University of California Berkeley - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Berkeley, CA)

 - Class of 1901

Page 17 of 362

 

University of California Berkeley - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1901 Edition, Page 17 of 362
Page 17 of 362



University of California Berkeley - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1901 Edition, Page 16
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Page 17 text:

moment we were won. Then the dignitaries had their turn, and he received the sym- bols of his office under the autumn sky. But every undergradute has grown to know his privilege oi being for that time the first claimant on the President. As we know him better our loyalty passes all former bounds. Of the greatness of his heart many may have still to learn who think they already know. The briefest sketch would be incomplete without mention of the President ' s wife, Miss Amey Webb, who was, of Providence. As the President holds all the devotion which can belong both to man and to office, so her quiet interest and her kindly pres- ence have won to her all that personality can add to the difference which belongs to her own presiding office as the First Lady of the University. A word remains, too, for Benjamin Ide, Junior a most uncompromising supporter of the BLUE AND GOLD. His devotion has even mastered the intricacies of Osky-Wow-wow, and his growing knowledge has an item of information about Stanford that " Dey got beat. "

Page 16 text:

Benjamin Ide Wheeler For many years we waited for a president to appear, All for the sake of California ; To lead us onward, hand in hand, to triumphs that were near. All for the sake of California. At last one came ; a noble friend and comrade is he now ; We ' ll stick to him through coming years and loyally we vow, Then here ' s three cheers for President Wheeler, with an osky-wow ! All for the sake of California. runs the rag refrain, and it holds a wealth of meaning, too. Who can blame us if we give only a glance at President Wheeler ' s achievements of the past; and, if we dwell long on the confidence and satisfaction gained from his half year ' s stay with us, and even if we give way to dreams of the future. Thankful he may be that he is a son of New England with a continent between him and those stories of youthful precocity which rise up and haunt men of distinc- tion. The biographer can only chronicle the record of his preparatory education at New England ' s honored Academies Thornton and Colby. His college days at Brown reveal his ingrained traits of character, for in his day he is reputed first on the campus as in the classroom. In 1875 he graduated a mem- ber of Phi Beta Kappa and Alpha Delta Phi, twenty-one years of age, distinguished as an athlete in baseball and rowing, and a brilliant classical student. Teaching he at once took up as his chosen profession, beginning at Providence High School and shortly going as tutor to Brown. Next he went to Europe for a term of study and preparation at the German Universities of Leipsic, Jena, Heidelberg and Berlin. He ended with a half year ' s stay in Greece, whither he went in l885 with the degree of Ph. D., magna cum laude, from Heidelberg. To this Princeton added LL. D. at her sesquicentennial, and among other associations with learned men he has recently been made a member of the Imperial Archaeological Institute of Germany:- On his return he instructed at Harvard until called to Cornell, and there he taught, adored by students, known and courted by people of culture, held in highest honor by the world of letters. While education has been his first concern, this has meant in no degree the ex- clusion of literary pursuits, nor the negligence of the active duties of citizenship. His writings, while not individually voluminous, have given to the cultured as well as to the learned world the results of his researches in Greek life and letters. In politics he has promoted purity, not by active participation alone, but as well by leading and organizing. Desired in vain by many institutions of learning, California secured from him a visit in the spring of 1899, in the summer his acceptance of her Presidency. For her voice had become one not to be left unheeded among Universities. Younger than himself, hers was not an invitation to " come West and grow up with the coun- try. " She has grown up, as it were, almost in a night, and is making ready to cast off her swaddling clothes and to enter into her true estate. Two destinies have met, and who can tell how they will soar? So he met us at the flagstaff on that memorable October morning, and from that 10



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The University in the Past Year |OT many years ago, an enthusiastic alumnus, revisiting his Alma Mater upon the occasion of some University celebration, declared that he was sanguine enough to believe that the time would soon come when there would be a thousand students at Berkeley. The sanguine alumnus is not appreciably older than he was when he uttered that startling prophecy, and there are over two thousand students at Berkeley. Our population during the decade has gone forward by leaps and bounds. The biggest bound forward was six years ago, when the increase over the preceding year was 37.9 per cent. Then there were smaller leaps. People said that the limit of expansion had been reached, and that the University could look forward to a period of rest and recuperation. Last year the gain was only 3.1 per cent. But this year, for some unaccountable reason, it jumped again to nearly 17 per cent. With President Wheeler ' s coming, there was a formal recasting of certain essen- tial principles of internal administration. The center of gravity, hitherto shifting from point to point with the changing currents in and about the institution, has been localized. Apart from this vital step, there has been slight change in the University ' s internal regulation or in its external aspect. The curriculum has been made a little freer, or, rather, the now familiar group elective system has been given a little clearer definition. Laboratory charges have been cut one-half. The diploma-fee deposit has been abolished. The enlargement of Harmon Gymnasium, this spring, to more than double its former dimensions, gives the University something like an adequate auditorium. Additions have been built to the chemical laboratories and to the Students ' Observatory. To the Mark Hopkins Institute of Art, in San Francisco, has been added the Mary Frances Searles Art Gallery, generously provided by Edward F. Searles, Esq., as a memorial to his wife. No new separate structures have been erected. The year has seen the completion of the Phoebe A. Hearst Architectural Competi- tion. On September 7, 1899, a little less than three years after the meeting of the Board of Regents at which Mrs. Hearst first publicly proposed the international com- petition, the awards were made, and, at Mrs. Hearst ' s invitation, a brilliant company met in the exhibition rooms in the Ferry Building to see the successful plans. As one glances through the volume containing the final report of the Trustees and the photographs of the drawings, one realizes anew the far-reaching and the permanent character of the undertaking. It would seem impossible for the University of Cali- fornia ever to be the home of the mean or the small. The distinguished architect to whom the first prize was awarded, M. Benard, visited the University in December, and made an exhaustive study of the relations and needs of the several departments, with a view to actual building at an early date. The year will be remembered, also, as " the year that Mrs. Hearst came to Berke- ley. " Her coming has meant a world of good to the University ' s social and aesthetic life. The benefit is not limited to the present generation of students. The expanded 12

Suggestions in the University of California Berkeley - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) collection:

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1897

University of California Berkeley - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1899 Edition, Page 1

1899

University of California Berkeley - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1900 Edition, Page 1

1900

University of California Berkeley - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1902 Edition, Page 1

1902

University of California Berkeley - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1903 Edition, Page 1

1903

University of California Berkeley - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1904 Edition, Page 1

1904

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