University of California Davis - El Rodeo Yearbook (Davis, CA)

 - Class of 1922

Page 1 of 226

 

University of California Davis - El Rodeo Yearbook (Davis, CA) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 226 of the 1922 volume:

.I gimWWV ubln rm: : .. ... ....$.4, x .w . r 1 H T. Ilia" .anUl3uHV!!-P- JHI-cl..nuaw$.u.l A . .v . .I?1.; .. THE RODEO Published Annually By The Associated Students of the Branch of the College of Agriculture Davis, Yolo County, California APRIL, 1922 M MM K m M M Na ,1 MCMJMAXV? , , XI M q "1th M , , W Q bf ,MJLVM'; 7 I V V b inKVWww prva t W able 01620106468 IIIIllHlIlIHIIlHlllllllllllltllllllllllllIIlIlllllllllIllllllIllllllllllllllllllll Advertisements .................................................................................................... ' ........................ 159-215 126, 127 Agricola. Statt ................................................................................... Alumni Notes 128 Associated Student Body ............................................................................................................ 66 Athletics .......................................................................... 77, 78 Autographs ................................................................................................................................... 2, 3 Baseball .......................................................................................................................................... 95-98 Zasket-Ball .................................................................................................................................... 91-94 Blue and Gold Dairy Club 75 3oxing .............................................................................................................................................. 103 Campus Characters ...................................................................................................................... 122,150 Cross Country Run ........................................................................................................................ 106 Dairy Livestock Judging Team ................................................................................................ 117 Dairy Products Judging Team ................................................................................................. 119 Dances ............................................................................................................................................ 111 Dedication ..................................................................................................................................... 6, 7 Divisions 11-27 Executive Committee .................................................................................................................. 67 Faculty ........................................................................................................................................... 8, 9 Farm Advisers in California ...................................................................................................... 64 Farm Scenes .................................................................................................................................... 10 Federal Board Men ........................................................................................................................ 62, 63 Football Foreword ........................................................................................................................................ 5 129-145 Fraternities Freshmen Class ........................................................................................................................... 58, 59 Glee Club ......................................................................................................................................... 72 Golden Hoof Club .......................................................................................................................... 73 Honor Societies ............................................................................................................................. 147-149 Inter-Fraternity Council ........................................................................................................... 69 Jitney Fair ..................................................................................................................................... 114 Jokes ...................................................................................................... 155-158 Junior Class ........................................................................................ ' ............................................ 56, 57 Literary 151-154 Organizations ................................................................................................................................ 65 Photographs .......................................................................................................................... 116, 118, 120 Picnic Day ........................................................................................................................................ 112,113 Pomology Round Table ................................................................................................................ 74 Portland Livestock Judging Team .......................................................................................... 115 Publications .................................................................................................................................... 123 Publicity Commlttee ............... 70 Rallies .............................................................................................................................................. 109 110 Rodeo Staff .................................................................................................................................... 124,125 School Year ................................................................................................................................ ,107 Senior Will ................................................................................................................................ 146 Senior Class .......................................................................................................................... 28-55 Standard Bred Poultry Club ................................................................................................. 76 State Fair Judging Team ...................................................................................................... 121 Table of Contents ............................................................................................................ 4 Tank Rush ................................................................................................................................ 108 Tennis ..................................................................................................... ' ------------------------------------ 105 Title Page ............................................................................................................................ 1 Track ..................................................................................................................... ' University Men ................................................................. .:::.:::: """"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" 93313? Welfare Committee ............................................................................... 1 Wrestling .................................................................................................................... 68 Y. M. c. A ---------------------------------------------- 1?? FOREWORD Illl--HII-llll-Illl- Illl' branch of the College of Agriculture, we have endeav- ored to place before you the events and memories of IN this issue of the Rodeo, the annual publication of the the past year in an attractive and interesting manner. With the College making the tremendous strides for- ward in agriculture that it has in the past year it is to be expected that a wealth of material could be found to be placed within these covers. We have not endeavored to cover the ground thoroughly, but only to record those things which in latter years will bring back memories of the College which are dear to the hearts of all. We have endeavored to give you a book that you will take pride in showing to your friends. We have endeavored to give all men the acknowledgment that they have earned. If, in this respect we have failed, we are indeed sorry and hope that our successors will profit by our mistakes. To the many students who have contributed articles and to the faculty who have helped with their welcome suggestions and contributions we extend our deepest gratitude. If we have succeeded in giving you a book that you are proud'of, then we are satisfied, and we hope that our successors in future years will endeavor to carry out the policy of.en1arging and refining this publication until it has reached the pinnacle of college publications. W. C. DeLAPP,JR., Editor. :3... .V.. 'w 4 . - . .I'. , . 'Itvbixy.b$zj$b.x, V, GEORGE O. HAMBLIN ALEX MCDONALD GEORGE PHILLIP RALPH L. DUNHAM ZLBeiJieatiun t0 ALEX MCDONALD, GEORGE 0. HAMBLIN, GEORGE PHILLIP; RALPH L. DUNHAM htg hulume at the Ruben 1'5 hehieateh t in recognition at their untiring effortg, loyalty anti trienhlinegg tn the QEuIIege 311D gatuhent ?Euhy alike. DAVIS, CALIFORNIA FACULTY OF THE BRANCH OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, 1 Al I! CIIUNIA IDAx 1' nu Ill llllll, Amxwmwmmmxx XXXNWWMRW V Faculty DAVID P. BARROWS President University of California THOS. FORSYTH HUNT Dean College of Agriculture EDWIN C. VOORHIES Director of Resident Instruction Administration C. B. Hutchinson,Director of Branch T. T. Tavernetti, Assist and Director J. Jacobson, Repair and Power I. F. Smith, Cashier D. G. McClise, Assistant to Comptroller G. E. Grady, Recorder Agriculture Engineering Professor L. J. Fletcher Mr. H. L. Belton Mr. R. C. Ingrim Mr. J. D. Miller Professor A. H. Hoffman Mr. H. C. Burkett Mr. E. J. Stirniman Mr. James Koeber Mr. C. E. Walsh Mr. A. Kendall Agronomy Professor G. W. Hendry Mr. J. G. Conrad Animal Husbandry Professor G. H. True Professor R. F. Miller Professor J. F. Wilson Professor C. E. Howell Professor W. E. Tomson Professor E. H. Hughes Mr. Arthur Folger Professor F. W. W011 DAVIS, CAL. FALL SEMSTER, 1921 Botany, Music and Orchestra Mr. A. M. Woodman Chemistry Mr. I. F. Torrey Dairy Industry Dr. C. L. Roadhouse Mr. G. D. Turnbow Mr. C. A. Phillips Mr.L10yd Raffetto English and Economics Professor T. R. Kelley Professor T. T. Tavernetti Entomology Mr. E. R. deOng Farm Division Professor T. T. Tavernetti Mr. A. J. Greer Mr. R. Harrington Hygiene Dr. W. E. Bates Miss Mae McCabe, nurse Irrigation Professor S. H. Beckett Mr. H. A. Wadsworth Library Miss Dorothy Deming, Libr Miss Merle Hyde, Assistan Mathematics Mr. C. M. Titus Mr. C. J. Burrell 9 1? Olericulture Mr. D. H. Carey Physical Education Mr. W. D. Elfrink Pomology Professor F. W. Allen Professor W. T. Tufts Mr. Guy Philp Mr. F. E. Neer Mr. Lloyd Austin Mr. Leonard Day Mr. LaWrence Barnard Mr. W. P. Duruz Mr. Lloyd Baldwin Poultry Husbandry Professors J. E. Dougherty Mr. W. E. Lloyd Mr. S. S. Gossman Soils Professor Alfred Smith Mr. R. E. Storie Veterinary Science Dr. S. M. Hayes Mr. Harvey Phipps Dr. H. Jay Viticulture Mr. L. Bonnett Dr. A. J. Winkler Mr. Jacobs Mr. G. Barovetta F. V. Vocational Training Mrs. Eckhardt WEST DORM AND CAFETERIA A BIT OF LAWN CLASS ROOM BUILDING NORTH AND SOUTH DORMS BUSINESS OFFICE DEANS COTTAGE W; Mng-H: 3. w Al-ytasge-QJM. , :pn-wm Animal Husbandry OR the Animal Hus- Fbandry Division at the University Farm, this has been a year of progress. An enrollment of 1170 students in our Classes has tended to keep us out of mischief, and trying to find a way to do experimental work in ad- dition has kept the mem- bers of the Division staff upon their toes. Experi- ments in feeding rice by- products to hogs, sun- flower silage t0 dairy cows, and the fattening of three cars of steers from the range are in progress. We judged live- stock at twenty-seven fairs last Fall, and have attended many meetings of breeders and livestock associations. Nearly five hundred 7 and 30-day ad- vanced registry records of dairy cows and over six hundred years records have been authenticated. The advanced registry for grade cows is going, and one for fine wool sheep is now under way. PROF. GORDON H. TRUE In the dairy cow competition that closed January 1st over seven hundred - cows completed yearis records. The showing of the division at the International Livestock Exposi- tion at Chicago this year resulted more spectacularly than heretofore even, and spread the name of California wherever stockmen meet throughout the world. Over 53 per cent of the Agricultural College prize money was won by the University of California animals. At the: Cali- fornia National Livestock Show at San Francisco a similar record was made. the University furnishing several champions. A new departure, that of sending out student livestock judging teams, resulted in the boys bringing home from the Pacific International Live- stock Show at Portland, Ore., much silver and glory. The dairy cattle judging team won second and the Jersey trophy given by the Western Dairy Instructors, Association, and the livestock judging team won first in both beef cattle and hogs, winning the Portland Cattle Loan Companyis trophy, and third in all classes. Stockniens Week was the best it has ever been, The association meetings of the week were better attended and were Characterized by a greater interest than ever. 12 .L tbundly 2 4.. Division of Pomology 1TH California the leading fruit grow- ing State of the Union and the acreage in orchards constantly in- creasing, the Pomology Division naturally occu- pies a prominent position -not only because of the instruction Which it gives to a large number of Farm School and Univer- sity students, but from the service Which it ren- ders through Short Cours- es and Extension work to the citizens within its borders. Since plans have been approved for the new Horticultural Building, to be ready for occupation next Fall, fa- cilities for giving class room and laboratory work Will be greatly increased. It is thus felt by Dr. J. C. Whitten, Head of the Di- vision, and also by each of the staff at the Farm PROF- F- W- ALLEN that a larger service can be rendered than has previously been possible. The large orchards at the Farm are of great value in connection With familiarizing the student With the different fruits and their habit of growth, and in furnishing material for such laboratory exercise as spraying, pruning and grafting. The advantage of securing actual practice in these operations is apparent from the fact that during the past holiday season 34 10f the more experienced students spent their entire time in pruning commercial orchards. Although teaching work occupies most of the time of the staff members at Davis and Berkeley, yet a large number of experiments are being conducted. The Deciduous Fruit Experiment Station at Mountain View, Where only investigational work is carried on, has secured some very valuable results in disease control. Blight, the greatest enemy of the pear grower, promises, through the discovery of resistant root stocks and improved methods of treatment to become a less serious menace. Many fundamental problems demanding access to well equipped chemistry and plant physiology laboratories are conducted at Berkeley, while those relative to methods of pruning, spraying, interplanting and the growing of cover crops, requiring orchard facilities, are conducted . at the University Farm. 13 Dairy Industry PPLICATION of sci- entific principles to the manufacture of dairy products is now es- sential t0 the largest suc- cess in dairy manage- ment. The Dairy Indus: try Division gives instljuc- tion in principles of dalry- ing, market milk, Cheese making, butter and Ice cream making, dairy plant management and creamery practice. Rec- ommended subjects given in other divisions are Milk Production, Judging of Dairy Cattle, Diseases of Animals, and Dairy Mechanics. After students have had some experi- ence in commercial plants, instruction in these cours- es should aid them in be- coming successful em- ployees of owners of dairy manufacturing plants. A commercial cream- ery is operated through- out the year, for the purpose of teaching students and carrying 011 inves- tigational work in the manufacture of dairy products. The sale of dairy products during the past year has amounted to $93,000. The daily manufacture of these products gives excellent facili- ties for practice in each department, and during the year there has been 441 enrollments of students in the various courses. A new Dairy Industry building is now under construction at the University Farm, which will give complete facilities for all phases of teaching and investigation, in connection With butter, cheese, ice cream, market milk, and condensed milk. The first floor of the main building Will include laboratories for butter and market milk, commercial testing, student testing, and bacteri- ology; a salesroom, offices and student locker-room. The second floor will be occupied by three lecture rooms, seminary, reading and dairy products judging rooms, office and storage space. The manufacturing Wing Will house the largecreamery laboratory, which will be used for teaching advanced students and those electing practice work in butter, cheese, ice cream, market milk, and milk con- densmg. There Will be also the milk receiving department, a student cheese laboratory, refrigerating, icemaking; storage and machinery rooms. DR. C. L. ROADHOUSE 14 axis 0 - 2 . NMVWMW. WWWWWW Agriculture Engineering HE California farmer uses more mechanic- al power per acre of improved land than any other farmer in the world. Many of his everyday jobs are engineering in na- ture. He operates and keeps in repair 35,000 electric motors, 24,000 gas tractors, almost countless stationary gas engines and a large per cent of the automobiles and trucks in this State. The Agricultural En- gineering Division offers instruction in the opera.- tion and maintenance of this farm equipment, to- gether With work in the construction and plan- ning of farm buildings. During this year 577 students have enrolled in the sixteen regular cours- es offered by this Divi- sion. These courses in- clude b1acksmithing,dairy PROF- '-- J- FLETCHER mechanics, gas engines, tractors,1nachinery,farni structures and buildings. Three laboratory buildings, totaling over 18,000 square feet of floor space, house the equipment of the Agricultural Engineering Division. Manufacturers and jobbers in this State have loaned over $40,000 worth of machinery to be used for instructional purposes. This equipment includes 15 gas tractors, 14 stationary gas engines, various types of plows, harrows, mowers, drills, pumps, etc. A steam boiler and accessories, feed pump and engine are available for the dairy mechanics work. The blacksmith shop contains 24 forges and other usual forging equipment. The work in farm structures includes the planning of buildings, estimat- ing of costs and lists of materials, concrete work and the construction of farm appliances and buildings. One of the-features of the divisional work has been the offering of gas tractor short courses. Ten such courses have been offered from 1916 to 1921, With a total enrollment of 1358 students. In 1921 a series of fourteen Tractor Extension Schools were planned to be held at various parts of the State. To date six of these schools have been conducted With a total enrollment of 346 students. , Extension work of the division consists mainly of the preparation of plans of farm structures. These include plans of such buildings as poultry houses, milking barns, dipping vats, hay storage barns, etc. 15 O.'N12 a Division ofVete rinary HE activities during I the past year, on the part of the Divis10n of Veterinary Science lo- cated at Davis, have fol- lowed the same general plan as that of previous years. In the Fall semes- ter about 70 Farm School students and 40 Univers1- ty students were given in- struction intended to as- sist them as livestock men in preventing destructive animaldiseases. This Spring semester 34 Uni- versity students are re- ceiving additional in- struction of this charac- ter. The large number of Classes and breeds of live- stock on the University Farm offers to the Divi- sion opportunities to dem- onstrate to the student, not only some of the com- mon diseases which he . will encounter as a live- DR. 5- M- HAYES stock breeder, but also principles and practices useful in the treatment and prevention of disease. In addition to these activities the members of the Division reply to many letters of inquiry relative to animal diseases, receive tissues of dead animals for laboratory diagnosis, confer with Visitors seeking infor- mation upon the treatment of sick animals, make some field investiga- tions of outbreaks of disease, and engage in research. The chief problems upon which research has been conducted during the past two years are those of infectious abortion in swine and cattle. Members of this division were among the first to isolate the causative germ and to determine and publish other important facts of this infec- tion in hogs. This will now be the major research activity as long as money is available and the information obtained justifies. During the Christmas vacation the Division held a five-day short course for veterinary practitioners of the State. The course specialized in diseases of cattle, but diseases of other animals received attention. Prominent veterinarians from other States were on the progam. Eighty- five veterinarians attended the course. Since last August, Dr. Robert J ay, field veterinarian for the United States Bureau of Anlmal Industry, has been stationed With the Veterinary gezlilgrclhat Dayis. Dr. J ay will make field investigations of hog diseases t arge, In an effort to reduce losses from these dlseases. 16 DiviS X wamsmm h kwamm ......... Division of Irrigation HIS Division was one of the first to start investigational work on the University Farm. In 1908 the twenty-five acres now occupied by this Division were leveled and experimental work started. This work dealt principally With the duty of water and water re- quirements of alfalfa, small grains and other field crops, and has been actively continued until the present time. Beginning in theSum- mer of 1922 this experi- mental work is to be eX- tended to the twenty-six acres now known as Field N0. 7. This area is to be leveled and equipped With a complete concrete pipe system. A long time project is being planned covering an exact study of the econOmical use of water in the irrigation of PROF- 5- H- BECKETT Indian Corn, Dwarf Milo, Beans, Sudan Grass and Hemp. To each of these crops varying quantities of irrigation water are to be applied at varying stages of development of the crop, comparison being made of the yields obtained from the different irrigation treatments. Direct delivery of water will be made to every plot under investigation, and an accurate meter measurement kept. With the coming of University Freshmen t0 the University Farm in the Fall of 1922, additional courses in.Irrigati0n Practice are being offered. These courses will substitute for those heretofore offered to the Freshmen and Sophomores at Berkeley. As a part of laboratory equipment for giving these courses, a field laboratory containing all standard irrigation equipment has been installed. This covers all types of devices, such as gates, valves, delivery boxes, tapoons, etc., used both in concrete pipe and open ditch systems for the irrigation of alfalfa, field- crops and orchards. Additional devices have also been added to the field laboratory of water measuring devices Which greatly facilitates the demonstration and instructional work in the measurement. of irrigation water. These field laboratories contain the most complete assortment of equipment and devices that has been assembled for instruction and demonstration purposes. 17 MathematicsSzSurveying HE.time spent on I Mathematics here is short. One semester is given to each of Mathe- matics 01 tFarm Arith- metici, Mathematics 02 tAlgebrai, Mathematics 03 tGeometryi ,Mathemat- ics 04 tComputation and Physics. Mathematics 05 tChain Surveying and Levelingi, and Mathemat- ics 06 tmore Leveling and Transit Surveyingi. The Farm Arithmetic is a brief review of frac- tions, decimals and per- centage and their applica- tions to simple farm prob- 1ems,such as figuring percentages of food ele- ments and various farm products, rations and nu- - tritive rations, soil moist- ure, standardization of milk and other creamery problems, field crop val- ues, and building mate- PROF. C. M. TITUS rials, etc. In Algebra the students study the fundamental operations and the solution of simple equations, special stress being put on the handling of such formulas as are used in farm machinery. 1n Geometry the definitions of the more common geometrical terms, fundamental principles taxioms, postulates, eth and the simpler and more practical theorems are taught, stress being laid on area theorems. The first half of Mathematics 04 is given to logarithmic computa- tions and the application of Algebra and Geometry to problems in land areas, figuring building materials and capacities of silos, tanks and reservoirs, hay stacks and concrete foundations, etc., and other problems which are not covered in Mathematics 01. The Physics part of the course deals with the principles of simple machines, mechanics of liquids as applied to pumps and siphons, work and power problems and the laws of motion and a very elementary treatment of electricity and 111agnetism leading up to the principle of the dynamo and motor. Mathematics 05 teaches the simplest methods of Chain surveying, including the measuring and mapping of irregular areas, and practice in profile and contour leveling and mapping such as are needed in laying out roadways and ditches and in checking land for irrigation. Mathematics 06 takes up cross-sectioning 0f ditches, roadways and problems 1n transit work, including the stadia method of topography. 18 k , h. -.A4,-G:.3,rt..d - -3... . N o !NN 7.? - , KN N , .mmxmtxxximxxxxwmmx WWMWWW Division of Agronomy HE leading activities of this Division are teaching and re- search. The principal Extension activity con- sists in the production and distribution of pure seed. This season this Division has distributed throughout the State over eight hundred sacks of barley, wheat and oat seed. Applications have exceeded many times this amount, but in order to accomplish the greatest good the allotments were limited and preference given applicants who would plant on clean fal- low and agree to dispose of the crop for seed. One of the greatest steps for- ward in the development of a new grain sorghum has been accomplished by this Division. This va- riety is known as Yolo White. In tests it has PROF- 5- W- HENDRV proven to be more productive than Milo or other grain sorghums, but its greatest feature is its dwarf nature, uniformity and erect head, qualities which are adapted to machine heading. These qualities no doubt will stimulate the production of grain sorghum in California. Seed for several thousand acres have already been distributed. Sunflowers 0f the mammoth western variety were grown last season as a silage crop for the first time at the University Farm, and feeding tests with dairy cows are now under way. The sunflowers yielded from twenty to twenty-four tons green weight per acre. The sunflowers grew to a height of from ten to eleven feet, but were so coarse and woody that it was necessary to cut each stock separately by hand. They are hardier than sorghum, and may be profitably grown On poor soils and mountain elevations or in cool coast climates where sorghums cannot be grown. An elaborate series of cobperative experiments with the Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. D. A., on cereal diseases is now in the third year of progress. All of the cereal investigational work of the U. S. D. A. has been transferred to Davis, and an elaborate cereal nursery planted. Provision has been made for a new seed cleaning plant, and modern seed cleaning machines will be installed. This will enable the Division to maintain and carry out a more effective program of building up and maintaining to a high standard the seed stocks of the State. 19 P 24912 a of pride that the stud- ents majoring in Poul- try Husbandry look back upon the work of the Di- vision during the past year. In spite of the country-wide business de- pression, the poultry hus- bandry of our State has forged ahead angl made a healthy growth during the past twelve months. The Poultry Plant has been augmented dur- ing the past year by the erection of several new houses for the stock. These comprise a laying house 100x16 feet, de- signed by the Division to meet California condi- tions, and having a capa- city of 750 to 1000 hens. There are five pens each 20X16 feet. The floors are so constructed that the house may be hosed pnop. J. E. DAUGHERTY out freely, this being a great advantage from a disease combating and labor saving Viewpoint. This house includes many other innovations too numerous to mentlon here, and merits a Visit of inspection from poultry raisers. The brood- ing equipment has been doubled. The Division now boasts a modern brooder house 160 feet long, comprising the continuous and colony sys- tems of brooding, and With a sufficient variety of brooding equipment and heaters to furnish extended instruction of great practical value. A new 50-foot rabbit house has been erected Which draws considerable at- tention, as the Division also conducts research in rabbit keeping problems. The staff of the Division has been strengthened by the addition of Mr. S. S. Gossnian, Who came to us from the South Dakota Agricultural College last July. ' In addition to resident instruction and research at the University Farm, poultry pathological work is carried on at Berkeley and Petaluma. Two Extension poultry experts spend their entire time carrying aid directly to the poultryman WhO cannot come to the college, and each Fall is offered an extensive six weeks poultry course for adult pros- pective poultry keepers Who must gain enough knowledge in a limited time to enable them to safely embark in the work. The success of many former Short Course men now in the poultry business testify to the great value of this work. IT is With a just feeling 20 a n "M. Iv E Division of Soils CTIVITIES of this Division are large- ly confined to in- struction work, and we: are now readjusting our work so that in the future our activities Will be much broader. During the past year we have offered three courses of instruction to Farm School students, With a total enrollment of 225. A large part Of the practice work of these courses was given in the various fields of the Uni- versity Farm. Our Extension work has largely been in an- swering correspondence from farmers, as well as prospective farmers, With respect to soil conditions and crop possibilities of various sections of the State. PROF. ALFRED SMITH A large map has recently been completed, showing in great detail the soil conditions of the 1000 acres owned or leased by the State of California at Davis. A part of each Summer is spent by members of this Division, Which is a part of the' Division of Soil Technology, College of Agriculture, University of California, in making soil survey in various parts of this State. Beginning next August this Division Will offer two courses to Uni- versity students at Davis, namely, Soil Technology 1, and Soil Tech- nology 2 tGeneral Geologyy ' Division of Chemistry ORK in the Chem- istry Division of the Farm the past year consisted of two courses of instruction. The first, or elementary, course was designed to meet the needs of Farm School students Who have had no previous training in chemistry. Itincludes a study of the elementary principles of chemistry, with special emphasis on the commoner elements and compounds and their relation to agriculture. Water as a Chemical com- pound is studied, and its absolute necessity in plant and animal growth and development, as well as its relation to soil for- mation and fertility, is stressed. The chemical composition of the atmos- phere and its relation to agriculture as the source a of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen for plant and animal life is brought out. The chemistry of soils, commercial fertilizers, farm manures, animal feeding and nutrition, spray materials, and dairy products are some of the other phases of agriculture touched upon in an elementary way. The second course in chemistry for Farm School students is also a years course, and is planned for those Who have had High School Chemistry or its equivalent. This course takes up in more detail some of the phases covered in the elementary course. The relation of soil fertility and climatic conditions to the worlds food supply are con- sidered along with discussions of the future sources of commercial fer- tilizers. In this connection atmospheric nitrogen and the methods of fixation and the possible sources of potash in the United States are particularly noted. The laboratory work in this course includes, among other things the qualitative analysis of the common feed stuffs, fertilizers and spra3; materials. and the detection of alkali in soils and irrigation waters The work .in both courses, While of an elementary nature is intended to emphas1ze the intimate relation and dependence of agriculture as well as all other industries, upon chemistry, and to point out to ,the student the reasons for many of the o eration on the farm. p S and methods 0f procedure PROF. J. F. TORREY 22 $ Division of Viticulture HE Division of Viti- culture of the Univer- sity at Davis has two main objects in View- teaehing and research. Never before have the classes been so large as they are this term. They are another proof of the great development of grape growing in this State. There are 31 Uni- versity students and 49 University Farm students, a total of 80 students take ing Mr. Bonnets courses. The practical work is giv- en in the six experiment a1 .Vineyards, comprising forty-two acres, of Which more than two-thirds are already planted. Vine- yard N0. 1, the largest, contains a collection of over three hundred varie- PROF- L- BONNETT ties of grapes, and is used for teaching and for research. Many experi- ments have been completed in this Vineyard, Where Vines are grown on their own roots, and also on resistant stocks. Vineyard N0. 3 has been used for irrigation experiments, Which have not given any results, owing to the stealing of grapes before picking time. Vineyard N0. 5 is a mother Vineyard of resistant stocks. Its small size at the time When there is a big demand for certain resistant stocks has made necessary the planting of a new resistant mother vineyard. Vineyard No. 6 planted last year will be entirely devoted to: experimental purposes. In order to avoid the stealing of grapes and to obtain results it Will be surrounded With an unclimbable fence. ' The products of the Vineyards are sold as dried grapes, and the brush sold as cuttings or as rootings the following year: The Division of Viticulture sends information by correspondence, and Will be glad to show the Vineyards to those interested. The staff of this Division at Davis comprises Mr. L. O. Bonnet, who is in charge of the Division; Dr. A. J. Winkler and Mr. G. Barovetto. 23 Division of Entomology HOUGH this subject I may not be Chosen as a major by many of us, we should all under- stand that particular branch of entomology that pertains to the study of the subject we are most interested in. It was quoted once that a man should know something about everything and everything about some- thing. So it is we should strive to learn everything about our particular ma- jor and something about the different phases relat- ing to it. Would the or- chardist be successful if he did not understand the life-history of an insect so that he could better control it? The sheep raiser must know the hab- its of the ticks and other pests, so that he may dip economically. The agron- omist must understand the grasshoppers life, the alfalfa weevilis cycle and others if he is to profit from his labor. V So we find entomology connected with all the forms:Oii farming, and if we are to be successful farmers we must consider the lifegzof insects. The Entomology Department is endeavoring to give the student the fundamentals connected with systematic study of insects and their control. The rudiments necessary for a thorough understanding in the life cycle of insects will often be declared iidryii by those learning to differentiate between them, for these preliminary facts must be mastered before we are able to progress to the specialized study of those insects that we are to meet in our future work. So it is we find that the Entomology Department has a subject to teach that may be tedious and tidry" until we have advanced to the point where we study those things that are most interesting to us, We are hoping to see a more extensive course in Entomology establlshed here next semester, though at present this department like others, .is handicapped for instructors and resources. , Thls semester a course is being given in the economic study of the common Insects found on the California farms. Some of the students who had this work before are now workin on s ecial ' to their future location. g p problems relative PROF. E. R. de ONG 24 .......-t-.....-...w.ms.. ... kxxxx Division of Botany ORK in the Bot- any Department is organized along various lines, including the study of Agricultural Botany, Plant Diseases, Weeds and Weed Control, Plant Propagation, Orna- mental Gardening. The study of Agricultural Bot- any, taking up the struct- ure and life processes of plants, germination and purity seed tests, study of fungi and bacteria, plant breeding,etc., is prelimin- ary to such subjects as Horticulture, Agronomy, Olericulture, and has 'an indirect bearing upon courses in Dairy and Ani- mal Husbandry. Consid- erable stress is placed up- on the practical bearing PROF. A. M. WOODMAN of botany upon these sub- jects. Especial emphasis is placed upon the study of plant physiology, since it is important that the young farmer know something about the life habits and functions of plants. Abundant opportunity is given on the Farm of studying at first-hand the botanical characteristics of plants and trees of economic importance, many types of obnoxious weeds, diseases attacking field crops, fruits, grains, and vegetables. Frequent field trips are made, supplemented by work in the laboratory. The student is trained to develop his powers of 0bservati0n-to think for himself. Seeds of weeds are collected for laboratory study; notes and observations made in the field are trans- ferred to a weed chart. A small greenhouse and several lathhouses afford facilities for plant propagation work, and for growing ornamental plants of economic im- portance. Plant propagation consists of practice in sowing flower seeds, making cuttings, transplanting seedlings and rooted cuttings, the growing of some commercial flower. The course in Ornamental Gardening includes the study of trees, shrubs, and plants suitable for ornamenting the home grounds, and the making of simple designs. 25 Division of Olericulture CTIVITIES 0f the Di- A Vision of Olericul- ture during the past year have been devoted almost entirely to instruc- tional work. Nearly all the work on the twenty- five acres, planted for the production of vegetables and vegetable seed crops, has been done by the stud- ents enrolled in the regu- lar courses of instruction. The work in the Practice Course, offered for the Farm School students, has been planned so that it is not necessary to arrange a definite schedule, and the student may devote any time he desires durn ing the week to this work, Many students have taken advantage of this, and have completed the work required in this Practice Course during the time which was previously PROF. D. H. CAREY wasted. The Division is constantly attempting to improve the varieties of many vegetables by selecting the most desirable plants from which to grow seed to produce the following crop. We now have improved varie- ties of cauliflower, beet, carrot, onion and celery. Several varieties of potatoes have been planted during the last year. The seed potatoes planted for these trials were obtained from various places in the State, and each place having a different altitude and climatic condition. Most favorable reports have been received of the certified seed potatoes dis- tributed by this Division during January, 1921, to growers in twelve different counties in the State. Almost every grower reported a yield larger than from other seed potatoes planted in the same district, and several requests have been received this year for another supply. This Division conducted a Potato Growersi Conference on October 4th. 5th and 6th, which was attended by potato growers from ten different counties of the State. Much interest was shown at various meetings where lantern slides, prepared by this Division, were exhibited. These slides show various methods of growing and harvesting vegetables. This D1v1si0n has prepared for distribution brief outlines describing the method of production as practiced in California of the following crops: Celery, pea, sweet potato, rhubarb, and melon. ' 26 smmwmmmmNNNb xxxxWxxwmmww. English and Economics N the early days of the University Farm School, when boys un- der 18 were admitted, cer- tain courses were pre- scribed in English Liter- ature, in English and United States History, and in Civics. About nine years ago these courses were replaced by suppos- edly tipracticalt, prescrib- ed courses called Agricul- tural Literature, Business English, and Rural Eco- nomics; all, for conveni- ence, conducted by the same teacher. This ar- rangement has continued, except that no English is required for graduation of students possessing evi- dence of having had at least two years of High School English,whi1e about three years ago Economics was transfer- red to the list of electives. Besides these courses, the PROF- T- R- KELLEY instructor has almost every year carried on another known as E. E103, in English Composition, a sort of individual coaching course. Under this title also, a number of students have received substantial credit for con,- tributions to the school publications. The course in Rural Economics has from time to time been sup- planted by one in Marketing of Farm Products. In the former course the attempt is made both to outline the field of elementary economics, to show the relation between technical agricultural economics and prac- tical farm management, and to prepare the student against some of the questions he must face as a Citizen in a rural community. For this course Cavieris Principles of Rural Economics has usually provided the basis, while the Farm Library has for both courses furnished an abund- ance of supplementary reading. For the latter course, Weldis Marketing of Farm Productsedisplaced this semester by Macklinis for recent Effi- cient Marketing for Agricultureehas commonly formed the basis. The widespread present-day concern with marketing principles, practices, and difficulties, is plainly reflected in the students readier response to this course. After this semester the English courses will presumably be con- ducted by the English Department of the University, and those in Economics by the College of Agriculture Division of Rural Institutions. 27 SENIOR CLASS A . x .0. .5 z... , w .1 G; . v1,wmnMw v 1w L. K. SMITH A. E. REYNOLDS JAMES BRONSON C. P. RICHARDSON The Class 0f 22 L. K. Smith .................................................................... President C. P. Richardson .................................................. Vice-President A. E. Reynolds ................................................................ Secretary James Bronson .............................................................. Treasurer L. C. J ones ........................................................ Sergeant-at-Arms erismit, if such a word may be coined, a class with the slogan of ttHigher Morale and Better School SpiritK and it is toward this which we have worked, and may safely say, have won. W 1TH THE ENTRANCE of the Class of ,22 came the era. of tiboost- Starting as Freshmen and after painS-takingly learning the tra- ditions of the school, we started to evidence our existence as the Class with the ttFrosh Frolicii and kindred activities, and continuing always for the advancement of the iiAlma Mater,, in every scope where itlive men with live principlesii were needed. And now comes the time when we begrudgingly have to leave, to carry the same spirit of cobperative ttboosterismii into the business world, and especially into the fields of agricultural endeavor. So to you, Class of 23, we leave a realm of openings to prove your worth. With the coming of the new College of Agriculture, will come new opportunities for the advancement of the University of California. 30 4..., "1.... Ww.mw , mA-e-W 7"" N t a 5w aw .zwi-rszu- .. - .......e h---" - axxxmwwxwmm ADAMS, H. E. Stockton, California Major subject, Horticulture Bona Amata ALEXANDER, F. P. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Football ,20, ,Varsity Football ,21 Executive Committee 21322 Chairman Housing Com. Stockmerrs Week Chairman of dance, Picnic Day, ,22 Block Letter Society Rodeo staff ,21322 Fitting and Showing Winner, Picnic ,21 Sword and Sandals Phi Alpha Iota AUSTIN, C. L. Chula Vista, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry President West Dorm 22 Tennis Manager 22 Assistant Business Mgr. Glee Club ,.s BACHMAN, J. E. Sacramento, California Major subject, Horticulture BAIRD, V. IL. Pasadena, California Major subject, Horticulture Chairman Jitney Fair 22 Chairman Entertainment Commit tee, Picnic Day 22 Rodeo staff ,22 BASCOM, L. P. Sacramento, California Major subject, Horticulture Agricola 22 Manager Rodeo 22 Blue and Gold Dairy Club Philo Delphos BECK. I. W. Berkeley, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Fitting and Showing winner Picnic ,21 Alpha Sigma Beta BLOSSOM, N. A. Stockton, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Inter. Frat. Council 21- 22 Bona. Amata OJ l0 BROADY, R. Garden Grove, California Major subject, Dairy Industry Baseball 21322 Capon BRONSON, J. E. Doyle, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Treasurer Senior Class ,22 Welfare Committee ,21322 Executive Committee 22 Golden Hoof Club Bona Amata BROWN, F. W. Trail, B. C. Major subject, Horticulture Glee Club ,19, Manager 20 Kappa Tau BUCK, S. D. Stockton, California Major subject, Horticulture Pom. Round Table Bona Amata Stockton, California Major subject, Horticulture Boxing 21322 Boxing Manager 22 Bona Amata BURGBACKER, R. G. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Horticulture Glee Club ,21322 Vice-President Glee Club 22 GAVIN, A. C. Madera, California Major subject, Horticulture Wrestling ,22 Porn. Round Table Glee Club 20-21 GAVIN, O. C. Madera, California Major subject, Horticulture Glee Club 20321322 Treasurer Blue and Gold Dairy Club Pom. Round Table 0 Wk w 2 CLAYTON, M. G. Davis, California Major subject, Poultry Husbandry COCHRANE, J. A. San Rafael, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Varsity Football 21 Block Letter Society Alpha Sigma Beta CORWIN, F. E, Redwood City, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Football 21 Glee Club 20 Philo Delphos CURL, E. E. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Philo Delphos 35 CUTLER, A. R. Visalia, California Major subject, Horticulture CUTTER, R. S. Sacramento, California Major subject, Horticulture DAVIS, L. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Capon DENBIGH, B. R. Berkeley, California Major subject, Horticulture President Pom. Round Table ,21322 4 v. v w-..Ma.n......m.i $ $ .. . Q KKK .mxxxxxxmwxxwxxxxwm XXXXKN KW... m DONNELL,R. Abiline, Texas Major subject, Animal Husbandry Executive Committee 22 Golden Hoof Club IHELAPP,WKC. Pasadena, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Executive Committee ,22 Welfare Committee 21 . Rally Committee 21- 22 Yell Leader ,21322 Editor Rodeo 22 Golden Hoof Club Calpha FOSTER,J.V. Fresno, California Major subject, Horticulture Track Manager ,22 Golden Hoof Club Calpha FOX;C.B. Davis, California Major subject, Horticulture 37 FOX, E. A. Davis, California Major subject, Horticulture FREEMAN, S. H. Chula Vista, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Football ,1? Wrestling '22 Golden Hoof Club GABRIEL, A. R. Oceanside, California Major subject, Horticulture Beta Phi GAGE, W. C. Elk Grove, California Major subject, Horticulture Rodeo 22 Philo Delphos GATES, R. A. Ventura, California Major subject, Horticulture GINSBERG, R. G. Oakland, California Major subject, Horticulture Secretary-Treasurer Glee Club 21 Secretary-Treasurer Kodak Club 21 Secretary Pom. Round Table 22 HARRISON, N. N. Pasadena, California Major subject, Horticulture Agricola 22 HILL, R. A. Berkeley, California Major subject, Horticulture Basket-Ball 22 Bona Amata 39 R-....KA.. ,.. .u ur. HILLMAN, L. P. Watsonville, California Major subject, Horticulture Executive Committee 22 Pom. Round Table HORTON, H. E. Berkeley, California Major subject, Dairy Industry V- HOUGHTON, W. B. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Horticulture HOWES, F. E. Los Gatos, California Major subject, Dairy Industry Boxing 21122 ' Beta Phi 40 ale Axwmmxxxwxmmm g .L R 3 HOWHTT Berkeley, California , wivw gwm M? ?e: 4 43; B. Californ S HUFFMAN, 1a 1ry Santa Cruz, 380 Ma Industry 21- t, Da b 301' S11 22 J Welfare Committee Glee Club 21322 H :HARRIMANgH Fallon, Nevada Industry Major subject, Dairy, Wrestling 20- 21 Kappa Tau wwx: mxwxx , agggpww "20 1 Husbandry ia ima iforn , An t ry winner Cal , W7 subjec 20 22 . F 9 j a Cross Count Pasadena or ack Kappa Tau IRLAND M Tr 41 -....Ma.. ., . V JANEWAY, R. K. Yorba Linda, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry JONES, L. C. Bartlett Springs, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Stock Judging 20 Fitting and Showing winner 21 Football 21 JONES, M. L. Sacramento, California Major subject, Horticulture Philo Delphos KILLET, S. C. Dayis, California Major subject, Horticulture 42 KINSLEY, C. H. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Horticulture President A. S. U. F. ,22 Editor Agricola Welfare Committee 22 Executive Committee 22 Chairman News Publicity, Picnic Day 22 Glee Club ,21 Publictiy Chairman Stockmen,s Week ,22 Philo Delphos KIRCHNER, G. W. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Horticulture ,Varsity Football ,21322 Varsity Basket-Ball 22, Mgr. 22 Block Letter Society Phi Alpha Iota LA ZANSKY, B. H. Oakland, California Major subject, Horticulture Inter. Fra. Council 22 Alpha Sigma Beta LEASE, C. L. Stockton, California Major subject, Horticulture Track ,21322 Block Letter Society Bona Amata LEWIS, P. E. Stockton, California Major subject, Horticulture Chairman Welfare Committee 20321 Baseball 20321322, Mgr. 21 Block Letter Society Alpha Sigma Beta LYONS, A. E. Orick, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Y. M. C. A. 22 Golden Hoof 21- 22 Winner Shearing contest, Picnic 21 MCCAUSLAND, L. E. Richmond, California Major subject, Dairy Industry Glee Club, Orchestra MCGRAW, H, G. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Horticulture Football ,21 Orchestra 20- 21 Agricola 21- 22 Philo Delphos MCKENNA, EUGENIA E. . Lemoore, California Major subject, Horticulture MCPHERSON, R. S. Edinburgh, Scotland Major subject, Horticulture MARLEY, T. P. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Horticulture Alpha Sigma Beta MARSH, N. L. South Pasadena, California Major subject, Horticulture Football ,21 Welfare Committee ,21322 Assistant Business Mgr. Rodeo ,21 Phi Alpha Iota 45 MEYERS, C. P. Berkeley, California Major subject, Dairy Industry MUNHALL, J . K. Orange, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Agricola Golden Hoof Club NICOLAI, A. S. Santa Maria, California Major subjects, Animal Husbandry and Horticulture Glee Club NIGG, C. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Horticulture Pom. Round Table xx Wimmmnwm NORTON, F. B. Berkeley, California Major subject, Dairy Industry Tennis 21- 22 OVERGAARD, N. M. Madera, California Major subject, Horticulture Glee Club ,21322 PECKHAM, R. M. Fullerton, California Major subject, Horticulture Bona Amata. PRICE, D. W. Campbell, California Major subject, Horticulture Glee Club 21 Beta Phi 47 REUSSER, W. N. Chico, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Golden Hoof Y. M. C. A. Glee Club REYNOLDS, A. E. Sacramento, California Major subject, Dairy Industry Agricola 20321322 Ag. Journal ,20321 Executive Committee ,21 Secretary Senior Class 22 Blue and Gold Dairy Club Philo Delphos REYNOLDS, R. P. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Inter-Fra. Council ,21 Chairman Student Body Dance 21 Chairman Junior-Senior Prom. 21 General Chairman Stockmelfs Week 22 General Chairman Picnic Day 22 Assistant Football Manager 21 Football Manager 22 Golden Hoof Club Treasurer Junior Class Sword and Sandals Capon RICHARDSON, C. P. Santa Barbara, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Wrestling ,20 Manager 21 Football 21 Glee Club 20321 Vice-President Senior Class 22 Cross Country Run ,20 Executive Committee ,22 Inter-Fra. Council 22 Kappa Tau RODEGERDTS, A. H. Sacramento, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry ROYSE, L. G. Santa Cruz, California Major subject, Dairy Industry Executive Committee 21 Secretary-Treasurer Glee Club 22 Blue and Gold Dairy Club ,21322 SAGEHORN, A. Willits, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Golden Hoof Club Stock Judging winner ,21 SARGENT, D. W. Davis, California Major subject, Poultry Husbandry 49 SCHELL,A.C. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Horticulture Secretary Freshman Class ,20 Glee Club 21322 Football 21 SCHULTZ,L.E. Yreka, California Major subject, Dairy Industry Track 21 Basket-Ball 22 Welfare Com. ,21, Chairman ,22 Secretary A. S. U. F. Block Letter Society Pres. Blue and Gold Dairy Club 21 Beta Phi SCOFTELD,J.G. Santa Cruz, California Major subject, Dairy Industry SENTOUS,F. 50 Walnut, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry ,Varsity Football 20 Basket-Ball ,19 and ,22 Baseball 19320 Track 20 and ,22 Chairman Labor Com. Picnic '22 Welfare Committee ,20 Executive Committee ,20 Block Letter Society Capon SHEESLEY, M. G. Livingston, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Y. M. C. A. 21-22 Golden Hoof Club Blue and Gold Dairy Club Fitting and Showing winner Picnic 21 SHEPPARD, F. F. Santa Rosa, California Major subject, Horticulture SIMMONS, J. B. Palo Alto, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Wrestling ,20321 Kappa Tau SMITH, L. K. Long Beach, California Major subject, Dairy Industry President Senior Class 22 Executive Committee ,22 President Glee Club 21 Blue and Gold Club Philo Delphos '51 SPILMAN, H. A. Berkeley, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Football 20- 21 Basket-Ball ,2, Captain 22 Boxing 21- 22 Block Letter Society Sword and Sandals Calpha STOUT, D. D. Galt, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Baseball 22 Philo Delphos TIMMONS, O. K. Eureka, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Boxing '19 Phi Alpha Iota TOWER, W. B. Felix, California Major subject, Horticulture Football 21 Track ,22 Glee Club 20 Beta Phi VOLZ, G. Placerville, California Major subject, Horticulture Y. M. C. A. 21 Orchestra '21 Kappa Tau WALTZ, C. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Football 21; Varsity '22 Track 21 President Inter-Fra. Council 22 Executive Committee 22 Chairman Finance Com. Picnic '22 Sword and Sandals Capon WEBB, L. A. Brooks, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Glee Club ,20321322 Y. M. C. A. ,20 Kappa Tau WELLS, R. A. Ventura, California Major subject, Horticulture Capon Ventura, California Major subject, Horticulture Capon WHITE, R. Los Angeles, California Major subject, Horticulture Boxing WOOD, M. A. Pasadena, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Wrestling Manager ,22 Executive Committee 22 Agricola 21322 Chairman Athletic Committee 22 Glee Club 21 WOOLFORD, W. Plymouth, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry WOODVVARD, J. H. San Diego, California Major subject, Dairy Industry Beta Phi VVOODFORD, J, B. Claremont, California Major subject, Animal Husbandry Track ,21322 Chairman Publicity Committee '22 General Chairman Publicity Com- mittee, Picnic 222 Fitting and Showing winner Picnic 20- 21 Sword and Sandals Calpha WRIDE, E. R. South Pasadena, California Major subject, Dairy Industry Football 20 Varsity 21 Block Letter Society Beta Phi WYANT, R. L. Santa Barbara, California Majorsubject, Animal Husbandry President Glee Club 22 Glee Club 20 JUNIOR CLASS hr x .w-M b JllNlLil! t.l A'-' J. CAROTHERS I. NORTH F. VALENTINE G. TRAYNER Officers of Fall Semester James Carothers ............................................................ President William Stay .......................................................... Viee-President Frank W. Valentine ................................... . .................. Treasurer Paul W. Hunter .............................................................. Secretary Officers of Spring Semester James Caruthers ............................................................ President Irwin G. North ...................................................... Vice-President Frank W. Valentine ...................................................... Secretary G. Trayner ...................................................................... Treasurer FRESHMAN REFLECTIONS Dropping out of nowhere, as it were, there appeared on the campus at the beginning of the Fall semester of 1921 a strange species of the human race, known and easily recognized by all as Freshmen. They were the men who were to stand apart from the innocent and unsuspect- ing world as the glorious class of ,23. Hailing from the remotest corners of the world, we were indeed the ttcream of civilization? After two weeks of terror brought about by being Freshmen and by the various duties, tributes, and dignities imposed upon us by our upper classmen, the struggles were brought to a close by the well-known and justly famous Tank Rush, which we had very carefully and diligently planned to win by several meetings on organizing the class. But for some unaccountable reason, before thirty minutes had passed after the dropping 0f the hat, the last struggler had been landed neatly and forcibly in the tank, with only a few of the upper classmen taking to the "big drink? At any rate, it was a good battle, and we had a good time, and well never forget it. 57 FRESHMAN CLASS bulllWlxN t I IKP..'- I lcl Freshmen The year 1922 brought with it new plans for the College of Agricul- ture. These plans were for the enlarging and upbuilding 0f the work offered at the branch at Davis. Heretofore it was necessary to attend at Berkeley before taking a degree, but these new plans make it possible for all work to be taken at Davis. In View of these plans it is feasible to expect that as many as possible would be discouraged from the non- degree work, and that they would be encouraged to take degree work, beginning in August, 1922. For these reasons we found that the number of men entering in January in non-degree work to be small. Although lacking in number, they Were of high order, and we find them today well imbued with the College spirit and forging rapidly ahead in Student Body activities. After learning the College traditions t0 the tune of many splashes and gurgles, they are now ready to help next years Freshmen Class learn these traditions in the same manner in which they were taught. We are sure that they will carry forth the ideals and uphold the traditions of the College in a true and sportsman-like manner. Remember, it is up to you to help build up school spirit, and we are sure that the traditions and ideals will be safe in your hands. FRESH FRESHMEN 59 UNIVERSITY MEN I N NI 1 IV IIVVIVI lli. t sax: mmmswmmxxxkxsssxm s a sxxmw U. C. Men at the Uniyersity Farm HE FALL SEMESTER of 1921 opened With sixty-four University I men in attendance at the Farm. Of this number about half were registered in animal industries. The remainder were quite evenly distributed between the other branches of the college. In order to bring together the U. C. men in the various branches a meeting was held every two weeks, where the needs and problems of the college as a whole as well as the perplexities of the individuals were discussed. At the same time different men of prominence spoke on subjects of especial interest to men in the College of Agriculture. While these meetings were not as well attended as they might have been, those who were present real- ized their value. The Golden Hoof, at this time composed of University men, served the same purpose except that it was an organization for students in animal industry only. Much good advice has been given to the students through these organizations. Activities of the men were especially noticed in student judging work. At the Sacramento Fair they carried away a majority of the prizes, and the teams sent to Portland were very successful, bringing back with them a large number of the awards. This work will no doubt be continued, and while last year the teams were composed of University men only, the years to come will, it is hoped, see such representations composed of men from both divisions of the college. A marked difference in the methods of study was noted by men who had heretofore attended the University at Berkeley, Their work there had been theoretical, and they had had little opportunity to approach the practical side of agriculture. Upon entering at Davis, however, they were offered an opportunity to not only see, but to work upon the various problems and theories which they had assimilated. The Spring semester of 1922, just finished, showed an increase of forty-six men from U. C. This makes a total of 110 men at the Farm from the University during the past semester. This increase is largely due to the larger amount of agronomy and pomology students who come to Davis for only one semester. There has been a noticeable cooperation of the University and Farm School students which is extremely gratify- ing, and which will form the basis of a more unified student body if this tendency continues. The students have worked together on the various - committees, in athletics, and on the big events, such as Stockmenis Week and Picnic Day, this effort bringing them closer together, and many of the University men expect to spend two years at Davis rather than the one which is required. The organizations this semester have been the Golden Hoof Club and the Pomology Round Table. The U. C. menis meetings have been discontinued, due to the lack of interest, and also to the many other interesting events which serve to displace it. This semester, however, all students have been welcomed to these clubs, and this also causes a closer relationship betwen the students. It is to be hoped that in the future the spirit of cooperation between the degree and non-degree students, which has been so in evidence this year will grow, and that they as a body will work for the betterment of conditions at Davis. 61 1 .14 $1141 FEDERAL BOARD MEN Ill lJLlIAl4 IIOAI'IJ MLN hx i x W xxx t x s V shex. h x 9 . IX x memxmx xwixx WXX ' Students in Training under the United States Veterans Bureau HE United States I Veteransi Bureau, formerly known as the Federal Board, Bu- reau of War Risk Insur- ance and Public Health, but named Veteransi Bu- reau with the amalgama- tion of these three, has been sending men to be trained in agricultural lines, to the University Farm School for the past three years, In all of the work done here at the Farm, in the class room and field, the men have found the heartiest 006p- eration 0n the part of all instructors. This year, 1921-1922, has brought the average number of eX-serviee men to the Farm. In the course of the three years. there have been in all some 547 disabled men here, averaging from 80 MISS H- WALKER to 90 men per semester. With the opening of the Fall semester 1921 there were 94 students registered, 34 of these being new men coming from other schools or directly from hospitals. The Veterans, Bureau students have taken quite an active part in student affairs. During the Fall semester we claimed Frank Cleland, President of the Student Body, Frank Needham, Vice-President of the Student Body, also President of the Senior Class; James Carothers, President of the Freshman Class; Charles Kinsley, Editor of the tiAgricolaii, and Vie Laney, Manager of the football team. A very pretty and successful dance was given on the 28th of Octo- ber, the decorations very cleverly carrying out the Halloween idea. January 9th the opening of the Spring semester found 85 men en- rolled, which included 17 new men and 68 0f the old men. There were 10 Veteransi Bureau men in the December graduating class. Charles Kinsley, one of our number, was elected President of the Student Body. George Michael was elected President of the Associated Federal Studentsi Organization. A number of men are hoping to be able soon to start on places of their own if given aid under the State Welfare Board. 63 L mwm-QumeE-XEE L. R: xxw Wmmmm ' Alameda .................................. R. T. Robinson .................................... 574 Castro Street, Hayward st. . Butte ........................................ 1:1. 13313331314? ................................... 609 Bird Street, Or0v111e Contra Costa A. M. Burton ............................................................................ Concgrd Fl Doradld P1ot B. J. Jones ................................ 423 Main Street, P1acerv111e ISI'CSHO ...................................................... Dr. J. P. Benson ................ Chamber of Commerpe Bldg, Fresno ' ''''''' Homer R. Keller, Asst ......................... CommerCIal Park, Fresno m T.M1'h,Asst. . Glenn .......... $?aXFGoatleuy.?.i .................................. Federal Building, Wlllows Ilumb-bid-t.l.v.-.,.I:.','.-...'::2th: ........... Dr. J. w. Logan ........................................ 622 Third Street, Eureka Imperial ................................... E. L. Garthwaite ................................ 645 Mam Street, El Centro Raymond Ellis, Asst. Invo ......................................... J. P. Hertel ............................................ Court House, Independepce Kan ........................................ M. A. Rice ................................................ Court House, Bakersfleld R. H. Klamt, Asst. Kings ........................................ Wallace Sullivan ...................................................................... Hanford Henry T. Anderson, Asst. Los Angeles ........................... R. W. Hodgson ................................ 361 Court House, LOS Angeles G. E. Gordon, Asst. V. F. Blanchard, Asst. Madera ................. . .................. T. O. Morrison ............................ Chamber of Commerce, Madera Marin ........................................ M. B. Boissevain ................................ Freitas Building, San Rafael Mendocino ....... . ..................... Prof. C. S. Myszka ...................................................................... Ukiah Merced ..................................... J. F. Grass, Jr ..................................... Farm Bureau Office, Merced J. L. Quail, Asst. , Monterey ................................. T. C. Mayhew ............................................ 261 Main Street, Salinas E. D. O4Brien, Asst. Napa ......................................... Prof. H. J. Baade ................................................ Court House, Napa Enoch Torpen, Asst. Nevada ..................................... H. I. Graser .................................................................... Grass Valley Orange ..................................... H. E. Wahlberg ........................ 508 North Main Street, Santa Ana A. F. Scott, Asst. Placer ....................................... R. D. McCallum ............................................ Court House, Auburn Riverside ................................. M. M. Wilson ............ Farm Bureau Office, 9th Street, Riverside J. F. Osborn, Asst. Sacramento ............................. L. Y. Leonard ............................................ Court House, Sacramento E. L. Stanley, Asst. San Benito ............... V .............. W. J. Tocher .................................... Farm Bureau Office, Hollister San Bernardino ..................... H. J. Wilder ............................ 438 Court Street, San Bernardino E. J. Campbell, Asst. San Diego ............................... J. G. France ............................ Chamber of Commerce, San Diego San Joaquin ........................... J. W. Adriance..Commercia1 and Savings Bank Bldg, Stockton E. D. Schlaman, Asst. Santa Barbara ....................... D. T. Batchelder ................ 208 Federal Building, Santa Barbara banta Cruz .............................. H. L. Washburn ................................ 4 Cooper Street, Santa Cruz K. W. Koch, Asst. Shasta ...................................... Prof; Payker Talbot ...................................... Court House, Redding bolzmo .................................... J. W. M1115 ....... . ............................................. C ourt House, Fairfield Sonoma ................................... Prof. H. A. Wemland ............................ Court House, Santa Rosa M. W. Buster, Asst. ' H. P. Everett, Asst. Stamslaus ............................... A . A. Jungerman ............................................ 922 J Street, Modesto gutter g g Ssnllll'th, ASSt' 2 4 '1 """"""""""""""""""""""""""""" ' - u Wan -------------------------------------------- Mission Hall, Yuba City $111153? """"""""""""""""""""""""" Ei-Qy'cculfflsegggg; ------------- Chamber of Coinrggarcg, Red Bluff Y W. E. Gilfillan, Asst. ...... u ltorlum, Vlsaha ygilotma """"""""""""""""""""""" SK; Cb 833113011 ------------------------------------------------ Court House, Ventura ' """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" '. .' Olton ------------------------------------------- COllI't House Woodland Ellba ----------------------------------------- Wllllanl Harrison 410 ' . W H Cudaba k i? ----------------------- Second Street, Marysvule W. F. 034141401ch6. merant Asst ..... Agnpultural Hall, Berkeley . - , Inerant Asst ........... Agrlcultural Hall, Berkeley 64 KINSLEY NEEDHAM SCHULTZ CLPEtsEAZTD Pres. '22 Vice-Pres. Secy.-Treas. Associated Student Body HE ASSOCIATED STUDENT BODY 0f the University Farm. is com- posed of every student in residence at Davis Who holds elther an A. S. U. F. card or' an A. S. U. C. card, or, in other words, pract1cally all Of the students enrolled at Davis. The functions of the Student Body are threefold: First, to work in the interests of the institution; second, to make for an orderly, happy student life at Davis, and third, to conduct a series of business or' semi- business activities, such as Picnic Day, Jitney Fair, athletics, etc., for the futherance 0f the first two functions. The successful conduct of these operations is dependent to a. large extent on the united efforts of the Student Body as a whole, or, to state it a little differently, cobperation. This has been the key to the suc- cessful conduct of affairs during the past yeardcobperation, the standing shoulder to shoulder of degree student and non-degree student, regular student and Federal Board student, fraternity man or non-fraternity man, all working for the common good and for the advancement of the University Farm. Much has been accomplished during the past year in preparation for the changes to come, not the least of Which is the granting of circle block letters to minor sports, the installation of a new Constitution, and a general tthouse cleaning, along all lines. X T X We WALTZ MOHN HILLMAN MACLISE KINSLEY BRONSON SMITH GIGAS BAIRD De LAPP ALEXANDER DONNELL RICHARDSON GLENNDING WOODS Executive Committee HE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE of the A. S. U. F. consists of one representative from each fraternity, society and dormitory, the Uni- versity of California men, the town men, faculty representative and manager and the Student Body officers. The committee corresponds in many of its functions to a board of directors. It is the duty of the committee acting in this capacity to direct in general the management of the Student Body business, the managers of the various sports and activities being held directly responsible to them for the conduct of their departments. A11 campus events, such as athletic activities, dances, mixers and so forth are subject to approval by the Executive Committee in order to prevent conflicts in dates. All expenditures of A. S. U. F. funds are made through the Faculty Manager upon authority of the committee. The committee appoint the Managers of athletic teams, the Picnic Day General Chairman, the Editors and Managers of Student Body publications and authorize the awarding of block letters for participa- tion in athletics. ' - ., 73?;er ' JONES, C. JONES, E. MARSH BRONSON HUFFMAN MEYERS NELSON CASWELL UEBELE The Welfare Committee HE STUDENT CONDUCT 0f the University Farm was under the control of the Faculty in 1913. A member of the Faculty living in each dormitory was responsible for the conduct of the students in the dormitory. 111 1914 each dormitory organized its own court, With its Judge, lawyers and policemen, but this system proved to be a failure, so the present Welfare Committee was organized. It is composed of a chair- man, secretary and a representative from each organization 01' group i 011 the campus. Last Fall the dormitories organized and elected their own Welfare Committees, which are responsible to the Student Welfare Committee. The Dormitory Welfare Committees are to be commended for the work they have done the past two semesters. This has allowed the Student Body Welfare Committee to branch out into other fields. The Faculty Committee on Student Control, composed of Professors Titus, Beckett, Wilson, and Smith, sit With the Welfare Committee, advising on affairs that come before the committee, and seeing that all receive justice. 68 anw..t.m.m h. e.....-,. A uo-uow .....-. M m i L oxmxxmwwmmxxmme SPILMAN VALETINE CAROTHERS BLOSSOM BAUMGARDNEI BARLOW ALLEN La ZANSKY BALLARD PHILLIPS WRIDE JEWEL RICHARDSON BROWN NEEDHAM Inter-Fraternity Council HE Inter-Fraternity Council was founded in March, 1919, With the view of uniting the energies of the fraternal organizations, that they might work in unison rather than separately toward the better- ment andiupbuilding of our College as a Whole. During the first three years of the Councils existence it has accom- plished much toward this end, giving its combined efforts to the advance- ment of school activities, both along athletic and social lines. Inter-Fraternity athletics have been instituted to encourage new material, and have been responsible for the bringing out of many good men. Through social functions fostered by the Council the spirit of friend- liness and fellowship have been constantly increased, and the semi- annual dances given are among the big events of the year. All the fraternities 0f the College are represented in the Council. This body should accomplish much, and should be a big help in solving the many new questions that will arise With change in the plans for the future of the College. WOODFORD SCHILLER McDERMOTT WORMLEY Publicity Committee HE PUBLICITY COMMITTEE during the Fall semester carried on the work of advertising the various games and athletic meets held at the Farm. Football games and rallies were posted about school and Davis. The committee also handled programs for the Farm vs. California Frosh games. Irving MacDermont and Dave Wormley handled the work during the Fall semester. The Spring semester track, boxing and baseball features were given full attention. The various meets and games were advertised. The work is being carried on systematically, and the committee has been working in conjunction with Mr. Maclease. The committee is prepared to carry on all advertising for the associated students. MEYERS DINSMORE SHEESLEY JESSUP PreSIdent Vice-Pres. Secretary Treasurer The Y. M. C. A. HIS YEAR has been one of marked success and progress for the Y. M. C. A. The students and faculty have backed the tTYh in every undertaking in a great way. Indications are that greater work will be done next year. Social activities on the campus were opened last Fall by a student mixer. Another social was given at the beginning of the spring semester by the Y. M. C. A. and Brotherhood Class of the Community Church. The ttY Half Hourh meetings have been held weekly throughout the year. and have proved very helpful. Another feature of the work this year was the Discussion Groups, held on the campus, which have served to give the men a chance to gather in small groups to discuss Vital subjects of life. In November Dr. Exner, social hygiene expert of New York City, gave two great lectures to students. In December the student Friendship Fund was presented to the body, and a goodly sum of money was raised. During the Christmas vacation five delegates from the Farm at- tended the Y. M. C. A. Conference at Asilomar, where nearly three hundred men from the colleges of California, Oregon, Arizona and Nevada gathered together for a great meeting, which lasted eight days. The ttY,t took part in the Jitney Fair, one of the big events of the year, by presenting the stunt, ttThe Shooting of Dan McGrew? The Advisory Board, composed of Faculty and student representa- tives, is an important branch of the Y. M. C. A., and is doing much to strengthen the association. 71 1? C . x x . h Ws'SXiXkXM. s, e t BURGBACKER The Glee Club HE PURPOSE of the Glee Club has been to bring men with musical inclinations together and provide music in various forms for general meetings held weekly and on other occasions. With this aim in mind the Glee Club started this year with much pep and enthusiasm. At the beginning of the Fall semester arrangements were made and practice begun to make up a road show. After a great deal of untiring effort on the part of the Director, Mr. A. M. Woodman, a group of skits, solos and group singing were presented in a performance at the Vaca- ville Auditorium in conjunction with the motion picture theatre. Later two shows were staged at the Grammar School Auditorium in Davis, with great success. Towards the end of the semester another show was given in Elmira to a small but appreciative audience. The Spring semester has not been very active insofar as perform- ances are concerned. The club, however, has presented musical numbers before all of the general assemblies and other meetings, such as those held during Stockments Week. A policy of direct musical aid to all other enterprises was assumed. A great deal was done toward furnishing mus10 for the Jltney Fair and Picnic Day. It is hoped .that with the experience the members have obtained, and theavallablllty of good talent the next year, the Glee Club will enlarge Its membership and scope and be ranked among the best. The wxxxwmhwe Wwwmwwmm X Golden Hoof Club Ted Ralson ...................... President .................. S. C. MacKenzie M. A. Salis .................... Vice-President .................... R. P. Myers S. C. MaCKenzie ................ Secretary .......................... M. A. Salis Guilford ........................ Membership ............................ Sheesley HE PURPOSE of this Club is to awaken a more general interest among students of livestock; to work jointly With the Faculty and stockmen for the promotion and development of the Animal Indus- tries Division of the College of Agriculture; to cobperate With all agen- cies that tend to encourage the raising of more and better livestock. To further the advancement of these things there is held each year on Picnic Day a livestock judging contest put on by the students in the club. E. Bronson S. Babin F. Bundy J. B. Gasin J. B. Gacksetter R. Guilford J. D. Harper H. Helt W. H. James L. C. Jones E. S. Jewell J. Foster D. 0. Lamb 0. D. Lambert A. E. Lyons J. J. McNamara R. Pennock J . N. R. Members H. E. Paxton N. G. Sheesley R. E. Rider J. Minwell D. M. Rutherford J. D. Graham W. N. Reusser B. H. Thomas J. K. Sexton J. A. Ogle N. G. Sheesley Ray Donnell H. D. Sylvester M. A. Wood P. H. Trymere E. Lyons A. B. Thomas S. Freeman H. J. Van der Merve A. Sagehorn P. J. Webster E. M. Worthington J. V. Foster R. B. Stemer N. S. Babin E. M. Hittas P. Becklund W. H. James F. 0. Blake H J. E. Bronson . J. Van der Merve . J. Van der Merve PU C. Wood J. McNamera . P. Myers I. Montgomery L. Carr . P. Reynolds Waltz Pressley W. C. De Lapp, J1: K. Munhall H. P. Sylvester L. C. Jones W. Reuseer W. P. Hunter W. Woolford K. W. Proctor roweewee BAIRD GINSBERG I STEiNHART SIL VA Vice-Pres- Treasurer President Secretary Pomology Round Table HE POMOLOGY ROUND TABLE is a student organization by which the Pomology Division is represented in all student activities. The purpose of this organization has been to increase the student interest in Pomology by obtaining men occupied in various lines of agricultural activities in various sections of California and having them speak on subjects with which they are personally acquainted. R. B. Denbigh, as President, last Fall did much towards increasing the popularity of the Round Table and building up a noteworthy organi- zation. Largely through his efforts the students were able to hear such prominent men as Mr. Gammon of Hood, Mr. Hecke, Director of the State Department of Agriculture, Mr. Condit, President of the Peach and Fig h'owersl Association, James Mills and others. In addition to obtaining interesting speakers, the Round Table have worked up shows and stunts for the Jitney Fair and Picnic Day, as well as interesting trips to various parts of the State. At the beginning of the last semester, the Round Table was reorgan- ized under a new plan, which allows for a more uniform distribution of the numerous duties, and from all indications, was very successful. The meetings have been well attended and enjoyed by all. Entertainment and eats, of no mean importance, were plentiful. It is hoped that with a sound organization, as has been developed, the Round Table will rank among the best, if not the best, organization of its kind on the campus. 74 a t .xxxxx ' --' i a w: mmxmmmmxh$ McNAMARA CAVIN BABIN BASCOM PreSIdent Treasurer Secretary Vice-Pres. The Blue and Gold Dairy Club HE BLUE AND GOLD Dairy Club is now in its second year as an organization on the campus, and can be proud of its position at the present time. Its success can only be attributed to the whole- hearted effort of its sponsors in the Faculty and its members, both of whom have worked Without stint to further its interests. The purposes of the club may be expressed in a few words, but the benefits Which may be derived are unlimited. The club has endeavored to bring those interested in the dairy industry in closer contact With the dairy problems of the day, and to cobperate With the Dairy Division in building up a larger and more efficient dairy department. Meetings are held on alternate Tuesdays, at Which time men who have made a success in the dairy industry speak to the members on subjects Which they are most qualified to discuss. The club has been addressed by H. S. Baird 0f the Northern California Milk Producers, Mr. Eugene Grubb, Mr. Feweiger of the Walnut Grove Creamery of Oakland, Mr. Lochry of the U. S. D. A., Western Dairy Division, and by members of the Faculty. In the Fall semester, members of the club competed at the State Fair in dairy products judging. From these members a team of four men was selected to compete at the Pacific International at Portland. For the second consecutive year the team took first honors, and this year the two highest men of the contest were members of our team. 75 " a .'.,.,4'n'4rw HELBACH WESTFALL JONES GOSSMAN Standard Bred Poultry Club HE STANDARD BRED Poultry Club was organized February 2, 1922, by students who are interested in the advancement of the poultry industry. The first meeting was held in the class room of the Poultry Building on February 9, 1922, and officers were elected and a Constitution was adopted. The purposes of this club are to foster a spirit of comradeship among the poultry students, and through debates, discussions and speakers from the investigational and commercial fields, to become better ac- quainted with modern practices of poultry culture. The members of this club are students, and a large number of town people who are poultry fanciers. All people interested in the poultry 1ndustry are invited to attend our meetings. . The elub'showed its ttpepT, by staging a prize winning show at the Jltney Fatr, teaturmg TtThe Egg Laying ROOStQIw and the 2Mechanical Egg Machlnei which were stlccessfully demonstrated to the public. By the increasing attendance at the meetings a bright future is assured for The Standard Bred Poultry Club. COACH W. D. ELFRINK Coach Elfrink is a new man to California. Coming here from Coe College in Iowa, he soon assimilated the true California spirit, and under his able guidance the athletic standard of the school has been brought rapidly to the front. 78 FOOTBALL CAPTAIN ALAN B. CARTER .79 'VARSITY FOOTBALL SQUAD .mmw M ,.. r OOTBALL started this year with a sizably bunch of fellows working hard to make the team. The absence of a permanent coach at the start made the team a little late in getting into top shape. All of the hardest fought contests were played away from home, making it impossible for the entire student body to support the team when support was most needed. Despite these handicaps the team stood preeminent, not because of actual winnings, but because of the fighting spirit they showed to the last minute of the last game played. The team was coached by Mr. Elfrink and captained by A1 Carter. The work of these two men was unceasing throughout the season, and it was through their ef- forts and the hearty co'dperation of the players and student body that the team gained the reputation of being a hard bunch to stop. ttVitf Laney managed the team, planned an excellent schedule, and helped greatly in making the season a success- ful one for the team. hti-IIIAI; FARM VS. CAL. GOOFS October 1 In the first game of the season the Farmis gridiron machine hit a boulder in the form of the powerful Cal. Goofs, who amassed a score of 35 points against the Farm teams 7. The game was somewhat one-sided from the first, the Farnfs squad finding it impossible to score until the fourth quarter, despite their very clever offen- sive. The game opened with the Goofs receiving the ball. After the pigskin had see-sawed up and down the field several times, the Goofs pushed it over the line for a touchdown and converted. The sec- CARTER BOGART 0nd and third quarters proved the weak- SP'LMAN SCHWE'N ness to be in the Farm,s line, as the Goofs ALEXANDER carried the ball over for three more touch- downs. In the final quarter, Miller received a forward pass from Spillman and made E'lIHIIHHHIHIIIIIlllllllllllIIIIIIlllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!Illllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllIIIIIIIlIIIllIIlIlIa. gain Of ten yards. The bill! was ad- 81 t r 3 ? J ' mm XXXNXWt, Amwwsxwxmvwxww vanced to the Goo'fs, three-yard line. Carter broke through the Go-ofst defensive for a touchdown and Bogart conve . The Goofs made one more touchdown, and the game ended with the Goofs having a score of 35 and the Farm 7. FARM VS. SANTA CLARA October 15 Perhaps the darkest spot in the 1921 football calendar of the Farm was the 49-0 defeat suffered at the hands of the Santa Clara huskies. The score was one- sided. The game was not entirely so. Time after time Santa Clara carried the ball to within a few feet of the Farmts goal posts, only to lose it on downs. Dur- ing this game the Farms scrappers fought as they never fought before, and the coach was well pleased with the grit they showed every minute during the game, and until the last whistle blew. The team played the game with no support on the side lines, and with a large part of the team crippled. ttFatt, Wilson and ttFattt Tuttle were quite severely injured, and Bert Schiller went out at the end of the first half with a broken ankle. Other members of the team played through the game with injuries. The showing the team made during this game was not al- together disheartening-in fact, it was a partial Victory for the coach, as the team not only fought, but fought together as a single body. So perhaps the Santa Clara game was not a blot after "all. FARM VS. CAL. FROSH October 22 The game with the Cal. yearlings was played on Californiats grid in a downpour of rain. The game was late in getting pHILLlps WILSON started, and owing to the large crowds in SCHILLER HARDIE the stands, who were present to witness FELTHAM the Ca1.-Oreg0n game, the contest was called at the end of the first half, the Fresh being in the lead, with a score of 20-0. The half ended with the Farmis . team gelng strong and due for a touch- IIHIHWxilmili11HiJHHHHHJIHHHFIHHHIIleilllIEHHHHHHHHLIHHIilIIHItlllll!IIIHlllllIIIIHllIlIdown any nliHU-te' Few passes were at.- 82 is. and m .H .. .. - 3,1. AVERY - WALTZ WRIDE KIRCHNER LANEY tMng J tempted because of the slippery condi- tion of the ball and field. Williams and Phillips did great work in running down punts, and Carter made several substan- tial gains through the line. Avery was unable to play because of injuries, and this lightened the line considerably. The Froshis scores, however, were not made through the line, but were accomplished by punts Which the Farlnis backfield men were unable to recover. On the other hand, the Farmis gains were made through the babesi lines and around their ends. FARM VS. NEVADA On Saturday, October 29. the Farm pigskin Chasers stole quietly into the town of Reno to meet the powerful Sagehen team. The outlook was dubious, and few but the coach realized the stone wall de- fensive that had been developed in the Farm line. The game started, and hardly had the Farm put its hands on the ball, than Bo- gart started off on a spectacular 59-yard run through a broken field. After a 20- yard penalty an intercepted. pass afforded Nevada the first touchdown. It was dur- ing the second quarter that Wilson picked up a fumble 0n the Farnfs 20-yard line and ran 80 yards to a touchdown, tieing the score 7e7. Nevada was shoved back to their 8- yard line by the continual line bucking of Captain A1 Carter, but again an inter- cepted pass brought the ball back to the Farnfs 10-yard line, and a long end run netted the Sagehens their second touch- down of the game. The half soon ended with the ball in the middle of the field and the score 7-14. The Farm came on the field at the end of the half-time rest period With a new lease on life, and after a series of spirited attacks on the Nevada line, Cap- tain Carter succeeded in going over the line for the count; but Spilman did not complete the goal. The score stood 1344, II:mnnmiuimmninumnmmlmmnnmnue;IninmmmInmmmnlmrm:mmmmwumm W'ith Nevada having the edge. 83 For five times in succession the Farm succeeded in piercing the Sage- hen line to within three and four yards of the line, but each tlme Nevada turned back the on-rushing Farmers. . . The quarter ended With the ball in Nevadats posses-s10.n,. and Wlth the whistle they succeeded in a long pass that netted thelr 1n1t1a1 score. Again the Farm pierced the Sagehen line to Wlthlri a few yards of the goal, but the gun ended the game With Nevada 8 p01nts t0 the good. This game more than proved the power of the Farm team, and the perfect unison 0f the team up to the last Whistle. FARM VS. GOBS November 4 . The game with the Mare Island Gobs was played on the Farnfs grld- iron, and ended With a score of 7,0 in favor of the Farm. Carter and Bogart made long end runs, and enabled Schwine to buck the ball over the sailors, line for a touchdown during the first few minutes of play. After scoring the Farm had rougher sailing, but outclassed the Gobs in team work and fight throughout the game. The Farm,s line did great work in br , fensive, and Carter and Bogart smashed through their line sev Farm was not able to score again. The game was a hotly contested and interesting one, and was a real victory for the eleven. J LAST FOOTBALL GAME Agnetian Club With the last game of the season at hand the Farm. ,Varsity anxiously awaited the signal that would hurl them through the club line to Victory. The Armistice Day crowd had filled the bleachers, prepared to Witness the last gridiron classic of the season. The Agnetian Club kicked off and from the minute the Farm put its hands on the ball the club weakened and took the defensive. Jack Phillips at end returned the kick-off 35 yards, and Bogart made a sweeping end run to Within five yards of the goal line. - The next play Captain Carter wrapped himself around the ball and shattered the club line, carrying two of the now weakened club players across the goal line for a touchdown. Bogart converted. The club men came back fighting every inch of their way, and for several minutes neither side could make their downs, but soon the Farm elected to kick the ball out of danger, a fumble and ttMonktt Waltz fell on the ball. The morale of the club men seemed completely broken, and at the end of the half the score stood 21e0 in favor of the Farm. The second half featured sensational passes that netted a good deal of ground for the Farm iVarsity. The fourth quarter saw the Agnetians, complete downfall. Never had a team worked in more perfect unison than did the Farm eleven in thtase Enalyfifteeh niinuges. They played the Agnetians off their feet an w en me 5 1n in ecame monoton tt ' r ' , the aerial attack togpegfection. ous Herble Splllman worked An mtercepted pass by Kirtchner in the last few minutes of play netted the last touchdown, and the istol shot . score of 38-0 in favor of the Farm. p ended the game Wlth a 84 1 n , ,3Whugw. 47 . THE KlCK-OFF A GOOD MIXUP llllllillilllIHllHlIllillHWHHHIHII'IHHH:i'lllHHHiH'IHIIHlHlHHI IIHHHIHWI MllilEIiLWHIIEEHJH'HJNH MW HHMI'M W ilmlW mm W! Nil HM ' ' 1 1C 1 uh Hmmh W; W W 3 .1 ; : .3 1 'EIHE S5 MORE NEVADA IIIHHHHL llWililtHllHHHHEI 1LlWl!ilI:1!IIH1ll.iIllIHlllllllH1IiE? I1H!lIIIHHlllillll!IIllllHlHlHllIIllIlIllllllIllIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllll'HHIHHIIHllllllHIlllllllllllllHHl!lllllHllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHlllllllllllHllHHHllllllllllHIHl 86 I, I: my FARM VS. U. C. GOOFS TOUCHDOWN HEHHLHHIHJFHH HHHHHHEWH y?! I'HHYIHHIIH ll!lIIIHHHSlIIPNIHHIlIIIIHIHl iinlei'li IHUlHlILHH?HHIIHIHW HH ilHiWiuHH I'rH WHIH IWHIYHII HH Hlx W NE M NH IIHNHJHL'W Hit "H T: W W WM MAM! WI 87 SECOND TEAM Second Team , HEN credit for the 1921 victorious 3IKI iVarsity is divided among those who made it possible the second squad deserves a substantial share. When the candidates first donned their uniforms there were fifty contenders for iVarsity positions. The end- of two weeks saw this number cut in half, and a second ,Varsity was picked. This team climbed to the top of the , ladder, and has the consolation that it will form the nucleus of next seasons 3 Victorious ,Varsity. . When Frank Watson, head second . . team coach and former ,Varsity man, first " issued the call, many responded for the , pre-season practice. Coach Watson had ' to work under difficulty on account of the seeming lack of material at the first of the season, but the first game proved , that he was equal to the task of producing ' a winner. Manager Bob Reynolds arranged , games with a number of Junior Colleges .and High Schools that proved to be hard, . . but Victorious, for the second string squad. REYNOLDS ' VAN ATTA Roseville was the first comer, and Manager Captain was administered a 40-0 drubbing. The following Saturday the Preston squad journeyed to the Farm and held the second squad to two touchdowns in a very Close but slow game, the final score being 13-0. Captain Van Atta, at quarter-back, commandered the team in great form, and showed a wonderful stock for the next seasons iVarsity. The second Preston game proved to be disastrous for the second squad, which lost by a 35-0 score. The next game was with the Santa Rosa Junior College, and with Coach Watsonis instructions to buck iem off their feet the squad celebrat- ed a 3517 Victory. Santa Rosais 1 tally was on an intercepted forward pass. The game with Sacramento High School proved to be a surprise, for it was one of the strongest teams that this squad met. The first game was won by the Farm 1417, the second was lost 6-7. Scores Farm ................................................ 40 Roseville .......................................... 0 Farm ................................................ 13 Preston ............................................ 0 Farm ................................................ 35 Santa Rosa Junior College ............ 7 Farm ................................................ 14 Sacramento High School ................ 7 Farm ................................................ 0 Preston ............................................ 35 Farm ................................................ 6 Sacramento High School ................ 7 .1 , Past Season 5 Scores 1916 U. C. Farm ........................................ 0 S. Marys ............................................ 9 U. C. Farm ........................................ 10 U. C. Frosh ........................................ 7 U. C. Farm ........................................ 15 University of Nevada ...................... 10 U. C. Farm ........................................ 0 U. C. Goofs ........................................ 13 U. C. Farm ........................................ 21 San Francisco Nationals ................ 14. 1917 U. C. Farm ....................................... 67 Preston ............................................ 28 U. C. Farm ......................................... 7 U. C. Frosh ....................................... . 6 U. C. Farm ........................................ 13 St. Marys .......................................... 0 U. C. Farm ......................................... 7 U. C. Goofs ........................................ 6 U. C. Farm ........................................ 28 University of Nevada ...................... 7 U. C. Farm ........................................ 10 Olympic Club .................................... 9 U. C. Farm ........................................ 26 University of Nevada ...................... 7 U, C. Farm ........................................ O U. C. Frosh ......................................... 3 1918 U. C. Farm ........................................ 0 St. Ignatius... .................................. ..13 U. C. Farm ........................................ 0 Preston ...................................... . ...... 48 1919 U. C. Farm ........................................ 38 Preston ............................................ 0 U. C. Farm ........................................ 0 U. C, Fresh ........................................ 7 U. C. Farm ........................................ 6 Stanford Frosh ................................ 19 U. C. Farm ........................................ 0 University of Nevada ...................... 21 U. C. Farm ........................................ 9 U. S. S. Boston .................................. 0 U. C. Farm ........................................ 0 St. Marys ........................................... 14 1 1920 ' U. C. Farm ........................................ 27 'U. S. S. Boston .................................. 0 U. C. Farm ......................................... 3 University of Nevada ...................... 7 U. C. Farm ........................................ 18 U. C. Goofs ........................................ 0 U. C. Farm ........................................ 0 Santa Clara ...................... . ................ 19 U. C. Farm ........................................ 13 Stanford Fresh ................................ 7 U. C. Farm ........................................ 0 U. C. Frosh ........................................ 13 U. C. Farm ........................................ 0 Olympic Club .................................... 21 1921 U. C. Farm ........................................ 7 U. C. Goofs ........................................ 35 U. C, Farm ........................................ 0 Santa Clara.--......."-...-.; ................... 49 U. C. Farm ........................................ 0 California Frosh .............................. 20 U. C. Farm ........................................ 13 Nevada .............................................. 21 U. C. Farm ........................................ 7 Mare Island ...................................... 0 U. C. Farm ................ 1 ........................ 3 8 Agnertian Club ................................... 0 Total .......................................... 383 Total ------------------------------------------ 2 g 90 CAPTAIN HERB A. QPTLMAN 91 'VARSITY BASKET-BALL SQUAD Preliminary Season B ASKET-BALL FOR 1922 started as soon after the Christmas holidays of 1921 as the team could be got- ten together. Coach Elfrink had issued the first call, and With four ,Varsity men back from the preceding season the pospects were bright. During the early part of the season the ,Varsity played teams of many de- scriptions, and under the various handi- caps that the preliminary season holds. Loose and rigid interpretation of the rules under different referees made it necessary for the team to adapt itself to the best of its ability. The American Legion team and that of Kimball-Upson both proved stickers, each Winning the three-game series two out of three games. The high schools surrounding Davis proved to be easy, but afforded the Farm much chance for the needed team work The Nevada Series - The first game With the University of Nevada was a sensation and a thrill to the spectators. The Country Bear had a hard time starting, and the first five minutes of play looked as if it would be snowed under by the Silver and Blue. With a few minutes left to play of the first half, Gilcrease and Erb broke away from the Sagehen forwards and scored several baskets. At half time the Silver and Blue led 13 to 10, but With such. speed and team work the Farm ,Varsity staged one of the ffneatest come-backsf that nearly spellt defeat for Nevada. With Davis ahead by four points the tide changed, and Dame Fortune favored Nevada With some long shots from midfield, and she won by the count of 28-24. The second game proved disastrous t0 the Farm, and not once did the ,Var- sity get its stride. The spectators that had come to witness as Close a contest as the night before were somewhat dis- mayed, as it was Nevada that won 32-22. 93 SPILMAN tCath SCHULTZ ERB STRAIN .,, "A" -" aw... , u , 4.0.4."..- --,-,m, i, FRESNO GAME After a short warm-up and with two recent defeats on their hands, the Coun- try Bear traveled to Fresno and had a hearty meal of Raisins. This game lacked features. There wasrft the thrills nor the sensations that usually prevail in the games. The condition and team work of the Varsity was largely responsible for the lopsided score by which the Farm won. The score was 37-28. Owing to the flu no return games were played. College of the Pacific With Coach Elfrink on the sick list Captain itHerbii Spilman, fresh from an operation on his foot, and Erb, the fast and furious forward, with shin splints, the ,Varsity met the College of the Pacific. Though handicapped the Varsity put up a creditable fight, and showed much superior offensive work, but fell down on the defense. The Vis- itors piled up a 7ep0int lead at the end of the first half and maintained it for the rest of the game. The game was close and exciting throughout, but the lack of condition lost out for the Farm by a score of 21-18. The footwork 0f Spilman and the skilled shooting by Gil- crease featured the game. Return Nevada Game The Country Bear upset the basket- ball dope by completely rushing the Sagehen team off their feet. With the largest rooting section of the season turned out to support the Varsity in the last game of the season the Farm spirit was manifest. The team was playing in top form with guards and forwards alike starring in scoring baskets. This was by far the best game from every standpoint that many had ever witnessed. Surprisingly few tries were made, and more passing resulted in situations whichiwere extremely in- teresting from the standpoint of the spectators. The Farm won 28-25. M SENTOUS REASE H HILL L L A B E S A B . CAPT IN GEORGE M. BOGART VARSlTY BASEBALL SQUAD HUGHES tCoacm BOGART JUDSON MARTIN WILSON STOUT IIIIIIIllllIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllIlllllllllllllHllIlHllUllillllllIHlllllililllHHHIlHHHHIIIHIHH F-? ? ,7 7 v kaveew - M, ng , a vmmwh y - a IVID exposure of the ttthrowingtt of games in some of the recent World Series contests have cast discredit 0n the sporting world. Baseball, however, is too popular to succumb to the dastardly work of a few gamblers and players. The effect. if any, upon collegiate baseball has been unnoticeable so far, although the popularity of the sport undoubtedly has been lessened to some degree. College athletics, and especially baseball, have not reached the stage of commercialism, and as long as they re- main so no doubt can exist as to their squareness. The University Farnfs 1922 baseball schedule comprised of somewhat more than twenty games for the preliminary season. Every accessible ball team in the northern part of California was brought to the Farm to give the ttFarmers2 a good workout. Practicing with the hard- est competition was Manager Carns and Coach Hughest prescription. The team was characterized through- , - out the preliminary season by a strong infield, and until the Pomona game, when the entire team responded as a ma- chine, the Victories were in large part ac- creditable t0 the basemen and the pitcher. Two or three weeks of intensive training proved sufficient to visit Berke- ley and play the Frosh. Clean-cut fielding and consistency won the first game for the Farm by a score of 5-4. The game was won by Arano, the Farm pitcher allowing only five hits and two walks. The superior hit- ting 0f the Farm was much in evidence. for we totaled nine bingles off the Babe pitchers. The perfect team work of the Farm and the consistency of the battery were the causes of the Farm victory. R. H. E. University Farm ............ 5 9 2 U. C. Frosh ...................... 4 5 4 9T The second game was a one-sided af- fair. The Farm failed to liven up-that is, all except Captain Bogart, Who scored two of the five counters the Farm put over the home plate. It was the second inning that proved to be the iiVVaterloo,i 0f the Farm. With three hits off Martin the U. C. Babes scored six runs. R. H. E. University Farm ............ 3 5 4 U. C. Frosh ...................... 10 6 3 On Picnic Day the Farm is scheduled to play the Babes for the deciding game. The Farm has had additional work, and the prediction for a close game is to be realized. THE POMONO GAME On the 14th of April the Pomona baseball team from Southern California met the Farm in What proved to be a thrilling game. The invaders promised to be close contenders, but were taken down by the Farm, With a score of 8e5. Both teams battled to a finish in ma- chine-like playing. The Farm twisted the dope on hitting, by collecting nine bingles to three weak connections by Pomona. Martin is accredited With the victory over Pomona, because of his pitching, taking fourteen strike outs to six by Dyer, the Pomona pitcher. R. H. E. University Farm ............ 8 9 2 Pomona .......................... 5 3 1 Next season it is hoped that the Farm Will be able to make the trip to Southern . California to meet Pomona in a return sums game, and also to take on some of the other colleges in that Vicinity. The squad as a Whole never worked harder, nor CARR ngr-l have they established a record that is so Victorious. Much credit is given Coaches Hughes and Walsh, for they have developed the WM u2.1mm!m1:lltlimmumultimummlluzlllmlmlmmmmmm strongest nine the Farm has seen. 98 STAY CAPTAIN FRANK XV. TRLAXD, JR. 99 'VARSITY TRACK SQUAD MCCLISE POGUE SCHWEIN IRLAND WISSMAN VAN ATTA HE track men this year were some- I what handicaped at the beginning of the season, due to the bad weather conditions that prevailed over the entire State. For this reason and also due to the fact that a large number of our men have had little experience in track work, our first few meets were not victorious for us. However, these meets were only premilinaries, and by the time that the finals came around, the Farm boys had had sufficient training, which enabled them to win almost every meet. The Farm this year has been fortu- nate in having the entire cooperation of the U. C. men. Many of these men have been well represented on the track team, as well as in other activities. In years to come, there will be more school spirit than there ever has been before, with every one working for the benefit of the institution. Our first big meet of the season was when our boys journeyed down to our mother school to tangle with the Babes of that institution. Although we were defeated 103 to 28, Coach McClise was well satisfied with his men, as this was the highest score that the Farm had ever made against the Frosh. Irland was the high point man of the day, taking first in the mile, third in half mile. Shaffer took third in the mile. Pogue did well, taking first in high jump. The Farm did well in the shot, Wiss- nian taking first, with Schiller third. Williams, of the Farm, took second in the two-niile, which was a very fast race. Anderson took third in the pole vault at 11 feet. Hardie took third in the javelin. Schiller took third in the discus at 109 feet. The California Frosh were exception- ally strong in the hurdles and sprints, but took second in both the 100-yard and 220- llllIHHHIIlIIIHIHilllIIllIIIlllllllllIIHHHTIIHHlHlHlIHET'UHHHIEIIlh HM Hi? TWI' ll WI :TH yard da511es' 101 Our next large meet was held in Sao- ramento against the High School of that city. Sacramento High has always had fine track men and offered good compe- tition for the Farm men. This meet re- sulted in a Victory of 72 to 40. Schwein showed up very well in this meet, taking second in the 100-yard dash, first in the 220. Irland also showed his usual good form by taking second in the 440, first in the 880-yard run, and third in the broad jump. Kerr and Schaffer came in second and third for the mile run. Van Atta won the low hurdles in good style, also winning high hurdles, with Lambert a close second. Wissman showed his ability at the shot by taking first with a throw of 46.1 feet. Sentous brought home second place in this event. Bullin took second place in the high jump. The Farm did well in the broad jump, taking first, second, and third. Meyers, Post, and Irland brought home these victories. Anderson, Avery, and Sentous won first, second, and third in the discus. Our team won the half mile relay, time 1 minute 3614 seconds. The team was made up of Holstein, Regetti, Dugan, and Sehwein. ' The Farm has competed in two tri- angle meets, winning both of them. The first meet was between Sacramento High- Woodland High, and the Farm. The final score in this meet was: Farm 52, Sacra- mento 49 2T3, Woodland 14 U3. Another triangle meet was held at the Farm School on April 15th. This meet was between Oakland Technical, SESRE'E REGETTI Sutte6r10ity inolfthe garm. The final score A FER POGUE was poin s or t e Farm, 44 for Sutter ANDERSON FOSTER wgm City, and 17 for Oakland Technical. On the 6th of May the Farmers track squads will journey up to Reno to meet the Sagehens of the University of Nevada. This is the one big event that all track men look forward to. as Nevada is our bitterest rival. The entire success of this years track season has been due to the earnest effort of Coach McClise and Manager Foster. 102 sru' . x4 Boxing OXING HAS TAKEN a stronger place in athletics than ever before B at the Farm. This is due to the conscientious work of Coach Barnard and the men on the team. Training started at the beginning of the Spring semester, and with the exception of a week during the small- pox epidemic, the team went through the training routine every after- noon after school hours. Gus Gerson, a veteran light-weight of U. C.,, was elected Captain of the team, and Tom Buck acted as Manager. Gerson and Persson were the only U. C. students on the team, while Hagen, Temple, Spain, Barlow, Wynne, Spilman, Perry, Miller, Laughlin, Buck, iiYoungi, Barnard, and House were Farm School men. The meet with the U. C. iVarsity Boxing Team on March 4th was a great success. Gerson, Persson, and ttYoungi, Barnard won their bouts, and every bout was clean, hard fought and, in the most part, very close. A large crowd attended, bringing $130 in gate receipts. The meet with Santa Clara on March 24th was quite a victory for the team, every bout in the evening being won, with the exception of one default, which was on account of a broken nose and doctors orders. The Farm men, on the whole, showed better condition and more expe- rience than the Santa Clara Men. Meets were arranged with U. C. for April 14th, and with Stanford for Picnic Day, which have not been held up to the time this article was written. 109. Wrestling RESTLING AT THE FARM has received a great deal of atten- tion this year, but due to many adversities we have not been able to stage many matches up to the time this book goes to press. - Although there is not such a large showing this year as last, those Who have been working for the team have shown exceptional loyalty in turning out every night and working faithfully under the able tutelage of Charley Andrews. , Coach Andrews was formerly a well-known champion at his weight, and is now coaching the California iVarsity. He comes up to the Farm once a week to show the Country Bears the fine points of the game. He deserves all praise for the interest he has shown in the institution, and the patience he has had in making the Farm Wrestling Team the suc- cess that it is. As the Rodeo goes to press we have a match scheduled With the California iVarsity team, to take place in our back yard. We anticipate a successful evening With them on that night. There are several other important matches lined up for the latter part of this semester, and the fans are looking forward With interest to the wrestling program of the coming months. - T ennis veristiy Farm. This year, however, has brought about a great change in the attitude that some of the students have about tennis. No doubt the coming year will see tennis as one of the major sports of this school. The three new courts that are now being put in at a cost of around one thousand dollars will bring this Change about. Tennis this year has received whole-hearted support, not only by the players themselves, but from the Student Body. A budget of $70 was given to tennis for the purchasing of tennis balls and for traveling expenses. This was not a very large sum, but it is a starter, and no doubt the coming years will see a much larger budget granted to the tennis players. Two very interesting tournaments were played off in the Fall sein- ester. The singles tournament had thirty-two entries, with Austin coming out ahead and Winning the silver loving cup that was presented by the Bowman Auto Supply Co. of Sacramento. The doubles were some- what handicapped by the sudden change of weather, but still there was a good deal of keen competition. Norton and Austin of the West Dormi- tory won the doubles championship and received as prizes a couple of large banners that were presented by Rudy Nickles of the Coop. As soon as the weather is certain a large number of tournaments will be played, and with men like Harris, who was Stanfordis third man, Norton, Blatt, Leavitte, and Austin, the Farm should not be afraid of losing very many games. IN YEARS HERETOFORE, tennis has been a minor sport at the Uni- 105 WILLIAMS tWinneri BROWN E tThirdi mllHlLitIHJJl; :4 .u hum :rlm VOLTZ tSecondi The Cross-Country Race ACH YEAR the students and Fac- E ulty 0f the Farm look forward to the cross country race, and as weather conditions delayed it last Fall, the interest kept on mounting until the entries for long distance honors lined up at the tape. These included three of the contest- ants in the Sacramento Union,s cross City race on Thanksgiving Day, where Frank Irland took third place and Vent- nor Williams placed sixth, against a field of forty-eight. George Volz was the oth- er man from the Farm. Before an enthusiastic crowd, Coach Denny McClise started the runners at the pistol shot on the three-mile circuit of the campus. Leaving the cafeteria and the cheering crowd the men circled the field of sorghum and headed for the Agronomy House, past the Poultry Building and horse barn. The course then turns south and east to the "ranch house, north past the hog and sheep barns and east at the dairy barn. Re- turning past the Animal Husbandry Buildings and Agricultural Engineering Shops and Creamery, the contestants cir- cled the sorghum field again and fin- ished in front of North Dorm. There was a stiff wind, but the 01d , Farm fight brought out the best that was in the runners. After leading from the start, Vetnour Williams was the first of the bunch to cross the tape, winning the gold medal. F. D. Browne took the silver medal for second place, George Volz placed third. The gold, silver and bronze medals were put up by the Bowman Auto Sup- ply Co. of Sacramento, furnishing a suit- ahle memento of a race well worth run- nlng. ' The cross country race is an old end honored tradition of U. C. Farm, and 1t is hoped that the same enthusiasm and spirit will prevail next year to put dnHiWMuiiEwiHHHhW:thHWHIIIHHHHHHHHH it over in great StYle. 106 T ank Rush the Seniors in that annual classic, the Tank Rush. This event is held to determine whether or not the Seniors shall have the moral right to force the Frosh to obey the traditions of the school. 3 T THE BEGINNING of every school year, the new Freshmen meet Late in the afternoon on August 18, 1921, the Freshmen met in front of the North Dorm. A11 wore their far-famed itbibs", and all had their faces blackened. At the stroke of five, the ensemble moved in a body to the tank and formed a line opposite that of the Seniors. htof. Beckett, as official referee, signaled the beginning of the melee. Twenty minutes later all the Frosh were on the opposite side of the tank dripping, while all but a very few of the Seniors were quite dry. Many thrills were furnished by ttBigi, Santous and his gang of Seniors in revenging the dousing of Al Reynolds, who happened to be the first Senior to receive a wetting. One Senior, Dave Wormley, was unfortunate enough to fall in while the tank was crowded, and in the wild struggle, the Frosh trod him under foot, and he had such a hard time that in order to save him, a number of his comrades were forced to rescue him. The Seniors gained the Victory, but it was only by stepping on the Freshmens ears with their hob-nailed boots, and then biting their necks or else pulling their arms, or any other method that would reduce them to insensibility, and tossing the inert bodies in the pool. The life saving crew was successful in its efforts to save all devotees of the 10y waters, so 110 casualties occurred. As the Frosh would hit the water there would be a stalwart swimmer 011 either side of him to enable 111111 to reach the opposite bank. Although Doc Bates searched the ground and tank very carefully, he was unable to find any track of stray arms, 'eyes or legs, so the battle was successfully closed. 108 7, a ,,,,A, .,.. ., . , ,,,., , i ,.,T.r..7 "----w:7;mwm w Feotball Rally September 1 THE PURPOSE Of this rally was to inspire some jazz and pep in the school along the line of football. Music, boxing bouts, wrestling matches and some excellent addresses filled the time that was not taken up with the b00- ing of tiBossie Cow Cow? Bill De Lapp, our handsome yell leader, acted as Chairman for the occa- sion, and kept things moving. He aroused pep in the meeting by leading a few yells, and then he introduced Acting Dean Thomas Tavernitti, whose popular- ity was evinced by a storm of applause. The U. C. Orchestra made its first appearance for the year with the strains of the latest popular songs, after which the events of the evening were staged. Due to the successful efforts of Her- bie Spilman, the bouts and matches were immensely enjoyed. The best bout of the lot was that between Bogart and Kid Temple. The results were quite gratifying to the blood-hungry mob. The main event was the playful little paper-weight tussle between Tiny Tut- tle and Babe Cochrane. It bid fair to stand as a classic in the art of wrestling, and the knightly-like conduct of the Vic- torious Cochrane won the hearts of the motley throng. Prof. Sam Beckett gave the word that the Faculty was behind the athletic ac- tivities of the school. After a few brief remarks from Vic. Laney, Football Manager, and Captain Carter the rally closed with the singing of ttAll Hail". Bleacher Rally September 16 Dan Carey brought a ton of his famous watermelons t0 the athletic field to make investigations as to the number of melons a good, healthy Farm School man could inhale, and to generate more pep and enthusiasm for student affairs. mmmu:LIuIIIIIIIIe!tImm1:iiIIrIImmmnlmwm:m:nm:mmumumar:w i It didlff take long for pep to arise, for De LAPP ARANT tiLET'S GO WITH A BIG BOSSY" 109 --- t iikw vm-ffitia K i.-. as soon as the melon eaters compl their lesson in yells .and songs under the tutelage of Bill De Lapp, they unloaded a11.the1r sp1r1t on one grand melon rind smash. To date Dan hasn,t publlshed a bulletin on the result of this investigation, but its safe to say it was most successful. Second Football Rally October 21 On October let we had a real pep rally in the Gym. It all started with a bout between two feather-weights and a talk from ttDocti Hayes. Straight to the point, he emphasized the teams need of support from the Student Body, and by the way things went from then on, thls plea must have borne fruit. . . farmers w1th thelr syncopated melodies, an a lively scrap put on by a couple of Barneyts prideseeBuck and Miller. By the. time the last gong sounded the whole Student Body was so full of pep that the a1d rendered by Ed Voorhies was hardly needed, yet his excellent talk seemed to impress upon the students the meaning of pep and support. Prof. Dan Carey next gave a short talk tempered by idiot sticks scattered by McDermott. Now and then as the smoke cleared away two more men, McCausland and White, could be seen playfully poking their padded fingers in each others ribs. Barney and Leuschner, two veterans at the game, put on a real show, after which the coach called in the team and introduced them one by one. Victory Rally December 8 Whenever the University Farm enters any competition it makes everyone else realize they are up against a real institution. The Live- stock J udging Team and the Dairy J udging Team were sent to the Port- land International, and a few carloads of the choicest livestock ever grown were shipped to the celebrated Chicago International. The boys from Portland and Prof. Gordon H. True and Alex Mc- Donald, our veteran herdsman, returned from Chicago at about the same time, and a special rally was called to honor them. Prof. True spoke first, giving a graphic description of the great fair and commending Bob MeNeal, Magill and Sagehorn on their efforts helping to prepare the prize winning animals for exhibition. He also lauded the particularly fine work of the Stock Judging Team for their excellent showing at the Porland show. Alex McDonald was the next speaker, demonstrating that he was a good speaker as well as a master at producing worldts champions. The work of the Dairy J udging Team was given great credit by Prof. Turnbow. . Prof. Tomson, the coach of the Dairy Judging Team, explained that thls was .the first ever sent to Portland, and with the excellent showing made thls year could be depended upon to successfully represent the Farm agalnst any competition that it may enter in the future. . The last speaker was Prof. Hughes, who cheerfully gave an impres- s1on of the men and the work they did. As a fitting conclusion, Prof. True presented the prize silver cup to the members of the Livestock J udging Team. 110 ZBanqu September 16-Scrimmage .................................. New Men and Pretty Girls October 1eBlock Letter Cabaret The curfew tolls the knell 0f parting day, The herd Winds slowly der the lea, While the children beat it to the cabaret, Where none may care or ask how old they be. October 14eAg. Journal .................................................... Syncopated Melody October 28eFedera1 B0ard....Many Pretty Girls From Sac. and Elsewhere November 4eFrosh ...................................................................... ttAwful" Good November lOeAmerican Legion Armistice Ball Happy Festivity With VVar-Time Color November 18eInter-Fraternity December ZeSenior.-.-.--...-.-..,. ................ Semi-Formal at the Tuesday Club March 18eBachelor Girls ........................ Hard Work Rewarded by Success March 31-An1erican Legion Masque Ball Pretty Costumes and Ladies Fair April 7eInter-Fraternity Picnic Day T HAS OFTEN been quoted that the farmers are the backbone of the nation. It has also been quoted that the prosperity of the nation depends upon the prosperity of its farmers. Food a nation must always have. It is the farmers Who supply the materials for this food. In order to extract a maximum amount of products from the soil, Whether animal or vegetable, one must have the proper knowledge. There are many young men at the Farm studying the methods evolved from the experiences of many farmers and specialists in agri- cultural lines. Parallel with this they have the opportunity to put into practice these methods, because of the excellent facilities in the livestock, orchard mechanical, purely agricultural and many other lines of en- deavor that have generously been furnished by the people of the State. 0111' Picnic Day has come to be recognized as one of the big days of the year for the agricultural public. We have had in the past from ten to fifteen thousand visitors on that day. This year we hope to reach the climax of our endeavors, and give the farmers of our great State, and all others interested in agricultural achievement, an opportunity to View this institution, the University Farm, and see for themselves the progress it has Inade up to the present time, as well as the preparations for future expans1on, On this, our Picnic Day, we not only afford the people a View of What we are doing, but we earnestly hope it Will be a day on Which they may come and offer suggestions that Will bring us in a still closer relationship w1th those who actually till the soil. 112 l . We declare Open House, and all Who come are our honored guests. Under the direction of our chosen leaders, we have endeavored to suc- cessfully entertain and interest them With our exhibits and our hospi- tality. We hope to prove that the future farmers of the State, when they are established for themselves, Will have the ability and knowledge to carry on their work in a husbandlike manner, and put the business of farmng at the head of the professions. Picnic Day Committeemen The 1922 Picnic Day Will be handled by the following men: R. P. REYNOLDS, General Chairman M. A. SALIS, Secretary Finance, C. WALTZ Entertainment, V. BAIRD Parade, C. TEGNER Decoration, L. PRESSLEY. Athletics, M. A. WOOD Reception, G. E. BOGART Labor, F. L. SENTOUS Stock Judging, B. H. THOMAS Publicity tNewsL C. H. KINSLEY Publicity tGeneraD, J. B. WOODFORD Refreshment, J. J. McNamara Circus, S. C. MacKENZIE Dance, F. P. ALEXANDER 113 uranwuu, i. . I t r . J 't y Fair HE LADIES of the Farm Circle have annually forwarded the Jitney I Fair. Always cobperating with the students, they keep a watchful eye open and endeavor to meet any particular necessity for help or encouragement that may arise. To further this purpose a number of years ago they founded the Annual Jitney Fair. . It has grown with great rapidity into one of the greatest of our yearly fetes. Organizations, fraternities, the 006p, Dorms, and the Faculty all do their bit to make the affair a success. The marvels of a jitney were once again public. The old loving call of light or dark, resounding from the bass voice of the rotund gentleman behind the long mahogany was again answered by the ring of the nickel and the sight of a foaming jug. Drama and melodrama mingled with the horrors of a gambling hell and the shock of a Stella. i Song and travesty were foremost in the scintillating joy of the Fig Leaf Follies presented by the P-omology Round Table. So good was their bit of cleverness that it was adjudged first in its class. Perhaps the most serious attempt at a real dramatic production was by the Farm Y. M. C. A. in their presentation of iiThe Shooting of Dan McGrewii, by Robert W. Service. An excellent piece of acting was por- trayed in the character of tithe lady known as Louii, taken by Earl Coke. This act was awarded second place, while the honors 0f premier actor of the evening were given to tithe ilady, known as Louii. Lochinvar by the Philo Delphos, and the Chicken and Egg Show put on by the Poultry Club succeeded in attracting their share of nickels. A bit of local color of Chili was portrayed by the Beta ths in their presentation of the Chilian dancers. The stunts were less pretentious than the shows, yet were quite clever and interesting. The honors 0f Hellts Half Acre will long live in the memories of those who dropped their nickel in the slot to view this terrible scene. The B011 Amatas evidently had recently done some slumming in Sacra- mento, for it was a most realistic picture of Hang Far Lowis opium joint. The Caponis Famous Stella, as mentioned before, was unusually shoeklng, while another and quite mild Stella was exhibited by the Golden Hoof. The much advertised iiMurielts Bathit, with its subdued lights and gentle peek into the fair lady,s bath quite prepared the Viewers for any- thlng that might follow. Of coprse, in such a large crowd with the West Dormis Gambling Hell runnlng full blast with its crooked games destined to rope the luck- less wayfarer of his jitneys, and the foaming ale 0f Dinty Moorets Place some restralnt was necessary to keep peace and order. The Federai Board men, foreseeing this need, took it upon themselves to form an efflelent Department of Country Constables. Michaels as the Nickel- Fakmg Judge, was stern, and officialdom waxed fat. , brought to the eyes of the 114 Portland Livestock Judging Team MONG THE MANY achievements of the University Farm during the A past year stock judging has ranked among the highest. For the L first time in its history the University of California was renre- sented at. the Portland International Livestock Show, Under the direc- tion of Prof. E. H. Hughes a team of fifteen men were trained during the Fall months. and from these six were chosen. Saturday, November 5th, found the representatives of the six com- peting colleges in the immense pavilion of Portland awaiting the con- test. At 9 a. m. the first class was led in, and at 10 otclock that evening the last set of reasons were given. California stood third, but was successful in winning first place in beef cattle and hogs. By winning the beef cattle classes California became the proud possessor of the Port- land Cattle Loan Associatione beautiful cup. 113 LULU MAYFLOWER Chicago International Livestock Show 1922. A Cross-Bred Shorthorn Sold for $1.10 per Pound, Bringing $1342.00. Grand Champion of Show, Champion Grade, Champion Yearling at Aberdeen-Angus Heifer, Bred by University df California. THOMAS COACH TOMSON PELLISIER HUDSON MDairy Livestock Judging Team ONG THE MANY achievements of the Un1ve1 Slty Farm in the past Myeal stock judging has held its own. With but a limited amount of training, but under the able leadership of Coach Prof. W., E. T-omson, the dairy livestock team accompanied the general livestock dairy production teams to Portland. The arrival at Oregon Agricultural College was a most hospitable one. Free access to all livestock was given the California teams, and many profitable hours were earnestly spent polishing the dull spots before the fatal hour. On November 5th the California team, represented by tiNat" Hudson, Leon Pellisier and B. H. Thomas, answered the roll call with four 00111- peting teams. The four leading breeds of dairy cattle were judged, three Classes in each, senior yearling heifers, mature cows and bulls. The contest came to a close at 2:30 p.111.,1asting five hours. The results were made known at the Western Dairy Instructors banquet held at the Multnomah Hotel on the eve of November 8th. The California team scored second, losing first place to Washington State College by a difference of only 10 2TB points out of a possible 3000. The California team scored highest on Jerseys, and was awarded the silver trophy donated by the Western Dairy Instructors. The highest placing of Jerseys and the second highest placing of Holsteins went to California men. The third highest man of the contest was also a California man. 117 BRED AND EXHIB TED BEST GROUP OF FIVE STEERS UNDER TWO YEARS OF AGE AT 1922 CHICAGO INTERNATIONAL. BY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA VAN DER MERVE MCNAMARA TURNBOW tCoachi PAXTON SALIS .3: Dairy Products Judging Team a " HE UNIVERSITY of California Dairy Products Judging Team again ' I won first place in the student judging contest at the Pacific Inter- - national Livestock Exposition held at Portland, Ore, November 5th 3 , to 12th, 1921. 1 ' ' The team made a total of 13,890 out of a possible 15,000 points, lead- it v ing the nearest team, Oregon Agricultural College, by 159 points. Wash- i j ington State College and the University of Idaho also entered teams which placed third and fourth in the order named. M. A. Salis, H. J. Van der Merve, H. E. Paxton and J. J. McNamara alternately made up the California team. Paxton was second in both butter and cheese; Salis was third in cheese, while Van der Merve was first in cheese and third in butter. This was enough to make Van der Merve high man of the contest, with Paxton a Close second. The team brought home two cups and a plaque, besides many individual prizes. Professor G. D. Turnbow 0f the Dairy Industry Division coached this years team as well as the team last Fall, which won first place. 111' WERE WINNERS AT CHICAGO INTERNATIONAL, 1922 First Prize Pen Hampshire Wether Lambs Reserve Grand Champion of Show, Champion Grade Wether Lamb CALIFORNIA STANDARD First Prize Senior Calf, Champion Aberdeen- Angus, Reserve Champion Calf Second Prize Hampshire Second Prize POIand-China Barrow Judging Contest at THIS HAS BECOME one of the important features of the State Fair, and is usually held during the first day. Formerly it was limited to University Farm School students, but during the last two years the University of California, as well as the University Farm School students, have competed, and it has become a very spirited contest. The State Fair awards $250 in cash prizes, distributed among the various classes of livestockebeef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, hogs and horses. In addition to these, the ttCalifornia Cultivator" has always donated a silver trophy for the high man of the contest. The winners last Fall were as follows: High man, B. H. Thomas. Beef Cattle-First, C. J. Burnham; second, W. N. Reusser and R. E. Rider ttiey Dairy CattleeFirst, S. J. Bell; second, C. J. Burnham; third, L. E. Harbach. SheepeFirst, C. A. Reeves; second, C. E. Tegner; third, B. H. Thomas. HogseFirst, A. Powers, Jr.; second, S. J. Bell; third, L. E. Harbach. HorseseFirst, B. G. McClelland; second, B. H. Thomas; third, J. H. Connelly and S. J. Bell ttiey Keen interest is being manifested in these contests, and last year forty-two students competed. Ten classes of livestock were judged, and oral reasons were given on five of these. The contest was conducted by members of the Animal Husbandry Divisionnamely,Professors Miller, Hughes, H0we11,Wi1son and Tomson. 1T1 ' 7m 127$ 2556 $735 Oaxkdwe 159i: i5 617 KYIJUX5 zdiwnwagpk r . K C E B N E R E H C S HAZLETT ALEXANDER L. P. BASCOM W. C. De LAPP, JR. Business Manager Editor-in-Chief Rodeo Staff ,22 W. C. De LAPP, JR ................................................ Editor-in-Chief L. P. BASCOM ........................................................................ Business Manager W. C. GAGE ........................................................ Assistant Business Manager ASSOCIATE EDITORS F. P. ALEXANDER ................................................................... Senior Records W. T. CASS ................................................................................. V...s....-.-...Sp0rts N. HAZLETT ................................................................................ School Year V. L. BAIRD .......... Photographs K. SCHIERENBECK...: ........................................................................ Jokes J. K. MUNHALL T. LAUGHLIN W. T. CASS H. G. MCGRAW H. K. SCHIERENBECK M. A. WOOD '11m m' llllHHHl1HIHH'IIEEHMIIHIHHHHIHHH 1HHHHHIIIHIIEIIIIIlilllIHHHHHIIllllllllllHHlIllllllllllilllllllHHHlllIlHHlllllllllilllllllilllllli1H!HllHllllHllHlilllflIlllllH IIIHII. l 1. $ . 1 . 1M s H Mni' 1diln.31ni:ii- . ' J26 x C. H. KINSLEY, EDITOR H. TEMPLE A. E. REYNOLDS Resigned Editor Business Manager The Agricela OR SEVEN YEARS the University Farm Agricola has been the official weekly publication of the Student Body of the University Farm. Throughout the term it appeared on each Wednesday as a four-page, six-column newspaper. The Agricola is a live, Wide-awake paper, containing all the latest agricultural news of interest to students and the outside public besides, and of course features the various school activities of the week. The circulation now numbers one thousand copies per week, with numerous special editions Which are published for the College of Agriculture. at which times as many as 2800 copies have been printed for distribution t0.pr0spective Farm School students and others. Every High School and College in the State is on our mailing list. In uniting the student body and promoting a closer bond of friend- ship between the Farm School men and the University students, the Agricola has succeeded wonderfully. It is also a very important means of keeping the alumni in close touch With the activities of the Farm, besides being an excellent means of advertisement for the University Farm. dam t i. ff . wuss; v p...- Alumni Notes By L. B. Rowland, President Alumni Association Dudley Heron, 16, is with the National City Bank sellinghonds in the Sacramento Valley. Dud is. the pi'pud" possessor of a. baby girl. Jimmy Brenton, ,16, is holding down one of the Associated Oil Co. stations in Sacramento. Harry Hennings, 18, has not been able to pull away from tiMy City Oaklandii, and is employed there by the Standard Oil Co. Jack Roberts, 16, is selling life insurance for the California State Life. 5'5 224.191: Carl Propfe, 18, has an active interest with the Rowland--Roberts CO. in Sacramento, handling the De Laval line, $5 3': 9? 3? Babe Slater, 17, is handling a bunch of sheep 0n the Conaway Ranch, near Woodland. ' $2: $1 $4.: Hira Hall, 16, is the proprietor of a music store in Marysville. He recently joined the ranks of the benedicts. Harold Jones, 18, is at present working for the Associated Oil Co. in Sacramento, but expects to go farming again. Johnnie Dugan, 16, has resigned his job at the Palo Alto Stock Farm, and is now employed at the Doyle 8; Davey Dairy, Dixon. at: k 1'::X: John Molter, 18, is foreman of the Doyle 8L Davey plant at Dixon, and is ably assisted by Joe Genshla, 17. Lou Rowland, 18, is With the Rowland-Roberts Co. in Sacramento, and is handling the creamery lines. He is also traveling in double harness. Bill Duffy, ,15, is back at the job in the Sutter Basin, in charge of the vegetable work. Jimmie Leathers, ,15, is now working his own place in the Holland Land C0. DI'OJeCt at Clarksburg, and is also selling insurance. Bill Glass, 17, is Assistant Butter-Maker with the Milk Producers Association in Sacramento. :k :X: Charley Smith is selling bonds With a San Francisco house. He was in the 18 Class. F. E. McConnell, '20, is With the Farmers 8c Mechahics Bank in Sac- ramento, and is now a teller. 12S 1 23'" v R. WELLS C. WALTZ S. WELLS R. REYNOLDS S. AVERY H. ARENT E. JONES H. BROWN G. DOWD H. HENDERSON C. BURHAM P. BARNARD L. R. F. VALENTINE E. RIGHETTI D. WORMLEY C. F. CLELAND 130 DAVIS BROADY STINSON S. BELL F. SENTOUS J. CAROTHERS H. COOPER G. BARNARD Capon Founded 1911 Honorary Members D. H. Cary Mr. Lloyd Raffetto Prof. W. E. Tomson Mr. Lawrence Barnard Prof. C. E. Howell Mr, Lloyd Baldwin D. G. MaClise Mr. M. J . Greer . Seniors R. Reynolds R. Broady C. Waltz S. Avery S. Wells R. Wells L. Davis D. Wormley F. Sentous G. Dowd F. Cleland 1 Juniors G. Barnard P. Murray J . Carothers E, Righetti E. Jones H. Cooper F. Valentine H. Brown N. Miller University Men P. Barnard S. Bell D. Richardson C. Burnham H. Henderson 131 W. De LAPP W. DEWAR W. FORD A. KING l. McDERMOTT A. POWERS H. SPILMAN C. REEVES C. TEGNER J. WOODFORD W. CASS L. HARBACH C. JUDSON G. TRAYNER W. CASWELL J. PHILLIPS E. SCHILLER J. ORCUTT M. SALIS D. HARRISON K. MARTIN M. ANDERSON A. FOSTER M. BENJAMIN S. WALSH J. FOSTER D. WALTER C. SCHILLER C. ENGEBRETSON X 1 .MWWWWNNNXx XXXXWWMM Founded 1913 Honorary Members mProf. T. Tavernetti Prof. H. S. Beckett Prof. E. C. Voorhies Mr. A. L. Denning Prof. J. 1. Thompson Prof. I. S. Smith Forest 1. Plant Dr. H. M. Hayes K. L. Engebretson Seniors W. De Lapp J. Foster W. Dewar H. Spilman A. King J. Woodford I. McDermott R. Walter A. Foster J uniors W. Ford G. Trayner W. Cass J. Phillips W. Gaswell K. Martin Freshmen R. Potter E. Reeves J. Orcutt E. Beck D. Harrison M. Benjamin University Men A. Powers I. Schiller C. Reeves M. Anderson C. Tegner S. Walsh C. Judson M. Salis C. Schiller 133 F. ALEXANDER J. BERRICK B. MCCLELLAND V. RODDEN A. CARTER H. POWERS H. TEMPLE W. HOLSTEIN R. BARLOW' G. KIRCHNER F. WILSON G. ALLEN J. DUGAN V. LANEY N. MARSH H. HERON R. SHAFFER C. TIMMONS I. NORTH L. AVERY H. GREEN V. GILCREASE J. WILLIAMS "WU . Ewrmmuyu P K "WWII" WEHHH' "U hY . Phi Alpha Iota Founded October, 1913 Honorary Members Dr. H. Phipps F. E. Neer H. A. Wadsworth J . D. Miller . Seniors Alexander B. G. McClelland Berrick Ray Shaffer Kirchner O. K. Timmons Marsh V. E. Laney Heron A. B. Carter H. J . Powers .P. .F. .W .L. .A J uniors L, Burnett H. Temple J . Dungan J . J . Williams Freshmen V. V. Rodden W. W. Holstein University Men H. 1. Green V. V. Gilcrist D. EDMOND P. DAWSON R. PECKHAM C. LEASE J. BRONSON J. EWING G. BOGART H. ADAMS T. BUCK A. HILL D. BUCK M. BLOSSOM R. CLOWES H. MILLER J. BAUMGARTNEF R. LAUSCHNER L. ERB. C. SCHWEIN V. METZLER B. GREEN B. LAUFFER J. TAYLOR P. JOHNSON E. FELTHAM 136 x K wk Bona Amata Founded 1915 Honorary Members Prof. J. F. Wilson Prof. H. S. Baird Prof. L. J. Fletcher Dr. W. E. Bates W. P. Duruz Seniors J . Ewing H. Adams E. Felthan T. Buck D. Edmond A. Hill R. Peckham M. Blossom C. Lease . D. Buck J. Bronson R. Clowes G. Bogart J. Taylor R. Lauschner Juniors J . Baumgartner E. Green L. Erb B. Lauffer C. Schwein H. Miller V. Metzler H. Stine Freshmen P. Johnson P. Dawson I. BECK J. COCHRANE E. PEABODY M. JORY E. BALLARD mmr m La ZANSKY CUTLER ACKERMAN MARTIN MILLER P. LEWIS T. MARLEY W. DANHOUSEN A. POLSSON G. PAUL D. WILSON J. PICKETT C. BALDWIN F. BROWNE E. HEFNER H. MOHN O. NELSON C. WALTERS H. MEYERS A. MCCABE NEILSON H. POGUE Alpha Sigma Beta Founded 1917 Honorary Members W. N. Seawright Lee A. Waite C. E. Walsh Frank E. Davis V Seniors 1. W. Beck . C. Pickett Dudley Danforth . F. Brown W. F. Danhousen . R. Cutler J. A. Cochrane . Lahann, Jr. B. H. La Zansky . R. Paul T. P. Marley . J. Wilson P. E. Lewis . F. Polsson Juniors L. D. Ackerman . A. Martin Cedric B. Baldwin . I. Mohn F. B. Browne . H. Nelson E. C. Hefner . A. Walters M. L. Jory . B. Pogue E. C. Peabody Freshmen E. C, Ballard H. C. Myers E. E. Miller Alex C. McCabe J. F. Neilson . Aldrich . Alferitz . Harriman .Madsen . Rider J. Simmons 200100 A. Adams R. Batterton . Therwaldson W. Gibbs E E. Jewel P. Nelson R. Weir R. Meyers T. Laughlin H. Nobmann P. Stay M. Steeley R. Bundy G. Voltz O. Lambert C. Parlier W. Stay V. William 140 T. Connolly R. Hall G. Michael C. Richardson F. lrland J. Wilson M. Dugdell R. Harris R. Meyersieck J. Rutherford S. Taschner C. Yutze Kappa T au Founded in 1919 Prof. Gordon H. True Mr. Ivor F. Torrey Mr. A. M. Woodman Mr. John T. Conrad Seniors 0. L. Aldrich C. A. Parlier R. V. Batterton C. P. Richardson T. H. Connolly P. V. Stay H, H. Harriman J. B. Simmons R. F. Hall ' Geo. Volz F. W. Irland, Jr. L. A. Webb V. G. Williams Juniors R. Btmdy P. E. Nelson R. Harris R. N. Weir T. T. Laughlin W. R. Stay M. Steeley S. H. Taschner O. Lambert J. R. W. Wilson G. E. Michael C. U. Yutze Freshmen Mayo C. F. Dugdell W. S. Gibbs Geo. Alferitz H. S. Nobmann University Men A. C. Adams C. M. Madsen E. O. Thorwaldson , R. Meyers E. C. Jewell J. M. Rutherford R. R. Meyersieck R. E. Rider B. H. Thomas 141 .---m.h L. SMITH E. CURL A. REYNOLDS L. FERRARI W. GAGE '1 C. KINSLEY B. WALKER F. NEEDHAM A. BROWN L. BASCOM ' E. BACHMAN J. SIMS D. STOUT E. WYNN L. UNGER T. CARTER E. COLLINS H. MCGRAW M. NORTON G. AZEVEDO F. CORWIN E. STURGIS H. SCHIERENBECK S. DAVISON C. CALHOUN M. JONES H. SYLVESTER C. JONES R. PERRY Philo Delphos Founded May, 1919 Honorary Members Prof. E. H. Hughes C. M. Titus Prof. J. E. Dougherty L. Smith E. Curl A. Reynolds L, Ferrari W. Gage M. Jones C. Kinsley J . Sims T. Carter L. Azevedo E. Collins E. Wynne C. Jones B. Walker A. Brown Seniors Juniors University M en Freshmen F. F . Needham . Bascom . Bachman . Stout . Corwin . Schierenbeck . Calhoun . Sturges . McGraw . Perry . Norton . Unger Davidson Blake H. Sylvester -p ,,....,.., - 4U-.4, ?..-u,ug .21: n A E. WRIDE W. TOWERS R. UEBELE C. LEAVITT M. WRENCH L. SCHULTZ J. WOODWARD A. GABRIEL F. HOWES D. PRICE R. HARDIE H. COOK R. .McKlNNON D. LEWIS E. VAN ATTA J. STAHELI J. SHIPMAN H. TOWNSEND B. GIGAS D. LAMB J. LANNAN M. BARTHOLOMEW L. BROWN J. MCCROSSEN A. SEFFIELD 144 Beta Phi Founded 1919 Honorary Members G. D. Turnbow C. Phillips H. Belton M. Bartholomew Seniors E. Wride J. Woodward W. Towers A. Gabriel L. Schultz F. Howes D. Price Juniors R. Uebele B. Gigas R. Hardie J . Lannan R. McKinnon M. Wrench B. Lewis H. Cook E. Van Atta H. Townsend J. Staheli A. Sheffield Freshmen C. Leavitt J. McCrossen J . Shipman Senior W ill To the Juniors S TIME DRAWS the curtain on our school days we, the Senior Class A of 1922, deem it necessary to make out a will to the Junior Class, who will follow in our footsteps. At this time we turn over our sacred rights and traditions to the Juniors, who, by their persistent efforts and studious endeavor, have gained the right of being Seniors of the University Farm. The Will 1steThe Senior Room: On the lower floor of the West Dormitory is situated the senior room. In this room all business transactions, meetings and other business is carried on. May you Juniors, now Seniors, take care of this room and permit no lowly Frosh to enter its mighty portals. Uphold the sacred right for which this room is given you, and preserve that sense of soberness which now prevails. 2nd-The Senior Lawn: Situated between the Class Room Building and the Creamery is yours. Its exclusiveness to the Seniors has been upheld while in our possession, and may you copy our methods of keep- ing this lawn for Seniors only. See that no Frosh shall enjoy the pleasure of basking in the sunlight upon said lawn, and if anyone should break this tradition, let him be cooled in the icy waters that silently await. 3rdeThe Senior Bench: Probably the most sacred to the heart of the passing Senior is the senior bench. Upon it many matters of astound- ing importance have been discussed. Time after time have its spacious arms held the dignified Senior after an arduous day in the halls of study. May you preserve this significant bench and allow no one, save Seniors, to adorn its magnitude. 4theThe Senior Hat: Worn only by those who, by their merits, have been admitted to the Senior Class. This hat is the emblem of intellect. May you wear it with a dignified air, and confine its sacred brim to the noble head of Seniors only. 5theRights and Traditions: In passing we give you the right to insert into the walk in front of the Class Room Building a brass plate with your class numerals upon it. May you take advantage of this . privilege, which has been instilled in the heart of the Senior. Consider it your sacred duty to take the lowly Frosh under your Wing, and to instruct them in the traditions which every Senior Class must lay down. Let not their shoes mar the walk across the alfalfa field; let not their lips be seen to hold any smoke save the festive corn cob; let not their bodies adorn or be draped in other than the usual clothing; let no form of head-dress be seen upon those green skuls except the tra- ditional hat. Further consider it your sacred duty to keep the upper lip of all male Frosh free from foreign matter. As Seniors it is your duty to set a standard in class work far superior to the under-classmen. Take your new status in life seriously, to uphold the honor that the upper classmen have established. Cooperate with your fellow classmates, and instill in the incoming Froshlthe spirit of love and respect for their college. Strive to make the University Farm stand out as foremost among agricultural institutions. CLASS OF 1922. 146 ,vm' . - Nuory . 7411310115, ' T $21013 . "$$th 2-": and O '. Sliding :;'oee11 ' - .95 1!9 v .fi'creak ieznof fiimnd- w: '- vzcious l" F. P. Alexander Saxton Avery C. J . Burnham Geo. M. Bogart A. B. Carter Chester Calhoun J. E. Cochrane Laurance Erb V. V. Gilcrease Robert Hardie R. A. Hill George Kirchner Victor Laney C. A. Lease Paul Lewis Jack Phillips Numerals Van Atta E. Righetti Richardson F. Stay W. Say Shipman Fletcher Baumgartner Ackerman Dick Barlow North Laschner Cowin Hunter L. C. J ones H. Temple F. Watson Reynolds 148 Henry Pogue A1. Powers Legro. Pressley Elbert Schiller C. A. Schwein L. E. Shultz Frank Santous Herb. E. Spilman E. Wride Francis Wilson Clarence Waltz J ames Woodford V. G. Williams W. D. Elfrink D. G. Maclise E. H. Hughes Uh 1 - Order of Sword and Sandals Members Deming G. McClise 1eorge M. Bogart Prof. Edwin C. Voorhies R. Donald Walters Prof. Elmer H. Hughes Richard B. Barlow Clark J. Burnham James Woodford Herbert E. Henderson Clarence Waltz Frank P. Alexander Francis R. Wilson Frank A. Cleland Robert P. Reynolds Herbert A. Spilman Prof. Samuel 11. Beckett Charles A. Reeves Hi- l ;;!;y I . k I ' . g 1 'v 1 J, , 5 MU? II I f?f"v'w IV! I l4 , y,:, j W I z I " m I I . A II" x x I " h . I 150 A a... v-...m...v.,w sew WA 1-"- t . .-....t.,.,'. ' Livestock As A Fractor In Eliminating Waste In American Agriculture By Osgood S. Lovekin, 25 most important of these functions is the elimination of waste. Some of the wastes of the farm, which animals help to avoid. might be classified, more or less in their order of importance, as follows: Waste of fertility, waste of by-products, waste of labor and capital. and waste of land. The preservation of and addition to the lands original fertility is probably the greatest function of livestock on the farm. To maintain fertility, humus is necessary, which may be obtained from two sources. either crops plowed under, or barnyard manure. By repeated experi- ments, examples of which are the fattening tests of Lawes and Gilbert, it has been shown beyond all doubt that when a crop is fed to animals practically nine-tenths of the essential fertilizing elements of the food reappear in the solid and liquid manure. Because of this fact it, is poor policy to plow under a crop if it can be conveniently fed. Barnyard manure is the most economical producer of humus known. The farmer who has a good supply of it, and who supplements its use with phosphates and nitrates for forcing crops, will always have a fertile farm. This is illustrated in the following example: Thirty-two years ago an Iowa farmer took over a run-down farm, and began buying animals and fattening them for market. Since then he has sold no crops off the place, and has consistently spread the manure produced by the animals, When he bought the farm the corn yield was about a ton and a half to the acre, and the wheat crops were not worth cutting. Today he is getting as high as 95 bushlels of corn and 35 bushels of wheat to the acre. In a survey over a period of years, the Iowa State College has shown that the livestock farms of the State have a much greater hay and grain yield per acre than the strictly grain producing farms. The Thirteenth United States Census on Agriculture also makes the report that in the ten States leading in value of animals sold and slaughtered on the farms. all but two are among the first ten in the value of all protlut-ts. Texas alone, 'oducing States, is in this latter list. Thus we see among the cotton p1 . . that when crops are fed at home. animals overcome waste of fertility by keeping it in the soil. The second important field in utilization of farm by-products. IIVESTOCK HAS MANY functions in the farm plan. and one of the livestockis elimination of waste is the In all manufacturing industries it has been recognized that by-products are of great importance, and often one of the chief sources of profits. The farmer is the only inanufzu-turer that has not come to this realization. antl although much has been done along this line. there is need for a fuller awakening. It is estimated that mil- lions of dollars are being wasted annually in abuses in the use of by- products on American farms. A discussion of three of the most important. l.'-l by-products, grain straw, corn stover and cottonseed meal, will serve to show the many uses to Which such products may be put in 11vestock production. Practical experience as well as experimental work has shown that grain straw and corn stover, combined With concentrates, can be eco- nomically fed to animals. These roughages are used in the fattening rations of practically all farm animals except hogs, and can be used in the winter rations of cattle, horses and sheep. Breeding herds of beef cattle and dry dairy cows can be kept on a ration containing a large amount of roughage, and it can be used, with the addition of some grain, in the rations of flocks of breeding ewes and horses doing light work or no work at all. While not adapted to producing the largest flow of milk, roughage has a valuable place in the rations of dairy cows. Milking cows may eat as much corn stover as they want, if in addition they get some grain, silage, or leguminous hay. For economical results the stover should be shredded, and a little molasses sprinkled over it Will add to its palatability. Oat, barley and wheat straw are other roughages that can be used in much the same proportion as stover. Besides being used for feed, straws and stover are very useful for bedding. Straw soaks up the liquid manure containing many valuable fertilizing elements, Which would be lost were the liquid allowed to escape. Liquid manure and the straw itself are important constituents of barnyard manure. There is still much room for extension in the use of these by-prod- ucts, for in spite of their proven value, much goes to waste. Only about two-thirds of the total annual production of grain straw is being used to best advantage, and at least one-half of the remainder is an absolute loss. Stated in figures, about 79 million tons or 67 per cent of the crop is used annually for livestock production, either as feed or bedding, 7 per cent is sold, 10 per, Cent plowediunder, and 15 per cent burned. If the straw is not acutally used by animals, or turned under, its fertilizing value is lost. Burning in particular almost totally destroys its value, and is practiced chiefly because of custom and ignorance of the value of the straw, to altogether too great an extent, particularly in the Western States. Corn stover is more widely used than straw; of the total annual crop, about 83 per cent or 204 million tons, are used in livestock production, while 10 per cent is plowed under, 3 per cent sold and 4 per cent burned. In this case also, burning results in almost total waste, although it offers an easy and quick way of getting the land cleared for plowing. In the case of cottonseed meal, large quantities have been used in recent years for purposes of direct fertilizations; in 1914 six of the Southern States used 1,000,000 tons in this way. This meal is worth from thirty-five to forty dollars a ton for feeding cattle, and When properly fed, the output of fertilizer is much greater than the output obtained from the meal itself, and farmers get in addition the profits from their livestock. Besides being used for direct fertilization, much cottonseed meal, together With molasses, corn and peanut concentrates, is being exported from the United States. In rations containing roughages large amounts of these concen- trates are and should be used, and their exportation or use as direct fer- 152 tilizers is therefore bad from the standpoint of both national and agricul- tural economics. Next we come to livestock,s function in eliminating waste of labor and capital. One way in which it does this is to stabilize the amount of labor needed on the farm throughout the year. Some forms of animal husbandry, such as sheep raising, require few laborers per unit of land, while others require a great number, but whether the amount of labor needed be large or small, it is, with few exceptions, stable. As many men are needed during the Winter as during the Summer. The wheat grower of South Dakota sows his grain in April and May, harvests and threshes it in July and August, and is without work for his men and equipment from September to March. The contrast between these two forms of agriculture shows one way in which livestock can save labor and capital. By acting as machines for transforming coarse, bulky raw materials into concentrated and valuable finished products, animals avoid waste of labor in another way. It takes ten pounds of dry feed to make one pound of beef, and thirty pounds of dry feed to make one pound of butter. Besides being much easier to handle and ship, these concentrated products bring the farmer who manages his place intelligently a much greater profit than he could have obtained had he sold them in the raw state, and, as noted above, their production keeps the fertility in the soil. These facts doubtless explain why it is that in most farming sections the most prosperous farmers are those who pay most attention to livestock. If the farmer feeds his crops to his animals in the field, he will not only turn his raw materials into finished products, but will also save the labor of harvesting and threshing. Poor rye, wheat, oats and barley can be successfully tthogged down? Corn may be harvested by hogs and sheep, and its feeding value may be increased if soy beans are planted with it, and rape sown in at the last cultivation. Mature soy beans them- selves are hard to thresh, but soy bean hay, mixed with some corn, makes an ideal Winter feed for hogs, since the beans supply the proteins and take the place of tankage. The following is a concrete example of the profit and saving of labor resulting from this method. An Oklahoma farmer bought 130 shoats during the Winter, paying $1,460 for them. During the Winter they ate $666 worth of corn. In the Spring they were turned into a thirty- acre alfalfa field, sharing it with some horses and cattle. They were charged with two-thirds of the rent of the field at the rate of $10 an acre, or $300 for the season. When corn had ripened sufficiently they were turned into a thirty-acre corn field, whose estimated yield was 1200 bushels, at a price of 75 cents a bushel. After consuming the corn in ninety days, and charging themselves with $900, the hogs were ready for market, and since it was early in the season, brought a price of 15 cents a pound. Upon adding up the items of expense, the total cost of the 130 hogs was found to be $3,260, not counting labor or fertility. How- ever, the labor saved by not harvesting the corn was greater than the labor used in caring for the hogs. At 15 cents a pound the hogs sold for $5,300, netting the owner a profit of $2.040. Finally, livestock eliminates waste of land by utilizing areas which, 131; were it not for their use by animals, would be partially or Wholly unpro- ductive. Lands along streams, lands partially covered With trees, stumps or slashings, and lands too hilly or stony to cultivate come under this head. Only one-half of the farm area in the United States today is improved, and only two-thirds of this improved land is in farm crops, including meadows. The other third of the improved land, and a con- siderable part of the unimproved, is utilized as pasture. Thus animals overcome waste of fertility by returning the fertilizing elements to the soil in the form of manure. They reduce waste of farm by-products by using them as feeds and bedding. They reduce waste of labor needed on the farm throughout the year, by transforming bulky raw materials into concentrated finished products, and When turned into the field, by helping the farmer harvest his crops in the busy season. They reduce waste of land by making productive areas that would other- Wise lie idle. The combination of these functions makes livestock a very great factor in the elimination of waste on the American farm. 1.5+ Advice and Wisdom from otables of theCampus Tavernetti tOur TonneYou cant get ahead unless you have one. :1? :X: 3? 3!: Doc. Hayes tVeteran Carpenterielf you Wish to prevent your dog from going mad in July, kill him in June. Flies cant see in Winter time; they leave their specks in Summer. :X: as 2X: ex: Prof. Jim WilsoneThe most satisfactory breed of sheep is the new mineral wool producing breed. These are fed scrap iron and produce steel wool. Doc. BateseWhat would I recommend for hives? Well, just keep them in a shady place and treat them occasionally with paint or white- wash. One cannot be too particular with bees. Prof. HowelleOn mules we find two legs behind, And two we find before; We stand behind before we find What the two behind are for. SE at $6 3's Miss WalkereDonT run your legs off after a girl. You will need them to kick yourselves with after, as 3k 3k :lk Prof. KellyeIt is all right to be grammatical, but when you see a girl with an abbreviated skirt, dont look after it for a period. 7"- SS ex: 3e Prof. Smith-Dust is mud with the water squeezed out. 3!: ex: 3E 9S Mr. Allison M. WoodmaneBe musicians, boys, be musicians because they work only when they play. elt- :X: 36 elk Prof. Neer-The first thing that turns green in Spring is the jewelry given out at Xmas time. Rudy Nichols-Always have J ewish things around the ranch. For instance, bees bring biz-z-z-z-ness, skunksLbring scents and Jewish bass drum when hit will always sing ttTooda benk, tooda benk". From the Stenos. tKitchen Recipesi RosyeTo keep catsup fresh, let a couple of Farm School students tease it a while. Miss Hemmy-To get rid of superfluous hair, stuff a sofa pillow with it. $6 all: 3? 3? Miss Burke-To make biscuits, mix one pint of flour with a little shortening and one gallon of TNT; then put it in the oven and beat it. 156 The potato,s eyes were full of tears, And the cabbage hung its head, And there was grief in the cellar that night, For the vinegarts mother was dead. 38 :X: all: 9.4g One Act Plays, Entitled itSmall Town Stuff, Time, Summer night. Place, Davis. Scene is laid at the Davis Fire Chiefs shack, With the phone ringing like anything. Chief answers: VoiceeHello! Is this the Davis Fire Department? Chieeres. Voice-Well, this is Mr. Jones. My house is on fire. ChiefeHow long has it been that way? Voice-Oh, about a half an hour. Chief-Did you try putting water on it? Voice-Yes, but it wont go out. ChiefeWell, then, it ainit no use of our wasting our strength in coming over. That is all we could do. Gus and Ole Meet Time, Picnic Day. Place, University Farm campus, Two sons of the Minnesota meet after a lapse of twenty years, and after the regular greetings are exchanged, open up the dialogue in this manner: Gus-Ole, how bane you getting on? Ole-Pretty good. I bane got married. Gus-Dot is good. OleeNot so good. My wife she have nine children. Gus-Dots bad. OleeNot so had. She have a million dollars. Guse-Dot is good. OleeNot so good. She won,t spend it. Gus-Dot is bad. Ole-Not so bad. My Wife she have a fine house. I donit pay no rent. Guse-Dots good. OleeNot so good. Der house she burned down yesterday. Gus-Dot,s bad. OleeNot so bad. My wife she bane burnt up, too. GuseDots good. OleeeYes, dot is good. Exit. Time, present Picnic Day. Place, Davis. A well-known business man arrives at the local hotel, with his wife, to see the "big doings? After registering he informs the proprietress that he must have the best room in the place. Prop.-eCertainly, sir; we always can accommodate the parents. Business ManeThank you. We will look around town a bit. tExit man and wifel Prop. tturning to the only houseinaidl-Fix up Room 2, and you can change the sheets. He has lots of money. Finis. 137 1? Prof. Howell iat the Grammar School Auditorium during one of the Community Service nights, addressing one of the iiusherstUaSay, Mac, is my wife forward? MacGraw-No; she wasnit to me. at: 5X: at $6 How to Make Curried Beef iAt great expense to the itRodeoii staff we have procured this recipe from Mrs. Kenny. It it is one that has been long sought after by the crownheads of Europe, the blockheads of England and baldheads of AmericaJ :X: 3? :X: S? Mrs. KennyeTake your beef and stretch it on the kitchen table, nailing it firmly at each end so it cannot get away. Then take an ordinary curry comb and scrape it over beef rapidly with a motion re- sembling the shaking of dice for a chance on a $2.49 diamonds necklace. Keep this process up long enough and the beef will be thoroughly curried. Curried rice is also popular, but it is not as easy to curry as beef, because it is harder to nail the rice to the table, and it will not stand still long enough. ax: as as :X: Barney BarnardeNever let kittens play with balls of woolen yarn in place of catnip balls, because once my little kitten swallowed a ball of yarn by mistake, and the following Fall when her kittens were born they had on sweaters. :Xt $6 3? as A mother was traveling with her son to the Picnic Day doings. The. S. P. R. R. conductor came through the train, and the lady handed him a whole and a one-half ticket. He thought a minute and said: tiMadam, I cant pass this boy on a half-fare ticket. He is vary large and wears long pants? uVery welPi, said the mother, ttif that is the basis for your decision, use the whole ticket for him and the half for me? Machinery Equipment and Supplies $3: Dairy, Creamery and Ice Cream Plant W3? DISTRIBUTORS OF SIMPLEX COMBINED CHURNS AND BUTTER WORKERS CREAM SEPARATORS INTERNAL TUBE MILK COOLERS TUBULAR MILK COOLERS SPRAY VAT PASTEURIZERS TUBULAR CONTINUOUS FLOW POSTEURIZERS B-L-K MILKING MACHINES MILK PUMPS FACILE BABCOCK MILK TESTERS PERFECTION MILK PASTEURIZERS ! CREAM RIPENERS I BRINE ICE CREAM FREEZERS ICE CREAM BATCH MIXERS TUBULAR MILK COOLERS DREADNAUGHT CHURNS FRIDAY BUTTER PRINTERS MILWAUKEE BOTTLE FILLERS CREASEY ICE BREAKERS BLUE LINE PRESSURE BOTTLE WASHERS VISCOLIZERS ROGERS AUTOMATIC ICE CREAM BRICK MAKER NEW ERA ICE CREAM BRICK CUTTER CHILLY KING MILK COOLERS MILK BOTTLES 22:25 ICE CREAM Equipment and Supplies for the Poultrymnn and Beekeeper Geo. W. Prising Company, Inc. Everything for Handling of Milk and Its Products 63 CLAY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. . ...... . ....... . ..... .-............aP Putronize Hoden" Advertisers. They Putrunizr- Yuu. q. HOTEL LAND SACRAMENTO, - - CALIFORNIA Located in the Heart of the Business and Amusement District Half Block From Capitol Park Comfort W ithout Extravagance- IS OUR SLOGAX AND XVE BACK IT UP WITH POPULAR RATES AND COURTEOUS SERVICE The Best Place To Eat in the City THE HOTEL LAND GRILL IS FAVORABLY KNOWN EVERYWHERE FOR ITS DOLLAR DINNERS FOX 8: JOHNS, Proprietors FRED J. JOHN.S., Manager Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers. They Patronize You. Attend Heald's 1 COM Qt Y Busim. . MW 1 The Joys of the Great Outdoors Every young man and every man Who wants to stay young should fill his leisure moments with the keen, healthful enjoyment that comes from out- door sports and recreation. Whatever your hobby, we have the very equipment you need in wonderful variety. EVERYTHING FOR Motoring Hiking Gymnasium Camping Baseball Sport Clothes Hunting Tennis and Footwear Fishing Golf Bicycles Track Kodaking Phonographs WRITE FOR OUR GENERAL CATALOG If not already on our mailing list, write for your copyeite free. s IA ': 11 x u! .4 B "Q .- , . 9 Li 7 B - -Q$X . QB? I 9 WT B h , '"e',:,' ' N v,, r ' '1 , ,9 V 7?; $$$st V v I 1'5; B '70, 1m BL K e W1. L .;:I'W x aLJ .' -29- .1; - ?;J '1 u. u .57: 45' 607-609-611 K St. Sacramento to "WAHLANDERSB Healavs Business College You cannot get all that,s due you in llfe Wlthout a, I'ngrFS AXNIB BXXI,S thorough understanding of THE PLACE TO IHW' YOI'R Business and Business Life YOU CAN LEARN IT AT HEALIPS 00R. 8TH AND K STS., LUKE W. PEART, Vice-Pres. 8; Mgr. 1121 Ninth Street SACRAMENTO CALIF. -, ................. -i ! g l I I Sacramento 1 .' 1F -.. 4h Patronize ttRodeo" Advertisers. They Putronize You. California F ruit Exchange Incorporated May 1, 1901 A Co-Operative, Non-Profit organization, handling California Deciduous Fruits. Owned, controlled and operated exclusively by fruit growers. A clearing house through Which sixty Fruit Growerst Associations throughout the State market their products. Represented by salaried agents in every principal market in the United States and Canada. The only organization under the supervision of the fruit growers and directly representing the indus- try, marketing annually from 0,000 to 7,000 ears. Intelligent distribution and careful and economical management have given our growers entire sat- isfaction. GENERAL OFFICES CALIFORNIA FRUIT BUILDING SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA Patronize ttRodeo" Advertisers. They Patronize You. kli' K Chas. J. H eeseman The Clothier of Sacramento Marx Clothes Not From a Bank Ad She reached below her dimpled knee Into her rolled-down stocking, And there she found a roll of bills; Ah, me! twas sweetly shocking! nWhy dorft you keep it in a bank?" Inquiredia nosey prier. The principal is the samei she said, But the interest here is highefi Fade Away He approached her with a look of tender- ness in his eyes. "Darlingi he began, as he started to encircle her waist With his arms Put on your brakes, kiddoK she inter- rupted, you re nearing a dangerous curve? Bring On the Bottle She Y0u are not feeling well tonight, are you, dearie? He-I havemt started yet! Patronize "Rodeo" WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF 1.1-1. C. Harvesting Machinery MCCORMICK AND DEERING MOWERS, RAKES AND HARVESTER THRESHERS High-Grade Hardware. Guaranteed Tools, Paints, House Furnishings and Clark Jewel, Puritan and Per- fection Oil Cook Stoves. Headquarters for H 0LT CAT E RPILLA RS -and- HARVESTE R R EPAIRS Emigh-Wz'nchell Hardware C ompany 709-715 Jay Street SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA Advertisers. 4i- F..- . .-.:.. They Patrnnize You. Martin Iron Works IIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIII I'II.IIIII III IIII'I IIII'I Il'i'I III'IYIIIIIIIIIIIII IIII 'IIII'III'I IIIfEIlIIIIII ITII IIIII III' III IIIIIIIIE I III'IIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII lllll II!IIIIIIIIIII llIIIlIIIIIIIII'IIIllIIIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII lIIII IIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII IIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII II L03 Angeles Manufacturers Of Irrigation Appliances HIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!lIIIIIllIlIIIIIIIIIIlIII IIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIEIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIII iIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIII!lI Our Valves and Gates Are Installed on the University Farm Where They may Easily be Inspected sers. They Patronize You. Eaglesnn IIen's Shim J..." ?Iikmm I x WIMV HIE VSHQ- 'U. -'E' 1911 .5.-." . 1 -1..- LEO LOBNER Kuppenheimer Good Clothes "es 1 905 K Street Sacramento, Calif. v + 4. 4r- ' I " H S Eagleson 8c C0. lger at tore ZR ?$ Manufacturing Retailers of F ; M81119 Shirts and Underwear FINE QI'ALITY 0F HATS AND 1 CAPS TO SUIT EVERYBODY S l XVe are Also Experts at Hat Cleaning i 717 K STREET Next. Post Office mng X ours 1" SACRAMENTO 1;--" Mm . 1016-1501 St. Between J and K 1118 Market Street 112-116 So. Spring St. Pd 1 . SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES Sacrmnento, California L ob io-cu-n .-. db Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers They I'utmnize Ynu. 1X, When You Are Ready T 0 Build T hat Home or Barn LET US GIVE YOU AN ESTIMATE ON YOUR REQUIREMENTS. BESIDES ALL KINDS OF BUILDING MATE- RIALS, WE CARRY REDWOOD SILOS, TANKS. AN D REDWOOD PIPE. OUR MOTOR TRUCKS CAN DELIVER THE LUMBER RIGHT ON THE J OB. Friend 8: Terry Lumber Co. 1 ACRAMENTO, CALIF. MAIN OFFICE 1012 10th Street Phone Main 506 YARD OFFICE 1918 Front Street Phone Main 574 Patronize 11R0de0" Advertisers. They Patronize. You. l1 Black or T an -An Oxford Y ear $6.53 to $16.53 Br0gues you bet! And more popular as the days go by. Stands up well in school and a corker for that arm: dash of dmssincss. Long wearing at a short pmce. FIFTY STYLES The Big Shoe Store, headquarters for tOp-notchcrs in square foes, semi- English and the more conservative types of Oxfords and boots. Pattm-nml for dressy as well as every day wear. The leathers soft and sturdy. Tim styles are lively y6t not loud. VENSWS me. K813? 7TH STREET MAIL ORDERS FILLED n19 THE BEST Compliments $5 of H AT Santa Anita IN' THE WORLD RanChO . Santa Anita J1m Patterson HATTER 824 K STREET SACRAMENTO California u-II-"'r +- Patronize "RodeO" Advertisers. They Patronlze You. Manufacturers and Distributors V V T Farm Implement Specia lties Some of Our Lines Stockton Gang Plows Shaw Co. Rotary Harrows Shaw CO. Grape Hoes Clark Harrows Roderick Lean Harrows XVestern Pulverizers Dunham Pulverizers Planet Jr. Cultivators, Etc. Forkner Cultivators Iron Age Sprayers Iron Age Potato Machinery Iron Age Garden Tools Thomas Drills Superior Bean Planters Universal Bean Harvesters Holden Lime Distributors Osborne Harvest Machinery Myers Hay Carriers Litchfield Spreaders Appleton Corn Shellers Hamm Co. Grinders Simplex Ditchers Bain Wagons Metal Wheel Trucks Diamond Wood Saws Racine Fanning Mills V ermorel Sprayers Queen Incubators Throop Land Levelers The H. C. Shaw Co. Stockton, California Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers. They Patronize You. .101. .... W ling; ' ' w: 1 C. -..-- NYL-.--'1- . g1 - 1; . '1 I ' . f . g . 1 i 1 . I. . RHHLH. 1111 1.1. 11 1M 1 Mud . . 111111. m 3... hm 1 u 1 11111::ng . :11? 11111121 11111511; 1011113 1 . 5111111 1y Marx. . 511113211111 -l. m ! me 51ml: Th1311.1; . . When. 1 .119: htH; B- HY WAS TE T IME: PLANT YOUR TREES WITH ,3;: f 4:; L . '. E. ,1 1' '- - : ERCULES m z .. iv, 4' :e elf . 'Ir . 9;. s": - 10.. 'gif ; l i - li:3'l-"-!'?';'ap,!' ?gee :, o? : $.DPCb--- 11'. h:,2y$:'fhe:.z'$: ;:. g i 4fr7'1"u":$ Z"c , 1. 3 x 43 STOP FIRST YEAR tosses eigd n?gi-zgf': 1.... E, 'I i u fathfn bu'sa- . P' " ' I v 'H a1. :'r'3"'?5'1':.; ' , SPEED OF DEVELOPMENT 2 ; wiggsfaggqg : :3 50 TO 100 PER CENT 110:3;39x' ,- ,q -. . : 0 "5' i I g a IMPROVE THE QUANTITY. COLOR t ???$ng : g . AND QUALITY OF FRUIT mmrrm ; I 0 HF. accompanying mus. :mmmmum Jllmrrvwmhvu-n'iw nations show two fruit i trees. both the name age and : '3? planted due same ,day. Ind ! . also the relative spread of the + roots of these trees. one planted in a spadevdug hole and the R 0'55 in a dynamited hole. DON'T WASTE TIME WHEN YOU SEE WHAT DYNAMITE CAN DO FOR YOU. FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS I "-1F 1' J. Another Test For Home Brew ? OXford You," Do' i ttHow would you test home Dr V t a - J Y . 0 ex 0 see 1 RALIEGH9 ?jllggggtgquDEi JOLL f 1f there was any wood alcohol in itiw asked i 't t l the old soak, 7 Stock for Sale I WVhy, strain it through a silk handker- i EDNA L. KNIGHT, WILLOWS. CAL- i Chief and see if you get any splinters," re- , - plied the young soak. Can You Blame Her? JudgeeWhat are your grounds for di- vorce? Young BridHHarry snores. 'Judge-Howlong have you been marrled? Young BrideeTwo weeks. JudgeeGranted! He shouldnit snore. Marvelous Missouri Blues Small Paul hit his mule with a maul, While stealing With stealth past his stall; The mule put his heels Where Paul put his meals: Muleis heelsebetween meals-some pall. Patronize iiRodeo" Advertisers. Whois Got the Garter! uWhere is your garter, Madge?" ttOh, somewhere around the house." nEr--isxft that stretching it a bit?" A New Way to Do It ttYes, sir; some burglars got into the house last night, bound me to a chair and gagged me." ttThen what did you do?" "Why, I sat around all night and chewed the rag." They Patrnnize You. CO-OPERATION PAYS Cooperation always pays. CO-Opera- tion, called team work, wins baseball 1 xx' games, football games, any kind of a ' game. 0 Cooperation, in the phraseology of bus- : sAfRW' t 1H iness called a combination, a merger, a i trust, Wins because it pools resources, HW"'W'0 increases strength, and enlarges capital. ?,WyM-w-t CO-Operation is bound to Win in the fruit industry. Thousands Of Califor- nia producers, growers, farmers, al- ready are selling their crops to better. : advantage through co-Operatively'owned MCCUITV sales organizations. They have proved 1 that cooperation does pay in the fruit industry. 1 1 Comn 3 PhOth California Prune and Apricot Growerst Association 1 10H 7 A Co-Operative Growerst Packing l NGUT hand Marketing Organization , . l: Embracing 10,000 Growers l Engaged in This ' ' l Industry in ' 12 California 1 dc Patronize HROdeO" Advertiserg. They Patronize You. KN products. Pioneer White Lead Pure Prepared Paint Silkenwhite Enamel Fullerwear Varnish SACRAMENTO Pedigreed Paints. lasting paints and varnishes at bargain prices. As ttthe laborer is worthy of his hire? so are good paints and varnishes worth all they cost. Fullerts have been making paints and varnishes for more than 73 years for West- ern people. Their products are standard. They are not the cheapest on the market, but an ever-increasing number of satisfied users claim that they are the best. When you come to paint or varnish, bear in mind the following ttpedigreed" Y OU CANT GET a pedigreed animal from scrub stock. Neither can you secure Fullerts Cold Water Paint W. P. FULLER 8: CO. ttSince t49tt Washable Wall Finish Pioneer Shingle Stains Barn and Roof Paint Porch and Step Paint CALIFORNIA eh McCurry Foto CO. C 0 m m e r c i 211 Photographers 1014 7th Street Sacramento, Cal. Compliments of T he Perfection Bread C 0. Sacramento, Cal. T- Patronize ttRodeo' ' Advertisers. They Putltnnizo: YOU. USE AMAROO BRAND Concrete Irrigation Pipe FOR QUALITY The above trade mark is not only a mark of superi- ority, but carries with it the California Associated Concrete Pipe Manufacturerts guarantee that the product is manufactured to their specifications. These specifications are the result of years Of re- search work, by competent engineers and the use of extensive laboratories for testing materials and finished products. Association members manufacture a product of known value and plan positive systems of irrigation. SYSTEMS PLANNED AND ESTIMATES GIVEN J. J. MERRITT CO. 218 CALIFORNIA FRUIT BLDG. SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA Member of California Associated Concrete Pipe Manufacturers Patronize ttRodeot' Advertisers. They Patronize You. Thc WW. Kept FaTPf -The most popular book of the year--and itts free for the asking. You calft read half a dozen pages Without a strong attack of planting fever. It is filled With enticing novelties in Flowers. Vegetables, Plants and Berries. Germaints new Rastrawberry is pictured and described on page 3; page 4 tells all about Gernlailfs hardy, year-round producing RhubarbePanama. It tells how to pro- tect stock and plants from pests; how and when to fertilize and spray; how to have bigger and bet- ter legume crops; gives complete cultural instruc- tions on p1anting-and how to feed and care for poultry, rabbits and pet stock. ADDRESS DEPT. L Established 1671 SeedazPlant N E. C mer . 0 Sixt :9 Main Sts. RE. Depot 0 . Los Kggeles. Cal. llll-IIII-IIII- Hopland Stock Farm HOPLAND, CALIFORNIA The Well Kept Farm R EGIST E R E I! SHURTHORNS HOLS'IIEIN-FRIESANS SHRUPSIIIRE SHEEP is the well painted farm. Paint for all farm uses may be had here, in- cluding wagon, truck and tractor en- amel. AND Wherever you locate, write us what your paint needs are, and we will BEST EQI'IPPICD PUI'L'IIRY IH'IPAR'I'M EN'I' IN FALIFURNIA gladly give you instructions and 21d- vice along with the farm paint we send you. 008-1012 5mm 5mm SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE I I I I g ! h;..,-,-.,-..-,lt I I I 226 SOUTHERN PACIFIC BUILDING I IIl-IIl-I.1--III-III-IIl-Illellu-I'l-IIIl-IIII-IIl-Ilnenn--I.Il-Illl-IllI-IllleIIII-Iln- uxl-un-nu-nl-ul-ual--uI-nl-u-:u-u-ul--n--I- - - - -+ "Ruler" .Mlh-rtisw's. IIIwy I'ntxl-nizw Yon. Putronize The Delicious Products of Your Great Packing Company The great Virden Packing Company is a triumph of Superior California, captained by Valley men and owned largely by the Ranchers, Stockmen, and Business Men of the interior valleys. The superiority of Virdents Camp Fire products is responsible for the rapid growth of the Virden Indus- tries. Insist upon the delicious and whole- some Virden Camp Fire products- Hams, Bacon, Lard, Shortening, Salad and Cooking Oils, Sausages and Canned Fruits. VIRDEN PACKING COMPANY SACRAMENTO SAN FRANCISCO LINDSAY so. SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND OROVILLE SAN JOSE MARYSVILLE ELMHURST Patronize ttRodeo" Advertisers. They Patronize You. ts... .l!" h t M . ux ! DEEUV' x , ' . s I " , manW t '. mumm i" W .1 H'HH tRl'Ith N.HHIHHH . k I Wou- HHMgl N.Ht HH t , Lt V NORM H 1 N r p, N: . t 4A.. Keniston 8C Root EUGENE BENJAMIN, Manager TRUSSES PROPERLY FITTED ELASTIC STOCKINGS, x-iz. . $.31 KNEE CAPS, ANKLETS, ABDOMINAL SUPPORTERS SHOULDER BRACES, ARCH SUPPORTS, CRUTCHES, INVALID CHAIRS, ETC. .-... :.9 31........ .. HOSPITAL, PHYSICIANS, SUPPLIES. SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS ' 1010 Tenth Street BetWeen J and K Streetw Sacramento, California NURSE? AND INVALID HEADQUARTERS FOR COLLEGE MEN NORMAN THOR SOFT COLLAR ATTACHED SHIRTS NEW MANHATTAN SHIRTS NEW SOFT COLLARS NEW HOSIERY RELIABLE UNDERWEAR MANHATTAN PAJAMAS When in Sacramento Come in and See Them Mail Orders Filled Promptly 1027 8TH ST. SACRAMENTO --:r 4.... Patronize "Rodeo" Adx'ertisers. Ed. Bedell, a young fellow himself wishes to meet you at the Hotel Clunie Ed. Bedell, Mgr. Sacramento, Cal. T h e y Pa t1" vn ize Yr: u, .q. 1': Factors of Case Leadership The Case policy of sales promotion for 1922 is based on the experience of over 50 successful dealers who made money in 1921 selling Case machlnery. They were successful in a difficult year, so we took the best of their tried ideas and methods and combined them in a PLAN for the use of all Case dealersea plan that will help any dealer who will use it, to get his full share of bus1ness in 1922. Besides these sales helps, Case dealers have many other advantages. Strong influences that are particularly effective at this time will be working for them: 1. Reputation. The Company was founded 19 years before Abraham Lincoln became President, and has grown in the esteem of farmers everywhere because of its honest products and honest dealings. 2. Quality Product. Case Tractors, Threshers and Power Farming machinery are noted for their superior qualities of design and con- struction. 3 Extensive Line. A line of Power Farming Machinery sufficiently extensive to meet the requirements of every farmer and of every con- dition in your community. 4. Large Manufacturing Facilities. Unexoelled facilities for produc- ing quantity high-grade machinery to sell at volume prices. 5. Large Sales Organization. A large, well organized and efficient sales force that will miss no opportunity to assist our dealers at any time. 6. Effective Advertising. Foroeful sales messages in leading farm journals and other effective advertising to the best farmers in every part of the country. 7. Well Organized Service Facilities that enable our dealers to keep Case owners satisfied. If you are determined to gain leadership in the power farming machinery busi- ness in your territory, come in to our organization and take advantage of these :31 opportunities now. F 2 ' J. I. CASE THRESHING MACHINE COMPANY Collarsixi' H Dept. R21 1 Racine Wisconsin i II ll f Ii 9 "-9th l E o m Z x- :n x w 11 m 7 C VI 1: p -1 0 n1 7. AND' IN FORBG N COUNTRIES: .l 1! 0 ll "w. Firm :an 13:30 MI "lulu!" 1"": "ll IJI .umnl F331. Jim: W Illll..... ll ,uul A-n-w- -.a NOTE: W , NOT the Caievzjgt the publzc t0 knew that our plows and barrows ate ws and barrows made by theJ. I. Case Plow Works Co. Jo Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers. They Patronize You. N i K KROGH DEEP WELL TURBINES FOR BORED WELLs-No PIT NEEDED Built in capacities 100 gallons per minute and larger, and for wells as small as 6-inch diameter. Our new grit-proof bearing and ball bearing pump head is a vast Improvement, and results in simplifying the operation and upkeep of thls type of pump. Pumps are made for direct connection to motors as shown, or for belt drlve. Our engineers Will advise you fully and without charge on any pumping problem. We also build a very complete line of every type of Centrifugal Pump for belt drive or direct connection. Write for Free Bulletin Krogh Pump and Machinery Company SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. Agents at All Principal Points - e 4!- THV. '3' f .1. 4: - m ' G t ttL t w f tV Lee orman S 68 e orge "HT , o o . Men S FurnlShlngS eLet this remind you of that ViSlt t you have not yet taken to that h :19 h ARE THE BEST unusual furniture store in Wood- 'llllli lHHlHZHIi'HII"? lalld! ., wry buSl' : . , . fIhGSB : Best shirts only are handled. eA blg store w1th modern 1deas U I 0 - ' ' ' -- but one which 01sed 1n bu mg. and seIVICe Extra care exer y hasntt forgotten the old-time Collars, too, are Of the best. habit of modest prices. We so- A11 the Jewelry is most fitting. licit your trade on the basis of r -' Underwear cannot be beat. better xalues. Standard of Merit. our watchword. , KRELLENBERG CO. Earnest are we in our hopes. I l G001! FI'RNITI'RE That You Will Try Us Once ! I'NDERTAKING N 'M Than Others I , . COSt o ore l 3rd and Main Sts., Woodland, Calif. 926 K STREET SACRAMENTO I h'Since leSSW .p j...- ................................... .. .......... 4? Patronize "Rodeo't Advertisers. They Itntronize Y'rx. t t W l , 0 EN! ,1. . I MIT At Last-The Supreme Small Tractor cm RngUSPatOB T-35 TRACTOR For four years Holt experience and skill have been devoted to the production of this wonderful little tractor. During that time Holt has designed, built and discarded small tractor models that surpassed existing standards, but fell short of the high ideal Holt had set for a small' ttCaterpillarll Tractor. To limit size without sacrificing power; to lessen weight Without imperiling strength; to maintain, above all, the Holt standard of eco- nomical, dependable, long-lived performance-that was the Holt ideal. Correct design and the development of new qualities of steels and better methods of heat-treatment made this achievement possible. Model T 35 "Caterpillar" Tractor is new, but new to the public only. It has been tried, tested and proven. It possesses, in fullest degree, all those qualities that have made the name thaterpillarll supreme in the tractor world. thaterpillar" T 35 Tractor is only 48 inches wide and 52 inches high, weighs but 4000 pounds, yet develops a liberal surplus of power over its 14 di'awbar-horsepower rating. It is of marvelously simple design, easy handling, all working parts fully enclosed, yet readily accessible. You will want full information regarding this latest Holt achieve- ment-a postcard or letter request brings it to you. Write today. The Holt Manufacturing Company Los Angeles, Calif. San Francisco, Calif. Spokane, Wash. Patronize HRodeo" Advertisers. They Patronize You. Unhl 01 11.9.11: "V ll l: Pythian C of l l 1300! x J1 lilrnixw- til 1 VI HM hair hhh . '1? When You Are In. Need of F arm Implements Remember that we carry a complete line of Oliver Flows and Tractor Tools, the Forkner Cultivator and all kinds Farm Im- plements. In addition, our knowledge of Farm Implements and Farming Conditions Will be of value to you in answering your implement questions. N ewbert Implement C0. ' GENERAL OLIVER AGENTS SACRAMENTO DISTRICT LARGEST FARM IMPLEMENT HOUSE IN SUPERIOR CALIFO RNIA 109-113 11J11 STREET SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 31' O. .I. T L . m ........... .4. J. M. BITTANCOURT Phone Main . 326w Muszc Ideals Pythian Castle College STEINWAY AND OTHER PIANOS Of Dancing , 111'0-11-11h'F1T1AN0S PIANOLA AND AEULIAN PLAYERS Classes and Socials Every VI P'THROYL A S Evening Except Sunday -4-1 PLAYER MI'SH' VICTOR RECORDS - aa - II - aa ml. PRIVATE LESSONS . CONVENIENT PAYMENT TERMS Afternoons and Evenings No Appointment Necessary u, ShermanEai'lay 8c. 00. 831 I STREET. 003- 9TH AND I Ninth and J Streets Sacramento, Calif. SACRAMENTO 4h 1 +----- 1 Patronize uRomeo" Advertisers. They PntrnnizoL Ynu. .5. : illHIIHlllIIHlllllllHIIHHHHllIIIIIIHHllIlllIHIIHHllllIIIIl!.HIHlHlllIIIIIHIIHHHIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllilllllllllllllIIllIIllIIIIIHlIIIIIlIIllIIHIIIHIHIIIIIHIIHII 1IIHHIIIIIIIHHIIlHIIIIIIllmllIIIIIIlilmlIlllIIIIIIIHillllIIlIIIIIIIIHIIHIIIlIIIIIill!HllllllliillllillllIIIIIIlIIllIlHlllIIlllllIllIHlIllllllllllllllllIl lllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllll m ta B r03. We Sell FRA TEEN I TI ES UN W H OLESALE BAS I S GRO CERIES PROD U OE Wholesale CIGARS E T O . 1004-1003 12th Stmet 1128-1130 J Street IllHlllIIlIiIIIlillihlllllIHIIIIHlllllli!I!IlIiIIEHHIIIIIIIllIII!IIIllIIHliHWllllllllll!lIIHII!llIIIllIIIIlllIllIIlll!illHlthHlllIl5IIIIIlllH'lllHHIllIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllll: lllllllllllllllllllIIlIHHllIllllIIlIIHIHllHlIIlIHIIHHHIIHlllIlIIIlIIllIIIHIliHHHllilliHlllHHlHlllHHHIHI!IlilllIIlLi!lllllllH'frHHHllIIIllIllHHHHHllllIlllllthIHlllHl .g. '4 Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers. Thev Patronize You. 2r,t .g, More Than $2,000,000.00 is the total of public; sales of registered cattle, both dairy and beef breeds, made through Our service by California breeders within the past five years. Through this organization, from its beginning, California breed- ers were the first in any state to place their public sale business upon a uniform basis, with definitely stated guarantees upon their cattle stated in contract form. We render a complete public sale service, furnishing the pub- licity, auctioneers, clerks, and catalogs, backed by a comprehensive knowledge of the market in Which we operate. In 1921 we inaugurated the financing of public sales managed by us, and during the first year of this additional service out of a total of more than $635,000.00 in sales we were able to take over 1 more than $100,000.00 in notes for the breeders, affording a source of credit that is not available through other established channels of finance. We are striving constantly to shape the service of this organi- zation to meet the requirements of the rapidly expanding develop- ment of the purebred registered cattle industry of California. OFFICERS AND DIRECTO RS J. M. HENDERSON, JR. FRANK M. IIELM President, Sacramento Director, Fresno FRANK L. MORRIS HORACE L. HILL, JR. Vice-President, Woodland Direvtor, Los Altos FRED W. KIESEL A. J, STALDER Treasurer, Sacramento Director, Riverside C. L. HUGHES Secretary, Sacramento . QLES 4,0 5 I 0 PUBLIC SALES a n18 H n uSkgiEn $3 v b Ob.$ 211-212 Ochsner Bldg., Sacramento, CalifornFa .-u-u-u.-u- ..-..-.. -. -u--c.-u-.-.---O4L . s Putrunize "nude." Adn-rtis-rs. 'l ilvfx' Intrnnizto Yuu. "7.,- , ,y--....... ! .1 -f... 4a- . HOTEL SACRAMENTO EUROPEAN PLAN SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS FIRST-CLASS FIREPROOF HOTEL AUTO BUS MEETS ALL TRAINS Dancing Every Tuesday and Saturday Night, 9 t0 1 P. M. Music Furnished by One of the Finest Orchestras of Pacific Coast SUNSET , WIRE FENCE FIGURE 8 KNO'lm For Sheep, Cattle and Hogs N0 Loose Ends t0 Tear W001 From Sheep A Sirong Economical Fence VICPl OR, WIRE NETTING For Poultry Y ards and Protection of Young Trees, Vines and Plants Against Rabbits MADE IN CALIFORNIA Your Dealer Can Supply You Without Delay CALIFORNIA WIRE CLOTH CO. SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND Patronize R0de0" Advertisers. They Patronize You. VTS We Are Glad to Greet You At Davis on This Happy Picnic Day an 31 We Will be Glad to meet you in our stone at XVoodland 21113 31213. 0111 stock is represented by the best grade of goods ma11ufa3tu1e3l11111111911311 Such as WINCHESTER ARMS CO. LEONARD REFRIGERATOR CO. INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER CO. BRIDGE BEACH STOVES SHERWIN-WILLIAMS PAINT CO. HIBBARD OIL STOVES A Complete Line of Buildersi Hardware, Fencing, Sporting Goods and Fishing Tackle of All Kinds. Kitchen Furnishings and Plumbing Supplies Service, Quality and Price The Winchester Store WOODLAND R- B. CRANSTON PHONE 26 iv Grape Wild Farm Guernseys Combine Show Ring Type With Production BULL CALVES OF A. R. BREEDING FOR SALE Grape Wild F arm Berkshires Show Ring XVinners Bred for Size and Quality, Pro- lificacy and Vitality Grape Wild Farms ESCALON. CALIF. Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers. They Patrnnize You. il- q. A POWERFUL FOE T0 Orchard Pests The General Chemical Company is the Westis most powerful foe to the insect and fungus pest of the orchard. This organization specializes in chemicals. Modern laboratories, skilled chemists, scientific methods and raw materials of the best grade, are all employed by this Company in its war on the profit-destroying pests of orchard and Vineyard. In addition to this, entomologists are employed by the Company to give ranchers counsel regarding the pest problem Every rancher is cordially invited to take advantage of this service. General Chemical Company LIME SULPHUR SOLUTION ATOMIC SULPHUR BORDEAUX MIXTURE ARSENATE OF LEAD UNIVERSAL OIL SPRAYS This Companyis products are made in the West to conform With Pacific Coast requirements. Write for interesting Booklet and learn how to prevent pest troubles, which will be sure to occur in time unless precautions are taken. GENERAL CHEMICAL COMPANY San Francisco Oll-Illl WOOD-CURTIS COMPANY SACRAMENTO, CALIF. IllI-IIH4 .P-nlnuu-u-w- WHOLESALE FRUIT AND PRODUCE OUR SPECIALTY CAR LOTS .gd-III-IIII-II-IM-IIII-I1I-T BEANS, ONIONS, POTATOES AND MIXED VEGETABLES iiTHE BOSS" REE PROTECTO Made of Yucca Palm Is cheap, durable and quickly put on the tree. It prevents rabbits from destroying your trees. A sure protector against frosts, sunburn, grass- hoppers or dry Winds. Can be easily removed. Will last for years. Send for samples. Per PRICES 1000 10 in. long, 7 in. wide $10.00 12 in. long, 7 in. wide 11.00 14 in. long, 7 in. wide 12.00 16 in. long, 7 in. wide 13.50 18 in. long, 7 in. wide 15.00 24 in. long, 7 in. wide 18.00 30 in. long, 7 in. wide 21.00 YUCCA MANUFACTURINGCO 1380 Willow St., Los Angeles, Calif. Pa tronize ttRodeo" Advertisers. They Patronize You. A. 11 th-UD : .. -,-.-l-u- J a xn- mv-p-R I l A . l r - O 3w -. 3E3 u-u-n---u-u-n--I-u--u-u-...-.-..-.-- .-l .-..-...-..-u.-....-u- 4L 4mm- The . : Cletrac F IS the value of the hour. Its power is 1 new model llF,, ample to pull two 12-inch bottumsvto turn under 6 t0 8 acres a day. In the $211119 proportion it speeds l I E I RAl up all Other farm wm'km discing. seeding. haying. harvesting; hauling. belt work. i TANK-TYPE TRACTOR . Lays Its own tracks anyxx'horv 11ml M'M'ywhm'v you $l 5 want it to go"rautmmltioully luln'imtml all work- ing parts accossilllv-glmmllos any job on lllt' fzn'm -7antl its low prioe will moot your means today. Delivered in California llLARGEST PRODIYCERS 0F 'lXLVK-TYPE 'HLH'TORS H T" If WURLID" 19081 Euclid Avenue. Cleveland PACIFIC COAST FACTORY BRANCHES LOS ANGELES, CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. SPOKANE. WASH. 7:. -ul -.---.---u------.---.l.-.-.-l...-4- .---.-.----.-.-.-.--.-------...+ T : l 'l TlllC HERD OF GREAT YEARLY RECORDS i . . I Imryml m Ilu' ll ml 1 ; A. W. MORRIS 85 SONS Vnrpm'ulinn Iilulla'lz'lilXI; N'I'IH'lx' from I".l .ll I I1 I lu'h' Hf ll' U N ll If I! I" I' I. .lt't'UllI'LINIIJIICN'I'N KY 0 U D l, A N D Every Student of Agriculture Should Know About H. P. Tracks For F 0rdson. Tractors The universal use of the Fordson on small farms makes it quite necessary that every student of agriculture should be familiar with a product so essential to Fordson efficiency as are H. P. Tracks. H. P. Tracks are a track-laying attachment that replaces the regular wheel equipment of a Fordson, making it safer on rough, hilly ground and assuring its steady pulling power in low spots or sandy soil. H. P. Tracks are simple in operation, foolproof in design and readily replace the regular Fordson Wheel equpiment. H. P. Tracks increase the Fordsonts power and decrease its fuel consumption, thus ultimately reducing tractor operating costs. H. P. Tracks put the Fordson in the same class as track- laying tractors of several times its cost. The Pacific Tractor : Machinery Co. SALES AND SERVICE NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 010 Patronize ttRodeo,t Advertisers. They Patronize You. IIEvery man is odd" But we can fit him FASHION PARK CLOTHES CUSTOM SERVICE WITHOUT THE ANNOYANCE OFA TRY-ON READ Y- TO-PUT- ON TAILORED AT FASHION PARK "K"Rt 993 II-IIH-OIH-IHI-ml-MI4 .-...-.f .1.- .......................................................... I I WATCHES JEWELRY SIVERWARE I I I I S. STURMER CO. I I I ! . . I IHUVIUVDQ I i AIIWALS' SELLS ND" IIIuhS I I +-I--""--"-M I i V. ' I WITH A FI'LL LINIu WATCHMAKERS I i t' . i U JEWELERS AND I I ENGRAVERS " lI lIIIIiS'lI-CIASS mums I I , .. +- ----------- -+ I I mm lulu-nm- mm I i IIII' INN Ix HI III'I INII'Ix JEWELRY MANUFACTURERS I I 1g.- AND DIAMOND SETTERS I I I i MIMIC .XXII SICIG +-w- I--I ---I-+ I I I I 502 K STREET SM'ILUIHVro II II mus RayIs Grocerteria I'S l'l HST .XXII YHI' XVILI. IHC SATISFIED FALIFURNIA KEEPING PACE Business progress requires good banking servicesit cannot get along without it. XVe are prepared to offer complete banking service to individuals and concerns to enable them to keep pace With present busi- ness developments. WE INVITE YOU TO CONSULT US ABOUT YOUR BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL PROBLEMS DAVIS BRANCH THE BANK OF YOLO sMain Office, Woodlanm H. B. CREGO, Assistant Cashier and Manager HOTEL COLOMA RATES $1.50 PER DAY AND UP HOT AND COLD WATER IN EVERY ROOM FURNACE HEAT PLEASANT LOBBY 508 K STREET SACRAMENTO, CAL. Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers. They Patronize You. NH 1H Soda F ountain Candy and Pool W m Pugh and Grady Davis Cleaning and Pressing W0 rks . A1. Jluglwff'i PI'UIH'inUI' HA VIS. F.1LlFUIIXIJ IIJ'I'N IHJH'KI'IH .l.VH WLI'HXICH 11.1 IHIu'S' I '.1.V!'Y H'I','.1 I? FUNDS !'I,I:'.l .VIz'H .lXH PIFICNNI'II' IN NS. HILLVIH'YI'N. WI 'IJ'I'J INS. Iz"l'! FIJI! .Vlu'H NI'I'I'N l'I,I','.l.VI:'IL PIRICNNI'IH J.VH Ifla'l'lllflfh HIJH'I'IN l'I,I:'.1.VI:'I! HI'IX!;'I.'.1I. IH'IPJIII H'Ulflx' Llw'nl rm tlll' l'rlmpux; -. .... - - -...-.u-u-..- ..-..-...-...-..-. -. - .- .- kII-IIl-HI-IIl-II-Il-Il-ul-l -...--,- .- Pilll'wnilv ' l;miv---' .Ml. wy'tzva 1w. l. V' .7. Mr, University Hotel STUDENTS HOT AND COLD WATER IN ALL ROOMS STEAM HEAT Reasonable Rates Good Meals in' Dining Room L. C. AND E. F. SCHMEISER . Proprietors CALIFORNIA B A N K of D A VIS Davis Barber Sh0p The Local Bank FIRST-CLASS TIVORK V with Q UICK SERVICE M Agency for WOODLAND STEAM LAUNDRY Dyeing and Cleaning M Capital and Surpluss $52,000,00 J. GOLDEN, Prop. DAVIS 'b Patronize Rode0" Advertisers. They Patronize You. BE YOUR OXVX BOSS Build a Home of Your Own THIS IS THE YEAR TO BIVILD Thls Company 18 ready to help YOU to make this YOI'R building war. Call at thls Office and talk it over with us and see our hundreds of designs of Modern Homes. Donjt Let Tamas Scam You. You Arc Paying Your Immllord'.s' Now. Davis Lumber Company PHONE 39-1 DAVIS, CALIF. x , U TAKING AN AUTO APART Is easy. Anybody can do that. But putting the parts together again properly is a different proposition. So if your car gets out of order don't tinker with it yourself. Send it here, PURE MINT where we have the knowledge and skill required to make all repairs. Schneider, Chappell 81 Jones and t0 restogeffivgggcgar to its best P1 M 3010 ' lone DAVIS GARAGE . .- w , S runento 610 J Street 739 1 ppmm' HOAG, Mgr. -u -Iuy ku-u-u They Pntmnize Ynu. Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers. The House Of Service? We Serve You With Both QUALITY and QUANTITY Lillard 8: Traynham The Davis Grocers PHONE 120 DAVIS, CALIF. J. G. ROWE PUMPING AND GAS FITTINGS WELL BORI N G Q AGENTS FOR LAYNE 85 BOWLER TURBINE PUMPS FAIRBANKS MOTORS AND ENGINES DAVIS CALIFORNIA Patronize R0de0" Advertisers. They Patronize You. W. UHF. 'x'ux IAMES DECK Wood, Coal and Ice General Draying Davis, California Kirk, Geary 8? C0. W lzolesalc Druggist Sacra men to, Cal . ..-u-u--u-u-n-u--u-u-..-u-u-..-..-..-.-...-y.-,.-4 u-u-pu-u-...-...-.. Ladiey F umishings Menls F umishings Dry Goods Shoes Nations A COMPLETE GROCERY DEPT. Give Us a Call B H. ROGERS GENERAL MERCHANDISE DAVIS CALIFORNIA Young and Covell Butchers For Quanity, Quality and Service Dealers in Livestock Davis, California Patmnuze Rode0".Adveruser$ They Patmnuze You. 1,4.IlH" 1.. Flrst Class Sh n hi. H. H H Diyl uu-db IIT he Cream of Motion Picturef Are to be Found at 11w ks TRA ND THEA TER J. C. Ll'FT 3; SONS DAVIS. HLIF. 4.-...-- ----..;. +I-..--..---I-I---..- I l I IIWear-EveW Leather I I C A L I F O R N I A I l Q x r r 1 l I'SICD m1: ILL ! II 14 ER FILILER I A I v i E i r j lIALF-SULIXH I i VVORRS I I l +-w-Ia-m-+ I I I I 3.; l : .VIIIIIIII'III-turrrs III' I I , ! I I IIIHIIILIC'I'I: II'I'III'I'IIJZI-IRS I I : ImxIc menu Ii'l'l'. I I A I I O l I . 5 Shoe Re alrlnd ! ' IH Pim- SL. Fallil'nrnin NlnrkI-I IHIIL'. 11's as P a I I I i I Phone: Douglas 37-15 I at Mmlvl'iltv Vl'iI'I'S I I sn II'IHM'IM'U.1'H.ll'. I I I I w uxI'IcI: I I ImIIII-II III'III-w I ' A I ' .. I ' '.' L I'Issw I11II:.. L s .X L'I-Ivs. I'; l t. DXVIS IHII : II II I II H II II 1 ---------------4 ;-----,III-I--I$-J +-.- IN I- C. D. JUDD C. D. Judd The Man to See For WOOD COAL ICE AND EXPRESS OR TRUCKING of all descriptions DAVIS, CALIF. Gas and Electric Service and Supplies Contracting and House KViI'ing' Agents- Royal Vacuum Cleaners Edison Mazda Lamps Prest-o-Light Storage Batteries VACUUM CLEANER FOR RENT C. S. FROST Phone 19-J DAVIS, CALIF. 'O. Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers. E. T. CALLAHAN DAVIS, CALIFORNIA JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIRING OF ALL KINDS A SPECIALTY ALL KVORK GUARANTEED Save 20 Per Cent by Sending for Selection 011 Memorandum They Patronize You. F" ....-- , .. mu 1 1 n 'l u l 1 1 1 1 l 1 1H2 l i Mi UNI h. I Q 'r Always Anxious to Serve B. C. FRENCH HABERDASHER pic I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 41.. COM IIIIF'IIF l' UHIR DON II 0F FRHI IIS 0F FORD PARTS x! Ford Station LINE E. P. LIGGETT AT 'IIllF FORD SII IIFIII I I Authorized Schicc Davis, California A'II'III IIIX IIY NH'IIAIIY - .VII . I..UV IIIIIIIIIII IXSI'IIAXIIIC ILI VIS IIIXK III'IIJIIMI DAVIS IHXIIIFIHINIA I-....--.-....-...- .... ...-I.- .- .-,.-I.-I..-...- ...V.-.,.-- Graduates! I want to thank you for your kind patronage and wish you success in your future work. C. B. WILLIAMS HOME OF THE BRUNSWICK STATIONERY MAGAZINES MUSIC DAVIS CALIFORNIA T Cascade Laundry Starlock Farm WILLARD WARNER M SHORTHORN CATTLE na er a g HAMPSHIRE SHEEP SPECIAL CARE POLAND CHINA HOGS GIVEN T0 STUDENT WORK C. HAROLD HOPKINS Owner W. RAY PERRY Camups Agent J. I. THOMPSON Manager SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA DAVIS CALIF. Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers. They Patronize You. -- . .- -- !! -- uu - - .. - .. -. ,, -..-.-.-.-u-:.-..-u.- ..... uuuuuuuuuuu H...u.-u..- PRINTING GI Familiarity never breeds contempt in the Anderson organization. We treat every job as though it were a trial upon which hinged a ten-year contract. q! This isn,t anything but plain business sense. It,s better to hold regular customers than to be continually replacing old friends by new acquaintances. 111 And we have such a small iicustomer turnoverii as to be negligible. Increase in facilities is why we can offer to add a few real earnest seekers after good, on-the-delivery- dot printing. QI Frankly, we want inquiries from big men who rank quality and on-time delivery higher than penny-splitting estimating. Anderson Printing Co. 416 J Street Sacramento California -..-..-..-..-..-..-u-.-.n-n-..-..-...-n KKK. EL SUPREMO HERD phonean 878 1 Ch POLAND CHINAS . 1 HEADED BY Capltal BOX F aCtory 1 US GIANT RANGER Manufacturers of 1 by C32 Ranger; glam, Cllarind?t Giaglgeiersls 239,312: 1 E3535211333213115lonoirffspmysiect.g FRUIT AND PACKING BOXES 1 . Sows i'n hegd rich in trht:1 bloongsfhzgcsh 822:? ll 1 Effingilgatng-Iegges?'liiheges'unbeam, Big Bob: BlOCkW700d and Sawdust 11 . and Fessy1s imm. P. 13- LONG TULARE, CALIF' Second and Q Sts. Sacramento 1 mElle Home of Better Polandw 1 : D. O. 1 a INNISFALL HERD ' ICE CREAM CONFECTIONERY 1 ..0f1 LIGHT LUNCHES 1 MILKING SHORTHORNS CANDY 1 Noted Families of High Production, TOBACCO 1 With Great Show Records 254 11011 the HighwaW 1 J- D- ROWE 36 SONS J. W. MCDONALD . . Proprietor '1 Sacramw? Lessees D AVI S CALIF DAVIS CALIF. 1 . .0 gr'pn'H-I'M' ' ALL AGES OF n 111.. MM Ii AT SA CRIFICE PRICES ' ' R't dJk,J td'tt,S I Suez: Hampshlre Swme 1:31: w 622:1, 'szversegz, AND Young Mules. Lot or parcels, or will 11 ., include with the best equipped 1148 1111131"; . ac e stock-farm 'n the S' ra Foot-hills: m 1 DutCh Balted cattle orghards, implerlnents, VJSEk and saddle M1133??? V stock, etc. m FOR SALE Ideal for raising purebred stock $131111? 1'1 1 FAIRVIEW STOCK FARM Address EL DORADO RANCH 11533; L. L. BEAL RED BLUFF, CALIF. PLACERV'LLE CALIFORN'A .. . .. The firms; 1 1 T And Va f 1 andthr 11 ..J A1119, - HEMP LAND AT COST 111111.... 'X 1' Q. - Purchased in large tracts at Wholesale prices, to sell in acreage to suit the buyer Whenn1111ig, at the SAME COST, HEMP LAND, Orchard Land, Land Suitable for Diversified Andq. ,. 1 Farming. If interested in building a home, fill out this blank today and mail it to The 11011111 , CALIFORNIA HEMP INDUSTRIES, 918 Sixth Street, Sacramento. H Ana. ., E 'is w '1 . V. . I am interested in growing .................................................................................................. 1:111:11. Name ............................................................................................................................ TheSXVj11'1,, 1 Address ............................................................................................................ 11111111. ; " 9119.111 V A1111 g. 1 Patronize 11R0deo" Advertisers. They Patronize You. ' harles j. Noack C0. Established 1870 I I I I I I I I .IEII'EL E 1m x1: I 'r I n X If 1m I nLIImxm IILI 'l'I'IIIz'N I .IIIJII'IJIJH' .x'II,I'I-:I:II1IIII: I l I I I I I I I I I I CLASS PINS AND TRUIIIIIICS A SIIICIIIALTY SIIi-K SII'PPI Sacramento California Illl IIII-III.-...I- II: - - ----'+ ?Im-uul-Im--Im--IIII-IIII-ImIIIII-IIu.-uu-uu--uu-IIII-IIII- - ----- J: I Tw-w-w-w-ww-ww'-ww"? "RICH I The 01d Time Runaway Train I I I . I Iu'rt'I'IIHIiIIq Hum! In I e41: I ISlowed Down by NatIon JonesI I ' ' I A :3 'I' I . . . . v: v u I .. x . I .. . , i ' N v v w I '13 A lumm 11.x tIam taIm IIImn IIH IIIIK Ix. I Ix I: I III A I: I. 'III R II A I: I - N I And 5110 Ilvw, shv 110w: I l ' I A runaway train I-amv down 11w Mark. I I I? I And shv I'lvw, shv I'va; I I I I r i v a a I' ! I A runaway tram HHIH' IIIIwn IIIU II'avII. I I INN IIIIHI . InuLII IIIIII AL. I -3 III; ' S110 hit, a, I'l'vight and III'IIkv IIvI' IHH'Ii. I I I I And shv flow. flow, I'lmv. I'var I II I Tho snn-of-a-gun. shv flww. . . I I . I MIA: I I.AS.XXIH.AIHII'A I 5:: I I Tho fil'mnan III' was slmvvling I-IIaI. I I ,ww-I . And shv flvw H'UIIIIHIH' tIIv IIIHIIHII as alme. I . , I I . ' ' I A1111 thv I-IIaI I'an intu IIIU l'iI'I'y Imwl. I Fl 1 I I" I'5 I , aI'I'UI AHII SIIU IIPW. MI... why. DIV. I I I The vasiI- Iw was svllinu his uum. I I And shv Ilvw, vita. I IVIwn a hum Imught snmv aIIII SIHII' IIix l'IIIII. I l M I And slw flvw. PU'. I I., I I . I Q n v'II 1 le pm'tm": namv was ICIIIIIII' .IIIIIIIN I I , ,0 I And shv flvw. Mr. I 110 was a Iliuhfalutwr with a pair III IHIIII'S. I I Ami shv I'lvw. Dtv. I n erson I I O l , 3 I I I The switvhman I10 was IIII'IIiIII: IIII- uIIIIIII. I I , I And 5110 IIIWV. NU. h. I h '. . 'n '. I Thv heavy UIII I'rvighl I'an IIIIU IIIw 'IIII'II. I 'l ' I'd" rllld I I And she flvw. ctr. , I +-----a---a------4 A aI I II I I I I POWER PLANT PLUMBING N ADDITION TO OUR REGULAR LINE OF VALVES, FITTINGS, STEAM SPECIALTIES 8L PLUMBING MATERIAL WE ARE DISTRIBUTORS OF l SAMSON WINDMILLS, ' STOVER GASOLING AND KEROSENE ENGINES, 1 DUMP JACKS AND POWER HEADS, ' DEMING HAND AND POWER PUMPS, VAILE-KINES AND DEMING HYDRO'PNEUMATIC . PRESSURE SYSTEMS, AND DEMING HAND AND POWER SPRAYERS AND ACCESSORIES io-ml lm nn-nn-4c 1855 0 RAN E CO. 1922 Frank , SACRAMENTO---OAKLAND---SAN FRANCISCO x mRANCH OF CRANE co., CHICAGm i 1d 1m; Phone Main IPU M Ps Pl PES . 00 ' Patronize R0de0" Advertisers. They Patronize You. R PAI IKIXH E IIIIII111111I1 E ' TA N X1 Ni ? L 1 ' IHCFIHHICHATIUX I LESLIE manufactures AHRIFI'LTI'RAL I a salt for every purpose. 1 1 1 1 0111' product will prove I 1113M H A II 1 to you that true economy 1N1 HVSTRIAL I lies in quality. 11A KING ' 1M1 1w 1 . ur Ilmnostn' use? Leslie Salt Refining Company I SAN MATEO SAN FIMM'ISHD SH'IKAMEN'I'U PALIF. II .-u--u-u-nu-u-u-u.-u-u-n--u-u-u------u-u .1. ....... .1. 1 i I 1 I I l 1 ; rm: ANYTHING 1 1 I 1 MADE 013 SHEET METAL. '1 '1 . I COPPER, BRASS m: 1 1 mxv '1 '1 . 1 1 Sults to Your Order 1 1 11seew 1 1 $371 In $60 1 1 1 YHI'XH MICVS STYLES 1 Frank Z. Ahl Sheet I I MY SI'ICI'IAIXIW' 1 1 I mwrmn 1 Metal Works I I W" '15 I 1 1 1615 21m 511: ll m I I I 1 Plume Main 3800 SAFILUI PINTO I l I I 1 1 l l 1009 k'l'll S'IIR EE'IV 1 "-u-u-u-u.-n-nu.-u-u-n.-u-u1-u.du.-.u-u.-.. When a person needs a thing he pays for it- W h e t h e r h e buys it or not. lhhhhhhhg A comfortable furnished Home is a necessity- and we help you get it through our LOW PRICES AND VERY EAS Y TERMS lthghhhh They Patnnuze'You. Nd for the development of California resources by patronizing Keep your 11fe msurancc premium in California CALIFORNIA STATE LIKE Over $5,000,000 of Admitted Assets Sacramento Over $44,500,000 of Insurance in Force O 'I' T I I I i 1 1 1 1 . l l i i i 1 I l l I I I I I I PASADENA SAN DIEGO POMONA BAKERSFIELD S SAN JOSE SAN FRANCISCO F re Hartsoakls A. IL MILLS. Photograph. 1105 ANN ICLICS STOC KTUN F RESNO u-u-u-n.-u-u-u.-L.-u-...-u--..-u-..- 4....-.- IElII'HIIIXP .. I'HV'I' - ...................................................................... J, ....................... .1- 4..-...---.-.---.-.-..---.......': II , I i I W1 1 M I ANTA CRI'Z I I 13; 3y ore I I I For 3 our SHOES? I SANTA ROSA I I Buy Ihvm HI 1 WV, ,, I i i BRADDOCKS i I I "Nothing! Uwr $x5u" I I II III Ix SIIPIII Surmmvnm I i I---yI-I----:----4 I I T-'I'II'I"III"'I"'T I I o I O l V 66 . ,? - Manager I I Barber Bl" Ldrllle I 7. , , I I I l I .. , . . ,. . , I I I I llllz hll IIIAI'S IVltlI-INID I , If I I -uI- I IHMAMI I i 'I'III'I N.I'B mull MALI. I X'ISAIJA I I I l SAHLXMICNTU I I ILXVh CALI! I -4. 3.. .................................................. .I. In. California Pine: BOX Distributors 1019 First National Bank Building, San Francisco, California Telephone Garfield 2885 A strictly Co-Operative Selling Agency composed of the principal Pine Manufacturers of California and Southern Oregon, with an output of 200,000,000 feet of sh'ooks010,000 cars. W79 manufacture Soft W hite Pine Fruit Boxes, Cannery Cases and Shook for every other known use, either in car lots or direct to consumer from any of 01113 branches located in the great fruit producing centers in California at the following points: San Diego San Jose Fresno Sacramento Los Angeles Watsonville Brawley dmperial Valley USE t0PINE MADIW BOXES Quality Service Quantity Patronize 0Rodeo0 Advertisers. They Patronize You. 3m BEST IN THE WEST PATRUNIZIC HUME INIII'STIIY. DEMAND NXUII' NI'N'I'IJAII IHBICIII I'IIIIM YUI'II IIRUIIICR UH IIIIIICII'P IIIIIHM 'IIIIIC BAKERY. I I I l I I I I I I l IIU'P BREAD AND ROLLS ALI. my I 19mm II A. M. 'm I P. M. i i I I l I I I I I I l PERSONAL ATTICN'IIIHN IIIVICN TU ALI. SPICIIIAL URIHCHS AT ALI. TIMES. Snow System Bakeries 215 G ST. PIIUNIC llI DAVIS I'.II.II"0IINI.I .Iu'I-ntx II'IIr Bergmann I Joggers H. S. Crocker Co.LIArLC: ICSILIIIIISIIPII 187M PRINTING Bookbinding : Lithographing The Only Umnplvtvly IIZIIIIIIIIIIIII Printing and IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIg ICsIzIIIIisII- Inontin Suvnunvnnx 373 Main 264 Caselli 8L Hunger .IIT K SII'PPI 205 J NTRIHYF SIII'I'UIIIVHHL I'ulil'nrniu I I I I I I I I I I I I I I . I I'I.III:sIII:I,II IIIII-zss sIIIII-zs I I I I I I I I I- Golden State Brand Vacuum Salt 99.7570 tSodz'um Chloridei ADOPTED BY THE UNIVERSITY FARM AND ALL CREAMERIES iTHAT ANALYZE THEIR SALT BEFORE USING IT IN BUTTER For Creameries, Canneries and Manufacturers Who Are Compelled to Use Extra High-Grade Salt tSOdium Chloridei in Preserving Their Products, the Following Short Farm Analysis for MAGNE SIA and CALCIUM Can be Used TEST FOR MAGNESIA IN SALT Make a saturate solution of salt with DISTILLED WATERethat is, add salt to the distilled water tstirring continuouslyi until no more salt Will dissolve; allow to stand a few minutes until air escapes and brine clears up; then add 20 to 30 drops of SODIUM PHOSPHATE SOLUTION to every pint of brine; if regular quantative analysis graduated 10 cubic centimeter test tube is used two drops of the solution will be sufficient. Pure brine Will remain clear indefinitely. If Magnesia is present it will turn white or milky, gradually coagulate and after standing twenty- four hours will settle to bottom, where percentage can be read on the test tube. Precipitate in this case is CHLORIDE OF MAGNESIA. SODIUM PHOSPHATE SOLUTION FOR MAGNESIA TEST Procure 10 cents worth of Sodium Phosphate, NaZHPO4 from any druggist; fill a bottle one- quarter full, add DISTILLED WATER to fill bottle. This, after shaking well, is saturated solu- tion, ready for use in Magnesia Salt Test. TEST FOR CALCIUM IN SALT Prepare saturated solution of salt brine, same as for magnesia test; to a pint of brine add 10 drops of Aqua Ammonia tcommon washing ammoniai; mix thoroughly, then add 10 drops of OXALATE AMMONIA SOLUTION, mix ,thoroughly. Pure brine Will remain clear indefinitely. If it turns white 01' milky Calcium is present which Will gradually precipitate, and at the end of twenty-four hours a quantative reading can be made in the regular 10 CC'test tube. The precipitate in this case is Calcium Oxalate formed from the Calcium Sulphate and Calcium Chloride present in the salt. OXALATE AMMONIA SOLUTION FOR CALCIUM TEST Procure 10 cents worth of Oxalate Ammonia Crystals tNHQ 2C204H20 from any druggist; fill bottle one-quarter full. add DISTILLED WATER to fill bottle. This, after shaking well, is a saturated solution ready for use in a Calcium Test. Sodium Chloride tSailti standing the above tests is practically chemically pure, there being no brash 01' bitter flavors remaining due to the presence of Chlorides of Calcium and Magnesium. CALIFORNIA SALT COMPANY 762 MILLS BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. Patronize itRodeo" Advertisers. They Patronize You. NVW " DAVIS ENTERPRISE XV. U. SVUTT. Pl'upl'ivtm' A VHAkly PllhliHHiHll ul' Hmwml ViH-ulnliun Pllhlislml :1! leis. Fulil'm'nin. GENERALPl'liLlSlllNH FINIC .1013 PRINTIXH HF ALL KINDS Advm'ntml lm-zltiml nl' l'nivm-sity Farm :ll hilViN INN'HIISU nf vlimnlv. soil and gmrlngiml lumtiun. :lml Hill ml llw fgrmlml lumsling fur llw HM"! Slir'firm 0f tlw Iirwl l'uuuly in Hz: HI'NI Nlulr in Illr I', N, .l. i H'HHSIHCR UV mun .ml:lml..x ! . L - - - ------ --- ----- --4 T ............................. .4. :- .............................................. .1. ! ! ! Ii Home Cooked Meals . HOMES a n d All X 0U C811 hilt Should 1w just us ullrm-tiw- us vily lmmvs. :nnl muny ut' thmn arr. Um' svrvirv m fulks living 0n lmlh lnl'gv and small farms nnhitlu nf thw t'ily is just us t'UIllltlt-tw us it is In lwuplv in Ihw t'ily. Special Rates to Students Wv 5'le Ilmlsv Furnish- illus fur M'wry kiln! nt' hmmn FRANCES OKIiIiHi Dunn and Frazier C0. "19 Stops Frum K" 91'". R AND I. SKH'MANHIN'HD u-n-u-u-u-u-u-'--.-----.-..--.-u-....-...-u-n WOODLAND STEAM LAUNDRY 2GET THE HABIT, ALL YOUR LAUNDRY VVASHED IN SOFT WATER BY OUR LATEST PROCESS WE 'DO THE LAUNDRY FOR YOUR NEIGHBOR WHY NOT YOUR? LEAVE ORDERS OR BUNDLES WITH GOLDEN,S BARBER SHOP Critchlow cQ Breece PHONE 58, WOODLAND 729 K VI m i 1310 MPH - McLAUGHLIN Sheet Metal Works WVE SPECIALIZE IN Sheet Metal Work for the Farm and Orchard g? Phone Main 3821 223 J STREET SACRAMENTO Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers. Davis Pharmacy DRUGS and MEDICINES PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED CIGARS and STATIONERY DAVIS CALIF. They Patronize You. r"-H-"."-H- -' q...p..-..-.,.......2 .. . Californiz AS: HM 216 Pine 1 1 1 1 I I 1 1 l 1 mu 1 1 I - ----- I HATS IF ITS RIG HT BALLARD HAS IT. IF BALLAIHD HAS IT IT IS RIGHT JIM BALLARD Hats 729 K S'IIR EIC'II SAFRAM EN'I'U 1210 IVashington 15411 limzulwuy OAKLAND r--11-----------14 1- .. ........................ .1. California Pear Growers Association W FRANK SWETT I Jresident V 216 Pine St. San Francisco u-u-n-u-u-..-u-u Bowman Auto Supply Compliment; of Company Auto Accessories Sporting Goods 11tl7 mull Struck sIcICrnUUCHtU CIIWOHIM III IT'S IH'GS YUI'Wl-I HUT WPLI, h'I-Z'I' 'Iiil Orchard Supply Company NH'RAM HVI'U. FALII'L llvmlqmlrtt-n MHSHNS .XNII ICQIIII'MI'IX'II FUR IIHBIIIA'I'INH IIICSTS IH'ST .XXII LlQl'IH SPHAYINH MATERIALS I'HMMICIU'IAI, .XNII ANIMAL I'II'ZH'I'ILIZI'ZHS I I I I l I I I I l I I l I IJI'ST .XXII I.IQl'IH SPILXYI'IHS 1 i l I I I 906 SEVENTH S'l'. l'lmnv 31-22l3 1 J- Fitz Geraldos Garage Dodge Brotherso Motors Vehicles, EXide Battery All Branches of Automotive Repairs Will Fitz Gerald, Prop. DAVIS CALIFORNIA u. T o the Young Man You are judged absolutely by your personal appearance. A well dressed, well groomed appearance gets you attentionogets you a job-increases your salary. No other item of consideration is quite so important. TAILORED SUITS $25 to $45 to $60 Made to your carefully taken individual measureowith all your personal and indi- vidual imperfections allowed for. No ready made suit is built along these lines. They are built to fit the average man. And we charge no more. Dudee Woollen Mills Professional Tailors to Men 1017 EIGHTH ST. SACRAMENTO 418 E. Weber Ave., Stockton A. M. RICE San Francisco Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers. G. Rossi 85 Co. F. Sarti, Manager 921 K STREET SACRAMENTO W Special on Corsages for Dances. Good Assortment of Flowers and Blooming Plants of A11 Descriptins. Other Stores Oakland Berkeley Fresno Reno, Nev. Stockton They Patronize You. Compliments 0f Gaiden HAYMANIS I I I I I I I I l I I I Vhere the I I I I I I l I I I I I I :1 IWIWI,,..-.,,,I,...-m.I...,,-...,-.,,.I.W4. GOOD CLOTHES Come From in Sacramento IDXVIS The Club P001 Hall : I I I I I I I I I I I I I.. III'mIIHLKs, I'mp. I I I I I I I I I I I I I TravelerIs Hotel is just M miles from Davis + W. II. Ilunlun J. l,, IIIIillIileiln I I I + . I h HIS 1' II IHIIWH I I 3th aij Sacramento I l I : I I w-A-----.-.-I-.. + ...... , ...... , ......... m, .5... .- 1 1 I 1 1 l 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 I i 1 1 1 1 I 1 I 1 '$' Compliments of Maxwell Pipe Sz Culvert Works East 1 Oakland, 2th St. S: 25th Ave. California q .. - -HII-IIII-IIH-Illi-IIlI--IIH-lln-IIII-'l"-"N-IIH--Ill-lln-llll1-H" Compliments t0 the Class 0f1922 H. T. Harger C0. Makers of Fine Jewelry 1008 K St. Hotel Sacramento Bldg. STAt DAVIs WHEN YOU THINK OF Fl'RNISlIINGS THINK OF DORMANIS Subway Oil Station A. T. GEILINGS. Prop. THE BEST PLACE IN SACRAMENTO ASSIH'IA'HIIIUILHIl'lmlbl't'TS. TO BUY YOUR VICEIHIL OILS HOSE, E'H'. WE ARE SHOWING A FINE HUUDRH'II 'IVIRI'IS ASSORTMENT OF SOFT FULIAR ATT.H'IIICID SHIRTS RELIABLE GOODS AT REGULAR PRICES Geo. Dorman gK' Son I I I I I I I I I ! SHIRTS. NHI'KIVMII, I I I I I I I I I I , I xrzx'r 'm IIIPP um: K S'IIIIIch'I' 'l I I I I I I I I I I ! l: NOIHVAIM 'l'lIHIIS AND TIRES I I I I I I I I I I I Shorty Williamson 'I'IIIC S'ITIHIIVI'S' Is It I EN ID Butter smu MH'NTAIN . Cheese STA'I'H INAHY cuunIrr'rIcs H 21m CHIAHS CANDY Bacon - r For Sale By A 11 Leading STAGE DEPOT FAIIIHDRNIX G mcers and M arkets C. SWANSTON 8g SON WVHOLESALE BUTCHERS AND PORK PACKERS Office, Abbattoir and Stock Yards at SWANSTON, NORTH SACRAMENTO Telephone Main 4480 MAIL ADDRESS P. 0. BOX 323 SACRAMENTO, CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE AND SALESROOMS, RHODE Telephone, Market 642 ISLAND AND DIVISION STS. COMPLIMENTS OF WV VNVV BERETTA VI V'V Eye Glasses and Spectacles 901 K STREET SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA THIRTY YEARS OF PUBLIC SERVICE OUR GUARANTEE Patronize "Rodeo" Advertisers 13' . They Patronize You. '. 1 .XLIF. 31 srs. 1 DE LAVAL Equipment $ 1 Brings Pros- perity to the Farm. CREAM SEPARATORS MILKERS ENGINES, PUMPS FEED CUTTERS BARN EQUIPMENT EVERYTHING FOR THE DAIRY THE BETTER WAY OF MILKING De Laval first gave us the better way of separating cream from milk, and now the better way of milking. :ll 1 "am'gccEmze-W 43.151 ' The De Laval has won 1.091 grand and first prizes at every im- portant exposition an fair in all parts of the ' World during the past forty years. M Sooner or later you will use a De Laval PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBI'TO RS DE LAVAL PACIFIC CO., ................................................................. 4, Patronize HRodeo' ' .Mh'ertisers. SAN FRANCISCO They Patrhnizo Ynll. Printed by Anderson Printing Co. Engravings by Dome Engraving C0. Binding by W. J. Weisman Sacramento, Calif.


Suggestions in the University of California Davis - El Rodeo Yearbook (Davis, CA) collection:

University of California Davis - El Rodeo Yearbook (Davis, CA) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

1924

University of California Davis - El Rodeo Yearbook (Davis, CA) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

1939

University of California Davis - El Rodeo Yearbook (Davis, CA) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Page 1

1950

University of California Davis - El Rodeo Yearbook (Davis, CA) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 100

1922, pg 100

University of California Davis - El Rodeo Yearbook (Davis, CA) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 167

1922, pg 167

University of California Davis - El Rodeo Yearbook (Davis, CA) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 162

1922, pg 162

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