University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR)

 - Class of 1936

Page 1 of 292

 

University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 292 of the 1936 volume:

ssiii W3 ' £vi ,DE SOTO FIRST ‘WHITE MAN TO ENTER ARKANSAS I 1541 " ■ l r ■ -■: i-i W ' ' . u . .. ' ' ■ Up ■ 9 % ' f ;«■? p- 1 [c John D Ewbank ! 341 St Charles Fayetteville AR 72701 | ' 5 . £j ' w ;;;• • ' • tf. ••7 | f „ V 1 ' f ; 1 ‘ I M| KtfH j» )| dfigjffiiC FIRST COLONY COMMUNITY CO-OPERATION ?•;• INDIAN ATTACK ON SETTLEMENT imw ARKANSAS POST HG5 V’V-t " - Vv The 1936 RAZORBACK COPYRIGHT 1936 JOHN L. ANDERSON Editor CLEMENT B. McCLELLAND LOUISIANA PURCHASE 1803 Manager ,r ] FIRST LEGISLATURE FIRST COLLE GE PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS l||f 11%; 5 ii _ f!. ' $» ! : i : -;il ' ‘I;! - m 4 wv 1:1 ifilf: | v :» 5|VsC ' Hi gg g MEXICAN WAR 16 6-46 FIRST CAPITOL BUILDING FIRST BANK FOREWORD In the attempt to mold the book in conformance to the Centennial celebration of the State, it has been necessary to make many changes in the treatment of ma¬ terial. These changes, although necessary, were made with the thought of giving to you a some¬ what different yearbook, and if it meets with your approval, our purpose will be more than satisfied. ARKANSAS ADMITTED TO UNION 1 3G CONTENTS Centennial Section Book One ADMINISTRATION Book Two FEATURES Book Three STUDENT BODY Book Four ATHLETICS Book Five ORGANIZATIONS Book Six ACTIVITIES Book Seven MILITARY Book Eight ADVERTISEMENTS PM irj a CIVIL WAR 1861 U.5. ARSENAL. AT FAYETTEVILLE ORGLANI ION OF TROOPS In recognition of the notable past achievements in its century prospective future RAZORBACK humbly dedicated to the State of Arkansas ■SgSlEisfcg -JT 1 fh ,«iS fehtjBw ' V; H Hi Jh jrv r H 1 ™ sa IfligfwKRdWHW b__. — .. v-t mS Ett®SK ' Vf r-T - ' " ' ' I ' _;.: v•■Cl.. ' uCti ' r. jSSj » y • 2 In the foregoing section, devoted to the portrayal of the Centennial theme, we have tried to present to you in a pictorial fashion the seven periods of Arkansas history. On each page, representing a period in the history, there are introduced all events of importance occurring during that period. In the following section we have prepared a brief resume of the history of the state in the attempt to better familiarize the citizens with the significance of Arkansas ' century of existence as a state. For the preparation of the resume of the state history we are indeed indebted to Ellsworth Chunn, the Centennial Editor of the book, and for the illustrations of the section, to Louise McCulloch, the Staff Artist. ARKANSAS ' HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT A Chronological Survey of Arkansas—Its Origin, Progression, and Present Status The past is past, and in the vaults of time A day, a year, an hundred years are one. The dead leaf mutters of a dying year But in the East blazes a new born sun. Thus Charles T. Davis closed his Centennial poem in commemoration of the one hundredth birthday of the Arkansas Gazette. Perhaps he felt that the huge tomes of history, the early lore, the dearth of memoirs, were overwhelming. Perhaps he looked to the future, to an Arkansas vastly superior to any age of the past. Ar¬ kansas should look forward. But now is the time to look backward, to review the highlights of a glorious past, to stand on the thresh¬ old of the State ' s second century and be like Janus, glance in retrospection at history, gaze with expect¬ ancy at futurity. From the time of DeSoto ' s journeys over Wonder State soil to Arkansas ' beginning as a Territory, she has contributed to society. From Territory to State¬ hood she has contributed. From 1836 to 1936 she has contributed. Arkansas will continue to contribute. Hon. H. M. Jacoway once cited Arkansas accom¬ plishments to Congress on the occasion of the State ' s eighty-sixth birthday. His statements still apply. ARKANSAS ACCOMPLISHES Arkansas won more medals at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in horticulture and agriculture than any other State. Farmers in the rice belt of Arkansas paid more in¬ come tax than any farmers of any similar area in the United States. Arkansas has more automobiles on its farms than any New England state. Waterworks systems all over the United States se¬ cure their alum for water purification from Arkansas bauxite. The paper-making industry and the manu¬ facturers of popular-priced baking powders are also dependent on Arkansas bauxite for their alum. cavations show that a sufficient amount of novaculite was removed at Magnet Cove to equip a nation with arrow heads, battle axes, and stone implements. Arkansas has pure glass sand in inexhaustible quan¬ tities. Slate suitable for composition roofing, in four colors—black, gray, green and red—is to be had in sufficient quantity to cover every building in the States of New York, Pennsylvania, and California, with the cities of Chicago, Detroit, Boston, Cleveland, Cin¬ cinnati, and St. Louis thrown in for good measure. Arkansas has marble—white, black, and gray—which will take as high polish as the famous Italian stone. College crews place hopes of victory on Arkansas manufactured oars. The round crate, used to ship bananas, originated in Arkansas and is made mostly from Arkansas veneer. Arkansas has two of the largest screen-door factor¬ ies in the United States. Arkansas ' seaport, Helena, is the head of naviga¬ tion for ocean-going vessels on the Mi ssissippi river. Over 65 per cent of Arkansas school graduates con¬ tinue their education at the University of Arkansas. LARGEST NUGGETS MINED The largest nugget of zinc ever taken out in one piece, weighing 70 tons, was quarried in Marion Coun¬ ty in 1893. A small chunk weighing 12,400 pounds was exhibited at the Chicago World ' s Fair, and after taking first premium for purity, was placed on exhibi¬ tion in the Field Museum at Chicago. The largest nugget of lead ever mined came from Marion County, and weighed 2,400 pounds. Inexhaustible is the supply of fuller ' s earth, a min¬ eral used to refine and bleach cottonseed oil and lard compounds. Albert Pike, America ' s most illustrious Mason, reached the zenith of his career while a resident of Arkansas. ARKANSAS HAD POET LAUREATE Scientists assert that the largest prehistoric imple- tment factory was located in Hot Spring County. Ex¬ Poet laureate of Masonry, Fay Hempstead, is a na¬ tive Arkansan. The Masonic lodge has known but two THE HISTORY OF ARKANSAS HAS SEVEN PERIODS Each Period Denotes a Step Forward in Its Growth other poet laureates—Robert Burns and Robert Mor¬ ris. Arkansas turned back to the Government in 1918, 1,000,000 pounds of sugar, or one-fourth of the na¬ tional allotment, that the soldiers might have more sweets. This was more than any other nine States turned back in response to the call. Arkansas has had the world ' s largest sorghum fac¬ tory at Fort Smith. Enough manganese oxides are in the state to manu¬ facture half the dry paints used in the nation. Lithograph stone for printing purposes is contained in Newton and Searcy counties and is superior to any in the United States. Arkansas has more medicinal springs than any State. It has grown the largest apple ever raised. The fruit grew to be 29 ounces on the tree in Benton county. Arkansas supplies more watermelon seeds than any other State. The state has a peach orchard which produces one peach for every man, woman, and child in the United States. Mountains of the nation ' s only deposit of saponite, the natural cleanser, are found in Arkansas. Only two classes of people speak of Arkansas ex¬ cept with praise. The two classes are those who are densely ignorant—and those who are morbidly envious, according to Congressman Jacoway. FORBEARS BUILD STATE That this great state should be so eminent is due to its heritage. The noble pioneer spirit caused men to push over the lands within Arkansas bounds and to es¬ tablish towns and civilization in a wilderness of po¬ tentialities. A search for gold brought the first white men to what is now Arkansas. Hernando DeSoto, governor of Cuba and Florida, came to the continent in search of precious metal. He and a band of hardy followers gained the Mississippi river and crossed it at about Chickasaw Bluffs, near Memphis, in 1541. Their jour¬ ney over the state is indefinite, but they probably fol¬ lowed the well-made trails of Indians. Stricken with malaria and rheumatism, the Indians directed him to a lake of hot water with wonderful healing power. This must have been Hot Springs. Later DeSoto raised the Spanish flag near Helena and claimed all the territory Early Traders on One of Arkansas ' Numer¬ ous Streams drained by the Mississippi for the king of Spain, whose country held it for 130 years. " Arkansas was a football, " says Historian John H. Moore, " And all efforts to own it was a tournament from 1539 to 1803. There were five teams: Indians, Spanish, French, English and the All-American team. " After DeSoto had died in Arkansas and been buried in the Mississippi river, his wife waited in Cuba for his return, but in vain. Finally she committed suicide by jumping from the tower of the fortress which still stands in Havana. FRENCH SECOND EXPLORERS After many years the French came exploring. A Jesuit missionary named Marquette, and a fur trader called Joliet, first explored the Mississippi river as far south as the mouth of the Arkansas river. They spent a short time with the Indians there, learned that the " Father of Waters " went to the Gulf, and then re¬ turned to Canada. When they returned to Canada, Rene Robert Cava¬ lier de La Salle looked the valley over. He went back to France and secured a commission from the king. In 1682 he raised the French flag at the mouth of the Mississippi and claimed the territory for his country. Then Arkansas went under French dominion. With La Salle was Henri de Tonti, called by some historians the " Father of Arkansas. " While La Salle was in France getting settlers to colonize the territory, de Tonti was busy building forts. When he went down to the mouth of the river to meet the detachment of settlers, he learned that La Salle and his troop had missed the river and landed in Texas, where the leader met death from one of his own men. Then de Tonti went north to the Arkansas river and there built a village which he called Post. This oc¬ curred in 1686 and was the first town in the Louisiana Territory. The town was later called Arkansas Post, first seat of government of the commonwealth. Arkansas again went under Spanish rule when Louis¬ iana Territory was ceded to Spain by France in 1762. France again received the country in 1800 when Spain ceded it back by the treaty of San lldefonso. ARKANSAS FINALLY UNDER U. S. The football was carried across the goal line for the last time in 1803 when President Thomas Jefferson pur¬ chased the land for $15,000,000 from Napoleon. His agents in the deal were William R. Livingston and James Monroe. At this time, as a result of the constant booting the ball had received, Arkansas was but a wilderness. Ex¬ ceedingly sparse homes of white men existed among numberless red men. About 400 whites existed in the territory, according to Moore, but by the time Arkan¬ sas was accepted as a Territory of the United Stafes, the figure had jumped to 14,000. Seeking elbow room from the steady westerly spread of civilization, many men found haven in Arkansas. As they came, they established towns. The first post of¬ fice was in Davidsonville and immediately after, one was set up at Arkansas Post, which two were the only mail stations in the country until Territoriality was es¬ tablished. The only settlers in the land at that time were adults, but about 1800, John Patterson, the first white child in Arkansas, was born. He came into the world in a meager log house, the floor of which was constructed of " puncheon, " split poles with the flat sides up. His mother cooked on the open fireplace. The Pattersons, like the other inhabitants, looked eagerly for the monthly visit of the post rider who carried mail on horseback from St. Louis to Monroe, La. In 1812a catastrophe occurred in the territory which is now included in northeast Arkansas and southeast Missouri that changed the whole map of the region. The great New Madrid Earthquake, so called after a little settlement in Missouri, caused the region in the St. Francis River Valley to sink and become inundated with lakes and swamps. Governmental administration was gradually being applied to the country and at the end of the childhood of Arkansas, when it became a youth as a Territory under United States fatherhood, two district courts had been established, sheriffs had been appointed, and the section divided into the first five counties of Ar- An Early Arkansas Fortress—Fort Smith kansas: Clark, Lawrence, Arkansas, Hempstead, and Pulaski. ARKANSAS BECOMES TERRITORY On March 2, 1819, President Monroe approved the Arkansas petition to become a Territory and thereupon appointed Sen. James Miller the first governor, and Robert Crittenden his secretary. Miller had become famous in the War of 1812 when he silenced offensive British batteries. He was a son of New Hampshire. He arrived at Arkansas Post, capital of the Territory, on Dec. 26, 1819, and his arrival caused as much furore as did the first edition of the Arkansas Gazette, first newspaper in the Territory when it appeared Nov. 20, 1819. On the occasion of the first paper, a store at the Post gave away a barrel of whiskey to celebrate. No official record has been made whether the feat was repeated to honor the new governor. Secretary Crittenden arrived at the capital on July 4, when Arkansas Territory began its separate exist¬ ence. A two-fold celebration was held—one for the Territory, one for the National Government. Governor Miller resigned shortly after the capital was moved to Little Rock, and the president put George Izard in the chair. This educated man brought with him the largest library to be seen in the Territory, and his collection of razors, one for each day in the week. The site of Little Rock, and even the name, musf have been unattractive to some citizens, for Gov¬ ernor Miller tried to have the town moved to Crystal Hill, about 12 miles up the river, and built a home there, but his plan was not given cognizance. In 1821, some of the settlers there drew up a petition to change the name of Little Rock to Arkopolis, combination of Indian and Greek meaning Arkansas City, but this, too, was not accepted. CITIZENS MOVE FOR STATEHOOD Ambition characterized action of Arkansas and they aspired to statehood. Ambrose Sevier, Congressman from the Territory, introduced a bill in 1833 to have Arkansas become a State. It was opposed on the grounds that the commonwealth was not large enough, nor possessor of public buildings to accommodate a state government. A census, ordered by Congress in its investigations, showed 50,000 population. Gover¬ nor Pope devoted untiring energy to having buildings constructed on federal land. When Governor Fulton expressed disapproval of the people framing a constitution, they petitioned for a convention. Finally the legislature called a constitu- tional convention for Jan. 4, 1836, and the body of delegates assembled in the Baptist and Presbyterian churches at the Capital. The constitution, as drawn up, met with the approval of Congress with the exception of one clause: slavery school for Cherokee Indians at Dwight, near Russell¬ ville, in 1822. Presbyterians started their work about 1820, Baptists in 1825, and the Christians in 1832, ac¬ cording to Professor Shinn. The first sawmill in the state was established at The Great Seals of the Territory and the State was provided among the tenets. This barrier could not be hurdled until Michigan sought admittance to the Union. Then a bloc of Southern senators brought their pressure to bear. A political trade was nego¬ tiated finally with the northern faction, and the South¬ erners voted favorably for Michigan to enter without slaves if the Northerners would accept Arkansas with them. GOSPEL SPREAD EARLY While political developments were taking place, Ar¬ kansas was also growing in other ways. Churches were springing up rapidly as a result of the work accom¬ plished by circuit riders, " preachers who covered a route of churches on horseback. They had started about 1810. The Methodists established a congrega¬ tion at Mount Prairie, Hempstead county, in 1816, and in 1820 the first sermon in Little Rock was delivered by Cephas Washburn, a New England Congregation¬ alism Washburn later left the capital and started a Helena in 1826, and the first national park in the na¬ tion was set apart as Hot Springs about this time. There were no public schools during the period, but several private ones were established. A Little Rock Academy was founded in 1825, and in 1835 Cane Hill, School (later college), called the first in Arkansas, was set up. The Arkansas Muse, Albert Pike, published his first poems in 1834, records reveal, and he followed the initial venture with several articles, poems, and books. ARKANSAS IS MADE A STATE Arkansas ' third reason to celebrate the Fourth of Ju ly occurred in 1836, when people celebrated State¬ hood, which had been declared June 15. In July, Ar¬ kansas officially had its state coming-out party as num¬ ber 25 of Uncle Sam s children. James Conway had been elected first governor and the first big parade was held to commemorate the inauguaration. Albert Pike gave him the oath of office and a salute of 26 guns was fired. The Masonic fraternity organized the Arkansas Grand Lodge in 1838 and gave to the state ' s chap¬ ters a central organization. The first chapter of Masonry in Arkansas was founded at Arkansas Post, but the lodge did not continue in operation. First permanent chapter of the Masonic lodge, which is still in existence, is in Fayetieville. It was established in 1835, and Archibald Yell, second governor of the State, helped to set it up. Yell is truly the most romantic figure of Arkansas history. Having served as a volunteer in the battle of New Orleans, he became district judge of Arkansas Territory and lived in Fayetteville. He was the first member of Congress from the state; governor in I 840; elected to Congress again, 1844; resigned and ac¬ cepted colonelcy of the Arkansas Volunteers for the Mexican War, 1846. He was killed at Buena Vista, Feb. 22, 1847, and before his final resting place in Evergreen cemetery at Fayetteville was reached, was buried three times. He was buried on the battlefield, and when the Arkansas troops returned home, they brought his body back in a metal coffin and placed it in the family graveyard back of his home, Waxhaws, which still stands on the foot of College avenue in Fayetteville. In 1872 the Masons moved his body from the family lot to Evergreen. TRAVELER TUNE IS COMPOSED The " Arkansas Traveler " first became known about 1840, according to legend and history. This famous old tune is said to have originated from Col. Sandford C. Faulkner, who, with a party of politicians, A. H. Sevier, Chester Ashley, William Fulton, and Archibald Yell, stopped at a squatter ' s home in the Boston moun¬ tains during a state campaign. After talking some foolish banter resembling that of the repartee of the Arkansas Traveler tale, Col. Faulkner played the moun¬ taineer ' s fiddle. Later at a banquet in Little Rock he was asked to reproduce the tune, and it thus became published. Education was spreading gradually as institutions of learning sprang up. Perhaps the first military school in the state, St. John ' s College, was founded in 1848, in Little Rock, by the Masons. The State School for the Blind was founded in 1859. A Deaf Mute Insti¬ tute came into being in 1868. " First west of the Alleghenies, " was what the Ga¬ zette in 1840 called the anthracite coal discovered near Spadra Bluff that year. A Mr. Walker picked up the mineral on the ground there and took a specimen to the newspaper office. The first public library was set up in I 843, when Pub¬ lisher Woodruff of the Gazette began circulating some of his personal volumes. The Fayetteville Female Seminary was founded in 1844 by Miss Sophie Sawyer on what is now West Mountain Street. The next institution of learning in the home of our University was Arkansas College, built in 1852, located on the present site of the First Chris¬ tian Church in Fayetteville. The need having arisen for a comprehensive report of minerals in the state because of new discoveries, Dr. David Dale Owen in 1858 mapped the gelogical resources of Arkansas. His work was not completed before his death, so his brother and Edward T. Cox A " Band of Regulars " in the Early Part of the Civil War Carried on. A more thorough study was made later in the century by Dr. John C. Branner, state geologist, and later president of Stanford University. Ex-presi¬ dent Hoover, then a student at Stanford, helped in the more extensive survey during his summer vacation in 1892. FIRST RAILROAD IS FOUNDED First railroad in Arkansas was organized in 1852, when the Mississippi, Ouachita, and Red River R. R. was constructed. The company was unable to buy or operate any trains, so it failed. In 1853 three others came into existence, according to Moore: The Mem¬ phis and Little Rock, The Cairo and Fulton, and the Little Rock and Fort Smith railroads. Though railroads were built, they got along without telegraph lines until about I 860, when the first wire was set up from Memphis to Little Rock. Right in the midst of the expansion movement, the curse of the centuries fell upon Arkansas. The Civil War was precipitated by formation of the Confeder¬ acy, but this state did not want war, and was one of the last to enter the Southern alliance. Though Arkansas ' citizens were loyal to the Union, their sentimens were Southern, for most had come from the South. They felt that they would rather not mix in the conflict until President Lincoln requested a regiment from Arkansas to aid " in suppressing rebel¬ lion in the South. " Governor Henry M. Rector, who later resigned to enlist as a private in the Confederate army, replied to the president, " None will be furnished. The demand is only adding insult to injury. " ARKANSAS JOINS CONFEDERACY So Arkansas ' lot was cast. On May 6, 1861, sev¬ enty delegates met at the Statehouse and voted to withdraw from the Union. Even this did not cause great consternation among Arkansans. Not until news reached the state that a large Federal force was sweeping south from Kansas City did the enlistment numbers jump. Then the state went wild. Grandpa grabbed his old squirrel rifle; the schoolboy got his muzzle loader; some soldiers received standardized equipment, and 50,000 Arkansas men went to war. From the State also went 8,789 who enlisted in the Union army. Arkansas furnished four major-generals to the Con federacy: James F. Fagan, Thomas J. Churchill, Thom¬ as C. Hindman, Patrick Roane Cleburne. There were 29 brigadier-generals, among them, Albert Pike and ex-governor Roane. Many citizens along the northern border remained loyal to the Union. Some outstanding officers among them include Col. Elisha Baxter, later governor, and Lafayette Gregg, later a Fayetteville judge. PEA RIDGE IS FIRST BATTLE SITE The first engagement in Arkansas between the Fed¬ eral and Confederates was on Pea Ridge, about 30 miles from Fayetteville. On March 6, 1862, 15,000 Confederates under Gen. Sterling Price attacked 20,- 000 Union soldiers under Gen. Curtis at Bentonville and drove them back to the ridge. Next day, the Southerners drove the blue coats into Missouri, but Price did not pursue them. For some reason he re¬ tired to Van Buren. There was another time that Price failed to follow his advantage. At Wilson Creek, ne ar Springfield, they chased Federals from the field, but did not go into the city where they could have ob¬ tained sufficient supplies for the hungry Southerners. Later the Confederates were ordered to Mississippi, and Arkansas was unprotected for the time. This gave Curtis a chance to advance and he moved down as far as Helena. Under the Trans-Mississippi plan, Gen. Hindman was put in charge of Arkansas. Previously, fearing inva¬ sion of the capital, the seat of government was moved to Hot Springs. On Dec. 7, 1862, was the battle of Prairie Grove. The Unions, 16,000 strong, under Generals Blunt and Herron, were forced back 12 miles to Fayetteville by the gray forces under Hindman and Fagan, with 12,- 000 troops. Later Fayetteville was bombarded by the Southern¬ ers and during the artillery fire across the town from the hill where the S. A. E. house is now, to east mountain, considerable damage was done to the town. One house, still standing on Center street, was struck by a cannon ball and the hole which it caused can still be seen. Arkansas Post fell on Jan. 8, 1863, when a fleet of gun boats brought 20,000 Union soldiers there. Gen. Churchill held out for three days, but surrendered to the tremendous odds. News came to the capital that Gen. Steele was leav¬ ing Helena to attack Little Rock, so Gov. Flanagin moved the capital to Washington, Ark. Small details of Confederate troops resisted Steele, but he reached Little Rock and took it on Sept. 10, 1863. Gen. Price withdrew to save his men. Hero of the Arkansas campaign was David O. Dodd, who protected his friends by refusing to reveal the source of military papers in his pockets when captured. He was tried and hung as a spy by the Federals. ARKANSAS REJOINS UNION Seeing their cause was futile, citizens from 24 coun¬ ties met in 1864 in informal convention and drew up a constitution which omitted slavery and set up a Union government in Little Rock. The document was ap¬ proved by the people of the state 12,177 to 266. At this time Gen. Steele decided to drive the rebels from Arkansas. He marched after them towards Camden, but they turned on him at Poison Spring and nearly captured his whole detachment. Southern hos¬ pitality was missing as they angrily pounced on his re¬ inforcements sent from Pine Bluff and ran off another detail of help coming from Sheridan. Then Arkansas ' fighting on a major scale was ended with the battle at Jenkins ' Ferry on April 30, 1864. A reflection on the poor sportsmanship of the North was exhibited in the reconstruction days when military rule was set up in the South. Gen. C. H. Smith was put in charge of Arkansas, and he immediately pre- An Early View of the University Campus vented the legislature, then in session, from working. Sen. Powell Clayton of the Federal army was elected governor by a political dictation method of prevent¬ ing many Confederates from voting. A new con¬ stitution was set up in 1868 by the same action. With loyalists in power, parasites of politics, called carpet-baggers, came to get appointments to govern¬ mental positions. They nearly bankrupted the state, besides badly scarring the social system. The Northerners organized a Union League to " teach " negroes how to vote. But the Ku Klux Klan, capitalizing on negro fears of ghosts, broke up the League. PRIVATE CIVIL WAR IS STAGED Arkansas had a little private civil war in 1873 when the Brooks-Baxter trouble was precipitated by a nar¬ row-margin election of Elisha Baxter, Reform-Repub¬ lican, over Rev. Joseph Brooks, Democrat. After Brooks contested and the legislature reiterated Baxter ' s victory, the Democrats saw his honesty, and went over to his side. Republicans got mad at him for not ap¬ pointing them to office, so they got behind Brooks and some of them went with the latter to the capitol and forced Baxter to leave. He did. He went fo St. John ' s Military College for protection, and for a time there was a large number of armed troops in Little Rock. The only " battle " occurred at Palarm when a boat bringing guns from the University was fired upon with little damage. Finally President Grant decided the mess " in favor of Baxter. Another " war " happened in Perryville when two families began feuding in 1882. The trouble brewed so hot that the sheriff went to Little Rock and swore his inability to handle the situation. The Quawpaw Guards was organized and dispatched to the scene, and the " war " was soon ended. To get rid of carpet bag rule a new constitution was adopted in 1874. This year marked the beginning of continuous Democratic control of Arkansas, for the Republicans failed to put a ticket in the field. The first telephones in Arkansas were set up by Western Union in Little Rock in 1879. The exchange there is the third oldest in the United States. The State Hospital for Nervous Diseases was built in 1883. Bauxite was discovered in 1887 by Dr. Branner as he walked over a field south of Little Rock. In 1888 the first electric lights were installed in Lit¬ tle Rock. But street cars, had been running since 1876 when mule cars " were first operated. Twelve years later a company was organized in Little Rock to run cars drawn by small steam engines. Finally electric cars were used. UNIVERSITY IS FOUNDED About this time the greatest advance in education since the printing of the first paper in Arkansas came. The University of Arkansas was established. By the Morrill Act in 1862, Congress granted each state pub¬ lic land to be used as an endowment for education. The legislature under Governor Murphy in 1868 ac¬ cepted the provisions of this act, but Congress refused to recognize the Murphy administration. Under Re¬ construction Government the legislature approved the Morrill act and the step had been taken. That was March 27, 1871. Only three counties in the state, Washington, Pulaski and Independence, voted to make bids. Citizens in Little Rock and Pulaski county voted down a proposi¬ tion to sell bonds to secure the University. Independ¬ ence County voters voted against such a proposal. Later Batesville voted to issue bonds in the amount of $50,000 for the location of the state school. In addi¬ tion, private subscriptions amounted to $19,000. Washington county voted to give $100,000 in county bonds and the town of Fayetteville agreed to issue $30,000 in city bonds. Only two votes were cast against the proposition. Prairie Grove offered to sub¬ scribe about $23,000. Fayetteville got the bid and the construction bill said " the liability shall be irre¬ vocable and forever fixed and binding. " In 1880 ex-President Grant visited Arkansas and was the first chiet executive to appear in the state. Others have been President Harrison in 1901, Roosevelt in 1905, Taft, 1909. Roosevelt the second will honor Ar¬ kansas in June this year as it celebrates its Centennial. Confusion as to pronunciation of the name of the state led the legislature, at the suggestion of the Eclec¬ tic Society of Little Rock, to pass a law fixing it as if it were spelled Arkansaw. A Confederate Veterans ' Home was made by the state in 1891 to care for the aging figures of Amer¬ ica ' s Dark Age. ARKANSAN FIRES FIRST SHOT OF WAR Arkansas responded quickly to the national call for troops in the Spanish-American War and furnished her quota of two regiments. An Arkansas boy, Stokely P. Morgan, of Camden, fired the first shot of Admiral Dewey ' s fleet which sank Spanish ships at Manila. The corner stone of the new state capitol was laid in 1900, but the building was not finished until 1910 due to lack of interest by administrators. Floating Down the Mississippi to the Territory of Arkansas The apple blossom was made the state flower in 1901. And in the same year natural gas was discov¬ ered on Massard Prairie, south of Fort Smith. When he was walking over his farm near Murfrees¬ boro, John W. Huddleson picked up two brilliant stones. He had them appraised, and thus was started America ' s only diamond field. The tuberculosis sanitarium was established near Booneville in 1909. Arkansas ' s official flag was adopted in 1913 after a contest had been conducted over the state to get a suitable design. Miss Willie K. Hocker of Pine Bluff won the award. Arkansas, the state song, was adopted in 1917. It was written by Mrs. Eva Ware Barnett. CAMPUS BECOMES CAMP Then came war. Again Arkansas ' sons took their places in the field. Her quota was supplied and train¬ ing camps were set up in the state. One extensive camp was on the campus at Fayetteville and the build¬ ing now occupied by the physics department was one of the military structures during that period. Camp Pike near Little Rock, and an aviation field at Lonoke, were also constructed. Arkansas furnished 66,437 men for the United States army in the World War. There were 5,359 men from the Wonder State in the navy and marines and 66 in the coast guard. Total casualties were 2,660. Many heroes of skirmishes came from Arkansas, and the last shot of the war was fired by a man from Pocahontas. Black gold, the mineral which made thousands flock to south Arkansas in 1920, was discovered in the Hunt¬ er Discovery Oil Well near Stephens, Ouachita Coun¬ ty. A great boom was precipitated and populations of towns around El Dorado boosted tremendously. PROSPERITY REIGNS An era of unheralded prosperity then began its reign over the state. Manufacturers increased. Crops in¬ creased. Population increased. Political progress of Arkansas ' sons led Joe T. Robinson, Senator, to be nom¬ inated by the Democratic party for vice president in 1928. When the man who wrote the shortest auto¬ biography ever printed in the Congressional record, " T. H. Caraway, Jonesboro " died, his wife, Hattie W., was made Senator, and was the first woman ever to hold such a chair. From such a heritage, Arkansas is properly fitted to be the Wonder State. The pioneers who built the great State have set before us a mark. As we stand on the threshold of our second hundred years, we may see the romantic past; we must make the future. The Capitol at Little Rock Time worn entrance to “Old Main ” and the stately North Tower mantled With the season ’s first snow BOOK number ONE ADMINISTRATION FROM THE CAPITOL AT LITTLE ROCK Governor Fu+rell Reveres the Past in That It Points to a Greater Future J. M. FUTRELL Governor of Arkansas To the Students and Faculty, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, My dear Friends: ® The year 1936 marks a great event in the history of Arkansas. On this occasion the State will celebrate its hundredth anniversary. It is altogether fitting and proper that on this occasion we should pause from our labors to honor the brave men and women who were active in the upbuilding of our State. • During its one hundred years of statehood, Arkansas has made wonderful progress, but the re¬ sources of the State are yet largely undeveloped. This is a State of unlimited opportunities. It is for you, the future leaders of the State, and for you who mold the minds of the future leaders, to resolve to raise the standards of the State and to carry on its development until the highest possible degree of perfection is reached. CAPITOL DOME AT LITTLE ROCK With the best wishes for your future success, I am Sincerely, J. M. FUTRELL, Governor. Page 23 JOHN CLINTON FUTRALL President of the University of Arkansas • The high spots in the life of the University for the present year are probably the putting into use the new library and the new chemistry build¬ ings which, though not as large as some, are the equal of any to be found in America from the standpoint of beauty, construction and equipment. Anyone who passes through the corridors of the new library building at any time of the day or eve¬ ning will be impressed with the large number of stu¬ dents who are in the building and are actually using it. Page 24 PRESIDENT FUTRALL REVIEWS BUILDING PROGRAM New Buildings, Remodeling, Increase in Enrollment Are High Spots of Year Remodeling of some of the older buildings on the campus is now under way and will give to certain departments much better quarters than they have had in the past. V Gratifying also is the large increase of more than two hundred students in the University this year, thus giving to the institution more than two thousand in the regular session for the first time in history. JOHN C. FUTRALL, President of the University Page 25 THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Theirs Is the Final Decision in Matters Concerning the University MEMBERS The Governor of Arkansas.Ex-Officio J. M. FUTRELL, Little Rock The Commissioner of Education.Ex-Officio W. E. PHIPPS, Little Rock MRS. J. F. WEINMAN.Little Rock T. D. WYNNE (Deceased).Fordyce JOHN M. ANDREWS.Fort Smith HARRY L. PONDER.Walnut Ridge JOHN G. RAGSDALE.El Dorado DR. C. E. DUNGAN.Augusta MARION WASSON.Fayetteville OFFICERS GOVERNOR J. M. FUTRELL.Chairman T. C. CARLSON ...... Secretary and Auditor Page 26 DEAN REID APPLIES " CENTURY OF PROGRESS " Since Oberlin Opened Its Doors to Women in 1835 Great Advancement Has Been Made • MARTHA M. REID Dean of Women • • The one hundred years between 1836 and 1936 may fittingly be called a century of prog¬ ress as regards the edu¬ cation of women in Am¬ erica. In 1835, Oberlin opened its doors to wo¬ men, and in 1837 Mt. Holyoke was founded, each offering a distinct type of opportunity to girls ambitious for higher education. 9 From its very beginning, the University centage of Phi Beta Kap¬ pa keys which are worn by women. • Since the open¬ ing of the new century, the social program which has been introduced into college communities has attracted many girls not particularly interested in scholarship. ® The FERA and the NYA have made it possible for young wo¬ men to attend the univer¬ sity, whose chief ambition is a paying job upon graduation. of Arkansas has had a surprisingly large proportion of women students. Four of the nine members of the first graduating class were girls. The question uppermost in the minds of parents and guardians of these first college women was whether they had the ability to succeed in college studies. This question has been effectively answered by the large per- These three motives, intellectual, social, and economic, are responsible for the large groups of women on our campuses today. To contribute to the needs of each of these groups, and to harmonize their interests is the duty and the privilege of the Dean of women. MARTHA M. REID Page 27 " NEXT HUNDRED THE HARDEST " SAYS DEAN RIPLEY Solving of Next Hundred Year ' s Problems Should Pave the Way " Truth forever on the scaffold Wrong forever on the throne, But the scaffold sways the future And behind the dim unknown Standeth faith within the shadows Keeping watch above her own. " • You and I are living past centuries in present throbbing minutes, crowding da ys of what to do into seconds of how to do, as we raise our standards, broaden our new horizons and make right today wrong tomorrow by replacing superstition with education. • S. E. RIPLEY Dean of Men The next hundred years may be the hardest, but you and I will not be present when Arkansas cele¬ brates her second Centennial. When the Editor of the 2036 RAZOR- BACK asks the Dean of Men for the second centennial story the Dean may write " The next hundred years will be the best " . Here ' s hoping this will be his story but I am not certain. However, I have confidence in the thought so clearly portrayed in the fol¬ lowing lines somewhat paraphrased. • To you students, who are young and full of hope and vision, we give the problems—and they are many, of the future. May you do better than we have done, and when you must pass on your work as we are now doing, may it be said to the youth of 2036 " THE NEXT HUN¬ DRED YEARS WILL BE THE EASIEST. " G. E. RIPLEY Page 28 GRADUATE STUDY GREAT AID TO TEACHING Dean Jordan Believes That Maximum in Undergraduate Enrollment Has Been Reached • In these days of depression, I am often asked for my opinion as to the advisability of a student ' s entering upon graduate work after the completion of his college course. Particular cases are best left to the judgment of the student himself; but in general I have certain convictions. • I believe that the maximum in undergraduate enrollment has been reached, at least for some years. Few additional teachers will therefore be needed. This fact has considerable bearing on the matter of gradu¬ ate study, inasmuch as many persons take up graduate study primarily as a means to advancement in the teaching profession. I believe that many people should be discouraged from beginning graduate work; but I believe just as firmly that able students should be encouraged even more than they have been in the past. DEAN J. C. JORDAN Graduate School • The depression will have been of much benefit if it forces us to improve the quality of our graduate students,—a result of great value if it raises the stand¬ ard of our teachers, and if it develops scholars who are capable of adding to the world ' s knowl¬ edge. J. C. JORDAN • Page 29 TWO QUESTIONS FROM THE DEAN OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Jones Compares Arkansas Education to That of Sister State What has Arkansas done for higher educa¬ tion in its hundred years of statehood? And what have the humanities, as taught in the College of Arts and Sciences of the University, done for Arkansas? The first question may be answered by the records. Unlike its sister state of Michigan, only a few months younger, Arkansas did not begin statehood with a university that was almost immediately to extend its influence to every part of the nation and to assist in the creation of material values undreamed of by the pioneer. Arkansas, as a state, was almost forty years old before it had a state university at all, and the pioneers were all dead before it had a standard modern state university. It now has the staff, the equipment, and, above all, the students with which it should become a vital force in the life of the state. To say that is not to discredit the fine work of a former day nor to disparage the influence that a good many thousand men and women who attended the university before 1920 have had in the life in the state. It is merely to call attention to the fact that only now, for almost the first time, is the university touching all sections and all interests of the state. For the answer to the second question, we shall have to wait until those who are now students in the uni¬ versity become the new pioneers in the realities of Arkansas in its second century. V. L. JONES Page 30 FINDING JOB EMBRYO ENGINEER ' S FIRST THOUGHT Opportunities for the Young Engineer Have Increased as Result of Accrued Depreciation in Industrial Machinery • Engineering is a profession involving the characteristics of science, art and business, and re¬ quires a knowledge of the physical laws of Nature, the mechanical properties of materials, the physical sciences—mathematics, physics, chemistry and me¬ chanics—, and the social sciences. • An engineer may practice his profession as an employee of a municipality, a corporation, a public utility, the Government or other public body; or, he may practice as a consulting engineer, or as an em¬ ployee of a consulting engineer. As an employee he receives a fixed salary. As an independent consulting engineer, his charges being a per diem fee or a per¬ centage of the cost of the work, his income depends upon his ability to sell his services and to render such satisfactory service that he will be sought by other clients and be recalled by satisfied ones. • On graduation from college the embryo engineer ' s first thought is to find a job so that he may help to start the wheels of industry which seem, recently, to have bogged down. For the past four years most beginning engineers have landed their first job in one of the Government ' s alphabetical adminis¬ trations. As industry has been restored to normalcy, opportunities for the young engineer have increased because of the accrued depreciation in industrial machinery. • The College of Engineering, through its per¬ sonnel department, is keeping in touch with its gradu¬ ates and is finding increasing opportunities to aid them in securing positions in their chosen fields. The prospect for a successful career in Engineering was never brighter than that opening before this year ' s gradu¬ ates. W. N. GLADSON DEAN W. N. GLADSON Engineering Page 31 BUILDING PROGRAM GREATLY AIDS LAW SCHOOL Another Step for School of Law. Conference Rooms and Library Space Provided The School of Law entered upon another distinct period of its history in the academic year of 1935-36. For eleven years the law school was located in the basement of University Hall. In the spring of 1936 one of the old buildings on the campus be¬ came the first law building. This building made avail¬ able for the first time adequate library space for housing the extensive law library, which now consists of over twelve thousand volumes. As a result of many changes and repairs in the old building the law school now has its own classrooms, a number of office rooms, a reading room, and several conference rooms for the convenience of law students. DEAN J. S. WATERMAN Law ® Students who attended the law school in the years gone by, even though they became attached to the old quarters in University Hall, will no doubt be gratified over another step in the development of the School of Law. J. S. WATERMAN Page 32 NEED FOR BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS Arkansas History Shows Need of Business Education Says Fichtner • It may be appropriate to recall in the CENTENNIAL RAZORBACK that the first business of the first Legislature of Arkansas was to create two banks: the Real Estate Bank on October 26, 1836, and the State Bank of Arkansas on November 2, 1836. The brief but tragic history of these banks is epi¬ tomized in the first amendment to the Constitution of Arkansas, enacted by both houses of the Legislature without a single dissenting vote, " No bank or banking institution shall be hereafter incorporated, or estab¬ lished in this State. " • The socialistic experiment of the State in the banking business a hundred years ago might be used to advantage in studying many contemporary eco¬ nomic problems. Certainly the failure of that experi¬ ment can be cited to point at least one lesson, namely, the importance of a comprehension of economic prin¬ ciples and methods of control on the part of those charged with business or public administration. The promoters and managers of these early banks had little conception of the functions of banking, or of methods of business administration. Capital was dissipated in financing speculative land dealings. Bank credit was unnecessarily expanded, with the result that for years the people were plagued with the evils of a depre¬ ciated money. Defaults occurred on State bonds. Arkansas, in consequence, suffered impaired credit and impeded economic development. DEAN C. C. FICHTNER Business Administration • The School of Business Administration sets as its first obli¬ gation the training of good citi¬ zens who will be motivated by a deep sense of social responsi¬ bility and capable of prudent busi¬ ness leadership. Economic ills can seldom be remedied by legislative or executive fiat. Bureaucratic domina¬ tion may well create more evils than it overcomes. Hope rather lies in the direction of improvement of the personal qualifications of business and public administrators, and their training in rational and time-tested methods and principles. It is to this unspectacular but solid function that the School in its very small sphere is dedicated. C. C. FICHTNER Page 33 COURSES IN AGRICULTURE FIRST OFFERED IN 1872 Agri Graduates Showing Leadership Throughout the Country DEAN DAN T. GRAY Agriculture • The College of Agriculture of the University of Arkansas is one of the new colleges of the Univer¬ sity. As originally organized, the University was not divided in the present manner. However, courses in agriculture were offered almost from the opening of the doors of the University, January 22, 1872. The College of Agriculture was not organized within the University, however, under its present name until 1905 —3 I years ago. As a matter of fact, therefore, the College of Agriculture is a mere baby, as educational matters are reckoned. Many other states have similar col¬ leges two or three times as old as ours. This does not mean, however, that our College is not exercising a wide influence among the people of this and other states. This leadership is being exercised very largely through our graduates—there being now approxi¬ mately 200 of them occupying positions of public leadership in Arkansas, and still others have important parts to play in the practical business and practical agricultural life of the state. • As indicated above, one of the main objectives of the Col¬ lege is to find and develop young men and young women for lead¬ ership in Arkansas. This, however, is not the sole objective of the College, since research and ex¬ tension activities constitute two very important phases of its work. DAN T. GRAY Page 34 MANY NEW DUTIES FOR COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Guidance, Articulation, and Placement Now Form Part of College of Education Duties dents in all the colleges of the University may go for information concerning apprenticeship requirements for successful teaching. • Articulation—the College strives to articu¬ late the work of the various subject matter depart¬ ments of the University so as to meet the needs of prospective teachers and in turn it supplements this work with appropriate courses of a professional nature. ® Placement—The number of students and alumni aided annually in securing teaching positions by the Teachers Placement Bureau of the College usually runs into three figures. © Studies of Educational Problems—A number of research studies are completed each year, thereby adding to the store of professional knowledge. H. G. HOTZ DEAN H. G. HOTZ Education • The College of Education was organized primarily for the purpose of providing professional training to young men and women who expect to make teaching a career. It was founded upon the principle that teaching, and the direction of teaching through supervi¬ sion are fields requiring expert techni¬ cal service. • While its basic purpose is to furnish professional knowledge and to develop technical skills, the function of the College of Education is, in reality, much broader and more inclusive. Other and related responsibilities of a teacher training unit in a university are: • Guidance—The College serves as an information bureau to which stu- Page 35 McMATH ' S STUDENT SENATORS - CAMPUS LAWMAKERS But No One Seems to Be Able to Find the Constitution They Have Been Amending All Year SIDNEY McMATH President LOUIE IBISON Treasurer • MEMBERS © DAVE BOATRIGHT JIMMIE ENGLISH FLOYD OLIVE IKE POOLE BILLY RUTH JAMES LOUIE IBISON FRANCES HOLT E. B. WARD jimmie McDaniel coleman nolen ANDREW PONDER BILL MAPES SIDNEY McMATH • OFFICERS © SIDNEY McMATH.President FRANCES HOLT .... Vice-President H. L. POOLE.Secretary LOUIE IBISON.Treasurer © The Student Senate, representing all classes of the University, has gradually been granted more authority, and has been recognized by the school as a useful unit of the administrative organization. © All student affairs, social functions, and elections are under the direct supervision of the sen¬ ate. The president appoints the student members of the Publication Board, Social Committee, and the Vigilance Committee. • This year McMath and Boatright attended a convention of College representatives from all parts of the nation held in Kansas City. © Olive .... Poole . . . Ponder . . . Mapes . . English . . McDaniel . . . . Boatright . . Ward . . James . . Holt . . Nolen Page 36 THE STUDENT SOCIAL COMMITTEE . . . DATE GIVERS To Them All Organizations Must Go for the Permission to Give Their Dances • MEMBERS • REGINALD EILBOTT ARTHUR WELLS RUSSELL MYERS CHARLES WHITESIDE BETTY HOOPER EVERARD WISEBURD RALPH WHITMORE E. B. WARD JACK WAGONER LEE CAZORT JAMES H. NOBLES, Jr. JAMES H. NOBLES, Jr. Chairman • The Student Social Committee, appointed by the President of Associated Students, enjoyed a com¬ paratively successful year under the able leadership of James H. Nobles. The committee has yearly in¬ creased in size, due to the greater number of social events scheduled. Every week-end is filled with some student dance or formal, and the duty of the Commit¬ tee is to allot dates to each organizations for their re¬ spective dances. It is easy to see that the Commit¬ tee ' s task is one deserving of much praise, rather than unjust criticism which it receives. . . . . EILBOTT .... MYERS_HOOPER . . . . . . WHITMORE .... WAGONER .... WELLS . . WHITESIDE . . . WISEBURD . . . WARD . .. CAZORT Page 37 THE GOVERNING BOARD AT CARNALL HALL Theirs Is the Job of Enforcing Rules at the Women ' s Dorm • OFFICERS » HELEN ROSE TITTLE .... President CATHLEEN CUSENBERY . . Vice-President JO BLUNK.Secretary • MEMBERS 0 PAULA BRAUN DOROTHY DOUGLAS RUBY JEWEL LIPE MARJORIE ALLRED • The Carnall Hall Governing Board is the discipline commitee of the girls ' dormitory. It has been a functioning unit of that institution since the establishment of student gov¬ ernment at the University of Arkansas. • The board is composed of representatives from the various classes elected in proportionate number by the girls who live in Carnall Hall.- Its pur¬ pose is to promote a feeling of responsi¬ bility among the girls, to administer dis¬ cipline, and to look after their welfare. ALLRED . . LIPE . . CUSENBERY . . BRAUN . . DOUGLAS Page 38 Perpetuating the memory of the eminent jurist whose name it commemorates, the Vol Walker Memorial Library is an eVer lasting source of knowledge to University students BOOK number TWO FEATURES GEORGE PETTY. ESQUIRE ARTIST, CHOOSES BEAUTIES Creator of Beautiful and Alluring Women Selects Five from a Group of Eighteen Out of the group composed of two representatives from each organization on the Self Styled " The campus, we present the first five girls in the Old Deer Choos- order named by Mr. Petty. er, " GEORGE B. PETTY One of Mr. Petty ' s Draw¬ ings from " Esquire " W George Meeting Petty is bound to be a disappointment if you expect to see the typ¬ ical artist, endlessly characterized in fiction. Petty has none of those expected attributes. Tall, heavy set, of ruddy complexion, with fiery red hair, and a still redder mustache, he looks as though he might be anything but an artist. Petty has no illusions about being a great artist, and he makes no attempt to create illu¬ sions about himself. Very frankly, he calls him¬ self an illustrator. As such, though, he has gained nationwide popularity for his drawings for " Esquire " and Old Gold advertisements. Petty is the only artist of his kind using an air-brush, a very delicate little instrument extremely difficult to master. CAMPUS QUEEN Jonesboro, Arkansas Arts and Sciences Chi Omega W. WALTER BATEMAN CLARENDON, ARKANSAS Agriculture MARJORIE ALLRED BENTONVILLE, ARKANSAS Arts and Sciences DAVID RUSSELL BOATRIGHT VAN BUREN, ARKANSAS Law III RUSH WEEK . . . Kappa Sig Coleman officiating in a congrat¬ ulatory manner at the Chio House . . . The Zetas rush out to embrace one of their newly acquired pledges . . . Ahlfeldt and DuBard seem to be well pleased at the success of the Pi Phi rush week . . . The Chios, in conference, appear perplexed as to the whereabouts of the other girls that they bid on . . . The Sig Alphs exhibit their new pledges at the Tri-Delt house during the annual open house on Sunday after rush week . . . The Sisters greet Beulah Stone when she decides to become a Pi Phi. Whiteside and Wamsley " stoke up " between halves of the game ... A small group of enthusiastic rooters at the night pep rally . . . Athletics ' Manager Cypert puzzles over the expense account with the officials . . . President Futrall leans over the rail to voice his enthusiasm to University Physician Gilbert . . . Tuck and Davidson look on as Boatright identifies himself . . . Wells and McCroskey before the days of her pinning . . . Pittman, Delta Prexy, and the stands go wild as Arkansas scores . . . The Freshmen entertain the stands during the half . . . " Independent " Gentry sways the crowd with his cheerleading antics. Jr2 (D siJt GEORGE MAKRIS PINE BLUFF. ARKANSAS Business Administration LAURA SHRODE LITTLE ROCK. ARKANSAS Arts and Sciences SIDNEY McMATH FtOT SPRINGS. ARKANSAS HOMECOMING . . . Queen Erline Campbell performs her duties, receiving flowers and the crown from Captain Choice Rucker . . . The maids view the game from their sideline bench . . . The Queen ' s float in the pre-game parade through town . . . Some informal shots of the ceremonies. Yoes and the Pi Phi float . . . Sherman, Campbell, and Storms salvage the wreckage of the Pi Phi decorations . . The Chios enlist male help in putting up their decorations . . . Weir adorns one of the floats . . . The winning Sigma Chi decorations . . . Senator Hattie Caraway attends the game . . . The advance guard of Guidon marching in the parade . . . Some of the bench sitters at the game . . . The prize winning freshman costume . . . Another of the floats . . . Captain McCulloch leads Guidon in the parade, followed by flag-bearer Hunt . . . Two Tri-Delts descend on the Lambda Chi House in the annual ticket drive . . . The Rootin ' Rubes astride their float. THE LITTLE ROCK TRIP . . . The Walls family stops to chat with President Futrall outside the Marion Hotel . . . The referee gives Sherland, onetime student prexy, some pointers on carrying the chain . . . Greg and Clell Taylor trying to get the band to the field on time . . . Students gathering for that long, dreary ride back to Fayetteville . . . The band still in formation after the long parade through the business section . . . Arkansas’ drummers swap sticks during one of the many maneuvers . . . A. B. C. ' s act as the official escorts to the Queen.in the parade . . . George Eld- ridge ' s presence doesn ' t seem to be welcomed by the apparently annoyed Burton twins . . . Judging by the broad smiles, the A. M. sponsors seem to be enjoying their place of prominence in the parade . . . The array of Queens, Maids, and Attendants views the game from the sidelines in front of the Governor ' s box. JAMES BOURLAND Fort Smith, Arkansas Engineering ELAINE BRAUGHTON Hot Springs, Arkansas Arts and Sciences CHOICE RUCKER Slaton, Texas Education THE SHREVEPORT TRIP ... A study in expressions as Arkansas scores . . . Governor O. K. Allen, since deceased, hands out bills to the members of the L. S. U. band . . . Drum Major Crumpler leads the band off the field . . . Nolen boarding the train after one of the stops . . . One of Olson ' s interior views of the train . . . Arkansas ' cheer¬ leaders during one of the exciting moments of the game . . . The L. S. U. band wins the applause of the crowd with their conception of a waltz . . . Greg watches anxiously as our goal is threatened ... A street corner concert by the Louisiana band . . . " Abe " Lincoln entertains while waiting for the Special to arrive . . . One of the many stops made by the train on the return trip. ) THE LITTLE ROCK TRIP . . . The Walls family slops to chat with President Futrall outside the Marion Hotel . . . The referee gives Sherland, onetime student prexy, some pointers on carrying the chain . . . Greg and Clell Taylor trying to get the band to the field on time . . . Students gathering for that long, dreary ride back to Fayetteville . . . The band still in formation after the long parade through the business section . . . Arkansas ' drummers swap sticks during one of the many maneuvers . . . A. B. C.’s act as the official escorts to the Queen in the parade . . . George Eld- ridge ' s presence doesn ' t seem to be welcomed by the apparenily annoyed Burton twins . . . Judging by the broad smiles, the A. M. sponsors seem to be enjoying their place of prominence in the parade . . . The array of Queens, Maids, and Attendants views the game from the sidelines in front of the Governor ' s box. Wl ! ARIE JOHN RUSSELL CALICO ROCK, ARKANSAS Agriculture ARA WANDA MILHOAN HARTFORD, ARKANSAS Education CLEMENT B. McCLELLAND FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS Law II Agri Day brings forth a personification of last year ' s Kappa Bete landslide . . . This student seems to be unmindful of it all . . . Waiting in the Palace for the election returns . . . One of the A. B. C. neophytes assumes the position . . . " Biggie " Nisbet burns a little of the midnight oil . . . Student Prexy McMath brings Braughton to the game . . . Dimples show as Joe Butt grins at one of the law school witticisms. THE TULSA TRIP . . . The Arkansas cheer leaders pul on Iheir tumbling act before the Tulsa stands . . . Coaches Rose and Thomsen watch anxiously as Tulsa threatens our goal . . . The cheer leaders pause during the half to have their pictures snapped . . . The Tulsa Queen, along with her escorts, meets the special to welcome Arkansas visitors • . . Mr. Foutz pleads with the band for the best they have during a street concert . . . The Arkansas players on the side-line stand awaiting the opening kick-off of the game . . . Mrs. Billy Hunter, formerly Mary Graham Murchison, being interviewed by a radio announcer concerning her recent marriage. TIPSY TUP.V) house MERCER WOLFF DUMAS, ARKANSAS Business Administration MAYHART STINSON DERMOTT, ARKANSAS Arts and Sciences LOUIE IBISON GREENWOOD, ARKANSAS Mechanical Engineering . vr Dr. Causey and Ernie Deane peruse the comics . . . Coleman and Wood amid the engineers ' greeting to " The Prexy " . . . After a hard drill at the Summer R. O. T. C. camp . . . The Arkansas delegation at Fort Leavenworth ... A study in Physique . . . Swearingen seems to be taking that last fatal plunge . . . Buddy Brooks after one of the numerous spills on the slide . . . Another view of Senator Caraway ' s visit to the campus . . . Branch having a little trouble negotiating one of the " Traveler ' s " barbed wire fences . . . The boys fill the Kappa Sig Bob-sled during one of the snows . . . JOE VOL BUTT Eureka Springs, Arkansas Law II FRANCES HOLT Little Rock, Arkansas Arts and Sciences JAMES LEE HOWELL Lonoke, Arkansas Engineering What Arkansas ' opponents had to " face " when K. O. Lunday entered the game ... A very undignified pose of Eli Leflar—but it was his own idea . . . Bunky and Agnes Garrett— ' nuff said . . . Ditty Curl and Otte express childish glee over the Boston Store ' s Xmas window ... Jo Cook in the process of devouring a carnival ice cream cone . . . Even the Editor can ' t explain why Hunt was subordinated to the rest of this page . . . Jack Brown pursues a few fashion tips . . . Carrie, intently interested in one of the cafeteria phone calls . . . Pritchard and Wamsley startled by the ungracious cameraman. Pud Burke looks as if he is in a " sweating " mood—is this just before that Monday morning " eight o ' clock, " Pud? . . . Business Manager McCann distributes that prize issue of the Traveler . . . Al Lauter ' s dazzling jewelry display seems to have made Niven consider a purchase . . . Some places this campus " key-man " would be called a B. M. O. C., ' cause I hear that they are all his very own . . . ' Tis very seldom that one can catch Traveler Editor Williams and newly elected Hutchison relaxing, even though the Traveler is coming off the press . . . The last minute check as the Traveler " goes to bed " . . . Midnight relaxation at the Pamp ' s—guess Rosie thinks that " Petty girl " is gonna get off that phone . . . Dean Ripley and two of the professors talk it over . . . The finish of a two-hour dressing job—WHO is the date? . . . The old cafeteria bunch waiting for some " sucker " to drop a nickel in the machine. This isn ' t a fake—he really went to the Palace like this . . . Ubiquitous Olson with that d- Graflex . . . The " Stooge " makes its last appearance at one of the football games . . . Nobles and Butts airing in the " white job " . . . McClelland, Yancey, Otte, and Curl plead with old Santy to fill the proverbial sock . . . Tuck literally attempting to oust McClelland out of " office " . . . Barnes and Storms buying " toys " for whom? . . . Wilson seems to disapprove of this Napoleonic pose of Leatherman ' s . . . Hudspeth and others just can ' t seem to produce that sought-for smile. Chaperones at the Kappa house ignore the boys around the punch bowl . . . Rosie Rowles, sans mess jacket, but with June Saunders—and a " line " ... A bunch of males visit the Kappa upstairs during housewarming . . . The old adage " an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure " is reversed in this apartment . , . Scabbard and Bladers get a chance to do something besides drill in their uniforms . . . The receiving line at a Kappa function includes Marianna Butts and a grin . . . The new " Black Cat " howls over the first Cotillion dance of the year. Lieutenant Groves, pistol in hand, guards a tree full of Scabbard and Blade recruits . . . Were Wamsley and Hinkle slipping something over, or is this one of the dramatic productions that we missed? . . . Election day finds the students out in full force—mostly Independents ... A scene from " Journey ' s End, " with Kerr in the limelight . . . Cleanup at summer R. O. T. C. camp . . . Branch and Wight in the death scene from " Journey ' s End " . . . Tulsa ' s Storms seems to be gloating over something—maybe the acquisition of both Olson and Williams . . . Losers Makris and Chunn pleading for a vote at the polls—winner Hutchison smirking in the background. BOOK nu m ber THREE STUDENT BODY Artistically landscaped, scientifically equipped, the NexV Agricultural Build¬ ing adequately serves its purpose EDITOR ' S NOTE • Because of the different treat¬ ment of the material in the class section a student will possibly have some difficulty in locating the identifying copy for each picture. The panels of pictures number from left to right on each page and the eictures on each panel from left to right and from line to line. Thus, if you wish to find the correspond¬ ing copy for the second panel on the page, you will identify it as the body of type beginning with the second large black dot on the page. All names of stu¬ dents are in capital letters, and if your picture is the third one on the panel, you merely count three names down in the cor¬ responding body of type. If this explanation seems inadequate, you may secure a complete one from any member of the staff. • • • GRADUATES 0 KATHARINA BOLLENBACHER . . . Fayette- ville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Graduation Honors ' 34 . . . Class Honors ' 34 . . . Department Honors in Botany ' 34 . . . Botany Seminar. AUSTIN BURKHART . . . Removo, Pennsylvania . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Delta Rho Beta . . . Inter¬ national Relations Club . . . Political Science Club . . . Y. M.C.A.CLYDE CATHEY . . . Camden, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Delta Phi . . . International Relations Club. NELL FARRIS . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences.PEARL ELLIOTT GREEN . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Business Adminis¬ tration .JAMES H. JONES... Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Botany Seminar . . . Y. M. C. A. . . . JOHN HARTLEY JONES . . . Conway, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences .... JOHN E. KING . . . Springdale, Arkansas Education . . . Lambda Chi Alpha Kappa Delta Pi, President Writers Club • KATHERINE CARRIE MIRES . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Gradua¬ tion Honors, ' 35 ... Pi Mu Epsilon . . . Kappa Delta Pi . . . Deutscher Verein. • RANDOLPH MURPHY ... El Dorado, Ar¬ kansas . . . Business Administration.ED¬ WARD J. PEEBLES . . . Springfield, Missouri . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Theta Kappa Nu . . . Pi Mu Epsilon.ELEANOR TRIMBLE . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Zeta Tau Alpha.CATHERINE VERMILLION . . . Mel¬ bourne, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences. Page 68 • • • SENIORS £ RALPH D. ABRAMSON . . . Holly Grove, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . President Political Science Club . . . International Relations Club . . . ORLIN MONROE ALLEN . . . Johnson, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . MARJORIE ALLRED . . . Bentonville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Carnall Hall Governing Board . . . Secretary ' 33- ' 34, President 34— ' 35 . . . Women ' s League Scholarship . . . Rifle Club . . . Rootin ' Rubes, Treasurer, ' 35- ' 36 ... Pi Mu Epsilon, Secretary 35- ' 36 . . . Vice-President, Senior Class . . . Octagon . . . Kappa Delta Pi . . . Women ' s League . . . RALPH E. ANDER¬ SON . . . Lonoke, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . G. E. S., ' 34- 35- 36 . . . A. I.E. E., ’34- ' 35-’36 . . . I. E. S. . . . SAM ASH . . . Kansas City, Missouri . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . THEODORE E. ATKINSON . . . Houston, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . R. B. AXUM . . . Lawson, Ar¬ kansas . . . Business Administration . . . RICHARD AYRES . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Sigma Chi ... A. I.M.E. . . . Cotillion Club . . . ERIN O. BABER . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . H. C. BAKER, JR. . . . Garfield, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . University Theater . . . Pershing Rifles . . . Debate Club . . . GOAH S. BARNES . . . Blytheville, Arkansas . . . Business Administration ... Pi Kappa Alpha . . . Glee Club ' 33- ' 34 . . . University Orchestra ' 34 . . . MARION D. BARNES Junction City, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Honor Roll, Spring ' 35 . . . International Relations Club . . . Pre-Med Club . . . Y. M.C.A. CLASS OFFICERS FRANCIS CHERRY Fayetteville, Arkansas President MARJORIE ALLRED Bentonville, Arkansas Vice-President KATHRYN P ERKINS Opelousas, Louisiana Secretary IVA HARNESS . . North Little Rock, Arkansas Treasurer Page 69 SENIORS • • • • ORTUS W. BARNETT . . . North Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . 4-H Club President . . . LEWIS CHARLES BARRY . . . Miami, Oklahoma . . . Engineering . . . Theta Tau . . . I. E. S. President . . . G. E. S. Secretary . . . Arkansas En¬ gineer Staff . . . A. B. C. . . . W. WALTER BATEMAN . . . Clarendon, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . President ' 35 . . . Blue Key, President ' 35- ' 36 . . . Inter¬ fraternity Council, Vice-President . . . Alpha Zeta . . . Student Senate 32- 33 . . . Who ' s Who ' 34 . . . CORINNE BEASLEY . . . Texarkana, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma . . . WILLIAM LEE BELT . . . Eufaula, Oklahoma . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Chi . . . Deutscher Verein . . . Black Cat Cotillion Club . . . Pre-Med Club . . . MARY ELIZA¬ BETH BEMIS . . . Prescott, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Chi Omega . . . KATIE BENTON . . . Rosston, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . JAMES T. BERRY . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . KEITH J. BILBREY . . . Imbo- den, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Alpha Zeta . . . BRUCE BISSELL . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . RUTH LILLIAN BLAIR . . . Paris, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Delta Gamma . . . Women ' s League . . . DAVID R. BOATRIGHT . . . Van Buren, Arkansas . . . Law III . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . Scabbard and Blade . . . Student Senate . . . President Law School Bar Association . . . Honor Council . . . Blue Key. 0 HOWARD W. BOND . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Phi Epsilon . . . Alpha Chi Sigma . . . Pershing Rifles . . . JAMES F. BOURLAND . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . Uni¬ versity Theater, ' 32 . . . Alpha Chi Sigma, ' 33- ' 34- ' 35 ... Pi Mu Epsilon, ' 33- ' 34- ' 35 . . . Arkansas Engineer Staff, ' 34- ' 35 . . . Pershing Rifles, ' 34 . . . A. I. Ch. E. . . . Black Cat Cotillion Club . . . Captain, R. O. T. C. . . . Scabbard and Blade . . . Tau Beta Pi, Vice-President ' 35 . . . JULIA BOWEN . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Delta Delta Delta . . . Pi Kappa . . . Vigilance Committee . . . ANNA TILLMAN BOYD . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . MARTHA JANE BRASHEARS . . . Delaney, Arkansas . . . Edu¬ cation . . . Psi Chi . . . Rifle Team . . . ELAINE BRAUGHTON . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas . . . Chi Omega . . . President of University Theater . . . Secretary Board of Publications . . . Blackfriars . . . Women ' s League . . . Razorback Staff . . . Traveler Staff . . . WARREN BROWN . . . Scott, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Theta Kappa Nu . . . FRANK BRUCE . . . Miami, Oklahoma . . . Journalism . . . MONA BUERCKLIN . . . Ashdown, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Y. W. C. A. . . . WILLIAM L. BUNCH, JR. . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Kappa Psi . . . Band, ' 32- ' 33- ' 34- ' 35- ' 36 . . . Y. M.C.A. . . . JOHN BUNKER . . . Lake Vil¬ lage, Arkansas ... Law III .. . GLEN BURLESON . . . Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Sigma Chi . . . P. D. BURTON, JR. . . . Lewisville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . PAUL FUTRALL BUSTION . . . Magnolia, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Kappa Sigma . . . Alpha Chi Sigma . . . Black Cat Cotillion Club . . . A. I.Ch. E. . . . MARIANNA BUTTS . . . Joplin, Missouri . . . Education . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma. Page 70 • • • SENIORS • CRYSTOL CAMPBELL . . . Ratcliff Arkansas . . . Education . . . A. D. A. . . . Home Economics Club . . . 4-H Club, Secretary ’34- ' 35 . . . BERNIECE CARTER . . . West Fork, Arkansas . . . Education . . . GEORGE CARTER . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Law I . . . Sigma Chi . . . MARVIN R. CARTER . . . Warren, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Alpha Gamma Rho . . . Y. M.C. A., President ' 35- ' 36 . . . Associate Editor Agriculturist ' 35- ' 36 . . . MARGUERITE CHAMPION . . . Gillett, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Phi Mu . . . Rootin ' Rubes . . . Home Economics Club . . . RUTH CHANEY . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . T. GEORGE CHASE . . . Memphis, Tenne ssee . . . Law III . . . Kappa Alpha . . . FRANCIS A. CHERRY . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Law III . . . Kappa Alpha, President ' 35- ' 36 . . . Bar Asso¬ ciation Vice-President . . . Political Science Club . . . Interna¬ tional Relations Club . . . Y. M. C. A. . . . Senior Class Presi¬ dent ' 35-’36 . . . CHRIS D. CORBIN . . . Magnolia, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Kappa Delta Pi . . . Glee Club ' 34 . . . International Relations Club . . . Honor Roll ' 34 . . . MAXINE CLARK . . . Oklahoma City, Oklahoma . . . Arts and Sciences . . . SAMUEL COHEN . . . Paterson, New York . . . Educa¬ tion . . . Kappa Nu . . . Honor Roll ' 33 . . . MARGARET CONGER . . . Van Buren, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Delta Delta Delta . . . Women ' s League . . . W. A. A. • JOHN LEVI COON . . . Moorefield, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . A. I. E. E. . . . MEYER MAX COOPERMAN . . . Edgemore, New York . . . Engineering . . . Honor Roll ' 32 . • . A. I. Ch. E. . . . WILLIAM T. CRAVENS . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Alpha Chi Sigma . . . Tau Beta Pi . . . CHARLES O. CRISWELL . . . Russellville, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Kappa Sigma . . . Football ' 33- ' 34 . . . " A " Club . . . E. R. CUNNINGHAM . . . Fayetteville, Ark¬ ansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Basketball ' 33- ' 34 . . . Track ' 33 . . . MARY ALICE DARR . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Education . . . ANNABEL DAVIS . . . Lowell, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Delta Delta Delta . . . JIM H. DEW . . . Tex¬ arkana, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . Black Cat Cotillion Club . . . J. B. DeWITT . . . Gentry, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . W. F. DHONAU . . Watson, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . JOSEPHINE FRANCES DRITT . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Alpha lota . . . JAMES H. DUNN . . . Foreman, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Alpha Lambda Tau . . . Alpha Chi Sigma . . . Treasurer of Pi Mu Epsilon . . . A. B. C. . . . Stooge. Page 71 SENIORS • • • 0 W. H. DVORACHEK . Fayetteville . Engineering . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . Band . Kappa Kappa Psi, President ' 34- ' 35 . A. S. C. E. . . . CLAUDE H. DYER . Fayetteville . Engi¬ neering . G. E. S., President . Theta Tau, President . Tau Beta Pi . A. S. C. E. . Arkansas Engineer Staff . . . EMMETT EDWARDS . Monticello . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . Alpha Zeta . 4-H Club . Y. M. C. A. . A. D. A. . Agriculturist Staff . . . GUS A. EIDSON . Springdale . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . Football ' 32- ' 33- , 34 . " A " Club . A. D. A. . Athletic Council ' 34- ' 35 . Agriculturist Staff . . . HELEN EIDSON . Springdale . Agriculture . Home Economics Club, Vice-President ' 35- ' 36 . B. S. U., President 34- 35 . A. D. A. . Y. W. C. A. . . . SANTO EMMANUELE . Fayetteville . Arts and Sciences . Deutscher Verein. 0 T. P. EPES . Helena . Business Administration . Chi Phi . . . DOROTHY FARLEY . Eureka Springs . Arts and Sciences . Delta Delta Delta . . . SEYMOUR FINEBERG . New York, New York . Arts and Sciences . Honor Roll ‘34-’35 . Deutscher Verein . Hillel Society . Pre-Med Club . . . THAD FOREST FITCH . Hindsville . Arts and Sciences . Psychology Club . Women ' s League . Kappa Delta Pi . B. S. U., Secretary . . . MAMIE OLIVE FOGLEMAN . Marion . Agriculture . Zeta Tau Alpha, Secretary . Rootin ' Rubes, President . Y. W. C. A., Treas¬ urer . Pan-Hellenic, Secretary . Vigilance Committee . W. A. A. . Women ' s League . Home Economics Club . . . JAMES ROB¬ ERT FONTAINE . Clarksville . Business Administration . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . Alpha Kappa Psi . Pershing Rifles . Vigilance Committee . . . WAYNE FOSTER . North Little Rock . Arts and Sciences . . . FALON ANDREW FRALEY . Marianna . Law III . Pi Kappa Alpha . Vigilance Committee . Debate Club . . . LUCILLE FRANK . Shreveport, Louisiana . Education . Chi Omega . . . H. ZED GANT . Van Buren . Law III . Interna¬ tional Relations Club, President ’33- ' 34 . . . KATHRYN GILE . Fayetteville . Arts and Sciences . Pi Beta Phi . W. A. A. . Y. W. C. A. . Women ' s League . International Relations Club . Political Science Club . Rifle Team. C. HOWARD GLADDEN. Little Rock .... Law III . . . Sigma Chi .... Manager Student Directory ' 35- ' 36 . Business Staff Traveler ' 34 . . . LOWELL GOFORTH . Wilson . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . 4-H Club . A. D. A. . Y. M.C. A. . Agriculturist Staff . . . GEORGE GOLDSTEIN . Brooklyn, New York . Arts and Sciences . Tau Epsilon Phi . Pre-Med Club . Hillel . Honor Roll ' 34 . . . HAROLD GORHAM . McCaskill . Engi¬ neering . Glee Club . Pershing Rifles . A. I. E. E. . . . RICHARD B. GREER, Fayette¬ ville . Business Administration . Phi Mu Al¬ pha . Glee Club . B. S. U., President . . . ELMER RAYMOND GREGORY . Alma . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . Alpha Zeta . A. D. A. . 4-H Club . Y.M.C.A. . . . MARJORY GREGORY . Parkdale . Arts and Sciences . Chi Omega . Women ' s League . Sigma Alpha lota . Vigilance Committee ' 35- ' 36 . W. A. A. . Women ' s Rifle Team . . . JOSEPH R. GROVES . Altheimer . Arts and Sciences . Phi Eta Sigma . Pershing Rifles . Scabbard and Blade . Rifle Team . Honor Roll ' 32- ' 33 . . . E. J. GUISE . Magazine . Agriculture . A. D. A. . Y. M. C. A. Page 72 • • • SENIORS JACK HADEN . . . Fort Worth, Texas . . . Business Administration . . . Football , 33- , 34- ' 35 . . . Track ' 34- ' 35 . . . ETHAN A. HANSEN . . . Ash Flat, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Alpha Gamma Rho . . . 4-H Club . . . Y. M. C. A. . . . COY A. HARDCASTLE . . . North Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . ANNETTE BROWN HARLEY . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . Arts and Sciences . . . Chi Omega . . . Lambda Tau . . . Sigma Alpha lota . . . Blackfriars . . . Octagon . . . University Theater . . . German Club . . . IVA HARNESS . . . North Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . 4-H Club, President ' 34 . . . A. D. A., Secretary ' 35 . . . Lambda Tau, President ' 35 . . . Senior Class, Treasurer ' 35- ' 36 . . . SEARCY HARRELL . . . Harrell, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . ALEXANDER EVERETT HARRIS . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Sigma Chi . . . Alpha Chi Sigma . . . Pershing Rifles . . . Rifle Team ' 34 . . . Engineer Staff ' 35 . . . . . . Scabbard and Blade . . . Black Cat Cotillion . . . Vice- President of G. E. S. . . . A. I. Ch. E. . . . JAMES R. HARRIS . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Law III . . . Kappa Sigma . . . Phi Alpha Delta . . . A. B. C. . . . Black Cat Cotillion . . . Interfraternity Council ’31-’32 . . . Debate Club . . . Vigilance Committee " 31- ' 32 . . . Tau Kappa Alpha . . . Y. M. C. A. . . . Young Democrats . . . University Bar Association . . . Election Committee . . . Razorback Staff ' 33 . . . Political Science Club . . . PAUL R. HARRIS . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Engi¬ neering . . . President A. I. E. E. . . . Treasurer of G. E. S. . . . Engineer Staff. AL HARRISS . . „ Bauxite, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Football . . . Press Club . . . WYLIE HEAD . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Alpha Lambda Tau • . . G. E. S. . . . Press Club . . . A. I. E. E. . . . I. E. S., Secretary and Treasurer ' 35- ' 36 . . . Arkansas Engineer ’35- ' 36 . . . FRANK T. HEARNE . . . Poplar Bluff, Missouri . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Chi . . . German Club . . . University Theater . . . Black Cat Cotillion . . . BETSY CAROLYN HED¬ RICK . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Black¬ friars . . . Home Economics Club ... I. G. HEDRICK, JR. . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Tau Beta Pi . . . Phi Eta Sigma ... Pi Mu Epsilon . . . A. S. C. E. . . . . . . PAULINE HEMPHILL . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . J. GUS HENDERSON . . . Tuckerman, Ar¬ kansas . . . Business Administration . . . A. B. A. Scholar¬ ship . . . Baraca Class, President ' 35- ' 36 . . . Beta Gamma Sig¬ ma . . . MERCEDES HINES . . . Okmulgee, Oklahoma . . . Delta Delta Delta . . . Women’s League . . . W. A. A. . . . RUTH MAST HODGE . . . Winthrop, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Home Economics Club . . . VIRGINIA HOLLOWAY . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma . . . Blackfriars ... Phi Alpha Beta . . . FRANCES HOLT . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Chi Omega . . . Vice-President of Associated Students . . . Rootin ' Rubes . . . Swastika . . . Women ' s League . . . W. A. A. . . . Rifle Club . . . Yell Leader ' 34-’35 . . . Octagon . . . Razorback Staff ' 34- ' 35 . . . Stooge Staff . . . Miss Texas A. M. ' 35 . . . LEO W. HONEA . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . En¬ gineering. Page 73 SENIORS • • • 0 W. A. HORTON . . . Dumas, Arkansas . . . Law III . . . Pi Kappa Alpha . . . JIM LEE HOWELL . . . Lonoke, Ar¬ kansas . . . Engineering . . . A. I. E. E. . . . Athletic Board . . . Football , 33- ' 34- ' 35 . . . Basketball 33-’34- , 35, Captain ' 35 . . . LYNN HOWLETT . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Chi Omega . . . Women ' s League . . . Rootin ' Rubes . . . TOM GEORGE HUDSON . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . JESSAMINE HUFF . . . McCrory, Arkansas . . . Agriculture ... Pi Beta Phi . . . Rootin ' Rubes . . . Women ' s League . . . Home Economics Club . . . ORVILLE HUGHES . . . Glenwood, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Pi Mu Epsilon . . . LUDY VEY HUNDLEY . . . Casa, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . ELIZABETH HUNT . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Chi Omega . . . Wo¬ men ' s League . . . Rifle Club . . . W. A. A. . . . JAMES LOUIE IBISON . . . Greenwood, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Alpha Lambda Tau . . . Scabbard and Blade . . . Pershing Rifles . . . Treasurer of Student Body . . . Non-Partisan Party . • • I. E. S. . . . G. E. S. . . . A. S. M. E. . . . Arkansas Engineer . . . Who ' s Who Committee . . . WILLIAM JUDSON JAMES . . . Piggott, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . A. S. M. E., Presi¬ dent . . . BID ELROD JEFFRIES . . . McCrory, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Kappa Sigma . . . " A " Club . . . Football ' 34- “35 . . . TROY S. JENNINGS . . . Calico Rock, Arkansas , . . Agriculture . . . 4-H Club . . . Y. M. C. A. . . . EDWIN JEWELL ... El Dorado, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . WENONAH JEWELL . . . Paris, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sci¬ ences . . . Women ' s League . . . ASHLEY C. JOHNSON . . . Shreveport, Louisiana . . . Engineering . . . Sigma Chi . . . Vigilance Committee ... A. I. Ch. E. . . . GEORGE THOMAS JOHNSON . . . Greenwood, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences „ . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . Phi Beta Kappa . . . Phi Eta Sigma . . . Kappa Kappa Psi . . . Botany Seminar . . . German Club . . . Band . . . ORLANDO JOHNSON II . . . Charleston, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . SAMUEL PAUL JOHN¬ SON . . . Wilmar, Arkansas . . . Law III . . . Pi Kappa Alpha . . . Debate Club . . . International Relations Club . . . . Y. M. C. A. . . . University Bar Association . . . Kappa Beta Phi. DAISY MAY JONES . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Delta Delta Delta . . . DOROTHY JOPLING . . . Texarkana, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Chi Omega . . . Women ' s League . . . Women ' s Rifle Club . . . CHARLES E. JOSEPH . . . Blytheville, Arkansas . . . Engineer¬ ing . . . Tau Epsilon Phi . . . Honor Roll ' 32- ' 33 . . . Arkansas Engineer Staff ' 34 . . . Interfraternity Council ' 34- ' 35 . . . Theta Tau . . . A. I.E. E. . . . Black Cat Cotillion . . . DAVID BEN¬ NETT JURAVEL . . . New York, New York . . . Arts and Sci¬ ences . . . Hillel . . . JOHN E. KANE . . . Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas . . . Business Administration . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . Alpha Kappa Psi . . . " A " Club . . . Psychology Club . . . Wesley Players . . . Band . . . Debate . . . Tennis . . . Black Cat Cotillion . . . Honor Roll . . . HAROLD GERRY KANTON . . . El Campo, Texas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . German Club . . . Pre-Med Club . . . KENNETH LEON KARNES . . . West Fork, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . ROBERT E. KAUFMAN . . . Gillett, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Tau Beta Pi . . . A.S.C.E. . . . HAZEL KECK . . . Pettigrew, Ar¬ kansas . . . Education . . . Kappa Delta Pi ... Pi Mu Epsilon. Page 74 • • • SENIORS 0 FRANK KELLY . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Busi¬ ness Administration . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . A. B. C. . . . Scabbard and Blade . . . Pershing Rifles . . . FRED KELLY . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . A. B. C. . . . Scabbard and Blade . . . Pershing Rifles . . . ADALINE KERR . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences ... Pi Kappa . . . Women ' s League . . . Stooge Staff . . . Traveler Staff . . . GEORGE F. KERR . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . Pershing Rifles . . . Blackfriars . . . University Theater ' 32- ' 33- ' 34- , 35 . . . Glee Club ' 34- ' 35 . . . Black Cat Cotillion . . . EWING W. KINKEAD . . . Little Rock, Ar¬ kansas . . . Agriculture . . . Theta Kappa Nu . . . Scabbard and Blade . . . Pershing Rifles . . . A. B. C. . . . GUS A. KOERNER . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . Sigma Chi, President ' 35- ' 36 . . . University Bar Association . . . ADAM A. KREUTER . . . Chicago, Illinois . . . Arts and Sci¬ ences . . . Kappa Alpha . . . Glee Club . . . Y. M. C. A. . . . Botany Seminar . . . EARL LANE.Gurdon, Arkansas . . . Law III . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . Phi Alpha Delta . . . Tau Kappa Alpha . . . Debate Club . . . Black Cat Cotillion . . . A. B. C. . . . Interfraternity Council ' 31- ' 32 . . . Vigilance Committee ' 32- ' 33 . . . University Bar Association . . . MAR¬ GARET LAMBDIN LATIMER . . . Caney, Kansas . . . Education. $ CHESTER HOWARD LEDBETTER . . . Springdale, Ar¬ kansas . . . Education . . . Freshman Football ’33 . . . Fresh¬ man Track ' 33- ' 34 . . . ARLINE LEETH . . . England, Arkansas ... Pi Beta Phi . . . Rifle Club . . . Women ' s League . . . Y.W.C.A. . . . MILDRED LEHMAN . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Lambda Tau . . . PAULINE LEHMAN . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Education . . . JOSEPHINE LEWIS . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . A. D. A. . . . Home Economics Club . . . Women ' s League . . . RUBY JEWELL LIPE . . . Paris, Arkansas . . . Agriculture ... A. D. A. . . . Home Economics Club . . . Women ' s League . . . Y. W. C. A. . . . HOWARD W. LITTLE . . . Jonesboro, Arkansas . . . Law III . . . Kappa Sigma . . . Blue Key . . . Interfraternity Council, President ' 35- ' 36 . . . E. G. LOWRANCE . . . Siloam Springs, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . MARIE MAINARD . . . Roland, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . 4-H Club . . . Home Economics Club ... A. D. A. . . . WILLIAM H. MAPES, JR. . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . Student Senate . . . Razorback Staff ' 33- ' 34 . . . Scabbard and Blade . . . W. C. MARRIS . . . Piggott, Ar¬ kansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Y. M. C. A. . . . Alpha Chi Sigma . . . WANDA MILHOAN . . . Hartford, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma . . . Y.W.C.A., Presi¬ dent ' 34- ' 35 . . . Pan-Hellenic Council ' 33- ' 34- ' 35 . . . Rootin ' Rubes . . . W. A. A. . . . Women ' s League . . . Sigma Alpha lota . . . Octagon . . . ELIZABETH MILLS . . . Marshall, Ar¬ kansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . HOWARD B. MITCHELL . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . ROBERT B. MITCHELL . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Honor Roll ' 32- ' 33- ' 34 . . . Tau Beta Pi Slide Rule Award . . . A. S. M.E. . . . C. OTHO MOFFETT . . . Fordyce, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . MAX MOODY ... El Dorado, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . LORENA MOORE . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Business Administration. Page 75 SENIORS . . . £ FRED MULLEN . Imboden, Arkansas . Business Ad¬ ministration . Political Science Club . Glee Club , 32- ' 33- , 34 . International Relations Club . Psychology Club . . . OTIS MUSGRAVE . Hatfield, Arkansas . Agriculture . . . MILDRED McCANCE . Brinkley, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Delta Delta Delta . Y. W. C. A. . W. A. A. . Women ' s League . Rifle Club . Wesley Players . University Little Theater . . . BOB McCANN . Fort Smith, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Kappa Alpha . . . H. M. McCASTLAIN . Holly Grove, Arkansas . Law III . . . RUSSELL WARREN McCRACKEN . Fli ppin, Arkansas . Education . Football . . . FRANCES McELROY . Wynne, Ar¬ kansas . Agriculture . A. D. A. . 4-H Club . Women ' s League . . . SIDNEY McMATH . Hot Springs, Arkansas . Law III . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . President, Freshman and Sophomore Classes . Business Manager Razorback ' 35 . Blue Key . Pershing Rifles . President Associated Students . President Non-Partisan Party . . . WOODROW J. NEWSOM . Louann, Arkansas . Business Administration . Alpha Kappa Psi . Honor Student ' 34- 35 . . . JAMES H. NOBLES, JR . Parkdale, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Pershing Rifles ' 34 . Men ' s Vigilance Committee ' 34 . Scabbard and Blade . Cabinet of Black Cat Cotillion Club . Chairman of Social Committee ' 35- ' 36 . . . JOSEPH NOVELLINO . Paterson, New Jersey . En¬ gineering . G. E. S. . A. S. C. E. . Theta Tau . Pershing Rifles . Y. M. C. A. . Honor Roll ' 35 . . . FLOYD OLIVE . McKamie, Arkan¬ sas . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . Al¬ pha Zeta . University 4-H Club . Student Senate . Y. M. C. A. . Danforth Foundation Fellowship ' 35 . A. D. A. . . . ANDER K. ORR . Joplin, Missouri . Business Adminis¬ tration . Phi Kappa Psi . . . JOHN LLOYD OSWALT . Gravette, Arkansas . Engineer¬ ing . Alpha Lambda Tau . Pi Mu Epsilon . Alpha Chi Sigma . A. I. Ch. E. . . . FRANCES ANNA PARSONS . Des Moines, Iowa . Arts and Sciences . Kappa Delta Pi . Inter¬ national Relations Club . Honor Roll ' 34- ' 35 . . . JOHN WILLIAM PATTON . Lewisville, Arkansas . Law III . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . Political Science Club . Interfraternity Coun¬ cil . Debate Club . Black Cat Cotillion . . . MARGARET ALICE PEASE . Pine Bluff, Ar¬ kansas . Education . Delta Gamma . Wo¬ men ' s League ' 35- ' 36 . . . JAMES F. PENIX . Tuckerman, Arkansas . Education . . . KATHRYN PERKINS . Opelousas, Louis¬ iana . Education . Delta Delta Delta . Rootin ' Rubes, Vice-President ' 34 . Swas¬ tika . Guidon . Student Affairs ' 34 . Stu¬ dent Senate ’34 . Vigilance Committee ' 33 . . . ALLIE PICKELL . Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas . Agriculture . Chi Omega . W. A. A., President ' 34- ' 35- ' 36 . Women ' s League . Home Economics Club . A. D. A. . . . FRANCES PITTMAN . Little Rock, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Delta Delta Delta, President ' 36 . Rootin ' Rubes ' 33- ' 34- ' 35 . Swastika . Guidon . Women ' s League ' 33- ' 34- ' 35 . W. A. A. . Student Affairs Com¬ mittee . Secretary of Junior Class ' 33 . University Theater . . . FLORENCE PITTS Clarksville, Arkansas . Agriculture . Home Economics Club . 4-H Club . A. D. A. . Women ' s League . Y. W. C. A. . . . M. J. PLISHNER . New York, New York . Arts and Sciences . Alpha Mu Sigma . Razor- back Staff ' 36 . Business Staff ' 35 . Stooge Staff . Hillel Society, President ' 36 . Kappa Beta Phi . Coach, Women ' s Rifle Team . University Theater . Blackfriars . Men ' s Vigi¬ lance Committee . Publication Manager of University Theater . . . H. L. POOLE . McGehee, Arkansas . Education . Football ' 32-’33- ' 34- 35 . Basketball ' 32- ' 33- ' 34- ' 35 . Track ’32- ' 33- ' 34- , 35 . " A " Club . Vigilance Committee ’34- ' 35 . Secretary Student Sen¬ ate ' 35- 36 . . . JOHN BENJAMIN POSEY, JR. . Monticello, Arkansas . Business Ad¬ ministration . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . Alpha Kappa Psi, Secretary . Black Cat Cotillion . . . BURKS PRICE . Cornerville, Arkansas . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . A. D. A. . HOYT PURVIS . Jonesboro, Arkansas . Business Administration . Kappa Sigma, Secretary ' 36 . Black Cat Cotillion . . . BOYD PYLE . North Little Rock, Arkansas . Business Administration. Page 76 • • • SENIORS 0 HARRY C. RALLS, JR. . Little Rock . Business Admin¬ istration . Theta Kappa Nu . . . FAYE RAMSEY . Fayetteville . EDUCATION . Political Science Club . Women’s League . Y. W. C. A. . Psychology Club . . . MARGUERITE RATCLIFFE . Cor¬ ning . Agriculture . Pi Beta Phi . Women ' s League . Y. W. C. A. . Home Economics Club . A. D. A. . . . ALICIA READ . Fay¬ etteville . Agriculture . Chi Omega . Y. W. C. A. . Women ' s League . Home Economics Club . A. D. A. . . . ALMA REED . Booneville . Agriculture . 4-H Club . A. D. A. . Y. M.C. A. . . . JAMES F. RHODES . Fayetteville . Engineering . Kappa Alpha . Theta Tau . A. I. E. E. . . . FREEMAN ROBINSON . Blythe- ville . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . Secretary and Treas¬ urer Young Democrats . Psychology Club . Xi Delta Psi, Presi¬ dent ' 30 . National Product Judging Team ' 35 . . . MARY ANGELA RODUIT . Webster Groves, Missouri . Arts and Sci¬ ences . . . LESLIE J. ROGERS . Relfs Bluff . Agriculture . A. D. A. . . . TOM DAN ROGERS . Paris . Arts and Sciences . Branner Geology Club, President ' 34 . Scabbard and Blade . Y. M. C. A., President ' 34 . Black Cat Cotillion . Non-Partisan Party . . . POLLY ROUSE . Greenland . Agriculture . . . JAMES ALBERT ROWLES . Carlisle . Law III . A. B. C., Presi¬ dent ' 34- ' 35, ’35- ' 36 . Blackfriars . University Theater . Black Cat Cotillion. 0 W. R. RUNDELL . Fayetteville . Business Administra¬ tion . Sigma Phi Epsilon, President ' 34- ' 35 . Interfraternity Coun¬ cil ' 34- ' 35 . Black Cat Cotillion . . . HERBERT B. RUSSELL . England . Agriculture . Alpha Zeta . . . J. ARIE RUSSELL . Calico Rock . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho, Vice-President ' 34- ' 35, ' 35- ' 36 . Associate Editor Agriculturist ' 34- ' 35 . Editor ' 35- ' 36 . Chancellor Alpha Zeta ' 35- ' 36 . Student Publications Board 35- 36 . . . ARTHUR RUTTKAY . Brooklyn, New York . Arts and Sciences . Psi Chi . Pre-Med Club . Hillel . . . EDITH BELLE RYE . England . Sigma Alpha lota . . . GENEVIEVE SALLEE . Pocahontas . Arts and Sciences . Pi Beta Phi. 0 DALE S. SANDLIN . Ola . Engineering . Theta Kappa Nu . Arkansas Engineer Staff ' 35- ' 36 . G. E. S. . I. E. S. . A. I. E. E. . . . JUNE MERRELL SAUNDERS . El Paso, Texas . Arts and Sciences . Pi Beta Phi . . . VIRGINIA SAVAGE . Fayette¬ ville . Arts and Sciences . Chi Omega . Sigma Epsilon Sigma ' 33- ' 34 . Lambda Tau ’34- ' 35 . Political Science Club ' 34- ' 35 . International Relations Club 34- 35 . Women ' s League ' 33- ' 34 . . . MARGARET L. SCHEID . North Little Rock . Arts and Sciences . Delta Gamma . Y. W. C. A. . Deutscher Verein . Women ' s League . German Club, Treasurer ' 33- ' 34 . . . KEN¬ NETH SCHRANTZ . Pine Bluff . Engineering . A. I. E. E. . . . COY SCIFRES . Relfs Bluff . Agriculture . A. D. A. . . . ODELL SCIFRES . Relfs Bluff . Agriculture . . . THELMA SCROGGS . Fayetteville . Arts and Sciences . . . HERMAN SEELIG . Little Rock . Engineering . Alpha Chi Sigma . Pi Mu Epsilon . Tau Beta Pi . Pershing Rifles . Freshman Basketball ' 32 . . . BILL SHAW . Marked Tree . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . Alpha Zeta . A. D. A., Manager . 4-H Club . A. B. C. . Black Cat Cotillion . Dairy Products Judging Team . Young Democrats Club . . . JOHN STANLEY SHEROFSKY . Bayonne, New Jersey . Business Administration . Theta Kappa Nu . Vigilance Com¬ mittee . Political Science Club . International Relations Club . Honor Roll ' 34- ' 35 . . . LAURA SHRODE . Little Rock . Arts and Sciences . Delta Gamma . Sigma Epsilon Sigma . Lambda Tau . Psi Chi . Pan-Hellenic ' 36 . Y. W. C. A., Vice-President ' 35 . Rootin ' Rubes . President of Octagon ' 35- ' 36 . Winner Hazel Hines Briggs Award ' 35 . Women ' s League, Treasurer ' 35 . President of Delta Gamma ' 35 . Phi Beta Kappa. Page 77 SENIORS • • • 0 CLIFFORD SMITH.Fouke, Arkansas. Agriculture.Alpha Gamma Rho.A. D. A. .JAMES M. SMITH.Berryville, Arkansas .Arts and Sciences.Alpha Chi Sigma .LEALDON SMITH.Sheridan, Arkansas .Agriculture.MATTIE MAE SMITH Little Rock, Arkansas.Business Administration . . . . . . . Delta Delta Delta.W. A. A.Wo¬ men ' s League.Treasurer and House Manager of Delta Delta Delta ' 35.MARY ETHEL SMYERS . . . Little Rock, Arkansas.Business Administration ....... Kappa Delta Pi.Lambda Tau, Treasurer .Wesley Players ' 34- ' 35.Y. W. C. A. ' 34- ' 35 .LILLIE SPEARS.Charleston, Arkansas .Education.Honor Roll ' 32- ' 33. Carnall Hall Governing Board 1 34- ' 35.Treasurer of Carnall Hall 34- 35 .JAMES C. STARBIRD. Alma, Arkansas.Arts and Sciences.Theta Kappa Nu.Honor Roll ' 3 3- ' 34.Alpha Chi Sigma.Pershing Rifles.Deutscher Verein.President of Theta Kappa Nu ' 34. OREN M. STEPHENS.Blevins, Arkansas. Arts and Sciences.Lambda Chi Alpha. Press Club.Writer ' s Club.Traveler Staff 34- 35 .MAYHART STINSON.Dermott, Arkansas.Arts and Sciences.Chi Omega, Vice-President ' 34- ' 35.President of Chi Omega ' 35- ' 36.Pan-Hellenic, President ' 35- ' 36. Sigma Alpha lota, President ' 34- ' 35, ' 35- ' 36.Lamb¬ da Tau.Octagon . -.Women ' s League .Vigilance Committee, Secretary ' 33. 0 HILDA STROUD.Fort Smith, Arkansas .Journalism.Delta Delta Delta. Pi Kappa, President ' 34- ' 35.W. A. A., Treasurer ' 34- ' 35, Vice-President ' 35- ' 36.Women ' s League. Octagon ' 35- ' 36.Pan-Hellenic ' 35- ' 36. Razorback Staff ' 34- ' 35.Traveler Staff ' 33- ' 34- ' 35- ' 36 .Stooge ' 34- ' 35- ' 36.SAMUEL PAGE STUBBS, JR.Fort, Smith, Arkansas.Arts and Sciences.German Club ' 32- ' 33- ' 34- ' 35. Pre-Med Club ' 32-’33- ' 34- ' 35.HELEN STUTZEN- BAKER.Stuttgart, Arkansas.Journalism .PAUL SULLINS.Fayetteville, Arkansas .Law II.Lambda Chi Alpha. A. B. C.Interfraternity Council, Secretary. Glee Club ' 33.KATHLEEN SULLIVAN. DeQueen, Arkansas.Education.Honor Roll .University Theater.HAZEL SWINDLER .Ozark. Arkansas.Agriculture. A. D. A. ' 35.Home Economics Club ' 35. Women ' s League ' 35.BOYD TACKETT. Glenwood, Arkansas.Law II.Track .Political Science Club.International Re¬ lations Club.BAYARD TAYLOR.Little Rock, Arkansas.Law III.CLELL TAYLOR .Magnolia, Arkansas.Business Administra¬ tion . Band. Page 78 • • • SENIORS 0 HENRY C. TEAGUE . Atkins, Arkansas . Engineering . Scabbard and Blade . R. O. T. C. . A. S. C. E. . . . FRANCES MARIE THOMAS . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Agriculture . A. D. A. . Home Economics Club . . . GILBERT T. THOMPSON . Muskogee, Oklahoma . Arts and Sciences . . . T. SYLVAN THRELKELD . Cane Hill, Arkansas . Business Administration . . . WAYNE TILMON . Dardanelle, Arkansas . Agriculture . Theta Kappa Nu . Track , 33- ' 34- , 35- , 36 . " A " Club . A. D. A. . . . HELEN ROSE TITTLE . Lincoln, Arkansas . Music . Sigma Alpha lota . Little Theater . Wesley Players . W. A. A. . Presi¬ dent of Carnall Hall Governing Board . . . WILLIAM H. TORRANS . Texarkana, Arkansas . Business Administration . . . WINSTON TREECE . Marshall, Arkansas . Engineering . . . A. R. TURQUETTE . Texarkana, Arkansas . Business Administra¬ tion . Pi Mu Epsilon . Honor Roll , 32-’33- , 34- ' 35. • JAMES H. TURKINGTON . Chicago, Illinois, . Engi¬ neering . Tau Beta Pi, President . A. I. E. E., Vice-Chairman . Editor of Arkansas Engineer . Who ' s Who of Engineering School . . . EDWIN UDEY . Rogers, Arkansas . Agriculture . Alpha Zeta . A. D. A. . Y. M. C. A. . Botany Seminar . . . W. P. VAN DALSEM . Perryville, Arkansas . Agriculture . Alpha Lambda Tau . . . IRMA ELLEN VEST . Atkins, Arkansas . Agriculture . Honor Roll ' 28 . Home Economics Club . A. D. A. . . . JACK WAGONER . Magnolia, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Theta Kappa Nu . Honor Roll ' 34 . Political Science Club ' 35- ' 36 . International Relations Club, President ' 36 . Social Committee ' 36 . Razorback Staff ' 36 . . . BURNELL WALDREP . Magnolia, Arkansas . Law III . . . HARLEY R. WALKER . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Engineering . Pi Mu Epsilon . A. S. C. E., Secretary . . . BRYANT WALL . Jonesboro, Arkansas . Business Adminis¬ tration . Kappa Sigma . Black Cat Cotillion . . . LUTHER WALLIN, JR. . Earle, Arkansas . Law III . Alpha Sigma Phi. • BURKETT H. WAMSLEY . Bixby, Oklahoma . Arts and Sciences . Sigma Chi . Writer ' s Club, President . Press Club . Editor of Stooge . Razorback Staff . Traveler Staff . Blackfriars . A. B. C. . . . CLAUDE C. WARD . Fort Smith, Arkansas . Business Administration . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . Alpha Kappa Psi . . . B. A. WARREN . Magnolia, Arkansas . Education . . . ORRIS L. WATSON . Cotter, Arkansas . Engineering . Sigma Phi Epsilon . A. S. M. E. . Scabbard and Blade . . . THOMAS D. WAUGH . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Kappa Sigma . Alpha Chi Sigma, President ' 35 . Pi Mu Epsilon . Glee Club . . . ROY R. WEEDIN . Russellville, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Alpha Chi Sigma . . . MAX WEIR . Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . A. D. A. . Agriculturist Staff . . . ARTHUR LEE WELLS, JR. . Helena, Arkansas . Business Administration . Kappa Sigma . Freshman Basketball ' 32 . GHe Club ' 32- ' 33- ' 34 . Black Cat Cotillion . Razorback Staff ' 34 . Social Committee ' 35 . Co-Chair¬ man Vigilance Committee ' 35 . Vigilance Committee ' 33 . . . SIDNEY WHARTON . Warren, Arkansas . Business Administra¬ tion . Kappa Sigma, President ' 35- ' 36 . Interfraternify Council . Black Cat Cotillion. Fage 79 SENIORS • PAULINE FRIDDLE WHEELER . Fayetteville . Agricul¬ ture . Rootin ' Rubes, Secretary ' 35- ' 36 . Guidon . Home Eco¬ nomics Club . . . HELEN WHITE . Hamburg . Agriculture . Home Economics Club . . . MARY WHITE . Little Rock . Agri¬ culture . A. D. A. . Home Economics Club . 4-H Club . Wo¬ men ' s League . House Manager 4-H Club House . . . CHARLES B. WHITESIDE, JR. . Fort Smith . Business Administration . Kappa Sigma . Blue Key . Pershing Rifles ' 33- ' 34 . Press Club . Vigilance Committee ‘33- ' 34 . A. B. C. . Razorback Staff ' 34 . Editor of Razorback ' 35 . Who ' s Who ' 35 . Co-Chairman Social Committee ' 35- ' 36 . Student Manager of Athletics ' 35- ' 36 . Black Cat Cotillion . Kappa Beta Phi . . . RALPH G. WHITMORE . Russellville . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho, Treasurer and House Manager . Alpha Zeta, Treasurer . Social Committee . Interfraternity Council . A. D. A. . Agriculturist Staff ' 34- 35- 36 . . . RUSSELL Z. WIDMER . Van Buren . Arts and Sciences . Y. M. C. A. . Wesley Players .... ETHEL WIENER . East Orange, New Jersey . Arts and Sciences . . . CECIL W. WIGHT . Fayetteville . Business Administration . Lambda Chi Alpha . Pershing Rifles . Scabbard and Blade . University Theater, Vice-President ' 35- ' 36 . Blackfriars . Wesley Players . Alpha Kappa Psi . . . EARL N. WILLIAMS . Fayette¬ ville . Law III . Kappa Sigma . Debate Club, Secretary. 0 LINUS WILLIAMS . Poteau, Oklahoma . Journalism . Sigma Chi . Assistant Editor Traveler ' 34- ' 35 . Editor Traveler 35- 36 . Press Club . Writer ' s Club . A. B. C. . Freshman Class Secretary ' 32 . Kappa Beta Phi . . . H. B. WILLIS . Marvell . Arts and Sciences . . . CLYDE E. WILSON . Green Forest . Law III . International Relations Club, Vice-President ' 34 . Poli¬ tical Science Club . . . HERBERT VANCE WILSON . Little Rock . Business Administration . . . MARY MARGARET WIL¬ SON . Little Rock . Agriculture . Home Economics Club . A. D.A. . Agriculturist Staff . 4-H Club House, Vice-President 34- ' 35- ' 36 . Lambda Tau . Women ' s Rifle Club . Women ' s Vigil¬ ance Committee, Chairman . Y. W. C. A. . W. A. A. . Psychol¬ ogy Club . Honor Roll . . . FRANCES WOFFORD . Fort Smith . Education . Delta Gamma . International Relations Club . Women ' s Vigilance Committee ' 35- ' 36 . Women ' s League . Y. W.C.A_MARY JENE WOFFORD . Tulsa, Oklahoma . Jour¬ nalism . Pi Kappa . . . MERCER WOLFF . Dumas . Business Ad¬ ministration . Tau Kappa Alpha . Student Senate ' 34- ' 35 . Black¬ friars, National President ' 35- ' 36 . Honor Roll ' 33- ' 34- ' 35 . Varsity Debate ' 33- ' 34 . University Theater . A. B. C. . Political Science Club, Vice-President ' 34- ' 35 . Debate Club . Black Cat Cotillion . . . JULIUS J. WOODRUFF . Prairie Grove . Engineering . Alpha Chi Sigma . A. I. Ch. E. . Arkansas Engineer . Business Manager ' 35- ' 36 . Pershing Rifles. HERBERT WOODS . Hamburg . Business Administra¬ tion . . . AMY WOOLWINE . Memphis, Tennessee . Agricul¬ ture . 4-H Club . Women ' s League . Rootin ' Rubes . Home Economics Club, President ' 35 . . . MARVINE WRIGHT . Gur- don . Arts and Sciences . Pi Beta Phi . Women ' s Rifle Club . Y. W. C. A. . Women ' s League . . . C. RUTH YANCEY . Fay¬ etteville . Education . Chi Omega . Traveler Staff ' 35- ' 36 . Wo¬ men ' s League . W. A. A. . Guidon . Pi Kappa . Wesley Players . International Relations Club . . . WILLIAM R. YANCEY . Fayetteville . Education . Lambda Chi Alpha . Scabbard and Blade, Captain 35- 36 . A. B. C., Secretary and Treasurer ‘35- ' 36 . University Theater . Treasurer of Junior Class . Student Senate 35- 36 . Vigilance Committee ' 34- 35 . Razorback Staff 35- 36 . Golf Team ' 34- ' 35 . Black Cat Cotillion Cabinet . . . WILLIAM B. YAUCH . Little Rock . Business Administration . Sigma Phi Epsilon, President . Interfraternity Council ' 34- ' 35- ' 36 . Intramural Manager ' 33- ' 34 . " A " Club . Social Committee ' 34- ' 35 . Alpha Kappa Psi . Black Cat CotiJion Cabinet . Young Democrats . Scabbard and Blade . . . BERNARD YES- NER . Richmond Hill, Long Island . Arts and Sciences . Tau Epsilon Phi . A. B. C. . Stooge Staff . Pre-Med Club . Hillel . Interfraternity Council . . . MARTHA YOUMANS . Fort Smith . Education . Women ' s League . . . JOSEPHINE YOUNG . Fort Smith . Arts and Sciences . Chi Omega . . . MILTON L. ZISES . Brooklyn, New York . Arts and Sciences . Tau Epsilon Phi . Deutscher Verein . Pre-Med Club . Hillel . Orchestra. • • • JUNIORS 0 ARNOLD ADAMS . Batesville, Arkansas . Law I . Pi Kappa Alpha . . . J. BENNETT ADAMS . Junction City, Ar¬ kansas . Engineering . . . MARGARET ANNE AHLFELDT . Stuttgart, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Pi Beta Phi . . . JOHN L. ANDERSON . Helena, Arkansas . Law I . Kappa Sigma . Blue Key . Student Senate ’33- ' 34 . Razorback Staff ' 34- 35 . Editor Razorback 1936 . . . JOHN ANGEL . Yellville, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . . . RAYMOND ARSHT . West Frankfort, Illinois . Law II . . . CLIFTON ARNOLD, JR. . Prescott, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Kappa Sigma . . . HAROLD ATKINS . Ozark, Arkansas . Engineering . . . BURL AUSTIN . DeQueen, Arkansas . Business Administration . Phi Eta Sigma . Pershing Rifles . Honor Roll ' 34- ' 35 . . . HAROLD T. BABER . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . . . CONDITT BARNETT . Augusta, Arkansas . Engineer¬ ing . Sigma Chi . Theta Tau . A. S. C. E. . A. B. C. . Black Cat Cotillion . . . RAY E. BARRICKMAN . Morgantown, West Vir¬ ginia . Law I. CLASS OFFICERS ELWIN GILLILAND . . . Beebe, Arkansas President MARY LOUISE SANDERS . Fayetteville, Arkansas Vice-President MARY ELIZABETH HOOPER Fayetteville, Arkansas Secretary MRS. BILL HUNTER . . Little Rock, Arkansas Treasurer Page 81 JUNIORS • • • 0 MAX BARRON.Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . . Arts and Sciences.Kappa Alpha.R. O. T. C. .CURTIS BARTON.Harrison, Arkansas .Arts and Sciences.Theta Kappa Nu .JOHN BARTON.Mena, Arkansas. Agriculture.DAVID BATEMAN.Newport, Arkansas.Agriculture.Alpha Gamma Rho .Wesley Players, President ' 34- ' 35.Arkansas Agriculturist, Assistant Business Manager ' 34- ' 35. Alpha Chi Sigma.Kappa Beta Phi.A. D. A. .Traveler Staff.KENNETH STONE BATES .Waldron, Arkansas.Agriculture. CORINNE BATSON.Dardanelle, Arkansas. Law I.ORRIN BATTLE.Hope, Arkansas .Business Administration.Kappa Sigma . . . . 0 W. F. BECKMAN.Fayetteville, Arkansas .Engineering.Kappa Sigma.C. O. BELL.Greenwood, Arkansas.Agriculture .Lambda Chi Alpha.Kappa Kappa Psi .Band.JIM BELL.Fouke, Arkansas .Agriculture.KATHRYN BELL. Fayetteville, Arkansas.Education.Chi Omega .University Little Theater.Blackfriars. Pi Kappa.Guidon.WINNIFRED BITTINGER .El Dorado, Arkansas.Arts and Sciences .Kappa Kappa Gamma.Pi Kappa, President .Rootin ' Rubes, Vice-President.Society Editor of Arkansas Traveler.ROBERT LEE BLACK. Dallas, Texas.Engineering.Sigma Phi Epsilon .Pershing Rifles.LOUIS BONA. Little Rock, Arkansas.Engineering.A. S. C. E. .Phi Theta Kappa.JOSEPH BORN. Paterson, New Jersey.Arts and Sciences. Hillel Society.WILBUR BOTTS.DeWitt, Ar¬ kansas .Law II.ALFRED BOWEN. Little Rock, Arkansas.Law I.Kappa Alpha . . . . . A. B.C.CARRIE BOYD.Jackson¬ ville, Arkansas.Agriculture.4-H Club, Secre¬ tary .A. D. A.Home Economics Club . . . . W.A.A.MILTON BRACK.Little Rock, Ar¬ kansas .Engineering.Pi Kappa Alpha. A. B.C. • MARTHA BRANCH.North Little Rock, Arkansas.Arts and Sci¬ ences .Delta Gamma.Uni¬ versity Theater.International Rela¬ tions Club.J. D. BRASWELL . . . . Calion, Arkansas.Arts and Sciences .Lambda Chi Alpha.FRED W. BRAUN.Galena, Kansas . . . . Engineering.PAULA BRAUN Fort Smith, Arkansas.Journalism .Rootin ' Rubes.Pi Kappa . . . . Carnall Hall Governing Board . . . . DOROTHY ANN BREWER.Earle, Arkansas.Arts and Sciences. JAKE BRICK.Marion, Arkansas .Law I.ROELOF BRINKER- HOFF.Harrisburg, Arkansas . . . . Arts and Sciences.FRANK T. BRODIE .... Van Buren, Arkansas . . . . Agriculture.C. J. BROOKS. Prescott, Arkansas .... Engineering . . . . A.S.C.E. Page 82 0 J. S. BROOKS . El Dorado, Arkansas . Law II . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . WILLIAM BROOKS . El Dorado, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . EDWARD CAR¬ TER BROWN . Helena, Arkansas . Business Administration . Kappa Sigma . . . JACK M. BROWN . Fort Smith, Arkansas . Engineering . Lambda Chi Alpha . Theta Tau . A. S. M. E. . . . WILLIAM A. BROWNE . Little Rock, Arkansas . Engineering . Theta Kappa Nu . A. B. C. . Vigilance Committee . Black Cat Cotillion . Yell Leader ' 33- ' 34- ' 35 . . . PARKS BRUMLEY . Pampa, Texas . Business Administration . Kappa Sigma . A. B. C. . . . CLAUDE BUFORD . Forrest City, Arkansas . Law I . Sig¬ ma Alpha Epsilon . Alpha Kappa Psi . . . FLORIENE BURKE . Okmulgee, Oklahoma . Agriculture . . . GOVAN H. BURKE . Marianna, Arkansas . Law I . Kappa Sigma . Black Cat Cotil¬ lion, President . Razorback Staff . . . VIRGINIA BURKE . Ok¬ mulgee, Oklahoma . Education . . . MARY CLARE BURLESON . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Pi Beta Phi . Women ' s League : 34- ' 35- ' 36 . W. A. A. ' 35- ' 36 . Y. W. C. A., Cabinet Member , 34- ' 35- ' 36 . Botany Seminar . . . BUELL E. BURNS . Yellville, Arkansas . Agriculture. 0 WINIFRED BUSH . . . Rogers, Arkansas . . . Education .JOE VOL BUTT . . . Eureka Springs, Arkansas . . . Law II . . Kappa Sigma . . Phi Eta Sigma , 33- ' 34- ' 35- , 36. President ' 33- . . . JUNIORS ' 34 . . . Pershing Rifles ' 33- ' 34- , 35- , 36, Captain ' 35- ' 36 . . . Blue Key ' 35- ' 36 . . . Law School Honor Council ' 34- ' 35 . . . Cadet Colonel 35- 36 . . . Glee Club , 32- ' 33- ' 34.MURRAY BYLANDER . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Sigma Phi Epsilon ..... ROLAND E. BYRD . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Alpha Chi Sigma. THELMA LOUISE BYRUM . . . Uniontown, Arkansas . . . Edu¬ cation . . . Honor Roll ' 33- 34 .ALICE CADE . . . Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . German Club . . . Pi Mu Epsilon.VIRGINIA CAIN . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Journalism . . . Kappa Delta . . . University Theater ’34- ' 35 ... Psi Chi Club ' 34 . . . Pi Kappa 34- 35 .WILLIAM W. CANADA ... Hot Springs, Arkansas . . . Business Administration.JACK M. CARSON . . . Carlisle, Arkansas . . . Law I . . . Debate Squad . . . Pershing Rifles . . . Political Science Club . . . International Relations Club.ALICE HALL CARPINTER . . . Tulsa, Oklahoma . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Zeta Tau Alpha.LEE CAZORT, JR. . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Law I . . . Sigma Chi, Vice-President . . . Social Commit¬ tee ' 35- ' 36 . . . Law School Honor Council ' 35- ' 36. LENDON CHAMBERS . . . Stuttgart, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Y. M.C. A. Page 83 JUNIORS • • • 0 JESS PAUL CHAMPION . Fort Smith, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Theta Kappa Nu . . . ELLSWORTH CHUNN . Jonesboro, Arkansas . Journalism . Kappa Sigma . Traveler Staff ’34- ' 35- ' 36 . Razorback Staff , 34- ' 35- ' 36 . Glee Club ' 33- ' 34- ' 35- ' 36 . Press Club, Treasurer ' 35- ' 36 . Pershing Rifles President Psychology Club . Y. M. C. A. . . . ELEANOR SCOTT CLARK . Charles City, Iowa . Arts and Sci¬ ences . Delta Gamma . Rootin ' Rubes . . . MEREL D. CLARK . Horatio, Arkansas . Education . . . WILLIAM T. CLEMENT . Glenwood, Arkansas . Business Administration . . . L. LEE CLINE . Siloam Springs, Arkansas . Law II . Tri Eta . Scabbard and Blade . Pershing Rifles . Wesley Players . Psi Chi . Black Cat Cotillion . . . MARK RICHARD COHEN . Paterson, New Jersey . Arts and Sciences . Hillel Society . . . JACK F. COLEMAN . Lonoke, Arkansas . Agriculture . Kappa Sigma . Pershing Rifles . . . NADINE COLN . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences. ROBERT J. COOK . Magnolia, Arkansas . Agriculture . . . ZELMA CORLEY . Ratcliff, Arkansas . Agriculture . . . LEO ANTHONY COWAN . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Business Administration . Kappa Kappa Psi . . . HARRY CRUMPLER . Magnolia, Arkansas . Law II . Kappa Sigma . Drum Major of Band ' 35 . Stooge Staff . . . PHILLIP T. CULLEN . Fort Smith, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Pi Kappa Alpha . . . BETTY SUE CUNNINGHAM . Arkadelphia, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Chi Omega . Women ' s League . W. A. A. • PAUL CUNNINGHAM . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Jour¬ nalism . Press Club . Traveler Staff ' 35- ' 36 . . . WILLIAM CURTIS . Haynes, Arkansas . Law II . . . JIMASON DAGGETT . Marianna, Arkansas . Law I . Phi Delta Theta . Razorback Staff . Cotillion Club . . . MILDRED ELINOR DANFORTH . Fort Worth, Texas . Arts and Sciences . Pi Beta Phi . University Theatre . Blackfriars . W. A. A. . . . SAMUEL LADD DAVIES . Morrilton, Arkansas . Engineering . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . JACK W. DAVIS . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Engineering . . . JOE DAVIS . Little Rock, Arkansas . Business Administration . Sigma Chi . Band . . . PAUL DEARING . Summers, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . . . ALLEN DeLANEY . N ew York, New York . Arts and Sciences . Sigma Chi . Pre-Med Club . Black Cat Cotillion . Psychology Club . . . JOSEPH W. DENNING- TON . Fouke, Arkansas . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . . . WILLIAM B. DENTON . A lma, Arkansas . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . A. D. A. . 4-H Club . . . VICTOR DIDINSKY . South Fallsburg, New York . Arts and Sciences . Kappa Nu . Honor Roll ' 32- ' 34- ' 35 . University Theatre . Blackfriars ' 34 . Hillel Society ' 34- ' 35 . Vigilance Committee ' 35 . Student Af¬ fairs Committee ' 35. 0 M . Page 84 . . . JUNIORS MARION DIXON . Pocahontas, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Y. W. C. A. . Rootin ' Rubes . . . J. MEREDITH DODSON . DeValls Bluff, Arkansas . Business Administration . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . DAVID F. DORFMAN . Wood¬ ridge, New York . Arts and Sciences . Tau Epsilon Phi . Presi¬ dent of German Club . Pre-Med Club . A. B. C. . Hillel Club . . . ELIZABETH DUDLEY . DeWitt, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Pi Beta Phi . . . SALLIE DUDLEY . DeWitt, Arkansas . Business Administration . Pi Beta Phi . . . WILLIE BELLE DUKE . Strong, Arkansas . Agriculture . 4-H Club . A. D. A. . Home Economics Club. WILLIAM F. DUNN . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Kappa Sigma . Press Club . . . WILL H. DYER . Tulsa, Oklahoma . Arts and Sciences . . . JAMES E. EDSON . Fort Smith, Arkansas . Business Administration . Theta Kappa Nu . Freshman Track ' 33 ... REGINALD EILBOTT, JR. . Pine Bluff, Arkansas . Business Administration . Kappa Nu, President . Social Committee . Business Staff of Razorback . Phi Eta Sigma . Pershing Rifles . A. B. C. . Vigilance Committee ' 35 . Cabinet of Black Cat Cotillion . Honor Roll 34- 35 . . . ROLFE C. ELDRIDGE, JR. . Forrest City, Arkansas . Engineering . Kappa Sigma . Theta Tau . Black Cat Cotillion . . . RAPLE C. ELLINGTON . Magazine, Arkansas . Engineering . Alpha Lambda Tau . Arkansas Engi¬ neer , 34- ' 35- ' 36 . A. S. C. E. . G. E. S. . A. B. C. . Pershing Rifles . Scabbard and Blade . Vigilance Committee . Inter- fraternity Council . Honor Roll . . . ALEXANDER ELLMAN . Brooklyn, New York . Arts and Sciences . Phi Sigma Delta . Hillel Society . Pre-Med Club . . . DIXIE ELSWICK . Lin¬ coln, Arkansas . Agriculture . 4-H Club . Home Economics Club . Women ' s League . A. D. A. . . . SEYMOUR JOEL ETTMAN . Bayonne, New Jersey . Arts and Sciences . Tau Epsilon Phi . Pre-Med Club . Psychology Club . Hillel Club. 0 CLARENCE EVANS . Anna, Texas . Arts and Sci¬ ences . . . MADGE EVANS . Anna, Texas . Arts and Sciences . SIDNEY FADEN . Little Rock, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Tau Epsilon Phi . Pre-Med Club . Deutscher Verein . Hillel Society . . . WILSON FALLS . Russellville, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Kappa Sigma ... N. B. FAULKNER, JR. . Wynne, Arkansas . Engineering . . . SAM J. FELLER . Brooklyn, New York . Arts and Sciences . Tau Epsilon Phi . Hillel Society . Pre-Med Club . Deutscher Verein . . . ALICE FINGER . Farmington, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . . . JOHN C. FINLEY . Ashdown, Arkansas . Law I . Theta Kappa Nu . . . MARK C. FORREST . Mul¬ berry, Arkansas . Agriculture . A. D. A. Page 85 JUNIORS • • • 0 SIDNEY EARL FORRESTER Prescott, Arkansas . Agriculture . . . RENNA CATHERINE FRANKLIN . Van Buren, Arkansas . Education . Delta Gamma . Rootin ' Rubes . Women ' s League . Y. W. C. A. . . . R. LEE FRASER . McCrory, Arkansas . Engineering . Sigma Chi . A. S. C. E. . Band . Stooge Staff . . . BETTIE SELDEN FRIEDELL . Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas . Agriculture . Delta Delta Delta . W. A. A. . A. D. A. . Home Economics Club . . . MARJORIE FUGITT . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Agriculture . . . LOUISE GARDNER . Hamburg, Arkansas . Agriculture . Women ' s League . Rifle Club . Y. W. C. A. ' 34 . Little Theater ' 34- 35 . . . JOHN FRANKLIN GAUTNEY, JR. . Jonesboro, Arkansas . Law I . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . BOBBY GELLY . Van Buren, Arkan¬ sas . Arts and Sciences . Kappa Sigma . . . THOMAS J. GENTRY, JR. . Little Rock, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Band ' 33- ' 34 . Kappa Kappa Psi . A. B. C. . Cheer Leader . International Relations Club . Political Science Club . Honor Roll ' 34- ' 35 . Pershing Riflles . Black Cat Cotillion. £ EDNA GIBSON . Tulsa, Oklahoma . Arts and Sciences . Chi Omega . . . EDWIN G. GIDEON . El Dorado, Arkan¬ sas . Arts and Sciences . University Theater . Glee Club . . . HELEN JANE GILE . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Pi Beta Phi . Blackfriars, Secretary . Little Theater . Wes¬ ley Players . Women ' s League . Rifle Club . W. A. A. . Y. W. C.A. . ELWIN GILLILAND . Beebe, Arkansas . Agricul¬ ture . Alpha Gamma Rho . President of the Junior Class . Treasurer of the Sophomore Class, ' 35 . Y. M. C. A. . A. D. A. . 4-H Club . Wesley Players . Basket Ball ' 34- ' 35- ' 36 . . . R. IVAN GILLILAND . Beebe, Arkansas . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . 4-H Club . A. B. C. . A. D. A. . Y. M.C.A. . . . MARY KATE GILMORE . Little Rock, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Delta Gamma . Varsity Cheer Leader ' 34 . Honor Roll ' 35 . Lambda Tau, Vice-President . Pi Kappa . Woman ' s League . Editorial Staff of Razorback . University Theater . Rush Captain of Delta Gamma ' 35 . . . BEN GINSBERG . Boston, Massachusetts . Arts and Sciences . Hillel Society . German Club . Pre-Med Club . Pershing Rifles . . . RICHARD GOODING . Clarksville, Texas . Arts and Sciences . . . DAVID W. GOODMAN . Westfield, Massa¬ chusetts . Arts and Sciences . Tau Epsilon Phi. • MINOR ELLIOTT GORDON . Claremore, Oklahoma . Arts and Sciences . . . FAYE GOREY . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Agriculture . A. D. A. .. .4-H Club . Home Economics Club . . . ARNOLD HENRY GOULD . Bloomfield, New Jersey . Arts and Sciences . Pre-Med Club . Hillel Society . . . HELEN JANETTE GRAHAM . Lowell, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Honor Roll ' 33- ' 34- ' 35 . German Club . Y. W. C. A. Vice-President 33- ' 34 . . . KATHERINE V. GRAHAM . Lowell, Arkansas . Education . W. A. A. Secretary ' 33- ' 34 . Y. W. C. A. . . . LESLIE ARTHUR GRAHAM . Hulbert, Arkansas . Law II . Alpha Lambda Tau, President, ' 35- ' 36 . Vice-President, ' 34- ' 35 . Press Club, Treasurer, ' 34- ' 35 . Wesley Players . Univer¬ sity Theater . Blackfriars . Arkansas Traveler Staff, ' 34- ' 35 . A. B. C. . Arkansas Stooge . Business Manager, ' 34- ' 35- ' 36 Vigilance Committee ' 32- ' 33, ' 35- ' 36 . Razorback Staff, ' 33 . Band ' 31- ' 32- ' 33 . . . MARGARET HELEN GRAHAM . Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas . Agriculture . Rootin ' Rubes . Home Eco¬ nomics Club . 4-H Club . . . MARY JEAN GRAY . Hot Springs, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Pi Beta Phi . . . MURRY GUINN GRAY . Wickes, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences. Page 86 0 O. L. GREENING . . . Camden, Arkansas . . . Busi¬ ness Administration . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon.ERNIS GREGORY ... El Dorado, Arkansas . . . Business Admin¬ istration . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . Pershing Rifles . . . University Theater.HARRY GRIFFIN . . . Carlisle, Arkansas ... Law I.ALBERT GUICE . . . Tucker- man, Arkansas . . . Law I . . . Kappa Sigma. THELMA GULLEY . . . West Fork, Arkansas . . . Education .CECIL M. HANKINS . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Alpha Gamma Rho . . . Arkansas Agricultur¬ ist ' 34- ' 35 ... A. D. A. , 34- , 35- 36 . . . Y. M.C. A. ' 34- 35 . . . 4-H Club ' 34- ' 35 . . . Vice-President ' 35- ' 36 . . . Black Cat Cotillion , 34- ' 35- ' 36.LOIS HANNA . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences.CLAY HAN- . . . JUNIORS SEN . . . Ash Flat, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Alpha Gamma Rho . . . 4-H Club ... Y. M.C.A.WILLA GRACE HARDY . . . Poteau, Oklahoma . . . Arts and Sci¬ ences . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma . . . Rootin ' Rubes . . . Women ' s Vigilance Committee . . . Pan-Hellenic Council . . . Women ' s League . . . University Theater. JOHN HENRY HARKEY, JR. . . . Russellville, Ar kansas . . . Business Administration.JOHN M HARRISON . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Law II . . Sigma Chi . . . Black Cat Cotillion.FRED W HARPER . . . Paris, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . State F. F. A. President . . . A. D. A. . . . 4-H Club .... WILLIAM M. HAWKINS . . . Memphis, Tennessee . . . Agri culture . . . Kappa Sigma.ELLA MAE HERREN . . Portland, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Chi Omega . . . Women ' s League . . . Rifle Team. EDWIN T. HILL . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . Sigma Chi.NEVA HILL . . . Russellville, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma . . . Home Economics Club . . . Women ' s League . . . 4-H Club VIRGINIA HINKLE . . . Newport, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences ... Pi Beta Phi . . . Women ' s League . . . Y. W. C. A. . . . Blackfriars . . . Swastika . . . Rifle Club.LOIS HITE . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Education. £ JACK HOBSON . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . University Theater, ' 35.PAUL HOFFMAN ... St. Louis, Missouri . . . Engineering . . . A.S. M.E.CHARLES HOLDER . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences.PAUL K. HOLMES . . . Newport, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Chi.J. FRANK HOLT . . . Harrison, Arkansas . . . Law II ... Pi Kappa Alpha . . . Interfraternity Council, ' 34- ' 35 . . . Traveler Staff, ' 34- ' 35 . . . Vigilance Committee ' 35- ' 36 . . . Black Cat Cotillion.WILLIAM T. HOLT, JR. . . . Newport, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences. ALLENE HOLTON . . . Poteau, Oklahoma . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma .... GRAHAM HOLMES . . . Stigler, Oklahoma . . . Law I.ELMER HONEA . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Alpha Zeta . . . Basketball, ' 34- ' 35. Page 87 JUNIORS • • • 0 BETTY HOOPER . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Delta Gamma, Treasurer, ' 35- ' 36 . . . Secretary of Junior Class, ' 35-36 . . . Social Committee .GERALD HORD . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . A. S. C. E. . . . Theta Kappa Nu. JAMES TAPPAN HORNOR, JR. . . . Helena, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . Kappa Sigma.LYNN D. HOWELL . . . Bradley, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Alpha Chi Sigma .JOHN H. HUDSPETH . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . Lambda Chi Alpha, President, ' 35 . . . Interfraternity Council . . . Deutscher Verein.MAR- JORI HUNT . . . Joplin, Missouri . . . Law II . . . Delta Delta Delta, President ' 35 . . . Guidon, Captain ' 35 . . . Regimental Sponsor ' 34 . . . Swastika, President ' 35 . . . Who ' s Who ' 34 . . . W. A. A. . . . Social Committee ' 35 . . . Student Affairs Committee ' 34 . . . Pan-Hellenic ' 35 .MRS. BILL HUNTER . . . England, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Chi Omega . . . Treasurer of Junior Class . . . Varsity Yell Leader ' 35- ' 36.RUTH HUTCHESON . . . Buckner, Arkansas . . . Home Economics . . . Home Economics Club . . . Rifle Club . . . Wo¬ men ' s League.JOHN N. HUTCHISON Gravette, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Alpha Lambda Tau . . . Pershing Rifles . . . Press Club . . . Writer ' s Club . . . Man aging Editor of the Traveler, ' 34- ' 35 . . . Editor of Student Loan News . . . Honor Roll, ' 34- ' 35 .DAN INGRUM . . . Springdale, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Alpha Gamma Rho . . . A. D. A. . . . Arkansas Agriculturist Staff ...... MARGARET JACOWAY . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences ... Pi Beta Phi, Vice-President, ' 35- ' 36 . . . Women ' s League, Presi¬ dent, ' 35- ' 36 . . . Razorback Staff ' 34- ' 35-’36 . . . Traveler Staff ' 35- ' 36 ... Pi Kappa, Vice-President, ' 35- ' 36 . . . Guidon.BILLIE RUTH JAMES . . . Joplin, Mis¬ souri . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Delta Delta Delta, Vice- President . . . Junior Representative to Student Senate . . . Women ' s League, Vice-President . . . Rootin ' Rubes . . . Blackfriars . . . Swastika. 0 LUCILE JAMES . . Horatio, Ar¬ kansas . . Education . . Delta Gamma . . Women ' s League . . . Y. W. C. A. ALTON JAMESON.Magnolia, Ar¬ kansas . . . Education.HENRY JARVIS . . . Paterson, New Jersey . . . Arts and Sciences.EDWARD JERUSS . . . Jamaica, New York . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Nu. EVERETTE JOHNSON . . . Jonesboro, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . Kappa Sigma .HELEN JOHNSON . . . Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Pi Kappa . . . Lambda Tau . . . Wesley Players.JAMES FRED JONES . . . Mount Ida, Arkansas . . . Law II.J. MACK JONES . . . Temple, Texas . . . Engineering . . . Sigma Phi Epsilon . . . Theta Tau . . . I.E.S. . . . A. S.C. E.ROBERT KAGAN . . . West New York, New Jer¬ sey . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Hillel Society . . . German Club.G. LARRY KELLEY . . . Little Rock, Ar¬ kansas . . . Engineering . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon.HEREFORD KELSO.Nevada, Missouri.Law II.JOSIE KILLOUGH. Vernon, Texas.Arts and Sciences.Kappa Kappa Gamma . Page 88 . . . JUNIORS $ ELOISE KINARD ... El Dorado, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Delta Delta Delta . . . Women ' s League . . . W. A. A.LEEMAN KING . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences.HERSCHELL M. KITCHENS, JR. . . . Waldo, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences.JESSIE MAY KITE . . . Hollister, Missouri . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma . . . Women ' s League . . . Y. W. C. A. . . . . . . Bentonville, Arkansas . . . Business Ad¬ ministration . . . Kappa Sigma . . . RAY¬ MOND KRAMP . . . Tulsa Oklahoma . . . Arts and Sciences STEIN . . . Maywood, New Jersey . . . Education . . . Kappa Nu . . . German Club . . . Hillel ' 36 . . . Treasurer of Kap¬ pa Nu ' 36 . . . Honor Roll ' 35. RICHARD LANCASTER . . . Mountain View, Arkansas Kappa Alpha LIN . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas . . gineering ... I. E. S. . . . A. I. E. E. News Editor of Arkansas Engineer . LELAND FLETCHER LEATHERMAN . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sci¬ ences . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . Blue Key . . . Sports Editor Traveler ' 35 . . . Sports Editor Razorback ' 36 . . . President Press Club. ELI PAUL LEFLAR . . . Siloam Springs, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . Blackfriars, President ' 34- ' 35 . . . Debate Club . . . De¬ bate Team ' 34- ' 35 . . . Political Science Club, President ' 34- ' 35 . . . Wesley Players . . . University Theater . . . Law School Honor Council ' 35- ' 36 . . . Tau Kappa Alpha.GUY LEHN . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Pi Kappa Alpha. 0 ISAIH LEW . . . Woodridge, New York . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Nu, House Manager ' 35 . . . Hillel Society . . . Pre-Med ' 34-’35 . . . Vigilance Committee ' 35 . . . Inter¬ fraternity Council ' 35.LAWRENCE A. LEWIS . . . Farmington, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Alpha Zeta. WILLIAM A. LEWIS, JR. . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas . . . Engi¬ neering . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . Band.WILLIAM MILTON LEWIS . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sci¬ ences . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . German Club. TOM LINCOLN . . . Bentonville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sci¬ ences . . . Press Club.CHARLES LINDSAY . . . Ash¬ down, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Kappa Alpha. JESSE LINDSEY . . . Bearden, Arkansas . . . Law I. W. A. LINDSEY . . . Prairie Grove, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Sigma Phi Epsilon . . . A. I. E. E.CLAYTON NOLEN LITTLE . . . Bentonville, Arkansas . . . Law II ... Kappa Al¬ pha . . . Honor Roll ' 33 . . . International Relations Club . . . Political Science Club . . . Debate Club . . . Black Cat Cotil¬ lion . . . Traveler Staff ’35- ' 36.REX LOONEY . . . Lowell, Arkansas . . . Law I . . . Debate Team ' 34- ' 35. ZOLON LOONEY . . . Charleston, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sci¬ ences .JOHN ROBERT LYLE . . . Mena, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Pre-Med Club . . . Psychology Club . . . German Club. ELMER KNOTT MOE KREG- Agriculture ... Pi CHARLES LAUGH- En- c_ EL 1 ' • " a « V r 4 f - J Page 89 JUNIORS • • • 0 LEONIDAS MACK . . . Newport, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . Phi Kappa Sigma.PATTY JOE MAHONY . . . El Dorado, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences ... Pi Beta Phi . . . . ROBERT L. MAIN . . . Louann, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . University Theater ' 34- ' 35 . . . Wesley Players ’34- ' 35 . . . Band ' 34- ' 35 . . . Orchestra ' 34- ' 35.WIL¬ LIAM J. MAISEL . . . Chicago, Illinois . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Nu . . . German Club . . . Hillel Society. GEORGE A. MAKRIS . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon ... Phi Eta Sigma . . . Blue Key . . . Tau Kappa Alpha . . . Alpha Kappa Psi . . . Pershing Rifles , 33- ' 34- ' 35- , 36 .... Honor Roll , 33- ' 34- ' 35 . . . . D. L. MALLORY . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas . . . Law I. 0 ARTHUR MARCUS . . . Brooklyn, New York . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Nu . . . Pre-Med Club . . . Hillel Society.ALLEN C. MARK . . . Eureka Springs, Ar¬ kansas . . . Engineering . . . Lambda Chi Alpha ... Pi Mu Epsilon . . . Phi Eta Sigma . . .. Alpha Chi Sigma . . . Glee Club , 33- ' 34- ' 35.MORTIMER MARK . . . New York, New York . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Nu, Correspond¬ ing Secretary . . . Hillel Society . . . Pre-Med Club. PHILIP F. MARK . . . Eureka Springs, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Sigma . . . Glee Club ' 33- ' 34- ' 35 . . . Black Cat Cotillion . . . Pre-Med Club . . . Honor Roll ' 33- ' 34- ' 35.GRACE MARLEY . . . Texarkana, Texas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Delta Delta Delta . . . Rootin ' Rubes . . . Women ' s League.FRED MARTIN . . . Havana, Ar¬ kansas . . . Agriculture ... A. D. A. DELIA MATTESON . . . Prairie Grove, Arkansas . . . Education.MIKE MAY . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Zeta Tau Alpha, President . . . Women ' s League ' 34- ' 35 . . . Y. W. C. A. . . . Beauty Section ' 34 . . . Vigilance Committee ' 35 . . . Pan-Hellenic ' 35.O. M. MEADOR, JR. . . . Dumas, Arkansas . . . Business Administra¬ tion .FLOYD T. MELTON . . . North Little Rock, Ar¬ kansas . . . Engineering . . . Theta Kappa Nu.JAMES G. MERRICK . . . Nashville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon.DOROTHY METCALFE . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Delta Delta Delta . . . Women ' s League . . . Y. W. C. A. Page 90 • • • JUNIORS 0 BRUCE L. MILLER . Siloam Springs, Arkansas . Law II . Beta Theta Pi . Varsity Tennis ' 35 . " A " Club . Black Cat Cotillion . Intramural Tennis Doubles Champion ' 34 . Y. M. C. A. Tennis Doubles Champion ' 35 . State Inter-Collegiate Tennis Doubles Champion ' 35 . . . KATHERINE MILLER . Hereford, Texas . Education . Delta Delta Delta . Kappa Delta Pi, Secre¬ tary ' 35- ' 36 . Women ' s League . W. A. A. . Carnall Hall Gov¬ erning Board ' 34- ' 35 . Rifle Club ' 35 . Honor Roll ' 33-’34-’35 . . . W. STANFORD MILLER . Ola, Arkansas . Journalism . . . ROY MILUM, JR. . Harrison, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . A. B. C., Vice-President ' 35- ' 36 . Theta Nu Epsilon . Y. M. C. A. . Vigilance Committee ' 34- ' 35 . . . JESSIE MITCHELL . Wynne, Arkansas . Agriculture . President 4-H House . Treasurer Home Economics Club . A. D. A. . 4-H Club . . . THOMAS JOHN¬ SON MOORE . Van Buren, Arkansas . Law II . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . HELEN MORGAN . Rayville, Louisiana . Educa¬ tion . Chi Omega . Women ' s League . Rifle Team . . . BILLY SNYDER MORRIS . Little Rock, Arkansas . Business Administra¬ tion . Sigma Chi . . . HAROLD JOSEPH MORRIS . Little Rock, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . . . D. E. MORRISON . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . . . RUSSELL MY¬ ERS . Van Buren, Arkansas . Business Administration . Kappa Alpha . . . PAT McCAIN . Little Rock, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Sigma Phi Epsilon . A. B. C. . Freshman Dance Com¬ mittee ' 33 . Theta Nu Epsilon. % EDWIN McCLAIN . Springdale, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . . . ROBERT B. McCLAIN . Bradford, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . . . CLEMENT B. McCLELLAND . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Law II . Sigma Chi . University Theater . Blackfriars . Blue Key . Business Manager Razorback ' 36 . Press Club . Glee Club ' 33- ' 34 . Kappa Beta Phi . Black Cat Cotillion Cabi¬ net Member . Interfraternity Council . . . ZOE A. McCONNELL . Fort Smith, Arkansas . Education . . . LOUISE McCULLOCH . Marianna, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Pi Beta Phi . Presi¬ dent, Swastika ' 35- ' 36 . Engineer ' s Queen ' 36 . Treasurer of Pan- Hellenic ' 35- ' 36 . President of Junior Pan-Hellenic ' 34- ' 35 . Captain of Guidon ' 35- ' 36 . . . JAMESINA McDANIEL . Jones¬ boro, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Chi Omega . Vice-Presi¬ dent Freshman Class ' 33- ' 34 . Secretary, Pan-Hellenic ' 34- ' 35- ' 36 . Vice-President, W. A. A. ' 34- ' 35 . Pi Mu Epsilon, Vice-Director . Junior Representative to Student Senate ' 35- ' 36 . Women ' s League . Campus Queen ' 35- ' 36. ,C!V ft o | ■L i v »» « i . -iJ ' nr £ THOMAS McDANIEL . Forrest City, Arkansas . Agri¬ culture . Alpha Gamma Rho, President . Alpha Zeta . Track ' 35 . . . NANCY McDONALD . Smackover, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Kappa Kappa Gamma . Women ' s League . Y. W. C. A. . . . J. D. McFARLAND . Nashville, Arkansas . Engineering . . . WILMA L. McKELVEY . Paragould, Arkansas . Agriculture . A. D. A. . Home Economics Club . Rifle Club . 4-H Club . Women ' s Vigilance Committee . . . JAMES L. McKINLEY . Hartford, Arkansas . Engineering . Honor Junior, Engineering School . Tau Beta Phi . St. Pat ' 36 . . . CHRISTINE McKIS- SACK . Waldo, Arkansas . Agriculture . Delta Delta Delta . A. D. A. . Home Economics . Y. W. C. A. . Women ' s League . Rifle Club . . . HOWARD McKNIGHT . Clinton, Arkansas . Agriculture . . . FLIPPEN McLEAN . El Dorado, Arkansas . En¬ gineering . Kappa Sigma . . . ERNESTINE McLEMORE . Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas . Agriculture . Home Economics Club . . . CLARA BERNICE McNAUGHTON Miami, Oklahoma . Arts and Sciences . Rifle Club . . . MARION S. NARISI . Fort Smith, Arkansas . Business Administration . Pershing Rifles . Freshman Basketball ' 33- ' 34 . Band ' 33-’34-’35 . . . VINCENT JOSEPH NARISI . Fort Smith, Arkansas . Law II . Lambda Chi Alpha . Debate Club . Cotillion Club. JUNIORS • • • £ JOE E. NEBLETT . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . Intorfraternity Council ' 35- ' 36 . . . Treasurer Bar Asso¬ ciation ' 35- ' 36 . . . Assistant Fraternity Editor Razorback ' 34- ' 35 . . . Vigilance Committee ' 35- ' 36.WILLIAM L. NELSON . . . Farmington, Arkansas . . . Engineering.LORENE NIMS . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . Pi Beta Phi.A. W. NISBET . . . Dallas, Texas . . . Law II . . . Kappa Sigma.JOHN W. NIVEN . . . Memphis, Tennessee . . . Engineering . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . Honor Roll 34 . . . Theta Tau . . . Band ' 33- 34 .HENRY NORMAN, JR. . . . Hardy, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Chi.JESSE F. NORMAN . . . England, Ar¬ kansas . . . Engineering . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon ... Pi Mu Epsilon . . . Pershing Rifles . . . Alpha Chi Sigma . . . Junior Cadet Officer . . . Honor Roll , 33- ' 34- ' 35.KIN NOR¬ MAN . . . Danville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences. NATHAN NORTON . . . Forrest City, Arkansas . . . Law I . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon.MARY LOUISE OAKES . . . Magnolia, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences ... Pi Beta Phi . . . Women ' s League . . . Y. W. C. A.MARY LOUISE OLIVER . . . Siloam Springs, Arkansas . . . Business Administra¬ tion . . . Zeta Tau Alpha . . . Y. W. C. A. . . . W. A. A. JOHN A. OWEN . . . Humphrey, Arkansas . . . Business Ad¬ ministration . . . Sigma Phi Epsilon. • MORGAN PARKER ... El Dorado, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences.MARY ELLA PARKINSON . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas . . . Education.KENNETH PARSLEY . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . Sigma Phi Epsilon . . . A. B.C.ANDREW PATTON . . . Canfield, Ar¬ kansas . . . Agriculture.COYE PEARCE . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Delta Gamma . . . Rifle Club.RAY PENIX . . . Lead Hill, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences.AMY GENE PEPPERKORN . . . Muskogee, Oklahoma . . . Agriculture . . . Home Economics Club 35- 36 ... A. D. A.ROBERT J. PETTYJOHN . . . Walnut Ridge, Arkansas . . . Law I . . . Theta Kappa Nu . . . Glee Club.TOMMIE M. PHILBECK . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Lambda Chi Alpha. • MARTHA PILKINGTON . . . Hughes, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences ... Pi Beta Phi . . . Women ' s Rifle Team . . . Women ' s League . . . W. A. A. . . . Y. W. C. A. JIM LEE PINNELL . . . Bentonville, Arkansas . . . Business Ad¬ ministration . . . " A " Club . . . Freshman Basketball ' 31- ' 32 . . . Tennis ' 33.FRANK PITTMAN . . . Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas . . . Business Administration.RUTH ELIZABETH PITTMAN . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Y. W. C. A. . . . Women ' s Rifle Team . . . University Theater . . . Wesley Players.CONRAD POWELL . . . Camden, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma .HOWARD E. POWELL . . . Gurdon, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . G. E. S. . . . A. I. Ch. E.ROWAN PREWITT . . . Tillar, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon.DOWELL PRICE . . . Booneville, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Alpha Lambda Tau.BEN RAND . . . Searcy, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Page 92 • • • JUNIORS WILMER RANDALL . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Sigma Chi . . . Glee Club . . . A. I. E. E. . . . Alliance Francaise.RALPH RAWLINGS . . . Waldron, Arkansas . . . Agriculture.WILLIAM M. REINHARDT, JR. . . . Hickory Plains, Arkansas . . . Agriculture. CYRIL EDD RICKETT . . . Romance, Arkansas . . . Alpha Gamma Rho . . . Y. M. C. A., Vice-President ' 35- ' 36 . . . 4-H Club ... A. D. A.CHARLES R. RIDLEY . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas . . . Engineering.SARABEL ROBERTS . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Delta Gamma . . . University Theater . . . Guidon.BETTY ROBERTSON . . . Shreveport, Louisiana . . . Arts and Sciences .FRANK ROBERTSON . . . Benton, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences.KATHLYN ROBINSON . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Delta Gamma. • ROBERTA M. ROBINSON . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Y. W. C. A.VIRGINIA ROBINSON . . . Cincinnati, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Pi Beta Phi . . . Y. W. C. A. . . . Women ' s League . . . Rifle Club . . . Pre-Med Club . . . University Theater. B. M. ROGERS . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Agriculture .DOROTHEA I. ROMMEL . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . A. D. A. . . . Home Economics Club .THOMAS ROSS . . . Star City, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Sigma Chi . . . Alpha Kappa Psi. FRANCES ROSSNER . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Delta Gamma ... Pi Mu Epsilon . . . Phi Theta Kappa.DUDLEY ROUSE . . . Prescott, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Sigma.SAM B. RUSSELL . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Sig¬ ma Alpha Epsilon.MARY LOUISE SANDERS . . . Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Vice-President of Junior Class . . . Kappa Delta Pi ... . Rootin ' Rubes . . . Lambda Tau . . . International Relations Club . . . Guidon . . . Honor Roll ' 33- ' 34- ' 35 . . . Freshman Queen ' 33. 0 PERCY SANDERS . . . Stephens, Arkansas . . . Educa¬ tion . . . Kappa Sigma . . . Varsity Football.GEORGE L. SANSBURY . . . Neosho, Missouri . . . Mechanical Engineer¬ ing . . . Theta Kappa Nu . . . Theta Tau . . . A. S. M. E. . . . Vice-President Theta Kappa Nu ’34- ' 35.DOUG SAXON . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Theta Kappa Nu . . . Vice-President, G. E. S.BILL SCHROEDER . . . Marked Tree, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Alpha Gamma Rho . . . Alpha Zeta . . . Managing Editor Arkansas Agricul¬ turist . . . 4-H Club . . . Dairy Products Judging Team. SAVOY SEAMSTER . . . Bentonvi.le, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Football ' 33- ' 34- ' 35 . . . Track ' 34- ' 35.LOUIS T. SH ACKLEFORD . . . Aubrey, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Sigma . . . Band . . . Glee Club . . . Alpha Kappa Psi . . . Honor Roll ' 33 . . . Political Science Club . . . Inter¬ national Relations Club.MARIE SHAFFER . . . Green¬ land, Arkansas . . . Journalism.GEORGE SHANKLE . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Black Cat Cotillion. Page 93 JUNIORS • • • 0 HAROLD SHARPE . . . Forrest City, Arkansas . . . Law I . . . Honor Roll ' 34.JAMES R. SHELTON . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Student Ath¬ letic Manager ' 35- ' 36 . . . President of the Freshman Class ' 33- ’34 . . . Traveler Staff ' 34- ' 35.Razorback Staff ' 34- ' 35 .SALAMIE SHERMAN . . . Haynesville, Louisiana . . . Arts and Sciences ... Pi Beta Phi . . . Women ' s League . . . W.A.A. . . . Y.W.C.A. . . . Rifle Club.ANNE SIMMS . . . Joplin, Missouri . . . Agriculture . . . Zeta Tau Alpha . . . Blackfriars . . . Rootin ' Rubes . . . Women ' s League . . . Home Economics Club ... A. D. A.HARRELL SIMPSON . . . Cave City, Arkansas . . . Law I ... Pi Kappa Alpha. M. EARL SIMPSON . . . Poteau, Oklahoma . . . Education . . . University Theater . . . Blackfriars.GAY SIMS . . . Haz- en, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . Kappa Sigma.RALPH D. SKINNER . . . Corning, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . Theta Tau . . . A. B. C. . . . A. I. Ch. E. C. GORDON SMITH . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Sigma Chi.ELAINE SMITH . . . Winnfield, Louisiana . . . Education . . . Chi Omega . . . . Women ' s League . . . W.A.A. . . . Rifle Club.ROB¬ ERT D. SMITH, JR. . . . Marianna, Arkansas . . . Law I . . . Kappa Sigma . . . Cotillion Club . . . Assistant Editor of Razor- back ' 36.BILLY SOMERS . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon. r. a p% J Z. r O O O n o _ I GEORGE WALLACE SORRELLS . . . Bearden, Ar¬ kansas . . . Agriculture.C. BYREN SPARKS, JR. . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Alpha Kappa Psi.HELEN MARGARET SPEARS ... Hot Springs, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Wesley Players . . . Home Economics Club . . . Women ' s League . . . Y.W.C.A. .HORACE STAFFORD . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Journalism . . . Writer ' s Club ' 33- ' 34.J. D. STEINHART . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . Tau Epsilon Phi . . . Menorah Society ' 34 . . . Men ' s Debate Club . . . Men ' s Vigi¬ lance Committee . . . University Theater ' 33- ' 34- ' 35. V. K. STEPHENS . . . Star City, Arkansas . . . Business Admin¬ istration . . . Sigma Phi Epsilon.OMA LEE STINSON . . . Ashdown, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences.W. J. STOCKER . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Pre-Med Club, President.PAT STOREY . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Theta Kappa Nu . . . A. B. C. . . . Assistant Editor of Traveler . . . Band. Page 94 • • • JUNIORS VJ Q W. A. STOREY . . . Malvern, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Kappa Sigma.ISABEL STORMS . . . Tulsa, Oklahoma . . . Arts and Sciences ... Pi Beta Phi University Theater . . . Women ' s League . . . W. A. A. . . . Women ' s Tennis Champion ' 33- ' 35 . . . Swastika . . . Honor Roll ' 32.CLAUDE D. SWEARINGEN . . . Farmington, Arkansas . . . Law II . . . International Relations Club . . . Political Science Club . . . Student Affairs Committee. SAM M. SWEARINGEN . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Scabbard and Blade . . . Glee Club, Presi¬ dent ' 34 . . . German Club . . . Orchestra ' 31- ' 33 ... R. O. T. C., Lieutenant Colonel.THEODORE R. SYLVAN . . . New York, New York . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Political Sci¬ ence Club . . . International Relations Club . . . French Club .CHARLES L. TARLETON, JR. . . . Warren, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Kappa Sigma.HARRY TAUBE . . . Woodridge, New York . . . Education. HERMAN TEETER . . . Russellville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sci¬ ences . . . Theta Kappa Nu . . . Press Club . . . Writer ' s Club . . . Student Senate . . . Stooge Staff . . . Traveler Staff .MARY JANE THOMPSON . . . McGehee, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Chi Omega . . . Rootin ' Rubes, Secretary . . . Swastika . . . Women ' s League. ROSEMARY THOMPSON . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences.HOWARD ALAN THORPE . . . Joplin, Missouri . . . Arts and Sciences ... Pi Mu Epsilon . . . Deutscher Verein . . . Y. M. C. A.DONNA TOWN¬ SEND . . . Stuttgart, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Delta Delta Delta . . . Women ' s League . . . W. A. A.WILLIS TOWNSEND . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Law I . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon.BURNELLE TREECE . . . Marshall, Ar¬ kansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . University Theater . . . Captain of Women ' s Rifle Team . . . W. A. A. . . . Y. W. C. A. .BRADLEY TRIMBLE ... El Dorado, Arkansas . . . Law I . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . Debate ' 35- ' 36 . . . Uni¬ versity Bar Association.HENRY TUCK . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . A. B. C. . . . Tennis. MILTON EDWARD TWEDELL . . . North Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Kappa Alpha . . . Little Theater . . . Blackfriars . . . Freshman Football . . . Outstand¬ ing Actor ' 35.WILMA VAN METER . . . Judsonia, Ar¬ kansas . . . Education.CLIFFORD VAN SICKLE . . . Morris, Oklahoma . . . Education . . . Football ' 33- ' 34- ' 35, Cap¬ tain ' 36.ROBERT M. VAUGHAN . . . Earl, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Sigma Chi.RAY B. VAUGHTERS . . . Eudora, Arkansas . . . Business Administra¬ tion . . . Kappa Sigma . . . Phi Eta Sigma . . . Pershing Rifles . . . Alpha Kappa Psi. R. W. VELVIN . Lewisville, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . Vigilance Committee ' 35 . . . G. H. WAGNER . Mulberry, Arkansas . Arts and Sciences . . . JOHN W. WALKER . Rogers, Arkansas . Business Administration . Al¬ pha Kappa Psi . . . NEWMAN WALKER . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Education . Band . . . SCOTT W. WALKER . Galena, Kansas . Engineering . . . W. THERMAN WALKER . Camden, Arkansas . Engineering . . . THOMAS MORGAN WALLIS . Helena, Ar¬ kansas . Engineering . Kappa Sigma . A. I. E. E. . Black Cat Cotillion . Theta Tau . . . THURMOND LOYD WALTERS . Springdale, Arkansas . Agriculture . Alpha Gamma Rho . Persh¬ ing Rifles . . . FRANCES WANTUCK . Fayetteville, Arkansas . Education . Delta Gamma. Page 95 JUNIORS . . . 0 E. B. WARD, JR. . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Busi¬ ness Administration . . . Kappa Alpha . . . Student Senate ' 35- ' 36 . . . Assistant Business Manager of Arkansas Traveler ' 35- ' 36 . . . Secretary Freshman Class ' 33- ' 34 . . Social Committee ' 35- ' 36 . . . Vigilance Committee ' 34- ' 35.J. E. WARE . . . Haynesville, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Intra¬ mural Manager . . . Band.JAMES NORMAN WARTEN . . . Joplin, Missouri . . . Law I ... Pi Kappa Alpha, Presi¬ dent ' 35 . . . A. B. C. . . . Interfraternity Council. CURTIS WATKINS . . . Joplin, Missouri . . . Business Adminis¬ tration . . . Kappa Sigma . . . Pershing Rifles.EARL J. WAUGH . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences .RICHARD C. WAUGH . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Sigma . . . Phi Eta Sigma . . . Alpha Chi Sigma . . . Glee Club , 33- ' 34- , 35- ' 36 . . . Persh¬ ing Rifles.A. ALLEN WEINSTOCK . . . Benton Harbor, Michigan . . . Arts and Sciences.MILDRED WEIR . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Home Economics Club ... W. A. A.EVERARD WEISBURD . . . West Memphis, Arkansas ... Law II.A. WESLEY WHITAKER . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas . . . Engineering . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . Band ' 32- ' 33-’34- ' 35 . . . Theta Tau.FRANKE WEST . . . McGehee, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Chi Omega . . . Rootin ' Rubes . . . Vigilance Committee . . . Women’s League . . . Women ' s Rifle Club.COLE J. WEST¬ BROOK . . . Fouke, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Alpha Gamma Rho ... A. D. A. 0 GARLAND WHEELER . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Sigma Phi Epsilon . . . Football ' 32- ' 33- ' 34 . . . Basketball ' 32- ' 33- ' 34 . . . Track , 32- ' 33- ' 34 . . . " A " Club . . . . EDITH WHITE . . . Cotter, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sci¬ ences .ORVILLE WHITE . . . Stigler, Oklahoma . . . Business Administration ... Pi Kappa Alpha.ALPHA WILLIAMS ... St. Paul, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences .A. L. WILSON . . . Humphrey, Arkansas . . . Business Administration . . . Sigma Phi Epsilon . . . Alpha Kappa Psi .E. B. WILSON, JR. . . . Russellville, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Alpha Lambda Tau. % WILLIAM JOHNSON WITT . . . Little Rock, Arkansas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Chi . . . Band , 33- ' 34- , 35- ' 36 . . . President of Kappa Kappa Psi ' 35- ' 36 . . . Business Manager of Band ' 35- ' 36 . . . Black Cat Cotillion . . . Pre-Med Club. MARTHA WOOD . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas . . . Education . . . Pi Beta Phi.NADIA WOOD . . . Hot Springs, Ar¬ kansas . . . Arts and Sciences ... Pi Beta Phi.ROBERT H. WOOD . . . Calico Rock, Arkansas . . . Law II. ROBERT LEE WOOLFOLK, III . . . Marion, Arkansas ... En¬ gineering . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . Black Cat Cotillion .LEWISE WYATT . . . Springfield, Missouri . . . Law I . . . Zeta Tau Alpha . . . Rootin ' Rubes . . . Guidon . . . Wo¬ men ' s League.WILLIAM D. WYLIE . . . Carthage, Ar¬ kansas . . . Agriculture.THOMAS D. WYNNE . . . Fordyce, Arkansas . . . Law I . . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon. RUTH ELIZABETH YOES ... Van Buren, Arkansas . . . Educa¬ tion ... Pi Beta Phi . . . Women ' s League ' 34- ' 35- , 36 . . . Y. W. C. A. . . . W. A. A. . . . Honor Roll ' 35 . . . Sponsor of Company C ' 35.IRENE YOUNG . . . Pyatt, Arkansas . . . Agriculture . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma . . . Home Eco¬ nomics Club . . . 4-H Club . . . Women ' s League . . . BER¬ NARD ZELNICK . . . Dallas, Texas . . . Arts and Sciences . . . Kappa Nu . . . Deutscher Verein . . . Hillel Society. Page 96 SOPHOMORES CLASS OFFICERS JAMES ENGLISH . . Fayetteville, Arkansas President MARY ELIZABETH EDMISTON . Fayetteville, Arkansas Vice-President JAMES ROY, JR. . . Cotton Plant, Arkansas Treasurer • • • • MARY ALEXANDER . . . Pine Bluff, Ar- kansas. A. D. ALLEN, JR. . . . Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. MARY AGNES ALLINDER . . . Gravette, Arkansas. OWEN ELMO ALLRED . . . Bentonville, Arkans as. BILLIE LEE ANDERSON . . . Delaney, Arkansas. ELAINE ARENDALE . . . Springdale, Arkansas. FRED WILBUR ARMSTRONG . . . Alton, Illinois. ROYCE ARTHURS . . . Carlisle, Arkansas. CECIL FLETCHER ASBURY . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas. THOMAS R. ASHCRAFT . . . Little Rock, Arkansas. GROVER ASHLEY, JR. . . . Springfield, Missouri. JAMES W. ATHA . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. RUTH AUSTIN . . . Eudora, Arkansas. LOYAL R. BABB . . . Tulsa, Oklahoma. FRANCES BADGETT . . . McGehee, Arkansas. BETTIE BARNES . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. IDA MAE BARNHART . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. CHRIS BARROS . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. C. H. BEASLEY . . . Little Rock, Arkansas. DONALD T. BEAMAN . . . Siloam Springs, Arkansas. Page 97 SOPHOMORES • • • Q JAMES BENTON . . . Fordyce, Arkansas. HOWARD M. BERNSTEIN . . . Marvell, Arkansas. BEVERLY BERRY . . . Pocahontas, Iowa. MAHLON G. BESSER . . . Little Rock, Arkansas. JANIE BING¬ HAM . . . Tomahawk, Wisconsin. GRAHAM BLACK . . . Corning, Arkansas. ERWIN W. BLANKEN¬ SHIP, JR. . . . McGehee, Arkansas. JO BLUNK . . . Eureka Springs, Arkansas. LAWSON W. BOB¬ BITT, JR. . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas. LAWRENCE A. BRONAUGH . . . Wheeler, Arkansas. ROBERT W. BROWN ... Van Buren, Arkansas. JOHN FLOYD BROWN, JR. . . . Lead Hill, Arkansas. • JOHN H. BROWN . . . Gurdon, Arkansas. MARION BROWN . . . Marianna, Arkansas. WIL¬ LIAM LOREN BROWN . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. WILLIAM LOWE BROWN . . . Tulsa, Oklahoma. FRANK S. BRUMMITT . . . Stuttgart, Arkansas. ZELLA BRYAN . . . North Little Rock, Arkansas. • JOSEPH G. BUCINA . . . Bayonne, New Jersey. RICHARD G. BULGIN . . . Poteau, Okla¬ homa. LORRAINE BURNS . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. JIMMIE BYRD . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas. ANNA- BETH CAIN . . . Little Rock, Arkansas. W. J. CAIN . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. C. B. CALDWELL . . . o D rf A r ,Q r A Li Fayetteville, Arkansas. EUGENIA CALLAHAN . . . Carlisle, Arkansas. H. CLAYTON CAMPBELL . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. JAMES O. CAMPBELL . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas. J. C. CAMPBELL . . . Oneida, Arkansas. MURREY CAMPBELL . . . Cane Hill, Arkansas. JOE M. CANNON, JR. . . . Caru- thersville, Missouri. CHARLES E. CAPLE, JR. . . . Little Rock, Arkansas. L. J. CARROLL . . . Camden, Arkansas. JOHN CARTER . . . Lowell, Arkansas. Page 98 • • • SOPHOMORES • LAUREN DEANE CARTER . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. YEVONNE CHARLESWORTH . . . Siloam Springs, Arkansas. GERALD W. CHASTAIN . . . Judsonia, Arkansas. SAM M. CHOATE . . . Rogers, Arkansas. JAMES W. CLARK . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. CLYDE CLONINGER . . . Atkins, Arkansas. ROYCE W. COLN . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. CHESTER CONE . . . Rogers, Arkansas. • HOLLIS CONWAY . . . Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. JOE R. COX . . . Newport, Arkansas. JOHN CRAVENS . . . Prairie View, Arkansas. VIR¬ GINIA CREEKMORE . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. MILDRED CROSS . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. ESTHER LANE CRUTCHER . . . Springdale, Arkansas. LAURA GENE CURL . . . Helena, Arkansas. JACKSON D. CURRIE . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas. JACK H. CURRY • ANN DU BARD . . . Marked Tree, Arkansas. J. WM. DUGGAR . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. FOR¬ REST LOUISE DUTTON . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. BARKLEY EDDINS, JR. . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas. MARY ELIZABETH EDMISTON . . . Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. MAURINE EDMISTON . . . Fayetteville, Ar. kansas. JAMES J. EDWARDS . . . Blytheville, Ar¬ kansas. FRANCIS ELLIS . . . Fayerteville, Arkansas. . . . Rogers, Arkansas. MARGY DANIEL . . . For- dyce, Arkansas. FRANKLIN KENNEDY DEAVER . . . Springdale, Arkansas. ARLIS DE BOW . . . Amity, Arkansas. SORRELLS DEWOODY . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas. HARRY R. DE VINNA . . . Okmulgee, Oklahoma. JOHN DODSON . . . Hot Springs, Ar¬ kansas. DOROTHY DOUGLAS . . . Pine Bluff, Ar¬ kansas. Page 99 SOPHOMORES • • • £ NEVIN ELLIS . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. JAMES ENGLISH . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. CHARLES E. ENNIS . . . Pitman, Arkansas. SAUL FEDER . . . New York City, New York. JESSE L. FERGUSON . . . Berryville, Arkansas. HERBERT P. FOSTER . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. MARY JANE FORD . . . Cave City, Arkansas. WILMA FOWLER . . . Springdale, Arkansas. 4) JACK WILLIAM FOX . . . Paterson, New Jersey. GEORGE FREED . . . Bloomfield, New Jer¬ sey. WILLIAM JOSEPH FROST . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. WILLIAM GANTT . . . Magnolia, Arkan¬ sas. CHARLES GARDNER . . . Russellville, Arkan¬ sas. EVELYN GEORGE . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. LLOYD C. GIBSON . . . Eureka Springs, Arkansas. GEORGE GILMORE . . . Wichita Falls, Texas. LOUISE GLEASON . . . Shawnee, Oklahoma. GEORGE E. GOSNELL . . . Ozark, Arkansas. PAUL GOSS . . . North Little Rock, Arkansas. RAY¬ MOND GREENBERG . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas. • VIRGINIA GREENHAW . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. H. LOH GREER . . . Siloam Springs, Ar¬ kansas. JOHN H. GUNN . . . Joplin, Missouri. JOHNETTE HALEY . . . Shreveport, Louisiana. ROBERT HALL . . . Oak Park, Illinois. JUANITA HALSELL . . . Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas. DOROTHY GENE HAMILTON . . . Rog¬ ers, Arkansas. OR¬ VILLE E. HAMILTON . . . Rector, Arkansas. BOB HAMP ... Ko¬ komo, Indiana. EDITH MAE HAND . . . Yellv ' lle, Arkansas. COILA HARDING . . . Fort Smith, Ar¬ kansas. RAYMOND HARDWICK . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. Page 100 • • • SOPHOMORES £ ROGER HARTMANN . . . Rogers, Arkan¬ sas. GEORGE HARVEY . . . Little Rock, Arkansas. WILLARD HAWKINS . . . North Little Rock, Ar¬ kansas. OTIS E. HAYS . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. JEAN HEIDEN . . . Little Rock, Arkansas. JAMES M. HENDRICKS . . . Farmersville, Texas. LOUISE HICKS . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. HAROLD B. HIGHTOWER . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. JOHN HOLDEN, JR. . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas. TRUSTEN HOLDER . . . Little Rock, Arkansas. CAL HOL¬ LIS .. . Pine Bluff, Arkansas. HARLAN HOLMES . . . Little Rock, Arkansas. 0 GLENN HOLMES . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. HOWARD HOLTHOFF . . . Gould, Arkansas. BEV¬ ERLY DENIESE HOPPER . . . Marked Tree, Arkan¬ sas. DALE HOPPER . . . Forrest City, Arkansas. D. W. HOWELL . . . Rohwer, Arka nsas. WALTER C. HUDSON, JR. . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas. KEITH HURLEY . . . Harrison, Arkansas. DUANE ISELY . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. MASTON M. JACKS . . . Douglas, Arizona. LEO JAMES . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. MARGARET JAMES . . . Horatio, Arkansas. HENRY E. JAQUYSH . . . Broken Bow, Oklahoma. ® PEARL JEFFERSON . . . Bentonville, Ar¬ kansas. JOHN JERNIGAN . . . Little Rock, Arkan¬ sas. EDDIE V. JEWELL . . . Oklahoma City, Okla¬ homa. HARRY C. JOHNSON . . . Harrison, Ar¬ kansas. MAYNARD JOHNSON . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. LOREN JOLLY . . . Pocahontas, Arkan¬ sas. ALICE FERGUSON JONES . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. JOHN V. KECK . . . Rogers, Arkansas. Page 101 SOPHOMORES • • • • MARY LOIS KEITH . . . Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. LOUETTA KENDRICK . . . Joplin, Missouri. AUSTIN LA MARCHE . . . Chicago, Illinois. HAR¬ RY R. LAND, JR. . . . Tyronza, Arizona. BILLIE LANDERS . . . Harrisburg, Arkansas. MARY JIM LANE . . . Little Rock, Arkansas. PAUL LATTURE . . . Beebe, Arkansas. JAMES PERRY LEA . . . Malvern, Arkansas. • BETTY LEE LEATHERS . . . Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. EUGENE LEATHERS . . . Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. JAMES LEATHERMAN . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas. FRENCH G. LEWIS . . . Watts, Okla¬ homa. BERNICE LICHTY . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. ELMER L. LINCOLN, JR. . . . Texarkana, Arkansas. DON LOCKARD . . . Batesville, Arkansas. EDWIN W. LOUDERMILK . . . Adona, Arkansas. JOHN LOWRANCE . . . Chester, South Carolina. PAUL¬ INE LYONS . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. RUSSELL MAIER ... St. Louis, Missouri. DON MAJORS . . . Harrison, Arkansas. EUGENE H. MANLEY . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. DOTTIE ANNE MAPES . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. DREW MARTIN . . . Morris, Oklahoma. LEE VEDA MARTIN . . . Lowell, Arkansas. £ EDWIN C. MILLER . . . Joplin, Missouri. ERNEST D. MILLER . . . Springdale, Arkansas. ROBERT R. MILNER . . . Newport, Arkansas. CELIA ELIZABETH MIRES . . . Fayetteville, Arkan¬ sas. CYRUS MOORE . . . North Little Rock, Ar¬ kansas. THORNTON MOORE . . . Arlington, New Jersey. BETTIE ETHELYN MORGAN . . . Benton- ville, Arkansas. HOWARD D. MORGANBESSER . . . Brooklyn, New York. Page 102 • • • SOPHOMORES £ BYRON R. MORSE . . . Blytheville, Arkan¬ sas. REX MULLEN . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. EVELYN E. MULLINS ... Ash Flat, Arkansas. WAL¬ LACE MURPHY . . . Calion, Arka nsas. MARGARET McALLISTER . . . Joplin, Missouri. SYLVIA Mc- CARTNEY . . . Greenwood, Arkansas. WILLIAM McCLAIN . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas. JAMES CA- ZORT McCLURKIN ... El Dorado, Arkansas. RUTH McCORD . . . Springdale, Arkansas. ADENE Mc- COY . . . Springdale, Arkansas. L. REGINALD McCRIGHT . . . Benton, Arkansas. BETTY Mc- CURRY . . . Russellville, Arkansas. DUEL J. Mc- DUFFIE ... El Dorado, Arkansas. BOB McKENZIE . . . Sheridan, Arkansas. CECIL K. NAIL . . . Lowell, Arkansas. NORMAN NAIL . . . St. Louis, Missouri. • WARREN NANCE . . . Hartford, Arkansas. OZZIE ARTHUR NELSON . . . Elizabeth, New Jer¬ sey. LENA MILLS NEWTON . . . Forth Worth, Texas. RICHARD NIENSTEDT . . . Joplin, Missouri. WOODROW NICKELS . . . North Little Rock, Ar¬ kansas. ARTHUR NOBLES, JR. . . . Star City, Ar¬ kansas. HUGH COLEMAN NOLEN . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. CHARLES JOHN OLSON . . . Inde¬ pendence, Kansas. IONE OTTE . . . Pine Bluff, Ar¬ kansas. W. B. OWEN . . . Alma, Arkansas. A. B. PATTEN, JR. . . . Hope, Arkansas. BARBARA PAYNE . . . Little Rock, Arkansas. HELEN SUE PEARSON . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. RUTH E. PENROSE . . . Hunter, Arkansas. DALLAS PET- ROSS . . . Springdale, Arkansas. JUNE PFEIFFER . . . Stuttgart, Arkansas. Page 103 SOPHOMORES • • • • ANN PICKENS.Fayettevilla, Ar¬ kansas. LAWRENCE R. PIERCE.Mobile, Alabama. LULA RAE PIERCE.Springdale, Arkansas. ED B. PLUMMER.Carlisle, Ar¬ kansas. LEROY R. POND.Fayetteville, Arkansas. ANDREW PONDER.Walnut Ridge, Arkansas. MARY ELIZABETH PORTER .Fayetteville, Arkansas. HOWARD A. POTTER.Cattaraugus, New York. JUAN¬ ITA PRATER.Brentwood, Arkansas. NA¬ THANIEL PRICE.Brooklyn, New York. GILBERT M. PRINCE.Caruthersville, Mis¬ souri. CHARLOTTE PUGH.Hamburg, Ar¬ kansas. THOMAS LAVELLE QUAY.Mt. Holly, New Jersey. J. M. REAMES.Hughes, Arkansas. WINIFRED REITZ.Paris, Ar¬ kansas. C. ROBERT RHODES.Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. Q H. B. RICE.Springdale, Arkansas. JOHN RIDDLER.Fort Smith, Arkansas. RUBELLE ROARK.Anderson, Missouri. ODUS ROBERTS.Poteau, Oklahoma. CLIFTON ROBERTSON.Rison, Arkansas. GEORGE ROBERTSON.Amarillo, Texas. NAN ROBINSON.Fort Smith, Arkansas. RICHARD R. ROGERS.Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. CARL E. ROWDEN.Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. AILEEN ROWELL.Keiser, Arkansas. KATHRYN ROWELL.Keiser, Arkansas. JAMES ROY.Cotton Plant, Arkansas. EARLE RUDOLPH.Arkadel- phia, Arkansas. LEONARD WHITE RUSSUM .Fayetteville, Arkansas. BUD RYE. Russellville, Arkansas. PAULINE SALYER. Springdale, Arkansas. Page 104 • • • SOPHOMORES • LEONARD SALZBERG . . . Glendale, New York. CHARLES R. SAUGEY . . . Little Rock, Ar¬ kansas. LESLIE JANIE SAVAGE . . . Crawford, Colorado. MICHAEL SBAR . . . New York City, New York. JULIAN SCHWALBE . . . Marvell, Ar¬ kansas. BEVERLY SHARP . . . Joplin, Missouri. LEOLA SHARP . . . Prairie Grove, Arkansas. W. O. SHIRLEY . . . Van Buren, Arkansas. • KENNETH JOHN SHAMBLIN . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. THOMAS JESSE SILVEY . . . Bod- caw, Arkansas. VIRGINIA SKILLERN . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. JAMES SLAYDEN . . . Alicia, Ar¬ kansas. DWIGHT SLOAN . . . Rudy, Arkansas. JAMES Y. SMITH . . . Sparkman, Arkansas. OLIN SMITH ... Van Buren, Arkansas. ROY HULL SMITH . . . Keo, Arkansas. EVELYN SNODGRASS . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. ELLEN ALABAMA SPEARS . . . Oil Trough, Arkansas. RALPH SPRIGG . . . Little Rock, Arkansas. EUGENIA H. STACY . . . Wynne, Arkansas. JACK STARNES . . . North Little Rock, Arkansas. KATHERINE STEEL . . . Texarkana, Arkansas. AARON STEIGER . . . Cedarhurst, New York. MAURICE L. STEPH¬ ENS . . . Cabot, Arkansas. ® STANLEY H. STERNBERG . . . Far Rocka- way, New York. FRANK V. STEVENSON . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. EDWARD E. STOCKER . . . Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas. R. T. STOUT . . . Okmulgee, Ok¬ lahoma. FRANCIS STRAIN . . . Rogers, Arkansas. T. L. STREETER . . . Wilson, Arka nsas. H. A. STROUD . . . Jonesboro, Arkansas. R. S. SUGGS . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. ® LUCILE SUMMERS . . . Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. ELSIE VIRGINIA SUTTLE . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. JAMES W. TAFT . . . Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. ED M. TALIAFERRO . . . Texarkana, Ar¬ kansas. CLARENCE THOMPSON . . . Smackover, Arkansas. IVA SUE THOMPSON . . . Harrison, Ar¬ kansas. ELSIJANE TRIMBLE . . . Lonoke, Ark ansas. HORACE TROTH . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. Page 105 SOPHOMORES • • • • MARY MAXINE TROUTT.Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas. HUGH TURNER. Fort Smith, Arkansas. VIRGINIA E. VAUGHAN .Fayetteville, Arkansas. VERNON E. VICK .Bentonville, Arkansas. JOHN CHARLES VOLENTINE.West Fork, Arkansas. JAMES P. WALKER.Prairie Grove, Arkansas. B. FRANKLIN WALLINGSFORD.Tinsman, Arkansas. ROBERT HARRY WARNOCK. Camden, Arkansas. • VIVIAN BETH WHELAN.Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas. MARY KATHERINE WHITAKER .Fort Smith, Arkansas. DAN F. WHITE Fort Smith, Arkansas. EARL H. WILDY. Etowah, Arkansas. JAMES WILCOXON. Corning, Arkansas. BILL WILLIAMS.Pot- eau, Oklahoma. EUGENE J. WILLIAMS. Fayetteville, Arkansas. H. L. WILLIAMS, JR. .Fayetteville, Arkansas. OWEN B. WIL¬ LIAMS .Pea Ridge, Arkansas. CLAUDE S. WILSON.Muskogee, Oklahoma. FRAN¬ CIS WADE WILSON.Camden, Arkansas. GLENN WING.Harrison, Arkansas • LEO R. WINTKER.Clarendon, Arkansas. GEORGE H. WITTENBERG. Little Rock, Arkansas. BENJAMIN WOLFGANG .New York, New York. AUBURN WOOD .Calico Rock, Arkansas. HENRY WOODS .Hot Springs, Arkansas. VESTER E. WOL- BER.Waldron, Arkansas. ROBERT WOZ- ENCRAFT.El Dorado, Arkansas. EARNIE WRIGHT.Cisco, Arkansas. JACK M. WYATT.Jonesboro, Louisiana. WILTON YANDELL.Fort Smith, Arkansas. MIL¬ DRED YARBROUGH.Camden, Arkansas. WINIFRED YARBROUGH.Camden, Ar¬ kansas. MELVIN R. YOUNGBLOOD.Jop¬ lin, Missouri. Page I0S • • • FRESHMEN 0 MILBURN ADAIR . . . Newport, Arkansas. BILL ADAMS . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. PETE ADAMS . . . Bradley, Arkansas. ROBERT S. ADAMS . . . Bath, New York. VALESKA AKIN . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. WILMA JANE ALFORD . . . Pine Bluff, Arkansas. BETTY ALLIS . . . Little Rock, Ar¬ kansas. CHARLEEN ALLISON . . . England, Arkan¬ sas. MARGUERITE ANDERSON . . . Keiser, Arkan¬ sas. FRANCES ARKY . . . Miami, Florida. BETTY ATHA . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. ABBIE REBECCA BAIRD . . . Springdale, Arkansas. CLASS OFFICERS CHARLES MEYER .... Little Rock President MARIE FEARING. . Camden Vice-President RICHARD BEAN .... Treasurer . Fayetteville RAYMOND SHELBY .... . Fort Smith Secretary • • • 0 JEFFIE F. BAKER . . . Morris, Oklahoma. HENRY FRANEL BARBARICK . . . Neosho, Missouri. JOHNNIE MARIE BARNETT . . . Little Rock, Ar¬ kansas. WILLIAM HAROLD BARRON . . . Jackson¬ ville, Arkansas. HENRY BAKER BATEMAN . . . Clarendon, Arkansas. RUTH BATEMAN . . . Clar¬ endon, Arkansas. SIDNEY BATTERMAN . . . Brook¬ lyn, New York. VINCENT W. BEACH . . . Green¬ wood, Arkansas. DICK HENRY BEAN . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. VANCE E. BEASLEY . . . Heth, Ar¬ kansas. CHARLES E. BENNETT . . . Brooklyn, New York. SYDNEY GORDON BENNE TT . . . Siloam Springs, Arkansas. Page 107 FRESHMEN • • • MARY CORNELIA BERRY.Dumas, Arkansas. MAURICE ANTONY BERRY. Rochelle Park, New Jersey. ROBERT BERRY. Fayetteville, Arkansas. JAMES BICKMAN. Boston, Massachusetts. GUTHRIE WILLIAM BIL¬ LINGSLEY .Bafesville, Arkansas. LIND¬ SEY BILLINGSLEY.Maynard, Arkansas. PEARLIE FAYE BIRKHEAD.Paris, Arkan¬ sas. DAVID B. BLACK.Port Chester, New York. JUDY BLACK.Mount Vernon, Illi¬ nois. LOU BLACK.Texarkana, Arkansas. BYRON BARNEY BLANKINSHIP.Texar¬ kana, Arkansas. ANN KATHRYN BOGERT. Fayetteville, Arkansas. SIDNEY DEESON BOND, JR. .Crawfordsville, Arkansas. BEN BORDEN .Little Rock, Arkansas. GAIL PARR BOR¬ DEN .Little Rock, Arkansas. ADA ANNA BOYD.Atkins, Arkansas. • WAYNE BOYDSTUN.Tulsa, Ok¬ lahoma. THAD O. BREWER.Hughes, Ar¬ kansas. MARGARET BRIGGS.Rogers, Arkansas. MARIAN BRINSON.Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. J. MELL BROOKS, JR. Blytheville, Arkansas. ARTHUR S. BROWN. Alton, Illinois. DAVID BROWN.Musko¬ gee, Oklahoma. JAMES L. BROWN. Rogers, Arkansas. PARK BROWN.De Witt, Arkansas. RALPH P. BROWN.Van Buren, Arkansas. WALTER N. BROWN. Joplin, Missouri. GEORGE BROWNING. Batesville, Arkansas. BOYD BULLOCK. Newport, Arkansas. JOEL A. BUNCH. Fayetteville, Arkansas. LILLIAN BURBRIDGE .Fayetteville, Arkansas. THOMAS J. BUR- DINE.Fayetteville, Arkansas. Page 108 • • • FRESHMEN • DOYNE BURNS.Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. RUDOLPH BURROUGH.Van Buren, Arkansas. CORA BURTON.Lew¬ isville, Arkansas. DAVID PAUL BURTON. Newport, Arkansas. LOUISE BURTON. Lewisville, Arkansas. MARY STEWART BUTLER .Osceola, Arkansas. CHARLES E. CAIN .Fayetteville, Arkansas. STEVE G. CALD¬ WELL .Horatio, Arkansas. WILLIAM CAMP¬ BELL .Forrest City, Arkansas. T. C. CARLSON, JR.Fayetteville, Arkansas. ROBERTA CARPENTER.Ash Flat, Arkansas. HAR¬ OLD CARTER.Ozark, Arkansas. HOW¬ ARD L. CASSARD.Brooklyn, New York. BARBARA CASTEEL.Forrest City, Arkan¬ sas. BARNEY W. CHAMBERS.Wickes, Arkansas. C. L. CHAPMAN.Smackover, Arkansas. • CAROLYN CHEEVES.Cameron, Texas. RUTH CHERRY.Jonesb oro, Ar¬ kansas. WILLISTINE CHERRY.Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. JOHN DAILEY CHESTER Little Rock, Arkansas. KENNETH CLARK Blue Mountain, Arkansas. FRANCES COLE. Okmulgee, Oklahoma. J. P. COLE.Alma, Arkansas. PAUL COLE.Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. DELBERT CONGER.Fayetteville, Arkansas. HAL CHENEY CONNER.Hot Springs, Arkansas. JIMMIE D. COOK. Paris, Arkansas. W. WARREN COOKE. Marvell, Arkansas. JACK COOPER.De- Queen, Arkansas. VIRGINIA COOPER. Marion, Arkansas. LUNDY CORBETT.Wal¬ nut Ridge, Arkansas. STEPHEN CORLETTE. Chicago, Illinois. Page 109 FRESHMEN • • • • BILL CORNWELL.Neosho, Mis¬ souri. DONALD COWAN.Fayetteville, Arkansas. JOHN W. CRAGAR.Perry, Arkansas. ELIZABETH ANN CRAIG.Ben- tonville, Arkansas. JEFF CRAIN.Fayette¬ ville,. Arkansas. MARY. CUMMINGS. Prairie Grove, Arkansas. ROBERTA CUMMINGS .Prairie Grove, Arkansas. ROBERT B. • MARY CHEW DAWSON.Forrest City, Arkansas. AARON DENENBERG. Woodridge, New York. PAUL DIAMOND. Brooklyn, New York. JOHN A. DIFFEY, JR. Cotton Plant, Arkansas. ARTHUR W. DILLINGHAM .Springdale, Arkansas. WILLIAM A. DIXON .Fayetteville, Arkansas. EDITH L. DOD¬ SON .Fayetteville, Arkansas. MAX DOL- CUNNINGHAM.Brooklyn, New York. LOUISE DACUS.West Memphis, Arkan¬ sas. AGNES DALTON.N orman, Arkan¬ sas. WALTER H. DAMON, JR.Wheaton, Illinois. LLOYD E. DARNELL.Lexa, Ar¬ kansas. D. C. DAVENPORT.Keo, Arkan¬ sas. CARL DAVIS.Bentonville, Arkansas. JACK J. DAVIS.Little Rock, Arkansas. BILLY CLARK DAVISS.Conway, Arkansas. LAR.Dumas, Arkansas. ORD DOUGH¬ ERTY, JR.Fort Smith, Arkansas. GENTRY W. DURHAM.Paragould, Arkansas. FOR¬ REST LOUISE DUTTON.Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. MAE ELLEN DVORACHEK.Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas.. RAYMOND EDWARDS. Fort Smith, Arkansas. JOHN EDWARD ELDRIDGE .Forrest City, Arkansas. DALE ELLIOTT .Longview, .Texas. HAROLD C. ELLIS .Garfield, Arkansas. Pag© I 10 • • • FRESHMEN • LEONARD ELLIS, JR.Hot Springs, Arkansas. MARIE FEARING.Camden, Ar¬ kansas. EDWARD WARREN FEDDERSEN. Chicago, Illinois. JACK H. FIELDS.Rogers, Arkansas. FANNY FINLEY.Lincoln, Ar¬ kansas. ANDREW JAY FIENMAN.New York, New York. JAMES BENTON FITZGERALD .Glenwood, Arkansas. MARION FLETCHER £ TOM GARY.Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. MARGUERITE JANE GAVERE. Fayetteville, Arkansas. CHARLES GILBERT. Marianna, Arkansas. ROBERT M. GOFF. Fayetteville, Arkansas. GLORIA GOOCH. Rogers, Arkansas. JUSTIN G. GOOSTREE. Fayetteville, Arkansas. JOHN WESLEY GRADY .Horatio, Arkansas. LESLIE GRADY .Hamburg, Arkansas. VOYNE FLETCHER .Bauxite, Arkansas. BOB FLOCKS. Fort Smith, Arkansas. MARGARET E. FORD. Fayetteville, Arkansas.. WILLIAM FOX. Manila, Arkansas. EUGENE W. FRANCIS. Schoberg, Arkansas. JEANETTE FRENCH. Valparaiso, Indiana. IRVING FREY.New York, New York. MARY HELEN GARRISON. Fayetteville, Arkansas. Des Arc, Arkansas. ROBERT M. GRAVES Lexa, Arkansas. CLAUDE GRESHAM Pine Bluff, Arkansas. ELIZABETH GRIFFITH Memphis, Tennessee. JAMES C. GUARD Blytheville, Arkansas. ORA GULLEY.West Fork, Arkansas. WILLIAM M. HALL.Tur¬ ner, Arkansas. HENRY HALSELL.Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. GEORGE B. HAMILTON Chicago, Illinois. Page I I I FRESHMEN • BURNEY HARBERT.Neosho, Missouri. MARY LUTTIE HARGER.Altus, Arkansas. DANE HARRIS.Hot Springs, Arkansas. J. W. HARRIS.Springdale, Ar¬ kansas. JERRY HART.Fort Smith, Ar¬ kansas. LOUIS HAVEN.Forrest City, Ar¬ kansas. HASKELL HAYNES.Glenwood, Arkansas. GARLAND HAYNIE.Houston, Texas. • WILLIAM O. HAZELBAKER.Eu- dora, Arkansas. SHIRLEY HEDRICK. Shreveport, Louisiana. LEONARD HEMPLING .Richmond Hill, New York. ALICE HENRY .Jacksonville, Arkansas. EMORY HILL Harrison, Arkansas. GEORGE HILL.Ster¬ ling, Illinois. ZARA ZOE HILL.Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. CHARLES H. HINTON. Little Rock, Arkansas. ALBERT C. HIRSCH. Ravenden, Arkansas. HAROLD E. HIRSCH. Ravenden, Arkansas. WANDA HOLLINGSWORTH .Flippin, Arkansas. J. J. HOLLOMON .Wylie, Texas. 0 HARLAN HOLT.Harrison, Ar¬ kansas. FRANCES HOLTZENDORFF.Haz- en, Arkansas. MARVIN HOLZER.Brook¬ lyn, New York. E. T. HORNOR.West Helena, Arkansas. JOHN HORNOR. Helena, Arkansas. GENEVA HOSEY.Join¬ er, Arkansas. JAMES R. HOWELL, JR. Paris, Arkansas. HELEN YVONNE HUGHES. Fayetteville, Arkansas. MARTHA HUMPHREYS .Pine Bluff, Arkansas. MAY CORINNE HUNT.Lincoln, Arkansas. CLARENCE C. HURLBURT, JR.Tulsa, Oklahoma. AL¬ DRIDGE JOHNSON.Greenwood, Arkansas. Page 112 • • • FRESHMEN • EUGENIA JOHNSON.Shreve- port, Louisiana. LAURA MAE JOHNSTON. Prairie Grove, Arkansas. BOBBY JONES. Fayetteville, Arkansas. . JAMES JONES. Alpena Pass, Arkansas. CHARLES JOURDAIN .Alton, Illinois.. MARY EVA KANE. Fayetteville, Arkansas. THEODORE KANNER ..)•••. Hampton Roads, Virginia. HOWARD KEELING.Bruno, Arkansas. • DALE KENT.Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. HAROLD KENT.Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. LOUIS KERSTEIN.Boston, Massa¬ chusetts. BILLY MIKE KOLB.Fort Smith, Arkansas. JACK KOLCHINSKY.Jamaica, Long Island, New York. MARY MATILDA KING .Fayetteville, Arkansas.. BEN KIRBY. Harrison, Arkansas. LONGLEY KIRBY. Marianna, Arkansas. TOLICE KIRKPATRICK. Forrest City, Arkansas. AARON KNYPER. Brooklyn, New York. HARRISON KUNZ. Fayetteville, Arkansas. FORD LACEY.Fort Smith, Arkansas. • KATHERINE LANGLEY.Hot Springs, Arkansas. HENRY LEE.Forrest City, Arkansas. SADIE MAE LEHMAN. Fayetteville, Arkansas. . MAX LEVINE. Pine Bluff, Arkansas. GRACE JEWELL LINCOLN .Forrest City, Arkansas. WILLIAM LEWIS LITTLE.Mansfield, Arkansas. VIRGINIA MAGRUDER.Prairie Grove, Arkansas. HOWARD MAINARD.Roland, Arkansas. PAUL MARINONI.Fayetteville, Arkan¬ sas. ROBERT W. MARSH.Fort Smith, Arkansas. EILEEN MARSHALL.Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. CLEO MARTIN.Inka, Ar¬ kansas. Page 113 FRESHMEN • • • Fayetteville, Arkansas. NED MOSELEY.Fordyce, Ar¬ kansas. CHARLES HILLMAN MOSES.Little Rock, Ar¬ kansas. ZOLA MULLEN. Fayetteville, Arkansas. EDWARD JACK McCABE.Hope, Arkansas. JOHN McCANNE .Fort Smith, Arkansas. nellie McCartney. Greenwood, Arkansas. EDWARD McCLELLAND.Fayetteville, Arkansas. MARY McCROSKEY.Dermott, Arkansas. • NEIL MARTIN.Texarkana, Ar¬ kansas. WILLIAM CARL MARTIN.Lit¬ tle Rock, Arkansas. BEN MATT.New York, New York. BETH MAXWELL.Cotton Plant, Arkansas. WILEY D. MAY.Haynes, Arkansas. MARY JO MAYES.Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. JULIET MAYFIELD.Rogers, Arkansas. DUDLEY E. MAYES.Fordyce, Arkansas. ERLE MEHEARG.Hughes, Ar¬ kansas. CHARLES MEYER.Little Rock, Arkansas. ANNA MARTIN MICHELL Harrison, Arkansas. A. LeROY MILLER Arkansas City, Kansas. • GLENN UTLEY MILLER.Mar¬ ianna, Arkansas. M. C. MILLS.Palestine, Illinois. JOE MILNER, JR.Shef¬ field, Alabama. JOE MITCHELL.Fort Smith, Arkansas. LLOYD MONTGOMERY.Baux¬ ite, Arkansas. LACKEY W. MOODY.Cal¬ ico Rock, Arkansas. BOB MOORE.Blythe- ville, Arkansas. MARY ALBERT MOORE Page I 14 • • • FRESHMEN • JAMES SARA McFARLANE.Hart- ford, Arkansas. EUGENE McSAUGHEY. Carthage, Missouri. ALBERT McGILL. Little Rock, Arkansas. CLIFTON McMICHAEL .Faye tteville, Arkansas. WOODROW Me- MURRY.Little Rock, Arkansas. LILA Mc- MURTREY.Rison, Arkansas. RUDOLPH McNULTY .Pine Bluff, Arkansas. JOHN LEE NASH.Lonoke, Arkansas. LAUREN DALE NEWLIN.West Fork, Arkansas. LENA NOWLIN.Yellville, Arkansas. 9 EARL W. PAUL.Hot Springs, Arkansas. JUNE PAUL.Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. BERNARDINE PAYNE.Hughes, Arkansas. DORIS PEPPERKORN.Musko¬ gee, Oklahoma. ROBERT S. PETERSEN. Wheaton, Arkansas. KENNETH W. PETTIT. Harrison, Arkansas. VIRGINIA PHELAN. Fayetteville, Arkansas. BILL OWEN PHILLIPS .Joplin, Missouri. • PAUL PHILLIPS.Paterson, New Jersey. MAJEL PITTS.Forester, Arkan¬ sas. ANN PRITCHARD.Hope, Arkansas. JESSIE RAINES.Hartford, Arkansas. FRED CHARLES RAINS.North Little Rock, Arkansas. LOUISE RAMSEY.Malvern, Arkansas. LEONARD B. RANDELL.Brook¬ lyn, New York. BETTY READ.Fayetteville, Arkansas. THOMAS JACKSON REED. Springdale, Arkansas. MARJORIE YSOBEL REID .Fayetteville, Arkansas. WALTER CLYDE RHODES.Brinkley, Arkansas. HOWARD RIDLEY.Newport, Arkansas ABRAHAM OKUN .... Bronx, New York. MARY JETT ORTON .Fulton , Arkansas. COR- INNE PARKER.Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. POLLY PARTIN .Memphis, Tennessee. HARRY PATTON.Ben- tonville, Arkansas. MARTHA FRANCES PATTON. Van Buren, Arkansas. Page I 15 FRESHMEN • • • • HYMAN REICH.Brooklyn, New York. MANNIE RIESENBERG.Pine Bluff, Arkansas. LONNIE H. ROARK.Eureka Springs, Arkansas. CHARLES THOMAS ROBERTS .Greenway, Arkansas. LEWIS EDWIN ROBERTSON.Fayetteville, Arkansas. MARY VIRGINIA ROBERTSON.Benton, Arkansas. FAIRY ROBINSON.Pine Bluff, Arkansas. MARGARET ROBINSON.West Fork, Arkansas. WILL RODGERS.Carter- ville, Missouri. TOM BILL ROGERS.Har¬ rison, Arkansas. JEAN ROTH.Joplin, Misouri. ROBERT WILLIAM ROWDEN. Fayetteville, Arkansas. GLENN ROWE. Tulsa, Oklahoma. BEN RUSSELL.Little Rock, Arkansas. WESLEY RYNDERS.Fort Smith, Arkansas. HELEN SALYER.Spring- dale, Arkansas. £ JOE SALZBERG.Glendale, Long Island, New York. JULIUS SANKIN. Brighton Beach, New York. ABEL A. SANSONE .Hackensack, New Jersey. EARL SAUN¬ DERS .Little Rock, Arkansas. HERBERT B. SCHLOSBERG.Greenwich, Connecticut. JOE J. SCHMELZER.Little Rock, Arkan¬ sas. HARRIET PEARL SCHULMAN.Hot Springs, Arkansas. FRANK SCOTT.Crane, Texas. EDWARD VANCE SCURLOCK. Piggott, Arkansas. JAMES W. SEAY. Paragould, Arkansas. ELMER SEMEL. Cleveland, Ohio. JOSEPH DAVID SHAY. Hot Springs, Arkansas. J. RALPH SHAY. Springdale, Arkansas. RAYMOND SHELBY. Fort Smith, Arkansas. DOROTHY SHEPARD. Little Rock, Arkansas. ROBERT SILLINS. New York, New York. Page I 16 0 HAROLD SIMONS . . . Springdale, Ar¬ kansas. HOWARD SIMPSON . . . Berryville, Ar¬ kansas. WALTER L. SIMS . . . Harrison, Arkansas. INEZ SISK . . . Joiner, Arkansas. VIRGINIA SLY . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. DALE SMITH . . . Mon- ett, Missouri. GLENN SMITH . . . Harrison, Ar¬ kansas. CHARLES SPENCER . . . Fayetteville, Ar¬ kansas. JOHN H. SPICER . . . Joplin, Missouri. ARNOLD A. SPITZ . . . Bloomfield, New Jersey. VIOLA STEINLE . . . Dumas, Arkansas. ADELAIDE STEPHENS . . . Cabot, Arkansas. JAMES H. STEWART . . . Highland, Arkansas. COLLEEN STOCKFORD . . . Fayetteville, Arkansas. BEULAH STONE . . . Farmington, Arkansas. JAMES STRAUSS . . . Malvern, Arkansas. . ..FRESHMEN • ELIENE SWEETSER . . . Fayetteville Ar- kansas. MARY E. SWISHER . . . Fort Smith, Ar¬ kansas. RALPH W. TAPP . . . Fayetteville, Arkan¬ sas. LYNNVILLE TARKINGTON . . . Cotton Plant, Arkansas. WILLIAM TERRELL . . . Stigler, Okla¬ homa. HENRY A. THANE . . . Arkansas City, Ar¬ kansas. RAY THOMAS . . . Walnut Ridge. Ar¬ kansas. WILKINS THOMPSON . . . Helena, Ar¬ kansas. WILLIAM HOWARD THURLBY . . . Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas. DICK TIPTON . . . Blytheville, Arkansas. ALLEN V. TORNEK ... New York, New York. THOMAS C. TRIMBLE . . . Lonoke, Arkan¬ sas. JUSTIN D. TUCKER ... Van Buren, Arkan¬ sas. NAN TUGGLE . . . Capleville, Tennessee. A. MICHAEL TUROFF . . . Brooklyn, New York. EARLENE UPCHURCH . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. Page 117 FRESHMEN • • • £ JACK WALLS . . . Lonoke, Arkansas. IRVING WALT . . . Port Chester, New York. FRANKLIN G. WASKOWITZ ... New York, New York. MAX WATKINS . . . Joplin, Missouri. DON WEATHERS . . . Salem, Arkansas. GLADYS WELCH ... El Dorado, Arkansas. CHARLIE EL¬ BERT WEST . . . Caddo Gap, Arkansas. LEE WHITE . . . Cotter, Arkansas. SYBIL WHITE . . . Kensett, Missouri. JOHN WHITING . . . Clarksville, Arkan¬ sas. WILLIAM FRANK WHITSITT . . . Fayette¬ ville, Arkansas. LEE WHITTAKER . . . Van Buren, Arkansas. BRUCE L. WILCOX, JR. . . . Douglas, Arizona. BILLY JOE WILKINS . . . Hot Springs, Arkansas. DOYLE WILLIAMS . . . Junction City, Arkansas. HENRY E. WILLIAMS . . . Fort Smith, Arkansas. • MARCUS T. WILLIAMS.Ash Flat, Arkansas. RAYMOND A. WILLIAMS. Rogers, Arkansas. EDWIN A. WILLIAMSON. De Queen, Arkansas. JACK WILLIAMSON. Mountain View, Arkansas. JACK WILSON. Blytheville, Arkansas. WILLIARD F. WILSON. Bird City, Kansas. ADA WINTERS.Colt, Arkansas. ART WITHERS.Little Rock, Arkansas. ROY WOOD, JR.Augusta, Arkansas. LUCILE WOODARD.Stutt¬ gart, Arkansas. GRACE WOLFF.Dumas, Arkansas. LLOYD J. WOODELL.Fay¬ etteville, Arkansas. HARRY A. WOODS. Fayetteville, Arkansas. ARNOLD F. WOOLF .Dorchester, Massachusetts. C. A. WOOT¬ EN, JR.Helena, Arkansas. EDWIN WRIGHT .Forrest City, Arkansas. • RUTH WRIGHT.Fort Smith, Arkansas. WENDELL ZIMMERMAN.Lowell, Arkansas. HAROLD ZINN.Miami, Florida. HERMAN ZOUDERER.Bridgeport, Con¬ necticut. Page I 18 Enshrouded and cloistered South entrance to “Old Main ” affords a refresh¬ ing relief to the recently constructed edifices of the campus BOOK number FOUR ATHLETICS ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT COACH TOMMY THOMSEN At the start of the 1935 football season Coach Fred Thomsen was faced with the task of putting an eleven on the field minus the services of over half the letter- men and practically the entire starting lineup from the good teams of 1933-34. There were several reserve lettermen from the previous year and a prospective looking squad of sophomores, but they lacked the experience that is necessary for conference play. However, after the second game of the season with Texas Christian University, it was ap¬ parent to everyone that " Tommy " had moulded to¬ gether a bunch that could give any team on the sched¬ ule a tough battle. These predictions were not ill-founded and before the season was through Arkansas had played heads up football with the leading teams of the country. Coach Thomsen developed a wide open attack that carried the battle to every eleven the Porkers played. The chief weapon was a dazzling forward and lateral pass¬ ing attack that was likely to explode at any minute. The Razorbacks had a made-to-order squad for this type of play with a fine group of rangy ends in Poole, Howell, Benton, Hamilton, and Hunter, a fast lateral man in Keen, and a wonderful passer in Robbins. Coach Thomsen used all these factors to advantage with a well drilled, blocking line to give Arkansas a football team that far exceeded pre-season expectations. FRED C. THOMSEN Coach GLEN ROSE Line Coach GEORGE COLE Freshman Coach Page 121 ARKANSAS 12, KANSAS STATE TEACHERS 0 Arkansas opened the season against Pittsburg, Kans. Teachers College and put across two touchdowns in the final half to win 12 to 0. The game failed to re¬ veal much as to the team ' s play and was slow and list¬ less through the most part. In the second half some of the Porkers ' laterals began clicking a little better, and, on one of these from mid- field, Bobbie Martin raced across for six points. Soon after this Jack Robbins slipped through a tackle and cut back through the secondary 45 yards for a touchdown. Neither of the attempted place kicks were good. Only two starters from last year ' s team, Jack Haden and Choice Rucker, were in the opening lineup. ARKANSAS 7, TEXAS CHRISTIAN 13 The Horned Frogs of T. C. U. brought a heavy, power¬ ful team to Fayetteville, big favorites over Arkansas, but the Red and White battlers fought them off their feet and gained a decisive first down margin al¬ though they finally lost out 13 to 7. T. C. U. scored first when Jimmy Lawrence plunged through the line, but they failed to add the extra point. Arkansas came back down the field, and Jimmy Benton leaped high to grab Jack Robbins ' pass over the goal and tie the score. Vann Brown sent the Razorbacks into a one point lead by place kicking the goal. The score remained 7 to 6 at the half. In the last half T. C. U. ' s all American quarterback, Sammy Baugh, who was held in check for the most part, rifled a pass to Willie Walls for the points that won the game. In this game the passing attack of Arkansas began to take form. On the first plays of the game Arkansas put T. C. U. on the defensive by completing two flank passes to Bid Jeffries. Texas Christian went on through the season to be ranked as one of the five leading teams of the nation, and on New Years Day won the annual Sugar Bowl game from L. S. U. They lost only to S. M.U., the Rose Bowl contestant. Fans were given an opportunity in this game to see two all-Americans in action. Darrell Lester was twice named on the mythical eleven at center, and this year Baugh received the honors at quarterback. Page 122 ARKANSAS 6, BAYLOR 13 In their first game on the road Arkansas traveled to Waco and dropped a hard luck game to the Baylor Bears 13 to 6. Arkansas outdid the Bears in first downs, passing, and running, but lost the game on two touchdowns that came as the result of breaks. Robbins tossed a flank pass to put the ball in position for the first touchdown and Robbins plunged over from the four yard line. Try for extra point failed. Baylor made their intitial six points when Holt fumbled behind the goal. A rush of Baylor linemen made a punt try impossible and when he was tackled behind the goal a Baylor lineman fell on the ball. Their place¬ ment failed too and the score remained 6 to 6 until the closing minutes of the game. Late in the last quarter Arkansas attempted a passing drive to win the game and Masters, Bear back, grab¬ bed in a wide pass on an unprotected flank and ran 55 yards untouched for the winning points. It was a hard game to lose, for the Porkers had kept the ball in Baylor territory most of the game. Robbins and Keen were substantial ground gainers all through the game, which was the first night football games ever played in the southwest conference. ARKANSAS 7, L. S. U. 13 Arkansas played one of its best all around games of the season in holding Louisiana State University to a 13 to 7 score. the game but Arkansas tied it up a little later when Robbins flipped a forward to Poole who lateraled to Keen wiih the little speedster going on across for the score. The total gain on the play was 40 yards. Seamster kicked goal to make the score 7 to 7. Rohm put the Tigers back in the lead by skirting end 17 yards for a marker in the final quarter. BENTON, End HOWELL, End POOLE, End HAMILTON, End The Razorbacks outplayed them throughout most of the game and only the inability to muster scoring pow¬ er from inside the 10 yard line deprived them of vic¬ tory. Bill Crass ploughed the line for the first touchdown of Arkansas made another serious threat when they car¬ ried the ball to the L. S. U. 4 yard line. When a pass was interfered with on the last down, the Red and White were given four more chances at the Tiger line but could not get it over, the game ended 13 to 7. Page 123 Jack Robbins played an outstanding game against the Tigers and completed 17 out of 28 attempted passes. His effective passing was largely responsible for the great showing of the Razorbacks. L. S.U. boasted four all-Americans in their lineup: Mickal, quarterback; Rukas, tackle; Helveston, guard, and Tinsley, end. The Tigers were ranked with the best in the nation at the time and later went on through the season to win the southeastern conference championship and repre¬ sent that section in the Sugar Bowl game New Years Day which they lost to T. C. U. 3 to 0. They were HOLT, Back ROBBINS, Back KEEN, Back JEFFRIES, Back ranked among the first 10 teams of the country by sports writers at the end of the year. ARKANSAS 51, COLLEGE OF OZARKS 6 The Razorbacks returned to Fayetteville for their next encounter with the College of the Ozarks, and turned all guns on the Mountaineers to smother them 5 I to 6 in a downpour of rain. Rain started soon after the game opened and held the score to 12 to 0 at the end of the first half, but weather was better during the last half and Arkansas scored at will. Taking the first kick¬ off Arkansas marched down the field, and after one score had been called back, made the initial six points on a pass from Robbins to Keen from the 22 yard line. Later a series of passes took the ball down to the one-yard line and Jeffries took it over on a spinner. Both of the placekicks failed. At the start of the last half Capt. Choice Rucker plunged over from the one yard line for the third marker. The next score was the result of a 12 yard jaunt around end by Allen Keen. This time Robbins scored the first point after touchdown of the day by sending a placekick between the bars. Big Jack Holt plunged over the next two scores. He took the first over from the four yard line and the next from the one yard line. Vann Brown placekicked the ex¬ tra point after the second of these scores. These touch¬ downs were both preceded by some fine plunging on the part of Holt. Aided by a fast charging line he tore through the Ozark forwards for big gains on each of the marches to the goal. Bid Jeffries made the next tally on a crisscross. He took the ball from Holt and went off tackle for four yards and six points. Brown again added the addi¬ tional point. The last points came on a pass. After several line plays had failed on the four yard line Holt stepped Page 124 back and flipped a pass to James Benton over the goal line, bringing the Porker ' s total to 5 I. The only Ozark points were on a freak pass. Near the Porker line the Mountaineers attempted a pass which an Arkansas half batted into the air in trying to break it up. It deflected, however, into the arms of an Ozark player across the goal for a touchdown. Arkansas made 25 first downs to 2 for the invaders. Allen Keen, speedy halfback from Oklahoma, thrilled the crowd in the second half by two of the most sensa¬ tional open field tackles ever made on Razorback field. Coming from his halfback position so fast that he was not noticed until he had made the tackle, he raced head on into Kellogg, shifty Ozark half, with such force WYNNE, Back MARTIN, Back that he carried him back several feet. A few plays later Keen repeated the act coming up seemingly from nowhere to nail the Ozark back when he appeared to have an open field ahead. ARKANSAS 14, TEXAS A. AND M. 7 The Razorbacks met their third conference opponent at Little Rock and defeated Texas Aggies 14 to 7. The game was attended by a large crowd of boosters and former students from all over the state. The first Porker points were made on a long pass diag¬ onally across the field to Poole in the end zone. Seam- ster kicked the extra point. Robbins flipped a short flank pass to Keen over the goal for the other marker. Seamster converted his second try of the day. The Razorbacks outplayed A and M during the greater part of the game except when a sharpshooting left handed passer was in the game. This southpaw pass¬ er, Shockley, gave Arkansas plenty of trouble during the afternoon and passed for their touchdown. ARKANSAS 7, RICE 20 Arkansas journeyed to Houston to meet the 1934 champion Rice Owls and lost 20 to 7. The Porkers met All-Americans Bill Wallace and John McCauley in their best form of the year and could not stop their slashing running game. These two touchdown twins, who won national fame during the past two years, got loose time after time and kept Arkansas on the defensive throughout. They received plenty of assistance on their drives from LUNDAY, Center HADEN, Tackle Page 125 Harry Witt who was ranked as the hardest blocking back in the conference, and from Sylvester, a great blocking end. The Razorback ' s seven points were scored again by their favorite forward lateral combination with Keen going over. The Rice team which met with varied success through the year played their best game of the year against Arkansas. ARKANSAS 6, S. M. U. 17 For their homecoming opponents this year Arkansas drew Southern Methodist University, which represent¬ ed the east in the Rose Bowl game against Stanford University. The Mustangs took the game I 7 to 6, but were on the defensive most of the game. Arkansas filled the air with passes from start to finish, and, though they were never ahead of the vistors, kept the big homecoming crowd on edge with their for¬ wards and laterals. The Porkers tossed 45 passes in this game and completed 19 of them. In every phase of the offense Arkansas outplayed S. M. U. They gained 369 yards from scrimmage to 191 for S. M. U. 262 of this total was the result of pass¬ ing. In first downs the Red and White finished with the big advantage of I 8 to 7. Jack Robbins threw all of the Razorback passes except one. He also led the ground gainers for the day with 54 yards from scrimmage. Bobby Wilson, the all-Amer¬ ican half of the Mustangs and spearhead of their run¬ ning game, was bottled up to the extent that he gained a total of only 21 yards, and his longest gain of the day was 9 yards. Maurice Orr and Truman Spain, all-American tackles, were outstanding in the line. Tipton, end, made both of the Mustang touch¬ downs after receiving passes from Wilson. Orr added two extra points and also kicked a field goal. Captain Choice Rucker plunged over the Ar¬ kansas score after a pass had been ruled complete deep in S. M. U. territory. BROWN Back GILMORE Guard ARKANSAS 28, TEXAS UNIVERSITY 13 The Razorback ' s offensive click¬ ed to perfection against Texas University in Austin, and the Porkers gained a 28 to 13 victory. Page 126 Jack Robbins played a wonderful all around game, pass¬ ing for one touchdown and making two more himself. Texas scored first when Sands skirted end and out¬ ran tacklers to the corner. Arkansas came back and took a one point lead when Robbins shot a flank pass for a touchdown and Seamster kicked the extra point. From then on it was Arkansas ' game all the way. A lateral pass with Robbins on the tail end put the ball a few yards from the goal and Rucker plunged it over. Seamster again made the point. The last two touchdowns were both made by Robbins on the identical play. On the first he faked a pass and raced right through the center of the line to score standing up from the 16 yard line. A moment later he repeated the performance from the 14 yard line. He left the game with an injured leg soon afterward. Seamster made good his third and fourth extra points of the day after these touchdowns. ARKANSAS 14, TULSA 7 Thanksgiving Day Arkansas revenged several defeats and ties over the last few years at Tulsa by beating the Golden Hurricane 14 to 7. Arkansas took the battle to Tulsa from the opening kickoff which they marched from their own 10 to the Tulsa I I yard line before losing the ball. They came right back up the field, how¬ ever, after gaining the ball back, and scored. On two fake passes Robbins gained 13 and 6 yards and then passed to Jeffries over the line for a touchdown. Seam¬ ster made it 7 to 0. At the start of the second half McLane returned ihe kickoff 79 yards before he was stopped by Keen on the I 8. Choice Rucker made a brilliant run for Arkansas at the opening of the last quarter. He intercepted a pass and ran 55 yards to the Tulsa five, where he was tacked from behind. After a triple pass, Holt to Benton to Robbins had gained 33 yards, Rucker lateraled to Keen on the seven, and he went across untouched. Seamster again kicked point. Estel plunged the line for the Tulsa touchdown and Dennis kicked goal. Page 127 1935 FRESHMAN SQUAD VERY PROMISING Wealth of Outstanding Material for Next Year ' s Varsity A wonderful array of promising high school football talent was collected together on this year ' s freshman squad. The team won one game, lost one, and tied one. Tulsa administered them the one setback, they tied Okla¬ homa A. M. frosh, and defeated Miami Junior Col¬ lege. George Cole coached the eleven, assisted by W. R. Benton and Oliver Criswell, former Porker stars. Woodrow McMurry and Neil Martin led an offensive that gave Arkansas a 6 to 6 tie with the Aggie frosh in the opening game at Fort Smith. Tulsa won from the yearlings in Tulsa, but the team came back in its next game to trounce Miami Junior College. Marian Fletcher, 200 pound fullback, smash¬ ed over three touchdowns in this game. Montgomery, Martin, and Price also turned in scintilating offensive games. The two regular ends were Art Wither, Little Rock, and Ray Thomas, Hoxie. In reserve were Dick Tipton, Blytheville, and Dudley Mays, Fordyce. Lundy Corbett, Walnut Ridge, and Randall Stallings, McAlester, Okla., held down the tackle positions, with relief coming from McKnight and Russell. Three exceptional guards appeared in Duel McDuffie, David Reves, and Jim Shea. The former was transferred from Centenary, and Reves came from Amarillo Junior College. Rodgers also looked good. Lloyd Woodell was considered a find at center. He is an expert on pass defense and has many character¬ istics of a fine center. He got plenty of work though from Lou Debonis, a hard fighting, scrappy center from Fall River, Mass. Debonis was handicapped only by size. In the backfield several combinations were used. Lloyd Montgomery and Marian Fletcher were in all of these, and the other posts were usually filled by Leonard, McChristian, McMurry, Martin, Moseley, or Price. Several freshmen were forced to leave school, but of the remaining, many have an excellent chance to de¬ velop into good varsity players. In the line Woodell and Corbett are counted on heavily for major duties with the Razorbacks. Corbett, a 220 pound all-state tackle from Walnut Ridge, will probably fill a tackle position, while Woodell can give Lunday and Donald¬ son competent relief. Reves, a guard, and Stallings, tackle, also developed rapidly toward the last of the season and during spring practice. In the backfield Lloyd Montgomery appears to be cap¬ able of triple threat duties equal to Robbins. He can pass, kick, and run, and is a consistent 60 yard kick¬ off man. Probably the shiftiest broken field runner on the squad, his specialty was in returning punts. Fletcher has the possibilities of a fine blocking back and can use his 200 pounds to hit a line to good ad¬ vantage. Price is the fastest man on both varsity and freshmen. Capable of doing the 100 yard dash in un¬ der 10 seconds he is particularly dangerous as a re¬ ceiver of laterals and flank passes and for quick open¬ ing plays. McChristian and Neil Martin are also clever open field runners. Page 128 REVIEW OF THE 1 9 3 5 SEASON Team Much Better Than Record Indicates Arkansas finished the 1935 season with a record of five games won, five lost, and fifth place in the South¬ west Conference standing. From a won and lost standpoint this was only a medi¬ ocre season, but to those who saw the Razorbacks in action, it was evident that the team was much better than this record indicates. For the first time in the history of the school Arkansas was right in the midst of big time football. The Razor- backs met and played down for down with the best football teams in the nation. And against each they displayed a fine brand of play, holding each to a narrow victory. Three of the teams on the schedule were chosen to play in the nation ' s two big football classics, the Rose Bowl and the Sugar Bowl. T. C. U. defeated L. S. U. in the latter game and S. M. U. lost to Stanford in the Rose Bowl. The first two teams beat Arkansas by one touchdown and the Mustangs won by a touchdown and field goal. Strangely enough Arkansas had a decisive margin in each game on first downs and general play. One other of Arkansas ' opponents was ranked through¬ out the season in the first ten. This was Rice. Arkansas finished the season with a flourish by smash¬ ing over two of their oldest and toughest rivals, Texas University and Tulsa University. Several Arkansas players won considerable individual praise. Chief among these was Jack Robbins who won national publicity and acclaim as the most accurate passer on the college fields last year. Howell and Robbins were both named on almost every all-conference team. Van Sickle, Gilmore, and Sand¬ ers were named on several opponents ' teams. Clifford Van Sickle was elected captain of the 1936 team and Bobbie Martin sub-captain. SOUTHWEST CONFERENCE STANDING Team Won Lost Pet. S. M. U. 6 0 1.000 T. C. U. 5 1 .833 Rice 3 3 .500 Baylor 3 3 .500 Arkansas 2 4 .333 Texas A. M. 1 5 .166 Texas 1 5 .166 1935 FOOTBALL SEASON RECORD Arkansas 12 Pittsburg Teachers 0 Arkansas 7 Texas Christian University 13 Arkansas 6 Baylor 13 Arkansas 7 L.S. U. 13 Arkansas 51 College of Ozarks 6 Arkansas 14 Texas A. M. 7 Arkansas 6 Rice Institute 20 Arkansas 6 S. M.U. 17 Arkansas 28 Texas University 13 Arkansas 14 Tulsa University 7 Page 129 OUTLOOK FOR FOOTBALL IN 1936 Arkansas Promises to Put One of Most Powerful Teams in Years on the Field . . . With experience behind last year ' s wonderful group of sophomores and a most prospective freshman team coming up from this year, Arkansas promises next sea¬ son to put one of its most powerful teams in years on the field. Fourteen lettermen will be back to form the starting lineup, but will have a job keeping their places after the first few weeks from the hard pressings of some oncoming freshmen. At the conclusion of spring practice the team ap¬ peared to have rounded out the kinks that always ac¬ company the making of a new team, and next fall mastery of the fundamentals should bring the team into top form early in the season. From the first conference game of the season with T. C. U., which is preceded only by the Pittsburg Teachers game, the schedule presents a rough road. A trip to Washington, D.C. for a night game with George Washington University will lend intersectional flavor. The highlight of the season will be reached the first weekend in December when Arkansas meets Texas Uni¬ versity in Little Rock as a part of the centennial cele¬ bration. In the practice game at the conclusion of spring prac¬ tice several new stars appeared. Billy Hunter played an outstanding offensive game at end making several sensational pass catches and scoring one touchdown on an end around end play. Leo Price, the fleet-footed New York freshman, got loose for a beautiful 60 yard run and Lloyd Montgomery looked awfully good at re¬ turning punts. Several of next year ' s varsity men were not out for spring practice due to the prolonged basketball sea¬ son. Hamilton, Lunday, Brodie, Martin, and Robbins were all members of the basketball team which was oc¬ cupied in Olympic elimination competition until April. At the ends next year Hamilton and Benton will be re¬ turning lettermen, while Hunter saw a lot of service last year. From the freshmen Tipton and Withers ap¬ pear to be good prospects. N. Gordon is a transfer from a junior college and Goza, McClurkin, and N. Rye are other prospects. Captain-elect Van Sickle and Spillers are returning let¬ ter tackles. They will receive support from two prom¬ ising freshmen, Corbett and Stallings, and Brodie, Lalman, and Stout, reserves of last year. A host of guards are available, led by lettermen Gil¬ more, Sanders, and Seamster. Other candidates are B. A. Owen, a junior college man, Burdine, Hinton, Kidd, May, Bud Rye, Reves, Rodgers, Shea, D. Martin, and B. A. Owen. Sanders may be shifted to end. Lunday and Donaldson, veterans, are back at center, with able assistance from Woodell, a sensational fresh¬ man, and Roberts and Jaquysh, reserves. In the backfield, Robbins, Bobbie Martin, Keen, Holt, and Brown are all lettermen. Reserves back from last year include Hopper, Rawlings, and Sloan. E. Gordon is a new man from Arkansas Tech, and a heavy and powerful set of freshmen backs, L. Montgomery, Leon¬ ard, H. Montgomery, N. Martin, McChristian, Nelson, Price, and Fletcher, should lend strength to the offense. Page 130 BASKETBALL TEAM WINS CONFERENCE TITLE Earns Trip to Madison Square Garden for Olympic Tryouts Arkansas ' giant basketball teams, famous for their su¬ premacy in the southwest for a decade, were swept before the eyes of the entire nation this year when the 1936 Razorbacks brought the university its seventh con¬ ference cup and then fought through the eliminations to the final Olympic team tryouts in New York City. Coach Glen Rose, in his own day a Razorback bas¬ ketball immortal, developed one of the finest teams in Arkansas ' history of superb basketball. The team swept through a season of 27 games with only three defeats. They won the conference championship with I I wins and one defeat and then leaped all the barriers until they were one of the last eight teams in the country that vied in New York for the right to represent Uncle Sam in the Olympic games this summer. The team was built around Captain Jim Lee Howell and Ike Poole, who were rewarded at the end of the season by their selection as alternates on the American Olympic basketball team. With these were two letter- men Gilliland and Lunday, a reserve, Martin, and five first year men, Brodie, Lockard, Hays, Robbins, and Hamilton. These ten men brought Arkansas more nationwide publicity than any athletic achievement in the history of the school. Before the season was half over they were generally acclaimed as the class of the southwest. Then when the Olympic elimination series started, sum¬ maries and resumes in magazines and papers the coun¬ try over repeatedly mentioned the exploits of the great Red and White team and their progress toward the Olympic goal. The season also brought recognition to Glen Rose as one of the country ' s leading basketball mentors of the present time. Rose has had the reins for three years now and his teams have finished third, tied for first, and won a clean title to the conference crown. Rose was a member of three of the five consecutive conference champ¬ ionship teams several years ago and was named all-conference guard three years. For the second con¬ secutive year H. L. Poole led the Razor- backs in scoring and ranked second in the conference. Arkansas as a team had the best offensive and de¬ fensive records in the southwest circuit. JIM LEE HOWELL Captain Page 131 POOLE GILLILAND Center Forward PRE-CONFERENCE GAMES Arkansas opened the season with two one-sided vic¬ tories over Tahlequah Teachers college. Gilliland scored 14 points in the first game, and Poole went wild in the second game to run up an individual high of 25 points. The Razorbacks then started on their annual Christ¬ mas holiday trip, and split a two game series with Okla¬ homa Aggies at the start. Oklahoma took the first game, but the Porkers set up a stiff defense in the sec¬ ond and won 24 to 15. They next swamped Tulsa Uni¬ versity 47 to 29 with Poole scoring 15 points, and trounced the Ft. Smith Vehicle Company the next night 52 to 24. Poole sank 17 points in this game. In the final two games Arkansas beat the Arkansas State Teachers 42 to 38, led by Poole ' s 19 points, and 66 to 27. Gilliland led the way in the second with 17 points. Coming back home after the holidays Arkansas took the measure of the Oklahoma Tire and Supply Com¬ pany team, formerly the Tulsa Oilers, 42 to 39 at Mus¬ kogee. TEXAS AGGIES AND RICE Arkansas opened conference play with a four game trip through Texas. In the first two they beat Texas A. M. 22 to 18 and 34 to 27. Poole was high in both games with 8 and 13 points. From College Station the squad went to Houston and whipped Rice 33 to 26 in the first game, but lost the second 35 to 29. It was their only conference de¬ feat of the season. Gilliland led Arkansas in the first tilt with 13 points and in the second with 7. ARKANSAS 42, TULSA 28 As an interlude in the conference fight Arkansas took a return game from Tulsa University 42 to 28 in Fayetteville. Bobbie Martin played a spark¬ ling game for Arkansas and scored 8 points. Poole tallied I 2. S. M. U. LOSES TWO Arkansas took the conference lead for good by sweeping the S. M. U. series 34 to 23 and 40 to 28. Poole scored 12 points in the first and 15 in the second. Lock- ard played an outstanding game in the op¬ ener with Poole. Poole passed Blanton of S. M. U. for the con¬ ference scoring lead in this series. ARKANSAS 44-39, BAYLOR 26-14 The Porkers moved within striking distance LOCKARD Forward LUNDAY Forward ROBBINS Guard Page 132 of the championship at Waco with two wins over Bay¬ lor. Both games were featured by the Arkansas tight defense. In the first game Baylor scored only 8 points the first half and in the second Arkansas held a 24 to 3 lead at half time. Poole and Gilliland both counted 10 points in the final victory. ARKANSAS 47-40, TEXAS CHRISTIAN 15-29 Arkansas humbled the T. C. U. Frogs in two games at Fayetteville putting them in position to win the title with one more victory. In the first game T. C. U. scored only 4 points the first half and were helpless be¬ fore the tall Razorbacks. They threw a brief scare in¬ to Arkansas, however, the second night holding them to a two point lead during the first half. Led by Poole with 16 points Arkansas pulled away to a 40 to 29 victory. TAKE TITLE GAMES FROM TEXAS The crucial series of the season brought Texas and Arkansas together at Fayetteville with Arkansas need¬ ing one game for the championship and Texas need¬ ing two. The first game was a true championship match, nip and tuck all the way, with the Razorbacks finally com- BRODIE HAMILTON Guard Guard HAYES MARTIN Forward Guard ing out ahead 38 to 37. Lockard sank a field goal from the side with only a few seconds left to play to bring Arkansas its title. In the second game the Porkers victory was more decisive, 43 to 31. Don Lockard did some sensa¬ tional shooting for 17 points. He was followed by Gilliland with 13. Howell left the game early on fouls, and Brodie, substituting for him, played a brilliant game. OLYMPIC DISTRICT ELIMINATIONS For the right to represent the southwest district Ar¬ kansas won out in a tournament at Houston. The first game they took from Texas University 27 to 16, hold¬ ing the Longhorns to 5 points in the first half. Howell was high scorer with 7 points. In the final game Ike Poole got " hot " and played a sensational all around game to give Arkansas a 53 to 24 win over Stephen F. Austin College. Poole scored 24 points, one of his baskets being an over head shot and another from the center of the court. Bl DISTRICT SERIES The next hurdle—the right to represent the south— found Arkansas opposed by Western Kentucky Teach¬ ers of Bowling Green, Ky. A last half spurt brought a 43 to 36 triumph. Poole and Robbins paced the Ar¬ kansas attack, but it was the sharpshooting of Hays and Lunday at the end of the first half that put the Razor- backs in the running. Arkansas played better ball in the second game and had an easier time winning 39 to 30. Poole again led the scorers, but the feature of the game was the goal shooting of Don Lockard. Lockard played only a few minutes in the first half and at the start of the second period, but in that time found the basket for 10 points. FINAL TRYOUTS Next Arkansas proceeded to Madison Square Garden with four other college teams, two winners from the National A. A. U., and one Y. M. C. A. winner. Arkansas drew Hollywood Universal for the first game, a team composed of former college stars and veteran A. A. U. players. The Red and White giants took a I 5 to 4 lead at the start of the game but soon the experience of their opponents told, and with about eight minutes left to play, the Uni¬ versal went ahead 28 to 26. In attempting to break up a stalling game the Porker defense loosened and Hollywood crept away. Poole and Howell left the game on fouls at this time, and with them went any chance of a victory. Howell, Robbins, and Lockard played starring games for Arkansas. The final score was 53 to 34. Page 133 FRESHMAN BASKETBALL TEAM PROMISING For Second Consecutive Year Yearling Team Goes Through Season Undefeated For the second consecutive year the Arkan¬ sas Freshman basketball team went through a season of 8 games undefeated. The yearlings are coached by George Cole. Neil Martin, forward, was high scorer, and paired with Captain Dick Tipton to form the forward combination. Fremont Goza, a six foot five inch giant, and Marion Fletcher alter¬ nated at center. Glen Smith, a fast floor man, and Art Withers or Lendon Chambers usually held down the guard positions. Leonard, Wood, Adair, Thompson, and Montgomery were reserves. In the season opener the Frosh beat Monett Junior College 3 I to 25. Chambers was high for Arkansas with 9 points. The second game was a thriller at Fort Smith. After staying behind through all the game Art Withers caged a long one to put Arkansas ahead with only a half a minute to play. Ft. Smith tied it up at 33 all, and the game was forced overtime. Smith looped a field goal and Goza a free throw in the extra session. In a return game at Fayetteville the follow¬ ing week Arkansas had an easier time winning 45 to 35. Martin with 15 and Tipton with 10 led the attack. Smith scored 13 points to send the frosh to a 37 to 22 victory over Winslow independents in the next game, and then the Yearlings trav¬ eled to Ft. Smith to take a 41 to 32 triumph. Martin tallied 15 points. Arkansas had little trouble with Joplin " Y " leaders at Joplin winning 46 to 3 I at Joplin, but in a return game at Fayetteville only Art Withers ' goal from the middle of the court brought a 24 to 23 triumph. In the season ' s finale they ran away from Ft. Smith Junior College 48 to 14. Martin dropped in I I points and Smith 10. Seven players were given their numerals: Martin, Tipton, Goza, Smith, Fletcher, Cham¬ bers, and Withers. Neil Martin finished the season with 68 points, followed by Smith with 60. Tipton was third with 55, and Goza fourth with 45. Freshman Squad Page 134 REVIEW OF THE 1 9 3 6 SEASON Seven Veterans Returning for Next Year ' s Team Coach Glen Rose will have seven veterans from this year ' s championship basketball squad to start campaigning for an eighth conference championship. Missing from the squad will be only Jim Lee Howell, Ike Poole, and Kenneth Lunday. This will give a possible veteran lineup to start the season with Gilliland and Lockard at forwards, either Hays or Hamilton at center, and Robbins, Martin, or Brodie at the guards. To supplement these will be Martin and Tip- ton, forwards, from the freshmen, Goza and Fletcher, centers, and Smith, Withers, and Chambers, guards. Of course, Howell and Poole will be sorely missed, as both were outstanding contributors in all the Porker victories this year. Poole fin¬ ished the season, exclusive of Olympic games, with 249 points in 22 games. Howell was the standout guard in the conference and failed to meet the forward that could score effectively over his airtight guarding. Lunday was also a great offensive player. However, the group left will have had a year of experience and have the potentialities of meeting the records of these graduating stars. Bobbie Martin is captain elect for next sea¬ son and Elwin Gilliland, sub-captain elect. These will be the only seniors on the team, al¬ though Brodie will be playing his last year due to the junior college transfer rule. The rest of the group of lettermen, Lockard, Hays, Rob¬ bins, and Hamilton will be juniors. Three men were named on the all-conference first team this year. Poole received the honor for the second straight year and Howell and Gilliland made the team for the first time. Lockard and Martin were given honorable men¬ tion. Gilliland finished the regular season in sec¬ ond place behind Poole in individual scoring with 181 points. Lockard was third with 96 and Howell fourth with 89. Poole ranked second in the conference scor¬ ing race, behind Collins of Texas, with I 14 points. Other Arkansas totals in conference play were Gilliland 99, Lockard 69, and Howell 40. SOUTHWEST CONFERENCE STANDING Team Won Lost Pet. Arkansas 1 1 1 .916 Texas 8 4 .667 Rice 8 4 .667 Baylor 6 6 .500 S.M.U. 5 7 .416 A. M. 2 10 .167 T. C. U. 2 10 .167 1936 BASKETBALL RECORD Arkansas 47 Tahlaquah Teachers 19 Arkansas 50 Tahlaquah Teachers 19 Arkansas 21 Oklahoma Aggies 33 Arkansas 24 Oklahoma Aggies 15 Arkansas 47 Tulsa University 29 Arkansas 52 Ft. Smith Vehicles 24 Arkansas 42 Arkansas State Teachers 38 Arkansas 66 Arkansas State Teachers 27 Arkansas 42 Oklahoma Tire Supply 39 Arkansas 22 Texas A. M. 18 Arkansas 34 Texas A. M. 27 Arkansas 33 Rice 26 Arkansas 29 Rice 35 Arkansas 42 Tulsa University 28 Arkansas 34 S. M. U. 23 Arkansas 40 S.M.U. 28 Arkansas 44 Baylor 26 Arkansas 39 Baylor 14 Arkansas 47 T. C. U. 15 Arkansas 40 T. C. U. 29 Arkansas 38 Texas University 37 Arkansas 43 Texas University 31 Arkansas 27 Texas University 16 Arkansas 53 Stephen Austin 24 Arkansas 43 West Kentucky Teachers 36 Arkansas 39 West Kentucky Teachers 30 Arkansas 34 Hollywood Universal 53 Page 135 TENNIS TEAM STARTS SEASON WITH THREE VETERANS Defeats Gustavus Adolphus College in First Match of Year Three lettermen of last year were back this season to form the nucleus of the tennis team. They were John Kane, Bruce Miller, and Henry Tuck. A fourth member, Harry Johnson, intramural champ, was chosen to round out the squad. Glen Rose coaches the net team again this year. Kane holds the number one singles position, while Miller plays number two, Tuck number three, and John¬ son number four. The two doubles combinations pair together Kane and Miller as the number one combination and Tuck and Johnson as number two pair. In the first match of the year the Razorbacks defeat¬ ed Gustavus Adolphus College of Minnesota 5 to I. Kane lost to the No. I Minnesota man, but Miller, Tuck, and Johnson all won singles matches and the two dou¬ bles combinations came out victorious. Miller, Tuck, and Johnson will all be eligible for an¬ other year of competition after this year. A schedule has been arranged with leading teams of Oklahoma and Arkansas. The squad will also participate in the Arkansas State Collegiate tournament which was won by Kane last year in the singles and Miller and Kane in the doubles. Rain hampered much of the pre-season practice, and the players were forced to take to indoor courts for limbering up. Page 136 PROMISING MATERIAL OUT FOR TRACK THIS YEAR Steps Being Taken by Coaching Staff to Build Arkansas Into a Southwestern Track Power A large squad of some of the best track material in recent years reported this year to Coaches George Cole and F. C. Thomsen in both freshmen and varsity divisions. In the dashes Ralph Rawlings and Tommy Wynne both ran the 100 yard dash in close to 10 seconds. Rawlings is a transfer from Arkansas Tech. He ran two 9.9 hundreds in pre-season workouts. Another junior college transfer gives the Porkers real strength in the 440. Allen Keen, speedy halfback on the football team, holds the Oklahoma record in the quarter and has run it in 49 seconds. Maurice Lee, a letterman, is the representative in the half mile. Lee was a consistent winner here two years ago and came back after a year ' s vacation. Caldwell and Thurlby, milers, round out the distance group. In the jumps, Tom McDaniel is a letterman and hold¬ er of the intramural record of six feet one inch in the high jump. He is also a broad jumper. Charles Gardner and Seamster are the pole vaulters. Three speedy hurdlers, Tilmon, Keen, and Rye prom¬ ise to give the Razorbacks points in these events. In pre-season workouts Keen in the lows and Rye on the high barriers looked best. The most promising weight man apparently ' is Bob Stout, 6 feet 7 inch mammoth, who has been hurling the discus between 130 and 140 feet. Haden is also a veteran weight man, and Spillers is expected to score in the shot and javelin. The freshman squad this year was almost the equM of the varsity in strength. The feature of the fresh¬ men was a crack dash relay that ran the 440 yard event in 43 seconds, an average of less than 10 sec¬ onds a man for the 100 yard dash. The quartet is composed of Leo Price, Hyman Reich, Vic Dovitch and Ben Russell. The first three are members of the record holding New York high school team, and Rus¬ sell holds the Arkansas 220 record. Cassard and Reich both run the quarter in around 50 seconds flat and Glen Smith won all middle dis¬ tance titles in the state last season. Martin and Fletcher are the hurdlers, while Martin also takes care of the high jump and broad jump with Chambers and Holt. Holt is a 23 feet jumper. Walls was last year ' s state champion high school vaulter. Hinton, Fletcher, and Withers are other weight men. Page 137 RECORD ATTENDANCE AT INTRAMURALS Lambda Chi Leading All Groups Up to April Fifteenth • At the end of the winter sport season Lambda Chi Alpha held the lead in the Intramural sports pro¬ gram with 647 points. Kappa Sigma followed in sec¬ ond place with 485, and Kappa Nu was third with 472. Other point totals follow: Town 360, Kappa Alpha 330, Dorm A 262, Dorm B 167, Sigma Chi 167, Pi K. A. 162, Golden Tornadoes 160, S. A. E. 145, T. K. N. I 15, S. P. E. 42, T. E. P. 32, A. G. R. 32. The last two titles decided were the boxing and wrestling team championships. Kappa Alpha and Kap¬ pa Nu won these championships, respectively, for the second straight year. Lambda Chi finished second in both divisions. The individual titles were pretty well divided. Austin LaMarche, Town, won the I 15 pound crown from Manley of Lambda Chi. L. J. Carroll threw Connor, Lambda Chi, in the 125 pound division, and Denenberg, Kappa Nu, took the 135 pound match from Leroy Pond, Lambda Chi. One of the finest matches saw Sammy Cohen, Kap¬ pa Nu, win the 145 division for the fourth straight year, defeating Charles Laughlin, Town, on time ad¬ vantage. Jack Carson, Dorm, beat Charlow, Kappa Nu, in the 155 pound class. Leo Price, the shifty football player and track star from New York, showed plenty of class in taking the ELWARD WARE.ROBERT SUGGS Intramural Managers championship in the 175 pound weight. Price swept through his weight on straight falls and took the last match from Lew, Kappa Nu, in two minutes. Lew won the 165 pound title from Charlow and Ed Lalman, Dorm A, took a time advantage over Lloyd Woodell in the heavyweight class. The winners in the boxing tournament were as classy a squad of fighters as the intramurals have developed in years. Bobby Rhodes, Kappa Alpha, a clever defensive fighter, took both the featherweight and bantam¬ weight crowns after some very interesting fights. Rhodes won the same titles last year. Max Barron, Kappa Alpha, retained his lightweight Page 138 and Kappa Sigma won from S. A. E., who had won the championship for three years straight. Lambda Chi beat Kappa Nu in the volleyball final three straight games. Dietrich, Dorm, won the Ping Pong singles from Hudspeth, Lambda Chi. Harry Johnson, Kappa Alpha, captured the tennis singles, and the doubles title went to Brooks and Brown, Lambda Chi. championship with a victory over Hardwick, Lambda Chi. Tommy Philbeck, Lambda Chi, won his second straight welterweight championship on default. Doc Barbarick, Lambda Chi, presented a dangerous right hand punch in his bout for the middleweight belt and used it to win from Walls, Kappa Sigma, by a knockout in the second round. Marion Fletcher took the heavyweight crown on a forfeit after winning his semi-final from Lloyd Woodell. Town team won the basketball tourney from Dorm B. The final score was 22 to 18. Seelig of Dorm and Smith of town were high point men with 8 points each. Lambda Chi won both the volley ball and touchball championships in the fall program. In the final touch- ball game L. C. A. beat Kappa Sigma 7 to 0 when Frank Kelly snagged a long pass from Yancey for the only points. Lambda Chi had beaten Pi K. A. in the semi-finals Page 139 • The intramural activities continue the year ' round on the campus, providing both recreation and exercise for the members of the various groups. Every sport suitable for this part of the country is engaged in, and the group with the highest total points at the end of the year is awarded an en¬ graved placque, which, if won for three years, be¬ comes the property of the group. The winners in the individual sports are awarded certificates. Page 140 WE PRESENT SOME OF THE INTRAMURAL WINNERS Intramural Activities Nearly Finished by Middle of April • Due to the inability to get the various intramural winners to¬ gether, and the fact that at the time of the printing of the book the activities were only half over, we are able to present only a part of the winners in the sports completed. This year more interest was shown in boxing and wrestling than ever before, and because of this renewed in¬ terest, we have attempted to present as many winners in that division as possible. Page 141 THE " A " CLUB First Row . Rucker . Harriss . Benton . Haden . Van Sickle . Poole . Gilmore . Jeffries . Second Row . Coach Cole . Seamster . Lunday . Holt . Sanders . Tuck . Keen . Miller . Third Row . Criswell . Lockard . Hays Hamilton . Howell . Donaldson . Coach Thomsen . Kane . Fourth Row . Coach Rose . Brown . Wynne . Spillers . Martin • OFFICERS • BOBBIE MARTIN.President CLIFF VAN SICKLE .... Vice-President KENNETH LUNDAY . . . Secretary-Treasurer • • COACHES • F. C. THOMSEN . . GLEN ROSE . . GEORGE COLE BOYD CYPERT .... Business Manager • • MEMBERS • JAMES BENTON . . . W. R. BENTON . . . FRANK BRODIE . . . VANN BROWN . . . BOYD CYPERT . . . GEORGE COLE . . . OLIVER CRISWELL . . . JOHN DONALDSON . . . J. C. FUTRALL . . . ELVIN GEISER . . . ELWIN GILLIAND . . . GEORGE GILMORE . . . JACK HADEN . . . RAY HAMILTON . . . AL HARRISS . . . DENNY HAYS . . . ELMER HONEA . . . JACK HOLT ... BID JEFFRIES . . . JOHN KANE . . . ALLEN KEEN . . . KENNETH LUNDAY . . . DON LOCKARD . . . MAURICE LEE . . . BOBBIE MARTIN . . . BRUCE MILLER . . . john McDaniel ... jack robbins ... choice RUCKER . . . GLEN ROSE . . . FRANK PITTMAN . . . H. L. POOLE . . . RAYMOND SPILLERS . . . SAVOY SEAMSTER . . . PERCY SANDERS . . . HENRY TUCK . . . CLYDE TREECE . . . WAYNE TILMON . . . FRED C. THOMSEN . . . CLIFF VAN SICKLE ... JIM WHEELUS . . . TOMMY WYNNE . . . W. B. YAUCH Page 142 THE ROOTIN ' RUBES ... FEMALE BOOSTERS Together with A. B. C. They Foster School Spirit and Loyalty • Rootin ' Rubes was organized in 1925 at the University of Arkansas for the purpose of fostering all University activities and to encourage student loyalty and spirit among the students. It was organized as the little sister of the Arkansas Booster’s Club, composed of men from various organizations on the campus. Rootin ' Rubes is composed of four members from each sorority, Carnall Hall, 4-H Club, and town. • MEMBERS • WILMA JANE ALFORD . . MARJORIE ALLRED . . FRANCES BAD0ETT . . WINNIFRED BITTINGER . . JO BLUNK . . PAULA BRAUN . . ELEANOR CLARK . . MILDRED CROSS . . MARIAN DIXON . . ANN DuBARD . . MAMIE OLIVE FOGLEMAN . . RENNA CATHERINE FRANKLIN . . HELEN GRAHAM . . WILLA GRACE HARDY . . PAULINE HEMPHILL . . NEVA HILL . . BEVERLY HOPPER . . LYNN HOWLETT . . JESSAMINE HUFF . . BILLIE RUTH JAMES . . ALICE JONES . . KATHERINE KEICHER . . MARGARET McALLISTER . . RUTH McCORD . . MARIE MAINARD . . GRACE MARLEY . . BETTY ALLYN NETTLESHIP . . FRANCES PITTMAN . . MARY LOUISE SANDERS . .LAURA SHRODE . . ANN SIMS . . EUGENIA STACY . . MARY JANE THOMPSON . . MARIAN FRANCES WEST . . PAULINE WHEELER . . AMY WOOLWINE . . LEWISE WYATT. Altord . Allred . Badgett . Bittinger . Blunk . Braun . Clark . Cross . Dixon . DuBard . Fogleman . Franklin Graham . Hardy . Hemphill . Hill . Hopper . Howlett . Huff . James . Jones . McAllister . McCord Mainard . Marley . Pittman . Sanders Shrode . Simms . Stacy . Thompson . West . Wheeler . Woolwine . Wyatt Page 143 THE ARKANSAS BOOSTER CLUB To Them Goes Credit for the Spirit at Athletic Gatherings CAPLE . . . JONES . . . GREGSON . . . ROWLES . . . YANCEY • OFFICERS J. A. ROWLES WILLIAM YANCEY W. S. GREGSON . . President Vice-President . Treasurer • CHEER LEADERS • CHARLES CAPLE . . . HOWARD JONES . . . JAMES LESLIE • A. B. C. is a pep club for men on the Univer¬ sity of Arkansas campus. In addition to furnishing yell leaders and taking a leading part in pep at the games, the club arranges such things as details of the home¬ coming celebration, pep rallies, parades, etc. An¬ other duty members of A. B. C. have taken upon themselves is the regulation of the freshmen at all foot¬ ball games. Page 144 • ASSOCIATE MEMBERS • JOHN ANDERSON .... HARRY CRUMPLER .... BOB McCANN .... CLEM McCLELLAND_SIDNEY McMATH . . . . BYRON MORSE .... CHARLES WHITESIDE LINUS WILLIAMS • MEMBERS • HAROLD BARNES . . . CONDITT BARNETT . . . LEWIS BARRY . . . W. W. BATEMAN . . . MAHLON BESSER . . . GRAHAM BLACK . . . BOB BLACK . . . MILTON BRACK . . . JOHN BROWN . . . WILLIAM BROWN . . . PARKS BRUMLEY . . . PAUL CADE . . . J. C. CAMPBELL . . . L. J. CARROLL . . . DAVE DORFMANN . . . JAMES H. DUNN . . . REGINALD EILBOTT . . . CHARLES GARDNER . . . TOM GENTRY . . . IVAN GILLILAND . . . L. A. GRAHAM . . . JOHN HOLDEN . . . GORDON HOLCOMBE . . . MASTON JACKS . . . JOHN JERNIGAN . . . MAYNARD JOHNSON . . . FRANK KELLY . . . FRED KELLY . . . EWING KINKEAD ... M. R. KOLLSWICH . . . PAUL LATTURE . . . DON MAJORS . . . PAT McCAIN . . . JOHN McCONNELL ... ED McDONALD . . . REX MULLEN . . . JOHN NIVEN . . . COLEMAN NOLEN . . . ABE OKUR . . . KENNETH PARSLEY . . . LEROY POND . . . GEORGE ROBERTSON . . . TOM BILL ROGERS . . . VANCE SCURLOCK . . . BILL SHAW . . . OGDEN SHIRLEY . . . ROBERT SILLINS . . . RALPH SKINNER . . . OLEN SMITH ... PAT STOREY . . . PAUL SULLINS . . . HENRY TUCK . . . BURKETT WAMSLEY . . . JAMES WARTEN . . . CURTIS WATKINS . . . MERCER WOLFF . . . BERNARD YESSNER. • Anderson . Barnett . Barry . Bateman . Besser . G. Black R. Black . Brack . Brown . Brumley . Second Row Campbell . Caple . Carroll . Crumpler . Dorfman Dunn . Eilbott . Gardner . Gentry . Gilliland . Third Row . Graham . Holden . Jacks . Jernigan . Johnson Frank Kelly . Fred Kelly . Kinkead . Latture . Majors Fourth Row . Morse . Mullins . McCain . McCann McClelland . McMath . Niven . Nolen . Okum Parsley . Fifth Row . Pond . Robertson . Rogers Rowles . Scurlock . Shaw . Shirley . Sillins . Skinner Smith . Sixth Row . Storey . Sullins . Tuck . Wamsley Warten . Watkins . Williams . Wolfe . Yancey . Yessner Page 145 0 In the course of the past year two new buildings have been put into use by the University. The Vol Walker Memorial Library is the very latest in both architectural design and conven¬ ience. Few in the country may be said to be superior. The new Chemistry building contains every piece of equipment known to modern science, and at the present time houses all science depart¬ ments, with the exception of physics. With the addition of these two new buildings the school has shown a marked increase in en¬ rollment, with the prospect of even a larger increase in the next few years. A step forward in the building of a greater University of Arkansas. . . . Page 146 Ivy clad Carnall Hall, dormitory for Women, serenely graces the northern slope of the campus . TWWhA ' TV , i |N? % i Nfe - wwt " V 5r % yVfbMSSgm RpJ Rppj! faAtek ' :. A mfflm Mm •vJvVi ‘fi wbkJ %SLi BOOK number FIVE ORGAN IZATIONS SORORITY HOUSE MOTHERS . . . HELP MAKE GENTLEWOMEN OF WOMEN Their Cultural Teachings a Fine Feature of Coeducational Learning • Sorority girls are exceptionally fortunate in having such fine women as these to make their college life truly a means of higher education. Their assist¬ ance in adapting the young women to maturity and its problems cannot be undervalued. Aside from their spiritual and moral assistance they are a very practical aid in house management and business affairs. MRS. WALKER . . Pi Beta Phi MRS. SULLIVAN . . Kappa Kappa Gamma MRS. HILL . . . Zeta Tau Alpha MRS. FORD . . . Chi Omega MRS. NORBURY . . Delta Delta Delta MISS PEISEN . . . Delta Gamma MRS. SEALS . . . . . 4-H Club House MRS. BARNES . . Carnall Hall MRS. NORBURY.MRS. FORD.MRS. SEALS.MRS. WALKER.MISS PEISEN Page 149 THE PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL Through Their Arbitration the Women Greeks Keep Peace • OFFICERS • MAYHART STINSON .... President MAMIE OLIVE FOGLEMAN . . . Secretary LOUISE McCULLOCH .... Treasurer • The Pan-Hellenic Council is composed of two members from each sorority on the campus, and has general control over intersorority matters. Each year the council sponsors a vice-versa dance which proves to be one of the highlights of the social season. CAMPBELL Page 150 PAN-HELLENI C COUNCIL . • MEMBERS • MAYHART STINSON . jamesina McDaniel . LAURA SHRODE . MARY KATE GILMORE . ERLINE CAMPBELL . louise McCulloch . MARIANNA BUTTS . . WILLA GRACE HARDY . FRANCES PITTMAN . . BILLIE RUTH JAMES MAMIE OLIVE FOGLEMAN MIKE MAY . Chi Omega Chi Omega Delta Gamma Delta Gamma Pi Beta Phi Pi Beta Phi Kappa Kappa Gamma Kappa Kappa Gamma Delta Delta Delta Delta Delta Delta Zeta Tau Alpha Zeta Tau Alpha McDaniel PITTMAN JAMES HARDY BUTTS Page 151 Omega CHI OMEGA HOUSE • OFFICERS • MAYHART STINSON.President FRANCES HOLT.Vice-President MARGORY GREGORY .... Secretary ELIZABETH HUNT.Treasurer • • Chi Omega was organized at the University of Arkansas April 5, 1895, by Ina Mae Boles, Jobelle Holcombe, Alice Carey Simmonds, and Jeanne Marie • Vincenheller. They were assisted in planning their organization by Dr. Charles Richardson, Kappa Sigma, who, in consideration of this service, was made sole honorary member. There are at present eighty-seven active chapters and two inactive. The total membership is now about 16,000. The open declaration of Chi Omega is " Hellenic Culture and Christian Ideals. " Included in the pro¬ gram of the fraternity is the Service Fund, the income of which is used to publish special research studies in educational, social, scientific, or civic lines. Page 152 CHI OMEGA • MEMBERS • • MARY ALEXANDER . . . BETTY ALLIS . . . FRANCES BADGETT . . . RUTH BATEMAN . . . CORRINNE BATSON . . . KATHRYN BELL . . . MARY CORNELIA BERRY . . . JUDY BLACK . . . ANN KATHRYN BOGERT . . . ELAINE BRAUGH- TON . . . CORA BURTON . . . LOUISE BURTON . . . EUGENIA CALLAHAN . . . RUTH CHERRY . . . VIRGINIA COOPER . . . VIRGINIA CREEK- MOORE . . . MILDRED CROSS . . . BETTY SUE CUNNINGHAM . . . LAURA GENE CURL . . . MARY ELIZABETH EDMISTON . . . MARIE FEARING . . . JOSEPHINE FISHER . . . LUCILLE FRANK . . . MARY HELEN GARRISON . . . EDNA GIBSON . . . VIRGINIA GREENHAW . . . MARGORY GREGORY . . . ANETTE HARLEY . . . ELLA MAE HERREN . . . FRANCES HOLT . .. LYNN HOWLETT ... MARTHA HUMPHREYS . . . ELIZABETH HUNT . . . MARY GRAHAM HUNTER . . . BOBBY JONES . . . DORO¬ THY JOPLING . . . BETTY LEE LEATHERS . . . VIR¬ GINIA MAGRUDER . . . DOTTIE ANNE MAPES . . . BETH MAXWELL . . . MARY McCROSKEY . . . JAMESINA McDANIEL . . . CLIFTON McMICHAEL . . . HELEN MORGAN . . . MARY JETT ORTON . . . BARBARA PAYNE . . . ALLIE PICKELL . . . ANNE PICKENS . . . ANN PRITCHARD . . . ALICIA READ . . . VIRGINIA SAVAGE . . . ELAINE SMITH . . . VIOLA STEINLE . . . MAYHART STINSON . . . MARY JANE THOMPSON . . . ELSIJANE TRIMBLE . . . LUCILE WOODARD . . . RUTH YANCEY . . . JOSEPHINE YOUNG. Alexander . Allis . Badgett . Bateman . Batson . Bell . Berry . Black . Bogert . Braughton . C. Burton Second Row . L. Burton . Callahan . Cherry . Cooper . Creekmore . Cross . Cunningham . Curl . Edmiston Fearing . Fisher . Third Row . Frank . Garrison . Gibson . Greenhaw . Gregory . Harley . Herren . Holt Howlett . Humphreys . Hunt . Fourth Row . Hunter . Jones . Jopling . Leathers . Magruder . Mapes Maxwell . McCroskey . McDaniel . McMichael . Morgan . Orton . Payne . Fifth Row . Pickell . Pickens Pritchard . Read . Savage . Smith . Steinle . Stinson . Thompson . Trimble . Woodard . Yancey . Young Page 153 « Zeta Tau Alph-a ZETA TAU ALPHA HOUSE 0 COLORS 0 OFFICERS 0 TURQUOISE AND STEEL GRAY ELEANOR TRIMBLE . . . President • JOHNETTE HALEY . . . Vice-President MAMIE OLIVE FOSLEMAN . Secretary 0 FLOWER 0 DORIS FLEMING .... Treasurer WHITE VIOLET 0 Zeta Tau Alpha was founded as the Virginia State Alpha, Virginia State Normal School at Farm- ville, Virginia, October 15, 1898, and was chartered as a legal corporation by the legislature of Virginia March 18, 1902. Since the former date the frater¬ nity has expanded until it now has sixty-seven chap¬ ters in the United States and ' Canada. Government of the fraternity is vested in a grand chapter composed of five officers. The legislative government is vested in a convention. The frater¬ nity ' s central office is located at Chicago, Illinois. Chapters of Zeta Tau Alpha are grouped in twelve provinces, with a province president appointed over each. There is a scholarship loan fund, not neces¬ sarily limited to members of the fraternity. Epsilon chapter was established at the University of Arkansas on December 18, 1903, and was the second national women ' s fraternity on the campus. The local organization which petitioned Zeta Tau Alpha was named Delta Phi. Epsilon was the fourth established chapter of the fraternity. Page 154 ZET A TAU ALP HA • MEMBERS • MARGARET BELL ALICE CARPINTER ESTHER LANE CRUTCHER LOUISE DACUS DORIS FLEMING MAMIE OLIVE FOGLEMAN JOHNETTE HALEY ADELE HEERWAGEN MICHAEL MAY MARGARET McALLISTER MARY LOUISE OLIVER POLLY PARTIN ANN SIMMS ELEANOR TRIMBLE LEWISE WYATT Crutcher . Dacus . Fogleman Haley . May . McAllister Oliver . Partin . Simms Trimble . Wyatt • Page 155 PI BETA PHI HOUSE • OFFICERS • ERLINE CAMPBELL . . . . President MARGARGET JACOWAY . . Vice-President ARLINE LEETH. Secretary VIRGINIA ROBINSON .... Treasurer • Pi Befa Phi was founded in 1867 at Mon¬ mouth College, Monmouth, Illinois, and was the first organization of college women founded upon the prin¬ ciples and organized with the aims and policies of a national fraternity. It was originally called I. C. Sororis, but in I 888 the name was changed to Pi Beta Phi Frater¬ nity, and as such it is incorporated under the laws of the State of Illinois. The fraternity now has seventy- eight active chapters located in the leading colleges and universities of the United States and Canada. Pi Beta Phi has 144 chartered Alumnae Clubs. The total active membership of the fraternity is approxi¬ mately 19,000. The fraternity, by voluntary contributions of mem¬ bers and alumnae, maintains a Settlement School at Satlinburg, Tenn., established in 1912 as a memorial to the 12 founders of Pi Beta Phi. Situated on over one hundred acres of its own land in eight well- equipped buildings, the school offers work covering eleven grades. It has an enrollment of nearly 150 and a teaching staff of nine members. Total assets of the School are now $81,000. Arkansas Alpha Chapter of Pi Beta Phi was founded at the University of Arkansas in 1909. A new $40,000 home was completed in February of 1931. The pub¬ lication is " The Arrow. " Page 156 PI BETA PHI • MEMBERS • • MARGARET ANN AHLFELDT . . . BETTIE BARNES . . . MARGARET BRIGGS . . . CLARA BURLESON . . . ERLINE CAMPBELL . . . CAROLYN CHEEVES . . . ELIZABETH ANN CRAIG . . . MARY CUMMINGS . . . ROBERTA CUMMINGS . . . MILDRED DANFORTH . . . MARY CHEW DAW¬ SON . . . ANN DU BARD . . . ELIZABETH DUDLEY . . . SALLY DUDLEY . . . HELEN GILES . . . KATH¬ ERINE GILES . . . GLORIA GOOCH . . . MARY JEAN GRAY . . . ELIZABETH GRIFFITH . . . COILA HARDING . . . ALICE HENRY . . . VIRGINIA HINKLE . . . BEVERALY HOPPER . . . JESSAMINE HUFF . . . MARGARET JACOWAY . . . ALICE JONES . . . LOUETTA KENDRICK . . . TOLISE KIRK¬ PATRICK . . . KATHERINE LANGLEY . . . ARLINE LEETH . . . PATTY JO MAHONEY . . . JULIET MAYFIELD . . . MARY ALBERT MOORE . . . LOUISE McCULLOCH . . . BETTY McCURRY . . . LORINE NIMS . . . MARY LOUISE OAKES . . . JUSE PFEIFFER . . . MARTHA PILKINGTON . . . MAR¬ GUERITE RATCLIFF . . . RUBELLE ROARK . . . NAN ROBINSON . . . VIRGINIA ROBINSON . . . MARY FRANCES ROUW . . . GENEVIEVE SALEE . . . JUNE SAUNDERS . . . BEVERLY SHARP . . . SALANI SHERMAN . . . CATHERINE STEEL . . . BEULAH STONE . . . ISABEL STORMS . . . MARTHA WOOD .. . NADIA WOOD . .. MARVINE WRIGHT . . . RUTH WRIGHT . . . ELIZABETH YOES. Ahlfeldt . Barnes . Briggs . Burleson . Campbell . Second Row . Cheeves . Craig . M. Cummings . R. Cummings Dawson . Third Row . DuBard . E. Dudley . S. Dudley . H. Giles . K. Giles . Fourth Row . Gooch . Gray . Griffith Harding . Henry . Fifth Row . Hinkle . Hopper . Huff . Jaco- way . Jones . Sixth Row . Kendrick . Kirkpatrick . Langley Leeth . Mahoney . Seventh Row . Mayfield . Moore . Mc¬ Culloch . McCurry . Nims . Eighth Row . Oakes . Pfeiffer Pilkington . Ratcliff . Roark . Ninth Row . N. Robinson . V. Robinson . Salee . Saunders . Sharp . Sherman . Steel . Tenth Row . Stone. Storms . M. Wood . N.Wood . M. Wright . R. Wright . Yoes Page 157 Delta Delta Delta DELTA DELTA DELTA HOUSE • OFFICERS • FRANCES PITTMAN.President BILLIE RUTH JAMES . . . Vice-President JULIA BOWEN.Secretary MICKY SMITH.Treasurer • Delta Delta Delta was founded at Boston University, Thanksgiving Eve, 1888. The founders, Eleanor Dorcas Pond and Ida Shaw Martin, on that day associated with them twenty undergraduates and organized as a national sorority. The spirit of Delta Delta Delta has so been shared that there are now seventy-six college chapters and eighty alumnae chapters in the United States and Canada. Delta Delta Delta now numbers in its membership more than 15,000 women. The local chapter of Delta Delta Delta, Delta lota, was granted a charter November 15, 1913. The • COLORS • SILVER-SOLD-BLUE • • FLOWER • PANSY anniversary of the chapter is celebrated annually by the return of Tri Deltas from all parts of the state to the chapter house for the Delta banquet given on that day. • Delha Delta Delta sponsors three endowment funds, the National Endowment Fund, the Trident Endowment Fund, and the Visiting Endowment Fund. The sorority is now building up a Thanksgiving Endowment Fund which is to be used for altruistic purposes among college women to further higher education. The three publications of Delta Delta Delta are the Trireme, the Triglyth, and the Trident. Page 158 DELTA DELTA DELTA • MEMBERS • • WILMA JANE ALFORD.BEVERLY BERRY.LOU BLACK.JULIA BOWEN .MARIAN BRINSON.STUART BUTLER .MARGARET CONGER.FORREST DUTTON.DOROTHY FARLEY.BETTIE FRIEDELL.MERCEDES HINES.FRANCES HOLTZENDORF.MARJORI HUNT. BILLIE RUTH JAMES.EUGENIA JOHNSON .DAISY MAY JONES.ELOISE KINARD .BERNICE LICHTY.GRACE MARLEY .MILDRED McCANCE.ADENE McCOY .CHRISTINE McKISSACK.DOROTHY METCALFE.KATHERINE MILLER. BETTY MORGAN.IONE OTTE.JUNE PAUL.KATHERINE PERKINS.FRANCES PITTMAN.MICKY SMITH.HILDA STROUD.DONNA TOWNSEND.NAN TUGGLE.WILTON YANDELL. Alford . Berry . Black . Bowen . Brinson . Butler . Conger . Dutton . Second Row . Farley . Friedell Hines . Holtzendorf . Hunt . James . Johnson . Jones . Third Row . Kinard . Lichty . Marley . McCance McCoy . McKissack . Metcalfe . Miller . Fourth Row . Morgan . Otte . Paul . Perkins . Pittman . Smith Stroud . Townsend . Tuggle . Yandell Page 159 Kappa Kappa Gamma KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA HOUSE • OFFICERS 9 MARIANA BUTTS.President ALLENE HOLTON.Secretary WINIFRED BITTINGER .... Treasurer NANCY McDONALD . . . House Manager • COLORS • LIGHT AND DARK BLUE • FLOWER • FLEUR DE LIS • Kappa Kappa Gamma was founded at Mon¬ mouth College, Monmouth, Illinois, in March, 1870, but did not make its public appearance until October 13, 1870, the anniversary of which is celebrated as Founder ' s Day. There are seventy-two active chap¬ ters, nine inactive chapters, and one hundred seven¬ teen alumnae associations. The total membership is over 25,000. • The fraternity publishes a history, a quarterly maga¬ zine, " The Key, " a song book, and a catalogue of members. Kappa Kappa Gamma called the first National Pan-Hellenic Convention, in 1891. The Rose McGill Fund and the Student ' s Aid Fund are among the philanthropic funds sponsored by the fraternity. The latter, founded in 1902 as a memorial to the founders, now totals over $52,000 and is avail¬ able to any woman student in institutions where Kappa has a chapter. The fraternity is governed by the National Council. The Central Office is located in Columbus, Ohio. Province conventions are held every two years, alter¬ nating with the year of National C onvention. Page 160 KAPPA KAP • MEMBERS • CORINNE BEASLEY WINNIFRED BITTINGER MARIANA BUTTS MAE ELLEN DVORACHEK MAURINE EDMISTON WILLA GRACE HARDY NEVA HILL VIRGINIA HOLLOWAY ALLENE HOLTON JOSEPHINE KILLOUGH JESSIE MAE KITE MARY JIM LANE nancy McDonald ERNESTINE McLEMORE WANDA MILHOAN LENA MILLS NEWTON CORINNE PARKER RUTH PENROSE CONNIE POWELL EUGENIA STACY MARY ELIZABETH SWISHER EARLENE UPCHURCH IRENE YOUNG PA GAMMA Bittinger . Butts . Edmiston . Second Row . Hardy . Holloway Holton . Third Row . McDonald . Milhoan . Stacy . Beasley Fourth Row . Dvorachek . Hill . Killough . Kite . Fifth Row Lane . McLemore . Newton . Parker . Sixth Row . Penrose Swisher . Upchurch . Young Page 161 T T Delta Gamma DELTA GAMMA HOUSE • OFFICERS LAURA SHRODE.President ELEANOR SCOTT CLARK . . Vice-President MARGARETE SCHEID.Secretary BETTY HOOPER.Treasurer • COLORS • BRONZE, PINK AND BLUE • m FLOWER • CREAM ROSE Delta Gamma was founded at Lewis School, Oxford, Mississippi, on January 2, 1874. It was the first national women ' s fraternity to have its beginning in the South. There are forty-six active chapters, twelve inactive, and its membership is about 12,000. O Five editions of the catalogue have been published since 1888, five of the song books since 1895 (a sixth now ready for publication), and two histories since 1901. The journal is the " Anchor, " which has been published annually since 1884. A $50,000 student loan fund provides to assist worthwhile undergraduates. Delta Gamma ' s outstanding philanthropic work is the Delta Gamma Clinic in Marchienne, Belgium, which was established during the war. $28,000 was raised for the Belgian refugee children. Alpha Omega chapter was installed April 10, 1930, at the University of Arkansas. Page 162 DELTA • MEMBERS • • AMY GENE BARRON.MAXINE BARRON.SYDNEY BENNETT.RUTH LILLIAN BLAIR.MARTHA BRANCH. ANNABETH CAIN.ELEANOR SCOTT CLARK.RENNA CATHERINE FRANKLIN .JEANETTE FRENCH.MARY KATE GILMORE.LOUISE GLEASON.EMILY DALE GRAY.JEAN HEIDEN.PAULINE GAMMA HEMPHILL.BETTY HOOPER.LUCILE JAMES.MARGARET JAMES.COYE PEARCE.MARGARET ALICE PEASE. EDWINA PORTER.WINIFRED REITZ. SARABEL ROBERTS.KATHLYN ROBINSON .FRANCES ROSSNER.LESLIE JA NIE SAVAGE.MARGARETE SCHEID. LAURA SHRODE.VIRGINIA SLY. FRANCES WANTUCK.FRANCES WOFFORD ¥ Bennett . Blair . Branch . Cain . Clark . Franklin . French . Gleason . Gilmore . Heiden Hemphill . Hooper L. James . M. James . Pearce . Pease . Reitz . Roberts . Robinson . Rossner . Savage . Scheid . Shrode Sly . Wantuck . Wofford Page 163 £ The drawings of the houses in both the Fraternity and Sorority sections this year were made from photographs, and for any discrepancy that might occur in the actual appearance of any, the editors apologize. It is indeed a difficult task that the artist had in making them appear as they actually are, never having seen any of them. . . Page 164 HOUSEMOTHERS MAKE HOMES OF GREEKS ' HOUSES Grace and Counsel Provided by Chaperones Adds Much to Fraternity Value MRS. CATE . . . Alpha Gamma Rho MRS. SUTTON . . Alpha Lambda Tau MRS. LEMING . . . Kappa Alpha MRS. SMYER . . . Kappa Sigma MRS. SHERRILL . . Lambda Chi Alpha MRS. PAYNE . . Pi Kappa Alpha MRS. WHITE . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon MRS. CLARK . . Sigma Chi MRS. BASS . . . Sigma Phi Epsilon MISS BEDFORD . . Tau Epsilon Phi MRS. McRAE . . Theta Kappa Nu MRS. CARSON . . Kappa Nu University regulations require housemothers tor all fraternities. But the value of the resident chaperone system is so great that campus social groups would often rather lose their residences than lose the fine women who make those houses into college " homes. " These housemothers act in a personal ad¬ visory capacity to their young men; assist in house management; and supervise social functions. MRS. SMYER . . MRS. SHERRILL . . MRS. CARSON . . MRS. BASS . . MRS. CATE . . MRS. CLARK . . MRS. PAYNE . . MISS BEDFORD . . MRS. McRAE Page 165 INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL They Set All the Rules HOWARD W. LITTLE President • OFFICERS « HOWARD W. LITTLE WALTER BATEMAN PAUL SULLINS President Vice-President Secretary W. WALTER BATEMAN Vice-President $ The Interfratern¬ ity Council, composed of two members from each fraternity on the campus, has as its purpose the cre¬ ation of a closer harmony among the various fra¬ ternity groups and the solving of any interfra¬ ternity problems that may arise. This year the council sponsored a formal dance at the Women ' s Gym, which, under the direction of Little and Sullins, prov¬ ed to be quite successful. Page 166 INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL • MEMBERS • DAVID BOATRIGHT Sigma Alpha Epsilon WALTER BATEMAN Sigma Alpha Epsilon thomas McDaniel Alpha Gamma Rho RALPH WHITMORE Alpha Gamma Rho HOWARD HOLTHOFF Pi Kappa Alpha FRANK HOLT Pi Kappa Alpha JOHN HUDSPETH Lambda Chi Alpha PAUL SULLINS Lambda Chi Alpha clem McClelland Sigma Chi JOHN JERNIGAN Sigma Chi CHARLES JOSEPH Tau Epsilon Phi BERNARD YESNER Tau Epsilon Phi SMITH HENLEY Sigma Phi Epsilon BROWN RALLS YAUCH WILLIAM B. YAUCH Sigma Phi Epsilon BILL BROWN Theta Kappa Nu HARRY RALLS Theta Kappa Nu RAPLE ELLINGTON Alpha Lambda Tau L. A. GRAHAM Alpha Lambda Tau HOWARD LITTLE Kappa Sigma SIDNEY WHARTON Kappa Sigma BERNARD ZELNICK Kappa Nu ISAIH LEW Kappa Nu RUSSELL MYERS Kappa Alpha FRANCIS CHERRY Kappa Alpha McClelland . . Joseph . . YESSNER . . ZELNICK . . Sec¬ ond Row . LEW . . ELLINGTON . . GRAHAM . . WHARTON JERNIGAN MYERS CHERRY Page 167 KAPPA SIGMA Colors . . . Scarlet, White, and Green KAPPA SIGMA HOUSE • Kappa Sigma was founded at the University of Virginia, December 10, 1869, by William G. Mc¬ Cormick, George M. Arnold, Edmund Law Rogers, Jr., Frank C. Nicodemus, and John C. Boyd. From its very inception the founders intended that the order should spread, and become established in other schools over the country, but it was not until 1873 that the plans for expansion began to material¬ ize. Xi Chapter was established at the University of Ar¬ kansas in 1890, being the first fraternity to be estab¬ lished on this campus. During the time that fraterni¬ ties were barred from the Arkansas campus, this chap¬ ter existed as the Richardson Club, named after Dr. Charles Richardson, who was also a founder of Chi Omega. • OFFICERS • SIDNEY WHARTON.President ELMER KNOTT.Vice-President HOYT PURVIS.Secretary HOWARD W. LITTLE.Treasurer • IDENTIFICATION • ALLEN . . ANDERSON . . ARNOLD . . BENTON . . C. BROWN . . M. BROWN . . BRUMLEY . . BRUMMITT . . BURKE . . BUSTION . . BUTT . . Second Row CAMPBELL . . CHUNN . . COLEMAN . . CRUMPLER . . DOUGHTERY . . DUNN . . J. ELDRIDGE . . R. ELDRIDGE . . FALLS . . GANTT . . GARDNER . . Third Row: GELLY . . GUICE . . GUNN . . HAWKINS . . HINTON . . E. T. HORNOR . . J. T. HORNOR . . J. HORNOR . . HUDSON . . JEFFRIES . . JOHNSON . . Fourth Row: KNOTT . . LITTLE . . MARINONI . . MARK . . MEYER . . MILLER . . McGILL . . NEINSTEDT . . NISBET . . PHILLIPS . . PURVIS. O P D © O © O O P O O .OteD fTj ikJGL jfk © a p. p ZAtiL P P. © © o o Le. o © O Cj c , S4 pf Page 168 KAPPA SIGMA Flower . . . Lily of the Valley • MEMBERS • • A. D. ALLEN.JOHN ANDERSON CLIFTON ARNOLD .... JAMES BENTON . . . . W. R . BENTON.CARTER BROWN.MARION BROWN.PARKS BRUMLEY.FRANK BRUMMITT.GOVAN BURKE.PAUL BUSTION.JOE BUTT.J. C. CAMPBELL ELLSWORTH CHUNN.JACK COLEMAN HARRY CRUMPLER . . . W. H. CUSHMAN . . .ORD DOUGHTERY.WILLIAM DUNN.JOHN ELDRIDGE.ROLFE ELDRIDGE.WILSON FALLS.WILLIAM GANTT.CHARLES GARDNER.ROBERT GELLY.ALBERT GUICE.JOHN GUNN.WILLIAM HAWKINS.CHARLES HINTON.TULLY HORNOR.JAMES T. HORNOR.JOHN HORNOR.WALTER HUDSON.ELROD JEFFRIES.EVERETT JOHNSON.ELMER r I M JS4 Jr A o a i.o M IIP fx a ex A ' rJk Y a es es : o Jk Va- L a Jr k£k Riddler . Rouse . Schmelzer . Shackleford . Sims Second Row . Smith . Storey . Strauss . Stroud farleton . Third Row . Thompson . Trimble . Wall Wallis . Walls . Fourth Row . C. Watkins . M. Watkins Waugh . Wells . Wharton . Whiteside KNOTT.HOWARD LITTLE.PAUL MARINONI .... PHILIP MARK .... CHARLES MEYER.GLENN MILLER.ERNEST McDonald .... albert McGill_richard NEINSTEDT . . ROBERT NEINSTEDT . . ALEXANDER NISBET.WILLIAM PHILLIPS.HOYT PURVIS.JOHN RIDDLER.DUDLEY ROUSE.CHOICE RUCKER.JOE SCHMELZER.LOUIS SCHACKLEFORD WILLIAM SCALES.GAY SIMS.ROBERT D. SMITH.WILLIAM STOREY.JAMES STRAUSS . . . CHARLES TARLETON . . . WILKINS THOMPSON_THOMAS TRIMBLE_BRYANT WALL_THOMAS WALLIS .... JACK WALLS CURTIS WATKINS.MAX WATKINS. RICHARD WAUGH .... ARTHUR WELLS SIDNEY WHARTON.CHARLES WHITESIDE. Page 169 SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON Colors . . . Purple and Gold • OFFICERS • DAVID BOATRIGHT ..... President JAMES FONTAINE .... Vice-President I HOMAS ASHCRAFi ..... Secretary JAMES MERRICK.Treasurer SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON HOUSE • Sigma Alpha Epsilon was founded in 1856 at the University of Alabama, by eight students of the University who had become intimate friends. During its early years it remained in the South, the first chap¬ ter north of the Mason and Dixon line being established shortly before the Civil War. At present there are one hundred and eight active chapters, and a total initiated membership of over 37,000. There are one hundred and five alumni asso¬ ciations in America and abroad. TS O i O O National headquarters are maintained at Evanston, Illinois. Publications are fraternity histories, director¬ ies, secret publications, and the periodical magazine, " THE RECORD”. Arkansas Upsilon was established at the University of Arkansas in 1894, with a chapter enrollment of sev¬ enteen. Ash . Ashcraft . H. Bateman . W. Bateman . Bissell Second Row . Boatright . Bond . Bourland . Brooks Buford . Third Row . Burton . Byrd . Campbell Currie . Davis Page 170 SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON Flower . . . Violet • MEMBERS • • SAM ASH.THOMAS ASHCRAFT .HENRY BATEMAN.WALTER BATEMAN.BRUCE BISSELL.DAVID BOATRIGHT.SIDNEY BOND.JAMES BOURLAND.WILL IAM BROOKS. CLAUD BUFORD.PERCY BURTON. JIMMIE BYRD.WILLIAM CAMPBELL. JACK CURRIE.JACK DAVIS.LADD DAVIES.JIM DEW.JOHN DIFFEY .JOHN DODSON.MEREDITH DODSON.W. H. DVORACHEK. JAMES FONTAINE.JOHN GAUTNEY. Pilf-- j P V L jr. a o y a 1 A .... Ja p a m ■ a C| p SUtL, C: , ?a» v JtM p p Davies . Dew . Diffey . J. Dodson . M. Dodson Sacond Row . Dvorachek . Ellis . Fontaine . Gautney Greening . Third Row . Guard . Hart . Haven . Kelley J. Leatherman . Fourth Row . L. Leatherman . W. A. Lewis . W. M. Lewis . Makris . Merrick . Fifth Row Moody . Moore . Morse . McClain . McMath Norman . Norton . Patton Posey . Rand . Rhodes . Russell . Somers . Second Row . Townsend . Trimble . Velvin . Ward . Williams Third Row . C. Wilson . F. Wilson . Wooten . Wright Wynne O. L. GREENING.JAMES GUARD. JERRY HART.LOUIS HAVEN.LARRY KELLEY.JAMES LEATHERMAN. LELAND LEATHERMAN .... W. A. LEWIS .... W. N. LEWIS.GEORGE MAKRIS. JAMES MERRICK.MAX MOODY. JOHNSON MOORE.BYRON MORSE. BILL McCLEAN.SIDNEY McMATH. J. F. NORMAN.NATHAN NORTON. WILLIAM PATTON.BENJAMIN POSEY .BEN RAND.WALTER CLYDE RHODES.SAM RUSSELL.BILL SOMERS.WILLIS TOWNSEND. BRADLEY TRIMBLE.ROBERT VELVIN. CLAUDE WARD.H. L. WILLIAMS. CLAUDE WILSON .... FRANCIS WILSON .... CHARLES WOOTEN, JR.EDWIN WRIGHT .THOMAS WYNNE. a Cj T . m m • Cs £ to — El V y a 1 a Page 171 KAPPA ALPHA Colors . . . Crimson and Gold KAPPA ALPHA HOUSE Kappa Alpha was founded at Washington and Lee University, December 21, 1865. The South was just emerging from the Civil War, and four stu¬ dents of what was then Washington College banded together to start a movement to foster and maintain the manners, customs, and ideals of the Southern people. They looked to Robert E. Lee, who was at that time President of Washington College, as their ideal. Kappa Alpha has confined itself to the South. There are sixty-seven chapters located in the principal colleges and universities of the South. Alpha Omi- cron was established at the University of Arkansas April 27, 1895. Before binding itself to the national fraternity, it was a local fraternity of ten men. The Kappa Alpha Order is organized into seven provinces and these officiated over by Province Com¬ manders, Secretaries, and Alumni Historians. Over these provinces are a Knight Commander, a Grand Purser, a Grand Historian, and a Chief Alumnus. Professor Allan S. Humphreys, a member of the local chapter is now serving as Grand Purser. Official publications are the Kappa Alpha Journal, the Special Messenger, Directory, and the Kappa Alpha Song Book. • OFFICERS • FRANCIS CHERRY.President BOBBY RHODES.Vice-President NORMAN NAIL.Secretary RUSSELL MYERS.Treasurer » Cl w 0Stk im. c n | ' ir; Barron . B. Borden . G. Borden . Bowen . Carroll . Chase Page 172 KAPPA Flower . . ALPHA . Magnolia Cherry . Goss . Halsell . Hill . Johnson . Kreuter Lindsey . Little . Myers . McCann . J. Rhodes . R. Rhodes . Rogers . Sloan . Smith . Twedell . Ward Wildy • MEMBERS • MAX BARRON HAROLD BEASLEY BEN BORDEN GAIL BORDEN ALFRED BOWEN L. J. CARROLL T. GEORGE CHASE FRANCIS CHERRY PAUL GOSS HENRY HALSELL GEORGE HILL HARRY JOHNSON ADAM KREUTER CHARLES LINDSEY CLAYTON LITTLE BOB McCANN RICHARD McCORMICK ed McDonald RUSSELL MYERS NORMAN NAIL JIM RHODES ROBERT RHODES TOM DAN ROGERS DWIGHT SLOAN OLAN SMITH MILTON TWEDELL E. B. WARD EARL WILDY Page 173 PI KAPPA ALPHA Colors . . . Garnet and Gold PI KAPPA ALPHA HOUSE • Pi Kappa Alpha was founded at the Univer¬ sity of Virginia, March I, 1898, by Frederick South- gate Taylor, Littleton Waller Tazewell, Julian Edward Wood, Robert Norward, James Benjamin Sclater, and William Alexander. At first the fraternity was con¬ fined to the South, but later began to expand to larger institutions throughout the country. At present the fraternity numbers seventy-nine active chapters, and has numerous active alumni chap¬ ters over the United States. A. Adams . . R. Adams . Ashley . Arthurs . Barnes Brack . Campbell . Cannon • OFFICERS HOWARD HOLTHOFF .... President GOAH S. BARNES .... Vice-President MILTON BRACK.Secretary JESSE FERGUSON.Treasurer Alpha Zeta was chartered at the University of Arkansas November 2, 1904, there being ten charter members. The chapter was established early in the year of 1905, being the first chapter to be estab¬ lished west of the Mississippi. The Shield and Diamond, the official publication, is issued five times a year, containing news from all the chapters, and topics of fraternity interest. The secret publication of the fraternity is the Dagger and Key. Page 174 PI KAPPA ALPHA Flower . . . Lily of the Valley © MEMBERS • © ARNOLD ADAMS.BOB ADAMS .ROYCE ARTHURS.GROVER ASHLEY, JR.HUBERT ASHLEY ... . GOAH BARNES.MILTON BRACK. CLAYTON CAMPBELL.JOE CANNON .JAMES CHAMBERS.JOE COE .PHILLIP CULLEN.JACK CURRY .JESSE FERGUSON.FALON FRALEY .HARVEY GRIFFIN.DENNIE HAYS .HARLAN HOLT.FRANK HOLT .HOWARD HOLTOFF.W. A. HOR¬ TON .CHARLES JOURDAIN.PAUL JOHNSON.C. HARRISON KUNZ. DICK LANCASTER.GUY LEHN. DON LOCKARD.HENRY MULLIS. DALE NEWLIN.CRAWFORD NORMAN .WILLIAM PENROSE.LAWRENCE PIERCE.ED PLUMMER.GILBERT PRINCE.LONNIE ROARK.CHARLES ROBERTS.TOM W. ROGERS. VANCE SCURLOCK.HARRELL SIMPSON .GLENN SMITH.JAMES STEWART .BOB STOUT.HAROLD WARD. JAMES WARTEN.ORVILLE WHITE. JAMES WILLCOXEN.JACK WILLIAMSON. Top Row . Cullen . Curry . Ferguson Second Row . Kunz . Lancaster . Lehn Bottom Row . Rogers . Scurlock . Simpson Fraley . Griffin . F. Holt . H. Holt . Holthoff . Horton . Jourdain Lockard . Newlin . Pierce . Plummer . Prince . Roark . Roberts Smith . Stewart . Stout . Warten . White . Willcoxen . Williamson s» o ■ ! $±JfM F $ » ' Page 175 SIGMA CHI Colors . . . Blue and Old Gold • OFFICERS • CLEM McCLELLAND.President EVERETT HARRIS.Vice-President BILL BROWN.Secretary GEORGE WITTENBURG .... Treasurer SIGMA CHI HOUSE • The Sigma Chi fraternity was founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, June 28, 1855, by Thomas C. Bell, James P. Caldwell, F. H. Lockwood, who, with the exception of the latter, had been mem¬ bers of Kappa Chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon. Sigma Chi was the nineteenth college fraternity to be ■ », m r, m . .A p rM j kk JtJ? fS V 0 cs • f 5% ' V- o o JSL J ▲ Ayres . Barnett . Belt . Branch . Second Row . Bobbitt Brown . Burleson . Caple . Third Row . G. Carter L. Carter . Cassard . Cazort founded, and the third to be founded at Miami Uni¬ versity, the other two being Beta Theta Pi and Phi Delta Theta, which with Sigma Chi form the Miami Triad. The fraternity was first announced as Sigma Phi, but in 1856 the name was changed to Sigma Chi, due to the fact that the ritual and records of the chapter were stolen, and that there existed at that time an eastern fraternity known as Sigma Phi. The fraternity was carried on during the Civil war by a very unique group, the Constantine Chapter, which was composed of seven Sigma Chi ' s who were in the Confederate Army. Its purpose was to per¬ petuate the fraternity in the South, regardless of the outcome of the war. Sigma Chi was the first Greek- Ietter fraternity to adopt a private publication, which was established in 1877. Sigma Chi consists of 91 active chapters, and 20 inactive. Two of the chapters are in Canada. The official publication is the Magazine of Sigma Chi. Page 176 SIGMA CHI Flower . . . White Rose • MEMBERS • • RICHARD AYRES.CONDITT BAR¬ NETT .BILL BELT.LAWSON BOBBITT .JOHN BRANCH.BILL BROWN .GLEN BURLESON.CHARLES CAPLE _GEORGE CARTER.LAUREN CARTER .HOWARD CASSARD.LEE CAZORT .JOHN CHESTER.JOE DAVIS. KENNEDY DEAVER.ALLEN DELANEY. BOB DeVINNA.DWIGHT DIXON. Chester . Davis . Deaver . DeLaney . Second Row DeVinna . Gladden . Greer . Hamp . Third Row Harbert . E. Harris . Hearne . Hill . G. Holmes . H. Holmes . Fourth Row . P. K. Holmes . Hurlburt . Jernigan Johnson . Koerner . Lincoln . Fifth Row . Morris McCabe . McClelland . Norman . Ponder . Randall • Roberts . Ross . Rudolph . Seay . Second Row . Smith Sprigg . Suggs . Vaughan . Third Row . Wamsley Williams . Witt . Wittenberg HOWARD GLADDEN.LESLIE GRADY. HOMER GREER.ROBERT HAMP. BERNIE HARBERT.EVERETT HARRIS. ROGER HARTMAN.FRANK HEARNE. ED HILL.GLENN HOLMES.HARLAN HOLMES.P. K. HOLMES.CLARENCE HURLBURT.JOHN JERNIGAN. ASHLEY JOHNSON.GUS KOERNER. JACK McCABE.CLEM McCLELLAND. BILLY MORRIS.HENRY NORMAN. ANDREW PONDER.WILMER RANDALL .ODUS ROBERTS.THOMAS ROSS .LEIGHTON RUDOLPH.JIMMY SEAY .GORDON SMITH.RALPH SPRIGG .SONNY SUGGS ..... BURKETT WAMSLEY .LINUS WILLIAMS.JOHNSON WITT .GEORGE WITTENBERG.S. I. WOOD .ROBERT VAUGHAN. O Cj Page 177 SIGMA Colors PHI EPSILON . . . Purple and Red SIGMA PHI EPSILON HOUSE ® Sigma Phi Epsilon was founded at Richmond College (now the University of Richmond), Richmond, Virginia, in November, 1901. The basis of the or¬ ganization was a society called the Saturday Night Club. One of the features of the fraternity is the financial plan. Concerning this, Baird ' s Manual says: " In 1916 the Purdue Chapter surrendered all its property to the alumni who devised a plan of operation since copyrighted by the fraternity as the Purdue Plan and now known as the " Sigma Phi Epsilon Plan of Finance. " Under this plan financial affairs of the chapter are entirely in the hands of the alumni, the inexperienced undergraduate being relieved of this burden, and so left free to devote all time to fraternal matters. The plan which worked so successfully at Purdue has been installed in all the chapters. " Arkansas Alpha chapter was installed at the Uni¬ versity of Arkansas in 1907. The publication of the order is the Sigma Phi Epsilon Journal, published monthly. • OFFICERS • WILLIAM B. YAUCH.President J. SMITH HENLEY .... Vice-President KENNETH M. PARSLEY .... Secretary MURRAY BYLANDER.Treasurer Black . Bond . Brown . Second Row . Bylander . Elliot Faulkner . Gilbert Page 178 SIGMA PHI EPSILON Flower . . . Violet and American Beauty Rose Holden . Jones . Lindsey . Second Row . L. Milner R. Milner . McCain . Third Row . Owen . Parsley Rundell . Fourth Row . Shirley . Starnes . Watson Fifth Row . Wheeler . Wilson . Yauch • MEMBERS • MILBURN ADAIR ROBERT BLACK HOWARD BOND DAVID BROWN JAMES BUMPASS MURRAY BYLANDER DALE ELLIOTT N. B. FAULKNER JACK FIELDS GEORGE B. GHOLSON CHARLES GILBERT JOHN HOLDEN J. SMITH HENLEY MITCHELL JOHNS ROBERT L. JOHNSON J. MACK JONES WILLIAM A. LINDSEY OSCAR LYMPUS LEROY MILNER ROBERT MILNER PATRICK D. McCAIN WALDON McCOLLUM JOHN A. OWENS KENNETH M. PARSLEY WILLIAM R. RUNDELL OGDEN SHIRLEY JACK T. STARNES ORRIS WATSON GARLAND WHEELER A. L. WILSON WILLIAM B. YAUCH Page 179 LAMBDA CHI ALPHA Colors . . . Purple, Green, and Gold OFFICERS • PAUL SULLINS.President VINCENT NARISI.Vice-President ALLEN MARK.Secretary OREN STEPHENS.Treasurer • Lambda Chi Alpha, an international frater¬ nity with eighty-two active chapters and two inactive, was an outgrowth of a social club at Boston Univer¬ sity known as the Cosmopolitan Law Club. Since its founding in 1909 Lambda Chi Alpha has expanded m g c o ft ft w ft k r i. ' r . ■ f me- ft Oi f Bell . Black . Braswell . Brooks . Second Row . A. Brown . J. Brown . Cole . Conner . Third Row . Flocks Gregory . Hardwick . Hudspeth LAMBDA CHI ALPHA HOUSE until it has a wide distribution of chapters at major universities throughout the United States and Canada. Administration offices of the general fraternity are in Indianapolis, where a full-time administrative secre¬ tary and his staff are located. Two full-time traveling secretaries and a special service secretary make chap¬ ter visitations at least twice yearly. Lambda Chi has been cited by the national interfraternity conference as the fraternity initiating more men annually than any other; as the fraternity having the greatest num¬ ber of active chapters; and as having never been be¬ low fourth among the larger fraternities in scholastic standing. Gamma Chi Zeta was chartered at the University of Arkansas in 1925, after acceptance of a petition submitted by the local social organization of Theta Phi Delta. General fraternity publications include " The Cross and Crescent, " monthly magazine, " The Delta Pi, " secret publication, the " Expositor, " the Pledge Training manual, the Song Book, and the Fraternity directory. Page 180 LAMBDA CHI ALPHA Flower . . . Violet • MEMBERS • • H. C. BAKER.FRANEL BARBARICK .BAILEY E. BELL.CHARLES O. BELL .ED BELL.GRAHAM BLACK. THOMAS B. BLACKWELL.J. D. BRAS¬ WELL .SAM BROOKS.ART BROWN .JACK M. BROWN.JUDGE CHAP¬ MAN .PAUL COLE.HAL CONNER .BOBBY FLOCKS.ERNIS GREGORY .RAYMOND HARDWICK.JOHN HENRY HUDSPETH.GEO RGE THOMAS JOHNSON.JOHN KANE.FRANK KELLY.FRED KELLY.GEORGE KERR .EARL KING.JOHN KING. JOHN LIVINGSTON.WILLIAM H. MAPES, JR.ALLEN MARK.LLOYD MONT¬ GOMERY .WALLACE MURPHY. Johnson . Frank Kelly . Fred Kelly . Kerr . Second Row King . Mapes . Mark . Montgomery . Third Row Murphy . McCanne . Narisi . Niven JOHN McCANNE.JOHN A. McCONNELL .VINCENT J. NARISI.JOHN NIVEN .HUGH C. NOLEN.CHARLES J. OLSON.TOMMIE PHILBECK.RICH- fa. o ' ik . 4 9% ' • ' ' • JS ji fl £ - O Cj. Nolen . Olson . Philbeck . Pond . Second Row . Rowles Shelby . Skinner . Stephens . Third Row . Sullins . Tapp Tucker . Yancey ARD LEROY POND.HOWARD RIDLEY .J. A. ROWLES.ART SALISBURY .RALPH D. SKINNER.OREN M. STEPHENS.PAUL SULLINS.SAM SWEARINGEN.RALPH TAPP.JUSTIN TUCKER.WESLEY WHITAKER. CECIL WIGHT.BILL YANCEY. Page 181 THETA KAPPA NU Colors . . . Argent, Sable, and Crimson THETA KAPPA NU HOUSE • Theta Kappa Nu was organized at Drury College at Springfield, Missouri, October II, 1924. At that time eight old established locals and a small national of three chapters assumed the same obliga¬ tions. Theta Kappa Nu, then, is unique in having no mother chapter; however, there are chapters in Theta Kappa Nu that date back to 1867. • OFFICERS O MASTON JACKS.President GEORGE SANSBURY .... Vice-President MAINARD JOHNSON .... Secretary WILLIAM BROWNE ..... Treasurer There are fifty-five chapters of Theta Kappa Nu. Arkansas Alpha was established in 1926 upon accep¬ tance of a petition submitted by the local organiza¬ tion, Tau Alpha Pi. Theta Kappa Nu stresses scholarship, morality, and good will. Barton . William Browne . Warren Brown . Champion Edson . Finley . Fitch . Hord . Jacks . Johnson f " 1 O- o a I 19 7 % r § Page 182 CO THETA KAPPA NU Flower . . . White Rose • MEMBERS O JACK BALLARD CURTIS BARTON WELLESBY BENTON WARREN BROWN WILLIAM BROWN JESS CHAMPION JAMES EDSON JOHN FINLEY THAD FITCH JERRY HORD MASTON JACKS MAYNARD JOHNSON LOUIS KAPPA EWING KINKEAD DUDLEY MAYS NED MOSELY FRED MULLEN ROBERT McLAIN WILLIAM PARKS EDWARD PEEBLES ROBERT PETTYJOHN HARRY RALLS DALE SANDLIN GEORGE SANSBURY EARL SAUNDERS DELBERT SCHMAND JOHN SCHEROFSKI DALE SMITH JAMES STARBIRD PAT STOREY HERMAN TEETER WILLIAM TERRELL WILLIAM THOMPSON WAYNE TILMON CLYDE TREECE JACK WAGONER LEE WHITTAKER BRUCE WILCOX, JR. ROBERT WILLIAMS HENRY WILLIAMS LLOYD WOODELL inkead tarbird Mays . Mosely . Mullen . Pettyjohn . Ralls . Sandlin . Sansbury . Saunders . Schmand . Smith Storey . Teeter . Terrell . Tilmon . Wagoner . Wilcox . R. Williams . Woodell . H. Williams Page 183 ALPHA LAMBDA TAU Colors . . . Gold and Black • OFFICERS • MAURICE LEE.President PAUL VAN DALSEM .... Vice-President LEROY TYSON.Secretary PAT SODBY.Treasurer ALPHA LAMBDA TAU HOUSE Alpha Lambda Tau was founded at Ogle¬ thorpe University, October 8, 1916, the first national organization on the campus. The prime motive of the founding was the desire to have a new frater¬ nity grow with a new university. For ten years there was an unconfirmed opinion among the members that the fraternity was to be forever confined to the South. Billingsley . Chapman . Cloninger . Second Row . Cragar Dunn . Ellington Several years ago, however, this subject was discussed in convention and repudiated. Since then the lone northern chapter has been established at the Uni¬ versity of Illinois. The fraternity was founded to be a national organization, and, although expansion has been extremely slow, a national survey has been car¬ ried out through the Central Office during the past few years. The fraternity issues a quarterly known as the Rose Leaf, and a monthly esoteric publication, known as The Alt. The first named, during the early years of the fraternity, was issued irregularly, but in recent years has been published regularly. Page 184 ALPHA LAMBDA TAU Flower . . . American Beauty Rose • MEMBERS 9 LINDSEY BILLINGSEY CHARLES CHAPMAN CLYDE CLONINGER JOHN CRAGAR WILLIAM DODSON Ennis . Graham . Head . Second Row . Hutchison Ibison . Moore . Third Row . Oswalt . Price . Van Dalsem . Fourth Row . Wilson . Woods JAMES DUNN RAPLE ELLINGTON CHARLES ENNIS W. N. GODBY L. A. GRAHAM WYLIE HEAD JOHN HUTCHISON LOUIE IBISON MAURICE LEE THORNTON MOORE JOHN OSWALT ROBERT PRICE H ARVEY SAUNDERS LEROY TYSON W. P. VAN DALSEM KERMIT WALTERS E. B. WILSON HERBERT WOODS Page 185 ALPHA GAMMA RHO Colors . . . Green and Gold ALPHA GAMMA RHO HOUSE • Alpha Gamma Rho was founded at the Uni¬ versity of Illinois, April 4, 1908, by eight students in the College of Agriculture. The purpose of the frater¬ nity is to promote a wider acquaintance and a broader outlook on the part of agricultural men through fel¬ lowship in a national organization that stands for the best social, mental, and moral development. At present the fraternity numbers thirty-three active chapters, and numerous active alumni chapters scattered throughout the United States. Alpha lota Chapter at the University of Arkansas was chartered April 29, 1934, there being twenty-five charter members. Previous to this time the chapter existed as a local A. G. R. Club. • • OFFICERS • THOMAS McDANIEL.President ARIE RUSSELL.Vice-President MARVIN R. CARTER.Secretary RALPH G. WHITMORE .... Treasurer I % r 1 A O W ' O ' , j f, ■ % “ as If A A " ) Baber . Bateman . Brewer . Second Row . J. L. Brown J. H. Brown . Carter . Third Row . Dennington . Denton Edwards . Eidson Page 186 ALPHA GAMMA RHO Flower . . . Pink Rose O 10,1 p sM ' n c ! ’ " ■ © • " r ,T £3% jo ,3 c D .O A-k 3L f Q D ; Oj O o ) o ■ - . a : 1LiJ E. Gilliland . I. Gilliland . Goforth . Gregory . Second Row . Hankins . C. Hansen . E. Hansen . Hazelbaker Third Row . Ingrum . Latture . Mainard . Martin Fourth Row . McDaniel . McKenzie . Nichels . Olive Fifth Row . Price . Rains . Rickett . Robertson . Sixth Row . Robinson . Russell . Saugey . Silvey . Seventh Row . Schroeder . Shaw . Smith . Streeter . Eighth Row . Walters . West . Westbrook . Whitmore • MEMBERS • © ROBERT ALDRIDGE.TRUMAN BABER.DAVID BATEMAN.THAD BREWER.JAMES BROWN.JOHN BROWN.MARVIN R. CARTER. KEITH DAMPF.JOE DENNINGTON. WILLIAM DENTON.GUS EIDSON. EMMETT EDWARDS.ELWIN GILLILAND .IVAN GILLILAND.LOWELL GO¬ FORTH .ELMER GREGORY.CECIL HANKINS.CLAY HANSEN.ETHAN HANSEN.OSCAR HAZELBAKER. KEITH HURLEY.DAN INGRUM. ELWIN KAY.PAUL LATTURE. HOWARD MAINARD.FRED MARTIN. thomas McDaniel.bob McKenzie. WOODROW NICKELS.FLOYD OLIVE. BURKS PRICE .... FRED CHARLES RAINS CYRIL RICKETT.GEORGE ROBERTSON .FREEMAN ROBINSON.ARIE RUS¬ SELL .CHARLES SAUGEY.WILLIAM SCHROEDER.WILLIAM SHAW. THOMAS SILVEY.CLIFFORD SMITH. ARVIL STAFFORD.T. L. STREETER. THURMAN WALTERS.MAX WEIR. COLE WESTBROOK.RALPH G. WHIT¬ MORE ..... Page 187 KAPPA NU Colors . . . Purple and White • OFFICERS • BERNARD ZELNICK.President EDDIE JERUS.Vice-President VICTOR DIDINSKY.Secretary MAURICE KREGSTEIN .... Treasurer Batterman . Bernstein . Cohen . Second Row . Denenberg Didinsky . Feder . Third Row . Feinman . Frey . Jeruss Fourth Row . Kanner . Knyper . Kolchinsky KAPPA NU HOUSE • Kappa Nu was founded at the University of Rochester, November II, 191 I, by six men who had as their ideals Cooperation, Unity, Brotherhood and Altruism. The organization due to a policy of internal strengthening, expanded slowly, until at the present time it has twenty chapters, situated throughout the United States. The government of the fraternity is vested in an executive committee and a judicial committee, con¬ sisting of graduate members, delegates from each chapter, and the National Officers. The National headquarters are maintained at Rochester, New York. Publications of the fraternity are: The Kappa Nu, The Reporter, the Kappa Nu Song Book, and the Directory. Upsilon Chapter was established at the University of Arkansas in 1931. Thus Kappa Nu brings to Ar¬ kansas the first national Jewish fraternity. The chap¬ ter previously existed as the Phi Epsilon local frater¬ nity which was organized in 1930. Page 188 KAPPA NU Flower . . . Pink Carnation • MEMBERS • SIDNEY BATTERMAN HOWARD BERNSTEIN SAM COHEN AARON DENENBERG VICTOR DIDINSKY Kregstein . Levine . Lew . Second Row . Maisel Marcus . Mark . Third Row . Matt . Okum . Reisenberg Fourth Row . Sankin . Schwalbe . Sillins . Fifth Row Wolfgang . Zelnick . Zinn . Zouderer ANDREW FEINMAN SAUL FEDER IRVING FREY EDWARD JERUSS THEODORE KANNER JACK KOLCHINSKY AARON KNYPER MOE KREGSTEIN MAX LEVINE ISAIH LEW WILLIAM MAISEL MORTIMER MARK ARTHUR MARCUS BENJAMIN MATT ABE OKUN NATHANIEL PRICE MANNIE REISENBERG JULIUS SANKIN JULIAN SCHWALBE ROBERT SILLINS BENJAMIN WOLFGANG HAROLD ZINN BERNARD ZELNICK HERMAN ZOUDERER Page 189 TAU EPSILON PHI Colors . . . Lavender and White TAU EPSILON PHI HOUSE • • Tau Epsilon Phi was founded at Columbia University October 19, 1910, by Israel Schwartz, Leo H. Fried, Julius J. Slofkin, Harry Goldsmith, Julius Klauber, Robert Plume, Julius M. Breitenbach, Ephraim Freedman, and Charles M. Driesen. It was originally founded as a professional fraternity, but the addition of the chapter at Cornell changed the organization to that of a national collegiate fraternity. At the present the fraternity numbers thirty-three chapters, and has numerous alumni chapters scattered throughout the United States. Tau Kappa Chapter was established at the Uni¬ versity of Arkansas April 29, 1932. The charter mem¬ bers were Harold Schwartz, Mac L. Levine, Moe Ushkow, Norman Riskin, Abe Alper, Abram O. Kap¬ lan, Marvin Grossman, Reuben Yontef, and four alum- Besser . Dorfman . Second Row . Ellman . Faden • OFFICERS • CHARLES E. JOSEPH.President DAVID M. DORFMAN . . . Vice-President SIDNEY F. FADEN.Secretary GEORGE GOLDSTEIN .... Treasurer • ni, Morris Rosenberg, Benjamin Miller, Leo Schwartz, and Maurice Gershman. The official publications are the Plume, published quarterly, and the Bulletin, also a quarterly, but which is distributed only to members. Page 190 TAU EPSILON PHI Flower . . . White Rose • MEMBERS • MAHLON G. BESSER DAVID M. DORFMAN SEYMOUR ETTMAN SIDNEY F. FADEN SAMUEL J. FELLER GEORGE GOLDSTEIN RAYMOND GREENBERG LEONARD HEMPLING CHARLES E. JOSEPH JOSEPH SALZBERG JOSEPH D. SHAY JEFFERSON D. STEINHART BERNARD YESNER MILTON J. ZISES Feller . Goldstein . Greenberg . Hempling . Joseph . Second Row . Salzberg . Shay . Steinhart . Yesner . Zises Page 191 In opening the Fraternity and Sorority sections we have tried to give the housemothers some of the well deserved recogni¬ tion that heretofore has been lacking . . Never could there be too much praise heaped upon them for the fine influence they exert over the students. . Page 192 The imposing beauty of the NerV Chemistry Building is a continuation of the architectural plans for the future University of Arkansas BOOK number SIX A C T I V I T I E S DIRECTORS OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS - THE BOARD Upon Them Rests the Burden of Guiding the Footsteps of Erring Editors and Managers • The board of publications at the University, which has control of all student publications, is com¬ posed of four student members, four faculty members, and a faculty chairman who votes in case of a tie. Thus, by having five members, the faculty has the actual control on all decisions. The Razorback and The Arkansas Traveler are under direct supervision of the board, while the Arkansas Engineer and The Arkansas Agriculturist are supervised by a budget committee. Meetings are held periodically to hear the reports of the business managers of each publication, and to receive bids and let contracts for the printing and en¬ graving of the Razorback and the printing of the Trav¬ eler. G. E. RIPLEY Chairman OFFICERS G. E. RIPLEY Chairman ELAINE BRAUGHTON Secretary EILBOTT BRAUGHTON RUSSELL JERNIGAN FACULTY MEMBERS T. C. CARLSON W. J. LEMKE J. A. THALHEIMER G. E. HASTINGS • STUDENT MEMBERS REGINALD EILBOTT ELAINE BRAUGHTON J. ARIE RUSSELL JOHN JERNIGAN Page 195 1936 RAZORBACK PRESENTS CENTENNIAL THEME • EDITORIAL STAFF • CHARLES OLSON . . Associate Editor BURKETT WAMSLEY . Associate Editor BOBBY SMITH . . . Assistant Editor JOHN NIVEN . . . Assistant Editor GOVAN BURKE . . Assistant Editor JIMASON DAGGETT . Assistant Editor MARY KATE GILMORE Sorority Editor BERNARD ZELNICK Fraternity Editor LELAND LEATHERMAN Sports Editor edward McClelland Asst. Sports Editor BILL DUNN . . . Organizations Editor BARBARA PAYNE . . Asst. Organizations Editor ELLSWORTH CHUNN Centennial Editor M. J. PLISHNER . . Military Editor LOUISE McCULLOCH . Staff Artist WYLIE HEAD . . Staff Photographer • • From its very inception the Razorback has been a publicati on attempting to present a pictorial review of the year ' s activities on the University campus. Each year the Editor presents for the first time some • JOHN ANDERSON Editor • idea proposing to change and enliven the book. But in making changes the editors must tread lightly, or in the eyes of the critical student censors, be forever " dubbed " incompetent or uninterested in the work. This year the apparently desired change is present¬ ed by attempting to have a different layout for each succeeding page—a task in itself not easy to perform. With the addition of the explantory headlines, and the bodies of copy, we have attempted to change, some¬ what the ordinary pages in a yearbook. Editing a yearbook is perhaps one of the most thank¬ less jobs in existence, and here on the campus is made even more so by the lack of cooperating staffs. How¬ ever, there is no incentive for members of any staff to work—their efforts are never recognized or rewarded. This fact is exemplified by the rejection of one of the most qualified candidates for editor of the Razorback that the campus has ever had, or will have. Wamsley .... Olson . . . . Niven .... Smith .... Burke Daggett .... Gilmore . . . . Leatherman .... McCulloch . . . . Plishner .... Dunn . . . . McClelland .... Payne . . . . Chunn .... Head .... Zelnick Page 196 SUCCESS FROM FINANCIAL STANDPOINT • BUSINESS STAFF • ANDREW PONDER . Associate Business Manager BILL YANCEY . . Assistant Business Manager REGINALD EILBOTT . Assistant Business Manag er JOHN JERNIGAN . Assistant Business Manager JOHN BRANCH . . . Advertising Manager ERLINE CAMPBELL Assistant Advertising Manager DICK BEAN . . Assistant Advertising Manager MARGARET JACOWAY . Organizations Manager LORENA MOORE Assistant Organizations Manager JAMES ROY . Assistant Organizations Manager JACK WAGONER Assistant Organizations Manager CAMPBELL .... JERNIGAN _ROY_EILBOTT_ BRANCH_YANCEY_ PONDER .... MOORE .... JACOWAY .... BEAN. • Even tho it is a time worn subject of advocation, there could never be a time more ap¬ propriate than now to bring out the need for a change in the method of electing editors. Perhaps then, with the change, the yearbook could be publish¬ ed by staffs with the incentive to co-operate with the editor in the work. But of course this is a problem to be coped with only through the students themselves, who, by the results of the past election, proved themselves stubborn enough not to recognize worth in a candidate. This year the Editor and Manager are indeed grate¬ ful to Mr. E. E. Whitson, of the engraving company, and to Mr. W. W. Mercer, of the printing company, for their invaluable assistance in publishing the Razor- back. And on behalf of the advertisers, who, in part, make the publication of the book possible, we say— patronize them. Page 197 ARKANSAS TRAVELER INAUGURATES NEW POLICIES Tabloid Sheet and Action Shots Introduced During the Course of the Year LINUS WILLIAMS BOB McCANN Editor Manager • The principal fault of the Arkansas Traveler is that it provides experience for few students—the editor, and the handful of other journalism students in¬ terested enough in their course to work without monetary reward. Since the editor alone receives a salary, he is often forced to do everything, from serving as his own reporter on up. The annual surplus turned in by the Traveler could be used to pay two assistant editors, and thus increase possibilities for a better paper. The Arkansas Traveler should be to the Journalism Department what a laboratory is in the study of science. Now, about the only experience it offers the journalism students is practice in news reporting. In the past, staff members have often secured and held their positions by having assisted in the election of the editor or gained his friendship afterwards. The selection of the candidates for editor of the Traveler by the Board of Publications is not always fair, since there are four student members on the Board, appointed by the incumbent student political party. Five faculty members complete the member¬ ship. It is always likely that the party in power may secure a " set-up " or " dummy " for its candidate, and keep a more qualified petitioner from running. The Traveler should be taken out of politics and turned over to the Journalism department for super¬ vision. A board of publications composed of faculty members and journalism students should select the edi- • OLSON . . . WAMSLEY . . . STROUD . . . CUNNINGHAM . . . CHUNN . . . Second Row . . HUTCHISON . . STOREY . . BITTINGER . . JACOWAY MOORE Page 198 hor. Journalism students make the Traveler possible, know more concerning the abilities of the respective candidates, and hence should be the ones to deter¬ mine who is editor. The Traveler this year has had one of the most ac¬ tive staffs in the history of its experience. The editor kept all political promises on taking over his duties, but removed staff members whenever someone with more energy and ability showed up. The editor espe¬ cially wishes to give credit to staff members John Hutchison, managing editor; Ellsworth Chunn, news editor; and Winnifred Bittinger, for any success which the 1935-36 Traveler may have enjoyed. LINUS WILLIAMS LITTLE . . . HARRIS . . . JAMES . . . WOLFGANG . . . Second Row . . . SIMS . . . ASBURY . . . ROSSNER . . . CARROLL MAKRIS • • • EDITORIAL STAFF • BUSINESS STAFF • JOHN H. HUTCHISON . . Managing Editor PAT STOREY.Assistant Editor THORNTON MOORE . . . Assistant Editor ELLSWORTH CHUNN . . . . News Editor CHUCK OLSON.Feature Editor BURKETT WAMSLEY .... Sports Editor PAUL CUNNINGHAM . Assistant Sports Editor WINNIFRED BITTINGER . . . Society Editor HILDA STROUD .... Associate Editor MARGARET JACOWAY . . Associate Editor CLAYTON LITTLE DANE HARRIS FRANCES ROSSNER GAY SIMS . . . BEN WOLFGANG . GEORGE MAKRIS . CECIL ASBURY . L. J. CARROLL . LUCILE JAMES Assistant Business Manager Advertising Assistant Advertising Assistant Advertising Assistant Advertising Asistant . Circulation Manager Circulation Assistant Circulation Assistant Circulation Assistant Page 199 AGRICULTURIST ENTIRELY A STUDENT PUBLICATION Seeks News from All Departments of College for Distribution Throughout State • EDITORIAL STAFF • MARVIN R. CARTER EMMETT EDWARDS IVA HARNESS LOWELL GOFORTH ETHAN HANSEN MARY MARGARET WILSON FREEMAN ROBINSON BILL SCHROEDER RALPH WHITMORE HELEN EIDSON FLOYD OLIVE CARRIE BOYD ALICIA READ JESSIE MITCHELL J. ARIE RUSSELL Editor READ . . BOYD . . OLIVE ..ROBINSON . . WILSON ..MITCHELL . . HANSEN .. EDWARDS . . HARNESS .. EIDSON . . SCHROEDER ..CARTER . . GOFORTH WHITMORE • The Arkansas Agriculturist, a magazine published monthly during the school year is entirely a student publication of the Agricultural and Home Economics departments. The editorial staff of the Agricultural Col¬ lege seeks news from every depart¬ ment of the college. The business staff is concerned with matters of ad¬ vertising, circulation, and general fi¬ nancial welfare of the magazine. A special issue is prepared each year as a feature of Agriculture Day. Page 200 DAN INGRUM Business Manager It is the purpose of the magazine to publish agricultural facts of inter¬ est and application to the students and agricultural people of Arkansas, and to advertise the College of Agri¬ culture of the University of Arkan¬ sas. The Agriculturist not only serves the students of the College of Agriculture at Arkansas, but is sent to all colleges and leading high schools of the state in exchange for other papers. JOHN BROWN . . . WEIR . . . LIPE . . . LATTURE . . . JAMES BROWN .. . RAINS .MAINARD. . . . . McLEMORE . . . . • BUSINESS STAFF • PAUL LATTURE RUBY JEWELL LIPE ELWIN KAY JAMES BROWN GEORGE ROBERTSON JOHN BROWN ERNESTINE McLEMORE CHARLES RAINS HOWARD MAINARD MAX WEIR Page 201 ARKANSAS ENGINEER OLDEST OF COLLEGE IOURNALS Published for Those Who Are Interested in the Advances in Science of Engineering tribution to the students of the College, the alumni, and to people all over the state who are interested in the advances in science of engineering. The officers of the publication are elected by the students and • EDITORIAL STAFF • D. S. SANDLIN WYLIE HEAD C. D. LAUGHLIN J. M. BROWN H. S. SEELIG J. F. RHODES C. H. DYER W. A. LINDSEY JULIUS J. WOODRUFF Business Manager • The Arkansas Engineer, official publication of the College of Engineering, is the oldest of the indi¬ vidual college journals. It was established in 1920. The Arkansas Engineer is published quarterly for dis- • BUSINESS STAFF • JOHN HOLDEN james l. McKinley ROBERT MILNER PAUL R. HARRIS HAROLD GORHAM LEWIS BARRY Page 202 serve with the cooperation of the faculty advisers, W. R. Spencer and W. B. Stelzner. The magazine publishes articles of interest to engi¬ neering readers, news of the alumni, and notes about the organizations connected with the college. • EDITORIAL STAFF • LINDSEY . . SANDLIN . . HEAD . . LAUGHLIN . . DYER . . RHODES . . SEELIG . . BROWN . . The Arkansas Engineer became a member of the Engineering College Magazines Associated at Terre Haute, Indiana, on October 16, 1934. This recogni¬ tion classed the Arkansas Engineer with the leading engineering college publications of the country. The E. C. M. A. is an association of twenty-four mag¬ azines, organized to develop better engineering maga¬ zines, to secure more and better advertising, and to create a set of standards which will make the engi¬ neering college magazine a more attractive advertis¬ ing medium to the national advertisers. • BUSINESS STAFF • HARRIS . . MILNER . . McKINLEY GORHAM . . HOLDEN . . BARRY Page 203 THE STOOGE .... ARKANSAS ' HUMOR MAGAZINE Recently Discontinued by Action of the Publication Board • EDITORIAL STAFF • DOTTIE ANNE MAPES HERMAN TEETER MARGARET JACOWAY FRANCES HOLT JIMMY BYRD FRANCES HARRY CRUMPLER WILKINS THOMPSON VIRGINIA CAIN COLEMAN NOLEN PAUL LATTURE WEST • ART STAFF • RALPH BARTON LEE R. FRASER MIKE PLISHNER BILL DVORACHEK WILLIAM CANADA • BUSINESS STAFF • ADALINE KERR JAMES DUNN GRACE MARLEY BETTIE BARNES Crumpler . . . Latture . . . Nolen . . . Teeter . . . Mapes . . . West . . . Byrd . . . Canada . . . Kerr . . . Barnes Jacoway . . . Marley . . . Dunn . . . Holt . . . Cain . . . Fraser . . . Thompson . . . Plishner . . . Dvorachek Page 204 HONORARY, PROFESSIONAL, SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS They Play an Important Part in the Extra-Curricular Activities of the University Students The following literary, professional, and social organizations represented on the campus fill an unavoidable abyss in student activity. Selected for their prominence and ability in the various schools or fields, the mem¬ bers represent the highest type of students found in the University. As a result of their selectivity, invitations are sparsely issued, but greatly demanded. Phi Beta Kappa, nationally known scholarship fraternity, confers distinction upon the propor¬ tionate few who attain the enviable grades in Arts and Sciences. Phi Eta Sigma is a similar honor open to only Freshmen. Alpha Kappa Psi affords the business school a comparable organization, while Tau Beta Pi is the zenith of Engineering students. The Agricultural Col¬ lege holds Alpha Zeta out as representing the highest standard possible in that field. There are, too, other honorary and profes¬ sional organizations on the campus that have a reputation quite as enviable as these, but from the many these seemed worthy of mention. Aside from the honorary and professional groups on the campus, there are social groups that form an integral part of student life. Page 205 PHI BETA KAPPA... THE ACADEMIC GOAL Nine Students Honored by Initiation During the Course of the Year Honorary Scholastic Fraternity in the Field of Letters Founded at the College of William and Mary 1776 Established at the University of Arkansas 1932 ZILPHA CURTIS BATTEY ROBERT ATCHISON CALDWELL THORGNY CEDRIC CARLSON VIRGIL DALE COVER SAMUEL CLAUDIUS DELLINGER GEORGE WESLEY DROKE CHARLES CLIFTON FICHTNER JOHN CLINTON FUTRALL HARRISON HALE LLOYD BLINN HAM LELA ELIZABETH ALLRED MARY TEMPLE ANDERSON JULIA BURNELLE BOYCE MARY GRACE BLAIR NATHAN GRABELSKY ELIZABETH GREEN ROSE PAULINE COOPER LODENE FULLER IDELE MAY GARCIA JULIAN HAWES HELEN HOFMANN HENRI PRICE CLEVELAND CAROLINE ELIZABETH DAVIES RUTH FLEMING RALPH D. ABRAMSON THELMA F. FLETCHER ANNETTE B. HARLEY FACULTY MEMBERS ARTHUR McCRACKEN HARDING GEORGE EVERETT HASTINGS DAISY YOUNG HOLCOMB JOBELLE HOLCOMBE VIRGIL LAURENS JONES JOHN CLARK JORDAN FREDRICK LAIRD KERR INA HELEN KNERR ANTONIO MARINONI JIM P. MATTHEWS JOHN PRESTON MOORE MEMBERS IN COURSE Class of 1932 J. WIRT BURNETT MARY JANE TRIBBLE HALE VIRGINIA HOUSTON CHRISTINE NELSON KELLEY Class of 1933 NINA HAYS LUCILLE ALEXANDRA LONG MEYER ORLINSKY Class of 1934 MORRIS ISSEKS ISABEL SWAIN JONES EVELYN LAMBERT TILLMAN MORGAN Class of 1935 KATHERINE FINNEY VERA ERNESTINE GARRETT GOULD PATRICK GROVES Class of 1936 GEORGE THOMAS JOHNSON WILLIAM D. PENROSE VIRGINIA SAVAGE HENRY HARRISON STRAUSS PAUL PORTER SUTTON DELBERT SWARTZ DAVID YANCEY THOMAS GEORGE VAUGHAN FRANK VINSONHALER JULIAN SEESEL WATERMAN EDGAR WERTHEIM ISABELLA CHILTON WILSON VIVE HALL YOUNG JAMES FARRAR LEWIS IRENE INGALLS PEARSON ALBERT REUEL SPARKS HAZEL PRESSON OLIVE LEE MATHIS WARRAM FRED W. WHITESIDE, Jr. EDNA LUCILE NELSON VIRGINIA PRYOR ROYCE S. WEISENBERGER JAMES GASTON WILLIAMSON HAZEL MUNCY WOODS LAWRENCE HOBSON RICHARD YOUNG HOLCOMB NICHOLAS MONROE SMITH THELMA SCROGGS LAURA ELIZABETH SHRODE ATWELL R. TURQUETTE Page 206 PHI ETA SIGMA . . . HONORARY MEN ' S ORGANIZATION For Those Freshmen Who Show a Marked Learning Ability • OFFICERS • LEONARD W. RUSSUM .... President EARLE L. RUDOLPH .... Vice-President JAMES M. ROY.Secretary FRANKLIN DEAVER.Treasurer • FACULTY MEMBERS • • DEAN G. E. RIPLEY.DEAN J. C. JORDAN.PROFESSOR A. S. HUMPHREYS MEMBERS • 0 BURL E. AUSTIN.CHARLES E. BENNETT.JOE VOLNEY BUTT. THOMAS F. BUTT.GERALD W. CHASTAIN .J. P. COLE.FRANKLIN DEAVER .REGINALD EILBOTT, Jr.HUGH GINGERICH.J. R. GROVES.ROBERT BIDDINSON HALL.H. B. HALSELL. J. J. HOLLOMON, Jr.GEORGE TOM JOHNSON.JAMES W. LEATHERMAN .GEORGE A. MAKRIS.ALLEN C. MARK.H. D. PATTON.THOMAS L. QUAY.MANNIE RIESENBERG. JAMES L. ROARK.JAMES L. ROY. EARLE L. RUDOLPH.LEONARD W. RUSSUM .RALPH SHAY.ARTHUR L. SMITH .JAMES W. TAFT.RAY B. VAUGHTERS .RICHARD C. WAUGH.EARL H. WILDY.GLEN PETE WING • Phi Eta Sigma is an honorary organization for students making a 5.00 or better their freshman year. Its purpose is to encourage freshmen who show a marked learning ability. The organization was installed in 1931 by Dean Herbert Smith of the University of Illinois, who is the national secretary of the organization. Since its incep¬ tion, with an enrollment of 12, it has grown increasing¬ ly under the guidance of Dean G. E. Ripley, faculty advisor. First Row . Quay . Makris Butt . Ripley . Waugh Eilbott . Second Row Roark . Shay . Roy Deaver . . Reisenberg Wing . Bennett . Third Row . Hall . Halsell Patton . Cole . Smith Hollomon . Fourth Row Chastain . Humphreys T. Butt . Leatherman Gingerich . Wildy . Fifth Row . Taft . Vaughters Mark Page 207 TAU BETA PI . . . FOR ENGINEERING SCHOLARS Election Is Considered One of the Highest Honors Possible for Engineers • OFFICERS • JAMES TURKINGTON.President JAMES BOURLAND .... Vice-President ROBERT KAUFMAN.Secretary CLAUDE DYER.Treasurer • MEMBERS JAMES BOURLAND.W. T. CRAVENS .LADD DAVIES.CLAUDE DYER. GRANT HEDRICK.ROBERT KAUFMAN. james McKinley.allen mark .w. L. NELSON.GEORGE SANSBURY. HERMAN SEELIG.JAMES TURKINGTON • MEMBERS IN FACULTY • W. B. STELZNER.R. G. PADDOCK .L. C. PRICE.W. R. SPENCER. W. N. GLADSON.A. G. HOLMES, Jr. DEANE G. CARTER.B. N. WILSON.G. P. STOCKER Bourland . Cravens . Davies . Dyer . Hedrick Kaufman . McKinley . Mark . Nelson . Sansbury Seelig . Turkingfon • Tau Beta Pi is an honorary society founded at Lehigh University, June, 1885, under the leadership of Professor E. H. Williams. Its purpose is to confer distinction upon those students who have maintained a high grade of scholarship, and to foster a spirit of liberal culture in the engineering students in the insti¬ tutions where its chapters are located. When a chapter is established it may confer its key upon its alumni and students of earlier years in analogy to a similar custom in Phi Beta Kappa. Membership • may be offered to graduates of engineering colleges where there is no chapter, provided the recipient has fulfilled the regular eligibility requirements as a stu¬ dent. Membership of distinction may be conferred upon prominent engineers who may or may not al¬ ready be members of the society. Alpha chapter has been active since its establish¬ ment at the University of Arkansas in 1914. Election is considered one of the highest honors that can be bestowed upon an engineer. Page 208 ALPHA KAPPA PSI . . . BIG BUSINESS GOES GREEK An Honorary for Future Tycoons of Commerce and Industry • OFFICERS • GEORGE MAKRIS.President JOHN KANE.Vice-President BEN POSEY.Secretary TOM SECOY.Treasurer • FACULTY MEMBERS C. C. FICHTNER.W. B. COLE. P. W. MILUM.A. W. JAMISON • MEMBERS • a GRAHAM BLACK_DICK GREER_ WOODROW NEWSOM .... COLEMAN NOLEN . . . . JOHNNIE OWENS_LeROY POND TOM ROSS .... LOUIS SHACKLEFORD . . . . E. B. SPARKS.BOB VAUGHAN.RAY VAUGHTERS_JOHN WALKER .... CLAUDE WARD .... CECIL WIGHT .... A. L. WILSON . . . . GEORGE WITTENBERG . . . . W. B. YAUCH a Alpha Kappa Psi, professional fraternity in business administration, was founded at New York Uni¬ versity in 1904. The fraternity now has fifty-seven chapters at schools of business administration of lead¬ ing universities in the United States and Canada. Beta Zeta Chapter was established at the University of Arkansas as an outgrowth of the Commerce Club in November, 1928. Three years ago the local chapter won highest honors in competition with all other chap¬ ters throughout the country in the National Efficiency Black . Kane . Vaughan . Ward . Second Row Owen . Walker . Shackleford . Newsom . Third Row Sparks . Greer . Ross . Posey . Fourth Row . Wight Vaughters . Yauch . Wilson . Fifth Row . Pond Nolen . Wittenberg . Makris Contest, and was awarded a plaque for excellency in scholarship, activity, administration, service to school of commerce, financial administration, and the like. Alpha Kappa Psi sponsors each year a series of speeches of interest to commerce students, an all busi¬ ness school banquet, and other such activities of the local school of business administration. The chapter gives a scholarship award to high point juniors and seniors in the business school. Page 209 ALPHA ZETA . . . AGRIS WITH SCHOLASTIC RECORDS Their Aim Is to Promote the • OFFICERS • J. ARIE RUSSELL.Chancellor EDWIN UDEY.Censor WALTER BATEMAN.Scribe RALPH WHITMORE.Treasurer WILLIAM E. SHAW.Chronicler • Profession of Agriculture makes the highest score in the judging contests held during the high school meet. Other activities of Alpha Zeta are: sponsoring a smoker of all men in the Agriculture College, aiding the Vocational Agriculture Department in carrying on the judging contests, and sponsoring a series of edu¬ cational lectures for agricultural students. The Chap¬ ter also has a loan fund for worthy, needy students of the Agricultural College. • MEMBERS • • WALTER BATEMAN.KEITH BILBREY .KEITH J. DAMPF.EMMETT EDWARDS .ELMER GREGORY.ELMER HONEA .L. A. LEWIS.THOMAS McDANIEL .FLOYD OLIVE.ARIE RUSSELL. HERBERT RUSSELL.BILL SCHROEDER. BILL SHAW.EDWIN UDEY.RALPH WHITMORE. • It is the object of the fraternity of Alpha Zeta to promote the profession of agriculture; to es¬ tablish, foster and develop high standards of scholar¬ ship, character, leadership, and a spirit of fellowship among all its members. Each year the Arkansas Chapter presents a loving cup to the freshman from the previous year who made the highest grade point. The chapter also presents a plaque to the Vocational Agriculture school which Bateman . Bllbrey . Edwards . Gregory . Honea Lewis . McDaniel . Olive . Russell . H. Russell Schroeder . Shaw . Udey Page 2 10 KAPPA DELTA PI AN HONORARY FOR TEACHERS Members Must Have a Continued Interest in the Field of Education • OFFICERS JOHN E. KINS.President KATHERINE MILLER.Secretary MARY ETHEL SMYERS .... Treasurer • MEMBERS • • MARJORIE ALLRED . . . RUTH BOGGS . . . CLYDE CATHAY . . . CHRIS CORBIN . . . FLORENE FLETCHER . . . HAZEL KECK . . . JOHN KING . . . KATHERINE MILLER . . . KATHERINE MIRES . . . FRANCES PARSONS . . . MARY LOUISE SANDERS . . . MARY ETHEL SMYERS • • FACULTY MEMBERS • • R. K. BENT . . C. H. CROSS . .GENEVIEVE DENNIS . . . HELEN GRAHAM . . . H. G. HOTZ . . . HENRY KRONENBERG . . . ROY W. ROBERTS . . . CHARLES M. REINOEHL . . . ELIZABETH A. PEAR • Kappa Delta Pi, an honorary society in edu¬ cation, was founded on March 18, 1911, and became incorporated under the laws of the State of Illinois as an honorary educational fraternity June 8, 1911. Alpha Beta Chapter was established at the University of Arkansas in February, 1924. Qualifications for membership consist of junior or senior standing, a grade point in the upper quarter, twelve semester hours of education, continued interest in the field of education, and desirable social quali¬ ties. Members of the faculty of the College of Edu¬ cation are eligible for membership. Page 211 OCTAGON HONORARY FOR SENIOR WOMEN Membership Is an Honor Equivalent to Mortar Board of Other Campuses • OFFICERS • LAURA SHRODE.President WANDA MILHOAN .... Vice-President HILDA STROUD .... Secretary-Treasurer MEMBERS • • MARJORIE ALLRED.ANNETTE HARLEY.FRANCES HOLT.WANDA MILHOAN.LAURA SHRODE. MAYHART STINSON.HILDA STROUD. LENORE SWEARINGEN Allred . Harley . Holt . Milhoan . Shrode . Stinson Stroud . Swearingen • Octagon, local honorary organization for out¬ standing senior women, was founded at the University of Arkansas in May, 1929, but did not make an official appearance on the campus until the following school year, when the members met, elected officers, and drew up a constitution. The organization was begun under the leadership of Miss Martha Reid, Dean of Women, who has held up before the group a prospect of Mortar Board, a na¬ tional organization for outstanding women. The name, Octagon, was chosen by the local group from the fact that there were eight members originally selected. The purpose is to develop and encourage in young women the qualities of service, leadership, and scholarship. Page 212 SIGMA EPSILON SIGMA PROMOTES SCHOLARSHIP This Year Adopted as " Little Sister " of Octagon • OFFICERS • LENORE SWEARINGEN .... President RUTH PENROSE.Secretary • MEMBERS • MARY EVA KANE .... VIRGINIA SAVAGE LAURA SHRODE • ALUMNI • • GRACE BLAIR . . . HENRI CLEVELAND . . . KATHERINE FINNEY .... RUTH FLEMING LODENE FULLER . . . ISABEL JONES . . . EVELYN LAMBERT . . . MARGUERITE WAGGONER Swearingen . Shrode . Penrose . Savage . Kane • • Sigma Epsilon Sigma is the honor sorority for all freshmen women in the University who average a grade point of 5.00 for the two semesters of their freshman year. This high scholastic standard is accom¬ panied by an equally high intellectual goal which is embodied in the motto of the organization. " Wis¬ dom, independence, and self control. " Zeta chapter of Sigma Epsilon Sigma was organized on this campus in 1931 with four charter members. The group is sponsored by Dean Martha M. Reid, and this year has been adopted as " Little Sister " of Octagon, Senior Women ' s honor society, under whose sponsorship it hopes to become one of the outstand¬ ing honor organizations on the campus. Page 213 SWASTIKA • • • FOR OUTSTANDING SORORITY WOMEN Noted tor Unusual Social Functions • OFFICERS • LOUISE McCULLOCH .... President BILLY RUTH JAMES . . . Secretary-Treasurer • MEMBERS • • LOUISE McCULLOCH.BILLY RUTH JAMES.MARY JANE THOMPSON .FRANCES HOLT.JOSEPHINE FISHER.ANN PRITCHARD.BETTY SUE CUNNINGHAM.MARY JIM LANE .VIRGINIA HINKLE.ANN DuBARD .CAROLYN CHEEVES.ISABEL STORMS.FRANCES PITTMAN. KATHRYN PERKINS.GRACE MARLEY .MARJORI HUNT.NADIA WOOD COILA HARDING • • Swastika is a club for outstanding University of Arkansas women which was organized in 1931 with eight charter members. The members are chosen on standards of character and leadership. The chief ob- Perkins . Fisher . Holt . Storms Thompson . James . Harding . Lane DuBard . . . Pritchard . . . Wood Cunningham . McCulloch . Pittman Hunt . Marley . Cheeves . Hinkle ject is to foster friendly social relations among sorority women. One of the chief features of the club ' s year¬ ly program is the Swastika banquet. Page 214 BLUE KEY PROMOTES INTERESTS OF UNIVERSITY Recognizes Outstanding Participation in Student Affairs • OFFICERS • WALTER BATEMAN.President HOWARD W. LITTLE . . . Vice-President CLEM McCLELLAND . . Secretary-Treasurer • • MEMBERS • • WALTER BATEMAN.EMON MAHONY.LELAND LEATHERMAN. DAVID BOATRIGHT.CLEM McCLELLAND .JOHN ANDERSON.CHARLES WHITESIDE.HOWARD W. LITTLE. JOE VOL BUTT.CHOICE RUCKER. W. R. BENTON.GEORGE MAKRIS. SIDNEY McMATH • Blue Key, honor fraternity, was founded at the University of Florida in October, 1924, by Major Bert C. Riley. A national organization was established in February, 1925. Blue Key recognizes outstanding qual¬ ities in character, scholarship, student activities, lead¬ ership, and service. Membership is composed of grad¬ uate and undergraduate students of all departments of American colleges and universities. Honorary mem¬ bership is extended to a limited number of faculty members and alumni. The fraternity is committed to Rucker . Little . Anderson . McClelland . Leatherman Makris . Whiteside . McMath . Boatright . Bateman Butt co-operate with the faculty; to study student problems; stimulate progress and promote the interests of the in¬ stitutions where it has chapters. The badge is an oblong key of gold on the surface of which appears a spread eagle; in the mouth of the eagle is a wreath; at the feet, on the lower left point of the cross, is a star. Outside of the oval in which these symbols appear, the corners of the key are bril¬ liant azure blue. Page 2 15 LAMBDA TAU PROMOTES LITERARY ABILITY IN WOMEN They Attempt to Create a Greater Interest in Literary Activities • OFFICERS • • MEMBERS • IVA HARNESS . . MARY KATE GILMORE ANNETTE HARLEY MARY LOUISE SANDERS President « MARY KATE GILMORE.DOROTHY Vice-President GUILLIAMS.ANNETTE HARLEY . . Secretary IVA HARNESS.HELEN JOHNSON . . Tr easurer MILDRED LEHMAN.MARY PORTER MARY LOUISE SANDERS.VIRGINIA SAVAGE .LAURA SHRODE.MARY ETHEL SMYERS.MAYHART STINSON.MARY MARGARET WILSON Gilmore . Harley . Harness . Johnson . Lehman Porter . Sanders . Savage . Shrode . Smyers Stinson . Wilson • The National Society of Lambda Tau was founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, by a group of English scholars. Beta chapter was established on the campus of the University of Arkansas in 1923, Membership in the organization is limited to those women students of the University who have displayed literary ability. The aim of the society is to create a greater interest in literary activities and to encourage originality by associating together girls who are really interested in the work. Page 2 16 PI KAPPA . . . BUDDING YOUNG FEMALE JOURNALISTS For Women Who Have Shown Interest, Originality, and Ability in Journalism Activities • OFFICERS • WINNIFRED BITTINGER .... President MARGARET JACOWAY . . . Vice-President JULIA BOWEN .... Secretary-Treasurer • MEMBERS • • BETTIE BARNES.WINNIFRED BITTINGER.JULIA BOWEN.PAULA BRAUN.ANNABETH CAIN.VIRGINIA CAIN.DOROTHY DOUGLAS.MARY KATE GILMORE.EDITH MAE HAND. JEAN HEIDEN.MARGARET JACOWAY .HELEN JOHNSON.ADALINE KERR.DOTTIE ANNE MAPES.BETTY ALLYN NETTLESHIP.FRANCES SHIRAS .HILDA STROUD.MARY JANE WOFFORD.RUTH YANCEY • Pi Kappa, a woman ' s professional journalistic sorority, was founded at the University of Arkansas in 1917. Membership of the group is made up of women who are planning to take up the profession of journal¬ ism, and only those who have shown marked interest, originality, and ability along this line, as well as hav¬ ing done consistent and creditable work on student publications, are recognized by the sorority. The purpose of the organization is to promote the interests of the profession and to bring about a more consumate feeling of co-operation and understanding among its members. Much constructive work has been done by the organ¬ ization. Pi Kappa also started a tradition on the campus in 1934 by giving a luncheon for the twenty- five most outstanding women on the campus. • • Barnes . Bittinger . Bowen . Braun A. Cain . V. Cain . Douglas . Gilmore Hand . Heid en . Jacoway . Johnson Kerr . Mapes . Stroud . Wofford Yancey Page 217 PRESS CLUB . . . OUTSTANDING CAMPUS JOURNALISTS Takes an Interest in Outside Activities as Well as Student Publications • OFFICERS • LELAND LEATHERMAN .... President AL HARRISS.Vice-President ELLSWORTH CHUNN .... Treasurer ERNEST DEANE . . . Permanent Secretary • ACTIVE MEMBERS • • FRANK BRUCE.JIMMIE BYRD. ELLSWORTH CHUNN.PAUL CUNNINGHAM .BILL DUNN.MERRILL ELLIS. THAD FITCH.BOB HAMP.AL HARRISS.OTIS HAYS.JOHN HUTCHISON.LELAND LEATHERMAN .TOM LINCOLN.THORNTON MOORE.CHARLES OLSON.OREN STEPHENS.PAT STOREY.HERMAN TEETER.LEROY TYSON.LINUS WILLIAMS Anderson . Bruce . Byrd . Chunn . Cunningham Dunn . Fitch . Hamp . Harriss . Hays . Hutchison Leatherman . Lincoln . Moore . McCann . McClelland McMath . Olson . Stephens . Storey . Teeter Whiteside . Williams • HONORARY MEMBERS • • ASSOCIATE MEMBERS • © JOHN ANDERSON ... BOB McCANN . . . clem McClelland .... Sidney McMath CHARLES WHITESIDE ® JIM BOHART.TODD ELLIS. ERWIN FUNK.J. D. HURST. .V. L. JONES.JEROME McROY .RUFUS J. NELSON.E. W. PATE. W. K. ROSE.E. R. STAFFORD.R. C. WALKER.A. G. WHIDDEN Page 218 POETRY CLUB MEMBERS ACHIEVING TWO OBIECTS Improvement in Their Work and a Deeper Appreciation of Poetry the Aim of Club • OFFICERS • President MARIAN BRINSON Vice-President GRAHAM BLACK Treasurer CHARLES ST. ELMO ENNIS Secretary BETTIE BARNES • ASSOCIATE MEMBERS • ROSA ZAGNONI MARINONI MARY ANNE DAVIS ALEETAH DICKINSON CHESTER A. DIXON IRENE CARLISLE • COLLEGE MEMBERS • MARIAN BRINSON GRAHAM BLACK CHARLES ST. ELMO ENNIS MARGUERITE GAVERE PAUL MARINONI BETTIE BARNES ANNETTE HARLEY ELOISE KINARD MYR DELLE CRESS AUSTIN BURKHART MARGARET ALICE PEASE HENRY SIEDEL • JUNIOR MEMBERS • LILLIAN TOWNLEY FRANCIS McMILLEN ELOISE ENGLISH Brinson . Black . Ennis . Gavere Marinoni . Barnes . Harley . Kinard Pease o • The Poetry Club is an organization composed of students interested in writing and studying poetry. It meets once a month to read and discuss verse. Membership is based upon the merit of poetry sub¬ mitted and the wish of the applicant to further the aims of the Club. Founded in 1926 by Mr. Laurence F. Ftawkins, an instructor of English at the University, and Mrs. Rosa Zagnoni Marinoni, poetess of national recognition, the Club was re-organized in the fall of 1935 by Mrs. Marinoni. Through her efforts the members are achieving two objects: improvement in their work, and a deeper appreciation of verse. Several members have had poems accepted for publication by poetry maga¬ zines. Page 219 l ALPHA CHI SIGMAS ARE FUTURE CHEMISTS The Fratern ity Has Both Collegiate and Professional Chapters • OFFICERS • WILLIAM CRAVENS .... President HERMAN SEELIG. Vice-President HOWARD BOND. Treasurer GERALD CHASTAIN .... Secretary • MEMBERS • • HOWARD BOND . JAMES F. BOURLAND . PAUL F. BUSTION . ROLAND BYRD . GERALD W. CHASTIAN . WM. T. CRAVENS . JAMES B. DeWITT . JAMES DUNN . EVERETT HARRIS . ALLEN C. MARK . . CLAIR MARRIS . . THOS. A. MATTHEWS . . JAMES F. NORMAN . . JOHN L. OSWALT . . HERMAN S. SEELIG . . JAMES M. SMITH . . BINFORD E. SPENCER . . JAMES STARBIRD . . THOS. D. WAUGH . . RICHARD WAUGH . . ROY R. WEEDIN . . JULIUS J. WOODRUFF • IN FACULTY • 9 WALTER S. DYER . . HARRISON HALE . . ALLAN S. HUMPHREYS . . EDGAR WERTHEIM . . LYMAN E. PORTER • • Alpha Chi Sigma, professional fraternity in chemistry, was founded at the University of Wisconsin in 1902. Its members are drawn from students who plan to make some phase of chemistry their life ' s work. From the date of its founding until 1922,-the fraternity was composed of its collegiate and alumni chapters, but during the year 1922 there began a division of the organization into two general branches, one of them consisting of the collegiate and the other of the pro¬ fessional chapters. Hale .... Waugh Woodruff . . Cravens Bond . Seelig . Smith Weeden . DeWitt . Byrd Second Row . . P. F. Mark . Marris . Starbird Lewis . Spencer . Dunn A. Mark . . Chastain Nelson . . Third Row Howell . . . Bustion Wertheim . T. D. Waugh Matthews Page 220 THETA TAU REQUIRES PROMISING ENGINEERING ABILITY Attempts to Inculcate High Ethical and Professional Standards Among Its Members • OFFICERS CLAUDE H. DYER.President HAROLD WARD.Vice-President LOUIE I BISON ...... Secretary ROLFE ELDRIDGE.Treasurer • • MEMBERS © BILL MAPES.LADD DAVIES. CHARLES JOSEPH.LEWIS BARRY. GEORGE SANSBURY.ROBERT MILNER • • Theta Tau was founded at the University of Minnesota on October 15, 1904. It was from the first intended to be a professional engineering fraternity to inculcate high ethical and professional standards and to foster close fraternal relations among its members. Membership is limited to students of engineering of " personal worthiness and of promising engineering ability. " Its scholastic standards are high. It does not permit its members to join other engineering fraterni¬ ties except honorary or scholastic organizations. Until 1911 the fraternity was also known as " Ham¬ mer and Tongs, " but in that year the Greek letter name which now appears on the badge was adopted. Upsilon Chapter was established at the University of Arkansas in 1928, and has been consistently active in Engineering School affairs. 9 Dyer . Davies . Milner . Ibison . Eldridge . Mapes Sansbury . Barry . Joseph Page 221 A. I. E. E. . . . THE ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS Open to Both Professional Engineers and Students • OFFICERS • • MEMBERS • P. R. HARRIS . . J. H. TURKINGTON . L. C. BARRY . . . RALPH E. ANDERSON President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer JOHN LEVI COON.JACK WALTER DAVIS.HAROLD EVANS GORHAM. WYLIE HEAD.LEO W. HONEA.JIM LEE HOWELL.CHARLES EDWARD JOSEPH .BILL MAPES.JAMES F. RHODES .DALE SANDLIN.KENNETH SCHRANTZ .CLYDE CHARLES TREECE.ROLFE C. ELDRIDGE.JAMES LLOYD McKINLEY .W. A. RANDALL.CHARLES ROBERT RIDLEY.D. A. SCHMAND.THOMAS MORGAN WALLIS Anderson . Barry . Davis . Eldridge . Gorham . Harris Head . Honea . Howell . Joseph . Mapes . McKinley Randall . Rhodes . Ridley . Sandlin . Schmand Schrantz . Turkington . Wallis 9 9 The American Institute of Electrical Engineers, a national organization, has as members professional engineers and students. Any student who is actively interested in the field of electrical engineering is elig¬ ible for membership. The purpose of the national organization is to pro¬ mote the interests of the profession. Through its student branches it helps the student engineer while in school and also aids him as he becomes established as a pro¬ fessional engineer after graduation. Page 222 A. I. CH. E THE CHEMICAL ENGINEERS Meetings Feature Papers on Subjects of General Interest to Chemists • MEMBERS • LOYAL R. BABB JAMES F. BOURLAND ROBERT W. BROWN GLEN BURLESON PAUL F. BUSTION MEYER M. COOPERMAN GERALD W. CHASTAIN WILLIAM T. CRAVENS FRANKLIN K. DEAVER COY A. HARDCASTLE ALEXANDER E. HARRIS LYNN D. HOWELL ASHLEY C. JOHNSON MAYNARD P. JOHNSON JAMES P. LEA Babb . Bourland . Brown . Burleson Bustion . Chastain . Cooperman . Cravens Deaver . Hardcastle . Harris . Howell Johnson . M. Johnson . Lea . Lowrance Mark . Nance . Nelson . Norman Oswalt . Powell . Skinner . Treece Walker . W. Walker . Wilson . Woodruff • MEMBERS • ALLEN C. MARK WARREN O. NANCE WILLIAM L. NELSON J. F. NORMAN EDGAR G. LOWRANCE JOHN L. OSWALT HOWARD E. POWELL ROBERT W. ROWDEN ROBERT H. SCOTT RALPH D. SKINNER WINSTON W. TREECE SCOTT W. WALKER WILLIAM T. WALKER CLAUDE S. WILSON JULIUS J. WOODRUFF • The Arkansas Institute of Chemical Engineers is an organization for students of Chemical Engineer¬ ing who are particularly interested in topics of every¬ day chemistry and in the advancement of that science. A Meetings of the A. I. Ch. E. feature papers and discussions on subjects of general interest to chemists and also give opportunity for carrying on interesting chemical experiments. Page 223 A. S. C. E THE CIVIL ENGINEERS They Stimulate Interest in Those Things Which Advance the Engineering Profession • OFFICERS • President JOSEPH NOVELLINO Vice-President CLAUDE DYER Secretary HARLEY WALKER Treasurer ROBERT KAUFMAN Reporter R. LEE FRASER • MEMBERS • A. D. ALLEN CONDITT BARNETT LOUIS E. BONA HOLLIS ROSS CONWAY HOLMES DAVIDSON LADD DAVIES BILL DVORACHEK CLAUDE DYER RAPLE ELLINGTON N. B. FAULKNER R. LEE FRASER IRA G. HEDRICK PHILLIP G. HORD DICK JACKSON ROBERT KAUFMAN LARRY KELLY ARTHUR RUSSELL MAIER BOB MILLNER DICK NIENSTEDT THOMAS NIXON JOSEPH NOVELLINO HARVEY WOODROW SAUNDERS HENRY TEAGUE HARLEY WALKER Allen . Barnett . Bona . Davidson Davies . Dvorachek . Dyer . Ellington Faulkner . Fraser . Hedrick . Hord Jackson . Kaufman . Kelly . Maier Millner . Nienstedt . Nixon . Novellino Saunders . Teague . Walker • The American Society of Civil Engineers is composed of seventy-eight chapters located in the principal universities of the United States. The pur¬ pose of the organization is to stimulate undergraduate students to an interest for things which advance the engineering profession. Membership is not limited to those of the civil engineering profession, but is ex¬ tended to all those who have the qualifications for membership. Page 224 A. S. M. E THE MECHANICAL ENGINEERS Seven Delegates Attended District Convention in Texas • OFFICERS • JACK BROWN.President GEORGE SANSBURY .... Vice-President JOHN NIVEN .... Secretary-Treasurer EDWIN PRATT.Reporter • FACULTY MEMBERS • • L. C. PRICE.A. G. HOLMES. R. G. PADDOCK. • MEMBERS • • HAROLD WARD.RICHARD AYRES.WAYNE SMITH.LOUIE IBISON_WESLEY WHITTAKER .... WILLIAM JAMES.ROBERT MITCHELL.FLOYD MELTON.LESLIE LINDSAY.ORRIS WATSON.JAMES McFARLAND. BILL BECKMAN.BENNETT ADAMS. JACK -BROWN.GEORGE SANSBURY .JOHN NIVEN.EDWIN PRATT • The University of Arkansas student branch of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, a pro¬ fessional organization formed over twenty years ago, has for its purpose the creation of friendly relation¬ ships with students of m echanics, to develop an in¬ terest in all subjects of that field, and to help grad¬ Adams . Ayres . Beckman . Brown Ibison . James . Lindsay . Melton Mitchell . McFarland . Niven . Sansbury Watson uates advance in the mechanical engineering profes¬ sion. Seven delegates from the local group attended the district convention held at Austin, Texas late in March. Floyd Melton presented a technical paper in competi¬ tion with delegates from the seven other schools repre¬ sented at the meeting. Regular meetings are held every two weeks, at which time projects are discussed, and technical pa¬ pers are presented to the group for study and com¬ ment. Page 225 THE GENERAL ENGINEERING SOCIETY It Manages All Social Activities of the Engineering School • OFFICERS • CLAUDE H. DYER. President EVERETT HARRIS. Vice-President LEWIS C. BARRY. Secretary PAUL R. HARRIS. Treasurer Dyer . Barry . P. R. Harris . E. Harris • The General Engineering Society is composed of students of the College of Engineering. Every stu¬ dent enrolled in the Engineering School is entitled to membership. The primary function of the organization is the management of all social activities, most im¬ portant of which is the St. Pat ' s day celebration. Yearly the Engineer students honor this occasion with a general holiday, and convocation, followed by Engi¬ neer ' s dance that night. This year James McKinley, as St. Pat, and Louise McC ulloch, as his queen, reigned over the celebration, with St. Pat beknighting the sen¬ ior engineers at the convocation, and he and his queen leading the grand March at the dance. Page 226 PI MU EPSILON IS FOR STUDENTS OF MATHEMATICS Requires Members to Have Relatively High Grades in Other Studies • OFFICERS • HERMAN SEELIG.Director JAMESINA McDANIEL . . . Vice-Director MARJORIE ALLRED.Secretary JAMES DUNN.Treasurer • FACULTY MEMBERS • • H. M. HOSFORD . . . V. W. ADKISSON . . . D. P. RICHARDSON . . . G. D. NICHOLS. tively high grades in his other studies. The organiza¬ tion is honorary, and monthly meetings are held at which discussions of various mathematical topics are taken up, serving as a laboratory for those interested in the science. Among the charter members of the club were A. M. Harding and D. P. Richardson. E. E. Stevenson, presi¬ dent of the club in 1922, was the recipient of a Rhodes Scholarship. • MEMBERS € MARJORIE ALLRED . . . BRUCE BISSELL . . . JAMES BOURLAND . . . ALICE CADE . . . JAMES DeWITT . . . JAMES DUNN . . . MADGE EVANS . . . WILLIAM HALL ... IRA HEDRICK . . . J. ORVILLE HUGHES . . . HAZEL KECK . . . ALLEN MARK . . . russell McCracken ... jamesina McDaniel . . . KATHERINE MIRES . . . J. F. NORMAN . . . JOSEPH NOVELLINO . . . JOHN OSWALT . . . EDWARD PEEBLES . . . FRANCES ROSSNER . . . LEONARD RUSSUM . . . HERMAN SEELIG . . . HOWARD THORPE . . . ATWELL TURQUETTE . . . EARL WAUGH . . . THOMAS WAUGH . . . HARLEY WALKER • • Pi Mu Epsilon has grown out of the Math Club, an organization founded at the University of Arkansas on February II, 1919, by a group of students inter¬ ested in mathematics. The original group was under the direction of Dr. W. L. Miser. The local chapter was founded on the campus in 1931. Pi Mu Epsilon requires a candidate for membership to have an average of 4.00 in mathematics, and rela- Allred . Bissell . Bourland . Cade . DeWitt . Dunn Evans . Hall . Hedrick . Hughes . Keck . Mark McCracken . McDaniel . Mires . Norman . Novellino Oswalr . Peebles . Rossner . Russum . Seelig . Thorpe Turquette . E. Waugh . T. Waugh . Walker Page 227 PRE-MED CLUB CREATES INTEREST IN THE SCIENCES Reorganized in 1934 After Several Years of Inactivity • OFFICERS • GEORGE GOLDSTEIN .... President SIDNEY FADEN.Vice-President SEYMOUR FINEBERG.Secretary DAVID DORFMAN.Treasurer ♦ The Pre-Med club, after several years of in¬ activity, was reorganized in 1934-35. With Dr. Har¬ rison Hale, head of the Chemistry Department, as the sponsor, the club has successfully encouraged many Pre-Med students and created in them an interest in the field of medicine and the associated sciences. • MEMBERS • MARY ALEXANDER MARION BARNES JOHN F. BROWN, Jr. ESTHER L. CRUTCHER DAVID DORFMAN ALEXANDER ELLMAN SEYMOUR J. ETTMAN SIDNEY FADEN SAMUEL J. FELLER SEYMOUR FINEBERG IRVING FREY GEORGE GOLDSTEIN ARNOLD H. GOULD GENEVA HOSEY JACK KOLCHINSKY ARTHUR MARCUS PHILIP F. MARK ARTHUR RUTTKAY JOE SALZBURG VIOLA STEINLE JAMES STOCKER PAGE STUBBS MAXWELL WEINSTOCK BERNARD YESSNER MILTON ZIZES Alexander . Barnes . Brown Crutcher . Dorfman . Ellman Ettman . Faden . Feller . Fineburg Frey . Goldstein . Gould . Hosey Kolchinsky . Marcus . Mark Ruttkay . . Salsburg . . Steinle Stocker . Stubbs . Yesner . Zises Page 228 DEUTSCHER VEREIN . . . THE GERMAN CLUB For Those Students Who Have Shown Proficiency in the German Tongue • OFFICERS • DAVID DORFMAN .... President ALICE CADE. Vice-President MILTON J. ZISES. Treasurer ANNETTE B. HARLEY .... Secretary • MEMBERS • • MARY ALEXANDER.CLIFTON H. BEASLEY.JAMES SAUL BINGHAM. JANIE BELL BINGHAM.JOHN FLOYD BROWN.ROLAND BYRD.ALICE CADE .LEE ANDREW DEAN.AARON DENENBERG.DAVID DORFMAN. DOROTHY DOUGLAS.RAYMOND R. EDWARDS_SANTO EMANUELE_SIDNEY FADEN.ANDREW J. FEINMAN.SY FINEBERG.HELEN GEORGE.MORRIS GERSHMAN.BENJAMIN GINSBERG. MURRAY GOODFRIEND.HELEN GRAHAM .ANNETTE BROWN HARLEY.FRANK HEARNE.THERESA P. JEFFERSON. ALICE JONES.ROBERT KAGAN. HAROLD KANTOR.ALEXANDER KLEINMAN .JACK W. KOLCHINSKY.LEWIS FREDERICK.WILLIAM MILTON LEWIS. JOHN LOWRANCE.ARTHUR LUNUN. NANCY ZINN McDONALD .... WILLIAM MAISEL .ARTHUR MARCUS.HARRY D. PATTON .LEONARD BERTRAM RANDELL. LAWRENCE RUBENS.LEIGHTON RUDOLPH .LEONARD WHITE RUSSUM.LEONARD SALZBERG.MARGARET SCHEID. HARRIET SCHULMAN.ELMER SEMEL. JAMES C. STARBIRD.AARON M. TUROFF .MAXWELL WEINSTOCK.ARNOLD F. WOLFF.MILTON JEROME ZISES ® September of 1929 saw the reorganization of the Deutscher Verein, the German Society of the Uni¬ versity of Arkansas. The club, which was inactive dur¬ ing and in the years directly following the Great War, has as its aim, the appreciation of German Culture. Monthly programs are presented which are planned to be of instructive interest. German songs and plays, as well as lectures and short talks, are featured at the meetings. Membership is the privilege of those stu¬ dents who have shown unusual proficiency in the Ger¬ man Tongue, although honorary members include cer¬ tain members of the faculty. The Deutscher Verein holds picnics and socials at regular intervals, and these make for closer contact between students and faculty members. • Alexander . Beasley Bickman Bingham . Brown Byrd Cade . Denenberg Dorfman Douglas Edwards . Emanuele Faden Feinman Fineberg George Ginsberg . Graham Harley Hearne Jefferson Jones Kagan Kantor Kleinman Kolchinsky . Lewis . Lowrance . McDonald Maisel Marcus Patton Randell . Rudolf Russum Salsberg Scheid Schulman Semel Starbird Turoff . Zises Page 229 UNIVERSITY BAND GAINS RECOGNITION Drum Major Crumpler Selected to Lead S. M. U. Band at Rose Bowl Game • FRESHMEN • • W. H. ADAMS . . . HENRY BARBARICK . . . G. P. BORDEN . . . D. P. BURTON . . . CHARLES CHAPMAN . . . J. F. DONOHUE . . . G. W. DURHAM . . . RAYMOND EDWARDS . . . R. L. FLOCKS . . . BOB HAMP . . . J. R. HOWELL . . . ALDRIDGE JOHNSON . . . LOUIS KERSTEIN . . . EARL KING . . . CHARLES KOON . . . WIL¬ LIAM L. LITTLE . . . EDWARD J. McCABE . . . WALTER W. McCLENNEY ... ABE OKUN . . . KENNETH W. PETTIT . . . SCOTT M. PRICE . . . GILBERT PRINCE . . . FRED RAINS . . . WALTER C. RHODES . . . H. G. RIDLEY . . . JOE J. SCHMELZER . . . HENRY SEIDEL . . . WILLIAM SIMONS . . . WALTER L. SIMS . . . ALLEN V. TORNEK . . . JUSTIN TUCKER . . . DAVID URBAN BRUCE WILCOX .... • SOPHOMORES • • JOEL BUNCH . . . JOHN DODSON . . . HAROLD DVORACHEK . . . HARLAN HOLMES . . . PAUL JAMESON . . . WILLIAM LEWIS . . . WILLIAM LUTHER . . . ROBERT L. MAIN . . . THORNTON MOORE . . . JAMES W. TAFT . . . . . . MARION NARISI ... LEO WINTKER . . . • UPPERCLASSMEN • • CHARLES BELL . . . WILLIAM L. BUNCH . . . LEO A. COWAN . . . HARRY CRUMPLER . . . BILL DYER . . . JOHN KANE . . . MILLARD MEANS . . . LOUIS SHACKLEFORD . . . CLELL TAYLOR . . . EDWARD WARE . . . JOHNSON WITT . . . NEWMAN WALKER ... PAT STOREY. • • At the close of its most successful year, the University R. O. T. C. Band has nothing but a bright outlook for the future. The organization appeared most versatile this year, serving dual purposes, Mili¬ tary and Collegiate. Under the direction of Francis Judah Foutz, a most talented and competent band master, and Harry Crumpler, acrobatic drum major, the band gained heretofore unknown recognition. A most faithful aide to the athletes, it supported them at every game possible. As a timely tribute to the excellence that the band produced, Harry Crump¬ ler, Drum Major, received the enviable invitation to lead the S. M. U. Band in the Rose Bowl, New Year ' s. Not only on the athletic field did the band excel. Upon all military occasions the band was ever present, doing its part to make the maneuvers more uniform. All in all, the student body would have indeed suf¬ fered a sad plight without the existence of this group. Page 230 A KAPPA KAPPA PSI STRIVES FOR UNIFIED BAND Their Members Must Have Musical Ability and Scholastic Standing • OFFICERS • President WILL H. DYER Vice-President MILLARD B. MEANS Secretary-Treasurer LEO R. WINTKER • HONORARY MEMBERS • W. S. GREGSON F. J. FOUTZ HENRY TOVEY (Deceased) • OUTSTANDING MEMBERS • JOHN P. SOUSA (Deceased) CAPTAIN TAYLOR BRANSON CAPTAIN WILLIAM STANNARD HERBERT L. CLARKE FRANK SIMON HENRY FILLMORE • MEMBERS • CHARLES O. BELL W. L. BUNCH, JR. JOE M. CANNON LEO A. COWAN W. H. DVORACHEK WILL H. DYER MILLARD B. MEANS LEO R. WINTKER W. JOHNSON WITT • PLEDGES • DAVID PAUL BURTON JOE F. DONOHUE JAMES R. HOWELL, JR. ALDRIDGE F. JOHNSON THORNTON C. MOORE WALTER L. SIMS Bell . Bunch . Burton . Cannon Cowan . Dvorachek . Dyer . Howell Johnson . Moore . Sims . Wintker Witt • Kappa Kappa Psi, national honorary frater¬ nity for bandsmen, strives for a unified band and to promote the best in its individuals. The fraternity was founded by Bohumil Makovsky at Oklahoma A. and M. College in 1919, the local charter having been granted in 1924 as the eleventh of the present thirty-five chap¬ ters. Criteria for membership in Kappa Kappa Psi are musical ability and scholastic standing. Page 231 THE GLEE CLUB ENIOYS SUCCESSFUL YEAR Featured on NBC Broadcast from Campus • OFFICERS • WILLIAM MAPES.President ELLSWORTH CHUNN . . . Vice-President ALLEN MARK.Secretary JAMES ROY.Librarian • MEMBERS • • SOAH BARNES . . . GRAHAM BLACK . . . CLIFTON BEASLEY . . . LINDSEY BILLINGSLEY . . . ELLSWORTH CHUNN . . . PAUL COLE . . . CHRIS CORBIN . . . GEORGE FREED . . . EDWIN GIDEON . . . HAROLD GORHAM . . . DICK GREER . . . ROBERT HALL . . GEORGE HILL . . ROBERT HAMP . . . GEORGE KERR . . . FRED LEWIS . . . ALLEN MARK . . . PHILIP MARK . . . WILLIAM MAPES . . . NORMAN NAIL . . . PAUL PHILLIPS . . . ANDREW PONDER . . . WILMER RANDALL . . . HOWARD RIDLEY . . LONNIE ROARK . . ARTHUR ROTHMAN . . . W. C. RHODES . . . JAMES ROY . . .B. E. SPENCER . . . WILLIAM TORRANS . . . JUSTIN TUCKER . . . R. C. WAUGH . . . T. D. WAUGH . . . EDWARD WRIGHT First Row . Hamp . Wright . Phillips Chunn . Mark . Black . Kerr Roark . Mapes . Freed . Second Row . Ridley . Rothman . Billingsley Spencer . Greer . Tucker . Beasley Hill . Roy . Lewis . Nail . Third Row . Cole . Gorham . Torrans Waugh . Ponder . Mark . T. Waugh Randall . Gideon . Hall Page 232 THE BLACK CAT COTILLION CLUB Three Outstanding Formals Sponsored by This Group Each Year The function of the Black Cat Cotillion Club is to sponsor three dances each year. These social functions differ from other festivities in the fact that a select number of representative students are chosen from the various organizations on the campus. All dances are formal and are recognized among the year ' s outstanding successes. The cabinet, the governing body, is composed of one member from each group represented in the Club. THE CABINET Sitting. . Yauch . Burke . Holt Standing. . Yancey . Morton . Nobles McClelland . McDaniel . Makris • OFFICERS • GOVAN BURKE.President W. B. YAUCH.Vice-President FRANK HOLT .... Secretary-Treasurer • CABINET • • GOVAN BURKE . . . FRANCIS CHERRY . . . REGINALD EILBOTT . . . L. A. GRAHAM . . . FRANK HOLT .... CLEM McCLELLAND .... THOMAS McDaniel .... george makris . . . . m. p. MORTON .... JAMES H. NOBLES . . . .ROBERT WILLIAMS . . WILLIAM YANCEY . . W. B. YAUCH Page 233 MEN ' S VIGILANCE COMMITTEE . . . ENFORCERS OF REGULATIONS They Impose the Degrading Penalties on Erring Freshmen • OFFICERS • PAUL LATTURE.Chairman ARTHUR WELLS . . . Assistant Chairman • MEMBERS • • FLIPPEN McLEAN.GEORGE ROBERTSON.TOM DAN ROGERS. L. J. CARROLL.ELMER LINCOLN. LAWSON BOBBITT.BOB VELVIN.JOHN LIVINGSTON.JOE NEBLETT.FRANK HOLT.JAMES FONTAINE.FALON FRALEY.ROBERT BLACK.HOWARD BOND.ED BELL.BILL BROWN. EWING KINKEAD.L. A. GRAHAM. RAPLE ELLINGTON.VICTOR DIDINSKY .ISAIH LEW.J. D. STEINHART .MAHLON BESSER.MEYER J. PLISH- NER.JOE SHOFNER O The Vigilance Committee is an organization chosen by the students to instill in the supposedly humble freshmen the due respect for the elders, and to begin them in their college career with the " Pro¬ per Attitude. " Should any erring freshman stray upon the senior walk, approach the campus lacking the mark of his servitude—the green cap, or fail to live within his rigid restrictions—then woe be unto him—the Vigi¬ lance Committee quickly requests his presence. De¬ grading penalties such as wearing the apparel of the opposite sex, or numbering the blocks to the foot of the hill, or any other ingenious absurdity that might grace the minds of the committee, is inflicted upon the unfortunate one. But, there is a cure for all mala¬ dies—-The freshman of today will be the Sophomore of tomorrow—and the new ones will be greeted with even better devices of humility. Bell . Bobbitt . Lew . Besser Lincoln . . Velvin . . Second Row Carroll . Robertson . Neblett . Holt Bond . Rogers . Third Row . McLean Wells . Plishner . Steinhart . Didinsky Ellington . Fourth Row . Kinkead Brown . Latture . Fontaine . Black Graham . Fraley Page 234 WOMEN ' S VIGILANCE COMMITTEE PUNISHERS Freshman Women Who Violate Rules Must Answer to Them • The Women ' s Vigilance Committee serves a purpose comparable to that of the Men ' s Committee. Basing its corrective measures upon embarrassing sit¬ uations and attires, it imposes punishment upon Co- Educational freshmen with equal deliberateness. Lack¬ ing only in severity of punishment and drasticness of action, the Women ' s Vigilance Committee tends to¬ wards the formation of " lady like " and sophisticated freshmen. By making use of every women ' s love of finery and beautiful clothes, along with their inhibition towards ridicule, the committee has achieved remark¬ able success in controlling the erstwhile wayward new¬ comers. A mere mention of the dreaded name is suf¬ ficient to make any aspiring Freshman adhere strictly to the regulations set forth by dean and committee. » OFFICERS • MARY MARGARET WILSON . . . Chairman Q MEMBERS • © JULIA BOWEN_VIRGINIA CAIN_ JOSEPHINE COOK.MAURINE EDMISTON .MAMIE OLIVE FOGLEMAN.LOUISE GLEASON.MARGORY GREGORY. WILLA GRACE HARDY.BEVERLY HOPPER .BILLIE RUTH JAMES.MIKE MAY. LORENA MOORE .... WILMA McKELVEY MARY MARGARET WILSON.FRANCES WOFFORD Bowen . Cain . Edmiston . Fogleman Gregory . Hardy . Hopper . James . May Moore . McKelvey . Wilson . Wofford Page 235 WOMEN ' S RIFLE CLUB MEETS FAVORABLE RESPONSE Encounters Unavoidable Delay in Securing Use of Rifle Range • OFFICERS • EUGENIA CALLAHAN .... President JANE BRASHEARS .... Vice-President ELSIJANE TRIMBLE.Secretary ELIZABETH HUNT.Treasurer BETTY ALLIS.Team Captain LT. M. J. PLISHNER . . . Executive Officer • MEMBERS • • BETTY ALLIS . MARGUERITE ANDERSON . RUTH BATEMAN . . CORRINNE BATSON . . JANE BRASHEARS . . EUGENIA CALLAHAN . . RUTH CHERRY . . ELIZABETH ANN CRAIG . FORREST DUTTON . MAE ELLEN DVORACHEK . JUANITA HALSELL . ELIZABETH HUNT . RUTH HUTCHESON . MARGARET JAMES . ALICE JONES . DE LORIS KIESTER . BERNICE LICHTY . PAULINE LYONS . MILDRED McCANCE . WILMA McKELVEY . C. B. McNAUGHTON . HELEN MORGAN . MARY JETT ORTON . BARBARA PAYNE . RUTH PITTMAN . . . MARJORIE REID . . KATHLYN ROBINSON . . FRANCES ROSSNER . AILEEN ROWELL . LESLIE JANIE SAVAGE . ELAINE SMITH . COLLEEN STOCKFORD . ELSIE SUTTLE . MARY ELIZABETH SWISHER . BURNELLE TREECE . ELSIJANE TRIMBLE . . VIRGINIA VAUGHAN . . MARY MARGARET WILSON . MARVINE WRIGHT • • Revised and re-organized last year, the Wo¬ men ' s Rifle Club has had quite a successful season in spite of an unavoidable delay in acquiring the use of the range. The Women ' s Rifle Club sponsors the Girl ' s Rifle Team which represents the University in the Intercollegiate League. The Club has met with favorable response among the women of the Campus and it ' s existence and activities in the future seem to be assured. Front Row . Wright B. Jones . . Cherry Payne . Allis , Plishner Callahan . . Trimble Brashears . . . Halsell McKelvey . Second Row A. Jones . . Pittman Lichty . Hunt . Kiester Rowell .... James Hutcheson . . McClure Dutton . . Third Row Robinson . Orton . Lyons Stockford . . Savage Fourth Row . . Rowell Reid . . . Rossner McCance . Suttle Page 236 BLACKFRIARS PRESENT OUTSTANDING SHOW OF YEAR Group Enjoys Successful Year Under Capable Leadership of Mercer Wolff • OFFICERS • MERCER WOLFF.President VIRGINIA HINKLE .... Vice-President HELEN GILE .... Secretary-Treasurer • MEMBERS • FRANCES ARKY RUTH AUSTIN BETTIE BARNES KATHRYN BELL GRAHAM BLACK JOHN BRANCH ELAINE BRAUGHTON MILDRED DANFORTH VICTOR DIDINSKY HELEN GILE ANNETTE HARLEY MRS. ADELE HEERWAGEN SHIRLEY HEDRICK BETSY HENDRICK VIRGINIA HINKLE BILLIE RUTH JAMES ALICE JONES ELI LEFLAR clem McClelland SIDNEY McMATH HENRY MULLIS BARBARA PAYNE MIKE PLISHNER J. A. ROWLES JAMES ROY MIKE SBAR ANN SIMMS STANLEY STERNBERG MARY JANE THOMPSON ELSIJANE TRIMBLE MILTON TWEDELL BURKETT WAMSLEY MERCER WOLFF CECIL WIGHT • Blackfriars, National Honorary Dramatic Fraternity, enjoyed one of its most successful years under the able leadership of MERCER WOLFF, who is at the present time National President of the organ¬ ization. " I ' ll Leave It To You " , a three-act comedy, by Noel Coward, was the first presentation of the semester. The play was produced by Betty Lighton, and leading roles were taken by J. A. " Rosy " Rowles, Elaine Braughton, Adele Heerwagen, Henry Mullis, Francis Arky, and Burkett Wamsley. The final presentation of the year was " The Swan, by Molnar—one of the most beautiful productions ever given on the University of Arkansas stage. Leads in the production were taken by Anita Mitchell, Henry Mullis, Elaine Braughton, Sidney McMath, Stanley Sternberg, and John Branch. Arky . Austin . Barnes . Bell . Second Row . Black Branch . Braughton . Didinsky . Third Row . Danforth Gile . Harley . Hedrick . Fourth Row . Hendrick Hir.kle . James . Jones . Fifth Row . Lef lar McClelland . McMath . Payne . Sixth Row . Plishner Rowles . Roy . Sbar . Seventh Row . Simms Sternberg . Thompson . Trimble . Eighth Row . Twedell Wamsley . Wolff . Wight Page 237 UNIVERSITY THEATRE PRESENTS TWO PREMIERE PERFORMANCES Plays by V. L. Baker and John Montgomery Produced on Campus by Members of Group • OFFICERS • ELAINE BRAUGHTON .... President CECIL WIGHT.Vice-President GEORGE KERR.Secretary ALICE JONES.Treasurer VIRGIL BAKER.Director M. J. PLISHNER.Pub. Manager • MEMBERS • • FRANCES ARKY_RUTH AUSTIN_ GRAHAM BLACK_ELAINE BRAUGHTON_ MILDRED DANFORTH.VICTOR DIDINSKY . . . EDWIN GIDEON . . . HELEN GILE . . . MARY KATE GILMORE_WILLA GRACE HARDY_ ANNETTE HARLEY_ADELE HEERWAGEN- ROBERT IRELAND_ALICE JONES .... GEORGE KERR_ELOISE KINARD_BERNICE LICHTY .MILDRED McCANCE.ROBERT MAIN .JOHN MONTGOMERY.VIRGINIA MONTGOMERY .... WILLIAM PENROSE • MEMBERS • RUTH PITTMAN . . . MIKE PLISHNER . . . SARABEL ROBERTS .... JAMES ROY .... MICHAEL SBAR . . . . HENRY SEIDEL .... EARL SIMPSON DAVE SOKOLOV_KATHLEEN SULLIVAN_ BURNELLE TREECE .... GLADYS WELCH CECIL WIGHT • • The University Theatre was organized in Oc¬ tober, 1932, and now has a large membership com¬ posed of students who wish to take part in all phases of dramatic activity. The Theatre is sponsored by V. L. Baker, and is the official dramatic organization of the department of speech. This year the organization presented two premiere performances of new plays. One was " Undertow " , by John Montgomery, and the other " Spanish Diggin ' s " by Virgil L. Baker. Other outstanding plays presented were: " Cock Robin " , " Journey ' s End " , " Spreading The News " , " Comedy of Errors " , and " Riders to the Sea " . Arlcy . Austin . Black . Braughton Danforth . Didinsky . Second Row Gideon . Gile . Gilmore . Hardy Harley . Jones . Kerr . Third Row . Kinard . Lichty . McCance Main . Pittman . Plishner . Roberts Fourth Row . Roy . Sbar . Simpson Sullivan . Treece . Welch . Wight Page 238 WESLEY PLAYERS METHODIST DRAMATIC CLUB Has Found a Definite Place in Campus Activities • OFFICERS • WILLIAM DYER.President ONITA LEE WINFREY . . . Vice-President MARIAN SCHWARTZ . . Secretary-Treasurer ROBERT L. MAIN.Librarian • MEMBERS • • DAVID BATEMAN.MARIAN BRINSON.JOHN BROWN.LEE CLINE.MAE ELLEN DVORACHEK. WILL H. DYER.HELEN SILE.ELWIN GILLILAND.HELEN GRAHAM.L. A. GRAHAM.LOIS HITE.JOHN HOLLOMON.JOHN HUDSPETH. MAY CORRINNE HUNT.ELWIN HURLEY .RUTH HUTCHESON.MASTON JACKS.THERESA JEFFERSON. HELEN JOHNSON.JOHN KANE. MARY KANE.ELI LEFLAR.BERNICE LICHTY.ROBERT MAIN.REX MULLEN.ZOLA MULLEN.OTIS MUSGRAVE.RUTH PITTMAN. DOUGLAS SAXON.THELMA SCROGGS .MARY ETHEL SMYERS.HELEN SPEARS.HELEN ROSE TITTLE. RUSSELL WIDMER.CECIL WIGHT. RUTH YANCEY.WILLIAM YANCEY • • Wesley Players has found a definite place in the lives of University students interested in dramatics. It is an organization composed of all Methodist young people and their friends, who are interested in dra¬ matic production. Beside dramatic production for the school, the organization co-operates with the various churches in the presentation of seasonal plays and re¬ ligious dramas. Bateman . Brinson . Brown . Cline . Dvorachek . Dyer Gile . Gilliland . H. Graham . L. A. Graham . Hite Hollomon . Hudspeth . Hunt . Hurley . Hutcheson Jacks . Jefferson . Johnson . J. Kane . M. Kane Lefiar . Lichty . Main . R. Mullen . Z. Mullen Musgrave . Pittman . Saxon . Scroggs . Smyers Spears . Tittle . Widmer . Wight . R. Yancey W. Yancey Page 239 Y. W. C. A. PROMOTES CHRISTIAN WORK ON CAMPUS Every Woman Student at the University Invited to Take an Active Part • MEMBERS • WILMA JANE ALFORD MARJORIE ALLRED FRANCIS BADGETT WINNIFRED BITTINGER PAULA BRAUN JOE BLUNK SCOTTY CLARK MILDRED CROSS ANN DuBARD MARION DIXON MAMIE OLIVE FOGLEMAN RENNA KATHERINE FRANLIN HELEN GRAHAM WILLA GRACE HARDY PAULINE HEMPHILL NEVA HILL BEVERLY HOPPER LYNN HOWLETT JESSAMINE HUFF BILLY RUTH JAMES ALICE JONES MARIE MAINARD GRACE MARLEY WANDA MILHOAN MARGARET McALLISTER RUTH McCORD BETTY ALLEN NETTLESHIP FRANCES PITTMAN LAURA SHRODE ANN SIMMS MARY LOUISE SANDERS EUGENIA STACY MARY JANE THOMPSON FRANKE WEST PAULINE FRIDDLE WHEELER AMY WOOLWINE LEWISE WYATT Alford . Allred . Bittinger . Braun . Blunk . Second Row . Clark . Cross . DuBard . Dixon . Fogleman Third Row . Franklin . Graham . Hardy . Hemphill Hill . Fourth Row . Hopper . Howlett . Huff James . Jones . Fifth Row . Mainard . Marley Milhoan . McAllister . McCord . Sixth Row . Pittman Shrode . Simms . Sanders . Stacy . Seventh Row Thompson . West . Wheeler . Woolwine . Wyatt Page 240 YOUNG MEN ' S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION Has Gone Far Under the Leadership of Mr. Gregson • OFFICERS • • MEMBERS • MARVIN CARTER.President CYRIL E. RICKETT .... Vice-President EARL WILDY.Secretary THOMAS QUAY.Treasurer W. S. GREGSON .... General Secretary • MEMBERS MARK ABLES DAVID BEATTIE LAWSON BOBBITT HOWARD BOND MILTON BRACK JAMES S. BROWN JOHN H. BROWN A. B. CHAPMAN ELLSWORTH CHUNN CHESTER CONE EMMETT EDWARDS IVAN GILLILAND LOWELL GOFORTH CLAY HANSEN ETHAN HANSEN JOHN HARRISON FRANK HOLT HARLAN HOLT HOWARD HOLTHOFF ELMER HONEA LEO HONEA HORACE JENNINGS TROY JENNINGS HARRY JOHNSON JOHN KANE LONGLEY KIRBY J. C. LEMM W. L. LITTLE HOWARD MAINARD BRUCE MILLER EDWARD J. MOUT ernest McDonald WARREN NANCE CRAWFORD NORMAN FLOYD OLIVE JIM PINNELL FRANK PITTMAN HOWARD RIDDER HOWARD THORPE HENRY TUCK JAMES WARTEN JIM WILCOXEN OWEN WILLIAMS CHESTER WILLIAMS MARCUS WILLIAMS BILL YANCEY ft ft ft ft ft 1 — - V ... %- X- .: m ltohi JBB jHRN JHH % V Jil iHB ft ft ft o. o •v . 5=r rs ft ft ft ■ . . : o. ft ft ft ft CM ft ft ft Miller . Nance . Olive . Pinnell . Pittman . Quay Rickett . Thorpe . Tuck . Warten . Wilcoxen . Wildy M. Williams . O. Williams . Yancey Bobbitt . Bond . Brack . Brown . Carter . Chunn Cone . Edwards . Gilliland . Goforth . C. Hansen E. Hansen . Harrison . F. Holt . H. Holt . Holthoff E. Honea . L. Honea . Jennings . Johnson . Kane Kirby . Little . Mainard Page 241 BAPTIST STUDENT UNION ACTIVE IN CAMPUS RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS Every Baptist Student Is a Potential Member • OFFICERS • President VESTER WOLBER 1st Vice-President A. B. CHAPMAN 2nd Vice-President EDITH MAE HAND 2nd Vice-President HELEN SUE PEARSON 3rd Vice-President LOREN JOLLY Secretary FLORINE FLETCHER DR. H. W. BLALOCK Sponsor Reporter WILBUR ARMSTRONG Reporter J. H. HARKEY Y. W. A. Representative DOROTHEA ROMMEL B. Y. P. U. Representative Treasurer JOHN BROWN Sunday School Representative MARY PORTER Sunday School Representative GUS HENDERSON Student Secretary IRENE PEARSON G The Baptist Student Union is a Southwide movement which has been in existence since 1920. It includes organizations for each of the seventeen states of the South, as well as for each college within the state. The local, state, and southwide B. S. U. ' s have as their purpose the directing of the religious activity of the Baptist students in their respective fields. A local union is the connecting link between a college and the Baptist church or churches of the college town. Membership in the B. S. U. is contingent upon member¬ ship in one of the unit organizations of the B. S. U.; that is, one must belong to a Sunday school class, the B. Y. P. U., the Y. W. A., or the Life Service Band. Every Baptist student is a potential member of the B. S. U. The officers of the B. S. U., together, with a repre¬ sentative from each of the unit organizations, make up an executive committee known as the B. S. U. Council. The council correlates the work of the unit organiza¬ tions. The council exists not for itself, but that the Sunday school, the B.Y. P. U., the Y. W. A., and the Life Service Band may be magnified. I. Pearson Wolber Brown H. Pearson Greer Rommel Hand Armstrong Harkey Harness Jolly Henderson Fletcher Page 242 HILLEL BEGINS YEAR WITH RECEPTION FOR FACULTY Holy Day Services Presented on Campus for First Time in History of Organization • OFFICERS • M. J. PLISHNER.President BERNARD ZELNICK .... Vice-President BENJAMIN GINSBERG . . Secretary-Treasurer BERNARD YESNER . . . Publicity Manager • MEMBERS • PHILLIP ARNO JOSEPH BORN LEONARD COHEN MARK R. COHEN VICTOR DIDINSKY DAVID DORFMAN ALEXANDER ELLMAN S. J. ETTMAN SIDNEY FADEN JACK FEINMAN SEYMOUR FINEBERG SAM J. FELLER GEORGE FREED IRVING FREY BENJAMIN GINSBERG ARNOLD GOULD ROBERT KAGAN ALEXANDER KLEINMAN AARON KNYPER JACK KOLCHINSKY MOE KREGSTEIN MAX LEVINE ISAIH LEVINE WILLIAM MAISEL ARTHUR MARCUS BENJAMIN MATT HOWARD MORGANBESSER ABRAHAM OKUN LOUIS PADWISOCKA PAUL PHILLIPS MEYER PLISHNER NATHANIEL PRICE MANNIE RIESENBERG ARTHUR RUTTKAY JULIUS SANKIN HENRY SEIDEL JOSEPH SHAY ROBERT SILLINS DAVID SILVER ARNOLD SPITZ AARON STEIGLER STANLEY STERNBERG THEODORE SYLVAN HARRY TAUB FRANKLIN WASKOWITZ ABRAHAM WEINSTOCK MAXWELL WEINSTOCK BERNARD YESNER BERNARD ZELNICK HERMAN ZOUDERER • Aided in it ' s activities by the Arkansas Jewish Assembly, the University Hillel organization has pre¬ sented varied and interesting programs during the year. In fostering it ' s religious, cultural, and social aims, the group started the year with a reception tend¬ ered to faculty members, new students, and the Fort Smith delegation. For the first time in the history of it ' s existence, Holy Day services were held on the campus by the organiza¬ tion for the Jewish New Year, and the Day of Atone¬ ment. First Row . Okun . Phillips . Plish ner . Price . Second Row . Riesenberg . Ruttkay . Sankin . Schulman Third Row . Schwalbe . Shay . Si 11 ins . Spitz . Fourth Row . Steiger . Sternberg . Sylvan . Taub . Fifth Row Waskowitz . Weinstock . Yessner . Zelnick . Zouderer First Row . Born . Cohen . Didinsky . Dorfman . Second Row . Ellman . Ettman . Faden . Fineman . Third Row Feller . Freed . Fray . Ginsberg . Fourth Row . Gould Kagan . Klineman . Knyper . Kregstein . Fifth Row Levine . Lew . Maisel . Marcus . Matt Page 243 A. D. A. DIRECTS AGRI DAY ACTIVITIES " Barn-Warmin ' " Given Soon After Opening of School Each Year • Agri Day Association, better known as A. D. A., is the organization which sponsors the annual cele¬ bration of the students of the College of Agriculture. The association was formed in 1917 and has continued to function each year in the presentation of a carnival featuring exhibits from various departments of the Agri college, a parade, and an Agri Ball. Amy Wool- wine reigned as queen of the Agri Day this year, and Bill Shaw served as A. D. A. manager. In addition to sponsoring the activities of Agri Day, the association is in charge of arrangements for an an¬ nual " Barn-Warmin ' " , given soon after the beginning of the school year, and a spring picnic and barn dance at the University Experiment Station farm. Each stu¬ dent of the College of Agriculture shares in the ex¬ penses of these enterprises, and each has a vote in the election of A. D. A. officers. Shaw . Read . Harness . Gregory • OFFICERS • BILL SHAW.Manager ALICIA READ .... Assistant Manager IVA HARNESS.Secretary ELMER GREGORY.Treasurer Page 244 AGRIS CHOOSE QUEEN AND OUTSTANDING STUDENTS Traveler Announces Results of Annual Election on Agri Day • Agri Day is the biggest day of the year for Agri students. It begins months in advance with the planning of floats, take-offs and exhibits by all stu¬ dents. The floats and take-offs are assembled into a parade through the campus and town. A queen is elected to reign over the events of the day. The day is climaxed by a gingham dress and overall dance at the gym. Each year four senior girls and four senior boys are named by the Agri students as the Who ' s Who of the Agri college, based on their outstanding activities in the college. WHO ' S WHO IN THE AG SCHOOL Helen Eidson . Ruby Jewel Lipe . Jessamine Huff . Iva Harness . William E. Shaw . J. Arie Russell . Ralph Whitmore Floyd Olive Page 245 4-H CLUB ENCOURAGES EFFICIENCY Its Members Must Have Had Previous Club Work • OFFICERS • ORTIS BARNETT.President IVAN GILLILAND .... Vice-President CARRIE BOYD.Secretary JOE COX.Treasurer © The University 4-H Club was founded De¬ cember, 1929, as an organization for students who have completed one or more years of Club work before entering the University. The purpose of the Club is to develop qualities of leadership, to increase knowl¬ edge of state and national club work, to encourage members of state 4-H Clubs to enter the College of Agriculture, and to become more efficient workers in the field of agricultural extension service. Page 246 UNIVERSITY 4-H CLUB • MEMBERS • • CHARLES ALLISON.ORTIS BARNETT.CARRIE BOYD.JAMES L BROWN.JOHN BROWN.MURREY CAMPBELL.JOE COX.JOHN CRAVENS.WILLIAM B. DENTON. WILLIE BELL DUKE.ELWIN GILLILAND. IVAN GILLILAND.LOWELL GOFORTH. FAYE GOREY.HELEN GRAHAM. ELMER GREGORY.CLAY HANSEN. ETHAN HANSEN_IVA HARNESS_GRACE JEWELL LINCOLN.WILMA McKELVEY .JESSIE MITCHELL.WOODROW NICKELS.FLORENCE PITTS.EDD CYRIL RICKETT.GEORGE ROBERTSON .FREEMAN ROBINSON.BILL SCHROEDER.BILL SHAW.THOMAS SILVEY.ELLEN SPEARS.MARY WHITE .EARL WILDY.ADA WINTERS Allison . Barnett . Boyd Brown . Campbell . Cox Cravens . Denton . Duke Gilliland . Goforth . Gorey Graham . Gregory . C. Hansen . E. Hansen . Harness Lincoln . McKelvey . Mitchell Nickels . Pitts . Rickett Robertson . . . Robinson Schroeder . Shaw . Silvey Spears . White . Wildy Winters Page 247 4-H CLUB HOUSE FIRST OF ITS KIND Past Four Years Have Seen Great Increase in Membership • OFFICERS • JESSIE MITCHELL.President MARY MARGARET WILSON . . Vice-President CARRIE BOYD.Secretary AMY WOOLWINE.Treasurer MARY WHITE.House Manager • • MEMBERS • • CHARLEEN ALLISON.CARRIE BOYD.AGNES DALTON.MARY DANIEL.WILLIE BELL DUKE.DIXIE ELSWICK.MARY LUTTIE HARGER. IVA HARNESS.MAY CORRINNE HUNT .GRACE JEWELL LINCOLN.RUTH McCORD.WILMA McKELVEY.JESSIE MITCHELL.FLORENCE PITTS.THELMA SCROGGS.MARY ETHEL SMYERS. .ELLEN SPEARS.EDITH WHITE. SYBIL WHITE.MARY WHITE.MARY MARGARET WILSON.ADA WINTERS. AMY WOOLWINE Allison . Boyd . Dalton . Daniel . Second Row . Duke Elswick . Harger . Harness . Third Row . Hunt Lincoln . McCord . McKelvey . Fourth Row . Mitchell Pitts . Scroggs . Smyers . Fifth Row . Spears . E. White . M. White . S. White . Sixth Row . Wilson Winters . Woolwine • The 4-H Club House was organized in 1933 under the sponsorship of the University of Arkansas 4-H Club. It was the first organization of its kind with the aims and policies toward a similar national organ¬ ization. The past four years have been very sucessful with the membership increasing and the original pur¬ poses being carried out. Page 248 HOME ECONOMICS CLUB ONE OF CAMPUS ' LARGEST Promotes Friendship and Social Life Among Its Members • OFFICERS AMY WOOLWINE.President HELEN EIDSON.Vice-President CLARETTA CAMERON .... Secretary JESSIE MITCHELL.Treasurer MISS MADGE COBLE.Sponsor 9 MEMBERS • CHARLEEN ALLISON MARGARET ANDERSON CORRINNE BEASLEY PEARLIE FAYE BIRKHEAD CARRIE BOYD FLORIENE BURKE LORRAINE BURNS CLARETTA CAMERON ROBERTA CARPENTER ROBERTA CUMMINGS MAE ELLEN DVORACHEK HELEN EIDSON DIXIE ELSWICK MAMIE OLIVE FOGLEMAN LOUISE GARDNER FAYE GOREY IVA HARNESS RUTH MAE HODGE JESSAMINE HUFF RUTH HUTCHESON JOSEPHINE LEWIS GRACE JEWEL LINCOLN RUBY JEWEL LIPE PAULINE LYONS FLORENCE McCARTY RUTH McCORD FRANCES McELROY MARY McCROSKEY WILMA McKELVEY ERNESTINE McLEMORE CELIA MIRES JESSIE MITCHELL EVELYN MULLINS CORRINNE PARKER MARTHA PATTON LINA JUNE PAUL ALLIE PICKELL FLORENCE PITTS ALICIA READ MARGARET REAVIS RUBELLE ROARK DOROTHEA ROMMELL ANN SIMMS EVELYN SNODGRASS ELLEN SPEARS HELEN SPEARS HAZEL SWINDLER MILDRED WEIR HELEN WHITE MARY WHITE MARY MARGARET WILSON ADA WINTERS AMY WOOLWINE • The Home Economics Club on this campus, founded in 1921, is open to all students taking courses in Home Economics, and is affiliated with both the State and American Home Economics Association. The club has as its aims: to create a spirit of good will and fellowship among the girls in the Home Eco¬ nomics department; to give the girls some knowledge of the vocational opportunities based on home eco¬ nomics training; and to promote the growth and wel¬ fare of the home economics department. McCord . McCroskey . McElroy . McKelvey . McLemore Second Row . Parker . Patten . Paul . Pickell . Pitts Third Row . Read . Roark . Rommel . Sims . Snodgrass Fourth Row . E. Spears . H. Spears . Swindler . Weir . White Fifth Row . M. White . Wilson . Winters . Woolwine Allison . Anderson . Beasley . Birknead . Boyd . Second Row . Burke . Burns . Cummings . Dvorachek . Eidson Third Row . Elswick . Fogleman . Gardner . Gorey Harness . Fourth Row . Hodge . Huff . Hutcheson Lewis . Lincoln . Fifth Row . Lipe . Lyons . Mitchell Mires . Mullins Page 249 WOMEN ' S LEAGUE STRIVES FOR A CLOSER ORGANIZATION OF CAMPUS CO-EDS Attempts to Overcome the Clannishness of Campus Social Groups • OFFICERS • MARGARET JACOWAY . . . President LAURA SHRODE. Treasurer BILLIE RUTH JAMES .... Vice-President JO BLUNK. Secretary Jacoway . James . Blunlc . Shrode The Women’s League was organized at the University of Arkansas in 1926 by the women students of the institution with the purpose of bringing about a closer unity and a more concerted organization among the women students. The organization became active immediately and has seen a steady growth. The League attempts to promote good fellowship and co-operation among the women students and to uphold the highest standards of honor, scholarship, and loyalty to the University. Women who would other¬ wise remain comparative strangers due to the clannish¬ ness of campus social groups, are brought into close contact. Other colleges and universities adopted the idea of a banded body of women and have founded similar organizations to promote cooperation among women students. We feel a little pride in the fact that Ar¬ kansas was a pioneer in this field. Page 250 IN MEMORIAM BOOK number SEVEN M L T A R Y COLONEL WHITE SEES MILITARY TRAINING AS AID Justified Self-Confidence and the Ability to Direct Men Outstanding Benefits Derived • " Since 1862 military training in the colleges and universities of the United States has played an im¬ portant part in the development of leadership in the young men of our Nation. " From the standpoint of national defense it is but natural that our government looks to college trained men for its leaders in national military emergencies. The Reserve Officers Training Corps creates a reserve of trained military leaders for this purpose. " The same qualities required for a successful military career are necessary to achievement in most civil oc¬ cupations. Respect for authority, promptness, neat¬ ness, loyalty, and a spirit of cooperation are among the qualities emphasized in the training of all Reserve Officers Training Corps Cadets. " Justified self confidence, and ability to control and direct men are probably the outstanding benefits derived by Reserve Officers Training Corps officers, and the physical development, proper carriage, and co-ordination of body and mind are benefits received by all cadets which will be of great value to them in later life. LIEUTENANT COLONEL WHITE " It is felt that the military training given at the Uni¬ versity of Arkansas in past years has played its part in assisting students to attain positions of leadership throughout the State and Nation. " Page 253 THE REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS STAFF They Direct the Military Activities on the Campus • Joe Vol Butt, chosen to lead the University ROTC regiment is the ACE of our military men. Not only do his grades—an " A " for each and every semester of military art—show excellence, but Joe was chosen by a board of officers at the Fort Leavenworth camp as the best Arkansas student of 1935. He was tied for second highest rating in all the seventh corps area, composed of eight mid-western states. His second in command, Sam Swearingen, was award¬ ed the Scott D. Hamilton medal for winning the soph¬ omore drill competition when he was still taking the basic course in military. The direct link between regiment personnel and the commanding officer is Captain Adjutant Joe R. HERMAN S. SEELIG, Major First Battalion . GEORGE F. KERR, Major Second Battalion . ROBERT E. KAUFMAN, Major Third Battalion . HARRY G. SIMS, First Battalion Adjutant . CLEMENT B. McCLELLAND, Second Battalion Adjutant . RUFUS N. GARRETT, Third Battalion Adjutant. Groves. Joe has spent three years in CMTC camps, three years in camp with the Arkansas national guard, and four years with the ROTC. He has competed in the national rifle championship matches and is cap¬ tain of the University Rifle Team. Page 254 THE CADET STAFF They Play an Integral Part in Perfecting the Military Units BERRY . . . BOND . . . ELLINGTON . . . HARRIS . . . I BISON . . . FRANK KELLY . . FRED KELLY . . LIVING¬ STON . . McConnell . . nobles . . NOVELLINO . . OSWALT . . PEN¬ ROSE . . STARBIRD . . TEAGUE . . WOODRUFF AUSTIN . . . BARRON . . . BEARD . . . BISSELL . . . BOWEN . . . BUTT . . . BYLANDER . . CARSON . . CHUNN . . . COLEMAN . . . DIDINSKY . . . EILBOTT . . . ELDRIDGE . . . GAGE . . . GILMORE . . . GINSBURG . . . GREENING . . . GREGORY . .. GUNN . . . . HASKINS .... HOLT HORNOR , , , , HUTCHISON LEATHERMAN .... MAKRIS McConnell .... nelson NIXON . . . NORMAN . . . PHILBECK . . . ROBERTSON . . . SANSBURY . . . VAN SICKLE . . . VAUGHTERS . . . WALTERS . . . WARD . . . WAUGH • The Cadet Staff is composed of those students taking Advanced Military Art. It ' s purpose is to aid the Regular stationed officers in moulding the raw recruits into trained soldiers. Indeed difficult is the task, but their reward is ample in the eyes of every militarist—a smooth, clock-like performing regiment on the day of annual government inspection. Page 255 ELAINE BRAUGHTON.REGIMENTAL SPONSOR Chosen by Popular Vote of All Military Students • One of the most coveted honors on the campus, that of Regimental Sponsor, was this year won by Miss Elaine Braughton, a Chi Omega from Hot Springs. All students taking either the basic or ad¬ vanced course in Military Art are eligible to vote in the election in which the Sponsor is chosen. On all state occasions the Regimental Sponsor is escorted by the Cadet Colonel, and at the Annual Military Ball leads the grand march. i Page 256 THE FEMININE TOUCH FOR THE R. O. T. C Company and Regimental Staff Sponsors Who Are Present at All State Occasions JESSIE FRISBY, Regimental Adjutant Sponsor . . . MARTHA PATTEN, First Battalion . . . VIRGINIA CAIN, Lieutenant Colonel Sponsor .... ANNE PRITCHARD, Second Battalion . . . BETH MAXWELL, Third Battalion . . . BEVERLY BERRY, First Battalion Adjutant Sponsor • • 9 ERLINE CAMPBELL, Second Battalion Adjutant Spon¬ sor . . AGNES SOULE GARRETT, Third Battalion Ad¬ jutant Sponsor . . DOROTHY FARLEY, Company B . . BETTY SUE CUNNINGHAM, Company E. . . LOUISE McCULLOCH, Company C. . . DOROTHY METCALFE, Headquarters Company . . DOTTIE ANNE MAPES, Company A. . . LOIS HANNA, Com¬ pany F. . . SIDNEY BENNETT, Company G. Page 257 COMPANY A Captain Mapes One of Most Conscientious Staff Officers • OFFICERS • Captain WILLIAM H. MAPES First Lieutenant HOWARD W. BOND First Lieutenant FRANK KELLY First Lieutenant LINUS T. WILLIAMS Second Lieutenant EDWARD B. AUSTIN • CAPTAIN MAPES • OFFICERS • Second Lieutenant ERNIS E. GREGORY Second Lieutenant JOHN N. HUTCHISON Second Lieutenant HOWARD JONES Second Lieutenant LELAND F. LEATHERMAN Second Lieutenant WILLIAM L. NELSON Captain William Henry Mapes—known as " Preacher " in select circles—has had little success in leading his company to honors this year, but military officials rate him as the most conscientious officer in the University regiment. Perhaps his career in the engine school has made him a bit too meek for the browbeating of frosh soldiers. Page 258 COMPANY B Captain McMath Has Company Well Up in Race tor Honors • OFFICERS • Captain SIDNEY S. McMATH First Lieutenant JOHN T. LIVINGSTON First Lieutenant JULIUS J. WOODRUFF Second Lieutenant GEORGE T. BEARD • OFFICERS 9 Second Lieutenant JACK F. COLEMAN Second Lieutenant VICTOR DIDINSKY Second Lieutenant GEORGE A. MAKRIS Second Lieutenant zoe a. McConnell Second Lieutenant EDGAR B. WARD, JR. CAPTAIN McMATH 9 9 9 Captain Sidney McMath, the best known politician on the campus, has applied his talents to leading his company well up in the race for honors. " Sid " is well known for his military manner and his 9 piercing stares at blundering cadets—and also for his booming voice. But he resents the implication that he has tried to politic the military staff into giving Company B the excellent rating it has maintained. 9 Page 259 I LJS COMPANY C No Undue Importance Attached to Rank by Captain Bourland • OFFICERS • JAMES F. BOURLAND . JAMES T. BERRY . . FRED KELLY . . . JOHN L. OSWALT . . CALVIN E. CHUNN . REGINALD A. EILBOTT PAUL K. HOLMES . JAMES T. HORNOR . J. F. NORMAN . . FRANK G. ROBERTSON Captain First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant • James Fagan Bourland, captain of C com¬ pany, is too good-natured to assume a hard-boiled military " front " ; but has kept his " boys " well up in the drill ratings. Jimmy is one of the most popular officers, attaching no undue importance to his rank. James Fagan certainly does take pride in his capacity as advisor to Guidon, the female infantry. • CAPTAIN BOURLAND Page 260 COMPANY E Setting the Pace for All Others in Drill Ratings • OFFICERS • WILLIAM R. YANCEY . ALEXANDER E. HARRIS JAMES L. I BISON . . JAMES C. STARBIRD . MAX BARRON . . . RICHARD M. BYLANDER JACK M. CARSON . . ROLFE C. ELDRIDGE, JR. ORLANDO L. GREENING JOHN H. GUNN . . Captain First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant • Captain " Bill " Yancey built one of the worst companys on the drill field into an organization that sets the pace for all others in efficiency. His work has been recognized by the official staff by giving him the honor ribbons time after time. And, though " Soob " has difficulty concentrating on subjects other than co-ed and fraternity, military work has managed to divert him enough to let him apply his talent. • CAPTAIN YANCEY Page 261 COMPANY F Captain Kinkead Leads One of Hardest Working Companies CAPTAIN KINKEAD • OFFICERS • EWING W. KINKEAD . Captain RAPLE C. ELLINGTON . First Lieutenant john a. McConnell . First Lieutenant JOSEPH J. NOVELLINO First Lieutenant THOMAS F. BUTT . . Second Lieutenant WILLIAM T. HASKINS . Second Lieutenant THOMAS D. NIXON . . Second Lieutenant GEORGE L. SANSBURY . Second Lieutenant RAY B. VAUGHTERS . . Second Lieutenant THURMOND L. WALTERS Second Lieutenant • Captain Ewing Kinkead hesitated over listing Boy Scout as " previous military training " on the RAZORBACK questionnaire, but he doesn ' t hesitate when military affairs are the question of the moment. Perhaps his enrolling in the Agri school has broughf unfair prejudice against his command on the drill field, but he insists that he has had plenty of enjoy¬ ment from his military work, drill rating or no. COMPANY G Captain Wight Has Well Balanced List of Military Activities • OFFICERS • CECIL W. WIGHT . Captain JAMES H. NOBLES, JR. . First Lieutenant WILLIAM O. PENROSE . . First Lieutenant EDWARD B. BISSELL . . Second Lieutenant EDWARD GAGE . . . Second Lieutenant BENJAMIN GINSBURG . Second Lieutenant TOMMIE M. PHILBECK . Second Lieutenant RICHARD C. WAUGH . Second Lieutenant • " Wight " makes might in military circles, and Captain Cecil Wight maintains a high standard of proficiency both in his campus and military affairs. CAPTAIN WIGHT His record shows an unusually well balanced list of activities, and a highly complimentary record as a soldier, both in camp and on campus. Page 263 HEADQUARTERS COMPANY Captain Rucker Directs Early Morning Drill Section e OFFICERS Captain CHOICE R. RUCKER Second Lieutenant GEORGE W. GILMORE CAPTAIN RUCKER • OFFICERS • Second Lieutenant JOHN F. HOLT Second Lieutenant CLIFFORD J. VAN SICKLE • Choice Rucker is a captain both on the drill and football field. Since the headquarters company is the black sheep of the regiment, and made up largely of athletes who cannot meet drill in the after¬ noon, he has more fun than most student officers. • But he has to endure the jeers of fellow officers be¬ cause the headquarters company is the scrapegrace of the campus army. And this is no reflection on Captain Rucker ' s ability. Page 264 SCABBARD AND BLADE Members Are Chosen for Proficiency and Interest in Military Affairs • Scabbard and Blade is a national honorary military fraternity which has as its chief purposes the creation of a closer relationship be¬ tween the military departments in our American universities and the spreading of intelligent information concerning our nation ' s military re¬ quirements. Members of Scabbard and Blade are selected from among the students enrolled in the ad¬ vanced courses in Military Training near the end of the junior year. Men are chosen in accordance with their proficiency • and interest in military affairs, personal character, and leadership abilities. Barron . Beard . Bourland . Bylander . Ellington . Garrett . Gilmore . Gregory . Groves . Gunn . Harris Hutchison . Ibison . Frank Kelly . Fred Kelly . Kerr . Kinkead . Makris . Mapes . McConnell . Nobles . Norman Phil beck . Rucker . Sims . Swearingen . Teague . Vaughters . Wight CAPTAIN YANCEY • OFFICERS • Captain WILLIAM R. YANCEY First Lieutenant SAM SWEARINGEN Second Lieutenant CECIL W. WIGHT First Sergeant R. N. GARRETT Page 265 PERSHING RIFLES Attempts to Promote Interest in Military Work • OFFICERS • JOE VOL BUTT.Captain SIDNEY McMATH .... First Lieutenant GEORGE MAKRIS . . . Second Lieutenant WILLIAM HASKINS . . . Second Lieutenant J. PAUL CHAMPION .... First Sergeant • Pershing Rifles, a national honorary military fraternity for basic students of R. O. T. C. units, was f ounded in 1893 by John J. Pershing. It was formed on the principles of promoting interest in military work, developing men of greater value to the R. O. T. C. and O. R. C., and inciting proficiency in drill. The local unit, Company F of the Second Regiment, was organized by Captain C. S. Myers, who con¬ ducted a series of tryouts to select the outstanding sophomores in the R.O.T. C. unit. The petition to Pershing Rifles resulted in the establishment of a chapter of the organization here on February 24, 1934. • Page 266 SEVENTH CORPS AREA RIFLE Captain Burt Directs Only Winners It Seems TEAM TEAM NO. I JOSEPH R. GROVES ALEXANDER E. HARRIS JAMES T. HORNOR ROBERT E. KAUFMAN EWING W. KINKEAD TEAM NO. 2 THOMAS F. BUTT DALE T. ELLIOTT EDWARD GAGE SIDNEY S. McMATH CHARLES L. SPENCER Harris Kinkead Captain Burt Groves Waugh Second Row Hornor Bourland Gage Butt Third row Elliott Spencer Swearingen McMath Kaufman McCauley Davidson • Thirty-two members of the R O. T. C. turned out in January for the try-outs for the Univer¬ sity Rifle Team. From these men fifteen were selected to fire in the Seventh Corps Area Intercollegiate Gallery Rifle Match, making a total score of 7343 out of a possible 8000, standing in Nth place among 16 teams entered. Five members of the R. O. T. C. Advanced Course took part in the Midwest Gallery Rifle Meet held at Kemper Military Academy, Boonville, Missouri, March 13 and 14, in competition with the other R. O. T. C. teams from universities, colleges, and military schools of the central states. In the team match, this team placed I Ith among 22 teams entered, with a total score of 700 out of a possible score of 800. Two teams represented the University of Arkansas in the National R. O. T. C. Rifle Competition for the William Randolph Hearst Trophy. Out of a total of 37 teams from Senior R. O. T. C. units in this Corps Area competing in the Hearst Match, Team No. I, with a total score of 881, out of a possible score of 1000, placed 18th, and Team No. 2, with a total score of 874, placed in the 22nd position. Page 267 GUIDON Aims for a Broader Understanding of Military Affairs captain McCulloch • Guidon, an honorary military organization include military drill and participation in the home- tor women, was chartered at the University in 1934 coming parade. It is an auxiliary to Scabbard and as a unit of the national organization. Its activities Blade. Perkins . Marley . Batson . Jacoway . Pittman . Second Row . Mahony . Hunt . Sanders . Beasley . Yancey Third Row . Wyatt . Thompson . Otte . Huff . Storms . DuBard • OFFICERS » LOUISE McCULLOCH.Captain FRANCES PITTMAN . . . First Lieutenant ISABEL STORMS . . . Second Lieutenant MARY LOUISE SANDERS . . First Sergeant RUTH YANCEY .... Company Clerk Page 268 Through the halls of “ Business ” pass the future executives of Arkansas BOOK number EIGHT ADVERTISEMENTS UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE " Everything the Student Needs " « « o » » " ON THE CAMPUS " « « o » » Prompt Attention to Mail Orders « « o » » Phone 250 EASON CO. FAYETTEVILLE ' S LEADING INSURANCE AGENCY Phone 99 Guisinger Music House PHONE 118 MUSICAL GOODS OF ALL KINDS Established 1905 DEDICATION To our friend Burkett Wamsley, the humor in this book is dedicated, not because its as stale as some of his cracks, but because of his connection with the humor magazine of the school, the ill-fated " Arkansas Stooge. " Burkett, at the time this book was distributed, was convalescing in a Tulsa hospital from a broken neck. Wamsley was guilty of the same old crime of which the infamous hog-wallow editors were convicted—trying to give the students what they wanted. In an effort to subtelly continue with this mild form of harmless anecdote, we trust that each and every one of you will realize what a difficult task it is to satisfy both sides. In succeeding on the one hand, we fail on the other. Old man censor weilds a convincing scythe. " FOREWORD " Had we our choice, we would elect, To end this book right here For Deans and so oft times eject Hog-Wallow " Eds " out on their ear. But after proper " pro and con " Mid Ripley ' s song and dance, We decided to, " sail on and on, " " Columbus took a chance. " So if this " Tripe " won ' t fill with Glee, You numerous lads and lassies, We still will get that said degree. NOTE: Rhyme scheme failing, the editors will be greatly grieved if the following does not stack up to your expectations. LEWIS BROTHERS CO. ALL KINDS OF SPORTING GOODS Appreciate Your Business J. C. PENNEY CO. FAYETTEVILLE ' S MOST ECONOMICALLY PRICED Department Store - +- Page 272 ODE TO A " HEEL " A fine young man they told me he was, Outstanding, clean moraled, and straight, But he proved he was kin as the Devil ' s cuz, A second class shoe he ' d help make. Just take a tip, and trust him not, That air is just a front! In " Horse ' s " columns he ' d be the top, The original " Arkansas " skunk. Perhaps you ' ve guessed who I ' m talking about, But if not here ' s a helpful word, Of all the bad, he ' s the worst of the lot, Known about campus as—(Editor of ' 36— ' 37) ! --—- When in Fayetteville . . . . THE MOUNTAIN INN WILL PUT YOU AT EASE WITH ITS FAMOUS HOSPITALITY I QUALITY FOOD POPULAR PRICES ----—- GRIN AND BEAR IT We hope your feelings aren ' t hurt, For this is only done in fun; These cracks were only meant for quirps, A friendly jest to everyone. But if you ' re mad because your name Appeared in print above, Or angry for a loss of fame Because you missed this move— We wish to take this little space To show our sincere feelings, And beg to have your humble grace, These wounds will soon be healing. You might as well design yourself To take it on the chin; Cause cursing will lend little help, She ' s printed now—YOUR time to grin! ! ! Page 273 PRICE-PATTON CLOTHING CO. " Style Headquarters " Phone 411 WEST SIDE SQUARE THE DAVIS FASHION SHOP FASHIONABLE ATTIRE FOR YOUNG LADIES READY-TO-WEAR HOSIERY, LINGERIE " On the Square " " QUERY " Marge Hunt is a cute little witch, She ' s had Holcomb, Nis ' , and now Mack in a twitch, ' Tis a mystery to all, How she makes these boys fall, Suggestions appreciated in answer to this???? List your suggestions here, Fellers: 2 3 4 - - — . . . COMPLIMENTS OF . . . THE McILROY BANK AND TRUST CO. FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS « « O » » •— »— " Serving This Section and the University Since 1871 " Page 274 SILVERMAN BROS. FOR FRATERNITY JEWELRY WATCH REPAIRING SEE SILVERMAN BROS. North Side Square THE CITIZENS BANK • STUDENT ' S BANK DOWN IN SHULERTOWN FAYETTEVILLE ARK. EXTRA —FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES SWEEP ELECTIONS— EXTRA Pi Phis, Tri Delts, Lambda Chis, Sigma Chis, Kappa Sigs, and Sig Alphs swing election in greatest landslide in history of the school. " Independent " of the non-fraternity vote, who never has been represented and has never wanted to be repre¬ sented, the big fraternity machine rolls under small fra¬ ternity and cow-college opposition, polishing them off with a overwhelming majority. The Chios, local girl ' s club, was reported to have been hardest hit, there being great wailing and gnashing of teeth at the thought of losing, after winning two years in succession. Mother " Howlett " consoled the girls with the thought that Cherry (boy friend) was going out to " get " the " sage of Poteau " and others who were responsible for the disaster. Voting started early election day, thousands of students crowding into the Y. M. C. A. building to stuff the ballot boxes, as the election officials winked at each other and asked " what the hell ' s the difference " . The election start¬ ed very quietly, except for occasional sound of gun fire as a non-fraternity man tried to slip into the polls to vote, but failed to elude the sharpshooters who were posted by the fraternity machine. Toward the end of the day, things began to get a little more lively, with the appear¬ ance upon the scene of Benny Goodman and his orches¬ tra, hired by the unrelinquishing fraternity group. A good time was had by all, but that wasn ' t enough. To climax the day off, the boys strolled down to Shuler and burned down George the Pamp ' s beer hall. It seems that people are showing a lack of interest in campus politics—Ah, for the good old days when elec¬ tions were exciting. 1 I 1 t We Print Your . . . OZARK GROCER 1 t 1 i " ARKANSAS TRAVELER " COMPANY 1 1 1 • 1 1 i i HIGH GRADE COMMERCIAL PRINTING . 1 ! t i l i W PROGRESSIVE STAR FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS 1 1 1 i PRINTING CO. I i i i FAYETTEVILLE Page 275 THE RED ■m CROSS DRUG STORE HAS THAT SNAPPY DELIVERY SERVICE OF % Toilet Goods £ Sodas £ Drugs £ Sandv iches Try That Delicious Red Cross Ice Cream The Student " Up-Town " Drug Store CARRIE AND THE GANG CAMPUS CAFETERIA Page 276 -—- -— FIRST NATIONAL BANK FT. SMITH, ARK. • Oldest National Bank in the State 64 Years ' Continuous Service THE DOMINANT FURNITURE STORE IN FT. SMITH EADS BROS. FURNITURE COMPANY FT. SMITH. ARK. Gracey the Goose—has finally passed on to her re- Would it be too much to ask if Eugenia Johnson has ward. ' Twere a dang fine meal—so we heard! ! ! Thanks ever found out she ' s in college:—Oh, well, allowances for the Invitation, shines! must always be made for one ' s age! ! ! - I Reynolds-Davis Grocery Co. ! | FT. SMITH, ARKANSAS | -4 A bit of Philozzophie might well go in here: THIS IS ON LOVE. Love is where you try to kiss a girl, and if you can, you wonder if she lets everybody kiss her, and if you can ' t, you wonder if she loves you—ah what ' s the difference— nobody would understand, anyhow. CALVERT-McBRIDE PRINTING CO. • " The District ' s Foremost Printers " • 20-22 North Eighth Street FT. SMITH, ARK. PORTER MIRROR AND GLASS COMPANY FORT SMITH, ARKANSAS ANNOUNCE THE OPENING OF A BUILDING SUPPLY WAREHOUSE North Second and " A” Streets Fort Smith, Arkansas Distributors for PRATT AND LAMBERT Paint . . Varnish . . Enamels Mirrors Rough- Plate GLASS Rolled Window Ornamental ...Metal Settings, Builder’s Supplies, Quality Brushes... Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Complete Line of P L Products Page 277 PORTRAITS, GROUPS, AND VIEWS IN THIS RAZORBACK WERE MADE BY ' McIntosh studio i I Fayetteville, Arkansas ! I « « o » » ! i I Negatives Are On File and Orders Can Be Filled at Any Time I 4 — — — —. w »«——«•—— » —— — ——— —--—— i j “On Dixon” I PALACE DRUG STORE J. P. OWENBY, Ph. G. I STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR OVER I ! TWENTY YEARS The i KClSlSL store STUDENT EMPLOYEES KNOW STUDENT WANTS Phone 677 I I I I i i I I I i I I i I I I I I I I I i I i i I i i Page 278 ACROSS THE CAMPUS John Jernigan has finally gone the way of all flesh. He crossed deep waters to see what was a-broad. • • • We nominate for the year ' s outstanding angler of the Isaac Walton league— " Charred " member Henry Lafay¬ ette Tuck. Even a fish knows better than to bite twice at the same hook, Dooney. • • • Is there any truth in the rumor that " Sweetheart ' s " pin has gone Kappa way on the rebound? Where does the Joplin Venus come in? • • • Will Andy Ponder ever make the grade over at the Chio house? • • • As a matter of information, we would like to inform Buck Ashcraft that there are some 1834 other students in the University. • • • Who will Grace Marley, three D white hope, finally net? • • • How long will Dick " Rough-house " Williams continue to take it on the chin????? • • • Quoted: Pritchard, " He was a ' tiger ' lily, but he ' s a shrinking violet now. " • • • Say, by the way, what ' s the score now, Koerner? Is it Frances May, Elizabeth Ann Craig, or just what is the score to date? • • • Years outstanding Success: One-man-Political-Machine McMath elects Braughton " regimental sponsor! " —Oh, well, might as well keep it in the family. • • • We would like to have a re-capitulation of the informa¬ tion divulged in the Tri-Delt house Homecoming night! ! • • • If Bruce T. Bullion were to get a nice new shiny car, would that help his failing cause with the Chio prexy elect? We doubt it . . . Might try a uniform with brass buttons, though. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS ATHLETIC TEAMS SELECT THE ALVIN Then select the hotel that is the choice of more prominent people in all walks of life. COMFORT PRESTIGE EXCELLENT FOOD All Rooms with Bath Rates from $2 S. J. STEWART, Manager Page 279 TIMES RECORD . . . SOUTHWEST AMERICAN TWO GOOD NEWSPAPERS Always Promoting the U. of A. FT. SMITH, ARKANSAS NAMES MAKE NEWS These names made news this year in Walter Wind¬ shield Williams ' scandal-bearing AS USUAL colyum. Linus was the gentleman who had the Kappa Bate boys (who claim credit for his election after swapping out on him) mad at him on accounta all the student loan baloney he put in the paper. The vigorous opposition went for naught as the loan went thru anyhow, but everybody found out who was editor of the Traveler. Also author of the famous " Non-frat Lad letters " which brought about his being called " Williams, the putrescent. " BUCK NOBLES—A one time potential big shot, Social- chairman Nobles got his five-dollar-per-student-dance-job for nothing, having " overlooked " his intiation fee into the non-partisan club and failing to secure the political sup¬ port of the organization called the Golden Tornadoes now. MARY McCROSKEY—Asked Choice Rucker if he saw the football game some time or another last fall—probab¬ ly trying to rope in the boy with the dreamy-eyes by mak¬ ing some of that dumb conversation at a student dance or sumpin ' . IKE POOLE—Athlete, Casanova, orator, given credit for certain rash statements made somewhere in the vicin¬ ity of the Tri Delt house Homecoming night. HENRY TUCK—Local playboy who slipped under Wells one time to be Mary Louise Sanders ' number one boy; got the proverbial digit when Bill Cain steps in and Sanders tells Doonie that she ' s going steady with Cain. Retaliation was hurried dates made with Veers, Storms, Barker, James, and Otte. (Anybody else?) LYNN HOWLETT—Influenced by K. A. Cherry (two- timer) double crosses politicking Makris and foils him in his efforts to line up the Carnall Hall votes for his club, the " non-partisan " Non-Partisans. DITTY CURL—Caused quite a sensation in the hotel down at Shreveport, it seems. At present, she is very successful in stringing Ed Bell and Bill Jackson along with much ease and grace (she thinks). - — | ELECTRICITY IS CHEAP | ! USE IT FREELY ! SOUTHWESTERN GAS ELECTRIC COMPANY Page 280 NAMES MAKE NEWS (Continued) JOHNSON WITT—White Cross wearer Witt invites sweet young thing to S. X. informal. " This one is really true to me " he told the press. HOWEVER, she joined the ranks of " Suction ' s " past flames and Witt re-joined the list of suckers, as she late-dated on him after the highly commended stomp . . . Ho hum . . . MARY ALEXANDER—Innocent little Chio, being very childish and not knowing just exactly what she wanted, passed up Wamsley for some guy that was just in town for the week-end—hasn ' t been doing so good since, they say. JACK WAGONER—Failing to get the Kap Bate nomination for Associated Prexy, denounces aforesaid club for boys and hitches up with Independent club for boys and girls. Yeah, this is the same guy that hollered " traitor " when Editor Williams fought the famous student loan bill .... Glass houses .... etc. . . TOM J. GENTRY—Boss Tweed of the successful Inde¬ pendent outfit. (Successful after his ousting). Makes big splash over at Pi Phi lodge these days—very similar to splash he made over at Delta Gamma house at one time. FIRST NATIONAL BANK THE STUDENTS ' BANK Capital, Surplus, and Profits $273,170.50 FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS OLDEST AND STRONGEST NATIONAL BANK IN NORTHWEST ARKANSAS BELLY-ACHE It seems that the town fogies here in Fayetteville are insistant upon turning a perfectly nice university into a school for the correction of incorrigibles. Perhaps if they would recall their " salad days " , the pressure would leviate slightly. After all there is much more to student life than just books. Also, a little item that needs metioning is that the merchants practically thrive on the money which is spent on the very items which they are trying to sup¬ press. ’Twould be a good idea to remember the man that cut open the goose that laid the golden egg every day. Page 281 .J, »f - ' —‘ ' " ' T ' " ' ' " ' ' " ' “ T " ‘ ’ " ' ’ " ' ' " ' ' " ' ' " ' ' " ' ' “ ' ' “’ ' " ’ ' " ‘•J 1 | Eat . . . !| MAJESTIC j SHIPLEY ' S i CAFE HOLSUM BUTERE0 | AND j • HONEY-CRUSHED WHEAT | i i BREAD | | " OPEN ALL NITE " l TO A BLIND DATE IN A SORORITY HOUSE Now, Bill, ' tis a sad, sad story, That I am about to relate, Tis ancient as proud " Old Glory, " Of the horrible results of a damn blind date. It happened during rush-week, The " Frat " was most insistent, THEY made the plans, and I was meek, A pledge has no resistance. I called for her at half-past eight, With vague and strange misgivings, It is the sad tale I now relate, How my expectations met with fate. We strolled into an enormous room, And sat and felt quite stupid, Talking of sports and recent tunes, While others about us played " Dan Cupid. " There wasn ' t even the slightest thing, We had in common for conversation: We talked of books and current things And about us were noises of osculation? A more terrible evening was never spent, Thank heavens that night is over, That girl is sure a first class " hant, " — Damn these fraternity " BROTHERS! " - FAYETTEVILLE ICE COMPANY OVER 25 YEARS OF SATISFACTORY SERVICE Fulbright Ice Cream and Crystal Ice BOTTLERS OF COCA-COLA -- Phone 527 Page 282 + --— COMPLIMENTS OF THE . . . OZARK PALACE ROYAL PICTURES AND STAGE SHOWS Continually Showing the New and Best FIRST ALL FAYETTEVILLE THEATRES and WM. F. (BILL) SONNEMAN, Mgr. ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY ' S 100% BOOSTERS THE BEST LAUNDERED SHIRT IN AMERICA X ficke u CLEANERS DYfR AUN R U H drV Leather and Suede Jackets Cleaned and Retinted or Redyed a Different Color PHONE 552 FAYETTEVILLE, ARK. Page 283 CAMPBELL BELL DRY GOODS COMPANY " UPTOWN AND ON THE SQUARE " 35 Years of Service fo University Students YOU: Can Have a Snappy Get-up Too! Just Take a Peek at These EXCLUSIVE LINES Merchandised in the University Manner FOR MEN ONLY Varsity Town Campus Clothes McGregor Sports Wear Florsheim Freeman Shoes Arrow Shirts Dobbs Style Park Hats Dunlop Golf and Tennis Goods FOR WOMEN ONLY Bradley Sports Wear Milgrim Mangon Dresses Mary Lee Shagmoor Coats Van Raalte Lingerie and Hose Vitality Shoes—Knox Hats LOOK FOR THIS LABEL OWNERS: H. M. LAWSON ' 17 R. W. WOOD ' 13 LILLIAN L. WOOD ' 14 AimiENTlC UNIVERSITY STYLES CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVES: DON FULLER NADIA WOOD " ORIGINATORS OF RAZORBACK APPAREL " ARKANSAS WESTERN GAS COMPANY " Serving Northwest Arkansas " « « o » » NATURAL GAS IS ECONOMICAL CLEAN CONVENIENT - MOLLOY-MADE cover quality is still serving the best books in the land—just as it did in the pioneer days of the modern yearbook. The cover on this volume is a physical expression of that fine quality and workmanship which the MOLLOY trade-mark has always symbolized THE DAVID J. MOLLOY PLANT 2 8 5 7 North CHICAGO Western Avenue ILLINOIS Page 285 — STUDENTS We Wish to Extend to You Our Thanks and Appreciation for Your Past Patronage and Hope to Be of Continued Service to You in the Future ROUND TRIP RATES FROM FAYETTEVILLE Little Rock Pine Bluff Hot Springs Memphis $7.20 $8.75 $7.20 $ 10.20 Texarkana Tulsa Harrison El Dorado $8.65 $4.35 $3.70 $ 10.45 UNION BUS TERMINAL 103 N. COLLEGE AVE. PHONE 65 OUR PREFERENCE FOR THE BEST CHILLED FRESHMAN Marie Fearing—oh yeah—we ' re simply roasting! Just been wondering, Marie, how many votes you got election day for Betty Sue by giving dates to the poor innocent country boys you ran down—and if so, how many you broke the next day after you slept the election off. Also interested in knowing how well you did by your best boy friend, Andy Ponder, the same day! Incidentally, our thanks to Jacoway, Yancey, and a few more that put so much time on the business-end of the — ■ — ■ — — — — — — — ■ — ■ — — ■ — ■ — — ■ — — — ■ — — — — — • — ■ — — — ■ — — ■ — ■ — ' ■■■ ■■■ i i j GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR CAR | LION KNIX-KNOX GASOLINE LION MOTOR OIL | j PENNZOIL j KELLY-SPRINGFIELD TIRES LION OIL REFINING COMPANY “An All-Arkansas Institution” T. H. BARTON, President EL DORADO, ARKANSAS Razorback. Dang white of you ' ins to come around offer¬ ing your services so much. Really, you saved us kabitzers up here a lot of worry with such valuable assistance. M TOUGHIE " Tough as a steak was Bullion the snake Hard boiled as a picnic egg He went on the loose with Grace the goose Drinking Cocoa-Cola by the keg. Page 286 THE SMART MODERN COLLEGIENNE GOES .... ' ROUND THE CLOCK WITH THE BOSTON STORE " Top to Tip, She ' s Tip-Top " When Dressed by the BOSTON STORE Miss Marie Fear¬ ing of Chi Ome¬ ga wearing a satin lastex bath¬ ing suit. Miss Sidney Ben¬ Miss lone Otte Miss Louise Mc¬ Miss Fairy Rob¬ Miss Lena Mills nett of Delta of Tri Delta Culloch of Pi inson ot Carnall Newton of Kap¬ Gamma wearing wearing an Eis- Beta Phi wearing Hall wearing an pa Kappa Gam¬ an active sports enberg afternoon a smart Boston Eisenberg street ma wearing a ensemble. dress. Store formal. dress. knitted spectator sports dress. | Miss Mike May of Zeta Tau Alpha wearing a swanky riding habit. READY-TO-WEAR LADIES ' FOOTWEAR SMART ACCESSORIES BEAUTY SALON BOSTON STORE Fayetteville ' s Finest Department Store Page 287 WARD ' S Ice Cream ❖ " It ' s a food—not a fad " ☆ WARD ' S ICE CREAM COMPANY FORT SMITH, ARKANSAS IN ANTICIPATION OF RUSH WEEK Listen, all you high school big shots, local joes, and mama ' s boys that have not been away to collich, and we will give you a few side slants on how to act rush week. If the group that is rushing you brings you up from your home-town, it is very improper to stay at their house, as it is a rank insult to impose upon a collich man both by accepting a free-ride to school and then accepting free chow after you get there. So, by all means, politely de¬ cline that invitation to " come on over to our dump " . If you didn ' t come up with the boys, decline anyhow, they ' ll think more of you. Don ' t even be seen with them until after rush week, then you can really find out what other people think of them and you won ' t have thereby hurt your own social prestige by bad company. As to eating at the boys ' houses during rush week, smoking their cigarettes, drinking their beer, etc., if you must be thrown with them, remember one thing and that is to GET ALL YOU CAN,—there ' ll never be another chance to live so freely upon other people, and there ' s just ONE rush week. Suggest going riding as often as you dare—don ' t be a chump and let them sit you down in the living room all day. If there ' s a good poker game going on, stay out of it, but spot the guy that ' s lucky—he ' ll probably be flush enough to take you around to see some of the local night life—don ' t expect too much, on accounta the night life closes around eleven o ' clock. In short—play ' em, boys, play ' em on the nose, but whatever you do, don ' t join ' em. . . . It ' ll mean dues, work, beating, and worst of all, more of those damn rush weeks —as long as you ' re in school. Page 288 THE NON-FRAT LAD. 1936 RAZORBACK ENGRAVINGS BY CENTRAL ENGRAVING CO. ST. LOUIS, MO. ¥ Page 290


Suggestions in the University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) collection:

University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Page 1

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University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1934 Edition, Page 1

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University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

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University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

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University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

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University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

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