University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR)

 - Class of 1974

Page 1 of 560

 

University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1974 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 560 of the 1974 volume:

Pv EQIP 'XC 'JC' H ? .J w . w,- ,A .,.i A v,:Q-- ,. 24 " -..l..' -QT?" J". 'Q-, ., Wil- 'Si Fi 1 11-u 1 X. '3- 3 79" 1 f...,1 W. ii-H , ,l. 94, '7' A . x AQ '- . 2- a X. sAX E is 'Y va .s'... I !'L L -11,4 -.. gFEffi1ge:vf.w,11 iggfq v' ' 'f' ',--- ,fm jf' Q 1 'I N '- .fs s -'f-, 7.6!-,- 'lmiwi' I L ' f':'w.l::: i'c:g..::g. . ,.,f'..,.-- ,: .-5 '-' ff.: O: I' I..-.I- . :l a'.l J'- u ,ol 5 'NL -111-i-1 H- 'f- ' 2,x': f J 1 Q ,N .f l fwq 4- .,-' 1 . I Q 'v.-- E ' . T, x "Y f ,TA , "'-.nm f V 'f 5. , ' A Q, . . I . xfd., 1 .5- a. . n . :- . , -gs.-.., , fl. ,f'6'w, A .1 1 L L. , . A I' - I Q 4 , . I Q' 1 ,, r - ,,,m"'7--i nal-z T' V"- " ' '- Q ' , " -- ,' :f :gi.1 Q.'- " - . -4, N 4 . , ,fn ' 'fm ' i- "1-.1-5' , 2 ,fy ,gl '- 'fig' X , " 5- .- I. DH ', ' A 102 .3 ' ,395 I' l '4 a 4 . A I 511 ,iw X 4 . 1. XG X I 'X I 'im . , n , A 1. ' Z ,i Aigrnqf '55 fa We x , ,V 'iw xl. an' H. ,,,. www .1 HnWR ECKE 4. A V 115, .Q vf' at 522' 'ol' 1 my iff-X K f'-s '1'. .- Introduction Features I: Campus Security .... Women's Rush . .. . WeekOne Registration. .. . Union Week . .. . John Barnhill . .. . Men's Rush. .. ... Thoughts.............. TheFlowerMan .... Lifestyles Division Page . .. .. .. . GrantandDena......... Fred and Linda . .. .. . Manifesto.. .... . .. .. .. Getting Things Done . . One Woman's View . .. . Good Morning, People just A Few Years Ago . . Fill Out This Form . .. Views.... ...... Profs TheGoodOutdoors...... It Happens At Night .... . . .. .. . OldMain.............. While You Were Here . .. . .. .. . Ah, Progress .... .... . .. . .. .. . Welcome To The Party . .. .. . . . Mr.Professor . .. .. .. The Lettermen . .. .. . Loggins and Messina . . Doobie Brothers. .. .. . Andrae Crouch . .. 102 Zachary Beau . .. 103 Sherman's Bar . .. .. 104 Just Having Fun . .. .. 110 Graffiti ... . .... . .. 112 The Art Gallery . .. 114 Candids........... 116 Apartment Living 118 The Old Union. .. .. .. 120 A Day In The Park .... 122 About Students . . .... . .. . .. .124 Portfolio: Art Meripol . .. . . .. .126 A Day At The Library . ... ... .128 ABunchOfTheGuys...... ....130 The Vanity Df Young Men . .. . . .. .132 Construction Work . .. .. . . .. .134 Women In R.O.T.C. . . 136 A Big Send-Off . . .... . 138 Ahhh...... .... 140 Mullins: The Building Years . .. . . .. .142 People...... .... 148 A50'sParty........... 150 A Few Words . .. . .... . 152 A Night At The Dorm . 154 Hmmm .... .. .... ....156 Finals Frolics. .. .. 158 SQHIOIS . . 160 Graduate Students .... 162 Arts and Sciences . . . 166 Agriculture .... . . .... . .. . . .. .176 Business Administration 180 Education........ .... ....186 Engineering .... .. LawStudents .... Administration Who's Who . Beauties . .. Sports . .. .. Publications . Military . .. .. Organizations Features II: Pot Sadiel-lawkins... Motocross . .. .. .. .. Lanny Van Eman. .. .. Portfolio:Mark Betts . .. Rangers .. .. .. .. .. Streakers .. .. .. Senate Bill 42 . .. .. The Weather. . . The Months .... . Women's Sports . . .... . .. .. SimonBolligrew .. .. .. .. .. Midsummer Night's Dream . Present Laughter . . .... . .. .. .. Man ln The Moon Marigolds . Lute'sSong ...194 ...196 200 208 222 240 278 294 310 ...330 ...334 ...336 . .... 338 . .... 340 .. .. .342 . .... 344 . .... 352 . .... 354 .. .. .356 .. .. .364 .. . .... 366 .. . .... 368 . .... 370 .. .. .. .372 . .... 374 Schola Cantorum . . Uarkettes .. .. .. Ozark Polk Tales. . .... . . Little Paces Looking Up. .. . l3ineArts Don Giovanni .... .. .... . .. Portfolio: Jim Sutherland. . . Back To The Drawing Board ThePaperPig .... Togetherness . .. .. .. . FreeAtLast .. .. .. Portfolio: John Partipilo . . Black Awareness Week. .. . BigRed ...... Arlo Klosterman . .. .. . Rugby .... Soccer...... .... Foreign Students. . .... . . Portfolio: Sc:ottMosley . . DerbyDay.. .... Al3loatTrip .... .. A.S.G....... .... Off-Campus. Dorms. .. . Greeks. .. Index . Credits . . .... 376 . .... 377 . .... 378 . .... 380 . .... 382 . . .... 384 .. . .. . . .386 ......388 . . .... 390 . .... 396 . .... 398 . .... 400 . .... 402 . .... 404 . .... 406 ...410 ...411 ...412 ...414 ...416 ...418 ...420 426 450 480 528 548 "Life around here is a zoo." tAn uni- dentified student at registration.j Perhaps he is right. The University is a jungle with thousands of unique crea- tures. Some of them have hairy faces and bare feet. Some don bow ties and platform shoes. Cthers wear uniforms with Old Glory flags on the shoulder. Though each of us is unique, we face common problems which we solve using our individual capacities. We have all known the pressure of leaving home and security. We have all known the guilt of letting group demands conquer parent's wishes. We present a facade of certainity in times of pressures and fears. We have survived the transition of late adolescence to young adulthood. All this plus the urgency of the 1970's and you have a breeding ground for neu- rosis. Never before have students had to make such critical decisions on such a vo- cal basis. Sleeping with your boyfriend was hushed, now it is not only accepted, but practically expected. A DWI would land you in jail, now dope is the status symbol. Women were to be seen and not 6 heard, now if not heard loudly enough they are considered apathetic. Politics used to be your parents cursing taxes, now the Government affects every phase of your life. The War was something your father was proud of, you lived through Vietnam and let your feelings be known. Nothing is new under the sun-but everything is exposed under it through the courtesy of network communications. Today the col- lege student is relevant. He is heard, heed- ed, and feared. The freshman must exist on one long adrenaline high. He is forced to define his position in a new, exciting environment. The decisions he makes will determine the remainder of his college years. It's fright- ening, but most manage from the sheer novelty of their new surroundings. The sophomore must manufacture an aura of certainity. He has been there be- fore, so he can manipulate his way in the world. Teachers are considered mediocre, classes are to be cut and final exam week is for parties. The junior views life with an aloof bore- dom. At this point he still perhaps too young. Familiar faces and classrooms are no longer security, but the ultimate bore. The senior adds the word "farce" to hisl- vocabulary. In retrospect, the whole ex-j perience seems unworthy of the emotions spent. He is anxious to leave, but maybe not just yet. Will it be more education, on to business, marriage, or the soothing ef-j- fects of Walden Pond? College life can hardly be catalogued as is a test of intelligence. It is primarily thei' skills of scheduling time, energy and ef-- fort. It is a process of deferred gratification: and self-discipline. We are on an agendai of money management, study time, lei- sure outlets and decision-making. But the college experiment is also a wel-' comed retreat for a few years while we col- lect our thoughts. We can nurture our feelings, experiment with our emotions, 3. and culminate into an individual. This is' the college experience or crisis. I' Someone once said, "God will not look you over for medals, degrees or diplomas, but for scars." I wonder if he is an alum- nus. JXQ Y - 14 1.4 . '9f'Waa. ?xW5V!Y r J , v-,RL 3-fa ig,,,, . X V Q 4, 'Y 1? 5 I W' -5 - -v FQ ' if 31: ' , , f K A K V -1 -I 'Q ,,- .ga , ,Q ., ,, -ad '- -f. ::'. - f. : , , A Q ' ff' "' v1e-wi' W , :-' ', fi' K. 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It might be for a pep rally, frat football game, Hallabaloo, or even for just a hayride as pictured here. There are still boundaries and rivalries between living groups, but the stu- dent of the '7O's has seen that it really doesn't make much of l a differenceg we are all in this together. ,.9. 4, . J., w 1 45 W . Y y Y, If--'. Q9 , v 4. n 1 1 9 f af -EE-55 ffl'.l XA R Q, , 0 1, ""'n V f ,ir - an A V ' f533e."" -lu.. 9 WLS? Q: 4- 143 f 5 J ig Y ,A . ' 4: , ,519 , fi -af? RWE, . -9- , fg. m- ' , I -374. fi' at ,,, ,V -P iw-A f f' 4' gi' .,Vg,.-ff-V .417 I '... Q, ,V 5" Mx' if P- ' V 1 ,", 1 Q ,gr C, K ' s vf - f " ' -if P f V ' f z V: "' H-'P' M , " if P ' F, aa, f ff2'9f1L,,'f ffwf ff 41. A xv. 4. ' V 'V v4 X -, -.Q f 33 ,Y 4' -A I'It'11','1' .f 4. ' V ' ' ,,..4,z,s. ,N-1.,, xv.. ,J ,Y Qu. .. wg., . .f1..Mx,., w. "-Q :-'. -vs f X - S alksigz -- f I Q 3111? . ie' V' v 1 ' ,I -Z-'F' .np ,rJ.-shrill' abt .iq .W , ,fgt '1 K1 ,mf P 0 a 4, -1 un, J T N., C w iv ' , "X .jk. f :gg-' ' r , Q , Q ' ,h ,,,:ah' Q ff? iii' f 53. ,Wg ,4 1 . 'ik , 'N J , uf., . "TNQ-A , , -I . jf-V f x.?f?1p NW: In V. ,Zig w Q.: ,ti a.. A .zu ., .har Y V ifizhjf-.x 29, nl -.gb ,f ,5x: f 3, ,mf wi ..'k','f:"4XL K ' ,.x, .. B 'A .. 1 . ,4,-7'2.,gi- --, ,,-wi -1 . :KA ' -- '41 .R- 'fv' ' "5 -. f Q52 -S . -w f gi,A,.LH?J- Q-1' If - 31 iiiffis V. , . A 5' W- 3 K5 -f ',z53'?fT'A' we -V-7i'5L1-.J- , ' fn 296: ,f 21 Y' A M , vu fl, ll fc, , , -, 1 .5 Y 1 vaxjggginw , ,p:wfAi4,,l . X, W , ,A f .ax ,Q NN., , A x fy-' 'S . ,.f3.z"iW f:,r,, - . 4: . ,ixgf . . -X 12 , , ,.f.- .:,fg4" , . - , V ---' 1 -, . 'cqv-'--'1.,.'-f'.g. , V, u .. . P 4 g ,- 1 - , - ?bQ5i:3qx- .L..K:-5-1:-.. , V-yhi L, f :V 4 " 1 fxyv A' ' Lu ' ' '4,vKx.,, 'JET '. xx 'T41--.ga"'.- I Q- 7 5. , HL . .-. ug.. -V W f. -,M-,L . 1 I U24 4 flyffix 2,-R :,Aj,,,.-Y-NE .yy .AA I . , K . """i -SME P 'L Y N fr:l,:f.W:4. N -F-an - 'fr-N 'J fr r M... C 5 'F 1 he-great monolithic structures that we call 'dorms' rise boldly above their crowded lots of cars. Parents delight that their children have it better now than the parents did. But we find it a threat to our naturally friendly ways and spon- taneous lifestyle. Thank heavens that the dorms are not winning the battle and that we are bold enough to move freely within their constricting walls. , ' 5525 Q T"'T"5' eral' ' . dw- , , Qing. . "Z?3?'5g3,53 5334? W' '. 3.4.1, - - , ,-7: . ,H .-dz, 2.2 F' Q 1.- 5'Q,'-ff L ' f: '12, - gs: , . . , :..,. . ,. + - -353. be 1, :L Ji J ,A -, by .15 - 4?':::f H955 4241--'. ,I -.. . : - ... , -5. Q- r tg '17, .- 4 f-Q 1 X, , Wg, -2. lin: 5.1 i. X' izsy lf 'fs 'Wf -M, W. iv, ' "rf-V5 W Q"4"'+ mf, . ra, .ii f'i'i-- K ""' f:'1?'Jg,. asf? Wm. Nu. V -. V ,Av-, X 1 rg ix-- 'ZJ.4 1 'K YJ !. , 0- f-4 M 21 M WW 1 , . 03, 25 .- . Vg T- - H .34 , .M wa. ,Z-.,,V ,-f.' 1 W 5 ' . I 4 l l V Y, .,.- 2 'yan fgavftlfxtifl, ,-1:1 A-951' gffsz - E513 ' 1,i,.f 1- 1'l 4' .A .. Q5 A - r1Qi'i,,3hf.QQ. M- . - x., ,, . . l u ,,,,,.,,,,w M" l ""EQ3243i-' it ' ' his years Miss Sorority Pledge Queen, jane Hunt, exemplifies something that we are seeing more and more of every day. This is the ability to 'share with our fellow students. jane is seen here sharing the good times. It is quite easy to share her joy. It is not as much fun to share th'e'bad times. All the prohlerns of the outside world can find their way to the campus and to someone we know. The death of a parent, financial 'prohlegns, or wreck- ing the car are some. But thewoes are just as severe in our little campus world. Breaking up with john, flunlcing that biology test, and having your texts stolen can seem as tough as anything the outside world can dish out. This is when we share. ' J if 1' 711' lf 1 isiT?"T.ya.. KC - 'Jn . 5, . 5? 44? ni f 1 422-"1nuf?-nm f: -,L M t , " Q fig? -,fag 5, ., ,N ,, S -Ar '. ggi! 4, ,LfQi,.g,x,- 1, 5:5 sg, 13 E :Vi V 4 , 'i a , as H, mv :MWA .r .'f'- 7- .mth W phi'-WZ"-fzqi fl.- .q?- W . f4..5NiQf?f9f.:Q"-' 9:3543 ff! A F-ag?"e,1f.- , 'vv'fK.?'gY-f ,w -' 5' aku ng: :VI ,rgiirl lgg. :,tq..Jv., ?'Q:,LA:,,,,' QEQFJA, i' 'I ,k u x I t-E --x'E'!'Ql-fi ""' "" L' " - H' .- ,- 1., Vfwgf-I: "'55:g. V we . '. -- -lg, ,gf "f -' x Q. 1? ':T3?3gg3i K3 -?:,- ."-.r. - 3.1 " '. -. -L-.-5. ,,:.sj'.-H u luv-T-'-' "ff, Q- . 1'-.1 H25 ,1.FZXf1..3-a. .2- O I . The view out the window might just bf a qof lhy self. I :, ,. V ,Y ., . ,. ,f.,, , f 611451541-2 ' 2514 J' 9' -fs!"-,. .N W' ' ,,v. f ' ' 1. 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Q ' " ' Y. -N' f ff ,y 5:a3S:22?2ai::g,,e Y-,mzwfg 1-V, A255112 - Qu rw--,L , fy f ' ,N ' ' uf - ' . NMA.. v.,,. ., N , , .Q ,,,,wM ,my W M, 4. , 1. f, Y , ., . L? fm ,i53gSi?ii2Qi,JL V 49,1 gf -F 'QW ' 2 Q, ,Q Vg," 491, W, Q, ,131 KW sf Ff-'W ,ww Ly.7,.,,i'Lm-'fflffww-y fi , W f- 1 If 7Mnf'V!"2?, f ,G 511 xr, ', T ' 'A?Zr'f'fy A .,N, rvvff-f4:,4.-f'-aufm, 1.,.v-..4,1,w . , v Xa, 14? pw-12 ' :FFYUYI Yv- c.,. . 3.52, ' - 'fy' v ".. PW ,ifibi ui::'g'mfg5,,w my 4 ww,- 3 in- v' QQ,-mf A4,b 11 ' "wwf iff' z iw f - ,Mr ,w:,,dvX,. v -J .. , ,- . A ,I mf? ,. , , ,,,W.aw- , -' 'iazfeaar'1gi22,ai,r. 1 wiux-W1-qi N G. ' mxgfe .. . Z : ,Q 2:1 .ff L. ,, 'wfqzyfz-, 4 f - ,Q -. 510 W, 1 ,.,5,5,., .mg7Q,+ - 4 ,f H A f f 4,.4-,WMQJ M, I " -dwv wfifw l 5, rw-1, uf, -.5 .1 Q yn Q n g, : 'QZW 1, H gf, ,1 fy-N -S h,f,"44-"- fy- m,'.., V - - Qfgk -- A'fw.3QkjL4f'Z'?Cem15g.51iQk,Q'5E9y'Zn mf' ' 'A ..w.LyJLdu,Q:9,-, ,:'5f,:+.-f J QA ivy in 2: . A sg ,sf-Af, , 5 ,- if f??f1 ',3g" J-W f, w, 4. , 4 :wx -A M 2351 1 Y ,-A1 m y 1. fi1f":e :'tzf"' 4 2 ' ZSW-:2-'ff Vx.: 5' z . 1' X ,, , Y ' - 'Q 'ww .' fflzgi N? 95351 T , N., QQ, :ms 1 ff, 'N ,N:5PEf21'f ' Q . 4,5- Q G ,,,, ,,'3e " "5 ,, in 3, A ' Q ?f?-'fzfzii 3 fa 7'HxQ,,?v 5 4 1 . Z, 5,.,.zfw,,g,b. , 1- Y - , 3: -94? ' , t mgzfri j4 5 fs-',1,'2W.,3 f , Q gg: 'if 1' x 1 WK,-QW,K.' y 2 ..,f PA " TQQ -.' . ' 1.3" ATT- . ., 3 ,, Q Vfif f ,sa ...f"fx,g ..: f 1 , Z-- till ' af ' ' . I cg X 1 'A ,Fi ,SLN gf iw .WL - 5 , A W MM 1 MSW' -Q df? ,Q ...., , M,.,f.,..,..,,.m-.M--4+-M-X-F"'1f . " 'Xi "ev,-1-yfww.,-rw V 1-f""""'Q'-'I' , R ,Mu 1 ff 'xf N Q Www,-f-mn,-.... X ' L-bfkfw - yy, . Y vv ' U - . , .' ,- 5 7. if ' ' H' 4 'ff' J' '. . N 5 9 gl n 5' ' W 'Vg 5 Q J ' "' -,, -"H, Q- , I gm , v M. . af S ' D .3 K I K. , an, Ffa- . I o..' -1 9 A 7" Q ' ':,,,", ' .1.5s,.., .15 1, -V. -, U., .,y? H. ,q Cl 'YSL g2?z1"w.2 ,""'fw'3 14? 1 ' ,. ' , .-QNQJQUIY .'j--4'l', , x x ,M v sf 'J 'ffkffi ,Q 1 um, sf r ,ivy 4 S- ,, n.. ,'K W ?x1if2E1f5F 1 31.5, of fl 5? , 1 F' .ml 0 1 X 'k ', I :M-Jan, Q - 'M Qs: X. 1 al' -im! 0 f N ,x Y ' ' in ,ini 1.8 hold a driver until the City official arrives. As one of- ficer put it, "At that moment we have the same power as any citizenj Another officer remarked on the issue of giving guns to campus security, "With the powers we have now, we don't need them. The only time we need them now is when investigating a theft and the other guy doesnit know if we are armedfi The female officer said, "I have no qualms about carrying a gun, but I do about shoot- ing itf A In the event of a theft or a stop resulting in arrest, the security officers must call in a Fayetteville policeman. The officers agree that if there were a traffic accident near campus, they would go. Their involvement would be contacting officials and directing the traffic. The pa- trol cars are not equipped with radar devices, they can- not issue a summons for speeding without this ma- chinery. Instead, they are compelled to give tickets for careless driving. Most students don't realize security officers are not the ones who greet them with parking violations. It is done by student ticket writers. Some have complained about the "heartless" handing out of violations by "fel- low students". As one officer explained, "These kids are just doing their job. They are told to issue tickets to cars parked contrary to signs, painted curbs or Uni- versity rules. They are checked on how well they do this job. They can't be blamed for just doing what they are toldf' Although the A-Book states no alcoholic beverages are to be allowed on campus, the rule is not strictly en- forced. One officer commented it is unwise to suggest to a football fan that drinking is prohibited. One ex- plained, "All this would do is get the rest of them on my back." Many of the officers believe if the drinking age were lowered and alcohol were allowed on campus their jobs would be easier. Students and faculty have been concerned about parking meters being installed on Maple Avenue this fall. I-Iowever, campus security men feel they insure a greater turnover in cars parked in the area. Campus se- curity can't be blamed for the decision to install the me- ters. Thanks go to the traffic board and the Fayetteville City Police. A female officer driving a patrol car has caused some double-takes. Male officers consider her an asset. She can take care of situations in womens dorms that male officers consider uncomfortable. I-Ier concern is if she makes a mistake, ' '... it would be a reflection on the new program, the other officers and women in generalfi The officers offered various comments about their work. One said, "I wouldn't mind it if there were ade- quate parking. That's the only thing that bothers me. All I hear is, "I know I shouldn't have parked there, but there just was no other place." Another said, "I enjoy it because students are a totally different group of people. I like students and thats why I took the jobfi One explained, "It leaves much to be desired. It's a new program and they've got to get the kinks outf One noted, "Slamons has the training he needs to do his job, but he's running into problems and ideas he didn't anticipate." Finally, "I like it right now. I'm a student too, and it's not my lifes goal. It's the only job in Arkansas that pays anything for a woman. That's why I got interested in the first place." 32 .1 4 'riruiamzplnaliwnw--f u.wn1a.mu.s-nur is u-aan .ans-nnsu1ixrsu wg-vs A x 6 I Y ., .rw if 1,1 ni' fff' gl JI Q1 ya .,f 5 X sts aff' Rf!!-'iw-Q The , Wpqzaien s Stampede hether you consider the annual sorority rush a livestock showing, the finest moment of your life, or view it with benign indifference-rush is alive and well and living in Fayetteville. It is just a matter of seman- tics-hurry, scurry, dash, speed, gush, surge, hasten, expediate, urge, drive, assault, attack, ad- vance, onrush, stampede. Any of these synonyms could amply describe sorority rush at the University of Arkansas. Few would dare make predic- tions based on figures about women. However, 2.77 women went through rush this year and 2.15 pledged. In 1972 the 350 women who went through rush were the largest group ever. Approximately 215 pledged. Rush, as every institution we know, is a victim of changing social conditions. Arkansas, as usual, was late in catching the trend toward individualism in campus life. Greeks have attempted to thwart the coming decline in pledge classes by liberalizing their programs and rush tech- niques. In most sororities study halls are gone, there is less hazing and the watchful eye of The House is not so prevalent. Rush '73, in reality, was no different from any other. Its u- niqueness was found in the up- dated thinking of rushees-a more mature attitude about their positions and a better knowl- edge of where they were directed. :uv-, .,.,,, -y.. 1 4., .,,,.,. ,Q-Ji. 3'0- Q . I :Wiz .hw 3. gig!! , ,Q We, I s, f . .4 24 "e N.. im 7 7, ' ,. W 1 , 'K' 'f 2 5 2 eek Une, or, Weak One, is that wonderful week after registration when we see just exactly what we have returned to after an easy summer. Rains covered the campus causing many areas to be turned into mud pits. The walks to the new union and men's gym were good exercise for students as they leaped from puddle to puddle. The puddles on the pave- ment were a safer course than chancing the bottomless mud pitts. Parking meters smiled as those with cars found another hassle to their driving woes. The official word was that it would increase turnover of parking areas. It managed, how- ever, to shove more cars into the already few spaces that line streets around the campus. Several of these outside streets were declared 'no-parking' and added to the ridiculous situ- ation. Students found the pep rallies wilder as bottle-throwing drunks caused injuries and a shut-down of rallies for 'away' games. The carnival provided some not-so-cheap thrills but a chance to get away from classes that were already boring by the end of the first week. The great thrill of returning to the big U of A lapses and many of us wonder why we bothered to return. M .Q3""W AMT 1 fl o . . ,1.Q , , ,W , X , ff A- -- " ,,,,,,,,......., ., .N 'f..,. X , ,ff NX X, X , J X, -.,w.'1 ,. - -- , -k vw- .X - w. My .nw Q.. .1 . . -1'-'SX 215 M new N' 43' 1. "'47..?'4. X I N, ,Q X X M: Q .. A., fl Y VJ. '- 1-A , ,- ,. 'wx rw-Q s- . - . , V -.4,xv x - 'rg v X XX 4 S xx Y XX Q3 K X x ' X , XX X X . Q , ' Q 'LY- F X X4 '- .H X M 4 ' af' ' 4' . .,,- 4 A1 f A, 4,1 . fe ,e 1 U , 1 fi, A xx 15 ' X1 ' X A .-1, :X fl 34 "X Xa 3 2 , 4 9? UL i , J4 Ax, . XX x W MX 1: N A, ,, ,f X fl , f I fa i- -I i X o If - o"'. P ..."'lO4 000.9 ' :V -.Q,e1f1ffwv-" -- ,H r,,.-.f .412 73' '- if-'il' .af-J-5-LT fl V-FT' 15? -- -'f5f?52 ' ' hu- - .. 1541, 'Q 'f , 'Afgirifffg ' if 'l',f0f5'--S59 1" , '.I':f'9r'1:' Qilzzi. -1 ff.e::-112 1 ' T1 " P ,X 5' 14722 ii, .i ,, mi Q 1 Lx 3 hp., E I Y, 1 b A X 8 1. P 'x a-R fi 4 W if 'VN .r wi O ' I 1 N gt.. ff- -1- -fw ' fx ,1' Q ,ae" ,.-Q F J s A ,219 ,. 'N' ,wiv swim Tn., 'mlm E nd The Committee said, "Let there be pre-registra- tion in the land. And the students and the faculty saw the pre-registration and saw that it was goofyf It all started in the Spring of '73. The Committee started looking at other schools and saw that using a computer would be a real neat way to run a registration. Maybe even turn out to be something to keep those darned students from complaining so much about cramming 10,000 people into the Men's Gym for a first-come, get-your-class opera- tion. The problem is that students hardly know what courses they want to take three days before the semester, much less five months before the semester. So, all the students pre- registered, then learned during the summer all the reasons why they shouldn't take those courses. Rumors about what mean teacher this guy could be. etc., etc., took effect. The Committee thought that whatever drop-ads were needed could be taken care of during the fall registration for those who missed the glory of working with the comput- er. That little fall registration turned into the biggest mess of a drop-ad session that the U of A has ever had. There were no kind words for The Committee. Each dark cloud has a silver lining. Higher ups in the ad- ministration stepped in and called a moratorium on comput- erized registration. Students return to the old Arena-style jack-around for the Spring of '74. 'kia 1 S . fffwff , 45' -' 1 " 06W mf ,W ,, Union Week The Union Week gave supporters of the blooming white elephant a chance to show the positive side. Remarks about how the Union resembled a mod- ern airport terminal or how it was truly the greatest maze of the world were silenced momentarily. lack Anderson opened the Sym- posium series by viewing Richard Nix- on as a "public master rather than public servant." The 600 observers in Barnhill were captivated as Anderson moved from quiet, sardonic humor to outrage as he described recent admin- istration sins. Coffehouse provided an escape from the books and a chance to hear good musical talent. "The Graduate" was a shot of nostalgia. Students Henry Woods and Rick Campbell lost in a celebrated pool match to Pres. David Mullins and Gov. Dale Bumpers. And, Doobie Bros. canceled. ?" v- - . A Us.. 6. .. if Ar Q - -' 'dllvnifv' . K" f' ffl-1? 73 A uf' 'N' K-:'.L'4"',' 1' Y 1. Q . . . 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MQ: Mn 11 JQHN BARNHILL 1903 1973 A legendary frgure rn hrs own trme john Barnhrll drd much to brrng Unrversrty of Arkansas sports to therr current natronal promrnence One of Tennessee s frnest all round athletes Barn hrll won nrne varsrty letters at the Unrversrty of Ten nessee was named Volunteer Athlete of the Year twrce and was an All Southern guard In 1927 he was named to play rn the Los Angeles All Star game whrch was the forerunner of the East West Shrme game After a strnt as an assrstant coach for Tennessee Vols to the Sugar and Rose Bowls and was chosen Southeastern Conference Coach of the Year 1944 Includmg hrs four seasons coachrng at Arkansas 11946 491 Barnhrll had a career coachrng record of 54 22 5 In 1966 Tennessee had a specral Iohn Barnhrll Day and he was rnducted rnto the Tennessee state and Ar kansas Halls of Fame The U of A further recognrzed hrs efforts rn 1956 nammg the freld house rn hrs honor Iohn Barnhrll wrll be long remembered for hrs con trrbutrons to the world of sports and the Unrversrty of Arkansas he was named head football coach in 1941. He led the ll - - - fl 1 1 by 0 0 n 1 a- ' A fi-gg' , .Q v, if' I ' ,-'f.:-vw. - A .. ev I Q 1 "' ' s . . g,f'I'1,-'Y' -R' A X 1 rw, 1,-u Li -- I .-, . . ' w w?" If -.11- ' o 'U C1 , C if " Q Ax :gg ' fl 4- x 82 wi, fa: , A 4 'Q Q f . Ma 6 ww-sf' 4 aim fr.. 3 Q . 5 , '26, , -,J 4- X . 'lk 'ha 'kv 1 ,V .,,, Q ' ' 5 X fl A A - 1 - ' f 34 .,.' , , 14 -A , is fi M 'I -. A X f 'E 2 i 5 . 19' Men Rush well, we were going to say a whole lot about men's rush, but then we realized that we have said it all before, and, what the heck? perhaps it's just enough to reflect that men's rush was a lot of fun for most, just as long as you didn't shake hands too much and watched what you drank. drunk? yes, come to think of it, many were 45 , I1 yu I .v-s.v.,.." - ww-V - , -I r' u 1 X, eff" f - . ' 'Q u ,,A.L. V 2515, ., AA: -55, ,1 -41 'HQ Q, ,f ,wi .Mx .1 - . Jntgu .. fu," , ' 1 'uf s-gy ' .' 7. Y-1n,,.3x,. . V - A. ,-' vw, , Q", s. H , M. .L gf ." s- -3945 . .M WJ! . . - ., -. 1, v A 9 4:3 31. 5 1 v fmij 1: is 321. iw 21 J: Vi N. .,n '-1 f 4 .-p ,r L, w Q A w 1 W 11 f N -Q 1 :Q uf ill .59 s 1 and lit'sf,onIy Eifgalh isfn't it?p5- 'f lj fff '4 we liye and .we but the answers tohave escaped u's,7 'eee' .4 , . v . At, and the questiofi is '7 4 whyqshould we wort? all these years , , ' and lose allhopel G when ever thing is e pressed against'qt'l1eL .4 window pane of life, Q S naked it exists , concealed and disguised from our eyes '- we see its beautg life is passing ' but it is real for the moment good morning people, and the questioncis. .ls V env, M, ,V . -r .' 1 'lx .. 3' Wm' 1- f., gf, ajil 'y " K if 5 , an ,mv - A'-.4 fx Q I ' ' 1 it 'Wg-1 'F,'..n',s. r '47, an .'5'.,,f' A K ,.,'f.,. ., is, .,' .J ', 4 ., , . .4 . . .' ,,.-.ij ., A " C' is , , . .,':Q , , ,. , -. ,fs ig . "A A 1 4 Q Q , , 1 vue W. W , . , . 4 .. l v' ,tux N ,,, .Y . . ."'l '. ,,' V-aJl9 x ' '-,nal 9 A . 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'f I "A '.Q,5" .X ',"'i - .. A., . .. .-.. , . -, A t , Y.. .kfs ,. I 4 ,, "- . 'Wi 'Yew An -QT... .'v- " ' .'+. . 1 - -:fa - .' vw' . , . ' xr- . 'W' 1' .Q . . M . sf H 'L-M 1. , Y . .- . . , ' . ' , ' . 1 ' Q , . -N , . L 5, J" ,WJ A - s -"w X ia' 'A , . H -3, , W . . , , . ,.. ..- 4 '1- . 1- A . A ..,f..f i-tw., - . , s. . ,,.,- '- s . . e '- -.. 2-:r e- , A t , , . ,V ... ..1v,,ffY. ' ' ,- A . , - Vggi -13.1 - p, gm' - fr.,-. f if' v-'Jx"',-'X '- w:f..',' ' -. f 1 A f 4 v. - . - 1 1 . . . , . A,,, .. ,, . f . , - -. . ,. 1- .., . . 4 .y,..., 7 , . . .., il. Alt , up - -y Q .-.1'- .' I , -I . ' Z . .fi . ' A ' , . Q" ' ' , . A, f, gf, .T,',A"3! -Q. . f - HH., .' v V ' -fu . 5 'Swv "5'- f" s H-fx s .--5 1, I " ' 7' V 5"."'f- 1142523 . - , " v ,' , w,-f ., .. 4- ,,- . , 4. Q 'lf 'Q . , 1 , 4. "v ,N . - . ', ' , . uqf. .g ,,' ,V . , f - f, ,--., . , 2, , I . I,v,,....1 ..A , V., 4 2' . "' " H +. 1 '-'Y' . . . .o ,. , . ., . L, . ,. . . .- i . .... 3 Ji , V , ,V TN., ' N. 1' ,,-.-' .nu .gifs ...Xi , A r. Lg., Q-. D-S: H -, '.-.- 6.5 V .-1 . 1 ': ' ' f- , x- ' ..' -4 'x Q - " . . ' , J - , .W . ' -- ' '4 xx. 1 K. .. .Q . z." ,, -'. fr ..4 N. ,Q-,A .v. . fa . ,uv . , . .. '- -5 ,.', fx, , : 'aw-. .'g.. ng' 4 '--- 0.1, '. f '1 .Zim 5" ' ..:. H-. 1- .Q In 'V '-ah..." . , ' .. - -' ' ' "1-'W'.' 'H' V - - '.x -V Q,-".. -' ' . , gl . . ., , fi ,. 3, .. f N s -vw.. , ,-.35 ., ., . .. it . i 1 "H ' .Q y . ff- 41.115-5 ,Q-'--1 ', ' ' -' U ' ' -,'. ' '- ' 'fu' '.'- ' X ' '- .. ' a ff - -'Pl' g'.'g ." la. 'A - , - 'Q . p ,,- - , 4, .. M.,,,h,, ,. ' 1- . i n .. v -, , 2 fs. 'v - '-' if K 'xv' i -- .'.' .:,,-fy - ,','-.k. . 4 , e 1 ,.,k. . x ,:,f' l .Y U 4 in , g .A . 5., u. . . , A- -I f ,,A-.!s- .V xx. MY. iN . 17: - .1 -" ' ' A.- . A. 1- "1 new Aga' 1-A' ., ,-3 ' 1.4.1,-,-'A , A 1 , ,, ef... , A, -n. -v--.., x ,- ,-.A - rf, - -,, aug ... ,-, . .-. . Y L .X , ,A ..,.,.,',,,t ,. ...tit ,sl- ,,',,, . .l . , 1 , .. 5 . ,. '. , ,., -, ,I . " " .- ' A .4'4.'f s'i-- -"--5-1','.-'.i'i' 'A . . 'sp' - '- . 15 , . ,..,' Jw'-'L ,p '1:.- ,gif -'-!S,',g g ' 1' , 7 if .. AN 'u' 'J 9- '..", '. ""-4 ,J . .- . .1 T7 . 'I .-?- .,-- ., ,. 3-I , ,f,-, x . J- . Q I ,. 1 ,.., ,. ,1 rt .-. , , - e .. ... ,- . .ww H-.K bf , .- -Q., ,,, - ,tdftv ..A 4 no . 94, j wg! V- X. A -' yy X, 1 ,Q xi--Uv, 4.5 -fl. Q M , , W' A v' , - -s 4. ' M 'ly -Q-3. ,P.v','y ' , 1. 9, usa, , , u ' J' f - W ' . .. 'Q' '.' f.. ,- .-. xv" ' ' .5 -'.,"' " N W 4' . ,' .4 4 . .A , -, 1 I ,. . . - . , , ,Qt me , . v x ig... 1-.f ,, A . ty, - p, , A -3 -. 4 .,., fu,-,, - , - . A - . ' s , '35 , -Q' v --. . .'. ., 0. . V , . .- f- . . . 1 . I . yn -1. nina, .v 1 Q' , , , t , 3 ,Q - .- ,- x -' sv. x, ' -' . ha' , 2.5" f Hugh Holland's name doesn't strike a familiar note to U students. Several thousand people see him daily and know hi only as "The Flower Man." Hugh Holland is that 83-year-old gentleman who sells flowe on Tuesdays in front of the Tri-Delt house. Students talk the flower man about the weather or comment on the pret flowers. They know little about his 24 grandchildren or his great grandchildren or his lasting marriage of 56 years. He just the lanky old man we pass while we hurry to class. It's very unlikely there is another person in Fayetteville whi gets more pleasure out of selling flowers tat 50 cents a bunch than he does. "I don't do it for the money," he explains. "I lo l all people and love to see them happy." 4 3 1 I 1 I 1 w vin ag 45" J . ,a -Q QQ' . ,r 1 , 4 11" 'fu , i 0 Q 1 : 'q. Y ,.- '. 9 Q 0 F x 1 Q , s f x 'I 7' fx' x N"'- 'X-fy" . ig ?'.:, ' ' x , '-if - fb "inf, :n 9 :vi ' .4 .-1-Q' 4 ,. ., V A - A4 v . ' x Q., f. . x .Q 1 X, A, A, s I A 5 . V' ' 1 'V' y o Ky' s 4 .1 'K ,1 xH- ,f Ni: I all 1 m 1 t -.I I Q-1 f. . s I 0 wa, ' . X ,, s y '5"IJ'fg:, X xx 5 Y xl Y! ' ,, N , lr 45 x -,6 3 1 A.. .. ,Fff 65 'YE4 1: 3 if M E gy ? 5 "2 1 A ""V-V 1 g f-- ? ' , 5' 4534 A is r v--nv' Q ! Z X .Q A A-H., , af 'Q 4 if , i , 45" "wg, Q I' 3 ' x I 4 Y? fl-5 HQ vb A091445 V 1 9 ww 9' l ,if :hw- L festyle Students in the early 1970's do not live with any different type of room- mates than did the students of the 60's. But they were more open about it. Homosexual couples came out of their dark closets and unmarried straight couples didn't worry so much about what Mama and Papa would think. In some quarters these lyfestyles became a status symbol. And, these Ide- styles were not confined to the weirdos. Susie Sweetgirl was just as good a candiatefor living with Bill. Students were living together for more than just the fun of 'shacking up.' lAlthough that continues as one ofthe most popular student activities! They were discovering that it was an alternative lifestyle to the .straight married ideal of the older society. And, they were discovering that it was a lyestyle they enjoyed. On the next few pages we talk with three couples who participate in the lyestyles ofthe 70's. We don't want to moralize, and would rather have thenz tell you why they have chosen their particular lifestyle. Clark and Dena Theirs was a marriage made in heaven, solemnized in her hometown and presently residing in Fayetteville. Clark and Dena live in a little white house with a daffodil lined sidewalk. It resembles a Doris Day-Clark Cable movie- surprisingly so does their marriage. According to the cou- ple their lifestyle as married students has not presented many unusual problems. Clark and Dena were married last August. They dated for two years and were dropped, then pinned and finally engaged for eight months. Both will graduate next May. Though they have financial help from parents the couple have part time jobs. Dena, who had never worked before, feels her job gives her some independence. They are still living in what your mother calls "marital bliss." Clark jokingly said, "We fought like hell before we were married and we fight like hell now. " Their adjustments to marriage have been normal. Clark now helps with household chores and Dena cooks a great chicken pot pie. Both admitted moving out of Creek houses into the responsibilities of marriage have been difficult- but, not that difficult. Clark and Dena were surprised their friendships have not changed. Most of their friends are single and they sometimes take kidding about "the old married couple go- ing home earlyf' Clark even gets tanked with the boys oc- casionally. Neither Clark nor Dena considered living together as opposed to marriage. Clark explained the social pressures, parents and personal feelings kept them from even think- ing about it. Both feel marriage has worked well in their situation-but wouldn't recommend it for everyone. 5 1Glll!w"'W"' iff -e+25"f xy N. gg, in A,,' I f 'f'j 9 .,.,, 459 J ilv V J 3...-g i ff .5 Linda and Fred 54 Fred and Linda are roommates. Like most roommates they share the economic burden of living together. They share the household chores, the cooking and cleaning, and even the bedroom closet. But, unlike typical roommates Fred and Linda are un- married and live together in an open manner. Therefore they share much more - an emotional and physical rela- tionship. This lifestyle is familiar to UA students. Each of us "knows" someone else in this living situation. Many have experienced the "evils" of shacking up. Many are now respecting and considering this lifestyle for its own merits - why? Why do we now talk openly about a lifestyle that is as old as time? What makes circumstances easier for these people now as compared to social conditions our parents knew? What sort of people can give credibility to this life- style? Fred and Linda can answer these questions. They are young people with their eyes directed in the future. They have made this way of life work for them. One fac- tor has strength - in these days of rampant divorce work- able relationships are worth examining. The couple met about a year ago in a shopping center in their hometown. They liked each other and started dating regularly. january brought the second term of school, and Fred went 1300 miles away. They spent time and money calling and visiting. When summer arrived, and they were together daily, they realized as Fred put it, . . a need for something more substantial." The summer and the romance progressed. Linda says, "Dating gets to be a real bore." With the time approaching for school and inevitable separation Fred noted, "We re- member what it was like last spring." The couple admits Linda's coming to Arkansas had been a tension point all summer. But not for the reasons one might suspect - she had recently gotten an excellent job, I 1 I I e I I I I I I I I A I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I 1 I I I I I I I and she is very close to her family. But, she came. Fred and Linda realized marriage was a consideration, but there didn't seem to be time enough to work out the plans before classes started. Neither Fred nor Linda wanted to rush into a legal tie. Fred noted, "Whether we were married or not was immaterial." Once making the decision the next step was telling the parents of their desire to live together. Fred related, "It was no big deal." Linda explained that their parents were well aware of the situation and were very understanding. Fred's father, however, needed some convincing. His son describes him as a "businessman," With parental wis- dom and practicality he questioned the economics. Fred's father opened possibilities the couple hadn't considered. They concentrated on working out problems and both say there were "no hostilities" that would face them. Fred sums it with, "This is a product of wanting to be together. We didn't grow up in strict Baptist homes - if so, things might have been different." Fred and Linda make no effort to conceal their life- style. The only social problem encountered land perhaps a humorous onej is not being able to show proof of marriage so Linda can get a student's wife football ticket. So they sit in the south end zone. They laugh about an experience in the Science Building elevator when someone asked Fred who he lived with. When he said "my girlfriend" there was an embarrassed giggle from the crowd going to the first floor. Fred and Linda are determined to build a future togeth- er. That future includes plans for marriage next summer and eventually children. Linda confesses she would like to have children now, but it would not be economically feasible. She also wants to be married when she has chil- dren, simply because of the confusion of last names. Speaking of children, Fred says, "That's probably one of our highest aspirations." A cliche that plagues this sort of lifestyle is that couples are only living in a fantasy world and can't face the realities of marriage. However, as Fred noted, "Our commitment is the same as in a marriage. This is not something we did that is irresponsible." Both feel the legal tie would not make what they share any stronger. However, it would naturally be easier to separate while unmarried. The possibility of separation is never mentioned except in a teasing sense. Another cliche they have broken is that their lifestyle is based not just entirely on sex. In answer to this, Fred says, "The physical thing, if kept in perspective can be constructive - the same as with emotions. At first it was more exploring minds than bodiesf' Linda notes, "We didn't want it to be just sex." Their daily lives are the same from the average married student couple. Fred cares for Linda because of her hon- esty, kindness and gentleness. Linda feels Fred is him- self, a gentle person and treats her on an equal basis. Most of all there is a concern for each other which they feel would be weakend by the 1300 miles with Linda at home. This lifestyle works well for them. But neither one would force their way of life on others. Fred said, "We are not doing this interview to glorify our lifestyle." Linda added, "Maybe it will help some people understand. Some people might feel we are irresponsible. That is not necessarily true." Fred claims that since the arrangement was made he is able to get more rest, and his study habits have improved. Linda has made a different adjustment to a college com- munity. She had not been a college student, and in the beginning found herself resenting Fred's studies. They have worked out problems as a joint effort. They believe in what they are doing in their lifestyle. Fred summed with, "Even if we didn't get married and separated, then we would have accomplished something - we didn't rush into legal ties and find out it didn't work." anifesto Ea'itor's note: This article in our lifestyles .section deals with homosexual relationships. We a'o not show a particular couple as state law deals harshly with 'offenders' Over the past few years, we have been priviliged to take part in what must truly be the first genuine "revolution"- the sexual revolution. Freed finally from the suffocating in- fluence of the "Dark Age" of militant Puritanism, men and women all over the world are proclaiming their sexual emancipation with eloquence and pride. After nearly two millemiums of slavery to a bloodless morality of spiritual, as well as physical, castration, society has begun recasting its image in metaphors of tolerance and enlightenment. For the first time in history, humanity is making a legitimate case for the overworked epithet "cilivization." ln light of the overwhelming evidence in favor of sexual liberation, adherents to the atavistic morality of convention appear simply ludicrous when they speak in solemn voices of "crimes against humanity" and "abomination in the sight of Cod." There has never been any question of right or wrong regarding sexuality-only the question of preference. To quote 1930's "badgirl" Mae West: "Goodness ain't got nothing to do with it." Homosexuality has long come under the controversial heading of "crimes without a victim," and now it's finally coming into its own. In the field of the arts, homosexuals have held a wide berth throughout history. Creative geniuses from Socrates to David Bowie have exerted influence in philosophy, litera- ture, art, and music. When confronted with the intolerance of outraged and outdated social systems, some have suf- fered, like Oscar Wilde, public disgrace and even imprison- ment, but the cultural legacy homosexuals have conferred upon the world lives on. The greatest difficulty heterosexuals have experienced in dealing with the gay community has been in accepting the fact that we are flesh and blood human beings, like them- selves.It has always been easier to deal with homosexuals in one-dimensional terms, in order to further alienate our sensibilities and attitudes. Subsequently, it has been quite a shock for heterosexuals to discover that we do not all conform to "type," but that our character is as multi- faceted and indeterminate as their own. Simply speaking, we are human. Considering the sexual barriers that have existed in the past, it is not surprising to find that the majority of het- erosexuals feel threatened by any movement that attempts to redefine sexuality in more realistic terms. Perhaps rightly, they feel that gay relationships exist as a kind of parody of the "straight" conventions of courtship and marriage-for the absurdity of such conventions become painfully acute when restated in the homosexual experience. It is an em- barrassing fact that role-playing in heterosexual relation- ships has always existed at the expense of the woman, with- out regard for her personal desires or ambitions. Homosexuality is neither a religion nor a creed, but a fact of life. To place it in a mock Christian context, it has existed since Cain "blew" Abel. The only basis for its suppression would seem to lie in considerations of war and blood. When- ever a society assumes a militaristic character, it subjects its citizens to a rigid breeding program, in order to supple- ment its armies. It grows intolerant of any activity which does not contribute to the "swelling" of its ranks. This is the actual "war machine" as it has existed from time im- memorial. We of the gay community in Fayetteville join hands with our brothers and sisters all over the globe to welcome the awakening of consciousness. The sexual revolution is of eminent concern to all peoples, from all walks of life, be- cause it is a revolution of the heart. Quite simply, it asks that we treat with tolerance and respect any person who chooses to adopt a lifestyle different from our own-and to honor that choice. For it is only in this spirit of under- standing that we can ever hope to bring peace into the world and love into our hearts. The Great ame "Hello? My name is john . . . oh, okay, I'll try there." "Hello? My name is john Smith and I would like to check about a student program. What? Fine, I'll try to get him. Thanks." "Mr. Crowder? Oh, well, when do you expect him to return? Okay, well, tell him I' hope he enjoyed his trip. Fine, I'll try there also." "I-Iello? Say, Frank I just wanted to check on some student input and find out where we stand on the new program. No, I tried him, but he was out of town. Sure, no, I don't mind trying over there. See 'ya later." "Hello? Yes, my name is john .... Approval Board of Trustees Acfionnmplemen' President - Other Administrative tation of proposals Officers Recommending Council - University Action Smdem Semte 48 student members! Sem-if Recommending Faculty Senate Univel'Sify University Committees Community -student Council --student-faculty-administration 5 student officers -University Senate te.g. CSRl 5 faculty officers -equity and grievance 5 admin. officers Specific Discussion of Proposals general concems deliberation indicates points for formal "input" from individual students and student groups 1717147 IELTS oglzs What is it like to be a Greek? For me, it was a very trying experience. I went through closed rush and got my heart broken. I had my heart set on one house, and I know now that I hadn't looked any farther than the front door. By Bid Day, I didn't ever want to see another Greek, let alone BE one. I considered transferring schools twhich many girls do because of a heartbreak during rushj, but I knew that would be stupid, and no answer at all. So I got out of the situation and tried to look at it realistically. I wasn't interested in being "social", I just wanted to live in a house where I could be loved for myself. Did I really want to be a Greek? Yes, or at least I thought I did. So I went through open rush. I got a look at houses as they really are and they got a look at me as I really am. And even through that, we pledged each other. When I recieved my bid card, I didn't know if I had made the right decision or not. I was used to doing things my way and I didn't know how restricted I would be, but I soon found out. Sororities still have study hall. They still have room check. They still give call-downs. They still have pledge duties. They still have pledge jack-arounds. They still have dress-up tnon-grubj meals. They still have cliques. They still have stereotypes. And they have much, much more. When I pledged, I was a very happy person willing to conquer the world. I am a very sarcastic person at times and have a very dry wit. After two weeks of being myself in the house, I was raked across the coals for my so-called "bad I 1 I I I i v I l 1 I l l fi 1 1 1 I l r attitude". I still don't understand it. I was being myself. Yet I was told that it would "be better for the house" if I could change my attitude. What was there to change? I was being myself. I loved the house then. However, I rea- lized Iwas changing to suit them. They couldn't accept me the way I am-sarcasm and all. just that one incident blew my whole conception of what sororities really were. I guess the one thing I couldn't take was people my own age trying to play god with me. The one time that sticks in my mind most was jack-around after a walk-out where my pledge sisters and I were hit with paddles by members. Another time as a jack-around, my pledge class had to serve dinner. By the time we were to make all the members beds as another jack-around, we were so fed up with the whole thing that we short-sheeted the beds. lWhich I thought was only cricket.J It is much easier to be a pledge if you can be laughed at and laugh back. I laughed as long as I could, then I began to cry. I felt very confined in my "home". I took to staying away as much' as possible. I spent a fortune on gas be- cause I rode around every night and all weekend. QI some- times feel largely responsible for the gas shortagej During these driving sprees, I picked the house apart. Did I get so upset because of the house and the people in it, or did I get so upset because of me?I guess I still don't know. To be honest, Ienjoyed some of the things about a sorority. It's nice to have someone around to do things with. It's nice to have someone to walk across campus with. It's nice to have someone who cares enough to bring you a meal when you're too sick to get your own. But these virtues are NOT confined to sororities-you can find them everywhere. But the one thing I'll never get over is Membership se- lection. All the rushees are "evaluated"-from outward ap- pearance to the size of her bank book. Remarks are made by members of the house that you wouldn't believe. How much can you learn about a girl at a rush party after talk- ing to her for only a minute or two? Certainly not enough to call her a "turkey" or say "I wouldn't want to walk to class with her". I feel it isn't our place to judge, yet every house does it every year. Even through all this, I made some lifelong friends through the house and because of the house. And I made some lifelong enemies. And I learned a lot about myself and a lot about other people. The biggest thing I learned is how important it is to make yourself happy and to do the things that are im- portant to you instead of always doing things for everyone else. You have to be your own person and you can't al- ways do that in a sorority. I pledged very excited and ready to go. I finished my jun- ior year very down and apathetic. For me, life holds more than letters on a person's shirt. And if people can't realize this by the time they graduate from college, then they've missed the biggest lesson college has to offer and have failed the four year course, Life 4048. uf., 1 N ef 1 . P . 11 ' X . . ,, ' ,A -vw . ,J ' I , " '5 ' X A x l xtg, K - O if wwf" -www jf , Nl if . if ' ,af , . k 4.1 4 k22Q,b1j:Ljik4u 1, , N ' ' , M- 1 Ei- ' 1-K 1'- Tgf-wfs-2 Sa,-,-'fx -' 3,1 Ag -w., .. - 1 ' + eww fs.-gs---,, 'Q-n-.-N, . ,x..,f -.,J :A,'Yl,H3gI?.,,'-', V' -'- --J .. , , ----L M-. - .,..,:'-:.A - '.- ' 1' 'fp 1. R ' 5-. , J9,,i,.,4' '- f-....u3,h fu.-'g ,Oh ,.,E,.v- . A ' ' X. 134, ...J-qv: ixxr. , 'r xanv, K F-ttf:-3.4 f-"its, - 111 :.q 'mm L 'f-..- y AT " if-..,v.. gif. M4 ,.,+53,1Q5,w ,- . -. . . "T"wwf..-iii-'Q-.. 2' v- Ti .. i.-ff - ., - 'f ig-f.i'13:TAf' :lj-f-54 il ,- A wi--4' J 2:,e:.:a:-"Q ,A H:-fx M. -L1.g'P:wf,,kf:,. 5' f--:Q - . ., wt- 'mg V-R eq-,w.51:'-::.f", ix X '- QQ-ig '15 E- wx-,+A -,,gf:',Q,E34,e,ugHfs14 jlT'jIQ.f'Q5'1 at-'dw ,,,. Cfkyx Al .-JM -4, f. 8 '11, 'ill 'Y ,pf MWF X HY 4' " F tml. the question is fi "q - ,E - :ffl T51 V '.i'iL:ifffAL A g and Why- and rwhyihvf-, 5 it's only a game g f l ta . , isn'tit? Q L- -'2' e i 4 we live and we try to understand but the answers seem A to have escaped us. Q A 1 1 .--..,,, 1., V, f , . , , V. f V, A ,. y?',-x-- ,.-f,, 3 .- ' We A'-'rrl'I1Q4I:'Q'4Yf:"xa'f4Y1!'L . " 'i5'ffEw, -V '.,:, V sr Q ' ,'.,Ihf:,1wg,'-v,:..1i5,,k!.f,g g,.":Xl,,,x -' V , -1, -f ' :.:-...ws-:-'yf41,n,q, 72 1,fA,f5:f,, +0554-'QQ' - 1S2jj'?"f:,f'- LY' - '- ..e'...f.,-4, ,- .,,, . .,-4,--g-, , rf-'Tu -22' ffs'Z-?fi223ff g Sw:-f:'-if at V . ff, .a'4,,-vtzgiliif' jyl-,gf-.IZ br ' '. w '3-'fix-'asa "2'+ wfi:-:3,.f.-ha 1' 'fl 1' ff'743l,f T711 and the question is - s V s A why should we worry all these years , and lose all hope when everything is pressed against the window pane of life, naked it exists concealed and disguised from our eyes we see its beauty life is passing but it is real , for the moment good morning people, and the question is. . . -! 1 X - r et, nlike many of its sister institutions of high learn- : ing, the University of Arkansas has been coeduca- tional from its very beginning. Women always have had a place on its campus, and they have been encouraged to attend. Two women enrolled for the University's first classes. At the beginning of this year there were over 4,600 women en- rolled on the main campus in Fayetteville alone. For a time in the early days, it was undecided as to the proper attire for the University coed to wear to classes. At first a uniform was adopted but it was soon abandoned. However, in 1880, women were required to wear grey dresses, white aprons and blue sun bonnets for the spring and autumn seasons. In the winter, they wore black dresses, white aprons, scar- let zephyr hoods and black wraps. As stated in Reynolds and Thomas' history of the U of A, "dresses of such fabrics as silks and satins will not be tolerated." Discipline in the early years was strict. To the University president, the son of a governor was no more than that of the humblest citizen. For instance in 1877, the third Mon- day after the opening of the University, General Daniel Hill, President, called the faculty together, expelled several boys for drunkenness and announced it at the morning chapel service. One or two of the boys belonged to promi- nent families in the state. Special efforts were made to in- duce the faculty to rescind the action. The governor's in- fluence was instituted against the faculty, but without avail. A demerit system was adopted in 1877. It provided for a student to receive 10 demerits for use of tobacco, Z0 for intoxication. A total of 200 demerits would mean expul- sion. The board also passed a resolution to prohibit stu- dents from "attending parties, circuses, theaters or any place of social amusement near the end of each school term." It was the early 1900's before any special customs arose. Yells and class songs existed, but there were no "peculiar exhibitions of college spirit except what was manifested in enthusiasm at athletic games or in nocturnal college pranks," according to Reynolds and Thomas. As the Uni- versity grew and its students established relationships with those of other colleges and universities, customs and prac- tices were established. Por instance, the graduating class observed "class day," on which the seniors gave a program consisting of class oration, prophecy, history and poems. The top two stu- dents in the class were known as the class orators and de- livered speeches at commencement exercises. "Pennant Day" originated in March 1903. It was the best-known and the most enjoyable since it gave a holiday to junior and senior classes. At first, the seniors placed their pennant on a pole and the juniors accepted the im- plied challenge to take it down and furl theirs instead. A general class struggle followed, sometimes accompanied with violence and personal injury. After a year or so this class fight was discontinued by faculty orders, but the holi- day was granted for years. To quote this account: "Cn pennant day the two classes were excused from re- citations. During the morning, the classes attended chapel and sang songs and did yells. Afterwards, they would promenade the corridors and with yells, songs and diverse noises annoy the professors who were valiantly struggling to impart knowledge to the absent-minded lower-classmen. Next, the juniors and seniors repaired to one of the literary society halls where a short joint program was given." fRey- nolds-Thomas History, 19105. The next feature of the day to be added was the laying of the concrete block in Senior Walk in front of University Hall tOld Mainj. On this slab, the names of the year's graduates were engraved. The first slab was laid in 1905 and this custom has continued. Later, came the planting of a senior tree on the campus with appropriate ceremony, a custom begun in 1907. In the afternoon, the two classes played Baseball and the day's festivities would close with a joint banquet. The month of May was also significant to the juniors and seniors since the president entertained them in his home on May Day. New boys enrolling at the University were given a recep- tion by upper-classmen each year. They were marched over the city and given military tactics, singing, yelling, dancing and such "stunts" which the older men thought would be helpful to them later on. In March, 1909, the engineering students inaugurated the custom of observing St. Patrick's Day as a holiday for engineers, a celebration befitting the honor of their patron saint. It was predicted at that time the celebration would become a Hfixed custom." It has. The predecessor of bonfires was the "night shirt" parade given by the boys when an athletic victory was won. In 1909, Brodie Payne's University Song, the present University Alma Mater, was chosen as the winner among a long list of competitors for the prize. Professor I-I. D. Tovey set the lyrics to music. In the 1913-14 academic year, daily chapel programs were no longer required, convocation was held at 10 a.m. each Thursday. Attendance was required of freshmen and sophomores and optional to upper-classmen. Two years later, convocation was made subject to the call of the Uni- versity president. In 1926, attendance was made optional to everyone. x-WY NLP PQ 10' 5 - I Oi' Q65 QSP' Y? 6 Q56 A Q P, ' 0 A QQ-9 k we PS' 59g 41 O -Q P67117 1 XXI .Ce 0 XX' yhx 955 ef? Nam f . 09 qv xx, 0 qt GY' G Oy QFW6 A 'og seg' Q eb gov se' L 3 Q 'Q 0 uc' a 6916563 dxotgefgql Q X st oc Q06 906 X 96. gbboqlxg 1.11. F. L FQ? W yo OS '00 Seqoixs 93,99 1 Se mst , 19. X Q-,SX ' o9' Vito' 0990 590 g 06 16.03 P,QY52QxC'ax'l.axe,W N500 8 I S60 1- 96015 9 CQ, Ofgxofff if 02.3695 ' is ixC .KX YXO . 66 603 906 gag. , ' X 0309 45'- , OYGQQOSX' I, A15 '-660 , U N 'xv Q A105 get a 10 PET 'Y is lv Y 5 . Q91 L UM 0 . C X0 4 Og GQ. ,Gag 00634 Yu C955 Ko 308 40288147 ss R -'LS 8' eoaoge move' ESS d 'oo reweb 19 S - I . .Qt W Z Vegzb Alqlfe ,, I .. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS 3 Moo A - S coLLEo1-3 OF EDUCATION emeS2Zf119-- , ELA , TUDENT TEACHING APPLICATION Spring""""' L 45 : Miss ICENSE Ivo MODEL I - Last First Middle S745 Hr A Telephone URI?-' B Fo ---,. 0' O s First Second , I 'on S h Year---1 X . G4 c ool City nd Car av il bl ...,...-,-,-,Cumulative GPA for Sip 8 e ferences : Location, dugg, Beyond commuting Distance Lua -' Ft- Smith,-,Little Rock Gther - Within commuting distance if possible - CSpecific city cannot be promisedD Lde :vel 66 Welcome, ladies and gentlemen, to the all-new 4 ?nd exciting U of A' .vgix 0 ,f v", f. f ,f 'Fr e Y HO! . 5 Qowotx I ,,,f""' 601, fb, 1:4 S , Gwffv ,eq I 013 ,0e'gOie 3. 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' 'B ' J SAS sw UmNm5yy'i OF R Z S, MAF ' """"""-' '--- ---- Class x9-' 301 wh: .FY v1 BDSHEE X , C "' 5 Dffr S20 fo IN 'ity of Ark 5' E "NW4o f5, LZYLEFORM ansas' Please comg31etet1O Coen! C0195-05 C Q A T ydivhin 10 339 0: ' oo r 11-ani-c E STAN C unit W ACON l LE Q N S OLL e "wo Q' TUB 'foe 1 T ' E 1 CFZ?.OZRrQ5CIg-P ,. P119 0. 1-P A AA,g05 U3 74 1 . w l 5 ' c i RECEIPT FOR ISSUANCE OF COMPACT REFRIGERATOR UNIT Q . . 1 .D . Number Last Name Fxrst. M1dd1e rr, .O 22. UQ j Residence Hall Room Ei, Z Q 5 PERMANENT ADDRESS '3 ff X c Please fill gut this form. X er -I3 NAME -p ADDRES sw DATE C PHONE N0 . UNE IN F A 'C T ID No. UNE UUT, PURPOSE: ROOM CHECKED BY B A 1 R namei Ali previous names used-twiaiden nfrig N7 V I 2: E - State - ' - O Sf 'Lip Code Q .lj St t Y , CJ -fr, . a e 'Lip Codf cj' SW gi' y Pfeserit Db S' Occupation ' 8 i .S piease iiii in appropiate space tsb cor 'Sy i D? if LS: SoiA Campus at Fayetteviiie Z O Le., -C 'esporidehce Study 7 - N W fe Aj' A 7 4 Q 5 4 if ., 5 -,gf cap ' Q' S' I5 'Qc i :ircie highest year oi schooi Cf Q if L 2 H , Elementary High Sv' "N N. gf' Omi' 'i2345e'1a9if Q'-4 'N' Si sb yi' S may SECHON 1 ,,, :Q 0 Hug ed to the University of Ar' 5 E0 53 bag: arse to meet degree ref 5 0 Spe no sec i 1' fo 5 2? Ci ure approva o 3 al 0. Co JJ ' Q' -. 5" - , - fu Q Q1 s tyour dearfs sigria' Q' .U D gf N -l 4 5 Zi 'N if St ete this course tak if Q af' L55 .U N nationsweeirs befor. Q, Q Q, -N, IU H' u rs or . . . Q- Q, Q1 'U ,g, J- Oh L icatiori ,registration tor reg ,C .Q ug, O ' - S 1 2 1, N7 ba' 5 3, Oth ' 1 it DSED1 8? 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Q 3.1-152355247 ' - , xii- fr , ,,,. zz. .J- Robert Leflar, Law "I believe the good legal education that a law school should under- take to give its students consists of four basic elements: Q11 Understanding of the funda- mental rules, principles, policies, and organization that make up our legal system as a whole, 121 Mastery of techniques for study and analysis of narrow problems in minute detail, but without losing sight of the broad fundamentals, Q31 Appreciation of the fact that the law justifies itself only as it serves our society, and serves it well, Q41 An interest in the law suffi- cient to induce each lawyer to spend the rest of his life trying to learn something about it." 72 v I 1 1 r i v v 1 w l J Miner Williams, i English 4 1 'rVe can afford to run out of everything ht beginnings." i i 1 i I I l Norman Demarco Drama "A most exciting phenomenon on campuses around the country arose during the turmoil of the 6O's. Students had discovered film as a relevant academic discipline. It was encouraging to see the verve and spontaneity with which students at the University of Arkansas seized upon their dis- covery of film, and the challenge it afforded, as a most pertinent medium of communication and expression. Most assurredly, with student freshness of spirit and continued zeal, it could well be that the status of film may eventually be raised from gimmick to art." Ernie Deane Iournalism "In quieter moments, I keep coming back to the feeling that our world isn't going to hell in a handbasket. So, young and troubled friends of the mid-1970's, take heart. Question what you will. Improve what you can. But, hold fast to that which is good, for much of it has come to you through 10,000 years of trial and error." its I f,,,...7 AN ff' Paul Sharrah Physics "Physics is Fun" land so is astronomyl and the students are fun fmost of the timel. l often tell classes jokingly that the university would be a fine place if it were not for the students! But we all know that the University would be nothing if it were not for the students. In the long run it is the students and their accomplishments which makes the University what it is. It is a joy and a challenge for me to teach and to share their lives and problems through the varying times of war and peace and inflation and recession and now the energy crisis. A teacher, whatever his subject, must lead a little, while be- ing led a little. He leads through the choice of emphasis in his courses as well as his personal example and conduct, he is led as he responds to the changing conditions and relevance of his subject. Lead on!" 75 Louise Kraemer, Biology ". . . A working scientist knows that critical to his method are the making of observations and the testing of observa- tions and the testing of hypotheses-these, being essen- tially deductive processes. Equally critical to his method are the devising of hypotheses, and the interpreting of data- primarily inductive processes. You may recall that rationalism existed long before the time of Descartes, empiricism long before the time of Ba- con. Induction and deduction have been logical methods at least since the time of Aristotle. And of course, both meth- odologies are indispensable to scientific and logical proce- dures. Empiricism without rationality is extravagant. Rad- ical induction without deduction is impossible. We must have empirical data from which to devise hy- potheses. We must have hypotheses by means of which to seek data. The processes feed each other. This is a relation- ship Immanuel Kant characterized generations ago: "Ge- danke sind ohne lnhalt leer, Anschaungen sind ohne Begriffe blind" - loosely paraphrased as "Concepts with- out percepts are empty. Percepts without concepts are blind." Further, induction and deduction and the relationship between them-provide the mechanisms for change, for evolution of our understanding of science. This change I wouldn't characterize as progress. Progress is a word which no longer has meaning for me. This change in sci- ence with time I would characterize as a developing ca- pacity for making distinctions-what I would call an in- crease in our powers of resolutions." William Baird, History "To me the study of history is both relevant and a lesson in appreciation. It is relevant because it connects the past with the present, providing moderns with options and alternatives as they confront the future. It is a lesson in ap- preciation because it makes us witnesses to the accomplish- ments or failures, the courage or timidity of individuals and groups in days gone In sum, history provides perspec- tives to individuals and societies. No education, therefore, is complete without some study of it." H Cyrus Sutherland, Architecture "lt is my professional prerogative, and I'm happy to say, my intense academic pleasure, to think of architecture in terms of history. History provides a vast matrix on which our architectural heritage can be plotted, analyzed, and then tolerated, condemned, or praised. I egotistically believe man's nature is revealed more fully by his archi- tecture than by any other of his endeavors. Architecture is vividly visual, concrete, obvious, comprehendible. lt is a tangible expression of man's material and spiritual needs, of his follies and weaknesses as well as his strengths. Con- cerns for contemporary and future life is of primary im- portance to all disciplines, but total concern for contem- porary and future life cannot avoid involvement in the past. Concern for the past is more than sentimentality .... it is an intellectual and moral obligation." 'ew 5-Q Gaston P. Fernandez, Spanish "Innovation, experiment, reform, these are the three cru- cial words in Higher Education today. The present gen- eration of students are not averse to learning but demand that it be given relevance and embodiment. Besides, they are interdisciplinary-minded, ahead even of those few teachers willing to pay lip service to interdisciplinary stud- ies. Students know that the solution to many of today's pressing problems, like air and water pollution, poverty and urban renewal, and education itself, cannot be learned from a textbook, and are not going to come of a "course" since they cannot be put in a discipline-oriented box. It is clear to me that contributions from the liberal arts col- lege to educational reform must be geared to the social and cultural needs of today's society. The University of Arkan- sas, and in particular the College of Arts and Sciences, is moving forward in the obtaining of these goals, and I am confident that in a near future education will reverse its direction down the narrow path of specialization and en- trust the crucial task of providing models for those who wanted to become civilized men instead of scholars." 4 1 Ill l v H 1 L F l l I V K i , l r 5 I 1 w Y It A,,, A ,Alf Margaret Bolsterli, English Richard Wommack, Law "A state university should lead the culture which sup- ports it-not tag along behind it." "To me the phrase 'Patience, this too will pass' has always had tremendous impact for me. If you are in the depths of troubles and woes, then have patience, this will pass and things will get better 5 if you are having everything go com- pletely right for you, have patience, this too will cease." ,---,...-....,,.,.,...,,,,.,,,,,,, , I,- MM. -.......w'---w--n-1.1-..g,, ..,.,,,,,,.,.,....-.-..-............,,..,,,.,,,,,,.,, , ,. ,, .... , 4w-..,.,,,..,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,, . A.,, M .,,. .,,,,,,, nnqouunw..-qi 5 .-.....,..,..,...,,,-. rnnuonnp... .---.-mM..,.,-,,.., , ,, , VM A "'MAm"'w" .......e .. i ,, r a r as -em llaivowovn-no-aw, , V Am 'W 0 WF' 1: .. ,,.h.,.A----.-.- F .J .-.......,.w.,,,.,,.. 4 ----.--.,.W.., 3 --.........,.....,..... 5 E 4-041-on-pw..--.... ...M x .mm-m.vN.,...,.,, V, ,..,, E .. w-.qw-..-..,,..r, ..,,, . S --Q--r.......,,.,...,,,, mum-u-..........,,.....,, sauna-u.....w-...M... may-t.-.,.,.......,,, '0lWvxwwn......,.,,,,,,, i bf james Lambeth, Architecture " . . . not to merely maintain but to celebrate life, with your personal passion." Dr. lim Dale, Pathology I hope the students get their new recreation cen- er." Harry Ainsworth, Marketing "To me, marketing is an exciting field. I don't suppose I can bring much of that excitement to the confines of a class- room, but I try. I thinks the jobs I am lucky enough to get each summer in Little Rock in advertising help me. Of course, I realize that advertising is just one part of market- ing. Our graduates work in retailing, transportation, sales, heaven knows what, and when they come back to the campus for homecoming they say they enjoy it. I hope so. A person might as well enjoy the way he or she makes a living." - I I f 5 v r' . K I v Y gtg ' Q' 5 f ' , S N -dt Z.. . A lin YQ- , 1 e ,,. , 1 :xiii I " ' 1 , ,. Lgxstxvxv A " f Q M Sf . 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Q4 ag, r li ,lzya ' P' in I ir QW " N z r -M0 ' x , , .f,' gf 'Of 45 ' QQ! 76' X ff .- "'15W'5 ' 7 ' . 3 ' a .. H 1 ' 'W ' ' 'P W 45415 iff 'ff 1 , " K 4 X . ,,. -Jw YI"-. Q, ' A 3 s Img' fp, if fm-,J X Q N. ,, I P ' ,, .. ,.f- ' 13' -if 'X " , . ' A lil: fff' :Ev J Q Q ' X f 3 . - A 14- Fw- Aff ffv, ' - 'Ras ng,:q'Qy.? ,. ., yy if 5-if ,'p ,N 'Q I .gf pq- J ply, 5, i f I A W, W-.4 tu' Q ik. FAX V ,af F .S z4v f Q. 1.-,M .M ,ff .K v . U x st N 'W H - 2' ' ' Vx xl I 1 al' Q", 5' if QI ' fl s K 'x lk 'Y 11'-X x " 3 P ,,. 1.1: , ,N . V AQ 1,2 ,',,,'F'Aa x N mira fl:-3 Pggitat ,Az , Q, 3 . 4 W -., 5 fii 4 ' ,,ffz:'fr-1f,' 'Q 2, Q r - ,g 'K if ' ff "G .' - Q If , 1 fi' df- "AL,,.e if 3 ,INN ' if' " mfg?-P H- iw, .A -A vw. "'x'vT'A'5f mm -1 ' Y 2' f 1' Q, -' f ff I 'Qi MS: H X ' ,ibkif X' 7.' Q il Y .o.T"':- ' .X ' 1 1 ff' il' , Q 1 .X my A 'jeg N' X f'c ' N'-v , D - , . -.H . .J 1 Q. f ,fx '- ', d, v-:fg,ff9',s , 'L - X -5 W ' , H. gli' A: Q il. '13, - mv H "1 14 N , 5'fgffe"' ' . ,, '50 - .Qw ff. V H W frrf-+:-5'i"f . "Wi, Y f if X' 'Q 'ff' 1' - f- N' :viii 'A 324 ' KX ., . i l , ' ' r ' 1 I 5, X 'nl W ' 'MN . ,A 3,4 L fr.: Ji, 4 .F -F K A .f I as X 5 fx in Nsxky, - K, '-'J' 4 ,'g "I 2 " .P y , ,A dx an I T ' N X . 7 fy 3 I ' -V .uw ' hh . QR H , . ' ' if fn, V , .li An Uplift? or, Downfall! The venerable campus landmark, Old Main, has seen better days. Consequently, the UA administration decided to give the ol' girl a face-lifting. A team of surgeons arrived this year to perform the operation. Fences surround her buxom figure. Men are seen climbing her creaking limbs. Surgical procedures can be viewed through her window eyes. They will take in tucks, remove blemishes, and smooth wrinkles. They will modernize her, update her, streamline her, and, in general, insult her dignity. Suddenly she be- comes Ms. Main. Like a middle-aged woman proud of her smoothed crow's feet, there is disappointment when she is treated as if she still had wrinkles. Her character and personality persists after surgical bandages are removed. In comparison, Old Main will continue to serve UA with characteristic nobility. But, the sturdy gaze she has held for one hundred plus years will now wear false eyelashes. The administration decision to rennovate the landmark met with thunderous reaction. Faculty, alumni and students voiced opposition. Editorials appeared in state newspapers, the Student Senate and Arkansas Legislature passed resolu- tions in opposition, and alumni pumped out angry letters. UA officials sent one press release and kept a closed mouth and mind. Administrators contended the building was dangerous and needed drastic repair. Opposition queried why the landmark had not been cared for. They found reasons economically, historically and sentimentally against ren- novation. Those in favor did not reply. As workers deface the building there are several issues yet to be resolved. For instance, where were the funds com- ing from? Some felt federal money was being illegally ob- tained. The government helps finance restoration of historic buildings-not the renovation of them. What is being done to Old Main is no more a restoration than rape is an act of love. While you were here. . . 1971 Charles Manson was convicted of murdering Sharon Tate. William Calley was found guilty of premeditated murder in the My Lai incident. Audie Murphy, the most celebrated pilot of World War ll, died in a plane crash. The New York Times began publishing the Pentagon Papers. Tricia Nixon married Edward Cox at the White House. The 26th amendment to the Constitution of the United States lowered the voting age in all elections to 18. Prisoners rioted at Attica State Prison where 41 persons were killed-32 prisoners and 9 hostages. Captain Ernest Medina was acquitted of all charges in the My Lai incident. Baltimore won the Su per Bowl. 1972 Shirley Chisholm, New York, was the first Black woman to seek the Presidential nomination of a major party. Baseball players conducted their first strike. I. Edgar Hoover, 48 year director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, died. George Wallace was shot and paralyzed at a Presidential rally. The Democratic National Committee Headquarters was burglarized. Oakland won the World Series. Dan Blocker, the gentle giant of Bonanza fame, died. Bobby Fisher beat Boris Spassky in chess. I l 1 1 u I A l I 1973 lGunfire erupted at Wounded Knee, South Dakota. lMarlon Brando refused the Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance in The Godfather. l lLiza Minelli was named the best actress for her perform- ance in "Cabaret". lThe last known prisoner of war was released by the Viet- Q cong. 1 V dSpiro T. Agnew resigned as vice-President of the United 3 Gerald Ford became the first vice-President of the U.S. to be elected according to the 25th amendment to the i Constitution of the United States. l Billy lean King beat Bobby Riggs in tennis. I l States. I Watergate became a household word. I ! Miami won the Superbowl. 1 l Peace was agreed upon in Vietnam. i . Lyndon johnson died. I x 4 1 lWinthrop Rockefeller, former governor of Arkansas, died in California. ! l i l l l 1974 jesus Christ became a bumper sticker if lv r ' .Q .gg .- ' 4 ' xv. 'u 4 KN b ' 'K xp . ' v ah'--"x -- , V rj 0 4-'A'-Qqfa .QI L N uv W. ., , s V . an ' 1..-,' ' f -. 'Q Us 1 4' 'E 4 .4 , K ' - - W . N 'M .am ' 1, .N K, .. , ' Q- - 'W-,N -. X -1 "' ix "VB up 1 0 ' ' 'x sn. ' W ' I F s L.:,.'M W J sq A Q iv., N Bifida 'flag ' - A' '- -A., A V aafif Q...1Ju-I .J . V ., xx . V .-a-.. 0- + N, . ii, X V! 0 . , . , -+ 9,4 ' .M -. M. '- - . 4. " ' ' .2 ' .. 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' f - A f ' -1' g-1-4 ' V . - r Y, Q, k , ,qv I v , -ff. neg A gl ,V S' - lf. X. I Q . 5 .. - N V H l X J. E Q ' x 9 fa-,Mkt -A ffm? Q 'PY 1 1, :l an 'A q -. , H . -mm WN F , -V ' .. q ,i - ' 'nee A' .' ' R ,., ' - 1 ,-.V : ., n li ,hi-'Z'-F' x ' 5 , u .fr r ir I I 7 f A. I 14 -an -t iq , 9 Qian, W - -ff f.. .f H525 . ' t. if '- .0 M .1 'Sli 1" .- 3. 1 1 A ' S ' -1 I ' A' J ' :UQ K . - . ., Q "' ik Q 6 ,ff . x Q wil I 'Y' ft 1 33 41? ,, ,mp I v, '- , x 0 A . , N 'Q ' s y at ' .? "' - - , , Vx' " -, J' ' ' I 1 .Q A , ., ' w 0 ' J' ' '-' 'b ' - 1 ' 'S X 'L F 1 -fra' ' 7' ' A 0 . ' . 1, ' i ' 7 fur - ' .v x" J ' "' z " ' .. - W- , ' f -'- ' - .4 an ' V. , B .. Q 5 'Y e 745. cr Welcome to the beautiful University of Arkansas, Fayetteville campus. Yes, the only major campus in the mid-west where mud blooms and stays luxurious year-round, where mini-mou ntains obstruct each well-worn path, where drainage is completely amissp and where roads that carry the most people to the most places are fenced off regularly. And trees! Let me tell you about the trees The U of A, Fayetteville campus, cuts them down . . .so the mud and water and people can flow freer. But we build lots and lots of buildings. . .nice and pretty and new. . .and dirty 'cause they all have mud tracked through them. Welcome to the beautiful University of Arkansas where progress isn't a dirty word. fThis photograph was taken six months after work had started on the Union-Library plaza. This area is becoming famous as the land-leveling job that has taken longer than any known on rec ordlj "' "w'!4 Jf. fi J4'?:Jgf4ff,:'f. -?.7f1ffH-by-I i, wwf' S L f 4 ' V--Effvpuy' J 14' 7fS'f.4f 1--sg ,- 'mfg' Y..--,-,,., .. 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I ! . -Am e -4: N.-.H " sl . ' 1-3. A A A, -' . ,,,U in .P Syd! 1 '.- x Qu ,, w 5 . Q lr xx' 5,' . .wg to 1' ' Q Q' . .Ss 1 ,Q ,Qi Y' li! X .X '7. b.' 2,31 W, is Ln' -3' QT '9 "V i.v1.." 9' 2' ,WH Egg 3' , 'N'-Q ,, 'fn 'x 1-1 it " ' , Mr. Professor, What do you think of the Communications Building? 2 . i"Sterile." 2"White." I i"No character." Q"Graduate assistants weren't even promised a parking ispace, and in most cases, they didn't get one." f"Townspeople going into the building from the parking ilot looking for a room are lucky to find something other 'I than a loading dock." l"No one with less than 60 academic hours should ride the elevator." J"Did you know that there are 113 steps between the sec- lond floor and the seventh floor?" l"It reminds me of the hospital scene in The Clockwork 3' Orange." f"There are two things that a window can do, but these lwindows can only do one of them fthey don't openD." l"It took a year to get the bugs out of the new foreign lan- fl guage labs." I "Since the windows don't open, the only way to air out 3, the building is to prop open the emergency exit doors, 1 which is illegal---but we do it anyway." g"You can't get to the first floor classrooms from the eleva- ltors." 4 f"Confusing." ,"No department wanted to be on the ground floor. Every 7 department wanted their offices on the same floor as their I classrooms. As a result the speech department has its of- ifices on the third floor, the foreign language department has its offices on the second floor, and the english depart- ment has its offices on the first, sixth, and seventh floors." "I hate concrete blocks." 1 "When the electricity goes off, classes have to be dismissed i because there are no windows to light the rooms." 1 "This 53.5 million center is as sterile in its interior as a hospital." l "Disappointed mustard is the predominating color painted onto cement block walls." "lt's dark, even in the daytime, except when the fluores- cent lights are on." "A least one section of it is an acoustical disaster area. i Footsteps overhead and in the halls are audible in offices. T The thunder of flushing commodes is barely muffled by a 1 A 1 1 wall that separates men's and women's toilets from a class- room." "To comply with the call for lower temperatures, another weakness of design and equipment showed up. When the thermostat was turned down, a classroom in which I teach, and which is normally cool, suddenly became overly-warm. Simultaneously across the hall, cold air was pouring into the departmental library." "More privacy." "We operated the entire foreign language department in Old Main out of a room no larger than the present mail- room." "Architects and physical plant people did a very good job. They gave us what we needed." "lt's the way I expected it to be." "It's a workable building considering the amount of money that they had." "A few bad things crop up in every building." "Better than expected." "All of us have some sort of nostalgia feeling for Old Main but we do a much better job of teaching here." "lt's an advantage to students and teachers to have offices and classrooms in separate wings." "lt's easier to keep clean." "Could be used as a starting point for building other buildings." "I like the atmosphere." "Windows that open would cause heat loss and damage to the building in the case of bad weather fthis happened on occasion in Old Main when the windows were left open accidentlylf' "Physical plant people and architects have gone out of their way to make the building as operable as possible." "Compared to some of the other buildings on campus, I feel like anyone would choose to move over here." "lf I could do as good a job of keeping my office clean as they did providing us with a good facility, I would be really happy-" V,-1. ,:Z5,,4gyg,,,,.,,,,, 4 . w ,,..,,53,4:f,-.X-y ,,!.f: 1 1 Q,Cff-dwg-,". z 7 f f -3,3 :IQ-f,1,vi w :ff -psf-' -- 3 l .,1f,. 1 QL-Q' 7 1. 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Go on back to the bar and down another draft-we'll holler when there's a spare cue. ,V 1 W xi Q v E 1 . . 1" .Qi f 'J 'K M' .J l r-W " fa ml V 36 il 'ij-. .gllxr . , 3 0. .- my 'Y 'K Ni H 19 lv. , 7: fit f.. fa x . f-- Z ,F SI uf ,dv , ,M 111 ,.-, - . N,-.,,, l , ' ' , 3-1, Y 'L' " ,,"V"?Qf: ff, "ff 1' ' -' -313'-:gp " Q : A ,1 .f',,..:,-,g , ,- V ,V ,,,,A,. , '42 j ggfy,'f':,J.'f :. ., 'JF 1' .5 .2 :J-. ,,- ' x ,, x 4 ,gvll X M, 4 f-,yi .X' X Q f Q' ' 13, ., . W., ab- " ' ,L ,-. . S32 ' I' ' 3' 5' 1.1, If .x 1 fr ' w ' r ' ' ww 4 H QQ, . ' V- Kifm- V ..,' ' if we +A fi? X W FT ' Tn! ' , 5 ' that Je., U rpixvn 1' fl 'A Q 1' we We 1 1, 1 V ' ' , , ,' fp V Q in-A K ill., 1. I'I'Q, lust Having Pun 2 I an ff" iff' ,il 6 vi 1'--H--u-.3 an 1 W it N ' ummm "W r,.,,......----- . Maia, i 5 is ,W , yn if WY :vu- Rudi . .,,..,,NLn4-"' I ' nk 'EI flaw 'FX it 'Qwif W4--ff fau f,f'2swfhf" . f, AX bihg- M sw awk VM 'Wu- fl "' M Mn W C K i 'mf 1 Q 1 if-fw ,H we-sf yi N 1- 9 V Q ' ' PM -gfgw I ,. 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" -j "iw ' - Hz: A' A A ,A ,I' 1 1 ,, 5' . 'A , 1 "' " . ' An , Af ,ef A ' A 2 f ' .F 'A A' ' ., .:A .?"f':A if it . f ' gi , Q ' ' if .42 ,:Q 1 -A V - af, ,af ' - 5 A , . j , ,P , A ,A A-L-i ,A-Q, A -, Af Q .A,jf- 'Q' aff. A, ,Aj .Y ,fe I Q9 f A, ,.. ff A ,. e,,,, y 1 A A .. Q V ,f -, , J .av ,gif ,Vin ,R,?,A tj ,1,,x V E. has A .- i. , - , A .L ff . 1 A A. "fA A A Aw A A TA A Af' A . A A , A A7 Aw? -Aff Af MA .4 5 l.1P".i5 - LA. -5-,Af ' A' , ! w . 5 ,,ff,f.22'.?63x'f1 if! A 1" X A Af' F ff 1 ' . ' jf ",,,',1 Ag A- T129 - 9527? , ffl-AAQ -f i ,A 326' ,Af -A - ffm' f 4 .A A 'V' ' , I 5 :HA " ' "mf " ' 'S 17 ' I :A 3" 1 ' V A LI 1 ' "M " :Vff:"- A '5' wi ' A5 VA uf Q23 ' J .f'5"g"t -'f "'5??lflAA7?' A . The Art Gallery TYH Department of Art ii ,, . t .t -f ' 'r -' A - ., . ' . x 1 . jv-.af , Q 0 A v ? 'Q I . H.. ' ......, Q gg 3 A EZ , -- 07. 'T-W Your nose knows it's ionized air, paint, turpentine, wood shavings or wet clay. What your eyes see are works of art-masterpieces. Everything from pottery, metal sculp- ture and portraits to an antique gas pump filled with gold fish. The University's Art Gallery provides the opportunity for students as well as Payettevillians to be exposed to "culture" QMany times in its finest forms.J Students, as well as graduate and staff instructors, pro- duce what their imaginations, talents and skills dictate. CThe results are often remarkablej The gallery was once open to the public at all times. Visitors to the campus dropped by, and patrons of the University Theatre or Concert Hall often spent idle min- utes before curtain time viewing the latest exhibits. Due to major thefts, it has been necessary to limit the viewing hours and maintain guarded protection. This is especially important when traveling shows are being pres- ented in the gallery. Those who haven't had the chance to take a look at the exhibits now have the perfect opportunity to do so. The Fine Arts Building provides a shortcut to the Union. 0r"""fv 'AW ,..-.xs 9 L fllfiug A ERIE Q 1 . . 1 V g R 01' Q, -1 ..'A--.,,.M-wf P' EJ- QKA .tw 54,0 .. AA, 1r--ii I n N 5 s "4 1, U if ' . , ' ,, 'l u gf M, , , , . X ini 4: . vw, '- S X, D P ,L if 1 Db: 4 'A asa O S Ax' I 1 ' if I . 'Q , Q .M W' 'F + . ,.f0"'M' A f X A -f -A ' K Mr' L H , .v -,. 4-f ,r an ,. g...L", ' ? X Nw If J an-W '- . V ,, Q- 5 S' wig L. i -nu: ,,,,x YJ 3? 5 'S ' g.1f "' ,M . , 5 TF.. ' . H':T.A"ik 'Xf"9 A.. J' 'N 4. 'V 3 'Q' -29 glt'3-fl - - 5- . Mp . 4, wt -fha I 5 ,, " 975 'f?'a'9 -. vip-9 rl 'fu' -6 '3 " . 3"w3e1- 4- '.'1 - 'Q . '4--Q4 x. '- ' ,W al 'Q if 1 in - -PY1. li 'ann' 7 cr'ffw",h Un' I ,.':. - ' 7"' - .0 K .QA-.,, 3, -, 17" X" H ,,"'! .a 'M . a'i""" ' , , ,V ,Lg .JV X ,, It i "l,,,,-.K ' Lwf ' ww. ,A 'NP' ., v Hg N ",, 90 I,.-. N ' . p 1 4 --fav gS.'4:",f ,,,W,,'u. .V , vw .WA W, , , ' 1, 'f r ...X w ' W - .ff aw ' --,rr , 1 vi ,K . ,, X-N '.' .y " , . -' ,.f4fg,K'm. ,M ':-fn M . , . V , fb. .v. ', .' 'ir' '.Q'v'QJ' ' 'ww-ff,Lj,. v I , J, 1, -' ,Q A - I V W Y ' . . x. ,M f'44Q"5N" Q Y ' .Ku 'Mg - E .af A fx Wg, N , QQ' , gr., .',f'j Y' 5 . ' i . ' 'Qi J '.- J' X 4', I - "-4' N xl. 'T"' 4 gt ,.., Q 4 2' ,ug .-'- ' 'yn X. , , ' H1193 . ,'Y.M . 'f . 1-2 -1, 'I J ' : 1 X 'fs , i . . Q if Q" .. ' 4. N N.--N-...N N H -,.....,,-A U if v Y ir, Q. , ,L w gg, W wx, -, - w -fa 95- .5 'A ZH , Ag 'J ,af ..V, 4 , ian, a iv ,wgv J mar, W . in k,, lv , Nik it 'A sl Y Q 1 V. ., . , y P A , .X . 7 L 2 a 11 Q O ..gQOl C O PQ F ,,.!?fzv ! N N I , Qi. 'i h , --fix 1 MN 'V' is N N Y - 'X 1 fd Apartment Living 4 li 9 ...x p Advantages Having a 14'f electric cooler exclusively for beer. Making the bathroom in 6 easy steps. No section meetings, Being able to have a guest without the head residents approval. Being able to have sex without the head residents approval. Wearing anything to dinner without worrying what anyone thinks. Disadvantages Hearing strains of the Rolling Stones coming through your roof without being able to shout "Quiet Hours!" Getting bit by the neighbor's dog. Peanut butter, peanut butter, and more peanut butter. Dishes, dishes and more dirty dishes. Rising early to drive to campus to search for an elusive parking place. Playing a guessing game of who's flush- ing the toliet now. The ld S.U. ln this account of the New fnow oldj Student Union from the 1940 RAZORBACK, we see the attitude of the student body towards the "modern, beautiful" and "luxurious" addition to the campus. She's seen her better days, though. Her "flowing" drapes now look more like Weary Willy's overcoat. The "heavy leather divans" look fresh from the junkyard. The whole thing is more a nightmare than a "dream." Where once students danced cheek-to-cheek to the music of Tommy Dorsy, professors orate on the democracies of Europe and the social structures of prisons. In 1940 the students were proud of this beautiful, ornate building. But the 33-year-old lady has been put out to pasture. 120 i AT LAST - THE UNIGN IOHN CURRY OF THE SlUDElNT UN ON MUFFS I-TIS BACKI-IAND Designed to be the amusement and recreation center of the University the new Student Union building has from dancing and ping pong to the host building for the Religious Em phasis movement Whether one cares for sports such as ping pong snooker and bridge or had rather Just relax and take things easy the Union is the place While the building was in the con struction stage for most of the school year most students dropped in every once in a while to see how it was shaping up but none had the faint est idea that in the final stage it would be so n'odern beautiful and downright luxurious as it is. lt is the concrete realization of the dreams of thousands of students who had hoped that some day the University would have one central building ex- pressly for the convenience of the student body The basement floor is made up of the confectionery with a black and chromium soda fountain and cafe teria facilities and the amusement rooms Walking down the hall from the confectionery one can go into two rooms equipped with ping pong tables and one with large lively snooker tables Up the stairs to the main floor and there one sees the front entrance from which leads the ballroom and the lounge room With a lofty ceil ing supporting four huge glass and metal chandeliers and tall arched windows draped with yards and yards of flowing expensive cloth the ballroom is truly a dream Over the especially designed band shell is a mural depicting all phases of student life at tloe University and all around the floor are chairs for chap erones and those who care to sit the dance out Overlooking the ball room is a balcony for those who care to watch rather than dance The chandeliers are all connected with the lights in the room from red blue green and orange back to natural lighting in a gradual fading process Equipped with heavy leather char s and divans the pastel colored lounge room can compare very well with the lobby of an expensive hotel Scattered throughout the room are lamps with indirect lighting and down at the end is a large fireplace topped by a huge square mirror Here students come to read talk or Just to listen to the radio . 1 . . I ,f ' 1 , 1 ' - been the site of everything this year one master Switch which Changes . A . I I 1 I 1 I , ' 1 U , 'r ' , - YL I H'- 1.1 if Q. X J Mg 1 0 Da in The Park S4 we -r fa: ff, iii? M 4' , .' Iv. , .W '1 .lf . 'lf . , ,tk Wag, 4 V 2 A ,-ug, ,. .I . , , 41 'f.,. i gr Ct., 123 Mr Citizen . . What do you think of those U of A students? LaDonna McHaney The Record Shop "I like the University. I'm still here because my husband's still in school." "About 7072 of our business is students. Mer- chants appreciate the students." Glenn Graham john Deere "The University's Agri, Animal Science, and Agronomy have john Deere equipment and they buy parts." "We employ students." "I'd rather not comment on the University being here, you'll have to ask Charles Mclllwain, the manager." Charles Mclllwain john Deere, Manager "The University out here has, well, it doesn't help us in this particular business as it does other john Deere Dealers in the state. Students pick information up here and then go home and are more likely to buy john Deere." "The university is good for northwest Arkansas. We do a lot of business with companies in other states because of them knowing about Payette- ville." "You better believe l go to the games. I put on my piggy tie and go." I. L. Helm "I like the university. I don't go with students being snobs. Kids are people. There's no genera- tion gap in my family-both my boys told me so." Melton Newman Fayetteville policeman "The police aren't as connected with the univer- sity as they were two years ago. The kids are quieter. Money may be different. The move to off-campus makes it quieter. The students have a freer reign." "The students are better. We have less trouble out of them. They have less money. The kids are the same-there's no difference in the kids than there was 4 or 5 years ago-when I was a kid." "They're bad on the weekends." "Money is the root of all evil. If they don't have it, they can't raise cane." Tim Stewart Gallery of Homes "I wouldn't like to see some of them armed fsecurity policej, and you can't arm one and not the other." "I couldn't make my living without students. Students do buy homes." "Any town has advantages with a university. Without the university, there wouldn't be much of a Fayetteville. The Mall wouldn't be here. Springdale would, maybe." Portfolio: rt Mer ipol 1 , xozmg 3 55:34 'N Q wa .Q5ifQ - -2- ' ,S P T-r V M. - .,, - 4 . iv' ,wt N f ' pi -P' -1N3"O.'g 5.1-- ,V wx.: QV 1 , WEMQ: Ee, .EN -mf -:ff:'f4af,i -:w:M.,5'+ - '.'m-2-V-:ze-1' -lfsigei' f -s,gf,5,.4 -34:-gf,,,1 ,1ui'?f..fa5g,!532lgQ 29 fgirfag-gg, 9- , 3' -Tx' -F5 Q- 5' --04", Peg' .H :'A71f,.-.:,f2'gg,. fi - Qs 4 f ff! 5.5Z1L1fiSff,- w-i2?2'S----.-f7:,- 2 o nz-g. 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K Q x . s : .5 1 , 5 vi 'R xx w -was-:-' - -. -.5 , . .. .- :- N w Nj 'X .N 1 1 1 I "9 vl S-Y-'51 ..-'S : 1625-Z'-w':h. , ' Sham-f,a.'-Q ""' ' L .n 2 nxinilgnffyil! 'Q 'fi'.:,-.,,,Q'-:::+-:g.Q:,q:3g::--:-,- - n '. :g ' Fx. N: ..- -ff ' '-.Er I-'-:,:,, Wg. " XR F R, 1 . Psa- 3-'-wx ' ' 2 '- , 5 , 0 s . .x .s l bfi. ,5 A f. V, i- 'kgkixliiq V-H - , i. -iv-Yam AH- - w- v -ng .ff ,grYj..,,,' V , i ' 'vw fvyrffbf-s-" 'Iwi-l'54Jg,g, 341. A Everything But Students Now that the new has worn off the library it has become one of the most sterile places on campus. Built at a cost of 53.6 million, it came equipped with everything a librar- ian could ask for-study carrels, group study tables, typing rooms, seminar rooms, audio-visual rooms, you name it. It has everything but students. Sure there are the everr present pledge classes and the long lost friends who never run into each other except in the library. But what about the serious student? Who wants to look at gray walls and carpet for hours on end? Studying is bad enough but studying at the library is even worse. You can smoke only in assigned rooms, you must walk the length of the building to go to the bathroom, you can't eat anything with a noisy wrapper, and you have to walk all the way to Brough just to get a coke. So if you want to leaf through a new magazine or crash for a couple of hours it's a great place to go. If you have to study you may as well stay home. 'L4ZZ0v W "I-. Vs if"fIcfnL:rzA::1 "' 'fr' "V4x'v1 M,,,f?1Qd9" ,,1x,f.,gns,. Q . W 91-,LQAKH ,F EEEYEWfE5fW'J5 V f 1. ""'1s-t 5 , bw -,2 T Q' 6' lp -ag 4 . Q., A gig, 1 vw b Z' .M I, -' H,3,fw5w' J- : ' ' 66 'SK ,Y sJs""" Q X765 g'v'!4i W ,Ll V ' A' .E, 'Q11t , gy-m 1 'sp x 'La ef "" si Y 54-f 55" was ,fi Q ww 1- .UM ' . I'Tf:'f 5fJ f i ilag, jing. Cixi Q- 7 - ' 5?l!Q,g:n'I" - ' , ' 5'j'3MgL2'f' ' ' A wr, J, ,Z ww , A 5 , .. . W' ' ,X .V ,QKQ f-.jfs-X gfyf A ., 3: 1 , ,VV,,,. ,. 'fm - 23:2 , M 52, 53 Mg, - R .4-'.. 1 ,Y Wm ' 3-rw -4'i'1'4 - fcffrfh . 53' T 5 :.-sl . X- Q ' 51:35 , .wt l 9 . I - A1 fo f? 4 if .75 1 5 f an '15 ,.. A . 3 - 2 , 23 'wo' ,V - USA I 1 as YL QQ FK if K g B it '. 9 'YS A CA. A .ff IW'M'I3f s A , I l f . 1 Ov vw' A 5 1 gl iw' ., , I ' N 6-'sta x' 1 I, X '. h....,-,..,,,,,,,,,,,,m,,,,, ,. v 1 5, A ' -my x 2234 ,G X 'mango 'fir Q x 6 ., we , A! 'fir h gi, 'NK gl Bunch of the Guys 4 I gf ,YJ 114' I' S. 175,-1 it iw! U 1 'A' kin NIU 'I 'Q inf, -zgy,.'Lg'1' A: 1 X " f'f-'5fiQ?3f5F2'1ff'! Q' 4 ' H3ffJI"" Z:-0' f ' ..-.-,. ,A Ms? .el-2 -xr: 1 ' :M rg' Jinx- -1 " 534.1 .5-Xian -Zffif, fr' gQf,g,,-825. .tif 'J' ,g". . .1., A uh' .A .gli .143 ,gg,.gZ., x--,.1 . it 4,7 -r Lrrff' -2" ,. , I . X . 2 i 1 I ' r I w ' r 1 N t ! f g , E 1' 4 1 , , 5 1 ? Nl 2 9 1 I . . . 1 Q! N QW I x W . is X 1 iq wx -X , I y 1 M . ' lf 1 1 V ,A ' S , f f f A li i f 4 I, I i ! i-Q 2 6 , J ? ! 1' 4 F 1 . LT, If i X r f A , ' 4 ' I! f I ll 1 , .I HV, I 1 5' , w I N I J , I 1 1 1 V W V N I N1 I Q , ! 4 4 'I H 4 I 1 H ii f x 5 i w ' I 1 I Q Q ' , ' I 2 4 5 1 49' c I ,WZ .ggi , f 3 Eg- Q . I ff" """"'+.x Y -X' 'N'xN.... , ,f f ' - -A---X , x 3. L- " 1. ' gf? ul The Vanity of Young Men Theirs is a casual grace. A cigarette held loosely in the fingertips, shirt sleeves folded above the wrist. They have the poise of pol- ished fruit. No less conspicuous in a crowd, their carriage suggests self confidence and a potential for greater things. People often stop them for directions. What makes them so attractive is the keeness of their minds. To them the sound of one hand clapping is half the sound of two. They never question the question. It is pleasant to be among their company. Watch them shaking hands or throwing a football. You would like to buy them a cup of coffee. 4 'V 'I bw uhm -3, ' ' pg yn u .,, v,W , -5 -1 . N AQ gghrh , I In , T! .. 5 'i A xl x u fx? 'N X QF' 'Y 1 5 - -va f ' 4 . ' As .vi ' Q. 2. 1 , - , . gm.. , 'fm . Q . , . Q ': , M... W t 1, ., Y e' "" .13 X 'U NJ sv 1 , ' ,. ... it A 4 Q' E Q 5 3, ' , . , if Rf L" 'Ws' f 2-.f ' . I 1. rr. I z ' 4 S ' gb 5 , A k gg' VF? mf ' ,we a E if-4 - .Q-3, in 1 'hi -f '.-F ,"."7,"wf .Q l' 'A ' 2' 'FN Wig N Qwssfxi Q0 PARKING fix ,Q ERARTMENT GF . Q f FfU5L!C ,5AEE IY 5 I X jx p':.'. -,vs if A 134 f A ff, v W. .Q 4 'X s 1 an i V vifpgnh 'Q .Q V lvvfzh ,. - 'Jw' i 'A of"'."""fQfAr!a-Q . MW , ,' V Y, "u v ,X Q-qi-gg- .,u1,.. .- v,5 ff' 4 , ,,. 1' 'Ar r 'tiff' -'sf " , I , ,gi .1 .,,.- A A .M .4-Q., FY! 12. ll ' I I been workm on de railroad ll , -mwwiv Wifi'-,gwlzla ,y X . .- 1, Wifi? 'yi' 514.3395 "T " ww Y' A , Pane ,y , ...we just thought we would give a little Credit IO the construction guys who do so much for our little campus. . .they really do try to make the campus pretty and all new-looking so that the alumnus will think we have such marvelous progress...you've probably seen these guys when you tried to walk somewhere and the sign says "Stop! Detour Ahead!" which means to take the long way around. . .and the sign won't be there for a day or two, but rather for a couple of months. . .not only have you seen these guys, but probably heard them, also.. .like with the lawn mowers during the busiest class hours.. .well, anyway, we just thought we would give them a little credit. . 'I ! l W5-'Sf' - n f V' X' fans-aw i i 1 Q.. -2 . ,g , . X? ,L 1. 1 - . 'J ' Milf f. fi' X37 'i,,Q+.f'fL 2 'fi-' f Q. :',:v'9223 s!':P'?1T,' '.,,:,' ,'..,',f. i ," 5-.QQ Y. fix: +,gQ.'-ifzklgqyi' "gf, 5.5 Nz W , :fi .f nf M- sa-is Q . A P 2 Ufagiiwfifi f',4f"Q1"' " ' Q? ggixfi ifdgz 54- L ggi, w if , F, Ev'-vgfvijj, ' -wt,.QP.Bv-NJ 4 4,5 My q'if.a,:!':.,Qq a'. ff,,f,..:f"-gs w.,"4 4 '1 gym e - ,M 0 ,.."'Si:i 'f jak ' 1 i4'.'fffK.5, 3, ' V '56 Liv: .Af ' 0 Q5 5 ' s if M... H152 Iv , 4549! 351 " At Ease, Lad ! " "Fall out menl' '...' 'Er, I mean men AND WOMEN!" For the first time in the history of the University women are participating in both the Army and Air Force R O.T.C. programs. Contrary to popular belief the girls aren't involved solely on the laurels of Women's Lib. Their reasons include scholarship opportunities, advancement, travel, self-dis- cipline, meeting people and "because I'm an Air Force brat." Their problems include "language barriers," sexual discrimination, misunderstanding and "double takes" when viewed in uniform. Pictured on these two pages are the eight girls - five in Air Force and three in Army - and their comments. Hazel Wiley, freshman, Air Force: "I plan on being an engineer in aerospace, and I feel that's a good way to get in it. You also get to meet a lot of people and travel." Cindy Benton, freshman, Air Force: "I wanted to join the service and I thought R.O.T.C. at college would give me a good idea of what it's like. It also makes you feel a part of the group." Deborah Castanedo, sophomore, Air Force: "You get different reactions. Girls are startled about it. It' was hard for my boyfriend to accept the fact I was in the same or- ganization and was persuing the same career as he was." Ramona Paschall, freshman, Air Force: "Sometimes we have an identity crisis. In lectures they say "you men" and "you boys." That is being remedied though." Holly Graves, freshman, Air Force: "I don't.want to feel committed right now. I looked at R.O.T.C. and felt it offered the most for me. Most girls feel if you're in R.O.T.C. that you've signed your life away, but that's not true." Vicky Smith, freshman, Army: "The R O.T.C. program offers the opportunity to someone to achieve rank if he wants a career in the military." Valerie Hatfield, freshman, Army: "I want to be a cop. I realize it's going to be hard. Army would be a good ex- perience. R.O.T.C. gives you a slight preview of what the Army is going to be like." Lisa Davis, freshman, Army: "The first day of class my instructor asked me if I was in the right place. I said "yes" and sat down. That day they didn't really know how to act. But after that I was really amazed at the way we were accepted. Most of the wierd stares come from people down on military. That doesn't bother me in the least." 'il f T rx 'F Y W , as Q .w ! 9 1 J I ,JM . ff iff 22, K' g.',g1? - ,Z 2? I WY! S295 Q if , Ask if ,. ,. 'V fr Q. , 5, V -1 fd , " . i ,f . an F M: f f .x fin. A " A , V, ,H ,... ,W , , MN, f a-w , . . ,L f. . 9 7 Lkmf- av' yy , Vw? ,, , ' 1? 'f vgogigif , 1 A ,ge -f K . Q! L Q MQ! 1 8 Zi' rs. , 1, 0 0 h - V ,pw-ffw.,. , r C is AJ.: 1, ,4 i Y ,h'i p ,', ,fb ,y 4' H Q. .. '- - Q 1 Q " pm 9 , Y X V u 5 5' x W Y f , ,ww , .. ' 'w,,,h ' X' W ,, 5.5, , 3,1-fi . 1, . , , ...M -1 W , X- f J. ,ww W 'W rw 'ff : 1 , ' .-5 A . , A? ,fy ' r 'gg iii if 1 ,s . I' , 7 1 l,.'A'yf. ug ,, ! I N -A , Q JA," f 5 . M. , , 454 ,k .,., ,. . n , M, 1 Ji - f ' N 1 V1 , W, . f 5 X fc uf Jia Sw , vi' f At, if X4 at 'Q 1 ,u, if 'V ' ff?" Q 1 5 352 zz, ff- Q4 5 4' 1 Z Di Q :Wm f Us ' Q. 4 K J 4, 4,1 ' 'JH . P Q. , Q 'fr 'K x if in 7 1 'fs A A , f 2y..' '45 , , 1' ryf A. X : 'i' aah' -f ' ' f l .X we 'W 11' Y U 'idk , , x '9- a 41' P l n i I 1 ' f 'N xf I I How to get creamed ll "Wow, some friends you guys turned out to be! A guy pledges and everybody in the dorm sets up a big send-off. Studies are left by the way-side, and everybody gets in on the fun. Shaving cream, rope and a strip-down are in order. The language gets raunchy as legs and arms are twisted and pulled. Need- less to say, the victim is much less than willing. X1 Y 1.5 fiiha L Q lv hhh! .. Xi -vacw Al. I I if I is 1 l i I Y V I i David W. ullins: Th Buildin Years It sounds like a storybook tale-how a college student one day becomes president of his alma mater. But it hap- pened. David Wiley Mullins was graduated from the Univer- sity in 1931. A country boy from Sharp County, he worked odd jobs, including in the library to supplement his finances. Mullins demonstrated his scholastic ability by major- ing in mathematics and in history and political science. At the University he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, national honor society. He holds a Master of Arts degree from the University of Colorado and a Doctorate from Columbia University. Mullins' career as an administrative educator began at Auburn University where he served eleven years as Executive Vice President. His numerous honors include 1969 Man of the Year in Arkansas and past president of the National Association of State Universities and Land- Grant Colleges, possibly the highest honor a public uni- versity president can receive. His fourteen years at the University have not been perfect, although he describes them as "very gratifying. " During his administration more buildings and facilities have been constructed on the campus than under any other president. He has been criticized for his lack of availability and lack of contact with the students. Many have com- mented that the only time they see him is at the home- coming game when he kisses the queen. In spite of the criticism, there is no denying his success as an administrator and educator. Upon retirement as president, Dr. Mullins will serve on the faculty of the College of Education. .Maybe he just happened to be in the right place at the right time. Maybe his storybook life has been just that. And anyone who had been in the same position would have beenjust as successful. Who knows. One thing is for sure. David Wiley Mullins was there at that "right time, " he did it, and did it well. RAZORBACK: Let's start with an issue, like campus parkin . MULLTNS: We are in bad shape on parking. But we are much better off than many of our sister institutions. It is difficult to increase the parking space. We have thought about constructin high-rise parking space, but it simply is not economicaiy feasible. Apparently we would have to charge at least 5100 a year per car to amortize the cost of high-rise parking. I doubt if we could get money from the legislature for this purpose, so we would have to pay for it out of fees of some sort or something like that. RAZORBACK: Do you forsee making it against Univer- sit rules for freshmen to have cars on campus? MULLINS: I have always o posed that. As you know, freshmen have been driving fldr two or three years before they come to the University, and then you would be telling them they can't have a car. I just don't believe that is the way to treat them. Another thing is that a lot of our fresh- men are veterans. The class he is in does not always in- dicate the age of a student. A number of institutions, par- ticularly small colleges, have tried this policy of not letting students have cars. It hasn't worked well and I doubt if it would work well at the University of Arkansas. We have to remember, too, that a majority of our students live off campus and commute a considerable distance. So I just don't think it would be fair to students and I don't think it is practical to restrict cars on campus. RAZORBACK: In addition to the parking, you have also come under fire from the student press regarding the cut- tin down of trees. MSLLINS: I understand I made The Grapevine this week. RAZORBACK: Yes sir, and a pretty good job. But we are curious if the attacks are because you are at the top of the ladder. MULLINS: Yes, I suppose so. I really didn't know they were planning that particular parkin area when the stu- dents approached me. The plans haf not come to my at- tention. I investigated the matter and was advised there would be only two trees taken out and they were both diseased elm trees. So the parking spacefwouldn't be de- stroying trees of any great value. Yet, I want to make it clear I'm anxious to conserve trees whenever possible. Incidently, some of the things students come in to see me "Yon have to allocate responsibility." about, as in this case, have not come to my desk at the time I am approached. RAZORBACK: ls it possible for you to know all the de- tails? MULLINS: No, the University can't operate that way. You have to allocate responsibility. Otherwise, a lot of work necessary to the functioning of the University just could not be accomplished. Fortunately, those who help me carry the responsibilities of the University are able and dedicated. RAZORBACK: How does it affect you when the student press comes out with an attack? MULLINS: Well, as you might imagine, I don't partic- ularly like such attacks. However, I don't think a great deal about them. I do ive thought to what students say in the press or when tftey come to see me in the office. They have a ri ht to express their views and they often make highly vafuable contributions. However, it seems to me the press does not always have all the facts concerning matters they cover. RAZORBACK: What keeps you up at night worryin ? MULLINS: Well, I don't stay up worrying, particularqy. RAZORBACK: You don't? MULLINS: No, not too much. I do the best I can and then hope that things work out in a reasonably satisfactory manner and, in general, they do. RAZORBACK: This interview will come out in May, so perhaps our next question will be solved between our ques- tions in November and then. What are your feelings about Senate Bill 4312? MULLINS: Well, this is a question that has been before us for a very long time, and I think that the sentiment now is pretty well solidified. Many people feel it is a bad thing to permit students who are 21 and over to drink in private- that is, in the privacy of their own rooms. Many are just constitutionally opposed to drinking anywhere. There are approximately 580 students livin in University hous- ing who are over 21. I really don't know how much dif- ference that would make in terms of the amount of alcohol consumed. Some reports from other institutions indicate it makes very little, if any difference. But, there will be people who will be quite vocal in their criticism of us, should the change be made. I do consider the consump- tion of alcohol as a very serious problem. , RAZORBACK: We understand that pre-registration was instituted to accommodate an increase in enrollment. Due to the fact the enrollment has declined, does the University still plan to continue in this area? MULLINS: I don't know about the long-range plans, but enrollment has not decreased to any alarming degree. Therefore, I think we should continue to have pre-regis- tration, and we should utilize the new technology which is now available to improve our system. RAZORBACK: Planners have predicted a big increase in enrollment. Why has this not materialized? MULLINS: The enrollment growth is slowing across the country. It results from a number of developments. One is the elimination of the draft which has tended to cause a number of students not to go to college who otherwise, perhaps, would have enrolled. Also, there's a tendency now or some students to postpone college for a year or two after they graduate from high school. Furthermore, the establishment of vocational-technical schools and com- munity colle es has adversely affected the enrollment in many of the four-year colleges and universities. Then there is the availability of funds for student aid. This aid, for such things as student loans, grants and work stud , is not as adequate as in revious years. However, in the Iong run, it's my opinion tgat enrollment will continue to grow, although not as rapidly as in the past ten to fifteen years. RAZORBACK: A few years ago there were only seven organizations dependent on student services allocations. Now there are at least fifteen. The total amount of money available hasn't really changed. What are your feelings regarding the amount of money available and Student Senate's role in the disbursement of those funds? MULLINS: Well, the University has a limited amount of money that can be used for activities carried out by student service organizations of this type you're talking about. We are always glad to listen to students, but under the law, any time the money comes through the University, we have to account for it. If the number of organizations increase, it may not be possible to fund the programs of various groups as adequately as might be the case with fewer or- ganizations. I sus ect those in charge of most pro rams at the University-whether student or non-student-fizel their procgrams are underfunded. I think it's a good thing that stu ents participate in decision making on this matter of allocating funds to student service grou s. But, this still will have to be carefull monitored, and fiyinds will have to be used and accountedyfor, and pro rams will have to be evaluated. In fact, under the law, tlge administration and the Board of Trustees are responsible for the expenditure of funds. RAZORBACK: How is the money system for student services allocations established? A 3 " IM MULLINS: ln developing the guide lines used by the Department of Higher Education, in recommending to the legislature the funds needed for each of the colleges and universities in the State, so much per student for student services is included. The smaller institutions receive a somewhat higher recommendation than do the larger in- stitutions. The philosophy seems to be that with a larger student body, the amounts per student needed for student serviced is somewhat less than in the smaller institutions. There is, in my opinion, a need to increase the allowance for student service programs at all the institutions. This is especially true in view of the growing inflation which means that it costs more each year to do what we did the year before. RAZCRBACK: Will the new president have to spend as much time as you have with fund raising and public rela- tions? MULLINS: I would not wish to speak for the new pres- ident. However, I am reasonably sure he will give a good deal of attention to what might be referred to as public relations. Certainly, most all groups in the state are in- terested in the Universit . The University is a state-wide institution with responsibilities in every county and com- munity in the State. Therefore, it is necessary that the officials at the University be in constant touch with the eople in the state. Since I came to the University, we have had a policy of holding one or more meetin s in each coun- ty every two years. We take a program to tEem and make a presentation of some twenty-five to thirty minutes, after which we invite comments and questions. These meetings, in eneral, are well attended. They are open to the lpublic ant? we are particularly anxious to have county o ficials and other county leaders, as well as our alumni and par- ents of our students. I would anticipate that the new pres- ident will continue to carry on a meaningful public rela- tions program. RAZORBACK: This development program . . . "I do the best I can and hope that things work out . . " IVIULLINS: Yes, that is a pro ram I am very ratified with. It has been highly successfgil. This program Pas pro- vided more than S3 million in funds from private sources which have been raised to stren then various areas of the University programs. We use tfiis money for such pur- poses as attracting and holdin distinguished faculty, roviding some badly-needed scfiolarship funds, and to help us in the construction of buildings for which state funds are not readily available. For example, one donor, a few months ago, provided 5100,000 for scholarships. Eight endowed chairs in four different colleges on the Fayetteville campus have been established in recent years. In the near future, the University will announce two addi- tional gifts totalling !1S350,000 to endow three more chairs on the Fayetteville campus. No single step could be more important in strengthening the caliber and prestige of the University's academic program than the decision we made in the mid 1960's to establish a Development Office and a Development Council of prominent leaders in Arkansas and throughout the nation. This whole program will be increasingly important in the future. I'm confident it will add a margin of excellence to the University. RAZORBACK: What are some of the specific areas where the President's responsibilities will increase? MULLINS: I think that it is true that they will keep in- creasing because I think people are oing to demand more of the University in the years ahead, and if they demand more, then you have got to relate to more people and more groups. I think probably one of the challenges of the fu- ture will be the expansion of Continuing Education where you operate programs throughout the state to which peo- ple wil come who are in refresher courses. This is happen- ing in Law and Medicine and Business and other areas. I think the University Without Walls will be the going thing for the future. And, the more you extend the boundaries and the areas in which the University operates, the more responsibilities the administrators will have, and of'course, the president, I am sure. As a matter of fact, as any insti- tution grows and takes on added rograms, the respon- sibilities of the Board of Trustees, the President and other major officials increase. These responsibilities already have increased enormously in the past fourteen years, which, among other things, have included the mergers of several other campus. With the demand for expanding the Medical Center and its pro ram, the demands for increasin in- service education, tEe desire of business, professionalg and agricultural grou s to have the assistance of the Univer- sity, the responsigilities of both the President and the board of Trustees and other officials will continue to grow. RAZORBACK: Uo you think the President of the Univer- sity should try to have more of a relationship with the students than has been in the past? MULLINS: Yes, this is the thing you always want to emphasize. I think, however, in spite of what some stu- dents might think, that there is a closer relationship be- tween students and the administration, including the pres- ident, than is the case in most universities of our size. In other words, I think I probably know a larger percentage of students than most residents of an institution this size. I have always practiced? an open-door policy in connection with the student body. I have constantly endeavored to keep in touch with the programs and interests of the stu- dents. I meet with students at every opportunity. insofar as I know, no student has ever been turned away who desired to see me. He may not have been able to see me im- mediately, but I am sure he did not have to wait too long. RAZORBACK: What dot you feel has been your greatest achievement? MULLINS: Well, while it is difficult to single out one achievement as the greatest, there are some of which I have been particularly proud. However, let me say that it is seldom, if ever, that any si nificant achievements can be attributed to an single individual. Our progress comes from the leadersfii and participation of many individuals and groups. I think that the thing that makes me rouder than anything else is the fact that we have been able to in- crease the quality of the faculty a great deal. We have added a lot of fine new faculty members. We have improved the librar facilities. I think the library is one of our real ac- complishments. The library is at the heart of any academic program and I think the library we now have is an out- standing facility. Of course, I would place the top priority on people, because no university can be better than the faculty and staff that serves it. This is why we have been deeply concerned by the critical situation facing the Uni- versity in attracting and holding faculty and staff due to the very low salary levels. This was a very critical situa- tion when I assumed the residency. Since then we have reached more competitive lyevels in our salaries, and I feel it has meant a great deal to the University. I think we have achieved much in the expansion of our programs at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. As a matter of fact, this is of great importance in meeting the needs of the state, by providing a wide range of undergraduate and graduate programs. RAZORBACK: Has the University gained any ground financially? MULLINS: While we still have a good ways to go, I think the University is much better financed than it was fourteen years ago. I remember when the total University budget in 1960 was approximately S14 million. During the current year, it is in the neighborhood of S94 million for all cam- puses and all as ects of the Universit programs. I should say, however, that less than half og, the budget for the University comes from funds rovided by the state. Not only our library, but all our fjacilities have been greatly improved. Approximately sso million has been spent for plant improvement and new construction on the Fayette- ville campus alone since 1960. Presently, on all cam uses of the University, a construction program which will? cost from S40 million to S545 million is in the planning stage or under wa . We have also tried to keep our construction program wefl balanced. That is, we have tried to provide modern facilities not onl for the teaching program, but for research, library facilities, and student services. The development of a multi-campus system by the University in the past few years is a significant thing, and I believe in the long run it will contribute greatly to the progress of both the University and the state. RAZORBACK: What was some of the resistance you en- countered in trying to move forward? MULLINS: Well, I will say it was extremely difficult in my early years at the University to secure the funds neces- sary to increase faculty and staff salaries and employ ur- gently needed new personnel to care for the rapidly rising enrollments. Also, the physical facilities of the University were woefully inadequate and the provision of these facili- ties has not been the easiest thing in the world to accom- plish. I will always feel that one of the most trying prob- ems we had at one time was in trying to get the voters to approve a S60 million bond issue for the hi her education construction. It failed. That was in 1961, the year after l came here. This slowed our progress greatly in terms of meeting the urgent needs of the University, and further- more, construction costs have increased a great deal since then with the result that the state has had to pay more for this construction than it otherwise would have had to do. I-Iowever, we did concert a lot of eople during the debate on the bond issue to the feeling that something had to be done, and so the legislature did move to provide funds for building purposes after that. But, nevertheless, the dis- approval of that issues was one of the most disappointing times we have had. RAZORBACK: In what areas will we be moving into shortly? MULLINS: Well, first of all, there is certain other con- struction we have to finance. We need to finance the ren- ovation of Old Main. We are moving toward the construc- tion of a new Business Administration building and an addition to the Pine Arts Center. We will renovate the old Union building in order to accommodate the Psycholo y Department. Another area is in physical education faciTi- ties and also for intermural facilities. We are very limited in that respect. In terms of programmin , I think we have a great opportunity now that we won't Ee growing so fast. We have the opportunity to strengthen our rograms. We ought to have an adequate faculty in terms ofjnumbers and we ought to be able to devote more funds to upgrading programs than we have been able to do in the past. This is where I think the state can improve the system of higher education without feeling the costs so keenly, because not girowing very raipidly means that a small increase would o a lot of goo in terms of upgrading the rogram. Of course, there will be certain new programs neecljed, if we are to keep abreast with the future. RAgORBACK: What does the future hold for the Univer- sity. MULLINS: Let me say this: I look forward with great optimism to the future of the University. This institution is an excellent position to consolidate the gains of the past and to concentrate on the improvement of quality in its programs in all areas. And I really feel this can be done without placing an undue burden on the state and its fi- nancial resources. You and I know that Arkansas is still the Land of O ortunity-and I believe the University of Arkansas shouljdjcontinue to be the University of O por- tunity. It will continue to increase its stature in order to rraakei even greater contributions to the state in the years a ea . "I look with great optimism to the future of the University." i N w 1 4 w 1 W 1 w N w l I w I w I Q4 'l, if I x L I V ,N . ll i f I t u A1 W i 1 1 I I 1 147 H A4 ww, Su if 7-Q 'A s rgwf I 0-X g'4'3ma:fu'w - f-4 - , ,fs Sb x 5 X ffxat Peopl wx' ga I 1 4 Q x 'e , f 14- K -Vw. ' L ' X . Y f' w '55 - 4 5-a- ' N475 gv-.. l s , 9 is. S 'ff 14 150 A-41 ti T27 F l "lf: flu, 'x"',"a u"Q' url" Q"o"a' ' ',,o.v, l 4 lI"' '.'u I '.,,galuis,,-s-0' ,.nll":ff" 12:1 ll ",.v:,i,u1f'1f. gui" ,n' n1il':' U' Hu ul! l,a1"',,u ', 'annul n,r,'U'n,. 1: 'inure 11, :l:".,u ' ,qgql ion 4 Q u .un sn 1 ,'l'Il':.:l :..al' ,Nl all' ..,s' Q., n' ,ss ,gal . . 'Oli' 'i!""c ' 0.'n 0' . .4 g!lKb ' 'uf io' ".'.2.-H ','4 .il d!'i ul.fl :fS'a"l " :-'..--- U ' ,s"-2' "vu Humphreys and Yocum dorms gave their own version of the movie, "Amer- ican Graffitif' with a sock hop. i I 1.53-Q 497 fi! N'ifQir:ff , f' Q ' f KZ W-437f??w 'Q-,iff :S 'S Y' 'Q gby, 4 'wif ' DN ,wqbwi fe MEAL AUTPDR1 58 'll 1 '4 z. 4. 1 ,J 1 yy-"3"" ., wwf" -riff' gf 4 ull 'fi nv 4 4 H151 ME Shu P ew Words Editor's Note: We asked Ernie Deane, assistant professor of journalism, for some personal observations, based on his long association with our University and his career as a journalist, soldier, and teacher. He was a member of the UA Class of '34. His comments are addressed primarily to the Class of '74, but we hope they'll prove interesting to all readers of the Razorback. Today's University students see our nation in one heck of a mess. You think this is something new. It's not. There's always a mess of some kind, often uncovered. Even so, Americans today are far better off than they've ever been. Today's college students are the beneficiaries of everything good accomplished throughout mankind's history. You have both the challenge and the opportunity, however, to make things better in the future, if you will. Please accept the challenge. Hope, meanwhile, that your own children a generation from now won't condemn you for the conditions you then present for them to face. While striving for improvements, remember the admonition of the Biblical prophet, "Prove all things, hold fast that which is good." You've been led to believe that today's college genera- tion is wiser in ways of the world than any before you. Not so. Uncertainty and plain old apprehension eat at your heart, just as they have troubled young people throughout times past. Some differences do exist between your genera- tion and mine, however. You've come up under more affluent conditions. You've been exposed to more information, some of it false. You've traveled more. And you do put up a bolder front, but I find this encouraging. Timidity never moved the world and never will. Audacity, coupled with intelligence and imag- ination, always has and always will. You've got a lot to learn about the art of accommoda- tion, or call it compromise if you wish. You'll find it es- sential in all fruitful human endeavors, for there are count- less differences of opinion, of hopes, and of needs. The faster you learn accommodation, the fewer failures and scars you'll suffer. The college generation just ahead of you was misled by false prophets who preached, "Don't trust anybody over 30." And, they said, "Let everybody do his own thing all the time." Many individuals who bought that "Over-30" pitch are now turning 30 themselves, and have already discovered it was phony. As for everybody always doing what he pleases - "his own thing" - that cannot be. Life involves a great deal more "give" than it does "take." Experience will teach you appreciation of basic truths and values. These include the joy of true friendship, and the need to have sympathetic understanding of the other fellow. A happier and more satisfying life will be yours if you help rather than hurt others. Then there's the vital importance of maintaining a reputation for decency and honesty. And, don't discount your duty to your country. Those who shirk this duty don't deserve a country. You're moving away from a close-knit campus com- munity into "the great beyond" - the wide world itself. The realities often are harsh there, and frustrations and heartbreaks are all too frequent. But adversity will cause you to re-examine your value system. It will hasten you on your way to maturity. Along the way if you occasionally stumble and fall, fall forward. You're no doubt wondering, as University seniors have always wondered, whether you've learned anything here that's worthwhile and will prove profitable. Give your- self a few years after graduation in which to test what you've been taught, and to judge those who taught you. Then, if changes to improve our alma mater seem de- sirable, please have the goodness and courage to work for changes. Educational institutions fall into ruts of com- placency and self-satisfaction just as do individuals do. Some administrators, deans, and even learned professors, take to believing their own publicity. Or, they hear only the voices of sycophants. Intelligent, vigorous action by concerned alumni can contribute more to the betterment of our University, and of Arkansas, than you might presently imagine. Let me wish you good fortune in all your honest en- deavors. You'll see a new century well into its first quarter by the time your class reaches the 40th anniversary of its graduation. Hopefully, by then you'll be able to look back with some feeling of accomplishment, not merely on behalf of yourself, but on behalf of others. I have great confidence that you will. -Ernie Deane nb, .4, f 1 arm lg - Vfll, 'WJ' 4, . 35.475 L Y 'X ,, . fx f gif f"f'x.1 ggi' uk ,, 4 P . 'S' 'L ' qv "S . I 1 ff ,1 s xr' if " 2 s , V x Y. , , :a-' --1 ,f if 1 O 531- Q39 D Q1 " , X '-15:7 it A ' N, X F Q X xv: 4, " 1' C 3 . 1gV, ss 'S X 1 Q ., . . ,, ns'- ' Q 'I ml v Kg ,v ' ' My 'iff X I l - l .4 ,ii . a ' ., . rin: ,S ' iv n 1, " ' , v - 1 1 T54 Q. 'L ' . - .1 n E '4 1 . Xi, 2 -I A . fi -5 +31 1 f' 5 ' W , I-N v 'e LF L F D- ' .v - 9 . f' f P x s v nc i I, n u., I I ,.'.-'S tw - we sv, o'l , .- , u 5 Final Frolics Football is not the only game the U of A can play. Theres a fun sport, played for an entire week, that takes place twice a year-it's called Final Frolics. This is a university game played by students, but in the past, students have suffered a disadvantage in not hav- ing a set of rules for playing. To balance that situation, here are the official rules for the unofficial games of Final Frolic . . . OBIECT: The object of the game is survival. The players ti.e. studentsl meet seemingly unsurpassable obstacles, and must, to the best of their-ability, fwhether this be through skill, chance, or cheatingl overcome them in order to finish. QNOTE: Finishing is not necessarily synonomous with winningj I1 To win, a player must maintain, or still more challeng- ing, improve his classroom status as recorded by letter grades. A letter grade of "A" is worth four points while "F" is worth zero. RULES: 1. Everyone is a player for stuclentj. All players are issued a plastic card and a number that automatically enters him in Final Frolic. QNOTE: This card also entitles, the player to participate in other university games such as Registration, Cro Through the Proper Channels, and Stand In Line. See specific game for detailsj. If a player chooses not to participate in F.F. tin truth, an impossibility since he is already in the gamel, he is auto- matically recorded a loser and will probably not be invited back to play many more times. 2. The week-long game is played ill during the Christmas party season and Q25 in spring, when the player's mind is especially keyed to books. 3. F.F. is essentially composed of test taking. Thus the player is provided with the opportunity to demonstrate how much he has learned during the semester andfor how much he can fake it. Tests are administered by several fig- ures of authority, in this case called professors. tOther variations on this noun are also suitablel. Test taking will make or break, so to speak, a player. One semester of work will not save a player if he fails his tests. Ho, ho! PREPARATION: Fun and strategy enter here! There are - several options open to the player. He can: i A. Keep up with assignments during the semester, before ' the actual game begins, and devote his time to study so , that when playing F.F. his chances of finishing and pos- sibly even winning are increased to as much as 30-40011. B. Attempt one semesters work in one night-.521 chance of winning, .OSLZJ chance of finishing. C. Smile alot and pray between card games and beers- 1O0fZ1 chance of survival, .5475 chance of winning. ADDED ATTRACTIONS: Added attractions to F.F. in- clude panic, exhaustion, nausea, and hysteria. QNOTE: Not all players acquire these features, but those who have the real feel of the game do.J FINAL NOTE: Players are reminded that despite the em- phasis placed on Final Frolic as a matter of pass or fail, it is only a game and good sportsmanship is appreciated. 5 l l ffrom the 1972 ROYAL PURPLE, Kansas State University! I 159 L L. L. .J L... .J L.. L. L... 11 I S I A I i 'L 1. W lv I -A W li A I1 N 'e .gi ,I xx s I g fi? I3 I I 1 w 79s. 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" 1 W H, A .av-M . 1 Ronald Harris Susan Harris Russell Hawkins Constance Hendrix Candace Henry Wendy Henry Janet Hildbold William Hill Wayman Holland Mark Hollingsworth jennifer Hopkins jan Hudson Gail Hyatt Philip Hyatt Karen Imhoff William Irwin Steven Jackson William james Richard jenkins Christy jones Ieanie Kattan Marsha Kelley Jeffery King Richard Knight Patti Kymer Randall Lewis Steven Lilly Nancy Lyons john Mallory Charles Mann Madeline Marquette Trudy Maslonlca Barbara McBeth Danny McConnell Karen McDonald Kay McDowell William McNeil Dian MCSpadden Deborah Meek William Melchior . 'W ,Afro is he yi ,gr . 16' in a. it if - GN. . V I s 'sid ,N , I. 1 JW r 1. ' 35. 5 Q , t ,ulyw Q52 M x 1 -, V g . 1 -f ,-Vg-'14-112311 V Q r mfg vi i E . ,ia , 1' ' ,i .- 'i . 5. ks. ali I 195 ps. Ox G- Yr rv' N X XX , s WJ YYQ, IVA N WA if 2 " . l 'Y JY?" ..r ' 93 .' :' 11" X-4.,..,vv' 491 ,, :ua f YQ' WW 1. my .JW uf ,WV v c . 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Patricia Flanigan Terri Freedle 1 C Judy Fringer David Garrett t james Gillespie Patrick Hagge Marilyn Hall Bill Handshy firing' 5 f fi ,l , I 'nv' C it. inf i ,Y , f- . , is 4 'f 1- ' ' Q- .41 ' ' iv . li ,I -1- ' ,fu ...aaa an --.Hull ag WN lt' MTV gr .. r'1r 2 l .xx ,ay-4. 2 if raffr or 4 A ., A ' ' wi W .-., l H I B4 aw' ,y .. r fy V .,,f ',', t,', 3 f A W' ' I t if li' V 1 rira f-V ,fur Q ' W1 gs., 4 ' I L , ,A W Q ir, '- 1, 2 1 'an V '. f., """ xg X A, " :wu t ii ag, W ss . is is "'. ., v,5!,:A'f.' .--",a 'i 'P v r- if via? ...Y , , . 1 , ,Vid ,pi K 9 . iw. , , f fy ' V y ' C lv ff" nw fl' ,Ar . . -an f WQ5' DAM? y f I' -42 2 I I lyk' Q, A ,J 11- Qt? milk W , .., Y 4' zz 'NKAY' ,sa jwg. 12 9f""'li" 'K 'Q' X . mwx 2 ,FQ 155 1 ,. X X it 3 'T' 1 4 f I xx E s , gay ' ai ff E 5 .. 4-. E r' v ,wi -'UK nfs wwf" .-+....h.. N X ' 2 S 4 -. .nr HPU' 'Un pq :.-:Iii V, Nw Y , F. N ' Q Ugg: X ' ,NX "N xx fx " ' N VN.. 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Y ,V I A 5,A2v,lih3ls.9 , 'I' . 4 '. x 5 1 . a . My john Bingham Calon Blackburn Ronald Burnett Douglas Chunn james Daugherty Boyce Davis Stephan Deen Phillip Dixon Richard Downing Don Eilbotr Paul Feldman John Finley james Gresham Ioe Griffin David Henry Richard Henry Leonard Hoffman Lewis Huddle Q. Byrum Hurst, J Forrest Iacobi I' 4 1 1 1 1 l 1 l 1 l 1 I, 1 K 1 l l l I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l I 3 1 Faber jenkins Albert Johnston Kohn Kearney Joseph Kilpatrick Frederick King john Lee Donald Lingo Robert Marquette james May Devereux McKnight William Meeks McPherson Moore Paul Nicholson Michael Parker James Patterson Kevin Pawlik James Pratt Paul Rainwater Richard Saxton Cary Shelton 0...-Q. Hmm ,pr 'LQ 'W -an ' 'Wg Q 13' " 1 N J in ,Y io. .fi " ja - -' 1 11 aj ,. - m p ,Q was .ex MW r 1: 5 ..?igs,,927f. 4, ,, 1'-Bygg' I 1 1 of , , ,, 'r F 1 ,- 4 . : . 1 ' ,Jff-Rf ' iff " 1 1 ti I I . 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Kemp, Jonesboro Fred Pickens, Chairman, Newport Dr. David Mullins, UA President Roy Ritter, Springd ale Nik Back Row: Fred Vorsanger, Secretary, UA Richard Arnold, Texarkana Dr. Raymond Miller, Little Rock Dr. Loyce I-Iathcock, Fayetteville Hugh Chalmers, Earle George Shankle, Hot Springs Louis L. Ramsay Ir., Pine Bluff in-L-pup... Q Dr. David W. Mullins, President Big Wheels Charles W. Oxford, Executive Vice President .,V. Fred S. Vorsanger, Vice President for Business Palmer C. Pilcher, Vice President for Academic Affairs john W. White, Vice President for Agriculture I 205 'R I if n -V 3 ,,L.::egfw, ' at, V K Eiviffl-A75 4 e - . fi1tc.'5g'Tff , , I -. ' ,, '- pgiii' ww I 0 ., , W .ff m V .f ,f'f4,J51.'1f-3 f ,, I Vn"""f fr - X 1' . ' .N-r" 5' A ' ' 4 t . X 4 ,f vi s 5. M., ,pflir W ,, W M. X , , . . C- , . , ,M 4 yy 'Q f - 'my .' :ex-,qi 9 H , F '7 an f' A-U5 , ,f Wy? 1. fs i,f'1Tf"f5f'jf 2 di: 2124 Lfizmf 'A X , eww ,. if , f M--4 2 U 1 , -f was , ,W . , ,, A A A 4, ,. is -, 9 "il "MMT A e .wigs-. 'L ,,,. . 1 A f e' fffzgf- Q t X, . imp. 5 rl f' Q " , ,' vwyf' 2 mf Q - X, 'Q x .1 M . N' JNAS' Zeng! ff sz. .,s v h 52221 X eff? 1'-3211 awake? if 'if mgajfiegqagdf . s e t 1 gF'f5??Za'f' , 7 M, 5 K fs O. J. Rinnert, Business Manager .,,,-.-, ef-'W Wt"-M "wr, al " A 1 , xx . x 3 1. , XS' W Jack Woody, Treasurer ,-I5 c "-m' ,rs Ne Q 9, .-J 9 25 Mix, 1, , - X. 12342315 . 'W f fa me 3, r O Q Wag, V' S A 5 X gwvrmmt . , , I My L: N x I . -...ve ffl x R I , Nw? ' Q13-3 lf: 1 K Sp NN ' if H-Igfzfffg ': N+43j,f.f2 Dennis L. Chappell, Purchasing Agent M -L awww , A N x 3 i 1, ,Sf ' 'yr 5 up 4 A . w , . Q fl Carl Whillock, Assistant to the President 'w egg! W uf. ! I .-49" wad' 1 if 4 3 3, , 5 ' X E 2 ff if 3 X 3' ' I flats, - af" Jdiisvfw john Rosso, Director of Alumni Association Iohn R. Carney, Controller Q 15 1 ? gy I igygfpvhfxafiq-,w.,fg5g'A Q vm. .,i,,,, . ,, I I 1 . .. fi . is- A P A 2-4'-5 gf: fn,-'X w . 4222 35 03, ,,.' , ,W ,r 'W H , , 3',,-5542: .11 1 mir 2 bfi 1 " 72.31- 4 William W. Hughes, Director of Information E. H. Donaubauer, Director of Development I 207 3 3 ,ef A 5 ,y f J L, 44' 1 Q" ,. I fi JANE BRGCKMAN JEANIE FOX DELTA DELTA DELTA K A K A G A A Order of Omega, President Cardinal Key, Vice President f . Panhellenic, President ROTC Cadette Q Mortar Board KAPPA KAPPA G A Delta Delta Delta, Vice President Order of Omega Panhellenic Rush Book, Editor 'C Kappa Kappa Gamma, Vice President Cardinal Key, President A Alpha Lamba Delta Mortar Board, 2nd Vice President if ROTC Cadettes, Vice President and 1 Acting Commander f ' 1 1 l 1 ' I f I Cheerleading '10 1 1 5, LARRY LOGAN DIANE WOOD OFPCAMPUS DOUG WALLACE Arkansas Traveler, Director of Photography Cardinal Key Razorback, Director of Photography Arkansas Traveler, Editor-in-Chief Angel Flight, Executive Officer Razorback, Editor Blue Key Order of Omega, Secretary Young Democrats Chimes, Vice President University Press Club Kappa Kappa Gamma, 2nd Vice Media Advisory Committee to the President Department of Public Safety , M C MX , , v . ' l Q2 V Hu. 'W 2 l DEBBIE WERNET DAVID GLENN OPPEAMPUS Union Governing Board, Chairperson Board of Publications Cardinal XX ASG Senator , Omicmn Delta Kappa Committee on Student Relations Associated Women Students, Treasurer Sigma Alpha Epsilon, President Student National Education Association, President 3' I S -.: J'fTQ -f . V if 1 :E YQ" "f " -.,,,-V 4 ' v .,,-I, I, LINDA VANDENBERG KAPPA ALPHA THETA 1 Mortar Board Angel Flight Cardinal Key ASG Director of Academics Vice President Association of Childhood Education, IERRY LAWSON QFT 1 ', 'r . 1 f ,V s-V .,,,"9 Q L 1 l an K it nr ,nn 'QR I v 'a 5 -. , ei, rv, X ,,, -, 'Kahn 07 1' . ff I 'ff ,fig 1' , f r A' ,f ff' ff '1 1 r 79 , ,Al I an 1 ! ,f 5' V ' , ny' jf 'fi I fl? g , 'fp' S 771 ,lo ' asf .X I. I fl is r. ,FA , 1 ,, if-qw.. 'Mx I' HOTZ HALL in 'f' KAREN IMHOFF Committee on Status and Needs of Women ASG, Governance Committee Mortar Beard, President Hallmarks, Edlt0l' Kappa Delta ASG, Dil'2Cf0f of COHSUIHCY Affairs Board of Publications, Chairperson Cardinal Key Pine Bluff Merger Committee Arkansas Traveler, Managing Editor Angel Flight ASC Senator Ozark Society Kappa Tau Alpha Razorback, Production Manager sk., 1. C' thaw CLAUDE HAWKINS WMA NU SUSAN MURPHY lnterfraternity Council, Treasurer Order of Omega, Treasurer KAPPA Beta Alpha Psi, Vice President Cheerleading Sigma Nu, President Mortar Board, Secretary Sigma Nu, Treasurer Chimes Kappa Kappa Gamma, Activities Chairman 2l4 . if :Mlm u. ' Q S 5 6 x ,,V,, VANN SMITH PI KAPPA ALPHA il Blue Key, Vice President Committee on Student Relations Q All Student Iudicary f Order of Omega ABC, Board of Government 3x Ml if of fs ii fi ? if" 'Io ..uw'7"' DENNIS A ---- -A KIRKPATRICK TODD GORDON SIGMA NU KARIN TUNNEU- PHI GAMMA DELTA Blue Key Ornicron Delta Kappa Cardinal XX Mortar Board Schola Arkansas Union, Vice president in ROTC Cadette Civic Club, President Leadership Hallmarks, Editor Arts Chairman of Arkansas Union Miss U cf A pagent Cmordinator Resident Assistant Student Representative on Music Advisorg Sports Information Office Commiffee 215 X x. I 'fm-wtf L N-Cass' CONNIE HENDRIX in gl , , Z , V, ' L JT? UHULENDT LARRY GRAHAM ALPHA DELTA PI YOCUM HALL PHI DELTA THETA Mortar Board, Vice President Blue Key . ASC Senator Cardinal K Tau Alpha Epsllon ASC Chairman of Public Relations ey , , APROTC Group Commander f . . Board ofPubl1cations, Secretary Distin uished Mimar Cadet Public Affairs Director for KUAP Order of Omega Resideit Assistant y Liaison for the Governor of Arkansas Phi Alpha Theta 4? A Thy." Uneven- dl ,sr 2 I , fi ALPHA DELTA PI K DENOI All Student Iudicary, Chairperson - Mortar Board Cardinal Key ASG Senator Order of Omega Hullaballo Hostess Panhellenic Blue Key, President Administrative Aide to ASG President Engineering Council, President Arkansas Union, Chairperson of the ASG, Administrative Aide Special Project and Coffeehouse American Institute of Industrial Committee Engineers University Senate Council, Engineering Representative 1 .Q . S f 5" 2 7 4 ff-wifi :fi - 5 RICK O BREIN SIGMA CHI SIGMA N ELLEN STEVENS GRAHAM CATLETT U Greek Week '73, Director PI A PHI University Senate Council lnterfraternity Council, President Olnicron Delta Kappa ASG Senafof Sigma Chi, President Order of Omega, Vice President Blue KW Mortar Board Signa Nu, President Beta Gamma Sigma Beta A117113 Psi Sigma Chi Sweetheart 218 ll1'lf'14fliftfi Milla 'UN- MERED ITH P01-K S . , .A ' ff X A SIGMA CHI M r ar Bo d Caiclinal Kady, Secretary D Kappa Kappa Gamma, President ASG President Chimes ALPHA GAMMA RHO ,,,ueg4ey U of A Recruitment Bureau Order of Omega Agricultural Students Association, University Senate Council President Council of Honors Society, President ASG Senator Alpha Gamma Rho, President Order of Omega --wp-.77 A ,J ,M C 5 ,N , . Y rx JOHN MC CLELLEN BENSON III TRA WSEHQEE UPF CAMPUS DAVID 0. RUSSELL KAPPA KAPPA National Collegiate Players, President Phi Eta Sigma r r Student Director for the Razorback Arkansas Traveler, Associate Editor National Collegiate PlaY9.f5 Speech Tournament, 1973 Board of Publications, Chairman Sm Festival Commlttee Arkie Award for Best Actor of the Year Omicfon Delta KEIPP3 can S 'st 1973 Order of Omega University Senate Council Mt.. ,nr xxX tsl .4 ,W N ."'i Q , , P5 ,,,,, 'A ' : aaa BILL HANDSHY GREGSON HALL IglHAkPresident Univergity Traffic and Parking Committee Tau Alpha Upsilon ASC Senator V' f . ff' ,H ' . ,s' ' lb, if 'I ' 1 ,- 'hm fvvViJL:.- : 'QI' bg, W. niiifv. 1 Iv- lv' D nh V 'qpfy ,.,. . 9 wg' - PTY? . .Y , JG- x. A ' .:f.p, w1 gg ,,, , 1 P-re? f .A Fgsm .i-. I,-. -f ' -L ,Q 19,3- 2 .aw 4:5 X A 4 , my rf fx." '-- -... . ,- , 3.3,-39 . fl' f -e- - s nf' -, 4' , G.. A ., 5 .7 1 . L Q 'elf' Dj ,. ,4 1, w -7,--. k"n L1 1 ' ' '32, in . ,,,A, Y .,.e.., N'.rw fl.: , , 'nw Z v 4 .." 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Vi 2 v--w 1 if . " 1 yi x Vryn, ,vKf,, -:rd .: V: - A ,Q337xj, , j- 291554, f,:w.l: - 11,,9fg.g55? 1 - wa .4 -fm f .fs1.-V-f-f..-:gs-H2-1' -" f..,ff,,fv'ffw. f . 1.453544 ' 5,x,, ,,,, 4, , ,. ' , , f ww wiki' fw fgw ye 1531" 1 'f' 1 ga ,, 3 4 f 4 4 1 ' mi. ' 4 S f 1 KW ,pf . f , , 4,'.w,:A4wv 1 I my ,L Vffawg, f- W ' ,, Iennifer Hopkins June Ford Fulbright 1 I i 1 1 f M one-1 W .' J ...Nui W - .- .r :y 5 I! 32 "' 'fi V, 'PDQ vb- v if 'i 'YUIR ,f- n..' 1-1 gli M' Uv 1:1 ..... "' -' -- '- -- f pl ... mm vu nl it R . - ' Q :Ere ' I' ' A FW 1 ' " .- ,, .9 ' '21 .nf pi ,V ' "' - Q I I F' i 'FY i Standing: Io Ellen Chivers, Teresa Dorman, Kim Crank 5 Sitting: Rosa Hale, Nancy l Jacobi, Robin Salas. 1 1 4 1 1 Q I I 1 t Homecoming Court K I Trudy English Jane Hunt Miss U of A Sorority Pledge Queen ' , 'blk Hazel Shaw Gail Gliver Miss B.A.D. Miss Dogpatch r 5 "aft .bl A-i , .V , M , if Mfg, , B4 H! if ' A 4 V' 'IV' si 1 f vs P an' Sl I-I 5 f I X X f I I 5 1 I 3 5 1 5 . il 4! U 1 if ni ' Z E, 1 i 11 - E1 i -Q -AK A uw 242 ,i .ff 3'-W George Cole Director of Athletics Emeritus I. Frank Broyles Director of Athletics Head Football Coach M. .,,,..,.-M-w. Charles Bidwell Business Manager int, F 'Hn.,,,,,,,J" 1,5 'W w il" Lon Farrell Administrative Assistant Fl WH lr. "s iN 0OL.i,i'? PUNT fa I N Ml' i"fg:"l'44f 1 , W ,s ff' v .. fs-Q.. Q, , "2 ' 5 1. 7 , 4 f, A 1 fi: A lil ,X A I X f K Wilson Matthews Assistant to Director "L" s X i ' l W' ,, 0 David Cawood Sports Information -UWC. 5 1 in num...-nf' X LF ll - .-Q. ' s I 1 F klflk 'ln g f' fxx 5 . ,w . I Bill L ' Richard Williamso ff'-'-H-5 fin- ESS' f 4 i 6 ffl M Harold Horton Jim Johnson Megrvin johnson M If 'wr' Wzrzzff J' Fx Q I . Don Trull Ken Turner Dean Weber -W . ,.,. ,L 4. ,-fv, 4,4-1-.' , .W '. . .- pg-'Z !.,'+:." ",'i1f', ffm ',f',:z-4:-wifi-,,,, 1-.Ma-2211-sf 2 " ff-Ml' -my ,'44ff'K,11,,, ' P' .f'i::w,w af-Qiifri if 5. v I s x ,M- Q M? x V. f ' 1 E-5, 7 ,, il ' V ,f 'f ' 7",,."f,1 if f -.Y g 'ff ff 2 .. ,, , x , 1 Y' A Aga' 'Q lA.N5, yy .. wx A f4f'f f A ' 22 7 , ' , f "4 f 'fg' f X in 1 ."' 'A " ' s-:i"'-4'?7'z t we ,W , r ...- Q I ,av-. .f Q 4 ., 717.7 X Q if fqx 2 " 1 ' ,gy hwy, gif ,I Q Q., .W " -, v Ugg? Q! 4, -Q-:N vw- w "Ml .V ,I W if an Env qi 2 "55WMb' Jr' ,5 -1 -M ,gba 3 5 , ,uf ya. an fx. M , '32 , 'mr 'L .. A 'C'51-nw' . Frm i as 19'1g,M ,ar ga -lrx. Y gif, 1 Q 1011 "Q, ,U 1 J if 3 ,E an ' ff., , W4 U 5 .ww gg ,N a 3553 Q " RKANSAS 21 I0 A ST. 19 rkansas returned to the winner's circle when a con- troversial twelve-man play carried them past the Cyclone of Iowa State Z1-19. Tied 13-13 with min- utes remaining in the final stanza, Arkansas threatened the Cyclone goal line. On third and goal from the five, an extra Razorback scampered onto the field. Quarterback Mike Kirklands lofty toss to end jack Ettinger was gath- ered in for a six-pointer. Iowa State coach Earle Bruce stormed onto the field and confronted the referee, but to no avail. The play stood and the Razorbacks went on to capture their first victory of the season. A two-point try by the visitors after a touchdown moments later fell short, insuring the Hogs of a hard fought victory. The win took its toll in injuries, however, as two I-logs were lost for the season. 248 1 'R If K was W r ff f' 2 0 'lvef' f. 1 , i . 'W' 4 '4 IJ '1 I I' mg RKANSAS 13 TCU stingy Porker defense held TCU to a lone field goal and a safety as the Razorbacks grinded out a 13-5 victoryhover the Horned Progs in Little Rock. The victory was the fifteenth straight for Arkansas in the Hog- Frog series. QB Mike Kirkland found back Freddie Doug- las open over the middle for a 26-yard completion and a touchdown midway in the final period to provide the win- ning margin for the home team. Defense was the name of the game as both defensive units gave up yardage grudg- ingly. Three fumbles shattered TCU offensive hopes, while the Razorbacks took advantage of two opportunities for scores. Kirkland ran seven yards for the other Razorback TD. The win evened the Arkansas record at Z-2 and placed the Hogs in a first-place conference tie with Texas. 'B xx .v.fg',1:.,-3, JI, fffaljull: 'X -, . ., '13 , A ., ' u 'v'1'., , ff ,Q','54j25'gs5",,,,,'- I 9 i ff L 1 F,'f,ff'1' .z:.f fn , 1, ,...l Y Vi . N 'Oils lk "' -we V tv V R :Y fy E W, L O 52501 , I :ig M 1 I A ,,u Q' M0 A' f L 'bf :T 4" l an '-ffm -ia Us f f' 'I 420' RKANSAS 14 TEXAS ABM 10 he Razorback defense thwarted a last-ditch drive by Texas ASLM and beat the Aggies 14-10, record- ing their first victory over the cadets in three years. Led by the running of Dickey Morton and the passing combo of Kirkland and Ettinger, the Porker offense mounted a drive in each half to down the visiting Texans. A bad punt put the Porkers in prime field poisition in the first half at the Aggie 38. The Hogs pushed across the goal line on Freddie Douglas' 16-yard dash to go in front at halftime. An 83-yard drive on their initial possession of the second half helped the Hogs dispose of the Aggies. Trailing 14-10 with minutes left, the Aggies moved to the Hog 32 where a fourth-and-two pass attempt went awry. Arkansas ran out the clock to preserve the hard-fought victory. ARKANSAS 20 TULSA t took only two snaps of the football in the second half for tailback Dickey Morton to break away for 77 yards and end a scoreless battle as the Razor- backs went on to calm the Tulsa Hurricane 20-6 in Little Rock. Miscues and penalties plagued both squads in the first half as neither could push across a score. But Mor- ton's scamper awakened the crowd of 42,000 and the Hogs came alive to score twice more to ice the victory over the nation's passingest outfit. The Hogs held the Tulsans to -23 yards rushing, a new Porker defensive record, and to 175 yards passing, far below their nation-leading average. Mike Kirkland's passing sparkled as he corn- pleted 7 out of 10 for 108 yards. Jack Ettinger was the recipient of three tosses, including one for 53 yards, just short of a TD. f I 1 , ,V . pr , 'a .........l- if r I. ,595 X ffffr if iv- ARKANSAS 7 M.. he Razorbacks held the SMU Mustangs score- less for three-and-a-half periods before the Ponies marched 45 yards for a touchdown to tie the Porkers at 7-7 and kill chances for a bid to the Peach Bowl. After a scoreless first period Arkansas recovered a Pony fumble at the Mustang 17. Following a fifteen yard march-off against the I-logs, QB Mike Kirkland found ends Ettinger and Avlos in the clear, the latter for 19 yards and a touch- down. The Ponies knotted the contest in the final period. The I-logs had two chances late in the game as Dickey Mor- ton ran to the SMU 18 before Andy Bolton's tie-breaking kick went wide. Cornerback Rollen Smith intercepted a Pony toss moments later, but the Razorbacks chose to punt from fourth down at midfield. The tie put the Porker slate at 5-4-1. ARKANSAS RICE 17 enalties, fumbles, and interceptions spelled doom for the Razorbacks as the Rice Owls stuck them for the second year in a row, 17-7. Misey struck early for the Hogs as Dickey Morton had the ball jarred loose on the first play from scrimmage and Rice recovered at the Arkansas 13. Rice fumbled back to the Hogs who drove to the enemy four yard line before misfortune struck again. QB Mike Kirkland looped a pass over the head of end Nick Avlos and Rice grabbed it off and raced 58 yards to the Arkansas 41. It was that kind of a day. Rice managed ten points to take the lead at intermission. Arkansas drove 92 yards in 13 plays for its only score late in the third stan- za. A last effort pass by Kirkland was picked off by an Owl who ran it in for the last tally of the game. 'Ls"'3.3"Z' M We 6. ef -ki!! f -Q 'iw 1 V RKAN SAS 17 TEXAS TECH 24 rkansas jumped to an early 10-0 lead over the power- ful Texas Tech Raiders but couldn't contain them and fell to the Gator-Bowl Bound Raiders 24-17 in the season finale for the Razorbacks. A 36-yard Kirkland field goal and a one-yard plunge by back Martin Daily in the first half propelled the underdog porkers to an early lead. All-Conference quarterback joe Barnes of the Red Raiders pulled his forces together, however, and the visitors scored on two consecutive possessions to take a 14-10 half- time lead. Tech converted an Arkansas fumble into a three pointer in the third period and the Porkers fought back to tie the score on a thirty yard run by Alan Watson. Tech tallied once more to ice the victory. Dickey Morton finished his career with a record 3,317 yardsl N if- -I 'VFP Dickey Morton: The End of an Era vs, Q' ' iw, " 1 V- e KW- , Q- ,g ""9v-.wmv Huw I' W W af MR S' W . an-,M 44' 42 , gf G f 5 1 3 2 2 Q a. . A-ww.,,wfug,, a..,.L, M ,, - 1- Lililfff ,L f. J' - Y ff, .11. 34512 '--. 'Fifi ff a Z :fin-gig -F . - - 'flicw - ,.':. ffl'-Z .. .i.fiF?.' ' F'5l,Zl,-1 A 1 ' 'H-' f- llvexf s::':1"g vw wa- ,- .,.-A f nf.w'1:,- -V' .. -'. 1-. , . 3. .. wr , fffffil? 1, 114, -. -H1 filff' 21,5 V- 1,-:A1 -.-51-5,s,:, 41'-311,25 ,XL 45 4 f'Y'I'4Z'f" 'Q' Q ij" n g 7f'14.i5Qff',,', L.: JLQGT1, A ' '1,"f-Tm' vi. Q Z '24, , . f lg -H ' : -'if f J if 'Q P' '31 ,.-. ix Q- fEXH il' ,L VU, 0' -i Z ,' we Une A "Uv 7 x 5 Y EI A gg,-.W -..-- n A , i A X A QL af S! , 4' ug, .... , bw' ash 7. .J .Q . x-.4 .Q-2, .v ' X pa- An M lf' P 11" N 7. :F-V' 4 1 I' nfs I J 5' P ,M Qi'-. -1. 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W A ,g x Bob Slusarek, Coach L 4 Y -aw , f - A - V f4:4.x5vf1'f - 1 . ave. . ,LL X '1. 1 gag-A 5 1-f -'Mfg' gxwfwu' x x ima 4 4 1 1 , 1 4 w 1 1 1 if i U 1 F I 9 I 4 if Track f' Sr, 3 j 1 En Ed Renfrow, Coach 4.95 A J 2 , if X1 2,136 -ff.-,. , -,Q ' L WZ, .2 - yquult Q.,...W-.- A .., . ' .'nE.Q7'f:,,! 3- gigwsx - .. 35. '.v ' 1 4 ff fx-:..f.ewf2iM ' 1 V' ,433 , S.. " I fx- .-A-ww VF- ,lg .My Lf' "wav fif , JV, z ,.",V '15 wif- ' ' " w" QW' aff 'Zi-mf, V, ' A 2 6f"rQ'9 K , R Wwrzfeg., ' 4' . -'25 ' V Wm. 4 wiv -V ,lf , , ,,hV,,.. g ,z VV V was 'V A. , i W " gJ,,f3VfE'v-ji wgjpggw gif Q K ,fag May L -,HV ug? dd.. um , "A" ' '-w14,.,, V-...W Z -. ,,.,,, ' , Y -, - AX .af xg y Mp v -Q 5 1 is Y' 1 4 K 'E J V 5 ' 1 P ,ax f 3 1 '- 6 A f 2ms?SsTjk,, 1 .V..M.,,.N , ' 1 L f N. M.. A , X. ., V, H In V ,, -W A, MMV. ' x V wfffifff lf' , """'M-'-M--Q---w......,....,, 9 -' I ' . ' 1 . Q - . . 'rf'-, ,V , 2 2 "W"-V mu---1-V-M-W.,....,M...:,, ,, V-gf,-Vfgg, ,f K 5, ,gskbs , , , X' V - . . 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The "old man" exuded a great deal of con- lideme and spirit to the younger players. , , ol Th Last Gam ri 10. ,, f 25 ' if Q, ,, J, 4 Tj., .,,g'm ' v lf' yi' Ettinger changes to his street clothes after his last appearance in a Razorback uniform. n he Hgh! Rah! H0335 Bah! Missy Sink and Bill Dykes jan Wallace and Danny Nassar Paula Marinoni and Steve Taylor Susie Robinson and Greg Post Becky Taylor and Bill Shelton Terry Clayton and Lyle Hartz i 2 w l ., N 4- ww ,. vw: K. :f':'we:1:zr3af1Q H4553 1- K off Xfwwf 152,655 -, Aw .f ' , 'M Hx 1--12f54fL:asX?,1w Dfw-vii: 2.3549 Q ,:E,'ig:ff2rw g,5gf,Qg3' ,f ak , I ,A f.4h1,,,,.,, 4 F1 .3 'fi6'2Txf'l f i 'EQQQZ5 I ' y4fSXgQ,gM cgigff 5 45. Qiiffk QM Q ii A ,, , ,Q , -f Y f v i f- skwfzffwi . X. 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V-,WT 8 .V , J fb , LAM 4 v- ,BMJ gsfw x :KN iii? r Cecilia Croft Chairperson 'H , If!! i 1 , f r:LH , 1, Q ww? -K' R0 X ik? . ,, Qpwa ,S ??3Q Zig V91 Scott Universit of Arkansas Nm. Board of Publications 'A ' f- A' .1 1 1 uw'Tfm:f'w5gs,,,, , s ," in Q..- Q - . u 1 ',si.!.1 I ' f ' 'r 1. A-,G ,- , VN , 1 -r 7 V ,,.,,..,,.,.,,,.. N, ,, .. ,WM M, Y., , ,,v,N...,..,.. ,WW , va.. 1 f , 5' ,fix . if h- Razorback Staff M- 'bw ignwnlf' Larry L. Logan, Editor 'li-I f'1v 4 'M ,M it M. fl-'4 W' r rrr 'Q ,tg ww: 25 " X as sf' li Betty Dennis, Business Cecilia Croft, Assoc. Editor Angel Tatum, Exec. Sec. Ioel Henderson, Art Joyce Melton, Copy Y gfig, COI1I1i9 Karnes, Copy jane Brockman, Copy Henry Woods, Copy Nancy Jacobi, Copy john Partipilo, Photography ,fix ., 1 M.. Q 7 E 4' 'w av ax . Ng AN Y ,M . +. t" - A 1 -' ' 6 k 1 ,I 1 , . ' Wd' A x 4,5 T...-'- I , X -1 ' 1 ' ,aa xx ....,.. . ' Q.. 4U 9 .g ',-v - . . 4 l ' T --. 'e X 2' ' -V ' 1-. - .' of ' ., , 4 V 45, xx.. 4 ' x A I 15" 3- 7 -1, .A ' , my ,JJ ff I' I, 4 5 . ' . L Y. - gf ,. -' ' f M : f K ,gpg . f , 4 - , . , " ,S , gk: ' .riff ,, s,' , ,- ,-r . ",. fa 'fl 3 ' 1-fiw 1 'al 'E Wm 1 4 'L 'A :- Y fr P linux' 4' vm 1' 1 1 a-'iii' X 'nv 5. GQ. Yes, Virginia, there is a swimming pool in the picture. 'D-. if f f'-' -sv-.4 I ,f 1-Y 'Tb tt' 'FQ IL 'T 1' "?'f'!3C R fix l , X of gk LP if 9179 7 o X- 3 KZFXL ' j ai!! aw it Ted Allder Larry Logan Art Meripol Scott Mosely Mary Hunter Rob Cosgrove John Partipilo Bryce Swindler jim Sutherland Don Cowan Rocky. :JF .V " 1' ,' LL, ' a .. W .Jl' 1 A I . TW X . ' 51 'I X '-f 1' LV i lx vi .- 5 tw: 0 Nw in iff' P' R an y I 4 1 rkansas Traveler I 'M 3 . X ' 4 ' ' '-A, Y 3 i if, li ., , , '11 U ' 2 i i-' 3 , - , rl-If , ,. . -, Q, , Douglas Wallace, Editor 4 3 E z 'M , M. 1 af A , '. 3 '.- 1 'Q s ' ' -- -,.. , , 'P'-'.'.f.a-Riga' N. - - 1: -.4 - ' . ' ' f ' 5135" -gf., . 1 .g .V 'gy .z'nI,l ., '- nu., na.: 4 . 4 1. gr. -V. g.,.' -'I-',p, , - N V . , A, v-"A - -1151 , Eb ,0', 41' y',Qf'-, Y.-,uf-f , ,ff . . -, . .,.4- 'Jar' .- ,.r',.n vu, ,,.,g . , V . ,a 14-' x , -,U h' , , 1 0 1' 0 .r- ' .l',..l',..l',, , - . 'Q Qu' I - - , , .,:,.. G . Mike Muller, Managing Editor David Russell, Associate Editor RTI A 'K N PX. if f ,gf ,4 if ff, r,. -5' ', J L in 7,21 .5 Q. .?. .,. ff 113' 'f' 'wc "ffl " y' 5-"'f'!f fgff ff'g'!1ge?f ff sal Ll f --'wff ",. 4' ,,J1.-1' ff' fi X Linda Bramblett, Business Manager Pai 511016, News ECUIOY 4. . S-'H 'Y fa lf, ','ff I .Jil ,fir 1 : 0 Q 3 , - ,'.o'p o"'."qh Q 1 5 il f sa., Henry Woods, Sports Editor Danae Columbus, Features Editor r I 9? fig Left To Right: lerry Lawson, Pat Suttle, Henry Woods, Bob Traveler Cray, Ellen Maurer, Melissa Matthews, Terry Wilson, Ricky Spears, jeff Grace, Lynn Meade, David Russell, David Brewers, Mike Muller, Overtis Hicks, Doug Wallace, Linda Brarnblett, Mary Wynne, Andy l-lawkins. L Left To Right: Steven Toler, Doug Wood, Al lan Davenport. 1 289 WMM, ., 5 , 5? I -vw U, , ..,,,,,,,,.,1 Y, , if, 4 Va in :gawk if 1 iff! o S KEEP Watch fort ' A ' - 4' 'A - - f ....,x,,....... , ,,...,.,.....A.-.v..4s-1 AF Vik,F T3 N . f , xg iw .v,,,,, xg, ,- , i . Qin' gi iff fiwlv ffl '4 i 'L IS UUR SED . DJ's studio light "iv-...pony an-GBM 6. 2 1 fam, X 'fa J iii .4 ,? V? well, our photographers kept bitchin' that they weren't get ting enuf space so, you guys, here it is now out your damn bitchirf! -1 U 1 af Y X " 5 EX --y 'f . QLUW' fy WA ihbillllill AA P, ' 5 Rob 'Cos Cosgrove john Parhpllo 'fv -" H' in W . 292 ' .gm ' O i wwf fr Macao CAUTION! f 1, W Blue gm.- 5 N L Scott Mosely lim Borden WY 1 Ted Allder Bryce Swindler .1 5 g gf v ' 2: :Q UB- .f Y W f 3 M 1 f I Ai, Un.,-e, nib . . ,- ,,, gk 79, 3 4 Don Cowan lim Sutherland 293 'S ! , 5.5, L My? ' ,A :fa AQ ,1 K 1 y wil .-A. -,uf ,, ..,-jf Q 1 w 5,-f xl, 423 ff " roi ,' 77 ,ms fa: - fl 'I . 1 x, f 6' s +' , , . , 1 ,V . Kf'f2 .f-fp iV:y'i'd 'ffawauaw .L ,ings J ' sf :r:'1gg'ffgf' 1 J,-f'1?Lr3 W J- . 'fF'HwBy? 1 . '-Jfikfz' Eff:- kdi'--1 if wm4i,,j A ' Q 1 gf Air Force ROTC Officers Col. William E. Chatfield, Major Billy G. Geren, Capt. Raymond T. Yeatman, Capt. Francis V. Barnett. Air Force RCTC Non-Commissioned Cfficers TSgt. Robert T. Williams, TSgt. Ronald D. Reining, TSgt. Jerry A. Bane. Arnold Air Society . 1 U A B Y'YA xi li' V :-: Ron Oholendt, Richard jenkins, Louis See, Riley Porter, Steve jackson, Newton White, Bob Petrik, Tom Machen, Ken Curry, Ben Westbrook Cary Risner, Wendy lacks, Dennis Rogers, Roy Bratton, Mark Anderson, Rich Lumpkin, Don Seal, Willard West, Clay Stephenson, Randy Nel- Dennis Matthews, Steve Mann, Bob Kraynik, Ken Reynolds, jim Cox, son,Iohn Davis, David Thomas. Arnold Air Society Staff SF if? We-is, .,,..-u-"" Row 1: Ken Reynolds, Lou See, Tom Machen. Row 2: Iim Cox, Bill Calcote, Riley Porter. The Arnold Air Society is a national honorary, military society named for General Henry H. fl-lapj Arnold. General Arnold was chosen as the namesake of this society be- cause of his contributions to airpower development and his leadership. Some of the objectives of Arnold Air include: to aid in the development of effective Air Force officers, to create a closer and more efficient relationship within Air Force ROTC, and to further the purpose, traditions, and con- cepts of the United States Air Force. Membership is by invitation, and scholastic require- ments include a 2.00 overall grade average and a 3.00 in Air Science courses. Some activities of the Arnold Air Society include com- munity service projects, helping organize the Military Ball, fund raising projects, and Arnold Air social functions. Arnold Air Society also has an associate organization known as Angel Flight. They work together on most proj- ects which come under their jurisdiction. Auxiliary Security Unit .. . pq ,Mini-. Row 1: Lee Madsen, Lee Denard, Row Walker. Row 2: Roy Bratton, Larry Risner, Randy Nelson, Hays McArthur, Dick Lumpkin. Row 3: Tom McCarver, Iohn Davis, Clay Stephenson, Bill Seaton. Angel Flight A ff Qi i Row 1: Darlene Wood, Diana Roberts, Baylus Stuckey, Karen Johansen, Kathy Whaley, Candy Fuller, Robin Wren, Terri Traylor, Kathy White, Diane Woods. Row 2: Carol Sample, Jan Brodie, Kathy Hudgeons, Linda Vandenberg, Marilyn Burton, Abbey Leggett, Roberta Boyd, Terry Wil- son, Mary Johnson, Sandy Fulbright, Terri Bales, Sonya Jones, Mary Stobaugh, Jan Hudson, Janie Adams, Martha Gorum, Kathy Dye, Jane Hunt, Kerry Wiley, Connie Tucker. Members of Angel Flight are selected on the basis of beauty, personality, and scholarship. The purpose of the organization is to take part in projects beneficial to the ROTC department and the general public. Activities this year included singing at the Veteran's Hospital, working with Indian Travel House, taking Boy's Club boys to a ball game, working with the Red Cross on the county blood drive and selling programs at football games. Martha C1orum Kathy Whaley Kerry Wylie Sandy Fulbright Abbey Leggett Janie Adams Kathy White Mary Stobaugh Commander Executive Officer Administrative Officer Comptroller Information Officer Operations Officer Liaison Officer Archives Officer l i 5 5, L Baylus Stuclcey is tapped for Angel Flight. iz ,Vt 9. -f ' 12 , .Y 3.-fig, Angel Flight aided the Red Cross in their local blood drive. Y RCTC Col. Guy I. Tutwiler Pershing Rifles 1 ' ! ravi I Kevin Sanford, Morton Hardaway, Robert Taylor. 1:5 A A Y-- . A A Russell Smith, Robert Taylor, Randall Hannah, David Chambers, jonathan Safren, Kevin Sanford, David Rackley, Lisa Davis, Raymond Roberson, lohn Jacobs, Nancy Meley, Valerie Hatfield, Carmen Manning, james Stephens, William Griffith, Stanley Catton, Hiram Simkins, Richard Lump- kin, Lawrence Smith 11'-.,,,g W , ,,c ,,. 5 vb V, W L 3 Y., 'Wu 'R 15" J Drill Team -as Y 2-11 ,mfg r X , ':.,Mf22-- w.,,1,fi ,Q qw. ' 4 .1 1 A ,5 , A Q,-'Q,2fg-we iw- ., A A ' .offasiwx . ' wi . . ' 'ff A 2 Vt 14 X ' My-w ' va ' s R A " A .. , - 5' .N Aff .3 , 2, . E I 1 4 6 jf, R VY., vw " Je nga: ' ' ' 351' ,y V t 'A xx W -fm? aff rgvafl Aixlgg - M?" 5 1' R 4 ,Q 2g?,fNiQ P ' ? . R. L 'll' ' "' ' '- W- 21 T: 55 'QL ff 'Q-5Q'14.K'ff M tiff' fi ,gg M. .Bay , ' A wwf' 'fi' 'Haw , 0 - Q, 'l"'f2f'g. "via 4- 4' f - V-, 4,.rf,'?'1 if ,f fi MW. . A fr ,. ' Y Ag, -' M' MV f - -sta'N 'vw' ,. " J, ff Hiya , - nl fra Ay K y,Q,,,.:.. Adv, ,QA Av., .,,, f xy, , . xkfn-yen 4 ga,-12N .gm M, r,.g 'Qs-Lfffnj M, 1 N Iohn Safren xx -Q I , Q ' Xxx XP Av anrg.M-,,.-r,-, ..W. 1 - M Randy Hanna, David Chambers, John Safren, Robert Crawford, Raymond Roberson, Alan Baker. N A. Cadettes 5 X35 f 4 I i Jin, ,Q if, 2 .f if 7, Q 'Y' Officers are: Suzanne Dunaway, Sarah Wiggins, Wendy Henry, Diane Row 1: Judy Grumples, Kathy Fair, Marilyn Crouch, Diana Jacoby. Row 2: Mungeyl Carmen Manning, Jan Wallace, Arlene Risley, Diane Munsey. Row 3: Overtis ,14- ',. ?'f"?'f. 7 . ,K ,.. ff ' 4 'i X I. If 114 r" Q., an tl , j f 4' , ,,, f .ra , f S , A.. I " 1'.' I 5 ff' Q- A 491' 'r N A+: ji If f' I Z" 'T s f l 1 A ,6? fl r A' f S If! K 'f . N Hicks, Nancy Meley, Ann Fawcet, Scott Hammans, Merrie Bellman, Tracey Traylor, Kathy Pomeroy, Suzanne Dunaway, Becky Hart, Kay Carson, Pam Nelson, Kathy Downer, lane Brockmann, Wendy Henry, Sarah Wiggins, Liz Norton, Nilea Parvin. 'auf t I Rangers he f. 5 J -:Q--ce ft I he ,L ,ff e""' ' ' 7 --'-fi'-." - P' Q' ,Q " .T. ' ..,-:.,,.f 4, ,f " ' ' - 1 f" ff f-'-:few Ziff.-35'1ff' e, W 'i ' X ' e 'ff ... v I , , , . e T Q vi ,A ' ll. :Qui .',gI2'qA f an , Q' N -iq-. u - B -- N, . R 'N H1 . e"" "f -1 i 'w-. - ' T Y-gf H, .. 5 ' , . A'. ,.' ' fro- H ' 1 Q ix, p A 1 W-, Ae iii:-' - . . L iffgg,Z i- - 1 Q if 'e ff--air "X if W . f 1 , - Y In -I Q 7 14,4 J. , .-5: sv. is . N A .J-sv "' A - 1g'.f"" ew "Mau o 'W A 1-ef' 4 4- f f X rv -- l"w-,sei-,.Hu"' 'W 1 '+1ej,gv,e' R ' X h , - ,ff " ' f '-2'5f-wggv 6.7 i f- ff i f f Q f 1" --ly Q.. ir, T . f I , ,wif-"' I .I Y' ..f"' .I Alf g ,N fi fl X Xi I , "-4 4 'L lx Q X Q BM . ,W-L 1 . up ,Z V V W N. 5 JA Q ' , . Q I .vb Wm A ts? A? f A Y Q-fax 4 2 mt- xl , f an K ' 3 Q V C4 ' 1 e r f' 1414 G A ' x qv., , f F 1' 2 - .vw . K .. L , N -, lf .2 5 1 lf H 2 " -'35 ' 'x Q' ' , N I ' , Q .- . f..' N -4 ' "" ' ' ' " ' if' if- --" ' iw' i fir- x H bv' 1 At I Jak' 4: ,1 ' f xi. , ff-wk 5 "'-'-wav' EQ:-.Lf If K .M ,f we NE 56 -...-as ,I "" Ni , 5 6 we rc-w::,,e5 Y: ,Z .F ., if QQ, if Q s 1 E ' K... f Q , f as sk l ' H 'xg X 5" I 5 Nia 'Q , si if L 1 J ' 4 N4 A , n , k ' I 4' Steve Yerby, Butch Holland, Iohn Lewis, Drennen Bullet, Tim Considine, Bob Harris, Charles Brickey, I Not Pictured: David Bernard, Steve Perkins. K 9--N 'xin -' 4 '--e. "fs, 1 Carroll Paul Urick t l M Rlf le Team l l l O Q Of' sf-'Q 9-vp gg- 1 7 'x Row 1: Randall Brock, Mickey Box, Ken Kidd. Row 2: lim Stephens, Mike Knight. l Scabbard and Blade if l ni w l O 1 v I I 1 l 4 I J l I l I x ll Row 1: john Lewis, Morton Hardaway, Robert Cook. Row 2: john Jacobs, David Barnard, Bill Browers, Steve Kerr, Steve Yerby, Ion Safren, Ray l Offenbacher, David Chambers. Al I.. 11-, Elf. rj- ll ' I S If 41 1 EH , ' ..x -v,..,. 43. m 1451 'wav ' .5 . 'J u'g L .'.. . T255 . . . .-'E' .-...-.ri 1. . . .. 7:24-2' tc-:-: V. Jn .. 'Zvi-C sv v. . 4 In u -1' 5. xr ' AE, 1 N x "R, . :Z -.ji '-P 4:2 . ,. v :N ' .5 . . v ,l in i A l,1 . , x, . 12 N JG f : K, mf '-ga:-z-1 . f P . ,MM .M ' 1, K 'ew ,H K M.-a.. ,L'f1 . . 1 AU. gf, Jw 1 as . '?Nf'.M.f. if ' ' Hagan . ff -..' ' L 'Q' T3 f D, da ,A U, .yffvr 1 fa . . .'a'n' -1. . . , .jnglj .,. !' 5.4 Hxri xx? ' 'CHL ax, Y 2 153151-'E ' r fx--gf , 'T-5? ' Z 21355 525 gif.: 5 z,,,.l. 1 1 2252 T, ,,5gil2i' nga! Little Sisters of Minerva X. Pictured Above Are: Margaret' Buford, Susan Jackson, Kathy Walker, Ian Maxwell, Ian Bodie, Fox, Carmen lacks, Kathy Whaley, Terry Webb, Mary Ann Faulkner, Lynn Riley, Carol Norman, Trudy English, Cecilia Croft, Kim Blakely, Bar- Scott Hammans, Paula Cwueirrio, Sally Warner, bara C-ary, C-reer Marshall, Libby McCollum, Ka- Becky Freeman. thy Blakley, Connie Patterson, Susie White, Becky Little Sisters of the White Star Pictured Above Are: Pam McKentire, Lynda Ry- Barbara Galbraith, Cathy Blalock, Dona Evens, burn, Mary Cox, Barb Baker, Sally Jackson, Stacy Mary McKennie. Myers, Darlene Woods, Mary Ann Dickinson, 2 i 1 f 5 Z Alethians Pictured Above Are: Sheila Givens, Susan Bogle, Sandy Fulbright, Jana Powell, Toni Taylor, Routh Jane Dunlap, Nancy Fairchild, Karyn Barnett, Ann Raney, judy Feldman, lay l-leller, Linda Gene Osborne, Cynthia Rix, Angela Van Zandt, james. Not Pictured: Nola Bull, Bev Collins. Pike Little Sisters lv-"" Pictured Above Are: Sandra Tamburo, Fay Smith, Susan Harris, Priscilla lohnsey, Karen jones, Ginny Huxtable, Toni Foster, Vivian Morley, De- borah Puckett, Diane Demuth, Susie Talbot, Shelli Bolien, Lu Ann Fulton, Cindy Oliver, Diane Felty, 2 S 1 X x X :Vx . XXX 1,53 X! 1- ' if - ,, li U J VH ,X A, It xx r 1- N. , C- .Qi - .N -es . Al. W1 Q 1 Kim Nicholson, Sammie Spence, Susan Glide- well, Norma Paulsen, Robin Slas, Gail Oliver, A- manda Phillips, Kip Sharkey, Terri Smith, Pat O'Neil. Blue Key Row 1: Terry Shope, Chip Baker, john Peace, Steve De Salvo. Row 2: Ron Oholendt, Tom Watts, Tom Yarnell, Alvin Phillips. Row 3: Spencer Robinson, Randall Per- guson, Don Chou, Dennis Beard, Keith Lewis. Row 4: Wendy jacks, Graham Catlett, Bill Handshy, Blair Arnold, fb Carl Hille. Row 5: Dennis Kirkpatrick, David Hunton Tom Baxter, Newton White, Vann Smith, Mike Wolfe Row 6: Bill Riggs, Greg Wallace, Lee Sing, joe Cogdell Bill Lambright. Lambda Chi Alpha Crescent Girls JJ! lik Row 1: Beth Kleuser, Marilyn Burton, Marilyn Crouch, Judy Huneycutt, Siste Reed, Vicki Arnold, Yvonne Ol- son, Dee Davenport. Row 2: Linda Ashcraft, Michelle Davis, Marty Adams, Debbie Ross, Ioan Jackson, Marci Millican, Donna Hawkins, Marsha Driver, jan Richard- x, uf J son. Row 3: Julie Fellows, Becky Wilson, Donna Taylor, Debbie Lewis, Lucy jackson, Kim Crank, Pam Massen- burg, Debbie Vanderslice, Carol Hendrickson, Cindy Neal, Patti Culpepper, Fran Craig, Terry Wilson, Pam Bassett, Pam Summers, Diana Vorsanger. Alpha Gamma Rho Little Sisters First Row: Marcy Pendleton, Rhona Weaver, Lana Flynn, Judy Wilson, Debbie Holland, Darlene Zeh, Lois Swaf- ford, Donna Smith. Second Row: Barbara Trace, Debbie Satterfield, Karen Kuznoff, julie Johnson. Third Row Kathy Gibson, Connie St. John, Lori Nielsen. Cardinal XX , , ' ,. fl! Row 1: Robbie Powell, Steve Crow tTreasurerJ, joe T. Robinson, Mark jones, Allen Davenport tPresidentJ, Clint Brazelton, Ken Vickers, David Love, Sam Stokes. Row 2: Jack Skinner, Bill Horne tVice Presidentj, Mike Morelidge 1 I zwwfw A-af., eww tSecretaryj, Baker Curtis, Row 3: Ben Walsh, Bill Bracy Charles Black, Steve Nance, Greg Walker, Randy Wilhite Ken Stewart. FCC LP? ""' 4. ...--as -fs' 1' P", K -3 ,A -f ,1 qt 5 bf H ggi' , A! , as-,AW , , .. Aw C i fi 'vu 6' . ' ' 'S A N ' . 5. Q. , 'M ' -0 X'-N in MM l' 5 f' Ks is ws... ,K Row 1: Iim Cox, Treasurer, Bill Cox, President, Craig Mc- Cone, Secretary, Mike Pinegar, Vice President. Row 2: Agronomy Club ,lf l 'V if 5 as Bill Rowland, Claude Badgett, joel Hamilton, Iohnny Mc Adams. Row 1: james Word, E. Moye Rutledge, Faculty Advisor, dent. Row 2: Brad Boyd, Michael Ransom, Chris Avery, Nur M. Miah, Tom Riley, Treasurer, Mike Verser, Secre- Larry West, M.S. Offutt, Faculty Advisor, Jerry Hardin. tary, Curt Rankin, Vice President, David Howard, Presi- Student Branch of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers E ' f V i V .naw 'XY C f f? it wr W, f -:rx ,ff . , , f-A V an zz: . , at ,.,, 6. 5 Row 1: Steve Harris: Arthur DallaRosa, Secretary: Billy dent. Not Pictured: Jerry Freedle, Treasurer: Danny Walk- Bryan: Richard Parrish, Faculty Advisor: Hugh Pack, er: Jerry Marsh: Lewis Mayfield: James Thomas: Larry Vice President: Billy Warnock: Earl Rausch. Row 2: John Harp: Steve Brannon: Cliff Snyder. Bocksnick: Joe Schroeder, Scribe: Nelton Henley, Presi- Phi Beta Lambda i 2 r z 2 1f'i,- A it Front: Bobbye Walls: Kathy Hawkins: Rex Anderson, Vice Chipman, Parliamentarian: Gay Widdows: Mary Jo Hu- President: Sondra Safer, Reporter: Mike jones: Julie ber, Historian: Debbie Eicher, Historian: Sandy Best: Webb, Secretary. Behind Counter: Cathy Smith: Roger Peggy Iackson,Treasurer:Mary McLean. Blackwell, John Gorecki, President: Debbie Sanson: Larry Union Staff V, . ,,,.s3 Q 1 ' 1 I 5-fr.. -4' liars ,ni-assi' rg Q 3 5 11' . . Ann Kittrell, jim Pequette, Terry Muse. U nio n Staff Henry Woods, Union Presidentg Debbie Wernet, Governing Board Chairpersong Rick Rogers, Union Vice President Union Films Committee fv' my Q.. 14 ,,, J. 'ff' , ' ', fn. Mtg- 2' l Stanley Deen, John McGoodwin, Randy Minnick. Union Staff Committee Iohn Combs, Publicity, Lhisa Brown, Outdoor Recreation, jerry Yarbrough, Outdoor Recreation Advisor. American Society of Mechanical Engineers :gi LM-A - D Members are: john West, Earl Presson, Charles Keene, Eddie Allbright, Levester Racy, Kent Hughes, Loren Monroe, Garry Young, Larry Young, Walter Hill, Andy Wood, jim Evans, jack Helms, Leslie Howard, Mike Garner, lim Bowles, Dan Burrow, Larry Pope, Tom Wells, Gary Gibson, Dennis Beard, Paige Dean, Frank Hawkins, Eddie Leonard, James Car- roll, Dennis Blackwell, Greg Hunter, Clyde Little, Ir., Ken Loudermilk, Tau Beta Pi .1 ,'N 4 I 'ur Prank Porbeck III, Robert Porbeck, Richard Rogers, Ir., jimmy Sanders john Seibold, Robert Snyder, Iim Steele, Steven Terry, Mike Upshaw Dan Von Horn, Ernie Edens, Mike Davis, Ion Dockins, George Rowe jim Thompson, Tom Thompson, George Ulmer, Carl Widmer, Dr. LH Cole, Faculty Advisor. Members are: Charles Martin, Ion Dockins, Dennis Beard, Earl Presson, Gary Risner, George Grisham, Bill Beal, Prof. james Kimzey, advisor, Prof. L.R. Kirby, advisor, Oliver Coker, john Compton, Nancy Fontaine, Randy .4 'N Moss, David Pipkins, Gary Smith, Cecil R. Tillery, j.W. Varner, Phillip Wagner, Russel Walker, Charles Weather- ford, R.V. Boyd. Sigma Phi Epsilon Little Sisters Q15 'L i y - A 'L 'rf ' .. 1 'wx , v,'f'e 2 ,WV Q u . t .., u 's . " 3 W? Row 1: Ginger Waddell, Shirley Stanford, Liz Taylor, Cagle, Terry Traylor, Ian Talbot, Patty Watson, Teresa Denise Eisler. Row 2: Jacque Keith, Jill VanErt, Pam Dorman, SherriSmith, Cindy johnson. la.. AV., Union Todd Gordon, Harry Aaronberg, joe T. Robinson Phi Delta Theta Little Sisters Row 1: Martha Washington, Kathy Downer, Christy Stobaugh, Connie Lewis, Roni Palmer, Keeny McDonald, Susan Scarbrough, Jan Stripling, Becky Taylor tSweet- heartj, Cathy Cox, Paula Marinoni, Karen Hannas, Susan Williams, Diane Jacobi. Row 2: Lugene McNeil, Debbie QQ? , f 5 Terry Bales Beverly Bassett Lisa Bell Paula Irwin Terri Lelievre Diane Jacoby Brenner, Lisa Bell, Marsha Donathan, Ann Conner, Terry Bales, Lisa McLaughlin, Paula Irwin, Debbie Meek, Bay- liss Stuckey, Diane Wood, Cheryl Hayes, Julie Bost, Nancy Connely, Terry LePevre, Cathy Oxford, Janie Windreth. Julie Boss Cathy Cox Kathy Downer Connie Lewis Paula Marinoni Lisa McLaughlin 5 In , 2 ' Q 't y 5 , "r. . a J 1 L , it if 5 L ef " Lugene McNeil Debbie Meek Roni Palmer Y Ine s' fig X In K , It K ggi . ,gm 1, 'Q tl my lf 1, 1 'Z J , , . :Q g ' l 4 :A , ' . f if . rf , I 4 Y -I , V Q ' Cheryl Smith Christy Stobaugh Jan Stripling Bailus Stuckey Martha Washington Janie Windruff Diane Woods Drder of Dmega 'T' 'Nw Row 1: Jeannie Fox, Meredith Polk. Row 2: Kathy Hughes, Christy Jones, Wendy Henry, Chip Baker, Martha Wash- ington, Debbie Brenner. Row 3: Margie Walker, Chris Cobb, Marsha Kelley, Jan Hudson, Connie Hendrix, Jan Bodie, Ellen Stevens, Jane Brockman, Diane Jacobi, Cherrye N J fb BQ Hammons. Row 4: Rick O'Brien, David Glenn, Connie Lewis, Tom Watts, Ken Creekmore, Spencer Robinson, Debbie Meek, Dennis Beard, Diane Wood, Ann Crigger, Mike Wolfe, Doug Threlkeld, Claude Hawkins, Graham Catlett, Max Wernick. Panhellenic e Row 1: Paula Craft, Jeannie Fox, Marilyn Mosley, Martha PON. ROW 3: Barbara Matthews, Scott Hammans, Beth Washington, Jackie Cawood. Row 2: Cindy Brown, Susan Kleuser, Liz Rainwater, Susan Fox, Meredith Polk, Ann Drier, Susan Biggers, Mar Chappel, Lou Ann McKinney, Crig er, Debbie Brenner, Tracey Nelson, Diana Roberts, Terry Wilson, Beth Henslley, Sally Jackson, Dee Daven- Stepianie Johnson, Nancy Clark. Engineering Council Row 1: Dennis Beard, Bamdad Bastani,.Terra Holicer, Bob Holt, Nelton Carroll, Gerry Reed, David Walker tTreasurerJ. Row 31 Scott Steele, Earl Henley, Walter Coffman, Mike Love. Row 2: Stephen DeSalvo tPresi- Presson, Bill Kerr, Mark Vaughn, Don Bradshaw, jim Langley, Brian dent, Jim Atkinson tVice Presidentj, Kay Carson, Charlie Martin, Jim Foster, Andy Wood, Terry Ernst, David Stimley, Kent Hughes. Alpha Zeta Members are: Scott Callaway, Larry Carnes, Kenny Combs, James Craig, David Evans, Will Feland, Nick Finn, Ross Formica, Paul Cramlich, james Hall, Marion Harris, Nelton Henley, David Howard, Richard Huck, Frank Leeman, Dwayne Martin, Paul Nester, Mark Newman, Thomas Pay, Ken Reynolds, Tim Ross, Blaine Sanders, Arthur Simpson, Steve Simpson, Dennis Spurlock, William Taylor, Doug Threlkeld, Barbara Wright, Patricia Cable, Carol Clark, Ron Cox, Fred Dunk, Kathy Gib- son, Leigh Ann Hanby, W.C. Huggins, Terry Kirkpatrick, Kathy Lowe, Earl Rausch, Monica Ritz, Don Rone, Roy Sharp, Allison Shassere, Dave Shower, Michael Taylor, Winston Vickers, Quinton Hornsby, Cindy Bramlett, Ed Kowalski, Michael Smith, Linda Via, john Kyle, Gary Gold- en, Cesar Zepeda, Rodney Baker, Debbie Simmons, Marcia Mahon, and Terry Cole. Union Staff ui Tom Sindon, Kacey DeNoi, Pat Ferrell, Iim Williams. Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers 'i-if -r...i....,1 ' ' ,NH - , 1. Q ,R nga. ,,,,, 4 Members are: Clifford Scott Rorex, Robby Livers, Christy Hadidi-T. Iossef, Haluk Ozemek, Charles Martin, james Kalkbrenner, George Covert, Richard Holland, Paul D. Cook, Walter Coffman, Fred Crossett. Strang, Dennis Hogan, Edward McCall, Sheedrash Sina, Cardinal K ' "4 , 'f'.g.'P Q new 1 W 'U' "M, 1' gnu A ,v 4 ,5 ,KX ,pv I We Y . Mir?-31' F 'Z I A . VY " Row 1: Pat Suttle, Cindy Carrington, Kerry Wylie, Ianna Riley, judy Harmon, Marilynn Mosely, Monica Ritz, Kathy Whaley. Row 2: Kathy White, Carol Volk, Kathy Downer, Deborah Van Hook, Mary Combs, Q X Kathy Dye, Sally Downer, Deborah VanHook, Mary Combs, Sally lack- son, Kathy Dye, Jean Waller. Row 3: julie Morris, Diana Roberts, Fenner Upchurch, Terry Wilson, lan Wallace, Debbie Richardson, Cindy Neal. ortar Board Row 1: Karen lmhoff, Christy Iones, Bonnie Alford, Ann Crigger. Row 2: Row 3: Patty Cherry, Linda Ashcraft, Dr. Montgomery, Karen Mont- jan Hudson, Margie Walker, Connie Hendrix, Gretchen Rom, Wendy gomery, Susan Murphy, Ellen Stevens, Meredith Polk, Debbie Brenner, Henry, janet Hildbold, Linda Ramsey, Connie Lewis, Cherrye Harnmans. Chris Cobb, Jeannie Fox, Connie Lewis. FF" ' n E u ' r Vw. O .-,- D,-' 1n,,,l' Jr, -L' N -WL We sincerely hope you enjoyed our first Features sec tion. We now offer for your pleasure: Features Il. Pot. Bob, my roommate, defines it as 'God's way of saying Hi' The law defines it otherwise. For many years, marijuana was a narcotic-not by scientific classification, but by an act of Con- gress. For many years, our hated rivals and neighbors to the southwest, texas, had a law which had the second strictest penalties for mari- juana possession in the world, second only to the culturally revolted for, some would say, revolt- ingj laws of mainland China. Pot has had a steady growth in popularity on this campus. It has been around forever, because it lstilll grows wild in this area of the Midwest. And, off and on, it was used in Fayetteville by the beat generation of the fifties. But the Fayette- ville hippies remember when pot first came to the campus in a popularized form. It was mailed, joint by joint, inside rolls of lifesavers from a student who had dropped out of college and gone to Haight-Ashbury and was doing a big favor for his friends at Razorback Hall. Even when I came here in '69, pot was not a subject of cafeteria conversation. In fact, if you spoke of it, you hushed your voice and rasped ma-ri-jua-na into someone's ear. Times were good back then-dormies could smoke in their rooms, because no one knew what the smell was. But times have changed, and now you can smoke in most parts of the campus with a relative degree of safety. It comes from all point of the globe, right here into little old Fayetteville. And it goes to almost all parts of the campus and Fayetteville environ- ment, a result of the increasing middle-class ac- ceptance andfor use of the drug itself. A lot of things go with pot. Like smoking it, and cooking it. You can smoke in in reefers fjoints, or whateverj, bongs, pipes or chillums tquite smooth, and multi-purposedj. You can cook it in brownies, meat loaf, spaghetti, cookies, or tea. You can eat it without cooking it, but it tastes bad and won't get you high. You can use a roachclip or a match, you can make hashish out of it, you can put it in a chamber in your pipe, you can grow it yourself, you can steal it fbad formj or find it land put a seed in your loafer for good luckj or but it or sell it. And it's not legal, but it's neither immoral nor fattening. It has been linked to great medical discoveries, such as relief of glaucoma, asthma, alcholism and schizophrenia, and has been used as general anesthetic for long operations tcheck with your personal physicianj. Other than this, there is nothing very unusual about pot, except the crazy things that happen when people are around it. Such as one story which starts out in the library . . . The tall one confided to the short one that it was basically his own fault. They had been ped- dling their ounces all over town for two days, and were on their way to make a big sale. On the way, they had stopped to make a small sale at the Uni- versity Library. Yessir, they had carried that briefcase full of pot right up into a carrel on the fourth floor, made their sale, returned to the sec- ond floor and were about to make their way past the guard when they remembered. Anyone can take a briefcase into the Library, but when you take it back out, they search it. And there was over two pounds of good Qwell, just better than mediocrej pot in the briefcase. So here they were. Standing in the Men's john on the first floor fthe artwork on the walls is much better than on second or thirdl and trying to figure a way to smuggle out the pot they had unthinkingly smuggled in. The tall one suggested breaking a window and tossing the briefcase to the ground below, but the short one thought it would make too much rack- et, so he suggested trying to bribe the guard with part of the pot, but the tall one didn't think that would work. The doors all have alarms on them for say they dol, so that was out, also. Then the short one had a good idea-finding students who would smuggle it out just a bit at a time, like one lid or one half-pound. But the tall one speculated that 11 that didn't prohibit anyone from squealing to the guard at the door and 25 that didn't prohibit anyone from just walking off with the pot. Standing in the men's john is not the best place to discuss such delicate affairs-the two end johns were occupied by guys who hadn't spoken or moved or made a noise since the tall one and the short one had entered ten minutes before. At first, the short one thought both of them were asthmatics, what with the heavy breathing going on. But that had subsided quickly. So the tall one and the short one ventured back up to the fourth floor to see if their customer was still in his carrel. Not finding him, they fled the technology of the fourth floor for the more social sciences of the third. Wandering around in the stacks and taking occasional hits from a portable bong, the two were in a guandry. Could they take off their boots and fill them with pot and then carry out their boots and an empty briefcase? Probably not. Could the pot be saved in any sure way? Perhaps. Why not create a distraction, said the tall one. How can we create a distraction, said the short one, when our only raw materials are pot and a bunch of books? They found a carrel that was left unlocked. Retreating inside, with just enough room for both of them and the briefcase, they opened their naugahyde companion to check again on the con- tents, for strategic purposes. Three half-pound bags and elevin lids. Each of the half-pounds is worth 10 or more lids, so it is the half-pounds that need to be saved above all else. The lids will have to go. Since the tall one was the only one with a jack- et, it was he that did the skulking around the li- brary. As the tall one came and went from the carrell three times the short one kept have sug- gestions. Like taking some obscure text, cutting a hole in the pages and stashing the lid in there- to be left for anyone to find in ten or twenty years. But, as the tall one carried out his business, he didn't need to cut the pages of books-he had no desire and no time for such. The eleven lids were placed strategically, on a urinal in the men's john in the Reserve room, behind the door to the women's john on the third floor, under a stack of books on a desk tas a library book replacer began to move towart it, and so on, until the last three were placed near the stairwells which led from the lobby on the second floor. The briefcase had those three half-pounds left in it, and the tall one and the short one moved steadily toward the main exit. The guard was still there, checking purses and briefcases and back- packs. Third in line, second in line, taking for- ever yet not enough time to think. Why didn't all hell break loose? A matronly librarian came running up the stairs into the lobby. "officer, officer . . . I'd like to report the finding of some sort of DRUG-ll!" The man in uniform looked surprised, aston- ished. As the baggie was waved by the frantic old woman, it began spilling out onto the carpet, seeds bouncing off into oblivion. "Where, where?" "on the first floor, in one of the slots where they keep the check-out cards." And as the uniform headed back down the stairs, it shouted, "Look, here's another one-call the police." But by that time, the tall one and the short one were on their way, smiling and knowing that only a Dragnet trained German shepherd could find all of the pot they had left in the Library- relaxing their bodies with the relief that comes from knowing that you have just bought your way out of trouble. And, they left with the three half-pou nds. As it turned out, they were so flustered at saving those three half-pounds that they flipped out during the big sale, got the customer para- noid, and didn't sell the pot that night. But, the next day, Friday, they sold two of the three to me. It was the first pound I had ever bought, and I was prepared for it. I had an old dishpan which I lined with newspaper to break the pound up in, and I went out to the IGA and bought a package of zip lock baggies. The ICA is the only store in town which I have found zip-lock baggies in. Zip-lock baggies are a basic for good cannabihol- ics, but at that point in time Qto the best of my recollection, yes, senatorl I was not yet aware of the unique quality of zip-lock baggies. My testimony is probably suspect, for sure, be- cause it was Saturday morning before I got to the pound to package it. And before I got to the pound, I fed myself a reefer and gave the roach to the cat. But the unique quality of zip-lock baggies is not the sip-lock. Nor is it the extra thickness of the plastic. Nor the added volume nor the brand name nor the pretty box. It's those helping hands. You know, those phantom philanges which appear on TV com- mercials to the users of zip-lock baggies, the same way the man from Glad appears for others. Ap- parently, the helping hands don't have the logis- tics problems that their counterpart has, because nobody runs around shouting "helping hands, helping hands!" They just appear. And, on cue, one finds himself saying "Why, helping hands!", just like on the commercial. And they proceed to help you out with whatever you happen to be wrapping. And I was bagging pot. And those damned hands helped me do it. Since I have no scales, I was glad to have the help. They divided up the ounces better than I could have, even picking out the choicest tops and powder for my special stash, and using the rest of the good pot for my roommates' lids, leaving nicely packaged left- overs for me to stash in one of the ventilation ducts. And when those helping hands were through, they reached into my stash la little pre- sumptuous, I thought, but payment enough for the aidj and rolled a one-paper reefer better than the ones that the radio-station staff can roll. And we smoked it. Yes, smoked it. When the hands inhaled QI know that doesn't sound right, but you describe ith the smoke just disappeared, And when the hands exhaled the smoke reappeared, to dissi- pate into the atmosphere. I tried blowing smoke behind, between and around the helping hands, llike they did the The Invisible Manj but it was no use. just hands, that's all, and lsomehowl smoking my pot. And the hands seemed to get real stoned, real quick. They must have been smoking a lot lately, because they even knocked an ashtray off of the kitchen table. As the official IMPEACI-I NIXON roachclip was being passed from me to them, the hands took one last hit fthe last hit, in factj, folded themselves, and slowly vanished. Sadie, Sadie, Sexey Lady 455' J' K3 1'2" AWA' ia 'E gk,J..4. H 'M-v"?Za2J 2 :7u, 24 'T' 0 'Wh .J , I 1., 4, 1 . ,, "'-'. ,fn ,,,, ff L.. Wu fm ., -f.. -at ' 9, , 4 ,eff - -w':'3"40VvJjy 4' 1 f 'I A J -5 1. Wi. fl Q 'in , h' 49 Z-f - A . . ' .1-4. A ' .w,.,m4 'W , ' .V 1 ,,, 7. rf' 5 . . - ' " . A . .1,, ,A A K1 ,ug , 1 .1 1 ' , ' V ' 4 ' , f C fm. Jr' , 14 MTW ,gi f Y . ' '. . - , f, f Q A ,"1V??' A 'naw Y ' if-5 f ,Q ai ' 1 ,T - V .0 V .gf - ,Q ' 1X4 -Va' .. f f 24 , f X ' Y ,l lg, ,y 'r .,, v. , A- . 4 . ' z " , ..- 9'2" "0 4 Q2 AJ' , W- ' KX . A I ' ' - v- . 1 M- , W ,. ' , ,fy 1 Z "' , ,-1' 1 ,, . wg- ..,,.fff 1' f -La' ' .45 J nw" .- 5 ff' 'rfysfff-JSQZ3. , f- V Q, Q , f , ,- . , ,,, K. . ' is ,W ,fy , W igyiiufq. - A Z ' 1,, "1.w.a-'4 3 . V v ii. a ' A if 1- 3 nf 5' ,gawk 'g" ' 7:94, ' "1 I . 4. - "12!g4'lj: ' in ff: 4- v 25,-g.1-,-ig-'fm ,, Qf '. -'v'31:jy55'j I 55 ' Q 39 - A ' I :fs 5.74 if Wy..-i"w , 5 Wfif-'iff' A f ' 'wg j',,..Q ' ' 45 . ig - 'ffl ' ,V f. Q mi I . A. , 'in G52 ty, Bu.. W, V. .qi -1 W. ,, .,,., A .,.1' .f,vL':" f xx -94' T.-Y, a. I ' As' L 9 , A 'Lu ' X W :git s 9-.f Q 22 Q 4 Q., f.. -. 'ffii' 'Ns ' . R 'Nia-. ., , rat nz, 'Nzf if'- ui' , ' 1 if 'Ek 2-v Motocross!! if ..-Y -...Q w -qylg, :r J an ,Q 5-s"'Z"" fl Q R silk v' E9- .-for Lann In 1970 when the Arkansas athletic department re- cruited a young Iowa assistant coach, Lanny Van Eman, to promote Razorback basketball, Orville Henry, the dean of Arkansas sports writers had these comments to make about the status of Arkansas basketball: "The right man for the job will be a man who can recruit and promote. By promote, I mean promote the enthusiasm that is necessary. He'll get the U of A backing, including the completion of Barnhill Field House's seating capacity, converting it to a basketball arena. Almost no one is promoting basketball in Arkansas just a touch of salesmanship would help." Van Eman fit these criteria as he became only the seventh Razorback basketball coach and only the fifth full-time basketball coach. He was the first with an out- of-state background. Lanny Van Eman inherited a complexity of problems, the two biggest ones were promoting Arkansas' recent poor record and its playing facilities-Barnhill Fieldhouse. Both were in dire need of improvement. He faced other difficulties during his four years at the U of A, but these proved to be the major ones. He came armed with en- thusiasm and a winning background and philosophy. During Van Eman's first two seasons as head mentor -usually considered rebuilding years for any sports pro- gram-his Runnin' Razorbacks with their aggressive, pressing defense finished with dismal 5-21 and 8-18 rec- ords. But his freshman recruits of 1970-71 completely re- wrote the U of A freshman record books with a perfect 16-0 record and were ranked tenth nationally. Then, last year Martin Terry, Doug Campbell, Jody Bass, Dean Tolson, Dennis White, Roger Spears and Rickey Medlock-all Van Eman recruits-led the rejuve- nated Hogs to a 16-10 record-their best record since 1961. They took second place in the SWC with a 9-5 mark, the Hogs' best league finish since 1958 when they tied for the title with SMU. When Van Eman arrived he tried to get football-oriented people to think about basketball for two or three months of the year. He was stunned by the poor attendance at the state basketball tournament in Little Rock. After all the disappointments of his first two seasons he said in 1972, "I've always moved under a lucky star. Everything I've known has come these first two years at Fayetteville." Some mitigating factors which may have hurt Van Eman's dreams for Arkansas basketball include the failure to renovate Barnhill Fieldhouse into a more attractive re- cruiting weapon, the scarcity of Arkansas radio stations carrying the Runnin' Razorbacks games, a lack of in- volvement from fans in Little Rock and an antagonistic press. , The legacy of Lanny Van Eman will be more clear in a few years and will depend on how his successor fares with some of Van Eman's recruits. Van Eman was a breath of fresh air who brought a progressive, optimistic outlook and a charming expressiveness. His record, 39-65, does not tell the whole Lanny Van Eman story. Hopefully, Arkansas basketball is headed in the right direction. Maybe with an improvement of Barnhill, Van Eman's successor will not have the same handicaps to overcome and can build on the foundation Van Eman established. He cer- tainly promoted the idea while he was here. If nothing else, Lanny Van Eman created a climate for change. no If 'Q' 'WK I I 1' 5 J ! , I. 5 A I ' .. ,K M 0 -nfl li? P'- f e ,.. .- 1 1 . , w--58 - N r Q. , .ZW Q5 ft? 'N- Q f? . , 6, 4 1 ' 1' '51, N ' M td -D ' 'O . 1 bfi :Zsfl f 'N Y . 1" - ,JP 4 'ln f A g sl , ' 0 , . , fix .. up 1 'NA 4 . U I i 4 1 4 , .ov 5 0 ,, JV ,gy 609 xv, W' ' 4 ,I X 1- ' My 6' F sf an-LMQQM Yxof' xl li ' w is , 1 PSHE?-if .knqghx +':, ' + P ll MJ, f 5. Q-Q-Q. ,xxx 1 Nw. 'bag """ 'hula ,M .W W fi' 'M nw . 'W' 11 1 ,A W M f. ' Q -,-fff , ',1:.., J.',:,,.Q . ,. gf f 1 , 'dia lx... ,H 4 HW! vn5,,w""" xx "L'iswf"g f fu use 'W-'lcv "in lm 'f f wl"' 4. B"'ip,g."w B Z 4.4, f.. an ,M a 024 M. V , A in V ww :fin -dk: 'N -rf' 2 . J' w 342 in ,Q Qs iw ,gm dunes 'vigil H..-Lvl. .. 'Hn '15-. 'vu 'al' tl' 35' -nv. 7 - 19 ,My QA, . s ,J ' zf 1 5 1 W '4-. 4 I v., ,, , , 'F -ef ,J-'K 1- . ,fn 1 3 1 Wu. - all in J '-.:' 1 8 I O T QT' ' 7 A 'i 'f'-"Vs ,fl ,. 'ff-na .59 X, 1 . v S., fl 1 ' .f , ., f Lf ' f 'K ,f . 1. You're in the Army now Ak,- 5,1 '..z' J. W'--'.s.-. ' 1 vi SQQOII 04 X l E- VA' wif wwf' I' Y -Q H., X 1' 1- "!',,. of, 6433 4,0 J 2.955 xii I . , 'K J f 73 ,, . "1 .'3Xmh '7 1-1 Il P3 .hw W 113, ,r ,4 I . 'Z ? e , r ,...,,, . 41 x ,K 5 1 , I I I "Nl .uf qi r A .vii jg" ""'!' If 5 I 6 ,.-w X I . The following pages are rated PG. Parental guidance is suggested. And now, ladies and gentlemen, we give you March 4,5,6 and 7th, better known as the Week of the Streak . . . vi ff ?4:.f,:V .. T , , I 551'-52", ' ZA., . V ., a- 'YQ ,J P w 'A fi-A As, . .Q-pnnmnlinhlvvv .pi x fgx ,Q ' 'iz pix.. ,, -nik x x, o v""g"W f f X zn- "W-..v- .ww- It has become quite apparent that U of A students can't stand the thought of being second to any other state insti- tution. So, when students elsewhere began streaking in the spring of '74, it was certain that U of A students would fol- low their lead. Streaking, to you parents out there, is much like the old goldfish-swallowing and telephone booth activities of a few years ago. Students have now found that streaking is not only ridiculous like their parent's sports, but also a lot more dangerous. Police can slap your sweet ass with an indecent exposure charge and if you're a woman, you can be tackled by 30 viewers. Viewing is much safer, and probably the most fun you can have with your clothes on. Well, so much for our digressiong let's get on with the actual events here at the University. On a week-end in early March, several schools around the country were going for the national streaking record of 250 streakers. Several frats combined to attempt the rec- ord on Monday night, but landed only 150 takers. How- ever, they were our first streakers and did a creditable job. From the Kappa Alpha Theta house, these nude men ran, jogged, and finally walked the 7f10 of a mile distance be- tween the Theta house and Pi Phi. Maple Street was lined with well-wishers, girlfriends, and amazed citizens. A large number of the unclads did not even go to the trouble of wearing masks to protect their identities. Thousands of students assembled later that night at Reid I-Iall for spon- taneous streaking and some panty throwing from Reid residents. The next night saw several hundred line Maple for some light streaking which caused more spectators to come to the event, bringing logs for a street bonfire. One young lass was arrested, and, in protest, a fellow student tmalej walked to the police station in protest. That is, he walked unclad with several hundred followers twho were cladj. Wednesday was a rest night for all the big streakers. Some isolated streakers kept a small audience happy until about midnight. Thursday night? Well, it started out with over a thou- sand students and high school kids on Maple. Conditions were too crowded for viewers and streakers alike, so over half the crowd moved down to the football field. There was a fence in the way, but the crowd was most kind in damag- ing only a small portion. Arkansas was soon to claim the title of the first Astro-Turf Streak. Women joined jogging men. As this article is written, it is not known of the future of streaking on the U of A. Perhaps we have seen our last mobsfstreaks. When you've seen a couple of hundred na- ked bodies, perhaps you've seen them all. Caught With Your Pants Down!! ntnrzwf ft 1 gr at W -is 2 ttf: warm mu M Q Q tv - L r 1' , Q 4 M A 1 t ,- X2 1 ml , 1 ,1 I Qi A , , tf 0 , .. ,. ,gp V ..v, it 1 Q gf L 'A ' 'fm .. Q3 ia' W' 4 ,r-f 'X if ,au-n,. 'T N-,., 7 W . 5 X 2' in 5. is N A In ,,.. 462, C I .5 4, X .ff O I' .1 4, "L 7 . J 31, ,, al ss-'-. ,wwf- ,4.Vf' 5 40 ' gr" a f"" ? : ' -ur , gy .wp-w"'R 3 X N n l -... y sl 3 -H. ui . X fx 0. .- 'N . i 349 , V,'1 Z For Shame! N. x .Mag 4 ai 9 1 'A Y, rfziv X' 5 , ' . will .Sr v: ,.f,. ' s 385 : P 5 On December la, the UA Board of T sus ly approved a change in A-Boolf. 'H wi permit students Zl years ot age or older ants in the privacy ot their roorns on the F Commonly known as Senate Bill 11, the riginated in Student Senate on Uct. 10, 197 Chou, then a Porntret Senator, as sponsor. 'though the original bill dealt with several regulations where state laws conflicted with carnpus pollcpf only the intoxlcants part of the bill was gien Board approval. The approved regulation reads: "P use intoxicants in public areas ot University E ing organized housesl and at otticial University held on campus ls prohibited. Persons ot legal age as pre- scribed by State laaw regarding alcoholic beverages, may possess and consurne these beverages in the privacy of as- signed student roorns. lrresponslble behavior while under the influence of intoxicants ls not condoned and may be subject to review andfor action by the appropriate judicial body." The change will really only attect about 506 students who are of legal age and who cornprise only five percent of the total enrollment. The rnoditication will not affect students under 21 years of age, nor will it change Univer- sity regulations against public drinking on campus. The regulations will continue to provide lor entorcernent ot Editors note: Senate Bill 332, allowing the consuming of alcoholic bever- ages in dorms, will become operative next fall. We other several ideas on the subject as written while consideration was given on the bill. Below is a background report on the bill, while on the Opposite Page are two views concerning this new freedom tor students. can be included in the next edition of the A-Book. .senate bill H changes retry little. ln the residence halls, null ease the lax in noisy out in be illegal. Ut will t to see if this is the pus intoxlcants. Thus there will con- tlnue to be only slight alcohol consnrnption by the sorori- ties in their living quarters. The passage ot Senate Bill li is the very least the Board at Trustees could do to comply with state laws. The new regulation still will not allow liquor at any event in the Un- ion. lt would have been handy tor student groups to have social tunctions in the Union Ballroom with liquor. Also taculty and staff members will not be able to enjoy a beer at lunchtime or in the afternoon on campus. ln another vein, the regulation only applies to this cam- pus ot the University.. All other branches tincluding the lvledical Center at Little lloclc where everyorte is an adultl stlll operate under archaic standards b ' that the houses be ee ecause they did not rules against irresponsible behavior arising lrom the use of intoxicants. Senate Bill 11 will not becorne law until This delay period was selected tor several re allow time for teedbacl-1 from critics across the review of the Board action it too much static can be an adequate period for alcohol abuse the Housing Office and Student Frffairsg the pressure the Board tor inclusion in the fou problern has solution ation here. controlled alcoholic Pro When the University upholds the practice of acting "in place of parents" not only do they take on a responsibility that the parents should have taught their children when they were home, but the University then tends to restrain privileges normally exercised by the same age people who happen not to be pursuing higher education. Senate Bill 2 and its orderly implementation will not solve the problems inherent to overconsumption of alcohol, but it will help al- leviate one aspect of the hypocritical way in which remain- ing regulations are enforced. The alcohol regulation we now have may be closely com- pared to open house regulations. The upbringing and mor- als of students don't suddenly change between the hours of 1 a.m. and 8 a.m., but our regulations are written as if they do. In regard to both sets of regulations, our educa- tional experience that is supposed to be preparing us for life should include facing the new personal decisions thrust upon us by the University environment while armed only with our personal morality, not the collective advice of a legislative body. On some points, there is legitimate opposition to the proposed change. Implementation of the bill will be diffi- cult, but could not possibly be more of a failure, nor as un- fair, as the present policy. Drinking will be harder to con- trol and it may or may not increase. Study conditions may or may not deteriorate. Students may or may not drive less while drinking. We'll have to wait and see. The present policy only makes it harder to consider the positive and negative aspects of alcohol's use by man. Why not let student behavior operate within the context of parental influence on personal morals and state law, as young adults do in the non-academic world. -from the editorial page of The Arkansas Traveler, Sept, Zo, 1973 Con The University of Arkansas Board of Trustees' new policy of allowing students of drinking age at the Fayette- ville campus to consume alcoholic beverages in their dor- mitory rooms was condemned Friday by State Senator john F. tlvluttj Gibson Sr. of Dermott. Gibson said the new policy "couldn't possibly add any- thing to the academic purpose of the university" and de- clared that "I intend to do whatever l can to see that they reverse" the action. His principal concern, the senator explained at a Capitol news conference, was that drinking students would "dis- tract from the studies of others who do not imbibe." Gibson said the Board did not "give enough thought" to the action and that it constituted an "invitation and con- donement" of alcoholic use. "This is an age of permissive- ness that has caught up with our education system." The senator said he would talk to the trustees individual- ly and try to persuade them to rescind the rule. lf that fails, he said he would "be inclined as a legislator" to question the funding of an institution whose ideas of education "differ vastly" from those of the people he represents. Gibson said he had waited for the people to object to the new rule but that there had been no outcry. "Lots of time, people are not aware." He said if the people "knew and understood the probable consequences" that they would be upset. -from a news story in The Arkansas Gazette, Dec. ZZ, 1973 If You Don't Like The Weather ..... Wait 5 Minutes Instant seasons! Yes, nine out of every ten students re- fer to the Fayetteville climate using such adjectives as un- predictable, unbelievable, and unreal. The University of Arkansas is probably the only place in the world where practically any stitch of clothing owned can be utilized at any time. The temperature can drop a degree a minute for 30 minutes. The wind can nearly blow you off your feet, and yet ten minutes later the air is as still as a vacuum. How about snow in late March?l just living in Fayetteville is a series of predictions. just because it's cold when time for your 8:30 class doesn't mean that you'll need that coat for your 9:30 . .. but this is not to say that it will not be needed at 10:30, whichis not to say that you should necessarily weariit anytime after lunch. Frustrating, maybe. Infuriating? Most of the time. Does it keep life interesting? For the most part. And, where else but Fayetteville can you streak one week and be completely forced indoors the next. Yes, the weath- er even interfered at the height of the streaking season at the U of A. Indoor streaking, anyone? w "3 -t X 4. ' , I -.. .N v. ,, Q I T. . 13 ,J Iwi '- J September Jack Anderson, the Washington syndicated columnist, was the first speaker for the 1973-1974 symposium series. Governor Dale Bumpers and Dr. David Mullins were vic- tors over Rick Campbell and Henry Woods in a pool match sponsored by the Arkansas Union. "The Spanish Hour" was presented by the University Opera Workshop. University organizations participated in an Activity Fair in the Union. The Lynn Norton Fund was started. The possible loss of accreditation for' the Psychology De- partment was announced. The Arkansas Union hosted Union Week. The University of Arkansas Board of Trustees author- ized 55.2 million to renovate Qld Main. Dr. M. Thomas Starkes, specialist in the fields of the occult, world religions and cults in America, spoke in the Union Ballroom on "The Occult Phenomenon in America Today". The University of Arkansas Associate Degree Nursing Program received accreditation by the National League of Nursing. 1 .,,. i E GERS , T, October Gail Oliver was selected as Miss Dogpatch in the Sigma Nu Sadie Hawkins pageant. Career Day was held by the Central Placement Office. Loggins and Messina performed in concert in Barnhill Fieldhouse. "Present Laughter" was presented by the Drama Depart- ment. Students granted representation on Senate Council. Health Careers Seminar was held. The Lettermen performed in Barnhill Fieldhouse. Beat Texas Week was fun for some, a nightmare for others, and controversial for all. John H. Barnhill, former athletic director, died. "Midsummer Night's Dream" presented by University of Arkansas Drama Department. The Biggest Hamburger in the world was made at Burger Chef in an effort to raise funds for the Lynn Norton Fund. The University of Arkansas sponsored an Open Chess Tournament, ovember Becky Wilson, Homecoming Queen, reigned over the game in which Arkansas defeated Texas A and M. 14-10. Casino Carnival, sponsored by RHA, was held at Pom- fret. Roller Derby made it debut at Barnhill Fieldhouse. Jane Hunt, Pi Beta Phi, was selected Miss Sorority Pledge Queen in the pageant sponsored by Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. Schola Cantorum sang a mass in honor of former Presi- dent John F. Kennedy. Hazel Shaw was selected to reign as Miss B.A.D. "The Thwarting of Baron Bolligrewu was presented by the University Drama Department. The University of Arkansas Modern Dance group, Qr- chesis, performed to a capacity crowd in the Women's Gym. The St. Louis Iazz Quartet performed in the Union Ball- room. The mayor of Fayetteville, Russell Purdy, spoke to the Student Senate on bringing the university community and the community of Fayetteville closer together. Q., if December The Doobie Brothers performed for a sell out audience in Barnhill Fieldhouse. james Mosely, founder of Saucers and Unexplained Celes- tial Events Research Society QSAUCERSJ, was a guest speaker in the Arkansas Union Symposium Lecture Se- ries. Living groups participated in the annual Singfony com- peddon. Tests, tests, tests .... Ianu ar Spring registration was january 9,10,11 but it had to be extended due to low enrollment. The University returned to the "arena" system of regis- tration. Cabaret was shown at the Union Theater. The University of Arkansas Board of Trustees voted u- nanimously to permit students 21 years of age or older to use intoxicants in the privacy of their rooms on the Pay- etteville campus. An attempt to impeach Rick Campbell failed when Student Court acquitted him. fr ,J av' , xx if 9. 'lx' Februar The U of A Cattle judging Team won the Southwestern Collegiate Dairy Cattle Judging Contest at the South- western Exposition and Fat Stock Show in Fort Worth, Texas. Kappa Sigma and Zeta Tau Alpha were the Scholar's Bowl winners during Greek Week. josh McDowell presented a series of lectures at Barnhill Fieldhouse on Christianity. Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show performed at Barnhill Fieldhouse during Creek Week. Jerry Lawson was elected A.S.G. President. "Gone With The Wind" was shown at the Arkansas Union Theater. Board of Publications elected Dave Baer to be Traveler Editor for the 1974-1975 school year. The Board of Publications fired Doug Wallace, Traveler editor and hired Associate Editor David Russell for the remainder of the school year. Delta Upsilon colonized on the University of Arkansas campus. The Board of Publications hired Betty Dennis to be 1975 Razorback editor. Lanny Van Eman, head Basketball coach, resigned. March Viet Rock was presented at the Union Theater. The University of Arkansas Opera Workshop performed Don Giovanni to a sell-out audience every night. "Streak Week" became a truly unforgettable part of the 1973-1974 school year. Miles Zimmerman resigned as President Pro Tempore of Student Senate. The Fine Arts Festival was a cooperative effort involving the Departments of Music, Art, Speech and Dramatic Arts, and Architecture. ' The U. of A. Uarkettes presented their annual home con- cert. Student Senate allocated funds to campus organizations. Proposed amendments to the Associated Student Govern- ment constitution passed providing for elective officers for the positions of Vice President, Secretary, and Treas- urer. Black Awareness Week featured Alex Poinsett, author and senior staff editor of Ebony magazine, as a speaker. The Foreign Language Department hosted area high school students at the annual Foreign Language Festival. Dr. David Mullins retired as President of the University of Arkansas as of March 1, 1974. , pril The Fine Arts Department presented Lute Song. An Apathy Parade was the first activity of Off Campus Week. "Romeo and Juliet" was showr. at the Union Theatre. Residence Hall Association sponsored Hallaballo. "Some Like It Hot" was shown at the Union Theater. Speakers for the Women's Symposium included janet Hall Diggs, Bernice Sandler, Margaret Dunkle, and con- gresswoman from Colorado Patricia Schroeder. "The Great White Hope" was shown at the Union Theater. Sport 4 '-k. V . .,,, ..1,.:i,.1., . ,,.r' 1513 Golf A . 11 ,ggi fe 1 N, H A A Y N Track Gymnastics ,f'f ,,...--Q 'J ' 1 3 " DELL r weak af pc"!'Y I 1WfFf:xa I 1,3 f . K, "l --a -'.JWf' Tennis Track F 'ff ' ' ",.' I.- , Q" . ' uf A ffffz' . .f ' Track 365 6 The Thwarting of Baron Bolligrew Directed by Tom Leabhart. Storyteller . ....................... Cynthia Cwoatley The Duke ...,................ ....... T homas B. Logan A Knight .......................... Robert Merry-Ship Sir Digby Vayne-Thumpington ............ Lowell Wilson Sir C-raceless Strongbody ,......... ..... D oyle Martin Sir Percival Smoothely-Smoothe . . . .,... Jack Rakes Sir Oblong Fitz Oblong ......... ........ I oe Brown Juniper ................. .... S ony Tomlinson Captain .................................... Ken Mills jasper, 15th Baron Bolligrew ................ Randy Rakes Peasants ...... Michelle Blair, Cindy Lockerd, Dottie Love, Linda McDonald, Delia Shields, Robert Merry-Ship, Sony Tomlinson Men-A -Arms .... .... D oyle Martin, Lowell Wilson Lord Mayor Obidiah . . . Magpie . . . A Secretary The Dragon A Corporal A Cook . . . Cymbalist . . . . ..........i........ Ken Mills . , . .............. Steve Teaser . . . ........... Amy Howell . . . ........... Lowell Wilson the voice of Harry Budd ..........DoyleMartin ' .... Cindy Lockerd . . . .Sony Tomlinson funn'- U I P i U w I 367 A Midsummer Night's Dream Theseus .... Hippolyta . Philostrate . . . Egeus ..... Lysander . . . Demetrius . . Hermia ..,. Helena ...... . Peter Quince .... Bottom fPyramusJ Snug QLionJ .... Flute tThisbyJ . . . Snout CWallJ ..,. Starveling CMoonj Oberon ......... Titania .... . . Puck .........i. Directed by George R. Kernodle. . . . .Michael Sweet . . . .Debbi Lundy ...Hjeff Tenant . . . .Randy Rakes ..,...jack Rakes Tony DelVecchio Danae Columbus .Gale Kelley Byrd .Doug Treadway ......,BertPrice . . . . .Rich Gerdes . .Tom Gallagher .Cal Grosshuesch ..........IimBeck . . . .john Benson . . . ................... Tracey Wilson Thomas B. Logan lmps, C-oblins, Fairies . .Susan Dietrich, Marsha Coldtinch, Joanna Risser, Kathy Satterfield, Nancy Todd, Ionelle West. 5 ,nm 11 l' 4, fm, g . V , .L,,, ,1 il .Ax U Present Laughter Directed hy Thomas R. jones. Daphne Stillington ,..... ,......... S usan Dietrich Miss Erik-son . . Fred ............ ,.... Monica Reed . Carry Essendine Liz Essendine , . Roland Maule A Morris Dixon Hugo Lyppiatt. Joanna Lyppiatt Lady Saltburn . .... . . . . . ,Bonnie Jean Thomas .Cal Crosshuesch . . ,..... Nancy Todd . . . ......,..i RJ. Quinn . . ..... Marsha Goldfinch . . ...... John Benson . . ..... Don Cowan . . . . . . . .David McElroy . . ....,. Tracey Wilson Kathy Satterfield 7 The Effect of Gamma Rays Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds Directed by Thomas R. jones. Tillie ....,...... .... ........... J 0 nelle West Beatrice . . ..,... Marsha Goldfinch Ruth ......... ..... T anya Treadway Nanny .......... ...... S heryl Branham Janice Vickery ..... ..... K ay Huckabee 'fi we an-:"""" 'mvP"""""""""""""""' . mlm-vw is-I R --'r Aa my Vimk K'- M W ,,, , 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , I 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 I A 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 '1 1 1 ff' 1 I 373 11 Lute Song Directed by George Kernodle. Tchang ..... Tsai-Yong ..... Tsai ........... M adame Tsai ,..... Tchiao-ou-Niang Prince Nleou ....,,.. .... Princess Nieou-Chi . . . . .Thomas B. Logan .Wesley Edwards' . . . .Doyle Martin . . .Ardith Morris ... . .Kerry Wylie . . . .Dale O'Brien .Martha McMillan Britt Crews Si-Tchun . .Kathy Satterfield Pao-Lin ...... . .Kathie Johnson Li-Wang ........... ..... D oug Treadway Youen-Kong .... .Richard Emerson Imperial Chamberlain . . . ..... Mark Mobley Marriage Broker ...................... Holy Man .........,................. ......Kay Kelley .Michael Landers Beggars, Benevolent Demons, Townspeople .... David Bell, Cindy Lockerd, Sylvia Stewart, Dorothy Woods, Ken Mills, Ken Stiltner, Kay I-Iurkabe. l V i 375 L Schola Cantorum I 3 P' x Uarkettes .1 " vk-45 r 1, E liilfffg is KV MJ V ' Ozark Polk Tales According to Mrs. Pearl Galloway, director, "This is a hodgepodge of Czark people. lt's the stories handed down by mouth to mouth-witchcraft, remedies, tall tales." Professor Norman DeMarco combined his arranging talents with the books of Vance Randolph to create a script designed to characterize the whole culture ofthe Ozarks. The cast of readers included Mark Mobley, Greg Stid- ham, Doyle Martin, Nick Miller, Kathy Kiley, Kay Kelley, jean Lambert, Mary Smith, and Doug Smith. I 1 I 1 . I . I1 V I fd? -1 -7 ,- jf, . M . , V A " 1, .A 3' 1 , , b , . s - A , x , ' , x ' , ' ' 379 P "Little Faces Looking Up" The Readers Theater in the Department of Speech and Dramatic Art at the University of Arkansas presented "Lit- tle Faces Looking Up" as it's first production for the spring semester. Mrs. Pearl Calloway, director, and assistant professor of speech and dramatic art, said the script is "for, by, and about children". She added that "younger children enjoyed 'Funny Duck', 'Anatole, the Mouse', 'Arthur the Anteater', and some of Kipling's 'lust So' stories as told from the 'book nook', and that grown-up children were amazed at the perspectiveness of children. The program concluded with writings of children from the ghettos of America who voice their frustrations, fears, dreams, and disappointments. The production was presented by the Readers Theater class and featured as directors Donald Cowan, laydes Wor- den, Io l-lunt, Nancy Smith and R. 1. Quinn. The readers were Terry Keough, Larry Graham, Cathy Blaylock, Sharon Walker, jack Mahan, Nancy Pickens, Dwight Segraves, Greg Stidham, Kathy Johnson, janet Pearson, Linda Johnson, and Morris Sylvester. lim Sutherland and Thomas Logan were in charge of lighting, while Joe Brown, Don King, Charles Walker, and jim Sutherland were in charge of stage. Music was by Don King and Charles Walker. . Ha 9 132, I Fine Arts N ' Mfr. ' , . f .30 x 5. 1. Q GE-L I . 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N mf' 1. g UA si 1 i 'f ZA- fi V ,. 2 44 lg: ,Z K Www ggwgikiq , lim, , XX Qs 4 SGS? Don Giovanni Directed by Maxwell Worthley. Leporello . . . Donna Anna ..... Don Giovanni . . . Commendatore .... Don Ottavio ..... Donna Elvira . . . Zerlina ., Massetto .......... Peasants and servants .......... . . . . .Harry Budd David Sackman . . . . . . .Louise Ryan Elizabeth Howick . . . . . .Max Ryan Todd Gordon . . .David Russell Frantz Batterfield Bill Burrows ....janetTurner Carolyn Egedal . . . .Glenda Sloat Sandra Meier . . . . .Steve Smith John McBee .. .. . ...Mary Comstock, Janice Diven, Shelley Edelen, Julianne johnson, Susan Kelley, Anne Peebles, Margaret Manning, Barbara Ray, Susan Watkins, Leroy Brown, Avis Hammond, Howard Matthews, Stan Staggs, Aubrey Watson. ,g ,lm .AQ-A' ,I I, L A r ,.,,.,' 25? I ' ' ' M fffM,',g W , ' P ,lf t . A A I , -x Q Ax 6 -W' fz'f'h?i f ' 4 5 , 'S 4, , f ' V, :Wg ' 4, ,- Q mini X -A ,., 'K -1. 1, A ' ff .,, .. , ,, Q Q .5 Q v? M' 7 , 'Q fflfnvmwwwyfwm 1.f,, 1-,,.-.,,. Q JS A Fm ., - ,,.. , "M A - 1 5, Q "'1"3Q ff 4' 'M sq, ,,,, mm. my uv .. , A Gif ,fy : 'Y 1' ff 'K 'S s I" My ,, 1 , 1 'lx 1' ,x A I 'Q XS 'V . as ,, H f W 'S-Q all J i H6911-15 , f , , , A ,irzy sf, , f. .fig A fix :bf .5 2 'wif U I5 Portfolio: Jim Sutherland 4 L K YS? 4 Qu ...-.... ..., .. ................ .....--.,--, --,.,- .., . -,- ...,..X,..,., A 1 I Y I I Q H N' . 1 W1 -' ly 1, 4 q,,,,,g1 4, gx i n w , J 1 I ' u 4 -I if I V A,,qW,M,.:, Y., 4 I pf- Q. F ' f 5,3 V , Q 'Ej,:,,iv,', '- 'N . , A am, -. , , . f f 9 . ,, 4, Y .8 f ' Q I H sk? .' W x.1Mb-vim ii I 1 P v iw 5, :I 1 4 fn 4 552 1 5. T 15 '18 f I . y5,' .filkVq.tz5h1 -,V 7 L, A 1 he 5 1 M WP.. ' Q--W ' I 'Si' gff ,z , 4 v"4'?4?"?1Y .fe P' .. n W 'iff -1 . -'!14t"' Ch well, back to the drawing board ali' W W . px, O wk' if C yi 1 Q w w N Z ,fan , 4 1 fm' sr 5 ,.,,iD 3, 95651 if f A . A A' ,wig ik f I mix 1 ' ' '--49, w "Nw K: f FJ M V. Q: C f ge, 'ff P ,Q "M Ze ' its f Mafia' A ' may 15 , 191 xx 3' vyrgfs, a 1 4 1 , fr New . A ' I . , ,M 3,' -Q'j1f,ZQ.'-fe - ,. j 2 Q, 4 j .L 1 M ,A,,,-,K : . f., .,,, , , V, 1' 1-M Kwfif 'I , KJ? .,g?'I . Q, 71,2 . ... fs 1 is ' z I ' an 00 g -.. il Q 8 it 3 I 1 X X Henry Woods, sports editor, joins the Razorbacks for five days and gives us this report. Paper Pig 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 First Day Press Day annually kicks off the season for the porkers as news media around the state and even a contingent from outside the state gather to meet and talk with the Razorbacks about the prospects for the ensuing season. I arrived around one o'clock to find numerous tele- vision cameras and tape recorders being set up for the afternoon ritual. One by one, Razorbacks donned in red jerseys and other Porker regalia entered the field area with cards in hand telling them which of the media wished to talk with them and take their pictures. I followed and watched a poised Scott Bull field question after question from a Tulsa cameraman, a Little Rock sportscaster, and a Springdale sportswriter, just to name afew. By my count, Bull was questioned three times about the carryover spirit from the season finale victory over Texas Tech, six times on the prospects and possibilities of the Slot-I formation, five times on whether he felt pressure as quarterback of the Hogs, three times on the attitude of the squad, twice on the rivalry between himself and Kirk- land, four times on his summer preparation for the sea- son, twice on the power of the USC unit, and one even asked him if he were planning to go on to pro football if possible 1to which his answer at this point in time is noj. Bull answered the last question with the same enthusiasm as the first and displayed speech skills that I didn't think a football player was supposed to possess. Cameras worked overtime that afternoon. I even got my picture taken once by the photographer and son of the edi- tor of the Harrison Daily Times. At this point, Sports Information Director Dave Cawood informed me that I was supposed to report to Coaches Mervin Johnson and Ken Turner at 11:30 on Tuesday attired in gym shorts and T-shirt for the meeting of the offensive linemen. Offensive line, I mumbled. I thought Coach Broyles didn't want me to get hurt. I'll probably get killed. I searched and finally found Coach Johnson and intro- duced myself. He seemed friendly enough, and remarked as he surveyed me that I just might be in better shape than most of the guys in the offensive line. That would remain to be seen. After I recovered from this initial shock, I counted upper lip growths that had escaped ultimatums for re- moval from coaches. Moustaches numbered nine 1ten counting minej, with Russ Tribble's handle-bar by far the best groomed. He, too, however expected to have it trimmed before practice. With the conclusion of Press Day activities, I headed to the dressing room to talk to the equipment manager about a jersey for me. I asked for one with the numbers OO, but he informed me that Razorback numbers start at 10 and run through 89. I took it upon myself then to have a jer- sey made to my personal specifications. When the time came to don shoulder pads, I would be ready with my red Razorback jersey with 8-inch numbers OO on both front and back. My first day as a Razorback concluded with dinner at Wilson Sharp. I took a place at the back of the line with the freshmen, a custom much like one observed in frater- nity houses where pledges wait until members have been served before eating. The cuisine was excellent, thick steaks and filet of fish fthe beef shortage has yet to take its toll at Sharpj. While my fellow teammates piled their plates full and cleaned them hastily, I picked at my partially-filled plate while con- versing with Mark Hollingsworth, Bill Bankston, and Scott Bull. I listened to the conversations going on around us. Talk varied from one's fishing trip to the thickness on the steaks to a team meeting later in the evening to how much the coach wanted one to weigh to a waiting date to the plight of the black people. The atmosphere was cordial, but alarmingly unenthu- siastic. Perhaps it was apprehensive of tomorrow's prac- tice, or maybe that's the way they play it when upperclass- men get their first look at the freshmen who might out- shine them and win a starting position. Nevertheless, my first day as a Porker was an interesting one, and we hadn't even hit the practice field yet. I spent the latter part of the evening in fear. Tomorrow was the start of practice and the whistle blowing to start the festivities interrupted many a dream that night. Second Da What doubts I may have had about the enthusiasm and dedication of this team were quickly removed as we took to the field on Tuesday. Breakfast was the first order of the day with a meal of eggs, sausage, toast, cereal, juices and milk 1lots of juices and milkj. After breakfast, most players returned to their rooms - some to sleep, some to study their playbooks, and all to anticipate the first practice at noon. The first meeting of the Offensive Line was at 11:30 in the film room. I was late of course II was later repri- manded for my tardinessj. The atmosphere was much like the academic classroom. Professor Mervin johnson drilled the linemen on their assignments in each play situation. A decent memory and a fairly good concentration span are musts for the football player. The football player's textbook, his playbook, was always in hand as players awaited the whistle signifying the be- ginning of practice. As we sprinted onto the grass field, we stopped to weigh in. I tipped the scales at all of one hundred and twenty four pounds of sheer muscle and determination. Clad in helmet, jersey numbered OO, official Razorback shoes, and track shorts tthe equipment manager Henry is still laughing at mej, I took a place at the back of the lines for warm-up exercises. The exercises varied from running in place to spread leggs-grab right ankle-touch chin to knee. Sprints were also part of the opening day warm-up protocol. I had a choice of positions. I could play either tackle, guard, or tight end. Being no fool talthough dubbed by many as crazy for spending the better part of five days of my life in this mannerj, I chose tight end. Mentor Steve Hedgepeth was to prove invaluable in instructing me on my play assignments. On one occasion during the first practice, I burst tyes, burstj through the line to block a safety. Failing to stop as is the custom in walk-through drills, I slammed into an un- suspecting freshman safety. Startled, he fell back. Well, I guess it was more like Liston taking a fall against Clay. Nevertheless, I had engaged in the first contact foot- ball of my life twhich at this point in time has been twenty- two year, five months and twelve daysj. My participation was limited to warm up, agility drills, passs receiving drill and the walk-throughs, but I think it was enough to give me a good indication of what it is like to be a Razorback. Small talk during practice was minimal as my teammates were thoroughly engrossed in play assignments. Practice was spirited as quarterbacks Bull and Kirkland looked sharp with their passing, though Bull did experience trou- ble in getting the ball from center. Quarterback is not the glamorous position we think it to be. Signal callers endure coaches' criticisms and tempers just like everyone else. Squads assembled around a sunburned Frank Broyles at the close of practice. He repeatedly emphasized the im- portance of remembering what had been practiced that day. "We're in a hurry. We've got to get ready. We can't wait on players who can't remember " Lunch was the usual subdued atmosphere. Cold cuts and liquids were consumed slowly, the opposite of the manner with which my teammates viewed food the day be- fore. After lunch most players headed for their rooms for a rendevous with their racks. Offensive Line 1-13 met again at 5:30 that afternoon. I was on time for this one, in fact I was early. Two a day practices mean two a day classes, too. I listened as a frustrated Prof. johnson asked a lineman if he understood the play and knew his assignment. The lineman answered, "I do now, Coach, but I probably won't when I get out there." Evening practice was held in the stadium. As I stepped onto the Astroturf in my practice attire, I pictured thou- sands of cheerings fans applauding my entrance. Many have dreamed and will dream of playing with the Razor- backs. I guess I'm just one of the fortunate few who has had the opportunity. I proceeded to take off my helmet for a moment to pull the hair out of my eyes. Evidently it was off my head for longer than a moment for teammate Bob Bruner cautioned me that removal of the helmet on the field resulted in sprints. I didn't have to be told twice. Warm-up drills initiated the practice. For the coaches and freshmen, it was their third practice session of the day. Fatigue leaves its mark on the coaches, as well as the players. Coach Broyles ruled his kingdom from an ivory tower, directing the instruments of his inexperienced but en- thusiastic orchestra. A full hour of drill, sweat, drill, and more sweat preceded the Gator-Ade break. No sooner had we plopped down on the turf than head manager Luigi blew the whistle to signify the resuming of practice. Moans echoed in the stadium. I watched the last forty minutes of practice from the side- lines, though I did run a few sprints at the end. Scott Bull strode past me once, thumped my helmet and commented, "You look just like Dickey Morton with your helmet on like that." Moments later, Jack Ettinger ap- proached and barked, "Hey, we don't sit down out here." Cries of fourth quarter filled the final minutes of prac- tice as my teammates encouraged each other. This year's team certainly won't be lacking in spirit. If they lose, you'll most likely have to chalk it up to inexperi- ence. For every varsity player who can't cut the mustard, theres a freshman ta big freshman I might addl waiting to step in. The varsity players are well aware of that. Com- petition should become keener as practice continues in pre- paration for that first game. Todays experiences proved to me that the idea of the "dumb jock" is a myth. You can't be dumb and expect to play football for Frank Broyles. We stopped to weigh in after practice. I waited until almost everyone had gone. The scales reached 122 and stopped, indicating a net loss of two pounds for the day. Not bad for the normal player, but two pounds is a lot of weight for someone of my size to shed in one day. Meat loaf headed the menu at dinner. I picked at my food. I wasn't really hungry, but had no trouble in down- ing four glasses of tea. When Borys Malczycki, head resi- dent at Wilson Sharp, told me to tuck in my shirt tail, I knew I was being accepted. Oh I won't start against Sou- thern Cal or anything like that, but at least the players know that one of the folks that writes about them every- day made an effort to find oat what its really like to be a Razorback football player. After dinner, I followed Dennis Dunkelgod, in hopes of surveying the typical athletes room. There I found the usual desk, bed, closet, books, as well as stereo tapes and player and a Coors can tfull of penniesj, Most of my teammates seemed to be preparing for re- tirement for the evening, although a few did change into clothes to meet a girlfriend. So ended my second day as a Razorback. I was sore as I walked out of Wilson Sharp that night to trod to my apartment. I didn't think you got sore until the next day . . .Wrong again. Third Day Soreness Webster defines it as painfully sensitive. I think he hit it right on the nose, for that's how I felt as I arose at 6 a.m. on my third day as a Razorback. I dressed slowly and carefully and headed for the sta- dium. It was still dark outside when I arrived. Players straggled in, some with one eye open, several with both eyes open, and most still trying to open either. I was relieved to find that the coaches did wait until there was some light outside before starting practice. I en- countered a different set of expressions from my team- mates that morning. Oh well, I guess I shouldn't have expected chatter and bright faces at seven a.m. I weighed in at 122, precisely the weight I carried away from practice the previous day. We dispensed with the initial flexibility drills and began working plays. I worked out with the tight ends as Bull and Kirkland fired bullets at us as we ran varied pass pat- terns. Imade one reception in three attempts for twelve yards. My teammates were less vocal than usual, excluding freshmen. You can't really count them. They haven't said a word in two days. I joined sure-handed end jack Ettinger for breakfast. Again my teammates went back to their rooms to rest be- tween practices. It was Wednesday morning at the Movies in Offensive Line 1013 as we watched films of spring practice while Prof. Johnson pointed to an assignment here, a missed block there, and even issued an occasional compliment now and then tbut rarelyl. We began the noon practice with flexibility exercises and then moved to walk-throughs of the plays gone over the past two days. With each practice, two additional plays were added to each player's reportoire. Coach johnson turned to me and asked what play I'd like to run. I answered Liz-ll. "Any particular reason?" he questioned. "Well, mainly 'cause it's the only play I know, Coach." Broyles closed the practice with " two and three a days may get old, but we don't have time to feel sorry for ourselves." It was examination time in Off. Line 1013 when we regrouped at 5:30. Associate Professor Turner greeted us with a test. I wasn't sure how important grades would be, but I was certain that the score would be directly proportional to the number of extra sprints required at the end of practice. The second practice was an up and down affair. A player would look sharp on one play, then completely miss an assignment on the next. It was the kind of a day. Following an errant Scott Bull pass, Coach Trull scoffed, "You won't complete 'em if you hit him in the ass with the ball." How true! I adopted my teammates' between practice routine by pausing for a nap in the afternoon. Punt coverage was the topic of discussion in Offensive Line 1013 as Prof. johnson reviewed each player's assign- ment. 4 The final three-a-day practice began again with spe- cialty drills. We tight ends picked up the tempo and were much sharper in our receiving. The fatigue of practice was beginning to take its toll on me now. There are no places to lie down on the turf. Be- lieve me, I looked for them! I was really becoming a jock. When I went to a meeting or a practice, I always had the feeling that I had just left there. Entertaining myself by trading jokes with'the defensive backs, relaxing on the sidelines, I was stirred to attention by a yelling Coach Williamson directing me to practice again. Ieez, I was even beginning to think like an athlete. If you think you know a clock-watcher, spend a week with the gang at Sharp and you'll see a house full of 'em. You could hear a pin drop in the dorm by 10 p.m. I had yet to see the after-hour shenanigans that Sharp is no- torious for Oh well, I would have had trouble staying awake for it anyway. . Fourth Day The fourth day began with the weigh-in. I again regis- tered a two-pound loss, putting my weight at 12.0. My teammates greeted each other with "Cheer up! This is the last day of three-a-days." The Offensive line, of which I was not an integral part, was the first unit to make its way to the turf for the first of three practices. I joined the tight ends as usual for specialty practices. I was one for three, not that impressive a percentage. Yet, my teammates were just as rusty and tight as I that morn- ing. Walk throughs of offensive line assignments followed, this time with contact encouraged. "C'mon, stay with him. All blocking is wanting to . . .' bellowed Coach Turner. We got our exams back in Offensive Line 1013 that morning. Prof. johnson remarked that the centers and tight ends had done pretty well. Un defense of the guards and tackles, it must be pointed out that their assignments are usually more complicated.J I had thought that by the fourth day all of the players had realized I was a writer. Yet sophomore Vic Underwood approached and asked if I were the one who was trying out for kicker. When my laughter subsided I told him "No, I'm here to beat out Hedgepeth for the starting spot at tight I end against Southern Cal." It was his turn to laugh. Practice was beginning to leave its mark on Prof. John- son. His vocal cords came and went throughout the lec- ture he gave prior to the exam. That was probably true of all the coaches. The 6:00 p.m. practice, third one that day, was my roughest workout. I ran patterns the first half hour with the tight ends. I was four for nine in receptions with the Bull to Woods combination the most effective combo. lliat your heart out, Southern Cal.j The "boards" were next on the agenda. They amounted to running at dummies Knot to be confused with playersj held by teammates and pushing dummy and teammate past the end of the board. You can imagine how good I was at that. , Two and a half hours and gallons of sweat later, we called it quits for the day. My biggest challenge was yet to come, however. It was the steak served me at dinner As I left Darby Hall, Mark Miller called out asking if I'd taken my salt tablet today. I thanked him for the re- minder. By the time I showered, dressed, and ate it was 9:30. I shuddered to think that it was only nine-and-a-half hours until I had to get to the field of play pronto. "Watch the end on this play, Henry. Next time around, you'll run it." My big chance to prove myself to the coaches. I chuck- led to think that I was probably getting more attention than the walk-ons vying for a spot on the team. As we broke the huddle I beseeched my teammates to "be sure and block for me." The center snapped the ball. I turned and ran across the backfield, took the pitch from Bull, and following my blockers,scampered forty yards for the score. Not to let this moment of glory pass without making the most of it, I promptly spiked the ball in the end zone. Cheers broke out upfield. Coaches and teammates roared as I trotted back to the huddle. Moments later, Jack Ettinger lined up to run the same play. As the play progressed, Jack ran head-on into a back. "We may get Henry back out here," snapped Coach Williamson. "At least he knows how to run the play." An exhausted "Paper Pig" headed for the dressing room after practice. It was then I decided to stick it out for pads the next day. I ate a hearty dinner that night, picked up sheets and pil- low, and headed for Room 208 where roomy Stan Audas llcenterj was already preparing for slumber. Allen Petray and Bob Bruner joined us. The discussion turned to hometowns, jail experiences, and other socially redeeming topics. The 10:30 lights out couldn't have been welcomed any more than it was that night. By 10:45 there wasn't a sound in the place. It wasn't the Hilton and the bed felt like a ton of bricks, but I can't complain. I slept until breakfast the next morn- ing. Fifth Day I wasn't sure whether I should eat a big breakfast be- fore donning pads. But since most of my teammates ate their usuallbreakast, I did likewise, though I ate onlyione waffle to their two. I checked out pads from a grinning equipment manager and shuffled fthe soreness in my legs necessitated itj to the dressing room. Trainers taped my ankles. I-Ionestly, the tape was so tight I thought the circulation had been cut off in my feet. Giants Nick Avlos and Randy Drake assisted me in put- ting on my pads. Fully uniformed I weighed in. Tipping the scales at 130, indicative of eight pounds of gear, I trotted back out onto the turf. The addition of pads restricted my movements initially. Yet I recorded a six for eight mark in pass reception during specialty. When the hitting started, I found my way to the side- lines out of the line of fire. The cream rises to the top, they say, when pads go on. Hard-hitting freshman bumped the vets around pretty good in that first practice. Those freshmen knew full well, however that, once the varsity adjusted to the pads, they would be the ones pick- ing themselves up off the ground. I was an enthusiastic observer of the offensive line un- til Coach johnson turned and asked, "Do you want some of this?" My answer was an emphatic "No." My term as a Razorback ended around noon. As I left the field, I thanked Coaches johnson and Broyles for their help the past five days. Regretfully checking in my gear, I left the fieldhouse. jersey 00 would join Clyde 5cott's number 12 as the only retired numbers of former Razorback players. What's it liketo be a Razorback? A combination of vary- ing amounts of sweat, soreness, fatigue, hearty appetite and dread of the next practice. No one has an easy job on the Razorback squadg that is, unless he wants to have an easy job. But then, that in- dividual never gets to play. Go Hogs! '-.z X V, N.. ,, ,V Z. QAZM:-,rg , . , new frfxun ' ' 5 v. - f 1-ag...-. ':Z37fi5i'?f:'A E, Q-if' 'ii' 2 -1 1 1, 2 nirnivi CTX- 'I-f.7'. 'V 'T '- ' is Listen I don't apologize for beingohard to know I am what I am sulking will not change that but apple pies and warm hands help and I have never known a cat that couldn't calm me down by walking slowly past my chair. So I'llsmile for you in winter if you'll go easy 0 and fill your rooms with roses when I can if you'll stop beating me with words and if 'in bed you never turn away . . . -Rod McKuen JJ Free at Last . The University of Arkansas Parachute Club provides ex- tensive training for those wishing to learn the exciting sport. The group jumps on weekends and has competed in national competition. 'Y' 3 lv 399 Zi? A A. If V 'fsb"Qb" 1vf:3.h'? " QQ-'ifswgwr Q. x'??'2f1fff-.'94T'gw'k?'5'-'sig 'F ""fff"f"'3"f"a? "F'?fI'S?'?'v J. Mi. Q 1 , incxbs U lcpina-,w1, Vx , 1 -ran .1 1 ifiglf t . Amf hxmy- x XXX KF" 13,213 .H ww .' ' ' ii , "-'F J wk 1 ,E ,xg.'.5.f Ill" JI I . I ' f A II H, f , , 1""'f T4 gffffffffixf Xyi' 155 1 , llfy X ,516 ap L F 4 eg. N 1 ff-4 1 I , 1 I I JH' sm.'.:,'f,f 12, ',,. T '.fW ' f s I 'Ak' rj f ' ,' ,fx 1' I, I!! ,f I Y I I ,. ,. C5 if ffff I I 1 I A' .f ,f' 5 .df f. , , uv-W6 .f"' ' 4 ," 'V 1' ' Q ' AQ 'J .1311 ,,,.qilaf!!!!4 11 16.4 X,xNXssl!LLQ1 VY Qhgf sv ln N-l ,,. I Q g ,ir , I QI! ly 'P' Fax I . J . ' "" 43" ' YK, 4 N ,. W 45 1 'ax ' ' V ' 'ff' ,fl 5 , -sv 'HQ . O' ' .. an "'-.. ' 9' vf-' ' -V . ' f ""' . .-, ' , 1- " H" T 1 ., z ,Q 5, Xl- ,A , Q" - , Q - .. Lb 4 If - A 5' ' - 1 f 9- X . ,ix 4 J K-f -4. 4 I 4-,, 'z 1 ll! f J r nb. 'l' ffl if lffil I - s . .yi I 7 54 3 , z .,v-v '35, Q' I 'NX Q. Evil Q. 4 1 .- q ., Black wareness Week , ,,,,, -rf-f-W 1 --1 V--:'l"'f77 Aalgxw, Dr. Samuel Proctor of Rutgers University Qlimi .f qlll ' , ,M ,nw , V- .I QQ, Ni Y "' i 3825 wi ri' 5-E1 -:EE E545 . ra 9 A mimi 1 Ei! El!! : gfgfzig. lflllllill .-4 :ff i--pm ..,. ..... z.: -t:.:.4:, IIHTQ lrlllztil v--1 vq sw- i In . r lan! lf lmi . ' l we "5 wif HMB H .., -- A --i.. -N f- '2if'f:.::.n: -1 ,, g-.4 V. lf! lssl "-" ""' . , 2 IISIH wr! lm: ,.- .... 51.2 r wig iii F' km N 4 !'! !! Fizz! :...:. :..5 !!f'! llmn 1 . ,N A- , J 3 5 Alex Poinsett of EBONY magazine is greeted by students. The Rev. Melvin Harrison held a Black art workshop. The fourth annual Black Awareness Week was observed on campus during the week of March 23-30. The week- long observance was sponsored by the Black Americans for Democracy. Events included were an art workshop held by the Rev. Melvin Harrison, numerous rap sessions, a theatrical pro- ductions, panel discussions, musical programs, and a fashion show. Soul food was featured on several dining hall menus throughout the week. Several noted speakers were featured throughout the week. Included were Alex Poinsett, author and senior editor of EBONY magazine, Dr. William D. Proctor, Mar- tin Luthei King Memorial Professor of Education at Rut- gers University: Sam Sparks, president of U-American Insurance Corporation, William Pierce, president of Ar- kansas Business Development Corporation of Little Rock, Phillip jordan, associate personnel manager for the Ray- theon Company of Andover, Massachusetts, and Mrs. Cora Mcl-Ienry, an Administrative assistant to Gov. Dale Bumpers and former assistant director for instruction of the Arkansas Education Association. I .ff ilfiefv., .sg . ,. ,J N, , ,, 1 , .Sy , 15 ' f M,,.,- 1' f.. ' Ya, 1 4' ' ,.i. 339' - ,B 2' I' -1 Student panels discuss the black positions on campus. 4 BigR d "What do you say about a 91!z-year-old-pig who retires? That he was beautiful? That he loved Bevo, Darrell Royal, and Frank Broyles - in that order? Big Red, the first official mascot for the U of A, is being retired due to ill health. At this writing he is not expected to live more than a few weeks. Red has been the start of a dynasty of Razorback mas- cots. Captured by a hunting club, near Jasper in 1967, he sired his successor, Big Red II, two and a half year ago. Said to be the best known live hog in the world, Big Red is a "Genuine Razorback," of the Tamworth breed. He is authentic to the fullest extent with his scars, ragged tail which was bitten off and his ears split from fighting in the wilds of the Ozark mountains before his capture. The purpose of Big Red is to typlify the rough, tough and vicious Razorback football team. He doesn't. Many times visitors to his pen at Hog Heaven, between Springdale and Fayetteville are disappointed. They expect him to charge and snort and run around like a "wild hogj' But he doesn't. Red is more of a pet. He's been adopted by numerous families in the area who bring their "doggie bags" from . 1 '- restaurants, feed him and talk to him. He sleeps most of the time now, more or less due to his poor health. As his volunteer caretaker, Tommy Haselowf, remarked, "A hog is just an old dirty hog." Tommy washes and polishes Red's trailer tAnd Red himselfl in preparation for football. Tommy also com- ments that the long trips to Little Rock are hard on the hog, especially for Big Red, because of his age and health. His fame is boundless, possibly due to the rarity of such an animal. He is star of television, magazines, newspapers, posters, T-shirts, and ash trays. At one television appearance in Little Rock an announcer interviewed Big Red on camera. Tommy was off-camera dubbing in the voice. At the first of the interview, Red mugged the camera. By the end of the' interview, Red mooned the camera. The announcer, cameraman and other technical sort-of people were rolling on the floor in laugh- ter. Tommy dubbed in the comment, "I just wanted you to get my best side." Whatever you think of Razorbacks, football or animals, Big Red has served us well, and we thank him. Q 1 . I "It's fun, it makes everybody happy, people look at me inside the Razorback suit, and they don't know or care what color the person inside is. They enjoy the dancing and that's me." This is the way Cary "Sweet Pea" White feels about his job as the dancing Razorback, a job that has pleased Razorback fans throughout the southwest. Gary started his dancing career at Fort Smith Northside while serving as a mascot for the basketball team. He start- ed his tenure as the dancing Razorback during the Texas football game this year He serves as a goodwill ambassador to the little Razor- back fans, who become bored with football and basket- ball games. That's one of the reasons he enjoys his role so much - he loves kids. Some of the kids are afraid of him until he takes his hat off. Crowd reaction is important to "Sweet Pea's" perfor- X-4 BigR cl mance, when he feels the crowd is with him, it makes him dance better For those who think dancing is just for fun, ask Gary. The task is not an easy one. He starts by loosen- ing up. He wraps his thighs, wears knee pads, takes whirl- pool baths and runs to stay in shape. He doesn't work up routines, all of his performing is impromtu. His Razorback red suit was made by a company in Arizona in about two months. C-ary says the suit itself isn't too bad, but the top is made of foam and gets very hot. Gary gets unusual questions from fans. Kids want to know if he's a "real Razorback." They also pull on his tail. All in all, Gary says the Arkansas fans are "super". He often gets fan mail from kids. Many times they are too young to write, so their parents do it for them. One wrote that he wants to "grow up and be a pig dancer." 'rr' A Y' eff"-',.f f, l , fi". -1'---Tw " ' ff 9 in 'ff .JJ '.,1-1-'fl' ' 'fr ' ' ' . f". 1: ", 'V ,I-iff 'Ht ' "lf 'ffl - ff, ., , .af w. . ng - f ','fl-"',"- -x. , ,4,..f..1-. V - A In-ff . ' PGI:-P-fir!! '- : ff ' ' ' ' 5' 'hiv :6f'zs1!5,0f':-5-g1',Q! ' J ,, f Q .1 L., A fu-.3',nf1 1:73 '..g.5?-2141!-1.1,,?f, ,A nf.. ,,-..,.. M7f'.,.,gv . X Fl- .1 ."' , ,. e"T,r-N , 1- rn g- J. A. 1 4,q,4:,w -v .- f- -1- -1- .Av igK1If'f'f" "' vf 5- -. u g, I 0 Q . 1 Aa I E - 1 4 I A 2 S 3 Y 5 i l 5 5 . S Y I v x 3 1 r 1 wirlff 3'421'g., ' 'Ali-n I' Lf'N ' Y' ,al V f'-:-fa. .1 . , - j.,:V3fi- 'V -- --:-' ,w,T.- ,A-5:3 .,.f: , ,. .A .ck,.,,. .-- R :zu-R.,-,-Q . , -. 'PSX I - . .,., M ,.. . , -Rf-M:'f'+ 'l 1 P- - . M. W., I NOAH KLOSTERM AN BABX ARLO PEGGY AND PICCY 3 CC 5:95 'I xx-, FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL Arlo's first encounter with destiny was in kindergarten when he play- fully SVl'DDed off Peggy Neiswefi- der's pigtail with his plastic scis- sors. Unfortunately, Peggy and her twin brother, Piggy, failed to share Arlo's sense of humor and forced him to eat pigtail, plastic scissors. and part of his school desk. ,- Q.. S ey sf XOYJ, NX. V Y' E ff' DY M'X"'-vm...-E' U 1' xt--,.......M"'M . s..k U!wNAM,4ff..i..'-,XA A A qMN,,, , X 4031. tlt - ,MX Arlo's breakfast was not Wheaties as you might have expected of our champion. but rather cocoa. Arlo was never without Baby Arlo's competitive spirit was quick to surface. At the tender age of 8 months, he had already be- come the neighborhoods champi- on at "Keep-Away." ln a week's time he had managed to keep 23 of his friends' footballs in his closet. X fu Arlo's first pair of real shoes were low-cut his hot cocoa on a cold, snowy morning. Of course, he also had it on hot, non- snowy mornings since his dad was a night watchman in a cocoa factory. . ..,, sneakers Csize 203. They were the popular A. "Everstick" brand and proved to be X a tl named. Once he got his q mother to tie them, Arlo g s xx wore his shoes day and SHOES X X - KX X W" " xg'-'s' :5g:i:g:3.:.-:,: .LL l A L4..L.L.L.l.1..4.l Arlo's athletic prowess brought him much notoriety dur- ing his high school days at Bentonville. Of course his ex- ploits on the gridiron were greatly publicized. However, the youthful Adonis was also quite a standout on the school's rowing squad. His greatest triumph was when he led the Catfish to an upset victory over arch-rival Sedalia Clifty in the Strawberry River Regatta, with a brilliant ef fort at left oar. LEFIOAR HE HAS DECIDED TO ATTEND ARKANSAS U I' 7 ,Lil Arlo first made national headlines in the Texas A8tlVl game. Unfortunately, it wasn't due to his performance on the field. Taunted by several Soybean Nu- trition majors during the first quarter at College Station, Arlo inexplicably darted into the stands and repeatedly struck them with his kneepad. His hard-headed tactics actually con- vinced two Soybeans to give up Nutri- tion and enter the ministry. gina me lf NT IMPOFTA Arlo received two modest scholarships to attend the University of Arkansas. One was in football and one was for the Marching Band. Opposing teams often objected to Arlo wearing his band uniform and carrying a baton while playinga game. His first day on campus created quite a stir. The exuberant lad decided he would be the first student to scale the Old Main Twin Towers blindfolded. After three futile attempts, Arlo finally reached the summit, spurred by the cheers of approximately 12 specta- tors. However, Arlo's antics were not without stiff penalty. He was expelled from the .lock House and sentenced to two-week around-the-clock guard duty atthe 1900 stone. i . - " Sf. .- , .'rf-'- ' x 3 fag , vp., Q J A., .lllli - N-fX ., , 1, 2 Lfyxg mi SOYBEAN NUTRITION M R During his senior year Arlo began to rewrite the Southwest Conference record books. He decided that would be a challenging project for his Typing 101 class. FAVORITE PROFESSOR Without doubt, Arlo's favorite profes- sor was Alex CThe Hammerb Miltweeter as f T? 65? oe. who introduced Arlo to the alphabet. Interestingly enough, Arlo quite often At the time of his graduation Arlo was over-slept and sometimes he barely well on the way to mastering state had time to throw on his football hel- capitals. met and Evergrip sneakers before "streaking" from the jock house to Western Civ. class. From this humble COACH IKE FUTCH so ed into a full fledged beginning, "streaking" has now blos m ' - fad RW N W M :gm 15, N vywukhb 1L'ww?3? 1 I C Nl ISN I. fNUi,B ww if NA.. Q Q Q 7 5 v ArM3'S ssH'w,f l19SH'fU mai' rr :A M Sy f'+4g'gTj9TN65 WQUE Nw g'g:,w,k-,wleiw Elraiemwrk M MQ, 'v'N!7Nb!fyf Nw 11 Arm mm S--Lisfwmlr r'x'wM? wx f rmfirifw fU.3fma3Xq,f A IH? W ' 'if?5W. YMT TC? 1'2"-l.W5w.'P"?2XH mm'-? WL? DHJH kwikm V cf? M212 U"'w',mxj?XY 3 md xmmwv? rw gum Aff "N' v-.AM M? , M11 fmw mf lmmmeef JH A Img x? Nia ifvfef www? ww UMYMH pf.. MW w if K 'wx 'WW Y? wwkwy ' :C Wil" FH " -'A' V-rw , 3. ,., ,, -, ..f ,fa ff' JIM - 1' ,.f' 13 S'lXNl.lXHl lllHNlilhl 0 'AN' k,--1' "- ,xx V xx- ! 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'r ' N" wx'- r . 5 , I 3 '13a?i'f' 'Af-R 1 - nm.-A1 yur: Soccer 411 li ELM.. I A 1 'PH 1 sm' P! gl 4 Foreign Stud nt At least once a week some Z0-odd of the 165 foreign stu- dents on campus assemble at a big white house on Prospect Street. The purpose of the gathering is the International Club. The purpose of the Club is for the American culture to learn about the foreign cultures and for the foreign cul- tures to learn about the American culture. The club does not restrict membership to foreign students - anyone can be a member. They encourage American students to join them at their meetings and parties. At a recent meeting several comments were made in re- gard to the University, Fayetteville and Americans in gen- eral. Most of those present were Latin Americans. We make this distinction because the nature of their answers does not necessarily reflect the feeling of all foreign students. RAZORBACK: "How did you come to be a student at the U of A?" FOREIGH STUDENTS: "This school offered programs most interesting to me." "I applied at several other uni- versities, but this one offered the most financial aid." "I am an exchange student sponsored by the Rotary Foun- dation." "Other students from my country came here. They told me about it, and I decided to come here." '1We have host families in the area who invite us to visit them, take us shopping, and show us the city." RAZORBACK: "How does the UofA differ from your na- tive schools?" FOREIGN STUDENTS: "I thought the school was very big for the size of such a small city." "In my country stu- dents do not live on the campus." "We have nothing like the fraternity-sorority system." "Attendance is not re- quired in our schools." "We use a pass-fail system." RAZORBACK: "What do you think of the UofA and A- merican schools in general?" FOREIGN STUDENTS: "My people feel American schools are inferiorff "I came for the experience of being a foreign student, not for the education itself." "In my country we go immediately to our field of study in college. We get the rest in high school." "Here you must know how to write good essays. It's hard for me because of the lan- guage." "Here the system is very structured, and you must have specific courses." "Students aren't students here tin Americai. The system makes them like high school." "People study for grades - not for benefit." "They're trying to produce a typical middle-class American." "There tin native countryj we go to college to help our people. Here students go to college to make 514,000 a year." "Here you can work and study. There the social classes won't allow such. You must get a career first and live with your parents until you are married." "Americans come to college to find a husband. They get married too young here. You should have fun first." RAZORBACK: "Have you had any problems?" FOREIGN STUDENTS: "Some students can't perform working independently, but some can. Maybe there should be more individual study." "I never did find the city." "I got lost. I'm used to flat land, and I couldn't orientate to the hills - but I think they are very beautiful." "My suitcase was lost for one week." "Most teachers are very helpful with foreign students. In fact sometimes foreign students have an advantage." "At registration teachers and American students all helped me." "I had trouble getting used to the food and weather " "People in the south are more helpfulf' "I had to learn to drive all over because of the snow." "Fayetteville is a very friendly city." "Driv- ing is easy here. It's well organized. All you have to do is read the signs and follow the lights." RAZORBACK: "What is typical of America?" FOREIGN STUDENTS: "Levis and bubble gum." "Puri- tanically conservative." "Liberal and nationalistic." RAZORBACK: "What about dating and getting along with people?" FOREIGN STUDENTS: "To get along here at the UofA you must first learn to call the hogs. Then you must learn to hate Texas. After that you can get along socially." "Dating is very structured. American girls keep a little black book, and you have to call them two weeks ahead of time." "We try to date American girls, but we have to try harder " "Sometimes they tAmerican girlsl won't date someone who looks differently." "If they start speaking slang, we're lost." "Sometimes an American will act in- terested at first. You think you have a good friend. Next time you see him, he doesn't know you." "We make quick friendships - but not lasting ones. They are just curious about our culture." RAZORBACK: "How do you feel about streaking?" FOREIGN STUDENTS: "Many foreign students come to our meetings and parties to learn to dance with the oppo- site sex. Even that isn't done in their countries." "In my country it is a disgrace to streak. You would be put in jail for a long time." Being a foreign student is a learning experience - aside from the classroom routine. Some of the students do not see their families the entire time they are here - whether for one year or six years. Others' parents come to visit quite often. Some return home after a semester because they are homesick. They don't usually go home for summer vacation. One student commented that if he were to go home his country would not wish him to return to complete his studies. Most of the foreign students are of the upper-middle to upper classes in their homelands. The expenses of a foreign student are quite high, although many are here because of grants, scholarships, etc. ff f,,f af ol' W . 'Mi' X I' ' A -1 A ' xdwpv , I Q. .41 arf! F 1, 1 J' 44 fl -Q ,ff .n X Ki" Qing.. 'I 'ff .HM -A-...,,,,,,-hmm M , K' 4m-,Lf.s',Y' J N-N.-... 14.4, , '., K 3, ,- .Y K ..?1!?g, ,, ,.. MP f """"'!ll Q. i '? J' 0 . S X ' - . - Wh Hi , I, ,y ,X ,ff ff E ,ff X' """.4P" ff I "' gl 'ii Sigma Chi's erby Day 1 .,. Nr ,NL W ,9'KM- V. Q ' M vi ' 'aefxwf ,Q "lf I nuf- M I 1" . 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Am Killer , guhahx -' , ' , ff' f - Ioe Cogdell, Bob Bufkin, Kacey DeNoi, Chuck Burt. Q , Y, mu? Senate David Russell Gene Nelson Tim Yarborough Dale Carlisle Mackie Pierce Carl Gessler Joe T. Robinson Bob Whiteside Spann Wilson Mark Higginbothom Mark jones Nick Thompson Fred Niblock Larry Oden Judy Whiteaker Karen Howard Pat Fogg Heather Hartman Kathy Nichols Roberta Boyd Laurie Dale Marilyn Moseley Dana Dodson Teresa Gentry Iulie McHaney Kim Taylor Lisa Tignor Carole Bryant Barb Baker Lindsey Leapord Alese You ng Sandra Reeves Sharon Walker Vickey Hanson Harry Heiss I. D. Webb Alvin Phillips Mark Webb james Brillhart Brad Baker Bill Brower Brij Srivastava Ron Jordon Jack Fortner Matthew Fleming George Rhoads Wayne Cockrell Bob Marquette Cecilia Croft Joyce Melton Ric Parrish Paul Rosenberg Donald Bennett Bill Lambright Connie Karnes Marla Crider Irma Elo Phil Thompson Keith Lowery Kacey De Noi John Bryant George Wise Gale Burd Penny Michaels Leon Holmes Ruth Nutter Ronnie Bumpass new Forrest Jacobi Larry Graham Frank Elcan Neal Beaton Mike Vanclerburg Curt Munson Wesley Goforth Conly Byrd Paul Meier Joe Carver jan Carlson Cary Wilkins Fred Fultineer Y 2 424 All Student Iudiciar Row 1: Cynthia Greerg Connie Lewis, chairpersonp Cherrye Hammans secretaryg Elna Weatherbee. Row 2: Dick Conway, advisorg Van Smith Randy Wilhiteg Terry Shopeg Ken Wood. ... l Kathy Adams Douglas Adcock James Albert Bonny Alford Jimmy Alford John Alford Julanne Allison Melody Alsafar Ibrahim Al-zamel Ramona Amos Patrick Anders Byron Anderson Chris Anderson Russell Andreasen Dixie Andrus jim Asquith Dee Atkins Dale Babb Lynn Babb Paula Babb Mark Backus Debbie Badali Pamela Baker Phillip Ball Donald Barber Erola Barber Barbara Barham Steve Barry James Bass Elizabeth Batchelor Sharon Batson Arnold Baughman Chester Baugus William Beal Becky Beard Robert Beasley Rick Beauchamp Patsy Beckham Jackie Bell Ronald Belote Richard Bender Lynn Benedict Richard Benefield Donald Bennett John Bennett Denise Beye William Biggs John Bingham Cindi Binkley Nancy Bischof Calon Blackburn Denzil Blackman Roger Blackwell Lisa Blankenship Erserline Blanks Sharon Blanton David Boerner Gardner Bogle Karen Bond Carrie Bodwell james Borengasser Fred Bosshart Judy Bostian james Bowles Amy Boyd Cece Boyd Kenneth Buckner Dennis Burrow Monda Burrow Brenda Bradbury Charlene Bradshaw Don Bradshaw Linda Bramblett William Brandon James Brandt Stephen Brannan Sara Brashears Neil Breeden Phillip Bridewell Ieri Broome Cricket Brown Debby Brown Judy Brown Mark Brown Richard Brown Sharron Brown Thomas Brown Karen Browning Iudy Broyles Thomas Broyles Timothy Bunch Cheri Burch Ann Burdette William Burke Ronald Burnett Cindy Burns William Burroughs Bill Burrows Richard Bushkuhl Conley Byrd Gale Byrd Paul Callahan Scott Campbell Michael Cannon Charles Cantrell Art Capehart David Carpenter Geneva Carpenter 5' 7 r Sv LB, 212 . 4' R 'Q it as ft 'Q . AQ lg, l yel X a ' F l Q3 ah. ,W-v X 355 ,-r,,,,,,m , 'lm -S L 9 .5 K H- """ Q-W X vf! 1 47 .1 ' mf A I ,ir 1, T, V ,Z f . t-1 A .Q X . . fy Pm ll -1 .'. , s M59 , c-l . 1, '- ""' 5. 'ny J 1 V n-- " I M' 'E ','i viii QQXQX, M 4 i' 7 QQ? A if S Ffffgiif 3 flfiff ft F5551 S f-.rf fiat Q 41- 1' 4 Q fi I. 1 ,AKI 4 g .43 ,T 2' it ,, ,. .- a5n. 'Q 'Q 'S ' ' 5 J 1 ff. u V 'Z-65 1' K ' 4,-.A , , is 'fi ,W x CA .l N X .. l ' ' f:-f:.1"'--lf?fi1l"-" A . ,Q ,,.-v. Urdu Cwv A Q- f ffiiii . 57 y, -- 'l Fw.. i"- - if! , "' aw il IX r .9 ., .pf L QI.- , .., 55" :"'Vfe5., , . i 153 W, as Q Ji, . B N 45 s 1 l i r Sn Nl ,J-.1 ,Y f pn. ,vs I ,.... W v. ,N ' .Q -are , .1 an "' -'K Q I' ' , , If I nl 1, , 5, 73- i X X. ,Q V A ,i 'I 35.0, l E 6 X Q 7 Q er i Af: 73 up 'Br a, 'B W Q iii iuli x X -. D.: B, ,i , . L- 'L 5 Pl W, mix I, .x K-2 . X Linda Carpenter Linda L. Carpenter james Carroll Gregory Carter Marcy Carter Ginger Casteel Kathleen Caudle Kathy Cazzell Richard Cazzell Laura Lee Cecil Becky Chambers Steven Chapman Glenn Charlesworth Patricia Chase Jody Cheatham Patricia Cherry William Chesarek Marsha Choate Patricia Choate Larry Chisenhall Douglas Chunn Lawrence Clack Larry Clark Patricia Clark Robert Clark Ronald Clark Alcie Clay Charles Clements Walter Coffman Larry Cohea Lynn Cole Rita Cole Ferris Cook Nancy Cook Mary Coolick Martha Cornwell David Cottrell Ramona Couvillion Rick Couvillion john Covington Denny Cowling Reginald Cowling Bill Cox Boyd Cox jim Cox John Craft Martha Crawford Mary Carwford Linda Crawley Michael Creswell Marla Crider Cynthia Crocker Thomas Crocker Cecilia Croft John Cross Robert Cross james Crowder Robert Cummins John Cunningham Alywin Currie Donald Curtis Dennis Cyr james Duagherty Suzanne Davidson Boyce Davis Butch Davis Elizabeth Davis John Davis Kathy Davis Kay Davis Ruthann Davis Wylie Davis Jan Debats Stephan Deen Betty Dennis Lexia Denniston Fermin DeOrbegozo Stephen DeSalvo Karen Dewey John Deyoe Peter Dherty Carol Dickerson Carolyn Dickinson Philip Dixon Ion Dockins Margaret Doherty jerry Dossey Larry Dowell Richard Downing jude Dubois Cecelia Dumeny Sheron Dumeny Ron Duncan Stephen Dunivin Frank Dunkerson Iane Dunlap Ronald Dyer Treeca Dyer james Eads Judy Earl Frank Easby-Smith Buddy Echols Ernest Edens Don Eilbott John Eldridge Margaret Eldridge Iohn Elkins Jeff Elliott Wyley Elliott Iohn Ellsworth Georgia Elrod Terry Ernst Harold Erwin jane Estep Phillip Ezell Kenneth Farmer Leta Path Vivia Faulkner Barbara Feese Paul Feldman Linda Fewkes Stephen Filippelli Marcia Finn Nick Finn Charles Finsel Tamara Finsel 'Z y Nj il- fm. g- it -., ,X '11 ' 1-f is ,X I3 ,,, . 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A7 fav- X -- Q Q""1v' T' 'x1::.7 1:1 4?- M ' ,x ' 'Q 3 1 6 wx Q. :rl Q S Vicki Firestone John Fitzgerald James Flaherty David Folsom Rebecca Ford Brian Foster Connie Foster Debra Frankenberger Kenneth Frankenberer Peggy Franklin Cheryl French Judy Fringer Ed Fryar Clifton Furcron Joel Gaiyean Larry Garner Alicia Gattis Jerry Geren Peggy Gibson Clifton Gifford James Gillespie Joanne Gillespie Terry Ging Doris Goff William Goff Jerry Goodson Ron Goodwin Martha Goss Danny Goyne Johnese Gray Larry Green Michael Greene Gwen Gresham James Gresham Dennis Griesse Joe Griffin Rex Guynn James Halderson Annita Hall James Hall Joel Hamilton Elizabeth Hankins Bernadine Hardin Betty Hardin Jerry Hardin Jean Harkreader Jerry Harkreader Larry Harp Pam Harriman Harold Harris Jerry Harris Karen Harris Michael Harris Shirley Harris Robert Harrison Regenia Harrison David Hartz Sherri Hatfield Daryl Hathcoat Russell Hawkins Leslie Hays Jack Helms Deborah Henderson Joel Henderson Constance Hendrix Nelton Henley David Henry Gilda Henry Richard Henry Bessie Hershberger Catherine Hershberger David Hickman Preston Hicky Carter Higginbotham Janet Hildbold Robert Hill William Hill Jama Hoffman Lee Hoffman Leonard Hoffman Leonard Hoffman Dennis Hogan Janice Holland Wayman Holland Mark Hollingsworth Suzy Hollingsworth Mary Hollis Mary Holt Larry Honeycutt Elizabeth Hooks Priscilla Horton Victor Horton Leslie Howard Jean Howell Mike Howell Lewis Huddle Charles Hulen James Hunter Richey Hunter Judy Hunton Thomas Hunton Byrum Hurst Gary Hutcheson Gail Hyatt Philip Hyatt Michael Icks Gary Isbell Ceci Jackson Michael Jackson Steven Jackson Forrest Jacobi David Jacobs Jerry Jeffery Faber Jenkins Richard Jenkins Deborah Jennings George Jennings Barbara Johnson Connie Johnson David Johnson Rebecca Johnson Robert Johnson Zed Johnson Albert Johnston James Johnston Pamela Johnston c , IX . tif S1 ' '23 . 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A . as ,159 vf vl., if I fa. 1 Q - gif Q' 9 pg 1 iii Ruth johnston Diana jones Irma jones Michael jones William jones Grant Kaiser Pongpaew Kanpaibool Connie Karnes Sammy Karnes jeanie Kattan Kandy Keacher john Kearney Richard Keith Sherri Keith johnny Kellar john Kemp Susan Kemp William Kerr Kenneth Kidd janis Kientz William Kientz joseph Kilpatrick Choong-ki Kim Sherry Kinion Anthony King Connie King Frederick King jeffery King Marilyn Kirkpatrick Neal Kirkpatrick Deborah Kneifl Lennie Knight Richard Knight Steve Knight Anita Knod jeffery Koenig Michele Konert Robert Kraynik Karen Kuznoff Patti Kymer Paula Kytle Carolyn Lafferty Franklin Lambert William Lambright Douglas Lane Sharon Lane Glen Langston Rebecca Langston Richard Langston Marcia Larkin john Laster Larry Latimer Ty Latta Michael Lawless Brenda Leatherbury Ronald Ledford john Lee Fredric Lehle Eddie Leonard Douglas Leslie john Lewis Randall Lewis Rebecca Lewis Rosanna Lewis Dayton Lierley Louis Lindsey Donald Lingo Sharon Lockwood William Lockwood Buford Logan Robert Looney John Lovett Jeffrey Lowrey Daniel Lukas Denny Lundquist Julie Luper Robert Lusk Raymond Lynch John Mallory Charles Mann Michael Manning Janet Marak Allen Marney Madeline Marquette Robert Marquette Howard Marshall Johnny Marshall Charles Martin Ken Martin Risa Martin Wendell Martin Mario Martinelli Ricardo Martinelli Trudy Maslonka Janet Maxwell Jill May Johnny McAdams James McClard Sonny McClain Deborah McClure Virginia McClure Craig McCone Danny McConnell Julie McCorkle Kaye McDowell David McDowell Billye McElmurry Anna McFadden Barbara MCC-hee Sheryl McGhee Herbert McGill Gregory McKenzie Mary McKinney Devereux McKnight Linda McNeely William McNeil Dian McSpadden William Meeks Paul Meier William Melchior Mary Melekian Joyce Melton Linda Merritt Mary Merritt Penny Michaelis Chuck Miers K1 L i x age, in .- who 'f i 'G Qin X is X in QA X R Q., FRI, , H he aa Q i 1' " f if ,N Z"'m1'i ., gs rye J iig- ? 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X t 4 V X I Timothy Milam Marcia Miller Mary Miller Angela Minden Bruce Mitchell David Molaschi Loren Monroe Clifford Monroe Norman Mooney Georgia Moore Marian Moore McPherson Moore Richard Moore Ronald Moore Carolyn Morgan Wanda Morgan james Morris johnnie Morris Monte Morris Peggy Morris Richard Morrisey Andrew Mosley Gidget Mosley Jackson Mott William Mouser Curt Munson Susan Murphy Charles Murry Susan Murray Rodney Naucke Michael Neal Albert Nelson Mike Newman Fred Niblock Chrissy Nincehelser Ian Nixon Mary Nokes Tami Noller Vicki Northcross Nathan Norton Scott Norton james Nutt Patricia O'Connor Larry Oden Karen O'Donnell C-lynda Ogden Laura Olsen Lee Olsen Linda Oneal Patrick Orourke Thomas Ott Richard Ourand Catherine Owens Debi Paladino Dale Parker Michael Parker Jim Parnell Kristy Parnell Alaric Parrish Rick Parsons Marilyn Pasierb john Patrick Iames Patterson Terry Patterson Vernon Patton james Paul Kevin Pawlik Pamela Peace joseph Pekarek Thomas Pendleton De Ann Pendry jimmy Peoples Basil Peters Amanda Phillips Cynthia Phillips Lilliam Phillips Marcia Phillips Nancy Phillips Charlicie Pickell Nancy Pickens Richard Pils William Pinegar Bruce Plante Thomas Plunkett jordan Pope Robert Porbeck Nancy Porter Paul Post james Pratt Earl Presson Debbie Preyer Talmon Preyer Dan Prier Lisa Prier Dennis Propps Paul Rainwater Cathy Raney Curt Rankin Henry Ransom, Ir. Bill Reed Gerald Reed Iulia Reed Graham Reid John Reynolds Kenneth Reynolds Cathey Rice Mike Rice William Richardson Lynda Rickey Laura Riddle Randy Ridgway Lynn Riebow Phyllis Riggan Gary Risner Marvin Rochler Lynn Rodgers Helmut Roeder Stephen Roll Michael Roller Robert Roten Susan Rothrock Sheila Rowden Clarence Rowe David Rowe Sherry Rowe William Rowe , -D , E. t"'i i l ' 4 it r 'IBN X. T 1-2 1l"i'??f .1 .ti X 731 ' ' x -QW if , ?-zfv' wr-Q f.k1?"'ff my r l t G.,-v -5 .45 r wsu ,, S, I .J 9 y N ' 1 sl Il is A me I an T5 1 'gn , fr-ff th asf-Izmir, TPQ, is fm 4,1':sw eff- u ,. 9 f Q ',-Xa' 'A 1 ,gh lt as Q..- 'Viv .xii , ,W ., o x? .rw fr, ., I 1' 5 . .. 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W Q v t ff Q e, .iA1...' .... ff' glg' 14 'tim' ' M2524 Rick Rowin Charles Rowland Kirby Rowland Linda Ruble Steven Rudolph Iohn Ruestow David Sadnavitch Theresa Sadnavitch Lou Samuel jimmy Sanders Linda Sanders Debbie Satterfield Richard Saxton Caryn Scharlau David Schenk William Schmidt Carl Schneider Stephen Schrimpf Mark Scobey james Scott Tom Scott John Scroggins David Seaton Paula Seay Richard Sebby Lewis See John Selby Michael Sharp William Shaver Cathleen Shea Jennie Sheets David Shelby Gary Shelton Morton Shelton Sharon Shepherd David Shower Debra Simmons Debby Simpson Elizabeth Simpson Ramon Simpson Steven Simpson Reece Simril Harry Sims Paul Sims Debbie Skidmore Marian Skinner Shirley Skinner Don Slone Anne Smith Anna Smith Denise Smith Gary Smith james Smith james Smith Lex Smith Michael Smith Suzanne Smith Vann Smith Vickie Smith Larry Snodgrass Lanny Solloway David Speer Cary Spencer Arthur Spooner Carla Spurlock Dennis Spurlock Kenneth Stacks Stan Staggs Catherine Stallard Sally Stalnaker Patricia Stanford john Stauffer Carol Steen Charles Steger Allen Stephens james Stephens Teresa Steuber john Stevens Sally Steward Leonard Stimley Gwendolyn Stockemer Mark Stodola Kristie Stone Sue Storey Morris Street Phil Stricklen Donald Stroessner Terri Struebing joe Stuart Iohn Stu art Rebecca Stu art Donna Sutherlin Lois Swafford Mike Swain lack Sweetser Larry Tabor Rosetta Taylor William Taylor jeffrey Tannant Mike Tennant Steven Terry Michial Tevebaugh Susie Tevebaugh Leslie Thompson Robert Thompson Ruth Thompson Cecil Tillery Io Townley Jimmie Treat Michael Treat Michael Trickey Ken Trout Ronald Troutman Susan Tubb Ronald Tullos Carol Tuner David Turner Karen Turner Iudy Twist jane Tyson Ianet Udouj William Van Leeuwen Carol Van Scyoc Ioyce Van Scyoc Angela Vanzandt Dennis Varble -any-w x ,fl 'T LI tt et , a,,,tt W er-.Qi .2-ff.: R .,,jLn1,'-W Maw . -' rm, 'e-' 5 fi'!.1Q"' if, in .4 :,,,'L.,,H,jl '.aMfrzf.A. 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J- QA, r my 'fl I K ' x L K x .X HSD-i N, Q., a-fi. 457 09 X 'x X! ,i x 4 A 1 ., 5 1 it A I James Vaughan Michael Verser Ginger Waddell James Walden David Walker Donald Walker Pamela Walker Robert Walker Larry Wall Chris Walthall David Ward Ann Warren Dennis Warren Donnie Watson Mari Watson Karl Weathers julie Webb Kathleen Webb Judith Weiss Robert Weiss Tom Wells Louis Wenzler Peggy West Robert West Wanda Whisnant Newton White John Whitehead Debra Whitsett Riley Whitsett Phyllis Widdows Ida Widner james Widner Dan Wilkerson janet Wilkerson Cuyla Willett Deanna Willey David Williams Debra Williams Dianne Williams Cary Williams joseph Williams Judy Williams Debbie Wilson Deborah Wilson Jim Wilson Lowell Wilson Spann Wilson Susan Wilson Lisa Winchester Valerie Wingfield Susie Winston Rolaine Winter Deborah Wolf Andy Wood Scott Wood Willie Woodmore Dianne Word Mark Wright Douglas Yates Charlie Young Carry Young jane Young jerry Young Larry Young Ronald Young Richard Zerr Mary Ziehr Andrew Ziser Gustavo Zubieta Linda Zulpo Apartment S ction l 'A xi iii.: mx ' Let's 'lm "' a .y Build Terr ar ium When plant fever strikes, the easiest and least expensive remedy is a terrarium. Terrariums are fun to make: Let your creativity run wild and choose a container from old fruit jars or fish bowls. Go even wilder selecting the plants. Remember: the number and size of plants depends on the size of the con- tainer. Don't crowd your plants. Also consider the amount of time you intend to spend caring for your plants, cacti require watering only every couple of months, while ferns need frequent watering and indirect sunlight. Clean your container with soapy water and rinse well. Put gravel and charcoal about an inch or so deep on the bottom. Then add about three inches of potting. Press it down, but be careful not topack it hard. Arrange your plants the way you want them to be in the container before you plant them. This eliminates having to pull them up and replanting. Use a pointed object, or just your finger, to make holes down through the soil layer in which to insert the roots. Remove plants from their individual pots. Carefully shake excess dirt from roots. For ease in planting you might roll dirt around the roots in a moist paper towel to form a root core. This can easily be inserted into the pre- pared holes. If your container has a long, slender neck, it may be necessary to use tongs, otherwise, use your fingers to position plants in their holes. Press dirt down around stems and roots. For decoration you might add rounded pebbles, drift wood twatch out for hiding insectsl, or ceramic figurines tfrogs, toadstools, etc.J. Moisten soil and plant foilage by spraying with distilled water. Now your terrarium is complete. Follow greenhouse instructions as to how often you need water your plants, and how much sunlight they require. You're now on your way to a satisfying hobby. Add terrariums by the dozens to your room or apartment. Noth- ing freshens up a place like green plants. Give "home- made" terrariums as gifts-personal and inexpensive enough to accommodate a students budget. Happy plant- ing! T W V 'IQ I I ' ' r l a I I lj Star Trek's Enterprise was on a ---year mission, and had 1- fnumberj of crew persons. 27 The Mickey Mouse Club first appeared on the tube in 195-,,- tgive the exact yearj. .,.,l,l,, starred as Cheyenne Boclie, a frontier scout in 39 the 1956 western. 43 American Bandstand was originally broadcast from.................. lname the cityj. 5l Lee Marvin played a tough detective in the police series.. Squad. 61 Name the original four cast members of Bonanza. 73 Ben Casey, neurosurgeon, was played by . His mentor, Dr. Zorba, was played by - Sl In 1961, johnny Carson was the host of the daytime quiz show, 91 In Car 54, Where Are You?, Joe E. Ross and Fred Gwynne are a pair of bird-brained cops, Give their names in the series. 10j Give the names of the two actors who have played Daren Stevenes in Bewitched. 111 The Doublemint Twins first exhorted people to double their funin the year ,l-, . 12l TW3 was a topical weekly satire. TW3 stands for l. . 131 In Hogan's Heroes, the roles of Colonel Klink and Sargeant Schultz were played by and sz . 14l Eva Gabor and Eddie Albert, as a pair of sophisticates, move to the farm in Green Acres and end up getting less fan mail than their co-star, ......1 i , 153 The whole nation is treated to the White House wedding of Lucy Baines johnson to Patrick Nugent in .- tgive yearj. 165 Dick Grayson, alias Robin the Boy Wonder was played in the Batman series by M .l. 177 Ronald Reagan gives up his role as host of this show to run for Governor of California. and, now, for all you Star Trek freaks. . . 187 U.S.S. stands for , 191 Earth-Mars conditions are typical of what type of planets? Zol Fill in missing words: "Space, the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise, her five year mission to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civ- ilizations, to boldly 219 The producer was s . , 22l The producer later married tin real lifej the woman who played Nurse Chapel, and her name is ii... . 2-3l Crew members often fell out of their chairs while under attack because: E. they were lousy actors. . they were drunk actors. C. there were no safety belts on the chairs. d. all of the above. 24l Describe a Klingon. 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Apartm nt Recipes 7 """" """""" ' ' V CHILLY-NIGHT CHILI I I Ingredients: lb. hamburger I 1 l big onion, chopped 1 or 2 cans of kidney beans 1 can tomato soup, undiluted ' 1 teaspoon salt I 1 tablespoon chili powder I I I --about 10 minutes. Add everything else' and let it simmer covered for half an I hour. I Serves 6-8. I Brown the meat and the onion in a little butter and cook till the meat is brown PIERRE 's PATTIES ' I Ingredients: 1 lb. hamburger I 1 small can mushrooms I 1 can prepared onion soup I Fry hamburger patties Iunseasonedl, turning' occasionally, till they're half done. I Then put the mushrooms on top of them. I Open the can of onion soup now, and pourI liquid into the skillet. Then the onion pieces and put them toast only the fish out on top of the patties, cover, and simmer' till the onion bits start to curl. I Serves 4. I I I ......-----------.---- I Mix up: 1 lb. hamburger, 8 cup bread I crumbs, 8 cup milk. I Shape it into small balls and brown them I SPEED BALLS in butter. Stir in: 1 package onion-soup mix and 1 cup water. I Then, mix it around gently so you don't I break the meatballs. I Simmer it while you cook quick brown rice I to serve it on. Serves 4-5. ' I I I FAST SKILLET SUPPER Cook half a cup of rice while you fry one pound of crumbled hamburger and two chop ped onions in two tablespoons of butter. Add rice to it. Then add: 18 cups canned tomatoes, S tea- spoon prepared mustard, 8 teaspoon chili powder, 1 teaspoon salt, 1!8 teaspoon pepper, 1 package frozen cut green beans Coverthis now and simmer it till the beans are tender but still green--about 15 minutes. Serves 4. RAGTIME TUNA Ingredients: 2 cans macaroni and cheese 2 cans chunk tuna grated cheese Alternate layers of macaroni and cheese and tuna in a greased casserole dish till you run out of material. Sprinkle the grated cheese lavishly on top and bake, uncovered, at 3000 for 30 minutes Serves 4-5. 111-.-.1.....11...-.-.-...1..-..1.-...1 SIM LEBURGERS Mix some chopped onion, salt, and pepper with your pound of hamburger and fry some patties. Keep them hot somewhere, and to the fat remaining in the pan add 8 cup cream 3 tablespoons Worcestershire Stir it up, simmer a minute, then put the patties on a platter and pour the sauce on top. Serves 4. .--1.1.-.-.-.-1.-1...-1144-11... 1....1.-.1-...-11.- .- 11-.-...-...1......1-1--.--.-.-.-.--. STAYABED STEW Mix these things up in a casserole dish that has a tight lid: 2 lbs. beef stew meat lcubedj, 1 can peas, 1 cup sliced car- rots, 2 chopped onions, 1 teaspoon salt, dash pepper, 1 can cream of tomato soup thinned with 5 cup water, 1 big raw potato Qslicedl, and a piece of bay leaf. Put the lid on and put the casserole in a 2750 oven. Now go back to bed. It will cook happily all by itself and be done in five hours. Serves 5-6. .-.-1.--.-11...-. HURRY TUNA CURRY Cook l!3 cup chopped onion, 3 cup chopped green pepper, and 1 clove garlic, minced, in 2 tablespoons butter or margarine till tender but not brown. Stir in l cup dairy sour cream, 1 teaspoon salt, and dash pep- per. Break 65, 7, or 9k ounce can tuna into bite size pieces: add. Heat slowly, stirring often. Serves 4. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - J 15-MINUTE STROGANOFF Trim fat from a l pound round steak lk inch thick! and reserve. Cut diagnally across grain in very thin strips. Heat fat in skillet till you have about 3 tablespoons melted fat Kif necessary, add buttery: re- move trimmings. Brown meat. Add 213 cup water and 1 3-ounce can broiled sliced mushrooms. Stir in 1 envelope or can dry onion soup mix. Heat to boiling. Blend 1 cup dairy sour cream and 2 table- spoons all-purpose flour. Add to hot mix- ture. Cook and stir till mixture thickens. Serve over noodles. Serves 5-6. L ..........-,..,-- ,,--- 1 SWISS LOAF Mix up 2 pounds hamburger, 18 cups diced Swiss cheese, 2 beaten eggs, 8 cup chopped onion, 8 cup green pepper, 18 teaspoons salt, S teaspoon pepper, l teaspoon celery salt, 8 teaspoon paprika, 28 cups milk, I cup dry bread crumbs in that approximate order. Then press it all into one big greased loaf pan, or use two. Bake, un- covered, at 3500 for about an hour and a half. Serves 6-7. -.-.1-.-1.-i-.--..-111.-.-.1-..-1-p FU YUNG Ingredients: 4 1 2 eggs onion stalks celery 1 can bean sprouts Qdrainedj 1 tablespoon soy sauce salt and pepper pork, shrimp, crab, or other meats as desired Mix all ingredients in bowl adding salt, pepper and soy sauce to taste. Heat skil- let with 2-3 tablespoons oil till hot. Spoon mixture into pan making patties 2-3 inches in diameter. Brown and serve. ONE-STEP TAMALE PIE In a lar e skillet, cook 1 lb. ground beef, onion, and 2 cloves garlic meat is browned and onion is in 2 8-ounce cans seasoned 1 cup milk, 2 slightly beaten Q 1 cup chopped Kmincedj till tender. Stir tomato sauce, eggs, l 12-ounce can whole kernel corn ldrainedb, 5 Cup sliced pitted ripe olives, few dashes bottled hot pepper sauce, 314 cup corn meal, 2 to 28 teaspoons chili pow- der, and 2 teaspoons salt. Turn into l2x75x2-inch baking dish. Bake in moderate oven 435003 for 45 minutes or till knife inserted comes out-clean. Cut into squares Serves 8. -...111..1.-111.-1.1.1.----111,--p 444 Make Your Own .................... Pizza Measure into bowl 1 cup warm Knot hotj water Sprinkle or crumble in 1 package active dry or compressed yeast. Stir until dissolved. Stir in 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, and 2 tablespoons olive or salad oil. Add 2 cups sifted enriched flour. Beat until smooth. Stir in additional IV2 cups sifted enriched flour Qaboutl. Turn out on lightly floured board. Knead until smooth and elastic. Place in greased bowl, brush top with soft shortening. Cover, and let rise in warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk, about 45 minutes. Mix together 5 ounce can l2f3J cupj tomato paste, V2 cup water, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon crushed oregano, and a dash pepper. When dough is doubled in bulk, punch down, divide in half. Form each half into ball, place on greased baking sheet. Press out with palms of hands into about 12 inches in diameter, making edges slightly thick. On each circle of dough arrange 1A pound Mozzarella cheese sliced labout 144 inch thickj. Spread evenly in to- mato mixture. Then, let your imagination run wild. On top of all that you can put sausage, pepperoni, Canadian ba- con, green peppers, anchovies, hamburger, or anything else that you might like. Sprinkel about 2. tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese on top. Bake in hot oven at 4000 P. for about 25 minutes. Serve hot. Ice Cream 4 cups scalded milk 2 tablespoons flour or corn starch 2 cups sugar 4 tablespoons vanilla 2 eggs IA teaspoon salt 2 quarts thin cream for whold milkj Make soft custard, cook slowly stirring constantly for over broiling waterj. Cool. Add milk and vanilla. If you want flavors lbanana, marachino cherry, peach, chocolate, peppermint, candy, etc.J use vanilla base, freeze until it is firming, then add the other fruits or flavor and continue freezing until firm. To freeze place chipped or crushed ice and ice cream salt Qmore coarse than table saltj in proportions of S to liin freezer around ice cream container. You can freeze more quickly with more salt but the grain will be more coarse. Start freezing slowly, then more rapidly until it is very hard to turn. Remove dasher and pack down, repack with ice and salt tafter sealing hole in top with ocrk or tight stop- perj and leave to ripen until ready to use. Cover with a heavy cloth or paper. 48 Great Ways to Cut Food Costs Planning and Shopping 1. Write menus for a few days or a week, then make a shopping list. 2. When it comes to limiting costly impulse purchases, a partial shopping list is better than no list at all. 3. Check newspaper ads for sales. 4. Plan to substitute or mix the animal proteins fmeat, fish, poultry, eggs, cheesej with the lower costing plant pro- teins tsoy products, wheat germ, dry beans, peas, lentilsj. 5. Stick to your list at the store, but keep any eye open for unadvertised or seasonal specials. 6. Never shop when you're hungry. 7. Read package labels carefully to find out what you're buying. Ingredients are listed in decreasing order of weight. 8. If unit pricing is available, use it to compare brands and sizes. Protein Foods 9. For good health, you need just four to six ounces of protein daily-just two meal-size servings of two to three ounces. Divert heartier appetites with homemade breads, first courses, vegetables, and salads. 10. You can often save by paying more for the lean bone- less meats which give three to four servings per pound, bony cuts like ribs and chicken wings yield only one to two servings per pound. 11. If you have the storage space, buy large cuts of meat and divide to spread over several meals. 12. Learn to recognize different meat cuts and how they should be cooked so you can sometimes substitute less expensive meats. 13. For entertaining, foreign recipes often make economical choices because they utilize lower costing meats. 14. Packaged skillet dinners iyou add the ground beefj are costly. Make your own from scratch. 15. Rib, blade, arm, and loin end pork chops cost less than center-cut. 16. Bulk pork sausage usually costs less than link. 17. Bologna and liverwurst in bulk packages cost less than pre-sliced packaged meats. 18. Sprinkle bacon-flavor soy protein bits on salads and Casseroles instead of the real thing. 19. Slice slab bacon yourself. 20. If broiler chickens cost more than half the price of ground beef, the beef is a better buy. If the difference be- tween broilers and turkeys is more than 12 cents per pound, turkeys are a better buy. 21. If whole chicken is 65 cents a pound, breasts should cost about 93 cents for equal value. 22. One large bird is a better buy than two small ones, it has more meal, less bone and fat. 23. You can often substitute chicken or turkey cutlets for veal. 24. White tuna costs more than light, fancy or solid pack more than chu nk, flaked, or grated. 25. The redder the salmon, the higher the price. From most expensive to least, varieties are sockeye, king, silver, pink, and chum. 26. Breaded fish sticks or cakes contain up to 30 percent bread. Save by breading filets yourself. 27. You can substitute canned mackeral for tuna and salm- on in some recipes. The flavor is similar, the color less attractive. 28. Eggs range in size from small to extra large. If the price difference between sizes is less than seven cents, the larger ones are the better buy. 29. Peanut butter is economical and provides good-quality protein. Dairy 30. Natural cheese costs more than process, grated, shred- ded, or slices cheese more than chunk style, sharp cheese more than mild. 31. Choose cottage cheese as a less expensive source of protein than eggs. 32. Use reconstituted canned evaporated milk or nonfat dry milk for cooking. 33. For drinking, mix regular milk with reconstituted dry milk. Pruits and Vegetables 34. Chopped or sliced, canned and frozen vegetables usual- ly cost less than whole. 35. Season and prepare sauces for frozen vegetables your- self. 36. Large bags of frozen vegetables cost less than small ones. Breads and Cereals 37. Watch for markdowns on day-old breads and rolls. 38. Enriched white bread costs less per pound than the whole grain or other specialty breads. 39. Cereals you cook yourself are always less expensive than ready-to-serve cereals. 40. The pre-sugared ready-to-serve cereals cost more than unsweetened cereals. Miscellaneous 41. Hold down the cost of lunch by making and toting your own. 42. These convenience foods are good buys-frozen orange juice, canned and frozen peas, canned soup, instant coffee, frozen french fries, refrigerated biscuits, muffin and cake mixes. 43. Use margarine, oil, or shortening in place of butter for frying and for many baked goods. 44. Serve a filling first course like soup or salad to take the edge off appetities. 45. Treat yourself to fruit juices and fortified punches in place of more costly soda pop. 46. Save by making your own salad dressings and mayon- naise. 47. Bouillon granules and cubes cost less than canned broth. I 48. Noodles, spaghetti, and barley rank higher in protein than rice. Enriched parboiled or converted rice is richer in protein than ordinary polished rice. 4 Keep Out Bad Guys! Time and sad experience have proved that no one can- despite the most intricate devices and alarm systems-make his or her apartment an impregnable castle. But you can take many measures to prevent, or at least highly discour- age, a burglar from breaking into your flat. First and foremost, there is the not-so-small matter of the lock on the front door of your apartment. When you move into new quarters-or even if you've been occupying your present premises and have been fortunate enough never to have been burglarized-it is wise to check how well your door is safeguarded. A clue is to observe the amount of metal used in the construction of the lock- the more steel or brass present, the stronger the lock. Most apartment doors are fitted with a mortise or a key- in-the-knob lock. The former is the more traditional-ap- pearing lock. This has a spring latch and a dead-bolt lock which is operated by an inside thumb knob or by your key on the outside. The bolt, when inla secure position, pre- vents anyone on the outside from prying open the latch or from jimmying open the lock. If only the spring latch is employed, a burglar can easily push it back with a strip of celluloid and enter your apartment. As for the key-in- the-knob lock, this should be replaced if you find that it is fimsy to offer maximum security. There is a wide variety of locks on the market and there are great differences between the quality of the various brands. It has been proved that all locks can be picked, but fortunately some are decidedly more difficult to force open. Many thieves will be discouraged and deterred by the more time-consuming and challenging locks of this type. One of the best locks on the market is the Medeco cyl- inder. This unusual cylinder features twisting tumbler pins that require a snaggle- toothed key to untwist them. Another strong security measure is the use of a police lock. Those equipped with braces between the door and the floor are for doors that open inward, for out-opening doors, the police lock is equipped with bolts that are in- serted across the centerboard of the door and slide into the jambs. All front doors should have two additional safeguards: a safety or night chain and a small peephole viewer which allows you to look outside but does not permit anyone on the opposite side of the door to look into the apartment. In the realm of the more expensive protective devices, there are many types of electronic alarm systems, varying in price and in complexity. The simplest is a sensor device, which, when set off, rings a loud bell or sounds a siren. The noise alerts your neighbors to action or scares away the burglar. In either case, it serves its purpose. The most elaborate of the intrusion detectors boasts an array of sensors, installed by professionals all over your apartment. The sensors are designed, when triggered, to detect burglary, fire and flood and to relay the appropriate signal automatically to the office of a private security firm. There are numerous such systems available at various costs. All come with decals or stickers of some kind which inform would-be burglars that the premises are protected by an alarm device. These decals are a main source of dis- couragement to professional thieves. Windows, of course, are another source of entry for the prowler. The most vulnerable windows are those which face a fire escape or an adjacent rooftop. Many apartment buildings have placed accordion-type gates across win- dows which are accessible from fire escapes and balconies. While these do indeed ward off the cat burglars, they are a source of danger to the apartment dweller in the event of fire. Be sure to keep readily available the key to the lock on the gate for such emergencies. Available at hardware stores are easy-to-install, hand- operated keyless latches which prevent burglars from slid- ing open your window. For those windows that are on the ground floor, the safest protection is the installation of bars. While this does cut off some of your view to the out- side world, it provides the sense of complete security while you are asleep or are away from your apartment. According to police statistics, burglaries take place most frequently between the hours of 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Dur- ing those hours, apartment dwellers are frequently away at their places of employment or they are doing their shop- ping. High on the list of loot favored by the thief are those items which are easily sold: stereo components, cameras, color TV sets, silverware, weapons, jewelry, power tools and paintings. You can save yourself a lot of grief by obtaining an insurance policy to cover personal property losses. And, through the medium of a safety-deposit box you can store your jewelry and important papers and securitites, away from the grasp of the burglar There are many simple steps the average apartment dweller can take to outsmart the burglar: If you lose your keys, change the lock on your front door. Don't leave luggage where it is easily accessible to a burglar, he will find it convenient to load them with loot to carry away with him. Beware of the "repairmen" or door-to-door salesmen who use their phony occupation to case your apartment and learn your daily habits so that they can return during your absence. Don't discuss in public places your plans to go away on vacation of a prolonged visit out of town. Provide your closet with a strong lock. Store in this your expensive clothes, silverware and othe portable valuables. After the burglar has broken into your apartment, he might not want to put in additional time by working on a second lock on your closet door Burglars shy away from apartments where a light is on or a radio is playing. While you are away use these meth- ods to keep the prowler out. Don't pull down shades or blinds on leaving your apart- ment. This gives the burglar the protection he wants from being spotted by your neighbors. Don't let newspapers, mail or milk accumulate outside your door if you are away. A woman living alone should be sure to lock her apart- ment door behind her the second she arrives home. Bur- glars have been known to watch a lone woman enter her apartment building. He then waits outside on the street and watches the windows of the building until the woman snaps on the light in her flat. This alerts the crook as to the apartment in which the lone woman resides, he then makes an attempt to break into her quarters knowing that there is no one but the woman inside. Keep your apartment keys separated from your car keys. When you park your car in a garage or parking lot where you must leave your keys with an attendant, keep in mind that duplicates can be quickly made by someone bent on entering your apartment. Don't carry identification on your key ring. Someone taking or finding the keys with your name and address on a tag, can get into your apart- ment with ease. Budget-Budget-Budget! We offer no sample budgets here, no national average percentages you should try to match. What we propose instead is this relaxed procedure for finding out where your money goes now. Once you have that information in hand, you're ready to work out a spending plat that doesn't pitch. 11 Start with a record book. You can skip the fancy double- entry ledgers, a loose-leaf notebook or spiral will do. 21 Summarize your mothly income. If you're salaried, it's simple. If you have commissions, seasonal bonuses or layoffs to consider, work that into an average monthly figure. 31 Write down all your expenses under rough headings like food, apartment, transportation, and clothes. You needn't itemize the small-change incidentals, but do keep track of just-a-few-bucks items such as movie tickets. As time passes and you continue filling out your financial log, resist the temptation to make changes prematurely. A spending plan works because it represents a thorough analysis of your habits, and that takes at least a month. 41 Don't forget the big infrequent bills, like annual in- surance premiums. You can handle these best by spreading the expenses over a year, setting aside a monthly payment in a separate banking account. 51 Sort out a month's figures on a paper, categorizing every expense as either fixed or flexible. True, it's all flexible, you could always sell your car or move. But unless you discover you're about to go down the tubes, you can probably find some relatively painless way to trade old spending habits for new. It could be as simple as cutting back on your clothes buying and entertaining at home instead of run- ning up big restaurant tabs. The important thing is that you decide where the flexible expense money should go and establish a plan according to your priorities. Giving plenty of thought to your choices is what makes the dif- ference. The usual get tough with yourself one day and vow to live within arbitrary limits-too often leads to frus- tration, failure, and tossing out the budget. 61 Continue to monitor expenses in the categories you've singled out for change, as a safety measure when you start living by the plan. In another month, if you've shifted your finances as planned, you can stick to the new system and drop the bookkeeping. If it's not working, you may want to try cutting back in other flexible categories. 71 Review your finances periodically, even when your spending habits have adjusted to the plan. Every six months or so is enough to see if you're holding the line. Your plan is bound to change, to accommodate a raise, a new car, an illness. But, unless you're a compulsive spend- er, you should be able to make short-term adjustments or alter the plan within the proportions that worked before. The benefits of sticking to your spending plan range from getting out of debt to building an emergency reserve big enough to tide you through a year without income. The obvious advantage, though, is controlling your money without the grindingroutine of a budget. Oragami 1 I f z This is just a toy when you do it at home, but on a hike you might find it practical. Suppose you are thirsty and you come to a spring, but you haven't got a drinking cup. just pull a sheet of paper out of your pocket and make one. It's quite simple. This is how you do it: Fig. 1: First fold a square piece of paper diagonally once. Fig. 2.: Now fold the left corner, then the right corner. Fig. 3: It will look like this. Fig. 4: There are two points at the top. Fold "a" forward and "b" back, and your drinking cup is completed. Fig. 5: Open the cup and it is ready for use. igg Q -A M! 5 fl ,lla-l Floulef . 1. Place six pop tops on top of one another. Take another pop top and pass it under the six and up through the hole. l Q I S il S, X !-Y 2.. Attach three more pop tops in the same manner, Spread- 3. Use bent lids for leaves. Attach with wire. Stand wire in ing out the six original tops. can filled with dirt or plaster of paris. Top with pebbles. 4 ummm cunnmm UDJFU7 um um UD WWW mm GLOW IID7 H' -mf M LIUI lllb Dorms Dorms Dorms Dorms Dorms Dorms Dorms Dorms Dorms Dorms Dorms Dorms Dorms Dorms Dorms T1n......,. '45 ia N.. N-Y. Z' ,ff I ,.. 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X l ,loanie Action Judy Adams Mary Ann Alaback Susan Alexander Nancy Allison Beverly Bagnall Julia Bailey Mary Bailey Nancy Bailey Lee Ann Blair Barb Baker Karen Banks janet Barge Cathy Basham Tonya Beane Cheryl Beasley Rebecca Beaton Mary Blackwell Becky Bogle Dana Bone Darla Bowen Charlotte Bowman Sandra Bowman Marcie Boyce Jenifer Bozeman Kathy Bradley Dinah Brewer Elizabeth Broom Alice Brown Carole Bryant Barbara Burns Arkie Byrd Cindy Campbell Tennie Campbell Debbie Carney Kristie Carson Lita Carver Reva Castleberry Becky Cathey Mary Chambers Debbie Clark Glenda Clement Patricia Clopton Kathy Colburn Melissa Commer Ellen Corley Pattie Cosgrove Teresa Craven Carol Dale Kay Dardin Deborah Dates Kathryn Davis Mary Davis Luanne Dillard Doris Dixon Jackie Dorethy Rhonda Dougherty Rebecca Dowling Deborah Dunn Jo Edmiston Karen Emory Elaine Engster Cheryl Evans Connie Evans Debra Evans Dona Evans Nancy Ferranti Sue Floyd Maria Foreman Rebecca Formica janet Forrest Nena Ford laney Foster Laurie Foster Ruthie Foster Cerelle Fowler Terri Freedle Connie Frenz Cindy Gainey Linda Garrison Mary Gentry Deborah Gillmore Diana Gillmore Holly Graves Reba Gregory Diane Grizzell Sandy Hager Patricia Halter Io Anne Hammond Marilyn Harris Sonya Harris Susan Harris Leann Harrison Cheryl Hayes Lisa Hemmert Rebecca Henry Mary Herron Ellen Hicks Overtis Hicks Diana Holce Holly Holiman Mildred Holley Lynne Holobar Mary Holsted Kathleen Horst Martha L. 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Y fi 1' ff., ',A gil ff gf' - L: A it ' QQ siia I .I f 2 1 1. -- .. eq-V-ff '19 it T127-AF 1' T, NAA :fy ' V lar. .QWAQF , 'Oi QQ f ,ft KSN . xm '5 ,SR .. at - it M, 'Q- vl- .. v g K Delois Arnold Elaine Ashley Regina Bailey Connie Barnett Diane Berger Kathryn Bevier Colleen Borengasser Nancy Boss Patricia Bridges Pamela Bufford Diana Burr Lydia Cannon Vickie Caraway Mellonee Carrigan Barbara Carnes Linda Carson Nena Carver Sandra Clark Susan Clark Kendall Clinton Karen Coyle Shelly Cravens Kat Crouch Sarah Doan Carla Donoghue Teresa Dorman Debra Doyle Mary Doyle Sheri Edmund Pamela Elkins Patty Estep Teresa Fream Denice Gebetsberger Kathy Givens Shiela Givens Teresa Graves Cynthia Cremillion lane Harrison Ida Henning Peggy Herring Catherine Hickerson Kathy Hollingsworth jennifer Hopkins Lisa Humphries Suzanne Jaco Linda Johnson Vicki Johnston Coleen jones Elizabeth Jordan Sara Kadell Karen Keller Sherry Kilcriease Linda Kincade Brenda Lee Cindy Lester Donna Lively Paulett Lofton Virlean Lofton Lori Lowrey Deborah Marks Barbara McBeth Susan McCollum McMahon Katherine Miller Carolyn Minor Monty Minton Nancy Naucke Iolie Nelson Nancy Nixon Deborah Norvell Lorraine Off Cynthia Parker Pam Parnell Marilyn Petrus Rozan Powell Kathi Reed Rita Roberts Nancy Robinson Nancy Rogers Susan Rogers Susan Scrape Kathy Selman Carroll Shannon Nancy Simmons Margo Smiley Robin Smith Susan Spooner Linda Stanley Maddelena Stanley Kathryn Stephens Rita Stiff Roseanna Tibbitts Marsha Trammel Cindy Tyler Marla Vaughan Sharon Walker Judy Watson Donna West Theresa West Alycya Wetherspoon Ioy Wheeler Mary Ann Whiteside Deborah Wilson Ellen Wilson Connie Woodruff Kathy Yoachum Ticia Yurich 5 i 'M l 7. ,az M ' 3 wr if X l 'at f 4 pvwmw wk 0 fm ' uw,-. - " ' ' if- lf sf 4 V f -X 1' ,, , . ov- 6, I E Qi M .W A - 1 .x V l V Q W' L I Qggjf ' ' .fx X v i r' -r Q .- f Y V R . 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X is VN 1 c 1 V .1 A mf- qs-4 2 ah' ...sf x - ff af ' 62 1' f wi Y 1 7 I. 1 , . -gf, X fra. : V B! . , am A,, Sr Q' ik, 4 F tiny K 'AAQ e- it . -jL."1 Q .AK XM! :J xy ,f l Chahriar Alayeto Cwaylyn Anderson Angela Andrepont Michael Archibald jane Ayers Robert Ayers Chiquita Babb loyce Bagby Ioan Baily Betsy Baker Carol Baker Howard Baldwin Luke Ballenger Bettie Banks Sara Barham Steven Barr lames Barron Cary Bell Kathy Benton Donald Beuke Sheryl Bicknell Robert Bradberry Donald Branson Carol Bricker Llewellyn Brown john Bullington Sara Bunyard Walter Burr Sallie Burrow Sandra Burt Kathy Bynum Charles Cates Thomas Clement Tom Cochran jamie Collier Edward Colten Michael Copeland David Cowan Donald Cowan Kim Curry Phyllis Dale Michael Davidson Gregg Davis Randy Dennis Garry Dennison Cathy Dickerson Becky Dickey Patricia Dickinson Ioanne Dirden IoLynn Dixon Gifford Douglas Mark Douglas Jim Dunn Debra Easley Ian Ehorn Michael England Margaret Pahrner Libby Falk David Feild Karen Flanigan Mary Fleenor Billie Giese Bradley Giles Randy Gillespie Regina Gorman Celeste Green Stephen Halcum Nora Hardin Theresa Harvey Valerie Hatfield Cindy Highfill Susan Hink Denise Herriott Nancy Hoisington Debra Holland Robert Holt Vicky Hull Philip Hutchison Philip Hurley Peggy Jackson Randy jones Rebecca jones jane Keith Eugene Kephart john Killingsworth Darrell King Larry King Laura King Lesa Lackey Felton Lamb Ir. Lindsey Leopard Freddy Liescomb Nina Lynn David Mainard Judith Martin Carolyn Mathews Chris McAllister Ronald McCraw Micheal McMurtrg Randall Melancon Charles Merchant Robert Middleton Lynn Mittelstaedt Kim Mooney Susan Moore William Meyers Elsie Neal Stephanie Neel Niall O'Shaughnessy Hugh Pack Robert Pack Ann Palmer WH, N , om . Q71 '-1' I' 'h f I f P gs! f A-f' L nk Q Aw? g 's vi AP A 1' 5' A ,S X. W J '1Lk Q Y i if xl, X 1 a s 'P LV.. It V, ,LQ '-wrt V -.fx m ,vi X ni- -fn., In 465 i, E Q.. ,QQ fi? ' 4 1 l a .Ii ef ' ,iff T105 L f "' ' s L ov x.K,! R .. .5:, . v- i "' V ii ff e f 5 h Q gi . . r,il,s 959 . MPI' i -M., , 'Q 5 ,gi , M ':AQgl,. 'nm 5? is V , X , , 'AFA' K xx X ft X .. QR , . P A 0. '?'- , .1 ' "Q 0' ' ' . ' ' u . ' I-'. '.t+,-T"'.. L-.' 5-35... xi' , 'K 1 ,af fu na 'Y' -tx Q XI 'gala Y 1 rf I E llllllqx' . if A 1 v Y-1 4. -'gif' Jia L 'him , P1 ' 1 W ,fi ! 1 ,,.. 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Allen Alverson Larry Ander jerry Anderson Benjamin Ashmore Jr Bill Atkins Donald Atwood james Bandeen Billy Bell David Bell Charles Black Mark Black William Bourne William Bradley Samuel Brazelton Danny Briggs Udell Brown Stephen Brock David Bruner Joe Buford Thomas Bull Frederick Burnett Charles Burns Leslie Butler Daniel Capstick james Carter Gary Carter David Cawthorn David Cheek Billy Clark Bobby Coffee Oliver Coker john Colbert John Combs john Compton Patrick Conry David Cook Grady Core Charles Cornelius Billy Crabtree David Crabtree Robert Crawford Jerry Criner Howard Cross Michael Dacus Arthur Dalla Rosa Howard Darwin john Davis, jr. John Droddy Leland Denard Dru Dodson Gerry Donner Larry Dubose Barton Easterly Bob Echols Don Edwards Thomas Egan jerry Elkins Michael Ervin Joseph Erwin Robert Evans jim Fairweather Phillip Farmer William Farmer Edgar Fay Michael Finnigan Ray Fish Matthew Fleming Steve Frankenberger jerry Freedle Michael Furrow joseph Garrett Bruce Gentry John Gillette Chris Godwin Bert Goins David Gray Raymond Gray Steve Green Dale Grigg Tommy Grisham Steve Grubb Chip Hammans Scott Harrington Ronald Harris Steven Harris james Harrison lim Hartz Lyle Hartz David Hawkins Henry Hawkins Steven Haynes Richard Hefner Michael Henry Orange Hillard Lyle Hobby james Hoelscher Chris Hulen Thomas Iacobs Robert Iohnson William johnson james B. jones james M. jones jim S. Jones Michael jones Michael Karnes james Kaylor Larry Keener Kim Keisner Calvin Kellogg William Kennington john Kincannon Kevin King is x Af. X -is am it 85 i ,gQf"JTi Na A! 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X ?r 1 I 'I Q Ari, K' , 5?i?,,m -1' Ni fl 4 Dean Kirby Robert Kolf joe Lane james Langley Leslie Langum Steven Lilly Michael Luker Ed Lynch Alan Malcolm William Mangum Stephen Marak Robert Mattei Joe Mays Lee McEwen Billy Mears David Melton Frederick Meyers Timothy Milar Charles Morgan Steven Morgan Scott Mosley Randy Moss Michael Mourot Steve Nash Elmer Newton Randall Oates John O'Connor Greg Otwell Butch Phelps Paul Pitts Curtis Powell Robert Puckett David Ragan William Resimont David Reynolds Randy Reynolds joseph Rhine George Rhoads Mark Rice Greig Roberts Philip Robbins Dennis Rogers Clifford Rorex jonathan Safren David Sanders Bill Scherer Lyndal Schisler Tommy Scott William Shaddox Gary Sherwood Bobby Shipman Belton Schock james Schope Douglas Simmons Stephen Smith Robert Snyder William Stafford Paul Strang James Summerford Bryce Swindler William Swink john Swofford Martin Thomason Franklin Thompson Clary Tidwell Davis Thompson Kenny Thompson Paul Thompson Thomas Triplett lack Tucker Charles Tyhurst Ralph Underwood Don Verser Kenneth Vickers Charles Wacaster Thomas Walters Bill Weber Randy White Charles Williams Chuck Wilmoth Willis Winston Wendell Workman Earl Zachary if X V. 1-.VY f-.K Q . 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Q is I Av- -f A , 'ti , Kr Vx F, 3 is i rv Ay X '5 . 41 ie- V , ,, ' i . . ,f , Q 1 'W WI Q ,X 2 . ., xii v I 5 I .V is y V ,,, J L X -, , - ' l , , it fr if Q V W , vb , , ,-,. 3, K is ,, S xg "L f J, , 6 1 V, QA K ,J ,Q N1 Ayvy LQ A . L n f J Q if , :A1 il ,A ld gl i I B ' 1 .C , "" 2 1 I . r H . y ' I vxv: S "Qs ,gl , - 6 " VIV ,Ali N N. 1 5 G y I A ' ,, ' ,Q t f y if , 'N f if , " Y ' ff 1 . l 4 i 2,2 . , V ' i 'gi A Q, ,M - D - Row 15 Linda Ashcraft, Ann Bender, Christine Bevier, Cindy Bridgeman, Cynthia Browne, Patty Carpenter, Christine Cobb, Debbie Cox, Paula Curlee, Donna Divine, Susan Dreier, Row 25 Cathy Eberly, Mimi Fairheacl, Rosie Fairhead, Sister Fink, Patricia Flanigan, Sandra Flanigan, Ann Poster, Nancy Futrell Kathleen Gibson, Barbara Ci1ley,luCly Harmon. Row 37 Becky Harrington, Kathy Hawkins, joan Hoyeslxi, Paula Kraft, Mary Lum, janet Marberry, Susan Martin, Barbara Mathews, Iocly Maves, Marsha Morgan, Lori Nielsen. Row 47 Yvonne Olson, Pamela Oneill, Marcy Pendleton, jan Pettigrew, Dawn Powers, Alice Rumph, Marsha Smith, Terry Smith, Lindy Staats, Debbie Udouj, Fenner Upchurch, Row 57 judy Whiteaker, judy Wilson. 5211 J -x Q, mf v '5 ,.. 54" fr v Y, 0 'S' L A di' Nh' 'Y Pe mn W A ' ' , "J'f0,l if -Irwin nv y. X .. 'Y-'Hana sumxax r - ' A5454 Q '.- A N I.. . U , ' ' ' ' .43 ' , ' if V ' .gf 5 . Q ' Iliff! .',. S V Q 3 "' Y . , I, t at . ,- . 'I' . , .,f,s'?l,, N, c ,, A r 9 Q W . :, A f . - , I' gf A, .Q s 'Q 4 ' - ,. . .- . v , . 'K 1 DQ , N -5 Ii 4, x I ' l , X: '.A1,Kl'f . -1? 6 uc- f ' 'W f' ' ,ww V Y ' 1 1 A54 , ' y fy ' in ' ' I 1 .. ' 4 ' a ' ' ri . , . . 4 ,yn J .K 'H a',4 6,61 4,1 4 - ' - in ' I-' - ,, A , Q - 1- 'rf' 7 4' ' - , . 5 'n I 2 1 .4 f. . . 4 , 1 f 1, K5 9 U , CA- A Q I I ",. 'filly ' 2 ?'- L" , 2 F .lv . A V, ,F .Vx 1 0 I V ' :Vina ' pg I TL N .T E- e . , . ,nv ' 'ff' I '4 11012, , . 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A Acton, Joanie M. Adams, Donna L. Adams, Cary K. Adams, Judy E. Adams, Kathy, Adams, Marilyn J. Adams, Martie E. Adcock, Douglas D. Aaback, Mary Ann, Aayeto, Chahriar, Abert, James A. A-exander, Susan D. Aford, Bonny C. Aford, Jimmy D. Alford, John D. l. Albritton, Jim R. Albritton, Paula J. Allen, Jr., Lee C. Alen, Linda D. Alison, Julanne S. Alison, Mark W. A.lison, Nancy Y. Alsafar, Melody J. Aiter, James K. A-verson, Allen R. AQvord, Carol S. A-vord, Cindy L. A--Zamel, Ibrahim Amos, Ramona L. Anders, Jim H. Anders, Larry D. Anders, Patrick Margaret E. Anderson, Anderson, Anderson, Anderson, Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Betty Byron Chris Gary L. Gaylyn Y. Jerry A. Lawson M. Andrus, Dixie Andreasen, Russell G. Andrepont, Angela R. Anthony, Jack H. Appleton, Richard Archibald, Michael E. Armbrust, Kurt C. Almond, Robert O. Arnold, Blair Arnold, Delois Arnold, Kent E. Arnold, Victoria A. Arrington, Gary M. Ash, Edward Ashcratt, Linda M. Ashford, Corky T. Ashley, Elaine L. Ashmore, Jr., Benjamin H. Asquith, Jim Atchison, John D. 166 186 180, 180 166 166 162, 180, 166, 193, 166, 176, 1 I 462 468 505 462 426 525 499 426 462 472 426 462 422 426 426 519 456 503 525 426 521 462. 426 503 476 493 493 426 426 517 476 426 511 426 426 519 472 476 507 456 426 472 426 521 517 472 489 513 519 470 517 525 503 461 483 505 470 476 426 521 Atkins, Bill Atkins, Dee R. Atkinson, Jim E. Atkinson, Michael R. Atkinson, Ruth C. Atkinson, Sam L. Atwood, Donald E. Atwood, Susan J. Audrain, Scott R. Ault, Deborah L. Ayers, Jane J. Ayers, Robert D. Ayres, Billie K. Babb, Babb, Babb, Babb, B Chiquita E. Dale E. Lynn D. Paula Babin, Hunter Babbit, Rebecca L. Bachelor, Latt Backus, Mark S. Bacon, Donald Badali, Debbie A. Bagby, Joyce A. Bagnall, Beverly E. Bailey, Joan E. Bailey, Julia A. Bailey, Leigh A. Bailey, Mary M. Bailey, Nancy I. Bailey, Regina L. Bair, Lee Ann Baken Baken Baken Baken Baken Baken Baken Baken Baken Al M. Barb Betsy J. Brad Carol A. Chip Joseph D. Julia M. Larry Baker,Pamela R. Baker, Rodney D. Baker, Stanley W. Baldwin, Dan S. Baldwin, Howard R. Bales, Terri L. Ballenger, LukeW. Ball, Philip M. Bandeen, James M. Banister, Gail M. Banister, Glen M. Banks,Bettie B. Banks, Karen M. Banks, Robert L. Banks, William B. Bankston, Char L. Barber, Donald R. 186, 193 166 166 180, 186, 186 180, 193, 180, 499, 162, 476 426 509 461 499 515 476 511 515 525 472 472 485 472 426 426 426 489 456 519 426 517 426 472 462 517 472 462 525 462 462 470 462 549 462 472 461 472 519 503 456 519 426 487 487 517 472 493 472 426 476 456 505 472 462 515 505 530 426 Barber, Erika E. Barge, Janet E. Barham, Barbara J. Barham, Sarah P. Barnett, Connie Ci. Barker, Cindy Barnes, Katherine D. Barnes, Linda J. Barnett, Karyn Barnett, Lou A. Barrett, Susan B. Barron, James H. Barron, William C. Barry, Eugene P. Barry, Steve H. Barr, Steven J. Bartlett, Jean A. Barton, Michael Basham, Cathy Basham, Chuck Basore, Joe Bass, James M. Bass, Lee E. Bassett, Beverly M. Bassett, Pamela J. Bassett, Bassett, Bassett, Bastian Richard B. Tod C. Woodson W. Bob Batchelor, Elizabeth L. Batson, Sharon K. Bauer, Mike Baugus, Chester A. Baughman, Arnold J. Baxley, Darcy J. Baxter, Cheryl K. Baxter, William T. Bays, David R. Beaird, Brian D. Beal, William D. Bealle, Becky 1 Beane, John Beane,Tonya K. Beard, Becky E. Beard, Dennis C-. Beasley, Anna E. Beasley, Becky J. Beasley, Cheryl D. Beasley, John E. Beasley, Lee Beasley, Robert B. Beaton, Rebecca L. Beaty, Mondella J. Beauchamp, Rick Beaver, Eric L. Beckham, Mike Beckham, Patsy L. Beckman, Debbie S. Beeler, Alvin J. Beineman, Douglas If. Beisel, Wayne Bell, Billy D. 166, 166, 186 176 193, 193 180 180 180 186 426 462 426 472 470 511 468 525 501 456 493 472 509 513 426 472 499 452 462 519 513 426 466 493 495 461 507 587 468 422 426 519 426 426 468 456 515 461 461 426 491 515 462 426 505 525 495 462 505 503 426 462 485 426 521 452 426 456 452 452 521 476 Be Brooks Be--, David W. Be Freda L. Be-, Gary D. Beff , Jackie D. Be...., James Be., LisaJ. Be Pamela J. Beff., Patti L. Beimann, Merrie A. Befote, Ronald K. Bender,Ann E. Bender, Richard D. Benedict, Lynn D. Benefield, Richard G. Bennett, Donald R. Bennett, John W. Bennettn Vikki L. Benton, Kathy M. Bercher, Lisa M. Berger, Diane Berlau, Jeannette S. Berry, John R. Besett, Gail Betzner, Paul Beuke, Donald T. Bever, Karla J. Bevier, Christine M. Bevier, Kathryn Bevill, Rebecca A. Beye, Denise K. Bicknell, Sheryl A. Biggers, Susan G. Biggs, Jerre L. Biggs, William S. Billingsley Robert E. Bilo, Beege Bingham, John B. Binkley, Cindi A. Birdges, Janie Bischof, Nancy J. Bishop, Joe A. Bishop, Merrill K. B-ack, Charles E. B.ack, Mark C. B-ack, Randall B-ackburn, Calon E. Backwell, Mary A. Backwell, Roger D. B-ackwood, Richard W. B-akely, Kimberly J. B-akely, Sarah B ankenship, Jo A. B.ankenship, Lisa G. B-ankenship, Erserline B anton, Sharon E. Bfass, Gus Baylock, Cathey Bledsoe, Lane B..evins, Betti Bindman, Scott Bock, Steve I-I. 166, 186, 166 162, 162 176 166 196 167 180 196 166, 468 476 456 472 426 521 493 468 493 491 426 483 426 426 426 426 426 456 472 493 470 499 489 525 505 472 468 483 470 456 427 472 525 456 427 513 519 427 427 501 427 452 461 476 476 519 427 462 427 526 456 491 493 427 427 427 517 525 456 491 521 505 Blodgett, Deborah A. Bloomberg, Jon W. Bloom, George Blythe, Mary J. Boas, Olivia L. Boas, Susan E. Bocksnick, John L. Bodie, David J. Boowell, Carrie M. Boener, David E. Boersma, Joey P. Bogard, Jerry L. Bogle, Becky L. Bogle, Gardner P. Bond, Karen L. Bonds, Kenny M. Bonds, Rickey D. Booe, Gerry M. Bolain, Shellie Bolin, Patsy J. Booker, Janet L. Bootenhoff, Craig E. Booth, Kenneth P. Boozman, Debbie S. Bone, Dana Borengasser, Colleen Borengasser, James E. Boring, Brenda S. Borum, David L. Bosshart, Fred E. Boss, Nancy E. Bostian, Judy A. Bost, Julianne Bourne, Jr., James C. Bourne, William A. Bowen, Karla K. Bowen, Mary M. Bowker, Deborah K. Bowles, James L. Bowman, Charlotte L. Box, Brenda J. Boyce, Marcie A. Boyd, Amy J. Boyd, Barbara A. Boyd, Brad G. Boyd, Cece M. Boyd, Jimbo Boyd, Roberta K. Boydston, Jackie R. Boyle, William M. Bowman, Sandra L. Bozeman, Jenifer C. Bracey, Bill E. Bracy, Betsy J. Bradberry, Robert L. Bradbury, Brenda K. Bradbury, Ralph E. Bradley, Deby Bradley, Joyce Bradley, Kathy M. Bradley, William L. Bradshaw, Charlene H. 186, 166, 12, 180 176 176 166 166, 186 180 193, 456 526 515 495 499 499 452 515 427 427 452 519 462 427 427 517 461 515 495 485 491 515 513 525 462 470 427 499 461 427 470 427 501 509 476 462 467 491 427 462 456 462 426 491 461 427 517 499 485 519 462 462 517 493 472 427 507 499 495 462 476 427 Bradshaw, Don M. Brady, Lawrence J. Brainard, Meigs R. Bramblett, Linda K. Bramlett, James M. Brandon, Gay Brandon, Nell Brandon, William E. Brand, Richard W. Brandt, James Branham, Joan E. Brannan, Stephen E. Bransford, Cynthia A. Branson, Donald L. Brashears, Sara A. Brass, Jennifer C. Bratton, Roy L. Brawner, Kim R. Brazelton, Samuel C. Breeden, Neil R. Brenner, Debbie J. Brewer, Dinah L. Brick, Steve M. Brice, Carolyn A. Bridwell, Phillip E. Bridewell, Robert G. Briggs, Alan T. Bright, Dixie L. Brillhart, James P. Bricker, Carol F. Bridgeman, Cindy L. Bridges, Patricia K. Briggs, Danny K. Brinkley, Diana L. Brenner, Brenda J. Brockman, Jane Brock, Stephen F. Brooks, Jan Brooks, Mary Ann Broom, Elizabeth Broome, Jeri L. Brother, Brooke A. Broughton, Dandy Brown Brown, Brown Brown, Alice E. Joe A. Judy D. Odell C. Browning, Karen M. Brown, Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown, Brown Brown, Brown, Brown, Annette M. Cricket Cynthia A. Debby S. Haray Llewellyn L. Mark A. Richard F. Sharron L. Thomas P. Broyles, Judy C. Broyles, Thomas M. Brumbaugh, Suzanne Bruner, David P. 162, 166, 166, 166, 166 167 186, 167 167 176 167, 167, 527 461 501 427 521 485 456 427 501 427 499 427 511 472 427 456 452 519 476 427 493 462 461 493 427 517 507 456 461 472 483 470 476 456 493 493 476 485 493 462 427 501 526 462 466 427 476 427 495 427 483 427 513 472 427 427 427 427 162 427 468 476 Bryant, Bryant, Bryant, Bryant, Bryant, Carol D. Carole L. Glen E. Norman W. Royce S. Bryce, Richard j. Buckner, Kenneth E. Buck, Robert D. Buekley, David A. Butfinjay C. Bufford, Pamela K. Bufkin, Bob Buford, Joe L. Chase, Patricia R. Buford, Margaret A. Bullington, John C. Bullock, Pamela E. Bullock, Suzanne V. Bull, Thomas C. Bunch, Timothy W. Bunyard, Sara I. Burch, Charlotte A. Burdette, Ann M. Burford, Catherine B. Burge, Linda C. Burgess, Denene A. Burk, Diane I. Burke, William D. Burleson, jane Burnett, Frederick E. Burnett, Ronald S. Burns, Ann Burns, Barbara N. Burns, Beth A. Burns, Charles B. Burns, Cindy j. Burns, jr. , Morrison R. Burr, Diana M. Burr, Walter E. Carpenter Burroughs, Gale L. Burroughs, Mike D. Burroughs, William L. 167 Debbie L. Burrow ,Debra A. Burrow, Dennis R. Burrow, Monda L. Burrow, Sallie N. Burrows, Bill Burton, Bruce Burton, Marilyn K. Burt, Chuck Burt, Sandra E. Bushkuhl, Richard M. Bussell, Karen M. Bussell, William D. Butler, Donna A. Butler, Edward Butler, Leslie G. Butler, Michael Butler, Nicholas B. Butler, Terri A. Bynum, Kathy Byrd, Arkie Byrd, Conley E. 180 167, 167 180 167 186 167 196 176, 186 193 167 176 186, 162, 167, 167, 167, 468 462 517 517 497 509 427 521 517 452 470 517 476 501 472 468 468 476 427 472 427 427 499 525 468 495 427 456 476 427 468 462 456 476 427 452 470 472 456 505 427 456 427 427 472 427 515 499 489 472 427 499 497 468 517 426 517 517 456 462 462 427 Byrd, Gale K. Byrd, Janis K. C Calcote, William R. Calhoun, Raymond E. Calhound, Richard A. Callahan, Paul M. Callaway, Scott E. Calloway, Brenda J. Cameron, Cathy A. Cameron, Mary L. Camp, Bob Campbell, Campbell, Campbell, Campbell, Campbell, Campbell, Cindy K. Joy L. Margaret A Mark S. Scott W. Tennie Cannon, Lydia P. Cannon, Michael R. Cantrell, Charles R. Capehart, Art W. Capehart, Carrie S. Capstick, Daniel E. Caraway, Steve E. Carey, Ruth E. Carder, joan Carlisle, Ered E. Carlson, Mark F. Carlson, Ralph I. Carlyle, Dale I. Carnahan, Catherine S. Carnes, Barbara A. Carney, Debbie C. Carney, lohn B. Caraway, Vickie L. Carpenter Carpenter Carpenter Carpenter David R. Eddie B. Carpenter, Carpenter, , Geneva P. , Linda L. Linda , Patty L. , Warren I. Carrigan, Mellonee Carroll Carroll ,James M. ,Tom W. Carson, Kay Carson , Kristie K. Carson, Linda D. Carter, Carter, Carter, Carter, Carter, Carter, Carver, Carver, Gary E. Gregory M. James R. Marcy L. Walter Virginia G. Lita Nena B. Cashion, Benson Casteel, Ginger Castillo, Mary L. 186, 427, 176, 162, 176, 180, 176 176, 176 167 180, 186, 180, 427 456 466 505 519 167 497 456 501 456 513 462 491 468 519 427 462 470 427 427 427 501 476 487 456 456 526 521 521 497 456 470 462 466 470 427 521 427 428 428 483 521 470 428 489 485 462 470 476 428 476 428 517 456 462 470 519 428 491 Castleberry, Reva A. Cates, Charles R. Cathey, Becky L. Catlett, Rebecca J. Catlett, S. Graham Caudill, Judy E. Caudle, Kathleen L. Cauldwell, Cathy D. Cawood, jackie Cawthon, David R. Cawvey, Robin L.. Cazzell, Kathy A. Cazell, Richard I. Cecil, Laura Lee Chambers, Becky Chambers, David L. Chambers, Dennis Chambers, Mary C. Chaney, Donald P. Chaney, Gay Chapin, Marty H. Chapman, Steven S. Chappell, Mary B. Charlesworth, Glenn M. Chase, Susan G. Chatmas, Robert G. Cheatham, Jody C. Cheatwood, Amber B. Cheek, David L. Cherry, Patricia G. Chesarek, William D. Childs, Elizabeth A. Chipman, Larry G. Chism, Laura L. Chisenhall, Larry Chivers, joellen Choate, Marsha L. Choate, Patricia A. Choe, Chang Y. Chunn, Douglas Churchwell, Jackie A C-ack Cark C .ark .ark C-ark C-ark Clark C. C. -ark Cfark ark C .ark C. C. -ark C. , Lawrence E. Billy R. Ciark, Gary L. Grace ,joel D. Larry W. Nancy M. Patricia Robert Ronald Sandra L. Susan L. ..ay, Alice E. C..ayton, Terry L. C-eary, Kevin P. Cement, joe W. Clement, Glenda J. Cfement, Thomas R. C..ements, Charles D. 167 180, 167, 186 186 181 181, 186, 167, 196 181 162, 168, 193 1 I 462 472 462 456 519 511 428 467 493 476 495 428 428 428 428 453 519 462 515 491 468 428 485 428 428 468 503 428 456 476 428 428 455 523 456 428 468 428 428 466 428 468 428 476 462 505 491 452 428 485 428 428 428 470 470 428 491 461 517 462 472 428 Clemmons, Christy Clifton, Ricky Clinehens, Connie L. Clinewens, Diane B. Clinton, Kendall Bo Clopton, Patricia A. Cobb, Becky A. Cobb, Christine M. Cobb, Philip D. Cochran, Tom Coe, joey M. Coffee, Bobby M. Coffman, Walter L. Cohea, Larry R. Coker, Oliver D. Co.bert, john L. Coburn, Kathy L. Coe, Barbara L. Coe, john W. Coe, Lynn Coe, Randall E. Co..e, Rayanna Co..e, Rita j. Coe, Terry Coeman, Charles T. Co.eman, Robert L. Colier, jamie L. Co lins, Beverly R. Coflins, Carren K. Colins, Deborah L. Coflins, Lenora S. Coiten, Edward W. Combs, john L. Combs, Kenny j. Commer, Melissa A. Compton, john D. Conley, Michael E. Conley, Nanci Conner, Virginia A. Conrad, Debbie A. Conry, Patrick M. Cook, Barry S. Cook jr., Charles E. Cook, David E. Cook, Ferris A. Cook, Freda K. Cooper, janice L. Cook, Ken Cook, Laurie Cook, Linda, C. Cook, Nancy j. Cook, Nancy L. Cook, Roger Coolick, Mary E. Cope, Larry A. Copeland, Michael L. Cooper, Russell B. Core, Grady B. Corley, Ellen j. Corley, Chip Cornelius, Charles L. 181 186, 456 515 501 456 470 462 456 483 461 472 517 476 428 428 193,476 176, 193, 168 186, 476 462 456 517 428 523 501 428 487 507 505 472 493 501 456 468 472 476 466 462 476 507 501 491 511 476 521 519 476 428 468 468 519 495 468 456 428 452 428 489 472 519 476 462 505 476 Cornwell, Martha A. Corso, Michael S. Cosgrove, Pattie A. Cosgrove, Robert S. Cotten, Clark D. Cottier, Cindy L. Cotton, Stanley A. Cottrell, David Couch, Sara C. Council, Charles D. Couper, Geoffrey C. Coutret, Karen S. Couvillion, Ramona L. Couvillion, Rick j. Covert jr., Cieorge W. Covey, Shari C. Covington, john D. Cowan, David C. Cowan, Donald M. Cowan, Morris R. Cowling, Denny P. Cowling, Reginald D. Cox, Bill K. Cox, Boyd D. Cox, jim Cox, Cathy j. Cox, Debbie A. Cox, Karen M. Cox, Mary E. Cox, Pam S. Coyle, Karen K. Cozad, Marsha C. Crabtree, Billy j. Crabtree, David K. Cracraft, judy Craft, john P. Craig, Cynthia L. Craig, Fran Craig, William E. Crain, Cathee Crank, Kim A. Craven, Teresa F. Cravens, Shelly D. Cravens, Thomas R. Crawford, Alan W. Crawford, Martha A. Crawford, Mary L. Crawford, Nancy L. Crawford, Robert W. Crawley, Linda K. Creekmore, Van K. Creswell, Michael j. Crigger, Ann B. Crigger, Charles E. Crider, Marla F. Criner, jerry L. Crocker, Cynthia M. Crocker, Thomas F. Croft, Cecilia N. Cronin, Laurie A. Cross, Carl 162, 456, 193, 193, 181, 168, 168 181 187 193 168 162, 176 168 428 454 462 513 452 533 452 428 455 487 517 468 428 428 452 456 428 472 472 521 428 428 428 428 428 493 483 456 499 525 470 467 476 476 511 428 467 511 517 456 511 462 470 461 503 428 428 456 476 428 509 428 511 517 428 476 428 428 428 511 507 Cross, Howard P. Cross, john B. Cross, john F. Cross, Robert L. Croston, Claire S. Crouch, Kat P. Crouch, Marilyn K. Crouse, Dean A. Crowder, james N. Crownover, Franklin P Cruse, Debra S. Crutchfield, Hartsell D. Culpepper, Callory A. Culpepper, Patricia Cummins, Robert P. Cunningham, Donna j Cunningham, john M. Cu pples, james L. Cupples, Kathy R. Curl, Debbie Curl, Michael W. Curlee, Paula C. Curless, jerri A. Currie, Alywin D. Curry, Kim A. Curtis, Dixie A. Curtis, Donald D. Curtis, Mary B. Curtner, Thomas C. Cyr, Dennis D. Cyrus, Michael j. D Dacus, Michael W. Daggett, Mala Daggett, Mitchell W. Daily, Kathleen A. Dale, Carol A. Dale, Edward E. Dale, Laurie A. Dale, Phyllis j. Dalker, C1reg R. Dalla Rosa, Arthur j. Dallarosa, Sharon M. Dardin, Kay Dark, Bill M. Dark, Clayton H. Darling, William W. Darwin, Howard M. Darlymple Stuart Daugherty Ann Daugherty james Davenport, Allen C. Davenport, Diane Davenport Lillian D. Davidson, Barry D. Davidson, Michael M. Davis, Boyce R. Davis, Butch Davis, Debbie 193, 187, 187, 168, 168, 181 187, 187, 181 196 181 196 187 168 I 476 428 461 428 456 470 493 523 428 466 467 487 511 511 428 485 428 461 511 491 507 483 495 428 472 468 428 456 517 428 519 476 456 505 457 462 489 501 472 513 476 468 463 513 513 519 476 503 457 428 507 501 491 507 472 429 429 511 4 Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis, Davis, Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis Drew P. Elizabeth Gregg A. Jill ,Jodi John L. Kathy M. Kathryn D. Kay John M. Jr. Lisa A. Mark M. Mary R. Michelle Robin R. RuthAnn Davidson, Suzanne S. Davidson, William A Davis, Wylie H. Dawson, Sarah A. Day, Leslie Deacon, Rush B. Deaton, David L. DeBats, Jan I. Debhavalya, Rote DeBusk, Susan M. Deen, David L. Deen, Stephan E. Deere, Bob Dees, Michael DeHosse, Brian R. Dempsey, Doris A. Dempsey, Dorothy J. DeMuth, Donna D. Demuth, Princess Denard, Leland D. Denney, Carole D. Dennis, Betty Dennis, Randy Dennison, Garry P. Denniston, Lexia A. Denty, Donna J. De Orbegozo, Fermin L. Derdeyn, Deborah J. Derrick, Dianne M. DeSalvo, Stephen Des Lauriers, Robin A. Dewey, Karen B. Deyoe, John C. Dherty, Peter A. Diamond, Sandy Dick, Joseph K. Dickerson, Carol S. Dickerson, Cathy L. Dickerson, David C. Dickey, Becky D. Dickinson, Byron L. Dickinson, CarolynJ Dickinson, Patricia A. Dider, Phyllis E. Dillard, LuAnne A. Dillard, Wynn J. 168 187 162 187 168 168 176, 168 196, 187 187, 176 168 f 1 507 429 472 501 493 429 429 463 429 476 468 461 463 499 495 429 429 515 429 455 457 517 503 429 466 457 489 429 513 507 521 457 491 457 457 476 525 429 472 472 429 493 429 468 457 429 501 429 429 429 457 517 429 472 507 472 503 429 472 495 463 507 Dingler, David W. Dinwiddie, Richard A. Dirden, JoAnne Divine, Donna L. Dixon, Debbie Dixon, Doris E. Dixon, Jo Lynn Dixon, Philip R. Doan, Sarah C. Docking, Kenneth E. Dockins, Jon D. Dodd, DeAnn Dodson, Dana S. Dodson, Dru A. Dodson, Thomas M. Doherty, Margaret E. Doherty, Patty Donathan, Marsha L. Donner, Gerry L. Donoghue, Carla J. Dorethy, Jackie Dorman, Teresa Dossey, Jerry B. Dougherty, Rhonda N. Douglas, Gifford W. Douglas, Mark S. Dowell, Larry J. Dowling, Rebecca R. Downen, Sheila D. Downer, Kathy A. Downing, Richard C. Downing, Richard Doyle, Debra Doyle, Mary K. Draper, Martin A. Dreier, Susan L. Dreier, Victor A. Driver, Marsha Droddy, John D. Drouet, Katherine D. Drye, Betty M. DuBois, Jude W. DuBose, Larry A. Duckworth, Brock D. Due, James A. Dugger, Ben Dumeny, Cecilia B. Dumeny, Sharon K. Dunaway, Suzanne Duncan, Allan I-I. Duncan, Ron D. Dunivin, Stephen M. Dunk, Frederick A. Dunk, Kenneth W. Dunk, Lee E. Dunkerson, Frank L. Dunlap, Anne Dunlap, Jane Dunn, Deborah E. Dunn, Jim E. Dunseath, Robert W. DuVall, Deborah J. 196, 193 168 181 196 168 168 187, 168 187, 168 162, 168 181 I I I 507 507 47? 483 455 463 473 459 470 497 429 457 525 477 519 429 525 491 477 470 463 470 429 463 473 473 429 463 491 493 429 489 470 470 519 483 452 485 476 511 468 429 477 519 513 515 429 429 525 507 429 429 497 497 497 429 511 429 463 473 517 467 Dye, Kathy A. Dye, Phillip D. Dyer, Ronald S. Dyer, Treeca J. Dyer, Trina A. Dykes, William N. E Eads, James R. Eagle, Gene A. Earl, Judy C. Easby-Smith, Prank B. Easley, Debra C. Easson, Karen K. Easterly, Barton K. Eberle, William A. Eberly, Cathy J. Ebersole, Katie Echols, Bob E. Echols, Buddy Eddy, Charles, R. Edens, Ernest E. Edmiston, Jo A. Edmondson, Donna L Edmund, Sheri L. Edwards, Don Edwards, Glenda G. Egan, Thomas A. Eggleston, Jon W. Ehorn, Jan R. Eilbott, Don A. E.dridge, Bill C. EQ.dridge, John R. E.dridge, Margaret E.kins, Jerry L. EQkins, John E.kins, Pamela J. EQ..edge, Richard W. E.f.iot, Jeff P. E-..iot, Marc C. E--iot, Nancy K. 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Malcom, Mary Ann Mallory, John A. Mallory, Ray R. Malone, Mike D. Mangum, William P. Mann, Charles W. Mann, Mary Manning, Carmen Manning, Michael C. Marak, Janet M. Marak, Stephen A. Marberry, Janet A. Marinoni, Paula M. Marks, Deborah A. Marney, Allen R. Marquette, Lynn A. Marquette, Madeline C. 163, 182, 182, 189, 171 182, 171 171 177, 189, 177, 171, 503 433 523 458 454 521 433 478 458 483 452 461 433 433 505 433 497 515 478 433 473 495 464 515 485 501 501 515 452 505 458 452 452 485 525 458 495 511 464 473 505 478 501 433 503 466 478 433 455 464 433 433 478 483 493 471 433 525 433 Marquette, Robert C. Marquis, Aldee Marsee, Denise A. Marshall, Greer J. Marshall, Howard A. Marshall, Johnny R. Marsh, Charles C. M3955 Martin, Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin, Martin, Martin Becky S. Martin, 197, Charles E. 97,54 594' 194, Martin, Tciflay C- U44 , 52,0 Danny A. Debra R. Dian E. Toby C. Julith A. Ken A. Risa L. Susan K. Martin, Terry W. Martin, Wendell S. Martinelli, Mario E. 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McCi.ure, Thomas J. 189, 189, 183, 177, 171 197, 171 183, 433 452 469 458 433 433 507 458 433, 458 452 493 435 49s 473 433 433 483 462 433 433 433 521 433 511 489 511 483 473 sis 430 476 469 433 462 511 511 433 458 499 467 517 433 495 478 464 433 435 485 471 507 503 456 511 433 511 433 sis 433 507 521 507 McClure, Virginia A. McCollum, Libby McCollum, Susan M. McColbs, Mary E. McCone, Craig McConnell, Danny K. McCorkle, Joseph E. McCorkel, Julie L. McCormick, Nancy V. McCown, Marian M. McCraw, Ronald L. McCurry, Gwynda S. McCutchen, Lex A. McDaniel, Becky McDaniel, Elizabeth M. McDaniel, Linda A. McDermott, John W. McDonald, Janie R. McDonald Karen V. McDonald, Ran M. McDonald WarrenJ. McDowell David T. McDowell Kaye Mclilmurray, Billye J. McElroy, Gary D. McEwen, Lee R. McFadden, Anna C. McFerron, David L. McGee, Sharon McGee, Terry L. McGhee, Sheryl McGhee, Barbara A. McGill, Herbert L. McGoogan, Michael B. McGray, Ricky McHaney, Julia C. McKellar, William B. McKenny, Bridget L. McKenzie, Gregory P. Monte Morris, McKinney, Carol L. McKinney, John R. McKinney Marsha G. McKinney Mary M. McKinney, Tom G. McKnight, Devereux J. McMahon, Mary L. McMillon, Martha B. McMuring, Michael McNair, Mark R. McNeely, Linda L. McNeil, Marsha B. McNeil, William D. Jr. McNeill, Paul D. McPhail, Mickey McSpadden, Dian McVey, Robin A. Meador, Robbye S. Mead, Lynn Mears, Billy P. Meek, Deborah L. Meek, James S. Meeks, Nancy E. 171, 171, 171, 177 183 190, 197 171, 171, 171, 433 491 471 501 433 433 505 433 491 495 473 464 521 493 464 458 517 501 525 515 505 433 433 433 487 478 433 462 485 485 433 433 433 507 517 458 466 464 433 499 513 485 433 513 433 471 525 473 515 433 501 433 517 503 433 458 493 525 478 491 515 458 Meeks, Richard Meeks, William R. Meggers, Steve Meier, Paul F. Melancon, Randall P. Melchior, William C. Melekian, Mary B. Meley, Nancy E. Melton, David K. Melton, Joyce M. Mendenhall, Matthew Mercer, Ruth N. Meredith, Susan Merchant, Charles R. Merritt, Linda R. 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Stone, Kristie Stophlet, Robert M. Storey, Sue Stout, Karen I. St. Pierre, Jill D. Strand, Todd H. Strang, Paul L. Strauser, Charlie W. Stricklen, Phil M. Strief, Robert E. Stringer, Aylmer R. Stringer, Robert L. Stripling, jan M. Street, Morris L. Stroessner, Donald G. Strong, Pam A. Struebing, Terri J. Stuart, Joe P. Stuart, John I. Stuart, Rebecca F. Stuckey, Baylus Stuckey, Elizabeth H. Stuckey, Ellen 163 174 163 178 184, 195, 198, 178, 174, 184, 174, 174, 505 437 466 437 437 467 437 495 471 437 517 437 511 465 437 437 507 459 507 491 474 517 491 455 491 437 471 459 515 511 507 437 515 521 469 437 517 519 469 437 509 437 465 474 453 478 462 437 519 513 505 493 437 437 459 437 437 437 437 525 465 474 483 Stuckey, Samuel H. Sugg, Deanna D. Sullivan, Sheri L. Summerford, james Summerford, joe Summers, Homer P. Summers, Pam F. Sutherlin, Donna K. Suttle, Patricia L. Swafford, Lois M. Swaim, Lisa A. Swaim, Tracy W. Swain, Mike Swain, Sarah F. Swearingen, Accy Sweat, Vickie Ci. Sweetser, jack M. Swindler, Bryce Swink, William G. Swofford, john O. Sylvester, Morris Szczeblewski, Gary T Taaffe, Susan M. Tabb, Murray Tabor, Larry R. Tackett, Karen K. Talbot, Susie Tallent, june C. Tam, Betty N. Tamburo, Sandra Tanner, Fred C. Tappen, Charles M. Tarbell, john G. Tatman, Leslie K. Tatum Tay..or Tay-or Tay-or Tay-or Tay-or Tay-or Tay-or Tayor Tay-or Tay-or Tay .or Tay-or Tay-or Tayor Tayror Taylor Tay-or Tayior I Angel Achary Becky L. Brenda K. Charles H. David A. David H. Donna S. ,',Frederica j jan C. julia B. Kim Michael B. Minor Rosetta M Stephen V. Stuart M. Toni P. William j. Teaford, Ann E. Teague, jeffrey M. Teed, Ralph A. Temple, Barbara L. Tennant, jeffrey E. Tennant, Mike V. Tennant, Steven D. 181 174 184 191 197 174, 174, 178, 507 469 525 478 503 505 495 437 474 437 459 521 437 495 509 469 437 478 478 478 453 453 469 509 437 455 495 474 467 495 503 515 462 459 465 509 491 491 521 517 453 485 459 491 465 459 517 517 437 521 521 495 437 493 519 515 469 437 437 474 Tenney, Dinda L. Terry, jean N. Terry, john B. Terry, Laura A. Terry, Steven H. Tevebaugh, Michial Tevebaugh, Susie Thalgott, Dee Ann Thaxton, Marvin D. Thomas, Becky Thomas, Caroline F. Thomas, Pat A. Thomason, Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson, Thompson, Thompson, Thompson, Thompson, Thompson, Thompson, Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson Martin C. Curtis A. Dana j. Davis E. Deborah A. Donna L. Franklin V. jerry L. john R. Kenny D. Leslie C. Nick Paul E. Robert Ruth A. Wayne V. Thornhill, Claudia A. Thornton, Mike D. Threlkeld, Douglas Tibbitts, RoseAnna M. Tidwell, Gary L. Tieman, Susan K. Tietze, Mary jane Tillery, Cecil R. Tillery, Libby Tilley, james W. Timmons, David Tinsley, james Todd, Anne Todd, Leslie C. Toler, Steven C. Tolley, Philip A. Townley, jo L. Trabank, john P. Trace, Barb j. Trammel, Marsha L. Traylor, Teresa M. Treat, jimmie D. Treat, Michael j. Treece, Valerie j. Treffinger, Fred M. Trickey, Michael W. Triplett, Thomas M. Troilo, Michael B. Troth, Mark D. Trout, Ken I Troutman, Ronald L. Troy, june Trussell, Charles W. Tubb, Susan j. 174, 174, 184, 195, 174, 195, 465 491 462 491 437 437 437 501 507 465 465 459 478 474 499 479 495 455 479 497 466 479 437 521 479 437 437 489 485 507 487 471 479 459 525 437 465 474 507 466 485 459 507 509 437 453 485 471 525 437 437 459 507 437 479 507 505 437 437 465 523 437 Tucker Tucker, Tucker Tucker, Tucker, Alden L. Constance S. ,jack A. Robert L. Scott Tullos, Ronald R. Tumilty, Rebecca S. Turnage, Ron F. Turnbow, Karen Turner, Turner, Turner, Turner, Turner, Turner, Turner, Turner, Turner, Carol A. David W. janice L. joe P. Karen Lana E. Margaret Sue A. Tommie S. Tuttle, Holly A. Twist, judy A. Twist, Randy S. Tyhurst, Charles K. Tyler, Cindy Tyson, jane U Udouj, Debbie Udouj, janet M. Uhlis, Debby M. Ulmer, Lori C. Underwood, Patrice Underwood, Ralph Upchurch, Fenner S. Utley, Alice C. V Vaden, Cynthia Van Es. Wendell j. Vandenberg, Linda K. Vandergriff, David B. Vanderslice, Debbie L. Vandewiele, Teri j. Van Ert, jill Van Hook, Deborah L. Van Horn, john W. Van Laningham, Kay A. Van Leeuwen, William W. Vanness, Carol Van Pelt, Leslie S. Van Scyoc, Carol E. Van Scyoc, joyce C. VanZandt, Angela A. Varble, Dennis Vaughan, james R. Vaughn, Becky j. Vaughn, Katherine A. Vaughn, Marla j. Vaught, Kimberly S. Verea, jorge L. Vernon, Lynn A. 184, 174, 174, 191, 164, 191, 174, 191, 192, 191, 501 495 479 519 513 437 474 462 465 437 437 465 513 437 474 474 465 501 499 437 521 479 471 437 437 459 501 474 479 483 465 467 454 499 505 493 465 511 459 503 469 437 491 485 437 437 437 437 438 525 457 471 465 474 459 Warren, Verser, Don W. Verser, Michael W. Vest, Deborah M. Vestal, Joe D. Via, Linda I. Vickers, Kenneth G. Waddell, Ginger L. Voisey, Allen R. Volk, Carol A. Vorsanger, Diana J. Wacaster, Charles W. Wackenhuth, Michael C. Waddell, Michael G. Wagner, Mark L. Wah, John C. Waits, Lyndal M. Wakeham, Linda L. Wa.d, Karen S. Waden, Cheryl J. Wa-den, James L. Michael W. Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa Wa Wa- Wa- Wa Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa- Wa. don don, ker, ker, ker, ker, ker, ker, ker, ker, ker, ker, ker, ker, ker, ker, ker, ker, ,Marlene E. Ronald D. Charles M. Danny O. David M. Diana S. Donald E. Greg James R. Johnny M. John T. Marjorie E. Pamela D. Robert R. Sharon L. Teresa L. Todd W. William S. 1, Larry J. lace lace lace lace, , Greg , Jan M. , Jerrel L. ler, Jean K. lis, Elizabeth S. Wa-sa, Ben J. Wash, Tricia R. Wa.ters, Thomas F. Wa-thall, Chris Wa-tman, Lisa W. Wa-ton, Sara B. Wann, Karen S. Ward, Terry E. Ward, Bryan A. Ward, David W. Ward, Jim J. Ward, Lesa A. Ward, Lenel Ward, Richard A. 195, 174, 192, 179 198 184, 198 192, 179, 175, 479 438 469 487 455 479 474 465 491 479 521 438 523 474 474 466 465 474 465 438 474 523 462 462 438 465 438 503 466 521 489 511 438 438 471 465 475 519 438 517 493 466 487 491 475 517 525 479 438 459 455 459 485 515 438 489 459 459 475 Warner Warner Warner Warren Warren Diane L. Lucy Y. Sally W. Ann G. Dennis M. Marlise L. Warringer, Donald P. Washington, Martha Wassell, Gayle C. Wassell, Lisa A. Watkins, John R. Watkins, Susan L. Watson Watson, Watson, Watson, Watson, Watson Watson Watson Donnie L. Judy Karen P. Linda S. Mari Patty A. Reba L. Rob K. Watts, Richard N. Watts, Susan L. Watts, Thomas E. Weatherbee, Elna Weathers, Karl E. Weaver I Weaver, Weaver, Weaver, Weaver, Weaver, Dewey P. Mary Lee H. Rebecca F. Rebecca G. Rhona J. Sandy E. Webb, Brenda L. Webb, Debbie K. Webb, Julie A. Webb, Kathleen A. Webb, Linda S. VVebb, Mark W. Webb, Terri L. Weber, Bill P. Webster, Chuck T. Weed, Tommy K. Weiler, Becky L. Weinert, Michael Weir, Jim R. Weis, Becky Weisberger, Joseph G. Weiss, Judith D. Weiss, Robert M. Welch, ewell R. Welch, Jim H. Welch, Rebecca Welch, Wendy C. Wells, Kathy L. Wells, Peggy Wells, Stanley K. Wells, Tom R. Welytok, Mark E. Wenzler, Louis F. Wernick, Joel P. Wernick, Max A. Wesson, Julie L. West, Donna K. 192, 164 184, 184 192 195 164, 164 195, 465 475 499 438 438 465 505 493 511 459 515 469 438 471 459 465 438 485 465 515 513 511 515 499 438 521 465 475 475 455 459 469 469 438 438 465 466 501 479 519 521 493 513 507 485 517 438 438 487 519 499 465 465 475 475 438 517 438 509 509 459 471 West, Joe S. West, Paggy A West, Ray West, Robert R. West, Theresa Westbrook, Janie Wester, Paul R. Westfall, Paul W. Westlake, Debbie J. Wetherspoon, Alycya L. Whaley, Kathy Whaley, James W. Whayne, Phyllis A. Wheeler, Joy M. Whellis, Nancy K. Whisnant, Cliff Whisnant, Wanda J. Whistle, Clement H. White White White ,Dan W. ,Newton ,Kathy White, Randy White, Ruth Marie M. White, Stephen D. White, Susie Whiteaker, Judy Whitehead, John W. Whiteside, Bob A. Whiteside, Mary Ann Witherspoon, John B. Whitlow, James M. Whitman, Kirk Whitmore Jr., Obie, Whitsett, Debra K. Whitsett, Riley Whittaker, Janie A. Wickerson, Dave L. Widdows, Phyllis G. Widner, Ida J. Widner, James C. Wiedman, Susie Wiggins, Becky Wiggins, Sarah W. Wiggins, William R. Wi.cox, Anne E. Wi.der, Kathy L. Wi.dy, David D. Wi.ey, Hazel M. Wi.kerson, Dan L. Wi..kerson, Donald M. Wi.kerson, Janet A. Wiihite, Randy Wifkins, Kay Wi-ks, Gary Wi.ks, Regina C. Wi.ks, Ron L. Wi.lbanks, Susan C. Willett, Guyla S. Wi.liams, Anita F. Wi.liams, Anitra S. Wi.liams, Andrew G. WiQliams, Charles C. 175, 179, 179, 195, 179, 175, 179, 164, 192, 184, 192, 175, 489 438 509 438 471 491 475 497 469 471 491 503 465 471 465 517 438 517 515 438 501 479 467 519 501 483 438 513 471 507 497 521 453 438 438 491 517 438 438 432 455 499 499 509 474 459 487 475 438 507 438 507 485 489 511 515 525 438 467 525 462 479 4 Woodard, Stephanie C. Yoachum, Kathy M. Winiams, Chris M. Wiiams, David M. Wi -iams, Debra A. Wi. iams, Dianne Wi. iams, Erma J. Wiiams, Cary L. Wisiams, Greg A. Wi iams, James H. Wimiams, Janet F. Wiiams, Jeannie A. Wiuiams, Joseph E. Wiiams, Judy S. Wi .,., iams, Linda A. Wimiams, Roger Wi...iams, Scott K. Wi... iams, Susan Wi..iams, SusanJ. Wisiamson, Kathy Wisiamson, Rick L. Wi--is, William H. Wimms, Kay Wifs, Pam J. Wi-..ey, Deanna B. Wimoth, Chuck Y. Wifson Carol L. Wifson S. Craig B. Wifson Debbie K. Wifson, Deborah G. Wi.son, Deborah R. Wi.son Don A. Wi..son, Ellen P. Wifson C-ary L. Wilson Jim D. Wifson, Joe E. WiQson Judy Wi..son Karen Wi.son Kenneth R. Wifson Laura L. Wi.son Lowell K. Wi.son Lynn D. Wilson Ralph E. Wilson Rebecca L. Wi.son Rhonda K. Wilson Spann Wilson Susan J. Wifson Terry A. WiQson, Tracey L. Winchester, Lisa Windham, Shirley E. Windle, D. W. Wingfield, Valerie A. Wingfield, William F. Winston, Susie H. Winston, Willis B. Winter, Rolaine K. Wittmer, Leon L. Wolf, Angela M. Wolf, Deborah J. Wolfe, Michael S. Wolff, Rufus E. Wood, Allison Wood, Andy 192 192 175 192, 175 192, 192, 175 175 192, 175 175 513 438 438 438 475 438 453 515 485 501 438 438 465 503 515 475 491 467 489 507 511 465 438 479 455 453 438 438 471 505 471 475 438 515 483 459 503 493 438 491 505 485 469 438 438 495 501 438 469 521 438 466 438 479 438 466 467 438 505 475 511 438 Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Diane Douglas W. Karen Kenneth Mary K. Robert C. Ruth E. Scott M. Vicki D. Woodmore, Willie D. Woodruff, Connie Woods, Connie M. Woods, Darlene Woods, Harvey E. Woodward, Reid Woody, Dennis C. Wooley, Jerry L. Word, Dianne Word, Susan Workman, Brad E. Workman, Wendell J. Worley, Alice M. Worthy, Mary B. Wright, David M. Wright, Steve A. Wren, Robin Wright, Mark D. Wright, Tracy L. Wylie, Kerry C. Y Yakley, Kenneth G. Yamona, Bernadette Yarbrough, Yarbrough, Yarbrough, Yarbrough, Yarbrough, Yarbrough, Cathy M. Chuck D. Jolene R. Steve H. Tim L. William B. Yarnell, Thomas V. Yates, Douglas Yates, Reggie C. Yee, Pat A. Yoes, Becky Young, Alese N. Young, Buck C. Young, Charlie Young, Carry C. Young, James R. Young, Jane J. Young, Jerry A. Young, Jerry T. Young, Larry D. Young, Leland P. Young, Ronald D. Young, Sherry M. Young, Susan I. Yurich, Tricia 175, 175, 195 192, 185, 192, 195, 175, 501 507 459 507 493 509 455 438 475 465 438 471 465 501 453 503 519 487 438 459 515 479 465 459 521 507 501 438 493 501 462 465 501 489 465 489 489 466 475 438 487 459 471 459 475 517 438 438 475 438 438 517 439 475 439 493 455 471 Z Zachry, Earl W. Zebrowski, Lauren Zeh, Darlene H. Zepeda, Cesar A. Ziehr, Mary Zini, Mark A. Zink, Judy Ziser, Andrew J Ziser, Angela G. Zell, Rita F. Zwayer, Nancy L. Zerr, Richard K. Zu bieta, Gustavo R. Zulpo, Linda M. Zvonik, Sylvia R. 1 479 459 459 487 439 515 459 439 459 465 465 439 439 439 92, 439 Credits copy-Cecilia Croft photo-Larry Logan photo-Mark Betts, copy-Larry Logan photo-Larry Logan photo-Jim Sutherland, copy-Larry Logan photo-John Partipilo photo-Rob Cosgrove: copy-Larry Logan photo-Mark Betts, copy-Larry Logan photo-Larry Logan, copy-Larry Logan photo-Larry Logan photo-Larry Logan, copy-Larry Logan photo-John Partipilo, copy-Larry Logan photo-John Partipilo, copy-Connie Karnes photo-John Partipilo, copy-Connie Karnes photo-Larry Logan, copy-Cecilia Croft copy-Jane Brockman photo-John Partipilo: copy-Cecilia Croft photo-Scott Mosely, copy-Larry Logan photo-Athletic Dept., copy-Jane Brockman photo-Ted Allder, copy-Larry Logan photo-Larry Logan photo-Bob White, copy-Larry Logan photo-Larry Logan, copy-Larry Logan photo-Larry Logan, copy-Cecilia Croft photo-Larry Logan, copy-Cecilia Croft copy-Alan Hickman copy-Larry Logan copy-Trudy Maslonka photo-Scott Mosley photo-John Partipilo, Larry Logan, copy-Logan photo-Mark Betts, copy-Cecilia Croft photo-Larry Logan, copy-Jane Brockman photo-Don Cowan, copy-prepared by Joyce Melton photo-Larry Logan 6 7 8,9 10,11 12,13 14,15 16,17 18,19 20,21 22,23 24,25 26,27 30,31 32,33 34,35 36,37 38,39 40,41 42,43 44,45 46,47 48,49 50,51 52,53 54,55 56,57 58 60,61 62,63 82,83 86,87 90,91 94,95 96 photo-john Partipilo photo-john Partipilo photo-john Partipilo, Larry Logan photo-john Partipilo, copy-Larry Logan photo-john Partipilop copy-Larry Logan photo-john Partipilog copy-Larry Logan photo-Art Meripol copy-Connie Karnes photo-Scott Mosley, copy-Nancy jacobi photo-Mark Betts photo-Ted Allder, copy-Trudy Maslonka photo-Art Meripol photo-Ted Allder, Larry Logan, copy- Betty Dennis artwork-jim Borden, copy-Marvin Schwartz photo-Art Meripolp copy-Larry Logan photo-Ted Allder, Larry Logan, copy- Connie Karnes photo-Bryce Swindler photo-Larry Logan, copy-Connie Karnes photo-Larry Logan, copy-Connie Karnes photo-Larry Logan, copy-Connie Karnes photo-Bryce Swindler copy-Ernie Deane photo-john Partipilo photo-Ted Allder photo-john Partipilo photo-lim Borden photo-Scott Mosley, jim Sutherland photo-Jim Borden photo-Rob Cosgrove photo-Ted Allder, Larry Logan photo-Larry Logan, copy-Larry Logan copy-Robert Trepp photo-john Partipilo photo-jim Sutherland photo-Don Cowan, copy-David Lanier photo-M ark Betts photo-Larry Logan photo-Larry Logan copy-lane Brockman photo-lim Sutherland photo-jim Sutherland photo-I im Sutherland photo-Jim Sutherland photo-Art Meripol photo-lim Sutherland photo-jim Sutherland photo-Don Cowman photo-Jim Sutherland photo-lim Sutherland photo-Larry Logan, copy-Henry Woods copy-Henry Woods copy-Henry Woods photo-Larry Logan, copy-Rod McKuen photo-Rick jones photo-john Partipilo photo-Scott Mosley, copy-Betty Dennis photo-Jim Sutherland, copy-Connie Karnes photo-Scott Mosley, copy-Connie Karnes All work by Rol Mommer and his weird staff at the yearbook company photo-M ark Betts photo-Art Meripol 97 98,99 100,101 104,105 106,107 108,109 112,113 114,115 118,119 120,121 124,125 126,127 128,129 132,133 134,135 136,137 138,139 142,143 144,145 146,147 150,151 152,153 158,159 224,225 226,227 228,229 230,231 232,233 234,235 236,237 274,275 332,333 334,335 336,337 338,339 340,341 346,347 348,349 354,355 366,367 368,369 370,371 372,373 374,375 378,379 380,381 382,383 384,363 386,387 390,391 392,393 394-395 396,397 398,399 400,401 402,403 404 405 408,409 410 411 photo-Don Cowan, copy-Connie Karnes photo-Scott Mosley photo-Larry Logan photo-jim Sutherland copy-Connie Karnes, Larry Logan copy-joyce Melton copy-Joyce Melton and Connie Karnes copy-Nancy Jacobi copy-Nancy Jacobi artwork-Betty Dennis 412,413 414,415 416,417 418,419 440,441 442,443 444,445 446,447 448,449 450,451 Volume 77 of the Arkansas RAZDRBACK Lithography by Iosten's American Yearbook Company Visalia, California Press run: 3220 copies 552 pages Size 9"x12" Paper Warren's 80 pound lustro gloss Ink Printer's Brown Cover 175 point collegiate board cover material was embossed grain with one applied color Binding Standard Smythe sewn Type body copy Palatino head copy Palatino, Cooper Black and pressed lettering Portraits by RappoportStud1o Inc New York, New York Parting Shots It's Spring Break. It's raining outside. I've got a head cold that won't quit. Perhaps now is a good time to jot down my two bits worth on how the year went and other non-related matter. We weren't sure what we were getting into when we changed over to a subscription yearbook. The headaches increased daily. Some kind people in the administration building, notably Mike Hill, came to the rescue with a great plan. Ernie Deane was an inspirational force. He tried to give us young journalists a good background. Now, don't go blaming Ernie for any of the copy in the book. He wouldn't agree with half of what we've written. l.et's just say that we're glad you were around. American Yearbook Company came through for us, again. Eldon Tanner, at the plant, was constantly on the phone with us, making sure everything was going o.k. QActually, he wanted to ask, "You guys SURE you want to run this stuff in your book?"J Steve Maxwell, Ameri- can's director of design, is the best in the business. We appreciate his after-hours work on the book and his never-ceasing flow of ideas. Dennis Scott, American's area manager, was the per- fect go-between us and the plant and did a great job of defending our late copy shipments and other weird be- havior. He was of great help in providing many of the candid photos in the book. Dennis became a close friend of all staffers and watched over us like a mother hen. Rappaport Studios of New York took all the senior portraits and individual pics. It was the smoothest opera- tion for portraits that we have had in years. We tried to keep our noses pretty clean with the Board of Publications. They took an active interest in the book and future editors stand warned that the Board will ex- pect only quality publications in years ahead. And, of course, we must turn to the staff. Betty Dennis worked very hard all summer to get the ground work done. She continued with enthusiasm all through the year. Cecilia Croft kept the copy straight. Connie Karnes and Nancy Iacobi provided good looks and good copy. John Partipilo, in addition to running the photo staff, provided some mighty fine shots for the book. Art, Scott, Jim, Bryce, Ted, Jim, Mark, Rob, and Don were not only good photographers, but also a great bunch of guys. There is always someone who stands out on the staff, always working when all others have gone home. Joyce Melton was such a worker. Her absolute dedication to the book was quite an inspiration. There is no question that we could not have made it to press without her efforts. Ioyce, you were a whirlwind, and deserve a hearty "Thanks!" I sincerely hope you enjoy this 1974 edition of the year- book. It has value today, but even greater value 20 years from now. Then, we can pour a beer, sit back, turn the pages, and reply to our kids, "Yes, that's the way we were. is-if-f QI , 4-4.15-"' '. 'P J, , . , 1 QL--f 'D 1 ,L w . mr lm- . W. - I I y 'll :W -H' l I 4 ' 'VW F' I 43 5-x IO, LP ' .' wx H - ,J ' Ur: " ' " I ,,,, , 1' X lj ,' II iw ' . H -NL. 1 1 " F . V' ,J , ' N' 'M ' - .Q p MW F ll - u "11"! l..l lu' , 'N ,N .M WL.. AW' ra thu--HI 'f 1, ' ig Q v.,l,v1: 'Qu 1 'ffm . ' 'ff 0 V1 . , 0 v ' W wal, . ., . W, W " -ego 5. w QW 1 J 'WJ -V .x,, Q "xx-' I 1 I ' ,,,r57,,. ,tv .. '- ,:.' 4. 4 M x , I . . H ff' -,W ' , - X J: Q Q:-- II Z y W My ' ,,, vf L .1 if O-' V .,' V, , ' I 4 Q-.3 ,, V. . A - 1 'ln 1 V 4 " . 1 1 ' ' Q ."'9'I I 14' - ' -'Ibm - F l .- n.Q.i',.N . , s V- 41 .I r . lin. :gr . 1 " if if v,. il Cab + 1 - - A lf' X Ii? r' . ' A I ,,-1-, . PF f- f' ' Y' I ---. ,, n , H .2 1. 3 -. M I o v L I , 1 1. J, -A, J - , ' ' -'B' - , 4 - .' ' - + I ' ' b U X? .r ,. sr '- ,pb Ldfah- I l F Fi, . 1 -'Is f 13.8 ,glfwj L in 'Je ' QP -,, r- L' 3 J


Suggestions in the University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) collection:

University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Page 1

1968

University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

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University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1972 Edition, Page 1

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University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1976 Edition, Page 1

1976

University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1980 Edition, Page 1

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