University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA)

 - Class of 1969

Page 1 of 508

 

University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 508 of the 1969 volume:

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INTRAMURALS-RECREATION ....6 ....4 .26 .....28 .....56 .....78 .....104 ....114 ....132 148 ....162 UNIVERSITY ..................... 184 ACADEMICS ...................... SENIORS AND SENIOR HONORS ..... HOUSING ........................ INDEPENDENTS ..... GREEKS ......... RHA ...... INDEX .......... IN MEMORIUM .... CLOSING ...... 260 296 342 346 370 418 474 494 496 'Q ' 4 . ,wvfjwfu vffhcnwv . ii " 1 'ffm f .. ' I 4 J 4, f.: 41 ,x. 1, 1 fftrfpg, ' r , 0 V, 1 eww rf A I '14, J"- . 0 ' I .Vex G ' Q I f ' 4.1 - lr -'f -- - - . 1 NA --M. 4 ffl' ,aj W 1 YQQ ' - -'-5' V 5 I ' 1' Q M ,I " A Q - . ' I I fu p A ' . - Q I ,. 1' '-. In I' ' '- '18 " C "-Q "IQ ' if ' - J- A - V ' ' .I I, '.. ,Th -' 1 A " , ' -' "' i . . , - - -4' f-bf . ' 1' 1 " 5 ' , 10 " 1' -4 .' A it f M ' " i - :HH t"iflLaifuYfw:"f ,',!!' f"fFw:Q'i"' " N ,Q W' at ' E M A' ,151 f V .. , . " ' ' J af a ' 5 ' ."9"9wf?l"'?lfi!f.,, 'fu ,,' , V' 'V N ' ' - , . 14,1 11'f'i5f ' ,. 'S , A 2 , Y-55131 4, N .33 '. fjfffgj- I 1 ,l .S 0 Q igijff " ' " y X 1'.f,3'Q . 9- - -.5-A-1 I ":",: f ag 5' f I ' ai-j V Sig., . 5 ' f- . '- 1 f " , , , f f 1' , -A s Q ,1, ' T ,XJQ ' 5 fy l, gf .- r , v ' P - r - ' . .If-gzi Hi? ' W ,,'.N 'A we 1' V 1 - , P ' , ggfLa1f.1,."'LfT-Q - fy n - , f rf-1 1: M " , ,1 ,I 21 ' Nifw--2,1. . X 4" " 'af 2 Ii ' 1,JE7ii3.Z1'5vl" 9 ,ML12-'Y -1-if 42'-.3 ' --' f :E . 1, .,.Mfg' . ' . '-ja31g,3iEf"ET - ' ' ,N-filj, 4 '-551gvi!gQ:-'.laQ:3Ea ,, 51 .- '7 E-' 15 'N . A V 'W fw.,wvmfw 3 - Q.,-1,-:ANU .- iff' Y ww' ' W fafff' ' W- H ,Fp3m'gf:'3Ei?3n23,'1',LWQ2j5il3'Vi'-aww Y ' ,, ,M',N,f uv - V, 7 uw, wM.'J 'fd zf 'A ,X- . ' Y ,-M V -M V Eiga' 3 . ,, F H15 ,C li J 1 9 A v ' A I. Q ' U' Q H ., ' , Q5 , ', 3' 'I 5 4' VTE K ff W W ,Q f 4 ' 'l J 0 'M 2' Q' ' 'HL ,'z5,'Q.,:2 5, 5 V . . . gin, 5 V sl.: , H 4 'J . ' C ,', ' " , .. .4 K 1 . V 5 n. Q .- .1 M -' 4' if f af' w w ' fu 1 . If ' -.2155 Y 5? . a vi u . Sli" ' ' ,' 1' 1 ' n., 3 gilt 'I 9 A ,A 1 ,Q - lv xl 2 ,1'Q"f in' 'fi 1 ' I : 1 oi--' lj' M s ' g ,.,. 4 .-:P D K 2 ff A45 1 1 rw V M .mc .., E' 5 W . E F jg rm Q all Y .. k 2, 1 f if . B E ? ia, ' 4 .lin---..,. . . U . FEBRUARY 21 CHEADIE STANDS TIP FOR STUDENTS H7464 Zluwmrq an at 4 gem, -Chancellor Cheadle, speaking to the -Regents on February 27, 796.9 Unknowingly, Chancellor Vernon Cheadle wrote his own dedication, for despite the slow progress of developing Ethnic Stu- dies at UCSB, he alone spoke up about what's happening cn campus. He com- mented, "The students, l think, are in the lead, and the administration. . .is in a fairly close second position,' the faculty is far to the rear. l just worry about the Regents being just as far to the rear in terms of the needs of the times and the tremendous resentment, particularly of our minority groups, and the use of this in terms of the crystaliz- ation of disappointments on the part of many of the students that we consider as moderates. . .l just want you to know that when Armageddon comes, l think maybe the administrators are going to be on the sidelines watching the faculty and the students fight it out with the Regents. " For offering us hope for action on existing grievances, Chancellor Vernon l. Cheadle, receives the dedication of the 1969 La Cumbre. MADEMIA HAS 6ROWIN6 60N6ERN, INHUENCE Everyone adehewmaqammmwaagaq eaclotlnaxdeuezqouontleoatadde look aataaaaqazgu. na, no." -Jim Ashlock In deference to conflict and challenge, the isolated University has breathed its last. Conflict lies in the taxpayersj legislators ', parents', draft boardsj and news media 's misunderstanding or misrepresenting the modern collegiate. Twenty-five years ago, when UCSB moved to its present idyllic location "students were students" and little else. But that was before the K ennedy-King-Kennedy assassinations, Vietnam, the urban crises, Eugene McCarthy, the Chicago convention, Eldridge Cleaver, mass technology, IBM, the 'generation gap, " and the megalopolis. Therein lies the challenge. How does discontented, dissenting academia show its concern? What is the slo w-mo ving solution to the crises of the University and the nationwide breakdown in communication? lNV0lVEMENT . i 1 .us ' " gap -I va ,if ' 'M .v- ' 1 A :f . . , ., 'f' ' -,af , 1.- 4 ' gf .5 ff' ' - . i Q A M any ' 'X fbi ' X g si m I t xv, rg, ' . ., Z ' f ','1 A 1 ' ' VM T1 T -i .il'1i:"f' gl - J 3'.:'d' Y l'-3 ,', L ' "V U - - '-, : +f f younwlfo ' I ,i', I vb"l-1.,- N7 lv 3511.7 L , I Mr- -b N , -If L L ' :- f ' 'W ' 4 N' ,-.' ' X1 v V 2, - 1 v . . v' ' vii K ,. f , V 1 5 . . X -! K , ',., . 1 .L ' Noyjl ' f Q 1i45fi1-- ' 'Y -' ,. fiiiggvr H A H X I -.1-. ', 1 v B , ' K -Lijg iw A 4 X 'A by Nl' .u kiwi ' 1 .....-.213 fy. L. qi... NEW ENERGY ARISES FROM THE SEASIDE IJAMPUS "z44aawa47entezedgame4mpa4 Vaaiedmqaellfwddlalgmatade Mmafwwemvw onanqalalftodoanefalldoaa -Lili Bita 's "lmpressions of UCSB" Even compared to other American institutions of higher learning, the San ta Barbara campus is materially plush and naturally breath taking. Small knots of Isla Vista dwellers often gather on the beach to gaze in awe at the spectacular fall sunsets. The glow of dusk also finds the beach and cliffs and campus above dotted with solitary dreamers fingering their guitars or simply enjoying the silence. Equally as colorful is the array of faces and balloons in the Homecoming football crowd. This year our paradise seems a little less sheltered, as it responded to community, state, and national trends and events. Although the resort-like setting still mirrors warmth and beauty, the campus inhabitants now have a forward look as well, l t seems probable that many of the people behind those grid-fan faces left the post-game stadium to resume energetic roles as innovators concerned about the world in which they live. 3 J . C U ' X , I x I i J 1 ,. 5. , .-If 3 f' ' E' ,fir .51 Y f ,eh i ' I 21151, V if gl U55 . Av MQ 4 ij, 1 'mm L11 fi xr HKU ff, X 4 I X QQ R , Q ,P ,ax ,,. 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V- - ' 5 N 3-,ffm gVyr4ifi'..igk5,f! i,d,f I ' - f - L K , , gf 2fa1,,,,: .wgwv . .-f. if-w'i'w+11-1-4.fwa,:-f - m d A 'X ' - ' 4 Mfwv :4...f,, Y,,,,,f- .-.W-,,-N, -, .. , , --gf.: , Q- 5 X8 Q'?'fQf".ff , ,., A - we-if -i-111-jf,pl1H ff'-M",j,'kZ' ,: ,..Q1:r.si if ' . N- A ' ' -W I ' -e 'S-,f"f.Q:A,,,1-.-Ufngylfzwf rf 'fad' ' --Mu-f ' vs, qfviw-M 1 'x"'5,' 11-1" N91-'Vi ff? fs T ' f 'T ' 'ef -iff, :,:B5f,.,,Q.b,.:, , -,ri ly ,W-25? 5,365 .. A ., I--i. 57:45,11?W.b. Ev! QQ, ' P"-wg ', -If 2Qi.:9,9,,.5.,.,g. 7, A fb- gaps. X . Y-P ,NEW , . 1,f5fj.f:,,, 4, 7 V 4- ,., A4341 V ,A M Q is A t . ,f 1 533'- s:?-3'Z i 1 i7f+4S?F' IQ 4 R 'if - We '51, -.JL 'J .9 M . Nj?-wc We ,. e X, ' "P" f' " fig - ' " . l' ' .5 545 1 M' 1 5-A. -- .-Qf' we .4 A , .f h ,- 5 1 M , H . e e f- - 7 ' - ' ' ' , .. l , , nv fn. fi? 'fu " . .,A , ,. W , . I U , Gi 2 , b, 459' , 'Ha "' 1' ' A1 - ' ' - . - J. - . sr- ' ' N I MQ P -f' A ' W' .f. . . ' e- - - W- in ,. - 45 ,g f 'J Vg be - if lk", " M gp mm Q he , R 9-.f an X E V W Ng, .Q , i , V . L H f 4 L: .. ff.. 15-.If . -1' , -Wei' ,- BTV: ,v f A e e Q1 -Q 'Y' Find out in the Peace Corp ML' "- fi Q., 'pw . . X I I AH. SANTA BARBARANS' ANSWER 6All-70-PEACE 74a4ew4om46epe4eefal mlwzwolazweawaadle. -President John F. Kennedy Peace is a big concern to this generation of Americans. Dis- sent on the issue of the un- popular and oft-criticlked war in Vietnam has made the head- lines. Yet the quiet resolu- tion of people like Santa Bar- bara 's Professor Charles Hub- bell have not been fully pub- licked. Such exemplary dedi- cation has caught on in college campuses and elsewhere across the country. A related issue which comes close to home is the controversy which continued this year over giving academic credit for ROTC courses. Coincident with criticism has come heartening support for the projects aimed at alleviating the vacuum of frustration, hunger and poverty in which violence can occur. Originated by the late President Kennedy, the Peace Corps is an organ of peaceful revolution. Santa Barbara is a leading campus in the numbers of graduates who have dedicated two years of their lives to the people-to- people program. By flocking to this call for give-and-take commitment, students have pur- sued the challenge of peace to its most demanding limits. l ji. . , , 1' A V .4 'fl gg. it . iii WEEKLY XG ren QD YENZUN VXI-INPM use .mm u PLE S I 11 u4mom4laz'4.'7fgoa?ze qoadlettezactontlan. Zdtdmactontieaepzaaplea , 1 I paemcded. -local Congressional candidate Stanley Sheinbaum ln recent political history youth have aroused the conscience of the en tire nation. They illuminated corruption and injustice during the Chicago political convention. They revived grassroots politics by their rally behind Senator Eugene McCarthy's bid for the Democratic presidential nomination. They have helped to focus attention on possible inadequacies of our electoral system. They have instigated voter response to the determination of University policy. They and others in academic circles overturned the rock of support for the Vietnamese war and dug up some unsavory effects of that conflict. University students have confronted the establishment wi th what they believe are , its shortcomings. ln the interim between elections it is up to the student to remain involved and urge involvement in peers and parents alike. Continued dedication to correcting the moral issues he has raised could render his criticisms more effective in 1972 than they were in 7968. 4014. ,. ' -1 1,4 ,. uv J ' A Q N NWN: Rx I XY - if S j I 2 --jn- - if I K, . fi-1.-' ,, . ,V. 1' " U 1 I . W f ' , f Y' K fl 'J 0 ,M : 4 I . ' 1. V 9 HY 2 ,fr ' f ffflfil , .rf 0 f AHL! . ',"s?-1- V '4 'Q - . , . 'IV-X, C' ' " K 52 Y1Q"f:Lf?f ,. ' Se: , 5 Hg' 1 " ,-' 1 15' -Qi, , 5155 ,fi 'J I ' ' 1-WML ' I.-if.. -',f',.1:: 1,2 ,if V 1 5 2' ' Q .f:n -V T: M- ' s ,f f,71' 1 +gg,g:w 1-rf-5-:QS 'Mfwqfg ,,,.-.4315-, 0. +1-::'fg+i41l1,f19'?s'j ' I Lk F23-23, wg'-1'-z:gfLfL'i?+FEaff:g' -, F1 , . aaa-Q?6fff5wwfavP5w 'B , ' 'C" ' 21'f' Q1-if F-uf-H: - ' VQQW1-h e N . ,I f', F,-3351. H 1- Z,'-Vi" V . , -" If F 1 M21 ' hi, -1 qw . PL"3L.'?Ejj' 155955 P551 -if-"' V ,M f ,'-423' 5515,-3-M .pggf',1L"4 '- , '21up',3?!5','.G:,-?f.,::fg,: Hu-ZIV: Q af f J F A V 14 5. W Q? - 14' S N VI' . ' -' , ' , Fi , A , 1' Q . ' ' I. f I ' 1 n .lip v - L Q . 1 . 1 - q . - I 4, . Q A i, , 3'-1!i""' .. me ' W lv 5 Jr- . f' I jf' i f -4 , if-, L' 2.-ru 515' 121 ,fkwiz-,..1 wg, .5 A,.,..5: . 4 4,,1:r-- 5,5 . JW ii ' -i ff -1W 7 0 , f .mu '1 N ""'.,'.1 . ,"'xl-- 11 K 41' XXX . 'l.-, f 4" 5 flwvxiiffggimi, , 'M K , W r gl""--'nr' Aw I4 ,..-r--' EOU6A TION AMPZII-'IES' lllS 0F 0l7V AND S00lETV H0W504fl'00,06064f46'6,4Itd0l0l eczcuaumzkgupqa mm.'7zu4mml.mfmwe, modfoacc'alm'u4,'7t64alaoa4 -from President Hitch 's special report to the Regents on the urban crisis. All across the nation, there is a revolu- tion occurring on college campuses. The causes are rooted both within and with- out the university structure in an ironic perpetuation of the inequities of society. A segment of students is seeking a re- orientation-away from monetary concerns and toward human ones. UCSB students and faculty attacked the problems of society on several fronts. A core group continued to push for an ethnic studies program and an end to "institutional racism." ln response to alleged 'political harassment, " sizeable numbers attend- ed the arraignment of seven black students and contributed to their bail. Also, the academic community joined citizens in condemning the Union oil well leakage in the San ta Barbara Channel. Countless others supported tutoring programs, big bro ther pro- jects, and aid to the aged and handicapped. I li E 519- HL 5 yi,- w1 ' ' 1 U. - IMF ,f . ,., ,Q 2 . ' Til? ini' -gp -,. Sw i N. A 5-x. 4 l 1 A I lr 1 ,.f 'Q 14 ' '. N -4.1 .. '. -1 mi mi- I . - Y .4 If W ,fi if-Qi j L W-nz, 1 I I . A -Q 5 ,1wff"i J' , . ,' v w ?S'vf""" X . W' I6 .1 44? 1 INVOIVEMENT S'0lI6lIT 0R ESCAPED IN IEISURE lI0llRS' "'7vfrazaad,6laqweucowzt4e mugmtpmmwdeazdewwdedaq woaldndz ldfeoew anlgaaeaamallaedoaafdadeane' Marshall McLuhan in Understanding Media Leisure activity is relatively unstructured at the Santa Barbara campusg all types of recreation abound. Amateur athletics boasts a strong intramural program, and 'pick-up "games of co-ed volleyball, basketball and touch football are likely to occur almost anywhere at any time. On the musical scene, a numberof student rock bands are constantly en ve- loped in a cycle of forming, hiring out and breaking up. Formal choral groups, organized by the music department, also draw healthy support, as they tour and perform locally and abroad. People are at play everywhere, display- ing new talent, learning to laugh and en- joy themselves and others. Occasionally, whether escaping involvement or seeking it, they simply pound out or belt out their pent-up energy. "Au an mvfazvfso t. Ana of at am? " -headline for a week of campus events listed in EI Gaucho. From a record Frosh Camp turnout to a revamped Bellamy Society and the newly organized Free Campus, the ex traccuricular scene fairly clamored for the participation of the UCSB populace. Although some of the activities bore a political tenor, there were the vast number of uncontro versial ones in between, among them cheerleading and hostessing Chimes ticket sales. A desire for entertainment, education and enlightenment motivated many of the special events. ln addition, UCSB has ah image to protect, University public relations to help improve, and more importantly, student interests and opinions to represent. During a year of occasional campus violence elsewhere in the state, Santa Barbara? open channels of communication were all the more valuable. lt was within on-campus involvement in informal conclaves that understanding among students and be tween students and administrators really flourished. CAMPUS lll-'E E V0lVES' THR 0U6H PM NNING AND PAR TICIPA Tl0N N N X 1 1 , k - -0- - ' 1 .- ' , " 'ijm 1' ' 4..f.X. My , Tx .,,5., , , f k.. x .. , 4,-fi wif. A ,sg X l ,..- M., W .. ' x , '-.K x ff, ' o 1 JrA:uP""' - 'A W ,rf ' 1 -Mn .,:u-.van Y- N,-. .T 1 "WFS-""' MH 'gm "" -9: 'J' : " 'Zig-f.'zff'f' aw-xv A .H-KA" .L-1 "IA," 'f'J' 'M fa- .ww , 71 . ,w:f'Qf'3"W in 'Q .rf Q-nf w9iK'g5..f M ' Yn- Mmwuwmw YH X ,. " 'Qzzrai 4 iff-of X A J ,.w we 15- V v V -, ,5..,:. -. nn- ' A P midi' - .,,, . .V 41:5 1: lg ' - 3, Fawn! .,..hv V x " " ,V-M-gat-if , .uf - 1 V f itayf' :Pg-fb-w f fix ' -, NI-:LSL few REA6lllN6 OUT BRINGS PEOPlE TOGETHER "70e7zenoZZ4l6Jn9a5oat4 Wlwflwlfwf-we tallaqaloataneamggaa aagqtlatohdaatlazgata ldueawltomoae.?qonm'4 -Dr. James Bevel in his Campbell Hall address "Reach out", urge pop singers in an epithet that captures the impulse to touch someone else. Involvement leads to understanding which nourishes love and truth. At the level of human interaction, reaching out means opening up and asking and giving compassion. We do need each other, especially here, especially now. lt takes courage to admit this need, but the need itself is too pressing to ignore. People touching other people seems to thrive in the campus environment. Soul brothers here, as elsewhere, have shown us spontaneous communication at its fullest. We also see it in the impromptu conversations that spring up in the UCen over coffee and the EI Gaucho. And everywhere there are couples who in their everyday energies live and love seeking tru th. Thoughts shared and dreams unveiled are not unique to this campus, but are basic to its new-found involvement. S011 TUDE, SEIF-EXPRESS'l0N YIEID Dl6NI7V .My ,uv T "'7de!zewq44zaulwl4md -medaadideawealoaldlebzqday topaeaentmanaaawloledearq 49m,wf:44z,w,m4a4.m4" -Dr. Benjamin Spock Mass technology and the megalopolis have dissected and diluted the essence of the individual. This modern, dehumanizing fact of life is no where more painstakingly evident than at the multiversity. What educational curriculum is forced by expediency to over- simplify or leave insufhciently answered, the student must seek out and personalize. Musings about life, death and inHnity have been phrased anew by each generation, but the distance be tween the restless collegia te and involvement in these questions seems to have shortened. Government, religious and educational institutions, which once supplied so many big answers, are now tottering under the weight of new challenges to their structure and precepts. Amid such turmoil, the student is searching for his own identity and dignity. introspection and reflection, solitude and creativity all propel the individual away from competition, red tape-and anxiety and to ward a strenthening communion with himself 'nw 1 W gm X uv .a -w .,'4 IQN: 4 . ,M 'Q---. 'QnnaQ,,.wx'A L ' A 'f'?'5:"l:tL. '- X -'5n....u-,,i,,,,,,-.f- fx-high N ' .. -yg - - 'Q-.N --Y. -.-.mb . ,, "UI" B9""'--wig. U., , - -5.5--ig.. J..-'Q' ax - V it - - -'Md ,QL - , A . -.-, .. - 1. , .al ,sn - - . M., -..,..,- ... , g-v - ...-Ag ,. ,511--'4-'r ' -....4,.-Q.-.ii Q. - - - .f ' ' ' " "" - -f , A L. , 4-. ,AA M h - N: ' 3 '-"7 ' - " , . F - Q ' ' h ' . ' ' -. v , ' . -- 'I ' " -1 uns, . , V - - . Q- A U - . '. ' -C " - l- - 4' ' -3 Y -Q GA- 'f-:- -. W k """ , 1' " -4 'Qu' 'ov 'f ". -all-N .- 4 J "1 ,- ' ., ,Q - 4 v ' - :LO -:""lI , - ' 0 -rr.. 0' . Q .E- ?dlv' Q-QS, . -lo 'b. ,At 'gi P 0 M if 9 . 9' fx ' 91" 1 -...qt -,. ' N , .A-.- H XJ ' ' 'U' 'tw .-.. -- P A A V' pl , x rg , - .V - .. .rf-1' P? '1.y14A 2' ' 'im -ee-W' . ,VA-V ' I -Q," ff ' ' gm v Jr ' , -s.,1 A, "Zaul4aean4dea4fee6a6dnZotlo4e sdfrdpeaadaeaalgjiaecentuadeoagawlo t4ef0z4tfe'me...ZoalaaeZ4.6eazall ofu4,allouat4eawzld,au'aeznew -President Johnson in his message to the Apollo 8 astronauts ln December the potential domain of involve- ment for all men was widened dramatically by Apollo 83 successful circling of the moon. With such success came the promise of a lunar landing in the near future, and consequently, an even greater challenge- that of insuring that such an awesome discovery would bring expanded international cooperation instead of a larger capacity for destruction. The threshold of universe exploration and the uses of such expanded knowledge are as endless as space itself University students who are about to move into places of leadership in a strife-tornwnation and world shared with many others the mind- bending experience of seeing our world as a luminous sphere in space. From the perspective of 793,000 miles away, human crises seemed deceptively insigni17cant,' for that matter, so did humanity itsehi except for one timely fact. We all can share in the triumph of Apollo 8, not by virtue of our nationality alone, but rather by our greater allegiance to mankind and to his achievements. Above all, we are involved in mans successes here and beyond, for what we do to better human conditions can only insure continued human accomplishment in a thrilling new era. A FAR HUN6 i WB ' '4A Q n' VM A M ww wwmmm IQ: 1METWWaz.W .- , M 1 - SL :U " ' -. , . WHA, , A A W Nz www ax 1 , ww A an , ,MX 1 Am , s 'H Q '- MWWWW QW Ww afE,ffMfMHWMM,Ps5NMQWHWWWWWWMWMPMWMW 1 Mmywfmimamiwwam 'WNW 2 EwwfifmswfmffmQWWM R z M 32 M4g,,,,ma 1 BE YON0 THE HORI 0N N05 Angel Sion Rendezvous wnrf . n 8 lil A hi J :QW -5. , 1, , v fl' '5- l . - -K . ,fa .av Wx, 'C l Q U, ,. at .V 3? f .Bri 2: 3' 1 J . -9 rg: 133 - r 54. X Wil . 'I i ' " 1 if ln- 111' 7 , ' ai 4. Q- 'X 6llMPllS EVEN 75' Regardless of their inclinations, students on campus found events to satisfy them in 1969. Socially, culturally, and politically, the calendar was filled. ln the political realm, organi- zations representing all shades of the political spectrum sprang into prominence. Lectures and protests brought the problems faced by mankind and our society before the minds of those who wanted to consider them, while campus issues "blew up" here as elsewhere. Besides the traditional cultural events each year sees, 1969 intro- duced additional foreign, ethnic, . 4.. 1' g , - V, 3 W lib." U 2: -41 Q- .K t al l 4 -- ' , Y 1 . Q a N - and avant-garde culture. Students were provided the opportunity to compare their own cultural heritage with that of others. Socially, the year presented dances and rock concerts mixed with Homecoming events and variety shows. Despite the novelty and tradi- tion, the most remarkable thing about this year's events was the degree of student participation. From "grass roots" dissentors to the auditor of an electronic music concert, from a novice enter- tainer to an art devotee, students found their own "niche" in 1969. N x. ' 'SNL r.-, M, ,. H1 i bm Mfg E4 ,V N ,A-N 4 .zfx qi K' f'3.LE ' J 'J .-4945.-kid. 5.5. snags: A, Nz JL- ' ' "Wi", H A HW151' cf3IlSt0U ,.f.' g,..,, Lffi'-,J .Q viii 3 EJ .gg--V itlfgi' , 15 P2321 5 -EYE 1 Tu ir ,N S. '1 J V a 2 nib , in V .iflm-.--5 Y-,4 . ,1 . .. Ay-'g,,gA M Q? mv 8 .QU di J-vw-nav-:wg Q Y E N 'ii , '-flluenrf f'f, L ' 4 5 D 5 B 4 I A an Q r DOll1IlCAl GVGUTSS The election campaign, with its joys and sorrows...Images of riots, war, death, oppression, injustice...Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King...The expression in a small child's eyes after he has at last grasped a point of knowledge... the feeling of satisfaction that comes from community service... the courage of the Resistancemgoing to an eight o'clock in North Hall and finding the building closed...Faces shouting racism from the second floor... Chicanos "doing their thing"...ques- tions fired at perplexed Vice-Chancel- lors by hostile students...A button reading "I am a human being, do not fold, spindle or mutiIate"...the desire of a growing number of students for involvement. K 'T 1 4, mal? ,fx . 4 73 5 f, ' . - V ...yY?.4a-:2:g:E FX A am-n,1u.g,,,,,:. , V "' 'V -1-1---.., jf!!! rms XZ f 1 fl i "" XXX 'xx - s 1 ' vnu 'Xe nxhxx V Wy s- f 'B' 'x f X The IAC investigations into racism do not seem to have effected the close rapport between Cary Williams and head coach Curtice. 3 ii i i f The ROTC program came under drill of the quarter saw protestors attack again this year, as the first demanding its abolition. CHANCELLOR INVOLVED pnotestons question l.A.C. Racism, Anmy Oct. 2-9 - Meeting in open session, the Intercollegiate g Athletic Commission took up charges brought by the Black Student Union that attitudes, policies and conditions in the athletic department were intolerable for black athletes. After prolonged discussion, the Commission finally voted to dismiss the specific charges against the department which had been referred to it by the Chancellor, and to move into the more basic question of "institutional racism," as the issue was deemed far too important, by both the Commission and the administration, to be dropped. Oct. 3 - An early morning chill on the field behind Robertson Gym provided the atmos- phere for the first demonstration of the year at UCSB. Before the Chancellor, Vice Chancellors and Deans gathered to observe the swearing in of new cadets to the ROTC program, a group of anti-war protestors, led by John Maybury and James Gregory, engaged in mock war games to make known their disagreement with the program. County sheriffs and campus police were on hand to keep the protestors in line, but aside from a faulty public address system, the swearing in and speeches went on uninterrupted. K . , F 5. i 'I .V 1 A3 ' if . J fr ' 19 ' I sq Q33 ff' , 5 . S , 3 . ' f 2 13 5 ' f A ' Q 53: V I A 6 Nix . ig ' V -. : f ' 1 5 ,IL -Li D 1 . Q V A , ,,-:,V k A , -:ati-JEMQQ , ,,.e5,. :uf A , 4 i m, . ' -wi-yjm','w'f,+.f V: . tg , A is iii , .1 - , ' ,. , ,IWZQZZA .ik .J'QMQmh'f x " , ' .,.Q, ,. X ,e V 3 n 'Q fx, J' 5, 4 . 1 , ,,......1.m V , 4 v 1 .1 --.agrig ,Q-'f1L.m. J .1 , ,g,,fg- 431: :igg -.gm ?', r --f 2 13 J 1 21, gif - v Ei , ig X ,' 3 sg, 9 1? e S-.N 1 f Nap'- x 1. 1 I " , 1- ' ,,,. , Q I 3: -1 11: ' ek V M ,,, lk . S is E5 , M ., PQ .-.m , .f- vr X 'L -gif Mx Q5 W 1 , hm - Brought to the scene by their concerned parents, the two children at left look at each other as if to ask what all the excitement is about. In contrast, the two young men above know full well what the issues are, and why they are taking a stand. One of the first acts of the captors of North Hall was Atribute to the ideals of the martyred black nationalist to display a sign renaming it Malcolm X Hall, in leader who has greatly inspired blacks. AMNESTY A WVITEE C I-IAQ W ,Z CHAOS a SOLUTION: SLOIN FREE cAMPus 2 i P '1 is 1 T . . ' 4 .1 . . Protesting the actions of the admi- dent takeover of North Hall, Free nistration with regard to the stu- Campus states its case. AFTERMATH OF DISORDER nonth hall lncloent Oct. 16 - Hoping to avert another North Hall "incident," a group formed calling itself the University Committee for Democratic Procedure. Their stated purpose was to make existing administrative channels open to students for the discussion of grievances. Oct. 16 - Nearly 1000 students gathered on the UCen lawn to hear A.S. President Paul Sweet, Vice Chancellors Goodspeed and Varley, and other officials discuss the events of Oct. 1.4. The talk centered mainly on the role of whites during Monday's incident. Gets Swift Reaction Oct. 17 - Claiming to speak for the "silent majority" of students, and condemning radicals and revolutionaries, Free Campus was born. The avowed goal of the organization was to keep the campus open and functioning in its traditional role. Oct. 28 - Bowing to student pressure, Acting Chancellor Buchanan and other adminis- trators made themselves available for student questioning in Campbell Hall. The majority of questions came from the Free University Coalition. lVlost students left dissatisfied. Taking a stand in support of students,Professor Pete Hall invites anyone concerned over the recent events to visit his office in Malcolm X Hall. l .4 ' Y 2 . X fgf UH 1 'N 3 1-2 ' N I' K X X , X X f t f jv a , Cy . H Y www .- y iii" 1 Xu X' X XX5 ' 5 '-Hifi: ' X X fx., , :J 5 F! 1 r wi? 1 v .5 . Q - A QF' 3,5191 - : ---- 1 +1051 " ii. 3 W. J 1 X VH' L qu 0 QQ: Y M41 Q ,.,-1' if JJ' 1, "T-"'-,.??'4f 'Q--u --- 1 1-1,,a.1... .sf.....,... N -,, 'wr ' '- . of , T i1-gf Ziigxe ff 1 .-. - 'BL . , ' ,f-N V--. --f' . A N 1 I 'f-5-M---W REQ! X 4- --4.7 .17 V1 Mf'1M1" !'N' '31?iI,'Tf WTXEQ 'i H' Students on campus were active in all phases of the 1968 election campaign. They manned tables in front of the library, walked door-to-doortrying to get out the vote, and poll-watched on election day. Preparing to exercise their franchise for the first time, students engage in another aspect of the electoral process and seek information so that they may vote intelligently. '68 CAMPAIGN HITS CAMPUS Stuoents 'Caught' In Election Swnzl Oct. 29 - Democratic senatorial candidate Alan Cranston appeared on campus as a guest of KCSB for a telephone question-and-answer show. Nlr. Cranston answered student questions for one hour, after which he left for another speaking engagement on the arms of two UCSB co-eds. Oct. 31 - Almost lost in the national, state and local campaigns, was the freshman class election. Those who had time or remembered, votedp Phil Kohn, Gary Wolfram, and Ginger Roth, the victors, quietly and gratefully assumed office. Nov. 3 - Speaking to student supporters and volunteer workers, Assemblyman Winfield Shoemaker asked that youth remain involved in politics regardless of the outcome of the 1968 elections. Their "vigor, idealism and ideas" made this continued commitment im- parative according to the incumbent. CLEQVER 'sayin .lu ppm.-r lo the NONE' Q Ln '21 mmf I n B, , 0 Y I '1 Elvis at :M CONSCIENCES EASED Actions, Olscusslons Eno llmst quanten Nov. 7 - David Harris, former Stanford A.S. President, husband of folksinger Joan Baez, and convicted draft resister, spoke in South Hall on the draft resistance movement. lVlr. Harris talked of his own experience and feelings as a resister, and his attitudes upon imprisonment. Nov. 14 - Ten UCSB students returned their draft cards to the local Santa Barbara board as a part of the national draft card turn-in. An hour before, they spoke to a rally on the UCen lawn to present the reasons for their action. The consensus was that such an action was necessary to free themselves and their consciences from a system they could no longer support. Nov. 18-24 - In its first action of the year, the Bellamy Society held a series of group dis- cussions on current problems. Nov. 19 - In an effort to aid Santa Barbara's lVlexican-American citizens, the Santa Barbara Community Service Center came into being. It will be staffed by UCSB students from UIVIAS and the Santa Barbara Action Corps and will provide legal assistance and tutoring. ffdg? iyigf ta- fa- fd.:-ui' sri 'LQ-fl nk -- 'fffi Above, 'a group of draft resistors contemplate their reasonstfor following the advice of the sign at right and casting their "whoIe vote," as they prepare to speak at a rally on the UCen lawn. All eyes were on Dr. Otis Graham led one of the Bellamy Society of the History Department, as he group discussions. 1 wi' mv , p Sh iZL I if ?'W..1f mas, M U ,N ,R V 7 1 Q5 X 1 if 15. 6 mm as-1 ea. ::- 5 ,L .di H 5 s 5 1 my fx.-t-. :. 1555 . , Jw .V..:.. , fgx As Mu. W 1 .. X M , A.,, A, ,g , '?Wa1:'w,Z l r - eg 25339 ,.,. V - I 1 . 5f.f w'l"'Df m ga. 7 VTTUN ':2?F5i' vA?WEf- -. 1 -' .111 1 f W fx . 1 Q -1 'lrfif 9 I-E. , 'ff : W W N ' . i zal 1 Y M3 5 N5 wx, " m t 'na- 5252 5 J vue! f Wm! " 'ik '-if X3 M 5 wt L 1' Au , UU 5 .,. H M 'W 45g2.:aJff X X ii? ,MT 1 :-:-. A'Qki5i1f3ZE??iLf ix -, E45 1 H 12. 'T'-1 Q-:su H3 M , .Jn 5552, WF , . gm 29 m. 'xl L. , I An UNIAS member talks to two the many discussion groups held high school students seeking to dis- during the weekend conference to cover their opinions and answer delve into various aspects of the their questions. This was just one of lecture program. CHICANO YOUTH INVITED UITIAS hosts thmo Weekeno Confeizence Jan. 3-4 - The United Nlexican-American StudentsiUIVlASl held the last in a series of three conferences with Chicano high school 4 students. The purpose of the gathering was to try to convince the youths to continue their education in college. The program was designed to show them the procedure for admission to college, the advantages of a college education, and to discuss the problems of the Chicano in American society. gl The weekend started on Friday morning l SMLSQY with registration at Francisco Torres. A whirl- wind of activity began which included dis- cussion groups, speakers, campus tours, -af f luncheons, dinners, and entertainment pro- vided by a Mariachi band. The students and their counselors left Sunday morning with a great deal to think about. Many felt a new pride in being Chicano, and a new hope for the future. Castulo de la Rocha talks to one of the student's high l school counselors during lunch. -1. ' - Y ,, , fam-.. Ewa: W - . .. Q., . - 4, A Wiz 2 fm- . 1 ' .- , . 4 nn - - 5-gf f- le u , I, W - 1 1 gr " ,f if up ' E 4. . . .-I ,Ei :. QQ , ' .' ' f .1 4' - fs. ,a 2' -'- .A xii! X QQLQ' J w I.vs,' V H w , Lil: fx, ' I Q'--.. 1. A -+f 'rw ' Y 1. ff . .... .. ,V -Q V . T Aim.: 52, , L, 5 1 si if - if ' " ' A , H Tr. i L5?E'?"pf: wi .weggfs M --V A Y N E ' L. fi' , iw W fi. . ' " ' . ,du Q , rg 1 ,AW Lfy,A,,4iQ.1Feg,,'5 , gk, ,LM T, K f- -' f Y" ' L5 , .. me - 1 'O' -,M ,Qfgm "- fi' E: 5? ' I 1 Y' pw: 'T ,I V-' 1- L"", V g 'TE 1- 5! . 5' .J g. us, Jig, Q. ge. S ,NQSFWEGWHN U1 .ii Q4 xg igergvs , 4 SX t rw 1: - , -x , . 'hs X A: . .wining . MM w- ,A ? - , I . he "Vg:.f,. . -,, - ff 1, . , Qlmmcj I I ' Q ' ,, ze ' 2 Q, ' 'U Vi E fig -is . , V553 , , F "' 5 . ' 5 " .J I .1423 ,'-. 7' . . , pr , ESF 1- ' YW FT , DA :4 I Ah HLIK " -' I ,TAF I J i Y 2 ,V W1 Q f I 'e' yn, - - -" . ,.l,,:.,,.-:gi, ,-gag I Q. 1 as 1 I., Eg, hui Vu 5 W 'gl' 1, . ,m.., ,... JA, 5 E51 ga f ,. L1 if , 'Q -4. wg f 24 ,W -X , - . v. 8 E, .f ,, gl Q bu A - I . if ' 'M' """"" '--"H A -' 5544?-I-.. wffld: -i'sL,.3.....'Qfzz11...4..,:.. '7' Y- JV A 'kxix if ' 1 . ' M , J 5-QR -T' 5 I 7 i ' - 4-' 5 - 'A fi Q ' 1 . W V f' SQ: "' '-rr Members of the United Front-Greg Knell, Bob Moritz, Castulo de Ia Rocha, Joel Garcia, James Rashidi Johnson, and Maurice Rainey-prepare to present their case, above. At right, a UCen rally. , jtvisnw f - 5 ,es u-eb 4 . ' an-'FF . Jr 5 , A fafblllf- 5 A if?-'HF .ua-37 -351 .v,1n-in ' eva-- - -mf- Chancellor Cheadle and A.S. President Paul Sweet confer on how best to answer the United Front. Rashidi makes a point in the San Fernando Valley State College sympathy rally. ii, im ,, , f ii,,.i2L,: file!! ii A V ,teresa miie 1 Above, Jim Gregory addresses the of BSU members look on hoping to crowd at the obscenity rally calling for find overwhelming support for the free speech on campus. Below, a group student body. U.F. DEMANDS PRESENTED IITIDAIIIGDCG Shown Jan. 10 - Explicitly voicing their support of the students at violence-torn San Fernando Valley State College, BSU members spoke at a rally held on the UCen lawn. Jan. 13 - Agents of the Santa Barbara County District Attorney's office attempted to obtain a tape from the KCSB studios of the BSU rally held on January 10 to use as evidence against James "Rashidi" Johnson, one of the speakers at the rally, who was charged with obscenity. Manager Mike Bloom refused to turn over the tape, as the officers had no warrant. Jan. 15 - ln an effort to show that the charges of obscenity against their members were being used as a means of political harassment, the BSU and SDS held an obscenity rally on the UCen lawn. After Paul Jacobs had defined the term "obscene" and had told of using obscenities on this campus without harassment from the police, the BSU led the crowd of 1500 in obscene chants to prove that only blacks would be arrested for the use of such language. Jan. 20 - Members of the United Front met the Chancellor in Campbell Hall to demand that he end police harassment of students and declare free speech on campus. They furthur demanded the initiation of Black and Chicano studies programs. -wax i n f p.. -,qvtww Lei gtg., g IC" 4+ , ' -' 1' - '- -' ., L? 4'7" g. - A' - W ' .L .- V " ' H P-'T Ilvvffi X 1 'M ' 'Hsu ' il' ll, flag? , smut mamma' ,felremaa f Ye ll l..,,fsnenaew-- ,W ,wsu gggggggeQ1aaw-- mx it it .mv ,, ii in it ,l it . :Nessie :w -M-W it with it H -- -1 ..lww 1 , ,V gm' U W , ...ga ,awww - Rimes 1 .M,A ,m1h -I U,A.,,A. 2 5 , rl A an I RS ' . .. 7,4-f 1 ' ' 516- "'f-1-' e ff 'T 1 is ' . tw ,lift 'Ny X Q or oo ,x 4-' Q V 2 Q I in ' 1 f' A' w K f fjfjf I , Ii, L X 7' aff ,LX. , .W , 7 f 51" 'I cf' r A r 1-Aff ff' 4' What at first appears to be a blob of oil picked off of one of our previously beautiful beaches proves, upon closer inspection, to be one of the many birds killed V :,. VI .44 by oil leakage from a Santa Barbara well. The bird lies on a table in front of the library next to a Get Oil Out petition. The young man at left affixes his signature to a Get Oil Out lGOOl petition, demanding the Department of the Interior to retract leases giving the oil companies permission to drill in 'uf' ' . Tw? 'W' ' fax -'v-4. Santa Barbara channel. Above is a Santa Barbara beach covered with oily debris. Sights such as this drew an out- raged cry from the entire nation. 45 SEVEN ARRESTED BSU amzests lncite hanassment Chance Feb. 3 - At about 8 a.m. six helmeted and fully armed officers of the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's office broke into a Del Playa apartment to serve an eviction notice. Inside were seven black students, all BSU members. The police arrested all who were found in the apartment and confiscated all property. Those arrested were Maurice Rainey, Vallejo Kennedy, Robert Allen, Mike Harris, James "Rashidi" Johnson, Earl McMillan, and Deborah Poole. The campus community expressed shock upon hearing of the arrests later in the day. Cries of political harassment were, immedi- ately raised, and collections to raise bail were begun. Professors set up a committee to retain counsel, and the Associated Students con- demned the arrests. l:!f gg. A.. f Umm Police and black students proved a run-ins with the law drew charges of volatile mixture during the year. Black police harassment. ffl: Yi mlm omcu Ili ' ' , fry., A , 1 Approximately 1200 students 'stood in test the arrest of seven blacks. Inside, Allen, Rashidi, and Vallejo Kennedy were front of the County courthouse to pro- Maurice Rainey, Mike Harris. Robert charged with thirty felonies. Jim Gregory, left, helps decorate a car used to carry students to the court- with an American flag. The car was house. The band played on, as the Associated to attract people to rallies which had Students implemented 3 new method become commonplace, COURTHOUSE RALLY HELD Black hanassment pnotesteo By 1,260 Feb. 4 - The arraignment of the blacks who were arrested on the third was scheduled for one o'clock, and the students did not let it go by unnoticed. The Associated Students called a rally for noon on the UCen lawn. A band was set up on the Free Speech platform to attract people to the rally. Paul Sweet, Bob Mason and Jim Gregory spoke, calling for students to join in a car caravan to Santa Barbara to show support for the blacks being tried. Approximately 1,200 people moved from the UCen lawn to the County Courthouse. Only twenty were allowed into the courtroom to see Maurice Rainey, Vallejo Kennedy, Robert Allen, Mike Harris, and Rashidi charged with 30 felony counts and five mis- demeanors. Earl McMillan was released on his own recognizance, and Deborah Poole was released in the custody of her parents. Rainey and Rashidi were released on 35,500 bail each. While these proceedings were under way, the crowd outside sang the "Star- Spangled Banner." Izmvlq-5, if f ug 48 In a show of solidarity with flags flying, the United building adapt the black' power salute to pledge all Front leaders of the march on the administration power to the peopIe." 4' i ff" S? , 5 A , 4- ? ff' S ' 'iimfsrgf Above, a drummer provides the cadence as students march from the UCen to the administration building. At right, Dr. Boughey addresses the crowd. i 'T , ,'-' f .RA 'tem bfi so ...ES .A,. MARCH ON ADMINISTRATION BUILDING uniteo Ilizont Dnesents Its Oemanos to Chancellor: Cheaole Lon the last time Feb. 18 - Stating that the Chancellor had "jived" too long, the United Front called a rally on the UCen lawn to inform the student body that they would present him with their demands "one last time." These included such items as an end to police harassment, free speech on campus, the institution of Black and Chicano studies, and the hiring of Black and Brown administrators and instructors. They then announced that they would proceed to march to the administration building to present their ultimatum in person, and asked all those who supported them to march along. Approximately 500 persons began moving in three platoons. Three United Front representatives went to the Chancellor's office, where they were told that the Chancellor was unable to implement their demands, since many were outside of his authority. The representatives returned to address the crowd. Along with Professor Boughey, they told the crowd that the old university was corrupt and thus not conducive to education. They then announced that they would march to the University Center, take it over, and establish a "New Free University," where students and instructors alike could pursue knowledge without administrative red tape. The crowd moved back to the Univer- sity Center to open the new university. -w---J'iSg42f1 1-4 ilxlf, lf' ' Xl ii 1' ,- lNIII14!X:UQlxJ The signs call for a demonstration order to achieve the revolution of effective student solidarity in which seems so close at hand. The crowd listens to Bob Mason call for unity. FREE UNIVERSITY BEGUN umteo ullnont takes UNIVERSITY CGITIIGIQ Feb. 18 - Within minutes after the first marchers passed through the doors of the UCen, the New Free University was inaugu- rated. Posters and banners were attached to the walls, a band was set up and began to play in the lobby, and people were set to work with water colors, painting quotations and pictures on the windows. Classes were scheduled and throughout the building small groups of students could be seen clustered around professors or other students in free, open discussion. In the evening, Charles Evers, brother of the slain civil rights leader lVledgar Evers, spoke to a large crowd in the coffee shop. He reminded the students that while things such as the New Free University were desperately needed, they should not forget the rights of others in seeking to establish their own, and that violence was therefore to be shunned. With this last point, the talk ended, and the audience joined hands to sing "We Shall Over- come." The crowd adjourned to the Program Lounge where an all night dance was held. The NFU's first day had ended. Bringing together people who might never have met, such as the two at left, a new, more casual atmos- phere pervades the UCen. Below, Charles Evers makes a point as he addresses students in the coffee shop. He was one of numerous guest speakers. 1:5-iq -ig! g p fm?--'E'YT'., "i T ug: ' if - 1 2' 3.55.-.g1f,e.f.fy.' , J, l - .-gg, 1 gf-gb-.2 Q, Q ,, at 5-.ir. ,, ,g, ,Q h Ii, me 1 ' "--A 1i-- - .: ,if-5 -Q-L1 , ' --, il .-,Z . . jg, if ":.TL"flfSil9Sl' -' -Y-' -if ' PIP 'Y 'I-'-'WEPEJ-1-"' 1. 'i Y 'iff '. -'ga 51 "ii ,QL--'V "- - . -' 1'-1 U1 , ,.- .3 ' 1 t. H .lisfilgv -.i-rl.: .ii ,V V i .Q , --irvgw N , r t l as 'Ba ,gif r Q' sam prarwgiliia mmm N HZ.. Ilf, 4 1 . e'h"""i"'TK"'rv-143' it E gb, gli M Q V Q ix Q . it ' f'.1't3iiie1-f'H9fl5' r il? .5,- M . L H 2 , , A . ff? gif, 1 X . i H R if MQ QR After the establishment of the New Free the railing on the third floor became a a strategic view of the happenings in the University, the sight of people hanging over common one, This vantage point provided lobby below. The changes in the UCen did Ebenstein seems to feel lVlr. Student artwork brings a com- new name to the recently not please everyone. Rob Storke looked better before. pletely new dimension and a liberated UCen. kr- :if 'N s., me 7. F ii E, 651, I if Q 8 vi, P r x Z - ,a. , .Q 1 1 ,fs .E , X5 ,,, 1. S . 55 I ' L I ' 1 I ..4 A ' 5 i -H... 1 li, E 751451 1 Ma . 'mv - 32 Aff-'wlkili W., 'E 'X sf? ,fav wuws. Y g ,,m,ail'4ar M dp i I Discussion groups and classes, such as sprang up in rooms which had been AM," "' 5' 'L 'ii g the one above with Dr. Boughey, mostly empty in the past. L. lt was not strange to see people cause in the crowded, bustling Adorning the formerly barren and quotations caught the making signs for their favorite lobby of the NFU. UCen walls, student paintings attention of visitors. 15 Seri A A . .5 Que 6? - A P E F s s V K r 1 - . , ,.4..n...:.-.- .Ear 'wsu' ,wx "K 1 I, LN f Q , qu 1 s U5 ..' S ' Z! W f X 35", Hts ,. ,. Rx 'x f f ,f ,' A-,s .in,' f 4. ' it x ' .' .QPU 1 vi 1' --5 A. xuk r.v-d":g,- - l l 1 UM. A 1, ., U tx. Q' J'?"x J 6' gf' 1: I f Tx 59,9 X if 11, x nt Af W' S5 -fe mba. ' 4 I - IM in I' fu :PT tu , 'fig' -' R N ' 'mf J- A f G 5 f 'QQ-X5 4' A-fff " ' , Hr-if 'lie . , ,ref my srl r , 7 ,Mfr ' .fy 'A L 'S':'l as 1532,-,g':fi1-K" "1 X al -A 1" I .L X :ix M Zffpl :fx '-,512-T"4'N 4- NYT . 3 .""'S ,f. 1 -V ik. W f . v'isQQfz','g',T N 7'ff:"'ES'sY' 1 I sq CUl1ZLll2Al GV SNES Music, dance, art, drama, comedy...the beauty of a baIIerina...the catharsis produced in the viewer of Gold Power... the striking beauty of African dance... the alcoholic fumes and magnificent guitar of John Fahey...CannonbaII Adder Iey's personal brand of jazz...Chicanos "telling it like it is" through El Teatro Campesino...A faculty art exhi- bit...Another year of outstanding Drama department productions...The peace and relaxing strains of the New York Cama- rata...Jose Limon dances...Noon concerts enhancing lunch hours...Satisfaction at having interpreted a piece of abstract art...Rich baritones and clear sopranos blending in song...The strange beauty of avante-garde art forms. CULTURAL DIVERSIFICATION Chamlsen Company tneats Classlclsm Oct. 14 - lnaugurating the cultural year at UCSB were the Festival Winds, making their first tour of the Western campuses. Nlixing brass and woodwinds, the group presented classical and contemporary pieces. Oct. 20 - Utilizing facial animation with her expressive voice, Miss Barbara Kinsey, pro- fessor at UCSB, presented a lively and thoroughly entertaining program. Included were two songs arranged by a graduate of UCSB, Carol Nelson Sams. Oct. 25 - New York's first permanent chamber ballet company, the Manhattan Festival Ballet, brought to the campus stage a distinguished range of styles in the classic dance. Each dance presented employed the full range and capability of this fine company. From the Rose Adagio to the Dance for Three People the company held the interest of a diverse viewing audience. Katharyn Horne executes her role as prima ballerina in the Rose Adagio from "Sleeping Beauty." Reflecting intense concentration the Festival Winds Baller mlstfess fm' the Manhaufm Festwal Ballet' Coordinate another hafmonlous performance K3thaI'Yn HOTIIS IHUStl'8t8S the CIHSSICBI f0l'l'T1. f' 113,55 -if: V ,,. . W fd' 'Q , F 3 Riu .W 1 Q52 .. 52' V F51 ,a..f, ., K x .F xxtmlit ' 4 I 1 war QQ'- f ., twm ,ff by fl L ., ,. gi 50 f 1 m, 1, . K H . msg-E! i SR' . x , , . -:I Q , 5 Y ' J The Mexican 93Ql9 9Y35Din9 3 SSFDSDT. behind the fun and play-acting of EI Teatro symbol of Delano's grape strikers, is an Campeging, ever-present reminder of the serious issues 'VIVA LA RAZA' 'teatno Campesino' SDO1IllQh1ZS ChlCAhOS Nov. 2 - Originating in a broken-down shack in Delano, California, EI Teatro Campesino became the vehicle for farm workers to make known their special feelings, attitudes, and problems through a series of one-act plays. Director Louis Valdez captivated the audience with his emotional dialogue on the rationale behind the strike. Songs reinforced the theme and enhanced intermissions be- tween acts. The first act presented La Quinta Tempo- rada lThe Fifth Seasonl, which related very simply and effectively the feelings behind the strike. El Bandido lThe Banditl criptically criticized the distortion of Chicano history, while Los Vendidos lThe Sell-Outsl attacked the forced assimilation required by white society of a minority group. Last on the program was the presentation of Rodolf Gonzales' epic poem, "l Am Joaquin," enhanced by slides and music. Luis Valdez, founder, actor, and director, speaks to the audience during the performance about Chicanos and their problems. I N K I TL L ,. '-f. 4'-. ,I 'na X .'-' 'a f' :fn x. ' wiv'- ,- " 4 .,, . ... ' , "' hx .K T 'F 1 " L sf? ,VL Q -'Fl-. . I L P, ig Q '? R4 .-.Y . "I . -we +2 5,3 ASV' 4yb"QQg, mi 1 I ' I V 1, M 553 Tiff 1 Q- I arm - ' ,I Q V, . .L .,,,. ,. Q -11+ x 4 f ' , gf! x r " ,wks X Q4 ' L: 5 1 , ,V 'L iii' .ff 1, 'unc-as 'V X 'V -J' ' X -'v V. -rug' S .1 - , "jg-. 1' .f ha efbzr--2515? l'- .-, ' FL- ' ' 'tg I , 4 , vw- 1.7- 4... i 8 'I ln b. Og T Y n -- VL i-,,... ,h .ig . Q' ' 1 . 1 . 12' , 4 42:1 Wig , ' 1 , A 7 5 'A Zi- , V T2'1i:i5g 1 .- , ii' ' A W W , . ' , ' g X . ig.-3 i , ' , N. 1 f ' .4.:fft, :H if - 1 f- -gi. f-fi , X W "5?'5"f5"2'?T'f+4f-1 '- ' - f'Tp,.,.':."fiw if , llaijif .HQ 'Lisp L . 'P W, , I ,J A 1 'V ' .1 0-PM A 'f' U H. I . A - . w " xg, ' .. 1 ir QUQQ? .M , ty .N 7 I Q x f W A ll K I , W AMW 'ilnff aiiuwgli If ' "wit I R129 ' - 3, ' - - Q-Jil, " ' k if I 'GJ K 1 if -6- .- .- I .A 1 if- -sl .1 I le It J -5 M Fl I' ,gr 1 A 1 ff-J nf., 2.31 Mm., . u yr 5 if -QA 4 ,, .W J' " ,f +A' 3 ms gig 5 aw "' fi Eygfg' , fM"W-W AAVVA X 3 grv I . U x '7 . " 5i,s.v,,2fi35iggff , 'M , 5 'gulf . my k 5 7.4 P n , f 7, - I -lf 1 1 ,A 4' 5 : " 2. GA I .sv -I M. W.. 'ima M ,x xv . . ' if v 1 IF, EW 1 if 'R X 55 if' vi? if K yy. M if 'ix ,AQ Q ff J if 45 F t. g, -7 af' "X ? .P . e- F ,,L:w::, " - f3'F2:'.:'T 1' -fm A " x fi 1 vi :Q A - fir K' as I .... K, ' ff n' jf , X A - N'-"f .' ' , . -'Y' ' 'CC ': "" .. 2. V -:qw-,gfgfi A Q05 hifi? L xx vm, R ff A' f ' '- A' a n . ' 1 ,. ',. 3 'Ag' km,-ww. Q - ' " A.., , 5 ..,. , . ' ' AU ? 11 -" 2 BN ,J -' '- ,, 2 , "af, Y 'L Q, , . VI V .A g , ,, ,K V.,: A L .E ,A fi? ,fjgm v wig? A 'I ,35 5. I - . QF, ' " Mi- 'S' ff: 32 ,8 I , wr MIL' F H A '25 ' Z is Qigffgg K wr' Jw., William Wittig and Charles Forbes combine musically to play Carl Maria von Weber's Trio, Opus 63. CAMERATA KICKS OFF WEEK BSu's 'Goto powen' Reveals Contnovensy Nov. 18 - The New York Camerata made its appearance in Campbell Hall to the delight of music listeners. This flute, cello and piano combination presented a varied program of Haydn and Beethoven combined with Poulenc and Nlartinu. Through several instrument combinations and the mixing of composer styles, each performer was able to demon- strate his own skill. Nov. 19 - From controversy comes action, and action may be interpreted in many ways, as in the Black Student Union's play "Gold Power," by Cecil Rhodes. Through the medium of drama, Blacks communicated with Whites on the issue of the Black movement and its three phases. Represented by the three mythical sons of Martin Luther King, these basic views became evident to the audience through dialogue and character interaction. Facts were presented and issues clarified as the cultural medium brought understanding of the social. BSU members become actors as they interpret the issues in Cecil Rhodes' play "GoId Power." Disagreement between characters illustrates the controversy. TALE NTED ARTISTS most RGCEDII wonks ShOWl'l A12 GXHIBIUOH Nov. 19-Dec. 22 - With the completion of the Art Gallery in 1961, the faculty of the Art Department has been presenting their own works to the wider university community in the form of an Annual Exhibition. This year was no exception as every professor in the department contributed to make the exhi- bition representative of almost every medium. From sculpture and ceramics to pottery and painting, a diversification typical of the department was displayed. Chairman Dr. Gebhard feels that this exhibit gives the students not only an opportunity to view the works of the professors, but to learn of their various points of view. The exhibit also enables the faculty members to examine the creations of their colleagues, while giving the rest of the community a chance to become aware of the current trends in the field of art. .... i,, ...al A traditional art exhibit reception finds even the The inside of the C0VefGd Jar bv 5h9ld0l1 KH93l10f'f youngsters taking some interest. provokes the curiosity of Kim Chnstalnsen Keith Aldrich, Associate Dean of the College of Letters and Science, examines a current work of Michael Arntz entitled Noyeau-Seed-nut, Nucleus, Stone 1968, presented at the Faculty Art Exhibition Robert Thomas's Fountain is the object of students. This is but one of many of the works observation and discussion by two interested represented in the collection. MUSICAL VARIATION linaoltional Opeiza vs. Gxpemmental music Nov. 22 - Comedy was the major theme as the UCSB Opera Theater performed Scarlatti's "The Triumph of Honor." This operatic comedy, performed in English, delighted the audience as Alis Clausen, playing Riccardo, tried to balance the delicate situation of one lover, one fiancee, one jealous man and a rich uncle. Nov. 26 - Ronald Ondrejka conducted the University Symphony orchestra in a fine musical performance which began with a fugue by Bach and ended with a Wagner overture. Nov. 27 - Symbolism, Christianity and com- Elizabeth Keeney, Ruth Warshawaky, and Lillian Adams labovel as the townswomen in "EI Manco," plot to destroy the Gonzales family while exclaiming their hatred for it. Below, Theodore Levatter as Rodi- marte and Suzanne Lukather as Rosina radiate with their newly discovered feelings in "Triumph of Honor." passion were intertwined in a thought pro- voking production of "El Manco" by the Los Angeles Repertory Theatre. Jan. 8 - lnitiating the new quarter was "a mind-expanding experience" presented by Prof. Daniel Lentz with his electronic music. A captured audience viewed with mixed emotions the strobes, tapes and drama used to express creative music. Daniel Lentz expresses religious zeal in his solo per- formance of the Gospel Meeting. Susan Alexander reveals the dancer as she executes a move- fine control needed by a ment fr0m "0verture." With body and voiceagroup of feeling of need in Dr Spar dance students express a row's"Nocturnal.' MODERN EXPRESSION GQ ff Jan. 24 - A body in motion can be one of the University Dance Group. Students of the N A Dance Department, using their training in body i iii tx i, N. ground music. closing number. "Nocturnal," progresses to its conclusion Cneativity unvelleo VIA Oancens' Souls at most expressive forms of communication as 1 demonstrated by Dr. Patricia Sparrow and the m control, spacial awareness and modes of ex pression, performed a variety of dances to a multitude of diverse accompaniments Ropes boxes, plastic squares and empty space were props. Bach, Varese, electronic music and Mayan and Aztec melodies provided the back In two of her numbers, Dr. Sparrow experi mented widely with music, props, and dance movements to create the desired effect Susan Hughes, one of the students who did the chore ography for Los Dios, utilized interaction between small groups for a very expressive Poised and alone is Gail Ann Teixeiraas as FINAL PERFORMANCE Jose limon Dances llanewell to Stage Jan. 30 - In his last appearance as a perform- ing artist, Jose Limon and his company of sixteen presented two of Limon's major works. "The Winged," danced to tapes of bird sounds, made the comparison between the aerial and earthly antics of birds and the human element. Unusual lighting, along with the agility of the performers, enhanced this effect. "Missa Brevis," with music by Zoltan Kodaly, was Lirnon's reaction to World War ll's devastation of the cities, and a tribute to the human spirit. Feb. 2 - La Noue Davenport, krummhorn, and sackbut were among the instruments used by the New York Pro lVlusica in their presen- tation of sixteenth and seventeenth century music of the Spanish court. Under the direction of Dr. John White, the ten-member musical group has preserved and perpetuated this musical form. Feb. 9 - Playing to a full house, Le Treteau de Paris, under the direction of Jean de Rigault, performed the comedy, "Fourberies de Scapin," by lVloliere. Drama helped bridge the language barrier, through the laughable antics of the comical hero, Scapin. ., lt' ,.A- ,gj i" I i f , , 1 u 'fl' ' . 'ff . if x .vi e in K h Li: - I I, AA is 1, .K W Q A A. ' 1. "' ' A, 'P A "r - , ,- , X fy-v, Q11 -YZ' -4- 1, 4. . J :A I , f if ,J-iQ. 'ar' .- ,+ -,,-as ,Maggy 4, ' ,ff ,.,- , . S' ' f 1 ' ' if Z I ,f 9, 'Pi v ' ., ,I - f wif' 'ff if , 2319? 1. ES f:i?7'!'fg?i 3 iQ 'Y' . --vii, ' gl 9 ' nilpfg., y Q iii-1 'EW' ef fy x M . 95 " QQ J.'i 3 ,Pfrzvbf 4 ,315 To .5 'FQ 3 , . 1, --1 90 - . qw, ,.,,7, ffjpg., Q lu '. 4. .W x X.. K 4. .KX .' -LA x 5 9 - Ax 5- Q 1 sf. fzx ' sm X x Y . Q 'iff 1 xx: ' s XG Will' y,- V. 'x , X il A .I K , .,,,. I IX! ,ein ---u J I fx - -1'-mf'f"85 lfmnnwf ,A . ,, Q' xx N . X x f. A! H? ff ." , .I- 4 o n'v. vo - rf li"-"A ,, .1 , I "uhm Y .22-.K ...r J X ,. X 1 11' . S ' J' MM. jf' u 1 pf: A. . x Hn-Q W ,V 3' . 4 E ' ,sv . h a-rr' xg . A V' .l- . EYf2 , xf" ,v.,if. Q, 5 , I w i 4' Ly. My 'V 41 ' .. Q. iw Q ,: .1532 .J . gg, ' 4 g i fi fg. " 'dv rv, 5' . uf. I '- .. ,- O - 6 NL A -Hgqqvs - w - l Kathy Enloe and Melissa Ladies scrutinize Tim Gray's Borders as The Mod Young phisiognomy. Caught up in his mischief Scapin greets an angry Gregory making, Harry Johnson as Piantanida. TT MODERN TWISTTO'HUMOR' Conceiztos Contnast moliei2e's Comeoies Feb. 23 - Directed by Professor Karl Geir- inger, UCSB's Musica Antiqua presented four . sacred concertos for voices and instruments by Austrian Baroque composer lsaac Posch. Several pieces by Bach including Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 and an unknown suite by Johann Bernhard Bach were also performed. Feb. 27 - Two of IVIoliere's comedies were presented by the drama department, using their modern approach to bring the lVIoliere genius to the UCSB stage. Adventures of Scapin and The lVlod Young Ladies lfrom "Les Precieuses RidicuIes"l utilized setting, lighting and costumes to enhance the effect of a Twentieth century lVloIiere. Directed by Stanley L. Glenn, the talented cast provided a most enjoyable and humorous performance. Blending the best talents of students and faculty, UCSB's Musica Antigua follows Dr. Geiringer. '7 V Af , , ' f' PW? 11- F f' W W' ' ' .5 ' L Q 4 4 l Q ' fQ 7iiTQpgg.1, Qhffg o L ' +., ,'f'-gg ll : ,1 "...f- . 1...:. Q ,F 1, 'i 1 5 T ver , i f X MY R. gf, X M I iw 2 ., I7 , , H5 n 5 24? S w H H 1 H w m w 1, w u 1 n -fy - un ww 24 o if ff-1 Q fi M ,aw A-, 3 wc , Y 1' -, J ff gf' 5:5 W :EW , :Q gif Q 4, 3, W rx 1 I 6 gi 3 L . if . . M 25 Q r 1 , , sg X 1 gs? , Q5 N iw 5? 1 9 UV Q nk A.. . pr fur A QW L SOClAl GVEHIS Wide-eyed, eager freshmen making new friends and learning the rigors of cam- pus life...The elation of the home- coming queen and her princesses...a Pied Piper Parade through Isla Vista...En- lightened parents on University Day... The rope burns, bruises, ecstasy and exhiliration of Sandpiper Weekend... Robertson Gym packed to hear the mag- netic voice of Glenn Yarborough... Music and laughter in GGR, RRR, and Spring Sing...Santa Barbara's own Indianapolis 500, the Push Cart Races, with all their thrills and excitement... A huge bonfire lighting up the UCen lawn...Pensive faces of seniors play- ing their last college football game. fir M , 1.-.-gggivfeig...:,.i.. me --:5,,.',x. . ' . was .1 .dfiaiiwmf ii w :rw T P H Vvfmlif as assi' ii 1 - . W, my--. N 1 T as it -' T if 1 aZ,f?23d'fffx x "' .w V7 " f V. if' A mlm' , i xr., i. .H T. 4 .f ' . 7 5 V , E .4 N' 5, e"'l A . 2222314 n Q,u ' I W X I 4.1.-..,w.w.f as N911 ,, .R ,V 1.1 ff, nn.: 3. it S Wei! E+ - "' K gg-1,.e.2.:g ,gs35Viiif it V :iii Mm. yi iiiqiigiia ' -152.2233-'51 5 was H f we R ,gy .aa-,F -2, W gg -ta ,X Two freshmen women listen intently to a counselor in a session held to acquaint them with college life. THEY ALSO HAVE FUN Ilnosh lnooctmnateo at thnee Ca Camp Sept. 18-20 - Converging upon a nearly deserted campus in Mid-September were approximately 1300 green-beanied freshmen and their enthusiastic band of counselors. Operating on the theme of "transition from high school to college," many homesick and awe-struck campers began the three-day indoctrination with the firm belief that this was "easier said than done." A major change in the format was intended by the staff to make the adjustment period more relaxed this year than in previous years. Unlike previous Frosh Camps, none of this summer's activities were mandatory. How- ever, the frosh attended all events in greater numbers than were expected. Through dia- logues with administration and staff, beach parties, picnics, and late night bull sessions, the freshmen and camp staff alike found that voluntary attendance not only brought a larger response, but also a closer rapport, and a rapid familiarity. Wifi . I. -5 A frosh camper encounters one of his year as a "dormie." Hopefully the many problems he will face in help is on the way. f amasse d , 4, me ffm- ff .Q ---apt? T . iw it v- -A - a w , - ...V T ,mv el ,l it its W l B . 921 . 6' 'f Registration procedure sometimes causes freshmen to HUFIQFV frosh CHWIPGFS "dig in" to the food Dl'0Vld6d wonder if high school wasn't a better deal. l f0f them af their PiCf1iC lunch Of' 320 IWQUSVS DBU0- ,. , MYTV. 2533 ., ,Wi ,H - x 'Se' , 4,- The Rainbow phantom strikes camp in practice for a pressures of academic life usually curtail his activities full year's terrorization of residence hall dwellers. The during the first weeks of the quarter. ll Campers and counselors alike enjoy themselves at the dance held on the final night of camp. The music was great, but one can't dance every dance with the partner of his for herl choice. THOUSANDS PARTICIPATE Danents, llouiz tops Shane top BIUIDG Oct. 19 - Thousands of curious parents descended upon the campus on University Day to learn about the lives their children lead. Guided tours led by Spurs, ROTC cadets, and enthusiastic students were avail- able to parents who wanted to see the campus. Representatives from the various departments manned tables in Storke Plaza in order to discuss programs and answer questions, and the University Center provided free donuts and coffee for the hungry. As the day ended, parents left with a deeper understanding of modern University life. Oct. 19 - Robertson Gymnasium was the scene, as the fantastic Four Tops brought their brand of soul to the Santa Barbara campus. For two hours, those in attendance "grooved" to their unique sound. Presented by C.A. Williams' Social Committee, the concert lasted an all-too-short one hour, playing to a near-capacity audience. Included in the repertoire were such "golden goodies" as "Bernadette" and "Can't Help Myself." r-' , . V ii lef: Sieelwi- .A E5 ee-3 Getting an idea of the environment in which their children live, several parents "take the tour." Dr. Paul Pitman explains the Education Abroad Glimpsing a less publicized side of the-University Program to two prospective applicants at his table. student, a Santa Barbaran shows delighted interest f Y fig!! Q' ,-r -.6-75? 61' 0. 0 ,' 0 5 Q . ..o. ,Pg 1.5 'fa' oe 1 0 .1.ee if Q' 9 G-.X '59' 0' 6 X .0 Qs x sw' , fm, Q ' if ..: g,: . 1 pg- 2 Tf ., ,L Q1 Q, -951 V ,-,,,:.i:s::.'ff . w 4 gag., s .QA ., 'SH-X x- sk Q s v'Qs s ,' .gylgi "-fs' ' ,gf I . ,Fl I-U v"1 1 2 " :::g:::. , .,- ,,. T? E? - . "H -". Y 1 - .- K. - . . Inu-5,..... Q .mg N.: .?11g1Z1'.'J... s . 'Y J? 0... jx '..--wuz.. X, 3 X ... - 1' pn 4' s if gf 'sq ,-M V+ af no U an I 4 5 . 3. -an U iv- 4 :xauw " Q J' -.vu ,.. .5 5, x nf Q W x - '.n"o 1 D11 I3 0 1 o','t4',.'t.a 9:9 'W' 'A O - ,gtnttzzy Q A 0 ,gvQn' ,1ll' S- 's f . ,nfjzo' .I'..atlll 4' , .+':51A""". 'v 'qw FR .Fon ,O .Q ,fgk w ,r 1. w X: 1. 5 xe .fe ST 2 hrs as-Q 5? 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' H2 iwilfil 15: .5 ' ', J:4fH'.s?f5ggi ,,,- , .:.3 'bf' "Im T 4 A 1 , ,, fm U rwr Hmmm- B 5 -1- qw..-,,-X A ' V' 1 . l . ,,- M rw-f . 5 .,,.,.,. .-., f. ..,,.. .M J, iw :zz .... 1 -"""'L V 1 I I . b 5.51 ESE s fr l xr' ir - in to it X , N, - ,, ll , 'ssl 5 S Fz:s:t,Z,EL l . pu 1 fl .. Symbolizing the weekend, the Sandpiper pushball gets "l2iUr1Ched." CAMPUS ROPEBURNS INCREASE Sanoplpen Games Gllclt Rlvalny Oct. 26-27 - Once again, Sandpiper Weekend got under way, giving sports-minded students a chance to demonstrate their physical prowess and compete for coveted trophies in a myriad of events. It also gave the lesser talents among us the oppor- tunity to observe our peers in both humorous and skillful action. The normally quiet tidepools on the beach came alive as hundreds of students descended upon them to participate in or observe the ever- popular tug-of-war, which culminated in rope burns, drenched suits and muddy faces. The beauty of the lagoon was enhanced by the sailing competition. Pedestrians became adept at side-stepping racing bicy- clists. Judo, ping pong, volleyball, pushball, pool and other events rounded out a fantastic weekend. , . .F , i I , - lt l -1 Q - . Hz ,. ,. V. V . .., K V K , Ss it, .qt me mg-ff" '13 fi tl . X 6 gif v. L 'V ,,- Vu. , .,. Ugf.:-1., ' ' 5 :Qt ' 1 -f ,N NZ' 5-S- 'II 1 ,TJ . '- T 4- 'Kia ' 7.f,,,.. ... nr .4 z A: "fe .-I -A-.Jn , , fx., ' .. ' . 'P"kv11' "WF '45 Wh. ' ' . 4.5 .. .hh . A, ' 2. . s,.' al . Q aw " , I ' ,. 1-4 ., , 5 . ' I ' 'K NW. -,nb .' 2 ,V ' , f f ,--. ' tx nf .r . ll ,v f IQ ,, vii 1 X x W 8 1 gi , 'xx '. 'S+ 1 - X1 Q. . . A .....l1-- ,- F? A ygj. 'Ik' 'Qi l 17 . 3' x . - .,,...L.f x ,Jiri ..., ,. K 'E .UI lp Vg Q 4'1fi'i'f 'L .f vi wt" f f Q4 .?""'f:+?, - -- 21:- A, . - an -1... .fzgfi . a. xi, , , ,-.Q .4-.J" ln. I 1 l SY KST? ' w aw K at X 1 WT, lf' :J 1 :. A km -f .ao-P Mez. 2, - ?w,,vM: ,K Q .x i ' , - , ,ff-, L 'W .Q l' , S.a"" i A ,f l 3 JY QM Y, . .Vx ' 'y xl. , ff ui, 'I NWN EDE N J X A ' QQ X X 'fi .gg wx' Nf I 1 li ti O..- ., ,A -5 Lv- 0 1 9 .wa Jw I x 1 X A rim f G i - P ' ' M' X y UGU QMI F SQE QG , ata XXXNX, X P' .-42 rf i XX X 2. -N X, 'x 1' wmv-1! Leading the Pied Piper parade, the Gaucho Marching Band winds its way through Isla Vista. 1 t X P ' - . P -3 'f,21',y.31J "if ,VTR . ' Y ,-Q-"cific l , x ,v . x . we 2 i i wg? ii i w X 35" ,ru E ,i w ,i E :L 1 ii it i ii , , i l . F Great Gaucho Prof Ray Varley is caught on his way to lead the game crowd in the annual GGP cheer. s i E + IHHOVAUGH homecoming Day Stnesses Iiizaoition ano - 1 'Y 5 The members of Lamda Chi Alpha and Kappa Alpha Theta put the finishing touches on their Sweepstakes winning house decoration "The Garden of Isla Vista." This "house dec" and the others which added if w Q-Q-A ,N iv .. ' 41,Q I f ci , 2: color and beauty to the campus-Isla Vista area on homecoming day, marked a signifi- cant departure from the traditional Santa Barbara Homecomings of past years. ln an effort to further integrate Isla Vista into campus life, the decision was made to scrap the usual floats and State street parade in favor of house decs and a "pied piper" parade through the streets of lslaVista.Thus homecoming came home. 1 P r s E a 1' g '. 'Av- il :l'!,L'J4r'r-pmt' 'uv - -is N- .2 , . I -, Y-gl . Q V , -'S Nl 1 , X 'U,2V':f 1 V Q "4-15s.?i1sf:fs2:15f , fzfglfxmf x.,.w. . , ..,.,4 .,.,.W,, H F, ,W W. A , my , , xr . wfsifiwk K? I 5 HI, ff. U Ar M 'Q f " l ,E f . 5 E -X f X, xx Q, k .- f'x ., . y ' 'Af . f" ' 45Qir, I, - in -BE, Lv-1 ,X sig! x . V 1 -1 HY? f fit, W X ' Y' W! ll R 1-.SFR 'xp' 'Q'-vi --... ,fi f Vim iff x L5 ' Y M h .- ' .-1' -' Q "?n:ir"f , .-Zff V x4 . . Q1 , 1 f,f fi ' '-gf Y . , , ii rf '.pus Y 4 or A 42 . Aa . ' z - 1 'IJ iI"f-w 4- .-:f-z"5nl!- K ..-,.., d., Q 'Q u ,.., 'S vfff ki . iw, 6- f T J' X , f ,, AL- -, " ,' N h . A J : , , w5,,.1Sw., : ' ' 2, -'Sign' 1 5, a ll-14 i .ii and ' TW f - , 'S ff- ,- .s ' nw- vu fm: 33364353 W 1' nfs ,luqnv 1 w sz 'M 7 I 3 r J- M ' wmv ' ,lax Aw ,V f sz 3 X. 3 4 2 if EW 'E ' I I J '15 nf , , Pi. Gini J , I xg 4 L1 M Yi , , .1 H, . Y4Nn..1.c:a , 9 , G r , 'J Persian handcrafts, as shown in the picture on the right, brought a small sample of Persian culture to American students. Below, American and foreign students share ideas, food, and common interests while a faithful chef and staff help senle the exotic dishes to a waiting crowd. eggs X 22245 , iw. , W rise ' p"XIT.a Q V , FOREIGN EXCHANGE Cultunes mix at DGRSIAI1 Banquet Feb. 9 - A touch of the Middle East was brought to the UC campus by the International Relations Organization as they presented a gourmet banquet of Persian food, followed by short Persian films. Persian students super- vised the preparing of the meal as others served a hungry group. During the week a display of Persian handcrafts, ranging from small rugs to jewelry and carved boxes, were exhibited in the UCen. 5 .N . wfggemf- sen i .. i if at sir? me vitae. Basra 'sm ssffur , k ve- w"ggi1i3.sm,.Ugy?i?i4 ' F -fr 'l-- Smal f' ' - . 3355, .gM,,l,,l,533,,1 :wigs , -as 42 ,Eel 'A ,va .J!t:si.3Q2E' Wim' ' 1 -1 ,R L, I I ,-.X "'- ' te" 2. 'l ui. nfl ,gg - 1 fa bfffi 5 I,-sf-'X 1' l ' , ,l ffm .rzgi gg! .lu .v-QSM Poised on the soft mat of the pole vault is Relays. Her attendants are Jan Fritz lleftl skill at the javelin throw one of the many Melinda Rogers, reigning Queen of Easter and Jill Iliff lrightl. Below, Susan tries her events in the relays. ROYALTY BESTOWS PRIZES Gauchos Run Away With Oay's honons lVlarch 22 - The first queens of the quarter reigned over Easter Relays, held at La Playa stadium during spring break. Chosen by the male populace on campus, Melinda Rogers, representing Spurs, became honored as Jan Fritz, representing Delta Gamma sorority, with Jill Iliff, representing Chi Omega sorority, were her attendants. Easter Relays, now an established tradition, is an invitational tournament of track and field events between various colleges and junior colleges through- out the state. V1 I I 'f!.'?? FT .. 1 I fi' IH W f V ' I T Au ' X , A: . .ffaxx ' 1 ' 0 1 4'-,, fr J J ,Q,i'i,Qi2 7 'fx SQT7 Erjff' v NP 2 XA! Q nf . X' Q Ei: il. 'X I 4 'A x ,.. 'F , 1 . 4 22136 224424 :Sw .:::. mm,.51 'Pa' 3 fin 3. X 3 uvlg . -, w Tqyg-Q95-' Ex 2 Fu V .f 1 E+ .L, 4. 3 W 9 L. ZS? ' 'E 9 x Fw' I :M""Cst in ug -J ' A.: wx a - u ' ""i . 9 H vii-guf ' I v '. it V. , 1 , ur 4 Q . 'V . Z 1 -4-vm. ,Q 4-H-4 - V r - - i Q! ' ' 41' ' IPA, ' .- " . K I--I F .f 7 . -., 3 5 1- 1 - 4 ' . 4' , A A 5 f - 1 ' J o .,. . in . gf' v -rv.. rg . . ff- ' : I a , 1 ' Q - 'r f' Q ...,...-....A " '11 , 131, 71 kkry ' , I ' fffhfg lam, L- Nag' N: Y 5' 'V' ' ' f . ff 55, 4, ....,, , Mggg Bob Hite lThe Beari, Adolpho de Ia Parra lThe Fitoi, Allan Wilson iBIind Owli, Henry Vestine J . .57 1 lf . f, Student publications and broadcasting media find a new home in the Storke building. iSunfloweri, and Larry Taylor iThe Molei jolted UCSB students with their blues-rock sound. ROCK CONCERT BEGINS QUARTER Opening anticlpateo lion Stonke towerz April 10 - A capacity crowd was soothed by the country sounds of Poco and jolted by Canned Heat's savage blues as a year of Robertson Gym rock rolled on. Following the all-girl Ace of Cups, Poco proved itself to be one of the best of the growing crop of Nashville-influenced groups. Canned Heat lost no time showing that the blues was alive and well, in this case the electro-orgasmic variety. Henry "Sunflower" Vestine nearly ripped the strings off his guitar, and when Bob "the Bear" Hite growled at the crowd to boogie, blues fans heeded the call. Summer 1969 - The most spectacular structure on campus, to be used by the student print and electronic media, will be dedicated early this summer. The 31,200,000 landmark is a contribution of Thomas M. Storke, the 92-year old emeritus editor- publisher of Santa Barbara News-Press. lVlain speaker for the dedication program will be Chief Justice Earl Warren, with many prominent journalists, educators, politicians and friends expected to participate in the opening festivities. 1 Q' Q at . . . x ,v xg I . "I 3, L, X xy, - ,',1.' 'V , X' E . 4 1, -an . 'h .gif xv , ig , gf' Wfllflf, KW f k if 2 '. M ' ' , ft X i M I J! gh 1' Q! ' ' 5 ,L1':-ff? K . H. 1 ""1 gf ,F T 3 'I ,,:?iL . N,,ii?ii D ' I K' x .A v. ff:-, I 1 uv .-S 3 -FB' Y ' . ' . li 1 .fv- ' S.. 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I I ., s' .WN " BLLINK .1,, 2 T aff' 1, ' , . Nj 'L 7 1 .x-fl, W i Nl I H- b ww, -,S-,f, J".-:,JJESh.,Qi I . ,-. ke y - , ,H frffm,.:g .x . 'L I ' -'71 fr- - :S ,--"A i. ' x' .A '-'V r 4 . , , . . , 4 - f.'11ZS,A1Af'l l-x4:'A I , If K , I 'wh-,T ., el, ,aiu-guy ,, -1.4. Q Q 1 . A ' " ' VJ- ": 'K '31 K . - l U' . 'V' . L , K 1-if -h X,Q'.,w,.,:,r. -M 3' ' "ry A-'r X I 1 A ., ls .Aw r. f--5 1 , '. 4 -Wu, - Nm. X A ':. , ., fiif. A 'ff 0' var 1-'.i'9J-"-r-"Lf" "'35"7'P' .. .' ' "' "'ii In .' nf ' ff Q4 f'fi1,f. -,.sYL.-54 -, Av-4 l ,av . .. - - - S.. ' ' . -Q, " K -.. 44.2 ' ,N p 'H , . - U '-31' ' fr, mx... W , 'lb -g,5,',.x J ,. -Q' ',-I-4' ' '.. ' , M- ' . ' ' ' " ' - P41 'J af, " -L-,Hjfgvi -f."'l'- 2 ,. 5 . 4' as ,IIAIM M 111. I . ,- V -at ,MNH mx Q 1 ,., F is ' XV I' I x 5 . -1 f ,, ,-. M. . ' - , .I -3, A 1 A" X . '- K F - K if "iq,--5,71 . UITVX fit - V., 0 .1 'xl x ' - 'w ' - -ff. , 1, .,- , ' ' , 'W X ?1sf:,J ' 'T' l V , "P L ' ,- " . 4 '. -a -.. . 2... D - v' .- 2. . - V ttf va' ' .",f'i'-"f1l'Au:-Lv1':.4- .5.g,4?.5..,,.9 . ' .,m-,, , 4 - ., :vi-X I I. .w.- l-'r.u.'1'4'fg"". 'Y - -'-.'.rNs ' Vp 4' , '+vgS-fm.-', "r:4.:- vm- 11 ,. A ,A X rw - - 'f- I ' N , -. ' 9 ' '-' '1g'- '- .,-,g. ... n , . , -4,3 , H X -. - - .1 ., . 4 W '. ' - I . , . 5 I . ' . 1 V r , 4 SPORTS In this automated age in which identity is lost amid numbers and punchcards, sports is one of the last isolated strongholds of indi- vidual participation. Escaping from the ever-increasing complexi- ty of modern education, the sports enthusiast has ample opportunity for extra-curricular involvement. Whether as a spectator or an athlete, the sports-minded in- dividual, through involvement, gains an outlet for the tensions and anxieties that pervade much of the academic life. Thirteen intercollegiate sports afford an area of competition for nearly 500 UCSB males while count- less other students participate in the 30 recreational clubs associated with the university. Over half of the male student body is involved in one or more of the 26 sports offered in the UCSB intramural program. Univer- sity women also take part in sports programs at both the intercolleg- iate and intramural levels. Finally on the verge of big time athletics, UCSB sports will con- tinue to provide for the needs of both the student and the community. Athletic director and head football coach Cactus Jack Curtice, his Business Manager Tom Morgan, who handles all the Gauchos business offensive playbook tucked under his arm, cheers on his charges. arrangements, surveys a crowd at Campus Field before a game. Gaucho football attracted large, enthusiastic crowds this season as they provided fans with an exciting, explosive offensive show. Cui2tice's 6th yean Bmnqs DCAA Gntny ln his sixth season at the "campus by the sea," and- his fourth as athletic director, Cactus Jack made giant strides toward his goal of making UCSB an athletic power. Under his direction, the Gauchos this year became members of the newest athletic con- ference on the coast, the Pacific Coast Athletic Association. As a member of this university-division league, the Gauchos will meet such powers as San Diego State, San Jose State and Long Beach State in twelve sports, including football, basketball, track and baseball in 1970. National small college football Coach of the Year in 1965, Curtice is ably assisted by Assistant Athletic Director Andy Everest, Business Manager Tom Morgan, Sports Information Director Donn Bernstein and Trainer Harry Callihan. I. ll, ' V. : ' ' My wg Y ,qi Y T' -. 1- I- 'A A 3,9 .Q . , - 1 L' It S 'S x ,IE " ..' , XJ A ik QE' r ipbgklxf v Y ? ll ' 'f ,S ' J- rj 4, ' lv LQ 'nmlg 1 Ft-7' ' at If ns? ff. nil x V .r EF wg. if as 4,5121 rf wb-ming " . 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W-5- ' E 5,4 g X i fly-1 rj , F"h - , i'11 4, 1 V 5.1.5.9 z -- NJ.: , Q - in 'ifffr-LQ .1 I 32.53, apes, Ei! ia! -'ff-4 Fi fflff. -egg? 'H ' 4' "" -V """'ix'4' " -"4 Li .. ., .at kfygyu. , 1-ev.- ,aft- ,W ,Q Q: ."-my is-V. A balloon-laden Homecoming crowd awaits festivities. VARSITY CHEERLEADERS - Bottom row: Rick Miller, Gary Langstaff Jim Marteney. Second row: Phil Leerskov, Kathy McNamara. Top row: Missie Hibler. Illness, lnexpemence hanolcap pep Squao For the second year in a row, the UCSB pep squad came under fire from the student body, not for their cheers, however, but for the lack of them. The 1968-69 squad, led by Jim lVlar- teney and Carolyn Caldwell, due to somewhat uncontrollable circumstances, made infrequent appearances at athletic contests after the close of the fall football season. Although sometimes criticized for their lack of cheers when they did appear, the pep at times displayed the ability to ignite the enthusiasm of the crowd. lVlost of their activity during the year centered on Homecoming Week, when they led the second annual pre-game bonfire rally, rode in the first Isla Vista version of the Homecoming parade, and masterminded a successful card stunt section during half-time of the Cal Poly lSLOi game. Overall, the 1968-69 pep squad worked hard, but a combination of illness, inex- perience, and comparisons to last year's squad proved insurmountable handicaps. rw , ,cam vcr:- .1- a. gg S 8 - , X , v 0 Q fx, f'5.:Q -g ' 1- ,Q DJ ' is 1 fy, , , L ' - ' '63 ,Q Ries.. Jw X. 4 ,nv q f M x m W was-+219-' ' , mf...-f'w'2.,'T -ff ' 5- Q .I . Q' V Y 'K P -Lv ig.,-' . ' ' wiv- J . if , P ew Yi - f, 'ig -1 -.A Qggi. im' 4... QE K 4 M W N tv 2 , Q Q K 55. H3 E ,1,, ,., if IU ,qv Q ,- WH 'n 1 I w 1 his ' i ' ! l ' ,. -- -A'. V f 12 fall sponts Footballers finish season A-4-1 Lose Pasadena Bowl bid...Broadhead sets season, career rushing records while joining Heinz on 1st team Little All-Coast...Chapple, Priest set records...Frosh go 1-4...Adams' harriers post 6-4 dual meet mark... Blemker voted MVP, team captain... Take fourth in PCAA conference meet...Soccermen take third in All- Cal...HoIlingsworth makes All- League...Varsity upsets Westmont... Water poloists take sixth in NCAA nationaIs...upset national champs San Jose State in PCAA conference encounter...Communicators make it three in a row with 21-14 victory... Leg Council loses in last minute. Gauchos tie mmens, tumsleo By tampa With vivid memories of 1967's 50-14 shellack- ing on their minds, Coach Jack Curtice's Gaucho gridders went into their season open- er against the University of Texas at El Paso hoping for an upset. Optimism dwindled when Miner quarterback Brooks Dawson launched a devastating passing attack that netted 342 yards in the air, giving UTEP a quick 14-0 lead at the end of the first quarter. UCSB refused to concede defeat so soon, however, as Gaucho signal-caller Jimmy Curtice, mixing short passes and clutch runs, engineered an 83-yard drive and scored on the next-to-the-last play of the third quarter to narrow the margin to 14-7. Midway through the final quarter, Curtice culminated another impressive 70-yard drive with a 3-yard toss to tight end Jim Priest for the tying score. A last second field goal attempt by Dave Chapple fell short and the Gauchos had to settle for a tie with the perennially tough Texas El Paso Miners. Glory was short-lived for the Gauchos, though, as they dropped an 18-7 game to Tampa University in their home opener be- fore a crowd of 8,000 fans. After taking an early 7-0 lead, the Gauchos were forced to watch helplessly as the Spartans pounded out 389 total yards, capitalizing on strategic fumbles and interceptions. Tampa went on to prove itself as one of the nation's finest college division teams, compiling an 8-2 overall record. , -diy , .,,i9?3::.-. Q7 ,iz-WE ...V 350,-.1.,F ggat, A "'-' Defensive back Mike Cobb closes in Matthews in the 14-14 season open- for the kill against UTEP's Reggie er with El Paso's Miners. Tampa's Leon McQuay finds him- Pareto and Johnny Burnett as he self in a squeeze between Stan attempts to hang onto the ball. .'-7.4-.gf +3 - 1-.-538.-E Rv" ,if .4411 v Q' T. , I , .,.. , Z A .., 1. " Hagiriffw-3. ,, Y fwi' 'iq egg Gaucho llumeles Ano WOIIIDACK By 17-13 A once hopeful football campaign took an- other turn for the worse on September 28th, when the Gauchos dropped their second straight of the new season to the University of Nevada, 17-13. Once again, offensive miscues plagued Jack Curtice's gridders. Although outgaining the Wolfpack, 361 to 349 yards, two U. of N. interceptions and four Santa Barbara fumbles proved disastrous. The season total advanced to 14 fumbles in three games, eight of which were recovered by the opposition's defense. Halfback Tom Broadhead gained 68 yards on 13 attempts, raising his three-game total to 224 yards, while quarterback Jimmy Curtice threw completions for 174 yards. Their val- iant efforts just were not enough to catch the spirited Wolfpack, however, and the Gauchos once again were forced to accept defeat. Coach-father Jack and quarter- egy for the next play during a back-son Jim Curtice discuss strat- time-out at the bench. Nevada's Leonard Gaeta makes a by-passes the outstretched hands of desperate bid for the ball as it defensive back Johnnv Burnett. poets Sllenceo as Qmooens Wm limst ln an awesome display of offensive power, UCSB gridders finally made their mark in the win column, blistering the Whittier Poets, 59-14, before a cheering crowd of over 8,000 at Campus Field. lt was all over for the hapless Poets just 17 seconds after the game began. On the first play from scrimmage, junior quarterback Jimmy Curtice tossed a 60-yard touchdown to end Steve lVloore and the Gauchos never looked back. Touchdown runs by Tom Broadhead and Kurt Speier gave UCSB a 21-0 lead at the quarter. Things got worse for the Poets before they got better. Broadhead's second TD run and a 36-yard field goal by Dave Chapple upped the score to 31-0 before Whittier could get on the scoreboard. For all practical purposes, the game was one of flag football, as the Gauchos were penalized a record 188 yards, 158 of those in the first half. The Poets gained more yardage from UCSB penalties in the first half than from their rushing and passing put together. After the second Curtice-to-Nloore TD brought the score to 38-7, reserve quarterback Tim Walker came in to try his hand. Walker completed 8 of 18lattempts for 156 yards and two touchdowns. A 60-yard toss to Steve Bunyon with one second left in the game tacked on the final seven points. Gaucho gridders huddle for last the field against Whittier in search minute instructions before taking of their first win. Tim Walker winds up to throw the Carey Williams in the closing mo- first of two touchdown passes to ments of the Whittier contest. " " QF Q 1 K .T M I . ' 1 .,f A e. iv-- Y . 5 XX , '1- ...4. . .1 ,, x 2 A W WS 5 H, 'li :A ' Y-1 , ., ,f 'YQ 'BM f M x ,QM .Q J. -wi 1 Q - Y Nt ,X 4 ,.i E! ' R-- 5 ' , Q WSJ W. 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Q E355 6 -1 rA wr mr , ' ' .1 J' f P il H V. vixxn ,iti .- -in J ,, A ,. r mustanqs' Rounoup Ruins homecoming Despite the fact that it was Homecoming, with 14 seniors playing the last game of their UC career, the Gauchos just didn't have it in their hearts, and were defeated by the Mus- tangs of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, 24-14. Following a demoralizing loss to the Uni- versity of the Pacific the week before, Cactus Jack Curtice's gridders just went through the motions as a talented Mustang offense, spear- headed by 22O-pound fullback Ron Hasson, ripped through the UCSB defense. Playing their farewell game for the Gauchos were seniors Doug Barker, Rich Becker, Tom Broadhead, Johnny Burnett, Dave Chapple, Mike Cobb, Bill Corlett, Dick Heinz, Kevin Jensen, Stan Pareto, Jim Priest, Jim Sweeney, Tim Walker, and Steve Young. Broadhead and Priest went out in style as Broadhead broke his own season rushing mark of 824 yards with 54 yards to spare and Priest caught his sixth touchdown pass of the season. The Gauchos finished the season with 4-4-1, the second straight .500 season for UCSB. Santa Barbara football, 1968, could best be described as "erratic." Quarterback Jimmy Curtice and flankerback Steve Moore were voted co-captains for the 1969 season. Curtice received more votes than any player in UCSB's gridiron history. Punter Dave Chapple gets his foot into the ball for 57 yards against With the Mustangs in possession and knocking on the door, Stan Pareto, Paul Tollefson, Jim Cal Poly, the last game in his record-breaking UCSB career. Beamon, Steve Young, Dick Heinz, Kevin Jensen, and Johnny Burnett stack-up for a goal-line defense. p. t l l, 1,1 l I . Q' Wi 1 4 l-:pi -1- ee!!! -81 lx: ls .2 mlqht meola men Captune keg, 21-14 VARSITY FOOTBALL- Front row: Rich Becker, Dave Chapple, John Burnett, Tom Broadhead, Mike Cobb, Doug Barker, Steve Young, Jim Priest, Tim Walker, Kevin Jensen, Jim Sweeney, Dick Heinz. Second row: Neil Baker, Steve Huntsinger, Stan Pareto, Bill Corlett, Larry Brandenburg, Rick Gangnes, Cromwell Williams, Tom Bishop, Greg Kezirian, Craig Tims, Loren Shumer. Third row: Bruce Marines, Charlie Cruzat, Gary Osendorli Bill Roos, Al Taylor, Mike Adams, Paul Weinberger, Jim Zant, Frank Michaelson, Ken Greenaway, Craig Smith. Fourth row: Jim Beaman, Paul Tollefson, Tom Shoji, Barry Miller, Wayne Smothers, Pat Muleady, Dennis Reilly, Jim Curtice, Sam Wilner, Greg Runyon, Jim Rodgers. Fifth row: Gary Anderson, John Standridge, Carey Williams, Paul Lee, Steve Moore, Mel Carrozza, Barry Silverman, Vic Larson, Barry Minster, Bill Hayes. Sixth row: Trainer, Curtis Watson, Head Coach Jack Curtice, Defensive Backfield Coach Roy Anderson, Defensive Line Coach Andy Everest, John Hines, Augie Rapanutg Ken Krall, Kurt Speier, Linebacker Coach Rod Sears, Offensive Line Coach Don Turner, Freshman Coach Ed Swartz, Head Trainer Harry Callihan. Six polnt underdogs going into the game, Communications made it three wins in a row with a convincing 21-14 victory over Leg Council in the fourth annual Beer Bowl at Campus Field November 10. lt was a difficult victory for the Mediamen, however, as they battled back from a 14-13 deficit in the last 90 seconds to cinch the win. A near-empty crowd of 43 began to file towards the exits as with less than 3 minutes to play the Communicators failed to move the ball and had to punt. The defense then held and quarterback Bill Graham, who had pre- viously thrown two touchdown passes to Lee IVlargulies and Clay Kallam, got one more chance. On short passes to Kallam and Margulies, Graham moved the Mediamen down to the one yard line with just seconds remaining and then hit team coach Nlargulies in the end zone for the final score. "Versatile and occasionally spectacular," communica- tions quarterback Bill Graham lets loose another bomb under Rich Mandel's fierce rush. "l""" HI, 'fda i -r ' ' 'U' ' H F l 5291! 0 E i Frosh quarterback Doug Fenstermaker skirts a block, and reverses his field in search of running room. FROSH FOOTBALL - Front row: Ken Murray, Wes Edwards, David Almanza, Stephen Meadows, Darrel Spurling, Rick Wallace, Joe Newman, James Otis, John Hernandez, Craig Smith. Second row: Tom Hundley, Bill Fisher, John Feeley, Charles Mahler, Gary Luke, Kirk Mulligan, Michael Walek, Richard Rigali, Ken Franklin, Robert Radcliffe. Third row: Dore Gilbert, John White, Tony Jackson, Don Pearson, Phil Erbez, Charles DeCuir, Evan Ancker, Dan Spitzer, Phil Cleak, Tim Oppezzp. Fourth row: Matt Herndon, Carl llneshmen Qmooens take Season lllnale ln contrast to their 1967 season record of 3-1-1, Ed Swartz's frosh footballers battled with a sophomore syndrome, fighting to a disheartening 1-4 final tabulation for the season. Despite the record, however, Swartz rated the '68 team as one of the best he has ever coached although the caliber of competition was imposing. Of the five league teams, only UCLA's was composed entirely of freshmen. Final statistics toted up impressive records for several Gauchobabes. Carl LeMons dis- tinguished himself as the team's leading rusher, while flankerback Kirk Mulligan led in scoring, snagging four TD passes. Defensive back Jim Mitchell racked up five inter- ceptions, carrying three over the goal-line. Dan Lennon, Mike Anton, Tony Jackson, and Jeff Feliciano also figured heavily in a valiant attempt to beat overwhelming odds. FROSH SCOREBOARD 7 UCSB ......... Long Beach State 15 O UCSB . . . . .Cal Lutheran JV's 34 6 UCSB . . .... Cal Poly lSLOl 13 UCSB . . ....... UCLA 56 41 UCSB . . . . . Valley State QQ 138 67 Final season record. 1-4 LeMons, James Randolph, Kevin Jeter, Peter Vredenburyh, Jack Davis, Spencef Honlvitz, Greg Barker, Mike Lopez, Dennis Hackworth. Fifth Row: Mike Akins, Jeff Feliciano, Pete Nimen, Kim Olsen, Mark Yano, John Sheibley, Ron De Shan, Mike Anton, Jim Griffiths, Head Coach Ed Swartz. Sixth row: Coach Rich Kezirian, Coach Jack Smith, Coach Dick Permenter, Ed Grant, Steve Nordeen, Dan Lennon, James Mitchell, Greg Barber, Gene Deuber, Earl Stout. , .1 ..., . .,.:.,. fl. .- ., , l 'L r 'fm w f' 532' le: Dave Blernker holds off a threat only senior, Dave was voted team from UCLA in the All-Cal meet. The captain and most valuable player. VARSITY CROSS COUNTRY TEAM - Sam Adams, Greg Ratlifi Dave Young, Front row: Keith Jeffers, Irvin Brown, Dave Blemken Bill Word, Steve Denney, .lerr Edelb k M'k B ll Ste Ch - G W lf y roc,1ee, ve am ary oram. bliss, Steve Bushey. Second row: Coach youthful hamzlens lllash Swift Spikes Four freshmen turned what might ordinarily be termed a "rebuilding" year into a successful season for Coach Sam Adams and his UCSB varsity cross country team. On a squad that had only one senior, three juniors, and two sophomores, these four novices, Irvin Brown, Greg Ratliff, Dave Young, and Steve Denney, provided much-needed depth. They were instrumental in guiding the Gauchos to a 6-4 dual meet season and a fourth place in the first Pacific Coast Athletic Association Conference meet at Fresno State. Team captain and most valuable runner Dave Blemker, and juniors Keith Jeffers and Bill Word, provided the leadership for the team, sharing the number one spot on the squad most of the season. One of the bright spots came when the Gauchos defeated California by one point for the second time in three years in a triangular meet with UCLA at Berkeley. SCOREBOARD CSCLB 20, UCSB 41, SFVSC 83 Santa Barbara AAU - Third place Westmont 19, UCSB 39 UCLA 17, UCSB 60, California 61 UCSB 32, SBAC 43, Pepperdine 54 UCSB 20, Fresno State 39 UCSB 15, Nevada Southern 50 PCAA Conference Nleet- Fourth place Cal Poly lSLOl 27, UCSB 28 All-Cal Meet - Tied for third place They're off and running, on the first step of countless Keith Jeffers, second from left, leads by a neck but thousands on UCSB's scenic 4.9 mile lagoon course. Cal Poly lSLOl narrowly won, 27-28. Well into the race, fatigue beings to show on the faces Wolfram. The trio placed high but the team took of Gauchos Bill Word, Keith Jeffers, and Gary third behind UCLA and UC Davis in the meet. n .pa . . afa EEE 1 L U." -.., Q -.., A943-4' ' f' f'-.,,,jf , gh 3 '1 1 L -. 1' ,,..-K- VV, f. 3 i--. ' N.-4f,,,- Y, , Q 3, 4 Q ,wt , -Tag, Q. N, -j'i,:.!'5f, . Q fl 1 f -, .ga ,lr-we ' f Q a .' " ' f ' J - . 1 4 'F' " 4' ,. is l, 1-Q 1 sr me gm l. fffsf.. TWC,-. W 'W N 1 . ml. "' l., ' ew M . , well x.S,g,.,- , g,,,f-Qgeslls. iw- , 1 l 5 .95 1,56 if s -S .Jr V -:af S is-fl ll l ., era 1 M ,JM : 4 - . . W J., v A , ' - ' .. , 2' sz., ,, A-4 . M- E5 ,- ll -,ffj,fis:za" 'I I-2' .- 'J 4, .C ,W P .1 Y M ,. V AEK F' 'fp3"""Ka"' "T"' 152:--' L3"'f pololsts Goals Sixth ln national Ratings In the words of varsity water polo coach Rick Rowland, 1968 was the year that the bridesmaid became the bride. A four-year rebuilding program finally bore fruit, as the Gauchos posted a fine 22-10 mark and were rated sixth in the nation. Highlighting the great season was an upset win.over San Jose State College, the national champions, in the semi-finals of the first annual Pacific Coast Athletic Association Conference Tournament. TheGauchos lost to the nation's number two team, Long Beach State, in the finals. Ben Gage, Larry Guy, and goalie John Steckel all received PCAA first-team honors. Jim Simpson was named to the second team and Robert Barker and Dave Ugarkovich, received honorable mention. ln other tournaments, the Gauchos took first at Fresno State and finished second to the number three team in the nation, UC Irvine, in the West Coast Championship Tournament. Coach Bob Gary's frosh team posted an 11-5 season record, finishing second to Chaffey Junior College in the finals of the West Coast Tournament, and were victorious in their own home tourney. 1 .Jipe " ' Hg.: .Q Fa. ,..p4A.LM .ff is iq, .. Q-ng as if 1 ll,.a.r 1 . ' , .0 , -- fa - :- .rm g - -..::5 . Tiff FZVQ5? sap' ..a, fi Fi .. -.wi V pa" --arg, as.. : .Z T if " exam. N A "5 VARSITY WATER POLO - Front row lfrom railingl: Captain Jim Simpson, Brent Clark. Second row: Jim Ranta, Bruce Montgomery, Dave Ugarkovich, Chuck Spink, Bill Wood. Third row: Ken Shoor, Head coach of the UCSB water polo team since 1965, Rick Rowland Ben Gage, Dirk Muntean, Craig Hendrick- son, Tom Honig, John Steckel. Fourth row: Phil Snowdon, Larry Guy. Not pictured: Robert Barken culminated a four year rebuilding program with a fine 22-10 record. L . OA., - J, , . A '- , , fn.. N- N Wi' Wage .c. 5315 ,F A H" I sf Mshkb' 'V - 1.45 A ' gn?-eel fag 1' 1' ,I - -,,1",d :' x3'14: :gs Sr 'FF' 1 J" 6' Eb,-1 ig! I fa' 'I l'1 A,"'f 1 lcqhlfv' 1 if f K 'Egg' qs ig! 5 1 ,,'53r ' ' " Gaucho Chuck Spink pre- pares to pass over UC Inline s All-PCAA goalie John Steckel leaps high out of the water in " 'fi 5 ' . -"silt: .A 1 l L-A 'L ' " Q Qffiff L , rf, x . G .qx,f.:,.'S if IQ, A V N fl I L , -L, ."'S-:Pg -S: FE , . n 5 nh af ,B 4, ,. , ,F . ' JK QV , . ,I 4-!'Ko' ,ohms '1 X- , s ' iv D 'N 7 I , AQ, I , , Ml , I - .KW H" , I I . , ' , Q' . fr, Y i 4 Q , -B B+ an so of J, .' T "N-'lv 1, ' - l as ia., ,, . is J '41,- I .AL , n.. I ik .,. r Q- -1, A -351 -f ' gate. aff z'L '4T4 ,sq Q , - y ,i,-1,-icgwis -bn Pas! '-"ai:s51gig-:r'i:-- fitifz- . 57 -' 1l-."f-i"rf,f,,- 1-f - 1 . ."l' ive.. -1. ,-4 , , ,- .,. ,, s Q 4, , 5 .,' -,if s , Steve Farmer. The Anteaters downed UCSB, 5-3. an attempt to block a shot in the PCAA Tourney. FROSH WATER POLO - Front row: Tom Jacobson, Dirk Muntean, Jaun Bowen, Steve Moody, Craig D'Ooge, Mark Miller: Second row: gang - V 1' E J ' . MMT .' i"1..- -l -' az, .- -V: i311 lull 1111 f:--fav- -:sf-'1 :mia Sliisjfl mul!! lilhlg 2' ""'8 LM, Reed Flocks, Glen Scott, Mike Jefferson, Lang Griffen, Bill Bates, Rick Gobel. Coaches: Bob Whitton, Don Kohlmann, Jim Hill. Third row: Gary and assistant, Dave Gray. Not pictured: Ted Harvey Holman, Al Smith, Walt VWlson, Murray Hill- 129 ' Y: A 'lf' Q i 5: ' iiii fi F' 2 'Y 1 Y 5' X A' ' 9" A f iff W 5 . it 49" ,l Usa i wx J' . it Playing goalie can be a strenuous task, as attested to teammate Craig Farmer to block a corner kick while by UCSB's Carlos Ortiz. Above he leaps over below he tries to avoid a rivaI's onrushmg foot. f' , ,, at 3 n at 'X W! 'rags N4 na Bootens Wm Seven, Sunpmse Westmont ln their second season as members of the Southern California Intercollegiate Soccer Association, Zoltan von Somogyi's footballers posted an impressive seven wins, two losses, and two ties for the season. In spite of losing two star insides, von Somogyi, aided by Assistant Coach Jack Fox, managed to field a team which out-scored its opponents 22-13 during the season. Rich Molander broke an ankle in the first pre-season tilt with Cal Poly lSLOl while Steve Sleeper was inactive due to an ineligibility ruling. Travelling to Berkeley for the annual All-Cal Soccer Tournament, the soccermen brought back two victories against UC Irvine and UC Santa Cruz and a scoreless tie with UCLA, good for third place. Last season's outstanding JV fullback line contributed both directly and indirectly to the soccermen's success. The superior efforts of Gene Barrett and Steve Cole in particular allowed von Somogyi to move Dave "Weed" Hollingsworth from center-fullback to inside without impairing the defense. Hollings- worth's performance, both offensively and defensively earned him a positive as All- League halfback. SCOREBOARD 3 UCSB ........... Cal Poly lSLOl 2 3 UCSB . . . ....... Westmont 2 1 UCSB . . . ........... UCLA 3 1 UCSB .. . .... Cal Poly lSLOl 3 3 UCSB . . . .... Fresno Pacific O 2 UCSB ............... Westmont 2 5 UCSB ................. Loyola 0 Third in the All-Calg USC- forfeit win T gi' 147: I ur ' l ll 1, nfl. 'll V l i .' 1 ." - j---'-11, I if ' .-..-...A 1: ,. ' ..gi?q'f..1rsL12t5'!r-xt UCSB's Gene Barrett heads ball past a startled Cal Poly lSLOl VARSITY SOCCER - Front row: Gene Barrett, Ken Pearson, Gary Broering, Carlos Ortiz, Van Eakes, Larry Miller, Sandy McCleocL Brent Thompson. Second row: Assistant Coach Jack Fox, .Tu .It A . ., 1 -.O V , . ,tn - , . defender. lt was one of the few bright spots in the 3-1 loss. Craig Farmer, Stan Cole, Stan Wood- ward Dave Hollingsworth, Mark Pugh, Eric Knudsen, Peter Tannenbaum, John Merrill, Head Coach Zoltan Von Somo- QV'- ,..,, , I, 1 ,-ijt! H 7.57 - .5 1 . N failfflf 7 u Ea Fyrfftfm. ,,, .sis 23, ..,,,.-4.5 1, Eli? - K - ' -- 1. 'TIM V E l E ? L wmten sponts Cagers post first winning season since 1964, go 17-9 . . . UCSB wins Winter Classic tournament . . . Doug Rex sets new scoring record of 463 points . . . Gauchos fourth in WCAC . . . Steve Rippe named to WCAC se- cond team, Rex gets honorable mention . . . Frosh finish 15-5 . . .John Tschogl MVP of yearlings . . . Swimmers net 8-4 season re- cord, take second in PCAA conference meet . . . Gage, Bower, and Moody qualify for University Nationals . . . UCSB wins Gold Coast Invitational . . . Best frosh swim team goes 3-2 . . . Wrestlers grapple to 6-8 record . . . Manuel Valdez wins MVP award . . . Gauchos take fourth in Biola Tourna- ment . . . Gymnasts post 7-6 mark, beat Stanford in home thriller, 138.48 to 133.61 . . . Ken Wagner high point man . . . Dave Chapple drafted by Forty-Niners, Tom Broadhead by New Orleans, Dick Heinz by St. Louis in pro draft . . . Jay Elbel wins Pollock Award. 2: K S S 2 'Qin-1 WG 12,85 'f, 'JAN -va 'gy Y 4 3 X My 1-Q...-i v 1 Z f' 'N is 323 Y , V 1 X, QQ? , Q ' ff 4 A W. 1 f Xa I , f ' Q 1 'wa g V ' - fi n 5 'ek 'GSK WL, qx M r. '-, Hx...-I -2 M .2f-: - K ., if Q 1 .gf , ig? eval 1955? .M iii , :QF -"',: J K , iff is ' in . Yr 'N L 4 , I xx? am- . , Ju :Q '., , 9 4- , , 5,fAx V my .Lz"' S A -i .E H A H'- ,, M' 5 1 xx. ,x, ',l Q, ' XM! 0 gm- :F ' ag 57" V 53? w is fx 'X 3, ff if -V if Q W ! .rw l 1 .ff- , 1 5 5.334 Nfl GLU an Q33 H - g 5 X .. Q -- '- fx 1' U ,, rx J!! V' i gf 2. ,,l H l 5 by 3 f 'gg' day, , . M 1 wk ' 'W 'mf l 2-51 . , j l '? ' ' K L . 5 Q L ' "ix I' I: F :' Su f . ' f , f ix .a . ' 'EF -A 1 wwtldfwt f li 3 K-K 1-, ,NZ 1' A kv gf Mg J si' .AL - X R 1 Q in JL f 5 ' r -sq . New , lil' ,Ji tsl ,, 7-W-:L gi as .fn ' - i ex: .I 5 ,, ,., 222' 51 I K N . -5 lfgk ' . Q-1 wififgzg-ws-S' - 7 Lili lfsi , .Q . Li , ' 'Q ,E y I TK ' xi Lai: Y Z' fir H Z 9 2 ' Sis. 'i!"6. .ja '. G 1 '34 , fri' 1 , wi A-' J f' X iii 5' A I I . .v- www? ., ,, N gg W I xg A if 11 If -..-,Ha .3 , 'nw -.. Qw- i! .F :f-2 ,. .fig ' " A 4 V , ,A ., Q.. X. In rf, , LN ' E g. Aj - ' '- ' N 4 I 'A' in X P J . 15mgfan,, . .W-f ' 4 -' -V fly," K - f '71 . e 1 ,- . 49, Ki H? I 177 7 s xf Q ' 180 'AQ ? 1 54 .4 if ,gd , wil, ' .. .W , 1 !' X "V A aug.. ,sera J? 4' f ,-.fl .fa .-ya , jf w dvi'- .- I+. VF35 ' .fv?51'ffiif' 5 Q15 "1 .J Jw. ?" ' V- '-1 M ' u. L.-'I . -. Q ' : x '?19.'JE. . ' --1 L?aE35A, 1--,rug W , irfv A - 3-. sa gr 10 H I-'Qin Lib Wm- ' , 1 I ,- A v -fgffi 'LR Coach Bill Hammer yells encourage- Coach Mike Hart, and Bruce Hori ment as Bruce lVlcCampbell, Assistant watch progress of match. Bruce Hori struggles to flatten his close to the floor to watch for the pin, Biola opponent as the referee hugs which Hori achieved. matmen Stant Gif fast, But Gno 6-8 After starting off the season on a winning note, victorious in five of their first seven meets, Coach Bill Hammer's varsity wrestling squad ran into some tough competition and dropped six of their last seven. The grapplers finished the season with a 6-8 season record. Fine performances were registered by Manuel Valdez and Bruce McCampbell throughout the season. Valdez was later named the team's most valuable wrestler. SCOREBOARD UCSB OPP. 2 UCLA 32 24 San Fernando Valley State College 10 22 San Diego State College 13 30 Los Angeles State College 15 18 Cal Lutheran College 11 11 Cal Poly Pomona 17 27 UC Riverside 6 11 Cal State Fullerton 17 2 UC Berkeley 32 0 San Jose State College 40 13 Cal Lutheran College 23 14 Biola College 21 33 Los Angeles State College 8 5 Cal State Long Beach, 27 Biola Tournament 4th placep Final record 6-8 mug: . -ffm. r - . .Jes 'nie , '-e-ew-',e., , A 24' ...RA I i 1 X , I Wu' ' ,4 5 - A f 1 U EV ' M W 5 11 i X.. , 1 I W V, ' l x 1 ,t--N -A eggs? "'Nv1"v'nu9v IV 3 --HQ' ,,, I .f-, ll A A .fl I N If assi' ' -A V"' . fi .Il ' - is W ' 0 gg , 1. , , .s wg. X V Q5 - -- "1 was-, II .V, .. ' Mggfszis f .w I A Q - , .. V .I ,I I , . c., 1 1 I 5 1 A,-.g ., r., 5- Vvifisilfi ,Q 1 as.- ',I ' I I "kj ' 'ill' QQ Q S 55? if 5 ' ,. V- .,..sfgsVVss3g , V V ,Wifi ' ' ' I fa: 1 - - I . ' , . ,M V C1 . r Y V V 1 ' I J. i, I L ' V - W f 'H' . " we Wa. .. I .5 L Q 1 N, me I .I , . II wa as, Q s. V. If-I .cf ' . . .I Veg ass T " EM'-.' V' ,K K ,Tc 3993251363 , Q V 'Will -V EES S I II :m,3.:" '. 'f V- V'- VWEISWEQ' -I I 'I -2,wA" 1 ' 19433 f . - I. -- Q H A ' N' I fag", izs,2'ws,v . - W I rel- 'I . ll IV",-if - - . . ' . ,Q a Individual medley specialist Chuck Spink checks on'the position of an opponent VARSITY SWIMMING - Front row: Steve Williams, John "Mac" Bower, Tom Honig, Charles Spink lcaptainl, George Bahlmer, Steve Moody, Jerry Woolf Mike Jefferson, Paul Hexe, '- ' Iv. I W ,, ,, 5 . , , , V , ,Jr - ' 2, 'f ."' 111 U,'-41' during the butterfly portion of a race. Spink, a senior, team captain, and All- Ted Hall, Steve Gieselman. Second row: Mike Dale, Hanrey Holman, Jack Undenrvood, Ted Long, Mark Miller, Phil Smith, Ken Shoor, Reed Flocks, Tim Morrell, Stan Loeb, Dave Guadagni. H-, .gs-5... ,-V .V-u V-.- ,m,' l,,:j' 2? sm K ,E I H. is ed I. me e. . . 'B " Y In WU C' 51:15 il . 'S .V V H fsfsggsw ,fs I -V '- .QA ' A , c, ,C American, is the holder of several UCSB school records. Third row: Ken Yegan, Diving Coach Bob Gary, Head Coach Rick Rowland, Ben Gage, Robert Rodd, Paul Cole, Assistant Coach Dave Gray, Assistant Coach Jim Ranta. gf .- - 'W ---..'-'vs . --... .3 . f- zp ss- I 'Q' 35' - Q7 ' .au-'N " '- .41 .. ., I 'li - -lil i m- . HQ" , fog ,, L,.V- SV.,-V,sf-E I H- . -I . - Nr.,., V f salsa - ' ,E --9 A A E - - A - A .Hr V ,.--4:3 ff- .5 John "Mac" Bower, Steve Moody, and University Nationals, conter with Head Ben Gage, who qualified for the Coach Rick Rowland. FROSH SWIMMING - Front row: Reed Flocks, Mark Miller fcaptainl, Steve Giesel- man, Steve Moody, Mike Jefferson, Paul Hesse, Ted Hall, John "Mac" Bower. Second row: Mike Wolfe, Dirk Muntean, Jim Hill, Gaucho diver Ted Long appears to be attempting to fly as he executes a Leonard Zilz, Hanley Holman, Tom Jacob- son, Al Smith. Third row: Head Coach Rick Rowland, Diving Coach Bob Gary, Assistant Coach Dave Gray, Assistant Coach Jim Hanta. beautiful back dive during the annual frosh-varsity meet. i :Q r a5 -we-5 T M ..:.s..sE , f l ii", in -is . M. , 1?"'u"i::' J ,.- i - , V ,iw -in - - l - J: . 40- ,-S , 1' ' Qlf-itx w izfsilwrf 3? -12-s .es Y ,Q i- , . ,E-:4iw .,'4i1L' ' sgigef'-. . ,,,' .Wasp nfslfilm' 2 -. - 5 r " - . 4 . 1-' -. . A ,fi fiona. ct' , 4255-5 -gggo.-. , A 7' is -.-' ' SEE "' ,, A- 4- - bl y ,".f ' - an Z -:5f-.L - V- ua ft - --:S-z:.v-E..-s -- - . . A----gi.. exit 4- 4 ,, -r . : .-ga".-'- . In - . 2- -' ,--1-'xi ffl' " A.,e.s.-it 1 13.2 , -, ' .' -1- ep-,4?s3!:sl:1'Q su ' ,xii-ali.-l1'5 , -, W., ,ur-07 . .Hg -,.,.fi- ,J ,..z-. tcm - h ' Z .R-eq-Q, ' tr- ' ' .- , ---, .. f . - ' 'H--?'.L'?:-. , -. , 1- jpvgrtz- ,-as - -2-.i:.':.g.-g --- 1 F , V. ..t . iff: W 1 K "., ' 'vga-S-g ki ' as -, . Qs., , Vw -. i.d,.'gQ:f, , ig. gk f Q Y V -. 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'5F3'll-"'725"3'1f"f. 3 ss.-2,-ga - ,A ., -.ns I-Y :. . , , v .3 -713,521-..1cw-,..vf - - .,-. . r '..-' C- -.Lx 1-,ag j 1 .,., -5. : -s2?jf'-x.- f as ff5'?::gf,51 ., 5' 7 Q .Z -:ws-iss " - S ff:-ifa w rf," H , a,-In -- -1 ' ' " .Q .T .- 4 - , . ,.,,,., 5 , 335535, .1 egsfisba , -. -5-, - ' -- . - c ame - -- ' sf- --iigifg'-J , .l1'?gfi"e I L-'ffflillfei Looking like he has lost his head, John "Mac" Bower, Gaucho 200 breaststroker, enters the water. SWIITI Cll1B SNIDGS In UHIVGRSIIY meets In Coach Rick RowIand's words, 1969 was a year of transition for the UCSB swimming team. The Gauchos moved from the ranks of the collegiates to the university division and joined the tough PCAA league. Nevertheless, the swimmers handled them- selves well and compiled a fine 8-4 record, including a second place in the PCAA con- ference meet. Highlighting the season were a "first time ever" dual meet victory over UC Irvine and a championship in the Gauchos' own Gold Coast meet. Three Gauchos, breaststroker Ben Gage, backstroker Steve Moody, and breaststroker John "Mac" Bower, set school records in winning their events at the PCAA meet, and qualified for the University nationals. The frosh squad, with their best team in UCSB history, won the Frosh-JC division of the Gold Coast Championships en route to a 3-2 season. Steve Moody was voted the team's most valuable swimmer. SCOREBOARD UCSB OPP, 62 UC Irvine 51 21 USC 85 56 Buena AAU Swim Club 46 64 Simon Fraser University 50 34 Brigham Young University 79 47 Cal State Long Beach 66 100 Cal Poly Pomona 15 59 Varsity vs. Frosh 45 63 Denver University 50 76 Cal Poly lSLOl 37 66 Santa Barbara AAU Swim Team 36 41 San Diego State 72 All-Cal 4th, PCAA 2nd, Gold Coast lst. ,E L' 'N f"x " . ' it . 5 ' qv ,. x 1. QL' " 1' il , n -- ,fr ' -4 ..,, xi' -" . 1 .:- I ef . 'gk :IJ , ,. J . - . ,. 1 F z 4 my .. Q-, . . , L , vs 3 W 4. V x 14, 1 .M ' ' n . wi., .N n 3: '11 " . X y ,l A ,.- , , u .M , ' rl f' x Ja ' I : -' N4 .W - 'X if . -X Q 'E-f. . ,gms - :A 1 - g as 5 Y . - X x- N. N. : 1 '.- ' ,,.1, if Q 'Q - ,. 1 - - W' . 1 fal 3 T55 ' f ,rv 01 . ' , X .' LL 1 Q 'glu1?'i-: " 'X K V , ps N' W ' , fr 4 ' -, -'N 1 . 1 , reg P , ifsfafiy 'xc . kdm- rf, 1 ,E - V ,1 'I' -X I , 1 . -is-KS .I -f .,, ff 5 M., '27 . A fl, "im fig, tghYv?T'74 ' V' " 4 i 1?:':,-':- - 'f":5r:s,y :' '- K ' . 'T'---1Ll"?'3i?z 1 fi g-33-, -1-wif m-3 --..' ' """'f:: ' ""iU"'1Lw-- 3 5 .. Y' J 'A W 1 f'?5?Ees'AT1f'f1EEai .v ' S ' . s P,A,.,fA,, 1 .0 Af-F' . f w uf , J' A' F 1 P'.,f':' ugixenb-HOA. '44 I 'J ' . f 2554 .. 1- Fr ' . Ib' 0: ,, 5x . .- ibn-1 ' ' Q ..,,,,,,h,LL, ,' --QQ. ,Q i ,, . ,x V ...-, -' --. , Q V. ' - ,, - ' . ,:f, 1 . Li, 1, ,Z 5 . 1 F132 ' -sw L 3' ,1 , , S , 5 ,. D 01131 H ,W - ft.: 1 , .x xx S ' g, GNNQ . 3.-- -v- --""" map- --. -Q v......-W-f T .X NY- - WW , ' Q ,Pt E-m,x's X N , iwxym vw.. ' V . F 2. e,, -- H sk . I av, .xxx X id, J - ffefwi - y 7 '? s'5'..,, K. x .. -t C V J 'gtk ,wav SDRIUG SDOQIS Rain harasses competition schedules . . . Baseball team looks toward league title . . . Volleyball team defeated in own tour- nament, but excels in others . . . All- American John Lee leads volleyball team . . . Track star Jay Elbel chosen as winner of the Pollock Award . . . Tennis team fights its way through rain and illness to victories . . . Andy 'lhuney leads golf team to triumphs on local courses . . . Top international stars compete in Easter Relays held at La Playa Stadium . . . UCSB seeks repetition of Easter Relays Tri- umph, wins it again . . . Baseballers play USC to a one-one tie, game finally called by darkness. Steel-leo tnackmen jom DCAA league After having posted their second straight number two finish in the NCAA College Division Championships last year, Coach Sam Adams' UCSB trackmen moved up a notch to the University division in 1969 having joined the newly-created PCAA conference. The Gauchos opened their season with a triangular meet victory over Pepperdine and Valley State, but the margin was closer this year than in years previous. UCSB tallied 76 points, while the Waves and lVlatadors followed with 62 and 42 respectively. In the Long Beach State meet, the Forty-niners avenged last year's loss to the Gauchos, edging them 78-67. After winning the College division of the Easter Relays, the Gauchos returned to dual- meet competition against Fresno State, but lost to the Bulldogs, 80-65. Pollock Award-winner Jay Elbel was the big man for the Gauchos, overcoming early season leg problems to post a school record of 47.2 for the 440. Elbel also clocked in at 46.4 for a relay quarter mile. Other outstanding competitors for the Gauchos were Bill lVlillar, triple jumper Jerry Wygant, javelin thrower Bob Engelstad, and hurdler Steve Lubarsky. . E W -7 . Javelin thrower Bob Engelstad, practice session. Engelstad Steve Leonard, junior discus the Pepperdine, San Fernando geEf?ea2t3n:g'hl':::oIIg 522522: S3221-an early Season best of thrower, winds up for a toss in Valley State meet. In his first year at UCSB, JC mediates that made him one of transfer Steve Lubarsky dis- Sam Adams' t0D PYOSDGCTS In plays his style on the inter- that event. 'u ' 1 -... e .A QV ,. A ', , 3 png, 3 Q- , 2 .541 q.Y'i'--, .M ' 4 'f 'g': ,'f.H, 5, .4 .-'lib' ' liz' k 4' ' 'a 9 as ' , fl, -I., gy In 1',.,! ' ' -" l' 'f X .21 J V1.5 A. ,,. . A , , , ,FQ , . 1 ,S ' . cl - - " A ,. , fl. . Hg f "T 1- kr 1 L. 4: N Rggi F 4-w X l'f xi. . 1 ! , f-V? we "4 5 9 fvm 'L 5+-' 1 '?.- .A-'ie. ' 1 RGS: A . - - Q.-5, ... ,-, ,, 4 . . . - I V I il. 'g .. , Us , . A vw , ff' - A W9 r n is. L TL J: K' 'ur s I ' ' 'x r.rfv' . iw Hi ii iii' ii ii .Q new 1 im.: mn ii, iii e2ff:1wffa,., E f . . :ls i, :Y W gg ii , sea, vig, i W . 'V .FQ-L, . iz Leading the Gaucho freshmen to victory in jumper leaps to clear the bar in the high year's team. Other outstanding attempts a triangular meet against Cal Poly lSLOl jump. Freshmen performances in this meet were turned in by Jay Elbel, Bill lVlillar, and San Fernando Valley State, this frosh gave Coach Adams great hopes for next Bob Engelstad, and Sunny Hatten. Bill Word leads the pack in a fast Brown, in third position, were mile on the UCSB track. Com- instrumental in leading the peting against Cal Poly lSLOl and Gauchos to victory. Valley State, Word and Irvin df' 'Q ' 75" ML ,Er - tq- " f ' 'fum -an T. -Q ,WUI - .,.. ' . r e - e -G B gigafsf- ' ' -- 'i J ff fr:.I,"1'-rf- '-U ,g"ff'e's,.'-N , , -1 .-ey-'fgw - Q ., -,. ,, i zfgf-,ggca 5 . ,A , ' e jr -Q Total exhaustion accom- Young, a freshman from r' 5 I -. gf, ',.'ji-.ff ,fgfjf-,:i'.,f'Q--'.fg12i.+f:::,'e1 -' ' f panies a first-place victory as Torrance High School, comes . . 5?,gQ,,-K if :Wff"l 'iff' ' '- , e":,s-mf -gi . .-QL,-A ,'..fx1'r .'f, ,'7.!5,3'A- ' f 'f'- ---- ,, . 'fi - -' Gaucho distance runner Dave home on the UCSB track. , ,- -j -, 5-it ,3g.ef,,i' .f,,g.- g:-7fg,sf- ,.a...-, .5 , , .sex .,. 'vt fifxf' 'P 'b."3R'5P'S'N3-W -. N .1 .-ns. .- 152 tnackmen Shine ln Gasten Relays A crowd of over 6,000 lent added color to the 31st annual Easter Re- lays, co-sponsored by the Athletics Department and the Santa Barbara Junior Chamber of Commerce, at La Playa Stadium. The USC Trojans, led by Olympic gold medalist Bob Seagren in the pole vault and sprinter Lennox Miller, a 1968 Mexico City silver medal winner, breezed to the University Division Championship. Coach Sam Adams' UCSB spikers nabbed their second straight college division crown. The Gauchos scored valuable points in all four relay races, setting two school marks and winning the mile relay. Sprinters Sunny Hatten, Doug Mar- shall, Bill Millar and Dan Madden set a UCSB standard in the 440 relay with a 42.0 clocking, then, Hatten, Madden, Millar and Steve Ross zipped to a 1:27.5 mark in the 880 baton ex- change for another school mark. UCSB's mile relay team of Steve Lubarsky, Phil Gonzales, Millar, and Jay Elbel earned its gold medal with a 3116.0 time, while the Gaucho jave- linist Bob Engelstad won his event with a heave of 217 feet, 3 inches. .- ,, -i.i..n.., 5 Jerry Wygant, school record holder in the but he placed third to contribute toward triple jump, didn't hit his peak of49',1K2", the team title. Gaucho anchor man Jay Elbel, the mile relay, providing 10 Dan Madden takes the handoff a San Diego senior, comes from points toward the UCSB team from Steve Ross as the Gaucho behind and hits the tape to win charnDiOI1Sl'lll9- 880 relay team gets a jump on f. , 1,- ,ffi fi ' :x l ' , .1 1-3' ' ' K. . , ,.1.,,, ,Nfrv V- . , l, irag- w.,-w-f--.-- . ,- l . -EIN 1, ..v I P 1 sages " ffl' i 2 ly - .-ui ff. . .. ,lwlmf xml. , .vel Ny - -A ,-.. - ' ..g.,,.f' A- ' " A--1 A. . , .iiwi3N.:,., -......,u.. X ,.' H ' ' fl ., . N, . Pepperdine. UCSB placed second to Pepperdine to score team points. r. figyfsg -. -" ' tus- - f :' .,. , K 'FAS' -,.f,, ,. -' f 'swf '1 P' 1 . 153 ' " . ff., g .-.,- . 1, :-I , ' ., mouno tmo Spaizks fast Oiamono Stant Intent upon improving their 1968 second place showing in their last season for the WCAC, Coach Dave Gorrie's Gaucho horse- hiders started off 1969 on the right foot, compiling a perfect 3-0 mark early in the season's campaign. But a disasterous weekend in early April put the damper on the Gauchos' title hopes. After defeating Pepperdine for the second time to raise their WCAC record to 4-0, the Gauchos lost a doubleheader to scrappy San Jose State, 1-O and 2-1. lVlore rough water lay ahead for the bat- men. Later WCAC opponents, the University of Santa Clara Broncos, held down the number one collegiate baseball ranking in the nation. Hitting problems plagued the Gauchos early in the season, and it was only strong pitching that kept the Gauchos above .500. Craig Schell, Jeff Chancer, and lVlark Boyd held down the mound game, while outfielders Tom Gamboa and Bob Bussie, and infielder Tom Jackson, a J.C. transfer with a knack for getting on base, led the Gauchos at the bat. Gamboa led the team with a .359 average th rough the first half of the season. Sporting number 14 on his uniform, Gaucho pitching ace Jeff Chancer is a picture of determination as he utilizes his entire body, including his tongue, in an effort to get a little extra on the ball. N l - . L 1 K so , - - tt - H, 1 -my gg , A rhewmii " l'g:53g5zf'fg2e " ' ,l ggsysitsj' .l . M 1 ll ll lg Q -1 y-sa-tfftmrliei i A A .Axtx-fi. M M 535 755. : A ll, t.r?1saa3ss?i ' - it smug, ll. 4 .yep 1,-1.1-El .A -v , - H-25,2 'Jay :I " 1 ' ' 'VV ll ' gage? ,fm 'I f...,'.I'. .. Q,-A-:Q .pity ' -1 f-.-2-,f-'wt' ',,.'vizlemfxl'E 2' 4--itvu ,A Q 3' War . , 'e g,.eq1ll,'i,-my 2 , ,, , , 29' 51 lute -l it I 41 A A Q . VARSITY BASEBALL - Front row: Assistant Coach Dave Gorrie. Second row: Mike Powers, Rick Magnante, Mark Soyo, Cleo Jones, Mark Coach John Gunther, Pitching Coach Rolf Tony Martins, Bob Marshall, Jerry Meyer, Mike French, Paul Harris. Not pictured. Rick Dixon Scheel, Chris Speier, Walt Rehm, Jeff Chancer, McAlpin, Mike Saylor, Tom Walsh, Hank Tommy Jackson. Steve Coleman, Bob Bussie, Harry Bloom, Head Ornelaz, Craig Schell, Tom Gamboa, Craig Ritter, '1 v. .ja-,,,,,,-35.14 ,gi L ,V...:L7i.: g '2.,,it.I, sw., A sits UCSB 9 Sznzmz AEN III 5" Sli we get cm, W, , , Q QUWI' ,, 'izZ5S2ZE',5fY Igfkv II I Ev ii 31222 if 'I I -,1 It " I : es25f'is2?sssz ,-II ,QV I ' ,Z , I I ,ji new 1' will ,Ii It ii " 2 "1if?5FIQs5?i 'I I .seas iffffgi ' V -9ffi"as11i:i5S9i1 ss112,w,gL5M I X 225, I rj is ,ll ' I W H 55513-5:ffsf1l li- W, u'i?'Qg'f'i5isE?5?'i I wssszssaaf' ,fs sfef,.s,gPf2- r 1 is lf ,f , wi? ' 31 I :P ..1?ff5'i ,. -he-N.-H .- f .r ,gsggi f I, vi ' Mai-9012 'L 1 I- -A , ,:.!.ij2:F1"aa 4 :'?,t-., HA wt N , Fa ,,.. ,. .as Q. 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Head Coach Dave Gorrie 1 6+ 5+ 4+ 1+ 3 241- 2-me 71- 4- 1- 7. 5- 4- 3 SCOREBOARD Opp. Cal Poly ISLOl 33 San Fernando Valley State 2 Westmont College 3 Cal State Long Beach 3 Cal State Long Beach 3 Cal State Long Beach 6 USC 1 Westmont College 5 California 9 Oregon State 3 Chapman College 10 Washington 1 San Francisco 1 San Francisco 0 Pepperdine College 1 Wyoming 5 Chapman College 4 Grambling College 5 New Mexico 3 Cal State Fullerton 6 USC 9 Indicates Pacific Coast Tourney game Indicates Orange County Tourney game Indicates WCAC league game Trailing 1-0 in the TOD of the third, Jeff Chancer, who went on to win the game, led at the midway point of the season, while Chancer stares in to get his sign, hoping to the Gaucho pitching staff in games started, compiling a fine 2.08 earned run average. force the batter into an inning-ending out. games won, innings pitched, and strikeouts S Y. 5 + 'I I Q9 6 A 501 i , I f S X I em I N Y - I . 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'Q :lvl El, 1,-.life -I H 113-fav. 2-523113:-''1v:,':?t:e:-.La41f235?p'S3'3f!se2,Z-'flffi?i:5x5,r". . .. t5rTP?S'?i JUNIOR VARSITY BASE- BALL - Front row: Greg Murphy, Glenn Olson, Jim Marteney, Ralph James, John Schogqh, Jere Nolan. Second row: Coach Mike Simpson, Coach Bill Kringlen, Cary Hanson, Paul Contreras, John Clabaugh, Craig Cummings, Henry Brown Jr., Gerry Behman. if In A F.. i , - of Outfielder Tom Jackson up the middle against makes contact for a smash Westmont. W, 1 ' ,N irxzit ' hi L+ 5 iam ' . LY 2 "fL'T"' ',. ff' fi 3-PK' Lv :if 1,14 'QF gg . 4' --' 1--V ra LFVWT . it ' wg 1 A F 354. Win. 25:-'Ati -, ' .1.'u-33.1 1, 4 'g-' e --2-.s.s.. -- 3?SrS5..fj5??4, , I A I 1. . A Sink HU- r 1' 5- +f'F3W1'9'75- -4..affifaEi,,sY.'i..f . A is' ww- ,""'ff-X o 'V ii-V-J. E , fo.. . k ii X'us..' ' 71- 7 f V4 -3-'VA n 2 .. 'l if nn .Aj fs ' sg, "f L -xx. . Mia' 3 "' fax., yi1."2.',jE- abidf -A ' rar 54, :,i n -,V-V ,N,.,,.,,-f-1 xw.-kvkll 'fi fn- ,fig , -M ' -.,,' , qqx, - '- .Z its .5 Lf.. , 1 ' , lf? ' -f35L?""" if .V 4' f I Se - ' "" . - , m'rh.v--1 V Ya 1 a it , X ' i , , 35 a w ,I 5 .. 'wi.5g...-VA-,,W, ,. .U QV. , an x "' ,,i1 ' .. Running it out in a futile attempt catcher Mike Powers irightl, 1 to make first base is infielder Rick crouches behind homeplate to 91 g,1'5-fQ"7II.l1-f"1--'1Z57s'f?'gf'ij':-f": fi' ,gf-A-1--,Af,.4q'1gi. , . . I . , U. hp- - Y-,go .1-:. . ".-- Y . ---,,x ,F iv 'E it Qr. X Dixon iabovelg his teammate, receivea pitch. -"3 -. . f 1- -s"'- V- .."' 5 . - ' 1 !: ri 3 2 5 i I H 91 F lyqjegvg,-1 r Y . -4-. , . Fifi'-5 'QE'-r9f'ff Zzsl, fit ' ' W "W .j....t. , "-"ffQ,,v'."'. Q.. g,-f , 'Q -. 5-iv nag'-... . ' f -V . -..i-f:.ver- ,-Q' :Z 5.-We-'fr effmisfr '-A - sa ' " ' - r ' 1? " 3. - - -5.. , fm ,af . . , Ji? i9""??4"'Qf' 3,-Elin' lilaxilgl: l - , . walk' Qsmrfillfln Fifi! '-'M '.f"" ' One of the Gauchos' leading round. Ritzau took fifth in,fthe golfers, Eric Ritzau, chips out of Far Western Golf Tournament the rough in a recent practice witha54-hole 225. lmkmen lmpnesslve In Opening matches Facing the now-familiar handicap of lacking a V top-notch golfer, Coach Newell Breyfogle's Gaucho linkmen nevertheless played con- sistent golf, posting an impressive early season record of 6-3. Taking fourth place in the All-Cal tourna- l ment, and adding an eighth place finish in the Far Western Golf Tournament at Pasatiempo in Santa Cruz, the Gauchos added impressive dual-meet victories over Long Beach State and Washington. Q Eric Ritzau, who took fifth in the Far Western with a 54-hole total of 225, just two strokes off the pace, played good golf for the Gauchos. Others showing early season . ire? promise were Steve Rhorer, Tex Williams, - F Doug Smithline, and Jeff Lee. 'L+' fi' Jeff Lee, one of the UCSB nine-iron shots outside of golf team's more promising Robertson'Gym. Lee placed players this year, practices his well several times. l . GOLF TEAM - Front row: Ed Mencke, Walla. Third row: Art Thielen, Doug Jeff Lee. Second row: Coach Newell Bray- Smithline, David VWlsan. fogle, Mark Meade, Charles Eddie, John 1 UCSB's number one man, Wayne opponent's return. Bryan played some Bryan, waits in anticipation of an of the nation's top players. X VARSITY TENNIS - Front row: Alan Snyder, Phil Bartlett, John Riley, Coach Ed Altree, Eric Lewis, Dave Grokenberger, Doty. Wayne Bryan. Second row: Bill Eddy, John UGUTIGD BREAK Sven Oven RAIDY Season With only two players returning from last year, and only one up from the freshman ranks, 1969 was a rebuilding year for Santa Barbara's tennis team. Nevertheless, the Gaucho netters had posted a respectable 11-11 record by mid- season, considering that their opposition included national powers like USC and UCLA. Early season play saw the netmen take a third place in All-Cal competition, but the February rains came, and for the second year in a row washed out the UCSB Invitational Tournament, as well as most of the annual Northern California tour. Three-year veteran Wayne Bryan headed the slate of players employed by Coach Ed Dotyin his eleventh year at the Gaucho helm. In his job as number-one man, Bryan turned in a creditable performance facing some of the toughest competition in the United State's tennis circuit. Only one other senior was on this year's team: Bill Eddy, who hadn't played com- petitively since his freshman days. Freshman George Houghton and Dave Grokenberger saw plenty of action, as did Eric Lewis, John Snyder, Phil Bartlett, and Alan Altree, l Dave Grokenberger,one of the Gauchos' more consis- tent players this season, Iashes a forehand smash at an opponent during early tennis action. I F r ,R ef' -s X47 7' K 154 xp!! 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Fail and G.B.T.B.'s rise as inde- pendent powers...Fencing Club gains success in U.C.L.A. lnvitational...C.R.C. buys new 15 foot motorboat...Sandpiper Week end big hit for Recreation Club ...W.l.A. starts co-ed and sportsmanship awards... Women enjoy volleyball and powder puff footbaIl...Girls Intercollegiate Volley- ball Team ranks high in league play... Ruggers continue winning ways and gain national stature...Crew continues to struggle in a tough league...Ski Club's Rading Team, repeats sweep of racing tournaments. D Q. F Q Vfm JE i' A as S5 if ' W ' Q f Q 0 v , H 5 V QEW' , ...:,, . Lk Ye:a-Pgafwf-T-"' g ' :-ii? M A V er . - R.. - 22 .- W, ' .- ' 4 I w U A A 1-7 . l ' 3 I iik im il Y , 1 f 1 . ,, fi ,, W . xfifflfgi K: ' E F M Q ,Q 1 -XJ. W 7 Xxx! a Ev 2 .. K K J fa' ,-4. E4 ' V - ss! ..... .. - .lm 'W .... rm 0 X tl ' . ' 4 if wr 5 Q J-4 P 4, - 14 5. ' Q ' 4 7 Q Xl X 'Q NK xx., A ' c V -.M I 0 em i 0 I 'pg' , Y Q -3- L, yn ,aa 0 A1 lv 5 4'1- 1 Q J K A V ' RBI' ,An ,-. -J e'f'.'!? 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'X -f. ,, J' ff I l if, yi :1 , 1622 2 A mf ,Q Q ml , Vp: . f' , ff? , ,si fg, E ,lg ' V 2 54. W3 . 45. .V y J. 4 I I u .-I I x, 1 N I ' v g 1 " 1:3 Q W ur ' 1 I 3121 "rar 'L -q t 6,1 vw 7 , V I " " ig ' ,QE 75 'ff ii E37 3 V L-J 4-1 ,.f' 3 "' ' ,I - X, Q' " 5 t v F, rf? 1 I lf' 1 P 4 I ish T ,wi V1 ' ff fl 5 1' f., L- . I Va. . 1:51 xv. V , . . 1 .Lf "" XI-P, S I M. .5 Sd. -o U .. .W -' , ff? 1. - qw M- , xg 4? x A J f H 2 'f . , . W ll o fsw "' B ' .T .H Q D is - , .. if ..:""' X 1 , 3 .H n 3 1 ,N -'. EA Q v VL V' -4 A X 5 , ,Q ,? E w. 447' mn. f '-Q ur- N 5 rg 1 mf, w gn its , 'sl , if fu 1 .wilt S fgpsvb 4 NR 5 MX 1 N r 1-,mm T RR HRW AN F x - J .Egfr i ki '- K an 2 f Q3 QAB :DAF ,gb I Alpha Chi Omega, Kathy Bell drives a hard spike over the net in recent W.I.A. action. Pi Phi Nancy Wolven prepares to return the ball as Alpha Chi's Karen Krakow and Donna McHenry look on. Front row: Linda Griswold, Cathy Brose, Sandy Robertson, Laurie Bissell, Pam Den0tter lPresidentl, Kay Hartzell, Ann Olsen, Mary Molitor. Second row: Miss Geri Mund, Connie Sternadel, Lynn Lipani, Janice Schwartz, Chris Almany. W.l.A. Aoenoa emphasis, llmsts, Olvenslty With an anticipated turn-out of about 600 participants this year, the Women's lntra- mural Association has kept pace with the necessities of growth, adding several new areas of competition. New also will be co-ed sports, a sportsmanship award and individual sports. Under the supervision of Miss Geri Mund and Pam Denotter, W.l.A. offered volley- ball, tennis, bowling and kickball in the fall and followed up with basketball, softball, archery and powder puff football in the winter and spring quarters. Competitors from the sororities and l.V. residence halls kept the hard fought contests exciting. Activities came to a close with an awards banquet and the presentation of the covet- ed Participation Trophy. Giving the impression of a ballet, is this W.l.A. basketball game with Kathy McNamara passing over stretching Lynette Gonzales. ', im V . At 'X ' up sf ,, , 3 0 E A 1 E A I ' 'Z iw f 4 . f? ffl ,-L , .4-sw Q ., L .fa . ., rv ia R Q? ,- 53. "'. W - gza' 7 . X51 Alice Warrick moves in to back Ingrid Ault's spike. V O L L E Y B A L L - Front row: Laurie Fobert, Roi Pfeiffer, Ingrid Ault, De E HE Russell, Pam Den Otter, Judy Sanders, Hun ter, Candy Silva. ' Norma Mon talvo. Second row: Donna BASKETBALL - Front row: Laurie Bissell, Donna Haworth, Jo Jenkins, Sue Scott, Sue Bontadelli, Barbara MacKirdy. Second row: Carrie Durkee lcaachl, Debbi Deane, Lynn Lipani, Cathy Brose, Jo 'Ann Stephenson, Ann Olsen, Linda Lissy. Third row: Tim McGee, Ruth Talk Pam DenOtter, Mary Moliter, Judy Sanders, Franny Nicholas. , Gaucho Cocos Gnteiz Competitive Sponts Female athletes this year participated in four sports on the intercollegiate level: volleyball, basketball, swimming and tennis. All their leagues were sanctioned by the Extramural Coordinating Council of Southern California Colleges. The campus program was under the direction of Miss Katherine Barthels. Success was attained in competition by all teams. ln the fall quarter, the basketball and volleyball teams both advanced to the finals in their respective sports. In the spring the tennis and swimming teams also achieved victory with the tennis team having an undefeated season. With several matches remaining after the break, tennis team leaders Linda Hancock and Janet lVlohr had high hopes of attaining the conference individual titles. The volleyball team had a great tournament season. The basketball in both A and B classifications was downed by only UCLA who won the con- ference title. Candy Silva rushes to assist teammate Ingrid Ault's attempt to drive the ball over the net during com- petition in the UCLA tournament. l73 v fa' -r, ig' Q gy, 6 A. E .' 6 U, 1 .r V R .i 1 ag -:fri , -- . f Q X1 X ul ,I , V - gi, ... 1- -.1 - F - i -:gg I' 41 4- ww .l"' ' 49" . I ' .1 Eg: a 1, Q H, .9 X . Q ' -X'54 .W ., ,Y EQ' . ,f ,, We 5- Kimi . -4 M, -'21 W I1 ! . I I. I if ' -gil,"l'. R r-- wi , J .I, Mg! ,Q , 1 rr - -- P' ,7 . Q lp lil ,,,. W , ' f :W f ',d'- ' L 'F Q Q., "fri N F ' " -if- 5 ' 1 - Y 1 " il- ' ' A.sf-.A ,- -Q. " ' Q : VY AEFZFQ-Q:-fy: ,. 5 5? '-'YT-4:-v-ej' wifi" T Q 9531465 A - 533-15- 'F 25- f ,, I Iifleww- "'--N.: 5 n Jizz - - -gb kM.,, I.. ,Q-g4,g'3,L-.px ' " 1' V1 iiifft T359 , q P - --. :rv-Ki : 5 ,, . 'N 'JW' . F ff 'v-Q32 1 AW A 5 L i "TT if-f'f'Ei '-'.g1' . 5, - ff, A . L W - .Q --,'1'1f'iMn 'R :X i'3f'?3?T'4"fi'e'3'l ' 5 X iqggi ,-- K A.,-fi ,lgfkk -3, 5 , 1:1-as -f-nf-i'I'tNi. 'Q , :Ra .:. . A '. 1.- ': ,'7L7Q?-gl- ' Gia' . , 1. 'ff'v-wh f4:ff,e-nr-fi-4 :pr ":""s.b' ,- 4 reef? '- " ,X 1 -V -.'.E ': "PE rv.,-1 .'- .5 57 5 M55 i fqv ' qx S Arr: 1-Q. 1 Auf' . 'rxwm -ll - Breaking from the scrum, a Gaucho tackle stymies a Peacock Gap player. Scoreboard UCSB 22 ...... Cal Poly lSLOl 0 UCSB 9 .......... UC Irvine 12 UCSB 26 ......... Piedmont 12 UCSB 10 .............. Oxy 0 UCSB 3 . . . Old Mission Beach 5 UCSB 14 ........... L.A.R.C. O UCSB 9 .............. USC 17 UCSB 13 .... ....... U CLA 17 UCSB 15 .,.. .... S an Diego 8 UCSB 6 .... .... S idney 26 UCSB 28 .... . . . Pomona 0 UCSB 3 .... .... S t. Mary's 3 UCSB 3 .... ........ U CB 6 UCSB 6 .............. Oxy 8 UCSB 9 ......... Capitol RC 6 UCSB 14 ....... Palo Alto RC 6 UCSB 8 . . . Cal State Hayward 3 UCSB 19 ....... UC Riverside 0 UCSB 11 ...... UC Santa Cruz 3 UCSB 5 .......... UC Davis 3 UCSB 3 ........ UC Berkeley 0 UCSB 5 ....... UC San Diego 6 UCSB 19 ....... Fullerton RC 3 UCSB 11 Fullerton Rugby Club 0 UCSB 11 . . Peninsula Ramblers 6 UCSB 6 ....... Cal State L.A. 0 UCSB 20 .... L.A. Rugby Club 17 Season Record: 19 wins, 7 loses, 1 tie Catalina Tourney Champions: 4 wins, 0 losses Rugby is more often than not a game of pain, as Tom Dimmitt discovers. Posing for an after-the-game picture, members of the togetherness which were generated during the Sidney UCSB and Sidney Rugby teams show feelings of team's four-day stay at the UCSB campus. FENCI NG AN D C. R. C. Carmack. Third row: John Higgens, Jim Hamren lChaifmanl. All-Cal Wlnnen llollows new aomlnistnatlve Reign This was a year of innovation for C.R.C., as the Council of Recreation Clubs became an administrative body for the 27 recreational clubs on the UCSB campus. Projects this year, included Sandpiper Weekend, the TCU bridge tournament and the purchase of a 15-foot Glastron motorboat. Gayle Grantier, member of Santa Barbara's league leading Women's fencing team, Iunges fonlvard to Under the guidance of Coach Zolton von Somogyi and President Kathy Soltwedel this year's Fencing Club, with several returning starters ex- panded meet competition in sabre and epee categories. This awarded the team victories in the U.C.L.A. ln- vitational and the All-Cal competition at Berkeley. score against fellow teammate Bob Shingai during a practice session in the gym. Front row: Pete Reynolds. Second row: Mark Steward Julie .-.-? I A ' ' 'V 1 Q -X, , 1 .V 3, : - A - . . , X., .r a x 8 ik 5 Al x , la re . lx W. . .-,Jr Z I , 5 . Front row: Kathy Soltwedel, Zolton von Somogyi lCoachl, Gary Breschi. Second row: Barbara Sheffield, Tim Gearhart, Marcia Bennett. Third row: Gayle Grantier,'Bob Hengen, Stan Loeb. Fourth row: Charles Collier, Charlie Roberts, John Walker. Fifth row: Mike Conroy, Bob Shingai.Sixth row: Leo Kennedy, Dennis Cain, Pete Reynolds. . ,,- i ,423 lk. RIDING CLUB CHARITGQ Gnoup Sets Stanoanos Under the direction of President Karen Kessel the Riding Club s initial year proved highly promising Home base for the club was located near Devereux school The members have put money and time into the con- struction of corrals and stables to house the 3 club horses and 13 privately owned horses used by the club and guests Weather permitting the club met every Saturday at which time non- members could take lessons in riding, brldllng saddlmg and care of horses. The club also held bake sales and candy drives to finance equipment. Purchased this year were tack items such as bridles and saddles feed and fencing materials. Members could ride any time during the week as long as they put in a required amount of work time on the maintainance of the stables corrals and the horses. Club members Pat Roberts Robyn Brock, Linda Niehans and Susan Gogel take a break from working around the stables to survey their accomplishments from a distance. if fi Devereux school is the home base Stopping for a picture during their for Riding Club and it provides a afternoon ride are Karen Kessel scenic area for horseback riding. lPresidentl, and Linda Niehans. facilities Benefit many lntenests Santa Barbara's well-known equestrian facilities lend themselves to students interested in the sport. The annual horse-show at Earl Warren draws many students. Access to the indoor basketball courts was especially popular this year with the heavy winter rainfall. Use of the gym on Sundays created a pro- jected expansion of hours for use. Providing equipment and playing area for non- organized sports enthusiasts, open recreation hours on Sunday afternoons at Robertson Gym fulfilled increasing demands. -. ' .m'f .4 wfsaazi' wr- M P 4 if x E? x , QP 'vi- .x., w I J?-.nv 'r -V -' ' 'vi' 1 'I- W xllv x L I tw , H5 .M - ww- , H 1, ., , 15' - , .. 7- ..., , ,- Y , 2- 1 .- 5 S" .-:LT 7513371 '- ' fl' .xlri-45? -S i , 1- H i.f, :': ' W- ' --V mils. Y ,X H? W --' . ., X . -Q55 . , .554 V Q -fill. -,ff A.-.., , J ' f 5 , ,F . ' 'I . X . .J +ff'f: f Y if X,-5-,..-3' 3 Shown in both pictures is Jeff Spencer, enjoying th 1 k' d't' :nun ibf d . .hZ..g1?Z,tZ5532W'JZHZy. 8 e C U on as it . e e l gg C .Iv-Agiilm id-'Qi Ja, 1w-,- 3. SKIGRS Ovel2COme heavy BIIZZAROS eeee eeen With most ski resorts buried in snow due to this year's heavy storms, the UCSB Ski Club changed their old motto "pray for snow" to "pray for sun." Many of the team's races, which had been scheduled for this winter were canceled because of the inoperative state of many popular ski areas. At Christmas, a broom hockey game with Cal Berkeley highlighted a 5-day trip to Squaw Valley. The club members were greeted with several feet of powder snow and generally great skiing. Two separate trips were planned for spring break, one to Park City, Utah and the other to the All-Cal Carnival held at Heavenly Valley. Special events at these areas included snow sculptures races and wine slaloms. 'jxphii set 'W . -1 for 1" ' , an Qt' ...w 1.5. ,Nf- ,pr- N. ,. . Q ii, , 3 ,A M ml ,, my -iii ii H E Qa4w"i'f'H ful' ssglayfwgir , ' i SE I Q! ' ., ' Q Q Z ..g g 2 W J is, ' HSHSWE.'fY We elves e.arf' as Lobster, sunken wrecks, and the beauty Sandfleas to the sea. Here two divers of the marine environment lure the ascend with their C6tCh- Scuea Clue GIVES to Sea wneckaqe UCSB's Sandfleas highlighted their year with a five-day diving tour of the Channel Islands over spring break. Heading for Catalina on the "Emerald," the group explored two wrecks, went freefalling off an underwater cliff, spearfishing and night diving. The highlight of the trip was a 120-foot dive to the wreck of the luxury liner "Valiant," which still contains 370,000 worth of jewels amidst the rubble in its hull. Between dives the Sandfleas went ashore in Avalon, and en route to the other islands, they flew kites and snacked on their catch of scallops, abalone, and sheepshead. The club also sponsored several bug dives, a joint with UCLA, and a trip to Jade Cove. Their meetings featured a variety of speakers and films and an assortment of unusual seafood tidbits. The Scuba Club highlighted this year's activities with a diving trip to Catalina Island. Here the Sandfleas are seen above Avalon Bay. Skipper Glenn MiIler's diving dog, lVlac, is anxious to go ashore in Avalon. CREW BUIIOS Boat Sh6l1Z6l2, makes WAY IIOQ EXPANSION Although the season didn't start until March, the Crew began training in September. Membership expanded this year to 50 competitive oarsmen and numerous non- competitive members. To handle this increase the Crew rented three extra shells to add to the three already owned by the members. This year's Crew was led by Coach John Caskin and Mike Treman. They were responsi- ble for raising money and supervising construction of the new boat shelter at Lake Cachuma. However, all members of the Crew helped in the construction during free time. This willingness to work in practice and competition brought great results during the season's regatta com- petition with San Diego State and Orange Coast. ' f ' ifmfftf' . -Q. , Al 'f - V irc' :N js ' it ' 1 it l l , .sw J Q vw V . 12 i , V 11 f ,, get 1. .f-:fi I l .' waz - U is , - az. asses 1 i same . . t - V ... .. - . My . . mi. f ... ,.1, ...-. Unison, a necessary attri- bute in rowing, is also a Enjoying a rare, pleasant day at Lake Cachuma, the Crew moves the boat across a lake of glass. As rf-1. ,-,,. s, A - V .. t. '- r..-N---. -.----. r il, 1 ,...: -Ha .. x 1 --- ,wa . . -itz. if -A-,.-Haste --s factor for success in getting the shell in the water. Coach John Caskin shouts encouragement to Carl Allen and Mark Phelps during an early morning workout at the lake. 1 1 -.gat-452 ,YQ inn V ' -- """'li1-' " 4-, N--V , Qji'ne'E""QPm--... Y k " lr , -- V'- fil I4' f -daui9:f71 ""3 ,J 'Qin , ef' ' 'uf' . the -, , ' ' 'Q-L. Q - Y .5 'S . p-M7g""'f'nu...,..- 'N ..-.,..1fm-L A . i ' 'were-.W fe' . Q' 'vw x-'hav' r' - .-1. ver.-. , is-... Y - . ' '- . --.,,,. ,., .. M., N, R ' 4- b -femmes 1- hp ibn-, -.. , .ibn .. - -.. . ,.., ' V U f...Qa-.Nw by i 1. ---1-...Q " ' 4. www- -f-u-.. .., --v, X. v -4 I 1 A ,Q N .. , Ar... Lu 1 -NS' 91 'Pnlnuswfx Bob McEwan pulls hard against the Crew netted success at local regattas oar during recent competition. The held at Lake Cachuma. iiiii if if Y iiicc -Q-.i,,.. iiii, yy eff, ' ,titt N' ' Y . :Q i 23354. Q--if ' fa . -.nv-ng ff? 2 ,acts -151 . ul' Z!- Concentration and fatigue are exhibited on the faces of the crew members as they strain hard to find the necessary timing of their strokes. U"-+39 m3'..,., 49193 :Q-, mm-1 353- 03m Tm-h 235' wgi 5:12 EID- omni :Q-H' H.-+ 6701 coll? 3"'Z 5'-la Q20 570' mmm eww QPF was Um 'IIT S55 30' Q4 89' wg., , 183 4-in A '- w sg J P O w ' 1 ' 1 - , v ' U I 1- ' ax 'J , u I ri ., U an D fu'-:J 1 , vu " 1 I 'f - I'-.' . Q ' I , ...kr . r If A . 6 . E f,l', 5. . .. . Alu .1-' ltrwy ." u'1. .5 . M .--r, . ' 'Q P1 , . I 5 s ,'. 4 1.x ' n v ,U Q' Q :'- , " px! ,I .H I, W 1. . a 1.- . . J-'54 gfkglsgfsl fly. :Wrx ' ,rs ','u'p go ' - "ul -l '..:.....:,.......... ..- .,'...' , 'N vu ...., .. W H -' .,,...-...-a- ' n 'Q 1-,I '-4 1 . C . V r icf' o I V i ' .U ,I n Q, -"1 'B ' 1 . I 4 -a :"ll' 'u, o .- ,g, - 'Vp 4 I bl' I 1 s - , , ' .fr n ' o"P'4'4 bins :lil :rf nclln? 11,5 ' .ufj I ff. ,,, Jlh f W-'fa 4 UNIVERSITY Within a myriad of committees, bureaus and boards is lodged the policy-making core of the Univer- sity. The newly-reorganized frame- work of the Associated Student Body includes a testing ground for new ideas and a continuance of those proved beneficial in the past. Specific provisions are made for student-faculty involvement by the Symposium Committee and a system of A.S. representatives to administrative and faculty boards. Concerts, lectures and special activities such as the J.l .V.E. clean-up campaign draw many stu- dent and local participants. A vital, but less centrally situ- ated part of the scheme are the honorary and service groups which foster comradeship for their mem- bers and publicity for the Univer- sity in the surrounding community. Sanctioned by the A.S. government, the activities of these organiza- tions are coordinated by O.C.B., a joint chancellors and Associat- ed students committee. Thus integrated and inter-related, these individuals and groups unite the larger body of the Uni- versity with the dynamics of the Associated Students of UCSB. 5 W L..' Yi' 5 1 , il? v O w 1 . Q Q 2. fini . L ' ' 4 I , c ,. L, .1 l "'..L's ...fgr- 'EW X Ronald Reagan Governor of California OP ,,eP' ,. EUREKA G K .0 ii ng, ,G if .7 0 ,Q QEVVI 1 .xx . ' -xl:fQ! -r 'j.-" , 'R'---.ritz Ia' ' C4 ..... f . if .....---"' rf Ns LIFQRN -f' xxx Q., "K-.-Nsv.---" Campus Curses penplex Reagan Campus disorders, ranging from the closing of San Francisco State College to quelling the use of obscenities, have continued to plague Governor Reagan as President of the Board of Regents. The governor and the Regents have handled complaints from all members of the various University groups- students, faculty and administration. A great source of student discontent in the past has been the question of tuition. However, the recent fee increase met with relatively little formal complaint, once it was enforced. In an attempt to lessen the political control over the University, a bill was introduced in the state legislature to remove the Governor, Lieutenant Gov- ernor, and Speaker of the House from the Board of Regents. Another bill was introduced to shorten the terms of office ofthe Regents, themselves. Charles Hitch, University President Earnest student dissent has proved a constant source of anxiety to Governor Reagan since his election. lone-team plans Wm top Dmomty In his first year as President of the University, Charles Hitch has overseen many innovations and changes which will be beneficial to the community as well as the student population of the University. The San Francisco Med Center established an epilepsy clinic, and the Irvine campus opened a Community service office. "Project lnvolvement" at Davis typifies the spirit of the students throughout the University. President Hitch also reported that San Diego Med School is working on a major heart and lung research project. In an attempt to meet the increasing demand for teachers, Berkeley has initiated a teacher clinic in San Francisco. Focusing attention on educational goals, Hitch stressed the state scholar- ship program, which has expanded to grant 3,082 University scholarships to deserving students President Hitch at Charter Day. J Wins. -ass Y..-55.44 Regents Conpzonteo By Range of views Following several new appointments in January, the Regents met, only to be con- fronted by criticism on their management of the University's S660 million in stock. The Board of Regents with newly appointed Ed Reinecke, Dean Watkins, Robert lVlonagan and Robert Reynolds, encountered the first of many ensuing criticisms and demonstrations. Berkeley's Student Body President, Charles Palmer, and First Vice-President Doug Turner, attacked the Regents for including 20,000 shares of Dow Chemical stock in their invest- ments. The Regents vowed to overhaul their investment policy in an attempt to come to a compromise with the students' grievances. ln addition, the Regents contended with communications from both the conservative and radical ends of the University spectrum. Many students and tax-payers expressed their concern over violence and subversive activities on the University and other state supported campuses. An open letter, focusing its criticisms on the University's treatment of minorities, was received from the California Black Student Unions. K- v2 . . K Philip Boyd James Brett Wesley Campbell John Canaday Edwan-j gym, William Cohlentz fr- 3 rw fe -. Allan Grant Mrs. Randolph Hearst ef sg. Frederick Dutton William Forbes Mrs. Edward Heller DeWitt Higgs 1 GY CP Q-6 if ----0 235 CQ11 .1--5 ---- -.1-g ---..o Q 5 -me-0 L Q Q - - , , 0 is :U 5, vig -X. .-A . n . William Smith Dean Watkins CHGACIG meets F' Ilaetlonal melee Caught on the tightrope between public opinion and student demands, Chancellor Vernon I. Cheadle found himself facing an unrelenting dilemma. ln his capacity as final authority over the affairs of UCSB, Cheadle has found it increasingly necessary to abandon the traditional concept of the bureaucratic administrator. His avoidance of immediate punitive action in the North Hall takeover brought charges of "capitulation" from the com- munity. At the same time, the failure of negotiations to lead to tangible changes culminated in the student march to the adminis- tration building and the demand for a personal commitment from the chancellor. Looking ahead to the seventies offers little hope of a Ietup from the agitation and reaction to this student conduct. Cheadle spoke out against the Regent's decision to dismiss student militants at the same moment members of the United Front labeled him inef- fective. The Chancellor seems to be ahead of his peers in deter- mining what future role adminis- trations will play. David Gafdfwf Dale Tomlinson Assistant Chancellor Assistant to the Chancellor A 1 F r 1 1 2' Q 'ww I 1' XL J L! ...J 0 pg. w W Yr .+-if A rs. Yl 5, - Y. r , -6 mv' w V ,mi I i ' i 4F Ay' V' W I ff F Sjig .."4 4: 1' mf' at G fu, 1 425.4 X ' "firi- 1 uf' H ,35- gg, '58 QW A 'Ziff ' ,iz U t in 'l it ii riiiif'-if " rf, " WT H 'gg fy Q W- 1 if H X A f I - 4 M... -R 5 -I kk H 5M Aj ? wSmTW . ' i-75114 ' .' sw 'I': Q. A f LW!!! w -""'l" ' F5 mf-. 11255. , - 4 PH ' , L ,v -" "T-5515 4 1. my S? , uw 5 . , X, A , . W 3.1: aw-Y' ' I I Y U ,,, w'Zuf,v 5-2 1 - M, packet Dnoouctlon utilizes Computens Deans Albert Spaulding and Upton Palmer, working within the College of Letters and Science office, had an influx of interviews and counseling with high school students this year, due to the increase of minority groups interested in attending UCSB. The counselors in the college aided the deans by helping both prospective college students and UCSB members with specific problems. A third dean, Keith Aldrich, worked with honor students in the University. A Letters and Sciences Scholars' Lounge has been established for these students to meet and discuss common problems and goals in academic life. The College of Engineering, under the direction of Albert Conrad, carried out its rigorous program with the addition of a new Engineering Library to supplement the General Engineering Section in the UCSB library. Theodore Harder, the registrar, had one of the most time-consuming jobs this past year- perfection of computerized registration. After experimentation and testing last year, regis- tration has been completely transferred to computers, which allows for quicker pro- cessing, less error and thus is more convenient for the students. + f luv. ..i . .. . . .M 15" f4Y34 lx. y .l. .W- ,t , - .wage-1-.,f, - 15 - ,.,,, l. i w 'E sim' lm: l f .. E .W . z -e. eq, 333 M tw, , qi . affgw Q XWEQEQ ' 1 24 r . 4 ' it Albert C. Spaulding, Ph.D. Dean, College of Letters and Science .lm 1 ll :.wr15u.f.,: f. H -. '- fi fl-if i fi '-. ' I ' emu f H wi i ,. ,W Y . . V ' 'ii - 0 5 . : ' -, zglf' F 1 ,L - -ff' "' T"' 4 , . . ZW Y . . A-1 W ir . 4- '--L Keith M. Aldrich, Ph. D. Upton S. Palmer, Ph.D. I Associate Dean, College of Letters and Science Associate Dean, College of Letters and Science E 1 '14 3' 5123. 4: A I svf, 1 4 far' ,. .., 'i 2 1, 'V Hr ' egg' 1 ,HJ - -if I i , Qnzwfil 1 -5' Liga-fq E: im! Y , 1: E., lf' 5 2 32224 iii ' M 1 5 533 5 552 . 1 1 1 4.255 i D MN, I 5. 15:3 f Q was 'E 3 qw- iw II," " l VFP! M' 4 Q 'ESI 1 'mr . L, 12 les .ii ,T is W2 I 1,fmh F igvme 13 sl Eg , 1 1 ' hr, Y 1 Y W 'lv-A, Villa .- th vi, ET' 5 1 SE f . , lkfgif Ia 1516 ii, , I 1 1 4 I v 2 .L ,l. 'x ,nf M. x 2252 i I ,w fl H W W lilrgslg '.L,5 'li If 4a l v 4 4 ,I , 143 r Fffifif .V , f wEff1?. 'HU . A . 1 I ' , , ffE'?f" , 'N -v-11 .N W f 2 ,i if V Q J E M: , fx '4 , v ' E ml? Jiri W Mak -,w w A , 1, I , W ml ' ly 'f' " :V-N W1 ' v v , X . , li - 'Q P - ga. hc' .Yr E A.S., UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL UC ABRCAO ADO UCSD AIIZGQGO SHEET THE This year saw a continuation of COMHON expansion and reorganization in the iiriar Q realm of the practical services offered FEEL by the Associated Students and the am' .om white Rc mer sn gi., University. The Recreation Office was 9 or P Q bxaugsiab 4 lqigtegssefgfiiigi card . . . R tl Desk W Recreation Director and Recreation nntp on Supervisors. UCen policies were stretched to include the activities of the New Free University lNFUl with extended hours. Completion of the new Student Health Center was scheduled for Spring of 1970. The Education Abroad Program added a credential program for French in Paris spanning two quarters, and two pro- grams for study in Africa, each encompassing a year. restructured to include a Dean, ,Q ciecify edlcatlons you want Q c A masterful idea, the Cold Clinic saves hours for both students and doctors. g X - Q ei ig X X l ' - ..,., , f , T T A lf , t H i it F Dale Lauderdale Robert Lorden John Carroll Daryl Rush Alumni Association Director A.S. Executive and UCen Director A.S. Assistant Executive Director A.S. Business Services Louis Hahl Robert Blakemore, Ed.D. William Allaway, Ed.D. lVliSS J03n Nlortell Bookstore Manager Counseling Center Acting Manager Education Abroad Director H0uSinQ Supervisor . Qi .4 lVlyriads of information, signs and people "liberation" of the UCen, creating special fOr the Governing Board until a com- appeared overnight with the NFU's problems for the staff and policy problems DYOWIFSG WHS I'9HChGd- 1551 we .,, ., m l x E.L. Chalberg George Obern Joel Witherell Robert KelleY Placement Office Director Public information Director Associate Dean of Recreation RGCYSHNOH DiI'0C'f0l' Ralph Nair, Ed.D. Wilfred Robbins, M.D. Lewis Walton, Ph.D. George Daignealllf. Ph-D- School Relations Director Student Health Center Director Summer Session Director U-C. EXfef1Si0f1 Dll'eCf0l' 4 WHQEJ George Kieffer Executive Vice-President Jim Ashlock Administrative Vice-President Paul Sweet Maridee Brandenburg Associated Students President A.S. Secretary PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE NSW DGRCGDIIIONS ANC CNANGING DRIORIIZIGS NGCGSSIIAIIG INNOVATION ANC INVOIVGITIGNIZ "If I were to characterize this year, I would call it a begin- ning, a Renaissance, for UCSB and Isla Vista, of student awareness of their environ- ment, The Associated Students have channeled this awareness toward the solution of many problems. We sought to create a University we could all be proud of, and enjoy living in. We sought to change the curricula to make it more relevant. We sought to make the University lespecial- ly our campusl a democratic and just institution, a signal of hope for Blacks, Chicanos, and poor all over the state. We sought to supplement the edu- cational environment with lectures, concerts and sports. We tried to encourage spontaneity, sensitivity and friendliness among all members of the University and Isla Vista Communities. We tried to make the Associated Students a more representative and viable government. We attempted to change the image of UCSB from a party school to its rightful place as a prime institution of higher edu- cation. We tried to establish new budget priorities so that students receive maximum benefit from their fees. We sought to make UCSB a com- munity model. For these attempts I do not claim success, yet neither did we fail. We carried these pro- grams forward. I hope that as students and alumni we will work to see these through to success. This message is neither a tribute or an eulogy. Let us never forget our respon- sibility to the programs above." Phil Pennypacker Kathy Russell Barry Posner Barb Strickland Duane Garrett Rep.-at-Large Rep.-at-Large Rep.-at-Large RHA Rep. RHA Rep. V.P. Jim Ashlock confers with President Paul Sweet prior to a Leg Council meeting. LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL executive Repont Oemanos Relevant System Changes With minority student affairs and an active commitment to community affairs as new focal points, Leg Council approved racial and ethnic programs. Implementation got an initial push from the assess- ment of an additional S1.00 per student per quarter. Council approval of the Ex- ecutive Report demanded that the University "seek changes within its own system." Bring- ing on reaction from all sides, this report outlined eighteen steps to action and demanded departmental investigations of discriminatory hiring policies. JIVE lJoint Isla Vista Effortl involved all elements of campus and IV in efforts to improve transportation, side- walk construction, and beauti- fication. The Contract Com- mittee was established to arbitrate disputes between realtors and students. Tension mounted as realtors attempted to issue unsatisfactory con- tracts and council advised students not to sign these con- tracts. Necessitating vast and basic reshaping of both structural and attitudinal levels of oper- ation, Leg Council made many changes in the apportionment of funds. The Executive Com- mittee was formed to help President Sweet keep abreast of issues of vital interest. El?-5j'fEF: ff f' fff.'..1l, 'E f a ti- ,it1'5'i'Ti5'?' -' I , fs i'ta.:5fst1-Ii..': .-jvf.sil,'f-IJ.-, . -' ' '-' HG-:: lr: ' 'l 'ff 'J . f- 4- 'itfI1?'3lf ,Ulf -' , ."'- I- 'Je " 'fb-'QL ' .33 53 Z7:"'.?I'1 k' 1 '. Arffr tg- n ". -A , ' ' - . j1',!Lrf " Lgiglzf..-LAS.: I I -g F: I ci-,,,iQ' L me-Pram-,. -,rg-51 tg . .f as -.ls iig-gtk-if .4 1 ,. 61 1,-Z?I1w 1- - ,-,. v ,sf I. 3 ' 446' I1 'ir t! :iag2ig'J':5'g l'l ' Q' .sv 'ar' -Y f' - rf 1 'L 1 rr . y '-r. I X . I 2 N.- Gary Langstaff Linda Korber Bruce Harger Cynde Meyer Jim Gregory Fraternity Rep. Sorority Rep. Non-affiliated Rep. Non-affiliated Rep. Non-affiliated Rep. FRESHMAN CLASS Coneent pnoeeeos Benefit llanm wonkens' Cnllonen Emerging from the disorder surrounding their recent arrival upon the University scene, the Class of '72 found itself confronted with the selection of class officers. Phil Kohn, Gary Wolfram, and Ginger Roth received the vote of confidence. During the Christmas Season the fresh- man class carried off their Phil Kohn President Gary Wolfram Vice President Ginger Roth Secretary-Treasurer mistle-toe-picking party and sale. An April concert netted proceeds toward a scholarship fund for children of the Delano farm workers. Joining forces with the sophomores, the freshman class sponsored a public movie in order to further augment their individual treasuries. J I ll " we si: ffl: 7125? A lui? 'ii r Za I . ass: Although a thief bagged the profits, the sophomores' Homecoming balloon sale was a colorful success. FRESHMAN CLASS COUNCIL - Front row: Anne McLaughlin, Mike Rudin, Eileen Kalk, Karynne Campbell, Carol Smetana, Mary Johnson, Anne Geary, Jenni McLellan, Anne Elberger, Loni Bennett. Second row: Debbi Kaufman, Jan Tornquist, Teresa Cook, Janet Wicktorin, Marilyn Hughes, Judi Painter, Paul Voyen, Bob Koenigs, Gary Wolfram, Phil Kohn, Ginger Roth, Joy Fauvre. M, 'PE - ,, , ,Maw ,lr , .l y we 1 l. 'N Q lille-4 E as if mtg ..l ,la , new," , Q U wr . ,ll ap . la? l -. :iw K- I M, eva-- .ea i, X YNY, SOPHOIVIORE CLASS COUNCIL - Front row: Gary Anderson, Pere Heublein, Fred Holden, Frank Cutler, Jeff Engler, Mark Malashock, Dennis Gardella. Second row: Sally Stires, Debbie Slemp, Jan Wagniere, Jackie Copple, Pat Dixon, Barbara Pybrum, Diane Lamphere, Yelena Brown, Jann Ficken, Julie DePauw, Eileen Vahryzek. Third row: Sue Machado, Mary Ann Peters, Virginia Giammana, Debra Sherman, Laurie Hirshberg, Margaret Neiswender, Caroline Potter, Nancy Drach, Janet Buickeroad, Kathy Kiley, Dave Abrech t, Jamey Blair, Bill Bradley, Art Hoppe, Sally Driemeyer, Mary Vail, Sandy Maynard, David Attree. SOPHOMORE CLASS Canes, Balloons, Shll21ZS SOIO IO Swell tneasun Sophomore class council's initial thrust forward came with the sale of class cards. Spirits soared as President Dave Abrecht and several class members peddled helium balloons to dot the Home- coming skyline. T h e S o p ho more-of-th e- IVlonth award program got under way in fall quarter. Nloving into the winter months the Class of '71 drew full houses at showings of "A lVlan for All Seasons." Sales- manship again became the Dave Abrecht Prnidont 1 f , B., 1 ' - ' AA -E jgk ,, . 2.5-,Ei an .231 , - f i ""l"' ' . ' .. if v' ' council's "bag" as they offered Gaucho buyers class shirts. Joining with other class councils in an attempt to activate the concept of govern- ment at this level, sophomores endorsed and actively partici- pated in the junior class Kennedy-King-Kennedy Lead- ership Conference. Along less serious lines was a Soph-Senior picnic, rounding out a year punctuated by class involve- ment in all spheres. Pete Heublein Vice President Clif!! Y St o 1 . .534 X so be Mary Vail Secretary-Treasurer JUNIOR CLASS Community Dizoelems Rechan nel Activities Breaking from the traditional mold of class government, the Class of '70 poured its energy into community affairs in their junior year. In an attempt to help alleviate the long-neglected plight of the American Indian, the Junior Class Council made significant progress toward opening a course on Cali- fornia Indian Affairs. The Indian Project also worked to establish a California Indian Center at UCSB, sponsoring several educational conferences and compiling a documentary book on California Indians today. Culmi- nating the latter effort will be the book's publication as part of the class gift to the University. Ground work for an active Kennedy-King- Kennedy Leadership Conference involved the council in a Community Rep program. The statewide conference was held at UCSB during Christmas vacation. Council also expanded the Class of '70 Scholarship program and passed a resolution for all juniors to donate SBI tovvard the establishment of an Interclass Coordination Council. Sunne Wright President Margo Capatan Vice President JUNIOR CLASS COUNCIL - Front row: John McPeak, Kevin Wychopen, John Walker. Second row: Carol Logan, Lois Martin, Donna Martin, Denise Ginotti, Lyn Barrett, Pat Greer, Sunne Wright, Susan Simons, Terry Simmerman, Carla Brooks, Robin McCandliss. I f M.. me Q. a.,,,,,g., Ed Olivas, chairman of the Santa Ynez Indians talks to juniors involved in their class Indian Project. , Y . J P l Lois Martin Secretary-Treasurer lowen Division Awanos 1 :mai eff vas? ' LN ,gm Q QP l2eoen1:'s REGENTS' SCHOLARS Howard, Carolyn Owens, Ano Dl26SlO6l'llI,S Scholans - Cathy Shay, Linda Steve Gottlieb, Edith Mary Vail Political Science major, Homecoming Oueen's Contest Chairman, AWS Representative and Glamour Chairman, Unit Hall President and Secretary, Sophomore Class Secretary- Treasurer, Honeybears, Chi Omega. Castulo de la Rocha Political Science major, UCSB Master Speakers Bureau, UMAS President 1968-69, ChanceIlor's Committee on Racism. Ron Saul Kaufman Political Science major, RH Student Advisory Committee, RHA President, OCB member, Unit Hall President 1967-68. ' Carey Addison Williams Political Science major, football, drama, radio show on KCSB, Educational TV Station, Sophomore of the Month, singer with "SouI Purpose," Concert Committee Chairman, Zeta Beta Tau. Klbele, Carl Palm, Paul Hesse, Kathy Brook, Gary PRESlDENT'S SCHOI-ARS - A179913 Soli, Wolfram. Joanne Karlton, Ellen Guethlein. . EOP pnoonam Channels RISING mlnonlty aio Put in motion by the A.S. in the fall of 1965 with two students and given a big push with the 31.00 quarterly assessment per student, the Educational Opportunity Program has served up to 280 minority students this year. Santa Barbara's EOP is funded by the A.S., the Regents, and the federal Office of Economic Opportunity, it offers financial aid, counseling, and assimilated classroom and individual tutoring. Selection of EOP students is channeled through the statewide OEO clearing houses. The work of the Master Speakers Bureau, the BSU and UIVIAS at the high school level has spread the program's reputation, as well as gathering referrals for aid. Director Cary Peyton and counselors Bill Fields and Bill Villa hosted 150 parents of UCSB black students at the Towers April 12 and 13 to help narrow the gap between minority and middleclass white cultures. Another 200 students will be added to the program in the fall. According to Bill Fields, it is imperative that EOP be thus expanded, for "the presence of minorities, different in cultur- al background, is extremely important if the University is to be a center of learning, aca- demically and in associations one acquires from rubbing shoulders outside the classroom. " f. - 1 ' ' ':':' Eff Chicano students' problems constantly volume, however, fails to affect his face Bill Villa, EOP counselor. The interest in each. Educational Opportunity Director Cary Peyton, Counselor Bill Fields. 'r 'Mil' 'JE' it T' , :-.- '- fiszaff- " T da-iirisji i ' Jil 'HSM A . ' H, Al .. ' aww legislative committees CSDI - Front row: Geoffrey Wallace, Tom Krakow. Second row: Chairman Rich Mandel, Rod VWndle, Jim Sheridan DavldJackson Crane, Cynthia Poindexter, Larry Smith, Karen Susan Nieubuurt, Deborah Smith, Karen Wollner, CSDI PUBLIC RELATIONS BOARD C6l11Z6I2'S Activities facilitate Olaloque In its first active year A.S.'s representative committee to the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions defined its goal as the creation of "dialogue," Dialogue between members of the Center and the student body was facilitated by taking groups of students to the Center, which is located in Montecito. A.S. gives a 31,000 honorarium annually to the CSDI, thereby making the Associated Students a member of the Center. ,es-41 Mez S we 22153525 Q , E .. six' " I IE:E 5 sfasfiifff A.S. liunnlshes Imk to local Resloents Newly created, the Public Relations and Information Board is designed to serve A.S. by gathering and distributing information regarding student activities in order to "promote a better image of UCSB" by in- forming the public at large about the campus. The Speakers Bureau, headed by Leonard Osborne, helped in this effort by informing students of Santa Barbara high schools of important aspects of UCSB, and through speeches before community'service groups. ,H me , Am as My . ,omg Sf 1' Q lien Q! A 3 I , ,,,,, fl f - 25: ,gist Q: 1 F n f l PUBLIC RELATIONS AND INFORMATION Osborne, Judy Parker, Chuck Newman lchair- Second row: Craig Avery Priscilla Hobson Dean BOARD - Front row: Mike Liftan, Leppard manl, Judy Anderson, Tim Weston, Ed Bnehm, Kay Goddard, Kristen Grim Bill Batwrlght llmll new Tim Weston Chairman BOY SCOUTS healthy pastime Involves youth Passing on the advantages of their long years of scouting experience to boys in the low income and minority com- munities, several University men offered their services as teachers and examples. The purpose of the University Troop Development Team is to promote enthusiasm for scouting, recruit local scoutmasters from among the boys' fathers, and train them to assume vital leadership positions in local troops. Student leaders withdraw and are assigned to another troop when their training objective is accomplished. Assistant Scout Master Bill Williamson gives last minute instructions to members of the Panther Patrol prior to a day of wandering and energetic exploration. H1f'Iv1- CAMP CONESTOGA Sumzounomq Campsites Benefit oepmveo youth Operated on a year-round basis with funds from the University and the Santa Barbara community, Camp Conestoga is an "outdoor adventure" for disadvantaged children in the Santa Barbara area. Its goal is to offer new perspectives in education, respect for self, and relations with others through a program of pack-in camps and field trips to nearby interest points. The majority of camps are staffed by University students, supplemented by a Juniors Leaders program for junior high students. Leaders conduct programs in rock and speciman col- lecting, hiking, camp cooking, and folklore of the area using Los Padres and Cachuma as a base. Summer camp-sites are located in forest areas of the high Sierras. l 5 I Dark, bearded Paul Helman, Chairman of the University Troop Develop- ment Team, shows these boy scouts the trick to tying the complicated sheepshank knot, a vital part of every scout's rope- tying repertoire. HUMAN RELATIONS worzkshop limes Qrzoup oynamlcs Conceived in the fall of 1966, the Human Relations Commission is geared to providing an atmosphere through which people may enhance their emotional and intellectual self- awareness. Three conferences are held each year at Cachuma Church Camp. The basic structural unit is an encounter workshop of ten, with a professional "guide." The approach has been called sensitivity training, although elements of Gestault Therapy and non-verbal techniques are also employed. H U M AN RE LATIONS COMMITTEEA: Carolyn Kwong, Steve Bogadlchairmanl, Richard Compton. SPECIAL PROJECTS pnognams Given Initial lmpetus ln its first year of official existence, Special Projects Committee handled small, one-time projects as well as initiating new ones for C.A.B. First year projects included starting a girl scout troup at Lincoln School and working with the Blue Jackets Teen- age Club soliciting local support. A Community Projects Clearing House and Community Projects Library and information Center are also in planning stages. .24 ,nm-ajfa . , -.sl I . Yi. ff PROJECT GENESIS - Deborah Sills, Richard Tuch, Tina Wellhouse, Peter Petraitis, Carol Moonie, Mark Cantor lchairmani. SPECIAL PROJECTS - Jim Pirdy, Jackie Schmidt While waiting to go down to the beach for an afternoon of exploration, these boys from Wilson Elementary School improvise a game of touch football with their Project Genesis friends. Wilson School is one of several "target area" schools with which Project members worked in an attempt to become "big brothers" to the children. Mark Cantor led this newly-formed committee. PROJECT GENESIS memisens make hot Bneakfasts Created to assist disadvantaged students in "target area" schools, Pro- ject Genesis is a recent addition to the Community Affairs Board. Activities focus on furthering educational and cultural opportunities and under- standing between minority and white groups in the community. Support from the A.S. Special Fund to Further Racial Under- standing, the Regents, and local con- tributions enables the Project to supply and maintain a "clothing bank" for five community schools. Also provided are the funds and staff for a hot breakfast program at Lincoln School for children who would not otherwise be able to eat a morning meal. Field trips, beach days and hiking excursions, were among the recre- ational and cultural activities planned, financed and executed by Project members. Serving the dual purpose of exposing the children to totally new experiences and fostering friendship and trust between black and white, these activities gained a foothold on the issues of the 70's. SCHOOL AID GRSOYIAL ll1VOl.V6lTl6l'l1I l2GACh6S 'UARGGI AREAS Focusing its attention on four main areas of activity, the School Aids Committee-Goleta Project involved over 120 students in a working re- lationship with the community. After School Project, St. Vincent's Project, Hillside House Project, and the Mental Health Project con- stituted the four working areas. Selecting elementary school students, who for individual reasons need personal attention, the After School Project sends two volunteers on weekly field trips. Informal As chairman of the Goleta Project, Kathy Daly is both its co-ordinator and an active counseling with a "friend" is the main objective here. Lincoln School, with its mainly Black and Nlexican- American enrollment, and predomi- nantly white lsla Vista School are the two participants in the program. Individual initiative on the part of volunteers going to St. Vincent's school for girls who are slow to learn or emotionally handicapped leads to many avenues of interaction in this phase of the project. Organization of a highly successful choral group of patients came as a participant in the program. Here, Kathy takes a group of youngsters from Lincoln result of student work at Hillside House, a Santa Barbara residence for cerebral palsy victims. A loose format allowed volunteers a lot of room for initiative in their relations with the patients. At the Mental Health Clinic, volunteers worked closely with the regular staff to help children attending a day-school at the clinic. Flexibility and individual crea- tivity allow students in this project to become totally involved in a chosen pursuit. School on an afternoon outing aimed at creating trust and friendships. TUTORING PROJECT new Oooizs openeo on local Chllonen Tutoring Project volunteers have stressed experimentation and originality when dealing with children having difficulty in grasping concepts. Exhibiting their ingenuity, the tutors used games and puzzles to explain math, acted out dramatic scenes for those learning English, and took the children on tours of art galleries, labs, and recreational facilities to widen their horizons. The big step for the future of the project is to increase the number of tutors from minority groups, who would be better able to establish rapport with young children from their ethnic background. l l l l GAUCHOS IN GOVERNMENT Summemtlme Spent leaiznmq the Ropes Now in its second year at UCSB, Gauchos in Government selects student interns to work in the state and national capitols during the summer. The interns take positions in federal agencies and the offices of congressmen, doing work ranging from clerical, to answer- ing letters from constituents, to doing legis- lative research. Selections are made during winter quarter. GAUCHOS IN GOVERNMENT: Prafexor Roger Davidson, Donna Folner fchairmanl, Professor Alan Wyner. ik ,-. il . Rav- 'L ' . I 1, 'W u,. I-1 , A: A- ga-fi' ,' i , 4 A Sl l .Q . 'nil ,x ' v 1 1 .. .,. . Q 7 ""' I-limp' ze-- 'wi' vs ff, file, V Friendship and fun were the note of Project's picnic held Winter quarter the day at the Saturday Tutoring behind the UCen. SIIUOGIWII ACTIVITIES BOARO , 'N 'f'IF'f:Q,,! V 1 ll H ' - W , -, X li Bill Bragg Chairman ARTS COMMITTEE: Kama Phillips, Martha Moran, Dottie McKee, Sally ARTS COMMITTEE CGRAITIICS lnstnuctlon Olzaws ucen Cnowo initiating a program of free ceramic instruc- Ti0l'l, the Arts Committee concentrated on activating programs to involve students. Committee members ordered and framed prints from Italy, making them available to students on a temporary loan basis. Quarterly films included "Genesis l," a collection of student films, a mid-winter series of animated films from all over the world, and "Born Free." ln conjunction with other A.S. committees, a Renaissance Fair completed an extremely active year. Weller fChairmanl, Diane Peterson. CONCERTS COMMITTEE penfonmens Roll In On Wave of Soul Despite initial problems resulting from lack of working experience, members of the Concerts Committee made up for lost time with a top quality schedule of musical happenings. Fall performances featured such well respected names as the Four Tops and Cannonball Adderly. Highlighting Homecoming weekend, the Committee brought Glenn Yarborough for another successful Santa Barbara visit. A rock festival captured many of the best elements of the current sounds. I?TdS'.zi1l:1'lII65i!:i3ICiT if wi. C O N C E R T S COMMITTEE - Front row: Cheryl Denton, Marcia Meudell, Kitty Han- sen, Ruth Crivello. Second row: Carey Williams lChair- manl, Nancy News- ham, Russell Love, Sue Ziemann, Dave Tayce. 'Yin RALLY COMMITTEE Gmc Game lianfane llills liall Rosten Capitalizing on Gaucho spirit, the Rally Committee saw most of its action in the early months of the year. Football was once again in the limelight as committee members decorated the goal posts for every home game and posted signs every week advertising the coming contest. Homecoming Weekend proved to be the hiatus of activity for this spirited group, from Friday night's bonfire to the successful execution of elaborate card stunts, Rally Committee '68 maintained a heavy schedule. Fast becoming a Homecoming tradition at UCSB, the card stunts seen at the games are planned weeks ahead of time by the Rally Committee. Each card was carefully placed the morning of the game. RALLY COMMITTEE - Front row: Barb Grell, Susie Stieg, Sally Stephens, Gary Langstaff, Kathy McNamara, Jo Wage- fourth, Margaret Goodwill, Priscilla Hobson. Second row: Susie Weber, Dana Lane, Jim Warren, Rick Miller, Judy Matalas, Loni Bennett, Joleen Higgin. Dog: Scotty. I .J LECTURE COMMITTEE haizo hitting talks Am Socle1:y's llls Closely involved with the most pertinent and pervasive social issues of the day, the Committee on Lectures presented students with such controversial speakers as Bobby Seale of the Black Panther Party. Scien- tologists David Smith and Alex Haily, who worked on the Autobiography of Malcolm X also spoke. Lecture series treated Isla Vista and the Middle East. LECTURE COMMITTEE: Saedleen Akashah, Judy Crowe, Janis Turner. l HOMECOMING-SPRING SING - Front Billie Paine, Nancy Colvin. Third row: Gary row: Sue Schmandn Second row: Gail Smith, Rod Wilkerson, Bob Lorden Templar, Mary Vail, Janis Jones lchairmanl, ladvisarl, Lee Edwards. HOIVIECOMING-SPRING SING Chances QGVIIAIIZG Campus tnaoltlons Moved by the desire to update traditional homecoming events and to make them more adaptable to the quarter system, the Home- coming-Spring Sing Committee innovated both "House Decorations" and a parade through Isla Vista. The 25th Anniversary Celebration also included the traditional Queen and Great Gaucho Prof contests, and an outstanding Galloping Gaucho Revue. Spring Sing also underwent changes, with the addition of a committee-sponsored "cast," aimed at providing both continuity and polish in the overall production. Bringing the traditional homecoming resulted in increased group and individual informal, spontaneous atmosphere for both parade home to the student community participation. The parade created an participants and onlookers. f X :X ' i I I, Z F .ti . N-xx L K ri K . RECREATION COMMITTEE memsens Concelve long-Rance plans The yearly sponsor of Sandpiper Weekend, Recreation Committee also aided the Long Range Recreation Planning Committee in creating a master plan for campus facilities. Other activities reached into organizing recreation, intramurals and intercollegiate athletics and sponsoring Dead Week films. RECREATION COMMITTEE - Front row: Toni Gaodge, Cathy Dunham, row: Larry Smith, Bob Gardner, Chris Julie Garlington, Stan Garlmgton Covington, Don Branstrom. Second lchairmanl. Dog: Samantha. .. Tug-o-vvars and volleyball year of being held in the fall, formed only a part of Sand- Sandpiper involved 800 piper Vlleekend. In its second students. 1 Lin?-T.7,7.?5,75r f.-I.:-.... -YZ -. if: 1177 I .- - -- . ' V. ' ' ' ' ' : , .iii ii , ' 7 -' -'I ,' L I - ' ,N ii it ' .' ,.,,,t.jiY Si. , , 3 I L ii, i3gs1ulvi,W'- 1, , -:alfa fa at ii, H g I ii it iii' ! -wr .. -f 'M' A NNN "if H , N' iii gifts? H a, ,E . rw' A a ii vm i . ,v -N A 1 . ,xl 11. q 4,9 "-fgixif-:'..s2- I Qizg -Elf SOCIAL COMMITTEE Bio Sounos Bnouqht lIr2om'San IIRADCISCO Some of the most spectacular and big name activity at UCSB was the result of Social Committee's efforts. In his last appearance before election day, Pat Paulson sparked the political first quarter. Capturing some of the best sounds of the music scene, the committee presented a series of dance concerts in Robertson Gym. Light shows and influxes of teenage fans charac- terized evenings with Moby Grape, Grateful Dead, and Quicksilver. MUSIC COMMITTEE liaison ano pusllclty Ame key functions In an attempt to effect smoother com- munications between groups interested in musical presentations at all levels, the Music Commission fulfills the role of liaison man. Coordinating the needs and proposals of Associated Students, non-musical student organizations, the Music Department, and Arts and Lectures, the Committee focuses its own efforts at such presentations as the noon concerts. This year they sponsored the evening concert with the University Chorus, UCR Madrigal, and Group 409 Concerts. Special publicity and presentational arrangements were also made by this group. MUSIC COMMISSION - R. Susan Goldstein, Chuck Selin ichairmani, Roberta King, Carmen Cannicott, Barbara Smith, Helen Gant, David Lenhardt. Not pictured: Mike Doty, Terry Shoop. Against the psychedelic background, members of the Quicksilver Messenger Service lose themselves in one of their lengthy numbers. SOCIAL COMMITTEE - Front row: Steven Stickney, Steve Krieger, Don French, Don Dawson. Second row: Nancy Hutchinson, Ken Lopez, Missy Fuhr. Third row: Stuart Gordon, Mike Powers lchairmani, Mark Thistlethwaite, Norm Shaskey, Mike Brinkman, John Tatum. Jan Musicer Chairman ASIA -- Jean Millenaar Gall Uota and Judy Anderson lchairmanl ASIA Gnoup Gathens llmqentlp facts As the official fact-finders for Leg Council, the Associated Students' Information Agency wrote letters, conducted surveys and checked its files in an attempt to answer queries. Topics ranged from the activities of ombudsmen in Sacramento to past stands taken by the Academic Senate. The committee's record-keeping responsibilities included indexing each El Gaucho for content, maintaining minutes for Leg Council meetings, reports on student activities, and the various legal and financial records of the Associated Students. Although a little known fact, the services of this committee are avail- able to any student who has a question about almost anything. lVlany of the articles appearing in EI Gaucho are both the products of, and sources for, the ASIA files. Each Gaucho goes into the file, which is kept crammed with Leg Council minutes and reports of various student activities which have taken place during the past school years. M -.yew 'E , , . jf' "T ', ll' 1' '-- 3? llljl if l Ari. ,A :lv ' .a . 'fr gd ' mx ,.-f-f- - u.j.'Lf' --'5,. lf Y z sw . i .,f A '- V-gY'f'4w:--' K, 'iffgul 9,8 fb, s 'ab gi in-N . :gil-1.4 'gf' gh, I ,LM '.A-ff t, 51,15 'A MZ.-g 'f'?j,s..F'T'1 ffkes-L -. -- "K, -' 434-, T --Q,-Q -, - ,-f, , v ' . , 2, fL1diFjL 5fs1P'.4-,i L gf. , "ggi . ' ' kiiiff ,' I E, - an if, 351, -1 i'2l',.J,Qa gwym. 4, --.4 ' unfi ss ,,g.,,,. A- 5, LJ-5 5: 'f-.iff 'ff ,S -.. V A ,U L. B-1 ..A 1 . ' A gals f4a:,e.f :ll-,Qgg,':i:Bl,l -- .'nl'ai-F' H v D954 ziwkf-5. : 1ff4,.'Z"rw- 'fa L 'N,1V'Q." ,l I fmt' 2 , 'ggi - QL'-ag' .2-?.,,4..at S. .,,l 315-'iii Effie- 2 F1 -' .fx , f'l',.-Q.-41 5 L -g , ig lwgsfka-7 .Q s , , g 9 any - 'f A, .eggs my Q., , . 1 .Ls 53 ' .Q 15 if 'frm' l --l x Vice-Chancellor Buchanan and Sharon Hann award pen sets to William Jurewitz, Don Carson and AWARDS COMMITTEE li' I Qiizll - 2 ol. IJ- Peter Morin for high scholastic made at the annual AS scholarship achievement in their respective luncheon, held during first quarter. classes. The above presentation was Stuoent ACCOlAO6S CGl.6Bl2AlI6O During fall quarter, the major event for the Awards Committee, in addition to mailing Dean's List certifi- cates, was the annual scholarship luncheon, honoring those students, who had maintained the highest grade point level in their class. Spring quarter, the committee members spent all their energy organ- izing the annual AS Awards banquet, held in May to honor outstanding student participation. 'C-Tr' A-. A WA R DS COM- MITTEE - Troy Kirkpatrick, Sharon Hann fchairmanl, Craig Parker, L ynette Gonzales, Carolyn Bell. STUDENT TRAVEL BUREAU 'assists' Run the Qamut fnom loentlty Canes to Counseling Although the Student Travel com- mittee undervvent a "liberation" from their office in February which temporarily disrupted their activities, they were soon back to work in a new location. Besides accommodating students with two charter flight schedules, the group branched out into the supply of student identity cards, Eurail passes, tours, and counseling on how to get along in foreign lands. Bob Helwick, in charge of Univer- sity Charter Flights, and Mike Good- rich and Holly Heflin, with National Student Travel Association, took a personal interest in their customers, on occasion arriving at the airport to answer last minute questions and make sure all accommodations were satisfactory. Notwithstanding chronic complainers, customers were pleased. STUDENT TRAVEL - Bob Helwick, Holly Heflin, Mike Goodrich. ' ' - 1' 1 l 2251352 fmt, .,... . ., Eg W -W K l l ., Ti as .A ELECTION COMMITTEE Onqamzeo votmq key to Success The actual polling is the responsibility of volunteers from various campus service groups, but the A.S. elections entail a myriad of administrative problems. The burden of organizing polling places and counting ballots, a tight security job, falls to the A.S. Elections Committee. Only two major elections consumed the committee's time this year: Frosh elections in the fall and A.S. elections in spring. ELECTIONS COMMITTEE - Melanye Moon, Kathy Hamilton lchairmanl, Jane Conway, Roberta Rohit ?? l 1 UCEN ACTIVITIES, FACILITIES jazz ano flicks OIIIIGRGO Weekly Working with a limited budget and a frustrating anonymity, as well as the advent of the New Free University, the UCen Activities and Facilities Com- mittee nevertheless managed to set some precedents for future UCSB traditions. Programming activities on a regular basis yielded such popular events as Jazz Night and Flick Night. Both student and faculty art shows lent a freer atmosphere to the Center. Fall Open House, the Post Bonfire Dance at Homecoming, and a dance celebrating UCSB's 25th anniversary were also held. Learning from their experiences of the year, the committee wishes to have the UCen implement cultural, social, and recreational programs, while the members concentrate on evaluating the existing facilities and services. This familiar scene at the air terminal ticket counter is one of the headaches relieved by the counseling and information dispensed to students with a wanderlust by the Travel Committee. UCEN ACTIVITIES AND FACILITIES COM- MITTEE - Nancy Ogden, Debbie Stanton, Nancy Aschenbrener, John Carroll ladvisorl, Chris Knowles, Donna Thomas, Ruth Campbell, Lynda Hedden lchairmanl. UUIVERSII AIIIIAIRS BOARO l BQ pcac, Blacks 'DAX m6mB6l2S Two major issues came to the attention of the Intercollegiate Athletic Commission this year. Brought to a head by the irate petition of several black athletes, the problems of ethnic minorities in inter-collegiate athletics became an acute controversy. lt was decided to establish and reaffirm policies to provide these athletes with an opportunity for closer contact with coaches and adminis- trators, and to encourage them to voice their opinions and recom- mendations concerning the athletic policy. The Pacific Coast Athletic Association, which officially commenced operations in lVlarch 1969, also provided an avenue for discussion. The commission had to study the advantages of UCSB's participation in this seven-team, thirteen-sport league. An advisor to the Chancellor, and policy-makers for athletic administration, the l.A.C. was taxed to its limits. Former Coach of the Year Jack Curtice takes time out from practice to discuss a play with his son, Jim. Coach Curtice is also a member of l.A.C. and chairman of the Rules Committee for the Football Coaches Association. l.A.C. - Front row: Orville Sandall, Miss Barbara Deutsch, Hay Varley, Dan VWnton, Mrs. Beverly Farr, Stefan Krayk, Stephen Goodspeed, David Gold. Second row: Jim Cherry, Jack Curtice, George Smith, Andy Everest, Don Bernstein, Robert Lorden, Arthur Gallon, Mike McAlpine fchairmani. iii: "' T ff - fm Q I K , fm fifx 5' as 'Q C . 15, r . . sn, .. X, V . .EmfQ 1 if Q aft fv LSL' QA ' f- -gif-' 4.19 S AY . UNIVERSITY DAY vlsitoizs given the Gizano touiz Beginning at 9 a.m. on a Saturday in mid-October approximately 2,000 prospective students, parents, and counselors flooded the campus for UCSB's annual University Day. For our guests the day included tours of the campus and a chance to discuss questions on such matters as housing, scholarships, admission requirements and extracurricular activities. For those involved with the actual procedure of the day, this and many of those which preceeded it, was a time of frenzied activity. Provisions included the drafting of over 400 student guides, as well as both students and faculty to man each of the information tables. Throughout the planning of the day an effort was made to maintain the school's repu- tation for friendliness. Capping the day's events was a pillow concert in Robertson's Gym featuring the Four Tops, backed by the West Coast Motown Orchestra. SYMPOSIUM COM M ITTEE Bamzlens tumele With Discussion Symposium Committee describes its work as an attempt to break down communication barriers which often exist between students, faculty, and administrators. The realization of their efforts occurs at Ranch Oso, a dude ranch in the Santa Ynez Valley, in the spirit of interaction which is created by informal discussion and 22 continuous hours together. The primary function of the Committee is the selection of the 35 students and 15 faculty members to attend each symposia, with priority for those who have not previously attended one. SYMPOSIUM COMMITTEE - Front row: Gail Baldelli, Jeanne Herrick, Jeanne Stevens, Jaan Parker, Merri Manion, Patty Pickle, Gail Armetta lchairmanl, Bobby Parlick, Dick Comstock, Fran Hutchinson. Second row: Doug Pittman, Ron Kauffman, Chris Wing, Nancy Rowe. 222 i U UN,- nsmsrmxrnm FRSITX T 'lllkfii After countless hours of organization and planning, finding groups to man the tables and act as guides, University Day finally happened, much to the delight of visiting students and parents who were treated to the red carpet welcome by the campus community. l K if ' 7'5" , ' ww m e-do it - ,M me M Y , ki? 5,32 ' v- ' NU. f,-wg . 7 5' X' wa? T T ff55f'c 5 ' QQ if 'ia , E-fl Sidi ,'T254f" f:s 'Q 1 vfn 'lf i P 125.54 gf -4, 'i - J W EL .45 55 .- tk.: ith- -"' ' .' ,form X Linda Korher University Day Chairman LIBRARY COMMITTEE DOIICV UDRAVGIGO By UGWSLGTZTIGR ln an attempt to inform students con- cerning the activities of the Associated Students Library Committee, and to keep them up to date on library pro- cedure, the committee initiated a quarterly newsletter entitled The Stack Strikes Back. As a member of the University Affairs Board, the committee acts as a liaison between the library adminis- tration and the student body. Their biggest task is conveying student requests and suggestions regarding the library facilities and materials, although they also meet in committee to discuss their own recommendations. LIBRARY COMMITTEE - Debbie Mount, Mr. J. Johnson ladvisorl, Marcia Maxwell. "1v -F-ww All T V " 7 'f'- -' 'fr' "" ' ' V -'..' " ' ' '7 1' ' W Y 'f N1-L' 'TTT "' "- .-.T ' -M V. 4-7 e'.t 2' Av' -- 'T ,' . Q ..,-1fi."-21F-- -'il'- 1, " ' ,,' 'I ". . ' 32.1 -A X5 'T' 1 T nj: ' 394 ' if r .J " ,Milf Vi -- ...::...,li . ii. my 1' Lag " " 5 wig? M . "-it A, t wx n'gF',-as ,si 'I "W' ' I-xl ' Q sgf,-J: Ll'-"Q, l iw its MT., 1 ,Ni X W in J.. ' . . 1' f 5- Mm ft. ' '- , Aj "2-.i"""' - 4 "psnin.-figs... 5 Q C' ' 1 4... .,. .' any 1 it XS-A' i-4.5. ,' ggi, a V iff?-'T ' , ww- .. . I ki ant-. fsQgf4f, ' ,AQ sr '93 F. . .,. ', ' ' .4 -A "'k I-fs" . MF. '34 "",'-1 ,-': L' "'f""L"' A ". " X"-fd' -' '. . -. - ' T ','- ' -'UF ' s ' ' ' 4. 'A . f- -f ml"?::5. 'LN' . ' . . --,V ,Q 4, . W, w- , ' ' "H 'f' Q, I. . " 4' .r H, ',',. I . E -fl A.--5 T . 4- i 4 AJ 9 , . - 1 'i- jl- ff i+l'2i'H'IIt ' ' ' - ' " 1 it . ' 1 ' " is F v F- 'il T get . ' M' 8 u . . N gk LE 3 2 n ,' tv- ll -4 5 ' , 1 .r .- gtoh. . . ' 25.1.21 -Erik Part of Frosh Camp was spent in sand-and- surf recreation. "Three lVlan Tag" and relay FROSH CAMP STAFF - Front row: Jill McCaffery, Norma Miller, .loan Hoffman, Beverly Wanter, Bonnie Campbell. Second row: Stove Turner, Lynne Hoefar, Vera Mae Walsh, Renata Farber, Nenita Ponce, .Bm Andrews. Third row: Rod Wilkerson, Warren Silverberg lamistant directorl, Saul Voyen, Rich Mandel, Fred Holden, om Morlan. Fourth row: Cynthia Poindexter fassistpnr directorl, Vonnil Prewett fdirectorl. Clad in grubbies, a few of the 1,500 Frosh Campers head with their recreation group, the "Piranhas," toward the beach for organized com- petitive activities. Standing by a beach-bound vehicle, a staffer guards bags of water balloons which the campers will be throwing to and at one another. races were reminiscent of childhood, but drinkless version of the collegiate game, the group in the foreground are playing a "Thumper," FROSH CAMP Gvenyone kept Busy In the fall, the get-acquainted marathon called Frosh Camp hosted 1,500 freshmen to a round of faculty speeches, closed circuit faculty discussions, a picnic and a talent assembly, to name but a few of the activities. For the first time, counselors recruited faculty members to be their advisors. Plans are in the making for another fun th ree days next fall. iv-'fzf Scheduled by OCB, the Ceramics Christiansen, and Arts Committee Center opened in January under the head, Sally Weller. guidance of instructor Kim JUDICIAL BOARD: Tim Donovan, Kent Alm lChairmanl, Judy Epstein, Sean Webb, Phil Fisher. JUDICIAL nonth hall Decision Inmates Busy yealz As a source of original jurisdiction in serious disciplinary matters, A.S. Judicial made news in October when they recommended "suspended suspensions" for the North Hall captivators. Directed by Kent Alm, the various committees also serve as an advisory body to the Dean of Students, and ultimately to the Chancellor. ORGANIZATIONS COORDINATING BOARD Campus Coonomatolz ls 'whene lt's at' As the official clearing house for all A.S. and A.S.-sanctioned events, OCB aids student groups in the planning and running of events. The Board schedules dates and rooms, orders films, and prints a weekly schedule of planned meetings and events. Currently headed by Brad Ginder, Organizations Coordinating Board is a joint Chancellors' and Associated Students committee. OCB: Margaret Pruette, Brad Ginder lChairmanl, John Cross, Dean Ellen E. Bowers, Ron Kauf- man, Bill Bragg, Tracy Huggies, Joan Reetz. COMMUNICATIONS BOARD move thmlls meola. Communications Board's initial year of operation was highlighted by the Board's involvement in managing the 31.2 million Thomas M. Storke Student Publications Building and Tower which opened in May. The new Communications constitution written last year overhauled the structure and responsibilities of the Board. This year it was accountable for the handling of a S200,000 budget for its media and staffs. An economical move was taken by the Board when it approved a revised 5-year El Gaucho printing contract. General guidelines for the media were evolved from preliminary suggestions and a basic draft, through committee changes, additions and deletions, and finally, approval by the Board. Adviser of the award-winning El Gaucho, La Cumbre, and KCSB, as well as the minor publications, AS Communications Director Joe Kovach has also energetically overseen the opening and operation of theThomas Storke Student Publications Building. Front rowz, Joe K ovach, AS Communications Director,' Kay Goddard, Dean of Students: George Obern, Administrative Rep,' Karen Feinstein, La-Cumbre Editor: Jim Ashlock, AS Administrative Vice-president: Sally Weller, Communications Rep-at-Large: Duane Garrett, Leg Council Rep,' Nancy Scagliotti, Undergraduate-at-Large. Second row: Dr. John Moore, Faculty Rep,' Donn Bernstein, Sports information Directar,' Steve Tabor, Communications Board Chairmanf John Walker, Activities Calendar Editor,' Michael Bloom, K CSB General Manager: Bob Lorden, AS Executive Director: Ross Robins, Undergrauate-at-Large: Jim Bertinger, El Gaucho Editor: Rich Zeiger, Communications Rep-at-Large. Gayle Kerr, Advertising lVlanager, and Connie Porter, John Walker Assistant to the Advertising Manager. HUSTLE RS' HANDBOOK lnoex SOIO GARIY -Although somewhat hampered by the Black Student Union take-over of North HaII's computer center, the Hustlers' Handbook still managed to make its appearance one week earlier than last year's version. Compiled by Wayne Flascati, with the cover design by Gayle Kerr, the student directory includes names, addresses, and phone numbers for the entire faculty and student body. Calendar Editor ACTIVITIES CALENDAR photos Oeplct love ln an effort to amplify the theme "Let there be light-Let there be Iove," John Walker, creator of this year's Activities Calendar, paired appropriate quotes with mood shots of students in attractive local surroundings. The calendar went on sale in the bookstore, and was included in the limited distribution of the packets compiled for incoming freshmen. G AU CH O G U ID E release of the Hustlers' Handbook QASCAU GOIIIS Book Produced by the Associated Students under the Editorship of Wayne Rascati this year s eighty-page Gaucho Guide made liberal use of photographs in its introduction to UCSB The phrase "a picture is worth a thousand words proved attractively accurate in Rascati s portrayal of the many facets of University life at Santa Barbara's "natural wonder campus The man responsible for ease of communication between students, and a healthy indoctrination of newcomers, Wayne Rascati smiles complacently upon the completion of his Gaucho Guide and the early ELGAUCHO tense yean plaques' meolum ln the traditional style of col- lege journalism, El Gaucho staff members began the year with the intention of working a little and playing a lot. Their schedule was curtailed, how- ever, with quotes from Black Panther Eldridge Cleaver, new flare-ups at the Berkeley cam- pus, and the October occupa- tion of North Hall by several members of the Black Student Union. With just enough time for the staff to catch its collective breath, the election-onslaught began, heralded by two special VIEW sections, and a scream- ing-red front page announcing the closely contested results. Two new sections made their debut this fall: the afore- mentioned VIEW and the weekly Calendar. VIEW, an indepth examination of issues relevant to the campus, studied such varied fields as the newly created Joint Isla Vista Effort, the perennial whipping boy ROTC, and the Peace Corps. Highlighting the year was the upset 21-14 victory of the Communications squad, coached by EG Sports Editor Lee Nlargulies, over the Leg Council Lechers. The media men moved up to a comfort- able lead in the annual Beer Bowl contests with three vic- tories against only one loss. Frivolity notwithstanding, Editor Jim Bettinger and his staff concentrated on pro- ducing a professional quality newspaper. Aided by the addition of an extra press for larger issues, a faster composi- tor with a larger, more readable type and the return of several seasoned veterans, EG came closer than ever to its goal. Jim Bettinger Editor f p 1,",,,-1,2 i'Yw l . 779 impending deadlines catch EI Gaucho staff members Julie Hoff, and Anne Crawford in an atmosphere of ', , Q, fi .eg . . we W ll we we 'X Q John Rethorst Editorial Editor Anne Crawford Copy Editor Lee Margulies Sports Editor Marilyn Senese Fall Calendar Editor Steve R iede Head Photographer Don "The Printer" Hill Dnessulzes of Carly Oeaolme Spank GG Gffonts ,nn SPORTS WRITE RS-Clay Kallam, Gerry Neece, Lin Loring. PHOTOGRAPHERS' ASSISTANTS-Chuck Markham, Thom MacDonald, Roger Hagie. 1. ff' V , Reduced to the lowly position of copy-boy and mail some of his precious authority to the editorial staff clerk, EI Gaucho Editor Jim Bettinger parcels out after the early morning "mail calI." STAFF WRITERS-Front row: Denise Kessler, Ann Henry. Second row: John Hankins, Peggy Burnside, Ruth Brinton, Larry Boggs. P RO D UCTION ASSISTANTS-Karen Fors, Linda DeJong, Joanne Jemmott, Vivian Stanton, Leslye Sherman, Alicia Beydler, Julie Hoff Kathy Peterson. ! Michael Bloom General Manager il z,J".,-,, 'L . ' ,mf 'A 1 M:- , ' rf-1 - ' ' M1 Cy Godfrey George Wood information Director Public Affairs Coordinator KCSB-FM KCSB Gains mone llstenens, amtlme Highlighting KCSB's eighth year of operation was expansion both in range of transmission and in the length of the broadcasting year. Relocation of the station's FIVI transmitter and a change in frequency facilitated recep- tion in Santa Barbara and the Goleta Valley, as well as providing an AM wavelength for on-campus dorms. The extension of its listen- ing audience proved a major impetus in KCSB's successful bid for a fourth quarter schedule, which was put into operation in the summer of 1968. Under the organizational genius of station manager Nlike Bloom, the Santa Barbara media became a founder for the Pacific College Radio Network. With 45 campuses in three western states participating, the PCRN provided a strong link for more comprehen- sive coverage during KCSB's broadcast of the November general elections. ln a long-standing tradition of including something for everyone, the range of air-time offerings again ran the gamut from C.A. Williams soul to Beethoven. ' Ed Brehm, Assistant Manager, and Jani Shibata, Secretary Tim Owens, Program Director of KCSB, confers with Wide Belt Coordinator Jim Price on the interest generated by the radio station during University Day. Tim Owens Program Director 'iii 'P .,. u. ,..f '4 ' ' ""X, f ,v R: f --11 xi '1 Roger Smith Publicity Director fie- ll - Rod Fivelstad Axlstant Program Director news Staff Shines On election mqht X ,sm 4 i2 i ,- - K 2 -2 , . w I i 3 1 -ff. ' -im Hi H: my 2 ,- ri H - fff- ' , , 1 145242 'fn ,,.., A , 2, W2 A ,sw , i ,, wg 24 . 'Q , ,, . - w J - Q wa. , ,. 2 r 2224222122 W. Nr 2 H--, .v ,W X ,w,.r.,g,U J, ,r,,:,gg , , ,, Y 71 -43'-' ff 'WEE Steve Sellman -1,- Chief Engineer .IL 27' 4 Jim Price Music Coodinator fR'f'W2,A, Fred Granlu nd Music Coordinator ,f Q . ,.- ,, 2 5 Y Z firm-fu l i . - E 1 F ' 4 73 T J: , K Q ., , ' Ii Fig ' 5 W if U 1 ., , "" 'H' me -5 st Q 1 'W 9 ,. If 5 Reflecting the tension of the evening, Kathy Stulla, Kathleen Muleady and Steve Taber combine their talents in KCSB-FM's live election coverage on November 5, 1968. Local results were broadcast from the County Admin- istration Building ancl local candidates' headquarters in Santa Barbara. A man of many talents, KCSB Disc jockey Carey A. Williams, Jr. "gets in the groove" during part of his three and a half hour Thursday night show. The program is divi- ded into the two hour "Something Else Again" and a one and a half hour "Jazz Scene" until 1:30 in the morning. lCan you D-I-G-I-T??l LA CUMBRE 1969 Staff IHSDIRGO By tmple Clzown La Cumbre 1969 had a hard act to follow, for the 1968 annual edited by John Zant garnered the "triple crown" in yearbook production-top ratings from Columbia University, National School Yearbook Association, and Associated Collegiate Press. Picked from a record-breaking 90 appli- cations and led by fourth year staffer Karen Feinstein, the 1969 crew was well-equipped to meet the challenge. Seasoned regulars and a new crop of talent tackled the theme of multi-faceted University involvement ,beyond the campus. Color was spread throughout the 496-page book, highlighted by another spectacular, lithograph cover and spot color, high-contrast division pages. Magazine-like format changes included narrower standard copy columns, the use of bold face in captions, more kickers in the headlines, a larger copy type size, and theme and division copy done in "unjustified" style. These innovations enabled La Cumbre to achieve greater readability and remain a pacesetting yearbook. Karen Feinstein Katie Johnson Editor Managing Editor mr., 4-if ? ,- :wma in wv V' , Gary Pearson Taking a respite from the pressures of a 112-page Photography Editor Qhristrrias deadline, piteher Aprilncatchesllllike unaware, April Coleman in her baby baseball game with Joann and Sunny. University Editor Sunny Mowbray Connie Porter Marjorie Reynolds Layout Editor Copy Editor Copy Editor 1. l ff' E . l l , L , lf' gi .1 .1 5 l ,,. , , ' 1 x, X-, Il' 1 L - A -ff.- - l A 3: Q' x, l . .1 . .1 S9 X , Wi"'w"" 4 V i ' 237 Cvencnowceo quantens mean Ceaolme Oololzums R1 ,LV Sharon Smith Bill Chapman Campus Events Editor Campus Events Editor .ik Q : 1 -, ' V 'y X ' f "xxx ill f'l 5 H'-if w Tina Sloat Joann Gelb Seniors and Academics Editor Seniors and Academics Editor Sharon Hann Greek Editor .JMMQ ASSISTANTS-Patty Pilotte, Ellen Kossyta, Belinda Berry, Jane Wanek, Janie Visa. w wr H 4 l, , W J in na: X 'i ' N 1. ' ' Hu, v. - ' rw ru ,v H 'QELLZEFEF ' F Janet Buickerood Kitty Fiedler RHA Editor Isla Vista Editor E.. l , ,-t..--- -i--- Y 77? -,.-- gif' Margie Gent Wayne Rascati Index Editor Business Manager .I V ASSISTANTS-Sally Weller, Brian Nagin, Jackie Schmidt, Debbie Gertlin, Perri Heinz, Shirley Carnahan. W V N -x ,,,,..Li Jerry Neece Sports Editor '-,fix fs., Mike Wrighi Sports Editor ALPHA PHI OMEGA BGDGIIIIZ WORK Adding a touch of distinction to the brotherhood of Alpha Phi Omega, astronaut James A. Lovell carried the fraternity pin with him on the historic Apollo 8 journey around the moon. Locally, UCSB's Psi Chapter distinguished itself in numerous service projects on several different levels of campus and community life. Winter found the group Mounds of crepe paper and chicken wire confronted Philip Brown and Larry Lewis as they helped in the panamount sponsoring a March of Dimes Blanket Toss at the Santa Clara basketball game. Homecoming involved members in clearing wood at Devereux School to be used for the rally bonfire on campus. Bicycle repairs at La Morada shool for Girls, and a spring picnic for the girls at St. Vincents' provided enjoyment for everyone concerned. Alpha Phi Omega project aimed at cleaning up the house decorations following Homecoming. " 35, 1 Larry Lewis helps evacuate a family during the January floods. The men X- I' ,L 'Y V. , W' 5 2, sell J, K 'n , QW. I T L , H l ,QW l K I 6' U ' IW' pie- ,1 G ass - 'Q . , , 1, VL.. 'Za I, r 3 4' E rf' 2 3 . " Sk X if :. 1 A A n ap,- J' . ' . , . .' . -.i L ,. -sl-ef . .. ' . Lp . ,, " . "' -rf ,. -iq.: H' .ft '. se - slcianmff of A Phi O also worked at filling sand bags during this flood-prone period. 6.5! 9' H ,U D f ff Za if Q L In 4 . 3 I K . fi: --.,l K 1 V 4 I L 15 A .-,L+ " . ' f f' , 1 f f. 1 LQ ' -J ir. .l, l sw 3 A A P . ' ' ' lflhlliam Barker James Baubel Philip Brown Wayne Burton Paul Clark Jeff Cohen Dennis Deck William Greenough Michael Fitzgerald Paul Helman Victor Kamhi Thomas Krider Larry Lewis Robert McCoy Norman Pensky Wayne Rascati John Seidell Otto t'Hooft Raymond Tracy Walter Werner Leslie Williams 1 LQ L ' Wai gg. 5 "wi 13 . 4 - f'fzf-p--f-'P'- ff' i"':2v'2'"1"'Sff5:'f'g'-TT' ' +".": -' ,V f"5fvs,w" f1'f:' Wztfffa' -I ., 7 'L W -- -- rf, '- M-.-? aww, if .Qi .4 V' f-. ff!-f X-:A -' if . iff'-fwf ,H 1,5 , - ,Q ' srfrif3Fi224- rl'-' 5 iiyfifegsfi W' 'ij 27' r 21 'ffaik , ' ,V Q 'S-lf-Q'lifzQ:?iQ?-265 fLhfr1is2vgEf'f?-QC5":- -V ' YQEQ ' ,ffii:Q:'Qi'.?4Q-fgfnkfggffixcw 5 jj'Iggf'1'k5:sivfE??f?g:j44oQgig,-:ff x 5 ' -'C 7,21'11--03..Jff!f'e'!i1yfw1'."'2l:1v-:' ,,f . ' Tqgiq.,-,f-f,'-X-cz? :4':,fi5k'Qg5Pgf1f,H',-.'. ' j ,l'1i,?4"43fs1aZf'v.lk.LW.2141 .. .11 . A 1 H Qiff::.f.-N1 A U M ly ge-4.1 -: Tv .: as -,1',, fiiw, 113 s ga -- 4 .bm .E , , -g , 1 . 4, 4 ,- , ! w, f - , , , ml, :nfl 4, 5.1. 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' ,,', N t 14-xg 1 ,vw f'JX'1 .- f If ' . l f i J 14" 3 ' ' 1 .. S , ' l sgff' 'fsfllligfgiwz . 1-, -' ' 'Mi' ' 'tx -. ,-,' U V qi? t , ,, -li . -'sa-, '5af2'?5?L' Xff' .' ff il ' NQLW-4 i X gf ' FJ' f it ' I' 'P-f , :fp-5 vi: - MM fx ,: ., ' 'v Ji "1 ' - - e 1 Q 4 H AWS Qnoup mARk6O IIOR EXIIHCIIOD By Outoateo QUIGS Breathing its last breath, AWS finally disbanded at the end of Winter quarter. The women's representative group formerly sponsored a tea for all women transfer students in order to acquaint them with the nature of UCSB. ln addition, they sponsored a "Wediquitte" series, in which every angle of wedding planning was investigated, a Lecture series entitled AWS EXECUTIVE BOARD - zswtzsf Q Front row: Gayle Nutter, '- Helen Cooksy, Debbie Mount, .af ll fi "For Women Only," and the glamour contest. Following the statewide AWS con- vention, held at UCSB in January, the executive board decided to terminate AWS because it was not truly representative, and those on the board were actually being represented twice-once as a member of AWS and once as a member of the ji:-H wh ,ut ,.l,j1,,uu.."alg ll 33H14g,Q.l 'gli ' ' group whom they represented to AWS. In addition, AWS' main purpose was to structure and modify the rules regarding the women students of the school. However, this year AWS voted to eliminate the restric- tive rules, and thus killed its main reason for existing. Miss Ellen Bowers, Advisor, V Bobbie Jo Schless, President. Second row: Mary Vail, Jane s ' Yokoyama, Gayle Uota, Carole Evans, Kathy Effertz. CSS C -Ba rba ra Strickland, Secretary and Leg. Council, Mary Vail, Linda Fuselier, Honeybears, Kathi Skinner, Chimes, Tim Weston, Chair- man, Larry Lewis, Alpha Phi Omega, Wayne Rascati, CAB Press Relations Officer, Barbara Bushman, Phrateres, Miss .loan Martell, Advisor. l ,. St CSSC Council UUIIIIGS Stuoent Qlzoups Created by the Dean of Students office, the Coordinated Students Services Council is in its second year as an active organization. The council itself is made up.of representatives from many service groups, honoraries and residence organizations on campus. Among its specific purposes, the council is expected to provide leader- ship training programs for the officers of member organizations, to maintain an information exchange between organizations, and to coordinate larger projects involving several campus organizations. 4 - r. Q 'Q .wif ig, v ,- ,A " Q33 1 Q Q, A :gy 'v 1' W , eff: " , , xy 1 . , A 'N l 'E 4 x 1 i u. 'UPN B 4' A I .. I , xv I X li., , X5 1 41 "3 . T Xi A K H m w' H wr, W XNXLEI ' fm' ' s I 'Lf :ibm X I W M' AL . X . x .2 H 7 ' m - honorary girls wait in line at "Brady's" in Susan Baltes . , Alice Bigham r '- Patricia Burns Barbara Bushman ' - Margo Capetan Barbara Cornell Ax" J Janet Hanson A Eileen Irvine Ice Cream "socializing" the Chimes Isla Vista. This snack fest is a Big-Little usual drudgery of maintaining honorary Sister event which spells the girls from the status grades. CHIMES Seizvlce Gizoup Goes honoizan In the interest of becoming a genu- inely relevant group, Chimes under- went a serious self-examination and re-evaluation in 1968-69. Concen- trating on the girls themselves and what each member gains from the others in lasting'-friendships, Chimes shifted its emphasis from a service to an honorary organization. Improvement of faculty-student relations spurred an initial coffee and discussion hour, while on a more individual level, a sensitivity session, led by Advisor Mrs. Jo Gottsdanker, opened up new vistas in grgup thought and intra-group potentials. Potlucks, picnics, and retreats pro- vided members with more traditional agendas. Continuing another custom, the group honored outstanding 'C"P is .vi ,X -Lv 4 '-'R vm , .X 7 xx--9 Paula Johnston Sandra K uge Nancy Lietz Leslie Messenger Debbie Mount Gina Paulson Laura Rich Jan Roberts Jackie Schmidt .- Susan Simons ' Kathleen Skinner W, Liz Smith ' Margaret Soares Debby Tanaka - Joetta Tenison Jan Vela l..7- women of the quarter. N fl as , S f, I ' t . wk E xl- 6 is 1:3 iii Hr' 'E 6 l 9 Q Claudia Wilcox Sunne Wright " g j M Cynthia Weber ' 1, ,il - S A Nancy Wolyen 7 '-Qfb L' i ' M i' ' -fr CIRCLE K mutual GIIIIQRIZS hasten Results Personal involvement with the dis- advantaged tapped the energy and crea- tivity of Circle K in 1968-69. Using such vehicles as picnics and sing-alongs, members of the UCSB service organi- zation found themselves caught up in a program that brought benefits to both parties involved. Friday nights took on special meaning, as members journeyed to Los Prietos Boys' Camp. Transforming girls' delapidated bicycles into functional vehicles involved a certain mechanical know-how, as well as group dedication. The Wheelchair Games Clinic, again, proved satisfying to all. lVloving on to a more routine level, activities included a fund-raising movie with Spurs and tutoring at Dos Pueblos High School. College Cabin was the scene of one of the purely social moments for Circle K. Football coach Jack Curtice beams midst applause following the speech on "The value of athletics" which he gave at the Circle K installation banquet. Joe Sluga heads the spring board installed January 27 at Bray's. CIRCLE K - Front row: Jim Houghell, Joe Sluga, Rich Randolph, Ed Rochett, Alan Frederick, Fran- cisco Jimenez, Greg DeBow. Second row: Ken Kruger l K iwanis Advisorl, Jim Howe, James Lud- wig, Jeff Fried, Stephen Middlebrook, John Put- tock, Mike Calwell, Greg Sprankling, Bruce Han- sen, Rager Stillman. With the assistance of Scabbard and Blade president Bob Jean and Assemblyman Don MacGiIIivray, Ann Rector attempts to win her Thanksgiving turkey in the annual man MacGiIIivray was Mayor of Santa Turkey Shoot, sponsored by Colonel's Barbara at this time, and supported the Tur Coeds and Scabbard and Blade. Assembly- key Shootas one of the Friends of ROTC. Adria Anderson :':' - Sherrell Ball -' , Catherine Batteen i ' If , Q Loni Bennett 3 -5 Jamey Blair z A Sherry Bracken , I k fl ,. JF? K Q in Judy Brookshire A ' f k Stephanie Brown Q ' , Jan Carter .. 4, Nina Chambers f J! ' ' , Cecile Currier lu 21 A A 1 , ' A ' 7 Donna Darrow Q f V y y Nj: 47 ,ff r - I 1 V A - n fl f-Qs H Pam Deming N J Diane Derian I, V L T T -les : i- Jaclyn Dewey " A 'lf ' Christine Engquist X , . ' N i - Gloria Ewig W fag' --- my y 1 Shirley Frantz 1, ' wg Jan Fritz ' '-. 3 "" i' 9 Y Nancy Hatch V All '., N' f ' -7 , S "' -, Laurel Herbert ' ' 1' - - in V. 'Y ,A Susan Huntoon I X ' ' ng' , E Peggy Jerome - 1 ' -"" 1 i V , V, ' " 1 ' ' Patricia Jones , ii. ,..2 1 f If "1 ' Ll ti 'X T is T11 W L X COLONEL'S COEDS St.. Vincent's Gnarls AlO60,Il1I2k6yS ShO1I Originating as an auxiliary of ROTC, Colonel's Coeds have branched out into community service in the past few years. St. Vincent's School is the pet charity. Aside from weekly tutoring,-the Coeds also plan trips, movies, and parties for the girls at the school. Money-raising projects for ROTC this year included a pot-luck dinner in l.V. and the annual Turkey Shoot, supported by the newly formed Friends of ROTC in Santa Barbara. ln reward for their labors, the Coeds were honored guests at the Military Ball held in April. Two other services of the group included ushering at football games and swim meets and selling Valentine Choners as a follow-up to last year's "Easter Cheer" Choners. if T Gag -Nl .... , H ag.. ,. 4 F5 3 tl- af Sue Kalinske Pearl Kaneshige Dana Lane Betsy MacLaren Modeling the "Love and Peace" choners they sold for Valentine's Day are: lkneelingl Shirley Frantz, Loni Bennett, Sharon Ready, lstandingl Ann Rector, Betsy MacLaren, Lynn Griffith, Major Ronald Griffith, Dorothy Neilson, Mary Ann Zaninovich, Georgia Thomas and Cecile Currier. Susie Merry f.-w"'., 'fr- Anita Misbach Dorothy Neilson Tina New Deryl Pratt Mary Pritchard Robyn Raiter Sharon Ready Ann Rector Melinda Rogers Elizabeth Huliffson Lynn Scarlett as gl 5 , . ., , 35 ,lg W.-'1-.xi : Ffh - l W , ll gf ' l -n. ll 1 in w 1 5, f if if ' .r 1, l in 5-4 we -ff 3 W T T T ' I E gzgg 'A-'ra5:l4!j" .,f t 4 5,l.l v lisvlifig? r-apnea 1 . 'll A, gsrrlfirg, figs? aaa lms..,:, .awe Nora Siu tzky fe et Pat Stampley . Pamela Stegen Steph Sten Penne Thacher 4 ,ml 5 , ,aa r as 2 we , Mila 3"-Si . a nf' Georgia Thomas 'ex Patricia Van Dam has Cayley White Margie VWlliams Teresa Williams Janice Younger Mary Ann Zaninovich Y 5 . o if A 1 Q . -.ax 1' QA.: '-5:32, .fi -. 1 rl 1 Y a in f - r' f 'H z .. vp S 'F r v v 0 If . ' gx ' 63" 'vw 4 jiff' A ,V i'-f-.EVE r ff 1 Y F f m If , H If F ,Q 4 i M,-. 1 lj' a ,L il . ' , XV '-wxlf v v A yi ig Q . fif' qi .. HONEYBEARS As an official hostess to visiting high school students, Linda Morse puts into practice tactics dis- cussed at the group's weekly meetings. hostesses exhnsit Chalzm at All events As campus guides to weary tourists, awe struck high school prospects, and newly arrived EOP students, Honeybears unwittingly developed a very effective exercise program for their girls this year. The hostess group not only provided a warm welcome for those unfamiliar with UCSB, but served as our ladies-of-state at all athletic events. Closer to home, the girls held a picnic during the spring quarter with Howdvbears, 185 and started their membership drive for next year. A point system was devised, based on the principle of bestowing accolades upon the hardest workers, while at the same time weed- ing out those who do not contribute their share of service to the group. While the new, official Honeybear tee-shirts adorned most of the girls, Libby Fraim was being selected Glamour Girl. Kathy McEntee Carla Meinel Linda Morse 'FL H' NP' W fa ,, Fr I f rf f-'R -Qffl ' 'I '-es., f 'fs l T fr 41 Judy Parker Carol Peterson -F' Vidda Quan M, , . . is ' ' " Sally Reynolds ' Jan Roberts V Regina Stewart f J -- Sally Stires Alex Tuck Mary Vail 'L . I . X, ,.,. . Jan Vernon Nancy Walls Peggy White Claudia Wilcox Ileene Wolf Maryann Zaninovich CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION Cuttune pontnayeo Oumng China Week In its first year at UCSB, the Chinese Students' Association lived up to its objectives of promoting friendly association among Chinese Students and acquainting the community with their culture. Fall quarter featured a get-acquainted banquet, and a pot-luck dinner, while Winter Quarter was highlighted by the events of China Week, in which Chinese culture was focused upon. During Spring quarter, the students went camping, and sponsored a movie and orches- tra to raise scholarship money. OFFICE RS, left to right: Raymond Yu, Attache, Johnny Ng, Vice President, Mary Moy, Secretary, Hok Pui Leung, Treasurer, Gaston Chan, President. CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSO- CIATION - Front row: Margo Tam, Noreen Chen, Mary Moy, Raymond Yu, Elsie Wong, Judy Lai-er, May Lam, Hok Pui Leung. Second row: Brenda Hee, Ching Kee Pah, Mabel Leung, Yu Chui-Ngan, Raymond Wong, Lillian Lim, Cecilia Lee, Johnny Ng, Yiu- Fai Chan. Third row: Gaston Chan, Dennis Allen, Advisor, Paul Tsoy-Wo Ma, Cheh Shiung Lu, Han Shan Chung, George Liu, Lai-to Lee, Bernard Chan, Yumon K wack, Chung-tin Chow. ff-' ' ' " ' ' I -' ii if ifE?fE?iwl'1 ,V - - . , V .N . --.si A China Week afforded Chinese students Bernard Chan hold, while Raymond a chance to demonstrate their ethnic Yu breaks a board with a Kung-Fu arts. Here, Raymond Wong and karate chop. F x X . xx W-1-Q N. ':-. 'V - .Q ' 1 ,, K . -'ek . E XJ, - M A 4 if fa " "mn i f-- 2' R -.mfuyf :G I . -.a. , Lf -WV -'I'-A 5gf-' 5 .1 4 If K . t ' H 3" , 2 V 'J '- Nf l 4' 5 . - .5367 f", I .I .., fp: X 1 S I f' Q-li. 1 -VI .r l . , Q ,L SX nur' .1-, i' - -r Q g 1 MHQX , z A x Q' a n 5 S S sf x Q Qiiw N 2 fwL9 , ' V ".,3'5jL P145 yd 'V ' 'rg Tiilff :'., . 4 ..4-. ,sh F'7 k H .v 41 , , ,- X.- 4 'f 1 Q 21, 5-55527 X-: Yr i V fi-11 i. - V fl-f A, l My fi g A Q ' 'Sa a t M M 'fjffsi d fd' , iq -fm.. 'V .X J l - TY' . ' 4' A tt , A Q T Tikes? ' . rf j k Q5 ,.,,. .::1,V.,., , Randy Crimmel ,R as , l 'dk ur: ,-- '17 Phil Fisher Andrea Heath Melinda Mathison Greg Misbach Steve Murata Dian Smith Digging beneath the obvious differences in culture and background, Randy Crimmel, Mindy Mathisen, and Andrea Heath each single out a Pakistani student and dis- cover the universal ualit , 1 'Q h.. s' a 'S fa v S f' of human understanding. . if At this school in Dacca, as well as many others across the tiny country they visited, Project members were able to converse at informal teas with their Pakistani counterparts. i"',Q PROJECT PAKISTAN team of Seven Gneeteo Wanmly Interaction with the people of Pakistan was the primary means of extending good will and friendship for the seven- man Project Pakistan team and the advisor, William Prescott. Enhancing the intellectual and emotional under- standing of the Pakistanis, the summer experience also hastened the awareness of the impact that the American culture has made abroad. Under the auspices of the University Religious Conference, and subsidized by the State Department and A.S. government, selection to the program climaxed an arduous winter of training sessions. Having visited West and East Pakis- tan, the latter in the after-math of severe flooding, the 1968 team was struck by the overwhelming warmth of their hosts. Also, they encountered the concepts of extended family and village loyalties, which are unlike anything they had known in the United States. The team discovered that beneath every cultural facade lies a universal reservoir of understanding. Dian Smith lends a hand in clearing ground at the Lallmatia College for Women.- Lallmatia was one of the Pakistani schools at which team members worked in projects. -4 -as .n .. .sas 4 , :fr -I Q, , . -:-sz... . .:. LI George Antonaros Bill Bragg 1 La Peter Clarke Jeff Jorgensen , 1 -aw ,..,,..,,l ' i55'ff?f1i9ll22 +A- Q. Qiluiis. f -X, Qi' 1' S-H Q , ,kg Outdoor marketplaces are common in the country of Nepal. Above, in the streets of Kathmandu, housewives do their daily shopping. To the left, a Nepalese is taking part in the Festival of the Cow, which happens once a year. The woman's headress is ornamented with a cow's face, which she is wearing out of respect for a member of her family who has died. PROJECT NEPAL ASIAN EXPERIENCE GXDOSES CUl1ll1l2E For three months last summer the four hardy members of the Project Nepal team braved the elements of the East, and returned much richer in experience and understanding of the Nepalese people and culture. A first trip to Asia sometimes shocks westerners, but the Project team gained more than a surface glimpse of conditions. The leper colony they visited painted a graphic picture of the ravages of that disease, but also provided an incite into the life-loving courage shown by the afflicted. A visit to the Red Chinese Embassy pointed up the tensions existing between that country and ours: but, for the most part, as stated by a member, the team "spent a lot of time enjoying Nepal, talking with people, visiting their temples, and getting used to the 150 inches of rain that falls during the June-to-August monsoon." 41 'Y'-.4 T-P' 1 Following one of the Crew Team's early Sue Barbour and Jan Inman fulfill their morning workouts, Shell and Oar members duties of supporting crew, with presenta- Margie Altmann .lan Anderson Susan Barbour Barbara Bowen Trudy Bo yer Leslie Bruhn Kathy Burk Bobbie Cale Susan Cresto Laurie Detloff Marcia Dickeman Nancy Drach Linda Eggers Elaine Ekberg Katherine Fiedler Mary Jane Fisher Diane Fleischli Tricia Greschner Patricia Griset Nancy Hartmann Julie Henderson Laurie Hirshberg Janis Inman Beverly Jonas .N AS w , tx: ' , X fi ' Y' we 'I in 1 'i , glsd . gi ggi . X 31' , VA Q- ,X A-4 K ,lib 1 ef ri- - ,. 2 A y . , .4 ff, anim ,ar If -4 I U . ,,-4 .1 .f fr 4 if ,. i 1 . J B - J W ' V 'A K Gal! . - , B , , .2 ' 4- "" it 1, 1 we D -6-ru 3 i .9 - vw tions of fresh fruit to Bob Deliema, Tom , 4' :M ,ar SHELLAND OAR Blue Chip llunomo eanns new Shells As the auxiliary to the Crew team, Shell and Oar's primary functions naturally center around Crew and Lake Cachuma. The girls travel with the team to meets and act as official hostesses at the home meets and regattas. This year Shell and Oar was also asked to senle as hostesses for the Doctors Convention in the fall. The Blue Chip fund raising drive proved a triumph for the girls, allowing the acquisition of two new four man shells for the team, with money left for a trip to Washington should Crew qualify for the Pacific Coast Champion- ships. Kidnap breakfasts were initiated by Crew early in the year and much planning went into Shell and Oar's revenge kidnap breakfast. A big brother-little sister program between Crew and Shell and Oar served to bring members of the groups even closer together. The year closed with the annual Shell and Oar-Crew Banquet. Geared for a rainy day, Bobbie Cole and Linda Ekberg come prepared to help crew dry out after a cold and wet practice at Cachuma. 4: . ,. Kathleen Kelley n N Kathleen K oski 4' 5' ' Karen Krakow M Pamela Long -' . Mary Markytan ff , l fi L gg Q. il? ' A X '-Q 12 -f JenniMcLellan 1 S I K Y . QC.-k A Alice Mattraw Valerie Okuda 0. Janice Palmer Judy Parker Gina Paulson Carol Peterson Six Melinda Rogers Pamela Ross Sue Smith Lindsey Stewart Julaine Sturdevant Barbara Thiele ' Georgia Thomas ' Gail Valpreda la' ga Fran Weems , - Toni Williams 1 Rebecca Yates '. I Maryann Zaninovich X. al lil I SPURS UCSB Campus hosts national Conclave With an eye toward both sewing the com- munity and fostering a spirit of loyalty and friendship among women students, Spurs geared its activities accordingly. Service for the year included working at election tables, acting as tour guides during University Day, ushering at on-campus events and partici- pating in the Gauchitas. gy Group efforts for fun and profit encompassed the sale of bright yellow lVlums at the Homecoming game, and the traditional Spur-O-Gram sale and delivery for Valentines Day. The Spurs undertook the additional responsibility of hosting the national con- vention, but not without the added pleasure of being able to show off the UCSB campus to members of sister chapters from around the country. Winter and spring quarters were busy periods for members of the sophomore women's honorary as the job of reviewing applications and selecting new members became the focus of the girls' attention. Joann Johnson, Linda Bohlinger, and Leslie Jones put the finishing touches on the Spurs' week display in the South Hall showcase. Sherrell Ball ' Elaine Barrett L inda. Bohlinger Cathy Bush Jackie Copple Anne Crawford Betsy Cuddy -Peggy Dager Diane Darian Cathy Edgorly Fran Fullerton Susan Gibbs Rebecca Gray Mary Hamerl y Janet Harrie Julie Henderson Janice Jacinto Lesley Jones Melanie Jones Lois Martin Suzanne Mellard Carol Moonie Janet Rasmussen Carol Rathbun Joann Johnson if ill H5 :K Wi. T- i l. 'l 469 Jeri Rehm x L Melinda Rogers . . . Debra Sherman ,a 3 i I G Martha Strock , I g,,,f ' , A Sylvia Thomson .W A' L' r Diana Weaver ' . , ,sez Marilyn Whiteley " . Sherry Wing SY. ii'-'i scifi ls uf' 1 f- WA 'Sl , ,-ii r ' ml" :L Ag, it -is me J . 5 . fx 'Vi 1 'T' x A Q - i- 4 M' f W Y 5? rig fl SQUIRES - WCRK AIDS Chll.Ol2Gl1 ADO Cancen SOCIGTSV As the sophomore men's honorary on the UCSB campus, Squires directed its activities toward sewing the surrounding communities in '68-'69. Locally, Squires helped the Santa Barbara chapter of the Cancer Society with its display at the Home Show held at the Earl Warren Show-ground during fall quarter. Teaming up with Spurs, the sophomore women's honorary, Squires treated deprived and handicapped children from homes and schools in the area to an afternoon of friend- ship and food. Facing a multitude of questions, Squires President Steve Suehiro pauses before deciding upon final organization of the group's part in spring quarter's open registration. The group was advised by Dale Lauderdale of the Alumni Office. as iisttfi ' ' H u A lx U U ,I Frank Cutler ?!ff'5 Qt me 4 fi. ' I "-r a em- or ft ff',52ff3Qef"'s , aaafi N., "' , is , , ' , ' ' Q Steve Gottlieb gl sux ar- .MAL ef. ' - A ' gt fi Q i M Craig Harelson G -- 4 , 1 Thomas Henderson A ' U fl, 3 5 Steve Kesler 4, ,,..? ,, f f he 11 ., ' , - 5, Norman Melnick -. 1 I - If I X 'l George Pendergast i M Q X g I "' Randall Pereira 4 r rlfhfi r',,' 2 5 V l ft" A " . , ' l gg John Puttock ,V A T " .A , , :ez ' 1" A - l v W l ' 'Alf Donald RedaUe nw ' Ksl 1 .1 f, If , fri' ' Gai eg, , Morris Sirota 'Q fl ' " , ' :gli H "7 f -0, ' ' H Joseph Sluga --l, nagersrillman Y K ttt. i ... il Iii 4 - , Randy Street h , g N L V ff -1 lc 51 4"i'x l , ,, M f BQ ' Steven Suehiro , ' Jim Wakeley V ' Paul Waldau ""' . Richard VWlber , a yr -- K Q L Ja 5 PHRAETERES famous llnienoliness Wonks ln Community Hosting this year's regional conference, Phraeteres enjoyed an unusually heavy agenda. The April 12 convention found members from the six other California local chapters of this international service organi- zation together for the day. ln accordance with their motto "famous for friendIiness," members of the group moved out to senle the community at several different levels. On the campus, Phraetereans proved to be.an indispensible aid in working at open registration. Isla Vista was the scene for the fall quarter trash-in and once again, the local chapter was well represented. Moving over into the political world, the Presidential election, 1968 found Phraeteres members manning election booths. Finally, the girls joined the marchers working for the local Nlarch of Dimes. Aside from such service oriented activities, the group maintained an active social sched- ule, proving that work and play can exist at the same time. Phraeteres President Barbara Bushman tries to review her notes for the forthcoming convention in the midst of pre-meeting chatter. PHFKAETERES - in First row: Judi Painter, Barbara Garrison, Jainie Ta ylor, Barbara Krenek, Janis T u r n e r , Pa m McLean, Gail Klein. S e c o n d r o w z Marjorie Harris, Gail Nutter, Kathi Kosh- ear. Third row: Donna Becker, A n n a Za v ala, Barbara Bushman lpresidentl, Alice Vernon, Pat Loom- is, Mary Alice Sang- uinetti, Susan Stroh- behn. an 4 li. -ti ,M . PJ Luisa- . ,,,,':,y' P '-5 5' . A. ' ' ' iii? 'ff , ,, . , V7 .Lx vi.: V - af ,X If J. nv ,. p ll H .D-l""" .iiw-1-ff, -..----""'d nn. ! . . , Y.. 7 'mg' , bs i VV . . H 1' 'E f . . Z 5 K, 0 i xiii? ,. 5 1- . - I D 1 . - 4 , 5 - 'x , , ' - n . . 1 .. 1 , L , I '4 . 1 A 4 , FLA -fl' '- if Li -ig ' ,'.L'4Mal. X A n 'tx - - ,Q f' 5 I fig., . '- If' ?I"'7- fl Q P r K 1.2, 7 1 lb I u 4 t... A. ':. f 'A il Y - x ' u xx, I L ll V-L 1 -..--. t ' . X . I q - f -X, Q! ,' , V-f lk... ,X .nn- 1 Y . 1 i s i. 1 1- 'v 1' . . I A 2, 59,1 ,., 534 i ek H - 'UV 151 E WWI? 1 , U f z ' .' I fi P 1' ' I ' 5' ' Q I Q fx f 4" f u . 1 4 f n fain El l i , I ,?-1.-. gig 34 - - wgdf' S, ..-A , E 3 1 i ACADEMICS Professors, having as an impor- tant function the presentation of their hard-earned knowledge to eager and open-minded students, are much like conductors of great and small orchestras. Their long years of experience enable them to evoke from their students a higher level of achievement than the students themselves think pos- sible. The ideal professor guides without dictating, encourages with- out demanding, and organizes with- out restraining. He attempts to bring together all the scattered elements of his subject matter to the young minds before him. With the rising disenchantment on college campuses everywhere, the academic goal of many profes- sors today is to loosen the re- quirements for their classes and give students a chance to demon- strate their scholastic ability as well as their creativity. Nlore and more emphasis is being placed on giving students a say in what they learn. In this way the faculty introduces ideas that be- come a basis for further thought and study, without stating their views as unquestionable fact. w r I ! ,, sw Q.: 1' EI, -4' L rv 945' Q ,.. S " I Y 15- J. N T P ff, fr'- +Q ' rw A. ?'zwq - 'J A 2' 'H ,, if -wears-1 ff f -.ggi Ji' . 5 1.5.3 'ag -'n151??5f ' wi Q 4 'fp b , A Q Q WT , . , -4 5 i .W 1 Front row: Charles Wen- dell, Robert Backus, John Waterman, Mary Lynne Freling,Roselinde Konrad, Batya Kedar, Lidia Savenkov, Harry Steinhauer, Clifford Bar- raclough, Burt Seiden- burg. Second row: llWlliam Holtrop, Jules Levin, Mstislav Kostruba, Allen Hanley, Richard . Exner. President Debbie Spruell has worked very diligently to make the newly- formed Spanish Club into one of the cam- pus's most interesting my associations. SPANISHIPORTUGUESE new Counses Spank Spanish lit majon lnstituting an entirely new course list, the Spanish!Portuguese department matched their curriculum changes with the changing times. ln the fall of 1968, a Ph.D. in Spanish literature became available to students at Santa Barbara. While overall faculty size remained fairly constant, two full professors, Jose Luis Aranguren and Arturo Serrano-Plaja, added their distinction to the faculty roster. Also honored this year were David Bary, Alyce G. de Kuehne and Donald L. lVlcGrady, who were recipients of Institute of Humanities awards, and Francisco Yala, a valued depart- mental guest speaker. GERMANXRUSSIAN DROIIESSOI2 S RECEIVE QUGGENHEIITI AWARDS Delving into the problems related to the entire sweep of civilization in Germany and the Soviet Union, the Department of German and Russian sponsored an extremely complex curriculum. Guggengeim Awards and an overseas exchange program went out to members of the faculty in '68-'69, In the only personnel change of the year, Dr. John Waterman, Professor of German, took his place among the departmental ranks. Front row: Marta Gallo, Lissa Staufen- R090 UU. CUFUS Caldwell, AITUFO berg, Patricia Dunselman, Pablo Avila, Margaret Mary Price, Alyce G. deKuegne. Second row: David Bary, Rafael Cornlfo, Serrano-Plaja, Carlos Garcia Barro'n, Enrique de Mon tolin. HUITIAHIIIES E On. mom Completes Six yeans as heao Boasting an increase of 67 majors in the last year, the Art Department entered its sixth year under the chairmanship of Dr. Alfred Nloir. ln addition to taking charge of departmental business, Dr. lVloir published his book, The Italian Followers of Cravaggio, and has the honor of being an Art Historian in Residence at the American Academy located in Rome. Anticipating offering a Ph.D. in the Spring, the department added several new courses on Modern and American Art. Instructor Michael Arntz demonstrates the basic principles of "throwing pot," using his hands to mold the spinning clay. Later, when the clay has partially dried, students ornament its exterior with small utensils, as shown in the photo at left. Front row: David Kuna le, Laszlo W Baranszky-Job, Michael Dvortcsak, Bruce Everett. Second row: Hazel Hedrick, Harvey Yo ung, Herbert Cole, Beatrice Far- well, Sheldon Kagan- ofi Howard Fenton, Gerry Haggerty, Alfred Moir, Pru- dence Myer. Third row: Steven Cort- right, David Gebharzi Michael Arntz, Wil- liam Dole. i Front row: Ben Wallace, Jamshed Mavalwala, Geoffrey Gaherty, Brian Fagan, Claude Warren, Thomas Harding, Elvin Ha tch, William Allen, Manuel Carlos, Elman Service, David Brokensha, Maner ' -. L. Thorpe, Albert C. - Spaulding. . Q.,- .. ANTHROPOLOGY Anthno highlights FOREIGN Cultunes As part of their effort to aid appreci- ation of foreign cultures, the Anthro- pology department co-sponsored the Ghana Dance Ensemble early in the fall. On a more academic level, Pro- fessor James Griffen's lecture on Hope- well Culture and Professor Victor Turner's on the Icelandic Saga were presented to interested students. Boasting 450 departmental majors, the department has had to increase its faculty by four, and has been able to add four courses to the curriculum. The Prehistory of California is of particular importance on this campus. With a graduate degree in this sub- ject, the anthropologist is given access to the teaching profession at all levels, as well as to unlimited fields of research in the study of Man, past and present. Chipping obsidian blocks in the same manner reputedly employed by primitive man, anthropology graduate student Tony Ranere attempts to gain insight into the motor coordination of our ancestors. -Aar- - -7, 3? 5 ' I 1 .. ' 'Q,. Aft.. m I p w,ffS ,W'fS1,Q- A M. . . ,, ., V, .. ,, . 4 I 1. .1 .Rn JZ, 41" R9 ., a , 2: Q Q. .Aw X - X A F A-,' ., w, . NA ,L F S 1 Ang-gk Q if , sg,-f l s X A W. !. I " ' KL 1 If I .lin -we A' 'X , -,. f- - . -, - f 4 ,EAL , 1 - V," . 'Q ' 1 if ' I f. 'f I ,V 9"-'I - fs,-1 .. ' H. I-ff if-if " 4 1: K .lfwa f ' 1. 1 I - 'Mz2,1,gZg::' f' 1 at sl 1 XF 1 I ,,-S' Q .gl ,' Ng f -J V 439' fy , A M: " 1 in , ,- '.L - 6 -- ?'l . 'Q . .-X I " ' ,7 H Y , fi-ffl -, 'C D bs' 1 I Y? if-1 ' E I . Mg ,ga I ., . X, t. iw M , A' --J. " S '-if A . if---. .Af EI: 1. -- MJ W gf- z V . -' L13 V 1 4 Al l Af" Z ' --- ., - -Y , Wag: 5111 Y lg .Q --- 'T ill-'z X -4 . ff ' .fglvvt K wa? . nr :Q -V F IN : , rg, xr' 1 14 V v' N W" W , , - ..w, -, ,.--- . 4 -L f :-'ez...,-x-,..,,.., www-A -1 w ' ' 1 - . ,. .41 ,. ,, ' 1-nv:-" . .- ,:.. ' XQ, A ' -ff, f"i'ffglIk mi 'Z 0. k Eb: ' . 'ni . s-gr-1- : f '-J , , H."-.V .S -'91,-.1 - :Z , MUSIC Dept. up-Oateo By Jazz Sessions For those who view music classes as dull, "long-hair" exercises, the Nlusic department has added a contemporary beat this year with the addition of the History of Jazz and Contemporary Jazz. Training in voice, composing, and instruments is paving the way to professional careers on. stage for many talented music majors. Some have already appeared during singing group tours around the country. Music Unit ll's new theater will facilitate more concerts here at UCSB. Vertical shadows added yet another dimen- sion to the penetrating harmony which Director Maurice Faulkner evokes from the members of the Brass Choir. Christmas music with a modern touch was the theme of the Noon Concert, held this year in the ivy-lined setting of the Music Bowl. Front row: Pieter Van den Toorn, Stefan Krayk, Erno Daniel, Dolores, Hsu, Martin Shapiro, Theodor Gb'Ilner, Ronald Ondrejka. Second row: Ennis Fruhaufj Daniel Lentz, Douglass Green, John Gillespie, Karl Geiringer, Roger Chapman, Dorothy Westra, Michael BRASS CHOIR Livingston, Albert Campbell. Third row: Geoffrey Rutkowski, Maurice Faulkner, Carl Zytawski, Wendell Nelson, Lloyd Browning, Peter Fricker, Roger Grove, Barbara Kinsey, Cutler Fall, Landon Young. XITIAS Show Ul1l1AlTlD6l26C By move A favorite UCSB musical group is The Choir was able to provide an Brass Choir, whose director, Dr. excellent Christmas program in Maurice Faulkner, served also as the spite of the confusion of moving conductor of Clark County Honor Band and Chorus earlier this year. into Music Unit ll. 'il S 5:52 Ml, Y fest H 'H' ' 'i..W,a 1 ml., ' Front row: Michael Livingston, Alyson Nowell, Teresa Rodriguez, Kathleen Belkowski, Sally Butler, Debby Kay, Barbara Smith, Alis Clausen, Susan Yoder, Jeanne Mascovich, Judy Turley, Gloria Tronset, Sharon Stanford, Barbara Romanchak, Barbara Bennett Second row: Robert Rentz, Robert Smith, Terri Trescott, Margaret Thorpe, Sally Stout, Jacqueline Lamer, Becky Thompson, Joanne Margarit, Wanda Windsor, Pat Farr, Linda Stanchfield, Marilee Long, Judy Bender, Hal Conn, Frank Markovich. Third rowt' James Glomb, Gary Smith, Gary Dale Smith, Roger Bradley, James Gilman, Keith Boman, James Colburn, Paul Solomon, Gregory Moore, Charles Selin, Bill Bryan, Mark Shinbrot, James Rodman. CHAMBER SINGERS music masteizy Oazzles Asians Under the direction of Associate Professor of Music Dorothy Westra, the UCSB Chamber Singers enhanced their already illustrious reputation during numerous appear- ances throughout the state. The success of their performances lead to a Far East Asian tour, sponsored by the State Department's cultural exchange. In the eight countries visited throughout the year, the sixteen talented young men and women won critical acclaim for their professional presentation of an unusually beautiful program. The Chamber Singers' repertoire con- tains music covering a range from the twelfth to they twentieth centu- ries, perfected in performances over the ten years the group has been functioning as a singing unit. Front row: Dorothy Westra. Second row: Jane Bishop, Camille Cooley, Vivian Dickerson. Third row: Virginia Coull, Judith Roeser, Judith 0'Dell, Janice Stiles, Suzanne Champ- ion. Fourth row: Richard Compton, Alexander Larkin, James Gilman, Steven Wilson, Edmund Kempruci James Rodman. Fifth row: James Colburn, Gary Brumm. REPERTORY CHORUS Bach Dizoonam lietes Qemlnoen Originally formed as the Nlodern Chorale in 1949, UCSB's Repertory Chorus has grown from a sixteen member unit to a strong force of approximately fifty singers. Director Michael Livingston's group has concentrated this year on a repertoire which includes a wide range of standard choralworks. ln honor of Santa Barbara's Dr. Karl Geiringer, who is an internationally known authority on Bach, the concerts have included a full program of music from the Bach family as well as others. Front row: Helen Gant, Jane Bishop, Sue lfWlliams, Betty VWlson, Beryl Gorzynski, Cynthia Carter, Carol Smallenburg, Terry Shoop, Diane Thurm, Kathy Eloe, Cynthia Weber, Lisa Goodlaw, Naomi Saucida, Priscilla Hendrickson, Angela Sali. Second row: Judy Fontana, Flossie Finnigan, Susan Tarbett, Holly Woods, Carmen Cannico tt, Shannon Ceccarelli, Susan Jones, Patti Wright, Lyndell Johnson, Georgeanne McKellar, Lynn Hoefer, Teddie Lawrence. Third row: Judith Gannaway, Faith Raigel, Elaine Halgren, Lunn Jordan, Kathy Stulla, Jaan Orland, Karen Craner, Pam Zerkle, Betsy Henzie, Bonnie Campbell, Chris Brodie. WOMEN'S GLEE AND DORIAN SINGERS touiz hlqhllqhteo B llmst maomoals Derzfonmance In February, 1969, the UCSB Women's Glee Club began a tour of UC campuses in Northern California. Under the direction of Dorothy Westra, the group of forty hand- chosen girls have toured the entire state of California with great success. They have also appeared frequently with the UCSB Symphony, perform- ing in large choral works by Nlahler, Debussy, Kodaly, and contemporary composers. Forming an auxiliary group known as the Dorian Singers, sixteen Glee Club members spend extra hours each week on a special repertoire. This year they presented the first American performance of Three Madrigals by composer Dobos Kalman. F ront row: Linda Duffendach, Helen Gan t, Priscilla Hendrickson, Carol Smallenburg, Terry Sh oop, Cyn thia W e b e r , L is a Goodlaw, Naomi Sauceda, Dorothy Miss Westra, Second row: Jane Bishop, Sue Williams, Betty Wilson, Beryl Gorzynski, Cynthia Ca r ter, Diane Thurm, Kathy Eloe, Angela Soli. MU PHI EPSILON ITIUSICAI ITIAICS masten mozant At their annual Spring Rush, the girls of the Beta Delta Chapter of Mu Phi Epsilon international music sorority pledged several new members. Pledges are chosen on the basis of scholastic standing and superb musicianship. Mu Phi Epsilon, presided over by Suzanne Lukather, gives receptions for all performing students at UCSB. Their fall recital in Novemberincluded pieces by Haydn, Houle, Mozart, and Schubert. ln addition, the girls sponsored pianist Marian Buck-Lew. UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY yean Spanneo By 5 Concepts Bach, Mendelssohn, Vaughan Williams and Wagner were featured composers in the University Symphony concert last November, one of five excellent concerts given by the group this year. ln January, the orchestra performed in a special inaugural concert at the opening of the New Music Hall. The March concert featured music by Benjamin Britten and Charles Ives. Lillian Steuber, visiting Master teacher, performed a Piano Concerto in E minor by Chopin. UCSB's University Symphony, shown here after one of its five performances this year, has received national acclaim. Taking a bow after a superb perform- ance at the Fall Music Concert in November of this year, director Ronald Ondrejka is undoubtedly well-pleased with the students in his orchestra. Front row: Carol Peterson, Barbara Turner, Cynthia Carter, Ruth Nielson, Dr. Dolores Hsu, Cynde Meyer, Julia Huntsman, Marilee Long, Helen Upton. Second row: Carmen Cannicott, Carol Smallenburg, Sharon Stanford, Suzanne Lukather, Roberta King. ECONOMICS pnofs Gnanteo Reseaizch llunos ln dealing with contemporary social problems, students participating in the department of Economics discovered important dimensions in today's society. Faculty member Walter lVleed was elected president of the Western Economic Association, Professor Lloyd Mercer received a National Science Federation Research grant and James Sullivan was the recipient ofa Regents grant. Front row: Maxwell Pellish, Jerzy Karcz, James .L Sullivan, John Hambor, IM Douglas Morgan, Harold Votey, Mortimer Andron, Mlliam F. Kennedy, John Pippenger, R. Robert Russell, M. Bruce Johnson. Second row: Lloyd Mercer, Robert Weintraub, David Podofi Robert Crouch, Llad Phillips. Drs. Walter Mead and Philip Sorensen discuss their recent study of the economic potential of ocean minerals with department chairman A. P. Alexander. HOME ECONOMICS majoizs examine home pizoslems Contemporary problems involving nutrition, education, money manage- ment, clothing consumption, and social welfare work came under the wings of the Home Economics Depart- ment again this year. Classes went from family relations to baby care. Vocational opportunities for gradu- ates of the department are many. Students are prepared to seek such occupations as dietitians, textiles re- tailers, fashion coordinators and interior designers. Paul Scherer, Frances Tacionis, Frances Halm, Ruth Shook, Evelyn Jones, Lucille Woolsey, Ann Rice, Bessie McNiel, Elea- norMarhewson, Eliz- abeth Maney. Borimir Jordan, David Young, Apostolos Athanassakis, Joseph Margon, L. Purcell Weaver, Keith Aldrich. Merrill Ring, Jan Wheatley, Harry Girvetz, Burleigh Wildins, Alexander Sfesonske, Vlhlliam Forgie, Patrick Nowell-Smith, Francis Dauer, Joseph Ransdell, Jack Barense, Charlotte Stough, June Main, Larry Houlgate, Ronald Hathaway, Paul Wienpahl. ef Elf? e ei new i PHILOSOPHY pnoonam Chance Offeneo to Qnaos Integrating student and faculty opinion on curriculum purpose and format, UCSB's 1968-69 Department of Phi- losophy underwent a complete revamping of its graduate program.. Procedural changes and several new courses emerged as an immediate result of the re- evaluation. Directed by Dr. Ronald Hathaway, a group of visiting scholars met here for a conference on Plato. In another sphere, Dr. Herbert Fingarette published his book On Responsibility. Officially named C8a04, but called West Hall by the students, this building became the new home of the Philosophy department in February. They were so glad to move, dragging their belongings to the 6th floor bothered no one. K vu ' , ,V ' 3 i t S ' " "W H " ' fm iii VY" ' 'ME Q 'T ' ' F CLASSICS Oepantment Gives masteiis Oeqnee Surpassing the enrollment at public colleges and universities of comparable size, the Classics Department continued to increase this year. For the first time, students were able to work toward a lVlaster's degree, and did so with the aid of such new faculty members as Dr. Borimir Jordan and Dr. Apostolos Athanassakis, and the new department chairman, Dr. David Young. RELIGIOUS STUDIES masterzs pizoonam In Religion Oeeut Students involved in the Religious Studies program today stress progress toward a deeper understanding of religion and its effect on the entire world, past, present, and future. Eight new faculty members joined the staff, greatly increasing opportunities for new fields of study. Growing with the department is a new graduate program which includes a Master of Arts degree. This will enable students to continue their studies, which are not limited to religion but also discuss society and its develop- ments. Staff members have kept busy working on publications, the most recent of which is Dr. Thomas F. O'Dea's work, entitled The Catholic Crisis. As the field of Religious Studies grows, the classes become more and more involved with the secular aspects of man's life in relation to his religion or religious practices. Dr. Robert Michaelson discusses one of these aspects with a student before his class on Contemporary Religious Trends and Practices. Front row: Charles Fogarty, Thomas F. O'Dea, Michail Couzens. Second row: Robert Michaelsen, Matthias Vereno, Stephen Reno, Richard Comstock. Z' ,maj r F i 4 .. :slits p Front row: Kathy Corey, Barbara Thomas. Second row: Sanford Gerber, Anthony Mulac, Upton Palmer, John Macksoud, Theodore 5522452444 lla 44a new izzi'll'llllgQfWlTe'a Hanley, Edwin Schoell, Glen Mills, Rollin Ouimby, John Snidecor. SPEECH Jump m majons Oemanos oeonzee Boasting a 25'Xu increase in major student 'enrollment this year, the Speech Department is hoping to be able to offer a Ph.D. by Fall, 1969. Also available to students specializing in Speech are training grants from Rehabilitation Services Adminis- tration and Office of Education. Faculty member T. D. Hanley was elected Administrative Vice President of the American Speech and Hearing Association this year. POLITICAL SCIENCE Cumzent Issues hasten Change Meeting the demands of the 70's head on, the Department of Political Science incorporated pressing issues of the 60's into their curriculum. ln- cluded in the new class schedule was a seminar of Black Leadership and a class on the Urban Poor. Faculty publications came from Stanley Anderson, ed., Ombudsmen for American Government and Dean IVlann, Nlen Who Govern. Front row: Peter Merkl, C. Herman Pritchett, Russell Fitzgibbon. Second r o w : Th o m as . Sc hrock, Robert Noel, Dean Mann, , l all , T Wolfram Hanrieder, ' Henry Turner, ..,, ' . VWlliam Ebenstein, ' T l John Moore. Third l l r o w : M i c h ael G ard o n, Roger Davidson, R. J. Snow, Alan Wyner. William Altus, Hgwafd Kendler, Robert Gorrs. danker, Elijah Lovejoy, Robert Newcomb, Gerald Blum, Charles McClin- f0Ck, David Messick, Jerry Higgins, PSYCHOLOGY Data Stuoy ls featuneo Psychology majors at UCSB are basically headed for careers in teaching or research. Our campus does not have the clinical program which pro- duces psychologists, but it does concentrate a great deal of effort upon the compilation and interpretation of data to be used by practitioners. Some of the research pro- jects now underway are experimental, such as Studies in Visual Space Perception, while others are based on conclusions drawn from collected data. Shown here in the earlier stages of a series, of experiments under the direction of David Premack, chimps Gussie and Sarah attempt to com- municate with humans by pulling the joy stick on a sound machine. Nllke .Eyans supports them in their scientific efforts. Q . 3 1 in H xiii! 1 n 1.1 mm Q ,Vasa ,pvf Q S., ,eu- ,. .,,,,,,,,, -it , 1 .91 SOCIOLOGY llrzom W eaen to Cleaven Under the chairmanship of Dr. Thomas J. Scheff, the Soci- ology department opened up several fields of controversy this year. Courses in the Sociology of Black Nation- alism, the Mexican-American Community, and the Soci- ology of International Politics filled the class rolls to ca- pacity. Also filled to capacity was faculty office space, with an expanded staff of thirty pro- fessors and associates. C. Douglas Johnson, Arthur Schwartz. LIN G U ISTICS language ls Cultune ev Language is a key to the understanding of a culture. In today's shrinking world it has become increasingly important that we understand not only how our foreign neighbors live, but how they think. The Linguistics department has been instrumental in opening that door. There is no undergraduate major in the department as yet. Dr. Arthur Schwartz and C. Douglas Johnson teach broad courses dealing with communication problems and language deficiencies of the "culturally deprived" nations. During a class in descriptive lin- guistics, Indonesian student Wen Yap instructs- Dr. Arthur Schwartz on word orders and uses peculiar to his native language. Front row: David Arnold, Gary Schu- lman, Thomas Wilson, D. Lawrence Wieder, Robert B. Smith, Tamowu Shibutani, David Gold Second row: Robert Billlgmeier, Frank P. Goldman, Milton Mankofi Paul Wuebben, Thomas Schefli Charles Spaulding, Daniel Willick, Lloyd Fins. Perched asymmetrically atop a ladder, members of Dr. Patricia Sparrow's University Dance Group demonstrate the inventiveness encouraged by modern dance. A variety of props suggest an untried theme to the spontaneous performers and the dance begins. Front row: Patricia Sparrow. Second row: Patricia Peters. Third row: Robert Hanlin, Emma Lou O'Brien, Isa Fartsch-Bergsohn. .--' L .. DANCE Repentony Class Aoos IHSDIRAIIOH Dance is an art form expressing an emo- tion or idea which cannot be expressed any other way. If there were a better means of expression, the Dance would not have been created. Such is the philosophy behind the department, and the reason for increased emphasis on creative choreogrophy. Introduced this year was a course in Repertory, explaining the works of major choreographers, and their methods of inspiration and design. The study of these seasoned professionals promises to enhance the work of student choreogra- phers who score numbers in the University Dance Group concerts. Of the three concerts put on this year by Patricia Sparrow's group, the highlight was "Posiblom," choreographed by Miss Sparrow to the music of an electronic score by Martin Farren. On to Buffalo or back to the frigate? Students Evan Cole, Rip Cohen, and Dan Dorse discuss their desti- nation in this scene from Ten Minutes to Buffalo by Gunter Grass. ' r .J-Q-ff' ' e jf' Jw, .7 4-3 Q, 5 . if ef i: HAIIURAI. SCIENCES BIOLOGY long-team Reseanch Dnoses mystemes In spite of the amazing progress made by man in the various fields of science, the study of organic life processes still holds many mysteries. Graduate students in Biology are now working on a five year Population Biology project subsidized by a Ford Foundation grant, while undergraduate majors have increased by sixty. . Under the massive heading of Biology major are several undergraduate special- izations. New this year are Cellular and Organismal Biology, Biological Sciences, and Biochemistry-Nlolecular Biology, which have been added to such standards as Environ- mental Biology, Zoology, and Botany. For non-majors, a course in Contemporary Natural Science lBioIogy 10l has been added to the broad curriculum. Biology graduate student Preston Hensley, having an almost unlimited field of research projects to choose from, has selected Enzymology as his field of specialization. Here, in the second year of his research, he uses an amino acid analyzer to facilitate characterizing the enzyme Aldolase. Front row: Michael Neushul, J. Robert Haller, William Purves, James Cronshaw, John Cushing, James Walters, Garrett Hardin. Second row: Henry Harbury, Barham DeWolfe, Robert Holmes, Dale Smith, John Riehm, Elmer Noble, Adrian Wenner, Walter Muller, Mary Erickson. l , J'-1 l .. 4 5 'Glas-,G 'iso-,. 9P""'e-U.. 1.-' -L s f ' af' ' xx Front row: Thomas Bruice, Daniel Santi, Michael Bowers. Second row: William Kaska, Bernard Baker, Clifford Bunton, John Kennedy, Glyn Pritchard, Henry Uffen, Ernest Bickerdike, Robert DeWolfe. Third row: Curtis Anderson, Peter Ford, Glenn Miller, Pierce Selwood, Bruce Rickborn, Douglas McCain, Richard Martin. Learning the processes of separation and purification of chemicals is among the complex techniques important to an aspiring young chemist. CHEMISTRY new Qnants Spank Llnoenqnao Reseanch In our increasingly industrialized society, the importance placed upon the value of chemistry has become inestimable. From the development of a new washing detergent to the refining of liquid rocket fuel, the various aspects of this science are being utilized daily. Several United States Government agencies, such as NASA, NATO, the Office of Naval Research, and the United States Public Health Services, have supplied grants to the depart- ment for research. A National Science Foundation Undergraduate Research Parti- cipation program, offered for two summers, entices serious majors in the department and has been responsible for a total publication of 1,039 scientific papers and books. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Qnaos Besleqeo With Jos slots Receiving research funds from NSF, NASA, and Jet propulsion Labs, the Department of Mechanical Engi- neering conducts research in satellite dynamics, rocket combustion, rarified gas dynamics, aerodynamics, structur- al dynamics, environmental heat trans- fer, diffusion in porous media and material science. Since a graduate program was instituted last year, the department has increased its faculty by two members. Dr. Roy S. Hickman and Dr. Gary Connell have added their particular fields of study to the pro- gram. ln addition, several new courses in Aerodynamics, Flight Mechanics and Orbital Mechanics have been added to supplement the new gradu- ate program. Graduates in Mechanical Engineering are very much in demand at present, and past graduates have each had several positions from which to choose. Chemical-Nuclear Engineering, located in the Art building, is a fast-growing department on the UCSB campus. Dr. Robert G. Rinker looks on as one of the many department mechanics adjusts a filtering apparatus which will be used for his research. Front row: lMlliam Thomson, Melvin Eisenstadt, Hartmut Basael. Second row: R 0 bert Roemer, G a r y Con n ell, Thomas Mitchell, Roy Hickman, John Bruch. I f r By if ! I' ,. ,174 . ,,..,,.. , wily 3, CHEM-NUCLEAR ENGINEERING UCSB Attnacts mlt pnofessoiz As the first step in developing a pro- gram in nuclear engineering at UCSB, the Chemical-Nuclear Engineering Department has hired Dr. Henri Fenech of Nl.l.T.'s Nuclear Engi- neering Department. To accommodate an enrollment increase of from 30 to 100 students, the department holds numerous research seminars through- out the year, and just approved a Ph.D. program for its students. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Staff Duizsues Active Reseanch Assuming his position as the new chairman of the Electrical Engineering Department, Dr. John G. Skalnik has seen a profound growth in its accomplishments. Active research areas include acoustic-electromagnetic interaction and computer hardware and software. Faculty members James Howard and Roger Wood have published an article on "Hybrid Simulation of Speech Waveforms." Front row: Duncan Mellichamp, John Myers, Paul Mikolaj. Second row: Orville Sandall, Robert Rinken Front row: C. William Harrison, John Skalnik, James Howard, Glen Wade, A.G. Conrad, George Matthaei Second row: Joseph Sayovitz, Philip Ordung, Jorge Fontana, John Baldwin, Jr. MATH Stuoles Appueo to Space-Ace pnoqnams With grants from the Air Force, NASA, and the National Science Foundation, the Math department has been able to branch out into a wide variety of research projects. Some of the areas now covered, for example, include functional analysis, graph theory, general topology, and probability. Although the undergraduate major enrollment has decreased in the past year, graduates have increased by about 12'ZJ, with an addition of two faculty members, and constant revisions in the curriculum. Vocational opportunities in mathematics were at one time limited to teaching and scholarly research. With the advent of the space program, and a new emphasis on modern science, the value of math has increased a hundred-fold in today's society. Workers at the UCSB Computer Center are often unaware of the intricate and cumbersome mathe- matical problems involved in computer programming. These particular computers are responsible for the calculations of the entire UC system. Front row: Michael Cambern, Max L. Weiss, Julian Weiss- glass, Charles Ake- mann, Henryk Mine, Robert Thompson, Phillip Ostrand, Da vid Outcalt. Second row: Ky Fan, Shu-Teh May, Larry Gerstein, Marvin Marcus, Da vid Sprecher, Raymond Wong, Adil Yaqub. Front row: Herbert Broida, Gordon David Phillips, Jose Fulco. Second row: MacDonald, Harold Lewis, Allan Krass, Robert Sugar, Vincent Jaccarino, William Richard Blankenbecler, David Caldwell, Walken PHYSICS qnaos pnoplt Enom new Bullomg, lass Concentrating its emphasis on the graduate studies program, the Physics department at Santa Barbara offers a full course of preparation leading to a Ph.D. Among the fields of research activity are such special- izations as Theoretical Physics, Solid State Physics, Nuclear Physics, Spectroscopy and Quantum Optics. Opened this year was the new Physics building, with much needed space for experimentation and classroom facilities, as well as faculty and staff offices. ln under- graduate as well as graduate courses, there is a strong stress on physical proof of theory through experiments. Involved in the new and exciting field of spec- troscopy is Herbert Broida, Physics professor. mf sw' W ' in-:saw E fiiii M ' i lUl I P moto-pe EDUCATION pnofs Reseanch Black eoucatlon Public school teaching at elementary, secondary and junior college levels is one means by which UCSB graduates can play an active role in helping find solutions to contemporary problems. Special projects in the Education Department include Dr. B. Nlurray Thomas' research on International Education and the work of Dr. John Cotton and Dr. Dale Brubaker on Black Education. Dr. George I. Brown was the honored recipient of a Ford Foun- dation Grant, and Dr. Lester B. Sands has been elected President of the Far Western Philosophy Associ- ation, a tribute to our school. Student teacher Carrie Hall lcenterl laughs along with her students as they watch themselves on closed circuit television. This is part of a new program in teacher edu- Front row: R, Murray Thomas, Glenn Durflinger, Kermit Seefeld, David Gardner, Marjorie Bastan- chury, Carolyn Cogan, Ruth Wilvert, Ruth Hartley, Harleen McAda, John Wilson, John Cotton, Ronald Blood, George Brown, Lester cation whereby the student teacher's hour is video-taped and then played back to her class as well as to other student teachers. Sa n ds, J o hn Nelson. Second row: VWIliam L am o n, S te wart Shapiro, Harold Ormsby, R ic h ard Ja m g och ian, Glenn Pate, VWlliam Salemes, Dale Brubaker. ie a , 5. F r o nt row: Jean Hodgkins, Theodore Harder, Vera Skubic, Rowand R. J. Chaffee, Joseph Lan tagne. Second row: Fenton Kelly, Ernest Michael, Sidney Ott- man, George Stelmach. Front row: Betty Dimmick, Judith Garman, Dottie Ch asse, Sandy Geuss, Pat Stock, Geri Mund, Zoltan v o n S o m 0 g yi. Second row: Newell Breyfagle, Gerri Walklet, Linda Werner, Donna Peterson, L ois Largent, Ed Swartz, Don Turner. Third row: Jack Curtice, Willie VWlton, Roy Anderson, Sam Adams, Bob Gary, Art Aldri tt, Ralph Barkey. Fourth row: Ray Bosch, Arthur Gallon, Emerson Smith, Bill Hammer, Jack Fox, Ted Fish, Kathy Barthels, Ed Do ty. Fifth row: Rod Sears, John Luccio, Dave Gorrie, Rick Rowland, Sher- man Button, Andy Everest, Ford Joy. PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION ITIIDOI2 In COACHING upoates DROGRAITI An Athletic Coaching minor, which will provide students with excellent job place- ment opportunities, was introduced into the curriculum of the Department of Physical Activities this year. Formerly, almost half of the coaches in California were classroom teachers and had no direct association with fieldwork. It is hoped that the new minor will remedy this situ- ation. ln another arena, Mrs. Pat Stock has recently published her book Personal Safety and Defense for Women. Among the titles listed by the Physical Education Department this year were Methods of Measuring and Percent of Body Fat Measurements of Boys and Women in California. The vocational opportunities offered by this department are teaching and entrance into medical and paramedical fields. There is also a relation to com- munity and personal health and welfare, in the support of optimum health for the individual in order that he may make his best contribution to society. MILITARY SCIENCE pickets Cenounce l201IC pnesence One of the most controversial depart- ments on the UCSB campus this year is the Department of Military Science. From the beginning of the school year, members of ROTC have been harassed, booed, picketed and denounced in letters to the El Gaucho editor. Those opposed to having ROTC on campus as an academic course, have instigated their own course in non-violence as a constructive form of protest. In spite of all this, the department, which is highly relevant to the many problems of our national security and the world military-political situation, has con- tinued to train and educate men to pro- vide commissioned officers for the United States Army. Each year, Scabbard and Blade, the ROTC men's honorary, sponsors a Turkey Shoot to raise money for the organization. Here, Bob Jean, president of Scabbard and Blade, helps Barbie Prout polish her marksmanship. Front row: Ruth Girvin, John Prossor, Ann Mont- gomery, George Dewey, V-4 Raymond Bloodharn Second row: Francis Bailey, James Dick, Ronald Griffith, George Gugino. Third row: Law- rence Way, Clarence VW!- son, George Kelly, James Johnson, Carl Martin. CREATIVE STUDIES College llloumshes, lncneases two-liolo Offering a spectrum of courses ranging from the Theory and Composition of Nlusic to Molecular Biology, the recently-formed College of Creative Studies has increased its enrollment from fifty to one hundred students. Three interdisciplinary courses were offered this year: Approaches to Computer Science, by Glen J. Cullerp Electronic Analogies in Contemporary Thought, by Hugh Kenner, and The ldea of the Modern, by Howard Warshaw. The College of Creative Studies is a sepa- rate undergraduate college, separately staffed and administered, with a special curriculum and specially selected students. Seen at right working on a clay model in which a bronze sculpture will be cast is Jim Glickenhaus, a student in the College of Creative Studies. In the fore- ground one of Jim's earlier creations, a finished cast bronze sculpture, sits atop a pedestal. Another student, Paul Lindhard lbelowl, works applying preservative to a half-finished wood sculpture. As he works, he explains his technique to other interested students who may want to attempt the same technique at a later date. we ,ga-.ms aware, "4 "Q, , 2J'TXf"'f f If 4, -' H . :U'.l'ia,.w'3,.f. uf. ff31qa'Liggf.q !,",f 55, .. . - - .mam sf' ..,. -,i,M,.v .- may was . . ,. .ff .1 . .- -153,122 , .. -.pf . .- w- - -1 - lI.'..f-. ..' ',5"."' ' "l'.'Z:C ,- - nga: , . .Q . . . .H.5r .U. .J n "!i'L as 1- n 4 in .. ig.: 3, 157. - wffvclus fax" 'L 1 f we -' .sgazzl 1 6- vt P - - 1 Q - .., fz.,?E.'. l U.. 2'. ' '.K'f- - . . . .. . .. - .':.:. I.. . I X Q V W xii P ' 1 A s V N K. y t. 4 ' f-15" John Nara lbelowl draws a fellow posing so they can get the feel of student. The students take turns working with live models. Above is a better view of Paul Lind- Glickenhaus offers suggestions while hard's unfinished wood sculpture. Jim Paul applies preservative. TUTORIAL pnoqnam Oejectives Chance with neeos Unique among the UC campuses is Santa Barbara's Tutorial Program. The purpose of this program is to give superior students a broad education in Liberal Arts through an inter- departmental curriculum which allows the design of individual courses of study. Since the institution of the program in 1949, it has grown considerably in size as well as objectives. At the present time the program has over 9,000 students and over 600 instructors who are borrowed from throughout the campus. During the Fall Quarter of 1968, the Tutorial Program sponsored a series of guest speakers on The Urban Poor, which blossomed into a new course by the same name. Seeking to revive a lost wax technique, student Joel Freiburger heats wax which will be used in making a wax model of a sculpture. Later, Joel will cast the sculpture in bronze, but for the moment he is con- cerned with perfecting the technique which has not been used for centuries. Z ,.,, ...,., , ,. ,MW .- -V- . -V rm-f 1,-.f fmx .rw -I 1 mf r Y m. 1 7 P i Y. -. . L1 ,ABQ-in tif' xy:-N WP' ,mia 4 it ll 5 l Z, A 1 , . ., 5 img Q 'll 'Uf5ff?i -. 'if Holding a sign indicating his desti- hitchhiking, one ofthe many ways to nation, Steve Rose tries his luck at move between places. lvl l .eras af? EDUCATION ABROAD yean ls llast, llun at oizeign Centens University of California students have excel- lent opportunities to quench their wanderlust by joining the Education Abroad Program, which is administered at UCSB. This year, correspondence with the students from several of the eleven campuses brought news of snowball fights at Gottingen University in Germany and a traditional Thanksgiving Day celebration at the Hotel Palace in lVladrid, Spain. From Hong Kong the claim was that the year went much too quickly for all concerned. HONG KONG STUDY CENTER - Front row: Barbara Bodine. Second row: Elaine Eckstein, Bruce Olson, Ming Fay. Physical fitness is important to the girls at the Bordeaux Center. Here, they enjoy themselves playing soccer in the icy air. s su-:una ,AR ,q V, M. I fl .V Tm " ' ,gl ' if, z ':,'N j 1. 'M if 5 1 .1 ,ffl Wffrs' A WIS 4 J O. ff g:?5'f'f?9f vw 1. X f , I, R3 1 ' e , r ' -' 16913 A J " f ,' f Q Vsbagi F , 4 ws, ' ' . 'L-704 'Q '5F'+. 1 f ' . ff ' . Tm' ' ,fit V P 'W ' I ' I 'Pl .- N. in .X --T'-1 A ,.-.Q-M... . .,., , ...... ',,.,,..w..... .........., M N.. -qv..-...u..-.1 n. u ,-" If SENIORS' ANO SENIOR HONORS' lmmersion in the total education of the sixties has altered the concept of the graduate. Newly aware that the peripheral world aside from his chosen field exists, he has discovered the complexity of his environment. Political activities on campus have increased notably in scope and number. No longer must the impetus for a fledgling movement originate in a political science senior seminar. Social orientation of the student in the sixties has expand- ed from his specialized field of study to include concern for the world at large. In attempting to cope with this new found awareness, each individual encounters a pan- orama of ideas which were often previously considered to be out- side of his realm of thought. As new doors are opened, the senior confronts a chaotic array of situations which simultaneously confuse and challenge him. No longer is the graduate the rigidly limited student of the past, now his commencement truly symbolizes a commencement. honon Copy GIVEN IO QOBGRII 'EIITIOIIHV weston 5 ' :M .. 1 . . fs fe .mu ll it Four years of outstanding work in student affairs has earned for Robert Timothy Weston the 1969 La Cumbre Honor Copy. In his freshman and sophomore years Tim's activities were many, including Colusa Hall President, Residence Halls Association Legis- lature, Anti-Collier Bill Committee, RHA Constitution and By-Laws Committee, and Organizations Co- ordinating Board, and RHA Cabinet. As an upper division student Tim senled as RHA president and a member of the Legislature and the cabinet. He was also a member of the President's Council, Associated Students Constitutional Judicial Board, and Cal Club. In his senior year Tim was chairman of Com- munity Affairs Board and a member of Associated Students Legislative Council. He was chairman of Co- ordinated Student Services Council and in the summer of 1968 interned with the Senate Commerce Com- mittee and Senator Warren G. Nlagnuson. Among Tim's many honors are the Dean's List, RHA Honorary, Most Valuable Lower Division Nlan 1967, Prudential Savings and Loan Most Valuable Student Scholarship, and Letters and Science Scholars. Tim is planning for a career in government - public administration andlor politics. He hopes to work in social problem areas related to urban development and governmental approaches toward solutions. ' rl --fi--' x. M WE' ' i .- IJ - 1 L ri. . , ,. rl' x ' A-av ir.. I Janis Nolen Jones , ?"'+'r 'T'-'3':'2T'f' 7 ' :fi ""' 1" "iff" 1 '7 7"'i:. fi". -EZPW -' giifirfni-4 ' ' A I 'A "5 tr 5EEf:l.itf41' Ss' ,ie ' " git? ,Lf I. .Tw '2,.Y jig I I :fs-as , misss eil iff? Ji ' V 'I -i :X V: V L l ' I Q , I if Paul Edward Sweet eminent thnee Get top honoizs This year's Outstanding Woman Student Award was given to Janis Nolen Jones for her extensive con- tributions to student life at UCSB. A senior, Janis is an English major, a member of campus committees, and was a resident assistant and a resident hall officer, in her earlier years. One of the Outstanding Nlan Students is AS President Paul Edward Sweet. His activities at UCSB have included membership in Circle K and IV Study Group, and senling as IV League Representative to Leg Council. Paul has always had a special interest in Isla Vista and relations between the community and the university. This year's other Outstanding lVlan Student is George David Kieffer, the AS Executive Vice-President. George, a history major, has been active as IV League President, on the Student Affairs Committee, and IV League Leg Council Representative. Among George's special interests are sports, and, like Paul, Isla Vista and the university community. George David Kieffer James Robert Ashlock Mathematics major, Camp Conestoga Financial Chairman, CAB Chairman, Administrative Vice-President, Honor Key. Michael Eugene Bloom Sociology major, Outstanding KCSB staff member 1967-68, Com- munications Board, Program Director KCSB, Manager KCSB, HonorKey. Kathleen Elizabeth Effertz Home Economics major, Treasurer Santa Rosa, Home Economics Club, Resident Assistant Santa Cruz, Chimes, Chairman of AWS Transfer Tea, Treasurer Mortar Board, Out- standing Senior Woman, Honor Key. James Richard Bettinger Anthropology major, Lassen Hall President, Regent's Scholar, Dean's List, Master Speaker, Com- munications Board, El Gaucho Staff Writer, El Gaucho Out- standing Staff Member, Editor El Gaucho 1968-69, Honor Key. Tim Lawrence Donovan Zoology major, Associated Students Judicial Council, Cali- fornia Club, Blue Key President 1968-69, Frosh Camp Staff 1966-68, Constitutional Judicial Committee, Student Academic Council Chairman, Speakers Bureau, Sigma Chi Fraternity, RHA Unit Hall Treasurer, Regents Scholar, Chancellor's Ad Hoc Com- mittee on naming of campus facilities, Phi Beta Kappa, 1969 California Heart Association Research Fellowship Award, Honor Key, Duane Blackburn Garrett History major, RHA Represent- ative, Resident Assistant, Humboldt Hall President, AS Legislative Council Representative, Honor Key. Linda Marlene Fuselier English major, President Honey- bears, Newman Club, Chi Omega, Greek Week Chairman, Frosh Camp, SCOP, Outstanding Senior Woman, Honor Key. Ellen Helene Gendel History major, lV League Secretary, Elections Committee, IV League Presidential Assistant, Spring Formal Chairman, IV League representative to Legislative Council, Finance Committee, Resident Assistant San Nicolas, Student Affairs Committee, IV Study Group, Outstanding Senior Woman, Honor Key. James Ellwood Haden History major, Frosh Camp, House of Lords President 1967, Resident Assistant House of Lords, Assistant Director House of Lords, AS County Commissioner, Honor Key. honon key Recipients 1 5- . -4--9-5 'i' -ff .i . '94 H-. cb V' ' .1- J to I u l Q , j A, Q... gxcq, ,,-fic, . J i l, . Q W t -.a,..x igl i fnx GXGITIDUIZ ll1VOlV6mGl11Z fit Y"V It X49 f'J if 'Q -5 .: +..g X 4. IM' 0' if' XT? Janis Nolen Jonas English major, Hall President in Tropicana, member of Dean Rey- noId's steering committee for EOP, Interim Steering Committee, Resident Assistant Francisco Torres, Resident Assistant High School Summer Program, Special Events Chairman Frosh Camp, Out- standing Senior Woman, Outstand- ing Woman Student, Student Orientation Committee, Recreation Committee, Chimes, Cal Club, Honor Key. Janice Nadine Musicer Anthropology major, IV League Advisory Committee, Frosh Camp Counselor, Government Affairs Board Chairman, Housing Contract Committee, IV League Vice-Presi- dent, IV League Representative to Leg Council, IV Study Group, Honor Key. Philip Howard Pennypacker History major, San Miguel Hall President, Resident Assistant San Miguel, Member of RHA Honorary, Hall Treasurer, Intramural Sports, RHA Legislature, Scabbard and Blade, RHA Planning Committee, Legislative Council Representative, Student Advisory Committee, Honor Key. Paul Edward Sweet Political Science major, Prime Minister House of Lords, IV League Representative to Leg Council, IV Study Group, JIVE member, Circle K, Associated Students President, Honor Key. George David Kieffer History major, Social Vice- president House of Lords, IV League Representative to Leg Council, Student Affairs Com- mittee, IV League President, JIVE member, Managing Assistant House of Lords, AS Executive Vice-pres- ident, Honor Key. Steven L, Myerson Geography major, Director of Frosh Camp, Guide Operation University Day, Recreation Com- mittee, Honor Key. Barbara Jo Schless Sociology major, RHA Honorary, OCB member, Hall president in Santa Cruz, Resident Assistant Santa Rosa, Hall Social Vice-presi- dent, RHA Student Advisory Com- mittee, Outstanding Senior Woman, AWS President, Honor Key. Robert Timothy Weston Mathematics major, Dean's List, Honors at Entrance, Most Valuable Lower Division Man, Cal Club, Colusa Hall President, OCB, AS Constitutional Judicial Board, RHA President, President's Council, NAACP Tutoring Project, Com- munity Affairs Board Chairman, Honor Copy, Honor Key. .. ., l , i- - 1 rf- wsreairw: we -- . ,W - ul ., u 1 N X, . ll ,- e.,-li,,Q,,gVk5 V N , 1 we l 1 :www rm: A - l rg -'F--' wif- fr 'f "'.?'Tw-xg,--'-.:--A B555 l. V- .,am. -5 Wu l li gisggxge E film l. -N 1, ' V Zi f ' " . , J .W . , . l .., , . . . fl V ' 4 ,fu l -.,-.T.,,,, Norm Shaskey President SGDIORS Give S200 to holioa Chamt Senior Class Cards, initiated as an attempt to increase participation in class-sponsored events, brought a sense of unity to the "card carrying members" of the Class of '69 this year. They also saved the card holders money on class events, which is a major selling point for even the most apathetic students. Cards came in handy for such events as John Fahey's sell-out concert in Campbell Hall and the 7984, The Birds double bill film fest, presented by the Class. As a holiday charity project, the class collected over S200 in food and clothing for needy families in Mission Santa Claus. SENIOR CLASS COUNCIL-Front row: Betty Jean Ong, Diane Bei. Second row: Mark Freter, Loretta Wong, Lynn Rodriquez, Lynnea Jenkins, Alice Rosen. Third row: Wayne Burton, Norm Shaskey, Phil Heller, Gaston Chan, Terry Bauer: Fourth row: Ron Gerron, Rich McEachen, Steve Orlick, Jim De Martini, Tim Yeh, Emmett Fisk. K ww K x Wayne Burton V ice-President Iwo- - Diane Bei Secretary Ellen Helene Gendel GIGVGI1 SENIOR Women QGCOGDIZGO AS SUDGRIOI2 Kathleen Virginia Cox English major, Chi Omega, Frosh Camp Counselor, Recreation Chairman, AWS Representative, AWS Rules Committee Chairman, Outstanding Senior Woman. 'fx Kathleen Elizabeth Effertz Home Economics major, Trea- surer Santa Rosa, Home Econo- mics Club, Resident Assistant Santa Cruz, Chimes, Chairman of AWS Transfer Tea, Treasurer Mortar Board, Outstanding Senior Woman, Honor Key. Tracy Paulsen Ruggles Combination Social Science major, Delta Gamma, Panhellenic President, Playboy Queen, Out- standing Senior Woman. Barbara Jo Schles Sociology major, RHA Honorary, Hall President Santa Cruz, Resident Assistant Santa Rosa, RHA Student Advisory Com- mittee, AWS President, Honor Key, Outstanding Senior Woman. Mary Ann Forst Combination Social Science major, Frosh Camp, Alpha Chi Omega, Spurs, Honeybears, Chimes, Panhellenic, Outstanding Senior Woman. History major, IV League Secre- tary, IV League Presidential Assistant, Finance Committee, Resident Assistant San Nicolas, IV Study Group, IV League Representative to Leg Council, Honor Key, Outstanding Senior Woman. Gail Vivienne Inline Cellular Biology major, Mortar Board President, Woman's Intra- mural Association, Westgate Hall Judicial Board, Chimes, Junior Class Council, Outstanding Senior Woman. Janis Nolen Jones English major, Tropicana Hall President,Resident Assistant Fran- cisco Torres, Chimes, Cal Club, Honor Key, Interim Steering Committee, Outstanding Woman Student, Student Orientation Committee, Outstanding Senior Woman. Judith Forman Lyons Dramatic Art major, Mortar Board, Spring Sing Director, Mask and Scroll, Roadrunner Review, Women's Glee Club, University Chorus, Summer Repertory Theatre, Outstanding Senior Woman . 0--,Q Jane Aiko Yokoyama Spanish mjaor, Chimes, Alpha Lambda Delta, AWS Executive Board, Outstanding Senior Woman. Linda Marlene Fuselier English major, President Honey- bears, Newman Club, Chi Omega, Greek Week Chairman, Frosh Camp, SCOP, Outstanding Senior Woman. Ss? montan BOARD Stnesses COmlTlUl'll1Iy ll1VOl.V6m6l11I 5 -- .all li, ..- P . mil. La. . , 1-'asm .. .. ...viii his fl, ,xl at., , fl, . aj. L :lest ' ts" .. 304 -a . I I 'J f ,- ZX 1 Sandra Bishop Mrs. Vernon Cheadle Helen Cooksey Margaret Corseluis Kathy Efferyz Martha Garrett Elizabeth Gilder Lynette Gonzales Gail Irvine Jeanne Johnson Linda Landucci Judith Lyons Members of Mortar Board, the Senior Women's Honorary Society, are working this year primarily toward the betterment of com- munity relations. Involvement of the group within the Santa Barbara area was stressed as Mortar Board sponsored a program in which prominent community members were invited to attend several classes. The subject matter included problems in Isla Vista, introduced by Vice-Chancellor Bay Varley's slide show entitled the "l.V. Story." The honor organi- zation also hostessed a social get-together between student and community leaders. They relegated time to discussions of the role of women today during one of their meetings, to which Alumni Mortar Boarders were invited. In their fight for more edu- cational opportunities, Mortar Board sponsored the film Grapes of Wrath, shown at the University this year. Based on the John Steinbeck novel, the film was intended to shock people out of their apathy, as the story has done for several decades. At a recent Mortar Board meeting, Dean Bowers dis- cussed with Helen Cooksey, Judith Lyons, and Jamie Gilder the role of young women in today's changing society. In order to implement what they discussed, they participated in a variety of community activities, such as "l.V. Story," augmented by social events which included student leaders, members of the faculty and staff, and eminent citizens from the surrounding residential areas. Qwfi E t if 'J ' 1 . 3 ' l Carol McMillan Robyn Murphy Lesley Wheatley Jane Yokoyama iv 'W-if 'fwfr , 'Lp' ,r -dh qv-v-If 35 254 -.4 . ,mo ., xi in i 'V' 1 if 'N A .. f--J' , fill: X 1 S I o- ar? QQ , if ,Q Q za: A y ae 4? 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P Y 1 -'gf' " , 'Z 5 ' Q fi .gs f-5 1 ii X in - i l1l0l2S Leslie Abraham Hillsborough, English Valerie Abrams Long Beach, Sociology Marcia Absher Bakersfield, English Karen Acosta Ontario, History Deborah Adams San Rafael, Botany Pamela Adams Ventura, Sociology Victoria Adams North Hollywood, Spanish James Adamski San Luis Obispo, Anthropology Patricia Aiello Concord, Political Science Karen Alden Los Altos, Home Economics Greg Alford San Marino, Political Science Bette Allen San Diego, Psychology Debbie Allen Tiburon, Social Sciences Dennis Allen Citrus Heights, Mathematics Pamela Allen Manhattan Beach, Social Sciences Penny Allen Corona, Chemistry Kathleen Allison Porterville, Sociology Eileen Almquist El Segundo, History Howard Alpert Alhambra, Mechanical Engineering Margie Altmann Beverly Hills, Sociology Nancy Alvarez Pleasant Hill, History Richard Alvidrez Los Angeles, Mechanical Engineering Suzanne Alvin Pacific Grove, Sociology David Amidon Whittier, Economics Judy Amundson San Gabriel, Political Science Duane Anderson Moraga, History Janice Anderson Anchorage, Alas., Social Science Judy Anderson Walnut Creek, Home Economics Kathryn Anderson Aubum, Psychology Linda Anderson La Crescenta, Political Science Lynn Anderson Manhattan Beach, French Susan Anderson Sun Valley, Spanish Frances Andrews San Carlos, History Jayne Archambault Rosemead, History Susan Archer Goleta, Anthro.-History Gail Armetta San Bruno, Art History Louisa Armstrong Fullerton, Anthropology Diane Arundell Fillmore, English Denise Asdrura Santa Barbara, French Richard Ashley Torrance, Political Science James Ashlock Fair Oaks, Mathematics, History Mary Atkinson Inglewood, Sociology Russell Atkinson San Jose, Mathematics Leslie Atwater Fullerton, History Ingid Ault South Bend, Ind., Phys.Ed. Janith Aust Danville, Anthropology Beverly Austin Altadena, Biology Michaal Austin San Bernardino, English a-.. -N-1. .,,., W , V...l.,i,..i V, Q., V,,, aw... N, .V -V . -- -- M- 1 N ...... 'Y ififa ' ' -'tive-me , ' . --.V - fa..- :f..., - ..,.,..- -H - -A M...-.. ,V V - "rar if ' l fe--A' .:- ' M--Y- v I- t V - 1 - , ,.g,,,'j":if,..-c-2 - Q U- 7---'ul'-' ' ' . . -7-. .... , A -r-1-" 5 ..,..1,.Q,i,,, ' A-"?- .--,..,,-P all V VV .gg - V . "' 'K V V A V fill!" V ' 1 A..bV1- -4.1. t A- ah 'Y V f V Vasu.. --Jer " " V75 ' -. -, , my . W.- R. 8,81 V J V , . .,... V .de VM arf .N - V -V,,-.,' . " ' - ' 'Q .....L- -V 0-1. A-. '--' Q - '- .- I.. A. 1 ag. ,ax ,l i X - 'L' -- V pw- , 'Q ...K n I ITL' W I VA., ..... ,- I Q... .. T Q' :'....".f.,f f ff- .. " 1: ff, ' s . 7- ' 'w -fi " '. ...i' ""'r4f2Evk-'TE1- f:1-F .. ,' if 4 F A l X ' ' " "" ' -' ., V ' 1 . -3-' --4 ---L.-.Lui an -1---. '-..,..,,.4 -Yaff 4- Q - Q 'A . " ' 'K . V N. .- . - -f. '- V -' - 1 XA "f- A --" , Q- -, -- 11 , , .. 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Graeme Auton San Jose, Political Science Craig Avery Bakersfield, Economics Susan Babb Thousand Oaks, Anthropology Jeffrey Babcock Santa Ana, Music Ann Badger Glendale, Anthropology Chris Bagley Los Altos, History Stephen Bailey Santa Barbara, Anthropology Jeane Baines Newport Beach, Anthropology Carol Bale El Cerrito, Social Sciences Sandee Banks Mercer Island, Wash., Pwchology Susan Barbour Pico Rivera, Home Economims Larry Barnum Goleta, Religious Studies Denim Barnwell South Pasadena, Social Sciences Martha Barrall Bakersfield, Mathematics Gregory Barrett Torrance, History Linda Barritt Covina, Psychology Ruth Ann Bafii Goleta, History Sharon Battram San Diego, English Karen Baum Pasadena, Psychology Bruce Baumann Lake Arrowhead, History Keri Bayles Oxnard, Anthropology Susan-Bayne Santa Barbara, Sociology'Anthro. Ron Beals Redwood City, History Bruce Beaton Kelowna, British Columbia, Chem. , my - V ' -1 a- n- fu -'- W 1: 'nfiziiii' K ' - "' .wifes- -. ... If Recreation is not the highest kind of enjoyment, but in its time and place is quite as proper as a prayer. -Prime 9 rfefwgfesli'-vv:e:g..',w,mggf 'S -., ,. , V -. .Y ,..VVV-2-,gig . .,'1 lv -up '-kl . half N , v.. - --q. , , .., - ., .. .,, sn ... ,,., 'em -'LV if' . I, r' Z ,V 4 ha V fy I I it V 'ST A i f f at r it i i ri- VV -4 . 4 - if t in ! l - - 1 i N . in fr 'aan , . ,V V - Vo. X- . A ' ' . "' -- .2 Mi. 2 . af 1 .- . ' : .Q-pf-,,. V an-su H R A f V5-sl, i V 4 mf E.. V75 -l Qian f' 'Q' Q -t-. E ..f' far ', if .. x it V, . a? 5' . UZSTJ 'J' I' '::- 'Et S 150' as .4 .,. I Q,.f . r J J' vp' 3 . ax. 'Q'-f4Y A J-. Z5 5 uss li -n 0 ijv L E .f W 'K if-9 A 5:2 Qi "' IC? 65 .' iq -S, 1' 4 ' J 'L' V g,-rl' 'Xa . 1 's 5 , .17 Q Q .A SEQ A so J X 'R J Nl . -:Q K I X yiae .W W- A-. A - ' ' lei . -fvv V U V A - ar- 5 gc: oc: . at as 'B' 0' " -1 'F Qs-9 .-. '-, 2 -1 v 'ix I ff N 'bww V fa. wr Ft 4- s N ' ff, , ' M F' y gr 41. ' ,gggig L 1 1 'fi . 4-r y, -:ar ,wt i 1 " is Q: ' i Q T Q 2 5- ' R S i ' 1 fi? 6-n " ll . fvfx. JM U YQ ' A x , 1 -- ' A r "' 4, 1 E - I F894 '-tk'f .- .'-' I -aug -... V we ' n - we ' ' 3 4, 7 s - xr-, ml,"- , 44 ,i ,. ..x ,gu- e 'P :Hi ' g.. E5- I-J fi -1-f-A Qr :Wi ,EP K 'ia 4L na .1- 'Q .av SGHIORS Richard Beaver Los Angeles, Political Science Mary Becker Whittier, Sociology Bart Beckman Lodi, Mechanical Engineering Mary Beckord Redlands, Home Economics Charlene Bedient San Francisco, History Ellen Beeks Claremont, Anthropology Ellen Beamer Laguna Beach, Psychology Diane Bei Burlingame, Political Science William Bengeyfield Orange, Zoology Laurie Benkon St. Paul, Minn., Psychology Robert Benmn Pacific Palisades, His-tory-Pol. Sci. Richard Berman Minneapolis, Minn., Pol. Sci. Belinda Berry Long Beach, English James Bertinger Belmont, Anthropology Denise Bielamowicz Montebello, Art History Jan Biella Santa Rosa, Anthropology Robin Billigmeier Santa Barbara, Social Sciences Monica Bilski Goleta, Sociology Mickey Bishop Long Beach, French Laurie Bisell Alhambra, Physical Education Bruce Black Walnut Creek, Mechanical Engineering John Black Santa Monica, Zoology Linda Black Pomona, History Patricia Black Monrovia, French Steven Black North Hollywood, Chemistry John Blades Danville, Zoology Tori Blair Los Angeles, History Tod Bledsoe Fullerton, Economics Michele Blockley Malibu, Anthropology Michael Bloom Pittsburg, Sociology Donna Boccalero La Canada, Anthropology Robert Bode Santa Barbara, Zoology Barbara Boegler La Crescenta, English Steven Boggs Santa Maria, Economics-Math Sharon Bohn Sacramento, Anthropology .lan Boisvain Los Altos, Physics Robert Boland Pismo Beach, Political Science Cheryl Bolton Redding, Art History Lynn Bommer San Gabriel, History Terry Bommer Blythe, Economics Christine Bonfilio Burlingame, Social Sciences Barbara Borden Allambra, French Toni Bothwell Riverside, History Anne Bottomley Santa Barbara, English Bruce Bottomley Santa Barbara, English Raymond Boucree San Jose, Anthropology Elaine Boudta Arbuckle, Home Economics Carl Bovill San Francisco, Mech. Engineering l1lOl2S Carol Bowman Flialto, French Douglas Boyack Woodland Hills, 'History Bruce Boyd Alamo, Political Science Mark Boyd Hollister, Anthropology Linda Boydstun Atascadero, English Sheralyn Boyer Oxnard, Sociology Patrick Boyle Mt. View, Economics Sarah Boyle Inglewood, History Thomas Boyle Newark, Delaware, Economics Steven Brabant Gilroy, Anthropology Mary Brabrook Weaveiville, English Adriane Braochi Bakersfield, Anthropology Janet Brace San Jose, English Charlotte Braden Los Angeles, Anthropology Adelia Bradford Walnut Creek, Anthropology Carolyn Bradshaw Walnut Creek, Social Sciences William Bragg Bell Flower, History Brenda Braley San Diego, Anthropology Janet Brazeal Oxnard, English Edmund Brehm EI Cajon, History Elisabeth Brereton Piedmont, Social Sciences Gloria Brickley Oxnard, Political Science Beverly Briggs San Jose, Speech-Hearing William Brinckerhoff Lafayette, Economics Paul Brinkman Los Angeles, Economics Roy Brisbois Northridge, Political Science Marianne Broberg Camarillo, Mathematics Gary Broering Corona del Mar, Political Science Duwayne Brooks Artesia, Sociology Martha Brown Brawley, History Pamela Brown San Francisco, Speech-Hearing Peter Brown Honolulu, History Philip Brown San Diego, Social Sciences Thayer Brown Stockton, History Gary Brumm Santa Barbara, Music Wayne Bryan Hawthorne, History Barbara Bucholz Garden Grove, History Vince Budrovich San Pedro, Pol. Science-Economics Cathalin Buhrmann Aurora, Ill., English Maryiane Bullock Coronado, Home Economics Deborah Bump Los Angeles, Anthropology Steven Bunch Bakersfield, Pol. Sci.-Psychology David Bunje Whittier, History Joanna Burcham Bakersfield, Physical Education Holly Burgess Hydesville, Rel. Stud.-Pol. Sci. Wayne Buigher Alexandria, Va., History Nancy-ann Burke San Francisco, History Sharon Burkhart Torrance, English 11- 1 l gg NI 35 lf'jXt , l f' r ls:-ar' .A 'zvrr f ra awk, r , Q A , . 'I' , .1 -Nts V f l fr QQ A , 'f -.ag . , .gg Q 3 -sf X' '5 ri' A , .1 5 f , Q rf fr-an , Syl gr 'J' Q ' l ' 'tr ' - Lap- .2 f-ws-'63 w 1 -:gif ii .K 'W . K X . ' QF, , .15 . 7. .f.gKfj',r ' Wolff. J -0 'ls-.AN ml r "Q, lv 1 7 ,.,aqg - 3 .I ,,..,.' ,gm ' A g1":?" 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Ks 1. -I s ,gig ,3- -9: f..,', pri rf .yi , 'R au. , Q' ,rbauml 6, f ' l l ,1, 'Q 'FW' l l u X T Y ll , -A H , Johnny Bumett Hayward, History Judy Bums Los Altos, Dance Wayne Burton Portland, Ore., Zoology Bob Bussie Van Nuys, Business Economics Linda Butt Sylmar, English James Byers Gilroy, Sociology Stephen Byrd Redondo Beach, History Stephany Cabral San Jose, History Doreen Cahalan Oakland, History Carol Calderhead Los Angeles, Economics Carolyn Caldwell Orinda, Sociology Dianne Caldwell Palos Verdes, English William Caloudes Santa Barbara, Economics Dougal Cameron Tustin, Physics Carlotta Campbell Pasadena, History Denise Campbell Lafayette, Spanish Richard Campbell Vista, Anthropology-Psychology Roger Campos Modesto, Social Sciences Alan Canfield Burbank, Spanish Ron Caple South Lake Tahoe, History Alex Carasa Havana, Cuba, Spanish Timothy Carl Redwood City, Pol. Sci.-History Shirley Carnahan Alhambra, English Nancy Carner Long Beach, Sociology 1- Q' The day IS lmmeasurably long to him who knows not how to value and use it. Vx The university should be the symbol of the highest powers and aspirations of mankind. Kathleen Carpenter Long Beach, Political Science Cynthia Carter Los Angeles, Music Ronald Carter La Crescenta, Physical Education Ruth Carter Santa Barbara, English Linde Cashbaugh Arcadia, Social Sciences Christen Casner San Gabriel, AnthropologySocioIogy Dennis Casidy Burlingame, Speech John Cas-ter Newport Beach, History Leo Cates Bell, Economics Susan Chadwell Ojai, Anthropology Cynthia Chambers Lompoc, Music Ronald Chambers Happy Camp, Zoology Timothy Chamhless Escondido, Sociology Gaston Chan Hong Kong, Mech. Engineering Charlotte Chandler Calabasas, Anthropology Lorena Chandler Santa Clara, Sociology William Chapman Oceanside, Pol. Sci.-History ' Pat Chavez Calexico, Speech-Hearing Kee Pah Ching Singapore, Political Science Dennis Chiniaeff Northridge, Social Sciences Paulette Chiniaeff Rialto, Social Sciences Norman Chodes Los Angeles, Physics , Charles Christensen Vista, Political Science Richard Christensen Mountain View, History Hutchins ' s 5 Z wwf NI 'L NN Q.. .. f 4, .,.. ' :lil P ? N, . , ff' yy r.. N ff-:V-, ftp A, ,A I., W ku Q, ' 4, lv , N 'Z' 55- . y A f 3 R V in sir .X mx W I-Tili 5 H' ,g 4 if-Isa:-f f'3' 2 V -'G 11 'HI r"'ur if- --.. f"X Q r , all fc r --.. ' W' 5 ,A X is f 'G' ' 'N' 1177" ' eisfn L ,Q - . - ' J 'wb i 'f -5 ff?m'3MN.' , 5' N V 1 A vi W I -lr LQ i X .ff ' ' X, 1 TZ, ii A' xg' ' XC, Qs 'U , EIVI x 'M J ' XI'- sf- , rf' x wil' x I-an ,1 as. i Ni' 1 ,jf eb A f , f . an ,, 06 Q 'l f. S- , as ' X I u kbs, vt X f it . -vf f ygiilw 1, 1, .,""',. ,th A .fx .fm . M- W Wilt? i' .,,., 3 -Q1 :T 'NDN :PG-ii -Kg 1 'W ,I f ,J , - R fb 6 E .4-or X., Q D 'G' - , me Qld? 411 .2 '1 ,fe . 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E 2 'i a I! ,Nr ""-it. , Q 15.31 fuf ' ' n K , , W' 4' as., l, f., V i as-nn., SGUIORS Paul Christiansen Hacienda Heights, Mathematics Fred Chung Los Angeles, Economics Adele Chunn ' Sacramento, Spanish Richard Civitate Camarillo, Chemistry Daniel Claffey Santa Barbara, Zoology Christopher Clark Silver Spring, Md., Sociology Paula Clark Long Beech, Social Sciences Rufus Clark Mobile, Ala., Anthropology Veronica Clark Thousand Oaks, Sociology Vickie Clark San Diego, Sociology Walter Clark Los Gatos, Sociology Elizabeth Clary Yorba Linda, Political Science Alis Clausen Los Altos, Music Renee Clendenning Fresno, Dramatic Art Lois Clevenger Santa Maria, History William Clinton San Bernardino, Political Science Donna Cocking San Bernardino, History Brent Coffin Pleasant Hill, Physics Sam Cohen San Mateo, Economics Sharon Cole Los Angeles, History Elaine Coletti San Mateo, French John Colgate Tarzana, Geography April Coleman Fairfield, English John Coleman Bakersfield, Sociology Rodney Collier San Diego, History Christine Collins Burbank, History Theodore Collins Anaheim, Political Science Nadine Connery Glendale, Sociology Jeffrey, Connors Palos Verdes Estates, Biology Michml Conroy Carmel, Art Linda Conti Lafayette, Anthropology Helen Cooksey Berkeley, Art History Edward Cooley Long Beach, Chem. Engineering Janice Cooper Nipomo, English Thomas Cormier Santa Barbara, Political Science Alice Correia Torrance, English l1l0l2S Margaret Corselius Monterey Park, History Elizabeth Cote Santa Monica, History Terrielo Cotton West Covina, Sociology Linda Coutts Covina, Biology Patricia Covo Mexico, Art History Steven Cowen Oceanside, Electrical Engineering Janet Cowger San Jose, History Susan Cowles Long Beach, Art History Kay Cox Lompoc, English Lee Cox Pacific Palisades, English John Cracknell Santa Barbara, Mech. Engineering Jane Craft Cheyenne, Wyo., Zoology Dixie Crawford Buena Park, History Craig Crawshaw Orinda, Mathematics Susan Crasto Camarillo, Home Economics Jeff Crimmel La Jolla, Geography Randall Crirnmel La Jolla, Political Science Catherine Criswell Watsonville, Geography Cheryl Crocker Downey, Anthropology David Cromwell Vacaville, Geology Gary Crooks La Canada, Mech. Engineering Karen Crosby Twentynine Palms, Spanish Sterling Cruz Van Nuys, Art Stephen Cummings Monrovia, Economics Ellin Cunning Santa Barbara, Sociology Glenn Cunningham La Habra, Physical Education Linda Curry Newport Beach, Political Science Vicki Cypherd Long Beach, Art John Daggett South Pasadena, Anthropology Ruth Dakan Duluth, Minn., Art History Kathleen Daly Santa Monica, English Jaan Dandona Santa Barbara, Political Science Nikki Daphne Hillsborough, Home Economies Michele Dart Chowchilla, Physical Education Wendy Davee San Jose, Philosophy Jane Davey Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, History Ginny David Hayward, History Tate Davie Pacific Palisades, Sociology Joan Davies Van Nuys, Speech-Hearing Charles Davis San Diego, Biology Earl Davis Vista, Physics Guy Davis San Diego, Zoology Linda Davis St. Louis, Mo., Spanish Marilyn Davis Long Beach, History Michael Davis Santa Barbara, Sociology Nancy Davis Huntington Beach, Sociology Pamela Davis Glendale, History Q. Y 1 'H' ,W Q Y I. ,QQ i 1- ' xwl 1 42 V iii, L' "J ' Q . fi' 4' Tr any is Ag J Q1 P. ff, f ' f,-:,5.- i"',A Katt?" - if. A.. 4 vs 3' "CN 1-Q ' va in s -c-v- TE- ,Y ' L" so . ik 1 1 P Q-'15 'Xa-G i" ' I fs 1 ala! ID f ,Q ' 1 ri. .45 f 4-if Alf ' '49 '- f ' x 1 4 . .X .::. f rm " P-5' 1 . , , nu' -3 5 'LT as .'? ,,'Q'X! -r I 42:9 i . -Avi , X I2 it Al Q ' -4' Y 7 -6, X - X l or J.:- ,QTA .: e A' .3 ive. o' M kr-'TV :is ffib .fx ist? will 4::':r,,! y K .1 1 - . :ga A " - 1--vp E 1? f 'ff 5- l 1 r aa, ,l 5' L 1 , 'al 53. S1 5 Q X: "ff xx, S J l.,i'T'Qd 4, it J C . -, J 15- asia 'I X sa., " ang' . w - I L: A, , ie., auflxi l 'fx ' .Y ' 'Wfrrv I Wayne Davis "'2'i' ..,-- Wifi me ie . 1 f fy Pi . 'Q Q 4 'f , 1 Q L7 "5 ' V . ,v Y- , . , C, , N .-vo QI , -I V .1 -1 5 X 5 -W V -V ' - Y L V Y M - " Q , 1- 'ivy-w-f-Wgw L S ' ,flf Rf' ' W ' as Q ' 1 ' r be . Ei , Q, Uv --x bl' y 'V il TLVNX . , ,.. 77 " wr . " " A fr-np QF: ' ' "' H ff' l K fi Y A4 'rr ' ir 'R' Q, f I Q . -5 ll 1 Q -yi . ,., V -4 -f -" H l 1 x D- V , 1 Xi K A l Q Y ' '. 'gs , Z . 24 L ' f ' Y' K, -'ir , 17- 43" Y l 21? Q X - '--.f-if 1 "' 1111, ii '-1 4'-'1-P' 1 X l X - " -0' 1 Q L . .j i X 1 - X hz rj A if E ' . bu. 1 sy uw A9 Q Q 7 si' V l U A F f.: H H 'MAP gg- lug Q5 . 75+ 3 Z5 ,, ,Q 'F C -4 -0 "3 E172 1 J, gy -3 , A , l -ra L Love is a canvas furnished by Nature and embroidered by imagination. - Voltaire Santa Ana, Environmental Biology Wayne Davis Erie, Pa., Chemical Engineering Greg DeBow Santa Rosa, Electronic Eng. Joanne DeFriez Oakland, English Sarah Degasis San Marino, Sociology Carla Degener Whittier, Sociology Jule Dagracie La Verne, Speech Larry Deis San Jose, Mathematics William Delameter Pacific Palisades, Mech. Eng. Antonia Dallamonica Hawthorne, Nev., Math.-Philosophy Collette De Medeiros Tulare, Physical Education Rusell Dember Ventura, Physics Wolfgang Dengler Northridge, Zoology Wayne Dequer Hawthorne, History-Anthro. John Desha Rancho Sante Fe, History Chuck Destrn Whittier, History Alice Dillon Los Angeles, Anthropology Thomas Dimmitt Santa Clara, Economics John Distel Goleta, Rhetoric-Economics Robert Divine La Mesa, Political Science Leslie Dixon San Marino, Speech-Hearing Garatt DoFoo Palo Alto, Mathematics Darryl Doke Saratoga, Political Science William Doke Redondo Beach, Zoology Curt Dommeyer San Jose, Economics Paul Dougl San Jose, Political Science Todd Downing Lakewood, Economics Jerry Dozoretz Studio City, Philosophy Marsha Drake Ormond Beach, Fla., Social Sciences Thomas Drew Fresno, Economics -lun... ,, ...,.,, ,. una- ',-. ,-,.,.,,.-so " - - VY! "-- 4" L' '1-ze --- -.Q ..... ., v-1 '53i!'uin-iq.:-:tn-Q t ,A 1 - V R 5 A -acifvsiee-:ez-v --afa,Jf1-T 4' Y, , .1 give, Y "" Q-evans... .:..-lmaaafey Am-vzfmmzx-. mms. wa wus. arms- 1s.....g.aw' rj'-in-1 .,, ' - - : . m-Lmafi?-9-.i-sz:-4-tis.-er1,5g:gv1F+ 2-s. Genius develops in quiet places, character out in the full current of human life. Twila Driver Saugus, English James Du Hamel Fullerton, Zoology Boyce Duke Inglewood, Chemistry Richard Dunford Fairfax, Physical Education Carolyn Dusenbury Torrance, Political Science Toni Dwiggins Malibu, Russian David Eakle York, Penn., Mech. Eng. Susan Easton Arcadia, History Vallard Eding Palto Alto, Psychology-Math. Catherine Edwards Houston, Texas, Pol. Sci. Dana Edwards Pottsville, Anthropology Roger Edwards Santa Fe Springs, Phy.Ed. Kathy Effertz Northridge, Home Economics Danielle Egli Santa Monica, Sociology James Eisenhert Carmichael, Economics Jay Elbal San Antonio, Tex., Phys. Ed. Mary Ellis Pasadena, Political Science Charles Ellsworth Tujunga, Mathematics Robert Elmore San Jose, Physics Joyce Elrod Glendora, Anthropology Jayne Emaott Baldwin Park, English Cathy Engel Redondo Beach, Zoology Robert Engel Solana Beach, Zoology-Anthro. Christine Engquist La Canada, Social Science Lincoln WX ' J All Q-2 . '22 my 1 y Ci 43, 1 ,, 5, i 4 -as ,wi f ,, '- 1 Q eff f. My 2 J . I of X "Sv V K. ll ' Aa 3 - ff ..,fj so x., Q I -I --- " ' M, ' W- 'F I 'J g,.El,.fl , 1 fx 'R'-7 ,..4v a,'f" .1iLi Y, .f-'77 'ii I . , A, Y If , i .. 4 I . .vm o ,,,, X , . , , K 'lt ' Il uf, Q -'X ' ,Ma . .WL J V 'fl ws., '35, -0 l. 'gn-,' V f' iii X Vrsy, I l K ,J'+-'X x-f-W A M A o ff ' r' ,l ,, ' " 1-px, .,. N i l J I. ' ,. -f ' f ,ff - ,-,faq ' ' ,.f M I ' 'S I i 35 Wx " ' at 'ra as 'I-T ,N ,, 1 ' f'-ni , as f-1' il' ' A 'Ser ."' it 4 , Q' , g ik 4 , .""' lv, A17-,,w..v. , R , I . Wfvrnilgmmt "- -2 Q 4 5' 7' IV ws. it ff g l 44- K Z -T' 1' iff Qi l -J ls I 1 :P ' fc rf , , ,- , 4 , ,av-az' ','a""a' it is 1 X 5 1 i -A . J-fp if r - -- V .3 - . F. T ' ,--f,s- -v ' I' C 4 '. 'I' - ' I " V V, , I i- ,J f , In If H , N ,,, 'JT' Q . 7 Q 4 ' Q 9 f, we ou:- N -.- r l fl' sa , 'nv 'vfv IE. , Q 'Tr' YK "'? f, ,. ' ' ,X 5 xx! 1 - - Y' ' - A , -ew . l 5.1, -t,.." " " - -'aaa ' T'-Calm A' I 1 iq- 4 55 s Rf' ,Q ,. f K Y fc - .,k , P -P ' 'ff ' X- Q 6 1 -ffm, - H, fm' ff 4' af- 4- at at ' A at -aa fc A 1 T F., 'F 'W GN! nv fo , N bf ,, v' fr , . - Y ll., I . X th' A l1l0l2S Kathy -Enloa Santa Barbara, Drama Jean Eppendorf Laguna Beach, Art Susan Enola Daly City, Sociology Daniel Eskelson La Canada, Political Science Jack Evans Tustin, History Susan Ervin Seal Beach, Sociology Sandra Etnire EI Centro, German Peggy Ettelson Tarzana, French Richard Eubanks Taft, Political Science Carole Evans Taft, Mathematics Cindy Evans Hollywood, Physical Education John Evard Los Altos, Rel. Studies-Hist. Alice Fadenrecht Pacifica, Spanish Sharon Farrar Fillimore, English Walter Fell Paso Robles, Political Science Robert Ferro Thousand Oaks, Econ.-Pol. Sci. Diane Fetherston Torrance, English Janice Fillip Walnut Creek, History Sylvan Finestone Riverside, Political Science James F innerty San Diego, Political Science Charles Finney Stockton, History Altree Fischer Northridge, Anthropology Jeffrey Fischmann Los Angeles, Political Science Marcia Fish San Anselmo, History Jane Fisher Altadena, English Susan Fisher Palo Alto, English Emmett Fiske Mariposa, Economics-Anthropology Michael Fitzgerald Los Gatos, Social Sciences Robert Fitzwater Los Angeles, Economics Rodney Fivelstad Inglewood, History Timothy Flake Pomona, Tutorial-Anthropology Paula Flatt San Jose, Sociology Antonia Fleck Escondido, German Scott Fleener Long Beach, Social Sciences Tonya Fleming Riverside, Sociology-Anthropology Thomas Flickingar Los Altos, Social Sciences David Fox Santa Barbara, Psychology Frances Fletcher Ventura, Dramatic Art Linda Floreen Tarzana, English Donna Fohsrt Malibu, Physical Education Donna Follmer Richmond, Political Science Sherry Fondren Pt. Hueneme, Spanish Jack Forrest Albany, Anthropology Maryann Forst Long Beach, Social Sciences Barbara Foster Saratoga, Art Steven Fox Campbell, Anthropology Ruben Frase Redlands, Physical Education Linda Freede Canoga Park, Mathematics Laurie Freeman Berkeley, Spanish-French Mark Freter Pacific Palisades, Pol. Sci.-Econ. Fred Friedman Los Angeles, Mech. Eng. Christopher Friar Santa Barbara, Zoology Joyce Friesen Pixley, Sociology Alan Fritchoff Santa Barbara, Mathematics Janet Fuller Camarillo, Art History Mariorie Fuller Santa Barbara, Sociology Melinda Funk Bakersfield, Sociology Sandi Fuhriman Monterey Park, History Linda Fuselier San Jose, English Rosemary Gelanda Torrance, History Dorothy Gallagher Inglewood, History Anthony Gallaudet Laguna Beach, Economics Thomas Gandy Redding, Zoology Joel Garcia Tehachapi, Political Science Knute T. Garcken Oxnard, Mathematics Robert Gardner Spring Valley, Math-Psych. Stanley Gerlington San Mateo, Political Science Jeanne Garner Greenbree, Anthropology Jacques Garnier Los Angeles, French f 'n' ., ,.. One joy dispels a hundred cares. Chinese proverb gn .ff .me 0, -, T s. K -J 11 wx ,t,'-will an-Q 'S If , W ,li if , I f ,I K , .li ' . . , ' v' 5 pc .A - , V, ., .,. 6 ME' is ' , 'YT' ' 'Z 'Zi ,M xy-:f -Q! Q' F3 GI 1 'L' Q9 H-ea, Awe. ,M QS f.,x 5,225 r ff' ., W 4 1' awww uw' " K f teena ,... ,, A 1 ' .f V ri :R I C Y '52 ll '23 R W if-lit lov f as KX: , ll .. 1+- ,4- Htl' .-cc.. ' 1--- A --. fm - .1 -I H K H,-A It 'art . , cggb'-souls . " "fear-"'3" 'iw T . 'E K -- -. "Hin it . Uni M - T, Jef Q s lf, . "'f - fgxi--sl . v , , "mv -D Q ' .a-un... -. A, X 4 M ,...-," ' - taxiway- , X JL. gf' "F:-. W 5-'W ' ,. , , , ., .i.i '. 53 hg:,x. N' Q 'N Ain s duh- - - .ss Q -3 ti - T L ' . W " was "' "5 M44 , , ' A A' . ,.g,+.,"'9'L-'Tw'-U to - 1 ,Ds V ' xslt' 'vgg - ' ,, will-.', 2 f'Lii""f-'1':"""i l LW' '- ."' -"f--1 2-gf?'1:'-K .- ft l. - -v- ' i' 1-il-'f ""' G Y Q-'S+'-u..?:,g -V A A ' Q ,ui 4,4 TLP.. I . , 'ZA' ext-, v t Q 'S -.. -'- 1' . ' .' G 1 ' """"L1. . - - . ' ,' '-.J . ' ' -- -. .. 'fu -nm -fn-Pr -f f as .,..- We ,. -3 . r 5. ,ft f"' , 'cvs-' 'U htm, 1 . ..-YF-gsm' Q f. ' fr , .ge ml 3' , , . , f- D' J Q- ,'y"mx --.af X rl - G 'lo K - -N t-, ra-,,,.,.' ' H.. ,- -, 'za -B, f--so -at I . i -, 1?! ia. Tyan QI- ,. 'M ,W ,V ,, ' ,.. F"T',... tg-A" ' 'P it X aio- 1 gig Q' " . ,. "'I bw """.f"" 'vez' . av, --4 uvwwnv-1 'S ff' ,. av- ss , :lr 'wa- .. ,Q , F , , 1, ll..-. M' . T - voip?-sae 5, L ,E . Q .'.' 1 Cx 'Q' ,Y ps. . . v- . N 1 4' -., ' K 'A-sa- :QQ 45:-1 :Dul- , ,fs -gain-' , i , V i 'tg-sg H7251 4 . . ,.. . su.--V xvjnf. ..- wq jg' ' ' - in ,gr-1 4 . ' 5'- .. .gl . -"1 li -.:',.jjf 4 Cv' . qos-. -bl-0 'N wo, , X F: iis."':t!-I S.. '- " 1 an ,-Q.: ..:' Alf' 45 F: ' nf., n 4, 1 A . s '. w-.M .pl up 'ff 'yn--a A i at '3 Q f" 'S-54, 3 K .ff-sf f' 'ear r- -Q' ,,--. - Lia es A :fe an 4, E1 uf' ,Q f' . AQ' 1 A-R-'sa 1:77 'vu fri , 4 a, ' -a xg' f 5-'V ls .6 pg Tw., ""'.,i X, Q, 55 , hd .- .4 . ffl if '17 'Y .BK-. I 'f' I .1 ' if: W! ' , Q.. J f 'fl E A 1' ' YZ, 4 '-QP, . Rf 0 Q Ang. I x.- v,. , in "' - -11 I N. s A 4135 ...af 5 , '35 : ge 1- ..1 A if, 1 l -.4 ' X, . I 1 . Qi .W ,". " u .- - N l ., . X 'Q ' i . - f P , if xg. A SGHIQR Martha Garrett West Covina, Home Economics Samela Garvin Carpinteria, Art History Richard Gayle San Jose, Political Science Gary Geiger San Mateo, Physical Education Martha Geist Auburn, Economics Eugene Geller Los Angeles, Political Science Robert Gerard Sylmar, French David Gerhardt Long Beach, Mech. Eng. Mary Gerhardt South Pasadena, English Karen Gernhardt Santa Maria, History Ronald Gerron Laguna, Political Science Chris Gevorkian Glendora, Anthropology Carol Gibson Hollister, Zoology Don Gibson Sylmar, Electrical Engineering Joan Gibson Sepulveda, History Jolene Gibson San Pedro, Mathematics Bill Gielow Davis, Zoology Richard Gilbert Tarzana, Economics Diane Gilchrist Pomona, Speech-Hearing Elizabeth Gilchrist Sante Barbara, History Randi Glick Encino, Classics Patricia Godwin Delano, History John Goebel West Covina, Economics Mary Goldstein Reseda, Speech-Hearing Gregory Gomes Oakdale, Political Science Lynette Gonzales Los Angeles, Psychology Vicki Gonzales Westchester, Sociology Joseph Gonzalez Carpinteria, History Lisa Goodlew Los Angeles, Social Sciences Michael Goodrich Long Beach, History Jerry Gossner Placewille, Mathematics Paula Goody Pasadena, History HIORS Eric Gourley Carson City, Nev., Anthropology Donald Graham Topanga, Political Science John Granholm Thousand Oaks, Pwchology Sheila Grant Santa Barbara, French Barbara Grantier Menlo Park, Anthropology Robin Gray Granada Hills, English Ann Greening Visalia, Physical Education Susan Gregg Menlo Park, Sociology John Granfell Rialto, Biology Carol Gressingh Santa Ana, Home Economics Elaine Greynald Sherman Oaks, Economics Laura Grigarick Davis, Social Sciences Nancy Griggs West Covina, French Pete Grim La Jolla, Psychology Linda Grunsky Newport Beach, Economics Cheryl G uerin Millbrae, French Ellen Guethlein Parlier, English Glen Gustafson Laguna Beach, Geography Charles G ulyash Ukiah, Zoology Thomas Gurnae Campbell, Anthropology-History James Gutman Pomona, History-Pol. Sci. Betsy Gwyn Malibu, Art History Lynn Hachten Anaheim, Dance Arleen Hacker Chino, English Lawrence Haff Sunnyvale, Political Science Pamela Hagewood Santa Clara, Social Science Linda Haite Redlands, English Robert Halcomh Los Alamitos, Economics Barbara Hall Glenview, Ill., History Peter Hallenbeck Woodland, Economics Betty .lo Halpern Coronado, Anthro.-Soc. Sci. Robert Hamilton Santa Barbara, Elec. Eng. Linda Hanks Bakersfield, English-Anthropology Sharon l-lann Salem, Ore., French Leslie Hanna Berkeley, Chemistry Alan Hanson Sunnyvale, Economics Vriginia Harbaugh Bakersfield, History Lynn Hardison Corona, Sociology Melana Hare Los Altos, Psychology f t' - K P - L V r -if I A 41:1 Vzzv' I . , "1 i '7' lf? at 1 'AL Hi Y fad 'i'!.':zv o ...L "Ja- fl of 'ff 'v'J 'nk Wljjyr ,...y.pp-J ,I , - -9 fi in 'J-fl ...f Q21 I ii' f, T.bnb .- "" JI' .fIIfI'ff?!" ,slim ,, be I f f l I 1 N 5 l' Q 2 an .va 1' ll . -rf-' 5 Q i Q 3, -,A f 9 15,1-'egasl 0 L l ,ew , . sf' -was .? I i ---qu if I A ' X Yo -- xv' ,- ' I 4 'S ' X 3 3 4"ur I 'exo Il - - fi X . A , ,. UL 59,7 Q X.:.r V - ' .4 1 yi "E" 4. li ' erm? 'X 'Es E , .il ' l 'Jw lf o-1 'Yip' g ll s 3 A "X d in ,xx It -71.119 i swf" nal-U" ...naw fi 5 -qs 3 , 'Q ' ,, r , xl, .' -4. ' , -i ' - af 1 J' ' ,fs - .. , We 'S X.. . an Q lax A' .. 4, Msg 'Sli 1-'fp -6 i A lean: f lo A ,Q .' if ' -'fs ' 'J "9 . gf Q S53 rx A 4 1 . A J' y In I 411, X i fkx l 'V Jmff, SRTJN 7 , 1 nl ' f l . 4' ff 1 Q , 'V ' filet: I "'9' l 4 . f ang ,K '-4' , -gg Q r..,.: What instruction is more effectual than self-instruction? -Thackeray Ron Harrington Pacific Palisades, Bus. Econ. Diane Harris Wheat Ridge, Colo., Spanish Earl Harris Phoenix, Ari., Sociology Harriet Harris San Francisco, English Paul Harris Atwater, Political Science Delayns Harthorn Ventura, Spanish Carol Hartunian Beverly Hills, Art Shirley Harvey Simi Valley, Sociology William Haskett La Jolla, Math.-Econ. Sandi Hattenbach Los Angeles, Sociology Walter Haughton Palo Alto, Bus. Econ. Darleen Hayball Goleta, Sociology Rachel Hayes Pensacola, Fla. Sociology Edgar Hazleton La Jolla, Philosophy Susan Hedberg Van Nuys, Anthropology Lynda Hedden Hillsborough, History Eleanor Heibel Tustin, English-Rel. Stud. Michael Heil Gardena, Sociology James Heino Chico, Pre-Law Linda Heller San Jose, Economics Phillip Heller Burbank, Asian Studies David Helman Colton, History Robert Helms San Mateo, Mathematics Charles Henderson Seal Beach, English Gay Henderson San Bernardino, Anthropology Nancy Henderson New York City, Home Economics Craig Hendrickson Inglewood, Physical Education Sue Herrington Arcadia, History Vicki Hmel Alhambra, English Joanne Hewitt Sonoma, Sociology l 319 l1lOl2S Laura Hibberd Costa Mesa, English Susan Hibbs Palo Alto, Social Sciences Martha Higgin La Canada, History Elizabeth Higgins Buena Park, Sociology Kathleen Higgins Hermosa Beach, Historv Suzanne Hiler San Jose, Social Sciences Meredith Hill Los Altos, French Roger Hill Santa Barbara, History Lois Hiromoto Watsonville, Economics Thomas Hodgkinson Ventura, Econ.-Pol.Sci. John Hofman Long Beach, Psychology Holly Holkesvick Fullerton, English Mark Hollan Oxnard, Chemical Engineering Douglas Hollar Warsaw, Ind., Economics Diana Hollister San Marino, Sociology Lisa Holm Carmichael, Zoology Cheryl Holman Napa, Anthropology Jan Holman Downey, Speech-H earing Graham Holmboe Pleasant Hill, Zoology Andy Holmsr Alameda, History Jeffrey Holt Santa Barbara, History Pamela Holt Los Anaeles. Pol. Sci. Stevan Honeggu Oakley, Economics Robin Hook Taft, Biology The stomach is the only part of man which can be fully satisfied. The yearning of man 's brain for new knowledge...is an appetite which cannot be appeased. -Edison t l at ' . , ' L E E- "Z if " ' ' " ,B ,fe g ,fe-B ,a I 'A 5 ? U7 ' -5 ' . . ' I H ll W I ' -VIE ' H llll 5:1 W if Z Y 1' Q--- ,,,, -I .fi-X, . f' 'fy' f' 1 B . . , " Y' .1 V - ' Y I iii 4 '- A-:Z:.:. i A A-3, -il, 'AR "' 'Q' -19? l ,,', , Y 'cp : 4 -- "' v' , . can -1' x if! lu in 4+ ,ff-1 N'---4 C19 ,gig ' 'fi - s Mui , V, K ff' 1' 9 g e in .253 L A h H A if ' I I i -.H ya f - Sill' 5534"-."',ll ll" ' 'Fx ' . A ' A Q, , - mi 4"', is 'vs '-L .I I R J . gf L- Aj ' ir- :97 ' ff 3 P iv W na Q .1 4 ' M 'Sv .I , , ,,, any Q es Q I 73 A ly - """5 - P ' , R K-5' W wwf, A 1-1? IW gf F x, X K X K 6 '13 'R 4,-3 I 'L' 'si-A Q f"-A ksrrr -J' X Li if Al lggtaiux I V f.---Ff' f3 g if 4 ' N fr y , - r Q y " Aw 'G' -"' Q, Fa A Q ,'.. 4. X' ' . A 1 43 ' I In 1 f- ' "A' ' I " J Q, fi' Fil so LL I , " ' -A L ir W - I , , as 1 ts A. I 2 3' I T If X - x ' - .- N4 7 .IK ,Og 19 ntg, 4- - -3 f '85 Q: 1.-JH, .-. tv:-V X'-r' .6 l '30 26' 4 ...fs ev 1 . if. 1 1-av '1Q'Vhl' I 'uv A: t , .Xu 411 'ETD I 9 , 1T"'vvl Q... A-gi 'iff Gail Hopkins Lafayette, Hispanic Civilization Chet Hom Pasadena, Philosophy James Homer Manhattan Beach, Economics William Hon Los Angeles, Political Science Charlene Howell Pacific Grove, Sociology Edward Howland Syracuw, N.Y., Art George Hoxie San Marino, Economics Edward Hudson Fresno, Zoology Susan Huebner Pasadena, English Michael Hughes Burlingame, Pol. Sci.-History George Hull Tarzana, Anthropology Penny Hulse San Bernardino, Home Economics DeEtte Hunter Manhattan Beach, History Jill Hunter Manhattan Beach, Sociology Kathryn Hunter Los Angeles, History Loren Huntley Playa del Rey, English-French Richard Huntley San Marino, English Susan Huntoon Indio, Anthropology Bill Hunsberger Glendale, History Julia Huntsman Altadena, Music Barbara Hum Burbank, History Magdalena Huwe Glendale, German Jeanne laoono San Pedro, Political Science Janis Inman Woodland Hills, Anthropology Katrine lnouye Ventura, Sociology Robert lntelsimone Burlingame, Rel. Stu.-Phil. Charles Ireland Santa Barbara, Ele. Eng. Gail Irvine Vandenberg, Biology Sally Irwin San Diego, English Cathy lsgrig La Crescenta, Social Sciences Holmes Ives Santa Barbara, History Susan Jacobmn San Mateo, Religious Studies Nancy Jaeb Lompoc, Home Economics John James El Monte, Zoology Bob Jean Los Gatos, History Kent Jeffrey Greenbrae, Geography Lynnea Jenkins Santa Ana, French James Jenks Long Beach, History Helen Johnson Newport Beach, History Jeanne Johnson Oakdale, English Karen Johnson Arcadia, History Kathryn Johnson San Jose, English-Anthropology Kenneth Johnson Tustin, Economics Linda Johnston Newport Beach, Spanish Allen Jones Palos Verdes, Zoology Douglas Jones Alamo, Geography Janis Jones San Rafael, English-A nthropology Kathleen Jones La Crescenta, English SGHIORS We are different, you and me.' sifted of separate sands from separate seas. We are different, you and me: like nothing each ofus wouldbe, if you and me were turned to we. -Michael L. Fram 'Fir . Marion Jones f ,- Los Angeles, Anthropology - -R,-tl. t V ' ' Richard Jones , -' . San Jose, Electrical Engineering ll 1 A Susan Jones :- 3 , - La Jolla, Anthropology it '. Eleanor Kadin RQ ' - gf Santa Cruz, Psychology 1 . " -' , u f' Robert Kama if ' i Alameda, History ' - John Kane 'le ' North Plainfield,N,J.,Russ.-Econ. 9 Barbara Kanemoto Los Angeles, History Mac Kaplowitz Los Altos, English Orla Kam A. 5.- Brooks, Anthropology Leslie Karp Goleta, Spanish Michael Katims Modesto, History Harvey Katz Monterey Park, Zoology Patricia Kausen f- Giendale, Physical Education Diane Kay Fullerton, Social Sciences John Kaye Stockton, Pol. Sci. Margaret Keefe Santa Paula, History Judy Kellar Santa Rosa, French Bob Kennedy La Canada, Economics Julie Kennedy Menlo Park, Anthropology Mary Kennedy Safford, Ariz., Sociology Reginald Kennedy -.. Nevada City, Anthropology Thomas Kennedy Peidmont, Economics Dorothy Kepner , , Davis, Social Sciences Q N Laurie Kerr ' Long Beach, Spanish Qi : Y JE? 1 I Y -'sn nf" A-...er is ..,. 4: ,ix em Q , A - 'X . - il l fvv li 5,, 3h V 1-:: - ' A " 'f 'TB f. A ' f,ii'?'Ii?"'i ' 5 W"-1' ,. 1 , 3 4 U 5'-:fs 't' Q , an , -4 L , , , ' gk' V. ' 'x-RAE? A f . fu ' ,dl ,-.1 ae ,'-r TN-v-.,a 'i rm -luv ,l 1-sie! of Q 't 'R -as , - ,A ,, zgifxf? . fx ix Q59 ii 1 A 'L - f ' In ,Z 'S Gr . , -pr HJ I' -- I. 'V A ' 1 jf' .. A, el X ei., LP F 3 X - L -1 . vm rg.: 'C' f, ea-A .A 1 H rf 11' g 'i i il 'i".1 V -61:5 NM, 1 1 1,1 'QQ' Y .W t V 7 S w '-sa -.4 04' 'Q-JI' 1 fr. Sg?1'fuisVHa:g M, .. l 'ZS' 1 sat ,A .7' it ,, 3 L Y WJ, gl . 1535 , at .- ' 'lie S , . ' E , , l '-5 :rg 3 N 5 f ' ,. : fl f l 1 . F W .. . ,M we ., 4 Ii l ....-. if xr ,Q ,A Linda Keyser Stockton, Social Sciences Mahdy Khaiyat Saudi. Arabia, Eng.-Pol. Sci. George Kieffer Hillsborough, History-Pol. Sci. James Kilgore San Rafael, Economics Christine Killian Livermore, History Peter Kimball Covina, Political Science Catharine Kindig Pasadena, Art Susan King Glendale, Social Sciences Sallie Kinne Claremont, Social Sciences Peggy Kirihara Dinuba, Anthropology Kathryn Kirkby Carpinteria, Anthropology Carol Kleinhofer Whittier, Social Sciences Susan Klier Torrance, Social Sciences Christopher Kloek Alhambra, Mathematics Catherine Knapp Santa Barbara, Political Science Suzanne Knauf Oceanside, Political Science Cynthia Knight Irvine, Anthropology-History Janet Knight Burbank, French Barbara Kocltos Oakland, History Thomas Koff Encino, Zoology Donna Kohl Mission Viejo, Sociology Richard Kolberg Monrovia, History Michael Komins Los Angeles, Economics Linda Kerber No. Hollywood, French Murray Kornblit Moorpark, Zoology Steve Koskela San Bruno, Political Science Kathleen Koski Sacramento, Sociology Timothy Kosub Ojai, English Ian Kramer San Diego, Zoology Konstance Krantz Redlands, English William Krend Covina, History Robert Kress La Crescenta, Pol. Sci. Michael Krieg Santa Fe Springs, Anthropology Kristine Kuhl Woodland Hills, History Fumiko Kurosawa Yokyo, Mathematiw Judith Kuryla Swampscott, Mass., Spanish Delores Kuyper Granada Hills, Home Economics Cheryl Lacy Fullerton, Physical Education Kenneth Laird Palo Alto, Chemistry Lam Tak-Yuk Hong Kong, Chem. Eng. V 323 l1lOl2 David Lamkin Alhambra, English Linda Landuoci San Francicso, History Dana Lane Modesto, Sociology Frank Lange Buena Park, English Jeffrey Lant Los Angeles, Hist.-PoI.Sci. Janine Larwn El Segundo, Psychology Janet Larson Fremont, Political Scienm Judy Larson Whittier, English Liana Latka Sherman Oaks, Speech-Hearing Carole Law Santa Maria, Zoology Marilee Lawrence Redlands, Anthropology Donald Lawson Pasadena, Hist.-Pol. Sci. Jo Leach La Mesa, Economics Judy Lean Arcadia, Anthropology Sandy Leckie San Ramon, Sociology Dianne Lee Ontario, Anthropology Marilyn Lee Woodland Hills, Political Science Robin Lee Glendale, Social Sciences Anne Lefever Ventura, Physical Education Thomas Leger China Tex., Political Science Kathleen Lemaster Montclair, English Peter Lemish San Rafael, History Linda Leonhardt Santa Monica, History Amy Lepon Wilmington, Spanish Stephen Levandowski Anaheim, Math-Economics Terrence Leveille Altadena, Political Science Nancy Leverette Napa, Anthro.-PoI.Sci. Adam Lewis La Mesa, Philosophy Larry Lewis Redlands, Political Science Lyndell Lewk Lodi, French Lynne Lewis Ventura, Speech Ronald Lewis Inglewood, Soc.-Psych. Marsha Ley Felton, History Linda Lindelef Los Angeles, Anthropology Lois Lindemann Whittier, Geography Susan Linder Los Angeles, Home Economics Rus Lindgren Concord, Political Science Michael Lifton Pasadena, English Stan Lindberg Pacific Grove, Political Science Sandra Livingston Portuguese Bend Club, PoI,Sci. Richard Llewellyn Encino, Social Sciences Lynne Locke Santa Barbara, English Nancy Locke Menlo Park, Sociology Karen Lode Santa Maria, Art Eleanor Lodge Reseda, English TK, 5 MW ' ' -"' We V -Q , ,. Q3 as no -Q if ' V , , N N I 4 Pi' R F .s .1 I 1 ., is 6 ,. ' x N QQ 3 K l I . ,fo ' , ' -4 lx J A like Q " ' .M ,, , i J 'lf I S.. .Sf , rw ' Q 41' t1'uvs.t -1-J 4 f "Qs ,, -0' 'W' fb 'Q ," ,W L' ll -J ' X 5 J H A U uf ,1- , A X 'M an ' 5. 5 5 3- Q h Q ,.,.,, .al-M f 1 ' li as 3 6: A 4- so Q we - T A gm R I 1 ,, 4 N V'-7 --lf J, 'ig' 'al W7 glut,-cj" X we , 'Q Q y ,A , Q f' . IX X . 5 1 , A , F 1 Q -1 f l E' 7 , ,lr ,ff ii W A ,A - " v K Jig ,. I by , -, li ll .- '55 2252 , Y EQ? i -fp V X :L V' if' F' a.,, 1 ' ,gy 3 A ,lsi f Si' 4' 'Q 'R , 3? 'T ' N' ' " H 'I . " Ei -cv, vi'--Rf v, V 'Hi ,an -1 4 f i - -'Wim . M Ffh' ' N V ' 'Ig W X J V4 V' 'f , W 4 I 1 . , S ' .. y V L' "f "V f W . .. ,,, L: V 1 ,tr I 1 Q f-"I , ' Q . 'A l 4 T . gg-gr-X - ,. -uf. 3279 y -1 -of fir' .I Frank Lynn Hillsborough, Political Science Judith Lyons Los Angeles, Dramatic Art Michael Lyons Covina, Political Science Katherine MacCIuer Santa Barbara, History Scott MacCluer Palos Verdes, Physical Education Susan Mack Woodland Hills, Political Science Gail Maddock Fallbrook, Speech-Hearing Marci Maddock South Pasadena, Social Sciences Edward Madsen Solvang, Physics Mark Maher Astoria, Ore., Pol.-Sci.-Russ. Steven Maioewsky Riverside, Electrical Eng. Robert Mallinokrodt Salt Lake City, Utah, Elec.Eng. H , A lx .- tw 4' r H 1 r ' i I:"- m e :,' 25, , P g c -1. M xv Stanford Loeb Claremont, Zoology Pamela Long Long Beach, Social Sciences Santa Barbara, Sociology Evelyn Lopez Santa Barbara, Spanish William Lovelace Pasadena, Political Science Roger Lowe Lawndale, Mathematics . 71 r A J Candace Lopez P I I 1 - F? Norene Lowry 1, Alhambra, Anthropology Terry Loyd G 1 "-- Lompoc, Political Science : ,, ' .3 ' Richard Luboff Joyce Lucas Santa Barbara, English Vicki Ludwick Claremont, Anthropology Daniel Lundy Los Angeles, Anthropology E .gk ?' M -zsf Gardena, Political Science I ll M If ,ai 1 rQs fn ' -.v -:av , -un 5f :x ' - Judith Lundy Del Mar, Sociology Robert Lundy Coronado, Human Ecology Michael Luros Northridge, Political Science 1 Becky Luu Los Alamitos, French Sumn Lutz Oakland, History Charley Lux Whittier, Electrical Engineering v-'. f .4 f 41 , i A, 'Y .fi . H x x A :Q I a lma ' 3 3 . 'Q - . fi 1 , 4: "" ' 'f 4- 4:-1 Ta f' L ' 'P '-v ,V xy , A t 4-.A N K -if if o k ,X , K . 4 i is r By space the universe embraces me and swallows me up like an atom, by thought l embrace the universe. -Pascal SGHIORS Larry Mandel Los Angeles, History Melinda Mantle San Gabriel, English Tod Marder Newport Beach, Art History Lee Margulies Encino, Political Science Elaine Marino Menlo Park, Political Science Carl Markov Lancamer, History Craig Marks Stockton, Pol. Sci .-Hist. Dennis Marston Pasadena, Chemical Engineering Paul Marti San Jose, History Janie Martin LaJolIa, History Linda Martin Santa Barbara, Home Economics Mary Martin Piedmont, History Pat Martin La Puente, Physical Education Darold Maxwell Antioch, Economics Mamie Maxwell Bakersfield, History Cheryl May Santa Barbara, Sociology Cheryl Mayfield Belmont, English Jayne Mazikowski Merced, Economics Michael McAIpin Wheatland, Geography Sally McArthur Orange, History Janet McBride Los Angeles, History Kathleen McCarthy Palm Springs, Social Sciences Glenn McChesney Tiburon, Social Sciences John McCoy San Bernardino, Mathematics Robert McCoy San Bernardino, Mathematics Shirley McCuistion Corona del Mar, Music Daniel McDonald Whittier, Chemistry Patricia McDonald Bakersfield, Sociology Patricia McEvoy Ventura, Sociology Dorothy McEwen Whittier, Anthropology David McGinnis Fresno, Englidm Ardis Mcfovney Houston, Tex., History Charles McGregor Madera, Zoology Kim McGuire Los Altos, Anthropology Sue Mclnerney Thousand Oaks, Philosophy Anne Mclnnis Seal Beach, History Kay Mclnnis N.AS. Lemoore, Psychology Craig McKee Benicia, Anthropology Kevin McKenna San Jose, History Larry McKenna Lc npoc, Sociology .Emily McKihben Berkeley, Music James McKihben Oakland, Spanish Karen McMahan Palos Verdes, History Carol McMillan Santa Barbara, Music Kathleen McMullen Richmond, E nglish Barry Mdfherson Lee Vining, Zoology Denise McRary Santa Barbara, Art Hist.-Hist. Mary McSorley Ventura, History V I r L L Bxx '2 as P' ' .1 K? ,. ru? LII: ,ro ra Q Q., q f ' ' -Rc: 'Q Qi , ' l V K1 ' fn:-f-,ET A ggx , I ' in ? ' ,.,, N7 in K 'Q 'til Q 1 KN '- H4 D a is ,,-., 'Vlbk -A. "P , -at 'zn- vi Tift. Q ,- ,fn r Fi A we ,...... ,. .s mf if' Q TPX Cry' .-are if .3 Q N -0 . 1 . 1 A if I ,c,, I' U,-- , 1,49 if res xx' NJ, x gd That the birds of Worry and Care fly above your head, this you cannot change, But that they build nests in your hair, This you can prevent. l W 4:21 A gg , "' r, 22- ' , . , ,pf .,g: .L -1:-r- X K - , L J TY f 'f W my tif' lu 2: ls: in 'f E Q 1 y 1,3 A+- L -:rm it - is f, xl . t Yi A 'D' X fb 1 lg-4 VK V 4- ' E W- I- z. as 5 ffl 6 I, g 4 .... l - ees M 'A' ' ' 'U' ,- . if pi ' 'if L 1 ZR , lr 3 3 fr E Q ,N 5 f r ' , i be-, V , ,A Q 1 I -1 1' ' , ' ,fel V if I. . -Y ,JVY ees., , K , H ,li 5 4' 94 I 'Ar 3 GQ aa, cg :R- A-sq "' X f' ,L A - xg , h Keel K ug-pa xv' QI j,. 2 J ., A -Chinese proverb William Meanley Poway, Electrical Engineering Dorothy Means Los Altos, Art Nancy Medina Santa Cruz, History Edward Medlin Kingsburg, Political Science Marcia Mehn Oakland, Sociology Arend Meijer Santa Barbara, Geology Marian Melemed Inglewood, Sociology Michael Melgarees Whittier, Mechanical Engineering Shirley Melnick Los Angeles, Home Economics Karen Melton Tustin, Sociology Karen Merkler Arcadia, Spanish Frank Meronk Long Beach, Biology John Merrill Pebble Beach, History-English Diane Messner Los Angeles, Sociology Cheryl Metcalf Riverside, Anthropology Kathleen Metcalf Yuba, Sociology Timothy Metcalf West Covina, Political Science Steven Meyers San Mateo, Political Science Robert Meyncke San Bernardino, Pol. Sci. Lisa Michel Oxnard, History Donald Miller Redlands, Mechanical Engineering Joan Miller Oakland, History Kenneth Miller Mt. View, Political Science Michael Miller San Anselmo, Social Sciences Steve Miller Sacramento, Economics Anne Miltimore San Lorenzo, Political Science David Mintz Lompoc, Electrical Engineering Greg Mishach Tarzana, Zoology Donald Mitchel Encino, Political Science Anne Mitchell Tustin, Sociology-H istory SGHIORS Charles Mitchell Salinas, French Thomas Mitchell Ventura, Political Science Robert Mizuno Reedlay, Biology-Geography David Moats Honolulu, English k Margery Moe Sacramento, Social Sciences William Molnar Arcadia, Spanish Marilyn Monks West Los Angeles, Sociology Barbara Moore San Francisco, Speech Brian Moora Burbank, Economics Gary Moore Burbank, Sociology-E nglish Mary Moore Canoga Park, History Nancy Moore Saratoga, Sociology Sylvia Moore Santa Rosa, Spanish Christine Moran Walnut Creek, Social Sciences Walter Morgan San Pedro, Anthropology Jan Morgan Whittier, Home Economics Michael Morgan Livermore, Political Science Stephen Morrell San Francisco, Biology Mary Mosier Woodland Hills, Anthropology Margaret Mostue Santa Barbara, Spanish James Mount lnglewood, Anthropology 2 Jill Moyer Carpinteria, French Charleen Mueller Pacifica, Mathematics Pat Muleady Whittier, History .. "A x , , e Q- U at H 0 i ug! ,, my gm, V., ' fl Q, . , -,- . S Vx 1' I-ix-Q, I pl " ,Q I in -, - L - ., tk f ' Y 1 'D l Q--as 1- il .of f'K 'Y'-"P .-.ggi 1 hal.. -st 4' tk PDQ xl i ak i '-o Vs 'PIP' .4 T ,it .. Z vi, Enduring peace is the only monument civilization can raise to the millions who have perished in its cause. -Myron O'Higgins tx' 'Cx 'UST' "QfhA , 1-s f "' fr ac- an '..f 3' " ! I Q -' is l r 1' f ' 4: ff i If H G A 'l wi' .- J. . ,Q I x I N , ' A 4 . 4 1 ' ni f 'F ' - '- - x Q 'A ' - N ,Y , is ' fq- y ' Ai .9 X Y 1 ,,'?X l X J X K'i.'Q' H I as :I ' Q if .M lr 9. g f" 'rf f, "' " ,za fl'-' is Q' l 1. 31 . -N F5 4 l If . 'O' Q. ,pail fer" A His: Q, 1 if: , aw , F Q ,' 'ap' 1' at Q, l. f' . '4 if l' . ei J' LA. , v - fair 5:5 A ., -, . ai jet x ii?-"lf ,..-5 -ng. ' ws' f-. r if P ' -3 l 78012 A 6, . l- 2 ,' 26- " f-5:2-P' - 1 5 tg, W lx. tr iv -vp -Q- 'Zgv ic, S ,H I VV,q -4X 'vs' . 'xp lt, 3 " - v . 'HK , J go N l,,.,J:,.h.. X- ll ll, ' ee 1. l iii "v Joan Murphy La Jolla, Anthropology Joseph Murphy San Leandro, English Marc Murphy Coalinga, Art History Robyn Murphy Burlingame, Eng.-Hist. Jan Musicer Los Angeles, Anthropology Vera Mussell Santa Maria, Soc.-Anthro. Steven Myerson Sherman Oaks, Economic Geography Judith Naas Concord, History Richard Nathanson Piedmont, Geography Rick Nathanson Van Nuys, Physical Education Judy Nation Sylmar, French Cheri! Nattress Newport Beach, Art History John Neva San Diego, ArtlCreative Studiesl Suzanne Needham Fullerton, Psych.-Phys.Ed. Marie Nelson Sacramento, Speech-Hearing Nancy Nelson Los Altos, English Stephen Nelson Santa Barbara, Electrical Eng. Sally NeSmith San Jose, Political Science Barbara Newcomb Pacific Palisades, Pol.Sci.-Hist. Barnard Newsom Jr. La Mesa, Political Science Michael Nickoloff Torrance, History Cynthia Nichols Long Beach, Sociology Ruth Nielson Santa Barbara, English Kenneth Nishimori Camarillo, Economics Eugene Nitta Granada Hills, Biology Stephen Nonneman Hayward, History Wayne Norris Mission Viejo, Physics Michael Nowlin Pasadena, Geography Bob Nugent Westlake Village, Art Gail Nutter Los Angeles, History Kathleen 0'Connor Edwarddmrg, Mich., History Gerald O'Day Los Angeles, Psychology Michael 0'Flaherty Bolling Hills, Anthro.-PoI.Sci. Michael Ogdon Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Pol.Sci. Hiroko Okado Santa Barbara, History Jeanne Oliveira Hayward, Soc.SociaI Sciences Donald Ollis Goleta, Electrical Eng. Robert Olmos Kingsburg, Political Science Ann Olsen Corte Madera, Physical Education Caren Olsen Ojai, Spanish l1lOl2S Diane Olsen Calimesa, Political Science Cathy O'NeaI Los Angles, Anthropology Patrick 0'NeiI Santa Barbara, Political Science Betty Ong Sacramento, French Jenifer Onstott Los Alamos, N.M., Anthropology Linda Orcutt Palo Alto, Social Sciences Judy Orel Los Angeles, Sociology Paul Oritt Goleta, History Steven Orlick Hollywood, Geography Carlos Ortiz Lennox, Chemistry Deborah Osborn Burlingame, Pol. Sci.-History Jean Ospitzl Madera, Chemistry Janice Otani Cotati, Art Susan Ottonello Yosemite, Speech-Hearing Patricia Overland San Bernardino, Art History Patricia Owen Mill Valley, English Tom Padrick Pasadena, Psychology James Paget San Luis Obispo, Pol. Sci. Billie Paine San Clemente, Political Science Bonnie Paine Monterey Park, Home Economics Margo Palmer Lakewood, Art Angela Parker Inglewood, English Eileen Parker Ventura, English .loan Parker Alameda, Art History James Parsons Palo Alto, English Dennis Patrick Madera, Political Science Daniel Patterson San Luis Obisao, Zoology June Pauly Dallas, Texas, History Meryl Pauly Dallas, Texas, History Don Payne Walnut Creek, Political Science Gail Peacock Alameda, Political Science Gary Pearson Woodland Hills, Economics Linda Peck Redlands, Ar't Kristin Pederson Torrance, Social Sciences Kathy Peirce Sepulveda, Geography Ruth Peterson Hayward, Art History Vicki Pelusi, Piedmont, French William Pelzer Whittier, Zoology Jean Pennypacker Los Angeles, History Philip Pennypacker Saratoga, History Buddy Peny Redlands, Ele. Englisl1 Louis Perske San Jose, Sociology-Anthropology Deborah Petersen Ojai, Pwchology Carol Peterson Oakland, Social Science 4 l tzv. f -If '-7:3-V - Q 4 w--fa , . is 6314 , 4 .r f.,,.," w L 'Q' A e I -1 -Q ...: W I 05. U 'ef 'i 'Y11' R9 Q? -is lr " M J 0 r ff nf ilgfgiiw ' I p"Q,,i, ' ' ' X . , V . ago - L' y ,N it-'21 x if , K 'rx .4-ul -5- 1 . 1 P' e f v QQ ,-' P 'X' L7 Y ' ,179 V ., , 2 . by ,q,. if Q iv an 1 J L., 7 , 'T l 1 1.13 'Y... Q - VL -:r E-fs , " sa g: :,: rvrv Q , X . x, F-- lwctrlx' ' 4 ' Y tl 1 in iiiii -' '- . 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V HK, 1 nf Our affections are our life.-We live by them,' they supply our warmth. -Channing Catherine Petrie Montecito, Art Laurence, Petrosian Fresno, Electrical Engineering Kristen Pfeiffer Manhattan Beach, Mathematics Kim Phelps Garberville, Zoology Carolyn Phillips Anaheim, Speech-Hearing Karna Phillips Piedmont, Art Sue Phillips Santa Maria, Sociology Patricia Pickle Alameda, Social Sciences Cathleen Pierce Burbank, Philosopny Kathleen Pierce Canoga Park, English Richard Pierucci Bakersfield, History Linda Pittman Santa Paula, Anthropology Michaelangelo Pontier Saratoga, Psychology Christa Popov Montclair, Anthropology Peter Popov Montclair, History Stephen Posthuma Altadena, Economics Barbara Potter Long Beach, French Lloyd Powell Hayward, Zoology Sumn Powell Los Alamitos, Speech Terri Prather Watsonville, Sociology Anthony Price Glendora, History Cynthia Price Costa Mesa, Zoology James Price Santa Maria, Electrical Engineering Patricia Prouse Alhambra, Sociology SGDIORS Jean Pryor Carson City, Nev., Dramatic Art Robert Purvin Encino, Political Science Sandra Ouadraocia La Puente, Social Sciences Joyce Quinlin San Diego, History Robyn Reiter Van Nuys, Economics Adrienne Ramay San Gabriel, French Troy Rampy Cupertino, English Lawson Ramsay Santa Barbara, History Peter Randtke , ,' - Santa Barbara, Physics '-. Donald Rapp Glendale, Economiw Wayne Rascati Goleta, History-Pol. Sci. Susan Rasch San Jose, Social Sciences Melinda Rasmussen Los Angeles, English Thomas Rau1h La Jolla, Zoology Robert Rawles Boonville, Economics Nancy Rear Mendocino, History Nancy Redemska Santa Barbara, Anthropology Sharon Reed Los Angeles, History-Pol. Sci. Ronald Reese Long Beach, Spanish-Hispanic Civ. Sharon Reich Twentynine Palms, Political Science Edward Reilley Q we ry Q25 ' . Vg'-,A EEA' l V: , - -N , -4 'Q 'Fi 1-'w .5 'C-. ? ri, X If Q 8 'B Q 'S 1' - - . - a ' . 5? -9 1 vu' A gg, , R . tl c ' 'fel 7' 'WP 41 " ' -1, Q--.0 -Iv fe '53 -5 Z3 ' iii f'a - , " ,g FL Q A N, x ' X' 9 A barb 4' I 'gg- 0 Alexandria, Va., Ele. Eng. ff. ' Paul Reinauer K I f- Y I "' ,5- Los Angeles, Geology ' Y Y U Carol Remley " T W ' . Northridge, History Gary Reynolds Los Angeles, Zoology ' I , , ,. , ' ' , Manorm Reynolds . 4.5 , , Q Wy., " -1g san Luis obaspo, Pol. sci. W ,E , s ' ' 'Q Mary Reynolds V A ' ' iffy' ffm V I J' Beaumont, History U1 f ' ,H A ,5Qfji1v Sally Reynolds - PN I ' fx ' Los Altos, Anthropology K .A , " 5' 1 6 ., Marjory Richards ,- -vp , . V. N . ' Santa Barbara, History 9 N Carla Richardson L f Vista, Spanish ' ' , Robert Richardson , Fullerton, Political Science ' A friend is a present you give yourself -Stevenson ' V if 4 V -if if K if K , 'Z' ' I' I, it u Q 1 1 'amy -1 "D . K - 'W K -QL S' . X 1 -Q Y at "" l Q?" 'S' ni 'a is .as use it -0- J ,, ic P A- . C' '. fer L , --' .I . tu , Q , .- .wl 9 L Y Y 'W , V . -.. E E gg 536 " , w ", J-- A "Fx , r at .. 'f'-' f- f A cliff Rochlin ' K 5 5' Covina,Economics 57 . ,,m" -' Carla Roddy L- Sunland, Anthropology 1 Rebecca Rodgers f 1. 13' El Paso, Tex., Russ.-Russ. Stu. , Karen Rodman l "- ,K Oceanside Sociolog '22 , Y q Lynn Rodriguez Monrovia, Spanish J Susan Rogers W La Habra, Political Science Roberta Rohlf Los Angeles, Psychology Ellen Rohrer Woodland Hills, German Paul Romain Northridge, History Rosemary Rombarg Ventura, Sociology William Rose x 'S f-Q41 , ' l A1 J 1, . f Q sr , i,, ,,,- .1 "Xi fy?" a A , 'TT5 fx? William Richardson Redondo Beach, Hist.-Russ. Robert Richert Morgan Hill, Sociology Dee Ricketts Woodland Hills, History Tom Rigney Walnut Creek, Art History Sharon Riley Des Moines, Iowa, English Donna Riordan Buena Park, Sociology John Riparetti Santa Barbara, History Roger Ritter San Francisco, History Louis Rivara Stockton, English Catharine Roberts Lakewood, French Chris Roberts Portuguese Bend, Econ.-History David Roberts San Jose, History Douglas Roberts Santa Barbara, Political Science Nancy Roberts Pasadena, Sociology-Anthropology Paul Roberts Pomona, Political Science Charles Robinson Tarzana, Social Sciences Leslie Robinson Atherton, Anthropology Christine Roche La Canada, History " " ,fax- .1 4 sd' 1 , ,Ls Walnut Creek, Zoology Alice Rosen Torrance, Mathematics Q To , f 'K 't I' at I , ' R .:-.2 f , Q 1' Xi my I A: ' l J Q I an ' K N l I f K6 :N fi 423' I 4 is . wx - -N -4-1 H x tk:-. .4 1:1 1'-'Y' H is l Q M ,di-g EA . Win- - L, if 'Lf ' Y' I .,' 5 -dx ' I '1-.-:SJ qu., is J M. 5 E, K' "leg, at S' x 1 0 f W 4' W F lo Terri Rosenbleet Los Angeles, Sociology Barbara Ross Long Beach, French David Ross Stockton, Philosophy Donna Rossillon Tuiunga, Sociology Karen Roth Newport Beach, Anthropology Kirsten Roth San Pedro, Home Economics Russll Rowan Saratoga, Political Science Rohan Royster Santa Barbara, Mathematics Craig Rubenstein Piedmont, History Ruampler, Henry West Los Angeles, Pol. Sci. Janis Ruffatto Sacramento, English Tracy Rugglas Van Nuys, Social Sciences John Rusell Long Beach, History Michael Russell Greenbrae, Psych.-Anthro. Timothy Salthouse Saratoga, Psychology Joanne Semmons Glendale, Sociology Judy Sanders San Diego, P.E.-Rel. Stu. Mary Sanguinetti Bakersfield, History HIORS John Sargent San Jose, Political Science Roy Sasselli Concord, Electrical Eng. Sandra Saucier Burbank, Sociology Sylvia Sawai Honolulu, Home Economics Joan Scantlebury Stockton, History Linda Schaefer Covina, PsychSoc. Edward Schafer La Crescenta, Mathematics Joseph Scharff San Jose, English Craig Schell Monterey, Physical Education Dee Ann Schemmel Modesto, Physical Education Sheila Schenck Los Angeles, Sociology Marilynn Schenk Glendale, Music Carolyn Schick Altadena, Physical Education Bobbie Schless Denver, Col., Sociology Susan Schmandt Concord, Art History Bruce Schmidt Inglewood, Economics Jecquelyn Schneider Studio City, Sociology Pam Schneider Altadena, Spanish Children have more need of models than of critics. -Joubert L. I 'Q-qv' X -of , ff--sv 'Q 'U all life'-' 'Q' f ' ' , M "' If -'j , if 5.1 ff .FH ni... N 'l ' N QQ A3 4 K. .xl 3 fc 2 gl 1,3-fx. 7" fy -11 - if' 4' i NEA 1 - gxjj r V" ' 52 W "1" fiLi , ' 6-'-., I S AQ? ' , 511. W, f " S ' ff, - ii V75 Wi. i r- r,,A I I -v-or ' ' ,653 'X fi' ' QI 55 It I '05, V 6 lh ,..-- 'Q no up 15' ,VI -Ji 1 i.,-as lx 4, A In h X 'F -Q-9' -J , i X iii, 'mfr' r L ' P gg , It-A R in -3 at 4 hz, ,ar U gl' - A -., ,il ,-0 4 E ' , -c--nsY 2 125' J .ah , w J V wk ...A V it -- srl A - 3522" ,1-li ,., - ,Eg k 'R E 4 ft 1,1 Y 'K ,gh , Q f 'UN4 ' J T9 , t--S,-Sv' Y ,f J y KZ? We - ' ' ll l W ,arn- w 1-fs T? 5 Q, A 4 . iifiillflf ' , 11 ,gp f gy Q '- , 1 --DA 1 " iff- j if 1 L--L, Q - 1 F Y g""'T an A r' sa n ew 91- Q is , M .5 I V. .A 1 i no I VA fx.:-A h 4,1191 -3 1 'ef' -'::- ' . 'I l . , I F' X T .Alt 4 L 1 n f-4' A 3 .Q , M ' . 55 - 63' l fl, g IA ffl 1 A L -,Q - Y Q . .. . ,. -,V H., ,,q. 'lg-.- ag i ,gf - A 4 -.7 it -li -f l'f.,"S' N x " Steven Scholl Walnut Creek, Political Science Cliff Scholle Corona Del Mar, Chem. 81 Nuc. Eng John Schroeder Sherman Oaks, Hispanic Civ. Stanley Schroeder San Luis Obispo, Sociology Mark Schuh Los Angeles, Political Science Lynette Schultz Camarillo, Anthropology Robert Schulz San Gabriel, Economics Sandra Schultz Lancaster, Social Sciences Alan Schwartz Torrance, Hist.-Pol. Sci. Donald Scott Palo Alto, English Robert Scott El Monte, Zoology David Seaborg Burbank, Psychology Stephen Sears Lafayette, Economics Charles Selin La Habra, Mathematics Roy Selin Jr. Los Angeles, Economics Don Sellars La Canada, English Barry Semegran Fort Lee, N,.l., Philosophy Marilyn Senese Santa Monica, English Philip Setrakian Fresno, Political Science Estella Shafer Temple City, Art History John Shangler Walnut Creek, Sociology Norman Shaskey Los Altos, Economics Saundra Shaw Northridge, Dramatic Art Margaret Shemaria Lancaster, Hispan. Civ.Span. Robert Shenk San Carlos, Social Sciences Phyllis Sheridan Inglewood, History Mike Sherman Inglewood, Pol. Sci.-Anthro. Susan Sherman Pasadena, HistorySpanish Margaret Shenuood San Marino, Anthropology Patricia Sherwood Palos Verdes, History Sharon Shingai San Juan Bautista, Spanish Nannerl Shirar Perris, English Constance Shoemaker La Verne, Social Sciences Terry Ann Shoop San Carlos, Social Sciences Thomas Shroyer Pasadena, Tutorial Marilyn Shumway Arcadia, Spanish Barbara Silken Carmichael, Political Science Diane Simpson Goleta, Sociology James Simpson Glendale, History John Simpson Goleta, Psychology John Simpson Homer, La., Psychology Thomas Simpson Santa Barbara, English Cheryl Singer Whittier, History David Sizer Santa Barbara, Mathematics Terry Skidmore Bakersfield, Chemical Engineering Peter Skinner Anaheim, Mathematics Andrew Skowrup San Marino, Economics Christine Sloat Santa Rosa, French SGl1l0l2S Carol Smallenburg Burbank, Music Anita Smith Modesto, English Beatrice Smith Imperial Beach, History Brandt Smith Los Angeles, Englim Bruce Smith Palos Verdes, Biology Catherine Smith Santa Barbara, Math-Anthro. Coralie Smith Lodi, Sociology Don Smith Lennox, History Eric Smith Monrovia, Zoology Stephen Smith Walnut Creek, Zoology Sue Smith Encino, Psychology Timothy Smith Monrovia, Zoology Mary Snapp Compton, Speech-Hearing Patti Snodgrass San Bernardino, Classics William Snowdon Redlands, Mathematics Linda Sobetzer Redlands, Dramatic Arts Sandra Soeder Monrovia, Spanish Kathleen Soltwedell Inglewood, History Florence Somers Saratoga, Spanish Alan Spaulding Cabazon, Geography Donna Spencer Corte Madera, History Michael Spensko Hawthorne, History David Speyer Yucaipa, Economics Sylvia Spicer Port Hueneme, Dramatic Art Richard Spiegleman Encino, Hist.-Pol. Sci. Charles Spink Redwood City, Geography Norman Sprague Los Angeles, Geology Debbie Spruell Antioch, Spanish Lewis Spurlock Merced, Clasis Linda Stanchfield Glendale, French Miles Standidi Van Nuys, Mathematics Claudia Stanley Redondo Beach, Spanish - Christine Staus Temple City, Sociology Susan Stayton San Gabriel, Social Sciences Stephen Steadman Merced, History Kathie Steele Newport Beach, Sociology Harold Steinberg Canoga Park, Psychology Bob Steinman Los Angeles, History Frank Stengele Mt View, Mechanical Engineering Gaye Stephenson Santa Barbara, Anthropology . ,W -, if-52 gf: ll ini 1 Q ' Hi. 'lb 0- G2 11 ff L hh , Y 6' ni., 4 :iw ' , -. W. - i , 'effiiifiilw ri, 1 , 4 ' if - V,-...ty y , M. 1 I . i ll' an J! -, L -rx 4' 'z Q I if . f' ' r 'fxa' 5' 'f tex " 'g:f:ig5- nr. X. wife ' '-1 " -an r s A 6 5412 a '- VE, .I uh, it, ., -- V 1 F- I ' 1: ph? X J ' '. A Hi it a kewl.. : U , 74' X N 4....,3. y 1 aj ,XL 'Q 4-4-n,p,tx?1 - 'tary' 1 it T , K --1: if 'Q 11 14, 'L N -,. -.5-, J - I f was X km ' ff N s ' V' 1 El rg-ww he -3 V 'i' l Lies -1- fl it -.v ' l il :Z b " 6 'Citi' ge 'isa 14 xt ...f , 4' 1 9 x 51 1 'mug' . Reel K '6- we-J 1 'ki If 1 6 . Y! -, i ., , x tt H0215 F' ' ,-aw .1 if" ,f-see: iitrg .. V, .v-'fn N v '4 A ' . 1 , f 'ff it YV I goth! 'I' rg? I 'Q ' l 'i ,Z-1' ' W:" Ta J-:Ts N 7. ", f 1-QW' , asf- f 4 . 4' tj ' ' , Q L , ' 0 6 is if l .Q f I - If .VI , 4 1 I if-9 i 4 L 'I 4 ' 4 Q32 4' X 'G 'IP' . will Wh an 1 X S """'! I-YU? , CN wi Thoughts lead on to purposes,' pur- poses go forth in action,' actions form habits, habits decide character,' and character fixes destiny. Tyron Edwards Edward Sterling Lafayette, Electrical Eng. Gwyn Stem Sioux Falls, S.D., English Jan Stem Los Altos Hills, Sociology Robert Stevens Lompoc, Sociology Lynn Steward Santa Barbara, History Sharon Stewart Palo Alto, French Ron Stodgell Vallejo, Sociology Nancy Stoneman Los Altos Hills, Music Linda Stoops San Diego, Art Randall Stoops Novato, Geography Marcia Stong Los Angeles, Art Maryjane Storz Pico Rivera, Biology , Helen Strange Bakersfield, English f .lonna Stratton Fresno, Soc.-Anthro. A Barbara Strickland Q Q Long Beach, Psychology John Strickley Orinda, History ' Susn Strohhehn X Ojai, Spanish Douglas Stuart Saratoga, Psychology Bette Sturr Palos Verdes, History .lack Stuster Van Nuys, Psych.-Anthro. Susan Styler . ,L Anaheim, Sociology - Sandra Sugita San Diego, History Marty Sullivan , I Bakersfield, Social Sciences " t Bill Sunkel La Jolla, English Brent Susnan Northridge, Geography Edward Sutterfield Granada Hills, History Susie Swain Saratoga, English Bruce Swanson ' Flagstaff, Ariz., Pol. Sci. Paul Sweet Lawrence, Kan., Pol. Sci. Julie Swisher Whittier, Soc.-Anthro. Carolyn Takeda Riverside, Anthropology Gary Talbot Thousand Oaks, Mathematics Lorine Tanimoto Gridley, Biology Kathy Tannen Los Angeles, Art Dennis Tapper Castro Valley, Economics Jeff Taylor Noblesville, Ind., English Linda Taylor Paso Robles, Anthropology Mary Taylor Seattle, Wash., Eng.-Hist. Susan Taylor Oakdale, French Gail Templar Pasadena, Anthropology Ingrid Terrell Santa Barbara, Sociology Brent Thompson San Mateo, Hispanic Civilization Mary Thompson Rosemead, History Roger Thompson Santa Barbara, Economics Ronald Thompson Sacramento, Electrical Engineering l --r , 15 Q ry, - - N H , 7" f eo' 'Z' :wane Gigi . , .vw -, , V , ' ' 4' v " pi H Nbr' ll -1, , lla, V ' llil 2 1 lla n- FR V , - S l lu l f, . , li" 1 -0 .lag 6 ' ' :Curz-5 Qk I, r an as K, '43 ml 4 . .I wi -'n ,ff L, l'.,,X 5 It is much easier to train the mind than Ronald Thompson R Q as form the character: T""a"ce'EC""""'l'1S . Q' il iff- A1 il y L Al ,E .-z I Q t,,, ,. -Shaw as ws 45125122.2891 V T r- tg, St. Helena, Pol. Sci.-Anth ro Otto t'Hooft S I I, V .I f Q dsl FY mari, I , cr: 64 J ,C - .Q 'f J? . , ,ofa A X , '3 , , fc J - , ,, --' -1 . of , 0 . xx? , .45 , . . t .1-+12 .- Avjfx' . ' ,J-,fini U in-, ,' i L 'A 2 'f ' A Y, - .ar - , 'Ba 6: A '. Y 1' 1 rv' E. J ....,, YE, Li.. 7? 5 K Z lm, ',. , L Y K N lu 1 1 QV ' H U, '. I . A f A is o Q, ., V .1 I , 'g -,Z I f J, 13.1, A veg, 'W X iff- I t Y -1- 4 , 'V . " W ' fix E f . S S' . xx fe.-T5 mg .:.:,' ,J i an 5 Q , . ,Y an A 'l - 'Q Ei. -6 --gy 'tj' vm -or ur -,ir 's-an ' gel f aiu. f'fN 'Ar -A-rr be il? ..e 15 lx 4: 4 -I P3 at 7 3 r r i N .dl A-Q ' F luv," -- -A ,B . . Qi , ,, . , i,' or I W 'H K qv --J TTL-.n -ur M 6' lfgbi '1 , " N V' ii- V, A' Yi .- . ,I ---I 5 1 , ' ear V "-I , A Lg I , ,js U E, B-Nz - , Y - "I 1:51 .17 ' ,x . t - r, Ei NIORS Janice Timbrook Saratoga, Anthropology William Timmermann Walnut Creek, Asian Studies Merrily Tischhirek Bakersfield, English Miklos Toth La Jolla, Psychology Willard Towle Pismo Beach, Zoology Raymond Tmcy Ojai, Political Science Roy Tribelhorn Berkeley, Political Science Jill Trick Yucaipa, Hisaanic Cultures Gregory Trout Reno, Nev., Political Science Rusell Trowbridge Rancho Santa Fe, Economics Nancy Troy Reseda, Speech-Hearing Mark Trueblood San Mateo, Political Science Larry Tuch Los Angeles, English Christy Tucker La Cresenta, History Linda Tumer Long Beach, History Mary Tumer Atherton, Home Ec.-French Joan Tyler Santa Barbara, Zoology Glenn Umont Santa Barbara, Mechan.-Eng. Margaret Urbach Mountain View, Hist.-E ng. Nancy Urist Los Angeles, French Joseph Valdez Hollister, Electrical Engineering J nette Valenzuela Pico Rivera, English David VanPeursem Laguna Beach, Zoology Linda Vaughan Redding, English Nancy Vaughan Coronado, Social Scienws Janet Verheyen Atamadero, French Catherine Vemon EI Cajon, Anthropology John Vemon Piedmont, Chemistry Leslie Vemon Bakersfield, Political Science Nancy Vickman Studio City, Biology Michael Victor Los Angeles, Sociology Claudia Viehman Ventura, Sociology Kent Vining Burbank, Religious Studies Mignon Vishanofl Colton, Anthropology John Waddell Lafayette, Elec. Eng. William Wahl Jr. Santa Barbara, Economics Karen Waite Newport Beach, Pwch. Stanley Walker San Carlos, Anthro.-H ist. Tim Walker Whittier, Political Science David Wall Lompoc, History Cynthia Wallace Santa Barbara, Phys.Ed. Linda Walter San Carlos, Political Science Michael Ward Glendora, Economics Patricia Ward San Anselmo, English Annette Warden Encino, Biology Russell Wamer Walnut Creek, Economics James Warren Whittier, Physical Education Michael Wass Riverside, Economics DIORS Debra Watson Arvin, History Cynthia Webb La Jolla, Social Sciences William Webb Huntsville, Ala., Hist.-Anthro. Diane Weber Lompoc, Anthropology Diana Weibel Fremont, History Roland Weinhold San Pedro, Political Science John Weiss Glencoe, Ill., Economics James Welch Ukiah, Economics Doug Well Santa Barbara, Biology Marilyn Weston Hillsborough, Psychology Robert Weston Alhambra, Mathematim Lesley Wheatley Encino, History Priscilla Wheeler Glendale, History Richard Wheeler Los Angeles, Chem. Engineering Barbara White Santa Barbara, History James White Burlingame, Elec. Engineering Roberta White Weed, Anthropology Clifford Wictorin Bakersfield, History Lynn Wise Fullerton, Physics Gary Wilcox Ventura, Biology Dale Wilder Burlingame, Anthropology Roderick Wilkerson EI Monte, Anthropology Kathleen Wilks Senta-Barbara, Art Carol Williams Arcadia, Anthropology Jill Williams La Jolla, Anthropology Lowell Williams Granada Hills, History Michael Williams Fresno, Sociology Nick Williams Fresno, Speech Correction David Wilson Fresno, Pol. Sci.-Psych. Gary Wilson Falls Church, Va., Anthro. Robert Wilson Hayward, Zoology Harold Wilse Bakersfield, Political Science Stephen Wiman Los Angeles, Political Science Tim Winchester Los Angeles, History Dan Winton Livingston, Economics Thomas Wirshup San Luis Obisno, Pol. Sci. Steve Wittman Whittier, Political Science Alan Wolf Bmwley, Psychology lleene Wolfe Los Angeles, Social Sciences Judith Wolfe El Cerrito, Sociology Kathryn Wolfe La Canada, Anthropology James Wolz Ventura, Psychology Loretm Wong Sacramento, Sociology Andean Wood Sacramento, Speech-Hearing Robert Wooten Santa Maria, English Susan Work Taft, Spanish Edwin Wrench La Jolla, Elec, Engineering Carla Wulkau Van Nuys, History if , f a '-if: yrjgfg if ' -. . V ' A I-, 'fix ' Auf' N' 4:3 R J' fx 'I ..,l fall A ' . 355- 4 J . f uh, 'Q V Y -A K . s V, -J' , l , . Q 1 f , lr 8: if" :V l 1 ',f,c"'5 K' 7" QT' K e ll ' 1 I :V 3217 ' p ,1- K2 f , , xiii K ' - K , lrli x 1' iii if 5'-il vt , 5 E .I -0 55,1 . 'Dt . .EXE -2: 'ii' J f' ' r Q.,1 at -g ik rex. I '- ' V . .1 1. 5 5, ll Q ,xy H: ww ,uk J 'W ' ... Qi 'F ' ' 'f be '- " as Y If R -Q wi, , 1 i 'U "K 332' ,.. ' 154 VC - af' 'yi Q., .:- l le-s 2 5 J , f A :Il - I a i' V L ' I, I L-e- ff' W, Q- A ' :A K L K im I .eiszggi .V J g , E. - y , ry V ' ' , 1 ftivtad r N PR. 4 f luis. . K-4 'llilfm-4 FNS-it tw 4 . lg f . -we ' ' ' 1 ' ' 1 , "' ' 1: :x,.... 2' C . CA 'iii , x 1 --' .1 Q PI I 3 E X 1 , l , do we-1 2- -an 0 I p-iii A f o - I N , X, V 1 ' N x s . ,I 1 n X 0 342 .4..T!. HOUSING For many students, the give and take of person-to-person relation- ships begins with the experience shared among roommates and friends, in dorms, apartments, and sorority and fraternity houses. These habi- tats involve many different kinds of people, most of whom bring with them unique personalities which have to be tolerated and, hopeful- ly, understood. New ideas are encountered and new people discovered, both of which lead to challenging situations. Each individual is a vital part of the whole,and he tends to identify with his own living unit, rather than the multiversity which surrounds him. Living groups are also active participants in many all-school events. The 3,000 dorm dwellers boasted a first place hall in GGR this year, while the Greeks garner- ed Sweepstakes for their spectac- ular house decorations. Signifi- cant numbers of the 6,000 independ- ents added their noisy support to the parade through Isla Vista. Interaction between campus commun ities and their non-academic sur- roundings was on the upswing. Whether it cements life-long friendships, or simply lends sol- itude, the living arrangement at UCSB is an enlightening experience. ' 5' ff: ! v I ,, H Wg Q? ' X w 1 s - 1456 :, J H?'EfZS1?' -Q'r"iQ:'-MH ' . .jf .1 wi - 1 -- 15. Y'-ga.. 1"??4, ' ,, 1,,,:wf 'wk-' 'fi , we lSlA VISIA Fall features thrust for developing com- munity sidewalks and park . . . JIVE sponsors trash-in to clean up IV . . .within weeks the streets are littered once again . . . Pide Pi- per Parade brings Homecoming home to IV . . tar ratio rises as Santa Barbara oil slick threatens IV beaches . . . heavy winter rains soak several apartments . . . "poIitical har- assment" charges spring from unorthodox eviction . . .three IV realty companies pic- keted by students protesting "unfair con- tracts" . . . supervised housing regulations become more lenient . . . parking problems and traffic congestion multiply with influx of people . . . out-of-state flower children swell population . . . the community contin- ues to join a cross section of society . . . youth lboth students and non-studentsl, professors and families, and dogs lived another peaceful year together. DGGDIG Leather craftsmen, other amateur artists and an occasional sun-sparkled helper-devotee occupy the Isla Del Playa resident Bill Goldblum breeze. His is one of a string of cliff- Vista Fair stans during the Warm season' reclines on his makeshift backrest side apartments which offer a sea- enjoying the sunshine and cool ocean scape panorama. ff? , . QADG6 of IDCEDGHOGYICG Shown BY IHCGDGYIOGHIZS "fi .-A5-1 -, 1 gil f , . 71 .1' JZ' U , ,.1 -. A M.. ,a I . .1-4 ,K f . -I .YM .j ,, Student-priest "Father Bob" Moran hails from Independents come in pairs?? This setting and mood of the community St. Mark's University Parish in Isla Vista. isn't necessarily true, but the weather, encourage such quiet companionship. The scene in Isla Vista is in- knots of people-friendly, casual This youth,with his displaced increasing number of children variable speckled with small and always independent. loyalties, is one of the seen at play locally. , X' . -V 3,-' f at , . 'az' ILT X ,. na - ,', H - i ., fu. 1 :rf -, ' L 'Lf , , . Q., , -Ni - , AW Z 4 . -- - -:sv 'fr- N 'ii A .fl I: L 'NLFVWQ Si D ui! X xv 5 si it X Bi af: 'as PIACGS ,LJ an-1 AW .QN Youth of all ages, but especially the collegiate crowd, stock their shelves with palate- pleasing natural foods. Ivy- covered and shrub-lined, the "Sun and Earth" beckons healthfood lovers from all over lsla Vista. Oemano Fon ooo, llun Ano IIRIEHOSHID answeneo .' AMW a E :flaw l - L 'An One of the most crowded streetcorners well-traveled sidewalks are usually alive seeking ahappening.. Many wander into the is the 006 b0rdering "Campus Cue." These with students escaping their studies or Cue and join the resident pool sharks. 348 l 3 1 - gg.: .ts..,.,.B,g.,-H .,- . V in ,, 53, 3 sms- ,- 5Ai.-z..,,.:m,,v:f: L, Qyifv ,Q ,- '., - 'Tse ' eu JU", -5 i 511-' --' M..,'5,wL',, "Wi sie 'fr H f i i ii-43'-za '4ifi"a17'5l f 21351 la iglifxirf gg . ir Q If-f Y'!'7g'i' X 1 .1 - , x v v: I, -a v 2. A - I-,Kf3::,:.f',,V .M.,, ,I kv 5' -4 L , wi, ' sim, ':q,-ll- , A . , s. n .1 fr, 5-er. ,, . ' 'C wus! "mill in ' f , ,E ,V 5 4..- 31 -, ,I ' - A Y ,-. ... A fl- : ' 1 .., , A 1. Y '-.- Q ,. 1, 'A , , i ' ' , w. Ln' : -. , . 1 --:Q-' - fl K f.-,X--H i 5 'kviefw sf ,- ,,, Q , .IV lx V iv? ' . V 2 . - 5' Q Y i .fax X :X ,ix 2 I W r nuff ia ij M- 1 r A. sg ,P I m f r --1 iff:-I 2 ,'. ,ffl ' .'v K :age 'a . As the neon sign suggests, "Stop n Go" finals, when all-night studying is in vogue, small-time shoppers purchasing soda pop, market features hours to match the night there is scarcely an open parking space candy, ice cream, or other energy-boosting owl whims of hungry Isla Vistans. During within a block. Lines inside swell with "midnight" snacks. Laundromats are no longer a washing, drying and folding female domain, in IV sorting, becomes everyone's business. f :E ,N-.. ' e l v Many a weary student is re- conversation in the "Donut juvenated over coffee and Shop," open 24 hours a day. . X: Q? fT""1u+' iff ll rr' ff rj ,ly ,l is aff, M .J Q, he ,. if M' ,ir ll, gmt 1 .Y as pastimes pizoislems Y I-,..,Sg,,, .,, V in i , V ,,. , -ag 34:3 1, ,e.se"' W ,- . V-Mft" H fries. 1 - Bob Ahearn and Roger Plock lin the foregroundl and their fellow pinball fanatics often stand two deep to get a chance to pit their skills against those of the machine. Seemingly mesmerized by their plastic and metal opponents, these stoical competitors plug in their dimes and quarters en lessly in an effort to "rack up" enough points. nightlife is that it is usually a strictly stag affai it in As the giant oil slick off IV beaches, "Get Oil Out" This beach-combing resident handles the CPmm0n Santa Barbara threatened the devotees canvassed the area. Plague Of Ta"'St3il'1ed feet in The 0l'llV WHY D0SSlbl9- possible advantage to this type of Isla Vist d. A a r. QQQQQ4 N. 1 if -w ki-9 S.. ,qv if -:Win u 5 i '55 sq. lil wh' x 147 Y 65.1 .1 gagka AA.:-if aft E 'Ss v-Q x W lu any g gfggufkiu '?f srl 1-q- 'Fifi' S ww Wk.: 85955.13 l X kg-si' :I , jg' -.u li 1 .. f T' - , if L , 4 ,if'f'f.4L'lf'-1 .5 Jai'-if-ff . 1-0. Q L ,J 10 AJ, . x 'S X U SDIRIIZS llpteo By Seasloe ponoemnq w' can - " . if fee, fx ff-:xi ff: if , -. V- -l if Qt. "Auf 'LJ lb! cf' LL, 5.1 J ld 'VET 4 ,fu nz, s, E 1? Il N GQS' ,f ,Af -7-if-.v lac- cc: fu l'2"Q'i af. H+, 4- 7. eff,-,:-it f-Q ,fa ,,. , il ,QQ ig, l , 1 F 52 fi., 23,1 .l . A Q ts- ' 162' -evo -Lf X-,cf L c F L 's:,,,-1 LJ A .Q - 3 , '." 1:- ' vfn' "' peace Oblivious to the incoming tide below, an ex- Casting an unlikely image of tranquility, a hausted IV denizen "crashes" in the iceplant. speedster stills his machine to gaze at the sea. Each of these coeds seems to be absorbed toward the water's edge. Their reflections spection which a leisurely stroll on the in her own thoughts while meandering on the shimmery sand symbolize the intro- beach can evoke. mg 'fa' wi,- 1 V atm. i fe-W - ii sw, l iii, X2 2 :fe 'if ., .ei 4 ,, . . LM- , . :cttw aw 1 ,, ,V f 2, 'timmy -- " V Y ri - 'Bidi 55555 X i msg' ffigizefiifzz iifiwu , . We was 3 , ii it Lgifzeiggrs k ii ,yn M, , q , Q L 35153, ' ii ,. 'ui M A g .eazg , X if V ? As a prelude to the inordinate number of eveningsg these, however, both soothed and rainy days, there were many cloudy captured the stormy spirit with the peace- From his cliffside perch a of the horizon and the sojourner soaks up the view warmth of the sun beyond. 1 ful beauty they lent to the twilight un- dulations of the sea. .. as . 'ga ' - ' ...,., -.., T , --4 1- f-UA Q f-- 4 ff"-fe . , . .-..- - V N -New-ag fl' Z f' ' L is . ,Tire . .wi .kj I,nh,.. .fsbwl ,, s A , . . . i V . . .Y.-""!-nr' With her wee child parked a few momentarily turns her back on feet away, this student-mother her cares. BX Beta Chl 3.1: 'in-I.: 1.1ai.'riiilr'11irEt1 llrzateiznlty Beams f active llmst yean Exuberance and growth marked Beta Chi's first year as an unaffiliated local fraternity. Undertaking a rather ex- tensive social agenda, the brothers of Beta Chi found themselves keeping dates in such faraway ports of call as Palm Springs and Tijuana. In observance of their second annual "Swift of lpswitch Odyssey," the group sallied forth to the Pacific. Moving on to a more serious level of activity, the Beta Chi's involved them- selves in several of the projects stressing student participation in the development of Isla Vista. Top on the list of such projects was JIVE. Beta Chi's spear-headed several of the various committees in this project. Local pre-school children of eco- nomically deprived families received the companionship of house members, as they continued work begun last year with Head Start. Growth, new housing, and involvement all domi- nated this first year for Beta Chi fraternity and set a future trend. Beta Chi Gary Ward jealously guards the original Pi Phi charter, "borrowed" from the sorority during a raid a year ago. fre' " Gary Anderson Richard Buford Charles Hanson Allen Johnson Michael Lee Dennis Aubrey Dennis Gardella James Heinn John Jastes Robert Masik f, 'K ara. 139 6 r - ' 5,5 it K I, 1 i - rg, if 'if ' s 3' ,, -7- , .sa 5 Q' ze... '3, F11 4 l Ki r h .78 ...Q C-fv I gray: 3. 'Mm with Greg McDougall Carter Ray James Warren Michael Murray Gary Ward Bernard Weinzimmer Q-at 4' I , -, j aes Ev . U r 5 lf ,a QT27 3 W- -Xt " L .41 I '.,,f'g -E mi 1 I l J . ff Z as , -an ai ip ,g Q 4: Q , 'V 5 ' I 1 .C l 1 ""'d-In V I Y' fi i . ' We . . . . .ir E 1-1, a QA or W 4 w is xx 1:1- +,., nys-3 '5l'- L 5"'E.'7E.g'135fA I . Vg l ' x Q .V ' -. y 9 .gpg fa 3 , 's ' ' 59 X93 Q9 If 'Q if Q . 'Vb' I b Q Km V 4 VV A i , -3 EZ I' W' 4 fir' A-R f , ' Q 4 '-ie? w h .' fe. ff-2' iii rf! . V - 5 E? 9' . ' 9' , . 'ii ' V' . -251 0255 K S 7 fb , , qT g F . A, 0 V my 1' . F 5 N, ., ami: - fx +111 -ia, I IX . 4 999' gum .M gf. rf , 'N 1 u if Q H515 V nm ' .9 -455' 5 A Vs' P ' ' X Wx - ' W 5 A A ,J ,N r . I I fb! Q ' - . EL DORADO EAST EL DORADO EAST hall Comes to life Qnanaoa W lth Gmc Bannen Launching the year with a burst of patriotic school spirit, the inmates of El Dorado East made and displayed a huge banner urging the "End of the Rainbows" in the Santa Barbara-Hawaii football game. Picking up the momentum, the girls got together with the boys of Sig Ep and carved over eighty pumpkins to deliver to the Dos Pueblos Convalescent Home. Everyone arrived home in time to trick-or-treat. Homecoming House Decs saw the creation of the "First Isla Vista 76," with a large keg and mug on the front lawn, in keeping with the hall tee-shirts. Holidays were always occasions for parties. Thanksgiving's individual hall happenings wereonly a prelude to the big Christmas shindig, which featured a Hall Council skit in which House Nlother Mrs. Snow played the Good Angel. Study breaks, dances, Secret Sisters, and student-faculty dialogues were among the many traditional activities enjoyed by one of the few residence halls still operating within Isla Vista. Front row: Toni Douvros, Pam Shirey, Caroline Potter, Ellen Eiseman. Second row: Cathy Buble, Gini Bolton, Nancy EL DORADO EAST ITIALLORCA Front row: Eva Lippman, Donna Halpern, Deborah Nishi, Shelley VanArsdaIe. Second row: Terry Simmerman, Kathy Knight, Susan Goringer, Linda Phillips, Barbara Kemp, Karen Wilson. Third row: Lesley Jones, Linda Newcomb, Alaine Malkin, Mindy Chase, Leah Diaz, Donna Troy, Anita Howry. Fourth row: Barb Paine, Carol Hanson, Janice Arnett, Donna Hintz, Mary Frink, Rusty Bowler, Kathy Genasci. Drach, Cathy Carlisle, Jeanette Kaji. Third row: Sharon Page, Linda-McCrary, Linda Tognoli, Martha Lemasten ,sr ,. W ,, w,,1ff i i OFFICERS Anna Wallace Secretary-Treasuren Kathy Genascl Social Chairman Rusty Bowler, AWS Representa- tive Judy Crowe Advisor Nancy Drach, Composite Prxldent Caroline Potter Publicity Chairmanf Mary Lynne Stephanou Granada President Terry Slmmerman, Magdalena President Karen Shea Mallorca President. EL DORADO EAST mAGOAl6nA GW f Q... ,A Christmas trees, ornaments, tinsel, and friends to help with the decorations can make El Dorado East almost as comfy as home for this coed. Front row: Linda Mitchell, Krista Carpenter, Debbie Ellingson, Sherry Fontan, Kristine Lund, Anita Wallace. Second row: Cathie Brown, Patricia Cantley, Connie Lee Dunhan, Caroline Hall, Seline Hunkin, Sue Howard, Karen Shea, Nanci Carter. Third row: DeDe Johnson, Cyndee Hutzel, Katherine Teigler, A'nn Schneider, Pam Whitelock, Susie Cole, Penny Yeaden. Resident Assistants Judy Crowe Joan Kleinhenz FIRE DEPARTMENT ...M CAITIDUS DROTIGCIGC Y 21 VOll1i11T66l2S V is ,H .- XX -+ ' E ' E, .r x 74- . 5-,ji Q.. Three members of UCSB's volunteer fire department struggle to put their folded ladder in an upright position during a routine drill. Of the twenty-one volunteers, there are eight students who work on a part-time basis to help the department provide fire protection for the entire campus. Once the ladder has been extended, this crew of campus firemen continue drilling their rescue pro- cedures. Perhaps the most notorious "extinguishing" they did this year was that of the ROTC building. FIRE DEPARTMENT -Jack l Doherty, Ray Montes De Oca, Pete Theriault, David Creeth, Billy Taylor, Fred Turnbull, Carl Yoshioka, Stephen Ball. i i i FONTAINEBLEU Close knit Gnoup Revamps ollcy Twenty-four hour open house will mark the end of FontainebIeu's existence as a semi-supervised living unit next fall. ln a last organized fling, the girls had a heavy schedule this year, including fashion shows, pizza parties, and hall "decs." The crown- ing glory was a Homecoming princess, in Wux.tzt: tl ,. 1 1 it the person of Wendy Williamson. Resident Assistants 'QI' it ,,,.,,. ,,.A V K Wi ,, . 3 6 z' tif 'Sak Q H 1 l " ' .st t-My ' fi.. I i QT.: 7 1 gr ., i. Nw 1, Q. asf.. i N 'bfi y K Serious matters seem to predominate quiet moment together in the rather Denise Barnwell Carol Mattingly here as an unidentified couple enjoy a ornately decorated formal lobby. Mafia MHCH-ale Jan Vela Front row: Betty Ong, Nancy Jarrett, Janet Johnston, Gail Hudgins, Lynn Yamaura, Sue Walters, Michele Tukusagawa, Bev Jonas, Liz Kuzell, Loretta Wong, Alicia Claeboe. Second row: Libby Fraim, Denise Mulle, Kathy Buzan, Sharon Rydbom, Betty Ricarto, Sherry Brown, Patty McEvoy, Karen Bogner, Cindy Lindsey, Melanie Lewis, Pat Griset, Pat Arnett, Verla VWnslow. Third row: Julie Henderson, Sue Bontadelli, Sheila Collins, Dottie Iverson, Patti Frantz, Toni Hoffman, Mary Markytan, Karen Friedrich, Cindy Banducci, Shirley Frantz, Ann Keitel, Leslie Davenport, Vicki Cassette. Fourth row: Mary Lawhon, Kay Zwartendyk, Barb Thelander, Ellen Casper, Susan Powell, Jan Palmer, Christie Jochums, Luann Zink, Nadine Herron, Holly Holkesvick, Sue Smith, Barbara Cone, Ann Ecofli Sandy Jordan. FRANCISCO TORRES Calsanet '69 nets In its second year on the Isla Vista horizon, Francisco Torres witnessed a crowded schedule of events. Bi- weekly movies included such big- name features as "Gambit," "The Music lVlan," and the perennially popular Road Runner cartoons. Cabaret '69 provided a colorful backdrop for the annual benefit to raise money for the UCSB Scholarship fund. Meeting in the Tower Room, guests enjoyed turtle racing, danced to the music of the Silver Blues Band, Bic pnopn: watched a full length movie, and ate delicious food. On a more serious level, the Towers sponsored a fall Speakers Series, entitled "Politics '68." Several representatives for the various Presidential candidates highlighted this relevant series. Continuing sports programs at Francisco Torres featured dances and an extensive agenda of diving, weight- lifting, billiards and intramurals. Front row: Mark Stasinis, Bob Van Epps, Ron Third row: Charles Sivley, Keith Mclntire, Chuck Stram, Bill Haytan, Charles Senn. Second row: Loring, John Luidema, Paul Grim, Andy Wold Jim Atkins, Mark Rotman, Cary Hanson, Wen Hans Senn Van Basel Wagemans. Yap, Bob Phillips, Ernie Bumatay, Dave Edgren. Front row: Paul Sisson, Jerry Edgar, Herb Kouns. Third row: Bill Geozgiou, Frank Odom, David Second row: Greg Lagana, Larry Asakawa, Choate, Gary Jones, George Soluk, Larry Kazan- Dennis Korbiak, Bruce Peterson, Marc Viducich. jlan. N Y. M V 4 .1 4 in -E 1' A . -Q-VVSQA Vw! '-w , -X-'N"K - - 1rgR:x:QXf . in X -K. A . cl' ,f ' I 1-S L la- ., I ' 49 IA- W M I . -1. , -.sr ' K sz-oa"9"11.,.k ' 51.31" E wa.. 5 !. ,Q 'EE E5 21,15 Efifi All H555 JJ . .N if -' V '! 1. - ,- I -.fffig ' X, 4, X YJ, ' A,., sjf, - f v- 3135? 'wsu , Q fi W' - ,J am ' ft : x T ' lr, .iss A A ' L gf.-5 js uf lv .4-"4 -Q-, - .15-Jggery: L 5 39- QQv."ftf ' . 1 'sf:21Sv,g . we ' QW ix 3.5, .A V' g 1 Bef?--M, 1 52. . ,.,,, , g, -f9?'l'gi.w, ,. ,,. ,W 1. -if ,J B' 0 W: 5'5" 'v ' '34 -. gg.-el" ceq? , -.., , at E 1 'Q ww JM, I : f. . 4 q ,pa 1 Nm 'Z jp, 1 L A Msn wal' '3:511.-,Qi , .I-wr f, , . f 9 ' X 353 Mfg 3. ,. 12604. - O g , ' FV' , , EQ . '3 . A' ,..h. A w X 1 f ,,., i '. sm 'III My- . Fi- A E , 5 gafffii A' ggi, .gf ea I f 2 ,W at in JH irq' .-5' ? W Q. . ig eg, v r mf ' gf, . 'KLU " , L . M , nwfrf ' : .5 if W I? -f 245 3- jf! 1 I .ug,?,l 1 1 M x X " fi?'?'fiV?E,1w E ,, .531 .mga '--. ' 4 - 'UGS' WFS? 1 .MQ 1 1 1 ' - '73 X A -la: ni 'ef - ,gfqfsi . uv., .,.. 52.1. nf.. .1 : ..-, . fl. W ' 113 PEW ,M W E. as-IQ: um. N ' if F 1. ' LL ' 11 ,M fl 1 2 fir? V 2.2 H1 Ei ., ,jlrkfi 'I , W5 'f sh :. , . . I 1 , fra N. V 'wp U. 3 .1 .,V. A W5 "Z1:'2'-'BCR V 432.31 'sf g, ,, W 51, ,I 1 v 3 A M112 ' 'wziw rv. Eau' me 2:1.2Qre, Y ,315 ,ij .,t,,, ,. i..5!Hf, si Xiu: Qu .. r ff' 'ilfififlilif 1 .Ewa M, ' ,. A 5 Q 4,1 3 ,A f:,.,v,Af Lnaiv ' , , f ,, ,wgim x I. f. , , 1 M 1 ..w,,ff f, . ,fa r gjgw L, ow, f-.gg J 1 ,a qu ,, I V W 4 W r I 'n 1 f t A . ,N P 2 S u . , V I U Us - ' 0 f f A V N N I 1 N l T H ,1 , 5 5 e,- X H L M X U"u"w' ff , , K . 1 fy 1 3 . fa 1 ex N ,R 1 ., , , - 9' Q X if V 5:95 " Y-5 ,, 'I . ,va 8: 5 Ji? A a 5 with 'cv- From the top of the Towers, a new high-rise landmark is seen taking shape. The 180 foot Storke tower, seen dominating the early twilight panorama of a turned on Isla Vista, will be the tallest building in the county. Its 60 bell carillon will be heard hourly throughout the stu- dent community and into Goleta. Front row: Michael Kander, Ken Kale- nik, Steve Keil. Second row: Gary Fachin, Augustus Marlow, George Johnson, Peter Bandurraga, Gary Pelka. Third row: Richard Moore, Steven M. Sellman, Gene Hannan, John Flaig, Kirk Reinhardt, Robert E. Kent. Resident Assistants Pe ter Bandurraga Gary Johnson Herbert K ouns Cindy Kress Randee Martin Robert Mcln tire Steven Miller f Lesley Rex ' 5' ,eg SOMERSET VICIORIGS GARHGRGO A11 SADODIDGI2 GAITIGS Sailing, sandcastles, and Women's Intramurals kept Somerset sports enthusiasts on their toes this year. First and third place trophies from Sandpiper Weekend took a prominent place among their souvenirs, but, not content with past glories, the girls went on to participate in several rigorous WIA activities. A Halloween costume party introduced the holidays in style. By Christmas, the girls had commandeered their own private Santa Claus in the person of Dean Richard Jensen, complete with a bag of goodies and a willing lap for the lovely believers to sit on while reading gift lists. Another of the administration's elite, Dean Barbara Deutsch, arrived for dinner at the House of Lords one night, followed by a relaxed visit in one of the Somerset apartments. The hen session covered such explosive topics as the North Hall incident and the strength of "student power." Participation in JIVE rounded out the hall's activities, along with, believe it or not, intense study sessions. The hall spirit was not to be lost in academia, however, as attested to by nightly snack breaks during Dead Week. xiii' s . .lsisf-3 l a SOMERSET As with all residence halls, one of Somerset's most beloved daily sights is the mail h carrier..."lf she has mail for me!" Front row: Maria Gonzalez, Peggy Edwards. Second row: Robin McCluen, Sue Weber, Lisa Hansen, Joan Orland, Linda Lyons. Third row: Eugenie Van Miller, Karen O'Brien, Helen Gant, Martha Westberg, Margie Reuter, Dorothea Maxwell, Peg Hebard, Karen Hansen, Lynn Ellis. Fourth row: Mary Kirkpatrick, Bobbie Montini, Laura Weinstein, Leslie Johnson, Lynn Evers, Sue Jennings, Karen Bell, Suzanne Mellard, Pat Castello. w rezrffwfzzlwiiie va? X OFFICERS Front row Lynn Evers WIA Represenmtrve Suzanne Mellard Composite President: Sue Weber Social Chairman' Bobbie Montini, Publicity Chairman,' Lesley Johnson, Vice ,-g 'QS XX. President Second row Karen Palmer Prcadrlly Sunshine Chairman Karen OBrien Denblrgh Sunshine Chairman Denise Wallace Plcadllly Chairman SOMERSET DICAOIH Resident Asistants Joetta Tenisan Pamela Walsh 4,0 Q11 Front row: Catherine Ries, Denise Pat Carney, Sally Goldsmith, Karen Wallace, Elizabeth Storms. Second row: Palmer, Nancy Barnett, Joetta Tenison. TROPICANA GARDENS Sun ano Sump ,,- F, hasten pace Everything was thoroughly lively for the women of Tropi- cana Gardens, from their GGR skit, "ThoroughIy Decadent IVIillie," to a spring beach party. Taking full advantage of UCSB's setting, members of this predominately freshman hall enjoyed a College Cabin Retreat and a breakfast horse- back ride. In an attempt to orient themselves to some of the pro- blems preoccupying the uni- versity community, Tropicana sponsored a showing of the film, "What ls Prejudice." Guest speakers such as Father Bob Donaghue, C.S.P., and EOP counselor Bill Fields stimulated thought and dis- cussions which continued into the small hours of the morning. Ng ,of X"-rv ws.,,,J'i Resident Assistants Kathleen Bell Marilyn Clayton Carolyn Reid Sandra Sugi ta TROPICANA l4AlTl6hAm6hA ii f l Front row: Alyson Nowell, Ginger Gainer, Leslie Beebe, Cassie Bartholic, Janet De Bois, Susie Palmquist, Karen Doidge, Deborah Hogan, Emilie Golding. Second row: Dottie Ehrhorn, Trudy Askew, Marilyn Glider, Janice Brock, Katie Hummes, Marsha Martin, Kit Kenney, Sherry Rojas, Pat Boynton, Colleen Maloney. Third row: Kathy Bell, Carrie Brooks, Ellen Fingerhut, Wendy Sommer, Judy Immenschuh, Micki Muto, Debbie llldlliams, Janice Garoutte, Debbie Del Duca, Joanne Blegen, Valerie Kear. Fourth row: Dana Derick, Roberta Gomer, Hil Holman, Robin Bruce, Alexa Romain, Sidne Barker, Joanne Flournoy, Kathie Wall, Michele Matlock. 'EASKIX-z-LBBILQ Il --A- CREAM .f.:.., vxfxk TROPICANA Uml "ivF"J" -1 3601! F, Unpacking after vacation is tire- TROPICANA A54 some, but Dottie McKee thinks it's 1T' Q nice to be home at Tropicana. nl Front row: Diana Abourezk, Maureen Kearns, Hattie Simons, Pam Moreland, Georganne McKellar, Mary Moy, Julie Kenny. Second row: Sharon Smith, Robin Johnson, Heather Howell, Kathy Keley, Martha Moran, Sarah Berkshire, -'fd' Music and refreshments at hand Debbie Williams and Colleen Maloney settle down to study. Marcy Manning, Kathy Aftergood, Leslie Johnston, Third row: Debbie VWlliams, Marcia Greene, Cathy Pinter, Dottie McKee, Sharon Hoerber, Julia Huddles- ton, Ginny Walton, Daun Conger. E Front row: Marilyn Mattoon, Dorothy Munday, Cynthia Ouan, Sue Colvin, Nancie Schalk, Kay Saroini, Liz Murrieta, Margaret Nicholas, Susanne Binckley, Lark Baynton. Second row: Mindy Cross, Heidi Donaldson, Ginny Seiferi Christi Reed, Judi Loeffler, Rita Donahue, Teri Koenig, Lyn Goldinger, Kay Austin, Pat Smith, Jan Schregardus, Cyn Craig, Judy Bickford. Third row: Joleen Higgin, Cheryl Mehlhaff, Ginger Roth, Anne Nuckolls, Holly Fairless, Penny Skaggs, Elizabeth Daoust, Caroline Vaughan, Kathy Gentry, Pam Maule, Diane Johnson, Peggy Amodeo, Joy Fauvre, Donna Gerlach. Fourth row: Barbara Pybrum, Lindsay Vann, Connie Linton, Jan Fritz, Carolyn Henke, Lynne Pellegrini, Lorelle Browning, Marilyn Cornelius, Connie Kelly, Kitty Duffin, Linda Paggi ffm r . H.i1,..w,u K W - iz ".'?"! h -' 5 '1?.w N, R A Sandy Sugita takes her turn at desk duty during a lull at Trop. For once, even the phones are quiet. A XXX 'X .x'1?"-an if ' - .'Q,Arf'?A. I -. ., I Af, Y- .lx-kv 'S -we L ":"E': . 'Q ' 1 I OFFICERS - Front row: Karen Doidge, Kamehameha Presidentf Carolyn Schleber, Teru Secretaryf Diane Buzzini, Teru Presidentf Kathy Bell, Kamehameha, Secre- tary. Second row: Judy Bickford, Sumi Secretaryg Marcy Manning, Leilani Secretaryj Julia Huddles- ton, Leilani President,' Pamela Maule, Sumi President. TROPICANA 1161211 be NX X ,Rx Front row: Shannon Mclntyre, Merisa Smith, Sandy Snyder, Judy Yeager, Pam Weble, Barbara Fujikuni, Lyn Goldfarb, Kathy Kimes, Kay Diamond. Second row: Barbara Baldwin, Susan Hutchinson, Debby Nichols, Kathy Campbell, Carolyn Schleber, Anita Koslar, Annette Nibley, Coral Singer, Melody Melusky. Third row: Lynn Olvany, Carol Brush, Carrie Oretsky, Lucianne Ranni, Trudy BOYSQ yo Hauge, Joann Gelb, Rebecca Gray, Christine Keene, Joy Clover, Janie Clinger, Fourth row: Diane Buzzini, Shar Braine, Betsy Palmer, Debbie Conley, Dale Patterson, Emilie Bursik, Claudia Gardner, Sara Jo Hornstein, Barbara Murphy. life? gif' 1',-' arried Students must each Carry a big out into the world and make enough to oad, when they share each other's lives. live on, while a mother already has her s students, the pressure is heavy to get hands and arms quite full. MARRIED STUDENTS multi-level life Olctates Routine Lying in the midst of one of the most rapidly expanding areas in the Goleta Valley, University Village houses the major percentage of UCSB's married students. Living in a suburban atmos- phere as bread-winners and housewives, these hardy souls are acting out multiple roles, as they commute from their student world to their business, and finally to the refuge of home life. Illus- trative of the dichotomy are the many bicycles with kiddie seats attached. While Daddy's away pursuing his graduate work and lVlommy's out working to help him through, the kids paste in trading stamps. EK 1? ESTW bt -2 1! - Qf 4 L E In VT r ,gk L I. 3 M ' 5? 55125 .JAWWIP-A I rm, I1 GRGGKS Greeks pledge hundreds . . . Isla Vista cleaned up . . . Blood donated to Larry Adams blood drive . . . Panhellenic develops Gauchitas Program . . . Pledges become actives . . . Side- walks stenciled . . . Queens and princesses chosen . . . Fraternities go on kidnapping spree . . . Brothers work with youngsters . . . Heart drive provides funds . . . House decs, parades, cheers raise Homecoming spirit . . . Greeks active in student government . . . TA's trailers painted . . .TG's and formals domi- nate social life . . . New dress codes insti- tuted . . . Sorority rush re-evaluated . . . Greeks involve themselves in pertinent cam- pus political affairs . . . Service to com- munity stressed . . . Houses compete in Spring Sing . . . Greek community grows, develops, widens horizons . . . Seniors bid farewell . . . The 1968-69 year makes way for the new. iw 1' QQ ' 5.. X emi WH ' .NVQ Km... Z 1 4 if gy W, S-5.13. v x Sim , ' i V g ,, ff up ,- ,.1 I T1 84' v , UI I. I -W f 6.- I , 'Q ,1- -" lf, 6 Q, A N 2 Mn- ,N 1' i f , , . .:f. Q ' 'S FH ' E HJ .4 1 v w aif x . KJ' 5, M - M, i 4. ., k .Q ,, -,Q-.1 . Oc, ' ,Q ' J : " 'gif ' ' . ' .r ,:. ,sn 'F Y f I-. if k KK ,.,., X A-Vx, 4 , QQ fx-L. . U . ,Q ..r ' . . I4 -x ,ia , Y I 1 sff I I I V ,, X V N ,Q .f 'I' .N 'V 4 W " , ', ' lf ' xt 5 ' " ."17'.- Q,,'f'1, 1 -' .. 1, ".'. if Af. .VX " ' " ' x 4 A -' '1' "', . '. "' . 'ru' rf v, .r. "1 ' ' 'X .- '- -A 'x .' I wx. K i-X ' -we , R. - ,ix 3- . ,-V f .1 iq, rl ,.'. 4, - ' ,J ',,'-QI.-ya.: .9-1' -- - 'qu . , , .r " f 1 -.91 '1 : 'T Y I .. xshrg - - ff Q' 12 xx? -I ,h X, I, f.. nf- .za 9'-1 - f' x Lf KS if . wg. 9: fi . 4. "ze-L ' ' - Q32-L 'gisfiiysgf ' 1-fx W. . ,QQLV , Lf lr- if -- J'7'-Phi J w .5 Lf Ffnflgrf ffsgh gglv"'L" , fi-1 1- .352 -Q 2 Q7-W f 'v.fzy,.g - ..- H -- .V lfjli lf i ,, .wi -XXV .F Q Lambda Chi Alpha and Kappa Alpha Theta garnered the Sweepstakes trophy in their portrayal of the "Garden of Isla Vista," a variation on the Garden of Eden theme. Alpha Epsilon Phi's interpretation of "ln the Beginning" was the theme of their homecoming house decorations. Sigma Phi Epsilon participate in the Isla Vista Homecoming Parade by featuring Bacchus, the God of alcoholic beverages, as their hero. 3, , .., 1? Wefszsss A .' 7-3-1 DAl1h6ll6l1lC COUUCII. F Tracy Ruggles Fall President Rush Gvaluateo By Panhellenic Shifting emphases rechanneled Pan- hellenic organizational efforts in 1968. Such reorientation made way for the initiation of new activities. One such development was the Gauchitas program designed to create a relationship with the young girls of Isla Vista. Based on a similar program for the boys, this project involves several members of each sorority working in a weekly arts and crafts program at St. Nlarks. Saturday afternoons one sorority entertains the youngsters at the different houses. Again, moving outside the more traditional involvements in the Greek community, the members took time to listen to members of the different and highly relevant campus groups such as the BSU and UNIAS. Toward the end of the year members looked to next fall and began an evalu- ation of the existing rush system, con- sidering shortening parties, shortening rush and possibly allowing casual clothes at some parties. Karen Baum of Panhellenic leads a con- tingent of their young protegees in song during a Saturday get-together at St. lVlark's. The weekly program, aimed at young Goleta Valley girls, was called Gauchitas. Stephanie Streisfield Alpha Epsilon Phi Debbie Mount Alpha Delta Pi Paula Wegeforth Alpha Phi Machelle Grant Alpha Chi Omega Margaret Corselius Delta Gamma Bobbi Kockos Kappa Alpha Theta Gretchen Gingg Pi Beta Phi Pamela Michels Sigma Kappa Linda Fuselier Chi Omega SENIOR Delegates I . 415 Q5 Q AECD Alpha Epsilon phi pleooes employ Smeaiz tactics Proud members of Alpha Epsilon Phi moved into their first house this year. An especially symbolic moment was the raising of the Greek letters with the help of the fraternities. With the aid of Phi Delt pledges, the girls constructed their house dec for homecoming, featuring a caveman era scene. During rush the pledges stole all the actives' make-up and strung it up throughout the house. During winter quarter the A E Phi's combined with Delta Gammas for a formal at Fran- cisco Torres, and instituted a big brother program. On campus, the girls rated second scholastically, participated in intra- mural volleyball, and were active in various campus organizations. During the spring they planned a casual formal and a lVlom and Dad's weekend. lVlay and June found seniors looking forward to graduation, and the rest of the girls awaiting the start of the national convention in the Bahamas. A E Phi's and DG's combine forces at Fran- cisco Torres in their winter quarter formal. The Tower Room provided an elegant setting for the regal gowns, although today's dancing makes them seem incongruous. 'v 'Q-J' me-"i, . IQN T? 1 iv -s Stephanie Streisfield Andrea Tarr Barbara Turner Alice Weiner he Arlene Cole Janet Disraeli Randi Ellman Judy Epstein Anne Fox Sherri Gold Lyn Goldinger Christine Keene Joan Millard Jackie Miller f' M h M 'll ars a 1 er , '- cb Mary Ellen Moore Y -5... . Judy Orel if 'sim Sharon Reed Nancy Schwartz Sheri Sabin AAU Alpha Celts pl HAIZIODAI OIIIIICGRC makes IV SIZOD This year was an auspicious one for the ladies of Alpha Delta Pi. In the fall they were visited by Grand Vice-President. A D Pi's started a program with Alpha School, participated in Gau- chitas and aided the tutoring project. At GGR a second place trophy was captured for their skit with the Phi Psi's, "The Nearly Dead Game." Dad's Weekend was held in the winter, and spring brought A D Pi's to competition in Spring Sing, Derby Day, and Pushcarts. Gay Aegerter f' il. Carolyn Arabian Judith Berrett Nancy Boyce Sharanne Braine Elisabeth Breretan Shelley Browne Sue Buck ff? V .Pie Kathy Burk Carolyn Caldwell Bonnie Campbell Linda Cashbaugh Stephanie Christensen Claire Cole Jackie Copple Virginia Coull Karen Craner Brooke Eagleson Diane Fleischli Joyce Fujii K. Chris Gevorkian QQ Tricia Greschner Stacey Ann Griffith Maryanne Harris Sue Herrington Mimi Hinze Joan Hoffman Cheryl Holman Genny Holmes Meg Huddleson Juanita Jackson Kathryn Johnson Nancy Jones ,' Q , Carolyn Kelly f ,, Z -'RW Barbara Kuntz K I Kathleen Lemaster ,, lF,f'9. Linda Lindelef 1. 2: Liz Linder , Marci Maddock " Ingrid Magnuson The El Encanto hotel was the setting Pi's winter formal. Almost everyone got appropriate for the "beautiful people" at A plenty of exercise on the dance floor. , . 'Yi 3:19 Jacqueline Martin Nancy Martinek Judith Ma talas -sl l"3 ci .. ' if I , !,'pX4. -1 V2 T. if A V, D' an ' V 3, 4 'Sr ""i -Q91 Pat Martin ey, - A-.. President Dede Stanley Rowse flank Province and housemother Mrs. President Mrs. Nelson. ' .,K. NK 'J A N ,..: rt V gf . Q S. V U as - - A X if i- 5. X n fe . ' P ' -5-'T , ' D T ls' V fer A at-I J t ' V, 0 V It - E A W ' S Q u n 4 ,rx U-,K ' . f.,-yy N f QA' li N f--- 1 rev, if A -1 ,V Q . Af' '3 " ,X ,, 45 5' A x I X ,N l 'Q ,gin QQ Q' D ' 4+ 'f f N ge ' 'Free X T n A J T is L Q dy 'S 3 ' Y ..,,. 45- 1 ' in J e -' it P -'-' T ' M j 0 A 0 5 P g -N .Q J Ea- H-+4 jf V -:sf ,s ' 4 n ' 1 tp it V y- ' S J J '51 A fl W - ' X 9-we L". me A ' o " N fi5gh,4f'g3l- l f'l"i as if J 42 T , 13' W f'-W' ' ' ' - :.: ' ii 121- ia 'Q 'K' i 7 - - 24 T ' .V.:: Lf V 1' 4 -'V W Q Y - ' 1 ., VVV:: : age - It .J , ,I X I 5 ' , l l ' tl 2 tr., X ,,. T2 1 ' .ff y A 41 K. f X N in ie J V 1 M U f S 1' J ' S' , ' U 1: X ' ., unify i, Linda Wright Beth Yeager Pamela Zerkle ,.,4 Marcie Maxwell Jill McCaffery Pamela McLean Carla Me-inel Susan Merge Leslie Messenger Jean Millenaar Cindy Mohler Linda Morgan Debbie Mount Judi Naas Chris Nelson Nancie Norman Mary Ogle Cathy O'Neal Christine Palmer Linda Pano vich Dale Patterson Carol Pearse Vicki Pelusi Debbie Peterson Ru th Ann Peterson Suzanne Rovzar Becky Saleeby Joanne Sammons Susan Schmandt Terry Shoop Liz Smith Mary Snapp Claudia Stanley Janet Steele Helen Strange Shelley Sturtevant Marty Sullivan Deborah Thompson Nancy Todd Patricia Ward Teresa Williams Sally Willson Lea Ann Wood Sandee Banks Tori Blair Sherry Bracken Judy Brookshire Cathy Brown Terry Brownell Stephan y Cabral Lynn Carpenter Michele Chiechi Bobbie Cole Marsha Drake Gay Eichhoff Kay Elmore Barbara Ferguson Kay Fitzgerald Sue Flower Carolyn Gill Gayle Ginthner Cassandra Gunter Eileen Hanson Lynn Hardison Nina Harris Nan cy Hatch Suzanne Hiler Jan Ju tzi Carole Kaufman Patricia Kausen Cheryl Lacy Vickie Luoto Shirley McCuistion Maryanne McNeely Susie Merry KJ' -L H, w m l Y, l Members ofthe Alpha Phi fall pledge class appear cheerful despite their burdensome duties. 0' 4 7 ,F""f'-may atb X Af , Avg A -. QM. -.1 'qw-ti l. FG.. .,. it L V 9 ? g acl .J 'X fl ?l ETS .119 'X' argl, ""' 1 - E A l 2 ,R QQ ' . fxrg' ' Q M ii' X?-:' tsx 4- 1 -N - 0 'H ACD Alpha pm Renovateo home Bmqhtens Vista Alpha Phis were welcomed back this year with a surprise - the alums had remodeled the house during the summer, for which the chapter organized a thank you dinner. At the convention the chapter had received a trophy for contributions to the Heart Fund. Joan Kleinman, sponsored by the Phi Psi's, was chosen a Homecoming princess, and Alpha Phis entered the parade with the Sig Eps. The winter formal highlighted first quarter activi- ties. Each month the Alpha Phis sent a letter and money to their foster child in Viet Nam. Parents' Weekend was held in the spring, when the girls also participated in Derby Day and Pushcarts. Trailer house painting was serious business during Greek Weekend as is evidenced by the faces of these Alpha Phi's as they receive last minute instructions from the painter. Donna Miglore Jane Nelson Trudy Nelson Jane Nibley Nancy Noble Candy Nowitzki Nancy 0'Brien Lynn Olvany Connie O 'Neill Susan Pearce Wendy Pedlow Carolyn Pen tecost Deryl Pratt Mary Pritchard Sandra Ouetnick Patricia Rice Alice Rogers Cher Flo th Sharon Rudolph Nancy Scaglio tti Peggy Sh uler Cheryl Singer 77sh Smith Jackie Sorenson Ka thy Stary Corinne Stevens Susie Swain Debbie Talmage Penne Thacher ig ,' .A Terry Thomas Nancy Urist Lynne Vandermeid AX Alpha Chl OITIGGA Beautiful house highlights yean Fall rush for the Alpha Chi Omegas was held at the University Methodist Church, as their new house was still being completed. October was high- lighted with the initiation of big brothers, and the annual Halloween Party. A proud moment was the dedication of the new house in November. At Christmas the Alpha Chi's had their annual Christmas party for Hillside students. The Homecoming house dec was constructed with the Phi Delts. The winter formal was held second quarter, after which Alpha Chi's went on a retreat to the Santa Ynez lVlountains. Ending an active year the girls parti- cipated in Derby Day and held the annual Senior Banquet. Uncle Sam and Paula Schminke seek recruits. Penn y Allen Julie A mick Suzanne Anderson Leslie A twa ter Robyn Babbage Sherrell Ball Susan Baltes L ynn Barre rr Pat Beim ford Kathy Bell ' Diane Berry Karen Bogner ' ' Alice Brown Leslie Bruhn A Ca thy Bush V Doreen Cahalan Barbara Cornell Betsy Cuddy Marilyn Davis Joanne De Vi to Joyce Doo Marilyn DuBois Cath y Edgerly Linda Eggers Lynne Engelhardt Nancy E ttelson Kaye E vle th , Michele Ferrero " MaryAnn Forst ' . Paula Goody Machelle Grant Elaine Greynald -di- ry. ! Ji, Y'-P 1-ev Sonja Hansen Devon Hedding il Kathy Bell, Mickey Ferrero, Anne Mclnnis, and Verla VWnslow Diane Zearbaugh fa 1... fs I l f X ff 1 1, , 'L , x l i , , A t Z 1 i V' . :rf awp' , Leslie Bruhn help Donn Bernstein tend bar Laurel Herbert Lynne Hoefer Jan Holman Janet Jennings Linda Johnson Margi t Juul Kathleen Kennedy Karen Krakow Elizabeth Kuzell Marilee Lawrence Teddie Lawrence Laura MacArthur Jacky Maguire Kathryn Mahood Janie Martin Anne Mclnnis Diane Newell Cindy Nichols Nancy Owens Carole Patterson Pamela Ross Carolyn Schnick Paula Schminke Lois Sims Cindy Smith Shelley Smith Lindsey Stewart Ellen Sudman Jan Tankersley Jan Vernon Melody Welman Janet Wictorin 95 Striking an ominous pose, DG Diane Higgen prepares to block the opposition from the Debbie Allen Julie Baird Linda Bates Susan Bates Alice Bonser Trudy Boyer Anne Bowdish Melinda Corell Grace Corselius Margaret Corselius Kerry Courtright Annette Cowan Linda Curry Donna Darrow Kathleen Davis Collette DeMedeiros Pam Deming Leslie Dixon Darlene Duncan Gloria Ewig Leighan Feffer Jan Fritz Chris Garcia Vicki Gonzales Lynn Hassler Patricia Hickey Diane Higgins Kathleen Higgins Bann Hoey Diane Hollister Cyndee Howard Mindy lngraham ami Q 3 el Strapp, as Marti Ruby bullets a pass over their startled, but valiant, heads. Bob Helwig and Linda Bates show Leighann Feffer and her date a "friendly" dance. - 3 . - V Y' -N: 5 ' ' t f l - - , er. f Z Nl lf' - XZ., :F I IN' f fl' - ,. ,lt H : ' 'fn "f 1 ' , ,' A g I l N 1 N as t i . 'X Xi ' r jf, N E- Meg Johnson , L , ,X , 1 ,,,ev,Q--fa 4' ,i ' ,3 li . ' V3 's as SD i gg x Q 8 5 V V , . I F x -7 . ii f' , A ' in 'A 5' H A A .L ' Paula Johnston N' Sue Kalinske , carharine Kfndfg '-59 Susan King 6 Deborah K urilch yk mer-an 3 Oelta Gamma Reaomo, Selling help the Blmo Fall saw the Delta Gammas deeply in- volved in activities. Pledges organized a barn dance and pulled pranks such as putting "just married" signs and tin cans on the actives' cars. DG's partici- pated in Homecoming with the SAE's, and won second place for their house dec, Fleagan's First Showstopper. During winter quarter, dads arrived for Dads' Weekend and actives turned out for a Valentine formal. Service projects for the DG's in- cluded reading for blind ladies, sending packages to Viet Nam, and selling ice cream to buy typewriters for the library. ln the spring, a luau, Spring Sing, Pushcarts, and Derby Day, maintained the active pace. s 594 W v l- 4- J, M l f. - " I l ,M Y --. ..., i flfiefff X f 5 ' EEL 'mi ,f H wt 1" 5 X 4- ,, vojg f Ni :R Jonna Stratton Charlotte Vondrak Chris Wells Nancy Wells Jane Wieman Rebecca Yates Dana Lane Kathy Ledeen Randell Lencioni Betsy MacLaren Melinda Mathisen Sally McArthur Denise McRary Karen Melton Patricia Mulvey Phyllis Ortega Susan Palmquist Mary Parker L ynn Patsel Candace Parry Fran Peterson Jill Pfitzer Peggy Ptak Vidda Ouon Ruth Randall Patricia Rankin Sharon Ready Martha Ruby Tracy Ruggles Jane Scurr Ann Seaman Donna Seeber Maggie Sherwood Deborah Slemp Pat Stampley Suzanne St. Clair Shirley Standlee Kathie Steele i 383 KAQ-D kappipha theta house Ceo Wins highest honons Returning in the fall from the national convention in Nlichigan, the women of Kappa Alpha Theta participated in Homecoming with the Lambda Chis, gaining the Sweepstakes trophy, and helped the Santa Barbara School for the Blind. Active on campus were members of Spurs, Chimes, Colonels Coeds and Honeybears. Sorority representative Linda Korber had a busy year, and Theta lVlarty Higgin was named Home- coming Queen. An informal barbecue was the high point of Dads' Weekend in the spring. The spring formal preceded practice for Spring Sing, as the girls attempted to repeat last year's first. At the end ofthe year Thetas participated in Derby Day and said goodbye to seniors. The fall cocktail formal for Thetas and their dates was a swinging affair as anyone can see by the happy expressions. Beri Barber Sarah Berkshire Ann Beranius Terry Bialecki Janet Brace Susie Cerrina Nina Chambers Lynn Chetkovich Barbara Cattle Diane Derian Ellen Easton Christine Engquist Kristin Finnegan Lynn Gausewitz Debbie Greyson Barbara Han ford Cindy Hawes Af MisSV Hibler ' 1 -Li W Joleen Higgin f Martha Higgin l Betsy Hillman ' ' ' Sue Hurst Jinn y James Peggy Jerome 1'-, Parti Kerr Jackie Kimmel Carol Kleinhofer Bobbi Kockos Laurel Korber , C x "Wee, 5 lb 5 l ll , i , ,' Q . N ,.,:, zz! '31 I i Yi A ' ll! ' ,lx W., X - . . ,X .,-xi? l i u '1 lliirzar .X I .y-D 'Z if as-41 r i ' Y? ' l l fx I " . 4 3 4115 Yv- wi lL 3 1 .rs 1 534 -' : iv Hi' Q4 Q A 'f'12ff'I'91Qw5f9' A- ,Pr - A - , wwf' Q ' 1? i lm mkum A g ,l,m:f!'Si?g 221.15 4 si i,'xLf'.f1" V.,A:i1w3i N w Mother Goose stopped at the Theta house during rush where Nina Chambers, preceded by Rocky Fredericks fill up their ,L , i . ss, K. H X i , oo., , ,, fgQl?f.'?l - ' 'Q -'r ' I ' " ' ' " H' gk -1--f ' fi 1 grid A af "' A f W V liigmflf Wifi: " . w,4,,. ' V, V H .V . fi mf- fi, .9 I I- V A5 w ld, A, A . K 1 4 ,V Q ' 1 1 s A I V ' - " fl ' .sf ' 35 Z n , ,u -f Patricia Van Dam I Q 'R' iff f Marti Vandruff 1 ic- X 1 ,,, f 1 L4 Alice Warrick K 4, r "1-rv' If Jo Wegeforth A ' i Jill VWlliams 6515? ' xl some of her friends were in Theme Night preparations plates from the buffet table preparing for dancing Linda Karber Judy Lean Susan Leiphardt Nancy Leverette Glenn McChesney Peggy McGinnis Allyson McKenzie Barbara Moe Margery Moe Chris Mullen Gayle Mulvey Joan Murphy Kathy Peirce Carol Peterson Kama Phillips Ann Rector Sally Reynolds Donna Riordan Leah Histau Janice Scobey Laura Smyth Patricia Stevenson Sherry Strong Mary-Kaye Tillman rf35 ees Mgr eggrjzl , gg is 3 1 Pu Phl s Betsy Gregg and Sally Stevens along with housemother Mrs. Dupe Bette Allen Jenny Allen Cindy Anderson Hallie Anderson Barbara Barieau Lark Ba yn ton Mary Bethea Jamey Blair Karin Cooper Susan Cowles Cindy Crowell Janet Culmback Sally Curran Ginny David Laurie Detloff Kathleen Dixon Laurie Douglas Nancy Drach Ka thy Evans Jann Ficken Sandi Fuhriman Gretchen Gingg Betsy Gregg Barbara Grell and cook Mrs. Miller enjoy the initia- tion banquet honoring spring pledges. l . i. In , jj. vi an K sa 4, I ., X '-.ip ix rv fK,'f,, " -' : JY' i H ' Jgmd 1 ' U' ' f I L my :Ei .. N 5 . ' , ,M H . I, 5 QNX , xg -K ' " "' ' I 3 -4.19, ' f':5 ' 4 ,f,1r7'K'F Q i i I X' , , , r J, , Q' L r fr ' .jk Kathy Kiley Sallye Lea R. Marilyn Lee Katie Lockwood Tina Maybay Kathryn McEntee is "" Tas ig. I , ia - V E sa- Q Q IVV 1' W ,I 'V' -K. i L x F 1 , 4 A S 'Wi . -1 .- F, K-rv 1' Q .YV se- 7 ff: Pat Thompson Alex Tuck Sherry VWng Nancy Wolven Diane Wood we Ti HBCD pi Beta pm SERVICE, Action Requmeo hustle Pi Beta Phi began the year by pledging 21 girls who promptly pulled a prank, putting sardines in the lights. Home- coming with the Sigma Chi was rained out. A winter formal was held at the lVliramar, but the frivolity only high- lighted involvement in class councils and committees on campus, as well as the student spirit squad. Service projects included the tutoring project, the Heart Drive and the Gauchitas program. Pi Phis also gave a party for girls at St. Vincent's. Dads came in the spring, helping in a work project and playing football and volleyball. A spring formal and the senior farewell luncheon climaxed another busy year for the Pi Phis. Kathy Dixon and her date rock out to the sound of the Soul Purpose at the Pi Phi winter formal which was held at the Miramar in Santa Barbara. L5 s Q, Patti McKeever Terri McNamara ' ' Patricia Meredith 1 Sharon Montague Christine Moore P Maggie Mosgrove J L if . V Susan Nelson Terri Newlee Marilyn Porter Caroline Potter Jeri Rehm Pat Russell Vicki Schmidt Sue Schumann Debra Sherman Arlyn Silacci '.., P .Q Adele Simmons Nancy Snow . , . Mary Stephanou iii ' -, S Sally Stephens "- ' SallyStires DianeSwift Linda Taylor i' 1 Susi Thomas gl In I 1 ef fa m W A. li Q 'ii vassal Y Y ' I 44 I mm 13, 1- l l ills EK Siqma kappa trzophy, lloizmal animate Aoenoa Taking a great fall pledge class the year's activities began in high style for Sigma Kappa. Participation in Greek Weekend, trailer house painting, TG's and Homecoming was culminated by a first place trophy for their house dec, "The First Voyage of the Nautilus." The pledges organized a semi-formal harvest party for the actives in November. Civic minded Sigmas participated in PanheIlenic's Gauchitas project as well as the heart drive and the sororities' national philanthropies. Sigma Kappa formal, Violet Ball was held in February. Dads' weekend forced inside by the weather and lVloms' weekend held in conjunction with a fashion dessert featuring spring clothes from the Lou Rose Annex took place in winter. By spring the Sigmas were looking forward to sun. Derby Day preceded the senior breakfast where seniors said goodbye and wrote "wiIls." Despite rainy weather much work was put into Sigma Kappa's Homecoming house dec "The First Voyage of the Nautilus" which featured a pink octupus and a yellow submarine. Karen Bailey Susan Barnes Linda Barr Barbara Beckman Carolyn Bell Yelena Brown Kathleen Campbell Joanne Cieri Veronica Clark Leslie Crellin Evelyn DuBois Renata Farber Carol Fenn - . aff li. Valerie Feuer ' Jan ice Foat Catherine Ford Barb Beckman appears to be intent on her deliveryman. These festivities presented a duties as chief Christmas present break from dead week and finals. , 'IVV-"Na, Y W yi W' Sandy Foster JoAnn Garofalo Lynette Gonzales Sharon Hann . my Q-.-.1.N ' 34 .al X ,, n-of-i,aggig3i uri? -fn-w ts-vw na. ...,.-v-save E E. Sill 'Sli Q U1 M: 4 3 Z.. 0 5 E. E . '1 v F21 M. l"i',!'hv"l '4135'Hi:1iNl6L1i1 wi WH WQBEJHWEVEF: il! 'ui .il i mwa- um agerg1.,gf'34i 'At'5niv7i9nnr 35- ,M 791 2 Nik veg . L Ei., S 5 QL 5,":x 532, 4, , s G X fig? i'-J if A , , Q In 0 LI? "?'1'F 0 5 Vlgfliklqa If 1-M fm .sq lv f- A ..W 1 4,. 7 1 1 1 Q . I I 3 U w 5 2 1 + ' ' Ib 1 Y 'A 4 - I 3 I ' . ' an ev, g 2 ,-ii, Q . ,, ,A ', K. f-ffm W rf, ,, . .,,,.. 1 W1 5 'E 'fa . 1 2 as xi ny M ' 5 W I ,. 5 3 M 4 1 E . i In V 3 Q1 1 f. T xxiflvfgr wg? if ' ww 'if-X ,Y lff'EiYei7iff ' ' 75 -f it ..-,, P-4 " I ,QE 1 M V. -Q.. .. E n Q Jig wig- vfkfz-7 'Fin' '. 1' fi ,Qs-,Wi 22 225. -E-P5 -. la:fi'l2s'g". - .', ' if 'ii Q: 3. iii 1- 563,121-if 'Fi-,F.ij-53.5.1 1 , f:E 1'5f1'i 5f13dFcf5!f ' """ - - I K ', , 6-TQ "' ' LV , IIIK Eefflfiiiiiiiu ' M A f ' 4 -5: V. WE' if N , T 1,3 - ' 31 - , fa , 'ff ' a iff 31' v--Nix. -1 . 1 --w-JH as --- Pity- X i N 'i L W .9 Janet Aho Nancy Alvarez Judy Anderson Elaine Barrett Cathy Barteen Karen Baum Mary Beckord Charlene Bedient Mindy Bergman Paula Biggs Mickey Bishop Melissa Borders Adelia Bradford Stephanie Brown Margo Capetan Nancy Carner Ellen Casper June Clark Debra Conley Linda Conti Laura Cooper Kay Cox Cheryl Crocker Diana Davidson Lee Finkle Marsha Fraser Linda Fuselier Lynn Gescheider Patricia Gibble Susan Gibbs Jan Greathead Holly Heflin 1 If i K' X .3 zz? 5' ih, , gr- ,,. , 4 . 525355. Diane Howell M. Jill Iliff Robin Johnson Melanie Jones Patricia Jo nes Mary Kennedy Marilyn Kluth Among Chi Omega fall pledges and Kathy VanDyne gather on Mary Schneider, Mary Vail, the walk preceding Presents . 343 1 R-33' ' 1 ,Y -QQ -3-3, . r rv, :I . TT?" I iv L , ' F, A L W . 5 - H i i pw- , o ox W fi' Maki ,mi 1 :fp K -If - 6- N 1 5, , Rug p I ' Qi, . .. it V. F :wi-,A . Im," ' ' , f , ix y L 2. W fy M ifm , I I' L" fry- S A N'--ry g f r If Steph Brown and friend head while Charlie Brown XJ an T "', Q1 i ' J. . s. Q 1 adjust Lucy'5 gives advice in the preparation for the looks on and Homecoming house dec. all sqft! vt. C-117 Q ' z, , .1 . I .E '-ss if . rl. I-fy ' " 728 , 1'-45 ' 1 .3 4, 1-51- ldfiam N' we iq' Ex l 1 -t I Chl Omega Rummage Sale V ltallzes llunos Chi Omega began the year with fall rush, followed closely by Homecoming and a first place trophy for the com- bined effort of the Chi O's and the Sig Pi's on their House dec. By winter Chi O's were deeply engrossed in painting trailers, a rum- mage sale to earn money for next year's foreign exchange students, and work on a new nursery school project. Active on campus, Chi O's were members of Chimes, Spurs, Shell and Oar, Colonels Coeds, and Honeybears. Finishing a great year the Chi O's planned a spring formal, participated in Derby Day, and Pushcarts and bid farewell to graduating seniors at a banquet. r V Konstance Krantz Lyndell Lewis 'N .J ' Nancy Lietz . Barbara MacKirdy -- ,H ' Michele Matlock ff I' V Melony McCracken L I Dotty Means Cathy Moar . l .f,..sf-'- 'N il l ' ' ll lx Q M , Vicki Moffett 1, Linda Morse 5 ' Robyn Murphy Dorothy Neilson ' ,. , N , Ann Noel ' C' V Patricia Oyama ' Gina Paulson Penny Pierson ' X '-. Robyn Raiter 5' W " C ' Q3 ' ,W Linda Ralphy Q f Ac E 6' Melinda Rogers ' U- it v X ,t Ib 'R Elizabeth Ruliffson "Lf "1 '-Tv 1 ' fp. ,M Ann Schneider ' b 1 . Q X QV Coralie Smith ' A ' ' X A ' Judy Smith Debbie Spruell bi V --sv 4 . I D bb' Th 4. . ,- Hx . .. - H+, 6' 'e Dmas ,A ' Yi, ' .-. , 5,1 """- ix ff Georgia Thomas ' ' Ai H. ' A ' Sylvia Thomson M Q I Q 4 ' , it '9 ':- EM 1 X 4 li ' J Dianne Travers -1 f - 1,113 Q ' 1 P Of ,,.. KZ- f ' Mary Vail ' ' 4 -' v " ' ' " ' ' ' Gail Valpreda ku V '-f ' Q A ' -'X , Kathryn Van Dyne Cynthia Wallace 1 .. fa- W M I 7 - ' Lesley Wheatley " f' ' l , 3 Claudia VWlcax "" 59 lx. ,, 3 , Marjorie VWlliams ,."'fx. - ff K A 1 QQ., lleene Wolf ,- 5 M . ' ' I Janice Younger A . in -V f K A' ' Maryann Zaninovich INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL QRGGKS accent CIVIC IFIIZGRGSII "Something new has been added" this year to lnterfraternity Council. The office of Vice-President was divided, providing for an administrative and an executive vice-president. In a more traditional vein council began the year with an active fall rush, introducing freshmen to Greek life on a university campus. With an increased interest in civic activities, lFC participated in Isla Vista clean-up day, Greek Week-end trailer painting, and the Heart Fund Drive, all in conjunction with Panhel- lenic. Fraternity members were tradition- ally active in all campus activities, broadening the Greek system's image to include all pertinent affairs, both political and social. Concentration centered on Greek-Independent relations. IIIC Officeizs ,,fff'-. .fs , 'iff W, Ni X si KK' 'npr'ill,, I N ,l Ki Richard Sinclair Jeff Smith IFC President Steven E. Jahr Secretary Executive Vice-President Ted Howell Treasurer Overflow crowds fill the Lambda Chi Alpha lawn at a Greek Weekend street dance. Early in Winter Quarter, this event drew a cross- section of local denizens. liizateiznlty pizesloents ..--ss, ,, we . ,I , Me , . J "UI 25. get F - TJTT7' Russ Lindgren Alpha Delta Phi wr' Richard Ashley Dennis Allen Bill Trevithick Steve Keenan -Thomas Dilworth Zeta Beta Tau Theta Delta Chi Kappa Sigma Lambda Chi Alpha Sigma Alpha Epsilon Gary Pimentel Robert Crouse Henry Ruempler Miles Standish ROBSI' Edwards Sigma Pi Sigma Chi Phi Delta Theta Phi Kappa Psi Phi Sigma Kappa T6 IEC Oeleqates ' ' ' Zeta Beta Tau l , Tim Graumann i l p , A an , i lg G? G ' Alpha Delta Phi 1 ' H if R 5' Robert Campbell i s I. , Robert Meyncke Theta Delta Chi v VF., V-,L 5' ,, s Paul Brinkman Sigma Alpha Epsilon , V I , . ,il ,E M Mike Crowley 2 Sigma Alpha Epsilon Chris Papas Phi Delta Theta ic - i I Robert Mizuno Phi Sigma Kappa lnterfraternity Council Presi- representatives from the fra- dent Richard Sinclair presides ternities discuss problems over weekly meetings at which pertinent to,aII Greeks. ,f fe,,, nw-a H -QE , ll N .:e,t.:g ' safes Zia is Big brothers of Alpha Delta Phi encourage their little brothers in the chugging contest, a winter quarter event. The annual Big Brother-Little Brother Day features a variety of contests. Featuring this much talked about sunken bar, the new Alpha Delt house was the first Greek dwelling on the beach. in ge, L L. l l ., i fs Richard Beaiier - A Q" , ' , V 3 Jay Caffe , ' " -1 ' Michael Clarkson Q A f ,gm I Qxr kv ,wh Q , u 1 6. g G Russell Cleveland gg if ' A ww L .w w T Mw igeg' , 1 E' in I 'N L. if Dennis evoke gt, -ff f l, g x ,: T- H - Steve Cooley xii' ' i- 7 - 'W' ' , ' , , , -' 1' ' Thomas Cox ' L w - K " Chuck D'fn"W"'f" T 'il h u A n A 'I ' L Dennis Duncan gif' K ., John Ebert in Bryan Garbutt dt- in f- 'B -B' 1.9599 , -- 'IF' X Q Eugene Geller :lik .7 L '-., Q -- si a - ' H g? ' X ,W f , f" I John Giorgianni l Q? Y HV' c. ' Tim Graumarm -, K Q g X Michael Hughes ' J , ' Q . 3 ,A ,113 vi., - -, , X . Alpha Oelta Dhl pleoqes' pnanks "Baptlze" house A new house on Del Playa seemed an auspicious beginning to the year for Alpha Delta Phi, but the pledges got right to work and stole the spiral stair- case and the doors to bedrooms while the actives were playing football. Only the railing was left to the stairs, and the actives found it a little difficult getting to their rooms. At the beginning of the year the annual Alpha Delt rush queen was chosen by the rushees. Parties in- cluded an all-Cal exchange at Berkeley and the Playboy bunny club. A boxer rebellion added spice to each quarter. A more formal affair was the Disneyland formal, at which the Alpha Delts and their dates received reduced prices for their evening's entertainment. In sports the Alpha Delts had a strong basketball team and were fourth in their league in football. The brothers built cages and cemented at the Child's Estate, an annual project. Another project was aid in getting water for the Santa Inez Indian Reservation. At the close of the year the Alpha Delts all looked forward to another year breaking in the new house. Posing happily following the annual Alpha Delt rush queen contest are the finalists Betty Settle, Sue Bakura, Cindy Stafford lOueeni, Lisa Nuemeier, and Betsy Brown. The girls act as hostesses for the fraternity during rush. The rushees select one girl during fall rush as their queen. fr- 1 if ' V Russ Lindgren fi ? X ' Terry Loyd , Q . . , 3 A. , H John Meanley 4 "" If 'ig 1 frm gf' 2, as l Q ' fx xt 5 Dutch Meijer L 'n ' fs: z - ,f ' w -1 -' ' 'QA pf. 1 Alan Parkhill . ' ., if: 5 'Z' 'I ,ff John Radford A X i ' - Steve Radford lm 4 le A A - ' iiii Bob Rawles T 1 - J . " W smack fr' W' '11 1 r, 3 , ,' ac: 5 9 W ' f Thomas Schales s- , .4 L , , .. all If f ,, . J ' lx - ' Alan smfm ,Hy 'Z' A U- "EP" L T" ""' ' T' 5 GregSmoak .. Q A h it 7 A W ' .ge D. . Leonard Thompson V . D W 'Q ' Larry Vilven . 1 - - tj' "" 4 A? ' 395 ZBT , Zeta Beta tau pleooes Gannen acaoemlc honon After merely one-year's growth as a colony, Zeta Beta Tau became a national fraternity in 1968. The spirit and pride of the new house were dis- played in its pledge class, scholarship, intramurals and social functions. Boasting the number one pledge class scholastically, the group proved its worth by aiding the emotionally dis- turbed children of Devereaux School. Diverse house interests encompassed every sphere on campus and were well represented on the athletic fields. Academically, the men of ZBT dis- tinguished themselves among the top four fraternities in over-all GPA. Prominent traditions established in the fall quarter were pre-game banquets, parents' week-end, and the ZBT Fillmore party. The winter quarter brought the inter-Greek raillery of Gaza Strip Week, while spring ushered in a formal, Spring Sing, push- carts and the annual ZBT Pie Fight T.G. Frank Cutler receives a purple heart for being kidnapped, from fellow Arab Greg Korb during the peace party following Gaza Strip week, a joint effort of Zeta Beta Tau and Phi Delta Theta during winter quarter. Da vid Arnold James Arrott Richard Ashley Mitch Bader Robert Campbell Robert Caplan Gary Dandy John Ernst Barry Evans Charles Finney Fred Franco Bernard Gans Thomas Ginther Lawrence Goddard William Hotz Steven June Timothy Kenna Gregory K orb Neil K orostoff James Lewis Robert Lewis Andy Liberman Les Lizama Bruce McCall --S t.. J T -, aw, tw -G . we ai? ,.., ' A . H , 3 ,, 1-" f 'i ,, , . ' Y 'r', JS fe., ' lfv ' , 2 ,k:,. 2 --V 5 VV 9 Q Y 5 -.,t Q 'li y ax 'Q X V Q ,,.,f - fu-"IX 1 Q -3.3 X If ,1 V g it f 'Q' ,Qi if 'Z 5, 4:2 ' Q Zi' I., L, al" H . , V' 'glib ' 3 -o -ALA . Kin 141 K limi A 1 . ,Q I., ,A U. With his brothers screening the Sigma Chi's, ZBT Bruce NIcCaII attempts a long jump shot in an attempt to score in the game's last seconds. X, ns J --,ee t., ii it i it A iz Q ii Ruth Peterson, Bob Saulsbury, Gary Smith Catl1y 0'NeaI and Bob Lewis grit their teeth and gasp for breath in a hotly contested tug-O-War. i w Mums- 1 . 1,1 Fa te? ' ' f"gYffllHff " N -4, ' it i 'T 5 I AQ- f 1 , X , , ' i F-A .A ., :4, V 1 , K JE . r 1 -J J 5 Q K :-: "li, Q S -I. X ,l 4: . , -- , A f L ,ax L X L, J X - I I xx . 2 ' ' V 6 , . U X X . ,b asv Q. I . H Q ' t I, X iQ , K!! Mig, N ' I ' A In t R 1 AlmA I QW I FQ E . ,. """'-T" , Y ,, . l"9l . .-v -an ff.- tm , 1.f- :ey , I - I f - V if :II li! .A Q S if K If H i G - A 4 A K . lg h K Richard McGough Edward Miller Jam es Murdock Chuck Newman Mark Pettine Raymond Roan John Robinson Sol Rosenzweig Robert Saulsbury Alan Schwartz Kenny Shoor Gary Smith Kenneth Steinberg Randall Stewart Kirk Stoddard Steven Suehiro Donald Trybul Jack Vallenga Brian Velthoen Dave Voelzow Fred Voss Lee Waldman Gary Watrous James West ll A D Pi's play hostess to members of Theta Delta Chi at this exchange dinner. Also attending the dinner was a member of A D Pi's National Board. Charles Atlas has nothing on Theta Delta Chi's own A.J. Kazutoff who willingly demonstrates his physical prowess. t fi, ,Q- 31 1.- 1.1.5 Dennis Allen - 1 'Z' ' 'F Burt Almond 'l ' ' X' Terry Baker A ' 3 ya. A 4 - gg Q! Gerrv Behman 'fr .H ,ep 'W '7' 'f. 9 Q ef. Ernie Bumatay 3 2? J Q . ' M if f Robert Butler . f f Q wig ' - , -. " 7 ',,,, ' ' Steven Cole N 3 - H' - . ' Steve Coleman A Q A R Roger Craig is I ff. ,fwiljgtan Y 4 1 V Richard David 5 ' f -. -' X M' ' ' 'f Michael Fogarty , ' 4, A 1 f. -3 4 33 - Qs. Q ,Q - Greg Gstettenbauer t u rw. ml ' , we Ag x '51 , if .J J? .,, V S ' -7 l. 'R QI I xi Q Joe Gstettenbauer f ,V ', 'Qi--J my my 1 - f , David Haig ..,., t ' . 1 r' . f it . A William Harris '- We f ' X 1 f ..' - . - e r 'I Michael Hengel t I ' . . La. i Jeff Herman ' , 'iiz 5 fr ' WI- -1 Richard Kalberg D :F . 1 e-.. " ' Larry Lee 'F' SAX theta Delta Chl exchange panty lnctuoes ucla Beginning the year in a new house, Theta Delts organized several theme parties, including a cave party during winter quarter and a "Sonova" party in the spring. The Virgin Islander party was in conjunction with the house at UCLA. At the Tom Jones party everyone wore animal costumes and ate without utensils. A work project with the Goleta Boys' Club was organized fall quarter. The Theta Delts served the boys hot dogs and ice creamand then escorted them to a football game. The brothers also participated actively in intramural sports and campus organizations and a little sisters program was launched during the year. Another highlight of the year was a turnabout day at which the actives be- came pledges and vice versa. Sunshine, sand and beautiful coeds seem to be the essential ingredients for a perfect time at the Theta DeIts'Sonova beach party. Unpredictable winter weather finds Theta Delt Burt Almond wallowing in the mud puddle left over from an earlier storm. lt , iii ll John Luidema 7 , T Terry Lydon . .3 V Robert Meyncka ,, . V ' ""' 'H lc 2' - g - ,-., sreve Miller l 1 1 I f N' 2 Thomas Miura 5 ff Pj: Michael O'Flaherty H Randal Pearson Q Joseph Plunkett , " Paul Roller V 1' V R 2' .' V Bob Scart L Y ini: sg 1 V 233- - . ' , f g Donald Scott A I r ,A 'Y .I ' . -as , 11 J 4 Norman Shaskey ' -e-- ...:,' lg me 1 - 13- .W , 1 A f'-Pi . I Richard smirh , 9, ' ' - if t 2 " srephen smirh ' . ' , . ' Donald Timmer E E, I I jf 4 5 f .f Greg Weiner I K' 'Q ll Il Rodger Young 49. , Dwight zms KE kappa Sigma Wlnten Concept yielos pizoceeos ln the fall of 1968 a homecoming party was held at Circle Bar B Ranch. Several theme parties were planned during the year, among them a Tom Jones and Doors of Perception party. Intramural sports were big this year as Kappa Sigs participated in soccer, volleyball and basketball, in which they were rated the top team. In the spring they sponsored a shuffleboard tournament at Jensen's in Goleta. During Winter quarter the Kappa Sigs sponsored a successful concert in Robertson's Gym with the Santana Blues Band and the Grateful Dead, the proceeds of which provided social benefits for Isla Vista. Spring quarter set the mood for a party held in Encinada, and housed in what used to be a Mexican monastery. The service project of the year was the annual blood drive. Flousing activity and good vibrations dominate the scene at this midwinter Kappa Sig party. Here the band elicits a wide range of emotions from these two unidentified dancers. Varying party formats from this rather formal affair to a casual Friday afternoon TG carry a thread of spontaneity. .1 David Allafre I 4- l , of skip .Allyn y l s ' '3 X l Thomas Banker . 5 , ,, , , l 1 , f 3, Bruce Baumann F l : ,N 1 A V: ,- , , xl ,, A K Richard Blackburn l .1 ' T i g .f i ll - if t ii 41' Bill Baehlert ' " ' ' V 1 4 ' 'z gd Michael Buchin . D , - Dan Burnham K , f h Douglas Coffey ,, - 53 I ' V' V9 .. Randolph Cox ' V ffl- ' ' ' ' V I 5 gy: , Stephen Firm .. Af. ,. 1 X 3 A ' g' 43 Moylan Garth lg . V' , Qu. X' ,J gif , Gb if , - Jeff Hermanson Z ' ,Q 2' . j Y , A Tom Haffpauir ' if ' 'W f ' ' Larry Jones " we 5 ff Alan L'Hommeo'ieu '- i Richard Moon Pre-concert preparation find the Grateful Dead to set up the Kappa Sigs joining members of extensive sound equipment. F-as Members of the Santana Blues number to an overflow crowd Band belt out number after of intent listeners. ft- " ' . 16 , . , i 'alt pm 4 QQ 'f Q 'f 1...- 'gmv . ' f 1 3 1 fe r. Q r -t s t.. Z i 'ru 73' F' if , - , his' 9 if N if A all W he I ,B '- " f x i sr 4 it faq' - it if--J 4 A L ' J Q .e-' I , ' ' I 543. A ES A Stan Woodward .Xin A TQ Catching the mood set by the band,these K Sigs and their dates follow their own personal modes of ex- pression in an evening of dancing and drinking. - 2 X Robert Moore R ' if f Jack Mutten - - . Mike Newman Mike Paul it Q Ned . ' H il D George Peeters In , -u,:. . 4 ' 5 Jon Poytress '- 1 t Richard Rust ' . i Gordon Sichi E F x 4 r Steve Siemers t w' ,, X5 Y it ' M ' Bill Sunkel I., , 2 xl . r Bill Trevithick W ' , 9 1' f p Robert Vartan 'Q William Walton TN ' ..: ,I . , , - Mike West , A Joe llWlson Sam Woodhouse Dave Abrech t Kent Alm David Amidon Brian Asamoto John Bodine Hoy Brisbois Gil Brown Michael Conte Dennis Cunnane Robert Cutting Kenny Davidson Russ Denea Chuck Destro Tom Doehrman Dennis Dolan Craig Ferguson Thomas Flickinger Michael Flucke Steven Freeman Ken French Rocky Friedrich Anthony Gallaudet Thomas Gamboa Steve Gramps Mike Groesbeck Steven Haskett Pete Heublein Dan Howell John Johnson Steve Keenan Ron K iskis Don K ohlmann Victor Larson In-housers and out-housers meet for a Y-mi ra chapter dinner on Friday night. f H The Garden of Isla Vista was sweep- A stakes winner in the house dec contest. 46 Uv 12 1 we F if eil it -F .fi is the - i -.S .Q i X 17 r 1 r xsan- el bleu A I F A I A V 1 I -erz 49 1 . f l QQ"-'S-' f i ' FW' t ' ii- ,F K ,, -12 ,Q TQ i 4 gf ee- 4 ir .par 2 A ,Ku-fimvi ,iv rio 'I if 'A I W "3 i i 'fi if-'jj ' QE: 1 A pt L F s ls in I J A A ' , ' 'T fx? ' " FLW Va., F' sir. ' 1 'ie .r " 9 3 ,' 'fi ,V 'M " i I - , A 4 A I4 AXA lamlsoa Chl Alpha AUIIGTIIC. ACCGDII Cnowns AGENDA In the true Lambda Chi tradition the "lamb chop" brothers were once again superior in intramural and inter- collegiate competition. ln football, basketball, wrestling, baseball and soccer the Lambdas continued their winning ways. Lambda Chi's cannon, the Player of the Week awards, and another Home- coming Sweepstakes trophy all point up the fraternity's attitude toward school spirit. In the academic field, a high standard of scholarship was main- tained. The traditional Playboy Dance, Spring Formal, held in Las Vegas, Greek Week parties and the annual Lagnaf overnight function at Ojai rounded out the always active social schedule. Big Jon Green, Dennis Dolan, Steve Gramps, Mike Nagler and Douglas Stewart fire away. Bill Pelzer, Jim Fitzgerald, and Ernie Rose enjoy the Homecoming party at Ojai. f L , - 3' V 'Y . Frank Lovell l K 55 ' it ' L 'L -' Greg Lowe 4 " X In I 'I E , 1- Q al -"' ' V Thomas llrlahony 5 i Lx f -gl 4 . V, 1 V l, ,.,,, John Meiers W-'til , . , lf: 'fl - 'D Fred Meitz ' ' , ":' ' ' .-... v - Steve Milam , ' ' "f' 1 Ric Miller Qt 4 I 1 . , Pat Muleady j ti- f I y i i .. , Mike Nagler I fl ' ' " v -.M Y , Steve Nutter L , 1 N Q. L , V 3 ff? ' ,ly 78' , ix fi - g Alan 0'Brien 4 ., y . .,1.,. vt , 4. ,L 5 D QA X, Hal Orr 2 j Y , ' lv? V r H 1. - 1.3! James Owens - ,Y ' ' - i V ' ' , "' " Timothy Paane Y 'tg ' 1 ' William Pelzer , A A fi, Ernie Rose 'l H Ari ' K ' H, Q 5 A Tom Ryder J - J VV, , ' A 'S Jerry Salles A 1, v R' 1 l ' is a c.: 1-'-' ,, jfgfggghefg ,h ' ' ' ' , - " ,-' j ' N ,' 0 V7 3179 9V , "1" I tl ' J Wayne Smothers 1 , ' X 1 .,... V ' ff V Bruce Solari ,- 4 ! ii' H H N Curt Stewart 4. Q ? l Doug Stewart - . l t ,f Tom Tranbarger David Vincent 13' G' l, 'wb Qi , ' Q r - ', ay f jf 13 cf, Paul Waldau .s , -.. A, Paul Weinberger ' , Steven VWnders ' Kenneth Yegan x ' -., N w f lt T '. lf nf , gh " e la LA.: K aht elk, . il Tim Yox EAE SIGITIA Alpha Epsilon Annual pnojects augment llunos Carrying the banner of Greek tradition the men of Sigma Alpha Epsilon par- ticipated in a wide variety of activities throughout, the year, ranging from social to civic projects. The social calendar included the annual Phi Alpha Weekend, the Christmas party, the Arabian Night's Party, Paddy lVlurphy's Wake, the High Society Party and the overnight Spring Formal. These events were sandwiched between T.G.'s and an active campaign in intramural sports, stimulated by hopes of recapturing the All-School crown. Each year the SAE's sponsor the March of Dimes Fund Raising Drive, the Basketball Awards Banquet, the Battle of the Bands, and the SAE car rally, funds from which are used for a basketball scholarship. The close of the year found seniors looking forward to graduation and the rest of the brothers anticipating another great year to come. SAE Kent Pearce lleftl and Ralph Barkey lrightl look on as John Wooden congratulates Steve Rippe and Breck McLaren. Members of the SAE intramural football team get "psyched up" for a game. Tom Bishop Thomas Blake X LQ JW' H 5' ,Q ,Q 7 E K 3 in ' ' 5 -ak ln Tad Bledsoe Robert Brady Mike Brinkman ' at Ms:- Paul Brinkman H AM Carl Bryan Wayne Bryan Bob Bussie ' -fa. - Michael Cobb T' D ' im egam Thomas Dilworth , p Vx Steve Dinsmore .J Bob Emery 'X J Carl Farnham n Q3 ,A ... 1 A NK 'EL I fr n If fl I Richard Gangnes Richard Ganong James Hahn Q' V 'Q' 3 at me Richard Halladay I Q45 stephen L. Heinsohn C' V 'G' John Hines Thomas Jones i A L ' .3 4' ,- ,.4 ., 19' - EI 3 ' ' W ' f J a I li 4 it rg-fa-aa Y ,iz st 1 ' , 5 V K VL - , lima x i ii : . 7 , 2, 6 C J if .. x 5 E i n 4 Li Q" ' ' a n 9 Gary Bianchini, fall president, presents a check from the SAE car rally to coach Ralph Barkey for the basketball scholarship. The annual Arabian Nights Party has this camel con- vinced there are better things than water. jp J , ' 5 it A , we Jim Kendall ' A 'f""gK'i, Jon Lee Q as ' ' 3 ' ' . Jim Lynch f A' i V f 3 ' qi ' 7 f' J Scott MacCluer Y:-9' . j 'lg ,.3.aif' , Z, QI, 7 Steve Maloney ,A I if i ' ' "5 Bob Marshall 'gf I ,M Kevin McKenna Q A A M' James Miller ' ' T52 " 3' Greg Misbach is , , Walter Morgan .- , , .GQ , ' Rick Nathanson Z, 4',- 1 rl V W - . K . it .3 1 . VWlliam Ryan ' if , 421 ' 7 ' F Michael Scott , ,N " A H ' 1.2 V - Henry Settle, Jr. if M f Patrick Smallwooo' . K Q A.. Bruce smfrh 'H-. . ' , p it J Tim Walker A I- V S G 1 David Washburn +2 G- . 3' , in q sin we-us ...Q A T i Q- ' ti? 3 Q. ,if Tim Winchester gf- VZ' . 'A Steve Wiftman if ' 'Q --:. , A ':" it ' Jerry Woolf I Hal Young ' A ,uw gg p xn- 'FQ X 'x 9 w xl ..- 5 J in 7 ' ' my -' .. , vussfmsim-fl ' ' .1 n4!s11:M?'!?? ' . lm , f-m2zi'14Xf-2, M1 gm wg, A aw A .,,b.. W. . .ff , Q. L fs :IU-mf , mf ' X 2!,,,?f,3',' . 1,5 ' " , , '53 l 1 517:24 "r-'fgf' xl iKu '4Ei T., " :ufai via 'i"f'i'i' 1 . q-fqvxvh 'I 4: q , . 1 X Sigma pl Snoopy, Banon Captune tnophy The 1968-69 school year marked the big move for the men of Sigma Pi as they left their old house and famous barn for new quarters on Del Playa. Easy access to the beach made this a prime location for the group. Combining hours of hard work and imagination, the coalitions of Sig Pi's and Chi Omegas managed to win a first place trophy for their depiction of "Snoopy vs. the Red Baron-A Real Dog Fight" in the Homecoming House dec contest. Theme parties and TG's capitalized on the advantages of the new location overlooking the beach. Brothers actively participated in all levels of the intramural competition. Civic projects and on-campus projects keep the agenda crowded. During winter quarter the Sigma Pi banner flew high in IFC circles with Rich Sinclair's election as president of the group. Greek weekend and the annual spring Pushcarts contest both brought a large turnout from the ranks of Sigma Pi. A combination of Santa Barbara "sunshine" and a new house in a prime Del Playa location provide the perfect backdrop for this card game. Sig Pi's Rich Enos, Doug Anderson and Mark Lieneweber out- maneuver the fourth. TG time finds the Sig Pi's hosting the Alpha Phi's at their new house. Traditionally these weekend happy sessions were held away from the Isla Vista community, however, the new Sig Pi house provides an ideal setting. 3 ' 'LT -' Phi In 5, Edward Olson ' ' -' ' . li' y T Walter Otto 9 3 ' -' , 35. 5. I gg -A , , Q Ray Piantanida , .Q ' . . at g . 7 T t T - . g . e Gary Pfmenwf .ea " 5. 11, 1 yy 2 2- Kevin Ritchie -. ' 5 'll , V L' Douglas Roberts ' - ' ' n ' Dennis Radeen aa A . ' Mike Sherman X "fl, g Vg. Ted Shreve ' ' ' -" ' . ' ' Bob Simmons I 'Q Q f 'Q 9 Q it ,' E . Q ' . vig. i 'rj at gl Richard Sinclair L ii! 7 , ' if ,H T? Thomas Slavik T ,N-. V Sf E ' X5 V' Shel Thompson . ,, ' ' , .-" . " 4 - "" Robert VanderMeid - 5 . U P ' Clifford Wictorin . , ' Sa ZCDE SIGWIQ phi 6DSllOl1 OOTZBAH Cnown CADTSURGO AGAIN It was a winning year for the men of Sigma Phi Epsilon, particularly in the field of sports. In intramural football the Sig Eps went undefeated for the fourth straight year and retained the championship. They were listed in top contention for the All-school award. Sig Eps innovated a program called Gauchitos this year, with boys ranging from the age of five to fourteen parti- cipating in sports each week, or going on field trips and to professional sports events. Parties were numerous, including a Tom Jones party with roast pig and wine, a joint party with Kappa Sigma and a spring formal. The Sig Eps have decided to experiment with a new kind of hell week - instead of hell week the pledges will have sensitivity training. Craig Rubenstein pulls back for a long pass in a hotly contested game of barefoot intra- mural football behind Robertson Gym. Sig Eps and dates, Don Hawley, Barb Grell, Mickey Ferrero, and Steve Brown register a variety of expressions at this cocktail party. L 1 l John Ahler I - l Zi, z it K V. as if E N D Tom Arthur W 3, , -L A . ..s, l A W WN 1 Ron Brunick 4 Q 3 f 5 f . ' x, 4- ' - " le , '35 'W Joe Campanelli , 9 W 1' 5 is 5- . -. E, f 5 A- ,--A l- '. Q Richard Campbell ' .1 A2 I Q . at 1. a .f if 9 ' Riff? NST " Flvnald Chambers f " -' ' , Y' -:l' ' 'V . Charles Christensen -.f-' .-':' . -"' Brent Clark V 7 I 1 H V A 4 ,E Randall Crimmel K ' I gxr 5' H 'ggg A V x " 7 Mark Enders ,ri -f 1 l . ,N ' ' ,N J E tt 'xy , lx W V nj Y Y -Y : g , K' I .zzfsflezigilf ff' . fy, Q y A a fs t i , Q 'ai James Flettlll Tw 5 ' ,,.- 9.15 5 , f i gg .-1 David Gleason l l ' 2 - ' .-,:AV 1 A '-, ' A . Don Hawley t ""' " i . ' Randy Herbon ' 1 ' A XY if , J i , John Hofmann 'ii' L51 'sf' Bill Huntsberger QQ I x , --.- q4,1,ggfQ,,fi.i . 1: 'Bd in F .5 lv ...L-A .-.x..,eA-f.-4ueaw.ua.w-iw 1 AJ... R541 -, ,W ,:,.,. .5,.EElu 1 15 '13 -1. 3 l a L 5 K x 4 3 We . fem, Q i K . "Q Z! Warm weather watchers enjoy a leisurely afternoon of volleyball tournaments and beer on the back lot of the Sig Ep House. as-..f....i,,Eg.,. Formals provide one of the more traditional aspects of Greek life. Congregating at the Miramar restaurant, Sig Eps and dates seem to be thoroughly enjoying this winter affair. W- ,W a, F- ,,: X i V ,. ,, if ., ' P 1 El f-if '- John Kaucher A, 5, -- ,N "'-- ' i iam att ews 1 U C, U g adm? Ai X ', 1? , I, 51- I If 114 :55 , Kim McGuire 'L-. "' ' , 'J ' -2 f. f Q. if 3 Q. 'J gif, is ' ' gf' VE, Kenneth Miller ,:. K - 7' I e ' f " 1 . ig. W X5 Steve Murata ' ' ' Y ' Bob Nugent U 75 A . -ki 7 LA 1 Robert Orr "1 so -t T D . 1 ' I 4 Thomas Raurh ' ' f - ' h 'g Y Paul Roberts g TA. I 1.33 - we A ' .5 X 1 Craig Rubenstein I ing ,, f Q xg. L gr 'LYS Ji Bob Schneider h " I' E -P Q5 W? 1 AAFJ ' -3, ' li A V Jim Simpson ' ' vf w-ga Vg - 2 , L we - i t :-- J " Paul Thompson 4 f ' fi f . -""' 1" Gregory Trout i , IQ A , ' Bruce Watts Harold VWltse ' A ' 'J I N, ..h.:,.f Stanley Witnov Tim Travers, Steve Jann, Chuck Stewart, Steve Boggs, Gary Langstaff, and Jim Duhammel survey the opposition during half-time of an Intramural football game. It isn't the hula, but the costumes are right for the annual Sigma Chi Rush Week Iuau. Jim Andrews Bart Beckman Mike Blower Steve Boggs Keith Boman David Bressler Duwayne Brooks Jim Brown Patrick Byrne John Clabaugh Paul Cole Paul Com treras John Cross Robert Crouse James Damonte Tim Donovan James DuHamel Jim Eisenhart Michael Gaskell Kirk Gillies Brad Ginder Steven Ginder Robert Helwick Curt Hodding Q i 4 ' 'yu ."'l ' -A l I M., . 1 - '- we lv -A Ln vflvsw f'-'.,r"' " ,wif i. I-M, A A lk 3 stag gl J. B ' 3 Shiv Y 'W-" W' ' "l Ulf 1 1" 6 'aalfi . -a- x ' Q " 1. yi" in A ' 1 l.. , . it '. ve K -"yi ' 5 fx U s X tn ...S 1 5 l f'.54q1u'q-' '- '-. x. 1 ' ' J' A 3,4 ' if l -Us '.. Q , '--.,. ' , .v 1 - iq '4 V42 7 ea-in! Wi f4 3' A-V i t . ' Kilim- :wiv QQ' 'ji m J 51- 1.93. f or W xawivi-'??fil?:??Eff3'.,t-Rf' T , 3?'mefl'1?2v'71.'.Q,at -Mwse?ffep:vf S. . x ,fm .gt A F J mga- :df I, ,l 'H 1 , if I-...Q 'Q I4 l ,J JA F- 5' , f ,q , -f I .F H. I, ,4 ' y - i -,N .4 ,J 7 l ' ' .' ,'- Q 'I 1 ,L . xx 1- J A A di e 4 l X I! -5. V 3' 'Q 3 Q15 ll,'3Q,g J 73' ,A -0' K .gl l 4 1.--s 1' .ing-' fi, V-,h . -p A- 'A S4 'E S 1 A VB Ki ' Ki Q A L - A 3 lg .ZH V , 'v- if ' ,X , . S . if x - -HP' ,vwhstz 5'-'l fa Xia 5 ,t 'C 'Q R '-3 6 l g, G , Ai: 3 A , as A Q -'i ' 1 42 -2 ,J 1 J' 1 S , V lah if K Ill l al .ea -4 , 4'-,V ' A . I , Andy Holmer X 1 t -N ' I , E Rex Jacobs ' A N my r ew gg. , 15' OR 'rf ss. Steven Jahr A RK .1 it V .,. - 1 'Z' -3 ., Y - , cl Steve Jam qu v -- W ' -r 'IJ' 5 Drew Kirbens X ' A ' 'X :N J Steve K oskela ! A -X J ' R 1 . 410 l . rfir Vip, ..n. Q ' -r t - nL,.n. 'i EX SIGITIA Chl llooteall llonce nets Accolaoes Campus activities, scholarship, social functions and sports once again filled non-classrooms hours for Sigma Chi. Having been all-school intramural champs the brothers were in the semi- playoffs for football. Homecoming with the Pi Phi's was "rained out," although participation in Spring Sing with the Chi Omegas was carried off in the usual Sig tradition. In the winter was the formal in Las Vegas. The annual luau, a fall rush party, a Pirates of the Carribean and a Hell's Angels party, as well as the Oklahoma State Teachers' Prom, at which everyone dressed as okies, tied up the social agenda. Sig pledges worked around Hillside House and spent time with the children there. Nloney was raised and donated to the national project, Wallace Village, located in Colorado. Liquid refreshment lbeer!?l flows fast, pro- viding relaxation after a hard week of classes, during a TG at popular Scofield Park. ' Tr W.. . R' hM d I kc fe-Q5 gf --'Ll ,QT k Q li 3 If ' i , I 5 Q f O Mgglosvan ', -- 'fb af ijq ,LL 5 gg - 1, ,jg l gg. , r ' 4 l John Merrill T '2'. ij V, i ' Y ' " 'T 1 ' , ' ' JamesMoffertIlI ,X , A ' ' ' Stephen Morrell K a Lia L L 'MAA I -f i L I Jim A 7. ' si ' - in S Bob Oehlman fa" ' John Pappenfus D 'A , , ' Q -9:5 , A aw 4 Fi was James Petrone .,"l " l 5 "Aff ff, 'al' M, , lv- . R- Y -,. u Q ,- 6' Phil Rightmer l -IL l I Q7 ' 65' f- ' N' QQ 1- .vt Robert Riley R fl l ' F V T M srepnen Robb - ' f is ' ' Ken Robison Q h A. In 2 A T 'SN Jfffffffvfi'-'Sfff' , , ,f -' QT J . . - ' 5- . ,QM--5,7 i f W JOhl'l 5? ' , ,.,, 5 Gregory Sarquis M 1 . ' - . f A '54 B S h 'dt as - - I s sf 1 if Q. me - T ti. A 'f s ef. E:ssm2,l"' f .1 - ,gg - gg I . Q' f-if N Q? f g,4.,g,N if EdSutterfield " f ' -g H ,f ' '. Stan Tankersley f is ' f Dave Walker - N1 ' . . . dl K it mill! I . L K .TL Q elim Samuel Williams les:-da 331 l A3 K' DanWinron Q wr-J l xrx. g it K X 1 ' ' if ' e -- , W gf.. 7' if fi Gil fi. VWlliam Wood David Wrentmore Robert Zorich phi Delta theta Anas-Jew Cmsis Recneateo in IV Phi Delta Theta began the year with a remodeled house. A lawn had been planted and the inside was painted. In the fall the Phi Delts had the annual Roman TogaParty. Other social functions during the year included a western party at circle Bar B ranch and Gaza Strip Week, which was a com- bined effort of the Phi Delts and the ZBT's. A week of RF's was concluded with a peace party for the Arabs lZBTl and the Jews lPhi Deltsl. ln the past year the men of Phi Delta Theta layed 400 square feet of pipe for El Alegro Boy Scout Camp. In intra- mural football, Phi Delts were third in the league. After last year's good finish, Cal Eta looked forward to Pushcarts. A Homecoming house dec was con- structed with Alpha Chi Omega. Presenting a Commendation to his Gaza Strip soldier, Bill Rasmussen, is Field Commander Mike Wright, who led the Phi Delts to Victory in the war against Zeta Beta Tau. Bob Beckham .K A 37 Mark Bishop 1 Ronald Carter i' , V ', n Q-gi ' I -3 Q- i 'A Q 4 4 kr l John Christensen wylffm :A ffflw, 'f .i if ll --.5 ' ' Roger Cooper A "' ff L W Z tt- W - '- ' David Derby ' or ' 1 ' J0'mDfSfe' la A in yy James Edwards i , ' ., MN VVAV A l 'W ' ' vwuiem Eick - ,ga l j R , y . Dave Fetter - 'f' Q 5 'X 41 A ' G' Q Jack Fitzhenry -Fa. ' 1 'R aah: , rx i A sf , If-' ,M I Ki. f,,. ,' Q, T . Roger G0fd0f' " ' lx-65 'S - tte. ft -'- 1 2 '35, George Henning 23, 5 W, ' K . . i , ' Michael Kander ' -". XV , ' y ' 1 ' L Michael Lambert 5 L I A V X A V 'Zig-egr." E U, i Frank Lange , ' YT, l FredLurmann .33-0 ar., , . 'll' U V - 19 v IH 'Q' 'N qu HowardMagill V .,. f'- ,.f...x. ,. ' " A. Z' gf ' 69 David McGinnis T? ' x:"':?' 'PL' 'V , V - Tim McNally , I ' f X, ' V if is 1 1 A o 1 M rf rl. .- ,gs U.-. . A P' Ka '. L. ,af ,,..s13,.r.-rv . ow P' ., ii' if iw L-y-re' f . -Q., , M 4 .uh ,. , nf.. Phi Delt Mike Miller shows why he defensive team as he deflects a pass was chosen for the All-intramural intended for Alan Altree 41 H. Vg Z I .' 3 iEi?gL if K' Q ,' - H H , -A 4, it wgii-vX-f ' ,QI iw 3. , 3 V if , U X, , 'iff -A I Q c K A16 A a A 1 A Q SW . R 'W f. ., .'. Q 9' ff 1 U.. fpfkfi A A ' il me 4 2 .ffl , +1 ' as J J: 4 Q ' D J X - i 1 V Douglas Taggart F" 9' ,LQ K A ', R A U' f 4-,Q GeneWalton .2-0 ff I Q.. ' f wx Raymond Vwnquist 'f - ,, V- -T, '1' V Dennis Wright . , ' X-,J Michael wright nd? A B .Q 1 2 rf af ' if' is lr. 3, 5 'H s s D gf Ian McNeil James Miller Michael Miller Dennis Mitchell John Morrisroe Dennis Murphy John Nunan James Otis Chris Papas Terry Paluso Rick Rafael VWlliam Rasmussen Henry Ruempler Gary Seput Jeff Smith Barry Stockwell ,Jw X , 413 The volleyball court behind the Phi Kappa Psi house, provides a place for relaxation for the members of the house as well as the neighboring apartment dwellers. Here, Marci Maddock serves the ball as the fraternity entertains a sorority at a traditional Friday afternoon social affair. Spring Sing is an important event for the whole school, but most of all to the Greek community. Last year, the Phi Psi's entered with Chi Omega to sing a medley from "The lVlan of La Mancha." Here the group warms up before walking over to the stadium where the performance took place. N ar- w"r'E ig' Sifligiii ee ge eg 3' I' 2?i-isa if fi. 53, as gm it Qexz- , an - F7":"' :w fl: l ' vgieii l, ,Q .. -' ' 155 . ' k73f"1,: L' J, D' ' f -' l -HES i .. 5' 25122: .. is ' Ef-4535 w S' ' V ' X K l df: W 1 --M f 2, ll l " - ' -K ,ls e'vz?3?2'g1,z'e9,, - - if :iw M 'reef - - ' xfgfe ,-..'.T-- 1 agen nl ' ' l Calvin Abe f e " A, V ' Saedeldeen Akashah ' ' ', Howard Alpert ' A V Q t , -3 z V ,VJ " 5: ,Q f 4. 5 cg 4:3 - S3 93 Terry Armstrong ' Q r f f' J? -.. ii 2- QA Alan Blackburne ',., 4:5 gr -- 3 ' ef, QQ .4 ,,' X ':' Steven Brabant ' X NX R X H it-qi, Roger Campos I " A ' K Tim clime ,Q Q A. - Q William oelwarfmf Q P t' ' Jeffrey Diner ' ' , , John Fentis 'a ws. A, ',,,, ,, 1: Steven Frank 2 B r "' 4' i 7' Q ' I 1- ,i xiii '- 'Q If 'r Q Fred Green in " - ' "' Douglas Griffin Steve Gurnee - Todd Howell I, ,X fre -Q Q.: xj E? f -+1 CDKXP Dhl kappa psi panty Gntentalns Goleta patients Homecoming, 1968, saw Phi Kappa Psi fraternity teamed with Alpha Delta Pi in Galloping Gaucho Review. The combination won second place with their take-off on the "Newlywed Game," called the "Nearly Dead Game." A few weeks earlier, the Phi Psi's had thrown a party on Halloween for the patients of Goleta Valley Hospital, in which the entire house participated. Winter Quarter found the socially directed Phi Psi's attending a cocktail party at their house, and planning a "choner" serenade with the Alpha Delta Pi's. I The sports-minded men took the championship in three-man volleyball, while making the finals in basketball and placing high in both football and wrestling. On tap for Spring, their social events included pushcarts with Chi Omega sorority, and their formal which was held in Nlexico. The little sister organization, which is an auxiliary to the fraternity, planned and carried out a breakfast with the pledges in the early part of the year. Members of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity can be found participating in almost every sport on campus. The Phi Psi's have always done well, and pushcarts is no exception. Above, Steve Caziac and Darrel Sperling demonstrate their speed and agility during pushcarts. At left, members of the Phi Psi intramural team, which played in the all-school finals, score. I Jeff Rattet X Keirh Jeffers ' Bob Kennedy , -ss. ne-.' Vx Stephen Levandnwski, X ..- ' Dennis Miller 'T' 3 Eric Pedersen X 'P Corey Roth Q Ronald Schroeder Philip Setrakian Jam es Slater 3 Miles Standish Stephen Swim xg Larry Tuch Tim Weeg Keith Wertheimer Q i 51 Tom Young Af l N CDEK "sm ,, 4. Y. - .z. phi Sigma kappa g Q . Gaucho Buttons Benefit hillsloe This year the men of Phi Sigma Kappa had a heavy social, sports and senlice calendar. Winter quarter featured an annual Christmas party with the little sisters and the main project of the year,selling "Go Gaucho" buttons for the benefit of Hillside House. Phi Sig pledges put on a nation- alities party and the little sisters had an "Oldies but Goodies" party. Winter quarter, spirits not dampened by the rain, Phi Sigs and their dates enjoyed a champagne ,formal at Disneyland. ln sports, Phi Sigs participated in the playoffs for intramural basketball. Coed intramurals with the little sisters garnered victories in volleyball and archery. The brothers expected to sweep archery for the third con- secutive year. Spring quarter Phi Sigs looked forward to more coed activity in Spring Sing with the Delta Gammas and Pushcarts with Alpha Chi Omega. During an afternoon practice behind their house, Phi Sigs Peter Stevens and Jim Marteney work out for the intramural basketball championships. Gary Breschini Christopher Browder . James Butler Frederick Carlin Larry Chapman - Gregory Davis . Michael Davis David Dogan Gregory Doherty - . Don Drozd ,vm A ' Roger Edwards .A sate? - '- us' - .l is iii r mr :wr -E 'X ., xv a .I H 1' H " ::"'A1 R avg I if -a. l x wl E -. I 7 .1 1 , .nf r va-L' -1. x 4 -f iw l 1 V 1 I-flush' X , ol ' it ,g 15' 9 ff" ' r ' ff. f ,V y ' fl I - ' Q -, X - ' Q '47-3' , 4 ..g 1 Ji p b. r A 4' V' f.--f Q99- Robert Ferro '. Q, -' g , 5 1 , .- L E ., f 1 , . 1 Richard Gffe ' -f ... ... i "i e . -. as ep . . r , 1,..7, . -1 ..., ,,,,,,.,, . -.:: , , is , N Michael Hastings if X Allr a ft' i I y -' gg James Kilgore ' t """ " A. ' , - H ,. Murray K ornbli t A A 'I - 5 Ken Kosloff Chuck Loring Robert Mallory Jim Marteney William McLain V 1 TW-tt .J A y, xi I K VQSD 1 ' ! -I Ex l. d tlt L slls Q I i lf,- I .ff Q . .q.A-'Q V , -tl'-Q...-66.58 V I 5"Qi-. 5, mane , wfawfxgn Phi Sigs and DG's practice their Spring Sing repertoire with an inter- pretation of some "Zoo" songs. President Roger Edwards presents a football and a check for S300 to Hillside House. Money was earned from selling "Go Gaucho" buttons. M , - Timothy Metcalf ' fl I , ' , : M V 1 'X Robert Mizuno , , l 'Q 3 , A 'v-as . I 'W ' A U A Gary Moore fc: "' , gf, 1 lf ' 3 Q ,jk ' V 1 ' ' f 1 ,gi Craig Parker aff? .f 2 'fl .- X enia-eff' if M Don Pavne '21 V ' fl ll T' - -"' f ff' --jf Peter Papor ' ' . 'N " " ' V, i g, r - Jonathan Hayden 4. X Q N Q 7ZR. Runsvold -- - ' 2 V - ' a 'a zzz '5 Norman Sanesi f- 4 "' J t L 'i ' Dan Santantonio , V V A ff - ' .R , Marc Se virell 25' 39 11 1' , , ' Q tv F5 7 ,L Q ,V 1 I Raberrsfglef 'E Q: ' 31 ' -- 1 ML, Y if , f N l christopher smith " f lv' " ' Kg 1 " - ' X' "' Peter Stevens - ' A 1 R , " -, N 'rl Bill Thomas A A X I A ss ' Swffffacv , l- . I' , QB I , fb We -l f 'R A Steve Turner 'A l' ,ix f ... in Doug Twlning ' -7 zu 1:7 '- - l ' Craig Vernier ' " ' f Daniel Wychgram -uma transit 11- Cl ' E mx , 1 , E-'!.'.. ?!: .... me ff lg LQ? iii-kia... a.:L .J W- Y Sitges, " .f Mig. Y r. . 9-t ' ' it 'vlL -, M 1 ,,' .4, Wg .. Lf' ' . -5 ' ,v 'A Wg, 1: nn A 2.-few. 2 V' 0 fn' ' 7 5 Jw tsffatt' . 1, .5,:i',,.-:',5' xh.!fA"'V'-kjygAf:'.lV,1': -Af-,,' 3051, jgifrg., an qv 1 -' -, 10-af "' -' '14 f' -1rS'.,,ef 11.--' f -eg, ,T 0 - 2 ga., -. ,iff 4' ' 4 w'.44x'.f ' '. " ,, J " Tir X' .' -. '. ..q'.,l: 0 Q ft' 1,-af - -e -f In f-3.. S!-wa, r,..if ri, ,. W 'J -eff l2.h.A. San Rafael, the campus' sixth dorm opens with 600 residents . . . 500 Anacapa and Santa Cruz residents initiate the first annual pillow fight . . . lVIergatroid, Enramada's pump- kin, wins the "Ugly Contest" at the Santa Cruz Halloween party . . . Girls celebrate by singing Halloween "Carols" . . . San Rafael's enthusiasm brings them first place in the Homecoming House Decorations, with their interpretation of "The First Zoo" . . . Another San Rafael first comes in the Galloping Gaucho Revue, and a victory by Yucca Hall at Sandpiper weekend . . . Corriente Cluffs of Santa Cruz give gifts to "Our Boys in Vietnam" . . . RHA enjoys this year's iinl for- mal, the Sweetheart Tree, on Valentine's Day . . . San Miguel goes co-ed, joining San- to Rosa and San Rafael, and dorm restric- tions become more lax. COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN - Front row: Diana Crose. Third row: :Janice Dyo, Sue John Phillips, Stef Sisman, Pete Campos. Scott, Janis Turner, Sue Crittenden. Second row: Julie DePauw, Paul Dirdak, Ron Kaufman President Lor Shepard Vice President Sue Boltinhouse Secretary Robert Gardner Treasurer EXECUTIVE BOARD - Front row: Lor Shepard, Duane Garrett, Ron Kaufman, Bob Gardner, Sue Boltinhouse. Second row: Lynda Bryan, Tom Tosdal, Ran Brock, Dean German, Alice Slattery, Dave Wood, Kari Perry. RESIDENCE HALLS ASSOCIATION new Rules, Rappmc Gxpano Comm vistas This year brought the addition of a new dorm, San Rafael, into the Residence Hall Association, plus changes in RHA rules and regulations which were in line with previously instigated plans for improving dorm living. Extended visitation, to include open house on weekday afternoons, and the abolishment of required signouts for women highlighted the changes. Educational .activities this year were ex- tensive. Rap sessions with the Deans, the Associated Students officers, the Black Students Union and United Mexican American Students were enlightening to all the students who took part. Lecturers included Charles Evers, elected "Author of the Year" by RHA, and Bobby Seale. Also in the educational vein were films presented by RHA, such as "Where is Prejudice" and "Decision at Delano." U The year was rounded out by the wide variety of social events available to residence hall occupants. Annual activities such as the RHA formal, "The Sweetheart Tree" held on Valentine's Day, and the pushcart races in May proved to be fun and successful., Other happenings included a hootenanny and Disneyland trip. as 'isnt' -5 . . I - ' ' 13359: I ' if rl. . .J ' - -'-a ': KJ ,QA . Y' 151' U' "3 AY '1- ' QQQfsgw1-W ,,- mmm , , E - 1 -1 X A X 1 :QNX ,mi , I 1... C. wg Q Pg!! f .K .. . tif! ,-mx no Y l Ye fi? Q V rf L? 5 Mb' I Eg" v V I 5-L ,.,. ,W . wif? -"" - , 'l ,J pi, " 'rl is H ii 5 ' Q as Z, Q mf.. - p ff .'.:.-.x.'.5:: s N- 35 :2 A A.. -sn .v 5 ,54,1,, P gl 1, fm. J w X, 1' :' ' Y 1 . 3 Q-,. Q. l fr Y 1 A. ' H1 fr, N 'Q- ..f ig: L' .P 4 F 1l"hl'.Kf 'X Q J un 4 -1 , -0 uw ne W'- Q , -+A w Ag- 'N mu Fleeman. Second row: Jon Heywood, Scott 'e::f. - -' 4 - i 4 igf.Q:.i,- ' 3 ,LQ .L+ LTL .i 4 ig v. Y , 1 X 'i an 33 : -ff" '5 L- A e. -"'-s ffiinse Y, -13 - 1 J 2' ' a., 1 1 'T -L . ,' 'Mbn- Front row: Warren Flegal, Kirk Duncan, Kirk Fisher, John Menzel, Bob Kindel, Steve McCarter, Ray Sanbower, Brian Just, Doby Cardella, ANACAPA ADACh6 Front row: Steve Ottmer, Russell VWlliams, Donnell Choy, Eric Kitchen, Tom Bray, Dave Turpin. Second row: Bob Joy, Jon Minkoff, Kevin Wychopen, Peter Holmshaw, Dan Mc- Much to the delight of UCSB's male population, dorm hours have become less and less restrictive over the past two Laughlin, Ed McGee. Third row: Bob Scharfri Tom Bickler, Chris Martus, Tam Hoffman, Jon Griffith, Bob Farley l Resident Assistan tl. years. Open house is now a more common occurrence, but sign-outs for girls are still required. ff u f. 7.4 Y' liv ?'N'N- "4 45 P32519 1, 1 -J , , '...L ' .1 f, Q3 sa R' 'Xp if- 1? 'fs "Q, . rw JU' .5 In D ll V 1 x -Q. 1 E- - ' 361 -..r-4' -Q .Q' ANACAPA ITIOOOC Front row: Bob Parker, Jeff Wright, Phil Hofstee, Ed Hass, Don Endicott, Bill Kleinhofer, Pat Habel, Richard Tilley. Second row: Gary Thoroughman, Ken Harris, Mac Bower, Dennis Iden, Mike Simkins, Resident Assistant Glenn Gregory, Steve Stockett. Front row: Ronald Lopez, Jerry Dunn, Steve Mayles, Steve Brooks, Steve Hoo, Glen Hernandez, Hnery Yee, Jeff Fletcher, Charles Patterson, Mike Peterson. Second row: Bill Root, John Sexton, Jim Goldmann, Greg Randall, Shadows and reflected sunlight frame the lagoon and its shore-lining eucalyptus trees to bring out the beauty of unhumanized nature. Doug lden, Mike Shire, Brad Chaney, John James, Bob White, VWII Mortison. Third row: John Riley, Mike Carroll, Steve K uster, Lee Moore, Jerry Hoeraui Bob Nelson, Steve Denning, Phil Twomey, Leif Ortegren, Johnny Toon. ANACAPA Front row: Kung-Fu Wu, Kenneth lsen, Jim Comerford, John E. Kobal, Dai Zischke, Jeff Veseley, Doug Reynolds. Second row: Richard Foye, Mike White, Gary Foster, Don Woods, John Shehorn, Joe Schabot, Dan Dickey, Eric Gourley. Third row: Greg Sprankling, Jim Moon, Steve Barber, Mike Maiman, Dennis Russo, Tom Stutzman, Kevin Twohy. 426 if Front row: Marc Shryer, Tom Foster, Stephen Millen Second row: Mike Wolfe, Richard Rea, Brian McKenna. Third row: Alan Peterson, Jim Levitt, Rich Ostrin, Rich Buys. Fourth row: Dwight Wrench, Mike Hatfield, Brent Hunter, George Elvin. Fifth row: Kenneth Fels, Mark Crebbin, Michael Ryan, John Krase. ANACAPA ITIARISCO Front row: Frank Shapiro, Greg Third row: Dave Blackburn, John Watson, Howard Boldenheimer, Mike Fischer, Fred Keller, Norm Laufen- Geary, Vincent Katow, Doug Gray, berg, Jim Bates, Tom Markuse, Karl Ruling, George Mochizuki. Howard Fffedmafh BNICE 5773Pff0, Second row: Jason Niiya, John Lock- Bob McDonald. Fourth row: Chris way, Randy Tyler, Tom Friedman, Ricks, Chris Salentine, Cris Pilegard, Scott Slotterbeck, Steve Meadows, Rick Goble, Glenn Olson, George Par- Craig Smith, Phillip Robertson, Bill sons, Andy King, Mike Scott, Steve Dias, Bruce Schafer, John Halloran. Cormany, Craig Seabury. ANACAPA 11116 Front row: Terry Warsaw, Ramiro Jaquez, Ronald Fong. Second row: Howard Boylan, Altree Fischer, Jeff Goward, Paul Dye, Larry Miller, Norm Melnick, Shawn Morford, Rodger Ritts, Steve Uthus. Third row: Wayne Dequer, Jeff Nokes, Tony Ginsberg, Gary Rose, Thomas Thompson, Peter McGivern, Ross Cordy, Michael Hood, Table tennis addicts monopolized the recreation room's two tables practically continuously, whether indulging in a hall grudge match or relaxing with a co-ed study break. Bradly Lazzarini, John Kirihara, Michael Bruck. Fourth row: Paul Bickner, Harold Jackson, Eric lseman, VWlliam Foulis, John Reedy, Earl Myers, Jack Holland, Lindsay Fisher. Fifth row: Scott Deacon, Jim La Velle, Bill Dikel, David Siefkin, Bob Glusman, Robert Gefvert, David Gomez, Geoff Morneau, Gary Ordway. ' J 15:1 , 4 2 "' Qi X Q 51 I ' '- -, x v I -'gg -3- . ,.,vi- Eggly. ,Vg-1. ,. Q . Q Q .N EW' .A-f kdsc .131 2.5.5 1 ,. 52 ,F A fy.. 1" - ' I ,"ELA 45 'Q r 'sea . ' xl ' -1 .1 lr .- V Q xt? Y ' f 1- .X .. i I A n I, L, . ,5,zQN - EX 19 Q'mfyf-ff , sg .. gg W ' I 'ff :I 551 -WI r -.X-A ,.,- ,.."" 2? .4135 fag? 2 I X mx ALJ- X . 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A . z.hfg..1 W 1. 154 f -. -21? if 1-115:11 Qffzw ' 5 "iiK?f1:x'S 4. 6 lf'-.-"'.'r-'if ' 1I ' 'yt 5 .NPRV ,R " 1 -.. . . "' 'QA'x,':3 f' - -f. 11. -.lv '- 1. ,, r-AV i' 4, g '- .1 --- - 'Q -Q .gg x t'.N1"f-.- 3.51: 1 ' HIL 11,1 '.', '-"JS-'wg-1 Jgxfi -545 15.31 Z' 'E' ' 1- 'F gj Lg11 .1.., 'qt , -ly. f-Lg .ff-'.y A ,.- .z'.1,.LIgifi-Ar . -1- L ' 3371.33 Nfl ,A :,g1:...3-.t.xif31:,1Q51 1 .1 ef 4-xf ' T-.. - 4 x m '1- -'Z' 1 19531: -"'f'lfl ,flSg5,,.'g,, 'Q Q .. 1 14 -1 g5J:..,3am.' ,N 9' 1 div -41 52: I 47 M, gif-f 4 N J.. y -. 1 fgfgf, -1,- -' ,Epi 15 ' T.-.ff A X' .' - . 4 1" f.v,,. A... . ,. -- . ,. V . , . 1, .g,.,.3 ' -, , ' gi-Lv. 1.-.5 0-.:,r'..',E,x.A1, Tkhblflsg - T B, xnxx , I K . W ' 1 ' A. .lj ' i"'1..1-QQ., .-A' V .ufk i. Q, h -S . ' ,- 1 . .,,'f'-5111. . .3-3 J -k. glg-'Vx J . ,,,- ,f . ,M N 1 ' M S. firm.-"-Q '1 1 , -L Q-Q , 1 .I A. ,rr yu, - .-,..,, .fb , .' . '-L. - , -.,'."l..":'-l,.'I! ' ' K Y ,,- g.4x?'iA.:.ff' vfffgf., K- - ', . . Q. N .A Ai 1 Q.. . :ml-,?..'.. I " 'I : b 5, 0,:,1W- ,14q1.s,0.g.,1 .nk .. Jvxg sn ., , 1- . L Q X ' W W .3 .- A . ,,. ,M N . -1.9 yxwgflm N .I h, L-, 5 . A 3 ..'.,-','j-- " ' I'-" M ' "'-I- '.. A 1 ,,-,gg 01, . -I - 'xx' .. .1 -4 ,I ., ,. , f 4. ,Q A , , ,. ,, . V.. - u . , r- , ,iq .1.-.A 35 3- ,. . - ' .,--.xl ,,,,l ...t -', 'eiqxv ' -. .--.1 -.l.m.- +1 - ' ."" l-L".-"" .1 :T M .V , xzwh, .-",.A , M, - ' . f-- T-A,-ul. ,.. ,. " I M - ,z.1 f, 1 1f1,.,v.1f1.,f'.. ,j.--- 11 3 K . in - N VN 1 . 11- 171. 411.5-.3 ' ' - - f-'-A - ' A 1 . . . 1 - ,, Front row: Pearl Kaneshige, Barbara Tokushige. Third row:Diana Gibbs, Janie Smith, Joan Denman. Second row: Vance, Linda Krebs. Elizabeth Wojta, Barbara Ewers, June SAN MIGUEL ITlGl1O0Cll'lO Front row: Sally Yu, Kindall Scott, Dale Eberle, Jane Santos. Second row: Anne McLaughlin, Brenda Hee, Sheryl Hughes, Party Wang, Jan Fleischer. Third row: Leanne Kolvitz, Jeanette Burns, Judy Rook- staol, Laura Cooper, Marette Lode. 2 fig Lt? Eire 'lil lf . iff' :rr Q 15 Qi F152 Whether clustered together in timid conversation or linked hand-in-hand for a long stroll through the , l l l halls, the men and women living in the co-ed Sam Miguel dorm seem to be perennially paired. SAN MIGUEL plumas Special lobby phones take the place of the old P.A. system and save a little leg-work. 'Q .-.v-es... ,771 Front row: Candy Weisshart, Dawn Draper, Christine Akerson. Second row: Mary-Margaret Dunn, Cindy Staffare. Third row: Linda Simon- son, Milfie Howell, Vivian Vega. Front row: Jenny Green, Jill Green, Jenny Grove, Donna Dobbs. Second row: Cecilia Lee, Vera Mae Walsh, L ydia Garcia, Analee Reynolds. Third row: Betty Cota I Resident Assis tan ti , Ka thleen Harrison, Ka thy Barco, Jackie Birer. E? J if 'ily P' A! ,mm Mf- . HNF A ,I lo N 'ft eilx 1 'M Q s rp' M v ,, ff? rf at W. .2 an f 3 I If We f-- --ffn Y- -H 4- .N-Q--2' Y-W - 1-2-, fy- 1 ---Y :A :pf-gn'--f . ymggc , ' ' 'A -f--H W - 'ww f. - . 4 --,.gi2fiL. -,.-, T., ..g,...LQ. . . I . -. ' . V 1 ,'-. .1553 .- ' ""5fg2:e - , ' I ,' . A . , s 1 2 - ' 4' , V, f W J , , I. . V if-4 J .Af f " V Q .ff -1- . " ' ' 1.5 ,xy H 'r 5 1 Q- FEE Vg . v Xa X .1 F H.. TESL, .3911 slfuzyf st, . uiayllf N.-' Q W A N,-, -, kg -nga -is 'J J '. r A , p h gf A Q3 y ,jig E!! t L XM 'n 1' .554 M 1: W - 1 .,: ' ' r ,- ,,,-If-Vg .-- ig SL , - - 1 X, ,.,, ,W Q K' j V V. arms ' 5 V J " .iri 11 ' ' h f -" f ' 'Q XJ. . :aria . V' ig , ' f . 4 Q N. -. " ' 'Y' 'Q ' ,X .'f' ' kia- -, an WF 1- . if E? .- . fl ' A it 5 . Q +5 T rw iff' lf ,I J uri,- 5:-zf Lf' ,I wp? ' EXECUTIVE BOARD - Front row: Catherine Knapp, Advisoc NancyAnn Phelan, Secretary: Karen Stein, AWS Representative: Gail Bei, Social Vice President. Second row: Alice Slattery, Presidentg Sue Gilbert, Historian: Nena Torrez, Vice Presidentg Pam Gilbert, Treasurer: Libby Hall, AWS Represen ta tive,' Sue Rickman, AWS Representative. GYIIIHUSIASITI ITIAYIIIIGSTZGO In OIVGRSG ACUVIUGS The fall quarter saw San Nicolas taking second place with their Homecoming House Dec, "First Love." Sandpiper Weekend also brought Kennesaw hall a first place. The enthusiasm and participation shown in these events was characteristic of that shown at activities throughout the entire year. Week nights, the hall sponsored films and speakers, like Father Donoghue and Dr. Klien. ln keeping with this new spirit of responsibility, the visitation policy was expanded to give the student greater control and flexibility in dorm living. Individual unit halls contributed to dorm activities. Such things as pumpkin caroling, initiated by Shenandoah, ,and a computer date joint for Rainer were two of the activities planned and executed by single halls. Other activities during the year in- cluded participation in Spring Sing, a dance with the men from Cal Poly, tutoring, and help at the Alpha School in Goleta. ea J H ll gee "Tj u ' - y ,fl f ' ' .f I , l V 3 352 will i 1 FALL PRESIDENTS - Front row: ette Nichols, Yosemite-,' Mary Jane SPRING PRESIDENTS - Front Walsten, Acadia. Second row: Mary Mary Ann Ramck, Shenandoahg Sweet, Saratoga: Kelly Spotten, row: Ann Reinhold, Yosemitep Mary Ann Ranick, Shenandoah. Bonny Mathe, Mesa Verde,' Joan Acadia,' Cyndee Hiatt, Kennesaw. Hoffman, Shiloh. Second' row:Jean- c' 5 ' Y ,Y gn - -ff, L.,fE-. 6 t, ,-if M., Q ji H va ' ff - , Q , K, ' 1., W 4 , 39' Q X a-wa ,. Y. 4 3: QA 5, I K1 E wk-T Y FFF' fx eww gy. i L. ua, :f if sv? 2 X W M mf A v :M -1 A M M M , . 1955 gg J N A x M. ff .1 gm 2' Msg imp gig is f E X221 3 S, ? 1. wi my 11 5518? r. A .. 'Lk iv, L-an 9.- :fs ,. I. A x 7-5. 1 1 :M ,g . : 3. 7" 9' :mu ,Hg iils ,f mi A .: , .. -,. ' - . :.,- :K1:--zwaggr sg .12 '-, 'V . --Er f-VW' ' ' ' - - ' ifzgfi ' .fa 5- 9 ' 4-X ' -- A' W- 2: ' ,- 'u ' W' L, rf: J ' , - "3 9 m n ,gf "' l ' ' 'sl-.M - AA r ,,, ,B 1, ,I f' ' H ' N ' Ga. H 37 if-E G . I ww V . ,, . ,':- -V, '- ,,,'15sf"'5gA. ,. ,. ' V, -A ,7 .D - L ,-,.- .LQ--...' Q '- . ' , Jigga'-l ,I -' -fo . U x 1,-. L f 15?-v'--2 ' 1 Q If X Af 'fuzeffi ww ibm. , , " ' Msgs? ' ' :Kiwi-gm! ' X553 .:f2F:LL:' , ,.:QP+Q,i 9 ' fu., - "f-'5 Y fu ,Q U1 ,n Q 4 'S F . 'wifi' "- ,' Q" 5 4, Q... Sur' W, 1 ,J lr, 43 I s' . 'f 23, 1 1 1---3 s gzsgzf- 5 1 '. ZR .- yi 'om' r 34. jjf:g-ajeigh .4-. ' 1 fipga.- 41.41.-,v 54 H W- Lu L., - Y 71" , K-.4 - N --' A --sstl--ij., A Nl'-,x V71 Q7 S. in ... , 1 ., -Q . ,3 -97 'Az ---sv Ls' , 1 4 4' lg, ., , . 55' 1,1 g,'J,-,.f4-4 Front rovv: Linda Foote, Patti Hartmann, Nancy Bottler, Sally Cindy Horn, Sally Stout, Terry Strong. Third row: Ann Fried- Willson, Catherine Knapp. Second row: Linda Landucci man, Alice Slattery, Chris Bjorn, Barbara Chisolm, Ellen Baath- lAssistant Head Hesidenti, Mrs. Gastineau lHead Residenti, rayd, Front row: Cyndee Hiatt, Jayne Wilsey, Janet Nakaga wa, Camille Cooley, Suzanne Ivey, Blythe Rowley. Second row: Libby Hall, Marilyn Zink, Nanette Deetz, Jackie Sorenson. Third row: Nancie Wenick, Evadne Sanichas, Liliana Scopinich. Fourth row: Kathy Ton, Peggy Stanley, Maggie Wall, Nancy Phillips, Sharon K opke. ,bw rw gf we ,ff L A' 'X ,X , 'fu nv -fy f JE, 4 U u hi 1 N gm w wx x I D 1 -qv QW' img M ...., ..,. ,.,.,.. :.: , .W- ' o 455 - f .1 ug? sizes 12255 may z TQQY: ,n ,Q ,fiib 59? E if .. ,, ,,. 37'-x wx :sw .gggk gsm, J may 5. W, , HM V. W 5 .V,, 5-.W A M, 2 We Q .3 W H .1 .l ., l 3 l .5 K 2 -may F' ff ME 1 M S A K Q v- 5 "1 S wi Q W 4.0 .::. W, t ,:.,, J ' 4 iv , f 1. qw! I F v-1 sg W. ,Yi NJA: i :Ev E, -,L 1 N Wx? En ,-V --,.v.-, vflil- .11 , . 'Q 5 F5 A 441W aeffv .4 Fw -11' ,1 ,A Nap-RAM! A 5 , I I I ' R' , 33 I tri Q F .? '1 'S- '- , Hmmgs 353, .A 'ga to up i, ' 4 .WST , X Jia Qi 494 ii U ,l.. 1 hm?" 11 13 Y T., U1 A 1 3 - f VK V 9' if , . N - ' v fv V . I V' . ,' 1 ' 1 , K a f- t wwwf, va. 1 ...A wg vw fr: as 2 1 my . A ,, I 33:50 QW . kk? X-Qi? ' Q13 U1 nn vw v- 'yu 1 .r 4 vw., . 1' iff? V" 51. ' a Q4 f ,, , I y. I, 15, , i 'vm'-. , fp - ' it 'fu . L 3- "-' , A rv . Y a 3.1 . , f'Q I J'- r...' ..,,,,, m E If I. . 35,- Q f 'iQ , A 3, QE . Q" e,,xiM'3 ..:f?1?1F C? I I 5 5 ei pf -'Qi' ii. -lg Q '.ivN,.ii- v- ix X e - ei '.r i Q lb fig. Front row Jeann1eHostetter Carrie Kruger Kay Fuglt Curran, Gail Papac, Anna Lee Eaton, Pam Purtymun. Third row: Vicki McDowell, Deborah Rochelle, Estelle Pabis, Suzanne Hill, Debbie Peterson, Peggy Piak. Front row: Judy Lai, Christine Wada, Joanne Uehara. Second row: Joyce Friesen, Linda Hollywood, Kathryn Kitchens, Pam Gilbert. Third row: Carol Mead, Bonnie Carter, Carolyn Owens. Fourth row: Lavon Pevey, Carolyn White, Sylvia Webster, Mary Ann Ranick. "They don't cook any night, they eat at dining delight," as the much maligned Dining Commons is affectionately referred to throughout RHA. . - - M 6524 '56 ' 'A i,":v'- . , . 7 Front row: Kathleen Herring, Laureen Young, Karen Lyum, Anne Elberger. Second row: Nancy Wells, Ann Yake, Sue Graff Joanne Priestley, Suzanne Miller. Third row: Nancie Burchett, Leighan Feffer, Elly Gendel, Resident Assistant' Kathi Yates. Fourth row: Cindy Klotzsche, Janet Somerhalder, Carolyn Shaw, Margo Nanny. Fifth row: Joan Hoffman, JoAnn VanderMolen, Vicki Russell, Vicki Porter. j SAN NICOLAS hllOh if Y I 1 . v I i . I . 1 r i 1 A x ,' ' N X, v, . ', A La ph' 5 . I ' M, . , Agjl Front row: Margo Tam, Lynnette Lewarton, Marie Sutton. Second row: Margaret Katz, Linda Rattner, Pat Stifter, Cathy Cooper. Third row: Sandy June, Laurie Lippitt, Cynthia Toilette, Karen Kaiser. Fourth row: Leslie Herrman, Sarah Catterman, Debbie Dorney. Fifth row: Ann Noel, Brenda Arnold, Denise Brownlee, Georgia Trailkill, Pam Blair. ,U-, ,app ,l 2 ,, ,rr ,. . ., Q new ' I ge . it . A I 1 I ' ' Q , 1 SAN NICOLAS OSGTDIIIG Front row Terry Sullivan Sylvia Lucas Cathy Buono Alice Becerra, Susan Ransom Lenl Ferrero Second row Holly Woods, Dorothy Cowell Cris Croak Brook Hedge Resident Assistant' Barbara Vlhgle Cathy Meyer Rlchahe Wyatt Talking a strolling c being use C SANTA CRUZ pee-Dawn Disaster: Catalyzes llonces Santa Cruz Women's Residence Hall had a great year sparked by unusual dedication on the part of the residents. The Homecoming House Decoration, built with the aid of the men of Anacapa, was a noteworthy example of the shared enthusiasm of the two dorms. Residents worked late into the night to finish the dec in time for the next days' judging. It was cold and rainy, but even this did not stop work. Nearly finished, the dec was blown down and totally destroyed around 3 a.m., but with true spirit, the residents began work again early the next morning and completed four days' work in less than seven hours' time. The fall quarter also included a Halloween dance, Trick-or-Treat party and many other activities, highlighted by a gigantic tvvo-hour pillow fight with the men of Anacapa, Winter and spring quarters featured beach parties for local under-privileged children. SPRING PRESIDENTS - Front row: Betty Wailes, Enramadaf Jennie Hadel, Consuelo. Second row: Jean K raisinger, Arbolada, FALL PRESIDENTS - Front row: Linda Parker, Consuelog Marcia Meu- dell, Estrellaj Beverly Clemen te, Primavera,' Caleen Erickson, Risuenaf Lynn Williams, Corrientef Patti O'Connell, Oceana. N ot pictured: Beth Staiger, Arboladog Betty Wailes, Enramada. EXECUTIVE BOARD - Front row: Sue Markine, Judicial Board Chairman 19685 Sue Foulk, Com- posi tie Hall Treasurer,- Robbi Imfeld, Composite Hall Publicity Chairman. Second row: Ellen Kos- syta, Judicial Board Chair- man 1.9695 Kari Perry, Compositie Hall Presi- dent: Helen Green, Edu- cational Vice President. I I , I, ,-L,-grit-'ff:I,E':,-.eafze .. E5--f.-,V ,, --A i , . I,. Is II.: II II .1 -4 , . :E+ Q-'33 Lis V7 .3134Ifggjg-5-:.:'I,xS',t,'Ifn,- .Eff 5- stile-. ' " .f ' fe ', 'Q L- ,Q 'ji- -' ' V If-J-. 4-5, .L. Ea- ,, A.. - -- Ax -5. .: P.-gp .- ' If.: , . .- , - -'1 . . ." Z'-If -.. "-wtf, I ' -jffsif L J- -lf? V- 1 'essr ,-. 's-tj-'W,,...,r-. or -' - ,, '. 1- 1 "T-L:-..di41Q--if-u.' f " A E ' Z2 5 ' H3551 Z" .. "1 ..f".fff-1' , -g'.t5..-1:1A,IAII,w-.,,,,k""', ,-1 ' "-Lf f - Igv,-I' l ' '.3..,Q:,1':,.Sv2" 'ESQ' ai Ki'-A"'?-563 -M . Q 4-.4 1 - -EEE:E:3E:E:E:E:': W f F ""i'7' " 'HW' ' IMI w.,,,wI.1 EE.: III,I. am., . .::sII. . . 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L -' 3. .- .? . gl?-2'..,3. ,,',aa . f - ' ' .- s '?.-JT.,'f"""?s"""a'F"4'7"4' ' '4"'.'- t'7'?.ei'F'+:'-'-" 'vm 1 ' f"'.-ef-wfii-'Z '::'f"EgfHl :-fra f Usd- . "T ' ' .,.-- - -rf, 5 - Y ,- . 4 ,,,-'bl' ' , f.. -in-.1.. . - A.: E I-kig,.c"y-e' fl- ' - 9 : 2,-1' ',ii--'QH I ' I-5: A. - .3191 iff' ,..,,I..: -'T , , :gf I "-r Q' - -gg-,,.,'z-.I - 'fi'f fgrwg -' '- ' ' ' A L.y.F--T." II A A - . . ' five.. Q ,,,..,s 'L-.:f:,:r.'z5 A :fs-A. N,-af. , ...S .4-'ff' v . .. , . K I 1 . , K I , . I Y .1o...x.",. . . .+I,-1 .I 4, -',-.", T.-.' I' . r-7-' ' I". I. ,-rr Though the sound and fury rage in front and behind, people relate. SANTA CRUZ ARBOIAOG Front row: Janice Stiles, Susan Ray, Paula Griggs, Beth Steiger, Linda Orcutt, Resident Axistantg Barbara Lewis, Jackie Vaughn. Second rovv: Roberta Sullivan, Erica Carlson, Terri Trescort, Lolly Smith, Nina Chambers, Sue Foulk. Third row: Sandy Robertson, Patty Wright, Peggy Blodget, Lyndell Johnson, Nancy Vwttmeyer, Vicki Palmer. Fourth row: Annette Isaacson, Marilyn Stosick, Anne Lodge, Suzanne Champion, Kathy Van Tilburg, Jan Tornquist, Rabbi lmfeld. SANTA CRUZ consuelo X' rf' 3-11 'ul Front row: Linda Parker, Elizabeth Liles, Melanye Moon, Donna Haworth, Gail Nakatsu, Kathy Lee- den. Second row: Mary Mackedie, Anita Brosius, Linda Foster, Leslie Edgerton, Sue Barnes, Merrill Everett. Third row: Mickey Valente, Leslie Smith, Jan Watkins, Elaine Linden, Kitiy Han- sen, Jean Knoernschild, Cathy McGough, Kerry Courtright. Fourth row: Jane Bodine, Sue Cousin- eau, Nancy Adams, Sue Ziemann, Chris Morrice, Julie Grow, Wendy Ho. Fifth row: Karin Cooper, Sherrie Schell, Linda Han- cock, Jan Harter, Terri McNamara, Peggy Jerome, Janet Smith, Resident Assistant: Chris Mullen. SANTA CRUZ CORRIGUIIG 1 ' -1 , , i v i Front row: Karen Bailey, Margo Koger, Kathy Vance. Second row: Jeanne Mascovich, Vickie Malcom, Linda Goos. Third row: Sheila Dorsey, Michelle Meyer, Linda Brock. Fourth row: Marianne Broberg, Randi Lencioni, Melony McCracken, Jeannine Wakeman. 9 ff ' ' A I 1 . i I Surrounded by stuffed animals, an atmosphere of relaxed com- a television and the all im- fort as opposed to the forced portant telephone, this dorm tension of the library. dweller finds studying easier in , l Front row: Leslie Wallace, Linda Pecyna, Carol Grafe, Thompson, Terri Sagge, Kim McDaniel, Sue Bunning, Vicki Porter. Second row: Dorie Knight, Beverly John- Michele Chiechi, Karyn Crandall. Fourth row: Becky son, Lynn VWlliams, Sue Buck, Carolyn Kelly, Cathy Gazzaniga, Nancy Fash, Tricia Owings, Gail Klein, Debbie Carson, Suzi Palmer. Third row: Lauren Schaffer, Denise De Voe, Pam Herbert, Carol Remley. re-I ,fl Cm! L 1'2" - Q -ee wt.-,A uf! .. xml'-"T ' ' Y A , e , zz- , f ' - ,M ' ----- - 1 E JA., ,if , 1 LW. 1 'STI - Z6 J Front row: Colette Elliott, Kathy Peterson, Jude Ratcliff, Deidre Bancroft, Robin Mclntire. Second row: Nancy Hei m, Sue Markine, Lynn Sembler, Liz Coker, Lynn Still- man, Sally Chenault. Third row: Annette Difol, Kathy Ferris, Gay Aegerter, Julie Weber, Jone Jones. Fourth row: Jane Meri- gian, Irma Arutinian, Beth Pierce, Diane Kohnert, Cathy Smith, Bridgid McMahon. Fifth row: Nancy Fearon, Kari Perry, Paula Cohn, Robyn Stone, Nancie Norman, Vickie Wake. SANTA CRUZ GITRAIHAOA . M Front row Mary Doran, Linda Bundy, Viola Sawyer. Second row: Sue Penner, Linda Vincent, Debbie Wohletz. Third row: Anne Hudson, Chris Lincoln, Debrah Polite. Fourth row: Mindy Bergman, Lynda Rowan, Dawn Stafford. 4 47 ,...:. Hb,-. ji 5 X .211 4 E f 'ji 'Ulf fi , E231 H17 I 4 '12, . lg ,gn 0 QW, 'llll !g' Q -V1 -'ru I , ,' 'fain' ' 1:1 gpfqffh ' . .N , -00" J c ' ora - F o E :I I' Vw' an --' ' -1 I 5, 'rd Li' 6 l xxx N 5 fi ly' Q , ,l Q55 .V A. its JFSQQ., QMA41 1 N.-. 5 " -Q Q YA - 3 Y v 'Q' "'l .1 '."" I, -- .-.. ,- Q f , ,, . cn A. A? l.Kq',1I?2,Qf:',, I' f" Z f - - A -'V+' 1-Lijg, C Lau ,. , 1:42 -1 0 fd? . 1 FL 'wif ggi? I W.- I Hr 'A ' ,gg "Z ... Q' .. lk' ii: ' -v J X 4? 32381: A wk Hg .4 ,,1 1 tix ,. lj . . fi ,. ,.L -1 Elm ff' " ,4- ,. .Q ., .. . , . v . ,...z.. Q!" ':Z,....- . nn .-... --...1...... . Q e .L gffllff " Ax ' Lf E ,fi X ff X- 4 A-v . -- , "L-C 1 ' w -,. fy " ? -A W . " Y' . , E , f '-fiwijf, . ' -535 i 25151153 . " - X Ffffiifl-. Q19 , ., F..a5,,i-, ,' '1 , -- ' . . .. . Img. . 15- 49.-'ua I -' . .-v"'f: 4:53 T7 W . ...cg 1: .V r .' .vmdmgc '- 1 N. rx -.:-.....-gg. ... . .. 1. ' .--0' ,....-.....- 'ri f' -f tx'-, if f aim' 1 t I". w f ,ff aff EJ I 1 .ww- vf. J .55 .'YV . I ' l M'-2222 - - Q., f ,EFF E.,-, ..w X is gif, . VM Q V'-1' :lx if ine-2:1 X' 'M W .,1,.mH wwfw Ay.. ' V. -15-'19 52 5 .3 Ill' A' -A AL . 5' 4 5 .15 . , A , x , .','..f'fL' 1. 2' .- 2 I. I X 2 if , xy 'z' ' 0 ' Jn w e 4 -, h. , 5 . .., jul" A. xx Ji". 'pf 9 X 1 5 QD- F Q ' ' .- 1 G rf -Eirygf. I ' 2 - ,L :I ' qxh,..F - - 51 , . 1' I I A ' ' 1 fa K - -2 4 - . 3' ' ,f 1, W A .V 'if A-. ' jmgwg-If img -:Jak ' - - ,v nl- , 4 pf 'L aw f qw Q- . Q il rs 4 H if ' , ' 4 . N , . ' . f - - -rf' . ., Q . 1 '15 1 r xl-Af 55,2 5 if " , . . F- .1 , if " 4' W iff -E. V til lf!!! ' ' . if' f-1-1 J bl S. tl dxf! W . , . I . .,. R. AY 1 5 M . , 5, 0 4 ' I if ,L V , - A f Aiglf k ' ' ' A-V ' - Y ' , -- N . W ...L-....... ., J .-.fry I? , X p f - ', , f'-'A 4 ffffg. ' - 5 QW? .V - Y' - - My X A A was 1 -. Q , 1 ,- H- -Eb: 1' 'B f Wg , 5. ' fl ay 1' I rw . 'Mui Rfb- 1' ' -'R f ' 'f-'He' A Hviig V .f -Q.. ,C .lr ' . 5 Q Ji ' 2 3' Q? ga 3535 . 3. : ,fi .. L 1 1 l ,. ' .z , ,. . Y, V ? 1 I U Q I , ?,' ' V. fr . . 1 aw- Front row: Judith Silver, Susan Hummel, Jeanne Fassell, Cathleen Duffy, Anne Barber, Heidi Hamil- ton, Beverly Clemente, Penny Hulse, Resident Assistant. Second row: Andrea Gerhardt, Marjie Moody, Susan Wooley, Joan Hannah, Keiko Shima- mura, Lynne Hollenbeck, Michelle Ledford. Third row: Beth Simons, Tina Mezzetta, Rosemarie Flethez, Peggy McKeown, Linda Mooers, Cindy Ogilivie, Jan Bolling. Fourth row: Linda Klocke, Wendy Brandt, Martha Wood, Joyce Elrod, Jean Kraisinger, Ruth Morden, Patricia Bartlett, Jean Perry. SANTA CRUZ DRIITIAVGIQA ifififv '1 5' ff ij ' -5--nu'- i m-, 'sf-: ::"'1+""'5.aLM" f" 'Av'-'A'-"6 L ' '11, I :Hy H '-,f,+'fm,' 5 fufigiie - ' L-,X - Y ,.,a,5v5gr.-S J- ' ,:' '- 1? A :W. .- .'-. -give!! . ,-,f'- -:- .fr -gen J H . 1 l' 1efefxfv?ae1i'a?'f I -gz, , '- 1-5 - gf 1 1 fTg,gff3'1'f:g.i!' 1' 'FALQQQ -1 ,',:"-3.-jfits .' '. 'if'7e".i?eUV's?f'5fwif'7-Fifi-A' .3:'-zzgaggr..'Q.::. nigga:-gli :':ih,,?.j, ffl,-,Y pl- g.:.:3.4A1.fA 7 .L I - " ' e, I, Qgggglw 'll 1 s ' I H if? Q ,Ma 524221.52 l Front row: Raghbir Hayre, Patricia Medina, Trish Wood, Mandy Bradford, Judy Martin, Sandy McCarthy, Nancy Calwell, Barbara Deutsch, Suzi Wexler. Second row: Shira Holtz, Sandi Schrader, Lynne McCoy, Andrea Alfred, Terry Theiss, Rosemary Cadena, Mary Pirruccello, Marta Warterman. Dorm rooms can be just a place to sleep a narrow Iuttle room which forces Its occupant out by the very nature of Its claustrophoblc walls But with a but of thought they can be a haven from outside hassles. l . Fl'0l'1f l'0W NOFITIH P0009 Kathi' H111-9-Yhl Pam Ofphan Brown, Nancy Gallaher, Brenda Smith, Susan Hill, Diane Page RhUf7da Blefman Ellen Varvn Second YDW Nancy Weiler, Barbara Lehmen, Resident Assistantj Lillian Lim Shelley Lange Lucy Gohr Mary Mowatt Randi Llgyd. SPRING OFFICERS - Barbie Schmidt, Sirena,' Janice Cypher, Executive Educational Vice President. EXECUTIVE BOARD - Jay Arrott, Menfs Social Vice Presidentg Randy Harper, Judicial Chairman: Linda Bryan, President' Linda Kidder, Secretaryf Sally Paquette, Executive Vice President SANTA ROSA Co-Go Oonm plan Catches On m '68 Santa Rosa, previously the only co-ed dorm on campus, lost that distinction this year, as San Miguel and San Rafael joined the ranks, but this did not result in a lack of spirit on Santa Rosa's part. As the fall quarter got underway, a party spirit pervaded the halls. Residents enjoyed a Welcome to Santa Rosa Barbecue, where everyone delighted in meeting their new dorm mates. This fast pace, which included a Casino Royale Roaring 20's party, a House Dec party and a Christmas party, was maintained throughout the year, and offered the residents of Santa Rosa the unequaled experience of campus living. FALL PRESIDENTS - Front row: Susan Barbieri, Sirena,' Michael Balice, Villa Marinag D o n n a Sandler, Bahia,- Ana Marie Scott, Cora- lina,' Burr Otto, Marisco. SANTA ROSA BAYIIA Front row: Hilary Kaye, Linda Petrini, Karynne Campbell, Barbara Knaup. Second row: Patty Graham, Carol O'Lone, Cheri Hurst. Third row: Peggy Black, Cindy Bell, Cathy Va n D yn e, Victoria Montagne. Fo urth row: Donna Sandler, Kristina Drucker, Millie Thro wer, Susan Spalding. r E 1 Glee lights the faces of two of truth passes. For once the dorm residents as the moment candy machine worked! Front row: Val Houlihan, Nancy Piper, Nancy Myers, Rockie Third row: Linda Levinson, Mary Anne Rutowski, Anita Farrell, Betsy Germershausen, Rita Heyn, Barbara Bruser. Shahoad, CBVW7 Horsfall' Melanie Kagan' Liz Randal, 577ffl6V Second row: Ellen Katsuki, Roberta Levitt, Kathy VWlliamse, Weiss. Diane Holmes, Katie Balicki, Angela Wallace, Becky Young. 453 ,,. I. av. . fl 13 :xl 5 .-1 a 4, . 'VFD .i' i gg if 'A ' n Ax if -- 1 4 , , Q, . sa. 9 g'f.:,f, . in I 5 7 , , N 1 , 42 9' ' mm- - .....- ,, , . . t ', J. p X A ,kg , Ji . Q IJ, ' l V 54 E I 'nfl' 'ff Q --A ., 4 1 " - 1- wf kws' R3 if Q ' H R 4 . V L - I .512 iii ggpvl 5 4 8, X rf , ...iii it aes- E, NF Q.-.1...,.f.....uail fnm.4. . Kwik-,. , 1 -Maiiilm .-.L-,n...1. .. , . .f .-.. .-. T' - 1 ., I we Wh xi 5 , H, as 1 f .. x- ,H ,.,f - , sg N I ,f F .fm 1 Q, 5 + 3 -4 I N K 2 . Q f"' - 11 'R' 2' -FT! f 5 A 1 x . A Q 1 I q X l W A 4. r K ' I V Q f3'x 3"afl , - Q ' u I P Av! X W: A wg' s lp, L X '1 Q ' T' i he '5' 4. if ,al D4 ' Q -Q vw a .-rx 1 311 9? ,ir K x Q' s uve I 1 165,-'f"7 M 2 , 1 0:5 sf, ff 55 M51 35 F4 F i , if . if 47 4 w , - . ri -4232 5.35.1 i 'g- Qpf hvzfv? zz ' 1,131 wk' .,." ,. Z' gghu' WL 1513 M Q sf QQ WH V wi H w is 'W' if ,-. ' ' f 9 - f -555 'Wm 'B . - 1 . .x- SANTA ROSA RIBGRA Front row: Debbie Mackie, Pam Young, Peggy McGovney, Kim Kaplan, Eil6er1B0Sa0ki- Second row: Dennis, Pat Marshall. Fourth row: Elaine Fontana, Nancy Brokaw, Ruth Zebb, Lise Reed, Marilyn Janet Cranston. Third row: Mary Hughes, CarolStewart. Front row: Jann Lane, Annie Geary, Carolyn Reilly, Jenni McLellan, Nora Slutzky. Second row: Kathy Kirkpatrick, Sylvia Garbers, Carol Korn, Diana Hall, Helene Hurford, Kathy Laflin. Third row: Becky Strum, Janice Cypher, Anne Craw- ford, Susan Paules, Deborah Deane, Nancy Myers. .ff . E' A V 'E "1 . 'J ivy' " :Wi M., A- L-H . 1 WJ! 31 X X 'I ": .qw I. f 1 aifaflfmxmwmffe: -- - pn af If If , 3 4-in-v zf-ai--A 1-4.4. ' . ,, .Q 5:3 :,,:.-5 Que-'11 : ' , ' -5. ' -. .1 r Tr"- mfgfi 4 it X Sw., 4-e , ,, ,A .1 y A. -"i,7:9efQQ:31.,e, ' .- ..:.rf ' "" sf - ' ., yfgffii'- .., QQ1' rtxil' Q A V. f Ae - re P 'ff , 1, ,,.g1q' .file M, -. f?5Ei"l:Q' X- ' "'2'1:-.5.i..'5 'ir-fr' , KT? ,WL Wi fl 4, 1,38 if fl J- - ,,:,. 5 :m , . L 'gjx-.-tu., v ww . '.-.2 - .- we-t , - ,-,A , 5, .-za -,,, y.. . . ffl, ,-f-9 a--fra: ty- -A 4 . -if -'fl Q fe- 1 ' ' I rf'Fa' ---241. , .5 - . to -f Jj 35,5 ,-.-we--, R 3.6-af,--'L . fgj Q. i 1 j,.'1ag,I gi-.1 X . 4 , .Q L'-JD.. Front row: Judy Clarke, Liz Granik, Shelley Vwsotsky, Patricia Tam, Susan Barbieri, Margaret Hacker, Georgia Floyd. Second row: Carol Dawson, Leanne Oglesby, Dianne Mc Bride, Diane Dorsey, .loan Linden, Carol Smetana, Susie Work. Third row: Lynne Garon, Barbie Schmidt, Louise Sauls, Sally Paquette, Pat Else, Kathy Paul, Eileen McMinn, Aileen Kasai. Fourth row: Louise Mar- shall, Blair Wardlow, Barbara Hill, JoAnn Stephenson, Olivia Casas, Linda Nolte, Linda Kidder, Candee Cooperrider. SANTA ROSA SIRGUA When you begin to bug your hall-mates to the point SANTA ROSA of distraction and they suggest you go fly a kite, why not? Our lack of power lines enhances this sport. Front row: Jim Lewis, Len Thompson, Jim Rapp, Jim Cox, Bob Lacey, Louis Labrie, Steve Andersen. Second row: Stephen Gong, Charlie Roberts, Fred Wapner, Steve Cooley, Resident Assistantg Robert London, Tomothy Mainland. Third row: Lynn Means, James Glickenhaus, Bob Creps, Bob Ken t, James Kimura Lawrence Kaplan, Louis Rivara, Phil Hess Fourth row Bob Schachter, Mark Hehder, Neil Bethel, Bob Koemgs Jeff Stark, Bruce Menzies, Gary Wolfran. ,L f 457 ' pix Ax Q-A fwmiig ' '. - kr if : .,p"A..c:'i-E-1 ' , , gk fm. nw , X Q , V Q , "r 1 , 3 Ja. , wh is ,' .Q 3' if I ' Jia df. 1-4x if ' . 1. ' I gr fi' ELI 5 li -EQ-3,1 Q-,.. 3 '.. ff'-,gh - F2121 C,-.,'--,.-:,n,,"L.--. sl" , ffm ., Eg 13. 'f , F 'Ms Q J :II , ' 2 1."'I' iw 1 v .'1.'T,1"'.+3 .,,- 5 Q ,H Lx ln. T1 'E 'L H . ,JH H L di SPRING OFFICERS - Front row: Sue Duckworth, Palm,' Bonnie George, Junipen' Margaret Katz, Pine. Second row: Rex Jacobs, Sequoia: Jim Moore, Men's Vice President' Don Shimasaki, Laurel,' John Abraham. Not pictured: Nancy Katuna, Manzanita: Anna Lee Berger, Willow,' Dave Platt, Sycamore: Chuck Brown, Yucca. FALL PRESIDENTS - Front row: Third row: Jim Simon, Toyonf Chris Joel Garcia, Cypress: Pan Jensen, Hendersho t, Junipen' Jim Moore, Willow. Second row: Meredith Yucca. Fourth row: Donna Jones, Webster, Madrona,' Tom Walsh, Palm,' Court Hanley, Sycamore: Kathe Sequoia: Janet Seargeanlp Manzanita. Taylor, Pine. SAN RAFAEL l2ha's ewcomens monopolize Races A new power came to the UCSB campus in 1968. The conglomeration of steel, plaster, and wood by the lagoon became a residence for 600 people. The chaos of construction gave way to an imaginative staff and an eager group of students, mostly upper classmen. To say that it was an auspicious debut is somewhat of an understatement. San Rafael garnered a well deserved first place in the Galloping Gaucho Revue. A nicely executed Homecoming house decoration, "The First Zoo," copped a first in its division, and Yucca Hall managed a victory at Sandpiper Week- end. Freshmen were welcomed at the start of school with a Sunday Beach Day, and the fall quarter also marked the successful incorpo- ration of Dead Week dinners into the busy schedules of the San Rafaelites. United halls participated in various joints, campouts and picnics throughout the year, to the enjoyment of all the Rafael residents. ,ez ag , iyyy EXECUTIVE BOARD - Front Rosemary French, Women's Vice row: Linda Panovich, Tnsesurerg' 'President Not pictured: Larry Tami Morison, Secretary. Second Flashberg, Men's Vice President row: Tom Tosdal, President' SAN RAFAEL c przess Front row: Ken Eisenberger, Matt Bergen Ed Casillas, Mike Brooks. Second row: John Kirtley, David Dunlap, Kip Hansen, Nick Gregory. Third row: William Snowdon, Front row: Timothy Owens, Craig Harelson, Chris Spohn, Victor Lee. Second row: Brian Hanson, Charles Ma len Dou las Hoffman Donald V , 9 I ,Redalje. Third row: Michael George White, Bruce Bucholz, Donald Blake. Fourth row: Jerry Bedwell, Joel Garcia, Alan Kase- hagen, Lar Shepard. Warner, Thomas O'Brien, Tim Geddes, Mark Barrall. Front rbw: Tim Craig, Bill Delameter, George Houghton, Richard Schneider. .J - VaIentine's Day found these RHA'ers and dates enjoying the Sweetheart Tree formal at the Coral Casino. SAN FKAFAEL launel Front row: Irv Moss, Robert Garcia, Dennis Strong, Jeff Allen, Tom Hoberman, Chuck Kanter. Second row: Gregg K orbin, Peter Lundberg, Richard Munger, Bob Klure, Larry Flashberg, Barry Solomon, Maury Gloster, Mark Turpel. Third row: Alan Gould, Robert Andrew, Steve Stoner, A. Scott Morgan, Bill Tweedie, Fredric Rosenberg, Tam Tosdal, Ron Nolte, Shawn Stinson, Greg Hodges, John Geddes, Doyle Baker, Steve Gottlieb. Fourth row: Dave Schuricht, Michael Cordero, Don Shimasaki, Chris Frier, Don Corliss, Ron Beck, Dan Henry, James Downing, Rick Canning, Wes Graham, Jim Thomas. SAN RAFAEL JUHIDGR Front row: Nancy Aschen- brener iResident Assistantl, Marge Rindge, Marie Papou tsis. Second row: Dotti Davis, Barb- ara Strickland, Pam Speich, Jane Lindquist, Martha Hummel, Nancy Wascoe, Mary Studer. Third row: Marjorie Harris, Peggy White, Sharon Neisingh, Judy Ballard, Kathy Brown, Linda Panovich, Bonnie George, Barb Thiele, Nancy Carver. Fourth row: Lisbeth Adolph, Pam Raun, Joanne Jemmott, Eileen Vohryzek, Julie DePauw, Darlene Haas. Front row: Norma Ruiz, Carol Eastbrooks, Madalyn Frazzini. Second .row.: Nancy Glick, Beth Warden, Linda Osmundson, Barbara Swindall. Third row: Anita Bonislawski, Paula Malan, Donnis Galvan, Linda Malmgran. Fourth row: Gerry Elliott, Pamela Puolsen, Paddy Calistra, Joan Kester. SAN RAFAEL Q2 .1-41 .S .. ...gg Qs , J -H 'ae' - - if ' wwf , "' ww" 'lm are f ' ' , .,. , . .- -sl . . 4 ,. , -ww -we -Answ- ' . Q1 1 4, 'f' I 4 ... Set in a corner of the campus, San Rafael enjoys both a view of the 4. - .,- - . msc, ...WV -.. V, '- , A , wi., . . " . , 45 A - L - "- -'?z.'3':.L:,4sf . 1- N -. - .-' ' v .. .e . .. -f - -f , K . Q .3-,, - . V .. ' Y . 5 ' fr-'Q ' "?"fr3'A" ' . as-1 , . - 4, .. - -..':s:'-.- - .- V -,. - A-when --x,:1-N"--'- -.r ,: 4 --f . 'V - ' ' ' ' V ,Z .- ,...-". V' ' - ', --, f 1' 5. , -' ,J .- . F , - Uh- ,-""9-?,--1..L-' K'-If M 1jy..gi,..'f '-- I- fn 'Y 1 '-1 .ya ' ' ' - idk-' "gi -. '+'T'-it lagoon from the west and a proxim ity to Isla Vista business. ITIAORODA Front row: Roxanne Judge, Joanne Kellar, Carol Fenn, Mary Ann Kalton, Linda Bond, Meridith Webster, Diane McCall. Second row: Jane Ferrante, Donna Riske, Marilyn K oenigs, Judy Pam, Devon Hedding, Nancy Strauss, Michele Kellett. Third row.' Phyllis Maurer, Leslie Mannis, Susan Phillips, Resident Amist- ant,' Nancy Canning, Laura Johnson, Marianne Michk y, Janis Haggerty. 462 .: "". dh-.- -fe ig-:rl .m 'fu F grwae W SAN RAFAEL HTAITZAIWIIIA if - S ..N-MM M: H 25' VF M N af K -M.-.een wlew " ' ""A"- ffl . U ,fl32e3'wu.1,gzz..g'M5w 553115553 4 f V , 3 , l I K , AJAX :. .1 . 4.1 3-" fy Front row: Marilyn Mintz, Carol Fishburn, Jayne Brogan, Harrison, Anne Bottomley. Third row: Ann Steinmetz, Susie Grant, Ruth Hussey, Judy Collar. Second row: Diane Nancy Grosvenor, Jean Coffey, Carol Eickworth, Darlene Bean, Carol Hanlon, Karen Aughinbaugh, Nance Troy, Cathy Peacock, Nancy Phipps, Nancy Ploessel. , 1 x Front row: Janet Mazzola, Janet Harrie, Susan Pearce. Second row: Karen Werner, Susan Furlong, Ginger Luke. Third row: Sherry Campini, Nenita Ponce, Cary Orr. Fourth row: Janet Seargeant, Chris- tene Leonard, Ann Hallisey. SAN RAFAEL palm Front rowi Tami Morison, Gige Sprigg, Lauria Bissell, Sggond rovy: Sand1'Dutra, Rosemary French Sue Scott Th' d . . nr row: GallBaldell1, Vicki Tubbs, Gloria Meinert. Fourth row: Linda Bohlinger, Janet V0nEssen, Connie May. Under the watchfully approving eye of Linda Reisser at the right, an impromptu jam session takes off. Front row: Stephanie Smith, Ann Hager- man, Kathie Pollock, Debbie Hyde, Darcy Boesel, Barbara Chesnut, Kathi Koshear, Ellie Clegg. Second row: Sharon Stan ford, Janis Riegle, Gail Belansky, Parma Plancich, Sue Duckworth, Cheryl Feld- man, Barbara Romanchak, Kah Hwa Njao, Susan Hirshberg. Third row: Ruth- ann Richery, Janice Johns, Elizabeth Dolan, Donna Jones, Margo Sowell, Marila Stidham, Laurie Simpson, Freda Wheatley. 'Gr' l l Front row: Ruth Hearon, Diane Gaffi, Janet Bruman. Second row: Linda Reisser, Karen Kavinoky, Kathy Newton. Third row: Sue Miller, Nancy Hutchinson, Andi Trum. Fourth row: Claire Torrigin o, Gail Erickson, .lan Wanko wski. SAN RAFAEL pm . J Front row: Candy Hern, Kathy Marshall, Rowena McGill, Marilyn Anthony, Carol McPhail. Second row: Evelyn Browning, Patti Kerr, Niki Starr, Libbi Francis, Gail Wolven, Barbara Swanson. Third row: Jeannie Nakano, Debby Dunn, Joanne Karl- Following the theme of "firsts," San Rafael's imaginative and artistic residents created "The First Zoo," which was sufficiently clever to win the newest dorm a first place in their Na S ton, Norma Montalvo, Billie Riley, Ginger Giammona, Elyse Dreyer, Lynn Hale. Fourth row: Kitty McKendrick, Kathe Taylor, Sheila Santaw, Margaret Katz, Karen Schilbrack, Susan Foster, Cathy Shannon, Edana Salisbury. division, Large Living Groups. For weeks after Homecoming the animals continued to prowl the hall of the dorm. Y '!"J4'.'ln 'Ji 'Es-il. 1.5554 2'l'. -f'.lAWI?K'anf'-luR'.f .,'lW.n' Anflil hm-'l.7.TQ-'N'-1 s-sl ' 194. -. SAN RAFAEL SGQUOIA Front row: Tom Jacobson, Bill Shea, Fraser Perkins, Resident Assistant. Second row: Ralph Cohen, Richard Ramay, Kim Nelson, Mike Chamb- liss. Third row: Wayne Baum, Ron Humberd, Chuck Burgess, Juny Myers. Fourth row: Mark Bartlett, Tom Walsh, Jonathon Haglund, RobertArsenault. Front row: Wayne Cole, Alan Mathews, John Scott, Rex Jacobs. Second row: Bob Hanson, Bob Gud- mundson, Bob Scott, Rick Bolling, Don Sloane. Third row: Damian Garcia, Brian Vandenloet, Stephen Yoshida, Dennis G. Bates. Fourth row: Dean Lachmann, Jim Putnam, John Bulgin, Doug Cort, Phil Hibbs, Steve Smith. Viewed from the back window of the women's hall, the bicycle lot of San Rafael reflects its extreme popularity. ill, R l el, l le: fl Q K if ,l ,apr A fi-,,s1q.:, ,rp ,e.5Q,.e1, 'J rv ,,.,,..l.,, .f,1.f,,.-, ,. zf. ef I me fur-1,--., rl T H35E5?f'fl5lZl2fV'u W., g.fe1le1w.' ,L 4 fsifsefle' af ff Z ff eswgg,-, ' - 1 I l ,, SAN RAFAEL UCCA Front row: Roger Ritter, Merrell Parham, Keith Fudenna. Second row: Terry Green, Ted Venable, Tom Harrington, Rick Seibert, Jim Moore, John Lilien thal. Third row: Duane Garrett, Jim Fishback, Bob Snashall, Larry Goldman, Steve Senesac, Chuck Brown, Howard Thomas. Fourth row: Bob Schwartz, Bob Perelli- minetti, Mark Jones, Joe Bader, Ross Robins, Kent Dellinger, Cliff Malone. Silhouetted by the sunset, San Rafael's eight-story women's tower rises from a plot of land which was merely an empty field last year. The design is unique to the dorm, and the rooms are in demand. SAN RAFAEL SYCAITIORG Front row: Don Anderson, Tony Kramer, Ronald Fischer, David Berks, l!Wlliam Hanley. Second row: Phil Bartlett, S. Paul Clark, Gary Altman, Bob Ricci, Paul Dirdak, Scott Spencer. Third row: Rudy Lay, Casey Cho, Brian Negin, Harry Bow- ron, Manrin Johnson, Mike Rudin, Hisashi lwahashi. Fourth row: Peter Campos, Joe Namath, Bill Bergman, Mark Mosko, Stef Sisman, Rich Hain, Wylie Chenn, Ton Woessner, Wes Petersen. iv If nf! X' 5 T 'yea I H per, 6 12' 4 f' 4,. 2 , x 'ins r E5 'P n . it Z X I 1 X I: J 'yu W F' :hae W i VX 1 i fy I '4 u ,- ,L vga-w K, F ' ' 4. ' 'gf I X E 'xl Tw. , gy X VB? gxx ' f x if 'B' rf A . V' I A . ff ,I -15? N ff" -, ff' Iv. - KN.. ' Lg , , " - ,J-vw-.4 V O f' eh-5"'l-Q """7'Zf"h ' - - fx? f I : , I V A 5 .' , u v ,-. I.. V' 45:-' K . M'. ' I W 1 I v - ' N ' H- 1 . fn-. -Q.,-ta , A ' ' . L55-1' X - f 7 y 4 ,-rv , M . . , D Y W V at W .,. , 1. -' Us A - . X Nrhfx S ,, mi if-" It -' fg - , -. .. Mi , gy-X f.,- Q gf ., 'fr I, 3 :' A ' ,R i-. ,q-gm-5654-A . , ...H 4 "' mug - ,-" -1 ' - . " -- x aged 1 V A . N . '-" -- b .f:q'3gw,'3-.::g5- '12 f ' 4 1-fjwiw I M . - A ,. 3-g, , " ' '-"' . 1 1 - - ,. , - ,, 3-N54:m.LKQM,L- I , .VI-,fL.,xf:!1 .F 13'-'fr-R'-' - 9 SAN RAFAEL WILLOW Front row: Mary Sanguinetti, Susan Linn, Marian Woodward, Roma Heillig, Robyn Broock, Janie Vise, Barbara Trens. Second row: Vicky McCoul, Linda Riggs, Kathy Cloud, Jolene Vajretti, Anna Zavala, Debra Watson, Chiyomi Oguri. Third row: Susan Mitchell, Diane Hum- boldt, Virginia Harbaugh, Shellie Mueller, Diana Crose, Sheralyn Boyer, Robin Lee. 7' ii- '- . L ss.. . UU' v-1 --94: Us, 'L As ' ss .onli ' ' xx W, i is .. , iii ' qu, 125' 1 iii as ug ' ' 1 1+ ' , we V t , .M . , 1 , X. XYZ f gs' 1 9 Front row: Ginny Stewart, Christa Hallinger, Leslie Brtek. Second row: Janis Turner, Kristine Allbaugh, Jennifer Miller. Third row: Susan Nichols, Nancy Davis, Pam Jensen. Fourth row: Mary Robinson, Lynda Cyderlund, Laurie Twilegar. Strays of all kinds seek each other out at UCSB. STREET SCENE: IHIIERSEEIIIOI1 of PERSPECTIVES 2 1 Y 5 Y 5 . ...A-..wf mx. .,.. -Y. Y., .4. . A . 55 -igfrw: I ' -mmlur ..n -ff ...M-.Q 1 R5 A Y Jr, 3 ' ' W ww. -wr,-U .,2..,,4.:-.,. -... .. 3. -"'l' +5 ' 1 ska 214,-.ap p, 5. ...nn 1 3.2 1: 1 I 3 I E gf! 4 5, 1 Ji fl ' ' Y. y , , Q14 4.34 ni F . 'fi J QQ H6 ' V4 -qs? 1 I v V P 3 E I P i i ::f-" -Ei , .:,-- ii 'WMNNNNNNN -lik?-l T lil : M J!!! l- , ,1,- 1l,.- ,,,f -iglf-+ ' -iv!! Y i L, Yll T Z- , , ff jg 4 i' W ,ww , flf lf,,fli -+ + 1 - f i Y , Y - 2 474 .Z f f N S 2 2 xg xi Q 3 . :J 6 x 'I ,.-L X w. ' W wx x W 3 i a Q 4 A I 3 h 1 J sf 7 In .Q gev'-i ilvx' I . "I .l- W ' . ,.Qn Q1" u -. . ' QNX .'.-' ' N , 'x g 4 .. -H--. ' ' 'V' " . ,H , " . . :N I " ' ' L NW3. , '-" F"":,,,,,,v"",'L'j,'T7 l v . QV l ' Q -..,"f'?vF' "" '. . , , xml 1? ' . A ' 'gui 1 " , f, , ...f ""','-1 -- . X . LJ . A ff'--f 4, s't,. ". 5 3' I 'I' " ' NL .,- "' n, : 7, A xl xx ds' -7 '. , - -- ' 4' JA'-' -E'-' - aww:QQ'M-,vr 'X' . H. - V ln . . h . LQ s4"l W .1 1. K W . 14 ., .,,t'x ls .y ' A N..-Xu' :muf f 8' . . QF... 1 ' ft V .r 's- , . A,- , W, gvwwsui W l 'fi l , INDEX lVlost of us are only migratory in- habitants of the moderate mecca we call UCSB. Hence, the sphere of this educational community is in a constant state of flux, many of its members vanish into the nameless, faceless, wordless past, as imperma- nent as the shadows of their solitude. For some of us, though, June of 1969 marks the end of a cycle of personal evolution. The shadows of our lives and dreams and hopes are now impervious to destruction, they have gained substance, evolving into via- able commitment to action. Nik ln the following pages, a cast of thousands is chronicled, many had only bit parts, others filled fea- ture roles. All were contributors on the increasingly dramatic stage of university development. These participants helped to re' define the student of the sixties in the context of the conflicts and crises which surround him. No long- er is the university career a time spent in retreat from reality. ln- stead, that four years is a period of transition in an arena of contro- versy, a reflection of involvement. :ww GGDGRAI A Acadia 436,437 Activities Calendar 227 Alpha Chi Omega 380-81 Alpha Delta Phi 394-95 Alpha Delta Pi 376-77 Alpha Epsilon Phi 375 Alpha Lambda Delta 241 Alpha Phi 378-79 Alpha Phi Omega 240 Anacapa 423 Anthropology 266 Apache 423 Arbolado 445 Art 265 ASIA 216 A.S.-Univ. Personnel 196-97 Associated Women Students 303 AWS Outstanding Senior Women 303 Awards Committee 217 B Bahia 453 Band Dancers 111 Baseball 154-157 Basketball 134-141 Beer Bowl 124 Beta Chi 354 Biology 282 Board of Regents 188,189 Brass Choir 268 C Cal Club 243 Calaveras 430 Camp Conestoga 207 Canalino 424 Chamber Singers 269 Chancellor 190 Chemistry 283 Chimes 244 Chinese Students Association 250 Chi Omega 410,411 Classics 274 Circle K 245 College Inn 355 Colonel's Coeds 246,247 Communications Board 226 Community Affairs Board 206 Consuelo 445 CSSC 242 Coralina 455 Corriente 446 Council of Recreational Clubs 176 Creative Studies 292 Crew 182,183 Cross Country 126,127 CSDI 205 Cypres 460 IHOEX D Dance 280 Deans 192-195 Delta Gamma 402,403 Diablo 454 Drama 281 E Easter Relays 153 Easter Relays Queen 97 Economics 273 Education 289 Education Abroad 294,295 Educational Policy Committee 221 El Dorado East 356,357 Election Committee 218 El Gaucho 228-231 Engineering, Chemical 285 Engineering, Electrical 285 Engineering, Mechanical 284 English 262 Enramada 447 Estrella 448 F Fencing 176 Fire Department 358 Football 116-125 Foreign Languages 263,264 Fountainbleu 359 Francisco Torres 360-363 Freshman Class 200 Frosh Camp 80 Frosh Camp Staff 224 G Galloping Gaucho Revue 86 Gaucho Band 108,109 Gaucho Guide 227 Gauchos in Government 210 Geography 267 Geology 288 Golf 158 Government Affairs Board 216 Governor 186 Gymnastics 144,145 H History 276 Homecoming 86-89 Homecoming Royalty 90,91 Homecoming-Spring Sing Committee 213 Home Economics 273 Honeybears 248,249 Honor Copy 298 Honor Keys 300,301 Human Relations Committee 207 Humbolt 431 HustIer's Handbook 227 In Memoriam 495 Intercollegiate Athletics Commission 220 lnterfraternity Council 392,393 International Relations Organization 251 Intramurals 162-170 I.V. Life 346-354 J Judicial Board 225 Junior Class 202 Juniper 461 K Kappa Alpha Theta 384, 385 Kappa Sigma 400,401 KCSB 232-235 L La Cumbre 236-239 Lambda Chi Alpha 402,403 Laurel 461 Lectures Committee 212 Legislative Council 198,199 Library Committee 223 Linguistics 279 Lower Division Awards 203 M Madrona 462 Manzanita 463 Marisco 427 Married Students' Housing 369 Mathematics 286 Mendocino 432 Men's Glee 271 Mesa Verde 438 Military Science 291 Modoc 425 Mortar Board 304 Mu Phi Epsilon 272 Music 268 Music Committee 215 N Navajo 426 O OCB 225 Oceano 449 Outstanding Man Student 299 Outstanding Woman Student 299 P Palm 464 Panhellenic 374 Phi Delta Theta 412,413 Phi Kappa Psi 414,415 Philosophy 274 Phi Sigma Kappa 416,417 Phraeteres 258 Physical Activities 290 Physical Education 290 Physics 287 Pi Beta Phi 386,387 Pima 428 Pine 465 Plumas 433 Political Science 277 Pollock Award 110 President, Associated Students 198 Primavera 450 Project Genesis 208 Project Nepal 253 Project Pakistan 253 Psychology 278 Public Relations Board 205 Pushcarts 100 R Rainier 439 Rally Committee 212 Recreation Committee 214 Regents and President's Scholars 203 Religious Studies 275 Repertory Chorus 269 RHA 420,421 Ribera 456 Riding Club 177 Flisuena 451 Roadrunner Review 94,95 Rugby 174,175 S Sandpiper Weekend 84,85 San Miguel 430 San Nicholas 435 Santa Cruz 444 San Rafael 459 Santa Rosa 452 Saratoga 440 Scabbard and Blade 259 Scuba Club 181 School Aid 209 Senior Class 302 Sequoia 466 Shell and Oar 254,255 Shenandoah 441 Shiloh 442 Sierra 434 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 404, 405 Sigma Chi 410,411 Sigma Kappa 388,389 Sigma Phi Epsilon 408,409 Sigma Pi 406,407 Sirena 457 Ski Club 180 Soccer 130,131 Social Committee 215 Sociology 279 Somerset 364,365 Song Girls 112,113 Sophomore Class 201 Special Projects 208 Speech 277 Spring Sing 100 Spurs 256 Squires 257 Stanislaus 434 Street Scene 470-473 Student Travel Bureau 218 Swimming 146,147 Sycamore 467 T Tennis 159 Tesoro 457 Theta Delta Chi 398,399 Toyon 468 Track 150-152 Tropicana 366-368 Tutorial 293 Tutoring Project 210 U Ucen Activities, Facilities Committee 219 University Day Committee 222 University President 197 University Symphony 272 University Troop Development Team 206 Ute 427 V Vice Chancellors 190,191 Villa Marina 458 Volleyball 160,161 W Water Polo 128,129 Willow 469 Women's Glee 270 Women's Sports 171-173 Wrestling 142-143 Y Yell Leaders 112,113 Yosemite 443 Yucca 467 Yuma 429 Z Zeta Beta Tau 396,397 stuoent A Abbey, Mary 111 Abbott, Richard 355 Abe, Calvin 414 Aberbook, Bermice 438 Abourezk, Diana 367 Abraham, John 459,468 Abraham, Leslie 305 Abrams, Valerie 305 Abrecht, David 201,402 Absher, Marcia 305 Acker, Stephen 454 INDEX Anderson, Duane 305 Anderson Gary 201,354 Anderson Harriet 386 Anderson Janice 254,305 Anderson Judith 205,216,305, 390 Anderson Kathryn 305 Anderson Kristina 241 Anderson Linda 305 Anderson Lynn 305 Anderson Nancy 449 Anderson, Roger 458 Anderson, Susan 305 Anderson, Suzanne 380 Anderson, Terry 436 Aiello, Acosta, Karen 305 Adams, Deborah 305,439 Adams, Leslie 248 Adams, Lillian 68 Adams, Nancy 455 Adams, Pamela 305 Adams, Patrick 124 Adams , Victoria 305 Adams, William 424 Adams ki, James 305 Adler, Terry 438 Adolph, Lisbeth 461 Aegerter, Gay 376,447 Aftergood, Kathy 367 Agern, Jean 436 Ahearn, Robert 350 Ahler, John 166,167,408 Aho, Janet 390 Anna 449 Aiello, Patricia 305 Akashah, Saedeldeen Ahmad 193,212,414 Akashi, Thomas 428 Akerson, Christine 409 Akins, Michael 125 Albade, Phyllis 438 Aldelott, Mike 424 Alden, Karen 305 Alexander, Rose 440 Alexander, Susan 69 Alford, Edwin 305 Alfred, Andrea 451 Allen, Allaire, Jr., David 400 Allan, David 429 Allbaugh, Kristine 469 Allen, Bette 305,386 Allen, Carl 182 Allen, Deborah 305,382 Allen, Dennis 193,251, 305,392,398 Allen, Diane 440 Allen, Jennifer 248,386 Allen, Mildred 436 Allen, Pamela 305 Allen, Penny 305,380 Ronald 140,424 Allison, Kathleen 305 Allsup, Sharon 440 Ally.n IV, Burton 400 Alni, Kenton 225,402 Almany, Christene 171 Almanza, David 125 Almond, Burt 398,399 Almquist, Eileen 305 Alpert, Glen 424 Alpert, Howard 305,414 Altman, Gary 467 Altmann, Marguerite 254, 305 Altree, Alan 159 Altree, Phil 413 Alvarez, Nancy 305,390 Alvidrez, Richard 305 Alvin, Suzanne 305 Amick, Julie 380 Amidon, David 305,402 Amodeo, Margaret 367 Amstutz, Douglas 142,454 Amundson, Judith 305 Ancker, Evan 125 Andersen, Gary 124 Andersen, Steven 457 Anderson, Adria 246 Anderson, Brent 271 Anderson, Cynthia 386 Anderson, Don 467 Anderson, Douglas 406,407 Andrew, Robert 461 Andrews, Frances 305 Andrews, Janes 224 Angus, George 294 Angus, Robert 294 Anthony, Marilyn 465 Anton, Mike 125 Antonaros, George 253 Appling, Frances 448 Arabian, Carolyn 376 Arbuckle, Roger 37 Archambault, Jayne 305 Archer, Susan 305 Arguelles, Jesus 424 Arkin, Andrew 428 Armetta, Gail 222,305 Armstrong, Louise 305 Armstrong, Nancy 449 Armstrong, Terry 414 Arnett, Janice 356 Arnett, Patricia 359 Arnold, Brenda 442 Arnold, David 396 Arrott lll, James 396,452,454 Arsenault, Robert 466 Arthur, Thomas 408 Arundell, Diane 305 Arutinian, lrmingard 447 Asakawa, Larry 360 Asakura, Denise 305 Asamoto, Brian 402 Aschenbrener, Nancy 219,461 Asher, Nina 439 Ashley, Richard 305,392,396 Ashlock, James 198,199,226, 300,305 Askew, Gertrude 367 Atkins, James 360 Atkinson, Mary 305 Atkinson, Russell 305 Attree, David 201 Atwater, Leslie 305,380 Aubel, Pamela 438 Aubrey, Dennis 354 Aughinbaugh, Karen 463 Aulman, Mark 468 Ault, Ingrid 305 Aust, Janith 305 Austin, Beverly 305 Austin, Kay 367 Austin, Michael 305 Auton, Graeme 306 Avera ll, Fred 429 Avery, Darryl 205,306 B Babb, Susan 306 Babbage, Elizabeth 380 Babcock, Jeffrey 109,271,306 Babyak, Linda 440 Bad, Dede 440 Bader, Joseph 467 Bader, Mitchell 396 Badger, Ann 306 Badgley, Chris 306 Baetz, Ruth 455 Bahnson, George 434 Bailey, Stephen 306 Baines, Roberta 306 Bainter, Michael 271 Baird, Julie 382 Baker, Doyle 461 Campus friendship adds a new takes his place between these two dimension here as this friendly canine strolling students. Baker, Neil 120,124 Baker, Terry 398 Bakura, Susan 395,439 Balcher, Alan 454 Baldelli, Gail 222,464 Baldwin, Barbara 368 Baldwin, Joyce 439 Bale, Carol 306 Bales, Rebecca 448 Balfour Ill, William 430 Balice, Michael 452,458 Balis, Mike 421 Ball, Sherrell 246,256,380 Ballard, Judy 461 Baltes, Susan 244,380 Bancroft, Deidre 447 Banducce, Cynthia 359 Bandurraga, Peter 363 Banker, Thomas 400 Banks, Sandra 306,378 Banovac, Ann 454 Barber, Anne 450 Barber, Beri 384 Barber, Greg 125 Barber, Stephan 426 Barbieri, Susan 421,452,457 Barbour, Susan 254,306 Barco, Mary 433 Barger, Annalee 421 Barieau, Barbara 386 Barker, Douglas 124 Barker, Gregory 125,424 Barker, Robert 128 Barker, Sidne 366 Barker, William 240 Barnes, Stephanie 488 Barnett, Nancy 365 Barnett, Richard 406 Barnum, Larry 306 Barnwell, Denise 306,359 Barovelli, Monica 439 Barr, Linda 388 Barrall, Mark 460 Barrall, Martha 306 Barrett, Ellen 256,390 Barrett, Eugene 131 Barrett, Gregory 306 Barrett, Lyn 202,380 Barrett, Stephen 145 Barritt, Linda 306 Barry, Susan 440 Barthelmess, Sharon 438 Bartholic, Kathleen 366 Bartlett, Mark 466 Bartlett, Patricia 450 Bartlett, Phillip 159,467 Bartlett, Stephen 355 Barton, David 271 Bartz Bates, Bates, Bates, Bates, Bates, , R uth 306 Dennis 466 James 427 Linda 382 Susan 382 William 129 Batteen, Catherine 246 Batten, Jonell 390 Battram, Sharon 306 Baubel, James 240 Bauer, Lois 302 Baum, Karen 306,374,390 Baum, Wayne 466 Bauman, Holly 448 Baumann, Bruce 306,400 Baumgart, Susan 267 Baxter, Anthony 429 Bayles, Keri 306 Bayne, Susan 306 Baynton, Lark 367,386 Beal, Gregory 424 Beal, John 454 Beals, Ronald 228,229,306 Beaman, James 123,124 Beamer, Rebecca 448 Bean, Diane 463 Beardsley, Craig 355 Beaton, Bruce 306 Beaumont, Karen 455 Beaver, Richard 307,394 Becerra, Alice 443 Beck, Robert 271 Beck, Ronald 461 Becker, Donna 258 Becker, Mary 307 Becker, Richard 124 Beckham Ill, Robert 412 Beckman, Barbara Jo 372,388 Beckman, Barton 307 Beckord, Mary 307,390 Bedient, Charlene 307,390 Bedwell, Gerald 460 Beebe, Leslie 366 Beeks, Ellen 307 Phi Sigs Jon Rayden and Doug McKell game at Hillside House, as Supervisor give tickets for the UCSB football C. Cooprider looks on. ' Beeman, Shelley 241 Beemer, Ellen 307 Beesley, Wendy 440 Begam, Richard 362 Behlmer, George 146 Behman, Jr., Gerald 398 Bei, Diane 302,307 Bei, Gail 435,441 Beimford, Patricia 380 Belansky, Gail 364 Belkowski, Kathleen 269 Bell, Carolyn 217,388 Bimat, William 151 Binckley, Susan 367 Bingham, Robin 355 Birer, Jackie 433 Bishop, Jane 269,270 Bishop, Mark 412 Bishop, Paul 271 Bishop, Sandra 304,307, 390 Bishop, Tom 119,124 404 Bisho Gre o 430 PD. 9 TY Bissell, Laurie 171,307,464 Y Stephen 307 Bell Cynthia 453 Bell Evann 449 Bell Karen 364 Bell Michael 126 Bell, Robyn 448 Bell, Susan 440 Bender, Judith 269 Bjorn, Christine 437 Black, Bruce 307 Black, Jr., John 307 Black Linda 307 Black, Patricia 307 Black, Pegg 453 Black, Bender, Laura 294 Bendt, Durvvard 406 Beneziano, Katherine 440 Bengeyfield, William 307 Bengle, Suzanne 455 Bennett, Loni 200,212, 246,247,455 Bennett, Marcia 176 Bennetts, Pamela 448 Benson, Robert 307 Bercovich, Bruce 355 Berger, Judith 439 Berger, Matthew 460 Bergman, Mary 390,447 Bergman, William 467 Berks, David 467 Berkshire, Elizabeth 367, 384 Bernardo, Bernardo 64 Beronius, Ann 384 Berra, Bruce 424 Berrett, Judith 376 Berry, Belinda 238,307 Berry, Diane 380 Berry, Mark 434 Bethea, Mary 386 Bethel, Neil 457 Bettinger, James 226,228, 230,300,307 Beydler, Alicia 231 Beyers, Nancy 448 Bialecki, Terese 384 Bickford, Judy 367,368 Bickler, Thomas 423 Bickner, Paul 427 Bielamowicz, Denise 307 Biella, Jan 307 Bierman, Rhonda 451 Biggs, Paula 390 Bigham, Alice 244 Billigmeier, Robin 307 Bilski, Monica 307 Blackbu rn, Dave 427 Blackburn, Richard 406 Blackburne, Alan 414 Blackshear, Barbara 436 Blades, John 307 Blair, Jamey 201,246,386 Blair, Pamela 442 Blair, Victoria 307,378 Blake, Donald 460 Blake, Thomas 404 Blank, Adele 448 Blare, Lindy 431 Bledsoe, Tod 307,404 Blegen, Joanne 366 Blemker, David 126 Block, Gordon 144,145 Blockley, Michele 307 Blodget, Peggy 445 Blodgett, James 271,424 Blodgett, Linda 436 Bloom, Harry 154 Bloom, Judith 440 Bloom, Michael 226,232, 300,307 Bloom, Roberta 448 Boathroyd, Ellen 437 Boccalero, Donna 307 Bock, John 468 Bockmier, Linda 438 Bode, Robert 307 Bodine, Barbara 295 Bodine, Betty 445 Bodine, John 402 Boegler, Barbara 295 Boegler, Karen 438 Boehlert, William 400 Boekelheide, Donald 271 Boesel, Darcy 364 Bogad, Steven 207 Bogatin, Linda 439 Bogdan, Tavi 454 Boggs, Larry 231 Boggs, Steven 307 Bogner, Karen 359,380 Bohlinger, Linda 256,464 Bohlmer, George 221 Bohm, Barbara 446 Bohn, Sharon 307 Boissevain, Jan 307 Boland, Robert 307 Boldenhei, Howard 427 Bolling, Eric 466 Bolling, Jan 450 Boltinhouse, Susan 420 Bolton, Cheryl 307 Bolton, Virginia 356 Bowman, Keith 269 Bommer, Lynn 307 Bommer, Terry 307 Bond, Linda 462 Bonfilio, Christine 307 Bonislawski, Anita 462 Bonser, Alice 382 Bontadelli, Suzan 173,359 Booker, Mary 355 Booth, Michael 430 Borden, Allan 430 Borden, Barbara 307 Borden, David 75,434 Borders, Melissa 390 Borzini, Ronald 271 Bothwell, Toni 307 Bottler, Nancy 437 Bottomley, Anne 307,463 Bottomley, Bruce 307 Bottoms, Kurt 424 Botwright, Bill 205 Boucree, Raymond 307 Boulton, Peter 429 Bourque, Kevin 355 Bourque, Scotti 355 Bouska, Elaine 307 Bovill, Carl 307 Bowdish, Anne 382 Bowen, Barbara 254 Bowen, Christopher 458 Bowen, James 129 Bower, John 146,147,425 Bowler, Frances 356,357 Bowman, Carol 308 Bowron, Harry 467 Boyack, Douglas 308 Boyce, Nancy 376 Boyd, Bruce 308 Boyd, Mark 154,308 Boyd, Robert 454 Boydstun, Linda 308 Boyer, Sheralyn 308,469 Boyer, Trudy 254,368,382 Boyhinj, Dave 161 Boylan, Howard 427 Boyle, Patrick 308 Boyle, Sarah 308 Boyle, Thomas 308 Boynton, Patricia 366 Bozsik, Albert 429 Brabant, Steven 308,414 Brabrook, Mary 308 Bracchi, Adriane 308 Brace, Janet 308,384 Bracken, Sherry 246,378 Braden, Charlotte 308 Bradford, Adelia 308,390 Bradford, Amanda 451 Bradley, Bill 201 Bradley, Rodger 269 Bradshaw, Carolyn 308 Brady, Robert 404 Bragg, William 225,253,308 Braine, Sharanne 376,386 Braley, Brenda 308 Brandenburg, Larry 124 Brandenburg, Maridee 198 Brandt, Wendy 450 Branstrom, Carl 214 Braun, Jerome 458 Bray, Thomas 423 Brazeal, Janet 308 Breckan, Jr., Erling 429 Brehm, Edmund 205,233, 308 Brereton, Elisabeth 308, 376 Breschini, Gary 176,416 Brickley, Gloria 308 Briggs, Beverly 308 Brimble, Philip 468 Brinckerhoff, William 308 Brinkman, Michael 170, 215,404 Brinkman, Paul 308,393, 404 Brinton, Ruth 231 Brisbois, Roy 308,402 Brittain, Sheila 441 Broadhead, Thomas 121, 124 Broberg, Marianne 308,446 Brock, Janice 367 Brock, Linda 446 Brock, Ronald 420,434 Brodie, Christine 270 Broering, Gary 131,308 Brogan, Jane 463 Broock, Robyn 469 Brook, Kathleen 241,436 Brooks, Carla 202 Brooks, Carrie 366 Brooks, Duwayne 308 Brooks, Martha 443 Brooks, Michael 460 Brooks, Steven 425 Brookshire, Judy 246,378 Brose, Catherine 171,173 Brosius, Anita 445 Broussal, Lauren 449 Browder, Christopher 416 Brown, Alice 380 Brown, Betsy 395 Brown, Cathy 378 Brown, Charles 421,467 Brown, Gilbert 402 Brown,Jr., Henry 155 Brown, Hugh 424 Brown, Irvin 126,152 Brown, Kathleen 357,461 Brown, Margaret 436 Brown, Martha 308 Brown, Pamela 308 Brown, Peter 308 Brown, Philip 240,308 Brown, Sherrill 259 Brown, Stephanie 246,248, 390,391 Brown, Susan 451 Brown, Thayer 308 Brown, Yelena 201,388 Browne, Shelley 376 Browne, Walter 362 Brownell, Terry 378 Browning, Evelyn 465 Browning, Lorelle 367 Brownlee, Denise 442 Brtek, Leslie 469 Bruce, Robin 366 Bruck, Michael 421 Bruhn, Leslie 254,380,381 Bruman, Janet 465 Brumm, Gary 269,308 Brunick, Ronald 408 Brunner, Howard 434 Brusch, Betty 248 Bruser, Barbara 453 Brush, Carol 368 Bryan, Linda 420 Bryan, Wayne 159,308,404 Bryan, William 269 Buchin, Michael 400 Bucholz, Barbara 308 Bucholz, Bruce 460 Buck, Susan 376,446 Budrovich, Vincent 308 Buford, Richard 354 Buhrmann, Cathalin 308 Buickerood, Janet 201,239 Bulgin, John 466 Bull, Doris 434 Bullock, Mary 308 Bumatay, Ernie 360,398 Bump, Deborah 308 Bunch, Steven 308 Bundy, Linda 447 Bunje, David 271,308 Bunkelman, Brad 140 Bunkelman, James 468 Bunning, Susan 446 Buono, Catherine 443 Burch, Clyde 421,430 Burcham, Joanna 308 Burchett, Nancie 442 Burdett, Barbara 448 Burgess, Charles 151,466 Burgess, Holly 308 Burgher, Wayne 259,308 Burhop, Barbara 438 Buritz, Deborah Anne 355 Burk, Kathryn 248,254, 376 Burke, Nancy-Ann 308 Burkhart, Sharon 308 Burner, Janis 434 Burnett, Johnny 116,117, 123,124,309 Burnham IV, Daniel 400 Burns, Jeanette 432 Burns, Judith 309 Burns, Patricia 244 Burnside, Margaret 231 Burr, Patricia 431 Bursik, Emilie 368 Burton, Wayne 240,302, 309,355 Busch, Jr., Marsden 430 Bush, Cathleen 256,380 Bushey, Stevan 126,151 Bushman, Barbara 242,256 Bussie, Robert 154,309 Butler, James 416 Butler, Margaret 421,440 Butler, Sally 269,443 Butler, Thomas 434 Butt, Linda 309 Buys, Richard 426 Buzan, Kathleen 359 Buzzini, Diane 368 Byers, James 309 Byrd, Stephen 309 C Cabral, Stephany 309,378 Cadena, Rosemary 451 Cahalan, Doreen 309,380 Cain, Dennis 176 Caire lll, Justinian 394 Calderhead, Carol 309 Caldwell, Carolyn 113,309, 376 Caldwell, Dianne 309,355 Calistro, Patricia 462 Calkins, Thomas 254 Caloudes, William 309 Cameron, Dougal 309 Campagne, Russell 430 Campanelli, Joseph 408 Campbell, Bonnie 224,376 Campbell, Carlotta 309 Campbell Denise 309 Campbell Karynne 200,453 Campbell Richard 309,408 Campbell Jr., Robert 393, 396 Campbell, Ruth 219 Campbell, Thomas 343 Campini, Sherlyl 463 Campos, Peter 420,467 Campos, Roger 309,414 Canfield, Alan 309 Cannicott, Carmen 215, 270,272 Canning, Nancy 462 Canning, Richard 461 Cannon, James 428 Canter, Howard 429 Cantley, Patricia 357 Cantor, Mark 208 Caparoso, Jr., Frederick 429 Capetan, Margaret 202, 244,390 Caplan, Robert 396 Caple, Ronald 309 Cappa, Mary Ann 448 Carasa, Alexander 309 Carbone, James 428 Cardella, Stephen 423 Cargille, Susan 355 Carl, Timothy 309 Carlin, Jr. Frederick 416 Carlisle, Catherine 356 Carlson, Erica 445 Carlton, Timothy 145 Carlyle, Timothy 355 Carmen, Andrea 449 Carnahan, Shirley 309 Carner, Nancy 309,390 Carnesoltas, Ana 355 Carney, Patricia 365 Carpenter, Kathleen 310 Carpenter, Krista 357 Carpenter, Lynn 378 Carroll, John 219 Carroll, Michael 425 Carrozza, Carmelo 124 Carson, Catherine 446 Carson, Donald 217 Carter, Bonnie 441 Carter, Cynthia 270,272, 310 Carter, Janice 246 Carter, Ronald 167,310, 412 Carter, Ruth 310 Carter, Shelley 439 Carver, Nancy 461 Casas, Olivia 457 Cashbaugh, Linda 310,376 Casner, Christen 310 Casper, Ellen 359,390 Cassidy, Dennis 310 Caster, John 310 Cates, Leo 310 Caziarc, Steven 154,415 Ceccarelli, Shannon 270 Cerrina, Susan 384 Cervantes, Lucy 439 Chad, Robert 434 Chadwell, Suzan 310 Chambers, Cynthia 310 Chambers, Nina 246,384,385, 445 Chambers, Ronald 310,408 Chambless, Timothy 310 Chambliss, Michael 151,466 Chambliss, Steve 126 Champion, Grace 269,445 Chan, Bernard 250 Chan, Gaston 250,302,310 Chan, Yiu-Fai 250 Chancer, Jeff 155,157 Chandler, Charlotte 310 Chandler, Lorena 310 Chaney, Bradley 425 Chang, Lana 455 Chapman, Beverly 294 Chapman, Larry 416 Chapman, William 166,238, 310 Chappel, David 123,124 Charette, Allan 355 Chase, Melinda 356 Chavez, Patricia 310 Chavez, Robert 434 Chen, Noreen 250,448 Chenault, Sally 447 Chenn, Wylie 140,467 Cherry, James 220 Chesnut, Barbara 364 Chetkovich, Lynn 384 Cheung, Sum May 434 Chew, Nelson 429 Chiechi, Michele 378,446 Childs, Jr., Russell 412 ching, Kee Pah 250,310 Ching, Michael 429 Chiniaeff, Dennis 267,310 Chiniaeff, Paulette 310 Biting bagels and keeping an eye on the happenings at Chisolm, Barbara 437 Cho, Casey 467 Choate, David 360 Chodes, Norman 310,355 Chow, Chung-Tin 250 Choy, Donnell 423 Christensen, Charles 310, 408 Christensen, John 412 Christensen, Richard 310 Christensen, Stephanie 376 Christiansen, Kim 66 Christiansen, Paul 311 Christiansen, Paula 449 Christopher, Corey 421, 424 Chui-Ngan, Yu 250 Chulack, Walter 454 Chung, Fred 311 Chung, Han Shan 311 Chunn, Adele 311 Cieri, Joanne 388 Cimino, Lily 438 Civitate, Richard 311 Clabaugh, Jr., John 155 Claeboe, Alicia 359 Claffey, Daniel 311 Clarfield, Marjorie 431 Collins, Michael 428 Collins, Sheila 359 Collins, Theodore 311 Colville, Glenn 430 Colvin, Nancy 213 Colvin, Susan 367 Colwell, Michael 245 Colwell, Nancy 451 Combs, Nancy 436 Comerford, Jr., James 426 Compton, Kathryn 241 Compton, Richard 207,269 Condren, Donna 448 Cone, Barbara 359 Conger, Daun 367 Conley, Debra 368,390 Conn, Harold 269 Connery, Nadine 311 Connors, Jeffrey 311 Conroy, Michael 176 Conte, Michael 402 Conti, Linda 311,390 Contreras, Paul 155 Conway, Jane 218,438 Conway, Jr., Thomas 406 Cook, Teresa 200 Cooke, Dennis 394 Clark Brad 259 Clark, Cheryl 95,111 Clark Christopher 311 Clark, June 390 Clark, Paula 311 Clark, Peter 430 Clark, Robert 128,408 Clark, Rufus 311 Clark, Sarah 431 Clark, Stephen 240,467 Clark Clark , Veronica 311,388 Vickie 311 Clark, Walter 311 Clarke, Judith 457 Clarke, Peter 253 Clarkson, Michael 394 Cooksey, Helen 242,304, 31 1 Cooley, Camille 269,437 Cooley Edward 311 Cooley, steven 394,457 Cooper, Catherine 442 Cooper, Charles 412 Cooper, Janice 311 Cooper, Karen 386,445 Clary, Elizabeth 311 Clausen, Alis 73,269,311 Clayton, Marilyn 366 Clayton, Pamela 440 Cleak, Philip 125 Clegg, Ellen 364 Clemente, Beverly 421, 444,450 Clendenning, Renee 311 Cleveland, Russell 394 Clevenger, Lois 311 Clime, Charles 161,414 Clinger, Rebecca 368 Clinton, William 311 Cloud, Kathy 469 the Renaissance Faire seem to please these two. Clover, Joy 368 Cobb, Charles 116,122, 124,404 Cocking, Donna 311 Coffe V, Coffey, Coffin, Cohen, Douglas 400 Jean 463 Brent 311 Janice 361 Cohen, Jeffrey 240,355 Cohen, Cohen, Cohen, Cohen, Ralph 455 Rip 59,280 sam 311 William 424 lCf4'?4fl".? Cohn, Paula 447 Coker, Elizabeth 447 Colburn, James 269 , Davis, Cole mi . a ,143 4. lg., ,U H!3,1-- V, Cole, Cole, Cole, Cole, Cole, Cole, Cole, Cole, Cole, Cole Arlene 375 Barbara 378 Bobbie 254,255 Claire 378 James 271 Neal 428 Paul 146 Sharon 311 Stan 131 Steven 398 Cole, Susan 357 Wayne 466 ,sv 'Aff ' ' ,'v1 .4'. ,Q . L '.'..+ ,, ' .es .-H, . ':.-- 3- '- ' gem,-AS' .ff 4' -' 1 ,, ..., Coleman, April 237,311 Coleman, John 311 Coleman, Steven 154,398 Coles, Christopher 454 Coletti, Elaine 311 Colgate, John 311 Collar, Judith 463 Collier, Charles 176 Collier, Rodney 311 Collins, Christine 311 Cooper, Laura 390,432 Cooperrider, Candis 457 Copple, Jacquelyn 201 ,256, 376 Cordero, Michael 461 Cordy, Ross 427 Corell, Melinda 248,382 Corlett, William 124 Corliss, Jr., Donald 461 Cormack, Julie 176 Cormany, Steven 427 Cormier, Thomas 311 Cornelius, Marilyn 367 Cornell, Barbara 244,380 Correia, Alice 311 Corselius, Ann 382 Corselius, Margaret 304,312, 374,382 Cort, Douglas 466 Cortese, Joe 362 Cossette, Vicki 359 Costello, Patricia 364 Cota, Elizabeth 312,433 Cotterman, Sarah 442 Cottle, Barbara 384 Cotton, Terri-Jo 312 Coull, Virginia 269,376 Court, David 228,229 Courtright, Kerry 382,445 Cousineau, Susan 445 Coutts, Linda 312 Covington, Henry 214 Covo, Patricia 312 Cowan, Annette 382 Cowell, Dorothy 443 Cowen, Steven 312 Cowger, Janet 31-2 Cowles, Susan 312,386 Cox, Gregory 430 Cox, Kathleen 243,303,312, 390 Cox, Lee 312,400 Cox, Thomas 394 Cracknell, John 312 Craft, Jane 312 Craig, Cynthia 367 Craig, Roger 398 Craig, Timothy 460 Cramer, Carol 436 Crandall, Karyn 446 Crane, Thomas 205 Craner, Karen 270,376 Cranston, Bryce 421 Crawford, Anne 229,256 Crawford, Dixie 312 Crawford, John 429 Crawshaw, Craig 271,312 Crebbin, Mark 426 Crellin, Leslie 388 Crenshaw, Thomas 52 Creps, Robert 457 Cresap, Vicki 439 Cresto, Susan 254,312 Crim, Peter 454 Crimmel, Jeffrey 312 Crimmel, Randall 252,312, 408 Crinklaw, Warren 161 Criswell, Catherine 312 Crittenden, Susan 420 Crivello, Gail 439 Croak, Christine 443 Crocker, Cheryl 312,390 Cromwell, David 312 Crooks, Gary 312 Crosby, Karen 312 Crose, Diana 426,469 Cross, John 225 Cross, Melinda 367 Crouse, Robert 392 Crowe, Judith 212,357 Crowell, Lucinda.386 Crowley, Michael 393 Cruz, Jr., Edward 312 Cruzat, Charles 124 Cuddy, Roxanna 256,380 Culmback, Janet 386 Cummings, Craig 155 Cummings, Stephen 312, 428 Cunnane, William 402 Cunning, Ellin 312 Cunningham, Anale 440 Cunningham, Glenn 312 Curran, Patricia 441 Curran, Sally 386 Currier, Cecile 246,247 Curry, Linda 312,382 Curtice, James 117,120, 121,124,220 Cutler, Frank 201,257,396 Cutting, Jr., Robert 402 Cyderland, Lynda 469 Cypher, Janice 452 Cypherd, Victoria 312 D Dager, Margaret 256 Daggett, John 312 Dahl, Robert 424 Dakan, Ruth 312 Dale, Micheal 146 Dalgleish, Herbert 271 Daly, Kathleen 209,312 Dana, Jr., Charles 454 Dandona, Jean 312 Dandy, Gary 396,424 Daoust, Elizabeth 367 Daphne, Nikki 312 Darling, James 430 Darrow, Donna 246,382 Dart, Michele 312 Davee, Wendy 312 Davenport, Leslie 359 Davey, Jane 312 David, Richard 398 David, Virginia 312,386 Davidson, Diana 390 Davidson, Robert 402,430 Davie, Frances 312 Davies, Joan 312 Davies, Richard 458 Davis, Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis , Davis, Davis, Davis Davis, Davis, Davis, Davis, 1 1 1 Carol 312 Charles 312 Dorothy 461 Earl 312 Gregory 416 fJr., Guy 312 Jack 312 Kathleen 248,382 Lau ra 438 Linda 312 Marilyn 312,380 Michael 312,416 Nancy 312,469 Pamela 312 Steven 458 Davis, Wayne 313 Dawson, Carol 457 Dawson, Don 215 Dawson, Marvin 145 Deacon, Scott 427 Deane, Deborah 173 De Bow, Phillip 245,313 De Bry, Merrilee 355 Deck, Dennis 246 De Cuir, Jr., Charles 125 Deetz, Nanette 437 De Friez, Joanne 313 Degani, Tim 166,404 Degasis, Sarah 313 De Pauw, Julie 201,420,461 Dequer, Wayne 313,427 Derber, Gene 125 Derby, David 412 Derby, Victoria 431 Derian, Diane 246,256,384 Derick, Dana 366 Dersey, Diane 457 Desha Ill, John 313 De Shon, Ronald 125,151 Deston, Elizabeth 440 Destro, Charles 313,402 Detloff, Laura 248,254,386 Deutsch, Barbara 451 De Vito, Joanne 380 De Voe, Deborah 446 De Vore, Charles 430 Dewey, Jaclyn 246 Dexter, Douglas 362 Diamond, Kathleen 368 Dias, William 427 Diaz, Leah 356 Dickeman, Marcia 254 Dickerson, Vivian 269 Dickey, Daniel 426 Diederich, Margaret 455 Diegel, Christine 455 Difol, Annette 447 Dikel, William 427 Dilley, Gary 151 Dillon, Alice 313 Dillon, Nancy 448 Dilworth, Thomas 392,404 Dimmitt, Thomas 174,175, 313 Diner, Jeffrey 151,414 Dinsmore, Stephen 404 Dirdak, Paul 420,467 Disraeli, Janet 375 Distel, John 169,313,412 Divine ll, Robert 313 Dixon, Kathleen 248,386, 387 Dixon, Leslie 313,382 Dixon, Patricia 201 Dobbs, Donna 433 Doehrman, Thomas 402 Do Foo, Garrett 313 Dogan, David 416 Doherty, G regory 416 Doidge, Mary 366,368 Doke, Darryl 313 Doke, William 313 Dolan, Dennis 402,403 Dolan, Elizabeth 364 Dommeyer, Curt 313 Donahue, Rita 367 Donaldson, Heidi 367 Donovan, Tim 225,300 Doo, Joyce 380 Dooge, Craig 129 Doran, Kathleen 438 Doran, Mary 447 Dorney, Deborah 442 Dorse ll, Daniel 280 Dorsey, Sheila 446 Douglas, Bruce 434 Douglas, Laurie 386 Douglass, Paul 313 Douvros, Antoinette 356 Downing, Colleen 440 Downing, James 461 Downing, Todd 313 Dowty, Steven 429 Dozoretz, Jerry 313 Drach, Nancy 201,254,356, 357,386 Drake, Marsha 313,378 Draper, Dawn 433 Draper, Douglas 454 Dreckman, Stanley 458 Dreischmeyer, Linda 455 Drew, Thomas 313 Dreyer, Elyse 465 Driemeyer, Sally 201 Drinkworth, Charles 394 Driver, Twila 314 Drozd, Donald 168,416 Drucker, Kristina 453 Du Bois, Evelyn 388 Du Bois, Janet 366 Du Bois, Marilyn 380 Du Bois, Richard 140,424 Ducker, James 406 Duckworth, Susan 364, 421,459 Dudley, Janet 449 Duffendack, Linda 270 Duffin, Katherine 367 Duffy, Cathleen 450 Du Hamel, James 314 Duke, Boyce 314 Dumas, Rosemary 438 Duncan, Darlene 382 Duncan, Dennis 394 Duncan, Kirk 423 Duncan, Terry 448 Dunfee, Paul 362 Dunford, Richard 314 Dunham, Cathy 214 Dunham, Connie 357 Dunlap, David 460 Dunn, Jerry 425 Dunn, Mary 421,433 Dusheck, Dianne 449 Dusenbury, Carolyn 314 Dutra, Sandra 464 Dwiggins, Toni 314 Dye, Paul 427 Dyo, Janice 420,455 E Eagleson, Brooke 376 Eakes, Van 131 Eakle, David 314 Eastabrooks, Carol 462 Easter, Melanie 455 Eastman, Susan 449 Easton, Ellen 384 Easton, Susan 314 Eaton, Anna Lee 441 Ebenstein, Robert 51 Eberle, Dale 432 Ebert, John 394 Eccles, Olivia 355 Eckhardt, Eugene 430 Eckstein, Elaine 295 Ecoff, Ann 359 Eddie, Charles 158 Eddy, William 159 Edelbrock, Gerald 126 Edgar, Gerald 360 Edgerly, Catherine 256,380 Homecoming hoopla proves to be too Isla Vista community, as they take a much for these two members of the rather negative view ofthe parade. Edgerton, Leslie 445 Edgren, David 360 Eding, Vallard 314 Edson, Janet 449 Edwards, Catherine 314 Edwards, Dana 314 Edwards, James 412 Edwards, Lee 213 Edwards, Marguerite 364 Edwards, Roger 314,392, 416,417 Edwards, Wesley 125 Effenz, Kathleen 242,3oo, 303,304,314 Eggers, Linda 254,380 Egli, Danielle 314 Eglin, James 458 Egnatchek, Linda 355 Ehrhorn, Dorothy 366 Eichhoff, Gay 378 Eick, William 412 Eickworth, Carol 463 Eiseman, Ellen 356 Eisenberger, Kenneth 460 Eisenhart, James 314 Ekberg, Elaine 254,255 Elbel, Jay 110,151,152, 153,314 Elberger, Anne 200,442 Elder, John 428 Ellingson, Debra 357 Elliott, Colette 447 Elliott, Geraldine 462 Ellis, Geoffrey 257 Ellis, Lynn 364 Ellis, Mary 314 Ellman, Randi 375,439 Ellsworth, Charles 314 Elmore, Margaret 378 Elmore, Robert 314 Eloe, Kathryn 270 Elrod, Joyce 314,456 Else, Patricia 457 Elvin, George 426 Emeott, Jane 314 Emery, Robert 138,139, 404 Enders, Mark 408 Endicott, Jr., Donald 425 Engel, Catherine 314 Engel, Nanette 421 Engel, Robert 314 Engelhardt, Lynne 380 Engelstad, Robert 150, 151,152 Engler, Jeffrey 201,257 Engquist, Christine 91 ,246, 248,314,384 Enloe, Kathryn 75,314 Enos, Richard 406,407 Eomurian, Arman 428 Eppendorf, Jean 315 Epstein, Judy 225 Erbez, Philip 125 Erickson, Caleen 421,444, 451 Erickson, Christopher 404 Erickson, Cynthia 294 Erickson, Gail 465 Ernst, John 396 Ertola, Susan 315 Ervin, Susan 315 Eskelson, Daniel 315 Eskridge, Dwayne 151 Estes, Tucker 235 Etnire, Sandra 315 Ettelson, Nancy 380 Ettelson, Peggy 315 Eubanks, Richard 315 Evans, Barry 396 Evans, Ben 454 Evans, Carole 242,315 Evans, Cindy 315 Evans, Jack 315 Evans, Kathryn 386 Evans, Kirk 458 Evans, Sandra 434 Evard, John 315 Everett, Helen 445 Everett, James 408 Evers, Lynn 364,365 Evleth, Kaye 380 Ewers, Barbara 432 Ewig, Gloria 246,386 F Fachin, Gary 363 Fadenrecht, Alice 315 Fahey, James 362 Fairless, Holly 367 Fall, Henry 268 Farber, Renata 224,388 Farley, Robert 423 Farlow, Dave 181 Farmer, Craig 130,131 Farmer, Scott 424 Farnham, Carl 167,404 Farr, Patricia 248,269 Farrar, Sharon 315,449 Farrell, Roxane 453 Fash, Nancy 446 Fasola, John 169 Fassell, Jeanne 241,450 Fauro, Deann 449 Fauvre, Madelyn 200,367 Fay, Ming Gi 295 Featherstone, Thomas 259 Feeley, John 125 Feffer, Leighan 382,442 Feige, Carol 294 Feinstein, Karen 226,236, 317 Feldman, Cheryl 364 Feliciano, Jeff 125 Fell ll, Walter 315 Feller, Marcia 448 Fels, Kenneth 426 Fenelon, Robert 271 Fenn, Carol 338,462 Fenstermaker, Douglas 125 Fentis, John 414 Ferguson, Barbara 378 Ferguson, Craig 151,402 Ferguson, Joanne 431 Ferrante, Jane 462 Ferrero, Leni 443 Ferrero, Michele 380,381, 408 Ferris, Kathleen 447 Ferro, Jr., Robert 315,416 Fetherston, Diane 315 Fetter, David 412 Feuer, Valerie 388 Ficken, Janet 201,386 Fiedler, Katherine 239, 254,255 Files, Marilyn 421,431 Fillip, Janice 315 Finestone, Sylvan 259,315 Fingerhut, Ellen 366 Fink, Nancy 439 Finkle, Lee 390 Finnegan, Kristin 384 Finnerty, James 136,137, 138,315 Finney, Charles 315,396 Finnigan, Florence 270 Fiore, Nora 440 Fischer, Altree 315,427 Fischer, John 427 Fischer, Karen 449 Fischer, Peter 221 Fischer, Ronald 467 Fischmann, Jeffrey 315 Fish, M arcia 315 Fishback, James 467 Fishburn, Carol 463 Fisher, Fisher, Fisher, Fisher, Fisher, Jane 315 Lindsay 427 Mary 254 Philip 225,252 Scott 423 Fisher, Susan 315 Fisher, William 125 Fiske, Emmett 302,315 Fitts, Stephen 400 Fitzgerald, Alfred 362 Fitzgerald, James 403 Fitzgerald, Kathleen 378 Fitzgerald, Michael 240,315 Fitzhenry Jr., John 167, 169 Fitzpat ,41'2 rick, Nancy 438 Fitzwater, Robert 315 Fivelstad, Rodney 233,271, 315 Flaig, J ohn 363 Flake, Timothy 271,315 Flashberg, Larry 461 Flatt, Paula 315 Flautt, Robert 454 Fleck, Antonia 315 Fleeman Ill, William 315,423 Fleener, Scott 315 Flegal, Warren 423 Fleischer, Janet 431,432 Fleischli, Diane 254,376 Fleischli, Jack 408 Fleming, Tonya 315 Fletcher, Frances 315 Fletcher, Jeffrey 425 Flethez, Rose Marie 450 Flett Ill, James 408 Flickinger, Thomas 315, 402 Flocks, Reed 129,146,147 458 Floreen, Linda 315 Flournoy, Joanne 366 Flower, Mary 378 Floyd, Georgia 457 Flucke, Michael 402 Foat, Janice 388 Fobert, Donna 315 Fogarty, Michael 398,454 Follmer, Donna 315 Fondren, Sherry 315 Fong, Ronald 427 Fontan, Sherry 357 Fontana, Elaine 421 Fontana, Judith 270 Foose, Barry 151 Foote, Linda 437 Ford, Catherine 388 Ford, Steven 169,458 Forrest, Jack 315 Forrest, William 428 Fors, Karen 231 Forst, Mary Ann 303,315, 380 Foster, Barbara 315 Foster, Jr., Charles 426 Foster, Craig 434 Foster, Gary 426 Foster, Linda 445 Foster, Sandra 388 Foster, Susan 465 Foulis, Jr., William 427 Foulk, Susan 444,445 Fox, Anne 375 Fox, David 315 Fox, Joseph 429 Fox, Larry 151 Fox, Michael 429 Fox, Steven 315 Foye, Richard 426 Fraim, Elizabeth 359 Francis, Linda 441 Francis, Lizbeth 465 Franco, Fred 396 Frank, Thomas 355 Franklin, Kenneth 125 Franklin, Laurence 468 Frantz, Patti 359 Frantz, Shirley 246,247, 359 Frase, Robert 315 Frazier, Earl 140,141,428 Frazzini, Madalyn Jo 462 Frederick ll, John 245 Fredericks, Robert 385 Freede, Linda 315 Freeman, Laurie 316 Freeman, Steven 402 Freiburger, Joel 293 French, Jr., Bruce 402 French, Donald 215 French, Mark 138,154 French, Rosemary 459,464 Freter, Mark 302,316 Fried, Jeffery 245 Friedman, Ann 437 Friedman, Fred 316 Friedman, Howard 427 Friedman, Thomas 427 Friedrich, Karen 359 Friedrich, Ralph 402 Frier, Christopher 316,461 Friesen, Joyce 316,441 Frink, Mary 356 Fritchoff, Alan 316 Fritz, Janice 75,246,367, 382 Frye, Gayle 434 Fudenna, Keith 467 Fugit, Katherine 441 Fuhr, Melissa 215 Fuhriman, Sandra 316,386 Fujii, Joyce 376 Fujikuni, Barbara 368 Fulcher, Jack 454 Fuller, Janet 316,355 Fuller, Mariorie 316 Fullerton, Frances 256 Fumoto, Jiro 458 Funk, Melinda 316 Furlong, Susan 463 , Fuselier, Linda 242,248,303, 316,374,390 G Gabe, Jeffery 454 Gaffi, Diana 465 Gage, Benjamin 128,146,147 Gage, Mitchell 355 Gainer, Virginia 366 Galanda, Rosemary 317 Gallagher, Dorothy 316 Gallaher, Nancy 451 Gallaudet, Anthony 316,402 Gallez, Leslie 439 Galvan, Donnis 462 Gamboa, Thomas 154,402 Gandy, Thomas 316 Gangnes, Richard 124,404 Gannaway, Judith 270 Ganong, Richard 404 Gans, Bernard 396 Gant, Helen 215,270,364 Gant, Margaret 239,361 Garbutt, Bryan 257,394 Garcia, Christiana 382 Garcia, Damian 466 Garcia, Joel 316,421 ,459,460 Garcia, Jose 42 Garcia, Lydia 433 Garcia, Jr., Robert 461 Garcken, Knute 316 Gardella, Dennis 201,354 Gardi, John 454 Gardner, Claudia 368 Gardner, Robert 214,316,420, 468 Garlington, Julie 214 Garlington, Stanley 214,316 Garner, Jeanne 316 Garnier, Jacques 316 Garofalo, JoAnn 388 Garon, Lynne 457 Garoutte, Janice 366 Garrett, Duane 199,226,300, 420,467 Garrett, Martha 304,317 Garrison, Barbara 258 Garth, Moylan 400 Garvin, Samela 317 Gausewitz, Lynn 384 Gaustad, Glen 424 Gayle, Richard 317 Gazzaniga, Rebecca 446 Gearhart, Timmothy 176 Geary, Anne 200 Geary, Michael 427 Geddes, John 461 Geddes, Timothy 460 Gafvert, Robert 460 Geiger, Gary 317 Geist, Martha 317 Gelb, JoAnn 237,238,368 Geller, Eugene 317,394 Gemmill, William 454 Genasci, Kathleen 356,357 Gendel, Ellen 221,243,300, 303,442 Gentry, Kathleen 367 George, Bonnie 421,459,461 George, Peter 355 Geozgiou, Bill 360 Gerard, Robert 317 Gerhardt, Andrea 450 Gerhardt, David 317 Gerhart, Mary 317 Gerlach, Donna 367 Germer Shausen, Elizabeth 453 Gerver, Grant 454 Gescheider, Lynn 390 Gevorkian, Karan 317,376 Ghersen, Clifford 257 Giammona, Virginia 201,465 Gibble, Patricia 390 Gibbs, Diana 432 Bill Goldblum coaches boys' baseball attempts to become involved in the in one of the many and varied student community around them. Gibson, Carol 317 Gibson, Donald 317 Gibson, Joan 317 Gibson, Jolene 317 Gibson, Robert 271 Gielow, William 317 Gieselman, Stephen 146, 147 Gilbert, Dore 125 Gilbert, Pamela 435,441 Gilbert, Richard 317 Gilbert, Susan 435 Gilchrist, Diane 317 Gilchrist, Elizabeth 317 Gilder, Elizabeth 304 Gilder, Marilyn 367 Gill, Carolyn 378 Gilman, James 269 Ginder, Bradford 225 Gingg, Gretchen 374,386 Ginotti, Denise 202 Ginsberg, Anthony 427 Ginther, Thomas 396 Ginthner, Gayle 378 Giorgianni, John 394 Gire, Richard 416 Gispen, Jenny 449 Giving, Jeff 361 Gleason, David 408 Glenn, Cathleen 64 Glick, Nancy 462 Glick, Randi 317 Glickenhaus, James 292, 293,457 Glomb, Jr., James 269 Gloster, Maurice 461 Glusman, Robert 427 Goble, Richard 129,427 Goddard, Lawrence 396 Godfrey, Cyrus 232,271 Godwin, Patricia 317 Goebel, John 317 Gogel, Susan 177 Gohr, Lucy 451 Gold, Sherri 375 Goldblum, William 346 Goldenfeld, Marcia 448 Goldfarb, Lynn 368 Golding, Emilie 366 Goldinger, Linda 367,375 Goldman, James 425 Goldman, Lawrence 467 Goldsmith, Sally 365 Goldstein, Mary 317 Goldstein, Rhea 215,434 Gombos, Aniko 448 Gomer, Roberta 366 Gomes, Gregory 317 Gomez, David 427 Gong, Stephen 457 Gonzales, Lynette 171, 217,304,317,388 Gonzales, Vicki 317,382 Gonzalez, Joseph 317 Gonzalez, Maria 364 Gonzalez, Philip 151 Goodge, Toni 214 Goodlaw, Lisa 270,317 Goodrich, Michael 218,317 Goodwill, Margaret 212,436 Goody, Paula 317,380 Goos, Linda 446 Gordon, Ann 443 Gordon, Gary 406 Gordon, Roger 412 Gordon, Stuart 215 Goringer, Susan 356 Gorzynski, Beryl 270,436 Gossner, Jerry 317 Gottlieb, Stephen 257,461 Gould, Alan 461 Gourley, Eric 271,318,426 Goward, Jeffrey 421,427 Grafe, Carol 446 Graff, Susan 442 Graham, Donald 318 Graham, Patricia 453 Graham, Wesley 461 Graham, William 124 Gramps, Stephen 402,403 Granholm, John 318 Granik, Lizabeth 457 Granlund, Frederick 234 Grant, Edmund 125 Grant, Machelle 374,380 Grant, Sheila 318 Grant, Susan 463 Grantier, Barbara 176,318 Grauman, Timothy 393,394 Graves, Kathleen 438 Gray, Douglas 427 Gray, Jr., Gardner 140 Rising above the confusion which so aerial shot captures the peace and Ho, Gray, Rebecca 256,368 Gray, Robin 318 Gray, Timothy 75 Greathead, Jan 390 Green, Charles 414 Green, Helen 444,448 Green, Jill 433 Green, Jonathan 403 Green, Terry 467 Green, Virginia 433 Greenaway, Kenneth 124 Greene, Marcia 367 Greening, Ann 318 Greenough, William 240 Greer, Pat 202 Gregg, Elizabeth 386 Gregg, Susan 318 Gregory, Glenn 425 Gregory, James 43,47,199 Gregory, Nicholas 460 Grell, Barbara 212,386, 408 Grenfell, John 151,318 Greschner, Patricia 254, 376 Gressingh, Carol 318 Grey, Dennis 271 Greynald, Elaine 318,380 Greyson, Deborah 384 Griffin, Benjamen 129 Griffin, Douglas 414 Griffin, Nancy 440 Griffing, Juliette 431 Griffith, Jon 423 Griffith, Lynn 247 Griffith, Stacey 376,439 Griffiths, James 125 Grigarick, Laura 318 Griggs, Nancy 318 Griggs, Paula 445 Grim, Kristen 205,449 Grim, Peter 318 Grimm lll, Paul 366 Griset, Patricia 254,359 Griswold, Linda 171 Grivello, Ruth 448 Grix, Robert 151 Groesbeck, Michael 402 Grokenberger, David 159 Grossman, Kirk 424 Grosvenor, Nancy 463 Grove, Jennifer 433 Grow, Julia 445 Grunsky, Linda 318 Gstettenbauer, Gregory 398,424 Gstettenbauer, Joseph 398 Guadagni, David 146 Gudmundson, Robert 151, 466 Guerdon, Ely 151 Guerin, Cheryl 318 Guethlein, Ellen 318 Gulliver, John 458 Gulliver, Rachel 288 Gulyash, Charles 318 Gunter, Cassandra 378 Gurnee, Steven 414 Gurnee, Thomas 318 Gustafson, Glen 318 Gutman, Jr., James 318 Guy, Lawrence 128 Gwillim, Madeline 448 Gwyn, Dorothy 318 H Haas, Darlene 461 Habel, Patrick 425 Hachten, Lynn 318 Hacker, Arleen 318 Hacker, Margaret 457 Hackworth, Dennis 125 Haden, James 300 Haff, Lawrence 318 Hagerman, Ann 364 Hagewood, Pamela 318 Haggerty, Janis 462 Hagie, Roger 230 Haglund, Jonathan 466 Hahn, James 404 Haig, David 398 Hain, Richard 467 Haite, Linda 318 Halas, Jonathan 429 Halcomb, Jr., Robert 318 Hale, Janice 465 Halgren, Elaine 270 Hall, Barbara 318 Hall, Caroline 357 Hall, Elizabeth 435,437 Hall, Nancy 455 Hall, Rodna 440 Hall, Ted 146,147,458 Halladay, Richard 404 Hallahan, Kirk 430 Hallenbeck, Peter 318 Hallinger, Christa 469 Hallisey, Leah 463 Halloran, John 427 Halpern, Betty Jo 318 Halpern, Donna 356 Hamerly, Mary 256 Hamilton, Heidi 450 Hamilton, Katherine 218 Hamilton, Michael 429 Hamilton, Robert 318 Hamilton, Susan 455 Hamren, James 176 Hancock, Linda 445 Haneiwich, Kevin 454 Hanford, Barbara 384 Hankins, John 231 Hanks, Linda 318 Hanley lll, William 421,459, 467 Hanlon, Carol 463 Hanlon, Richard 238 Hann, Sharon 217,318,388 Hanna, Leslie 318 Hannah, Joan 450 Hannan, Gene 363 Hansen, Bruce 245 Hansen, Karen 364' Hansen, Kathleen 445 Hansen, Lisa 364 Hansen, Sonja 380 Hanson Alan 318 Hanson Brian 460 Hanson Carol 356 Hanson, Cary 155,360 Hanson, Eileen 378 Hanson Janet 242 Hanson, Karin 361 Hanson Robert 466 Harbaugh, Virginia 318,469 Hardie, Arthur 429 Hardison, Lynn 318,378 Hare, Melana 318 Harelson, Gilbert 257,460 Harger, Bruce 199 Harper, Randall 452,454 Harrie, Janet 256,463 Harrington, Ronald 319 Harrington, Thomas 467 Harris, Barbara 438 Harris, Diane 319 often characterizes campus life, this beauty of the surrounding area. flea li will Mr- , w Wu 'tlia.zisff. . ,li ll Harris lll, Earl 319 Harris, Harriet 319 Harris, Kenneth 425 Harris, Marjorie 241,258, A 461 Harris, Mary 376 Harris, Nina 328 Harris, Paul 154,319 Harris, Jr., Trester 468 Harris, William 398 Harrison, Barbara 449 Harrison, Catherine 463 Harrison, Kathleen 421, 433 Hart, Mike 142 Harter, Jan 445 Harthorn, Delayne 319 Hartmann, Nancy 254 Hartmann, Patti 437 Hartrantt, Debra 361 Hartunian, Carol 319 Hartzell, Kay 171 Harvey, Shirley 319 Harwood, William 424 Haskell, William 424 Haskett, Steven 402 Haskett lll, William 319 Hass, Edward 425 Hassler, Lynn 382 Hastings, Michael 416 Hatch, Nancy 246,378 Hatfield, Michael 426 Hatten ll, Thoburn 151, 152 Hattenbach, Sandra 319 Hauge, Jo Ann 368 Haughton, Walter 319 Haver, George 271 Hawes, Cynthia 384 Hawley, Don 408 Haworth, Donna 173,445 Hayball, Darleen 319 Hayes, John 124 Hayes, Rachel 319 Haynes, Susan 361 Hayre, Raghbir 451 Hayton, William 360 Hazelton, Edgar 319 Heacock, Carolyn 451 Hearron, Ruth 465 Heath, Andrea 252 Hebard, Margaret 364 Heck, Antonia 438 Hedberg, Susan 319 Hedden, Linda 219,319 Hedding, Devon 380,462 Hedge, Brook 443 Hee, Brenda 256,432 Heflin, Hollace 218,390 Heibel, Eleanor 319 Heil, Michael 319 Heillig, Roma 469 Heim, Nancy 447 Heims, Jack 430 Heineccius, William 428 Heino, James 319,354 Heinsohn, Stephen 404 Heinz, Richard 123,124 Helin, Phillip 429 Heller, Linda 319 Heller, Phillip 302,319 Helman, David 319 Helman, Paul 207,240 Helms, Robert 319,428 Helwick, Robert 218,382 Hendershot, Christie 421, 459 Henderson, Charles 319 Henderson, Gay 319 Henderson, Julie 254,256, 359 Henderson, Nancy 319 Henderson, Thomas 468 Hendrickson, Craig 128, 319 Hendrickson, Priscilla 270 Hengel, Michael 398,454 Henke, Carolyn 367 Hennessy, Thomas 454 Henning, George 412 Henry, Ann 231 Henry, Daniel 461 Henzie, Elizabeth 276 Herbert, Laurel 246,381 Herbert, Pamela 446 Herbon, Randy 408 Herman, Jeffrey 398 Hermanson, Jeffrey 400 Hern, Candice 465 Hernandez, Glen 425 Hernandez, John 125 Herndon, Matthew 125 Herrick, Jeanne 222 Herring, Beverly 440 Herring, Kathleen 442 Herrington, Barbara 319,376 Herrman, Leslie 442 Herron, Nadine 359 Hershey, Philip 434 Hess, Phillip 457 Hesse, Paul 146,147,271, 428 Hessel, Vicki 319 Heublein, Peter 201,402 Hewitt, Jo 319 Heyn, Rita 453 Heywood, Jon 423 Hiatt, Cynthia 421,435,437 Hibberd, Laura 320 Hibbs, Philip 466 Hibbs, Susan 320 Hibler, Melissa 112,384 Hickey, Patricia 382 Hicks, Leland 140 Hide, Terry 458 Hied, Sandra 355 Higashi, Kathleen 451 Higgin, Joleen 212,367,384 Higgin, Martha 86,91 ,320, 384 Higgins, Diane 382 Higgins, Elizabeth 320 Higgins, John 176 Higgins, Kathleen 320,382 Hiler, Suzanne 320,378 Hill, Barbara 457 Hill, Frederick 271 Hill, James 129,147 Hill, Mary 443 Hill Meredith 320 Hill, Jr., Richard 170 Hill, Roger 320 Hill, Susan 451 Hill, Suzanne 441 Hill, Teresa 455 Hilligoss, Stephanie 436 Hill Hill man, Elizabeth 304 o, Bobbie 439 Hindman, James 59 Hines, John 124,404 Hintz, Donna 356 Hinze, Marion 376 Hiromoto, Lois 320 Hirshberg, Laurie 201,254 Hirshberg, Susan 364 Wendy 445 Hoberman, Thomas 461 Hobson, Priscilla 205,212, 436 Hodel, Jennie 444 Hodkinson, Thomas 320 Hoefer, Lynne 224,270,381 Hoerauf, Jerald 425 Hoerber, Sharon 367 Hoey, Elizabeth 382 Hoff, Julie 229,231 Hoffman, Antonia 359 Hoffman, Douglas 460 Hoffman, Joan 224,376, 421,435 Hoffman, Thomas 423 Hoffpauir, Thomas 400 Hofman, John 320 Hofstee, Philip 425 Hogan, Deborah 366 Hokholt, Carla 431 Holden, Frederick 201,224, 406 Holkesvick, Holly 320,359 Hollan, Mark 320,458 Holland, Jack 427 Hollar, Douglas 320 Hollenbeck, Lynne 450 Hollingsworth, David 131 Hollingsworth, Joan 361 Hollister, Diane 320,382 Hollywood, Linda 441 Holm, Lisa 320 Holman, Cheryl 147,320,376 Holman, Hilary 146,366 Holman, Janet 320,381 Holman, William 129 Holmboe, Graham 320 Holmer, Carl 320 -i 1 ,AIM 'si Peace Corp pushers set up shop in of the project answer a wide range of front of the library. Former members student questions. Holmes, Carol 440 Holmes, Diane 453 Holmes, Genevieve 376 Holmes, Randolph 428 Holmshaw, Peter 423 Holt, Jeffrey 320 Holt, Pamela 320 Holtz, Shira 451 Honegger, John 454 Honegger, Steven 320 Honig, Thomas 128,146 Hoo, Stephen 425 Hood, Michael 427 Hook, Robin 320 Hooper, Susan 439 Hoos, Michael 430 Hopkins, Gail 321 Hoppe, Art 201 Hori, Bruce 142,143 Horn, Jr., Howard 321 Horn, Lucinda 437 Horner, James 321 Hornstein, Sara 368 Horrocks, Shirley 431 Horsfall, Caryn 453 Horton, James 271 Horton Ill, Samuel 428 Horwitz, Spencer 125 Hosley, Deborah 448 Hostetler, Jean 441 Hotz, William 321,396 Houghell, James 245 Houghton, George 460 Houlihan, Valerie 453 Howard, Cynthia 382 Howard, Linda 449 Howard, Susan 357 Howell, Howell, Howell, Howell, Howell Charlene 321 Daniel 164,402 Diane 390 Heather 367 Margaret 433 Howell, Theodore 392 Howell, Todd 414 Howenstein, Ann 389 Howland, Edward 321 Howry, Anita 356 Hoxie, George 321 Hsu, Reginald 458 Huang, Joseph 429 Hubert, Joan 111 Huddleson, Margaret 376 Huddleston, Julia 367,368 Hudgins, Gail 359 Hudin, Michael 467 Hudson, Anne 447 Hudson IV, Edward 321 Huebner, Susan 321 Hughes, Kate 455 Hughes, Marilyn 200 Hughes, Michael 151,321, 394 Hughes, Sheryl 432 Hughes, Susan 95,111 Hull, George 321 Hulse, Penelope 321,450 Humberd, Ronald 466 Humboldt, Michele 469 Hummel, Martha 461 Hummel, Susan 450 Hummes, Katherine 366 Hundley, Henry 125 Hunkin, Seline 357 Hunt, John 434 Hunter, Brent 426 Hunter, De Ette 321 Hunter, Jill 321 Hunter, Kathryn 321 Huntley, Loren 321 Huntley, Richard 243,321 Huntoon, Susan 246,321 Huntsberger, John 321,488 Huntsinger, Steven 124 Huntsman, Julia 272,321 Hurn, Barbara 321 Hurst, Cheri 453 Hurst, Susan 91,248,384 Hussey, Ruth 463 Hutcherson, Janice 443 Hutchinson, Frances 222 Hutchinson, Nancy 215, 465 Hutchinson, Susan 368 Hutzel, Cynthia 351,357 Huwe, Magdalene 357 Huxley, Daniel 151 Huyssen, Roger 170 Hyde, Deborah 364 I lacono, Jeanne 321 Iden, Dennis 425 Iden, Douglas 425 Idte, Melanie 431 lkola, Kathleen 438 Iliff, Maw 75,248,390 lmfeld, Roberta 444,445 Immenschuh, Judith 366 Indermill, Kathy 382 lngraham, Melinda 435 Inman, Janis 254,321 Inouye, Katrine 321 lntersimone, Robert 321 Ireland, Charles 321 Irons, Donna 448 Irvine, Eileen 244 Irvine, Gail 303,304,321 lnfvin, Sally 321 lrvvin, Stephen 434 Isaacson, Annette 445 lseman, Eric 427 lsen, Kenneth 426 Isgrig, Cathy 321 Iverson, Dorothy 359 Ives, Holmes 321 Ivey, Suzanne 437 lwahashi, Hisashi 467 J Jacinto, Janice 256 Jackson, Anthony 125 Jackson, David 205 Jackson, Harold 427 Jackson, Juanita 376 Jackson, Thomas 156 Jacobs, Rex 459,466 Jacobsen, Susan 321 Jacobson, Mark 129,147,466 Jaeb, Nancy 321 James, John 321 James, Rose 448 James, Virginia 384 Jaquez, Ramiro 427 Jarrett, Nancy 359 Jayne, Frederick 161 Jean lll, Robert 246,259,291, 321 Jeffers, Keith 126,127,151,415 Jefferson, Carl 129,146, 147,428 Jeffrey, Kent 321 Jemmott, Joanne 231,461 Jenkins, Josephine 173 Jenkins, Lynnea 302,321, 389 Jenks, James 321 Jennings, Gale 448 Jennings, Janet 381 Jennings, Ross 454 Jennings, Susan 364 Jensen, Edward 181,424 Jensen, Kevin 122,123,124 Jensen, Pamela 421 ,459, 469 Jerome, Margaret 246,384, 445 Jeter, Kevin 125 Jimenez, Francisco 245 Jochums, Christie 359 Johannsen, Karl 271 Johns, Janice 364 Johnson, Adolph 430 Johnson, Allen 354 Johnson, Beverly 446 Johnson, Diane 361 Johnson, Gary 363 Johnson, George 363 Johnson, Harry 75 Johnson, Helen 321 Johnson, Jeanne 304,321 Johnson, Joann 256 Johnson, Karen 321 Joh nson, Kath ryn 236,321 , 376 Johnson, Kenneth 321 Johnson, Laura 462 Johnson, Leslie 88,364, 365 Johnson, Linda 381 Johnson, Lyndell 270,445 Johnson, Margaret 382 Johnson, Marvin 467 Johnson, Mary 200,434 Johnson, Robin 367,390 Johnson, Sharon 438 Johnson, Sheila 440 Johnson, Stephanie 389 Johnson, Wendel 138 Johnston, Janet 359 Johnston, Leslie 367 Johnston, Linda 321 Johnston, Paula 244,382 Jonas, Beverly 254,359 Jones, Allen 321 Jones, Cleo 154,157 Jones, Donna 364,421,459 Jones, Douglas 321 Jones, Gary 360 Jones, Janis 213,243,299, 301,303,321 Jones, Jone 447 Jones, Kathleen 321 Jones, Lawrence 400 Jones, Lesley 256,356 Jones, Marion 322 Jones, Mark 467 Jones, Melanie 256,390 Nancy 376 Jones, Jones, Patricia 246,390 Richard 322 Jones, Jones, Scott 169 Jones, Susan 270,322 Jones, Thomas 404 Jones, Timothy 424 Jonson, Judy 455 Jopson, Robert 429 Jopson ll, William 468 Jordan, Lynn 270 Jordan, Sandra 359 Jorgensen, Jeffrey 253 Jostes, John 354 Joy, Robert 423 Joyce, Maureen 434 Judge, Roxanne 462 Juelke, Paula 449 June, Sandra 442 June, Steven 396 Jura, Christine 438 Jurewitz, William 217 Just, Brian 423 Jutzi, Janice 378 Juul, Margit 381 K Kadin, Eleanor 322 Kaganoff, Sheldon 322 Kahn, Cathy 439 Kaiser, Karen 442 Kaji, Jeanette 356 Kalenik, Kenneth 363 Kaleva, Robert 406 Kalinske, Susan 247,382 Kalk, Eileen 200,431 Kallam, Thomas 230 Kalman, lldiko 251 Kalton, Mary 462 Kamhi, Victor 240 Kander, Michael 181,363, 412 Kane, John 322 Kanemoto, Barbara 322 Kaneshige, Pearl 247,432 Kanter, Charles 461 Kaplan, Lawrence 457 Kaplowitz, Mac 322 Kappel, Kathleen 455 Karlton, Joanne 465 Karn, Orla 322 Karp, Leslie 322 Kasai, Aileen 457 Kasehagen, Alan 460 Kassebaum, Arthur 271 Kasson, Melanie 453 Katims, Michael 322 Katow, Vincent 427 Katsuki, Ellen 453 Katz, Hanley 322 Katz, Margaret 421,442, 459,465 Kaucher, John 409 Kaufman, Carole 378 Kaufman, Deborah 250 Kaufman, Ron 203,222, 225,420 Kausen, Patricia 322,378 Kavinoky, Karen 465 Kay, Diane 322 Kaye, Hilary 453 Kaye, John 322 Kazanjian, Larry 360 Kazutoff, Alexander 398 Kear, Valerie 366 Kearns, Maureen 367 ' Keefe, Margaret 322 Keehn, Robin 439 Keenan, Steven 392,402 Keene, Mary 368,375 Keeney, Elizabeth 68 Keil, Steven 181,363 Keirsey, David 429 Keitel, Ann-Charlo 359 Keith, David 271 Kellar, Joanne 462 Kellar, Judy 322 Keller, Frederick 427 Kellett, Michele 462 Kelley, Kathleen 255,367 Kelley, Nancy 426 Kelly, Carolyn 376,446 Kelly, Constance 367 Kelly, Devin 434 Kelly, Megan 449 Kelsey, Jay 151 Kemp, Barbara 356 Kemp, Thomas 434 Kemprud, Edmund 269 Kendal Ill, James 405 Kenna, Timothy 396 Kennedy, Julie 322 Kathleen 381 Kennedy, Kennedy, Jr., Leo 176 Kennedy, Mary 322,390 Reginald 322 Kennedy, Kennedy, Jr., Robert 322 415 Kennedy, Thomas 322 Kenney, Katherine 366 Kenny, Julie 367 Kent, Robert 363 Kepner, Dorothy 322 Kerr, Laurelynn 322 Kerr, Patricia 384,465 Kerrigan, Patrick 429 Kesler, Steven 257 Kessel, Karen 177 Kessler, Denise 231 Kester, Joan 462 Keyser, Linda 323 Kezirian, Gregory 124 Khaiyat, Mahdy 323 Khogeer, Ibrahim 362 ' 483 Kidder, Linda 452,457 Kieffer, George 198,243, 299,301,323 Kieffer, Joseph 221,429 Kiley, Kathryn 201,386 Kilgore, James 323,416 Killton, Christine 37,323 Kimball, Christopher 430 Kimball, Peter 323 Kimes, Kathy 368 Kimmel, Jacqueline 384 Kimura, James 457 Kindel, Robert 423 Kindig, Catharine 323,382 King, Andrew 427 King, Gerald 145 King, Roberta 215,272 King, Susan 323,382 Kinne, Sallie 323 Kirchner, Leanora 434 Kirihara, John 427 Kirihara, Margaret 323 Kirkby, Kathryn 323 Kirkpatrick, Troy 217,372, 389 Kirtley, John 151,450 Kiskis, Ronald 402 Kitchen, Eric 423 Kitchens, Kathryn 441 Klein, Diane 449 Klein, Karen 258,446 Klein, Nancy 355 Kleinhofer, Carol 323,384 Kleinhofer, William 425 Kleinman, Joan 91 Kleinman, Leslie 431 Klier, Susan 323 Klocke, Linda 450 Kloek, Christopher 323 Klohs, Debra 448 Klotzsche, Lucinda 442 Klure, Robert 461 Kluth, Marilyn 390 Knapp, Catherine 323,435, 437 Knauf, Suzanne 323 Knaup, Barbara 453 Knell, Gregory 42 Knight, Cynthia 323 Knight, Doris 446 Knight, Gail 448 Knight, Janet 323 Knight, Kathy 356 Knoernschild, Jean 445 Knowles, Christine 219 Knudsen, Eric 131 Kobal, John 426 Kockos, Barbara 323,374, 384 Koenig, Teresa 367 Koenigs, Marilyn 462 Koenigs, Robert 200,457 Koff, Thomas 323 Koger, Margo 446 Kohl, Donna 323 Kohlmann, Donald 129,402 Kohn, Philip 250 Koh nerr, Diana 447 Kolber, Richard 323,398 Kolvitz, Leanne 421,432 Komins, Michael 323 Koontz, Anna 455 Kopke, Sharon 437 Korabiak, Dennis 360 Korb, Gregory 396 Korber, Laurel 384,431 Korber, Linda 199,223, 323,385 H Korbin, Gregory 461 Kornblit, Murray 323,416 Korostoff, Neil 396 Koshear, Kathleen 258,364 Koskela, Steven 323 Koski, Kathleen 255,323 Koslar, Anita 368 Kosloff, Ken 416 Kossyta, Ellen 238,444 Kosub, Timothy 323 Kou ns, Herbert 360,363 Koyanagi, Christine 448 Kraisinger, Jean 421,444, 450 Krakow, Karen 171,205, 255,381 Krall, Jr., Kenneth 124 Kramer, Anthony 467 Kramer, lan 323 Krantz, Konstance 323,391 Krase, Jr., John 426 Kraus, Jon 430 Krayk, Stefan 220,260 Krebs, Linda 432 Krend, William 271,323 Kress, Robert 323 Krider, Thomas 240 Krieg, Michael 323 Krieger, Steven 215 Krimholtz, Richard 251 Kruger, Carolyn 441 Kruger, Josef 271 Kruse, Barbara 449 Kruse, Cheryl 448 Kuchendorfer, Bob 430 Kuckenbaker, Pamela 440 Kuge, Sandra 242 Kuhl, Kristine 323 Kumley, Lloyd 271 Kuntz, Barbara 376 Kurilchyk, Deborah 382 Kurosawa, Fumiko 323 Kurtz, William 468 Kuryla, Judith 323 Kuster, Steven 425 Kuyper, Delores 323 Kuzell, Elizabeth 359,381 Kwock, Yumon 428 Kwong, Carolyn 207 L La Bare, Richard 165 La Brie IV, Louis 457 Lacey, Robert 421,457 Lachman, Millard 466 Lacy, Cheryl 323,378 Lagana, Gregory 360 Lai, Judy 250,441 Laiolo, Antonio 138 Laird, Kenneth 259,323 Lam, Tak-Yuk 250,323 Lambert, Christopher 138 Lambert, Michael 412 Lamer, Jacqueline 269 Lamkin, David 324 Lamphere, Diane 201,389 Landucci, Linda 304,324, 437 Lane, Dana 113,212,247, 324,383 Lange, Frank 324,412 Lange, Shelley 451 Langstaff, Gary 112,166, 199,212 Lant, Jeffrey 324 Larkin, Edward 269 Larsen, Janine 324 Larson, Janet 324 Larson, Judy 324 Larson, Victor 124,402 Lathrop, Ann 241 Latka, Liana 324 Lauer, Kitrick 142 Laufenberg, Norman 427 Lavagnini, Henry 458 La Velle, James 151,427 Law, Carol 324 Lawhon, Mary 359 Lawrence, Marilee 324,381 Lawrence, Theodora 270, 381 Lawson, Jr., Donald 324 Lay, Rudy 467 Lazzarini, Bradley 427 Lazzaro, Linda 436 Lea, Sallye 386 Leach, Jeffrey 144,145 Leach, Jo 324 Leach, Lee 271 Lean, Judith 324,385 Lebsack, Ann 361 Leckie, Sandra 324 Ledeen, Kathy 383,445 Ledford, Michelle 450 Lee, Cecilia 250,433 Lee, Dianne 324 Lee, Jeffrey 158 Lee, John 161 Lee, Jonathan 405 Lee, Lai 250 Lee, Larry 398 Lee, Marilyn 324 Lee, Michael 354 Lee, Paul 124 Lee, Robin 324,469 Lee, Ruthann 386 Lee, Susan 361 Lee, Victor 460 Leeper, Judith 434 Leerskov, Philip 112 Le Falle, Lizzetta 434 Lefavor, Brent 428 Lefaver, Anne 324 Leger, Thomas 324 Lehman, Barbara 451 Lehman, Joan 294 Leibrecht, James 64 Leiphardt, Susan 385 Leite, Constance 449 Lemaster, Martha 324,356, 376 Lemish, Peter 243,324 Lemons, Carl 125 Lencioni, Randell 383,448 Lenhardt, David 215,259, 271 Lennon, Danforth 125 Lentz, Daniel 68 Leonard, Christene 463 Leonard, Steven 150,151 Leonetti, Kathleen 355 Leonhardt, Linda 324 Lepera, Eileen 361 Lepon, Amy 324 Leuke, William 421 Leung, Lok Pui 250 Leung, Mabel 250 Levandowski, Stephen 324, 415 Levatter, Theodore 68 Leveille, Terrence 324 Leverette, Nancy 324,385 Levin, Harvey 428 Levinson, Linda 453 Levitt, James 426 Levitt, Roberta 453 Lewarton, Lynette 442 Lewis, Adam 324 Lewis, Barbara 445 Lewis, Cheryl 436 Lewis, Eric 159,409 Lewis, Larry 240,242,324 Lewis, Lyndell 324,391 Lewis, Lynne 324 Lewis, Melanie 359 Lewis, Michael 429 Lewis, Robert 396,397 Lewis, Ronald 324 Ley, Marsha 324 L'Hommedieu, William 400 Liberman, Andrew 396,454 Lieneweber, Mark 406,407 Lietz, Nancy 242,391 Lifton, Michael 205,228, 271,324 Liles, Elizabeth 445 Lilienthal, John 467 Lim, Lillian 250,451 Lincoln, Christine 447 Lincoln, Mark 362 Lindberg, Stanley 324 Lindelef, Linda 324,376 Lindemann, Lois 324,376 Linden, Elaine 445 Linden, Joan 457 Linder, Elizabeth 376 Linder, Susan 324 Lindgren, Russell 324,392, 395 Lindhard, Paul 292,293 Lindquist, Jane 461 Lindsay, David 434 Lindsey, Cynthia 359 Lindskog, Robert 468 Linn, Susan 469 Linton, Connie 367 Lipani, Linda 171,173 Lippitt, Laurie 442 Lippman, Eva 356 Lissy, Linda 173 Liu, George 250 Livingston, David 271 Livingston, Sandra 324 Lizama, Lester 271,396 Llewellyn ll, Richard 324, 411 Lloyd, Randi 451 Lloyd, Teri 455 Locke, Lynne 324 Lockway, John 427 Lockwood, Kathleen 386 Lode, Karen 324 Lode, Marette 432 Lodge, Anne 445 Lodge, Eleanor 324 Loeb, Stanford 146,176,325 Loeffler, Judith 367 Logan, Carol 202 Loman, Geoffrey 424 London, Robert 457 Long, Marilee 269,272 Long, Pamela 255,325 Long, Theodore 146,147 Loomis, Patricia 258 Lopez, Candace 325 Lopez, Evelyn 325 Lopez, Kenneth 215,271 Lopez, Michael 125 Lopez, Ronald 425 Loring, Charles 360,416 Loring, Ernest 230 Louie, Jay 151 Louie, Judy 449 Lovelace, William 325 Lovell, Frank 403 Lowe, Gregory 403 Lowe, Roger 325 Lowry, Norene 325 Loyd, Terry 325,395 Lu, Paul 250 Lubarsky, Steven 150,151 Luboff, Richard 325 Lucas, Joyce 325 Lucas, Sylvia 443 Ludington, Susan 111 Ludlum, Susan 294 Ludwick, Vicki 325 Ludwig, James 245,468 Luidema, John 360,399 Lukather, Suzanne 68,272 Luke, Gary 125 Luke, Ginger 463 Lund, Kristine 357 Lundberg, Peter 461 Lundy, Daniel 325 Lundy, Judith 325 Lundy, Robert 325 Luoto, Victoria 378 Lurmann, Frederick 412 Luros, Michael 325 Lusby, Karen 438 Luscke, Richard 429 Pool sharks take advantage of the free facilities pro- Lutz, Becky 325 Lutz, Susan 325 Lux, Charley 325 Lydon, Terrence 399 Lynch, James 405 Lynes, Carolyn 438 Lynn lll, Frank 325 Lyon, Linda 364 Lyons, Judith 303,304,325 Lyons, Kathleen 436 Lyons, Michael 325 Lyons, Pete 167 Lyum, Karen 442 M Ma, Paul 250 MacArthur, Laura 381 MacCluer, Katherine 325 MacCluer, Scott 325,405 Machado, Sue 201,372,389 MacHale, Marla 359 Mack, Susan 325 MacKedie, Mary 445 MacKenzie, Kirk 271 MacKinnon, Douglas 355 MacKirdy, Barbara 172,173 391 MacLaren, Zaidee 247,383 Madden, Daniel 161 Maddock, Gail 325 Maddock, Marsha 325,376, 414 Madsen, Edward 325 Magill, Howard 412 Magnante, Richard 154 Magnuson, Ingrid 376 Maguire, Jacquelyn 381 Maher, Mark 325 Mahle, Chrisann 436 Mahony, Thomas 403 Mahood, Kathryn 381 Maiman, Michael 426 Mainland, Timothy 457 Maioewsky, Steven 325 Malan, Paula 462 Malashock, Mark 201,411 Malcom, Victoria 446 Maledy, Melinda 241 Malkin, Alaine 256 vided in the Torres lobby. B' Mallinckrodt, Robert 325 Mallory, Robert 416,430 Malmgren, Linda 462 Malone, Clifford 467 Maloney, Colleen 366,367 Maloney, Stephen 405 Mandel, Larry 326 Mandel, Richard 204,224,411 Manion, Mary 222 Manning, Marcy 367,368 Mannis, Leslie 462 Mantle, Melinda 326 Marder, Tod 326 Margarit, Joanne 269,436 Margulies, Lee 229,326 Marino, Elaine 326 Marker, Andrew 421 Markham, Charles 230 Markine, Susan 444,447 Markov, Carl 326 Markovich, Frank 269 Marks, Craig 326 Marks, Marle 355 Markuse, Tom 427 Markytan, Mary 255,359 Marlow, Augustus 363 Marshall, Douglas 151 Marshall, Kathleen 465 Marshall, Louise 457 Marshall, Robert 154,405 Marston, Dennis 326 138,139 Marteney, Jr., James 112,155, 416 Marti lll, Paul 326 Donna 202 Martin, Martin, Jacqueline 376 Martin, Judith 451 Martin, Lois 202,256,389 Martin, Marsha 366 Patricia 113,326,376 Martin, Martin, Randee 361,363 Martinek, Nancy 376 Martins Ill, Anthony 154,454 Martus, Christopher 423 Mascovich, Jeanne 269,446 Masik, Robert 354 Mason, Jr., Robert 49,52,135, Mason, Sharon 438 Matalas, Judith 113,212,376 Mathe, Bonny 221,421,438 Mathisen, Melinda 252,383 Matlock, Michele 366,391 Matsinger, Harry 168,428 Matsuoka, Laura 431 Matthews, William 409 Mattingly., Carol 359 Mattoon, Marilyn 367 Mattraw, Alice 255 Maule, Pamela 367,368 Maurer, Phyllis 462 Maxwell, Darold 326,454 Maxwell, Dorothea 364 Maxwell, Marcie 223,325, 377 May, Cheryl 326 May, Constance 454 Maybay, Tina 386 Mayfield, Cheryl 326 Maylen lll, Charles 460 Mayles, Steve 425 Maynard, Sandra 201 Mazikowski, Margaret 326 Mazzola, Janet 463 McAdam, Steven 429 McAlpin, Michael 154,169, 220,326 McArthur, Sally 326,383 McBride, Janet 326 McCaffery, Jill 224,377 McCall, Bruce 396,397 McCall, Diane 462 McCampbell, Bruce 142, 143 McCandliss, Robin 202 McCarter, Douglas 355 McCarter, Kirk 423 McCarthy, Kathleen 326 McCarthy, Sandra 451 McChesney, Glenn 326,385 McCleod, Sandy 131 McCluen, Robin 364 McClure, Daniel 288 McCormick, Douglas 468 McCoul, Vicky 469 McCowan, Jr., Jack 294, 411 McCoy, John 326,428,429 McCoy, Lynne 451 McCoy, Robert 240,326 McCracken, Melony 391, 446 McCrary, Linda 356 McCuistion, Shirley 326, 378 McDaniel, Kimberly 446 McDavid, Mary 448 McDonald, Daniel 326 McDonald, Patricia 326 McDonald, Robert 407 McDonald, Thomas 230 McDougall, Gregory 354 McDowell, Vicki 441 McEachen, Richard 302 McEntee, Mary 249,386 McEvoy, Patricia 326,359 McEwan, Robert 183 McEwen, Dorothy 386 McGee, Edward 140,423 McGill, Howard 430 McGill, Rowena 465 McGinnis, David 326,412 McGinnis, Peggy 385 McGivern lll, Peter 427 McGory, Michael 138 McGough, Catherine 445 McGough, Richard 397 McGovney, Ardis 326 McGowan, Whitman 424 McGregor, Charles 326 McGregor, Kenneth 259 McGuinness, Lorie 440 McGuire, Kim 326,409 McHenry, Donna 171 Mclnerney, Sue 306 Mclnnis, Anne 326,381 Mclnnis, Kay 306 Mclntire, Robert 360,363 Mclntire, Robin 447 Mcl ntyre, Shannon 368 McKee, Dorothy 367 McKee, Robert 326 McKeever, Patricia 387 McKellar, Georganne 270, 367 McKend, Kirk 429 McKendrick, Kathleen 465 McKenna, Brian 421,426 McKenna, Kevin 326,405 McKenna, Larry 326 McKenzie, Allyson 385 McKeown, Margaret 450 McKibben, Emily 326 McKibben, James 326 McKinley, Kathleen 389 McKinnon, Paul 434 McLain, William 416 McLaughlin, Anne 200,432 McLaughlin, Daniel 423 McLean, Pamela 258,377 McLellan, Jennifer 200,255 McMahan, Martha 326 McMahon, Brigid 447 McMillan, Carol 304,326 McMinn, Eileen 457 McMullen, Kathleen 326 McNally, Michael 412 McNamara, Kathleen 112, 171,212 McNamara, Mary 387,445 McNeil, lan 413 McPeak, John 202,243,430 McPhail, Carol 465 McPherson, Barry 326 McRary, Denise 326,383 McSorley, Mary 326 McSparran, Thomas 429 Meacham, Margot 431 Mead, Carol 441 Meade, Mark 158 Meadell, Marcia 421 Meadows, Stephen 125,427 Meanley, John 395 Meanley, William 327,391 Means, Dorothy 327,391 Means, Lynn 457 Medina, Nancy 327 Medina, Patricia 451 Medlin, Edward 327 Meena, Shelley 449 Megarry, David 430 Mehlhaff, Cheryl 367 Mehn, Marcia 327 Meiers, John 403 Meijer, Arend 327,395 Meinel, Carla 249,377 Meinert, Gloria 464 Meitz, Frederick 164,403 Melemed, Marian 327,355 Melgares, Michael 327 Mellard, Suzanne 256,364, 365 Melli, Ann 449 Melnick, Norman 257,427 Melnick, Shirley 328 Melrose, Karla 389 Melton, Karen 327,383 Melusky, Melody 368 Melvick, Shirley 449 Melvin, Pamela 440 Mencke, Jr., Raymond 158, 355 Menees, Katherine 438 Menzel, John 423 Menzies, Jr., Edward 457 Meredith, Patricia 387 Merge, Susan 377 Merigian, Margaret 447 Merkler, Karen 327 Meronk, Jr., Frank 327 Merrill, John 327 Merriman, James 406 Merry, Donna 247,378 Meshishnek, Michael 434 Messenger, Phyllis 244,377 Messner, Diane 327 Metcalf, Cheryl 327 Metcalf, Kathleen 327 Metcalf, Timothy 327,417 Meudell, Marcia 444,448 Mewhirter, Anne 361 Meyer, Catherine 443 Meyer, Cynthia 199,272 Meyer, James 430 Meyer, Jerry 154 Meyer, Katherine 389,439 Meyer, Michael 454 Meyer, Michelle 446 Meyers, Steven 327 Meyncke, Robert 327,393, 399 Mezzetta, Celestina 450 Michaelson, Franklyn 120, 124 Michaelson, Ronald 362 Michel, Lisa 327 Michels, Pamela 374,389 Michky, Marianne 462 Middlebrook, Charles 245 Milgore, Donna 379 Mikkelsen, Karen 438 Milam, Stephen 403 Milburn, Michael 454 Miles, Kathleen 431 Millar, William 152 Millard, Joan 373 Millenaar, Jean 216,377 Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Milliga Miltim Barrett 124 Curry 164,424 Donald 327 Eugenie 64 Jacqueline 375 James 151 Jennifer 469 Joan 327 Kenneth 327 Larry 327,409 Mark 129,146,147 Marsha 375 Michael 327 Norma 224 Stephen 426 Steven 327,363,399 William 151 n, Melinda 431 ore, Anne 327 Mina, John 430 Minkoff, Jonathan 423 Minster, Barry 124 Mintz, David 327 Mintz, Marilyn 463 Mirger, Carol 448 Misbach, Anita 247 Morin, Peter 217 Morison, Natalma 459,464 Moritz, Robert 42 Morlan, Thomas 224,406 Morneau, Geoffrey 427 Morrall, Timothy 146 Morrell, Stephen 328,411 Morrice, Christina 445 Morrisroe, John 413 Morse, Linda 249,391 Morter, Scott 294 Mortison lll, William 425 Mosgrove, Maggie 387 Mosier, Mary 328 Mosko, Mark 467 Moss, Irv 421 Mostue, Margaret 328 Mount, Deborah 223,242, 244,374,377 Mount, James 328 Mowatt, Mary 389,451 Mowbray, Alison 237 Moy, Gloria 431 Moy, Mary 250,367 Moyer, Jill 328 Mueller, Charleen 328 Mueller, Shellie 469 Muleady Ill, Francis 124, 328,403 Muleady, Kathleen 235 Mullally, James 411 Misbach, Gregory 328 Mitchel, Donald 327 Mitchell, Anne 327 Mitchell, Charles 328 Mitchell, James 125 Mitchell, Paula 440 Mitchell, Susan 469 Mitchell, Teresa 439 Mitchel I, Thomas 328 Miura, Thomas 399 Mizuno, Robert 393,41 308 Moar, Catherine 391 Moats, David 328 Mochizuki, Jr., George 427 Modaresi, Saeed 251 Moe, Barbara 385 Moe, Margery 328,385 Moffett lll, James 411 Moffett, Victoria 391 Mohler, Charles 125 Mohler, Cynthia 377 lVI0lit0 7. Mulle, Denise 359 Mullen, Ann 445 Mulligan, Kirk 125 Mulvey, Gayle 385 Mulvey, Patricia 383 Munday, Dorothy 367 Munger, Richard 461 Muntean, Dirk 128,129,147 Murata, Stephen 252,409 Murdock, James 397 Murphy, Barbara 368 Murphy, Gregory 155 Murphy, Joan 329,385 Murphy, Joseph 329 Murphy, Marc 329 Murphy, Robyn 304,350, 391 Murphy, Sandra 431 r, Catherine 355 Molitor, Mary 171 Molnar, William 328 Monks, Marilyn 328 Monroe, Kim 454 Montagne, Victoria 453 Montague, Sharon 387 Montalvo, Norma 465 Montgomery, Robert 128 Montini, Roberta 364,365 Moody, Marjorie 450 Moody, Steven 129,146, 147 Mooers, Linda 450 Moon, Moon, Moon, James 426 Melanye 218,445 Richard 400 Moonie, Carol 208,256 Moore, Barbara 328 Moore, Brian 328 Moore, Christine 241 ,361 , 387 Moore, Gary 328 Moore, James 421 Moore, Kenneth 430 Moore, Lee 425 Moore, Mary 328,345 Moore, Michael 164,170 Moore, Nancy 328 Moore, Paula 449 Moore, Richard 363 Moore, Sylvia 328 Moran, Christine 328 Moran Martha 367 Morato, Catherine 361 Morden, Ruth 450 Moreland, Pamela 367 Morford, Shawn 427 Morgan, Jan 328 Morgan, Linda 377 Morgan, Michael 328 Morgan Raymond 461 Iviorganf Walter 328,405 Murray, Kenneth 125 Murray, Michael 354 Murrieta, Elizabeth 367 Musicer, Janice 216,301 , 330 Mussell, Vera 330 Muto, Micheline 366 Mutten, Jack 401 Myers, Chico 467 Myers, Earl 427 Myers, Juny 466 Myerson, Steven 243,301 , 329 N Naas, Judith 243,329,377 Naccarato, Timothy 254 Nagler, Michael 403 Nakagawa, Janet 437 Nakano, Jeannie 241,465 Nakata, William 434 Nakatsu, Gail 445 Namath, Joseph 467 Nanny, Margo 442 Nathanson, Frederick 329 Nathanson, Richard 329,405 Nation, Judy 329 Nattress, Cheril 329 Nava, John 292,329 Neavill, Jonnie 443 Neece, Gerald 230,239 Needham, Suzanne 329 Negin, Brian 467 Neilson, Dorothy 247,391 Neisingh, Sharon 461 Neiswender, Margaret 201 Nelson, Christina 377 Nelson, Gerald 466 Nelson, Jane 379 Nelson, Linda 439 Nelson, Marie 329 Nelson, Nancy 329 Nelson, Patrick 151,454 Nelson, Stephen 271,329 Nelson, Susan 387 Nelson, Trudy 379 Nesmith, Georgia 329 New, Christina 247 Newcomb, Barbara 329 Newcomb, Linda 356 Newell, Diane 381 Newlee, Terri 387 Newman, Charles 205,221 397 Newman, Joseph 125 Newman, Mark 430 Newquist, Deborah 436 Newsom, Jr., Bernard 329 Newton, Katherine 365 Ng, David 250 Nibley, Annette 368 Nibley, Jane 379 Nicholas, Margaret 367 Nichols, Cynthia 329,381 Nichols, Deborah 368 Nichols, Dorothy 424,435, 443 Nichols, John 164 Nicholson, William 271 Nickloff, Michael 329 Niehans, Linda 177 Nielson, Ruth 272,329 Niebuurt, Susan 214 Niiyla, Jason 427 Nis i, Deborah 356 Nishimori, Kenneth 329 Nishimura, Melvyn 259 Nishimura, Stanley 468 Nissen, Peter 125,458 Nitta, Eugene 329 Niwa, Jeffrey 424 Njoo, Hwa 364 Noble, Nancy 379 Noel, Ann 391,442 Noell, Jonathan 406 Nokes, Jeffrey 427 Nolan, Jere 155,430 Nolte, Linda 457 Nolte, Ronald 461 Nonneman, Stephen 329 Nordeen, Steven 125 Nordhagen, Ralph 406 Norman, John 170 Norman, Nancie 377,447 Nordian, Mariam 439 Norris, Wayne 329 Nowell, Allyson 269,366 Nowitzki, Candice 379 Nowlin, Michael 329 Nuckolls, Anne 367 Nuemeier, Lisa 395 Nugent, Jr., Bobby 329, 409 Nunan, John 413 Nutter, Gail 242,258,329 Nutter, Steven 403 Nygaard, Robert 151 Nyhoff, Carol 439 O Oatis, George 440 Oberti, Larry 142 O'Brien, Gregory 403 O'Brien, Karen 364,365 O'Brien, Nancy 379 O'Connor, Kathleen 329 O'Connell, Patricia 421, 444,449 O'Day, Gerald 329 O'Dell, Judith 269 Odom, Frank 360 Oehlman, Robert 164,411 O'Flaherty, Michael 329, 399 Ogden, Bud 135 Ogden, Nancy 219 Ogdon, Michael 329 Ogilby, Gary 434 Ogilvie, Cynthia 450 Ogle, Mary 377 Oglesby, Leanne 457 Oguri, Chiyomi 469 O'Hara, Kathleen 440 Okada, Hiroko 329 Okuda, Valerie 255,449 Oliveira, Jeanne 329 Ollis, Donald 329 Olmos, Robert 329 O'Lone, Carol 453 Olsen Ann 171 173 329 Olsen, caren 329,355 Olsen, Olsen, Olson, Olson, Olson, Diane 330 Ralph 125 Bruce 295 Edward 407 Glenn 155,427 Olvany, Lynn 368,379 O'Malley, Thomas 362 O'Neal, Mary-Catherine 330 377,397 O'Neil, Patrick 330 O'Neill, Constance 379 Ong, Betty 302,330,359 Ong, Jackie 449 Onstott, Jenifer 330 Oppezzo, Timothy 125 Orcutt, Linda 330,445 Ordway, Gary 140,427 Orel, Judy 330,375 Oretsky, Carolyn 368 Oritt, Paul 330 Orland, Joan 270,364 Orlick, Steven 302,330 Ornelaz, Raymond 154,157 Orphan, Pamela 451 Orr, Caroline 463 Orr, Robert 403,409 Ortega, Phyllis 383 Ortegren, Leif 425 Ortiz, Carlos 130,131,330 Osborn, Deborah 330 Osborne, Leonard 205 Osendorf, Gary 124 O'Shaughnessy, Brian 458 Osmundson, Linda 462 Ospital, Jean 330 Ostrin, Richard 426 Otani, Janice 330 Otis, James 125,413 O'Toole, Peggy 440 Ottmer, Stephen 423 Otto Ill, Walter 407,421 ,452, 454 Ottonello, Susan 330 Overland, Patricia 330 Overton, Sam 430 Owen, Patricia 330 Owens, Carolyn 441 Owens, James 151,403 Owens, Nancy 381 Owens, Pamela 449 Owens, Timothy 233,460 Owings, Patricia 446 Oyama, Patricia 391 P Pabis, Estelle 441 Padrick, Thomas 271,330 Page, Diane 451 Page, Marcia 361 Page, Sharon 356 Paget, James 330 Paggi, L Paine, B Paine, B Paine, B Painter, Palmer, Palmer, Palmer, Palmer, Palmer, Palmer, Palmer, Palmer, Palmqu inda 367 arbara 356 illie 213,330 onnie 330 Judith 200,258,454 Betsy 368 Christine 377 Janice 255,359 Karen 365 Margaret 330 Steve 430 Suzanne 446 Victoria 445 st, Susan 366,383 Pam, Judith 462 Panovich, Linda 377,459,461 Paone, Timothy 403 Papac, Gail 441 Papas, Chris 393,413 Pape, lsaac 430 Papoutsis, Marie 461 Pappenfus, John 411 Paquette, Sally 452,457 Pareto, Stanley 116,122,123, 124 5112 .. riiiiiw ' Catching up on newsworthy events, animated conversation over some these two Gaucho coeds carry on an amusing item in El Gaucho. Parham, Merrell 467 Parker, Angela 330 Parker, Eileen 330 Parker, Howard 217,417 Parker, Janet 222 Parker, Joan 222,330 Parker, John 330 Parker, Judith Kay 205 Parker, Judith 249 Parker, Linda 421,444,445 Parkhill, Alan 395 Parlick, Bobby 222 Parsons, George 421,427 Parsons, James 330 Paslay, Donald 430 Patrick, Dennis 330 Patruso, Susan 439 Patsel, Lynn 383 Patterson, Carole 381 Patterson, Charles 421,425 Patterson, Daniel 330 Patterson, Dale 368,377 Paul, Kathleen 457 Paul, Michael 401 Paulson, Virginia 244,255, 391 Pauly, June 330 Pauly, Meryl 330 Payne, Donald 330,417 Peacock, Darlene 463 Peacock, Gail 330 Pearce, Kent 404 Pearce, Susan 379,463 Pearse, Carol 377 Pearson, Donald 125 Pearson, Gary 237,330 Pearson, Kenneth 131 Pearson, Nancy 447 Pearson, Randal 399 Peck, Joyce 440 Peck, Linda 330 Pecyna, Linda 446 Pedersen, Eric 415 Pederson, Kristin 330 Pedlow, Wendy 379 Peeters, George 401 Peirce, Kathleen 330,385 Pelka, Gary 363 Pellegrini, Lynne 367 Pelusi, Vicki 330,377 Peluso, Terry 413 Pelzer, William 330,403 Pendergast, George 257 Penn, Stephanie 439 Penner, Susan 447 Pennypacker, Jean 330 Pennypacker, Philip 199, 243,301,330 Pensky, Norman 240 Pentecost, Carolyn 379 Peregoy, Susan 294 Pereira, Randall 257 Perelli-Minetti, Robert 467 Perez, Ernest 467 Perkins, Fraser 466 Perry, Buddy 330 Perry, Candace 383 Perry, John 428 Perry, Katherine 444,447, 450 Perske, Louis 330 Peters, Alexander 145 Peters, Mary 201 Petersen, Alan 426 Petersen, Deborah 330,441 Phyllis 438 Petersen, Petersen, Wesley 467 Peterson, Bruce 360 Peterson, Carol 249 Peterson, Debora 377 Peterson, Frances 383 Peterson, Kathleen 231,447 Peterson, Michael 425 Peterson, Ruth 330,377, 397 Petraitis, Peter 208 Petrie, Catherine 331 Petrini, Linda 453 Petrone, James 165,411 Petrosian, Larry 331 Pettine, Mark 397 Pevey, Lavon 441 Pfeiffer, Kristen 331 Pfitzer, Jill 361,383 Pfitzer, Judy 361 Phelan, Nancy-Ann 434, 441 Phelps, Kimberly 331 Phelps, Mark 182 Philibosian, John 95,271 Phillips, Carolyn 331 Phillips, John 420 Phillips, Karna 331,385 Phillips, Linda 356 Phillips, Nancy 437 Robert 181,360 Phillips, Phillips, Susan 331 Phipps, Nancy 463 Piantanida, Gregory 75,454 Piantanida, Jr., Raymond 407 Pickle, Patricia 222,331 Pidgeon, Charlene 294 Pierce, Cathleen 331 Pierce, Elizabeth 447 Pierce, Gregory 145,428 Pierce, Kathleen 331 Pierson, Ellen 391 Pierucci, Richard 331 Pilegard, Cris 427 Pilgram, Patricia 95 Pilotte, Patricia 238 Pimentel, Gary 392,407 Pinter, Cathy 367 Piper, Nancy 453 Piper, Sandra 439 Pirdy, James 208 Pirruccello, Mary 451 Pittman, Douglas 222 Pittman, Linda 331 Plancich, Parme Kay 364 Plock, Roger 350 Ploessel, Nancy 463 Plunkett, Joseph 399 Pluth, David 267 Poindexter, Cynthia 205 Poland, Arlette 431 Polite, Debrah 447 Pollock, Katherine 364 Ponce, Nenita 224,463 Ponce, Norma 451 Poncini, Cheryl 441 Pontier, Michael 331 Pope, Nancy 436 Popoff, Christa 331 Popoff, Peter 331,417 Porter, Conley 237 Porter, Marilyn 387 Portnoy, Marcia 439 Posner, Barry 199 Posthuma, Stephen 331 Potter, Barbara 331 Potter, Caroline 201 ,356, 357,387 Powell, Lloyd 331 Powell, Michael 154 Powell, Susan 331 Powers, Michael 154,156, 215 Poytress, Jon 401 Prather, Terri 331 Pratt, Charles 468 Pratt, Deryl 247,379 Pray, Marta 440 Prewett, Yvonne 224 Price, Anthony 331 Price, Cynthia 331 Price, James 233,234,331 Priest, James 124 Priestley, Joanne 442 Priolo, Christopher 98 Pritchard, Mary 247,379 Prizmich, Stephen 458 Procter, Gregg 468 Prossor, John 291 Prouse, Patricia 331 Prout, Barbara 291 Pryor, Jean 332 Ptak, Pe9QV 383,441 Pucci, Gerald 428 Pugh, Mark 131 Pulich, Robin 436 Puolsen, Pamela 436 Purtymun, Pamela 441 Purvin, Jr., Robert 332 Putnam, Howard 466 Putnam, Jim 466 Puttock, John 245,257 Pybrum, Barbara 201,367 Q Quadraccia, Sandra 332 Quan, Cynthia 367 Quetnick, Sandra 379 Quinlan, Joyce 332 Ouon, Vidda 249,383 R Radford, John 395 Radford, Stephen 395 Radosh, Richard 428 Rafael, Richard 413,428 Raftery, Anne 435 Ragsdale, James 429 Raiguel, Faith 270 Rainey, Maurice 42,52 Raiter, Robyn 247,332,291 Ralphs, Linda 391 Ramay, Adrienne 332 Ramay, Richard 466 Rampy, Troy 333 Ramsay, Jr., William 333 Randal, Elizabeth 453 Randall, Gregory 425 Randall, Ruth 383 Randolph, James 125,151 Randolph, Richard 245 Randtke, Daniel 241 Randtke, Deborah 241 Randtke, Peter 332 Ranere, Anthony 266 Ranick, Mary Ann 421,435, 441 Rankin, Bruce 267 Rankin, Patricia 383 Ranni, Lucianne 368 Ransom, Susan 443 Ranta, James 128 Rapanut, Agustin 124 Rapoza, Irene 440 Rapp, Jr., Donald 332 Rapp, James 395,457 Rascati, Wayne 227,239, 240,242,332 Rasch, Susan 332 Rashdall, Hastings 424 Rasmussen, Janet 256 Rasmussen, Melinda 332 Rasmussen, William 412, 413 Rathbun, Carol 256 Ratliff, Gregory 126,151 Ratliff, Judith 447 Rattet, Jeffrey 415 Rattner, Linda 442 Raun, Pamela 461 Rauth, Thomas 332,409 Rawles, Robert 332,395 Ray, Carter 354 Ray, Shirley 445 Rayden, Jonathan 417 Rea, Richard 426 Reader, Jr., Rex 440 Ready, Diane 440 , Ready, Sharon 247,383 Real, Jr., Emil 468 Rear, Nancy 332 Rector, Ann 246,247,385 Redalje, Donald 257,460 Redemske, Nancy 332 Reed, Andrea 438 Reed, Christine 367 Reed, Sharon 332,375 Reed, Thomas 429 Reedy, John 427 Reese, Ronald 294,332 A break in the rainy weather finds these members of an acting class moving outdoors to Reese, Thomas 225 Reetz, Joan 225 Refvem, Catherine 449 Rehder, Mark 457 Rehm, Jeradean 256,387 Reich, Sharon 332 Reid, Carolyn.366 Reilley, Edward 332 Reilly, Dennis 124 Reilly, Patricia 439 Reilly, Stephen 429 Reinauer, Paul 332 Reinhardt, Kirk 363 Reinhold, Ann 435,443 Reising, William 458 Reisser, Linda 464,465 Remley, Carol 332,446 Renger, Robert 176 Rentz, Robert 269 Rethorst, John 229 Reuter, Marjorie 364 Rex, Douglas 137,138 Rex, Lesley 361,363 Reynolds, Analee 433 Douglas 426 Reynolds, Reynolds, Gary 332 Reynolds, Marjorie 237,332 Reynolds, Mary 332 Reynolds, Peter 176 Reynolds, Sally 249,332, 385 Rhoda, Christopher 170 Rhone, Sandy 491 Ricatto, Betty 359 Ricci, Robert 467 Rice, Patricia 379 Rice, Walter 430 Rich, Laura 244 Richards, Marjory 332 Richardson, Carla 332 Richardson, Robert 332 Richardson, William 333 Richert, Robert 333 Richert, Ruth 364 Ricketts, Dolores 333 Rickman, Susan 435,443 Ricks, Christopher 427 Riede, Stephen 229 Riegle, Janis 364 Ries, Catherine 365 Rigali, Richard 125 Riggs, Linda 469 Rightmer, Philip 411 Rigney, Thomas 333 Riley, Billie 465 Riley, John 159,425 Riley, Robert 411 Riley, Sharon 333 Rindge, Marguerite 461 Riordan, Donna 333,385 Riparetti, John 333 Rippe, Stephen 137,138,140, 404. Riske, Donna 462 Ristau, Leah 385 Ritchie, Kevin 407 Ritter, Marshall 154 Ritter, Roger 333 Ritter, Susan 294 Ritts, Rodger 427 Ritz, Sandra 449 Ritzau, Jr., Erik 158 Rivara, Louis 333,457 Rivera, Janet 439 Roan, Raymond 397 Robb, Stephen 411 Roberts, Catherine 333 Roberts, Charles 176,457 Roberts, Christopher 160,161, 333 Roberts, David 333 Roberts, Douglas 333 Roberts, Janice 244,249 Roberts, Nancy 333 Roberts, Patricia 177 Roberts, Paul 333 Robertson, Phillip 427 Robins, Ross 226,467 Robinson, Charles 333 Robinson, James 151 Robinson, John 397 Robinson, Leslie 333 Robinson, Mary 469 Robison, James 428 Robison, Kenneth 411 Roche, Christine 333 Rochelle, Deborah 441 Rochlin, Clifford 333 Rockett, Edward 245 Rodd, Robert 146 Roddy, Carla 333 Rodeen, Dennis 407 Rodgers, James 124 Rodgers, Rebecca 333 Rodgers, Thomas 134,136,138 Rodgers, Wayne 355 Rodman, James 269 Rodman. Karen 333 take advantage of the unconfined natural setting of a campus lawn. Rodriguez, Lynn 302,333 Rodriguez, Patricia 438 Roesen 256 Rogers, , Judith 269 Alice 379 Melinda 75,247,255, Rogers, Rogers, ,391 Susan 333 Rohlf, Roberta 218,333 Rohrer, Ellen 333 Rojas, Sheryle 366 Roller, Leslie 399 Romain, Alexa 366 Romain, Paul 333 Romanchak, Barbara 269, 364 Romberg, Rosemary 333 Rommel, Mary 355 Rookstool, Judith 432 Roos, William 124 Root, William 425 Rose, Ernest 403 Rose, Gary 427 Rose, Steven 295 Rose, William 333 Rosen, Alice 302,333 Rosen, Jeffrey 145,411 Rosenberg, Fredric 461 Rosenbleet, Terri 333 Rosenzweig, Sol 397 Roseth, Donald 430 Ross, Barbara 333 Ross, David 333,355 Ross, Pamela 255,381 Ross, Steven 151,153 Rossen, Steven 454 Rossillon, Donna 333 Rossmannek, Fred 430 Roth, Carey 415 Roth, Cheryl 379 Roth, Karen 333 Roth, Kirsten 333 Roth Richard 228,229 Roth, Virginia 200,367 Rotman, Mark 360 Rounds, Gerald 428 Rouse, Ronald 137,138 Rousseau, Randall 468 Rovzar, Suzanne 377 Rowan, Lynda 447 Rowe, Nancy 361 Rowen, Celia 222 Rowen, Russell 333 Rowley, Blythe 437 Royster, Robert 333 Rubenstein, Craig 166,333, 408,409 Ruble, Catherine 356 Ruby, Martha 382,383 Rudin, Michael 200 Rudolph, Sharon 379 Ruempler, Henry 333,392, 413 Ruffatto, Janis 333 Ruggles, Tracy 225,303,333, 374,383 Ruiz, Norma 462 Ruliffson, Elizabeth 247,391 Ruling, Karl 427 Runwold, Thomas 417 Runyon, Gregory 124 Runyon, William 151,424 Russell, Anne 442 Russell, John 333,411 Russell, Kathleen 199 Russell, Russell Michael 333 Patricia 387 Russell, Sydney 434 Russo, Dennis 426 Rust, Richard 401 Rutowski, Mary Anne 453 Ryan, Michael 426 Ryan, Jr., William 405 Rydbom, Sharon 359 Ryder, Thomas 403 Rysdale, Timothy 267 S StClair, Suzanne 383 Saleeby, Becky 377 Salentine, Chris 427 Salisbury, Edana 465 Salles, Gerald 403 Seaborg I Salm, Arthur 458 Salthouse, Timothy 333 Sammons, Jo Anne 333, 377 Sanbower, Roy 423 Sandall, Orville 220 Sanders, Judy 333 Sandler, Donna 421,452, 453 Sanesi, Norman 417 Sanguinetti, Mary 258,333, 469 Sanichas, Evadne 437 Santantonio, Daniel 417 Santaw, Sheila 465 Santos, Linda Jane 432 Santos, Linda 434 Sargent, Jr., John 334 Saroini, Kay 367 Sarquis, Gregory 411 Sasski, Wendell 424 Sasselli, Roy 335 Sauban, Valerie 440 Sauceda, Naomi 270 Saucer, Mary 241 Saucier, Sandra 334 Sauls, Louise 457 Saulsbury, Robert 397 Sawai, Sylvia 334 Sawyer, Viola 447 Saylor, Michael 154 Scagliotti, Nancy 226,379 Scantlebury, Joan 334 Scarlett, Patricia 247 Schabot, Joseph 426 Schachter, Robert 140,457 Schaefer, Linda 335 Schafer, Bruce 427 Schafer, Edward 335 Schaffer, Lauren 446 Schaffer, Peter 468 Schalk, Nancie 367 Scharff, Joseph 334 Scharff, Robert 423 Schell, Craig 154,334,403 Schell, Sherrie 445 Schemmel, Dee 334 Schenck, Sheila 334 Schenk, Marilynn 334 Schetter, David 355 Schick, Carolyn 334,381 Schilbrack, Karen 465 Schleber, Carolyn 368 Schlesinger, Teri 431 Schless, Barbara 242,301, 303,334 Schmandt, Susan 213,334, 377 Schmickrath, Susan 294 Schmidt, Barbara 452,457 Schmidt, Bruce 334,411 Schmidt, Jacqueline 208, 243,244 Schmidt, Linda 431 Schmidt, Maxine 434 Schmidt, Peter 454 Schmidt, Teresa 438 Schmidt, Vicki 387 Schminke, Paula 380,381 Schmitz, Jean 438 Schnaible, Denis 454 Schneider, Ann 357,391 Schneider, Jacquelyn 334 Schneider, Jane 439 Schneider, Mary 390 Schneider, Pamela 334 Schneider, Robert 409 Schoch, John 155 Schodt, Frederick 430 Schoeser, Mary 449 Scholes, Thomas 395 Scholl, Steven 335 Scholle, Cliff 335 Schrader, Sandra 451 Schregardus, Janet 367 Schroeder, .lohn 335,424 Schroeder, Ronald 415 Schroeder, Stanley 335 Schub, Mark 335 Schubert, David 458 Schulte, Valerie 37 Schultz, Lynette 335 Schultz, Sandra 335 Schulz, Robert 335 Schumann, Susan 387 Schuricht, David 461 Schuyler, Susan 440 Schwartz, Alan 335 Schwartz, Janeice 171 Schwartz, Marilyn 436 Schwartz, Nancy 375 Schwartz, Robert 467 Schwartz, Wendy 455 Scobey, Janice 385 Scopinich, Liliana 437 Scott, Ana 421,452,455 Scott, Donald 335,399 Scott Glen 129 Scott, Ke ndall 432 Scott, Lessie 434 Scott, Michael 405,427 Scott, Robert 335 Scott, Susan 173,420,464 Scurr, Jane 383 I, David 335 Seabury, Craig 427 Seaman, Ann 383 Seargeant, Janet 421,459,463 Sears, Stephen 335 Seeber, Donna 383,440 Seibert, Richard 467 Seidell, John 240 Seifert, Virginia 367 Seldomridge, Ray 430 Self, Sherry 389 Selin, Charles 215,269,271, 335 Selin, Jr., Roy 335 Sellars, Don 335 Sellman, Steven 234,363 Sembler, Lynn 447 Semegran, Barry 335 Senesac, Steven 467 Senese, Marilyn 229,335 Senn Wagemans, Charles 360 Senn Van Basel,'Hans 360 Senzaki, Wesley 454 Seput, Gary 170,413 Serne, James 430 Serpas, Helena 449 Setrakian, Philip 335,415 Settle, Bettye 395 Settle, Jr., Henry 405 Sewell, Marc 417 Sexton, Jr., John 425 Shafer, Estella 335 Shahood, Anita 453 Shanahan, Janis 436 Shangler, John 335,403 Shannon, Cathleen 465 Shapiro, Bruce 427 Shapiro, Frank 427 Shapiro, Martin 268 Shaskey, Norman 215,302, 335,399 Shaw, Carolyn 442 Shaw, Sau ndra 335 Shay, Catherine 421,439 Shea, Karen 357 Shea, William 466 Shearer, Toni 436 Sheffield, Barbara 176 Shehorn, John 426 Sheibley, John 125 Shellum, Roberta 241 Shemaria, Margaret 335 Shank, Robert 335 Shepard, Lawrence 420,460 Sheridan, James 205 Sheridan, Phyllis 335 Sherman, Debra 201,256,387 Sherman, Leslye 231 Sherman, Michael 335 Sherman, Susan 335 Sherwood, Margaret 335,383 Sherwood, Patricia 335 Shibata, Janis 233 Shimabuku, Grace 455 Shimamura, Keiko 450 Shimasaki, Donald 421,459, 461 Shinbrot, Mark 269 Shingai, Robert 176 Shingai, Sharon 335 Shirar, Nannerl 335 Shire, Michael 426 Shirey, Pamel 356 Shoemaker, Constance 335, 431 Shoji, David 161 Shoji, Thomas 124 Shoop, Terry 270,335,377 Shoor, Kenneth 128,146,397 Shoultz, Carol 438 wi .Ee,a:.e2'f3-wQJL44. - 4 . - L A young man's eye follows his fancy, which, in this case, seems to be the Shreve, William 407 Shroth, Melanie 241 Shroyer, Thomas 335 Shryer, Marc 426 Shuler, Peggy 379 Shumer, Loren 124 Shumway, Marilyn 294,335 Sichi, Gordon 401 Siefkin, David 427 Siemers, Steven 401 Silacci, Arlyn 361,387 Silken, Barbara 335 Sills, Deborah 208 Silver, Judith 450 Silvera, Douglas 468 Silverberg, Warren 224 Silverman, Barry 124 Silverstein, Robert 454 Silvett, Larry 138 Simkins, Michael 425 Simmerman, Terry 202, 356,357 Simmons, Adele 387 Simmons, Judith 389 Simmons, Robert 407 , 3 ' -A - . Simmons, Susan 202 Simon, James 421,459,468 Simons, Beth 450 Simons, Henrietta 367 Simons, Susan 244 Simonson, Linda 433 Simpson, Diane 335 Simpson, James 128,161 , 335,409 Simpson, John 335 Simpson, John William 335 Simpson, Laurie 364 Simpson, Thomas 271,335 Sims, Lois 381 Sinclair, Richard 393,407 Singer, Cheryl 335,379 Singer, Coral 368 Sirota, Morris 257 Sism an, Stefan 420,467 Sisson, Paul 360 Sivley, Charles 360 Sizer, David 335 Skaggs, Penelope 367 Skidmore, Terry 335 Skillman, Dianne 111 shapely anatomy of this coed, one of many such distractions. Skinner, Kathleen 242,244 Skinner, Peter 335 Skowrup, Andrew 335 Skroup, Dave 161 Sladek, Jr., Phyllis 361 Slater, James 415 Slattery, Alice 420,435,437 Slavik, Thomas 407 Sleeper, Stephen 168 Slemp, Deborah 201,383 Sloane, Donald 466 Sloat, Christine 238,335 Slotterbeck ll, Scott 427 Sluga, Joseph 247,257 Slutzky, Nora 247 Smallenburg, Carol 270,272 336 Smallwood, Patrick 405 Smetana, Carol 200,457 Smith, Alan 129,147,395, 458 Smith, Anita 336 Smith, Beatrice 336 Smith, Brandt 336 Smith, Brenda 451 Smith, Bruce 336,405 Smith, Catherine Archer 336 Smith, Catherine 355 Smith, Cecilia 389 Smith, Cindra 381 Smith, Coralie 336,391 Smith, Craig Dellard 125 Smith, Craig 124 Smith Deborah 205,389 Smith, Dian 252 Smith, Donald 336 Smith, Douglas 254 Smith, Elizabeth 244,377 Smith, Eric 336,411 Smith, Gary Dale 95,100, 213,269 Smith Gary 269,271,397 Smith, George 220 Smith, Janet 445 Smith, Judy 391 Smith Lanelle 448 Smith Lawrence 205,214 Smith Leslie 445 Smith, Merisa 368 Smith, Paul 454 Smith, Phil 454 Smith, Roger 233 Smith, Sharon 238 Smith, Shelley 381 Smith, Stephanie 364 Smith, Stephen 336 Smith, Susan 336' Smith, Sylvia 361 Smith, Terry 449 Smith, Timothy 336 Smithline, Philip 158 Smoak, Gregory 395 Smothers, Wayne 124,403 Smyth, Laura 385 Snapp, Mary 336,377 Snashall, Robert 467 Snodgrass, Patricia 336 Snow, Nancy 113,387 Snowdon, Philip 128 Snowdon, William 336,460 Snyder, John 159,434 Snyder, Sandra 368 Soares, Margaret 244 Sobetzer, Linda 336 Sobin, Sheryl 375 Soeder, Sandra 294,336 Sogge, Teri 446 Solari, Bruce 142,402 Soli, Angela 270 Solomon, Barry 461 Solomon, Paul 269 Soltwedell, Kathleen 176, 336 Soluk, George 360 Somerhalder, Janet 442 Somers, Florence 336 Sommer, Wendy 366 Sorenson, Jackie 379,437 Sorensen, Neil 454 Soule, Alan 429 Southwick, Christine 440 Sowell, Margo 364 Spalding, Susan 453 Spaulding, Alan 336 Speciale, John 454 Speich, Pamela 461 Speier, Chris 154 Speier, Kurt 119,124 Spencer, Donna 336 Spencer, Jeff 180 Spencer, Scott 467 Spensko, Michael 142,336 Speyer, David 271,336 Spicer, Sylvia 336 Spiegleman, Richard 271, 336 - Spink, Charles 128,129, 146,336 Spita, William 468 Spitzer, Daniel 125 Spohn, Christopher 460 Spotten, Karen 435 Sprague, Norman 336 Sprankling, John 245,426 Sprigg, Virginia 464 Spruell, Deborah 264,336, 391 Spu rling, Darrel 125,415 Spurlock, Lewis 336 Stafford, Anita 447 Stafford, Cynthia 395,433 Stafford, Jack 468 Staiger, Beth 421,445 Staley, Sheila 434 Stamp, Sue 440 Stampley, Patricia 247,383 Stanchfield, Linda 269,336 Standish, Miles 336,392,415 Standlee, Shirley 383 Standridge, John 124 Stanford, Sharon 269,272,364 Stanley, Claudia 336,377 Stanley, Margaret 437 Stanley, Wendy 438 Stanton, Deborah 219 Stanton, Jaclynne 436 Stanton, Jean 434 Stanton, Vivian 231 Stark, Jeffrey 457 Starr, James 271 Starr, Naomi 465 Stary, Kathleen 379 ' Stasinis, Mark 360 Staus, Christine 336 Stayton, Susan 336 Steckel, John 128,129 Steedman, Stephen 336 Steele, Janet 377 Steele, Kathryn 336 Stegen, Pamela 247 Stegman, Hugh 355 Stein, Karen 435,443 Steinberg, Harold 336 Steinber, Kenneth 397 Steinman, Robert 336 Steinmetz, Ann 463 Sten, Stephanie 247 Stengele, Frank 236 Stephanou, Mary 357,387 Stephens, Sally 212,387 Stephens, Timothy 468 Stephenson, Gaye 336 Stephenson, Jo Ann 457 Sterling, Edward 337 Sterling, Steven 161 Stern, Gwyn 337 Stern, Jan 337 Sternadel, Constance 171 Stevens, Corinne 379 Stevens, Janine 448 Stevens, Jeanne 22 Stevens, Mark 434 Stevens, Jr., Peter 416,417 Stevens, Robert 337 Stevens, Sally 386 Stevenson, Patricia 385 Steward, Lynn 337 Steward, Mark 176 Stewart, Curtis 403 Stewart, Douglas 403 Stewart, Lindsey 255,381 Stewart, Randall 95,397 Regina 249 Stewart, Stewart, Sharon 337 Stewart, Virginia 469 Stickney, Steven 215 Stidham, Marila 364 Stieg, Susan 212 Stifter, Patricia 442 Stiles, Janice 269,445 Stillman, Lynn 447 Stillman, Roger 245 Stinson, Shawn 461 Stires, Sally 201,249,387 Stirling, Mark 428 Stockett, Stephen 425 Stockwell, Barry 413 Stoddard, Kirk 397 Stodgell, Ronald 337 Stone, Robyn 447 Stoneman, Nancy 337 Stoner, Steven 461 Stong, Marcia 337 Stoops, Linda 337 Stoops, Randall 337 Storms, Elizabeth 365 Storz, Lyn 355 Storz, Maryjane 337 Stosick, Marilyn 445 Stout ll, Earl 125 Stout, Sally 269,437 Strain, John 169 Stram, Ronald 360 Strange, Helen 337,377 Strapp, Jack 454 Stratton, Jonna 337,383 Strauss, Nancy 462 Street, Randy 257 Streisfield, Stephanie 374, 375 Strickland, Barbara 199, 242,337,461 Strickley, John 337 Strock, Martha 256 Strohbehn, Susan 258,337 Strong, Dennis 461 StrongrSharon 385 Strong, Terry 437 Stroup, Susan 448 Stuart, Douglas 337 Studer, Mary 461 Stulla, Kathryn 95,235,270 Sturdevant, Julaine 337 Stu rm, Jerry 429 Sturr, Bette 337,434 Sturtevant, Shelley 255 Stuster, Jack 337 Stutzman, Mary 440 Stutzman, Thomas 426 Styler, Susan 337 Sudman, Ellen 381 Suehiro, Steven 257,397 Sugita, Sandra 337,367, 368 Sullivan, Martha 337,377 Sullivan, Michael 288 Sullivan, Roberta 445 Sullivan, Theresa 443 Sunkel, William 337,401 Susman, Brent 338 Sutterfield, Edward 338, 411 Sutton, Marie 442 Swain, Susan 338,379 Swanson, Barbara 465 Swanson, Bruce 338 Sweeney, Jr., James 124 Sweet, Mary 435 Sweet, Paul 42,44,86,198, 199,299,301 ,338 Swift, Diane 387 Swim, Stephen 415 Swindall, Barbara 241,462 Swisher, Julie 338 T Taber, Stephen 235 Taggart, Douglas 413 Takeda, Carolyn 338 Talbot, Gary 338 Talmage, Deborah 379 Tam, Margo 250,442 Tam, Patricia 457 Tanaka, Deborah 244 Tanimoto, Lorine 338 Tankersley, Janice 381 Tankersley, Stanley 411 Tannen, Kathy 338 Tannenbaum, Peter 131 Tapper, Dennis 338 Tarbett, Susan 270 Tarr, Andrea 375 Tarvin, William 458 Tatum, John 151 Tatum, Robert 215 Taylor, Allan 124 Taylor, Jane 258 Taylor, Jeffrey 338 Taylor, Kathe 421 ,459, 465 Taylor, Linda 338,387 Taylor, Marc 145 Taylor, Mary 338 Taylor, Susan 338 Teigler, Katherine 357 Teixeira, Gail 69 Templar, Gail 213,338 Tenenbaum, Jon 454 Tenison, Joetta 244,365 Terrell, lngrid 338 Thacher, Penne 247,379 Theiss, Terry 451 Thelander, Barbara 359 Thiele, Barbara 255,461 Thielen, Arthur 158 Thistlethwaite, Mark 215 Thomas, Daniel 142 Thomas, Debra 391 Thomas, Donna 219 Thomas, Georgia 247,255, 259,391 Thomas, Howard 467 Thomas, Jr., James 461 Thomas, Susan 387 Thomas, Teresa 379 Thomas, William 417 Thompson, Brent 131,338 Thompson, Deborah 377 Thompson, Denise 446 Thompson, Harold 355 Thompson, Leonard 395, 457 Thompson, Mary 338 Thompson, Rebecca 269 Thompson, Roger 338 Thompson, Ronald 338 Thompson, Sheldon 407 Thompson, Thomas 64,427 Thomson, Luana 434 Thomson, Ronald 338 Thomson, Sylvia 256,391 Thooft, Otto 240,338 Thoroughman, Gary 425 Thorpe, Margaret 269 Thorsen, James 338 Thrower, Mildred 453 Thurm, Diane 270 Tibbetts, Gloria 455 Tiedy, Marsha 431 Tierney, Michael 424 Tilley, Richard 425 Tillman, Mary-Kaye 385 Tilton, Deborah 431 Timbrook, Janice 339 Timmer, Jr., Donald 399 Timmermann, William 339 Timmons, Scott 430 Tims, George 124 Tinney, Larry 430 Tischbirek, Merrily 339 Titley, Lorita 431 Todd, Nancy 377 Togami, Edwin 429 Tognoli, Linda 356 Tokushige, June 432 Tollefson, Paul 107,123,124 Tollette, Cynthia 442 Tomlinson, Timothy 458 Ton, Kathleen 437 Toon, John 425 Tornquist, Janet 200,445 Torres, Carmen 440 Torrez, Nena 435,441 Torrigino, Claire 465 Tosdal, Thomas 420,459,461 Toth, Miklos 339 Towle, Jr., Willard 339 Townsend, Lynne 361 Tracy, Raymond 240,339 Tracy, Scott 417,454 Trailkill, Georgia 442 Tranbarger, Thomas 403 Trattner, Kim 443 Travers, Dianne 391 Trens, Barbara 469 Trescott, Teresa 269,445 Treusch, Bradford 429 Trevithick, William 392,401 Tribelhorn, Roy 339 Trick, Jill 339 Tronset, Gloria 269 Trotter, Bruce 355 Trout, Gregory 339,409 Trowbridge, John 339 Troy, Donna 356 Troy, Nancy 339,463 Trueblood, Mark 339 Trum, Andrea 465 Trybul, Donald 397 Tschogl, John 140,428 Tubbs, Vicki 464 Tuch, Lawrence 415 Tuch, Richard 208 Broken glass and charred walls remain bombing of the new Faculty Club in the aftermath of April 11's dawn One man died in the tragedy. Tuck, Alexandra 249,387 Tucker, Christy 339 Tukusagaiwa, Michele 359 Turley, Judith 269 Turner, Barbara 272,375 Turner, Janis 212,258,420, 469 Turner, Linda 37,339 Turner, Mary 339 Turner, Steven 224,417 Turpel, Mark 461 Turpin, David 423 Tweedie, William 461 Twilegar, Laurel 469 Twining, Douglas 417 Twohy, Kevin 426 Twomey, Jr., Philip 425 Tyler, Joan 339 Tyler, Randall 427 U Uehara, Joanne 441 Ugarkovich, David 128 Umont, Glenn 339 Underwood, Jr., William 146 Ungerleider, Sandra 438 Uota, Gayle 216,242 Upton, Helen 272,438 Urbach, Margaret 339 Urlst, Nancy 339,379 Uthus, Steven 427 V Vail, Mary 201 ,203,213, 242,249,390,391 Vajretti, Jolene 469 Valdez, Joseph 339 Valdez, Jr., Manuel 142 Valdente, Michele 445 Valenzuela, Jeanette 339 Vallerga, Jack 397 Valpreda, Gail 255,391 Van Arsdale, Shelley 356 Vance, Jane 432 Vance, Katheryne 446 Van Dan, Patricia 247,385 Van DenToorn, Peter 268 Vandermeid, Lynne 379 Vander Meid, Robert 407 Vander Molen, Jo Ann 442 Vandervoet, Brian 466 Vandruff, Margaret 386 Van Dyne, Kathryn 390, 391,453 Van Epps, Robert 360 Van Miller, Eugenie 264 Vann Lindsay, Patrice 267 Van Peursem, David 339 Van Tilburg, Kathy 445 Varon, Ellen 451 Vartan, Robert 401 Vaughan, Caroline 367 Vaughan, Linda 339 Vaughan, Nancy 339 Vaughn, Jacqueline 445 Veach, Sharon 421,434 Vega, Vivian 433 Vela, Jan 244,359 Velthoen, Brian 397 Venable, Ted 467 Vergari, David 428 Verheyen, Janet 339 Vernier, Craig 417 Vernon, Alice 258 Vernon, Catherine 339 Vernon, Jan 249,381 Vernon, John 339 Vernon, Leslie 339 Vesley, Jeffrey 426 Vickman, Nancy 339 Victor, Michael 339,355 Viducich, Mark 360 Viehman, Claudia 339 Vieth, James 145 Vilven, Lawrence 395 Vincent, David 403 Vincent, Linda 447 Vining, Kent 259,339 Vise, Mary 238,469 Vishanoff, Mignon 339 Voelzow, David 397,430 Vohryzek, Eileen 201,461 Vondrak, Charlotte 383 Von Essen, Janet 241,464 Voss, Houston 397 Voyen, Paul 200,224 Vredenburgh, Peter 125 Vrilakas, Cynthia 431 Vuilleumier, Stephen 468 W Wada, Christine 441 Waddell, John 339 Making a dent in the voluminous Rhone exercises a bit of the diligence reading assigned at UCSB, Sandy necessary to stay on top. Wictorin, Clifford 340,407 Wagner, Kendall 145 Wagniere, Jan 201 Wahl, Jr., William 339 Wailes, Betty 421,444 Waite, Karen 339 Wake, Victoria 447 Wakeley, James 257 Wakeman, Jeannine 446 Waldau, Paul 257,402 Waldman, Lee 397 Walek, Michael 125 Walker, Barbara 431 Walker, John 226,227 Walker, Stanley 339 Walker, Timothy 118,124, 339 Walker, William 405,411 Wall, David 339 Wall, Margaret 437 Walla, John 158 Wallace, Angela 453 Wallace, Anita 357 Wallace, Cynthia 339,391 Wallace, Geoffrey 205 Wallace, Leslie 446 Wallace, Norene 365 Wallace, Rickey 125 Wallace, Thomas 142 Walsh, Pamela 365 Walsh, Thomas 154,421 , 459,466 Walsh, Vera 224,433 Walsten, Mary 420,435,436 Walter, Linda 339 Walters, Susan 359 Walton, Gene 413 Walton, Jr., Walter 271 Walton, Jr., William 401 Wanek, Jane 238 Wankowski, Janet 465 Wanter, Beverly 224,421 Wapner, Fred 457 Ward, Gary 354,355 Ward, Janet 389 Ward, Michael 339 Ward, Patricia 339,377 Warden, Annette 339 Warden, Elizabeth 462 Wardlaw, Blair 457 Ware, Sally 434 Weiashart, Candace 433 Welch, James 340 Welch, Jonathan 355 Weller, Sally 225,226,243 Weller, William 434 Wellhouse, Christina 208 Wells, Christine 383 Wells, Douglas 340 Wells, Nancy 249 Wells, Susan 436 Wells, William 405 Welman, Melody 381 Wenger, William 95 Wenick, Nancy 437 Weak, Claudia 434 Werner, Karen 463 Werner, Walter 240 Wertheimer, Keith 415 West, James 397 West, Mike 401 Westberg, Martha 464 Weston, Kenneth 242 Weston, Marilyn 340 Weston. Robert 205,206, 243,298,301 ,340,468 Wexler, Susan 451 Wheatley, Freda 464 Wheagley, Lesley 304,340, 3 1 Wheeler, Priscilla 340 Wheeler, Richard 340 Whela White White n, June 361 , Barbara 340 Carolyn 441 White, Cayley 247 White, Gayle 455 White, George 460 White, James 340 White, John 125 White, Katherine 440 White, Margaret 249,461 White, Michael 426 White Paula 389 Wh ne, Roberta 340 White, Scott 430 Warner, Michael 460 Warner, Rusell 339 Warren James 212,339, 354,355 Warrick, Alice 173,385 Warsaw , Terry 427 Wascoe, Nancy 461 Warshawsky, Ruth 68 Wass, Michael 339 Watkins, Gary 430 Watkins, Jan 445 Watrous, Gary 397 Watson, Debra 340,469 Watson, Gregory 427 Watterman, Martha 451 Watts, Bruce 409 Watts, John 151 Wayman, James 145 Weatherly, Judith 421,434 Weaver, Diana 256 Webb, Cynthia 340 Webb, Sean 225 Webb, William 340 Weber, Cynthia 244,270 Weber, Diane 340 Weber, Julia 447 Weber, Susan 212,364,365 Weble, Pam 368 Webster, Meridith 421,459, 462 Webster, Sylvia 441 Weeg, James 415 Weems, Frances 225 Wegeforth, Jo 385 Wegeforth, Paula 374 Weibel, Diana 340 Weller, Nancy 451 Weinberger, Paul 124,403 Weindling, Jeffery 430 Weiner, Alice 375 Weiner, Gregory 399,424 Weinhold, Roland 340 Weinstein, Laura 364 Weinzimmer, Bernard 259, 355 Weix, John 340 Weiss, Shirley 453 Whiteley, Marilyn 256 Whitelock, Pamela 357 Whitesides, Michael 151 Whitton, Lang 129,402,424 Wictorin, Janet 200,381 Wieman, Jane 383 Wiese, Lynn 340 Wigle, Barbara 443 Wilber, Richard 257 Wilcox, Claudia 244,249, 391 Wilcox, Gary 340 Wilder, Dale 340 Wilkerson, Roderick 213, 224,340,411 Wilkins, William 424 Wilkinson, Douglas 429 Wilkinson, Robert 362 Wilks, Kathleen 340 Wilks, Victoria 449 Williams, Brian 271,424 Williams, Carey 118,119, 124,203,235 Willia Willia Willia Willia Willia Willia ms, Carol 340 ms, Cromwell 124 ms, Jill 340,385 ms, Leslie 240 ms, Lowell 340 ms, Lynn 421,444, 446 Williams, Margaret 247 Willia Willia Willia ms, Marjorie 391 ms, Michael 340 ms Nicki 340 Williams, Russell 423 Willia Willia ms, Samuel 411 ms, Sarah 449 Williams, Steven 146,271 Williams, Teresa 247,377 Williams, Toni 255 Williamse, Katherine 453 Williamsen, Wendy 91 Willson, Sally 377,437 Wilner, Samuel 124 Wilsey, Jayne 437 Wilso Wilso Wilso n, Betty 270,455 n, David Clayton 76 n, David 158,340 Wilson, Gary 340 Wilson, John 401 Wilson, Karen 356 Work on the new publications building and frequent and severe rainstorms of the expanded quarters of the facilities made Storke Tower resumes after one of the winter season. The urgent need for the summer completionanecessity. Wilson, Robert 340 Wilson, Stephen 269,271 Wilson, Walter 129 Wiltse, Harold 340,409 Wiman, Stephen 340 Winchester, Timothy 340, 405 Winders, Steven 403 Windle, John 205 Windsor, Wanda 269,436 Wing, Christopher 222 Wing, Sharon 256,387 Winquist, Raymond ,413 Winslow, Verla 359,381 Winton, Daniel 220,340, 411 Wirshup, Thomas 340 Wisotsky, Michele 457. Witek, Donald 428 Witnov, Stanley 409 Witt, Dorothy 455 Wittman, Stephen 340,405 Wittmeyer, Nancy 445 Woessner, Thomas 467 Wohletz, Deborah 447 Woita, Elizabeth 432 Wolcott, Maren 372,389 Wolf, Alan 340 Wolf, Andrew 259,360 Wolf, lleene 249,340,391 Wolfe, Judith 340 Wolfe, Kathryn 340 Wolfe, Mardi 438 Wolfe, Michael 426 Wolfram, Gary 126,127, 151,200,457 Wollner, Karen 205,389 Wolven, Gail 465 Wolven, Nancy 171,244, 387 Wolverton, Christopher 468 Wolz, James 181,340 Wong, Elsie 250,438 Wong, Loretta 302,340, 359 Wong, Patricia 432 Wong, Raymond 250 Wood,'Ardean 340 Wood, David 420 WooclfDianne 381 Wood Ill, George 232 Wood,,l:geann 377 Wood, Martha 450 Wood, Patricia 451 Wood, Jr., William 128,411 Woodhouse, Samuel 401 Woods, Donald 426 Woods, Nancy 270,443 Woodward, Marian 469 Woodward lll, Stanley 131, 401 Wool, Julia 434 Woolev. Susan 450 Woolf, Jerry 146,405 Woolsey, Rae 241 Wooten, Jr., Robert 340 Word, William 126,127, 151,152 Work, Susan 340,457 Wray, Janet 436 Wrench, Dwight 426 Wrench, Jr., Edwin 340 Wrentmore, David 411 Wright, Dennis 413 Wright, Jeffrey 425 Wright, John 151 Wright, Melinda 377 Wright, Michael 164,167, 237,239,413 Wright, Patricia 270,445 Wright, Sunne 202,243,244 Wu, King-Fu 426 Wulkau, Carla 340,389 Wyatt, Richalie 443 Wychgram, Daniel 288,341, 417 Wychopen, Kevin 202,423 Wyden, Ronald 138 Wygant, Gerald 151,153, 341 Y Yake, Ann 442 Yamaura, Lynn 341,359 Yano, Mark 125 Yap, Wen Tjoen 279,360 Yates, Kathleen 442 Yates, Lanse 341 Yates, Rebecca 255,383 Yeaden, Penelope 357 Yeager, Elizabeth 341,377 Yeager, Judith 368 Yee, Henry 425 Yegan, Kenneth 146,341, 403 Yeh, Timothy 302 Yen,Julia 341 Yoder, Susan 269,439 Yokoyama, Jane 241,242, 303,304,341 Yoshida, Stephen 466 Yoshino, Timothy 142 Yoshioka, Carlton 181 Youmans, Tim 341 Young, David 126,151,152, 429 Young, Jr., Hal 243,341, 405 Young, Kathleen 355 Young, Laureen 442 Young, Patricia 341 Young, Rebecca 453 Young, Rodger 122,123, 124,341,399 Young, Stephanie 341 Young, Thomas 415 Younger, Janice 247,391 Yox, Timothy 403 Yu, Chui-Ngan, Sally 432 Yu, Raymond 93,250 Z Zamora, Richard 421,430 Zaninovich, Maryann 247, 249,255,391 Zant, James 124 Zavala, Anna 258,469 Zearbaugh, Diane 381,448 Zeiger, Richard 226 Zerkle, Pamela 270,377 Ziemann, Susan 445 Zilz, Leonard 147 Zink, Luann 259 Zink, Marilyn 437 Zink, Ted 458 Zins, Dwight 399 Zischke, Dai 426 Zorich, Robert 411 Zseleczky, Joan 439 Zwartendyk, Katherine 359 S ri i N, l , 've of the construction scaffolding. Elevator Rising 175 feet off the ground, Storke scape at UCSB. Here, the impressl ' ' ' t rior to the removal service will carry visitors to the top. Tower vastly altered the expanding land- structure is seen jus p 1' 59 5 1 IWQW .. ' -5,2811 , , LMA Amid the beat of the drums and the noise deep conversation among students. Here at tained during dinner as well. of electric guitars, there is little chance for Francisco Torres the residents are enter- photo CREDITS Cover Hal Stevenson Color Richard Lane 3,12,13 Diehl Martin 3 Hans Rasmussen 2 Hal Stevenson 1,4,9 Bill Sunkle 8 Bob Ternavan 6,7,16,17,18,21,22,23,25 Black and White Bill Chapman 28B,3OB,35b,36b,37tl,b,38t,39,40, 42,45,54,55,60,66,67,77,100,101,102t,b Jim Freeberg 430b Roger Hagie 129tr,204b Steve Herzog 103b Raymond Jung 465b Lee Margulies 130,131lt,144tl,146t Diehl Martin 8O,84,233b,43Otr Thom lVlcDonald 487 Jerry Neece 114t,116,117b,118b,120t,bl,b,132tr,tl 142t,b,143b,tl,146b,147bl,tr,c,181 b Brian Negin 30t Chuck Newman 33t Gary Pearson 31t,33,37tr,65b,80,98,99,168, 169,178,179,230b,232bl,234t,br,235b,327, 328,354t,355t,356,36Ob,361b,362tr,br,363t, 364t,366tr,br,363t,364,366tr,368t,369, 424,426b,432tr,442b,446tr,448br,449bI, 453tr,454t,456c,462t,477,479,481,482, 484,486tr,br,488,492,493,494,495 Jerrold Schatzberg 496 Sharon Smith 66,67b Bill Sunkle 400,401 Larry Thorne 125t Chuck Wright 186b,483 - x K l l 1 1 xi 1 .v i 1 1, - 1 Y S N4 5 J i 4 4 I i . 1 I v A In m6lTlOl2lAlTl Dr. George E. Hand Ann G. Barry John D. Bill Jack R. Mendenhall Catherine A. Schofield Tommy R. Broyles Mary F. Fouquette A Frederick W. Jayne Kenneth Langford Stephen McNally - James Parks Dover 0. Sharp Beverly M. Watt General Dwight D. Eisenhower Senator Robert F. Kennedy 431.9 ,,jqi?'l4,,. Qi-4 at last Nly endless appreciation goes out to campus photographer, Hal, and his assistant, Buff, who gave us their best in every situation 5 to our adviser, Joe, for his constant help and influence, to the managing Katie, and every member of this or-die staff, and to my Howie. La Cumbre 1969 is history and soon this unforgettable year be, too. It has been nine solid months of a sometimes frustrating, but always painstaking transition for this campus. We have been made to realize the timeliness of our involvement in our community and each other. UCSB has really come alive this year, and there's hope in that. Perhaps we have captured some of that life and hope on these pages. Karen Feinstein, Editor 'wil . Q do ' - SJKM '75 4' I y


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University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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University of California Santa Barbara - La Cumbre Yearbook (Santa Barbara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Page 1

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