University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR)

 - Class of 1918

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University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 296 of the 1918 volume:

 IOUR PHOTOGRAPHER DUDLEY STONE FAYETTEVILLE (WOODLAND SCENES BY FIELDS) OUR ENGRAVER JAHN AND OLLIER ENGRAVING CO. CHICAGO OUR PRINTER THE INLAND PRINTING AND BINDING CO SPRINGFIELD, MO. T () 0L remember Razor back Day? 0| y The Staff expressed at Convocation the hope that we might be able to make the Razorback artistic; if no better, at least different, and certainly in keeping with the spirit of the year. How well we have done these things you must judge. As Editor-in-chief, I wish I might tell you what an invaluable factor the Assistant Editor has been in editing the book. He has worked in the background, but the Student body will not be unappreciative of his work. I wish to thank the rest of the Staff for their ready co-operation. Professor Roger Williams has given me much personal encouragement and advice. Perhaps you can detect his hand at some point. On another page the Staff thanks the Art Department for its contribution; but I w ish to add to that my personal appreciation of Miss Galbraith's and Miss Metzger's valuable and considerate help. I wish 1 could mention all who have been thoughtful and kind, but that is impossible. I shall not—neither will the Staff —forget them, though.71 NY great undertaking has to face a 0 1 question of finances. This was the hardest problem the Razorback staff had to confront at the very outset of its work. But it is with a spirit of pride that I can state the situation was met. It was not solved by any one man, but through the council of the staff, and the whole-hearted co-operation of the students and organizations of the University. I wish to acknowledge my indebtedness to Byrnes Walker, the Advertising Manager, whose consistent work and untiring efforts have done much to solve the financial problem. To the U. of A. Boys in Khaki and Serge This volume of the Razorback is affectionately dedicatedBoard of Trustees The Governor of Arkansas.......................Ex-Officio Chairman Hon. Charles H. Brough. Little Rock. The State Superintendent of Public Instruction..........Ex-Officio Hon. J. L. Bond, Little Rock. First District Hon. James K. Browning.................................... Piggot Second District Hon. H. L. Ponder Walnut Ridgt 'Fhird District Hon. .. Lvtton Reagon Fayetteville Fourth District Hon. James D. Head Tttxarkana Fifth District Hon. Frank Pace Little Rock Sixth District Hon. A. B. Banks Fordyce Seventh District Hon. Joe K. Mahoney El DoradoPresidkxt John C. Futrall “If any one has had the idea lliat a college training unfits a man to meet the hard, rough, disagreeable things of life, the events of the fast year should obliterate that idea forever. Before the selective conscription act took effect when our government was calling for volunteers for the army and was having great difficulty in securing them, college men offered their services as did no other class of the population. College men are first on the firing line, first on the battleships, first in aviation, first in the engineers' corps, first in the hospital sen-ice. College women are first in all forms of women's work, el fust and proper sense of obligation requires that college men and women who have not yet been called to the colors should ‘carry on’ with renewed energy to the end that they may hereafter, with honor to themselves and for the glory of their country, take the places of those ;who have gone before.’’I)r. V. N. Glahsox Vice-President of the University, and Dean of the College of EngineeringG. W. Drokf. Dean of the College of Arts and SciencesFaculty John C. Futrall, M. A.........................President of the University William Glapson, Pii. D................I 'ice-President of the University COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Georoe Wesley Droke, M. A.....................Professor of Mathematict Walter Matthew Briscoe, B. A.........................Professor of German Georoe Chester Curtiss, M. A....................... Instructor in English Mary A. Davis.......................................Instructor in English X. F. Drake, Pii. 1)...................Professor of Geology and Mining Allen G. Flowers, L. L. M......................Instructor in Economies Clarence James Foreman, Pii. D..................Professor of Economics J. Sam Guy, Pii. D..............................Professor of Chemistry Hillel Halperin, M. A.........................Professor of Mathematics John Leonard Hancock, Pii. D...........Instructor in Indent Languages Mrs. Willie Vanderventer Crockett..............Instructor in Expression Arthur M. Harding, Pii. I)....................Professor of Mathematics Mary Gar.NETT Hargis...................Instructor in Romance Languagef Jobelle Holcombe, M. A..............................Instructor in English Alfred Procter James, M. A.......................Professor of History Mary Cummings Bateman...............................Instructor in Voice Mabel Clare Beli....................................Instructor in Piano Virgil Lawrens Jones, Ph. D..........................Professor of English Alfred Edwin Lussky, M. A......................Instructor in German Antonio Marinoni, M. A.................Professor of Romance Languages Elizabeth Jackson Galbraith, B. A....................Instructor in Art David C. Hansard.....................................Assistant in Violin Evelyn Joan Metzgf.r..................................Assistant in Art Clara Miller, Ph. B....................Instructor in Physical Education Wilson Lee Miser, Ph. D............Assistant Professor of Mathematics Owen Mitcheli.............................Assistant Instructor in Music Wallace Carl Murphy, M. A..............Assistant Professor of History Edwin G. Xoursf., Ph. 1)........................Professor of Economics Frank Wellborn Pickel, M. Sc.........................Professor of Biology Norman John Rapper, B. A........................Professor of Journalism Giles Emmett Ripley, M. S............................Professor of Physics Henry Harrison Strauss, M. A...........Professor of Ancient LanguagesHarry Elwyn Sturgeon, M. S.... Henry I). Tovey............... Dana Porter Weld, B. S. C..... Rogkr Williams, M. A.......... Claude Harrison Watts, B. A.... ...Assistant in Chemistry ....Professor of Music ....Assistant in Chemistry ....Instructor in English .Professor of Economics COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE Martin Nelson, M. S............................Professor of Agronomy B. C. Rilf.y, B. S. A..........................Director of Extension Henry Edmund Dvoraciiek, B. S. A......Professor of Animal Husbandry Percy Bouskield Barker, M. A...................Professor of Agronomy Georcf. Grover Becker, B. S....................Professor of Entomology Clifford L. McArthur, M. S.....................Professor of Hacteriology James B. Rather, M. S.....................Pofessor of Agri. Chemistry J. Ralph Cooper, M. S..........................Professor of Horticulture Walter S. Fields, B. S......................Assistant Plant Pathology Clyde H. Heard, B. S. A.......................Instructor in Horticulture Frederick H. Herzer, B. S. A..........Instructor m Animal Husbandry Dk Forest Hungkrford, M. S.............Assistant Professor Agronomy William Emmet Ayres. M. S.....................Instructor in Agronomy Lynn Wesley Osborne, B. S. A..........Assistant Professor of Agronomy Richard H. Ridgell, B. Sc...............Instructor in Agri. Chemistry Herman Sandhouse. B. S. A............................Instructor in Animal Husbandry Samuel R. Stout, B. S. A.............................Instructor in Animal Husbandry Ruth S. Speerstra, B. S..............Instructor in Home Economics Mary E. Metzger..........................Atsislant in Home Economics Amelia Jean Hill, B. A...............Assistant in Home Economics Ruth Ophelia Dyche, B. A............Assistant in Home Economics John Asbury Elliott, Ph. 1).............Instructor in Plant Pathology COLLEGE OF EDUCATION James R. Jenvell, Pii. I)....................Professor of Education Herbert Bascom Bruner, M. A................. Professor of Education Horace R. Crosland, Ph. I)..........Assistant Professor of Education James R. Grant, M. A......................................... Assistant Professor of Education and Director of Training School Caroline Louise Jenks, B. A.................Instructor in Education Kate W. Simpson.............................Instructor in Education Lucy A. Warburton, M. A.....................Instructor in EducationCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING V. X. Gladson, E. E., Pii. I)......Professor of Electrical Engineering Julius J. Knock, C. E....................Professor of Civil Engineering Frederick G. Baenpkr, M. M. E.......Professor of Mechanical Engineering Virgil I’roctor Knott, B. C. K...Associate Professor of Civil Engineering John Henry Clouse.................Instructor in Mechanical Engineering James Dinwiddie....................Assistant in Mechanical Engineering Walter H. Waiileigh, M. S.......................Instructor in Electrical Engineering Harry Foster Lickky, B. S.......................Instructor in Electrical Engineering Clare A. Poland, B. S...................Instructor in Civil Engineering OTHER OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION Arthur M. Harding, Ph. D....... William H. Cravens............. Mary Ann Davis................. Mrs. Jessie Blocker Warner...... Mrs. Fannie S. Park............ Nina W. Hardin, M. I).......... Norman Carr Paine, S. B........ Noah H. Drake, Ph. D........... George Willoughby Martin, Major. Joseph Wheeler, First Sergeant. Julia R. Vaulx, M. A........... Bolling James Dunn, M. A....... Jim P. Matthews, B. A.......... Juanita Moore.................. Jane Kennedy Dickey, B. A...... ............Registrar and Examiner ........................... Auditor ...................Dean of 11'omen Superintendent of Men's Dormitory ....Superintendent of Carnall Hall .......Superintendent of Infirmary ,..............Director of Athletics ................Curator of Museum .............U. S. A. Commandant ...........Assistant in Military Art ......................... Librarian .................Assistant Librarian .................4ssistanI Librarian .............Secretary to President ..........Secretary of V. IP. C. A.Pure as the dozen on the braze of thy beauty H atches thy soul from the mountain of God Over the fates of thy children departed, bar from the land where their footsteps have trod. Beacon of hope in the ways dreary lighted, Pride of our hearts that are loyal and true; Prom those who adore unto one who adores us— Mother of mothers, zee sing unto you.Peabody HallAgricultural BuildingCarxai.i. Ham.Gray Hali. • Dairy Bcim)IX ;(Hasses3Amis, James ., I V...........Biology Fort Smith. Secretary-Treasurer of Cadet Club: Sergeant-Major Cadet battalion '17-MS. He teas never precise in promise keep• it iff. Bishop Mark, K£..............Economics Nashville, Ark. ' Iljackfriars: I’lii Alpha Tau: I Delta Epsilon; Business Manager Arkansan: Kazorback Staff, M6-M7; Treasurer Junior Class M6-M7. A fine little fellow, honest, intelligent and kind. Braswell, Margaret, Q..........English Fort Smith. Itlackfriars; V. V. C. A. A daughter of the gods. Divinely tall and fair, divinely fair. Campbell, Kate...............Education Fayetteville. Theta Omicron Chi; Rifle Club; V. V. C. A. Thought does not become a young woman. Kale has searched many years to find a vocation and since joining the Rifle Club has decided to become a soldier. Campbell, Martha, X ..........English Van Buren. Question Club; V. V. C. A. Cabinet M7-MS; Treasurer Girls' Dormitory M6-M7. "The smile that blest one lover's hear! has broken many more." Cantrall, G. A.......Cit il Engineering Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. His mind his kingdom and his will his fate.Casey, John E.. UK A.........Agronomy Boxlcy. President of Y. M. C. A. '16-M7; Obtain Company "It’'; President of Glee Club. President of Garland; Member of Student Council; Inter-fraternity Conference. A. It. C. Formed on the good old flan, A true and brave and downright honest man. Cheeky, Rufus L., KA.............Biology Paris. XXX; President Inter-fraternity Conference '1?-‘18; President Pre-Medic C'.u»; Mentbcr Athletic Hoard of Control; Business Manager Razorback; Second Lieutenant Company "C.” A young man with a bright future. Always has a smile and stands well with the 'adies. Clark, J. A........Animal Husbandry Fort Smith. Alpha Zcta; Agri Club; Student Council ; Razor back Representative Senior Class. •The heights by great men reached and kept were not attained by sudden flight. Hut they -while their companions slept were toiling upward in the night." Douthit, Jesse C................... .........lilcctrical l:. it gin eering Stephens. 1IIIH; Secretary-Treasurer of Glc Club ’17-M8; Dormitory Governing Boa'd '16-M7; Secretary-Treasurer of A. I. E. I". ’I7-’18: Class Prophet; President of Engineers. The mildest manners with the bravest mind. A ladies' man. Has many dates. Dowell, Gladys.......Home Economics Fayetteville. Vice-President of the Home Economic Club. Gladys is the girl to be depended upon. Whether the call be for work or for fun. Dyer, J. M...................Horticulture Fayetteville. Sccrciary-Trcasurei Agri Club; Peri-clean; Y. M. C. A.; Second Lieutenant Company "A.” A sturdy son of the good old soil -who can use his brain as well as his hands.Evans, A. O., SM................. .........Electrical Engineerin') Arkadelphia. Tan Beta Pi; A. I. K. K. It must be done like lightning. He is in love. Faisst, Herbert..................History Benton. mill; Editor-in-Chief Weekly 17- 1S; President Student Council 'IZ-’IS; Pre-• dent of Pi Delta Epsilon ’17- I8; Me s-ber Hoard of Athletic Control 17-’ls; Treasurer Sophomore Class '1S-M6; Pc.i-dean; A. B. C. "lie did with cheerful will what other ‘alked of while their hands were still." Gii.breatii, Bernice, XQ........German Fayetteville. . Theta Oniicron Chi; V. W. C. A.; Normal Club. "el woman nobly planned, Horn to warn, comfort, and command." Gout, Marjorie, IIIM»...........English Fayetteville. Skull and Torch; Sapphic; KKK; V. . C. A.; Vice-President of the Senior Class. "Oh, call it by some other name, for friendship sounds too cold.” Greaves, Bernice, Xti...............linglisit Fayetteville. Y. W. C. A.; Blackfriars. ds fair a la ly as you ever met, Hut she has become a suffragette. Hay, W. C......................Englis.'t Mena. Garland; Y. M. C A. For four years a student and a profes sional man as well. U'ho else could do it Heath, I. J....................Agronomy Magnolia. Vice-President V. M. C. A. 'I7-,IS; President A ;ri Club ’15; Captain Company "II” ’17-’18; Secretary Glee Club •l .’IS. A politician with many virtues. He is a farmer, yet he sings well. Hkerwagex, P. K.................. ............Animal Husbandry Fayetteville. Razorback Staff ’I5-’16; Ajtri Club; Garland; V. . l. C. A. P. K. makes a good many visits on Dixon street. Il'e wonder when he goes. He is a good student and craves agriculture. Hemphill, Mary, X .............Latin Richmond. Skull and Torch; V. V. C. A.; Senior Class Poet; President Carnal! Hall ’I -’!'. If there is anything better than to be loved it is to love. Mary is an all-round college girl. Hoeltzel, Pauline, IIB I ......... ...........German and Education Little Rock. Question Club; V. V. C. A. Cabinet: Normal Club; Sapphic. Her eyes dance always with a merry laugh. She deserves her many friends. I loLi.AitAiT.il. Gladys............English Marshall. Prescient o( Sapphic ’17; V. V. C. A. Cabinet; Arkansan Staff; Weekly Staff. Sedate and modest, yet full of fun. Appears like an angel, but ain't yet one. McCoy, Ailkex, A .............. ..................Home Economics Fayetteville. Sik’iua Rho; President o Home F.c' --omics Club; Ra orback Representative Senior Class. They call upon her when they want it well done. McDonald, Dorothy, 0........History. Fayetteville. Theta Omieron Chi: Y. V. C. A.: Normal Club. "The loud laugh that bespeaks the vacant mind." Dorothy may be heard if not seen at any time about the Hook Store. McGacc.hy, J. P., I IKA--Economics Pine Bluff. XXX: Garland: First Lieutenant Company “B” ’I7-’18; Inter-fraternity Conference; Quawpaw Club. Great things through greatest hazards are achieved; and then they shine. Midiu.kbrooks, Pf.ari..........English Hope. Secretary Senior Class; Y. V. C. A. Cabinet. "1 am whatever seas, is, or will be." Pearl makes A's and plays the ukelele. Mitchell, Y. M.. KS............ ..........Economics anti German Morrilton. Pi Delta F.psilon; Business Manage: I'niversity Weekly '17-M8; Student Covtt cil ’ 17-MS; Second Lieutenant Com pan j •C" M7-MX. Providence prosides for me and I am well content. Moody, J. C..................-... .........Mcchanical Engineering Bald Knob. Tan Beta Pi; Student Council M7-M'i: Lee: Y. M. C. A. "It is not strength but art obtains the Prize, And to be swift is less than to be wise.” MORCAX, R. E..............Economics Tulsa, Oklahoma. IIIIII; Pi Delta Epsilon: A. B. C.; Normal Club; Garland: Y. M. C. A.; President of Senior Class; Secretary- Treasurer of Men’s Dorinitor ■ M7-’H; Vice-President of Student Council ’17-’K; Weekly Staff 'I7-M8; Razorba k St. i M6-’17: Cheer Leader M7-M8; Jun or C‘.v. Football; Intcr-collcgiate Debating '17-MS "Of no man's presence he feels afraid. At no man's Question looks dismayed " He makes frequent visits to Askew's. If hyp IEconomics « Xhi.son, Irene.....Home Mena. Simn:i Klio; Normal Club; Treasurer ci Home Economics Club. Irene has always been a faithful student and will be remembered for her true worth. O'Bar, Blanche................Education Charleston. Sapphic; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Girl-.' Dormitory Council; Art Editor of 'IS Raxorback. Strong in character with businesslike from ft ness. O'Neal, E. I’.................... ...........Electrical Engineering Hope. Dormitory Govcriiirst Hoard 'I7-’!S; Glee Club ’17-’I8; Preident of A. I. E. E. ■ •'or he by geometric scale Could take the size of f°l and fail, elnd wisely tell what hour of the day The clock docs strike by algebra." Parker, E. 1.......Civil Engineering Cleveland. Tau Beta Pi; Y. 1. C. A.; Garland; Treasurer of Senior C!.i s. He -wears a boshful look, but watch him get the money. Prothro, R. E., 2$E £ ■ Little Rock. A. H. C.: I’criclcan; Captain Com- pany "D" '17-’I8. How can he be such an Ec shark and fuss the ladies Sof Ramsey, Adele, ZTA..............French Fayetteville. Y. W. C. A. : Quest on Club; French Club; Normal Club; Elickfriars. Lore was not meant for [eoflc in their wits. A dele is strong for the farmer.Rankin, F. S..................English Jonesboro. Glee Club ’14-MS; Normal Club; Pre-medic Club; Secretary of Y. M. C. A. M7-MS; President of Periclcan M7; Quaw-paw Club. A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance. Robison, I I. H.................. ...........Electrical Engineering Hope. Y. M. C. A.; Vice-President of A. I. K. E. M7-MX. " am always in haste, but never in a hurry.’’ Why? Because he is an electrical engineer. Sailor, Lkla....................German Bigelow. KKK; Pi Kappa; Skull and Torch; Sapphic; Associate Editor of Weekly M7-M8; Student Council; President of Young Women’s Honor League; President of Caruall Hall 1918. Wanted—Someone to appreciate my importance. A master mind with a trend tozeard Polities. Stkvkxsox, K. 1C...............Education Pottsvillc. Normal Club; Class Football 1915; Varsitv Football M6-M7 and M7-M8; President S'. M. C. A. M7-M8; President Peri-clean 1918; President Dormitory Governing Hoard M7-M8; Student Council M7-M8. “For he who is honest is noble, what-ever his fortunes or birth." Steve dictates to the offenders against the dorm council. Wilson, Maroarkt, ! ............English Russellville. Y. W. C. A.; Hlackfriars. .Vom- was ever jollier to have that added virtue, a well-brained mind. Wilson, William................. .............Animal Husbandry Beebe. Agri Club; Varsity Football M5-M6. ‘I6-M7, and M7-M8; Hoard of Athletic Control M7-MS; Student Council M7-M8-; President of Varsity Club M7-M8. Bill is some football player. We see someone wearing an "A" sxeeater with three service stripes.George V. Winfrey.........Horticulture Fayetteville. Alpha Zcta; President of Perielean Society; Major Cadet Battalion; Razorback Staff Mft-'l7; Senior Class Orator; Pres-idem of Officers’ Club; Student Assista-.it in Plant Pathology: Agri Club. " hut still they gazed ami still the wonder grew. That one small head could carry all he knew.” R uth II ovvei.i.................English Foreman. Skull anil Torch: Y. Y. C. A.: Normal Club; Sapphic; President of Y. V. C. A : Kditor-in-Chief of the Arkansan; Sponsor of Battalion. There is no necessity for pushing when you have a pull. "My kingdom for an Igri, they are so independent." 'The Big Four’Elmo Loyd FarkekCLASS OFFICERS V. O. Turner.................................. Una Ross ...................................... Jean Russeli................................... C. A. Shumaker................................. J. E. Bradley.................................. Giadys McCullough.. J. G. Ragsdale.....I........................... ..................President ............I 'iee-President ..................Secretary ...................Treasurer .....................Orator Kasorback Ref resentatiz esAi.kwink, Boyce (Stormy) He took Rood care of Jimmie' furniture; such Rood care that Jimmie himself was unable to find it. A I.KXANDER, MARCARET "A Rood disposition is more valuable than ROld.” Alter, G. K. ”1 did not make my A, but 1 Rave the fellow who beat me a Rood race.” Atkixsox, Pearl "Common sense in an uncommon dcRrcc is what the world calls wisdom.” Bailey, Fraxcks “Proper diRnity always the rule. Heard, S. .!. (Ramie) Romeo. Beard, Mrs. S. J. Juliet. Helkxai , Ray Coaches those who are no: able to make the correct impressions in their Calculus classes. I ean Drake's assistant.Browne, Ada “Because I know for me my work is best." Bradley, J. E. (Brad) Jim has let his Hill llall environment lead him the wrong way. Cantraix, V. M. The very life of the dormitory board of censorship. Coleman, J. V. He will hit the Germans just as hard as lie hit hi opponent in a football game and that is more than any German can stand. Cole, Xell "Light hearts live long. Conley, George I). "Think I’ll join the Navy and keep up the reputation of the Admiral.” Davidson, Gene (Sodie) "Boys, all I like about this dormitory council business is that I can do as 1 please and get by with it.” Dirrkll. Artilla "Care smiles to see her free from care. And hard hearts love her unaware."Evatt, Estelle "AH the genius I have is the fruit of labor ami thought.” El.1.1 SON', Fred "If l)r. Xourse didn't talk -o far above my head, I believe I could pass this course.” Felton, Rijtii See sophomore writeup. Furr, Beatrice "Shine out. little head, sunning over with curls.” Fincher. L. G. The guy that put Waldo on the map. Harrell, V. M. "What's worth doing at all is worth doing well.” Gilliam, Ei.ka.nor “For I am but a simple, guileless girl.” Hart, Ethei. "I'm just in love with all the boys.”Hendrix, Agnes Bkli.k "No one but she and Heaven knows of what she’s thinking.” Hays, Brooks Kditor-in-Chicf. What else do you want to know ? Hinds, Hubert Stars in “Ec 12" I ecausc of his knowledge of horticulture. Hilton, Amelia “Thus neglecting worldly ends for the closeness ami bettering of my mind.” Hodges, Bess "Just the airiest, fairest slip of a girl.” Johnson, Madge She cooks the things that Mother used to make. Kuykendall, S. J. “He's in the army now.” Kkknard, R. C. (Hob) A detective of note. Has been accused of being a Senior.Lee, W. M. ( fill) The military Agri. “I have three brothers in the army and there is nothing for ntc to do but to follow after them.” Knott, John “Sis Cow, she lay low and say nothin’.” Locke, I). A. ( ) A demon with the ladies end a man of note in the military world. Logan, R. L. (Bob) "You just think you have a date with Bess.” Maciiex, Hughes The class politician who usually gets what he wants. Lcvk, George George paid the penalty of his crime by serving as a private on the Mexican border. McBride, Lillie Mae “The blue of her eyes beats the blue of the skys.” McCaleb, T. M. We wonder how he can remain such a staunch bachelor and still room with Hooker.McLaciilax, R. L. (Mack) I.ooks good in his striped uniform. He made a fortune on the world series. McCullough, Gladys “Nothing ever, hardly ever, troubles me." McMurtry, Olivette "When study interferes with a good time, cut out the studs-” McIlroy. Mkktyk Quiet and demure, but wise for all that. Mullins, V. E. (Tubby) "Come over on the sunny side of life.' Miller, Alma “A type of noble womanhood.” Mulrexxix, Cass A fullback that every true Razorback all but worships. Morrow, Franklin H. Champion rat catcher oi Gray Ilall. 4XlSBETT, J. , I. (Jimmie) The medical world will be proud of him. Xkki.y, Virginia "So she grew a noble lady and the people loved her much.” Payne, E. R. (Hoots) Expect to get there by continual booting. Surprise l)r. Drake by hi excellency in Geology. Pratt, Evangeline "Don’t wake me up; I am dreaming.” Reed, C. A. Great on account of hi ability to drag himself out of any dilemma into which he may have dragged himself. Ask Prof. Murphy. Ragsdale, J. G. (Kays) The pride of I'nion county. Rice, A. W. The sturdy wrestling coach.Russell, Jean "A quiet, modest maid.” Ross, Una "Mow pleasant it is, at the close of the day. no follies to have to repent.” r Sanders, C. B. (Sandy) “Sandy” is there in a pinch. Makes his best grades in Campustry. Sailor, Mrs. V. L. "The way to be loyal to Uncle Sam Is to fall in love with a soldier man.” Smith, Isabella “There are few doors through which liberality, joined with a good disposition, cannot find it way.” Searcy, R. L. (Bobbie) Has had only one date in three years. Matches pennies for pay. Smith, Lyle (Bays) lie played with a broken arni, but he showed his opponent that his strength all went to his other arm. Shumaker, C. A. (Billie) The guy with the enviable langh. Class cashier.Stewart, Olive “Success comt' to those who lead a life of endeavor.” Taylor, Beloit If he docs not make a hit with that cute pompadour and by his athletic attainments, lie is lost. York, H. A. He made the Agri day what it was. and that i. saving a Rood deal. Turner, Y. O. Hill made such stirring addresses that no one dared try to defeat him for the presidency. Bradley, M. M. A bold, bad man from Oklahoma. Walker, Byrnes If the war will only leave me alone, the whole world will some day be proud of me.Ai.ford, T. Elbert The best freshman among the sophomores. Barrett, Lois The merry laugh that wins friends. Barrett, Joe A willing worker and a line fellow. Baskin, Ci-ara Krst while school ma’am. Bennett, Lucy She wants to know why "Little Brother” Hits from hill to hill. Bishop, Thelma “Nothing is impossible to a willing mind.” Boysen, Mae "A southern wind has blown us fair Mae. No other, we hope, will take her away.” Bridewell, Effie Mae Frankly independent, but lovable. Briscoe, Gladys The gym star. Brownino, Ethel She greatly despises a camouflage. Carroll, Mamie "I want no uproar, I’m a quiet girl.” Carnall, Frances Never hurries, never worries. Chotard, Elizabeth She docs not live in China, but she surely likes her "Rice”. Clark, Harry A tennis expert—especially in love games. Clifton, Artie She may regret her silence, but never her speech.Coker, Edith "Now some Kiris lo giggle and others !o chatter, 15m I give my time to more serious matter." Coleman, C. K. (Slats) A cheer leader in public; in private a home-breaker (almost). Com.a m ore, L. J. A line fellow. Responded to the call of the colors. Cooper, R. A. A reformed bachelor and a hard working student. Conner, E. C. (Johnnie) He can't help it because his eves arc mellow brown. Cotton, Nina "Care is an enemy to life.” Ccx, Jesse Ye president. Understands freshmen and vice versa. Cress, Roscok That fellow of diKnified mien and businesslike voice. Cravens, Pauline "I am resolved to grow fat and stay young till forty.” Diiirell, Artilla Sec Junior writeup. Dean, Margie “Nothing so becomes a woman as modest stillness and humility.” Evans, J. S. (Sid) “Say, fellows, I'll tell you what; let’s . . Loves Calculus. Evans, Hugh Orator, politician, student. Falconer, F. Armistead Vest pocket Reau Brummcl. Eei.ton, Ruth She didn’t mind being in the Infirmary, but she hated to miss her dear classes.Fincher, Guy A quiet stranger. l.cft at mid-term. Fincher, Gwix "Merrily, merrily, shall I live now." Dormitory detccktuf. Gaffney, Claude (Pinkey) Had one "swell” time this year; if it was in the Intirmarv. Gatewood, K. M. (AVrf) lias made a close study of women’s hearts. Gee, Stayton When he smiles, he grins. Gold, Paul (Ikey) Good looking; a football hero . . • need we say more? Gosden, W. E, (Duck) A very “dexterious” man. Govan, Doll Happiness consists of Hugh, a car, and a package of gum. Gregg, Carolyn Fair, modest flower; quite proficient in the art of winning everybody’s heart. Harper, La Verne “Kenneth, is it Folly tonight?” Harrell, Ruth Nothing could cause her to hurry. Harrison, Clyrenk Carnal) Hall will never need a player piano as long as she is around. HARRINGTOX. .1KAXETTF. "She was just the quiet kind whose natures never vary.” Hassell, Eugene G. (Gus) Some musician. Tickles the ivory for pastime. Hays, H F. (Slits) Dr. Foreman’s pet.Hkn.y, I':.oyi» lie runs a "tin” Henry. Hoi.i.a n. ug 11, Hr n est Don’t confuse with the Arkansas beauty. Hon, Sarah She imposes on her own good nature. Moon, Edna When Hill is out of town she niel(s) to pass the time away. I.VON, NlBL Sometimes he seems to he Hooded in oblivion. Irby, Annie Carnall Hall Manicurist. Irby, Pet Lately changed 'o II. T',. course. She is preparing: herself for t!:c future. Knight. W'm. Jackson (H'ill'c) The author of Frisco Shine, and an otherwise intelligent young man. Knoch. I.ster (Little If; other) “I .-in content, 1 da rot c-re. Wag rs i: will, the world for me ” Kone, Evelyn “Some secret charm does all her acts attend.” Lake, Mary “I envy those who know me more than I pity those who know me less.” Lake, Winfred (Jabe) Afraid of the girls. Lambert, Betty Her ideal ... to dress her charms and to make herself beloved. Lawson, E. H. Into everything. Si eaks broken English fluently. I .ee, Cornelia A blonde maiden, fair to look upon.Lockk, 1). Archibald "Sweetness Ioiik drawn out." Aspires to be an Art ilia (ry) captain. Lockharte, Mildred Baby face, a baby's smile, but not a baby’s stature. Logan, Lilline A cheerful temper. Maddox, Lila Mae Has a heart of steel. Markwei.l, Kenneth "Who stole my cap?” lie is responsible for this sophomore sarcasm. Marshall, Maxine With eves that look into the very soul. Matthews, Verda Parks Her hiKhest ambition, to attain Gobi. Massengale, Lura Grccnwitch VillaRC—her Roal. McCaleb, J. Burt A newcomer. Has never been known to smile. Another math, shark. McCartney, Paul Vernon Castle 11. McGill, Sarah Rather studious. McKennon, Joe Lee Joe's doR Spot is |uitc a favorite at the I’i Phi House. McLaughlin, Claire She bobs her hair and burns a locke. Mendenhall, Ruby “BcinR always on the job beats earryinR a rabbit's foot for luck.” Metzgar, K.mma Louise A sweet, oldfashioncd flower RrowinR in a col-Icrc Rarden.Mick el, Melba There is no credit in being jolly. Mix miEit, George S. A gay boy from gay "Parcc”. Miller, Fa nit a The Physics shark. Mofkitt, James Y. Dignity is the prerequisite of greatness. Has a soothing voice. Mitchell, W innie “All virtue lies in individual action, in inward energy, in self-determination.” Montague, M aro.aret “True genius kindles and fair fame inspires.” Murphy, Foy C. (Pal) Whether he is saved or not he has a soulc. lie likes musicians, especially harpers. Newman, Stanley M. Purely and simply an engineer. O’Kelly, J. F. Highest thing in dignity. Parker, Donald, (Don) . . . Deleted by the censor. Oliver, William L. (Bill) Is trying to take courses in two colleges. Dean Morgan claims him. Pasley, Cecil "On that way madness lies: let me shun that.” Paulk, Byron D. An ab-Xormal student. Polk, J. T. Star of the | canut league. Prather, Doris Found that college life was too strenuous.Pyles, Helen Louise She will try anything once. Reed, Lloyd (Humpy) Strange how the sight of females contracts his facial muscles. Robinson, Chloera Could Dill turn ’er? Roney, Xannie May The only girl member of the mumps club. Royer, Joe Maybe he is—er—cr tired, but he is a good dancer anyway. Sanderson, Sibyl Hill Hall niece. Shark, Kathleen "Her heart and hand both open and free, for what she has she freely gives." Scott, Jean Where there is a will, there is a way. Sellars, Mary Dale She is so little, but oh, so bright! Shinn, William Darrell Feels at home among the ladies. Simms, Mary Charlotte Presence of mind is greatly prompted by absence of ! ody. Simpson, Augusta Her bills are due much oftener than the first of the month. Skaggs, Xorris Our speed king. Is in the aviation now. Slaughter, Bernice “Words are like leaves, and where they most abound Much fruit of sense is rarely found.” Smiley, Leona "His manly form is always at her side.”Stai rkr, C. A. God made him; therefore let him pa for a man. Stareird, Lkvi A typical Gray Hall saint. Towler, H. S. An important man in the school’s history. Trottf.r. Conner She thinks that measles and an Edison make ROOd company. Turner, B. B. “Bolon Babbling” is a financier, an orator, and a politician. Is proud of the title, “R. F. D.” Wade, J. S. Why do the girls call him cute. He is anyway. W allace, Albert (Bert) "He does it with a better grace, but I do it more naturally." W hittaker, Lee Deserted us to go to France. W ilson, Louise "Chloera, 1 know that is a p. f. middy; all that pink stitching proves it to me.” W ilson, A. I’. Yes. lie is a nice little fellow, too. W inkle.man, Ben Became noted through his clarinet. A football star. W OOHWARD, S. S. Ye corporal oi ye awkward squad. Deane, Catherine The ”1)” drop| cd down among the "W’s” to add daintiness to the grout . A very modest and retiring “D”. Woodson, E. M. He of the stately bearing. Johnson, M. D. Byron’s brother.Job Munsky Faucbtt ill.YTHK Tkimm ........ Grace Nenvman ......... D. B. A knob........... i jkaxvii.i.k McCaslin... Helen McIiavein... I IXX'.AN UOOKKS..... " CLASS OFFICERS .................President ............Vicc-P resident .................Secretary .................Treasurer ...........Weekly Reporter Razor back RepresentativesRitfrnathy Riicmn Barton Bojltlin BK-vini -annum Burlingame Bonom Burkett Bronn Boro on FrRRIOR EARLE Freeman FCR JSON TT FCLSENTHAL FENTER 0- JLL (WAY GILLCSPlE OrRAHAM ESTES F.DWARDS HAMILTON HaRD N 'hflRRinOTOn HaRR S Hart huRmtxn Harris Henderson Hicks Holland Hinds Hotopp Hudgins Ishervuood Jackson James Jamison JlTTON JotRDCH KmSWORTHYIBBI IcoriAPD Lews KuYKCtlMLL L nE Wrmiws Mrxwell LotiBflRD Lovell Locke MWteer MKasum WQwinell n'Dflmc.L MeJuumn M'HfliR Mitchell Moore Middle dROOKS Miller ME ELY P IRLTTE Myers Phillips Smith Thimbu. _ ■ • OiMPscn SmjrrteLD SKfiOC-5 $MEA0 SmCAO DuLumrfT SuLUVfln Topbztt Twcvzll Oi.ii GloryDepartmentsDepartment Heads WN.Glaoson .iV. Wilson Dr. Y. X. Gi.ahsox B. X. Wilson :U'drical 1ngi, 11 erring ,Experimental Engineering Heat and Power Engineering Civil Engineering Dr. J. S. Guy Chemical EngineeringThe College of Engineering NGINEERING work was offered in the University as early as 1873. but the first f ur-yca-coursc was not offered until 1878. The Department of Civil Engineering was the first one organized, giving a degree of B. C. E. for the completion of the four years’ work. In 1885 the Department of Mechanical Engineering was added to the University, giving a degree of B. M. E. In i8 ;i a four-year course in Electrical Engineering, leading to the degree of B. E. E.. was added. In the last few years the Department of Chemistrv has been added, offering a degree of B. Ch. E. Eor the past several years Dr. W. N. Gladson has been Dean of the College of Engineering and under his efficient administration the department has prospered, so that today it is considered one of the foremost Engineering Colleges of the South. The purpose of the courses in the College of Engineering is to prepare young men for the profession of engineering. The value of the training that is acquired in a university course is recognized by all the large industrial concerns of the country. Graduates of the College of Engineering of the University of Arkansas are scattered over the entire world, occupying positions of trust in foreign lands, in the service of the United States government, in large manufactories, and in state or municipal service, or building for themselves reputations as professional engineers. Many are serving their country in the armies of the U. S. and her allies as aviators and machinists in the aerial squadrons or construction engineers in the Engineering Corps.Department of Electrical Engineering For several years the Electrical Engineering Department has been the largest of the Engineering Departments. Its men, both in long and short courses, have been of uniformly high quality. Its graduates have always been able to secure positions as soon as they finished school. The usual practice is to do one or two years apprentice work with one of the great electrical manufacturing or operating companies in ' rder to gain practical experience. The curriculum of the department embraces various courses from elementary Physics to advanced theory of alternating currents, transmission lines, laboratory practice, etc., with elective courses in English, Modern Languages Economics, etc. As much practical work as possible is done. Inspection trips to the great companies in the no-thern states arc made whenever possible. Water power surveys are made annually. Many of the students work during the summer in electrical or allied industries. Arrangements have been made so that radio and wireless courses can be given to drafted men in order to fit them for the army. FACULTY Dean W. N. Gladson Prof. G. E. Ripley Prof. H. F. Lickcy Prof. W. H. Wadlcigh STUDENTS Seniors: Freshmen: Jesse C. Douthit A. O. Evans Ernest I . O’Neal Hale H. Robison Juniors: William M. Cantrell Paul Dixon Hannah William Oakley Turner L. D. Anderson Sophomores: Loy Barton George Ross Edwards David Archibald I.ockc Bernard C. Mulrcnin Joe Royer Earl Herman Burroughs ohn Clinton Black .enjamin R. Askew Granville B. Cowley Clarence E. Davis Sonncl J. Fclscnthal John Perry Galloway Walter Edwin Hicks Ernest Hollabaugh Wade Hudgins Russel Howard Joerdan Bertis L. Jordan Fagan B. Mason Paul Martin John Russell Steele Saul I. Towcry Short Course, First Year Frank Orville Harsh Short Course, Second Year Foy C. Murphy OFFICERS OF THE ARKANSAS BRANCH OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS President .......... Vice-President .... Secretary-Treasurer ...E. P. O’Nkai. H. H. Robison J. C. DouthitDepartment of Civil Engineering Professor Knoch is the Head of the Civil Engineering Department. V. P. Knott is the Associate Professor and C. A. Poland is the Instructor of Civil Engineering. The Department of Civil Engineering offers four-year courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Civil Engineering in Highways and Bachelor of Civil Engineering. The professional degree of Civil Engineer is conferred upon graduates who have been in successful practice of their profession for at least three years. In obtaining a professional degree each candidate must present a statement of his record since graduation accompanied by an acceptable thesis presenting the results of original research. In order to equip students for some special trade within the field of Civil Engineering a two-year I rade Course is given. At the completion of this course a certificate is granted. These courses in Civil Engineering include theoretical instruction accompanied by as much engineering as is possible. They arc designed to give the student a knowledge of fundamental principles that will enable him to enter intelligently into the practice of Civil Engineering. The studies may be grouped under the heads of Hydraulic Engineering. Sanitary Engineering, Railroad Engineering, Bridge Engineering, Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Surveying, Highway Engineering, and Masonry. FACULTY OF THE CIVIL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Profkssor J. J. Knoch Mr. C. A. Poland Associate Professor V. P. Knott STUDENTS Seniors George Cantrell Elmo Parker Juniors John H. Knott Franklin H. Morrow Leighton A. Philbrick Horace H. Harding Neil C. Imon Sam J. Kuykendall Roy E. McLachlan Sophomores J. B. McCalcb P. O. Tctcr Lester Knoch Albert Wallace Hughes Maclicn George S. Minmicr Hugh E. Wright Kenneth W. Mark well Claude Gaffney Stanley M. Newman Donald Parker Lee Whitaker Stayton GeeMechanical Engineering The course in mechanical engineering is designed to give a student a broad foundation in the subjects that are of greatest importance in his work, a technical education in his chosen field made practical by shop and laboratory courses, and. in electives, a certain amount of specialization and cultural development. The courses offered include pattern making, foundry and machine shop practice, heat engines, power plant practice and theory, machine design, strength-of-materials testing and others that arc essential to expert engineers. The department of Experimental Engineering was formed this year with Prof. B. X. Wilson as head of the department. Prof. Wilson, who was head of the mechanical engineering department for several years, received his Master's Degree in mechanical engineering at Cornell University in June last year. Prof. F. G. Bacndcr, who also has a Master's Degree from Cornell University, is head of the mechanical engineering department. Both Prof. Bacndcr and Prof. Wilson have had a large amount of practical experience as well as experience in teaching. Mr. J. H. Clouse, who is from the University of Ohio, is the instructor in the machine shop where the practical operation of planing, turning, milling, and forging of iron and steel is taught. Mr. J. Din-widdic is the instructor in the carpenter and pattern shop, and Mr. J. Danner has charge of the foundry. FACULTY Prof. F. G. Bacndcr Prof. B. X. Wilson Mr. J. H. Clouse Mr. J. Dinwiddic Mr. J. Danner STUDENTS Belknap. K. L. Hccrwagen, I.. F. Bradley. M. M. Jacobs. K. W. Conley. G. D. Moody. J. C. Cowan. B. P. Parker, Chester Evans, J. S. Parsley, O. D. Kogcrson. J. B. Chemical Engineers FACULTY Ur. J. Sam Guy ROLL Prof. 11. E. Sturgeon Brazil, E. Logan. R. R. Vv itiklcman, Ben. Paul. B. B. Kizcr. R. Gatewood. E. M. Shumaker, C. A. Perhaps one will wonder why it is that there arc so few candidates for the degree of Chemical Engineer when there may he seen at th ■ end of any period a veritable avalanche of students pouring out of the building and another equally as large waiting to get in. Students iron all the colleges take courses in chemistry both as required work and as electives. Up to this year it required more credit hours to graduate with the degree of Bachelor of Chemical Engineering than it took for any other degree in the University. This year the standard of the other courses ir. the College of Engineering was raised to that of the course in Chemistry. requiring one hundred and forty-four semester hours for graduation. The course in Chemical Engineering requires thorough work in mechanical and electrical engineering, physics, one foreign language, mathematics, and chemistry. The graduates are trained for analytical work, physical and industrial chemistry and the engineering pro'ession at large.y- wC Fresh max EngineersVDf.an Martin- Xki.sox— IRISH POTATOES A PROFITABLE ARKANSAS CROP 0ft 017. Agr Exhibits The College of Agriculture E COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE offers four-year courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B. S. A.) ; special short courses in Agriculture; a four-year course in Home Economics leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics (B. S. H. E.); and a special two-year courc in home economics for club and demonstration work. Four branches of specialization are open to the student: Agronomy, Horticulture, Animal Husbandry, and Home Economics, and in each of these branches technical courses, the equivalents of the undergraduate work in the leading schools in the country, are offered. At the outset, however, the student is required to ground himself thoroughly in the fundamental sciences. Chemistry, Physics, and Biology. Besides the sciences, courses in English, Mathematics, and Economics are prescribed, so that the farmer is given a liberal as well as a technical education. The outstanding feature of the C' liege of Agriculture is its ro-gressivcncss, together with the loyalty and enthusiasm of the student body. The Agri Club is an organization of the students of Agriculture which has served not only as an educational factor but has always been ready to advance the interest of the College in any way possible. Fhc College of Agriculture has its Honor Fraternity in the Alpha Zeta, a national organization. Its object is to encourage and reward those who win distinction in scholarship and activity in student affairs. Membership in the Alpha Zeta is limited to Juniors and Seniors whose scholarship places them in the upper two-fifths of their class, and who give promise of achieving something in their chosen profession. Agri day, which comes the day before Thanksgiving, is considered the most important event on the University calendar. During the day exhibits were displayed representing all the featircs of Agricultural science. At noon the enthusiastic Agris drifted down to the Home Economic department in true farmer boy style where they were served with a calorific luncheon by the dainty and neat home economics girls. The Agri dance, on Thanksgiving eve. is an event which is always eagerly looked forward to, both by Agris and their friends, and in connection with the dance a typical County Fair was held for the entertainment of those who did not care to dance.Roster of the College of Agriculture P. B. Ranker W. II. Wicks (i. (i. Becker (i. L. Caldwell II. A. Sandhousc C. H. Heard II. K. Dvorchek V". L. Jones F. G. Bacndcr FACULTY l)e F. I lunger ford C. L. McArthur W. S. Fields R. II. Ridgcll L. W. Osborne Ruth Dyke H. K. Sturgeon C. B. On ley R. II. Austin STUDENTS J. B. Rather W. E. Ayres S. R. Stout Ruth Spccrstra lean Hill F. H. Hcrzcr J. Sain Guy J. R. Cooper Seniors : James A. Clark Julian M. Dyer Irvin J. Heath George W. Winfrey W illiam Wilson Paul K. Heerwagcn John E. Cascv Bryan Stearns Juniors : II. Fred Ellison Walter I). Merrill Harvey A. York George R. I.ovc William M. Lee Glenn K. Alter Hubert H. Hinds Henry A. Lucas Lydlc P. Smith Samuel J. Beard SOPHOMORES : Joseph I '. O’Kelly Ray Johnson Lester Yolcntine Jefferson A. Goodwin Cyrus A. Stauber F. Armstead Falconer Fkf.shmen : Jack P. Dante Arthur Garlington Mack Lester M. I). Johnson William L. Oliver William B. Mathews Harold J. McGinley Paul McCartney Ralph Webb Walter C. Tillman Carey Eugene Clark William W. Beers James G. Abernathy Hal S. Alcorn Robert E. Alcorn Lawrence Horner Joe Hall Torbett Andrew W. St. John Victor Y. Arsdale Hugh P. Motlitt Shelby H. Mitchell Martin Dyke Special: Alfred M. Bracy OFFICERS OF THE AGRI CLUB President........... Vice-President...... Secretary-Treasurer. I Veekly Reporter... Pirst Terin Second Term G W. Winfrey ,VV. M. Wilson J. M. Dyer .G. K. Alter J. M. Dyer Frei Ellison G. K. Alter Joe Torbett Third Term G. K. Alter Freii Ellison Joseph O’Kelly Victor Y. Arsiiai.e 6Agricui.ti rai. Students—Juniors and SeniorsAgricultural Students—Freshmen and Sophomores feRI XE ME5 mam ■■■■■ Department of Home Economics ME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT was established in 191 as a branch of the College of Arts anil Sciences. In 1914 this department was transferred to the College of Agriculture. At present the College offers a four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics and also a three year course designed especially for those training for demonstration and teaching work. The work of the department has been made to conform to the present economic conditions. Special courses in food conservation have been introduced. A free course in cooking is open to all women in the University. The active organization of the department is the Home Economics Club. Its purpose is to draw the students closer together and to create a greater interest in home economics work. High scholarship is stimulated through an honoran organization. Sigma Rho. which was formed by the six seniors of 1917, the first graduates of the department. Membership is open to upper-classmen who rank high in scholarship and have shown a marked activity in student affairs. ROSTER Seniors I.cnnic Ayres Gladys Dowell Ailccn McCoy Irene Xclson Juniors Francis Bailey Estelle Evatt Bess Hodges Madge Johnson Virginia Neely Velma Smith Sophomores Jessie Anderson Edith Coker Ardcll Grubbs Evelyn Konc Mildred Lockhart Pet Irby Ruby Mendenhall Leona Smiley Kate Williams lone Rudolph Freshmen Bcaulah Carl Ida May Moore Marie Plank OFFICERS OF THE CLUB. A11.ken McCoy...........................................................President Gladys Dowkli....................................................I iee-President Jrssie Anderson.........................................................Secretary Irene Xelson...........................................................Treasurer Bess Hodc.es............................................................Reporter Virginia Xkkly..........................................................Rasorbaek Representative A Glimpse at the "Home Ec” WorkDean James R. Jkweu.J.R .Grant HR. Crosi ' Professor James R. Grant, Assistant Professor of Education and Director of Training School. I)k. H. R. Crossland, Assistant Professor of Education. Professor Herbert B. Bruner, Professor of Education.The Normal Club OFFICERS hirst Semester: President...................Margaret Montague Vice-President..............Epkie Mae Bridewei.i Secretary...................Thelma Bishop Treasurer...................F. S. Rankin J Veekly Represen la tire...Bern ice Gilbreath Razorbaek Representative....Li ra Massengale MEMBERS Margaret Alexander Lura Massengale Frances Bailey Edith McCullough Thelma Bishop Gladys McCullough Mac Boyscn Dorothy McDonald Effic Mac Bridewell Sarah McGill Gladys Briscoe Claire McLaughlin Mrs. Gray Campbell Melba Mickel Artie Clifton Alma Miller Nina Cotton Winnie Mitchell Pauline Cravens Margaret Montague Elizabeth Crockett Leone Moore Catherine Deane Irene Nelson Margie Deane Laura Porterfield Helen Mar Edwards Neva Porterfield Jessie Frcyschlag Doris Prather Bernice Gilbreath Helen Louise Pyle Carolyn Gregg Adclc Ramsey Ardcll Grubbs F. S. Rankin La Verne Harper Nannie Mac Roney Jeanette Harington lone Rudolph Clyrene Harrison Maymc Sanders Ruth Hccrwagcn Kathleen Scliaer Pauline Hoeltzel Jean Scott Edna Hood Leona Smiley Ruth Howell Isabella Smith Annie Irbv E. E. Stevenson Evelyn Kone Willie Stuckey Mary Lake Charlotte Watts Cornelia Lee Kate Williams Mildred Lockhart Beulah Wilson Maxine Marshall Margaret Wilson Chloera Robinson Louise Wilson Second Semester: Margaret Montague Mei.ba Mickel Nannie Mae Roney F. S. RankinMiss Gai.kraith INSTRUCTORS Miss Mbt .cir Art instruction is placed in the curriculum of the University to meet the needs of both the layman and professional artist. Its purpose is educational: both social and ethical. It is pursued in three different branches: Academic. Design and Normal. The Academic department includes History of Art. Drawing and Painting. The Normal course is for teachers and consists of Public School Drawing and Construction. The Design includes both Industrial and Applied Design. The average layman does not realize what a college art course would mean to him, for it is tolerated with more or less suspicion by many college authorities; and most students regard it as a negligible quantity among the multiform educational problems which confront them. '1'he professional educator so far afield in the quest of vocational training, has just now seemed to stumble upon the necessity of art training. Perhaps he has come to realize for the first time the buildings that he lives in, the chairs that he occupies, the clothes that he wears, in fact all objects that he uses daily were built or manufactured from a drawing. Good honest drawing is the finest possible discipline for the academic beginner in any technical work. The staff wishes to thank the following art students for their contributions: Katherine Kerr Alma Miller Lois Barret Ellen Conner I css Hodges Theresa Mastin Evan Aumick Melba Mickel Gladys McCullough Cornelia Lee Joe Pratt In connection with this the staff wishes also to mention the contributions of Miss Helen Pettigrew. 15.Gkorgf. W. Martin Major of Infantry, U. S. Army Professor of Military Science and Todies, CommandantJoseph Wheeler First Sergeant, U. S. Army A s sis la n I C o in man dan I... . " George wW herey Cap et Major John E .Casey Capet Captaih First Aipe to CoMMAncwnr William O.Turner. Capet E RJTLlEUTEfWrr Battalion Rujurmi LAPhuvriw Capet Eirst LiEUTEnmT BATTALION ORPNANCE Of j'CER Thk Staff7RSWTV ,'r V 7The Band Bkx Wixki.kmax—Band Master Sergeants: Corporals: Lester Knock J. C. Black Darrell Shinn R. R. Greaves A. Z. Wallace K. Hollabaugh Gaston Skaggs Wade Hudgins W. J. Knight Privates: , T. V. Burress W. J. Hotopp A. P. Wilson C. K. Clark F.. H. Burroughs Earl Ham B. I.. Jordan S. I). Mitchell Chester ParkerCompany “A” LoCrin Dyer MlLL£R Captain: O. B. Alewine Scry cants: First Lieutenants: Second Lieutenant: B. B. Miller J. M. Dyer R. L. Logan Corporals: G. I). Conley, First Scry cant K. W. Mark well J. M. Nisbett H. S. Towler R. L. Searcy A. Taylor J. Ptak E. M. Woodson . B. Dudley B. P. Cowan J. T. Polk C. A. Stauber J. W. Moffitt Privates: F. H. Mason J. A. .Massey C. II. McDaniels W. K. Mycr II. P. Moffitt Joe Pugh Jack Pitcock C. A. Reed J. It. Rogerson It. T. Smith K. F. Shuflicld A. Stanfield Beloit Taylor B. L. Tallman P. O. Teeter V. V. Van Arsdalc G. K. Wilson J. M. Young R. K. Alcorn T. E. Alford C. O. Burkett G. II. Beasley C. T. Carson X. S. Campbell J. It. Earl G. W. Eldredgc Aubrey Estes S. J. Felscnthal C. It. Freeman Claude Gaffney Leo I leer wagon W. F. Hicks S. M. Harris Lawrence Horner R. W. Jacobs E. Kolb NV. S. Carter Omagene Goff I.. II. Knock T. M. KirkscyCompany “A”Captain: I. J. Heath Company “B” First Lieutenant: Second Lieutenant : J. P. McGaughy Hughes Machcn Sergeants: J. P. Galloway, First Sergeant W. M. Lee, First Sergeant K. A. Cooper J. F. O'Kellcy J. C. Barrett C. R. Coleman Mack Lester Corporals: E. H. Lawson E. C. Conner H. R. Hays R. Johnson R. H. Clark J. L. McKennon E. M. Gatewood J. I). Adams It. R. Askew I- K. Barton R. K. Blair R. E. Burson G. B. Cowley W. M. Carson S. II. Dill Hugh Evans F. A. Falconer J. V. Ferguson F. S. Gee FI. G. Hassell L. E. Henson M. D. Johnson G. I). Little II. A. McGinley J. B. McCalcb B. R. Maxwell V. E. Mullins B. B. Paul Neil Phillips Albert Rusher A. V. Rice J. I,. Rogcrson O. F". Sullivan O. C. Trimble B. B. Turner L. J. Williams I). C. Wilcox J. A. Wood C. B. Ford G. M. FergusonCompany “C” Captain: K. R. Payne First Lieutenant: Brooks Hays Second Lieutenants: W. M. Mitchell R. L. Cherry Sergeants: C. A. Shumaker, First Sergeant J. B. Walker G. S. Minmicr Paul McCartney J. N. Perdue W. L. Oliver G. C. Shelton Corporals: S. M. Newman R. E. Cress F. S. Woodward J. F. Williams Paul Gold J. S. Evans F. R. Parker Privates: M. C. Albright I). B. Arnof A. J. Brown A. J. Colbert J. S. Dante V. W. Driver J. M. Faucett Vernon Fore V. M. Hamilton U. A. I-oveil S. II. Mitchell J. B. Paulk Frank Ogden II. A. Paton L. II. Rogers Carlos Slaughter A. V. St. John J. R. Steele S. I. Towcry J. II. Treadwell J. N. Van Frank J. O. Whitted R. B. Winfrey Walter Wallace (I. A. Smith J. G. Hestwood Fount Richardson C. R. Sadler J. F. SmithCompany “C"The OfficersU. ok A. Men With the ColorsI', ok A. Men With the Colors mn d Maid Sponsor CoMP my 3 flnn GfiLE Cotton Maid Ep ith Sponsor. Sponsor ompnnyP rr no Sponsor Company C Doris Prntncr Mrry Hempn ll P r d Maud UK department of Physical Kducation is one of great value and pleasure to the young women JWKsm of the University. Crowds of girls arc s nbPs brought together in the gymnasium, and c r IhtWs 7| through the mutual interest in class work ami games acquaintances arc formed which create a more friendly atmosphere in the University life. iTTl The work in physical education is divided into two parts, outdoor and indoor work. The eludes tennis, volley-ball, captain-ball, base- ball, basket-ball and field-hockey. 'The indoor work includes general class exercises, rhythmic work and games. The activities arc under the direction of Miss Clara Miller, head of the department. All girls are required to take two years in physical education work. In addition, the third and fourth year optional classes (of which a large number of girls take advantage) make it possible for one to receive credit for four years gymnasium work. An exhibition, which is given each spring, is always one of the most successful performances of the year. From these exhibitions, which arc always extremely well attended, one, who is not enrolled in the department, may get a fair picture of the work of the year. The girls of the University realize that much gratitude is due the instructor, since through her sincere efforts, they are given the privilege of supervised corrective work and at the same time are allowed to express the buoyancy of their youth in the rhythmic motions of the ;esthetic dance.' •; .'fa ■Ot Ihe C.o ir|«. O0Cor d Ye r Group. Girls’ RiHe Club The Girls’ Rifle Club of the University of Arkansas was organized October 29, 1917- Regular target practice is held twice a week under the direction of 1st Sergeant Joseph Wheeler of the military department, in order that the members of the club may become good marksmen. Other aims of the club arc to promote good sportsmanship and a love of outdoor sports, as well as a spirit of fellowship among the university girls in general. MEMBHRS 8 Jean Scott Lucy Bennett Edith LcClcrcq Kate Campbell Effie Mac Bridewell Olive StewartAmerican Girls’ Legion FOUNDED BY MISS B. L. MOCK Legion Xo. I was organized in Arkansas April 6, 1918. The purpose of the legion is to unite the young womanhood of the country under one name to co-operate with existing patriotic and altruistic organizations and to aid the government in promoting its measures. The University battalion consists of two companies with a total membership of one hundred and fifty-nine. Legion Xo. II has been organized in the University of California and the Universities of Mississippi, Colorado and Manitoba. Canada, have asked permission to organize battalions. The University of Arkansas battalion has instituted its war work by regular military drill, by materially aiding the American Red Cross and by co-operating with the Council of National Defense in signing registration and food pledge cards. The majority of the girls have also joined the food conservation classes conducted by the Home Economics department. Valuable assistance has been furnished by the members of the faculty advisory board. First Sergeant Joseph H. Wheeler of the military department directs the weekly drill. STATE PATRONS Governor Charj.es H. Brough Mrs. C. M. Brough Mrs. H. C. Gibson Mrs. Joseph Frauexthai. Mrs. S. P. Davis Mrs. J. T. Beal Mrs. T. T. Cotxam Mrs. J. C. Futrai.i. Mrs. G. V. Martin Mrs. R. E. Blair STATE COM MAXDER Mrs. A. Marixoxi FACULTY ADVISORY BOARD Miss Mary Ann Davis Miss Clara Miller Miss Ruth Speerstra Miss Jane Dickey Major G. W. Martin Sergeant Joseph Wheeler Major ............ Adjutant ......... Sergeant Major ... Captain .......... I'irst Lieutenant .. Second Lieutenant Captain .......... Lirst Lieutenant .. Second Lieutenant OFFICERS Battalion Staff Company “A Company "B .......Olive Stfavart ...Clyrf.nf. Harrison ......Edith LeClerq Effie Mae Bridewell ..Aubrey Wilkinson ..........Jean Scott .....Kate Campbell .......Lucy Bennett ......Gladys MorganActivitiesThe University Weekly Editor-in-Chief .. Associate Editor Assistant Editor Assistant Editor Local E.ditor ... Society E.ditor ... Exchange E.ditor EDITORIAL STAFF .............................Herbert Faisst ................................Ijsla Sailor ...............................Brooks Hays ..............................Amfxia Hilton ...............................James Bradley ...............................Olive Stewart ........................ Gladys Hollabaugh BUSINESS STAFF Easiness Manager.......................................William M. Mitchell Assistant Easiness Manager.................................Si-eight Towler Circulation Manager.......................................Robert E. Morgan REPORTERS Ruth Howell K. W. Markwell Pauline Cravens W. J. Knight Thelma Bishop R. A. Cooper Kathleen Schaer B. B. Turner Pauline Hoeltzel Joe Barrett Edna Hood Fay Rankin Martha Rule Darrell Shinn Helen Mcllwcin Joe Torbctt Bess Hodges J. M. Faucet Beatrice Furr Hubert Patou Gussie Simpson James Moilit Georgic Lee William Oliver Otis TrimbleThe Arkansan Published Monthly Editor-in-chief...... Fiction F.ditor...... Essay Editor......... Poetry Editor ....... Exchange Editor ..... Miscclloncous Editor Miscellaneous F.ditor Alumni Editor ...... EDITORIAL STAFF ............................Ruth I. Howeli. ............................Beatrix Quaile ............................Ethel Browning ..........................Gladys McCullough ...............................Ethel Hart ...............................Lucy Bennett .............................Eugene Mullins ..............................James Nisbett BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager .................................................Mark Bisnor Assistant Business Manager......................................George Beasley Circulation Manager.......................................William J. Knight Assistant Circulation Manager.............................Gladys HollabaUCHRazorback Staff EDITORIAL STAFF Editor -in- Chief ...... Associate Editor........ Assistant Editor........ Assistant Editor........ Engineering Editor...... Agricultural E.ditor.... Athletic Editor......... Military Editor......... College Life Editor..... Art E.ditor ............ Society Editor ......... ..................Brooks Hays .................Amelia Hilton .................Hugh Machen .............Mrs. Vance Sailor .................F. H. Morrow .....................W. M. Lee .................J. G. Ragsdale .................Gordon Perdue ..............('. A. Shumaker .................Blanche O’Bar ....................Ethel Hart BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager...........................................................J. E. Bradley Advertising Manager ......................................................Byrnes Walker Senior.............. Junior.............. Sophomore........... CI - A SS R EI ’ R ES EX T A TIV ES | ilkkn McCoy I J. A. Clark j Gladys McCullough (J. G. Ragsdale ( Gussie Simpson ( K. . Markwell ( Helen McIlwein ( Logan Rogers Ereshman.Husky Doughty Tovey Owen C. Mitcheli..... Gutiierie Hassei..... Glee Club .........Director .Assistant Director ......Accompanist OFFICERS John Casey ....................................................President Ii.vi ng J. Heath..............................................Secretary Byrnes Walker...........................................Business Manager First Tenor W. J. Knight E. P. O’Neal C. B. Sanders G. E. Wilson Ben Winkleman CLUB First Bass Joe Barrett Hugh Lawson J. iR. Steele Byrnes Walker Second Tenor R. R. Greaves L. H. Knock George Love G. S. Mininicr Second Bass J. E. Casey J. C. Douthit G. C. Shelton I. J. Heath ASSISTING THE CLUB Mary Cummings Bateman................. Henry Doughty Tovey.................. Dave C. Hansard....................... Soprano ...Piano ....Violin ORCH ESTRA Dave Hansard, Violin George Love, Saxophone L. H. Knocli, Trombone Ben Winkleman, Clarinet Owen Mitchell, Trombone H. D. Tovcv, Pianoii.IT) :cn ) :mxMBM—aW mammmmmam Fhe Blackfriars INC KPT I OX AND HISTORY This organization was conceived and effected by a number of students interested in the study of modern drama, during a series of lectures upon that subject given in the evening by Mr. Williams. After the presentation of "The Girl With the Green Eyes,” it was found best to limit the membership of the club to twenty-five for the sake of systematic study and to secure the most effective results. Each year it is the custom of the club to make a brief tour over the State. All endeavors along this line have proved quite successful. Presentations range from farce to tragedy. During March 1918, “Let’s Get Married" was played to appreciative audiences at Helena, Conway. Camp Pike. Ft. Smith and Fayetteville. The play selected for Commencement is “Lady Windcmcrc’s Fan.” PLAYS PRESENTED 1913—“The Girl With the Green Eyes.' 191-1—“Alice Sit by the Fire.” 1915—“Her Husband’s Wife.” 1916— "The Fortune Hunter.” 1917— “The Mollusc.” 1918— "Let's Get Married.” CAST OF "LET’S GET MARRIED" Claire McLaughlin Ellen Connor Margaret Montague William Knight Eugene Mullins Martha Rule Adelc Ramsey Jack Galloway 7 S TYLoaA rfLSxJijrl ' du?- nit O tL $(- £W f xt . x ZT 1 ) X T d£ rtS o£ 4S Jjdxio u. (%2 £ tyttsUJUK, 0[%u.{Hl ts • ‘CfZaJlA.ov » » -»-% '"WC 0»v- O- ytA -O 7 VcA _ Cc+tVisg 4u Maiw h.ii -!•- -oe.i.v-«-iv Brooks Ha vs .Pcriclean R. E. Morgan...............................Garland l.ee “Bob” was a senior before the desire to excel in forensics became strong enough to lead him out before a committee of six dignified professors to prove that he was an orator. He left no one skeptical. Some one, affectionately called "my old man”, should be proud of him. B. B. Turner............................Garland-Lee Itolou received this year the title of “the whole I.ec Literary Society himself”. The G.-L. is a master’s degree. lie learned the art of public sepaking at Mount Zion and some day a prim, energetic little Congressman will be introducing bills in the House of Representatives "to appropriate $50,000 for a federal building to be erected at Mount Zion, Arkansas. "II. B." is one of the clearest thinkers in the student body.Pcriclcaii }. G. Ragsdale Three years ago a tall, ambitious “prep” listened to two notorious Arkansas "orators” give two Texas “longhorns” a sound drubbing. Perhaps that was his inspiration, for straightway he began to prepare for his calling—“the platform". "Rags” had a great many friends watching him and these formed a gratified group when the news came that Arkansas had repeated the drubbing. J. E. Bradley..................................Periclean Jim possesses three essential characteristics of the successful speaker. He has a logical mind, a pleasing delivery, and a splendid voice. If the bases arc full it's lucky for Arkansas when Jim comes to bat. C. R. COLEMAX "And now abidctli scholarship, studiousness, and college pep, but the greatest of these is college pep.” Here is a man who jmsscsscs all three, but "vim” is the word that characterizes Slat's style. And whether it be in front of a grand stand at the football game or before the audience in a debate you will find him pushing every minute. 9Debating in the University of Arkansas INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATING. Ir is owing to the untiring efforts of our excellent coach, C. J. Foreman, that Arkansas made so good a showing in her debates this season. Two debates were scheduled, one with Oklahoma A. M. College, and the other with Texas University. Owing to war conditions, Oklahoma was unable to meet us, so the only contest was with Texas. Arkansas met this school at Austin, April 8. and won a 2 to 1 decision. Only one veteran debater was back this year, but there were plenty of new men who were anxious to help, and spirited tryouts resulted. Next year when more debates are to be held, these men arc going to give Arkansas “all they have," and we believe they will bring honor to the school. The University gives both alternates and regular debaters three semester hours' credit for their work. Another reward is the fact that those who take part in an inter-collegiate debate become eligible to the Taj Kappa Alpha debating fraternity. INTER-SOCIETY DEBATES. The regular inter-society debates between the Garland-Lee and the Pcriclean literary societies were held Friday, April Both societies were well represented in this contest—each society having two teams. The victory was divided, the Pcriclean taking the decision in one debate, the Garlard-Lce in the othe-. ORATORICAL CONTEST. The oratorical contest for the Grant Loving Cup was again won by the Sapphic literary society. They were ably represented by Miss Thelma Bishop. This is the second time in succession that the cup has gone to them, and if they win it next year, they retain it permanently.Board of Athletic Control FACULTY MEMBERS President J. C. Futrall Prof. VV. M. Briscoe Prof. J. J. Knoch Prof. A. Marinoni Prof. B. N. Wilson R. L. Cherry STUDENT MEMBERS William Wilson Herbert FaisstNorman C. Paine CoachFootball for 1917 HE football season of 1917-18 opened with only five of the last year’s “A” men back and with only two of the former Freshmen team. The new material was scarce and small, and from this the new coach bad to build a team to meet a bard schedule. It was this new coach, Norman C. Paine, coming to us from Chicago, who developed a team for Arkansas equaled by none except the undefeated team of Hugo Be .dek. The season opened with the Warrcnsburg Normals only two weeks after the beginning of school, and for the first time in all their contests Arkansas was able to defeat them—the score being 32 to o. Just one week later Rolla School of Mines, our old rival, went down before us 39 to o. Hendrix College next came against the Razorbacks firmly believing they would do the impossible and go away victorious. After putting up one of the stiffest fights ever displayed by them against us they had to take the small end of a 19 to o score.Last year’s Southwest champions, Kendall College, was next in order. This was expected to be one of the hardest games of the season, but the determination of our men plus a superior class of football enabled us to win 19 to 7—they being the first ones to cross our goal. Kvcrvbody looked forward with eagerness to the annual clash with the Louisiana Tigers. By superior form of plays, noble hcadwork of Captain Davidson, and the determination of every player to win, the Tigers’ tails were twisted for a score of 14 to o. Being outclassed in every department of the game they were unable to advance the ball any nearer our goal than the 40-yard line.On Nov. 17, the Oklahoma Sooncrs were met by the Razorbacks in their annual game at Ft. Smith. The Sooners expected to walk away with the honor of the day, but the Razorbacks, showing true form and spirit, held them to a o to o tie. Being outweighed 10 pounds to a man, the Razorbacks were forced to turn to forward passing and here showed up their opponents at their own game, completing 9 passes to the Sooncrs 2. A game with the Texas Longhorns had been scheduled for Turkey day. The long ami wearisome trip, unusually hot weather, light men, playing in hard luck, enabled the Longhorns, playing their best game of the season, to defeat us 20 to o. 'Faking the season as a whole, the success of the Razorbacks was much greater than had been expected at the beginning. Our backfield was the lightest in the history of the school—being less than the average high school. 'Flic heaviest team Arkansas could put on the held at any time averaged 157 pounds. But the untiring and wonderful coaching of Coach Paine made it possible for us to win prominence in athletic circles. Such an excellent record was made that Captain Davidson was chosen as all Southern quarterback. SCHEDULE OF THE SEASON OF 1917 Arkansas...................... 32 Arkansas...................... 39 Arkansas...................... 19 Arkansas...................... 19 Arkansas...................... 14 Arkansas........................ 0 Arkansas........................ 0 Warrcnsburg Normals ............... 0 Rolla School of Mines............. 0 Hendrix College................... 0 Kendall College .................. 7 Louisiana State University........ 0 Oklahoma University............... 0 Texas University ................. 20 Total Arkansas. 123 Opponents 27Davidson, Gene, Quarterback—{Sode) All-Southern quarterback- His excellency in interference, his sure and hard tackling, his wonderful hroken-tichl running, his unquestionable speed, his effectiveness in generating a team, his superior passing, his famous punting— these qualities make him one of the best players ever to don a Raxorback uniform and the most finished player in the South. Stevenson, E. E.—Fullback Steve knocked himself out fighting for his team and no one failed to see that the aid lie could give was sadly missed. Though hurt in the very first practice, he had brought the onlookers to their feet by his sensational plays. We regret that he will no longer be on the Razorback squad. Smith, Lyplk 1’., Left Guard—{Bags) One of last year's letter men who was a star the whole season, in spite of the fact that in the beginning he received a sprained ankle and a painful Charlie horse. Bags played in every game of the season and could be relied on at all times to do his part in helping Arkansas win a game. Wilson, William, Right End—{Bill) llis ability to receive passes brought Arkansas touchdown after touchdown, anil his wonderful tackling prohibited all plays from coming round his end. A hard tackier and speedy in going down on punts. One of Arkansas’ best all round meu.Coleman, J. W. Center "With eleven men like Coleman we could easily defeat Harvard, Vale or Princeton.” said Coach Paine. Colie put out all he had for Arkansas in every same and no man ever fought harder, lie saved the day at Fort Smith, and Sodie never made a center rush but that Colie opened the way for a sure train. An excellent player, a perfect passer, a continuous fighter, an all round man—every true Razorback says Coleman tilled the requirements. Mulrexix, Cass, Fullback Cass played one of the hardest places on the team and there was no room for anybody to find fault with his playing. Won the highest respect and admiration of the student body by his consistent and ground-gaining work against Oklahoma. A clean player, a sure tackier, a regular ground-gainer, a hard fighter—such was Cass. YVixklkman, Bex, Right Half—(Wink) Wink di l some spectacular work last year on the Reserves. Line-plunging and end-running was his hobby then and still is. He was hurt early in the season ami did not get to show what he had till late, but then lie put it all out. Brazil, Ernest, Left Tackle Brazil, our big left tackle, was a mainstay of strength on the left side of the line. Blocked more punts than any other man on the team, and by his famous punt-blocking he almost won the Oklahoma game at Fort Smith. Starred against Texas.Gold, Paul, Right Guard—(Ihey) One of last year’s Reserve who fights from whistle to whistle and always tries to | »it that same lighting spirit into his teammates. A very effective man in breaking up wing plays. Sanders, C. B., Left End—(Sandy) Sandy, though inexperienced and entering school two weeks after the season had begun, ranked as high as any end he met. lie rarely failed to get his man on defense and was a reliable pass catcher. One of the big stars in the Texas game. Kizer, Roland, Left Half Kizer made Ins reputation in the game against the l-ouistaiia 1 igers. A good end runner and showed by his work that he was a capable and sincere gridiron man. lie got several passes for good gains, too. Aiaorn, Elmore, Left Half Another one of the little men who made good ami by his hard work showed the student body that they could count on him whenever he was needed to do his part in carrying the Razor-backs to victory.Dyke, Martin, Etui Dyke came from Fort Smith High and proved that his training there was good. Ilis light was kept up continually, and with him in the lineup next season no one has any anxiety about the position he holds. Ewart, Jim, Right Tackle flood old Jim. The only new man who played every minute of the season. Was a pillar of strength to the right side of the line on defense, and always played a spectacular game on offense. Coach Paine had great confidence in him and Jim has proven himself worthy of it. Perdue, Gorton A., End The smallest man on the team, but what he lacked in size lie made up in pep, fight, and Arkansas spirit. A broken foot kept him out of the biggest game, but everyone knew that he was only too willing to give even himself for the glory of his school. He promises to be a future star on the Razorback gridiron.Alcorn, Hal, Right Half Hal was little, but when lie had the ball it took a bin one to stop hint, lie went low and ta-t, thereby becoming a good line-plunger. With another year’s experience he will do Arkansas worlds of good. Edwards, G. R., Left Guard Edwards came to us from Ouachita and proved to be a very effective man. If Smith is drafted watch Edwards fill his | osition with the same fighting spirit and determination. Always fights hard and steady. Smith, Artie, Right Half Smith was a good open-field runner and many gains were due to his hard work. In the Louisiana game he received an injury that remained with him for some time, but it never could prohibit him from continuing his old-time style.A. W. Rick II 'resiling CoachThe TeamBaseball Season of 1918 Owing to the exigencies of the war and the unusual drain on the athletic material, no regular varsity team was put out this year. Only one “A" man was hack to begin practice and the new men were, for the most part, inexperienced. Much interest was shown and practice had begun in due time. Our coach was using every effort to make the baseball record as good as the football record had been. Games had been secured with such schools as Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. By the time for the games our men would no doubt have been in good condition, and ready for the best of matches. The war cut short all these plans and work-outs ceased. Later the different departments had their regular annual contests and some interesting games were played—one of them lasting fifteen innings and ending in a 4 to score. Freshmen pitchers showed some good stuff, and fast infields gave wonderful support. The outfield was in just as good form, and after the final game had been played, everyone felt that if the players could have worked under the superior coaching of Coach Watts, our old record as a baseball school would have been easily upheld again.I'l."i ' ..Ax crf A£rtt ■ - • 4 ',- ■•” E M . •; v » iT-v i N 2v« 'Freshmen Out Organisations The CouncilsThe Student Council Herbert Faisst, President................ Robert Morgan, Vice-President............ Lf.la Sailor, Secretary.................... K. E. Stevenson, Treasurer............... J. C. Moody.............................. J. A. Clarke............................. John Casey................................. VV iLLiAM Wilson......................... Gladys Hollabaugh........................ Gene Davidson........................... Gordon Purdue............................ Eleanor Gilliam.......................... W. L. Oliver. Edna Mood.... .......Arts and Sciences College ....................Senior Class ...............Literary Societies ......Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. .............Exgi x eerixg College ............Agricultural College ............Military Department ........................“A” Men ....................Senior Class ....................Junior Class ....................Junior Class ....................Junior Class .................Sophomore Class .................Sophomore Class 'Went into the service February 4. Succeeded by Gordon Purdue. The Student Council is composed of fourteen members, ten of whom arc seniors, two juniors, and two sophomores. It is the link between the students and the Faculty and endeavors at all times to bring about better understanding and good feeling between these two college groups. 'fhc purpose of the Student Council is to eliminate undesirable conditions and customs from the campus and to draw the students into closer relationship. This is done by providing for the welfare of student organizations, promoting student enterprises, and reflecting student opinion in all matters. Some of the concrete results of the work of this year’s student council have been a service flag for the University and the devising of an electoral system for student elections. Gladys Hollabaugh—Sigma Evans Piet iga Young Women’s Council of Girl’s Dormitory 1917-1918 Mary Hkmphili...............................................I'resident X i xa Cotton............................................Vicc-Presiden t Sarah Hon................................................... Secretary Pearl Middlebrooks.......................... BOARD OK PROCTORS Thelma Bishop Estclla Evatt Ethel Hart Edna Hood Lida Higgs Marjorie Lombard Thelma Mildred Lockhart Grace Newman Mary Dale Sellars Gussic Simpson Bernice Slaughter Leona Smiley Vaughan Treasurer Edna Hood—'"Which shall it he, Niel, or Joe?"■H .v H nf KwH Young Women’s Council of Girl’s Dormitory 1918-1919 Amelia Hilton............................ Alma Miller.............................. Hess Hokoes.............................. Nannie May Roney......................... HOARD OK PROCTORS Kflic Alley Thelma Bishop Mamie Carroll Pearl Lane Clyrcnc Harrison Ruth Jamie McConnell Blanche O’Har Doris Shandy Kathlccii Schaer Opal Davis Eel ton .....President I 'iee-President ... Secretary .....Treasurer 1'i'Tii Felton—She loves rock candy.Men’s Dormitory Governing Board y.fs. Jessie Blocker Warner..............................Matron P.o.sKRT E. Morgan.......................Treasurer of Dormitory Huchanan Hall K. E. Stevenson Brooks Hays Gray Hall Hill Hall E. P. O’Neal Glen Alter Gene Davidson Pat OW'kai.—Terror of the highways.Christian AssociationsYoung Women’s Christian Association Motto: "I am come that thty might have life, and that they hate it mar, abundantly." CABINET OFFICERS Gen eral Sec re tary.................... President .............................. Vice-President ......................... Secretary .............................. Treasurer .............................. ....Jane K. Dickky ......Ruth Howell .......Lf.la Sailor Margaret Alexander .... Martha Campbell CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES Mission Study ...... Bible Study ........ R el in in us I celings Music .............. Social ............. Association AYtes . Extension .......... Hostess ........... ....Blanche O'Bar ....Doris Prather ...Paulin k Hoeltzell ....Ethel Browning Pearl Middlebrooks ..Gladys Holi.abaugh ....Amelia Hilton .Nannie May Roney C. R. Ford—Corporal, retired, L'. S.Y. M. C. A CABINET OFFICERS President.............................................E. E. Stevenson Vice-President...........................................I. J. Heath Secretary................................................F. S. Rankin' Treasurer................................................G. K. Alter CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES Membership ..............................................Frki» Ellison Religious Meetings ......................................Brooks Hays Finance .................................................Glenn Alter Bible Study..............................................I. J. Heath Mission Study ...........................................J. F. O’Kelley Social Service...........................................H. A. York Extension ............................................G. A. Cantrell Music ...................................................VV. 1). Shinn Social ..................................................J. E. Bradley MEMBERS Elbert Alford E. L. Henderson W. G. Pcay Toni E. Abington I. J. Heath Chester Parker Glenn K. Alter W. G. Hamilton E. E. Parcttc Win. Worrall Beers VV. C. Hicks R. E. Paslcy Earle Blair Earnest Hollabaugh Logan Rogers J. C. Barrett Brooks Hays Fount Richardson Earnest Brazil H. F. Hays J. B. Rogcrson J. E. Bradley M. D. Johnson F. S. Rankin Dewey Conley Reed Johnson J. L. Robertson Herbert Crunk R. H. Jocrdcn Clyde Sone C. E. Clark B. I.. Jordan J. F. Smith George A. Cantrell T. M. Kirkscy Darrell Shinn R. A. Cooper U. A. Lovell E. E. Stevenson Robert P. Cowan Hugh Lawson C. A. Shumaker I. Y. Coleman Robert Morgan J. W. Treadwell VV. M. Cantrell W. B. Matthews P. O. Teeter Fred Ellison A. R. McKenzie J. H. Torbctt Julian Dyer F. B. Mason B. B. Turner Guy W. Fincher 'I'. M. McCalcb O. C. Trimble Berry Floyd F. H. Morrow J. X. Van Frank A. E. Fcntcr J. C. Moody Lester Valentine Herbert Faisst H. J. McGinlcy H. E. Wright C. VV. Freeman K. V. Markwcll E. M. Woodson J. M. Faucett VV. I.. Oliver E. G. Wakefield Claude GalTncy J. F. O’Kcllcy L. J. Williams R. R. Greaves Frank Ogden J. F. Williams J. A. Goodwin E. L. Parker Terry Williams W. J. Hotopp H. A. Patou H. A. York J. T. Polk G. K. Alter—A judge.Honor SocietiesSkull and Torch ACADEMIC HONOR SOCIETY Founded by the Members of the Two Honor Societies, the Skull and the Torch, February 15, 1915 Pi rposk: To develop a higher efficiency in scholarship and a more whole- some moral sentiment through a fraternal relationship. MEMBERS 1918 Beatrice Summers Gladys Hollabaugh Pearl Middlebrooks James McGaughy 1919 Gladys McCullough Nell Cole ALUMNAE IN RESIDENCE Jim P. Matthews Beatrix Quaile 1917 INITIATES IN SERVICE Brvan L. Milburn HONORARY MEMBERS Dr. J. S. Guy Marjorie Gold Mary Hemphill Ruth Howell Lela Sailor Amelia Hilton Juliette Mather L. Orland Leach Dr. J. L. Hancock J1 m :: 1 : McGaughy—A rose among thorns.mmTau Beta Pi ENGINEERING HONOR FRATERNITY Founded at Lehigh University, June, 1885. Alpha Chapter of Arkansas Installed December 14, 1914. Colors: Seal Brown and While. MEMBERS IX FACULTY VV. X. Gladson F. G. Br.cndcr ACTIVE MEMBERS E. L. Parker J. C. Moody John Knott A. O. Evans Ray Belknap ACTIVE CHAPTERS. I.ehigh University Michigan Agricultural College Purdue University Stevens Institute of Technology University of Illinois University of Wisconsin Case School of Applied Science State University of Kentucky Columbia University University of Missouri Michigan College of Mines University of Colorado Armour Institute of Technology Syracuse University Colorado School of Mines University of Michigan Missouri School of Mines University of California Iowa State College Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute University of Iowa University of Minnesota Cornell University Worcester Polytechnic Institute University of Maine Pennsylvania State College University of Washington University of Arkansas University of Kansas John Homkk Kxott—He never had a dale.Alpha Zeta AGRICULTURAL HONOR FRATKRNITV Founded at Ohio State University, 1897. Arkansas Chapter Installed April 18, 1917. Flower : Pink Carnation. MEMBERS R. H. Austin P. B. Barker H. E. Dvorachck W. S. Fields ACTIVE G. K. Alter J. A. Clark F. H. Ellison G. W. ACTIVE Ohio State University Pennsylvania State College University of Illinois Cornell University Michigan Agricultural College New Hampshire A. and M. College University of Nebraska North Carolina A. and M. College University of Minnesota University of Vermont Iowa State College University of Wisconsin Colorado Agricultural College Colors: Mode and Sky Pine. IN FACULTY F. H. Merger Y. C. Lasseter Martin Nelson L. W. Osborn MEMBERS J. F. O’Kelly C. A. Stauber Bryan Stearns Winfrey CHAPTERS University of Maine University of Missouri Washington State College University of California Purdue University Kansas State Agricultural College North Dakota Agricultural College Kentucky State University University of Tennessee Georgia College of Agriculture Louisiana State University Oklahoma A. and M. College University of Arkansas G. W. Winfrey—That tall, stately man with the handsome brow.Tau Kappa Alpha ORATORICAL HONOR FRATERNITY Governor Charles H. Brougii, Sational President MEMBERS IN FACULTY Prof. J. R. Grant Dr. Y. L. Jones Dr. J. R. Jewell ACTIVE MEMBERS J. G. Ragsdale Brooks Hays J. G. Ragshai.e—“! am {joint to see my woman in a minute.The Ouawpaw Club The Quawpaw Club was organized at the University of Arkansas in the spring of 1918 for the purpose of petitioning the Sigma Upsilen Literary Fraternity, a charter of which is hoped for in June. The club is strictly elective in character, membership being limited to twelve men of the Junior and Senior classes who have shown marked interest in literary affairs. OFFICERS President............................J. P. McGauchv Vice-President..........................F. S. Rankin Secretary-Treasurer.....................J. M. XlsnKTT FACULTY MEMBER Dr. Virgil L. Jones James Nisbctt James McGaughy Brooks Hays Fay Rankin ROLL James E. Bradley W. E. Mullins Courtney Reed Mark Bishop Mark Bishop—The notorious Arkansas { rafter. Pi Delta Epsilon JOURNALISTIC HONOR FRATERNITY Founded at Syracuse University. FACULTY MEMBERS Dr. Virgil L. Jones Mr. Norman J. Radder Herbert Faisst H. S. 'Fowler Mark Bishop C. B. Ford ACTIVE MEMBERS Kenneth Markwcll W. M. Mitchell . R. E. Morgan James E. Bradley Brooks Hays VV. J. Knight A. B. ArmstrongPi Kappa Pirposk—To promote larger interests of Journalism in the University of Arkansas, to stimulate interest in journalistic work, and to reward efficient and consistent service on the University publications. Membership is limited to women students. M EMBEKSHIP Gladys Hollabaugh Pauline Cravens Edna Hood Amelia Hilton Ethel Olive Stewart Lcla Sailor Ruth Howell Kathleen Schacr Browning Oi.ivk Stewart—She kids the professors Phi Alpha Tau Founded ar the Emerson School of Oratory, Boston, Massachusetts, 1909 Installed at the University of Arkansas, February 6. 1918 OFFICERS Raxis W. J. Knight Hasin Katib MEMBERS W. J. Knight J. M. Nesbitt Byrnes Walker I). G. H011 Jack Galloway Ardes Smith Y. E. Mullins Aubrey Estes G. M. Ferguson Jack Pitcock Mark Bishop Albert Rusher Roger Williams Lucian Locke G. H. Beasley ACTIVE CHAPTERS Alpha..............................Kmcrson College Gamma..............................University of Nebraska Zcta...............................Carrol College Eta................................College of Puget Sound Theta..............................Northwestern University Iota...............................University of Kansas Kappa..............................Syracuse University Lambda.............................University of Texas Mu.................................University of Oklahoma iV«................................Pacific University Xi...................................University of Michigan Pi. ...............................University of Arkansas Jimmie Nesbitt—A Joiner front Joincrsviltc.Varsity Club W illiam Wilson K. E. Stevenson D. P. Weld Gene Davidson J. W. Coleman L. P. Smith Ben Winkleman Ernest Brazil B. C. Mulrcnnin George Love Rowi.a.vd K izkr—Freshman. M EMBERS. Football Martin Dyke Ross Edwards Paul Gold C. B. Sanders Ardis Smith R. E. Alcorn Hal Alcorn Gordon Perdue Rowland Kizer Baseballliterary SocietiesSapphic Literary Society OFFICERS FOR THE TERM 1917-1918 President ......... Vice-President .... Secretary ......... Treasurer ......... Weekly Reporter... ... Gladys Hollabough ........Alma Miller ....Thelma Bishop ...........Uxa Ross ....Kathleen Schaer OFFICERS FOR THE TERM 1918 President .......... Vice-President...... Secretary .......... Treasurer .......... Critic ............. Weekly Reporter ... ..........Una Ross ........Ada Browne ......Beatrice Furr ......Velma Smith ..Beatrice Robinson ......Tiielma Bishop MEMBERS Una Ross Thelma Bishop Ada Browne Alma Miller Blanche O'Bar Lcla Sailor Gladys Hollabougii Velma Smith Lillie Mac McBride Kathleen Schaer Arizona Reed Jamie McConnell Vivian Savage Ethel Keener Ruth Howard Rosalie Fontaine Opal Davis Beatrice Robertson Beatrice Summers Pearl Lane Feb James Ruth Henderson Augusta Simpson Beatrice Furr Bess Hodges Gertrude Hart Jim P. Mathews Loice Parks Annie Kinsxvorthy Doris Shandy Gussie Simpson—Theda Bara.12Garland-Lee Literary Society At the beginning of the present school year, the Garland and Lee Literary Societies faced a problem that every young men’s organization in the United States now faces. The Lees found that out of twenty-seven men on the roll of last year the war had left only four. The Garlands faced the same situation. During the first semester the struggle was carried on in each society by these few old men and the new men gained among the freshmen. After viewing the first semester’s work the Lccs decided that it was not exactly in accordance with their motto, "To be rather than to seem.” The Garlands realized that a standstill conflicted with their motto. "No steps backward.” as much as a real backward step. The result was a union. They are now one under the name of Garland-Lee Literary Society. The good accomplished cannot be measured. The members have caught the spirit that pervades all real literary societies as is shown by the fact that the society has two representatives on the Inter-Collegiate Debating Team. This union will stand until an increased membership demands a division. GARLAND LITERARY SOCIETY OFFICERS First Quarter: Second Quarter: President I. J. Heath I I. Heath 1 'ice-Presidcnt C. Soke Secretary W. I). Shinn W. I). Shinn Treasurer 1. E. Casey J. E. Casey Weekly Reporter Oris Trimble Oris Trimble Critic K. E. Morgan R. E. Morgan LEE LITERARY SOCI1 iTY OFFICERS First Quarter: Second Quarter: President 1. F. O’Kki.ley J. F. O’Kelley Pice-President G. K. Alter E. II. Burroughs Secretary B. B. Turner B. B. Turner Treasurer 1. C. Moody 1. ('. Moody Critic G. K. Alter A Homey F. E. Barr GARLAND-LEE LITERARY SOCIETY OFFICERS Third Quarter: Fourth Quarter : President 1. E Casey 1. C. Moody Vice-President B. B. Turner ('. B. Freeman Secretary 1. C. Moody Y. M. Lee Treasurer W. M. Lee C. B. Ford Critic 1. F. O’Kelley G. K. Alter Weekly Reporter 1 1 Heath Otis Trimble Bon Morgan —The pearl hunting Egyptian. Periclean Literary Society The Pcriclcan was organized in 1900 as a debating club but in 1901 it broadened into the wider field of literary society work. It is now the largest organization of its kind in the University. The society is especially proud of the fact that for the last two years three Pcriclcans have been members of the debating team. Once a Periclean, always a Pcriclcan. FACULTY MEMBERS Prof. J. R. Grant I)r. A. M. Harding Prof. W. B. Stelzncr Prof. W. C. Murphy OFFICERS First Term: Second Tenn : . President..........................F. S. Rankin E. E. Stevenson Vice-President.....................J. G. Ragsdale .1. E. Bradley Secretary..........................J. C. Barrett R. C. Pasley Treasurer..........................K. V. Mark well E. H. Lawson Chaplain...........................Brooks Hays J. M. Dyer Critic.............................E. E. Stevenson Brooks Hays Reporter...........................Manky McCai.kb Berry Floyd Third Term: Fourth Term: President..........................G. W. Winfrey I). P. Weld Vice-President.....................I). P. Weld Julian Dyer Secretary..........................F. H. Morrow Hugh Evans Treasurer..........................James Moffitt R. E. Bi.air Chaplain...........................F. S. Rankin E. E. Stevenson Critic.............................J. E. Bradley J. G. Ragsdale Reporter...........................J. M. FaUCETT Robert Am acker Rasorback Representative...............................Frank Morrow MEMBERS Robert Amackcr J. M. Faucctt F. B. Mason J. G. Abernathy A. E. Fcnter Sextus Mitchell Maurice Albright Stayton Gee Arthur McKinzcy Elbert Alford Brooks Hays G. S. Minmicr D. B. Arnof Walter Hicks Frank Ogden J. Q. Adams Reed Johnson R. C. Pasley J. C. Barrett B. H. Joerdon G. A. Perdue Ernest Brazil Marvin Johnson W. G. Pcay E. H. Brown T. M. Kirksey Hubert Patou R. E. Blair E. H. Lawson E. E. Parcttc R. A. Cooper Maxev McCalcb J. G. Ragsdale B. P. Cowan C. H. McDaniel F. S'. Rankin Julian Dyer W. M. Hamilton Logan Rogers Fred Ellison K. W. Markwcll J. L. Robertson Herbert Faisst Frank Morrow Fount Richardson Berry Floyd E. E. Stevenson C. A. Staubcr G. W. Winfrey V. V. Van Arsdal Joe Totbctt D. P. Weld J. F. Williams E. R. Payne Guy Fincher James Moftitt E. E. Stevenson—lirad's successor.Chi Omega Founded at the University of Arkansas, April 5, i8 j s PSI Cl I APT IiR Colors: Cardinal and Straw Fi.owkr: White Carnation ACTIVE MEMBERS Mary Hemphill Margaret Wilson Margaret Braswell Ethel Hart Doll Govan Sibyl Sanderson Eleanor Gilliam Nolle Cole Geneva Lewis Alethia Barton Anna Gale Cotton Carolccn Burlingame Fannie Howell Bessie Merle W ells Virginia Neely Claire McLaughlin Laura Conner Martha Campbell Bernice Greaves Artilla Dihrell Mary Dale Sellars Emma Louise Metzgar PLEDGES Josephine Martin Ruth Harrell Gertrude Guthrie Doris Miller Grace Hendrix Helen Mary Edwards Carolyn Gregg Elizabeth Crockett Louise W ilson Dorothy McDonald Bernice Gilbreath Xina Cotton Vcrda Matthews Betty Lambert Margaret Harris Lillian Neely Sue McDonnell Evelyn Konc Charlotte Soule Louise Barton ACTIVE CHAPTERS Psi................................I'nivcrsity of Arkansas Chi................................Transylvania College Sigma..............................Randolph-Macon College Rho................................Tulanc University Pi.................................University of Tennessc OmieroH............................University of Illinois Xi.................................Northwestern University Nh.................................University of Wisconsin Mn.................................University of ’Californio I.ambitii..........................University of Kansas Kappa...............................University of Nebraska lota...............................University of Texas I h, ta............................West Virginia University Kta................................University Of Michigan Zeta...............................University of Colorado Delta..............................1 lickinson College Gamma..................... Florida woman's College Beta Colhy College Alpha..............................University of Washington Pst-Alpha..........................University of Oregon Chi-Alfha..........................Jackson College Phi-Alpha..........................George Washington University V psilon-Alpha.....................Syracuse I 'niversity Tau-Alpha ......... ...............Ohio State University Sigma-Alpha....................- M ianii I ’niversity Rho-Alpha..........................University of Missouri Pi-Alpha...........................University of Cincinnati Omicron-Alpha .....................Coe College Xi-Alpha...........................University of Utah Xu-Alpha...........................I .eland Stanford, Jr., University Mu-Alpha...........................New Hampshire College Lambda-Alpha.......................University of Kentucky Kappa-Alpha........................Kansas Stale Agricultural College Iota-Alpha.........................Southern Methodist University Theta-Alpha..............„.........Cornell University Caroi.kkn Brm.1 nc.amE—“My sweetie.Zeta Tau Alpha Founded at Virginia State Normal, Fannvillc, Virginia, October 25, 1898 EPSILON CHAPTER Colors: III it e and Gray Mertye Mcllroy Eugene R. Heard Mildred Hornibrook Adclc Ramsay Evangeline Pratt Loisc Gillespie Myrtle Smith Kathleen Lawrence Mardelle Ellis ACTIVE MEMBERS Mildred Lockhartc Martha Ride Margaret McNair Mary Lake Margaret Alexander Frances Bailley PLEDGES Lucille Jeffries Ritchie Sinead Virginia Buchner Eleanor Jeffries Fi.owkr : White Violet Helen Louise Pyle Cornelia Lee Emma Davis Anna Smead Ruth Fuller Florence Drew Rebecca Stinson Olive Reed Bernice Owens ACTIVE CHAPTERS Beta................................Jud»on College, Marion, Alabama Delta...............................Randolph-Macon Women’s College, Lynchburg, Virginia Epsilon.............................University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas .eta...............................University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Tennessee Theta...............................Bethany College, Bethany, West Virginia Kappa...............................University of Texas, Austin, Texas Lambda..............................Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas Mu..................................Drury College, Springfield. Missouri iVw.................................University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama AT..................................University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California Omieron.............................Brenan College, Gainesville, Georgia Kho.................................Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts Siflnia.............................Baker University, Baldwin, Kansas Tau.................................James Millikin University, Decatur, Illinois Upsilon.............................University of California. Berkeley, California Phi.................................Trinity College, Durham, North Carolina Chi.................................University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Psi.................................University of Washington. Seattle, Washington Omeija..............................Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas Pledges withdrawn. Helen Louise Pyle—Wanted, a Greare-anee.Pi Beta Phi Founded at Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois, April 28, 1867 ARKANSAS ALPHA CHAPTKR Colors: in tic and Blue ACTIVE MEMBERS Flowkr : Red Carnation Beatrix Quailc ' Marjorie Gold Pauline Hocltzcl Jean Russell Mac Bovscn Lucy Bennett Frances Carnall Lura Massengale Margaret Montague Jean Scott Doris Prather Maxine Marshall Lila Mac Maddox PLEDGES Ellen Conner Catherine Ellis Thenie Hall Lillie Ishcrwood Ruby McGaughy Florence Kruger Edith Le Clcrcq ACTIVE CHAPTERS Ontario Alpha......................University of Toronto Vermont Alpha......................Middlebnrg Collet; Vcimont Beta.......................I Diversity of ermoiit Massachusetts Alpha................Boston I mversity; New York Alpha.....................Syracuse I mversity New York Gamma.....................St. Lawrence I mversity Maryland Alpha.....................Goucher College . Columbia Alpha.....................Geortte Washington I nivcrsity Virginia Alpha.....................Randolph-Macon College Virginia Bela......................Hollins Collette Florida Alpha......................John It. Stetsoni I mversity Pennsylvania Alpha.................Swarthmore College Pennsylvania Beta............-.....Bucknell I mversity Pennsylvania Gamma.................Dickinson College Ohio Alpha.........................Ohio University Ohio Beta..........................Ohio State I mversity Michigan Alpha.....................Hillsdale College Michigan Beta......................University of Michigan Indiana Alpha......................Franklin College Indiana Bela.......................University of Indiana Indiana Gamma......................Butler College Minnesota Alpha..............-.....University of Minnesota Wisconsin Alpha....................University of Wisconsin Illinois Beta......................Lombard College Illinois Delta......................Knox College Illinois l-psilon..................Northwestern I mversity Illinois .eta.....................University of Illinois Illinois lila......................James Millikin University Iowa Alpha.........................Iowa Wesleyan College Iowa Beta..........................Simpson College Iowa Gamma.........................Iowa Stale College |,,wa .eta .......................Iowa State I mversity Nebraska Beta......................University of Nebraska Missouri Alpha.....................University of Missouri Missouri Bela......................Washington I mversity Missouri Gamma.....................H™rv College Kansas Alpha.......................University of Kansas Kansas Beta........................Kansas State Agricultural College Arkansas Alpha.....................University of Arkansas Louisiana Alpha....................Newcomb College Oklahoma Alpha.....................University of Oklahoma Texas Alpha.................. .....University of Iexas T-xas Beta .............Southern Methodist I mversity Wyoming Alpha......................University of Wyoming Colorado Alpha ....................I mversity of Colorado Colorado Beta......................University of Denver Arizona Alpha...................... mversity of Arizona California Alpha...................Lcland Stanford, Jr.. .1 mversity California Beta....................University of California California Gamma...................University of Southern California Nevada Alpha.......................University of Nevada Oregon Alpha.......................U mversity of Oregon Orczo,, Beta.................-.....Oregon State College Washington Alpha...................University of W aslungton Washington Beta ..................." Mhwgton State College Ma-.ca:ut Montac.uk—Ii'eak for first lieutenants.Delta Delta Delta Founded at Boston University, 1888 DELTA IOTA CHAPTER Colors : Silver, Gold and Blue Flower : ACTIVE MEMBERS Ailccn McCoy Beatrice Sims Mary Charlotte Sims Gladys Morgan Eftic Mae Bridewell Pauline Cravens Ethel Browning Lillinc Logan La Verne Harper PLEDGES Mclita Cavett Belle Hendricks Gladys Briscoe Estelle Housley Ruth Smith Helen Mcllwain ACTIVE CHAPTERS Adelphi College James Millikin University Adrian College University of Minnesota University of Alabama University of Missouri University of Arkansas Mount Union College ltakcr University University of Nebraska Boston University University of Nevada Brcnau University Northwestern University linckncll College Ohio State University Colorado State College University of Oklahoma University of Cincinnati University of Oregon Coe College University of Pennsylvania University of Colorado Randolph-Macon College University of California St. Lawrence College Cornell University Simpson College Pc Pauw University Southern Methodist University Drury CoIIcrc Southwestern University Florida State Woman’s College Stanford University Franklin CoIIcrc Stetson I "niversity Gouchcr CoIIcrc Syracuse University Hollins CoIIcrc University of Texas Iowa State CoIIcrc Transylvania University Judson CoIIcrc Vanderbilt University Kansas State CoIIcrc University of Vermont Knox CollcRe University of Washington University of Maine University of Wisconsin Miami University University of Indiana University of Michigan Colby College University of Wyoming Butler College University of Iowa MiddlcburR CoIIcrc University of Pittsburgh Estelle Houslky—Please dance with . PansyKappa Sigma Founded at the University of Bologna, 1400 A. I). Established at the University of Virginia, 18(19 XI CHAPTER Installed at the University of Arkansas, 1890 Colors: Scarle!, IV iilc and Emerald Flowkr: Lily of the Valley Mark Bishop W. M. Mitchell J. W. Amis Paul E. McCartney Lawrence Horner President J. C. Futrall ACTIVE MEMBERS Gene Davidson Lydlc P. Smith W. M. Harrell, Jr. PLEDGES George I). Little Aubrey C. Estes V. O. Turner G. I). Conley Shelby H. Mitchell Benjamin Askew MEMBERS IX FACULTY Prof. B. N. Wilson Prof. Virgil P. Knott ACTIVE CHAPTERS University of Maine University of Vermont Bowdoin College Brown University New Hampshire College Massachusetts Agricultural College Dartmouth CoIIckc Harvard University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Swarthmorc CoIIckc University of Pennsylvania William and Mary CoIIckc Ham| dcn-Sidncy CoIIckc University of Maryland George Washington University Richmond College Davidson College Trinity College University of North Carolina Wofford College North Carolina A. and M. College University of Alabama Mercer University Georgia School of Technology Alabama Polytechnic Institute University of Georgia Louisiana State University Tulanc University Millsap College Cumberland University Vanderbilt University University of Tennessee Southwestern Presbyterian University University of the South Unjversity of Kentucky University of Michigan Ohio State University Case School of Applied Science Denison University Purdue University University of Illinois Wabash College Cornell University lA'high University New York University Syracuse University Pennsylvania State College Btickndl University Washington and Jefferson College Dickinson College University of Virginia Randolph-Macon College Washington and Lee University Lake Forest University University of Wisconsin University of Indiana University of Chicago University of Nebraska University of Minnesota University of Iowa Iowa State College William Jewell College University of Missouri Washington I 'niversity Baker University Missouri School of Mines Washburn College University of Kansas University of Arkansas University of Oklahoma Southwestern I 'niversity University of Texas University of Denver Colorado College Colorado School of Mines University of Arizona University of Colorado l.cland Stanford University University of California University of Oregon University of Idaho Washington State College Oregon Agricultural College University of Washington Jim Amis—Should he a T. AT. E.Sigma Alpha Epsilon Founded at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama. March 8, 1856 Living Members, 18,673. ARKANSAS ALPHA UPSILON CHAPTER Installed at the University of Arkansas, 1894 Colors: Royal Purple ami Old Cold Flowkr : Violet A. B. Armstrong S. J. Beard E. C. Conner ACTIVE MEMBERS S. J. Kuykendall H. S. Towler II. M. Lawson J. S. Wade W. E. Mullins G. II. Beasley E. H. Bowers L. E. Barton. I). I). Ralph Jones PLEDGES D. G. Hon C. R. Sadler Granville McCaslin B. L. Tallman R. E. Wait, Jr. MEMBERS IN THE CITY Jay Fulbright W. H. Mcllrov A. P. Eason I)r. C. Layson ACTIVE CHAPTERS University of Maine Boston University Massachusetts Institute Technology Worcester Polytechnic Institute Dartmouth College Cornell University Columbia University St. Stephens College Syracuse University Allegheny College Dickinson College Pennsylvania State College Bucknell University Gettysburg College University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh George Washington University University of Virginia Washington and I.ec University of North Carolina Davidson College University of Michigan Adrian College Mount Union College Ohio Wesleyan University Vanderbi 11 t ni versify University of Tennessee University of the South Union University I.eland Stanford University University of California University of Washington Washington State College Oregon State College University of Arizona University of Nevada University of Wyoming New Hampshire State College Colorado A. and M. College Harvard University University of Missouri University of Cincinnati Ohio State University Case School of Applied Science Franklin College Purdue University Indiana University Northwestern University University of Illinois University of Chicago Millikin University University of Minnesota University of Wisconsin Beloit College University of Georgia Mercer University Kmory College Georgia School Technology Southern University University of Alabama Alabama Polytechnic Institute University of Florida Washington University University of Nebraska University of Arkansas University of Kansas Kansas State College University of Iowa Iowa State College University of South Dakota University of Colorado Denver University Colorado School of Mines Louisiana State University Tulane University University of Texas University- of Oklahoma Central University Bethel College Kentucky State University Southwestern Presbyterian University Cumberland University Cor nk Lius Conn hr—lias those devilish eyelashes.13Kappa Alpha Founded at Washington and Lee University in 1865 ALPHA OMICRON CHAPTER Installed at the University of Arkansas, April 27, 1895 Colors: Crimson and Gold Flowers: Red Rose and Magnolia Rufus L. Cherry James M. Nesbitt Byrnes W alker Bertrand Miller ACTIVE MEMBERS ’18 Beloit Taylor 19 '19 Thomas Pettigrew 20 19 F. A. Falconer 20 21 I). A. Locke 19 Eugene Burson Ben Winklcman Neil Phillips Norman S. Campbell PLEDGES George Smith Jean de Roulhac Tom V. Biirrcss Albert L. Rusher Winfred Lake Robert R. Greaves Lucien P. Locke Wallace Eldridgc Martin T. Dyke ACTIVE CHAPTERS Alpha..."..................Washin ton-Lcc I'nivcrsitv, l.ex'iigton, Virginia Gamma......................University of Georgia, Athens, Gco.gia Epsilon....................Kiuory College, Oxford, Georgia Delta......................Wofford College, Spartanshurg, South Carolina .eta......................Randolph-Macon. Ashland, Virginia Eta........................Richmond College, Wcsthampton, Virginia Theta______________________Kentucky State I niversity, Lexington, Kcntucky Kappa..........................Mercer University, Macon. Georgia Lambda.....................University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia An.........................Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, Alabama Xi...........................Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas Omieron....................University of Texas. Austin, Texas Pi.........................University of Tennessee. Knoxville, Tennessee Sigma ..Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina Upotion....................University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Chi........................Vanderbilt I'nivcrsitv, Nashville. Tennessee Pti........................Tulanc University, New Orleans, Louisiana Omega......................Central University of Kentucky, Danville, Kentucky Alpha-Alpha................University of the South. Sccwancc. Tennessee Alpha-Beta.................University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. Alabama Alpha-Gamma................Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Alpha-Delta............... ..William Jewell College. Liberty. Missouri Alpha-Z.eta ...............William and Mary College. Williamsburg, Virginia Alpha-Eta..................Westminster College, Fulton, .Missouri Alpha-Theta................Transylvania University. Lexington. Kentucky ellpha-Kappa...............University of Missouri, Columbia. Missouri Alpha-Lambda...............Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland Alpha-Mu...................Millsaps College, Jackson, Mississippi Alpha-Xu...................George Washington University, Washington. District of Columbia Alpha-Xi...................University of California, Berkeley. California Alpha-Omierou University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas Alpha-Pi...................I.cland Stanford. Jr., University, Palo Alto, California Alpha-Rho..................West Virginia University. Morgantown. West Virginia Alpha-Sigma................Georgia School of Technology. Atlanta. Georgia Alpha-Tan.................. Hampden-Sidney College, Hani| dcn-Sidtiey, Virginia Alpha-Phi..................Trinity College, Durham. North Carolina Alpha-Omega ...............North Carolina A. and M. College. Raleigh. North Carolina Beta-Alpha.................Missouri School of Mines. Rolla, Missouri Beta-Beta..................Bethany College. Bethany. West Virginia Beta-Gamma.................College of Charleston. Charleston, South Carolina Beta-Delta.................Georgetown College. Georgetown. Kentucky Beta-Epsilon...............Delaware College, Newark. Delaware Beta- eta..................University of Florida. Gainesville. Florida Beta-Eta...................University of Oklahoma. Norman, Oklahoma Beta-Theta.................Washington University, St. Louis. Missouri Beta-lota..................Drury College. Springfield. Missouri Beta-Kappa.................Maryland Agricultural College. College Park, Maryland Beta-Lambda................Southern Methodist University. Dallas, Texas Beta-Mu....................St. Johns College. Annapolis, Maryland Puppy Miller—A lieutenant with seven years’ "experience” in the Horse-MarinesPi Kappa Alpha ALPHA ZETA CHAPTER Founded at the University of Virginia, 1886 Installed at the University of Arkansas, 1904 Colors : Gomel and Gold ACTIVE MEMBERS Flower: Lily of the Valley J. E. Casey C. A. Reed L. H. Knock J. I . MeGaughy R. I I. Clark S. M. Harris J. L. McKennon R. C. Kennard Cato Wilcox B. C. Mulrcnin PLEDGES Norris Skaggs Berry Elovd I.eo I leer wagon Joe McAtccr Russell Cole C. B. Freeman ACTIVE CHAPTERS Alpha.............................University of Virginia Beta..............................Davidson College Gamma.............................William and Mary College Delta.............................Southern University Efsilon............................Virginia Polytechnic Institute .eta..............................University of Tennessee Eta...............................-Tulane University Theta.............................Southwestern Presbyterian University Iota..............................11ani| (len-Si lncy College Kappa..............................Transylvania University Lambda............................South Carolina Military Academy -V'...............................Presbyterian College of South Carolina •Vm...............................Wofford College •Vi...............................University of South Carolina Omicron...........................Richmond College Pi................................Washington and Lee University Rho...............................Cumberland University Sigma.............................Vanderbilt University Tau...............................University of North Carolina Cpsilon...........................Alabama Polytechnic Institute Phi...............................Roanoke College Chi...............................University of the South Psi...............................North Georgia Agricultural College Omega.............................Kentucky State University ellplia-Alpha.....................Trinity College Alpha-Beta........................Centenary College of Ixtuisiana Alpha-Gamma.......................Louisiana State University Alpha-Delta.......................Georgia School of Technology Alpha-Epsilon.....................North Carolina A. and M. College Alplia eta........................University of Arkansas Alpha-l-ta........................University of State of Florida Alpha-Theta.......................West Virginia University Alpha-1 ota.......................M illsaps College Alpha-Kappa.......................Missouri School of Mines Alpha-Lambda......................Georgetown College Alpha-Mu..........................University of Georgia Alpha-Mu..........................University of Missouri Alpha-Xi..........................University of Cincinnati Alpha-Omicron......................Southwestern University Alpha-Pi..........................Howard College Alpha-Rho.........................Ohio State University Alpha-Sigma.......................University of California Alpha-Tan.........................University of Utah Alpha !'psilon....................New York University Alpha-Phi.........................Iowa State University Alpha-Chi.........................Syracuse University Alpha-Psi.........................Rutgers College Alpha-Omega.......................Kansas State Agricultural College Beta-Alpha........................Pennsylvania State College Beta-Beta.........................University of Washington Beta-Gamma........................University of Kansas Beta-Delta........................University of New Mexico Beta-Epsilon......................Western Reserve University Beta eta..........................Southern Methodist University Norris Skaggs .—The man that put Hanky Tonky on the map. Sigma Nu Founded at Virginia Military Institute, January I, 1869 GAMMA UPSILON CHAPTER I mailed at the University of Arkansas, December 20, 1904 Colors: Black, While and Gold Flower: While Rose ACTIVE MEMBERS O. Bovee Alcxvine Charles R. Coleman A. Olin Evans Paul Gold Joe Hardin Floyd Henry Gordon A. Perdue J. Newton Perdue IJoyd M. Reed J. Russell Steele Austin B. Taylor Hal S. Alcorn R. Elmore Alcorn Robert Amacker Alfred M. Bracy Jack P. Galloway PLEDGES Hale Jackson Mullins McRaven W alter Driver Daniel M. Moore Jack B. Pitcock Joe Pugh Allan V. Rice Gaston Skaggs William P. Sinead A. Warner St. John John A. Wood ACTIVE CHAPTERS University of Virginia Washington and Lee University University of North Carolina North Carolina A. and M. Delaware College George Washington University North Georgia Agricultural College Mercer University University of Georgia Emory College Georgia School of Technology Stetson University University of Alabama Howard College Vanderbilt University Alabama Polytechnic Institute De Pauw University Purdue University Indiana University Rose Polytechnic Institute University of Kentucky Bcthany College Ohio State University Mount Union College West Virginia I University Case School of Applied Science Western Reserve I niversity Carnegie Institute of Technology Lehigh University University of Pennsylvania Lafayette College Pennsylvania State College Stevens Institute of Technology Cornell University University of Washington University of Oregon Syracuse University Columbia University University of Vermont Dartmouth College Brown University University of Maine Lombard College Albion College Northwestern I 'niversity University of Wisconsin University of Illinois University of M cliigan University of Chicago State University of Iowa Iowa State College University of Minnesota University of Nebraska University of Missouri William Jewell College M ssouri School of Mines Washington University University of Arkansas University of Oklahoma University of Kansas Kansas State Agricultural College University of Texas Louisiana State University Tulanc University Colorado School of Mines University of Colorado Colorado Agricultural College University of .Montana State College of Washington University of Idaho l.eland Stanford University I 'niversity of California University of Nevada Colgate University Oregon Agricultural College Trinity College Paul Gold—Strolls around the Parks.Si rma Chi Founded June 28, 1855, at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio OMEGA OMEGA CHAPTER Installed at the University of Arkansas, June 29, 1905 Colors: Blue and Gold Flower: White Rose ACTIVE MEMBERS I ;. R. Payne, ’18 C. B. Sanders, ’19 C. A. Shumaker, ’19 P.rooks Hays, '19 W. J. Knight, ’20 Guthrie Hassell, ’20 H. F. Hays, ’20 MEMBERS IN FACULTY Roger Williams H. B. Bruner PLEDGES W. E. Gosdin, ’20 R. P. Allen, ’21 Logan Rogers, ’21 J. H. Young, ’21 G. M. Ferguson, ’21 Ardis Smith, ’21 R. H. Thompson, ’21 W. R. Myers, ’21 ACTIVE CHAPTERS Miami University Ohio Wesleyan University University of Georgia Geoigc Washington University Washington and I.ee Pennsylvania College Uucknell University University of Indiana Dennison University Del'auw University Dickinson College llutlcr College Lafayette College Hanover College University of Virginia Noi tliwestern University Hobart College University of California Ohio State University University of Nebraska llcloit College State University of Iowa Massachusetts Institute of Technology Illinois Wesleyan University University of Wisconsin University of Texas University of Kansas Tulnr.e University Albion College Lehigh University University of Minnesota University of North Carolina University of Southern California Cornell University Pennsylvania State College Vanderbilt University Lcland Stanford, Jr., University Colorado College University of Montana University of Utah University of North Dakota Case School of Applied Science and Western Reserve University University of Pittsburgh University of Oregon University of Oklahoma Trinity College University of Colorado University of Arkansas Brown University Iowa State College Oregon Agricultural College l’urduc University Waoash College Central University of Kentucky University of Cincinnati Dartmouth College University of Michigan University of Alabama University of Illinois State University of Kentucky West Virginia University Columbia University University of Missouri University oi Chicago University of Maine Washington University University of Washington University of Pennsylvania Syracuse University University of New Mexico University of Tennessee Arms Smith— ‘Cuckoo, I’m a bird.Sigma Phi Epsilon Founded at Richmond College, Richmond, Virginia, November I, 1900 ARKANSAS ALPHA CHAPTER Installed at the University of Arkansas, 1907 Colors : Purple am! AY« George R. Love Foy C. Murphy R. E. Prothro Harold McGinlcy Roy L. Me Each! in Lawrence G. Fincher Flowers: A me 1 ACTIVE MEMBERS F. P. Martin Stay ton (ice Mack Lester BROTHER IX FACULT S. R. Stout PLEDGES James M. Ray Joseph 1). Rover Henry G. Graham ACTIVE CHAPTERS iron Meanly Pose and Violet George S. Minmier Ray Johnston Edwin M. Gatewood Thomas X. Graham Scott Carter Edward D. Kolb West Virginia Beta Ohio Alpha New York Alpha Virginia lipsilon Virginia lita Vermont Alpha District of Columbia Alpha.. Kansas Alpha Colorado Beta Missouri Alpha Arkansas Alpha Kansas Beta Kansas Agricultural College George Love—Hear George moan on his saxophone—at 3 A. M.1N T [ R.-F KATE RNITY CONFERENCE - OFFICERS- PRESIDENT R.L CHERRY. VICE-PRES. E.R. PAYNE. SEC.-TREAS. H.5.T0WLER. K A IN R.L. CHERRY. G.APURDUF.. BYRNES WALKER CHAS. COLE MAN. tr K A Z X C. A. REED. E.-R TAYNE. J. P. Ms GAUGHY. W.J. KNIGHT. K 1 I .[ M ARK BI 5 HOP. GEO. LOVE. JAS. AMIS. PC. MUKPHT. X A E W. E. MULLI NS. H. S. TOWLR, INTf'.R-Fraternity Confi.rixcf.SocialThe Question Club Tri Chi Installed in the University of Arkansas, October 15. 1916. Flower: Violet Colors: Lavender and WhiteEta Eta Eta ClubSt follock Myrtle Smith Connor Trotter Rebecca. Stinson Olive Reed Tki Kaim’a ClubDelta Gamma TauGladys HollabaughBlythe TrjmmEvf.lyn Konf.Ardis: "Fcrgy. tell me why it is that a girl always closes her eyes when I kiss her?” Ferguson: “There is a mirror behind you. Smith,” Carolccn was sitting with her feet stretched far out toward the fire place, and was busily popping her gum when Sibyl walked in. “Carolccn. take that gum out of your mouth and put your feet in!” Pearl Lane, to B. B. (Baby Ben): “Call me early, B. B.. Don’t let me sleep late; Call me early, dear B. B.. So I’ll get to class by eight.” Prof. Murphy: “Where did Magellan go when lie left the Philippines. Mr. Ragsdale?” Rags: “Why, er—ah, lie died while lie was there and I really don’t know where he went from there.” Major Martin (to Adjutant Turner, assisting in sizing the company): “You are taller than that man, step in front of him. Oh. 1 beg your pardon, you are the Lieutenant.” Tallman. knocking on the library door, was answered by Prof. Dunn: "Is Ivan-h.oe in the library?” Freshman, to Bob Morgan: “Bob, why don’t you ever study?” Bob: “1 can’t let studying interfere with my college education.” Henderson Young, to Jim Amis in crowd of fellows talking to the President on depot platform: “Should 1 ask the President if I may smoke?” Logan Rogers in Hodges: "Do you serve lobsters in here?” Waiter: “Yes, we serve anybody, have a seat.” Lokktta Hoi.i.axi I'irc escape socialist4Ardis: "Fcrgy. tell me why it is that a girl always closes her eyes when I kiss her?” Ferguson: ‘‘There is a mirror behind you. Smith.” Caroleen was sitting with her feet stretched far out toward the fire place, and was busily popping her gum when Sibyl walked in. “Caroleen. take that gum out of your mouth and put your feet in!” Pearl Lane, to B. B. (Baby Ben): “Call me early, B. B., Don’t let me sleep late; Call me early, dear B. B., So I'll get to class by eight.” Prof. Murphy: “Where did Magellan go when he left the Philippines. Mr. Ragsdale?” Rags: “Why, cr—ah. lie died while he was there and I really don’t know where he went from there.” Major Martin (to Adjutant Turner, assisting in sizing the company): “You arc taller than that man, step in front of him. Oh. I beg your pardon, you arc the Lieutenant.” Tallman. knocking on the library door, was answered by Prof. Dunn: “Is Ivan-hoc in the library?” Freshman, to Bob Morgan: “Bob, why don’t you ever study?” Bob: “1 can’t let studying interfere with my college education.” Henderson Young, to Jim Amis in crowd of fellows talking to the President on depot platform: "Should I ask the President if I may smoke?” Logan Rogers in Hodges: "Do you serve lobsters in here?” Waiter: “Yes, we serve anybody, have a scat.” Lokktta Hoi.lanii—I-ire escape specialist4SHORT TIME DEGREES. Madge Lewis (Sailor), M. R. S. Bob Morgan. Ph. D. (Post Hole Digger). David B. Arnof, M. H. F. (Master High Finance). Slate Coleman. M. S., (Master Spoofer). Lee Henderson, | r B. S. (Beta Sigma). Bob Logan. J Jim Amis, R. F. I). (So explanation). C. A. Reed. M. A. (Math Always). Jas. Xisbett, J. U. (Joiner’s Union). W’liat arc the two best ways to help Uncle Sain? Do and do without. Torbett: “I dreamed last night that 1 had died and gone to Hades.” Ford: “Well, it could have been worse.” “What?” “It could have been true.” Freshman Burroughs: “Waiter, please bring me a spoon, these peas just will roll olT my knife!” I moil (morning of Freshman dance): “Baton, what do you think of the sophs' stealing Fauccttc?” “That just leaves that much more punch for the rest of us.” Miss Hargis, in French I: “Mr. Tay- lor, have you read this lesson?” Austin: “Owic, Owic.” Faisst: "Weld, have you read my editorial against fraternities?” "Did you mean all stuff, Dutch, or was it sour grapes?" Bill W ilson—of Beebe, This Stalev - the Blackfriars Dramatic Club “LET’S GET MARRIED” A Ihrrr At! Fam-Toardy ky Raw H» K Jr. dit rW rlore VoI Squirrel Convention Held in Front of Peabody Hall, April i, 1918, for the Purpose of Sorting the Nuts. B. H. Kixswortiiy.... Bon Logan ......... Kexxbth Markwkll Bill Knight........ OFFICERS ......................Chief Squirrel ......................Squirrel l:ood ......................A ut Collector ........................Nut Chcwcr DELEGATES Androbogiam S. Smith Slats Coleman Dratic Miller Oniagenc Goff Tanlac Joerdan Ikcy Fclscnthal Bohart Cowan Dana Porter Weld Dutch Faisst Frankie Ogden Louis Tallman Beloit Taylor Bob Morgan Ben Winklctnan Gene Burson S. E. Hollabaugh Jimmie McGaughy Joe McKcnnon Geo. Love Darrell Shinn Jim Amis Harry Fred Hays R. C. Cooper Gaston Skaggs Geo. Little Geo. Mininicr Joe Lee McKkxxox—“ ruined my voice cooling soup'Star Navy Club Founded October 12, 1492. at Key West, Florida. ARKANSAS ALPHA OMEGA CHAPTER Chapter House, Hill Hall. ☆ CHAPTER ROLL . Darrell Shinn Martin McDaniel C. B. Ford Bill Oliver J. B. Rogerson I. J. Heath Joe Torbett J. F. O’Kcllcy Claude Gaffney D. A. Miller Joe Barrett Xcil Ini on Quincy Adams Percy Allen I). B. Arnof Buddy Miller Joe Hardin Boh Greaves J. Elbert Bradley Wienie Minmicr J. C. Douthit F lunker’s Club 1 Founded by Act of The General Assembly, March 27, 1871. OFFICERS Hubert Baton Blanche O’Bar Xcllc Cole F. A. Falconer Jimmie MeGaughy Jean Russell Mack Lester Frank Morrow Ray Belknap Clint Black John Knott Pete McCaslin Bill Turner C. A. Reed MEMBERS Lack of space forbids the enumeration of the names of the individual members, but a large percentage of the students arc on our roll book which is in the Registrar’s Office. L. J. Williams—hong John, Petey’s brother.The University Mumps Club The University of Arkansas Mumps Club began to take in members shortly after Christmas, 1917. The founders of this organization were F. H. Morrow and J. L. Robertson of I’iggott. Their Chapter House is the University Infirmary and "Ma” Hardin is their Matron. The following arc Charter Members: Joseph Barrett Glen K. Alter R. A. Cooper Carey I '. Clark Hugh Lawson Nannie May Roney B. B. Turner F. H. Morrow J. L. Robertson J. F. O’Kelly C. B. Freeman Boiuuk Greaves—“ wonder why a literary society doesn’t bid me:Fclscntlial to Librarian: “I want Miss Alcott’s Jew book, please.” Miss Yaulx: “I have never heard of that one but perhaps something else by the same author will do just as well. We have “Little Women.” "Little Men,” and "Rose in Bloom,” and That’s it! ‘Rosen-bloom’.” Hassell: "Have you heard my new song. 'The Proposal’?” Gladys: “No. what key is it in?” Guthrie: "Be mine’er.” Extract from Pctcy McCaslin’s English exam: “Chaucer was a great lover of birds as shown from his knowledge of chickens.” Dr. Jones, to class when fire gong rang: "Please keep your scats for a moment until I get that little book and see what to do next.” Doll Govan: "Did your new dress- maker give you a fit in that new evening dress?” Claire: “I should say she did. They had to call in two doctors and a trained nurse when I saw myself in it.” Prof. Ripley: "You know glass is very clastic. They make dresses out of glass. Olive Stewart: “What kind of dresses, wool, cotton, or silk?” Blanche O’Bar, making an announcement in the mess ball: "Mr. Flowers will meet his class in Black and White this afternoon.” Bernice Gilbreath, translating Burger’s ‘Lcnorc’: “O beloved, come into my arms for warming purposes.” Lois Barret on Clicm. test: "When a flaming splint is applied to oxygen, it makes a soft mellow glow like moonlight.” R. H. Clark—Jasper, where is iftKflie Alley: “Ruth Howell lias such an anthropologctical mind." Grace Xcwman: “What’s that?” Effic: “Dealing with man and all his relations.” Proprietor of Gholson’s Cafe: “Yes. this restaurant is very historic. Almost everything here has its romantic legend.” Customer (beginning to eat after a long wait): "Tell me about this curious old ham sandwitch. I am sure it must have a quaint story attached to it.” Prof. Grant (to small Peabody student): “Do you like to go to school. Elsie?” Elsie: “Yes. and I like my teacher, too.” “What do you learn there, dear?” “Rcadin writin’, and the gozintas.” “Gozintas—what arc they?” "Don't you know? Why. three gozinta twelve four times, five gozinta fifteen three times, like that.” Sergeant Wheeler, on hearing the glee club practice one day: “They won’t let that racket get outside the state of Arkansas. will they?” “W hat are you knitting, my pretty maid?” She purled, then dropped a stitch. “A sock or a sweater, sir,” she said. “And darned if I know which!” Bob: “After all, fools make life amusing. When all the fools are dead 1 don’t want to be alive.” Pearl: “Don’t worry, you won’t be.” I’ve eaten a bale Of spinach and kale. And I’ve never raised a row. I have swallowed a can Of moistened bran And 1 feel like a brindlc cow. 1 am taking a snack From the old haystack In the evening shadows gray. And I’m glad, you bet At last to get To the end of a meatless day. Otis Trimblk—llill Hall InfantTallinan, on Nov. 2. 1917: “Speight, lend me $25. I want to lay in a good supply of postage stamps before prices go up tomorrow.” Bill Turner: “Amis, do we have a cadet hop tomorrow night?” Jim: “No, the cadets don’t hop to- morrow. they skip.” Doris Prather: “Oh, Margaret. I took my little pupils upon East Mountain this afternoon and we had the loveliest time picking hucklc-burrs.” Sergeant Wheeler, in Military Art 1: “Explain movement of lying down, Little.” George: “Move both feet to the front and -----” Sergeant: “Very good, very good, sit down. Dean Drokc: “No, that ‘S’ on your notebooks docs not stand for ‘Satisfactory,’ it stands for ‘Saturday.’" We’ll come back then and work ’em right.” Her chum to Lucy Bennet on her return from school: “Oh. Dearie, how you’ve changed, you look so sweet.” Tubby Mullins, in Geometry: “All the lines cross at this vcrticc, and ---” Jim Bradley: “This is freshman week at the studio. Let’s all go and have our pictures made for the Razorback.” Mrs. Warner: “Bob, when is Christ- mas?” See. Morgan: “I think it's on the 25th of December.’ Bill Matthews, to O. C. Trimble: “You don’t know the first principles of Fresh-manhood.” Machcn: “Shinn, lend me your Sunday suit to wear to the Agri Dance.” Prof. James: “Mr. Turner, how many wars did England have with Spain?” B. B.: “Six.” Prof: “Enumerate them.” Bolon: “One, two. three, four, five, six.” Pat Clarke: “Bill, what can I give my girl for a Christmas present? 1 want something that is rare but inexpensive.” “Give her a lock of your hair, Pat.” Dec. 10: Brooks got tooted. Mack Lester: “If ignorance were bliss, I would die of happiness." Madge Sailor: “Why should 1 want my B A when I have my MRS?” Bill Olivkr—MAh, look at my dimples! IPro ESHSa r a Patriar mwm rx'i-. m4wThe program read: “Recital by Miss Blank, Mezzo-Soprano.” Prodigy Colbert, when it was half thru: “Well, this woman has sung at us for an hour, but when is that fellow, Mezzo Soprano, going to come out?” Ray Belknap says that there is only one kind of man that he can’t beat playing pool, and that is a cross-eyed, left-handed Chinaman shooting with a crooked stick. Munscy and his guardian. Lyda Higgs—Little MuttFilings That Had Ought to he Suppressed Drill on Thursday. The Stick Law. The Discipline Committee. The Scholarship Committee. All Committees. Trips to Monctt. The Glee Club. The Kaiser. Campustry. The Honor System. The Bone Dry Law. Girls riding in cars. The Registrar. Beta Sigma. Going to Church. “Stcw”dcnts. House Parties. Herbert Faisst. Poetry. Dances on Saturday Beau Brummcl Falconer. Bob Morgan’s Alfalfa. Any more Frats. The Hula Hula Girls. Myrtle Smith. Miss Mary. “Porch Talk.” The Guy 'I’hat Wrote This. (F.d. Xote: The Editor wishes to thank Mr. J. Byrnes Walker for this contribution.) Martha Rule, Lomoke, Akk.—Bill Turner’s compatriot.PROGRAM OF EXERCISES At the Inauguration of JOE MUNSEY FAUCETT President of the Freshman Class, University of Arkansas. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER TWENTY-NINTH. Ore Thousand Nine Hundred Seventeen, Twelve Fifteen O’clock, P. M. Processional ..........................................Euckne Burson, C. G. F. Invocation .......................................Fred O’Kelley, I). M. H. K. Sermon, “Kcglcctcd Opportunities”....................James K. Bradly. A. ). A. "Farewell to the Green Dandruff Hoods"................Frank Ogden, A. G. H. C. "The Physical and Mental Effects of Dissipation upon the Freshman President” ...............................Joe Barrett. D. F. I). Focal Solo, “I Fell For Her and She Let Me Lie"........Hill Hali. Quartette Presentation of Keys of Freshman Class...........Bolon B. Turner, I . S. H. A. Response ..........’...............................Joe M unsky Faucktt, F. P. Inaugural Address, “The Inadvisability and III-diplomaey of Pernicious Insubordination of Presumptuous Freshmen".............................I.. Brooks Hays, I). C. P. "Arkansas” .............................................Led by Allan G. Flowers Grand Marshal of the Day.............................Hughes Machen, H. 1. H. Master of Ceremonies............................Robert E. Morgan, C. II. L. C. EXPLANATION OF DEGREES. C. G. F.. Chorus Girls' Favorite; I). M. H. K., Dispenser of the Milk of Human Kindness; A. O. A., Ancestor of Ananias; A. G. II. (’.. Adjutant of the gotohell committee; I). F. I)., Doctor of Freshman Discipline; I’. S. H. A., Peddler of Stale Hot Air; F. P., Freshman President; I). C. P.. Dormitory Chief of Police; H. I. II., von Hindenhurg’s Interpid Henchman; C. II. L. C., Col. Hccza Liar's Cohort. All addresses have been passed by the National Board of Moral Censorship, composed of Spot Merrill, Stubs Rankin, Onion Cantrell and Squirrel Tillman. Pf.i.i. Cato Wilcox—Carries a smile with him. a m i'.' ITIZENS To make your personal appearance better is our aim. T. E. Morgan, Manager retUrn everything but the dirt.' O. K. Lunch Room Is the place to get good things to eat Courteous Treatment and Excellent Service The Arkansan Your Magazine Subscribe to, and Support it i Satisfactory Florist's University W eekly Service The choicest flowers, arranged with that artistic touch of the skillful de- Keeps you in touch signer, always pleases alike the one who receives flowers and the one who with your school sends them. Our reputation for satisfactory Florist’s Sendee is proof of this. hetlicr SUBSCRIBE it be floral emblem, bridal bouquet, corsage, basket arrangement or gift box, skill and taste combine here to produce satisfactory service. Through our co-operative Telegraph Delivery Service, we deliver fresh flowers throughout the United States, and in the principal cities of Canada $ 1.00 a year anywhere and Europe, within a few hours time. in the country South western Seed Floral Co. Local and Long Distance Phone 320. Fayetteville, Ark.UNIVERSITY LIFE FAYETTEVILLE. ARKANSAS ON Till'. UAMIT'S. JOE PUGH JOINS INFANTRY. Extra to Life. It was reported on the campus today, that after many attempts to join the aviation, tank corps, artillery, and other branches of the service, Mr. Pugh has at last succeeded in joining the Infant-ry. Mr. Pugh has been actively connected with the Military Department for the past year, and we predict a brilliant career for this loyal son of the“ould sod," and sincerely hope that after his sojourn in the battle-swept fields of France, he will see fit to return to his Alma Mater and be permanently connected with thv Military Department of the U. of A. CONSTERNATION!! Miss Mary Delivers Ultimatum Special to Life. I iss Mary attended the Cadet Dance last Friday evening all dressed up i 1 her war paint. All girls wearing low neck, no sleeve dresses were immediately ordered to the dressing room, where she furnished a large supply of tulle. Among those ordered from the floor were Misses Ruth Howell. Ethel Hart, Myrtle Smith. Mary Hemphill. Leb Sailor, and Virginia Buchner. Miss Louise Barton was requested to retire to Carnall Hall and borrow n "grown up" dress. Many of the couples were criticised for dancing with cheeks in close proximity. Miss Mary stated that the habit was unhealthful. Several young men were “called down” for indulging in this practise. They were: Jim Bradley, Byrnes Walker, (jus Hassell, and Martin Dyke. Mr. Hassell was severely criticised on account of his funny dancing with Miss Ruth Howell. The boys were rather disgruntled, so started a medley of grunts to show theii CHI OMEGA HOUSE ROBBED. Deep, Dark, and Dirty Work by Gang of Thugs. Special to Life. The Chi Omega House was entered by burglars last night in the wee sma’ hours and several thousand dollars worth of property carried away. Following is the partial list of the stolen articles, as given to a Life reporter by one of the inmates of the looted house: 200 assorted Victrola records. 1 Victrola crank. 2 memory books. 3 ton face powder (Frivole). 4 dozen powder puffs. I stove pipe. 4 pounds of butter. 3 wigs (red). i large divan blanket. hog. 16 bottles peroxide from Doll Govan To show that their hearts were in the right place, and that a fair exchange is no robbery, the brigands left the following articles of value: i torty-root piece of Louise Barron's line. 6 cans of freckle ointment for Caro-leen Burlingame. I pint of Inspiration for Fannie Howell. No clew has as yet been obtained as to the identity of the marauders but the City Police, working under the supervision jf "Sis Doc," have ordered a set of the .ceencst blood hounds from Sitka, Alaska, and will soon be hot on the trail with the coming of summer. dissatisfaction, whereupon Miss Mary immediately stopped the music. A delightful evening was enjoved bv all. I. J. Heath—Captain Poppa von BowerTHE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS LIFE 1a I F E Published in the Sprint? of the Year by the Students in the College of Cainpustry, University of Arkansas. Entered as Second-Class Matter March 21. 1871. at Fayetteville. Ark. STAFF OF LIFE. Editor in Chief..............................Dean MorK.au Business Manager.... David ArnofT Chief Flirt.. E. E. Stevenson Itnitor Boots Payne Athletic Editor..................Tanlac Joerdan Society Editor.......................I. J. llcath Typesetter ............................Joe Pugh Faculty Adviser .................. Red Gatewood IIII.I. IIAI.L. ARK.. APRIL I. I 18. A SUGGESTION. We have been pained to note for some time a growing spirit of unrest and general dissatisfaction with existing circumstances in a certain few of our fellow students. 'Flic outbursts of these students, which have appeared frequently in the editorial columns of a student publication. take the outward form of a sincere desire to reform existing evils, hut when analyzed more deeply, seem to he hut the tempestous outbreaks of a single untamed spirit. Everything on the campus has been attacked from the humblest freshman to the learned faculty, but no persistent effort has been made to push any one reform to a successful end, and it rather seems that an energetic but perverted mind seeks a spectacular outlet. Probably the best remedy for this discontent would be to seek relief in work along more useful lines, as. for instance, making the world safe for democracy. They need energetic men in France. Since our last report some of our devotees have gone on a long visit to our Uncle Sam. Prof. Rankin, of the Household Physics Department, says his pupils grow brighter day by day under his careful supervision. Some reports say that his vision is better than his super-vision. College bred—a four-years’ loaf. Fresh Stanfield reports that he will in all probability attend the dances next year as it ought not to take him over a year to learn to dance. L. A. Philbrick has become a General in the Home Guard. A LOVER’S PRAYER. By Kenneth Mark well. My Venus, to Thee I make Sacrifices; with my eyes, To Thee, am I but a servant, A subject to Thy wishes, Thy desires, and To all of thy propensities am I heir. For to Thee alone do all my spare Moments go, That I may come to adore Thee more. Even if it is possible so to do. Thou adorable than most precious jewel. Thou, my Ideal. (With due apologies to the inventor of blank verse.) CORRESPONDENTS’ COLUMN. What does Jim Bradley pay his stenographer? L. S. He doesn’t put out anything. Why did the Dorm Council pass a ruling against water throwing? R. R. G. Stevenson got wet. Has Jim Nisbctt joined anything lately? He might get one on me. W. J. K. No, Bill, you are still one ahead. Does Bob Morgan ever study? And, it so. when? H. P. We have never caught him at it yet. Amelia Hilton—Her dream—a soldier's bride.UNIVERSITY LIFE X-RAY!! WHAT FREAKS DO THIS? Pat Clark—Vet School Prof.GOLDSMITH’S GUARANTEED Base Ball, Tennis Supplies, Athletic Goods Spring and Summer Sports, Season 1918 The Peer of All League Balls Goldsmith's Official League No. 97 Guaranteed 18 Innings Baseman’s Gloves Catcher’s Mits Fielder’s Gloves Shoes, Suits to Measure Louisville Slugger Base Ball Bats Foot Balls, Foot Ball Supplies Basket Balls, Basket Ball Supplies Boxing Gloves, Striking Bags Boy Order one of Tucker’s all wool, flannel combination Rain C Coats, suitable for dress wear as well as turning the rain. Color, tan. Square pockets, tailored collar, belted back, very dressy. Length, 46 inches. $16.50 Tucker Duck Rubber Company Fort Smith, Arkansas 5 15 Garrison Ave. Phone 1017 Johnson says: Young men will find a stock of Clothing here that will appeal to them immensely. Styles that are authentic. Qualh ties above criticism. The kind of clothes the college man really likes to wear. $15 and up to $50 W. Johnson A. J Clothing Co. Fort Smith, Arkansas Cadet Uniforms The Famous Kalamazoo and Superior Quality Make an outfit of which wearers are proud to wear. They give service that commends them. The Henderson - Ames Company Kalamazoo, Mich,Fr.or.i 1868 Cardinal Tubby Mullins (at telephone): "Hello. Central, give me Heaven.” ---------But that is not what he got. “What on earth li l that fellow mean when lie said he was a ‘peregrinating pedestrian. catigating his itinerary from the classic Athens of America’?” "lie meant that lie was a Quo Yadis be t ing his way from Boston.” Today 1 bought an alarm clock. It has a very loud ring. I think I will call it the Star Spangled Banner, For every time I hear it I have to get up. Darrell: "Jesse, what do they mean by poetic license? Does a poet have to pay for a license?” Cox: “No. If they did we’d have fewer poets.” "What if we lose this blasted war after all. Bill?" "Well, all I can say is—them what finds it is quite welcome to keep it." Corporal Newman (after giving wrong command to squad of freshmen): "Signals off!” And Pandemonium Reigned in the Mess 11 all— The butter was strong enough to stand up and talk to the coffee hut the coffee was too weak to answer. New Freshman first week of school: “Please pass me the syrup." Soph, to next man: "I suppose he wants the zip." ’Twas in May. Dr. Foreman: "Do you believe that Jonah swallowed the whale?” Byrnes Walker (dreamily): “Yes. sir." Buddy: “This Chi Omega House is just like a hotel. I believe I will start a hotel and call it the Chi Omega Hotel.” Martin: "You wouldn’t get any trade save from Chi Omega’s.” Claire: “You would get all the male trade.” Sodic: “Bags, 1 need some spending money. Give me that two hits you owe the dormitory council.” Marc.arkt Harris H'ill Mr. Lore be in the laboratory this afternoon?”E. B. Harrison, President H. K. Wade, Cashier J. H. Mcllroy, Vice-President F. P. Hall, Asst. Cashier Mcllroy Banking Company Fayetteville, Arkansas Capital Stock, - - - $ 50,000.00 Surplus, - - - - $ 150,000.00 DIRECTORS E. B. Harrison C D. Mcllroy J. K. Pool J. H. Mcllroy H. K. Wade We Appreciate Your Valued Business And in return we give you service, style, quality, and the price in keeping with the class of merchandise your taste demands. The New Model Successors to The Mcllroy Dry Goods Company Complimentary to Junior Class 1918 The Shop of Culture And soliciting your continued patronage Famous Lilley Uniforms A' RE the Recognized Standard for Colleges everywhere. They are superior in point of style because made by skilled Military Tailors and wear better than any other Uniform. CATALOG ON REQUEST. Addrtss THE M.C. LILLET CO. COLUMBUS. OHIODr. Guy: “Mental energy, class, is held by many chemists to he the decomposition of phosphorous compounds. You see what a woeful lack of phosphorous we have.” Miss Holcombe (helping a freshman classify): “Whom would you like to have for English?” Freshman: "I don’t care, but the boys told me not to get that fellow Holcombe." Miss Speerstra (to Floyd Henry): “Arc you the same young man that I gave some war bread to last month?” Floyd: “No ma’am, and what’s more, the doctor says I never will be!” Jim Bradley (shaving in agony, two weeks after Thanksgiving): "Bob. I am actually afraid to strop my razor since this anti-hazing movement began.” 1'rof. Droke: “Did not the Egyptians give us math?” C. A. Reed: “Yes, but I wish they had kept it!” Lieut. Miller: “Colyum. right about, Howooooot!” Bill Knight (in journalism class): “'Flic first paragraph should contain the who. when, where, what, how, and why.” Voice from the rear: “What’s the rest of the article?” Three couples of campustry students marching in row down Dixon Street: Sergeant Bill Oliver: “Watch your dress!” Gussic Simpson (to B. Furr): “What is the matter with it?” Corporal Forrest Williams to deployed squad: “Just gather up ’round here, squad.” Shinn: “Bolon, have you read ‘Romeo and Juliet’ yet?” B. B.: “I have read Romeo but 1 have not got to Juliet yet.” Lucy Bennet: “Isn’t this a grand picture Fields made of me?” Cutic Russel: "Yes, ain’t science won- derful tho?” Bob Logan—An active member of Beta Sigma.University of Arkansas Fayetteville A standard institution, comprising colleges of liberal arts, agriculture, engineering and education. There is also a medical department situated at Little Rock. Entrance to the Freshman class is based on a four-year high school course. The usual courses leading to the bachelor’s degree are offered. New courses are now being offered in stenography, typewriting, accounting, journalism, domestic science, education and other subjects w hich are especially intended to meet war-time needs. There are excellent laboratory and library facilities. Tuition is free to residents of Arkansas. Non-residents pay an annual tuition fee of $10. The next session w ill begin September 18, 1918. Catalogue and circulars of information may be obtained from the President or Registrar.Dudley Stone Official Photographer Razorback 1918BUY IT ON THE CAMPUS Everything the Student Needs Textbooks. Stationery and Supplies, Official Drawing Instruments and Material Gymnasium Suits, Tennis Rackets, Shoes, Etc. Rackets Restrung Fountain Pens. Pens Repaired Prompt Attention to Mail Orders The University of Arkansas Book Store “On the Campus”First National Bank Fayetteville Oldest and Strongest We Want Your Business Arkansas National Bank Southwest Comer Square Fayetteville, Arkansas Capital - - - - $100,000 Surplus and Profits S 25,000 Strength and Conservatism Combined Do Yon Know 1. W. Guisinger That at 614 Garrison Avenue, Ft. Smith, Arkansas Music House Is located one of the Highest Class Haberdashery shops in the South- west, catering to college men? Everything Mail Orders Taken Care of in Music Promptly — — Fayetteville, Ark. Pianos and Plavers to lore's best to 3 stop©” Fort Smith, Arkansas Victrolas Edison Diamond DiscThe In iana Printing and Binding Company The Largest and TTlost Complete Plant of Its Kind in Southwest ITLissouri 415 417 East Oliue Street Springfield, TtlissouriLaboratory Apparatus and Chemicals for Educational and Industrial Laboratories Supplies for AH Laboratories Chemistry Physics I Mology Bacteriology Immediate Shipment made from our large stock carried in Chicago Schaar Company 1025 S. State St., Chicago A. H. Petting Manufacturing Jewelry Company Manufacturers of Greek Letter Fraternity Jewelry 213 North Liberty Street Baltimorey Md. Special 1 designs and Estimates on Class Pins, Rings, Etc. Hotel Fort Smith Main Arkansas U. of A. Barber Shop The Goldman 420 . Dixon JCe Cater to Student Trade The Only Elect ical Devices Fireproof Hotel in for Massaging and Shampooing Fort Smith Union Barbers Built for Your Comfort Phone 331-W D. E. Snidery Manager R. C. Murphy C. L. Cory Austin Hall Falconer: ‘‘I think there's something dovelike about you, Carolyn.” “Really." “Yes, you’re so pigeon-toed.” Sergeant Wheeler, to Girls’ Rifle Club: “Right Shoulder------Arms! Jean Scott: “Which is my right shoul- der?” From '17 Razorback: Bill Turner wore his pink shirt Dee. 8. 1916. (Please take note when he wears it again.) Dee. 8. 1917. The earth has gone its cycle and Bill has on his shirt. CHI OMEGA HOUSE to paul McCartney, Dr.. For 26 free meals................................... Hole in woodwork burned by cigarette................ Breaking plaster by ivory dome...................... Use of Yictrola .................................... Garage rent for jitney.............................. Ruining of freshly waxed floor...................... Injury to feelings of inmates by excessive singing.. Damage to porch swing............................... Feb. 28. 1918. ........’......$26.00 ................ 10.00 ................. 5.00 ................ 15.00 ....................10 ................. 2.29 ................200.03 ................ 20.00 Total ................................................................$278.42 Rebate for services as phone boy, butler, waiter, and chaperon........................ 00.24 Total due ....... $278.18 Miss Hargis (expecting translation): “Mr. Miller, who arc you?” Buddy (waking up): “Buddy Miller. Not twelve o’clock yet. is it?” Jess Douthit: “Frank, 1 bet you tell your girl you have to go home early and study.” Morrow: “Well, I never did but twice.” Prof. Drake: “Mr. Henderson, what is the difference between an iccburg and an ice floe?” Lee: “An iccburg is formed on the land and an ice Hoe is just frozen water.” Dick Thompson—The White Hope from Little Rock.Fayetteville Printing Company Winchester Cash Market PRINTERS OF EVERYTHING CHOICE MEATS 108 W. Center St. STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES Corner School and Dixon. We do it well—quick. Phone 132. Conner-Fulbright Grocer Co. For Good Things to Fat, GOOD GOODS. PRICES RIGHT. PROMPT SERVICE CANDIES, COOKIES AND FRUIT. Phones 71 and 72 E. C. GOLLAHER Fayetteville, Arkansas 414 West Dixon Street. BOWLING PARLOR RED CROSS DRUG STORE On the Square. Telephone 490. Spend an hour with us. Get some Rood exercise and enjoy yourself. DRUGS, STATIONERY, FINE CANDIES North Block Street Splendid Fountain Service When You Think of Photos, Think of the Class Studio. WASHINGTON HOTEL HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS OUR SPECIALTY. CLASS STUDIO FOR THAT BANQUET OR DINNER Phone 107. West Corner Square. Fayetteville, Arkansas T. J. Brumfield If You Patronize FRISCO DRUG STORE BUCK’S DRUG STORE Northeast Corner Square DRUGS, SUNDRIES. TOILET GOODS STATIONERY Fayetteville Eastman Kodaks YOU WILL ALWAYS COME BACK We Appreciate Your Patronage. CAMPBELL-BELL DRY TH E F IELD STUDIO GOODS CO. For the “The One Price Store" Artistic in Portraits and Dry Goods, Shoes, Ladies’ Landscape Photography. Ready-to- Year twvrz CAMPBELL-BELL DRY GOODS CO. West Side Square. West Side Square. U. of A. LIBERTY HARDWARE CO. There’s More to a Shirt Than Dixon Street. the Neckband We carry a full line of Shelf Hardware and Cutlery, Sporting Goods and Ammunition, Electrical Supplies, Stoves and Ranges. A shirt is more than just something to fasten a collar to. It’s a chance to lo some “landscaping.” If you take any thought whatever for your appearance, you necessarily give a good deal of attention to your shirts. We can. for any one that wishes it. hand out a given quantity of a given size at a given price of a given standard pattern. Wc get more fun out of the business, though, when a customer is fussy! Be as “choosy” as you like in here. See Us. PRICE CLOTHING CO. Clothiers, Hatters, FurnishersGHULSON’S CAFE LEWIS BROS. CO. Dixon Street HARDWARE, FURNITURE, SPORT- REGULAR MEALS AND SHORT INC GOODS ORDERS. QUICK SERVICE Call on us. STUDENTS’ HEADQUARTERS FAYETTEVILLE. ARK. Long Thayer Meat Market T. M. JONES Dealer in FRESH MEATS SECONDHAND FURNITURE AND CLOTHING PROMPT DELIVERY 119 W. Center St. We Solicit Your Trade. East Center Street A Square Deal Telephone 259 STUDENTS! WRIGHT’S Spend your vacation pleasantly and North Side Square profitably. For particulars sec MEN’S FURNISHINGS AND SUITS Parker Bros. Nursery Co. Tailored to Measure. Office Wolf Building STAR BRAND SHOES Telephone 612. Student trade appreciated WHITE’S CAFE On Dixon Street ALLEN HARDWARE CO. BEST M HALS AND SHORT ORDERS 608 MAIN ST. IN THE CITY. LITTLE ROCK. ARK. Special attention given student trade I. K. COOK I NGH AM MILLINERY The management of The Razor back wishes to thank the Largest Stock, Finest Goods, Reason- merchants who have advertised able Prices. in the 1918 Annual. East Side Square Compliments HALL CARTER BE VO BAR Owl Cafe. CIGARS, TOBACCO. CHEWING GUM Special Accommodations for University Students LUNCH SERVED AT ALL HOURS Shooting Gallery On Dixon Street PALACE OF SWEETS HAVE YOU BOUGHT YOUR NEW BONNET? Finest Fountain Service in Town FRESH HOMEMADE CANDY DAILY MARTHA WASHINGTON CANDY If you haven’t, may we suggest that you come in at once and make your selection from the lot of beautiful hats we have just received? Surely one of those charming new models will appeal to your fancy, for there is a wonderful variety of becoming shapes. MRS. GOLD A GILBERT See Us When in “Big Town.” Successor to Mrs. E. Curry. DUKE JEWELRY CO. “FLOWERSHOP CORONA” DIA MON DS. WATCH ES, FINE JEWELRY 408 West Dixon Street, Fayetteville, Ark. Fraternity and Class Jewelry in Stock and on Special Order. Phones: 113 Day; 615 Night Local and Long Distance B. H. Barnes. We carry regularly a full line of CHAMPION NEWS CO. We arrange table decorations and make all kinds of flower work. CIGARS. CANDIES, COLD DRINKS. ST AT IO N E R Y, SPO RTIX G Our store is one where talent and ex- GOODS pericncc count. KODAK SUPPLIES. MODERATE PRICES Leading Daily Paper. QUICK SERVICE Fayetteville, Arkansas. Give us a trial and you will be satisfied.Washington Hotel, Fayetteville, Ark., December 1, 1917. Dear Freshman Brothers: Everything was so peaceful on the campus last night about bedtime, 1:30. No one thought that a storm would he on before the ---------- hammer had made the first sweet tintinabulations to the empty stomach at the hour of rosy dawn. My heart is broken to think that my best friends would enter my bed room and attack me in such a manner. However, I am resting comfortably at present with ............. (censored)...... Big reward for freshman who can trace me from this. Don't let me miss the grand march at our dance this afternoon with the Fairest One. Yours in Tribulation. JOE MUX SKY FAUCETT, President. Baton: “Brad. I have heard a lot about Carnal! Hall, but I have never been able to find it. Is it anywhere near the Girls’ Dormitory?” Joe Torbett: “American as you arc, Trimble, don't you think that you would be awed by the presence of a King?" Otis: "Not if I held an Ace.” Miss Hargis: “How do you spell the word for ‘emphatic’ in French?" George I.ittle: “What is the word for ‘emphatic’ ?” Prof. iRiplcy: “If Mr. Hardin holds these Madgeburg Hemispheres in his hand and I pull, lie will have to pull as hard as I. will lie not?” Kinsworthy: “No, he won’t, because lie has to stand still as hard as he pulls.” Gussic Simpson: “If you would have only one wish, what would it be?" Bill Oliver: “It would be that—that— oh, if I only dared to tell you what it would be?” Gussic: “Well, go on. What do you suppose I brought up the wishing subject for?” Lieut. Dyer: “Private Hicks, drill is not over, what arc you leaving the parade ground for?” Hicks: I have Captain Heath’s verbal orders to do so, sir. Lieut. Dyer: “Show them to me, show them to me!” I.cla to —(guess who) : “I offer you my heart's first fresh affections." “Hollabaugh, why arc you wearing that red ribbon on your hat?” “To attract attention to my head.” “What do you want to attract attention to your head for?" “So people won’t notice my feet. I have a hole in my sock.” R. A. Cooi’KR—He had a dale—once.Illustrations. Designs Photographs ° Half-tones. Line ni Den Dai Zinc Etchings ThreeFour Color0 Process Plates- Iahn $ Ollier ENGRAVING COMPAnA 22cs ?ners oiu Lngrerers of ZfyAes Q j yr -ANNUALS yfcidBlast QualityTflflT Logic exrm.' In closing, tlie editor wishes to say that, contrary to usual custom in such eases, lie will he in his room at 106 Gray and will welcome any and all callers between the hours of 12 and 2 A. M. He wishes to state further that lie has a reception committee of three Browning machine guns and a trench mortar trained on each window and the door, following the ancient and well put motto of the Boy Scouts of America, "Be Prepared.” The Kditor-in-Chief and the Business Manager have left town as per the usual custom. The former can he found at Mattcawan where he is taking the rest cure for an exhausted mind. The Business Manager is in Monett spending his ill-gotten gains in a vain attempt to find forgetfulness of his troubles in trying to get money out of some of the people and organizations of the University. (Signed) TIIK JOKE EDITOR. Victor Vki.van Van Arsdel—I-inisAUTOGRAPHSAUTOGRAPHSNow Lay The Razorback Down To Buy War Savings Stamps Nmr College People Can Serve by Saving


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University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1915 Edition, Page 1

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University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1916 Edition, Page 1

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University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

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University of Arkansas Fayetteville - Razorback Yearbook (Fayetteville, AR) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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