University of California Berkeley - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Berkeley, CA)

 - Class of 1937

Page 1 of 514

 

University of California Berkeley - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 514 of the 1937 volume:

B V iv O " COPYRIGHT, 1937, BY THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. PAUL D. EHRET, EDITOR. 1 9 5 7 BLUE A N D GOLD BLUE AND BOLD VOL.64- I ( )o7- PUBLISHED BY THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA M F II K F : I E Y, C A I I F N I A FOREWORD Our University is a mass of individual ideals, compounded of the visions and efforts of the thousands of Californians, living and dead, who during the past seventy-seven years have been the builders of California. To each of these, in his particular experience, the University means something different; but, in his consciousness of an animating spirit, something much the same. For through the thousands who have made contributions, each in accordance with his own conception of what the University should be, conflicting concepts have been rendered supplementary, and policies have been stabilized along the line of progress; thus have an Ideology, a Tradition, and a Spirit been evolved. This is the University of California. Today on seven campuses of the University leaders of men are attacking all of the recognized problems of society, that they may interpret them for younger Calif ornians. With represen t- ing, however briefly, activities during a single year on the largest campus this book is chiefly concerned. .T at . - " - r f : . . J M ' - i .- |HB v 4- , % r. .4fc Ai 1 TO THOSE IDEALS WHICH ARE THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA THIS ROOK IS DEDICATED That the sincerity of purpose of her modern builders may he as deep as the love of the thousands v hu already have served. I N M E M R I A M A D M I N I S T R A AND FACULTY MELVIN E. CUMMINGS ALFRED H. HEALD WILLIAM A. HILLEBRAND JOHN A. HOWARTH GEORGE W. KELHAM ELWOOD MEAD FINLEY F. NEAL LOUIS C. RUFFINO S T 1 T I) E N T S I.OREN CAFFE WILEY CRIST JOHN BLAIR DAVIS WADE GOODMAN LOUIS T. HENGSTLER BERNARD LUDDEN HOEY CAROLINE WHITE HOL iLjL WALTER LATIMER .11 RLEM CLINTON ROBERTSON l N () SIIIOTA CONTENTS C A L I F R N II STUDENT LIFE ATHLETICS IV ORGANIZATIONS BENJAMIN D WHEELER Builder of California - -. ?mr " V B3 CALIFORNIA Human progress has ever been the motivating force of the University of Cal- ifornia. Here the attack on ignorance and prejudice is unimpeded by the extrinsic forces which elsewhere limit free thought. There is no necessity, no desire to defend particular doctrines,- Truth, the key to progress, is the goal. Ever conscious of this goal, the group of scholars which is the faculty of this University explores and frankly discusses all phases of society ' s many problems without fear of censorship. Here is one of the greatest of those institutions upon whose successful functioning depends the future of the state... and society. HEARST MINING BUILDING H A V I LAND I HALL . m ' i: r r PRESIDENT ' S HOME AGRICULTURE HALL i - ,-,. I - . - r .x , , ; ' -- ' ' - .- . ; -. ' . y fc _ . i LIFE SCIENCES PATHWAY m , ?J f ' ji " " ' 9K - - ::. F OTBALL TROPHY BACON x 3Fv-. ' . j i ;y v ITT irrii f Irfl n fj : . , ' . -- - vi . .-| Sc - , ; ; : M IB 111 ill ENGINEERING BUILDING s 11 ilil I I , CALIFORNIA HALL S I TY V I RATI N 22 Cali " s tone of e CoI18 Utution tbe C0 n- Under the State Co v. tbc ent8 ffaitB and at rt J gW een nment Regent8 pOS91 b e of Bj may b. 24 PRESIDENT ROBERT GORDON SPROUL MEMORY LIKE MONEY derives its value from the uses to which it is put. A remembrance of past dreams and achievements which does nothing more than soothe an anemic conscience about an arthritic ambition represents wealth misused and the squandering of the capital of experience upon which life ' s dividend payments are based. Memo- ries of yesterday have value only to the extent that they lead to greater memories for tomorrow. The counting and recounting of things past without thought of the future is a means of escape from the present used only by those who would rather exist than live. It is with these facts in mind that one should treasure this 1937 Blue and Gold. It is a book of memories memories of mutual trials and pleasures during what will always be one of the most significant periods in the lives of the several thousand members of the Class of 1937. Within its covers are the tangible records of old friends, and of the multiplicity of events and activities which were enjoyed with them. In years to come, as its pages are turned, long forgotten scenes and thoughts will be freshened in the mind. But if these things be recalled as an end in themselves it is a danger signal, a symptom of that most pitiable disease of college-trained men and women popularly known as eternal sophomorism. The actor who cannot forget how well he played Oliver Twist in his younger years will never aspire to greater and more mature roles. If remembrance stops at actualities and neglects the dreams and hopes and the spirit behind them it fails of its purpose. So it is with this book. Let it not remind you of the past alone, but of the future as you saw it then. Let it recall to you the spirit of a great University, and the words of scholars who exhorted you to keep your mind ever open, to develop yourself by continued reading, and to seek for truth in the affairs of life in order that the truth might guide you. ROBERT GORDON SPROUL j THE ADMINISTRATIVE YEAR THE YEAR ENDING March 1, 1937 has seen the University proceeding on its way steadily but without startling changes. Among the notable additions to the faculty were Richard Goldschmidt, the geneticist, who came as Professor of Zoology from the Kaiser Wilhelm Institut in Berlin; Gilbert Chinard, scholar in French and comparative literature and biographer of Thomas Jefferson, who left Johns Hopkins University to become Professor of French and Comparative Literature; and William McKim Marriott, Dean of the Washington University Medical School and pediatrician, who be- came Dean of our Medical School on July 1, 1936 and passed away on November 11 of the same year. Another important administrative change was the resignation of Professor Clarence Paschall, Examiner of Schools, and the creation of a department known as Relations with Schools, of which Hiram W. Edwards, Associate Professor of Physics at U.C.L.A., was named Director and L. A. Williams, Professor of Edu- cation on this campus, was designated as Associate Director. Death took from the University W. McKim Marriott, Dean of the Medical School; Henry B. Carey, Dean of the College of Pharmacy; George W. Kelham, Supervising Architect of the University; George J. Martin, Registrar of Hastings College of the Law; and Samuel E. Bassett, Sather Professor of Classical Litera- ture. 26 THE REGISTRATION OF students mounted sharply. At Berkeley in the fall of 1936 there were slightly more than 14,000 students, an increase of 1100 over the corresponding semester of 1935: at Davis there were in 1936 almost 1000 students, an increase of 200 students as compared with 1935. Similar growth marked the Summer Sessions, the two Berkeley sessions having a total registra- tion of 3290 in 1936, while the 1935 enrollment was 2595. One of the most important academic developments was the establishment of various curricula in Public Health for health officers, sanitarians, and public health nurses, who have been in service; this is a development under the new Social Security legislation. Dr. Karl F. Meyer has served as director of these curricula. The erection of a Radiation Laboratory for the work of Dr. E. O. Lawrence and his colleagues with the cyclotron, was made possible by a generous gift of Regent W. H. Crocker. Regent Garrett McEnerney established a series of six undergraduate scholarships. An important gift was the grant of $150,000 by the Carnegie Corporation for the work of the School of Librarianship. The Class of 1906 established undergraduate scholarships and announced their intention of providing ultimately an endowment of $25,000; the Class of 1916 presented the University with the same amount. These are merely examples of the gifts made to the University. Honors and degrees in large numbers have come to members of the faculty. Among the most notable was the award of the honorary Doctorate of Laws to Andrew C. Lawson, emeritus professor of Geology, at the Harvard Tercentenary. Professor E. C. Tolman was chosen President of the American Psychological Asso- ciation. Of very high importance was the designation of Dean Henry F. Grady of the College of Commerce to represent the United States on the Economic Commission of the League of Nations, and as a member of its committee on raw materials. Among the recipients of Guggenheim Awards were three of our fac- ulty: Harold F. Blum (Physiology), Irving A. Leonard (Spanish), and Saul K. Padover (History). In a study of Guggenheim Fellowships it was pointed out that of the 525 indi- viduals who have won them in this country since their establishment, the largest number (32) was won by the University of California. In second place came Chicago, Harvard, and Minnesota, each with twenty; next followed Columbia with fifteen. If on the other hand we list the members of university faculties who have held these fellowships, the University of California again stands first with 29 recipients, Chicago coming second with 24. The Faculty Research Lecturer chosen annually by his colleagues was in 1936 Joel H. Hildebrand of the Department of Chemistry. All in all it was a year of busy activity the University continued both its growth and its progress. 27 THE SIX COLLEGES of the University provide studeiv the opportunity of studying in the specialized fields of ag culture, chemistry, commerce, engineering, and mining, in ad- dition to the general cultural curriculum offered In the College of Letters and Science. The College of Agriculture gives resident instruction on campuses, conducts research on state and national problems agriculture, and non-resident instruction in agriculture a home economics. Preparing students for professional careers in industrial lab- oratories and research institutions is the main purpose of th ' College of Chemistry. Only students with excellent scholarshi and potentialities for success in the field of chemistry are ad mitted to the college. The curriculum offered to students is pri marily along the line of chemistry, physics, and mathematics. The College of Commerce, one of the largest professional divisions on the campus, provides its students with a sound and well-rounded background so as to enable them to meet busi- ness problems effectively. It also aims to provide them with a proper appreciation of business ethics. Since the establish- ment of graduate work in business administration in 1929, the students have been given an opportunity to supplement their undergraduate work with a year of intensive research. In addition to training its students in the fundamentals of pure science, the College of Engineering stresses the impor- tance of recognizing costs and values, of understanding good business principles and of directing men. Following this policy the engineering laboratories at the University conduct research in cooperation with industry, the state, and federal government, including investigations of salt water barriers, harbors, bridges, materials for dams, and headlight and automotive tests. The College of Letters and Science makes available the fields of learning that enter as elements of a liberal higher educa- tion and a training in the fundamental sciences that underlie higher professional studies and research. It requires a breadth of program together with concentration in the field of the student ' s choice. Increased student interest in the mineral industries has been responsible for a larger enrollment in the College of Mining than ever before in the past. The College equips its students to lead in the future development of these industries, supplying the world witli mineral products and developing new and more efficient methods of production. 28 SCHOOLS THE SCHOOL OF Architecture continues to face the prob- lem of turning out designers with imaginative powers capa- ble of handling the architectural problems of our times. Practically, they are given the groundwork of technical knowledge that will make them useful members of their profession. Offering students the opportunity for training necessary to various types of educational careers is the function of the School of Education. Students receive practical in- struction not only in the supervised practice teaching of high school and junior high school classes, but also in spe- cialized leadership in the administration, supervision, and financing of schools. The School of Jurisprudence aims not only to prepare students for the practice of law, but to develope the scien- tific study of law and to further legal research. In addition to the strictly professional courses, such subjects as inter- national law, Roman law, and legal history are offered as part of the curriculum of the school. The School of Librarianship prepares college graduates for professional positions in university, county, public, school, and business libraries. It offers a basic curriculum open to fifty students of superior scholarship, and an addi- tional year open to those who wish to specialize in certain phases of librarianship in preparation for a master of arts degree. School 29 Melin Earl Cummings William Arthur H ilk-brand TRIBUTE LATE IN JULY 1936 the University of California lost two of its most active and valuable faculty leaders within three days of each other. Melviii Earl Cum- mings, Assistant Professor of Modeling in the department of Architecture passed away on July 21 in Berkeley and William Arthur Hillebrand, Professor of Elec- trical Engineering passed away on July 24 at Akron, Ohio, where he was spending the summer as consulting engineer for the Ohio Brass Company. Born in Utah in 1876, Professor Cummings received his early education in the Rocky Mountain region. After three years study in Paris, his first real art work was done at the Mark Hopkins Institute in San Francisco, where he served as Professor of Sculpture. In January 1906 he was appointed Instructor in modeling in the School of Architecture on the campus, being later promoted to Assistant Professor. In spite of his brief sojourn at the University, Professor Hillebrand, who accepted an appointment as Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of California in 1932, rendered important service. Prior to this time he had had a varied career holding faculty posts at Stanford and Oregon State College, and industrial positions as research engineer. Both of these men were indefatigable workers devoted to the University and freely extending their activities to outside projects. Professor Cummings will also be remembered for his works of sculpture, many of which can be seen in Golden Gate Park, while Professor Hillebrand is renowned for his articles in both foreign and American technical journals. Most important of all, is the universal respect and affection with which each man is regarded by his former students. 30 RETIRING PROFESSORS THIS YEAR CALIFORNIA loses nine distinguished professors by retirement. All of them have seen long and active service with the University and endeared themselves to their students as well as to their colleagues. Derrick Norman Lehmer, professor of mathematics, began his teaching career at the University in 1900 and advanced to professorship in 1918. His mathemat- ical achievements have been brilliant and he has also achieved fame as a poet and a composer of Indian operas. In the same department Professor Charles A. Noble has served since 1896 after receiving his B.S. degree here and his Ph.D. at Goettingen University in Germany. Charles Rugh, professor of education, after serving as principal of schools in Clarion and Oakland, came to the University in 1907 and began his noteworthy career on this faculty. Distinguished achievements have also marked the work of Associate Professor Clifton Price of the Latin department, who became an instructor in the Univer- sity in 1895 after graduate work at Yale University. Witli the retirement of Dr. Carl Copping Plehn, professor of finance, and George Randall Hatfield, professor of accounting, the Economics department loses two of its leading authorities. Both men have served in the past as Dean of the College of Commerce and their academic and literary careers will be long remembered. Willis Linn Jeppson, professor of botany since 1919 first became associated with the faculty in 1899 and is a well-known authority, particularly concerning native plants of California. Forty-five years of distinguished service is the record of California ' s pioneer professor, Joseph Nisbet LeConte, who has been a member of the Mechanical Engineering department since 1892. He has written many basic works on machin- ery and hydraulics. It is with regret that the University releases these valuable men, who have exerted such an enduring influence on their students and who have served to advance the University ' s reputation for progressive instruction and academic achievement. 31 CHARTER The President, Provost, and Governor extend a warm welcome at the Charter Day banquet. Governor Merriam, President Sproul, and Bishop Freeman await the commencement of exercises. ,, res ident WITH TRADITIONAL CEREMONY and pageantry the University celebrated its sixty-ninth birthday at the Charter Day exercises on March 23. Six thousand people attended the meeting, held this year in the Gymnasium for Men. Activities commenced with the customary parade of classes, dignitaries, and faculty members in their caps and gowns. Speaker of the day was Bishop James Edward Freeman, Episcopal churchman from Washington, D. C., who discussed the spiritual and economic heritage of the American people. He warned against losing sight of this priceless gift and abandoning landmarks of American- ism. Expressing strong disapproval of makeshift rem- The end of Charter Day banquet at the Palace Hotel. edies in the economic life of this era, he emphasized the importance of a permanent cure rather than " patching up " measures. As a means of accomplishing this end, he advocated continuance of a democratic form of govern- ment, strongly opposing any attempts to change the spirit of the Constitution. President Sproul also addressed the University, point- ing out the achievements of the past and the problems facing today ' s youth. He spoke primarily of the necessity of maintaining the intellectual integrity of the University and expressed a desire for higher standards in the exist- ing educational syst em. DAY Regents McEnerney, Ehrman, and Ramm Honorary degrees of LL.D. were conferred on the speaker, Bishop Freeman, and four other distinguished persons: Niels Bohr, eminent physicist; Max Farrand, di- rector of the Huntington Lihrary; Charles Purcell, chief engineer of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge; and Gertrude Atherton, noted California authoress. The benediction was pronounced by the Right Reverend Charles A. Ramm. In the evening the annual Charter Day Banquet was held at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco. The main address, made by President Sproul, was broadcast over a national hook-up, and members of Treble Clef and the Glee Club sang. 1111 ' ' ' _ .. ' . ' , . . II s 1 5 1 1 1 II a I a I i I $ Krf LEADERS OF THE SEVEN CAMPUSES Back Row: Wilson, Dentistry; Childers. Fine Arts; Charvet, U. C.; Cornelius, U. C. L. A.; Riggs, Mt. Hamilton; Hilbig, Pharmacy. Front Row: Aleck, Hastings; Campbell, Davis; Doyle, Hastings; Brown, Riverside; Marsh, Medicine; Kelly, Hastings. SEVEN CAMPUSES EVERY FIELD of world interest is studied and developed on the seven campuses of the University of California. The basic phenom- ena of the universe : the earth, the ocean, and the heavens; are explored by the Davis Col- lege of Agriculture, Scripps Institute of Ocean- ography, and Lick Observatory respectively. Another group, composed of Riverside Citrus Experiment Station, Kellogg ' s Institute of An- imal Husbandry, and also Davis, deal with animal and plant life. The remaining divi- sions are concerned more directly with human beings. Their physical well-being is studied by the Medical School, the School of Nursing, and the Colleges of Pharmacy and Dentistry; man ' s legal relations are expounded at Has- tings College of the Law; the Berkeley and U. C. L. A. curricula cover all these subjects and also investigate the fields of social and physical science; and finally, the School of FineArts pursues life in all its aspects, through art. These campuses are units of a single Uni- versity, under a single administration and the natural bonds of their student bodies are strengthened by the California Club, which this year, under Vernon Johnson, developed a permanent organization. In addition to estab- lishing u chapter at Davis, the club sponsored numerous activities on the week-end of the U. C. L. A.-U. C. football game, and on No- M-mber fourth at a University Meeting pre- sented speakers from each division. T " _ fr -i- 7000 students attend joint Uninrsity meeting of Berkeley and Loi Angeles campuses in the Greek Theater. THE RECORD of a year at the University of California is more than a listing of events that tran- spired on one campus, for the University has seven campuses each of which is a part of the whole. Next to the Berkeley campus, the University of California at Los Angeles is the largest of these parts. During the year 1936-37 it offered instruction to more than seven thousand students in regular sessions and to fifteen hundred during the summer session of 1936. At the opening of the year, Professor E. C. Moore, who was largely responsible for the establishment of the Los Angeles campus, brought to an end his seventeen years of service as head of the institution by resigning from the position of Vice-President and Provost. Dr. Earle R. Hedrick, professor of Mathematics at U. C. L. A., was appointed his suc- cessor. Professor C. H. Rieber ' 88, active in the de- velopment of U. C. L. A., retired from the post of Dean of Letters and Science and his place was taken by Dr. Gordon S. Watkins. Aside from these changes Dr. Earl J. Miller was named to the newly created post of Dean of Undergraduates, and twenty-seven new men were added to the faculty. In further recognition of the growth of the Los Angeles campus a College of Business Administra- tion was established and new curricula were or- ganized in public health nursing, coast artillery, etc. Probably the most important advance, however, was the inauguration of graduate instruction lead- ing to the doctor of philosophy degree in several fields. Among physical additions to the campus were the completing of a new administration build- ing, the augmenting of the library stacks for an ad- ditional 150,000 volumes, and the excavating of a giant bowl to serve as an outdoor amphitheatre. As greater and greater numbers of able scholars have been added to the teaching staff at Los Angeles the annual contribution of scientific discoveries and creative works has comniensurately increased. Among the few that space permits to be mentioned for the past year are : the internationally recognized experiments on sound by Dr. Vern O. Knudsen ; the researches of Dr. A. W. Bellamy on the mechanism of sex determination ; and the studies of Dr. Bennett M. Allen, R. S. J. Barnett, and Dr. Joseph Kaplan. Among the books published were: " The Story of Instruction: The Beginnings " , by Dr. E. C. Moore; " Organ Voluntaries " , by Alexander Schreiner; a Spanish edition of " Chile, Land and Society " , by Dr. George M. McBride; " Kiaochow Leased Terri- tory " , by Ralph A. Norem; " The United States and Europe, 1815-1823 " , by Dr. Edward Tatum; and a translation of Freinfels ' " The German, His Psychol- ogy and Culture " , by Dr. Rolph Hoffman. Honors received by faculty men included the honorary de- gree D.Sc. from Michigan awarded to Professor Earle R. Hedrick, and the appointment of Profes- sor Robert W. Hodgson to make a horticulture survey in India. As on all campuses of the University, efforts were made during the year to bring outstanding lecturers to the campus and to provide frequent musical pro- grams for the benefit of the students. In recent months these events have included a series of con- certs by the Kolisch Quartet, an appearance of the Vienna Boys ' Choir, and lectures by Salvador de Madariaga, Rudolph Altrocchi, and Will H. Hays. With the further growth of the University at Los Angeles, student activities have increased in num- ber and scope. Following registration, the Associ- ated Women ' s Students entertained the entering women at an orientation luncheon, while the very successful counseling system instigated by Bill Ackerman, graduate manager, continued through- out the first week of school. Climaxing the orienta- tions program, President and Mrs. Sproul greeted all new students at a reception and dance. On October 30th, the day preceding the Stanford game, the annual Homecoming celebration oc- curred, featuring a colorful parade through the streets of Westwood Village with floats from every organization on campus. That night, after a huge bonfire on the athletic field, one of the largest All-U dances took place in the Men ' s Gymnasium. Great excitement preceded the first U. C. L. A.- U. S. C. football game in approximately twenty-five years. On Friday there was a giant rally and a torch parade in the Quad, besides an All-U dance in the Men ' s Gymnasium. Amid the numerous football rallies, the juniors celebrated their Junior Swing Prom, members of the Women ' s Athletic Associa- tion enjoyed a Sports Spread, and all university women took part in the Women ' s Hi Jinks, which was forbidden to men and took an entire night for its bizarre presentation. Immediately after the Thanksgiving vacation Phrateres held its initia- tion, and then joined with the A. W. S. in prepara- tion for the Christmas canned food drive, which closed with the Christmas dance. Following the spring recess with its pilgrimage to Balboa, the year closed with the eighteenth annual commencement. EXECUTIVE COM MITTEE Back Row: Young, Probstein, Farris. Campbell, Graves, Goodwin. Front Row: Smith, Davis, Shulte, Sandstrom, Hatfield, Fielder, Borden. BERT CAMPBELL Student Body President A CONSIDERABLE INCREASE in enrollment on the Davis campus this year made necessary many improvements in facilities. New members added to the faculty provided a broader system of education in lower division courses, while the new gymnasium and large tile swimming pool, com- pleted this year, improved the athletic equipment. An advancement in the standing of the school in all sports, particularly football, basketball, and boxing, the three major sports at the College of Agriculture, was evident. The fact that the National Intercollegiate Boxing Tournament was brought to Sacramento by men of this institution was illustrative of the recognition granted the College at Davis. Extra-curricular activities are prominent in campus life at Davis. Most of the large divisions of the college have ac- tive and representative clubs such as the Golden Hoof Club, Blue and Gold Dairy Club, and Horticulture Round Table. Publications also hold an important place on the campus. The weekly newspaper, " The California Aggie " , describes the current activities of the student body, and a yearbook, " El Rodeo, " sums up the year pictorially. On " Picnic Day, " which occurred late in April, the stu- dent body played host to nearly ten thousand visitors, alumni, parents, and high school students. With the continuous increase in the number of students and corresponding improvements in campus facilities, the Davis branch of the College of Agriculture has kept pace with the developments at the other campuses of the university. ROBERT FERRIS Student Body Vice-president 40 LH UML 1 illiilllll 33 iniii 11 I ilillCEBRIBHfl If I Hi U 33 JJ J I I III I J.I.IJ ! " DR. H. B. CAREY EUGENE SBARBARO Dean Student Body President College of Pharmacy College of Pharmacy WITH THE FIRST group of four-year students completing and successfully establishing the advanced curriculum, the College of Pharmacy has gained prominence among the Medical Center units. Accordingly, many improvements, new laboratories, equipment, and instruction methods took place under the direction of Dean H. B. Carey, whose sud- den passing occurred in February. Dr. Carey had been with the college for 30 years, acceding to the deanship in 1931. Under Eugene L. Sbarbaro, student body president, the Pharmacy School sponsored a " Big Game " rally, Junior Prom, and a Senior formal which attracted considerable attention among Medical Center students. MISS TRACY LUCILLE LANGER Director Student Body President School of Nursing School of Nursing DIRECTED BY MISS TRACY, a leader in nursing educa- tion, the School of Nursing has now become one of the most progressive schools in the west. In addition to a three-year certificate in nursing, the students may now obtain the de- gree of bachelor of science for a five-year course in public health and administration. The student nurse has at her disposal the hospital, clinic, medical library and instruction by doctors and professors of known merit. The student body ' s social activities included seasonal sports, glee club events, a fall formal, a Christmas party, and a spring informal. Students receiving instruction in nursing and pharmacy classes I I I 1 n i n I fi i n n i n n Ill 19 II m lid 111 III III III IN AUGUST, 1936, Dr. William McKin Marriott became dean of the Medical School, replacing Dr. Langley Porter. Dr. Marriott, formerly dean at Washington University, was well known in the fields of medical education, pediatrics, and nutrition. On November 12, 1936, Dr. Marriott passed away and Dr. Porter once more assumed the duties of dean. The nature of medical studies allows little time for stu- dent body activities. Nevertheless, Brooks Pringle, student body president, promoted an inter-class dance, a banquet, and an open house the day before the Big Game to honor 13,000 alumni. DR. LANGLEY PORTER BROOKS PRINGLE Dun Student Body President Medical School Medical School THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY under Dr. Millberry has done much to further the science of dentistry through re- search conducted by chairmen of the various divisions of the college. In accordance with this policy of research Presi- dent Sproul granted the faculty one week ' s leave so that they might attend the American Dental Association conven- tion held in San Francisco in July. This enabled the in- structors to confer with dentists from the entire country, to attend clinics on new techniques, and to learn of new dental developments. A scientific exhibit from all colleges on the Medical Center Campus attracted much attention and indi- cated the progressive work being done by these institutions. DR. GUYS. MILLBERRY WILLIAM F. WILSON Dean Student Body President College of Dentistry College of Dentistry Students in medical and dental laboratories HASTINGS AND SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS HASTINGS COLLEGE of the Law is located in the State Building in Civic Center, San Francisco. Created in 1878 by an act of the state legislature, it was the first law institution established on the Pacific Coast. The instructors are all practicing attorneys and the students are taught not only the theoretical and historical aspects of law, but also practical methods. A large number of the students are employed in attorneys ' offices, thus learning the routine work which is essential to actual practice. The Student Body operated this year under a new constitution which placed the disciplinary con- trol of the school in the hands of a Student Welfare Committee composed of a representative of each class and the student body president. This judicial body exercised all powers connected with student discipline including those of investigation and of recommendation to the faculty. THROUGHOUT ITS 63 years of existence, the California School of Fine Arts has been prominent, but recent public spirited activities have engendered a new feeling of creative enthusiasm and respon- sibility in student artists. Inspired by this new national consciousness of art, many students are doing original and interesting work such as the many drawings of the Bay Bridge during the process of its construction which one student made at great danger to her life. Members of the faculty working on important commissions in California and in the East are: Victor Arnautoff and Ralph Stackpole, who recently completed frescoes in the George Washington High School in San Francisco besides cooperating in the decoration of the Anne Bremer Memorial Library; and Maurice Sterne, who is doing work on the Library in the new Federal Building at Washington, D. C., and a piece of sculpture for the city of Philadelphia. Several scholarships were added this year to those previously available to students, including the James D. Phelan Foreign Traveling Scholarship first won by Miss Helen Phillips. RIVERSIDE AND LICK OBSERVATORY A PROGRAM OF research on subtropical horticulture in general and on citrus fruits in particular is the work of the Riverside Experiment Station. A staff of fifty workers is maintained in the research division whose work is concerned with problems of importance to horticulture, with special regard to those relating to Southern California. Although there are opportunities for graduate study in certain fields, no formal instruc- tion is offered. A valuable aid to the citrus industry, the use of nitrogen trichloride gas for the preservation of oranges in storage or in shipping was recently developed at Riverside. This treatment is now being used by many of the California packing houses. WITH A COMPARATIVELY small staff, Lick Ob- servatory, as a research center, has maintained a distinguished place among the world ' s leading astro- nomical institutions during the forty-eight years of its existence. Assisted by the Lick Fellowships, most of the grad- uate students in astronomy spend their final semesters at Mount Hamilton to complete the research require- ments for the doctor ' s degree. As far as its facilities permit the observatory also offers these benefits to less advanced students during their vacations. That this phase of the observatory ' s activities has been success- ful is indicated by the fact that one-fourth of the astro- nomical membership in the National Academy of Sciences was trained by this University. SCRIPPS INSTITUTION AND KELLOGG RANCH FROM A SEA-SIDE station founded at La Jolla in 1897, the Scripps Institute of Oceanography has become one of the most important marine research institutions in the world, being best known in foreign countries where oceanography is a necessity. The Institute not only collects and observes sea life; it also cooperates with the U. S. Navy, the Coast and Geodetic Survey, the Fishery Commissions, Navigation companies and enterprising individuals in the important task of studying oceanography in all its aspects. Through this unit the University enlarges the body knowledge of the " other two thirds of the world " : the ocean, its inhabitants, and its relation to man. THE W. K. KELLOGG Institute of Animal Husbandry at Pomona is an outgrowth of the Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch. The name was changed and certain research work inaugu- rated when Mr. Kellogg presented the ranch and an endowment of $600,000 to the Uni- versity in 1932. The purpose of the institute is twofold: to provide and preserve a high quality of breed for the stables of America and to improve the Arabian horse. Extending over 750 acres it i s well equipped with every modern convenience and has more than eighty horses. Many of these came from the Crabbett Stud in England, and are en- tered in the thoroughbred stud books of Eng- land and America. Registered with the Amer- ican Arabian Horse Club, the ranch is rapidly attaining a high reputation. A Kellogg Pasture UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL EACH YEAR a large group of graduate students from the University of California engages in teaching under supervision at the Uni- versity High School, in order to fit themselves for service in the public schools of the state. University High School was founded 1914, largely through the efforts of Professor Charles E. Rugh. It is one of the public high schools of Oakland, allied to the University through its teacher- training program. University High School is widely known for its long established student-body government, which gives the students their full share in the administration of the sc hool; for its advanced practices in curricu- lar organization; and for the excellent records made by its graduates. While it is not an experimental school, it was accepted in 1934 to repre- sent California in a group of schools sponsored by the Progressive Edu- cation Association; in accordance with the terms of the Association ' s agreement with the leading universities of the country, University High School is given freedom to alter its curricular organization, with the understanding that its graduates will be accepted in these universities upon the principal ' s recommendation, even if they have not fulfilled specific entrance requirements. Through its share in the University ' s program for the professional education of teachers, University High School has aided the University of California in one of the latter ' s most important services to the state, the preparation of teachers for service in the state ' s high schools and elementary schools. Chemistry laboratory being conducted by a student teacher. DR. MARION BROWN Vice-Principal OR. CLINTON CONRAD Vice-Principal PAUL FLEMING Vice- Principal DR. GEORGE A. RICE Principal H RALPH T. FISHER President of the California Alumni Association ROBERT SIBLEY Eiecutive Manager of the California Alumni Association Left to moureux, Swim, nHm, Kirt- land, Calkins, Sihley, Fisher (pres- ident). Mott. Sclfin, Barbat, Nichols, Masser, Henck. Thompson. WHAT WILL BE the destiny of individual members of the Class of 1937? How will they live, what will they do? These questions can be answered by the California Alumni Association on the basis of statistics about the University of California graduates that have been accumulated for many years. The average alumnus of the University earns $4700.00 per year, but fluctuates between two and three thousand dollars until he reaches thirty-six years of age. The graduating senior has a fifty-fifty chance of owning his own home, which will be valued on the average of $10,000.00. Almost every mem- ber will own a radio, and 91% will drive thair own automobiles approximately eleven hundred miles a month. Twenty-five per cent will take a foreign trip each year. These are just a few of the facts the Alumni Association knows about its members ... an in- dication of the thoroughness with which the problems of alumni service are under- taken. As a result of the Association ' s recent activity in publishing " The Golden Book of California " , it has now attained a membership in excess of 22,500 graduates and for- mer students of the University. It sponsors a large range of activities, which include the publication of the California Monthly, which has been awarded prizes for its work by the American Alumni Association annually for the last five years; the maintenance 50 ; Row: McNcill, Emery, Watt. Pettitt. Front Row: Brockhagen. Holfarook. Sibley (editor), Kuthnt, Calkins. FREDERICK R. BROCKHAGEN Editor of the California Monthly of more than seventy annual freshman scholar- ships; support of the University radio broadcasts; promotion of literally hundreds of alumni meet- ings from Berkeley to Bombay; active assistance to the University in the legislative and public re- lations problems; maintenance of the Bureau of Occupations, and a host of other activities. The most important development in the Alumni Association work during the past year was its contribution to University unity by com- mencing the unification of the various separate alumni groups. For the first time in the history of the University, the Presidents of affiliated alumni groups, such as the University of Cali- fornia at Los Angeles, the College of Agriculture at Davis, the College of Medicine, the College of Pharmacy, and the School of Nursing met in con- ference with the Central Council of the Alumni Association to discuss a unified alumni body. A system of representation with these various groups on the Central Alumni Council is being planned, and a closer relationship between the Berkeley and Los Angeles groups is expected to be the outcome. Of importance too is establishment throughout the State of three regional alumni councils, with local autonomy, and the provisions for five simi- lar groups. In Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego permanent organizations have been estab- lished with local jurisdiction that will send ex- officio representatives to the Central Council. It is expected that this new activity will have far- reaching effects and that it will offer to alumni away from the campus greater opportunity of participating in University affairs. Dr. Matt E. Hazeltine. president of the class of ' 16, presents President Robert Gordon Sproul with a tins lift of $25.000. at the twentieth birthday reunion of Ike clan. VERA CHRISTIE Manager of the Bureau of Occupations Left to Right: Nelson, Van Every, Christie (Chairman), Sanford. THE OUTSTANDING accomplishment of the Bureau of Occupations during the past year was the presentation of Vocational Conferences for students and younger alumni. The Conferences represented part of the greater effort expended to assist undergraduates in selecting their vocations and in their technique in applying for a position. Three were dinner meetings and the fourth was held in Wheeler Auditorium and was opened to the public. Among the topics discussed by the speakers, all business leaders, were : The Univer- sity Graduate and the Job Market, Selling and Sales Management, The Field of Advertising, and Government Service. Student and alumni placements in the aca- demic year surpassed the placements of the peak year 1928-29. Over 900 alumni were placed dur- ing the year in full time positions and 7,525 part- time jobs were found for students. Due to the fact that more students secured summer employ- ment and some parents were able to increase allowances, a somewhat smaller percentage of the student body found it necessary to apply to the Bureau for employment. Approximately thirty- five per cent of the student body applied to the Bureau for part-time employment during the year as contrasted with forty per cent of the 1935-36 registration. During the Alumni membership campaign hundreds of alumni throughout the state volun- tarily expressed their appreciation of the assist- ance given them by the Bureau of Occupations either during their undergraduate years as self- supporting students or as young graduates eager to get their start in business and professional life. 52 Students Making Application For Employment STUDENT LIFE A student ' s life is one of constant learning. Concurrently we learn the lessons of the classroom and experien ce the situations arising from associa- tions with many types of people. Our miniature world called the Campus has all the problems known to its larger counterpart; our citizens have their trials, bitter disappointments, and their triumphs. The democratic spirit of campus life helps preserve many of society ' s finest ideals. Student Life at California is democratic life, unaffected, sincere; with an attitude, not of worldly cynicism, but of eagerness and enthusiasm for the future and its problems. HENRY MORSE STEPHENS m n 54 I Students in Engineering get together over a problem set; Mr. Williams emphasizes a theory by actual demonstration; Professor Kerner entertains with an anecdote; Architecture students rest after a difficult plate. Practical experience in mining; Lehman on the novel; the mysteries of Chemistry; Grady lectures to 190. [White develones force equations: graduates in librarianshin: Hinds answers question, after lecture; the Academic Senate in session. FVl surrounded by chem equipment: a week-end trip for ge Ray explains Poll Sci students; the Academic Senate, presided orer by President Sp Hildebrand in Chcm 1A. California spirit sows at impromptu Telegraph Avenue rally, joint U. C. L. A. rally and at Women ' s Big Game Rally. Archil Williams Is welcomed home hem his Olympic ilctory at a special step rally. " " " --.. Top: The Freshman Rally. Bottom: Rally at station tor Washington Bear rooters fin rarsity last cheer before Oregon State game. Ed and Willie. i i i I J i ' 8 ' ' ' THE ADVANTAGES af- forded bay city commuters by the new bridge which relegated the San Fran- cisco Bay ferry boats to a position of secondary im- portance justify its erec- tion. But those who enjoyed the leisurely passage which allowed time to scan the myriad lights of the city or watch the antics of the seagulls, may reject the speedier journey over the bridge. In its final analysis it is another instance of sacrifice of a romantic stu- dent tradition to progress. OF CAMPUS LIFE M Ht James W. Ford Dr. Rufus Matthew Jones The Chilean delegation THE AXE PROBABLY THE FIRST great event in the baseball history of the University was the stealing of the Stanford Axe, famous symbol of the rivalry between California and Stanford. Having lost the first game of the California-Stanford baseball series of 1899, and feeling the need of something to bolster their spirit, the Indians procured a large axe to give reality to their yell of " Give ' em the Axe, " which they had originated in 1896. The Stanford rooters brought the Axe to the field before the second game of the series, played at 16th and Folsom Streets in San Francisco on April 15, 1899, and paraded it in front of the California rooters before taking it to the bleachers behind first base where they celebrated each successful Stanford play or Cali- fornia miscue by chopping Blue and Gold ribbons to bits. After the game, which was won by California 9-7, California men set upon the custodians of the trophy, Clint Miller grabbing the Axe and passing it to William Drum. An exciting chase through the streets of San Francisco followed before the Calif ornians were able to get away with the prize. In order to make the Axe less conspicuous, the handle was cut off in a butcher shop near Golden Gate Park. A California man easily hid the Axe in this shape under his coat, and, in company with a co-ed, passed through the heavy guard of Stanford men and policemen sur- rounding the Ferry building, and brought the prize safely to Berkeley. After the Axe had been brought to the California campus, Stanford men made several raids to recover the trophy, b ut due to the vigilance of the California students they were unsuccessful. The Californians, not knowing what to do with the trophy, were going to return it to Stanford when a committee composed of Professors Richardson and Green of Stanford, and Edwards and Bacon of California decided that it had been fairly captured by California students and that it should be kept by them. When the Axe had been awarded to California, it was placed in a vault and only brought out on the occasion of an Axe rally. At each of these Axe rallies the trophy was turned over to its new custodian, always a baseball man, who had charge of it for the next year. For the first few years after the capture of the Axe, the entire University accompanied the custodian to the bank to prevent any theft of the trophy. Gradually this custom faded out and just the Freshman Class went with the custodian to guard the Axe. Finally even the Frosh stopped guarding the trophy, and the Rally Committee took up the task. On April 3, 1930, Walter Wyatt brought the Axe to the rally in an armored car and turned it over to Norman Horner, who was to be custodian for the ensuing year. Following the rally only a few students accompanied Horner as he returned to the bank with the trophy, the others having gone to a dance after the rally. As Horner got out of the armored car, he was jumped upon by several Stanford men who had stolen rally hats at the Big Game the year before and who had mingled with the crowd as committee men. As soon as the prize was snatched from Horner, a tear gas bomb was thrown, and flash bulbs were set off to confuse any pursuers; and before the Californians could recover, the Axe had been taken to a waiting car and whisked out of sight. Although the entire California Student Body tried all the rest of the night and the next day to recover it, they were unsuccessf ul and the Axe remained in a Palo Alto bank vault until, by agreement of the two schools, it was put up as a football trophy in 1934. 69 INTEREST IN snow sports at the University has increased by leaps and bounds as it has all over the state. Much credit for developing enthusi- asm over skiing is due to the work of the U. C. Winter Sports Club. The Club, through the gen- erous cooperation of the Sierra Club has pro- vided trips to the Norden Lodge at very low cost mid presented programs on skiing. Left: Professor Mon Commander Alford Vernon Johnson Professor Ira B. Professor Strong Right: Professor MacDonald General Barrows Professor Adams Professor Daggett 1ISSMI THE STUDENT ' S LIFE IS ONE OF CONSTANT ACTIVITY STUDENT oisnw " IVNQ SMOi d GOVERNMENT ?iN3MiNioddd s wol 1i:)N noo NOU.VOUS3ANI u t OEBflTE SCHEDULE RECOMMENDATION: FOR BIG C AWARDS 5EMIOR WEEK conniiTEE Pau l Hastings BM n..na C.mpt.n 6rims 76 AS THE LEGISLATIVE and administrative body of the Asso- ciated Students, the Executive Committee supervises and directs the policies, affairs, and properties of the student body. In con- ducting its business, the policy of the group is to operate the Association efficiently with changes in its organization and con- stitution only when new conditions in the University warrant them. The Committee is composed of fifteen members including the student body officers, a member of the Academic Senate, an alumnus of the University, and representatives from each of the seven activity councils. Authorizing expenditures, levying fees and assessments, appointing executive A.S.U.C. officers and em- ployees, and granting letters and awards constitute the general phases of business of the Committee. Controversial matters are referred to appropriate councils before coming to the Executive Committee for final approval. Jack Brubaker Will " 1 Turner i ' Cluster Carlul. P.tt,, DURING THE PAST YEAR several changes have been effected by the committee in student organization and activities. The administration of Stephens Union was transferred from an alumni committee to the A.S.U.C. by President Sproul. With the permission of the administration, the council took over the an- nual peace meeting in an effort, with the aid of interested groups, to remove the controversy and ill-feeling of the past. Changes were made in the eligibility rules in regard to partici- pation in A.S.U.C. activities and administration, setting up a " C " average requirement for senior appointments and elective posi- tions and an average above probation for work on any activity. Another revision delegated the Student Loan Fund adminis- tration to a sub-committee of the Executive Committee, with its funds to be gathered from proceeds of dances and programs rather than by solicitation. FINANCE COMMITTEE Back Row: Putnam, Priestley, Charvet (Chairman), Nichols. Front Row: Appleby, Cunningham, Freyer. KENNETH PRIESTLEY General Manager of the A.S.U.C. GRADUATE MANAGERS Back Row: Davis, Priestley, Fischer, Penry, Frederick. Front Row: Clarke, Abrams, Bumstead, Catoire. BUSINESS AD MINISTRATION UNDER A NEW graduate manager, Kenneth Priestley, the business administration of the Associated Students has continued this year to operate on a sound financial basis. Regulat- ing the finances of the A.S.U.C. with an end to providing a wide range of activities for the students has been the aim of Priestly and his departmental graduate managers. Notable among their activities this year was the reconstruction of Stephens Union, com- pleted in the spring semester. At an expense of $100,000 the Union now conforms with pres- ent day building standards, and provides, among other things, more adequate diniiig- room facilities. The A.S.U.C. debt, incurred by the building of Edwards Field for track and baseball, was reduced during the past year, due to increased membership in the A.S.U.C. and larger at- tendance at student body functions. 78 Back R: ShimidM. Rygel. Cook. Hastings, Jones, Rubin. Second Row: Watkins. Neilson, Knowles. Tlumion. Honer, Firestone, Garvin. First Row: Jensen. Nazro, Christiansen, Crouse, Phillips, Johnston, Reed. WELFARE COUNCIL IN COOPERATION WITH the A. S. U. C., the Welfare Council, under G. Milton Crouse, carried on investigations for the better- ment of conditions on the campus, functioning whenever student opinion deemed examination important. Among its activities was the Council ' s investigation into stu- dent working conditions which involved the formation of a stu- dent-faculty committee to act as an arbitration board between students and employers. This group was instrumental in several cases in having salaries raised and hours shortened. COVERING A VARIED program of jictivities the Deputations Committee represents organized stuorrt_ejfi r t8 toward publiciz- ing the University. In the fall semesfcl, the speaking committee appeared before 55,000 California high school students, and em- phasized the value of higher education. The other committees include transportation, entertainment ferv R news, and visita- tions. James Aschoff ser sub-chairman. as chairman, Lucile Elvin as DEPUTATIONS Back Row: Simonson. Neville. Byers. Pitman, Golden, Aschoff, Wingefeld. Barber. Breck, Erickson, Young. Second Row: Goemmer, Kennedy, Gaston, Newton, Pauli, Norton, Chapman, Thornton, Fleming, Allen, Livingston. First Row: Sinnott. O ' Neal, ' Slate. Wenzel, Lucas. Street. Turman. Goble, Muller. Muller, Elvin. Back Row: Wiybur. Johnson, M., Kent, Johnson, S. Front Row: Price, McNamara (Chairman), Goodwin, Lewis. ROBERT MCNAMARA Chairman of Men ' s Judicial Committee JANET EVANS AMES Chairman of Women ' s Judicial Committee Back Row: Retd, Noack, Shaeffer, Bagley. Front Row: Cunningham. Ames, Booth, Meiklejohn. MEN ' S JUDICIAL COMMITTEE WOMEN ' S JUDICIAL COMMITTEE FUNCTIONING FOR the purpose of settling stu- dent problems in general, the Men ' s Judicial Com- mittee has a wide scope of duties, ranging from the handling of theft cases to the investigation of cam- pus publications. Chief among its activities during the past year has been its jurisdiction over cheating cases, involving a thorough examination into the present Honor Sys- tem. Upon the recommendation of the University Committee on Conduct in Examinations, changes were made in the examination system heretofore employed by the University, in an effort to make student behavior more reliable. The modification places sole responsibility for orderly conduct in midterms and finals upon the professors and their assistants. Need for the regulation of campus football fervor was forcibly brought home to the Committee in its dealings with overly enthusiastic Bear rooters dur- ing the fall semester, and steps were taken to pre- vent similar future misdemeanors. The Committee, composed of three juniors and six seniors, was headed by Robert McNamara. 80 THE WOMEN ' S Judicial Committee, an outgrowth of the Women ' s Student Affairs Committee, formed several years ago as a unit of student government, functions as a disciplinary body. Its main duty in- cludes hearing and passing judgments on cases of dishonesty in examinations and violation of univer- sity rules. The group is composed of three juniors and six seniors, appointed for one year by the President of the University upon the recom mendation of the student body president. Junior members are al- lowed to vote on cases only after their first semester on the council. All decisions are subject to the ap- proval of the Dean of Women and President Sproul, with penalties ranging from simple censure and full censure, to suspension and expulsion. Working together towards a common end, the Men ' s and Women ' s Judicial Committees provide an investigating as well as a disciplinary committee in the University. Janet Ames was chairman of the women ' s com- mittee for the fall semester, and Hallie Booth headed it in the spring. Back Row: Compton, Cohn. Post. Front Row: Meikltjokn. Eldinoft, Hawkins. LESTER R. DRAY Fall Chairman of Honor Students ' Council JOHN E. LINDBERG Spring Chairman of Honor Students ' Council ri.M Back Row: Einarsson, Blum, Llndberg. Burnham, Beard, Aller. Front Row: Fenn. Fitzsimmons, Bowman, Sapiro, Bissell. Mullen, Dray. HONOR STUDENTS ' COUNCIL OPEN FORUM BOARD ACTING AS EXECUTIVE body of the honor stu- dents of the University, the Honor Students ' Coun- cil formulates the policies, outlines the functions, and appoints the committees of that group. Of sig- nificance this year has been the council ' s resolution of dissatisfaction with the existing examination system. The chief functions of the council include the helping of new students in the University, entertain- ing freshmen who have been Seal Bearers in high school, and endeavoring to secure the best faculty advisors for both upper and lower division classmen. The honor students are brought into contact with each other through discussions, picnics, luncheons, and " Nite Life " parties .held once a month. John Lindberg was president of the Honor Stu- dents ' Council; Lorna Mullen was sub-chairman of this group and head of the Students ' Advisory Bu- reau. The latter group aids University students who are having difficulty with their studies. During the past year, the Bureau gave tutelage to over 150 students. THE OPEN FORUM BOARD functions as a plan- ning unit of discussion groups for student body and faculty members, encouraging spontaneous or or- ganized debate on vital problems. Meeting when- ever debatable topics presented themselves, the Board sponsored discussions on topics including the N. Y. A., the Supreme Court question, the A. S. U. C. presidential elections, and the national presidential election. The latter was discussed at an organized symposium, with a speaker to represent each political party. The Board is composed of the A. S. U. C. presi- dent and the Forensics Commissioner, who are ex- officio members; two members elected from the floor; and three appointed by those already serving on the Board. Members for the fall semester were Reynold Cohn, Sol Eidinoff, Wen del a Hawkins, Charles Post, and Ann Meiklejohn. In the spring semester James Doyle, Robert Moon, Borden Price, Joseph Schoeninger, and Jean Seville composed the board. Leonard Charvet and Ray Compton acted in their capacity of ex-officio members each semester. 81 IT AT S =s SS a -sa i . fludyaMi?. 011 ,, , ,,, ' PPer a rl% iB oi, 1 ' J _ 9 ' . r Hi sv f sgRg fiituS Engineer " ; y , ' . a d an ce u, g ' -n 1 LfltglZ .! C W lfi I. _ 1 1 Sj g 82 V, " ,01S 810H .eteoce i the comj i mp 8 electi Vf C Election I )V)d v ntv t,l -f tl G svw 1 tAjOlK 1 i O - radio talent Action- orde r to - ot coi-- ' s s sss : Y. M. C. A, Max Radin speaks for the Student-Faculty hour. V. M. C. A. CABINET Back Riw: Luell, Taylor. Brown, Chamberlain, Lapp, Collins, Poston. Second Row: Berry, Morris, Clyde, Burns, Ornellas, Poole, Wright. Front Row: Waybur, Price, Voth, Pestana, Hershey, Graves, Akamatsii. STILES HALL, the University Y| PHHi% l $o a lilx ral and democratic fellowship of students and famll meinl ei . Its purpose it- to supplement I conferences, and social service the educational program of tlie I and aid men to achie e their highest potential de elopnient lit personality and to groi mental and spiritual insight. In the field of social li n the ' in the envisaging and building of Policies are determined by a student cabinet of thirty men guided by an occasional poll of the entire participating membership. All men students irrespective of race, creed or class are welcomed without fee. IN PASSING THE nine thousand mark on the Eshleman court thermometer, more student body cards were sold this year than ever before in the history of the A. S. U. C. Jack Appleby, chairman, stimulated interest in the sales by competition within the committee, contests among houses, and a raffle. 84 JACK APPLEBY Chairman KAY THOMSON Sub-Chairman Back Row: Peck, Irving, Appleby, Chairman; Lavenson, Merritt, Kushlda, Hallsted, Lindsay. Lynch. Fifth Row: Fleming, Komatsu, Kilgore, Newman, Edgemond, Robinson, Savlnar, Rocca. Fourth Row: Thomson, Valente, Lake, Todrank, MacKay, Parrish, Flnlay. Elder. Third Row: Godt, Johnson, Perrine, Hodgkln, Hand, Fullmer, Hauri, Wood. Second Row: Shilling, Gibb. Pleratt, Wolfe, Stuch- berry, Kurtz, Smith, Van Hovenberg, Resner. Front Row: Shneyeroff, Mahoney, Feineman, Malone, Grekoff, Damon. Phillls, Rogers. Ward. Elston. CARD SALES COMMITTEE MIXER DANCE COMMITTEE Left to Right: Minion. Heml. Goss. MM, Cuiarc STRAPS OF I ' D I iiion eacli Tlmr an af tori ioi it i " - r acquaintance - in Throughout f [LAR dance music cmunatftg from tIA Women ' s Club rooms of Stephens afternoon gave evidence ol llie iui r dances. In addition to providing tlou. tliese dances have i H l the opportunity for making new rVai _ Bspring se iejjler. when JiTephqipagSil iM ' as under reconstruction, the mix- ers were " Veld " in the auditorium of the International House. A committee of six students, headed by Donald Caziarc, supervised the affairs. Under Stan Stebbins, Saturday night mixer dances were held, marking a successful expansion of the mixer idea. SATURDAY NIGHT ASSEMBLY dances sponsored by the University and its Mothers ' Club have continued in popularity during the past year. Music was furnished at these functions by Jack Buckingham ' s orchestra. Door prizes, donated by Berkeley merchants, and danc- ing classes and contests added interest in the dances. Julian Wagenet headed the committee, and Elinor Briggs was sub-chairman. Bick Row: Saunders, Williams, Wagenet. Esther, Stebbins, Nelson, Cayet. Third Row: Hurst, Morrison, Kirk, Vickman. Howe, Klute. Second Row: Briggs, Keenan, Parks, Pieratt, Gardner, Hodges. Front Row: Dally, Ungaretti, Callan. Millet, Heinl, Miller. ASSEMBLY DANCE COMMITTEE DON CAZIARC Chairman of Mixer Dance Committee MARK MANION Chairman of Assembly Dance Committee 85 CO CO CO AS THE YEAR 1937 drew to a close, the senior class became conspicuous for its spirit of unity and organization. Perhaps not such a high peak of enthusiasm would have been reached if the difficulty of surmounting earlier obstacles had not helped the class to gain a greater knowledge of how to work together. In- difference on the part of individual members and financial defi- cits were the prevalent difficulties met and overcome. During its freshman year the class of ' 37 was led by Ross Law- rence, President; Elizabeth Rushforth, Vice-President; Ogden Kiesel, Secretary; and John Schroeter, Yell Leader. The Mardi Gras dance began its social season, and in the spring it joined with the sophomore class to give the first dance of that semester. Later on, the Freshie Glee was held in San Francisco. Both as freshmen and sophomores, the Class of ' 37 lost the traditional Brawl, although a modified type of hazing was estab- lished, giving a new spirit to the class. In October the Sopho- more Hop occurred, the next major event being Labor Day in the spring semester. The class officers were: Vernon Goodin, President; Ann Gould, Vice-President ; Stuart McClure, Secre- tary-Treasurer; and Edward Freyer, Yell Leader. _ ...... - 88 During the Junior year the class officers, Willard Goodwin, President; Martha Crew, Vice-President ; Donald Woodrum, Sec- retary-Treasurer; and Edward Freyer, Yell Leader, succeeded in putting the class finances on a sound basis. A " Hello California " dance opened the first semester, followed by the annual Junior Day in October. The spring semester included the Informal and the Boat Ride. Marking the first social function of the senior year, the Senior Informal was held in November at the St. Francis Hotel. Seniors had the opportunity of being the first class to travel over the Bay Bridge to their annual fall gathering. In the week preceding the dance, fashions appropriate for the occasion were modeled at the Senior Women ' s Luncheon. Senior Singings took place in both fall and spring semesters, and here definite plans and poli- cies of the class were organized under Jack Pettis, President; Jean Haven, Vice-President; Matt Conolly, Secretary-Treasurer; and Howard Alderson, Yell Leader. In March the Seniors held their second Informal as an introduction to Senior Week. The theme of this seven day event pictured college life as commonly bur- lesqued by moving pictures and cheap literature rather than the true four years spent in these University surroundings by the members of the class of ' 37. 89 GORDIE LEE JACK APPLEBY WILLIE GOODWIN BILL TURNER VERN GOODIN SENIOR HALL (0 OF FAME AUDREY STARR MARY MARGARET SIMON IRENE CHRISTIANSEN NENA DOUGLASS MARY RUTH MCLAUGHLIN Marie Phillips Jack Brubaker Barbara Eames Geome Lawrence Esther Simpson Ray Balsley Ray Campion Frank Pestana . Boh McNamara Janet Evans Ames 6. Milton Croust Ann Meikleiohn Frank Mitchell Isabelle Prisms r Bill Eng.ick I Prry Beeson BOB LAWS DONNA REID MILDRED CALDWELL CHARLES POST JIM DOYLE SENIOR HALL OF FAME PHIL PIERPONT PEGGY PRAY BILL HEWITT HALLIE BOOTH STEVE ROGERS UP TRADITIONAL SINCE the days of Benjamin Ide Wheeler, the Senior Singings this year proved un- usually successful in providing opportunities for informal discussions of class affairs and problems, as well as affording several evenings of light enter- tainment, singing, and dancing. At the first Singings, held on September 17, two skits were given for the women by members of Little Theatre. After some community singing led by Ed Freyer, an informal debate was held between Dick Rathbun and Reynold Cohn on the subject, " Resolved, That Women Should Pay Half the Expenses on Social Engagements, " but no official decision was reached. Stub Allison outlined the prospects of the football team to the men at their meeting. The raising of funds for the improvement of Senior Women ' s Hall by a candy sale, and plans for the Senior Women ' s Luncheon were discussed on October 29, at the women ' s meeting of the second Senior Singings. Alden McClelland provided the Women discuss clot problems; dance follows men ' s and women ' s Singings; Janus Fisner.Nortbrup. Bill Craig, and Esthtr Simpson entertain at first Women ' s Singings: President Jack Pettls leads Senior Week discussion at joint Singings. Ed Freyer leads songs; btll from Old North Hall Is rung by Robert Slbley who told of California traditions and of past Senior Weeks; men sing old California songs at first men ' s Singings. evening ' s entertainment by singing popular gongs to his own accompaniment. Assistant Coach Frank Wickhorst was present at the men ' s sing- ings to show pictures of the 1935 Washington game, and later, arrangements were made for the Senior Informal. The only joint singing of the year was held on February 4, at which Jack Pettis, class president, announced Senior Week chairmen. Motion pic- tures of the 1912 Senior Week, the first pictures ever taken of the event, were shown by Robert Sibley, besides pictures taken of the 1936 Senior Week. Relics which had been placed in the cor- nerstone of old North Hall were on display at the Singings along with the cornerstone itself and old North Hall bell. A dance featuring two orches- tras and uninterrupted dancing concluded the combined meeting. On April 8, at the last of the Singings, the women enjoyed a fashion show pre- viewing Senior Week fashions, after which def- inite plans for Senior Week were formulated. W ITH A l catnpu 8 ' ffl aret S " n : pl 01164 " 5-Joe College " . Wch Dr. -S= Wdlf swimming, riding, and golf in Marin County, the cele- brators of Senior Week joined in a gr and barbecue and informal dance. Thursday afternoon President and Mrs. Robert Gordon Sproul held a farewell reception at their home. After the Senior pilgrimage on Friday afternoon, ifty seniors took part in the prize winning extravaganza " My Kingdom For a Horse " by Louis Pinson and William Fenn. The last day included the commencement cere- monies in the Memorial Stadium and the final all-night Senior Ball held in San Francisco ' s Palace Hotel. Those seniors who looked forward with excitement to this cele- bration, as each succeeding class will do, now have mem- ories of fellowship and enjoyment which even time will find hard to efface. WILTON ROBERT ABBOTT San Jose Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from San Jose State lege; Eta Kappa Nu; American In- stitute of Electrical Engineers; Masonic Club. GRACIANO C. ABULOG Philippine Islands Letters and Science History Transfer from Mann Junior Col lege. ALDEN THORWALD AGE Los Angeles Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from I). C. L. A.; Amer- ican Society of Mechanical En- gineers: Masonic Club. JOSEPH JAMES ALBRECHT Marysille Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Yuba County Junior College; Baton; Newman Club; A. S. U. C. Band (3) (4); Intramu- ral Water Polo (2). BERGIE B. ALEXANDER Bakersfield Letters and Science Psychology. BRUCE FRANKLIN ALLEN Cupertino Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from San Jo:e State Col lege: Wrestling. THOMAS AXEL AMNEUS Oakland Engineering Civil Engineering Tau Beta Pi; American Society of Ciiil Engineers; Sigma Xi; Chi EpsilM. RAYMOND THEODORE ANDERSEN Oakland Utters and Science Economics. ROGER COWAN ANDERSON Oakland Letters and Science History Circle " C " Society; Fencino. 100 JAMES GRAHAM ABRAHAM Hollywood Engineering Mechanical Engineering. MARIAN ADAMS Berkeley Letters and Science History Alpha Xi Delta; Little Theatre (1)(2); Personnel (1)(2); Crop and Saddle (3X4); Counseling. VIRGINIA ANNE AHLSWEDE San Marino Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from Occidental College; International House; Delta Chi Alpha; Little Theatre Costume Staff. WILLIAM HOWARD ALDERSON Oakland Chemistry Chemistry Chi Pi Sigma; Rally Council; Class Yell Leader (4) ; Senior Peace Committee; Chemistry Club; Y.M. C. A. PENELOPE ALEXANDER Berkeley Commerce Business Administration Newman Club. DE WITT CLINTON ALLEN Vallejo Letters and Science Physics. A. ANDY ANDERSEN Los Angeles Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Los Angeles Junior College; Bowles Hall; Honor Stu- dent; Circle " C " Society; Pi Sigma Alpha; Varsity Wrestling; Y. M. C. A. ANDREW HARVEY ANDERSON Berkeley Mining Mining Engineering American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers; Mining Association. DAVID POWELL ANDROSS Yuba City Letters and Science Economics Phi Kappa Sigma: Blue and Gold (2X3); A. S. U. C. Band. PEARLANN ABREO San Jose Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from U. C. L. A. DOROTHY CLARA ADRIAN Escalon Letters and Science German Deutches Verein; W. A. A.; Tum- bling. BERTHA MASAKO AKIMOTO Stockton Letters and Science Zoology International House; Japanese Women Students Club. ELMER CLARE ALDRICH Oakland Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege. JANE LOUISE ALLARDT Fresno Letters and Science Household Art Chi Omega; Delta Chi Alpha; Guild of Applied Arts; Phrateres; Intramural Sports. MODESTE BRIGHT ALLOO Berkeley Letters and Science History Phi Kappa Sigma; Tennis (1) (3) (4); Debating. JAMES RUSSELL ANDERSEN La Mesa Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from San Diego State College; Tau Beta Pi; American Society of Mechanical Engineers. FRANCES RUTH ANDERSON Oakland Letters and Science Nursing Education Counseling. DORITA AGNES ANTHONY Sacramento Letters and Science History Transfer from Sacramento Junior College: Masonic Club. ROSE ELIZABETH ANTHONY Santa Cruz Letters and Science History Alpha Gamma Delta; Daily Cali- fornian (1X2) (3); Counseling; Women ' s Discussions (3) (4). PETER SHIGEKI AOKI Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Japanese Students Club BETTY ANN ARCHAMBEAULT Piedmont Letters and Science Art Chi Omega: Daily Californian; Counseling. WALTER WATSON ARMANTAGE Downey Letters and Science History La Maison Francaise; University Symphony Orchestra. ALEXIS NICKOLAIVITCH ASTAFUROFF San Francisco Letters and Science Public Health Intramural Basketball. TED C. ATWOOD Placerville Agri cul ture Forestry Alpha Delta Phi. YOZO BABA San Francisco Commerce Accounting Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Japanese Students Club. JAY DARWIN BACON, JR. Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Phi Beta Kappa; Scabbard and Blade. THOMAS PAIGE BAGLEY San Francisco Letters and Science Architecture Chi Alpha Kappa: Delta Sigma Chi. MARY R. ANTON San Francisco Letters and Science Nursing Education Transfer from University of New Mexico. JACK JESTINY APPLEBY Blythe Commerce Business Administration Bowles Hall; Glee Club: A. S. U. C. Finance Committee, Secretary; Senior Peace Committee; Basket- ball (1). ELLEN OLIVE ARCHIBALD Oakland Letters and Science Economics Community Service. ANNA JANE AOKI Sacramento Letters and Science Household Science Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Japanese Women Students Club; Alpha Nu. CHRISTY P. ARMSTRONG San Francisco Commerce Economics Beta Gamma Sigma. ELIZABETH ATKINS San Francisco Letters and Science Art Delta Epsilon; Elections Commit- tee. RICHARD BRUCE AUER San Francisco Agriculture Entomology Transfer from San Mateo Junior College. JEAN LOUISE BACKUS Altadena Letters and Science English Transfer from Pasadena Junior College; Occident, Business Man- ager (4). WILL IAM EDWIN BAECHTEL Willits Commerce Economics A. S. U. C. Band (1X2X3). BETTY ETHEL BAHMEER Berkeley Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Iowa State College; Counseling: Y. W. C. A. PATRICIA APPLETON Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Alpha Omicron Pi; Prytanean; Personnel (1X2); Blue and Gold (2 (3): Activities News Book (2); California Club; Women ' s Discussions (4); Class Commit- tees. HERMOGENES JORQUIA ARIGO Berkeley Letters and Science History International House; Tennis. R. KEITH ARNOLD Glendale Agriculture Forestry Xi Sigma Pi; Alpha Zeta. IRIS VENITA ATTERBURY Gerber Letters and Science Art Kappa Phi; W.A.A.; Y.W.C.A. ROBERT ABRAHAM AXELROD Berkeley Commerce Insurance. ALMIRA ELIZABETH BACON Berkeley Letters and Science Art Phi Delta; Orchesis. MERILYN OLIVE BAGLEY Red Bluff Letters and Science Spanish Women ' s " C " Society: Counsel- ing; W. A. A.: Student Affairs Committee: Phrateres. CAREL ELIZABETH BAILEY San Francisco Letters and Science Economics International House; W. A. A. 161 m WILLIAM JAMES BAIN, JR. San Francisco Commerce Accounting. FRANK C. BALBO, Oakland Commerce Finance Alpha Delta Sigma; Hammer Coffin; Pi Delta Epsilon; Peli (3). Manager (4); Daily Califor man (1X2); Publications cil (4); Fencing (1). ROBERT JONES BALL Piedmont Agriculture Forestry Alpha Zeta; Xi Sigma Pi; Forestry Club. RAYMOND IVEN BALSLEY Berkeley Letters and Scieni Physical Education Golden Bear; Big " C " Society; Basketball. LAWRENCE EDWARD BANKS Sacramento Letters and Science Zoology Masonic Club. CHARLES DAVID BARKER Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Phi Delta Theta; Skull and Keys Beta Beta; Senior Peace Commit- tee. JOHN REEVE BARNARD Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Transfer from St. Mary ' s College; Masonic Club. HOWARD JAY BARNEY Los Angeles Letters and Science Zoology Alpha Sigma Phi; Phi Phi; Tri une; Varsity Rowin Club; Crew BETH BEATRICE BARTENSTEIN Salinas Utters and Selene Economics Transfer from Salinas Junior Col mn ELELYA BRACKETT BAKER Berkeley Letters and Science History Phi Omega Pi; Little Theatre (1); Counseling (2) (3). LOUIS PETER BALDINI San Francisco Letters and Science Architecture Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Newman Club; Band (1) (2); Architecture Association (1) (2) (3) (4); International House. ROWLAND ELLIS BALL Long Beach Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; American Society of Me- chanical Engineers; Masonic Club. BARBARA BANDY Escondido Letters and Science- Household Art Transfer from Glendale Junior Col- lege; Delta Chi Alpha; Little The- atre Costume Committee (2) ; Junior Farce Costume Chairman (3). HARRY S. BARBER Pasadena Letters and Science Economics Zeta Psi; Golden Bear; Winged Helmet. WILLIAM BARKER Berkeley Engineering Aeronautics Transfer from Williams Junior College; Alpha Sigma Phi; Ameri- can Society of Mechanical Engi- neers; Football. BETTIE BARNES Duarte Letters and Science Art Transfer from Pasadena Junior College; Masonic Club. ETHEL BARON Berkeley Letters and Science French Pi Delta Phi. ALICE ERLE BARTER Arcata Letters and Science Bacteriology Transfer from Humboldt State College. MARY ELIZABETH BAKER Santa Rosa Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from Santa Rosa Junio College; Delta Delta Delta; Guili of Applied Arts; Phrateres. DONALD WESLEY BALDRA Oakland Letters and Science Zoology. BEVERLY LUCILLE BALLAGH Maricopa Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Pry tanean; Theta Sigma Phi; Adver tising Service Bureau, Assistan Manager (4); Women ' s Counselim (3), Executive Board (4); Groui System (4); Phrateres (3) (4) Y. W. C. A. (3); Class Commit tees. BARBARA GOULD BANGS Long Beach Letters and Science Physical Education and Hygien Transfer from Long Beach Junio College; Physical Education Ma jors Club; Phrateres. ROBERT EUGENE BARIEAU Fresno Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from Fresno State Col lege; Chi Pi Sigma; Pi Mu Epsilon YVONNE M. BARMETTER Healdsburg Letters and Science French Transfer from Santa Rosa Junio College; Maison Francaise; F Delta Phi. CHARLES BURTON BARNES Montrose Engineering Electrical Engineering Varsity Gymnastics. CLAIRE HELEN BARRICKS Petaluma Letters and Science Physical Education and Hygien International House; Phrateres; Y W. C. A.; W. A. A.; Intramura Sports; Physical Education Major Club. MARGUERITE ZELLA BARTH Washington Letters and Science Spanish La Casa Hispana; Sigma Delta Pi Pi Lambda Theta. WILLIAM EVRETT BARTHOLD San Francisco Agriculture Forestry Alpha Zeta; Xi Sigma Pi; Forestry Club, President. ROBERNA MAYBELLE BASSETT Fowler Letters and Science English Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege; Honor Student; Y. W. C. A. LEON D. BAUER Richmond Commerce Accounting. CLAUDINE JUNE BAYLESS Lincoln Letters and Science Household Science Guild of Applied Arts; Alpha Nu; Masonic Club; Dormitory Associa- tion. EDWIN T. BEAN San Francisco Commerce Accounting. Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Masonic Club; Soccer (3) (4). LESLIE JANIAH BECHAUD, JR. Berkeley Mining Metallurgy. FREDRICK EDWARD BECKERT Oakland Letters and Science Psychology. JOHN CRAIG BEECHLEY Oakland Commerce Economics Delta Tau Delta. CARLEEN JUANITA BEHRENS Petaluma Utters and Science English Transfer from Pomona College; Chi Omega; W. A. A. Fencing Manager. NOREEN BARTON Rodeo Letters and Science History A. S. U. C. Sales Committee (2) (3) (4); Class Committees. KENNETH HOFFMAN BATES Tuolumne Letters and Science Political Science Track (1). ELLWOOD PALMER BAXTER Salinas Letters and Science Mathematics Assembly Dance Committee (3). RUTH JUANITA BEACH Anaheim Letters and Science Spanish. MARY ELIZABETH BEARD Marysiille Letters and Science English Transfer from Yuba Junior College. ELSIE ELEANOR BASSETT San Francisco Letters and Science Public Speaking Alpha Gamma Delta. FRED BATKIN Dinuba Agriculture Agricultural Economics Alpha Kappa Lambda. 4. VIOLET DANE BECHELLI Oakland Letters and Science Physical Education W. A. A.; Newman Club; Italian Club; Physical Education Major ' s Club. STANLEY PRENTISS BEE Oakland Agriculture Forestry Forestry Club. HENRY FULLER BEEDE Antioch Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Stanford; Sigma Nu WINFRED L. BELL Berkeley Letters and Science Philosophy. OLA V. BAXTER San Diego Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from San Diego State College; Beta Phi Alpha; Interna- tional House (2) (3): Orchesis: Class Committees; Commerce As- soc iation: Crop and Saddle (2): Counseling. OLIVER HOWARD BEAHRS Pomona Letters and Science Zoology Theta Delta Chi; Deputations. SANFORD WILCOX BEATTIE Oakland Commerce Accounting Transfer from South Dakota State College; Scabbard and Blade; Commerce Association. RICHARD GEORGE BECK H anted Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from Fresno State College. JOHN DOUGLAS BEEBE Larkspur Agriculture Forestry Alpha Sigma Phi. f V ' iJ B ,;- P? PERRY EDWARD BEESON Healdshurg Letters and Science Economics Delta Upsilon; Golden Bear: Winged Helmet; Scabbard and Blade; Varsity Rowing Club; Football (1X2); Crew (1)(2) (3) (4). SALVATOR J. BENIDETTINO Los Banos Letters tot Science History Football (1)(2)(3). 103 mrnjl HARLO A. BENNETT, JR. Trinidad, Colorado Letters and Science Psychology Phi Gamma Delta; Big " C " So ciety; Skull and Keys; Beta Beta Football (1X2) (4); Rugby (2) JOSEPH HAROLD BERG Pasadena Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Luther College Senate; Debate. ARTHUR PAUL BERNHARD Bakersfield Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College: Kappa Delta Rko; A. S. U. C. Band; California Engineer: American Society of Civil Engi- PETER HENRY BERTOLA Maywood Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Los Angeles Junior College; American Society of Me- chanical Engineers; California En- gineer Editorial Staff. HELEN CLAYTON BIGGERSTAFF Berkeley Letters and Science English Alpha Phi; Torch and Shield; Ace of Clubs. DWIGHT C. BIRCH Madera Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Fresno State Junior College; Bowles Hall; Pre-Med Club. DOROTHY ANNE BISSELL Oakland Letters and Science History Sigma Kappa Alpha. MARIAN LUCILE BLEWITT Huntington Park Letters and Science English Transfer from Fullerton Junior College; International House; Honor Student, Women ' s Council: Varsity Debating; V. W. C. A. BLOSSER JOHN AVERY Bl Oakland Letters and Scienct Zoology Abracadabra: Phi Mi; Penning RhVs: Baton: A. S. U. C. Band: A. S. U. C. Saks Committee: Class Committees. 104 FRED A. BENTLEY Quincy Agriculture Forestry Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Kappa Sigma; Skull and Keys; Beta Beta. LIESELOTTE BERG Berkeley Letters and Science Music Y. W. C. A. ANITA JEANNE BERRY Berkeley Letters and Science Household Art Phi Omega Pi; Mortar Board; Pry- tanean: Hammer and Coffin; Guild of Applied Arts, President; Voca- tional Information Committee, Chairman. JAMES SANFORD BEST Berkeley Letters and Science Journalism Transfer from University of Idaho, Southern Branch; Phi Tau Theta, President; Daily Californian; A. S. U. C. Band: Wesley Foundation; Wesley Players. RICHARD H. BIGGS Glendale Letters and Science- Kappa Alpha. Economics RICHARD W. BIRK Burlingame Letters and Science Economics Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Sigma Pi. ROBERT HARTLEY BLACKFORD. JR. Wheatland Letters and Science Zoology Alpha Sigma Phi; Big " C " Guard: Baseball (2) (3) (4); Basketball (1). ELEANOR BLINN Berkeley Letters and Science History Alpha Delta Pi; Phi Beta Kappa; Pi Lambda Theta. MARGARET FINLEY BLOWER Santa Ana Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Chi Omega. J. HOWARD BENTLEY Glendale Commerce Business Administration Transfer from Glendale Junior College. EUGENE HENRY BERKENKAMP Sacramento Agriculture Forestry Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Kappa Delta Rho; Big " C " Society; Alpha Zeta; Varsity Rowing Club; ForestryClub; Crew; Inter-fraternity Council. WILLIAM BURNETT BERRY Palo Alto Agriculture Forestry Chi Phi; Winged Helmet; Skull and Keys; Track Manager (2) (3); Swimming, Captain (1); Water- polo. EMANUEL BICKOFF Hollywood Chemistry Chemistry CAROLYN L. BILES Oakland Letters and Science Household Science Personnel (1). GLENN ELLIS BISHOP Santa Ana Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Santa Ana Junio College; Honor Student. CATHERINE EMMA BLAUER San Jose Letters and Science History Transfer from San Jose State College; W. A. A. ARTHUR CURTIS BLOOM Emeryville Letters and Science Physical Education and Hygiene Phi Kappa Tau; Phi Phi; Big " C " Society; Varsity Baseball, Brick Morse ' s Collegians. FRIEDA ANN BLUM Letters and Science Psychology Alpha Epsilon Phi: Little Theatre Make-up Staff (1)(2). CECILE FERN BOLIN Berkeley Letters and Science History. ELIZABETH (ONE BOND San Francisco Commerce Finance Beta Sigma Omicron; Counseling; Commerce Club; Commuters Club. DONALD KIETH BORTHWICK Sunnyvale Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege; American Institute of Elec- trical Engineers; Masonic Club. HARRY T. BOUQUET San Bruno Engineering Mechanical Engineering Varsity Handball. JEAN CLAIRE BOWMAN El Paso, Texas Letters and Science Mathematics Transfer from Texas College of Mines and Metallurgy, and Uni- versity of Denver; International House: Pi Mu Epsilon: Phrateres; California Engineer, Women ' s Ed- itor; Pelican (3); Honor Students ' Council; Dormitory Council. RONALD CALVIN BRADLEY Sacramento Commerce Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Beta Gamma Sigma (3) (4); Commerce Association (3); Glee Club (3) (4). EILEEN MARY BRADY San Francisco Utters and Science Nursing Alpha Tau Delta; Newman Club; Crop and Saddle (1X2); French Club. ROBERT VERNON BRAND Berkeley Letters and Science Physics. ELMER JOHN BRANT Piedmont Letters and Science Economics Chi Psl. IMOGENE AUTEN BOLSTAD Berkeley Letters and Science History Treble Clef. MARVIN THOMAS BONDS San Francisco Commerce Sales Management Bachelordon; Alpha Delta Sigma; Senate. EVELYN LOUISE BOSTIC Oakla nd Letters and Science Household Art Alpha Delta Pi; Delta Chi Alpha: Orchesis;Mask and Dagger Revues; Class Committees. MIRIAM BERNYS BOVEY Sacramento Letters and Science History Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Masonic Club; Y. W. C. A. ELSIE BARBARA BOYNTON Oakland Letters and Science Education Treble Clef. KENNETH ENGLISH BRADSHAW Oakland Agriculture Forestry Circle " C " Society; Forestry Club: Soccer (1); Varsity Fenc- ing UH3H4): Senior Manager Fencing (4). SOLON MILLER BRAFF Los Angeles Letters and Science Physics and Optometry Kappa Nu; Omega Delta; Track (1); Soccer (1) (2) (3); Elections Committee; Class Committees. WILBUR F. BRAND, JR. Sacramento Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junior College: Beta Theta Pi. LILLIAN MARY BRASSY Oakland Letters and Science History Newman Club; Y. W. C. A.: Lit- tle Theatre Make-up Staff: Social Service; Music Group; A. S. U. C. Tea Committee. BLYTHE VIRGINIA BOND Oakland Letters and Science History Areta; Phrateres. HALLIE MAURINE BOOTH Piedmont Letters and Science English Delta Gamma; Torch and Shield: Ace of Clubs; Women ' s Judicial Committee: Daily California! (1) (2); Secretary Women ' s Executive Committee (2) HELENE LUCILE 80ULTON Yutaa City Letters and Science English Transfer from Yuba County Junior College; Theta Upsilon; Thalian Players (3); Y. W. C. A. Drive: Masonic Club: Women ' s Counsel- ing; Y. W. C. A. Choral Club. JOHN ROBERT BOVYER Oakland Mining Economic Geology Mining Association. WALTER IRWIN BRADBURY Berkeley Letters and Science English Sigma Phi. ROBERT STANLEY BRADT Sacramento Engineering Electrical Engineering American Institute of Electrical Engineers. HENRY EDWARD BRANAGH Piedmont Agriculture Forestry Xi Sigma Pi. FRED MORSE BRANDT Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Baton; A. S. U. C. Band. MARIE NEVA MARIE BRIANO Richmond Letters and Science French Maison Francaise. 105 nnnJ ELINOR BRIGGS Oleum Letters and Science Political Science Prytanean; Theta Sigma Phi; Daily Californian (1H2H3), As- sociate Editor (4); Counseling; A. S. U. C. Sales Committee; Assembly Dance Committee, Sub- chairman (4). ALFRED LOUIS BROSIO Berkeley Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Tau Beta Pi; Chi Epsilon: American Society of Ciiil Engi- neers, President. EVERETT S. BROWN Oakland Agriculture Plant Pathology. MARGARET LORRAINE BROWN Oakland Letters and Science Biochemistry Newman Club. ROBERT W. BROWN Oakland Chemistry Chemistry Masonic Club; Y. M. C. A. Cab- inet; Chemistry Club; Winner of Congress Liars Contest (3). JACK HAROLD BRUBAKER Walnut Creek Commerce Finance Alpha Delta Sigma; Scabbard and Blade; Pi Delta Epsllon; Hammer and Coffin; Daily Californian (1) (2) (3), Manager (4); Publica- tions Council, Chairman (4); A. S.U.C. Executive Committee (4). CLAIRE MAY BUCKNER MM Letters and Science Bacteriology Women ' s " C " Society; W. A. A. Swimming Manager (2). MARY ELLEN BULLOCK Oakland Commerce Economic! Counseling; Y. M. C. A.; A. S. U. C. Social Committee; A. S. U. C. Hostess Committee; A. S.U.C. Group System; Masonic Club: Commerce Association : Phrateres; College Women ' s Club Juniors. JAMES JACKSON BUNNER San Francisco Commerce Economics Scabbard and Blafc; Water Polo (1). GERTRUDE BRONSTEIN Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Theta Sigma Phi; Esperam; Phra- teres; Counseling (3) (4); Wom- en ' s Managerial; Little Theatre (1) ; Daily Californian (1) (2) (3) . BYRON HUGH BROWN Oakland Letters and Science Economics Masonic Club; Alpha Delta Sigma; Hammer and Coffin; Advertising Service Bureau (3), Manager (4); A. S. U. C. Card Sales, Publicity Director (4); Pelican Managerial (2). HUBERT LEIGHTON BROWN Walnut Grove Letters and Science Economics Delta Kappa Epsilon. RALEIGH C. BROWN Berkeley Chemistry Chemical Engineering Track (1); A. S. U. C. Band; Water Polo; Glee Club. STANLEY C. BROWN Berkeley Engineering Mechanical Engineering American Society of Mechanical Engineers. CARTER ROYSTON BRYAN Peoria, Illinois Letters and Science Economics Phi Delta Theta. GWENN LOVE BUDZIEN Modesto Letters and Science Political Science Phi Mu; Orchesis; A. S. U. C. Radio Commission. ERNESTO E. BUNGE Buenos Aires, Argentina Mining Petroleum Engineering. 106 CORBIN BURBANK Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Sigma Phi; Winged Helmet; Tri- une; Football Manager (2) (3); Rugby (2) (3) (4). ADELE STUART BROOKS Alameda Letters and Science Bacteriology Chi Omega; Personnel (1) (2). E. CARY BROWN Santa Monica Commerce Finance Transfer from Santa Monica Jun- ior College; Beta Gamma Sigma. JESSIE TUNNELL BROWN Stockton Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from College of the Pa- cific. ROBERT MILTON BROWN Berkeley Letters and Science Geology Transfer from Pasadena Junior College. GEORGE P. BRUBAKER Fresno Engineering Electrical Engineering EDWARD ZABRISKIE BUCK Vacaville Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from George Washington University; Theta Delta Chi. ELIZABETH IRENE BUFFORD Santa Rosa Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Santa Rosa Junior College; Pi Phi Delta. ELIZABETH BUNKER Oakland Letters and Science History Kappa Alpha Theta. BONNIE BEVERLEY BURDETTE Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Masonic Club; Y. W. C. A. Com- munity Service; Psychology Club, President (2); A. S. U. C. Tea Committee (1). DELAVAN MADDOX SURGE Berkeley Letters and Science Architecture Delta Gamma; Alpha Alpha Gam- ma; Architecture Association; A. S. U. C. Card Sales Committee; Class Committees. ALFRED LORENCE BURK Rinrside Letters and Science Chemistry Transfer from San Bernardino Jun- ior College: Chi Pi Sigma. CONRAD MELVIN BURMESTER Petaluma Agriculture Poultry Husbandry Transfer from Davis; Alpha Gam- ma Rho: Calvin Club (4); Glee Club (1)(2). LAURENCE B. BURNLEY Alameda Chemistry Chemistry Phi Kappa Tau; Varsity Rowing Club; Crew. ERNESTINE BURROUGHS Antioch Letters and Science English Theta Upsilon; W. A. A. (2). ROBERT ELDON BURUM Ventura Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Ventura Junior Col- lege. ROSELYN DAYLE BUSSEY San Bernardino Letters and Science Social Institutions Transfer from U. C. L. A. ELEANOR BYCRAFT Berkeley Letters and Science English Phrateres; Daily Californian (1); Masonic Club (1). ELIZABETH CADMAN Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Alpha Phi; Torch and Shield: Ace of Clubs. MARIE BURGESS Redding Letters and Science Public Health Nursing Transfer from University of Cali- fornia Hospital; International House; Honor Student. CHARLES WALLACE BURKARD Oakland Letters and Science History. HUGH DANNER BURNHAM Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry Alpha Chi Sigma; Pershing Rifles; Scabbard and Blade: Chemistry Club; Engineers Council (3) (4); Chairman Students ' Advisory Bu- reau (4). MARIANNE ELEANOR BURNS Berkeley Letters and Science Household Art Delta Chi Alpha. WALLACE HAROLD BURT Los Angeles Letters and Science Physics Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College. JAY ELDEN BUSBY Berkeley Commerce Finance Beta Theta Pi. GEORGE ALLEN BUTLER Ukiab Letters and Science Economics. RUTH BYCRAFT Berkeley Letters and Science Spanish Phrateres (3) (4); Masonic Club. PETER D. BURGESS Melones ters and Science Economics Delta Phi. ROSALIE MATILDA CAFFARENA Oakland Commerce Business Organization Newman Club: Commerce Club: Phi Chi Theta; W. A. A. (2). FRANCES GERTRUDE BURKE Riverside Letters and Science Bacteriology Alpha Delta Pi; Little Theatre Managerial Staff (2); Intramural Tennis. . CARMEN BURNHAM Berkeley Letters and Science Music Transfer from San Francisco State Teachers ' College; Areta: Alpha Mu. JOHN EDWIN BURRI Berkeley Commerce Accounting Football (1). WILLIAM W. BURTON Berkeley Letters and Science History Alpha Kappa Lambda. MARY HELEN BUSSEY San Bernardino Letters and Science Social Institutions Transfer from University of Red- lands; Alpha Omicron Pi. GERALDINE BUTLER San Francisco Letters and Science Public Health Alpha Tau Delta; Pelican Staff (1). KENNETH TRUMAN BYERS Oakland Letters and Science Political Science Honor Student; Congress; Deputa- tions Committee: A. S. U. C. Radio Plays: Forensics Council. MILDRED VIRGINIA CALDWELL San Jose Letters and Science Political Science Mortar Board; Prytanean; Theta Sigma Phi; Esperam; Phrateres; Daily Californian (1)(2)(3). Women ' s City Editor (4); Cwin- seling (2) (3) (4); A. S. U. C. Radio Commission: A. S. U. C. Card Sales; Masonic Club; Y. W. C. A. Drive: Class Committees. NEWELL THORSTROM CALL San Bernardino Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from San Bernard in ior College. DOROTHY ELLERY CAMERON Berkeley Letters and Science Mathematics Alpha Phi. PATRICIA MAY CAMPBELL Oakland Commerce Merchandising Transfer from Pasadena Junior SAMUEL WILLIAM CAPRA Sacramento Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Swimming. BERNHARD MARTIN CARLSON Berkeley Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Marin Junior Col- lege: American Society of Mechan- ical Engineering; Society of Auto- motive Engineering. NEVADA KATHERINE CARNEY Sacramento Letters and Science English Transfer from Sacramento Junior Collete. JOAN CASTLEDINE Berkeley Letters and Science Music Kappa Kappa Gamma; Alpha Mu; English Club; Tennis Manager: Intramural Board. DOMINIC JOHN CAVALLO Alameda Commerce Economics Baseball (1). ROBERT S. CHADWICK Burlinaame Utters and Selene Political Scienci International Houw. 108 GENEVIEVE HORNING CALVERT Altadena Letters and Science Psychology Little Theatre Properties and Make-up Staffs. JOHN ALEXANDER CAMERON Palo Alto Agriculture Forestry Transfer from San Jose State College. WILLIAM DOHN CAMBELL Artesia Letters and Science Zoology Delta Upsilon; Winged Helmet. JAMES M. CARL, JR. Waterford Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege. GLADYS VIRGINIA CARLSON Hollywood Agriculture Landscape Design Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; Phrateres: Landscape De- sign Association; Crop and Saddle; Canoeing. STEFAN JOHN CARNIGLIA San Francisco Commerce Safety Engineering. WILLIAM HAMPTON CASTRO Berkeley Letters and Science Economics HENRY JAMES CAVIGLI Bowman Mining Petroleum Engineering Theta Tau; American Institute of Mechanical Engineers; Track Man- ager (2); Newman Club. WALTER BURNS CHAFFEE Garden Grove Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Fullerton Junior College. ROBERT WAYNE CALVERT Altadena Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from Pasadena Junior College. ADELE FRANCIS CAMPBELL Piedmont Letters and Science Public Speaking Phi Mu; Deputations; Daily Cali- fornian. Managerial; A. S. U. C. Social Committee; Class Commit- tees. BRUCE L. CANAGA Berkeley Letters and Science Pre-Medical Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Phi; Scabbard and Blade: Deputations (2); A. S. U. C. Card Sales Committee (3) (4); Class Com- mittees. ANNA CARLETON Berkeley Letters and Science Philosophy Pelican; Y. W. C. A.; Counseling. NORMA MARIE CARLSON San Francisco Letters and Science Spanish Alpha Chi Omega; Blue and Gold (2). MARTHA ROSE CASTLE San Francisco Letters and Science Music Kappa Phi; Alpha Mu. NINO LOUIS CATTUZZO San Francisco Letters and Science History Transfer from San Francisco State College; Honor Studen t; Newman Club. DONALD RITCHIE CAZIARC Berkeley Letters and Science History Scabbard and Blade; Miner Dance Committee, Chairman; Assembly Dance Committee; Fall Frolic, Chairman. ILSE THOBURN CHAMBERLIN Oakland Letters and Science Art. - LELAND ELROY CHAMBERLIN Whittier Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from Fullerton Junior College: Circle " C " Society; Varsity Ski Team. KENNETH JAMES CHARLTON Berkeley Engineering Civil Engineering Baton; American Society of Civil Engineers. CHARLES WILBER CHASE Sacramento Commerce Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. LAURENCE HILDRETH CHERRV Berkeley Engineering Mechanical Engineering Circle " C " Society; American So- ciety of Mechanical Engineers; Water Polo. Sen or Manager (4); Wesley Foundation; Water- Sports Club; Engineers ' Council. ANNIE MAY CHICK Piedmont Letters and Science Economics Phi Omega Pi; Personnel; Blue and Gold (2); Women ' s Counsel- ing, Executive Board; Y. W. C. A.; Class Committees. ALFRED ERNEST CHINBUAH Atwebo, Gold Coast, West Africa Agriculture Agricultural Economics. HARRY EDWARD CHISHOLM Hay ward Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry Club; Pre-Medical Club; Calvin Club. IRENE LILLIAN CHRISTIANSEN Oakland Letters and Science Economics Prytanean; Welfare Council, Sub- chairman; Phrateres, Social Chair- man, Recording Secretary; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Y. W. C. A. Eris- tics Chairman; Women ' s Executive Committee. GILBERT CLARK Oakland Letters and Science- -Zoology. EDWARD JAMES CHAN Oakland Letters and Science History Chinese Student Club. ABRAHAM CHARTOCK San Francisco Letters and Science Medical Science Phi Beta Kappa. LOLA CHATFIELD Williams Letters and Science Music Transfer from University of Utah; Deputations (2) (3). SPENCER THEODORE CHESTER Sacramento Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Stanford University: Beta Theta Pi. GEORGE DORNIN CHILDS Piedmont Engineering Mechanical Engineering Sigma Alpha Epsilon; American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Soccer Manager (2). SILAS CHINN San Francisco Letters and Science Medical Science Chinese Students Club; Honor Stu- dent; Student Advisory Bureau. SAMUEL CHO Berkeley Commerce Economics Chinese Students Club; Varsity Handball Team. PHILLIP D. CHUBB Berkeley Mining Mining Phi Delta Theta: Theta Tau; Scabbard and Blade: Rugby. GROVER VINCENT CLARK Vallejo Letters and Science Economics Bowles Hall; Big " C " Society; Crew; Varsity Rowing Club. tilt III jr Rlllllfi j Illtfllfi VIDYA CHANDRA San Francisco Letters and Science History Transfer from San Francisco State College. LEONARD W. CHARVET San Bernardino Letters and Science Medical Science Sigma Phi Epsilon; Golden Bear; A. S. U. C. President; Big " C " Society, President; Track (1X2) (3) (4); Honor Student. ELIZABETH CHENEY Berkeley Letters and Science French. JACK FRANCIS CHEWNING La Habra Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Fullerton Junio College; Theta Xi. RICHARD ELI CHILDS Madera Engineering Electrical Engineering Pi Tau Pi Sigma. CALVERT GRAHAM CHIPCHASE Berkeley Commerce Insurance Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Quarter- deck. ALAN DALE CHRISTENSEN Selma Letters and Science- Political Science Transfer from Fresnt State Ctl- lege. EARL ASHTON CLARK Del Rev Commerce Business Administration Track (1); Men ' s Dormitory As- sociation. Treasurer (3). MARGARET BROWNING CLARK South Pasadena Agriculture Landscape Design Transfer from Pasadena Junior College. 109 MARY-ADELE CLARK Berkeley Letters and Science Education Sigma Kappa; Prytanean: Y. W. C. A., Community Service. ROBERT BRYDEN CLEGHORN San Francisco Engineering Civil Engineering Phi Kappa Sigma; American So- ciety of Civil Engineers; Football Manager (2). DORIS IRENE CLINE Strathntore Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Porterville Junior College; Alpha Omicron Pi; Honor Student; Advertising Survey Staff (3). WILLIAM JAMES CLOUGH San Bernardino Mining Mining Engineering Transfer from San Bernardino Junior College; Sigma Phi Epsilon; Theta Tau; Engineers ' Council (3), Treasurer (4). EDMOND A. COHN Oakland Letters and Science Medical Science Zeta Beta Tau; Phi Beta Kappa Phi Delta Epsilon. MARGARET BAISE COLE San Diego Letters and Science English Beta Phi Alpha. .. RAYMOND J. COLLIN Clear water Commerce Advertising Transfer from CompUn Junior College: Theta Delta Chi; Daily Californlan Editorial Staff (3), Daily California I Manaierial Staff (3); Commerce Association. MARGARET ANNE CONGER Letters and Science English Tramfer from Yuba County Junior College; Pi Lambda Tbcta. MATTHEW J. CONNELLY Berkeley Letters and Science- Political Menu Q Delta Tau Delta; Clais Secretary Treasurer (4). 110 THOMAS JAY CLARK San Leandro Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from the University of Utah; American Institute of Elec- trical Engineering. MORRIS CLELAND Alameda Letters and Science Philosophy Circle " C " Society; Proskopoi; Handball Manager (4); Y. M. C. A. NORMA MARIE CLINE San Bernardino Letters and Science Household Science Alpha Nu. VERA COLENE COATES Sunnyvale Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege; Alpha Gamma Delta; A. S. U. C. Social Committee; Assembly Dance Committee. MELVIN EDWARD COHN San Francisco Letters and Science Political Science Weight Basketball. BETTY ADELAIDE COLLINS Marysville Letters and Science Biochemistry Beta Phi Alpha; Y. W. C. A.; 4H Club; Vice-president (2). RAYMOND EARL COMPTON San Francisco Letters and Science Philosophy Golden Bear; A. S. U. C. Execu- tive Committee (4); Open Forum Governing Board (4); Chairman Forensics Council (4); Varsity Debating (4); Senate Debating Society (4); Forensics Commis- sioner (4). ROBERT CHARLES CONKLING Berkeley Letters and Science International Relations. KATHERINE CONNICK Berkeley Letters and Science Social Theory Kappa Alpha Theta; Intramural Board; Counseling; Y. W. C. A. THELMA ELLEN CLAYTON Lemoore Letters and Science History Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege. TEMPLE SMITH CLEWE Sonoma Engineering Civil Engineering Zeta Psi ; Scabbard and Blade (3) (4); American Society of Civil Engineers; Glee Club (1)(2)(3), Senior Manager (4); Wheel and Torch (4); Music Council (3), Vice-chairman (4). ROBERT MANVILLE CLOSE Berkeley Commerce Accounting. WILLARD WESLEY COCHRANE Los Angeles Agriculture Agricultural Economics. FLORENCE JUDITH COLE Richmond Letters and Science History W. A. A. OLGA HUMBERT COLLINS San Francisco Letters and Science English Class Committees. IRA ALSON CONDIT Morgan Hill Letters and Science Botany. BETTY CONLISK Oakland Letters and Science History Transfer from Williams Junior College; Pi Beta Phi; Y. W. C. A. WILLIAM JOSEPH CONNOLLY San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Marin Junior Col- lege: Pi Kappa Alpha; Varsity Baseball. )ORIS MAY CONNOR Winters Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Areta: Calvin Club. AYMOND FRANCIS CONWAY Grass Valley Agriculture Forestry Transfer from Sacramento Junior MM . 3ILLIE A. COOKINHAM San Francisco Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from San Francisco State College; Alpha Chi Omega. HENRY CHARLES CORKE Oakland Letters and Science Economics Honor Student. ROBERT F. COTTON Santa Monica Commerce Finance Transfer from Santa Monica Junior College. EUGENE MORGAN COURTNEY Lodi Agriculture Poultry Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Alpha Zeta. CAROL CELESTE CRAFT Berkeley Letters and Science English Gamma Phi Beta. SUSANNA MAUDE CRANE Richmond Letters and Science History Women ' s Intramural Sports. Chair- man: A. S. U. C. Card Sales Committee: Women ' s Counseling. MARGERY MESERVE CREED Piedmont Letters and Science English Kappa Kappa Gamma MARY CECILIA CONRAD Berkeley Letters and Science Bacteriology Sigma Kappa. DANA P. COOK Piedmont Letters and Science Political Science Scabbard and Blade; Elections Committee, Chairman; Welfare Council; Rally Committee; Orien- tations. JOSEPH WELLES COOPER Ormille Letters and Science Economics Chi Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Golden Bear: Winged Helmet; Senior Peace Committee; Track. SUSAN T. CORR Richmond Letters and Science Hygiene. C. MURIEL COTTRELL Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Little Theatre (1X2) (3). HELEN MARGARET COX Anaheim Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from Fullerton Junior College; International House; W. A. A. MARGARET McKINSTRY CRAIG Alameda Letters and Science Physical Education Alpha Phi; Torch and Shield; Y. W. C. A.; Intramural Sports; Co- Educational Badminton. EARL L. CRANSTON San Bernardino Commerce Economics. LAVINIA CRESAP Berkeley Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from Williams Junior College; Alpha Delta PI; Delta Chi Alpha; Y. W. C. A.; Daily Cahfornian (1); Women ' s Coun- seling. LPH MORITZ CONRAD Oakland Mining Mining Engineering Mining Association; American In- stitute of Mining and Metallurgi- cal Engineers. DAVID WRISTEN COOK Burlingattie Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Phi Mu Delta. KEITH LEE COREY Berkeley Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Ventura Junior Col- lege: American Society of Mechan- ical Emlneers. ROBERT M. CORSON Oakland Letters and Science Economics. FRANCES ADELE COUPE Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Masonic Club. NINA-MARIE COX Ahwahnee Letters and Science English Daily Californian (1)(2); Wom- en ' s Counseling (1X2X3): Class Committees. NETTIE VIRGINIA CRANDALL Berkeley Letters and Science Art Transfer from Lewiston State Nor- mal School. ROBERT HENRY CREDE San Fernando Letters and Science Medical Sciences Transfer fram U. C. L. A. Sigma Nu; Phi Beta Kappa. OU CRE NANCY LOU CRESS Sacramento Letters anil Science History Alpha Xi Delta; Pelican. GEOR6E JOSEPH CRODA Oakland Commerce Advertising- Retailing Transfer from St. Mary ' s College Newman Club. PHYLLIS CULBERTSON Fresno Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Bakersfteld Junior College; Hostess Committee. HELEN ELIZABETH CUNNINGHAM Saratoga Letters and Science Political Science Prytanean; A. S. U. C. Vice- president; Executive Committee; Women ' s Executive Committee; Women ' s Student Affairs Commit- tee; Deputations Speakers Com- mittee; News Committee, Chair- man; Stephens Union Administra- tion Committee. Chairman. MAURICE JOSEPH CURTIS Richmond Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from Matin Junior Col- lege; Blue and Gold Photographer. AUGUSTA KEITH DABNEY Berkeley Letters and Science English Kappa Kappa Gamma; Prytanean; Mask and Dagger; Thalian; Little Theatre. JUNE CLAIRE DALGLEISH Lower Lake Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from Marin Junior Col lege: Delta Chi Alpha. GLENN EMMETT DANIELS Oakland Letters and Science Astronomy. DOROTHY LEA DAVIDSON Berkeley Letters and Science- Household Art Masonic Club; Guild of Applied Arts; W. A. A. GEORGE JEFFERSON DAVIS. JR San Francisco Commerce Economies Masonic Club. 112 FRANK KENNETH CROUCH Oakland Engineering Mechanical Engineering. ROBERT NEVILLE CULNAN San Diego Letters and Science Mathematics Transfer from San Diego State College: Calvin Club. ROSS ALLISON CUNNINGHAM Riverside Letters and Science Physical Education Transfer from Riverside Junior College; Sigma Alpha; Gymnastics Team (3), Captain (4). PATRICIA SKINNER CUTLER Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from Pasadena Junior College; Alpha Delta Pi; Little Theatre. EVELYN MARIAN DAKIN Berkeley Letters and Science Philosophy Phi Mu; W. A. A.; Little Thea- tre Properties Staff. LOUISE A. DALLY Los Angeles Letters and Science History Masonic Club; Assembly Dance Committee (3) (4); W. A. A.; President ' s Reception Committee; Class Committees. WILLIAM H. DASEKING Atherton Letters and Science Architecture Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Chi Alpha Kappa; Delta Sigma Chi; Architectural Associ- ation. WILLIAM RAYMOND DAVIES Fullerton Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Fullerton Junior College; Theta Delta Chi. JACKSON CAMERON DAVIS Oakland Letters and Science Economics. G. MILTON CROUSE San Francisco Letters and Science Political -Science Executive Committee; Welfare Council, Chairman (4); Senate; Masonic Club; Class Committees. MILTON ARTHUR CULVER Oxnard Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Ventura Junior Col- lege; Rugby. ELIZABETH VIRGINIA CURRIER San Francisco Letters and Science International Relations Kappa Kappa Gamma; Ace of Clubs. MARGARET LOUISE CUYLER Long Beach Letters and Science English Transfer from Long Beach Junior College. CHARLES KENNETH DALE Red Bluff Letters and Science International Relations Daily Californian (1); Soccer (2). JULIA NEY DALTON Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Beta Sigma Omicron; Blue and Gold (2); Crop and Saddle; All California Riding Team (1)12) (3); W. A. A. CHARLES HENRY DAVEY Nevada City Letters and Science Economics. DOROTHY RUDDOCK DAVIS Berkeley Letters and Science Art Alpha Omicron Pi. JOSEPHINE MARIE DAY Turlock Letters and Science Bacteriology Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege; Counseling (2); Y. W. C. A.; A. S. U. C. Committees. DWARD FOON DEA San Francisco Engineering Electrical Engineering. DAVID EDMOND DEBEAU Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry Bowles Hall. .ICE HELEN de CARTERET St. Helena Letters and Science History Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Kappa Alpha: Women ' s Executive Com- mittee; Honor Students ' Council; Student Advisory Bureau. ATALIE de GROOT Berktley Letters and Science International Relations Daily Californian; Y. W. C. A. EVA DELL ' OSSO Oakland Letters and Science Economics Prytanean; Phrateres: College Women ' s Club; Women ' s Execu- tive Committee; Women ' s Counsel- ing, Chairman: . W. C. A.; Loan Fund Drive. EARL R. DeLUCIA Oakland Letters and Science Art Y. W. C. A.: W. A. A. Rifle Team. ERESA PAULINE des GRANGES Fullerton Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; W. A. A. Hockey Team. ' RANK L. DICKEY Los Angeles Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Amer- ican Society of Mechanical Engi- neers; Scabbard and Blade. -EONARD JOHN DIEDEN Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege; Theta Xi. MARY FRANCES DILL Wendel U Letters and Science Nursing Transfer from Lassen Junior Col- lege; Honor Student. WENDELL F. DEETER Redondo Beach Letters and Science Chemistry Transfer from Compton Junior College; Chi Pi Sigma; Honor Student. ANDREW NICHOLAS de HEER Gold Coast. West Africa Agriculture Soil Science. BRUCE EUGENE DEL MAR Los Angeles Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Amer- ican Society Mechanical Engineers (3); President (4); Track (1); Engineers Council (3), President (4); Engineers Dance Chairman (4); A. S. U. C. Card Sales. PAUL HERMANN DENKE San Francisco Engineering Civil Engineering American Society of Civil Engi- neers; Tau Beta Pi; Chi Epsilon. JOHANNA M. DESMOND Burney Letters and Science Nursin Alpha Tau Delta. HELEN DICKSON Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Pomona College; Pi Lambda Theta; Pi Phi Delta: A. S. U. C. Symphony Orchestra; Crop and Saddle. JANET EVELYN DIEHL Santa Ana Letters and Science English Transfer from Santa Ana Junior College; Alpha Delta Pi; Coun- seling (4). MARGARET HELENA DILLON San Francisco Letters and Science Political Science. ALDO DeBENEDICTIS Redwood City Ckemistry Chemistry HAAS deFREMERY Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Transfer from Williams Junior College; Beta Theta Pi; Winged Helmet: Crew Manager (2) (3). MARIE LOUISE DEHORITY Sacramento Letters and Science French Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. FRANK STEPHEN DeLUCHI Berkeley Engineering Mechanical Engineering American Society of Mechanical Engineers. JOHN HANS DERMER Madera Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege. KATHLEEN ISOBEL DICK Fullerton Commerce Accounting Transfer from University of Brit- ish Columbia. ROBERT LYLE DICKSON Berkeley Engineering Mechanical Engineering American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Daily Californian (1) MARGARET PAULINE DIETZ Oakland Letters and Science Nursing Beta Phi Alpha; Alpha Tau Delta: Y. W. C. A.; Discussions (1)(2): Women ' s Counseling (2) (4); De- bating (1); Crop and Saddle (4); W. A. A. Archery (2). DONALD ELLIS DIMOCK National City Agriculture Forestry Transfer from University of Idaho; Xi Sigma Pi. 113 MARY ELIZABETH DITTO Oakland Letters and Science History Phi Delta; Phrateres; W. A. Daily Californian (1)(2). WAYNE ELMER DIX Pacific Letters and Science History Transfer from Lassen Junior Co 1 lege. WILLIAM R. DOLAN Wasco Letters and Science English Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College. KATHRYN THEDRA DONOHUE San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Transfer from San Francisco State College; Newman Club; Commut- ers ' Club (3) (4); Y. W. C. A. (4). VIRGINIA ANN DORSEV Scotia Letters and Science History Delta Gamma; Intramural Sports. JEAN M. DOUGLAS Berkeley Letters and Science English Kappa Alpha Theta; Mask and Dagger; Thalian; Little Theatre. DOROTHY ELOISE DOYLE Berkeley Letters and Science English Transfer from Long Beach Junior College. RICHARD EDWARD DRURY Felliws Utters and Science History Transfer from Taft Junior College HAROLD MADISON DUFFY Modest Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Modesto Junior Col lete: American Institute rf Me chinicil Engineers. 114 LYLE H. DITZLER Whittier Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from Fullerton Junior College. ERNEST LOWRY DOBSON San Francisco Chemistry Chemistry Circle " C " Society; Proskopoi. HAROLD ELKINGTON DONALDSON Los Angeles Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Alpha Chi Sigma; A. S. U. C. Band. JAMES LINVILLE DOOLEY San Bernardino Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from San Bernardino Junior College; American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Society of Automotive Engineers. JOHN GREIG DORWARD, JR. Alameda Engineering Mechanical Engineering Tau Beta Pi; American Society of Mechanical Engineers. NENA DOUGLASS Berkeley Letters and Science Philosophy Prytanean, President; Blue and Gold Editorial (2) (3); Women ' s Executive Committee (4); Y. W. C. A. Drive; Class Committees. EILEEN ELIZABETH DOYLE Conrad, Montana Letters and Science English Transfer from College of the Holy Names; Newman Club; Theta Sigma Phi; Esperam; Daily Cali- fornian (3); International House. CONSUELO DUARTE Hollywood Letters and Science Spanish Transfer from New Mexico State College; Casa Hlspana; Newman Club; Treble Clef. CHARLES NELSON DUKE Oakland Commerce Economics Transfer from Marin Junior Col lege; Masonic Club. GEORGE WHITNEY DIVINE La Jolla Letters and Science Architecture Theta Upsilon Omega; Delta Sig- ma Chi. ALISON FULTON DODGE Piedmont Letters and Science Political Science Delta Delta Delta; Personnel (1) (2); Blue and Gold (2); Counsel- ing 1)(2)(3); Class Committee! THOMAS JOHN DONEGAN Roseville Commerce Transportation Transfer from Sacramento Junioi College; Newman Club. KATHLEEN MARIE DOOLEY San Francisco Letters and Science English Transfer from San Mateo Junioi College. RUTH ANN DOSER Atascadero Letters and Science French Pi Delta Phi; Women ' s Dormitor] Association, Secretary: W. A. A VERNON LEGRO DOWNS Santa Rosa Commerce Economics. JAMES M. DOYLE Conrad, Montana Letters and Science Economics Golden Bear; Winged Helmet: P Delta Epsilon; Hammer and Cof lin: Daily Californian, Editor (4) A. S. U. C. Band (1)(2). EDWIN LAWSON DUCKLES Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Senate Debating Society; Y. M C. A. Cabinet (3) (4). WILLIAM WALLACE DUNL Placerville Engineering Electrical Engineering Tau Beta Pi; Eta Kappa N Honor Student; Calm Club: Dei utations. RVL DONNA DUNN Sacramento Letters and Science English Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Phi Omega PI; Dally Californian. OLIVE PARCHER DYER Berkeley Letters and Science Botany Phi Sigma. BERNARD DALE EASTBURN Sacramento Commerce Economi cs Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Phi Tau Theta; Wesley Foundation; Barrington Hall. RICE EDDY Piedmont Letters and Science English. DONALD PHILIP EDINGER Pomona Chemistry Chemical Engineering Alpha Kappa Lambda; Football (1); Basketball (1); Big " C " Guard (2); Varsity Swimming (2). GRACE LOOMIS EDWARDS Concord Letters and Science Philosophy Honor Student; Plymouth House; Y. W. C. A. FLORENCE ELIZABETH EHLERS San Francisco Letters and Science English and Dramatic Literature Little Theatre Managerial Staff (1)(2); Class Committees. SOL EIDINOFF Berkeley Letters and Science English Barrington Hall: Publications Council; Occident Managerial Staff (3). Manager (4); Open Forum Board: Pelican Editorial Staff; Occident Editorial Staff. FRED RAY ELLSWORTH Oakland Letters and Science Economics. ETHEL LORRAINE DURST Palo Alto Letters and Science English Transfer from San Jose State College. LEONA MAE EADS Pomona Letters and Science Household Science Transfer from Pasadena Junior College. LOUISE ECHENBERGER Alameda Letters and Science Spanish and Italian. ROBERT ELLIS DYE Piedmont Letters and Sciences Economics. JAMES DORR EDDY Piedmont Commerce Economics Beta Theta Pi; Phi Phi; Track (1); Tennis Manager (2X3). MARY EDMUNDS Thermal Letters and Science History and Education Transfer from Santa Ana Junior College; Phrateres; W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A.; A. S. U. C. Music Group. PEGGY JEAN EDWARDS Sacramento Letters and Science History Pi Beta Phi. PAUL DONALD EHRET Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Golden Bear; Pi Delta Epsilon: Blue and Gold (2) (3). Editor (4); Publications Council. ALFRED W. EINARSSON Berkeley Letters and Science Physics Phi Beta Kappa. ALICE IRENE ELSHERE Sacramento Letters and Science Household Science Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. BARBARA EAMES Berkeley Letters and Science History Prytaatan: Mask and Dagger; Thallu Players; Little Theatre (1X2) (3). Women ' s Manager (4); Election Committee (1X2) (3); A. S. U. C. Card Sales (1) (2) (3); Junior Farce, Sub-chair- man: Y. W. C. A.; Junior Class Adviser: Class Committees. DAMON CLOUD ECKLEY Walnut Creek Letters and Science Physics and Optometry Omega Delta. GORDON H. EDGAR San Leandro Commerce Accounting. ELEANOR MAE EDSON Berkeley Letters and Science French Masonic Club: A. S. U. C. Tea Committee: Assembly Dance. ALTA L. EGGERT Dixon Letters and Science Bacteriology Transfer from Davis; Sigma Kappa. ROLAND C. EHRET Pomona Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from Pomona Junior College. ROY HOLLIDAY ELLIOTT, JR. Berkeley Engineering Electrical Engineering Chi Phi; Rugby. JOHN E. ELTCHINOFF Berkeley Commerce Economics Transfer from San Francisco State Teachers ' College. LUCiLE ALICE ELVIN San Francisco Letters and Science Household Art Alpha Delta Pi: Guild of Applied Arts; Women ' s Executive Commit- tee: Deputations Committee: Sub- chairman; W. A. A.; A. S. U. C. Card Sales Committee; Class Com- mittees. NADIA LENORE EMRICK Glendale Letters and Science Spanish International House. NATHAN ENGELBERG Oakland Letters and Science Economics. JULIA PAULINE ERDMAN Princeton Letters and Science Public Health Nursing Alpha Tau Delta. FRANK JOSEPH ESCOBEDO Ocean Park Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Santa Monica Junior College. BILL ALWARD EVANS Berkeley Mining Petroleum Engineering Transfer from San Diego State College: A. S. U. C. Band; Cali- fornia Engineer. MARGARET MARY FAGEOL Oakland Letters and Science History Zeta Tau Alpha: Counseling; W. A. A.; Class Committees. PHILIP HENRY FARLEY Redding Letters and Science Psychology Acacia; Masonic CM; A. S. U. C. Band (1) (2) (3) (4); Foot- ball (1); Track U) 2); A. S. U. C. Tumbling Team (1); Deputa- tions; Reception Ommittee. JIM SHAW FARQUHAR Huntington Beacfc Commerce Business Administration Swimming Team (2) (3) (4) ; Wa- ter Polo (2) (3); Assistant Var- sity Yell Leader (3); California Club. DOUGLAS E. EMERY Modesto Commerce Business Administration Commerce Club. ELI ENG Oakland Commerce Business Administration Chinese Students Club. WILLIAM CLARK ENGVICK Oakland Letters and Science Art Kappa Alpha; Golden Bear; Eng- lish Club; Mask and Dagger: Delta Epsilon; Hammer and Dim- mer; Little Theatre; Dramatics Council; Art Staff; Author Junior Farce, Mask and Dagger Revue (3) (4); Composer Senior Extrav- aganza; Author-Director Thalian Plays. GAIL ERICKSON Berkeley Letters and Science French Blue and Gold (2). NEIL STUART ESTRADA San Francisco Chemistry Chemistry Crew (4). JANET EVANS Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Alpha Chi Omega; Prytanean; Thalian; Women ' s Judiciary Com- mittee, Chairman; Little Theatre; Deputations. CHARLES WEBBER FAIRBANK Glendale Agriculture Forestry Transfer from Glendale Junior College; Theta Xi. BETTY FARNUM Oakland Letters and Science Political Science Kappa Kappa Gamma. WALTER RUSSELL FARR Ogden, Utah Commerce Business Administration Transfer from Weber Junior Col- lege. FRANCIS CHARLES EMMERT Madera Agriculture Forestry Transfer from Fresno State Teach- ers College; Alpha Gamma Rho. ERNEST ANDREW ENGEL San Francisco Commerce Accounting ELEANOR MARY ENDS Sacramento Letters and Science Biochemistry Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. MARCELLA ERIKSMOEN Crosby. North Dakota Letters and Science English Transfer from Glendale Junior College; International House; Women ' s Executive Committee; Masonic Club. HEINZ H. F. EULAU Effenbach, Germany Letters and Science International Relations Transfer from Effenbach Univer- sity, Germany; International House; Circle " C " Society; Var- sity Skiing. MAURICE GWIN EVANS Modesto Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege. KARL HENRY FANNING Brea Letters and Science Bacteriology Transfer from Fullerton Junior College; Masonic Club. GEORGE SHAW FARQUHAR Huntington Beach Letters and Science History Transfer from Santa Ana Junior College; Daily Californian: Weigh! Basketball; A. S. U. C. Radii Commission. D. JACKSON FAUSTMANN Sacramento Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Phi Delta Theta; Arneri can Society Civil Engineers. kirmn 116 iHIIHII] Illllllllj HUH .EONARD FELDHEYM Oiklind Letters and Science Social Institutions PI Delta Epsllon; Triune; Dally Californian Sports Staff (1)(2) (3), Associate Editor (4); Ma- sonic Club. STUART FERGUSON Oakland Letters and Science International Relations Debating (1): Senate: Loan Fund Drive; Class Committees. :ATHLEEN FEYEN Berkeley Letters and Science History Delta Zeta; W. A. A. (4): Little Theatre Managerial (1); Make-up (2); Class Committees; Hostess Committee (2); Blue and Gold Editorial (2). MARY FRANCES FINCH Fort Lawton. Washington Letters and Science Social Institutions Kappa Alpha Theta; W. A. A.; Counseling; Blue and Gold (2). LOWELL WARD FIRSTENBERGER Fresno Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege; Chi Pi Sigma. HOWARD HELMKE FISHER Oakland Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Williams Junior College; Phi Kappa Psi. JEANETTE FITZSIMMONS Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Honor Student; Honor Students ' Council, Secretary; Junior Orche- ils. ROBERT BURKETT FLANNIGAN Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science. VERLYN LOWELL FLETCHER Merced Letters and Science Political Science Theta Kappa Nu. ARTHER ERNEST FELDMEYER Giysenrille Letters and Science Economic Geology Theta Tau; Circle " C " ; Varsity Wrestling. LEO CHARLES FERNANDEZ Pittsburg Letters and Science Mathematics Newman Club. WENDELL MAX FIELDER Berkeley Commerce Accounting Alpha Kappa Lambda: Newman Club; Deputations Committee (1) (2). LILAH CROWELL FINLAY Berkeley Letters and Science French Transfer from Connecticut College for Women; Delta Delta Delta: W. A. A. Fencing; Crop and Sad- dle; A. S. U. C. Teas; Personnel. GEORGE WASHINGTON FISH BURN San Diego Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from San Diego Army- Navy Academy; Phi Delta Theta: Scabbard and Blade. JANE OLWEN FISHER Woodland Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Phrateres; Y. W. C. A.; Wesley Foundation. PATRICIA LILLIAN FLAHERTY San Francisco Letters and Science Economics. HELEN LEE ADELE FLEMING Eureka Letters and Science English Honor Student; Phrateres. EDMUND ROBERT FLOOK Stockton Letters and Science European Hist ory Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege: Phi Delta Kappa. RICHARD HENRY FELTER Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry Proskopoi; Phi Tau Theta; Chem- istry Club. EDA MARY FERRANDO San Leandro Commerce Foreign Trade Commerce Association; Beta Gam- ma Sigma; Honor Student. ELPHINA FILICE Berkeley Letters and Science French Transfer from Williams Junior College. JOHN DENNIS FINNEY. JR. Stockton Letters and Science English Honor Student. DONNA MAYRE FISHER Chico Letters and Science English W. A. A.; Girl Reserve Commis- sion: Intramural Sports. ROBERT ANTHONY FITZPATRICK Oakland Commerce Accounting Newman Club; Beta Alpha Psi. WILLIAM JOSEPH FLAHERTY Sacramento Chemistry Chemistry Engineering Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Chemical Club; Newman Club. DORIS LUCILLE FLETCHER Merced Letters and Science Spanish. DOROTHY VIRGINIA FLOYD Oakland Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Gamma Delta; Counseling (2) (3). JOE WILSON FLOYD Dinuba Letters and Science Geology Del Rey; Theta Tau. MARION BAUMANN FORCE Piedmont Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Omicron Pi; Little Theatre UH2H3); Treble Clef (1)(2) (3) (4); Class Committees. MURIEL ALICE FOURNIER Niles Letters and Science History. WILLIAM LOUIS FOWLKS Glendale Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from Glendale Junior Col lege. RENO JOHN FRANCESCHI San Francisco Commerce Foreign Trade Delta Phi Epsilon. FRANCES AUGUSTA FRANZEN San Francisco Letters and Science Political Science. ROBERT A. FRATUS Oakland Commerce Accounting Transfer from St. Mary ' s College. LOUISE EDNA FRISBIE Redding Letters and Science English Transfer from Chico State; W. A. A.; Little Theatre. WILLIAM LANDIS FRY Ornlllc Engineering Electrical Engineer) Sum. Chi; Tau Beta Pi; Eta Kappa Nu: Crew (3). 118 BEPPINO JOHN FONTANA San Francisco Chemistry Chemistry Honor Student; Sigma Xi. JAMES FORTINO Hollister Letters and Science Political Science Newman Club; Circle " C " Soci- ety, Secretary; Wrestling Team, Captain. EDWARD HARRISON FOWLER San Francisco Commerce Accounting. JULES H. FRADEN San Francisco Letters and Science Zoology. JANET FRANKLIN San Diego Letters and Science History. Transfer from San Diego State College. ETHEL ERNESTINE FRAPWELL Santa Cruz Letters and Science Psychology. EDWARD MORRISON FREYER Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Golden Bear; Winged Helmet: Mask and Dagger; Triune; Little Theatre, General Manager (4); Varsity Yell Leader (4); General Manager Junior Farce (3); Rally Council; Big " C " Guard (2). RICHARD KENDALL FRISBIE San Diego Commerce Business Administration Transfer from San Diego State College; Theta Kappa Nu. HAZEL IRENE FUGETT Ripon Letters and Science History Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege; Honor Student. MARY JANE FOOTE Sacramento Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junio College. JAMES GILBERT FOULDS Oakland Chemistry Chemistry. RICHARD HARDIMAN FOWLER Berkeley Agriculture Soil Technology Abracadabra. RAYMOND RALPH FRANCESHI San Francisco Letters and Science Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Barrington Hall; Delta Sigma Chi. ERMA ADELE FRANSCIONI Gonzales Letters and Science Spanish GORDON FREEMAN FRASER Lakeport Commerce Finance Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege. CHARLOTTE CENTER FRIEND Crockett Letters and Science Anthropology. MADA MARGARET FROME Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Delta Delta Delta. ANSON TADAO FUJIOKA Los Angeles Commerce Insurance Transfer from Los Angeles Junior College; Japanese Students Club. IIIIIHII iHiiiiu] mini ARLES KAZUO FUJISAKI Riverside Letters and Science Zoology anese Students Club. INK MINORU FUKUDA Oakland Engineering Electrical Engineering American Institute of Electrical Engineers: U. C. Life Saving Carps; Soccer Team. kNE GABRIEL Oakland Letters and Science Art Kappa Kappa Gamma. RLES RICHARD GALLAGHER Ventura Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Ventura Junior Col- : Phi Kappa Sigma; American Society of Civil Engineers; Var- sity Gym Team. EVADA JEAN GARDINER Bakersfield Letters and Science Household Science Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College: Hostess Committee (2). NTHONY JOHN GARIOTO San Francisco . Letters and Science History Glee Club. ATHLEEN MABEL GARRETT Burlingame Letters and Science Economics Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; International House. ERNE WILLIAM GATES San Bernardino Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from San Bernardino Junior College: American Society of Civil Engineers: Wesley Foun- DNA YVONNE GAVIN Berkeley Letters and Science Household Science Utrimque. ALICE MASAKO FUJISHIGE Fresno Letters and Science French Japanese Women Students Club. LOIS E. FULLER Berkeley Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from College of Holy Names; Delta Gamma. AUDREY LEWIS GAISER Berkeley Letters and Science Nursing Alpha Tau Delta: W. A. A. FRANK JOSEPH GAMBA Jackson Commerce Accounting. ROBERT GRAHAM GARDNER Oakland Letters and Science Economics Theta Kappa Nu. HARRY WELLS GARRETSON Berkeley Engineering Electrical Engineering Tau Beta Pi; Eta Kappa Nu; American Institute of Electrical Engineers. ROBERTA MARIE GARRETT Berkeley Letters and Science History. RUTH LUVERNE GAUGER Dos Palos Letters and Science Nursing Transfer from U. C. Hospital. E. HOWARD GEE Arcadia Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Pasadena Junior College. MARGARETTE EMIKO FUJITA San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Japanese Women Students Club. JAMES FRANKLIN GABLE Los Angeles Letters and Science Music Transfer from Los Angeles Junior College; Sheridan Hall: Alpha Baton; A. S. U. C. Band: Glee Club; University of Calitor- Syinphony Orchestra; Intra- I Tennis. ELEANOR MADELINE GALBRAITH Richmond Letters and Science Political Science Phi Delta; Little Theatre; Philor- thean: Junior Farce; Counseling: Thalian. BRUCE JONATHAN GAMMONS Gridler Letters and Science History Transfer from Reedley Junior Col- lege; Senate Debating Society; In- tramural Basketball. MERLE WARD GARING Batanteld Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College; Kappa Delta Rho; Amer- ican Society of Civil Engineers. KIRK DURAND GARRETSON Oakland Letters and Science Zoology Glee Club (2) (3) (4). MARY ELIZABETH GARTHWAITE Oakland Letters aid Science Medical Sciences Phi Beta Kappa: Phi Sigma; Treble Clef; Counseling. MELVIN F. GAUTIER San Gabriel Engineering Civil Engineer! Transfer from U. C. L. A.; da Chi Alpha ADELAIDE GEMMEL Ontario Letters and Scie nce English Transfer from University of Ari- zona: Chi Onega. ft 119 ELINOR VERNE GEORGE Merced Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Xi Delta; Women ' s Coun- seling (2) (3); Treble Clef (1) (2) (3); Class Committees (3). EDWARD MELVIN GERSHANOV Sacramento Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Barrington Hall; Honor Students Club; Intramural Ping MARIE NOEL GIBBONS Vallejo Letters and Science Physical Education-Hygiene Transfer from San Francisco State College; International Club; W. A. A. ALBERT JOSEPH GILARDI Santa Rosa Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from Santa Rosa Junior College; Tau Beta Pi; Eta Kappa Nu; Pi Tau Pi Sigma; American Institute of Electrical Engineers. ADELE MARIE GILKERSON Oakland Letters and Science Household Science Theta Upsilon; Women ' s Counsel- ing; College Women ' s Club Jun- iors: Masonic Club; Women ' s Ma- sonic Glee Club; Y. W. C. A. FRED BAKER GLASSLEY Oakland Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Sigma Phi; Phi Phi; Wel- fare Council (3). FRANCES T. GLOVER Alameda Letters and Science Physical Education-Hygiene Women ' s " C " Society; Women ' s Physical Education Majors Club, President: W. A. A.; Golf Mana- ger (2) (3). BLYE WINFIELD GOCKE Long Beach Commerce Accounting Transfer from California Institute of Technology; Commerce Associa- tion; Wrestling (4). RICHARD GOETTSHC San Francisco Commerce Economics. CAROLA BEATE GERDES Oakland Letters and Science German W. A. A.; German Club. DOROTHY GRACE GESELL San Jose Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege; Pi Sigma Alpha. ROBERT ROSS GIBSON Merced Letters and Science Economics Theta Upsilon Omega JAMES A. GILBERT Pasadena Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Pasadena Junior College; Sheridan Hall; Alpha Rho Mu; International House; Y. M. C. A.; Intramural Sports. JEAN GILMAN San Dimas Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from Chaffey Junior Col- lege; Phi Mu. JOHN PHILIP GLEESON Carmel Letters and Science Economics Transfer from St. Mary ' s College: Newman Club; Glee Club (4); Advertising Service (3) (4). MARGARET RAMONA GLOVER Alameda Letters and Science English College Women ' s Club; Pelican (1). JESSIE GLORIA H. GODFREY Vallejo Letters and Science History. ELAINE LENORE GOLDBERG Los Angeles Letters and Science English Transfer from University of Michi- gan; Whitehall, President. WILLIAM FASOLT GERKEN Berkeley Engineering Electrical Engineering Pi Tau Pi Sigma; Scabbard and Blade; American Institute of Elec- trical Engineers. RAYMOND WILLIAM GIANNINI Martinez Chemistry Chemistry. LORENE GIFFEN Alameda Letters and Scienci Household Arts Gamma Phi Beta. JOHN B. GILBERT Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Scabbard and Blade: Crew (1) (2); Glee Club (3) (4) ; Pershing Rifles. YEKOH WILLIAM GINOZA Fowler Letters and Science Bacteriology Japanese Students Club. BERNARD BILLY GLICKFIELD San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Honor Student; Tennis Manager (2) (3). THEODORE MARIE GOBEL San Francisco Commerce Economics. ROBERT WILLIAM GODWIN Long Beach Letters and Science Medical Sciences Phi Kappa Psi; Phi Beta Kappa Nu Sigma Nu. LORAINE GOLDBLOOM Beverly Hills Letters and Science English Transfer from U. C. L. A. 120 it BABETTE GUSTINA GOLDSMITH San Francisco Letters and Science Political Science Philorthian Debating Society. VERNON LEE GOODIN Piedmont Letters and Science Economics Beta Thcta PI; Golden Bear; Winged Helmet: Sophomore Class President; Senior Peace Commit- tee; Track (1); Class Committees. MARK L. GOODSON San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Phi Beta Kappa; Little Theatre (1) (2) (3) (4); Sproul Gold Medal Debate; Congress. BELLE GOOSBY Oakland Letters and Science History Alpha Kappa Alpha; Y. W. C. A.; Negro Students Club. ROBERT JOHNSTON GORMAN Oakland Commerce Economics Pi Kappa Alpha: Football (1); Rally Committee; Class Commit- tees. DONALD AUGUSTUS GRAHAM Auburn Commerce Insurance Transfer from Los Angeles Junior College; Beta Gamma Sigma. CATHERINE JANE GRAY Oakland Letters and Science Chemistry Alpha Phi; Women ' s Intramural Riding. Manager (3). MARGARET CARMAN GREEN El Cerrlto Commerce Accounting Beta Gamma Sigma. MAURICE CARLISLE GREINER Santa Paula Engineering Mechanical Engineering American Society Mechanical En- gineers. RICHARD S. GOLDSTONE San Francisco Commerce Business Organization Zeta Beta Tau. MARIAN GOODRICH Letters and Science Music Y. W. C. A. JOSEPH J. GOODWIN Bakersfield Commerce Economi cs Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College. KATHLEEN M. GORDON Oakland Letters and Science Education. ANDREW GOTZENBERG Los Angeles Agriculture Landscape Architecture Transfer from College of Agricul- ture at Davis; Alpha Gamma Rho; Alpha Zeta; Glee Club: Senior Quartett; Landscape Design Club; Wesley Foundation. ELIZABETH GRAHAM Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Transfer from University of Ore- gon. ALICE DEVEREUX GREEN Long Beach Letters and Science History Transfer from Long Beach Junior College. TAYLOR PASLEY GREEN Alhambra Letters and Science English Transfer from Pasadena Junior College; Honor Student. WILLIAM ARTHUR GRIFFEN Piedmont Commerce I nsurance. DeWITT PAUL GOOD San Francisco Litters and Science Economics Big " C " Society; Track (4). VIRGINIA SHAW GOODRICH Oakland Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Omicron Pi. WILLARD E. GOODWIN Montrose Letters and Science Biochemistry Alpha Delta Phi; Golden Bear: Winged Helmet; Triune; Student Affairs Committee; Senior Peace Committee, Chairman; Junior Class President; A. S. U. C. Ex- ecutive Committee: Honor Stu- dent; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Sen- ate; Football (2). WILMA GORDON Hollywood Letters and Science Bacteriology Transfer from University of South- ern California. GOLDIE MILDRED GRABSTEIN Pittsburg Letters and Science Economics Alpha Epsilon Phi; Little Theatre: Group System: Personnel Commit- tee. VELMA FERN GRAHAM Mai well Letters and Science History. JOSEPH EDGAR GREEN San Pedto Engineering Mechanical Engineering Circle " C " Society; Rugby; Foot- ball (1). MARJORIE JANET GREER Berkeley Letters and Science English. PAUL WILLIAM GRIFFITHS Berkeley Commerce Economics. : ORVILLE FRANK GRIMES San Bernardino Letters and Science Pre-Medical Phi Kappa Tail; Golden Bear; Big " C " Society, President; Phi Phi, President; Triune; Senior Peace Committee; Chairman of Athletic Council; A. S. U. C. Ex- ecutive Committee; Baseball (1) (2) (3), Captain (4). ERIC GEORGE GRUNDY Long Beach Letters and Science Chemistry Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; Alpha Chi Sigma; Chem- istry Club; Masonic Club. HAZEL MURIEL GUNOERSON Oakland Letters and Science Spanish. DELWYN CHARLES HACK Sacramento Commerce Accounting. MARYALIS HADLEY Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Glendalc Junior Col- lege; Treble Clef (3); Masonic Club (3) (4); International House (3) (4). ANITA MARIE HAGSTROM Piedmont Letters and Science Art Transfer from Mills College; Chi Omega; Blue and Gold (2). DOROTHY MARIA HALL Berkeley Letters and Science Household Art Theta Upsilon; Masonic Club (1) (2); Delta Chi Alpha. HARRY BENJAMIN HALPERIN Hollywood Agriculture Poultry Husbandry Transfer from Rutgers University. THOMAS FENTON HAM L dl Minim Petroleum Engineering Theta Tau. 122 LILLIAN HEDRIG GRIP Oakland Letters and Science Spanish Casa Hispana. CHARLES SAMUEL GUBSER Gilroy Letters and Science Public Speaking Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege; Kappa Alpha; Deputations Committee. KAMINI KANT GUPTA San Francisco Letters and Science Political Science Pershing Rifles. CARMEL ANN HACKETT Oakland Letters and Science History. ROBERT MOWER HAGAN Oakland Chemistry Soil Science Theta Chi; Scabbard and Blade; Sigma Xi; Honor Students Asso- ciation. GRACE H. HALDEMAN Oakland Letters and Science Art College Women ' s Club; Pelican; Counseling; A. S. U. C. Card Sales Committee (4); Class Com- mittees. ERIC REXFORD HALL Berkeley Engineering Electrical Engineering Phi Kappa Tau; American Insti- tute of Electrical Engineering; Track. BEULAH RAE HALPERN El Paso, Texas Letters and Science English Transfer from the Texas College of Mines and Metallurgy. JOHN HAMILTON San Francisco Letters and Science- Political Science. GEORGE JOSEPH GRUBB San Francisco Letters and Science Psychology Football (1). RENE J. GUIRAL San Francisco Commerce Accounting Transfer from University of San Francisco; Sigma Phi Sigma. WALTER A. HAAS, JR. San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Alpha Delta Phi; Triune; Recep- tion Committee (2) (3), Chair- man (4); Freshman Tennis, Var- sity Tennis (2) (3) (4); Honor Student. EDITH VICKERY HADDEN Berkeley Letters and Science Household Art Kappa Alpha Theta; Personnel; Y. W. C. A. JACOB MICHAEL HAGOPIAN Fresno Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege; Sigma Chi; International Re- lations Club, President (3). CLARENCE ARTHUR HALL Roseville Letters and Science Mathematics University of California Students Cooperative Association; Circle " C " Society; Cross Country; Var- sity Track. HOBART ROOKER HALLORAN Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry Chi Psi; Honor Student. LILLIAM IRENE HALSTROM Reedley Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Reedley Junior Col- lege; Ph i Sigma; Y. W. C. A. ROBERT NOEL HAMMOND San Francisco Commerce Insurance Sigma Nu; Skull and Keys; Winged Helmet; Football Man- ager (2) (3); Senior Peace Com- mittee. AMES JOSEPH HAMROCK JR. San Francisco Letters and Science History Newman Club. RED JOHN HANLY Oakland Chemistry Chemical Engineering. 1ARY ELIZABETH HARDY Oakland Letters and Science Economics Phrateres. IARRY NETTLETON HARPS Bakersfield Letters and Science Physics- Optometry Omega Delta. VILLIAM FAIRLAMB HARRISON Glendale Commerce Accounting. OUISE HARTT Rawlins, Wyoming Letters and Science Physicial Education Hygiene Transfer from Colorado Women ' s College: Physical Education Ma- jors Club. Secretary; W. A. A. ilRARD E. HAVEN Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Phi Kappa Psi; Scabbard and Blade: Senior Peace Committee; Track Manager (2) (3); Class Committees. THOMAS CLAYTON HAWKINS Riverside Commerce Accounting Transfer from Riverside Junior College; A. S. U. C. Band (3) (4). :YRIL BENJAMIN HAWORTH Bakersfield Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College: Kappa Delta Rhi. CLARENCE ANNIN HAMSHER Los Gatos Agriculture Entomology-Parasitology Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege. WALTER 0. HANSEN Fresno Agriculture Forestry Transfer from Fresno State Col- leqi: Xi Sigma Pi. CAREY HARGREAVES Redwood Valley Agriculture Soil Science 4-H Club; Inter-Church Council; Treasurer. GUY HENDRICKSON HARRIS San Bernardino Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from San Bernardino Junior College; Masonic Club; Chemistry Club; U. C. Life Saving Corps; Intramural Sports. MARY-EDITH HARRON San Francisco Letters and Science Psychology. DORIS EMILY HARTTER San Francisco Letters and Science History Alpha Xi Delta; Women ' s Recep- tion Committee (2). JEAN ELEANOR HAVEN Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Prytanean: Torch and Shield: Class Vice-president (4); Y. W. C. A. National Student Council, Vice-chairman; Regional Council Y. W. C. A., Chairman. HARRIETTE ELIZABETH HAWLEY Piedmont Letters and Science Political Science Kappa Kappa Gamma. CHARLES AMOS HAYES San Francisco Letters and Science Mathematics Phi Beta Kappa: Sigma Xi; PI Mu Epsilon. ta Phi JACK BELVILLE HANLEY Hay ward Commerce Finance Transfer from San Jose State Col- JACK FRANCIS HANSON Oakland Commerce Foreign Trade Epsilon. ROBERT ARTHUR HARMON Lodoga Letters and Science Political Science Abracadabra. PHILIP C. HARRIS Certs Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Modesto Junior College; American Society of Civil Engineers. E. ROSS HART Vallejo Letters and Science Physiology Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; Phi Kappa Tau; A. S. U. C. Band. DOROTHY S. HARVEY Berkeley Letters and Science Music Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege; Counseling. HENRY GORDON HAWES. JR. Palo Alto Letters anil Science Political Science Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege. JU ANITA MAY HAWLEY Sacramento Utters tut Science English Transfer from Sacramento Junior College: Calvin Club. RAYMOND FORREST HAYWOOD San Francisco Letters and Science English Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege; Pi Kappa Alpha. 123 JOHN MARTIN HAZELETT Phoenix, Arizona Commerce Economics Transfer from Phoi lege; Sigma Nu; Varsity Track Intramural Football; Bowling. omics oenix Junior C ROBERT PRICE HEARN Livermore Letters and Science Bacteriology. ROBERTA ESTELLE HEI Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Phi Omega Pi; Masonic Club; A. S. U. C. Card Sales Commit- tee; Y. W. C. A.; Assembly Dance Committee; Little Theatre Make-up Staff; Elections Commit- tee; Counseling. DUANE WESLEY HEEREN Fresno Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege; American Society of Mechan- ical Engineers. IRENE ALICE HENDRIX Long Beach Letters and Science Zoology. Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; International House. ELIZABETH JANE HENRY Ventura Letters and Science Public Speaking Transfer from Ventura Junior Col lege; Alpha Chi Omega. MIRIAM GRACE HERR Denair Letters and Science Public Health Nursing Transfer from Los Angeles Junior JESSE HESS Redondo Beach Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Santa Ana Junior College; Senate Debating (4); Roman Festival (4); President, Men ' s Dormitory Association. WILLIAM ALEXANDER HEWITT Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Alpha Delta Phi; Colden Bear; Track Manager (2) (3) (4); Senior Peace Committee. 124 CHARLES ELLERY HAZLETON Fortuna Agriculture Agricultural Economics Bowles Hall; Winged Helmet; Crew Manager (2) (3); Varsity Rowing Club. ELINOR G. HEATH Cloverdale Letters and Science History Transfer from San Mateo Junior College. JONAS EDWIN HEDQUIST San Diego Commerce I nsurance Transfer from San Diego State College. EDWIN G. HEINBOCKEL Alameda Commerce Economics Sigma Phi Epsilon. THOMAS BIGALOW HENLEY Bakersfield Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College; Bowles Hall. JAMES AULDEN HENRY San Bernardino Commerce Economics Transfer from San Bernardino Junior College; Phi Sigma Kappa. DOROTHEA DONALD HERRIOTT Berkeley Letters and Science Household Art Alpha Delta Pi; Delta Chi Alpha; Personnel (1)(2)(3); Y. W. C. A. (3) (4); A. S. U. C. Tea Committee (1X2). MARGARET ISABEL HESSEL Arcata Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Humboldt State College; Areta; Pi Sigma Alpha. PERCY CLARK HICKERSON, JR. West Los Angeles Commerce Transportation Delta Upsilon; Big " C " Society; Track (2) (3); Rugby (3) (4). PATRICIA HEALY San Jose Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from San Jose Junior College. ROBERT WHITCOMB HEAVEY Berkeley Letters and Science Criminology Kappa Sigma; Big " C " Society; Track. JOHN FREDERIC HEDTKE Santa Barbara Letters and Science American History Transfer from Santa Barbara State College; Honor Student. ROBERT WILLIAM HENDERSON Riverside Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Riverside Junior College; Bowles Hall; Honor Stu- dent; American Society of Me- chanical Engineers. N. HELEN HENRICH Oakland Letters and Science History Delta Zeta; Parliament; A. S. U. C. Teas; Class Committees. WILLIAM JOHN HERDMAN Berkeley Engineering Mechanical Engineering American Society of Mechanical Engineers. STEWART MACKENZIE HERRIOTT Berkeley Letters and Science Zoology Football Manager (2) (3). LILLIAN R. HESTER Red Bluff Letters and Science English Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; W. A. A. GEORGE ARTHUR HILL Oakland Engineering Civil Engineering American Society of Civil En- gineers; Intramural Sports. RY ELIZABETH HILL Berkeley Letters and Science Household Science. i HOMAS TOMA HIRASHIMA Summerland Agriculture Plant Pathology Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Jap- anese Students Club. LIZABETH CAVENDISH HOBBIN San Leandro Letters and Science Political Science Utrimque. ARGARET ANNE HOEFNER Newport Beach Letters and Science English Transfer from Santa Ana Junior Collene: Phrateres (3) (4); A. S. U. C. Dance Committee (3); W. A. A.; Hockey (3) (4); Bas- ketball (4). WILLIAM GABRIEL HOLLY Berkeley Commerce Economics Phi Kappa Psi; Scabbard and Blade; Quarterdeck: Crew (1)(2) (3) (4); Varsity Rowing Club. :HARLES ADOLPH HOLSTEIN Berkeley Agriculture Forestry Alpha Zeta: Xi Sigma Pi. JAMES BRITTON HOMMON Oakland Engineering Civil Engineering American Society of Civil Engi- neering. JANET JOYCE HOON San Diego Commerce Accounting Transfer from San Diego State College: Commerce Club. ELIZABETH ADELE HOPKINS San Francisco Letters and Science History Alpha Delta Pi; Counseling Execu- tive Board; Little Theatre (1) (2); Personnel (1)(2); Discus- sions (2X3); Intramural; Class Committees. MILTON THOMAS HILL Oakland Agriculture Forestry Phi Kappa Tau; Masonic Club; Forestry Club; Swimming (1); Water Polo (1): Assembly Dance UH2H3); Mixer Dance (2); Class Committees; Glee Club (2) (3). JOHN H. HIRT Los Angeles Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Glendale Junior Col- lege; American Society of Mechan- ical Engineering. DONALD WILLIAM HOBBS Oakland Commerce Economics. JOHN FRAZIER HOLLISTER San Luis Obispo Letters and Science Psychology Chi Phi; Daily Cal fornian Man- agerial Staff (1); Track (1); Var- sity Fencing (4); Pre-Medical Club (2) (3). MERRILL McBRIDE HOLMES Oakland Letters and Science Political Science Phrateres. FREEMAN MATTHEW HOM San Diego Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from San Diego State College; Chinese Students Club; Honor Student; University of Cali- fornia Symphony Orchestra. NGAI HO HONG San Francisco Letters and Science Political Science Chinese Students Club. BURTON M. HOOVER Berkeley Commerce Foreign Trade Theta Chi; Little Theatre (1) (2) (3); Welfare Council (3) (4); Fi- nance Chairman Loan Fund Drive (4); Welfare Personnel Commit- tee (2) (3); President ' s Reception Ball (1X3); Elections Commit- tee (2) (3); Class Committees. CLAY CHARLES HOPPER Concord Chemistry Chemistry Scabbard and Blade; Intramural Rifle Team. LEWITT HINK San Leandro Commerce Finance. HISAKO HISANAGA Hilo, Hawaii Letters and Science Public Health Nursing International House; Alpha Tau Delta. JAMES ROBERT HODGES LORI Beach Engineering Electrical Engineering MARTHA EDWARD HOLLOWAY Colusa Letters and Science History Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Chi Omega; Blue and Gold (2); Intramural Sports. ROXANA CAROLINE HOLMES Clarksburg Letters and Science Economics Sigma Kappa; Mortar Board; Pry- tanean; Y. W. C. A.; Treble Clef; Counseling: A. S. U. C. Teas; Music Council; Pan-Hellenic; Class Committees. PEGGY HOMER Ventura Letters and Science Physical Education Gamma Phi Beta; W. A. A. Vice- president; Pennant " C " Society. LUCILLE MARIE HOOK Walnut Creek Letters and Science Public Health Alpha Cbi Omega. CLAIR ALFRED HOPKINS Stocktm Letters and Science Psychology. DOROTHY LOUISE HORNBLOWER San Francisco Letters and Science English Beta Phi Alpha: Parliament (3) (4); Group System (3); Counsel- llltMlll :: tilth j 125 FERMOND CECIL HOROWITZ Los Angeles Engineering Civil Engineering American Society if Civil Engi- neers. JACK GORDON HOSMER Richmond Commerce Foreign Trade Pan Xenia. WILLIAM ANGLE HOWARD Sacramento Letters and Science English Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. HELEN HOWE Berkeley Commerce Foreign Trade Phi Chi Theta; Blue and Gold (2); Commerce Association. BYRON ROSS HUBBARD Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry Chi Pi Sigma; Congress Debating Society (3X4). CHARLES RAYMOND HUDSON Eureka Letters and Science Art Transfer from Humboldt State College: Delta EpsilM; Plymouth WOODROW WILSON HUMBURG Colusa Commerce Accountint Big " C " Society: Commerce As- sociation: Baseball. MARYJANE ANN HUNTINGTON San Francisco Letters and Science Philosophy Delta Gamma: Pelican (1X2): Intramural (1)(4). WILLIAM LLOYD HUTCHINGS Piedmont Commerce Business Administration International Houst; Alpha Delta Siqmi: Daily Cahftraian (1)(2). MASAO HOSHINO Winton Letters and Science Economics Japanese Students Club. WILLIAM JUDD HOSMER San Diego Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Army and Navy Academy: Sigma Alpha Epsilon: Secretary Interfraternity Council: Senior Peace Committee. MARY ALICE HOWAT Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Varsity Debating. ROBERT TEMPLETON HOWELL Pleasanton Commerce Business Administration Football Manager (2). JOHN WHITE HUBBARD Oakland Letters and Science Music Alpha Mu; Symphony Orchestra. L. ELIZABETH HUGHES Venice Letters and Science Household Science. MARIE CAROLINE HUND San Rafael Letters and Science Economics Phi Mu; Hammer and Coffin; Pry- tanean; Pelican (1X2) (3), Stan Head (4); Counseling; Property Chairman of Junior Farce; Dra- matics Council: Class Committees. FRANCES HOLLIDAY HURLBURT Berkeley Letters and Science English Women ' s Discussions, Secretary (3)(4); Counseling (3X4): Col- lege Women ' s Club Juniors; Y. W. C. A. Social Service (3); Class Committees. AYAME ICHIYASU San Francisco Letters and Science History Japanese Women ' s Students Club: Sigma Kappa Alpha; Counseling. CHESTER CRAIG HOSMER Long Beach Letters and Science Political Science Phi Kappa Psi; Winged Helmet; Crew Manager (3); Deputations Committee. PRESTON E. HOTZ Sonoma Letters and Science Geology Masonic Club; Thalian Players. ALBERT B. HOWDEN Oakland Letters and Science Political Science Scabbard and Blade (3X4). HALL HOLBROOK HOXIE San Francisco Commerce Foreign Trade Baseball Manager (2X3); Scab- bard and Blade. FRANK W. HUBBELL Glendale Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Glendale Junior College. LOUISE MARY HUGO Berkeley Letters and Science Art Phrateres; Daily Californian Art Staff; Newman Club. YVONNE MARIE HUNTER Long Beach Letters and Science English MINERVA JANE HURLEY Los Gatos Letters and Science Public Health Nursing Alpha Tau Delta. ROBERT GEORGE IMRIE Napa Commerce Finance Phi Sigma Kappa; Daily fornian Managerial (3); Committees. Call- Class tAIZO WILLIAM IMURA Alameda Commerce Economics. MARY SVLVIA ISAACS San Diego Letters and Science Economics Transfer from San Diego State College: Masonic Club: Phrateres: California Engineer Staff. LLOYD IVERSEN San Pedro Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Tau Beta Pi: Chi Epsilon; American Society of Ciil Engineers. OROTHY GRACE JACKSON Fresno Letters and Science English Alpha Omicron Pi: Girl Reserve Sponsor. EDWIN VICTOR JACOBSEN Piedmont tgri culture- Agricultural Economics Agricultural Economics Club. JOSEPHINE ANN JEFFERY Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Alpha Delta PI. DON JENSEN Oakland Letters and Science Economics Golden Bear; Big " C " Society: Basketball (1)(2) (3) (4); Mem- ber of U. S. Olympic Team 1936: Swimming (1); Water Polo (1) (2): U. C. Life Saving Corps: Golden Gate Swimmer: Y. M. C. A.; Thalian Players: Class Committees. PAUL EDWARD JOHANNES Long Beach Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; American Society of Mechanical Engineers. EVALYN ANNA JOHNSON Kentfield Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Marin Junior Col- lege: Masonic Club; Y. W. C. A. WILLIAM BEVERIDGE INNES Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry Chi Pi Sigma; Chemistry Club; California Engineer. FRANK HITOSHI ISOBE Sacramento Engineering Electrical Engineering American Institute of Electrical Engineers. BARBARA MARION IVIE Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Phi Omega PI; Personnel (1); Blue and Gold (2): Class Com- mittees. HARRY N. JACOBS Los Angeles Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from U. C. L. A PAUL LOUIS JACQUES Santa Ana Letters and Science Economics. WILLIAM ROBERT JEFFERY Nevada City Letters and Science Economics A. S. U. C. Band. LOIS VELDA JENSEN Riverside Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Riverside Junior College: Alpha Gamma Delta. BERENICE MARIAN JOHNSON Oakland Letters and Science International Relations Honor Student. FLOYD WILBUR JOHNSON Folsom Commerce Accounting Transfer from Sacramento Junior College: Phi Tau Theta; Wesley Foundation. ' KAORU INOUYE Los Gatos Utters and Science Chemistry Japanese Students Club. MASAYOSHI ITATANI San Francisco Letters and Science Physlcs-Optometry. IRE ELINORE JACKSON Piedmont Letters and Science Economics Little Theatre UH2H3H4); Class Committees. MARY JANE JACOBS Hanford Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege: Delta Delta Delta. VIRGINIA JAMESON Bakersfield Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College; Areta. GENEVIEVE JEMTEGAARD Petaluma Letters and Science Political Science Varsity Debating (2) (3) (4); Philorthlan (1) (2) (3) (4), President (3); Freshman Debat- ing; Forensic; Council (3) (4). MILTON HOWARD JENSEN Tracy Chemistry Chemistry Quarterdeck: Scabbard and Blade. CHARLOTTE JOHNSON San Francisco Letters and Science Philosophy Kappa Kappa Gamma; Ace of Clubs. GEORGE ROBERT JOHNSON Long Beach Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Occidental College: Bowles Hall: Honor Student: Daily Californian (2). 127 GORDON A. JOHNSON Turlock Commerce Accounting Transfer from Modesto Junior Co lege; Commerce Association. HAROLD JOHN JOHNSON Alameda Commerce Economics. MARY ANN JOHNSON Berkeley Letters and Science Economics. NANCY PRISCILLA JOHNSTON Berkeley Letters and Science History Hammer and Coffin; Welfare Coun- cil (3) (4); Pelican, Personnel Director (3); Treble Clef: Orche- sis; Phrateres; A. S. U. C. Card Sales; Leap Week Chairman (3); Class Committees. HAROLD RALPH JONES Berkeley Letters and Science Education Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Alpha Phi Alpha. REX LANDER JONES, JR. Redlands Commerce Finance Delta Upsilon; Golden Bear; Winged Helmet; Crew Manager (2) (3), Senior Manager (4); Big " C " Society; Varsity Rowing Club; Senior Peace Committee. JAMES LOUIS JOUBERT Camptoniille Mining Mining Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Thtta Tau; Masonic Club: Ameri- can Institute of Mining and Met- allurgical Engineers; Mining Asso- ciation. SANFORD L. KAHN Oakland Letters and Science- International Relations Dally Californian (2) (3) : Assem- bly Dance Committee; Advertising Service Bureau; A. S. U. C. Card Sales Committee, Junior Manager; Mask and Dagger Revue (2); Class Committees. SUNAO KANEMITSU Artesia Engineering Mechanical Engineering Japanese Students Club: American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Society of Automotive Engineers. 128 GORDON FRANCIS JOHNSON Santa Monica Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Ma- sonic Club; American Institute of Electrical Engineers. JANE ABIGAIL JOHNSON Berkeley Letters and Science French Delta Delta Delta; Pi Delta Phi. STANLEY JOHNSON Oakland Letters and Science Economics Alpha Delta Phi; Phi Beta Kap- pa; Golden Bear; Triune; Stu- dent Affairs Committee (3) (4); Senior Peace Committee; Recep- tion Committee (2) (3); Varsity Debating Team (2) (3) (4) ; Senate Debating Society; Interfraternity Council, President. FINN JONASSEN Seattle, Washington Engineering Mechanical Engineering Tau Beta Pi. J. PAUL JONES Bellevue, Idaho Commerce Economics Alpha Tau Omega; Black Towers; Glee Club (1)(2)(3): Crew (1); Baseball Manager (2); Fencing Manager (3); Commerce Associa- tion; Class Committees. RICHARD PEARSON JONES Sacramento Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Phi Gamma Delta. WILL C. JUMPER Natoma Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Senate Debating Society. THELMA KAHN San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Phi Sigma Sigma, President; Daily Californian (2X3): Varsity and Freshman Debating. NAOMI LILYAN KANTER Hollywood Letters and Science French Transfer from U. C. L. A.; PI Delta Phi. HAROLD GRENFELL JOHNSON Berkeley Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege; American Society of Me- chanical Engineers; Glee Club. LOLA EVANGELINE JOHNSON Crockett Letters and Science English Daily Californian; California En- gineer; Assembly Dance Commit- tee; Leap Week Publicity; W. A. A. Golf. WELDON STARR JOHNSON San Bernardino Letters and Science Economics Transfer from San Bernardino Jun- ior College; Phi Sigma Kappa. DAN JONES Pittsburg Engineering Communication American Institute of Electrical Engineers; California Engineer; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. LEIGH MAXWELL JONES Alameda Mining Mining Engineering Mining Association; American In- stitute of Mechanical Engineers; Alpha Delta Sigma; California En- gineer, Advertising Manager. WILLIAM MARTIN JOOST Martinez Letters and Science International Relations Sigma Phi Epsilon; Scabbard and Blade; Delta Phi Epsilon; Circle " C " Society; Track (2); Elec- tions Committee (1X2); In Hockey, Manager (3) (4). MYER SOL KAHN San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Bowles Hall; Debating Manager; Forensics Council; Senate; Class Committees. ELLEN LUROSE KALBFELL Los Angeles Letters and Science Spanish Transfer from U. C. L. A.; W. A. A.; Sigma Delta Pi. HORACE M. KARR Los Angeles Engineering Civil Engineering Alpha Kappa Lambda; Tau Beta Pi; Chi Epsilon; Quarterdeck; Glee Club. ICH SYLVIA KARSKI 1 1 Oakland .etters and Science Public Speaking .Ipha Epsilon Phi; Pelican; Crop nd Saddle. IROLD C. KAUFFMAN Alturas .etters and Science Economics. DID KAWASAKI Santa Maria ommerce Foreign Trade ransfer from San Mateo Junior : JEANNETTE KELLEY Oakland and Science History :ollege Women ' s Club: Masonic :iub: Counseling: A. S. U. C. I Sales Committee; Class Com- IUNCES LOUISE KELLY dream etters and Science Music -ransfer f.om U. C. L. A.; Delta lelta Delta. NICHOLAS VAN DE GRIFT KARSTENS Rimslde Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Riverside Junior College; Engineers Council (3), Secretary (4); American Society of Mechanical Engineers (3) (4). JEAN FLORENCE KAUFFMAN San Mateo Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Stanford University; International House; Phrateres;Y. W. C. A.; Elections Committee; A. S. U. C. Card Sales Commit- tee. JACK ALLEN KEENAN Pasadena Chemistry Chemical Engineering Transfer from Pasadena Junior College; California Engineer, Edi- tor; Publications Council; Chem- istry Club; Intramural Athletics. STANLEY JOSEPH KELLEY Alameda Commerce Economics Scabbard and Blade; Quarterdeck; Football (1). MARGARET L. KELLY Monrovia Commerce Economics Transfer from University of Colo- rado; Pi Beta Phi at U. C. L. A.; Phi Chi Theta; Y. W. C. A.; College Women ' s Club; Commerce Club; Blue and Gold. i DREW MAXWELL KENNEDY VIRGINIA LOUISE KENNEDY San Francisco engineering- Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Marin Junior Col- cur. ,RY PATRICIA KEOGH Gait Letters and Science French Newman Club. NE BEAVEN KIDD San Francisco Letters and Science Physical Education-Hygiene Delta Zeta; W. A. A. UH2H3) (4); Physical Education Majors Club (1)12) (3) (4); Little The- atre Make-up Staff (1). ANCES RENKO KIMURA Berkeley Letters and Science Bacteriology Japanese Women Students Club; W. A. A.; Counseling. Vallejo Letters and Science Public Speaking Parliament; Debating. RICHARD W. KERSHNER Santa Cruz Letters and Science Mathematics Transfer from San Jose State Teachers College. OGDEN KIESEL El Cerrito Commerce Economics Delta Kappa Epsilon. LAWRENCE NEIL KINCH Sacramento Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. TJ . SELMA M. KATTNER Salinas History Litters and Science Hlsti Transfer from U. C. L. A. MADELEINE D. KAUTCH Oakland Letters and Science Political Science Phi Delta; Masonic Club: Adver- tising Bureau, Assistant Manager CLAIRE EDNA KELDSEN San Francisco Letters and Science Physical Education-Hygiene Masonic Club; Orchesis; W. A. A. BARBARA FRISBIE KELLOGG Berkeley Letters and Science Bacteriology Alpha Chi Omega. VIVIAN ELSPETH KELLY Berkeley Letters and Science Zoology Treble Clef; Utrtmque; Y. W. C. A.: A. S. U. C. Social Commit- tee; Counseling. JANIS LOUISE KENT San Francisco Letters and Science History and Theory of Art Kappa Kappa Gamma; Y. W. C. A. Finance Committee (1); Intra- mural Riding, Tennis: Deputations (2); Cbss Committees (1X2) (3). HARRIET KEYES Menlt Park Letters and Science Economics Transfer from University of Ne- braska. DOROTHY A. KIMBALL Sacramento Letters and Science History Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Newman Club. ELLIS LeROY KINDIG Santa Rosa Agriculture Landscape Design Transfer from Santa Rosa Junior Colleie. 3m! 129 CARL W. KINDT Berkeley Letters and Science English Chi Phi; Scabbard and Blade; Track. ROBERT MORRIS KING Pomona Letters and Science Architecture Alpha Kappa Lambda; Scabbard and Blade; Pershing Rifles; Soccer (2). TOSH 10 KITO Kamishima, Japan Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege; Japanese Students Club. CYNTHIA ANNE KLINKHARDT Berkeley Letters and Science History Counseling; Senior Singings. DOUGLAS KEMLER KNIGHT Berkeley Commerce Economics Phi Kappa Psi; Skull and Keys Beta Beta; Basketball. RICHARD JULIUS KOSHLAND San Francisco Letters and Science Economics. THEODORE M. KREIGBERG San Mateo Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; American Institute of Electrical Engineers; Engineers ' Council; California Engineer. ROBERT LOUIS KRETZ San Francisco Mining Economic Geology. KROF BERNARD LEWIS KRONICK Berkeley Letters and Science- Political Science A. S. U. C. Card Sales Commit to (2) (3) (4); Class Commit tot. 130 MARY EILEEN KING San Francisco Letters and Science Public Speaking Delta Ze ta; Little Theatre (1) (2) (3); Counseling (2) (3). WILLARD ADELBERT KINNEY Berkeley Commerce Economics Phi Kappa Psi; Scabbard and Blade; Quarterdeck. HELEN MARK KLEIN Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Philorthian Debating. ROBERT J. KLITGAARD San Francisco Letters and Science Political Science Theta Upsilon Omega; Triune; Hammer and Coffin; Interfraternity Council; Senior Peace Committee; Rally Committee; Pelican Mana- gerial; Lightweight Basketball (4), Manager. CARL BUCKINGHAM KOFORD Piedmont Agriculture Forestry Transfer from University of Wash- ington; Xi Sigma Pi; Quarterdeck. VICTOR M. KOSTAINSEK Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry Scabbard and Blade; California Engineer. LOUISE VICTORIA KREMER Alton, Illinois Letters and Science Household Science Alpha Nu; Honor Student. JOSEPH SAMUEL KRINSKY Oakland Letters and Science International Relations Congress; Hillel Foundation, Pres- ident. CARLYN VIRGINIA KRUPP El Paso, Texas Letters and Science Public Speaking Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Alpha Epsilon Phi; Masonic Club; Hillel Foundation; International House; Deputations. MARY JANE TERESA KING San Francisco Letters and Science Latin. JACK DONALD KITLEY Ventura Agriculture Entomology. ISABEL OSBORN KLEIN Berkeley Letters and Science History-Zoology Beta Sigma Omicron; Y. W. A. (1X2); Counseling (3); Cr and Saddle. CAROL IONE KNIGHT Alameda Commerce Economics Mortar Board; Prytanean; Phi C Theta; Women ' s Executive Coi mittee, Secretary (4); Y. W. A., Cabinet (4); Counseling ( (3); Personnel (1X2). HISAE KONDO Alameda Letters and Science History. ERNEST HENRY KOUTZ Berkeley Letters and Science Economii Commerce Association. PAUL WENZEL DRESSMANN Richmond Letters and Science French Newman Club; Glee Club; D Californian. CATHERINE JEANETTE KROELLS Lindsay Letters and Science English Alpha Delta Pi. ROSEMARY JOAN KRUSE Oakland Letters and Science Economi Alpha Omicron Pi; Counseling (3) (4) ; Class Committees. EAN KUERZEL Oakland Letters and Science Alpha Omicron PI. History HIS RICHARD LAEREMANS Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Armstrong Junior College; Baseball. IAYMOND G. LAMB Ontario Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from Chaffey Junior Col- lege: Delta Phi Epsilon. ICK MASON LANDIS San Francisco Engineering Electrical Engineering Abracadabra: American Institute of Electrical Engineering: Intra- mural Football, Tennis, Water Polo. :ARROLL LA VERNE LANG Downey Letters and Science Social Institutions Transfer from Compton Junior College: Sheridan Hall, President: Men ' s Dormitory Association, Treasurer . 4ERLE LA RUE Pasadena Letters and Science Anthropology Transfer from Pasadena Junior College. IAMES MADISON LAURENT San Francisco .. Letters and Science Economics Beta Theta Pi; Daily Californian Editorial UH2). RO BERT FRANKLIN LAWS Riverside Letters and Science Political Science Golden Bear; Pi Delta Epsilon: Hammer and Coffin; Daily Califor- nia . (1X2X3), City Editor (4); Senior Peace Committee: Radio News Reporter (4). ELEANOR MAE LEAL Hughson Letters and Science Music Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege. FORREST GUV LACKLAND Berkeley Agriculture Entomology Entomology Club. EDITH LILLIAN LA GRONE Redding Letters and Science Latin Little Theatre Costume Staff (2) (3); Phrateres. ROSEMOND LAMB Long Beach Letters and Science Chemistry Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Phra- teres; W. A. A. NORMAN HOWARD LANE Oakland Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from Polytechnic Junior College: Delta Phi Epsilon; Golf (3X4). THOMAS H. LARKIN, JR. Berkeley Letters and Science Economics. JAMES RICHARD LATHAM Chino Commerce Accounting Alpha Kappa Lambda: Newman Club. ROBERT GLOVER LAVENSON Oakland Letters and Science History Bowles Hall; A. S. U. C. Card Sales Committee. JACK FRANKLIN LEACH San Jose Letters and Science Political Science Pi Sigma Alpha; Senate: Debat- ing. DAVID ALVIN LEE Berkeley Letters and Science Architecture Transfer from San Francisco State College; Chinese Students Club: Architecture Association; Delta Sigma Chi; Architectural Annual, Business Manager. ELMER E. LAOINE San Jose Agriculture Forestry Transfer from San Jose State Col- Intramural Baseball. EDWARD CARROL LAMB Falltarook Letters and Science Economics. BETTY LAMBORN Red Bank, New Jersey Commerce Money and Banking Mortar Board; Prytanean; Phi Chi Theta; Women ' s Dormitory Asso- ciation; Personnel (1X2)13): Counseling (2) (3); A. S. U. C. Social Committee (1X2) (3): V. W. C. A.: Commerce Association; Class Committees. PEARL ANNE LANE Fort Bragg Letters and Science Household Art Delta Chi Alpha. THOMAS EDWARD LARNER. JR. Marysfille Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Yuba County Junior College; Delta Phi Epsilon; New- man Club. ANNABEL LAUGHLIN Santa Rosa Letters and Science History Transfer from Santa Rosa Junior College; Phi Mu. GEORGE EARL LAWRENCE Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Phi Beta Kappa; Circle " C " So- ciety: Swimming: Water Polo: Water Sports Club. RUTH MARIAN LEACH Piedmont Letters and Science Political Science Kappa Kappa Gamma; Ace of Clubs: Y. W. C. A.; Welfare Per- sonnel; Intramural Sports. ELMER HARVEY LEE Oakland Letters and Science Zoology Chinese Students Club. 131 GORDON CANFIELD LEE Berkeley Utters and Science History Phi Kappa Sigma; Big " C " So- ciety: Baseball Manager (4); Senior Peace Committee. LOW KEE LEE Oakland Engineering Electrical Engineer Chinese Students Club; Ameri Institute of Electrical Engineers. JOHN L. LEONARD Riverside Letters and Science Physics Transfer from Riverside Junior College. JACK ANDREW LESSER San Francisco Letters and Science Economics. A - t -JP w RUTH M. LEUTZINGER Oakland Letters and Science Psychology Gamma Phi Beta. MARYELLEN F. LEWIS Whittier Letters and Science Economics Counseling (3) (4). OMAR J. LILLEVANG South Gate Engineering Civil Engineering. ADELE ETHEL LINOQUIST San Francisco Letters and Science English. PHILIP A. LISH Yorba Linda Letters and Selene - Political Science Del Rey. JOAN LEE Fulton Letters and Science English Alpha Chi Omega; Treble Clef; Blue and Gold. PAULINE LEE San Francisco Letters and Science Education Chinese Students Club. 132 MILLICENT LEPETICH San Francisco Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Counseling (2) (3) (4), Executive Board (3); Commuters ' Group, Chairman (3); Y. W. C. A. ALBERT M. LESTER Berkeley Commerce Account! ng Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Tennis (1). SIMEON LEVINSON Sacramento Letters and Science Economics Kappa Nu; Hillel Student Coun- cil. RICHARD NEWTON LEWIS Inverness Letters and Science Chemistry Golden Bear; Glee Club; Student Affairs Committee. KWONG LIM San Francisco Letters and Science Medical Sciences. MARJORIE HELEN LINDSAY Santa Ana Letters and Science History Alpha Chi Omega. BETH LITTLE Stockton Letters and Science Household Art KENNETH KOON LEE San Francisco Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from Lingnan University, Canton, China; Chinese Students Club; Tri-Chi, Vice-president. ANNIE B. LENAERS Berkeley Letters and Science Public Health Nursin Alpha Tau Delta. DONALD MOORE LESLIE Mountain View Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege: Honor Student; Chemistry Club; California Engineer (3); Student Advisory Bureau. LEON MELVIN LESTER Pleasanton Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Ventura Junior Col- lege; Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Phi; Hammer and Coffin; Alpha Delta Sigma; Pi Delta Epsilon; Daily Californian (2) (3), Managing Editor (4). JAMES VERNON LEWIS Berkeley Letters and Science Mathematics Pi Mu Epsilon; Phi Tau Theta: Masonic Club; Student Advisory Bureau. WILLIAM 0. LEWIS Colton Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from San Bernardino Jun- ior College; Bowles Hall; A. S. U. C. Band (3) (4). JOHN EMERY LINDBERG, JR. Stockton Engineering Mechanical Engineering American Society of Mechanic! Engineers, Secretary; Calvin Club ROBERT E. LINNAN Pasadena Commerce Finance and Accounting. JOSEPHINE VIRGINIA LITTLE San Francisco Letters and Science History Transfer from Chico State Colltg V 3INIA CHURDAN VINGSTON San Francisco tiers and Science French. H C. LOFQUIST San Bernardino tiers and Science History. STIN C. LOPEZ Manaoag, Pang, P. I. ttm and Science International Relations bating (1); Centuriata Debat- g Society: Daily Californian Ed- anal Staff; Blue and Gold Edi- rial Staff (2): Varsity Fencing W DELL W. LOVE Glendale ' tters and Science Public Speaking ansfer from Glendale illege; Sigma Nu. Junior E ' ABETH MARY LUCID Pinole otters and Science Spanish. A IN ERICSON LUNDQUIST Berkeley etters and Science Spanish. LVRENCE H. LUTZ Santa Ana etters and Science History si Upsilon: Skull and Keys; Beta leta; Big " C " Society; Football 1H2M3), Captain (4); Track I 3). HA MAY LYON Oakland etters and Science English lelta Delta Delta; Esperam; laily Californian (1X2) (3): ounseling. J EUGENE McATEER San Francisco .etters and Science Economics ;igma Phi Epsilon: Big " C " So- iety; Varsity Football. DONALD R. LOCKWOOD Water to n. New York Letters and Science Political Science Theta Upsilon Omega. MARIAN REED LOGAN Berkeley Letters and Science Nursing Alpha Tau Delta; Masonic Club; W. A. A. KATHERINE LOUISE LOTHROP Oakland Letters and Science Art Phi Delta, President. VIVIAN LOWE San Leandro Letters and Science History Little Theatre Art Staff. DOROTHY EUGENE LUNARDINI San Francisco Letters and Science Italian Public Speaking Pi Mu lota. President; Circolo Italiano, President. CELESTINO DAPRENAL LUNTAO Dingle, lloilo, P. I. Commerce Business Administration Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege. FRANCES ELIZABETH LYDERS San Francisco Letters and Science International Relations. RALPH WILSON LYTLE San Francisco Letters and Science Chemistry. GERTRUDE AGNES McAULAY Fullerton Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from Fullerton Junior College; International House; W. A. A.; Hockey. PAUL V. W. LOFGREN Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Honor Student. FRANK ELWIN LONES Pas Robles Letters and Science Medical Sciences Honor Student; Phi Tau Theta: Circle " C " Society; Wesley Foun- dation (1)(2)(3 (4); Gymnas- tics (1)(2)(3)(4). EANOR LOUBET Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Sigma Kappa; Pelican (1X2). JEANETTE LOUISE LUBLINER San Francisco Letters and Science English Philorthlan: Daily Californian (1); Counseling. JOHN PEER LUNDE Vallejo Engineering Mechanical Engineering Tau Beta Pi; American Society of Mechanical Engineers. ANNA ELIZABETH LUPTON Richmond Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from Fullerton Junior College: Masonic Club. JUNE MARTHA LYNCH Oakland Letters and Science English Little Theatre Costume Staff; W. A. A. Fencing; Counseling; A. S. U. C. Music Group. BERTHA MAY McANDREWS Pinole Commerce Transportation Little Theatre. DAVID WILLIAM McAULEY Klamath Falls, Oregon Chemistry Chemistry Abracadabra: Phi Phi; Hammer and Coffin; Scabbard and Blade; Pelican Editorial Staff (2) (3) (4); Freshman Cross-Country (l);Crew (1). ELIZABETH McBRIDE Berkeley Letters and Science- Medical Sciences Transfer from University of Utah; Alpha Delta Pi. MABEL MARGARET McCAMMAN Oakland Letters and Science Economics Pi Phi Delta. DONALD EDWARD McCOLLUM Yuba City Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Yuba County Junior College; American Society of Civi Engineers. MARJORIE LOUISE McDONALD Sacramento Letters and Science Music Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. ROBERT HOFFMAN MCDOWELL Pomona Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Pomona Junior Col lege; Alpha Kappa Lambda. FLORENCE McFARLAND San Leandro Letters annd Science Economics OLIVE PROVIS McGINNIS Berkeley Letters and Science Bacteriology Honor Student; Little Theatre Properties Staff. FRANCES MARY MacCREGOR Berkeley Letters and Science- Public Speaking Hostess Committee. HELEN SAXON McKEAN Oakland Letters and Science Economics Phraterei; Y. W. C. A. Commun ity Service. 134 LUCILLE McBROOM Oakland Letters and Science Economics Phrateres; Counseling; W. A. A. STUART LORING McCLURE Mission San Jose Letters and Science Public Speaking Delta Kappa Epsilon; Circle " C " Society; Polo (2) (3) (4); Little Theatre; Crew; Class Secretary (2). FENWICK HARRIS McCOLLUM Riverside Engineering Mechanical Engineering American Society of Mechanical Engineers. RALPH CONNOR MacDONALD Berkeley Engineering Civil Engineering American Society of Civil Engi- neers; Tau Beta Pi; Chi Epsilon. JAMES M. McFADDEN Placentia Commerce Accounting. ROBERT JAMES McGANN Bloomington Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from San Diego State College; American Society of Civil Engineers. RUTH ALICE McGOWAN San Francisco Letters and Science Art Delta Epsilon. ASHLEIGH D. MCINTOSH San Diego Letters and Science French Transfer from San Diego State College. EDITH MOBLEY McKENZIE Lodi Letters and Science Public Health Nursing Treble Clef; Alpha Tau Delta; University of California Training School for Nurses. President; Dormitory Council (4); Blue and Gold (2). GEORGE L. McCALL Riverside Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from Riverside College; Fencing (3) (4). Junior WESLEY McCLURE Salinas Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Salinas Junior Col- lege; International House; Y. M. C. A.; Wesley Foundation; Honor Student; Phi Sigma Alpha; Inter- national House Men ' s Council; Congress Debating Society. JOHN ALEXANDER McDONALD Madeline Letters and Science Mathematics Transfer from Lassen Junior Col- lege. ALICE JUSTINE McDOUGAL Perkins Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. MARJORY HELEN McFADDEN Oakland Letters and Science Household Art RUTH McGIMSEY Port Chicago Letters and Science Household Science Masonic Club, Council (4); W. A. A. ELIZABETH CLARE McGRATH Oxnard Letters and Science Economics Chi Omega. RICHARD McKANNAY San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Bowles Hall; Alpha Delta Sigma: Blue and Gold (2) (3): Pelican Managerial (2X3); Class Com- mittees. HELEN ELIZABETH MacKENZIE Brentwood Letters and Science Art Kappa Phi; Little Theatre: Junli Farce. 1 .1 LIAM MACKEY San Francisco alters and Science Public Speaking rack (1)(2) (3) (4); Little The- Class Committees. AYNE MAY MCKINLEY San Francisco etters and Science History Ipha XI Delta; Y. W. C. A.; (2) (3). (Y RUTH MCLAUGHLIN Crescent City etters and Science Physical Education men ' s " C " Society, Nu Sigma si: Prytanean; A. S. U. C. E - :utie Committee: W. A. A. (1) 2X3), President (4); Physical ducation Majors Club, Secretary 2); A. S. U. C. Executive Com- ittee; Women ' s Executive Com- ittee. IID MCNUTT Oakland and Science Public Speaking Gamma Delta; Scabbard and S1UEL IRVING McREYNOLDS King City etters and Science History hi Pi Phi: Circle " C " Society; appa Kappa Psi, Treasurer; Di- ctor. A. S. U. C. Band: Bas- etball: Daily Californian, Sports taff; U. C. Life Saving Corps. J ' SON MADDEN Dixon ommerce Money and Banking ' hi Gamma Delta; Winged Hel- let; Alpha Delta Sigma; Daily altfornian (1X2) (3). J CARSON MAGILL Vallejo .etters and Science English Transfer from Santa Clara Unlver- ity; Phi Gamma Delta; Golden iear; Skull and Keys; Beta Beta: tally Californian Sports Staff (2) 3). Associate Editor (4). RREN WALLACE MAHONEY Berkeley .etters and Science Geology Baton: Manager U. C. Band; Mu- se Council. IRBARA ELIZABETH MANGUN Bakersfield Letters and Science Zoology Hostess Committee. ETHEL G. McKIBBEN Berkeley Letters and Science Art Delta Epsilon; Elections Commit- tee. JOSEPH DONGAL MacKINNON Chico Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Chico State College. ANGUS V. McLEOD Ukiah Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from Matin Junior Col- lege; Glee Club (3). . GREGORY McPHATE San Bernardino Letters and Science Public Speaking Phi Sigma Kappa; Phi Phi; Big " C " Society; Black Towers; Baseball. RUTH MAY McVEAN Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Phi Mu. JOSEPH ALLEN MADISON Berkeley Commerce Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Delta Tau Delta. JAMES PETER MAGUIRE San Francisco Agriculture Forestry Transfer from San Francisco State: Scabbard and Blade; New- man Club. MARY ELIZABETH MALLORY Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Pi Phi Delta; Kappa Phi; Treble Clef (1)(2), Manager (3X4); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4). GERALDINE ROBERTA MANN Oakland Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege; Beta Gamma Sigma; Chris- tian Science Society; Masonic Club; Honor Student; Counseling. m GLADYS PHASER MACK IE Los Angeles Letters and Science French Transfer from Pomona College; Alpha Chi Omega. JEAN ESTHER McKINSTRY Gait Letters and Science Social Institutions Little Theatre; University Choral Ensemble (3) (4). ROBERT STRANGE McNAMARA Oakland Letters and Science Economics Phi Gamma Delta; Phi Beta Kap- pa; Golden Bear; Winged Helmet: Student Affairs Committee. Chair- man; Crew. JEAN ELEONORE McQUINN Oakland Letters and Science Household Art. FLORENCE VIRGINIA McWILLIAMS Bakmfield Letters and Science Art ELLA MADSEN Ripon Letters and Science History Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege; Theta Upsilon; Masonic Club; Counseling (4); Y. W. C. A. LEONE MAGUIRE Palo Alto Letters and Science History Pi Beta Phi. EDA MARGARET MALOY San Francisco Letters and Science Art. CARL AUGUST MANNISTO Berkeley Commerce Foreign Trade Pan Xenia; Glee Club. fltftlltt) 135 MINERVA MANNISTO Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Thalian; Little Theatre. HARRY LOUNSBURY MARSH Pasadena Agriculture Entomology Transfer from the University of Idaho; Bowles Hall. ELLA DOROTHEA MARTI6NONI Oakland Letters and Science Education Transfer from Williams Junior College; Sigma Kappa. JOHN FREDRICK MARTIN Monterey Letters and Science Political Science Zeta Psi; Winged Helmet; Skull Keys; Football Manager (2) (3). TRAVER SEARS MARTIN Stratford Agriculture Fruit Products Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege; Chi Pi Sigma: Brick Morse ' s Collegians. MARJORIE R. MASON Berkeley Letters and Science Pi Phi Delta: Masonic Club; Win- ter Sports Club: Crop and Saddle; W. A. A. Council. ROMNEY WOLFE MASTERS Berkeley Engineering Mechanical Engineering Sigma Phi. ROSE F. MATSUMOTO Walnut Grove Letters and Science Education Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Japanese Women Stu- dents Club. WALLACE E. MAY Coalinoa Letters and Science Physics Optometry Omega Delta; Newman Club. 136 omics NECTALIO F. MANRIQUE Huancayo, Peru Chemistry Chemistry. VIVIAN I. MARSHALL San Mateo Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from San Mateo Junior College: Masonic Club; Phrateres; A. S. U. C. Women ' s Orchestra; Little Theatre Costume Staff: Thalian: Stebbins Hall Council: Y. W. C. A. ALICE EVELYN MARTIN Whittier Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from Whittier College; Pi Beta Phi; Guild of Applied Arts; Delta Chi Alpha, President: Phrateres; Counseling. LOIS MARIBELLE MARTIN Reedley Letters and Science Physical Education Hygiene W. A. A.; Masonic Club. HALE MASON Chico Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Chico State Teach- ers College. J. STANDISH MASSIE Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Zeta Psi; Winged Helmet; Tennis (1); Boxing (3) (4); Rally Com- mittee. 0. JAMES MATHSON San Jose Commerce Accounting Transfer from San Jose State College; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. LILY YURIKO MATSUSHIGE Ceres Letters and Science Music Japanese Women Students Club. HELEN JEAN MAYER Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Zeta Tau Alpha: Blue and Gold (2); A. S. U. C. Card Sales. WILLIAM BARCLAY MANUEL Vacaville Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Stanford University. ARTHUR ELMORE MARSTON Monterey Letters and Science Mathematics. CHARLES PHILIP MARTIN Richmond Engineering Civil Engineering. MARVIN DE WITT MARTIN Berkeley Engineering Mechanical Engineering Masonic Club. JACK MASON San Diego Letters and Science Physics Transfer from San Diego State College. RUTH PRESTON MASSON San Francisco Letters and Science Social Theory. MITSUGI MATOI San Francisco Letters and Science Physics Optometry Japanese Students Club; Omega Delta. HENRY FARNHAM MAY Berkeley Letters and Science History Phi Beta Kappa, President: lish Club; Occident, Editor: Honor Students Council. BENICHI MAYEWAKI Hanford Letters and Science International Relations. 4RTIN HAROLD MAYFIELO Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Boxing; Swimming. IN MEIKLEJOHN Berkeley Letters and Science Philosophy Delta Gamma; Phi Beta Kappa: Mortar Board; Prytanean; Torch and Shield; English Club; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3X4); Open For- um Board (3) (4); Women ' s Ju- dicial Committee (4). ELYN LOUISE MELOAN Taft Commerce Economics Zeta Tau Alpha: Daily Califor- nian: Blue and Gold; A. S. U. C. Committee. 3EDERICK W. MESSCHAERT Piedmont Letters and Science Architecture Transfer from Williams Junior College; Phi Kappa Sigma. OBERT C. MEYER Burlingame Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Bachelordon; Big " C " Society; Varsity Tennis. ORRAINE ROSALIE MICHEL Richmond Letters and Science Physical Education Hygiene Nu Sigma Psi: Women ' s " C " So- ciety: W. A. A.: Physical Educa- tion Majors Club. LYDE LEONARD MILLER Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Honor Student; Masonic Club; Track (1). OHN ANDREW MILLER San Francisco Engineering Mechanical Engineering Kappa Sigma. MARY SHANNON MILLSAP Woodland Letters and Science History W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Daily Californian (1). MAE MAYNARD Berkeley Letters and Science Music. MARGARET ELLEN MELLINGER Santa Barbara Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from Santa Barbara State College. PAULA ANN MERRILL San Francisco Letters and Science English. JEAN CHRISTINA MESSENGER Fresno Letters and Science Public Health Nursing Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege. WILLIAM C. MEYER Berkeley Commerce Foreign Trade. ROBERT T. MILER Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry. EARL ANDREW MILLER San Francisco Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from San Mateo Junior College. MERRILLYN LORRAINE MILLER Los Angeles Letters and Science History Alpha Delta Pi; Personnel (1) (2); Y. W. C. A. (1)(2); Class Committees. MARGARET HELEN MINARD Sacramento Letters and Science History Alpha Xi Delta. ELIZABETH HAZEL MAYO Berkeley Litters and Science Curriculum in Nursing Delta. ANSEL JOHN MELLO Rode Letters and Science Optometry Omega Delta. HOMAS STILES MERRILL Santa Barbara Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Santa Barbara State College; Barrington Hall. MALCOM MEYER San Leandro Commerce Foreign Trade. VERA MEZIRKA Oakland Letters and Science Slavic Languages Slavic Society, Secretary, Vice- president. EMMA ISABELLE MILES San Francisco Letters and Science Public Speaking Chi Omega. FRANCES MARIANNE MILLER Lakeview. Oregon Utters and Science English Gamma Phi Beta. RUTH EVELYN NE MILLER Oakland Letters and Science Economics Alpha Gamma Delta: Daily Cali- fornian; Class Committees. EDWARD WILLIAM MINASSIAN Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from San Francisco State College: Pre-Medical Club; Psy- chology Club. RICHARD ADOLPH MINGST San Francisco Commerce Labor Economi HERBERT C. MOFFITT, San Francisco Letters and Science Zoology Delta Kappa Epsilon; Honor Stu GAIL MONTGOMERY Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Philorthian. CHARLOTTE CHILDS MOORE Los Angeles Letters and Science Public Health Nursim Transfer from U. C. L. A.: Alpha Tau Delta. BENTON DAVIS MORGAN San Francisco Commerce Business Administration Scabbard and Blade; Pending Rides; Newman Club; Senate: Welfare Council: Orientations Council, Chairman (4); Senior Peace Committee: Commerce Soci- ety (2) (3). DORIS KERN MORGAN San Francisco Utters and Science Political Science. HARRY YOSHIO MORI Imperial Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from Central Junior Col- lege; Japanese Students Club. GEORGE LANHAM MORRILL Oakland Letters and Science Spanish Sigma Delta Pi; Newman Club lf.ti.vtb 138 IRENE G. MORRIS Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Areta. JAMES MITCHELL Los Angeles Letters and Science Music Transfer from Los Angeles Junior College; Alpha Mu. AYLTA GREY MONROE Woodland Letters and Science History Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Delta Gamma; Y. W. C. A. ROBERT WARR MOON Bakersfield Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College; Senate; California Club; A. S. U. C. Radio Commission; Swimming. REX MOORE, JR. Sacramento Commerce Insurance Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Hammer and Coffin; Alpha Delta Sigma; Commerce Club; Pelican Managerial (3), Manager (4). BURROWS W. MORGAN, JR. Berkeley Commerce Foreign Trade Sigma Nu; Skull and Keys; Scab- bard and Blade; Class Commit- tees. ETHEL LOUISE MORGAN Berkeley Letters and Science Mathematics Y. W. C. A.; Phrateres. FRED TOSHIO MORIOKA San Francisco Commerce Business Administration Japanese Students Club. BERT MILLER MORRIS Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry Honor Student; Y. M. C. A. Cab- inet; Masonic Club; Chemistry Club. MURIEL MAXINE MORRIS Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Zeta Tau Alpha; Class Commit- tees (3) (4). JAMES FRANKLAND MITCHELL Visalia Commerce Economics Kappa Alpha; Alpha Delta Sigma; Pi Delta Epsilon; Blue and Gold Managerial Staff (2) (3), Mana- ger (4). JOY MONSKY Omaha, Nebraska Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from University of Chi- cago; Alpha Epsilon Phi. BARBARA MARIE MOORE Berkeley Commerce Retailing Phi Chi Theta. VIRGINIA JOY MOREHOUSE Piedmont Letters and Science English Chi Omega. CLAIRE E. MORAN Eureka Letters and Science Public Health Nursing Transfer from Humboldt College; Alpha Tau Delta. State JOHN ROLLIN MORGAN Modesto Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege. HARRY HIDEO MOROFUJI Turlock Commerce Economics. EDNA FRANCES MORRIS Berkeley Letters and Science Economics. WILLIAM E. MORRIS, JR. Stockton Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Kappa Lambda. I-TTY VI MORSE Alameda Letters and Science Household Art Household Art Society; California Engineer Managerial Staff. )NALD DAVID MUEH San Francisco Commerce Economics Scabbard and Blade. iSTER H. MULLEN Sacramento Engineering Mechanical Engineering American Society of Mechanical Engineers; A. S. U. C. Band. EITH BRAKENRIDGE MUNRO Berkeley Letters and Science History. ICTOR MYER Westwood Engineering Electrical Engineering Tau Beta Pi; American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Vice- president. Chairman. AKAO F. NAKAYAMA Sacramento Agriculture Plant Nutrition and Plant Physiology Transfer from College of Agricul- ture at Davis. ICHARD HENRY NEDDERSEN Oakland Letters and Science Economics Scabbard and Blade; Pershing Rifles. WILLIAM NEILSON. JR. Oakland Mining Mining Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Golden Bear; Tau Beta Pi; Tneta Tau; Triune; Alpha Delta Sigma; En- gineers ' Council; California Engi- neer: Welfare Council; Football Manager (2). MARTIN PHILLIP NELSON Glendale Letters and Science Economics Sigma Nu; Little Theatre; Glee Club. BILL REYNOLDS MOST Oakland Letters and Science Chemistry Baton; Pershing Rifles; A. S. U. C. Band; Daily Callfornian (1) (2); Varsity Handball Team. JOHN JAMES MULLARKY Oakland Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from St. Mary ' s College; Commerce Club; Foreign Trade Club. LORNA ELIZABETH MULLEN Kneeland Letters and Science Latin Beta Phi Alpha; Phi Beta Kappa; Women ' s Executive Committee (4); Student ' s Advisory Bureau (3), Sub-chairman (4); Califor- nia Engineer; Women ' s Counseling (2) (3); Vocational Information Committee; Honor Students Coun- cil; Blue and Gold (2). JEANNE M. MUSY Palo Alto Letters and Science History Transfer from San Jose State. MARY CLAIRE MYERS Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Blue and Gold (2); Pennant " C " Society, W. A. A. KAARLO WILLIAM NASI San Diego Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from San Diego State College; American Society of Civil Engineers; Chi Epsilon. GEORGE HILLYER NEEL Burlingame Letters and Science Bacteriology Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Chi Pi Sigma: Masonic Club; Little Theatre, Production Manager; Glee Club (1X2) (3) (4). ALLEN NELSON Berkeley Letters and Science Journalistic Studies Swimming; Track; Cross-Country. RUTH VIVIAN NELSON Oakland Letters and Science Bacteriology. ALBERT GRAY MOWBRAY Berkeley Utters and Science Astronomy. JOE EDWARD MULLIN Healdsburg Agriculture Agricultural Economics Transfer from Santa Rosa Collcte. Junior BOB FRED MULVANA Bakersfield Commerce Economics Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College: Kappa Sigma. WILLIAM LOUIS MUTSCHLER Oakland Commerce Accounting. RICHARD THERON NAISMITH San Jose Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from San Jose State College. JEAN LOUISE NASON Alameda Letters and Science History Zeta Tau Alpha; Class Commit- tees. ROBERTA ELIZABETH NEILL Denalr Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege; Areta. CHARLES R. NELSON Rancho Santa Fe Letters and Science English Transfer from San Diego State College. WESLEY JOHN NELSON Richmond Agriculture Forestry Alpha Zeta: XI Sigma Pi. (lifill! ROBERT R. NEPTUNE Burlingame Commerce Retailing Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Honor Student; Beta Gamma Sigma, President; Wesley Foundation, President; Phi Tau Theta; Wesley Players. RICHARD WARRINGTON NEWELL San Francisco Commerce Finance Sigma Nu; Winged Helmet; Alpha Delta Sigma; Pi Delta Epsilon; Phi Phi; Daily California . LOIS MARGARET NEWMAN Oakland Letters and Science History Alpha Delta Pi. ANNA LAWRENCE NICHOL Fort Lewis, Washington Letters and Science International Relation Chi Omega; Phrateres (3) (4); Women ' s Counseling UH2). KINGSLEV M. NICOLSON Berkeley Mining Engineering Theta Chi; American Institute of Mining Engineers; Mining Asso- ciation. IDA REED NOACK Oakland Letters and Science Political Science Sigma Kappa; Prytanean; Women ' s Representative (4) ; Women ' s Ex- ecutive Committee, Chairman; A. S. U. C. Executive Committee; Women ' s Judiciary Committee: Personnel (1X2) (3); A. S. U. C. Social Committee (1)(2)(3); Women ' s Counseling (2) (3); Blue and Gold (2). HELEN LOUISE NOBLES Yorkville Letters and Science Household Science Alpha Nu; Women ' s Counseling (3) (4). JANE NOLD San Leandro Letters and Science Zoology Calypso Club; Honor Student; Student Advisory Board. BILLIE ANN NOWINSKI San Diego Commerce Economics Women ' s Counseling, 3) (4); Phrateres; Little Tkntre Make-up Staff (3): W. A. A.; Class Com- mittees. 140 JERRY NEVIUS Oakland Letters and Science Architecture Architecture Association; Hammer and Coffin; Delta Sigma Chi; Daily Californian, Art Editor; Pelican, Art Board. HARRIET LOUISE NEWGARD Oakland Letters and Science International Relations Masonic Club; Phi Delta; Adver- tising Service Bureau, Manager (3). MILTON MAXWELL NEWMARK Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Scabbard and Blade. AGNES MARIE NICHOLS Walnut Grove Letters and Science History. LAVINIA MAE NIEMANN Winters Letters and Science History Transfer from Sacramento Junio College; Chi Omega. JACK DONALD NOBLE Glendale Agriculture Agricultural Economics Transfer from California Agricul- tural College; Sigma Nu. MARJORIE REY NOBLES Cloverdale Letters and Science Public Health Nursing Transfer from Santa Rosa Junior College; Alpha Tau Delta. LEONARD KIPFER NORTON Berkeley Mining Mining Abracadabra; MasonicClub; Swim- ming; Water Polo. ALICE ANNE NOYES Alameda Letters and Science English. SEARLE GEORGE NEVIUS Oakland Engineering Mechanical Engineering. CHARLES NEWMAN San Francisco Letters and Science Music Honor Student. ALFRED ARNOLD NEWTON Taft Letters and Science Art Transfer from Taft Junior Col- lege; Delta Epsilon; Big " C " Society; Basketball; Tennis. MARGARET LOUELLA NICHOLS Anaheim Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Fullerton Junior College; Y. W. C. A. NANCY ELIZABETH NIGHTINGILL Watsonville Letters and Science Political Science Sigma Kappa; Daily Californian (1); Women ' s Counseling (2) (3); A. S. U. C. Teas (2)(3); W. A. A.; Class Committees. JOHN W. NOBLE Berkeley Letters and Science History- International Relations Transfer from Marin Junior Col- lege. DAVID NOGUCHI Sacramento Engineering Mechanical Engineering American Society of Mechanical Engineers. V. AUTHENE NORTON Berkeley Letters and Science Household Art Phi Omega Pi; Y. W. C. A. (1) (2); Ma sonic Club (2). TOMOYE K. NOZAWA San Francisco Letters and Science Oriental Languages-Household Art Japanese Women Students Clui Phi Theta; Delta Chi Alpha: ternatlonal House; Phraten Y. W. C. A. ILIA ALYCE NUNES Auburn Letters and Science Spanish Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Assembly Dance Com- mittee (3); Dormitory Council 4URENCE DONALD DATES Sacramento Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. HOMAS JOSEPH O ' BRIEN Roseville Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Barrington Hall. AYAZI ODA Berkeley Commerce Accounting Beta Alpha Psi. IDEMI OGAWA Garden Grove Commerce Economics Transfer from Santa Ana Junior College: Japanese Students Club. HILIP E. OLIVER-SMITH Alameda Letters and Science English English Club; Hammer and Cof- fin; Little Theatre, Art Director; Junior Farce; Mask and Dagger Revue. ILIZABETH M. OLSON Clarksburg Agriculture Agricultural Economics Delta Delta Delta. TOMOYUKI TOM OMORI San Francisco Letters and Science Political Science Japanese Students Club. 10SE ORINGEL Los Angeles Letters and Science Curriculum in Nursing Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Honor Student. ROSALIND NUSS Santa Monica Letters and Science Economics Transfei from Santa Monica Junior College; Sigma Delta; Hillel Stu- dent Council. JACK J. O ' BRIEN San Diego Letters and Science Mathematics- Physics Transfer from San Diego State College; Pi Mu Epsilon. VIRGINIA OCCHIENA Hanford Letters and Science History Deputations (3); Phrateres (3) (4); Newman Club (2) (4); W. A. A. Swimming and Tennis. PATRICIA AILEEN O ' DAY San Francisco Letters and Science Latin Alpha Delta Pi; Newman Club (1) (2); Elections Committee (2); Blue and Gold Managerial (2) (3); Crop and Saddle (4). JOSEPH HIROSUKE OGURA San Francisco Letters and Science Medical Sciences Japanese Students Club; Interna- tional House. EVELYN RUTH OLSON San Francisco Commerce Business Administration. MARIE HILDEGARDE OLSON San Francisco Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Counseling. GRACE O ' NEILL San Mateo Letters and Science Physical Education Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Alpha Gamma Delta; Class Committees (3) (4); W. A. A. FRANK LEO ORNELLAS Oakland Letters and Science Economics Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Football Manager (2); Varsity Boxing Team; Co-chairman of Race Rela- tions Group of Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A.; Chairman of Social Action Committee of Y. M. C. A. MARY ELIZABETH NYE Ventura Letters and Science Spanish Transfer from Ventura Junior Col- lege; Pi Beta Phi; Counseling; In- tramural. RNELIUS O ' BRIEN Bakersfield Commerce Business Management Transfer from Texas University; Commerce Club. MELBA O ' CONNELL Oakland Letters and Science History. MARGARET VIRGINIA ODGERS Roseville Letters and Science German Transfer from Sacramento Junior College: Deutsches Verein. TED SADAO OKUMOTO Los Angeles Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Jap- anese Students Club; Interna- tional House; Commerce Associa- tion. GUSTAV HELGE OLSON Kimjsburg Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Reedley Junior Col- lege. HHUI [Itlllllll jlttllltii RITA ELIZABETH O ' MARA Oakland Letters and Science Spanish Hammer and Coffin; Pelici Counseling. BETTY OPPENHEIMER Alameda Letters and Science French Transfer from Stanford University; Kappa Kappa Gamma. WARD CHARLES ORVIS Coronado Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.; Amer- ican Society of Mechanical Engi- neers; Blue and Gold Editorial (2) (3). 141 CHARLES THOMAS OSBORNE Long Beach Letters and Science Political Science Phi Kappa Psi; Deputations Co mittee; Baseball. JANET ISOBEL OSTROM San Martin Letters and Science Public Health Nursinf Transfer from San Jose Junior Col- leie. EMILY ELIZABETH OVERHOLTZER Alameda Letters and Science History Transfer from San Mate Junior College. JOAN OZBURN Taft Letters and Science Art Transfer from Taft Junior ROBERT THOMAS PALMER San Francisco Engineering Civil Engineering Scabbard and Blade; American Society of Civil Engineers; Base- ball (1)(4). THOMAS C. PARRY Avenal Letters and Sciena Political Science Transfer from Full College. lerttn JOHN EDWIN PARSONS Berkeley Commerce I nsurance- Finance Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Daily Cali- fornian (1)(2)(3 . ROSALIE NETTE PATTON Berkeley Letters and Science Architecture Transfer from Marin Junior Col- lege; Alpha Alpha Gamma; Archi- tectural Association; Newman Club; Crop and Saddle. . RECNAR PAULSEN Woodland Agriculture Agricultural EcoitMlics Transfer from Stanford University: Delta Kappa EpsllM. PATRICIA R. OSER Chico Letters and Science English Transfer from Chico State Col- lege. FRANKLIN WOMACK OTT Westwood Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Lassen Junior Col- lege; Quarterdeck; Scabbard and Blade; Commerce Association; Ma- sonic Club; Intramural Track. ALAN BURR OVERSTREET Berkeley Letters and Science International Relations Varsity Fencing Team, Manager (4). SIMEON VERGARA PACQUING Berkeley Letters and Science History. Junior FRANCES LEONA PARATORE Berkeley Letters and Science Latin Utrimque. CHARLES MASON PARSONS Bakersfield Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College. EDWARD ALBERT PATRIQUIN San Francisco Letters and Science Chemistry Chess Club. WARREN H. PATTON Gilroy Letters and Science Architecture Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege; Chi Alpha Kappa; Delta Sigma Chi; Architecture Associa- tion. BETTY CLARA PAYNE Suiter Creek Letters and Science English W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Phrater- es; Masonic Club. JAKE OSOFFSKY Sacramento Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Barrington Hall; Ameri- can Society of Civil Engineers ' Wrestling Squad. WILLIAM HENRY OUTMAN Richmond Letters and Science Physical Education and Hygiene Sigma Alpha: Baseball U)(4). JOSEPH OWASHI El Cajon Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from San Diego State College; Japanese Students Club; American Institute of Electrical Engineers. FRANK AIRHART PALMER Honolulu, Hawaii Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from the University of Hawaii; International House; Crew (3). ROBERT WILLIAM PARKINSON Berkeley Commerce Transportation. JAMES J. PARSONS Monrovia Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Pasadena Junior College; Psi Upsilon. CREIGHTON WALLIS PATTERSON Berkeley Commerce Finance Track (1)(2); Cross Country (1): Basketball (4). FRANK PETER PAULS Fallon, Nevada Letters and Science Public Health Administration Masonic Club; Glee Club. VIRGINIA JOSEPHINE PAYNE San Francisco Letters and Science Economics. ARLES EMIL PEACOCK San Francisco Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from San Mateo Junior College. LUIS E. PEQUEGNAT Riverside Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Riverside Junior College. EDWARD PERRY Wnittier Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Whittier College. ANK S. PESTANA Oakland Letters and Science Philosophy Golden Bear; Y. M. C. A., Presi- dent: Y. M. C. A. Pacific South- west Field Council, President; Na- tional Intercollegiate Christian Council, Vice-president; Wrest- ling (1)(2) (3) (4). .LEN KATHRINA PETRAY Geyserville Commerce Foreign Trade Phi Chi Theta; Blue and Gold Editorial Staff (2); Counseling (3). IHN SIDNEY PHELAN San Francisco Letters and Science English Transfer from Marin Junior Col- lege; Pi Kappa Alpha. ONALD RODNEY PICKENS Berkeley Commerce Business Administration Transfer from University of Ore- gon; Sigma Chi; Alpha Delta Sig- ma; Advertising Service Bureau, Assistant Manager; Daily Cali- fornian. HILIP GARDNER PIERPONT AW Engineering Electrical Engineering Phi Gamma Delta; Golden Bear; Winged Helmet; Skull and Keys; Scabbard and Blade; Big " C " So- ciety; Pi Tau Pi Sigma; Tennis Manager (2) (3), Senior Manager GNES ELIZABETH PINKERTON Santa Paula Letters and Science Household Art Gamma Phi Beta; Delta Chi Al- pha: Intramural Tennis Manager; W. A. A.; Class Committees. LORIN ELLSWORTH PECK Merced Letters and Science Economics Bowles Hall; Elections Commit- tee (3), Advisor (4); Track (1); A. S. U. C. Sales Committee (3) (4); Loan Fund Drive; Class Committees. DWIGHT RICHARD PERRY Sanger Commerce Business Administration Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege; Theta Chi. LORNA LANEY PHILLIPS PERRY Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from University of North Dakota; Pi Beta Phi at North Dakota. THEODORE HILL PETER Bellflower Chemistry- Chemical Engineering Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; Masonic Club; Chemistry Club. JOHN ALROY PETTIS Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Phi; Tri- une. G. MARIE PHILLIPS Oakland Commerce Economics Alpha Gamma Delta; Mortar Board; Prytanean; Women ' s Ex- ecutive Committee; Welfare Coun- cil (3X4); Welfare Personnel (3); Blue and Gold (2); Cali- fornia Club (3X4). ROBERT LLOYD PICKERING Berkeley Letters and Science English Pi Delta Epsilon; Hammer and Coffin, President; Triune; Pelican, Editor (4); Daily Californian; Thalian. WILFORD HAYES PIKE, JR. Piedmont Commerce Economics Baton, Secretary; Band (2) (3) (4); Daily Californian (1X2); Intramural Tennis. ELIZABETH PLUIM Merced Letters and Science History W. A. A. DELOS W. PECKENPAUGH Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science. EMMA GENE PERRY Denalr Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege; Areta; Counseling (4). MARGARET TERWILLIGER PERYAM Van Nuys Letters and Science Zoology Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma XI; Lambda Upsilon; Phi Sigma; Ma- sonic Club. WALTER HOWARD PETERSON Long Beach Chemistry Chemical Engineering Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; Water Polo; Assembly Dance Committee. MARTHA MARY PFOSI Roseillle Letters and Science Latin Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Pi Sigma. BONNIE 0. PICKARD Berkeley Letters and Science English Alpha XI Delta; Daily Californian (1X2); Blue and Gold Editorial Staff (2); Counseling (1X2) GINO PIEROTTI Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry Honor Student. RUTH MERRILIE PILLSBURY Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Transfer film Stanford University: Phi Delta I nun in [niffffii ELIZABETH MAY PLUMB Sacramento Letters and Science History Transfer from Sacramento Junior College: Delta Zeta; A. S. U. C. Social Committee; Class Commit- tees. 143 ALBERT WYLIE PLUNKETT Alameda Letters and Science Physics Varsity Handball; Orchestra; Y.M. C. A. JANET PEARL POMERANTZ San Antonio, Texas Letters and Science Bacteriology Transfer from the Unitersity of Tes; W. A. A. Tennis; Pelican. CHARLES T. POST Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Alpha Tau Omega: Phi Phi; Pi Delta Epsilon; Black Towers; Daily Californian (1) (2) (3), Editor (4); Reception Committee (2) (3); Co-ordinator Wheel and Torch (4) ; Honor Student; Senior Peace Committee; Open Forum Board. JOSEPHINE ETHELDRA POWER San Francisco Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Southern Oregon Normal School. ELIZABETH ANNE PRATT Sacramento Letters and Science Art Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Chi Omega; Y. W. C. A. PAUL M. PRICE San Bernardino Mining Mining Engineering Transfer from San Bernardino Junior College; Theta Tau. THEODORE PULAS Stockton Letters and Science History Alpha Tau Omega. SARAH ROSAMOND PUTNAM La Jolla Letters and Science Beta Sigma Omicrra; Parliament (2) (3) (4); Forensics Managerial (3); V. W. C. A. (2) (3) (4): Class Committees (3). BEN QUAN San Francisco Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Marin Junior Col leg ; Chinese Studnts Club. 144 -Psychology ELBERT DONALD POLHEMUS Elk Grove Letters and Science History Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. MARGARET POOLE Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Theta Upsilon; Little Theatre Managerial Staff. RAYMOND LYONS POUND Brawley Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Brawley Junior Col- lege; Calvin Club; Masonic Club. RALPH D. POWERS Poway Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from San Diego State College; American Society of Me- chanical Engineers. MARGARET HUSE PRAY Chula Vista Letters and Science International Relations Alpha Delta Pi; Prytanean. ISABELLE ARZELLA PRISING Sacramento Letters and Science Public Speaking Phi Omega Pi; Theta Sigma Phi; Parliament; Women ' s Executive Committee (4); Blue and Gold (2) (3), Women ' s Manager (4); Masonic Club; A. S. U. C. Card Sales Committee (2) (3) (4). HERBERT WARREN PUNCHES Alameda Commerce Transportation Basketball. JANICE ADELE POLLACK Oakland Letters and Science Public Speaking. JOHN W. PYLE Glendale Letters and Science History Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Theta Xi. . QUARTLY Rodeo i culture Forestry. STEPHAN JOHN POPOVICH Los Angeles Letters and Science Medical Science. CHARLES MOORE POWER Glendale Letters and Science Education Transfer from Glendale Junior Col- lege; Theta Xi; Wrestling. STANLEY JOHN POYSER Berkeley Engineering Mechanical Engineering Phi Kappa Sigma; American So- ciety of Mechanical Engineers. LAWRENCE A. PRESSLEY Santa Rosa Letters and Science Economics Transfer from George Washington University. JOHN WORSLEY PRUD ' HOMME Sacrament o Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; American Society of Me- chanical Engineers; Society if Automotive Engineers. NEIL H. PUTNAM Piedmont Agriculture Agricultural Economics. KENNETH NELSON PYLE San Diego Engineering Electrical Engineering Tau Beta Pi; Eta Kappa Nil. EILEEN MARY QUINN Oakland Letters and Science Art Transfer from the College of the Holy Names; Theta Upsilon. IRYN L. QUOCK ian Francisco ters and Science Household Art nese Student Club. 10 RT ALLAN RAMSHAW omona ters and Science ' olitical Science msfer from Pomona Junior Col- VVtlROW JENNINGS RATEKIN )akland ters and Science ' olitical Science. ' ANN REA jakland ters and Science- Household Art ateres. FRANCES REDNALL Marysville ters and Science History msfer from Yuba County Junior lege; International House; stess Committee (3) (4); Phra- es (3) (4); Newman Club (4); men ' s Counseling (4). R N J. REED Berkeley Iters and Science Geology ta Theta Pi; Winged Helmet; ibbard and Blade. REGAN W JAM EDWARD Hollywood tters and Science Economics i Phi; Winged Helmet; Tennis. . RY C. REID, JR. Berkeley tters and Science Chemistry :w (1). SUGE S. RENTZ, JR. Long Beach tters and Science History ansfer from University of the lilippines. HARRY CORRELL RADIN Long Beach Letters and Science Mathematics Transfer from Long Beach Junior College. MERLE DENHAM RANDALL Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Kappa Alpha; Hammer and Cof- fin; Rally Committee (2); Peli- can Managerial (2) (3); A. S. U. C. Card Sales; Senior Peace Com- mittee; Basketball (1); Track (1). RICHARD RATHBUN Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Varsity Debating; Forensics Coun- cil; Freshman Debating. i. LAWRENCE RECORD Berkeley Letters and Scie nce Music A. S. U. C. Band (1) (2) (3) (4). BEATRICE L. REED Oakland Letters and Science Household Art Mortar Board; Prytanean; Guild of Applied Arts; Delta Chi Alpha; Personnel, Co-chairman; Welfare Council; Y. W. C. A.; Student Affairs Committee; Counseling; Deputations; Elections Commit- tee; Crop and Saddle. JOSEPH ARTHUR REED Altadena Letters and Science Zoology Scabbard and Blade. FRED M. REIBIN Walnut Grove Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Ice Hockey. ARTHUR WILLIAM REINHARDT Berkeley Engineering Civil Engineering American Society of Civil Engi- neers. JACK A. REYNOLDS, JR. Oakland Commerce Foreign Trade. CHARLES DEAN RAMSDEN Oakland Mining Mining Theta Chi; Water Polo U); Blue Gold (2); Mining Associa- BERENICE ONEIDA RANKER Klamath Falls. Oregon Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Southern Oregon Normal School; Phrateres; Coun- seling; Little Theatre Make-up Staff. CLIFTON FORREST RATTENBURY Dixon Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Delta Chi. RUTH G. RECTOR Nevada City Letters and Science Public Speaking Delta Zeta; Little Theatre (1) (2) (3); Counseling (2). ESTHER MARIAN REED Modesto Letters and Science Economics Alpha Kappa Alpha; Negro Stu- dents Club; Y. W. C. A.; Inter- national House. MARY KATHRYN REED Glemkra Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from u. C. L. A.; Alpha Gamma Delta; Masonic Club. DONNA MAURINE REID Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Alpha Xi Delta; Prytanean; Theta Sigma Phi; Daily Californian (1) (2X3), Women ' s Editor (4); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Newman Club; Phrateres. VIRGINIA MARSEILLIS RENETSKY Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science University of California Symphony Orchestra; Y. W. C. A. Music Group. SARGENT M. REYNOLDS Alameda Letters and Science Geology Kappa Sigma: Skull and Keys; Theta Tau. 145 JACKSON AINSLEY RHODEN Sacramento Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. JERRY A. RIDDELL San Francisco Letters and Science Architecture Transfer from San Mate Junior College; Big " C " Society; Base ball (2). ELEANOR PAULINE RIGA San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Phi Sigma Sigma; A. S. U. C. Tea Committee; Counseling; Class Committees. HELEN RILEY Los Angeles Letters and Science Public Speaking Transfer from Occidental College Delta Zeta; Blue and Gold (2) Treble Clef. CORALEE RISER Oakland Commerce Economics Masonic Club. DOROTHY MILLER ROBERTS Burlingame Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Treble Clef; Hostess Com- mittee; Little Theatre Make-up Staff. DAVID JOHN ROBERTSON Richmond Letters and Science- Public Speaking Transfer from Marin Junior Col- lege; Theta XI. WAYNE THOMAS ROBINSON Seattle, Washington Letters and Science Economics. A. JEAN ROCKWELL San Pedro Letters and Science Education-Public Speaking Transfer from Santa Ana Junior College; Thallan; Y. W. C. A.: Little Theatre; Phrattns: Deputa- tion!. 146 HERBERT RICH Oxnard Agriculture Plant Pathology Transfer from Ventura Junior Col- lege. WALLACE CLIFFORD RIDDELL Berkeley Commerce Economics Phi Kappa Sigma; Honor Student; Circle " C " Society; Basketball (2) (3). CHARLES WILLARD RIGGS Oakland Letters and Science Zoology-Pre-Medical Masonic Club (1)(2): Glee Club (1)(2)(4), Manager (3); Track (1); Music Council. RALPH WARNER RILEY San Francisco Letters and Science Political Science Chi Phi; Winged Helmet; Scab- bard and Blade; Skull and Keys: Baseball. HAROLD MOYER ROBBINS Honolulu, T. H. Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from University of Ha- waii; American Society of Civil Engineers; Barrington Hall. HARRY ROBERT ROBERTS Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Pi Sigma Alpha; Varsity Debat- ing; Forensic Council; Senate. ROBERT CARLYLE ROBERTSON Pomona Letters and Science Art Transfer from Pomona Junior Col- lege; Alpha Kappa Lambda; Ma- sonic Club. BERNARD THOMPSON ROCCA, JR. Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Sigma Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Scab- bard and Blade; Baton; Proskopoi; A. S. U. C. Band; Senate. DORIS LAVERNE RODDAN Placerville Letters and Science Bacteriology Honor Student. GORDON VAUGHN RICHARDS Placerville Engineering Civil Engineering American Society of Civil Em neers; Tau Beta Pi; Chi Epsili BRUCE ALLEN RIDER Watsonville Agriculture Agriculture Economics Alpha Kappa Lambda; Daily Ca fornian (1)(2). GEORGE ALEXANDER RMS Oakland Commerce Finance Basketball (4). ARTHUR J. RINNE Berkeley Commerce Economics Baseball. DONALD GLEN ROBERTS Burlingame Letters and Science Music Transfer from San Mateo Jun College; Glee Club; A. S. U. Band; Orchestra. JACK D. ROBERTS Los Angeles Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from Los Angeles Jun College; Sheridan Hall; Amerii Institute of Electrical Enginee RUTH ELIZABETH ROBINSON Sacramento Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from Sacramento Jun College; Honor Student; Delta I Alpha; Household Art Discuss! Group; A. S. U. C. Card Sa (4). JOHN ROBERT ROCK Marysville Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Yuba County Jun College; Delta Phi Epsilon. SAM BOYCE RODEHAVER Hollywood Commerce Economics Transfer from Texas Mines; Thi Delta Chi. mm luiiiiui illlliiuj niiimi] WILLIAM OLIVER ROD6ERS Ontario Agriculture Plant Science Transfer from U. C. L. A. ELIZABETH LATIMER ROGERS Oakland Commerce Economics Beta Gamma Sigma. FRANK PAUL ROMANO Oakland Letters and Science Economics ELMAN JOSEPH ROSE Santa Rosa Letters and Science Physical Education-Hygiene Transfer from Santa Rosa Junior College; Del Rey; Circle " C " So- ciety; Sigma Alpha; Rambler Football (2): Varsity Rugby (3) (4); U. C. Rugby Club. RGE EDWIN ROSENBAUM San Francisco tors and Science English isfer from San Mateo Junior liege: Junior Farce; Newman ub. YALE ROSENFELD San Francisco Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Los Angeles Junior College; American Society of Civil Engineers. FORREST VINCIL ROUTT, JR. Martinez Letters and Science English Transfer from U. C. L. A.; I ternational House; Glee Club. PAUL SELIG RUBIN Hollywood Letters and Science- Medical Science. DOROTHY VIDA RUNDLE Redwood City Letters and Science Household Science Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Alpha Nu; Orchesis; lota Sigma Pi; Phrateres. CARLETON EMERSON ROGERS Oakland Commerce Foreign Trade Sigma Pi; Phi Phi; Track (1); Baseball (1); Baseball Manager (2X3); Class Committees. STEPHEN JOHN ROGERS Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Sigma Phi; Big " C " So- ciety; Triune; Phi Phi; Intramural Manager (4); Daily Californian U)(2); Class Committees. MARY LUCILLE ROMANO Oakland Letters and Science History Y. W. C. A. FRANCES ELLEN ROSE Redding Letters and Science Psychology Bryn Mawr Dormitory President; Masonic Club; Y. W. C. A.; Lit- tle Theatre Costumes (2) (3) (4) : Counseling (2) (3); Personnel (2). FRED GEORGE ROSENBERG San Francisco Letters and Science History Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Zeta Beta Tau; Varsity Track (3); Varsity handball. D. CAMPBELL ROSS Piedmont Letters and Science Economics Beta Theta Pi. STERLING HOWLAND ROWLEY Oakland Commerce Accounting. MARTHA ALICE RUDE Bakersfleld Letters and Science English Transfer from Bakersfield Junior PIERINA ONORINA BLANCH ROSSELLO Oakland Letters and Science Paleontology Utrimque; Y. W. C. A., Cabinet: Y. W. C. A. Council, Interna- tional Cabinet; Italian Club. ARTER JOHN ROGERS San Francisco Commerce Finance- 1 nvestments Bowles Hall; Handball. GEORGE T. ROMAN! San Francisco Letters and Science- Political Science. AURIA RON San Francisco Letters and Science Spanish Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Casa Hispana; Sigma Delta I DAVID ROSENBAUM San Francisco Letters and Science Economics-History. HAROLD LOUIS ROSENBERG San Francisco Letters and Science Optometry Omega Delta; Glee Club. EVALYN LYTTON ROTH Los Angela Letters and Science Art Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Delta Epsilon. THOMAS COCHRAN ROYCE Long Beach Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; American Society of Civil Engineers; Ice Hockey (2) (4). DOROTHY ANN RUDMAN Idaho Falls. Idaho Letters and Science Psychology Alpha Epsilon Phi; Hammer and Coffin; Pelican (1X2). ELIZABETH H. RUSHFORTH Berkeley Letters and Science History Alpha Phi; Ace of Clubs; Y. W. C. A. (1)(2X3) (4); Counsel- ing (2) (3) (4); Vice-president Freshman Class; Class Commit- tees. nun MARY ELIZABETH RUSSELL Modesto Letters and Science English Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege. BEVERLY BEATRICE SACHS San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Delta Zeta; Little Theatre Make- up Commrttee, Chairman; Class Committees. ELIZABETH RUTH SAIT Spokane, Washington Letters and Science Latin Transfer from Washington State College: Delta Delta Delta at Washington State College; Honor Student; College Poetry Society. MARIAN LOUISE SANDO Hayward Letters and Science Household Art Guild of Applied Arts. ROGER PIERRE SANS Woodland Letters and Science Economics A. S. U. C. Band. RUBIN M. SAUL Los Angeles Commerce Accounting Transfer from Emory University Atlanta. LOUIS CLAYTON SAYLOR Berkeley Agriculture Forestry Scabbard and Blade; Pershing Ri- fles; Forestry Club 1)(2)(3) (4); Intramural Sports; A. S. U. C. Card Sales Committee (3) (4) ; Rifle Team (1)(2) (3) (4); Senior Peace Committee; Masonic Club; Class Committees. JOHN JOSEPH SCHAUER, JR. Gallup, New Mexico Letters and Science Economics Bowles Hall; Baton; A. S. U. C. LAWRENCE ALLEN SCHEI Sacramento Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junior College: Psl Upsllm; Honor Stu- dent; Varsity Debating; Senate Debating Society. 148 MARY INEZ RUSSELL Berkeley Letters and Science Household Art Delta Chi Alpha; Little Theatre; Crop and Saddle. HENRY SACHS Los Anodes Engineering Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Tau Beta Pi; Eta Kappa Nu; Ameri- can Institute of Electrical Engi- neers; American Society of Me- chanical Engineers. MARY JULIA SALA San Francisco Letters and Science History HOLDEN SYLVANE SANFORD Stockton Commerce Accounting and Finance Sigma Alpha Epsilon. ANITA SANWALD Hayward Letters and Science Nursing Alpha Tau Delta. JEAN CHRISTENSEN SAWYER Berkeley Letters and Science Spanish Phi Omega Pi; Women ' s Hostess Committee (1)(2)(3). VIRGINIA SCAMMAN Concord Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from College of Pacific; Mortar Board; Prytanean; Pen- nant " C " Society; Phrateres; Women ' s Executive Committee; Y. W. C. A., President; Dormi- tory Association, Vice-president; W. A. A. RALPH C. SCHAUPPNER Berkeley Letters and Science Physics-Optometry Transfer from Fullerton Junior College; Omega Delta; Honor Stu- dent; U. C. Chess Club (2) (3) (4). ROSE MARIE SCHEIBER Lincoln Letters and Science German German Honor Society; Associate Member of International House; Y. W. C. A. CAROL CAMERON RUTHERFORD Los Angeles Commerce Business Administration Transfer from Los Angeles Junior College. KIYOKO JUNE SAIKI Anaheim Letters and Science Education Transfer from Santa Barbara State College; Y. W. C. A.; Japanese Women ' s Students Club. VERDA ELAINE SANDERS Omaha, Nebraska Letters and Science Physical Education-Hygiene Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege. CARLOS VICTOR SANJINES Burlingame Letters and Science Economics. GEORGE SASAKI Brawley Commerce Commerce Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Jar anese Students Club. JOHN B. SAWYER Berkeley Letters and Science Bacteriolo Alpha Tau Omega; Scabbard a Blade; Rally Committee (2). , JOHN PETER SCHAGEN San Francisco Letters and Science Architect Chi Alpha Kappa; Delta Sit Chi; Fencing (1X2). LESTER ALEXANDER SCHEELINE, JR. Berkeley Engineering Mechanical Engineering Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Amei Society of Mechanical Enqin ROY JEROME SCHLOTHAUER Klamath Falls. Oregon Letters and Science Econoi Transfer from Sacramento J ir College; Honor Student; A. ! I. C. Band; Senate. ROBERT AUGUSTUS SCHMIDT Oakland Letters and Science Geology. ALBERT SCHNEIDER Lodi Letters and Science History Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. ALTER RICHARD SCHUBERT Sa n Francisco Letters and Science Economics Transfer from San Mateo Junior College. ABEL MARY SCHUSTER San Francisco Letters and Science Spanish. CK RUDOLPH SCHWEIZER Berkeley Commerce Insurance and Economics Scabbard and Blade; Boxing. MILTON LEONARD SCOTT Riverside Letters and Science Biochemistry Transfer from Riverside Junior JULIA DICKIE SEARLE Oakland Letters and Science English Sigma Kappa; Personnel; Pelican; Blue and Gold (2); Class Com- mittees. CAROLINE R. SEDGWICK Dixon Letters and Science History Alpha Chi Omega. TERESITA DOLORES SELMA San Marino Letters and Science Economics International House; Blue and Slid 2 . OLIVIA JANE SCHMITTOU Porterville Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Porterville Junior College; Alpha Delta Pi; Pi Sig- ma Alpha: Deputations; W. A. A. Tennis. LOUISE FRANCES SCHNEIDER Marysvllle Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Epsilon Phi: Pelican ERWIN MATTHIAS SCHULTE Oakland Letters and Science Latin Newman Club; Tennis. SHERMAN WILLIAM SCHWARTZ Wilmington Letters and Science Physics-Optometry Transfer from Compton Junior College; Omega Delta. PAUL J. SCOTANUS Los Angeles Letters and Scienc HELEN MARIA SEABURY Oakland Letters and Science Economics A. S. U. C. Women ' s Orchestra; Newman Club. PHILIPP PETER SEBASTIAN, JR. Berkeley Commerce Accounting Transfer from San Francisco State College; Beta Alpha Psi; Com- merce Club, Treasurer; Cross Country Running; Track and Field; Intramural. ROBERT SELIGMAN Dinuba Letters and Science History Glee Club (4); Frosh Crew (2). DORRIT MAY SENRAM Berkeley Letters and Science French Pi Delta Phi; Student Advisory Bureau. FIDEL SCHMITZ. JR. Wilmington Litters and Science Political Science Transfer from University of Ala- bama. LORIA BUTTERWAY SCHREFFLER Berkley Letters and Science Genraphy Transfer from San Diego State College: Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A. HERMAN CONRAD SCHUMACHER Hanford Letters and Science Physics-Optometry Omega Delta. JOHN SCHWEIFLER San Francisco Letters and Science Zoology FLORENCE JEAN SCOTT Livingston Letters and Science Political Science Beta Phi Alpha; Deputations. DOROTHY ELOISE SEAMAN KenMeld Letters and Science French Transfer from Marin Junior Col- lege: A. S. U. C. Social Commit- tee (3) (4); Y. W. C. A.: Class Committees. WINIFRED SEBASTIAN Berkeley Letters and Science English Delta Delta Delta. WILLIAM THOMAS SELLING Oakland Letters and Science Architecture Architecture Association; Archi- tecture Annual; Manager Archi- tectural Float in Bridge-opening Parade. THELMA LAVERNE SERPAS Fresno Letters and Scien Public Health Newman Club. 149 mnr JEAN SEVILLE Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Gamma Phi Beta; Mortar Board; Prytanean; Women ' s Executive Committee; Daily Californian Edi- torial (1); Blue and Gold (2) (3), Women ' s Editor (4); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3) (4); Associate Member International Hiuse. MARY BEATRICE SHAND Piedmont Letters and Science History Kappa Alpha Theta. ROGER FRANCIS SHELDEN Richmond Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from Marin Junior Col lege: American Society Mechani cal Engineers. THOMAS A. SHELLHAMMER Dixon Letters and Science History Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Delta Chi; Phi Phi; Big " C " Society; Baseball. CHARLES JOHN SHIELDS Oakland Commerce Foreign Trade Track (1X2) (3): Crfss-country (2) (3). DONALD HARMON SHORT, JR. Piedmont Letters and Science Art Masonic Club; Delta Epsilon; Hammer and Coffin; Pelican Art Board (1)(4); Daily Californian Art Staff (1 (2)(3), Art Editor (4). ADELE FRANCES SILVER Los Angeles Letters and Science Psychology Counseling. MARK EDISON SILVERSTONE Los Angeles Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Washington Uni fersity, St. Louis; Internationa House; Senate Debiting Society Hillel, Campaign Manager; Stu dent Loan Fund Drhc (4). ALEXANDER ALECSEEVICH SIMONOFF San Francisco Mining Petroleum. KEITH M. SHAFFER Merced Commerce Business Administration Theta Delta Chi; Triune; Phi Phi; Inter-fraternity Council, Vice- president; Senior Peace Commit- tee; Senior Men ' s Hall Board of Directors; Baseball (1). E. NEIL SHAVER, JR. Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Phi; Rally Committee (2) (3) ; Sophomore Vigilantes; California Collegians; Senior Peace Committee; Class Committees. HORACE EDWARD SHELL Jamestown Letters and Science Geology Del Rey. RAYMOND J. SHERWIN Mountain View Letters and Science Economics Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege; Glee Club; Debating. GEORGE NOBORU SHIGEZUMI San Francisco Commerce Business Administration Japanese Students Club. HUBERT SHUMAN Redding Letters and Science History Transfer from Chico State College; A. S. U. C. Band (1) (2) (3) (4); Brick Morse ' s Collegians (1)(2)(3)(4); Tennis (1) (2) (3) (4). DOROTHY REGINA SILVERMAN Oakland Letters and Science History Alpha Epsilon Phi. MARY CHARLOTTE SIMMONS Piedmont Letters and Science Art-Household Art Alpha Xi Delta; Mortar Board; Prytanean; Theta Sigma Phi, President; Guild of Applied Arts; Daily Californian (1) (2) (3); Class Committees. BAPTISTA JOSEPH SIMONTACCHI San Rafael Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Marin Junior Col- lege. BOYD SHAFSKY Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Sigma Chi; Scabbard and Blade. DUDLEY THOMAS SHEARER Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Baton. STANLEY ALFRED SHELL Jamestown Letters and Science Physical Education-Hygiene Transfer from Sacramento Junio College; Del Rey; Phi Phi: Circl " C " Society; Ramblers (3) (4) Boxing. BERTRAM K. SHIBLER Berkeley Mining Metallurgy Sigma Alpha Epsilon; America Institute of Mining Engineers. RINDGE SHIMA Berkeley Engineering Electrical Engineering American Institute of Electrii Engineers. JULIE MARCELLE SIBLEY Oakland Letters and Science Household Art Delta Chi Alpha, Social Sei. tary; Pelican (2). MORRIS SILVERMAN Stockton Letters and Science Public Health Congress Debating Society; Del ing Manager (3); Little The (1); Crew. MARY MARGARET SIMON Oakland Letters and Science History Mortar Board; Prytanean; Pel nel; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; lege Women ' s Club; Women ' s Game Rally Chairman. ESTHER ANNETTE SIMPSON Oakland Letters and Science English 150 COLETTE SIMS Los Angeles Letters and Science Architecture International House; Alpha Alpha Gamma; Architectural Association. WILLIAM EWART SINCLAIR Oakland Mining Mining. MARJORIE VIRGINIA SIMS Los Angeles Letters and Science Psychology Y. W. C. A.; Counseling. ALICE KATHRYN SKINNER Fillmore Letters and Science Household Art Delta Chi Alpha. MARGARET HELEN SLATE San Francisco Letters and Science Public Speaking Deputations (2) (3) (4); Crop and Saddle; International House. 4NETTE M. SLEDGE Los Angeles Letters and Science English Transfer from Los Angeles Junior illege. ZEL PARNELL SMALLEY Fullerton Letters and Science Physical Education Transfer from Fullerton Junior College: Physical Education Ma- jors Club; Masonic Club. ARVILLA TALBOT SMITH Sacramento Letters and Science History Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Alpha Omicron Pi. CATHERINE ISABEL SMITH Hawl, North Kohala, Hawaii Letters and Science Anthropology Phi Omega Pi; Pelican (2) (3). ETHEL TYNER SMITH Oakland Letters and Science Mathematics. ANNA MARIE SINDICICH San Francisco Letters and Science Economics. LACHLAN MACLEAN SINCLAIR San Francisco Letters and Science History. f - Ji ' - ' ARLINE OMA SLACK San Gabriel Letters and Science Household Art Delta Chi Alpha: Counseling; In- ternational House. MATHIEU THOMAS SLATER Fresno Letters and Science History Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege; Zeta Beta Tau. AUGUSTUS EMERY SLOAT, JR. Riverside Agriculture Forestry Transfer from Riverside Junior College; Track (3) (4); Cross- Country (3) (4). CLIFFORD E. SMELSER San Diego Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from San Diego State College; Theta Kappa Nu; Com- merce Club; Masonic Club; Inter- Fraternity Council. BARBARA EURETTA SMITH Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Phi Delta. EDWIN CORTELYOU SMITH, JR. Piedmont Letters and Science Economics Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Circle " C " Society; Rugby Club; Soccer (1) (2) (3) (4); Rugby (4). EUGENE MILO SMITH Berkeley Commerce Finance Crew, Manager; Intramural Base- ball; Interclass Boxing. :w SISICH San Francisco Commerce Business Administration Senate. Secretary (4): Men ' s Dormitory, President (4); Soph- omore Labor Day Committee; As- sembly Dance Committee. M G. SLADE Eureka Letters and Science International Relations Transfer from Humboldt State Collete; Bowles Hall: Delta Pnl Epsilra. RUTH ELIZABETH SLAUGHTER Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Prytanean; Hammer and Coffin; Pelican, Personnel Director: Phra- teres Council: Deputations; Coun- seling; W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A. MARGARET MARCIA SLY Chico Letters and Science Art Transfer from Chico State College: Chi Omega. ANNA MARGUERITE SMITH Santa Paula Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Ventura Junior Col- lege. BRADSTREET P. SMITH Claremont Agriculture Agriculture Economics Transfer from Pomona College; Alpha Kappa Lambda. ELIZABETH CLARE SMITH Pinole Letters and Science Economics. FRANK HARRY SMITH Piedmont Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Armstrong Junior College; Pki Delta Theta: Ham- mer and Ciflm. 151 Brick FRANKLIN DOW SMITH La Jolla Commerce Foreign Trade Phi Kappa Sigma; Pan Xenia; In- tramural Manager (3); Morse ' s Collegians. JOSEPH TINNIN SMITH Oakland Commerce Economics. NORMA ELIZABETH Sacramento Letters and Science- Political Science Alpha Delta Pi. WELDON HALLIWELL SMITH Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry Abracadabra; Circle " C " Society; Swimming (1X2) (3), Captain (4); Water Polo (1)(2)(3)(4); Basketball (1); Track (1). WILLIAM E. SNELL Salinas Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Salinas Junior Col- lege: Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Inter- national House; Tennis Manager (3) (4); U. C. Life Saving Corps. FRANCIS ADRIAN SOOV Fellows Letters and Science- Medical Sciences Transfer from Taft Junior Col- lege; Nu Sigma Nu; Pershing Rites: Scabbard and Blade: Pre- Medical Club, President (4). WILLIAM VINCENT SOSOTTE San Francisco Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from the University of San Francisco; Newman Club; Ramblers (3) (4); Rugby (3); Track (2). LORRAINE EDNA SPENCER Alameda Letters and Science Fre nch W. A. A.; Cercle Fnncaise. HELEN MARGARET SPINNING Berkeley Letters and Science Paleontology Masonic Club. 152 HALL FRANK SMITH San Francisco Engineering Mechanical Engineering. LESLIE PALOMA SMITH Fortuna Letters and Science Botany. RICHARD WOODSON SMITH Berkeley Letters and Science Physics Circle " C " Society; Boxing (2) (3) (4); A. S. U. C. Band. W. PRESTON SMITH San Francisco Engineering Civil Engineering Scabbard and Blade; American Society of Civil Engineers. ELLIS ADAIRE SNYDER Taft Letters and Science Political Science. WALTER B. SORELLE Bakersfield Commerce Accounting Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. GABRIELLE MARIE SOUTER Oakland Commerce Economics- Accounting Discussion Groups. ROBERT FRANCIS SPENCER San Francisco Letters and Science Semitic Languages Honor Student; Wrestling (1); German Club; Luther Club; Honor Student Advisory Council. RODNEY B. SPRAGUE Berkeley Letter s and Science Geological Sciences. IRMA SMITH Berkeley Letters and Science Zoology Alpha Gamma Delta. MONA FRANCES SMITH San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Honor Student. STEPHEN LINCOLN SMITH Concord, Massachusetts Letters and Science History Alpha Delta Phi; Triune; Fresh- man Track. ADELE AMBER SMYTH Loomis Letters and Science Art Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. LOIS FLORENCE SNYDER Berkeley Letters and Science English Women ' s Counseling, Women ' Executive Board (2) (3) (4) Women ' s Discussions (3) (4) College Women ' s Club Juniors Senior Commission (4); Socia Service (4). EVA DARLENE SOREN Petaluma Letters and Science Social Institutions Transfer from Santa Rosa Junii ' College. STANLEY E. SPARROWE Berkeley Commerce Economics Beta Gamma Sigma. GENEVIEVE McDANIEL SPICEF Berkeley Letters and Science Economi Alpha Chi Omega. JEAN DOROTHY SPRINGER San Francisco Letters and Science French Transfer from San Francisco S College. HELEN STADTMULLER Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Sigma Kappa; Personnel (1) (2) (3), Chairman (4); Counseling U)(2) 3): Women ' s Discussions (1X2); W. A. A.; Crop and Saddle: Y. W. C. A. (1)(2); Class Committees. MARGARET EVELYN STAMP Long Beach Letters and Science History Transfer from Long Beach Junior College. AUDREY CLAIRE STARR Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Prytanean; Women ' s Executive Committee: Phrateres; A. S. U. C. Social Committee: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet: A. S. U. C. Sales Com- mittee; Elections Committee; Per- sonnel; Stephens Union Admin- istrative Committee; Women ' s Counseling; Class Committees. ARTHUR ROBERT STEELE Oakland Letters and Science Economics Daily Californian Sports Staff (2) (3X4). LENA STIELBERG Berkeley Letters and Science Music Phi Beta Kappa; Alpha Mu: Eng- lish Club: Treble Clef; Y. W. C. A.: W. A. A. Fencing Manager: Music Council; Daily Californian: Honor Students Council. FRANCES STEPHENS Berkeley Letters and Science Music Alpha Gamma Delta; Kappa Phi; Blue and Gold (2); Class Com- iittee JOHN ROBERT STEVENS Oakland Chemistry Chemistry Chi Pi Sigma. HAMILTON R. STEVENSON Oakland Letters and Science Art Transfer from Williams Junior College; Delta Chi; Scabbard and Blade; Ice Hockey. CLIFFORD RALPH STOCKING Santa Cruz Agriculture Plant Nutrition Transfer from Riverside Junior College: Alpha Zeta. RUTH VIRGINIA STAFFORD Roseville Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Phrateres. JAMES GLEASON STANDLEY, JR. Sacramento Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Acacia; American Society of Civil Engineers; Boxing Mana- ger (3). REBECCA MARY STARR Los Angeles Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from University of South- ern California; Delta Chi Alpha; Y. W. C. A.; Little Theatre, Costume Mistress; Dramatics Council. HENRY STEFANETTI Hollywood Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Amer- ican Institute of Electrical Engi- neers. GLADYS INEZ STEIN San Francisco Letters and Science Nursing Alpha Tau Delta. ERNEST NORMAN STEPHENS Piedmont Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from University of Ala- bama. THOMAS LAWRENCE STEVENS Oakland Letters and Science Public Speaking. HAROLD STILLER San Francisco Letters and Science Music. MILDRED FRANCES STOCKTON Bakersfield Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Bakersfield Junior College; Hostess Committee (3) (4). JOHN HAROLD STAHLE Berkeley Commerce Business Administration Abracadabra: Scabbard and Blade; Quarterdeck; Phi Phi; Football (1). JOHN DAMON STARICCO Alameda Commerce Economics. MARSHALL STEEL. JR. Berkeley Commerce Finance Bowles Hall. DOROTHY STEFFENSEN Sacramento Commerce Business Administration Transfer from Sacramento Junior College: Phi Omega Pi; Pelican (1): Commerce Association. GEORGE A. STENMARK Manteca Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from Modesto Junior Col- lege; Honor Student. JAMES CHARLES STEPHENS Alameda Letters and Science Political Science. WALTER WILLIAM STEVENS San Francisco Engineering Mechanical Engineering Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Beta Beta: Golf Manager (4); Crew (1X2) (3); Sophomore Vigilantes. HERBERT ALLEN STITT Fresfli Agriculture Agricultural Economics Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege: Alpha Zeta; Agricultural Economics Club. JOHN L. STODDARD Walnut Creek Engineering Mechanical Engineering Theta XI; American Society of Mechanical Engineers: Glee Club (3X4); Daily Californian Mana- gerial Staff; Intramural Football (2X3). TOT ,53 FRANCIS ADAMS STOEPEL Beverly Hills Letters and Science Economii Delta Gamma; Personnel Commit- tee (1X2): Intramural 1)(4). DOROTHY KENNEDY STORMES Ororille Letters and Science English International House; Phrateres; Dormitory Council. EMILY IRENE STREET Manteca Letters and Science Household Sci ence Transfer from University of Wash ington; International House. CARL EINAR STROMBERG Napa Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. HARRY EASTON STUARD, JR. Berkeley Utters and Science Political Science Alpha Tau Omega; Debating (1); Track Manager (2); Glee Club (3) (4); Gymnastics Manager (3) (4). ENID NEWCOMB SULLIGER Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Fresno State Col left. MARJORIE SCARFE SUTHERLAND Oakland Letters and Science- Household Art Alpha Gamma Delta; Delta Chi Alpha; Guild of Applied Arts. WILLIAM SWABEL Berkeley Letters and Science- Public Speaking Sigma Phi; Football (1); Ram- blers (2); Rugby (2) (3) (4); Rugby Club; Weight Basketball (3); Circle " C " SKiety. GEORGE SWITZER Petaluma Letters and Science Geology Transfer from Santa Rosa Junior College; Masonic Club. JOHN WILLIAM STONE Santa Barbara Agriculture Forestry Kappa Sigma; Winged Helmet; Skull and Keys; Bet a Beta. GREGORY STANSBURY STOUT Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Alpha Delta Phi; Phi Phi; Honor Student; Big " C " Society; Track BEVERLEY LAVERNE STREETER Long Beach Letters and Science English Transfer from U. C. L. A. WALTER S. STROMQUIST Palo Alto Letters and Science Architecture Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege; Delta Sigma Chi; Phi Beta Kappa; Honor Student; Architec- ture Annual, Editor; Daily Cali- fornian Art Staff. NORMAN DARBY STURM Toppenish, Washington Commerce Marketing Transfer from Whitman College; Commerce Club; International House; Masonic Club; Assembly Dance Committee. MILDRED KATHLEEN SUND Los Gatos Letters and Science Anthropology Transfer from San Jose State Col- lege; Dormitory Council. MELVIN CLYDE SUTTON Sonora Chemistry Chemistry. DORIS JANET SWANSON Turlock Letters and Science Music Phi Beta Kappa. MARY ELIZABETH SWORDS Berkeley Commerce Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; HostessCommittee; Com- merce Association; Y. W. C. A.; A. S. U. C. Teas. NORRIS CHARLES STONE Los Angeles Mining Mining Engineering Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Min- ing Society; A. S. U. C. Band. ROBERT EDWARD STRACHAN Berkeley Commerce Accounting Beta Gamma Sigma; Beta Alpha Psi. MARJORIE LOUISE STROCK Hayward Letters and Science Spanish Counseling (2) (3) (4); A. S. U. C. Social Committee (2) (3) (4); Class Committees. NEVA VANEIGH STRUVE Pacific Beach Letters and Science Art Transfer from San Diego State College; Masonic Club. TETSUO SUGIYAMA San Francisco Letters and Science- Medical Sciences Phi Beta Kappa. LOUISE ANNE SUNDSTROM Berkeley Letters and Science History Counseling (2) (3) (4); A. S. C. Social Committee (2) (3) (4) Class Committees. RICHARD C. SUZUKI Aiea, Oahu, Hawaiian Islands Letters and Science Economic: Transfer from Brawley Junior I lege; Japanese Students Club. BERNARD SLAYTON SWEATT Hyampom Agriculture Forestry Transfer from San Jose State C lege; Forestry Club. ARTHUR LEWIS SYMONDS San Francisco Letters and Science Political Science Kappa Nu; Triune; Football ( Baseball; Vigilantes. 154 ALDEN WATARU TAKAHASHI Los Angeles Commerce Economics Japanese Students Club. OLIVE YAYEKO TAKAHASHI Berkeley Letters and Science Household Art. WILLIAM HENRY TALBOTT. JR. San Diego Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from San Diego State College; Campus Hall, President; Men ' s Dormitory Association, Secretary; Miier Dance Commit- tee; Assembly Dance Committee, Chairman (3) (4). DAVID MASAHARU TATSUND San Francisco Commerce Business Administration Japanese Students Club. LENN J. TAYLOR Long Beach Agriculture Forestry Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; Xi Sigma Pi; Forestry Club. ARTHA ANNE TAYLOR Berkeley Letters and Science Household Science W. A. A. HARVEY THAL Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Commerce Business Administration Transfer from San Diego State College. HERBERT ARTHUR THOMAS Santa Rosa Agriculture Forestry Transfer from Santa Rosa Junior College. THEODORE READ THOMPSON Azusa Engineering Civil Engineering Transfer from Citrus Junior Col- lege: Kappa Delta Rho; Intra- mural Manager (3). ERNEST SHINO TAKAHASHI Berkeley Letters and Science Physics-Optometry Japanese Students Club: Omega Delta; Honor Student. KATSUTO TAKE! Santa Cruz Letters and Science Physics-Optometry Omega Delta. DONALD THURMAN TAPPE Portenille Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Portertille Junior College; A. S. U. C. Band (3) (4). ROBERT PHILIP TATUM Oakland Letters and Science Economics Wrestling (1)(2) (3) (4); Diving (1). LOIS TAYLOR Glendale Letters and Science English Transfer from Glendale Junior College: Phrateres; Masonic Club: International House; Elections Committee. DAVID TEITELBAUM San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Zeta Beta Tau; Foo tball (1); Big " C " Guard; Daily Californian, Sports Staff. MARCELLA MARIE THEIL San Francisco Letters and Science French Transfer from Stanford Unit sity; Counseling; W. A. A. GRACE ELIZABETH THOMPSON San Francisco Letters and Science French Delta Sigma Theta. ALISON THOMSON San Francisco Letters and Science History Kappa Kappa Gamma; Torch and Shield: Ace of Clubs; Y. W. C. A. W; nniiimi iTiniim lllHH.i GRACE NOBUKO TAKAHASHI Berkeley Letters and Science Physics-Optometry Sigma Omicron. ROBERT GOHEIDA TAKETA San Francisco Letters and Science Economics. LOYAL A. TARBET Van Nuys Letters and Science Geology. JEAN TAVERN ETTI Berkeley Letters and Science History Alpha Xi Delta; Personnel; Peli- can: A. S. U. C. Card Sales Com- mittee; Class Committees. MADELINE TAYLOR Esparto Letters and Science English Prjtanean; Stebbins Hall. Mana- ger; Y. W. C. A., Cabinet (3) (4); W. A. A. (1)(2)(4). ANGUS DOUGLAS TESKEY San Rafael Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Sigma Phi; Scabbard and Blade: Pershing Rides: Vanity Rowing Club; Crew (1)(2)(3). HENRY MUIR THELEN Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Alpha Delta Phi: Golden Bear. IOLA ELIZABETH THOMPSON Corninf Letters tut Science Physical Education- Hygiene Phrateres; W. A. A.; Physical Education Majors Club. CARL WHEATLEY THOMSON Sacramento Engineer) ! Civil Engineer in Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; American Society of Civil Engineers. lUflilll HlUif KATHLEEN FRANCIS THOMSON Alameda Letters and Science Household Art A. S. U. C. Card Sales: Wi Council. DONALD PAGE TICKNER Oakland Agriculture Forestry Glee Club; Varsity Rowinj Club. LEONARD GRIER TITUS Sacramento Commerce Foreign Trade Transportation Transfer from Sacrament Junior College. HOHN D. TOM San Francisco Engineering Mechanical Engineering Pi Alpha Phi; American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Phi Theta. MORSE AKERS TRAVERS Long Beach Engineering Electrical Engineering Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; Bowles Hall. HAJIME J. TSURUMOTO Warm Springs Commerce Economics. MARY JOAN TURNBULL Santa Barbara Letters and Science History Sigma Kappa; Prytanean; Hammer and Coffin; Pelican (1)(2)(3), Women ' s Director (4); Women ' s Executive Committee (4); Per- sonnel (1X2); Vocational Guid- ance (2) (3); Counseling; A. S. U. C. Card Sales; Class Commit- tees. MARSHALL CHITTENDEN TURNER Los Angeles Mining Mining Engineering Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Min- inq Association; let Hockey. WALMSLEY R. TWI Berkeley Commerce Economics Alpha Delta Sigma; Pi Delta Ep- sllon; Daily Californian, Manager ma 156 NEIL ALEXANDER THORBURN Susanville Letters and Science History Glee Club; A. S. U. C. Band. RICHARD 0. TIGNER Long Beach Letters and Science History Transfer from Long Beach Junior College; Masonic Club; Y. M. C. A. JOHN H. TOBIN Fairfax Commerce Business Administration Transfer from Marin Junior Col- lege; Hammer and Coffin; Alpha Delta Sigma; Pelican Managerial (3); Masonic Club. MARK A. TOMAS San Diego Letters and Science Geography. REINE MARIE TRESMONTAN San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Y. W. C. A.; Counseling. PAUL MARCUS TULLY Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry Calvin Club; Chemistry Club. DONALD JAMES TURNER Santa Rosa Chemistry Chemistry Scabbard and Blade. RUTH ELEANOR TURNER Taft Letters and Science English Transfer from Taft Junior College; Prytanean; Women ' s Hostess Com- mittee (3), Chairman (4). GERTRUDE ADELE TYLER San Diego Letters and Science Physics-Optometry Transfer from San Diego State College; Beta Phi Alpha: Counsel- ing; International House; Sigma Omicron; Phrateres. JOSEPH F. THORNTON Watsonville Agriculture Forestry Newman Club; Alpha Zeta; Sigma Pi; Forestry Club. Xi HELEN TIPTON Watsonville Letters and Science Economics Phrateres; Pennant " C " Society: Women ' s " C " Society; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A., Secretary (4); Basketball, Manager (2). MARGARET TODRANK Oakland Letters and Science Economics Masonic Club; Commerce Associa- tion; Little Theatre (1); A. S. U. C. Card Sales; Pelican. GRACE JOAN TOW Oakland Letters and Science Political Science Chinese Students Club. WILLIAM HOWARD TROLAN Santa Cruz Letters and Science Zoology Pi Kappa Alpha. DICRAN VARTAN TURKIAN San Francisco Letters and Science Zoology Glee Club. ERNESTINE MIRIAM TURNER Paso Robles Letters and Science History Phrateres; Little Theatre (1) Deputations (3) (4). WILLIAM PHILIP TURNER Oakland Letters and Science English Hammer and Coffin; Pi Delta EC silon; Thalian; Pelican. Editi (4); Occident, Associate Edito Basketball (1). HARL CURTIS TYLER Chula Vista Commerce Accounting Transfer from San Diego Sta College; Beta Gamma Sigm Honor Student; Brick Morsi " Collegians " ; Commerce Associ tlon. ZVONIMIR THOMAS UBOJCICH San Francisco Letters and Science History Masonic Club: Jugoslav Univer- sity Club; Slavic Society. HIRDSHI UYEHARA Los Angeles Engineering Electrical Engineering Japanese Students Club. WILLIAM M. VAN FLEET Richmond Letters and Science Architecture Abracadabra; Architecture Associ- ation: Track Manager (2). CHARLES FREDRICK VANNICE Grants Pass, Oregon Commerce Finance Pi Kappa Phi. ' (DEL J. M. VICENTE Sunnyvale Letters and Science Spanish. RBARA VINCENT Piedmont Letters and Science- Paleontology Pi Beta Phi; Torch and Shield; Ace of Clubs. MARY ELIZABETH VODDEN San Francisco Letters and Science Physical Education. MIRIAM CLARK UTT Berkeley Letters and Science English Transfer from Pacific Union Col- lege; Blue and Gold. BARBARA LANSING VAIL Oakland Letters and Science History Alpha Phi. WALRAVINE MATHILDE VAN HEECKEREN Concord Letters and Science Political Science Mortar Board; Prytanean; Mask and Dagger; Thalian Players; Torch and Shield; Honor Student: Little Theatre; W. A. A.; Crop and Saddle; Y. W. C. A.; Coun- seling; Phrateres; Junior Orchesis; Class Committees. LLOYD RUSSELL VAN TASSELL Oakland Letters and Science Bacteriology. AMIL STEVE VICKERS Jackson Commerce Foreign Trade Slavic Society; Yugoslavic Univer- sity Club. CARRIE LUCILLE VINCENT Point Richmond Letters and Science Economics. CHARLES J. VOLAND, JR. Oakland Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Gamma Rho; Phi Phi. TEMPLE STADTMAN VOORHEIS WILLIAM H. VROOM Oakland Engineering Mechanical Engineering Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Theta Delta Chi; American Society of Mechanical Engineers. VIRGINIA MARIE WAGNER San Francisco Letters and Science Spanish W. A. A.; Utrimque; Commuters Club. San Di ego Letters and Science- Transfer from San College. -Economics Diego State AGNES JOY WALKER Berkeley Letters and Science History. IVAN REA UTTER Berkeley Commerce Economics. WILLIAM VAN de KAMP Susanville Engineering Electrical Engineering Bowles Hall. JULIETTE MARIE VAN HOVENBERG Oakland Letters and Science English Phi Beta Kappa; Pi Lambda Theta; A. S. U. C. Card Sales Committee; Women ' s Counseling; California Engineer; Phrateres; Group System. KATHRYN VEIHMEYER Dab Letters and Science Political Science Phi Mu; Hammer and Coffin: Pan- Hellenic; Y. W. C. A.; Pelican. Exchange Manager: Women ' s Counseling. BEN VIET7Y Fresm Letters and Science Zoology. JOHN VINN, JR. Berkeley Commerce Transportation Baton; Quarterdeck; A. S. U. C. Band. MARIAN INGEBORG VON HUSEN San Francisco Letters and Science Household Arts Delta Chi Alpha. EDWIN JOE WACHTER San Francisco Le tters aid Science Economics Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. ELEANOR STAUFFER WALKER Yorba Linda Letters and Science Economics Transfer from Fullerton Junior College: V. W. C. A.; Interna- tional House 157 LILLIAN WALKER Redwood City Letters and Science History Transfer from San Mateo Junior College; Masonic Club; Phrateres; Treble Clef; Crap and Saddle. PAULINE HILDEBRANDT WALTERS Berkeley Utters and Science History Alpha Chi Omega. ELOUISE MARY WARD Tatt Letters and Science History Alpha Chi Omega. WILLIAM NICHOLS WARNER Hayward Commerce Finance Transfer from Marin Junior Col lege. BEATRICE ANN WATSON Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Alpha Gamma Delta; Little The- atre; Little Theatre Make-up Staff; W. A. A.; Intramural Sptrts; Y. W. C. A. FREDERIC REGINALD WATSON Oakland Engineering Mechanical Engineering American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Society of Automotive Engineers; Scabbard and Blade. GEORGE LINCOLN WEAMER Dunsmuir Chemistry Chemical Engineering Transfer from Sacramento Junior College. MARY KATHERINE WEBBER Berkeley Letters and Science History Cki Omega; Counseling RAYMOND CARLTON WEBSTER Fresno Chemistry Chemistry Transfer from Fresn State Col lege; Chi PI Sigma. 158 Wi MILTON A. WALKER Alameda Commerce Economics. ELWIN F. WANAKA Martinez Commerce Business Administration. THOMAS ANTHONY WARD Petaluma Letters and Science Medicine Phi Chi; Newman Club. ALICE EUGENIA WARREN Palo Alto Letters and Science Household Arts International House; Kappa Phi; Wesley Foundation; Little Theatre Make-up Staff (3); Wesley Play- ers. DOROTHY WATSON Graton Letters and Science French. VIRGINIA LOCKHART WATSON Los Angeles Letters and Science Alpha Tau Delta; House. Nursing International ROBERT CHRISTIAN WEAVER Merced Engineering Electrical Engineering Calvin Club; Signal Corps; Pi Tau Pi Sigma. WALTER ANTHONY WEBER San Francisco Commerce Accounting Phi Sigma Kappa; Phi Phi; Scab- bard and Blade; Crew (1). JOHN WILLIAM WEEDER, JR. Washington, D. C. Commerce Finance Transfer from University of South- ern California; Sigma Nu. JOSEPH FRANCIS WALSH Eureka Letters and Science Zoology Transfer from Humboldt State College; Bowles Hall. DAWN LYNNETTE WANLESS Long Beach Letters and Science Social Institutions Transfer from Long Beach Junior College. JACK FRANKLIN WARNER Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science Alpha Sigma Phi; Scabbard and Blade; Pershing Rifles; Pi Sigma Alpha. BERNICE MARGUERITE WARREN Berkeley Letters and Science Economics Phi Mu; Esperam; Daily Califor- nian; Advertising Service Bureau; Counseling. EUGENE EARLE WATSON Berkeley Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Delta Phi Epsilon. LOWELL GRANT WAYNE San Francisco Chemistry Chemistry Chess Club , President. VIRGINIA WEBB San Diego Commerce Business Administration Transfer from San Diego State College. HARRIET EDITH WEBLEY Los Altos Letters and Science Latin International House. BARBARA WEEKS Berkeley Letters and Science Anthropology Hammer and Coffin; Pelic Women ' s Discussions; Counselin HERBERT A. WEHRLY Porterville Letters and Science History Transfer from Portenllle Junior College: American Student Union. JANE HORTENSE WEINGARTEN San Francisco Letters and Science History Kappa Alpha Sigma. RALPH RUSSELL WELLINGTON Berkeley Commerce Economics- Insurance Tennis (1); Weight Basketball ROBERT HENRY WESSON San Pedro Letters and Science English Transfer from Long Beach Junior College: Daily Californian, Sports Editor (4); A. S. U. C. News Bureau; Senior Peace Committee: Pi Delta Epsilon. LEOLA IRENE WHARTON Corning Letters and Science French Alpha Delta Pi; Pan Hellenic (4); Intramural Sports (3) (4); Class Committees. LOIS MARGARET WHITE La Mesa Letters and Science English Transfer from San Diego State College: Masonic Club. SHIRLEY LOUISE WHITE Alameda Letters and Science History Delta Delta Delta. RUTH WOODROW WHITLEY Ontario Letters and Science English Transfer from Chaffey Junior Col- lege: Dormitory Council. DOROTHY MIGNON WIGHT Ontario Letters and Science Art Transfer from Chaffey Junior Col- lege. LEONARD ALAN WEHRMAN Winters Agriculture Plant Pathology Transfer from California Agricul tural College. LOUISE WEINMAN Los Angeles Letters and Science Public Health Nursing Transfer from U. C. L. A ROBERT CLINTON WELLS Stockton Commerce Finance Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Beta Theta Pi. DAVID MILLARD WEST San Diego Letters and Science German A. S. U. C. Card Sales Commit tee (4). JOE BEN WHEAT Van Horn, Texas Letters and Science Anthropology Glee Club. MARGARET SHEPPARD WHITE Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Zeta Tau Alpha: Blue and Gold; Personnel (1) (2) ; Counseling (2) (3). WILLIAM RIORDAN WHITENER Los Angeles Commerce Foreign Trade Transfer from San Diego Army and Navy Academy; Delta Phi Ep- silon; Newman Club. RICHARD HAMILTON WHITTEN Fresno Letters and Science Physics-Optometry Transfer from Fresno State Col lege; Omega Delta: Masonic Club A. S. U. C. Band (4). ELVIRA VIVIAN WILDER Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology OBERT NEIL WEICHERT Waterford Letters and Science Physical Education-Hygiene Sigma Alpha; Gymnastics Team. HERBERT GUSTAV WEITZMAN PeUluma Letters and Science Biochemistry Transfer from Santa Rosa Junior College. WALTER MELVIN WELLS. JR. Piedmont Commerce Economics Transfer from San Diego State College; Sigma Nu; Phi Phi. ELINOR FRANCES WEST Pomona Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from Pomona Junior Col- lege. MARGARET WHELAN Oakland Letters and Science International Relations Kappa Alpha Theta. OLGA F. WHITE Berkeley Letters and Science Spanish Transfer from Pasadena Junior College: Utrimaue: Newman Club: Hostess Committee. GEORGE COIL WHITLEY Berkeley Commerce Business Administration Transfer from Armstrong Junior College: Masonic Club: Commerce Association. HELEN ELIZABETH WHITTLESEY Portland. Oregon Letters MO) Science Political Science Transfer from Reed College: Honor Student; Hostess Committee. Sub- chairman: Elections Committee; International House. EDWIN MARION WILDY Berkeley Commerce Banking Transfer from Sacramento Junior College: Circle " C " Society; Bas- ketball (1)(3) (4). T59 JOHN BARKER WILKES Berkeley Chemistry Chemistry. CHARLES C. WILLIAMS Fresno Letters and Science History Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege; Brick Morse ' s Collegians. ALICE LOUISE WILLIAMSON Chico Letters and Science History Chi Omega; Elections Committee (2) (3) (4); Pelican (1). MEL-MARGARET WILSON Berkeley Letters and Science History Masonic Club, President (3); Treasurer (4); Phrateres. RODERICK WILSON Carmel Letters and Science Political Science Transfer from Salinas Junior Col- lege. JIN GIN WING San Francisco Letters and Science Physics-Optometry Pi Alpha Phi. ADRIA WISEMAN Jenner Letters and Science Economics Pi Phi Delta. SUSAN WOLFF San Francisco Letters and Science VIOLET GIL WONG Sacramento Letters and Science Economics Tri-Chi. Secretary; Chines Stu dents Club; Y. W. C. A. -Spanish. CLYDE FRANCIS WILKINS Richmond Commerce Foreign Trade Pan Xenia; Y. M. C. A. GRACE DOROTHY WILLIAMS Long Beach Letters and Science English Transfer from Long Beach Junior College. BARBARA WILLSON La Jolla Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from Pomona College; Alpha Chi Omega. NORMA FRANCES WILSON Riierside Letters and Science Psychology Transfer from Riverside Junior College; Chi Omega. RODNEY GUY WILSON Glendale Letters and Science Medical Science Transfer from Glendale Junior College. CONRAD THEODORE WINGEFELD Paso Robles Letters and Science Political Science Daily Californian (1)(2); Depu- tations (2) (3) (4). JANET WEST WOOD Berkeley Letters and Science Public Speaking Women ' s Executive Committee; Women ' s Discussions, Chairman; Women ' s Counseling (1)(2)(3): Daily Californian (1)(2)(3); Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; Women ' s Rally Committee; Class Commit- tees. HERBERT CHOY WONG San Francisco Letters and Science Psychology Chinese Students Club; Pre-Med- ical Club. WILLIAM L. WONG Oakland Commerce Foreign Trade- Marine Transportation Chinese Students Club; Commerce Association; Tri-Chi. WILLIAM CHARLES WILKINSON Oakland Letters and Science History-Economics Senate Debating Society; Deputa- tions Speakers Committee; Debate Manager (2) (3); Honor Student Advisory Bureau. ROBERT KEMP WILLIAMS Santa Monica Agriculture Forestry Transfer from Santa Monica Jun- ior College. BYRON JULIAN WILSON Oakland Letters and Science Music Baton, President; Senate; A. S. U. C. Band, Captain (4); Rally Council (4); Music Council (3) (4); Tennis (1); Class Commit- tees. PERRY DALE WILSON Orinda Letters and Science Economics. EMMA RUTH WING San Jose Letters and Science- -Nursing. LOUIS ARTHUR WIRGLER, JR. San Francisco Commerce Business Administration Transfer from San Mateo Junioi College; Alpha Sigma Phi; Depu tations; Intramural Water Polo. HESTER LOUISE WOLFE Long Beach Commerce Economics Transfer from Long Beach Junic College; Masonic Club; Pelica Staff; A. S. U. C. Card Sail Committee; A. S. U. C. Sou. Committee. LINCOLN WONG San Francisco Letters and Science Pre-Mcdical- Psychology Pre-Medical Club; Chinese St dents Club. JEAN WOODBURN Oakland Letters and Science Economics 160 DONALD WOODRUM San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Alpha Sigma Phi; Phi Phi; Foot- ball (1); Crew (1X2) (3); Class Treasurer (3). ARGARET CATHERINE WORDEN Atascadero Letters and Science Household Art Guild of Applied Arts. MASAO YAMADA Berkeley Commerce Accounting Japanese Students Club; Beta Alpha Psi; Advertising Service Bureau. BESSIE ANNE YELLIN San Francisco Commerce Account! ng Sigma Delta; Little Theatre. BEN TSUTOMU YOSHIOKA Los Angeles Letters and Science Political Science Japanese Students Club. HOWARD WELLINGTON YOUNG San Francisco Agriculture Landscape Design Landscape Design Club, President. VICTOR CHEOUNG YOUNG San Francisco Letters and Science Economics Chinese Students Club, President; International House; A. S. U. C. Card Sales Committee (3) (4). JOSEPH ZALMANOFF Los Angeles Engineering Electrical Engineering LOIS M. ZIMMERMAN Bakersfield Letters and Science Nursing Alpha Tau Delta. GLENNETTE BEATY WOODS Merced Letters and Science Spanish Casa Hispana; Personnel; Crop and Saddle; Rifle. EDNA AMES WORTH Berkeley Letters and Science Anthropology Transfer from University of Wash- ington. HAROLD YOSHITO YANAMURA Honaunau, South Kona, T. H. Letters and Science Bacteriology Honor Students ' Club. FANITA EWING YOAKUM Oakland Letters and Science German Transfer from Stanford; Alpha Omicron Pi; Honor Student; Ger- man Club; French Club. WOODROW DOW YOST San Ardo Letters and Science History. LOIS LIBBY YOUNG Pomona Letters and Science Social Institutions Transfer from Chaffey Junior Col- lege; Masonic Club; Dormitory Council. ELIZABETH YOUNGHUSBAND Riverside Letters and Science Household Art Transfer from Riverside Junior College; Delta Chi Alpha. ALFRED JAMES ZAVATERO Berkeley Commerce Transportation Masonic Club. MARIE CORINNE ZUGG Berkeley Letters and Science Political Science California Engineer (2) (3) (4); W. A. A. (1). DOROTHY VIRGINIA WOODSIDE El Segundo Lctteri and Science Public Speaking Zeta Tau Alpha; Philorthian. Varsity Debating; Little Theatre Make-up Staff (1)(2)(3); Blue and Gold (2); Debate Manager (2); Class Committees. YSOBEL WRIGHT Alametfa Letters and Science English. STANTON GENE YEE Oakland Letters and Science Zoology Chinese Students Club. FRANK TOSHIO YOSHIMURA Vacaville Commerce Business Administration Japanese Students Club; Interna- tional House. ALBERT YOUNG San Francisco Letters and Science Medical Science Chinese Students Club; Honor Student; Advisory Council. PORTIA ELIZABETH YOUNG Van Nuys Letters and Science History Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Alpha Omicron Pi. ROBERTA ZABRISKIE Hollywood Letters and Science Public Health Nursin Alpha Tau Ottta. DOROTHY FLORENCE ZERWER Berkeley Letters and Science Psychology Phi Omega PI; Prytanean; Theta Sigma Phi; Esperam; Phrattres: Daily Califwnian (1)(2)(3), Associate Editor (4); Counseling (2)(3)(4 : Masonic Club. MARY GRACE ZUGNONI Grass Valley Letters and Science Spanish. Klttll 161 JULIA M. ARMANINI Mountain View Pharmacy Pharmacy Lambda Kappa Sigma. CURTIS RUNDLE BIDDICK Davis Agriculture Animal Husbandry Philo Delphos; Picnic Day. Sub- chairman (3) ; Picnic Committee, Chairman (4); Manager Assem- blies (3) (4). JAMES W. COLLINGE, JR. Santa Barbara Dentistry Dentistry Transfer from Berkeley Campus; Xi Psi Phi. JAMES De MARTINI San Francisco Pharmacy Pharmacy Sigma Kappa Theta; Glee Club: Baseball. ALI A. K. EL KHESHEN Cairo, Egypt Agriculture Genetics. ALBAN L. BAILEY Petaluma Dentistry Dentistry Xi Psi Phi. STANLEY F. BURSON Lodi Letters and Science Dentistry Transfer from Berkeley Campus; Delta Sigma Delta; Epsilon Alpha. OWEN CORNETT San Francisco Dentistry Dentistry Xi Psi Phi. WILLIAM HISAYUKI ETO Gardena Agriculture Truck Crops Transfer from U. C. L. A.; Horti- cultural Round Table; Wrestling. RUSSELL GATES San Francisco Dentistry Dental Surgery Transfer from Santa Maria Junior College; Class Vice-president (4). ERNEST C. HARTUNIAN Fresno Pharmacy Pharmacy Transfer from Fresn State Col- lege; Phi Delta Chi. NORMAN MENDERS Sanger Pharmacy Pharmacy Transfer from Frew State Col- lege. 162 O in m JT MARY ANN DURLO San Francisco Pharmacy Pharmacy Lambda Kappa Sigma. MURRAY BALLARD Healdsburg Dentistry Dentistry Xi Psi Phi; Epsilon Alpha. STANLEY CADENAZZI Knowles Pharmacy Pharmacy Transfer from Fresno State Col- lege; Phi Delta Chi; Student Council; Rally Committee. ROBERT FRANKLIN DAVIS Concord Agriculture Animal Husbandry ASCA Stage Manager (2) (3); Executive Committee (4) ; Cali- fornia Club (4); Golden Hoof Club (2) (3) (4); Cal Aggie Play- ers (2) (3) (4). PHOEBE EHRHARDT Elk Grove Agriculture Agronomy. MOHAMED SAID EL RAFEY Tanta, Egypt Agriculture Chemistry. ROBERT CLIFFORD FARRIS Santa Rosa Agriculture Dairy Industry Philo Delphos; Alpha Zeta; A. S. C. A. Vice-president (4); Junior Class, President (3): Varsity Basketball (2) (3) (4); Block CA; El Rodeo, Manager; Picnic Day Committee (3). SEYMORE BEVIER GRAY San Francisco Dentistry Orthodontics Transfer from Colorado State; Delta Sigma Delta. President (2); Pi Kappa Alpha. HAROLD HEFNER Orovllle Pharmacy Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi; Student Council: Rally Committee. JACK D. HENDRICKS Red Bluff Agriculture Economics Alpha Zeta; Wrestling (1) (2): Band (1)(2); Glee Club (4). MARGARET ESTHER ESOLA Berkeley Letters and Science Nursing Transfer from Marin Junior Col- lege; Alpha Tau Delta; Masonic Club, Secretary (2) ; Election Com- mittee (3); Mixer Dance Com- mittee (3); Class Committees. BERT FELDHEYM San Francisco Dentistry Dentistry Alpha Omicron; Phi Beta Delta. MARGUERITE J. HAGG Sebastopol Dentistry Dental Hygiene Alpha Kappa Gamma. CHARLES HEMPHILL Oakland Letters and Scienci Xi Psi Phi. -Dentistry DONALD R. HORNER Berkeley Dentistry Dentistry Xi Psi Phi; Epsilon Alpha: Sen Class President. JOHN WADMAN HOXIE San Francisco Agriculture Truck Crops Alpha Gamma Rho; Alpha Zeta, President (3) (4); Scabbard and Blade; California Aggie, Business Manager (1); El Rodeo, Business Manager (2); Stage Manager (1); Dramatics Club (1); Welfare Council (4); Vigilance Commit- tee (2); Cadet Major (3). KOKI KUMAMOTO Sacramento Dentistry Dentistry Transfer from Berkeley Campus; Epsilon Alpha. WILLIAM E. McMICHAEL Celeste, Texas Pharmacy Pharmacy Press Club. PHILLIP W. PARK Stockton Dentistry Dentistry. EL SAVED MOHAMED SAKR Kafr, Kela El Bab, Egypt Agriculture Plant Physiology. FELIX KARRER Brentwood Engineering Mechanical Engineering Acacia. JUN KURUMADA San Francisco Dentistry Dentistry Epsilon Alpha. VIVIAN GRACE MANSHAEN Sacramento Agriculture Dairy Industry Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; Blue and Gold Dairy Club; Dramatics Club; C. A. W. A.; South Hall Club: Golden Hoof Club. ELIZABETH ROBERTA MOORE Winton Letters and Science Nursing Alpha Tau Delta; Kappa Phi; W. A. A.; Class President (2); Class Representative (3) (4); Executive Committee (2) (3) (4). ALFRED COREY NICHOLAS San Francisco Pharmacy Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi, Vice-president: Basketball (2) (3) (4); Baseball (3); Vice-president Senior Class; Athletic Manager (3) (4). rf JOHN PARKER San Francisco Dentistry Dentistry XI Psi Phi. RICHARD ANTHONY PESCARO Daly City Pharmacy Pharmacy Transfer from University of San Francisco; Kappa Psi. DEMAS ALLEN POPE Lodl Agriculture Horticulture Philo Delphos; Football. EUGENE SBARBARO Weed Pharmacy Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi; Student Body President. ARTHUR F. SKAIFE, JR. Burlingame Dentistry Orthodontics Delta Sigma Delta; Epsilon Alpha. THOMAS EUGENE TUFT Richmond Agriculture Animal Husbandry North Hall; Alpha Zeta; Baseball. ANTHONY P. SOUZA Sonoma Letters and Science Dentistry. LLOYD W. TUTTLE Petaluma Pharmacy Pharmacy Kappa Psl; Pharmaceutical. ELMER 0. VITOUS Puyallup, Washington Dentistry Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta; Honor Com- mittee. Chairman (2). WILLIAM S. WILSON Oakland Dentistry Dentistry Transfer from Sacramento Junior College; XI Psl Phi; Junior Class President; Student Body Presi- dent. RALPH BYRON KEPHART Lakeside Agriculture Pomelofy West Hall. Vice-president (3): Horticulture Round Table, Presi- dent (3) (4); California Club, Di- rector (3) (4); Boilug (2X3) (4). HENRV JAMES LITTLEJOMN Artnia Agriculture Dairy Industry Transfer from Fullerton Junior Collet ; Blue and Gold Dairy Club. President: Track (3X4). JAMES MARION MARSHALL Clarksburg Agriculture Animal Husbandry Philo Delphos; Manager Assem- blies (2); Vigilance Committee (1); Picnic Day (1X2X3). Chairuan (4); Interfrattrnitr Council, President (2). EVERETT S. OSTROM Klnuburg Pharmacy Pharmacy Sigma Kappa Thcta: American Pharmacy Association, President. | itftini; ANDREW PERRY SuiSH Letters and Science Dentistry Transfer from Berkeley Campus: Xi Psl Phi. DOROTHY LINDSAY PRATHER Montaguf Pharmacy Pharmacy Sigma Kappa Thcta. CHARLES A. SEYDEL Chlce Dentistry Dentistry Xi Psl PHI. . BERT STOFF San Francisco Pharmacy-- Pharmacy. EMILY LOUISE UFFMAN San Matto Pharmacy Pharmacy Transfer from San Mateo Junior Celine: Lambda Kappa Suma: Blue imt Gold Apothecary. Edi- tor: Press Club, President; Senior Class Cauncil Representative: Lambda Kappa Epsilon, Treasurer (2X3); President (3X4). WILLIAM WONG San Fratxisco Pharmacy Pharmacy Transfer from Salinas Junior Col- 163 iJPTf -. AMBITIOUS, and possessing a marked enthusiasm for their class, the juniors established a high record during the year for participa- tion in activities, both among themselves and on the campus gen- erally. The class followed the traditional junior social program in the fall semester, with Junior Day necessitating a large number of com- mittees, arrangements, and providing many good times for the class members. The Junior Informal was the main event of the spring term and was held at the Hotel Oakland during March. The annual boat ride, however, failed to materialize, and its substitute, the Junior Fling, was cancelled. The women of the class presented an afternoon tea dance in April to finance the redecoration of the Senior Women ' s Hall. Despite the few events occurring in the spring, the good financial standing of the class at the end of the year was proof of the cooperation of its members. Chet Carlisle was president of the Class of ' 38, with Janet Hall serving as vice-president, Bob Knowles as secretary-treasurer, and Bob Wiley as yell leader. Junior women working in campus affairs included Jean Macdonald, Sylvia Malone, Iris Straffer, Janice Wat- kins, Marion Sproul, Jean Thomas, Betty Edgemond and Jean Berg. The Junior Women ' s Activities banquet, sponsored in the past 164 5- " by Prytanean, was taken over this year by tbe Women ' s Executive Committee, and the event was placed under the direction of Mildred Hickok. Little Theatre was another field of activity in which many Juniors participated. Ralph Ames, Marian De Cew, Louise Lin- ton, Constance Johnston, Dick Oliphant, Jess Swan, and Tom McCorkle, took major parts in productions. Much of the successful climax of the football season was due to the Juniors on the varsity, Bob Herwig, Johnny Meek, Sam Chapman, George Cornell, Ken Cotton, Henry Sparks, " Mushy " Pollock, Yard Stockton, Ed Thomas, Claude Evans, and Willard Dolman. During the basketball season, Ralph Hillsman, Bob Her- wig, and diet Carlisle all proved experienced hoopmen. In track Archie Williams brought California fame, while McCaffrey and Chapman were outstanding in baseball. Henry Peters, Curt Rocca, Al Daggett, Arpin and Peter Porterfield were all prominent on both the Varsity and Jayvee boats. Combining in all these sports and activities, the Junior class formed an enthusiastic group which proved eager to support its own functions and equally interested in the more serious affairs of the campus. 165 -s ;- 1V1 ' v OftV H " %Y n tR ' :R b nit. " :K THK III ' ( Ch.-I Carlisl N. dent, the la-- of " .if! became llic center of oi . ' ) ilh the celebration of (Jalifi nal Junior Day. Off to an -url .slart fl Junior i BT twenty-three, ami contii International House. Hei (I speeial futerlaiiuiK ilancin ! l y Ilollaiul and filled the time until tlie attention Louisf start of lor cast n at the of the class en- Uee Clul Informal d; the California- y ' s football ime at which Jtmic ;itor ccupied a s|)eci il mixed rooters i l ' esti itie concluded ii mior year, tin mi, h Colonial and Italian rooms of the Hotel St. Franci in San Francisco. Bob Beal furnished the miisii | guesf artists from San Franci-co ' s leading hotf vided entertuiuir -nt. Kuthu.-iaBtic Miperatioii an ort ma cipal cl.i s acti ity cial and a social succos. Tin: author of the Junior Farce, optimistical]) called ' One Foot Off the (, utter " , managed to write an [omple plot involving jewel thieve-A, treasure. lo e interest, and murder. Credit should to author Tom McCorkle and to dir for the fine coordination and jood of the .- ticip.ints In Junior class I d met catch applet ainlng fne bids 1 4 B a THE JUNIOR INFORMAL, held by the class of 1938 at the Hotel Oakland on Saturday, February 27, was not only a social success, but also served to increase the class treasury. The success of this dance must largely be attributed to the capable leadership of diet Carlisle, class president, Richard Lynch, general chairman, and Sylvia Malone, sub-chairman, as well as to the fine cooperation shown by all of the committee members. For the first time since the now traditional Junior Informal was inaugurated five years ago, members of the class provided the entertainment for the occasion. Jean Macdonald, Al Tieburg, and Dinorah Rego were featured as the vocalists with Don Mulford ' s orchestra. The decorations also followed a typically Californian theme. They consisted of blue and gold streamers suspended from the ceiling. Later in the evening, multi-colored balloons were released Over the large Crowd. Jean Macdonald entertains with Don Mulford ' s orchestra. " tin, A " the, == President Carlisle laughs heartily while pre- siding owr the last class meeting. 169 inntr A NUMBER OF outstanding personalities, a well-organized and efficiently working group of officers, and a widely-recognized class spirit characterized the Sophomore class of this year. The class officers were Bill Stoll, President; Nancy Lou Glass, Vice-president; Richard Body, Secretary-treasurer; and Robert Culver, Yell leader. The fields of debating, dramatics and Thalian plays provided activities for many Sophomores, with football re- ceiving more than its share of athletes from the Class of ' 39. Seventy appointed Vigilantes maintained discipline in the Freshman ranks, and saw that the Class of ' 40 wore the proverbial dinks. Sixty Big C guards were chosen to guard the " Big C " dur- ing football season from the painting campaigns of rival colleges. They succeeded in their task, with but two highly publicized ex- ceptions the St. Mary ' s game and the Stanford game. Avenging the defeat of the year before at the hands of the Class of ' 38, the Sophomore class defeated the Freshmen in their annual brawl on Hilgard Field. Not only did the Sophomores win three out of five of both the morning athletic events and the afternoon brawl affairs, but they were able also to stave off the advance of the Freshmen towards the Sophomore lawn. 170 Nevertheless Freshman-Sophomore rivalry did not cease with the presentation of the Paddle to the Sophomore Class at the Brawl Dance that evening. It reached its peak this year at the Freshman Rally in the Greek Theatre. Following the flooding of Wheeler lobby with a convenient fire hose, the two classes formed behind the Juniors and Seniors for the traditional march up into the Greek Theatre. In the frequent melees that took place there the Freshman bear-cub banner fell to the onslaught of the Sopho- mores. The rally lingered in the memory of both classes, for it resulted in their mutual bankruptcy. At the Pajamarino Rally, where class spirit was tested, the Sophomores triumphed once more and became possessors of the annually presented trophy, the old North Hall Bell. On Hallowe ' en Eve, October 31, the Class of ' 39 held the annual Sophomore Hop at the Claremont Country Club. Carrying out the Halloween theme, the ballroom was decorated with corn- stalks, hay, and pumpkins. As each person came in the door he was given a pumpkin and instructed to hop to the check room holding his leg, thereby carrying out the name of the affair. Nor- man Savinar was the general chairman of the dance, and Helen Stanton, general sub-chairman. VH - " 171 Sophomore men ' s reward lor a morning ' s labor: beard growing winners proudly display their two- weeks growth; Big " C " receives its annual painting: tuxes replace jeans at the Sophomore Hop. Last one down from the " C " misses lunch: Soph men labor at the " C " : time out between jogs at the Soph barn dance; Sophomores relax at their barn dance after a day of labor. CHOOSING " LIFE BEGINS WITH ' 40 " as a theme for their class activities, the freshmen class commenced its college career with unsurpassed enthusiasm. Officers for the year were Jack Far- ley, President; Barbara Jackson, Vice-president; Robert Peter- son, Secretary-treasurer; and Lloyd Whitman, Yell-leader. The class of ' 40 put up a spirited fight against the sophomores in the traditional Soph-Frosh Brawl on Hilgard Field, only to lose to their rivals by a score of 3 to 2. Altering an old custom, the freshmen women met at a dinner in place of the usual luncheon. The affair was held on March 17, in the Women ' s Club Rooms of Stephens Union with decorations in keeping with St. Patrick ' s Day. Leila Anderson, secretary of the Y. W. C. A., was guest speaker, and other guests of honor were Miss Hoyt, Assistant Dean of Women, and Miss Cobb, Assistant Supervisor of Physical Education for women. Entertainment was furnished by Dinorah Rego, who sang, and Florence Blest, who played the violin. In order to encourage interest in the Frolix, two free bids to the dance, theater party, and luncheon were raffled out of a St. Patrick ' s hat. Not satisfied with the establishing of one new freshman class jolt " . Rom " " " - 174 i tradition in the form of the Freshman Women ' s Dinner, the class of ' 40 originated the Frosh Frolix, an all-day social event held on April 10. The Frolix, of which Phil Boone was the chairman, consisted of a luncheon, theater party, and dance. At the luncheon, held in Stephens Union, the freshmen were entertained with a comical skit, presented by various members of the class, and music by Morris Anger and Marian Hecksher. The theater party was given at the United Artists Theatre in Berkeley, with Boh Peterson in charge of arrangements. Hearst Gymnasium was the scene of the Freshie Glee Dance, the Hawaiian beach theme of the day being carried out in an attractive and unusual manner. Decorations consisted of palms, cocoanut trees, cabanas, an eight-foot moon, and various types of beach equipment. Don Mulford ' s orchestra played for the affair, and additional entertainment was furnished by the music of a four-piece Hawaiian orchestra, and several Hawaiian dances and specialty numbers. Barbara Jones was general sub-chairman of the day. Committee heads were: Finances, Bob Greig and Virginia Hoisholt; adver- tising, George Brown; tickets, Mary Lou Bailey; entertainment, Marian Hecksher; and decorations, Lloyd Whitman. 175 FROSH PROLIX COMMITTEE HEADS Back Row: Farley, Swartz, Sharp, Palmer, Smith. Second Row: Bullock, Whitman. Boone, Benjamin. Brown. Grelg, Pugh. Front Row: Bailey, Tolen. Langbeldt, Jackson. Jones, Hennessey. Freshman women celebrate Saint Patrick ' s Day: Freshman Day brings Freshman men and women together lor lunch; Frolix entertainment provided by " The Campus Maestro " . All rinlr; forgotten: Sophomores and Freshmen mingle; with one another at the Brawl Dance. O FUNCTIONING AS a clearing house of information and as a body for tak- ing action on problems common to all women ' s activities, Women ' s Exec- utive Committee has been extensively active this year. Besides sponsoring many social events during each semes- ter, the committee revised its by-laws and designated the position of secre- tary, which had formerly been held by a sophomore Daily Californian re- porter, to a senior. University rules regarding the supervision of women living in dormitories and sororities were clarified and definite check-ups of the enforcements of house rules were also made. In the fall semester the Women ' s Executive Committee entertained the U.C.L.A. Women ' s Council before the U.C.L.A.-California football game. A breakfast party and meeting were held at which problems of both cam- puses were discussed and ideas ex- changed. The U. C. L. A. Women ' s Council returned the gesture by act- ing as hostess to the California women at a luncheon on the U.C.L.A. campus the day of the U.S.C.-California foot- ball game. Later in the semester a Neva Dell Barbara Eames Irene Christiansen Marcella Eriksmoen Lucile Elfin Jean Haven 180 Pegny C U T I V E M M I T T E E , v supper was given for the dormitory and sorority presidents at which they were asked for their cooperation in the enforcement of living rules. The committee also sponsored a junior recognition dinner in the fall. Action was started in the spring to revive next year the Parthenia, a spring festival held for many years in Faculty Glade by the women stu- dents. On April 11 representatives from approximately 15 four-year col- leges attended the Intercollegiate Con- ference conducted on this campus by the Women ' s Executive Committee for the purpose of contemplating col- lege problems. The semester ended with a women ' s appointment banquet in the form of a ceremonial. Much comment has been made on a revision and decrease in the mem- bership of the Women ' s Executive Committee, but its leaders feel that to make it an adequate and representa- tive body for the creation of friendly feeling among women students it should, on the contrary, have several additions. Stan- Jean Seville Esther Simpson Donna Reid Virginia Scamman arie Philips Isabelle Prising 181 - ' ;,{ . ' - " +J %$ New women are entertained at first tea of semester. AUDREY STARR Chairman of the A.S.U.C. Social Committee RUTH TURNER Chairman of the Hostess Committee Back Row: McAnulty. Miller, Smith. Macdonald. Ducker, Me Kenzie, Jones, Wolfe. Copper. Fourth Row: Pieratt, Matttson, Enos, Buffum, Stevens. Taber. Struck, Usher. Third Row: Sund- strom. Hodges, Eldridge. Acklty. Larson, Herrick, Chubb, Larson. Second Row: Gronlund, Fencel, Seaman, Stone, Shapiro, Conn, Bullock, Kennedy. Front Row: Holland. Coates. Hoag. Howson. Parrish. Starr (Chairman), Jacoby. Horwita. Turman. SOCIAL COMMITTEE ALTHOUGH TWO OF its major functions, the regular inspections of women ' s rest rooms and keeping the bulle- tin boards in order, went on as usual, the major service of the Hostess Committee, serving tea to women who bring their lunches, was somewhat changed in proced- ure during the fall term. During the rehabilitation of Stephens Union, Ruth Turner and her committee were forced to perform this service in the recreation room of Hearst Gymnasium. A special feature of the year was the Spring Tea, given to entertain the Deans, faculty women, and the Women ' s Executive Committee. The work of acquainting women students with one an- other and with women faculty members was furthered this year through the efforts of the A. S. U. C. Social Com- mittee. In addition to bi-monthly afternoon teas, the committee presented various entertainments such as the Big Game tea in the fall, and the Senior Week fashion show and Japanese tea in the spring semester. Audrey Starr as chairman of the committee, also had charge of the Koffee Klatsches, a new series of student and faculty informal get-togethers. These meetings were held in Stephens Union with a different faculty speaker each time in order that both men and women might meet many faculty members in a social atmosphere. HOSTESS COMMITTEE Back Row: Rednall. Fiscalini, Watson, White. Hofer. Hurst. Front Row: Dam. Kessing, Whittle- sey, Turner (Chairman), Morrison, Kennedy. McFarland. 183 Back Row: Chick, Berg, Teuteberg. Rowell. Goursau. Front Row: Snyder, Kessing, Dell ' Osso (Chairman), Kimura, Watkins. COUNSELING ASSISTANCE IN MAKING the necessary adjustments to campus life is offered to all new women students by the Women ' s Counseling System. Under its program each freshman woman and junior transfer is assigned to an upperclassman who is trained to assist and give advice to each member of her group. Neva Dell ' Osso, chairman, introduced two new procedures into the organization to further its efficiency. In order to insure the constant func- tioning of the group throughout the year, the executive board and individual groups met regularly once a month. The second improvement was the filling out of standard- ized reports by the counselors for each girl. Freshman women are Introduced to their counselors before leaving the Men ' s Gymnasium following registration. DESIGNED ESPECIALLY to acquaint women students with the vocational fields and opportunities open to them, Vocational Information offers valuable guidance to un- dergraduates. The committee, headed this year by Anita Berry, is supervised by a group of faculty members, and is open to every interested woman student. This year ' s program included addresses by Mrs. Patricia Farthing, of the Oakland Associated Charities, and by Miss Dorothy Williams, assistant United States Attorney for the San Francisco district. A file containing an outline of each discussion was established for the benefit of persons unable to attend the meetings. VOCATIONAL INFORMATION ANITA BERRY Chairman of the Vocational Information Committee NEVA DELL ' OSSO Chairman of the Women ' s Counseling System Back Row: Samson, Berry (Chairman), Berg, Thomas. Front Row: Haden. White, Malone, McCann. 184 The Council room of Stephen ' s Union Is the scene of weekly discussion groups. HELEN KNOPP Chairman of Group System HELEN STADTMULLER Chairman of the Personnel Committee Back Row: Burnham, Gti set. Hand. Knopp (Chair- man), Madsen. Goldeen. Front Row: Dobson. Trumpler, Weindorf. Evernden, Ballagh, Bullock. G R U P SYSTEM THE GROUP SYSTEM, a non-competitive, social, and educational activity, endeavors to unite campus women who have mutual interests. Under Helen Knopp its range was considerably broadened this year by the inclusion of many new groups such as books, current events, German, and art. In addition to the regular meetings with speakers and programs, some groups went on excursions, held so- cial affairs, or sponsored special events. The music and drama groups provided the program for a joint Group System luncheon, the household art group held a fashion show, and the garden group offered a flower arrangement course. The meetings of the Executive Board were made valuable by reviews of books on leadership. WITH THE COORDINATION and integration of A. S. U. C. activities as its main interest, the Personnel Com- mittee this year introduced bi-monthly meetings of its members and the heads of women ' s activities to consider mutual problems and to become acquainted with the functions of each group. Besides compiling activity rec- ords, Personnel members do office work for the A. S. U. C. and keep statistics of student activity interests. In an effort to help entering students, the committee devoted a week in attempting to place cadi nr uom.m in that activity in which she is most interested. PERSONNEL COMMITTEE Back Row: Baker, Amery. Young. Jones, Staia, Barber. Dewell. Per- rine. Third Row: Clint. Butcher. Schord. White. Seller. Morabe. Ross-Lewin, Parrlsh. Second Row: Barnard, Dam. Wright. Kilgwe. Babasinian. Langheldt. Larson, Brown. Front Row: Siska, Golton, Pedrotti, Reed, Stadtmuller, Ma- lone. Oewey. Wilding, Guyot. 185 Third Row: Crandall, Edwards, Collins, King, Kafafian, Nace, Miller, Bagley. Second Row: Bartlett, Varney, Kako, Wells, Collins, Schneider, Brewster. First Row: Chue, Marshall, Bee, Seabury, Tyler, Turman, Nottage. WOMEN ' S ORCHESTRA OFFERING AN OPPORTUNITY to play classical and 8 emi- classical works by great composers, the Women ' s Orchestra, for- merly a part of Group System, has lately been organized as one of the newest activities for women on the campus. The group this year was made up of thirty members, and, managed by Adelaide King and directed by Haig Kafafian, it played for several campus functions. The orchestra broadened its program by participa- tion in the annual Glee Club and Treble Clef operetta and in the radio University hour. SINCE LAST YEAR ' S theme, " Getting the Most Out of One ' s College Career " wa xtremely suitable one, Janet Wood, eight discussions per- art of the orTentanolr jTgrani for fill, all new women stt wa Chairman of Wome taining to this sub Freshmen women. df nls signed up f first iif I In- f :ir. The fif pated in lunchconlg lar meetings. WOMEN ' S DISCUSSIONS Back Row: Cramer, Hall, Foster. Budelman, Stys, McKechnie, Merrill. Second Row: Hurlburt, Strandberg, Straefer, Yager, Munter. Grandjean, Snyder. Front Row: Leigh. Richardson. Wood (Chairman). Appleton, Coney, Phillips. roups as IIi( registered at ups (.hue ' organized also partici- m l to supplement regu Back Row: Kearns, Taylor, Chabot. Mallory, Taylor, Thomson, Landauer, Seville. Middle Row: Hlckock. Bradley, Long, Noda, Marx, Knight, Frame. Front Row: Simon. Clark, Scamman, May. Poat, Meiklejohn. Y W G A DURING THE LAST 48 years, the Y. W. C. A. has established it- self firmly in the campus life of the University women and con- tributes inestimably toward their welfare. Better understanding among women of all races and creeds is being brought about by the Y. W. C. A., whose main purpose is to give the women of the University an opportunity for independent thought and discus- sion. It is a unit in a great international organization whose stand- ards have brought finer ideals of womanhood all over the world. Finding a field for their special interests, over seven hundred campus women participated during the year in the twenty-five departments, which were under the supervision of Virginia Scammon, president, and an executive rinet. Activities were carried on in the friendl uUiiosplie-ro of the " V " ' cottage, where si iiilrnis gathered in various i_ r roii| s and discussions. The current emphasis of the program dwelt on tin- major | rol lems of today; peace, economic , race and religion. A group of the members hear a luncheon speaker. W. A. A. COUNCIL Back Row: Roberto, Loven, Tipton, Sond- haus Stuchberry, Caylor, Bagley, Mason, Whyte. Front Row: Behrens, Crane, Pat- terson, Cobb, Mclaughlin, Benny, Gross, Hickok, Rogers. WITH OVER ONE thousand women in- cluded on its rolls as active members, the Women ' s Athletic Association provided rec- reaction and relaxation from campus work throughout the year. During both semesters, canoeing, fencing, golf, crop and saddle, riflery, tennis, and winter sports were offered. Hockey, archery, swimming, and W. A. A. ' s newest sport, baseball, were given only in the fall, and basketball, life saving, and volleyball only in the spring. This year W. A. A., in cooperation with the men ' s Physical Education Department intro- duced a new program of co-educational sports. Competition between mixed teams in tennis, golf, badminton, and volleyball was scheduled and worked out very successfully. Two traditional W. A. A. sports days were high lights in the year ' s calendar. Triangular Sports Day held in the fall preceded High School Sports Day on March 13, at which W. A. A. entertained representatives from over sixty high schools. Many special events also made up part of the year ' s program, which included a canoeing regatta, a water pageant, a fencing conclave, a horse show, be- ginners ' ski camp, and a semi-annual field week. Intramural sports conducted by W. A. A. were highly successful this year. Under the leadership of Sue Crane, the Intramural Board conducted signups and ten weeks of actual competition each semester. The wide range of activities included riding, tennis, bad- minton, fencing, swimming, golf, and volley- ball. W. A. A. SPORTS MANAGERS Back Row: Stuchberry, Caylor, Sondhaus, Bagley, Mason, Whyte. Front Row: Behrens. Loven. Benny, Gross. Rogers. WOMEN ' S C SOCIETY Back Row: Mlnshall. Dun- lap, Miner, Tipton, Bag- ley. Middle Row: Mc- laughlin, Adams. Michel. Whyte. Front Row: Pat- terson, Lowenthal, Flnlay, Frank, Buckner. PENNANT C SOCIETY Back Row:Minshall, Cole. Johnson, Homer, Nace. Third Row: Caldwe II. Mosher, Adams, Scamman. Rittenhouse. Second Row: Miner. Mclaughlin, Fin- lay, Tipton, Bagley. Front Row: Lowenthal, Michel, Frank, Dunlap, Myers. Kimura. SPOR I WOMEN ' S INTRAMURAL BOARD Back Row: Chichitola, Hart, Murphy. Pmkerton. Sloan. Scott. Leebrick. Mariani. Front Row: Standish. Lester, Swift, Crane. Kennedy. Rogers. Hickok. Bernhard. 189 TR 1 AN G 190 TRIANGULAR SPORTS DAY, an annual day of competition among the women of Mills College, Stanford, and California, was held at Mills College on Saturday, November 14. Act- ing as a factor in producing an amicable relationship among the women of the three participating schools, this event encourages competition between class teams rather than individuals, and has introduced a spirit of friendly rivalry. The meet brought together participants in six sports: hockey, tennis, swimming, golf, fencing, and archery. Those competing in the fencing match were fortunate in having as guest referee the well known Olympic fencer, Helena Mayer. Immediately after the meet, the members of all the teams joined in a luncheon on the campus. Clever entertainment, arranged by the chairman for the day, Helen Tipton, fol- lowed this event. The climax of the day was an exhibition professional hockey game which enabled the earlier participants to become spectators, and in which the All-Australian hockey team triumphed over the Berkeley Terriers. Marian Randall of California executes a jackkmfe from the low board. Elizabeth Hankey of California misses a thrust. Cali- fornia seniors face Mills on the hockey Held. 191 . f- x , ,. . -V -V 192 PUBLICATIONS .- . .. A CONCERTED EFFORT was made this year to build the publications: Blue and Gold, Daily Calif ornian, Pelican, Occident, and the California Engineer into a unit to achieve the benefits to be derived from closer association. Frequent meetings of all publications for business and social purposes, including an All-Publi- cations Ball, and association with publication heads of other universities through Major College Publications, were emphasized. Supervising the activities housed in Eshleman Hall was Fred C. Fischer, Director of Publications. In this capacity, he managed the funds allotted to publica- tions, prepared the budget, and served as ex-officio member of the Publications Council. Publications Council, on which all managers and editors sit, is the executive body of the A.S.U.C. publi- cations. Jack Brubaker acted as chairman of the Coun- cil in the fall, and William Turner in the spring. As a coordinating agent, the council fosters contact between the students working on publications and guides the organizations as a whole. It took action against the publishing of Theta Sigma Phi ' s date book and took an active part in the press convention. Speakers 195 EDITORIAL BLUE JUNIOR EDITORS Back Row: Langmaid. Nelson, Lynch. Front Row: Tinneman, Thomas, JEAN SEVILLE Women ' s Editor REFLECTING THE MANY activities of the Uni principally characterized by variety. It is the job Seville, to coordinate campus impressions and only familiarizes the editors with organizatio training and social contacts, linking them closely Early in September all divisions of the ,. the work of ilu- Ulue and Gold editorial Mail ' direction of Paul Khret and Jean ection nf student life. This projcei not )nt :i es them valuable technical aterial on their colleges. Following this, alumni officers were interviewed and academic and student administrations were surveyed. Staff members at the same time, checked organization lists, prepared senior records, and supervised all photographic work. Notes were made on special activities such as music and Little Theatre by personal attendance of performances. The men concentrated on reporting the fall and spring sports and took charge of sports and group photographs. Paralleling the acquisition of pictures and information, a great deal of technical work was involved in the actual publishing of the Blue and Gold. In addition to practical training in writing copy, mounting pictures, and preparing dummy sheets, staff members made visits to the printers, engravers, and artist ' s studio, thus acquiring first-hand knowledge of the technical processes involved in yearbook production. Finally the staff achieved a balance between publishing and social activities. The members became better acquainted at dinners held every few weeks during the year, at dances held in San Francisco and at a picnic and barbecue at one of the country clubs. GOLD SOPHOMORE EDITORS Back Row: Flint, Fowler, Zinn, Johnson, Mee. Viney, Berminqham, Scanlon, Riley, Carver. Fourth Row: Young, Hook, Woolpert, Newton. Thieme, Teilman, Stable. Third Row: Eddy, Brownlie, Taylor, Yeaton, Meyer, McCarthy, Schuessler. Second Row: Caldwell. Barnard, Baldwin, Andross, Carlson, Scott, Anderson. Front Row: Nutt, McClure, Bullock, Mavity. Woods, Semson, Hoffman, Elwood. MANAGERIAL JUNIOR MANAGERS Front Row: Hammer, Kearns, Coney, Puccinelli, Hallsted, Irving. ISABELLE PRISING Women ' s Manager THROUGH A SYSTEM of rival selling teams, indi agerial staff of the 1936-37 Blue and Gold topped In the fall, in individual competition, Jeanette L and both the second fall and all the spring sales the students contacted for sales, but also printin the affiliated colleges; all organizations; and the Alumnithrovign luul competition, and ;id ertisiiif; campaigns, tin- Man- epinji almost 200 more assessments. 1 hi r|ir.-l sales score for the first lri -. by Lcnore Hemiesse . ot onlv were inie- throughout the United States: in tin- California Monlhh. Under the supervision of Frank Mitchell, Manager, and Isabella Prising, Women ' s Manager, the prices of the organization pages were considerably reduced in the hopes of increasing the number of purchasers. Connected with work of this type there was necessarily a vast amount of office work. Bookkeeping, typing, filing, and telephoning consumed the major part of the managers ' time. Not all the work, however, was of this monotonous type. Poster making proved interesting and the personnel work was both entertaining and instructive. To further prepare the Sophomores on the managerial staff for office management, the Juniors conducted weekly skull sessions, during which printing, engraving, paper-making, writing, editing, and the make-up of the other publications of the A.S.U.C. were discussed. Their meetings were not all merely for business purposes. The entire staff participated in bi-weekly dinners, a barbecue in the fall at John Hinkle Park, a spring picnic, and two informal dances. GOLD SOPHOMORE MANAGERS Back Row: Dailey, Flem- ing, Maloney. Searight, Teilman, Caflee, Weems. Third Row: Kent, Drenth, Ormsby. Lucas, Eggert, Craig, Losee, Ellison, Bentley, Babasinian. Sec- ond Row: Parker, Betts. Casey, Robinson, Collins, Douthitt, Scholield. Mc- Nutt. Front Row: Me- Fall, Morse, Mayers. Wil- liams, Klein. Falk, Miles, Hoffman, Hennessey. EDITORIAL BOARD Back Row: Turner. WaH VOL XXIX OI;AM F.I) INDKK a hoar in a nove ii in i i [ p man to I Divers content current i Oi-cidenl . vritt lion- ma com casionally article from John Stein To help reach was radically ch section, then ings to illuslral printed material. Under the din the fall, and K magazine in an spring instead of the in the hiMor ise circu staff sponsored it for the great e- 1 in. As another innovation, the mag;i tising of books, hook .tor B, .m.l FALL 1936 of the editorial board dcler- s, leaving the duties of chair- magazine, some of the lies of general . Although the it. students, contribu- radtiate students. ( )c- eared. sncli a- a letter H the physical aspect of the hook the inclusion of a hook i iev e ' ' lack and white line drau- - cre run with the of the Occident in laiiagcrs issued the wo numbers in the ised a sales system, unique nt the publicity campaign ies for sale purpo-e-: lin rtising: staff members sold sors: and prize were uiven tained classified ,ulv er- ie-. I5 tin-- means, together 200 A LETTER FROM JOHN 5TESNBECK DIEGO RIVERA: A CHILD ' S PORTRAIT FREE SPEECH: ANN MEIKLEJOHN STORIES BY BILL WALLACE, JAMES KENNEY NORMAN CANRIGHT, ELEANOR THOMSON, MARGARET WOOD Twny-fiv Cnt COM 1PLET It UNITED PRESS 3 tt. E A S E E WIRE S B VICE THE DAILYmilFORNIAN 3 SPRING, 1937 Student Daily Serves 11,000 Readers With World Campus News The Daily Californian, " Monarch of the College Dailies, " adequately presents to its eleven thousand student readers all important world news, and specializes in University activities and campus interests. Through a system of beats assigned to the Junior editors, the " Mon- arch " boasts a " complete campus coverage " . The academic side of the University is covered by women, and the men take care of the larger and more difficult beats. Pride in accurate reporting and the constant antic- ipation of an unexpected story that might break add to the adventure and excitement of a reporting job in campus newspaper work. Complete coverage of world news, always a part of a well-balanced college newspaper of interest to everyone, is also sought. Two teletype machines carrying United Press leased wire releases remain open from 3 p. m. to 1 a. m., and a column entitled " News Briefs, " in which items of importance are summarized, is published daily. Several additions and changes made during the year enhanced the general appeal of the paper. Business Staff Again Breaks Sales Records Mildred Caldwell Itaining the names of all Ithe sorority pledges, his- tory of the Channing Way Derby, and a fore- cast of the next day ' s events, was issued. The Spring Fashion Supple- ment of thirty pages was the larg- est ever published by the paper and topped the record for size among all Bay Region journals, and metro- politan lineage on the Maritime Strike was almost equaled. To arouse interest in the presidential campaign, the paper conducted a straw vote to determine campus feeling. City Editor Makes Safe Driving Appeal Since " ... and Sudden Death " appeared over a year ago in the Reader ' s Digest, numerous appeals have been made for care in driving. The University of California ' s con- tribution to the cause was an edi- torial by Robert Laws written just before the U. S. C.-U. C. football game, " It Can ' t Happen to Me. " As a result there were only two minor accidents, although over 3000 stu- dents went south for the game. Richard Newell With the impetus of a fifteen per cent increase in circulation, the managerial staff of the Daily Cali- fornian has promoted nu- merous origi- al and pro- gressive ideas. The sorority extra on the night of pledg- ing was its first move toward originality. After this came the Fall Fashion Supplement, an edition of twenty-four pages, which again surpassed the metropolitan newspapers in advertising space and fashion lineage. Another big edition was the one issued on " Big Game " day which also featured the opening of the Bay Bridge. The Managerial Staff is a busi- ness organization divided into four divisions. The Freshmen work con- sists mainly in learning the funda- mentals of selling, a small amount (Continued on page 2) Managing Editor L. MELVIN LESTER is in charge of the make-up of the paper. New Methods Improve Work Of Cartoonists The goal of the Daily Californian Art Staff for this year has been to bring cartooning, the principal me- dium of newspaper artists, up to professional standards. To this end the staff was split into two divisions, the senior artists and the less experienced juniors. Each week published cartoons were posted with criticisms and sugges- tions in order that the artists might make comparative ratings of each other ' s work. Ability, interest, and ideas contributing to the improve- ment of the department determined the staff positions. Junior members were required to submit one car- toon each week, depicting an active event and con- veying a story. Although eli- gibility to the junior staff was unlimited, the art editor promoted the juniors to the senior staff at his own discre- Jerry Nevius In addition to the daily two- column editorial page cartoon, the Daily Californian ran sports car- toons pertaining to the Pacific Coast Conference each Friday. Special cuts were made for the exchange Californian Coordinates A. S. U. C. As a medium for the unification of the ten thousand members of the A. S. U. C., the Daily Californian brings all important campus and world news to the students ' atten- tion and strives to discuss all as- pects of controversial subjects. The free publicity given by the pa- per to A. S. U. C. activities arouses student interest in these affairs. It helps to assure the success of the numerous dances, drives, and pro- grams sponsored by the Student Body. Through its patronage of athletics, it stimulates student par- ticipation and attendance. Most valuable of all, " The Californian " inspires closer cooperation of stu- dents and the administration. City Editor ROBERT F. LAWS ' feature article " It Can ' t Happen to Me " was the outstanding piece of journalism written on the campus this year. page with the Daily Bruin of U. C. L. A. and for the September Fash- ion Supplement. The Big Game issue included a half-page, eight - column spread featur- ing caricatures of the players on both teams. The increas- e d staff resulted in keener compe- tition among Donald Short staff members. TWO THE DAILY CALIFORNIAN SPRING, 1937 Managers Junior Managers JACK BRUBAKER and WALMSLEY TWINING who served as Fall and Spring managers, respectively. Scott, Cook, Sauer, Bissell. Associate Editors Junior Editors Magill, Zerwer, Shinoda, Briggs, Feldheym. il Back Row: Lee, Seaver, Johnston, Murrish. Middle Row: Smith, Hoad- ley, Goldeen, Moss, Barnett. Front Row : Wiley, Brewer, Larsen, Hickok, Stecker. (Continued from page 1) of office work, and the daily distri- bution of the paper. As evidence of the value of this training, it is inter- esting to note that nearly every man who has received the Fresh- man cup, awarded in May for the best work of the year, has later be- come Manager of the Daily Cali- fornian. The staff depends to a large de- gree on its sophomores to sell ad- vertising and to cover the ac- counts in the Bay area. The work of the Junior Managers is divided into two parts. Their first responsibility is servicing old advertising accounts and selling new ones, thus providing the bulk of the local revenue. Jun- iors are also accountable for the management of the afternoon work, in particular, dummying, proof- reading, and office routine. As directing heads of the staff there are three seniors, the Man- ager, the Assistant Manager, and the Advertising Manager. Sophomore Editors Back Row: Baker, Wade, Haggard, Maines, Compton, Canright. Middle Row: Gaines, Carver, Pool, Cassell, Schaaf, Ewing. Front Row: Pieratt, Walking, Lamb, Schuster, Baldwin, Levy, Munter. I Advertising Service Bureau Reorganizes The Advertising Service Bureau was organized on an activity basis for the first time this year. Divided into two groups, one part of the staff writes advertisements for the campus publications, and the other conducts surveys concerning stu- dents ' buying habits. Byron Brown and Beverley Ballagh directed its activities. Brown and Ballagh The Brawn Patrol By BOB WESSON Though not quite up to par with the best of prophets, Bob Wesson managed to see the campus through a year in which football dominated the " Brawn Patrol " along with a real, live feud with a city sports editor. When not arguing with a certain Art Cohn as to whether Stanford ' s practice football field is 153 or 153.789 yards in width, U. C. ' s representative in the sport- ing world emerged from a sur- rounding haze of alibis and made several enlivening contributions to the field of current events. We shall entirely forget the prophetic words of Mr. H Wesson con- cerning such I games as St. Mary ' s, U.C. L.A., Wash- ington, and Washington State, and note | only his con- I structive dona- tions. Begin- ning with his startling disclosure that it only takes Mushy Pollock and a lecture on wood-carving to down the Great Goddard of Wash- ington State and let California win the ball game, we conclude with his remarkable discovery that the old era of the Stanford " gentleman " has passed on we are now facing a new and heartier (not to say slightly rougher) brand of farmer. This same charge, however, was thrown back about basketball time by " Crusading John " Bunn of Stan- ford. Bob groped around for an apt retort and brought forth " proselyt- ing " . INTRAMURAL While Varsity baseball aspirants satisfied themselves with peanut baseball squash, badminton, ping- pong and bowling all proved bitter battle grounds for the American and National Leagues. The more strenuous-minded monopolized squash and badminton, with Alpha Delta Phi carrying off the squash title and the " I " House being vic- tors in badminton. THE DAILY GUNMAN SPORTS SPRING, 1937 Athletic Wars of Golden Bears Chronicled by Sports Writers; Staff Presents New Features Under the leadership of Bob Wesson, Sports Editor of the Daily Cali- fornian, the Sports Staff became an actual unit of the Editorial Staff and not a separate division as it had been in the past. The new arrange- ment facilitated communication between the two staffs, permitting a Sports Editor to advance to any position on the Californian and not nec- essarily a sports position as was the tendency in the past. Supplementing the " complete news coverage " of the Editorial Staff, the Sports Staff prides itself on its inclusive reports of campus and world sports news. Through a system of beats, every sport, major and minor, including weight-lifting, was cov- ered. The members of the Junior Staff were assigned all major sports; the sophomores, all minor sports; and the freshmen covered all first year sports. Each member went over his beat daily and was ac- corded all press privileges, such as Sports News Offered On Air passes to secret football practice. They also received tickets of admis- sion to the games although any ex- penses incurred in transportation were borne personally. The juniors, who served as night editors, did the actual editing and made up the sports page. Later at weekly meet- ings, criticisms of the make-up and copy were presented. Through the wire service of the United Press, world wide coverage of the sports was possible. The paper could therefore make known the results of crew races, track meets, and football games to the campus immediately after their close. The coaching staffs of the various A.S.U.C. sports assisted too in their willingness to give inter- views and scoops to members of the Californian. Among the several special edi- tions published by the staff during the year, was the " Big Game " issue of nine pages, in which the Califor- nia and Stanford sports editors ex- changed columns. Attempts were made to trade columns with Wash- ington and U.S.C. but these failed. The Southern California copy was burned in the airplane crash of No- vember 4, and the Washington copy arrived a day late. Another sports edition was issued in the spring after the Washington Crew Race. As a special feature during the football season, the sports page car- ried a weekly, two or three column cartoon by Jerry Nevius. It pic- tured serially the tale of the " Bear ' s " perilous trip down the conference river to the Indian falls. T-HC- D C C C Deer TRUST There really wasn ' t any obvious reason why we shouldn ' t beat U.C. L.A. and Len Feldheym planned one nice sprint for California to end in a touchdown. Later, trying to divert his mind from his failure as a prophet, he turned to the prob- lem of the alumni, in particular to their onslaught against Coach Stub Allison, who had pushed the team on to eleven victories out of four- teen games all in two seasons. As for the Senior Formal, we ' ll sympathize with the columnist in his attempts to get passes on the auto ferries. Not only did he de- clare the bridge to be unsafe, but horrors " unromantic ! " After this brief spree into the softer aspects of life, Len reverted again to type and football, especially why the Frosh team should be beaten. Wasn ' t Minnesota? He even urged us to go out and see them lose. L " ill Supplementing the editing of the sports page, the Sports Staff of the Daily Californian has taken to the radio, which has become so impor- tant within recent years. Besides af- fording another means of publiciz- ing the sports news, it provides an excellent opportunity to the report- ers for experience in another field. This year, Bob Wesson broadcast the sporting news weekly over " The Daily Californian of the Air " . In addition the staff went on the air the night preceding every football game. Whenever possible, the Cali- fornian staff collaborated with the opposing school ' s sports staff. Be- fore the Washington game Bob Wesson spoke in Seattle alone; but prior to the U.S.C. game Jones, Sports Editor of the Daily Trojan, and Beauchamp, a . Junior Sports Editor of the Californian, broad- cast together. Klauber of the Stan- ford Daily and Wesson questioned each other before the " Big Game " . DAILY CALIFORNIAN SPORTS STAFF Back Row: Jones, Moore, Hegarty, Beauchamp. Middle Row: Toner, Lloyd, Speed, Wada. Front Row : Adams, Kelly, Fairman, Lange. ilg (Ealifnrntatt lEiiitnrial THE DAILY FORNIAN Published daily except Saturday and Sunday during the regular college year, once a week during Intersession, and twice a week during the Summer Session by the Associated Students of the Uni- versity of California. Entered as second class matter on March 1. 1901, at the postoffice, Berkeley, California. Lederer, Street If Zeus, Printers, Berkeley. Members of the Major College Publications. Represented by the A. J. Norris Hill Company Inc., co| Dan V. Huguenin, Russ Building, San Francisco; 415 Lexington Ave., New York City; Chamber of Commerce Building, Los Angeles; 1004 Second Ave., Seattle; 35 E. Wacker Drive, Chicago. Charles T. Post, Editor Fall James M. Doyle, Editor Spring Jack Brubaker, Manager Fall Walmsley Twining, Manager Spring Managing Editor: L. Melvin Lester; Assistant Editor: Bill Murrish ; City Editor: Robert F. Laws; Sports Editor: Bob Wesson. Women ' s Editor: Donna Reid; Women ' s City Editor: Mildred Caldwell ; Art Editor: Donald Short. Assistant Manager: Richard Newell; Advertising Manager: Carl W. Sauer; Adver- tising Service Bureau Manager ; Beverley Ballagh. Associate Editors: Leonard Feldheym, Carson Magill, Peter Shinoda, Elinor Briggs, Dorothy Zerwer. MONARCH of the COLLEGE DAILIES Editorials and feature articles in The Californian reflect the opinion of the writer. They make no claim to represent student or University opinion. All unsigned editorials are by the editor. THE LAST WORD Public opinion expected to see its right and left reflection this year in the Daily Californian. Nowhere could one find two more opposite personalities than Charles Post, fall editor, and James Doyle, editor in the spring. To a cer- tain extent these two men fulfilled predictions but neither pursued consist- ently the policy prophesied for him. Post, as expected, proved a conservative in national and world affairs, but, contrarily a decided liberal on all matters pertaining to campus welfare. Doyle, although taking a broader view of poli- tics and allowing his subject matter to wander farther afield, never merited a " pink " epithet. In style they conformed little more to pattern. Post ' s strict editorial form: premise, elaboration and conclusion, could not restrain his enthusiasm. Nor did the freer style, employed naturally by the spring editor as more suited to his topics and individualistic outlook, make his work haphazard. As Post concentrated on subjects of general interest to the campus at large, he could afford to be more formal in his writing. Outside of an excessive stress of national politics, he confined himself primarily to condemning Freshmen hazing, promoting self-regulation of fraternities, and acted as a publicity agent for campus and world athletics. Doyle, although keeping even closer to campus affairs, covered a greater range of topics, presenting at the same time many original ideas. Due to a more impartial stand on national affairs, he could devote time to the sponsorship of a " home talent " Senior Extravaganza, criticism of the Bureau of Occupations, denunciation of the orientations pro- gram, and election of A. S. U. C. secretary, and reluctant condemnation of the R. O. T. C. It was their attitude toward these subjects and life in general which showed most distinctly the sharp cleavage between them. In the fall, life, and campus life in particular, seemed paramount; and in the spring toleration took the place of enthusiasm. By DONNA REID ' 37 Friends, Romans, and anyone else who happens to be around: For the past year this daily column has been the scene of scintillating sen- tences, capricious clauses, and pal- pitating phrases. Incorporating a one woman, two slogan party, the " Conscientious Objector, " and the " Rah, Rah, How Wunnerful, " Little Reid has divided her column into three parts, to- wit and viz. below: The " Down with Everything, Ab- solutely " section features Philip Oliver Hyphen Smith who so very casually designed the Mask and Dagger Revue settings. Only next in this series of heinous crimes is the Berkeley Police Department, who have neither decorum nor fi- nesse (especially after Big Game Rallies). Then come Smorgasbords, and house managers who object to snakes. The " Someone Slipped up Some- where " section includes those Pelly gals, who are neither the gals nor the blondes they used to be; and al- so the great slip-up of letting Betty Stecker write this column while she, Donna, was down south at the U. S. C. game. TO THE EDITOR: LETTER TO END ALL LETTERS This letter is prompted by the discovery of certain problems which have never before been brought to the attention of the students of the university and about which some- thing should be done. Why must such an unfair grading system be allowed to continue in such a fine organization as we have here ? Why must be be bounced, jerked, rocked and tossed in all directions when we are trying to park our cars? For years I have waited to view the passing parade from that cov- eted " Senior Bench. " Now I find everything there but senior men. Isn ' t anything sacred ? Finally, when the Sophomores were sup- posed to be cutting classes to guard the Big " C " , Indians from the Farm or Joe Colleges from Berkeley High were calmly pouring buckets of red paint on it. But we really shouldn ' t feel too badly since we won the Big Game. The novelty of these situations should insure the prompt attention of the vigilant G. Milton Crouse and his famous Welfare Committee. Geology 1A Fault-finders. ERIk WAVE the pun is the lowest form of humor. but briggs thinks the pun is mightier than the sword. jokes are of six classifications: perishables standard dry bread off-grade dull we quite agree and would only add the over the waves variety TH CALIFORNIA MOORE Manager WOMEN ' S DIRECTOR I ALL A nice little number for any party. A dream with silver sandals. MARY TURNBULL THE ESSENCE The women Manager three departments: Sales, office, fashions. Side by Side For business women The Pelican. Personnel the guiding side Publicity the poster side Journalism the clever side Stenography the typing side Fashion the modeling side Exchanges the " other " side of eighty or ninety colleges. Women ' s Administration Mary Turnbull was the man ' ger Of the women in the fall ; From the sales girls to the models They were ever at her call. In the spring wonders. Rita O ' Mara did Fine Feathers Most outstanding activity; The Vanity Fair Fashion Shows. Twice a semester in Eshleman Court Once in Faculty Glade The clothes were provided by wise ad- vertisers; (It pays to advertise in the Pelican) The music, by talented students While the staff brought models galore By try-outs. To compensate these wise advertisers The magazine a short fortnight later Devoted to them an article With pictures. Scourge oi Life To combat this boresome life The girls all joined in social rife Gay skating parties Picnics festive, but not neat Hilarious dinners, Banquets sober, sedate Most of all- Appointments Banquet. RITA O ' MARA STYLE QUALITY YOUTH WOMEN ' S DIRECTOR SPRING The California Pelican ' , WOMEN ' S STAFF Back Row: Ayrault. Ebeling, Kelly, Goodman, Stava, Kocher, Bailey. MacKay, MacMichael, Welsh, Samson, Hollins. Fifth Row: Parrish, Perrine, Morris, LeRoy, Nelson, Smith, Smith, Newman, Todrank. Johnson. Fourth Row: Holmberg, Winslow, Stevens, Wolfe. Hand, Jacobsen, Bonds, Toleit, Damon, Pearson. Third Row: Street, Watkins, Duhme, LaNicca, Rhine, Johnston, Beck, Searle, Pollard, Rogers. Second Row: Straefer, Friend, Titus, Drummey, Chapin, Kurtz, Hauri, Craig, Mason. Front Row: Shaeffer, Yager, Feineman, Howson. O ' Mara. Turnbull (director), Slaughter, Smith. Mahoney, Phillis. BETWEEN CLASSES EDITORIAL AND ART BOARDS Back Row: Heindl, Schlesinger, Turner (spring editor), Hawley, Mendosa. Front Row: Nevius. Pickering (fall editor), Wallace, Ericksen. EDITORIAL STAFF As its underlying trend in the fall, Pel- ican chose the relation between the cam- pus and the outside world. National political events of the year figured promi- nently; however, with the exception of the Big Game issue, the fall numbers were without definite themes. In the sp ring all material pertained directly to campus af- fairs and particular motifs dominated all issues. One satirized campus war and peace activities, and another ironically mimicked campus journalism. Due to the influence of modern art, the Pelican abandoned the comic strip car- toon and published in each edition cari- catures of campus celebrities and campus scenes. MANAGERIAL STAFF Under the leadership of Frank Balbo in the fall and Rex Moore in the spring, the Pelican sales showed a twenty-five per cent increase and more copies of the sum- mer issue were sold than ever before. Betty Edgemond made an all-time record of one hundred and thirty-one sales for one day. The prize for the largest total sales of the fall term went to Mary New- man, and the prize for subscriptions to Beth Drummy. Fall advertising introduced a new and novel feature, an eight-page insert enti- tled " Preview of Fall Fashions " . Spring advertising gained prominence by attain- ing a new high for space sold during the spring months. MANAGERIAL STAFF Back Row: Bigis, McLaren, Chapman, McCombs, Kahn, Chariot. Schrader. Williams. Front Row: James, Moore (manager), VOLUME 15 1936-1937 No. 4 I i EDITORIAL STAFF Back Row: Burckhardt, Hand. Esther, Versaw, Lloyd. Parke. Second Row: Conner, Nelson, Keenan, editor. Rossi, Bernhard. Front Row: Patterson, Bowman. Macdonald, White, Ream, Puck. MANAGERIAL STAFF Back Row: MacFaHane, Nerlson, Jones, Bertola, Kostainsek. Roberts. Middle Row: Wall, Scott, Hadlen. Curtis, Crofts. Har- Front Row: Saari, Dowling, Saari, Hie CALIFORNIA ENGINEER " THE POLICY OF THE California Engineer dif- fered this year from past years in the use of non- technical material in place of the previous scien- tific articles. This made the Engineer more readable to the campus at large and increased the circulation among non-engineering students. Two outstanding themes of the year were " Air Races " and " The San Francisco Bay Bridge. " The Engineer also inaugurated several new columns, among them, " On the Job " , a pictorial resume of recent engineering feats. Another new feature presented a brief outline of the research work done in Engineering, Mining, and Chem- istry. Beginning this year with a greater number of subscriptions than were on hand at the close of the 1936 campaign, Manager Victor Kostainsek cooperated with the Editorial Staff in publiciz- ing the new version of the California Engineer. Although there was an increase in subscriptions lo non-engineering students, the sharp rise in total sales came principally from men in ongi- ncf-ring departments and societies. Expansion of advertising forced the Editorial department to enlarge the magazine from sixteen pages to twenty pages. Therefore, the men on the staff had to confine themselves to advertis- ing while the women maintained the sales quota. CIATED STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ADVERTISING SERVICE BUREAU THE ADVERTISING SERVICE BUREAU, the first of the only two university agencies to be established in the United States, is an independent staff performing all the functions of an advertising agency except selling. There are four main types of service performed by the bureau : Writing ads for firms with no advertising depart- ments and for national firms who want the " collegiate angle " 011 copy; surveying the college market and pub- lishing monthly accounts of campus affairs conducive to sales; answering ads, and checking on merchandise; and finally, arranging publicity for the A.S.U.C. and class affairs. Aside from the routine work, the staff is instructed in the more technical phases of advertising through a series of meetings known as " Copy School " to which guest speakers are invited to direct studies. As advertising is second only to football as a source of revenue for the A.S.U.C., it is an important publications unit and is to be represented on Publications Council for the first time in its eight years of existence next fall. Back Row: Pickens, Kahn, Jennet, Heymans. Third Row: Leach, Swift, Hoard, Newoard, Stump, Ballagh, (manager). Roberts. Second Row: Wiechers, Pearl, Damm, Anderson, Ivey, Shipper, Nylander. Front Row: Thompson, Becker, Sherwin. Whitaker, Sherwin, Overmire, Hutton. Crane. f-, , j JSJJ m m One of the lighter moments at the convention Melvin Lester, Daily Californian managing editor, discusses make-up. HIGH UPUI Women delegates enjoy tea in Stephens Union. Fred Fischer leads a (inly discussion with the Junior College delegates. REPRESENTATIVES, NUMBERING over 450, from California high schools and junior colleges attended the annual Press Convention sponsored by Pi Delta Epsilon, honorary journalism fraternity, Alpha Delta Sigma, honorary advertising fraternity, Theta Sigma Phi, national women ' s journalism society, and Pi Alpha Sigma, women ' s honorary advertising fraternity. The convention hegan on Thursday morning, April 2, with the allotment of living quarters in fraternities, sororities, and dormitories to the delegates. This was followed by an official welcome by Fred C. Fischer, Director of Publications, Professor Voorhies, Assistant Dean of Undergraduates, and Charles Post, fall editor of the Daily Californian. In the afternoon the Berk- eley Daily Gazette opened its offices and plant for a tour of inspection, during which machines, their oper- ation, and the various printing processes were ex- plained. Thursday evening a group of picked delegates edited the Friday Daily Californian with the aid of the regular members of the editorial staff. Jack Tauge, Long Beach; Robert Kibby, Centerville; Douglas B. Guy, San Mateo ; Dolores Schmidt, San Francisco ; and Ardath Wise, Oroville, were among those selected to work on the paper. Friday morning was devoted to round table discus- sions led by Jim Doyle, Editor of the Daily California!!, Harry B. Smith, Sports Editor of the San Francisco Chronicle; Bob Laws, City Editor of the Californian; PRESS The advertising roundtable discusses means of financing. Bob Wesson gives a few pointers on sports writing. SCHOOL Melvin Lester, Managing Editor; Henry May, Editor of the Occident; and Bill Turner, Editor of the Pelican. The speaker at the Friday luncheon, held at Inter- national House, was Dr. Paul Cadnian, former eco- nomics professor at the University, whose subject was " Freedom of the Press " . The annual Matrix dinner, sponsored by Theta Sigma Phi, occurred in the eve- ning. Peter B. Kyne, and Evelyn Wells, feature writer for the San Francisco Call-Bulletin, were the guest speakers for the event. Following the banquet, the Publications Council sponsored a dance in the men ' s gymnasium. Theodore Smith of the San Francisco News, and Dorothy MacDonald, fashion editor of the San Fran- cisco Call-Bulletin, both prominent journalists, ad- dressed groups Satu rday morning, and the three-day gathering was concluded by a luncheon at the Interna- tional House. Sam Hayes, Richfield Reporter, was the guest speaker, and on the conclusion of his address, awards were presented to the writers of the best news story, the finest editorial, and the best journalistic re- port of the 1936 Convention. Medals were presented to Jack Whipple, Stockton High School; Gayle G. Stewart, Pittsburg; and to South San Francisco High School, respectively. CONVENTION Fred Fischer introduces Sam Hayes, the Richfield Reporter. Registration of delegates I DRAMA 214 EDWARD FREYER Manager BARBARA EAMES Women ' s Manager EDWIN DUERR Director DRAMA THE YEAR 1936-1937 has been a milestone for the Little Theatre. The organization finally reached that artistic and managerial peak of non-pro fessional per- fection where it could produce one of the longest and most difficult of plays, Eugene O ' Neill ' s outstanding trilogy, " Mourning Becomes Electra " . The three plays of this work, which was instrumen- tal in bringing the Nobel award to O ' Neill, " Home- coming " , " The Hunted " , and " The Haunted " , were offered to the campus and community public in four performances. Each began at five o ' clock in the after- noon, recessed for dinner from seven until eight o ' clock, and then continued until 11:30 o ' clock. The production of this magnus opus for the first time by any group outside the New York Theatre Guild allowed the bay region critics to say with one accord that " the University of California Little The- atre has automatically placed itself among the top flight amateur organizations in the country " . The production of " Mourning Becomes Electra " was simply the culmination of a five year plan of progress, the outward manifestation of the size, effectiveness, and artistic stability of Little Th eatre. It has finally reached the place of being one of the largest and most active of all campus activities, a fact which is all the more noteworthy when it is realized that the group functions without any assistance from the University. Little Theatre offers work in acting, directing, play- writing, exploitation, costume and scene designing, and other allied crafts of the theatre. FRED C. FISCHER Graduate Manager DRAMATICS COUNCIL Back Row: Craig, Starr, Oliver-Smith, Rider, Eng- vlck. Front Row: Sachs, Eames. Jackson, Freyer (Chairman), Simpson, Hund. SEASON to a group which numbers in excess of 600 students. Over five hun- dred students were enrolled in Little Theatre ' s acting company for the year, the other one hundred or more work for managerial ap- pointments on the various production staffs. That Little Theatre ' s work has met with popular public favor is vouched for by the fact that attendance at its productions has regu- larly increased by over one thousand patrons each year since 1931- 32, the first year of Edwin Duerr ' s directorship. The attendance fig- ures for 1931-32 are 2,247; for 1932-33, 3,254; for 1933-34, 4,127; for 1934-35, 5,109. Figures for the year 1935-36 are 7,442, showing a triple increase in attendance for a five year period. These attend- ance figures include attendance at only the major full length pro- ductions, they do not include attendances at allied Mask and Dag- ger revue, the Thalian Players full-length play, nor weekly work- shop productions. Because of this success, and because of its thoroughly extra-cur- ricula nature, the group functions without facilities or proper equip- ment, and without the benefit of a theatre. Little Theatre has this year, therefore, set forth on another five year plan. It wants a theatre building of its own, not a University auditorium seating 8,000 which it may utilize in odd moments. It wants an auditorium seating about five hundred, workshops, rehearsal and class rooms, a workshop theatre, and storage space. Until this goal is reached the Little Theatre cannot go ahead much further. It has reached the peak o development under present conditions. James Fisher- Northrup as Seth in " Mourning Be- comes Electra " ART STAFF Back Row: Denton, Oliver- Smith, Engiick. Front Row: Manchester, Rider, Harvey, Challoner, May- hew. L IT T L E IN ADDITION TO its routine work of controlling the policies of Little Theatre, making appointments, and settling problems which come up during productions, Dramatics Council organized a new campus group, Hammer and Dimmer. This group gave a party after each play for all Little Theatre members, and also sponsored its first appointment banquet. A new policy was inaugurated in one of the five managerial and production staffs. The Production Staff which builds the sets and handles lights was directed for the first time by a woman, Charlotte Rider. This group worked in collaboration with Phillip Oliver-Smith ' s staff which designed and painted the sets and posters. The Costume and Make-up Staffs also worked in close cooperation in arranging the appearance of the actors, Rebecca Starr directing the designing and making of the costumes, and Beverly Sachs the prac- tice and actual make-up work. The Women ' s Managerial Staff, led by Barbara Eames, took care of pub- licity and ticket sales. PRODUCTION STAFF Back Row: Butler, Gar- llnghouse, Elliott. Front Row: Tolson, Neel, Fenn. T E WOMEN ' S MANAGERIAL STAFF Back Row: Malmgren, Kuns, Amery, Heffner, Kyle, Knox, Dudley, Pct- tite, Nines, Gatewood. Davis. Fourth Row: Brown, Mahan, Chamber- lain, Danzig, Lyons, Les- ser, Barratt, deFremery. Third Row: Gilh. Jones, Daly, Lauppe. Hamm, Merrill, Cramer, Jordan, Toolen, Finerty. Second Row: White, Pedrone, Bernsten, Bullock, Har- den, Underwood, Haynes. McVittie, deRonden-Pos, Front Row: Resner, Ma- ther, Dierssen, Droste, Eames, Rosedale, Blakely, Naphan. French. Elston. MAKE-UP STAFF Back Row: Quinn, Hook, Reith, Linton. Browning. Third Row: Matteson, Bertelsen, Allen, Oatman. Second Row: Taylor, Baker, Johnston, McAdoo, McDowell. Front Row: McCall, Bishop, Sachs, Burge, Manchester, Rowland. COSTUME AND PROPERTIES STAFFS Back Row: Nattinger, Er- skine. Moores, Dakin, Lynch, Karstens, Schirt- zinoer. Third Row: Seelye Root, Nelson, Lyman Brown. DeMaria, Ahl swede. Second Row: Rus sell, Pracy, Hinz, Eggert Marshall, Mello, Belkin Front Row: Sherwin, L. Turman, Challoner, Hund (co-chairman). Starr (co- chairman), Drummey, Bennett. Sherwin, C. I r , hot Louis W n jean Oou John G.IW ttVl VfOtl r ti- ' " " - _.lvill tt 0 - ' s. - ett aUy --t lSE T r TAviAg . a comptejr f -. tiow4 c Y e u N rod r " -.Jivetedw , by is?=H8 cr a U ' A i (or ' M UU e Theatre ' fj ys, rsAft StS TaE. o v cn L 3? ; a w- ln STV,. HSU ' ' 111 j p ;oai c . -i -= 1 $P , e banaV y -v rithtV Robert | Helen I Jb e tot was Michael ,; Helena Soriy Jlya x 7 , otSce. Uncle X cast " s l SsfcS JSSsSsK: f u.o-s m OE RU-tH GfcUBRM LOUISE H ' -l o. ,.u W ' s i W MOON touts i TEL I. SSS -S Luig;v 9K pers 11 f.,ef , W " R V r ; P ay nished :cb 1 ' T un k in jfeijS -idS jrtP? - play t e Tom Thumb The Great. Mourning Becomes Electra. The Showing Up of Blanco Posnet. Mask and Dagger Revue. Passion, Poison, and Petrifaction MUSIC COUNCIL Back Row: Fairchild, Sutcliffe, Williamson, Uren. Second Row: Wilson, Leupp, Clewe, Mahoncy. Front Row: Unnewehr, Kendall, Simpson, Manchester, Harwell. MUSIC YEAR OFFERING A GREAT variety of worthwhile and enjoyable entertainment to music lovers, this musical year has heen one of the most successful that the campus has experienced. Activities for the year opened on October 20, with the program of the Don Cossacks, the famous Russian male chorus, in the Gymnasium for Men. Directed by Serge Jaroff, selections were given from the works of various cele- brated Russian composers. The program began with religious songs, " The Lord ' s Prayer " and " O God, Save Thy People " by Tschesnokoff. After singing the chorus from the opera, " The Life of the Tsar " , they turned to lighter works, including Cossack songs and Gypsy airs. On November 22, Roland Hayes, negro tenor, presented a concert in the Men ' s Gymnasium. His program was extremely diversified and included both classical and modern works. The main features were the singing of Walther ' s Prize Song from " Die Meistersinger " by Wagner and " The Prodigal Son " by Debussy. In his last group of songs, he sang his own arrangement of " By and By " , followed by " Roun ' ' bout de Mountain " , arranged by Percival Parham. The York Mysteries, given by the Steinforff Choral on December 22, were a fitting tribute to the Christmas season. Ian Alexander directed the series of nativity dramas, which included " The Spicer ' s Play " , " The Tile Thatcher ' s Play " , " The Chandler ' s Play " , and " The Goldsmith ' s Play " . Each of these presentations treated dif- ferent versions of the birth of Christ. The spring series opened on January 17 with a brilliant and startling performance by George Gershwin and the San Francisco Symphony orchestra, directed by Pierre Monteux. Gershwin, pianist and composer, conducted the orchestra in his own compositions. After playing the well-known Symphony No. 5 in C minor by Beethoven, the orchestra, led by Gershwin, followed with a suite from his ultra-modern " Porgy and Bess " . Gershwin also played his own Concerto for piano and orchestra in F major while Pierre Monteux conducted the orchestra. The program concluded with " Rhapsody in Blue " . Received with enthusiastic appreciation, this invasion into the symphonic field by a so-called jazz composer promised future programs of a similar nature. " Two Gentlemen of Verona " Bl Top: Bronislaw Huberman, Don Cossacks. Bottom: Roland Hayes, Sylvia Lent. ON MARCH 25, the U.C.L.A. A ' Capella Choir, directed by Squire Coop, appeared at the International House Audito- rium. They sang the music of early composers such as Giovanni P. da Palestrina and then turned to the works of later musi- cians such as Bach. After giving Bach ' s " Coro " from the can- tata, " Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott " , and choral and fugue from " Sign Ye " , they sang " Kolyada " by the contemporary Russian composer, Rimsky-Korsakof, and " Legend " by Tschai- kowsky. On April 11, the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, di- rected by Pierre Monteux, played at the Gymnasium for Men. Bronislaw Huberman, Polish violinist, was guest artist. The program included Berlioz ' s " Carnival Remain " , Brahms ' " Concerto in D major " , Cesar Franck ' s " Redemption " , and the " Fire Bird " suite by Stravinsky. Huberman received tremen- dous applause for his playing of the difficult " Concerto in D major " . As this was his first appearance in America after an absence of eight years, his performance was received with doubled interest. Closing this year ' s musical season, Alpha Mu, the University honorary musical society, presented a concert on April 17. Esther Anderson SYMPHO NY UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHES UNDER THE DIRE 01 me for .-day In llicir lirst |m i led " Xi;. " Smfonii . com Mlx-n I. El cstra enjo ol its career. Maintainin odern works and the elates. tliree concerts in itCTwiilar sea- two extra concerts, j he latter, the eighty-fifth Jnmiiversary of oilier, an aUnlo .art concert. luh jram on November 15, the orches- ; on Bare Mountain " , by Moussorg- Ita " , by Miashowsky, in addition m and Negro Rhapsody by Rubin ring before the public for the first time, the newly organized University Chorus com- bined with the Symphony Orchestra in presenting an outstanding concert. The second concert, on February twenty-eighth, was unusual in that the two original works of Charles Cushing and William Denny, " Carmen Saeculare " and " Bacchanale " , which were composed for the Horace Festival, were played by the orchestra, in addition to works by Mozart and Moussorgsky. The orchestra closed the season with a Bach, a Men- delssohn, and a Mozart violin concerto, featuring Sylvia Lent, and the second symphony of Brahms. ALBERT I. ELKUS Director _ _ ' " V ' ' 1 ! OHM WARREN MAHONEY Manager BYRON WILSON Captain CHARLES C. GUSHING Director B CULMINATING A YEAR of activity at the football games, in campus concerts, and at many varied off- campus functions, the A. S. U. C. Band looks back with justifiable pride on its unusually fine program. Originality and enthusiasm best describe the spirit of this organization during a year when they played to a total of five million people. lyed at the State Fair at Sacrani According to custom the Band ball games. Their other activitigsj cluded the Admission Day P; ra three-day San Francisco-Oakland Ba Bridge celebrations. Climaxi ig tli presented its annual Spring Woncert i the Gymnasium for Men. On our own gridiron, the Band surprised the football fans with unique stunts. At the Big Game they out- lined the historic axe with their instruments and caps, and, dividing into five groups, formed the words " We want the axe now. " This field maneuver, the first of its kind, was highly successful, and was character- istic of the high spirit displayed by the band at every campus function in which they participated. Jo, as ell as at the out-of-town foot ional Park Opening, and tht I rogram for the year, the Band D 233 GLEE HARRISON WARD Director of Glee Club and Treble Clef THE GLEE CLUB and Treble Clef Societies look back upon a year of diversified activity, which in- cluded their participation in many campus func- tions and in productions of their own. The student head of the Glee Club was Temple Clewe, and Esther Simpson was manager of Treble Clef. Under the direction of Harrison Ward ' 19, the groups joined in two major productions. On Novem- ber 11, in Wheeler Auditorium, they presented their annual concert of American folk and college songs, contemporary music and Armistice Day lum bers. Included in the program were solos bers of each of the organizations, and selections from the Mask and Dagger Katherine Decker and Nathan Scott. The two societies in close cooperation prod a world premier of the light opera, " Two Get men of Verona " , by John Laurence Seymour, on April 9 and 10 in the Campus Theatre. Cos- tumes for the premier were designed for members of the Metropolitan Opera Company. Under the direction of Esther Simpson, the operetta was by, 234 PHILLIP NELSON Soloist TREBLE CLEF ESTHER SIMPSON Minagtr Back Row: Hall, Roberts, Brimberry, Morse, Pettygrove, Budelman, Edqemond. Waters, Pringle, Chamberlain. Third Row: Cunningham, Harwell, Samson, Dugdale, Field, Bailey, Carpenter, Taylor, Leebrick. Second Row: Unnewehr, Bullock, Dehe, Bonnington, Barnes, Nodder, Duarte, Guinee, Robertson. Front Row: Manchester, Trumpler, Turman, Smith, Simpson (Chairman), Moreton, Kelly, Yelland, Schmidt, Machado. KATHERINE DECKER Accompanist presented without the use of sets, employing prop- erties exclusively. Throughout the year the Glee Club and Treble Clef were featured in radio programs over stations KRE and KLX. Both groups have been indispen- sable at rallies, and during the football season the Glee Club introduced an original medley of old and new California songs. Other activities of the music societies included their appearance at the University meeting in honor of Harvard ' s Tercentennial, the dedication program of the East Bay Regional Park, and the annual Charter Day Banquet at the Palace Hotel. On its annual tour to the south in February, the Glee Club sang at U. C. L. A., Taft Junior College, San Bernardino Junior College, and for several alumni groups. Social events for the year included two banquets, a joint formal at Diablo Country Club, and a Treble Clef informal at the Palace Hotel. In April Treble Clef members entertained their alumni at a tea held in the Women ' s Club Rooms of Stephens Union. MARY HODGKIN Soloist 235 D 237 DEBATING ACTIVITIES IN the University have attempted not only to give rise to power of oratory and rhetoric, but also to develop the individual through opportunities for thinking and under- standing major problems of the times. Not averse to innovations, leaders in debating have directed experimental work in symposiums, cross-examina- tions, and panel discussions. Problems of today have been considered not only politically, but with regard to their philosophical, psychological, and sociological significance. FORENSICS COUNCIL Back Row: Kahn, Roberts, Aschoff. Compton, Goldner. Front Row: Rathbun. Frame, Jemtegaard, Montgomery, Noia Byers. Non-decisional debating has been championed, because of its emphasis on coherent presentation of facts, without regard to individual victories. On April 9 and 10, students from fifteen colleges in California and Nevada assembled for a College Congress, sponsored by Forensics Council and Delta Sigma Rho. Discussions were held on such topics as the living conditions of the people, freedom of speech, and neutrality. 238 DEBATING YEAR DEBATING MANAGERS Back Row: Voris, Rowen. Kahn (Chairman), Spiro, Reder, Wallenberg. Front Row: Colby, Jacoby. Woodside, Jacobson, Hill. Stanford University of Nevada Utah State Agricultural College Brigham Young_University Itah niversrt Drake University University of Nebraska University of Iowa Washington in St. Louis Louisiana State Tulane University Southern Methodist DISCUSSING TOPICS OF national and world significance, members of the debating teams spoke on this campus, on tours throughout the country, and over the radio. They opened their activities for the year with a symposium on Spain, which created wide interest because of its close con- currence with the Spanish civil war. Dr. Ma Radin and Dr. Frank Russell represented the faculty, and Melvin Reder and Reynolds Cohn spoke for the students. Another symposium was conducted at the end of the semester, at which Genevieve Jemte- gaard, Irene Noia, Raymond Rocca, and Myer Kahn discussed the many problems confronting labor in the modern world. Although the program was definitely confined to the Univer- sity during the fall semester, a few inter-collegiate debates were held. Among these was a dual debate with Stanford covering the topic of the effect of modern civilization on personality. The two California teams were composed of Melvin Reder and Stanley Johnson, and Ray Compton and Richard Rathbun. At the time of the U.S.C. football game in the south, Harley Spitler and Harry Roberts met U.S.C. debaters while Morris Herzig and Richard Rathbun debated at U.C.L.A. During Christmas vacation, Genevieve Jemtegaard and Irene Noia debated at four universities in Nevada and Utah, and two of the men spoke at colleges in the middlewest. Visiting Nebras- ka, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, Ray Compton and Harry Roberts met debaters of nine univer- sities discussing neutrality, minimum wages, and Fascism in the United States. David Bers Constance Carlson Marian Blewitt Ray Compton Reynold Cohn Isabel Goldeen Jean Frame Margaret Hill Morris Herzig Harold Berg receives the Arnold Trophy from Kenneth Byers. Roderick Jameson Mary Alice Howat Stanley Johnson Genevieve Jemtegaard Thelma Kahn Myer Kahn Norman Lowenstein Irene Noil Richard Rathbun Melvin Ruder Harry Roberts Ray Rocca Martin Rothenberg Margaret Ann Russell Lawrence Schei San Jose State St. Mary ' s Santa Clara U.S.F. San Francisco State f MiUTCcji University of Otaga Washington State Utah state Agricultural College University of Washington U.S.C. Columbia University During the spring semester the debaters carried out an exten- sive program. Because of the interest in lahor strikes, industrial unionism, neutrality, fascism, and the Supreme Court question, speakers were sent to various business organizations. Bi-weekly broadcasts were inaugurated over K.R.E., in the form of discus- sions between two speakers. Members of the debating organiza- tion spoke over the radio on two other occasions, once in contest with the University of Washington, and later with Columbia University. Dorothy Woodside and David Bers participated in the symposium with the northern university, and Harley Spitler and Myer Kahn in the transcontinental debate. A series of six debates took place on the University campus during the spring semester. Early in the term Dorothy Woodside and Genevieve Jemtegaard met a women ' s team from Drake Uni- versity, considering the cooperative movement. Discussing the problem of the survival of democracy, Morris Herzig and Richard Rathbun contested with debaters from the University of Otaga in New Zealand. A symposium with Tulane University followed, based on the N.R.A. Members of the team debated throughout the semester against Washington State, Utah State Agricultural College, and U.S.C. Off-campus contests were held with San Jose State, St. Mary ' s, Santa Clara, University of San Francisco, San Francisco State, and Mills College. The finale of the debating year was the Joffre Medal Debate with Stanford on April 22. An annual debate on some phase of French history or government, it dealt this year with the topic, " France and World Peace. " Participants were Ray Compton, Morris Herzig, and Genevieve Jemtegaard, with Raymond Rocca as alternate. Bernard Shapira Byron Snyder Harley Spitler Robert Stevenson Roger Wollenberg Dorothy Woodside Reynold Conn, Bernard Shapiro, and Ray Compton participate in a roundtable discussion oier station KRE. ifDER THE DIRECTION of Margaret Hill, manager, freshman debating included a large number of activities in its calendar during the past year. The program for the debaters provided fundamental instruction in the pro- cedure of debating and speaking, and general improvement of background with special reference to subjects having bearing upon future debates. Pro- vision was also made for competition with debating teams from high schools, junior colleges, and freshman teams from nearby universities. Pauline Kale was freshman representative on Forensics council. During the fall semester, the debaters encountered Lowell High School and the University of Santa Clara. The schedule was enlarged in the spring term due to the increased experience of members of the team. A dual meet with the University of San Francisco began the season, closely followed by debates with Santa Rosa High School on the subject, " Resolved: all elec- trical utilities be government owned and operated " , and with Santa Clara on, " Resolved: present neutrality laws are inadequate " . The climax of the freshman season was the debate with Stanford on the topic, " Resolved: democracy will survive in the United States " . Douglas Badt, Charles Davis, Pauline Kale, Carol Lippman, Richard Neustadt, and Philip Verleger were chosen to meet the first year debaters of Stanford. COLONEL GEORGE C . EDWARDS I I I ii ii if as a SB 99 d - 91 ATHLETICS The California athlete is an amateur. Whether in a physical education class or on an intramural or a varsity team, he sees in true perspective the relationship between athletics and his other activities. He plays as Californians traditionally have played: cleanly and courageously,- victory is but one criterion of athletic success. One of the greatest builders of Califor- nia athletics characterized the spirit of the California athlete with these words, ' Better to have played the game and lost than to have won at the sacrifice of an ideal " . HARRY DAVIS Athletic Manager Back Row: Priestley, Dodge. Jones, Fowler. Front Row: Davis. Grimes (Chairman), Reichel, Fellom. ACTING AS A recommending body to the Executive Committee of the A.S.U.C. for everything pertaining to intercollegiate athletics, the Athletic Council exercises juris- diction over the various major and minor sports conducted under the auspices of the student body, makes recommendations for coaches ' contracts, and grants athletic awards. The council consists of the president, and vice-president of the Big " C " Society, a member of the Big " C " Society representing the athletes, a representative of the senior managers of the major sports, and the president and vice-president of the Circle " C " Society. The general manager and the athletic manager of the A.S.U.C. act- ing in an advisory capacity, are also members of the committee. During the past year the most important business of the council included the rec- ommendation for definite action toward the investigation of athletic insurance, discus- sion of the petition requesting recognition of the rifle team as a minor sport, and deliberation on a plan for improving the intramural managerial system. The council also changed the Big " C " requirement amendment and prepared a new list of revised rules on baseball, track, and tennis awards. 243 SEEKING TO EFFECT more cooperation between yell leaders and rally and reception groups in the promo- tion of a unified and sustained school spirit, the operations of these bodies were brought this year under the direction of the new Wheel and Torch Council. The Council, composed of A. S. U. C. president Len Charvet, co-ordinating chairman Gene Palmer, chairmen Don Owens and Wally Haas of the Torch and Wheel Societies, Yell Leader Ed Freyer and class yell leaders, deter- mined the general policies regarding student rallies, handling of crowds at athletic contests, and providing support for California ' s athletic teams. Included in the general reorganization was a change of name. The old names of Rally and Reception Commit- tees were abandoned and those of Torch and Wheel Societies, representing the respective activities of the two groups, were adopted. The Torch and Wheel Societies have functioned very successfully during the past year, planning and supervis- ing rallies and rooting section stunts, and receiving visiting teams and students from other universities. Varsity Yell Leader Ed Freyer and his two assistants Bob Wiley and Bill Comstock successfully kept the rooters ' spirit and sportsmanship at a high pitch throughout the year; the wonderful support by the rooters, even in d efeat, encouraged the football team to stage its comeback at the end of the season. 244 245 .? Dana Carey ' Ovie " Overall ME CALIFORNIA FOOTBALL II First Team lyd A. " Wreck " Womble ' 02 L.E. jwart " Stew " Beam [Dana Carey rin C. " Babe " He iral O. " Ovie " Ove irles A. " Lol " Pr rold P. " Brick " arles F. " Charlie ' l cy W. Hall Wt B. " Pesky " Si [hur W. " Wolf R! Second Team Robert A. " Bob " Berkey Gordon " Ted " Beckett ' Cort " Majors " Dan " M.-M ill; Roy M. (Hi,, Co Daniel Irvine I Mima . - ' I Hi " imlay Arleigh T. Vi illiani ,11 ron V . " I . ..- ni)otivt " Sinit John ( . utl in BLUE AND CliJ I ' M A 1. 1 SI " HrirL " Mnr-( . . Vlajrw Walter (;hri lirinan slection such as this from among many great athletes is lilii -ulj littee in choosing these teams used as a basis for company oental qualifications of an athlete: Sportsmanship, Courage . ' . il. Intelligence and Competitive ability. Undergradj were not considered. s vs. -,r Chirlie Erb Left: " Wolf " Ransome Center: " Babe " Horrell Right: " Lot " Pringle Left: " Brick " Muller Right: Percy Hall Left: " Stew " Beam Right: " Wreck " Womble n J " e J Back Row: Callaghan. McCaflery. Wickhorst, Thomas, E., Allison, Breeden, Gordon, Evans, Uteritz, Rcglnato. Jones. Bottari. Third Row: Solinsky, Collier, Cotton, Chapman, Howard, Hanford, W., Johnston, Stoll, Anderson. Stockton, Pollock. Second Row: Gilbert, Thomas, J., Hanford, R., deVarona, Meek, Sparks. Herwig, Bennett, Ray, Winterbottom. Front Row: Pollock, Vallejo, Souza, Blower, McAteer! Nordstrom, Archer, Barker, Dolman. cotf 250 ALTHOUGH SUFFERING five defeats and end- ing in fourth place in the conference standings, the 1936 Bear varsity goes down in California grid history as one of the outstanding teams in the history of the University. In the face of bitter defeats which would have disheartened and dis- illusioned an ordinary eleven, the Bears had the courage to carry on and ended their regular schedule in a blaze of glory, vanquishing their last three conference opponents in an impressive manner. By virtue of these victories, the Bears established themselves as one of the most power- ful aggregations on the Pacific Coast. The varsity sent California grid stock soaring to one of its highest levels in years as both Stanford and Southern California, for the first time since the days of the wonder teams, were defeated in the same season. With many of the 1935 regulars missing and in- experienced men in their places, the Bears were unable to hit their stride until late in the season. Coach Allison was forced to shift men to different positions in order to strengthen weak spots. Four defeats at the hands of St. Mary ' s, U. C. L. A , Washington, and Washington State lowered Cali- fornia ' s prestige with both press and public. The team was nevertheless taking shape in spite of these losses and its morale and that of the student body remained unshattered. The Southern Cali- fornia game proved to be the turning point of the season. California, in the face of three straight conference defeats and overwhelming odds was able to rise to the occasion and outclass and out- smart a previously unbeaten Trojan varsity and earn a clean cut victory. Continuing to play a winning brand of football, the Bears smothered Oregon under a 28-0 score the next week. In the Big Game, the Bears brought the season to a fit- ting climax as they trounced their traditional rivals from Stanford, 20-0; scoring their first vic- tory over the Indians since 1931 and the second in the last 13 years. During the Christmas vaca- tion, the team traveled to Georgia Tech where they were upset 13-7 by the Southerners. The Bears failed to display their best form after a month ' s layoff. 251 BEARS 39 Ai BEARS 14 C. 0. P. THE BEARS SCORED a double win in the 1936 open- ing by overwhelming their " little cousins ' " from Davis 39-0, and emerging victorious in their tor with the College of Pacific by a The Aggies were to California ' s ragged but effective " tack as they were smothered under a barrage of six touchdowns. Coach Allison used the entire squad during the course of the game. In the second game, the Blue and Gold forces had to extend themselves to the limit to subdue a determined, stubborn eleven from the College of Pacific. Unable to gain consistently on the ground, the Bears took to the air in the second half in order to put a dent in the sturdy defense of the Stockton team. California ' s first score came in the third quarter on a pass from Chap- man to Meek from the 23-yard stripe. In the closing seconds of the game a bullet pass, Chap- man to Willson, put the ball on the one-yard line, and Cornell smashed over for the final touchdown. Howard gains twelve yards over guard against the Aggies Bill Archer Harlo Bennett Floyd Blower Vic Bottari IN THEIR weeks of grid aggre end of a 10- fornia territ line stands w ing into a mm p ' The Gaels Sparks catches Blower ' s pass for 10-yard gain. sco: 1936 from " i. Ma n ' t- ami i re. ' I he ( , Miiin . luriiij; ihe major par! of lit i uardi ' d (ill (ael -ennui; thl ul ' !. nine and : .nld ! ' o fir-l ill llie -eeDIld the Bears, after only three the challenge of a powerful it of the contest on the short forced itself deep into Cali- and only repeated goal t the game from turn- lim between the cross ' lead. St. Mary ' s sco from the one-foot California ' s only t The injection of Cor: ing Bear offense the 60-yard march do defense tightened ai just short of the jioal on a fourth down m f roi lain in the thir Umax a iift-yard dr me in ll into t ed park. and the Id to the threi ic advanco as halte ;n Ferry sent the hall e his teammates a 3-0 rter when Groux plunged over half soon after the kickoff. If seemed to give the falter- tile half-back engineered a e. At this point St. Mary ' s , hen Chapman was tackled fs play. ther Groux on the California four-yard line after a four-yard gain. 253 The movie camera follows a California pass play, in which Archer throws to Chapman for a ten-yard gain. ff Jud Callaghan Jack Breeden Sam Chapman BEARS 7 BEAVERS ' I fc-J ' " S PLAYING THEIR FIRST game away from home, the Bears were forced to extend themselves to the utmost to register their initial conference win of the season, a 7-0 victory over a scrappy Oregon State College eleven. After a brilliant flash of offensive drive late in the opening quarter which resulted in the only touchdown of the day, the Bears played mediocre football the remainder of the afternoon and experienced difficulty in protecting their lead. An O. S. C. fumble, recovered by Herwig on the Beaver 26-yard line paved the way for the only score of the afternoon. The Bears applied pressure with Archer firing a pass to Meek for 11 yards, and Chapman carrying the ball to the 5-yard line on a lateral from Archer. On the following play, Archer circled around his own right flank to dive into the end-zone, and Chapman ' s place- kick added the extra point. After this display of strength, California slowed down when Coach Allison inserted his reserve forces. The Beavers staged a counter-attack which kept the Bears in their own territory dur- ing most of the second and third periods. After staving off several Beaver threats, the Bear offense suddenly came to life in the fourth quarter. Although holding a distinct edge during the en- tire quarter, the Bears were unable to avail themselves of any of their three scoring opportunities. Dolman and Meek stop Grey after he has broken through the line for a four-yard gain. Anderson gains a yard over the center of the U.C.L.A. line. Sparks and Meek smear Ferguson for no gain. BEARS 6 BRUINS 17 A SURPRISINGLY STRONG eleven from U.C.L.A. dealt a severe blow to the Bears ' chances of retaining their co-champion- ship of the Pacific Coast Conference by scoring a decisive 17-6 victory over the Berkeley school. This game marked the Bruins first victory over their " big brothers " since the beginning of their football rivalry. The Bears were unable to cope with the Uclans crushing power plays and effective aerial attack and allowed themselves to be pushed deep into their own territory on numer- ous occasions. The Bruin eleven struck swiftly and surely in the first half, scoring the first six points from the Bears ' 33-yard line on a per- fectly executed pass, Hirshon to Schroeder. U.C.L.A. added three more points in the third period on a field goal by Williams from the 14-yard line. The Uclans completed their scoring in the fourth quarter via the air route. Their ground attack momen- tarily halted by a desperately fighting Bear line, the Uclans changed their tactics by sending Hirshon back to heave a long pass into the arms of teammate Schroeder who continued over the goal line. California ' s only touchdown was made possible when Funk was smothered by the California line in attempting to punt on fourth down from his own five-yard stripe, giving the Bears possession of the ball at this point. A sweeping end run by Pollock, and two bucks by Anderson put the ball over for the score. Pollock starts around end with Anderson, Meek, Stockton, and Gilbert ready to clear the way. " 4 Hirshon stopped by Pollack, E. Thomas, and Anderson after a nine yard gain. Schroeder evades Blower after catching a long pass from Hirshon to score the Bruins ' second touchdown. Chapman receives a long pass in the final minutes Meek, Herwia, and Anderson stop Johnson after a short gain around end. 256 BEARS HUSKIES 13 THE BEARS HIT their lowest point of the 1936 season when they invaded the Northwest to be defeated 13-0 by the conference champions, the Wash- ington Huskies. A combination of speed and power swept the Bears off their feet and kept them on the defense most of the game. California was able to take possession of the ball in Washington territory only three times for brief intervals during the entire game. After an uneventful first period, the first Washington scoring thrust was initiated by a 20-yard return of a Bear punt to the California 43-yard line. A series of line bucks advanced the ball to the 29-yard marker from which point Haines tossed a well-aimed pass to Peters who was brought down on the 7-yard line. Four cracks at the line succeeded in carrying the ball over for the first score of the day. Washington ' s offense began to function effectively again after the inter- mission, with a 62-yard march culminating in the second touchdown of the day. Two long runs by Haines put the pigskin on the California 33, from which point Washington advanced to the one-yard stripe on short gains. Haines swept around right end on the fourth down to score. The Bear line was outcharged by the Husky forwards during the entire game, with the result that the Berkeley backs were able to do little offen- sively. Washington ' s tremendous edge was shown by the fact that they were able to make nine first downs against one for the Bears. Willard Dolman Claude Enns Bob Gilbert Hi H BEARS 13 COUGARS 14 A REJUVENATED BEAR varsity returned home to play its best game of the season to date, only to be nosed out of victory when Washington State came from behind to win 14-13. In the closing moments of play, W. S. C., behind 7-13, attempted a pass on California ' s 15-yard stripe. The pass fell incomplete, but the Cougars were given possession of the ball on the three- yard line when the Bears drew a penalty for interfering with the receiver. Repelled for three downs by a fiercely fighting California line, Goddard drove over center to score on the final try to tie the score at 13-13. Rowswell was rushed into the game and played the " hero " role as he booted the ball between the crossbars for the deciding point of the contest. The first touchdown was scored in the opening quarter when Cotton plowed through from the one-yard line and Ray Hanford converted. The Cougars tied the score in the final minute of the second quarter when Cotton fumbled as he tried a buck from his own one-yard line and Washington State recovered in the end zone for a touchdown. California sprang into the lead once more after the half when Pollock intercepted a W. S. C. pass on his own 39-yard line and ran through a broken field 54 yards before being brought to earth on the enemy ' s six-yard stripe. Cotton smashed through for a second score and Ray Hanford ' s attempted conversion was wide. Bill Hanford Ray Hanford Bob Herwig BEARS 13 Pollock is thrown for a one yard loss on an at- tempted end run. TROJANS Ai! AN INSPIRED California varsity tofd U.SX. from the ranks of the undefeated witTi a 13-7 triumph. An open type of offense featuring for- ward passes, laterals, and deceptive running plays, aided by an unyielding defense enabled the Bears to humble Troy for the third consecu- tive year. California first scored from the 35-yard line as Pollock, faking a run around end, shot a pass over center to Dolman. The Bear end, swarmed by Trojan tacklers, lateraled to Herwig who con- tinued down the sidelines for a score. Southern California tied the score at the beginning of the second half when California fumbled the kick- off and the Trojans recovered on the Bear 33- yard line. The Blue and Gold came back to score three plays later and take the lead on a long pass from Bottari to Chapman. The fourth quarter was filled with thrills and suspense as the Bears protected their lead against vigorous Trojan as- saults. U.S.C. ' s last threatening drive was ended when Davis was stopped on California ' s one-foot line on the fourth down. Gene McAteer Bennett nearly blocks Gammon ' s punt. RIDING ON THE cr Trojans the week b by defeating Oregon conclusively that Californ . - f tliem to victory over the Jcar varsity gained its third conference iclor brilliant playing of the entire team showed victory over I ' . S. ( ' .. was not an accident, and that the Bears were fast reaclu l TOlrpeak of the season and becoming a power to be reckoned with in the Pacific Coast Conference race. The first touchdown was scored late in the second quarter after the Bears had traveled 60 yards on two passes by Bottari. Stoll paved the way for a second score when he recovered an Oregon fumble on the enemy ' s 32-yard line. A bullet pass, Chapman to Bennett, was good for 16 yards, the rest of the distance being traveled on the ground with Anderson and Bottari doing the heavy work. A few minutes later McAteer broke through to block a Webfoot punt and Sparks recovered in the end-zone for another six points. An eleven composed of members of the second and third teams dealt the final blow to the weakened Northerners as they ran and passed their way to the fourth score. Sparks made all four conversions. Still McCaffery Ray Nordstrom Milt Pollack Farrar and Lacau get through Chapman and Anderson to stop Pollock ' s end -4M Pollock intercepts Calvelli ' s pass: Williams returns ' off for 21 yards before being stopped by SparlTs and out in the clear and snags Bottari ' s pass for a ,- if jjoonrl Herwttj; half kick- Meek gets Tommy Ray Mushy Pollock Angelo Reginato BEARS 20 CALIFORNIA REGAINED possession of the coveted ax, symbol of Big Game supremacy, when the Golden Bears vanquished a favored Stanford eleven by the wide margin of 20-0. For the first time since 1923 the Memorial Stadium was the scene of the Bear ' s victory over their arch rivals from Palo Alto. In gaining their second Big Game victory in the last 13 years, the Bears ran up their most decisive score against the Indians since the days of the wonder teams. Except for the first three minutes of the game, the Bears held the upper hand throughout the battle and gained al- most at will through the Stanford line. Stanford crossed the mid- stripe but three times during the entire 60 minutes of play, devot- ing the remainder of the game to defending their goal from the onslaught of the Berkeleyans. The Californians played their best game of the season. Their fast-charging line, superior blocking, and powerful offense con- tributed much to the overthrow of the " Red Machine. " The Bears were especially effective in breaking up Stanford ' s famed passing attack, intercepting nine out of 26 passes attempted by Stanford and allowing only four completions. California gained 248 yards from scrimmage to 156 for Stanford. Stanford ' s only threat came after the opening kick-off when Chapman fumbled the ball on his 20-yard line and the Indians recovered. After two line bucks and a pass failed to advance the ball, Calvelli attempted a field goal which went wide. Chapman about to be brought down by Hoos and Galloway just short of the goal after intercepting Calvelli ' s pass and putting the Bears in position for their final score of the game. .round end, before bumj stopped by Evans and Sparks; Ctv, goes around end early in the first quarter for Stanford ' s longest gain of the name. Perry Schwartz Henry Spirks INDIANS CALIFORNIA ' S FIRST score came in the second period with Bottari leading the Bear offense. After marching from their own 25-yard line to the Indian ' s 35, Bottari dropped hack and heaved a long spiral into the end zone to Sparks. Although the ball was batted down by the two Stanford defenders the Bear end made a miraculous catch of the pigskin just before it hit the ground. Sparks ' conversion was good for the seventh point. After half-time, a poor kick by Calvelli gave the Bears the ball on Stanford ' s 35-yard line. Chapman, on a reverse from Anderson, faded back and sent a long pass to Schwartz who gathered it in before falling out of bounds seven yards from the goal. A wide end run by Archer and two line bucks put the ball over and Sparks again added the extra point. As the close of the game approached, Chapman intercepted a Stanford pass and darted back 36 yards to the Indian 18-yard line. After advancing the ball to the two-yard line, the Bears scored on a beautifully executed lateral pass play, Bottari to Chapman. Chapman failed to convert. The Bears missed scoring another touchdown by twelve inches on the last play of the game when Meek intercepted Brigham ' s pass and dashed downfield only to fumble the ball out of bounds as he was tackled on the one-foot line. Meek evades Moos ' block to stop Vigna after a two-yard gain. A l ' " ?V i a- ' 7f ' (JU- 1 QUARTER 5 HAS BALL 115 YDS TO GO ON 215 YD LINE Andersen scores the second touchdown on a yard buck through the line. i and Herwlg stop Georgia Tech power play. BEARS 262 CALIFORNIA WAS UPSET by Georgia Tech 13-7 after having traveled 3000 miles to Atlanta, Georgia to engage in a post season game. Unable to regain the form they had displayed in the latter stages of the regular season after a month ' s lapse of play, the Blue and Gold was outclassed during most of the game by the Southern team. The win enabled Georgia Tech to even their intersectional football series with California at two games each. Neither team was able to score in the first half. California drove deep into enemy territory on two occasions, but each time their march was halted, once on the 5-yard line, and again on the 7-yard line. The Georgians ' first touch- down march started in the second half when Sims returned a California punt to the Bear ' s 24-yard line. A pass followed by two laterals advanced the ball to the three-yard line from which point Konemann scored on a dash around end, after three futile line bucks. Tech came right back to score again in the fourth quarter on a 47-yard march as passes and laterals advanced the ball to the three-yard marker, and Sims went over for a second touchdown. California rallied in the final minutes of the game when Bottari entered the game and started throwing passes that carried the Bears 70-yards to their only touchdown. Sparks converted for the extra point. A second drive downfield to tie the score failed as Tech succeeded in knocking down Bot- tari ' s passes and took the ball on their own 20-yard line. Vard Stockton Bill Stoll Ned Thomas I ENGINEERS 13 THIRTY-THREE BEAR GRIDDERS, accompanied by Coach Stub Allison, Assistant Coaches Frank Wickhorst and Irwin Uteritz, and Trainer Bert Jones left Berkeley Sunday, December 20, for Atlanta, Georgia, for the game with Georgia Tech. The trip across the continent was broken only by a workout in New Orleans, the squad arriving at Atlanta Thursday, Decem- ber 24. After a brisk practice, the Bears were given a taste of southern hos- pitality at a banquet held in their honor that evening. Christmas day was spent on a trip to Stone Mountain in the morning and a final workout in the afternoon. The team left immediately after the game the next day, trav- eling straight to San Antonio, Tex., where they turned off for their trip into Mexico. As a reward for their labors during the season, the original plan had been for the entire party to return to Berkeley after the game by ship through the Panama Canal, but the maritime strike forced a revision of their schedule. Monterrey was the first stopover in Mexico, where they en- joyed a short, pleasant visit. The Bears then proceeded to Mexico City where they stayed three days. Trips were taken every day to surrounding points of interest. The party started home New Year ' s day, and stopped en route for a half a day at Guadalajara, arrived in Berkeley January 6. Perry Thomas Eddie Vallejo Bud Wintertaottom 263 Ramblers line up before attempting an end run against the Fresno State Bulldogs in a night game. ORGANIZED WITH the idea of aiding the vars- ity, their own schedule merely incidental, the Ramblers experienced a season of four straight defeats. Playing no small part in the develop- ment of the varsity by scrimmaging with them in practice, the Bear reserves found little time to devote to perfecting their own style of offense. College of Pacific ' s well executed aerial attack proved too much for the Ramblers and they dropped a 26-0 decision to the Tigers in the sea- son opener. A 32-6 loss to Fresno State was fol- lowed by a 19-0 defeat at the hands of the San Diego Marines. In their final game of the season against the Stanford Greys, the Ramblers were severely trounced 31-6. The Indians scoring parade started in the first quarter when Jordan intercepted a Rambler pass to run 60-yards for a touchdown. Soon afterward, the Bear second varsity recovered a fumble on their opponents 21-yard line and paraded downfield to score their only touchdown of the game. sS ' t z -ff!ig3 s - ' i ubel WiB ' S fraeM ' tl ' w THE FRESHMAN eleven scored six straight wins over tough opposition to become the third consecutive unbeaten yearling team and ex- tended Coach Clint Evans ' winning streak as freshman mentor to twenty games. The powerful U. C. L. A. Frosh were nosed out 13-12 by the Cubs in the opening game. Next to fall before the yearling onslaught was Sacra- mento Junior College, defeated 13-7; and the Trojan freshmen were outpointed 7-6. After de- feating San Mateo Junior College by a single touchdown, and Marin Junior College 13-6, Clint Evans ' charges finished their triumphant season with their eighth consecutive victory over the Stanford Papooses, 7-0. Hubert returns a punt (or 15 yards, and Anderson breaks away for 9 yards in the Stanford game. - Phillip Embury Aubury Kineaid Warren Norton Harold Elfert Virnt Corbin ALL CALIFORNIA BASKETBALL VARSITY FIRST TEAM Harold Eifert W TJbrbin ibury Kin Phillip Embury SECOND TEAM ur Eggelston ter Georg John Tal Francis Watson MITTEE Clarence M. " Nibs " Price, ' 13, Chairman HHIHHlB Harold Houvenin, ' 24 rl Vendt ' Raymond Olson, ' 36 A selection such as this from among so many great athletes is difficult. The Committee in choosing these teams used as a basis for comparisons the fundamental qualifications of an athlete: sportsmanship, courage, strength, speed, intelligence and competitive ability. Undergraduates were not considered. 269 Back Row: Halminski, Lilot, Duffy, Chalmers, Knight, Carlisle, Garetson. Second Row: Herwig, (co-captain), Hill, Goldenson, Dougery, Kindblad, Hunt, Smith, C., Smith, G., senior manager, Front Row: Price, coach. McNeil, Jensen, Balsley, (co-captain), Hillsman, David, Olson, assistant coach. 270 ALTHOUGH THE 1936-37 Basketball Season was a rather disappointing one from the point of view of games won and lost, the Bear Varsity Basketball team acquitted itself well for the year. Despite the fact that they won only four out of twelve conference games, and failed to win a single series, the team showed a fine spirit in the face of a number of heart breaking defeats and was always a menace to other teams. In nearly every conference game it was the inability of the Bear hoopsters to hit the basket that spelled defeat. When the final season rec- ords of the Coast Conference were released, it was found that the Bears had the best defensive record in the Conference but the worst record of shooting ability. In the U. S. C. series, the Bears lost the first three games by an average of two points each game after leading most of the way. In each of these games it was the Bears ' inability to score in the second half and the Trojans ' uncanny abil- ity to sink their free throws that gave the South- erners the victory. The advantage in height and experience gave Stanford its first basketball series victory over California since 1921. Even in defeat the Bear five made the best showing of any team in the conference against the Redshirts and ended the season with a 44-31 victory. The U.C.L.A. series was another disappointment to California sup- porters who expected the team to sweep over the tail-end Bruins, as the two teams split their series, each team winning and losing once on each floor. The non-conference season was more success- ful than the season against the higher powered conference teams, the Bears winning 13 out of 15 of their games against the smaller local schools. Big " C " awards were presented to Balsley, Car- lisle, Chalmers, David, Duffy, Goldenson, Her- wig, Hillsman, Hunt, Jensen, and Lilot for their play during the season, and Bob Ingram was ap- pointed student manager for the coming year, to succeed George Smith. 271 NON- Chalmers goes high in the i to recover the ball from the backboard. VI M. G THIKTKEN out of fifteen praclu-o games apainst excellent competition, llie California basketball team shoved good early season form and enjoyed a very successful non-conference season. In the first game of the year, the Bear quintet defeated the Golden State five of the Industrial League by a 31 to 21 score. Following this game, the Californians won their first intercollegiate game of the year by defeating the University of Oregon, 54-44. The Blue and Gold team, led by Duffy who scored 25 points, completely outclassed the Northern team, winning easily in an uninteresting game. In their next appearances, the California cagers split a thrilling two game series with the barnstorming Ohio State five. Winning the first game 33 to 31 as Balsley and Carlisle scored in the closing moments of play, they lost the second 30 to 28 when George, Buckeye center, scored from the foul line in the last five seconds of the game. The Bears next outclassed a road weary Arizona team 55 to 22, and then crushed a highly touted Santa Clara quintet under a 63 to 39 score. In these games the Blue and Gold reached its best form of the practice season, showing a fast breaking attack, with brilliant ball handling and Hunt recovers Chalmers ' shot from the backboard. Duffy is shoved by Andersen of St. Mary ' s as he goes under the basket for a setup. accurate shooting. While Coach Price was in Los Angeles scouting the Tro- jans, the Bears came through in the last few minutes of the next game to break a 20-20 tie and defeat the Olympic Club 28-21. Closing the practice season, the Bears came back after a listless first half and defeated St. Mary ' s 30-25. In their first practice game after the opening of the Coast Conference the California basketeers crushed a weak Cal Aggies five under a 52-27 score. The Bears made it two straight over the Santa Clara five by coming from behind in the closing minutes of their next game to score a 46-44 victory over the Broncs. The Varsity was nearly upset by the Alumni in their annual tilt in which the first team had to be sent in to salvage the game 45-40. Coming from behind in the last moments of each game, the California five added a 33-32 victory over St. Mary ' s and a 32-30 win over U. S. F. to its string of non-conference victories. The Bears suffered their second non-conference defeat 37-27 at the hands of the Olympic Club, whom they had previously defeated. The reserves who started the game were unable to meet the clubmen ' s attack, and the varsity was unable to make up the deficit when sent in. Closing the non-conference season, the Bears defeated the Athens Club 54-37 in their last home appearance of the year. 273 " " ? ban CONTINUING THE tradition of close, hard fought basketball games between the two insti- tutions, the quintets of California and U.C.L.A. split their four game series, each team winning once and losing once 011 each court. The Bears opened the series on the Berkeley floor with their first conference victory of the season, a 32-27 win. The Bruins led at half time 15-13, but the Bears completely outplayeorhpir rivals in the second half to win going away. Al- though displaying a marked superiority over the southerners in the second game, the Bears could not find the hoop from the floor or foul line, and as a result succumbed 46-44 in an overtime game. In the third encounter of the series the Bears started fast but weakened in the second half and were defeated 37-33. Realizing that the regular varsity had been unable to hold the Bruins in check, Coach Price started five sophomores in the last game of the series. This proved successful strategy, and the Californians ended the series with a 43-31 vic- tory. Ball follows in om Jensen ' s guarding. Hillsman attempts a hook shot over Gram ' s guarding. BEATEN TN THE last second of play or in overtime periods, the California basketball team lost the first three Dailies of the U. S. ( ' .. series, but came back in the last game to stop a Trojan rally in the final moments and end the series with a well earned victorx . Inability to shoot accurately in the second half proved the downfall of the Bears in the first two games of the series played in Los Angeles. After lead- ing throughout the first half of both games, the Califomians were unable to find the basket, and as a result were defeated 41-37 and 35-34 by the south- erners whose shooting was very accurate, especially from the foul line. The California Gymnasium saw its most spectacular game of the year in the third game of the series when the Bears scored twice in the last 15 seconds of play to tie the Trojans 29-29 and then carried the game to two overtime periods before losing 38-36. Trailing 19-9 at half time in the last game of the series, the Trojans started their closing rush that had carried them to victory three times before, but this time the Bears would not be denied, and in one of the roughest games of the season finally won 36-31. Ralph Hillsmin Lee Hunt Don Jensen Captain Bob Herwig recovers the ball as members of both teams took on. 276 INDIAN SERIES LOSING THE ANNUAL basketball series to Stanford for the first time in sixteen years, the California team dropped the first three games of the series to the conference champions, but came back in the last game to hand the Indian five its worst defeat of the season. The superior height, speed, and nearly complete backboard control of the Cardinals told the story of the first game of the series in which the Bears took one of the worst beatings in the history of their basketball rivalry with Stanford. The only thing that kept the Bears ' defeat from becoming a rout was the brilliant shooting of Captain Balsley, whose seven field baskets from far out in the court kept the Californians within a respectable distance of the speedy Indian five. Taking the lead in the first two minutes of the game, the Cardinals were never in danger, leading 24-14 at half time and 51-35 at the end of the game. The second game of the series, played at Palo Alto, looked like another Stanford walkaway until twelve minutes before the end of the game when Luisetti fouled out with Stanford leading 37-30. Here the Bear hopes rose sharply as Balsley and Jensen scored in quick succession, but these hopes were short lived as Zonne, Turner, and Moore scored four times in rapid order to cinch the game for the Indians, the final score being 50-37. Playing before a capacity crowd in the California gymnasium, the Cali- fornia basketeers went down to their third straight defeat by a score of Doug Knight Maurice Lllot Doug McNeil Carlisle scoops up loose ball while Chalmers blocks out Stoefen and Robertson. INDIAN SERIES 36-32. Although they never led after the first three minutes of play, the Bears stayed close enough to the Indians to make the game in- teresting all the way through. With Luisetti leading the attack, the Cardinals piled up a 21-14 lead at half time, but as the second half opened, the Californiaiis, led by Balsley and Carlisle, came back with new life and drew up within two points of their rivals, 23-21. Here Luisetti, Zonne, and Calderwood went to work again and five minutes before the end of the game the score stood 34-24 for Stan- ford. At this point the Blue and Gold team rallied again, but their efforts were cut short by the final gun. Clearly outplaying the Stanford five all the way through the game, the Bears came back at last to avenge themselves for their three previous defeats by upsetting the favored Indians in the last game of the series by a score of 44 -31. Evidently anticipating an easy game, Stanford gave California just what it needed by starting a team of four seniors and Luisetti. Duffy scored three field goals in the first three minutes of the game and by the time the Stanford reserves were taken out the Californians led 20-10. The regular varsity of the Cards fared no better than the reserves when they were put into the game, as the Bears continued to pile up their lead until the contest ended with a score of 44 to 31. Herwig. Carlisle, Moor . and Lui_ ;. far session of has rebounded from tht i.asl ' tt; Da d ;,.-- as Stoefen and Card ;e t on the basket: Turner (on I ' oor) attempts to clear the bt 1 to Lee as Balsfey cames in. Carlisle leaps to recoier a rebound from Moore. SCORING 775 points to their opponents ' 565, and winning 13 out of 15 practice games, the California Freshman basketball squad enjoyed a successful season despite the fact that they lost the big series with the Stanford Frosh two games to one. The practice season was a triumphant one for the first year men, as they lost only to Santa Clara Frosh 50-47, and to Auburn High 36-35, in fifteen starts. With a squad crippled by injuries, the Bear Cubs dropped the first game of the Stanford series 43-38, but came back to even the count with a decisive 42-29 victory in the second game. However, the Papoose five rallied in the last game to take the series with a 49-37 victory. Topham of Stanford takes the ball off the backboard, and Morgan of California shoots in the second Stanford game. BEAR ROOTERS Don Blessing Pete Donlon Hub Caldwell James Workman Bill Dally Bill Thompson Fran Frederick Jack Brinck Curley Stalder CALIFORNIA ' S OLYMPIC 282 rtrit Ed Salisbury James Blair Morris Graham Duncan Gregg Herman Holman Dave Dunlap Burt Jastram Charles Chandler Hays McClellan Ky Ebright Harold Tower Winslow Hall CHAMPIONS 7928 1932 Pete Donlon ... Stroke Ed Salisbury Hub Caldwell .7 James Blair James Workman 6 Duncan Gregg Bill Dally 5 David Dunlap Bill Thompson 4 Burt Jastram Fran Frederick 3 Charles Chandler Jack Brinck 2 Harold Tower Curley Stalder Bow Winslow Hall Don Blessing Cox Norris Graham 283 IF; h s HI Back Row: Peck, Bell, Matthew, Talbot, Delia Vedowa, Coley, Collins, Steinmetz, Colussi, Burford, Trobitz. Fourth Row: Porterfield, Arpin, L., Arpin, P., Moorhead, Forrest, Beeson, Manross, Roe, Cooper, Chandler. Third Row: Le Feaver, Yates, Rocca, Shatter, Poat, Schaeffer, Smith, K., Bergh, Frost, Baber. Second Row: Lawrence, Moore, Ball, Peters, Hoefer, Du Bois, Burnley, Holly, Roberts, J., De Varona. Front Row: Rossi, Dieterich, Clark, Cueny, Shinoda, Roberts, E. 284 UNSUCCESSFUL ATTEMPTS to carry away first honors at Poughkeepsie and later at the Olympic trials marred the California season dur- ing the summer months of 1936. Defeated by Huskies in the final half mile of the Poughkeep- sie regatta, the Californians had nonetheless rowed a sparkling race and were in the lead until overtaken by the Huskies. In the preliminary heat of the Olympic trials the Bears rowed a race good enough to establish them as Olympic favorites over the Huskies in the final race. But Washington again overtook the Californians and won the right to represent the United States in Germany. In spite of these defeats the California shell in both races had been the shell to beat. The opening of the 1937 season saw Coach Ky Ebright concentrating on developing new ma- terial for his first varsity boat. With the excep- tion of a few Juniors and Seniors Ebright had to center his attention on the Sophomores whose experience for the most part was limited to their Freshman year. Starting training in the early fall, the Bears first collegiate competition was against Oregon in the spring of ' 37. Having motored down from Oregon, the Webfeet were met by the varsity and Freshman boats on a rainy Oakland estuary. Al- though the contest developed into a race between the varsity and Freshman boats, this was in large measure due to the swamping of the Beavers ' boat at about the halfway mark. The Freshman Ft. " boat finished but half a length behind the var- sity shell, Oregon trailing by about four lengths. Washington swept the Bears from the water in the " Big Meet " of the oarsmen ' s season. Carry- ing the same rowing personnel that won them Olympic honors, the Husky coxswain was the only new member of shell. In addition, the ash- ington jayvees were victorious as was the ash- iiigton Freshman boat. Frequent crabs proved costly to the Califor- nians at the midway mark on the three-mile Oakland course. Here the Huskies overhauled the Bears and finished three lengths ahead. The Vi ashington jayvees easily conquered the Bears jayvee contingent and finished ten lengths in front. In the most exciting contest of the day, the California Freshman crew dropped a close race to the Washington Frosh by a length and a half. The U.C.L.A. meet over a 2,000 meter course at Long Beach will finish the western crew season for the Bears. 285 Frost, Scharrer, Collins, Bergh, H oefer, Moore, Rocca, Arpin, Clark, cox. POUGHKEEPSIE, 1936 SEEKING THEIR fourth Poughkeepsie championship, the Bears were nosed out hy a Washington crew that made an uphill fight to win in the last half mile. The early part of the contest saw the Cali- fornia boat trail the pace setting Navy and Pennsylvania oarsmen. Increasing their tempo the Bears attained second position at the two-mile marker, while another drive set the pacemaking Navy in second place. With California holding first place at the three and midway mark, the race devel- oped into a three boat contest between the Bears, Navy, and the Huskies in that order. Staging a terrific drive, the Huskies over- hauled the Navy and in the final fight for first place overcame the " California Clip- per " in a thrilling finish to win going away. 1936 Varsity practices in preparation for Poughkeepsie Regatta. Coley, Roberts, Schaelfer, Moorehead, deVarona, Peters, Burnley, Ball, Kueny, cox. OLYMPIC TRIALS, 1936 THE 2,000 METER course 011 the placid waters of Lake Carnegie witnessed the tri- umph of the Bears in their preliminary heat only to lose to the record-breaking Huskies and Pennsylvania in the final race for the right to represent Uncle Sam. Trailing Pennsylvania, the Bears over- hauled the Navy at the midway mark. By raising the stroke to a 38 per minute ca- dence, the Bears drew even with Pennsyl- vania 200 meters from the finish, and by holding off a late Pennsylvania thrust the Bears settled down to win in 6:07.8. The final contest for Olympic honors saw the Huskies overtake the Bears beyond the quarter mark, while at 1500 meters the Californians followed the Pennsylvanians. With the Huskies in first place, the Bears staged a final drive to trail half a length in third position. Bears win semi-final heat from Pennsylvania on Lake Carnegie. - Bell, Baker, Roe, Hawley. Vates, Trobitz, Porterfield, Smith, Dleterich (in.). OREGON STATE ON THE RAIN-SPLASHED Oakland es- tuary the California reserve and freshman oarsmen met and downed the Oregon navy. Pulling into the lead at the start of the contest, the Californians set a steady thirty- two stroke rhythm with the freshmen in second position and the Oregonians follow- ing close. The boats maintained their rel- ative positions at the halfway mark, and the race turned into a rout at the three-quarter marker. Following the reserves by half a length, the freshmen were two lengths ahead of the rapidly washing out Oregon shell. With the freshmen pressing the Varsity boat, the reserves lost distance but crossed the finish line of the two-mile course in 4:58, four lengths ahead of Oregon and half a length in advance of the frosh. Vanity fourth boat defeats Oregon State in a driving rainstorm. 9 Jl M i TT . - Washington Varsity defeats the California eight. WASHINGTON RACE HUSKIES ADDED the final blow to van- quish the Bear oarsmen completely in tak- ing the varsity race by three lengths. The Olympic Champions rowing with the same crew, except for the coxswain, that was victorious at Berlin, were matched stroke for stroke by the Bears in the first two miles and were able to gain little advantage. Just before reaching the Park Avenue Bridge misfortune overtook the Californians when the Bear No. 7 man, caught a crab which forced the Bears to come to almost a com- plete stop before they righted themselves and resumed progress. This gave the Hus- kies an advantage which the Bears were unable to overcome in so short a distance, and Washington swept across the finish line three lengths to the good. Bear Varsity crosses finish line Washington Jayvees defeat the Cal second boat by 10 lengths. Curt B cc WASHINGTON JUNIOR VARSITY THE HUSKY JAYVEES put on a superb demonstration of power and rowing form as they won handily over the Bear second boat by a margin of ten lengths. The Cali- fornia junior varsity was composed entirely of inexperienced men, most of whom were rowing in their first big race. Washington moved out in front early in the race and the Berkeley eight was unable to challenge their supremacy at any time during the race. The Northerners held a length and a half edge at the one mile mark and steadily increased it to five lengths at two miles. The Husky second varsity proved to be one of the greatest Jayvee eights in the history of the school by covering the course in less time than that required by the varsity in winning the final race. Husky varsity, Jayvee, and Freshman boats practice on the estuary before the California race. , Back Row: Sodmtrand, Neri. Pfeifle. Rogers, Cherry, Moore, Tullock, Eggleston. Third Row: Lattanner, Berkholm, Wolcott, Swartz. Steel, Edwards, Casey, Tutton. Echols. Reed Second Row: DuBois, Van Horn, O ' Sullivan, Backlund, Talcott, Spaan, Webster, Thompson, Hansen, Arata. Front Row: Hughes, Gilchrist, Fredell, Shreve. Gibson. FRESHMAN SEASON THE FRESHMAN EIGHT opened the 1937 crew season by taking second to the Junior varsity by half a length and defeating the first Oregon State boat by five lengths over a rain swept, two mile course along the Estuary. Traveling up the Sacramento River to the Capital city, the first Freshman boat met the Sacramento Junior College first shell and defeated the Jaysees by two lengths. The second Frosh crew made the day a clean sweep by a five length victory over the Sacramento Jaysees second boatload. The big race of the year, the Washington regatta, was held on the Oakland Estuary. Washington took the regatta in three straight, the Freshmen being swamped along with the Bear Varsity and Jayvee shells. Although beaten by the northern boat, the Frosh hung up a new California yearling record of 9 minutes and 48 seconds for the two mile course. The Washington eight led the entire distance but were closely pressed throughout the contest. At the half-way mark, the Bears were trailing by half a length, stroking a strong 36. With a half mile yet to go, the Washington crew raised its strokes slightly and, slowly pulling away, crossed the line with two lengths of open water gleaming between the shells. In winning, the Washington eight were timed at 9:41.5, the second fastest time ever set-up by a Freshmen crew on the Estuary. The record, 9:05.7, was set by Washing- ton in 1923. Bear yearlings are unable to overtake the Husky Frosh and lose by two lengths. T R A C K ALL-TIME CALIFORNIA TRACK VARSITY First Team Second Tegm 100 yard dash Anthony Cadogan ' 03 Robert Kiesel ' 34 220 yard dash William Drum ' 00 Oxy Hendrixson ' 22 440 yard dash Edwin Mays ' 93 Albert Sprott ' 21 880 yard run Elmer Boyden ' 26 Harry Wood ' 14 Mile Edward Coke Hill ' 90 Robert Fowler 36 2 Mile Everitt Mossman ' 32 Walter Henry ' 93 120 Hurdles Herbert Dell Fishback ' 36 220 Hurdles ' . Edward Beeson ' 13 .................. High Jump Kenneth Churchill ' 31 ................. Javelin William Neufeld ' 24 .... Discus Burt Walsh ' 01 .................... . Walk-1 Mile.. Howard Squires ' 00 ..................... Bike Clinton Morse ' 96 .................. p o ie Distance ' . George Macfcey ' 36 ................... Shot Put .... Robert Clark ' 35 ................... Broad Jump John Merchant ' 22 ................. Hammer Allan Norris ' 23 ..................... Pole Vault Herb Henderson ' 22 Fred Koch ' 96 ...... Jimmy Todd x ' 15 Karl Goeppert x ' 20 Harry Torrey ' 95 Harold Muller ' 24 Emery Curtice ' 30 Elmer Gerken ' 28 . . . Otto Westerfeld x ' OO Charles Townsend ' 90 Dr. Edwin Van Dyke ' 93 ... Dr. Roy Woolsey ' 01 Olie Snedigar ' 06 Alfred Plaw ' 04 George Pool ' 32 Rela y BLUE AND GOLD TRACK SELECTION COMMITTEE Walter Christie, Chairman Olie Snedigar ' 06 Fred Koch ' 96 Clinton R. " Brock " Morse ' 96 Al Roach ' 15 Brutus Hamilton A selection such as this from among many great athletes is difficult. The Committee, in choosing these, used as a basis for comparison the fundamental qualifications of an athlete: sportsmanship, courage, strength, speed, brains, and competitive ability. Undergraduates were not considered. UNIVERSITY RECORD HOLDERS 100 yard dash { cSSTASi?38 } : 9 ' 5 220 yard dash Robert Kiesel ' 34 :20.8 440 yard dash Archie Williams ' 38 :46.5 880 yard run Elmer Boyden ' 26 1:54.1 Mile run Harry Wood ' 14 4:21.6 Two mile run Robert Fowler ' 36 9:31.8 120 yard high hurdles Thomas Moore ' 36 :14.2 220 yard low hurdles Dell Fishback ' 36 :23.7 High jump Edward Beeson ' 13 6 ft. 5% in. Javelin Kenneth Churchill ' 31 220 ft. lV 2 in. Discus Glenn Randell ex ' 37 155 ft. 4 in. Pole vault distance Clinton Morse ' 96 26 ft. 5% in. Shot put James Kills ' 38 51 f 1. 1 in. Broad jump Robert Clark ' 35 24 ft. 11% in. Hammer ihrow Karl W. Shattuck ' 15 175 ft. 10 in. Pole vault Jack Mauger ' 35 13 ft. 10% in. Kent Weaver ' 38 Gregory Stout ' 37 Dell Fishback ' 36 Archie Williams ' 38 Left to right, top to bottom: Henderson Plaw. Mays. Walsh. Koch, Drum, Neufeld Hendrixson, Weaver, Clark, Churchill Mossman, Wood, Beeson, Mauger, Merchant. Page 295 Left to right, top to bottom: Kiesel, Wil- liams, Randell, Mackey, Fowler, Moore Gerken, Cheek, Curtice, Anderson, Fish back, Woolsey, Boyden, Pool, Todd, Westerfeld, Squires. tff9tk f K ' , Back Row: Jacques, Hawley, Shields, Nelson, Lehman, Monroe, Burr, Manuel, Hanson, Harding, Herbig, Lindstrom. Third Row: Hall, C., Helmer, Weiman, Rogers, Law, Mehlert, Trumbly, Nutting, Weaver, Sebastian, Marsh, Watts. Second Row: Shibada, Miller, R.. Stout, Lawrence, Bohme, Cleary, Hazlett, Hall, W., Kindt, Hollands, Voorhees, Anderson, Williams, Hamilton (coach). Front Row: Miller, C., Bessick, Biggs, Hankey, Hunt, Hickerson, Baker, R., Baker, G.. Colwell, Cooper, Lyon, Dowdakin, Kendall. 296 AT FULL STRENGTH in the early meets of the season, the California track and field contingent was later seriously handicapped by injuries. The first contests revealed point winners in almost every event, and the Bears easily downed Wash- ington and U.C.L.A., but yielded to the Olympic Club stars. Although swamped 801 2 to 5Q l 2 in the initial meet with the Olympic Club, the performance of the Bear athletes was not dimmed by the score. Archie Williams ' 48.3 in the 440 was brilliant, while in a return to form, George Anderson turned in a good 100-yard dash, though not win- ning, and by his 6 ft. 3 in. high jump, Jacques also showed himself in good form. Winning eight firsts in the indoor contest with the Washington Huskies, the Bears were without the services of Archie Williams who was the first casualty of the season. The Bears were especially brilliant in the field events, taking all but the high jump. In defeating the Bruins 93-38, California swept five events and took eleven firsts. Upsets were registered in the high hurdles, Hickerson down- ing Berkeley of U.C.L.A. in 15:2. George Ander- son at his season ' s peak in this meet finished sec- ond to Pollock in the 100 and won the 220 in 22 flat. Stronger in the field events, the Bruins won the discus and the javelin. Bowing to the superior strength of the Trojans, the Bears ' 52-79 loss was further darkened by in- juries to Anderson, Williams, and Nutting. The outstanding performance of the day was that of Sefton, Trojan pole-vaulter, who leaped 14 ft. 7% in. to set a new world record. The biggest upset of the meet was Jacques ' triumph over Vickery of the Trojans in the low barriers and his new meet record of 6 ft. 5 in. in the high jump. No match for Michigan, Big Ten Indoor Cham- pions, California placed first only four times. Voorhies ' two-mile victory was the day ' s upset, although Weiman ran brilliantly to place second in the 880. 297 Bob Clark, second place winner in Olympic Games Decathlon. V 1936 OLYMPIC GAMES REPRESENTING THE United States in the 1936 Olympic Games at Berlin, Archie Williams, Negro track star of the University of California, outgained and outsped a crack field of the world ' s best 400 meter sprinters to cinch Olym- pic honors for the event. Bob Clark, another product of the University, repre- sented the United States in the decathlon, taking second place to Glenn Morris of Colorado. Both athletes were proteges of Brutus Hamilton, head track coach; and by their outstanding performances against stiffer competition than they had ever met before, showed the results of his careful and diligent coaching. In winning the Olympic sprint, Williams showed perfect form, taking the race in a new Olympic record time. ARCHIE WILLIAMS BY PLACING in the National Amateur Athletic Union meet held at Princeton in early July, Archie Williams won for him- self a place on the Olympic team. He was forced to take third in the race due to an upset, but the place was sufficient to put Williams on the roll. In the Olympic Stadium in Berlin, Williams verified the early prophecies of the sport scribes by taking the 400 meter race in grand style by a time of 46.5 seconds and a new Olympic record. In so doing he beat Brown of England by two sec- onds. BOB CLARK COMPETING against Glenn Morris in the two day Olympic decathlon grind at Berlin, Bob Clark, a former University of California track star, challenged the eventual winner all the way, only to lose the honor in the second day by 382 points. In the opening day, Clark was in the lead by the scant margin of two points after the comple- tion of five of the ten events. The second day saw a different scene, however, for by losing the 110 meter low hurdles, Clark lost the victory. c c A L L H A 1 F Y M M P R N 1 P 1 A ' 1 N S C S Archie Williams, Olympic Games 400-meter champion. 298 Archie Williams steps away from Al Fitch to win the quarter. George Anderson George Baker Although defeated HO ' i-SO Via star-studded Olympic Club contingent from San Kraneisco, the Bears revealed a smooth and potentially powerful track and field aggregation. The Winged " O " experienced little difficulty in capturing twelve firsts to the Californians three. Registering California ' :, first victors of the day. illiam- nii the 1 III with u sparkling :!! . , ' i. Another Hear triumph was recorded in the mile relay, Hubbard, Miller, Weimaii ami Williams winning in 3:21.5. Jacques ' 6 ft. 3 in. high jump was the Bears lone field victory. SUMMARY CALIFORNIA SOV4 100 Yard Daih Won by Dean (OC) ; Pollock (C), second: Fitch (OC) and Anderson (C). tid foi- Ihird. Time 0:9.8. 220 Yard Daih Won I.- Dean (OC) ; Trumbly (C), second: Helmer (C). Ihird. Time 0:22.6. 440 Yard Daih Won by Williams (C) i Fitch (OC). second; Hubbard (C), third. Time 0:48.3. 880 Yard Daih Won by Robinson (OC) ; Miller (C). lecond; Wieman (C), Ihird. Time 1:55.8. Mile Run Won by Bright (OC) ; Robinson (OC). second; Heavey (C). third. Time 4.22. Two Mile Run Won by Bright (OC) ; Mehlert (C). second; Voorhees (C). third. Time 9:37.4. 120 Yard High Hurdles Won by Moore (OC) ; Stoul (C). second; Hunt (C) and Hall (C) tied for third. Time 0:14.8. 220 Yard Low Hurdles Won by Fishback (OC) ; Jacques (C), second; Moore (OC), Ihird. Time 0:23.9. OLYMPIC CLUB 80 ' j Broad Jump Won by Clark (OC). 25 ft. even; Manuel (C). 23 ft. " ' j in., second; Kido (C) and Nulling (C), 23 ft. 6% in., lied for Ihird. High Jump Won by Jacques (C), 6 ft. 3 in. (first jump); W. Marty (OC), 6 ft. 3 in. (second jump), second; Canning (C). 6 ft. 2 in., third. Pole Vault Won by Manger (OC), 13 ft.; Haikell (OC) and Carrett (OC), 12 ft. 6 in., tied for second. Javelin Won by Mottram (OC), 210 ft.; Lehman (C) 200 ft. 2 in., second; Manuel (C). 191 ft. 6 in.. third. Shot Put Won by Dunn (OC). 50 ft. 9 in.; Allee (OC), 49 ft. 8 in., second; Hankey (C), 44 ft. 8 in., third. Discus Won by Dunn (OC), 157 fl. 10 in.; Levy (OC), 143 ft. 10% in., second; Burr (C), 130 fl. 9 ' 2 in., Ihird. Mile Relay Won by University of California team No. 1, (Hubbard. Miller. Weiman. Williams); Uni- versity of California No. 2 team (Helmer, deary. Watts, Weaver), second; Olympic Club (Young, Moore, Briadbent, Fitch), third. Time 3:21.5. Don Burr i 300 Clarence Hall Dick Hankey Henry Harding Monroe clears the bar in the indoor meet at Seattle. HUSKY MEET VICTORIOUS BY A 73-57 SCORE at the indoor Washington Pavilion at Seattle, the Californians took eight firsts and dominated second place to increase their winning margin. Substituted for the 100-yard dash, the 75-yard sprint saw Pollock crack the tape in 0:7.6. In the 220 he placed second to Humber of the Huskies. Shattering his old Washington 880 record by .3 of a second, Palmasoii outran Miller of the Bears to win in 1 :57.8. Although both hurdling events went to the Huskies, the Bears countered when Heavey won the mile and Mehlert the two mile. A lone Washington victory was scored in the field events when Vandermay leaped 6 ft. 4 in. to win, while the Bears swept the remaining first places. CALIFORNIA 73 75-YARI) DASH Won by Pollock (C) ; second. Ander- son (C); Ihird. Hay (W). Time :07.6. 220-YARD DASH Won by Humber (W): second. Pol- lock (C); third. Trumbly (C). Time: :22.6. 410- YARD DASH Won by Montgomery (W) ; second, M,.|,,MT (C); third. Hub ' bard (C). Time: :49.9. 880-YARD DASH Won by Palmason (W) : second, C. Miller (C) ; third, Courtwrighl (W). Time: 1:57.8. (New Washington I ' avilion record. Previous 1:57.1. made by Palmason in 1935.) MII.K RUN Won by Heavey (C) ; second. Voorhee. (C); Ihird. Trowbridge (W). Time: 4:28.4. TWO-MILK RUN Won by Mehlerl (C) ; second, Voor- hees (C) ; third, Croadsdill (W). Time: 9:58. 80-YAH1) HIGH 111 KDI.KS- Won by McGoldrick (W) : lecond. Slulfield (W): third. Slout (C). Time: :10. 180-YAHD LOW HUHDI.KS Won by MrColdriek (W) : ,.,..inl. AM. I. ill; I; Ihird. Sloul (C). Time: . ' " ..; WASHINGTON 57 BROAD JUMP Won by Nulling (C), 23 fl. 2 in.: second, Manuel (C), 23 ft. 1% in.; third. Panton (W). 23 ft. HIGH JUMP Won by Vandermay (W). 6 ft. 4 in.: second. Jacques (C). 6 ft. 2 in.: Ihird. Law (C). 6 ft. POLE VAULT Won by Monroe (C), 13 ft.; second. Childs (W), 12 fl. 6 in.: third, none. JAVELIN Won by Lehman (C). 199 fl. 3 in.: second. J. Miller (W), 18fl fl. 61 2 in.; Ihird, M. Miller (W). 184 ft. 2 in. SHOT-PUT Won by Hankey (C), 46 fl. V t in.; sue- ond. Markow (W), 45 fl.: Ihird. Anderson (C). 43 II. ' 4 in. DISCUS Won by Burr (C). 140 fl. 2 in.; second. Han- key (C). 133 fi. ll ' , in.; third, Markov (W), 129 fl. 8 in. MII.K RELAY- Won by Washington. Humber. Klagg. PalmaHon, Montgomery. Time: 3:24. (New Wash- ington I ' avilion record. Previous 3:52.2. made b Washington in 1935.) Nutting takes off on winning jump; deary and Weiman If fhe field at the halfway mark in the 880. Bob Heavy Rex Heap BRUIN MEET SWEEPING FIVE EVENTS and gaining eleven first places, tin- Blue and Gold track team swamped the invading Bruins 93-38 at Edwards Field. Trailing Pollock of tlie Bears to a :9.9 victory in the century dash. Anderson was later victorious for the Californians in the 220 sprint. The outstanding performance of the day was Young ' s smoothly spec- tacular 47.7 in the 440 which tied the meet record and won that event for the Bruins. In the 880 and the mile run the Bears finished one, two, three, Weiman garnering first honors in the half-mile, and Mchlert in the mile. The field events saw the Bruins shut out in the pole vault, Monroe clearing 13 feet to win, but the Uclans countered with victories in the javelin and discus, while the Bears won the remaining events. 100 Yard Dash Won by Pollock (C) i Anderson (C), second; Trumbiy (C). third. Time 0:9.. 200 Yard Dash Won by Anderson (C) : Trumhly (C). second; Jampol (UCI.A). third. Time - 0:22. 110 Yard Dash Won by Bob Young (UCI.A): Miller (C). second: Kiefer (UCI.A). third. Time 0:47.7, (equalling meet record set by Jimmy In Valle of MIX in 1934). HSO Yard Dash Won by Weiman (C) : Biggs (C). second: deary (C), third. Time 1 :57.1. Mile Rim Won by Mehlerl (C) : Voorhees (C). second: Heavey (C). third. Time 4:24.6. Two Mile Kun Won by Van Alstine (UCLA): Hall (C). second: Baker (C). third. Time 9:59.3. 120 Yard High Hurdles Won by Hickerson (C) : Berkeley (UCLA), second; Anderson (UCI.A). third. Time :15.2. 220 Yard l.o Hurdles Won by Stout (C) : Jac- Miles (C). second; Berkelev (UCI.A). third. Time :2I.3. SUMMARY Broad Jump Won by Nutting (C). 24 ft. 2 in.: Manuel (C). 24 ft. ' 1% in., second: Kido (C). 23 ft. 6- 1 , in., third. High Jump Won by Law (C). 6 ft. 2 in.: Good (C) and Berkeley (UCLA). 6 ft., lied for sec- ond: Harding (C) also cleared 6 ft. but on a later jump. Pole Vault Won by Monroe (C). 13 ft.: Rogers (C). 12 ft. 6 in., second: l.indstrom (C). 11 ft. 6 in., third. Javelin Won by Heilz (UCLA), 203 ft. 1 in.; McKenzie (UCLA). 200 ft. 6 in., second: Leh- man (C). 189 ft. H ' 2 in., third. Shot Put Won by Hanson (C). 44 ft. lO ' i in.; Hankey (C), 44 ft. 7 ' 2 in., second; Walther (UCI.A). 43 ft. 2 ' 4 in., third. Discus Won by Tyre (UCLA), 143 ft. ' in.: Burr (C), 142 ft. 2 in., second; Hankey (C), 133 ft. % in., third. Mile Delay Won by U.C.L.A. (team composed of Grimes. Calleri. Kiefer. Young) . Time, 3:1B.H. Final score California 93, U.C.L.A. 38. Stout and Jacques defeat Berkeley of the Bruins in the low hurdles. Young takes the quarter for the Bruins as Miller outfinishes Kiefer; Weiman, Biggs, and Cleary sweep the 880: Anderson and Trumblv take one-two in the furlono. Paul Jacques Bob Law MEET Weiman defeats Roulac in the 880. FEATURED BY 1 ' SETS L the low hurdles and high jump :s well as a new world ' s record in the pole vault, the Trojan ineef saw the Cali- forniaiis defeated r 2-7 ' in the I.os Angeles Coliseum. Crane ol the Soullierners won the century dash and the 220, hut Miller and Weiman of the Bears counlered with wins in the 440 and 880 respec- tively. Third as they cleared the final barrier in the low hurdles, Jacques upset Vickery of the Trojans in the final sprint for the tape. A spectacular vault by Sefton of the Southerners set a new world ' s record of 14 ft. 7 and % inches, while Jacques set a new meet record of 6 ft. 5 in. in the high jump. SUMMARY Doug Lehman CALIFORNIA 52 100 yard dash Won by Talley (USC); Pollock (C), second: Crane (USC), third. Time 0:9.6. 220 yard dash Won by Crane (USC); Talley (USC). second; Jordan (USC), third. Time :21.2. 440 yard dash Won by Miller (C) : McNerney (USC). second; Olson (USC), third. Time 0:48. 1180 yard dash Won bv Weiman (C) ; Roulac (USC), second; Biggs (C), third. Time 1 :56.5. Mile run Won by Bush (USC); Jensen (USC). second; Heavey (C), Ihird. Time 4 :20.6. Two mile run Won by Mehlert (C) ; Voorhees (C), second; Portanova (USC), third. Time 9 :44.6. 120 yard high hurdles Won by Slaley (USC) ; Stout (C), second; L. Olson (USC), third. Time :14.8. 220 yard low hurdles Won by Jacques (C) ; Vickery (USC). second; Stout (C), third. Time :24. U.S.C. TV Broad jump Won by Manuel (C) ; Boone (USC). second; Skinner (USC), third. Distance 24 ft. t in. High jump- Won by Jacques (C) ; Thurber (USC), second; Good (C). third. Height 6 ft. 5 in. (New meet record). Pole vault Won by Seflon (USC), 14 ft. 1% in. (New World Record); Meadows (USC), 14 ft. 4 1 . in., second; Howe (USC). 13 ft. 6 in., third. Javelin Won by Soper (USC); Martin (USC), ec- ond; Lehman (C). third. Distance 189 ft. 6 in. Shot put Won by Hanson (USC); Miller (USC). second: Fisher (USC), third. Distance 50 ft. 4 in. Discus Won by Wrotnowski (USC); Burr (C). sec- ond; Caspar (USC). third. Distance 145 ft. 8% in. Mile Relay Won by California (Hubbard, Miller. Helmer, Watts) ; Southern California, second. Time 3:19. Stoller of Michigan comet from behind to defeat Pollock in WOLVERINE MEET CALIFORNIA PROVED to be no match for Michigan, Big Ten Indoor Cham- pions, and lost their third meet of the season 811 2 to 491 2- The Wolverines scored eleven out of fifteen first places. The contest was marked by close races in several events. Miller lost the 440 to Birleson of Michigan by a yard after a brilliant challenge in the back stretch. An outstanding performance was turned in by Wieman who placed second in the 880, won by Davidson of Michigan in 1:53.7. Wieman just failed to pass the winner at the finish line after a grueling battle. Voorhies scored the greatest upset of the meet when, after trailing O ' Connell and Alix for the entire race, he finished with a burst of speed to win in 9:44.7. Also worthy of note was Manuel ' s winning leap in the broad jump of 24 ft. 6% inches. CALIFORNIA 49 $ 100 Yard Dash Won by Sloller (M); Pollock (C). sec- ond: Smith (M). third. Time 0:9.8. 220 Yard Dash Won by Smith (M) ; Trumbley (C). sec- ond; Miller (C). third. Time 0:21.9. 440 Yard Dash Won by Birleson (M) ; Miller (C). sec- ond; Watts (C), third. Time 0:48.4. 880 Yard Dash Won by Howard Davidson IM): Wieman (C), second; Starr (M). third. Tinw 1 :53.7. Mile Run Won by Davidson (M) : Brelsford (M). sec- ond; Heavey (C). third. Time 4:19.7. Two Mile Run Won by Voorhiel (C) ; O ' Connell (M). second; Alis (M). third. Time 9 :44.7. 120 Yard High Hurdles- Won by Osgood (M). Stout (C). second; Hickerson (C), third. Time 0:14.9. 220 Yard Low Hurdles Won by Osfood (M) ; Mason (M). second: Jacques (C). third. Time--0 :23.9. MICHIGAN 81V4 Broad jump Won by Manuel (C). 24 ft. 6% in.; Watson (M). 24 ft. 1 s , in., second: Stoller (M) and Kido (C). 23 ft. 3 s , ill., tied for third. Hitch Jump Won by Jacques (C). 6 ft. ! ' in.: Law (C). 6 ft. . in., second: Good (C). 6 ft. ' . in., third. Pole Vault-Won by Hunn (M). 13 ft.: Kinsley (M). 12 ft. 6 in., second; Monroe (C). 12 ft. 6 in., third. Javelin Won by Lehman (C). 175 ft. It 3 ' , in.: Martin (M). 175 ft. 5 ' i in., second; Manuel (C). 171 ft. 3 ' , in., third. Shot Put Won by Watson (M). 50 ft. 1 in.; ll.mU. (C). 46 fl. 2 in., second: Townsend IM). 46 ft. 2 in.. third. Discus Won by Watson (M). 141 ft. 11% in.; Townsend (M). 141 ft. 4 4 in., second; Hankey (C). 136 ft. 6 S 1 in., third. Mile Relay Won by Michigan (team composed of Clark. Miller. Osgood. and Birlesim). Time ( [ 1 Guy Manuel Charles Mehlert Charles Miller 303 Pollock and Anderson take the first two places in the 100-yard dash in the time of 9.8 seconds. N D AN 304 STARTING SLOWLY BUT amassing a large majority of points in the latter events, the favored Stanford track squad defeated the California cindermen T? 1 to SS 1 in a meet held at Edwards Field. Bear hopes were high early in the meet as Pollock and Anderson took the first two places in the 100-yard dash and Hickerson and Stout took first and third in the High Hurdles. However as the meet wore on and Stanford swept the shot and discus and took the first two places in the 440, 880 and low hurdles, the California hopes faded. A new California-Stanford and Edwards Field record was made in the 220 low hurdles when Wierhauser of Stanford stepped away from the field to win by a flight of hurdles in the time of 23.2 seconds. Alexander of Stanford opened the meet by out-sprinting Heavey of California in the home stretch to win the mile in 4:20.9. A moment later the Bears came back again as Pollock took first in the century after leading all the way, and Anderson came from behind to take second. In the high hurdles Hewitt and Hawkins of the Indians led until the ninth hurdle, where they tripped, allowing Hickerson of California to take first place. Miller of the Bears stumbled when he tried to cut in in the quarter and was unable to make up the distance, allowing Malott and Wierhatiser to place first and second for the Cards. Mehleit and Vcorhies sprint home to win the t- MEET MEHLERT AND VOORHIES passed Burroughs on the last curve to place first and second in the two mile. Mallott scored an unexpected victory in the furlong for Stanford, when lie stepped away from California ' s Captain Pollock to take the event in 21.6 seconds. Anderson who had been expected to score for the Bears, weakened at the 180-yard mark and finished out of the money. The field events ran true to form with the Indians sweeping both the shot and discus, and the Bears getting first and third in the javelin. Mad- lem of Stanford scored a come through to take second place in the broad jump from Kido of California. SUMMARY STANFORD 77 V4 100-Yard Dash Won by Pollock (C). Anderson (C). -.-... it. I: Carew (S). third. Time :09.8. 200-Yard Dash Won by Mallott (S) : Pollock (C). second; Carew (S). third. Time :21.6. 440-Yard Dash Won by Mallott (S) ; Wierhauser (S), second; Miller (C). third. Time :48.1. 880-Yard run Won by McCurdy (S) ; Mahurin (S), second; Weiman (C), third. Time 1:55.5. Mile Run Won by Alexander (S) ; Heavey (C). second: March (S). third. I nn.- I :. ' u. " . Two-Mile Run Won by Mehlerl (C) : Voorhies (C). second; Burroughs (S), third. Time 9:42.8. 120-Yard High Hurdles Won by Hickerson (C), Hewitt (S), second; Stout (C), third. Time 220- Yard Low Hurdles Won by Wierhauser (S) : Hewitt (S). second; Jacques (C). third. Time :23.2. (New Big Meet Record.) CALIFORNIA S3 ' ; Broad Jump Won by Manuel (C) ; Madlem (S). second; Kido (C), third. Distance 23 ft. 7 1 , in. High Jump Won by Jacques (C), Morrison (S), Good (C). Canning (C) tied for third. Height 6 ft. 4% in. Pole Vault Won by Boore (S), Monroe (C), second; Gill (S), third. Height 13 ft. ' .. in. Javelin Throw Won by Lehman (C). Carlson (S), second; Manuel (C), third. Distance 203 ft. 7 in. Shot Put Won by Montgomery (S) ; Hershey (S). second; Reynolds (S). third. Distance 49 feet 1% inches. Discus Throw Won by Cribben (S) ; Zagar (S), second; Cornet! (S), third. Distance 151 ft. 9 in. Mile Relay Won by Stanford (McConnell. McCurdy. Wirrhauser and Malott). Kent Weaver Elton Weiman Archie Williams 305 START IMIIE 2Mll RELAY FINISH 120 HN I MILE 2MILE RELAY Voorhies picks up twelve yards in last lap to win two mile; Pollock and Anderson take one-two in the 75-yard dash; Hubbard gives Watts a two-yard lead over the Trojan re- lay team; Hankey set for a put at Wash- ington; Heavey and Voorhies defeat Angle in the mile run. OPENING THE SEASON against one of the strongest Junior College teams in the country, the Cubs lost their first meet of the season to San Mateo J.C. 69-63. Follow- ing this defeat, the Freshmen won five straight victories defeating Sacramento J.C. 70-52; Contra Costa All-Stars 8714-3414 ; Modesto J.C. 74-48; San Francisco Prep All- Stars 98-24; and San Francisco Junior College 97-25. Outstanding performers for the first year men were Captain Modisette who did 1:56.3 for the 880; Sadaj who turned a 4:24.1 mile for a new frosh record: Brombacher with a mark of 49.6 for the quarter and Michaels who tossed the shot 47 feet 2% inches. The Frosh relay team also set a record of 3:23.1 for the mile relay. This team was composed of Modisette, Weidel, Burns, and Brombacher. Strzelecki was also a very promising prospect in the javelin with a throw of approximately 190 feet to his credit. .. " " e jBTir -- peiU ' 307 B A Ovie Overall Heine Heitmuller Bill Hallauu Taylor Douthitt Nick Williams ALL TIME VARSITY Jack Bliss Zeb Smith Norman Horner Claire Goodwin Ray Rowhtr CALIFORNIA BASEBALL VA Secon Catcher " Dutch " Thorn . Pitcher Hal Dimo William Peterson . " Lefty " Hermle ' 2 Al Santcl all ' 04 orner ' 29 . . . " Hap " Meyers ' 09 Goodwin ' 13 ' 09. . . Ham Hallauer ' 34 ine Heitmuller ' ylor Douthitt ' 24. v Rowher ' 21 k Williams ' 04 rtstop eft Field Field . Right Field Milton Mclntyre ' 33 . . . Utility Henry Glaist Tayl George Wolfman ' 31 Fred C. Fischer ' 29 this from among many great athletes is diffici c teams, used as a basis for comparison lete : sportsmanship, courage j 311 Back Row Packer Crouch Rokutanl, Steele, Owen, Martin, Moses, Prati, Hope, Edwards, Hiatt. Fourth Row: Greenleaf, Hawkins, Feiehtmelr, Smith, B., Fox, Abblitt, Wehb, Laeremans. Jensen, Archer. Smith, L. Third Row: Dunlap, Connolly, Lombard!, Pihl, Young, Mills, Meyer. Rinne, Barry. Second Row: Lilly, Callaghan, Thode. Cannon, Winterbottom. Daugherty. Firpo, Denurs, McNamara, Eians. toach. Front Row: Porterfleld, Bell. Priest, McPhate. Grimes, Humburg, McNeil, McCaffrey, Koral. 312 STARTING THE SEASON as the dark horse of the C.I.B.A., the California baseball team has shown remarkable hitting power and competitive ability to offset their pitching weakness, and leads the conference by a game and a-half with only two more games to play. The pitching de- partment, which has been the questionable part of the Bear team, due to the lack of experienced twirlers, has come through well in the conference games because of the ability of Priest to pitch most of the important games by himself, and the support of McNeil and Laermans in the games which Priest could not pitch. The Bears won every conference series except the one with U. S. C. in which the pitching of Gonzales was too much for the California batters in two of the three games. In the series with St. Mary ' s and Santa Clara the Californiaiis did not lose a single game, and as this is written no games of the Stanford series have been lost. The non-conference season, while not so suc- cessful as the Conference games, has given many of the younger players valuable experience. The Californians opened the practice season with a defeat at the hands of the Kennealy Seals, a group of professional players, by a 15-6 count. McCaffrey was the only Bear who could hit con- sistently in this game. In their next two starts the Blue and Gold tossers dropped close games to the Athens Club 3-2, and to the Kenney Park All- Stars 4-3. Staging a comeback from their three previous defeats, the Bears started a seven-game non-con- ference winning streak by beating the Mission Rookies in a 14-4 slugfest. McNeil led the Bear attack with a triple, two doubles, and a stolen base. Continuing their unbroken string of victo- ries, the Berkeley team defeated Standard Oil 6-3, Alameda Elks 10-1, California Aggies 9-3, and San Jose State 7-5. Daugherty was in good form in the San Jose game, allowing four hits and fan- ning seven men. Closing the practice season, the Bears defeated the Pacific Greyhounds 7-5, and came from behind to defeat U. S. F. 6-4. 313 McCaffrey is too late to tag out a St. Mary ' s man as he slides to first; Grimes scores as Perrie and McCaffrey look on; Bell slides home under a high throw. Sam Chapman GAEL SERIES v Audit Daugherty SHOWING COMPLETE MASTERY in every game, the Califor- nia baseball team swept the series from the St. Mary ' s tossers three games to none. Although the Gaels were said to have the best team in the C.I.B.A. at the start of the year, the Bears experi- enced little trouble from them. The Californians opened the Conference season with a 6-0 win behind the four hit pitching of Dave McNeil. Flannigan of the Gaels held the Bears to five hits but was the victim of several errors on the part of his mates. Devaurs collected three of the Bears ' five hits to lead his team ' s attack. Winning their third straight conference game, the Blue and Gold team came from behind in the seventh inning to score a 12-7 victory in the second game of the series. Trailing 7-6 due to several long hits off of Daugherty, the Bears came to life and aided by three errors and home runs by Bell and McCaffrey, piled up six runs to cinch the game as Priest handcuffed the Moragans for the last two innings. With Priest pitching three hit ball, the California team com- pleted their sweep of the series by taking the last game 5-2. The Bears picked up a run in the first inning on hits by McNamara and Chapman and Morey ' s error, and two more in the third 011 hits by Priest, Devaurs and McNeil. Captain Grimes ' home run accounted for another of the tallies. McCaffrey fails to put out a St. Mary ' s base runner as McNeil stands by. McNeiMatt tut single: close decision as a Californian slides Sullivan stretches to make put out for Santa Clara. FINDING LITTLE TROUKLK in -oKing th- slants. ofth highly touted Santa Clara pitcliers. tlie Bears swept the three game series from the Broiics, scoring more runs than in any other series of the season. The first game of the series, played on Co-ed ' s Day, resulted in a Cali- fornia victory by a 9-5 score. The Broncs took an early lead when they blasted Daugherty out of the box in the third inning with a four run rally, and, at the beginning of the eighth inning, led 5-4. Here Lombardi led off with a single, Devaurs was safe on an error and Porterfield singled to fill the bases. McNeil then came through with a long triple which scored three runs and sewed up the game. Behind the steady pitching of Priest, who fanned 14 men, the Bears batted in a 6-2 victory in the second game of the series. Although the Broiics nut hit the Bears eight to seven, they were unable to do much scor- ing as Priest tightened up when in danger and pitched his way out. Pounding out a barrage of 23 base hits and knocking three Santa Clara pitchers out of the game, the Bears ended the series with a 19-8 victory. Leading the Blue and Gold attack was Captain Grimes who got four hits including a home run with the bases loaded. Priest ' s throw to McCaffrey is too late to catch Santa Clara ii.i Jot Koral u Tony Lombard) Stan McCaffrey Bob McNamara Suski slides home as McPhate is drawn from the plate by a bad throw. HANDICAPPED BY A RAIN soaked field and a week without practice due to had weather, tlie Bears suffered their first conference defeat of the season when they dropped the first game of the U.C.L.A. series 7-4. This game was costly to the Bears in more than one way as Len Porter- field, star shortstop, fell and dislocated his shoulder in the second inning while making a running catch behind third base. Although Laermans of the Bears and Sargent of the Bruins each allowed 10 hits, the south- erners bunched theirs and as a result won the game. Dave McNeil was in rare form in the second game of the series, allow- ing six scattered hits and hanging up a 6-1 victory. He held the Bruins scoreless until the last inning when he tired and walked in a run. He also starred at the plate, scoring a long home run, as did Captain Grimes. The California nine came from behind by scoring three runs in the seventh inning to win the last game of the series 3-2. After five scoreless innings, the southerners broke the ice by scoring twice on two hits and an error. However the Bears rallied to take the game in the next frame as Devaurs and Winterbottom singled, Koral tripled and McNeil singled to drive in the winning run. t runs for first as Jacot and Gonzales attempt to field S R S R J A N TOO MUCH OF JOE GONZALES, the league ' s best pitcher, proved to be the downfall of the Bear varsity in its series with the U.S.C. Trojans as they lost twice to the southerners when Gonzales was pitching but won the third game, which he did not twirl. Opening the series with a double header on Wrigley Field, Los Angeles, the Bears fell before the Trojan nine 12-4. McNeil opened on the mound for the Berkeley team but proved ineffective as he was touched for 14 hits. Chapman, McPhate and Koral got two hits apiece to lead the Bears. In the second game, a seven inning affair, Priest throttled the Trojan attack effectively while his mates, led by Connelly, who banged out a triple and two singles in three trips to the plate, piled up a 5-3 victory to even the series at one game each. The Trojans took the series with a 3-1 triumph in the last game, a pitchers ' battle between Gonzale and Priest. The southerners opened the scoring in the first inning on two errors and singles by Petruskin and Bernardino, and scored again in the second frame on hits by Schwartz and Tanner and two flies to the outfield. The final S.C. run was made when Bernardino homed with one on; however Bernardino ' s run did not count as he failed to touch first base. California ' s run was scored in the third inning on walks by McCaffrey and Lombardi, a sacrifice fly by Priest and a single by Devaurs. Dave McNeil Greg McPhate Len Porterfield 317 Bell takes a husky swing. Bill Print Art Rlnnc THE BEAR VARSITY opened the series with a thrilling 2 to 1 victory over the Cardinal nine. Taking the lead in the first inning with two runs on hits by Devaurs, Koral, McNeil and Winterbottom, the Bears were not headed for the rest of the game, although Priest had to pitch himself out of some tight spots, retiring the Indians with the bases loaded on more than one occasion. The highlight of the game was a general fight between members of the two teams which was precipitated when Linde, Stanford third baseman, was tagged out at the plate. With Furman in rare form and pitching four-hit ball, the Indians evened the series by taking the second game 8-3. The Bears scored two runs in the second inning when McNamara tripled with one on and was scored on a long single by Grimes. In the fifth inning the Cardinal batters began to solve Priest ' s pitching and scored six runs, driving Priest and David out of the game, and piling up their winning margin. George Thode Lombard! sets himself (or a swing In the third in X 4 ' AFTER OPENING THE season with a defeat at the hands of the Cinnamon Bears, the Freshmen scored a series of victories over Berkeley, Ala- meda, Oakland Tech, Balboa and San Mateo high schools. Following these victories, the Frosh lost to Mission and Richmond High Schools and to Pasadena and Marin Junior Col- leges while winning from Fremont High. Closing the practice season, the Frosh won from John Sweatt and Petaluma Highs and lost both games of the St. Mary ' s series by scores of 3-0 and 10-1. In the last game of the year, the Cubs fell before the Stanford Frosh by a 13-10 score in a wild slugfest that saw one pitcher replace another throughout the game. 319 TEN N I S Bud Chandler and Tom Stow Gervais Hillls Bradshaw Harrison ALL Hardy Phil Betters T Dolph Muehleisen Gene Smith Bt Muciuh ENNIS VARSITY Mel Carl Holmes Wallace Bates ALL-TIME CALIFORNIA TENNIS VARSITY Doubles Gerald Stratford ' 25 Gervais Hillis ' 25 Edward " Bud " Chandler ' 26 Thomas Stow ' 28 Dolph Muehleisen ' 3 1 Bob Muench ' 2 Singles Sumner Hardy ' 00 Melville Long ' 12 Axel Gravem ' 17 Wallace Bates ' 23 Gerald Stratford ' 25 Philip Bettens ' 26 Edward " Bud " Chandler ' 26 Bradshaw Harrison ' 27 Thomas Stow ' 28 Dolph Muehleisen ' 31 Carl Holmes ' 34 Gene Smith ' .H4 Selected by Coach Tom Stow and a committee of former players A selection such as this from among many great athletes is difficult. The Com- mittee, in choosing these, used as a basis for comparison the fundamental qualifi- cations of an athlete: sportsmanship, courage, strength, speed, brains, and com- petitive ability. Under gradual . were not considered. Back Row: Haas, Meyer, Imhoff. Schwartz, Regan, Coulthardt, Craig. First Row: Mann. Wellington. Vetter, Bennett. Newton, Tanafca, Alloo. Stow. 324 THE 1937 TENNIS SEASON proved to be a great success with California winning the Pacific Coast Championship for the first time since 1931 by win- ning five out of six conference matches. Competi- tion proved stronger than ever before, and from the start the conference race became a three cornered struggle between California, Stanford, and U.S.C., with U.C.L.A. trailing far behind. The final outcome of the race was in doubt until California ' s second victory over the Indians gave them undisputed pos- session of the crown. To open the season, the Bears defeated the Berke- ley Tennis Club 8-5 in a non-conference match. A second practice match was held with the Olympic Club, the Bears winning by the lopsided score of 11-1. An informal practice with Don Budge, Davis Cup Ace, and Bud Chandler and Gerald Stratford, former Bear netmen, closed the preliminary season. California opened the conference season scoring a 6-3 victory over U.C.L.A. Rain halted the first U.S.C. matches with the Trojans holding a 2-1 edge. Play was resumed when U.S.C. traveled north and the Southerners proceeded to hand California its only conference defeat 6-3. T his loss was avenged by a smashing 6-3 victory two days later. In the second U.C.L.A. match, the Bears were able to gain a 5-4 victory to sweep the Bruin series. As U.S.C. and Stanford had split their series and both of these teams had won both their matches from U.C.L.A., the conference standings rested upon the outcome of the two Stanford contests. The Blue and Gold netmen rose to great heights to defeat Stanford in two bitterly contested encounters by 5-4 scores. A lion ' s share of the credit for the team ' s out- standing performance goes to Coach Stow for his unceasing efforts towards improving the play of every team member. Also worthy of praise was the stellar play of Co-Captains Newton and Bennett, playing their third and final season for the Bears. 325 I ; " " 3t t t K MATCHES THE U.C.L.A. series by scoring two close " victories 6-3 and 5-4. In both con- tests, the individual matches were very close and hard fought, and the Bears were never assured of victory until the closing minutes of the contest. In the first matches, California won four out of six singles, and gained victory as Coulthard-Imhoff and Meyer-Neel scored victories in the second and third doubles. In the final contest at Berkeley, the Blue and Gold was unable to gain better than a draw at 3-3 in the singles. Bennett and Newton van- quished Heldman-Anderson 8-6, 6-4 and Coulthard- Imhoff gave California what proved to be the de- ciding edge by defeating Kendis-Mcliiish 6-3. 3-6. and 6-2. 1st singles Bennett (C) d. Anderson (UCLA) 5-7. 7-5. 6-1. 2nd singles Heldman (L ' CLA) d. Newton (C) 6-4, 8-6. 3rd singles ImhofT (C) d. Mclnish (UCLA) 6-4, 7-5. 4th singles Kendis (UCLA) d. Neel (C) 6-3, 6-3. lli singles Coullhard (C) d. Uhl (UCLA) 6-0. 2-6, 6-2. 6lh singles Alloo (C) d. Singer (UCLA) 6-3, 2-6, 9-7. 1st double. Heldman-Mclnish (UC LA) d. Bennett-Newton (C) 6-4. 3-6, 6-4. 2nd doubles Coulthard-Imhoff (C) d. Anderson-Kendis (UCLA) 6-1, 3rd doubles Mever-Neel (C) d. Se- liger-Barker (L ' CLA) 4-6, 6-4, 6-3. SECOND MATCH 1st singles Heldman (UCLA) d. Newton (C) 6-3, 6-0. 2nd tingles MclnUh (UCLA) d. Bennett (C) 4-6. 6-1. 6-4. 3rd singles Imhoff (C) d. Anderson (UCLA) 6-2. 6-1. 4th singles Neel (C) d. Kendis (UC LA) 6-8. 6-1. 6-1. 5th singles Coullhard (C) d. Uhl (UCLA) 6-3, 6-2. 6th singles Singer (UCLA) d. Ta- naka (C) 6-4. 6-4. 1st doubles Bennett-Newton (C) d. Heldman-Anderson (UCLA) 8-6. 6-4. 2nd doubles Imlioff.Coulthard (C) d. Kendis-Mclnish (UCLA) 6-3, 3-6, 6-2. 3rd doubles Singer-Barker (UCLA) d. Regan-Haas (C) 6-4. 7-5. Bennett winds up (or i hvd sem. TROJAN Co- captain Newton stretches for a hard-hit ball as co-captain Bennett looks on. MATCHES THE BEAR NETMEN GAINED an even break against Southern Cali- fornia, defending champions, by turning the tables on the southerners to defeat them 6-3 in the second match after having been defeated by a simi- lar margin in the opening encounter. Rain prevented the completion of the first match with U.S.C. holding a 2-1 lead. The Bears took two out of the three remaining singles matches when the Trojans traveled north to resume play, but were ineffective in the doubles and lost all three matches to make the count 6-3. Knowing that a second defeat at the hands of U.S.C. would virtually eliminate them from the conference race, the Blue and Gold rose to the occasion to overwhelm U.S.C. 6-3. Victories by Newton, Neel, Vetter, and Imhoff gave the Bears a 4-2 lead in the singles, and Newton-Bennett ' s vic- tory over Mako-Hall insured the Bears victory. The victory marked the first triumph over U.S.C. racketmen for the Bears since 1931. FIRST MATCH 111 tingles Mako (SC) .1. Newlon (C) 11-6. 7-5. 2nd tingles Bennett (C) d. Vk ealhrnill (SC) 6-2, 0-6. 6-4. 3rd single: Kneynieyer (SC) d. Neel (C) 4-6, 6-2, 6-0. 111. singles Imhoff (C) d. Hamon (SC) 7-5. 7-5. Sth singles Coullhard (C) d. Nelson (SC) 6-3, 10-6. mh tingles Hall (SC) d. Alloo (C) 3-6. 6-3. 6-4. 1st doubles Mako-Hall (SC) d. Bennett-Newton (C) 1-6, 6-4. 6-3. 2nd doubles Kneymeyer-Weatherall (SC) d. Inihofl- Coulthard (C) 7-5. 3-6. 8-6. 3rd doubles Nelson-Hanson (SC) d. Neel-Meyer (C) 6-3. 6-3. SECOND MATCH 1st s ngles -Mako (SC) d. Bennett (C) 6-0. 6-1. ingles Newton (C) d. Weatherall (SC) 7-5, 4th ingles Imhoff (C) d. Kneymeyer (SC) 6-3. ngles Hanson (SC) d. Tanaka (C) 6-0. 0-6. ngles Neel (C) d. Elson (SC) 4-6, 6-4, 6-4. ngles Veller (C) d. Hall (SC) 6-2. 4-6, 6-3. Hall 6th 1st doubles Bennett-Newton (C) d. Mak 6-2, 10-8. (SC) 2nd doubles Inihoff-Coultliard Weatherall (SC) default. (C) d. Kneyme er- :)rd doubles Hanson-Nelson (SC) d. Vetler-Tanaka 10-8. 6-3. (C) Doug Imhoff Bud Meyer Jack Morrison 327 Imhoff aces Seward to win a crucial point in the deciding match of the first Stanford contest. 328 INDIAN MATCHES FIVE-FOUR VICTORIES IN two thrilling, hard-fought matches over the powerful Stanford tennis team gave the Bears their first conference tennis championship since 1931. In the first encounter played at Palo Alto, victories by Newton, Bennett, and Coulthard evened the score in the singles. Newton and Bennett then proceeded to play sensational tennis to defeat the highly touted doubles combination of Underwood and Palmer 7-5, 7-5 in the first doubles. Coul- thard and Imhoff scored what proved to be the deciding victory by upsetting Seward and Dey, National Collegiate doubles champions, 6-4, 7-5. With the conference championship hinging on the result of the return match at Berkeley, the entire team played inspired tennis to win the first four singles matches and the third doubles to give them the margin of victory. FIRST MATCH SINGLES Newton (C) defeated Lynch (S), 6-4. 4-6. 6-4. Bennett (C) defeated Braley (S), 6-2. 8-6. Seward (S) defeated In, hull (C). 4-6. 6-4. 8-6. Dey (S) defeated Neel (C), 3-6. 7-S. 6-2. Coulthard (C) defeated I ' ommer (S), 8-6, 8-6. Underwood (S) defeated Ml,.., (C), 6-8. 6-3, 6-3. DOUBLES Newton-Bennett (C) defeated Pommer-Underwood (S), 7-5, 7-S. Imlioff-Coultliard (C) defeated Seward-Dey (S). 6-4. 7-S. Braley. Cheitum (S) won by default from Neel-Meyer (C) . SECOND MATCH SINGLES Newton (C) defeated Lynch (S), 6-1, 6-4. Bennett (C) defeated Braley (S), 8-6, 6-1. ImhofT (C) defeated Seward (S), 6-4, 6-0. Neel (C) defeated Dey (S), 4-6, 6-3, 6-4. Underwood (S) defeated Coulthard (C). 6-3. 6-3. I ' ommer (S) defeated Vetter (C). 6-4. 6-4. DOUBLES Dey-Seward (S) defeated Newton- Bennett (C). 10-8, 0-6, 9-7. Tommer-Underwood (S) defeated Regan-Haas (C). 6-3. 6-3. I .in.il. i M, ., . (C) defeated Braley. Chesium (S), 6-2. 6-4. Craig Neel George Tanaka Roger Vetter SE SOH THE 1937 FRESHMAN tennis team upheld the tra- dition of strong yearling net aggregations by going through the season undefeated. Matches against Piedmont High, Alameda High, and San Mateo Junior College were won 9-0, while a 3-2 win was registered over Modesto Junior College when dark- ness halted the completion of the doubles matches. The Freshmen climaxed their season by overwhelm- ing the Stanford first year team 7-2, winning all six singles matches, and the third doubles. Co-captains Boh Harmon and Bob Peacock were undefeated at the number 1 and 2 positions throughout the season, while Moody, Smeltzer, Hoogs, Garrett, and Gibson turned in very credit- able performances. peacock A tense moment of actian In the third doubles match. Harmon and Ptacock ha a little trouble in defeating the first Piedmont High doubles team MINOR SPORTS ' m mm -.% tt b. I California ' s Minor Sportsmen in Action Voorhies, Werson, Norton. Thomson. Wist man, Derr, Wellington. Cunningham. Lawrence, Jenkins, Gniwold. MINOR SPORTS LEADERS 333 334 A VERY SUCCESSFUL swimming season was climaxed by a smashing victory over Stanford, rated as the third strongest team in th e country, for the first win over the Indians in twenty years. California was handicapped at the first of the season by lack of practice when the pool was closed for three weeks due to the flu epidemic. The Bears, after defeating the Athens Club, dropped straight contests to U.C.L.A., Fullerton J.C., and the Olympic Club. The swim- mers then proceeded to break their losing streak by winning from the Athens Club, Occidental, and U.S.C. The Bears ended their season placing second in the Pacific Coast Intercollegiates. The climax of the season was reached against Stanford. Given very little chance to break the Indian ' s long string of victories, the Bears turned in spark- ling individual performances to score upsets in nearly every event and to win 44 to 301 2. Barber in the 50-yard free style, Shields in the 220-yard free style, and Farquhar in diving exceeded their previous best efforts to win their re- spective events, and Werson turned in his usual brilliant race to win the 200- yard breast stroke. The most thrilling race of the day was the last event, the 400-yard relay in which the California team of Prizer, Reimaii, Shields, and Barber upset the powerful Stanford relay team. Without this victory, the Bears could have gotten no better than a tie. M 0 " UNDOUBTEDLY THE GREATEST water polo aggregation ever to represent the Blue and Gold, the Bears enjoyed a highly successful season, losing but two games out of their twelve starts against first-class club and college compe- tition. California took second place in the conference standings behind Stan- ford, with four victories and two defeats. The water poloists swept their preliminary games, winning five contests by decisive margins. Meeting their first Conference opponent, the Bears upset the defending champions from U.C.L.A. by a 5-2 margin. Against the Trojans, they ran up their largest score of the season, smothering the southerners under a 16-1 score. Traveling south for return games with U.C.L.A. and U.S.C., the team met heartbreaking defeat in its first contest with the Uclans, when they were nosed out 4-3 in two overtime periods, the regular game ending at a count of 2-2. After a scoreless first overtime period, U.C.L.A. scored twice in the gathering darkness of the second extra stanza, while the Bears were held to a single goal. The varsity piled up a 14-0 score the next day against U.S.C. to make the trip fifty per cent successful. Meeting Stanford in their own pool, the Bears climbed to a tie for first place in conference standings by vanquishing the powerful Palo Alto team 1-0. In the second and deciding game, the Stanford team rose to great heights to hand the Bears a 4-2 trimming in a hard-fought game. 335 OSlH8 ' C,pt " A mo - " " itk CM . DIVIDING THEIR CONFERENCE scores three ways, the Rugby team tied with U.C.L.A. in their initial contest, defeated U.S.C. 8-4 and tangling with the Indians in the final contest lost 9-0. The Bruin contest saw the Bears get off to an early 3-0 lead when Drnovich tallied, the attempted conversion failing. But the Uclans retaliated near the close of the first half and their conversion gave them a 5-3 margin. Midway in the second half Troxel of the Bruins scored and Peers ' conversion gave the Bruins an 8-3 advantage. Desperately countering late in the final period, Drnovich tallied on a pass from Gale and Sullivan ' s conversion knotted the score. Taking the Trojans by a score of 8-4, the Bear ruggers gained an early 3-0 lead in the initial period when Boone tallied on a dribbling rush. Countering early in the second half the Trojans led by 4-3 after Walsh netted 4 points from a field goal. Outrushing the Southerners the rest of the contest, the Bears scored the winning points when Green went over the line for three points and Sullivan converted. The final contest and also the Conference championship were lost to the Indians when the Bears were blanked 9-0. Featured by the kicking of Wayne Richardson who accounted for the total Indian score, the game saw the Bears trailing 3-0 in the first half and unable to stage an effective rally in the second period. 336 c .,ck Gt. ' WINNING FOUR out of five matches with intercollegiate rivals and showing well in the Pacific Coast Intercollegiate and National Collegiate meets, the Blue and Gold boxing squad had a very successful season in 1937. The Bears opened their season at Stanford where they pounded out an 8-3 victory over the Indian mittmen. Kim, Derr, Glendenning, Wallstrum, Mead, and Thomas scored knockouts over their Stanford rivals, while California ' s only real upset occurred when Pease decisioned Milliron in the 159-pound divi- sion. The Californians also won their second match with the Cardinals, 10-1, featuring knockouts by Derr, Mead, Thomas and Wallstrum. The only defeat of the season was at the hands of Cal Aggies in the second match of the season by a 7-6 score, but the Bears came back later in the year to gain revenge by slugging out a 9-1 decision in a return match and winning in every weight except 139. In their other intercollegiate match of the season, the California battlers defeated the barnstorming Arizona State College ringmen by a score of 4 to 2. This meet was rather uninteresting and there were no knockouts. In the Pacific Coast Intercollegiates, Derr won the championship in the 129- pound class and Captain Wallstrum was runner-up at 149, while Mead, Shell, and Derr were semi-finalists in the National Collegiates which attracted the best boxers from all over the country. Owed Eddi, Nemir 337 ALTHOUGH OPENING the season with a very inexperienced team due to the loss of all but two of last year ' s champions, the Bears lost their first few matches but gradually improved throughout the season, climaxing the year by winning the Conference Intercollegiate Championship for the eighth consecutive time. In the first match of the year, the U.C.L.A. grapplers defeated the Califor- nians 26-8. Lee Benson was the only Berkeleyan to win his bout. Following this defeat, the Bears attempted to take Stanford and Utah, Rocky Mountain Champions, in the same night. They succeeded partially, subduing the Indians 26% to 11, but losing to the Utes 18-16. In the last intercollegiate matches of the year, the Californians eked out a 20-19 victory over the Cal Aggie grapplers. The Bears, at full strength for the first time during the season, won the Con- ference Intercollegiate Championship of the Pacific Coast by upsetting the favored U.C.L.A. team and scoring 35 points while the Bruins finished second with 17. Kikuo Yamamoto at 125, Milton Dalo at 135, Lyman Griswold at 145, Lee Benson at 165, and John Spear, heavyweight, won five of the eight cham- pionships in this meeting in which the best intercollegiate wrestlers on the Pacific Coast competed. 338 THE U.C. WINTER Sports Club ended its second year of existence with a trebled membership. It spon- sored intercollegiate meets at Norden and Cisco, the annual University In- terclass meet and Snow Carnival at Yosemite, and a number of programs showing American and European ski pictures. THE SKI TEAM entered six intercol- legiate meets and placed consistently close to the top. The skiers took sec- ond in the opening meet at Cisco and at Big Pines, and third in the Pacific Coast Intercollegiate Championships at osemite. During the Spring recess, the team split into two groups, one entering the Conference Champion- ships at Mt. Rainier where they placed third, and the remainder of the squad placed second at Norden in the South- ern Section Championships. To wind up the season, the squad beat out Ne- vada for first place at a second meet held at Cisco. E... 339 POUND ' tin. ' ' lust same " the seaso WEIGHT BASKETBALL THE 130-POUND basketball team, coached by Art Hooper, had a mod- erately successful season, winning 11 games while its opponents won 7. Oil a trip through northern California, the ISO ' s defeated Ukiah High but lost to teams representing Willits and Grass Valley highs. The Bears reached the finals in the P.A.A. playoff at Stock- ton, but were downed by the San Francisco Shang Tai team in a hard fought contest. Wellington was the outstanding scorer for the ISO ' s, mak- ing 236 points in 17 games. COACH HARVEY SHIRK ' S 145- pounders enjoyed a very successful season, winning 27 games out of 30 played and scoring 897 points to oppo- nents ' 454. On a barnstorming tour through the southern part of the state they defeated 7 teams in a row, num- bering among their victims Pasadena and Santa Maria Junior Colleges. The 145 ' s emerged from the P.A.A. tourna- ment with the championship in their division after defeating the Nortli Oakland Y.M.C.A. in the finals. 340 and Hall THE BEAR CROSS COUNTRY squad won all four dual meets, defeat- ing U.C.L.A., San Mateo J.C., San Jose State, and Stanford. The first three opponents were vanquished by wide margins, while the Stanford vic- tory was by a single point. California took four out of the first seven places to defeat the Indian distance runners for the first time in a number of years. Captain Voorhies, Hall, Mehl- ert, Lawrence, and Baker, were out- standing for the Bears. THE SOCCER TEAM scored seven victories and one tie to win the Pacific Coast championship, defeating San JoseState and Stanford twice, U.C.L. A. and San Mateo once, and against U.S.F. winning once and drawing once. Also worthy of praise was their tie with the powerful H.M.S. Appolo British soccer team in a non-confer- ence game. The most noteworthy per- formances during the season were turned in by Captain Norton, Mu- sante, O ' Doiinell, and Aboitiz. SOCCER Pauls 341 THE GOLF TEAM emerged victo- rious in their first two matches, defeat- ing Modesto J.C. 6-3 and San Mateo J.C. 6 l 2 -2y 2 . The golfers entered the intercollegiates at Del Monte where medals were won by Captain McLene- gan and Oliver. Meeting a well bal- anced aggregation from Stanford, the Bears went down to defeat by a score of 2314-31 2. Contests with U. C. L. A. and Pomona were scheduled, but can- celed due to conflicting dates. Top men during the season were Stimac, McLenegan, and Berg. THE BEAR FENCERS opened their season by finishing second to Stanford by one bout in the Heron Trophy matches and defeating Olympic Club, Funke ' s Academy and San Francisco Y.M.C.A. Following these, the Cali- fornians repeated their victory over Funke ' s but lost to Stanford 17-8. The Epee team avenged this defeat with a Z ' -Vz victory over the Indian Epee wielders. Walt Westman was the out standing performer throughout the year. B ' iitt. 342 DURING THE 1937 handball season, the California squad won six and lost five of the matches in which they played, including encounters with U.S.C. and U.C.L.A., which were the first intercollegiate matches ever played by a California handball team. Traveling to Los Angeles during Easter vacation, the Bears defeated the Trojan team 4-2 but fell before the hard hitting Bruin varsity by an 8-6 score. Captain Harry Bouquet was outstanding for his play throughout the season. THE VARSITY GYMNASTIC team opened its season with an overwhelm- ing 81-9 victory over the Stanford team. Following this victory, the Bears traveled to Los Angeles where they were defeated in a triangular meet with U.S.C. and U.C.L.A. In a return contest with the Bruins and Trojans the Bears again finished third al- though showing great improvement over the previous meeting. Captain Cunningham won the P.A.A. tumbling championship in the P.A.A. meet. to " 1 ' p c a$e. 343 INTRAMURAL S P R T S 345 3 SSS al dto leadt. ate e 346 347 ALPHA SIGMA PHI, FOOTBALL CHAMPIONS B ck Row: Wndrum, Barney, Teskey, Witzel, Bolitno. Front Row: Murray, Steponoilch, Roblson, Glassley, Rogers. TOPPING A SUCCESSFUL season of iii- terf raternity tackle football competition with a win over the contenders for the league championship, the Alpha Sigs suc- ceeded in nosing out Navy by one point for the attainment of the University title. Vanquishing the Phi Belts 18 to 0, the Alpha Sigs played scoreless ties against Delta Chi and Xi U. They beat Kappa Delta Rho by a 6 to score and moved into playoff position. The Fijis went down before the attack 13 to 7, making the Alpha Sigs the Greek leaders. A hard-pressed game against Navy, the American League leaders, resulted in a 6 to 6 tie at the end of the regular period, the deciding point being played off in a four-down series to determine superior ground gainage. WITH HOISTED anchor and full steam up, Navy sailed out at the beginning of the Intramural touch football season with the University championship as its destination. Meeting Forestry a few days out, they engaged the enemy and sunk them 12 to 6. Casa de la Jolla, Newman Club, and Miners were next to go down under the heavy shelling, the scores standing in favor of the Navy, 14 to 0, 12 to 0, and 6 to respectively when the smoke cleared away. The deciding encounter for American League supremacy was played against Forestry, Navy sweeping the league seas clear by an 18 to 6 vic- tory. The University championship playoff was held against Theta Delta Chi, Inter- fraternity Champions. Trailing at the half by 6 points resulting from a blocked kick and recovery behind their goal, Navy opened up with its big guns in the second half and outmanoeuvered the foe for a 12 to 6 win, thereby sailing off with University honors. NAVY. TOUCH FOOTBALL CHAMPIONS Back Row: Koford, Hoefer, Daggett, Loring, Pirag. Middle Row: Lundgren, Bowker, Boyd, Snyder, I (coach). Front Row: Ash, Lawson (cant.), Schweizer, Wells. PI KAPPA ALPHA, BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS Back Row: Ferguson, Sparks, Gorman. Front Row: O ' Malley, Macdonald, Phelan, Wheeler. PASSING AND DRIBBLING their way through the Interfraternity Basketball League, the Pi Kappa Alphas sank a long shot by meeting and downing Forestry, the American League champions, and walking off the floor with the University championship. Playing only one league game during the fall semester, the Pi K A ' s won from the Del Reys 30 to 20. Opening the spring season with a 15 to 13 victory over Phi Sigma Kappa, they continued their win- ning streak at the expense of the Fijis, Theta Xis and the Betas, the scores being 22 to 19, 26 to 11, and 23 to 22 respec- tively. In the last game of the season, Pi Kappa Alpha d efeated the Foresters 27 to 21 to decide the University champion- ship. DELTA UPSILON Track Champions Back Raw: Franklin, Breeden, Biggerstaff, Gaither. Hawley. Front Row: Milter, Boyd, Oli.et, Shurtlelf. IN THE INTRAMURAL TRACK meet, held on March 30 and 31, the boys of the Delta Upsilon fraternity, holders of the Faculty Trophy for Intramural Track, rightfully retained title to it for another year by reason of their outstanding victory. Garnering 31 points in the course of the day, they were approached only by Navy, whose total was 24.2. Following in third and fourth positions were Forestry with 21.5 points and Beta Theta Pi with 20.2. Fifth place was taken by Psi Upsilon with 19.2 points; sixth by Phi Delta Tau with 13 points; seventh by Alpha Delta Phi with 12.2 points; eighth by Phi Gamma Delta with 12 points; ninth by Theta Delta Chi with 11.2 points; tenth by Kappa Sigma with 11 points; eleventh by Sigma Nu with 10 points; twelfth by the Japanese with 4 points; and last place by Chi Psi with 1.5 points. Despite the fact that members of both the Freshman and the Varsity track teams are barred from entering the competition, some good distances and times were turned in. Timber-topping was demonstrated by the For- esters when they won the low hurdles in the time of 14.9 seconds. Navy showed its strength in the 150 yard dash, being clocked at 15.7 seconds, while the broad jump went to the Foresters at 19 feet, 5 inches. STROKING THEIR WAY down the Oakland estuary on November 10 to the shrill bark of Coxswain Swanson, Forestry went over the line to victory and the American League Crew Championship. The Navy, Chemistry, and Harrington Hall boats trailed the winners in order. Skimming along at a lively clip all the way, the Foresters seemed to gather confidence under the steadying influence of Berkenkamp, Dodge, and Rocca, all experienced Varsity oarsmen. Two days after the American League race, the Theta Delta Chi shell left the Phi Kappa Psis and the Alpha Delta Phis bobbing in its wake to capture the National League honors. The victors sprinted into the lead at the start and, despite the occasional catching of crabs, led the aggregation the entire distance. THETA DELTA CHI Crew Champions Back Row: Peters, H de- fer. Daggett. Brown, J., Lapham. Front Row: Mur- ray, Brown, G . Burford, Anderson. Football, Boxing, Ping-Pong, Gymnastics, Wrestling, and Fencing are among the sports in the intramural program. INTRAMURAL SPORTSMI T I M 350 CHARLES MILLS G A Y L E Y ORGANIZATIONS In every institution uniting great numbers of individuals there evolve in the course of time many groups of persons with common interests. Ends otherwise unattainable are realized through the cooperation made possible by these associations. The University itself feels their influence,- they are a part of student life. The fellowship of the boarding house, the fraternity, and the society is an inestimable part of college life... and an unforgettable memory. % FRATERNITIES A B R A A A A - r Wt ' 3B is 4 - E Blo;ser Harmon Landis McAuley Norton Skeels Smith, W. Stable Stone Van Fleet Franklin Hall Honnold Reese Adam Cayot Dorr LeCount Manning Robinson. D. Taylor Twining Wulffraat Andersen Conrad Robinson, W. Smith, R. Thompson Walker 2425 RIDGE ROAD. FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1895 ONE CHAPTER UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Louis G. Baker Robert G. Sproul Ellsworth F. Quinlan Frank M. Spurrier Robert M. Underbill GRADUATES SENIORS John A. Blosser Richard H. Fowler Robert A. Harmon Richard M. Landis David W. McAuley Ernest L. Miller Thomas W. Caldecott Donald L. Grunsky Melvin G. Kidder Leonard K. Norton Colman Schwartz Weldon H. Smith John H. Stable Norris C. Stone William M. Van Fleet H. Stewart Kimball Henry L. Knight ward H. Twining SOPHOMORES Kenneth D. Adam Ramon F. Cayot John W. Dorr Charles W. Le Count William T. R. Manning, Jr. Dunlap R. Robinson George J. Taylor Lyle Turner Fred N. Twining Arnold T. Wulffraat JUNIORS Harry L. Franklin Richard E. Hall Harold L. Honnold, Jr. Llewellyn H. Reese John H. Skeeh 352 FRESHMEN Thorvald J. Andersen Benjamin D. Conrad, Jr. Robert W. Hansen Webster R. Robinson Richard C. Smith Winthrop E. Thompson Robert H. Walker c I Symmes Sweetser Maloy Wall i AT 2340 PIEDMONT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1904 CALIFORNIA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1905 TWENTY-SEVEN CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Edwin D. Dickinson B. L. Robertson Charles F. Shaw F. H. Swift SENIORS SOPHOMORES Hiram N. Bishop, Jr. E. Ralph Brian Harry J. Cartwright Philip H. Farley Felix Karrer Otto W. Schrader Fred Sperber James G. Standley, Jr. Edward W. Bowes George A. Donatello William D. Edwards Robert W. Maloy William A. Tope Ernest C. Twisselmann .HMOUS Harry J. Carpenter Leonidas T. Petersen George P. Sutton Emery B. Sweetser Richmond G. Wilson FRESHMEN Robert S. Ayer Robert F. Duttle Robert H. Morrin Fredrick D. Stuthman Robert E. Symmes Myron Sharman Wall 353 ALPHA C H I S I G M A Lowman Williams Burnham Donaldson Grundy Newton Sunderlin Caley Campbell Carlton Davis. J. Davis, 0. Fisk Hall Huldrum McDonald Mayes Nelson, R. Nelson, W. Saunders Seymoure Shaw Vogtmann Brewster Daiis. G. Harrington Kemper Moore Calkins Martin Weber 2627 VIRGINIA STREET. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN, 1902 SIGMA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED IN 1913 FIFTY-TWO CHAPTERS Frank W. Allen Herman J. Almquist Walter C. Blasdale Gerald E. K. Branch UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Arthur U. Christie William J. Cruess Erman D. Eastman Franklin T. Green Joel H. Hildebrand Paul L. Kirk Wendell M. Latimer Gilbert N. Lewis Gerhard K. Rollefson T. Dale Stewart Alan C. Nixon Axel R. Olson Charles W. Porter Merle Randall GRADUATES Louis A. Blanc John E. Booher Oliver L. Brown C. Gerald Clear George H. Denison, Jr. SENIORS Hugh D. Burnham Harold E. Donaldson Eric G. Grundy Harry L. Heckel JUNIORS J. Lester Caley S. Kelly Campbell G. Jasper Carlton Orris Davis John G. Davis Frank Fisk William G. Hall George W. Huldrum Jack Vogtmann Thomas C. Doody John J. Eiler Dorr H. Etzler Ralph S. Halford Irving H. Isenberg Don Newton Russell S. Sunderlin Francis T. Tymstra Hugh B. Zartman Maiden C. Lowman Edward Mayes John McDonald Ralph E. Nelson William N. Nelson Paul R. Saunders Sidney Seymoure Charles Shaw George H. Learned, Jr. Donald D. Lee F. Eugene Lindquist Fred Lorenz hn Lyman Nello Pace Glenn T. Seaborg Carl M. Smith Paul H. Williams Clarence F. Winchester SOPHOMORES Earl G. Brewster Grover Davis Ambrose F. Gegan Walter D. Harrington Conley Kemper Robert Moore FRESHMEN William H. Calkins Noel Martin William G. Weber 354 TA P H I H A Ci r hj r..j ... Bruzzone Burgess Goodwin Haas Norton Johnson, M. Law Poat Goss Gottlieb Ingham Jackson Van Slcklen Blodget Dorn Grady Krenz Hayes Hewitt Johnson, S. Smith, S. Stout Thelen, H. Applegarth Briggs Selfridge Uren (an Loben Sets Woolsey Cooper FoRansbee Frick Leonard Matthew Meads Powell Schaefler Smith, A. Lisser Murray Skewes-Cox Stock Terry Thelen, M. Harding Gibson Stevens Tremoureui Wadsworth Woolams 2401 RIDGE ROAD. FOUNDED AT HAMILTON COLLEGE, 1832 CALIFORNIA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1908 THIRTY-FOUR CHAPTERS Herbert M. Evans Thomas H. Goodspeed UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Emerson Holbrook Dr. Hans Lisser Frank L. Kleeberger Deming G. Maclise Fletcher H. Swift G. D. Mallory Paul P. Michael SENIORS SOPHOMORES Louis Bruzzone Peter D. Burgess Willard E. Goodwin Walter A. Haas, Jr. William A. Hewitt Stanley Johnson Leslie D. Joynes Francis L. Leupp Stephen L. Smith Gregory S. Stout Henry M. Thelen JUNIORS Allen S. Applegarth William C. Briggs William T. Harding Ovid B. Horton Murrey M. Johnson Robert D. Law, Jr. Robert L. Nelson Arthur A. Poat, Jr. John S. Selfridge, Jr. Donald E. Uren Wilfred E. van Loben Sels Payson S. Woolsey John S. Cooper Merrill M. Follansbee, Jr. Robert P. Frick Harry R. Gibson, Jr. F. Ferrier Goss Robert G. Gottlieb Theodore A. Ingham Harry A. Jackson Walter R. Krenz FRESHMEN Lee Blodget Jackson G. Dorn Reginald Grady Calder Hayes Allan C. Lisser William P. Murray, Jr. Sherman J. Leonard Ronald Matthew Manson Meads Stanley Powell, Jr. James G. Schaeffer, Jr. Alan K. Smith Samuel P. Stevens Roy C. Tremoureux James H. Van Sicklen Bennet Skewes-Cox John P. Stock Ray M. Terry Max Thelen, Jr. Joseph H. Wadsworth, Jr. Leonard A. Woolams, Jr. 355 ALPHA GAMMA R H Bales, F. Bales, J. McMillen Bennett Burmester Emmert Gotzenberg Powell Putnam Smith Voland Cornwall Higgins Lawson Merrill Palmer Paulson Permenter Perry Voris Huxtable Oxford Robinson Stevenson Deadrick Lindstrom Lundgren Pfeifle 2735 HASTE STREET. FOUNDED AT OHIO UNIVERSITY, 1904 CHI CHAPTER ESTABLISHED IN 1923 THIRTY-ONE CHAPTERS B UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Maynard Amerine Emil M. Mrak E. O. Essig GRADUATES Forrest H. Bales James C. Bales Lester H. Grant Donald F. McMillen SENIORS J. Franklin Bennett Conrad M. Burmester Francis C. Emmert Andrew Gotzenberg Norman Harris Jonathan S. Powell Neil H. Putnam Sheldon W. Smith Charles J. Voland, Jr. JUNIORS Milton H. Beecher William A. Cornwall Walter K. Higgins John Danie l Lawson John F. Merrill Harold O. Palmer Owen D. Paulson Paul Permenter John E. Perry Jack G. Smith Robert M. Voris ' Absent on leave. SOPHOMORES Homer W. Huxtable Charles O. Oxford Egbert M. Robinson Robert L. Stevenson John A. Deadrick, III Allan J. Lindstrom FRESHMEN Arthur E. Lundgren William S. Pfeifle 356 A L I 1 H A K A I ' r A LAMBDA Batkin Brown Burton Ooxsee Latham McDowell Morris Rider Holmes, F. Johnson Mclaughlin Nelson Culver Daugherty Etcheverry Holmes, C. Fiedler Karr King Lady Robertson Smith, B. Brumbaugh Coffman Palmer Peabody Smith, J. Ades McGirk Bradley Brockett Parker Spaan 2701 HEARST AVENUE. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1914 ALPHA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1914 TEN CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES James T. Allen William R. Dennes William B. Herms Robert T. Legge Samuel C. May Walter S. Morley SENIORS SOPHOMORES Fred A. Batkin C. Lloyd Brown William W. Burton Earl D. Doxsee Wendell M. Fiedler Paul R. Fosnott Robert J. Herwig Eugene C. Johnson H. M. Karr Robert M. King Kenneth E. Lady James R. Latham Robert H. McDowell William E. Morris, Jr. Bruce A. Rider Robert C. Robertson Bradstreet P. Smith Lucius R. Ades Robert G. Culver Audie A. Daugherty Robert E. Etcheverry Carl A. Holmes Donald D. McGirk JUNIORS George U. Brumbaugh Waldo H. Coffman B. Dorland Drury Fred W. Holmes Charles H. Johnson Kistler Wagy Absent on leave. Arthur R. McLaughlin Robert E. Nelson Fred H. Palmer Frank E. Peabody James E. Smith FRESHMEN Lawrence F. Bradley J. D. Brockett James L. Garrett Karl A. Parker Harry C. Spaan 357 ALPHA SIGMA P H Barker Barney Beebe Blackford Glassley Miller Murray Warner Wirgler Woodrum Davis Edmonston Knowles Rader Doane Foulkes Gregory Musladin Pearl Steponovich Vokoun Elkins Farrell Long Longwell Morrison Ragan Roseland Rogers Robison Bolitho Wertsch Teskey Teasdale Crowe Witzel 2739 CHANNING WAY. FOUNDED AT YALE UNIVERSITY, 1845 NU CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1913 THIRTY-THREE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Eldridge J. Best Andrew J. Carlson John W. Gregg Alfred A. Solomon William Higgins Benedict F. Raber Charles H. Raymond GRADUATES F. Arthur Harris Lloyd R. Swift SENIORS William T. Barker Howard J. Barney John D. Beebe Robert H. Blackford H. Boyd Gainor Fred B. Glassley G. Winton Jones JUNIORS Gerald M. Allen, Jr. Philip S. Breck Guy R. Davis Nin J. Edmonston Thomas K. Miller William H. Murray Stephen J. Rogers A. Douglas Teskey Jack F. Warner Louis A. Wirgler, Jr. Donald Woodrum Robert W. Knowles Ralph D. Rader William H. Robison Walter E. Teasedale Dudley F. Zoller 358 SOPHOMORES Howard R. Cuyler William L. Musladin John F. Doane Dugan H. Pearl William O. Foulkes John B. Steponovich Waldron A. Gregory Joseph F. Vokoun, Jr. George L. Vonderheide, Jr. FRESHMEN George L. Bolitho Douglas S. Crowe Sam Elkins Robert F. Farrell John B. Long John P. Longwell Milton Morrison Edward M. Ragan Payson Roseland Robert A. Wertsch Everett M. Witzel A L I 1 H A MEGA Gawthrop Cornell Westman Moses Heizer Danford Wilder Prentiss Boggs Easley Bergh Stoll Jones Gottlieb Collins Barker Lester Hanson Craig Edwards Pettis Hazen, C. Foster Kotok Post Kerr Gester Raney Pulas Kitts Hazen, W. Rocca Sawyer Peery Henck Searls Stuard Smith Jaques Stone Bolton Sutclitfe Jordan Tilney 2465 LECONTE AVENUE. FOUNDED AT VIRGINIA MILITARY ACADEMY, 1865 GAMMA IOTA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1900 NINETY-FIVE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Stanley Cosby Carroll M. Ebright Oliver W. Washburn GRADUATES Howard E. Gawthrop Robert F. Heizer SENIORS Frank S. Boggs, Jr. J. Paul Jones L. Melvin Lester John A. Pettis, Jr. JUNIORS Harry R. Bolton George E. Cornell Warren L. Danford Claudius M. Easley, Jr. Ted M. Gottlieb Robert T. Hanson Charles L. Hazen Robert S. Kerr Absent on leave. Charles T. Post Theodore P. Pulas, Jr. John B. Sawyer Harry E. Stuard James W. Kitts Charles S. Peery Paul D. Rea Robert W. Smith Paul Sutcliffe George R. Tolson Walter D. Westman Donald M. Wilder SOPHOMORES Emil M. Bergh Frank C. Collins Owen J. Craig Winslow J. Foster, Jr. Howell W. Gester Wayne C. Hazen William E. Stoll FRESHMEN Joseph P. Henck Louis Jaques, Jr. Robert H. Jordan William P. Moses Wilbur G. Neel Vernon Prentiss Loring M. Barker Charles H. Edwards Edward S. Kotok Marksbury G. Raney Andrew H. Rocca. Ji Niles I. Searls Robert C. Stone Ralph B. Tilney 359 B W H A f Agern Allen Andersen Appleby Birch Brubaker Craig Hazleton Henderson Henley Hodges Johnson Kahn Lavenson Marsh Sehauer Trams Van de Kamp Walsh Adams Armer Barnett Bunch Day Gygu Hammer Hastings Hewes Huff Hunkins Kildare SENIORS SOPHOMORES Alden T. Agern DeWitt C. AUen Andrew H. Andersen Jack J. Appleby Dwight C. Birch George P. Brubaker, Jr. Grover V. Clark Maurice B. Clark, Jr. William E. Craig, Jr. David E. Debeau Robert B. Engle Harry N. Harps Charles E. Hazleton Robert W. Henderson Thomas B. Henley James R. Hodges George R. Johnson Myer S. Kahn Robert G. Lavenson Donald M. Levy Harry L. Marsh Earl A. Miller Thomas H. Morrin Ward C. Orvis Lorin E. Peck Carter J. Rogers John J. Sehauer, Jr. Foster H. Sherwood WUliam G. Slade Marshall Steel, Jr. Morse A. Travers William Van de Kamp Joseph F. Walsh Bruce Waybur Don Anderson Sterling H. Crouch Charles S. Dever, Jr. Vernon Ellsworth Glenn W. Foor William E. Grenfell Robert R. Haussler Frederic G. Humphrey Richard K. Hurwitz Francis L. Lucchetti Louis W. Sander Byron B. Snyder Boyd W. Walker Donald E. Wilkins J. Roger Wollenberg 360 () W H A .4 - Nelson, W.W. Newcomb Ostrom Palmer. J. Pichetto Priest Shomate Tetrick Thomas Thompson Tregonis Ward Way Anderson Grenfell Haussler Humphrey Hurwitz Lucchetti Snyder Walker Wilkins Haas Hook Lewis Moodie Palmer, R. Porter Rebok Rodda Reher Reiman Robertson Crouch Dever Ellsworth Poor Wallenberg Cleland Davis Gribkoft Saling Sharp Wallace Weaver ft! n " ' jr. FRESHMEN JUNIORS Thomas F. Cleland Irving F. Davis, Jr. E. Yale Dawson George P. Gribkoff Peter J. E. Haas Chester C. Hook Jack F. Lewis Forrest D. Moodie Robert H. Palmer Robert T. Porter Donald C. Rebok Gordon F. Rodda Frederick E. Saling Robert G. Sharp Donald E. Wallace John E. Weaver Edward E. Adams Charles C. Armer George J. Barnett Allison C. Brooks Paul S. Bunch William R. Cato Frederick W. Clayton Edgar B. Cole William E. Conway Joel B. Coulter Justin M. Day Felix X. Gygax Julius P. Hammer Paul T. Hastings Gordon W. Hewes Hilton H. Huff Charles F. Hunkins William E. Kildare Stanley E. McCaffrey James C. Medcalf Henry B. Murphy William B. Nelson William W. Nelson Carleton A. Newcomb, Jr. Charles D. Y. Ostrom, Jr. Jack Palmer Peter B. Pichetto Bill J. Priest Robley C. Reher Talbert N. Reiman David J. Robertson Charles F. Rosenthal Eugene L. Scherer Edwin M. Shomate Samuel L. Taylor Arthur K. Tetrick Gail E. Thomas Irwin S. Thompson Verne M. Tregonis Heinz L. Waldthausen, Jr. Robert O. Ward Howard L. Way 361 B A H R D Bonds MacKinnon Meyer Kemp Marsh Schionnemann Sinton Berriman Mesak Wells 1 N 2519 COLLEGE AVENUE. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1894 ONE CHAPTER UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Dr. F. C. Cordes Edwin Duerr SENIORS Marvin T. Bonds Willis T. MacKinnon Robert C. Meyer SOPHOMORES Laurence R. Berriman Charles Mesak Warren Vanderbilt JUNIORS Leslie M. Lincoln Charles A. Kemp Fred G. Marsh Eric Schionnemann James B. Sinton Glenn S. Waterman FRESHMAN John Arthur Wells 362 II E T A H A i Brand Busby Chester de Fremery Eddy Comstock Coulthard Forrest Gock Hill Smith Steckmest Sweetland Wheeler Cleary Sharp Soule Viney Ziegler Allen Goodin Johnson Laurent Hogan Kent Lamson Eastman Graham Howat Alston Freeborn Jones Reed Ross Wells Allen Langmaid Posey Putnam Rlcker Keane Milliken O ' Flaherty Powell Lehman Lelghton McKibben Traiers Bryan Shields Rue Umphred Wilson 2607 HEARST AVENUE. FOUNDED AT MIAMI UNIVERSITY, OXFORD, OHIO, 1839 OMEGA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1879 EIGHTY-NINE CHAPTERS B. H. Bronson R. T. Fishe r SENIORS Wilbur F. Brand Jr. John W. Britton J. Elden Busby Spencer T. Chester William H. deFremery James D. Eddy JUNIORS " Thomas N. Allen John R. Bryan William D. Comstock W. Tale Coulthard Gaylord T. Forrest Richard A. Gock Edward J. Halloran Jr. Robert S. Hill Thomas P. Hogan Thomas J. Kent Jr. Baldwin G. Lamson Frank I. Langmaid H. R. Hatfield H. C. Moffitt UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES E. C. Van Dyke C. A. Ramm E. G. Smith G. M. Stratton N. L. Taliaferro GRADUATES Robert B. Bias W. Sterling Gorrill Hiram W. Johnson, III Charles J. Leighton Arthur E. Sugden R. Bruce Wachob Vernon L. Goodin Philip B. Johnson James M. Laurent Irving J. Reed D. Campbell Ross Robert C. Wells Gordon W. McKellips George M. Posey Whitfield Putnam Jr. Richard Ricker Ralph W. Robinson Jr. James G. Shields Jr. Rodney D. Smith Francis W. Steckmest William E. Sweetland William E. Umphred Robert M. Walsh Charles S. Wheeler, III SOPHOMORES Frank W. Cleary William M. Eastman Chester E. Graham J. Clark Howat Gerrit L. Keane Arthur W. Milliken Karl F. Ziegler FRESHMEN David W. Allen Edwin F. Alston Stanley B. Freeborn Jr. Delbert A. Jones Harold Lehman Terry O ' Flaherty James R. Powell Frank G. Rue Jack C. Sharp Edward L. Soule Robert M. Viney Richard M. Leighton David T. McKibben Donald E. Travers Lee A. Umphred Jess C. Wilson Absent on leave. 363 c H I H I Berry Carlson Huey Clarke Dallam Burns Cooper Elliott, R. Hollister Regan Riley Butler Leonard Nickel Bean Edbrooke Elliott, T. Fletcher Gardiner Juch Lord Lynde Roberts Stone Watts Boone Law Moore Reed, G. Reed, J. Smith Swartz Van Home 2529 HEARST AVENUE. FOUNDED AT PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, 1824 LAMBDA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1875 THIRTY-FOUR CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATE P. S. Taylor SENIORS SOPHOMORES William B. Berry Arthur E. Burns, Jr. Joseph W. Cooper, Jr. Roy H. Elliott, Jr. John F. Hollister Donald C. Ralston William E. Regan Ralph W. Riley JUNIORS Ralph H. Butler Jr. William E. Carlson Raymond A. Leonard, Jr. George W. Nickel Alfred G. Bean Stanley W. Edbrooke George S. Edwards Thornton W. Elliott Harold A. Fletcher, Jr. W. Douglas Gardiner Harris Huey Robert Juch Thomas B. Lord Albert W. Lynde, Jr. Jerome R. Roberts John D. Snook Ward H. Stone Donald R. Watts FRESHMEN Philip S. Boone Thomas Clarke Welwyn Dallam, Jr. D. Warner Law M. Joseph Moore Gladstone Reed Jerome Reed K. Hart Smith Burton Swartz Jr. Garrett Van Home ' Absent on leave. 364 C H I I li M A Alderson Innes Purirs Webster Brown McLean Mallard Barleau Burke Deeter Scott Smith Stevens Gibson McCready Martin Mendes Roddick Countryman Firstenberger Hubbard Stoughton Tuttle Reich Echols Thomas Stone 2405 PROSPECT STREET. FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ALPHA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED IN 1921 THREE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES George E. Gibson A. O. Larhman Lawrence G. Saywell SENIORS SOPHOMORES W. Howard Alderson Robert E. Barieau Robert D. Bethel Alfred L. Burke Wendell F. Deeter Richard H. Felter Lowell W. Firstenberger Byron R. Hubbard JUNIORS Harrison S. Brown John W. Gibson Newton McCready William B. Innes George G. Purvis Thomas M. Scott Kenneth J. Smith John R. Stevens Raymond W. Stoughton John E. Tuttle Raymond C. Webster Traver S. Martin Louis Oleari Ray Reich James W. McLean Paul Mallard Douglas Roddick Frank Mendes Ralph Merritt FRESHMEN Kirk Collins David Countryman Robert E. Echols James Sheran Wilbur B. Thomas Farrol Stone Absent on leave. 365 I Bernsten Sherman Rath Ambrose Dodge Cooper Sweet Brant Forbes Falk Barry Clune Hexberg Ferrier, P. Brewer Ford Hodge Haldeman Eadie Halloran Jessee Holland Ferrier, H. Lange toy Hurlburt Kellar Milton McArthur Kennedy McConnell Ursin McWhorter McMillin Peck Pabst Moore Woods 2311 PIEDMONT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT UNION COLLEGE, 1841 ALPHA DELTA DELTA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1895 TWENTY-FIVE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATE William Ferrier SENIORS SOPHOMORES William C. Ambrose Elmer J. Brant William C. Clune Talbot Evans Richard Ford JUNIORS Jack Beck H. Kellogg Bernsten A. Sherwood Dodge Wilson R. Forbes C. Russell Hexberg William C. Hodge Richard Grattan Hobart R. Halloran J. Conradi Lange William C. Milton Edmund E. Ursin Albert W. Jessee Milton E. Loy Lewis L. McArthur Kenneth D. McCloskey John H. McWhorter Edmund G. Pabst John F. Cooper Sands G. Falk Philip K. Ferrier Horace Haldeman Robert J. Holland Robert A. Hurlburt Laurence J. Kennedy Rollin B. Moore D. Claibourne McMillin John S. Rath Gilbert H. Sweet FRESHMEN Roger M. Sherman Edward L. Barry Chauncey M. Brewer Robert M. Eadie Hugh W. Ferrier Clayton S. Kellar Douglas D. McConne Edward F. Peck Baldwin Wood 366 i) Rlehl Butler Caldwell SeLeiue.C.B. Shell, H. E. Shell, S. A. Balfrty, W. Balfrey, S. Grant Lewis Nord Hayes Hudspeth Humphreys McCarthy Carlton Floyd Brown Cloyd SeLegue.D.F. Weems Marshall Myers Lish Greenfield Dernier Robinson Rose Hassard Emerson Scott Schweitzer Pendleton Gleeson Semas Turner Hawley Tout 1727 EUCLID AVENUE. FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1904 ONE CHAPTER UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES J. B. Brown R. C. Chandler Charles Foster, Sr. Claire Funk W. R. Ralston L. J. Scott GRADUATES SENIORS Leonard D. Butler Hugh F. Caldwell Richard Carlin Robert B. Carlton Warren DeGuire Joe W. Floyd JUNIORS William A. Balfrey Jonathan B. Brown Watson W. Greenfield Absent on leave. Roger Burum Robert Neill Philip A. Lish Elman J. Rose Frank J. Schweitzer Charles B. SeLegue Horace E. Shell Stanley A. Shell Robert F. Hassard James E. Pendleton, Jr. Don A. Turner Louis Riehl William Sharp SOPHOMORES Stanley J. Balfrey William A. Lewis Everett M. Chandler Bernard N. Nord Charles R. Grant David F. SeLegue Gordon C. Weems FRESHMEN William R. Cloyd Edison J. Demler Linton L. Emerson, Jr. James Leonard Gleeson James B. Hawley Robert Hayes William A. Hudspeth E. LaVerne Tout Charles K. Humphreys William Marshall Francis G. McCarthy James Myres William B. Robinson Dennis L. Scott Virgil Semas 367 D A H Barg Fenton Francis Mizulo Parker Rattenbury Richter Shelltiammer Steienson Vieira Brown Fulmer Holbrook Johnston Kerrigan Kilpatric Lindberg Mason Murray Rohwcr Jepsen Hedgpeth Morlan Watkins Anderson Brooks Dobey Harvey Howells Ryerson Button 2200 PIEDMONT A NIVERSITY, 1890 SENIORS Fred B. Barg Lowell Del Fenton William J. F. Francis John Mizulo V. Dale Vieira CALIFORNIA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1910 THIRTY-FIVE CHAPTERS Robert G. Parker Clifton F. Rattenbury Thomas A. Shellhammer Hamilton R. Stevenson SOPHOMORES Forrest A. DuBois Edward P. Jepson, Jr. Samuel M. Hedgpeth, Jr. Robert G. Morlan Ralph S. Watkins, Jr. JUNIORS Kenneth M. Brown Karl P. Buck Paul D. Fulmer Wallace E. Holbrook Daniel S. Johnston Howard W. Kerrigan Othel A. Kilpatric, Jr. John E. Lindberg, Jr. Robert H. Mason William H. Murray Lester D. Rohwer FRESHMEN Arthur R. Anderson Fred R. Brooks Kenneth J. Dobey James Downs Benton Harvey, Jr. Harold W. Howells J. Wilton Ryerson J. Blaine Sutton 368 E L T A K A I 1 P A E P S I L N Brown Ashby Bell Griffith Jones Young Andrews Harrold Dexter Joses Brinkman Kiesel McClure Eckart Heise LeFeaver MacBride Ebright Moody Moflitt Allen Newson Moore Paulsen A.enah Nutt Richardson Reed Castro Vail Smith Reynolds Cole Warner Wilder 2302 PIEDMONT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT YALE UNIVERSITY, 1844 THETA ZETA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED IN 1876 FORTY-SEVEN CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES H. W. Ballantine C. G. Hyde R. S. Minor GRADUATES Richard Belcher, III Clifford M. Todd SENIORS Hubert L. Brown Herbert F. Harrold John L. Jones Ogden Kiesel Stuart L. McClure Herbert C. Moffitt, Jr. B. Regnar Paulsen Ben W. Reed, Jr. ' Frank H. Reynolds Alexander Wilson, III SOPHOMORES H. Williams Allen Peter A. Avenali Alexander H. Castro Nathaniel B. Cole Edward M. Griffith Roy T. Jones Robert M. Joses James H. LeFeaver, Jr. Robert B. MacBride Sidney A. Newson John W. Nutt Milton R. Vail Seth Warner Charles H. Young JUNIORS Richard A. Ashby Donald L. Bell Dudley Dexter, Jr. Absent on leave. William N. Eckart Edward D. Heise J. Hubert Mee, Jr. FRESHMEN William S. Andrews Paul F. Brinkman Charles B. Ebright Douglas M. Moody David W. Moore John A. Richardson Morrison M. Smith Alvin D. Wilder, Jr. 369 DELTA T A U E L T A Beechley Clark, E. H. Connelly Knox Madison Parrish Welty Wilcox Geiger Gibson Gregory Hatch Lorinq Palamountain Richards Spott Surge Calhoun Church Gay Hooper Huston Marshall Mitchell Wigley Wilkinson Andrews Clark, W. H. Gaddis Hamilton Haugh Mclnerny Woolley.L.W. Worthington Strong, A. Woolley, M. Peterson Strong, K. Mayer Whitehead 2425 HILLSIDE AVENUE. FOUNDED AT BETHANY COLLEGE, 1859 BETA OMEGA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1898 SEVENTY-SIX CHAPTERS I UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES D. C. Duncan Francis S. Foote Brutus Hamilton George H. Hart Frank L. Kelly Armin O. Leuschner Warren C. Perry Chester H. Rowell Charles E. Rugh SENIORS SOPHOMORES John C. Beechley Edwin H. Clark Matthew J. Connelly William G. Herbert Reginald L. Knox William E. Worthington Allen Madison William S. Parrish Robert B. Welty Richard K. Wilcox Lorimer W. Woolley JUNIORS John C. Geiger C. Balfour Gibson Walter D. Gregory James J. Hatch C. Linwood Loring Blake W. Palamountain Warren S. Richards Robert C. Spott Addison C. Strong Muir J. Woolley Noel S. Burge, Jr. John A. Calhoun George E. Church William W. Gay Jack E. Hooper James D. Huston Lindsay P. Marshall William F. Mitchell Edward W. Peterson Kenneth F. Strong W. David Wigley Richard Wilkinson FRESHMEN Frank V. Andrews William H. Clark William P. Gaddis Patrick D. Hamilton Richard L. Haugh James R. Mclnerny Francis W. Mayer Gardiner Whitehead ' Absent on leave. 370 I) E A II I N - Allen, D. Beeson Franklin Hawley, J. V. Hickerson, P. C. Jones Thomson Warner Boone, R. L. Boone, W. R. Boyd Durney Hawley, L. J. Hickerson, N.S. Luther Miller Oliver Pierce Skaife Smith Amonette Breeden Caldwell Culver Dickey Hamilton Humphries Oppenheimer Scott Shurtleff Thompson Wells Allen, R. Bartaour Biggerstalt Dam Gaither Kahl Laugenaur Long McCain Moftatt Rowe True Walters West 2425 WARRING STREET. FOUNDED AT WILLIAMS COLLEGE, 1834 CALIFORNIA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1896 SIXTY-ONE CHAPTERS Edward V. Brewer Monroe E. Deutsch Lloyd L. Farrar James Hopper, Jr. UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Charles W. Merriam George R. Noyes Louis J. O ' Brien Lawrence M. Price Robert Sibley Herbert R. Stoltz James W. Thompson Robertson Ward Herbert C. Wyckoff SENIORS SOPHOMORES Douglas G. Allen Perry E. Beeson William W. Franklin J. Vernon Hawley JUNIORS Robert L. Boone William R. Boone Joseph M. Bowles James Boyd, III James J. Durney Leslie J. Hawley Norman S. Hickerson Clark Hickerson Rex L. Jones Jr. Robert D. Thomson Richard E. Warner Floyd E. Luther John B. Meek Robert R. Miller Edward R. Oliver James R. Pierce Douglas C. Skaife Wyman G. Smith Wilbur K. Amonette John R. Breeden Robert M. Caldwell Frank Clymer J. Robert Culver Laurence W. Dickey Jr. James G. Hamilton Jr. Richard K. Humphries Ralston E. Maloney Arthur C. Oppenheimer Leland Stanford Scott Jr. Eugene A. Shurtleff Harry F. Thompson Robert M. Wells FRESHMEN Robert F. Allen Allen B. Barbour William E. Biggerstaff Francis S. Dam Andrew Gaither Ernest A. Kahl Eugene Laugenaur Alfred Long William McCain Charles A. Rowe John Marshall True Jr. Peter K. Walters Joseph Hilton Wadsworth Jr. George S. West 371 K A A A H A Biggs Bullock Engvick Gubser Matthew Mitchell Randall Brown Dahlmeier Ekstein Goss Hawkins Hoadley Keehner Mensinger Pryor Searight Smith Van Praag Wheeler Burt Elliott Goodwin Hunt Janes Klute Millsap O ' Hara Zak Boyd Bramblet Byers Callahan Considine Lattanner Monson Moore Nittler 2425 PIEDMONT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY, 1865 ALPHA XI CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1895 SEVENTY CHAPTERS GRADUATES Edgar E. Baker Richard Z. Lamberson J. Rodney Mathews Harold C. McMenomy SENIORS Richard H. Biggs, Jr. Robert E. Bullock William C. Engvick Rudolph E. Fuetterer Charles S. Gubser William A. Heal Raymond P. Mathew J. Frank Mitchell Merle D. Randall JUNIORS Kenneth E. Brown Eugene Cavitt Edison W. Dahlmeier Roland A. Ekstein David G. Eldridge James M. Ferguson Lee A. Goss Ray H. Hawkins Walter E. Hoadley Leroy V. Hunt Edward H. Keehner Fred Mensinger Frank D. Pryor Paul J. Searight Maurice S. Smith Vincent A. Van Praag SOPHOMORES Grinnell Burt, Jr. Robert B. Elliotl F. Merrill Goodwin Olaf H. Hansen Vernon E. Hunl Alvin J. Zak Berlram D. Janes Charles H. Klule R. Russell Millsap George K. O ' Hara, Jr. James A. Rogers FRESHMEN James M. Boyd Henry H. Bramblet Robert K. Byers William P. Callahan Charles R. Considine Victor Lattanner Prentiss Monson Arthur J. Moore James F. Moore Alan H. Nitller Edward M. Wheeler Scoll Rogers 372 K A I ' I 1 A A R H Fink Russell, R. Ayer Caring Haworth Thompson Thursby Shaw Tatum Williams Curry Burns Burum Hunt, D. Hunt, T. Bengston Berkenkamp Bernhard Turner Eieland Farrell Nettell O ' Neal Goodwin Lee Pick Russell. C. Tisdel Marshall Matthews Sturgeon Sweatt Williams 2522 RIDGE ROAD. FOUNDED AT MIDDLEBURG COLLEGE, 1905 LAMBDA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1922 NINETEEN CHAPTERS GRADUATES Lyman R. Fink Robert W. Russell SENIORS Paul H. Ayer Carl R. Bengston Eugene H. Berkenkamp A. Paul Bernhard Harold Turner SOPHOMORES Merle W. Caring Cyril B. Haworth Theodore R. Thompson J. Ralph Thursby Russell E. Curry Donald W. Goodwin William Nelson Paul F. Pick Carl E. Russell Myron Tisdel JUNIORS George H. Eveland, Jr. Roy G. Farrell Frederick L. Nettell Nolan C. O ' Neal Charles T. Shaw William Tatum Tom P. Williams, Jr. FRESHMEN J. Scott Burns, Jr. J. Wilson Burum Daniel E. Hunt Thomas D. Hunt Neil A. Marshall Thomas P. Patten Richard Sims Ellsworth Sturgeon Howard L. Sweatt Robert G. Williams Absent on leave. 373 I, A A N U Bratt Harris Jacobsen Levinson Pollock Symonds Weissman Cohn Fleisig Friend Gilbert Krieger Meyer Weil Weiner Wertheimer Domb Savinar Schwartz Sugarman Barbanell Epstein Jalofl Warton 2412 PIEDMONT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, 1911 TAU CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1922 SEVENTEEN CHAPTERS GRADUATES Robert C. Burnstein Leonard M. Ginsburg Irving C. Sugarman SENIORS SOPHOMORES Solon M. Braff Charles C. Gensler Bernard F. Harris Ellis Jacobs Gunther W. Jacobsen Simeon Levinson Morris Pollock Arthur L. Symonds Martin P. Weissman JUNIORS Reynold H. Cohn Arnold P. Davis Philip F. Fleisig Eugene L. Friend Robert A. Gilbert Edgar M. Krieger Wesley N. Meyer Bernard J. Weil Herman L. Weiner Lloyd E. Wertheimer Stanley D. Braff Leonard E. Domb Norman D. Savinar Henry Schwartz Myron Sugarman FRESHMEN Clifford A. Barbanell Morris Epstein Russell Jaloff George Warton 374 K A I G M Bentley Brown Cully Forsyth Heavy Miller Rogers Sciutto Archer Burrell Cameron Cornwall Long Rosendahl Schwartz Anderson Bottari Chalmers Davidson Durfey Stone Vann Walsh Wilhelm Winterbottom Hale Putnam Mulvana Reynolds Nason Pitman Reich Gerwick Rosso Stephens Saunders Scott Terry 2220 PIEDMONT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, 1869 BETA XI CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1901 ONE HUNDRED AND NINE CHAPTERS SENIORS Frederic A. Bentley Mills Brown Donald C. Crilly Ralph K. Forsyth Robert W. Heavey John A. Miller, Jr. Bob F. Mulvana Sargent M. Reynolds David H. Rogers Charles W. Sciutto Robert W. Sparks, Jr. John W. Stone Conrad H. Tenney SOPHOMORES Herbert Anderson Victor Bottari Robert K. Chalmers Gordon T. Davidson Donald Durfey Allan C. Walsh Raymond T. Winterbottom, Jr. Ben C. Gerwick, Jr. Raymond R. Rosso Carlos D. Stephens James P. Stone Frederick H. Vann JUNIORS Spencer Archer Russell R. Bryan Frederick L. Burrell Samuel C. Cameron Thomas H. Cornwall Leonard O. Long Thomas H. Nason Frederick A. Onstott Arthur D. Phelps Rinard E. Pitman Carl Reich Milton O. Rosendahl Perry Schwartz Glassel S. Stringfellow, Jr J. Perry Thomas FRESHMEN William M. Hale Guy L. Putnam, Jr. John W. Saunders, Jr. Ray Scott Raymond Terry Robert G. Wilhelm 375 LAMBDA C H I A ! ! ' II A . Street Armstrong Canaga Candia Eddy Gautier Hamilton Shaver Beauchamp Clark, R. T. Clark, R. M. Cook James Reno Sauer, C. Tharp Thode Brown Bylin Carlson Maclean Moblad Schaaf Starling Toland Vartnaw Fredell Millar Tuttle Sauer, H. 1755 LEROY AVENUE. FOUNDED AT THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY, 1909 MU CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1913 EIGHTY-SEVEN CHAPTERS GRADUATE M. Dunklin Street SENIORS Roger K. Armstrong Bruce L. Canaga, Jr. Caesar R. Candia Robert N. Eddy Melvin F. Gautier Robert S. Hamilton E. Neil Shaver, Jr. JUNIORS David D. Beauchamp Richard T. Clark Roger M. Clark William P. Cook William H. James William T. Rawles Louis G. Reno Carl W. Sauer Richard F. Tharp George E. Thode SOPHOMORES Walter J. Brown Richard S. Bylin Kenneth F. Carlson Randall C. MacLean Walter G. Moblad Samuel A. Schaaf George W. Starling, Jr. William E. Toland William R. Vartnaw, Jr. FRESHMEN Erling W. Fredell Niles O. Millar, Jr. Howard A. Sauer John E. Tuttle Charles W. Zang 376 I ' H I II E T A DELTA Firestone, M. Hatfield Koblick Meltzer Stamper Tieburg Wasserman Falk Firestone, B. Grodin Grossman Kast Rothenberg Saltzstine Bloom Dangott Eisenberg Grossman Gruenenbaum Markovits Masonek Rotner Schwartz 2250 PIEDMONT AVENL NIVERSITY, 1912 CALIFORNIA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1922 SEVENTEEN CHAPTERS GRADUATES Morton J. Caba Sanford Goldner Walter M. Lehman James M. Popper Harold L. Strom SKMOKS N. Mark Diamond Jerome A. Solomon JUNIORS Robert J. Bibbero Mose J. Firestone Robin B. Hatfield Allan Koblick Ed Meltzer Milton S. Pollack Julian L. Stamper Al Tieburg Marvin E. Wasserman SOPHOMORES Myron P. Falk Bernie Firestone Richard L. Grodin Donald H. Grossman Robert Kast Stanley Krieger Martin E. Rothenberg Stanley N. Saltzstine FRESHMEN Howard S. Bloom Saul Dangott Walter E. Eisenberg Hill " 1 1 Grossman Julius Gruenenbaum Stanley M. Markovitz Harvey M. Masonek David L. Rotner Melvin H. Schwartz 377 p H r H E T A ffl f Barker Newell Kean Kaynor Bellini Bryan Applegate Cook Markwart, P. Martin Markwart, J. Merrill Crist Deubner Mlddleton Modisette Faustman Dolman Moon O ' Sullivan Fishburn Doman Stutt Petersson Gillis Fox Todd Shetlield Jackson Grumtn Tolman Steere Picard Hawgood Wood 2717 HEARST AVENUE. FOUNDED AT MIAMI UNIVERSITY, OXFORD, OHIO, 1848 CALIFORNIA ALPHA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1873 ONE HUNDRED AND NINE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES J. H. Hildebrand J. P. McBaine P. O. Ray Thomas Stow SENIORS SOPHOMORES Charles D. Barker Guido Bellini Carter R. Byran Raymond F. Crist D. Jackson Faustman George W. Fishburn Lyman R. Gillis JUNIORS William W. Applegate William L. Cook Kenneth E. Cotton Julius C. Deubner Willard T. Dolman John M. Hoffman William L. Jackson Charles G. Kerch Henry C. Markwart Donald O. Nelson Dwight A. Newell Frank H. Smith Jack C. Doman Benjamin N. Evans Karl O. Fox Gunther S. Grumm William H. Picard William A. Beal Richard L. David Lewis B. Kean Phillip G. Markwart James W. Martin John S. Middleton Robert S. Moon Robert W. Stutt Frank W. Todd Laurin F. Tolman FRESHMEN Edward A. Thomas Robert A. Harmon A. Phillip Hawgood Laird A. Hunt Alexander Innes Eugene S. Kaynor John Markwart Robert H. Merritt DeMott Modisette C. Dion O ' Sullivan Robert T. Petersson Richard A. Sheffield Richard C. Steere William J. Wood 378 I ' H fi A M M A DELTA Bennett Bishopp McNamara Pierpont Crosse Crowe Hamlin Harris Sherman Skinner Stoddart Struthers Fowler Hunt Knowles McDonald Plummer Scatena Woodward Boucke Fleming Haas Hawkins McMahon Newton Tutton 2620 BANCROFT WAY. FOUNDED AT JEFFERSON COLLEGE, 1848 DELTA XI CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1886 SEVENTY-THREE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES LeRoy Briggs Harold L. Bruce Charles Derleth, Jr. W. H. Durham Norman E. A. Hinds Woodbridge Metcalf SENIORS SOPHOMORES Harlo U. Bennett, Jr. Robert J. Bishopp Richard P. Jones Robert S. McNamara JUNIORS Ortus F. Adams Robert Cowden David H. Crosse Richard D. Crowe Edwin M. Hamlin David McNutt Judson Madden J. Carson Magill Philip G. Pierpont Ross E. Hamlin, Jr. Armor W. Harris Robert S. Sherman, Jr. George W. Skinner David A. Stoddart Jack Cowden John M. Fowler Frank Hunt Gorhan B. Knowles Paul L. McDonald Robert P. Pierpont Pierson Plummer Frederick N. Scatena Robert D. Woodward FRESHMEN Robert W. Boucke John V. Flemming Madison Haas Thomas W. Hawkins Robert McMahon Richard V. Newton John R. Struthers Stanley M. Tutton 379 Cahill dine Osborne Pruyn Storch Tipton Merrill Rowley Fisher Breaux Vane Hosmer Kinney Knight Meserve Lamon Lunceford Reynolds Saunders Smith Graham Ingram Leete Lelacheur Martin Willson Fast Lawson Lucas Steel 2625 HEARST AVENUE. FOUNDED AT JEFFERSON COLLEGE, 1852 GAMMA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1899 FIFTY-TWO CHAPTERS GRADUATES William E. Cahill Herbert T. Moore, Jr. Wilson E. Cline Robert J. Simpson Gordon A. Steers SENIORS SOPHOMORES Edwin D. Davies Edward G. Dougery Howard H. Fisher Robert W. Godwin Edwin T. Goree Girard E. Haven William G. Holly JUNIORS Homer G. Angelo Laurence C. Arpin John Fisher Ralph W. Lamon Bert L. Lunceford C. Craig Hosmer Willard A. Kinney Douglas K. Knight John R. Meserve C. Thomas Osborne Jack F. Pruyn George A. Smith William R. Morgan F. Marshall Reynolds Thomas F. Saunders, Jr. Harold J. Smith John A. Storch Harold T. Arpin Peter K. Arpin Richard C. Biggs S. Locke Breaux H. Lee Graham Wilbur Ingram Donald J. Lawrie Harley M. Leete, Jr. Jerry Lelacheur Vernon P. Martin A. Phil Merrill Milton M. Rowley Robert E. Steers Henry G. Turner Walter A. Vane Ted C. Willson Benjamin P. Tipton Earl A. Fast Lester D. Lawson Lyle Golding FRESHMEN Matthew A. Little, Jr. John D. Lucas Lowell F. Steele 380 I H I K A I 1 P A S I (i M A Alloo Andross Bell Buckman Cleghorn Gallagher Jordan, M. Lee Messchaert Poyser Riddell Smith Bischoff DeLancie Ellis. G. Foote Janin Barbierl Canning Dieterich Emsole Lange Peterson Reinecke Tolf Baker Brown Ellis, D. Jordan, J. Roberts Vandenburgh Verleger McKinnon Harding Skinner on Geldern 1756 EUCLID AVENUE. FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, 1850 ALPHA LAMBDA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1903 THIRTY-NINE CHAPTERS David P. Barrows Thomas Buck Clark J. Burnham, Jr. John U. Calkins, Jr. UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Malcolm M. Davisson Walter M. Hart S, ml UK! V. Larkey Ivan M. Linforth Reginald H. Linforth George D. Louderback Albert H. Mowbray Heber A. Newsoni SENIORS Modeste B. Alloo David P. Andross Roger V. Bell Millard E. Buckman Robert B. Cleghorn Charles R. Gallagher Merrell H. Jordan, Jr. Albert H. Lederer GRADUATES Valentine Brookes David B. Gideon Gordon C. Lee Kenneth L. Leimbach Judson H. Longaker Kenneth L. McKinnon Frederick W. Messchaert Stanley Poyser Wallace C. Riddell Franklin D. Smith SOPHOMORES John K. Barbieri Edwin W. Brown Robert B. Canning James W. Dieterich Stuart K. Eversole Theodore E. Lange Robert A. Peterson Frederick Reinerke Frank A. Skinner McFarland Tolf Robert H. Variel JUNIORS Elmer N. Bischoff Richard H. DeLancie G. Milton Ellis F. Seeley Foote, Jr. Henry H. Harding C. Howard Janin FRESHMEN Robert H. Baker Dean G. Brown Donald G. Ellis James D. Jordan David S. Roberts John J. Vandenburgh, Jr. Philip K. Verleger Edward von Geldern 381 H II Carter Hart Lynch, B. VanVlear Ward George Hooper Burnley Hill Polk Swing, J. Smith Westphalen Dewhirst Birkholm Hansen Kerr Conway Grimes Hall, E. R. Swing, R. Draper Lynch, D. Donaldson Hall, E. A. Hawkins Morey Ruhstaller Salz 2335 PIEDMONT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT MIAMI UNIVERSITY, 1906 NU CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1921 FORTY-THREE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES SENIORS Lawrence B. Burnley Walter H. Conway Orville F. Grimes Eric R. Hall E. Ross Hart Louis A. Blanc Ainsley M. Carlton Arthur S. Huey J. Sheldon Martin George A. Rice C. E. Ryan Carl Carter Milton T. Hill William A. Jamieson Howard C. Payne Tom G. Polk Jack W. Swing Richard L. Swing GRADUATES William George Arthur Hooper SOPHOMORES William H. Dewhirst Robert S. Donaldson Edward A. Hall John D. Ward Robert A. Hawkins Wilmer W. Schroebel Warren B. Van VIear JUNIORS Jack W. Draper Richard C. Lynch Robert C. Lynch Floyd F. Smith Eugene J. Westphalen FRESHMEN Charles R. Birkholm Robert H. Hansen William J. Kerr Gordon R. Morey Frank D. Ruhstaller Robert B. Salz 382 P H I S I G M A KAPPA Johnson, V. Aschoff Colley Imrie Johnson. W. McPhate Hand Patterson Paige Kelly Fatrman Ferroggiaro Greenwell Hulme Hall Heap Henry Weber Ahlert Clyde Lawrence Pitman Bochnak Krakow Ung Moore 2211 PIEDMONT AVEN T MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE, 1873 OMEGA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED IN 1909 FORTY-NINE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES R. L. Adams C. E. Chapman Clinton Evans Fred C. Fischer Walter Frederick Franklin C. Palm Herbert I. Priestley Kenneth Priestley GRADUATE Vernon A. Johnson SENIORS James A. Aschoff Thomas E. Hall Rex M. Heap James A. Henry Frank Ahlert Ralph Ames Robert Clyde JUNIORS Robert Imrie Weldon S. Johnson Gregory B. McPhate Walter A. Weber William H. Hand Charles Patterson James H. Paige SOPHOMORES Herbert C. Kelly George Lawrence Willard W. Pitman FRESHMEN Vincent Bochnak Robert Fairman Robert N. Ferroggiaro Martin D. Greenwell Francis W. Hulme Vernon A. Krakow James T. Lang George C. Marti Byron A. Moore Robert Royston 383 p I KAPPA ALPH Ayres Goggin Titus Haywood Phelan Trolan Becker Rippey Sauter Sparks Stramler O ' Malley Packer Rea Webb von Neff Connolly Duke Gorman, R. Ferguson Gorman, W. Macdonald Maloney Merrill Nutting Van Leeuwen Wester Aboitiz Carver Hunt Moody Bennett Couris Duggan Glazier Lenox Wheeler 2324 PIEDMONT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, 1868 ALPHA SIGMA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1912 SEVENTY-NINE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES W. L. Bender Marshall C. Cheney E. W. Cleary C. L. Hoag W. D. Horner C. D. Hulin F. G. Linde A. R. Olsen T. D. Stewart GRADUATES Alvin D. Ayres Donald F. Tit us Edward A. Goggin John von Neff SENIORS William J. Connolly Charles N. Duke Robert J. Gorman JUNIORS Arthur G. Becker Ian Ferguson William M. Gorman Clyde L. Macdonald Edward T. Maloney T. Stephen Merrill Raymond F. Haywood J. Sydney Phelan W. Howard Trolan Arnold A. Nutting Boyd A. Rippey Arthur R. Sauter Henry C. Sparks James H. Stramler Ernest G. Van Leeuwen, Jr. SOPHOMORES Edward J. Aboitiz Thomas H. Carver William T. Hunt E. Albert Moody Philip B. O ' Malley Paul E. Packer Malcolm A. Rea William F. Webb, Jr. FRESHMEN Robert E. Bennett T. Thomas Couris R. Bruce Duggan Edward A. Glazier Vernon Harper Lionel R. Lenox Edwin A. Wester Fred G. Wheeler 384 P I K A H I Brear Shields Gravenhorst- Cramer Brouwer Osborne Mellatia Olsson Vannice Boswotth Dawson Emerson Macki Stotts Edgar McMurry Weatherall Windsor Witt 2510 LECONTE AVENUE. FOUNDED AT THE COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON, 1904 GAMMA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1908 FORTY-FIVE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATE Dr. H. E. Erdman GRADUATE Charles F. McEnerney SENIORS Wilmer E. Shields Charles F. Vannice JUNIORS John B. Bosworth Fred G. Brear Raymond F. Cramer Absent on leave. Robert S. Dawson C. Lee Emerson, Jr. Jack L. Macki SOPHOMORES G. B. Arentz Otto C. Gravenhorst-Brouwer J. Robert Looney Jack Du Fosee A. Lee Edgar Arthur W. McMurry Raymond Mellana John C. Mackey Charles Osborne, Jr. Ben E. Stotts FRESHMEN Robert F. Olsson Neil B. Weatherall Jack Windsor Richard M. Witt 385 I u I N Clark, H. Howe Lewton Lutz Parsons Schei Armstrong Clark, R. Hay McKevitt Picco Stevens Stockton Wood Anderson Hahn Lehe Martin Roe Smith Stone Teichert Thomas Crenshaw Cunningham Dibble Hill Huters Kelly Macdonald McLaren Snell 1815 HIGHLAND PLACE. FOUNDED AT UNION COLLEGE, 1833 EPSILON CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1902 TWENTY-NINE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Edward D. Adams William C. Bray John Dyer-Bennet Bernard Etcheverry Martin Flaherty Howard Fleming Donald S. Mackay Howard Naffziger Leon Richardson Thomas Sanford Rudolph Schevill SENIORS SOPHOMORES Addison C. Bowers Hiram S. Clark William C. Howe Theodore G. Lewton Lawrence H. Lutz James J. Parsons Lawrence A. Schei JUMORS C. Armstrong Rush S. Clark Jack Hay Charles Picco, Jr. Thomas F. Saunders Robert L. Scripture William K. Stevens Yard A. Stockton George M. Wood Absent on leave. David L. Anderson James D. Hahn, III Eugene E. Lehe Walter S. Martin William S. Thomas Benson B. Roe Sidney V. Smith, IV Robert L. Stone Henry Teichert FRESHMEN George W. Crenshaw J. Western Cunningham William F. Hill Frederick C. Holmes Earl Snell William M. Huters Douglas V. Kelly Reid Macdonald Kenneth L. McLaren 386 S I fi M A ALPHA E P S I L N Chipchase Joubert Neilson Parsons Sanford Scheeline Shibler Skarda SoRelle Stevens Doughty, C. Doughty, S. Gebauer Meyer Miller Rittenhouse Butler Cotcll Folsom Green Hawley Unery Lurmann McGinn Prati Todesco Ziegler Zrnn Bell Brewer Fensler Griffith Hussey Lamons Lory McAfee Rohlfs Yocco 2722 BANCROFT WAY. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA, 1856 BETA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1894 ONE HUNDRED AND TWELVE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES A. F. Blanks R. W. Chancy Stuart Daggett Ralph R. Miller Major S. R. Stribling GRADUATES SENIORS John F. Bonner Calvert G. Chipchase William J. Hosmer James L. Joubert Albert M. Lester John F. Lord O. James Matheson William Neilson, Jr. Robert L. Condon Stanley K. Crook Rirhard C. Dinkelspiel Melvin W. Gipe Ray T. Marsh John E. Parsons Holden H. Sanford Walter B. SoRelle Lester A. Scheeline, Jr. Bertram K. Shibler Lynell G. Skarda Edwin C. Smith, Jr. Walter W. Stevens SOPHOMORES Harry G. Butler Ellsworth R. Covell Tom E. Folsom Walter G. Green Robert Hawley William A. Lavery Paul F. Lurmann Boyd McGinn Edward V. Prati James V. Todesco Robert B. Ziegler Willard J. Zinn JUNIORS Jack E. Donovan Colvin C. Doughty Sterling B. Doughty, Jr. Emmett F. Gebauer FRESHMEN Hermann R. Krusi Robert H. Meyer James R. Miller Royd B. Rittenhouse Wilson D. Bell John H. Brewer Robert W. Fensler James H. Griffith, Jr. James E. Hussey Donald C. Lamons Charles L. Lory- Harry E. McAfee Robert W. Rohlfs George V. Yocro 387 I G M A C H Borg Yerman Clifford Fox Fry Savage Shafsky Benedict Eustis Falkell Geary Harper Helmet Kunkel Smith, A. Watson Clark Dykes Farrell Goldenson Hohwiesner Lee McGuire Ray Reid Schafer Scouler Sheffield Townsend Wade White, C. White, R. Bahme Brendel Cross Eldridge Erichson Frick Metcalf Noble Smith, J. Van Ribbink Wright Wyatt 2345 COLLEGE AVENUE. FOUNDED AT MIAMI UNIVERSITY, 1855 ALPHA BETA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1886 NINETY-SEVEN CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Elmer R. Hall Charles A. Noble Clarence M. Price GRADUATES Frank Borg, Jr. William Brock Fred Yerman SENIORS Gerald B. Clifford Fred S. Fox William L. Fry David N. Taylor John C. Lilly Harold A. Savage Boyd B. Shafsky JUNIORS William E. Benedict Alvin A. r.u - 1 i - . Jr. M. Binford Falkell James F. Geary Robert B. Haas William R. Harper James F. Helmer Sutler Kunkel George A. Michelsen Russell Raine Allan A. Smith James E. Watson, Jr. SOPHOMORES Ernest P. Clark Benjamin C. Dykes Alexander C. Farrell Lewis W. Goldenson Henry G. Hohwiesner, Jr. Leo C. Lee Daniel F. McGuire Thomas M. Ray, Jr. Walter R. Rei.l John P. Schafer Allen B. Scouler Robert F. Sheffield Carl Spilker Stephen S. Townsend John R. Wade Charles B. White Richard O. White FRESHMEN Richard B. Bahme Philip Brendel Chester H. Cross John W. Erichson Robert A. Eldridge Walter P. Frick Lawrence V. Metcalf Robert W. Noble James B. Smith Ernest M. Wright, Jr. Fred L. Wyatt Edward F. Van Ribbink Absent on leave. 388 M N U Anderson, D. Hammond Bennett Bertram Emery Finlayson Bell Dobrzensky Durley Hazelett Love Morgan Nelson Newell Graff Hurlburt Ingram Lindsey Scott Friden Gheen McGuire Rabjohn Stlne Geppert Grainger Hildreth James Morrill Noble Weeder Wells. W. M. Squires Sullivan Bartholomew White Wilson Anderson. F. Simpson Wells. B. Wells. W. T. 2710 BANCROFT WAY. FOUNDED AT VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE, 1869 BETA PSI CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1892 NINETY-SIX CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Charles R. Dodson Peyton Hurt Robert H. Merriinan SENIORS SOPHOMORES David A. Anderson Robert N. Hammond John M. Hazelett Wendell W. Love B. William Morgan JUNIORS Frederick W. Bennett Donald C. Bertram Russell G. Graff G. Gordon Hurlburt Robert S. Ingram M. Phillip Nelson Richard W. Newell Jack D. Noble J. William Weeder Walter M. Wells, Jr. Laurence L. Lindsey, Jr. Roy R. Rogers W. Vernon Scott, Jr. Fred H. Squires, Jr. John F. Sullivan M. William Bartholomew Jack M. Emery John D. Finlayson Stanley Friden John F. Gheen William J. McGuire, Jr. Lloyd C. Rabjohn William L. Stine William L. White C. Elwin Wilson FRESHMEN Fred M. Anderson, Jr. Charles R. Bell, Jr. Stacy H. Dobrzensky William N. Durley George R. Geppert Charles H. Grainger James B. Hildreth Robert L. James Lewis V. Morrill, Jr. Grover F. Peterson William S. Simpson Barratt M. Wells Walter T. Wells, Jr. 389 I H Rocca, Kindt Olson Crane Bradbury Newhall Sharrer Curtis Burbank Rocca, C. Taylor, B, Fagan Masters Shadinger Tyler McCollum Donald Vogel Bley Taylor, G. Kasch Fawcett Blodget Weir 2731 BANCROFT WAY. FOUNDED AT UNION COLLEGE 1827 ALPHA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1912 TEN CHAPTERS GRADUATES Robert N. Bovard Robert T. Esbleman Bernard T. Rocca, Jr. SENIORS Walter I. Bradbury H. Corbin Burbank JUNIORS William C. Donald, Jr. James W. K.asch James H. Kindt Romney W. Masters William Swabel James W. Newhall Curt M. Rocca Gail J. Shadinger Robert C. Vogel SOPHOMORES E. Kahl Fawcett Norman A. Olson Gwynne H. Sharrer B. Grant Taylor, Jr. J. Curtis Tyler Jr. FRESHMEN C. William Bley Ralph B. Blodget Philip S. Crane William S. Curtis Jerome B. Fagan Lawrence H. McCollum George G. Taylor Robert R. Weir 390 S I M A I 1 H I E I ' S I L () N as. Cory Garner Charvet McAteer Blair Crawford Knowles Carieth Friend George Kramer Parker Porter Cadwalader Crosby Heinbockel Joost McConnell McFall Newton Laroza Marliave Moflitt Doyle Evans Smyth 2728 DURANT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT RICHMOND COLLEGE, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 1901 ALPHA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1910 SIXTY-EIGHT CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES J. H. Corley W. W. Robbins R. H. Gann A. W. Samson F. L. Mason E. M. Tomkins H. R. Wellnian GRADUATES Bert M. Garner Marc W. Johnson John M. Cory Robert F. Reynolds SENIORS Frederic P. Garner Leonard W. Charvet William J. Clough Edwin G. Heinbockel William M. Jonas William M. Joost John G. Lowry Eugene McAteer Thomas H. Moore Warren A. Wood JUNIORS George F. Anderson William A. Blair Sam B. Chapman Clifford N. Crawford Claude F. Evans Robert S. Knowles Ernest Kramer William H. McConnell Silver R. McFall Kenneth B. McNamara Charles Carveth Rollis L. Friend Robert George Enrique E. Laroza SOPHOMORES Robert M. McNamara Burton H. Marliave Melvin A. Moffitt Stanley D. Parker Paul F. Porter FRESHMEN Daniel A. Newton Arthur Burns Cadwalader Gordon W. Crosby William R. Dorsey Harrison Doyle John H. Evans Sidney H. Smyth 391 SIGMA I ' H I SIGMA Guiral Henrich Williams, N. Baum Ward Wentzel Joy Weatherwax Mackey Reichel Bruce Dexter von Brincken Williams, C. Board Body McConnaha Mettler Williams. E. 2312 WARRING STREET. FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, 1908 EPSILON CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1916 EIGHTEEN CHAPTERS SENIORS Rene ' J. Guiral William Markey Joseph A. Reichel Jr. JUNIORS Robert M. Baum Irving W. Bruce Albert T. Dexter Aram A. RuBtigan UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATE Thomas C. Mayhew GRADUATE Dellmar K. Henrich Edwin M. Taylor Morris L. Williams Norman L. Williams Galen S. Stouder Friedrich W. von Brincken Maris L. Ward George R. Wentzel Jr. SOPHOMORES James A. Board Richard P. Body Marshall W. Joy Allen W. Weatherwax Cheater R. Williams FRESHMEN William C. McConnaha Ole R. Mettler Edward E. Williams ' Absent on leave. 392 I G M A Jensen Cook Howard Smiley I 2250 PROSPECT STREET. FOUNDED AT VINCENNES UNIVERSITY, 1897 IOTA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1913 THIRTY-TWO CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Cecil A. Ditty Evan Haynes George D. Mallory GRADUATES Ralph W. Berringer Harold A. Erne SENIORS William O. Ball Richard W. Birk William G. Brown Earl A. Jensen Joseph L. Nielson, Jr. Carleton E. Rogers William C. Roland John A. Rutter Walter P. Sexton Alexander Simontacchi SOPHOMORES Arthur F. Howard J. Roy Jones, Jr. Karl O. Van Leuven JUNIORS Mahlon F. Cook Roland L. Ferguson H. Donald Funk Edwin A. Wallace FRESHMEN David O. Collamer William R. Hayden Harold W. McDonald Stanley J. Smiley 393 H A C H I Weir Dellinger Dopkins Ratmden Snow Ausfahl Waldren Wheatley Winter Ball Arata Cleeves Farley Fisher Hanelt, L. Hermann Buffington Dudley Cavasso Oelu Flanagan Fowler Hoover Nicolson Perry Geiger Mayrisch Penn Hanelt, M. Tooley Watrous Harwell Moore Newman 2462 LECONTE AVENUE. FOUNDED AT NORWICH UNIVERSITY, 1856 MU CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1913 FIFTY-TWO CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES J. Dewey Long T. H. McGavack L. H. Petersen GRADUATES Walter W. Wier Gordon P. Pierce SENIORS II. .Hi- Dellinger William E. Dopkins, Jr. Leslie L. C. Hanelt Sheldon E. Hermann Burton M. Hoover Kingsley M. Nicolson D. Richard Perry C. Dean Ramsden Raymond H. Snow JUNIORS Robert H. Ausfahl Victor J. Bernhard, Jr. Robert D. Buffington Edmond T. Dooley Albert J. Geiger Lenard Mayrisch, Jr. Charles R. Penn Lawrence D. Sheehan M. Frank Waldren Dave H. Wheatley Herbert L. Winter SOPHOMORES Wilfred N. Ball, Jr. Leon Cavasso, Jr. Emil W. Delu Miles M. Hanelt Jack H. Tooley John H. Watrous FRESHMEN Winfield H. Arata Vincint F. Cleeves John L. Farley, Jr. William O. Fisher John M. Flanagan Bryan P. Fowler Everett E. Harwell Gordon E. Miller John F. Moore Raymond S. Newman Absent on leave. 394 T H E T A HELTA C H I Beahrs Shaffer Hyde Belshaw Anderson Mulford Schmidt Braucht Brown, J. Murphy Brown. G. Brooks, G. Burford Perkins Lapham Brooks, L. Carlisle Warden Luth Buck Ciiille Allen Morrow Clark Funk Dobbins Reeves Davies Greefkens Green Simonson Rodehaver Hoefer Hickson Whitman 2647 DURANT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT UNION COLLEGE, 1847 DELTA DEUTERON CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1900 TWENTY-EIGHT CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Herbert E. Bolton Leonard W. Buck George P. Costigan Merrit Y. Hughes Keble Pirene Chester L. Roadhousr Worth Ryder E. A. Stokdik SENIORS Oliver H. Beahrs Charles M. Belshaw Jess W. Braucht Gerneaux G. Brooks Leon W. Brooks Edward Z. Buck Don E. Clark William R. Davies Samuel B. Rodehaver Keith M. Shaffer William G. Sheaff JUNIORS SOPHOMORES Hugh S. Allen, Jr. David T. Dobbins Robert L. Green Robert Hickson William E. Murray Stanwood S. Schmidt John R. Anderson James A. Brown Burke E. Burford Chester G. Carlisle Lewis A. Civille Albert C. Funk Albert L. Greefkens John H. Hoefer Gordon W. Hyde D. Donald Mulford Vincent J. Murphy Thomas C. Perkins FRESHMEN George A. Brown William E. Lapham Carl F. Luth H. Keith Morrow Jack K. Reeves Thomas R. Simonson A. Francis Warden Lloyd G. Whitman 395 T H E T A KAPPA N Dodge Fletcher Frisbie Richeda Sharwood Smelser Hall Hawkins Richter Sill, F. Tinniswood Wynkoop Hiatt Sharpsteen Sill, A. Barrows Batchelder Hood LeGrand Moist Semer 2399 PROSPECT STREET. FOUNDED AT THE DRURY COLLEGE, 1924 ACHEAEN CLUB ESTABLISHED 1912 FIFTY-FOUR CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATE G. E. Troxell SENIORS Thomas P. Canham Richard K. Frisbie Laurence A. Dodge Verio L. Richeda Verlyn L. Fletcher Richard G. Sharwood Clifford E. Smelser JUNIORS Fred V. Hall Harry J. Hawkins, Jr. John Richter Fred A. Sill, Jr. William W. Tinniswood Albro Wynkoop SOPHOMORES Charles G. Hiatt William C. Sharpsteen Alan M. Sill FRESHMEN Burton F. Barrows Robert F. Batchelder Robert S. Hood John LeGrand Ted R. Moist John C. Semer 396 THETA UPSILON OMEGA Maclntyre Webb Yates Boody Senram Bright Bickerton Coltrin Snyder deVarona Ferran Divine Gregg Kay Kennett Klitgaard Taylor Tonini Lachtnan Lightfoot Schulte Stornetta 2559 L-C LECONTE AVENUE FOUNDED AT NATIONAL INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL, N. Y., 1925 GAMMA BETA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1925 SEVENTEEN CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Bruce Jameyson H. Hawkins SENIORS Frederick J. Boody Gordon L. Coltrin George W. Divine Robert R. Gibson JUNIORS Wayne D. Gregg Edmund McLees Robert J. Klitgaard Neil R. Maclntyre Frank G. Senram Robert W. Snyder, Jr. Bernard E. Taylor Harold C. Tonini Jay G. Webb SOPHOMORES Harold S. Bright, Jr. David T. deVarona Curzon Kay Stanley S. Lachman Henry W. Lightfoot George W. Little, Jr. William J. Yates FRESHMEN Walter B. Bickerton, Jr. C. Gordon Ferran William Kennett, Jr. Bernard H. Schulte, IV Walter D. Stornetta 397 H A Cox Welch Chewning Power Robertson Schmoekel Holden Laulhere Miller McNamara Merrick Hinds Potts Deal Slusser Reynolds Sauer Dieden Fairbank Hollen Joy Smith, G. Stoddard Croft Echeerria Smith, W. White Fisher Liggit Schleussner Schweitzer Strong Westbrook 1730 LA LOMA AVENUE. FOUNDED AT RENESSELAR POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, 1864 NU CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1910 THIRTY-SIX CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Raymond W. Jeans William J. Raymond Harry W. Sheperd Edwin C. Voorhies SENIORS Jack F. Chewning Clyde W. Deal Leonard J. Dieden Charles W. P ' airbank Theodore T. Hollen Austin S. Joy JUNIORS ' William B. Ball Albert E. Croft Thornton H. Daley R. James Echeverria A. Jack Fisher George S. Ford GRADUATES Wallace W. Cox H. William Hansen Austin R. Welch Charles M. Power David J. Robertson H. Max Schmoekel Willis S. Slusser George W. Smith John L. Stoddard John M. Holden Bernard M. Laulhere, Jr. Robert B. Reynolds Theodore R. Scott W. Guy Smith Robert J. Stork Hubert A. White SOPHOMORES Frederick R. Liggit Jack S. Lohrberg Harvey Odell Perry Connor John G. Hinds Ted R. Hubert George F. Potts Ralph W. Sauer Robert L. McNamara Clarke F. Merrick- FRESHMEN Charles E. Schleussner Howard L. Schweitzer Louis E. Smith John H. Strong Taylor Westbrook ' Absent on leave. 398 z T A II A A II Berenson Daiis Nordman Seligman Brown Cohn Nahman Rosenberg Slater Baer Chitrin DeRoy Goldeen Goodman Irving Morris Ncwfield Sinai Brodie Goldflam Goldsmith Jacobs Katz Sands Badt Goldstone Hertzberg Friedman Friendly Tick Becker Beniofl Cohen 1712 EUCLID AVENUE FOUNDED AT THE COLLEGE OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, 1898 ALPHA ETA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1921 THIRTY-THREE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Max Radin Waldo Cohn GRADUATES Jerome H. Berenson Robert N. Gold Julian Davis Benjamin E. Nordman Milton S. Seligman SENIORS Arthur Brown Edmond A. Cohn Joseph Goldman Richard S. Goldstone Mathieu T. Slater Mervyn Hertzberg Morton S. Nahman Fred G. Rosenberg Sanford F. Schoenfeld JUNIORS Alfred A. Baer Robert Chitrin Richard H. DeRoy Howard J. Friedman Melvyn C. Friendly Donald S. Goldeen William E. Goodman Robert M. Irving Frank M. Morris Richard J. Newfield Robert W. Sinai Milton H. Tick SOPHOMORES Howard H. Becker Earl D. Brodie Bertram F. Given Robert S. Goldflam Richard H. Goldsmith Melwyn S. Jacobs Hilliard J. Katz Richard H. Lachman Stanley H. Sands FRESHMEN Douglas Badt William J. Benioff William S. Cohen Sanford Kolmitz Absent on leave. 399 Barber, H. Clewe Lee Martin Massie, H. Massie, J. Miller Minor Panton Clinch Gushing Cykler Dyer, E. Hall Harrison Johnson Milligan, R. S. Shuey Weaver Wegge Wither Abbot Barber, S. Biesemyer Leonard Lincoln Merritt Shine Zook Bundschu Caswell Dyer, P. Forkner Greig Hayden Hoogs Milligan, R. H. Pryor Slattery Stephens 2251 COLLEGE AVENUE. FOUNDED AT NEW YORK UNIVERSITY, 1847 IOTA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1870 TWENTY-NINE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Joseph N. LeConte Orren K. McMurray C. C. Plehn E. Joseph Rowell Wallace Terry Irwin Uteritz SENIORS SOPHOMORES Charles C. Albright, Jr. Harry S. Barber Temple S. Clewe Harry D. Johnson Warner W. Lee John F. Martin JUNIORS Downey C. Clinch John E. dishing, Jr. John F. Cykler Ephraim Dyer Chaffee E. Hall, Jr. John P. HarriHon A. Harper Massie J. Standish Massie Charles H. Miller Paul D. Minor Edward B. Panton Edward H. Solinsky William P. Hincks Charles M. Johnson R. Sheldon Milligan, Jr. Hayden Shuey Kent M. Weaver, Jr. J. Robert Wegge Samuel L. Abbot, III Stephen T. Barber Jay C. Biesemyer Alan W. H ays Hobart S. Leonard Charles S. Lincoln, Jr. John B. Merritt Earl E. Shine Edgar T. Zook Jr. FRESHMEN Gordon H. Wither Towle Bundschu George B. Caswell, Jr. Peter R. Dyer Hamden L. Forkner, Jr. Robert W. Greig Curtiss Hayden, Jr. William H. Hoogs, III Francis X. McEachen Richard H. Milligan Caillard S. Pryor Bradley N. Slattery William C,. H. Stephens, . 11- in on leave. 400 ALPHA I, A I 1 I ' A I 7 , A I ' P A Denny Bennett Johnson Brereton Ellis Boudett Kimball Combs Fratis Jorqensen Lindsay Turner Brock Cowden Davis DeWeese Murray Page Potter Sherman Howard Hutchinson Moore Mross 10(1 JUDAH STREET, SAIS 7 FRANCISCO FOUNDED AT DARTMOUTH MEDICAL COLLEGE 1888 SIGM CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1899 SIXTY CHAPTERS LeR. C. Abbott R. B. Aird H. V. Allington E. J. Best H. F. Blum Z. E. Bolin J. W. Brown L. Bryan E. C. Bull W. A. Carrol J. H. Catton E. W. Cleary T. W. Cornwall M. W. Debenham C. A. Dickey W. G. Donald G. E. Ebright E. H. Falconer F. S. Foote J. N. Force C. F. Gelston G. E. Hein E. W. Henderson C. L. Hoag M. N. Hosmer Edward Butler SENIORS A. Merlon Bassett Lorin W. Denny Robley N. Ellis Anthony M. Fratis, Jr. Elwin W. Turner UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES V. T. I unman F. Kellopg W. H. Kellogg A. R. Kilgore A. P. Kuueger J. B. Lagan S. P. Lucia C. J. Lunsfortl A. J. McDowell D. A. Macfarlanc- H. H. Markel H. E. Miller R. J. Millzner INTERNES Vern Innian Earl O. Hagan Melford B. Jorgensen Stuart Lindsay James C. Luce ouglas Kelley R. O. Moody H. Morrow G. B. O ' Conner S. Olsen J. A. Owen, Jr. G. W. Pierce S. T. Pope W. W. Port T. E. Reynolds H. E. Ruggles H. H. Searls E. M. Shebesta D. R. Smith James Leary J. Smith R. Soto-Hall J. M. Stevenson B. Stone J. J. Sullivan J. W. Swindt L. R. Taussig F. J. Underwood A. M. Vollmer W. W. Washburn T. B. Wayman M. S. Woolf SOPHOMORES Warren L. Bostick Fred S. Howard Hugh G. Brereton Martin Hutchinson Robert C. Combs Herbert L. Moore George A. Mross JUNIORS Carl A. Anderson Crowell Beard Austin W. Bennett Daniel W. Boudett William Q. Brock Ambrose A. Cowden Edward W. Davis Roger E. DeWeese, Jr. Owen C. Dickson J. Blaine Divine Stanley G. Johnson H. Stewart Kimball John Murray Emery P. Page Laurence A. Potter George F. Sherman FRESHMEN Lee D. Fulton Wayne S. Hansen David Zeagler Robert Ray Prescott Thompson 401 H I D A C H I Arlin Hartunian Hilbig Vollbrecht Baratone Barry Hefner Kattge Holloway Klotz Barnes Thomas Cadenazzi Crete Nicholas Sbarbaro Caldiera Laubacher Schuck Stebbins Waring Boulware McClard 860 ASHBURY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. FOUNDED AT ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, 1883. ZETA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1902 TWENTY-THREE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Dr. H. B. Carey Dr. T. C. Daniels F. W. Johnson F. W. Nish Dr. J. F. Oneto M. T. W. MacWilliam SENIORS Ray Arlin John L. Baratone William J. Barry Volney W. Bursell Stanley S. Cadenazzi William Crete Lloyd Edwards Homer Welty JUNIORS Fred Caldiera Ralph Hilbig Jack Holloway Charles R. Klotz Ernest C. Hartunian Harold H. Hefner Ralph Kattge John McCracken Alfred C. Nicholas William Royal Eugene Sbarbaro Frank Laubacher Lawrence Schuck Charles Stebbins Earl Vollbrecht SOPHOMORES Clifford C. Barnes Harry Hinds Louis Lencioni Arthur Schilling Stanley Thomas Albert Waring FRESHMEN William Boulware Alan McClard PLEDGES Raymond Edmonds Donald Rhinehart Arthur Wilson 402 I I H I Bailey Ballard Co ' linqe Seydcl Wilson Cunningham Brown Danford McArthur Grimmer Hamlin Lawrence Lynch Hemphill Horner Martin Stern McMurry Schwocrer Nielsen Payne Parker Perry Bird Bishop Ausburger Berryman Ratnbone Renwick 745 PARNASSUS AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO. FOUNDED AT ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, 1889 IOTA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1895 FORTY-FIVE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Dr. George L. Bean Dr. F. C. Bettencourt Dr. Elmer C. Chappell Dr. George W. Cowden Dr. C. W. Craig Dr. A. DeFerrari Dr. Roscoe H. Dewitt Dr. Stanley Erpf Dr. Erwin W. Ferber Dr. C. D. Gwinn Dr. George W. Hahn Dr. F. H. Hare Dr. H. Walter Harrison Dr. Melvin G. Henningsen Dr. L. A. Hewitt Dr. Chester W. Johnson Dr. Howard M. Johnston Dr. Alex J. Ker Dr. Guy S. Millberry Dr. H. A. Nagle Dr. Ernest M. Setzer Dr. Carl H. Showalter Dr. G. H. Terwilliger Dr. K. F. Terwilliger Dr. J. R. Weeden Dr. Lloyd G. Welty Dr. Donald P. White Dr. Seymore G. Winslow Dr. J. L. Wood Dr. C. J. Zappetini Dr. Thomas J. Zingheim SENIORS Alban L. Bailey Murray L. Ballard James W. Collinge, Jr. Owen W. Cornell Charles D. Hemphill JUNIORS Jackson F. Bean Mervin G. Cunningham James H. Hechtman Sluarl F. Stern Donald B. Horner John H. Parker Andrew J. Perry Charles A. Seydel William S. Wilson J. S. Martin Herbert L. Nordstrom John T. Owens SOPHOMORES Saxton Bird George Bishop Fred Brown Porter R. Danford, Jr. R. M. MoArthur Ralph McMurry Wendell Schwoerer Byron Thomas Wilbur Wann Graham West ERESHMEN Russell Augsburger Carroll H. Berryman Elmo Grimmer Dana A. Hamlin Clifford S. Lawrence Louis Lynch Arne G. Nielsen Robert D. Payne John S. Rathbone Jack K. Renwick 403 i SORORITIES 404 405 A i i; Anthony Cadman Hook Shaefter Baker Crew La Cabe Sondhaus Barton Davis McVean Thomson Bibber Frome Mayer Turnbull Biggerstaff George Miles Tyler Booth Holmes Monsky Vincent Burnham Homer Nye Wharton (Intersorority Organization) FOUNDED AT CHICAGO, 1902 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1916 OFFICERS { ' resident PEGGY HOMER Secretary-Treasurer ALISON THOMSON Social Chairman ROSE ANTHONY Rushing Chairman BARBARA VINCENT MEMBERS Alpha Chi Omega Lucile Hook Alpha Delta Pi . . Leola Wharton Alpha Epsilon Phi Joy Monsky Alpha Gamma Delta Rose Anthony Alpha Omirron Pi Dorothy Davis Alpha Phi Helen B ' gS erstaff I Elizabeth Cadman Alpha Xi Delta Elinor George Areta M. Carmen Burnham Beta Phi Alpha Gertrude Tyler Beta Sigma Omicron Ruth Sondhaus Casa Hispana M. Luisa LaCabe Chi Omega Emma Miles Delta Delta Delta Mada Frome Delta Gamma Hallie Booth Delta Zeta Noreen Barton Gamma Phi Beta Peggy Homer Kappa Alpha Theta Martha Crew Kappa Delta Marie Shaeffer Kappa Kappa Gamma Alison Thomson Phi Mu Ruth MrVean Phi Omega Pi Elelya Baker Phi Sigma Sigma Dorothy Miller r- i. r i_- Barbara Vinrent Pi Beta Phi ) I Mary JNye ( Mary Turnbull higma Kappa ; Theta Upsilon . Zeta Tau Alpha Roxana Holmes .Gertrude Bibber ... Helen Mayer 407 ALPHA C H I OMEGA Vincent Carlson Cookinham Henry Hook Kellogg, B. Lindsay Mackie Sedgwick Spicer Walters Ward Willson Anderson. A. Gibb Kellogg, A. Kendall Kilgore Lucas Lytle Masters Newman Wilson Alltucker Barnes Bischott Newton Sinnott Taeger Welsh Oownie Footman Gatewood Goble Layne Livingston McGogy O ' Hara Kelly Lee Blouin Buffum Sears Shilling Anderson, J. Bullock Reinhold Sharp Burns Stapleton Carroll Smith Dam Voorheis Dewey Tomasini 1756 LE ROY AVENUE. FOUNDED AT DE PAUW UNIVERSITY, 1885 PI CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1909 FIFTY-NINE CHAPTERS GRADUATE M. Elizabeth Vincent SENIORS Margaret F. Blower Norma M. Carlson Billie A. Cookinham " Janet Ames Elizabeth J. Henry Lucile M. Hook Barbara F. Kellogg G. Elizabeth Kelly JUNIORS Ann B. Anderson Hazel V. Blouin Peggy Buffum Mildred B. Burns Barbara J. Davis Dorothy Gibb Anne N. Kellogg Elizabeth A. Kendall Mary S. Kilgore Katharine C. Lucas Joan Lee Marjorie H. Lindsay Gladys F. Mackie Caroline R. Sedgewick Genevieve Spicer Pauline H. Walters Elouise M. Ward Barbara Willson Florabelle Lytle Margery Manchester Mary E. Masters Mary Dale Newman Jane L. Parsons Elinore B. Sears Marie Shilling Shirley Stapleton Bettie Voorheis Jean P. Wilson SOPHOMORES Margaret Alltucker E. Ann Ponedel Margaret E. Barnes Harriet Sinnott June Bischoff Margaret Taeger Pauline A. Newton Fayette E. Welsh FRESHMEN Jane E. Anderson Bobbie G. Bullock Elizabeth K. Carroll Ann H. Dewey Mildred Downie Aileen V. Footman Mary Ann Gatewood Jean Goble Aileen Layne Eugenia C. Livingston Mary Elizabeth McGog Patricia A. O ' Hara Emily Reinhold M. Eleanor Robinson Anita J. Sharp Margaret E. Smith Dorothy J. Tomasini 408 " Absent on leave. ALPHA DELTA P I Hopkins irhart Blinn Bostic Burke, F. Cresap Oiehl El, in Herri ott Jeffery Kroells McBride Miller Newman O ' Day Pray Schmittou Smith, N. Wharton Babcock Burke, A. Ensign Flint Hall Johnston Kerns Muller Nickerson Quigley Richardson Rogers Smith, E. Warner Wattles Vager Zampa Atkins Baldwin Brimberry Casey Dahleen Dailey Davis Douglass Ewing Juergens Lemmon Lucas Mauer Miller Pracy Putnam Righetti Schmidt Stable Wolf Woltz Becker Darby Eder Hall Hinz Imholf Jones Johnston McConnell Morafae Schord Thomas 2400 PIEDMONT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT WESLEYAN FEMALE COLLEGE, 1851 PSI CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1913 FIFTY-FIVE CHAPTERS SENIORS Eleanor Blinn Evelyn L. Bostic Frances G. Burke Lavinia Cresap Janet E. Diehl Lucile A. Elvin Dorothea D. Herriott Elizabeth A. Hopkins Josephine Ann Jeffery JUNIORS Pauline Babcock Alice M. Burke Elizabeth P. Carr Leona E. Ensign Emily-ann Flint Janet B. Hall Constance H. Johnston Elizabeth C. Kerns Genevieve H. Muller Claire R. Zampa Catherine Kroells Elizabeth McBride Merrillyn L. Miller Lois M. Newman Patricia A. O ' Day Margaret H. Pray O. Jane Schmittou Nornia E. Smith Leola I. Wharton Margaret A. Nickerson Miriam C. Quigley Frances M. Richardson F. Gail Rogers Elizabeth J. Smith Ruth H. Warner Dorothy E. Warren Mary E. Wattles Jane Yager SOPHOMORES L. Ellen Atkins Bernice M. Baldwin Joan F. Brimberry Mary M. Casey Elizabeth K. Dahleen Mary M. Dailey Barbara J. Davis Eniilie L. Douglas Louise C. Ewing M. Elizabeth Gearhart M. Jane Juergens Norma Lemmon Jeannette E. Lucas Marjorie Mauer B. Jeanne Miller Beverly J. Pracy Patricia Putnam Marie Righetti Barbara M. Schmidt Helen J. Stahle Irmgard F. Wolf Janice Woltz FRESHMEN Jean C. Baker Natalie Becker Elaine C. Darby Dorothy M. Eder Marjorie Hall Shirley Hinz Virginia R. Imhoff Emily E. Jones Martha J. Johnston Margaret McConnell Elizabeth A. Morabe Elizabeth R. Schord Betty Ann Thomas 409 ALPHA E P S I L N P H I Blum Kirske Kay Horwitz Grabstein Karski Klein Lesser Kulakofsky Nathan Kahn Kohn Monsky Rudman, D. Lippow Wagner Schneider, A. Spiro Levy Randle Schneider, L. Silverman Colin, D. Ginsburg Todresic Cotin, L. Rhine Rosenberg Block Jacoby Goldware Hirschberg Cohn, M. Geballe Rudman, J. Williams CHANNING WAY FOUNDED AT BARNAKI) COLLEGE, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, 1909 TAU CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1922 TWENTY-NINE CHAPTERS SENIORS Frieda A. Blum Joy Monsky Goldie M. Grabstein Dorothy Ann Rudman Ruth S. Karski Louise F. Schneider Dorothy R. Silverman SOPHOMORES Dorothy E. Cohn Marjorie N. Ginsburg Shirley L. Goldware Elinor Hirschberg Shirley R. Kay Evelyn Kulakofsky Margaret B. Nathan Audrey Y. Schneider Meredyth F. Spiro Marcelle N. Todresic JUNIORS Florence L. Block Sylvia Jacoby Barbara M. Kirske Jannette Wagner Harriette R. Klein Phyllis G. Lesser Florence Lippow FRESHMEN Lorraine F. Cohn Marjorie L. Cohn Miriam Geballe Rita L. Horwitz Phyllis Kahn Rae E. Kohn Barbara Ann Levy Lucy Mae Randle Marjorie J. Rhine Violet A. Rosenberg Janice Rudman Helen R. Williams 410 A L I 1 H A (i A M M A U E L T McDonough Kemp Wolfenden Rakestraw Miller Leach Fencel Hoaq Phillips Pearl Bonstin Smith, M. Browning Ebell O ' Neill Seaman Anthony Bassett Coates Smith, I. Stephens Watson Acktey Coney Damn Puccinelli Reuter Rogers Sarver Sehorn Sweet Damon Deacon Harrington Holland Lmde Lowe Fitzgerald Hammond Marshall Morris Oatman Patterson Floyd Jensen Douthitt Ellis Fortune Taylor Wagner Wellman McNutt Merrill Perry Scott Se.bel Tuttle 2726 CHANNING WAY. FOUNDED AT SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, 1904 OMICRON CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1915 FORTY-FIVE CHAPTERS GRADUATE Lou Ella Fencel Mary Louise Gessling Gay Louise Hoag STUDENTS Virginia Mathews Grace O ' Neill Dorothy E. Seaman SENIORS Rose E. Anthony Elsie E. Bassett Vera C. Coates Dorothy V. Floyd Lois V. Jensen Barbara M. MrDonough Ruth E. Miller G. Marie Phillips Irma Smith Ada Frances Stephens Beatrice A. Watson JUNIORS Clare E. Ackley Alexa A. Coney C. Virginia Damni Shirley B. Douthitt K. Elizabeth Ellis Elizabeth K. Fortune Lucile Kemp Virginia Leach Betty Rae Pearl Helen Wolfenden Doria V. Puccinelli Evelyn F. Reuter G. Gail Rogers Helen M. Sarver Marjorie Y. Sehorn Wilma M. Sweet Elizabeth L. Taylor Barbara L. Wagner Elna H. Wellman SOPHOMORES L. Janet Bonstin Jayne A. Browning Mary E. Damon Dorothea Deacon June G. Harrington Betty J. Holland Marjo Smith Margaret E. Linde E. Jean Lowe Linda McNutt Mary E. Merrill Anna L. Perry Mary Rakestraw FRESHMEN Lucille A. Ebell Betty Ann Fitzgerald Barbara Hammond Beverly C. Marshall Patricia B. Morris Margaret E. Oatman Dorothy J. Patterson Elizabeth H. Scott Elaine C. Seibel Margaret L. Tuttle 411 ALPHA M I C R N P I Smith Stall! MacKay Graff Appleton Streeter Young Wood Zeus Merrill Piersol Harlowe Bussey Cline Crane Davis Force Goodrich Atkinson Campbell, R. Chamberlain Felthouse Hart Hattie Bellingham Cramer Godt Hawkins Henderson Hennessey, L. Power Smith Van Wagenen Withers Archer Bailey Hennessey, L. F. Kline Kyle La Nicca Le Roy Miller Moore Jackson Kruse Jensen Ingalls Campbell, M. Nelson Kuerzel Lennon Scott Jones, B. Jones, H. Davis, A. Davis, E. Sherman Tarn Shean McCargar Dondero von Morpurgo 2311 PROSPECT STKEET FOUNDED AT BARNARD COLLEGE, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, 1897 SIGMA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1907 FORTY-TWO CHAPTERS SENIORS Patricia Appleton Mary Helen Bussey Doris I. Cline Susanna M. Crane Dorothy R. Davis Marion B. Force Virginia S. Goodrich 412 JUNIORS Marion L. Atkinson Ruth Gene Campbell Shirley E. Chamberlain Marie E. Felthouse Barbara E. Gale Audrey V. Hart Elaine L. Hattie " Ahse.nl on leave. UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Mildred Bell Bernice Hubbard Etta Haynes Dobbin Isabel H. Jackson Margaret Eddy Stone Dorothy G. Jackson Rosemary J. Kruse Jean Kuerzel Jane E. Lovell Arvilla T. Smith Beverley Streeter Portia E. Young SOPHOMORES Alice F. Bellingham Hortense Jones Beatrice McCargar June Mackay Marjorie A. Merrill Helynn F. Piersol Marion F. Power E. Marian Smith Eleanor C. Crammer Marie J. Godt Rosemary A. Hawkins Norma L. Henderson Lenore Hennessey Margaret L. Ingalls Bette Jones Billie Withers Sue G. Van Wagenen Barbara F. Jensen Patricia A. Lennon Eleanor H. Scott Jane M. Shean Virginia E. Stahl I oi inn. R. Wood Christine M. Zeus FRESHMEN Jane Archer Tessa Dean Bailey Marvis L. Campbell Alice D. Davis Elizabeth J. Davis Patricia Dondero Janice M. Graff Bette W. Harlowe Lilian F. Hennessey Janice D. Kline Dorothy Kyle Margaret B. La Nicca Marjorie I. Le Roy Virginia Miller Elizabeth H. Moore Margaret E. Nelson E. Elizabeth Sherman Bayona J. Tarn Lois R. von Morpurgo A H H I 1 Townsend Parker Hook Clark Baker Vail Sherwood Palmer Cltne Biggerstaff Barry Smith Roedinq Craig. J. Cadman Bennett Walter Scholi Denby Cameron Bowman Allen, A. Skaife Jennings Craig. M. Butltr Allen, J. Sorrick Jones Davidson Corse Amend Strong Mahon Erskine Denby Brainerd Vincent Osborne Gray Holder Davis Welch Salsig Mosenthal Hutchison Detert Wickett Sninn Otto Kennedy Dingley Alexander Shoemake Rushforth Legoett Doelker Bailey Thatcher Nott Finlayson Barieau Yuill 2830 BANCROFT WAY. FOUNDED AT SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, 1872 LAMBDA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1901 THIRTY-SIX CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATE Barbara Armstrong Ian SENIORS SOPHOMORES Margaret Baker Helen C. Biggerstaff Elizabeth Cadman Dorothy E. Cameron Margaret M. Craig EiIeen R. Davidson Carolyn F. Erskine Catherine J. Gray Joan E. Mosenthal Barbara J. Otto Elizabeth H. Rushforth Nan E. Townsend " Barbara L. Vail Anne C. Allen Joan S. Allen Ellen M. Amend Eleanor M. Brainerd Janet F. Davis Gabriele H. Detert Anne C. Dingley Florence M. Doelker Mary Elizabeth Finlayson .! MII Hoagland Elizabeth P. Hook Jean Palmer Jane C. Roeding M ,H no E. Scholz Margery M. Skaife Barbara E. Sorrick Polly M. Strong Janet Vincent Barbara Welch ' Caroline E. Wickett JUNIORS Betty Barry Barbara Bennett Virginia G. Bowman Betty L. Butler Jean A. Corse Inez M. Denby Mary R. Holden Elizabeth Hutchison Helen W. Kennedy Jeanne A. Leggett Edith A. Nott Jane Parker E. Jane Sherwood Janet B. Smith Janet Walter FRESHMEN Jean Alexander Mary Lou Bailey Doreta Barieau Kathleen Clark Catherine H. Cline Jean E. Craig Margaret H. Jennings Jean H. Yuill Barbara I. Jones Phyllis Fay Mahon Anne Osborne D. Elizabeth Salsig Anna M. Shinn Jean A. Shoemake Claire Thatcher Absent on leave. 413 Adams George Colby Dexter Tinnemann, J. Wiley Phillis Rountree Hartter, D. McKinley Minard Pickard Reid Simmons Brownlee Bullis Butcher Douglas Hartvig Kleeberger Larson Pettygrove Pierce Quinn Staehling Tinnemann, E. Buffington Edwards Elder Eldridge Graham Hartter, N. McRae Neal Paddon Bouton Caldecott Claxton Foreman Jacobsen McCleer Moseley O ' Neal Preisker 2833 BANCROFT WAY. FOUNDED AT LOMBARD COLLEGE, 1893 OMICRON CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1909 FIFTY-SIX CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Evelyn Lewis Stewart Dr. Alice Maxwell Marjorie Gear Petray GRADUATES Betty E. Feist Clementine Violieh SENIORS Marian Adams Elinor V. George Doris E. Hartter Allayne M. McKinley Jean Tavernetti JUNIORS Elizabeth J. Brownlee Barbara D. Bullis Phyllis J. Butcher Virginia D. Colby Dorothy A. Dexter l- ' iln I G. Douglas Barbara A. Fawke Mildred .. Hartvig Mary J. Wiley Margaret H. Minard Bonnie O. Pirkard Donna M. Reid M. Charlotte Simmons Dorothy A. Kleeberger Urda K. Larson Jeanette M. Pettygrove June L. Pierce Edith C. Quinn Donna M. Staehling Ethel M. Tinnemann Jeanne M. Tinnemann SOPHOMORES Nancy A. Buffington Barbara A. Edwards June T. Elder Betty J. Eldridge Ruth I. Graham Jean Rountree Jeanne V. Bouton F. Elizabeth Caldecott Majorie H. Claxton Janet L. Foreman Nancy E. Hartter Marilyn H. McRae Blossom M. Neal Patricia E. Paddon Miriam A. Phillis FRESHMEN Frances A. Jacobsen Eleanor R. McCleer Nancy Moseley Betty F. O ' Neal Patricia A. Preisker 414 H A Morris Kyne Owens Burnham Morris Pollard Carlson Neill Radcmacher. A. 1 Rademacher, M. Sherman Connor Perry Robinson Stump Haney Hessel Baker Bond Sutherland Drew Logan JL Mackie Jameson Copley Griffen Michels Morell France McLellan Pollard Margraves MacDonald Tweed HASTE STREET FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS ANGELES, 1925 BETA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1929 THREE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Karen E. Anderson Edith A. Bishop SENIORS M. Carmen Burnham Doris M. Connor Dorothy S. Harvey Margaret I. Hessel Virginia Jameson LaVerne B. Morell JUNIORS Frances Baker BIythe V. Bond Phyllis M. Copley Winifred C. France E. Elizabeth Sutherland Edna F. Morris Irene G. Morris Roberta Neill E. Gene Perry Doris L. Carlson Evelyn Stewart Lota E. Hargraves Ardell Rademacher Beatrice M. Robinson Gladys Kyne Margaret L. Pollard SOPHOMORES Miriam M. D. Drew Evelyn F. Griffen Mary Alice Little Doris E. MacDonald M. Irene Stump FRESHMEN Charlotte Logan M. Jeanette Mackie Betty Ann McClellan Elizabeth L. Owens Miriam E. Rademacher Florence L. Sherman Patricia B. Michels Dorothy L. Pollard Marcia H. Tweed 415 BETA P H I ALPHA Cole Scott Harbach Elliott Keep Bailey Baxter Hornblower Mullen Yates Hutchinson Collins Sharp Kelner Diet? Tyler Lopez Murphy Young 2725 HASTE STREET. CALIFORNIA, 1909 ALPHA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1909 THIRTY-FOUR CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATE Fanny Bulger GRADUATES Ruth L. Elliott Dorothy R. Keep SENIORS Frances E. A. Bailey Ola V. Baxter Margaret B. Cole Betty A. Collins Margaret P. Dietz Dorothy L. Hornblower Lorna E. Mullen F. Jean Scott Vivian I. Sharp Gertrude A. Tyler Elsie M. Yates JUNIOR Dorothy N. Hutchinson SOPHOMORE Ellis J. Harbach FRESHMEN Dorothy M. Kelner Mary E. Lopez Thelma Murphy Mildred M. Young 416 15 A S I (i M A U M I (} N Bond Klein Knapp Mayo Delehanty Harris Hensley Jackson Kausen Meals Sondhaus, M. Sondhaus, R. Wahlheim Crestetto Hadlen Marlanl Scott Tressel Tucker 2415 PROSPECT STREET. FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI, 1888 ALPHA IOTA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1927 TWENTY-TWO CHAPTERS GRADUATE Virginia L. Hoessel SENIORS Elizabeth I. Bond Julia Dalton Knapp Isabel O. Klein Margaret V. Mayo Sarah R. Putnam SOPHOMORES Ernestine M. Crestetto Florence I. Hadlen M. Ardeane Marian! Elizabeth L. Scott Betty Jane Tressel JUNIORS Helen L. Delehanty Virginia J. Harris Agnes M. Hensley Marjorie Jackson Ella Jean Kausen Absent on leave. Jeannette F. Meals Mildred F. Sondhaus Ruth L. Sondhaus Margaret W. Sumner Jeanne ' A. Wahlheim FRESHMEN " Josephine L. Hart " Virginia S. Tucker 417 C A A H I 8 ANA Barbierl Canan Dcwhirst Fuller Lacabe Rantz Telonicher Vieira Duarte Grip Gunderson Livingston Ron Woods Ambrose Filice Harvey Norton Mello Ramos Soletti Thompson Williams Mack Whiting Harden Laurence Pharlss Saxton Tetzlafl 2562 LE CONTE AVENUE. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1928 ONE CHAPTER GRADUATES Ines Barbieri Ruth Allene Canan Margaret Dewhirst Frances M. Fuller Martina Luisa Lacabe Marie Helen Rantz Olga T. Telonicher Mary Vieira SENIORS Consuelo Duarte Lillian H. Crip Hazel M. Gunderson JUNIORS Rose K. Ambrose Rose Filice Virginia Harvey Jane Horton Jean Livingston Auria Ron Glennette B. Woods Olive Mello Antonia Ramos Ellen Louise Soletti Mary Dell Thompson SOPHOMORES Dorothy Mack Ave Maria Whiting FRESHMEN Dorothy L. Harden Emily Laurence Helen Victoria Williams Margaret E. Tetzlaff Margaret Phariss Georgia M. Saxton Absent on leave. 418 C H 1 M i; A Allardt Allen Archambeault Behrens Brinck Hagstrom Holloway McGrath Miles, E. Morehouse Nichol, A. Niemann Sly Williamson, A. L. Wilson Christy Derr Gray Haley Hazzard McCall, M. Pratt Richardson Tretheway White Anderson Becker Bowman Bullock Cameron Chichlzola Confer Jones Malmgren Miles, M. Parrish Poppe Post Pringle Randell Russell Shuster Smith Stanton Williamson, C. Woodfield Goudie Heffner McCall, L. Muller Nichol, E. Richard Shaw 2421 PIEDMONT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS, 1895 MU CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1902 EIGHTY-NINE CHAPTERS SENIORS SOPHOMORES Jane L. Allardt Barbara Allen Betty A. Archambeault Carleen J. Behrens W. Jean Brinck Adele S. Brooks (Catherine S. Douglas Anita M. Hagstrom Martha E. Holloway Elizabeth C. McGrath Emma I. Miles Virginia J. Morehouse Anne L. Nichol Lavinia Niemann Alice Shaw Margaret M. Sly Mary K. Webber Alice Louise Williamson N. Frances Wilson JUNIORS Retha Christy Ruth E. Derr Jessie H. Gray Anne Marie Haley Ethel M. Hazzard Absent on leave. Marjory McCall Elizabeth A. Pratt Hazel Jeanne Richardson Lucille J. Tretheway B. Roxie White Betty Anne Anderson Helene Becker Dorothy E. Bowman Elizabeth J. Bullock Betty M. Cameron Marion F. Chichizola Beatrice N. Confer S. Antoinette Jones Margaret D. Lorimer Jane Malmgren Marion Miles Gail G. Woodfield Helen A. Parrish M. Patricia Poppe Janet M. Post Jane Lee Pringle Elizabeth Randall Isabel E. Rowbotha n T. Aileen Russell Peggy R. Schuster Eleanor N. Smith Helen B. Stanton Claudia V. Williamson FRESHMEN Betty Jean Goudie Elizabeth E. Heffner Lorraine McCall Caro June Muller Betty F. Nichol Anne L. Richard Geraldine Shaw 419 E L T A DELTA DELTA Baker Dodge Fmlay. L. Frome Johnson Lyon Olson Sebastian Waybur Bailey Bingaman Burnam Lightfoot Perkey Shulte Wright Batmale Bishop Donovan Eddy Finlay, S. Hadsell Names Howson Kearns McFall Scofield Friend Gould Hart Hartzel Henck Herrick Hockett Holmberg Jones Jost Miller Perkins Skerry Thomas White Winton 1735 LE ROY AVENUE. FOUNDED AT BOSTON UNIVERSITY, 1888 PI CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1900 EIGHTY-EIGHT CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Sue M. Love Alice Porterfield G. L. Roeth SENIORS Mary Elizabeth Baker Alison F. Dodge L. Crowell Finlay Mada M. Frome Margaret Waylmr SOPHOMORES Jane A. Johnson Kdna May Lyon M. Elizabeth Olson Winifred Sebastian JUNIORS Betty Bailey Barbara G. Bingaman Dorothy G. Burnham Harriet C. Wright Katherine F. Lighlfoot Mary Perkey Alberta E. Shulte Antoinette J. Batmale Verl M. Bishop Shirley A. Donovan M. Eleanor Eddy Sarah C. Finlay Barbara Hadsell Jeanne E. Haines Mary J. Howson Doris R. Kearns Molly MrFall Marion M. Scofield FRESHMEN Doris J. Friend Cora E. Gould Elise G. Hart Janet C. Hartzell Ann P. Henck A. Virginia Herrick Dorothy D. Hockett Betty C. Holmberg Ruth P. Jones Carmella N. Jost Janice C. Miller E. Elizabeth Perkin- Geraldine ( ' .. Skerry Elsie M. Thomas Betty Louise White Kathryn D. Winton 420 I) A B A M M Leach Booth, H. Burnt. D. Dorsey Fuller Huntington Meiklejohn Freer Lester, A. Macaulay McLeod Moon Poat Byrne Heilig Hughes Jackson Jones Kllnker Stephens Thieme Booth. J. Boyd Brazier Brown Lester, S. Morris Paramino Paulsen Perrine Rice Monroe Stoepel Balantine Bourgeault Brun Power Quinn Reed Andross Bell Lilly McCarthy Mathews Neville Polin Burge, B. Dewell Eckart Greenlin Griffin Roger Ross-Lewin Saph Schedler Somers de Bach Fairchild Bridge Bush Schuessler Stava Griswold Hoyt Waybur Wells 2710 CHANNING WAY. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI, 1874 (;AMMA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 190? FORTY-EIGHT CHAPTERS SENIORS Hallie M. Booth Delavan A. Burge Virginia A. Dorsey Lois E. Fuller JUNIORS Bala Ballantine Leslie F. Bourgeault Anna J. Brun Alice de Bach Elizabeth B. Fairchild Frances F. Freer ' Eleanor Gaddis Sara H. Reed Mary Jane Huntington Ann V. Meiklejohn Aytla G. Monroe Francis A. Stoepel Adrienne R. Lester Betty Macaulay Barbara Dee McLeod Caryl Moon Kathryn M. Poat M. Beverly Power M. Elizabeth Quinn SOPHOMORES Jeanne Andross Patricia A. Bell Martha Bridge Carroll O. Bush Betty L. Byrne Ruth L. Heilig Marian M. Hughes Janet Jackson Audrey E. Jones Jean B. Thieme FRESHMEN Jean C. Booth Hope S. Boyd Betty Brazier Barbara A. Brown Barbara A. Burge Jane A. Dewell Elizabeth H. Eckart Francise L. Greenlin Patricia M. Griffin Virginia R. Griswold Ella Margaret Hoyt Barbara W. Leach ' Martha S. Welb Laurie Klinker Alice Mary Lilly Patricia McCarthy Christine Mathews Diane L. Neville Elizabeth Polin Barbara M. Schuessler Margaret W. Stava Aloise Stephens Susan A. Lester Claire V. Morris Carolyn A. Paramino Bernice R. Paulsen Isabel C. Perrine Mary D. Rice ' Gabrielle M. Roger Viola T. Ross-Lewin Betsy L. Saph Elsa L. Schedler Jean W. Somers Anne Waybur 421 Absent on leai-e. I) A A Barton Feyen Henrich Kidd, A. King Plumb Rector Riley Sachs Cooperrider Hillefeld, M. Kidd, E. O ' Kelly Bullock Decker Feehan Helbig Hicok Hillefeld, H. Laughlin McClure Muller Purser Schafer Storey Copper Lane Quinn Schmidt Taylor Zimmerman 2311 LE CONTE AVENUE. FOUNDED A 1 IVERSITY, 1902 MU CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1915 FIFTY-SEVEN CHAPTERS SENIORS SOPHOMORES " Katherine V. Alexander Noreen Barton Cathleen Feyen N. Helen Henrich Anne B. Kidd Mary E. King Elizabeth M. Plumb Ruth G. Rector Helen Riley Beverly B. Sachs JUNIORS Clare Cooperrider Marie Hillefeld Absent on leave. Emily L. Kidd F. Lutitia O ' Kelly Margaret Ann Bullock Kathrin K. Decker Catherine M. Feehan Mary G. Helbig Marjorie A. Hicok Henrietta E. Hillefeld Mary Elizabeth Laughlii Roberta J. McClure Maurine G. Muller Margaret M. Purser Dorothea Jeanette Schal Betty E. Storey FRESHMEN B. Babette Copper Edith M. Lane Mary L. Quinn Barbara M. Schmidt Virginia L. Taylor Jeanne I. Zimmerma 422 A M M A I ' H I II E T A Craft Giffen Grennan Homer Leutzinger Miller Pinkerton Seville Burns Caldwell, J. Gadsden Houwers Huguenin Lutz Matteson McCann McCorriston Moss Pentecost Powell Reed Bly Colton Cheroske Craig Gardner Gorrill, A. E. Gorrill, S. P. Hamshaw Harrold Helmer Hoffman Kitchener Moyer Siska Swift Bennett Catton Kelly Langworthy Lockwood Oakley Reid Smith Goemmer Hancock Caldwell, B. J. Collins Locarnlni Marx Vollmann Zumwalt 2732 CHANNING WAY. FOUNDED AT SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, 1874 ETA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1894 FORTY-EIGHT CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Alice G. Hoyt Violet B. Marshall Jane Richardson SENIORS Carol Craft Lorene Giffen Dorothy V. Grennan Peggy E. Homer JUNIORS Jean Burns Jane Caldwell F. Elizabeth Gadsden Phyllis E. Goemmer Ruth J. Hancock Mary B. Houwers Jeanne M. Huguenin Ruth M. Leutzinger Frances M. Miller Agnes E. Pinkerton Jean Seville Virginia Lutz Margaret V. Matteson Doris R. McCann Jean McCorriston Frances K. Moss Barbara V. Pentecost Jane S. Powell Priscilla A. Reed SOPHOMORES Burris A. Bly Betty Jane Caldwell Patricia A. Collins Mary Elizabeth Colton Eleanor A. Cheroske Jean M. Craig Anne E. Gorrill Sally P. Gorrill Peggy E. Gardner Jane C. Hamshaw Eleanor A. Harrold Elizabeth F. Helmer Rachel M. Hoffman Barbara Joyce Betty A. Kitchener Martha H. Locarnini Betty Marx Mary Jane Moyer Virginia P. Swift Olga M. Siska FRESHMEN Mary Frances Bennett Jeanne Catton Betty Jean Kelly Helen Langworthy Leslie A. Lockwood Barbara Oakley Anna May Reid Joyce Marie Smith Annette Vollmann Saralee Zumwalt .f serU on leave. 423 ALPHA T H E T Bunker Fletcher Moffett Kleeberger Lion Church. B. M. Cox. M. A. Church, E. Connick Rowell Sloan May Parrish Dahl Dierssen Crew Finch Madden Higgins MacDavid Whelan, M. Droste, F. P. Elston Button Uelsmann Yelton Ballentine Cox. J. P. Ditzler Garrettson Gibson Jones Pattiani Peiser Phelps Poetz Wachob Adams Anderson Bernsten Bertz Droste, C. Erwin Heckscher Hoisholt Landsborough Lauriston Newhall Quinn Whelan, J. 2723 DURANT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT DE PAUW UNIVERSITY, 1870 OMEGA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1890 SIXTY-SEVEN CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Charles Fenton Clark Madre Merrill SENIORS Elizabeth Bunker Eleanor Church (Catherine Connick Martha Crew Jean M. Douglas Margaret Whelan SOPHOMORES M. Frances Finch Shirley F. Frick Edith V. Hadden Jean R. Higgins Bettyann MacDavid JUNIORS F. Patricia Droste Patricia C. 1 . 1-ton Pauline E. Fletcher Nadine Moffett Betty Lou Yelton Elizabeth Rowell Lillian E. Sloan Barbara A. Sutton Dorothy L. Uelsmann Lucy E. Ballantine Ann C. Berryhill Suzanne Bocqueraz Jane P. Cox Elizabeth M. Ditzler Jean Garrettson Jane Gibson Jean A. Kleeberger Mary Elizabeth Jones E. Josephine Lion Janet A. May Jane S. Parrish Ynez Pattiani Shirley L. Peiser Shirley E. Phelps C. Bettye Poetz Nancy H. Scott Patricia J. Wachob FRESHMEN Virginia W. Adams Helen E. Anderson Barbara I. Bernsten Jacqueline L. Bertz Beatrice M. Church Madelyn A. Cox Katherine B. Dahl Martha B. Dierssen Jane Whelan Carol Droste Cecelia W. Erwin Marian Heckscher A. Virginie Hoi lmli Antoinette Landsborou Jane Lauriston Catherine M. Newhall Jane R. Quinn ' Absent on leave. 424 I. A A I) Fowle Henne Fiscalini Flannery Webb Wenzel Beck Patterson Shaeffer Brink Chapman, M. M. Frame McDermott Miller Roelse Buerkle Chapman, 0. 0. Wilson Kennedy 2461 WARRING STREET. FOUNDED AT VIRGINIA STATE NORMAL, 1897 PHI CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1917 SIXTY-EIGHT CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATE Myrtle Frost GRADUATES Maurine Lee Casey Eunice Grouse Margaret A. Jones Marion J. Roach SENIORS Barbara E. Fowle Wilma M. Henne Dorothy G. Kaufman Margaret W. Patterson Marie C. Shaeffer JUNIORS Beverley Jane Balchin Jane C. Beach Betty H. Brink Martha M. Chapman Theresa Conens Margaret K. Fiscalini Billie Flannery Jean Frame Evelyn Jensen Patricia J. McDermott Evelyn B. Miller Margaret E. Roelse Eleanor A. Webb Ruth P. Wenzel SOPHOMORES Helen J. Beck Dorothy O. Chapman Exa Buerkle " Louise Smith Barbara J. Wilson " Absent on leave. 425 P P A GAMMA Castledim Creed Currier Thomson Webb Abbot Standish Btackaller Chickering Murpby Paquette Stanton Dabney Dibert Alexander Burt deFremery Dunham Upham Brown Farnum Gabriel, J. Hawley Johnson, C. Kent Clifton Courtright Elliott Haug Lund Gabriel, M. Greenlee Johnson, M. E. Johnson, S.M. Johnston Burke Corbet Dawson Hamilton Nine Leach Oppenheimer Rideout Nicolaus Rawlings Sproul LaBourdette Lewitt Luchsinger Massie Kerner McHenry Pugh Watson 2725 CHANNING WAY. FOUNDED AT MONMOUTH COLLEGE, 1870 PI CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 188 SEVENTY-TWO CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Martha A. Chickering Vera L. Christie Anita Crellin Mary B. Davidson Emily H. Huntington Lillie Margaret Sherman GRADUATE Margaret B. Wood SENIORS SOPHOMORES Joan Castledine Margery M. Creed Elizabeth V. Currier Augusta K. Dabney Betty L. Dibert Betty Farnum Jane Gabriel H. Elizabeth Hawley Charlotte Johnson Janis L. Kent Ruth M. Leach Nancy E. MacBride Betty Oppenheimer Clara A. Rideout Alison Thomson Virginia R. Webb Ann Blackaller Dorothy Chickering Edith deFremery Jean E. Dunham Mary Gabriel Phyllis Greenlee Marjorie E. Johnson Sheyla M. Johnson Barbara Johnston Suzanne T. La Bourdrttt Joanne Lewitt Anne H. Luchsinger Eleanor G. Massie Elizabeth Murphy Alta M. Paquette Mary C. Stanton Leonore A. Upham JUNIORS Jeanie O. Abbot Patricia Alexander Nancy E. Burt Caroline Clifton Barbara Courtright Jean Elliott Clerimond W. Haug Karin Lund Betty E. Nicolaus .Iran Rawlings Marion E. Sproul Patricia M. Standish KRKSHMKN Jeannine Brown Ann M. Burke L. Gwynn Corbet Eleanor Dawson Elizabeth Hamilton Carol L. Hine Rose Kerner Jean L. McHenry Janet C. Pugh Janet Watson 426 Absent on leave. M Budzien Campbell, A. F. Gilman Wright Budelman Campbell, H. Phillips Wood Bailey Yeaton Campbell. J. M. Fraser Kramer II TA Hund Laughlin Carpenter Oakin Hill Nichols Maggenti Parker McVean Veihmeyer Warren Gunton Hensley McLean Ohslund Thompson Whiting Roberts Steindorlt Walker 2722 DURANT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT WESLEYAN COLLEGE, 1852 ETA ALPHA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1916 SIXTY-EIGHT CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATE Delta R. Olsen GRADUATES Hallie E. Couch Marion G. Phillips SENIORS Gwenn L. Budzien Adele F. Campbell Jean Gilman Marie C. Hund Annabel Laughlin Ruth M. McVean Kathryn Veihmeyer Bernice M. Warren Virginia F. Wright JUNIORS Willa Jean Budelman Harriet E. Campbell L. Leola Carpenter Evelyn M. Dakin Helen W. Ferguson Emily A. Gunton Carolyn E. Hensley F. Patricia McLean Mary Margaret Murry Edith C. Phillips SOPHOMORES Peggy J. Bailey Ellen May Ohslund Margaret H. Hill Patricia Thompson Kathleen R. Nichols Claire S. Whiting Mary Katherine Yeaton FRESHMEN Jeanne A. Wood Jean M. Campbell Kathryn Fraser Margaret Kramer Florence M. Maggenti Florence E. Parker Kathleen R. Roberts Ruth E. Steindorff Frances Walker Absent on leave. 427 H I M A Baker Berry Chick Dunn Smith Stelfensen Zerwer Beers Madsen Allen Banner Carlson North Ormsby Semsen Swift Hector lie de Loge Engel Greves Hampton Wilson Elliott Norton Prising Fairbanks Krom Johnson Miles Nielsen Fleeson Hackmeier Iliff 2601 LE CONTE AVENUE. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA, 1910 CALIFORNIA ALPHA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1919 TWENTY-NINE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATE Pauline Hodgson GRADUATES Dorothea L. Allan Elizabeth Frank Elaine W. Morgan SENIORS Elelya B. Baker Anita J. Berry Annie May Chick Veryl D. Dunn Roberta E. Hector Dorothy F. Zerwer Barbara M. Ivie V. Authene Norton Isabelle A. Prising Catherine I. Smith Dorothy Steffensen JUNIORS Mary Ellen Been Ki Ida A. Cunningham R. Gwendolyn deLoge Virginia A. Engel Absent on leave. Sara J. Fairbanks Ruth E. Krom ' Melva M. Madsen Margaret E. Mayes 428 SOPHOMORES Hartley P. Allen Jean F. Bonner Alma C. Carlson Glenda L. Greves June-Adele Hampton Fay A. Johnson Arda Mae Miles Muriel E. Nielsen Virginia I. North Helen M. Ormsby Aubra A. Semsen Mary Ruth Swift (Catherine M. Wilson FRESHMEN R. Lucile Elliott Jeanne E. Fleeson Cecile M. Hackmeier Dorothy Iliff ) ' H I S I (i M A S I {} M A Lewis Mark Kahn Glickfeld Miller Morris Naqin Riga Oreyer Feldman Stone Behrendt Buchwald Coefield Shapiro 2709 CHANN1NG WAY. FOUNDED AT HUNTER COLLEGE, 1913 MU CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1926 TWENTY-SIX CHAPTERS GRADUATES Jeanne M. Lewis Ruth Mark SENIOR Thelma Kahn JUNIORS Nadine S. Glirkfeld Bertille J. Morris Dorothy L. Miller Marjorie M. Nagin Eleanor P. Riga SOPHOMORES Josephine B. Dreyer Queenie Feldman Helen R. Stone FRESHMEN Barbara L. Behrendt Ruth L. Burhwald Margaret A. Coefield Lillian Shapiro 429 1 B A H Barmby Clark Hagan Hamilton Hall, M. E. Hoffman Goeppert Grady Conlisk Edwards Maguire Martin Nye Vincent Kelly Thomson von Schmidt Whalen Allen Burke Hulse Kahl Mahan Makins Russell Booth Hall, M. A. Hill Kinqsland Kinnoch Lauppe Merrall Brainard Chase Frost Glass Everingham Fishel Moorhcad Rivolta 2325 PIEDMONT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT MONMOUTH COLLEGE, 1867 CALIFORNIA BETA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1900 EIGHTY CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATE Helen Fancher SENIORS SOPHOMORES Marian Barmby Constance M. Clark Betty Conlisk Peggy J- Edwards Leone Maguire Alice E. Martin Mary E. Nye Barbara Vincent JUNIORS Virginia Q. Brainard D. Frances Chase Barbara Foley Jean C. Hagan S. Virginia Hamilton Marjorie Kelly Sarah Jane Thomson Joan T. von Schmidt Mary Elizabeth Allen Patricia I. Burke Elizabeth D. Clark Ann C. Frost Nancy Lou Glass Martha E. Hall Betty Jane Hoffman Virginia B. Hulse Laverne E. Kahl Eleanor M. Mahan Betty Makins Margaret Ann Russell FRESHMEN Georgia E. Whalen Barbara E. Booth Nora Y. Brown Anne Everingham Winifred M. L. Fishel Vera Goeppert Patricia L. Grady Margaret A. Hall Alberta E. Hill Eleanor C. Kingsland Mary E. Kinnoch Norma J. Lauppe Hope Merrall Margaret Moorhead Helen D. Rivolta ' Absent on leave. 430 I 1 B M I. A I 1 I 1 A Boynton Clark Conrad Eggert Holmes Loubet Martignoni Monson Turnbull Coddington Harwell Lopes Steele Thomas White Baxter Houchins Kent Marsh Mason Mitchell Nelson Rider Searle, H. Waldner Yelland Allen Anderson Brown Egan Fatzer Henry Nightingill Noack Beeson Betts Stebbins Stoll Payne Rocca Searle, J. D. Stadtmuller Challoner Dugdale Thiele Turman Smith, M. A Smith, M. L. 2506 PIEDMONT AVENUE. FOUNDED AT COLBY COLLEGE, 1874 LAMBDA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1910 FIFTY CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATE Edith H. Clymer SENIORS SOPHOMORES Elsie B. Boynton Mary-Adele Clark Mary C. Conrad Alta L. Eggert Roxana C. Holmes Mary Eleanor Loubet Ella D. Martignoni Doris V. Monson Nancy E. Nightingill Ida R. Noack J. Dickie Searle Helen Stadtmuller Alma A. Tilley Mary J. Turnbull Mary E. Wallace JUNIORS Gladys C. Coddington ' Barbara J. Connick Jane F. Graham Ruberta L. Harwell Eleanor L. Lopes Josephine E. Steele Jean M. Thomas Mary K. White Juliet F. Baxter Jeannette Beeson Vinita E. Betts Carolyn F. Challoner Charlotte E. Dugdale Barbara Houchins Kathryn P. Kent Florabelle Marsh Lynette Mason Alberta M. Mitchell Ann E. Nelson Kathryn B. Rider Harriet L. Searle Chartley I. Stebbins Muriel M. Stoll Marian L. Thiele Frances L. Turman Sara E. Waldner Z. Louise Yelland FRESHMEN Jean T. Allen Eleanor M. Anderson Virginia E. Brown .1 nli- H. Egan Barbara I. Fatzer Rowenna A. Henry M. Geneva Payne ' Marian K. Rocca Marjorie A. Smith Miriam L. Smith Absent on leave. 431 H T A U I ' S I L N Brownlee Hall Brannan Clark Earhart Taresh Boulton Madsen Daly Tisher Burroughs Day Poole Wiest Hamilton Bee Gelston Gilkerson Beem Bibber Karstens Wehrheim Cross Betz Brown Rutherford 2527 WARRING STREET. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1911 ALPHA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1911 THIRTY-TWO CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Eleanore E. Bartlett Amy Darter Lucilc K. Czarnowski Helen M. Eveleth Myrna Montgomery GRADUATES Florence H. Brownlee Marian F. Cuneo SENIORS Helene L. Boulton Ernestine Burroughs Josephine M. Day Harriet G. Gelston Adele M. Gilkerson Dorothy M. Hall Ella Madsen Margaret Poole Rosalind M. Wiest Gloria L. Moots Marta Sherman SOPHOMORES Merle Cross Beatrice Earhart Catherine J. Taresh Aloha G. Tisher JUNIORS Dorothy J. Beem Gertrude L. Bibber Evelyn Brannan Mary H. Clark ' Absent on leave. Kathryn Daly Jeanette C. Hamilton Katharine Karstens Margaret R. Wehrheim FRESHMEN Betty Bee Lucille I ' " I Arley Brown Margaret Rutherford 432 I A T A U ALPHA Wentzel Wilson Reanier White McElhinney Reeve Abbott Brunje Fageol Woodside Searls Krimmel Green Agnew Toft Miller Mayer Boot Hatch Parker Meloan Covert Mavity Poppe Morris Grilling Snow Tolen Nason Horwinski Taylor Zugg 2420 LE CONTE AVENUE. FOUNDED AT THE VIRGINIA STATE NORMAL, 1898 CALIFORNIA UPSILON CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1915 SEVENTY-THREE CHAPTERS GRADUATES Romana Wentzel Lorraine E. Wilson SENIORS SOPHOMORES Margaret M. Fageol Vivian L. Green Helen J. Mayer Evelyn L. Meloan Muriel M. Morris Jean L. Nason Elsie K. Ramsey Helen E. Reanier Evelyn Schlichting Margaret S. White Dorothy V. Woodside JUNIORS Mary Jane Agnew Josephine C. Boot Loraine H. Covert Mary Lou Griffing Mary C. Horwinski Annette B. McElhinney Louise Reeve Jean P. Searls Barbara Hatrh Nancy Mavity Kathrine E. Snow Verna O. Taylor FRESHMEN Doris G. Toft June L. Abbott Janice Brunje Abbie Jean L. Krimmel G. Jeanne Miller Shirley J. Parker Peggy R. Poppe Virginia M. Tolen Lorraine A. Zugg 433 HONOR SOCIETIES CLUBS P H I BETA KAPPA (Scholastic Honor Society) FOUNDED AT WILLIAM AND MARY COLLEGE, 1776 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1898 ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTEEN CHAPTERS OFFICERS President V. F. LENZEN First V ice-President G. C. EVANS Second Vice-President W. E. FARNHAM Third V ice-President A. E. GORDON Secretary-Treasurer L. A. HARPER Recording Secretary A. H. ROWBOTHAM COUNCILLORS E. T. Grether A. H. Miller Carmel Thomas Henry F. May Bruce Waybur GRADUATES Lester R. Dray, Jr. Merle LaRue Krieger Thomas A. Amneus R. Keith Arnold Jay D. Bacon James Barkeley, Jr. Roberna M. Bassett Dorothy A. Bissell Eleanor Blinn Kenneth E. Bock Ronald C. Bradley E. Gary Brown E. Zabriskie Buck Hugh D. Burnhani James M. Carl, Jr. John B. Castiglione Abraham Charlock Edmond Cohn Henry C. Corke Joseph W. Cooper Robert H. Crede June De Lancey Katherine Dilworth Alfred W. Einarsson Stanley J. Elliott, Jr. Fred W. Matting Robert R. Neptune SENIORS Philip J. Farley Lowell W. Firstenberger Margaret D. Flint William B. Fretter Helena M. Gannon Mary E. Garthwaite Robert W. Godwin Mark L. Goodson Hayden S. Gordon Mauri Gould Donald A. Graham Charles A. Hayes John W. Hubbard Stanley Johnson Harold C. Kauffman Robert A. Kepner Frances R. Kimura Grace M. Kneedler Helen L. Knopp George E. Lawrence Jack F. Leach James V. Lewis Richard N. Lewis Marian R. Logan Rose Oringel Philip W. Powell June M. Lynch Ruth P. Masson Kenneth L. Maxwell Henry F. May, Jr. Harold E. McCarthy Robert S. McNamara Ann Meiklejohn William C. Meyer William Mosher Albert G. Mowbray Lorna E. Mullen Mary C. Myers Alan B. Overstreet Tatinia N. Pchelkin Martha M. Pfosi Joseph D. Phillips Stephen J. Popovich John C. Pryor, Jr. George S. Rentz, Jr. Bernard T. Rocca Doris L. Roddan Elizabeth R. Sail Nicoline F. Sampson John J. Schauer, Jr. John E. Tuttle Leslie J. Zeigler Lawrence A. Schei Goroge Schimotori Nobuko Shimotori Francis A. Sooy Dan Stanislawski Helena Steilberg Clifford R. Stocking Raymond W. Stoughton Everard L. Stovall Walter S. Stromquist Tetsuo Sugiyama Doris J. Swanson Ernest S. Takahashi Katsuto Take! Henry M. Thelen Juliette M. Van Hovenberg William J. Vasquez Margaret C. Waddell Bruce Waybur John R. Whinnery Kathleen M. Wells Hans Weltin Fanita Yoakum 436 Louis G. Brizzolara Maurice P. Cunningham Phyllis de Caccia JUNIORS Hiroshi Sugiyama Roy W. Donley Alvin A. Eustis, Jr. Morgan Harris Oliver R. Vannucci George H. Hollidge Ruth A. Janke Marian E. Matteson Barbara J. Wagner William B. Murrish Kingsley B. Price Marion E. Sproul Back Row: Sachs, Denke, Smith, Reaves, Pyle, Powers, Paules, Nutting, Parker. Fourth Row: Kosman, Robertson, Arthur, Iversen, Peletz. Jonassen, Dicmas, Nasi. Third Row: Richards, Iversen, Page, Bickerstaft, Henderson, Karstens, Bingham, Stecker. Second Row: Brosio, Ray, Hall, Andersen, Charter, Brummer, Rogers, Whinnery. Front Row: Oppenheim, Pearson, Lunde, Knupp, Lindberg, MacDonald, O ' Brien, Noguchi, Amneus. U B T A (National Engineering Scholastic Honor Society) FOUNDED AT LEHIGH UNIVERSITY, 1885 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1907 SIXTY-EIGHT CHAPTERS OFFICERS Fall 1936 LISTON F. HILLS JAMES M. BARKLEY, JR. RALPH C. MACDONALD . JOHN T. O ' BitiEN LLOYD IVERSEN WILLIAM W. DUNLOP . . President Vice-President Corresponding Secretary Recording Secretary .... Treasurer Catatoger Spring 1937 . RALPH C. MACDONALD ..JOHN T. O ' BRIEN, JR. EABL C. POULES MILAN C. ARTHUR JOHN P. LUNDE MILTON KOSMAN UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES R. W. Ager Arthur Alvarez Leonard J. Black Anders J. Carlson Virgil H. Cherry Charles F. Dalziel Daryl D. DavieH Harmon E. Davis Raymond E. Davis Charlei ll.-rl.-lli. Jr. Charles R. Dodson Bernard A. Etcheverry Richard G. Folsom Francis S. Foote Leonard F. Fuller Ernest A. Hersani C. H. Hickox Carlton D. Hulin Baldwin M. Woods Charles C. Hyde Andrew C. Lawson Joseph N. LeConte George D. Louderback Thomas C. McFarland Warren C. Perry William C. Pomeroy Frank H. Probert Benedict F. Raber Lester E. Reukema Burlis L. Robertson Thomas A. Rogers H. J. Scott Robert G. Sprout Nicholas L. Taliafen George E. Troxell Lester C. Uren Walter S. Weeks SENIORS Wilton R. Abbott Thomas A. Amneus Milan G. Arthur James M. Barkley, Jr. Raymond M. BickerstafT Alfred L. Brosio Joseph Brummer Paul H. Drnkr John G. Dorwood, Jr. William W. Dunlop Stanley J. Elliott. Jr. William L. Fry Harry W. Carretson James R. Anderson Kenneth B. Binghan John T. Brewster Loy M. Charter Albert J. Gilardi Hayden S. Cordon Robert W. Henderson Paul R. Hill Liston F. Hills Harold W. Iversen Lloyd Iversen Finn Jonassen Horace M. Karr Nicholas V. Karstens Willard B. Knupp Milton Kosman John E. Lindberg. Jr. John L. Diemas Charles R. Carbett Richard E. Hall Eneas D. Kane JUNIORS John P. Lunde Ralph C. MacDonald Howard F. Matthews Lester H. Mullen Victor Myer Kaarlo W. Nasi William Neilson. Jr. David Noguchi Walter E. Noller Herbert B. Nottage John T. O ' Brien. Jr. Robert L. O ' Bryan Louis H. Oppenheim Willard H. Nulling Myron E. Page Harold Peleta Rufus P. Ranney Arthur W. Parker Earl C. Paules John L. Pearson Joseph M. Pellil Ralph D. Powers Kenneth N. Pyle Gordon V. Richards Henry Sachs Carroll J. Southwell William W. Stecker John R. Whinnery Philip N. Woodward Richard A. Ray John C. Reaves Ralph J. Smith Donald E. Uran 437 ORDER OF THE GOLDEN DEAR (Senior Men ' s Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1900 ONE CHAPTER Leroy W. Allen Leonard B. Allison David P. Barrows Albert M. Becker Carroll W. Brigham Frederick K. Broekhagen John I . Calkins. Jr. W. W. Campbell Walter Christie James H. Corley Fred W. Cozeni William H. Crocker Charles Derlelh. Jr. Monroe E. Deutsch Edward A. Dickson William C. Donald Carroll Ebright Sidney M. Ehrman Edwin Emery Clinton W. Evans W. W. Ferrier. Jr. Frederick C. Fischer Ralph T. Fisher UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Marlin C. Flaherty Mortimer Fleishhacker Edwin L. Carthwaite Elmer C. Coldsworthy Walter A. Cordon Chaffee E. Hall Brutus Hamilton Joel H. Hildebrand Elbert A. Hugill Alexander M. Kidd Burton A. King Harry L. Kingman Frank L. Kleeberger Charles B. Lipman George D. Louderback Garret W. MeEnerney Deming C. Maelise Orrin K. McMurray Guy S. MUlberry Ralph D. Miller Herbert C. Moffitt Everitt L. Mossman Russell A. Nagler John Francis Neylan Luther A. Nichols Dan S. Norton John W. Olmsted William A. Peterson Clarence M. Price Kenneth Priestley Frank H. Probert Thomas M. Putnam Alva W. Ragan Charles A. Ratiim Charles H. Raymond Leon J. Richardson Chester H. Rowell Henry Schacht James G. SchaeflTer Robert Sibley Robert C. Sproul Frank C. Stevens Wallace I. Terry Robert M. Underbill Edwin C. Voorhies Robertson Ward Baldwin M. Woods Charles C. Bagg Robert B. Bias William L. Blanckenburg Richard C. Dinkelspiel John Dyer-Bennet Harold J. Eiferl F. Arthur Harris GRADUATES Frank L. Kidner Kenneth May Arnold E. Needham Kimio G. Obata Theodore T. Ohashi William C. Shriner Alden W. Smith Morris E. Smith Evald L. Swanson Wakefield Taylor Jacobus ten Broek William P. Velter Robert W. Walker Franklin M. Wilson Raymond I. Balsley Harry S. Barber Perry E. Beeson Floyd A. Blower John W. Britton Leonard W. Charvet Raymond E. Compton John W. Cooper, Jr. James M. Doyle Paul D. Ehret William C. Engvick SENIORS William W. Franklin Edward M. Freyer Vernon L. Goodin Willard E. Goodwin Orville F. Grimes William A. Hewitt Don Jensen Philip B. Johnson Stanley Johnson Rex L. Jones, Jr. Robert F. Laws Richard N. Lewis Robert S. McNamara James C. Magill William Neilson, Jr. Frank S. Pestana Philip C. Pierpont Morris Pollock Henry M. Thelen Robert D. Thomson Bruce Waybur 438 Berry Meiklejohn Siegel Caldwell Phillips Simmons Holmes Reed Simon Knight Scamman Simpson Lamborn Seville Von Heeckeren M R T A R BOARD (Senior Women ' s National Honor Society) FOUNDED AT SYRACUSE, NEW YORK, 1918 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1925 FIFTY-NINE CHAPTERS Margaret I. Beattie Louise S. Cobb UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Mary B. Davidson Helen W. Fancher Alice G. Hoyt Lucy W. Stebbins OFFICERS President V ice-President Secretary Treasurer .... Editor . MARIE PHILLIPS BETTY LAMBORN BEATRICE REED MARY MARGARET SIMON . MILDRED CALDWELL Anita Berry Mildred Caldwell Roxana Holmes Carol Knight Betty Lamborn ACTIVES Ann Meiklejobn Marie Phillips Beatrice Reed Virginia Sramman Jean Seville Ruth Siegel Charlotte Simmons Mary Margaret Simon Esther Simpson Walravine van Heeckeren 439 PATRICIA APPLETON Treasurer NENA DOUGLASS President ROXANNA HOLMES Corresponding Secretary MARY MARGARET SIMON Vice- President N N (Women ' s Honorary Society) FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1900 TWO CHAPTERS HONORARY AND ASSOCIATES Fay Allen Leila Anderson Barbara N. Armstrong Eleanor Bartlett Josephine Blaisdell Ethel Cadman Elizabeth Campbell Eugenia Carneiro Louise S. Cobb Ina Craig Blanche Cross Lucile Czarnowaki Constance Daggett Mary B. Davidson Alice Deutach Helen Fancher Leslie Gaynard Grace Haring Agnes Hart Ethel Hatfield Alice Hoyt Roberta D. Kerner Ruth Kingman Mae Lent Jean MacFarlane Emma McLaughlin Frances McQuiston Violet Marshall Elizabeth Monahan Katherine Nichols Lily K. Paetow Jessica Peixolto Gladys Penland Marjorie G. Petray Emily N. Plehn Madeline Putnam Lily-Margaret Sherman Catherine S. Sible Ida Sproul Cornelia Stan Lucy Ward Stebbins Rosalie Stern Grace Stockwell Edna Warren Cora Williams Lenora Woods SENIORS Janet Evans Ames Patricia Appleton Beverley Ballagh Anita Berry Hallie Booth Elinor Briggs Mildred Caldwell Irene Christiansen Mary-Adele Clark Helen Cunningham Augusta Dabney Neva DeU ' Osso Nena Douglas Barbara Eames Crowell Finlay Jean Haven Roxanna Holmes Peggy Homer Marie Hund Claire Jackson Nancy Johnston Carol Knight Betty Lamborn Jane Lovell Virginia Lyon Jean MacDonald Mary Ruth McLaughlin Ann Mcikl.-j.ilm Ida Noack Rita O ' Mara Marie Phillip! Margaret Pray Isabelle Prising Bee Reed loiiii.i Reid Virginia Scammon Jean Seville Charlotte Simmons Mary Margaret Simon Esther Simpson Ruth Slaughter Helen Stadtmuller Audrey Starr Helena Steilberg Madeline Taylor Alison Thomson Mary Turnbull Ruth Turner Walravine von Heeckeren Janet Wood Dorothy Woodside Dorothy Zerwer Jean Barnett Jean Berg Susanna Crane Patricia Droftte Patricia Elston Margery Evernden Janice Watkins Janet Hall Ethel Hazzard Mildred Hickok Constance Johnston Patricia Kearns Elizabeth Kendall JUNIORS Adrian Whyte Helen Kennedy Virginia Leach Zelda Long Jean MacDonald Elizabeth Mather Marian Matleson Wiley Marie Shaeffer Elizabeth Sleeker Iris Straefer Jean Thomas Jeanne Tinneniann Barbara Wagner 440 WINGED HELM E T (Junior Men ' s Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1901 ONE CHAPTER J. T. Allen L. B. Allison D. P. Barrows H. E. Bolton W. W. Campbell C. E. Chapman Walter Christie James H. Corley F. W. Cozens I. B. Cross M. M. Davisson M. E. Deutsch W. G. Donald Carroll Ebright Clinton Evans F. C. Fischer R. G. Gettell E. C. Goldsworthy Sanford J. Goodman W. A. Gordon H. F. Grady UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES C. A. Gulick, Jr. Brutus Hamilton Robert Hemphill J. H. Hildebrand H. G. Houvinen C. G. Hyde Harry Kingman Myron E. Krueger Edward Landon J. N. LeConte A. O. Leuschner J. P. McBain D. G. Maclise N. Wing Mah W. W. Monahan Guy Montgomery E. C. Moore W. C. Morgan Russell Nagler L. A. Nichols W. D. Norton Ronald L. Olson F. C. Palm C. M. Price H. I. Priestley H. T. Priestly F. H. Probert T. M. Putnam A. W. Ragan C. H. Raymond L. J. Richardson C. H. Rowell W. A. Setchell Robert Sibley R. G. Sprout Thomas Stow L. F. Toomey Robert M. Underbill E. C. Voorhies Robertson Ward I. K. Wilkin B. M. Woods Pierce Works SENIORS Douglas G. Allen George F. Anderson Harry S. Barber Perry E. Beeson Thomas F. Bell H. Kellogg Bernsten William B. Berry Robert J. Bishopp Addison C. Bowers John W. Britton H. Corbin Burbank William D. Campbell Joseph W. Cooper Edward G. Dougery James M. Doyle William W. Franklin Harley S. Fremming Edward M. Freyer Vernon L. Goodin Willard E. Goodwin Robert N. Hammond Jim F. Helmer C. Craig Hosmer Philip B. Johnson Rex L. Jones, Jr. Theodore G. Lewton, Jr. Robert S. McNamara Judson Madden John F. Martin Richard W. Newell Ray C. Nordstrom Edward B. Panton Philip G. Pierpont Morris Pollock William E. Regan Ralph W. Riley David H. Rogers Peter S. Shinoda George A. Smith Edward H. Solinsky Robert W. Sparks Robert D. Thomson Richard E. Warner Mervyn W. Wehe JUNIORS Ortus F. Adams Homer G. Angelo Laurence C. Arpin Donald L. Bell Lee Charles Benson James Boyd, III William C. Briggs Chester G. Carlisle Dan S. Carter Rush S. Clark Downey C. Clinch Walter T. Coulthard Ephraim Dyer Gaylord T. Forrest Richard A. Gock Donald S. Goldeen Chaffee E. Hall, Jr. Paul T. Hastings Charles E. Hazleton Robert J. Herwig Terrell L. Hill John H. Hoefer Thomas P. Hogan, III Robert S. Ingram Murrey M. Johnson Thomas J. Kent, Jr. Robert S. Knowles Ralph W. Lamon Raymond A. Leonard, Jr. Bert L. Lunceford Stanley E. McCaffrey Silver R. McFall John B. Meek James R. Miller Robert R. Miller Royal S. Milligan, Jr. D. Donald Mulford William B. Murrish George W. Nickel, Jr. Jack Palmer Henry B. Peters Peter S. Porterfield Borden B. Price Kingsley B. Price Curt M. Rocca Charles F. Rosenthal James G. Shields, Jr. Rodney D. Smith Vard A. Stockton John A. Storch John F. Sullivan Edward Thomas Wilfred Van Loben Seh Robert C. Vogel Kent M. Weaver, Jr. J. Robert Wegge Charles S. Wheeler III Archie Williams 441 Back Row: Grimes, Helmer, Williams, Cotton, Gubbins, Kitts, Bottari, Dodge. Third Row: Carlisle, Weaver, Hanford, McCaffrey, deVarona, Schuster, Bowers, Lutz. Second Row: Charvet, Lilly, Meyer, Bell, Priest, Arpin, Humburg, Jacques, Piper. Front Row: Pierpont, Bonkofsky, Bennett, Tanaka, McPhate, Heavey, McKinney, Souza. B I G i t i i SOCIETY David A. Anderson David L. Anderson ll.irln I . Bennett, Jr. Victor Bottari D. Judson Callaghan Robert L. Carlelon Sam B. Chapman George E. Cornell Kenneth E. Cotton David DeVarona ill.u. I T. Dolman FOOTBALL Louis J. Drnovich Claude F. Evans Robert A. Gilbert E. Raymond Hanford William H. Hanford Robert J. Herwig Richard D. Johnston John L. Jones Lawrence H. Lutz Eugene McAteer John B. Meek Ray C. Nordstrom Milton S. Pollack Morrii Pollock Angelo Reginato Perry Schwartz George W. Smith Alfred A. Souza Henry C. Sparks William E. Sloll J. Perry Thomas Edward L. Vallejo BASKETBALL Raymond I. Balsley Chester G. Carlisle Robert J. Herwig Don Jensen David L. Luce Raymond N. Olson George A. Smith George Anderson Dick Brace Leonard W. Charvet George W. Fink Dell M. Fishback Dewitt P. Good Rex M. Heap TRACK Robert W. Heavey Jim F. Helmer William A. Hewitt Paul L. Jacques James W. Kitts Robert D. Law Thomas H. Moore Morris Pollock David H. Rogers Greg S. Stout Hugh L. Thompson Edward L. Vallejo Leslie Voorhees Kent M. Weaver Archie Williams Tom Bell Charles F. Bonkofsky John F. Bonner Sam B. Chapman Joseph P. Koral Orville F. Crimes BASEBALL William R. Cubbing W. W. Humburg Gordon C. Lee John C. Lilly Stanley E. McCaffery Lester McComber David M. McNeil B. Gregory McPhate W. Wesley Piper Leonard It. Porternpl Bill J. Priest Jerry A. Riddell C. William Sciutto Laurence C. Arpin F.ugene Berkencmnp Crover V. Clark Alfred H. Dagfetl CREW Laurence A. Dodge Frank Dunlap Kdwia T. Goree Rex L. Jones Nathan J. Rubin Charles L. Schuster Evald Swansoii Roberl Walker TENNIS Richard T. Bennett W. Tate Coulthard John T. Dunlop Andrew H. Mastic Robert Meyer Paul A. Newton Philip Picrpont Perry Schwartz Eugene M. Smith George Tanaka 442 Back Row: Murray, Bradshaw. Kent. Vieira, Cherry, Miller. Oliver. Third Row: Rlddell. Fulmer, Johnson, FlegaJ, Fuetterer, Wer- son, Wildy. Second Row: Feldmeyer, Gish, Stuard, Firestone, Sullivan, Rose, Cunningham. Front Row: Cho, Hall, Moon, Fellom, Fortino, Olwell, Andersen. CIRCLE " C " SOCIETY OFFICERS President yice-Pretidfnt . . . Secretary Rov FELLOM JIM FOHTINO .MoSE FIRESTONE HONORARY I.. B. Allison Dr. W. C Donald A. W. Dowden E. C. Coldswor.hy Edward Graff Brutus Hamilton N. E. A. Hinds BOXING Elwood Derr William J. Fletl-Franeis Edwy I.uker William W. Monahan H. A. Newsom C. A. Pease F. C. Probert J. H. Shroeder Henry A. Stone Carl E. Zamloch Richard Smith Vin Stratton George H. Thurston 130 BASKETBALL Robert Johnson Shigeshi Modokoru Bill Murray Edwin Wildy 145 BASKETBALL Carl W. Flcgal Paul Fulmer Robert R. Gibson Robin II. .Hi. -U Dellmar Henrich Arthur Jacobs Milford Lundgren J. Robert McEntee Harry Olwell Wallace Riddell CROSS COUNTRY Clarence A. Hall FENCING James Ashley Thomas M. H. Km Bradshaw Kimio Obata Burr Overstreet Waller I). Westmati HANDBALL Shigeshi Modokoru POLO Alex Wilton RUGBY Phillip D. Chubb William J. I Ini-l rann- Joe CreeD William G. Herbert Heinz Eulau Arthur Harrison Kd llran Carl J. Carter James Fortino Tom Lawson Harold C. Norton Charlel M. O ' Donnell SKIING SOCCEK SWIMMING Louis deLu James Farquhar William Froome Rudolph E. Fuetterer Drliiniii B. Cilh F.lniati J. Rose Jack Sullivan Victor D. Vieira Charles Wheeler Robert W. Hatcliff Ml Thomsen Joseph Reichel Edwin C. Smith Vin Stratton Henry P. Weber William Witherspoon J. Leonard Yager Harold F. Heinecke Robert W. Moon Weldon Smith James Werson WATER POLO Long worth Dewey Ralph Lanion Ross Cunningham Ernest 1 . Dodson Mose Firestone Vincent Geren George Jaure GOLF GYMNASTICS Travis Winsor Alan G. McLenegan Edward R. Oliver Addison Jones Frank E. Lones Robert R. Miller Harry E. Sluard Noil Weisherl Laurence Cherrv Andrew Anderson Lee C. Benson Arthur Feldmeyer James C. Shields WRESTLING Paul Wingeyer Thomas J. Kent Roy Fellom, Jr. James Fortino Bert Lederer 443 Back Row: Delia- Vedowa, Vann, Chalmers, Smith, Viney, Trumbly. Third Row: Walker, Monroe, Hanford, Frick, Eastman. Second Row: Dykes, Townsend, Wlnterbottom, Ray, Cleary, Merrick. Front Row: Mehlert, Imhoff, Lindsay, Rue, Dieterich. u N (Sophomore Men ' s Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1934 ONE CHAPTER Ralph W. Chancy Stanley F. Freeborn HONORARY Sanford J. Goodman Robert G. Sproul Edwin C. Voorhies Norman Canright Bob Chalmers Frank Cleary Len Collier Dick Delia Vedowa James Dieterich Ben Dykes Bill Eastman Bob Frick Bill Hanford ACTIVES Ray Hanford Douglas Imhoff Alan Lindsay Charles Mehlert Clarke Merrick Keith Monroe Thomas Ray Frank Rue Norman Savinar Kirk Smith Byron Snyder Bill Stoll Steve Townsend Jerry Trumbly Fred Vann Bob Viney Jack Wade Boyd Walker Bud Winterbottom First Row: Davis, Uratsu. Lowe, Sachs, Foskett, Holier, Learned, Starns. Second Row: Diinlop. Smith. Mayes, Robertson, Abbott. Hom, Scott. Third Row: Craig, Benoist, Pettit, Waterman, Uren, Fenn, Gilardi, Hudson. Fourth Row: Gruenig, Prichard, Fen- chuk, Whinnery, Garretson, Pyle, Lawrence, Rogers, Dalziel. N U (Electrical Engineering Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, 1904 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1915 TWENTY-THREE CHAPTERS OFFICERS President Vice-President Recording Secretary K. N. PYLE S. J. ELLIOTT, JK. . J. R. WHINNERY Corresponding Secretary Treasurer Associate Bridge Editor H. SACHS .W. R. ABBOTT ,D. B. FOSKETT Clarence L. Cory HONORARY Clarence E. Fleager Harris J. Ryan Robert Sibley C. F. Benham D. I. Cone ASSOCIATES E. N. D ' Oyly F. E. Pernot L. S. Ready G. H. Senger B. M. Woods UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES L. J. Black C. F. Dalziel D. D. Davis L. F. Fuller E. E. Gialdini L. L. Grand! R. Bollaert B. M. Woods GRADUATES T. C. McFarland L. E. Reukema B. L. Robertson E. L. Ginzton T. A. Rogers D. Silveraian A. Tilles SENIORS W. R. Abbott W. W. Dunlop S. J. Elliott W. W. Fenchuck W. H. Fenn D. M. Finch D. B. Foskett W. L. Fry H. W. Garretson A. J. Gilardi F. M. Hom O. W. Mayes J. M. Pettit K. N. Pyle H. Sachs R. J. Smith W. F. Starns H. Uratsu J. R. Whinnery T. M. Benoist F. D. Craig B. Davis W. G. Gruenig G. G. Hudson W. A. Lawrence JUNIORS R. V. Learned E. D. Lowe W. E. Noller J. S. Prichard G. S. Waterman J. M. Wrenn 445 SKULL AND KEYS 446 SKULL AND KEYS ( Interfraternity Social Organization) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1892 ONE CHAPTER HONORARY MEMBKRS Stub Allison David P. Barrows Dr. Boles Paul Cadman John U. Calkins. Jr. R. W. Chaney Charles Chapman Waller Christie Clarence Corey Harry Davis M. M. Davisson Monroe E. Deutseh William C. Donald Newton B. Drury W. II. Durham Ky Ebright Capt. Neil Edmunds Col. C. C. Edwards James K. Fitk Martin C. Flaherty Stanley B. Freeborn Horace K. Caithrr Raymond Cettell Everett Glass E. C. Coldsworthy Capt. Sandy Goodman Lieut. Harry Greenlaw John Crover Brutus Hamilton Robert II,.,,, |, I, ,11 Norman E. Hinds John Hostater James B. Hutchinson Lincoln Hutchinson Carl Zamlock Bill Ingram Alexander M. Kidd Peter B. Kyne K. Landon Karl C. I.eebrick Matthew C. Lynch Walter E. Magee Jack McKenzie Ralph P. Merritt Brick Mitchell Brick Morse Rus Naglcr Eugen Netihaus John Francis Neylan R. I.. Olson Edmund O ' Neil F. C. Palm Major C. H. Peabody Thomas H. Putman Thomas F. Sanford William A. Selchell James C. Shaeffer Andy Smith George A. Smilhson Robert C. Spronl Edward C. Stricklen Major J. S. Switzer Nicholas Taliaferro Irr. Uteritz Charles R. Volti Edwin C. Voorhies Benjamin Wallace Benjamin Ide Wheeler ' Frank Wickhorst GRADUATES Andy Anderson Bob Bias Floyd Blower Bill Boone Fred Bouke Dick Brace Dutch Bremer Bill Bricca I.eRoy Briggs Bob Brittingham Jack BriUinghan Sandy Brown Sam Chase John Craig Jack Davis Frank Donant Bob Fowler Francis Gherini Rudy Cingg Ed Coree Joe Hendrick Doug Hensley Bill Huey Howard Inman Bill Jackson Dale Kellogg Howard l.uther Larry Lutz Neal McCralh Dave Meek Herb Moore Dirk Mover Joe Pease Merry Reith Sarge Reynolds Chet Ristenpart Bill Sciutto Bull Steers Bill Stone Norm SutelifiV Conrad Tennr Tevis Thompson John Waldo Bob Walker Bill Wegge Jay Wicklrr Frank Wilson Parker Wood SENIORS Bud Albright Doug Allen Bill Archer Chick Barker Speed Bennett Fred Bentley Bill Berry Bob Bishopp George Waddell Addison Bowers Jud Callaghan Don Crilly Ed Davies Tom Dawson Ed Dougery Don Fowler Bob Haninioiid Dick Warner Harry Johnson Johnny Jones Reggie Kittrelle Doug Knight Carson Magill John Martin Bill Morgan Phil Pierpont B.id We he Ralph Riley Dave Rogers Jack Sexson George Smith Ed Solinsky Bob Sparks Fred Sperry Glassell Stringfellow Jimmy d. mi- Homer Angelo Don Bell Jim Boyd Rill Briggs Deceased Bob Thomas Sam Chapman Downey Clinch Ken Cotton Jim Durney Bill Eekarl JUNIORS Bob Wegge John Geiger Bob Ingram Ray Leonard Bert Lunceford John Meek Mnir Wooley Bob Miller Charlie Miller Dan Newton Fred Onstott Johnny Storrh 447 H H 448 H H (National Interfraternily Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, 1917 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1921 EIGHT CHAPTERS HONORARY David P. Barrows Paul F. Cadman H. H. Campbell Morse A. Cartwright Charles E. Chapman Walter Christie M. M. Davisson Charles Derleth, Jr. Monroe E. Deutsch Dr. W. G. Donald Carroll Ebright Capt. V S. Edmond Clinton Evans Stanley R. Freeborn John M. Gregg Brutus Hamilton Charles G. Hyde William Gary Jones Dr. Robert T. Legge George D. Louderback William Monahan Brick Morse Everett Mossman Franklin C. Palm Frank H. Probert Charles H. Raymond Royal S. Roberts Capt. C. E. Ryan Robert G. Sproul Charles R. Volz Edwin C. Voorhies ' Benjamin Ide Wheeler Frank Wickhorst Earl Wright SENIORS James Aschoff William Ball Frederick Barg Howard Barney John Blosser Bruce Canaga Robert Carleton James Eddy William Francis Boyd Gainor Frederick Glassley Willard Goodwin Orville Grimes Arthur Harris Rex Heap Vernon Johnson Winton Jones Barney Laberle David McAuley Gregory McPhate Melvin Lester William Murray Richard Newell John Pettis Charles Post Carleton Rogers Stephen Rogers Keith Schaeffer Stanley Shell Thomas Shellhammer George Smith John Stable Gregory Stout Victor D. Vieira Charles Voland Walter Weber Walter Wells Donald Woodrum JUNIORS Ralph Ames Philip Breck James Brown Chester Carlisle George Cornell Julius Deubner William Donald William Harper Charles Hazen Walter Higgins Francis Warden Othel Kilpatrick Robert Parker Charles Patterson Thomas Polk Lester Rohwer Walter Westman Donald Wilder Gail Shadinger Niel Shaver Henry Sparks G. Elwood Thode Donald Uren ' Deceased. 449 Marianne E. Burns Alice E. Martin Julie M. Sibley Arline 0. Slack Marian I. Von Husen DELTA C H I ALPHA (Household Art Major Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1934 OFFICERS President ALICE E. MARTIN V ice-President MARIANNE E. BURNS Secretary MARIAN I. VON HUSEN Treasurer ARLINE O. SLACK Social Chairman JULIE M. SIBLEY UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Helen W. Fancher Mae N. Lent M. F. Patterson Erelyn T. Baldwin Dorothy R. Keep Elaine W. Morgan GRADUATES Mary I. RuBBell Frances A. Scudder Ceraldine Slrizicli Kalherine C. Titus Lucy C. Woolery SENIORS Virginia A. Ahhwede Jane L. Atlardt Barbara M. Bandy Marianne E. Burns June C. Dalgleish Helen J. DeMaria Dolly B. Crandjean M. Lou Gri fifing Dorothy M. Hall Pearl A. Lane Adcle E. Lindquist Jean E. McQuinn Alice E. Martin Velvia E. Miller Tomoye Nozawa Agnes E. Pinkerton Beatrice L. Reed Ruth E. Rohinson Julie M. Sibley Alice K. Skinner Arline O. Slack Bebecca M. Starr Marjorie S. Sutherland Kathleen F. Thomson Marian I. von Huaen Mary E. Watson Hilda Mae Willis Elizabeth Younghusband Lois M. Beck Jean S. Berg Margaret E. Darst Elsie S. Deahler Winnifred Dole Marian E. Faulkner Isabelle E. Hamilton S. Virginia Hamilton Mary C. Harper C. Elizabeth Hrnsley JUNIORS Chryetal Hildebrand Jean H. Johnston Lola M. Lathrop Eleanor L. Lopes Helen H. Loven Shirley K. Luttrell Doris R. McCann Patricia J. McDermott Janet McFarlane Mary Jane Maharg Mary E. Masters Jean A. Moores Olga L. Nomellini Claire Pauli Mary Agnes Phillips Vivienne A. Righetti Elizabeth Ryan Amy F. Schirmer Jean L. Sturgeon Jean A. Wildenradt SOPHOMORES Eleanor L. Beck Doris E. Boyd Virginia C. Bush Mary E. Colton l.olila Dutro Sylvia Filming Dorii P. Geddis Dolly M. Goldman Harriet I. Harper Barbara H ouch inn Corinne E. Howe Barbara R. Ingham Carol L. Jackson Grace C. Joyce Ethelyn Kraus Catherine MOBB Mary Jane Moyer Ann E. Nelson Catherine E. O ' Connor Jeanne P. Perry Kathryn B. Rider Phyllis R. Russell Jean M. Shean Nelda Shockey Evelyn M. Smith Edith C. Stedman Mayfred G. Stryker Verna Taylor Jessie W. Trelease Marie L. Wrigley Valora M. Wylley FRESHMEN 450 Betty Brown Gertrude I . Gutleben Caroline D. Hamilton Mary H. Jenkins Martha J. Johnston Hose M. Kt-rm-r Gladys M. Palmer Valborg K. Rasmussen Julia E. Swift Jane Whelan DELTA P H I E P S I L N (National Professional Foreign Service Fraternity) FOUNDED AT GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY, 1920 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1923 SEVEN CHAPTERS OFFICERS Fall Semester 1936 Spring Semester 1937 WILLIAM M. JOOST President EUGENE EARLE WATSON EUGENE EARLE WATSON V ice-President THOMAS E. LARNER, JR. NORMAN LANE Secretary JOHN R. ROCK HARRY ALLEN Treasurer WILLIAM G. SLADE Lawson Reno UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Eric C. Bellquist Dean E. D. Dickinson Harry Allen Charles Dick Benin Reno J. Franceschi Jack Hanson SENIORS William M. Joost Raymond Lamb Thomas E. Larner, Jr. John R. Rock Eugene Earle Watson Thomas C. Sewell Charles J. Shields William G. Slade Richard O. Tigner James T. Braafladt John Carol Houghton Norman Lane JUNIORS Lyford Merril Morris Robert Thomas Read Richard Rickenbacher Russell O. Risser Harry S. Scott Paul W. Gaebel Robert C. George SOPHOMORES Enrique E. Laroza William Machek Jack Carl Maldonado Sheldon Charles Tracy J. Curt Tyler, Jr. FRESHMEN Stanley M. Bennett Vance A. Boyer 451 Back Row: Reed, Schirmer, Pauli, Berg, Macdonald, De Maria. Second Row: Baldwin, Norton, Sharrer, Sutherland, Martin, Loven, Gibb. Front Row: Ellin, Sands, Berry, McCann, Strizich, Morgan. GUILD OF APPLIED ARTS (Household Art Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1926 ONE CHAPTER lima L. Badgley Helen W. Fancher UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Hope M. Cladding Mae N. Lent Lila M. O ' Neale M. F. Patterson Lelia Reynolds Evelyn Baldwin Eleanor Culp Eleanor Loudon Fredericks GRADUATES Kathleen Gravatt Rosamond Kedzie Elaine Morgan Johanna Roos Frances Scudder Marjorie Sharrer Geraldine Strizich Jane Allardt Mary Elizabeth Baker Claudine Bayless Anita Berry Dorothy Lea Davidson SENIORS Lucile Elvin Alice Martin Authene Norton Beatrice Reed Ruth Robinson Marian Sando Amy Schirmer Hazel Scholz Charlotte Simmons Marjorie Sutherland Margaret Worden Jean Berg Helen De Maria Maryella Gardner JUNIORS Dorothy Gibb Patricia Lennon Helen Loven Doris McCann 452 Jean MacDonald Claire Pauli Dorothy Stout Front Row: Takahashi, Welch, Firenze, Schauppner, Brown, Lewis, Matoi. Second Row: Schumacher, Potwin, Harris, Gilbert, Mello, Takel, Sasaki. Third Row: Eckley, Macatee, Borg, Braff, Rosenberg, Platt, Schumann. Fourth Row: Setterlund, Simons. Slatkin, Singer, Fuller, Murrish. Fifth Row: Harris, Harps, Hobson, May, Kunkel, Peters, Rabinowitz, Simmons, Whltten. M (Professional and Social Optometric Fraternity) FOUNDED AT NORTH ILLINOIS COLLEGE, 1919 DELTA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1920 FIVE CHAPTERS OFFICERS President DAMON C. ECKLEY Vice-President HARRY SIMMONS Secretary HERMAN SCHUMACHER Treasurer Fall ED POTWIN Treasurer Spring . RALPH SCH AUPPNER Editor in Chief Fall . . Editor in Chief Spring ANSEL MELLO DAVID DAVIS BOB GILBERT . HARRY HARPS SLITTER KUNKEL FACULTY T. A. Brombarh Everett Coe J. T. Hobson Harry Kamp F. L. Mason Ralph S. Minor ACTIVE MEMBERS Frank Borg Solon Braff Marvin Brown Warren Firenzi Gene Fuller Harold Gumpert Bernard Harris Marion M. Harris Slitter Kunkel Gordon Lewis Russell Macatee Mitsugi Matoi Wallace May Henry Peters Edward Platt Morris Rabinowitz Harold Rosenberg Sherman Schwartz Ronald Setterlund Mervyn Simon Joseph Singer Laurence Slatkin Ernest Takahashi Katsuto Take! Austin Welch Richard Whitten PLEDGES Rupert Flower Elvin Genung Reidar Hagen Richard Lee Francis L. Leupp William Murrish William Peiser 453 Back Row: Twining, Doyle, Fisher, Turner, Short, Silva. Middle Row: Magill, Ehret, Post, Wallace, Balbo, Schrader. First Row: Mitchell, Newell, Wesson, Feldheym, Sauer, Wilkin. P I DELTA E P S I L N (Men ' s Journalistic Honor Society) FOUNDED AT SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, 1909 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1918 FORTY-FIVE CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES AND HONORARY ASSOCIATES David P. Barrows Charles Derleth, Jr. Monroe E. Deutsch Charles Caldwell Dobie Samuel T. Farquhar Fred C. Fischer J. R. Knowland, Jr. Weston M. Alt Frank C. Balbo, Jr. Jack H. Brubaker Ray Christiansen James M. Doyle Paul D. Ehret Leonard Feldheym Stuart O. Harding Benjamin P. Kurtz Benjamin H. Lehman William W. Monahan Luther A. Nichols John E. Pickett Kenneth Priestley SENIORS Robert F. Laws L. Melvin Lester J. Carson Magill J. Frankland Mitchell Jerry Nevius Richard W. Newell Kimio G. Obata Robert L. Pickering Charles H. Raymond Robert G. Sibley Robert G. Sproul James E. Wales I. King Wilkin Ira I. Wilkin Edward A. Zeus Charles T. Post Donald C. Ralston Peter S. Shinoda Don H. Short, Jr. Freeman A. Silva William P. Turner Walmsley R. Twining Robert H. Wesson William B. Murrish JUNIORS Carl W. Sauer Claude N. Schrader William S. Wallace 454 MASK AND DAGGER (Dramatics Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1908 ONE CHAPTER OFFICERS Spring Fall JOHN GALBRAITH President WILLIAM ENCVICK AUGUSTA DABNEY Vice-President AUGUSTA DABNEY JAMES FISHER- NORTHROP Secretary MARJORIE SMITH RAYMOND PARKER . Treasurer RAYMOND PARKED Frederick Blanchard Anthony F. Blanks Theodore Bowie Alice Brainard Sheldon Cheney Mathurin Dondo Edwin Duerr HONORARY Willard H. Durham Hope M. Cladding Everett Class Alexander S. Kaun Benjamin II Lehman Florence Lutz Doris E. McEntyre Guy Montgomery Eugene Neuhaus Irving Pichel Kenneth Priestley Max Radin Sarah Huntsman Sturgess Alan R. Thompson Charles D. von Neumayer ALUMNI MEMBERS ACTIVE IN THE PROFESSION Morris Ankrum Lois Austin William Bernal Bernice Berwin Lloyd Corrigan Vincent Duffy Ralph Edwards Richard Ehlers John Eldredge Alfred Etcheverry James Krieger Emily Lowry Baldwin McGaw Paul Nathan Nestor Paiva Walter Plunkett Michael Raffetto Curtis Roberts Robert Ross Lucian Self Gloria Stuart Kathleen Wilson Menaham Wolfe Donald Woods W. Barton Yarborough GRADUATES Charlotte Rider Marjorie Smith Janet Evans Ames Augusta Dabney Jean Douglas Barbara Eames William Engvick James Fisher-Northrop SENIORS Edward M. Freyer Ruth Freidberg John Galbraith Helen Gilbert Alden McClelland Phillip Nelson Philip Oliver-Smith Raymond Parker Louis Pinson Esther Simpson C. Dunning Somers Walravine Van Heeckeren JUNIOR Crahan Denton 455 Back Row: Albrecht, Wollenberg, Carmichael, Rocca, Benoist, Williams, Brien, Greenfield, Nagel. Third Row: Rahlves, Ather- ton. Gable, Fairchild, Phillips, Yockey, Blain, Galeno, Brehm, Setter-land. Second Row: Toreson, Schauer, McArdell, Denny. Peterson, McGillicudy, Lowe, Kean, Fay, Wilson. Front Row: Fleming, Most, Wulffraat, Charlton, Schuchard, Sinai, Blosser, Seedman, Walker, Friendly. B N (University of California Band Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1934 ONE CHAPTER OFFICERS President V ice-President Secretary-Treasurer .... JOHN A. BLOSSER . BERNARD T. ROCCA, JR. . CURTIS FLEMING Max E. Denny Joseph J. Albrecht Edward C. Bergen John A. Blosser Frederick W. Brehm Raymond M. Atherton Thomas M. Benoist Douglas H. Elliott Lewis P. Fairchild Curtis Fleming Melvyn C. Friendly Claude W. Blain James R. Brien Jack C. Carmichael Edward A. Fay William A. Caleno HONORARY Robert C. Snyder Christian Tellefson SENIORS Kenneth J. Charlton Richard F. Edwards James F. Gable William R. Most John E. Perry JUNIORS Watson W. Greenfield Burnett A. Hendryx James M. Keith Richard G. Lowe Ernest O. Nagel Frederick L. Nettell SOPHOMORES Lewis B. Kean, Jr. Lawrence E. McArdell Paul D. Phillips Robert D. Robinson Otto V. Schuchard 456 Forrest W. Watson Bernard T. Rocca, Jr. John J. Shauer, Jr. Dudley T. Shearer John R. Vinn, Jr. Byron J. Wilson Bill F. Peterson August H. Rahlves Daniel A. Seedman Ronald A. Setterlund Wilfred E. Toreson Wesley W. Walker Robert W. Sinai John H. F. Skeels J. Roger Wollenberg Arnold T. Wulffraat Paul M. Yockey Back Row: Comstock, Roberts, Moon, Breck, Henig, Sutherland. Fourth Row: Reese, Sislch, Caner, Schei, Gammons, Pollack. Third Row: Dorr, Jameson, Conn, Shapiro, Silierstone, Lowenstein, Rocca. Second Row: Riwllns, Craig, Berk, Berg, Spire, Schindler, Rowen. Front Row: Stevenson, Compton, Olson, DellErgo. Atwood, Baker, Wollenberg. N (Men ' s Debating Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1900 ONE CHAPTER Arthur Baker Joseph Berg William Berk Raymond Compton William Craig Edwin Duckies Bruce Gammons Homer Angelo Philip Breck Reynold Cohn William Comstock Dean Atwood Thomas Carver Robert Dell ' Ergo Lyman Griswold SENIORS Wesley Hershey Morris Herzig Jesse Hess Will Jumper Jack Leach Robert Moon John Morgan Seymour Pollack JUNIORS Richard Foster Roderick Jameson Max Krauss Raymond Rocca SOPHOMORES John Dorr Norman Lowenstein Melvin Reder Bernard Shapiro FRESHMEN Theodore Olsen INACTIVE MEMBERS Borden Price Bob Rawlins Llewellyn Reese Harry Roberts Lawrence Schei Mark Silverstone Matthew Sisich Byron Wilson James Rowen Bernard Schindler Herbert Spiro John Sutherland Lloyd Somogyi Robert Stevenson Roger Wollenberg Kingsley Price 457 Caldecott Meyer, W. Caziarc Reed Code Stable Han an Teskoy SCABBARD ANB BLADE (National Military Honor Society) FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN, 1904 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1923 EIGHTY-TWO CHAPTERS OFFICERS Fall Semester HERBERT CLAUDIUS . . WILLIAM A. MEYER . . THOMAS CALDECOTT . . ROBERT HACAN DOUGLAS TESKEV .... MAJOR J. A. CODE, IK Spring SemesteY Lieutenant Colonel HERBERT CLAUDIUS Captain DOUCLAS TESKEY First Lieutenant JOHN STABLE Second Lieutenant DONALD CAZIARC First Sergeant J. A. REED Liaton Officer MAJOR J. A. CODE, JR. W. E. Benedict Jitiiif- J. Bunner J. W. Bruner Thomas Caldecott Donald Caziarc Robert V Eddy John B. Gilbert Edward C. Bergen Hugh Burnham Sanford W. Beattie Louis Brizzolara Temple S. Clewe Dana P. Cook I.lovd 1 . Colvin Jay D. Bacon, Jr. Perry E. Beeson Bruce I.. Canaga Cirard E. Haven Jack A. Hayes Arthur Hoffman W. E. Holbrook Charles W. Hood Albert Howden Harry F. Jefferson Frank Dickey Robert M. Hagan George F. Cirot Norman Hemphill Robert M. King Ralph McDonald Nathaniel Faithorn William Franklin Milton H. Jensen Stanley J. Kelley Frederick Kellogg ACTIVE MEMBERS INFANTRY William M. Jonas William M. Joost James H. Kindt Francis I . Leupp D. McNutt B. D. Morgan R. Most ORDNANCE Clay C. Hopper John G. Lowry Frederick R. Watson ] COAST ARTILLERY John McWilliams Donald D. Meuh Robert T. Palmer Lawrence Reinecke SIGNAL CORPS William F. Cerken Ralph 1 . Merrill NAVY Willard A. Kinney William C. Meyer Burrows W. Morgan Milton Newmark Jack A. Pettis Jack Reed Joseph A. Reed Ralph W. Riley E. J. Satterthwaite John B. Sawyer David W. McAuley Mareellus B. Ricks P. Weber Louis C. Savior Robert Schlitzkus William W. Sleeker Theodore Steinmetz Joseph M. Pettit Phillip C. Pierpoint Chandler P. North Raymond Nils Olson Jack R. Schweizer Clayton D. Somers L. A. Stuck, Jr. Paul R. Teilh Charles Toflley Walter A. Weber W. D. Westman Jack Warner W. Preston Smith Donald J. Turner Hamilton Stevenson John W. Sweeny Angus D. Teskey Oliver R. Vanucci Glen S. Waterman Boyd Shafsky John H. Stahle 458 Back Row: Mtu, Faithorn, Wtbtr. HOIK. Benedict. Stuck, Franklin, Pirrpont. Schlitikus, McW ilharm, Wright, Stecker, Newmark. McNutt. Fifth Row: Holbrook, Leupp, Watson, McAulty, Prttlf, Waterman, stnnmcti, Gcrktn. Ptttlt, Lowry, Kindt, Gilbert, Howdtn, Magulre. Four th Row: Woolsey, Bergen, Dickey, Brinolara, Eddy, Oser, Vanucci, Burnham, Stevenson, Merritt, Rlttt, Weber, Dm. Palmer. Third Row: Hemphill, Toftley, Saylor, Glrot, Morgan, Beattie, M ueh, Reed, Hood, Bunner, Colvin. Warner, Ha.cn, Neddersen. Second Row: Turner, Smith. Cook. Brubaket, Becon, North, Beeun, Shafsky, Holly, Stahle. Jensen, Kell ey, Hooper, Sweny, Clewe. Front Row: Jefferson, Schweiier, Kellogg, Canaga, Code, Teskey, Hagan, Meyer, Kinney, Morgan, Caziarc. u (Naval R. O. T. C. Social Organization) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1927 ONE CHAPTER J. D. Bacon, Jr. P. E. Beeson B. L. Canaga, Jr. C. F. Carroll, Jr. C. G. Chipchase E. H. Dimpfel W. G. Holly M. H. Jensen SENIORS F. D. Kellogg E. C. Kock C. B. Koford J. D. Lawson G. B. Lennig A. O. Lind C. P. North J. R. Schweizer F. D. Smith J. H. Stahle J. Vinn, Jr. L. C. Arpin R. V. Bell J. L. Caley R. F. Ash H. W. Bell R. L. Bouque G. A. Bowker V. J. Coley E. J. Curran G. C. Davis, Jr. W. H. East R. B. Edwards A. J. Fisher R. H. Guichard D. T. Dobbins N. D. Dutcher III R. E. Fahnestock J. D. Finlayson R. C. Fleming S. M. Frost B. C. Gerwirk, Jr. JUNIORS R. P. Horncr H. V. Hutchings H. M. Karr SOPHOMORES H. L. Graham J. W. Haggard J. E. Hooper T. A. Ingham A. C. Jackson R. H. Larhman C. W. Le Count C. L. Loring F. E. Luther R. G. Lavenson E. H. Ledstrand A. R. McLaughlin F. W. Ott E. D. Marks C. F. Merrick R. L. Middleton A. G. Pirag C. C. Pollock M. A. Rea E. W. Rebard J. H. Russell, Jr. T. F. Saunders, Jr. G. W. Schutz, Jr. H. S. Wallace D. R. Robinson W. H. Robison B. B. Roe D. J. Rose R. B. Schieffer J. C. Tyler, Jr. W. M. Welfitt T. C. Adams J. D. Ainsworth F. V. D. Andrews W. S. Andrews, Jr. W. H. Aver R. H. Baker J. G. Bastow, Jr. W. E. Biggerstaff D. W. Blakeslee W. M. Brennan, Jr. F. R. Brooks J. S. Burns, Jr. G. M. Callison D. S. Chase J. B. Fagan H. I. Fahnestock L. G. Fitzsimmons, Jr. R. M. Foudy E. W. Fredell S. B. Freeborn, Jr. W. P. Frick, Jr. R. L. Huugh H. G. Hohweisner, Jr. S. S. Hoos FRESHMEN W. A. Hudspeth J. E. Hussey S. A. Jackson O. W. Jakel E. T. Jaugenour V. H. Koisterud D. H. Laughlin J. B. Long A. E. Lundgren D. D. McConnell, Jr. R. F. McGuire R. L. Meyer H. W. Michael V. A. Moitoret J. A. Moore C. B. Noyes G. A. Rice, Jr. W. R. Robinson H. A. Sauer C. N. Shane W. C. Shreve J. A. Soens F. L. Sprague J. A. Stevenson, Jr. H. L. Taylor E. A. Trudeau J. E. Tuttle J. J. Vandenburgh, Jr. A. E. Virkery W. G. Watson, Jr. B. M. Wells R. D. Whaley R. W. Wilson E. H. Young R. F. Young 459 Back Row: Rogers, Stevens, Johnson, Solinsky, Goree, Briggs. Front Row: Stringfellow, Sparks, Warner, Smith, Magill, Knight, Sperry, Wehe, Doiigery, Bennett, Jones. B B (Senior Men ' s Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1906 ONE CHAPTER HONORARY Morse A. Cartwright Dr. William Donald James Fisk Stanley Freeborn John Jennings Earl E. Leaderman Earl Leebrick Mathew Lynch John MacKenzie William W. Monahan Robert G. Sproul Capt. John Switzer Earl Voorhies Carl Zamloch ACTIVE Douglas Allen Charles Barker Harlo Bennett Fred Bentley Addison Bowers Don Crilly Ed Davies Edward Dougery Harry Johnson John Jones Reginald Kittrelle Douglas Knight Carson Magill Fred Onstott David Rogers John Sexson George Smith Edward Solinsky Robert Sparks Fred Sperry Glassell Stringfellow George Waddell Richard Warner Melvin Wehe 460 BLACK TOWERS (Inter fraternity Social Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1936 ONE CHAPTER GRADUATES Vernon Johnson Richard Sugars SENIORS Fred Barg William J. Flett-Franois Boyd Cainor Orville F. Grimes John Paul Jones B. Gregory McPhate Charles Post V. Dale Vieiria JUNIORS Othel A. Kilpatric William Murray 461 Back Row: Gerken, Franklin, Faithorn, Grimshaw, Ames, Pruss, Benoist, Ward, Weaver. Third Row: Netted, Pettit, Eveland, Ommert, Butler, Karrer, Mautz, Johnson. Second Row: Colvin, Waterman, Pierpont, Van Leeuwen, Uren, Clark, Patterson. Front Row: Higginbotham, Fenn, Code, Gilardi, Lingo, Merritt, Leva. Barnes. P I T A U P I SIGMA (National Military Fraternity) CALIFORNIA IOTA CHAPTER OFFICERS President V ice-President Secretary . . . WILLIAM F. GERKEN WILLIAM A. GRIMSHAW . RALPH L. MERRITT, JR. Treasurer Historian Editor . WILLIAM W. FRANKLIN . . . PHILIP G. PIERPONT . ROBERT C. WEAVER SENIORS Everett K. Ames James M. Barkley, Jr. Richard E. Childs T. Jay Clark Lloyd D. Colvin Nathaniel R. Faithorn Willard H. Fenn William W. Franklin William F. Gerken Albert J. Gilardi William A. Grimshaw Earl R. Higginbotham Alfred Lingo Ralph L. Merritt, Jr. Robert L. O ' Bryan Joseph M. Pettit Philip G. Pierpont Glen S. Waterman Robert C. Weaver JUNIORS Robert T. Barnes Thomas M. Benoist Ralph H. Butler George H. Eveland Robert M. Johnson Ulrich G. Karrer Francis L. Leva Matthew C. Mautz Frederick L. Nettell Clifford A. Ommert Charles P. Patterson Hugo F. Pruss Donald E. Uren Maris L. Ward 462 Beverly Ballagh Isabelle A. Prising Barbara Eames Catherine Roberts Carol I. Knight Esther A. Simpson Virginia Leach Ruth E. Slaughter Rita E. O ' Mara Mary J. Turnbull P I ALPHA SIGMA (Professional Women ' s Advertising Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1937 ALPHA CHAPTER OFFICERS President BEVERLY BALLACH yice-President CAROL KNIGHT Secretary-Treasurer ISABELLE PRISING CHARTER MEMBERS Beverly Ballagh Barbara Eames Carol Knight Virginia Leach Rita O ' Mara Isabelle Prising Esther Simpson Ruth Slaughter Mary Turnbull Catherine Wright 463 S I L N ALPHA (Dental Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1915 ONE CHAPTER HONORARY G. L. Bean H. B. Carey B. D. Hartley Gertrude Mann M. S. Marshall K. F. Meyer J. S. Shell Max Wassman UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES G. L. Bean Hermann Becks F. C. Bettencourt H. H. Bjornstrom F. P. Burke H. B. Carey G. W. Cowden C. W. Craig F. W. Epley S. F. Erpf E. W. Ferber W. C. Fleming H. E. Frisbie H. H. Gale J. R. Gill C. D. Gwinn O. A. Gwinn G. W. Hahn F. H. Hare L. A. Hewitt Carl T. Hirota G. A. Hughes D. Q. Jackson C. W. Johnson E. L. Johnson A. J. Ker F. C. Larsen R. C. Locey E. F. Lussier N. A. Lussier Mark McKimmins R. H. McVey J. A. Marshall M. S. Marshall E. H. Mauk G. S. Millberry J. V. Mitchell R. I. Peachey Daniel Ransdell H. E. Ridnour A. F. J. Ries W. B. Ryder F. W. Schubert A. E. Scott E. M. Setzer J. G. Sharp W. F. Sharp W. G. Sheffer J. S. Shell C. H. Showalter J. F. Steffan G. E. Steninger A. H. Suggett G. H. Terwilliger K. F. Terwilliger W. F. Walsh Fred Wolfsohn J. L. Wood C. J. Zappettini R. C. Zeisz SENIORS Murray L. Ballard Stanley F. Burson Paul E. Frey Donald B. Horner Everett G. Keyes Koki Kumamoto Junior Kurumada Frederick J. McNulty Arthur F. Skaife, Jr. Marshall C. Turner Carlo E. Vecchiarelli Floyd W. Burson JUNIORS Arthur L. Lundblad Enrico F. Raffanti Back Row: Sachs, Bortola. Henderson, Bingham, Prout, Powers. Brye, Schinnerer, Voorheis, Dorward, Gessling, Walker, Watson. Fourth Row: Childs, Karstens, McCollum, Herdman, Barker, Withington, Greiner, Tom, Thrall, Bentson, Dicmas, Dawson, Styerwalt. Third Row: Woodfield, Iversen, Carlson, Heeren, Tramontini, Levy, Hunger, Gale, Wilson, Ball, Johannes, Kane. Second Row: Del Mar, Raber, Netius, Weinberg, Brown, Parker, Zimmerman, Dobbins, Puck, Zeitlin, Wong, Kellogg. Front Row: Woods, Eastin, Corey, Brazil, Llndberg. Lunde, Johnson, Noguchi, Liedstrand, Grondona, Droubay. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS CALIFORNIA STUDENT BRANCH PARENT SOCIETY FOUNDED 1880 LOCAL SOCIETY FOUNDED 1911 OFFICERS Chairman BULGE E. DEL MAR Vice-Chairman Fall LAURENCE CHERRY Vice-Chairman Spring HAYDEN CORDON Secretary JOHN E. LINDBERC, JR. Treasurer JOHN P. LUNDE Adviior ... PHOFESSOK B. F. RARER I . M. K. Boelter R. G. Folaom E. D. How. UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES H. B. Langille J. N. I.e Conle R. C. Min.rik M. P. O ' Brien B. F. Raber N. F. Ward B. M. Woods Lieut. T. F. Donohue H. F. Eckberg E. E. Cialdini GRADUATES Louis I.. Grandi J. L. Shank M. R. Woodward SENIORS Alden Acern Rowland E. Ball William Barker Harold Benlson Peter H. Bertola H. E. Burrier Bernard M. Carlson L. H. Cherry George D. Childs Allen Collins Keith L. Corey John M. Crouch Brace E. Del Mar Frank De Luchi John G. Dorward Bertrand Eastin Howard B. Everett Hayden S. Cordon Dehaven Cralz Maurice Greiner Duane W. Heeren Robert W. Henderson John H. Hirt Harold Iversen Paul E. Johannes Harold G. Johnson Suano Kanemitsu Nicholas I. Karnaugh Nicolas Karstene Frederic D. Kellogg Milton Kosman Joseph Levy John E. Lindberg. Jr. John P. Lunde F. H. McCollum Neil R. Maclnlyre Fred W. Malting John Miller Lee J. Mohler Lester H. Mullen Milton Munger Searle G. Nevius David Noguchi Herbert B. Nottage J. (VBrien Ward C. Orvis Donald F. Owens John C. Pappas Stanlev Polland Ralph D. Powen S. Peyser Edwin R. Prout John W. Prud ' homme R. P. Ranney Henry Sachs L. Scheeline F. F. Stafford John Stoddard A. H. Sulliger Temple S. Voorheis Akin R. Walker F. R. Watson C. A. Wilhinglon. Jr. Frederick M. Wong Gene L. Woodfield Arnold W. Zimmerman JUNIORS Donald K. Albrecht Walter H. Axelson Kenneth B. Bingham John T. Brewsler W. E. Brink James M. Brye R. E. Orach Daniel E. Corcoran Joel Coulter John T. Dawson John L. Dicmas R. James Echevrrria Frederick H. Fitzgerald Charles R. Carbetl George Geisling Francis A. Gillice Howard H. Hinds Marion S. Israel Julius Jelinek Eneas Kane William P. Ya.lalrr willard Kaufman Edmond V. Lailone Earl H. Liedslrand Milton E. Loy J. E. Maledy A. W. Nelson Julian P. Newman W. H. Nutting Russell [ %..,]! Jack Palmer Alan F. Parker Richard F. Puck Richard Ricker Roy L. Schinnerer Winehell Smith Alfred J. Slyerwalt Bernard Toben Vernon N. Tramontini William R. U ..Mm Edwin B. Weinberg David T. Dobbins Leonard Gale Howard E. Roberts Daniel S. Sanborn SOPHOMORES Gordon Sawyer Edward Thrall McFarland Ti.ll Harold J. Wilson 465 H I N (National Civil Engineering Honor Fraternity) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, 1922 THIRTEEN CHAPTERS OFFICERS Fall Spring GIFFORD M. RAN DALL President RAYMOND M. BICKERSTAFF RAYMOND M. BICKERSTAFF V ice-President GORDON V. RICHARDS GORDON V. RICHARDS Treasurer THOMAS A. AMNEUS THOMAS A. AMNEUS Recording Secretary KAARLO W. NASI PAUL H. DENKE Corresponding Secretary RICHARD A. RAY HONORARY Paul Bailey Henry J. Brunnier Herbert G. Crowle Harmer E. Davis Thomas A. Amneus Alfred L. Brosio Joseph Brummer Paul H. Denke Lloyd Iversen Horace M. Karr Ralph MarDonald George J. Calder Henry D. Dewell Frederick Scobey Robert G. Sproul Raymond E. Davis Charles Derleth Sturla Einarsson UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Bernard Etcheverry Francis S. Foote Sidney T. Harding SENIORS Gordon V. Richards Kaarlo W. Nasi Arthur W. Parker Earl C. Paules John L. Pearson Harold M. Robbins Richard Sedlachek G. E. Troxell C. T. Wiskocil Charles G. Hyde Bruce Jameyson W. Preston Smith JUNIORS Alexander Allison Carlos A. Arroyo Jack Barrish Ravmond Bickerstaff E. Ralph Bryan Randolph Dewante Richard E. Hall William Sleeker Lyman G. Horton Louis Oppenheim Charles Ostrom Myron E. Page Harold Peletz Richard A. Ray John C. Reaves P H I C H I T H E T A (National Professional Commerce Sorority) FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, 1924 ETA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED, 1926 TWENTY-ONE CHAPTERS President y ice-President OFFICERS CAROL KNIGHT Secretary IRIS STRAEFER Treasurer Editor . ELLEN PETRAY . MARGARET KELLY ROSALIE CAFFARENA PATRONS AND PATRONESSES Professor and Mrs. Ira B. Cross Professor and Mrs. Stuart Daggett Dean and Mrs. Henry F. Grady Acting Dean and Mrs. E. T. Grether Professor and Mrs. H. R. Hatfield Professor and Mrs. Allan H. Mowbray Professor C. C. Staehling Dean Lucy W. Stebbins HONORARY Vera Mae Bishop GRADUATE Mildred Lorenz Catherine Findley Helen Howe Dorothy Brandon Nathalie Crane E. Harriet Farnsworth SENIORS Betty Lamborn JUNIORS Helen Hammond Mildred Hartvig Urda Larson Barbara Moore Hester Wolfe Edith Phillips Helen Voeller Eileen Weichers Kmilie Douglass 466 SOPHOMORES Carolyn Geis Lucile Rodoni H N U (Household Science Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1915 Dr. Louise .ilium UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Dr. Agnes Fay Morgan Dr. Ruth Okey Dr. Betty Watts OFFICERS President ELSA PFAFF V ice-President ADINA WIENS Treasurer ANNA AOKI Secretary CLAUDINE BAYLESS Editor . MARIE CLINE Ann Anderson Bessie Cook Margaret Cooper Helen Davison Zella Dunlop GRADUATES Eleanor Fredericks Frances .ilium Vera Greaves Alice Hall Clema Kozak Christine Laird I in a Morse Takako Negi Elsa I Tall Thelma Rietzke Hazel Schulze Adina Wiens Anna Aoki Claudine Bayless SENIORS Marie Cline Jeannette Hendricks Louise Krenier Mary Rentz Dorothy Rundle Gladys 1 ilh.nl Elsie Orr JUNIORS Helen Nobles Margaret Pollard Maria Stuart N U I G M (Women ' s Physical Education Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1916 LUCILE K. CZARNOWSKI, SPONSOR OFFICERS President M. EDLO CALDWELL Secretary MARJORIE ADAMS Treasurer MARY K. DUNLAP Eleanor E. Bartlett Frederica Bernhard Louise S. Cobb HONORARY Caroline W. Coleinan Ruby L. Cunningham Lucile K. C arnowski Sarah R. Davis Anna Espenschade Marie H. Glass Beatrice Hellebrandt Pauline Hodgson Eugenia Kennan Violet B. Marshall Esther Sinclair Marjorie E. Adams Clarisse M. Bois GRADUATES M. Edlo Caldwell Mary K. Dunlap Elizabeth Frank Isabel B. Kane Pauline Lowenthal Nancy Miner Virginia J. Strout Dorothy J. Tollefsen Mary Ruth McLaughlin Margaret E. Dinsmore Laura R. Gibbs SENIORS JUNIORS Leslie Kelley Margaret E. Kessing Lorraine R. Michel Lucile E. Patterson Linda Roberto 467 N N (International Professional Foreign Trade Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, 1916 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1912 TEN CHAPTERS OFFICERS Fall Semester Spring Semester FRANKLIN D. SMITH President JACK G. HOSMER ERIC L. COLEMAN V ice-President CLYDE F. WILKINS CARL A. MANNISTO Secretary-Treasurer IVAN R. UTTER Henry F. Grady UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Ira B. Cross W. Andrew Ross Victor Alcone GRADUATES Donald Bird William B. Cecil Scott Davidson Al C. King SENIORS Eric L. Coleman Jack G. Hosmer Carl A. Mannisto Franklin D. Smith Ivan R. Utter Clyde F. Wilkins JUNIORS Maxwell Burland Richard Lynch Howard J. Fratzke Robert C. Lynch Winston O. Gilkey Ralph D. Rader Leland S. Hamilton Lewellyn E. Walters H I (French Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1906 NINE CHAPTERS OFFICERS President BARBARA SHUEY Vice-President LISL LOEB Secretary RUTH DOSER . Treasurer . . . DOROTHY KEITH GRADUATES Vernon J. Chapman Bruce F. Dean Suzanne d ' Orssaud Marie L. Dufrenoy Ned C. Fahs John H. Fawcett L. Fencel Albert D. Franek Mary L. Gessling Dorothy O. Keith Margot J. Kuper Gina T. Lana Lisl S. Loeb Mary C. McGrillies Catherine A. Musante Olive S. Parish Mother A. Olga Rossi Pietro C. Rossi Mary J. Russell Luigi D. Sandri Barbara W. Shuey Howard Stone Ronald N. Walpole Yvonne M. Barmettler Ethel Baron Elizabeth Cheney Jean M. Cunningham SENIORS Ruth A. Doser Henry Hefter Dorothy S. Fraser E. Holden Helena M. Gannon Jean Johnson Helen G. Haley Olga M. Mahomed Juliette M. Van Hovenberg Marian T. Parry Dorrit M. Senram Clayton D. Somers Marcella M. Theil Alvin A. I .ii-ii-. Jr. JUNIORS Phyllis C. Foreman Simone C. Goursau 468 H I (Women ' s Economic Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1926 ONE CHAPTER President Vice-President Mrs. R. A. Brady Mrs. A. Buchanan Mrs. N. S. Buchanan Mrs. P. F. Cadman Mrs. R. D. Calkins Miss M. H. Chickering Dr. B. N. Armstrong OFFICERS . . . MARY MALLORY MABEL MCCAMMAN Secretary Treasurer . AURIA WISEMAN MARJORIE MASON HONORARY Mrs. Ira B. Cross Mrs. S. Daggett Mrs. M. M. Davisson Miss K. C. Felton Mrs. J. F. Forbes Mrs. H. F. Grady Mrs. E. T. Grether Mrs. N. R. Hatfield Mrs. M. M. Knight Mrs. J. E. Krueger Mrs. C. Landauer Mrs. A. H. Mowbray UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Mrs. Mary B. Davidson Dr. E. H. Huntington Miss M. E. Murdock Dr. J. B. Peixotto GRADUATES Mrs. C. C. Plehn Mrs. L. Rogin Miss L. M. Spiers Mrs. C. C. Staehling Mrs. P. S. Taylor Dean Lucy W. Stebbins Alberta Chambers Helen Dickson Dorothy Jacquelin Jean Shearer Aileen Clarke Pearl Fawcett Jane Mulcahy Joy Smith Betty Crawford Constance M. Irons Mary Mullins Evelyn Whitehead SENIORS Elizabeth Bufford Thelina Kahn Mary Mallory Mary B. Thaxter Margaret Flint Mabel McCamman Marjorie Mason Adria Wiseman JUNIORS Mary K. Baker Kathryn Daly Josephine M. Van Horn Barbara J. Wagner June DeLancey SIGMA KAPPA ALPHA (Women ' s History Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1915 FOUR CHAPTERS Herbert E. Bolton Jessie E. Boyd Dorothy H. Bronstein Catherine Beringer Virginia Bever Virginia Cafferata Maxine Chappell Margaret Clark OFFICERS President LILLIAN K. DEL GEORGE Vice-President ALTHEA Ross Secretary-Treasurer CATHERINE BERINCER UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Charles E. Chapman Lucia B. Kinnaird George H. Guttridge Lawrence A. Harper Robert J. Kerner GRADUATES Helen Cooley Betty Crawford Mildred Dickson Marietta Eisenberger Gladys Fitzpatrick William A. Morris Franklin C. Palm Frederick L. Paxson Jean Gilmore Marjorie Gunn Frances Harper Dorothy Jarquelin Hilda Kessler Dorothy Bissell Eleanor Blinn Marian Matteson SENIORS (Catherine Connick Alice de Carteret Shirley Duncan JUNIORS Charlotte Pearson Herbert I. Priestley- Howard M. Smyth James W. Thompson Saima Koski Josephine McCann Althea Ross Laura Schaefer Margaret Ward Ayame Ichiyasu Jane Weingarten Ethel Tinnemann 469 U B (Intersorority Social Organization) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1928 ONE CHAPTER Marian Barmby Helen Biggerstaff Hal li. Booth Betty Cadman SENIORS Eleanor Church Martha Crew Elizabeth Currier Charlotte Johnson Ruth Leach Virginia Lyon Elizabeth Rushforth Carol Symmes Alison Thomson Barbara Vincent Joan Von Schmidt Patty Alexander Leslie Bourgeault Betty Butler Jean Elliott Jean Hagan La Verne Kahl JUNIORS Adrienne Lester Betty Makins Janet May Sally Reed Betty Lou Yelton SOPHOMORES Gabrielle Detert Phyllis Greenlee TORCH AND SHIELD (Women ' s Social Organization) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1906 ONE CHAPTER HONORARY MEMBER Mary B. Davidson Helen Biggerstaff Hallie Booth Elizabeth Cadman Patricia Alexander Leslie Bourgeault Barbara Courtright Margaret Craig Martha Crew Patricia Droste Peggy Kennedy SENIORS JUNIORS Jean Haven Ann Meiklejohn Jean MacDonald Marion Sproul Alison Thomson Walravine Van Heeckeren Barbara Vincent Joan Von Schmidt Janice Watkins Betty Lou Yelton 470 (Social Service and Citizenship Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1933 ALPHA CHAPTER ESTABLISHED IN 1933 ONE CHAPTER James Orville Archer Dr. S. H. Babington Paul Herbert Baldwin FRATRES IN URBE H. Peter Dechant, Jr. Thomas Hays Fortney Edward Davis Gray Lawrence Burge Gray Boynton Kaiser Donald Greame Kelley Harry Majors, Jr. William Hampton Marshall David Havens Newhall Andrew M. Price C. Mason Whitney Owen C. Dickson GRADUATES W. Sterling Gorrill Luther Newhall, Jr. Robert Durant Ray Fred Batkin Morris Cleland Charles Arthur Anderson Harold Bakker Willard Kenneth Davis SENIORS Ernest Lowry Dobson Richard Henry Feller Paul Donald Ehret George E. Lawrence JUNIORS Rush Spencer Clark Richard Arthur Ray Curt Mitchell Rocca Elliot Sawyer SOPHOMORES George C. Gester, Jr. Herbert White Graves John Lewis Morgan Bernard T. Rocca, Jr. Payson Sheridan Woolsey Russell Usinger T H E T A SIGMA P H I (Women ' s Journalistic Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, 1909 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1923 THIRTY-SEVEN CHAPTERS Gertrude Atherton HONORARY Mrs. Walter Kolasa Rose Wilder Lane Kathleen Norris Cornelia S. Parker Lucy W. Stebbins SENIORS Beverly Ballagh Mildred Caldwell Isabelle Prising Charlotte Sim Elinor Briggs Eileen Doyle Donna Reid Dorothy F. Z. Gertrude Bronstein Marian Nelson Ora Short JUNIORS Jean Barnett Margery Evernden Agnes Larsen Betty Sleeker Phyllis Brewer Mildred Hickok Janet Smith Mary Wiley 471 ALPHA DELTA SIGMA (Professional Advertising Fraternity) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI, 1913 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1927 TWENTY-SEVEN CHAPTERS UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Reginald Biggs Lowell Brown Earl V. Burke Charles W. Collier John J. Cuddy Ben D. Dixon J. Rufus Doig Fred C. Fischer Donald E. Oilman Charles E. Greenfield Ewald T. Grether Carl F. Ohliger Charles H. Raymond Royal A. Roberts Stanley G. Swanberg Earl V. Weller I. King Wilkin Howard Willoughby GRADUATE Guido A. Ferrari SENIORS Frank C. Balbo Peter Bertola Philip Bissell Byron H. Brown Clyde R. Carter William L. Cook Ephraim Dyer Robert C. Disher Donald R. Harris Jack H. Brubaker John B. Hawthorne William Hutchings Leigh Jones JUNIORS Clinton T. Hallsted Julius P. Hammer Robert M. Irving L. Melvin Lester Judson Madden Frank Mitchell Reginald Moore William Rubin Carl W. Sauer Winfield Vernon Scott Jr. SOPHOMORES Clark A. Lee Robert E. McClure Daniel F. McGuire Fred N. Twining Richard W. Newell Donald Pickens Claude Schrader Walmsley R. Twining Rudolph Edwin Streit Jack Tobin Everett E. Zeigler W. David Wigley HAMMER AND COFFIN (National Humorous Publication Society) FOUNDED AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY, 1906 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED, 1924 SEVEN CHAPTERS Ray Christiansen Dorothy Fischer Fred C. Fischer Frank C. Balbo William F. Berk Byron Brown Jack H. Brubaker James M. Doyle Floyd Dreyer Robert F. Laws James Bell Morton Chapman Ephraim Dyer Douglas H. Elliott Jack Chariot GRADUATES ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Edward Zeus SENIORS L. Melvin Lester David W. McAuley Rex Moore Jerry Nevius Donald C. Ralston Merle Randall JUNIORS William H. James Karl Kasten Kenneth L. McCombs SOPHOMORES 472 Lionel Ormsby Charles H. Raymond I. King Wilkin Murdock Schlesinger C. Nelson Schrader Don H. Short Freeman Silva George Somers Jack Tobin Bill Turner H. Thomas McCorkle Wesley N. Meyer William J. Wallace Elwood Williams Stanley Staub H I H I N (If omen ' s Debating Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1920 ONE CHAPTER OFFICERS Fall Spring GAIL MONTGOMERY President MARY ALICE HOWATT JEANETTE LUBLINKR Vice-l ' ' resident JEANETTE LUBLINER BABETTK ( OLDSMITH Secretary MAXINE JACOBSEN DOROTHY HOY . . Treasurer . MARGARET HILL SENIORS Maude Alexander Muriel Ehrlioh Babette Goldsmith Mary Alice Howat Genevieve Jemtegaard Thelma Kahn Helen Klein Jeanetle Lubliner Gail Montgomery Marjorie Wallace Dorothy Woodside Jean Frame Theresa Goldner JUNIORS Maxine Jacobsen Sylvia Jacoby Jane Powell Constance Carlson Patricia Golton SOPHOMORES Margaret Hill Dorothy Hoy Rosemary Martin Dorothy Miller Harriet Plunkett Shirley Resner Margaret Ann Russell Cecile Trumpler ALPHA T A U DELTA (National Nursing Fraternity) ALPHA CHAPTER OFFICERS President Vice-President Corresponding Secretary Recording Secretary Treasurer . EDITH MCKENZIE GERALDINE BUTLER . CLEONE LINDBORC JULIA ERDMAN . ELYSSE POLK MEMBERS Eileen Brady Geraldine Butler Catena Crum Charlotte Ehling Julia Erdman Johanna Desmond Freda Foster Joyce Frug Hisako Hisanaga Carlene Hynes Janis Ke nney Pearl Kurokawa Annie Lenaers Cleone Lindborg Marie Logan Edith McKenzie Ann Martin Claire Morgan " Elysse Polk Adele Ryan Anita Sanwald Jeanne Volin Bobette Thompson Roberta Zabriskie Eleanor Anderson Shirle Bass Louise Brown Helen Buck Lois Oxsen Mary Coates Dorothy Cole Gladys Crites Elaine Darby PLEDGES Mary Williams Liselotte Doerfler Lois Halloran Minerva Hurley Mary k u 1,1 Lois Zimmerman Lei McLean Elizabeth Mayo Marjorie Nobles Margaret Oatman 473 HAMMER AND DIMMER (Little Theatre Social Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1936 ONE CHAPTER HONORARY Edwin E. Duerr SENIORS JUNIORS William Craig Augusta Dabney Evelyn Dakin Barbara Eames William Engvirk Edward Freyer John Galbraith I ' .mil Gheist Marie Hund Claire Jackson Philip Oliver-Smith Freeman Rirketts Beverly Sachs Esther Simpson Mary Baker Kathryn Daly Cranan Denton Patricia Droste Douglas Elliott Constance Johnson June Lynch Marjorey McCall Thomas McCorkle Carlton McKinney Margery Manchester Helen Mayhew Jean Moores Mary Margaret Muny Joe Murfield Marie Naphan George Tolson H U (National Professional Engineering Fraternity) EPSILON CHAPTER LIMITED TO MINING AND GEOLOGY STUDENTS FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, 1904 EPSILON CHAPTER ESTABLISHED, 1911 TWENTY-THREE CHAPTERS OFFICERS Fall Spring GALEN H. STURGEON President PHILLIP CHUBB WILLIAM NEILSON, JR Vice-President JAMES L. JOUBERT JAMES T. WILSON Recording Secretary WILLIAM MOSHER JAMES L. JOUBERT Treasurer IAN LAWRENCE JOHN F. LORD Corresponding Secretary MILAN G. ARTHUR Charles A. Anderson Perry Byerly Ralph W. Chancy FACULTY MEMBERS Cordell Durrell Walter S. Merely Earnest A. Hersani Adolf Pabst Carlton D. Hulin Frank H. Probert George D. Louderback Nicholas L. Taliaferro Lester C. Uren V. L. VanderHoof Howcl Williams Joseph Gregory William MoFaddt-n Jr. Milan G. Arthur George Beinhorn Robert Brown Henry Cavigli Phillip Chubb Russell Bryan William Clough Arthur Feldmeyer Joseph Floyd Ralph Fowler Robert Fowler John Douma GRADUATES Richard Mielenz SENIORS Galen H. Sturgeon James T. Wilson JUNIORS 474 Thomas Ham Kenneth Hill Russell Johnson James L. Joubert John F. Lord Ian Lawrence William Mosher William Neilson, Jr. Paul M. Price George F. Reed Albert Repecka Sargent Reynolds Vard Stockton DELTA E P S I L N Ray S. Boynton Helen W. Fancher Hope M. Cladding (Art Honor Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1914 FOUR CHAPTERS OFFICERS President ALFRED A. NEWTON V ice-President F. ELIZABETH GADSDEN Recording Secretary LARRY MENDOSA Corresponding Secretary BETTY WEISKOTTEN Treasurer KATHARINE L. MCCARTNEY UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES John Haley Chiura Obata Erie Loran Stephen C. Pepper Howard Moise Warren C. Perry Eugen Neuhaus Margaret E. Petersen John C. Ayres Elaine L. Bailey Evelyn B. Bailey Ella Hlirmaii GRADUATES Katharine L. McCartney James A. MoCray Alfred A. Newton Worth Ryder Rosamond B. Stanley Oliver M. Washburn Kimio G. Obata Dorothy H. Patterson Betsey R. Straub Carmel M. Thomas SENIORS Elizabeth Atkins Carolyn L. Broadhead Bettyann MacDavid Ruth McGowan Ethel McKibben Evalyn Roth Bronson Butler F. Elizabeth Gadsden JUNIORS Zelda Long Lawrence Mendosa Karl Van Leuven G. Elizabeth Weiskotten Don Short George E. Somers M N (Women ' s Debating Society) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1912 ONE CHAPTER President . . Vice-President OFFICERS HELEN HENRICH Treasurer Reco rding Secretary . EDNA STONE Corresponding Secretary MARIAN HUGHES SARAH PUTNAM DOROTHY HORNBLOWER Helen Henrirh SENIORS Dorothy Hornblower |-.I!H II, Prising Sarah Putnam Florire Andrews JUNIORS Patricia Guinee Marjorie Larsen Zonna Murray Jerry Harbarh Jeanne Fleeson SOPHOMORES Marjorie Hicok Marian Hughes FRESHMEN Thclnia Murphy Selma Richman Dorothy Sumser Virginia Taylor 475 H (National Women ' s Social Organization) IOTA CHAPTER FOUNDED 1935 NINE CHAPTERS Margaret I. Beattie Louise S. Cobb HONORARY MEMBERS Mary B. Davidson Helen W. Fancher Alice G. Hoyt Lucy W. Slebbins President V ice-President Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary OFFICERS . . JEAN MACDONALD . . . RACHEL KNAPP IRENE CHRISTENSEN . . . ELINOR NORTON Treasurer Office Manager . . Historian Alumni Secretary M w MM KISTEMAN MAKJORIE SCHERER . . RUTH SLAUGHTER . PHYLLIS KIMBALL SENIORS Barbara Bangs Blylhe Bond Gertrude Bronstein Mary Ellen Bullock Eleanor Bycraft Ruth Bycraft Mary Edmunds Jane Fisher Mary ali Hadley Merrill Holmea Louise Hugo Nancy Johnston Jean Kauflfman Madeleine Kautch Dorothy Krayenbuhl Maryellen Lewis Lucille McBroom Ida Noack Berenice Ranker Mary Ryan Audrey Starr Lois Taylor Juliette Van Hovenberg Dorothv Watson Dorothy Zerwer JUNIORS Dorothy Atkins Barbara Bennett Jeanne Bennett ' Azile Blevins Dolly Dunwoody Elizabeth Fortune Louise Garvin Eleanor Gerard Mildred Hartvig Eleanor Herb Betty Hoffman Justine Hyde Barbara Kennedy Lola Lathrop - Charlotte McAfee Sylvia Malone Marian Milea Dorothy Miller Janet Murray Mary Agnes Phillips Evelyn Reuter Margaret Roelse Elizabeth Ryan Nellie Sheafe Claire Zampa Etna Smith Betty Stecker June Sweeney Belly Lou Taylor Lorraine Ungaretti Josephine Ward Wilhelmina Wildhagrn Mary Wiley SOPHOMORES Helen Babasiniai Grace Baldwin Barbara Barnes June Bischoff Arline Brownlie - Jean Campbell Alice Chubb Beth Dahleen Dorothea Darch Florence Doelker Lolita Dutro Sarah Finlay Sylvia Fleming Lois Fullmer Helen Gerhart Jessie Gray Frances Turman Elsie WicksX Margaret I e Guild Constance Hagan Betty Jane Hoffman Claris Holland Margaret Lowland Doris MacDonald Augusta Miller M- M MM Hi Quinn Maxine Rickenbacher Helen Runstrom Doris Ryan Helen Savage Anna Stephenaon Nancy Taber Jewel Torbert Zelda Troedson Jean Wildenradt FRESHMEN Margaret Butzbach nti- Clark -- ' Helen Damon Vivienne Deane LucilU Ebell Dorothy Gaston Helen Hederman Evelyn Hutchison Shirley Keuzer Jane Lyon Mary Lyoni ' " " Isabel McGilchrist Dorothy McPeak Betty Malry Goapava Melinovich Billie Nawenski Grace Norton Gladys Palmer Isabel Perrine Renette Prior Virginia Ryerson Marian Spillman Janet White Gertrude Wolfien 476 INTERNATIONAL HOUSE STAFF Allen C. Blaisdell, Director Mrs. Allen C. Blaisdell Eugenie Carneiro Elizabeth Edmunds Burton A. King Isabel Magana Ann Saito Victor Young Burdette Boileau Henry Bruman Carlton Goodlett GRADUATE COUNCIL Norman Hanwell F. Arthur Harris David Marrs Marlin Shirley lull- Smith Glenn Bishop Burdette Boileau Malcolm Byce Douglas Cooke Ben Dienstein MEN S COUNCIL Dudley Dillard Heinz Eulau Verne Hendrix Don Hirkok Russell Kramer Folke Kristensson Wesley McClure Jesus Perez Clarke Pettit Don Rutledge Leo Saito Marian Blewitt Jean Bowman Sarah Cohen Jean Coolbaugh WOMEN S COUNCIL Marcella Eriksmoen Constance Howard Patricia Jensen Jean Kauffman Margaret McKechnic Virginia Stephens Gisela Wassermann 477 CHINESE STUDENTS ' CLUB Chan, E. Chinn Chong Dea Lee, K. Lee, P. Lim, K. Quack Tow Young, A. Young, V. Yuke Fung, J. Lee, R. Jew Moon Wong, E. Dong Fong Eng Horn Hong Lee, D. Lee, E. Wong, H. Wong, L. Wong, V. Wong, W. Yee Lim, F. Chan, R. Chue Gee Hoo Fung, M. Jan Lew Shum Young, G. 2600 ETNA STREET. FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1913 ONE CHAPTER Chia Wei Chang Tsi-hwa Chang Jacob Fong Ernest F. Horn UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES Allyn Lee N. W. Mah C. P. Sha Mrs. L. L. Lee Henry D. Moon B. C. Wong GRADUATES Liang Hwang Chew S. Tong Sing D. Koo James L. Tong Choh-hao Li Sui M. Weng Glenn D. Lyin Caroline Wong Hock S. Ong Howard M. C. Wong SENIORS I ' hi I -MII Ahn Edward J. Chan Silas Chinn Samuel Cho Harry Chong Edward F. Dea Clarence C. Dong Eli Eng Edwin K. Fong Fulton F. Fong Freeman M. Horn Ngai Ho Hong James J. Jang Alvin K. Joe Andrew Kim Kai C. Kim David A. Lee Elmer H. Lee Louis Chan Benjamin Chow Herbert W. Dea Ruby Dong Albert K. Fong J----H- P. Fung Mary Fung Lawrence Jue Edion Lowe William J. Lowe Fong I inn Cheuk Y. May George Mew 478 JUNIORS Ping Kwan Wong Wai Law Wong Chien S. Wu Chao M. Yu Etta Lee Kenneth K. Lee Low Kee Lee Pauline Lee Kwong Lim Kathryn L. Quock Grace J. Tow Jim Wing Bing Q. Wong Guey G. Wong Herbert C. Wong Lincoln Wong Violet G. Wong William L. Wong Stanton G. Yee Albert Young Victor C. Young Ruby M. Yuke Sing Gum Ng Yik S. Ng James P. Tomwye Albert J. Lee Donald Lee Rose S. Y. Lee Wallace F. Lee Frank B. Lim Karl J. Tong David W. Wing Chung Y. Wong Ming-Shek Wong Clifton Yip SOPHOMORES Bertha L. Chan George F. Chan Raymond Chan Paul Cho Ruth M. W. Chue Peter Gee Lawrence J. Hoo Lillian P. Jew Howard B. Joe Hing Lee Stephen F. Lee John G. Lew Ray Lew Theodore W. Loo Grace C. Lowe Jean M. Lym George Mar Jean V. Moon Henry H. Soon Edward W. Tom Earl D. Wong FRESHMEN Victor Ah Tye Alvin B. Chan Edward J. Chan Elwood B. Chan Samuel Dang Marian K. Dong Elizabeth M. Dun Frank Eng Clifton Fong Jane Fong Albert Q. Foo Minerva Fung John C. Holt Leong Hop Howard H. Jan William M. Lai Albert S. Lee Fredrick Lee Lew Hong Lee Rowland C. Lee Stanley C. Lee Agnes P. L -oii}! Bertha Lew Stella Lew Jonah G. Li Allen Lim Donald T. Lim Funston G. Linn Yuen Cheung Ma Bruce Quan Emma M. Shum William D. Won Wyman Won George Yee Lily E. Yee Gertrude Young APANESE STUDENTS ' CLUB Ginoza Aoki Baha Fujioka Fujisaki Hirashima Inouye Kanemitsu Kito Morioka Omori Owashi Shigezumi Takahashi, A. Takahashi, E. Tsurumoto Uyehara Yamada Yoshioka Asakawa Iseri Mori Nagai Shimidzu Fujita Shibata Suzuki Obata Suqano 1777 EUCLID AVENUE. FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1913 LOCAL CHAPTER ESTABLISHED 1913 ONE CHAPTER GRADUATES SENIORS Akira Aisawa Peter S. Aoki Yozo Baba Anson T. Fujioka Charles K. Fujisaki Jack Y. Fukunaga Kazwo Goto Thomas T. llira-hirna Kaoru Inouye Sunao Kanemitsu Hiroslii Kavvahara Toshio Kito Masaini Kono Mitsugi Matoi Harry Y. Mori Fred T. Morioka Victor Abe Frank S. Endo Yoshiki Fujiharu Yoshio Hotta Shori lijima Will iam Y. Ginoza Yoshimi Hiraoka Harry Naka Theodore Ohashi William Wake Joe Ogura Tomoyuki Omori Joseph Owashi Leo T. Saito George N. Shigezumi Peter S. Shinoda Richard C. Suzuki James Tabata Alden W. Takahashi Ernest S. Takahashi George Tanaka Hiroshi Uratsu Hiroshi Uyehara George Y. Yamada Masao Yamada Ben T. Yoshioka FRESHMEN George Kitahara Nobu Nishimoto Benjamin T. Obata Masao Sugano George M. Yamamot JUNIORS George Adachi Moto Asakawa Roy T. Hanaoka Shigeki Hiratsuka Morio Ikeda Toru Ikeda Victor C. Iseri S. John Iwatsu Shigego R. Komatsu Tatsuo Kushida Yoshihira Mori Herbert T. Miyao Charles K. Nishi John Y. Teshima George M. Yasukochi Sunao Nagai Mitsugi Nishikawa Kiyoshi Nobusada Shizuo H. Okamoto Susumu Okamoto H. Leo Saito Mils Sakai Everett S. Sasaki Tom T. Sasaki Kazuyoshi Senzaki Lincoln Shimidzu Peter Sugawara Susumu Take! SOPHOMORES Leslie H. Abe Iwao Egashira Minoru Endo Masaru Fujimoto William K. Fujila Tokuji Hedani Torao Ichiyasu Ernest Izumi Yoshio Kasai John S. Nishimoto Shiro Omata Sam S. Rokutani George K. Shibata Tim Shimazaki Keichi Shimizu Daniel S. Shinoda Arashi Shirakawa Goro Suzuki Nobumitsu Takahashi Masao Takeshita Roy I. Teshima Toshi W. Yamazaki 479 Ruth Doscr Betty Lamborn Dorothy Miller Virginia Thickens WOMEN ' S DORMITORY ASSOCIATION (Representative of the Organized Dormitories) FOUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1914 COUNCIL MEMBERS FALL Marian Matteson Margaret Dorothy Flint Frances Rose Beulah Cox Lois Young Dorothy Cuthrie Alice Justine McDougal Kate Boyd Audrey Lowe Edith McKenzie Claire Nace Patricia Campbell Lois Clauson Jane Whitaker Ruth Whitley . Alpine-Warring .Beaudelaire Beverly Lodge .Bryn Mawr . Colonial . Concord . .Concordia .Durant Place .Epworth . Haste Lodge . Joaquin . Lantana Lauralon .Magnolias . .Martha Washington North Cables. . SPRING Marian Matteson . Jean Allison Bernice Weaver .Ruth Doser Louise Wilbur Lois Young Dorothy Guthrie lola Thompson Ruth Lucille Boly Hester Wolfe .Sylvia Marvin .Julia Erdman Patricia Campbell .Lois Clauson Margaret White Margaret Rose FALL Katherine Stokes Piedmont Place Marjorie Sims Prospect Terrace. . . . Mildred Sund Redwood Betty Kerr Regent Cleora Ritz Ridgemont Elizabeth Norman St. Margaret ' s Ritter Barbara J. Wagner Btebbins Alice Barter Stratford Katherine N. Gross Sunny Brook Gables Elaine Goldberg Whitehall Mary-Edith Harron Wisteria Betty Catterton Utrimque Jean Bowman International House. Madeline Taylor Y. W. C. A SPRING . Alice Larsen . Caryl Ladd Bernice Downing Virginia Thickens Hanny Salvisberg . Josephine Little .Eleanor Walker . Barbara J. Wagner .Margaret Hessel Ethel Flack . Adele Stimmel . Claudine Bayless . Frances Paratore . Jean Bowman Madeline Taylor Back Row: McKenzie, Rose, Hessel, Guthrie, Taylor, Boyd, Erdman, Nace. Third Row: Sund, Stokes, Downing, Miller, Matteson, Wolfe, Salmberg, Boly. Second Row: Larsen, Thompson, Thickens, Walker, Ladd, Paratore, Lamborn, Bayless, Campbell. Front Row: Catterton, Wilbur, Cox, Bowman, Wagner, White, Harron, Young. 480 CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 2601 DURANT AVENUE ORGANIZED IN 1907 Christian Science Society of the University of California was organized on this campus in 1907. From that time until the present there has been a steady growth and progress in its activities. The year 1933 saw the culmination of building plans with the construction and occupation of a new edifice. A Reading Room is open daily, where authorized Christian Science literature may be read. Testimonial meetings are held in the auditorium every Tuesday evening, and each semester a lecture is presented by a member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church, the First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts. Students and faculty members are cordially invited to attend the meetings and use the Reading Room. 481 Bailey Edson Hansen Hector Hill Mehlert Miller Merrill Engel Flanders Krom McGimsey Rygel Stryker MASONIC CLUB ORGANIZATIONS ESTABLISHED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1923 MEN ' S MASONIC CLUB Fall Spring CLINTON RYCEL President ROBERT MORRILL MILTON HILL Vice-President HARLEY SCOTT PAUL EVANS Secretary DALE ELY Louis SAYLOR Membership Secretary CHARLES MEHLERT ROBERT MORRILL Treasurer THOMAS UBOJCICH JAMES JOUBERT Representative CHARLES MILLER CHARLES MEHLERT Representative CLINTON RYCEL NICHOLAS BAILEY Representative NICHOLAS BAILEY WOMEN ' S MASONIC CLUB Fall Spring ROBERTA HECTOR President RUTH McGiMSEY VIRGINIA ENCEL V ice-President RUTH KROM ELEANOR EDSON Council Representative ELEANOR EDSON RUTH KROM Council Representative VIRGINIA ENCEL RUTH McGiMSEY Council Representative MAYFRED STRYKER SUSAN SEARLES Secretary SYLVIA FLEMING CORINNE HOWE Membership Secretary SUSAN SEARLES NEL-MARCARET WILSON Treasurer NEL-MARCARET WILSON MARYELLA GARDNER Women ' s Representative CORINNE HOWE MAYFRED STRYKER Women ' s Representative BERENIECE WEICAND ARLETTA TRAVIS Glee Club Representative MARYELLA GARDNER MASONIC EXECUTIVE COUNCIL Fall Spring JAMES JOUBERT President ROBERT MORRILL RUTH McGiMSEY Vice-President ELEANOR EDSON RUTH KROM Secretary RUTH KROM VIRGINIA ENCEL . Treasurer VIRGINIA ENCEL 482 WOMEN ' S MASONIC GLEE CLUB President Ja ARLETTA TRAVIS Manager JHJSL RUTH KROM Secretary ii ll RUTH McGiMSEY Librarian . 3kMJx RUTH DOBSON MORGAN REID JOYCE President Vice-president Secretary COMBER Treasurer NEWMAN CLUB (Catholic Students Social and Intellectual Center} ESTABLISHED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 1899 Newman Club, the campus social, intellectual, and religious center for Catholic students, set up a new record for varied activities this year. Besides the traditional Tuesday afternoon open houses, Friday luncheons, and monthly Sunday night suppers, a daily breakfast and luncheon were served, and a choral group, a discussion group on current problems, and a class in Christian Apologetics were formed. Special events were: a costume barn dance in October, a Mardi Gras carnival on Shrove Tuesday, a student retreat in February, and a picnic in April. Officers for the coming year were inaugurated at the spring formal held in April. Front Row: Kennedy, Joyce, Morgan. O ' Hara, Wonlfrom, Reid. Back Row: McCaffery. Comber, Hugo, Bartholomew, Kressman. 483 Bullock Dell ' Osso Duval Holmes Kessing Umborn Reed Rutherford Russell Snyder Strosk Swords Unnewehr Wiechers COLLEGE CLUB JUNIORS (Junior Auxiliary of the East Bay Branch of the American Association of University Women) 2680 BANCROFT WAY EXECUTIVE BOARD President GEORGIA UNNEWEHR Philanthropy LUCILLE STROSK 1st Vice President IDA NOACK Social BEATRICE REED 2nd Vice President RUTH DUVAL Membership HELEN RUTHERFORD Recording Secretary EILEEN WIECHERS Telephone JOYCE RUSSELL Corresponding Secretary Lois SNYDER Publicity ROXANA HOLMES Treasurer MARGARET KESSINC Luncheon MARY ELLEN BULLOCK Historian . , BETTY LAMBORN Sports BETTY BRADFORD Senior Representative MARY SWORDS Elsie Boynton Gwenn Budzein Mary Ellen Bullock Anna Carleton Irene Christiansen Helen Cunningham Neva Dell ' Osso Adele Gilkerson Dolly Grandjean Grace Haldeman Betty Bailey Betty Bradford Willa-Gene Budelman Mary Cornett Lois Crane Kathryn Daly Daphine Dean Dorothy Dodds Vera Ench Frances Armstrong Sarah Finlay Constance Hagan SENIORS Roxana Holmes Frances Hurlburt Nancy Johnston Alice Kelley Peggy Kelley Betty Lamborn Ruth McVean Ella Martignoni Ida Noack Beatrice Reed JUNIORS Louise Garvin Patricia Gill Jessie Gray Mildred Hartvig Ruberta Harwell Margaret Kessing Agnes Labadie Mary McElreth Mary McGillivrary SOPHOMORES Barbara Johnston Mary Ford Kelly Louise Kistner Doris Machado Mary Russell Helen Rutherford Mary Margaret Simon Ruth Slaughter Lois Snyder Audrey Starr Mary Swords Janet Taylor Kay Thomson Janet Wood Jean Mathewson Mary L. Rist Joyce Russell Kathryn Sexton Olive Stocking Lucille Strosk Iris Straefer Georgia Unnewehr Eileen Wichers Margaret Ann Russell Jean Teilman Marie Wrigley 484 Marjorie Claxton Nan Duhme FRESHMEN Mary Jo Gleeson Florence MoCloud Pat O ' Rourke Abracadabra 352 Acacia 353 Ace of Clubs 470 Advertising Service Bureau 209 Affiliated Seniors 160-163 Alpha Chi Omega 408 Alpha Chi Sigma 354 Alpha Delta Phi 355 Alpha Delta Pi 409 Alpha Delta Sigma 472 Alpha Epsilon Phi 410 Alpha Gamma Delta 411 Alpha Gamma Rho 356 Alpha Kappa Kappa 401 Alpha Kappa Lambda 357 Alpha Nu 467 Alpha Omicron Pi 412 Alpha Phi 413 Alpha Sigma Phi 358 Alpha Tau Delta 473 Alpha Tau Omega 359 Alpha Xi Delta 414 Alumni 48-52 Alumni Council 50 Alumni Publications 51 Areta 415 A. S. M. E 465 Assembly Dance Committee 85 A. S. U. C. Band 233 A. S. U. C. Card Sales Committee. .84 A. S. U. C. Social Committee 183 Athletics, General 243-245 Athletic Council 243 Baseball 308-319 Baseball, All California Team. 310-311 Baseball Captains and Coach 312 Baseball, Freshman 319 Baseball Managers 313 Baseball Series 314-318 St. Mary ' s 314 Santa Clara 315 Stanford 318 U. C. L. A 316 U. S. C 317 Baseball, Varsity Season 312-313 Basketball 266-279 Basketball, All California Team 268-269 Basketball Captains and Coach. . . .2YU Basketball, Freshman 278 Basketball Managers 2Y1 Basketball, Non-Conference Games 2 2-2 li Basketball Series 274-277 Stanford 276-277 U. C. L. A 274 U. S. C 275 Basketball, 130-Ib. team 340 Basketball, 145-lb. team 340 Basketball, Varsity Season 270-271 Bachelordon 362 Baton 456 Beta Beta 460 Beta Phi Alpha 416 Beta Sigma Omicron 417 Beta Theta Pi. . ..363 Big " C " Society 442 Black Towers 461 Blue and Gold Editorial 196-197 Blue and Gold Managerial 198-199 Boalt Hall of Law 29 Bowles Hall 360-361 Boxing 337 Bureau of Occupations 52 " Bury the Dead " 219 Business Administration 78 California Club 36 California Engineer 208 California Monthly Staff 51 Casa Hispana 418 ( ' banning Way Derby 406 Charter Day 32-33 Chi Epsilon 466 Chinese Students ' Club 478 Chi Omega 419 Chi Phi 364 Chi Pi Sigma 365 Chi Psi 366 Christian Science Society 481 Circle " C " Society 443 Classes 86-177 College Women ' s Club Juniors. . . .484 Colleges at Berkeley 28 Contents 9 Copyright 2 Counseling Executive Board 184 Crew 280-291 Crew, All California Team 282-283 Crew Coaches and Squad 284-285 Crew, Freshman 291 Crew Managers 285 Crew Races 286-290 Oregon State 288 Olympic Trials 287 Poughkeepsie 286 Washington 289-290 Crew, Varsity Season 284-285 Cross Country 341 Daily Calif ornian 201-202 Daily Calif ornian Sports Page 203 Daily Calif ornian Editorial Page. .204 Davis Agricultural Branch 40-41 Deans 27 Debaters, Freshman 242 Debaters, Varsity 240-241 Debating 236-242 Debating Year 238-239 Debating Managers 239 Dedication 7 Del Rey 367 Delta Chi 368 Delta Chi Alpha 450 Delta Delta Delta 420 Delta Epsilon 475 Delta Gamma 421 Delta Kappa Epsilon 369 Delta Phi Epsilon 451 Delta Tau Delta 370 Delta Upsilon 371 Delta Zeta 422 Dentistry 43 Deputations Committee 79 " Design for Living " 218 ' Deutsch, Dr. Monroe E 26 Director of Publications 195 Divisions 3447 Divisions, General 36-37 Dramatic Season 214-215 Dramatics 212-227 Dramatics Council 215 Elections Committee 83 Engineers Council 82 Epsilon Alpha 464 Eta Kappa Nu 445 Executive Committee 76-77 Fencing 342 Fine Arts, California School of 44 Football 246-265 Football, All California Team 248-249 Football Captain, Coach Squad. .250 I ' nt lull. Freshman 265 Football Managers 251 Football, Ramblers 264 Football Season 251 Football Games 246-265 California Aggies 252 College of the Pacific 252 Georgia Tech 262-263 Oregon State College 254 St. Mary ' s 253 Stanford 260-261 U. C. L. A 255 Oregon 259 U. S. C 258 Washington 256 Washington State 257 Football Varsity 250 Forensics Council 238 Foreword 6 Fraternities 351403 Freshman Activities 176-177 Freshman Brawl 177 Freshman Class 174-177 Freshman Debating 242 Freshman History 174-175 Freshman Officers 174-175 Gamma Phi Beta 423 General Athletics 243-245 Glee Club 234 Golden Bear, Order of the 438 Golden Book 51 Golf 342 Graduate Managers , 78 Group System 185 Guild of Applied Arts 452 Gymnastics 343 Hammer and Coffin 472 Hammer and Dimmer 474 Handball 343 Hastings College of Law 44 Honor Societies and Clubs. . . .434-484 Honor Students ' Council 81 In Memoriam 8 International House 477 Intramural Board, Women ' s 189 Intramural Carnival 347 Intramural Champions 348-350 Intramural Season, General 346 N Intramural Sports 344-350 Intramural Sports Managers and Directors 346 Japanese Students ' Club 479 Junior Class 164-169 Junior Day 166-167 Junior Farce 167 Junior History 164-165 Junior Informal 168 Junior Officers 164-165 Kappa Alpha 372 Kappa Alpha Theta 424 Kappa Delta 425 Kappa Delta Rho 373 Kappa Kappa Gamma 426 Kappa Nu 374 Kappa Sigma 375 Kellogg Institute 46 Lambda Chi Alpha 376 Lick Observatory 45 Little Theatre Forum 226 Little Theatre Staffs 216-217 Mask and Dagger 455 Mask and Dagger Review 224 Masonic Club 482 Medical Center 4243 Medicine 43 Men ' s Judicial Committee 80 Minor Sports 330-343 Mixer Dance Committee 85 Mortar Board 439 " Mourning Becomes Electra " 220 Music 228-235 Music Council 230 Musical Year 230-231 Newman Club 483 Nursing 42 Nu Sigma Psi 467 Occident 200 Omega Delta 453 Open Forum 81 Organizations 351-433 Orientations Council 82 Pan-Hellenic 407 Pan Xenia 468 Parliament 475 Pelican ..205-207 Pennant " C " Society 189 Personnel Committee 185 Pharmacy 42 Phi Beta Delta 377 Phi Beta Kappa 436 Phi Chi Theta 466 Phi Delta Chi 402 Phi Delta Theta 378 Phi Gamma Delta 379 Phi Kappa Psi 380 Phi Kappa Sigma 381 Phi Kappa Tau 382 Philorthian 473 Phi Mu 427 Phi Omega Pi 428 Phi Phi 448449 Phi Sigma Kappa 383 Phi Sigma Sigma 429 Phrateres 476 Pi Alpha Sigma 463 Pi Beta Phi 430 Pi Delta Epsilon 454 Pi Delta Phi 468 Pi Kappa Alpha 384 Pi Kappa Phi 385 Pi Phi Delta 469 Pi Tau Pi Sigma 462 Press Convention 210-211 Proskopoi 471 Prytanean 440 Psi Upsilon 386 Publications 192-211 Publications Council 195 Quarterdeck 459 Radio Commission 83 Regents 24 Riverside Agricultural Division. . .45 Rugby 336 Scabbard and Blade 458 School of Fine Arts 44 Schools at Berkeley 29 Scripps Institute of Oceanography. .46 Senate 457 Seniors 86-163 Seniors, Affiliated 160-163 Seniors, Berkeley 100-160 Senior Hall of Fame 90-95 Senior History 88-89 Senior Class Officers 88-89 Senior Singings 96-97 Senior Week 98-99 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 387 Sigma Chi 388 Sigma Kappa 431 Sigma Kappa Alpha 469 Sigma Nu 389 Sigma Phi 390 Sigma Phi Epsilon 391 Sigma Phi Sigma 392 Sigma Pi 393 Skiing 339 Skull and Keys 446-447 Soccer 341 Sophomore Activities 172-173 Soph Hop 173 Soph Labor Day 172 Sophomore Officers and History 170-171 Sororities 404-433 Sproul, President Robert Gordon. . .25 Student Government 74-85 Swimming 334 Tau Beta Pi 437 Tennis 320-329 Tennis, AH California Team . . . 322-323 Tennis, Captain and Coach 324 Tennis, Freshman 329 Tennis Managers 325 Tennis Matches 326-328 Stanford 328 U.C.L.A 326 U.S.C. ..327 Tennis, Varsity Season 324-325 Thalian Players 225 Theta Chi 394 Theta Delta Chi 395 Theta Kappa Nu 396 Theta Sigma Phi 471 Theta Tau 474 Theta Upsilon 432 Theta Upsilon Omega 397 Theta Xi 398 " Tom Thumb the Great " 221 Torch and Shield 470 Torch Society 244 " Tonight at 8:15 " 222 Track 292-307 Track, All California Team. . . .294-295 Track Captain and Coach 296 Track, Freshman 307 Track Managers 297 Track Meets 299-305 Michigan 303 Olympic Club 299 Stanford 304-305 U.C.L.A 301 U.S.C 302 Washington 300 Track, Olympic Champions 298 Track, Varsity Season 296-297 Treble Clef 235 Triangular Sports Day 190 Tributes 30-31 Tri-Une 444 U.C.L.A 38-39 " Uncle Vanya " 223 University Administration 22-23 University High School 47 University Symphony 232 Vocational Information Committee.184 W.A.A. Council 188 Water Polo 335 Welfare Council 79 Wheel Society 244 Winged Helmet 441 Winter Sports Club 339 Women ' s Affairs 178-191 Women ' s " C " Society 189 Women ' s Discussions 186 Women ' s Dormitory Association. . .480 Women ' s Executive Committee. 180-181 Women ' s Hostess Committee 183 Women ' s Judicial Committee 80 Women ' s Orchestra 186 Women ' s Sports 188-190 Wrestling 338 Xi Psi Phi 403 Year ' s Debates 240-241 Yell Leaders 245 Y.M.C.A 84 Y.W.C.A 187 Zeta Beta Tau 399 Zeta Psi 400 Zeta Tau Alpha 433 APPRECIATION With the final pages of the 1937 Blue and Gold assembled, the staff wishes to express gratitude to those whose assistance through- out the year has made possible the publication of this annual. DR. MONROE E. DEUTSCH, besides writing " The Administrative Year " , has given many valuable suggestions; and PROFESSOR CHARLES RAYMOND ' S criticism was very helpful. The willing assistance of MR. FREDERICK C. FISCHER, Director of Publications, was invaluable, as was that of the staff artist, MR. LOME BEE, who did all of the art work in the book. MR. WALTER FREDERICK, Director of the A.S.U.C. News Bureau, assisted in many ways. DAD WILKIN ' S help facilitated office routine. Appreciation is due MR. FRANK COLBOURN and MRS. GRACE O. COLEMAN of Colemans Studio in Oakland for the portraits con- tained in the book; and for all but a few of the other photographs we wish to thank MR. JOHN D. BLACK, staff photographer. JOHN CORBETT, MAURICE CURTIS, A. SIMONOFF, and MR. FRED B. SEVILLE, also helped with the photography. The staff appreciated the kindness of MR. ROBERT SIBLEY, execu- tive manager of the California Alumni Association, who allowed us to use the color plates of President Sproul which appear on page twenty-five and which are used in the Golden Book of Cali- fornia. The Borden Printing Company, Inc., printers of this volume, have provided every facility and courtesy possible. The keen interest of MR. HARRY F. BORDEN, MR. SAM BERUTICH, MR. EMILE PLUMTREE, MR. WILLIAM THARP, MR. ROBERT ABARTA, MR. HUGH DARLING, and staff is sincerely appreciated; for them no task was too difficult, no detail unimportant. The cooperation of the American Engraving and Color Plate Company in engraving this annual has been splendid. MR. MAX FLADER, MR. WAYNE THORNTON, MR. COURTNEY REBITT, and MR. HARRY LANG, besides making excellent halftones, have assisted in many other ways. MR. THORNTON ' S counsel was of great assist- ance. We are indebted to MR. BEN KEYS of Dever, Garrity Keys, for the binding of the book, and to the SCHMIDT LITHOGRAPH COM- PANY for the main division pages. We extend our thanks to MR. A. S. HOFMEISTER of the Agfa Ansco Corporation for judging the photographs and donating the prizes for the Blue and Gold Candid Camera contest. To the many others who assisted in some way in the publishing of the 1937 Blue and Gold, ire express sincere thanks. TN H


Suggestions in the University of California Berkeley - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) collection:

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