University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA)

 - Class of 1970

Page 1 of 476

 

University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 476 of the 1970 volume:

v ' l A R W. QTL., l ' 1 ry - i - 4 i --, Y' -. ! .., rl, A.. fx 1 A ' 'z'-few .-H, l 112' 9 ,i --, x., 1-1 , ' 'fi 'HHH' A' F 1970 LA CUMBRE University ot Calitornia Associated Students Santa Barbara, Volume 50 UCSB, Publisher Sunny Mowbray, Editor Connie Porter, Managing Editor Joe T. Kovacb, Adviser 1, My Y . ' A 1 F N 2 'A+ fs-S-' Y 2' gl" .Jr -5 . ,PR .4 Iiif 1 f' N ' X Us I 1 A 1 r 1"f. ij. 1. M .-v 33, f 5 I 'S 1 4 .., ,. Y 5 x . -E x .LN 'A APFVP. A p gf 2321 ' " 4 me - ?' 1 ff, f N x l X. , L Lx f 3' 2 I "fx H fx fr. if. L- ,-x , u Ig ' .- i K , JL f x W in . , V f. -Q. 5, '-Xi.: - W na i J , If A .- P.. nf . ,,-Q T - M. .,i. n a,f', M K N , A 1 ,um .,. UT, n V J 'Tw ggi' w. 1-Q" " 41 5 vw. A ' . 3-5 .. ' ' - ,r .P 4"'i!N . . , jk. "f24f9'w " ,il ff 'X N f . ., I, ' U2- -33:4 EHS" Wig ,V gi -37 5' F Z' ll I M if, f Qwff -. fMW 'U' az- A fi -" 1352: 5?-'1 11 ' V ' - ,ff A Ng' VV f N' .1 ""1.. -, Q ug . 1'T'7'v -"Y 1 a . ,X cr S In , ' 1 u ,., W J- ,, si' , , ef, a '5' , mf?- 'sig if 3 5 .,' : TFi,v u W wil-ff. n if 'if l 'fl ,N 7 -1 1 l 6. 6-i Dedication . . . Focus: 1970 ...... ..... 6 rf' 1 l 'c-1, Hai Q TABLE CDF CONTENTS Spring ............... lntramu rals ,,,, Campus Events .... .... 2 6 Living Groups .... Political ....... .... 2 8 Cultural-Social Academics ....... . . .102 University .... Sports ...... Fall .... Winter . . . G reeks ........ . . . .... 56 Residence Halls . . . Isla Vista ...... ...138 Seniors ..... .....2l0 Index .....218 lnlvlemoriam .....232 Closing....... -4155!-fifths - ,NW ....244 fffI444 .462 .464 'iff if .3 'L 1 N MA lr I 'Y' M '3.o 4 N 1 . ir. 'Q '. .u f ,. I o Lin.--f'2:. my F' in " li' s fx, ii ', , C. I , - x If" 40' r Q an 4-6- -Q ,Z Q-D 'N 2 J, 1- L, .hx st is V., ' . f 'D 4 1: f V 1-R. ik x. 5 I . .. H -.1-. X" . 1 gf -41 E Q v X 'H ...th ' ., .a, AL '- 4 1. ' " . .1 I 'S-grid, - XX, 1 - i 1 1' IT:-V54 +EffF.'f,L' . V . 4' :A ,A-41-V , ,H I ' ' .ffl K-4 W.. z. x f ' X Cvlffff jk, l , .r 6 f ' ' - ff., 'ki -Xu' '54 ' 5 F" . ' . ' x - , .u Y F. 4 . 'i'- L, . '-" F " 1 - .- xii 'ng 'v"-' 1. 1 Lf I 4 . ft.. I 'T , , Y-,R 6 1. v sz H- r f , far, - W ,44,:7' - X ' ' ,-. .4--,'.', - '1 . r ., . q . , v- . -N X gn ,S Q, eg, vvi 1 Nxfr. If Dedication: Dr. Garrett Hardin Believing that the spirit of science has penetrated deeply into our society, Dr. Garrett Hardin relies upon the perspective of reason and rational emotion in dealing with problems. As an advocate of change, he maintains that those who attend reform must be patient, 'keep their cool,' and persevere. Of his literary accomplishments, tvvo of the most outstanding include 'the widely used Biology, its Princi- ples and Applications and the con- troversial high school textbook, The Human Meaning of Birth Control. His efforts have been aimed toward reform in the vital areas of population control, modifying strick abortion laws, and, at present, his major concern is conservation. Because of his original outlook, his optimism regarding the potential for rapid change, and his respect for intellectual' interaction with stu- dents, we dedicate the 1970 La Cumbre to Dr. Garrett Hardin. .Q-"'v7 -"- wud: ,,,"""1ii .. fd, r CHN T 154215 55" f Q fx . Y 1 4 1' ruff: ll 'Q --,fg'... 15 ' " , 1 o .134 4 Rf 7' 'wax " ...A A ,." 7' ff -. Jin 'H' , " 4'-bf A f.Af5?f7 -1: 1 , dv, W an 3"'I"" my x slr- H sb Q 5 ff. 1 -5-tu, lv. w',- 5--"w, 'if :Q 1 ..f' 1gQf,:,g,,, 3 . 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Yet men have artifici- ally divided this vvorld, thus, there is a challenge. 1. w N W vu c 1 w -Q.. 43.195 -L,-Il The voices of nations are' Ioudp it is time to listen to the voices of people. w W N l I 5 5 I W H5 wo, United by idealism and a com- imitment to change, the youth of our nation strive for the recognition of human rights. 1 bf' Yi i If .-,,. pk R -xx it A .uf ,,- - Ji. ., ,ii , ' .bli- --':.-- -311- I zf. Q. iii- 5: ' ' Q ' -,. 9 '1-. , GN! 55'- I' - ' n ' IL 2 Q ',.-. 5 2 'I L7 - t 5 1 1 X , "if ? ! 5 . ..::' u- , +2 I, vb . J .1 s x u 4 v'-rs ,, a an., M1 f mf if 4'X xx x X f if rf Part of the abundant energy of university students is directed to- ward Santa Barbara, their adopted community. ln conjunction with concerned citizens, they work to preserve the ecological balance and to promote educational opportunity. , V' 'VV T- VW A fag., , 'X fm- b ' V EV J ."' . I VV be .,L- . --,A:."1L- b ' 'ir-U , :Y ' - 'Q 1. 1. 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Q85 1 ' A 1 Y G. , .- N ku-in 'JR A O 11' f ' ' - 1 525.112 . Q1 I , 1 A " M F f R 5 A I V ut A1 ' 5 W x' JVM W. . - ,Q 1 N , 'Rw- , 9 .x , 1 L ,J X V' u S., ' ,J 1' Lf , ' ' yy 'K L, A SL, 1 , ff L if X -Y , K 'F f Q , . " ' 3 'K A 'iv J V 1 eq 53 VY 6 R L A VS V , mm 4 , Va 1 ink V UV R ,a VT V u ,mm s ,, , LM A , " ' H 4 M ew I ' 1 , 9 ' ,fy W lr I? 2 , V , U . JL I 1 ' 2 'K N ff' 1 W M AI il 4 A I ,V vTKV.LL' W 1 uf: ' , is 'L V mf , , ' 1 " xx.-' . , V Lost in anonymity, the student seeks traditional involvement to enhance his need for belonging. As his self awareness increases, he is confronted with the conflict between group identity and individuality. iii--1 fikf By establishing honest relationships within an intimate group, the stu- dent learns to reach out to others. 'K 0 'Y ,Qs Q' h 1. 8'-gs' 4,3 P' , Je, . ilk ,Q-HTI4! , , u 1 , 4 . 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' - aw.. . , , 4 '4 -1, 'r In various ways the individual interacts with his environment to gain insights into himself and his future. ,Em H , mf,-- , 'rw A X 'f u ngi M ,, ,-4 . :- Wim gn ' 5 NZ X P' T1 Q13 x am V M ,. x ,, , M . ,, ,,, 1 H A H 71 ' ' H wfilfc, 153 Q: Rx Xmr .Qu-2? owe. Y i M '-L ,T-,,. - f x in 5. , f x Ss, u 2 n W Qs F, - 1, 4.2 ml I , K wr 'SHN ill" 5 A 1 5.11 -4 -. w Vszfffffdf mm , ,, yy. .hm ,r. . gg. 59 ' . 142 , L U, fi JN. A Ah at hw' :F NL 4 YA5 hi J -:Iii ua'v,m . I., e gf, ies idhifaif EIFUFQ QQmTV1a Le3QEQ1Un , 1 fiHL51'x3' mea ILfsfLu1ggaffm , Um ffl? Q STH? si:wUfEfnQ1f3s.nniQQg ltihnfafii iyfccnwllmaflw 'iihew wiimdl kHlafg3nQpnFi nz15se:ea , ,, W QA 'vw - 1,21 Q w A HJ rj Q ' K Y I L, W1 ff 'E VII f-.faggg . V guy I H55 A K i ll!! l ! li Jun!! .ww- tgp is gi i lil? 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Sober reflection then renounces impatience and small victories generate strength. :L K '7' 1:1:n"'E1,'- 'EEQHC- 'i 4. "" ,... ' f . ! b 'F ii 4 , it 'ta 9 f i' 24 A 'U 'fi Q'-.,'.5?1fJ:xfV' -" -'v Q . " ' --l -. V351 i -- ,.llJ..x5m. Ultimately alone, the individual must resolve within himself the demands of integrity and society. 1 A ' fiiiruei ,I 1qioQsnu,'N' 3 Q :Wim V "H Ev Q. 4- in L A-Q, .. CAMPUS EVENTS ' ' , ,:, ' '-:' f H - K? ' Ffa - is f ': 1.1: use 5. gf. EE , My " ' .E uw: . fffi ' 2 de " J 5,1 5.3, v 5 1 - F f - 3 him, W ' ,, , -we A 8' 1 , 1 'Y pa? P ff gf N. 'K X risk E ,J hs. f -1 , Y . xg ,W ik fd ska H M www, ,Q xQ , 1 , V an I Nb 1 ji 9. Q 5 ff? W win if Ei? fgft- W? Q-1 Y E ,, ..,.,. ' 9, 2121 5Zffif2'1 wyy 3 Q .,.. Q X .Ju Wk' ' . 'fin 0 0 in-. ..fl 32, ' 'U 5 TI? s. ag-1 , . .V - I ,V -.Law in ,A 1 M 91 wifli: fl- Q' ' 4 ,Q ' 'Eg ' ,wi Mg .i ,. 4 4 , .,:,,., m :,,,.: Z I 4 ffgt1,.,,"f- A , A ' mi ?fR3N'VfLx . 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October Moratorium The marching effe te with extinction . . . . . . Shriver misses studies director forced to Davis demands changes . . . . November national attention . . . brutality . . . Bomb has m musua! . . crucial issue . Q ."Student 1 I I r vii r s3,""v'm F's-l-,sri sinus Y BBQ!! F .11 L-f . .T - s'-.N vi- "wo Mayor Joseph Alio to, center, undeclared candida te for Governor, tours the campus after his speech. CANDIDATES VISIT Alioto, Tunney Seek UC Student Support October 3 - Speaking to an overflow audience in Campbell Hall, Mayor Joseph Alioto opened his local campaign as an undeclared candidate for Governor. Seeking student support, the Mayor defended Angela Davis and declared his support of ROTC, as well as attacking his al- leged links with the San Francisco lVlafia. October 9 - Seeking an eloquent spokesman in the upcoming race for the U.S. Senate, stu- dents flocked to hear Congressman John Tunney. Their ardor was cooled as his com- ments left most students with the feeling that he was equivocating on such issues as the war and the grape boycott. Congressman John Tunney beside the flag he serves. in E'-' i ""LJ""' 'LA SEMANA DE LA HAZA' Speakers Inaugurale Chicano's Campaign October 13 - Continuing their struggle for po- litical and social equality, the Chicano students of UCSB commenced their 1970 campaign by sponsoring "La Semana de la Raza," The Week of the Race. Present to inaugurate the program were guest speakers Sal Castro, Abe Tapia, Corky Gonzalez and Dolores Huerta, Vice- President of the United Farm Workers Organ- izing Committee of Delano. The generation gap lleftl is bridged by an allegiance to the goal of Chicano betterment. UCSB Chicano students lbelowl man the display set up to inform the campus about the grape boycott. ii,. i i "' Dolores Huerta, Vice-President of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, inaugurates "La Semana de la Raza" - The Week of the Race. OCTOBER MORA TORIUM Wor's End Demonded, Two Thousond Morch October 15 - Joining with their comrades across the nation, two thousand UCSB students observed the first National lVloratorium to End the War in Viet-Nam. Travelling to the City of Santa Barbara, these concerned citizens march- ed in the peace parade down State Street, and went door-to-door in an effort to convince less knowledgeable citizens of the need to immedi- ately end the war. In the evening, the cam- paigners participated in a massive candlelight march down the shoreline. Backed by the sup- port shown through national interest in their cause, the lVloratorium leaders planned and announced further demonstrations to come. Students fbelowl gather to observe the commencement of the first National Moratorium to End the War in Viet-Nam as missionary Blaise Bonpane, fright! urges them to persevere un til the war's end. 5.-as ib- s WEEKLY VIGIL ron QPHMCEINVIETNAM PLEASEJON IIS -- 4 nun to Moratorium protest took several forms. Some students labovel stood with Professor Charles Hubbell in his weekly "Silent Vigil for Peace,"' while others fbelow and leftl marched to downtown Santa Barbara to D RA - T picket the local draft board, a symbol of the war. OARD in ?kf 'X 1 1,9 ,f 33 N1 L . . 'A . 4' rf q"'1W'fM I A .Ah - .I QI ,, , W4 I I - ke- 4 .I . I I I I I I W, .. .P ,J"r""' -Ar g,-- ' 1' ' , I I f.:I V,,,-- ,.' 1... ', . I' img 5 T' J- ' fig I 'f ' W. . .W . . . E . I I - I .1 " -f . I . I. T ,gg ,WIJI5 ' I I Ii. .fy - I rIgfI 551' fiwv ,J'm..., 1 . -,fu . N I I 4 ,I II 'rr '--' If - M . ,II ., I I 4150- 1, I . I f , . .ww ,A ,. I I ..I I ...X ,Ig WI 1 IIs W ...III Ml, . . II, I " , 1 . 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Q 1 ' un -N f J. ,' ,JM W J ".I.:j'1' - f-wL.:,-if' 1. XII-' Yr - -Q T A . - ' 19.-4. -A "-4' -. .Ig rl . H ' -sy. 'T' - .L ' 1 .. .-.. . ..I.,. , II -,. ,- -,em , .I1- I -. .I - xg I In III-vw j, - -'J T ,151 . '.... Q H, 5' - . . . - a . 1 - 3, xiii' ,,T',-. .Lp rv- -'H ' . . , , 1 1' I. "fifff',' wtf i ,pi I I7 fi' A - A my ' ' 1 . ,Q . w G if 1' I il-.AI bf, fl- X, . - - - - - -. A .V f. J' . ww. -, . . . 1- 1 Q I- -H 1' - mf' g .- .I'f,RR'l.:l L'5.xI 4 I M I J. I I I 1 I I I ,I N - N H I I, ,, I..,. .. ,. I A. . , , n 4 v I I - I, JI. If II ff I , .J I . I N . . 1 -.5-.I -I .bhp I -:. -' I I, If II, I ' I, w...,,,,fA' H 5 .I 1 .I I 'qi-TJI .I 'Y-I III, ' ' f , iv' II .f. if ,ru Q." . III4 .M .- X if I I .II J .gfwz I I I. I . ' .. . . I I ' 'I .. If . , , 1 . II, -Q, . I . 5 ' ' I I' - . r I u . ,fl Concerned students Bob Martinich, Becky Calhoun, Anita Brosius, Sue Mogie, and Steve Morrell locate a marker for the proposed freeway through the slough. E,-. .I . file ,- C -waggfL.1gf1,4z, SLOUGH-GOO Slough Rally informs, Oil Leakage Persisfs October 27 - "Save the Slough" was the cry of a rally called to inform students about the impending destruction of the Goleta Slough by the Army Corps of Engineers. Dr. Norman Sanders, representing Citizens for Defense of the Environment, outlined plans which would destroy the slough as a refuge for wildlife to build a freeway and a flood-control project. The uniqueness of the Goleta Slough and the necessity of preserving one of the few remain- ing sanctuaries on the West Coast has prompt- ed the establishment of dedicated groups by students and citizens of Santa Barbara. The continuing menace of leakage in the Santa Barbara Channel initiated the formation of Get Oil Out, an organization of students and local citizens which concentrates on informing the public about oil leakage problems. The protection of natural fish, water birds, and beaches, GOO states, is directly jeopardized by the presence of derricks and the constant danger of more leakage in the future. Looming on the horizon, the oil derricks lleftl in the Santa Barbara Channel have raised a controversy because of leakage. The Goleta Slough lbelowl is threatened by plans for a new super highway. . U I ,Y ...,- , T. , l': 1 - W, iff- PTU315' ' 1' 'L' V' l s. l R Sargent Shriver declares, "Universities face not a revolution but revulsion at the hypocrisy in our society." S71 JOHN-STEVAS, SHRI VER Lecturers Deol with Coniemporory Issues October 23 - Norman St. John-Stevas, British barrister and member of Parliament, spoke about the evolution of standards in censorship from the Victorian Age to the present day. His talk defined obscenity as a reflection of one aspect of human nature which should not be suppressed. October 27 - R. Sargent Shriver spoke out about the "University in crisis" in a convocation address concentrating on the hypocrisy of the University stances. The difference between word and deed on the part of administrators, especially in the areas of minority group admissions and conservation, he stated, is the cause of discontent among the student populations. His solution demands the University to strive for truth rather than to preserve the system. Norman St. John-Stevas, M.P., discusses the British impression of contemporary censorship in the United States. BLACKS BOYCOTT B.S.U. Dernonds Mel, Fisher Resigns Post November 3 - The Black Students' Union successfully forced the resignation of Black Studies Director, Dr. Sethard Fisher. Robert Nlason, speaking for the B.S.U. said, "lt is not Fisher whom we are attacking, but the things he stands for. His refusal to step down when he had lost the support of the Black Studies students and faculty clearly indicates that he is not interested in the future of the Black movement." Because Fisher refused to follow the B.S.U. beliefs and because he sided with the establishment, Nlason said Dr. Fisher did not have the right to head the department any longer. Chancellor Cheadle responded to the crisis by appointingia seven member com- mission of inquiry to investigate the troubled department. B..S'. U. member Robert Mason discusses the unresponsiveness of the administration and faculty. Angry Black students lmtla te the boycott of the Black Studies program because of Chairman Sethard Fisher. Angela Davis discusses academic and civil freedoms. B.S. U. members listen attentively as Miss Davis speaks. CALL FOR UlVfTY Davis Says Eliminate Reagan and Rafferty November 4 - Angela Davis, UCLA associate professor, addressed an audience of approxi- mately 5,000 in the campus stadium. Miss Davis, whose recent national publicity centers on her admitted membership in the Com- munist Party which jeopardized her status on the UCLA faculty, discussed the need to unite the causes of academic freedom and civil liberties. She stated that Governor Reagan and State Superintendent of schools, Max Rafferty, are retarding the intellectual growth of the University and restricting its relevance to the society it should reflect. use '55 I Q I CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS Bill Allen Dismissed, AS Elections N ullified November 6 - Tenured members of the Anthropology Department announced their intention to fire Dr. Bill Allen, assistant professor of anthropology. Reasons cited for the dismissal were his inability to maintain a proper social distance between himself and his students, his habitual absences, and his failure to publish. Dr. Allen is a popular instructor on campus and his dismissal trig- gered considerable dissent from students. Petitions condemning the action were circu- lated and widely signed. November 10 - AS President Bill James in- validated an election held November 6 and 7. The rationale for this action was the discovery of three constitutional violations in the ad- ministration of the referendum. Failure to publish the amendments a week in advance of the election, of KCSB-FlVl to read the amend- ments, and of the Elections Committee to con- duct the election were listed as the violations. Dr. Allen lleftl faces dismissal from the Anthropology Department. Bill James lbelowl in validates the AS election because of constitutional violations. CNE, The front of the march fabovel proceeds down Geary street in San Francisco. A protestor fright! stands in front of the UCSB library. NOVEMBER MORA TORIUM Students Congregote In Golden Gote Porlc November 15 - The second Vietnam lVlora- torium took place in Washington, D.C., Chi- cago, and San Francisco. Hundreds of UCSB students travelled the 290 miles to join an estimated 200,000 marchers in a seven mile demonstration through the streets of San Francisco which ended in a peace rally at the Polo Grounds of Golden Gate park. Speeches by leaders of the march and entertainment by such celebrities as Buffy St. lVlarie and Phil Ochs highlighted the rally. ill we ' -f asa: fa r l if fi ' he .. X, . gg .- Hz? was e 2133 wvux ' A peifafgl r, , l ffsmv ,, rem.. 1 1 255 ,.tge.l! misss? get -4 '. 18- , -Tw? QU" 3 E, .. aa. 1?-asem as 5 5 5 We we LIBERA TlOfV, BRUTALITY Kunene Defines Aims, Blocks Chorge Police January 8 - lVlazisi Kunene of the African National Congress, the South African liberation movement, spoke in the program lounge of the UCen. His lecture concerned the art and history of Blacks in South Africa and the means by which their culture is being overshadowed by the Europeans who control South Africa. Kunene emphasized that nations friendly to the current regime in South Africa are hurting the people to whom the country actually belongs. A group of 200 to 300 Black students con- gregated in downtown Santa Barbara to protest the mistreatment of Rep-at-Large Booker Banks and Phil Gardiner during their arrests for possession of marijuana. Both Banks and Gar- diner addressed the crowd to describe the rough treatment they received. Banks stated that mace was used to subdue them and that wounds resulting from undersized handcuffs remained untreated until the day following their arrests. Mazisi K unene labovej discusses the liberation struggle. Black students fbelowj await the release of the pris- oners outside the jail in Santa Barbara. 1.-4..... Q.. . L, iffu Q' ax rn-on mp-hnrzgg-F mr -Oh wl Q as--Q -. -nmfff -' rd 1' --1+ -' fr- 4: ag ff -n,,P,5f ,,, ,Y .. 4- ,f Y - k., ,. .. . :N ,, 19 I E ' "- r' ' ' " 'G' J" Q C Q- Qw: 9-q fl w- - ' Q g C' ' ' 1 u I :- Y ' U A' 'K . 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F , 4,5 -1 4 .,l f- W 4 A - l 12' l1kIl'p'3X X59 E" PY , AR " - ' X f . 5 5 K. 1 ,ff - ff' ' F .1 f 41" '1- g"r"' ' I -- -' V ,,,k 'ff' t 1 -i g A -fi fi, 4. 4-I is V . H VL A m Y vw ,Ma ggy - f . -1 ,W np, . . , f ,,, , ,M K X ! . WML .WW VI ,gi ' . X1--YJ ' 'iii ' 1 1 Ei rw' . N. gg- N Jai? " ' ffy- ' 'M IJ? uhh if' '23 R115 V 5 P 1 -jf ' V . 'Y 2:"'f-Q M .1 . I I ' "' . x' 'af 1, ' hr- i 333 4 :Ln f 4 ' 'Jr'-K ..- 'gf 2 1-wc, 5' ' W Lzlaf.. 43 if . Q I Q...m. . 3 H5 2 I I Zig i: Y 75' -432 vii. , , - .X ,Q 'L "L SX Y-lu siitmsiiii. WWMH ,-X ECOLOGYDAY Pollution Conference Drows Sfofe Leoders January 28 - The first anniversary of the oil spill in the Santa Barbara Channel dated an Ecology Day series of lectures and panel dis- cussions on the Santa Barbara City College campus. The central issue of these meetings was the impending crisis of environmental pol- lution which has attracted national attention. United States Senator Alan Cranston addressed a crowd of over four hundred in his afternoon speech. He asserted that citizens themselves should be the main force of the crucial effort rather than relying on state and national poli- ticians to work tovvard bettering the pollution problems. Jesse Unruh, a candidate for governor, de- scribed a plan for the formation of a State Conversation Agency composed of scientists and qualified individuals to make recommenda- tions for legislative measures to curtail environ- mental destruction. Richard McGinnes labovej discusses the threats to the environment. Lt. Governor Ed Reinecke lleftl points out the responsibility of the government to protect the environment from dangerous pollutan ts. Environmentol Puriticotion Attrocts Notionoi Attention An interested member of the audience ltopl describes her position on the channel drilling problem. Jesse Unruh labovel discusses his plan for an environmental control agency. Senator Cranston lrigh tl answers questions on his stand for citizen mobilization. Vl0LElVCE ON CAMPUS Teoc:her's Dism issol Acfivofes Protesters January 29 - Police were called to put down a protest demonstration held in front of the Ad- ministration Building. The rally resulted from the administration's refusal to act upon the demands of 7,776 students who signed a peti- tion requesting an open hearing for Bill Allen.. Students felt a hearing was necessary to expose the grounds of the dismissal of the young anthropology professor. When the group threatened to occupy the building if a settlement was not obtained, acting-Chancellor Russell Buchanan activated off-duty police from the campus and Santa Barbara forces. ln the presence of the police student tension mounted rapidly and they at- tempted to rush the main entrance, causing police within the building to break out through windows to halt the advance. Dean Robert Evans, speaking for the ad- ministration, declared the assembly unlawful and a scuffle broke out between a student and Evans. Between 1000 and 1500 students re- mained on the scene throughout the day and approximately 200 people spent the night at the building to maintain the protest. The scene from within fleftl shows students clustered tightly about the entrance to the Administration Build- ing. Police lbelowl patrol the area. .!'..7 A member of the Campus Police Force lrightj stands guard at the Administration Building. Students lbelo wi who parti- cipated in the all-night vigil outside the Administration Building join hands in an Old World folk dance. Blaise Bonpane and Dr. Bill Allen labovej greet each other outside the Administration Building. Students lrightj march around the campus protesting the Administration rejection of their pleas for an open hearing. X '-. 0 U1 3"-X vb - tg 1194" Fifteen students labovel pose outside the County Courthouse after they were released on bail following arrests on February 2. Students lleftl march into the North Hall plaza where further demonstrations were held to discuss action proposals. POLICE ON CAMPUS Heoring Pleos Denied, Demonstrotors Persist January 30 - Sporadic violence marred the otherwise peaceful protest outside the Administration Building. Approximately 5,000 students and 300 police participated in a standoff which resulted in the closing of the Administration Building for security pur- poses. Students dispersed at 5 p.m. February 1 - 500 students met in the after- noon in Perfect Park to be informed by Dr. Bill Allen and student leaders about the plans for further demonstrations. February 2 - A debate between Dr. Fagan and Dr. Allen, both of the Anthropology Depart- mentg the occupation of North Hallg and the halting of through-traffic on campus were major events of the days' demonstrations at which nineteen students were arrested. The Academic Senate meeting in a lengthy emergency session voted down a proposal to conduct an open hearing. Students gather on both sides of police lines fright! in front of the Administration Build- ing. Richard Flacks lbelowl advises listeners about the student strike. Pat Melly frightl talks of the failure of the Administration to meet student demands. Jeff Herman lfar righ tl discusses a proposed moratorium and the speech made earlier by Angela Davis in which she called upon stu- dents to join in the nation-wide struggle for return of power to the people. Notionol Attention Focuses on UCSB 'vc ..+,e1Qg-1...,,a ,,, ., V..- , "',.f wr' -'-feffizgfy it A 131 .2 Q 'K ,,,,?. 5,.3i,, ,LM :- E ' LF' 1 jg p .f ,, ,A 5, Ts . 4 , . Q Ing' - ,1- 1 . - -Atlanta -' .--v' V L- , i f--.1 arr- f ---4 4. L.-.--Q . -It-h1our-of-Q-f-.----.,,1-W ' ' ' ' 2 -' ef , :Em -L '35-w Q CFHCAGO SEVEN Kunstler Attocics Court, Discusses Conspirocy February 26 - William lVl. Kunstler addressed over 2,000 in Campus Field, outlining the events of the trial of the Chicago Seven. His discussion emphasized injustices perpetrated during the trial of the defendants. Sentenced to over four years in jail for contempt of court himself, Kunstler criticized Judge Hoff- man, who heard the case, claiming that the trial was a miscarriage of justice. Concerning issues of revolution in the country, Kunstler asserted that violence would not solve problems, and that the acts of violence by demonstrators throughout the country were insignificant and damaging to the cause. As a result of Kunstler's speech, being allegedly linked to the student violence before and after his appearance, he is being investi- gated for violation of the law which prohibits crossing the state lines to incite to riot. l!Wlliam Kunstler labove left and left! delivers a speech in which he assailed the court system following his introduction by an active supporter labovel. i x, Wf ,, ,ww , i nal. M, if + 'Yr-fn?" ' 'FEE nw ' E A Y ,I if , fxf W pm , 'H nf Wi- 3 f " f , aisgisignx. A H- r V K I A ,l 5 , QE? . , JN f' 1.5 " EE"w,'J - ' V. . iff 'Q . ,. -- 1-. ,i sa , X . ' Y '-' ,L .11 3: i-515 " - -' 1- , ..,J,.,.,, Q-LQ, V ' - . ,:.-1- , 4 :gr .g. --. Eeg,r"f ,nv , , ,, 1-rm, A..,, pane: , A Q if-19 ff? 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'Q' M 'C -- " 'f.., . ' xx f' Sw v 5' ' Nw -L - -'iiiiiwzz ., v -N-4fif5'2Qi.i-5 -' :' ,V 11 N: . ,QQ--f rang? , . f ' L X 53 , ' V -N A .- N, ,.,.-555-. . 4- , 5 K-, 3455. . 53,7 .La ,nn Y.. WA: 7 .Tv .W . fe? slew . x . v .ff -. HEP", L 2 x 1' ......,-., - . '51 ' ., ' v K, 1 if ,. . ,s ,.qf' ,J X A.,- 922 -4 National Guardsmen labovel plan the entry and tactics to be used to quiet the disturbances, while frightl they prepare to march into rain-drenched Isla Vista. UNREST ENDS Student Groups Form To Seek Riot Couses February 27 - As the National Guard moved in to reinforce existing police units and take up positions throughout Isla Vista, violent contact became sporadicp however, tensions on all sides remained high. lVlore arrests were made and the total number arrested in the disturbances rose to approximately 135. February 28 - No new violence occurred, but police and National Guard units patroled in case of any new flare-ups. March 1 - Various student groups met to try to determine the causes of the violence. Blame was laid on the methods and verdict in the Chicago Seven Conspiracy trial, a general feeling of impotence, anger over the fact that students had little or no role in decision making on campus, and disgust with the practices and unkept promises of Isla Vista realtors. . S.. 300 DEMONSTRA TE IN SANTA BARBARA Profesfe rs Arrested , Cheadle Suspends 29 IVlarch 18 - Nineteen students were arrested during a demonstration in Santa Barbara when Governor Ronald Reagan arrived to speak at the El Paseo Restaurant. Several windows were broken at the nearby Bank of America as protesters scuffled with police in the street, but no injuries were reported. Reagan appeared in Santa Barbara to attend a fund-raising luncheon to support his bid for a second term as California's chief ex- ecutive. Prominent citizens of the area and state Republican party leaders participated in the affair. Spring Break - Chancellor Cheadle announced that disciplinary action had been taken against 29 students involved in the Isla Vista and Bill Allen demonstrations. The actions ranged from suspension from the university to censure by a reprimand. Police lleftl line up at the Bank of America to prevent protester movement, Kim Christianson lbelow leftl is frisked, while Dr. Bill Allen lbelowl, who was later suspended from the university, waits. E Q TKR!A N 4' Frat EWS 'V' efggx Thomas Storke lrightl gives the dedication speech at the opening of the Starke Publications Build- ing. A student lbelowl talks to students at a rally for Dr. Allen as Vice-Chancellor Russell Buch- anan looks on. Students, Speakers Stress Porficipofion ,.., 1" "" " Angela Davis flefti assails the university system in her address. Marchers fbelowi fill Geary St. in their peaceful protest of the Viet Nam War. ,,, H. ,. - . Chicanos fleftj distribute information about the Grape Boycott. Alan Cranston fabovel answers questions at the Ecology Conference. K l P COlWllVG YEARAIVTICIPATED Frosh Comp lniiiotes Eoger New Students September 26 - 28 - Hundreds of new fresh- men converged on the UCSB campus for three days of orientation prior to registration vveek. Frosh Camp is an attempt to prepare the anxious but apprehensive new students for the complexities of college life, and to help make the transition from home and high school easier. An informal atmosphere provided opportu- nities to form lasting friendships and gave the campers a chance to accustom themselves to their new surroundings before the onslaught of returning students and the hassle of open registration on October 3. Much of a student's time lrightl is spent waiting in lines, but these freshmen make the best of it, using the opportunity to meet new people. Frosh Campers lbelowl listen intently as a counselor answers their questions concerning life in the university. H --wi Mi. 'f. ll- 'Q Seeking group security, campers lleftj congregate near the dorms. They fbelowl are on their own to find classes amidst the confusion of open reg. 1 g e . H , U Y i A W WH X W ' - V ee., 3 ., i ' V r fm Q' g , A I x f if fn , ,a ac- , ' , . .1 . ',.,.,4' L , -.ee ' . -. . 'F'e- 4' W M' 'f fi' K -' f' ' , f X fs auf -- F. ' , -- - A w ,L fr 1. I . I . ,' Q ,-A ' . " I ig, e 1- 1- - Q, . , I '44--5 . 'J '.J,t.gL -.A L31 -1 TOWER DEDICATED New Lo ndmork Hoiis Journoiisfic: Freedom September 28 - Many distinguished guests gathered for the ceremonies that officially opened the Thomas lVl. Storke Student Publi- cations Building. Speakers Vernon I. Cheadle, Charles Hitch, Clark Kerr, and the Honorable Earl Warren paid tribute to lVlr. Storke, applauding his contributions in the field of journalism and to this campus. Congratulatory telegrams from Robert Finch and President Nixon were read. The tower's sixty-one bell carillon, the only one of its kind in existence, rang out for the first time as Ennis Fruhauf, official caril- loneur, played the University Hymn. An open-house reception followed the pro- gram. Visitors were conducted through the beautiful new facilities that the building has provided for the student communications media at UCSB. Mr. Storke lrightl beams after officially opening the new communication center, while Michael Bloom and Chancellor Cheadle look on. Earl Warren lbelowl emphasizes the importance of journalism today. After the ceremony, many ileftj came in for a closer look at the impressive new structure. A crowd fbelowl gathered for the reception while a continuing concert of carillon music was played. I 'g 'ik 'f A QUARTER GETS UNDERWAY Science ond the Arts Blend to Enrich Life Fall 1969 - Through the newly formed AS jazz workshop, under the direction of Eldon Ray Lucas, interested students joined together to learn and perform jazz. Fall 1969 - Diversified, but always exciting exhibits are held throughout the year in the art galleries. Highlighting this quarter was a multi-media show, "The New Art of Van- couver," and selected works of well known artists from the Gemini lithography workshop in Los Angeles. October 10 - The campus community was af- forded the opportunity to hear one of the great scientists of our time, Arthur P. Kornberg, speak of his research. He was awarded the No- bel prize for his discovery of the enzyme that enabled scientists to synthesize the heredity controling DNA in a laboratory environment. Nobel prize-winner, Arthur P. Kornberg frightj, explains the process of synthesizing DNA. Eldon Ray Lucas fbelo wi, former professor of aesthetics, returned to UCSB to direct a workshop in the study of jazz. K 55. . P F Abi ME xiii , MEM 0' f Q-lin' The pop and op creations fabove and lefti in the "New Art of Vancouver" were met wi th varied reactions from observers. is LQ 3 L ,.. ea --A Mx HMM- x , 1'-"5 - E - ' 1. , , , A ,Q 9 QM. W 4'W"' ll fi--' Tm. ,Kg-. W. x W ,. Q K sis. Sy. ' , K . . ff ' . ,, . , 1 1 r s N 'gk kg' 1 . Q, Q . l -vii -- sex X x A J?5g, "P V X '51 -Ui, X nc ' ., f ":- :'-:+1sgZ'saLv 5-Xxiemygjef mftw ' . .NW 'vin , i gf ' 15,1 'Q J1i.!Lg??'-Kill' A, ' ,Q 4- . ,L w,j,f1:,'i-,ab 1 - :Mf ::f11:z ' - ' vw? 'Q .2 QF- , - S Q . , . X ,vw-, ff, A , . X- .'.E."Qn,,-A -ff gay .fi-,' . v :lf - ,..v, gv-,N 0. YQ -:Y-f'f-WK yjil'-.-gf, 0 X- .ff - W 2 ng- ' -QQMY, , W-X -.-.rx ,wi - C19 'A AY?-"N '.':??-i1?I':A -i'1.ff-'ini' N Nm v .-,-fiiuvf . ,, , gx .gqxNtW-,.L,-lf.:--J Xwa Qxsssfii -.14 - ' f ,-4,91 3 "' A gx ,X Q '31'v.-Inj!-,'t'j'TZ -5'3N-'NN?kM:i"1-Pm. . .2 ,- f,,gNwNx55.n,,, X x V '- -Qfq-:.g,, ,xx 5359- P 25. Ai 'Say 5 . 5 A 1 ., 1 'f' f'- 4? -A ,- A -fiesta labovel at the UCen attracted the new generation of Mexican-Americans who are growing up with a greater appreciation of their heritage. Castulo De la Rocha fright! introduces the band. 'VIVA LA NUEVA RAZA' Chicanos Goin Salute, Exhibit Rich Heritage October 12-17 - ln order to promote a greater understanding of the meaning of "Chicano," Mecha sponsored a week-long exploration of the culture, history and politics of the Nlexican-American. Corky Gonzales, a national leader in "La Causa," spoke to a large lVloratorium Day crowd on the role of the Chicano in politics. The week was cli- maxed by a colorful fiesta with a mariachi band, dancers, and a poetry reading. Hope- fully, the week left the community with an awareness of the culture and an insight into the problems of the Chicanos in our society. L 1,7 Q, gnc fi! L . - -1'..v- T' ' fefzl.-'Af:vk,,. - , ,....4 Poet Saavedra lleftl ex- presses the plight of his people. Corky Gonzales and Mecha members lbelowl appeal to everyone for understanding. 1 K f ,.. ,V U ' 4 v , 4 f,:7i'?v" - 1 ',-1148, ,I ' Il 4,-,.' P9- Ii' 2' "v? 5. wr' WE L5 i If P a .gl Q lv xy M i 5 , . I W , X .x -df .. A .5-fi J, r k H , . , - . M- X f - -- K. . X . , . AU ,gf 'W . - . J. Vx v 'V' - Ri J. 'ff , r -. I fi -'. , A, .' f WW 1 I 'V 'ffgi' - 1.5. ' ' rg, -- , V .- . I l X .. . I I ., E51 ,4" 2355 Q. i 'X E 3 If-fi- 'ki r ink X: iam 1 -4L:rL"2f' 7' hh 'V A ,. 15. , 'uf fl-I - - , A ' X-fan KRT 1. Ei , .1 , . Y K- L v . p. F fs. - W ' .i r' V " xifd-L 12' Q. fvj' iff.: G,-1,5 N- .Jin -. V5 F I '- Q W.. vm - - 1,,,. ti. '- ." .5 ' ffx, -'ffl-E' g N'gf4. a. 'A , In 5.3 f 'A 3. ' mi 1 if . '-.4 15- . 1 '- W 3' A r , -,, AZ., , 1 I. , . . , ax X , - fi- ' . I n, I xqr Q, 11 --Z "f nn - u tasks: i If Q I w ' - H+. A, 1 Q 3 X 'fr l """6y3,.4g...,. TINA WAILS, MASTERS SUBDUE Soul Revue Conirosis Clossic Periormonce October 24 - The exuberant energy of Tina Turner, backed by the polished showmanship of Ike, the Ikettes, and the Kings of Rhythm, turned on a huge crowd packed in Robert- son's Gym. October 24 - Julian Bream, second only to Segovia in his mastery of the guitar and un- rivaled on the lute, captivated those who ordered tickets far in advance. November 3 - Classical music connoisseurs were treated to a program of early Baroque and Renaissance vocal and instrumental music by the renowned Deller Consort. Master musician Julian Bream lleftl displays perfection on the lute. The Deller Consort fbelowj led by counter-tenor Alfred Deller, extreme right, performs wi th aristocratic elegance and professionalism. 'E-L 'HAPPINESS lS ---' GGR l-los New Look, Queen Rules Events November 3-7 - The theme of "Happiness is. . dominated the week of activities lead- ing up to Homecoming, 1969. Several innovations enlivened Galloping Gaucho Revue this year, with a chorus of twelve talented performers tying the show to- gether. Student directors, Mike Boyle and Cynde Nleyer were proud to present three rising professional groups: Jaim, a new folk- rock group, The Jazz Experiment, Santa Barbara's new dance company, and the UCSB Chamber Singers. Highlighting the week was the coronation of the Homecoming Queen during Wednesday night's GRR. The male element on campus chose Georgia Thomas to reign over the up- coming festivities. Alana Brown lrightl of the Filbert and Gullivan Oily Tarts Opera Company performs a scene from their winning GGR skit, "The Trial of St. Barbara." The Gaucho-72 lbelowl take a well-deserved curtain call. ll if F N' ,3 S S lfsex W' gg lull 1 V .Q if Mme l ,, ! 1 l X X 'Wim E ,. it N. ons. t nl ea, -fare Refusing to be rained out, these die-hard Gaucho fans decided to hold their own parade between Isla Vista showers. COLORFUL SPECTACLE Homecoming Endures, Spirit Conquers Roin November 8-9 - Even though rain forced cancellation of the parade and ruined many house decorations, Homecoming was deemed a success as enthusiastic Gaucho fans cheered the team on to their most convincing season win over Cal State L.A. Thousands turned out Sunday afternoon to hear the dynamic combination of Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young. All four are accom- plished musicians in their own right, each having been with prominant groups in the past. The high expectations of the crowd were met and the concert was a fitting climax to Homecoming week 1969. umm? - A, Illsdt' -ai. 1' -X' . , X I' -+-. ,.., x , . 5 P - 'rig I wa- r-" , mu S - fx 'N x Q' '51 L 1 5 M-, Q. ,Z M RN , , f ,A ff., ff -, f ,. ? f ' ', J lf! 'f mf f I U 50115 4 A 1 , . w- -X' QW V- ? . 74 N Q GM.- k gli? :Q ' me ,, 5 'Ps' U . asf 51i2f :.+ 1: ,rl 1,-e +V' , D I sox.--x uf QA. '-aiu, "1 -Q-55 if ' My Y f 1 f 15,0 ,I su' -f' g if ---wr U- , 7'.'g'3- 5? .f f . v, N -YL L I A 5155 .t 2 ..,., . N V W1 bl, -K N A I, -.fr-"1--f t . v - Ar b : I 5 ll '. Se 1' 135. s',N':- : , M,n'K.' ' -D.. .' ,- .,.v'.' , 11.13 " gn. .-4 Q, ,XA .mf .,. T-,f V 1 VT, .. - 1 fin. "1 f 45 'U' J' o ww. ' .4 4. .uw W3 'f-L7 .,-'ff Nil, 'w Y FQ P f , . my F 'Y-'H' BUZEM-H Ee Above is a scene from Cris Marker's award-winning film, "La Jetee." The UCSB Chamber Singers irightj pre- pare for a tour which will take them around the world this summer. -f 5 CULTURAL VARIETY Operofic Fonlosy Vs. Conlemporory Films November 11, 18 - The New Cinema series was a stimulating collection of the finest avant-garde films in the world today. The films, selected from the major European film festivals, have collectively won every im- portant short film award. November 13-15 - A delightful escape from the pressures of the real world was provided by the comic, fairytale opera, The Elixir of Love. lt was performed by talented members of the music department, under the direction of lVlme. lVlichaelis. November 17 - Preparing for their goodwill world tour this summer, the Chamber Singers gave a concert in Storke Plaza to kick off their fund raising campaign. Carl Z ytowski lleftl plays the lovesick hero, Nemerino in The Elixir of Love. The chorus lbelowl listens as Adina l.loan Barber! sings of her plight. V i V Q E IA f pr VL! r .QA V ' T 53 ' f 'Q 'I f 'I sg 2 , f 3 w 1' A . 'ig' .. 5 X 3 1 vu ' T F X . ' ' Il' I A A- 5 ,I f 4 1, I T if 4 2 - ' ' ...J' 0 ' ' j f . .x.14J 2, ag y Xi. J .' . i3 ax 1 ff lg? x . ii V A 'V EA . 5 xii, 2sif",1v ww L, X f 5351! 0 ae .g J ' f ' 'ligl-Y-Z u if Q .5 ' 4' - f 4 ff I H I A In ' 1 I 1 CLASSICAL ARTISTRY Musicians Atlciin High Degree of Excellence November 25 - Under the baton of Ronald Ondrejka, the University Symphony Orches- tra performed in Lotte Lehman Hall. Included on the program were works by Purcell, Dvorak, Beethoven, and a unique piece by Vaughan Williams that incorporated human voices with the orchestra. December 4 - In one of his rare appearances in western United States baritone Dietrich Fisch- er-Dieskau presented a program of songs set to the poetry of Goethe. Known as the world's foremost interpreter of lieder, he displayed all the finese and control for which he is noted. The London Observer has said of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau lrightl that "no living singer can rival such magnificence of voice." An ensemble of the UC Symphony lbelowl performs in Lotte Lehman Hall. Tom Thompson lleftl portrays the tortured emperor Caligula. Celebrated Yugoslavian director, Georgij Paro, left, and his assistant Downing Cless lbelowl, wa tch a rehearsal of the play. 'CALIGULA' Dynomic Symbolism Hos Ominous Theme November 28-29, December 3-6 - "lVlen die and they are not happy." This is the tragic realization of the emperor in Albert Camus' Caligula. Georgij Paro, noted director from Yugos- lavia, has brought unprecedented innovations to his production of the play. He initiated a revolving cast that enabled each actor to de- velop more than one role. Tom Thompson and Gene Seamans alternated as the psychotic Caligula and the stable Cherea. The result was a production that was a valuable learning ex- perience and a meaningful statement. MW' Gail Teixeira, left, and Andrea Hairston labovel dance in the opening number, "Triad," ln the same work lrightl, are Gail again left and choreographer Dianne Skillman ae? M mg: www . gf XFN ,ggewgg wg Q21 1.253 x Q, x, 3 if -' , 's ' , - L4 ....,:Qs.-.s.4x .Q. - ,1- .,. 5 J xx 'S ' Az" f' 1 +f T- V X H. "" ff Wy 5 .1 1 i A .I . wif' i i Q .axx J :itil ,Q - ILM-a. ', 'Q' mf - - -I F F 1. I' "sl fx, x , , ' 5375115 if Visitors to the UCSB art galleries labovel examine the varied works of contemporary painters and Aborigine craftsmen. A bizarre film lrigh tl en titled "Love A ffair or the Case of the Missing Switchboard Operator" was the first of the win ter series. FILM ART DANCE Modern Arf Explores Meons of Expression Winter 1970 - Focusing on Eastern Europe this quarter, the Committee on Arts and Lec- tures continued to present the finest in for- eign films to UCSB. The Sunday afternoon series included Roman Polanski's first film, "Knife in the Water" and a hilarious Czech satire called "Lemonade Joe." Winter 1970 - A noteworthy collection of twentieth century painting, featuring such prominent artists as Picasso, was shown in the main art gallery. Concurrently in the entrance gallery was an exhibition of the art of Austral- ian Aborigines, emphasizing contrasts and striking similarities between the two shows. January 19-21 - The Don Redlich Company, the second in the modern dance residency series, augments its humorous style and fine technique with multi-media devices. gf , Members of the Don Redlich Company lleftl perform their dance-happening, "Slouching Toward Bethlehem." Demonstrating the company's versatility, Mr. Redlich and Luly Santangelo lbelowl dance the more structured Work, "Couple t. " vlgglr - 'ga' V' pr'-' f V 1 The resident quartet of the Juilliard School of Music lleftl performs on the Campbell Hall stage. The attire of The Band lbelowl reflects their sound, a unique blend of country and rock music. ,T Q XM? 'v 3 f . 'll' T515 2 - slr?" ' is ' ' 5, V - f Uflfli ,F , ., , . 5154, , A.v.r ' , ., V - M MUN IN ' mgsagfigxga, .,.,Eg:,..gi.:5g5 '55 f ' " V , , ,. , i b ..,.. 1 .... 'W f- . L . il if 14+ ,V .A Ig:-V 3- '- A M . . Y fx gy -fs: F5 'A ff? fx F i- fi? ,f W 5 r .W,,,.:15g '- Ae HIW1 4 ' rv X V ff' 4 . '-. M' W 7- Q., ' mg . .- . .0 X. x , ,, K WM1 W Hu ya ??5i??f L saw' . :izisfi ,mi K 4 .9 ' Y 5 ffl W- 5 -11 2 , . , ..a, ,. fm' N. H, My .-u - .e-35 ' 1 I 1 '11 . :gl ss QQ -QA 11' iq' A 'VW' 11:1 L l 5' s M 51, O 04 9.9 Fr M S 452. ,Q P. V !'f1""! Hal Brendle fleftj leads the Roadrunner Band in the show's rousing overture. The cast fbelowj enjoys the antics of Sol Rosenzweig and Les Lizama as much as the audience. I li. S I 'o X l 1 4 a .il ,i K V' ,.,: , l v A .I ja: LQ ' 'Q' 5 N! . A e it wit Pa, i 'i a- Ht". flifxl - " Q 4 1., '-fxfx '..' " .- ,w- .gif .iff . , S 'f' -- f lk.-Jw, 53- 'frrf A -. , 1-if ' 2+-if.. ' a ,S 1 . j K, . . , 0' V i'..,., Av", ,Q ? if ' . " '4" ani -K 1 1 '-" - A Q, -, , , gf'- T i, f f P u i I WHVTER PRODUCTIONS Stoge Comes lo Life In Trogedy, Comedy February 10-14, 17-21 - The womb-like environment of a lower class apartment pro- vided the setting for the deeply moving tragedy "Who'lI Save the Plowboy?"p the story ofa failure who lives with deception. lVlarch 3-8 - The UCSB production of "Uncle lVl" marked the English premiere of this six- teenth century comedy. The large, colorful cast romped through life in Rome, the sin capital of the Renaissance. lVlarch 1 - Musica Antigua, a program of music of the past, was presented in Lotte Lehman Hall under the direction of Karl Geiringer in collaboration with Cecil Hill of the University of St. Andrews, Scotland. lVlarch 6-7 - The University Dance Group per- formed works ranging from a comic takeoff on the popular TV series "Dark Shadows" to the sophisticated "Aria" which combined voice and strings with the dancers. Musica Antigua flefti is presented by the UCSB music department in Lotte Lehman Hall. Three witches fbelowi Micki Dart, left, Carol Anderson, and Penti Kumpalienan dance a comic version of "Dark Shadows." WHATISART? New Work Bewilders Amoleur Art Critics February 24-lVlarch 28 - Casual passersby paused in amazement to see the huge pile of lumber in the art gallery. lVlost shrugged in disgust of "modern art" without bothering to examine the work more closely. Robert Morris, creator of the piece, is one of today's leading conceptual artists. Through his work he tries to stimulate thought about art and the aesthetic object. lt is the art of concepts, not of craftsmanship. The work is intended to make the observer re-evaluate his definition of art. lVlust art be confined to a gallery? By placing the lumber in a gallery he is forcing us to view it in terms of art. Would the same stack of wood be art in a lumberyard? Robert Morris is attempting to encourage new ways of looking at the world through his art. Stearn's Wharf agreed to purchase and re- move the lumber after the showing. Robert Morris lbelowl watches as part of the ex- ecution of his work is left to chance. Other observers lrightl register changing expressions as the huge blocks fall to the gallery floor. l i 1 ' Jean Henoir's "Rules of the Game" labovel, one of the "Films of the Thirties," has been named one of the world's ten 'best films by a poll of international critics. Chancellor Cheadle lleftl congratulates Karen Dinkins on being crowned Easter Relays Queen. SPRING SPURS ACTIVITIES Queen Rules ot Meet, Films Spotlight 30's March 28 - Karen Dinkins, UCSB sophomore, was chosen to reign over the thirty-second annual Easter Relays. This Santa Barbara tradition, an invitational track meet held each spring in La Playa Stadium, brings together some ot the world's top athletes. Spring 1970 - The Sunday tilm series con- tinued this quarter with the theme "Films ot the Thirties." These works, including "Beau Geste" starring Gary Cooper and "Horse Feathers" with the lVlarx brothers, are classics of the film-makers art, focusing on an age when movies were in their prime. ,,,,Q. . A 0. '-K 33212 W 1 1 N: at Qi. M fi K P 1 G av' .3 'FQ Ei f E . elif. "5 F' L ., . F ,Q H55 If 1 4- -. in .. Vi J AP' I-A 1 xx., xv. X ww ARTS AND LECTURES PRESENTA TIONS Com mittee Sponsors Quolity Entertoinment Spring 1970 - "The Kinetic Art," shown in Campbell Hall this quarter, is a collection of the finest short films being produced in the world today. April 10, 11 - Climaxing the modern dance residency series was the Lucas Hoving Dance Company. Hoving's relaxed style combines the acting and dancing talents of his com- pany. May 25 - Andre Watts got his first break as a last minute substitute on a Leonard Bernstein telecast at the age of sixteen. Today, at twenty-three, he is a widely recognized and sought after concert pianist. lVlay 28-30 - Black militants, white fascists, and the Rolling Stones add up to "Sympathy for the Devil," Jean-Luc Godard's new feature film which cuts sharply into contemporary society. Rising young pianist, Andre Watts lleftl performed to a capacity audience in Campbell Hall. The music of the Rolling Stones set the pace for the biting social com- mentary of the film "Sympathy for the Devil" lbelowl. up iff: P , .rn ,- , ,W lil: I xxwqk fx x ' 9351? r . .' L' YI ifr d , j - ' md 'I X 5 t Q 1 J asf A , 'T , 17' x I 6 3 A ' 7 . it www N- ftqb 155 Q ' ,Ak , ,., N ML. -V ww - '..,,+. Jima' - - H -. .W . --NJN rf Q A. . -.Q .. - ff-ff :,' . n'11'a--,-I-Q2 ge? ,,.1 X -- ,Q-.I ' -- Q f , 4 A .up--1 1 4-' ....TN-" xt - all 'I s I K I 5 ' v --Q: I Y I V V, .E 1 X, N4 4' '1 ,I .: sq Q , 1 ii 'Gig 21' X A x' 1 5 I A Agfw ' f' 'f 'fel-5 V' -- ..g.1,?If '13-'W"i'?r f'3 ' 3, ,f2""' xiii-iv fi X ' .'1i:1,:g. 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Lil, , wig if , f 14 s,,p.'.'f-1 1 ff - 1- ,. -M-"N .' 4' . m 1. jf " XZ :gi . , , f A2 J - MMR ,gy ,ir , Q. .jr x .74 K- V - ,..,, ,-415m A' . mv. Jvl-..gygD,,,-, , X -. ,hge V ,.- x B X' 1' 'r , xi-ix, ,Ln ,E 5 ?g,,-' 05' s ',..' if - X HW '-gmqfigg -QW 4.5 ,- rfl., 1 4- 3. - , fir :XU4 ,, U Q E. A ,, - . ' -' " - 1 - A 1 . , . '- -.MA f. '- ., A X gs, L, 1.-1 -5 K - - A Lf M FQ' ,A I -"A ' A13ff2"ag,' T' 'Q 1 ff ,,, f -" F ,1 ,, ' " S XC 1: v bg X ' I Wai" k my! XX K VG' " " lb'-' V , A . ' 3 Q N f K Y, 4 , WI! A -T ' ' -' ,,1 iw my gm, -. ,, . , ,:' f - M Mi-T introspection ond Discipline Demonded One of the major aims of the creative emphasis within the Art Department has been to motivate students toward introspection for new ideas, rather than working with the com- mercial output of the day. Practical discipline is demanded in the creative field. lVlerely stressing self-expression would reduce its meaning and value to a therapeutic hobby. Another aspect of the department is the study of historical art objects of past civili- zations in order to shed light on the cultural history of man. ln this connection, Dr. Nlario Del Chiaro, department chairman, hopes to see a study-abroad program started to enable graduate students to receive field training. Students lrightl allow personal creativity free rein in studio courses such as ceramics. UCSB'S Touring Group lbelowj is renowned as a unique stage ensemble dealing with current cultural phenomena. lli Qi llllllii lii, a L ART DEPARTMENT-FRONT ROMA' Richard Dunlap, Miles Varner, Prudence Meyer, VWlliam Ptaszynski, Mario Del Chiaro lChairmanl, Michael Dvortzsak. SECOND ROVlk Sheldon Kaganoff Herbert Cole, Conway Pierson, Robert Thomas, Michael Arntz, Harvery Young, Hazel Hedrick, Howard Fenton. DRAMA DEPARTMENT-FRONT ROVlk Rachel Kurland, Patricia Robin- son, Robert Morgan. SEATED: Marty Swing, Pat Peters, Margaret Nelson, Stanley Glen, Cedric VWnchell, Paul Weisser. STANDING: Sandi Bell, Joan Hutchison, Theodore Hatlen lChairmanl, Richard Lorenzen, VMC. Tisdell, Floyd Gaffeny, David Sackerofi Richard Nelson. DRAMA Deportment Productions Reflect Sociol Concern The Drama Department deals with the theor- etical and historical aspect of dramatic litera- ture. ln so doing, the student is encouraged to understand man's past and present attitudes as reflected in the play itself and in the author's intentions in writing the story. Relativity of the dramatic performance to the student is seen as a stimulus for personal creativity. ln various phases of production the UCSB Touring Group gathered recent material reflecting present social trends and performed in city ghettos. Concerning campus productions, the department was honored to have with it Georgij Paro, visiting professor from Yugoslavia, directing the fall and winter plays, Caligula and Volpone. i i REPERTORY CHORUS-FRONT ROIM Director Michael Livingston, Shannon Ceccarelli, Judy Cooper, Diane Bean, Madalyn Frazzini, Joan Zseleczky, Judy Hyde, Shirley Siler. SECOND ROW: Ryan Sanders, Arnold Maltz, Mark Shinbrot, Stephen Fitzpatrick, Sally Stout, Joan Christianson, Gail McEvoy, Bev Chapman, Mary McNamera, Janet Hopkin. THIRD ROW: Christophe Priolo, Marille Hersh, Alan England, Richard Anderson, Robert Miller, Jon Mounts, Nancy Gustafson, Janet Main, Karen Craner, Nancy Stoneman, Kay Barco, Cindy Meyer, Janice Finney. FOURTH ROW: Richard Miller, Donald Bleeck, Glenn Miller, Andy Pitts, Paul Croshier, James Rodman, Dan Compton, Ann Noel, Julia Grow, Barbara Bennett, Bill Bailey, Dave Moore, Debby Kay, Sharon Stanford, Gloria Tronset, Barbara Brockie. FIFTH ROW' David Weber, Al Larkin, Gary Smith, Lee Leach, Robert VanFrench, David Westerbeke, Jim Glomeb, Robert Reed, Mike Romanchak, Betsy Laurel Leef, Jane McGrew, Debby Smith, Linda Hollywood, Candy Walker, Sally Butler, Melody Long, Judy Gannaway, Susan Dahlin. ix XA. H, 3, I Liga ...t .. if-. e . . ,. ,,m.fAe.- - Y., ,. , ef CHAMBER SINGERS CHORUS Germon Chorol Fefe Gives Tour lmpefus Chamber Singers is a mixed male and female vocal group which selects rare and unique musical pieces to perform. From an informal Christmas presentation and participation in GCR to a variety of formal productions, outstanding flexibility was recognized. This merit gained them an invitation to the German Chorale Festival for which they plan a European tour this summer. Repertory Chorus performs major choral works including oratorios and masses. This year the feature works were "Beethovan's Nlass in C lVlajor" and Benjamin Britten's "Ceremony of Carols." Concerts were pre- sented at the end of each quarter and a tour of UC campuses in Southern California was in the offing. . A CHAMBER SINGERS-FRONT ROM Gary Brumm, harp,' seated, Vivian Dickerson, Camille Cooley, Roberta Shellum, Dorothy Westra, Director. SECOND ROW: Arthur Pitts, flute, James Gilman, Suzanne Champion, Alexander Larkin. THIRD ROMA Karen Craner, Sally Butler, James Rodman, Bonnie Campbell, Virginia Coull, James Colburn, Janice Stiles, Richard Compton. ABOVE: Chris Priolo. FRONT ROW: Bob Skilling, lseatedl Bill Krend, Dennis Gray, Jim Mitchell, David Mock, Ted Olsen, Steve Dexter, John Jones, Gary Smith, Stan Loeb, Craig Crawshaw, Carl Zytovvski ldirectorl, Samuel Hsu, Brent Anderson, Van French, Les Lizama, Mike Rosso, Kevin Smith. FOURTH ROW lon David Keith, John Carey. SECOND ROMA' Richard Procter, Rob Lovan, walll: Lee Leach, Paul Hesse, Marc Ream, Jose Garcia, Dave Lopez, Richard Scott Humble, Don Johnson, Roger Venocchi. THIRD ROW: Chris Buckley, Stevens. J- 5 - 5 i n l ! I ' V ,st . , i J, l 1 L In I , K .Q x . Q 1 X SCHUBERTIANS, MEN'S GLEE Selected Compositions Worm Performonces ,Z Z 'U' If The Schubertians is an elite group of thirteen selected from lVlen's Glee, under the direction of soloist Carl Zytowski. Their repertoire con- sists of selections of the literature composed for small ensembles of male voices, creating a concert spirit which is intimate and convivial. The men's specialty is the part-works written by Franz Schubert for his musical friends. This year the Schubertians conducted a concert tour of the Hawaiian Islands in early April, and performed a unique concert called Schubertiad, a re-creation of Viennese musical life in the 1820's. The lVlen's Glee, performing all types of music ranging from classical, folk, Bach, and to the Beatles, planned several concerts. Included were Valentine's Day serenades in the dorms, a Northern California tour, a re- A A tUl'n concert, and 3 spring Concert- FRONT ROW: Les Lizama, Mike Rosso, Carl Zytowski ldirectorl,Eric Gourley, Van French, Dave Lenhardt. SECOND ROl!lk Paul Hesse, Jeff Babcock, David Keith, Paul Bishop, Brent Anderson, Gary Smith, Craig Crawshaw. ' 'x u x X 'H 1.55 - ,. 1- V. - li' X- . . , - ffv 'J ' ' A. V 1 ' N' , V . ,. K, ' ,, . ' 'y A -. ' Y. '. , m . . .'. ,,., V, . -V . . . H 4-. . ,.- 5 . . L.'f'-'Y ,. 5 if gy! V, ',QEL Vwixif' if-5 tg ai. , 1 ,f 5 -,Q S M f 1 . 'Nu 1 6 wx 'Q ' In ' Y' 'mr Jw ., at, . , , " , . .,. " 1 , , 1 , v Q X W. 9 . ff. S 9 ? I , in N - N f V ' il 1 '4 Q! K -. 9 . Tffif vi D 1 0 SYMPHONY AND BRASS Cl'lOll? Period Linked Music Vo ried by Treoimenls Symphonic and- chamber works from the major musical periods are those emphasized by the University Symphony. Concerto nights, in which five or six solos were featured among the orchestral group, were included in the concert given each quarter in Lotte Lehmann Hall. In addition to the concerts, tours of the immediate area's high schools and the southern U.C. campuses were scheduled. UCSB's Brass Choir is one of the first estab- lished on the West Coast. The group deals with serious music from late Renaissance, Baroque, Romantic, and Contemporary periods, as well as Jazz in the Stan Kenton idiom and small ensembles. The popularity of their performances was reflected at a Sunday concert at the Unitarian Church in Santa Barbara. According to its members, it attracted the largest crowd the church had ever held. The night-lighting of Campbell Hall creates an aura of elegance befitting the music of the University Symphony labovel. ln contrast, the Music Building plaza lrightl provides a casual atmosphere for the contemporary music of the Brass Choir's concerts. 41- ?' '9 , . ., 'Ai 'I 2 ani-wif, Q A V N .... . ' ' -I " -. -. - ' sagslfif- -, is ' L ' , , , T Q, . W. . K .. ,. DANCE Discipline Enhances Creative Expression The Dance Department offers an opportunity for creative expression. As in arts, modern dance is progressive for it is new and alive. One sees fresh new developments and creativity result in unique forms and wide- spread variations. The faculty believes it is not their job to teach dance but to train students to 'discipline skills so true personal form may emerge., CLASSICS Ancient Culture Study Compares to Present Classics involves research into the historical, philosophical, and scientific writings of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. The goal of the research, being twofold, is to develop an appreciation of past works and promote a clearer comprehension of our present society through comparisons. Popu- larity of such study has been demonstrated by increased enrollment in classics courses. The University Dance Group, composed of students who choreograph their performances, presents "Dark Shadows." CLASSICS Alva Bennett, David Young, Borimir Jordan, Jae Margon, Apostolos Athanassakls Purcell Weaver. DANCE FRONT ROW: Emma Lou 0'Brian, Isa Bergsohn. SECOND ROIM Pat Sparrow Floyd Gaffney. THIRD ROVlk Robert Hanlin. HUMANITIES ECONOMICS Innovotive Prog rom Stresses Inte roction The Economics Department concerns itself with the study of theories while providing basic training for future business and professional careers. In order to introduce theoretical study of economic concepts and to keep pace with changes in technology, a program stressing interaction between computers and students was initiated last year. Now in its second phase, it requires active participation in evaluation and revision of course materials. HOME ECOlVOMlCS Deportment Contronts Eminent 'Phosing Out' In opposition to other expanding depart- ments, the home economics major is being phased out. Chairman Evelyn Jones states, "lt is a sad day when household planning is elimi- nated." Currently, enough faculty remains to bring this year's freshman class to degrees in nutrition, textiles, and economics. FRONT ROW' Frances Tacionis, Marianne Elliot, Hillary Farkas, Marjorie Kinsey, Lucille Woolsey, Frances Halen. SECOND ROMA' Ruth Shook, Paul Scherer, Evelyn Jones, Eleanor Mathewson, Ann Rice. This teleputer is used in FRONT ROW: John Hambor, Mortimer Andran, Douglas Morgan, Alex Alexander fChairmani, VWlliam Kennedy, Harold Votey, Robert Crouch. SECOND ROW: Bruce Johnson, Lloyd Mercer, James Sullivan, Perry Shapiro, Walter Mead, Llad Phillips. iNu--- l L1 conjunction with textbook material to enable students to grasp th e c 0 ncep t of statistical analysis. f' 1' .' f 1 X flair tx Xt'fTxt,i ' ,asia itieni ,m r , ,f f V 'l"Lw' ' L-Yffzvli ,- 77 K ' ,V-Q ggi!! ,J-' " 151: in ' wa s . V -A,- -V 7-ff' r , gf .J . .I Q ,:4:A!..l , , V. .. V - . ' L. '- l ,, ,e,wiE:' J 'Y 'W If- Q- 'I 3.i V' If- f -7:1 lf' 4 , . Ziff" fi, - ,,a,.. .. ,M .Niagra 157. Lfw - " 3 E - s - " -21' 'W-S' 3 FRONT ROW: Sri Ratnam Swami, Al Hansen, Jeff Smith, Paul Clark, Dennis May. SECOND ROW: Michael Kuhn, Peter Mason, Susan Baumgart, Berl Golomb, David Wagnor, Margaret Greenwald, Bernard , Riley. GEOGRAPHY Ecologicol Problems Rise 'ro Prominence All aspects of the social life of man in relation to his physical environment are actively in- vestigated by the Geography Department. Fle- sults from recent studies have been actively manifested in the increased communication and controversy over conservation problems. The threats of noise, air, and water pol- lution to man and his natural resources are studied with reference to situation, produc- tivity, and future potentials. New techniques in laboratory research aided the scientific probe for ecological balance. Dr. Norman Sanders took a firm conservationist stand on the preservation of the Goleta Slough as a bird and wildlife sanctuary. He speaks here at a rally which in- formed students of the danger threatening the slough by a new freeway system. 4 HISTORY lncreosed Discussion Stresses Po rticipotion History presents a many faceted experience as the reflection of social, political, and econo- mic themes through the ages. Through the realization and utilization of these aspects in the History Department, the student may now approach man's ideas with a broader scope of humanity. New teaching techniques place stress on critical reading and provide increased dialogue between students and faculty members. Newly restructured, a European History course initiated three discussions a week to replace the previous traditional three lectures. Classes of this design will emphasize the role of participation in learning experiences. Material from which students draw mean- ing and relevance to contemporary problems may be obtained in recently formed upper division courses in Black and Chicano history. Drawn by the challenge of adventure, Dr. Roderick Nash of the History Department followed the path of John Wesley Powell on the Colorado River. The ex- pressed motivation for the river run was "to commune with time and power and process and thereby catch a glimpse of the meaning of two billion years of earth history on display in the Grand Canyon. " anan, Otis Graham, Henry Mis- bach, Arnold Barton, Stephen -' 1 Hay, Joachim Remak, Warren Hollister, Frank Dutra, Abra- ham Friesen, Alfred Gollin, FRONT ROW: Russell Buch- 'P' 1 sf Elliot Brownlee, Henry Adams. SECOND ROIM Paul Sonnino, Martin Legassick, VWlliam Alex- ander, Richard Oglesby, Vldlbur Jacobs, F. A. Bonadio, Chi-Yun Chen, Donald Dozeer, George Haddad, Alexander Callow, Carl Harris, David Jones. ANTHROPOLOGY Teaching Innovations Personalize Learning Communication is essential in anthropology for it acts as an effective bridge in the cultural fields, transmitting knowledge of one to another. Biological and historical fields com- bine to enable students to obtain a broader understanding of the aspects of mankind in perspective. This year Dr. Brian Fagan introduced a new teaching method to the department. He utilizes taped lectures heard through earphones and in the near future hopes to include individual slide projectors. This plan will allow technical media to teach so that the students are enabled to learn at their personal rates. FRONT ROW: Elman Service, Albert Spaulding, David Brokensha, Thomas Harding, Elvin Hatch. SECOND ROW' Donald Brown, Brian Fagan, Charles Erasmus, M.K. Martin, James Keyser. 1 r" Y 'M 1' S K ' - Fil ff' t Doug Clymer lahovel, a graduate student of Anthropology, takes a contemporary view of his subject, as Professor Bill Allen lleftl, displays a product of man 's evolution and advances. POLITICAL SCIENCE Brood Course Ronge Contributes Relevoncy From the broad range of cou rses offered, the Political Science Department hopes to gener- ate in the student an appreciation of political systems and a more comprehensive under- standing of foreign policy and diplomatic re- lations. These studies enable individuals to make knowledgeable contributions in such fields as public service, regional planning, law, or teaching. Plans are being made for future study in Chinese Politics, Politics of the En- vironment, and simulations of developing societies and administrations. Dr. Robert Noel demonstrates a procedure that utilizes a computer to communicate with Political Science De- partments of colleges throughout the state. gn . aiwtaziwii i W -..il - -at IQ? E y rl 1-. X .-. ,,. LQLNT 'fag 'T A P' will LAT , .lr Ji.. ng' f 'L 5 'si 'l ' . 'P--ei" ml lb ui it Q' ,T ,M , Q 'Q N .4 'fr 1: "0 4' Q Q ' It-1,,4.'-sz. ,VP , 1 wifi? -' 7' A- , , V. ' v Q .,,,,f,j -fssv: J " M' t FfiT',5-it -A M ' . LlC.':'f:",fi . - -N ss- . . ' l Y -fel. '-:L-TL. . , ' 11- . ll , V- e Je. ...Q , ,,, . W - -h ' ia-Q-,331 F I tiff F' ' ,. a' 1 .... EE L lf .l .Y sf a W V223 FRONT ROVW R.J. Snow, Alan J. Wyner, William Ebenstein, Henry Turner, ROVW Dean Mann, Carl Hetrick, Alan Lin, Roger Davidson, Thomas Gordon Baker, Richard Harris, Robert Noel, Stanley Anderson. SECOND Schrock, Russel Fitzgibbon, Peter Merhl, Herman Pritchett. PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT: Robert Reynolds, Roulette Smith, Gerald Blum, A. Robert Sherman, Ben Clapton. PSYCHOLOGY Behovior of Humons Anolyficolly Observed The Psychology Department directs its courses of study toward helping the student gain a better understanding of human be- havior. Toward this end the student is ex- posed to research into such topics as per- ception, conflict, and development. The study of psychology finds many applications in fields of education, vocational guidance, industry, public surveys, and clinical work. Sound scientific foundations are offered in lower division courses in prepara- tion for advanced courses which reflect the stress placed on experimentation and analyti- cal observation by the department instructors. 1 l YN l X Q X Melanie McLees and Marion Dalin of the Psychology Department interpret their findings after observing .yea-1 sections of rat brains. . , ,. '.'., ffhgi li u un An. xi i. FRONT ROIM D. Lawrence Wieder, Bruce Straits, David Gold, Milton Mankaff, Homero Yearwood, Charles Spaulding, Thomas Scheff, Don Zimmerman, John Baldwin, Gary Schulman, Morris Friedell. SECOND ROIM David Arnold, Aaron Cicourel, J. Michael Ross, Walter Buckley, B.M. Blegriad, Charles Hubbell, Richard Flacks, Robert Smith, Paul Wuebben, Donald Cressey, Thomas Wilson. SOC! OL OG Y Students Allowed More Active Porticipotion In answer to the students' demands for more participation in their education, the Sociology Department decided to allow students to attend committee and faculty meetings in orderto develop an awareness of the structure of the department. Students are now included in conferences with interview boards for pro- spective faculty members. The department has been updated with the introduction of Political Sociology and Ethno-methodology. The latter is an attempt to reverse the traditional role of sociology, which is to view man in relation to society, to the emphasis of how the normal person views himself in relation to the life the cur- rent society has created for him. The department is also assimilating man- to-machine communication in order to begin concentrating on the social psychology of conversation in everyday usage. The sociology conference room lrightl provides a unique place to study and to exchange opinions during seminars. Dr. Jon Wheatley lbelowl becomes engrossed in his hobby and lifes work, examining the varied aspects of philosophy. RELIGION New Emphasis Placed On Eastern Religions The Religion Department has strength- ened its emphasis on Eastern Religions and next year will include three new appointments in the area of Indian Religions. By revising the major into new sequences, students will be allowed to concentrate on specific area traditions, leading to increased specialization. RELIGIOUS STUDIES DEPARTMENT: Thomas O'Dea, lIWlbur Fridell, Robert Michaelsen, M. Gerald Bradford, Mathhias Vereno, Stephen Reno, Birger Pearson, Walter Capps. PHILOSOPHY Coffee Room Yields Lively Conversations Philosophers philosophize. Thus, any phil- osophy department should be a center of abstract verbal communication. As a con- sequence, the department holds as many small discussion classes as possible. The Philosophy Club is very active and the coffee room, where stimulating, casual conversation between students and pro- fessors materialize, is rarely empty. FRONT ROVlk Nandini Iyer, Hubert Schwyzer, Jan Wheatley, Francis Dauer, June Main, Herbert 'Finger- ette, Harry Girvetz, J. VWlliam Forgie, Charlotte Stough. SECUND ROMA' Christopher Macann, Bernard Boxill, Jack Barense, Joseph Ransdell, Laurence Houlgate, Lloyd Reinhardt, Noel Fleming, Burleigh VWlkins. ' I Jun, X , . 4 -f.. 1, ,A w f , x ml ' , .frm . --,, , . r . - - ,v,,,'v'vw 'ZWH-f ,, :PL--f H' , ' -H 1 1 .A .x . vs-,V fr an-up gf- . I' ' ' 1, 4,A N-'mgj -A 5' 1... 'fig .f i 3 ,ji vl:xL,'.fff,-L.4?,.2: V,, 1'.f,zf 1 A' ' f J " F-'+2 5" jr' 3'- . ' .4 . ,l J,--a.', w "" ?+f'i:'J1Td'5y' '12, Q4i ,F--1'4lQr 3.4. 1 4-- - ' ,. , uf- qv' 'ya vtniffg. 'if-J 1-Hi5'i""-' df" A Q ,- at .. -lf 120 P xi' F gs ta. ik! ' ., , .se Him CCDMMUNICATION FRONT ROVlk Chesley Mathews, Donald Guss, Norman Council, Robert Potter, Walter Davis, David McPherson, Martha Banta, James Dolan. SECOND ROW: Joseph Foladare, miriam Frost, Albert Wachtel, Logan spa-irs, Mary slaughter, Jann siiverman, William ENGLISH Creativity Emphasized By Example, Training Marks. Studies in literature enable the student to conceive worlds through sense impressions other than his own. An overall effort of imagination, rather than abstraction, is required to feel the created world and to be aware of the subtle influences which affect it. The English department trains students in creativity and demonstrates its own with staff members publishing in fields encompassing poetry, drama, short stories, and novels. Creative writing classes are offered to students to further abilities in clear and imaginative aaa.. a self-expression. FRONT ROIM Nancy Scagliotti, Barbara Thomas, Janis Costello, Kathy Corey, Judy Mann. SECOND ROMA' Sanford Gerber, Edwin Schoell, TD. Hanley, Glen Mills, Upton Palmer, John Snidecor, John Macksoud. SPEECH Expansion Required As Graduates Needed The Speech Department, rapidly developing on this campus, has added fifteen new graduate courses this year. In the field of speech and hearing, growth is needed to fill the demand for better trained i and certified professionals. Certification per- l mits further research relating to disorder causation and correction. In the field of public address and rhetoric, ln the heated competition of an intercollegiate debate, finesse several classes have been initiated concerning is essential to outwit an opponent. COn'1muniCati0n theory. By Relevont Prog rom The scientific study of languages, its organi- zation structure, and evolution form the basis of Linguistics courses. The growing program , at UCSB is still young, having been initiated t by a single faculty member, Professor Authur Schwartz in 1967. By Fall 1970 there will be three professors of Linguistics. The program now offers a full-fledged undergraduate major and an array of graduate seminars Within a few years the linguistics program anticipates becoming an independent department providing opportunities for ad- vanced degrees. Dr Douglas Johnson of Linguistics checks his sources. FRONT ROW' Naomi Greene, Alfredo Bonadeo, Jack Murray Edmond Masson. SECOND ROIM Philip Walker, Ronald Tobin Mark Temmer, Ivan Sonier, Ernest Sturm, Harry Lawton Patrizio Rossi, Andre Malecot. . I Qi i' ' Expansion Anticipated FRENCH AND ITALIAN Active Foculty Roles Notionol Recognition Nationally known for their work, several members of the French and Italian Depart- ments have been invited to speak to the lVlodern Language Association's national and regional conventions. Included in this dis- tinctive group is, the department chairman, Ronald Tobin new to the campus this year, and Ivan Sonier, Alfredo Bonadeo, and Andre Nlalecot. Concentration is necessary to make the language lab beneficial to the student. l VWth the onset of warm weather in third quarter, outdoor classes become popular. SPA NlSH-PORT- UGUESE-FRONT ROW: Harvey Sharrer, Brenton Campbell, M. Gaiza, Jane Yokoyama, Paul Buckelew, Alan Canfield, Enrique Martinez-Lopez, David Bary, Jose Luis Aranguren. SECOND HOW: Enrique Montoliu, Rene Rodriquez, Sam Cohen, Steven Carey, America Lopez, Helen Landerman, Jessie Smith, Lourdes Carrasco, Adele Chunn. GERMAN-RUSSIAN-FRONT ROM Robert Hetzron, Mrs. Erika Batz, Mary Lynne Freling, Roselinde Konrad, John 71 Waterman, Mrs. May Hutchinson, Stuart Atkins. SECOND ROW: Robert Bakus, L. Carl Moody, VWlliam Holtrop, Gunther Go ttschalk, Burt Seidenberg, Harry Steinhauer. SPANISH-PORTUGUESE Chicano Student Need lnspires New Course Alert to student needs, the department developed a class for Chicano students' special language problems. New to the upper division curriculum are Spanish classes in linguistics, culture, and literature in translation. Although Portuguese is spoken on four continents, there is a shortage of professional people trained in this language. Responding to this deficiency, a Portuguese minor has been instigated this year. GERMAN-RUSSIAN Newly Selected Name Emphasizes Changes Coinciding with its new name, the Depart- ment of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures has expanded the emphasis on Slavic and Scandinavian Languages. New teachers and upper division courses will supplement the increased interest of students, who will have the opportunity to evaluate their classes. The prestige of the department increased this year with the election of Professor Stuart Atkins as first vice president of the Nlodern Language Association, the largest professional language organization in the world. NATURAL SCIENCES BIOLOGY Voriety of Disciplines Comprises Department In the UCSB Department of Biological Sciences a broad range of disciplines is com- bined in one department which enables the biology major to undertake a diverse course of study. Undergraduate and graduate in- struction is provided at many levels of bi- ology, biochemistry, molecular biology, de- velopmental and cellular biology, physiology, Systematics, environmental biology, and population biology. The marine laboratory provides studies which take full advantage of department resources and the readily available marine fauna and flora. The newly developing College of Environ- mental Stress occupies the fifth floor of the nevv Biology Building and is a focal point of interdepartmental research. The latest con- cern of scientists for ecology is evident by increased coverage of the population ex- plosion and pollution. Dr. William Purves lrigh ti, of the Biology department, counsels a student during office hours. Dr. Marvin Gass- man's lab technician, Robin King, adjusts the Biology Departments analytical ultra centrifuge ltop rightl, known as Marvelous Marv's Surrealistic Eggbeater. FRONT ROMA' Mary l Erickson, Nancy Lee, Elmer Noble, Beatrice ' Sweeney, W.N. H 0 I m e s , J o h n Cushing, Demorest Da venport, Marvin Cassman, Henry Har- bury, John Carbon, VWIliam Purves, Edu- ardo Orias. SECOND ROVlk Maynard Mose- ley, Bruce Wales, James Cronshaw, Jack King, Aharon Gibor, Edward Triplett. ix . Q! I is "rx Q 9 .1 r 'X E", '25 gg 1 '3 Q il P ima-e Q T: , -Q .1 Q 'om 1 x A . . , I- , - --. - --A . 1. , I., ,Y-.',, ' V 'J - .xv 4 ,'L,'.f-MA. v ', .,, . , . .4 .. x .. . '+ S"' .f:-if-.ff ,-7:if.,,,5:+, x fs- - fviff'-'xf.i1T.L .-,.qw:-.:,- . .. . . , - , - A. ra -1-,.-X, u .-, ,V-,. W, W 51.3 N Q -Q., i-I - L9 A .4 . Er, xg: Y K, V, , V- ,V 44- . Q, ,V ng.. NA' , My VA-m,:L w , ,fx .r AA 33,5 i Qi A it ,Y iv tw Q , ., ., . I, k In Gln.. A 'Tally ip A i N - ,. . ,, ng , A in, 'sf X ,Xfi- 13. lr uk iff V "fi ff!! 9' J Engineering classes have begun investigation into feasible methods of removing the contaminating oil, resulting from off-shore rig spillage, from the stained beaches. FRONT ROIM John Myers, Henri Fenech, Owen Hanna. SECOND ROW: Robert Rinker, Orville Sandall, Edward Profio. CHEM-NUCLEAR ENGllVEERllVG Local Pollution Crisis Spurs Class Project The current upper-division class project of the Chemical-Nuclear Engineering Department is of great interest and relevance to the sur- rounding community. Their research involves building a prototype of a portable apparatus which will remove oil from beach sand. The developing department proudly announced that their first Bachelor of Science degree would be granted in June 1970. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Government Research Linked to Space Age Involved in research under NASA and the Jet Propulsion Lab, the UCSB mechanical Engi- neering Department explores such areas as satellite dynamics and rarefied gas dynamics. Dr. Ekkehard Nlarschall joined the faculty, enhancing the thermoscience capabilities of the department. Trends of student interest led to classes in Ocean Engineering and Environmental Pol- lution this year. Graduates have been granted scholarships to other major universities and placed in responsible industrial positions. FRONT ROIM Robert Sennett, Melvin Eisenstadt, Robert Roemer, Hartmut Bassel, Ray Hickman, Ekkehard Marschall. SECOND ROMA VWlliam Kuby, Thomas Mitchell, William Thomson, John Bruch. w v- : j.".flf?-H , u 1 fu , 1 4 'ii 4 V lb . 1 z 4,6 'ai' A xb H , A ii' ' 4 K3 'iw Ai gwf' ' fs . f f ' .- 7' 1 ggi? git- J 9 -.lj "1 . ' :-gf-niixww p ' I ' In xy '03-Eff ' Q' "1- . I W ,Q -3 n,'. 5' Vim- V ,Kg af! . .' QQ? - ..,, 'N' -' ' fig: fe , , Q "' l L , aj I ' 3, - in vc' 0- , 3, , A , ,,.,- A ,W ,Q f, - 5 F . - "' fl' Af . wg, 1 w rg 1 .1 I :F .1 . -- 'sr - - f. J' Q' '-. L 1 Fm ffm' 'In-.1 - . , 'ff-fqhmf B5 ' V Y' ..,J ' -L.. A" bi , R' ' ' fl 5 -.. '- ' - 4. ' ' L.f v 'rw Q-mg 4g.,if, :V if 5 'W wiiiz. as f - .' -. . V r, , . - "CL I ' 'v , , uiffzrt pf' Q. F F K ' , V af W A - .' Xe 9 Mi ' 1 Y ", 'n 1 W' .Y S ff ff' ' :.. .-'373:'FY- Z1-M 2:51 . 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W-31,3 ..:.:.:.: g FRONT ROIM Eugene Johnsen, Max Weiss, Adil Yaqub, James Robertson, David Sprecher, Robert Thompson, Thomas Boehme. SECOND ROVW Larry Gerstein, Kenneth Millett, Phillip Ostrand, David Outcalt, Melvin Rosenfeld, Hubert Berens, Jack Ceder. MATHEMATICS Beneliciol Revomping Occurs on All Levels Change affected every level of the lVlathe- matics Department this year. Undergraduates saw the computor introduced as an essential part of their numerical analysis courses. Graduate students in the applied math pro- gram found applications relating to other sciences such as biology, chemistry, and economics. The teaching credential curriculum was revised to include courses pertaining directly to the teaching of math. An attempt was directed toward better co-ordination of courses and tests in the Ph.D. program so that requirements can be met sooner and students can progress to more engrossing aspects of advanced study. O PHYSICS Non-Science Moiors Receive Recognition An expansion of the undergraduate pro- gram has begun to diversify education for non-science as well as science majors. The department is dedicated to the prepa- ration of students for their role in a science- oriented society. The new Physics Building has facilities for expanded research in such fields as as- tro-physics and elementary particle physics. FRONT ROMA James Hartle, Vincent Jaccarino, Ray- mond Sawyer, Toru Moriya, Franz Gross. SECOND ROW: Harold Lewis, David Caldwell, Robert Glasser, Bernard Silbernabel, Burton Kendall, Robert Eisberg, Da vid Phillips. Dr. 71 K. McNab takes a reading on the Physics Department's cryostat equipment. S SPECIAL PROGRAMS 'El " fi L. FRONT ROIM Carl Martin, Charles Turner Jr., George Nikotich, VWlliam Brand Jr., Richard Hidalgo, Raymond Bloodhart, James Johnson. BACK ROW: Pedro Flores-Morales, George Gugino, Ruth Girvin, George Kelly, Ann Montgomery, James Dick, Tommie Thompson. FRONT ROW: Deanna Jensen, Nancy Norman, Linda Werner, Pat Boyd, Elaine Rotty, Elizabeth Dimmick, Gerrie Mund, Pat Stock. SECOND ROIM Newell Breyfogle, VWllard Hammer, Leroy Eckardt, John Luccio, Sandy Guess, Larry Lopez, Sherman But- ton, Mayville Kelliher, Ronald Cote, VWlton Wil- ton. THIRD ROW: Ed Doty, Emerson Smith, Andy Everest, Robert Gary, Roger Sears, Dave Gorrie, Art Aldritt, Richard Baldiz- an, Zoltan von Somogyi, Ralph Barkey, Art Gallon. i FOURTH ROVW Ted Fish, l Ray Bosch, Sam Adams, l Rick Rowland. The annual turkey shoot was the highlight of the year for Scabbard and Blade, the ROTC men 's honorary. PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES Progrom Sets Trend For Severol Colleges Since taking the unprecedented step of intro- ducing an Athletic coaching minor, the UCSB Physical Activities Department has been flooded with requests from colleges in eleven states for help in setting up similar programs. The program allows coaches to major in the academic field in which they plan to teach. lt has been predicted that this minor will replace the usual physical education minor. ROTC Course Improvement Reduces Controversy The enrollment pattern in this sometimes con- troversial department has changed over the past year. At present approximately ten per- cent of the students enrolled in Military Science classes are not regularly enrolled in the ROTC program. Students are attracted to courses in U.S. Defense Establishment and American Military History. Both qualify as relevant to our tumultuous world. X 'fly N, V if 1-1 E. L as WL EDUCATION ABROAD Culturol Involvement Stressed os Obiective The objective of the Education Abroad Program is "involvement in the life of the country, specifically in the lite of the university, on both social and academic levels, by an exchange among equals." Presently, the curriculum, supplemented by related tutorial sessions, is expanding to encompass both the normal academic progress toward a degree and specialization in the specific cultural studies for graduate students who wish to teach. .LA Alice Myers lleftl, Education Abroad Student, tests her stamina on a camel ride outside the walls of Jerusalem near the Garden of Gethsemane. Anna Kay Floss labove and upper leftl, also of UCSB, enjoys her stay in France at the LeMans Car Halley and dancing with friends on the Bridge Avignon. COLLEGE OF CREATIVE STUDIES Specio lized Prog rom Exponds Enrollment The College of Creative Studies isa "separate undergraduate college, separately staffed and administered with a special curriculum and a specially selected group of students." Oppor- tunity is provided for a student to pursue one field of particular interest via a tutorial or seminar structure. Enrollment is based on evidence of talent demonstrated in a particular interest area and the studies encompassed within the college. Presently enrollment stands at eighty students. During the 1970-1971 school year, however, twenty additional positions will be available. Q. Gil'l1Qj'Lbw . 1. W, Laura Wimberly's free artistic interpretations of a live model labovel contrast sharply with the exacting technical intra- cacles of Jim Bates' microbiology experiment lrightl. Dan Farkas lleftl surveys the science of mathematics, pondering the solution to an in trlcate problem Frank Bowman lbelowl is given insight into the structural framework of sculpture by instructor Sheldon Kagonoff. s ll M, , ,ggi H li 33515 ii ui wg ll ' fsaxlfwf ll TUTORIALS Program Encourages Personal Development The Tutorial Program's main objective is to "give the superior student a broad education in the liberal arts through an interdepartmen- tal curriculum which allows the design of in- dividual courses of study." To accomplish this task, organization of a study is emphasized critical reading, discussion, and writing. Opportunity for the student who desires to research outside established majors or to ex- pand a subject's implications into another field is provided through the structure within the program ofthe Colloquia. Dr. Lawrence lfwllson, head of Tutorial, smiles en- couragingly at the progress of his seminar class. Graduate Research Analyzes Raw Materials Lab Technician Mark Stein and Geology Graduate Research Assistant Stan Church labovel view the results of the mass spectrometer which are used to analyze the history of liquid volcanic rock extracted from the Cascade Mountains. Ph. D. candidate Bob Deshotels lrightl explains the research of Doug Chaplin concerning the source of oil found in the San ta Barbara Channel. By measuring trace metals it can be determined if the oil comes from natural seeps, tankers, or drilling platforms. The math research of the Graduate School of Education lbelo wi providesa clinical setting to measure youngsters' ability to abstract the concept of place value. Biology Ph.D. candidate Bill Morgan lleftj operates an amino acid analyzer used in his research regarding the heat stability of proteins. The analog computer aids Mechanical Engineering Ph.D. candidate Greg Hobbs in his fundamental investigation of dissipation mechanisms in structures. w fv www: mu H Mm A Lg? UNIVERSITY , :V -- f -' r-'fi 'X ,, , ,, gx , . ' N , 1 WM.: A H- -i U 'fl ' V H 'M' ju I ' - ?mw,.11,,f' A 1-2 "' , QQ, , - 5 ,j?..1 Elf KT, - - "2 , 1: f ' -:ia-1 . :if '1.g1.,Ei'rv J ,, , 4' - fl ' .ff?ff'.'1ff15L.. ,, ga-5 f, . , 5 -L '.y,.gkx, J ' ' V K M, , 1 W "Xing-iz,-'P ' 'v - 'Y x , Nu mi . 'V ,, ., N . D g:..v1? L L, ' - , gg, ,N A 5 iwiycfw' " 'Wd k'F'a'f'H': F- .1 ,T , 4 - 'L ' ,,, , x. . . M . ?.,fSg4 3 y yt .fl -' W -r if-Jw 'I Y' L - ga K " ' D' , 1 r '-1 JB' s I Yi? 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X, -ff-Q- A LS! ,.....5"' 112.-.VM W' QQ. -- g 40 GOVERNOR OF CALIFORNIA Reogon Proposes Inlfuollng Tulhon Wlth lncreaslng concern over the rlslng cost of education Governor Reagan proposed the establishment of tultlon for all registered students At the February Regents meeting has pro posal was accepted with some mod: flcatlons Students will pay S150 more for their education next year and twice that flgure In the fall of 1971 The only flnanclal assistance provided In the new tultlon plan IS the deferred payment program vvhlch IS now ln effect for Regents and National Defense loans Governor Ronald Reagan lbelowl greets friends at a press conference. His accepted tuition proposal increased student dissent hrsfx..--.um-.. x xx fb xx S a-'A u I, ,......,, H xxx, l euafmq ' -. A .0 'Un I S- xf' Q' fgiivgf - 'P 0 73 g ?fL?l"'l M , ffafflly lf' 2 1 f Wx l 5 TSQNFQX Z y TON ml X' f .k Q 'Killa' P LI FQRN ,J ., ,-Jf Ti., Q " r- President Hitch, right, Bill James, and Regent Boyd labovel, listen attentively to Earl Warren 's dedication speech in honor of the Starke Publications Building. President Hitch lleftl relaxes in his office. UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT H ifch's Fee Plon Promotes Debofe Because of financial necessity, Presi- dent Charles Hitch recommended a proposal to increase student fees. Although the amount of the increase was similar to Reagan's proposed raises, President Hitch stressed that student financial needs should be a major consideration as well as unive- rsity expansion and improvement. Hitch opposed the deferred pay- ment plan because he felt that numerous complications would arise from the program. Despite his ob- jections, Reagan's tuition proposal will be initiated next year. :fl """'N pm....t..., l is H H, W zz A 1 M R if "JE 1 i , vi w fx Mrs. Randolph Hearst Mrs. Edward Heller DeWitt Higgs Charles Hitch Robert Monagan Joseph Moorey Edwin Pauley Ronald Reagan Max Rafferty Ed Reinecke Robert Reynolds William Roth Norton Simon William Smith Dean Watkins Wendell Witter 14 44 Chancellor Vernon Cheadle labovel reflects on recent campus problems. Vice Chancellor David Gardner lrightl and Assistant Chancellor Dale Tomlinson labo ve rightl advise the chancellor. CHANCELLOR CHEADLE Community Riots Inspire Changes Traveling, controversy, and riots were on Chancellor Vernon I. Cheadle's 1969-70 agenda. While the chancellor was traveling to establish new edu- cational centers in Paris, Nairobi, and Ghana, violence erupted at UCSB when Bill Allen supporters clamored for a reconsideration of his case. Upon his return Chancellor Cheadle faced not only student dissent but also community disapproval as a Santa Barbara Councilman asked for the resignation of Cheadle and his staff. Following the burst of violence in Isla Vista, Ray Varley was requested to drop his normal duties and to begin working with students and com- munity leaders in an attempt to improve lsla Vista with actions such as the formation of a community center. I . l ,i Preston Dent and Ralph Herrera, newly appointed assistants to the Chancellor on Minority Affairs, discuss the various proposals concerning minorities on campus. Vice Chancellor Russell Buchanan llefti is in charge of Academic Affairs while Vice Chancellor Stephen Goodspeed, sitting, and his assistant Dr George Smith lbelo wi handle Student Affairs. . .: Vice Chancellor of Business and Finance, Ray Varley lleftj, has taken on the duties of probing into the lsla Vista disturbances. Dr. Gordon MacDonald labovel is the Vice Chancellor of Research and Graduate Affairs. i 7,11 Dean Evans, Dean of Men, and Dean Bowers, Dean of Women, lleftl repose from the current problems while the newly appointed Assistant Dean of Men, Ernie Zomalt and the Assistant Dean of Women, Barbara Deutsch lbelowl chat beneath the familiar Kiosk. N ' K wlnx S M.- "' ,.-.N JU, N ......, I Bm' H . , ulodffmdbwun - - a..,.,,-,.W"tf -A-... .- I S , an '- "?"a.,,..,, by Q, 1 A iq , ir'.E',L'x.t' U 'SM' at arf s '-S Joan Reetz, Assistant Dean of Student Activities, and Leslie Meyers, Dean of Student Activities, talk to student Steve Barrett. l , . Dr. Theodore Harder iabo vel, Registrar, is caught between appointments, while Dr. Albert Spauld- ing lrightl, Dean of the College of Letters and Science poses in the Administration Building. Dr. Gunthrop Gottschalk and Dr. Clayton VWlson lbelowl enjoy a break, as Dr. Upton Palmer ibelow righ tl awaits a meeting. I' .fn N :im -.,. .A-i awk., . :ff ' . ' ff'f?' ' - .1 f ' ff 5.32 wr if ,Qi ASPERSONNEL Student Opinions Voiced in Plons Student Participation is a main factor in the affairs of the University Governing Board as students now have the controlling vote on the Board. Student participation has also been encouraged with the University Ex- tension as it now sponsors New Consciousness and several experi- mental classes initiated by students. The new Health Center projected for completion in the summer of 1970 promises expanded and improved facilities. The Education Abroad Program is providing more opportunities for students to participate in foreign studies in 14 countries. The University Center cafeteria is a familiar service to students which is provided for by AS funds and staffed by many students. '51 r Jw? J., 1"' Ml Q S" t .finalist I nr-f"'l .ttyl- Dale Lauderdale Josephine Gottsdanker William Allaway Joan Model! E L Chalbefg Alumni Association Director Counseling Center Manager Education Abroad Director HOUSIUQ Supervisor Placement Offlce DWGCTOV George Obern Ralph Nair Wilfred Robbins LEWIS WHKOH GBOYQS Dalgfleauif Public Information Director School Relations Director Student Health Center Director Summer Sessions Director U C Extension Director X Peggy Hughs, Louise Smith, Margaret Begg, and Bette Ducat lleftl are the familiar people who service the AS Cashier's Office. Doug Jensen lbelowl admires gifts presented to the University Cen ter. ,M , I 'I ,3if1t,Sil l,i y Q l, l Louis Hahl fleftl, AS bookstore manager, discusses UCen affairs with Robert Lorden, AS Executive and UCen Director. Daryl Rush labovel of AS Business Services takes over secre tarial du ties for a change of pace. f . z Tom Tosdal, Representative-at-Large Booker Banks, Representative-at-Large As President of the Associated Students, Bill James lrightl acts as a liaison between the university and the greater statewide and national communities. PF'ESlDENT'S MESSAGE Meons for Change Events at UCSB in 1969-70 were dominated by issues involving ecological responsibility, political responsiveness, academic reforms, and, above all, a stride toward human justice. The student's com- mitment to these issues reflects his increasing awareness of individual responsibility to the society in which he lives, and for the nature of that society. Realizing what must be done, we face a difficult and important decision concerning the means by which we can productively channel our commitment. Effective means of dissent must be constantly reevalu- ated in order for them to attract a favorable response from the public. Finding the right tactic at the right in Students Union time is the real challenge. UCSB has the potential of leading the nation's students. We have the most sophisticated student union in the United States. We have even more potential than Berkeley and UCLA, in that we are the only student organization in the U C system which has a vast amount of control over its own budget. Legis- lative Council approves a budget of well over half a million dollars. We in the University should not underestimate the power of our student government. lt can be a real vehicle to reaching many goals. lt will always be viewed by the public as "the legitimate voice of the student." l, 1 Steve Kottmeier, Representative-at-Large Jeff Herman, Representative-at-Large "fr A E, ,'1Ai'..f L 3 i George Behlmer, Non-Affiliated Representative Javier Escobar, Non-Affiliated Representative AS Secretary June Olson takes minutes at the council meetings and prepares reports. Greg Knell, Executive Vice President Castulo de la Rocha, Administrative Vice President Mary Vail, Panhellenic Representative Dave Abrecht, Fraternity Representative Linda Rudolph, Non'Affiliated Representative Adolph Johnson, Non-Affiliated Representative . Kati Perry, RHA Representative Phil Kohn, RHA Representative 4 FRONT ROIM David Pasternak, VWlliam Bilodeau Raymond Tlscher Derby Don Endicott Casey Cho Linda Howard FOURTH ROW John SECOND ROVlL'Jon Chacopulos, Riece Good, Irene Rapoza Marlyn Jenvey Mansfield Richard Anderson John Snyder Mark Berry Gary Wolfram Martha Hill, Marilyn Prall, Jane Sterrett. THIRD ROW Dan Park Richard Mark Barrall HEGEIVT-SVSCHOLARS Scholarships Cul By Lock of Funds The Regents' Scholarship, the highest of University awards, is given solely on the basis of exceptional academic achievement and promise. All re- cipients of this scholarship receive an annual S100 honorarium. Students requiring financial assistance beyond this also receive an additional sum commensurate with their need. The Regents' Scholarship is the only four year scholarship awarded at UCSB. All others require annual renewal. This scholarship program is currently suf- fering from a short supply of funds. Recipients of Regents' Scholarships must maintain excellent grade-point records throughout their college careers. I 2 my-1 - - -f--- "- PRESIDENTCS' SCHOLARS Students Compete For Elite Aword Academic performance coupled with financial needs are given foremost consideration in the selection of President's Scholarship recipients. The scholarship covers one academic year, so that renewal candidates must compete with other deserving appli- cants. The program, although offering few scholarships, lays special emphasis on financial aspects. Commending entering freshmen for outstanding academic achievement in high school, the university awards students with Honors at Entrance. Gary Wolfram, a Regents' scholar, talks to a fellow track team member and President's Scholar award-winner, Ted Bechtel. .sad HONORS AT ENTRANCE-FRONT ROIM Dean Marikawa, Bill Bilodeau, Linda Kesler, Maureen Regan, Mary Streitwieser, Lisa Kalfsbeek, Frances VWllson, Raymond Tischer, David Pasternak, Karen Ross, Marcia Hoffman, Debbie Knorr, Doreen Honegger, Elsa Allred, Gary Wolfram, Richard Derby, Linda Yemoto, Cathy Brideau, Marcia Miller. SECOND ROW: Dick Luther, Thomas Kaufman, Ted Bechtel, Casey Cho, Terry Smith, Linda Howard, Marilyn Prall, Kathy VWllyard, Cindy Mize, Tina Hoellvvarth, Gail Pospisil, Debra Elliott, Ellen Barrowcliff, Sally Small, Kevin O'Brien, Don Petersen, Rick Delanry, Deborah Burnick. THIRD ROW' Richard Fridell, Martin Hesky, Mark Barrall, Dianne Scott, Martha Hill, Darcy Topper, Laura Brandt, Nancy Crowe, Annabelle Eaton, Pam Martens, Sylvia Baca. FOURTH ROMA' Ellyn Sapper, Renee Yarbrough, Artha Landreth, Marlyn Jenvey, Helen Whiteford, Debbie Smith, Heidi Reichwein, Gregg Petty, Nad Peterson, Christine Horvath. FIFTH ROW' Jlm Schallheim, Richard Anderson, Bruce Kelly, Phillip Madruga, James Evans, John Grant, Robert Vlhlliams, Brett Enders. QP Regents Consider Rescinding Funds This year the Educational Oppor- tunity Program has again been the subject of much discussion in the academic community. The Regents and the Governor have considered withdrawing their support from the program. This would leave ree sponsibility for funding the program to the Associated Students and the Federal Office of Economic Oppor- tunity. Nearly 500 students have benefited from the financial aid, counseling, and classroom and individual tutoring offered by the offices. Selection of EOP students is channeled through the statewide OEO clearing houses. Prospective students are informed about the program through the Master Speakers Bureau and the BSU and IVIECHA at the high school level. FRONT ROW: Doris Wolf, Catherine Skaron, Lillian Campbell, Lizzetta LeFalle. SECOND ROIM Vanzan Brown, VWlliam Fields, Charlette Williams, Cary Peyton. .E 19 ,, LEFT T0 RIGHT: Ann '. ' Aquilera, Yolanda Lopez, f, if 34.1.11 Bill Villa, Lillian Campbell, r' fgf ' 'Y Sally Orsua, Dani Hyde, ' ' ' Irene lshibashi. Q af ,755 5 Students involved in the Center for Study of Democratic Institutions do not form a committee, but appear for discussion groups when interested. Geoffrey Wallace, second row sixth person, is in charge of organizing the project. 'WEEE-s CSDI Controversies Constructively Anolyzed The Center for the Study of Demo- cratic lnstitutions aims at a better understanding of the issues con- fronting our world today. Com- munication is aided by a regular radio program which rebroadcasts tapes of guest speakers at the Center. Members of the Center gather for informal discussions which con- centrate on constructive opinion. Two areas covered in depth this year dealt with "lVlan and His Environment" and "What is a Great Teacher?" These issues were especially pertinent to UCSB's involvement in ecology and the dismissal of non-tenured faculty. PUBLIC RELATIONS BOARD Students Improve Public Relotions Created last year to serve the Associ ated Students by organizing and distributing information regarding stu dent activities, the Public Relations and Press Information Board was active this year. The Board, in conjunction with the University Public Information Office, prepared announcements to release. P U B L l C R E L A- Tl 0 N S - F R 0 N T ROW: Frank Vivian, Helena Serpas, Jarvis Kincaid. SECOND R O W: Chairman Mike Dubrasich, Jim Mills, Dennis Ro- deen, Kevin Ritchie. 8 TUTORING PROJECT Classroom facilities are not always available for volunteer tutors, lbelo wj, but those eager to learn take advantage of any setting. Santa Barbara elementary schools lrightl also reap the benefits of UCSB students' willingness to impart knowledge to slow learners and those needing extra help. Future Teochers Volunteer Tolents Expanding its various service projects helped the Community Aid Board to win this year's Goleta Valley Golden Deed Award. As the largest of CAB's numerous programs, the Tutoring Project has gained recognition throughout Santa Barbara. Three segments, the afternoon, morning, and Carpinteria programs, concentrate on employing creative teaching methods to aid elementary and junior high students who are experiencing difficulties in math and languages. A pre-professional program has been initiated to utilize future teachers as aids in a classroom environment in local schools. TUTORING PROJECT-FRONT ROW: Kathy Martin, Linda Skidmore, Sue Boltinhouse, Chairman og Kim Bish. SECOND ROIM Eileen Kalk, Richard Tuch, Peter Fischer, Robert Kent, Bill Ludlum, Paul Helman, Craig Gerlach, David Tredway. Lili,- Zi snr I V,-H K- was '1 l "lil v X ,J az' he GAUCHOS lN GOVERNMENT Politicol Prog rom Troins Interested First-hand experience in city and county government is the goal ot CAB's Gauchos in Government. This internship program enables students to work part-time in various areas of local government. Also included are programs which involve work in Sacramento and Washington, D.C. ln an attempt to break down communication barriers, both Human Relations Conference and New Con- sciousness utilize sensitivity training methods. New Consciousness focuses the program on encounter groups which are conducted throughout the year. A UCSB student labovel, involved in the Gauchos in Government program, works part-time at the Santa Barbara City Hall. Non-verbal methods of communication ltop and leftl are explored in sensitivity training. COMMUNITY PROJECTS Aclion Underwoy To Help Needy The emphasis of the Nlilpas Com- munity Center has been on working with the Chicano community and assisting it in the utilization of existing services. A tutoring project has been organized in connection with the center. Camp Conestoga is a project de- signed to encourage the development of self-reliance and confidence in groups of local children through a series of weekend camping trips which are also intended to increase their appreciation of the outdoors. Going into its fourth year, the Native American Awareness has emphasized working specifically with the Chumash Indians, located in Santa Ynez, and attempting to familiarize university students with the many problems concerning California Indians. Meredith Ouinn, a Dakota Indian and head of the Foundation for American Indian Rights, lnc., discusses problems of Indian civil rights. Milpas Center student volunteers labove and righ tl tutor Chicano children. eifffgfeizs TW?-'U '?7": 'fm 5-If' ' 'iw -il" l" fl 'eyes 132555 'l,.J.if3?'i wt YQ 5 I L ' wid- -til . , ,-W 1 3 -' 5 1..'.2mIs ', ,fc I jay ff A.,-, ' ZF' . gf W -.riffij f ' ff 1 ' ' ,, ,f K 1133 r:,:w- ' ' A f I, 4 l 1 ,V , ' ' 'ful Q Yr: 5 .V - -,eQef.:i,i ,..., 5.1 ,A sm 9 i , A K ,User L Q Z .V-.ea M 'f 1. ' 1' la? gi-WE-re ET f leer, Y ti . PP t g um: iLfgj.Kgig5"ie2 me ? asm are 13, f N - - - Qtr' . ,, .I ., - ,, by --4 Q ig ui " V i 'R 'Y ,f"""' w . Y 'tt , , A f-1 'AV-N13 ge N, I ' Z " Y A,...n 2 'Zi 3. PROJECTAIVHGOS Heolth Clinic Built With Student Help Living and working in another culture was the unique experience of members of Project Amigos, a group of university 'students who spent Christmas and Spring breaks in San Martin de Porres building a medical clinic under the guidance of a Mexican foreman. Students lbelowl interested in joining Project Amigos receive a briefing on the purposes of the program. Because of student involvement in Boy Scouts lbelow left and leftj, more troops can be organized, providing increased recreational opportunities. BOYSCOUTS Students Activote Locol Boy Scouts The University Troop Development Team works with various Boy Scout Troops which need adult leaders. Special Projects committee is in charge of the initiating and establish- ing of new projects for CAB. GOLETA PROJECT-GENESIS Merge Anticipoted Between Projects Goleta Project is an expansive pro- gram which involves youngsters from the Goleta area, and St. Vincent's School and which currently plans to include Hillside House and La lVlirada School for girls. The project provides friends for underprivileged children. Visiting zoos and museums as well as providing opportunities for recreation are the means by which the program works. Project Genesis' specific aim is to assist the children in Santa Barbara's "target area" schools through a hot breakfast program, clothing banks, and recreational and cultural trips. Future plans include a consolidation of efforts between this group and Goleta Project. Robert Kent labovej leads children through the hot breakfast line provided by Project Genesis. Craig Gerlach lleft and above left! of Goleta Project entertains his charges during an afternoon at Child's Estate, a children 's zoo, in Santa Barbara. s I Carey VWlliams lbelowl, Chairman of the Student Activities Board, has encouraged more student activities on campus. Roger Smith lleftl, Chairman of the Concerts Committee, a subgroup of the Student Activities Board, has helped bring top groups to UCSB. ' ' Lei ,,., 1T5:E'?1'i7f"',m a rtr H' S ' 4 M4111 CONCERT COMMITTEE Compus Violence Concels Concerts Headed by Roger Smith, the Concert Committee brought to the university several outstanding groups such as Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young,The Band, and Blood, Sweat, and Tears. Although these events were successful, no concerts were held third quarter due to a prohibition because of the campus disturbances. ARTCOMlWlTTEE Art Loon Librory lnilioled by Group Providing UCSB students with an opportunity to enjoy art at home, the Art Committee arranged for a print loan library so that students may borrow one of a variety of Italian prints. They presented Genesis ll, an avant-garde film series and maintained exhibits of works in the UCen. ART COMMITTEE: Neil Baker, Chairman Sally Weller, Pete Sherman, Duchess Sherman. 4 LECTURE COMMITTEE Speo Ice rs Present Relevont Lectures With the intent of presenting per- tinent speakers to the campus, the Lecture Committee this year spon- sored notables such as Tom Hayden, of the Chicago Seveng William Kunstler, Chicago defense lawyerp Sargent Shriver, Peace Corps Headp San Francisco lVlayor Joseph Aliotop and Congressman John Tunney. RALLY COMMlTTEE Spirit Encouraged In Sports Crowds Given the task of selecting cheer- leaders and song girls, the Rally Committee devoted time to re- evaluating qualifications for pro- spective spirit leaders. Rally Com- mittee supports the pep squad and helps promote' audience participation. RALL Y COMMITTEE- Chicago Seven Defense Lawyer, VWlliam Kunstler, who was sentenced to serve four years in prison for contempt of court, spoke in the campus stadium. Although he did not advocate violence, his appearance has been linked to the following Isla Vista rio ts. FRONT ROW: Judy Fer- guson, Paula Christiansen, Carla Wulkau, Chairman Kitty Fiedler. SECOND ROW' Kathy Panovich, Marsha Geiger, Sunshine Sandeen, John Ernst, Corinne Braly, Jimmy Moffett, Cindy Springer, Leslie Anderson, Gwen Pabst. HUMECOMING-SPRING SING Hoppiness Theme Domincites Activity Both Spring Sing and Homecoming organizational activities are combined under one committee. The group selected "Happiness is as the Homecoming theme, utilizing it in GGR. The structure of GGR was revised, dividing the program into three groups: the competing numbers, guests, the Jazz Experiment from Santa Barbara and the campus, and the Gaucho Twelve which provided unity throughout the show. RALL Y COMMI TTEE-FRONTROW: Cynde Meyer, Ginger Roth, Chairman Bonnie Campbell, Anne Perry. SECOND ROW: Don Drozd, Lee Edwards, Keith Boman, Mike Boyle. lll One Homecoming activity was the crowning of Georgia Thomas lleftl as Homecoming Queen at halftime. Despite rain which canceled the lsla Vista parade, many groups produced attractive House Decorations labo vel. MUSIC COMMITTEE Touring Groups Split AS Funds The Music Committee, headed by Camille Cooley, allocates the 951,600 appropriation allotted to the music organizations. The funds are divided between six major student musical groups to be used for their tours of the state and foreign countries. This year the Men's Glee is going to universities and colleges in southern California, while Women's Glee tours northern California. Schubertians will travel to Hawaii and the Chamber Singers are hoping for a summer European trip. FRONT ROVW Michael Rossa, Chairman Camille Cooley, Alex Larkin. SECOND ROVW James Colburn, Bonnie Campbell. Chamber Singers labovel, directed by Dorothy Westra are trying to raise money to travel through Europe on a concert tour. The Senior Class meetings lrightl center on discussions covering various aspects of racism and solutions to the problem Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young was an extremely successful AS sponsored concert during Home- ,u coming. Jeff Herman lleftl helps set up a rally to increase awareness of student political issues. Blaise Bonpane labovel speaks at the convocation on November 78 as an invited guest of the AS Lecture Committee. Elena Alioto lrightj takes advantage of ASIA s information file to gather interesting facts about current issues ASIA has been selling the poster lbelowj produced by Company Meta morphosis to raise money for the defense fund Embers Expond Scope of Service The Associated Students Intelligence Agency's main concern has been providing information to and obtain- ing from students their opinions of the campus, the administration, and the faculty. During the Bill Allen incident ASIA compiled a file concerning the details of AIIen's case. Since the demonstrations began ASIA has been raising money for the defense of those arrested during the Bill Allen and the Isla Vista disturb- ances. One of the major projects for raising money has been the sale of posters depicting the burning of the Bank of America. John Radford, manager of the AS printing services, has been indispensable to ASIA in their attempt to disseminate information and gather opinions via student opinion polls. La V-ae-L5"" . 1 . r",""h 'Ls-sifggfkia -f - 9' r. 15: L L .Lt X 4 AWARDS COMMITTEE Loclc of Funding Eliminotes Awords Hampered by a lack of funds, the Awards Committee was forced to abandon many of its presentations. The only awards to be given this year by the Associated Students were the Honor Copy of La Cumbre, the Thomas Storke Medallion and the Outstanding lVlan and Woman Awards. Other traditional awards have been taken over by a variety of campus organizations. The Alumni Association now re- cognizes the outstanding lower division students and a reception was held to recognize award recipients. AWA RDS COMMITTEE: Diana Waldie, Pam Alcala, Julie Morrison, Marie Waldie, Chris Van Gieson Chairman Janet Butz. 1 ELECTIONS COMMITTEE Polls Supervision Assures Legolify Being responsible for all Associated Students' elections entails planning and organizing for Sorority Rep and class officer elections, and conducting the proceedings for the ASIA opinion polls. Although Elections Committee recruits assistants from Spurs and Honeybears to actually man the polling places on election day, the committee itself is responsible for publicizing all elections, supervising the polls, and making sure all constitutional procedure is strictly adhered to. This includes a constant vigil to eliminate the possibility of ballot-box stuffing. ELECTIONS COMMITTEE: Chairman John Evjen, Wendy K orenko, Mary Kay Saucer, Janet Butz, Mary Vail. STUDENT THA VEL COMMITTEE Discounts Heighten Interest in Trovel As a service to students, faculty, and staff, the travel committee provides information concerning travel in Europe and other areas of the world. Students and faculty discounts, charter flights, and car rentals can be arranged through this office. FINANCE COMMITTEE Budgeting Money Couses Conflicts Allotted a total budget of S500,000, Finance Committee is responsible for the distribution of the money to meet demands and priorities. Recent issues have centered on ethnic appropria- tions and the limiting of IAC and student media funds. FINANCE BOARD: Phil Kohn, Steve Kottmeier, Janet Parker, Chairman John McPeak, Bob Lorden, Brian Vandervoet, Ken K engas. Skimrning through travel brochures, Bob Helwick, chairman and sole member of the student travel committee, informs students of travel opportunities. till" Wi? -.-'I.T' Y. Y? ll' it 1 , -,, A 6 i an . LfPZZ:9F.- -W1 i .. X i 4 e..t,.t-mt ' . A ll, Vg 2 , "3 afsseggii l -4 if l 1. l 53 l ri K is v ' 'Z it .gat ' V . V . .l.: Iii! N' lli ill. ' 'LIE gk i ,,, . Q 1 wi 12 it L .sf j UCen A CTI VI TIES B OA R D - F R O N T ROMA' Steve Darwin, Debbie Slemp, Jackie Stanton, DougJensen. S E C O N D R 0 W: Ka thy L yons, Craig L ipp man, Debbie Stanton. UCENACTI VITY BOARD Vo riety of Events Occupied Students Designed to increase the activities available to students, the UCen Activities Committee planned a free film series, concerts, and dances. Cathy Campbell, vvho arranged evening concerts, produced entertain- ment such as Frank Frost and his Jazz Quartet and Chuck Keyser with his flamenco guitar. The group engaged in decorating the UCen to make the campus center more attractive to students. The committee sponsored an old films night once a quarter during finals to relieve tension. The new improvement was the "UCen Focus," a glass enclosed bulletin board which listed current campus events. Although many students view the University Center only as a place to join friends for a meal in the cafeteria, the potentials of its full use are being developed. IAC-FRONT ROIM Dr. Stephen Goadspeed, Dean Barbara Deutsch, George Behlmer Jim Cherry SECOND ROW' Donn Bernstein, Cliff Jenkins, Dr. Otis Graham, Dr. David Young. i Y f 've it' . wi" - Activities Chorge Focilitotes Events Another victim of the budget cutback, the Intercollegiate Athletic Com- mission was responsible this year for allocating limited funds for university athletic events and awards, as well as setting policies and eligibility rulings. As the governing body of inter- collegiate athletics, IAC, under the leadership of Vice-Chancellor Stephen Goodspeed, found, it necessary to charge students for attendance at events for the first time in UCSB history. The new Activities Pass cut down somewhat on attendance at sporting events, but enabled IAC to perpetuate UCSB's participation in intercollegiate competition. As chairman of the University Affairs Board, Ron Kaufman iabovel oversees many of the Associated Students' policy- making and amendment committees. Football lrightl is one of the most popular of the sports threatened by IAC budget cut-backs. l i 1 ' A K fame- V , ,mea - ,, ,A at twist .tl EDUCA TIONAL POLICY COMMI TTEE -F HONT ROVIk Tom Tankersley, Chairman Chuck Newman. i7Lf.f Studies Exomine Acoclemic Policies With an accent on participation, the AS Committee on Educational Policy has student representatives on twelve Academic Senate Committees. The Committee focuses on reviewing foreign language requirements, the freshman who have no general require- ments, and the liberalization of independent studies classes. SECOND ROW: Jann Ficken, John Cotter, Liz K uzell, Steve June, Mary Vail, Barry Posner, Ralph Smith. JUDICIARY Joint Workshops . Accented Justice 1 As the highest judicial body, AS Judiciary Board has tried to increase the objectiveness of trials by initiating open hearings if desired by the student. Workshops centering on stu- dent justice were held with members from lower boards and deans attend- ing during first and third quarter. .IUDICIARY BOARD: Bruce Lumbard, Raymond Morgan, Chairman Judy Epstein, Stewart Brown, Ravinder Jain. 74 SYMPOSIUM COMMITTEE-FRONT ROMA' Joan Parker, Jeanne Stevens. SECOND ROIM Debbie SYMPOSIUM COMMITTEE Klohs, Bob Hitchcock, Nancy Rowe, Chairman Gail Baldelli, Janice Cypher. Rap with Faculty W A Increases Rapport I ln its eighth year, Symposium Com- mittee continued to provide oppor- gl iwl' V tunities for faculty, students, and administrators to retreat for a week- end of unstructured encounter. Asthe t accent is on communication, post- l symposium parties have been intro- duced to maintain friendships. Q' Quarter Schedule Qrganizes Events As a joint AS-Chancellor's board, the Organizations Coordinating Board is responsible for the administration of policies regarding the scheduling of campus facilities. The registration of student organizations is handled by this group. . -- X- . W I Q, rg c 'sv N 2 ,R I OCB-FRONT ROIM Polly Breckinridge, Margaret Pruette, .loan Reetz, Laurel Korber. SECOND ROW: Steve Darwin, Ron Jaeger, Chairman Phillip Hesser, Tom Tosdal, George Behlmer, Doug Jensen. FROSHCAIWP Grientotion Plons Undergo Chonges Dispensing with the current focus of the Frosh Camp, the committee is planning a week of activities for new students during registration week. Combining orientation for both fresh- man and transfer students, the Com- mittee's aim is to produce a more effective academic and social orien- tation program. FROSH CAMP-FRONT ROW' Chairman Joan Hoffman, Judy Berrett, Debbie Thompson. SECOND ROIM Paul Voyen, Mary Walsten, Lance Heineccius, Jane Conway, Steve Hamm. UNIVERSITY DAY Focully, Students Orgonize Function The annual University Day was held to inform parents and potential students of the academic oppor- tunities available at UCSB. Jenny Jenkins, the student coordinator, worked with the Honeybears, Colonel's Coeds, and volunteers to provide directions for lost parents and students and conduct tours of the campus. A permanent committee of faculty and administrators handles the in- formation details and provides repre- sentatives of the academic depart- ments to counsel students concerning possible majors. University Day enables parents and prospective students to explore the campus and ob tain information about programs. COMMUNICATIONS BOARD Medio Focilities Ultro Londmcrk Now located in Storke Publications Building, CommunicationsiBoard has expanded its services. Major issues handled by the group include the discussion of the Regent's examination of student media and censorship. The study suggested that the media go completely independent of AS appropriations. ln view of the already limited AS funds, research will begin to consider the steps necessary to gain financial independence. Joe Kovach, Communications Director, handles the many crises involved in producing successful student media. This year he also served as President of the Pacific Coast Publication Managers Association and was selected by the National Council of College Publications Advisers as the 7.969 Distin- guished Yearbook Adviser. l COMMUNICATIONS BOARD-FRONT ROIM Sunny Mowbray, Dave Abrecht, Leslie Meyers, Wayne Rascati, Chairman Gary Hanauer, John McPeak, Michele Hutcheson. SECOND ROW: Castulo de la Rocha, Greg Knell, Becca VWlson, Harvey Molotch, Joe Kovach, George Obern. Michele Hutcheson, the Receptionist of Starke Publications Building, aids the student media Connie Porter and Gayle Kerr, Advertising Managers Wayne Rascati, Gaucho Guide ,, It Chris Blunden, Activities Calendar MINOR PUBLICATIONS Ccflendor Displays Nude Photography This year's Hustler's Handbook was produced by Advertising Manager Gayle Kerr, who compiled the thou- sands of names to form a directory for the students' convenience. For the second year, Wayne Rascati edited the Gaucho Guide, completing a brief and factual guide for new students to UCSB. Showing creativity through photo- graphy, Chris Blunden produced a unique activities calendar, featuring three nude models. A crane lifts the first of the 67 carillon bells to the top of the 788'Storke tower. Cindy Heaton lrigh tl decorates the El Gaucho office, displaying opinions of governmental policies. Becca Vwlson lbelo wl, El Gaucho Editor, examines the daily publication to co-ordinate follo w-up stories. Mai 178 EX Q, P ,A .xx '--Q Jn, - gre-' 1 vs -- -M :., nav x-.mx .A ..-. , - '-- "lv-on. "N -' QQ? N John Hankins Managing Editor Cindy Heaton Co-City Editor P35 . . T IK-1 ann.: EL GAUCHO Crificol Incidents Pressure Staff A turbulent year kept the El Gaucho reporters on the move to fully cover the varied events. From the Angela Davis controversy to the Regents' decision to institute tuition, the staff, headed by Becca Wilson, presented the facts to the 13,000 students attending the university. El Gaucho, acting as a major source of information for students, received heavy criticism concerning its alleged biased reporting on controversial stories. To answer charges, El Gaucho wrote letters of information, ex- plaining the difficulties of answering to many voices. Opening the paper to guest editori- als was a mechanism introduced by Becca in order to represent varying points of view. Reorganization of the staff, a movement to oust Becca as editor because of a unit deficit, and the explosion of riots kept pressure on the staff as they conveyed immediate news to concerned students. PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF ltop leftl-FRONT ROIM Andy Mills, Gordon Chapple. SECOND ROIM John Franklin, Gerry Neece, Joe Melchione. STAFF WRITERS fleftl: Wendy Landau, Denise Kessler, Sharon Wallis, Ann Henry. Jeff Probst 'qif'7'i V i , Co-City Editor Larry Boggs Feature Editor . V 'X PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS: Gail Franklin, Kathy Peterson, Sharon Wallis, Annette DiPol, Vicky Ashworth. ' , , H .2 ,,, -M -. 'B-, Pat Mell ni. 5 gf' ,,f- .l Ql'j' Y Editorial Editor Cyrus Keller Layout Editor l tiimii' ' 'H 3, Gerry Neece Sports Editor Ruth Brinton il Kiosk Editor , eu, my xi ii ,w,. fra- , ' 4- gi-fl-'fi Staff members ileftj gather to work jointly on a feature. Becca ibelowj discusses a submitted poem with resident poet, Kim Christianson. Joanne Jemmott Night Editor Kathleen Peterson Copy Editor 1 Mark Aulman Arts Editor ' Don the Printer Printer Sta tion Manager Cy Godfrey competently handles emergencies such as setting up spontaneous "live" broadcasts and tape delays. 4:-.M r . t. -l KCSB-FM New Twin Studios Enhonce Prog rom At the beginning of the academic year, KCSB had the privilege of initiating operations from new facili- ties in the Storke Student Publications Building. The increased studio and office space more than tripled KCSB's past working areas, providing the foundations for improvement of pro- gram material. At present, KCSB proudly broad- casts from the finest radio facilities between Los Angeles and San Fran- cisco, serving dorm residents on an ANI channel and the surrounding com- munity on FlVl. The studio improvements enabled KCSB staff members to provide live broadcasting of varied events includ- ing the Regents' Press Conferences from Los Angeles and San Francisco and on-the-spot immediate coverage of the Bill Allen rallies and the emer- gency Academic Senate meeting. Bob Dederick, Assistant Public Affairs Director, and Maxine Cass present a newscast in the new S torke studios. News facilities have expanded in the studio. ull, Bob Skalnik, Assistant Program Director Jeanie Rucci,PubIic Affairs Director Staff members Cathy Pardee, Kathie Rantz, Pete K oza, and Rick Frank inspect a new shipment of records received by the sta tion. Rick Frank, Program Director 'N as. Barbara Bohm, Business Manager Susie Burnett, Music Coordinator Added Resources Expand Programming And Coverage General Manager Cy Godfrey labovel keeps on the job. Staff members lrigh tl broadcast "live" during the Bill Allen rallies. Bill Kleinhofer, Chief Engineer Steve Sellman, Chief Engineer 184 ,pf f 'sg - it Lf A, an F Y A. aff.----V .QQ---rl' K CSB staffer Howard ' Phelan adjusts the con- trols in one of the new studios of the station. .xg News Director Greg Sprankling labovel previews a news story as it comes over the wires from national news services. Staff members Judi Bloom and Howard Phelan lleftl proof news stories before they are aired. 'fm-3. -if .f-1: I M ,.,,..m M L b M, A Ay, 'Y , .N K 3 ' 111:1 1 ,. 'Ng .'. x, S WA X M mg 14 ??1sL 'j K1?' ? ff --L' V M I ' 'A Lf ll , h1ff2'40zA JFW' '71 " 'J ,, 1 1' a 5 as . . , A 9 4 '. X., -.5 Nga-1:1-.. 'S- '55 'An ' 1 I 1 .si 1 -4-,., fl 1 , ' .511 " A 3' .fTff:5'15a 'T 1 , it- F, .? ,if S gf LA CUIWBRE Novice Sfoff Sells, Produces Annuol Inspired by the top ratings from critics awarded to the 1969 La Cumbre, the 1970 staff, composed mainly of college yearbook novices, attempted to cover the year of turmoil and rapid changes objectively. The book, although 32 pages smaller than the previous, contains more H-i".,1-ld pages of candid pictures than ever before in order to show more aspects of the student's life. The expansive new offices in the Storke Publications Building allowed each editor to claim a private working area, leading to less last minute lost-picture-emergencies. The staffers, headed by Sunny Nlowbray, fanned out across the campus to interview as many presidents, chairmen, depart- ment heads, and coaches as possible in 1 order to make the copy factual and 1 relevant. The La Cumbre went on sale for the first time in the 1969-1970 year. Because the response at the end of first quarter was an excellent 3,000 purchases, 4,000 books were ordered. The sales campaign was handled by IJIAIL Shelley Lulow Sharon Neisingh and aided by staff Panfffcsgrlfgler members, who donated time to sit at Copy Editor tables and paint colorful posters. l l ASSISTANTS: Diane Johnson, Intramural Sportsg Jean Takagaki, Isla Vista,' Jason Niiya, Phatagrapherf Bruce Zimmerman, University. Section Editors Cover Yeor of Changes 1:2 gh uri: 'M W' x :S . Susan Linn Henry Silverman Cultural and Social Events Editor Intercollegiate Sports Editor Gerry Hinkley Lynne Pellegrini Political Events Editor Intramural Sports Editor 1: Z,-f Celeste Plaister Becky Reeder Lind? KOGYIQBY Academics Editor Greeks Editor ISIS VlSt3 Editor E . L ,X f li, e. Ricardo Freeman Karen LYUW1 RHA Editor RHA Editor 5 Ji M me ,.. Sharon Maclntyre Business Manager, University Editor Sharon Neisingh Business Manager To complete final pages for a 744-page deadline, staffers Susan Linn, Sharon Maclntyre, Celeste Plaister, and Sunny Mowbray gave up part of the spring vacation. :H ,I gi Q ,iffy I ,'if'Q'," 44114, ell: 1 .1 Margie Gant Index Editor BLUEKEY Sunday Sessions Increase Potential The high standards of membership re- quired by the National Blue Key honorary organization are maintained by the men of the local chapter. Upper division men selected must be in the top third of their classes and exhibit leadership in all phases of campus activities. Bimonthly meetings over Sunday breakfast with distinguished guests present, encourage members to fulfill the potentials of college education. il Larry Adams, lecturer in political science, discusses current affairs with Blue Key f labove and topl during one of Q 1 the bi-mon thly breakfasts. ' 2 ig,-' 1 :sa ni. Keith Boman 'Ee ,. "Iss, i it l r 3 it ln! 'ua W - We -:gif "" ' 49 i ,fs l R- A , X , ,.,,, , 1 B ' t , l i Gary Cook Robert Crouse Donald Drozd Brad Ginder Robert Helwick Skip McCowan Chuck Newman Ron Reese Raymond Roan William Steiner - i 'ii '- .'-'JN' f, gi' lx 38 ' k ,4,:: ,,, 0 bfi Shelley Beeman Christine Doney Julie Henderson Susan Pearce 259- x4 ' 2 14" TN? 'Uk W I: xxx' Q N I l ,f ,Xin . i' , l 3, X Kathleen Brook Jackie Copple Grace Corselius Caleen Erickson Virginia Giammona Roberta Gomer Kathy Kirkpatrick Ann Lathrop Sharon Neisingh Ruth Ann Robinson Pam Schulz Sharon Veach 'Q li l i s is , K L V Shelly Davis Mary Haloski Mary Parker Susan Wilcox Newly selected Chimes treated their "Big Sisters," last yearis group, to a surprise lce Cream Social at Brady 's in January. CHIMES 1 . . . Weeks Activities Focus on Future Switching emphases this year from traditional service projects to an honorary group, Chimes dedicated their efforts to a Chimes Week held third quarter. Its purpose was to acquaint junior men and women with the necessary steps for applying to graduate schools and jobs. Lecturers discussed career oppor- tunities and new fields opening, as the girls attempted to help students avoid the delayed decisions of the senior year. During the sessions held from April 13 through 16, Chimes produced a pamphlet which contained valuable information concerning futures after college. MUPHI EPSJLON Musicol Sorority Entertoins Students As a professional musical sorority, the Santa Barbara chapter of lVlu Phi Epsilon contributed to the Music De- partment by donating scholarships and presenting talented recitals. The group serves to expand music appreci- ation in the community by giving per- formances and instruction to children at elementary schools. FRONT ROW' Judy Cooper, Beverly Chapman, Cynde Meyer lPresidentl, Sally Butler. SECOND ROM4' Carol Smallenburg, Jeanne Shumway, Angela Soli. Gathered about the piano, Mu Phi Epsilon members work to coordinate their talents. SCABBARD AND BLADE Milito ry l-lonoro ry Serves Community Scabbard and Blade, a national mili- tary honorary, concentrated its efforts toward raising money for a scholar- ship to be presented to an ROTC cadet. The biggest money raising pro- ject is the annual Turkey Shoot jointly sponsored with Colonel's Coeds. The annual lVliIitary Ball was held at Andrews Air Force Base. FRONT ROW: Nigel Buxton, Cris Wolverton, James Lambert, David Sale, David Lenhardt lPresidentl, Bernard Weinzimmer, David Gomez, Ron Reiner, Robert Arsenault, Robert Anderson. SECOND ROW' Bruce Clark, Mike Featherstone, George Hum- phries, Martin Breaker. SCABBARD' Bi I. lf x I X 4.7 --Efx ' X XA, ,ef 122 wif: W High . xg A If x . 1 T, f Y-.. , -MW ,X 1, 1 ' L , . 2' 'a !',',, ,4 r 3 - 2 'S ' 4' 0 D l z q. 'J -Q 5E. I :FN I 5 54'-V1 sj'L1,.'.,'f " ' 'kigiffiif ' 1 "4"lL ""' I ' :z.'9'?3.-.r - . ,- " f ' 11 , '-5.-,.,:"l ff Y ' A .M A '-- , :H 'df 'L'1inzzfg f,p " ' , --5 :I-J. . vwxw ff:1Ti.f!!!l ' ' ,2"' x.. 'Q' . ii ' ' 3 .-wifi: f A ' mn I .1 w X 34A Lb w+ L xx X d., 6 ' 'aj R gy XA 'ugli- gs 'f ' J v . I' r, ' , uw - my-. n 7 . I NJ? M35 "'fi'f:: 91, 1.01: ' 'lu "n ,.!'o1'u 1xg:.,?u .MNPXQQQ Woifii 13 ll 'N A"'ff!: "TP ffffi, ' xt: iv - X. '44 w fx. rg ,f ! ., f. K , L mm99H, "1 -nflilffxi . ,, ,, g-I 0 0 '. y '. .uma 0 4- , ! L I I 1 1 !,:1f-4' V. . ,f 4 . 4 if x SEQ' W3 gifs? . C Q? ,E if .21 Q.. , ww, -?fe'w,-i . 923535555 fggm .1 ' -'ii '52 ,K . ggaw vgsf S 11, lm 1 ,, EQ. A :M- H 115 c 1 1 ff.: ff - 'u .Sli 4? 1 iwmffx fl f 1,-vfqgggg .PM EiQ24?iQ4n..fM J Duff L , -QPR, . 5, ... ,A fmruggggxmtgffy' s., :Enix ,A gg, 1 'J Vx' ww J 6 -219 - 1 Q'.Vb'XX'X l ' -1 . W. 2 l ww- . "'!"i' K' f .5-ff Ti 414554 .f ' 'ff .Pl .tx . 1, , -' 3 f -, 43? f 1 43:5 E s 'JE' L - .fb E . 'K is - 1 5 IP N I I 5.. x -. 1:.-, Lf w uw 1: w x Ex 4. ,,V,,-- rf :Q -f wif 4 vw 4 ... .J E 1 Z' ' n in I r M w w I , . n, 1, .... :, . " :':Iaf?3?'I ' '94 L .w -A. ' 'iv .. .-.r ,f-ix .A-4 'in-. 1 -v I ff X J'-1 ? -'P' - ' A -f 4 1. Q, Te' l lx T . , ,- f ff' z, N ' 't E-' X ' n N , in , I K .. ' 1 Q W A 'f ' I f A t- W--P gl WM agar ' 5 5, L: a . 1 . ' - - " ' -- T ' - V' n ', f W 1 , . .5 Tl . fa ia Q V ,Z 'ff' ,' , -. - in L ' Y Z Iwi ? .4 M , ' l " ' Q 'ff' - I in jd.: gl 'I' Q' N A ff' , 'A ' " b -., 15' F f-4 ' .' W Y A-Q , ',, "N-Q, l ,f?51, ' , Y T.. . EY 1 . R - 5" wi- Q ' -A ,- - - -V , V , , I ' 'V " "" .N f 4 "qv-A-,P 1 - 1,9 1 H, J .N M N 5 Z, W , , , . .' 1 l A , 3... g -f.,, I i Y X 'Y E'-Q I -, F 2-V , ' 1-5 hw Z' 5 11 ' 4 ,, ,V . .ps---.-.,-,-'fn 1-x--ew, .25 .4-. 'H+ '-1 . ' ff ,V . J I B 'Q liQQ.l31.f- " '1 '2 QQ. ' ' 'f-ffl. az- 2 A ,if s , ', . gp . 'if' ' if ' '5aEf3f:F.if.L-5+ , . Sf- f ' Q . ' 1' . y Rf: ' Q 'V 754 xl ' .,.,. , -if V "s f' 5 ...ss ...fs - . vb . S V- gig 'Y' f' ' f 4" A ' "li "fl ' Cl 1 ' fl ' W ' FJ f W 5, -f ,, li' Ni: . ' '3 xi? , ' A . :P X47 " ' s u Wg E N5 1 -, iq'-.Q I . fefyn :A , W 5 1 . v - K.: . - 'J ' ' 4 1 - ' 1 - 'Q . 'M ' Y I ' A ' 1 7 1 ms? f fn , . 1 A 1 N - ,-" f1Ai A lag. - - '- - A -4 T ff' - K T H M 2 I Y V, W l L,.,.,,,..Af' . I I ' ,' i .A Q32 fgiwsx W 1 M . 55' 'f cr f 1 , . , as 1 , ,X ya.--W .V,L 5, Q hz? 2 N5 -1 ' Q. A gn 10 '-,gan e -X' , PX f 95533 z J :-X. CULONELCS COEDS Shifting Emphosis Stresses Service Previously considered an auxiliary to ROTC, Colonel's Coeds voted to dis- associate themselves and become an independent organization under CAB. Concentrating on service, the group's main project this year was active volunteer work, tutoring and planning social events, for St. Vincent's, a school for emotionally retarded girls. Continuing to act as a service group for ROTC, members aided with pub- licity and bid selling for the military ball. Other services included ushering, selling programs at games, guiding for University Day, and helping with Freshmen Orientation. ColoneI's Coeds sponsored the Glamour Contest for the Best Dressed Girl on campus and are planning to adopt a child from a foreign country. To help fund these projects, they sold Christmas chooners. has sift., ' lfliiiir iii? W S- '- Ui'-5 'f' 3 ' 'Q s 1. I 1 i ,." A ff :-' -at 'f t i. . , .. 5. r l P . r ' i .t 'A "l' 1 ' - I ' ' -. , I' i ' X -5 1' . -,g ..t .t-'. . , ef' A I Q A A S "+C ii" " ' .-:-:- p g VM'-f L2 Q V v. g . Q 5 ,qt fr f,. ll 11 A q '1 f , Q t i Sherrell Ball Lynn Barnes Catherine Batteen Perri Heinz Laurel Herbert Marcia Hoffman NSN!-'Y'Al1'7 Phelan Sharon Ready Melinda Rogers i N .' ,f , f J . : of "X, ' . ' F ? -A 'E-iiiii' Stephanie Brown Rose Anne James Patricia Scarlett 1'-ev Debra Conley Cecile Currier Chew, Denton Diane Derian Janet Jennings Peggy Jerome susan Lejphafdf Carol Moller Georgia Thomas Patricia Van Dam Lindsay Vann Karen Wilcox f J B YlI ,. V M gi- , " mi is v i Enthusiasm prevails over meetings as Cheryl Denton lleftl, president of Colonel's Coeds, receives suggestions from members concerning activities to be planned for St. Vincents. Cheryl Denton and Rose Anne James lbelowl and Lynn Barnes and Janet Jennings lbottoml exemplify eagerness working with girls at St. Vincent's during this year's annual Christmas party. .,f . 41 w Shirley Frantz Dorothy Neilson Anne VWllis A A Jan Greathead Janet Okazaki Janice Younger .,x .-.5 Nancy Hatch Patricia Oyama Maryann Zaninovich wg N ,,. i. - 3. 'fi ei 5 . , I .14 I "Vi . .. vw i X 5 Honeybear Sue Pearce guides a Chicago high school student and her mother through the semi-tropical setting of the dorms. 529616 Q Q r- KD QD B' +7 6 'X N x Xt in -V 47+ 1. A. f ,, 57 It U, - P' 1 k ,Q V, "" if , .:., V. j 1, 15, ..f2'Qrg hifi 'V I , fl Dee Anderson Elaine Barrett Stacey Griffith Sarajo Hornstein Jan Roberts Ellen Savage M4 ' - I P . i K ' g I 12. -, f "' Susan Bates Carolyn L ynes Carol Stewart F - f 1. X . egg 4 me- , .tee .1 Gail Bei Sharon Mason Mary Vail ,L r ' w A' - F. , , , - Trudy Boyer Stephanie Brown Kathy Burk Linda Morse Judy Parker Susan Pearce Barbara Walker Sally lfWllson Becky Yates J: , n slit, 'x ' x .. ,, 4 ii ra - - Nancy Colvin Vidda Ouon Maryann Zaninovich 2-1-L We QI -IU! l i + f f ' W' ' Ka th y Da vis Sharon Ready The UCen art galleries lfar leftl and Ortega Dining Commons fleftl are regular stops in guided tours of the campus featured by the club. HONEYBEARS Cfficiol l-loslesses Aim for Service Thirty active members of Honeybears filled the year's calendar with many activities fulfilling their role as official hostesses for UCSB. Chosen for their poise, appearance, and honesty-with- tact, the girls serve to present a pleasing picture of the campus to visitors, and have recently opened membership to juniors and transfers. Between their official duties of Uni- versity Day and Parents' Day the host- esses conduct tours for visiting students and parents. This year they ushered at various cultural events, sold programs at basketball games, and cheered teams leaving for away games. Second quarter the girls held a tea for their auxiliary group, Howdy Bears. PROJECT NEPAL: Jeff Jorgen- sen fteam advisorl, Sonja Hansen, Fran Foster, Mike Nagleg Joe Campanelli lan Jack. PRUJECTNEPAL Rich Experiences From Asion Visit Following rigorous selection and train- ing, the five chosen team members embarked on a goodwill mission to Nepal. In its second year, Project Nepal's purpose is to establish rapport with college students based on sincere friendship and understanding by visit- ing colleges and youth hostels throughout the country. Programs at the universities con- sisted of three main meetings: an in- troductory visit with student leaders and the principal, a rap session with interested students, and a cultural ex- change program with both students and team members participating. Joe Campanelli fabovej chats with two Napalese students while the team fbelowl presents one of their cultural exchange pro- grams before an audience of university stu- dents. PROJECTPAKISTAIV Student Exchange Brings Aworeness Bicycle jinrikishas, shalamar gardens, teas with students, and dinners with families were the memorable experi- ences shared by members of the Project Pakistan team. Because of the increasing political awareness of the Pakistani student, the seven year old project has shifted its emphasis from informing Asian stu- dents to clarifying generalizations con- cerning the United States. The group's goals were carried through by means of involved discussions and the develop- ment of friendships with the students at colleges and universities throughout both East and West Pakistan. FRONT ROMA Lynn Rigney, John Kaucher, Sam Woodhouse, Rod Vlhndle. SECOND ROVW Robert Siberry ladvisorl, Barbara Harris, Paul Box, Rochelle Rose. ln one of the typical rap sessions with students from the universities ln Pakistan Rod Windle exchanges political viewpoin ts. 02 "So what do we do now?" asks Kirk Duncan, immedi- ate right, as Dane Mason, Shirley Onodera, Pat Dixon, Fred Kaplan, and Terry Lipari haul one of the crew's 33,000 shells to the familiar lagoon. il. .,.,, M1 V ' ig, l " , -: ' eff' wt: H. :.: :-:-' . WV Que? I 'fi' N? , 1'f'uY-BL-'f'--:'f7 L- 4' Jar ess . .. .5-3. .ffibrf . 'I 1 If ' ,J--up 'V 4'3" H .- 1 Nxttii 345 l IJ at at ., Deborah Ayars , " il Randi Ellman r J 'XF-,., Q Linda Koerner uf, I Hi -v 7, Q ,...,.. I I H iih g - r - Susan Barnes Gsrol Bagden Kitty Fiedler Noreen Fiore Dareene Kolar Carol Korn Celeste Plaister Susan Powell K Q "' of 1 .1 T 1Xe'A Leslie Bruhn Diane Fleischli Barbara Kruse Cindy Shields I aL e? -r I QR Kathryn Burk Patricia Griset Kathy Ledeen Janet Skladal 'P X :vo XM' , K ' ll Bobbie Cole Donna Halpern Jennifer McLellan Sue Smith 47-19 9 9 its 6, v, .11 Jane Conway Cindy Crowell Julie Henderson Sandra Hilscher Jeanette Mandella Katherine Meyer Jan Stephen Lindsey Stewart ' i if if l. Raw 621: , 4.13 AX ., -V-Q w...g ., l . :ark I 1 k , Patricia Curran Toni Hoffman Linda Mooers Barbara Thiele P1 pig' w., 4. , in-1-V l . ai, ' "-'? f"' 1 pdf f Pat Dixon Susan Hummel Ruth Morden Diana Waldie Nancy Drach Katie Hummes Valerie Okuda Candy Walker Linda Eggers Seline Hunkin Shirley Onodera Fran Weems Elaine Ekberg Kathleen Kelley Patricia Owings Pamela Whitelock SHELLANDOAF' Crews Exponsion Reflected by Need As the auxiliary to the Crew Team, Shell and Oar's primary functions center on Crew and Lake Cachuma. The girls travel with the team and, at home, act as official hostesses for meets and regattas. Before the actual season starts, members concentrate on raising money and keeping the team's supply of vitamin C high by buying oranges in wholesale lots. Shell and Oar, in conjunction with Crew, raffled off a new Datsun. Socially active, the girls planned frequent parties and picnics. A big- brother-little sister program was initiated to increase rapport between the groups. A spring banquet com- pleted the year. 20 gJ?T?M 5'.,' 1 1 ' E ll ' SQL . egg O4 my 1 ' . Q1 me M G' wifi No stone was left un turned, nor bush unbent, when the lsla Vista clean-up zealots, led by Spurs and other service groups, hit the littered fields and streets of the off-campus community. i :AA . 'i , av I .- Kay Austin Elsie Camerlengo Lucy Cervantes Suzanne Hill Linda Howard Katie Hummes Gail Papas Analee Reynolds Marguerite Rindge ' 4 "Grab your bag, pick your area, and clean up," was the order of the day, as Spurs lleftl and friends from l. V. lbelowl gathered together to help alleviate accumulated trash in the Isla Vista community. :M Girls' l-lonorory Aids Community Q- ie ii it . In addition to their on-campus service activities for 1970, Spurs participated in the Joint Isla Vista Effort Trash-ln 'M w- " and aided the lVlarch of Dimes cam- paign during lVlarch. As in past years, members sold bright yellow mums at the Homecoming game and delivered Spur-O-Grams in time for VaIentine's Day. Combining charm and service, Spurs could be seen ushering at the Galloping Gaucho and Road Runner Reviews, working at Open Registra- tion, and manning an information booth at University Day. As part of their national affiliation, representa- Q 2 it Q ,, LuCinda Cook Candee Caoperrider .Aigner Elgson bujzy Gigi: gathy Harris tives attended the l'eQlOl"I3l COl'lV9lTlIlOn Eileen Johnson Linda Mathews argo ann y a erie uda atricia Owings - - - Barbara Schmidt Carol Stewart Candy Walker Debbie VWIliams Laureen Young In October at to dlscuss serwce projects of Spurs across the country. x. 'ff ., XML' lgiv NWN U " 'i J r.. x '51, 'ff' f 5 We l liking 1,54 N' t. N H191 R mu, y an .2 Y , 43' .H . .Ig X wg, ,L-, , .. . 'Je A 3 Wig ,. I vqxw Aff +S- P rl ' 1 K. NJ' . ew' KH. if .ppm- vw, A rfwf- 454 .242 "ff fy? , .N- A N-. 4. F517 --2. -- -.4. x s S. . N Q Y ...al 2 gwig- -- ,gf 5-. x ,- 2 ,,.. an ,ff , fs ,YN fm :gg Meal? Qian , M W qq,L v,f1!.nw A feif ,f.:,g:?-G'f?f',:4" gg, was ,fe,,:w- --:X Q if -www:-.,:-,:e ff K .QW , Active Students Work E 208 Craig Gerlach labovei, of CAB's Goleta Project, shares an afternoon with a school child. University Day labove righti endeavors to explain the academic opportunities of the University to parents and prospective students. Educational awareness through interaction is demonstrated by Dr. Hodgkins' discussion with Debbie Mount lrighti. in 0 Multi-faceted University .5 5-Q-1-. ' - 1 arphgjs . E" In ' ' sa' Reflecting the spirit of the well-rounded university, students of all ethnic groups and political affiliations are given as much aid as possible fleftl to facilitate their desire for an education. Some prefer solitary study lbelowi, but others find more relevance in becoming tglz E involved with the decision-making processes lbelowl. R,,,,,F...,Q -GW K- M1 fW"W ' 'SSX W ' ,X ww:- Qfn 'E' 'W' ' ,. tg'-5 3, W , 4,4151 -SE F Y .. ,..... , vi -wx 5 ' , a SPORTS ' ' W .. . .-Ax., ,f49.,,WL I A K : ,. n.w.,,-1-1. -V , - M 6 'mv was .psvgrszfnwwuw mv.-L'--'h1H'WV'WU"W'fW Wk 1 ww I 1 1 1 I Rani. ,FFP -3 ER f er --. . f U., Y A , "gk gli r . A ., V Q , : i 'W 'V 1 ' .M , :.. . . , , . ., H v ell' , ' as ., "' A 'Q W, P ' . , 1 ff " I, 'Q A , - A - ,f Q V ,E up .9-A , , . . , M O , Jr-"P?v'g-ff' 1' -Qi., T. ',!"fii'r'?f ,J W I S . Q A f -as 3 R f -"",sf.,4-ff 1? .if 4. "Y Eli" -Q-Wig I i'!k , Si 'J' ,-- LAI- '1.,u.,,:'fa,3li?Qlfk 1i, V '5',f . ,nf H3 ' , -'YT lf, M-: '?D'S:-g'X', 1,,.'. ,ff 31, ,xg QQXMWQH ' -ui K '- if 'Q H1 , . 3 lf. 'gfivsfz ,' .,,,,. '..-1' asf' " 5 nf. Aam 4e-555' fpib' - -' ' f x'-. ands Ilnll :wa 1 1 D ., 4. W 4 4-93.21 A "Q Q be ,H A Q ' ' I ,am , 4- M-fs: ' . , USS' , GH vm' , . J Q fl, vi: ,J LYEHS- Y' 15 f "W Q-1 1 QQ- , Q- ' 1 1 . 1 1. .A I 4 .. ' wg N '6 ' V W ,Z gym A fm- ,W ,, '.i5f-.41 5 -. JFS? - 13751 , . , ,ue-,.. 9, , I .1-I. 'pk .. yr .-A-L-' H 4 -VIP' as-"' fi-fq .145 . . Af" '3 V '33 ..,, , f. 4: f73m,,'1',:c'-J. ,Que ,f. .f 1. 1.- AFTER 40 YEARS. . . Joclc Curlice Relires, Everest Tolces Over "Cactus Jack" Curtice, a 40-year collegiate coaching veteran, announced his retirement at the conclusion of his seventh season as head football coach at UCSB. During his span at the helm, he compiled a 37-29-1 tally. In 1965 he produced the finest season record in UCSB history, 8-1, and was selected Football Coach of the Year. Curtice, who will remain Athletic Director, a post he has held since 1965, has proven in- valuable in season scheduling, planning the Campus Stadium, and finances. He will be re- placed by his longtime friend and assistant, Coach Andy Everest. Coach Curtice imparts pre-game strategic "words of wisdom" to senior quarterback-son Jim. UCSB Sports information Director Donn Bernstein jOVl3ffy msplres Cumge 5 valuable aides framers Curtis Watson and Harry Call flankerback Joe Nunez before the Homecoming Game, ahan escort injured player Joe Nunez across the turf H L-.....,.,..,, ,,...--f-Q el 1 .-. ' ggvs ,., V---" f .J ? , , . . ,f Q 'x ' Q .-:HL , 1 ' 'I f- - '- in , 5- i T , I, v-Q! 55 F fl r ' 132' j-- I1 f- f s Q V 5 I R e 4 V Q ,- in ' Y 5 gl 1 I N Iwi: V' ' M .. EEE f 3. NM' V , J 1 ff ' 'YY " , . Wa , V XX 55, V f V Wx ii 'Q V , K. . Q , 3 Q ,.I... . E I., ' ' ' . 73-'35 V 1 ' 5 ' 5236154-,,.c J Q, V,, 12,55 . -ii g,'.LI5' . V ,2.Vf- 5,1 4 n VZ, V :lx vi' ., ' pllbf. I , -gy, V. 4 V-'A Vg 'Y A V-if iq ,Q .g,,-- ' V,, -.l,y-- -if-13 ,wgsi VV ,.V. . --VV 1 -7- .. 44--it '.4K.-,Vg ag V. ,. V VT- V .. , - W1 -9, P- " A :GJ V 1- V 1 -,- 4 ,. V fm: 3 1 V fww fr- - V V yV.-VL-'- - mf! V . 1 451, 5 - V i V V .ml 'L -,L gydty W . QM.: ,.-.1i,f5-in jg-gi :hx H,-g,Q::'H1-,4V,:fa+1fj'g, . il - ' k . f: ' L ' J-an :Vf-wg : J R H P. A , I, V ...MN Y, V 'nf ,if--VIN, Q .,.-.. ..V V. My Y 'Y "iffy :nu--z f.,.g- 1. .V.'."' Eff V1 t.':P"i' -.4."'1"T7--I . I "V 'L .fb gr-,V , s, , V fL,'1'rI'-'L"" 'Fir-.1214 - 3 VV:.V1?sg21'Vf-If 3 .5 - 1 1-.-VVf'Va,-:-Pz:Vvf- "Vg5gV-2-V '19 4 , W ,. ,, -ehiwuf p..6'1f 'H uf ' Vu- V VW 'F N' P385 5 l 4, ' ' V ..- if , -L if A ' 'I'-+ 4' "-VWVQVQV jg: Jax. .4 , ' gr 'K 1 1: - 1. l 5 ' i i' . d ' Q24 - W4 -Q , , , I , WM. 1 .:T3.,, ,Q ',,- , V -ew! 1-V V vilffw ww' ' 4- . , : ' ' EV Y 4 V-, - .V wan,-V ,,,,,,.'1,'-,Ei-l'b-.high ' ' 'ssi.,E. V . 'H ff--41 'H 'WW' .-. me .-ws, 4,4-.Qm..sq1-wx-1 ., ' H V vi- W... .. M, W ,V L V ...V,...M.Qf--ig. gag-,1-ae. V V 'I I-4:6 1 f . .- .A,..,...: r,Q,.ewf,1,Qu V :.V 4-4,.py,.5-.:.f.--.w..v....-.V . ,...,,. .. wr wlifmf, ...M..s:p.zrr ...Quin-:ae..g.2s. V ,AL g :gg .fp-g -- f . .-n-'VE-km-.f-Atv. Hama.-1 ' . ..,- ,.V ,, , .M-is ,Af , .WV VW. 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'K v, H " nj M 'F 4f'xViA szkciif ,f,1x'li: yf't:x Psi ff '2 f1v5 9' A 1' "' GJ F" " 3" QQ .-"" 3' ' "Cm 1-1: fi .Q-s ,J 'Q Q Isa." 1 xx 655 Sw? rr 353-x 'fl ,P . ,, WY 1 .jf nw 'N 1,- 'S- ., fx tg? x W ,A fb. - , 'SX lzjfx .V 5 TT? wfx-,W W , CHEERLEADERS Squad Foces Dissent, Unenthusiosfic Fons 1969-1970's Gaucho spirit corps was the target of considerable dissent from the student body. They were often criticized for lack of spirit and inappropriate cheers. Led by Gail Teixeira, the songleaders exerted considerable effort, but were cen- sored for their disorganization. The six song girls distinguished themselves by attending all of the out-ofltown football games, and were noted for their cooperation with band director Hal Brendle. Although the cheerleaders were often blasted for their crudeness and apathy, they often came up into the stands in an attempt to enthuse the admittedly small Gaucho foot- ball audiences. VARSITY CHEERLEADERS-FRONT ROW: John Ernst. SECOND ROW: Jim Moffett, Tex Williams. THIRD ROW. Debby Nichols, Diane Swift. Tex VWlliams and Diane Swift ibelowl address Gaucho crowds with vigor and enthusiasm. ii 2 .4 11 .1 5 3. F F 1 1+ V 1 W W nf 5 Tl A m I K R QQ i W N r., . ,. , X - .. , .X M 1 ,. L , Y N H .KW,-.,..Llyggjjfjij-51vfp.i53g,:.,Q:,, -.1--q.:,.q,,,,,,,M,,.-v,W:,Ww.W1w.m1gAww.swmygXg,,g'g,.-W-.-.wQ,-5,5-71-f.wg,,,y,-Xinm.,:My,,,,,,391N,,Jgb! ,,,,..X0.A.,Q.m,w:,13 . 1 9 ww mucuus mu ' -- - b ,QQ E -mmm, ' 3 . jf m x 4 A F I QPF' M Q F 1 L Q V 5 Az. Ii f"", A f , 1 'Alu - . 1 .M 1,...QdH 5159 .. 'W' 2. , ' M ' GT . J' flni. 226+ ' ln...-N 220 I",- w .ff s - ' x qf'..??f3 1 . ' , 'L X A :iw ff - .i H 55 ' -, ,n-:4 1 FN F IX-I X5 r- . s I -1 , x N . N " l 1,1 ' V 'WY'-c ' y.. H .an "GSA 4. gk 4'-1 'Q '11 . IP' , 4' r wa I 5 , kj Y -1 . Q 1, 5 I . I ' rl ' 4 ' Lv, ' . v M Q . ,J E 'm C 4 , -"ki v' x f ' .JI .- -. . - 1. .. , I -xr W x- Q' , I .' - ua.: 'f ., x s, ,J v f ' 'Q ,',',. 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L iz fi "2isss::f 113 - IEEE? 2' Y al :H "mic-w 1 gk - .vwggizi .1 .'?,g JSF: ' ' " ' 1 Q T v I wgvff 13 WF: -.lk H 1 WV. 55- A 1 1.7 'L 'T re: .v'-WL . in x A -.1f1::s?.25 ' ' Q Ae A if -1 59,45 . 1131 ' W fffa .XFN ,,. Y 1 4 SANTA BAR xi R Ja as , I 'QR Q s s x I iff 'N' air' N. gl Hr' if " if X aj 5, 5, . XM ,, ..,., EA H, if 'Q3i?s5T2'x H522 Iwi a A '- YN ' ' . QQ A52 . . , Q! EE Mg in Q. ' qi' ,w . A w .41 is Efkzz 5.255 . cg B? msqerf :fgsggsszzeg , 58' ' 33. QQEEVQJ N l 1 : l llll' yf k' fi - i IH. ,I ,f,. ' V' l A , t K I 'V A --.lui f 11, V ' V , J -x MIRAM "W ' V -,A-0 6,5-,QQ YQ. M x i Place-kicker Augie Rapanut lleftl demonstrates the field-goal style that won the Cal Poly thriller 9-7 in the final minutes of action. Defensive halfback Jim Mitchell stops a drive of Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo with an interception which proved instrumental in UCSB 's upset victory. i' - ts'- VARSITY FOOTBALL TEAM-FRONT ROW: Bruce Marines, Mel Car- rozza, Dennis Reilly, Loren Shumer, Rick Gangnes, Jim Curtice, Steve Moore, Mike Shultz, Brian Donnelly, Greg Runyon, Jim Rodgers, Lonnie McConnell, Barry Silverman. SECOND ROW' Jim Beaman, Neil Zaslow, Tom Sanchez, Cliff Jenkins, Paul Thatcher, Rich Rigali, Ken Krall, Cary VWlliams, Kurt Speir, Steve Vermillion, John Standridge, Gary Andersen. THIRD ROIM Phil Erbez, Gary Luke, Rick Wallace, Kim Olsen, Doug Fen- stermaker, Greg Kezirian, Tom Bishop, Jeff Feliciano, Steve Galbraith, Larry Brandenburg, Sam VWlner, Neil Baker. FOURTH ROW: Frank Michaelson, Dan Rodriquez, Dennis Ward, Mike Williams, John Neiderkorn, Gary pegs: Simons, Matt Herndon, Mike Ponezocha, Mark Espy, Nick Dragich, Ken Greenaway. FIFTH ROW: Tom Hillis, Brock Arner, Paul Tollefson, Fred Oppezzo, Mike Ackerman, Jim Mitchell, James Randolph, Chuck Cruzat, Gary Osendorf, Joe Nunez, Augie Rapanut. SIXTH ROW: Al Taylor, Paul Weinberger, Kirk Mulligan, Paul Lee, Steve Evangelist, Steve Huntsinger. SEVENTH ROW: Assistant trainer Curtice Watson, Defensive Secondary coach Ron Cote, Frosh Football coach Ed Swartz, Offensive Line coach Don Turner, Head Defensive coach Andy Everest, Head coach Jack Curtice, Line- backer coach Rad Sears, Frosh Football Assistant coach Cromwell VWlliams, Equipment manager Bob Rapanut, Head trainer Harry Callihan. ' ,.-. .A Ju u I '--F 1':,..3aw5a bf Jw x A kj 'ii 1 Q. xv- wx xan- C,71l A? f'jQ12- X,- - A -N -- Q- ., , wwf z . . -- .1 . ..,.-,.:- ..: . .,,, --Y' ,. 1?-was - , . ,, , . , w 'V 3. mi. , 4.5, ,f- -f.. . ,f , Q. - Mg-. , ' -I 1- fc' V .xgqsgg - .l ' -' lg .1 ff ' r f swf- ,, Q . , - , if ' QW -' - - . , W 9:2 1- 1- , ..-ff . 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N v 1 CROSS COUNTRY Gouchos Tolce SBAA, Third in All-Col Meet After initiating the season with a loss to UCLA and UC Berkeley, the cross country Gauchos, with the help of team captain Keith Jeffers and transfer student Joe Belton, bounced back to destroy Pepperdine and the Santa Barbara Athletic Association. In a split meet, the harriers defeated the University of the Pacific and lost to Fresno State. The loss proved a bad omen, as the Gaucho runners fell to their two toughest op- ponents, Westmont and Cal Poly lSLOl. Outside of league competition, which netted a win-loss record of 2-3, Sam Adams' endurance men took a third place in both the All-Cal meet and the tough Santa Barbara AAU tournament, lending encouragement to the 1970 varsity squad. R - -xt SCOREBOARD Santa Barbara AA U-Third Place UCLA 20, UC Berkeley 47, UCSB 82 UCSB 31, Pepperdine 42, SB Athletic Assn. 56 Fresno State 27, UCSB 35, UOP 67 Westmont 75, UCSB 50 Cal Poly ISLOI 76, UCSB 42 All-Cal Championship-Third Place ,,,,,- UCSB runner, Ted Bechtel, competes on the scenic two mile cross country course which runs by the lagoon. CROSS COUNTRY-FRONT ROVM Mike Macy, Mike Maron, Keith Jeffers lcaptainl, Joe Belton, Greg Ratliff, Rick DeLanty. SECOND ROW: Coach Sam Adams, Mike Bell, Gary Wolfram, Steve Bushey, Ted Bechtel, Bill Word, John Gran t, Cliff Busby, Brian Castleman, Mike Chambliss. I 1 ,. 6? , ' J vi vx '- . , W' ' 1 , W V h 41 .wi-'Tf1'i4Zv'5,Li"." .v- fag 1 f. - wavywfm A K Sikh ,Rf 5 W5 5 ' , .flgfgri ,-jg.. :N w W-,w, , .. ,k -Ap: ,5-M ff, .Aus A q SP? W S - ,Y-.Y 1 -, M, X fv-. X. - " ,fffl-5439 ,LVD 'x'1,I,1 ,N is H., P f N Q , . 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K m 5 ag, L Q, -, .4 ..l L , inf f',:nM 545 N mcg ,. wa' -x, . , X,ix 'uf 'Q' if 4- - -4- -1-E 4 1, 'H fx ,,,-M? .6 . ll! , 7 A '41 r- V 'W iv- ,' W 1. V , ' ' 'f J Qagv 4- vs Q fag .H?'35,y,.,!t 1iig,:j,k4-rl Wl??!? iflltg? ,mf 2 Lnrjff, :2,y+..,F'l ef axle! -Vi" ,,. ,, k vi-',-5,.f'.i., 3+ i , Q f.,, 'iw-,-V .- if-.N , 4, A . -I - V v A. ., 'WV ' , wr. Q .wr , , fgML.'f54,,A . ., I WATERPOLO Mermen Place Third In National Playoffs The Gaucho vvater polo team demonstrated a winning potential this year. Coach Rick Bow- land and his Gaucho mermen swam to a third place berth in the NCAA university division finals at Long Beach, defeating the Long Beach State 49'ers 12-8 in the final play-offs. After accumulating an exceptional record of twenty wins to four losses in league play, the Gaucho team, unable to settle dovvn and place their shots, lost to the UC Berkeley Golden Bears in a close game in the national semi-finals. Goalie Mike lilhlson bats away a field goal attempt to help main tain UCSB? third place rank in the NCAA. FROSH WATER POL O-FRONT ROW: Bruce Crandall, Greg Crum, Mike Mircovich, Richard Sperberg, Dan St. John, Greg Goodyear, Coach Bob Gary. SECOND ROW: John Belden, Steve Dougherty, John Weston. THIRD ROW' Dick Luther, Neil Ouinn, Hank Benjamin, Doug Erenberg. FOURTH ROIM Don Randall, Bill Sinkinson, Jeff Boinig. I -, R 2 4, MQ-, 4 J Y N ig' mwszf-af: 1 imrgf 1 v vlan- .,, ,ax MQ, 1 55521 -C, rsgggw-ww, R .. A,kL .. :'lrj'??kiaR1T-gh ---Il -Y 5 1 7 Mig g.-,,.,'!..:- fm hfniqv., 1 I I ' .1 ' 17 T? !Efi5'.if1?iiQ1.fi ' K r 4- r-1." f:i41'r:i1.fffLz22: fx A ' -: -.nf---'-s-'-M". swef , ,a D ,, 353A ,fv ,.1,:,,?KT.N1z,3,,T. 3,21-,j -QQ'x'zisi7"Q'f,4?.,f,5"f--If' , - -iw , ,1 1i'31,'.'f"f2 :,gqTm:,12ys-1 55-' A " 11 1 ' :1"'Q.32J,11gjl'?: 'nw ?1'f.1"'F-..1g.Cf7:-' - ' 3.'Qa:,,,-. 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X. , 4 1 X ,W ,i M , A -' 5... gm Hx' M. A , - 1.1 nh, 'M ' I' - 1 ' ' -f' gf-L 1 1 1 11 vm gg, ,A -, ' 4. "-"'2A,.'i, .,5 , ' ig - 1' '-',, K--. V 1- , --- w 51, N ,U ' w. Acer! V , V K , any .Y ',,,,:.l ...F Q M if , 1-' Basketball close . . . Gymnasts the sea season fine -,i-,E V w soh . . . Victory m All-Cal material Q :X 'Xa a ."f"'r1 " , '32 ffm N- - 1 4 X 1 , ,.,a, ..l'........., a a ru, dike' KI . , ,i W3 M44 , M J f' H idx p . SE? 5 Q' -rffz 1 1 , ' A :QB . ,eff , , QQ , 9 .15llH .VX Y'. lx X f W -H5 f. . , Q: 1 'Pri Z. -N, 4' Y ., iv - 4 I I A 'E 1, ,,, -Q I ka. ,Qi ', I , A 'I . JH 3 ff 'A as ...py- 10' bl o f -fx V .f ix Q N- l Q rf'-N 4 M., ans -Q 'Ish aff um.-N -6.""f km I 0 :sis ga ' Q1 J '15 I "9 b 5 1 ' .- fl 93371 :tw 1, - v- X ix fb 6 c W .Q W. . ! -1 86,05 A' f ,ball W 1 QI, ' vw XF4"'9'i"7 " pi'0.g' s-4'f'iI4.x 5 AN ,W 4. p ,K . Oa ggglif 2 EEE J F R ,,Fr1gl S f" iA"'i , affzl Q Qw",z-1 - - ww. f - r ,pw ' ni ' . . . 'Z "' 3: H M -Q 'il . 1. . :MDA .fi ,A as I 3, s , 5 W, 19 3if.giaV"i :xl J .qv . 404, -im 1 's'2?3F 'Zu' f 1 Sw I QX WW' K! ff .F ,A 1 -fs A QYJT 1 fL0YllL4 xx , V' M 7 U X i F :Qs J- 12" x ,' -- - A E? A 5 pf f' " A I ' L zz' P . f U 4 J ef .f 3 "' 5 ' 'I' .41 I I , 0 5 U I I I O I 5 Q O t I Q 0 Q I e , 4- alsx . 'N .Q,.M4f1 Y 3 H . G fi ' .M fi .X x 52. 4' X Q .-:Q 1, by f, 4 U' lo Q 5 4 E rf ' 1 MWF? U KI , 'qfz Ne 6 ai., pf 254 M 5 -'w xg Q: w . V' 240 Frosh Stors Compete With NCAA Veterons Working with one of the finest gymnastic teams in Gaucho history,Coach Art Aldritt produced such notable talents as Freshmen NCAA competitors Brian Kolb and Randy lVlolina, both with averages of 8.5 plus. In addition to these fine performers, veteran gymnasts Ken Wagner, Jeff Rosen, and team captain Bob Harris returned this year. Jeff Leach, the team's all-around man, performed well on the parallel bars despite a mid-season sprained ankle. The Gaucho gymnasts faced one of their toughest seasons, as demonstrated by one triangular meet which resulted in each team's final score placing amazingly within 42 points of the other. Despite the loss of senior greats, enough exceptional team members will re- main to uphold a high degree of excellence on the squad. Senior Ken Wagner demonstrates one of his specialties the difficult inverted iron cross, on the rings. FRONT ROIM Captain Bob Harris .hm Borg Randy Molina Ken Wagner Jeff Rosen Alex Peters Jim Wayman SECOND ROVW Coach Arthur Aldritt Dave Izzo .lerry K mg Brian Kolb Greg Pierce Jeff Leach Tim Carlton WRESTLING All-Col Tourney Won By Goucho Gropplers ...gal UCSB's wrestling team completed one of the finest seasons in recent years as Coach Bill Hammer's crew compiled a 12-5 mark and took second place in the Pacific Coast Ath- letic Association with 64 points behind champion Fresno State l78l. The Gauchos took three first places in the conference championships as top trophies went to Manuel Valdez C142 lb. classl, Bruce lVlcCampbell l15Ol, and Gordon George ll58l. lVlcCampbell represented UCSB in the NCAA finals but was disqualified in the first round of competition. In addition to their fine record in the conference, the Gauchos captured two tournaments, the All-Cal and the Biola. UCSB also took a second in the San Fernando Valley State Invitational. In the Biola tourney Junior Bruce McCampbell battled to the 150 pound class championship by defeating four grapplers in two days of competition. FRONT ROIM Doug Amstutz, Jim Galuan, Kit Lauer, Manuel Valdez, Danny Thomas, Bruce McCampbell, Gordon George. SECOND ROMA' Andy Popovich, Dan Morales, Pete Van Patten, Kenny Linn, Tom Wallace, Johny Feeley, Coach Bill Hammer. SWIMMING Individual Performers Spark Winning Year This year's varsity swimming team performed admirably, defeating tough PCAA foes UOP and Los Angeles State to garner top honors in the Gold Coast Swimming and Diving Champ- ionships. The season ended with the Gauchos rated second place in the Pacific Coast Athletic Association. Outstanding individual performances were contributed throughout the season by Steve Moody and Rich Sperberg in the 200 back- stroke and lVlac Bower in the 200 breast- stroke. Also aiding the total success of the team were championship divers Ted Long, Paul Hesse, and Robin Hosstetler. Coach Rich Rowland stressed the import- ance of team participation and interaction as the factor leading to the season's success. Dan Twogood irightl springs into his dive at an exhibition meet. The standard racing dive ibelowj is a much more common sight to swimming enthusiasts. as-tlyi .,.t i st.t, fi, '? :Will vi .ri ii ,, f , :Awe , l N, get-U - . ll' Mi'-'-, , f l illi--Will' miie it ll it limsis- mllli. f Mm - 1 i ,MQ , il li ir' gli' stag' y ill - new . mi ' ii' Y - stair- Y? 1-fiiimfi wi ilu 1 as., . 'Plugin wx ' q,f..,,t,, ,. 5 'igiill ll A' iiiuilvkii: I ,mr - V , ,i v1Ii-sie? 1 V. Mi.. -- '-ll,lllw ll il - nil , . . i., i i ix iii l 'FEIHW if F5325 . ,523 , Tx H , A - llllzggg ii E 2 .riff-" ' - -L -1 iii 'V 1 - :Flu-. - ' ' 'ir ' ar f' -fain .,.m,., aw... ,.. ,W f fiillif, ' Y' mll:i'g5i,? A ,iii -, ll" .l fam- --f 'S ,,, - ' ' ' : .s lmfisilif F' ' li 5 . ll" -.. ' 'S 'X W .. F ' "H:2:-w-- ' - ' wif- Y C., ,,,, - .. " ,ia-W my .,,.-, ,-1 T' Sf-, --aug ,,., V A - I 1975 :eff-1: 2 '2- , ,, 2-Bri ii , ut. S 3 X - .,. ll .. W" ,... .,, , T' aft? xx? ' , 1 I., . N, '33 i i l l l l l l l l i ll 1,5 qt -J. VARSITY SWIM TEAM-FRONT ROW: Dan Twogood, Jack Underwood, Al Smith, Captain Jerry Woolf, Rich Sperberg, Mike Jefferson, Ted Long, Craig Shaugnessy, Coach Rick Rowland. SECOND ROW: Assistant Coach Frank Cercos, Dan St. John, Terry Warwick, Robin Hostetler, J. Mac Bower, John Belden, John Weston, Bill Thomas, Bob Gibson. THIRD ROVW Diving Coach Bob Gary, Bruce Crandall, Paul Hesse, Stan Searcy, Mike Mirkovich, Bill Sinkinson, Neil Quinn, Greg Crum, Dave Tang. NOT PICTURED.' Greg Stephens, Steve VWlliams. i!. -1"""' 'tag-5 ,av - ek... ...-,t,.,.sqggn-new--cf .g. ,c,.Awm-um.-.mv .- S R X C .Va A ' A J T--,. . W A I . r H Y V , V .:' -- . ri - f . 5 ffgf-'-"V H ' ' x x'.""Rg f , 5 'S fs.. 4' 1 , ,. F - ack 1 'ri 'L 4 7 rl f ,A ' ,' 4 4 . , N,:'sj:'f :Vg .1 fif, , ,, M, wi., gif, .,,,y.. , . ig , LJ I :V , L A A-x.,j,Ag,, , A , Z M' ' V K hx Swimmer John Bower demonstrates his meet specialty, the breaststroke. Freestyler Bill Sinkinson captured the Gold Coast title. ,651 'fff'- If-4 .fiif ' G-3 X . iiyfvi. . ex, 4- , 5 ' " A 1, - -lvwmfeg ' 4 , My - 3 igq. .12 xwgi ., 1 .Warm f:x,. vztmlvt '.,. ., , M-H -- Q - , ggiww. ,. fqffw U fain '51 . . ,, , 1- Q..-.X , ,, sp Q, an S 1... f lv Q Q K 2? . , .. . . V Fm 9' 155'.f'-aswf, , rw W' 'Dx ' W 1 Q S E, S x 4 O as -LW ig "N-' ,f 1 , , , 1 1 1 11,,,11111,1,,1 1 11 11 11,,11111 1 1 1 V ' 1 1 .21 1 1 1 Gaucho baseball starts slow, then wins six . . . Gains national . 1 . Streak of Easter lrst Gaucho meets Volleyballers fl ve to na tional L ,1 , , ,1 , ,,,1, , 1 ,,,1,1, , 1,1, 1,,,,,1 11,1, ,, 1, 111,,1,,1111,,J,,11, 1111,,11111111 1 ,,1,,111 1111, 11,,111,, 1,11,1,, 1,1111 1 , 111111111 1111,11111111111j11511111111m11'11111111111111111,11,111111111! 111111111Q11111111p1,111,1:1Z1:31111111 1111111.11 111111:,,11111111111:111111,1111111:1U:1111,1,1111111, 1111111111,,:1111111111111F 1 11113 1,,11' 11111 1, 11 ' '111F,f1" V71"11171I1"3,1V,1f11"1'11W1"11f'1W1 11 1111 ,711 1: 11"1f'1111 1111111 11,,,11111,111111,,,f11111,111111: N , ,,,1,,,,11,,,,1,1 11721112 111.11111,,,,,,,,1,1,,,:,, 1 1111111 111, 111111 ,,1111 1 1111111 11 1111:111,111,1,11 1 11,1111 11111111121 1111:,111Qg121111:'511115111171111 , 1 111111111 1 ,51'1: 1 1 '111111-11 1 111 111 1, '11,111:11111W1111' 1 11 1 ' 1 f ' 1 W11Q,',, ' "H1f',,111g11 1 1 11111,1 11 1 1 ' 1 1 V 111111111111111111 1 1 , 11111,11,,1 111 111 1 111 1 7 , 1 ,M11 1 A 1 1-1,1 ,,, , 1 1 ,,11,1 1 ,1 ,,,,, ,111. 1 245 46 l BASEBALL Gorrie's Club Ronked Tenth in Notion Poll After compiling an impressive 58-25 mark during the past two years, Coach Dave Gorrie's baseballers came out of the gate a little slowly in 1970, but rallied quickly to win the Pacific Coast Intercollegiate tourna- ment championship with consecutive wins over Washington, Westmont, San Fernando Valley State, and California. The tourney title boosted the Gauchos into the 10th spot of the nation's midseason polls made them a top contender in the tough Pacific Coast Athletic Conference race. ln addition to their tourney win, UCSB collected two prestigious victories over UCLA and managed to down No. 1 ranked USC. Top hurlers for the Gauchos were Mark French, Jeff Chancer, and Walter Rehm, each of whom were regular rotators during the 1970 campaign. Ace southpaw Walt Hehm's 16 strikeouts against his former teammates at Westmont set a UCSB mark and , also a tournament record. A l Fleet-footed Bob Buzzie scores the winning run in the 17th inning against.San Fernando as his teammates get ready to celebrate the 4-3 victory in the third game of the Pacific Coast Intercollegiate tournament championship held during the spring break. First-string pitcher Walt Rehm lleftl goes into his wind-up for a fast ball against a USC batter. During the Gaucho's turn at bat, infielder Tom Jackson lbelowl connects with a hard pitch for a base hit. l A, . f f ,P u- .af I' - , -,-, , , 555711 'Q - Q 1' ' , ' . - , - f - rQ .'.' . A C- e 1 sss .im LL FRONT ROVW Greg Murphy, Jeff Chancer, Walt Rehm, Mike Powers, Steve Ross, Mark French, Tom Walsh, Craig Ritter, Allan Niebel. SECOND ROW Jerry Meyer, Mike Saylor, Paul Lee, Tony Martins, Roger Billings, Dave Walski, Cary Hanson, Tom Jackson, Cleo Jones, Tom Gamboa. THIRD ROW: Coach Dave Gorrie, Rick Dixon, Steve Coleman, Larry Hold, Roger Allcraft, Jere Nolan, Mel Aaron, Bob Bussie, Bob Marshall, Mike Arellano lequipment managerl, Assistant Coach Dick Baldizan. 247 I i N 5 V I x Long jump king James Randolph kicks through the air in a lifetime best leap of 22'7 Ha" to cap ture an unexpected Gaucho first against CSCLB. 1.4-gf J ' , All gxxziimen Exhibit Skill In PCAA Competition Demonstrating considerable talent on the cinders and in the field, Coach Sam Adams' Gaucho thinclads posted an early season re- cord of 3-2 in their second year of PCAA competition. Prepping with the traditional triangular meet against Pepperdine and San Fernando Valley State, the UCSB trackmen chalked up a double victory and the following weekend hosted Long Beach State in their first dual conference home meet. Pre-meet expectations predicted a maximal thirty points for the Gauchos, who were handicapped because CSCLB posted better marks in every event in early season competition. Headed by the superb performances of long-jumper Jim Randolph, javelinist John Tolbert, the Gauchos rallied to total 67 points, losing to the Forty-Niners by only eleven. ln their second home dual meet, the Gauchos were downed by Fresno State, 82M to GOM, but staged a comeback by ousting Westmont, 102-52, the next week. Other UCSB stand-outs were sprinter Sunny Hatten, freshmen 440 man Wayne Snyder and two-miler Ted Bechtel, triple jumper Jeb Burgess, and discus-thrower Steve Leonard. i ii'ii J iiiiii at - FRONT ROW' John Wright, Dan McLaughlin, Kevin Law, Keith Jeffers, Phil Gonzalez, Mike Maron, Terry Hill, Joe Belton, Steve Caziarc. SECOND ROMA' James Randolph, Gary Dilley, Jim Dloust, Bill Braadhead, Doug Duncan, James Tolbert, Roger Wgnocchi, Dan Madden, Sunny Hatten, Mike Macy, Rich Jensen, Greg Ratlifi THIRD ROW' Dan Huxley, Coach John Luccio, Ted Bechtel, Jim O'Donnell, John Tatum, Jeb Burgess, Jim La Velle, Steve Leonard, Carey Williams, Gary Smith, Steve Bushey, Ro y Saldin, Mike Chambliss, John Tobin, Brian Castleman, Wayne Snyder, Cecil Elrod, Tom Horwitz, Coach Sam Adams. 249 , s V in -- . E. g., ,. Y ,.,., . V. 5.35-Y,h .:,, ,,, F... V J , . N I A it . t , ' we U U H--1, .1 -1 :. : V 1, K . e, . A Y ., 1 .. , . as-. ..:,., 1 - ,. .,v- ve. . . ...f 1 "1--:: '-'-X-1 'H ' .r , -- J -. - .'- w : "Vl'r' , --vw 1' if " a " X" e ' A ' -' ' ,QI V' . .' Y :J ,va -,J ' N V ' ' ' "Qi - ...- "T: - - ' ' ' r m ' 11 H Ili, 'EY l 250 Clearing the first hurdle with an appreciable lead, Gauchos Carey llWlliams and James Tolbert lbelowl maintain their advantage to finish first and second respectively. VWth a winning heave of 227 '6 ", javelinist John Tobin lrightl is observed by Coach Sam Adams. Y """'f" ' 4 Q t Y f ' 551 w2Qp"T. Sb---v--,,fe'f ,,":f-r. ' ,, -ent- tfff' . M... -.539--1-f , --1 , ' f ZA'?'4!!'g'5.. f'kH':,,.Nt,,, Y , zfswfsfwffjrfi . . 'V ,V 'f' ,W mr "Magi 1 , 'W' Q 5, M . , if - ' , 1.-m--Q-wr X M un-, 1 'asf - ag.W:v A 1,-X-Q.. mn! " . vfffifl- L41 ' 3" ',...g - -.. Y Q .Q . f ' ... 'A ' ' ' "-nlhl"", 'fd 'T 54,5 "' A -ao' ' 'U' ..,..,..flg ' a ..e- 5.7" at A I riffs 1. wil- A f -"-'-'- "M "f ""' wr..,r29' 'f ':,, A', ,cl j'-lynn 'lt- , 5 A . WM - ,..., Neck and neck with CSCLB opponent, Wayne Snyder receives the handioff from Roger Vignocchi and opens up a wide lead to aid the Gauchos in their unexpected mile relay victory. Nick Carter lleftl, honored as the Easter Relays innovator, tips his hat to the audience as his retirement is announced. Gaucho triple jumper Jeb Burgess lbelowl was a valuable pointgetter with seasonal leaps of 45'6". Ted Bechtel lbottoml, UCSB freshman distance wonder, leads the pack in the first lap of the Relays three mile run. 7 EASTER RELA YS if Nick Corfer Honored ,,,, At Annuol Spikeiesl it lllll il if it Celebrated as the traditional West Coast track XV and field "carnival circuit opener" meet, the . Thirty-Second Annual Santa Barbara Easter Relays attracted 29 high school, junior col- lege, college, and university teams. La Playa f Stadium, home of the Easter Relays, echoed with the applause of 5000 track fans. lrrrll Defending two-year champions in the col- lege division, UCSB graduated a notch this year to compete in the university division. UC Berkeley walked away with the title, accumu- lating 62.5 points to the sixth place Gauchos' three points. Garnering points for UCSB were Jim Tobin with a fourth place javelin heave of 218'5" and the 880-yard relay team of Roger Vignocchi, Dan lllladden, Carey Williams, and Sunny Hatten. Saluted during the Easter Relays were Honorable Meet Referee Marshall Booher and former Olympian and perennial meet director Nick Carter. UCSB spike coach for 25 years until 1963 and one of the founders of the Easter Relays, Carter retired this year. mg Pocific Eight Powers Dumped by Linlcsmen Coach Newell Breyfogle came up with another colorful and exciting golf team which raced to early season victories over such powers as Cal, UCLA, and Washington, three of the Pacific Eight Conference's toughest teams. Midway into the season, UCSB was riding on the crest of a 10-3 mark. The talented Gaucho team was captained by Steve Rhorer and included such standouts as Vern Caloudes and Charles Eddy who kept UCSB high in the win-loss column. Others on the club were Tex Williams, Dave Wilson, Ed lVlencke, and Bryan Garbutt, all of whom con- tributed heavily to the success of the 1970 campaign. Caloudes, a transfer from Santa Barbara City College, is considered one of the finest young golfers ever to compete for the Gauchos. Charles Eddy, one of the more promising UCSB players, practices his wood shot an the campus course. FRONT Ff0Vlk Vern Caloudes, Ed Mencke, Charles Eddy Captain Steve Rohr Dave Wilson SECOND ROW Steve Cadet Tex Williams Scott Weir, Bryan Garbutt, Coach Newell Breyfogle. TENNIS Netmen Foce Slote Ot Strong Opponents Coach Ed Doty's Gaucho netters showed pro- mise early as Bill Steiner defeated Cal's Bob Alloo in a major pre-season upset. The Gauchos had their ups and downs during the mid-season as they faced one of their toughest schedules in recent years. Included on the slate were nationally ranked UCLA and USC along with several other major powers from H the state. Leading the Gauchos into action along with Steiner were Ken Bentley, Eric Lewis, Craig Fugle, Brooks Barthels, and John Riley. ln another major upset Bentley defeated Red- lands' number two man, Bob Warfield in a long three set match. Going into the PCAA finals, Doty's club was rated among the league's strongest entries. Although UCSB did not compile an impressive win-loss record, the Gauchos turned in several exciting performances. TENNIS SQUAD-FRONT ROVW Dave Wanella, Tom Sutton, Bill Steiner, Jim Fick. SECOND ROW: Gary Rose, John Rousseau, Bob Henderson, John Haynes, Richard Lee. tl 4, 'I u ,I QZIZKSJIELSTARTERS-FRONT ROM John Riley, Ken Bentley, Craig Fugle, Brooks Barthel. SECOND ROIM Coach Ed Doty, John Rousseau, Eric Lewis, 15, S ,V . y I aw! 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X f , ' N111 ,v '!'N 'VW' N", ' "NN 1' " MA ! 5" ' M, N H M"1',15 V NWN M Q AWN V- ,- W-W A EWWWWH WW W H W WWgWVHMMyWh WM W MW EM WhW W WM W WhQ Wf j WWH WgNW Wu WU W H EW WMHWWWW H WH W WW V 6WWWWWW W MMg M M WH W WuMMQHNUWMWHMW UWwWWWWMW MMUMmm W MWWMWWWWWHW NW WW VW y W WMM WNWMu w f MWJ MHNJN + lw f l+ 1v WW wJwWW u MlM fi W w WWWWUVWV ' ? f W N UN WWWf M MWWv H U WWWWH f+WW WWWW UW M' WWW w , , ww ,wx Q w,x' N " w WMUWWWWWWwmgwwmjwww m wwWmyWwQW u H MUNM MM umuw w W M H w Uw w MJ N WH wMww W WH w w wg w MVMh wWwWMMNW w iw wW ggWWWMW w W mWhWMWM uw w wgm WuMuUWMW Hw W WM MV QQ3WWWWHWMuWMh i 'W WgMNMQWWhWWWw H gg v W W W W WWW 4 EMWV W WJWWW WU 2 INTRAMURALS New Gutlook Stresses Moximol Porticipotion The men's intramurals department assumed a new focus this year, placing an emphasis on the recreational aspect of competition as the main objective of its program, rather than the accumulation of total participation points. With the addition of 1.8 meter basketball, a league designed for men 5'1O" and shorter, opportunities were afforded for more teams and more players. Prevalent among the llVl leaders were the Sigma Chi's, who captured the football crown. Chief rivals were the Sig Ep'sp the Phi Psi's, who eked out a victory in double over- time hoop finalsp Pass-Fail, always among the top contenders: and soccer champions, SIVID. In spring sports, competition continued for the coveted All-Sports Trophy, the winner to be largely determined by the volleyball and softball results. Intramural program director Sandy Geuss, working in conjunction with assistants Clay Kallam and Larry Lopez, endeavored to maximize the opportunities extended to male students for participation in athletics. -,Stu-V ,. ff' , y 1 ' 4 ls lv II .fl ,iftv-fiiFr..I'm..' Ig ' ". 1 1-1 . a Q, ' ,- 4 i Qin? V1 ,,.Y , -'i' t t I l l - - F3-f W' 3 - A+ ' .l v QW ' 4+ -1.-gfH'a.' ' ' .-miie. 'W ,lg 'f-. , ' '. . . .. s-T' 'f f' Y-H n.: gem ' . ' .--, ' fr -.' f' . " QR- is 1-' , -. ':,,..'wl: ' ,' f .af"..,s?:.:,zs.. --ai - .ae it . . ' -2.2, .1 wi, - ,- . .. tb 1--K-f an .fr-.' Q5 ,,. f ie' 1' ta-it-4 J' f 'T' ff fi' sefzr - "1f.,..5.r'f'f.gf'-it i fifiig 3' '1"'-3' 9- ' . 'f' ' :if i ts AI.. . 'L 11' ' l " -"" - 5 ff' .ff 1, fi ' all 1- in 7-Q" 'f- -vt? 'ipjigffjrj W '- fl . -' -.-. W l - as . f ' Wl" "'N " ' . 5ti'- - .' '- ' 't r- .fi . N .. 4 ,g t f . 'rf QE .EA 6'.2..u.Ci The route was long and the trek arduous, but the combination of stamina and competitive spirit drove all the harriers to the finish. J., 1 ,fiP"' 287 T We .V ' H. fn XY4. 14- '-S '-an - H 5,21 ., -5 EX 'vag- X .5 .54 ff k . I A A I 1 . , n 1 , -ef' II . 'QI Wx. NE, . .. . 8 9,3 .ii Q". " it ,xtwvsqwg F, ' Q "T, V vs- Qtf--L a 1 'V 1. WH I 1 .h 1 ix HY x e-, , Q 'eudlqea' ...m.,m,,.Q,. - . 55-5 v Q .. . in x, ,A f Xa 9 ng ,-- W' ,Mfr-we E S, 1 1 i Nm x A 9' -x- '1-A 5, v 31' Y 6 . 55:0 ' X -- ' Q15?-gulf LX 1 , -M55 2- ' f x mix? -" - . , up Qf:vaQiQ- if Rfb ' ii i KM A I .. 'T . 3 , 1'!x.g'i'i F- , 1' ?. en ' 1 1 N. K Qi!.1i'Q4i' in :1v'.,:,:f.3X 195' ., , ' ' V ' 2lv,v1:3fE'nP.yz . 'if . Q, ! my 5264 ffi ' ' i 's x,' J ...Q x in fi ,,, r 1 9, ,, s ,Q - 14514: Q 5. xv 5, Q 5255 :iw Q if , S . 'Q 9 ,Q ' x 1 A ,, A 2- I .-I if "" 'ygdfi I 4 1 ' t 2 1 . MMF' , 'Q it Fgilifx 2 at B U ii., ,. E fx yr .x-X: ,I V - I-Kffgx , P. af 'K K fi H' -Q' v X D E 9 nf' Q . 01. , 1 f, . L ,Q x , ,.A. QQ, M ,-f' la: 1" gqslgi 4 f .L .F-fww-A - f "gQ53w'L'PlA'rf-zagiijj-, x ..i fa 4 ' skf ,:,,, gee. V: :iw f,' 1 fi 1 5' .. . 9' f Jw 3' ,F Q , aj I 'S A gb Q- as X N , W ,gy B Q, . ,. i ,J "H, : ,, .1 iQ 1 ' - F K ,. vf -visa, fr '- - f , Rs: j i , , N-,E -N , A .VF , -www, yn X .bw wp-4 gn, , . ' -H55 wwf, 1?-1 . ,115 -VL- ,1 wid. U ' '1 4 Pursued behind the line of scrimmage by Mother's Milk's Bob Biles, GBAC quarterback Dave Chapple scans the downfield for a possible receiver. I- - - 1.1 -.,' .s-. " 4 o , .. ,, 8 l,,,,,, John Higgins of Pass!Fail lunges to reach the ball carrier despite the presence of a protective teammate. Sw I -4 X Q 1,4 .Af s . ww Il ' 367 1 ji! 59 I . E A . Q Q Q :L V Wh: if V L 1 .Ji , 1 4 V N4-v L' L z If-5 3' 5 AY g"",' :ESF :qw- Lv-1 -3, s -Q b 1 -.V , .- :- pg, W.. snmi A D t auf: A 4 avg v IJ ! Lei ,131-2 J, 5, :' L s , W , :ll ir If V my .5 , ' , 'L fi 11.- -A - , f , 4, ,E T -, , , ,i. K fl, ' 4351-lisa Q . V., - , : JESSE' , ,.z-ill.. T' ,:- 'f' 3252- ' L I f",-g:':-.gi 'ff' E .. A 2 fav' -,-""'T -famgawwiyiigd :ig I ,war-f ,,,...-v f.,v.ee!""5"""' 5. D, w 5 17 I 5 i A : "f,, Q :Q - -, L' fix A, 31 . 4-7 ' A .E "'-U , Q-.ge an 1 J , .xx V ...- K QQ 1 n , ' A 2 3 gn 95 w ,AI - -, ww -+..V4 f mivnw- Nf Qi. 1 . ,. :X -. , ,352 " Q hi 7' ' : 2:2 .. M veg .Q-Ar ? .,f.gm, 'q .- Tp, V, 1 3-1-J. ,"f'r,' iff, - ff, ..- - Nf 1. I gg, -A f E. - -.V 1521,-'-. -ri. ' Q! as "f W1 w as ff H- 'W , dl W 'w Za 'E 39 Q5 ,-, Awww muff ' M a . A Q y AXA L 5 7' ..,,. TEEN, E X'! Q Y L , 'F' w. X r swan-" A 2 x 'E . e I i 5, ..., ,,,Y,Y my , v Q... 84" 47 X .,-A iiffwpg 1 14, f' .fr t I 15-FX 1 5 I . 2 Tir ::E:II: X :ag ff- Wwlffw- , im -A 'img ,. ,W 5 5' WUMEN INTRAMURALS Prog rom's Exponsion Promotes Porticipotion Widely acclaimed at conferences to be the best program in the state, UCSB's Women's Intramurals Department emphasizes diversity in offerings and growth of participation. Dorm teams and Independents were especially strong in competition this year, with the former winning first in basketball and second in volleyball. The Independents dominated powderpuff football. An increased interest in team sports was demonstrated by a 252, growth in the number of basketball, volleyball, softball, and football teams. With the introduction of a swim meet, bike rally, fencing tournament, and jogging contest came a novel arousal of enthusiasm in individual sports. Women's intramurals director Miss Geri Nlund was instrumental in promoting the pro- gram expansion, aided by her two assistants Lynn Lipani and Cathy Brose, who tallied participation points, publicized activities, and officiated games. Pigskin tucked firmly under her arm, Mary Molitor of the Strapp ltopl pulls a "quarterback sneak" and races downfield toward the outstretched arms of Chinese Bandit Ginger Gainor. Members of the Strapp team labovel, defending Powderpuff champions, huddle between downs. Intramural soft- ball games lrigh tl encourage sportsmanship and competition. 'Ll Q' lu, I: 49, 2. -1,-1 1 32 ' 53? ...y W 8 ,Witt F 'Q in 9,3 l 1 I If i 1 QE Za 443 DU 13 , 'Q 1199 wil? qifgywi, '35 L ni EJ, Q K H -2 ,Q- .S ' YE H 'W 1 'ff' 1 A Kg :U .-gr-T51 if ,I X f4 NS. ' ' V? M' , M, 13? :Y . H.. 4 i Q. Tltr "-' 4 13255 SWIMMING TEAM-FRONT ROW lbelowl: Laurie Nielsen, Kathryn Fletcher, Peggy Brase, Randi Ellman, Barbara Luick, Pam Holt, Judy Rapaport. SECOND ROMA' Cindy Springer, Marilyn Chandler, Ruth Zebb, Paula VWest, Heidi Hartman, Anne Edgcomb, Joan Ellen Cebat, Lynn Hanna. THIRD ROW' Miss Geraldine Walklet, Sydney DeFay, Jeannette Mul- holland, Melody McGough, Mary Mackedie, Vera Mae Walsh. TENNIS TEAM-JUNIOR VARSITY-FRONT ROW Ihottoml: Vicki Sark, Sherry Strong, Lee Lawrence, Hallie Hyer, Yvonne Neely, Brooke Hedge, Jan Ruitz. VARSITY-SECOND ROVW Georganne McKellar, Lynn Silman, Janet Mohr, Helena Tanner, Cecily Waycott, Karen Palmer, Linda Hancock, Genae Hall, Barb Gross, Lindy Blare. WOMENCS' INTRAMURALS Goucho Girl Athletes Evidence Versotility With the 1970 introduction of softball and field hockey, Gaucho coeds participated in seven intercollegiate sports including volley- ball, basketball, swimming, tennis, softball, track, and field hockey. Finishing a successful season with a third in their league, the netters were honored to par- ticipate in the Women's National Intercol- legiate Volleyball Tournament in Long Beach. Playing under the innovated five-man rule in- stead of the traditional six players, the basket- ball team had a losing season, motivated by enthusiasm but hampered by inexperience. In the spring, female athletes represented UCSB in Southern California competition in swimming pools, on tennis courts, tracks, and playing fields. Butterfly specialist Marilyn Chandler swims laps daily to perfect her stroke and to build up endurance. 7 RECREATION DEPARTMENT Diversified Gfferings Enhonced by Focilities Intended to provide students with extra- curricular hobbies, activities, and inter col- legiate competition, the Department of Recreation organized clubs, teams, and arts classes which were joined by hundreds. A newly formed group, the Gaucho Rugger Huggers, consisted of 130 girls who were instrumental in boosting support for the rugby team. Maintaining and operating its own station on campus, the amateur radio club sent and received messages from all over the world as a service to students. With the availability of individual corrals on the newly acquired Devereux property, private horses were boarded, riding lessons were given, and horses provided by the Recreation Department were also rented out to students for rides along the beach. Other clubs and programs sponsored by the Recreation Department were the ski program, folk dance club, photo club, sports car club, volleyball club, flying club, and mountaineer- ing club. Facilities available to students through the Recreation Department included the pool, old gym, weight room, and property at Devereux School. Open every day at noon and all day Saturday and Sunday for public recreational use the pool ftopj provides leisure-time activity for students and practice opportunity for scuba beginners. Porrt Sports Car Club membership included both na vlgators and drivers fabovei, who entered and hosted rallies throughout the year PDPP7' RUGGER HUGGERS-FRONT ROMk Joy Fauvre, Peggy Thomas, Loni Bennett, Deanna Jensen, Judy Crowe, Diana Biffle, Libby Fraim, Pat Boyn- ton, Mindy Bergman, Rosemary Kokes, Sheila Jesswein, Sydney DeFay. SECOND ROVW Ellen Eiseman, Linda McCrary, Cyndy Lane, Linda Lemaster, Martha Lemaster, Lynda Rowan, Carol Ule, Jan Greathead, Sue Gibbs, Sylvia Baca, Jeanie Ruggles, Dorothy Schaefer. THIRD ROIM Sally Cahill, Sally Paquette, Anne VWllis, Adrienne Medalie, Elizabeth Hans, Fabienne Reischman, Linda Perez, Maile Baker, Becky Reeder, Janie Camp- bell, Phyllis Petersen, Teri Schmidt, Colleen Zerman. FOUR TH ROW: Heidi Hepfer, Pam Aubel, Karen Mikkelsen, Edith Kibele, Barbara Alger, Carol Holmes, Linda Panovich, Marsha Sims, Debra Walker, Ginger Luke, Lesley Jones. FIFTH ROW' Karen Busby, Carolyn Lynes, Ellen Farbstein, Marie Meredith, Diana Waldie, Laura Lindquist, Ann Draper, Jane Conway, Joan Oxford, Sandra Kuge. SIXTH ROIM Elizabeth Dolan, Elizabeth Daoust, Susie Palmquist, Diane Child, Lucy Gohr, Cathy McCarty, Sue Westhoven, Shelley Smith, Janet DuBois, Cathy Bush, Laura Rich. Y 1171? 1 M ca.,--L l Q . . , , . H 1 . - fr ,gg -'Q 1,4537 - - . im 1 wi E- X. :I K. ,A ' V , ' 4' . V "QS Q . ,.'-.33 ..,.....-.-.:?...Tr,- , aa, 2.1.-.Q Gathering their equipment for an underwater excursion off Refugio Beach, Sandfleas Mike Kander, Bob Phillips, and Mike Redemer labovei display wet- suits, air tanks, and a harpoon. Flying club members Ted Venable, Jeff Wright, Steve Vick, and Larry Harpe llefti proudly exhibit their Cessna 750, which they purchased with club funds and store at the San ta Barbara Airport. 9 Q ..-Q.. ,Q a .A 1 4: , Yi' . , V . M ERS. .X WF b lf. wi , -, fr- w A, ,, M W xwzwfisri 4 A tes, f 353323 2' ' n .1 ff va '?'.r va-1 .af . W gf N 'Fi - " EQ , V if ' nl?- : TH' M gn.-N + N ww Q51 , .4 Y , , Qrgq. Q -ia lv 'Wifi 5 f i ex: S 3 lk qi ' L Nu Eu ' 5 N 1 V If " if 9? 2 'sg 9 I 2 nv 3 4, "Q f. n., Yi, I 'iz li' Y 159 gifs 1 Tv, wk ff 1, K 1,4 W -LJ -155. K. ' 4 ' . 1 -. x , - ' L "Tr H. Q ' 1.57 ' XX 4 t 4 r I 5 1 I X' fi 25+ A Q + fx S f' . . 'Y if X 5, fi Nr ' is fw A F! an I W 'U X F 5 X ,ji 3 'ff' rut, A K s VZ-3,5 1 , , -X 4 ' sf' A , 'Alfa , tiff.. .' . - 1 A .Q:"' . 1, . I 1 'V , , ! 5. J' 3 - -3- . . . M,.,x.r A M -fi F M UV: ff: ai K ,,- .-f' ' 4, -' ' ' , , ry- l ' ' Q' 3, , . +fT?2ifg5lQi'Afiji ' Ei K gf KN, f J- ,Ak 'Q .4 -liki 1 vii eff A' I JUDO TEAM lbelowl: Dave Huntley, John Hernandez, Pierre Constans. CREW TEAM- KNEELING lbottoml: Knute Garcken, Ross Jennings, John Sandy, Mike Hoos, Robert Hanson, Dane Mason, Don Betts, Dan Levvalt. STANDING: Steve Trueblood, Ken Keener, Doug Smith, Alan Kasehagen, Randy Olson, Bill Raising, Pete Sinding, Fred Kaplan, Kirk Duncan, Scott Bergquist, Tom Reardon, John Menzel, Bob McEwan, Rich Zamora, Bill Stout, Dennis Borsenberger, Bob DaLiema, Bill Raven, Randy Scheel, Bill Webb, John Gulliver, Alan Welch, Jack Vallarga, Fred Ochsner, Terry Lipari, Given Harrison, Mike Nielson. W l A ,Ill . I K RECREATlOlV DEPARTMENT lntercollegiote Teoms Excel in Competition Exercising its motto, "The campus that plays together stays together," the Recreation De- partment expanded its l97O program to in- clude eleven intercollegiate teams. This season the Gaucho fencing team cele- brated its fourth year in intercollegiate com- petition by again ranking among the top ten Western Division teams. Finishing another successful season of com- petition in the Western Intercollegiate Surf Council, the surfing team was undefeated in home and dual meets. Hampered by the 1969 graduation of its four blackbelts, the judo team spent its sixth season in a rebuilding program, while the karate team became one of the fastest grow- ing recreation sports on campus. The sailing and bowling teams launched new programs this year, expanding member- ship, facilities, and activities. In its fifth year in intercollegiate compe- tition, the crew team was one of the largest on the coast, composing four varsity-junior varsity squads and one freshman-eight squad. Also popular was the lacrosse team, which made its debut as an intercollegiate team at UCSB. The Gaucho ruggers, again one of the top teams in the country, were chosen to partici- pate in the All-Cal Rugby Allstars tour of Australia. Lacrosse Makes Debut, Female Fencers Vue for Title , . fa war H .1 -1 is -we ,f , es, fe rcs., 1 , sig. . W f L -sf I , , ., sA.,. - w . ,mm M 272 LACROSSE TEAM-FRONT ROW ltopl: Rick Stanley, Reilly Ridgell, Jack Megarity, Pete Crim, Dave Lord, Larry Levin, John Newberry. SECOND ROW Tom Lendino, Brian O'Neill, Randy Coates, Doug Tomson, Robert Almy, Jeff Shields. SURFING TEAM-FRONT ROW fabovel: Steve Frank, Scott Hamen, Steve Ellestad, Pepper Nevins, George Cabot. SECOND ROW' Bob Moore, Gary Linden, John Bowdish, Tom Schaefer, Scott Wilson. SKI TEAM-SITTING lrightl: Jim McClune, Pat Sheehy, Richard Handley. STANDING: Chris Mahle, Cindy Klotzsche, Art Jones, Dave Spender, Pete Stanford, Dave Gottfredson, Kim Olson. BOWLING TEAM-FRONT ROW' Jim Muller, Phil Buchanan, Ken McNerney. SECOND ROVW Bob Lessin, Bob Newton, Rich Armstrong. Gaucho fencer Barbara Sheffield retreats to avoid the poin t-scoring foil touch of her Valley Sta te opponent. s Pr , ,..4,.--'A+ ' ,ig ' Y A ' ' fx 'Ui' 'Q ? VP - a ix FENCING TEAM-LEF T T0 RIGH7? Coach Zoltan Von Somogyi, Ron Richard Huang, Pete Reynolds, Barbara Sheffield, Ron Trice, Kevin Ritchie, Miles, Randy lsmay, Marcia Bennett, George Humphries, Gary Arnold, Robert Chad, Doug Matheson, Chuck Maylen, Charles Collier. as-5-"" W 273 45 F354 Wi " J- f all fa-fem' '1 15457: -:AA - wo-' vi '..4 v,,. L. I F Q Lil. LL ln. ""'ifm5m if 3 1 V. fl e 41,,,.., L - ',?"h ffl'-' ' -- A Q. VV. , ,, 'M 1' RUGBY TEAM ltopi-FRONT ROW: Ford Joy, Tom Mahony. SECOND ROMA Jerry Desmond, Bruce Forbes, Kevin Jensen, Dick K ovalcheck, Bruce Smith, Tom Hennessey, Al Anderson, Doug Stewart, Tim Opezza. THIRD ROW' Paul Forrest, Tom Furnanz, Steve Honegger, John Burnett, Bill Lawrence, Tom Rosenthal, Skip Niebauer, Barry Silverman. FOURTH ROW: Coach Rod Sears, Dennis Reilly, Mike Cobb, AI Taylor, Scrap Lundy, Gary Luke, Bill Matthews, Chris Pappas, Ron De Shon, Wayne Smothers, Phil Martin. SAIL ING TEAM labovel-FRONT ROW: Bruce Badeau, Wayne Rodgers. SECOND ROVW Bill Lippincott, Bob Creps. THIRD ROVW John Lilienthal, Mimi Sheridan, Brian McKenna. wql if S fm.,- jx, r L, 5 A: , ! ,K. vi Sian' Q a 'M , gb , 4 I Z1 I P53212 WB.- 0 ! : 1 Q. .LL ,lf far- . ,Q M? arf gi f 9 34,3 . "i?feg!lEf' Q -'v"'T'?" Him' Ea ., .3 1. -. . . ' 1 , . n 5 x. Y ' ' 2 2 3 - :: :3 5, Q .g . 13 if :. .- . .. '. .2 1' . .3 -. '- 71 0 ': - :. . ,. .. . .. . we' wif' 117: . Y p k 1' Lu' S ri. 35?- 5 55i L: , ., , ,N K Lx - x-x ,Q lim Ig, .,e5L, il is ,ik s mx N ! gf' F V. 1 ' M .L .. , L zzz . . N m!" nu ' 1 ' v 5 I UL r At instructor Angie Bjorkland's mountain home, students in spinning and dyeing classes learn how to dye wool by boiling plants. Concoctions of sage, Hawaiian Punch, and black walnut yield multi-colored wools and yarns. M -116,31-1 51? 41 1 -' J, . 1 - 'A 2 V ri 1' xv: - .. A-, Q sw- d 1 ..:- .' :inn-I-.I Elementary and advanced pottery classes are designed to instruct students in the techniques of forming, firing, and glazing pots, vases, bo wls, and dishes. . .V Far' QS- ' xc " rn""-Luci i, .A .V f V ,A X, , - 'gy2l'?- gx Y ' " ,. X ., , 1 - . , V evil , if, xx , A 5381.1 ' ' N. -4 '-gg 'VX ' W The Living Arts Program welcomed students with guitars, offering classes of instruction for both the beginning and the skilled. 277 l if LIVING GROUPS 1 . .A - V .N 1. '.' .--., ,n .,x,. Vita: .. ' ww - ' .M ,lr iii 7- gf'- ,ix ,' W.. ,A M. EK: "I11',f'fe?1-U"gff'r'. Jn' H .7 fx.. ' w7i..'f"?"1f4i'L"T.,3 I ff ,. ff' -a , - gf, 1-.2 -WM. 'Z , A 7, 1. . .-.f . 1 ly. ,, Q:-1... Q HE. ..fgA I-.WA ..- 1.. f'3' .. a. in Q' V U - . . .L I.. .-uf af? 2 4 f . :g'.:.qf-'f.-33'-I"-f K X. . -We-.5 -,L ,WM H ' gk-ff. A ,1ik',,,, ,aff-, ,rw ' 'CAS RE'-1 ' , .. MI,,.v', v W., Q. vgv. ? W4 .Q Q.. bf' 44- -. .. nf-A---N 'if .V . S .1 X , 'L "?wvk'E, if? f J f ' 2, pi--5 x, f. g , '.--.5 . km.. .',..'f' -f' V. ' mu. " wr Nr. . Q Q, B .W .3-rs. ,Y " 'M W 'Wi' -1 ww' " 'V ' "'--,r...x:'-'7f?3sff?,g' . T -1. 4, ff xX'.'7'4'g4,?.1': NY, .,.J-va, X ,L 5 'S f...:L' .1 grf I Rayz., ,V Ln A - nxI,tAi.,Sh,4W-f1- tw.. . ' - ' - .-a,5'.,,' 0 "6TT7'2g, ' ., :FS fx-1'..f,,i"-WW Q' ',.:.:.:,,, . ' - -vw' ' as y. . A, . if 1 V r A. -' ,.'.,,5 :E lg., -.xii K 'YN rw--TQ' 13: Q I va H!!-is " rf ,iff f' 7516937 'i My ' 44 bf -.,4 . Q 1 . F 'L' H? ii f .1 ' -Q 1:11 af' 1,4 x., Y -4 x A K skid- -' E v- . fa .-" vw r- mg K, 1 dv Rush successful though numbers drop . . . Participation in Jl VE . . Volunteer work with underprivileged .t Fratternitieslicoach football team' for LM boys . . . Gauchitas flourishes . . . Homecoming house decs brighten lV Friday TGCS' with Little Sisters . . . Fraternity Rush Queen Court elected . . . Elaborate costume and theme parties . , . Quarter formals highlight social calendars' Q .4 Dad's Weekends planned . Q. Strong teams in intramural sports . . . Greek Week passes raise money for park . . . Spirited efforts to build park . . . First annual Sorority Pledge Beauty Pageant raises money for charity . . . Tutorial Project fills spare time. u Q , k if-'J f , l 4 Ezgziz wig -I ef Antonie Escherich Fall Panhellenic President PANHELLENIC Council Inougurotes Greek Community This year's members of Panhellenic Council chose, as their main objective, to determine ways in which they could help strengthen the Greek community. One of their outstanding service contri- butions is the Gauchitas program which is designed to help underprivileged chil- dren by organizing activities for them. A desire for unity and communication between sororities and fraternities led to joint meetings with l.F.C. The groups discussed current issues and circulated petitions calling for better coverage of Greek events in the El Gaucho. Numerous hours were dedicated to- ward planning a successful Greek Week which was newly reorganized to raise funds to build a park in l.V. They tenta- tively planned to go to high schools and speak to coeds about college and the Greek system. Spring quarter brought rush and the installation of new officers. SENIOR DELEGATES l L i 6 ii at .L af 'A 'Q Qi H I 'vie Debbie DeVoe Alpha Phi Nancy Drach Pi Beta Phi Robyn Babbage Pam Zerkle Alpha Chi Omega Alpha Delta Pi Kathy Davis Sarah Berkshire Delta Gamma Kappa Alpha Theta Judy Simmons Nancy Lietz Sigma Kappa Chi Omega 4 AA ALPHA DEL TA Pl Anniverso ry Yeor inspires Proiects 1970 marked the Twentieth Anniversary of the local Gamma Xi chapter of Alpha Delta Pi. The girls celebrated with an earnest program of service projects with- in the local community. Needy families in Goleta benefited from the ADPi's participation in Gauchitas and a special Thanksgiving dinner. The "admission price" was cans of food to be donated to less privileged families. Work with the Community Chest Drive and making Halloween bags for hospitalized children completed an impressive list of services. Many sisters attended the installation of a new ADPi chapter at Cal State Full- erton. All were present for their new house mother's Welcome Tea. ADPi Ginny Covll passes down a reception line of distinguished guests at the banquet held in honor of the ADPi chapter anniversary. Xl 1 r is -Q., 3 1, I i v-'P r Y? .V -e l Q9 Nl g l 4 'T ' "l. as .. fl Debra Hanke MaryAnne Harris Suzanne Hill Mimi Hinze Joan Hoffman Marcia Hoffman Genny Holmes Doreen Honegger Pamela McLean Ingrid Magnuson Jacqueline Martin Nancy Martinek Judi Matalas Carla Meinel Leslie Messenger Jean Millenaar Dale Patterson Roberta Rohlf Ginger Roth Becky Saleeby Teri Schmidt Jane-ice Schwartz Elizabeth Smith Deborah Thompson Becky Salebe and Jackie Copple lbelowl carry the banner for p f , ff I, ADPi's in a tightly contested intramural basketball game. The e ill H , sisters were active in all phases of intramurals. ' W Y .,, aa 16 ,-5 4.11. Q 3 Jig Las agna V Fifi? QL Gay Aegerter Elsa Allred Susan Barr Judith Berrett Sharanne Braine Christine Brown The X I 4 Kb me 5' 'S ' . , 'Y Z- 1 tsltmv B 9 X, .frufy f 1 1 V v ur ' - , K Y , 1 . V Y, AV' Nw-yt , Susan Buck Kathy Burk Bonnie Campbell Jacquelyn Copple Virginia Caull Karen Craner Diane Fleischli Karen Fox Joyce Fujii ,, ,f fi ' 2m , safe I I V. - I V Q-r ,N 35, 43' D, . , . A . 'if' WX . f 91: -E 252 E V .Ea- af K . .JW ,,, , Barbara K untz 5 Mary Ogle Meg Huddleson Terry Huggins Juanita Jackson Nancy Jones Carolyn Kelly Debbie Knorr Linda Morgan Deborah Mount Chris Nelson Nancy Nelson Randy Nixon Carol O'Bill Denise Thompson Cindy Mohler Nancy Todd Terry VWlliams LeaAnn Wood Pamela Zerkle I i -te E 'VY Karen Bender Shelley Browne NP' ' ,Q K Q ik ' If .Xi X ,Y. Sf. .P Stephanie Christensen Brooke Eagleson Stacey Griffith Q Yin Jill McCaffery Linda Panovich ALPHAPHI Spirit of Service Dominotes House Service projects dominated the Alpha Phi's group time this year. The house participated in Gauchitas, J.l.V.E., and the Heart Association Drive, while indi- vidual members donated time to De- vereux, St. Vincent's, and the Goleta Pro- ject. The girls also became foster mothers, sponsoring an orphan in Chile by donations. The Fall Formal was held in El En- canto Hotel early in the year, followed by Parents' Weekend, and Spring Sing. A highlight for the pledges was a "Famous CoupIes" costume dance, held jointly with Theta's and Pi Phi's. The pledges of Pi Beta Phi, Kappa Alpha Theta, and Alpha Phi co-ordinated their social plans in order to sponsor a theme-costume dance to highlight February. A few of the "famous couples" lrightl relax while the more energetic couples lbelowl dance enthusiastically to the music of a popular band, the Soul Purpose. r ,., fyvlf , N . N' "I'N , :HY . .F V fx II, f. A R., I 'M -av-wiv Qi 4 4 .N ' . We F' it 4 A 'Q ' ii 4.4 -A- ' . - fi' - P" E ' T 1 ki F - ' - -, "' if ,fr n--j ' tttt .... T . -rti 1 A 5. It I ... E V NI V Z .. 'T A L ' 'Y ' ' 1 - T X If ax ,655 " 'F v IN H 1 if AJ 1 wx? Q 2 'si it r -P if L . A 3 f in 3' J F ll f I ! Jeanne Anderson Marilyn Bailey Robin Barkley Missy Baron Kristine Borglin Cathi Brown Terry Brownell Lucy Campbell Kay Fitzgerald Sue Flower Suzette Hall Barbara Hassebrock Nancy Hatch .loan Hollingsworth Jan Jutzi Carole Kaufman Nancy O'Brien Lynn Olvany Susan Pearce Wendy Pedlow Deryl Pratt Lita-Nadine Ouetnick Sandra Ouetnick Alice Rogers V, 1-ff" -. ' ' 9 , ij 1 -iw '13 , 1 if ' Q 5 iz Lx VN ,N is , ,M mr - ,1. ', R , , 'Vw 'Q-I.: "EA uv it 'Ng , wc 25 an N 'ar wg! 'cv W jx f?k 1 1 , L 1 X I :K V 'E ,H-ig " , , X531 'U' ,L ,-,52f33? - 233: we e. is1,1m,. V A Q wma mg 51 5112 epizel, . J' na'1b!,'i,g5KggE.r . X. Egg 923: 1. 1 -X X x ' 0 ' fxv' 'TY' 1 l Y' Q 1 al I I 'T' H.-vi I 'ls in Bobbie Cole Joan Kleinman Jane Nible y Camille Cooley Carol Couch Darlene Darata Alida Davis Cheryl Denton Leslie Kleinman Rochelle Lulow Dottie McKee Michelle Meyer Donna Miglore Sharon Rudolph Nancy Scagliotti Carolyn Shaw Peggy Shuler Tish Smith 3 - iw X 4 Q -5 Q 41- . Q W ' r Francie Englehart Barbara Ferguson Trudy Nelson Annette Nibley Julie Weber Betsy Weber 1 ALPHA CHI OMEGA Com munity Service Sociolly Enhonced Although working with the Greek-organ- ized Gauchitas Program occupied much of the Alpha Chi Omega's time, they managed to sponsor their annual Christ- mas party for the residents of Hillside House. The large fall pledge class further committed themselves to community service through participation in the Com- munity Chest Drive. Diversifying their busy schedules, the A Chi O's activities included a Fall Formal held at the luxurious El Encanto, a Winter Formal at the Santa Barbara lnn, and an awards dinner. Sisters Barb Baird, Joan DeVito, Lorie Mc- Guiness, Jane Conway, Gail Fisher, Verla Wins- low, and Nancy Effelson ltop right! incorporate their midterm study into a question-answer seminar. A relaxing atmosphere pervades at the Fall Formal lrightl, as Sherrel Ball and her escort lfar rightl demonstrate with the beat of the band at the El Encanto Hotel. , 3, 1 """' . 'F TE' m ,V X . I , 9- V I ' 1: ff V -.E can V l . X i 3 " ' ff V' wtf' Betsy Cuddy Joanne DeVito Joyce Doo Laurel Herbert Caryn Horsfall Eileen Johnson Margaret Neiswen der Nancy Owens Phyllis Petersen f .U Juv -' Ann Draper Linda Johnson f ff as 1, ' X 3 l f i . K fi, ' ff 1, WK l 4, Q, i , fs , E l , , - v- X Tia-yi Gzarm-7 .ft K " i , 1 i I ' lil: 14' li l .f i 5 r ' 1 I M .ii N X -- yi ' J K M v ' 5 it M lu 2 Marilyn DuBois Linda Eggers Lynne Engelhardt Jacqueline Ernst Karen Krakow Elizabeth K uzell Kristine Laun Connie Linton Pamela Ross Cindy Smith Shelley Smith Lindsey Ste vwsrt Ruthann Richert L 'Tb -A 1 1 M ' 1 ' 'H Q9 1 mt f Kaye Evleth Mickie Ferrera Noreen Fiore Cathy McCarty Catherine McGaugh Lorie McGuinness Janet Tyler Denise Wallace Melody Welman 'I kv :- L.. . 0. f 4, L N U al x 6 t Pamela Alcala Barbara Baird .rx- fix I.. L gy aa J A n I U ya, f A 2 1' ..a.g J f :f:-: Julie Amick Patricia Arnett Sherrell Ball gi fsw ffligl: 'sq :,da.a nr Susan Baltes ix. A 1 ..,, if ,--1-WW 2' ,ff ifif i?i2if'3 ' f 14 M , .,:, --,:, gif 5 F ....1 - 5,-, 'I H rin , M ' -av. Robyn Babbage Lynn Barnes 1 - 'L 1, L4 'S' t " .J Lyn Barrett Patricia Beimford Cindy Beisner Leslie Bruhn Kathy Bell Darcy Boesel Pamela Bradley Cathy Bush Sally Butler Janet Butz Krista Carpenter Jane Convwy Gail Fisher Kally McMurray Suzanne Westho i' Iwi if Machelle Grant Laura MacArthur ven Gayle White 4,314-:E .s 5 f Qty F' A ug, Claudia Griffith Jacky Maguire Verla Irwnslow Mary Haloski Par Maguire Diane Zearbaugh Devan Hedding Marilyn Mispagel Erin Zerman 290 DELTA GAMMA Women Aid Blind, Gorner Trophies While also involved with service projects such as Gauchitas and J.l.V.E., partici- pated in by the entire Greek community, the girls of Delta Gamma sorority in- creased its philanthropic works to in- clude reading to the blind. The DG's received awards resulting from their participation in both intra- murals and Homecoming. Their house dec, constructed with the Sigma Chi's, garnered a second place prize. In intra- murals, the girls' team moved to the championship playoffs in basketball. In conjunction with fraternity men, the girls formed a promising coalition with the Phi Sig's for Pushcarts, and joined with the Sig Pi's to create an entry for Spring Sing. The Delta Gamma VWnter Formal was held this year at the Mira Mar Hotel in San ta Barbara. L t" 2 W ' i ,xqvg j kk A' fi :iii I e u. - li ,, iii 'gall' ,ff Donna Darrow Kathy Davis Debra DuBose Gloria Ewig Leighan Feffer Sue Kalinske Cindy Klotzsche Marilyn K undert Deborah K urilchuk Kathy Ledeen Mary Parker Lynn Parse! Candace Perry Vidda Quan Sharon Ready 1 N 'Q ,ev we in l Y 5 ' '- YY iii: " ' . r " 15 ,Q ii' ' 4 f , ,V Ei ,N : J ' id 1 . V 1 ' -I . ' 2. Rebecca Gray Sandy Guillot Patricia Hickey Barbara Lemman Randall Lencioni Carolyn Lynes Martha Ruby Ann Seaman Deborah Slemp rr., , 5- M55 The girls of Delta Gamma lbottomj combine the luxury of sun bathing with the student necessity of preparing for final exams. Late and lazy Sunday mornings are often spent over a cup of coffee lbelovvl, discussing school work and activities or reading the newspaper with other members of the house and friends who enjoy the friendly atmosphere. Y vs-we , D ,V - gt.. ' 'QIT-,Z-'EQ ?2'mg""e'--1 'M- f'--Q-.ws -If ' 'N' ' Kris Albade Nancy Banker Susan Bates --X.-v "ut tije Ei I P Leslie Anderson Linda Bates Gail Bei Trudy Boyer Betsy Bowe Liz Coker Grace Corselius .rf 3 A 4, fa. 619 J V -Y my J, A nf A 7222 Q , "-'fx I ,e 3 Paula Johnston V . g Gail Papac . H' F, ' In 4 l -L 4 - Z I fb 1 . T if W 4: M ,- 'ig' we Priscilla Hobson Bann Hoey Cyndee Howard Marilyn Hughes Mindy lngraham Barbara Jenkins Meg Johnson Linda Mclilhlliam Betsy MacLaren Sharon Mason Norma Miller Patricia Mulvey Victoria Palmer Susan Palmquist Patricia Stampley Suzanne St. Clair Katherine Thompson Pamela Turver Sandra Verhulst Cindy Yates Rebecca Yates KAPPA ALPHA THE TA Trosh-In Effort Aids Community In order to serve the community, members of Kappa Alpha Theta worked, in conjunction with others, to clean up Isla Vista. Many girls dedicated time to serviceffor Camp Conestoga. Active socially throughout the year, the Theta's planned a lVlother Goose theme for fall rush. During Homecom- ing, the traditional Theta-Lambda Chi alliance produced the first place house decoration, "Happiness is Anything Illegal, lmmoral, or Fattening." Other activities included a Valentine's Day costume dance and participation in Spring Sing with the Sigma Chi's. A National Convention Centennial in San Diego completed the year. Theta's gather about Kristin Finnegan at the piano for a short song-fest study break. A i I . , .4 'sg , , :-,, ' , f ' .,, f 1- x V N ' 'sg' 1 Nl - , 1 ig, s it l 52 vi 3 Vs I .1 1 to 3 y, . tr, J, wr: ' .-' is X W fill ? H , B C- 1.-3 y V' ' H2 -J in M3 :ii A 4- 4-,ri . f 1 4 . :. H x ,VA 1 ,i 1 A M tl R: ar, ' lu ' rf' 'Ii i f, ' I' , l ali" J M 1 a- r A if J J'--1 'D' w t ' C ' e "" V r , l' s 1 'A l fx . J sf f if me . l :C T'7i?f 71 A 49' i we -fe f , i ft' ' ff X t jr.:-1-S. in 1 W .g g g N . . , P , .A rn' . - Z, .- f' , M i ' ' ., ' A , sa- , ,f f it f .,.: ' , -.- i 'E . , . 4 2 ' ' l I ,SIR A . Bi, x , I In r V Nina Chambers Diane Child Barbara Cattle Diane Derian Debby Dodd Ellen Easton Antonia Escherich Joanne Ferguson Jaleen Higgin Deborah Holderness Betsy Hillman Sara Ja Hornstein Linda Huyssen Peggy Jerome Devon K earn Patti Kerr Peggy McGinnis Georganne McKellar Allyson McKenzie Ann Smith Laura Smyth Carolyn Spencer Barbara Moe Judy Sprankle Marti Moore Patty Stevenson Chris Mullen Sherry Strong Gayle Mulvey Sue-Anne 77llman Barbara Murph y Mary-K a ye 77llm gf N . 94. -1-.1 ., 2 5 S f ' .52 ,f H' " fi 1 gi., i... 4 ., I , . 9 51? lf QW ,. ,I ,KA .V v if . 1,,,, -.1 V 4 ,Lg 3 "1 " A 1 "7 4 -' 4 wt ' 3 5 1- T f I 1 : 2 I , . 1 J "tl" Y C -1 Nancy Adamsf Cathy Ballenger Sarah Berkshire Terese Bialecki Ann Beronious Barbara Bodine li 4 A. -Q K + Fi.. , E i 1 "EQ , , .: ' ' I L, I Marilee Burchfiel Liz Callen Madelaine Gvmpbell Jane Case 'Qu' eus- 1' ...p- Hx 's 1: RM f V I K .Q 'T-N? "F"-'f 4 X , ' Q L1 1... Lynn Gausewitz Susan Krelle Kristi Ronningen Alice Warrick 7 , ..,,:::. N rn ' Fig 'Qi 'OW' I f . - E ,J l g T II ,ij f, Ji, Debbie Greyson Nancy K ulvin Wrginia Sales Cecily Waycott 5 .ga ,. "" .- 'CNT y ,v x 5' x- 6 A H' I 'U Q Q - . ,R 4 i .I W A f X Janie Campbell Susan Cerrina If? 2' Fx , Wx. 1 vfvxvb L P 25. 41 , ' .1 M 1 .1 '25 . Barbara Hanford Tricia LaHue Christine Schleicher Cindy Wood E i . 4 3 Ann Harrold Cindy Hawes Patricia Lawrence Susan Leiphardt Debbie Schock Janice Scobey HBCD FVBETAPHI Stress on Tutoriol, Service to Others Following the presentation of the fall pledge class, the Pi Phi's devoted time to working independently for the Tutoring Project and the Gauchitas, and to organ- izing various service projects as a group. The girls sponsored an annual spaghetti dinner to raise money for a scholarship to be presented to a sophomore girl. During the spring quarter, the pledge class carried out a service project for the house. During Homecoming, the girls helped the ZBT's design and construct a house decoration which was awarded third prize. Other activities included a winter formal at the Nlira Nlar Hotel, a Hallo- ween costume party, a big-little sister camping trip, and a spring formal, al- though the diverse social life did not distract Pi Phi's from maintaining a high grade point average. ZBT Fraternity and the Pi Phi's created Cinderella's carriage for Homecoming '69. The Spring Luau fright! provides a festive opportunity for a colorful evening at the Elks Club in San ta Barbara, as the Pi Phi 's and their dates model their creations. Jan Palmer, Cheryl Thomson, and Cindy Crowell fbelowl enjoy a cup of "cheer' during a break in the activities of Dads' Weekend at San ta Barbara's Scofield Park. '51 V . " . " , . ' ,Eff ' R ' 1? .., gp I tl K lb j .. .ta ll: - - - . ' I ' -'N I its I -1 X .- , 1 ' -5 Y A . , r Q 7 ,, -, L' gg N W4 ' " L .9 f ," I: Q I ' ir isa ae . -.a , fx Gretchen Gingg Laurie Haggland Barbara Howard Kathy Kiley Linda' K locke Maggie Musgrave Debby Nichols Jan Palmer Marilyn Porter Caroline Potter Alex Tuck Lindsay Vann Judy Walker Jan Wentz Linda Williams . V . W .ix E W MH, I , . , 8 Jw of 1 it A ,. ., - ...,, ' we , it . , gf- .1 - x 131 -- My W .1 I F 'E ,gf 4' 1 em K :TES " ' ' .. ' 'f ,. W Len ' 1 ' X 1 yu! ' J' Barbara Barieau Christina Bryant Cindy Crowell Candy Blackford Cathy Buck Sally Curran Susan Anderson Jamey Blair Susan Colvin N' - -, yn ' , if . we ' Y Q N5 Si - Tl, X , Yr? M. 4 T ,, -Q N , .,.. J L ..., gg. ' lg., it F0 A .,.,g.1 5, ., Y .,.. .,.. Q XX 4.535 ,- 1 - s .- U Af U . gf, N A " wif '-' :fg. - My ,f"" . - arg ,fg .5 JH f 1 . wi ' g ' - e , 3, dl Sn, , ' D Q , x -P , x I . K IN Laurie Douglas Kath y Evans Nancy Dowd Kath y Dixon Merrill Everett Nan cy Drach ""' ll? .A 1.-If li il" , by V gifali ' ,,,, Qi.,-25" - 1 '12 g K , .k i ji V , , -:lf gl, af ' B S Q. nf iff' VVI 5 , g- - -111 q,, A 1, ,. 77na Maybay Kathy McEntee Patti McKeever Jeri Rehm Lynn Rigney Debba Sherman Katherine VWls0n Shelley VWIson Nancy Wolven - -f ' ---1 'Q' Shannon Mclntyre Marianne Michky Pam Shirey Kristy Singer Dianne Wood Jan Wyant Pamela Monroe Sharon Montague Chris Moore Arlyn Silacci Sandy Snyder Sally Stires .,,,. Tig., . 1 , H. 1 1 ,F 4. u It V 2 SIGMAKAPPA Service Projecls Result in Benefits Sigma Kappa's emphasized service this year with both individual and group participation in numerous projects. During fall quarter, the girls sponsored a Fashion Dessert with all proceeds going to the Santa Barbara Library to buy large print books for elderly citi- zens. In spring 1969 they donated one hundred dollars to Gauchitas, which they earned from the Ugly Nlan Con- test. lVlembers continued to volunteer help to the Gauchitas this year and also to the Tutoring Project. Despite involvement with service projects, they maintained an active social calendar, events including a house Christmas party, both a lVlom's and a Dad's Weekend and a pledge- sponsored Gypsy Theme dance. The annual Violet Ball dinner dance was a festive highlight for the Sigma Kappa's. TT T T V T TT gi l l ,el I s g . j, , -A 1 9 .f ,l 7 Fi W ' 5. T 1 E A Av lx Tm ei ,, ' M ,L 'yi A, 1 ,,--, ' . to lf M . c 'L 4 A 4 in Leorah Abouav Karen Bailey Susan Barnes Linda Barr Barbara Beckman Carolyn Bell Kathleen Campbell Joanne Cieri Ann Howenstein Anne Keeney Troy Kirkpatrick Diane Lamphere Kimberly McDaniel Sue Machado Lois Martin Katherine Meyer Ars Evelyn Du Bois Renata Farber Marian Fleming Him Michels Mary Mowatt Patricia Owings Several members llefti of Sigma Kappa discuss plans for future social activities prior to the weekly Monday night Chapter dinner. The girls spent many hours working on the Sigma Kappa Homecoming house decoration lbelowi which was ruined by rainy weather. gil Carole Grafe YQ -O , 5 2 Cathi Ford Sherry Self Margaret Gant Marsha Geiger Lynett Goulart Judy Simmons Cecelia Smith Carla Wulkau 98 CHIUMEGA Volunteer Efforts Aid Sf. Vincent's Chi Omega's aimed their service plans to- ward volunteer work for St. Vincent's and the Gauchitas this year. Fall quarter was filled with pledge activities including a kidnapping and a paddle party. The house decoration that the girls and the Theta Delta Chi's con- structed captu red the Sweepstakes trophy during homecoming. A January formal was held at the Circle Bar B Ranch. An "informal" spring formal completed the year, as the members waited anxiously to welcome back the four representatives from their house who studied abroad this year. Chi O's Karen VWlcox, Ginny Walton, Wendy For- man, Laurel Chadney, Kathy Moar, and Penny Pearson relax during a study break discussing upcoming events. y, ii 3 X 5 f" -.eff M? .15 r i , AE -e ii lf l s N sa i 'if 1 ' l as l Robin Johnson Melanie Jones Marilyn K luth Nancy Lietz Melony McCracken Barbara MacKfrdy Michele Matlock Cath y Moar Melinda Rogers Lynda Rowan Mary Saucer Ann Schneider Georgia Thomas Carol Ule Mary Vail Ginny Walton in Homecoming. Corinne Braly ibelowl is shown as she was announced winner of the first sorority pledge beauty con test. " A joint effort ileftl of Chi O's and Theta Delts won sweepstakes , 9 cbvvl .J I"Y'Q tit Janet Aho Corinne Braly 1-IN 5 xv , I -'W 'ss M 'Z' x1 Ea 35 E5 CE, ,gr W Cathy Carson C, Laura Cooper Joann Gelb Julie Henderson f fra ,S w Q -. 3 Q , f Q X 1! J , 2 . ' '31 ' - ..- L' TTT' '1'--v r S., - 9 Q. 'J gf' ,, Wcki Moffett Linda Morse Kathy Murray Dorothy Neilson Patricia Oyama Gail Welborn Claudia VWlcox Karen VWlcox Anne Willis Charlene Young -cv Elaine Barrett Catherine Batteen Stephanie Brown Emilie Bursik .v 1 I, ,gf .- Y, r, . ,W .K N. j , C, My 5' ,, ,N . , x , , q- ' 1 L Y , 1 f l y -,eine ht Laurel Chadne y Gayle Clark Diana Davidson Kathleen Diamond Susan Gibbs Beryl Gorzynski Susan lrvvin Marilyn Jen vey 'im' W-7 L . W I .1 ' - ' U msg ng- ' x 1 1, f'f"X ' - as t it 'tn T-'X ,X ,f X Peggy Hagan Kathy Ritchie Janice Younger Maryann Zaninovich We f Z 98 ,X 1 ,md - H if 5155. wk. Mindy Bergman Katherine Buschman W - gee" V ,W . , hxq1':ff'N Y' 'sa , K, A .-.H , Q V, , -' 2 ,M -on .Q x " -, nf S' . ' 1' 1' X 1 all 47 .M 4 , fb i A L U N ' ATA A f , J Q4 t 1 fi? . If in-.674 i a l, ft H- , I P-Q a 'fi-L s-. 9. June Clark Wendy Forman Jan Greathead Mary Johnson aff xvgfiri sfyn , M rf- H , 'M ' Ruth Robinson . . 'W' ,ig -S 1 O0 INTERFRA TERiViTY COUNCIL Frolernifies Bock 'Bui lnterfraternity Council directed its Greek relation attention toward estab- lishing a better rapport with Panhellenic Council in joint meetings. The com- munity action emphasis was to develop a park for the Isla Vista area. IFC President, Shel Thompson, served in the capacity of Chairman of Greek Week to co-ordinate efforts to restruc- ture the traditional activities. To raise funds to build the park, the Greeks sold "Greek Week" passes on campus. These Id o Pork' Drive passes entitled the holder to a myriad of events ranging from an all-l.V. Friday T.G. to athletic events. Joint meetings with representatives from the sororities enabled the council to ensure better planning and more Greek participation in all-school activi- ties. IFC members took an active part in matters relating to the University and the community in an effort to make the Greek system more relevant to today's needs and demands. IFC OFFICERS ' 1 ,' ref ,X Hare? V Q A Y I ,p 6 .' V- .4 V Vince Real Chris Browder Administrative Executive Vice-President Shel Thompson IFC President One of the highlights of Greek Week was the Rugby game lrightl with New Zealand. A basketball battle between Greeks and independents labove rightl was also included in the Greek Vice-President Marc Sewell Rick Davis Treasurer Secretary Week pass, sold to obtain funds for the building of a park. , ..,- :JI vi LLL Q-'ILM-1 IFC DELEGATES bf A"..i': i " . T. 'Q 'QL aw' A P of' xi ,, IQ .env y S ,, N ,,. ll l 5' I f' ' l ' I ' F -4 ' 7 ' L' ,, " I A A , 2 , -QR V- 1 i N PM A-' ii, '-rs?" Alan Parkhill Alpha Delta Phi Barry Posner Sigma Phi Epsilon I Dennis Duncan Larry Miller Keith Jeffers Alpha Delta Phi Lambda Chi Alpha Phi Kappa Psi Michael Crowley Bill Matthews Geoff Morneau Sigma Alpha Epsilon Sigma Phi Epsilon Phi Sigma Kappa Steve Boggs Chris Papas ' Sigma Chi Phi Delta Theta FRATERNITY PRESIDENTS i 'V - -- x f '3 Eilf i-i i ii: 'K --. . I -'ze-iii I I r ' J' Tig'-P . bf 1- ' ff ' T-Jxg W QW j B V W 1'-zzsx. Q - ,,- ', . vlr it W -N- i-V .. 1 . A I, ,- ,Q-I Y ll: f , ' " - y f V an 2 A T ill - Brian Velthoen Larry Lee Stan Woodward Dennis Dolan Bill Ryan Zeta Beta Tau Theta Delta Chi Kappa Sigma Lambda Chi Alpha Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fred Holden Kirk Gillies Mike Wright Fred Greene James Butler Sigma Pi Sigma Chi Phi Delta Theta Phi Kappa Psi Phi Sigma Kappa 302 ALPHA DEL TA PHI Volunleer Teoching Fills Service Time Emphasizing volunteer work for their service projects in 1970, the Alpha Delts lent their energies to organizations such as Devereux, Alpha School, and the Santa Barbara Action Corps. As a special contribution, the brothers serenaded Isla Vista with Christmas carols at the end of first quarter. Valentine's Day elicited a show of sentimentality, both from the fraternity and from their little sisters, the Daugh- ters of Odin. The men sent red roses to all the girls, who reciprocated with a sur- prise party early Valentine's morning. A flamboyant luau, cocktail parties, beer and pizza parties, and a weekend ski trip kept the Alpha Delts occupied. Homecoming was celebrated with the SAE's at the l.V.P.D. Jim Ouesenberry labove rightl tries to convince his date of the relative merits of the house speciality drink, "Dicky the Brick," while members of the Rush Court lrightl relax with the brothers after the coronation ceremony. 5 . W..- Highlighting fall Rush Week was the selection of the annual Rush Queen and Court by men participating in fraternity rush. Elected to the 7969-70 court were Becky Reeder, Queen Cathy Brideau, Sharon Vernatta, Cynthia Snyder, and Carla Thompson. ., .aB??-51 -A "'i 'C ' '- V F -.Q.. '. : Y S D 4 - 2 I ifii c:-: J: I - R c:-- 1 A e r M , . I J l xt 5 1 wg 1- :" we , xxxx N ,, .,.wMNMEx! Li A FM ? . lrb V X. f -'N,v lgvl Q g if ' fm ,.- jijz 1 . J Y 4? q ' '- 1 D .. 57 pf f 11 V if-fl R t ' , a ' , , t Q e yu Bill Hart Steven Kaufman Russ Lindgren John Lammiman John Meanley Greg Moore John Radford Steve Radford Alan Scharlach Thomas Scholes David Tang Bud Whitcomb gif 4 1 :Lf . H if" S ruff K . Y ' - u ' ' x W 'V V' 'M " 1 ' 1: , aw, . 'gag T -'A John Abbott Michael Clarkson 5 , 1 -4 Q Justinian Caire Russell Cleveland area L Q 'I . jd' 1 X, Qi.--P+ I r 'Lg ' ' - tx. R u Q 'A . Q wlstfr . -D J N :"v, " 1 W ' WI A -- q 1 it A A V , w,,, ,b A if P .. ' t... I. t ae x . Dennis Cooke Charles Duncan Steven Fox Steven Gottlieb Francis Perez Sam Chuck Drinkworth Dennis Duncan Bryan Garbutt 77m Graumann Jim Ouesenberry 30 304 ZBT ZETA BETA TAU Morole Boosting Is Service Aim Contributing to the morale of the patients at St. Vincent's hospital the men of ZBT donated some of their all-too-sparse leisure time to visit the bed-ridden. Other service projects in- cluded volunteer work at St. Vincent's, an afternoon of baseball with the Goleta Boys' Club, and participation in the Greek Week 'Build a Park' drive. The brothers, aided by the Pi Phi's, built a trophy-winning house dec for Homecoming and enjoyed the traditional Gaza Strip party, with friendly rivals Phi Delta Theta. Spring Sing presented a challenge to the fraternity and their partner's, the Alpha Chi Omega's, to defend their Sweepstakes honors from last year. 1' 4 : ' V- Y , i , '- , , ai u, lee- it f ,fi liz' 1 fa? l 'g3'f I 4 A . g -lf:.- 5" A A ,. A , ..f' E ' i H Q 'l I 'J 7: J 4. Ada da r Jay Arrott Barry Beith Mitchell Bader Rick McGough Charles Newman Bob 0'Hair Brother Gary Smith, active in campus even ts, participates in Road Runner Review l l is U in bl 9, 2 igf ' Robert Campbell Frank Cutler Chris Poehlmann Max Riley I 'Q ' ' Qhir r r' 1 t" l -if Q r . t . g- x ,, V , 3.3 , 2 N an .. . lllnllfni John Ernst Barry Evans Dennis Fujii Raymond Roan Kenneth Shoor James Simon Water polo lleftl was a house intramural strong point, with ZBT's Don Trybul, Steve Moody, Ken Schoor, and Bruce McCall among the top players. Pi Phi 's and ZB Tis lbelowl were drenched with rain as they completed their Homecoming dec at dawn. g.. LL. ZBT interest in the Bill Allen demonstrations was exemplified by house participation. W i F 'ft Q I I f A X Z i ' -1 Q I IQ S14 2' f Q r at V :'- L f '33 --1 ' R f 4' is 2 t ' 1 5' ' Nt 'ff . " - , K 'Z R ' ' L Q l 1 c 4 D i .Q L Andy Liberman Bruce McCall ll . A 5 V V, I -N 1 5 L, I h gg ' k -0 I 'Af 24, ' , L 'NV' 1-,I N 'Wing' V. ".-T Z Bernard Gans Larry Goddard Jack Holland Bill Hotz Steven June Robert Lewis Gary Smith Steven Suehiro Jack Vallerya Brian Velthoen Fred Voss Jim West O6 THETA DELTA CHI Philonfh ropic Work Proves Enjoyoble Theta Delta Chi's service projects this year not only contributed beneficially to the community by employing the men's talents, but also yielded enjoyment for them. A favorite project was coaching a football team for Isla Vista boys. Goleta boys were treated to a Halloween party sponsored by the brothers for the Boys' Club. On the national scale, Theta Delts campaigned for the United Heart Fund. Homecoming brought honor to the house with the capture of the Sweep- stakes Trophy for house decs. Another social highlight was a joint party with Theta Delts from UCLA and Arizona. The Theta Delt little sisters participate in an informal meeting to plan their strategy for a supreme R.F. in "honor" of the brothers. Ass o R James Bailey Greg Gstertenbaue Randal Pearson The Theta Delt Caveman party lleft and belovvl brought a lot of throw-backs to the Neanderthalic era out of hibernation, and challenged their girls' sewing skills. w ' -rw" .133 5 Y -' ,Q M ---' J 'T , . 3 "o- P . V E' Q K 5 4 R :sr I' I J fr QL! . f - fc J IA 1 X ,' X ,Q ' " ' .LL .i. ' W V ? -. Q, W I I ml ..., J w is --f J ' e we we .J we 5 J I - 1.-in X, W 4 zo, . W A . A ' A A 4 i iv-if 1 l I, W rx ., - . ' .Y N Y . 'i Q.. i .,.. , X I b y -:I t :W , ' A x . J T ' K' -. , Q - , L, f--- :-: V ' ,Q .. ..e, , ,- R - 1. P l -, J J T S or T ss , , V V - if . , 4' f in Q - -j, H fi S-, be l, All L I. M512 ,- f ' 'f ,, , ay 5' .. " ' R' "if " L ' , -T V ' if A S T , .2 L "1 R ' .2-A, ' I ' ' ' ' Eigizisn ' , .,., y -' ' 1, ' " 5 Y J-5 azz 2, Y .' - If H .L A iii' Gerry Behman Ernie Bumatay Robert Butler Steve Coleman Richard David Stan Dreckman Tod Fogarty 77m Gardner Joe Gstettenbauer Bill Harris John Harris Michael Hengel John Honegger Larry Lee Terry L ydon James O'Donnell Rob Robertson Paul Roller Bruce Shapiro Scott Slotterbeck John Speciale Mark Stasinis Gregory Weiner Ted Zink 30 , ,.....,,. -mmm .-..,. ..:f2a.mfmnz,.......,,.:,msm.wz...:.QJ., ' ' 4 .:..., ' ' ' '1sa.L.i.MMf-Y-M Before the havoc wreaked by the wind and rain, this House Dec for Homecoming 7970 was DLT attractive and clever enough to garner a first place trophy in the Greek division. Constructed by ' Lambda Chi's, with the Kappa Alpha Thetas, the winner was titled "Happiness is Illegal, lmmoral, or Fattening." L ' if li'lhl D v - 1 ,fi V r z' l57T"3' A ' 'r' L I , fi I V. - Cl' , ' K ' ,- 'Q --f , vQ , 1 1 ' A ':': - - I 1' X-31: 'N' f . . if - , . ' 1 'E' Q - ' Atfzfg A if 9 . . ' W , ' ' 'Q' A 5' ' ff 1 ' 'a', It ' , - 1 4, ' ' -,J - - . ',-. Q L-'. 1 It " 'Q' gg: ' 3 H , st or I L. t it l .i.. X , I ' fr . v mi, 4 - X ..: ' ' "' ' V Y 1 rf 5 1 " ,i T -.jj '- . -F, : I , ,I J --TY V V ,. v+,Qv'xw,- v tt x Don Khalmann Greg Lagana Wc Larson Frank Lovell Richard Luskin Tom Mahon y Fred Meitz Stephen Milam Lawrence Miller Alan O'Brien Paul Orgeron Jim Owens Terry Snowden Bruce Solari Curt Ste vmrt Doug Stewart Tom Tranbarger David Vincent A ,, my My k x Dave Abrecht Richard Bach Gilbert Brown : .H "9 4 x I X L Brian Asamoto John Bodine Stewart Brown g A , .. , Jack Collins Dennis Cunnane Michael Conte Ken Davidson ., " Y iQ .fd a L ia V ' iw L ' ' aid if at Richard Markota Tim Paone Paul Waldav 'r 1? ,. i John Meiers Wayne Smothers Steve Winders 30 O The surprisingly warm and sunny February weather was a special brothers celebrated the formal initiation of Donn Bernstein bonus for the SAE sports day lbelowl. Earlier in the year the lbottoml, Sports information Director, as Advisor to the house. . Hia, 1 ' ll iw 'i 5 51.3 SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON Men Aid Closses, Excel in Athletics Acting as concerned tutors, the brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon this year con- centrated their community service ef- forts on supplementing the classes at . Elwood Elementary School. me of P E 'f at Ea , A Active on campus, the house made a good showing in intramurals, winning ' 'E the two-man basketball tournament and V .7 . - 4 ,. E' ' placing high in soccer. The sports sched- lj gf 3 5531 ' - gi I hs. , ule was highlighted by Phi Alpha Week- ' ,, ,E if it A els jf . ' ' end's competitions with the SAE's from d A , ,L ,L Long Beach. The annual Harvey Hubler- - q-'s U Dick Ryder Banquet was held to recog- . Ti N J 'ET I "T nize and honor the current basketball Q A, my S - 1 team's merits. 4 M - i,, A liii B '-' 1 The brothers worked with the inde- i ' il li ,fr pendent Fountainebleu women on a 1, A A -M A ' 'a r Homecoming house dec and initiated the ' T T ' , Q., ' first annual Tom Jones party. John Abraham Roy Bowen Bob Brady Paul Brinkman ' Michael Crowley Steve Laska Jim Lynch Jim McClune Terry McLaughlin Pete McMahon 6? 1 Q- X - Brothers practice lleftl the style which won the two-man basketball trophy for the house. inclement weather did not dampen the spirits of the SAE-Fountainebleu pro- duced World War l Flying Ace lbelowl. ,- - p N X "F i w. , f..f 2,-w f , ri A q T '- , '3- , st .. M- i xi, .I Rick Gangnes James Guillou Stephen Heinsohn Doug Smith Bill Wells Jerry Woolf Xiu Q SIGMAPI Islo Visto Service Receives Attention Selecting the theme "progress begins at home," the Sigma Pi's directed their pro- jects toward Isla Vista. The pledge class devoted many hours to the J.I.V.E. Trash-in on their work day. Plans were formulated to initiate a Big Brother pro- gram for younger residents of the com- munity. Spirited enthusiasm was elicited by Greek Week service plans. Members engaged in other activities, such as four of the men who spent the winter quarter in Peru on an archeologi- cal expedition. ln sports, the brothers held a respectable record in intramurals, especially in basketball and the strenu- ous cross country meet. One of the biggest social events of the year was the three-day tormal held in Ojai. A "green death" party and a luau were other house specialities. Entertaining at home at the Sig Pi's reveals the casual life of the lsla Vista Greek scene. Sig Pi Fred Holden lbelowl "breaks in " the keg at a Friday afternoon 726. while several other brothers and little sisters lrightj engage in a more active pastime. i G1 v. 'QI ' 6 f 5? Q D, J' x " -' T 1 'fx v . W--'T 'Y' '4'l'..-'Y' 1 'IK T' i 'V .- if A L 4 - Af T- a 6 1 - ' -f ' ., .' -J ! V' .Q M, 'K i. ix A A A ' .f 4,7 Q' I 3 i A- fi " U '3 5 K ' G3 va- - . . 4. A 4 g. . n K it ' .YA 'Cav : ,3 , , H . - k I W h Gary Gordon Jim Greenlee Craig Grossman Jon Noell Ralph Nordhagen Chester Nuckols Douglas Roberts Dennis Rodeen Steve Scheuch f g,,,x-- I K, ' ,. "'lT1,' A tyler, I Jr, vu Qtr, ' , ' , I , 1. J 'gfkfff J JT K SL Q V wh 1 xr 4 if ,S f ' J A ' 5 1, - asefdmg I, fm if in me i 9' ,2- 1 5? i 58 , 6! M ' " H 4 ' Doug Anderson James Bendt Mike Dubrasich M-: sm. 5 -N . 4, ,f A 52? .- .eil , in f Herb Engel Peter Fenerin Richard Barnett Tom Conway James Ducker 1-6 Richard Enos John Fischer - 'fy' A ef ff: . , i , I A Y H Q , ' 1 Y f -.DQ Qi V1 fa 'A in , ' 'Q fc? 'QQ 'Cf ' V. A ia , ax- ffi ' X 1 Q75 "r ,LJ ' 2 Qs 'J-2 I ' If E ' nf' rre X J T " H W I - ' vi X. , H ,QM rr ,Q -1. A ,J f. wr.. fe 1. are C . , T -es J he F' 'ge ae M e e C 'f' - ' mg- 1 . -- -5 y T T ' '-e" Q . N ' W ' ' J N , if w P ' rerree or ll , Rl , -i F 3 H I Q . A r i -' ii X J N V I 4 . L 'fi' sg, "ik, A 1 ef f J' 55' 5 , L' T if -. 3 ' A .' 3. g , fi - l I 'fl' '- ff .Qatar ?- 5 ll' I Q b A M Fred Holden Edward Olson Ted Shreve Robert K opf ' Mark Leinen Weber Karl Lopker Michael McCurdy James Merriman Thomas Morlan Burr Otto Thomas Peters Ray Pian tanida Cris Pilegard Gary Pimen tel Vince Real Bob Simmons Richard Sinclair Tom Slavik Peder Talbert Shel Thompson Frank Vivian Michael Muckley Kevin Ritchie Clifford VWctorin 4 ECDE SIGMA PHl EPSILON Gouchilos Progrom Aids lslo Visions ln the Big Brother capacity of the pro- gram initiated last year by the house, the men of Sigma Phi Epsilon con- tinued their Gauchitos project to pro- vide wholesome recreation for the children of lsla Vista. Within the university the brothers were active in various organizations and clubs and sent representatives overseas in Project Nepal and Project Pakistan. ln their traditional contention for the Intramural Football Championship, the Sig Eps held a strong second place behind Sigma Chi's. Perennial social activities filled an already packed calendar this year, in- cluding pastimes such as the long- awaited Wine Festival and the 102nd Annual Bicycle Race. Bicycle-race tee shirts, crash helmets, and cups of liquid refreshment labove and rightl symbolize the beginning of another Sigma Phi Epsilon Annual Bicycle Race. Hours of practice prove worthwhile at the post-race party. if P1 "' lm T i cm 5 - ii tg 1? 'lx ' ' Q ,SL--will Lisa, Randy, and Sally enjoy the uninhibited . atmosphere of this Sig Ep fall quarter event. I i in . L A U '47, 'A A L2 -- se- ' 213. -ir:-' t T-as ei , ' : " I' ff M In ' John Ahler Doyle Baker lMlliam Lofft Bill Matthews Although the tradition at Homecoming Parade was cancelled due to sudden showers Sig Eps refused to let this dampen their Homecoming spirit. They constructed a "float," named it "Happiness is VWne," and rode through l. V. emitting spirit to inhabitants. X I V I ' ,F in j, ' , Y Y 'f U it " '. 1 A - Q J I uux, F if " A - .1 4 ,, i A 11' , ' ' ' I ,. ' ' 'H .- . K. , , A V ' .' , ' -f 'a ft, "-, - as V4 5 A . t, 1 if me 1' c 0 a , A gm 'I f ' Q' f fr . .lil W 5 M- if' x tv H, wif., J . R "-, ' X ., . N st- H A i Marvin Bultman John Culver Jon Finch Jack Fleischli Handy Herbon John Hofmann John Kaucher Rick LaBare Larry Morgan Robert Orr Barry Posner Mhlliam Sanford Robert Schneider Lote Thistlethwaite Jim Van Driest Walt VWlson 315 SIGMA CHI Fraternity Charity Teaches Retarded Pet service projects occupied much of the brothers' time this year. The Sigma Chi national fraternity project is raising money for Wallace Village, an institution which educated the mentally deficient who are capable of learning constructive skills. On the local level, the men made two volunteer visits for work at Hillside House this year, while also helping to organize the joint-fraternity football league for local youngsters. Sig Chi's were more than qualified for this pro- ject, since they captured first place in intramural football this season. 1 - '- ' J -l is r V--.aa - . ,, I -as lfWth the aid of the DG's, Sigma Chi constructed a unique house dec lrightl which captured for them a second place trophy. ln the in tramurals cross country meet, held first quarter, Sig Chi Dave Walker lbelowl ran away with house honors. 1? fe-M aifiug p A ' ' qwyuib 'Avi' ' s' . .v - -em Y . -., ,...., Qt """ 145355 ., WJJ- ' ' tit. iii a- XQQAQ, .glffff 5-' :M V- V . , ,. .. 5 2: ,ef ,..:-- ""' . 4- - . . 2. Y , , .S ,ir 'tgp ' ,. . M ,gi -.5 , - . . - ax?" . ' . . X. In H ' 2' ' H 4 1' -- H ,M , , Q A N.. Q gh W, . , . , Q kff. : Eva' - q - gif, ifiai f.-in : -5-w. 'I' if Lf -all-'w AI' .11 , '.j .L::iQA, 1' 4 Va. -. 'S r A -- - tt . R . 1 1 Q A f A ,,- A t xii it ,'.,,., L 4 ,Yi . Q- A Ani P Y 1 3 W 4 wi l F i ,Q L X 3 .li i t X193 an . i ir- e , ii ' ' w wi F I L V ' i i L . - .l , . . . nv -A 2 ., if .... of ne- . L .R in " Q' f ,il 4., ,' w,Vbi'l Kits' 'li ,, Nj' ' , fl ii, sae N " ' .il Q ,J as 8' I i N , N V i. 'ir I Y r' 7 . ,B-Al . be-I af'-e .l ,rs e ti' t J N we , . f .f . ' ,, 1 1. ,... , i , ,IB jeff. tw,Vi:v-F X f - A r A lg J - L John Crass Robert Crouse Wes Edwards Brad Ginder Steven Ginder Jim Mullally Glenn Olson John Pappenfus James Petrone Stephen Rhorer Mark Helvey Robert Helwick Curt Hodding Steve Robb Jim Robison Ken Robison I- V ,,. L, A .mx Y A I AJ I 1 ' A Et uv L Arthur Adams Stephen Barrett I . tm 9 , 'tru ,yi Eze 1. g SL , .H Keith Boman Patrick Byrne Rich Codington 1:-:yu , , . 4 lv P- Michael Collopy Y f . : J 3.-1. ' 1 L A f a co4 4 lynn Q RQ mi tl A fc ,ty V A J 1 0 h ' 4' . ' , ' 1 f l, ' if ,- "'- , yu 1 '4' C . ,. "' X ta I ,, !,Y!I N . .. ,.,:.: I V rw - y f 51:52 ' " Rx i 15 tu . Rex Jacobs Phil K ohn Paul Lee Fred Lit-tlejohn Skip McCovwn Mark Malashock Peter Mills Jeffrey Rosen 77m Travers Eric Wallace VWlliam Walker Samuel VWIliams David Wrentmore Bob Zarich , 12 C EQ A -- tc :- 'x 5, 1 1 5 'Q' Q 3'- Phil Bartlett Steve Boggs -35' " k L ' 1 ,gf it ,F ,., J nf' , 'f--J ' ' I '. A I ,r VIH ' 1 .a - 421 ' 'NY .. . J , :wel fx 7- Minton Brown John Clabaugh Paul Cole Paul Contreras 3? 2 7 591 1 Q 'P fr if James Moffett CDA PHI DELTA THETA Childrens Outings Prove Entertoining Combining charitable works with plea- sure, the brothers of Phi Delta Theta selected their annual project to be a series of outings conducted for under- privileged children in the Santa Barbara and Goleta areas. On the social agenda, the Phi Delts hosted a Halloween party, a Roman Toga party, and a gathering at the Circle Bar B Ranch. Playoffs for intramural crowns found the brothers among the top contenders in both basketball and football. Despite their many activities, the Phi Delta Theta's achieved the highest overall fraternity grade-point for Fall, 1969. Dennis Mitchell lbelowj runs a complicated maneuver to avoid being tackled 171 intramural flag football. Phi Delt Jeff Vesley lrigh tl struggles for a rebound with his Pass!Fail opponent. Q S' " '11 - N - ".' ' J Q ' 41-5 A, A ' In Q ',,," Hts , In' -vi Z 5 f I ' A-rj it "I l A . W 1 1 ,V Q, r lx .AA L g .-J A ' ... - 1 ,1 29 ffl "l 1 , '-J -.1 'V '- P X " in -na? ' " x,4. ' J fs? f 4 - ' ilffgs ga I Q i' I N. Bill Garlack G5-ofge Henning Terry Jackson Rick Jensen Michael Kander Richard Reynolds Dennis Russo Craig Smith Bill Stack Jerry Swarteager J' 0 , 1. 5 Fiwl x..fR,4 1-,J-, , 'Vi P . , , if .N ,1 AVA u w' B, .X f xl Srephan Barber Carl Blaine Jim Comerford 32gfM,yQn-..,x ' -if K A -Q. '- . IZ: SE LF 3 . x fi I f V- QF Q , ' . . Roger Crouthamel Jim Edwards John Elder Thomas Powell , yn 'f' P . . 'F Q A J 1 Clif -2' ' Y H . -4, ,I ' ' I V jg I . .2 I ,f l V . 5:1 px. rl l, 1,'g,m L 12. Q 47 D L F 1 'W ' : f ,Y 1, ,SAT Chris Papas 1 IV, X W G ' " .4 L. if " 'V A K I L Marty Lack Harry Matsinger lan McNeil James Miller John Morrisroe Bob VanEpps Gene Walton Jeff Vesely Peter VWle Raymond VWnquist 2 ,s 2 frm- 1 'Y' , V J JL -12: 65 l ,gl Robert Beckham Neal Cole Roger Cooper ii sf Y ' ...J K fi V .Ya f ,Y-.if , , 1 H -, ,, , ww ,PO .,:: F 'ij . N W Q M Gary Earle Wiliam Eick John Fitzhenry 1 , - .,' 'f , :iq Em- -A VWll11am Rasmussen 320 CDKXP PHIKAPPAPSI Holloween Project Enterloins Children A Halloween project challenged the creativity of the men of Phi Kappa Psi. Aided by their little sisters, the brothers carved pumpkins and filled bags of candy for a party held in honor ofthe children at Goleta Valley Community Hospital. The Phi Psi's and their little sisters also provided the entertainment, presenting a concert of original Hallo- ween carols. In a brotherly gesture, the house hosted a Iuau for the Phi Psi's of Valley State after the San Fernando Valley football game in Campus Stadium. Also active on the sports scene, Phi Psi's con- tinued to dominate the intramural volleyball tourney. A lot for a new fraternity house has been selected, and the brothers are pre- paring to move to a beach site when the building is completed. Members of Phi Kappa Psi and little sisters lrigh tl sing carols to the children in Goleta Hospital. Phi Psi 's take a break from winter finals lbelowl for an outing in their bus. -s-if .A JV - fy .Q Michael Blodgett Keith Jeffers David Bressler Gerald King On Halloween night the men of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity and their Community Hospital. They decorated the rooms with pumpkins little sisters passed out candy to the children in Goleta Valley and then gathered to sing some original Halloween carols. aw sd 1 'l ,Q X Tw W.. T k -'J Q . ., '- , Q W A 4 1- "V .Q , , . " . 1, L , 1" :ETV A M F sigh. Steven Frank Dennis Miller Douglass Faist Mike McKeown l r' " ' ' ' "Wea W -- 4 , x , ' ,.., '4 1 1 ... 'L A . . , 2 "" 1 3,4 31 iq gg-1-2 5, - 31 H, 'WJ 'W 4:1 1 ,ft ., .- N A ,. .Q , H ,nga 2 fm. . V V Y. ' . , , t P213 as 1 at D fi R .. L ' ,f i 5 J - V . , ff' - - 5 ' ' Q-egg' 415- 1 Q- E , ,Q ' - -vz ' - 1' X '13, R Q ,V 5 4 . g . Fred Green Douglas Griffin Robert Harding Randall Harper Chris Richards Carey Roth David Sale Tom Young T L f ' A ' v if Tom Horwitz Todd Hovwzll lrightl provided a basis which allowed the Phi CDEK PH! SIGMA KAPPA Services Focolize On Cerebrol Polsy The many Phi Sigma Kappa service pro- jects proved them to be one ofthe most active houses on the UCSB campus this year. They sponsored the Cerebral Palsy Drive and ran a transportation shuttle for crippled people from Hillside House to Gaucho football games. The First Annual Sorority Pledge Beauty Pageant was also initiated by the house, with pro- ceeds going to combat cerebral palsy. The brothers were active in intramural sports and rated high standings in foot- ball. Winter quarter was highlighted by a formal in San Francisco and Dad's Week- end, which included a get-together at the El Encanto. Phi Sigs John Eisenhut, George Fulco, and Dave Dogan labove right! relax after lunch. Teamwork Sigs to main tain a high rank in in tramurals. ' f we tra. ' ii 35353 Q3 , id , 103. . 1 'ff' y 5 ' lr " !c-i- " . Fw ' V: l . "ll -' P .f V., I ,, L yr Y V 'v V 'lt-I gl 'V -. . , .Q , V .E M A I ' ll. T ,,.... Jr T 1 , -- af' V , -and - ' ', io " i '. 3 ' ,. '- .1 ' . "2 P l ,V is 744. i l , V. '4' ,, fl' s :--: it ' - . l 1 L 4 1 A 41 A .ln Kurt Bottoms Chris Browder James Butler Gary Butts Fred Carlin Larry Chapman Andy Chulack Dave Dugan Jim Marteney Timothy Metcalf Geoff Morneau Craig Parker Peter Popov Jon Rayden IR. Runsvold Norman Sanesi An informal football game ibottoml often takes place outside the their fathers lbelowl gather for a casual group portrait during Dad's house as a brief respite from studying. Phi Sigma Kappa men and Weekend, held at the El Encanto during second quarter. ,fu L F55 - ,f v- 4, 2 3 5' is4eggg,E:m5wif'4 serif fat f A . X sg Y 2 an ,Q . e V it h M ' H' ' ' 1 ,J T N, n V' xi, Vh VI ' ' ' H Q At.. fit L' 5 1 r t i '5 1 QQPQSGSQW fl Q' fl!! rig' 'gei e if 11 , M -- ' A 12:35. f Q A. P .1 W 1 1, - a.te Q A ,F LK i L Az to for - L 43 4 L Don Drozd John Eienhut Mike Fifield Dave Grokenberger Paul K imoto Ken K osloff Yumon K wack Richard Loehr Dan Santanonio Marc Sewell Christopher Smith Peter Stevens William Thomas Doug Twining Scott Tracy Steve Turner r E E 2 E I E l I 5 i iv A N 2 ss ,, ,X , f - - . M - X ,, . . -. .- , ,, , lgponsibilily Coupled With Added Freedom Two of the major policy changes within the Residence Halls Association in the 1969-70 school year will relieve the dormitory stigma of being "poIiced." For those who like to make the dorms more like home, twenty-four hour visitation rights were granted. With the reduction of off-campus supervised housing, the announcement by the housing office that freshman women no longer are required to live in supervised housing was welcomed. ln an attempt to help the Residence Halls take a more active part in the learning process of the university, a measure was passed to have educational television installed in each dorm, and language lab facilities in each study carol at San Rafael. The guest speaker program produced such notables as Professor Searle, who spoke on "The Evolution of the Role of the Student in the University." Lectures were coordinated with discussion groups to gain the maximum benefit from both. COMPOSITE HALL PRESI- DENTS-FRONT ROW: Gary Cook, Anacapaf Glen Robertson, Santa Rosa. BA CK HOVlk Amye Leong, Santa Cruz,' Kathy Moberly, San Nicholasf Brian Mc-Kenna, San Rafaelg Mari Brown, San Rafaelg Bev Wanter, San Miguel. RHA CABINET-FRONT ROIM Kari Perry, RHA Rep.,' Steve Arnold, RHA Presidentg Phil Kohn, RHA Rep. SECOND ROVW Peggy Katz, RHA Treasurerf Bonny Maths, RHA Secretaryf Patti 0'Connell, RHA Vice President. FALL VOTING-FRONT ROVlk Marty Cresalia, Wayne Raffes- berger. SECOND ROVW Kathie Whitworth, Stanley Nishimura, Sheldon Schlesinger. THIRD ROW: Mary Kerr, Pam Orr, Merrilee Fellows. FOUR TH ROIM Gary Lewis, Sandy Zapf, Randy Nixon. FIFTH ROMA Jim Van Noord, Roy Saldin, George Pecci Jr. SPRING VOTING-FRONT ROW: Margaret Goodwill, Terre O'Rourke, Kathy Reiner, John Austin, Tom Butler, Sharon Sher- man, Deborah Webb, Daneen Flynn. SECOND ROVW Kim VWIIiam- son, Casey Collins, Marge Lafarge, Lindee Carruth, George Hough- ton, Brian Gomes, Nick Nemersky, Bruce Douglas, Dobie Mirosh, Michael Benkosky. THIRD ROIM Sari Goldman, Mary Sparacino, Dotti Davis, Roger Osmunden, Dennis Strong, Scott Grover, Kathy Onoye, Marfi Callow, Pam Bennetts, Conni Wright, Michele de Rosa. FOURTH ROW Dee Tudor, Liz Oakes, Terry Warsaw, Vickie Fleck, Kathy Kirkpatrick, Debbie Blumberg, Debi Taylor, Vicky Lieber. N 327 28 ANACAPA Good-Nofurecl Bottles Spice Communol Life Communal living at Anacapa originated at the unit hall level this year as Apache Hall carried on a friendly rivalry with the men of Navajo. The most ferocious and futile battle took place in the bathroom, in a continuous fight with ants for rights of occupation. Ute Hall ran away with the intramural football champ- ionship, with an undefeated record. Activity during the winter quarter included sponsoring the film, "The Dirty Dozen," which was open to the public. A special pro- ject was undertaken by the composite hall, with the leadership of president Gary Cook. The boys began a campaign to revive the De La Guerra annex, a snackbar, open in previous years when the commons were closed. The request was that it be opened on a twenty- four-hous basis as an informal lounge and eating area for all of the dorms. The Silent Majority was quite vocal in support of the proposal. EXECUTIVE BOARD: Gary Cook, Composite Hall Presidentf Oswald Barnett, Composite Hall Secretary. Q ' E f'1"r"?. , X. , Q it ls r Y V e Mrs. Edith Daley Head Resident Robert Farley Assistant Head Resident ez ii lx RESIDENT ASSISTANTS: Larry Thorne, Yuma,' Rich McGough, Ute: Dan Henry, Maricopa. The Formal Lounge becomes informal wi thin a very short time, as students begin to accept the "home" status of the dorms k if i 1 'P 1 rv 1 FRONT ROW: Dan Henry lResident Assistantl, Randolph Getz, Rick Dzubuia, Randy Rosenblatt, Craig Ebersole, Greg Ranch, Peter Simonos. SECOND ROW: Tom Boulder, Kent Smith, Patrick Carroll, Duane lnlow, Eddy Mackie, Christopher Randolph, Eric Brown. THIRD ROVW Steve Crooke, Kevin 0'Leary, Mack Sauers, Jim Clarke, John Grant, Mike Nageotte, Bill Hyder. FOURTH ROW: Don Whiteside, John Wells, Kevin O'Brien, Harold Ballard, Denny Keogh, Frank Prussia, Dan Alexander. WICGPA O FRONT ROW: Gerry Rounds, Dan Morales, George Houghton, Bob Gillett, Bob Orcutt. SECOND ROVM Jim Copple, Phil Abrego, Brian Baughman, John Perry, Da vid K luver, Chris Vender. THIRD ROVIk Alan Beverly, Brett Enders, Doug Erenberg, Sam Horton, Len Kado. FRONT ROW: Lex Perillat, Doug Canete, Mike Rottapel, Geoffrey Feige. SECOND ROMA Miguel Ruiz, Kevin Raftery, Jim Lopple, Scott 'l7mmons, Tony Rohrkemper. THIRD ROVW Ralph Nitta, Phil Abrego, Bob Graves, Gary Sickles, Kirk Kiloh. FOURTH ROIM Mike Mugglebee, Kenneth Gray, Bruce Robertson, Donald Segerstrom, Roger Pierce. FIFTH ROMA John Young, George Sliger, Joe Guenberg, Roy Saldin, Steve Knowles. PIMA in 7 in fi can-dn' me 'G ,esizfaszez 1,-A' ni l K E -aa- .1-ea Q.,-2, - .. ' ?- :.L.,,,jJ.l- ,,: . ANA CAPA UTE FRONT ROIM Philip Krome. SECOND ROIM Dan Fedrick, Rich Mc- Gough IResident Assistantl, Michael Guntrum, Dave Mazzetta. THIRD ROW: Robert Giragusian, Gerry Halonen, Tom Mikowicz, Bruce Van Vranken. FOURTH ROVW Bruce Mairs, Sparky Myers, Joe Thorne, Rick Diedericksen. FIFTH ROMA Andy Cesare, Marc Marcus, Neal Lewis, Jak Meyer. H 1 7 af' 1.4:-I G2 LH' tk H I 45, 4:7 .6 4 '-L-'Q e-Q lf' R.A. Rick McGough, Iabovej from Anacapa's Ute Hall, snags a well-aimed pass in one of the plays which helped them to capture the Intramurals football championship. Ortega Commons student workers Ileftl face the dinner-dishes pile-up every evening. N XXXX FRONT ROW: Brian Games, Mark Frick, Andy Marx, Jerry Nichols, Stephen Cardella, Bill Ferguson, Steve Mueller. SECOND ROVM Greg Thomsen, Matt Moody, Michael Houlemard, Tom Gardner, Tom Lendina, Peter Watkins, Sam Brown. THIRD ROW: Gregory Stempel, Kenneth Woody, Keith Andrews, Wellington Wong, Gary Thomas, Steve Wawrychuk, Richard Stanley, Barclay Lew. FOURTH ROW: Larry Flor, Nathan Kroopnick, Jay Spingarn, Sam Gamgee, Richard Monguia, Albert Cline, Thomas Powell, Richard Luther. FIFTH ROIM Tom Laver, Rick Kneale, Thomas Metz, Brian Morgan, James D'Aoust, Steve Conners, Bill Bilodeau, Robert Peyton, Pete VWlkens. AlUlfl1A Ns xQR L2 x wt H v, y Y X . X x X -. x r -.X ' Q' , I -, w. ez, ' X , H 1' 'WX' 1 ' " 1 , ffl H X W1 X 2 W x N I - i ' x X . ' . X , N R X x . AK " .5--fare K Egg E :ii H. H-,M,m,e - -: I. isiifvsgasi if S e f 32 -Y - v -.-,.,.q , - Z' W ,A 'P ' .A 5-gr-sp-if-..7..,-...k .-.,-f-- au.: , A , :,,,.,, Kenneth Woody, Gregory Stempel, and Steve Wawrychuk indicate that there is more to the hurried, hasseled UCSB life than books. As representatives of Yuma, they exemplify the hall spirits. H N' ' 5 I'-21 ,J-.:'.i'5s',kr , .. Vg aww ' ' 4 ..,,u. . ,. . .- M ,l s.--,ff fir QL. N I fiwfuf, , V: nip, V , . 1 X ,n Ta- X. ..-A.i"':f K. Q f 1-1-..fg,,, "'3f5. f I , 14,55 it .5 V, . x ..4 U 'A Th , x. , ,..-s L,Q'1',LX' . X QQar'N15EQ, 'A '55, ff- .1fj..?w.T-N' ' Nf,'14" 1 . ' 1- .H7 94 -v 0 . , 30 as ,1, . . vf 7-. 6 V ' 6 I-9. , , 1 ' -If z- - f. fn Z Lic X jsfkqestzb I, 'E 1. '-151,-vfi. A AFR. . ,P fr , .5-if :sig -f, 335, ,G ,hx Q wQH' , .-', .1 .X- .EM , :Mx . T ,,", 1 , Y, J Ugg, ' ,.l , - V4-.J , J,-gf 'U xv QN N. '-4'ja1-X--R Xxx L:':x5'txx " -1 ' "fu f.A..,,,N, 4 rx: ,,, L X K 'Fa 5? 'f X Pg -o . -A A nn- -Q.. 1 1. I SAN MIGUEL CALA VERAS FRONT ROW' Robert Orcutt, Hal White. SECOND ROVM Larmen Lundy, Bob Oxnard, Brian O'Shea, Kent Frobe. THIRD ROIM Pete Shelley, Millard Percy, Mack Johnson, John Schwartz. FOURTH ROW Andy Demom, Mark Goodrich, Stu Briden, Brian Jones. FIFTH ROW Randall Love, Ralph Espinosa, Tom Ouoval, Fred Numey. "T W l FRONT ROW' David Akin, Neal Donaldson, Thomas Stickles. SECOND ROMA Craig Shaughnessy, Bob Yant, Samuel Murray. THIRD ROW: Joel Simon, Andy Sacar, 77m Moore. FOURTH ROW: Don Robinson, Stef Sisman lResident Assistantl, Richard O'Donnell. fs,fT2?'N -L , 2, f-if For many students who are away from home for the first time, a new dorm fad provides a sense of security and warmth. The "Womb," comprised of a makeshift tent structure over the bed, creates a private world for the Freud-oriented sleeper. .,- .Jfvyqlnsgf i'- "5 'A - I A FRONT ROW: Pam Francesch, Debby Kay lResident Assistantl, Leslie MacDonald, Darcy Freeman, Gail Wat- son, Connie Leahy. SECOND ROW: Nancy Koch, Moira Casey, Terrie Naruo, Cathi Hamre, Pam Martens, Chris Van Zandt. THIRD ROW: Amy Kaida, Laura Pitta, Linda Holiday, Jill Lehman, Paula Deen, Becky Reeder. FOURTH ROW: Debbie Kemp, Barbara Bartz, Lindee Carru th, Alana MacFarlane, Nancy Higgens, Beth Lawrence. 'il' s. . .,..d , E , r, HUMBCDLDT Feeding 2800 dormies en tails a large-scale clean-up campaign for the Commons' crews. Q 53,1532-f' . ' ""'f'fi'r?'f-Emi-..-' 2 'Gifting A -'QE' - -' v :N f - M- iw IM . I al-: fi gQ on sr we an un QQ mr 1:- M .ia lflflill uni! o ' P , , QR? 'N , 1 N all 3' Q., A I F 0 L fi ' V' I . 3 i I F'-bf X' Q ' " flii- r ' Y' 9 ", ' ' 3. 3 H. Q - . . 5. f,i . 1 0 gi 5 3 1, Q 'mn 'Q ,. P Qu 9 Q fi 114 SAN MIGUEL PLUMAS FRONT ROW' Lynn Hanna, Julie DePauw lResident Assistantl, Bev Wanter, Maxine Greene. SECOND ROVW Lynne Kastel, Mary Sparacino, Elaine Moriwaki, Rosemary Kokes, Kris Ollikkala. THIRD ROW: 77na McElderry, Kris Borglin, Cheryl Popp, Joan Denman, Marilyn Whitford, Syndey DeFay. FOURTH ROW: Liz McDade, Sharon Culley, Karyn Zarubica, Sheila Jesswein, D. M McRae. FRONT ROW' Joanne Kolvitz, Leslie Lass, Donna Black, Marilyn Morrow, Nancy Ran- SAN MLGUEL dall. SECOND ROW' Melody McGough, Rosalie Harris, Kerry Bussing, Leanne K olvitz, Elissa Raeck. THIRD ROVW K yunsoon Kim, Elizabeth Brashear, Sally Raab, Marcy Smith, Maxine Cass. A giant Christmas tree in the court of the girl is tower of San Rafael reminded students, who were frantically studying for fall finals, of the vacation to come. 8 me as ' Sociol Life Speolce rs Fill Activity Colendor San Nicholas girls enjoyed a busy social life, featuring Halloween and Christmas parties in the formal lounge. The agenda also included lectures by' Father Robert Donoghue of St. lVlark's Church and Dr. Richard Klein from the Counseling Center, concerning such topics as "What is Love?" and drug abuse. During Homecoming, San Nic participated in nearly every event, highlighting the festivities with their house dec, "Happiness is Being Able to Grin and Bear lt" and a first place skit in GGR. The girls submitted Dr. Nash as their candidate for GGP and Sandy Gregory as their representative in the Homecoming Oueen Contest. EXECUTIVE CABINET-FRONT ROW' Sunny Sandeen, Treasurer: Dianne Scott, Executive Vice President: Kathy Moberly, President. SECOND ROVW Linda Breler, Secretary. Carolyn Reid Assistant Head Resident RESIDENT ASSISTANTS-FRONT ROVlk Sue Crittenden, Shiloh Hall. SECOND ROW: Ellen Guethlein, Kennesaw Hall: Nate Ponce, Mesa Verde HaIl,' Libby Hall, Yosemite Hall. THIRD ROW: Linda Bryan, Saratoga HaII,' Miki Vottryzek, Acadia HaIl,' Joanne Canary, Rainier Hall. ,, M ' 3,1 2' SAN NICHOLAS ACADIA Dave Hardy succumbs to the favorite tension-reliever for creative collegians during one of many study breaks. if" FRONT ROVW Roxanne Sylvester, Laurie Chisolm, Miki Vohryzek lResident Assist- an tl. SECOND ROW: Laura Brandt, Eileen Klein, Dianne Harris. THIRD ROW: Evid Moore, Gloria Tronset, Alida Davis. FOURTH ROW: Joyce Fernandez, Casey Collins, Geri Hulse. FRONT ROW' Kathy Takaki, Terri Arm- strong, Karen Childes, Kathy Ito. SECOND ROW: Diane Kresha, Lisa Moulthrop, Amy Johnson, Gail Pospisil. THIRD ROW: Nala Bright, Bonita Parsons, Ruth Zebb, Marcia Miller. ICIIAESA W FRONT ROW' Gail Muller, Patti Pattee, Janelle Hopkins, Darcy Topper, Vonnie Snyder, Dianne Scott. SECOND ROW: Karen Yee Fang, Janet Nakagawa, Jasmine Aseka, Diana Messined, Susan Endo, Jeri Yokoi. THIRD ROW: Mary Horst, Marilyn Prail, Kathy Moberly, Kathy Ouick, Susan Black, Mary Ann McEImurry. FOURTH ROW: Bobbi Kridl, Beverly Duerr, Karen Flinn, Carolyn Kreston, Judy Weatherly. FRONT ROW: Ellen Guethlein lResident Assistantl, Martha Morado. SECOND ROVW Diane Plumb, Barbara Hassebrock, Suzanne Bressoud, Deborah Garret. THIRD ROW' Kathy Green, Janice Abe, Patty Burke, Karen Fujikawa. FOURTH ROW: Nancy Crowe, Sue Aquino, Barbara Leman, Sue Owens. FIFTH ROIM Carmen La Gory, Cindy Bales, Simone Wilson, Janet Peary. .E .QV :- s ,H . . N 1 ff: , 1 W, . , ' V. 'I 3 4 ' I E I in D Ls,-V 5' ,L V V' . x Q i .P X' , i 4 " A, 1 , ' '3 X 1 ,QQ H 31 525 .V I V ' I 1 ' ' Y ' I N 'x, - ., Q V , '81, , I 5 - P F .J 1.3, j l fr 4 - , H Y ' T' , '44 ' fr! 1 "1.. xi' . 4, :uhm f l I ,M W Q Jil' '.- . I Q . 'Q ' V- . .M ,,, 4. , - V 2 a. ' J, , u z - ,O , .- -AH 'g A ' 1 . . , 4 --+9 . " v '- wugvlig Lfjgrugie it W :asv ?fl,u , E 'ij 'C w PP' ' v V4 f 'ran - ' ' v ' ' H' ' "J 1 ' ' V' f . '- . ' ,. . R I V. : , I, l W 3:11. dfgrxf 4.71: , :Ne U 4 4 - ' ' 1.' -' r 'Q 1 ' I 1 '- 1',- Q--'Q' ..E"'T in ' ' ki :Q 'III-I: 340 v if l f f 1 r' 3' fu- A "7 , ' I .m A U- f 1 .' ' " A - or . J , Q, A 1' , R - 1 mga? 1 " V -+ - va' 0, ' 5i'gs??Z5T - -b-fiiw . U f',1- I '1' ' - N EJ, u . . 1. . f .. W ,K .,, x -. Sci, ,af - .. 2.4.1 Ek' 'fi' '5evxA,'Et'i?N?.' I .Hu - .ag ' l.A,':' ' '-lT?"Y'N, fav' ", 'H 'u V' 4 1 5.55: -- j' .. FN. A lg.3,ix,v,I. . Jig-I' , '97 K xi: ' v xv? ' . 4 . ' ., I ',g,-N ,sfny K4 I' Qin aim. NA . YJ Y. 'Q I I , 1 ' "YU QA-idif' 4- 4 H' eww -J: -4 hiv, r H 1 ,JA ,k .Q D V. 1,5 .t K ' ,lg 1 5,iC'.' . '-riff -2- -P , ..r . - -. L-. , gli. ,. .I . ,P ,fy ..- ,1,'. 'fa , .--'A '. J' , 0 - lf. "' ' ' - wing.. .- '.r':Y: 41 5 ,'. I: bf- k f iz. 1 A :X am- .' -, I-f fu-'-I' ' : . ' A ,-xxx I P- .R , , - ' ,D 4 3j"-Q"'-1f'- N' l - wg. gs N. an ." - , . 4 34,113 v- I .' M- nv 4 v Q ,gq , . , may 'H aww. .f,...,,. 5 4 . N' . . A.. A '. ' -fl' N' 5 1 f ...". ' x f n .-,Y ,V YDS: L ,N V. Q-,fr i wi. SAN NICHOLAS MESA VERDE FRONT ROW' K.C Walsh, Sarah Logan, Gail Spencer, Pat K noblauch. SECOND ROW' Janice Kanemitsu, Chris Utsumi, Annie Kuriki. THIRD ROM6 Cindy Lou McGenagle, Pamela Orr, Marti Reed, Judy Hitchcock. FOURTH ROW' Nancy Smith, Marcia Pomeroy, Jan Schulz, Patricia Pettit. FRONT ROW' Claudia Hamblin, Penny Childs, Penelope Morgan, Susan Crinklaw, Carol Gutierrez. SECOND ROW: Judy Fong, Rosie Yuranovich, Nate Ponce IResident Assistantl, Cathy Landon. THIRD ROMA Missy Baron, Maureen Lyons, Phyllis Farrington, Barbara Merrick, Leah Weinstock. FOURTH ROIM Jeri Krier, Susan Hun ter, Wendy Pope, Susan Fisher, Lisa Sharron. As Santa Barbara sunshine entices many students away from the coldness of the study lounges, they learn to compromise their love of nature wi th academic demands. I . 1 --Q.. , V J 'L as t ,J P is X1 3 . 4' Y U ,p.I Wi' ti SANNICHOLAS 'sh 1 L L RA ,N ,ER ' H i fi i 'F A,., H4 ' For those who remember their day, the weekly linen service is a k, L if M E,3?l'l'd labor-saving boon to dorm residents. Fresh linens are picked up upon t t' f th . 1?-M " 'rr' f ff ,L presen a lon o e used ones and a room key jd Q 1 1,1 ,W F Lf - -cffzl 4 f f fi e --' 1 L, L ' , .f , l -ff ' - ' , 'W ,.. . ,Z v 1' I ' " T 'AJ 'Y ff! .. , I, M-"X, A - FRONT ROW: Kathy Post. SECOND ROW: Margaret Ferris, Carolyn Spencer, Linda Breler. THIRD ROW: Cathy Bridean, Laurie Bernhard, Diane Thomsen. FOURTH ROW: Tamie Currie, Joanne Canary lResident Assistantl, Marilyn Gist. FIFTH ROW: Leslie Fambrini, Patricia Sparling, Karen Campagner. FRONT ROMA Peggy Brose, SECOND ROMA' Annabelle Eaton, Barbara Ernst, Laura Eubanks. THIRD ROW: Patricia Cooney, Mary Kerr, Teresa Yoshimura. FOURTH ROVW Cindy Bills, Lynda Tuttle, Gwen Pabst. FIFTH ROW: Janice Patronite, Kathy Rogers, Maryann Chavin. 342 D , i 5 va-'Ti FRONT ROW.' Mary Pinkney. SECOND ROW: Marlyn Jenvey, Elizabeth West, Stanette Taylor, Pat Duncan, Ellinor Ekelanai THIRD ROW: Cindy West, Julie Johnson, Jeanne Hunt, Denise Leonard, Paula Firestone. FOURTH ROMA Wanda Fears, Mary Marchman, Gretchen Dumas, Erin Hoenes, Holly Hand. FIFTH ROW: Debbie Elliott, Catherine Kastrop, Sue Freas, Jacqueline Wilson, Maureen O'Hagan, Celeste Plaister. SAN NICHOLAS SARA TCDGA FRONT ROW' Pat Steele, Annie Moehlman, SECOND ROW: Deborah Webb, Donni Brossard, Patricia Fiedler, Beverly Artru. THIRD ROVW Linda Bryan lResident Assist- antl, Maryann Bliss, Carson Culver, Chris MacKirdy. FOURTH ROW: Jane Ray, Cathi McLain, Linda Kesler, Susan Pease. FIFTH ROW' Jamie Olsen, Debbi Springer, Lynn Swet, Kathie Glandon. 34 WEST? FRONT ROIM Renee Brabant, Debbie Smith, Paul Heiser, Sandy Hansen, Turie Hoffart, Kathy Peterson, Cindy Kressin. SECOND ROMA Lynnette Lewarton, Donna Eurey, Cindy Thompson, Nancy Wagner, Karen Thornblad, Chris Parkov, Sandy Nielsen, Judy Rapaport, Deborah Heath. THIRD ROW: Lisa Kalsbeek, Liz Oakes, Judy Humiston, Teri Copeland, Stephanie Harris, Kim Porter, Connie Westberg, Nyla Marquis, Carole Richard. FOURTH ROW' Jo K uhl, Chris Hinckley, Chris Mullers, Ruth Duncan, Jane Sterrett, Joyce Blair, Sue Crittlenden lResident Assistantl, Tricia Latlue, Laurie Round. FIFTH ROW' Lyn Brownwell, Jill Hawes, Kay Sorensen, Helen Whiteford, Martha Robinson, 77na Barnet, Margaret Cheramy. FRONT ROW: Kathy VWison. SECOND ROW: Debby Muilenberg, Carol Shoulta lResident Assistantl, Donna de Genva, Patricia Hunt, Vicki Von Bergen, Liz Bailey, Terry Huggins. THIRD ROVW Jessica Jordan, Jeri Grenfell, Jan Stephen, Nancy McLaren, Dorthy Hinds, Ann Giguere, Carol Sandoz. FOURTH ROVW Carolyn Owens, Dede Tudor, Shirley Craig, Cheryl'Poncm, Kit Buckley, Ann Albright, Connie Boyle. FIFTH ROMA' Mary Andno, Arm Mefflff, Roberta McReynalds, Leslie Pitchford, Sue Irwin, Barbara Roum, Marilyn Martin. EHEHXNDQAH 344 'C L 1 V. SAN NICHOLAS YQSEMITE FRONT ROW' Marcia Hoffman, Colleen Zerman, Genya Stec, Barbara Robbins. SECOND ROW: Sharon Ruiz, Sandra Piercy, Judy Wooten, Kathy Balch. THIRD ROW: Nellie Bracamontes, Lynn Eisenhut, Marcia Manly, Francie Escobedo. FOURTH ROW' Pam Bottaro, Diana Rapoza, Sandy Boone, Ann Ree, Candy Blackford. FRONT ROIM Charlene Young, Sharon Lynn Sherman, Maggie Hill. SECOND ROIM Debbie Komisar, Barbara Miller, Frances Willson. THIRD ROW: Cindy Mize, Mary Streitwieser, Lynn Keefer. FOURTH ROW: Cynthia Snyder, Libby Hall, Suzie Rintoul. The Holiday Spiri t pervades dorm cubicles, giving residents an outlet for their creativity as well as their more mischievous instincts. 34 346 Mrs. Winnifred Grove Head Resident Nancy Aschenbrener Assistant Head Resident Steve Gurwin Assistant Head Resident SANRAFAEL Recreoiionol Services Provided by New Holl San Rafael has evolved this year from a tightly knit community in its own to an in- creasingly influential body in campus affairs. Among other activities a showing of the con- troversial film, "Where is Prejudice," was sponsored. The newly built volleyball courts vvere made available on a 24-hour basis to the entire campus community as expanded recre- ational facilities are in demand with increased enrollments. The atmosphere of the formal lounge was enhanced by an art gallery and stereo radio. A highlight was the vvell-attended Christmas party staged in the Women's courtyard. Steve Gifford was featured as Santa Claus, while lVlaria Brown portrayed his helper. EXECUTIVE CABINET-FRONT ROW: Maria Brown, Spring Co-President. SECOND ROMA' Mary Studer, Treasurer,' Laurel Leef, Secretary. THIRD ROW: Clay Nelson, Fall Presi- den t,' Brian McKenna, Spring Co-President. RESIDENT ASSISTANTS-FRONT ROIM Molly Whiteley, Ron Reese, Fred Ouarterman, Nancy Colwin, Jim Moore, Janet Seargeant. SECOND ROMA Frank Austin, Bette Sturr, Ralph Phillips, Claudia Gardner, Dave Arnold. SAN RAFA EL CYPRESS FRONT ROW: Ralph Phillips lRe-sident Assistantl. SECOND ROIM Don Strauss, Jerry Braun, Richard Derby, Bruce Hillman, Robert Snow, Jeff Wright, Don Ross. THIRD ROW.' Raymond lrey, Fred Barnhart, Lawrence Grossman, Ron Butler, Earl Byron, James Ulotck, Dennis Oliver. FOURTH ROW: Mark Crebbin, Bill Rash, Cy Godfrey, Jim Unruh, Tom Stutzman, Ricardo Freeman, Mark Stein- berg, Marshall Croddy. FIFTH ROW: Stephen Arnold, Stephen Taber, Jim Moon, Robert Seager, Tim McLaughlin, Brian Brumby, John Kobal, Larry Mattes, Eugene Allred. Shedding the restrictive attire of formal portraiture, the men of Cypress decided to exhibit their "true" personalities to all. 34 C. 'S ,. sg! SAN RA FA EL Q5- 0 'X iff, 7A 1 V71 1- N ,iff ' Q: FRONT ROVW Carol Holmes, Eileen Emi, Christine Southwick, Sue Stamp, Molly Whiteley lResident f' Q? ' Q. Assistan ti, Susan Cool. SECOND ROW: Jane Davey, Debbie Dorney, Linda Francis, Rosemary Dumas, '65, ' 5745, Karen Aughinbaugh, Dawn Draper. THIRD ROW: Cyndee Hiatt, Laurie Brindle, Sheila Brittain Ann 5 C' Steinmetz, Leslie Herrman, Rhonda Lebby, Margaret Hurlbert. FOUR TH ROVIk Bonny Mathe, Barbara 'T Alger, Marilyn Stosick, Karen Werner, Jean Coffey, Donna Dennison, Susan Stroup. A - 7 r 3 . 'wh -Y - ea' - ' 348 . xl 5 . ff' ix 3- Yi ' 1' Q M4525 .J 5 'Ira "Way wud Show SANRAFAEL AZT ' ?fia N3 L MANZANITA FRONT ROW: Brent Lefavor, Thomas 0'Brien, Rich Sperberg, Mac Bower, Scott Warner lRes1dent Assistanti, Don Endicott. SECOND ROW: Gary Lewis, Jeffrey Fried, Mike Altamura, Scott Morgan, Hermez Moreno, Richard Tilley, Raul Acosta. THIRD ROW: Miles Katayma, Jere Lubeck, Mark Barrall, Ron Nolte, Terry Hide, Glen Hernandez, John Stark. A national pastime for college students - keeping in touch with home - is aided by regular paper deliveries to dorms. FRONT ROW: Patricia Kim. SECOND ROW: Patty Calistro, Paula Cohn, Nancy Pearson. THIRD ROW: Janet Dudley, Elsie Wong, Donnis Galvan. FOURTH ROW' Louise VanAsselt, Diane Page, Camille Meade. FIFTH ROIM Betty Wailes, Nancy Rolfe, Tina Bialis. Cf, I, gfafyf fi.. ff.-, OJ 'ssv,'i'C,l ! D . , fo 1 I 1, 'L i-,H X S V ,, , w me 3 91 2056 ii SAN RA FA EL T MADRQ NA O'Connell, Barbara Brockie, Yoko Tanigavva. SECOND ROIM Nancy Colvin lResident Assistanti, Darlene Peacock, Daneen Flynn, Barbara Swindall. THIRD ROW' Kati Perry, Diana Miller, Susan Voss, X Sharon Kopke, Robin Robbins. FRONT ROW: Jane Lindquist, Kendall Scott, Patti 349 Nw: SAN RAFAEL PALM FRONT ROW: Irene Rapoza, d'Riece Goodbody, Danna Jones, Laurel Leei Betty Wilson, Donna Sandler, Chris Spencer. SECOND ROW' Andrea Bryan, Pam Bennetts, Pegge Butler, Bobbie Hillo, Janet Rios, Kathleen Muleady, Lanelle Smith, Christine Wada, THIRD ROW' Susana Hino- josa, Dori Maria, Roberta Bloom, Ann Hagerman, Nancy Dill- on, Deborah Davis, Chrystal Peppas. FOURTH ROW.' Janet Perucca, Janet Seargeant IResident Assistantl, Trish Burr, Leslie Gerson, Heidi Hepfer, Lorita Titley, Nancy Beyers, Sally Cahill. W f I 0 SYCAMCDRE FRONT ROVIk Ron Fischer, Marc Miller, Robert Krause, Bill Bergman, Greg Pickles, Wylie Chenn, Mike Peterson. SECOND ROW: Mike Rosen, Mike Bonin, Dave Maize, Jim Sherrell, Pat Ferre, Ronald Weissman. THIRD ROVW Jerry Sturm, Jeffrey Sobel, Hank Bonin, Kenneth lsen, Phil Kohn, Bob Ahrens. FOURTH ROW.' Mitch Allen, Wes Petersen, Jerry Johnson, Mark Strange, Jim Moore IResident Assist- antl, Joel Grossman, Tim Mc0uiIlan. SAN RAFAEL SECQUGIA FRONT ROIM Dan Yee, Patrick Huang, Juny Myers. SECOND ROW: Lou Obertreis, Wayne Cole, Craig Smith. THIRD ROMA Ronald Jaeger, Bill Wilkins, Damian Garcia, Ken Sakaguchi. FOUR TH ROVIA Jim Comer- ford, Bill Root, James Narducci. FIFTH ROMA Ron Hull, Steve Barbar, Tom Walsh, Isaac Pape. FRONT ROW.' David Arnold lResident Assistantl, Mark Heluey, Mike Collopy. SECOND ROVW John Wright, Randolph Carlson, Joseph Hard- castle. THIRD ROW: Larry Ayers, Robert Lemon, Henry Yee. FOUR TH ROW: Steve Brooks, Usher Krushell, Nicholas Nemirsky. FIFTH ROW' Wes Willett, Paul Minta, Don Sloane. With hundreds of talented residents supplying free entertain- ment, the Formal Lounges in every dorm often play host to impromptu "concerts" and jam sessions. From the do-it- yourself amateur to the potential concert pianist, everyone seems to take his turn during the course of the year. A . SAN RAFAEL JUNIPER Interior decorating took on a new, and infinitely more interesting, twist this year at San Rafael. To give them the benefit of the doubt, the management and the Campus Police assume that these gentlemen trucked in their "building blocks" from off-campus. ,, , j '1'UW'LA- ei::gf.fiTEsi-- , ww W W W 1. W ' - , ' is ' ' 1 H 52 FRONT ROW: Olivia Casas, Gretchen Henkel, Gail Klein, Marily Schmucki, Jeannie Boggs, Mari Brown, Sarah Clark, Mary Studer. SECOND ROW: Patti McDonald, Peggy Dager, Nancy VWttmeyer, Ellen Savage, Chris Lincoln, Janice Miyashiro, Gloria Moy, Laura Matsuoki. THIRD ROW: Sue Penner, Rosemary Cadena, Sue Hummel, Robin Mclntire, Melinda Milligan, Nancy Rashman, Paula Moore, Cyndy Barksdale. FOURTH ROMA Ruth Morden, Libbie Breisch, Marguerite Rindge, Marilyn Jenkins, Susan Northridge, Joanne Jemmott, Debbie Wohletz, Viola Sawyer, Mary Doran, Adele Blank. WN FRONT ROW: Greg Procter, Steve Denney, Brad Bunkelman, Mark Lane, John Bulgin, Don ' Anderson, Steve Smith. SECOND ROW: Trester Harris, Ron Sigurdson, Phillip Hofstee, Dennis 0'Dowd, Casey Cho, Douglas Silvera, Ronald Lopez. THIRD ROW: David Tang, Harley Kelly, Charles Pratt, ' George Bahnson, Paul Lindsay, Ron Reese lResident Assistantl. FOURTH ROW' Alex Larkin Steve Palmer, Robert Harris, Jim Hoffman, Steven Gifford, ' Walter Low, Steve Stockett. 5 t I YUCC!-X FRONT ROW: Randy Johnson, John Shenorn, Kirk MacKenzie, Chris Martus, Glenn Miller, Scott Deacon, Thomas Palmer. SECOND ROW' Dean Baim, Bill Pumford, Frank Shapiro, David Chard, Chuck Dana, Ruben Cortez, Casey Cho, Arthur Delgadillo. THIRD ROW Jim Hinrichs, Richard Rea, Kirk Whisler, Dave Frost, Stanley Nishimura, John Grow, Frank Austin lResident Assistantl, Bruce Schafer. FOURTH ROW' Dwight Wrench, James Kimura, John Lilienthal, George Eluin, Howard Thomas, Allen Weiss, Craig Ellerbrock, Larry Goldman. 4 gwl Ziqlfil WILLOW FRONT ROW: Meg Brown, Jeanette Burns, Kristine Minster, Allyson Tuckfield Barbara Chesnut, Diane Stickler. SECOND ROW: Robyn Brock, Anna Zavala, Nicklet Nickison, Junko lida, Eileen Kalk, Norma Ponce. THIRD ROW' Bette S turr lResident Assistantl, Sheryl Hughes, Vickie Fleck, Christine Haack, Marilyn Brawsers, Leslie Brtek, Mikkie Bertuca. FOURTH ROW' Mary Alice Sanguinetti, Donna Patrick, Anne VWnnemore, Carol Mieger, Barbara Burdett, Annalee Barger. 5 4 . Brotherhood Achieved Th rough Po rticipofion "Happiness is Brotherhood," the theme of the Santa Cruz Homecoming house dec, was adopted as the girls' chosen theme for the iirifiir entire year. Cooperation and communication through hall participation were stressed as essential to an understanding of 'one's neigh- bors. Extending their theme to the community, the girls of Santa Cruz worked with CAB to bring a happy Thanksgiving to needy families in Santa Barbara. ln "interdorm" com- munication the girls published a quarterly magazine-newspaper, featuring art work and creative writing by the residents. December festivities opened with a dance in the Old Gym, with music provided by JAIIVI. A Christmas party followed the next week, ending with a spontaneous but spirited caroling spree through Anacapa. EXECUTIVE CABINET: Leslie O'Dell, Executive Vice Presi- dent,' Amye Leong, President: Debbie Lang, Social Vice Presi- dent. NOT PICTURED: Carol Cullen, Secretary: Katie VW!!- yard, Treasurer. ff ' ' . Q . ' 3 4 i it Mrs. Alet Redman Head Resident Judith Crowe Assistant Head Resident RESIDENT ASSISTANTS-FRONT ROVW Jan Mazzola, Corrientef Lesley Jones, Estrella,' Susan Furlong, Primavera. SECOND ROMA' Claudia Barnes, Risuenap Ginger Luke, Enramadap Chris Van Gieson, Oceana: Debbie Peterson, Consuelo. wwf 3- , S,-ggi ' 'Y' U 1 ' Q- ' x --J QA 5 4 5 ,sg Q. r, ms 4, : au! 2 1 ,. f E ef - x. Q., -nv 4' .?.... . r 5 DL ,-5.4.1- 1 12.2 F 'fa E , ,,:r'f gig! - 5 : 1 -4 1,2515 wigs- . 17 ..ai-Fla.-kv QE.,,-2,1---f ,N ,,. ,,.-. 11 , fy 52, 1 J ,V '--f.fi"fZ'7 ' ' '-'if 'V " . 4 . ' S, -f ' K ' J. 'Z ' 1 P M - I I' ' ' . 1, ma: ' A , , 4 5 ., . -:'.:'.:., . . . . tn.-, f..J6A:""'z' .w ..:.-:- M , . - - -H Na' Q .gq,yZ,,'g-,Eg .Q .1 Gygax-X --if - , fi 1' - A , 4- M ' -4,4 -. ' .gssquu , '- . .... f. , . . W , A mVV6f giw ,,-,-A-.. ,.,, W. . . . My Q Y , -3? Hi: ' . , Q. I n sb A. T.,::,,. l 1 V Mal.: 171 ' 554 " 4 ,. 1-it ,,,-, X -V vg..-.gm-,g:L14, , 1,--xy U Y- 3 .- . Www JM 3 2 a X -W, y - A' ,WJ '- 1' xy-f v K 7 4 ' if , avi 1 -.. ' .--s-1 : 4, . 31. .. b.a.:.-g4.L...-'1i,4g2.i, -'V J" W ,c-mu, V I kk' - Q.-Jiiaz I , A W 5 A ' Q V - .4 l 7.1, f gay 119352 iu3g3f3.'--I'.g,gi345zg.g-,:f'.zfM: --.ifr'H '-'rvawf-'Jf!Ef?'v:f , ,ff 'Ffa 'EY-55-. --:gas-zlff. 1 -.f , f, .,.. ww PM f-Hr,-i.4-,1,n.-L., , w., --... f. LJ- -15.-f 1-U, , ,. V- .. "f .2 Lair ,og1-,P5?Srg95.3??f'-.5f:-szilgimww 1' 'f-..--J frwf ni ,- i N '-115+ ':,1fie2'v1g,'.H. if-41r,u'fHf:, A-9":pqf-,,'z:4fi1.f1 L-"Hifi:-"51. 'fx v-fl '-53-.:'.'f wan' -A , ' f. - 1 ,, - f , 1g.:.:-if f" f' rj: r'-' "Kg-. -- 1 :. .... -13--"Z, ' ' ' p'."'.A ' gfj Wi-.9'f'.,1'.T?ff'l',vE5,f,j.lgAFill' 311' f"f"gffL,g1L'.,,p ..,::5Q,:'.,p1-Z-7 :ggi 1 fig ,-gg, .fag Ag'Ff-fggii A 'il -' . S", if v ' "3 'B-' - I ' ' '1!f'.,.f1 'rev' .'x"5""l,Q'f ,Q Mike'-W.. Q FQ? lv 2 :54545 :ai Niidsbvi Sf-Wh HYLIQQV5,-7? 1, .f '11 Fi' -jgrwmt ...Y -9 . ,-.-,'-b, gi-,,C,1 .B J 1-f, K . 1 ' 'U-.'-A Qi? "1w'F:"'aF5""'i.! :u.,-s:w-- is xv- ' M .vw 'em-L .sf sGf'A:ffw:c-M221-2 Q V .ffw Q Q' '-' 'V ' ' ?k1'1 .Hff ' ' ',.. ., " ,.,2f'Lff-'T'f'Qe.'ig7-Q Q'f'2"f M :S " 5 -.fl 5' "fl!i+i','5-"E1' F , : f .sf ,rr k . uf .. ,L .M '3'H.,:1i.LfmaA:q,1i: W ff? ,1 56 SANTA CRUZ ENRAMADA FRONT ROW' Laurel Crittenden. SECOND ROW: Debbi Deiveras, Cathy Osborne, Nancy Jacobson. THIRD ROW' Barbara Howard, Sue Warren, Eileen Kadesh. FOURTH ROW' Carla Kamhi, Cindy IfWlIer, Marilyn His- atomi. FIFTH ROIM Gay Geiser, Kris Snyder, Julie Burton. ' Usually filled with messages, the San Miguel boxes have a new en try. FRONT ROMA Marcia Huntley, Sheila Furth, Yoko Hirose, Kathy VWllyard, Sandy Hartnett. SECOND ROIM Cathie Leavitt, Janice Bolt, Peggy Ragan, Debbie Falkner, Erin Pollen. THIRD ROIM Kathy Nelson, Janet Nelson, Suzette Hall, Cathi Schuler, Karen VWlcox, Ginger Luke IResident Assistantl. FRONT ROW' Leslie Crowell, Roberta Powell. SECOND ROVW Francine Englehart, Janet Mazzola lResident Assistantl, Janet Clark, Linda Yemoto. THIRD ROVW Sandy Zapf, Jeanne Grant, Cathie Hallie, Linda DeMetrick. FOURTH ROVW Melanie Stein-Kuhler, Kristin Stahl, Laura Riedle, Ferne McMullun. SANTA CRUZ CORRIENTE Stuffing each other's dorm "cells" with newspaper is a time-consuming task, but makes for a unique, not- soon-to-be-forgo tten "R, F. " uw" 'ui ww' 'm ,Ea ' FRONT ROW' Lisa Burmann, Jean Lester, Margaret Laing. SECOND ROW' Madeline Cunningham, Barbi Curbow, Suzanne Kalfsbeek. THIRD ROW: Carol Cullen, Gena Kurzfeld, Kathy Ward. FOURTH ROW' Sandy Denhart, Terre O'Rourke, Sue Dahlin. 58 FRONT ROW: Heidi Hartman, Lucy Crater. SECOND ROW Sheila Marquess, Kathy Reimer, Penelope Stamm, Judy Collins, Liz Nelson. THIRD ROW Leslie Taylor, Laurie Myrabo, Susan Shutt, Robbi Baker, Chris VWnker. FOURTH ROW' Merrilee Fellows, Sue Scott, Barb Strauch, Debbie Peterson lResident Assistantl, Laurie Scharff. FIFTH ROW' Sue Simon, Patty Wolf, Anne Slattery, Diane Rodriquez, Karen Stannard. CGNSUELCD ESTRELLA FRONT ROW Freda Seamen. SECOND ROW Peggie Currie, Toni Stephen- son, Susie Stark, Janet Patterson, Linda Schamps, Corinne Braly, Francine Lembi, Valerie Warner, Karin Pearson. THIRD ROW' Susan Pauling, Mary Ann Cappa, Janis Schmitz, Pamela Nounse, Janet Hagberg, Jan Erickson, Cassie Ariey, Sari Goldman, Chris Vernizzi, Elizabeth Roma. FOURTH ROW' Cheryl Dlccardo, Dee Lincoln, Kathy McCampbeIl, Debbi Miozzi, Denise Fertman, Becky Beamer, Res Scott, Sandra Defenbaugh, Carole Cederlund, Joy MacPhee. FIFTH ROMA Sue IfWIson, Marianna Samuels, Mary Lou Hermann, Susan Clemens, Gretchen Stengel, Barbara Conway, Genae Hall, Lesley Jones, Sue Merrill, Maureen Regan. Although the individual conscience must sometimes bow to the demands of the institution labovel, a voice of protest against estab- lished values lrigh tl still arises from unexpected quarters. 5 N 1 V51 Q- YZ? , KEVW W, . ,, ii, f 'K Q 9 K?-in wi if 3553? Xfif A Q A . YQL ef '11 YJ. .W Q. Q. Ty -Hifi FRONT ROW' fabovei: Robbie Roth, Kristine Bjorklund, Pam Hitchcock. SECOND ROMA Donna Frazer, Maria Vergari, Kris Laun, Margarita Sanchez. THIRD ROW' Jacqueline Rogers, Sue Furlong, Joannie McArthur, Telma Rodriquez. FOURTH ROMA Connie VWlliams, Sue O'Reilly, Jan Pearson, Kris Cusack. FRONT ROW labove rightl: Linda Bis- hop, Debby Dodd. SECOND ROVM Ellen Farbstein, Robin Krogfoss, Norma Bautista. THIRD ROIM Barbara Berg- man, Shirley Siler, Peggy Davis. FOURTH ROW: Carol Mason, SueAnne Tillman, Sally Small. SANTA CRUZ PRIMAVERA Stylish coeds, on a typically small college budget, develop in genuity to create homemade, fashionable wardrobes. FRONT HOW: Denise Brophy, Marge Gen try, Karen Frame. SECOND ROVW Pat Weimort, Antoinette Sosnow- ski, Anne McCarrick, Carmin Craig, Sue Jarvis, Gina Adams. THIRD ROW: Judy Donner, Mannon Rivera, Ann Edgcomb, Lisa Howard, Rae Rottman, Ellen Cristiano. FUURTH ROIM Debbie Kirk, Marji Callow, Sheila Walsh, Paulette Sink, Susan Lovenberg, Ellen Hillson. FIFTH ROW: Sally Dennison, Ann Harlow, Sue Kenney, Michelle Clay, Sandy Lee, Julie Christensen. Many people agree that breakfast in Ortega Commons is not always the best way to start off the day. The young lady below looks hopeful. 62 SANTA ROSA Dorm Servicefkclivily Supplonts Trodilions Santa Rosa students arose as leaders of the Resident Halls this year in innovation. ln February, Santa Rosa organized, in con- junction with CAB, a Junior Olympics. Elementary school children from the five schools of the surrounding community with the highest percentage of minority students as competed in junior sports events complete '3 with ribbon and medal awards for achieve- ment. A highlight was the Santa Rosa house dec. Because the relevance of Homecoming is being questioned by many organizations, Santa Rosa chose the theme "Happiness is a Full Stomach." Instead of spending the al- lotted S300 for a house decoration on crepe- paper and chicken wire, the money was used Y'- to purchase canned goods which were donated to Family Service in Santa Barbara to be distributed to needy families. is---ff EXECUTIVE CABINET-FRONT ROIM Claudia Simmonsp Composite Hall Secretary, Karen Corner, Executive Vice Presi- dent. SECOND ROVIk Jack Pribble, Men 's Social Vice Presi- den t,' Glen Robertson, President. skit F -, l Mrs. Eileen Fuss i Head Resident icci Robert R Assistant Head Rwdem Connie Lou Shoemaker, Sirena. SECOND ROW: Fraser L. Perkins, Villa Marina: Maury Gloster, Diablo,'Al Palazzo, Tesoro,' William Shea, Marisco. RESIDENT ASSISTANTS-FRONT ROV10 Laurie Bissell, Bahia,' Sonya Varea, Coralina,' Pauline E. Brooks, Riberaf T . wi g 'm' 21. f 2 . 2iJ54?5"Z ,Q Iv . Kffflu H 5 'S uw I' 1 11 J 1 . W Q r ,Q -1 . Q41 H, J- 552.6 FR, K k v 'Q QS L f 4 , Q 4' 9' O L 4 .9 al " -, 4, ' k AJ, Q? s A , 5 1 ff 'K-4 SANTA ROSA BA!-HA "A watched pot never boils" is an expression perhaps never fully appreciated until one has spent a Saturday afternoon in the dorm laundry, waiting for the last revolution of the drying cycle. 4 FRONT ROW' Connie Sternadel l Resident Assistantl, Pat Larson. SECOND ROW: Lisa Stuart, Patricia McMillian, Frances Josephs, Lori Marmer, Vicki Goldstein, Laura Ornest. THIRD ROW: Irene Wright, Ellen Larson, Linnea Benson, Chris Horvath, Marnee Phillips, Nancy Braswell. FOURTH ROW: Carole Wade, Ellyn Gersh, Karen Sinclair, Judy Levin, Pamela Diggle, Claudia Simmons. FRONT ROVM Carol Mclntosh, Sandy Raes, Sandi Lachman. SECOND ROVW Linda Frisch, Chris Neal, Gail Whaley. THIRD ROME Suzin Fong, Kathie Whitworth, Carol Mann, Nicole Bronzovic, Pam Burke. FOURTH ROW: Luci Malin, Lucy Campbell, Clare Henjum. A lg 5 SANTA ROSA :fi A ' f V fl 1 x :L I . ,ij if A CORCDLINA ' , if 343 I f , i FRONT Row: Debbie Bfumberg, Peggy Jordan. secofvo Rom Elsa gif! Allred Dyann Frankel, Sonya Varea, Marylee Beach, Linda Simonson. f THIRD ROMA Kathy Strachan, Dorey Brandt, Paula Houy, Carol lwaoka, I Arlene Lee. FOURTH ROMA Debbie Walker, Annie Hawkinson, Marilyn i Lord, Diane Ridley, Pat Roberts. FIFTH ROW: Sue Swenson, Barb Calvert, V Terry Hastings, Carol Corner, Annie Bergman. .j' . ,I F 17 fb , ' 1 Ei ' ffl We ' Z' 1.2151 21 F- ' .qi :iii aging h , N- ?w .iii , ,fe- , 'll FRONT ROW: Theodore Magos, Sandy Pepper, Steve Sultan, Craig Peterson, Richard Eeds. SECOND ROW: Jack Knutson, Jonathan Gross, David Robertson, Richard Fields, Christopher Toole, Tony Hewes. THIRD ROW' Bill Shea lResidentAssistantl, Robert Heller, Steve Swartz, SANTA ROSA Ruben Sandoval, Martin Beebe. FOURTH ROW: David Vandenberg, John Coret, Greg Rittmaster, Rich Lee, Micheal Gottfredson, Keith Roberts. MARISCCD SANTA ROSA SIRENA Work and play take on dual personalities at a university. These girls seem to ha ve found the secret to the old theory that "learning can be fun." Some people, however, seem to take even thelr play very seriously. The basketball court between two dorms ifar righ tl has seen many tense con tests to prove athletic prowess among peers. FRONT RUW: Martha Silva, Jan Hansen, Margo James, Ann Shepard, Vicki Hansen, Karen Phillips. SECOND ROIM Marion Bernard, ,Masako Hirota,. Alice Woom, Juliette Jacques, Laura Travis. THIRD ROIM Una Hoellwarth, Artha Landreth, Constance Shoemaker lResidentAssistantl, Joan Wenger, Liz Murphy, Carol Berry. SANTA ROSA FRONT Home Eileen Patterson, Stacy vaneuren, Kay scnmldr, Pam Nelson. SECOND '1 - ROW: Anna vwlkinson, Sylvia Castillo, Sharon Anderson, Pauline Bf00kS, Pafflf-'Ia Milnor, Christine Harris, Lonna Ouement. THIRD ROW: Chris Walker, Julie Heers, Nancy Armstrong, Kris MacCallum, Ellen Peter, Marilyn Perkins, Connie Urlhe. FOURTH ROW: Judy Hennon, Laurie Byer, Judy Jenkins, Alison Hughes, Nancy Reld, Kathy Kirkpatrick, Wendy Landau. FIFTH ROlr1k Penny Parker, Janet Schoellhamer, Andrea DuPont, Krista Veblen, Toni Brovvy, 77na Manuel, Lynn Duffy. vv f 2 I 'L K7 A . 1 if I X 4i Rx? 'fs , fg ,wwljh -Y: R VJ- -zz X' A? v i U Ni: A 1 :GA 'X 94 i 5 :JA . 'x uw - U: 21 V -M' ,A 1 1 , 1 - vi ' Q.. sf ' .V-"' .v 14. v - , 'fit I 1 I hw, .Lg - f , - ., 17 ' ffiviii 4:9 in H af fi Yfis- 5. . - -:I l51Q!"'i1-, If hi: in Q. I lt 'I 368 SA N TA ROSA VILLA MARINA FRONT ROVW Dave Phillips, Bob Telleria, Roger VWlcox, Chuck Byce, Rob Otsea, Bob Rogers, Fraser Perkins lResident Assistantl, Greg Castle. SECOND ROW' Reed Clark, Richard Lee, Jerry Doran, Robert Garson, Bruce Swanson, Darrell Turner, Roger Osborn, Rick Aswod. THIRD ROW: Howard Gogel, Jack Griffen, Michael Peritoiri, Tim Sullivan, George Yoshimura, John LaSalle, Richard Petrie, Robby Seligman, Dave Fogel. FOURTH ROMA Peter Geddes, John Belden, Ben Johnson, Jim Deacon, Paul VanAntwerp, George Pecci, Marshall Whitney, Greg Clark. Finals frenzy produces a variety of reactions, from nail-nibbling con- centration lbelowl to languid acceptance lbelo w, rightl. Www 2.-1 1'-" " . s kid' J ' , . N V' ' Y" ' F - 4' ef' f ' is D ' gil. if 'ti f' Mi V , - " , 15. 4 Q fl , 4 . , ,Sf , it-in gziix :i?3ifi3.2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 And. she wakes and she is alive for she has known a brief moment of time and she has known what it is to live and love and be loved. Smith 369 l- ixvwmmsuraawwhwwnvw 'vi' W x. J Evvff? ' , 5, K. V :RSC ff' - i P 'wb J N I ", ,,,,1 Vfs ta dents from services held Record business Increase and 72 BETA CHI Activities, Porties Fill Second Yeor Socially, this year was an active one tor the Beta Chi's, both in and away from Isla Vista. Fall events included a trip to Disneyland, multiple journeys to Luigi's Pizza Parlor, and experiences with Bernar- do and the Leilani Room. Roller-skating was also a favorite pastime. Home parties usually took place at Big Al's and John's, complete with wine tasting, the house speciality punch, and water wars. ln their first year of par- ticipation in intramurals, the men proudly claimed three winning teams. "Beak" of the Beta Chi's throws out of the pocket against the Sigma Chi 's in Intramurals. -fe - 'Y I .ae 4 ' -.ul . ' , , aiu "ft . . i 1 ing ' , i Q 4 . . ,ai 4 4-ll X A A I Dick Buford H . S L t Wayne Burgher Clifford Evans Brian McKenna Robert Masik 2 .4 , A V rf , .1 W ,. N ., i i V -Lvzizu iig 3 !'. i . - it , ,P .... -- ,. t ...., .A 5' x - V 1 J' Qs , .fy it ,J E .A , fy A 'rn I . Q:-:xii 1? ' I it hx i Mark Frederick Dennis Gardella Charles Hanson Michael Murray Terence Redmond Franklin Segal 'i 1 I i ' v ,L i.,... .-E, I , U .:. L K 'iiilrlg ie f 1 A f gg j ,. Q e - 19" tl - ff a f Michael Lee Gregory McDougall Matt Smith Gary Ward 374 EL DORADO EAST Sociol Activities Occupy Residents The residents of El Dorado East found their numerous social activities to be dis- tracting to studies. ln spring quarter, men from Vandenberg Air Force Base were invited for a successful combined party and dance. Nervous study breaks were initiated when the girls called upon the dependable UCSB Fire Department to frighten away suspect strangers who sometimes plagued the building. Many girls participated enthusiastically in intramural volleyball games and though not always victorious, spirits were high. The powder puff football team, the Chinese Bandits, labored defensively to retain its high 1969 standing. Eavesdropping on Marilyn Hanson's conversation with a boyfriend, roommates Dee Anderson and Anita Wallace give some unsolicited advice. F R O N T R O W: Joanne Salimar, Kathy Lyons, Sue Schuyler, Dee Anderson, Monica Barovelli, Peggy Smith, Deeann Marinouch. SECOND ROW: Joni Killeen, Andrea Alfred, Judy Parker, Lorraine Lawrence, Pattie Greene, Anita Wallace, Priscilla Hobson. THIRD ROW: Janie Perry, Marilyn Hanson, Lynne Pellegrini, Sue Wells, Jackie Stanton, Pam Aubel, Kristine Lund. it Q 'Sl' lll if ' 'I K. tlll.ilifitttillt?li . Smiling with rellef as she greets her date Anita Wallace escapes from the drudgery of study for a night in beautiful downtown lsla Vista. EL DORADO EAST COUNCIL Kathy Hlgashl publicity chairman,' Nancy Colwell, secretary treasurer Nancy Weller WIA representative Mary Walsten, coordinatorf FRONT ROW: Linda Lazzaro, Barbara Ann Blackshear, Dorothy Schaefer, Linda Lyons, Nancy Colwell, Kathy Higashi. SECOND ROW' Sandy McCarthy, Lucy Gohr, Nena Morrison, Carolyn Heacock, Kathy lndermill. THIRD ROVM Carol Moller, Connie Dunham, Mary Walsten, Nancy Weller, Brenda Smith, Randi Lloyd. FRANCISCO TORFFES Numerous Activities Entertoin Residents Highlighting dances this year, the social calendar of Francisco Torres kept the more than 350 residents actively paced. First quarter festivities included a Hal- loween dance and a Christmas dinner- dance. To celebrate Valentine's Day, an open dance, featuring a live band and a light show, occupied students. The Towers' residents enjoyed several International Nights, including German and Spanish cuisine, served in the dining hall. Another attraction to Tower living were movies such as "Arabesque" and "The Unsinkable Nlolly Brown" which were shown on alternate Sundays. lVlen and women sports enthusiasts participated in intramurals. Rooms at Francisco Torres lrighti provide a practical environment for long nights of study as indicated by this student's arrangements. Recre- ational facilities such as billiards lbelowl offer a break from scholastic worries. Group studying ltopl allows interaction of new ideas and understanding of assignments. The dining commons labovel offers a variety of meals over which students can rap and relax. An unfortunate necessity, washing one's laundry, is attended to by students lleftl in the Tower facilities. Ping pong is one of the numerous recreational facilities offered to Towers studen ts. l 37 7 78 Ewiy, iiiiii. i:vl5Tyig?Qa,v, fx Resident Assistant Sheila Collins rates special treatment from fellow RA 's Marla MacHale, Mary Law- hon, and head resident Jan Vela as she prepares for very special date. FONTAINEBLEU 'Freedom' Inilioles Sociol Orienlofion Fontainebleu women celebrated their first unsupervised year with a gala round of parties, TG's with the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity, and the creation of a Home- coming House Dec with Sigma Alpha Epsilon. To welcome the new decade, the girls chartered a yacht for a dinner affair. The annual champagne dinner and a Luau highlighted winter and spring events. FRONT ROW labove, rightl: f ttiii Katie Hummes, Alexa i' A Romain, Deborah Hogan, Cathy Buon, Elizabeth Sears. SECOND ROW: Bonnie Faucher, Vikki Strohbin, Carrie Brooks, Janene Lawrence, Cathy Riekenberg. THIRD ROW: Ann Ecoff, Kit Kenney, Marguerite Burr, Cindy Banducci, Toni Hoffman. FOURTH ROW: Susie Catherina, Nadine Herron, Holly Holkesvick, Sharon Hoerber, Joy Chover. FRONT ROW lrightl: Linda Banuelos, Linda Petersen, Linda Williams, Sharon Smith. SECOND ROW: Linda Reser, Shirley Lee, Pat Griset, Debbie Stanton, Linda Watson, Vicky Kees. THIRD ROW: Denise Thompson, Linda Brock, Ann Nuckolls, Ann Biller, Kathy Campbell, Joy Fauvre, Denise Mulle, Janie Connolly, Pam Moreland. FOURTH ROW: Linda Peterson, Margie Morgan, Marti Baum, Neil Varnum, Paula Christiansen, Sharon Rydbom, Kay Zwartendyk, Megan Wade. 1 rl l. we Wasil' l A - A . TROPI CA NA New Coed Concept Greeted with Spirit Following the trend in lsla Vista, Tropi- cana Gardens went co-ed this year, and the change was met enthusiastically. The combined talents of the sexes produced a second-place house decoration for Home- coming. Hall activities established an unpre- cedented diversity in catering to the interest of its mixed company. Everything from football films to a spring street dance was organized to occupy Trop residents. The move of International Hall to the premises added cultural variation as well to the changes. TROPICANA STAFF-FRONT ROW' Marilyn Clayton Joe Kieffer, Lois Mall, Kathy Kimes, Susie Grant. SECOND ROIM Ann Facknitz, John Burnett, Tom Shoji, Judy Epstein. Foreign students aid international communication. 5lNGER 1 ..-1'1" Sv Sewing labovel eases the tensions and budget for this busy Tropicana co-ed. Judy Epstein lleftl Hnds time to visit with a friend while attending to desk duties. SOMERSET Residence Storts Coed Lite Style Somerset joined the Isla Vista trend this year by becoming coed, and the first male head resident emphasized the change. The residents spontaneously gathered together for many impromptu activities. A favorite informal pastime was the production of home movies to be viewed by fellow resi- dents and critics. The students enjoyed a variety of par- ties, including the hosting of two wedding receptions during the fall quarter. Out- standing events were a potluck inter- national dinner and an A.S.lVl.E. keg party. The spring quarter was climaxed with a hayride. Residents Pat Curran and Gail Bei ltop right! con- fer with Head Resident Joe McCutchan on hall activities. Sharon Peace, Kathi Evers, Patti Curran, and Gail Bei lrighti share a study break around the piano in the lobby of Somerset. FRONT ROVW John Kendall, Greg Murphy, Christine Kalinaski, Bob Wade, Sharon Mason, Emily Jane Mor- gan, Susan Sabo, Susan Ward. SECOND ROIM Barb Thiele, Sarah' Goldsmith, Carol Murphy, Colleen Downing, Bob Moreland, Sherry Vldllllv, Carol Hubert, Alexis McCabe, Beverly Dunderdale, Herb McKelvy, Kathy Malone, Carolyn L ynes, Joe McCutchan. Jim and Lynette Beaman labovel find pets an entertaining addition to their household. A stim- ulating game lleftl provides competitive fun for the couple. MARRIED STUDENTS Couples Mix Study With Responsibility Constantly increasing in numbers, the married students community reflects the serious attitude of students toward educa- tional goals and acceptance of responsibili- ty. Couples living in the married students housing sections balance academic pres- sures often while maintaining a job and raising children. The economy-minded students often maintain meager budgets and have limited time, but they manage to spare a few hours for relaxation. Evening television viewing affords companionship away from the daily stresses of work and studies. !, V '1.- , 1-M. , H A' t.,,.. l .Yur- W' 'army' J.. 1 , Q .FN .V . 1 , V 2, - i an , . , Q, 'F U--u,,:. P ,.-?-- -1.4-,iitg x .5 W..-.--.W . , tx W N , QV 1- F V- 11 -' 1311: ' 1 , ' - , 1 ,A I " W ,1-.. 1g:Q," if--in ' ,, fsf'Q,.,..J,,, ' K V in -- , 'ff f'fh'i:A..j. A ' " 4a' -4... fa , . Y ul ZEN, ' :-mr ' 1 ' ' an ' '15 Q-g , 9 ' ,VA YF .I T ' 3 v"3'z " --3-I 5 V-av Y ' ., U T", 2- 5,,.,. ,J ' . , V, yr- V.-r WV' Sifff -' f .V -- I -1 . ' 1 ,n f . 749. 1 , Q . ,. . I .. . , . J'- -f'-Y . . , , 4 l XF '36, J. Afrf: 41' :rf ' f '13, J 1 t LLL? -iff if f. if ' , , -4-vv,. 'h H 4 L W Students Solve Tronsportotion Problem ID Vornous Woys ,, asm , E my M l . -1, ggi t tw of f ' -i ii f , W .ff ,YY 31, 2 , 5 v t .Sal 384 ,-5 Lf, ,. mf t t 5 ,. tt tit ' Y J 2 t 15' 7 - ,A K :VY ML i - ,:f, X Walking labovel is by far the most common means of transportation in Isla Vista. Flat tires and muddy parking lots labove rightj can plague the often battered cars students drive. Los Carneros Road lrigh tl is the link binding lsla Vista to Goleta and San ta Barbara. Af REPAERS ' ASCES532 . ' vt. . , f'U"5-S "si A self-styled van labovel can easily double as a home as well as a means of transportation. Students lleftl often resort to hltchhiking to get to classes on time. Bicycles lbelo wl serve as the all-purpose vehicle. If ivy!- Bm E SH-QD 64059 BZ-55.9 86 Housing Retlects Fost Growth ot lslo Visto Community in I 58- ,f The bulk and simple lines of the College lnn ltopl contrast sharply with the beach-environment cottages labovel originally constructed in lsla Vista. The water tower lrightl was one of the first structures to appear in the now heavily populated area. MZ, In, ,,, g:.yVV: H m IE? m l K J? f M 55 ' 3 - M1 11- Q ' A my 2,5 33 fi I J 1 f B , Q 1 iq:-N f ix 1229. XS i Q15-' gif 1 A I - .l . A JZ ,f lf- I r-"' 1 . if 1115 I . . v- if 5. kv, f A ai Sl A H: , L an , " - -4 - ,-H' u, Q . -it-' X . -1' ..'- . S" "'Y"Q' U r v f . 1 I f- , - 1 1 4 Q , X: , ls ' ' 4 ' ' 54, fl -, I mv! r 9 1 ' , X- ' Q , f va 11. V F ia I-,nun E- 5 J , , . 1 ,.' ' - . 1 V .yn fvl v A 14 . I 1 ,,,'.r. " s ' 1 1- fpzyf 4, if, - ' .:. ' ' p-g r ','- ' nl E 5 ff , ,,,, - ' 'Q vs., Q V lk r H' A .jQ....J,..,Q,, A ' 'iQ . , t' 'P I V ' 'Z ", 'f ' Q v 'Vw' 1- H- "9" ',, "7"'J0'9l"'1 hNv,m'!rQH'T'?"'-.,.. U' ' , ,..:rv"" 'N'4"'k,V" Y , .Dfw '11 4.,.w-f' 74, Q' fr 8 Pinball machines ibelowl charge a dime for a moment of pleasurable frustration. Beach activities lrightl consume the greater part of student leisure time. Perfect Park ibottoml, newly initiated this year, has become a com- munity center for residents to gather, picnic, or just sleep in the sunshine on the grass. .LL F "' i -, s' A, ty. I, ,F ug. 5-I 000 .X ,Jw f -if n 221: 5116447 Win ' 1,1 , a i E? Eff I , .1 K, , if ' 4 fi' .kt A f ? ,4 1 , 7 iv 1' .nf ' Multiple, Diverse Activities Engage Isle Visto Residents ARUN vol RUF L,...f..: Billiards fleftl stresses skill with recreation. Jogging labove leftl keeps students in shape while pro- viding a release of tensions. Playing the guitar fabovel lends personal accomplishment to informal public enjoyment on the streets. 9 Street Scenes Otter Perspectives ot Community Lite ? tfrfgfj. , X ., Enco Ile' JZ, Residents labovel stroll , 1 leisurely through l. V. streets. -'T I El Colegio Road lrightl focuses on the major large residence f Y X structures in lsla Vista. ' L A L J ' ,ur , ,..,f'i 1 t NX A L. X Casual congregations labove left! in front of the pool hall have long been a familiar sight in lsla Vista. Bicyclists lleftl assume the right-of-way on streets, often slowing cars. Street football games labovel run continuously regardless of season or traffic. Frnvollfy Solemnity Conirosf Moods V C, of h d f H pp 'gh' A W ,ix X il' I HW ,rw Y A GM 1 W w W:v:: +M "1 MW i1Wii f' ? :f'ilJw "f ' Wf fi , W ".'--:"-MW 'N W M:J ++ +++ W - 55:?NM ' WN' M ' ' V v M IN W Mm WMM HL gMy pf:,f Li 'QS WNgmi:inlM:fJ m H M M N ww n -ix Fmt mm hw' A YY W IA L . l w W qW Wiw I':H M ! R I :W 5AJ:Z!WWZUL3 WM M A XXX KX g i f 5 W -Q ogg, oooo ..-'Q'- "'?lTi W 1 f ' - if 1 gfQ?5M" L gf: K V. I' 'wil A! K U 0 - ""- I , . ,j,'g' ily" .A 't' . J A- A A xi! I HQ' ali ' J -...vg-3 ," N x,,-f . 'Lai ' , C ' r Aa' . rwwgs 'f 'Y 1 'F' -if ii 3 1 va AQ Q yt. 5- Lf' -.P 1 1 '1 Il C 5 5. P Q, ww Sis W- ' EEE? 1 , A M- .... an ' , ,aw :HH H.,.. . A LEW , wg -my ifxgf . f . :Mx Y 37- ,, ,Q - -fi? 1 Q 14 www- usias' 'QENEH fm, wg . . 5351 ffl ii H ,Sf 3. ' 1 V 4 ' x ' I .. 1. - U ,,Qi,gx N -yr 1 1 fx ' ,f Q7 V gg, uf, r ff gf' W' .Y fk, 'a ,,', .,, g, -huh ,,,,-'B' g.. . ,.,. 1 . 'L '4 ' ' ' -, . Ai 4 63.7 5 , ' ' 1' ,. , 3.51- , A A ' , Al 'f ,,, . - Wa., .1 K Avi, 1 4, ,-1, r 'X - lg ' ,j:. , . 'XX-. 5 eg ' a s UA ,X I ,.. K lV7..'..A . , , H , W. , Y. H H , , H 7 , ,Q H X H H N N. , H . H na -fi H N .Y ww H w H NM H W V kwa? E I 353, 3- WW! - T .... 2 E ' 1 -"' V ,,.. ., U' ,,.Wm .. M,,.h Q. .,.. ,Sy kg . ,.. F W... ,., , , ,. ..,n.,.A,,A..1..,.. ,,, ,,.,:,,..... ,Q , ,,,,,,. .r2,..., x ,,.. z L 5? MQ ,Q 'P2 .... . , , .Q .. N -A f 'W 1' : Li M A ..., s " 5 K ' 4 Q ,.. " I Q , Q -f -' L ' I ' - -Q f w ' . A' .N 1 H, ' 3 : - ' ' , f iwfifu 5 ' , xt M Q ,g .. IQ , , V, , - ,, EE , ' Q Wy A '5 em , . f f N f A . x . if , 1 .Q . 2 ' ' , - , sw f . " gr ' Q- v vt, V. 1, gl Q E I in ',, J . Ak L Q "' ' -' ' , ':?:I22' . 3 -' A ' H.. W Q V I an V A F ,v-- , ,W AV ,, f. ,J ' V 6 if wg A x M ', ,aaliunevvw V , an 'mm ff-15 ,Ia 'Eff ' .x af , , -Q 1, 2 ' : .A ww , M we . W, J T Q 5 1 " Y Q ,Q '98 av' 3 ww: A 25 , ff., Y K .- 1 K U aes V, 'Lf , " , l, ,mg ' ' 5 I af - 1 1 M I . N Y,. ai P, ak! H fy , , I L I 5 t X Aff. MV? i, , .1 K 'Ju gf as 2? . . as K N- , " E M I 9 , ' fi Y., A F ,A , , 5, , ,y new , xy , y V I Y 4, 3 F N X gi! W Keg? A 014. 555 I 53 f - l S YQ V 7 55, - , .+ W R f M "N U., f ag-T 1 " if 34" - ' 5 A ' X Www 1 . " ' " , A w, I M . , ,la ' .F l ' ' yr" as ' 1 " ' - ' fi- ...L " - i' "mf ,,,, . ' A " W , .5 7' 5 157 A , sa f-+-2:11141 'V Q 4 T . , -. , j 4' 4 517522 ' :sis . gf ,.j1. ,am , ff 2' - 1 ,, ' ' lm X' ' W ??'f"'M 3' 'W 'T 2. 5. f Q mf . - :11,g,gi:l. H 'R .55 ff 4 M V iff -J 5 ? 9 Q' ' 5 Q 1-11, F 'wsigiiag ' 3 S V V 'ig?m 95415 2 -,1.,G J . w , f' 2' I , dl Q . -L K +6 gk 45: 6 Q . as my ' sew" ff ge ax ww' M aw ' I ew . '. :i1Yi:'.. 317 W, .fr-1 Q Q'-fi , 1' N N, f:0,g...':u:,w Q .,.-E.,1: ,-up , .:.:.: gp. 1 i..f - .,5s::p,:x. Wi? ,E -SN.-, sf W- V LTI: wma: V if E ff M Qi wx ,M If .mg 2 . N - , '?' zz., .:..iQ,.Q- ..., .. .1 3 . MH T- C I - if A ...- N4 132' X '3':fw,:r if , , . , 4 , 5 .Ag 3 JW ,mx .. an ' Q , Q ' . . H ,Mi QT walls n 5,1 Bw E f 4 f it: ff f iff p Q ,E AE' 'Vx wi Fx . r-.sgsirq li"g-,Wax tr 1 -- 5' -W ' if if 5 , "fixed , A Q Q? ' f M: ,Q Q mr 'X . M f , W - M 'V 2. , 3: .AQILL M43 Y, -4 K: ' K . K 9 RH E if 'Q fi E Y 1 W 3 , 5 .. . W 15,53 , ' :"'1'e.-.... 1" " "'.' ' fa" ' "5..:5:,-V ' ww . , ,,.! wa 1, 55" , 3. Q a 9 I x - . .s'f:f.kf ' 7-F F if Q :Eb ' -aiu' 'lv mf? Y 2 N if . 2 ' , 1 71? A ,, as .ay li , N... M-M. w 11 M., ffm uf , ' A Officers of the Senior Class and interested participants lrigh t, below right, and belowl use meetings as seminar sessions in order to fully examine the causes of racism through discussions and propose logical solutions. SENIOR CLASS Government Reorienis To Destroy Preiudice As class government is no longer viable, the Senior Class has reoriented its purposes to serve in helping to destroy racism with multicultural education a considered solution. Four years ago the Indian Project, spon- sored by the Class of '70, launched the first anti-racist campaign on campus. The working hypothesis was that non-Indians can best help F native Americans by first dealing with their own racism. Last year the Class presented the principle of multicultural education during a leadership conference for high school students. This year a UC Extension course has been initiated for high school students which deals with the individual in a multi-cultural society. 5 1'-49' api? Y- 'L of MORTARBOARD Coeds Achievements Acclaimed by Honor With the increasing emphasis being placed on the role of women in today's society, Mortar Board has taken on a new relevance. The senior women's honorary is comprised of exemplary models of today's modern woman. Weekly meetings center on intellectual de- velopment and achievements of women. The selection process for membership is extremely complex. Present Mortar Board women examine the files of all junior women who have a 3.0 or better G.P.A. for evidence of leadership and service qualities. Those who meet the strict requirements must have letters of recommendation from faculty and stu- dents, and are then voted on by senior Mortar Board members. Deborah Mount Vs fp ' '44 anis v7"Ne ilu J f -. Y-.. "-fwvv Susan Bates Sue Boltinhouse Kathy Davis Jeanne McKay Lilll Puente Jacqueline Schmidt Sharon Maclntyre Debby Tanaka 7 YCDUNG FACES: A SCDCIETY IN TRANSITICDN n 5 1 I uw ' .-Q ,rm QQ' I E 5,1 -v., , 1 . 4 ' 14,1 is 'gg li: ins! . A51 11 IBF' :- ,-4 - , , f-5 ik -. Q A , ff ri 1-If 757 -. . .N I ., i ' .' x , ' 'TY 1 'Aj , 1 , . '41 A. L ' Q' ,:. ' '-i QA' ' QQ. ' 'f - Myst. .rug 1. ' ffm.. ' H 1 X .A H I Y, iffy?-' ' I . 'i??.j.1f, - Q ':'V7lr.' ' 1 - r.. , if-I ." - 1 400 r I r 1 K v w ,,m:Q1,f zz My :Mr wfzyffwf- wma-e-1 : Q. ,is .- 'Skis If ,. ,mfwfsmi 'A sszifvzfeifffzq ,H L wa, , H irfliff' Q,,M1,,ff --41 ww- , :MMM , mmm 'NNT v x -1.mA.y .mm . . , V Lwmvwuf 7 7 -W-mr L, 3 -. 1 , 1. .Ll Ta 1 Q1 fy, , , 4 IV ' ' f wg" . gyggri .. E 1 i I .gil , . ...Q , . , I ' 'A ' Y ' Yf, ' A. , 1.7 nxt, , I A. W - fv -4 J .Q w w ,ba Q. fm fb -' . 'm 'WL B. 4.-4 41" N 401 402 f ' 15,41 Z 7 YJ ff' AM! ,'dQY' -Mr ukfpvf' Q 'L I TEV , .. . I . ' 5 ' KI! fix, J -l I' 5- " W 'P A ffm' ' si -1 X V, W I M A 1, H In fi? , , :ay ' N -it Hin 3. y xl 4 95, .QI cfs ' , Q fi' " A L-1-f"l fi .-ug ' Ll 'S A 5.4 1 Q 5 , P gy is 4 ' I A, . , ' . 'if' ' f U Le S, 1 w, Av ' I I 1 .fi .1 ! y"+-4, ,, iff A K 1 I 7' if i I ,,,pgs,, 'HV ,, uw , I l?j't9IQu s T X A . f LI' 'Qin 500 R11 ge, f 4 H, 1' 1 I i 1 F ...ak 5' I" ,. f f , Q 9, .,., - 7' s 1 I kiiggg ,. , I 1 ' m I is ' 2 A s ,s 'ml ? l 2. 1 1 tw xfiigs, ,N L . i. f ,D SENIORS MAR Y ABBEY Ridgewood, N,J., Art ANN ABBOTT Halliston, Mass., Social Psych, WADE ABBOTT Pasadena, Philosophy CAL VIN ABE Salinas, Economics JOHN ABRAHAM Hawthorne, Economics BIL L A DL ER San Bernardino, Psychology JANET AHO Anaheim, History ALAN AICHES San ta Barbara, History FLORENCE AIELLO Santa Maria, Botany MICHAEL ALDWORTH Manhattan Beach, Sociology ROSE ALEXANDER Antioch, Mathematics GREG ALFORD Balboa Island, Poli. Sci. DA VID ALLAIRE JR. San Diego, Political Science KRISTINE ALLBA UGH Northridge, English ROGER ALLCROFT Glendale, Mech. Engineering JO YCE ALMAN South Gate, Sociology DA VID AMBILL Torrance, History JULIE AMICK Santa Barbara, History BRENTANDERSON Bethel Island, Marine Biology LINDA ANDERSON Modesto, Psychology ROBIN ANDREWS Glendale, Comb. Soc. Sci. ALAN ARNDT Yosemite Valley, Poli. Sri. PA TRICIA ARNETT Leggett, Speech!Hearing MA R K A RN OL D Torrance, History NANCY ASCHENBRENER Pasadena, History HARLAN AUBREY Reedley, Political Science KAREN AUGHINBAUGH Carmichael, History FRANK A US TIN Downey, Sociology DEBORAH A YA RS Solana Beach, Sociology ROBYN BABBAGE Riverside, Comb. Soc. Sci. ELODIE BABYAK Inglewood, Spanish BRUCE BA DEA U Mantoloking, NJ., Economics MITCHELL BADER Burbank, Political Science STEPHEN BAILEY Northridge, Economics LINDA BAKER San Bruno, Physical Education NEIL BAKER Los Angeles, History PAMELA BAKER Temple City, History E THEL BALBER Woodland Hills, French SUSAN BAL TES Brea, Rhetoric!Public Address LINDA BANBRUOK Chatsworth, English LINDA BANUELOS San ta Barbara, History RON BA RA CK ER San Jose, Economics ROBERTBARKER EI Segundo, Sociology LINDA BARR Lancaster, English L YN BARRETT Lompoc, Sociology!Anthro. VICKI BARTEL T Alta Loma, Sociology CRAIG BA R THELMESS EI Cajon, Political Science DIA NA BASKETT Stock tan, English 40 SENIORS MARTHA BASSE TT Whittier, French LINDA BA TES Mountain View, Phys. Ed SUSAN BA TES Mountain View, Home Econ. ANN BEAL Van Nuys, Sociology DIANE BEAN Oxnaroi Mathematics CRAIG BEARDSLEY La Canada, History KAREN BECK Lakeport, Sociology ROBERT BECKHAM Pasadena, Political Science GEORGE BEHLMER Pacific Grove, History CHRISTINE BEHNCK E San Bernardino, Comb. Soc. Sci. PATRICIA BEIMFORD Woodland Hills, History KAREN BEL L San Bernardino, Sociology KA THLEEN BELL EI Toro, Sociology KA TH Y BELL Palos Verdes, History MICHAEL BELL Carson City, Nev, Pali. Sci. DOUGLAS BELLO Santa Maria, Hispanic Civ. MARILLE BELSHE Huntington Beach, History CHE FI YL BEMIS Anaheim, Sociology JUDITH BENDEH Long Beach, Speech!Hearing LAURA BENDEH Scottsdale, Ariz., Anthro, CHRISTINE BENEDETTI Hillsborough, Home Econ. MARCIA BENNETT Hawthorne, Spanish STEVEN BERGDAHL Los Angeles, History ALICE BEHGGREEN Salvang, Anthropology LA URIE BERMEL Fresno, Speech LINDA BETTENCOURT Castro Valley, History BETH BEURKENS Dayton, Ohio, Philosophy TERESE BIALECKI Rodondo Beach, History DIANA BIFFLE Sacramento, Phys. Ed. if J .tg . H gr ' is it mt af' ALICE BIGHAM Whittier, Political Science "Tut, tut, child," said the Duchess. "Everything's gota moral if ' if - 'L-, A V f' if only you can find it." Carroll I . . 1-Aff 'oval 3 ' - E' Z. . '31 , .-.- '1' A 1-f A 41 .Y JZ' . .1 Y 9? . 5, tiff! Y .fr-T r Q42 , . my A11 xy ff X ,. xx. A it Jig. ...Al ' N .BK 1 4 I '4, Q 1 -- i fa x X, 'ff- K F J , .t 6 'H fl- Q-1 JIS' 'due ' 3 It vefiw X I,-U sn 3 , ln .4 :iowa .1 --- 1 , 5, iff' ' L. 1 L-t""', R Q- 4, ef' l'i ,-ae. 'TP :- ' , G Af , 1 ' I I uk 1 ' ' ft - 5? " L' . , 'E T. 2 . 6 7,1 M: 'Ge ,R 1 -is 1, f --" .-ef'-Y . "B, ,. 'ff' .C , .415 0 '-rg-.. 'h-.gg . ---r , q N '55 . tim ,Q .XG Y . i,-of . 'Q , SENICDRS ANNE BILLER Claremont, Art EDWARD BISHOP Granada Hills, English PA UL BISHOP Monrovia, MusicfCrea tive Sr. CHRISTINE BJORN Stockton, Comb. Soc. Sci. MA RTY BLA IR Canoga Park, History ELINA BL UMBERGS Los Gatos, Political Science CHRIS BL UNDEN Alameda, Economics!Pre-Law BA RBA RA BODINE Northridge, Asian S t. !POIi. Sci, JOHN BODINE Muskegon, Mich., History KA R EN BOGNER Poway, History WILLIAM BOHNACKER San Jose, Relig. St.!Anthro. SUE BOL TINHOUSE San Bernardino, Sp. !Hearing LAURA BOMBERGER El Monte, History ROBERT BONAR Redding, Zoology MARY JO BOOKER Altadena, SocioIogy!Pl1 y. Ed. GEORGE BOWEN Rossmoor, Political Science KA THLEEN BOYD Newport Beach, Comb. Soc. Sci. JAMES BOYLE Arcadia, Political Science THOMAS BO YLE Burbank, Poli tical Science ROBE R T BRA D Y Palos Verdes Estates, Econ. KA THY BRANNON San Gabriel, Economics KA THL EEN BRANT Sylmar, Mathematics PATRICIA BREM San ta Barbara, History DA VID BRESSL ER White Plains, N. Y., English CHERYL BRICKER Palo Alto, SoeioIogy!Anthro. WILLIAM BRIDGES Glendale, Sociology CAROL BRISTOW Porterville, History DONNA BROCK Menlo Fark, English LINDA BROCK Santa Fe Springs, Anthro. PA TRICIA BROERING Huntington Beach, Art Hist. CA RLA BROOKS King City, Speech!Hearing GILBERT BROWN Berkeley, Religious Studies LINDA BROWN Ridgecrest, Home Economics STEPHANIE BROWN Fullerton, History STEWART BROWN Greenwich, Conn., Econ.lPaIi. Sci. EVEL YN BROWNING Santa Clara, History!Anthro, LESLIE BR TE K San Diego, History LESLIE BRUHN Salinas, Biol0gyfChemisrry JANET BR UMAN Sherman Oaks, English 40 406 Please do not understand me too quickly. Gide BETTY BR USCH Ojai, Political Science ED BRUSH Modesto, English VIRGINIA BRUSH Modesto, Art CHRISTINA BRYANT Riverside, History VINCE BUDROVICH San Pedro, Econ.!Poli. Sci. NANCY BUDZINSKI Lemon Grove, German DICK BUFORD Buellton, English MAR VIN BUL TMAN II Bakersfield History ANN BUMB Pacific Palisades, History JIM BUNKELMAN Santa Maria, Physics MA RIIN BURGENBA UCH Costa Mesa, English JAMES BURGESS Los Altos, Economics KA TH Y BUH K Gladwyne, Pa., Anthropology LILLIAN BURKENHEIM Glendale, History SALL Y BUFILEIGH Fullerton, Speech!Hearing BILL BURLINGTON Hanford Political Science JANIS BURNER Santa Barbara, Phys. Ed DONALD BURNS Riverside, Psychology PA TRICIA BURNS L os A ngeles, Sociology MARGUERITE BURR Malibu, Physical Education HOBER T BUSH L as A ngeles, Political Science BA RBA RA BUSHMAN L os Altos, Economics JA MES B U TL ER Lang Beach, Cellular Biology L INDA B U TL ER Pasadena, Physical Education hs ' L . v, ' " -2 . E ' 1 A 4: 'ew , ' 1 1 ' .,8:.35' e w - f 3 I a' I 2 1 Yan' E 3 V 2 vc ,. J Q. ,Q W , ,gp lg 'J , Qian L. if J , at Y' Q 11. ' -nv. , I 1 i' 'I ' 'Q If , jvc: iff:- 1, P For 3-,IN 3 - .R. 5 w ,I I fs.. ' A f if . I5 . L ,i.' J , en l S-1 1 1 -51 , w--qi' . 4 1 'T I , 'Ti 'I ,l ,, K . r'0', 'ir ' by 1' 1 'W tl L 9' rw-f ,X .G :sw in ii A 'E if 'T an ' "XI:-, .. x I qu. . ' L, .X mf l ' Esta. - -ee, , 'W ,V L A 1 X H' '3 A 1 s J ,J vw tw , 'L f n' is Y -.-Q.. cz:-1 X Lrg f - '. :.' it J , ' : .ex 1 l . ,J 5 ,Sl f . if , an -,5 -f 4 ,fs .. W-4,4-11 , z - 3 L 5. Jo as s , .. N , e' " ' ,.wH --of ts S' 'J' , v,-f-fa frfgt- is P-f-15 1 ar, 'ft Ei. I - - P gp fa' , P, A , .bf M, 4 SENIORS NANCY BU TL ER Whittier, History PENN BUTLER Woodside, Philosophy!Hisrory ROBERT BUTLER Santa Barbara, Geography KA THLEEN BYRNE Los Angeles, Economics LISBETH CACCESE Goleta, History RICHARD CA GGIANO Mission Hills, Biology JUSTINIAN CAIRE Bakersfield, Poli. Sci.!Hist. PA TRICIA CALISTRO San Leandro, Comb. Soc. Sci.!Spch. THOMAS CALKINS Saratoga, Elec. Engineering BONNIE CAMPBELL Downey, English KA THLEEN CAMPBELL Glendale, Poli. Sci. KATHRYN CAMPBELL King City, History MARCIA CAMPBELL Whittier, Dramatic Art SHERR Y CAMPBELL Santa Barbara, Spch.!Hearing SAL VADOR CAMPOS Carpin teria, Spanish PA TRICIA CANTL E Y San ta Monica, Spanish MARGO CAPETAN Pico Rivera, History VIRGINIA CARETTO Goleta, Environ. Biology SUSAN CARGILLE Seal Beach, Anthropology FREDERICK CARLIN JR. Newport Beach, Zoology CA THY CARLISLE Stockton, History DENNIS CARL OCK San Bernardino, Russian St. CA TH Y CARLSON West Covina, Comb. Soc. Sci. DANA CA RL TON Woodland Hills, Pre-Den tal TIMOTHY CARL YLE Santa Ana, Political Science ANA MARIA CARNESOL TAS San ra Barbara, Psych.!Sac. DALE CARRICABURU San ta Ynez, History BONNIE CA R TER Palo Alto, Anthropology NA NC Y CAR TER San Rafael, History!Anthro. OLIVIA CASAS South EI Monte, History MICHA EL CA TINO Sacramento, Anthropology LA RR Y CA VE Bakersfield, Nuc. Engineering LINDA CA YL OR Orange, Anthropology JOAN CE BA T Palos Park, III., Anthro. FRANK CERCOS San Francisco, History SUSAN CERRINA Bakersfield, Sociology JAMES CHADBOURN Cambridge, Mass., English BRIAN CHAMBERLAIN Oakland, Philosophy DONNA CHAMBERLAIN Hawthorne, History JULIE CHAMBERLIN San Jose, Sociology REBECCA CHAMBERLIN San Diego, Anthropology SUZANNE CHAMPION Tarzana, Music BERNARD CHAN San Francisco, Chem. Engineering MA RIL YN CHANDLER Lafayette, Spanish!Anthro. BE VERL Y CHAPMAN Inglewood, Music CYNTHIA CHAPMAN La Habra, English!Al1thro. AL LAN CHA RETTE West Los Angeles, Phys. Ed. VIRGINIA CHA TTER TON San Jose, Spanish IA n th ro. L 407 408 SENICDRS PHILIP CHA UVIN lll San ta Barbara, A nthropol ogy ROBERT CHRISTIANSON Ojai, Economics ALICIA CLAEBOE San Anselmo, Comb. Soc. Sci. KA THLEEN CLARDY Whittier, PsychologyfReIig, St. DONALD CLA RK Santa Barbara, Poli. Sci. GA YL E CLA RK La Canada, History LINDA CLARK Los Angeles, Sociology MICHAEL CLARK San ta Cruz, Anthropology LINDA CLARKSON No. Hollywood, Comb. Sco. Sci, MICHAEL CLARKSON Alexandria, Va., EnglishfHlsl. MA RIL YN CLA YTON Long Beach, History JOY CLOVER Modesto, SpeechIHearing DOUGLAS COFFEY San Diego, History JEAN COFFE Y Dinuba, History!SocioIogy ARLENE COLE Encino, History .IANIS COLE Long Beach, Anthropology SHEILA COLLINS Sacramento, Political Science JO Y COMPTON Phoenix, Ariz., Mathematics ANTHONY CONNELL Y Poway, Comb. Soc. Sci. PA TRICIA CONNORS Thousand Oaks, History MICHAEL CONTE San Francisco, Soc.!Psycl1. JOHN COOE Y Long Beach, History CINDY COOPER Seal Beach, Ergo.!Phys. Ed, JOANNE CORDES Torrance, Mathematics VICKI COSSETTE San Rafael, Soc.!Anthro. JOHN COTSENMO YER Lompoc, Economics NANCY COTUGNA San Bernardino, Home Econ. SUSAN COULBY Phoenix, Ariz., English VIRGINIA COULL Walnut Creek, Art History PAMELA COUTCHIE Salinas, ZoologyfFrench PRESTON COX Lompoc, Mathematics THOMAS COX K enslngton, Sociology LINDA COZADD Covina, French TR UDY CRA IG Yucaipa, History KIM CRAIN Anderson, Anthropology KA RE N CRANE R Bakersfield, Music KENT CRAWFORD Los Altos Hills, History BURTON CRINKLAW San Jose, Biology CUR TIS CROOKS Richmond, Biology JOHN CROSS Visalia, Political Science NANCY CROSS Van Nuys, English WILLIAM CROSS Orange, Mathematics ROBERT CROUSE Sacramento, Political Science JUDI TH CROWE Monrovia, Poli. Sci.!Hist. PA TR ICK CR YMES Vista, English JAMES CUCCI Torrance, Econ.!Anthro. BONNIE CUMMINGS Granada Hills, Sociology ROBERT CUMMINGS Ventura, Zoology N , ' x -1 ,ga U I ff- r J it qw ,,,, W, X -JW an " A K 'Rv . . L, k El' tf"'i?' A ,J ,Ln I Ai 45- -sg' 23- . - 5 C5 " r 'f"'? y .f 'Lb ff ., - L i li' , 4 . I 3' , . , X , ff, , - Q: Qi: f E ' A X . 4. 1 . R K1 F? V -lj X - . M . Q - 41. Eg, s !.,. N .lf ", , T31 I I AQ! M , E , th if . E., gigzlz 'eo' E Q I - F L rt! H 'f sg- , 1 , .4.,, 18' I -1 A- 370 -1? 0+ ,. ,f-vw ! . t r ' N r g 'Q gin ' r S. M, f' ?' . . 52: LI L X 1 ., L I ..N Q , I Q wa J , . "" K I -E ,-'f J rd 1-:J sf .- , AQ' ,QX V117 ,W X eu! 111, 75 . ' ' xv V ' I V . . ",'3j 1 " A'- - A I2 If 'ref-w A 3' W I L , 'Q ' 'f .X 'ans ' . I ii x Fm E ng 1 L., gl i 5 fn Q V - . '. ' 3 ' -' I E Trl'- s - Y ' ,E mr . N I flu' 'Ya '14 Q-an Q 1- i I ., , F may ,,. Ll., J I. i J, , SENICDRS ROBERT CUNNINGHAM Riverside, History EDWARD CURRAN III Santa Paula, Chem. Engineering JANICE CYPHER Stockton, English SANDRA DAHL VW1ittier, Home Economics PHUONG-MAI DANG Saigon, Zoology SUZELLEN DARDEN San Lorenzo, Comb. Soc. Sci. LOU DARK Oklahoma City, Okla., English LESLIE DA VENPORT Tustin, SocioIogy!Anthro. RICHARD DA VID Los Altos, History DIANA DA VIDSON Granada Hills, Poli. Sci. DA VID DA VIS JR. Whittier, Economics JOAN DA VIS Taft, Environmental Biology KA TH Y DA VIS Northridge, Art MA H Y DA VIS San Bernardino, Comb. Soc. Sci. MAR VIN DAWSON Visalia, Chemistry GINNI DA YS Santa Barbara, English Lit. SCOTT DEA CUN Los Angeles, Mech. Engineering MERRILEE DE BRY Hacienda Hts., Comb. Soc. Sci. CHARLES DEGAN Bakersfield Environ. Biology ROBERT DEL IEMA Pasadena, Geography JIM DELMAN Pomona, Political Science JOHN DENNIS Paso Robles, History!French SARAH DENNIS Long Beach, History PAMELLA DEN OTTER Santa Fe Springs, Phys. Ed. fi .N i I aim., Y gf, 'P Tomorrow when I wake, or think l do, what shall l say of today? Beckett 7 N' I 4 410 SENIGRS DEBORAH DERLACHTER Arcadia, History THOR DE VENISH Manhattan Beach, Spanish STEPHEN DEXTER Tracy, Psychology JOHN DICKINSON Carmel Valley, Anthropology GAR Y DILLE Y Menlo Park, Political Science KA THLEEN DIRKES Ventura, Art History BRUCE DIVELBISS Santa Barbara, Mech. Eng KENNETH DIX San Bernardino, History SHELB Y DIX Los Angeles, Soc.fAnthro, PA TRICIA DOCKER Y San ta Barbara, Spanish PAM DODGE Riverside, Anthropology TOM DOEHRMAN Fullerton, Economics DA VE DOGAN Valparaiso, Ind., Biology JACK DOHERTY JR. Santa Ana, Economics ROBIN DUKE Sunnyvale, Physical Therapy DENNIS DOLAN Santa Maria, History RITA DONAHUE Sacramento, Sociology BRIAN DONNAN Santa Rosa, Environ. Biology DIANE DONNAN Santa Barbara, Environ. Biology JANE DONSKER Long Beach, History JEAN DORMAN San Gabriel, Spch.!Hearing!Soc. DIANE DORSE Y Apple Valley, A n thropology DENISE DOTY Santa Barbara, Home Econ. EVEL YN DU BOIS Lancaster, Comb, Soc. Sci. FRANCIS DUGGAN Los Angeles, Rhet,!Pub. Address DA VE DUKES Ssn Rafael, Anthropology TOM DUNDERDALE Woodland Hills, Physics DEBORAH DUNN Ventura, Biology STEVEN DUNN Reseda, History ROBERT DYKSTRA La Jolla, Economics BROOKE EAGLESON Bakersfield History ANN ECOFF Oxnard Sociology SUSAN EDELSTEIN Pacific Palisades, Comb. Soc. Sci. JE RR Y EDGAR Boulder, Colo., Math!Creat. St. JIM EDWARDS Pasadena, Art LEE E DWA RDS Palo Alto, Economics LINDA EGGERS Inglewood, Art History LINDA EGNA TCHEK Palo Alto, Cellular Biology GA Y EICHHOFF Hillsborough, S,oeech!Hearin9 WILLIAM EICK North Hollywood, History GA YLE EIPPE R Long Beach, German!Soc. KENNETH EISENBERGER Malibu, Sociology ELAINE EKBERG South Gate, Sociology LUANNE ELBEL Glendale, History A RNULD ELLIS San Francisco, Sociology CHARLES ELLSWOHTH Tujunga, Mathematics CL YDE EMERSON Downey, Environ. Biology DANIEL ENGLER Santa Barbara, Poli. Sci. . 7 , - 1' i ' T' .. 'X -I .,,,.,.,, , X :Q in , ' ,,. 1 . T?-" " LW I if g I I -as 'siilfb 7, "SHP, 5 'V , 'N ' ' -1f"'N1. iL -' I D inf- fx-+ve . s "- f A A Q A lf. , ,,, l I fee- .f 129' 3"'L"" T 5. iii' . - , - . Hg vu- l I 1 gil X tl 2 .H my fag t '41 H e 1? 5 V 1:-G V' A :- :P . 4 1 'P ' ? . f a t ge-- ' ' Y"'gM , . If-.,, ...Wt - . ., -sa-1. X we x ,I . . 4' - 1 dl I - '. ...E gf," , ' -' , ' ,Q wiswfh.t. , 4, ., 4. .. gv i 'R' iv 'I 7 NY ,V N. -r . R E' 50" - life , cs W4 I HI Q . fi .. 2 if 1 "' -v' K, x i:. I ea . R 5 -.1 , so 'T'-271' ., 5 I ,E ly F I' 2-+ 3' Q' ,352 :Z-Y ,L. Q- sf . if -az' -sf- ji' ', ri 1- if - I rf, -x , "QA ,Q4 s v4.1.- sl- '::.: .7 nf A I , "Vi 4 ' -.s - '4 .1 1-A, Y, , 45 . L L, -, K: if--' ' 5 " ? I believe in believing six impossible things before breakfast. Not that I usually get the - I ' chance. The trouble with life is that not enough impossible things happen for us to believe in, don 't you agree? Eagle MICHAEL ENGLER San ta Barbara, Poli. Sci, , V " i - A LINDA ENGLISH , Ft. Morgan, Colo., History CHARLES ENSLEY JR. I 7, ' LosAIamitos, Relig. Studies ,-. -N.. .1 .. I ff Y" - s ' -9 V Mg . J 1 sf Q ,, f I X -. 'eatin 'fri 'ff 49 2 I WS' wx Ai K in ,. ' " JUDY EPSTEIN Beverly Hills, History!Poli Sci. nf- if 1 ' ' , V ' " . CINDYERICKSON 'av L ' N - ' ,- at X , - Pasadena, Spanish ' JL 14 GAIL ERICKSUN Santa Maria, History lx- , 5 ' Eg. -1 Y- ' it th -gm' VRF X ' 5-' KATHLEEN ERICKSON JOHN ERNS T . ' Downey, Political Science ' . ' ' I . - A- ' ANTONIEESCHEHICH "xl er .-. N I1 I r , 1 I V L - I ,- H , i.q1,"'-N ga, ,Q dt 'DTI' v 1 'TIT U' 'wif 'P hug, i lsie Ria. ' "sr V ' ll ' f Pasadena, Anthropology LORRAINE ESPINOZA Oxnard, Comb. Soc. Sci. KENNETH EVANS Sacramento, Zoology KA THRYN EVEH5 Pleasanton, Comb. Soc. Sci. . ' ' F-' " Covina, Political Science 'I 1' L YNN E VERS Pacific Grove, Sociology GLORIA EWIG San Marino, Art History GA R Y FA CHIN Bakersfield, Physics DOUGLASS FAIST Ventura, Economics ROBERT FARLEY Troy, N. Y., Elec. Engineering RALPH FA RR Los Angeles, Geology RICHARD FARRELL JR. Saratoga, History TRUDI FASTENOW Woodland Hills, Home Econ. ARETA FEATHERINGILL Cucamonga, Speech RON FEA THERINGILL Long Beach, English LAWRENCE FEENEY Tarzana, History CAROL FEIGE San Mateo, Spanish 412 SENIORS CECELIA FELIX L os A ngeles, Speech!Hearing JANICE FENLEY Riverside, History . BARBARA FERGUSON , San ta Clara, His tory f JANE FERRANTE San Diego, English BARBARA FERRY Los Altos, History DONALD FESLER Arroyo Grande, Pali. Sci. JANE FESTON Chula Vista, Ar! History KRISTIN FINNEGAN f Los Altos Hills, Geography SHIRLEY FINSTER V , Santa Barbara, Comb, Soc. Sci. AL TREE FISCHER Northridge, Anthropology PAMELA FISCHEH Encirzo, Art MARY JANE FISHER El Cen rro, Anthropology .Q f- l , .. gg PM 'QI 1 There is a paradise on earth. lt is in us. Reps 4 uw 'AQ"" A 311- 1 A 'Q 'ir WS: -Q A I ks-9' Ja ',"fT Q -w , , -.J A l Gil 31 X 'rf Q . T3 - L 1- 'OX 4777 5 ST' 'os 'ay' ' Q l r f. , N I f ' 1 ' M . ':s.,- ,L ' w -3 Q W ' f ' M 04.1 41 . . EX hx -93' ., C- " Q' 'P iigiix ,- 'iw H we M, X' N:-wv'W ' ' 3 , K V . : 4 Q ar K. by 1 ff. 'f L ff? I 1 , ,- l ,,. Q' V Q A 4 If "'- sg . ' -- rv-.,.. .1 . , '?.- L. .Fx 5 A A it -,135 Q I an 'og' ' .1 M , f 5.-4: if A rf Y. .. iq, w l if-"ff" 1111 VF 41' -. C rs., vw, - J. lf, ' f 'ai' . l .IG A .f s. .i " ., N vm ,. ff- 1 S Y A I 1 f.4, Q Q., lf' . '9 ' ?1 ,. .- , " Pas 'VN 7 ' A K ' 'fm .E gms? ll rg' . I V N fsug H lj yi- , A0 ii' V 'N 'WJ' eg. 1 X J' -hs. SENIORS PA TRICK FITZGERALD Santa Ynez, History MICHELE FITZPA TRICK Lafayette, English KAREN FLEISCHLI Newport Beach, Poli. Sci. JUDITH FONTANA Forestville, Anthropology BARR Y F OOSE Bakersfield, Ph ys. Ed. CARTER FORREST West Covina, Political Science WILLIAM FORREST Los Angeles, Environ. Bio. CHRISTINA FOSTER Los Angeles, Comb. Soc. Sci. SUSAN FOULK San Pedro, History JOHN FOWLE R Escondido, Psychology DIANA FRANCIS Redding, English LIZBETH FRANCIS Burlingame, Sociology RICHARD FRANCIS Pico Rivera, Speech STEVEN FRANK Encino, Political Science GAIL FRANKLIN Fresno, Home Economics MAR Y ANN FREEMAN San Jose, History SHARON FRENCH Oxnard, Anthropology LEN FRENZA JR. Berkeley, Poli. Sci.!Pre-Law KAREN FRIEDRICH Ventura, History GREG FROWNFEL TER Selma, Political Science KA THERINE FUGIT West Covina, Sociology MELISSA FUHR Los Angeles, History JANIS GABBERT Long Beach, Home Economics BARBARA GADUT Hacienda Heigh ts, History DIANE GA F Fl Fairbanks, Alaska, Biology JA YNE GALLAGHER Inglewood, Anthropology MARCIA GALLERON St. Helena, Geography DENNIS GAL VAN San Leandro, Anthropology TOM GAMBOA Sherman Oaks, History MARTI GANGNES Santa Ana, Dance RICK GANGNES Tustin, Zoology BERNARD GANS Downey, Mech. Engineering YOLANDA GARCIA Sunland History CAROLE GARNER Los Altos Hills, History KA THR YN GARNER Taft, Sociology BARBARA GARRISON La Canada, Home Economics WlLLlAM GEMMILL Colo. Springs, Colo., Poli. Sci. CHRISTY GENUIT Stockton, Speech!Hearing BONNIE GEORGE Watsonville, English CRAIG GERLACH Hillsborough, Zoology KATHLEEN GERRY Van Nuys, History LESLIE GERSON Tarzana, French VICKIE GESSNER Fresno, Philosophy MARK GILBERT Oxnard, Biology BRAD GINDER Lakewood, Political Science GRETCHEN GINGG Oakland, History DENISE GINOTTI Burlingame, Sociology GA YLE GINTHNER Los Angeles, Psychology 414 SENIGRS STEVEN GL EITMAN Los Angeles, Chem. Engineering LAWRENCE GODDA RD Anaheim, Sociology ROSS GODL IS Claremont, Political Science LINDA GOLBUFF Ventura, Anthropology SUSAN GOLDBERG Beverly Hills, SpeeChfHearing ALAN GOLDHAMIVIER San Diego, Chemistry BEVERL Y GOLDIN Sacramento, Hispanic Civ. SARAH GOLDSMITH Visalia, Sociology RHEA' GOL DSTEIN Las Vegas, Nev., Music DONNA GOODMAN La Mirada, Anthropology ANI TA GOOS Westminster, Anthropology EUGENE GORDON Santa Barbara, Environ. Biology LINDA GOSS Chatsworth, Psychology NICHOLAS GRAHAM FiedmonL Geography PHYLLIS GRANDT Oakland, English FREDERICK GRANL UND Santa Maria, History MACHELLE GRANT Sacramento, Sociology TIM GRA UMA NN Fresno, History ROBERT GRA VES Pleasanton, Zoology SANDRA GRE CO Yorba Linda, Sociology FRED GREEN Bakersfield, Economics JENNIFER GREEN San Francisco, Sociology LE ANN GREEN Pasadena, Comb. Soc. Sci. CHER YL GRESSETT Monrovia, Anthropology DOUGLAS GRIFFIN Napa, Economics NANCY GRIFFIN San Leandro, Psychology CAROLE GRIFFITH Modesto, Sociology SHARON GRIGGS Adams Cen ter, N. Y., Sociology K RISTEN GRIM La Jolla, Poli Sci. !Sociology LINDA GRINSTEAD Fullerton, Sociology PA TRICIA GRISET Pomona, Physical Education ROBE R T GRIX Carmichael, Biochemistry KA TH Y GROSSMAN Manhattan Beach, English JENNIFER GRO VE Fresno, Comb, Soc. Sci. GEORGE GUETZLAFF Inglewood, Mech. Engineering GRETCHEN GUNDERSON Atherton, German DANNA GUNTHER Solana Beach, Speech!Hearing NANCY GUSTAFSON Redding, French MELISSA GUY Corona del Man Art MADELINE GWILLIM Los Altos, Music DARLENE HAAS Santa Cruz, Sociology JOHN HA GL UND La Canada, Economics CANDI CE HALL Santa Rasa, French GA R Y HA NA UE R Pacific Palisades, History DEBBI HANCOCK North Hollywood, Sociology BARBARA HANFORD Redwood City, French JOHN HA N K INS North Haven, Conn., English SONJA HANSEN Napa, A n rhropology " N' ,. L .EYE 7 'aug' 4. 'K I' A ' G6 Ji' 1 1 , 1 ag! eil. 9 sc A H H , . 90-N ,, 1 1 if llittzfa--I pa u .vf1" n H .. Quufsf, 'G Q K 8' 4 ' D . , :'aw. -A. 'QF' 4 I ' ' . 1 3 . 'y fd .4..... . , A rr X' Iiimiifw as- . - . -I m::1'2f,'.s.f?5 W" , - .5 U M .2 gr . , A , W ' za - 2 . - . ,., ' Q X L ' L 4, -uf, 11 1 , W El, 'Hr . ,,. Q E V '51-S' i A ' xx-- I 'ww 1 fie- 491 1 -ry. 4' - ' YYY" 1551 .N I ' x if M 'ON ft' 'Noa- W . 4, F393 , -.E E, Yap y , K i f Wa. A N- . fi' g '14 'fl 1 J 9' 4 5 , . AE-59: . gl WM 5. , . .. R3 1 - vi AT- , if- J , 1 Q . 1 .,,, ' is .JM f J 1 " , . Y ' 1 ' I 'f E571 . Ti' ,Q Q' in Q r hx t t I I Q ,y 4, ,E 4 1 K A lp SENIORS KA RIN HA NSON Las Angeles, English ROBERT HARDING Bakersfield, History BR UCE HA RGE R Santa Barbara, Botany BA RBA RA HA RPE Long Beach, Anthropology LA RR Y HA RFE Long Beach, History GREGORY HARRAH Upland, Zoology LANA HARRIS Middletown, R. I., Sociology MARY ANNE HARRIS Placentia, English STEPHANIE HARRIS San Ma teo, Sociology CATHERINE HARRISON Whittier, Physical Education GIVEN HARRISON Upland, Sociology KA THLEEN HARRISON San Jose, Sociology The only way to get rid of a temptation is to yield to it. Wilde 4 4 SENICDRS CLA UDIA HA R T Los Gatos, Comb. Soc. Sci. NANCY HARTMANN Media, Pa., Comb. Soc. Sci. LINDA HARTNEY Manhattan Beach, Psychology KA Y HAR TZELL Long Beach, Anthropology GLENN HA TFIELD San Leandro, History JO HA UGE Reedley, Psychology HOWARD HAWKES Lompoc, Histor-y!Art History DONAL D HAWS Santa Barbara, Political Science SUSAN HA YWOOD Burlingame, Geography R U TH HEA R RON San ra Clara, EngIish!History ANDREA HEA TH San Jose, Sociology BROOK HEDGE Fresno, History NORINE HE G Y Walnut Creek, Sociology CAROL YN HEIJN San Gabriel, Home Economics NANCY HEIM Burbank, Physical Education PA UL HE LMAN Colton, Chemical Engineering ROBERT HELWLCK Culver City, Political Science SARA HENCH Canoga Park, French CHRISTIE HENDERSHOT Placen tia, A nth ropology JOHN HENDERSON Redwood City, Environ. Biology ROBERT HENDERSON Rialto, Economics JA COUEL YN HENDREN Sepulveda, Home Economics GRETCHEN HENKEL San ta Paula, English ANN HENR Y Pomona, Anthropology MAR Y HENR Y Hillsborough, Anthropology PAMELA HERBERT Riverside, Home Economics RAND Y HE RBON La Mirada, Political Science NELSON HERLIHY Pleasanton, Zoology NADINE HERRON Ventura, English Rl TA HE YN Van Nuys, History PA TRICIA HICKEY Malibu, Political Science JAMES HICKSON Pomona, History KA THLEEN HIGGINS Buena Park, Anthropology JENNY Hl G UCHI Honolulu, Hawaii, Home Econ. DEBORAH HILL Westlake Village, German ELIZABETH HILLMAN Long Beach, History .IEANETTE HILLMAN Medicine Har, Alberta, Soc. RICK HIL TON San Bernardino, Comb. Soc. Sci. HILARY HINCKLEY Palo Alto, English DONNA HINTZ Carmel, Biology MlMl HINZE Chatsworth, History ROSE HIPSKIND Ventura, Environ. Biology CHA RL ES HI RT Sacramento, Economics KAREN HOAG Sacramento, Comb, Soc. Sci. STEVEN HOCHSCHILD Delano, Poli. Sci. !English CURTIS HODDING Long Beach, Speech SHARON HOERBER Fontana, Physical Education JULIE HOFF Costa Mesa, Art no Lf ar , f 'if L Qu , k. - L , MAL I s 'Q 1 i an 4 v Qui fjvvr.. f - , wr. ,,- if i , r 1 so 3' -- f Q? ij ' , " 3 fn 'I A ,,,. , I E ' TT " ' ' ic-:sf 'mf f 9 i. l N in ' Wu :W N 5 s .5 5 T r A i 49' A ' Q5 i '.f V an ' Lg ' r f 'faix gm I , B f, 'T ' . if . ,V " gg, A A if F, - 'Q .."- . 1 iff' ,, I - . l -' ,I fi" , A f az. V V G'-VTX I 'Q' ci ' Ag x I Q v , ix F. , v , ' 5153? A- ,- Au ' 'X I . - ff" s i 1 'G . .lg X 'Q Q z' , A ff. ,I 'FT I A ,'x-iff' ' 31 .--- : -Y .. - A , 7' H . 4 T' .4 . ' . n- , 1 r E' . gpg,-,.g :-1:5-. .5 - -1.1QP?Pf . kt. ,Pi ,. 4 4-: A... V ,,,gL,,f,4 QQ -',,f, V: f s-LVL '- W N 1 . 'WM w -V - w M55 :N . ra 'TWH B :EE - 3 fs "WF "":.5 75:9 :.:.:.:. E J' ' '- ' '-1 -"""iif' 'fiszd V " 'Q5:!- vw . .fmmz V -:aff L51 J wfw . 1:3 5 , 4.4 1 I. v,,-J: ' -.-if 1 LQ? , nl. ,,,yiknyL,,, V, fr -Hs. A Ai. Y I Q, 1 21,5 A Y- '-M., ffm, 'mv g':'4:l:: '-.e.1L". 'Dj' "ff: . W ii... 1116? , ,-... V p- , 1 ' "-:453??Q?+iLf??Qff:1f -5 nxf A 'NX 1, 5 GI' , - QV fa ,, wx E. 'Q- fa-4 I 'RPL z 1 418 xx R aa wi fa' .,-as And here l stand,' judge, my masters. Shakespeare SUSAN HOUGA RD Y Grand Rapids, Mich., Sociology CYNDEE HOWARD Burbank, History!Art JAMES HOWE San Jose, Anthropology TODD HOWELL Los Angeles, Political Science ANN HOWENSTEIN Glendale, Comb. Soc. Sci. JAMES HUGHELL A tascadero, Political Science LINDA HUYSSEN Redondo Beach, Sociology JO H YNES Ventura, Zoology BEA TRIZ H YP Mexico, Spanish!Biology ROBEHTA IMFELD Glendale, Sociology BARBARA IMHOFF San Jose, French EILEEN IR VINE Vandenberg AFB, Mathematics MARSHA I VE RSON Ventura, Anthropology DAN JA CK SON Westminster, Chem. Engineering LE ROI JACKSON JR. L as A ngeles, H istary REX JACOBS Tujunga, Poli. Sci.!History ROBERT JACOBUS Santa Barbara, French RA VINDER JAlN Bombay, India, Physics KEITH JEFFERS San Diego, Physical Education ROBERT JENSEN Playa del Rey, Mech. Engineering FRANCISCO JIMINEZ Hayward, Mech. Engineering CHRISTIE JOCHUMS Camarillo, Sociology DONALD JOHNSON JR. Santa Barbara, History GEORGE JOHNSON Indio, History JOSEPH JOHNSON Santa Barbara, Political Science LANI JOHNSON Santa Barbara, Biology LA RR Y JOHNSON L ompoc, Anthropology L YNNE JOHNSON Santa Barbara, History MA R VIN JOHNSON Camarillo, Economics MEG JOHNSON Encino, Art History we V r ' im N I 'J'!Ql,' x , x 'rl IF' 1 x- , 1,43 X t 1: L - if 43 an 'Y ,m ,, -, , I, . A 'lX . f'x rr ix -f L-gf M L ' ' .9 w e .N 1 vs , 1 ' rf! 1' A , 1 Q ' I ,L 59.1. ..,1,, ,f ll .. YTD- on un' N .i I ,... . ' lj -' . -. Q W , -' i flint 413' 4: f. ,.. -a ini H Xi NY' 3' K A bf ,qv N . HL, , H W v W .. iv . 4. J , - , .-ft v. v, - V - . , f V v I - D.-J ww , .-:M -f,,' ff, '. f .1 WEE Al .- I 1 if l 'K H 5- IQ, "" L '41 S . . . L nf 'V W i '.:,::,:,:' A ' 'IM-as:-:Q-'ie-,.:1e'E W' ., ' .. . .. :':f:j.gsj5,s5.::::::s "Taf t f Ei52gf::i'Q: I ' , H: A 'Hs ' D' i'6"'2 5: ,. f: 'dv 1 ' it .Wal -"Hi , fc . Y, I T' 55 . at AL Q "M 'S 'sw :L uw V X ei .. W iqg l H I Y Aeoi, .35 ,. "L A , t dbx' ,M I YD -we 1: ot w pt 4 -1 fans, 4 - - I ,? AV ' ,ix V K. i -I ' 1 ' , have - A ' Q f X ew, e. I l V .t- i .. ' -H Ai V . 1 'Ek A - 5 , I ,Q fi' "NA , -V '1. ' . 1' 552 ' ,: .4 A - .. V, - Vat. ii .L - - kfmzr' f- V F 3-'Y W, A g, . 1 . . ' K , j ul L' OP it ' L .' L - t ni it "' - fl -f--,., 3 1 I , L35 ' . Z ,J X r, L ' li H t V H 1 W I V K I-YS, I f 219- -- . V A- a x Q' ' . av I ,. . f g Q, , , X S as K I f jj' oy' y -X - L, "i HQ- -' . P I . My , , e , ' ' . K 'JU X 5. 14, I3 Lf l E, HL we I , 1, L ,Q Q wf,fzz+-f s'if y W.-4' SENIORS VIRGINIA JOHNSON Santa Monica, Political Science JANET JOHNS TON Reno, Nev., Sociology PA ULA JOHNSTON Westchester, Sociology!Psych. BE VERL Y JONAS Novato, Home Economics ELIZABETH JONES Santa Barbara, Anthropology JOHN JONES Santa Barbara, Anthropology KENNETH JONES Temple City, Political Science NANCY L. JONES Santa Barbara, Comb. Soc. Sci. NANCY M. JONES LaMesa, Comb. Soc. Sci. RA ND Y JONES Corona, Elect. Engineering CLA Y KALLAM Lafayette, History GLENN KAMMEN Los Angeles, Political Science RA YMOND KANES Walnut Creek, History PAM KAPLAN Stockton, History AILEEN KASAI Los Angeles. History MARGARET KA TZ San Bernardino, Sociology DEBORAH KA Y Menlo Park, Anthropology ANN K E I TE L Downey, Physical Education DA VID KEITH Burbank, History!EngIish ANN K ELL Y Burbank, English JOHN K ENNED Y San Jose, Mathematics SHIRLEY KENNEDY Chicago, lll., Political Science PATRICIA KERR San ta Barbara, History BRIAN K I DD San Bernardino, Comb. Soc. Sci. PA TRICIA KIM San Francisco, MatI1.!Anthra. JACOUELINE KIMMEL La Canada, History CAROL YN KING Woodside, History!Anthro. ABBE KINGSTON Studio City, Elect. Engineering RONALD KISKIS Whittier, Chemistry NANCY KL EIN Westchester, Sociology JOAN KLEINHENZ Arcadia, Comb. Sac. Sci. JOAN KL EINMAN Van Nuys, Sociology KENDALL KLEVELAND Encinitas, Anthropology GLORIA KNOX Encino, History STEVE KOEHLER Fresno, Cellular Biology MA RIL YN KOENIGS Arcadia, Comb. Soc. Sci. LINDA KOEHNER Pasadena, Sociology LOU K OLL Tustin, Biology DENNIS KORA BIA K Tujunga, Political Science L YNNE K OSS Los Altos, Political Science STEVE KOTTMEIER San Carlos, Economics BETHANN KRAFT San Diego, Comb. Soc. Sci. KA REN K RA K OW Las Angeles, Sociology CLIFFORD KRAMER Pasadena, Elec. Engineering JEFFREY KRECK Huntington Beach, Mech. Eng. THOMAS KRIDER Glendora, Sociology STEPHANIE KROEGER Corona Del Mar, Sociology GA R Y K ROU TH Los Angeles, Chem. !Creative S L 420 SENIGRS SANDRA K UGE Sanger, History JOAN KUNBERGER Coronado, Art History WILLIAM KURTZ Richmonol Political Science ELIZABETH KUZELL San Francisco, History ALENA LA CHMAN San Diego, Sociology DEAN LA CHMAN Oceanside, Philosophy CASSIE LAFFOON El CHIDI7, Political Science E DDY LAINE Heedley, Political Science JOHN LA KE Bakersfield, Mech. Engineering DA VID LAMBERT Carpinteria, Mathematics DANIEL LANCASTER JH. San Jose, Mech. Engineering MICHAEL LANDR Y Glendale, Environ. Biology ELISSA LANE Tacoma, Wash,, Art MARY LA POINTE Canoga Park, Art SHARON LA RISCH Vista, Spanish STE VEN LA UB San ta Barbara, Poli. Sci. THEODOHA LAWRENCE Palos Verdes, Comb. Soc. Sci. WILLIAM LAWRENCE JR. Santa Barbara, Environ. Bio. BARBAHA LAWSON San Diego, Sociology GA H Y LA WSON Pomona, Art LA RR Y LEE Port Hueneme, History JOAN LEHMAN Palo Alto, Spanish KA THLEEN LEMASTER Montclair, English DA VID LENHARDT Buena Park, Political Science L YNN LENHARDT Corona del Mar, English STEVEN LEONARD San Francisco, Zoology KATHLEEN LEONETTI Alhambra, Zoology ERIC LESLIE Covina, Chemistry ROBERT LESSIN Santa Monica, Economics HOK PUI LE UNG Hong Kong, Undeclared MA RGO LE VY San Francisco, Economics L YNNETTE LEWA RTON Bakersfield, History DA VID LEWIS Tustin, Economics DA VID ALAN LEWIS Sunnyvale, Political Science MELANIE LEWIS San Gabriel, Drama ROBERT LEWIS Palo Alto, History DIANE LICCIARDI Northridge, Italian NANCY LIE TZ Arcadia, History JOAN LINDSA Y Manhattan Beach, History LINDA LINDSA Y San Jose, Physical Anthro. CYNTHIA LINDSEY Temple City, History LESLIE LINDSEY Garden Grove, Comb. Soc. Sci. ROBERT LINDSKOG Whittier, Mech. Engineering L YNN LIPANI Los Angeles, Phys. ECL MICHAEL LIPARI Ventura, Biology E. , W, 7'--+--113:19 I fvo , . , K sr' X , -W eg, ax .. r' I A I X 4 I ' gag!! . W".-' W5 El I js, . f S A ' 1 3-1 P ,aw .53 A. if . f "5 AE... C I 'S ' 'KX . ' It tr f , ' - is-o H 'LN M '. ,I s I 'f.' f Q, . fi 'I f,."'x, . A 'LT gg. N -Q 1' A Elf 3 F76 'V J L- 3 I .. 'i" Yq,M 'A ., I' ' A- bc 4 ,'w'E" e i. Y ,YfT"r"T D K Q .N Q an Lag. , W1 ,K W .c 4 it fm r -A il -Ai as ' X' ,N MAN? :QA ' A 'N- I ' - it ' , .. as "' AG ' . -0 li' ' Y' me 1 I , 7 XY .a-1 , my E I X, ' I ,q , gl 'X X, V f F. - tr . 4' . Q. ,, ,,' f f m , - L Q '1 f" U' S .1 ' "- if . ... b .5 4,7 gif B' A. - . I b . ITB ,. -, X :rf In WH I 'Kg- ' I ri, U if Q . I V, H 10:1 I if m ,f"" K ' ' ' 'W' :A xi-pgs' 6 V! Q? . ,f ' . J' 1 4" f. x E I I px. A xt ' l ff it Z 'I 5 I - if ,w ff' f uv .wry . Y , , . I ' if ' -,X i . A fn "if I is A . ' ' Vi" i f ,rv F - W Y , , A 4 ak , t J V ., ' -1, A -51.-mal , . ta- 5-1 L, as -.rat Q., X . ' i"5't' -ea.. O Wgf5w?f9"fi E454-5 ' V ' A H' '. 'M ' W . I , - - - an A Q' 'P A 'Af .Q 5 N -A ff v- 'I-JP O J L A E L rl A u.Q ?'i -.., ' - 5 Vymlitiig, L xx f-7' . Il we at -A '-f' -. it fr- F. 'NF ' .. if " ' ' 5 'Y' 'ff E -5 . to MY' 6-" ' 1. a ' ' 'Q ' ..:k j ., I 'gif ,, E, -'j -' ' mr: , , - ' "" R ' . . Q W4 ' lb., N .. XA , f . I .V Q A - -fr fps. " .J T T5 ' 'wg NM H A tsl SENIQRS WILLIAM LOFFT Greenwich, Conn,, Economics CAROL LOGAN Riverside, Political Science EILEEN LONDON Moraga, Art THEODORE LONG Pasadena, English PA TRICIA L OOMIS Lancaster, Sociology JAMES LOPES Delano, Sociology!Econon1ics KEN LOPEZ Monterey, Sociology CHERYL ANN LOVAN Bakersfield, English RUSSELL LOVE Westchester, Biology BA RBA RA LOYD Seattle, Wash., Comb. Soc. Sci. ROCHELLE L UL OW Encino, English BRUCE L UMBA RD San Mateo, Anthro.fP0li. 5-fi. RICHARD LUSKIN Whittier, Psychology JlM L YNCH Sonoma, History A RTHUR L YONS San Jose, Geography LAURA MACARTHUR Hermosa Beach, History CHR YSSA MAC CUTCHEON Fullerton, Sociology MARY MAC DONALD Selma, History MARLA MAC HALE Citrus Heights, English ROCK MAC KENZIE Santa Barbara, Drama!MiIit. Sci. BARBARA MAC KIRDY La Verne, Physical Education ROBERT MAC LAGAN Lakewood, Political Science BETSY MAC LAREN San Marino, History TED MACY Saratoga, Elec. Engineering INGRID MA GNUSON Whittier, English PA ULA MA LAN Brawley, Home Economics GAIL MANDA VILLE Garden Grove, Political Science RICHARD MANDEL Sherman Oaks, Relig. Studies JEANETTE MANDELLA Paso Robles, Environ. Bio. BARBARA JO MANN La Habra, Sociology N A b0y's will is the wind's will, and the thoughts of youth are long, long thoughts. Longfellow SENICDRS JOANNE MARGARIT Burbank, Mathematics CHARLES MA RKHAM Los Angeles, Anthropology BOB MA RSHA L L Northridge, Political Science SUSAN MARSHALL Redwood City, History JIM MARTE NE Y Long Beach, Economics ,DONNA MA RTIN San Jose, History JA CQUEL INE MA R TIN Greenfieloj History L OIS MA R TIN Claremon t, Spch. !Hearing!His t. RACHEL MARTIN Abington, Pa., History SONIA MA RTINEZ Santiago, Chile, Poli. Sci. ROBERT MASI K Palo Alto, Political Science JUDITH MA TALAS Alarno, Political Science JAMES MA TTHEWS Rosemead, Anthropology LOIS MA TTHEWS Long Beach, Comb. Soc. Sci. JOYCE MA TTOS Fresno, Political Science WE LDON MA TTOS JR. Los Banos, Political Science SANDOR MA YUGA Long Beach, Political Science JAMES McALENEY JR. Los Altos, History SEONAID McARTHUR La Jolla, FrenchfArt History JILL McCAFI-'ERY Orinda, History CATHERINE MCCALL Fountain Valley, History JOHN MCCANDL ESS Tustin, Zoology GREGORY McCLAlN Downey, Political Science JOYCE MCCLIESH Mountain View, History KA THL EEN MCCORMICK New Canaan, Conn., Zoology JACK McCOWAN Menlo Park, History JOSEPH McCUTCHAN Encino, Mechanical Engineering GREGORY McDOUGALL Palo Alto, History RICHARD MCEACHEN Whittier, Economics BABETTE MCELDEHRY Santa Maria, Matherna tics JOHN McGEE Corning, Economics RICK McGOUGH Brea, History JEANNE McKA Y San ta Barbara, Art History MARGARET McKEOWN Glendora, Sociology MARK McKINLEY Gale ta, Physical Education ROBERT McLEAN Vista, Political Science KALL Y MCMURRA Y Woodland Hills, Sociology MAR YANNE McNEEL Y Canoga Park, Asian St.!Art Hisr. JOHN McPEA K Berkeley, Elec. Engineering S UNNE McPEA K Livingston, International Med. CA ROL McPHA IL San Juan Capistrano, Phy. Edu. JANICE MCOUADE Garden Grove, Phys. Ed. SUSAN MEACHAM Morro Bay, History CAROL MEAD Pasadena, French ADRIENNE MEDALIE Arcadia, SocioIogy!Hi.vtory JOHN MEIERS San Diego, Physical Education L YNN MENEFEE San ta Barbara, Soc.!French DONNA MERLINO San Jose, History - 'v Tb.-7' K V A I - 1 1 N A os -. is K4 A 5 ,"" xg. .7 'Q fi , ' s... l' 4 V' J? "CFP" ' ir.,..,,t. , .-gk 'K' 'if - if' .' 9 'X stTf'TS-K ' ' X kk ' I J 5. ti, fx, ea, T?:r -ff H-f::'U1t ,. 1 X A , it Qi' --xr' ' 'Z -1 Q-ai . "ru ss u 4. ..1' 6' ' L it N an ' .f. I w i 1-' had w-of .T 'sv' ,RT .Q "lf ' I ,.. 1' IFLNI ,. , 1' '5 w. . A .,. Y . ' 1 , x vie J a ' L A In order to have a well-balanced perspective, the person who has a dog to worship him should also have a cat to ignore him. Anonymous ,-.,. i K 1 .-Q ir? 1. LA If-.6 ' ' D . if f . ef , in ie , Q.. lil 'lil' 22' 2 gm , ,,., , is 1 as-. ,gk ,S A ll.-L I tit' .1 2- f 2 3 we 4:5 f JU' 7. -nv V 5-49 "va:-.p-'W ZR 41 WJ .su 40. hx it i . L I .J A .,..4.. .II 2'-E i f LINDA MERHICK Canoga Park, English!Russian JAMES MERRIMAN Mission Viejo, History MA R Y ME RSH ON Louisville, Ky., Sociology LESLIE MESSENGER Newport Bch., Poli Sci.!Hist. TIMOTHY METCALF West Covina, Poli. Sci, XZ oo. AL EXANDRA MEYER Redwood City, English CYNDE MEYER Fremont, Rhetoric!Pub. Ad. JOAN MEYER Oxnard, Geology FRANKL YN MICHAELSON Anaheim, Political Science BRUCE MICHEEL Jacksonville, Fla., Marine Bio. PAMELA MICHELS Los Angeles, History NANCY MIDDLETON EI Monte, Zoology STEPHEN MILAM Los Angeles, Economics NANCY MILBRANDT Fountain Valley, French JEAN MILLENAA R San Diego, Home Economics DENNIS MILLER Hillsborough, Political Science GEORGE MILLER Lansing, Mich., Math.fEcon. LUCINDA MILLER Los Altos, History NORMA MILLER Tustin, Home Economics SUSAN MILLER Rota, Spain, German DEBORAH MITCHELL Sunland, Comb. Soc. Sci. LESLIE MITCHELL Taft, Art History SUSAN MITCHELL Maryland, SociolagyfHistory LELAND MLEJNEK JR. San Francisco, Zoology 4 ff' ,g f Q, '--f x 34: fini .1 ' . I 1 ,. ' 1 4 152' ,F 5,.M,..1:,, F 12 -r . 'a+ Q. " -,.g:.ze. 1, ,lx-1-.3 W A -:Q -Q:-f' ,5- .5-j 37? ,rf ,J H 8"-L X , ,. nga 4 5: 'S NL if , XA A WK N -4-5 J L' , lv gif? W Q J 1 x .AK . w '4 lr ,, w L., -4' :.x'HA 5355573 "':5551.3,.,'n-.. s.J.nJ, . ' '-A '07 fff: is JZ' "WW:--511, pq 55.5, :Pj yfg,'.gvf :pmgeyg ' ' VZ-hisT7i,17'5f5i4'5SfA':i''-1+-, A ,g' ,i'lf"2T? Q11-.ix-QR P12 ' 9 jf.-.W5:?e,:" .f'LW.,44",:f.1yE'1'fi FTP'- " -. 7 -'-fy.: F . .. 2:4 f':T12!axsQ,,i'.v,' . .A 3- -' 'PL- ,.-S' -all 's -u'ff:2E:ff'fgvf1f 1 'F'-:-1"'W f QA g, .xv -ex A -- -Qwififap ,fmgimw,':,ffw ' T W . '-fs. Merffi fx Y H-L :ff wan. fgqsf,-' vzsa-fm' 2 qgiiegil-+ 1 ,1 ' ,Q x,?:"f1,- 5' ,gag . -' 'r - ,' s-.ffm 'f " . ' 7, 4' . F .1 W gf 4 fx .xl N - dw 415- -J n.V V Hz- AW V 4 Men: , vga . . T 5 u 'G' f f , , I if . "5 XV. 'j'zg'x 4 I I fc, Q' -J ' W E, ,g g vi., . 1' s PK? ,Q g .,- 'feb fi I R 3 , ts fl it I ' pf' .pf it , 3 gr K A , -'av 'n --Q 5 4? K 'H if 5555? Nw E -t 'W 1- J HI, 'K A Qs .Q-K Y ft 'De Args I-.r H ff , '61 X an lf'-v - 'ET V J A QL' g , s "' m r 1 A Q X , a , ,- x E iw, . -I 5.43 gy ,Q . Y 'ec i '13, L 'S xx B11 oN Nl' 'mi --I1 u. W 'T I.-"'C +- 1-4 I if?" Q , W ite 'Q it . M , 1 ? . ' A T' 2 15313 at -I i . 'T " y , an we E io' 2 V 'X E E X ., , f' ' -1: is ix 'QW-" " J ' X ' 3 I 'I if ,ri Y "V 1 V ,- 'lx . Tk" I I, -9 ' X Q '. if i ,t 'tif A - if J f' X, In 5 H ' ff ., ' 8' V, , . . , EN A. 6 I Ki . ,I , 1 Q55 -L J A -,,, . X -x 1 I SENICDRS MA R Y MOLI TOR La Jolla, Sociology NANCY MOOD Y Palo Alto, SpeechXHearing DA VID MOORE Claremont, Anthropology KEVIN MORAN Saratoga, Economics LINDA MORGAN Malibu, Sociology RITA MORGAN Upland, English RUTH MORGAN Upland, Social Sciences THOMAS MORLAN Santa Barbara, Poli. Sci. JOHN MOR REAL E Eagle Rock, Anthropology JOHN MORRISROE Santa Maria, History VI VIAN MORSE Novato, Anthropology L YNNE MOR TON San Diego, Art History MAGGIE MOSGROVE Fresno, Physical Education MARK MOSKO Long Beach, Anthropology EDWARD MOSS Torrance, Political Science DEBORAH MOUNT Santa Monica, Hispanic Civ. SUNNY MOWBRA Y Ojai, Biology KA THRYN MUCKLEY Oxnard, Comb. Soc. Sci. MICHAEL MUCKLEY West Covina, History CAROL YNN MUELLER Arcadia, Sociology JIM MUL LA LL Y Sacramento, Political Science DENISE MULLE Arcadia, Comb. Sac. Sci. GA YLE MUL VE Y San Carlos, Phys. Ed. RA YMOND MUNGER Delano, Mech. Engineering RICHARD MUNGER Livermore, Zoology DENNIS MURPHY Arcadia, Economics MICHAEL MURRA Y Sacramen to, Political Science ALICE MYERS Bakersfield, Political Science .IUDI TH NA IMO Los Angeles, Psychology SCOTT NA GEL Las Angeles, History RALPH NAIR Santa Barbara, Elec. Eng. JANET NAKAGAWA Los Angeles, Sociology MARIL YNN NA KANO Guadalupe, Mathematics TONI NANINI Lake Forrest, Ill, English GERALD NE E CE Rolling Hills, Psych.!Soc. DOROTHY NEILSON Gilroy, English!History BR YAN NELSON Sherman Oaks, Sociology GERALD NELSON Downey, Electrical Engineering HEL ENE NE U Torrance, French TINA NEW Canoga Park, Sociology JUDITH NEWCOMB Dallas, Tex., Speech!Hearing WILLIAM NEWELL Rolling Hills, Religious Studies CHARLES NEWMAN Los Angeles, Political Science JULIANA NEWMAN Atherton, Art History NANCY NEWSHAM Alexandria, Va., Poli. Sci. ROBE R T NEWTON Arcadia, Sociology JANE NIBL E Y Los Angeles, Anthropology JOHN NG Hong Kong, Economics 42 426 I am waiting for the discovery ofa new symbolic western frontier and I am waiting for the American Eagle to really spread its wings and straighten up and fly right. Ferlinghetti RICHA RD NICOLL Redwood City, Psychology JON NORMAN Orange, Cellular Biology JAMIE NORTH Rialto, Sociology VICTORIA NUGENT Sou th Pasadena, French CAHOLE O'BRlEN San Mateo, Art History EILEEN O'BRIEN Sunnyvale, Sociology JUDITH O'DELL Visalia, Music KRISTINE OLSEN Bakersfield Sociology CRAIG OLSON Los Angeles, Elec. Engineering EDWARD OLSON Visalia, Political Science RALPH OLSON San Pedro, Pali tical Science KA TH Y ONO YE Los Angeles, Asian Studies f . fm ' 3 ik .6 4 A ' I' Qlsiin. 1 ,, , lf' ly ,-es... . A, 2 'H . a-' s iii ' f ,fa J Q I' 3 4' I., Q. ' . -I I 'QA -1 X .E- fa 'f '. 'ti i r-I t ::-, 1 4-1- 17' ,VXA Q...-n' f w- '-'J I " -N. I-.fxi U ,..-1 0 ? Y' F' pdl! F f'4' " J 'Z' ID q w QP ,......,, - .W , A W 1 0 w+v .L Ju. f an Ga' N ., '-I V ,funnel rm T 4.16 . . rar, , f . fvyya m f I 'Tl 'o M ' ,Q , f. A 74 9' . X . K 5 r 'O X , . I f 'I t"'1P' t H' 'g1q- ,YQ7 f sara +, .A ' ...Q E., -A Eqyzii., rf L an is Lll L l r, . 1 Yr I M I 'O' -ff D -av' " , I fr'-v ' . ark, - ' . ,,f-gg H 1 ' ,Q ' ' u. 4 H L 4' Y Q ', Y 'Q '. ft "' , H g Rr: , ., I. . A I H L4 ' " ' L, f 'TYAE K Y 2, r-5 4 E, 'K get ' ll' I. : ' JL II fin i H., 9' , , 1 " 'J' ,,, V v JNN, f'-. f , .3 . xjfgr f E xi l N , V :z - :cj ' K fx am f NT' ' ESQ. --Q. I lp rr, Fgij N" 1 ag f F ,- , as f-as 39' ' eq -.1 ki '14 K-4 -..ap eh . EN A ,-. iv, 03" -949' ' ff 22 ,xii W: qua. I ', an 4 -lv -1 5 'huh' 7 5 "' .lr ""' fe f H'- H. Y ,. Q s. . Vai, I tt asf? I A' A 2 'fff i L . -, s '4 ' Q SENIQRS OWEN ONSUM San ta Barbara, Economics ROBE R T ORR La Jolla, Zoology LINDA OSBORN San ta Barbara, Spanish LEONARD OSBORNE San ta Barbara, Rhet.!Pub. Ad. PA TRICIA OWEN Long Beach, Speech!Hearing ROBERT OWEN Pasadena, Elec. Engineering JOA N OX F OR D Pacific Palisades, Art History LA RR Y PAA S K E A tascadero, History ESTELLE PABIS Ontario, English DIANE PA GE Bakersfield, Music RALPH PA l G E Newport Beach, Poli. Sci. NA NC Y PA L MER San Bernardino, Sociology CHRIS PAPAS Stockton, Political Science HOWA RD PARKER Goleta, History PHIL PARKINSON Durango, Colo., Philosophy WEND Y PA R TCH Berkeley, Sociology ALAN PA TERSON Hughson, History SUSAN PA TERSON Covina, French GAR Y PA TTERSON West Covina, Psychology WILLIAM PAXSON JR. Whittier, Economics L YNDA PEARSON Fullerton, Comb. Soc. Sci. WENDY PEDL OW Glendale, History JOYCE PENNER Fresno, Mathematics CLAIRE PERA Redondo Beach, Sociology SUSAN PEREGOY Madera, Spanish CA RL PERELL I-MINETTI Petaluma, Historv PA ULA PERHAM Newport Beach, Sociology TOM PERHAM Newport Beach, Asian Studies ANNE PERR Y Van Nuys, Anthropology CANDACE PERR Y Rancho Sante Fe, Comb, Soc. Sci. EDWA HD PE RR Y Redlands, Economics ANN PE TE RSEN San ta Barbara, History WESL EY PETERSEN Whittier, English JAMES PE TH Inglewood, Religious Studies JOHN PE TH Inglewood, Economics LA VON PE VE Y Tulare, Speech!Hearing JUDY PFL E GER Los Altos, Spanish HOWARD PHELAN San Carlos, History RALPH PHILLIPS Redlands, Political Science ROBERT PHILLIPS Redwood City, Psychology SALL Y PHILLIPS Santa Ynez, English BERNIE PIKE Ventura, Anthropology JOHN PINE DA Santa Paula, Art TERRENCE PLETTE San Jose, Economics CYNTHIA POINDEXTER San Dimas, History SUE POPIK Redwood City, English PETER POPO V Montclair, History BA RR Y POSNE R Claremont, Political Science 428 SENICDRS PAMELA POULSEN Richmond, French DERYL FRA TT Portola Valley, History JANE T PRA TT Bakersfield Sociology JOSEPH PRA TT Oxnard, Mathematics ROBERT PRESLEY Ukiah, Economics Y VONNE PREWETT Brentwood Sociology RICHA RD PRIESTA F Santa Barbara, Comb, Soc. Sci. ALLISON PRI VETT Fullerton, English JEFF PROBS T Van Nuys, Sociology EARLEEN PRUITT Lancaster, Economics JOYCE PUCCINI Sunland, History LILLI PUEN TE Huntington Beach, Fr.!Span. ART OUADRACCIA La Puente, Economics PAM OUESENBERRY Visalia, Speec-h!Hearing SANDRA OUETNICK Hillsborough, Comb. Soc. Sci. EDWARD QUICK Fullerton, Art History VIDDA OUON Los Angeles, Sociology RICHARD RABBIN Anaheim, Sociology JANE T READ Camarillo, Sociology GA R Y REED Santa Maria, Mathematics MICHAEL REED Long Beach, Mech. Engineering DIANE REES Modesto, Sociology RON REESE Long Beach, Span. fHispanic Civ, WAL TER REHM Santa Barbara, History CAROL YN REID San Rafael, History RON RE INER Oakland, Political Science ANN REINHOLD Whittier, Psychology JOHN RE THORST Pasadena, Psychology THOMAS REYNOLDS Atwater, Economics .IANICE RHODES El Centro, Art SANDY RHONE Salinas, S0c.!Religious Studies STEPHEN RHORER Long Beach, Zoology ROBERT RICCI A naheim, Economics PATRICIA RICE Santa Maria, Political Science LAURA RICH Newport Beach, English KA TIE RICHMOND Palo Alto, Hist,!Asian Studies SUSAN RICKMAN Santa Rosa, Art CATHERINE RIEKENBERG Anaheim, Sociology CANDACE RIEKER Saratoga, Comb. Soc. Sci, L YNN RIGNE Y Alamo, Political Science RA YMOND ROAN Mill Valley, Math.!Creal. Stu. JAN ROBERTS Claremont, French PA TRICIA ROBER TS Pasadena, A rt INGRID ROBINSON Bellevue, Wash., Sociology KENNETH ROBISON La Jolla, Psychology WA YNE RODGERS Arcadia, Geography KA Tl-ILEEN RODRIGUEZ Anaheim, Cellular Biology CA THERINE ROESL ER Santa Barbara, English , , .far K ati.. " , ..-'jxs if V ...J L X 'K 5 lyk , I V3 'H "h' E t, vc N i r' . ,- .4 331 , ff' 1? ,""",. .e --J - 3. SKS: if I 'N W 11 1 v 'w I L -cm PQ. mat 1 A -,TAF .ii 2 -3- A KL A . .. ' W ns , if fl ' ft .V fm G , E , I .tg - - sf , 1 'ar V , -g' 4 ably' ' ' 4 5 N ' "" " ,,,. ' f ' . xr I I ..' E I ' X X v 3 A . N ,. 3, 74 I F . ff" H A if ,"' 5 V A v 1 val ' ' 1 .... I K Q ' ff H -' . '- ' X, 3 . .7 it ' i an ,, :-' 2 ' x li A ,.,f-1 - - 1 f ,Q "3 X '1, A+ ,, T w R b ' Y, A S L.: 9 A A I IE f ' ' if 5 4 it fx V' 1 Q also Q "F iv? I A g ffl 7 4 Y , ,-'FAQ V - " v "' 'A RW Ol 'i i' 1 - V - " tb -0 ,X tsyt 4 N! ,l, SW .,,, . . M is a I I -6' fgm as 'R ' 'gs' , fl: -4- ' 'ir r--I' ' , .K I, 1 i 3 X lj il A V, lr ' a - 1 . 'ZH 3 0' SENIQRS ALLAN ROFER Pacific Beach, Mathematics ROBERTA ROHLF Las Angeles, Psychology BOB ROMANISK Y Twin Falls, ldaha, Drama ELAINE RONE Y Ridgecrest, English JUDY ROOKSTOOL Sunnyvale, Sociology WILLIAM R008 Long Beach, Econ.!Poli. Sci. GEORGE ROOTH San Pedro, Economics MYRA ROSELINSKY Mon tebella, A n rhrapology ANNA ROSS Los Allos, French PAMELA ROSS Sunnyvale, Home Economics TOBY ROSS S fDCk!UI1, Geography RONALD ROUSE Las Angeles, Political Science Why go anywhere? Aren't we already here? Mind moves. ltis hot. Take off your clothes, skin, bones. Take off through universe freely. Reps 4 4 P x l J!" . -1 if? - :f- rl K . .3 I 51 , I 1, 11 , ,-,,,a, if , 'L X S A Q AQ ' Sl . -1 QQ y A 1 fs -r JW if? Ik , I it I' ILFLQ --4,3 " I, 195. f 'wa , , 5 W. , . L 4' of . . ,' I T - T x-Q , '-:5 ' ' ' , Q M, , an-I , ,- , -A V ' . A' YK. ' at r- -: I L 1 ln-Q. ' . '. f-X ' QQMPJIA ,Y JJ :V 9 A r ei' xi' - is ' f T3 2- 'U s - I - .1 L,,. may A1a',. I , ,, , .. A ,,-.-: .ft , w-,et A 7 f f wiz. , : '-as X 1 1, 7 X f ,Q Wx 1 if K' ,if Q 1 was ani 1, W W s I fs E 1 X ze, I. 1 Z 1 J F R - Q wiv Q... - 4 H5 ra of . 'if-sa r". 'Civ' A V 1 I r 'Sr ,. w, KW ' , .2 ' I 9' , li . I 2. -1 Rb , if ,. ' ---V 22 2 -:as wv1iifsww'f ' -fi F' Y --M, ,.WN. , , . 'gm H , A the E+.. .I SENICDRS SHARON R YDBOM San Marino, History CYNTHIA SA GE Bellevue, Wash., Sociology DA VID SAL E El Cerrito, Poli. Sci.!Sociology ANN SANDERS San ta Barbara, Physics NORMAN SANESI Mission Hills, Mech. Engineering DAN SANTANTONIO Sacramento, Biology GREG SAROUIS Modesto, Anthropology PA TRI CIA SA UNDERS Washington D,C., Psychology STEPHEN SA UNDERS Whittier, Zoology NANCY SCAGLIOTTI Hollister, Speech!Hearing DA VID SCANLIN Los Altos, Economics CHRISTINE SCHAFFNER Holrville, Physical Ed.!Ergo. LINDA SCHALLICH Mountain View, Dramatic Arts ALAN SCHA RLA CH Lafayette, Political Science SALL Y SCHE CK La Canada, French DA VID SCHETTER Carmel, Economics SUSAN SCHMICKRA TH Long Beach, Spanish JA COUELINE SCHMIDT Sepulveda, Sociology KA THR YN SCHNEIDER Inglewood, History PAMELA SCHOFF Arcadia, Relig. Studies!Anthro. LEO SCHOUEST Los Angeles, Zoology BRETSCHREIBER Malibu, Economics ALAN SCHROEDER Santa Barbara, Psychology MA RIL YN SCHUL TZ San ta Barbara, Spanish MICHAEL SCHUL TZ El Centro, Economics LINDA SCHULZE Atherton, History SUSAN SCHUMANN Palos Verdes, Comb. Soc. Sci. ROBERT SCO77' Whittier, History CHAR YN SCRIVNER Atascadero, Zoology NELL SCROGGINS Grand Prarie, Tx., Psych. fSoc. THOMAS SCULLION San Francisco, History FRANKLIN SEGAL Los Angeles, Biology JOHN SEIDELL Albany, Mathematics RONELL SEVLAND Woodland Hills, Phys. Ed. MICHAEL SHANLEY Sunnyvale, Economics KAREN SHEA San Jose, Comb. Sac. Sci. WILLIAM SHEA Danville, Political Science .IONA THON SHEH Beverly Hills, Cellular Biology MIMI SHERIDAN , Manhattan Bch., Poli. Sci. !Hist. .IUDITH SHERMAN Encino, Sociology MICHAEL SHERMAN San Francisco, Poli. Sci. PETER SHERMAN Los Angeles, Political Science SUSAN SHIEL DS Vista, Sociology DA VID SHILLING Torrance, Political Science GRA CE SHIMABUKU Oxnard, History DONALD SHIMASA KI Bethesda, Md, Mathematics THOMAS SHOJI Honolulu, Hawaii, Physical Ed KENNETH SHOOR Los Angeles, Zoology 4 4 SENICDRS EDWARD SHULER Granada Hills, Elec. Engineering GILBERTSIEGERT Santa Barbara, Zoology KATHLEEN SIL VA Covina, Comb. Soc. Sci. WARREN SIL VERBERG North Hollywood, Anthro. LARRY SIL VETT Whittier, History KIM SIMK INS Goleta, History MICHAEL SIMKINS Manhattan Beach, Poli. Sci. TERRY SIMMERMAN Oxnard Political Science BOB SIMMONS Los Angeles, Poli. Sci. !Econ. L UCILLE SIMONS La Jolla, Comb. Soc. Sci. SUSAN SIMONS Long Beach, Comb, Soc. Sci. LINDA SIMONSON Ventura, Psychology RICHARD SINCLAIR Hughson, Sociology PA UL SK EELS Santa Monica, Economics LINDA SKIDMORE Fullerton, History ROBERTSKILLING Orinda, History MARIL YN SLA YBA UGH Ashtabula, Ohio, Poll. Sci. STE VE SLEEPER Walnut Creek, History ANN SMITH Northridge, Comb. Soc. Sci. CA THERINE SMI TH Huntington Beach, Psychology CIND Y SMITH Sacramento, Psychology CRAIG DELLARD SMITH Napa, E lectricial Engineering CRAIG TIMOTHY SMITH Los Altos, Geography ELIZABETH SMITH Saratoga, Spanish GA R Y SMI TH Whittier, Mathematics JANE T SMI TH Saratoga, History JEFFREY SMITH Bakersfield, Geog.!Geology L E WIS SMI TH Bakersfield, Physics LINDA SMI TH Brentwood Political Science SHA RON SMI TH Falls Church, Va., Psychology SHERRI SMITH Walnut Creek, Speech!Hearing ROBERTSNASHALL JR. Lafayette, Political Science DEBORAH SNA VEL Y Los Altos, Comb. Soc. Sci. JOHN SN YDER Delano, Chemistry RONALD SOFEN Granada Hills, Economics ANGELA SOL! Santa Monica, History ELLERY SORKIN San Bernardino, History FRANCINE SPEERS La Canada, Sociology NANCY SPICKLER Los Gatos, Sociology WILLIAM SPITA Corte Madera, Elec Engineering GREGORY SPRAGUE Los Angeles, Geography PA TRICIA STAMPLEY San Marino, History SHARON STANFORD San Gabriel, Sociology DEBORAH STANTON Fresno, Sociology JEAN STANTON Santa Barbara, Sociology KAREN STANTON Buena Park, History CHE R YL STARR Vista, Comb. Soc. Sci. KAREN STEIN Modesto, Dramatic Arts , ul -.I A ' 1 r 5 TL ,DC 3 1 Y 'M' 5 1' 1 fp V L rv I X. ' 'Y 'if .f- 'V A A :EZ4 l I fl A' Q - ,e T1 1 ' 'F' ,, " "' . -QEI 5 Tl? ,vin . rg.-. - .QW , I ,Q 'Q' , - vga, h ' 1 ' ,. I '.. if ,J f . , 'P 'L' 1' " -w ,, - , . , ., "':', 'T' t -17 W' " 7 bf", .w f ' ' H . I . f S- . ' V ,Q ll XL Ai 4 1 s E' Q ff. N. ... ,.. . fax A .' 'D' - iy - -.. - Sd Y-'nv ' I ' -5- v--is . '-, l '- Vi ff' ' r ' - . 582 Q -Q 9 W ' ' , ' 'K ' ' ' Qt R " I :L. - R Q ' -I , 1 ., ,' -,- x 'M V -A X-- X. 'V 1 -1- CES I"--1 yjg AX H K , X , ,gg I , If J N ,L wi 3 d' , '3 , , I fr. ,, xy K1 E' T 1 A 7: :ii ' ,w I ,X W A V A - w a J 1' ff"' A' f . . , - '- , ff- Q: ,erlxf xx 4' I, 'y , . If A .vii HQ' , . Q 4 vb N s-:, --"f 171' 4' .1 4 I .i fr-' v MQW' ' ,U 1: - . : ' Af .Q N . 1. 1 ' i. gap, -- ur ' 'lu my-V. .- wwf - ,-Q1 ' ', ,V 'r LX' .1 'fl 5 I E. ff M H' Q f ' - ,af WEBER k w1.g,,.L.,:., ,' ,'uMfj:3l." UL' 1,n: . A r 1 ,Q xi X' A ,,. I 4 -,. . 5: ' 4? .ff 434 SENIORS WILLIAM STOUT Taft, Psychology!8ociology RONALD STRAM Crestline, Economics DENNIS STRONG Visalia, Political Science KA THR YN STULLA Tarzana, Hispanic Civilization MA RG 0 S TURM Norwalk, English WESLEY SUGINO Oxnard, Biology ROBERTA SULLIVAN Ventura, Art ELAINE SUMROW San ta Ana, Comb. Soc. Sci. GEORGE SWAN San ta Barbara, Psychology DA VID SWANN Santa Barbara, Physics SANDRA SWANSON Burlingame, Comb. Soc. Sci. FRANK SWEENEY Ill San Diego, History VERONICA SWEENEY Van Nuys, History MARTHA SWICKARD Los Alamos, N.M., Biology STEPHEN TABER San Mateo, Urban Studies JEAN TAKAGAKI Pasadena, Art History MARK TALBOT Lompoc, Elec. Engineering DEBBIE TALMAGE Newport Beach, Comb. Soc. Sci. DE BB Y TA NA KA Modesto, Comb. Soc. Sci. JANICE TANKERSLEY Manhasser, N. Y., Poli. Sci SUSAN TARBETT Berkeley, Speech!Hearing RALPH TASSINA Rl Ven tura, Psychology ANI TA TA YL OR Long Beach, History GAIL TEIXEIRA Nipomo, Dance JOE TTA TENISON Lemon Grove, English KAREN TERRY Tahoe City, Hist.!AnthropoIogy JOYCE THEIOS San Bernardino, Psychology ARTHUR THIELEN Los Angeles, Economics THOMAS THOMAIDES JR. Chesterfield, Mo., Ph ysics!Econ. DONNA THOMAS Burbank, Physical Education GEORGIA THOMAS Dublin, History RICHARD THOMAS Lafayette, Russian Studies WILLIAM THOMAS Riverside, History!PoIi. Sci. HAROLD THOMPSON Rena, Nev., Political Science JAN THOMPSON Salinas, Economics SHEL THOMPSON Modesto, History!Poli. Sci. STEPHAN THOMPSON Glendale, History GAYLE TIBBETTS San Jose, Anthropology ELLEN TIGER L os Angeles, Ma thema tics MARY-KA YE TILLMAN Arcadia, History CRAIG TIMS South Gate, History NANCY TODD Chatsworth, History CAROLE TONOFF Vista, English TAD TOOMA Y Ontario, English MA RJORIE TOW Fair Oaks, Political Science CHRISTINE TOWNE Long Beach, Anthropology TIMOTHY TRA VERS Santa Monica, Political Science BA RBA RA TRENS Concord, History!Speech an fi Mui 1 B' 4 I J if X ,.. .,,, .,.,, ,,, . H L if , I l I s P . " r. X 1- an i 1 X. . .. i A -.L 1 z 4 r te . Q. .,, ' Nm-,Q , as nate-1 .,. .,N....., H , ,QW ' v 5 V l Xi 4 1v i I , if ff' r, w it i fi esta .,..: , fa 'Q wigs-ai M . . I K, f N Q gif' ' Q-03-, . " 1 ju-im V ' . - ' 'f' ,, - R ,- , 1 - K: " '- .X : ' X- , ' . 1 H- .,.,. .... . - Y .-G 4'--1 1 . . ,Lg , f:':Hff"'t' 'sn ,, 1: -K --vw .A v A MUG. Mt:-I 'U '- 4 . 4 - 1?-F ' VW rv . ii i ,sa-r a. ii . . .. , 'E .ff ,V Y' 52,1 I .P K 1. 1 F xi: lg.: .: -0 I 4 I Qi,-Y' . . Q R ,N , .N ' ,L 5 -Five" i , HL ' af. s f -A . 5' 'Clin' R" A I 4 ' ,X 1.5, H., 4' " 4' 71 ,- wt' me-3 ,fe ,.,-v A -P .', --'f um? . .X hs- ' VE' y i 0- A N V '6- 'Y 'SD' 4 . , I-. -nr , . SENICDRS -Q A yn . .6 ,C ,-.5 , . 4- t ef : 'D' , pm up-1 is-Ie' if . -A , l F fm X " QQ ef -lg' w-4, M -4 s-,, ,QL-,Viva SUZANNE THICKETT San Mateo, History CAROL TROWBRIDGE Gardena, German ANDREA TRUM Oak Harbor, Wash., History CHRISTINE TURNER San Mateo, Speech!Hearing PAMELA TURNIPSEED Anaheim, Economics ARLENE TUROUEZA Monterey, Pali tical Science PAMELA TURVER Lafayette, Comb. Sac. Sci. DA VID TUTTLE Headley, History KA THY TUTTLE Van Nuys, Art DOUG TWINING Wascn, Mech. Engineering .IOANNE UEHA RA Santa Monica, Comb. Soc, Sci. CAROL ULE Rolling Hills, Nutrition Clay is moulded into a vessel, but the empty space is the useful part. S0 we see that the existence and use of things has its basis in nonexistence. Roshi no Shir Kenkyu 435 Nowhere 's a big pocket To put little Pieces of nice things that Have never really happened. Pa tchen GA YL E UO TA Visalia, History ROBERT UPHOFF Porterville, Comb. Soc. Sci. ALEX IS UPTON L os A ngeles, French DOUGLAS URBAN Manhattan Beach, Zoology RICHARD VALENCIA Santa Barbara, Psychology CLAIRE VAN DAM Los Angeles, Poli. Sci. !Hist. MARIL YNN VAN DAM L os A ngeles, German !History JO ANN VANDER MOLEN Corona, English BRIAN VANDER VOET Whittier, Economics CHRISTINE VAN GIESON Woodlands Hills, Art History EDWARD VANIMAN Pasadena, Mech. Engineering SON YA VAREA Salinas, Frenchlspanish 'Q' ai -. -Q ,'. -IG. V-. '?je,,.v Q f Quo. '-9' 'iz' , Q flaw , t ,. 4 'f 4-" . 'li " v ., .4 t A 1 iq Qs E. . 2- I fu-f '---' 'Vi-rn liar' -J' fi NJ a ..5:i 5 7 K 4 X ' .J -nv - 1--, , 13 R z' ng eff? 1 W9 "hh , QW, Wi., v -an -. tfxs? - 4: an. Q- fm. g, as ct " 1 ,gf I LQ" -6 1: Y - 'J N K '4 -Q ' v-TT? M 'g r I wk 1' . x' ,f X f. t - . . aiu A X 15" ' ti A ,X A x Ut-pk '--f , ,. .5 . A U . A o, fw- We-asv ,Q '. ix ,Biff x Wm Q . 1 R . . 3-U J -v' .Qs , at t s of n ,, "' . ,V , . 21 XJ 1 fs- A iv ,A --er c 'Y:v' SENIQRS NELL VA RNUM Burbank, SpeechiHearing KA THA RINE VA UGHAN Los Gatos, Botany JAMES VEGHER San Pedro, Political Science JAN VELA El Cerrito, Speech!Hearing BRIAN VEL THOEN Modesto, Political Science ROGER VENNES Downey, History SANDRA VERHULST Norwalk, History ALICE VERNON San Bernardino, Anthropology LARRY VIL VEN Pasadena, History DA VID VINCENT Tujunga, Economics JANET VINING Goleta, History KENT VINING Goleta, History FRED VOSS Lynwood Chemistry STEVE VUILLEUMIER Las Angeles, Economics CHRISTINE WADA Hilo, Hawaii, History KENDALL WAGNER Van Nuys, Zoology DANNY WAL K E R Los Angeles, History MARTHA WALKER San Diego, Anthropology PA M WA L K E R Laguna Beach, Sociology WILLIAM WALKER Cherry Hill, N..I., Poli. Sci. JOHN WALLA Covina, Economic.-:iArt ANITA WALLACE Los Angeles, History FRANCES WALLACE Laguna Beach, Phys. Ed JO YCE WALLA CE Chatsworth, A n thropology SHARON WALLIS Bakersfield, Economics PAM WALSH Ontario, Socioiogv VERA MAE WALSH Buena Park, History GENE WALTON Albuquerque, N.M., Econ. NANCY WAL TON Menlo Park, Sociology JOSEPH WAL TUCH Tujunga, Political Science JANET WANKOWSKI Greenbrae, Comb. Soc. Sci. GA R Y WA RD Pacific Palisades, Economics RICHARD WARD San Francisco, Zoology WILLIAM WARD Bakersfield, Biochemistry TODD WA RNE R Altadena, Economics ALICE WARRICK Van Nuys, Art CYNTHIA WEBER La Habra, English JACOUEL YN WEBER Oxnard, Political Science FRANCES WEEMS Long Beach, Geography ALICE WEINER Beverly Hills, History GREGOR Y WEINER South Gate, Elec. Engineering STEPHEN WIENER Torrance, Biological Sciences DANIEL WEISMAN L os A ngeles, Political Science MARCIA WEISS Granada Hills, English SALL Y WELLER Los Angeles, Art JIM WEST Escondido, Psychology LINTON WHALEY San Diego, History BUD WHI TCOMB Fresno, Art CA YL E Y WHITE Los Angeles, Phys. Ed. 4 37 438 SENICDRS .IEFFERY WHITE Santa Cruz, Environ. Biology STEVEN WHITE Palos Verdes, Mech. Engineering TH DMA S WH I TE San ta Barbara, English A B B Y WH I TN E Y King City, Sociology CAROL WlEBELT Oxnard, HistorylA n thropology CAROL WIEGARDT San Leandro, French STEPHEN WIENER Torrance, Biological Science BA RBA RA WIGLE Patterson, Historv CLA UDIA WIL COX S tra thmore, English DENNIS WIL DS Santa Barbara, Zoology WILLIAM WILEY Hawthorne, Environ. Biology CA THERINE WIL KEN Thousand Oaks, Phys. E it CHARLES WILLIAMS Saratoga, Elec. Engineering JAMES WILSON Alameda, Sociology KAREN WILSON San Carlos, Sociology VERLA WINSLOW Oceanside, Speech!Hearing K E NNE TH WOLF Van Nuys, Speech!Hearing MERIDETH WOLFF Los Gatos, Sociology NANCY WOL VEN Oxnard, Anthropology ELSIE WONG McFarlanzL Art History DIANNE WOOD San Diego, Home Economics Rl TA WOOD Livermore, English ROBERT WOOD Rolling Hills, Political Science MA UREEN WOODS Glendale, Political Science MA RIAN WOODWA RD San Bernardino, English JE RR Y WOOLF Bakersfield, Chemistry LOREN WORKING Ill Chatsworth, Mech. Engineering JANE T WRA Y Pasadena, Art L YNN WRENCH Del Mar, Physical Education VICTOR WROBEL Los Angeles, Elec. Engineering CA RLA WUL KA U Van Nuys, History JAN WYAN T Mill Valley, History KE VIN WYCHOPEN Delhi, Sociology MARY YAHOLKO VSKY Sacramen to, A nthropology SUSAN YODER Long Beach, Environ. Biology TIMOTHY YOSHINO Livingston, Environ. Biology LINDA YOST Sanger, History IRA YOUNG Long Beach, Economics KATHLEEN YOUNG El Segundo, History TOM YOUNG Long Beach, Zoology GEORGE ZACK Pico Rivera, Poli. Sci.fSoc. THOMAS ZANI C Artesia, Anthropology MARYANN ZANINO VICH Delano, History DA VID ZERGA Mountain View, History PAMELA ZERKLE Orinda, Political Science L UANN ZINK Fresno, Zoology NANCY ZIPP Menlo Park, Arr CYNTHIA ZORADI Santa Barbara, Comb. Soc. Sci. N l li? 5 is ti 1 R. A 1 gg, r ag s A.- E F .J 'ii "x A my 1 s L, F JE, 1, . jwff' -R V Q: Gnu: ' , 117' . gg L, ., I 54, N -ZW K A- A , . 'Se' A yah YZ? , J ' is r ,, l AGGQ V.,,. , 4 'bl g -js Z? u s Y x " I ,ab li, tg: 4 1. , ' 'V ar B, Lyme, ' an I sa r.. ,- 9' ,.- Av iv ,... 1--gn ' E R Q -i'- , f , L Q , '- J' 'lv' ' ' V ' r. 5 A' . in . "' V 'Q' A Li .. 9' ug itz - V g :Q R. w :a-2 w htrf 'V Jun- xg- 'L H' "' . -'V .. , 'ins I ' 5 ' .ggi -Q' - " we 1 'Q - . E E f -A - --- I - L , AYP' 5 .A J-fs! I, ' -:sr ' -4 ' .iz t Q : V N, VE' , , R - .,,. . , M., H 'JSE ' ' ' M.. :pf ff Ea KZ! so.: I A ryry r + L x3 yLLFLk xL LL , Jl Lk ,, ? k G F n Q WH W f ffff,'-f No circle so perfect but that If has its blur. I would change things for you if I c0uld,' As I can't, you must take them as they are. Han Fei Tzu 439 19701 A TIME FOR CI-IANGIN I 'll' - A'- V , x 4 ' S 1 ' - 3' iv m . w 41g x Q 51 V H V. , mf ' ,f W mf, ul -22 W W . , we KM-. ' A ' ,af -'L H 1 ..,-1, 4 . , hr - , ' ,iff- J A 1, . 4- Q I. 27 1 . , J F' K . ' ..,f. 1 is-F' I LI 1,5 ,K ,ig ' K --kw- nmg, is -V GIVE 44 442 5 4 lv. vu ' ,, W Ang K4 K yxisw 'XX ' + we ' it . 'V 5 I vga ill g 'G K '53 X ' ' 1 1 wg X 1 Hyq ,FF 'ant-Nl si JL X14 1 vx 1 2 '. , ns!"-Q Eu- X as :Vx Q W I X 'A YA "M x 'Wi A K--7 ?'4A -. s g' 'I Z5 nv' , f,, X xt 9.44 If wx, a. V, gl '4TjA.,f.NQ 5 X YQ fm xi A N4 N., . x aj QL' K. l " ' ' P XR vi KIM , I1 fix X ro ress'0uPMos13 Importantprocluct 5 X 7 4 if T1 Wflfs . NX if 'H 'If' . C ik 1: "" 5:15. :AA 'g 2 , . Qi" "Q . ,' -. . n mu. 4 Zg9g'9Q -' fi, I 'AG - ' pm u W , .. .- . , -'-' Q . . 'F JY - '55 RL A ,I r' 'yr bf!-fit 1 :A-1 QU: '-.ff n ' -, 7cA ' :ff . 2 7.51 x. 3564701 Q I .vi V' 5-,Q I ,91F'5Zff 1' .H ,, 1' "fi . I - JT!-'ffl X M . .I-Qf-f':,.ii - '."'- 1' A. ff f' .V ,I 133 5 ., gfiff ww., 51 V , f iw "1 Tk' iW.'1ff1l?'lBir 2 Tjikxix .M ' 25 :A ,hj,: VAN- Xin. Q A ff A 3, . X1 ' .xg A vm.. . E1 , QA -, . K 1 , -,, P ,L 4 ,X V 4, 1 , f-- f .lf - ' e , t ,,. -.4 :w ' . f - ' L ,Ai ' ' ' z "I, A C' it fgigiwt. ,TF w 5 L . i -s KH Eli "P gig? ' XV H U., I. 13 If .f, if M . fl. 1- '7-I. 1 fl' J' K.. rv. Sf' 5 - H J ff 4 3 Gi 32 Q! V, v 'x ,. 1 1 Q, I fx-r' A M- -, ,.,.- fl ,fm , ,-J V Z 14. I .. --, -.- S wmv " 'X 'ff Q ,f 154.5 1.- -"" .'. ,Ajit KL, f -, 5:11 ig. A ' .J aft? , - ,. K ,, W, , . v Q VFX .. X 5 ' lg' ., , 1, - ,bmi X at '.m"'.mgi L'- 1 1 5. 'lr -5' 23,5 if 141,473 . 1 ,Q 'A ,, 31" - ' 5 via' 5' 1i.sl -5 L. . .,,,., 2 . A 1 fl 4 - ,4 ll' 'Q J, ,A 173 ' 53: x gt ,1 an , , ' . I o V, 59 iii if Q , in ., ,,1-f--zum' ' - uma... -' - , T' 'L , 'UF f il 1... gg .-. 1.1, ww 0 y, 1 ! 40" "WL 21 W, sf-s..ff.5' :ll 'Qi INDEX 'E ,N 4 , in , 59, H if N5 vi.. A Acadia 33 Alpha Chi Omega 288-9 Alpha Delta Phi 302-3 Alpha Phi 286-7 Anacapa 328 Anthropology 115 Arbolada 355 Art 104 Art Committee 163 A. S. Band 214-5 A. S. Calendar 177 A. S. I. A. 168 A. S. Personnel 150-1 A.S. Judiciary Board 173 Awards Committee 169 B Bahia 364 Baseball 246 Basketball 234-9 Biology 124 Blue Key 190 Bowling Team 273 Brass Choir 110 C Camp Conestoga 159 Calaveras 334 Chamber Singers 107 Chancellor 144 Cheerleaders 216-7 Chemistry 125 Chem-Nuclear Engineering 127 Chimes 191 Chinese Students Assoc. 194-5 Chi Omega 298-9 Classics 11 Colonels Coeds 196-7 Communication Board 176 Concert Committee 163 Conseulo 258 Coralina 356 Corriente 357 Creative Studies 134 Crew Team 271 Cross Country 227-8 CSDI 157 Cypress 347 D Dance 1 1 1 Deans 146-9 Dorians 109 Drama 105 E Economics 112 Education 132 Education Abroad 133 Education Committee 133 El Dorado East 374-5 Elections Committee 169 Electrical Engineering 126 ,' El Gaucho 178-81 English 121 Enramada 356 E. O. P. 156 Estrella 358 F Fencing Team 273 Finance Committee 170 Fire Department 373 Folk Dancing Club 270 Football 220-5 Fountainbleu 318 Francisco Torres 376-7 Frosh Camp Committee 175 G Gauchos in Govt. 159 Geography 113 Geology 128 German-R ussian 123 Girls' Intramurals 264-7 Goleta Project 162 Golf 252 Governor 140 Gymnastics 240 H History 1 14 Homecoming-Spring Sing Comm. 165 Home Economics 112 Honey Bears 198-9 Honors at Entrance 155 Kappa Alpha Theta 242-3 Karate Team 274 KCSB 182-5 Kennesaw 340 L Lacrosse 272 La Cumbre 186-9 Lambda Chi Alpha 308-9 Laurel 348 Lecture Committee 164 Leg Council 152-3 Linguistics 122 M Madrona 349 Manzanita 348 Maricopa 329 Mathematics 129 Mechanical Engineering 127 Mendocino 336 Men's Glee 108 Mesa Verde 341 Milpas Community Center 160 Mortar Board 397 Mu Phi Epsilon 192 Music 106 Music Committee 166 N Native American Awareness 160 New Consciousness 159 O Human Relations Conference 0, C, B, 174 159 Humboldt 335 Hustler's Handbook 177 I I. A. C. 172 I. F. C. 300-1 International Hall 379 I. R. O. 193 J Judo Team 271 Juniper 352 K Oceano 359 P Palm 350 Panhellenic 283 Phi Delta Theta 318-9 Phi Kappa Psi 320-1 Philosophy 119 Phi Sigma Kappa 322-3 Photography Club 270 Physical Activities 131 Physics 130 Pi Beta Phi 294-5 Pima 330 Plumas 337 Pollock Award 213 Political Science 116 President's Scholars 155 Primavera 360 Project Amigos 161 GENERAL INDEX Project Genesis 162 Project Nepal 200 Project Pakistan 201 Public Relations Board 157 O R Rainier 342 Rally Committee 164 Regents 142-3 Regents' Scholars 154 Recreation Department 276 Religion 1 19 Repertory Chorus 107 R. H. A. 326-7 Risuena 361 R. O. T. C. 131 Rugby Team 275 S Sailing Team 275 San Nicholas 338 San Rafael 346 Santa Cruz 354 Santa Rosa 362-3 Saratoga 343 Scabbard and Blade 192 Schubertians 108 Senior Class 396 Sequoia 351 Shell and Oar 202-3 Shennandoah 344 Shiloh 344 Ski Team 272 Sierra 345 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 310-1 Sigma Chi 316-7 Sigma Kappa 296-7 Sigma Phi Epsilon 314-5 Sigma Pi 312-3 Soccer Team 228-9 Sociology 118 Somerset 380 Spanish-Portuguese 123 Speech 121 Spurs 204-5 Student Travel Comm. 170 Surfing Team 272 Swimming 242-3 Sycamore 350 Symphony 110 Symposium 174 T Tennis 253 Tesoro 367 Theta Delta Chi 306-7 Toyon 353 Tropicana 379 Tutorial 135 Tutoring Project 158 U Ucen Activity Board 171 University Day Comm. 175 University President 141 U. R. C. 206-7 University Troop Development Team 161 V Vice-Chancellors 145 Villa Marina 368 Volleyball 254-5 Volleyball Club 270 W Water Polo 230-1 Willow 353 Women's Glee 109 Wrestling 241 X Y Yosemite 345 Yucca 353 Yuma 352 Z Zeta Beta Tau 304-5 445 446 STUDENT INDEX A Aaron, Melvin 247 Abbey, Mary 403 Abbott, Ann 403 Abbot, John 393 Abbott, Wade 403 Abe, Calvin 403 Abe, Janice 340 Abouav, Leorah 296 Abrahm, John 310, 403 Abrecht, David 153, 176, 309 Abrego, Philip 330 Abueg, Marianne 336 Ackerman, Michael 225 Acosta, Raul 348 Adams, Arthur 317 Adams, Nancy 293 Adams, Regina 361 Adler, Bill 403 Aegerter, Gay 285 Ahler, John 314 Aho, Janet 299, 403 Ahrens, Robert 350 Aiches, Alan 403 Aiello, Florence 403 Akin, David 334 Albade, Phyllis 291 Albright, Ann 344 Alcala, Pamela 169, 389 Aldworth, Michael 403 Alexander, Dan 329 Alexander, Rose 403 Alford, Edwin 403 Alfred, Andrea 374 Alger, Barbara 348 Alioto, Elena 168 Allaire, David 403 Allbaugh, Kristine 403 Allcroft, Roger 247, 403 Allen, Dennis 193 Allen, Jeffrey 373 Allen, Mitchell 350 Allen, Ronald 236, 238, 239 Allred, Elselina 155, 285, 365 Allred, Lyle 347 Alman, Joyce 403 Almy, Robert 111, 272 Altamura, Michael 348 Ambill, David 403 Amick, Julie 289, 403 Amstutz, Douglas 241 Anchordoguy, Rosalie 336 Andersen, Gary 225 Anderson, Albert 275 Anderson, Brent 108, 403 Anderson, Carol 95 Anderson, Dee 198, 374, 375 Anderson, Don 352 Anderson, Douglas 228, 313 Anderson, Jean 286 Anderson, Joseph 78 Anderson, Leslie 164, 291 Anderson, Linda 403 Anderson, Richard 107, 154, 155, 206 Anderson, Robert 192 Anderson, Sharon 366 Anderson, Susan 295 Andonian, Diana 336 Andrews, Keith 332 Andrews, Robin 403 Andro, Mary 344 Aquino, Susan 340 Ariey, Catherine 358 Armstrong, Nancy 366 Armstrong, Carl 273 Armstrong, Terry 254 Armstrong, Terry Lee 339 Arndt, Alan 403 Arner, Brock 220, 225 Arnett, Patricia 289, 403 Arnold, David 346, 351 Arnold, Gary 273 Arnold, Mark 403 Arnold, Stephen 326, 347 Arrott, James 11 1, 304 Arsenault, Robert 192 Artru, Beverly 343 Asamoto, Brian 309 Aschenbrener, Nancy 346, 403 Aseka, Jasmine 340 Ashworth, Susan 180 Aswad, Richard 368 Atwater, Aleta 109 Aubel, Pamela 374 Aubrey, Harlan 403 Aughinbaugh, Karen 348, 403 Aulman, Mark 181 Austin, Frank 346, 353, 403 Austin, John 327 Austin, Kay 204 Ayars, Deborah 202, 403 Ayers, Lawrence 351 B Babbage, Elizabeth 289, 383, 403 Babcock, Jeffrey 108 Babyak, Elodie 403 Baca, Sylvia 155, 269 Bach, Richard 309 Badeau, Bruce 275, 403 Bader, Mitchell 304, 403 Bagasao, Ramona 109 Bahnson, George 352 Bailey, Bill 107 Bailey, Elizabeth 344 Bailey, James 306 Bailey, Karen 296 Bailey, Marilyn 286 Bailey, Stephen 403 Baim, Dean 353 Baird, Barbara 288, 289 Baker, Doyle 314 Baker, Linda 403 Baker, Maile 269 Baker, Neil 163, 225, 403 Baker, Pamela 403 Baker, Roberta 358 Balber, Ethel 403 Balch, Katherine 345 Baldelli, Gail 174 Baldwin, David 373 Bales, Cynthia 340 Ball, Robert 373 Ball, Sherrell 196, 288, 289 Ballard, Harold 329 Ballenger, Catherine 293 Baltes, Susan 289, 403 Banbrook, Linda 403 Banducci, Cynthia 378 Banker, Nancy 291 Banks, Booker 152 Banuelos, Linda 378, 403 Baracker, Ronald 228, 403 Barber, Stephan 319, 351 Barco, Mary 107 Barger, Annalee 353 Barieau, Barbara 295 Barker, Robert 230, 403 Barkley, Robin 286 Barksdale, Cynthia 352 Barnes, Claudia 354 Barnes, Lynn 196, 197, 289 Barnes, Nancy 336 Barnes, Susan 202, 296 Barnett, Bettina 344 Barnett, Oswald 328 Barnett, Richard 313 Barnhart, Frederick 347 Baron, Melissa 286, 341 Barovelli, Monica 374 Barr, Linda 296, 403 Barr, Susan 285 Barrall, Mark 154, 155, 348 Barrett, Ellen 198, 299 Barrett, Lyn 289, 403 Barrett, Stephen 147, 317 Barrowcliff, Ellen 155, 355 Bartelt, Vicki 403 Barthel, Brooks 253 Barthelmess, Craig 403 Bartlett, Phillip 317 Bartz, Barbara 335 Baskett, Diana 403 Bassett, Martha 404 Bates, James 134 Bates, Linda 291, 404 Bates, Susan 198, 291, 397, 404 Batteen, Catherine 196, 299 Baughman, David 330 Baum, Martha 378 Baumgart, Susan 113 Beach, Mary 365 Beal, Ann 404 Beaman, James 225, 381 Bean, Diane 107, 404 Beardsley, Craig 404 Bechtel, Ted 155, 227, 249 Beck, Karen 404 Beckham, Robert 111, 319, 404 Beckman, Barbara 296 Beebe, Martin 365 Beeman, Shelley 191 Beery, Michael 367 Behlmer, George 153, 172, 174, 404 Behman, Gerald Jr. 307 Behncke, Christine 404 Behr, Patricia 355 Bei, Gail 198, 291, 380 Beimford, Patricia 289, 404 Beisner, Cynthia 289 Beith, Barry 304 Belden, John 231, 243, 368 Bell, Carolyn 296 Bell, Karen 404 Bell, Katherine 289, 404 Bell, Kathleen 404 Bell, Michael 227, 404 Bellenger, Joseph 367 Bello, Douglass 404 Belshe, Marille 404 Belton, Joseph 226, 227, 249 Bemis, Cheryl 404 Bender, Judith 404 Bender, Karen 285 Bender, Laura 404 Bendt, Durward 313 Benedetti, Christine 404 Benjamin, Richard 231 Benkosky, Michael 327 Bennett, Barbara 107 Bennett, Loni 269 Bennett, Marcia 273, 404 Bennetts, Pamela 327, 350 Benson, Cynthia 355 Benson, Linnea 364 Bentley, Ken 253 Bergdahl, Stephen 404 Berggreen, Alice 404 Bergman, Annette 365 Bergman, Mary 269, 299 Bergman, William 350 Bergquist, Scott 271 Berkshire, Elizabeth 293, 383 Bermel, Laurie 404 Bernard, Marion 366 Bernhard, Laurie 342 Beronius, Ann 293 Berrett, Judith 175, 285 Berry, Carol 366 Berry, Mark 154 Bertuca, Michelina 353 Bettencourt, Linda 404 Betts, Donald 271 Beverly, Alan 330 Beyers, Nancy 350 Bialecki, Terese 293, 404 Bialis, Tina 349 Biffle, Diana 269, 494 Bigham, Alice 404 Biller, Anne 378, 405 Billings, Roger 247 Bills, Cynthia 342 Bilodeau, Cheri 336 Bilodeau, William 154, 155, 332 Bish, Melvin 158 Bishop, Edward 405 Bishop, Paul 108, 405 Browne, Shelley 285 Bishop, Tom 225 Bjorn, Christine 405 Black, Donna 337 Black, Susan 340 Blackford, Candace 295, 345 Blackshear, Barbara 375 Blaine, Carl 319 Blair, Jamey 295 Blair, Joyce 344 Blair, Marta 405 Blake, Deborah 336 Blank, Adele 352 Blare, Lindy 267 Bleeck, Donald 107 Bliss, Maryann 343 Blodgett, Michael 320 Bloom, Judith 185 Bloom, Michael 160 Bloom, Roberta 350 Blumbert, Debra 327, 365 Blumberts, Elina 405 Blunden, Christopher 177, 405 Bodine, Barbara 293,405 Bodine, John 309, 405 Boesel, Darcy 289 Bogden, Carol 202 Boggs, Jeannette 352 Boggs, Kathryn 336 Boggs, Larry 179 Boggs, Steven 301, 317 Bogner, Karen 405 Bohman, Janet 359 Bohm, Barbara 183 Bohnacker, William 405 Boinig, Jeff 231 Bolt, Janice 356 Boltinhouse, Susan 158, 397, 405 Boman, Keith 165, 190, 317 Bomberger, Laura 405 Bonar, Robert 405 Boniface, Christine 266 Bonin, Henry 350 Bonin, Michael 350 Bonynge, Timothy 254, 255 Booker, Mary 405 Boone, Sandy 345 Borg, James 240, 367 Borglin, Kristine 286, 337 Borsenberger, Dennis 271 Bottaro, Pamela 345 Bottoms, Kurt 322 Boulder, Tom 329 Bowdish, John 272 Bowe, Elisabeth 291 Bowen, George 111, 310, Bower, Stuart 243, 348 Bowman, Frank 135 Box, Paul 201 Boyd, Kathleen 405 Boyer, Trudy 199, 291 Boyle, Connie 344 Boyle, James 405 Boyle, Michael 165 Boyle, Thomas 405 Boynton, Patricia 269 Brabant, Renee 344 Bracamontes, Nellie 345 Bradley, Pamela 289 Brady, Robert 310, 405 Braine, Sharanne 285 Braly, Corinne 164, 217, 299, 358 Brandenburg, Larry 225 Brandt, Dorey 365 Brandt, Laura 155, 339 Brannon, Mary 405 Brant, Kathleen 405 Brashear, Elizabeth 337 Braswell, Nancy 364 Braun, Jerome 347 Brawders, Marilyn 353 Breaker, Martin 192 Breisch, Libbie 352 Breler, Linda 338, 342 Brem, Patricia 405 Bremner, James 367 Bressler, David 320, 405 Bressoud, Suzanne 340 Briano, Carol 336 Bricker, Cheryl 405 Brideau, Catherine 155, 303, 342 Bridges, William 405 Bright, Nola 339 Brindle, Laurie 348 Brinton, Ruth 180 Bristow, Carol 405 Brittain, Sheila 348 Broadhead, Tom 213 Broadheak, William 249 Brock, Donna 405 Brock, Linda 378, 405 405 Brockie, Barbara 107, 109, 349 Broering, Patricia 405 Bronzovic, Nicole 364 Broock, Robyn 353 Brooks, Kathleen 191 Brooks, Carla 405 Brooks, Carrie 378 Brooks, Pauline 366 Brooks, Steven 351 Brophy, Denise 361 Brose, Catherine 265, 266 Brose, Margaret 265, 266, 267, 342 Brosius, Anita 35 Brossard, Donna 343 Browder, Christopher 300 322 Brown, Alana 72 Brown, Cathy 286 Brown, Charles 367 Brown, Christine 285 Brown, Eric 329 Brown, Gilbert 309, 405 Brown, J. Minton 317 Brown, Linda 405 Brown, Margaret 353 Brown, Mari 326, 357 Brown, Maria 346 Brown, Sam 332 Brown, Stephanie 196, 199, 299, 405 Brown, Stewart 173, 309, 405 Brownell, Lindsay 344 Brownell, Terry 286 Browning, Evelyn 405 Browy, Toni 366 Brtek, Leslie 353, 405 Bruhn, Leslie 202, 289, 405 Bruman, Janet 405 Brumby, Brian 347 Brumm, Gary 107 Brusch, Betty 406 Brush, Edwin 406 Brush, Virginia 406 Bryan, Andrea 350 Bryan, Linda 338, 343 Bryant, Christina 73, 295, 406 Buchanan, Phillip 273 Buck, Catherine 295 Buck, Susan 285 Buckley, Catherine 344 Buckley, Christopher 108 Budrovich, Vincent 406 Budzinski, Nancy 406 Buford, Richard 372, 406 Bulgin, John 352 Bultman, Marvin 11, 315, 406 Bumatay, Ernie 307 Bumb, Ann 406 Bunkelman, Brad 357 Bunkelman, James 406 Buono, Catherine 378 Burchfiel, Marilyn 293 Burdett, Barbara 353 Burgenbauch, Martin 406 Burgess, James Jr. 249, 406 Burgher, Wayne 372 Burk, Kathryn 199, 202, 406 Burke, Pamela 364 Burke, Patricia 340 Burkenheim, Lillian 406 Burleigh, Sarah 406 Burlington, William 406 Burmann, Lisa 357 Burner, Janis 406 Burnett, Johnny 275, 379 Burnett, Susan 183 Burnick, Deborah 155 Burns, Donald 406 Burns, Jeanette 353 Burns, Patricia 406 Burr, Marguerite 378, 406 Burr, Patricia 350 Bursik, Emilie 299 Busby, Clifford 226, 227 Buschmann, Susan 299, 336 Bush, Cathleen 269, 289 Bush, Robert 406 Bushey, Stevan 227, 249 Bushman, Barbara 406 Bussie, Robert 247 Bussing, Kerry 337 Cabot, George 272 Caccese, Lisbeth 407 Cadena, Rosemary 352 Cadet, Stephen 252 Caggiano, Richard 407 Cahill, Sally 269, 350 Caire, Justinian 111, 303, 407 Calhoun, Rebekah 35 Calistro, Patricia 349, 407 Calkins, Thomas 407 Callen, Elizabeth 293 Callow, Marjorie 327, 361 Caloudes, Vernon 252 Calvert, Barbara 365 Camerlengo, Elsie 204 Campagna, Karen 342 Campanelli, Joseph 200 Campbell, Bonnie 107, 109, 165, 285, 407 Campbell, Jane 269, 293 Campbell, Kathleen 378, 407 Campbell, Kathleen Janice 296 Campbell, Kathryn 407 Campbell, Lucinda 286, 364 Campbell, Madelaine 293 Campbell, Marcia 78, 407 Robert 304 Campbell, Campbell, Sherry 407 Campos, Salvador Jr. 407 Canary, Joan 338, 342 Canete, Douglas 330 Cangiano, Barbara 336 Canning, Deborah 355 Butler, James 301, 322,406 Butler Linda 406 Butler Margaret 350 Butler Nancy 407 Butler Penn 407 Butler, Robert 307 Butler, Robert Wesley 407 Butler Ron 347 Butler, Sally 107,192 Butler, Thomas 327 Butts, Gary 322 Butz, Janet 169, 289, 358 Buxton, Nigel 192 Byce, Charles 368 Byer, Laurel 366 Byrne, Kathleen 407 Byrne, Patrick 317 Byron, Earl 347 Cantley, Patricia 407 Capetan , Margaret 407 Cappa, Mary 358 Cardella, Stephen 332 Caretto, Virginia 407 Cargille, Susan 407 Carlin, Frederick 322, 407 Carlisle, Catherine 407 Carlock, Dennis 407 Carlson, Cathy 407 Carlson, Randolph 351 Carlton, Dana 407 Carlton, Timothy 240 Carlyle, Timothy 407 Carnesoltas, Ana Marie 407 Carpenter, Krista 289 C Carricuburu, Dale 407 Carroll, Michael 329 Carrozza, Carmelo 225 Carruth, Lindee 327, 335 Carson, Catherine 299 Carson, Robert 368 Carter, Bonnie 407 Carter, E Carter, G Carter, N Casas, OI Case, Jan lizabeth 336 erald Jr. 260 ancy 407 ivia 352, 407 e 293 Casey, Moira 335 Cass, Maxine 182, 337 Castillo, Sylvia 366 Castle, Gregory 368 Castlema n, Brian 227, 249 Catherina, Susan 378 Catino, Michael Jr. 407 Cave, Larry 407 Caylor, Linda 407 Caziarc, Steven 249 Cebat, Joan 267, 407 Ceccarelli, Shannon 107 Cederlund, Carol 358 Cercos, Frank 111, 407 Cerrina, Susan 293, 407 Cervantes, Lucy 204 Cesare, Andrew 331 Chacopulos, Jon 154 Chad, Robert 273 Chadbourn, James 407 Chadney, Laurel 298, 299 Chamberlain, Brian 259, 497 Chamberlain, Donna 407 Chamberlin, Julie 407 Chamberlin, Rebecca 407 Chambers, Nina 292 Chambliss, Michael 227, 249 Champion, Grace 90, 107, 407 4 47 448 Chan, Bernard 407 Chancer, Jeff 247 Chandler, Marilyn 267, 407 Chapman, Beverly 107, 192, 407 Chapman, Cynthia 407 Chapman, Larry 322 Chapple, David 261 Chapple, Gordon 179 Chard, David 353 Charette, Allan 407 Chatterton, Virginia 407 Chauvin, Philip 111, 408 Chavin, Maryann 342 Chenn, Wylie 350 Cheramy, Margaret 344 Cherry, James 172 Chesnut, Barbara 353 Child, Diane 269, 292 Childs, Karen 339 Childs, Penelope 341 Chisolm, Laurie 339 Chiu, Willy 274 Cho, Casey 154, 155, 352, 353 Chover, Joy 378 Christensen, Julie 361 Christensen, Stephanie 285 Christiansen, Paula 164, 217, 378 Christianson, Joan 107 Christianson, Robert 408 Christy, Dan 230 Chulack, Walter 322 Church, Stanley 136 Cieri, Joanne 296 Clabaugh, John 317 Claeboe, Alicia 408 Clardy, Kathleen 408 Clark, Bruce 192 Clark, Donald 408 Clark, Gayle 299,408 Clark, Gregory 368 Clark, Janet 357 Clark, June 299 Clark, Linda 408 Clark, Michael 408 Clark, Robert 230 Clark, Sarah 352 Clarke, James 329 Clarkson, Linda 408 Clarkson, Michael 303, 408 Clay, Michelle 361 Clayton, Marilyn 379, 408 Clemens, Susan 358 Cleveland, Russell 303 Clime, Charles 255 Cline, Albert 332 Clover, Joy 408 Clymer, Douglas 115 Coates, Randolph 272 Cobb, Charles 275 Codington, John 317 Coffey, Douglas 408 Coffey, Jean 348, 408 Cohn, Lucy 269 Cohn, Paula 349 Coker, Elizabeth 291 Colburn, James 107, 166 Cole, Arlene 217, 287, 408 Cole, Barbara 202 Cole, Janis 408 Cole, Paul 317 Cole, Steven 228 Cole, Wayne 351 Coleman, Steven 247, 307 Collatz, Collier, Collins Collins Collins George 274 Charles 273 Cathleen 327, 339 ,John 309 Judy 358 Collins, Sheila 378, 408 Collopy, Michael 317, 351 Colvin, Nancy 199, 346, 349 Colvin, Susan 295 Colwell, Nancy 375 Comerford, James 319, 351 Compton, Dan 107 Compton, Joy 408 Compton, Richard 107 Conley, Debra 196 Connelly, Anthony 408 Connolly, Jane 378 Connors, Patricia 408 Connors, Stephen 332 Constans, Pierre 271 Cooper, Judy 107, 192 Conte, Michael 309, 408 Cooper, Laura 299 Contreras, Paul 317 Cooperrider, Candis 205 Conway, Barbara 358 Copeland, Teri 344 Conway, Jane 175, 202, 269, Copple, Jacquelyn 191, 285 288, 289 Copple, James 330 Conway, Thomas Jr. 313 Cordell, Suzanne 109 Cooey, John 408 Cordes, Joanne 408 Cook, Gary 190, 326, 328 Corey, John 108, 365 Cook, Lucinda 205 Corner, Carol 365 Cooke, Dennis 303 Corselius, Ann 191, 291 Cool, Susan 348 Cortez, Ruben 353 Cooley, Camille 107, 166, Cossette, Vicki 408 287 Cotsenmoyer, John 408 Cooley, Steven 263, 373 Cotter, John 173 Cooney, Patricia 342 Cottle, Barbara 292 Cooper, Charles 319 Cotugna, Nancy 408 Cooper, Cindy 408 Couch, Carol 287 Coulby, Susan 408 Coull, Virginia 107, 284, 285, 408 Coutchie, Pamela 408 Cox, Preston 408 Cox, Thomas 408 Cozadd, Linda 408 Craig, Carmin 361 Craig, Dana 94 Craig, Shirley 344 Craig, Trudy 408 Crain, Kim 408 Crebbin, Mark 347 Creps, Robert 275 Cresalia, Martin 327 Crim, Peter 272 Crinklaw, Susan 341 Crinklaw, Warren 254, 408 Criset, Pat 378 Cristiano, Ellen 361 Crittenden, Laurel 356 Crittenden, Susan 338, 341 Croddy, Marshall 347 Crooke, Steven 329 Crandall, Bruce 231 ,'243 Crooks, CUYUS 408 Craner, Karen 107, 285 Croshier, Paul 107 Crater, Lucy 358 Cross, John 316, 408 Crawford, Kent 408 Cross, Nancy 408 Crawford, Vivian 92 Cross, William 408 Crawshaw, Craig 88, 108 Crouse, Robert 190, 260, P 316, 408 Crouthamel, Roger 319 Crowe, Judith 269, 354, 408 Crowe, Nancy 155, 340 Crowell, Leslie 357 Crowell, Lucinda 202, 294, 295 Crowley, Michael 301, 310 Crum, Gregory 231, 243 Cruzat, Charles 225 Crymes, Patrick 408 Cucci, James 408 Cuddy, Betsy 288 Cullen, Carol 357 Culley, Sharon 337 Culver, John 315 Culver, Patricia ,343 Cummings, Bonnie 408 Cummings, Robert 408 Cunnane, William 309 Cunningham, Madeline 357 Cunningham, Robert 409 Curbow, Barbara 357 Curran, Edward 111, 409 Curran, Patricia 203, 380 Curran, Sally 295 Currie, Peggy 358 Currie, Tamara 342 Currier, Cecile 196 Curtice, James 212, 221, 225 Cutler, Frank 304 Cypher, Janice 1-74, 409 D D Accardo, Cheryl 358 Dager, Margaret 352 Dahl, Sandra 409 Dahlin, Susan 107, 109, 357 DaLiema, Bob 271 Dana, Charles Jr. 353 Dang, Phuong 409 Daoust, Elizabeth 269 D Aoust, James 249, 332 Darata, Darlene 287 Dark, Lou 409 Darrow, Donna 290 Dart, Michele 95 Davenport, Leslie 409 Davey, Jane 348 David, Richard 300, 307, 409 Davidson, Carole 355 Davidson, Diana 299, 409 Davidson, Kenneth 309 Davis Davis , Alida 287, 339 David Jr. 409 Davis Deborah 350 Davis Dorothy 327 Davis, Joan 409 Davis, Kathleen 199, 290, 383, 397, 409 Davis, Mary 409 Davis, Shelly 191 Dawson, Marvin 409 Dawson, Warren 373 Days, Virginia 409 Deacon, James 368 Deacon, Scott 353, 409 De Bry, Merrilee 409 Dedrick, Robert 182 Deen, Joan 335 De Fay, Sydney 267, 337 Deffenbaugh, Sandra 358 Degan, Charles 311, 409 De Genova, Donna 344 Deiveras, Debbi 356 DeLaG uerra, Joe 373 Delanty, Rick 155, 227 De La Rocha, Castulo 66, 153, 176 Delgadillo, Arthur 353 De Liema, Robert 409 Delman, James 409 De Metrick, Linda 357 Denhart, Sandra 357 Denman, Joan 337 Denney, Stephen 352 Dennis, John 409 Dennis, Sarah 409 Dennison, Donna 348 Dennison, Sally 361 Den Otter, Pamella 266, 409 Dense, Charles 367 Dent, Preston 144 Denton, Cheryl 196, 197, 287 De Pauw, Julie 337 Derby, Richard 154, 155, 347 Derian, Diane 196, 292 Derlachter, Deborah 410 De Rosa, Michele 327 De Shon, Ronald 275 Deshotels, Lynn 136 Desmond, Gerald 275 Devenish, Thor 410 De Vito, Joanne 288 De Voe, Deborah 383 Dexter, Stephen 108, 410 Diamond, Kathleen 299 Dickerson, Vivian 107 Dickinson, John 410 Diederichsen, Rick 331 Diggle, Pamela 364 Dilley, Gary 249, 410 Dillon, Nancy 350 Dilworth, Thomas 311 Dinsmore, Stephen 311 Di Pol, Annette 180 Dirkes, Kathleen 410 Divelbiss, Bruce 410 Dix, Kenneth 410 Dix, Shelby 410 Dixon, Frederick Jr. 247 Dixon, Kathy 295 Dixon, Michael 367 Dixon, Patricia 202, 203 Dockery, Patricia 410 Dodd, Deborah 292 Dodge, Pamela 410 Doehrman, Thomas 308,410 Dogan, Dave 322, 410 Doherty, Jack Jr. 373, 410 Doke, Robin 410 Dolan, Dennis 301, 308, 410 Dolan, Elizabeth 269 Donahue, Rita 410 Donaldson, Neal 334 Doney, Christine 191 Donnan, Brian 410 Donnan, Diane 410 Donnelly, Brian 225 Donner, Judith 361 Donsker, Jan 410 Doo, Joyce 288 Doran, Jerry 368 Doran, Mary 352 Dorman, Jean 410 Dorney, Deborah 348 Dorsey, Diane 410 Doty, Denise 410 Dougherty, Stephen 231 Douglas, Bruce 327 Douglas, Laurie 295 Dowd, Nancy 295 Drach, Nancy 203, 295, 383 Dragich, Nick 111, 225 Draper, Ann 269, 288 Draper, Dawn 348 Dreckman, Stanley 307 Drinkworth, Charles 303 Drozd, Donald 165, 190, 323 Du Bois, Evelyn 297,410 Du Bois, Janet 269 Du Bois, Marilyn 288 Du Bois, Richard 238 Du Bose, Debra 290 Dubrasich, Michael 157, 313 Ducker, James 313 Dudley, Janet 349 Duerr, Beverly 340 Duffy, Lynn 366 Dugan, Paul 308 Duggan, Francis 311, 410 Dukes, Dave Jr. 410 Dullea, Peter 94 Dumas, Gretchen 343 Dumas, Rosemary 348 Duncan Duncan Duncan Duncan, Duncan, Duncan, , Charles 303 , Dennis 301 , Douglas 249 Kirk 202, 271 Patricia 343 Ruth 344 Dunderdale, Beverly 380 Dunderdale, Thomas 410 Dunfee, Paul 260 Dunham, Connie 375 Dunn, Deborah 410 Dunn, Kathleen 109 Dunn, Steven 410 Du Pont, Andrea 366 Dykstra, Robert 410 Dzubur, Eric 329 E Eagleson, Brooke 285,410 Eakes, Van Howard 228 Earle, Gary 319 Easton, Ellen 292 Eaton, Annabelle 155, 342 Ebersole, Craig 329 Ecoff, Ann 378, 410 Eddie, Charles 252 Edelstein, Susan 410 Edgar, Gerald 410 Edgcomb, Anne 267, 361 Edson, Janet 205 Edwards, James Jr. 319, 410 Edwards, Lee 165, 410 Edwards, Wesley 316 Eeds, Richard 365 Effelson, Nancy 288 Eggers, Linda 202, 288, 410 Egnatchek, Linda 410 Eichhoff, Gay 410 Eick, William 319,410 Eipper, Gayle 410 Eiseman, Ellen 269 Eisenberger 410 Eisenhut, Donna 345 Eisenhut, John 322, 323 Ekberg, Elaine 203, 410 Ekeland, Ellinor 343 Elbel, Luanne 410 Elder, John 319 Ellerbrock, Craig 353 Ellestad, Stephen 272 Elliott, Debra 155, 343 Ellis, Arnold 410 Ellman, Randi 202, 267 Ellsworth, Charles 410 Elrod, Cecil 249 Elvin, George 353 44 450 Emerson, Clyde 410 Emery, Robert 238 Emi, Eileen 348 Enders, Brett 155, 330 Endicott, Donald Jr. 154, 348 Endo, Susan 340 Engel, Herbert 313 Engelhardt, Lynne 288 England, Alan 107 Englehhardt, Paulette 359 Englehart, Frances 287, 357 Engler, Daniel 410 Engler, Michael 411 English, Linda 411 Enos, Richard 313 Ensley, Charles Jr. 411 Epstein, Judy 173, 379 Epstein, Judy Ann 411 Erbez, Philip 225 Erenberg, Douglas 231, 330 Erickson, Caleen 191 Erickson, Cynthia 411 Erickson, Gail 411 Erickson, Jan 358 Erickson, Kathleen 411 Erikson, Dick 367 Ernst, Jacqueline 288 Ernst, John 164, 216, 304, 411 Fenstermaker, Douglas 225, 308 Ferguson, Barbara 287, 412 Ferguson, Joanne 292 Ferguson, Judith 161 Ferguson, William Jr. 311, 332 Fernandez, Joyce 339 Fernandez, Ronald 193 Ferrante, Jane 412 Ferre, Patrick 228, 350 Ferrero, Michele 289 Ferris, Margaret 342 Ferry, Barbara 412 Fertman, Denise 358 Fesler, Donald 412 Feston, Winnifred 412 Fick, Jim 253 Ficken, Janet 173 Fiedler, Katherine 164, 202 Fiedler, Patricia 343 Fields, Richard 365 Fifield, Michael 323 Finch, Jon 315 Finnegan, Kristin 292, 293, 412 Finney, Janice 107 Finster, Shirley 412 Fiore, Nora 202, 289 Firestone, Paula 343 Fisher, Susan 341 Fitzgerald, Patrick 413 Fitzgerald, Kathleen 286 Fitzgerald, Shellie 336 Fitzhenry, John Jr. 319 Fitzpatrick, Michele 413 Fitzpatrick, Stephen 107 Fleck, Victoria 327, 353 Fleischli, Diane 202 Fleischli, Jack 315 Fleischli, Karen 413 Fleming, Marian 297 Fleming, Sheryl 293 Fletcher, Kathryn 267 Flinn, K aren 340 Flocks, Reed 230 Flor, Laurance 332 Flower, Mary 286 Flynn, Daneen 327, 349 Fogarty, Michael 307 Escherich, Antonie 292, 383, 41 1 Escobar, Javier 153 Escobedo, Jennie 345 Esparza, Alex 367 Espinoza, Jesus Jr. 411 Fischer, Altree 412 Fischer, John 313 Fischer, Karen 358 Fischer, Pamela 412 Fischer, Peter 158 Fischer Ronald 350 Espy, Mark 225 Eubanks, Laura 342 Eurey, Donna 344 Evangelist, Clifford 225 Evans, Barry 304 Evans, Clifford, 372 Evans, James 155 Evans, Kathy 295 Evans, Kenneth 411 Everett, Helen 295 Evers, Kathryn 380, 411 Evers, Lynn 411 Evjen, John 169 Evleth, Kay 289 Ewig, Gloria 290, 411 F Fachin, Gary 411 Facknitz, Ann 379 Faires, Louise 109 Faist, Douglass 321,411 Falkner, Deborah 356 Fambrini, Leslie 342 Farber, Renata 297 Farbstein, Ellen 269 Farkas, Daniel 135 Farley, Mickey 367 Fischmann, Jody 293 Fisher, Gail 288, 289 Fisher, Mary 412 Fogel, David 368 Fong, Judy 341 Fong, Karen 340 Fong, Susan 364 Fontana, Judith 413 Foose, Barry 413 Forbes, Bruce 275 Ford, Catherine 297 Forman, Wendy 298, 299 Forrest, Carter 413 Forrest, Paul 275 Forrest, William 413 Foster, Catherine 358 Foster, Christina 413 Foster, Frances 200 Foulk, Susan 413 Fowler, John Jr. 413 Fox, Karen 285 Fox, Stephen 303 Fraim, Elizabeth 269 Frame, Karen 361 Franceschi, Pamela 335 Francis, Diana 413 Francis, Linda 348 Francis, Lizbeth 413 Francis, Richard 413 Frank, Richard 183 Frank, Steven 272 Frank, Steven Mark 317, 413 Frankel, Dyann 365 Franklin, Gail 180, 413 Franklin, John 179 Frantz, Shirley 197 Frazier, Earl 238 Frazzini, Madalyn 107 Freas, Susan 343 Frederick, Mark 372 Freeman, Darcy 335 Freeman, Mary 413 Freeman, Ricardo 189, 347 Freeman, Steven 308 French, Mark 247 French, Robert 108 French, Sharon 413 Frenza, Leonard Jr. 413 Frick, Mark 332 Fridell, Richard 155 Fried, Jeffrey 348 Friedrich, Karen 266, 413 Frisch, Linda 364 Frobe, Kent 334 Frost, David 353 Frownfelter, Greg 413 Fugit, Katherine 413 Fugle, Craig 253 Fuhr, Melissa 413 Fuigin, Erick 367 Fujii, Dennis 304 Fujii, Joyce 285 Fujikawa, Karen 340 Fulco, Jorge 322 Furlong, Susan 354 Furnanz, Thomas 275 Furth, Shelley 356 G Gabbert, Janis 413 Gadut, Barbara 413 Gaffi, Diane 413 Gage, Benjamin 230 Gainer, Virginia 264 Galbraith, Steven 225 Gallagher, Jayne 413 Galleron, Marcia 413 Galuan, Jim 241 Galvan, Donnis 349, 413 Gamboa, Thomas 247, 308, 413 Gamgee, Sam 332 Gandy, Stephen 367 Gangnes, Margaret 413 Gangnes, Richard 225, 311, 413 Gannaway, Judith 107 Gans, Bernard 305, 413 Gant, Margaret 189, 297 Garbutt, Bryan 252, 303 Garcia, Damian 351 Garcia, Jose 108 Garcia, Yolanda 413 Garcken, Knute 271 Gardella, Dennis 372 Gardner, Claudia 346 Gardner, Thomas 332 Farley, Robert Jr. 328, 411 Farmer, Craig 228, 254 Farrm, Ralph 411 Farrell, Richard Jr. 411 Farrington, Phyllis 341 Fastenow, Trudi 411 Faucher, Bonnie 378 Fauvre, Madelyn 269, 378 Fears, Wanda 343 Featheringill, Areta 411 Featheringill, Ron 411 Featherstone, Thomas 192 Fedan, Nick 274 Fedrick, Daniel 331 Feeley, John 241 Feeney, Lawrence 411 Feffer, Leighan 290 Feige, Carol 411 Feige, Geoffrey 330 Feliciano, Jeff 225 Felix, Cecelia 412 Fellows, Merrilee 327,358 Fenerin, Peter 313 Fenley, Janice 412 Gardner, Timothy 307 Garlock, William 318 Garner, Carole 413 Garner, Kathryn 413 Garrett, Deborah 340 Garrison, Barbara 413 Gausewitz, Lynn 293 Gebhart, Lloyd 11, 367 Geddes, Peter 368 Geiger, Marsha 164, 217, 297 Geiser, Gay 356 Gelb, Joann 299 Gentry, Marjory 361 Genuit, Christine 413 George, Bonnie 413 George, Gordon 241 Gerlach, Craig 158, 162, 208, 413 Gerry, Kathleen 413 Gersh, Ellyn 364 Gerson, Leslie 350, 413 Gessner, Vickie 413 Getz, Randolph 329 Giammona, Virginia 191 Gibbs, Susan 269, 299 Gibson, Robert 243 Gifford, Steven 352 Giguere, Ann 344 Gilbert, 413 Gillett, Robert 330 Gillies, David Jr. 301 Gilman, James 107 Ginder, Bradford 190, 316, 413 Ginder, Steven 316 Gingg, Gretchen 294, 413 Ginotti, Denise 413 Ginthner, Gayle 413 Giragosian, Robert 331 Gist, Marilyn 342 Glandon, Mary 343 Gleitman, Steve 414 Glomb, James Jr. 107 Glover, Joan 358 Goddard, Lawrence 305, 414 Godfrey, Cyrus 88, 182, 184, 347 Godlis, Ross 414 Gogel, Howard 368 Gohr, Lucy 205, 375 Q 71: Golbuff, Linda 414 Goldberg, Susan 414 Goldhammer, Alan 414 Goldin, Beverly 414 Goldman, Lawrence 353 Goldman, Sari 327, 358 Goldsmith, Sarah 414 Goldstein, Rhea 414 Goldstein, Vicki 364 Gombos, Aniko 109 Gomer, Roberta 191 Gomes, Brian 327, 332 Gomez, David 192 Gonzalez, Philip 249 Good, D. Riece 154 Goodman, Donna 414 Goodrich, Mark 334 Goodwill, Margaret 327 Goodyear, Mark 231 Goos, Anita 414 Gordon, Eugene 414 Gordon, Gary 312 Gorzynski, Beryl 109, 299 Goss, Linda 414 Gottfredson, David 272 Gottfredson, Michael 365 Gottlieb, Stephen 303 Goulart, Lynett 297, 359 Gourley, Eric 90, 108 Grafe, Carol 297 Graham, Nicholas 414 Grandt, Phyllis 414 Granlund, Frederick 414 Grant, Jeanne 357 Grant, John 155, 227, 329 Grant, Machelle 289, 414 Grant, Susan 379 Graumann, Timothy 303, 414 Graves, Robert 330, 414 Gray, Dennis 108 Gray, Kenneth 330 Gray, Laurie 336 Gray, Rebecca 290 Greathead, Janette 107, 269, 299 Greco, Sandra 414 Green, Charles Jr. 301, 321, 414 Green, Kathy 340 Green, Pattie 374 Green, Virginia 414 Greenaway, Kenneth 225 Greene, Maxine 337 Greenlee, James 312 Grenfell, Jeri 344 Gressett, Cheryl 414 Greyson, Deborah 293 Gridley, John 263 Griffen, Jack 368 Griffin, Douglas 321, 414 Griffin, Nancy 414 Griffith, Carole 414 Griffith, Claudia 289 Griffith, Stacey 198, 285 Griggs, Sharon 414 Grim, Kristen 414 Grinstead, Linda 414 Griset, Patricia 202, 414 Grisham, Michael 239 Griswold, Linda 266 Grix, Robert 414 Groesbeck, Michael 308 Grokenberger, David 323 Gross, Barbara 267 Gross, Jonathon 365 Grossman, Craig 312 Grossman, Helen 414 Grossman, Joel 350 Grossman, Lawrence 347 Grove, Jennifer 414 Grover, Scott 327 Grow, John Jr. 353 Grow, Julia 107 Gruenberg, Joel 330 Gstettenbauer, Gregory 306 Gstettenbauer, Joseph 307 Guethlein, Ellen 338, 340 Guetzlaff, George 414 Guillot, Sandra 290 Guillou, James 311 Gulliver, John 271 Gunderson, Gretchen 414 Gunther, Danna 414 Guntrum, Michael 331 Gurwin, Steve 346 Gustafson, Nancy 107, 109, 414 Gutierrez, Carol 341 Guy, Melissa 414 Gwillim, Madeline 414 H Haack, Christine 353 Haas, Darlene 414 Haberly, Norman 367 Hagberg, Janet 358 Hagerm an, Ann 350 Haggland, Laurie 294 Haglund, John 414 Hairston, Andrea 82 Hall, Candice 414 Hall, Cenae 267 Hall, Elizabeth 338, 345 Hall, Genae 358 Hall James 373 Hall, suzene 286, 356 Halonen, Gerald 331 Haloski, Mary 191, 289 Halpern, Donna 202 Hamblin, Claudia 341 Hamm, Steven 175 Hamp, Doug 373 Hamre, Cathryn 335 Hanauer, Gary 176, 414 Hancock, Debra 414 Hancock, Linda 267 Hand, Holly 343 Handley, Richard 272 Hanford, Barbara 293, 414 Hanke, Debra 284 Hankins, John 178, 414 Hanna, Lynn 267, 337 Hans, Elizabeth 269 Hansen, Allen 113 Hansen, Jan 366 Hansen, Sandra 344 Hansen, Sonja 200, 414 Hansen, Victoria 366 Hanson Cary 247 Hanson, Charles 372 Hanson, Karin 415 Hanson Marilyn 374, 378 Hanson, Robert 271 Hardcastle, Joseph 351 Harding, Robert 321, 415 Hardy, Harger, David 339 Bruce 415 Harlow, Phoebe 361 Harpe, Harpe, Barbara 415 Larry 269, 415 Harper, Randall 321 Harrah, Gregory 415 Harris, Barbara 201 Harris, Christine 366 Harris, Dianne 339 Harris, John 307 Harris, Kathleen 205 Harris, Lana 415 Harris, Mary 284, 415 Harris, Patricia 358 Harris, Robert Alan 352 Harris, Robert Michael 240 Harris, Rosalie 337 Harris, Stephanie G. 344 Harris, Stephanie Rae 415 Harris, Trester Jr. 352 Harris, William 307 Harrison, Catherine 415 Harriso n, Given 271, 415 Harrison, Kathleen 415 Harrold, Ann 293 Hart, C laudia 416 Hart, William Jr. 303 Hartma 358 Hartma n, Heidi 266, 267, nn, Nancy 416 Hartnett, Shirley 356 Hartney, Linda 416 Hartzell, Kay 416 Harwick, Burton 243 Harwood, Julie 355 Haskett, Steven 238, 308 Hassebrock, Barbara 286, 340 Hastings, Terry 365 Hatch, Nancy 197, 286 Hatfield, Glenn 416 Hatten, Thoburn 11, 249 Hauge, Jo Ann 416 Hawes, Cynthia 293 Hawes, Jill 344 Hawkes, Howard 416 Hawkinson, Ann 365 Haws, Donald 416 Haynes, John 253 Haywood, Susan 416 Heacock, Carolyn 375 Head, William 274 Hearron, Ruth 416 Heath, Andrea 416 Heath, Deborah 344 Heaton, Cynthia 178 Hecht, George 239 Hedding, Devon 289 Hedge, Brook 267, 416 Hee, Brenda 194 Heers, Julia 366 Hegy, Norine 416 Heijn, Carolyn 416 Heim, Nancy 416 Heineccius, William 175 Heinsohn, Stephen 311 Heinz, Perri 196 Heiser, Paula 344 Heller, Robert 365 Helman, Paul 158, 416 Helvey, Mark 316, 351 Helwick, Robert 170, 190, 316, 416 Hench, Sara 416 Hendershot, Christie 416 Henderson, John 416 Henderson, Julie 191, 202 Henderson, Robert 253, 416 Hendren, Vera 416 Hengel, Michael 307 Henjum, Clare 364 Henkel, Gretchen 352, 416 Hennessy, Thomas 275 Henning, George 318 Hennon, Judith 366 Henry, Ann 179, 416 Henry, Daniel 328, 329 Henry, Mary 416 Hepfer, Heidi 269, 350 Herbert, Laurel 196, 288 Herbert, Pamela 416 Herbon, Randy 315, 416 Herman, Jeffrey 43, 152, 167 Hermann, Mary 358 Hernandez, Glen 348 Hernandez, John 271 Herndon, Matthew 225 Herrman, Leslie 348 Herron, Nadine 378, 416 Hersh, Marille 107 Hesky, Martin 155 Hesse, Paul 108, 243 Hesser, Phillip 174 Hewes, Anthony 365 Heyman, Elissa 94 Heyn, Rita 416 Hiatt, Cynthia 348 Hickey, Patricia 290, 416 Hickson, James 416 Hide, Terry 348 Higashi, Kathleen 375 Higgin, Joleen 292 Higgins, John 261 Higgins, Kathleen 416 Higgins, Nancy 335 Higuchi, Jenny 416 Hill, Deborah 193, 416 Hill, Margaret 345 Hill, Martha 154, 155 Hill, Suzanne 204, 265, 284 Hill, Terry 249 Hillis, Thomas 225 Hillman, Bruce 347 Hillman, Elizabeth 292, 416 Hillman, Jeanette 416 Hillo, Bobbie 350 Hillson, Donna 361 Hilscher, Sandra 202 Hilton, Richard 416 Hinckley, Deborah 344 Hinckley, Hilary 416 Hinds, Dorothy 344 Hinkley, Gerald 188 Hinojosa, Susana 350 Hinrichs, Jim 353 Hintz, Donna 416 4 4 Hinze, Marion 284, 416 Hipskind, Rose 416 Hirose, Yoko 356 Hirota, Masako 366 Hirt, Charles 416 Hisatomi, Marilyn 356 Hitchcock, Judy 341 Hitchcock, Robert 174 Hoag, Karen 416 Hobbs, Gregg 137 Hobson, Priscilla 291, 374 Hochschild, Steven 416 Hodding, Curtis 316, 416 Hoellwarth, Kristina 155 366 Hoenes, Erin 343 Hoerber, Sharon 378, 416 Hoey, Elizabeth 291 Hoff, Julie 416 Hoffart, Turie 344 Hoffman, Antonia 203, 378 Hoffman, Charles 352 Hoffman, Joan 175, 284 Hoffman, Marcia 155, 196, 284, 345 Hoffman, Sandra 193 Hofmann, John 315, 417 Hofmann, Michael 417 Hofstee, Philip 352 Hogan, Deborah 378 Hoiem, Bruce 417 Hoke, June 417 Hold, Lawrence 247 Holden, Carl Jr. 417 Holden, Frederick 301, 312, 313 Holden, James 417 Holkesvick, Holly 378 Holland, Jack 305 Holliday, Linda 335 Hollie, Cathie 357 Hollingsworth, David 228 Hollingsworth, Joan 286 Hollywood, Linda 107 Holmes, Carol 269, 348 Holmes, Christine 417 Holmes, Genevieve 284 Holmes, John 417 Holt, Pamela 267 Honegger, Doreen 155, 284 Honegger, John 307 Honegger, Steven 275 Honig, Thomas 230, 417 Hoos, Michael 271 Hoover, Alice 109 Hopkin, Janet 107 Hopkins, Janelle 340 Horner, Linda 417 Hornstein, Sara 198, 292 Horsfall, Caryn 288 Horst, Mary 340 Humfreville, Ellen 266, 359 Humiston, Judy 344 Hummel, Susan 203, 352 Hummes, Katherine 203, 204, 378 Humphries, George 192, 273 Hunkin, Seline 203 Hunot, Arthur 373 Hunt, Jeanne 343 Hunt, Patricia 341 Hunter, Susan 341 Huntley, David 271 Huntley, Marcia 356 Huntsinger, Steven 225 Hurlbert, Margaret 348 Huxley, Daniel 249 Huyssen, Linda 292, 418 Hyde, Judy 107 Hyder, William 329 Hyer, Hallie 267 Hynes, Jo 418 Hyp, Beatriz 418 lida, Junko 353 lmfeld, Roberta 418 lmhoff, Barbara 418 lndermill, Kathy 375 Ingraham, Melinda 291 lnlow, Duane 329 lrey, Raymond 347 Irvine, Eileen 418 lrwin, Michael 230 Irwin, Susan 299, 344 lsen, Kenneth 350 lsenberg, Scott 367 lsmay, J. Randall 273 Ito, Kathleen 339 Iverson, Marsha 418 lwaoka, Carol 365 Izzo, David 240, 267 J Jack, lan 200 Jackson, Dan 418 Jackson, Juanita 285 Jackson, Leroy Jr. 238, Jacobs, Rex 317,418 Jacobson, Nancy 356 Jacobus, Robert 418 Jacques, Juliette 366 Jaeb, Nancy 109 Jaeger, Ronald 174, 351 Jain, Ravinder 173, 193, 418 James, Margo 366 James, Rose 196, 197 James, Timothy 367 James, William Jr. 39, 42, 141, 152 Jarvic, Susan 361 Jeffers, Keith 227, 249, 301, 320, 418 Jefferson, Carl 243 Jemmott, Joanne 181, 352 Jenkins, Barbara 291 Jenkins, Clifford 172, 225 Jenkins, Judith 366 Jenkins, Margaret 266 Jenkins, Marilyn 352 Jennings, Ross 271 Jones, Cleophus 247 Jones, Donna 350 Jones, Elizabeth 109, 419 Jones, John 108, 419 Jones, Kenneth 419 Jones, Lesley 269, 354, 358 Jones, Melanie 298 Jones, Nancy 285 Jones Nancy Louise 419 Jones Nancy Marie 419 Jones Randy 419 Jordan, Jessica 344 Jordan, Lynn 109 Jordan, Margaret 365 Jorgensen, Jeffrey 200 Josephs, Frances 364 Joy, Michael 275 June, Steven 173, 305 Jutzi, Janice 286 K Jensen, Deanna 269 Jensen, Kevin 275 Jensen, Richard 249 Jensen, Rick 318 Jensen, Robert 418 Jenvey, Marlyn 154, 155, 299, 343 Jerome, Margaret 196, 292 Jesswein, Sheila 269, 337 Jimenez, Francisco 418 Jochums, Christie 418 Johnson, Adolph 153 Johnson, Amy 339 Johnson, Ben 368 Johnson, Diane 186, 187, 266 Johnson, Donald Jr. 108, 418 Johnson, Eileen 205, 288 Johnson, George 418 Johnson, Gerald 350 Johnson, Joseph 418 Johnson, Julie 343 Johnson, Lani 418 Johnson, Larry 418 Johnson, Linda 288 Johnson, Lyndell 109 Johnson, Lynne 108, 418 Johnson, Margaret 291, 418 Johnson, Mark 334 Johnson, Marvin 418 Johnson, Mary 299 Johnson, Randall 353 Johnson, Robin 298 Johnson, Virginia 419 418 Jackson, Martin 367 Jackson, Terrance 318 Jackson, Thomas 247, 248 Jacobs, Douglas Johnston, Janet 419 Johnston, Paula 291, 419 Jonas, Beverly 419 Jones, Arthur 111, 272 Horton, Samuel 111, 330 Horvath, Christine 155, 364 Horwitz, Tom 249, 321 Hostetler, Robin 243 Hostetter, Suzanne 417 Hotz, William 305,417 Hougardy, Susan 418 Houghton, George 327, 330 Houlemard, Michael 332 Houy, Paula 365 Howard Howard, Howard, Howard, 204 , Alyce 361 Barbara 294, 356 Cynthia 291, 418 Linda 154, 155, Howe, James 418 Howell, Todd 321, 418 Howenstein, Ann 296, 418 Huang, Joseph 194 Huang, Patrick 351 Huang, Richard 273 Hubert, Carol 380 Huddleson, Margaret 285 Huggins, Terry 285, 344 Hughell, James, Jr, 418 Hughes, Alison 366 Hughes, Marilyn 291 Hughes, Sheryl 353 Hull, Ronald 351 Hulse, Geraldine 339 Humble, Stephen 108 Kadesh, Eileen 356 Kado, Leonard 330 Kaida 335 Kalfsbeek, Lisa 155, 344 Kalfsbeek, Suzanne 357 Kalinoski, Christine 380 Kalinske, Susan 290 Kalk, Eileen 158, 353 Kallam, Thomas 419 Kalman, lldiko 193 Kamen, Scott 272 Kamhi, Carla 356 Kammen, Glenn 419 Kander, Michael 269, 318 Kanemitsu, Janice 341 Kanes, Raymond 419 Kaplan, Frederick 202, 271 Kaplan, Pamela 419 Kastel, Lynne 337 Kastrop, Catherine 343 Katayama, Miles 348 Katz, Margaret 326, 419 Kaucher, John 201, 315 Kaufman, Carole 286 Kaufman, Ron 172 Kaufman, Steven 303 Kaufman, Thomas 155 Kay, Deborah 107, 335, 419 Kearn, Devon 266, 292 Kearney, Douglas 88 Keefer, Lynn 345 Keeler, Chester 94 Kenner, Kenneth 271 Keeney, Anne 296 Kees, Vicky 378 Keigh, Robert 230 Keitel, Ann 419 Keith, David 108, 419 Keller, Cyrus Jr. 180 Kelley, Kathleen 203 Kelly, Ann 419 Kelly, Bruce 155 Kelly, Carolyn 285 Kelly, Harley 352 Kemp, Deobrah 335 Kendall, John 380 Kenegos, Kenneth 170 Kennedy, Dan 206 Kennedy, John 11, 419 Kennedy, Shirley 419 Kenney, Katherine 378 Kenney, Susan 361 Kent, Robert 158, 162 Keogh, Dennis 329 Kerr, Mary 327, 342 Kerr, Patricia 177, 292, 419 Kesler, Linda 154, 343 Kessler, Denise 179 Kezirian, Gregory 225 Kholmann, Don 309 Kibele, Edith 269 Kidd, Brian 419 Kieffer, Joseph 379 Kiley, Kathy 294 Killeen, Joanne 374 Kiloh, Kirk 330 Kim, Kyung 337 Kim, Patricia 349, 419 Kimes, Kathy 379 Kimmel, Jacqueline 293,419 Kimoto, Paul 323 Kimura, James 353 Kincaid, Jarvis 157 King, Carolyn 419 King, Gerald 240, 320 Kingston, Abbe 419 Kirk, Deborah 361 Kirkpatrick, Kathleen 327, 366 Kirkpatrick, Mary 191 Kirkpatrick, Troy 296 Kiskis, Ronald 308,419 Klein, Eileen 339 Klein, Karen 352 Klein, Nancy 419 Kleinhenz, Joan 419 Kleinhofer, William 184 Kleinman, Joan 287, 419 Kleinman, Leslie 287 Kleveland, Kendall 419 Klocke, Linda 294 Klohs, Debra 174 Klotzsche, Lucinda 272, 290 Kluth, Marilyn 298 Kluver, David 330 Kneale, Charles 332 Knell, Gregory 153, 176 Knight, Cynthia 293 f'TB,1i:f .'. - " 'L .2 1 ,Y is - S Knoblauch, Patricia 341 Knorr, Deborah 155, 285 Knowles, Stephen 330 Knox, Gloria 419 Knutson, Jack 365 Kobal, John 347 Koch, Nancy 335 Koehler, Stephen 419 Koenigs, Marilyn 419 Koerner, Linda 188, 202, 419 Kohn, Philip 153, 170, 317, 326, 350 Kokes, Rosemary 269, 337 Kolar, Doreene 202 Kolb, Brian 240 Kolvitz, Joanne 337 Kolvitz, Leanne 337 Komisar, Debbie 345 Kopf, Robert 313 Kopke, Sharon 349 Korabiak, Dennis 419 Korber, Laurel 174, 293 Korenko, Wendy 169 Korn, Carol 202 Kosloff, Ken 323 Koss, Lynne 419 Kottmeier, Stephen 152, 170, 419 Kovalcheck, Richard 275 Koza, Peter 183 Krakow, Karen 288, 419 Krall, Kenneth Jr. 225 Kramer, Clifford 419 Krause, Robert 350 Kreck, Jeffrey 419 Krelle, Susan 293 Krend, William 108 Kresha, Diane 339 Kressin, Cynthia 344 Kreston, Carolyn 340 Krider, Thomas 419 Kridl, Barbara 340 Krier, Jerilyn 341 Kroeger, Stephanie 419 Kroopnick 332 Krouth, Gary 419 Kruse, Barbara 202 Krushell, Usher 351 Kuchenbaker, Pam 187 Kuge, Sandra 269, 420 Kuhl, Mary 341 Kulvin, Nancy 293 Kunberger, Joan 420 Kundert, Marilyn 290 Kuntz, Barbara 285 Kuriki, Annie 341 Kurilchyk, Deborah 290 ff' Kurzfeld, Gena 357 Kuzell, Elizabeth 173, 288, 420 Kwock, 323 L La Bare, Richard 315 Lachman, Alena 420 Lachman, Millard 420 Lachman, Sandra 364 Lafarge, Marge 327 Laffoon, Catherine 420 Lagana, Gregory 309 La Gory, Carmen 340 Lahue, Patricia 293 Laine, Eddy 420 Laing, Margaret 357 Lake, John 420 Lambert, David 420 Lambert, James 192 Lammiman, John 303 Lamphere, Diane 296 Lancaster, Daniel Jr. 420 Landau, Wendy 179, 366 , ig., Landon, Catherine 341 Landreth, Artha 155, 366 Landry, Michael 420 Lane, Cynthia 269 Lane, Elissa 420 Lane, Mark 352 Lang, Deborah 354, 359 La Pointe, Mary 420 Larisch, Sharon 420 Larkin, Edward 107, 166, 352 Larson, Ellen 364 Larson, Patricia 364 Larson, Victor 309 La Salle, Richard 368 Laska, Steven 310 Lass, Leslie 337 Lathrop, Ann 191 Latlue, Tricia 344 Laub, Steven 420 Lauchland, Debie 336 Lauer, Kitrick 241 Laun, Kristine 288 La Velle, James 249 Laver, Thomas 332 Law, Kevin 249 Lawhon, Mary 378 Lawrence, Beth 335 Lawrence, Janene 378 Lawrence, Lorraine 374 Lawrence, Patricia 267, 293 Lawrence, Theodora 108, 420 Larence, William Jr. 275, 420 Lawson, Barbara 420 Lawson, Gary 420 Lawton, Benjamin 274 Lazzaro, Linda 375 Leach, Jeffrey 240 Leach, Lee 107, 108 Leahy, Constance 335 Leavitt, Cathie 356 Lebby, Rhonda 348 Ledbetter, Nancy 336 Ledeen, Kathy 202, 290 Lewolt, Daniel 271 Liberman, Andrew 305 Licciardi, Diane 420 Lieber, Victoria 327 Lietz, Nancy 298, 383, 420 Lilienthal, John 275, 353 Lincoln, Christine 352 Lincoln, Dorothy 353 Linden, Gary 272 Lindgren, Russell 303 Lindquist, Jane 349 Lindquist, Laura 269, 358 Lindsay, David 352 Lindsay, Joan 420 Lindsay, Linda 420 Lindsey, Cynthia 420 Lindsey, Leslie 420 Lindskog, Robert 420 Linn, Kenneth 241 Linn, Susan 188, 189 Linnegan, Florence 109 Linton, Connie 288 Lipani, Linda 420 Lipari, Michael 202, 271, 420 Lippincott, William 275 Littlejohn, Fred 317 Lizama, Lester 89, 108 Lloyd, Randi 375 Lock, Martin 319 Loeb, Stanford 108 Loehr, Richard 323 Lofft, William Jr. 314, 421 Logan, Carol 421 Logan, Sarah 341 Lonbaken, Janice 355 London, Eileen 421 Long, Marilee 109 Long, Melody 107 Long, Theodore 243, 421 Loomis, Patricia 421 Lopes, James 421 Lopez, Dave 108 Lopez, Kenneth 421 Lopez, Laura 109 Lopez Ronald 352 Lee, Arlene 365 Lee, Jerry 239 Lee, Jonathan 254, 255 Lee, Larry 73, 301, 307, 420 Lee, Michael 372 Lee, Paul 225, 247, 317 Lee, Richard 253, 368 Lee, Sandra 361 Lee, Shirley 378 Leef, Laurel 107, 346, 350 Lefavor, Brent 348 Lehman, Jill 335 Lehman, Joan 420 Leinenweber, Mark 313 Leiphardt, Susan 196, 293 Leland, Robert 367 Lemaster, Kathleen 420 Lemaster, Linda 269 Lemaster, Martha 269 Lembi, Francine 358 Lemman, Barbara 290, 340 Lemon, Robert 351 Lencioni, Randell 290 Lendino, Thomas 272, 332 Lenhardt, David 108, 192, 420 Lenhardt, Lynn 420 Leonard, Denise 343 Leonard, Steven 249, 420 Leong, Amye 326, 354 Leslie, Eric 420 Lessin, Robert 273, 420 Lester, Jean 357 Leung, Hok Pui 194, 420 Levering, Robert 239 Levin, Judith 364 Levin, Larry 272 Levy, Margo 420 Lew, Barclay 332 Lewarton, Lynnette 344, 420 Lopez, Yolanda 156 Lopker, Karl 313 Lopple, Jim 330 Lord, David 272 Lord, Marilyn 109, 365 Lovan, Cheryl 421 Lovan, Robin 108 Love, Randall 334 Love, Russell 421 Lovell, Frank 309 Lovenberg, Susan 361 Low, Walter 352 Loyd, Barbara 421 Lubeck, Gerald 348 Ludlum, William 158 Luick, Barbara 267 Luke, Gary 225, 275 Luke, Ginger 269, 354, 356 Lulow, Rochelle 187, 287, 421 Lumbard, Bruce 173, 421 Lund, Kristine 374 Lundy, Jack 275 Lundy, Larmond 334 Lusby, Karen 269 Luskin, Richard 309, 421 Luthaker, Suzanne 90 Luther, Richard 155, 231 r 332 Lydon, Terrence 307 Lynch, James 310,421 Lynes, Carolyn 198, 269, 290, 380 Lyons, Arthur 421 Lyons, Kathleen 171, 374 Lyons, Linda 375 Lyons, Maureen 341 Lyum, Karen 189 Lewis, David 420 Lewis, David Arthur 420 Lewis, Eric 253 Lewis, Gary 327, 348 Lewis, Melanie 420 Lewis, Neal 331 Lewis, Robert 305, 420 M MacArthur, Laura 289, 421 MacCallum, Kristine 366 MacCutcheon, Chryssa 421 4 454 MacDonald, Leslie 335 MacDonald, Mary 421 MacFarlane, Alana 335 Machado, Sue 296 MacHale, Marla 378, 421 Maclntyre, Sharon 189, 397 Mackedie, Mary 267 MacKenzie, Christopher 421 MacKenzie, Kirk 353 Mackey, Martha 108 Mackie, William 329 MacKirdy, Barbara 266, 298, 421 MacKirdy, Christine 343 MacLagan, Robert 421 MacLaren, Zaidee 291 , 421 MacPhee, Joy 358 Macy, Michael 227, 249 Macy, Ted 421 Madden, Daniel 249 Madruga, Philip 155 Magnuson, Ingrid 284, 421 Magos, Theodore 365 Maguire, Jacquelyn 289 Maguire, Patricia 289 Mahle, Chrisann 272 Mahony, Thomas 275, 309 Main, Janet 107 Mairs, Bruce 331 Maize, David 350 Malan, Paula 421 Malashock, Mark 317 Maley, Madalyn 355 Malin, Lucia 364 Mall, Lois 379 Malone, Kathy 380 Maltz, Arnold 107 Mandaville, Gail 421 Mandel, Richard 421 Mandella, Jeanette 202, 421 Manley, Marcia 345 Mann, Barbara 421 Mann, Carol 364 Mansfield, John 154 Manuel, Betjina 366 Marchman, Mary 343 Marcus, Marc 331 Margarit, Joanne 422 Maria, Dorothy 350 Marines, Bruce 225 Marinovich, Dee 374 Markham, Charles 422 Markota, Richard Jr. 309 Marmer, Lorraine 364 Maron, Michael 227, 249 Marquess, Sheila 358 Marquis, Nyla 344 Marshall, Robert 247, 311, 422 Marshall, Susan 422 Marteney, James, Jr. 322, 422 Martens, Pamela 155, 355 lvlartin, Donna 422 Martin, Jacqueline 284, 422 Martin, Kathy 158 Martin, Lois 296, 422 Martin, Marilyn 344 Martin, Phillip 275 Martin, Rachel 422 Martinek, Nancy 284 Martinez, Sonia 422 Martinich, Robert 35 Martins, Anthony 111, 247 Martus, Christopher 353 Marx, Andrew 332 Masik, Robert 372, 422 Mason, Dane 202, 271 Mason, Robert Jr. 37, 142, 236, 238 Mason, Sharon 198, 291, 380 Matalas, Judith 284, 422 Mathe, Bonny 326, 348 Matheson, Douglas 273 Mathews, Linda 205 Mathews, William 260, 275 Matlock, Michele 298 Matsinger, Harry 319 Matsuoka, Laura 352 Mattes, Lawrence 347 Matthews, James 422 Matthews, Lois 422 Matthews, William 301, 314 Mattos, Joyce 422 Mattos, Weldon Jr. 422 May, Dennis 113 Maybay, Tina 295 Mayes, Shirley 336 Maylen, Charles 111, 273 Mayuga, Sandor 422 Mazzetta, Dave 331 Mazzola, Janet 354, 357 McAleney, James Jr. 422 McArthur, Seonaid 422 McCabe, Alexis 380 lVlcCaffery, Jill 285, 422 McCall, Bruce 305 McCall, Catherine 422 McCallion, William 274 McCampbell, Bruce 241 McCampbell, Kathryn 358 McCandless, John IV 422 McCarrick, Anne 361 McCarthy, Sandra 375 McCarty, Cathy 269, 289 McClain, Gregory 422 McCliesh, Joyce 422 McClune, James 272, 310 McConnell, Lonnie 225 McCormick, Kathleen 422 McCowan, Jack Jr. 190, 317, 422 McCracken, Melony 298 McCrary, Linda 269 McCurdy, Michael 313 McCutchan, Joseph 372, 380, 422 McDade, Elizabeth 337 McDaniel, Kimberly 296 McDonald, Patricia 352 McDougall, Gregory 372, 422 McEachen, Richard 422 McElderry, Babette 422 McEIderry, Tina 337 McElmurry, Mary 340 McEntee, Mary 295 McEvoy, Gail 107 McEwan, Robert 271 McGeen, John 422 McGenagle, Cindy 341 McGinnis, Peggy 292 McGory, Michael 237, 238 McGough, Catherine 289 McGough, Melody 267, 337 McGough, Richard 304, 328, 331, 422 McGrew, Dorothy 107 McGuinness, Lorie 288, 289 Mclntire, Robin 352 Mclntosh, Carol 364 Mclntyre, Shannon 295 McKay, Jeanne 397, 422 McKee, Dorothy 287 McKeever, Patricia 295 McKell, Douglas 259 McKellar, Georganne 109, 267, 292 McKelvy, Herb 380 McKenna, Brian 275, 326, 346, 372 McKenzie, Allyson 292 McKeown, Margaret 422 McKeown, Mike 321 Mark 422 McKinley, McLain, Catherine 343 McLaren, Nancy 344 McLaughlin, Daniel 249 McLaughlin, Terrence 259, 310 McLaughlin, Timothy 347 McLean, Pamela 284 McLean, Robert 422 McLees, Melanie 117 McLellan, Jennifer 202 McMahon, Peter 310 McMiIlian, Patricia 364 McMullun, Ferne 357 McMurray, Kally 289, 422 McNamara, Mary 107 McNeely, Maryanne 422 McNeil, lan 319 McNerney, Kenneth 273 McPeak, John 170, 176, 422 McPeak, Sunne 422 McPhail, Carol 422 McQuade, Janice 522 McQuillan, Timothy 350 McRae, Diana 337 McReynolds, Roberta 344 McWilliam, Linda 291 Meacham, Susan 422 Mead, Carol 422 Meade, Camille 349 Meanley, John 303 Meck, Kathryn 336 Medalie, Adrienne 269, 422 Megarity, Jack 111, 272 Meiers, John 309, 422 Meinel, Carla 284 Meitz, Frederick 309 Melchione, Joseph 179 Melly, Patrick 48, 180 Mencke, Raymond Jr. 252 Menefee, Lynn 422 Menzel, John 271 Meredith, Marie 266, 269, 358 Merlino, Donna 422 Merrick, Barbara 341 Merrick, Linda 423 Merrill, John 228 lvlerrill, Susan 358 Merriman, James 313, 423 Merritt, Ann 344 Merritt, Susan 355 Mershon, Mary 423 Messenger, Phyllis 284, 423 Messineo, Diana 340 Metcalf, Timothy 322, 423 Metz, Thomas, Jr. 332 Meyer, Alexandra 423 Meyer, Cynthia 107, 165, 192, 423 Meyer, Jack 331 Meyer, Jerry 247 Meyer, Joan 423 Meyer, Katherine 202, 296 Meyer, Michelle 287 Meyers, Leslie 176 Michaelson, Franklyn 225, 423 Michael, Bruce 423 Michels, Pamela 297, 423 Michky, Marianne 295 Middleton, Nancy 423 Mieger, Carol 353 Miglore, Donna 287 Mikkelsen, Karen 269 Mikowicz, Thomas 331 Milam, Stephen 309, 423 Milbourn, Mary 336 Milbrandt, Nancy 423 Miles, Ronald 273 Millenaar, .lean 284, 423 Miller, Barbara 345 Miller, Dennis 321, 423 Miller, Diana 349 Miller, George 423 Miller, Glenn 107, 353 Miller, James 262, 319 Miller, Lawrence 228, 301, 309 Miller, Lucinda 423 Miller, Marc 350 Miller, lVlarcia 155, 339 Miller, Norma 291, 423 Miller, Richard 107 Miller, Robert 107 Miller, Susan 423 Milligan, Melinda 352 Mills, Andrew 179, 186 Mills, Jim 157 Mills, Peter 317 Milnor, Patricia 366 Minster, Kristine 353 Minta, Paul 351 Miozzi, Deborah 358 Mirkovich, Michael 231 243 Mirosh, John 327 Mispagel, Marilyn 289 Mitchell, Deborah 423 Mitchell, Dennis 319 Mitchell, James 108, 225 Mitchell, Leslie 423 Mitchell, Susan 423 Miyashiro, Janice 352 Mize, Cynthia 155, 345 Mlejnek, Leland Jr. 423 Moar, Catherine 298 Moberly, Kathleen 326, 338 340 Mobley, Marsha 424 Moccia, John 424 Mock, David 108 Moe, Barbara 292 Moehlman, Ann 343 Moffett, James 111, 164, 216, 317, 424 Moffett, Victoria 299, 424 Mogee, Susan 35 Mohaupt, Charlotte 424 Mohler, Cynthia 285 Mohr, Janet 267 Mokler, Richard 424 Molander, Richard 228 Molina, Randolph 240 Molitor, Mary 264, 425 Moller, Carol 196, 375 Monguia, Richard 332 Murphy Monroe, Pamela 295 Montague, Sharon 295 Moody, James 332 Moody, Nancy 425 Moody, Steven 305 Mooers, Linda 203 189, 425 Moon, James 347 Moore, Christine 295 Moore David 107 , 425 Moore, Evid 339 Moore, Gregory 303 Moore, James 350 Moore, John 225 Moore, Martha 292 Moore, Paula 352 Moore, Robert 272 Moore, Robert Thomas 334 Morado, Martha 340 Nagel, Scott 425 Newsh Morales, Daniel 241, 330 Moran, Kevin 425 Morden, Ruth 203, 352 Moreland, Pamela 378 Moreland, Bob 380 Morgan, Brian 332 Morgan, Emily 380 Morgan, Larry 315 Morgan, Linda 285, 425 Morgan, Marjorie 378 Morgan, Penelope 341 Morgan, Raymond 173, 348 Morgan, Rita 425 Morgan, Ruth 425 Morgan, William 137 Morikawa, Dean 155 Moriwa ki, Elaine 337 Morlan, Thomas 313, 425 Morneau, Geoffry 291, 322 Morreale, John 425 Morrell , Stephen 35 Morrison, Julia 169, 266, 358 Morrisroe, John 319, 425 Morrow, Marilyn 337 Morse, Linda 199,299 Morse, Vivian 425 Mortison, Nena 375 Morton, Lynne 425 Mosgrove, Maggie 294, 425 Mosko, Mark 425 Moss, Edward 425 Moulthrop, Elisabeth 339 Nlount, Deborah 208, 285, 397, 425 Mounts, Jon 107 Mowatt, Mary 297 Mowbray, Alison 176, 186, Moy, Glori 352 Muckley, Kathryn 425 Muckley, Michael 313,425 Mueller, Carolynn 425 Mueller, Stephen 332 Mugglebee, Michael 330 Muilenburg, Deborah 344 Muleady, Kathleen 350 Mulholland, Jeannette 267 Mullally, James 316, 425 Mulle, Denise 378, 425 Mullen, Ann 292 Mullens, Christine 344 Muller, Gail 340 Muller, James 273 Mulumba, Pierre 193 Mulvey, Gayle 292, 425 Mulvey, Patricia 217, 291 Mundi, Alexander 193 Munger, Raymond 425 Munger, Richard 425 Muntean, Dirk 230 Murphy Barbara 292 Murphy, Deirdre 355 Murphy, Dennis 425 Murphy Elizabeth 366 I Gregory 247, 380 Murray, Kathy 299 Murray, Michael 372,425 Murray, Samuel 334 Myers, Alice 133, 425 Myers, Juny 351 Myrabo, Laurie 358 N Nageotte, Michael 329 Nagler, Michael 200 Naimo, Judith 425 Nair, Ralph 425 Nakagawa, Janet 340, 425 Nandy, Ashesh 193 Nanini, Toni 425 Nanny, Margo 205 Narducci, James 351 Naruo, Teresa 335 Neal, Christina 364 Neece, Gerald 179, 180,425 Neely, Yvonne 267 Neiderkorn, John 225 Neilson, Dorothy 197, 299, 425 Neisingh, Sharon 189, 191 Neiswender, Margaret 288 Nelson, Bryan 425 GL- 4 as-L A - 'f.-, 'N' .9 -'l . 1 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It All :'.1'if 'fl :- " ' i Nelson, Calvin Jr. 346 Nelson, Christina 285 Nelson, Elizabeth 358 Nelson, Gerald 425 Nelson, Janet 356 Nelson, Katherine 356 Nelson, Nancy 285 Nelson, Pamela 366 Nelson, Trudy 287 Nemirsky, Nicholas 327, 351 Neu, Helene 425 Nevins , Henry 272 New, Tina 425 Newberry, John 11, 272 Newby, Candace 266 Newcomb, Judith 425 Newman, Charles 173, 304, 425 Newman, Juliana 425 am, Nancy 425 Olvany, Lynn 286 O'Neill, Brian 272 Ong, Michael 367 Onodera, Shirley 202, 203 Onoye, Kathy 327, 426 Onsum, Owen 427 Oppezzo, Timothy 225, 275 Orcutt, Robert 330, 334 Orgeron, Paul 309 Orr, Pamela 327, 341 Orr, Robert 315,427 Osborn, Linda 427 Osborn, Roger 368 Osborne, Catherine 356 Osborne, Leonard 427 Osendorf, Gary 225 O'Shea, Brian 334 Osmundson, Roger 327 Otsea, Robert Jr. 368 Otto, Walter 111,313 Oulie, Jorn 254, 255 Newton, Robert 273, 425 Ng, John 194, 425 Nibley, Annette 287 Nibley, Jane 287, 425 Nichols, Deborah 216, 294 Nichols, Gerald 311, 332 Nickison, Nancy 353 Nicoll, Richard 426 Niebauer, John 275 Niebel, Alan 247 Nielsen, Laurie 267 Nielsen, Sandy 344 Nielson, Michael 271 Niiya, Jason 187 Nishimura, Stanley 327, 353 Nitta, Ralph 330 Nixon, Randy 285, 327 Noel, Ann 107 Noell, Jonathan 312 Nolan, Jere 247 Nolte, Ronald 348 Nordhagen, Ralph 312 Norman, Jon 426 North, Jamie 426 Owen, Patricia 427 Owen, Robert Jr. 427 Owens, Carolyn 344 Owens, James 309 Owens, Nancy 288 Owens, Susan 340 Owings, Patricia 203, 205, 297 Oxford, Joan 269, 427 Oxnard, Bob 334 Oyama, Patricia 197, 299 P Paaske, Larry 427 Pabis, Estelle 427 Pabst, Gwen 164, 342 Page, Diane 349, 427 Paige, Ralph 427 Paju Vivi, Anne 359 Palazzo, Alfred 367 Northridge, Susan 352 Nourse, Pamela 358 Nucko Nucko lls, Anne 378 ls, Chester 312 Nugent, Victoria 426 Nunez , Joseph 212 O Palmer, Janice 294 Palmer, Karen 267 Palmer, Nancy 427 Palmer, Steve 352 Palmer, Thomas 353 Palmer, Victoria 291 Palmquist, Susan 269, 291 Panovich, Kathleen 164, 358 Panovich, Linda 269, 285 Paone, Timothy 309 Papac, Gail 204, 291 Oakes, Elizabeth 327, 344 Ober, Janice 336 Obertreis, Louis 351 Obill, Carol 285 Papas, Ghris 275, 301, 319, 427 Pape, Isaac 351 Pappenfus, John 316 Paquette, Sarah 269 O'Brie O'Brie n, Carole 426 n, Eileen 426 O'Brien, Gregory 309 O'Brien, Kevin 155, 329 O'Brien, Nancy 286 O'Brien, Thomas 348 Ochsner, Frederick 271 O'Connell, Patricia 326, 349 O'Dell, Judith 426 Leslie 354 Pardee, Catherine 183 Parham, Merrell 228 Park, D Parker, aniel 154 Donald Jr. 367 Parker, Howard 322, 427 Parker, Janet 170 Parker, Joan 174 Parker, Judith 374 Parker, Judith Lee 199 Parker, Mary 191, 290 Parker Penny 366 O'Donnell, James 249, 307 O'Donnell, Richard 334 O'Dowd, Dennis 352 Ogle, Mary 285 O'Hagan, Virginia 343 O'Hair, Robert 304 Okazaki, Janet 197 Okuda, Valerie 203, 205 O'Leary, Kevin 329 Oliver, Walter 347 Ollikkala, Kristine 337 Parkhill, Alan 301 Parkinson, Philip 427 Parkov, Chris 344 Parsons, Bonita 339 Parsons, George 311 Partch, Wendy 427 Pasternak, David 154, 155 Paterson, Alan 427 Paterson, Susan 427 Patrick, Donna 353 Patronite, Janice 342 Olsen, Jamie 343 Olsen, Kristine 426 Olsen, Ralph 225 Olsen, Ted 108 Olson, Craig 426 Olson, Edward 426 Olson, Glenn 316 Olson, June 153 Olson, Kim 272 Olson, Ralph 426 Patsel, Lynn 290 Pattee, Patricia 340 Patterson, Eileen 366 Patterson, Gary 427 Patterson, Janet 358 Patterson, R. Dale 284 Pauling, Susan 358 Paxson, William Jr. 427 Peacock, Darlene 349 Pearce, Susan 191, 198 4 428 4 199, 286 Pearson ,Jan 109 Pearson, Karin 358 Pearson, Lynda 427 Pearson, Nancy 349 Pearson, Penny 298 Pearson, Randal 306 Peary, Janet 340 Pease, Sharon 380 Pease, Susan 343 Pecci, George 327, 368 Pedlow, Wendy 286, 427 Pellegrini, Lynne 186, 188, 265, 266, 374 Penner, Joyce 427 Penner, Susan 352 Peppas, Chrystal 350 Pepper, Sanford 365 Pera, Claire 427 Peregoy, Susan 427 Perelli-Minett, Carl 427 Perez, Francis 303 Perez, Linda 269 Perham, Paula 427 Perham, Thomas 427 Perillat, Alexis 330 Peritore, Michael 368 Perkins, Fraser 368 Perkins Marl n 366 Perry, , V Anne 165, 427 Perry, Candace 290, 427 Perry, Edward 111, 427 Perry, Jane 374 Perry, John 330 Perry Katherine 153, 326, 349 Perucca, Janet 350 Peter, Ellen 366 Peters, Alexander 240 Peters, Thomas 313 Petersen, Ann 427 Petersen, Donald 155 Petersen, Kathryn 344 Pettersen, Linda 378 Petersen, Phyllis 269, 288 Petersen, Wesley 350, 427 Peterson, Craig 365 Peterson, Deborah 354, 358 Peterson, Kathleen 180, 181 Peterson, Michael 350 Peterson, Nat 155 Peth, James 427 Peth, John 427 Petrone, James 316 Pettit, Patricia 341 Petty, Gregg 155 Pevey, Lavon 427 Peyton, Robert 332 Pfleger, Judy 427 Phelan, Howard 185, 427 Phelan, Nancy 196 Phillips, David 368 Phillips, Karen 366 Phillips, Marnee 364 Phillips, Ralph 346, 347, 427 Phillips, Robert 269, 427 Phillips, Sally 427 Piantanida, Raymond Jr. 313 Pickens, Donald Jr. 239 Pickles, Gregory 350 Pierce, Gregory 240 Pierce, Roger 330 Piercy, Sandra 345 Pike, Bernie 427 Pilegard, Cris 313 Pimentel, Gary 313 Pineda, John 427 Pinkney, Mary 343 Pitchford, Leslie 344 Pitta, Laura 335 Pitts, Andy 107 Pitts, Marion 107 Plaister, Celeste 188, 189, 202, 343 Plette, Terrence 427 Ploss, Jana 358 Plumb, Diane 340 Poehlmann, Christopher 304 Poindexter, Cynthia 427 Pollen, Erin 356 Pomeroy, Marcia 341 Ponce, Nenita 338, 341 Poncini, Cheryl 344 Ponczocha, Michael 225 Pope, Wendy 341 Popik, Susan 427 Popov, Peter 322, 427 Popovich, Andrew 241 Popp, Cheryl 337 Porter, Conley 177, 186 Porter, Kim 344 Porter, Marilyn 294 Posner, Barry 173, 301, 315, 427 Pospisil, Gail 155, 339 Post, Mary 342 Potter, Caroline 294 Poulsen, Pamela 428 Powell, Roberta 357 Powell, Susan 202 Powell, Thomas 319, 332 Powers, Lester 247 Prall, Marilyn 154, 155, 340 Pratt, Charles 352 Pratt, Deryl 286, 428 Pratt, Janet 428 Pratt, Joseph 428 Presley, Robert 428 Prewett, Yvonne 428 Priestaf, Richard 428 Priolo, Christopher 107 Privett, Allison 293, 428 Probst, Jeffrey 179, 428 Procter, Gregg 352 Procter, Richard 108 Pruitt, Earleen 428 Prussia, Frank 329 Puccini, Joyce 428 Puente, Lillian 397,428 Pugh, Mark 228 Pumford, William 353 Q Quadraccia, Arthur 428 Quarterman, Frederick 346 Quement, Lonna 366 Quesenberry, James 302, -303 Quesenberry, Pamela 428 Quetnick, Lita 286 Quetnick, Sandra 286, 428 Quick, Edward 428 Quick, Kathleen 340 Quinn, Neil 231, 243 Quon, Vidda 199, 290, 428 R Rabbin, Richard 228, 428 Radford, John 168 Radford, Stephen 303 Raech, Elissa 337 Raffesberger, Wayne 327 Raftery, Kevin 330 Ragan, Margaret 299, 356 Ramer, Andrew 367 Ranch, Greg 329 Randall, Donald 231 Randall, Nancy 337 Randolph, James 225, 249 Randolph, John 329 Rapaport, Judith 267, 344 Rapoza, Diana 345 Rapoza, lrene 154, 350 Rascati, Wayne 176, 177 Rash, William Jr. 347 Rashman, Nancy 352 Rasmussen, William 319 Ratcliff, Thomas 367 Rathbun, Carol 109 Ratliff, Gregory 227, 249 Raven, William 271 Ray, Victoria 343 Rayden, Jonathan 260, 322 Rea, Richard 353 Read, Janet 428 Ready, Sharon 196, 199, 290 Real, Emil Jr. 300, 313 Ream, Marc 108 Rear, Scott 311 Reardon, Thomas 271 Rector, Dennis 239 Redemer, Michael 269 Redmond, Terence 372 Ree, Ann 345 Reed, Martha 293, 341 Reed, Michael 428 Reed, Robert 107 Reeder, Rebecca 188, 269, 303, 335 Rees, Diane 428 Reese, Ronald 190 346, 352, Regan, Maureen 109, 155, 358 Rehm, Jeradean 295 Rehm, Walter 247, 428 Reichwein, Heidi 155 Reid, Carolyn 338, 428 Reid, Nancy 366 Reilly, Dennis 225, 275 Reimer, Kathy 327, 358 Reiner, Ronald 192, 428 Reinhold, Ann 428 Reischman, Fabienne 269 Reser, Linda 378 Rethorst, John 428 Retrie, Richard 368 Rex, Douglas 237, 238 Reynolds, Analee 204 Reynolds, Peter 273 Reynolds, Richard 318 Reynolds, Thomas 428 Rhodes, Janice 428 Rhone, Sandy 428 Rhorer, Stephen 252, 316, 428 Ricci, Robert 428 Rice, Patricia 428 Rich, Laura 269, 428 Richard, Carole 344 Richards, Christopher 321 Richert, Ruth 288 Richmond, Katie 428 Rickman, Susan 428 Ridgell, Reilly 272 Riedel, Laura 357 Riekenberg, Catherine 378, 428 Rieker, Candace 428 Rigali, Richard 225 Rightmer, Philip 260 Rigney, Lynn 201, 295, 428 Riley, John 253 Riley, Max 304 Rindge, Marguerite 204, 352 Rintoul, Susan 345 Rios, Janet 350 Ristau, Leah 293 Ritchie, Kathleen 299 Ritchie, Kevin 157, 273, 313 Ritter, Marshall 247, 248 Rittmaster, Gregory 365 Rivera, Mannon 361 Roan, Raymond 190, 304, 428 Robb, Stephen 316 Robbins, Barbara 345 Robbins, Robin 349 Roberts, Douglas 312 Roberts, Janice 198, 428 Roberts, Keith 365 Roberts, Patricia 365, 428 Robertson, Bruce 330 Robertson, David 365 Robertson, Glenn 326 Robertson, Rob 307 Robinson, Ingrid 428 Robinson, James 254, 255 Robinson, Martha 344 Robinson, Ruth 191, 299 Robison, James 316 Robison, Kenneth 316, 428 Rodeen, Dennis 157, 312 Rodgers, James 221, 225 Rodgers, Wayne 275,428 Rodman, James 107 Rodriguez, Daniel 225, 263 Rodriguez, Diane 358 Rodriguez, Kathleen 428 Roesler, Catherine 428 Roest, Sandra 364 Rofer, Allan 429 Rogers Rogers Rogers Rogers, , Alice 286 , Kathleen 342 , Melinda 196, 298 Robert 368 Rohlf, Roberta 284, 249 Rohrkemper, Anthony 330 Rolfe, Nancy 349 Roller, Leslie 307 Romain, Alexa 378 Romanchak, Michael 107 Romanisky, Robert 94, 429 Romo, Elizabeth 358 Roney, Elaine 429 Ronningen, Kristina 293 Fiookstool, Judith 429 Roos, William 429 Root, William 351 Rooth, George 429 Rose, Gary 253 Rose, Rochelle 201 Roselinsky, Myra 429 Rosen, Jeffrey 240, 317 Rosen, Michael 350 Rosenblatt, Randy 239, 329 Rosenthal, Thomas 275 Rosenzweig, Sol 89 Ross, Anna 133, 429 Ross, Donald 347 Ross, Karen 155, 355 Ross, Pamela 288, 429 Ross, Steven 247 Ross, Toby 429 Rossa, Michael 166 Rossen, Steven 259 Rosso, Michael 108 Roth, Carey 321 Roth, Virginia 165, 284 Rottapel, Michael 330 Rottman, Rae 361 Roum, Barbara 344 Round, Laurie 344 Rounds, Gerald 330 Rouse, Ronald 238, 429 Rousseau, John 253 Routh, Susan 430 Rowan, Lynda 269, 298 Rowe, Nancy 174 Rowen, Celia 420 Rowland, Rita 430 Ruby, Martha 266, 290 Rucci, Jeanette 183 Rudd, Daniel 430 Rudolph, Linda 153 Rudolph, Sharon 287 Ruggle, Jean 269 Ruitz, Jan 267 Ruiz, Miguel 330 Rutz, Sharon 345 i Runing, Karol 430 Runsvold, Thomas 322 Runyon, Gregory 223, 225 Russo, Dennis 318 Ryan, Janet 430 Ryan, William Jr. 301 Rydbom, Sharon 378, 431 S Sabo, Susan 380 Sachar, Andrew 334 Sage, Cynthia 431 Sager, Ruth 109 St. Clair, Suzanne 291 St. John, Daniel 231, 243 Sakaguchi, Kenneth 351 Saldin, Roy 249, 327, 330 Sale, David 192, 321, 431 Saleeby, Becky 217, 284, 285 Sales, Virginia 293 Saliman, Joanne 374 Samuels, Marianna 358 Sanche2, Thomas 220, 221, 222, 225 Sandeen, Carolyn 164, 338 Sanders, Ann 431 Sanders, Ryan 107 Sandler, Donna 350 Sandoval, Ruben 365 Sandoz, Carol 344 Sandy, John 271 Sanesi, Norman 322,431 Sanford, William 315 Sanguinetti, Mary 353 Santantonio, Daniel 323, 431 Sapper, Ellyn 155 Sarquis, Gregory 431 Saucer, Mary 169, 298 Sauers, Mark 329 Saunders, Patricia 431 Saunders, Stephen 431 Savage, Ellen 198, 352 Sawyer, Viola 352 Saylor, Michael 247 Scagliotti, Nancy 121, 287, 431 Scanlin, David 431 Scarlett, Patricia 196 Schaefer, Dorothy 269, 375 Schaefer, Thomas 272 Schafer, Bruce 353 Schaffner, Christine 431 Schallheim, James 155 Schallich, Linda 431 Schamp, Linda 358 Scharff, Laura 358 Scharlach, Alan 303, 431 Scheck, Sally 431 Scheel, Randy 271 Schetter, David 431 Scheuch, Stephen 312 Schleicher, Christine 293 Schlesinger, Sheldon 327 Schmickrath, Susan 431 Schmidt, Barbara 205 Schmidt, Jacqueline 397, 431 Schmidt, Kay 366 Schmidt, Teresa 269, 284 Schmitz, Janis 358 Schmucki, Marily-Lou 352 Schneider, Ann 298 Schneider, Kathryn 431 Schneider, Robert 315 Schock, Deborah 293 Schoellhamer, Janet 366 Schoff, Pamela 431 Scholes, Thomas 303 Schoor, Ken 305 Schouest, Leo Jr. 431 Schreiber, Bret 431 Schroeder, Alan 431 Schuler, Catherine 356 Schultz, Marilyn 431 Schultz, Michael 431 Schulz, Janet 341 Schulz, Pamela 191 Schulze, Linda 431 Schumann, Susan 431 Schuyler, Susan 374 Schwartz, Janeice 284 Scobey, Janice 293 Scott, Dianne 155, 338, 340 Scott, Earl 373 Scott, Kendall 349 Scott, Rae 358 Scott, Susan 358 Scrivner, Charyn 431 Scroggins, Nell 431 Scullion, Thomas 431 Seager, Robert 347 Seaman, Freda 358 Seaman, Peggy 290 Searcy, Stanley 243 Seargeant, Janet 346, 350 Sears, Elizabeth 378 Segal, Franklin 372, 431 Segerstrom, Donald Jr. 330 Seidell, John 431 Selby, Michael 274 Self, Sherry 297 Seligman, Robert 368 Sellman, Steven 184 Serpas, Helena 157 Sevland, Ronell 431 Sewell, Marc 300, 323 Shanley, Michael 431 Shapiro, Bruce 307 Shapiro, Frank 353 Sharron, Lisa 341 Shaughnessy, Craig 243, 334 Shaw, Carolyn 287 Shaw, Thomas 311 Shea, Karen 431 Shea, William 365, 431 Sheehey, Patrick 272 Sheffield, Barbara 273 Shelley, Pete 334 Shellich, Linda 109 Shellum, Roberta 107 Shelton, Jan 355 Shenorn, John 353 Shepard, Ann 366 Sher, Jonathon 431 Sheridan, Frances 275, 431 Sherman, Debra 295 Sherman, Judith 431 Sherman, Michael 431 Sherman, Peter 163, 431 Sherman, Sharon 327, 345 Sherrell, James 350 Sheilds, Cynthia 202 Shields, Geoffrey 272 Shields, Susan 431 Shilling, David 431 Shimabuku, Grace 431 Shimasaki, Donald 431 Shinbrot, Mark 107 Shirey, Pamela 295 Shoemaker, Constance 366 Shoji, Dave 213 Shoji, Thomas 379, 431 Shoor, Kenneth 304, 431 Shoultz, Carol 344 Shreve, Ted 313 Shuler, Edward 432 Shuler, Peggy 287 Shultz, Mike 225 Shumer, Loren 225 Shumway, Jeanne 192 Shutt, Susan 358 Sickles, Gary 330 Siegert, Gilbert 432 Sigurdson, Ronald 352 Silacci, Arlyn 295 Siler, Shirley 107 Sillman, Lynn 267 Silva, Kathleen 432 Silva, Martha 366 Silvera, Douglas 352 Silverberg, Warren 432 Silverman, Barry 225, 275 Silverman, Henry 188 Silvett, Larry 238, 432 Simkins, Kim 432 Simkins, Michael 432 Simmerman, Terry 432 Simmons, Claudia 364 Simmons, Judith 297, 383 Simmons, Robert 313, 432 Simon, James 304 Simon, Joel 334 Simon, Susan 358 Simonos, Peter 329 Simons, Gary 225 Simons, Lucille 432 Simons, Susan 432 Simonson, Linda Carol 432 Simonson, Linda Jean 365 Sims, Marsha 109, 269 Sinclair, Karen 364 Sinclair, Richard 313, 432 Sinding, Peter 263, 271 Singer, Kristy 295 Sink, Mary 361 Sinkinson, William 231, 243 Sisman, Stefan 334 Skalnik, John 183 Skeels, Paul 432 Skidmore, Linda 158, 432 Skilling, Robert 108, 432 Skillman, Dianne 82 Skladal, Janet 202 Slattery, Anne 358 Slavik, Thomas 313 Slaybaugh, Marilyn 432 Sleeper, Stephen 228, 432 Slemp, Deborah 171, 290 Sligar, George Jr. 330 Sloane, Donald 351 Slotterbeck, Scott 11, 307 Small, Sally 155 Smallenburg, Carol 109, 192 Smith, Alan 230, 243 Smith, Ann 292, 432 Smith, Brenda 375 Smith, Bruce 275 Smith, Catherine 432 Smith, Cecelia 297 Smith, Christopher 323 Smith, Cindra 288, 432 Smith, Craig 318, 432 Smith, Deborah 107, 155, 344 Smith, Douglas 271, 311 Smith, Elizabeth 109, 284 Smith, Gary 107, 108, 249 304, 305, 432 Smith, Janet 432 Smith, Kent 329 Smith, Kevin 108 Smith, Lanelle 350 Smith, Lewis 432 Smith, Linda 432 Smith, Marcy 337 Smith, Margaret 355, 374 Smith, Mattathias 372 Smith, Nancy 341 Smith, Patricia 287 Smith, Ralph 173 Smith, Roger 163 Smith, Sharon 378 Smith, Sharon Lee 432 Smith, Shelley 269, 288 Smith, Sherri 432 Smith, Stephen 352 Smith, Susan 202 Smith Terry 155 Smoak, Gregory 263 Smothers, Wayne 275, 309 Smyth, Laura 292 u Snashall, Robert 432 Snavely, Deborah 432 Snow, Robert 347 Snowden, Vernon 309 Snowdon, Philip 230 Snyder, Cynthia 303, 345 Snyder, John 154, 432 Snyder, Kristin 356 Snyder, Sandra 295 Snyder, Wayne 249, 250 Snyder Yvonne 340 Sobel, Jeffrey 350 Sobelman, Martin 214 Sofen, Ronald 432 Solari, Bruce 309 Soli, Angela 109, 192, 432 Sork, Victoria 266, 267 Sorkin, Ellery 432 Sosnowski, Antoinette 361 Southwick, Christine 348 Sparacino, Mary 327, 337 Sparling, Patricia 342 Speciale, John 307 Speers, Francine 432 Speier, Kurt 225 Spencer, Carolyn 292, 342 Spencer, Christine 350 Spencer, David 272 Spencer, Gail 341 Sperberg, Richard 231, 243 348 Spickler, Nancy 432 Spingarn, Jay 332 spira, William 432 Sprague, Gregory 432 Sprankle, Judith 292 Sprankling, John 185 Springer, Cynthia 164, 267 Springer, Debra 343 Stack, William 318 Stahl, Kristin 357 Stamm, Penelope 358 Stamp, Sue 348 Stampley, Patricia 73, 291, 432 Standridge, John 225 Stanford, Pete 272 Stenen, 458 Stanford, Sharon 107, 432 Stanley, Richard 272, 332 Stannard, Karen 358 Stanton, Deborah 171, 378, 432 Stanton Stanton Stanton , Jaclynne 171, 374 , Jean 109, 432 , Karen 432 Stark, John Jr. 348 Stark, S usan 358 Starr, Cheryl 432 Stasinis, Mark 307 Stec, Virginia 345 Steckel, John 230 Steele, Patricia 343 Stein, K aren 432 Steinberg, E ugene 347 Steiner, 433 William 190, 253, Steinkuhler, Melanie 357 Steinme tz, Ann 348 Stempel, Gregory 332 Sharon 433 Stengel, Gretchen 358 Stephen, Jan 202, 344 Stephens, Grogory 230 Stephens, Timothy 433 Stephenson, Toni 358 Stern, Julieann 733 Sternadel, Constance 364, 433 Sterrett, Mary 154, 344 Stevens, Jeanne 174, 433 Stevens, Peter Jr. 323 Stevens, Richard 108 Stevenson, Patricia 292, 433 Steward, Mark 433 Stewart, Carol 198, 205 Stewart, Curtis 309, 433 Stewart, Douglas 275, 309 Stewart, Ernest Jr. 94 Stewart, Lindsey 202, 238, 433 Stickler, Dianalee 353 Stiles, Janice 107, 433 Stires, Sally 295 Stockett, Stephen 352, 433 Stoneman, Nancy 107 Stosick, Marilyn 348 Stout, Sally 107 Stout, William 271, 434 Strachan, Kathleen 365 Stram,, Ronald 434 Strange, Mark 350 Strauch, Barbara 358 Strauss, Donald 347 Streitwieser, Mary 155, 345 Strohbin, Vikki 378 Strong, Dennis 327, 434 Strong, Sharon 267, 292 Stroup, Susan 348 Stuart., Lisa 364 Studer, Mary 346, 352 Stulla, Kathryn 434 Sturm, Jerry 350 Sturm, Margo 434 Sturr, Bette 346, 353 Sturtevant, Shelley 217 Stutzman, Thomas 347 Suehiro, Steven 305 Sugino, Wesley 434 Sullivan, Roberta 434 Sullivan, Timothy 368 Sultan, Steven 365 Sumrow, Elaine 434 Sundstrom, Linda 266 Sutton, Tom 253 Swan, George Jr. 434 Swann, David 434 Swanson, Bruce 368 Swanson, Sandra 434 Swartfager, Jerry 318 Swartz, Steven 365 Sweeney, Frank 434 Sweeney, Veronica 434 Swenson, Susan 365 Swet, Lynne 343 Swickard, Martha 434 Swift, Diane 216 Swindall, Barbara 349 Sylvester, Roxanne 339 T 'x Taber, Stephen 347, 434 Takagaki, Jean 187, 434 Takaki, Kathleen 339 Talbert, Peder 313 Talbot, Mark 434 Talmage, Deborah 434 Tanaka, Deborah 397, 434 Tang, David 243, 303, 352 Tanigawa, Yoko 349 Tanke, Anita 266 Tankersley, Janice 434 Tankersley, Thomas 173 Tanner, Helena 267 Tarbett, Susan 109, 434 Tassinari, Ralph 434 Tatum, John 249 Taylor, Allan 275 Taylor, Anita 434 Taylor, Deborah 327 Taylor, Leslie 358 Taylor, Stanette 343 Taylor, William 373 Teixeira, Gail 82, 88, 217, 434 Telleria, Robert 368 Tenison, Joetta 434 Terry, Karen 434 Thatcher, Paul 225 Theios, Joyce 434 Thiele, Barbara 203 Thielen, Arthur 434 Thistlethwaite, Lote 315 Thomaides, Thomas Jr. 434 Tillman, Sue-Anne 292 Thomas, Daniel 241 Thomas, Donna 434 Thomas, Gary 332 Thomas, Georgia 73, 165, 196, 298, 434 Thomas, Howard 353 Thomas, Peggy 269 Thomas, Richard 434 Timmons, Scott 330 Tims, George 434 Tinining, Doug 323 Tischer, Raymond ll 154, 155 Titley, Lorita 350 Tobin, John 249, 250 Todd, Nancy 285, 434 Thomas, William 243, 323, Tolbert, James 92, 249, 250 434 Thompson, Carla 303 Thompson, Deborah 175, 284 Tomizawa, Mitsuharu 367 Thompson, Denise 285, 378 Thompson, Harold 434 Thompson, Janice 434 Thompson, Katherine 291 Thompson, Lucinda 344 Thompson, Sheldon 300, 313, 434 Thompson, Stephan 434 Thompson, Thomas 81 Thomsen, Diane 342 Thomsen, Gregory 332 Thomson, Cheryl 293 Thornblad, Karen 344 Thorne, Joseph 331 Thorne, Larry 328 Tibbetts, Gayle 434 Tiger, Ellen 434 Tilley, Richard 348 Tillman, Mary-Kaye 292, 434 Tolf, Ruth 266 Tollefson, Paul 225 Tomson, Douglas 272 Tonoff, Carole 434 Toole, Christopher 365 Toomay, Tad 434 Topper, Darcy 155, 340 Torrigino, Claire 336 Tosdal, Thomas 152, 174 Tow, Marjorie 434 Towne, Christine 434 Tracy, Scott 323 Tranbarger, Thomas 309 Travers, Timothy 317, 434 Travis, Laura 366 Tredway, David 158 Trens, Barbara 434 Tribul, Don 305 Trice, Roderick 273 Trickett, Suzanne 435 Tronset, Gloria 107, 339 R an Trowbridge, Carol 435 Trueblood, Steven 271 Trum, Andrea 435 Tschogl, John 238 Tsouvelli, Voula 193 Tuch, Richard 158 Tuck, Alexandra 294 Tuckfield, Allyson 353 Tudor, Nelda 327, 344 Turner, Christine 435 Turner, Darrell 368 Turner, Steven 323 Turnipseed, Pamela 435 Turqueza, Arlene 435 Turver, Pamela 291, 435 Tuttle, David 435 Tuttle, Kathleen 435 Tuttle, Lynda 342 Tuttle, Signe 359 Twining, Douglas 435 Twogood, Daniel 242, 243 Tyler, Janet 289 U Uchida, Deborah 358 Uehara, Joanne 435 Ule, Carol 269,298,435 Villa, Weston, John 231, 243 Voss, Houston 305, 437 Ulotck, James 347 Underwood, William Jr. 243 Unruh, James 347 Uota, Gayle 436 Uphoff, Robert 436 Upton, Alexis 436 Urban, Douglas 436 Uribe, Constance 366 Utsumi, Wanda 341 Uyeda, Caroline 359 V Vail, Mary 153, 169, 173, 198, 298 Valdez, Manuel Jr. 241 Valencia, Richard 436 Vallerga, Jack 271, 305 Van Antwerp, Paul 368 Van Asselt, Ruth 349 Van Buren, Stacy 366 Van Dam, Claire 436 Van Dam, Marilynn 436 Van Dam, Patricia 196, 293 Vandegrift, Christine 266 Vandenberg, David 365 Vander, Molen 436 Vandervoet, Brian 170, 436 Van Driest, James 315 Van Epps, Robert 319 Van French, Robert 107 Van Gieson, Christine 169, 354, 358, 436 Vaniman, Edward 436 Vann Lindsay, Patrice 196, 294 Van Noord, James 327 Vannucci, Leslie 293 Van Patten, Peter 241 Van Speier, Jonathan 367 Van Vranken, Richard 331 Van Zandt, Christine 335 Varea, Sonya 365, 436 Varnum, Nell 378, 437 Vaughan, Katherine 437 Veach, Sharon 191 Veblen, Krista 366 Vega, Vivian 190 Vegher, James 437 Vela, Jan 378,437 Velthoen, Brian 301, 305, 437 Venable, Ted 269 Venatta, Sharon 303 Vender, Christopher 330 Vennes, Roger 437 Venocchi, Roger 108 Verhulst, Sandra 291, 437 Vermillion, Stephen 220, 225 Vernizzi, Christine 358 Vernon, Alice 437 Vesely, Jeffrey 319 Vick, Stephen 269 Vignocchi, Roger Jr. 249, Wallace, Joyce 437 Wallace, Norene 289 Wallace, Rickey 225 Wallace, Thomas 241, 373 Wallis, Sharon 179, 180, 250 Robert 155 437 Walsh, K. C. 341 Walsh, Pamela 437 Walsh, Sheila 361 Walsh, Thomas 247, 351 Walsh, Vera 267, 437 Walski, David 247 Vilven, Lawrence 437 Vincent, David 309, 437 Vining, Janet 437 Vining, Kent 437 Vivian, Charles 157, 313 Vohryzek, Eileen 338, 339 Von Bergen, Vicki 344 Walsten, Mary 175, 375 Walters, Donna 336 Walton, Gene 319, 437 Walton, Nancy 437 Walton, Virginia 298 Waltuch, Joseph 437 Wanella, Dave 253 Welborn, Gail 299 Welch, Alan 271 Weller, Sally 163, 437 Wells, John 329 Wells, Susan 374 Wells, William 311 Welman, Melody 289 Wenger, Joan 366 Wentz, Jan 294 Werner, Karen 348 West, Cynthia 343 West, Deborah 355 West, Elizabeth 343 West, James 305, 437 Westberg, Constance 344 Westerbeke, David 107 Westhoven, Suzanne 269, 289 225, 249, 250 Williams, Charles 438 Williams, Deborah 205 Williams, Linda 294, 378 Williams, Michael 225 Williams, Robert 155 Williams, Samuel 317 Williams, Teresa 73, 285 Williams, Thomas 216 Williamson, Kim 327 Willis, Anne 197, 269, 299 Willis, Sherry 380 Wankowski, Janet 437 Whaley , Gail 364 Willson, Frances 155, 345 Willson, Jacqueline 343 Willson, Sally 199 Willyard, Kathryn 155, 356 Wilner, Samuel 225 Wilson, Wilson amy 109, 350 David 252 Voss, Susan 349 Voye, Anne 293 Voyen, Paul 175 Vuilleumier, Stephen 437 W Wada, Christine 350, 437 Wade, Carole 364 Wade, Megan 378 Wade, Stephen 380 Wanter, Beverly 326, 337 Ward, Dennis 225 Ward, Gary 372, 437 Ward, James 437 Ward, Katherine 357 Ward, Richard 437 Ward, S Warner, Warner, Warner, Warren, usan 380 Scott 348 Stuart Jr. 437 Valerie 358 Susan 356 Warrick, Alice 293, 437 Warsaw , Terry 327 Watkins, Peter 332 Watson, Gail 335 Wagner, Kendall 240, 437 Wagner, Nancy 344 Wailes, Betty 349 Walcott, Janice 355 Waldau, Paul 309 Waldie, Diana 169, 203, 269 Waldie, Marie 169 Walker, Barbara 199 Walker, Candace 107, 203, 205 Walker, Christine 366 Walker, Daniel 437 Walker, David 316 Walker, Debra 269, 365 Walker, John 214 Walker, Judith 294 Walker, Martha 437 Walker, Pamela 437 Walker, William 317, 437 Walla, John 437 Wallace, Anita 374, 375, 437 Wallace, Eric 317 Wallace, Frances 437 Wallace, Geoffrey 157 Watson, Linda 378 Wawrychuk, Steven 332 Waycott, Cecily 267, 293 Wayman, James 240 Weatherly, Judith 340 Weaver, Mark 228 Webb, Deborah 327, 343 Webb, William 271 Weber, Cynthia 437 Weber, David 88, 107 Weber, Jacquelyn 437 Weber, Julia 287 Webster, Elizabeth 287 Weems, Frances 203, 437 Wei, Christopher 367 Weiler, Nancy 375 Weimortz, Patricia 361 Weiner, Alice 437 Weiner, Gregory 307, 437 Weinstock, Leah 341 Weinzimmer, Bernard 192 Weisman, Daniel 437 Weiss, Allen 353 Weiss, Marcia 437 Weissman, Ronald 350 Whaley, Linton 437 Whisler, James 353 Whitcomb, Norbert 11, 303, 437 White, Cayley 438 White, Gayle 289 White, Hal 334 White, Jeffery 438 White, Steven 438 White, Thomas 438 Whiteford, Helen 155, 344 Whiteley, Marilyn 346, 348 Whitelock, Pamela 203 Whiteside, Donald 329 Whitesides, Michael 262 Whitford, Marilyn 337 Whitney, Abby 438 Whitney, Marshall 368 Whitworth, Anne 327, 364 Wictorin, Clifford 313 Wiebelt, Carol 438 Wiegardt, Carol 438 Wiener, Stephen 438 Wiest, Paula 267 Wigle, Barbara 438 Wilcox, Claudia 299, 438 Wilcox, Karen 196, 298, 299, 356 Wilcox, Roger 368 Wilcox, Susan 191 Wilds, Dennis 438 Wile, Peter 319 Wildy, William 438 Wilken, Catherine 438 Wilkens, Peter 332 Wilkins, William 351 Wilkinson, Anna 366 Willer, Cynthia 356 Willett, Wesley 351 Williams, Carey 73, 88, 163, Wilson, James 438 Wilson, Karen 438 Wilson, Katherine 295, 344 Wilson, Michael 231, 254, 255 Wilson, Rebecca 176, 178, 181 Wilson, Scott 272 Wilson, Shelley 295 Wilson, Simone 340 Wilson, Susan 358 Wilson, Walter 315 Wimberly, Laura 134 Winders, Steven 309 Windle, John 201 Winker, Christine 358 Winnemore, Anne 353 Winquist, Raymond 319 Winslow, Verla 288, 289, 438 Wittmeyer, Nancy 352 Wohletz, Deborah 352 Wolf, Kenneth 438 Wolf, Patricia 358 Wolff, Merideth 438 Wolfram, Gary 154, 155, 227 Wolven, Nancy 295, 438 Wolverton, Christopher 192 Wong, Elsie 194, 349, 438 Wong, Wellington 332 WOO, Alice 195 Wood, Cynthia 293 Wood, Dianne 295, 438 Wood, Lea 285 Wood , Wood, Rita 438 Robert 438 Wood, Stephen 373 Wood , William Jr. 230 Woodcock, Andrew 239 E 'Y A ggi" M ii ii X ll .W X it 'LV' A Biff 5' I x sf 1 T55 45 Woodhouse, Samuel 201 Woods, Maureen 438 Woodward, Marian 438 Woodward, Stanley 111, 228, 201 Woody, Kenneth Jr. 332 Woolf, Jerry 243, 311, 438 Woom, Alice 366 Wooten, Judith 345 Word, William 226, 227 Working, Loren 111, 438 Wray, Janet 438 Wrench, Dwight 353 Wrench, Lynn 438 Wrentmore, David 317 Wright, Constance 327, 359 Wright, Irene 364 Wright, James 367 Wright, Jeffrey 269, 347 Wright, John Patrick 249 Wright, John Strother 351 Wright, Leslie 336 Wright, Melinda 206 Wright, Michael 301 Wulkau, Carla 164, 297, 438 Wyant, Janice 295, 438 Wychopen, Kevin 438 Y Yaholkovsky, Mary 438 Yant, Robert 334 Yarbrough, Renee 155 Yates, Lucinda 291 Yates, Rebecca 73, 199, 291 Yee, Daniel 351 Yee, Henry 351 Yemoto, Linda 155, 357 Yoder, Susan 438 Yokoi, 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t,62,69t, 75,83,204,205,209l,394b, 406,4 17,4 18,424,426,429,430,433,439 John Stahl 96 Tom Stu tzman 70t,9 1b,335,337, 34 5, 34 7,356,364,4 15,456 Will Swalling 78,81,94 Bob Ternavan 5,20,22,23bl Others Glen Anderson Steve Chamblin Gordon Chappel Peter Clarke John D'Melveny Kurt Ingham Jeff Jorgensen Bob LeBoeuf Thom McDonald Sharon Mclntyre Mike Phelps Ralph Smith Jannete Stahl Rick Treitman David Wagoner Andy Mills 2, 7 7, 75bl,27tr,30t,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,46t,48,4.9, Bruce Zimmerman :rf ' args ' g gf' ,I t , J, " V -'Y' , 3. 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'? 1970 has been the most startlingly contro- versial year in UCSB history. We have at- tempted to cover the year of the Nlarching Effete and the Silent Majority as objectively as possible, while maintaining a student view- point. Although hindered by police disregard for press passes and countless cancelled photo assignments, we present a yearbook that hopefully reflects the great transitions of the present. lVly heartfelt thanks go to the friends and faithful staffers who dedicated so much time to producing this volume. Special acknowl- edgement goes to Joe, who did simply every- thing, and Connie, whose endless support pulled me through. Bob's kind patience cheered me in the bleakest moments and Ann was the best friend and roommate who ever wrote copy at 4:30 in the morning. Ricardo was the only RHA Editor ever to be stopped twice by the Campus Police while in the line of duty. Susan not only never missed a deadline, but also became an expert in translating my hand- writing. Gerry, whose rewrites of the memor- able headline "iAngelal Davis and Rafferty Make Strange Bedfellows" considerably brightened Christmas vacation, and Celeste joined the staff late in the year. Nly appreci- ation goes to Hal for his good pictures and his awful puns. Andy spent the majority of his vacations in the darkroom, while Bill Chap- man never failed to materialize during emer- gencies. Nly gratitude goes to my mother, who supplied dinner parties, and my father who continually asked, "You mean you're not finished yet?" mrg-a:.-.-fx-+ Y ?T-ff.,i,..u.,..,LK,,,,,,,. . ,Q .,11,:,,,,.1,-...- .-..,, ...TW , , 1.- ..- l l


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University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1967 Edition, Page 1

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University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Page 1

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University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

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