needed to take twelve units ln Summer School here as I am sure you well remember Your demal of my rlght to attempt twelve units even though I had successfully taken the same number the prevlous summer confused me and yet confrrmed my worst expectatlons Smce that tlme I have come to understand your posltlon Our common bond has always been the fact that Shakespeare changed both our lives As you told me It was the great old bard fto use your words who led you to your present honorable and enlxghtened posltlon Had you not been selected from your nlnth grade class to recite Shakespeare at UC Berkeley you probably never would have attempted hrgher educatnon as your many slblmgs fanled to do I am grateful for thls lnslght mto your background butl found you extremely unwllllng to know how Shakespeare had affected my llfe You also denied me the prlvllege of explalnlng my reasons for desmng to graduate early This treatment frustrated me becausel had never spoken with a dean before Is not a dean s1r a man who makes blmd declsxons before the observant eyes of students and one who avolds the present vital questlons by grasplng for relevant answers from the past? The reallzatlon of our common Shakespearean bond would have been welcome had xt come at another tnme However I am now grateful for your obstlnacy In SPIIC of your llmlted vlew of educatlon and thls mass production UHlVCfSlfy I have successfully learned the way to learn I hope lt IS not offenslve to confess that through your refusal to understand me I have come to understand myself and the value of learnlng Havlng come to thls reallzatlon wxth so l1ttle and from any office of the UHIVCYSITY I shall not be dlsappolnted wlth this one achlevement of learning I have now awakened from my false dream that the Umverslty IS the only hope of higher educatlon It IS with this knowledge thatI wlll leave these concrete walls and your College of Letters and Sclences Your Deanshlp s most confldent and dlsobedlent servant Lorelle Brownlng . . . Q 7 n . . , . . . . . . , . . . . . . 7 - 7 , 1 7 7 ' 7 7 o Q U 77 ' ' H 77 ' 7 J, . 7 H . . 7, . . . . 7 . ' 7 . 7 7 ' ' ' ' H 77 . ' ' H 77 ' 7 n . . . . . . , - - , . 7 . 7 . . . . . . . 7 - . . , . . . ,FJ . 13 1 will KV' 1' 'E 'M Q . as ywkwfw, W Nw w N, Wy 3 5 'fa-me ,W ,wa ,W f. 2 ph- :ag '. Uv Q , Y.,4 gat! W '76 'w v' a Q fx -. A u ,v f. A Nh ,K T 9 535 4,9 ff? rhfli- 3 , 354 4234 Ridgeway Drive San Diego California 921 16 February 1 1972 Mr Ricardo Freeman Editor 1972 LA CUMBRE P O Box 13402 UCSB Santa Barbara California 93107 Dear Mr Freeman You have asked your 1972 Seniors to express ideas perspectives and conclusions about UCSB As parents we too have experienced a delightful change as we observed our daughter s progress from an intrepid Freshman through the traumas of Subject A street people the riots friendships Nexus letters and articles dropping football etc to the honor of the Dean s List a mature young woman now able to separate the wheat from the chaff Her understanding of human behavior compassion and sense of proportion have increased manlfold She has brightened improved and regenerated our outlook significantly Her faithful letters home have kept us abreast of the multitude of events within your caldron as well as her individual experiences Undoubtedly academic excellence could have been obtamed elsewhere but the unique experiences evident at UCSB and environs fesp lsla Vista make hers an especially poignant and significant education Honor and renewed vigor have been brought to our family we truly are proud of our graduating 1972 Semor Marjle Moody Sincerely Robert 8: Edith Moody Y 3 ' Y . . , Y ' Y Y . . , Q Y ' ' ' If 99 i Q i 0 I , , Y Y 7 7 ' , . The trials and tribulations of Marjie have faded into oblivion as she has developed into I I Q u . , . , ' I I u I l , , l 0 Q . u i . 0 a I 3 : a . g Y ' , S , . Y 355 1 SENIOR STEPHEN ACKER pasadena, political science SHARI ADAIR las angeles, art WILLIAM F. ADAMS santa susana, sociologyfanthro. ALEX ADELEKE lagoL nigeria, biological sci. JOY AHLGREN altadena, mathematics ANNA AIELLO concord sociology ANN AL BRIG HT van nuys, history DAVID L. ALLAN pebble beach, art SHARON ALLSUP newhalL french STEVE AMANO sun valley, political science ADRIA ANDERSON whittien art history CONNIE ANDERSON danoillm cultural anthropology RICHARD L. ANDERSON xenia, ohio, psychology NEAL ANDREN cupertino, biological scifenv. stds. ROBERT W. ARCADI santa barbara, psychology NANCY ARMSTRONG stockton, historyfanthropology CARLA ARNOLD los angeles. psychology JAMES ARROTT altadena, zoology ANDREW AULL santa barbara, history W. MICHAEL AYDELOTT san mateo, political science MARIA T. BACANI n. highlands, spanish RUTH E. BAETZ hacienda heights, sociology JAMES BAILEY long beach, english DEAN V. BAIM walnut creek, econjpoli. sci. SUSAN BAKURA marina del rey, frenchfpoli. sci. ALAN M. BALCHER los angeles, political science BARBARA BALDWIN granada hills, home economics JOYCE BALDWIN san leandro. frenchfsoc. sci. MICHAEL BALICE burbanh, economics GREG BALL larhspun social science LORELLE BANZETT huntington beach, sociology STEPHAN A. BARBER los altos, economics KENNETH BARCZI mountain view, mechanical engr. MARION BARNARD san diego, french MARK BARRALL bahersjieli electrical engn CHARLES BARRINGER san gabriel, histjrelig. studies SHARON BARTHELMESS el cafon, psychology STEVE BEAL van nuys, sociology RE BECCA BEAM ER w. covinm physical therapy KAREN BEAUMONT portola valley, speech and hearing GLENDA BEDWELL oceanside, sociology WENDY BEESLEY manhattan beach, history GAIL BEI burlingame. mathematics GAIL BELAS santa monica, spanish SUZANNE BENDER n. hollywooi sociology BRUCE BERCOVICH oahlami political science MARY BERGMAN portland oregon, history BRUCE BERRA bakersjielzi political science ,Q ' , ,gg gy-',:wgz,:m2,.-2,sa,f ,c A i . ,,, 5,215.1 ' , -.ya A iivz, E 52,2 ,V I , ez. 5 . .. .. X 2 E 'lp Q Q. 2' .-as 2 f' :Q f 2 95 1 f 5222 I 2 , X, K viii W , mx IQ s 2 I 25,5 4-ei 5' 25 ,2 t-ff wm21w2wmefs:ow Lt f' Liilsilzssfer 5515 W2 of 143: W 2, .222ez2uz ,,,,,,2W , o,,, , 51-Z2117E9?T 'va2tH fiTk ' 22g,sw2525g'feiif.,,2. 2 .,. Q i 1Q,1?f,w2Lf f221,', 2 552151: 5:?:, .L:'.-,.22-ww liw,-L2.fi' ifr',' iw-fe H ' i f:-zgw I ,.., , V5,,?,E 2 'fm , tzglisisw-mil , 2 2, 22,52 ,Q -f,.., -fz'12,112Z 22, 1,320 ,, YW,-H ,ali 2 mfg? 2 ,iff 9 I , , A, 2 my ' I f , 2 2 32, s 3, 5 s ' 1, A IIS 5 I I f W 2 , Z ,559 2 .2 ?iQ5i55E2iWS "'m ' of 1 " tm, 5 ,s 25, 2- lc t,., 2,,,.,.2.,,22,32, f.e,?tfz,sn215:iS' ,,,,,,,m,,, ,.., 3, F. W 55337 55322 mlfitm 9? ..s: .. igfif-2255957 '- my-ip' 22, -,- ff me . I Q, .:2, me , 11 L-fnzieifscssi , 'mem Z-me :f,1f,2,siss?zgw f, ,,,.,,, ..-v., -55::E,a53,, 2 f 2, 2 W f 2,5 5 2 2 X30 M ,L 2.2 fe sf if so 22 ,mi 2, 2 Q -8 'f 22 QW gglsiigzws H -1- 2 sm 2 5 2,32 W , W ino 2 S s 2 1 M t f f 'e 'ef I J Q 5 3 2 Q2 5 -,...,.,,,-tw, .2 1' , 5 5 asf-2 2,.. A ' V A Q fa:2,sz:,i2fh E I' I, . 4515 1: 'asm ,, .. 3,9--:.-,, 2 'JN' ,V I f fs.-u ff Q, 2 ? ,, 2 45 1, goggle? 32. I S? seo 5,1 som .22 r u g LL' 3 Q26 o. I 2 M2 to 2 2 S52 I is 1 P422 23362322-s 5 251525 W ii W5 f I K Z vu s Q Q 'Xe 2 2555 A if 2 3322 s of ' 2 ,.,g:,x,S2 ::2,,,.. , f 2 ,25 52 f. . 2-fi: ,. '. 'ofiie' 173' wt ' ,J in gk . wif, 2251 giftesgwio f2::sff2ff2a::2f', ', ws, ,w f5q,-fne- ,..- ,,f.1w ,1 xg ' -:r' wqtz, -' nz- K, ,Q .aft ,--,,,::::-,,,m5,,- ., ,2,.,,,,.-up I-is I 562 H56 F22 Zi 4 237, f 1, 2 'i' gf 5 fill' Q" il3z'ffi5!1f1,,Qgs-1- S2191 - 2 2?f12afzf,1'? - ' so ng 16 2,22 w ,M2 1 m2 Ngsugffii 112: . , F' " . ' Hi gsligvgwy , ' ffaafyfr' .ermmg u , 'ii ' , . -' 5 2 K- f,-,wig S Q 2 S .. SGHIORS JUDITH BERRETT menlo park, english RICHARD BEY far rockaway, n.y., dramatic art NANCY BEYERS burbank, mathematicsfeconomics PAULA BIGGS pleasanton, spanish ROGER G. BILLINGS ventura, rnathernaticsfeconornics DONNA BLACK ventura, english SANDRA K. BLACK compton, history ALAN BLANE san jose. sociology ADELE BLANK haywari sociology RONALD L. BLANTON haywari history JOANNE BLEGEN fremant, mathematics JAMES M. BLODGETT hillsborough, history ,IUDITH ILENE BLOOM canoga park, history ROBERTA BLOOM woodland hills malhjeconomics CHRISTINE BLOZAN riverside, nutrition KATHY BOARDMAN goleta, political science BOOKER T. BOBBITT chicago his., ill, histjblh. studies HOWARD BODENHEIMER los angeles, political science PAM BENNETTS BOHL tracy, english BAR BARA BOHM pittsburg, economics GERALD BOLAS alhambra, english RUTH BOLLING manhattan beach, spanish HANK BONIN redlandsz psychology ELLEN BOOTHROYD tracy, social science ALLAN BORDEN alharnbrm biological sciences KRISTINE BORGLIN balersfeli social science HARRY W. BOYD arcadia, history HOWARD BOYLAN riverside, environmental biology Q5 . ws Es? 'iff -wk. 41294 sn' pgqtsamfa-3g,f21i1.452 3 - 52, 1 wzgi'-I 3' fifiifs' .1 is .- --mr it s , fs? :S i w as . .ggi A .,..,.,n,m3 ,, 1 eh ,aw W .ego ,safe SGHIORS MICHAEL BOYLE goleta. Psychology ELIZABETH ANN BRASHEAR pacwc grove, social science CH ERYL BREETWOR goletm english BETSY J, BRENEMAN huntington park, culturalanthro. BUD BRI DGERS carpinteria, spanish ANGELA BROWN curnberland by.. sociology HUGH BROWN los angeles, biological sciences MARIA BROWN elsinore, historyfpoli, sci. DENISE BROWNLEE san diego, biological sciences BRIAN D. BRUMBY diamond ban political science V ' , , I ' ' ROBERT BRYNGELSON ventura, mechanical engineering , -. 1 CATHERINE BUCKLEY o ' i rnerced biological sciences NTWKKQQ Amit . r ', 'L f, :or A " :5 4' ,.:'F. 'W Y I gt H , ,n Twin lnnn . 5 Main? ,, is og I Nl A X Ji ,Z e 4 15' sr ' ' To lo-vers whose bodies smell ofaeach other, Who think the same thoughts without need of speeph. And babble the same speech without need of meaning . T.S. Elliot SU E BUCK huntington lzch., spch, and hearing LILLIAN BUCTON arroyo grande, history DORIS BU L L far rochaway, n,y. biological sci. BRAD BUNKELMAN santa maria, zoology SUZANNE BUNKER baltersjielli history CATHERINE BUONO san diego, cultural an thro, BARBARA BURDETT oakland sociology MICHAEL BURKE san pedro, biological sciences JEANETTE BURNS elcajon, environmental studies PATRICIA BURR malibu, economics EMILIE L. BURSIK shervnan oaks, enuiron. studies PEGGE BUTLER tracy, anthropology SALLY BUTLER whittier, music DIANE BUZZINI gilroy, speech and hearing I SGHIORS YVONNE L. BYRNE santa barbara sociology MARK BYRNE covina, biological sciences FRANK M. CABRAL goleta, sociology ROSALIE CALDERONE flushing, n.y., economics JUDY CALLAHAN n. hollywood sociology BERNARD CAM BA guadalupe, electrical engr. ELSIE JOY CAMERLENGO resedm speech and hearing SARAH CAMPBELL san clemente, art history CHERYL CAPES carpenteriz sociology MARY ANN CAPPA cavina, english STEPHEN CARDELLA temple city history ERICA CARLSSON san luis obispo, poli. sci. JACQU ELI NE CARMICHAEL tulare, englishffrench GARY CARNAHAN golelm mathematics CATHY CARSON ahmo, cultural anthropology ANTHONY M. CARUSO los angeles sociology M. COLLEEN CARY wilmington, english BRIAN L. CASTLEMAN baleersjieli history JANICE CAVE bahersjieli physical anthro, BRUCE R. CHADWICK santa barbara, nuclear engr. PATRICIA A. CHADWICK santa barbara, anthropology ROBERT CHAN hong hong, zoology BRADLEY L. CHANEY gilroy, geography LY NNE CH ASE san clemente, physicalanthro. ROBERT CHAVEZ santa paula, economics LESLIE A. CHEEK fair oaks, speech and hearing C H AR LIE C H E N altadena, cultural anthro, NELSON CH EW sunnyvale, economics DIANE C HILD northridgq history DAVID CHURCH goleta, sociology MARGE CLARFIELD san leandro, comparative lit. JENNIFER S. CLARK palo alto, sociology HILARY COATES san pedro, speech IDA F. COCHRANE pacoimo, sociology CHARLES COCKERILL goleta., historyfpoli. sci. KATHY COCKERILL goleta, english ,IULIETTE COENEN glendora, sociology or 2 my is 4' W 1427 4 - iff F f 1 1, 2 .F iff 'IL' ?'6 W 79,411 at 1 Y Hia 2 4 K, 2 if W Z 63 DH wf 2 , . ,-..::" ! ec.5 .. ..., Y ,,.,.,,,.. .,.,,. ' I n fjfgl 12, H V' fviiilisf , .g -1 ve ' I ' ' -, H Fe E f L 'I ff .IW 'M' ' Mil fi? -1,,. . .-3+--'Qi ii':iff55,.:":E','--..1' Ifnf .sto zflfhfififi, -M -is Wx fgef- vfvf . if . ' B , if Wh ? 4. M is if A' Q R 2 oz, Q aw Q 2 of X ygsiwm NWN' 51- 12' ':::,iE- :g2'ii.','i .::.",.:2w V- gtg 2 r, ,f not f' fiiiisigws gow .2 . , gmffw wor t , , ..i,. qgwsffvff ?f12:P2f131iiwQ,11f, ,. " -is : s13?s?fszgiQ1Si ig-1o5,?f,,W.:. ,, x ' - , :fg,m:fz,3i-f 52f'zlf,'?Ef55QZ'55?5i5?f . :, i?31553rf'3'i5vi4fif ,. : rgw fflt : ,' 552'-f ' 2z'SffT'hit,'lr:, It is all one to me where I began: for I shall come back here again in time. Parmenides N55 1 an 1 Q Q get v gf as X, ,mx vw sg, ww 5. ls-x'kl1T1 wfxix igbgbiwk 1 ww ' ff' , gb mi '-R 5. ff Nw wus: as QR Sw Nw wlwiis Q i? if x '-5 XNQ Q5 A N A Xfxx -M my + Q 9 5 NR? ,S X' " Wi 5.13. 5. F. S 3 'fffvtif 6172: 53, i . SH 5 K All ' 5 15 31 , . -sz'ffegf gA2'fXQwzS- f fs.: '-'FT-1 E N, Z,l,Lf fi " ,., ' 'Q 433 - K K if Kr! :ak SGHIORS We, too, the children of earth, have our moon hases all throug any year, the darkness, the delivery from dark- ness, the waxing and waning. None lives, except the mindless, who does not inusome degree experience this, hours of despair followed by hope or, perhaps slow adjust- ment: times of fear, even panic, and then light, however small. Faith Baldwin SHIRLEY M. CRAIG monterey, speech and hearing LESLIE CRISWELL palos on-des, art RUTH CRIVELLO nuvato, anthropology JERRY CRONIN santa barbara, social science RIC H AR D CR O N K alhambra, economics ROBERT CROSBY claremant, geography CRAIG R. CUMMINGS palos verdes, nuclear eagr. CAROLI, CUZNER healdsburg, social science ROBERT DAHL navato, zoology DONNA D'ANGELO glendale, sociology JAMES DARLING yreka, environmental biology JACK DAVIS golelm political science STEVEN B. DAVIS sherman oaks, eleczricalengr. SUSAN BARR DAVIS fresno, psychology BOB DE GROFF goleta, political science SHARON DE GROFF goleta, sociology DEBORAH DEL DUCA santa barbara, sociology ARTHUR DELGADILLO santa maria, history .yfgfz Q,'fm'gygggiwwfgiyzxggrfmfsggwewgzf .1241 1 fifeww' I :iii 1 ,lie IE, , f i liigwafw W, me MZ .ze isgzx' ' .ewif z- zexzmrsser fav :5,s3r497fP? , , A ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,3 fziiiiszlfr t - z slelsilfgf' iffflik , 'wwfw 'wfifsfifl -' -,gcmi f ' 'U - 1' ' " 457 wwe :.4?,53EL3i, ,ws ff wc,-f.,f2,. .,f -,fi-, ,mcesfszf eg , 3 . , i,,,c, i, f SJ? 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I X f M . ,, ",s, ' ' to 9 I ttt- 1 ,- , ' 7 H We Q +2 -,: .sm , zz' Aki. it Siu.-ftwi e . L 'fi ,, A-, W X f': 2 fzvie v H W f , .,,,f' I, 5, cfs, , i nt, ,fig Wf,?ffwgv"- f V IM, ,x,, ,, A is rp ,, , , 0 3 may Z, ,, , . ,ly 467,11 J ,l:"":5, Wiakviafb I ,Q , . , ,.., Y yy . I' L,A. 'V-V I , , lg 4 -1 'V 5 "ii '- ji-,f,Q,, 2 , I ' ,' I 7'YL f' , sei 1 5 I SGDIORS JOAN DENMAN los angeles, sociology CHARLIE DENSE redding, economics JUDY DEVENISH I manhattan beach, spch, and hearing CATHY DE WALD w, sacramento, sociology KATHLEEN DIAMOND resedd, political science NANCY DIERDORFF concord psychology KAREN DINKINS losangeles, sociology ANNETTE DI POL china lake, history JANICE DIRDEN los angeles, englishfafro, areas ERIK DISEN placentia, history DANIEL R. DOIRON riverside, nuclear engr. STEVE DOLOWITZ petalurna, culturalanthro. ROBIN DONOGHUE santa barbara, historyfpali. sci. JONNA DOOLITTLE santa monica, speech DEBBIE DORNEY la canada, history ROBERT DOYLE anaheim, historyfbiological sci. ANN DRAPER rnenlo park, geography DAWN DRAPER monterey, speech and hearing DOUG DRAP ER glendale, history STAN DRECKMAN long beach, political science ALAN H. DRULEY ventura, economics DAVID W. DUCHARME santa barbara, french JANET DUDLEY granada hills, sociology CHARLES DUFFY woodland hills, political sci, PATRICIA A. DUFFY napa, political science , PETER DUFFICY waodacre, english JANICE DYO so. pasadena, sociology DALE EBERLE palo alta, psychology MARLENE ECKER goleta, anthropology JAMES EGLIN sherrnan oaks, political science JOHN ELDER santa barbara, biochemistry STEPHEN ELLINGTON merceal biological sciences RANDI ELLMAN encino, physical education 36 4 SGHIOI2 GEORGE ELVI N petalurna, history DONALD ENDICOTT garden grove, mech. engr. JO ENGLISH redlands sociology JUDY ENGSTROM lornita, psychfsociology MERRILL EVERETT atherton. psychology JONATHAN W. EYMANN palo alto, psychology SCOTT FARMER san rnarino, religious studies TERRY FARRIS sacramento, socjrelig. studies NANCY FASH glendale, spanish JEFFREY FELICIANO san luis obispa, bio. sci. JOHN FENN golem historyfsociology PATRICIA A. FERNANDEZ santa paula, english TOM FICKEISEN burlingame, history JONNIE F INCH bakersjield poli. scijsocial sci. LIANE FINK san rnateo. italian HOWELL FINKLE saratuga, political science NOREEN FIORE covinm sociology KAREN LEE FISCHER narthridge, cultural anthro. WILLIAM G. FISHER san luis obispo, biological sci. RICHARD FISK palm springs, electrical engr, VICTORIA FLECK escondido, history BRAD FLEISCH san luis obispo, history JEFFREY FLETCHER bellrose, n. y. rnech. engr. ROSE MARIE FLETHEZ san bernafdino, spanish MICHAEL FOGARTY greenbrae, economics LINDA FOOTE los angeles, history CATHERINE FORD long beach, history DENNIS FORD santa barbara. psychology MARGARET FORD santa barbara physical anthro. RICK FOSTER northridyw history JANET FREAS los angelesg french DEBORAH FREDERICK frernong social science JEFFREY FRIED sherman oaks, history HOWARD FRIEDMAN woodland hills, zoology BETTY C. FULKERSON santa barbara, hispanic civil JO ELLEN FULLER san luis obispo, spanish LINDA GAI NZA stockton, history JAMES R. GALVAN elmonte, english ELIZA GARCIA oxnard english JANICE GARRETT sanfrancisco, biological sci. ANNE GEARY altadenm social science TIM GEDDES santa ana, history SALLY GEIG ER sanjose, english OZZIE GERV ER tarzana, political science MARGERY GIBSON glendale, history JACK GILLOOLY sepulveda, cultural anthro. LAI LUN GIN santa barbara, mathematics SCOTT M. GITLEN santa monica, sociology 4ewo59m::v - ' ist? mftfi .,i., ,.e:o.,, ., :.....,,,f. fiswmz Z. -5 H L-ff-2 'w4ff w-cf, ,-IWVQ LSE? ?:-silkiffar sms''-fjilelat1r'f!1l.!s1'1ffU"-ILT tw ww ,sy 1 an ,,, -' - 'f'1m,o,4ow..f , -of -:saw-fs f va- my n,,,,,,,-Q. fvfm,y4g,.m, W1 siszfdissv' ' angie my sza w.. 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W, Wm IIQQQ ni' A , -- ' H7551 7541 ff :fr Z? 5 Wf,f,?Ws fm: 1' " fill as 3 sg F, -me si 2 if is 91 M- sa . 1. f fm sl Y - s eg S sew ' X Q X i 2 is jj S K at L EWR s wi 3 is S , rf A is 255914 me f L it if 5 92+-if 'f sfssxgflux K X s :VM of in is KW: 2 vs xo ,R A X 1, S f is vw? t s J 1,4 , .-45, . if Y - . iii hiv ,K nf -ru- .ES Que? 5 sfgfg,q3-newgig5,2427fs,isggiseQf,2vw,.QfsfL-infix? .:2,.,,1S,1,,n:e.,w.s.s,1 2 ft.ws,2sMrfw Tis, no ff f. - misss .Hifi '21zsi2f12. M 6 I' L .L t if . .es -rf 'IM if' My i 1-e'e.ff:w - u ,f f , ,. ., k,,:f3,i,g mg-. f . , Mzffmrsy-,f,. , ,M f, ff W ,V HSMIWV, A - at - I I- 4--16-J fwiii 2 Q ' -if9'ifI'5l. ., ' ' fl wsffe, ,L ng 2' 'if , ' A '--f -wife -. W ,g.',"'ff ff, fx , ff' I R97 -Mtg ' iffff, , ' ' , ' ii: ' Sggfeggigsz . ,111 z Jw M' 1' ' SGDIORS Listen to him first . . . listen to what he means, which may be hidden in what he says, . .. It will be a sobering and maybe even. humbling experience. Louis B. Lundborg JAMES E. GOLDMAN sierra madre, economic: DENNIS GOM ES huntington beach, english DAVID G OM EZ los angelrs, latin amer. studies DARLA GONZALEZ goleta, psychology D'RI EC E G OO D sunnyvalc, p hys. edu catia n BERYL GORZYNSKI canoga park, music CAROLE L. GRAFE saratoga, economics DENNIS S, GRANDLE lakewood, chemistry HELEN GREEN losangelcs, engfblack studies ROBERT R. GREEN corona delmar, economics WILLIAM GREEN glendora, economics DIANAH GREENLEES san diego, sociology DENNIS L. GREENWALD weslporl, conn., poli. sci, ROBERT-I. GREGORY san hernardino, history WILLIAM GREY cupertino, biological sci, DEBORAH GREYSON whittier, anthropology JOHN GRIDLEY ncwhall chemistry ,IULIETTEGRIFFING palos verdcs, physical an lhra. fi f N FM X ggi? .. W 1 fx N fa QS---X.g. -. ,: sms n HQ b X K .1 N ,. Ik . --,gf 3 X' ' ':E:.i . ' f.:2:.2:Q . : ,. . . .. .WWW X Q, " Lili :,, ' 1-Q: A kg X N W f .,.,. n: 1 if 3325143 Mag: , .. - 5 ,V -axezffeo qtpwflfi I .Q . ts... ,4,, . YEWW 535 J 4 ,, K as HQ pw 2 3, 'V 5922? 6, we ,xv s 5 ,xg f M Q , .1 1 e , , ,Q K 1 lf 3 if AJ' , ' .7 ., ' 25,2 '7 l F ,Q so A 5 Q Shlgjnow 5 M ' H 22 M' 255 K , , it of ff-:w,s,,, lp, . , p,',fs,,-.5 hzffeiiwiff ei 15 1 f , ' ,mffiil fc 2? was Q? ge? S iii? I 4 , QE , t ac 9' 'is'-L ZZ. ff A ei W4 , God could not be efuerywhereg therefore he made mothers. Arabian saying filo 355299 , -ws, waged . -- Q' v Pg... , SGNIORS MARTHA HARRIS salinas, speech and hearing MAUREEN HARTE san bernardino, bio, sci. RAGHBIR HAYRE mnysville, english BRENDA H EE fresno, speech and hearing STEVE H EINSOHN long beach, history JOH N H ELM ER fallbrook, geography CYNTHIA HENDERSON los altas, anthropology RANDY HENSLEY india, history CAROL A. HERAUF goleta, mathematics MICHAEL HERAUF goleta, english CANDICE S. HERN garden grove, art history ADELA HERNANDEZ beaumont, history MATT H ER N DON bahersfeli economics KATHLEEN HERRI NG san diego, history LESLIE HERRMAN Ia canada, english TERRY HIDE anaheim, psychology KATHLEEN HIGASHI sanjose, anthrojrel studies BAR BAR A HI L L sierra madre, home economics BARTON H. HILL visalia, economics DAVID HILL los angeles, biological sci. SU ZANNE HI LL oakncia, economics BRUCE HILLMAN woodland. sociology DOROTHY HINDS oxnari bilingual education JO H N R. HI N ES vacaville, art IREN E H O DSON santa monica, anthropology JERRY HOERAUF paramount, economics DANIEL HOFFMAN sanjose, history DOUGLAS HOFFMAN saratoga, compu ter science JIM HOFFMAN so. san francisco, economics JOAN HOFFMAN arcadia, social science THOMAS HOFFMAN san rafael, sociology PHILIP G. HOFSTEE visalia, economics DIANE MARIE HOLMES santa monica, geography JOHN HON EGGER oalley, economics SGDIORS TERRI HONG sanfrancisco, psychology ROBERT HOOK goleta, electrical engr. FRANK HOOPES oceanside, geography BARBARA HORROCKS so. pasadena. sociology ROBERT HOSACK pomona. history RICHARD HAROLD HOUGARDY hawthorne, social science LINDA HOWARD warden, mont, zoology ANITA HOWRY la mesa, social science REGINALD HSU los angeles, sociology WILLIAM W. HSU rosemeai chemical engr. JOSEP H HU ANG redwood city, zoolagy FRANCES R. HUBBARD san francisco, english CAROL HU BERT san pedro. cultural anthro. CHARLES HUCKEBA goleta, art SHERYL HUGHES w. covina, zoology LEONIE HULTQUIST santa barbara french KATHERINE HUMMES los angeles, speech and hearing RENATA HUNDLEY goleta, history JOHN A. HUNT redwood city, enlfiron. biology BRENT HUNTER la mesa, economics THERESA THOMPSON HURD golela, cultural anthro. SUE HUTCHISON tarzana, art history KATHLEEN IKOLA yorba linda, sociology KATHY INDERMILL hakersjield social science SUSAN IRWIN napa, cultural anthropology RANDALL ISMAY santa barbara, biological sci. GLORIA JACKSON novato. speech and hearing PAM JACKSON vandenberg afh, home econ. ROSE ANNE JAMES sanjose, history JUDITH JENKINS sacramento, home economics ALLEN JOHNSON santa barbara, envir. studies BEVERLY D. JOHNSON oakland historyfpoli. sci. BRITT JOHNSON santa barbara. history DAVID J OH NSON santa barbara, political sci. W S ,, 5 ,S S Q K it is W lf A 'R , --e" ,,,g..,,e.M, , .,.a.,,,m,, vzziewmw it if-. awww ,.,. ., , ..., ,, .. ,, Q1 :Wy . .- gs -as sys, , ..:,,,,. wweaws 3- ,. .- a.a,3,,,.5,Z . feifsgifof , ,?gsmef1 -new -:sf teggxwszgsii fg57liW1s:?giSI ': .-E14 -. . -' 937191-iUi5U1L-V ' fnsieib-mem' ' - fmgsxfviw Poi- -. ' -'f ' f -an we 1 ' :ii ' :fi Ivgiafn vmgifri-fini' -f . 1 w .emfq ggi' feygwr fc,,..ms,o15'-qgt1q4 1f,1ogs.,4fofzzzgff:,h. sm? While,.wiarorifafiesisfibfza ,. N, .,,M,, ,, . of A MM -mi.. iw : f of ,sexqnggwwosse 542- cf- : my mfweifwm my f or lfw tfa 5.32m ffeylfwzo' e42?c2g "" , 2Sv'Wof'eP woxwsiff " Q. , ., . . ,- ., wa 1 of .1 f' W .H - M ., .I -W, 1' ,,is'Mm,v,.ff fs. mm, ., ww 1afto.t-1-- wff ' o:c,.f:f.-w,zo- ,-ff,fz.t-me ,,,. . . iypxiffclaw 4c:wfg',ie1'a-'aw gmwgsf ..... ' -3:,gZ.,y,3afgtfgzff5:E A-fe. as lf 1 Q ,' f I .f Hiya f' Q f I yr , X 1 LS .Ll '61 3 uf W 5 Q? .. fc- N o ,e ,gag A In W., 5 we 4 . mis 2 2 3 K' if l ' fs t 5 s Y' , , Ii Y ,. ,Q ..,. 4' 'K Pk V 4+ W iw r r f View Wife 4 1.3 sigswioew,wigmsiesvgwifoevgfsqsrgeszewitzefgi swzeirswffamfofW21ww11Ha1w1SvM319'f'wf'vfs' :N..:i:-' .1 r5f,W'r'f , e iwifwifgsz' 1: flwwog vwww 5 f .1 ' .f.2f,., 1vwsf fgf:V'1.ffPf7 iff '::i2E"7' YA?T72f5g'j 1 e.e. cummings IB ,X , , 1 gsm' Simi 'flmf . 'fx P , S S if L ig? - S' N W . J 5 Q , 'N kim S MN ,.,f ' J J f ,,,. ttt W 'Q liz -A 1- 'V T . ,,QK . 1. ' s:L'-5::::.:Si- ,fs-f-95: :gf- S1 QL QS AL an 1' .-3 if .1 x f f 1- K, Q NX Neg N x ,L nm- -f' -rw at any fm . Q9 1- -., J.. E. J 9 if vw X an QQ 3 YIIORS DAVFJOHNSON bakerrfield, econnmifs DEBORAH S. JOHNSON paso fables, .vofmlugy FILEEN JOHNSON santa susana, sorinlngy JUDY L. JOHNSON rourtlanaf ar! history KEN JOHNSON nf-wport beach, anthrapnlugy LYNDFLLJOHNSON rnnmrd, speerh fofrtrrturtimlinns MARY JOHNSON walnut rreeb, history ROBIN JOHNSON ,vanta ana, art SH EIL,-X J OH NSON wllejo, dance STEGER JOH NSON hillxbarough, psyrholngy ART JON ES bfrkeley, zoology SHARON JONES lox angeles, history TIMOTHY B. JONES los angeles, snrinlagy PAIQLAJUFLKIC la rnirada, anthropology CH RISTINE J lj RA glendale. sociology KAREN A. K.-XISFR whittier, binlugzral sn, JEANF'I'TE T. KAJI liringslon, spferh and hmmm, EILFFN KALK redondn bearh, geography 9 37 O DIOR PEARL KANESHIGE carson, mathematics SUSAN M. KATZ bahersjielah spanish MARK KAUFMAN narthridge, sociology REGINA GAIL KEELAN hab'moon bay, english JAMES KEELING las vegaa new., poli. sci. VICKY KEES whittien history FRED B. KELLER lornpoc, geology MICHELE KELLETT chico, litfcreative studies KATHLEEN KELLEY newport beach, sociology CAROLYN KELLY menlo park, sociolayyfanthro. MEGAN KELLY santa barbara, zoology KATHERINE KENNEY new canaan, cvnn, phys. ei CHRIS KIM BALL covina, history JAM ES KIM URA concord mechanical engr. ROBERT KINDEL laguna beach, economics MICHAEL KINWORTHY chula vista, history KRISTEN KJ ERULFF palo alto, psychology DIANE KLEIN santa clara, sociology GAIL KLEIN whittien sociology WILLIAM KLEINHOFER long beach, elec. engr. JAMES T. KLINE lalzewaoli english KATHERINE KNABKE san martin, Political science JANICE KNICKERBOCKER palos verdes, anthropology DON KOH LM ANN redwood city, enuiron. studies PHILIP J. KOHN los angeles, historyfpoli, sci. DIANA KOHNERT san mateo, biology LEANNE KOLVITZ lornpoc, music CHARLES KORSON van nuyay economics JAY KOSOFF northridge, history CAROL KRAM ER santa barbara, .vocj cultural anthro. DONALD F. KRELL rnorristown, 11.11, geography AN NE KR EYM ER santa susanm sociology RHONDA KUCKENBAKER hollisten french DEBORAH KURILCHYK santa ana, political science BARBARA KUWAHARA gardenm sociology KATHY LAFLIN thermaL history f 'W 'aiilffi ' 'F :ew 1 -,il I , X LTIJI? :Q fam ' Xu W , ,, 4 gil -seshtjoif ,M is of ig 2 3 , Q KM 2 is 5 f in fo r oc S I f l 4419, Q5 5292? . , ffff f f,:cw,w-w,1wIfw,fs1ww-W5 'vfffv .w lawns, ,MW ,, 'wwe+e21ss1se'Li?s?fzif fmosmiefff H www -A 1 : an MW ,,,,, , - fS::1M1swm-- ,,3,7,.,, m.s?iL1,aqm- ,1 1 vszwegifi we 11, , www: +422 12 92 - - ff 1 of W,-. 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I, ,X , ' 3 I iw i I f' :if Sas f az 1 9 ,iw 41, 25 3 N, f vs :rf X 2 at s S E 5' we 255' 1 33,53 ef ia A 5 as . vii' f f sig as 2' Hwy may WH' ksgkggggi ' Yfifi, 1f!f7i?'v57S'3V3fiifi5?l'5i5xj5e sf siiigliuiewtigigww f ,e,I ,,,,,,, i469?6?35935a:7 ' zif.oms5fm'a:,'- ,no :HiJ?4'f"23E -' 5112236 5 , gixfigiksilifi, ' ' :11w,ff:fs, ,,,..,, .Q wc-Q -- to 2 If C? so 1, , 5111425 A, H :ffm 112 15511 fi, 5 f m wo V1 3 s 5' 95, 32925255 5395 ,sf if V745 L ,Z A f A 1-Y 7,-t,,fs,3mwf,-- " .. ff 1' 1' ' f lfg - A ' flEf54:ffMif,:1 ' ' ,, gow ilgagnffy 33355, w a if ,, SVN? 5743 is - at 13, , .. V, w. .5 X y ag me :aww H S, sialic! fi? X ,,Mz,,y?' 7 ,gas ,. fs W I V new If I had never seen him, never heard his voice, I would not have cried. wtf -- i f - :-hu - ,- wp J , - K' 3' W o . f ,-s.B.:12-9:1 I Lug, of. ,oemig I gl ,J -5 up .,M...m I . ...,, , -, 1. 52, I . 'E+ 1 2 fr . ,A , 4 if I if Q98 f vi I 1 are f Qi, X35-B. ff I 2, sk? ff . 1- QR 3 Q , . o f? -1 1 I ffiifiva. :fl . W" f Tgfllt A ,,e,ee,.., .. if I 17? ,, , -.M .ag,.,c, :f',.ffs5:z.:ggtaf Mi - A -1a:,5:e-',:fxe',..' f u xg i M if W A Q I ,I 5, I .f , sf .e . ,,.. .V QSSQQSQSIWU I Vs, ,Q I Y x have 'V J 1 4 q 2 M 133' -13:5 I .5 P' x In E I .cs if 'i 'ff of Q 52' 223 Q11 fm, ,f I 1,.f.,f. , -- A , -uf Coggins I., on we vm' fl 1 ,of M' .MJ E95 'pf fi' in fly, fr M1545 . I A' f 3 1 ff 5 G I of I Q i ' Q, 5" 1 I 3' Z 4 o, 'ff iw X yi? S if S3524 if DIORS GREGORY LAGANA rescda, political science IRWIN S. LAGUSKER sepulveda, economics STEPH ANI E T. LAM mill valley, spanishfanthro. DIANE LAMPHERE fullerton. sociologyfhislory JERRY LAND ES lo! gatos, zoology LESLIE LANGDON altadena. sociology HENRY A. LAVAGNINI las angeles, history STEVEN LA VIOLA fort lee, n.f., biological sci. JANENE LAWRENCE los angeles english JOHN MARCUS LAY ojai,economics ALLAN LAZARUS mmlo park, history LINDA LAZZARO millbrae, sociology OLIVER LEE goletu. biological sci. VICKI E LEE slochton, physical therapy STEVEN A. LEIBO santa clara, history RANDELL LENCIONI menlo park, sociology HARVEY LEVIN resedd. political science MICKEY LEVY palos vzrdes, cconfpoli. sci. CH ERYL LEWIS beverly hills, psychology JAM ES R. LEWIS lustin, poli. scijgeography WILLARD M. LEWIS, JR inglewood, mechanical engr. PATRICIA LIERLEY goleta, anthropology BARBARA J. LILEK chicago, ill, phys. therapy MARK LINCOLN samloga, hirtoryfenviron studies BARBARA D. LIND ventura. sociology MARGARET LINDEBERG anaheim, biological sciences EVA LIPPMAN torrance, psychology 72 l'll0l2S MELANIE LITE van nuyr, anthropology PAUL M. LOGAN farmichaeL hixtory RONALD E. LOPEZ las angeles, xoriolagy CHUCK V. LORING los galos, Speed: Iz. LINWOOD LORING yoletd, anthropology JUDY LOUIE san franrisro, malhrmalrfs WALTER C. LOVV armyn grande, electriral eng: MICHAEL LLCH ETTI san rafa6L sociology WILLIAM LL'I-.CKE lo: angeles, xoriolngy TERISA L LIGER turranfe, religious Studia VICTORIA LUKENS bakerxfieli xofiology DAVID C. LL NA mnta paula, xorial rfirnre KRISTINF LUNIJ saraloaa, polilifal :rienfe MARY IVlacGL.-XSHAN arradia, social xfirnfe PAUL.-X K. MADISON fompton, political xfienfe CH RISTOPH ER M ANKF carmeL zooloyy .-XN'I'OINI'f'I'TE MARKS banning, hislory MICHAEL MARON long beach, biologiral science """ Q 'N-..- W all Q" 'F 3? .- H gs A I fs- 4 mv . ....,, ' we ,823 Q. .,,,,.,, ,.E. . , . M,W fLn , , - of f , ' f , 'ZW Ar haw If f it . I ,. ,' ' Vi ' mf 7 , I I' E a, t I 1 . 3 ' -iafgiiiggwiifzi ,L 5- f , , ,,A , mxiL. gikx . Y And I asked myself about the present: how wide it was, how deep it was, how much of it was mine. Vonnegurt SGHIOQS KATHLEEN MARSHALL lajolla, art history LOUISE MARSHALL walnut creek, sociology IDA MARTINELLI fairfax, spanish KATHRYN MASSON pacific palisades, anthropology LUIS MATA, JR. carson city, electrical engr. HARRY MATSINGER san rafaeL biological sciences LARRY MAURER gokta, economics GINO MAZZANTI lajolla, political science KATHY MECK camarillo, spanishfitalian KATIE MENEES shervnan oaks, cult, anthro, KENNETH MERIDETH santa barbara economics MARGARET MERIGIAN fresno, english MARCIA MEUDELL san marino, sociology MICHELLE M. MEYER saratoga, cultural anthropology CELESTINA MEZZETTA mountain view, frenchfitalian MARIANNE MICHKY fountain valley, physical ed. DAVID MIER placentia, economics GARY MILHAN whittier, political science DEBORAH MILLER redwood city, sociology JAMES CURRY MILLER san anselmo, english LON MILLER galeta, history PETER MILLS san anselmo, physical ei SUSAN MINKLEY arcadia, music BAR BARA MOE sacramento, history MARJORIE J. MOODY san diego, sociology MELANYE MOON anaheim, mathematics CHARLES MOORE goleta, engineering VIRGINIA MOORE ven tura, sociology DENNIS MORDECAI santa rosa, speech and hearing PAM M ORELAN D west covina, sociology MARJORIE MORGAN uisalia, sociologyfanthropology R. SCOTT MORGAN solvang, economics ROBERT MOSS goleta, art DAWN MUHLEMAN riverside, portuguese Fi S? g:E'j3Qi',:2 5.2215 :E af: ,, X 'Q gA' A , .. " , ,J fs 5 im A . ww-1. 'fuk Vw. ,mug 5 X 1 qgfgggriw-NQ,5f,,1Y:Q,-Wx -.M ..- fiffr l , A fshff X .V Mist-I LM, +545 H,-A P J i ,..,,.f, Q , K M 'K 6 KL1, , ,Q A is ,G s L W I ,S W. 5 . Q' " ' X V, .Q 1 ij 2 ' X f - -P '- i 21 .shvyqfb N .-ry A , fs K X 2' ff 4 2 . . 1. .. RXEW. ... .3 1: V X Q fax af Q H 4 Q f 5 xg qu S, P Q X im 3 Qx 2 N X , 4 , , K ,X 5 1,.,.A, A . ... .Tm me i it Y? .., .. . 5 Q gg W -gb I 53 32 " 4' , gow Y K 5 4' f ,tif sf s rsd wt , og of 5 fo " mf, 65 aff 4 3 . N s S7 ,Y W I' , f:wi'f1xf , '. ' '. ' I M 1 f-'f 1' f gf, ' iii If I W 122524 . as .-K it I ,I 5 Q, ,, .Zi sk. what ilqso- if foo 95 it 9481 'iii W' of www 5 W ,. M ya ..,wg,, ., ff, .. -, ' K I - -msggw V -0559? Qi - ,. we '25, wggfgfe , we -W - of V ,, nw, DIOR PATRICIA MQDONALD piedmont, ergonomics, phys. ed. CHRISTINE MCDOWELL millbrae. psychology LORI MQGUINES morgan hill, speech and hearing MICHAEL MCINNIS san rafaeL social science ROBIN J. McINTIRE fremonb history WILLIAM Mc.INTOSH M crescentm history RAYMOND MCKEEFERY ventura, electrical engr. BRIAN MCKENNA san jose, anthropology ANNE MCLAUGHLIN martinez, physical therapy JENNIFER MCLELLAN henilworth, ill, bio. sci. CHARLIE MQMONAGLE palo alto, mechanical engr, TERI MCNAMARA bahersjieli music IAN McNEIL los angeles, history VIRGINIA MCNEILL pacific palisades, sociology KIM MCPEAK sadamento, political science ROBERTA H. MCREYNOLDS modesto, german BRI AN NEGIN pasadena, political science DAVID R. NELSON sacramento, political science DAVID W. NELSON arcadia, music THOMAS NEW san gabrieL economics DEBORAH NEWQUIST encino, sociology THUY MINH NGUYEN saigon, vie! nam, elec. engr. ANNETTE NIBLEY los angeles, anthropology DEBBIE NISH1 altadena, social science JERE NOLAN yreha. psychology LINDA NOLTE oxnard historyfpolilical sci. STEVEN NORDEEN inglewaod physical anthfn. EDWIN NORDSTROM glen ellen, anthropology SUSAN NORTHRIDGE newport beach, ar! SEI-II NOZAKI kodatsuno, Eanazawa, japan, poli. sci. ELIZABETH OAKES san francisco, historyfpsych. LOU OBERTREIS san diego, mechanical engr. CA TH Y 0'BRlEN alamo sociology KEVIN O'BRIEN golela, zoology THOMAS O'BRIEN moraga, mathematics ROBERT W. O'CONNOR lake oswego, ore., history GARY OGILBY la habra, history GARY ORDWAY seal beach, physical ed. STANLEY OROPESA anaheim, english LEIF ORTEGREN pleasant hilL economics NICRS HALINA OSINSKI los angeles, frenrhfpoli. sri. RICHARD OSTRIN la crescenla, psychology JIM OTIS berrian springs, bio, sci. STEPHEN BUTLER PAGE pacific palzxades, anlhro, SUZANNE PALMER danville, social science SUSAN PALMQUIST oceanside, sociologyfanthra. GAIL PAPAC pomona. physical lhempy SARAH PAQU ETTE burbank, unthropology GEORG If PARSONS burbank, hixlaryfanlhrvpalogy DALE PATTERSON balboa, speech and hearing CAROL PEARSE costa mesa, sociology NANCY PEARSON las vegas, new., sociology Q-Yif'?22?5Y's?il?Wallwifi,f f U ,M,,,2 .,A. Wm A ,A , fyk ,,A,. .,.,.., ,V as A , , . , 'liiiigiiwiif W 11 ,WY L3' Q J gf ,gl if Identity crisis: he does not recognize the person he once called "I", B.F. Skinner zito, a mf 1. ' ' A,,, 3, ,, . J ,, , J , , , , 9 4 I AQ if X S les, V QUE s 14 S I X , 3. E he Q 'Ze 'za , i 9 ,,, ,,,v 1 , ff I if 4 QX Afff nf gi? ., jf if .,., Efffr Zz Fr V Kg as X . 5 is Sv , X Y - ,, .. ,ff 1 qw fm - -3 ,, . f ,mzgs1 xaxg1v',t ffm,ffQsli?i1fiF1,ia7t'fvlfwf' 4,4 rf , ?w?5w-'lf' :g,Wsf,, . f, 1, f.:m,,fsf2zi:g 4551-sif?,.?' V, .. ., KP " f '17I5?ii2,'l' ,f - f3w'-1":,'Q'ElWff 1,9 .,kV 1 I , Mehta IKM? fs ' '55 Qs I , am H , by K, 2 , J is ,Q fi ,sw , 2, 4- 2, W , f ,W 2 , ,,, 5 1 ,Q 1 4 fx 9'-Ei C gg 5 w- I A -f K W gs Ao' W 5 r 1 - ' N -f ' A,,, . . ,nf .,ys.,,',2.. - ,, 'N rw .I , ff, f v, lg 4 Q ggi I 2 1 SGDIORS ROBERT W. PERLIS apple valley, political sci. SUSAN PERRONE march afb, speech and hearing SH ERY L PERRY northridge, psychology JANET PERUCCA fremont, anthropology JANICE PETERSON san ta barbara, speech MICHAEL PETERSON stoclzton, mechanical engr. JOAN P H EL PS visalia, sociology TOM PHILLIPS bakersheld, electrical engr. BETH PIERCE san carlos, history LYNN PIERSON rolling hills, sociology MARILYN PINDROH san carlos, sociology MARK PIOZET los altos, history ARTH UR PITTS goleta, music JOHN PLAXCO santa clara, economicsfsoc. ROG ER PLOCK fresno, anthropology CHRIS POEHLMANN san bernardirw, bio. sci. DEBRAH POLITE los angeles, political sci. NANCY POLLOCK goleza, an NORMA PONCE salinas, sociology CHERYL PONCINI rnt. view, political sci, JAYNE POULLOS santa barbara, spanish DENISE PRAGER san bruno, psychology CHARLES F. PRATT san francisco, chemjbiochem. STEVE PRIZMICH san pedro, socialpsycholagy CYNTHIA QUAN los angeles, economics ROSS QUIGLEY goletu, economics JAMES RAGSDALE san marino, english LELAND RAMSEY salinas, economics MARY RANDLE garden grove, hispanic civiliz. SUSAN RANSOM lakewooi history ROBERT RATCLIFF beverly hills, nuclear engr. GEORGE RAY encino, political science ELIZABETH REED sierra madre, ergonomics KEN REEVES woodside, history CATHERINE REFVEM burlingame, historyfenglish JEFFREY REISS playa del rey. environ. CINDY RESH watsonville, history DOUG REYNOLDS palos verdes, biological sci. SUSAN REYNOLDS berkeley, speech and hearing GARY R. RHOADES lacrescenta, zoology MARGUERITE RINDGE alpine, n.j., biological sci. JANET RIVERA san jose, anthropology BARBARA ROBBINS panorama city, mathematics LINDA R. ROBERTS san bernardino, history KATHY A. ROBINSON santa paula, cultural anthro. PAUL ROBINSON losgatos, physics JAMES A. ROBISON lajolla, economics STEVE ROCKHOLD santa cruz, psychology HIORS R.-KY ROCKVVELL lafayette, political sci. EI.IZABE'I'H ROGERS santa barbara, political sci. HELEN ROSEN no. hollywood sociology KI'1NNE'IAH ROSENFELD no. hollywood art DONALD ROSS san marina, environmental bio. DOUGLAS ROSS long beach, history VIRGINIA ROTH northridge, political sri. TOM Rf DTH EN BERGER fullerton, philosophy LYNDA ROVVAN glendale, historyfpoli. sci. IVI ELVI N RU BE fresno, political science R.-XLPH RVDSER ian nuys, geology LARRY RIQNKLE santa barbara, political sci, VICKI RUSSELL oalzlani history DENNIS RUSSO simi valley, psychology DOLORES S, RYAN santa barbara, economics KENNETH SAKAGUCHI lancaster, economics CONNIE F. SANDBERG mountain view, soriology DONNA LEE SANDLER honululu, hawaii, english oas is s o , Q 5 'E f x 5 I , R, 2 SQ gs ' Ref. e H 1 X 2 X is in cgi ' is if X 1:2 S J .e w if I 1 sf ' Q is . 5 . f ' a w .fi xg, ,Aa -fx, ..,: . - , iii? giww ,fa-:sie One of the best ways to persuade others is with your ears-by listening to them. Anonymous ni? 492 I' , W az fi-',is,zMf, . f V',f - f ,EE ' Q4 2- 1,3 nr-"9 2 ' 9 53gy,go,,iQgg, f,,5Q35f,17 ,Sf , I' ,YM vi ,,,,, ,mn : ?"V'-'lS?3?3'?'5f fQ:l's?LliYf',E -f V .1 f , ., -f,-lx-I if : , 9 tfmasww, JW ,. it - L, ,,-, ,.2i,. , sa - " if Se it .-I warn ,-W., , X .. ..f Q I ' if , f . 1 ' va , 41,0 4 Lf I . 7 ' 'E, Eg' , - ' SQ. 1-, sr V , K V Wi- I 4 5,5 -1. T I , i n g W -. J JK "" ' Q I ,.g,.' ,QA 5 Gas WX!" 5 M l if , k+4s,'i:J H ,,M , of 43s s in 4' E W if ,fy 54,5 L g le, .,,. V ,nsyw . , . s f"' ie 3 , i, T ,E 'fi fi? J Rv sfxff' 'xi ' . ,,iig,,t A- , f 3 ,, I Ah . J DIORS VALERIE SAUBAN montrose, political science BARBARA SAYERS san lorenzo, english BARBIE SCHMIDT sepulveda, historyfpali. sci, TERESA M, SCHMIDT haywafi psychology WILLIAM SCHMIDT reseda, english RICHARD SCHNEIDER newport beach, psychology BRET SCH REI BER malibu, an throfeca nwfbio. sci. MARK SCHREI BER northridge, history REBECCA SCHUMACHER bakersfield, social science SUSAN SCHLYLER san carlos, mathematics RO BERT SC H WARTZ los angeles, historyfpoli. sci, ANA MARIA SCOTT danville, social science JOYCE SCURR pasadena, physical education HELENA SERPAS belmont, spanishfdance JOHN SEXTON san bernardino, biological sci. KEVIN SHANNON costa mesa, mathematics JOHN SHEHORN westlalze village, poli. sci. GEOFFREY SHIELDS grand rapids, mich, poli. sci. TOSHI SHIMIZU los angeles, physics YOUNG JUN SHIN seouh korea, electrical engr. MICHAEL SHIRE bakersfielii mechanical engr. LY N N SI L L M A N las vegas, neu., history BRUCE SI LVA bakersjield, political sci. CHARLES SIVLEY calusa, english JANET SKLAIJAL sunnyvale, biological sci. BRENDA SMITH claremont, sociology ELIZABETH SMITH balboa island, physical ed. PAUL SMITH pasadena, engineering JAMES SNOOK concord sociology ROBERT SNOW chico, zoology SENIOR GEORGE SOLUK los angeles electrical engr. EUGENE M. SORKIN las angeles, cellular bio. ALAN SOULE Mfayette, mechanical engr. JOHN SPECIALE los altog economics JANICE SPELLMAN bahersjieli english C H RISTINE SPENCER Mhewoai sociology KARIN SPRAGUE santa barbara, history A. DAWN STAFFORD whiltien english SHEILA STALEY hz puente, hispanic civilix. GLENN STANTON III wisalim political science MARK STASINIS northridge, economics SUSAN STECKI whittien english KATHRYN STEEN goleta. historyfanthropology PAMELA STEGEN van nuys, culturalanthro. BETSY STELES calabasas, history GR EG STEM PEL san rafael. economics JOY STEPHENSON mountain view, sociology DIANE STERLING los angeles, psychology JIM STEWART xo. sanfrancisco, economics BARBARA STONE los angeles, social science SALLY STOUT burlingarne, dramatic art SHARON STRONG piedmont, history KENT SULPRIZIO lafayette, mechanical engr. CAMY SUMOWSKI torrance, sociology SUZANN SWEENEY sunnyvale, history ROBERT TABER sunnyuale, economics RICK TAKAHASHI san mateo, history Um 'it :: zz gs , ,K vc- .. , , Q., fs 2, giisgga 4 5' l A ,.,. gg 'V be 1., I as Q it I ww-?fiTi?f'2f fff?xgfQf'si1iif- J , 3 f -sniff wi W ae T srl 5 Y fs 6 fe ,S if f A345 f , , is 1 M Long the summer day . . . Patterns on the ocean sand . . Our idle footprints. Haiku Poem .mf ,k Y, .aff W I 3 X ? Viz: :ffs:,z HIORS PETER TALMACHOFF whitlien eleetriealengr. LEWIS TANNER duarle, psychology BARBARA THOMAS redwood rity, english HOWARD THOMAS folsom, mechaniralengr. VIVIAN THOMPSON redondo beach, english MILLIE THROWER paexfr palisades, history RICHARD TILLEY edwards, nurlear engineering DON TIMMER san rafaeL linguislicsfanthro. RAYMOND j. TISCHER II santa barbara, muff: EDWARD TOATLEY so. san francisco, history LAURIE TODD santa rruz, history JUNE TOKUSHIGE west eovina, history CYNTHIA TOLLETTE las angeles, soafeull. unthro. KATHLEEN TON losgalos, anthrafpsyrhology JOHN TOON van nuys, engineering SCOTT TRACY whittier, eeonomirs TERESA TRESCOTT glendora, history NEIL SNOWDEN uphnd history. HIORS STEVE TURNER torrance, mechanicalengr. BEVERLY VALENCIA goleta, english RICHARD VALENCIA lompof, sociology MICHELE VALENTE los angeles, psychology PAUL VAN NOORD bellflowen social science STACY VAN VUREN napa, history ANTHONY VENTIMIGLIO pleasanton, english JEFF VESELY burbank, mathematicsfecon. MARGARET VOLESKY ojai, social science PETER VREDENBURGH chula vista, history BETTY WAILES fremong histaryfrheloric ELIZABETH WAITE ventura, home economics BARBARA N. WALKER san carlos, social science BARBARA E. WALKER pasadena, history MARY WALSTEN san bernardino, english BEVERLY WANTER saratoga, psychology PETER WARD lajolla, political science WILLIAM WARD redwood city, history BLAIR WARDLAW san rafael sociologyfpsych. GARY WASHAUER san carlos, economics STEVEN WAWRYCHUK west covxna, economics JAMES WAYMAN studio city, mechanicalengr. SYLVIA WEBSTER oxnard, sociology CAROL WEEKS goleta, anthropology CHARLES M, WELCH,JR. concord history SUSAN WELLS moraga, history KENT WESLEY thousand oaks, histfpoli. sci, OLA MAUREEN WESTERMAN sequim, wash., sociology SUSAN WEXLER los angeles, social science GAYLE WHITE sarataga, arl JERRY WHITING pleasant hill french WILLIAM D. WHITNEY san mateo, english LANG WHITTON newport, marine science JANET WICTORIN bahersjield physical ed. V,jg?Qggi,gr? 23 ,J iehs ., J,ga 1, ffii , 4 . . is m f X 2 1 MMQYZ 5955 i 4 s X 34 xx F! X i 2 s id ff ,Q 7- F, , , 5 iii ,EEV iyi' s,'. . f s f f, 'I " fm fx s Q 'ms as ,, 1 'X A' 4 1 ix 9' R K X .,, - on A 1235 VJ 3537 41 .fxvlfi 1 .eww f.c rJQfm w ,sw W he Mai' ' A A 'Iii 1' 538' ., - Ysf7'?15: Tell everyone Now, today I shall sing beautifully for my friends' pleasure. Sappho SGDICRS PAU LA WIEST sacramento, ergonomicsfphys. ed. BETTY WILSON redwood sity, french CYNTHIA WILSON cintinnati, ohio, sorlology SUSAN WILSON ne-wporl, anthropology j ERRY WI NDOM lang bearh, political scienre RALPH WINN santa barbara, biochemistry MICHELE WISOTSKY lusangeles, social srirnre NANCY WITTMEYER san luis obispa, history RO BERT WOLF sunnyvalt, sociology WENDY WOLTERDING Sausalito, sarial scienre DWIGHT WRENCH lajolla, mathematirs JEFF WRIGHT san elements, economics MELISSA WYATT san clemente, sofiology KATHLEEN YATES fulsom, history LAUREEN YOUNG waimanalo, hawaii, sprh and hearing BETH ZEBB pasadena, physical education CARL ZEIGER long bearh, biological sci. SU S A N Z1 EM A N N san jose, Physicalanthro. 383 ww I thought the children Were going to play iacks Or iump rope Or skip . And go naked. I did not know they Were going to play Revolution Until I saw The Blood. William Eastlake 3 ww. IHOGX A Abbott, Cindy 341 Abernathy, Ralph 35 Acker, Stephen 356 Adair, Shari 356 Adams, Sam 230,232 Adams, Victor 239 Adams, William 356 Adams, Yvonne 306 Addison, Michael 141 Adeleke, Alexander 356 Adler, Thomas 195 Agruss, Christopher 227 Allen Ahlgren, Joyce 356 Aiello, Anna 356 Aitken, David 143 Akoni, Abdulhamid 137 Albright, Ann 190,318,356 Aldritt, Art 237 Jonathan 225 David 195,356 Allan, Allen, , Ronald 215,218,221 Allen, Skip 234 Allman Brothers 65 Allred, Frances 322 Allsup, Sharon 356 Altounian, Laura 306 Amano, Stephen 356 Amstutz, Douglas 223 Andersen, Gary 214 Anderson, Adria 356 Anderson, Connie 356 Anderson, Dennis 195 Anderson, Jeffrey 338 Anderson, Ned 233 Anderson, Richard 356 Anderson, Susan 190,318 Andren, Neal 195,356 Andrews, Laurence 223 Antigone 73 Anton, Mike 206 Arcadi, Robert 356 Armer, Gregory 195 Armstrong, Nancy 356 Amold, Carla 356 Amold, Janet 341 Arrott, James 321,356 Artigues, Charles 183 Ashcraft, Mrs. 330,331 Atkins, Stuart 149 Aull, Andrew 356 Austin, Lawrence 237 Aydelott, William 183,356 Azakian, Ed 145 B Bacani, Maria 356 Baetz, Ruth 356 Bailey, Elizabeth 322 Bailey, James 356 Bailey, Kevin 230,231,232 Baim, Dean 356 Baker, Brad 195 Baker, Janet 82 Bakura, Susan 356 Balcher, Alan 356 Baldizan, Dick 227 Baldwin, Barbara 318,356 Baldwin, Joyce 194,356 Balice, Michael 356 Ball, Gregory 356 Ball, Timothy 195 Ballus, Patricia 333 Banker, Nancy 190,336 Banzett, Lorelle 356 Barber, Ann 341 Barber, Steve 325,334,356 Barczi, Kenneth 232,356 Barger, Ramon 320 Barkey, Ralph 215,220 Barnard, Marion 356 Barnwell, Robert 321 Barrall, Mark 356 Barrett, Stephen 328 Barringer, Charles 356 Barron, Stephen 206 Barthel, Lee 195 Bass, Gregory 206 Bauer, Douglas 334 Baynton, Lark 341 Bearman, Dave 110 Becker, Horst 138 Behman, Gerald A., Jr. 320 Bei, Gail 336 Bellefeuille, Stephen 325 Belvin, John 334 Bennett, Jodi 136,144 Berger, Marsha 187 Bergman, Mindy 330 Berlant, Gary 237 Bemstein, Donn 204 Berra, Eruoe 320 Berrett, Judith 322,358 Berry, Susan 306 Berryessa, Jeffrey 214,232 Bertetta, Gerald 237 Bertram, Andrea 194,306 Betts, Edward 321 Bey, Richard 358 Beyers, Nancy 190,322,358 Biggs, Paula 358 Billings, Roger 358 Bishop, Elvin 65 Bishop, Lynn 322 Black, Donna 358 Black, Sandra 188,358 Blackburn, Elizabeth 333 Blackford, Candace 341 Blackman, John 302 Blackshear, Barbara 336 Blair, Pamela 247 Blakely, Richard 146 Blanc, Alan 358 Blank, Adele 358 Blanton, Ronald 358 Blegen, Joanne 358 Blodgett, James 358 Blois, Douglas 338 Bloom, Harry 239 Bloom, Judith 188,358 Bloom, Roberta 358 Blozan, Cristine 358 Boardman, Kathy 358 Bobbitt, Booker T., Jr. 358 Bodenheimer, Howard 358 Boesel, Darcy 318 Boggs, Steven 328 Bohl, Pam Bennetts 358 Bohm, Barbara 183,358 Bolasm, Gerald 358 Bolling, Ruth 35 8 Bonin, Henry 35 8 Bonynge, Timothy 224 Boothroyd, Ellen 358 Borden, Allan 358 Borg, James 237,334 Borglin, Kristine 190,326,358 Borror, Suzanne 304 Bosch, Ray 224 Boskovich, Philip 206 Bossin, Debra 193 Bothwell, John 328 Bottoms, Kurt 338 Boughton, Don 141 Boulton, Lynn 326 Bourgaize, William 227 Bower, John 225 Bowers, Ellen 175 Bowin, Phil 210 Bowman, Craig 211,225 Boyd, Harry 358 Boyer, Larry 195 Boylan, Howard 189,35 8 Boyle, Michael 359 Braasch, Teri 184 Bradley, Michael 214 Bradshaw, William 325 Braly, Corinne 330 Brandenburg, Larry 206 Brashear, Elizabeth 359 Bream, Julian 94 Breetwor, Cheryl 35 9 Breneman, Betsy 359 Brewer, Wendy 304 Brewer, William 320 Breyfogle, Newell 237 Bridgers, Bud 359 Briggs, William 325 Broadhead, William 231,232 Brooks, Barbara 184 Brouillard, Patricia 302,333 Browder, Christopher 338 Brown, Brown, Brown, Brown, Brown, Brown, Brown, Brown, Brown, Angela 359 Christine 322 Hugh 359 Kenneth 211,225 Maria 359 Nevin 193 Pamela 336 Scott 227,229 Stephanie 190 Browning, Lorelle 100,187,188 Brownlee, Denise 359 Brumby, Brian 359 Bryngelson, Robert 232,359 Buchanan, Kathryn 306 Buck, Catherine 341 Buck, Susan 316,322,359 Buckley, Catherine 190,318,359 Bucton, Lillian 359 Bugg, Nancy 188 Bull, Doris 359 Bunkelman, Brad 359 Bunker, Suzanne 326,359 Buoncristiani, Adrian 215,220 Buono, Catherine 359 Burdett, Barbara 359 Burdick, Charles 234 Burke, Michael 338,359 Bumham, James 334 Bums, Anna 302 Bums, Jeanette 359 Burr, Patricia 318,359 Bursik, Emilie 359 Buschmann, Susan 330 Bush, Allen 321 Bushey, Stevan 212,232 Butler, Jane 306,322 Butler, Pegge 359 Butler, Sally 318,359 Butz, Janet 54 Buzzini, Diane 316,318,359 Byer, Laurel 341 Byme, Yvonne 360 Byme, Mark 360 Byrne, Patricia 302 Byron, Carol 304 C Cabot, Joyce 175 Cabral, Frank M., Jr. 360 Calderone, Rosalie 360 Calhoun, Rebekah 193 Callahan, Judith 360 Callahan, Michael 184 Callihan, Harry 204,206 Callow, Marjorie 326 Camba, Bemard 360 Camerlengo, Elsie 360 Campagne, Russell 325 Campbell, Corinne 306 Campbell, Janice 333 Campbell, Laurie 318 Campbell, Sarah 360 Campbell, Steven 325 Cannon, Frederic 320 Capaccio, Jolm 302 Capes, Cheryl 360 Cappa, Mary Ann 360 Cardella, Stephen 360 Carlson, David 184 Carlsson, Erica 360 Carmichael, Jacqueline 188,360 Carmilla 67 Camahan, Gary 360 Carson, Catherine 330,360 Carter, Elizabeth 318 Caruso, Anthony 360 Cary, Mary 360 Pinky 333 Cass, Maxine 183 Castleman, Brian 360 Cave, Janice 360 Cavin, Shari 140 Celmer, Ted 302 Cermeno, Frank 212 Cesare, Andrew 324,325 Cesare, James 325 Cetti, Stephanie 318 Chadwick, Bruce 206,360 Chadwick, Patricia 187,360 Chan, Hobert 360 Chaney, Bradley 360 Channing, Bradford 334 Chase, Lynne 360 Chavez, Robert 360 Cheadle, Vemon I. 144,204 Cheek, Leslie 360 Chen, Charles 360 Chew, Nelson 360 Chiang, Yvonne 87 Child, Diane 333,360 Choreographic Spectum 69 Chorica 71 Christiansen, Paula 341 Christopher, Gregory 183 Church, David 360 Cima, Joyce 336 Clartield, Marjorie 360 Clark, Craig 227 Clark, Jennifer 360 Clark, Pamela 322 Clark, Richard 321 Clarke, James 239 Cleary, Coleen 330 Clifford, Nancy 306 Cloud, Preston 148,149 Coates, Hilary 360 Cochrane, Ida 360 Cochrane, Zenola 306 Cockerill, Charles 360 Cockerill, Kathrine 360 Codington, James 328 Coenen, Juliette 360 Coff, Dana 302 Cohen, Roy 212 Colm, Paula 361 Cole, Neal 334,361 Colgate, Vicki 326 Colley, Stephen 183 Collins, Jack 234-236 Collop, Sandra 330 Colvin, Susan 341,361 Colwell, Nancy 190,361 Comegys, James 328 Comerford, James 317 Comstock, Richard 158 Concertus, Musicus 68 Conger, Cynthia 361 Connolly, Jane 361 Conway, Jane 318,361 Cook, Teresa 361 Coolidge, Christine 322 Cooper, David 189 Cooper, Judy 361 Cords, Carolyn 333 Corliss, Donald 361 Cosentino, Michael 215 Cote, Ron 206 Courtney, Jon 195 Courtright, Kerry 361 Cox, Michael 237 Craig, Shirley 362 Crinklaw, Susan 326 Criswell, Celeste 194 Criswell, Leslie 362 Crites, Robert 328 Crivello, Ruth 362 Crocker, David 206 Cronin, Jerry 362 Cronk, Richard 362 Crooker, Debra 302 Crosby, Robert 362 Crowther, Bishop Edward 137 Cuddyre, Terence 334 Cuellar, Joseph Sr. 102 Cummings, Craig 362 Cunnane, Michael 214 Cunningham, Katy 333 Curtice, Jack 204 Cuzner, Carol 183,362 D Dahl, Robert 362 Dahlgren, Pat 193 Danache, Daniel 232 Dance, Maurice 231,232 D' Angelo, Donna 362 Daniels, Mareva 306 Darling, James 338,362 Davies, Jane 341 Davies, Kathryn 336 Davis, Debra 192 Davis, Jack 362 Davis, Ronald 49 Davis, Sue 188 Davis, Steven 362 Davis, Susan Barr 362 De Bow, Deborah 322 Dedrick, Robert 183 De Franco, Diane 222 De Gooyer, Lance 317,328 De Groff, Robert 362 De Groff, Sharon 362 De Groot, David 234 Delanty, Rick 212 De Laveaga, Martha 318 Del Duca, Deborah 362 Delgadillo, Arthur 362 De Muth, Philip 184 Denhart, Sandra 318 Denman, Joan 363 Dennis, Kathleen 192 Dense, Charles 363 De Pangher, Michael 302 Derrah 113 Deutsch, Barbara 175 Devenish, Judy 363 De Voe, Deborah 326 De Wald, Cathy 363 De Wolfe, Robert 138 Diamond, Jeffrey 328 Diamond, Kathleen 363 Dickey, Robert 237 Dickson, Deborah 336 Didinger, James 321 Dierdorff, Nancy 363 Dierker, Richard 227,229 Dimmitt, Tom 233 Dingler, Robert 302 Di Pol, Annette 363 Di Pol, Loretta 304 Dirden, Janice 363 Di Rosario, Michael 302 Disen, Eric 183,363 Dixon, Robert 328 Dodd, Deborah 190,333 Doiron, Daniel 363 Dolby, Susan 330 Dolowitz, Steven 363 Donoghue, Robin 180,363 Doolittle, Jonna 363 Doolittle, Karl 338 Domey, Deborah 363 Doty, Edward 226 Downey, Daniel 325 Doyle, Robert 325,363 Draper, Ann 363 Ia? KL ' if Q'-f s"'? wax ..-. 1 a i E 1 e E W Q by -fx. Uh . M24 Ili! - ww -aa' f - .mf ,"' aww ar' 'ff " 1' -up Ford, Dennis 364 Ford, Margaret 364 Foreman, Dennis 205,206 Foster, Rick 364 Fox, Susan 304 Frame, Karen 322 Franco, Irene 304 Franco, Robert 227 Frank, Josh 226 Franklin, Coleen 140 Frazier, Earl 215,220,221 Freas, Janet 364 Frederick, Deborah 364 Freeman, Ricardo 187 French, Mark 227 Fried, Jeffrey 364 Friedman, Howard 364 Frisco, Don 302 Frolli, Mark 227 Frost, Frank 150 Frye, Anthony 206 Fugle, Craig 226 Fujikuni, Barbara 190 Fulco, Jorge 338 G Gammon, Christopher 210, 211,225 Gans, Carl W., Jr. 212,230, 232 Garcia, Eliza 364 Garcia, Margaret 319 Garcia, Robert 232 Garza, Victor 223 Gates, Marshall 227,229 Gazdecki, James 338 Gearhart, Richard 226 Geary, Anne 341,364 Geddes, Peter 189 Geddes, Timothy 189,364 Gedney, Neil 195 Geiger, Sally 364 Gentry, Bradford 234 Gerver, Ozzie 364 Geuss, Sandy 239 Geweke, Deborah 333 Gianelli, John 220 Gibson, Lee 320 Gibson, Margery 364 Gibson, Robert 211,225 Garcia, Robert R., Jr. 41,178 Gieselman, Stephen 321 Games, James 174 Giles, Dana 322 Garrett, Janice 364 Gillooly, Jack 364 Garrison, Michael 183 Gin, Bob 338 Gin, Lau Lun 364 Gingold, Samuel 338 Gitlen, Scott 364 Givens, Cleo 179 Glenn, Stanley L. 141 Glokenspiel, J acquelyn 302 Glover, Joan 188 Gluck, Kedra 322 Goeckermann, Celia 302 Goldberg, Sara 304 Goldfine, Bernard 226 Goldmann, James 365 Goldstein, Mary 161 Gomes, Dennis 365 Gomez, David 365 Gonzalez, Darla 365 Good, D'Riece 365 Good, Mary 304 Gooder, Elizabeth 337 Goodman, Clayton 206 Goodrich, Edwin 86,142 Goodspeed, Stephen 204 Gordon, Doreen 333 Gordon, Michael 184 Gorrie, Dave 227 Gorzynski, Beryl 330,365 Grafe, Carol 365 Graham, Howard 237 Graham, Jack 325 Grandle, Dennis 365 Grant, John 193 Graves, Jeremy 105 Gray, Paul 211,225 Gray, Rex 145 Grayson, Deborah 188 Greathead, Janette 316,330 Green, Clixie 302,337 Green, Helen 365 Green, Robert 365 Green, William 365 Greenlees, Dianah 365 Greenwald, Dennis 365 TT, ' Gregory, Mel 233 Grey, William 365 Greyson, Deborah 333,365 Gridley, John 365 Griffin, Carol 319 Grifling, Juliette 365 Griffith, Jon 328,366 Griffith, Stacey 322,366 Griffiths, Dale 189 Grifman, Phyllis 184 Grimes, Patricia 366 Groener, William 302 Grokenberger, David 226,366 Grokenberger, Marian 366 Gronich, Lori 194 Grossberg, Michael 184 Gstettenbauer, Gregory 320 Gudelj, Steven 205,206 Guild, John 195 Gullotti, Steven 206,208 Gundersen, George 325 Gutierez, Joseph 338 H Haas, Jeffrey 226,320 Hahn, Bruce 214 Hall, Barbara 306 Hall, Nancy 366 Hall, Suzette 316,326 Halpem, Leslie 194 Hamilton, Michael 366 Hammer, Bil 206,223 Hammett, Bnrce 321 Handler, David 184 Hanke, Debra 322 Hankins, Hesterly 366 Hanley, Theodore 161 Hanna, Patricia 366 Hannan, Joseph 212,232 Hansen, Kathleen 366 Hansen, Melissa 337 Hanson, Cary 227,320 Hanson, Michael 366 Hanson, William 230,232,328 Harbison, Jeffrey 366 Hardie, Arthur 366 Hargis, J ack 366 Harper, Christine 330 Harper, John 334,366 Harper, Randall 366 Harris Harris Harris Harris Harris, Harris, Harris, , William 320 Harris , Diane 190,366 , John 320 , Kenneth 338,366 Martha 367 Patricia 190,322 Richard 48 Scott 223 Harrison, Tony 141 Harrop, John 141 Harte, Maureen 367 Hide, Terry 367 Higashi, Kathleen 367 Higgin, Joleen 333 Higginbottom, Linda 319 Hill, Barbara 322,367 Hill, Barton 367 Hill, David 367 Hill, Suzanne 322,367 Hillman, Bruce 367 Hinds, Dorothy 367 Hinds, William 206,207 Hines, John 367 Hixon, Mark 195 Hobson, Priscilla 109,337 Hodge, Rebecca 337 Hodson, Irene 367 Hoelke, Peggy 189 Hoerauf, Jerald 367 Hoffman, Daniel 367 Hoffman, Douglas 367 Hoffman, James 367 Hoffman, Joan 316,322,367 Hofstee, Philip 367 Hogaboom, Kathleen 326 Hogan, Susan 333 Hold, Lawrence 227,325 Holdemess, Deborah 333 Holland, Jack 321 Holmes, Charlene 302 Holmes, Diane 367 Holzer, Michael 325 Honegger, John 320,367 Hong, Terri 368 Hook, Robert 368 Hoopes, Frank 368 Homberger, Gayle 1 87 Horton, Samuel 214 Hosack, Robert 368 Hoshin, Diane 142 Hougardy, Richard 368 Houston, John 321 Howard, Linda 368 Howry, Anita 368 Hsu, Reginald 368 Hsu, William 368 Huang, Joseph 368 Hubbard, Frances 368 Hubbard, Freddie 77 Hubert, Carol 368 Huckeba, Charles 368 Hughes, Sheryl 368 Hull, Steven 195 Hultquist, Leonie 368 Humfeld,,J'anet 188 Hummes, Katherine 368 Humphrey, Susan 333 Hundley, Renata 368 Hunt, John 368 Hunter, Brent 368 Huntsinger, Steven 206 Hurd, Theresa Thompson 368 Hutcheson, Michele 181 Hutchinson, Susan 368 Harvindeguy, Yvonne 195 Haskett, Steven 215,218,219 Hassebrock, Barbara 326 Hatlen, Theodore 141 Hayes, Lindy 333 Hayes, Marc 338 Hayre, Raghbir 367 Haywood, William 211,225 Head, Marcia 341 Healy, Christine 141 Heath, Steve 338 Hee, Brenda 367 Heinsohn, Steve 367 Helmer, John 367 Helvey, Mark 328 Henderson, Cynthia 322,367 Henderson, Robert 237 Hensley, Randy 367 Hepp, Gregory 183 Herauf, Michael 367 Hem, Candice 367 Hemandez, Adela 367 Hemdon, Matthew 367 Herrera, Ralph 174 Herring, Kathleen 367 Herrman, Leslie 367 Hesch, Nancy 319 Hewlett, Gretchen 187 I Ikola, Kathleen 368 Imrie, John 328 Indermill, Kathy 368 Irwin, Susan 330,368 Isenberg, Ed 187 Ismay, Randall 368 J Jackson Jackson Jackson Q Pamela 368 Jackson, Jackson, , Gloria 368 Kermeth 206 Terrance 334 Thomas 227 Jacobson, Jay 226 James, Margo 188 James, Mike 212 James, Rose Anne 330,368 Janovich, Peter 206 Jaworski, James 338 Jefferson, Mike 225 Jeffries, Steven 321 Jenkins, Judith 368 Jensen, Karen 326,327 Jensen, Marlene 190,323 Jensen, Susan 119 Jenvey, Marlyn 331 Jemigan, Sandra 306 Johnny Otis Show 76 Johnson, Allen 368 Johnson, Amy 190 Johnson, Beverly 368 Johnson, Britt 368 Johnson, David 334,368 Johnson, David 369 Johnson, Deborah 369 Johnson, Eileen 319,369 Johnson, Judy 369 Johnson, Karen 319 Johnson, Kenneth 369 Johnson, Lyndell 191,369 Johnson, Mary 188,330,369 Johnson, Robin 330,369 Johnson, Sheila 369 Johnson, Steger 369 Johnson, Steven 211 Johnston, Craig 234 Johnston, Rodney 325 Jones, Art 369 Jones, Kent 122 Jones, Lorinda 306 Jones, Omar 129 Jones, Patricia 333 Jones, Richard 211,225 Jones, Sharon 369 Jones, Timothy 369 Jones, William 215 Jordan, Sidney 223 Jostes, John 187 Joyce, Madeline 179 Juelke, Paula 141,369 Jura, Christine 369 Jurewitz, Claudia 304 Justiniano, Nancy 326 K Kahn, Judy 326 Kaiser, Karen 369 Kaji, Jeanette 333,369 Kalk, Eileen 369 Kane, Christopher 234 Kaneshige, Pearl 370 Kates, David 320 Katz, Susan 370 Kaufman, Mark 370 Kaye, Hilary 184 Kearn, Deborah 333 Kearn, Devon 333 Keams, Jerry 135 Keefer, Lynn 326 Keelan, Regina 370 Keeling, James 370 Kees, Vicky 370 Keller, Frederick 370 Kellett, Michele 370 Kelley, Kathleen 370 Kelley, Marta 306 Kelly, Carolyn 323,370 Kelly, Megan 370 Kemble, Susan 304 Kemp, Dennis 302 Kendall, Gregory 302 Kenney, Katherine 370 Kerr, Gayle 180 Kezani, Tom 165 Kilpatrick, Alan 320 Kimball, Cluistopher 370 Kimura, James 370 Kindall, Carolyn 333 Kindel, Robert 3 70 King, B.B. 80 King, Betsy 337 King, John 234 King, William 195 Kinworthy, Michael 370 Kjerulff, Kristen 370 Klein, David 370 Klein, Gail 370 Kline, James 370 Klouda, George 325 Knabke, Katherine 370 Knickerbocker, Janice 3 70 Knight, Cynthia 333 Knight, John 321 Knopke, Terry 326 Knorr, Mary 319 Koester, Kathleen 333 Kohlmann, Donald 325,370 Kohn, Philip 370 Kohnert, Diana 370 Kolb, Brian 237 Kolling, Mark 214 Kolvitz, Leanne 370 Korson, Charles 370 Kosoff, Jay 370 Kovach, Joe 181 Kramer, Carol 370 Krass, Allan 48 Krell, Donald 370 Kreston, Carolyn 323 Krevis, Judith 188,191,319 Kreymer, Anne 370 Kropf, Susan 304 Kukenbaker, Rhonda 370 Kuehn, David 227,325 Kuhn, James 321 Kulvin, Lori 333 Kurlichyk, Deborah 337,370 Kuwahara, Barbara 370 1 it 5' 9 J iii 5 A , :sl A 'V M , .. 1 ,sw-if fi? L Laflin, Kathleen 370 Lagana, Gregory 325,371 La Gory, Carmen 191,319 Lagusker, Irwin 371 Lam, Stephanie 107,187,371 Lamphere, Diane 371 Lamsa, Michael 232 Landes, Jerry 371 Lane, Dick 126 Lane, Gordon 183 Langdon, Leslie 371 Langstaff, Gordon 328 Langstaff, Nancy 337 Larsen, Karen 319 Larson, Gerald 158 Laun, Kristine 319 Lavagnini, Henry 371 La Viola, Steven 371 Lawrence, J anene 371 Lawson, Harry 144 Lay, John 371 Lazarus, Allan 183,371 Lazarus, Gail 323 Lazzaro, Linda 371 Le Blanc, Joan 304 Lee, Jerry 215,221 Lee, Paul 227,328 Lee, Richard 226 Lee, Vickie 371 Lees, Allyson 330 Legassick, Martin 48 Leibo, Steven 371 Lem, Roberta 194 Lemman, Barbara 337 Lencioni, Randell 371 Leonard, Arthur 195 Le Roy, Terry 333 Leslie, Laura 341 Levin, Harvey 371 Levit, Donna 304 Levy, Mickey 371 Lewis, Cheryl 371 Lewis, James 371 Lewis, Neal 325 Lewis, Willard 371 Li, Charles 151 Lierley, Patricia 371 Light, Kenneth 232 Lilek, Barbara 371 Limon, Jean 304 Lincoln, Mark 371 Lind, Barbara 371 Lindeberg, Margaret 371 Lippman, Eva 188,371 Lite, Melanie 372 Littlefield, Mark 227 Littlejohn, Fred 328 Lloyd, Charles 77 Lochhead, Lauriarme 188 Logan, Paul 325,372 Logan, Stephen 183 Look, Angela 302 Lopes, Jeffrey 211 Lopez, Ronald 372 Loring, Charles 317,338,372 Loring, Linwood 338,372 Loscotoff, Robert 214 Louis Falco Dance Co. 96 Louie, Judy 372 Lounsburt, Steven 231,232 Low, Laura 306 Low, Walter 338,372 Lucas, Sandy 239 Luchetti, Michael 372 Ludekens, Ronald 211,225 Luecke, William 372 Luger, Teresa 372 Luhr, Kathryn 337 Lukens, Victoria 372 Luna, David 372 Lund, Kristine 372 Lyding, Richard 325 Lystrata 72 M Mabou Mines 84 Mac Glashan, Mary 372 Macomber, William 154 Macy, Michael 212,232 Madden, Daniel 230,232 Madison, Paula 372 Malecot, Andre 146 Manke, Christopher 372 Mankoff, Milton 48 Manosar, Gregory 206 Marceau, Marcel 62,78 Marchesi, David 189 Margolies, John 135 Marion, Robin 194 Mark, Mindy 302 Marketter, Cindy 333 Marks, Antoinette 372 Maron, Michael 232,372 Marshall, Kathleen 373 Marshall, Louise 373 Martinelli, Ida 373 Martini, Edward 101 Martini, Ned 187 Martinich, Richard 237,334 Masson, Kathryn 373 Mata, Luis, Jr. 373 Matsinger, Harry 334,373 Matthew, Kollamala 175 Maurer, Lawrence 338,373 Mayers, Karen 319 Mazzanti, Gino 325,373 Mc Adam, Steven 374 Mc Andrews, David 374 Mc Bride, Kenneth 206 Mc Call, Bruce 374 Mc Cart, Karyn 194,323 Mc Carthy, Sandra 374 Mc Carthy, Thomas 374 Mc Carty, Cathy 319,374 Mc Clellan, Judith 41,l08, 178,374 Mc Connell, Lonnie 206 Mc Cullough, David 374 Mc Dade, Elizabeth 374 Mc Diarmid, Michael 338 Mc Donald, Patricia 375 Mc Donald, Patrick 325 Mc Dougal, Lee 219 Mc Dowell, Christine 375 Mc Eachem, Lee, Jr. 184 Mc Elhany, Ronald 325 Mc Fadden, Leslie 333 Mc Ginnis, Michael 237 Mc Givern, Peter 214,334 Mc Guinness, Lorie 319,375 Mc Guire, Daniel 338 Mc Innis, Michael 375 Mc Intire, Robin 375 Mc Intosh, William 375 Mc Keefery, Raymond 375 Mc Kenna, Brian 375 Mc Kibbin, Douglas 214 Mc Laughlin, Ann 375 Mc Lellan, Jennifer 375 Mc Monagle, Charles 375 Mc Namara, Teresa 375 Mc Neil, Ian 334,375 Mc Neill, Virginia 375 Mc Peak, Kim 375 Mc Quade, Wendy 341 Mc William, Linda 191,337 Meade, Catherine 195 Meadows, Gail 189 Meck, Kathryn 373 Medlin, Laralee 323 Mce, Gus 234,236 Menees, Katherine 191,319,373 Meredith, Kenneth 373 Merigian, Margaret 373 Metcalf, Terry 207 Meudell, Marcia 373 Meyer, Michelle 326,373 Mezzetta, Celestina 373 Michky, Marianne 341,373 Michrina, Andy 120 Mier, David 320,373 Milhan, Gary 373 Miller, Barbara 326 Miller, Curey 226 Miller, Deborah 373 Miller, James 373 Miller, Larry 214,239 Miller, Lon 373 Miller, Lynne 188 Miller, Marilyn 187 Miller, Mark 321 Miller, Nancy 333 Miller, Susan 330 Mills, Andrew 115 Mills, Peter 328,373 Minervini, John 302 Minkley, Susan 341,373 Minter, Steve 205 Mirkovich, Michael 210 Mitchell, James 206,209 Mitchell, Linda 191,319 Moch, David 230,232 Moe, Barbara 373 Molina, Randolph 237 Montagna, Ernses 328 Montgomery, Bruoe 145 Moody, Marjorie 373 Moon, Melanye 373 Moore, Charles 373 Moore, Kathleen 306 Moore, Stephen 206,211 Moore, Virginia 373 Morasch, Patrice 319 Mordecai, Dennis 373 Moreland, Jennifer 333 Moreland, Pamela 373 Moreno, Antonio 338 Morgan, Marjorie 373 Morgan, Scott 373 Moro, Gerry 232 Morrow, Quenby 323 Morse, Barbara 333 Mortroni, Jim 211 Moss, Robert 373 Mount, Robert 206 Moy, Gloria 188 Mueller, John 328 Muhleman, Dawn 373 Muirhead, Richard 328 Muleady, Kathleen 191,374 Mulhaupt, Rick 195 Muntean, Dirk 374 Murkovich, Mike 211 Murphy, Gregory 227 Murphy, Sandra 374 Musselwhite, Charlie 77 Myers, Donald 374 Myers, Nancy 374 Myers, Theodore 125 Myrabo, Laurie 337 N Nakaoak, Janet 304 Nakashima, David 195 Nash, Roderick 144 Negin, Brian 375 Nelson, David 375 Nelson, Janet 326 Nelson, John 191 Nelson, Pamela 188 Nelson, Patrick 321 Neuman, Randy 232 Neumann, Betty 191,323 New, Thomas 375 Newlon, Molly 337 Newquist, Deborah 375 Nguyen, Thuy 375 Nibley, Annette 326,375 Nicassio, Allan 206 Nicol, Crystal 187 Nigro, Katherine. 333 Nishi, Deborah 375 Nixon, Randy 191,323 Nolan, Gary 227 Nolan, Jere 338,375 Nolte, Linda 375 Nordeen, Steven 375 Nordstrom, Edwin 375 Norris, Lance 211 Northridge, Susan 375 Norton, Gayle 341 Noss, Kathleen 194 Nozaki, Seiji 375 O Oakes, Elizabeth 375 Oberg, James 225 Obertreis, Louis 317,328,375 O Brien, Cathy 326,375 O Brien, Kevin 375 O Brien, Thomas 375 O'Connor, Katy 326 O'Dea, Janet 158 O Donnell, James 320 Ogden, David 206 Ogle, John 212 Oglesby, Richard 150 O Hagan, Maureen 188 O Hollaren, Robert 339 Okazaki, Janet 319 Olin, Milton 121 Olsen, June 179 Olsen, Kim 206 Olson, Deborah 326 Olson, Glenn 328 Olson, Margo 306 Oltmann, Henry 325 O Neill, Kevin 226 Ong, Michael 226 Open Theatre 97 Oppezzo, Timothy 206 Orchard, Kristine 333 Ordung, Katherine 187 Ordway, Gary 375 Oropesa, Stanley 375 Orrick, Elizabeth 306 Ortalea, Paul 112 Ortegren, Leif 375 Orth, Pamela 341 Ortiz, Maria 306 Osborne, Leonard 183 Osinski, Halina 376 Ostrin, Richard 376 Ostrom, Sven 227 Otis, James 376 Owens, Bradley 195 Owens, Tim 104 P Pabst, Gwen 337 Page, Patricia 306 Page, Stephen 376 Palmer, Jean 194 Palmer, Suzanne 376 Palmquist, Susan 337,376 Palomino, Randolph 206,208 Panovich, Kathleen 323 Papac, Gail 376 Pappenfus, Karen 319 Paquette, Sarah 376 Pardee, Catherine 183 Pareto, Cynthia 337 Park, Craig 227 Parker, Meg 302 Parrish, William 211 Parsons, George 376 Partridge, Joyce 330 Pasternak, James 339 Patterson, Michael 227 Patterson, Dale 376 Patton, Gregory 226 Paul Sanasardo Dance Co. 89 Pearse, Carol 323,376 Pearson, Nancy 376 Peck, Leslie 323 Pederson, Kent 206,207 Peel, Leslie 304 Pellecchia, Gary 321 Pembleton, Valerie 304 Perkins, Katherine 191 Perlis, Robert 377 Perrone, Susan 377 Perry, Sheryl 377 Persinger, Wendy 304 Perucca, Janet 377 Petersmeyer, Kent 215 Peterson, Arthur 339 Peterson, Craig 339 Peterson, Janice 377 Peterson, Michael 377 Peterson, Peg 191 Pettengill, Diane 183 Pfarr, Michael 237 Pfau, Molly 306 A. 1 ff, " 7 9? 1. ,V fififyw K vi i X if Nia 4 Reiss, Jeffrey 377 Remy, John 211 Resh, Cynthia 377 Reyes, Gilbert 206 Reynolds, Douglas 377 Reynolds, Lyle 175 Reynolds, Richard 334 Reynolds, Susan 377 Rhoades, Gary 377 Rideout, Lucie 302 Rigali, Richard 206 Riley, Mark 206 Rimer, Skip 184 Rindge, Marguerite 377 Riordan, Mary 326 Ristau, Leah 333 Rivera, Janet 377 Rivers, Larry 135 Robbins, Barbara 377 Roberts, John 236 Roberts, Jon 234 Roberts, Linda 377 Robinson, Kathy 377 Robinson, Paul 377 Robinson, Robert 320 Robison, James 377 Roche, Cynthia 304 Rochlin, Tina 194 Rockhold, Steve 215,216,22O, 377 Rockwell, Ray 226,378 Rodriguez, Daniel 206 Rogal, Gail 323 Rogers, Elizabeth 378 Rogers, Jacqueline 194 Roller, Paul 320 Romano, Marinel 326 Rose, Gary 328 Rosenfeld, Kenneth 378 Rosenkranz, Lois 326 Rosenquist, Richard 211 Ross, Donald 378 Ross, Douglas 378 Ross, Greg 237 Ross, Lisa 194 Ross, Steven 227,229 Rostropovich, Mstislav 83 Roth, Roberta 194 Roth, Virginia 323,378 Rothenberger, Thomas 378 Rowan, Lynda 378 Rowe, David 124,183 Rowland, Rick 210,211,225 Roy, Marilyn 341 Rube, Melvin 378 Rudman, Kelly 304 Rudser, Ralph 378 Ruggles, Steve 226 Runkle, Larry 236,378 Russell, Vicki 378 Russo, Dennis 334,378 Ruthroff, Sally 191,337 Ryan, Dolores 378 Rye, Vernon 339 S Sachs, Catharine 306 Sakaguchi, Kenneth 378 Sakakihara, Paul 189 Saldin, Cathy 304 Samples,'Ethar1 339 Sanchez, Josie 192 Sandall, Susan 191 Sandberg, Constance 378 Sande, Rona 140 Sandeen, Carolyn 341 Sandler, Donna 378 Sanford, Peter 226 Sassard, Carol 302 Sauban, Valerie 191,379 Sauers, Lawrence 193 Sauers, Mike 193 Savage, Marshall 234 ' K - .llLf"55'TTiY -. 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Stanbury, Corey 211,225 Stanley, Sheila 327 Stanton, Bud 230,232 Stanton, Glenn 325,380 Stark, Susan 330 Staschower, Judith 319 Stasinis, Mark 320,380 Stecki, Susan 380 Steen, Kathryn 380 Stegen, Pamela 380 Steigely, Randall 225 Stein, Alan 321 Steiner, William 339 Steles, Betsy 380 Stelling, Susan 194 Stempel, Gregory 320,380 Stephenson, Joy 380 Sterling, Dane 380 Stevens, Peter 339 Stewart, Carol 306 . 1, , ,. :.,,, ., s..,,W,,.:,,s,,,,,,,,-,.-..:,3:,,-5,-1,:,.F,.',,::' fu- yi 317 --yan :rv-Q w. ,fgirfry Kg fig? x'V :r::,' i. : Al, H 135 Q-'fi 'i,e'EffEF"5r5: t s 1 fzge-zgezif rv - 1 - 1 ' -' f r - H 1 1 - - ff ' I Stewart, Craig 183 Stewart, David 334 Stewart, James 380 Stewart, Randall 141 Stinson, Stuart 321 Stocklin, Joven 148 Stone, Barbara 380 Stout, Sally 380 Straatsma, Cary 302 Streed, Margaret 191,319 Strong, Sharon 333,380 Strunk, Sandra 306 Stuart, Sheila 341 Sugerman, Michael 183 Sullivan, James 143 Sulprizio, Kent 380 Sumowski, Camilla 380 Sundstrom, Linda 337 Sutton, Thomas 226 Suwara, Rudy 234 7.,.f,f ,- was -3, - - me Swartfager, Roger 334 Swargz, Ed 204 Swauger, Kerri 304 Swearingen, Carrell 328 Sweeney, Suzanne 380 T Taber, Robert 380 Tacoma, Shirley 319 Tai, Susan 86 Takahashi, Ricky 380 Talmachoff, Peter 381 Tanner, Lewis 381 Tarre, Sheldon 187 Taylor, Wesley B., Jr. 152 Telleria, Robert 223 Thomas, Barbara 381 Thomas, Daniel 223 Thomas, Howard 381 Thomas, Lisa 191,330 Thomas, Randy 206 Thompson, Gail 337 Thompson, Katherine 326 Thompson, Marcia 330 Thompson, Rogan 206 Thompson, Vivian 381 Thomson, Tom 189 Thornton, Fergus 317,325 Thrower, Mildred 381 Thurston, Pamela 326 Tighe, Claudia 194 Tilley, Richard 381 Tillman, Sue-Anne 333 Timmer, Donald 381 Timora 320 K Tischer, Raymond 381 Toatley, Edward 381 Tobin, John 230,232 Todd, Laurie 381 Tofanelli, Lee 226 Tokushige, June 330,381 Tolbert, James 232 Tolegian, David 198 Tolleson, Robert 234 Tollette, Cynthia 381 Tomlinson, Dale 174 Ton, Kathleen 381 Toon, John 381 Torres, Anthony 227,229 Tracy, Cheryl 381 Tracy, Scott 339 Trammell, Dennis 226 Trant, Jeffrey 321 Trescott, Eresa 381 Troedson, Mary 333 Try, Jennifer 306 Tschogl, Jolm 215,217,219 Tuazon, Turlow, Turner, Turner, Turner, Turner, Renato 328 Ken 206 Dan 206 Henry 174 Lindsey 302 Steven 339,382 Tuttle, Lynda 188 Twogood, Daniel 225 U Uchida, Deborah 3 1 9 Unzueta, Manuel 214 Utsumi, Christine 341 V Valdez, Manuel , Jr. 223 Valencia, Beverly 382 Valencia, Richard 382 Valente, Michele 304,382 Van Dyck, Neil 206 Van Er, Jerry 237 Van Noord, Paul 382 Van Vuren, Stacy 382 Varner, Miles 135 Venatta, Sahron 188,319 Ventimiglio, Anthony 206,209, 382 Vernier, Craig 339 Vesely, Jeffrey 334,382 Vviiano, Angela 306 Vogt, Elaine 330 Vogt, Leslie 239 Volarvich, James 206 Volesky, Margaret 382 Von Bergen, Vicki 191 Von Somogyi, Zolton 204,214 Vredenburgh, Peter 382 W Wacthel, Albert 143 Waddell, Joanne 330 Wade, Carole 341 Wailes, Betty 382 Waite, Elizabeth 382 Walker, Barbara 382 Walsh, Thomas 239 Walsten, Mary 382 Wanter, Beverly 382 Ward, Peter 382 Ward, William 382 Wardlaw, Blair 382 Ware, Ted 183 Warner, Michael 321 Wamer, Valerie 331 Warren, James 212,232 Wasbin, Deborah 302 Washauer, Gary 382 Washington, Patricia 189 Watanabe, Patricia 326 Waterhouse, Philip 225 Watkins, Peter 214,339 Watts, Karen 333 Wawry Chuk, Steven 382 Wayman, James 237,382 Webster, Sylvia 382 Wechter, Robert 193 Wedaa, Karena 302 Weeks, Carol 382 Weir, Kimberly 306 Welch, Charles M., Jr. 382 Wells, Susan 382 Werner, David 339 Wesley, Kent 382 West, Stephen 225 Westerman, Ola 382 Wexler, Susan 382 White, David 206 White, Fleet 195 White, Jack 206 White, Robert 339 Whiteford, Helen 330 Whiteside, Donald 183 Whiting, Jerry 382 Whitney, William 382 Whitton, Lang 382 Wictorin, Janet 382 Wiest, Paula 194,383 Wild, William 206 Williams, Ann 192 Williams, Constance 188 Williams, Deborah 326 Williams, Ford 334 Williams, Joseph 339 Williams, Michael 206 Williams, Wendell 206 Williamson, Patricia 330 Wilson, Betty 383 Wilson, Cynthia 383 Wilson, Joan 323 Wilson, Susan 383 Wimpress, Cecily 304,337 Ng? L 'Z A , I., -,:"g1: 4 af ' ' fw f 4 f E 1-+ if 31? ' Q2 L 93 4 1 f I W y.: .i , I ' A W fiifii - f Q as MW ,ff Y ef f fy A I 39 4 Reiss, Jeffrey 377 Remy, John 211 Resh, Cynthia 377 Reyes, Gilbert 206 Reynolds, Douglas 377 Reynolds, Lyle 175 Reynolds, Richard 334 Reynolds, Susan 377 Rhoades, Gary 377 Rideout, Lucie 302 Rigali, Richard 206 Riley, Mark 206 Rimer, Skip 184 Rindge, Marguerite 377 Riordan, Mary 326 Ristau, Leah 333 Rivera, Janet 377 Rivers, Larry 135 Robbins, Barbara 377 Roberts, John 236 Roberts, Jon 234 Roberts, Linda 377 Robinson, Kathy 377 Robinson, Paul 377 Robinson, Robert 320 Robison, James 377 Roche, Cynthia 304 Rochlin, Tina 194 Rockhold, Steve 215,216,220, 377 Rockwell, Ray 226,378 Rodriguez, Daniel 206 Rogal, Gail 323 Rogers, Elizabeth 378 Rogers, Jacqueline 194 Roller, Paul 320 Romano, Marinel 326 Rose, Gary 328 Rosenfeld, Kenneth 378 Rosenkranz, Lois 326 Rosenquist, Richard 211 Ross, Donald 378 Ross, Douglas 378 Ross, Greg 237 Ross, Lisa 194 Ross, Steven 227,229 Rostropovich, Mstislav 83 Roth, Roberta 194 Roth, Virginia 323,378 Rothenberger, Thomas 378 Rowan, Lynda 378 Rowe, David 124,183 Rowland, Rick 210,211,225 Roy, Marilyn 341 Rube, Melvin 378 Rudman, Kelly 304 Rudser, Ralph 378 Ruggles, Steve 226 Runkle, Larry 236,378 Russell, Vicki 378 Russo, Dennis 334,378 Ruthroff, Sally 191,337 Ryan, Dolores 378 Rye, Vemon 339 S Sachs, Catharine 306 Sakaguchi, Kenneth 378 Sakakihara, Paul 189 Saldin, Cathy 304 Samples,'Ethan 339 Sanchez, Josie 192 Sandall, Susan 191 Sandberg, Constance 378 Sande, Rona 140 Sandeen, Carolyn 341 Sandler, Donna 378 Sanford, Peter 226 Sassard, Carol 302 Sauban, Valerie 191,379 Sauers, Lawrence 193 Sauers, Mike 193 Savage, Marshall 234 if tfvsff W , 1 N ' 1 it W. ,- , , - -.aw , ,H wr ' .J adder , S f sf-Qg125ff33g!,f,,v"t1f-.rf W 1 'x , ,X PQIA A!"':1'TIZf'5'?' 2 ,fi 'L' 'ft ' ,L . 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F5 .wg -.,. sigm..-,.f, 15 fggw-Wu U xc , P I X sr- mm W, Jwff if sn 35" Stanbury, Corey 211,225 Stanley, Sheila 327 Stanton, Bud 230,232 Stanton, Glenn 325,380 Stark, Susan 330 Staschower, Judith 319 Stasinis, Mark 320,380 Stecki, Susan 380 Steen, Kathryn 380 Stegen, Pamela 380 Steigely, Randall 225 Stein, Alan 321 Steiner, William 339 Steles, Betsy 380 Stelling, Susan 194 Stempel, Gregory 320,380 Stephenson, Joy 380 Sterling, Dane 380 Stevens, Peter 339 Stewart, Carol 306 .f g- ., f: s--:- 2 e,s:.:gff,.e:gf-ME.,,,z . - E-I , - ,,,,- as . ww fs. K X wt 1 P X 3 Vw .f UW 'l' 31.5. ' . Wa, - pf-ef 1 1 N. '-" -- ' " ' 1 X ' 1 .-:zzffw BQLM we Nz, 53 ,5 4, .A , salsa H ,,, QQ ,s at s ., we Q W E X " Sfxf,: QM S f ,R as gs' 1 ff ,S Q, s x i ami rl : ws rx ffl Qs? ,Har .rf , -,:. 1, , ,,.t .L . ..:-fwfvra um 'J Z Stewart, Craig 183 Stewart, David 334 Stewart, James 380 Stewart, Randall 141 Stinson, Stuart 321 Stocklin, Joven 148 Stone, Barbara 380 Stout, Sally 380 Straatsma, Cary 302 Streed, Margaret 191,319 Strong, Sharon 333,380 Strunk, Sandra 306 Stuart, Sheila 341 Sugerman, Michael 183 Sullivan, James 143 Sulprizio, Kent 380 Sumowski, Camilla 380 Sundstrom, Linda 337 Sutton, Thomas 226 Suwara, Rudy 234 Swartfager, Roger 334 Swargz, Ed 204 Swauger, Kerri 304 Swearingen, Carrell 328 Sweeney, Suzanne 380 T Taber, Robert 380 Tacoma, Shirley 319 Tai, Susan 86 Takahashi, Ricky 380 Talmachoff, Peter 381 Tanner, Lewis 381 Tarre, Sheldon 187 Taylor, Wesley B., Jr. 152 Telleria, Robert 223 Thomas, Barbara 381 Thomas, Daniel 223 Thomas, Howard 381 Thomas, Lisa 191,330 Thomas, Randy 206 Thompson, Gail 337 Thompson, Katherine 326 Thompson, Marcia 330 Thompson, Rogan 206 Thompson, Vivian 381 Thomson, Tom 189 Thornton, Fergus 317,325 Thrower, Mildred 381 Thurston, Pamela 326 Tighe, Claudia 194 Tilley, Richard 381 Tillman, Sue-Anne 333 Timmer, Donald 381 Timora 320 Tischer, Raymond 381 Toatley, Edward 381 Tobin, John 230,232 Todd, Laurie 381 Tofanelli, Lee 226 Tokushige, June 330,381 Tolbert, James 232 Tolegian, David 198 Tolleson, Robert 234 Tollette, Cynthia 381 Tomlinson, Dale 174 Ton, Kathleen 381 Toon, John 381 Torres, Anthony 227,229 Tracy, Cheryl 381 Tracy, Scott 339 Trammell, Dennis 226 Trant, Jeffrey 321 Trescott, Eresa 381 Troedson, Mary 333 Try, Jennifer 306 Tschogl, John 215,217,219 Tuazon, Turlow Renato 328 Ken 206 Turner: Dan 206 Turner, Turner, Turner, Henry 174 Lindsey 302 Steven 339,382 Tuttle, Lynda 188 Twogood, Daniel 225 U Uchida, Deborah 319 Unzueta, Manuel 214 Utsumi, Christine 341 V Valdez, Manuel , Jr. 223 Valencia, Beverly 382 Valencia, Richard 382 Valente, Michele 304,382 Van Dyck, Neil 206 Van Er, Jerry 237 Van Noord, Paul 382 Van Vuren, Stacy 382 Varner, Miles 135 Venatta, Sahron 188,319 Ventimiglio, Anthony 206,209, 382 Vernier, Craig 339 Vesely, Jeffrey 334,382 Vviiano, Angela 306 Vogt, Elaine 330 Vogt, Leslie 239 Volarvich, James 206 Volesky, Margaret 382 Von Bergen, Vicki 191 Von Somogyi, Zolton 204,214 Vredenburgh, Pe ter 382 W Wacthel, Albert 143 Waddell, Joanne 330 Wade, Carole 341 Wailes, Betty 382 Waite, Elizabeth 382 Walker, Barbara 382 Walsh, Thomas 239 Walsten, Mary 382 Wanter, Beverly 382 Ward, Peter 382 Ward, William 382 Wardlaw, Blair 382 Ware, Ted 183 Warner, Michael 321 Warner, Valerie 331 Warren, James 212,232 Wasbin, Deborah 302 Washauer, Gary 382 Washington, Patricia 189 Watanabe, Patricia 326 Waterhouse, Philip 225 Watkins, Peter 214,339 Watts, Karen 333 Wawry Chuk, Steven 382 Wayman, James 237,382 Webster, Sylvia 382 Wechter, Robert 193 Wedaa, Karena 302 Weeks, Carol 382 Weir, Kimberly 306 Welch, Charles M., Jr. 382 Wells, Susan 382 Werner, David 339 Wesley, Kent 382 West, Stephen 225 Westerman, Ola 382 Wexler, Susan 382 White, David 206 White, Fleet 195 White, Jack 206 White, Robert 339 Whiteford, Helen 330 Whiteside, Donald 183 Whiting, Jerry 382 Whitney, William 382 Whitton, Lang 382 Wictorin, Janet 382 Wiest, Paula 194,383 Wild, William 206 Williams, Ann 192 Williams, Constance 188 Williams, Deborah 326 Williams, Ford 334 Williams, Joseph 339 Williams, Michael 206 Williams, Wendell 206 Williamson, Patricia 330 Wilson, Betty 383 Wilson, Cynthia 383 Wilson, Joan 323 Wilson, Susan 383 Wimpress, Cecily 304,337 249- ..- W x , . . vwxy. Y Y 4 N X I Agill-Q ,Q af ' X. , Q f , - 5 Q . .. .,.g .+ . Q X ' 7, 4 -.K 1.,5.- V- - X ' ,, f f N " 13? f J , -.51 . 5 ,Va ,' I Q 'L V jVgii,,X., 5,,-.-. . 5+ .,+ Q- w k nk ' f-.wi-. -" -. . X , -f 25 - FQ. . Q' if .55 .fp '. 'L-S ,wir-S . XJx . NA , K Q . ' Q. 5 , -, f . ,+1??'5?W- .zigwf be ,..gT'W'f-W ... Q sf .. . rk, k . .bi 1 399 1 QA. ?iSG'SZf1 N1 , mfg, fi 1 A if 2 Mm-hfz-- +-, iz, 0 ,, ,qQqfSgQS5gf55g',-gg .gr vw fi 2 H 1 . is Zermeno, Frank 232 Ziemann, Susan 383 Zink, Lori 188 Zink, Ted 320 Zermer, Martha 193 Zimmer, Righard 225 Zomalt, Emest 175 I wanted to create masterpieces but spent my tame watching this dream crumble I was blocked by bureaucracy racism, and unter medta backstabbmg I settled for second best and demanded less than I should have I spent lonely deadlines proofing pages and feeling that my book was bemg sabotaged by my staff I blamed frtends and made enemies because of my own paranoia and built an ego that could wlthstand the attacks of the year I watched tncompetency pollute those tn power around me and was foolish enough to believe thatI could avoid tt To those people who helped make this book I am grateful To Sunny who taught me to accept my fatlures and shortcommgs and made my eagmertence wtth La Cumbre as painless as possuble she change my hfe To Gretchen who never learned her lace and always challenged me I thank her for this an will be forever grateful to her Without her strength and support there would be no book I love this lady To Henry Silverman who I have tnsulted, behttled and neglected I now thank pubhcly for has humor has knowledge and has tolerance He azded and educated me more than almost any person thus past year I only wash we could have been friends ToM1chel2 I needed someone to confide in and share media tntrtgues with someone who was not on my staff who dtdn t backstab but who knew where the bodies were burted. I thank you My staff has caused me so much am and so much delight I am grateful to thetr talents their skills and their tngenutt eg knew more than I could teach htm Katte was a whzz with Greeks Juris dad mzrac s with no-light pictures Gayle and Crystal were never replacements they were superstars Lorelle alwa s knew what she was domg Celeste and her understanding made our oslttons bearab Martlyn and Sheldon were the most talented freshmen on my staf amela Melvin, my model and cover girl, ts a very talented and beautiful Black woman. o Andy s sktll with the Isla Vista section, Patty s knowledge and Ned s perseverance I thank you alL There were so man that I used and abused, so many mistakes thatI made To those people that I care about w o I offended, I ask your forgiveness To those thatI hurt who hurt me I ask nothing of you And lastly to those peo le who helped me make at throu h the past year Joe Kovach Cwho ave me the freedom t t I needed and allowed me to uve with my mzstakesj John Zant usan Jensen Barbara Davies Milton Olm Jeanne Stevens the Freemans The Cummings the Sktnners David Rowe Patrice Saville Eugene Keyes Gretchen s roommates Mark Steinberg Jams of the M ountazns and Linda of Berkeley J ont Mitchell, Roberta F lack and the Paktstan people Rtcardo Freeman 1 972 Editor , . I ' 0 . . . -. . . . l I , . . D 1 i , - . ' , . . . . . , . f 9- 3 7 0 . . . . . . . ., l i . . Q . E - , , lg. . . . . . . , . ,. . . , . lg . . . . , . . . . , i I 3 . I ' i I . . . . 5 , , I ! 1 ! I . . . . . , I I I I ! I! 9 I ' ' . 404 In m ITIGRIAITI Nancy S. Bain Dr. Bernard R. Baker Kevin Barry Harold S. Bowen Thomas R. Cormier Idalia Escamilla Peter G. Gibbs Barbara D. Gross Sandra F. Hines Betty Ingram Ernesto S. J ose Mary E. Miller James E. Neil Kirk D. Phillips Robert P. Rauch William C. Rudloff Karen A. Signore Mark D. Steward Thomas M. S torke Luana F. Thomson Earl M. Weinhaus Ronald J. West and for all those who died in silence who we ma ha-ve overlooked we N dedicate this page. There are some men who should have mountains to bear their names to time. I had a friend: he lived and died in mighty silence. and with dig-nity, no book, son, or lover to mourn. Nor is this a mourning-song but only a naming of this mountain on which I walk, fragrant, dark, and softly white under the pale mist. I name this mountain after him. Leonard Cohen 4 05 406 A.P. 206t Mike Aydelott Artwork 74, 101 Bryon Baughman 198t Brooks Institute Ken Gatherum 207bl, 208, 215, 218, 219t, 221b1 Jim Simpkins 208b, 209 Mike Smith 165 Cotton 292tr, 293 Juris Dumpis 67, 68, 70, 71, 81, 86, 87, 95b 8: lr, 117, 104, 110lr, 1161, 124, 133bl, 135c, 137bl, c, 138t, bl, 139, 140t, c, 142t, 146t, br, 150, 151lt, b, 153b, l54b, 155, 156, l57r, 161, 166, 174br, 175, 179t, l, 191bl, 193tr, 203, 212, t, 221b1, 224, 225t, 229, 230, 232, 236t, br, 240b, 241, 243, 244, 248, 250, 254, 255, 314, 315, 329bl, 344, 355, 373, 376, 382, 384, 385 Fox 275, 290, 291 Willie Gibson 34b, 35, 76t, cr, 174, 184 Frank I-Ialberg Cover and Division pages Life 28,29 John Jostes 39tl, 76b, br, 132 cr, br, l35t1, l36tr, 142b, 1431, t, b, 158t, 168, 187, 360, 366, 370, 374, 387, 380 2,1 Stephanie Lam 13br, 1301, 267, 296, 298, 302t, br, 303br, bl, 304, 306, 307, 308, 309, 311 Tom Lendino 49, 106, 242tr Rafael Maldonado 207 Peter Moore 84 b Nexus 32b, 44r, 50, 65b, 67, 69, 114, 209b, 309br Ned Martini ll, 13, 24, 25, 36tl, 46bl, 65t, br, 76b, br, 101, 133tr, 136b, 146tr, 147, 149tr, 181tr, 187br, 189t, 192br, 195tl, 204b, 223, 245br, 362, 357, 358 Andrew Mills 1, 5, 10, 16, 17, 49b, 102br, 108bl 112bl, 118t, 132tl, 133tl, 170, 252, 253, 256, 257 258, 259, 260, 261, 266, 267, 268tl, 269t, b, 27lt, b, 272, 274, 276, 277, 279, 280, 282, 283, 284 285, 286, 294, 295, 347, 349, 351, 353, 402b, 406 7 3 ! ! 408 Bob Ponce 228, 241t, 244t Art Roger 239, 245t Alan Savenor 239, 245t T.L. Swalling 138, 144t, b, 164 U.P.l. 30, 31, 32t, 34t, 38t, 39b Fritz Weaver 278tr Sharon Zinc 386 For those of you, who out of our negligence or yours, are not credited on this page - we acknowledge you and are forever in your debt. 407 L 1 v I i 'K , 4 'K x ff J , 5 I V AE 2.-1'-r'1'1v-11 " A K ? 'w-'-Q--1 ff' f---....,, . A , - fC'f - W1 W r J what can I say? ' LL: -,V 127'-'E '-T , P "3:g.'-wfvai' Q Q 6... A:-,Q ' - -xskw ,Vw-g vm: -A va-11':awn1Q9'!g'CH""lf1'YYFW!"FE?EN' 1-rv' lmfwwfimvrVV:9?4f1'?2-fff-if.. .A ' V awflg- n w -- fa-S ,- . w s- -1, .-V2 f-'-'vez - N J- ' -w w " " I - ' ' H f '-ff ' -' - ' - - .- 5' J'-ep' -5,-sf-.gir.g,,-. ff.. QQ. fr, git ..-,.,,vg:y1, .. 4.252-w..,Q -.1l42'ggq"iwi.V-..- -. - ,.a:E.,:xt,Q-, J f2,gsQ,,..iLi X555 "Rep -- .Six-vc:V5Ngl?.3-ff. 231- 4 .?g+,,gff1!fa'f Ev.. 5 I..C.f51-wt f,,'i'X5zjf .fi jglf- 1 Q9 --ik . '.'.,-fffxf ,Wi .:.Vi- - V- sb: P- 3 x Y" .1 Af ji' V .ep 'UL -" if'-?'5fLiZ-wfriiiilgiaj' -M fl?" 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Suggestions in the University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) collection:

University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

1969

University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Page 1

1970

University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1971 Edition, Page 1

1971

University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1973 Edition, Page 1

1973

University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1987 Edition, Page 1

1987

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1988

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