University of Arizona - Desert Yearbook (Tucson, AZ)

 - Class of 1958

Page 1 of 468

 

University of Arizona - Desert Yearbook (Tucson, AZ) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 468 of the 1958 volume:

1 1 I , 'af bi. HT: mary lee hutchison, co-editor karen utke, co-editor pat larson, art editor andrea lott, business manager 5 p , . T i i i t , Q 1 A published by associated students V university of arizona copyright 1958 tucson, arizona it l-4.4 rim- V. l l li. ' ll ig MR. AND MRS. For their continuing contributions to the Univer- sity of Arizona as teachers, and for their warmth and understanding as counselors and head residents, this 1958 Desert is dedicated to both Mr. and Mrs. George F. Herrick. Better known as "Proff' and "Mom", the Herricks have practically become an institution on the UA campus. Although they have no children of their own, they have managed to adopt a "family" that now numbers in the hundreds. lts members range from a 70 year old Japanese student studying for his doc- torate in geology to a lonely freshman coed away from home for the first time. In Cochise Hall, where the Herricks are head residents, it has become the custom for approximately 12 boys to be invited in for Sunday breakfast of waffles and bacon each week. And many are the boys who can tell about the times "Mom" ironed white shirts for them in time for the big dance. One boy was so happy to see "Mom" after summer vacation that he threw his arms around her in a powerful bear hug . . . powerful enough to break two ribs. While Mrs. Herrick is well known for the love and birthday cakes she gives her "family", "Prof." is equally famous for his sense of humor. One of the stories told about him concerns the time he invented a new cure for students failure to attend examina- tions. Any student who didn't take his quiz at the regular time got another chance at 5:30 a.m. If he didn't show up then, he was given a third chance . . . at 4:30 a.m. He explained that at these hours there would be no conflicts with other classes or , D.- -7- rv 1' ' l Q l , .l e l l' 1 T' l u li n r 9 1 - l l GEORGE F. HERRICK social activities. One day Prof. Herrick found that five out of 45 in his insurance class didn't arrive. He set the second chance at 5:30 a.m. and two football players showed up, accustomed to getting up at an early hour. But that left three coeds who also missed their third chance at 4:30 a.m. A com- promise was finally effected for the lunch hour, the only free time the girls had, leaving them famished but quite impressed with "Prof's" stamina. Professor Herrick has been with the BPA faculty since 1927, except for a leave of absence during World War ll. Before receiving his M.B.A. from Northwestern University, he served as a first lieuten- ant in the army during World War I. Mrs, Herrick, a native of Chattanooga,Tennessee, was graduated from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio in 1922. She became Dean of Women at the University of Arizona in 1942, a post she held until 1944 when she retired in favor of marriage to Mr. Herrick. She was in- strumental in allowing married womenls attendance at the University. In addition, she helped organize the Phi Lambda chapter of Phrateres on campus and was an alumna colonizer of the local chapter of Alpha Xi Delta. The Herricks' inhuence, subtle and direct, has been felt in this University community for over 30 years. Their splendid example of dedication to the University, to their students and to each other will long be remembered on this campus. As beloved foster parents to so many, many students, as teachers, scholars and truly fine individuals, Mr. and Mrs. Herrick have brought honor to us all. F- . '-V I . ,l . . - 1 ,A 1 - 5 I , L ,i. ' ',v'f I . . 1 V ' X A V 1 XL ' . I , I v 1 E 6 I I 1 E Y W . , W , I H? -' ,U,,,,r,v ny 4, 9 lx .mfg ' l:-2.2. F' table of contents photographic essay . administration . . activities colleges . Campus life . . organizations . sports . advertising MEMORIAL fountain, framed in a grove of date palm trees, is located on the west side of Old Main. Periodic poolings of both underclassmen and newly-pinned couples has been, for many years, a traditional scene on University of Arizona campus. IVER ITY GF ARIZONA PHOTOGR PHIC ESS Y 6 . The student is the pulsebeat of a university. Without him its purpose is meaningless, its buildings are mere silhouettes. A student is the heart, the life, the symbol of college. Here on the campus of the University of Ari- zona, and here on the pages of its yearbook, is evi- denced the unique metamorphosis which takes place every year. It is a subtle change, without benefit of ceremony or tradition, but one through which an individual must pass before he becomes this intricate part of a college society. It requires more than the payment of fees or the passing of tests. Much more. To define the prescription that fuses student and college is impossible. Definitions are awkward, for words can only touch the intangible process. Words cannot penetrate the feeling hidden in the moment a student senses pride in both himself and his school for the first time. Nor the warmth. It is a personal thingg he would not tell his roommate. But it is that moment that contains the transformation, and only then do the sacrifices-the time, the work, and the money-which pay the price of education seem worthwhile. Only then does the value of senti- ment and "getting along with others" weave its way into college life. Here then is the University-its students. Here on these pages is the meaning of education. Here is time, caught in the swift moment of four years, which blends the symbols of hope, trust, and knowledge .... WARM DESERT nights are an added incentive to the social life of University students. A formal dance is a spe- cial occasion here, as on any campus, but might easily end up with everyone singing around a desert campfire. 7 COMMITTEES conduct investigation and hash out problems too complex to handle in larger meets. MORTAR BOARDS take time out for coffee and some fun. Man, by nature, is a gregarious animal. But on the UA campus, this phenomenon is intensihed to proportions encompassing every student in a most complex system of both formal and informal gather- ings. Although meetings of governmental bodies all over campus often run to several score members, small committees gathered under palm trees or in Greek house or dorm basements are probably more numerous. Subjects generally run anywhere from last night's date to a formulation of school policy... COMMON bond is shared by participants in the successful "Night Club' as they watch a friend's comedy act in the University Auditorium 'fQ'.i1'5', ge,1l,4..u,15u:.p. ' ' ' 4 V ', wif?.fx. 'Dm , ' w V "' M . fx - iv, , LM. - .. ,, , . tm 15.41 fr n , , , fvr A ' . R ' J 'D n' uw. Xl? 5 I :va 2' .ff 1 1, 1 .v .EH a 4 Y r Q e::2.'5 131-5 3:15 , .,-.gftgstfm Wfvslaggzif' : fm. . X ,-vrz 'J 5, "Q'-191' 'J r . nf' . 1, ' , ,QM ' V-. ' l ,fzr ' ,adm . ---L,,, w S-.,, 'uv Lf ,ff I , .1 3 , 1 WJ- , I 'S+-.... 3 , K" A-1 :V I5 , N" V T73 " . 1 - if ' -' ,- '- ,Lf ,fffiif 4' H. AV' x Wx: .,-1, ,J ,. l V. ,.,-gg. L - ,. w,, 44 I - f--: Q' 1 1 Wie.,- , V U -- axqf- ..,, ra-.abil GRADUATE STUDENTS innoculate chick eggs with virus and rickettsial organisms as part of a research problem in bacteriology. This is only one of several hundred research programs on the campus in which students participate under faculty guidance. RUUND TABLE discussions are informally led by faculty members. History professor, Dr. C. H. Haight summarizes a topic over a cup of coffee 10 An education at any university certainly cannot be calculated by the number of units which one takes or by the number of courses which a student registers for each semester. An education is measured by the intangible-by the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake-by the understanding which one has of his fellowman-by the way one becomes capable of individual thought and expression. Here at the University of Arizona there is great opportunity for students who have special interests to develop them by participating in the individual problems program and by Working on research activities . . . THE ACADEMIC fervor justifiably is centered around the University library. Students have access to 280,000 volumes, an extensive periodical file and many government documents. Built in 1925, it is one of the older buildings on the campus. 'i ,.....d .pf-' 11 11' 4-,.,.t-E-r"" ...The noisy sounds of construction filled the air again this year as University officials strove to keep pace with the ever-increasing enrollment. The old stone walls, marking the boundaries of the campus, have become mere symbols of yesteryear. The newer buildings have taken on a streamlined appearance al- though the traditional red brick construction has been retained. The Mines Building, below, and the ultra-modern Mojave-Manzanita dormitory are but two examples of the burgeoning University... 12 .V 1 . A apawaanaa- . W-:N---K ,lx GA.. L I -Z-7, 4 x a .: -- , 73.1 .J X .X J -.0 "-'Am ff . ' . 1:39 5 3. " ' . , ff.-" . . Lei Us 'SL 4 .., - QI.-aaa v ' : .V I - yy. ...E ., .III , - Q-:rx + 5. nv ,gf-IL . . fu 1 Xfcfl ' 55? 1 . I .'f..I1ffQfiJ H" 1, -fi ,I,':'-. fm - - v . -- I .fain h . W-.III,, ik A "1 - .25 .:,Qf?'?' 'Qi' nv- I ,ui 'fi',i' 494: - ' M ' 'fi' 57' 1--- TH . ' I.4f'IQIig?k47.f:f"'z VJfQIKa:.',3 A ,I I...II I A, . 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V 41 - af .412 Jeff '.:fnV--V-G'f'f'k 1 -V '?'5Y3"""" f W .V - '.g',"fu ' " ' Igjf Fiijaff' 11- .1.j2'5J-Sf-.Q:' Wgvff--. . -L25 ' -E--' .vi 1yr"'l', i3?NJg gi. I- I- -I , .3 . I. 'ff ,I ' QI. , 1 5.3. --.w-- I-:A 1 I if-.I .lf -.I-i.N?'- 'v , If-"' '- any ..n ':f'5 Vaj2"1.71 I-V1.'ff,'V',7ix?, 'YN f Ag A., I -,I -- ,-1 - 3 Iv. ,' .Vu ,. .V ' ..-.I I I I :I - N . . Vg.,-s , V - ,Q . .U ,.:,..W-...-f -V -..,,,I,,.,.....f.,.., .. - II, I I . .. , . . ..-. ,, 'fu' ' 12 xg, 'V ,. 0 -. , '55 ' .- L. " ..- , A .Zu .Iii V ' -II..-' z J f -. . ' :V . 15 ', Ig, - - if 1 'f "'-4VV"f 5 Z" -'X ' 51' x F f , W, Q' I w"'f'f',.3:" " " 1 , Q f V .-'-A --- - J' 1' '- iff.--'Pi '--' ,V V . .- V. -1, V v VI - I I- 1- I-4 ,V . . .5 1 'I-5 -5, .MV-3' H xv H5 I , v. 'iffy II ' 'LSA I , I . EK V- .LXR-4'-Vf5.v'v fl: ' in ' "A ' '-.' , " 'f 'V 1 X. . :ig , 'AF " , ,A ,IE sh - I Jr lv I A-"F-1 .f-n.-.1 .Ig Qigy.. , Q. V ' -" . II -v .31-rg' Ar. A4 1 ' . , V' 'N ABS.,-2 V - 'A 55- H.. I I ugh - -"x X 41 Q . -fin A . ' .V 5.- w--5. 4:4 " 5, -U V A-:LF '..jl'1 ' LQ . 4--nb I' " xi' - ' ri' L' L V , - -,-'L I 'Ag' E ' ,Hx-5--I -. 'II""g'5'f ,if ., ' I F11-' - I . .. . I I I . .. I , . . 1 . V- - . X . I - ' ' . ,, f -V ' V -1. -. fe ' n 'E wx ' n , ze... -V7. ,V .., I, --"' '. T. '.,,. -,lf - ..- " 7' 'if up 1 r Qv 6 I 571. .-.uf 'SN VI X .f f .1 1 5-A 'f ,I ' X ? LX! :' ' -'lf . xy... E, n rg . , . . r '- 4 n.' Eau. -' req ig- " Lf-1, " f r Y I 1 o Tb- - H .4-9-1. .I., I LU' g . gi . J.. av- I IJ, ,. . HAYRIDES often highlight weekend activities. Levis, guitars, a full moon and star-filled sky are the necessary elements BALMY winter days entice students to the tennis courts. 1'- :T-eff-.V-f -V 117' n-5-ffm"-r:-r-'rrf."""f':f?'g'.:-'H ,- I 17 i""A 'i" if "it ' ' r ' ' l ies, .W-t fini: fiizlzl jitlrn will I' I .Ll in r 1 . . ' ' . . . The western flavor found on the University cam- pus is one of its outstanding characteristics. The desert vegetation, perennial blue skies and distant mountain peaks greet students each morning and gradually be- come an integral part of their lives. In spite of the tremendous increase in enrollment, all the warmth and individuality of the small-college campus has been carefully preserved. Newcomers ind themselves caught up in a pleasantly relaxed atmosphere where informality reigns supreme. Western hospitality is exemplified by the friendly hellos echoing across campus and through crowded college hallways. H.. A. f J n f -Y, 1 x J 4 ,w sert 1 esert sert desert sert desert sert desert sert desert sert desert admin! tration nese dese dese I dese dese dese 0 CSG R C5 6 Q : I Wh V 1 it I A"v!-! 1 F, R ' :sert desert dese' 2' ' -.A' Q f, Qz idpd ff x , A' I! V- .ul lvhv IQJY,-:Vi 2 ' 1 d HL eg t 1 t 5 PRESIDENT Though appointed president by the Board of Re- gents in l95l, Dr. Richard A. Harvill was not a new- comer to the University. He joined the faculty as an economics professor in 1934, and successively served as Dean of the Graduate College and Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. Dr. Harvill is presently faced with the challenge of a burgeoning, fast-growing university. Annual student enrollment including extension classes and corres- pondence courses has grown to 1 1,439 for the current school year. As president of the state University, Dr. Harvill is responsible to the Board of Regents. He presents an annual budget to the Board and submits proposals for curriculum changes, building contracts, and re- search projects for their consideration. He presides over the Faculty Senate which formulates academic policies of the University. He is the spokesman for all University policies, and must express them to the resi- dents of the state of Arizona. Though he is mainly concerned with administrative duties, Dr. Harvill maintains his interest in economics and politics as a member of the American Economic Association and the Executive Club of Tucson. He attended three schools in his college career: Missis- sippi State College for his bachelor of science, Duke University for his masters, and Northwestern Uni- versity for his doctorate. l .1i.-galil. . . . H-Y-A' ---e ,vii MAIL BALL is an important part of Dr. I-Iarvill's day. Whether in his office or at home, the postman's whistle is the signal for a welcome break in a day hcavily scheduled with appointments. HARVI LLS AT HCM E In the life of a University President, the home is as much a place of work as is the office. This is es- pecially the case with both Dr. and Mrs. Harvill, who find that a great deal of their social life is not their own. The Harvills' home in El Encanto Estates is con- veniently designed to receive many guests. The patio and living room can accommodate large faculty teas and student receptions as well as smaller informal dinners. Mrs. I-larvill's tightly-scheduled days are filled with community, civic and campus activities. Her interest in YWCA begins at the local level and continues through State and National, where she is a member of the board. Showing her true southern hospitality, she takes an active interest in promoting international understanding through the United Church Women's Hospitality Committee for Foreign Students, the Insti- tute of International Education and the Experiment in International Living. In their moments of relaxation, the Harvills like to read in their study or play a game of cards with neigh- borhood friends. LEISURE TIME comes not too frequently for the Harvills. ln their well-fumished living room, a '57 Desert provokes smiles from the busy co uple. ,rap I if 15- . I.. 15 N ll 1. A1 Y 1:5 , ,I . ' 1?-I..lz'. l T I 1 rl 5 Fl' ' ' 'fl' ., ' ff ,Tug .. ly , A-Z N, .rr - .A 1 51439: Qtr.: ' ' 5 1 , ,j . , y F, ' U 1, ' ',' vguj ni ' lfi .- .. . "..'.3l: I 1 1 -' 1 F .f A 1 rg , - 9 -. :-,N Vg-x -'AQ' -15.5 1 I .1-if . I . ,fffi N. . .r,-w.-g"- V 'X-1 V W I ,fa .. ,nfl " .ft 'lx A -' 5 , ...ff l "' - V.. t -l Q I .:, - 5. fl?-:tif ' -' n if-ft I '-. .rim-' :I-ll ,i L..-.s '11 2 .A . -, K . V 1 i:A,N.V:.: . ,1 .-,.' ll: H -I-tv. ., 31 .. 5 ij' arf: .. f 1,-g,.,'..,: f-' ,,.., ,H " 7 ' ' F1v..'-. jflf -' . V ,,s tv- t .1 Robert L. Nugent stepped into the executive vice president's spotlight this year, thus highlighting a ten year billing as a University of Ari- zona vice president. Dr. Nugent, a native New Yorker, received his BS in chemistry from UA in 1923 and obtained his MA in 1925. He trav- eled to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar in 1927 and completed his student career with a Ph.D. from Cornell in 1928. After instructing chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Nugent returned to UA in 1932 as an associate professor, and later served as Dean of the Graduate and Liberal Arts Colleges. fT ite- Norman S. Hull was 'initiated into a University of Arizona vice presi- dency this year after serving a three year term as a professor of law at UA. Dr. Hull graduated from the UA with highest distinction in l928g then maintained a law practice un- til 1930 when he became assistant United States Attorney for the Dis- trict of Arizona. Dr. Hull returned to law practice in 1931 and con- tinued in this capacity until he joined the UA faculty in 1954. In 1955 he held a position as special counsel for the Arizona Interstate Stream Commission. 20 VICE PRESIDENTS David Lyall Patrick began his new position of vice president in charge of academic affairs this year follow- ing twenty-three years of faculty service at UA. An Iowan by birth, Dr. Patrick was awarded his BA at the University of Iowa in 1923 and his MA from Stanford in 1926. While attending Stanford he was a Royal Victor fellow from 1928 to 1930 and obtained his Ph.D. in 1934. Dr. Patrick has instructed at both his alma maters, as well as hav- ing published three works concern- ing English literature. While not writing or instructing, Dr. Patrick enjoys art, music, and astronomy. .l'....'. 'Lf X . , N . GOVERNOR OF ARIZONA Governor Ernest W. McFarland, an ex-ofiicio member of the Board of Regents is responsible for ap- pointing eight members of the Board. He then works with them to promote expansion of the three col- leges. The ten board members meet on call, usually once a month, on the different campuses throughout the state. The power to govern the University and the State Colleges of Arizona is wielded by the Board of Re- gents. The Board, composed of the Governor, the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, and eight members appointed for eight-year terms by the Gov- ernor, meets monthly. Individual committees meet more frequently to consider the awarding of building contracts and local purchases of real estate for the expansion of the three schools under their control. All contractual obligations of the University and other Colleges, plus faculty and staff appointments and reports from the three presidents concerning gen- eral conditions, are presented monthly to the Board for their approval. Through their committees, the Board of Regents presents annually to the State Legislature the budget for both operating capital and for funds needed for the construction of new buildings at the three institu- tions. BOARD OF REEENTS: Alex Jacome, John Babbitt, Lynn Laney, John Jacobs fpresidentj, William Matthews, Ellwood Bradford. Evelyn Kirmse, Samuel Morris. Not pictured: Marion Brooks, Governor Ernest W. McFarland. 2l 1 .lt DEAN OF MEN DEAN GF WOMEN ASSISTANT DEANS l l l ' l f N f u . R13 l, 3 . ' - P . if - t ni l '. N "'fMj.,.,-i'f ,. i Y I- . ttasg-Q.: -fi ,-tw: l aiL..jL,a::.,ii iii - -Neill -----.....,,,,.... .:.....:....,,C.Q -ztfzgrgtl. -Y..l.,. , , In his senior year at the University of Arizona, A. Louis Slonaker, now Dean of Men, received the Free- man Medal for excellence in char- acter and scholarship. As a UA varsity athlete he earned fourteen letters, the greatest number ever awarded at the University. Aside from his official duties as Dean of Men, Mr. Slonaker devotes much of his time to the Alumni Association. Under his impetus the Alumni Magazine and Directory were first published. He is now Executive Sec- retary of the organization. Karen L. Carlson, Dean of Women since 1951, has served as "double hitch" at the University. After serv- ing as Assistant Dean of Women at the UA from 1945-1949, Dr. Carl- son returned to Arizona to assume the Dean of Women's duties after being registrar for two years at the University of North Carolina Women's College. Latin and French were Dr. Carlson's majors. Dean Carlson, extremely active in UA women's activities, is a counselor to UA coeds. Assistant Deans Dorothy Clement and Darold Shutt counsel troubled students and meet with ASUA com- mittees as advisors. Dr. Shutt studied at the University of Illinois, receiv- ing his BA, MA and Ph.D. there. He flew 29 missions over Germany as a bomber pilot in 1942. Miss Cle- ment received an MA in music at Northwestern University and studied piano in London, England. She was in North Africa and Italy in 1943, serving the Red Cross. ADMINISTRATIVE HEADS Ralph E. Deal entered University service as Purchasing Agent in 1946 after eleven years on campus as a cashier. Deal, UA class of 1929, has twice been elected to the presidency of the Southern Arizona Football Official Association. Clifford Ed- wards, Business Office Manager for UA was connected with various rail- road companies from 1918 to 1925. New York-born Arthur Grant re- ceived his BA from Arizona in 1951 and promptly joined the faculty as an English instructor the following year. A member of Phi Kappa Phi, national honorary, Grant was ap- pointed Assistant Registrar in 1953. Robert Houston began his UA ca- reer as Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds and graduated to the development of airbases on Oki- nawa in World War II. Houston re- members the removal of 20,000 enemy mines and the exacting work of intelligence otiicer in Korea's Iron Triangle. He is now head of UA's physical plant. UA Registrar C. Zaner Lesher also received rec- ognition in wartime following his graduation from the University in 1917 with a BA in agriculture and a MA in business. After being award- ed the Croix de Guerre, Silver Star and Purple Heart, Lesher came to Tucson in 1922. Kenneth R. Mur- phy enrolled in UA as a student and remained as Comptroller upon ob- taining his BA in 1951. Murphy, a native of Illinois, is aiiiliated with Phi Kappa Phi and is Chairman of the Board of Saguaro Credit Union. An original Arizonian is Dave Wind- sor, Associate Director of Admis- sions, who was born in Casa Grande. He was awarded a BA in 1943 and his MA in 1951, as well as being honored in Phi Beta Kappa. Before returning to the Wildcat school, he fought with the army at Anzio. Max P. Vosskuhler, Extension Serv- ice Director, is a UA graduate. He received his BS and MS here. Choral work, dramatics and gardening are some of his leisure activities. 1 I I te I . Vw ., "" N. if 111L .I I ' .-TE-. Charles Tribolet, graduate manager, completed his college career at UA in 1930. "Bumps" was appointed graduate manager after serving four years in the Navy. His office sets up the campus calendar and athletic budget and finances student organi- zations. Fleming Bennett, head librarian, is a graduate of Fairmont State Col- lege and holds a BS in library sci- ence from Ohio's Western Reserve University. He has served as head of acquisitions for Columbia Univer- sity libraries. Boyd Allen also graduated from the University in 1930. He was presi- dent of his senior class and the student body. Nicknamed "Mr. Ari- zona of Greater New York,', he led the Alumni Association there for nine years. With a wide background in school administration, Dr. T. C. Johnston assumed his duties as director of UA Placement Service in 1956. He was elected to "Who's Who" from Central State College in Oklahoma. He received his Ph.D. from the Uni- versity of Arizona. VISUAL AIDS BUREAU: Venice M. Lindsay tdirectorj, Robert Pierce, Laura McNeill and Mrs. Merlyn Prince. UNIVERSITY SERVICES The otlicials on these pages perform the services essential to keep the University operating as a func- tional whole. The head librarian is responsible for the maintenance of all library facilities up to maximum efficiency. The Placement Bureau tracks down job op- portunities for University students. The ASUA Photo Division keeps busy recording all campus goings-on with the camera, while the infirmary keeps equally busy treating student illness. The Alumni Secretary and his staff have charge of the University's relations with its alumni in all parts of the world. The Graduate Manager advises ASUA leaders in planning the campus calendar, and pays the bills for student publications and organizations. Edu- cational films for UA classrooms are supplied by the Visual Aids Bureau. All news for public release is handled by the Press Bureau. In addition to the daily radio broadcasts concerning UA activities, a TV film is sent to Phoenix to be telecast each Sunday. RADIO-TV BUREAU: Mrs. Gertrude Masterson, Wes Johnson, Harry Atwood, Ben Markland tdirectorj, and Frank Barreca. .f ., i.. 5, .Ai rf' . v , new "vm . OFFIC Fan McDougall. RESS BUREAU: Stewart Bailey, Alice Sigworth, Bill Smith fdirectorj, David laumm Jim Allen, Pat Harris, and Dorothy Gyger. lf' ' x GRADUATE MANAGER'S STAFF: Philip McLaughlin, Catherine Waggoner, Lorna Marks, Betty Jo Martin, Delcie Hatch, Charles Magness, Alice Gazik. I or "-lr ii' PHOTO DIVISION: ROW 1: Stan Oaks, John Fogle, Henk Moonen. ROW 2: Bob Broder, Art Grasberger, Janet Rountree. X , l eesert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert 1- rt desert desert K aetib iii ' r t I if B l ASSGCIATED STUDENTS Warren Ridge, ASUA vice-president is a contempor- ary jazz fan. Sports also rank high on his list of favorites. He has played varsity basketball for three years and devotes much leisure time to golf. Warren is a member of Arnold Air Society, and Scabbard and Blade, military honorary. His major is psychology, with a split minor in sociology and economics. Upon graduation, Warren plans to enter the Air Force for three years. M., l 1 . 5,11 l : i l I l I 'l 1 l .I I P 'Q' l " l i , N ll if Y. 0 V i 'l l ., l ll Joan Mureiic, ASUA Secretary, was elected to her olice in the spring of 1957. A member of Mortar Board, Joanie also holds membership in Pi Omega Pi, business education honorary, and Alpha Epsilon, women's business honorary. She belongs to the Stu- dent National Educational Association and plans to teach in secondary school after her graduation in June. Joanie was a Spur, a Chime, and sat on the AWS General Council. l l L r ' S f , I A5 ff" ,N-al. 4 -N V 'fl -:li M- v ... V k ZX J x r , l 'i . if - ' 5 ' 1 H j Ti "Y 1' ,W , 4 I 28 Redhair, ASUA president and Wildcat player, has served the University in capacities during the past four years. Student Body President, Jack is an ex- member of various boards, including Academic Committee, Board of Control, Union Activities Board and Board of Sophos, Chain Gang, and Tra- have all claimed Jack as a member. his sophomore year he was class president last year was elected junior councilman. originated "A" Club, and served as vice- an and president of East Stadium Cheyenne, Wyoming, is his birth- Denver, Colorado, is his home. He from a Denver high school and Sigma Chi fraternity his freshman year UA. As president, Jack has done a very all job of getting things done and keep- order in Executive Council on busy afternoons when the discussions be- heated. The 1957-58 school year has exciting one, yet full of work for and the school is proud of his efforts accomplishments. Congratulations, Jack on a job well done. .hm ..t ., ,Q 'nl 54. 1 ' ,-....d-is-4----N Arizona's Junior Councilwoman, Dolsy Lyon, was a member of Spurs during her sophomore year and served as vice-president of the class honorary. Now, claiming member- ship in Chimes, Dotsy is majoring in elementary education and plans to teach after graduation. K-.f -X 137 Dave Martyn, one-half of the Junior Councilman team, was inaugurated at the Red and Blue Ball in the spring of 1957. Dave is a member of Traditions, the Student Union Activities Board and Phi Delta Theta. I Q i' Dave Engleman was elected as one of two Junior Councilmen last year. He is a member of Alpha Kappa Psi, National Men's Business honor- ary, and Phi Gamma Delta fra- ternity. Last year Dave belonged to Sophos and played varsity basket- ball. , . .5 C C? EXECUTIVE COUNCIL: ROW l: Linda Lou Fiscel, Doris Smith, Dixie McDoniel, Dean Karen Carlson, Dotsy Lyon, Bette Jo Moran Polito, Mary Randall, Joan Muretic. ROW 2: Warren Ridge, Phil Weeks, Bill Ramsay, Jack Redhair, Dave Martyn, Dave Engleman, Dan Shafton, Bob Perkins, Fred Joyner. 30 REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL -Representative Council President, Bill Ramsay is one of the busiest men on campus. Last year Bill was named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities" and was elected IFC President. He is also a member of Bobcats and Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. Created late in the spring of 1957 by a majority vote from the student body, the Representative Coun- cil is the lower house of UA student government. Its members number twenty-nine and include student presidents of the colleges, four class presidents, Stu- dent Union Activities Chairman, Associated Women Student's President, Graduate Manager, Student Union Director, Panhellenic President, lnterfraternity Council President, Student Religion Council Presi- dent, Inter Dormitory Council President and the elected members of Executive Council. The main functions of the Council are the coordi- nation and planning of general student body activities. They also review problems, grievances or suggestions from any group of students on campus and make nec- essary changes or modifications. Bill Ramsay did an eflicient job as Representative Council's first president. Lynn Hornbrook served as vice-president and Helen Gee as secretary. REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL: ROW l: Mary Shower, Mike Garrity. Dixie McDaniel. Duane Lingafelter. Joe Terrill. Ben Pulow, Ed Muns. Joan Muretxc, Mary Lee Hutchison, Mary Randall. ROW 2: Doris Smith, Lynn l-Iornbrook, Bill Ramsay, Warren Ridge, Gene Krum- lofi Mike Wozni, Bob Perkins, Dave Engleman, Dave Martyn, Bucky Maud, Jim Fox. Bob Browder, .lack Redhair. 31 PRESIDENTIAL APPOI NTM ENTS x -K A A Dan Shnfton, Assemblies Chairman, was this year's busiest sophomore. A member of Traditions, Sophos, SUAB and Zeta Beta Tau fraternity, he also found time to organize the popular Shafton Combo. ASUA Publicity Chairman, Linda Lou Fiscel, holds membership in Chimes and Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. She was appointed to both the Elections and Academic Com- mittees Iast year. Linda Lou is a so- cial studies major and plans to teach after graduation. Elections Chairman, Phil Weeks, is a senior majoring in Liberal Arts. Phil holds membership in Blue Key, Traditions, and Phi Kappa Psi fra- ternity. During his junior year he was appointed to the Academic Committee and was elected Junior Councilman. 32 'Qi kxfl Ye' Moran Polito, better known "B.J.", promoted a more varied in the Artist Series this An education major, "B.J." president of both the Education and Student National Edu- cation Association and was named to "Who's Who." An interest in both modern and pro- gressive styles of music ties in with Gene De Cet's work on the Social Life Committee. Chosen for "Who's Who," Gene served as vice-president of the Marketing Club, his major academic field. Bob Majors, Chairman Of ASUA Public Relations, began a series of tours to state high schools this year to interest seniors in the University. Bob, a junior chemistry major, also served as Publicity Chairman for Greek Week. Chairman of the Associated Stu- dents Bookstore Committee, Milo Van Voris is a business major in the field of personnel management. Milo is a member of Traditions, served on the Assemblies Committee and was an IFC delegate to the regional convention. J UA pre-med student, Paul Schnur, had served three years on the Aca- demic Committee before being elected chairman last fall. Paul's home is Oak Creek and his favorite pastime, photography, lends itself well to the area. He, too, was named to "Who's Who." A junior at the University, Fred Joyner, as chairman, has organized the charity drives of the Community Service Committee this year. He serves on Executive Council and is a Chain Gang member. A native Arizonan, Fred spends his free time water-skiing. 33 GRADUATIDN plans are being formulated by Senior class officers Jens Johansen, Jens Johansen, vice president, Suzi Daly, se Suzy Daly, Pat Wrenn and Lynn Hornbrook as Commencement approaches. and pat Wrenn, treasurer. JUNIOR CLASS The Junior Class Council, under the direction of class president, Jim Wilkes, dealt with a wide range of campus problems. The newly organized group met twice monthly to discuss and propose revisions for various campus activities. The main project was the revision of the Fresh- man Week program including orientation, assemblies and the Prexy and Frosh mixers. The group also worked with the Representative Council in a program to increase public relations with incoming freshman students. Membership was limited to one representa- tive from each campus living group and Phrateres. Olivia Gonzales served as vice president, Mary Kay Plumb as treasurer and Jackie Purdue, secretary. SENIOR CLASS of this year's Senior class. ln the month of M graduation announcements went on sale, wit proceeds going towards the purchase of the class presented to the University at the end of school j Class officers serve as a planning committee the distribution of caps and gowns during the v preceeding Commencement. This year, the class was instrumental in the organization and public of the annual Blood Drive held in December in 1 e Graduation is the prime goal of the 1 100 men h junction with the Red Cross Lynn Hornbrook served as president, assiste URGANIZING a study of Freshman Orientation Week keeps Junior class ofl Olivia Gonzales, Jim Wilkes, Jackie Perdue and Mary Kay Plumb, busy. 'Q ng T IUNIUR CLASS COUNCIL: ROW 1: Ronnie Stone, Lee Hughes, Sue Levy, Alice Holly, Madilyn Buntz, Janie Slagle. ROW 2: Barbara Vota Mary Monroe, Colleen Ashley, Mary Kay Plumb, Olivia Gonzales, Julia Harlan, Jackie Perdue. ROW 3: Jim Wilkes, Bob Ludlow, Vi Mansour, Bob Leivian, Ken Trout and David Schreiber. W, ck 34 SOPHOMORE CLASS , U , t The Sophomore Council was first organized last by the class of 1959. The representatives to the , 5 E, Mi.. iv J : 2 J this year totaling fifty, are elected by their f and houses and attend weekly meetings on evenings. Among their activities were a r I , i fl x , 1 new f f X F , f. J lf? , N l bake sale and an informal class dance. -fa 3 if j 1' X i i H TM- 1 I If i lent a hand in the High School Senior Day Contest and at halftime activities that night. , , , LEADERS of the'Sophomore class, Ed Muns, Bobbie Haworth, Geri Craig and Sue Smith approach the Student Union steps on way to their weekly meeting. SDPHOMURE COUNCIL: ROW 1: Jim Wil- son, Bobbie Haworth, Ed Muns, Jim. Berry, Bob Johnson, Anne Collins, Rae Fukuchi, Judy Kent, Don Lowe, Jack Harmon. ROW 2: Joe Martin, Dave Fiscus, Margo' McKenzie, Gloria Aras, Arlene Lehman, Pauline McCommas, Connie Christensen. ROW 3: Fritz Rollins, Martin Halpern, William Tur- ner, Joe Zimmerman, Charles Green, Lee Hersh, Jean McLean, Joan Naugh- ton, Nancy King, Sharon Parker. ROW 4: William Estes, Jerry Hagerman, Ray Dull, Wes Brookfield, Ed Morgan, Joe Kalish, John Willis, Eugene Margolis, Sue Smith, Lydia Weissenburger, Geri Craig. FRESHMAN CLASS ...... E. u V r I FRESHMEN GDUNCIL: ROW 1: Jane Rosenblum, Sharon Rains, Carole Owens, DISCUSSING the agenda for a weekly meeting are Freshman ofiicers Karen -IQhI150H, 5'-le Fuller, P0882 SUUPSPQ- RUW 23 Fred Kay. La1'1'Y Betts, Kenlyn Williams, Jim Fox, Linda Merrill and Carolyn Roettger. John Kline: Sharon BaT10W1fZ, B111 Albllllll, Lloyd Wib0fg- 35 AWS GENERAL COUNCIL: ROW 1: Sharon Benovitch, Shauna Gates, Sue Forster, Carol Heiniger, Eleanor Anderson, Sharon Ferris. ROW 2: Charlotte I ones, Heidi Dowell, Marty Garcia, Shelby Porter, Joey Lendora, Norma Jean Campbell, Pat Baer, Anne Snoddy. ROW 3: Brenda Nixon, Anna Oswald, Julia Harlan, Sydney Wade, Doris Smith, Melinda Thomas, Jody Eads, Janet Kemp, Margie Parker, T obi Roc- camora, Gayle Runke. ROW 4: Shir- ley Van Shike, Beth Colvin, Alma Val- esco, Serita Shepard, Charlotte Foster, Joan Humphreys, Jo Clark, Jackie Morgan. nr Senior Marty Garcia is a Spanish major and devotes much of her time to that department. An active campus leader, Marty was chosen for "Who's Who." She was AWS vice-president this year, a Wrangler and Mortar Board member. s Shelby Porter, AWS secretary, is a member of Chimes, the ASUA Community Service Committee and the Housing Committee. Majoring in elementary education. Shelby is a junior and plans to teach after graduation. 36 ..-.-.. in-"' AWS treasurer, Marilyn Ottinger, is majoring in commercial art and is a member of Alpha Rho Tau, the art honorary. Chosen for Chimes, jun- ior women's honorary, Marilyn also worked with the paste-up crew on the Desert. ASSOCIATED WOM EN STUDENTS "To unite the women students of the University of Arizona and to provide them with their own form of self-government" are the two major goals of As- sociated Women Students. In February, the UA chapter hosted the state convention which was attended by delegates from Phoenix College, ASC at Flagstaff, New Mexico A 8: M, and ASC at Tempe. Workshops were conducted by UA delegates and centered around the theme, "Yours Is To Reason Why." Dean Darold Shutt, guest speaker, led a discussion entitled, "Women and Their Place in Student Government." A newly established service of AWS this year is the Campus Activities Volunteer Board directed by Jackie Purdue. The "Desert Dream" formal, AWS Get-Acquainted Tea and Twirp Week contributed to a successful year. iq ' af YI?" '4 E W1 xx g. X, . s -P .X i . x The AWS presidency keeps psychology major Doris Smith in a whirl of activities. Doubling her responsi- bilities this year, the UA chapter hosted the three-day state convention in February, Doris is also a member of Mortar Board, the Academic Committee and Phi Beta Kappa. One of the outstanding leaders on campus, Doris hails from Fort Worth, Texas. STANDARD procedure at the "Get-Acquaintedn Tea is to stop by the DAISY MAE, played by Donna Stanford, and Jim Blair award the trophy to punch table. Ann Snoddy and Marilyn Ottinger, representing the this year's Lil' Abner, Dave Thomas as Twirp Week draws to a close ophomore and junior women's honoraries, greet Erdene Telford. . 'Y jim The Student Union Activities Board, better known as SUAB, governs all student activities concerned with the Student Union building. The 14-member con- trolling board is made up of 7 regular members and 6 ex-oilicio members. As chairman of the group, Bob Perkins presides over all meetings and acts as general co-ordinator for all the committees. Mike Flournoy, with his Recreation Committee, arranged bridge games, bowling tournaments, and dancing lessons and supervised the Union's indoor recreational facilities. As Administration chairman, Pat King is in charge of the secretaries who recorded every business transaction carried on by the Board. Bill Larson was UA's oilicial student ambassador. He and his Public Relations Committee planned guided tours of the Union. John Dunlop saw that Union equipment ran smoothly. His House Committee deco- rated the Coop for special events and sponsored Coke- tail Time. Pat Larson's Arts and Music Committee catered to the cultural desires of students in the Music Listening Room and Browsing Library. Bulletins and Records, with Dorian Henry as chairman, kept up the Union scrapbook and published a Union brochure. Special events was the "catch-all-do-all" committee as they sponsored any special events which came up during the year. Chairman Glenda Richter supervised the Travel Bureau and photography contest. Linda Lou Fiscel and her Publicity Committee advertised any big University event with posters, and skits. Dan Shafton emceed many of the programs and assemblies which his Assemblies Committee spon- sored. The Social Life Committee, under Gene DeCet, scheduled social functions for all school organizations and saw that the social code was enforced. STUDENT UNIG CO-ORDINATORS A marketing major, Bob Perkins, SUAB chairman, graduates in May. Serving on both Executive and Representative Councils, Bob is also a member of Blue Key, national senior men's honorary and was named to "Who's Who." A FOCAL POINT in student life, Louie's Lower Level's grand opening was hailed by UA last November at the Student Union Birthday Party. - -- Af 1-a rf VT Y' ri ' 'fr r ff f I 1 H 1 gil, ,W Q, - :1g, . Illini, a '.I . I 1 , 5 A I I I it . W . , , . I ' ' fl : i I - ' I , I 1 ' I I I ""f' ff .. I iI i I I I, I . .I E! il?I! I Z I , , ' I I , X , ,I X V I I I I -Q I 17 'Y? STUIIIENT UNION ACTIVITIES BOARD: ROW l: Glenda Richter, Bill Larson, Pat Larson, Mike Flournoy, Martina Garcia, John Dunlop. ROW 2: Bill Ramsey, Dan Shafton, Linda Lou Fiscel, Bob Perkins, Dorian Jones, Gene DeCet. I I .bv-H ,H I gl THE BRUWSING library, located on the tirst Hoor of the Student PAUSING from their oflice work are Student Union Director Marvin "Swede' Union, offers students the latest books, magazines and records. Johnson, Lynne Hanhlla, Steve Cooke, Betty Weatherly and Sissy Burke 39 BOARD OF CONTROL:-Joan Mueretic, Doris 'Smith, Mary Pilgrim, Warren Ridge, Jack Redhair, Fred Enke, "Bumps" Tribolet, Kathryn Wagoner, Louis A. Slonaker and Bob Perkins: . QU- , l T f I Tw 3 I V . I l I I I , 4 I I BOARD DF PUBLICATIONS: ROW 1: Brewster Campbell, Mary Lee Hutchison, Karen Utke, Mary Ellen Fulton and Jack Redhair. ROW 2: Koyo Lopez, Gordon Evans, Charles "Bumps" Tribolet, Bill Smith, Ron Butler and Bill Youngren. STUDENT LIFE: ROW 1: Jack Redhair, Joan Muretic, Doris Smith, Dorothy L. Clement. ROW 2: Darold L. Shutt, Gene DeCet, and Warren Ridge. Not pictured: Dean Francis Roy, Dr., Robert Nugent. BOARD OF CONTROL Commanding the disposition and appropriation Associated Students funds is the function of the B of Control, comprised of four faculty members five students. Assessed fees from the student act tickets collected at registration are allocated campus groups such as AWS, forensics, rodeo, W and publications. The athletic fund received the receipts. The board also approved awards to Athletic and Music departments. Recently, separate budgets were set up for A committees by the Board, eliminating a general serving the same purpose. BOARD OF PUBLICATIONS Election of editors and appointment of business managers, subject to the Board of Control's approval, is under the supervision of the Board of Publications. The annual Desert Queen selection is handled by the group, and as tradition dictates, only the male mem- bers are allowed a vote. Finance, policy and contracts are also referred to the Board, which meets on call. The annual Publications Banquet is held each spring to announce the dedicatee of the Desert and to introduce the new editors and staff members for the following year. Serving as chairman for 1957- 1958 was Brewster P. Campbell, head of the Journal- ism Department. STUDENT LIFE COMMITTEE The Student Life Committee is a joint faculty- student board appointed by the president of the University. This year .lack Redhair, ASUA president and Dr. Robert Nugent, the University Executive vice president served as co-chairmen. The group's main concern involves campus living groups. It serves as a recommending body rather than a disciplinary group. It considers problems of campus- wide interest and recommends improvements to the president or the student body. Five students and four faculty members comprise the groupf I ' A 1 4-7 l' E ' i W " ' K N x - -I .TV , . .if . .,.,, ,..fSh ,- LX?-x ' M ' A 1 SERVICE -cs TUV' ' BILL ALEXANDER AL BABER VAUGHN BINZER ELAINE BDETTDHER Bobcats, Traditions pres., Sophos, Chain Gang, Traditions, Bobcats, Traditions, Varsity Chimes, Mortar Board, Scabbard and Blade, Delta Arnold Air Society, Scabbard wrestling, Chain Gang, IFC, staff, Alpha Epsilon, Beta Sigma Phi pres., Phi Gamma and Blade, Alpha Zeta, Phi Scabbard and Blade, Zeta Gamma Sigma, Phi Kappa Delta historian. Gamma Delta housemanager. Beta Tau pres. WI-lO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS IN AMERICAN CULLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Each year outstanding members of the senior class are chosen to be named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities." This year forty-two students were awarded the honor at UA. The process of selection begins with the compiling of eligible seniors into a list by the junior councilwoman and councilmen. All students, classified as seniors, with an ac- cumulative grade average of 2.8 or better are placed on the , 3' - X if 1 X Aww '- i 2 A R . ' 5' list and it is presented to the members of Representative Council. The student body is given the opportunity to add any names to the list during the elimination process. The number is narrowed down by the Representative 'Council and is taken to the Executive Council for final approval. The award is based upon scholarship, service to the school and cooperation in extra-curricular and academic activities. It represents the highest quality of student leadership on the University of Arizona campus. ED BROWN ED DA SILVA Blue Key vice pres., football International Students' Club and track captains, IFC, Kappa pres. and vice pres., I.R.E., Alpha Psi pres. Pi Mu Epsilon, Newman Club 42 all GENE DE BET ASUA Social Life chairman, Student Life Comm., Marketing Club vice pres., IFC, Univets, Newman Club. GURDDN EVANS Blue Key, Chain Gang, Tucsu Press Club Scholarship, Wildcat Editor, Board of Publications, Desert Sports sta Sk' MARY ELLEN FULTON Spurs, Chimes, Wranglers, Kitty Kat co-editor, Wildcat reporter and copy reader, ASUA Assembly Comm. SUAB Publicity. CHARLOTTE FUSTER Chimes, Mortar Board, Circulation Manager, Phi pres. if' is var MIKE HIJFFMAN Sophos, Chain Gang, Bobcats, IFC rush chairman, Phi Gamma Delta pres., Baird Scholarship. Cham Gang 1' raditions, ey pres., Desert editor, of Publications, Beta Beta. BGR GULUFARB KD I In MARTY GARCIA Spurs, Chimes, Mortar Board, Wranglers, Pan-American Club pres., AWS treas. and vice pres. Sigma Delta Pi vice pres. HELEN GEE College of Agriculture pres., ASUA Rep. Council sec., Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Omicron vice pres., 1956-57 National Sewing Champion. Aa LYNN HORNBRUUK So hos Chain Gan Traditions, P y gl Blue Key vice pres., SUAB, IFC vice pres., Sr. Class pres., Chairman Greek Week, ASUA Rep. Council vice pres. MARY LEE HUTCHISON Spurs, Chimes, Mortar Board, Pi Lambda Theta, SRC pres., Desert co-editor, ASUA Public Relations, ASUA Rep. Council, Board of Publications. , Q F1 it 'Hatter R - .-1, .--. I li A BILL LARSUN PAT LARSUN DUANE LINGAFELTER LUCIA LUNG lophos, Chain Gang, Blue Key, Chimes, Mortar Board, Fr. and Engineer's Council pres., ASUA Spurs PICS-, Chimes, MOFIHI' raditions, SUAB pres, and Soph. Class vice pres., Rep. Council, AIEE-IRE Board, SUAB Public ublic Relations chairman, Mermaids, SUAB Arts and Club, Univets, Theta Tau Relations, Music and Arts tudent Council, Board Music chairman, Desert Art PICS-, Tau Bela Pi- COIIJD1-, DCSCl'tDa11CCCh3i1'I'I'l3Il- f Control. Editor, Alpha Rho Tau. BILL LYNCH Sophos, Blue Key, AIME pres., Jr. Class vice pres., Scabbard and Blade vice pres., Tau Beta Phi. is A , f fl c I X . 1' - n ' i f fi : 4 A . I, it A 'ummm ', S, . DIXIE MGDDNIEL BUUKY MAUD RALPH MILLER Spurs, Chimes, Mortar Board Sophos, Chain Gang pres., Tau Beta Pi pres., Alpha pres., ASUA Jr. and Sr. Blue Key, BPA College pres., Omega pres., Sophos, Blue councilwoman, Soph. Class ASUA Rep. council, Beta Chain Gang, Pi Mu sec., Pi Lambda Theta, Gamma Sigma, rodeo Pi Omega Pi. business manager. IOAN MEURETIC JOYCE MURPHY BUB PERKINS Spurs, Chimes, Mortar Board, SUAB Board, ASUA Assemblies SUAB pres., Sophos, Chain ASUA sec., SUAB sec., chairman, Student Council, Gang, Traditions, Blue Key, Administration Comm. University Players, Mermaids, ASUA Rep. Council, Executive chairman, Alpha Epsilon, Nat. Collegiate Players. Council, Board of Control. Pima Hall vice pres. 5 V7 STEVE PIJGSON Sophos, Chain Gang, Traditions, IFC, SUAB House Comm., Delta Sigma Rho vice pres., Sigma Nu pres. B. I. PULITD ALAN PULLEY ASUA Artist Series chairman, Sophos, Bobcats, football Social Life Comm., FTA, co-captain, "A" Club pres., Student NEA pres., ASUA Graham Hall pres., "Most Rep. Council, Pi Lambda Theta. Eligible Bachelor." 44 MARY RANDALL Mortar Board, Panhellenic ASUA Rep. Council, Pi Theta, Alpha Omicron. .ng -or .ii ,p p I li. ll.l'f'U . - Q U l A 1 al 3-,P ,A P ' A f-Slififigt.. I 221 A I ' l !'f'?f!f?,Ifi, ,, 5. -. , ' l .. 1. A .. .'g 't..1fi2f5tr-,-..g,ts. . .wr " V.-H I ,f,iQifrf,5iQ:-!,.F3'Q '13, mf-all ' 4' - .-i, tv?-' , , . ,:. -' 1 -.'f?v1?'3.i..rv"!ff'.iI5w c Q -if ' i - 1 ' l"v'Qf1T'a.TQ!1f'-'gif 5 Viv. - . ' ' 'i .'T77ji', ' ' :I.1'n'.j., - li' ' "- Ji - f'1'35eEiffl' :igi: :fit ' A' A 'nk ,H N511 3.1. Hg., ' t 'f f Y' - ao - if h . I' - ,Q-.g,.LiA:.:: . xr:-itll,-, V gg:9Z i?Q':X-5w4u'i2,ff . 7 -' , it 'yn 323 - "nfl- ... ' ' ' Y ' ' N- -.-wasfazf - A fist., w 4??a:1.f.tf-aa1- - l 'A ,- f.m7if-..-. ,, -.t-:rf 4 'aff -- ,. JACK REDHAIR A pres., Sophos, Chain g, Bobcats, Traditions, h. Class pres., ASUA Jr. ncilman, "A" Club, sity football. -C" WARREN RIDGE Sophos, Bobcats, Varsity basketball, ASUA vice pres., Board of Control, Scabbard and Blade, Arnold Air Society. XL ROSALIE RIIBLES :J i PAUL SCHNUR Chimes, Mortar Board, Wildcat Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Lambda News editor, Band vice pres., Orchestra, Tau Beta Sigma pres. as-.hx Upsilon, Blue Key, Traditions, Academic Comm. chairman. PAT SHELLY MARY SHOWER IJIJRIS SMITH Sophos, Chain Gang sec., Mortar Board, Spurs, Fine Arts Spurs, Chimes pres., Mortar Traditions, Bobcats, SUAB Student Council pres., ASUA Board, AWS pres., Exec. Recreation Comm., Scabbard Rep. Council, Alpha Rho Tau, Council, ASUA Academic and Blade, Alpha Zeta. Alpha Lambda Delta pres., Comm., Phi Beta Kappa, Kappa Alpha Theta pres. Alpha Kappa Delta. L N . ...nf , 1 .f . " -A, , - MARILYN TENCH KAREN UTKE um, SUAB Special Events Spurs, Chimes, Mortar Board, Ixmm., Pi Lambda Theta, ASUA Publicity Comm. sec., ection Comm., Greek Week Alpha Epsilon, Desert co-editor, nce co-chairman, Esert Index editor. Board of Publications. 45 PHIL WEEKS Chain Gang, Blue Key, Traditions Comm., Jr. councilman, Elections Comm. chairman. IDHN WILBUR Sophos, Traditions, Chain Gang, Blue Key, Jr. Class pres., SUAB Public Relations, ASUA Community Service Comm., Student Senate. .J CF r Nad '59 Mortar Board president, Dixie Mc- . Doniel, is a senior majoring in busi- ness education. She has been elected to Pi Lambda Theta, Pi Omega Pi, v and Alpha Epsilon. She serves as f' 9 Senior Councilwoman on the Ex- ., .,,.,:.1 i' .4 " - ecutive Council and was named to C f 7 ffwhois who." naeEL.4 2 f l 1 PREPARING for Homecoming Alumni Tea are Mortar Board members Mary Lee Hutchison, Doris Smith, Dixie McDoniel, Lucia Long, Marty Garcia. MORTAR BOARD Ninety-six college campuses claim chapters o Mortar Board, national senior women's honorary. Th primary goals of the group include the promotion o cooperation, loyalty, service and fellowship amon college women and the maintenance of high standards of scholarship and leadership. This year's UA chapter began a series of student- faculty coffee-breaks in the spring. They crowned the "Most Eligible Bachelor," Mike Pollack, at their annual dance, "The Purple Onion" in January. In conjunction with Blue Key, Mortar Board members co-sponsored Mom and Dad's Day and continued their program of assisting foreign students on campus. Each month in their pamphlet, "Mortar Board Sug- gests," they urged student attendance at cultural events on campus. Mortar Board represents outstanding leadership among UA's women students. Membership included the AWS president, Panhellenic president, Desert co- editors, Student Body secretary, Senior Council- Woman, and many members of "Who's Who." MURTAR BOARD: ROW 1: Mary Lee Hutchison, Betty Page, Mary Shower, Dixie McDoniel, Elaine Boettcher, Karen Utke, and Rosalie Robles. ROW 2: Lucia Long, Mary Randall, Dorothy Michelbach, Pat Larson, Doris Smith, Joan Muertic, Martina Garcia and Charlotte Foster. 46 BLUE KEY '13 queen Carole Schwaemmle, Bob Goldfarb officiates Senior Day activities. an annual event sponsored by Blue Key. -M urn Pre-med student Bob Goldfarb will begin his studies at ,Tulane next fall. Versatile in campus' affairs, he was Desert editor in 1957 and selected for Sophos and Chain Gang. He has received the "A" service blanket and was selected to "Who's Who." The national senior men's honorary Blue Key sponsors two of the biggest events on the UI11VCISlty campus: High School Senior Day and Mom and Dad's Day. This year working jointly with Mortar Board national senior women's honorary Blue Key organ ized Mom and Dad's Day which included registration tours to the Arizona State Museum Art Gallery and other points of interest on campus Entertainment was arranged by the groups and "A blankets were pre sented to the parents with the most children enrolled in UA and those who traveled the greatest drstance For Senior Day, Blue Key chose the queen who reigned over' the activities which mcluded a picnic a dance and the football game. xi, BLUE KEY: ROW 1: Paul Schnur, Irwin Mordka, Ralph Miller, Howard Tarr, Syd Salmon, Hank Mollner, Bob Perkins Busch Clark ROW 2 Bill Lynch, Harvard Hill, Gordon Evans, Bucky Maud, Bill Larson, Lynn Hornbrook, Ed Brown, Phil Weeks B111 Margolf Bob Goldfarb and John Wilbur. 47 WRANGLE RS 'iimglll Kitty Jo Parker, a junior majoring in journalism, is secretary of Gila Hall and a member of the Women's Press Club as well as being president of Wranglers this year. Spare time activities include horseback riding and leathercraft. In its sixth year on campus, Wranglers have a worked in conjunction with AWS in wornen's dences. Acting as counselors in the women's dormitc Wranglers helped the freshmen get settled last Q 6 Working with Spurs, the Wranglers added a . service to their activities. This year a second-sem tea for the new and transfer students was held Y acquaint the new students with the University's e curricular activities. l Wranglers also sponsored an informal twirp d for UA students this spring. In conjunction with c women's service groups, Wranglers acted as hostr at the Dean of Women's Tea and the Fresh Mixer. "WING UP" the discussion of coming events are'Wranglers Kitty Jo Parker, Anna Mary Oswell, Norma Berrellez, Mary Jean Harper and Margo Reos. 'mg A' 'tl Q ia , w - id ... Q-S 3 . -.f -J 5' ',,,fr g,,.f' WRANGLERS: ROW 1: Judy Darlington, Marilyn Ruterman, Donna Lee Myers, Ola Wells, Norma Berrellez, Geargene Goodwin, Margarita Excobedo, Sigrid Maitrejean, Judy Kent, Nancy Cook, Kitty Jo Parker. ROW 2: Nancy Dearden, Ilze Grasis, Marty Garcia, Betty Harris, Pat Lacey, Ann-Marie Rascop, Gloria Garcia, Suzanne Schneck, C. A. Theobald, Sherry Shepard, Jeanette Carrera, Marilyn Smith. ROW 3: Mary Jean Harper, Betty Tadano, Gladys Merrick, Anne M. Holmes, Anna Mary Oswell, Terry Jay, Connie Christensen, Joy Bradshaw, Andy Simpson, Angla Casanova. ROW 4: Christine Ellis, Shirley Vanskike, Caroline Kline, Elizabeth McRae, Marsha Rush, Darln McRae, Ila Kartchner, Pat Van De Walleg Margaret Crehan, Marilyn Nothnagel, F idi Elder, Anne A. Beaudry, Io Clark. 48 President of Traditions Committee for 1957-1958 is Bill Alexander, Phi Gamma Delta. In connection with his business interests, Bill was presi- S dent of Delta Sigma Pi, business honorary, and a member of the BPA College council. He was honored by membership in Bobcats and Scab- bard and Blade, and selection to "Who's Who." The Traditions Committee is composed of sopho- more, junior and senior men chosen on the basis of high scholarship and activities, Since its organization, the Committee has been a driving force for instilling school spirit in the students of the University. The first undertaking of this year's members was the selection of cheer leaders and pom pon girls, During Freshmen Week, Traditions men cruise the campus with a sound truck, impressing new students with the importance of wearing their beanies and socks. They are also responsible for the planning and ,hx carrying out of card stunts at football game half times, their president is an old tradition for members of the Committee Splrit-building rallies' and helping the responslble ' organizations carry out such special events as Home- coming, Mom and Dad's Day and University Week. far' .-.fi 1 I-I' cj., . - J ., 1, .f TRADITIUNS: ROW 1: Al Baber, Bob Perkins, Lynn Hombrook, Vaughn Binzer, Jim Wilkes, Jim Rolle, Dan Shafton, Jerry Pence, Ted Wier- sema, Boyd Gibbons. ROW 2: William A. Estes, Bill Hunsaker, David Schreiber, Jim Block, Jim Berry, Steve Effron, Chuck Wagner, Gordon Alley, Jim Templin, Howard Goldwyn. ROW 3: James Kimes, Larry Angle, Roy Wong, Ken Koenig, Joe Martin, Larry Leahy, George Cran- dall, Tom Kennedy, George Ekdahl. Dick Dicus, Mike Garity, Bill Alexander. ROW 4: Bob Bergquist, Fred Joyner, Joe Kranhold, Robert Posner, Mike Beck, Leon Thikoll, Dennis Winsten, Milt Lalien, Dick Thompson, Mike Floumoy, Steve Pogson. ROW 5: Larry Bamhill, Bill Brierley, Jay Lowry, Joe Magee, John Dunlop, John Carroll, Ben Miller, Davis Johns, John Lentz, Bob Steenbergen, and John Benson. 49 BDBBATS: ROW 1: Howard Goldwin, Pat Shelly, Andy Swain, Jack Redhair, Mike Hoffman, Bill Alexander. ROW 2: Alan Polley, Bill Ramsay Al Baber and Warren Ridge. Not pictured: Tag Merritt, Lauro Suarez and Vaughn Binzer. V ARRANGEMENTS were made for athletic awards at Men's Night by Bobcat members Howard Goldwyn, Bill Alex- ander, Pat Shelly, Warren Ridge and Bill Ramsay. BOBCATS Sports enthusiast, Andy Swain, served Bobcats as president this year. He has participated in all intramural sports and is an avid stock car fan. Andy is a member of the Traditions Committee and served as "A" Day Chairman. Majoring in mechanical engineer- ing, he was selected to AIME. Bobcats is the local senior honorary for men students. Custom has limited the active membership to thirteen. The organization seeks to mold student opinion and to keep alive the true Arizona spirit in the student body at all times. The group's most important effort is the organ- ization of Homecoming activities each year. Last fall, special letters were sent to all Bobcat alumni inviting them to the Homecoming festivities. Altering the traditional pattern, eight finalists were chosen for Homecoming Queen instead of the usual five and the new plan produced the highest turnout in history for this type of election. 3.0!-n l'fl'l "Wig, Q Q Alma"-s.."Vf , lf hifi Homecoming activities are Chimes Nancy tadvisorl, Julia Harlan, Cathy Clark, Patricia King. At the Women's Day assembly in 1957, the former president of Chimes named the 22 new members to the national honorary for junior women. Chimes' first project of the year was the fortune- telling booth at the SU Birthday Party in November. During the Christmas season, members visited the Ryland Home for the Aged and distributed holiday cheer. Once a month, members took turns preparing early Sunday morning breakfasts and the site of each was as unpredictable as the menu. In May the group sponsored the annual Spring Sing in the Greek Theatre. On Women's Day of this year, new members were announced at the assembly and each was required to ring the bell in the Student Union tower to announce the event to the University. Sydney Wade served as this year's president of Chimes. She coordi- nated campus charities as chairman of Civic Activities and belonged to the ASUA Assemblies Committee. She was Kitty Kat promotion man- ager and a member of Orchesis, dance honorary. A commercial art major, Sydney was elected to Alpha Rho Tau. Her sorority is Delta Delta Delta. CI-IIMES l Cm ws' ' f 4 Q 'CZ-A2-P f V ' x ,..-1-- -- Q ,' 3 t .irn p , , A -h, i -lt 1' N ,Y , p.' V- 1 5 I 1 ' K' g. ,p X iii' N Ja' . CHIMES. ROW 1: Joyce Benbow, Linda Lou Fiscel, Maxine Anderson Renkin, Cathy Clark, Marilyn Ottinger, Gail Ottinger, Betty Tadano, Sally Switzer. ROW 2: Pat King, Martha Jo Anderson, Beverly Clark, Julia Harlan, Shelby Porter, Sydney Wade, Ann Bogner, Kathy Park, Mary Kay Plumb. 51 . l As Chain Gang president, Larry Barnhill directed the activities of the junior men's honorary this year. Active in intramural sports, he is a past member of the varsity track team. Larry is a native of Tucson and is majoring in industrial admin- istration in the College of Engineer- ing. He is a member of the Traditions Committee and Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. Chain Gang, the oiiicial junior men's honorary, acts as the school's main public relations ambassador. It is composed of outstanding men of the junior class chosen on the basis of scholarship, campus ac- tivities, and service to the school. In general, they assist in campus functions and act as hosts to all visiting athletic teams. This year the group supervised the Homecoming float parade, entertained high school visitors on Senior Day and served at the All-University Picnic in the fall. This year's membership numbered 24. They pro- vided each visiting coach and team with entertain- ment and transportation when the groups reached ENIUYING a moment of relaxation after their weekly meeting in the Tucson to compete with U A. Union are Chain Gang members David McDaniel, Dick Moore, Bob CHAIN GANG: ROW 1: Dick Moore, Mickey Henderson, Dave Martyn, John Colyer, Dave Schreiber, Bob King. ROW 2: Mike Flournoy, Jim Wilkes, John Carroll, Larry Bamhill, Bill Seganski, Dave Engelman. ROW 3: Tom Kennedy, Ralph Hunsaker, Jay Lowry, Steve Pogson, David McDaniel, John Dunlop, Robert Majors, Fred Joyner, Richard Dicus. Not pictured: Bob Bergquist, Tom McIntosh. 52 s....,-Q-s.,.T......-. -.i-,- -QED-...L . -. ii-.-,., 7-P... ' '-,:..Q.4L1- L- -'.:- r.. ...-, .1 -. 1 f Y, . s I .U vt ,, , 5 - - 1 V Y A ij, , TH I fn 'A It 5, l J J., SOPHUS ROW 1: Dave Dunbar, Leon Thikoll, Chuck Morgan, Jerry Pence, Ed Morgan, Jim Howell, Jim Rogers, Jim Berry, Ed Muns, Ron B t L' n Wallace, Tom Berresford. ROW 2: Bruce Scott, Mike Beck, Ray Dull, Tim Tomko, Dave Heckler, Dan Shafton, Eob Johnson, arnc in Dennis Winsten, Joe Martin, Roy Wong, Robert Posner. ROW 3: Jack Tannenbaum, Joe Kranhold, Paul Wygant, Ted Wiersema, Bill Wheeler, Tom Harris, Dave Vance, Jim Templin, Jok Legallett, Martin Halpern, Ford Knowles, Jon Standlee, Frank Jordon, Eddie Mansour. SOPHOS President of Sophos, sophomore men's honorary, is Jim Howell. A native of Illinois, Jim completed his second year of pre-dental study at the University. He served as a mem- ber of the Public Relations and ASUA Service Committees and par- ticipated in intramural wrestling. He is aliiliated with Sigma Chi fraternity. The 1957-1958 year marked the silver anniversary of Sophos, sophomore men's honorary, During Fresh- man Week the 47 Sophos met planes, trains, and buses carrying incoming students, and escorted them to their campus residences. These goodwill ambassadors also supervised activ- ities of Arizona high school seniors during Senior Day and cleaned the Women's Field after the All- University Picnic in the fall. Sophos planned and organized the card stunts at football games and as- sisted in class registration. In the spring they super- vised Greek Week activities. WELGUMING freshmen to UA is a traditional service of the sophomore men's honorary, shown by Chuck Morgan, Ed Morgan, Leon Thikoll, Alan Hale. 53 . Atl . ,, , ' . fa ea . a . 7 V . Q- P R x Q 'V N V i 9' 4 AJ : Hub ll A Y 1 - I, K -2, I. x tr-Y ' , rx V , W A 'I 1 . 4 . ' t-. I fit" QA ' 1 'QS L, 1 ' , Egg' A ' 'A-sr : iff . Pg1T?.L,v.., - T . Y in A ' ' - . h ' X E' V . if fwa- - A' t X ' Lzwagista e ' fixes. 1 QQ' It-.4-. 1, .-.Ji .. 5 ,,,.,... 1 V, HMM F, -I. , l .A I ,il-, Q Vhivinx , Eiga. ..-Fe lt Sq K lbl. -7- , 1 " Ji , t . Y Ui - A V, Vx ., Q fl I 1 X LQJQ-g N In E J' I - t Ts, I A-A V ' ri ' 1' ,.,, , HP- ij, it V N Pal., . , IF, . N' ' XX x b A g I, I ,,., - h v . X li, 14- .- . - -4 "I . 5 ! if --" SPURS: ROW 1: Helen Loubet, Margo McKenzie, Cheryl Ziedler, Betty Thompson. ROW 2: Sharon Ferris, Gale Marsh, Sue Lindsley, Joan Naughton, Ann Castleton, Miss Margaret Brown Cadvisorj, Carolyn Cline, Shirley Vanskike, Nancy Hely, Donna Carlson, Rosina Greene. ROW 3: Mary Ellen Percy, Shirley Franks, Sharon Thelchus, Roberta Carpenter, Gale Guerkey, Sue Smith, Gayle Runke, Geri Craig, Glenda Richter, Carol Heiniger, Eleanor Anderson, Pat Culbertson, Bobbie Hayworth. ROW 4: Susie Davis, Patsy Leonard, Janet Brough, Barbara Marshall, Ann Snoddy, Joan Cooper, Sandra Tims, Gayle Gambel, Lydia Weissenburger, Vickie Engals, Charlotte Jones, Claire Leibenguth, Gloria Wilke, Demuris Peters. Since 1937, the sophomore women's honorary S 5 Spurs, has been "spurred on" to greater things N I each successive year. As its main goal, the 50 stress school spirit and the necessity for each girl campus to work for the University through activ I 4. and service. "lei Publicizing this need for school interest, s sold Bear Down buttons to spectators at the Hc , iff coming parade. They met incoming freshmen in X I V, tember, helped settle them in dorms, and served wi to the new students who white-washed the "A," ,V L ai URIENTATING freshmen women is a major responsibility of Spurs Caroline 'V' Kline and Sue Smith as they answer questions on the steps of Yavapai. C-ft 3' President of Spurs, sophomore women's national honorary, was Tucsonian Cheryl Zeidler. She was also publicity co-chairman for Re- SPURS iigien In Life Week held in Febr- uary, and an ASUA secretary. An English major, Cheryl enjoys teach- ing a Sunday School class. She is a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. 54 :week- 'X-,,,.. "' fx xx! PUBLICATIONS in l Karen Utke, Desert Co-editor is a May graduate in General Business. She hails from Douglas, Arizona, and holds membership in Mortar Board, Alpha Epsilon, business women's honorary and was selected to "Who's Who" last fall. DESERT ,i,. iflfj' J f'i'T1 "J-si. 7-fd? , ' fp XXtiSeg-.Lf.aLh',c: As Desert Co-Editor and Student Religion Council president, Mary Lee Hutchison has had a busy sen- ior year at UA. Majoring in ele- mentary education, she is a member of Mortar Board,Pi Lambda Theta, Representative Council and was named to "Who's Who." Throughout holidays, vacations and weekends, co- editors Karen Utke and Mary Lee Hutchison super- vised production of the 1958 Desert. This year 16 additional pages were added to the original 448 to cover the growing phases of campus life. Layouts were drawn the previous summer and submitted to various printing companies for bids. The beginning of the school year brought together the editors and staff members and the actual work began. Headquarters, located in the "publications alley" of BUSINESS MANAGER Andrea Lott the Student Union, found writers, secretaries, mem bers of the paste-up crew and ad-sellers engaged in meeting the inevitable deadlines. Professional photographer Ray Manley supervised the color photography and Henk Moonen's Photo Division supplied the major portion of photographic work. Stan Fabe, of Shandling Lithography, organ- ized the paste-up crew, made up of members of the Art Department, and supervised their work. Mr. Bill Smith, director of the Press Bureau, served again as advisor. ART EDITOR COPY EDITOR Pat Larson Gail Ottmger 'lk ,-A 5.4 'lk X...- 'JZ ,,..JL'2f?LEf!f1l?'sf,2 f i i L. , gb' vly., X ,,-fr L-,R an ,f 'ks ,A . X " if g 5 ,ff N , l...H5f ' " 1' - , ' I 1 ,g f 'J 1 - J , , , --I COLLEGES I If J I , Ann Bogner if f -45521-rzggg ' numnm- I ' SQ hiv J, LDLFLGANIZATIONS I Qf-4 Claire Leibenguth 'A ' fix CAMPUS LIFE Noel Ruhberg ADMINISTRATION AND ACTIVITIES Gayle Runke .KVW iv w-fr' Q 15 ' INDEX Beverly Clark SPORTS Ernest Leonard W I LQIKU U LA 1 IUN Pat Gordon 57 I l l I 4 l SECRETARIAL Margie Baldwin THE DESERT GGES T0 PRESS Layouts contributed to a full sum- mer's work on the part of co-editors Karen Utke and Mary Lee Hutchi- son and art editor, Pat Larson. Plans must be made early to allow time for printing bids to be secured be- fore the beginning of the school year. Ray Manley, well known Arizona photographer, was contacted for the color shots in the Photographic Essay. Assisted by Tommy Caroll, appointments were made, facilities secured and "models" obtained with the help of the editors. This year a "paste-up crew" was ob- tained from the Art Department under the supervision of Mark Voris and Stan Fabe. Offset printing re- qires the pasting down of pictures and printed copy on a dummy sheet which is then photographed and proofed. ,gum 754 Portraits were taken of fraternity and sorority members by Art Gras- berger of the ASUA Photo Division. Over 1500 Greeks were photo- graphed in a period of three months. Their studio is located in the base- ment of the Student Union. Andrea Lott, Business Manager, and Bill Smith, advisor to the Desert, discuss available advertising space to be sold to local business concerns. The Staff also organized the index system used in the yearbook to check the spelling of thousands of names. rC"T" Over one hundred members of the Desert office staff worked throughout the year to organize the mechanics of the yearbook's production. Also af- filiated with the Business Staff is the Desert Dance Committee, this year headed by Marcia Orr. From the workshop in SU 210, copy was sent to Morneau Typographers in Phoenix. Proofs were re- turned to the ofiice and the paste-up crew inished the mechanicals. Stan Fabe, of Shandling Lithog- raphy, supervised the final printing in their Tucson oiiice. Arizona Trade and Bindery printed the cover using a silk-screen process and, in the final process, bound the pages. 59 ARIZONA KITTY KAT With the beginning of the 1957-58 school year, skeptical eyes turned toward the Arizona Kitty Kat, traditionally, the University's rampaging humor mag- azine. This began the second year that the Kitty Kat, having been subjected to censorship, went into publi- cation as a straight feature magazine, But in spite of the change, the Kitty Kat managed to save its most vital heritage - its sense of humor. The year opened with a publicity campaign that boasted the only college magazine in the country with- out sex appeal. And to spearhead the campaign the magazine's staff selected the now famous animation of a Hsexless cat." Nationally known cartoonists Jerry Dumas and Dick Calkins appeared regularly on the Kitty Kat pages, and good-natured ribbing of such national institutions as the Marlboro Man, brought to the staff a never-ending supply of cigarettes. And the Kitty Kat concluded its 1957-58 year by winning the Associated Collegiate Press All-American Honor Award. Furnishing the Wildcat with news of the UA entertainment world has been Ron ButIer's job for the past two years. Kitty Kat co-editor, Ron writes both humor and fiction and has published 32 stories in this year's magazines. Mary Ellen Fulton holds the oth half of the Kitty Kat editorshi Concluding her second consecuti year on the staff, Mary Ellen prefe feature writing to fiction. Majori in journalism, she plans a care in magazine writing. 4 BUSINESS interviews by telephone are made by Koyo Lopez while Amol Boyner checks numbers and Hollie Christy records the results found PROMOTION FEATURE EDITOR FICTION EDITOR DIRECTOR BUSINESS MANAGER Stan Katz Vince Flynn Sydney Wade Koyo Lopez . ' ' D 1 , an II - 'ff vi .W I F ' ' Liii" sli- I ll ' I , of l ' F' .rag 60 XR The student writers appearing high on the mast- ead of the Arizona Kitty Kat raised the editorial tandards to an award-winning high. The feature staff, headed by Stan Katz, probed into corners of the University to produce controver- sial as well as entertaining stories. Vince Flynn, fiction editor, set the pace for quality Iictiong he contrasted such notables as Claudia Mo- holy-nagy, who has published in Harper's, and popular mystery-writer Chris Cole. Co-editor Ron Butler added to the high quality material with thirty-two short stories. INSTRUCTIONS for poses are given to Kitten Dixie Crocker Bernie Sedley, Tucson Daily Citizen Photo Editor. ,ei . K W mi se, .. . l :Aid iffti N Q f 2 ' NIGHT SESSIONS are attended by staff -ftt, .,,,, , members Sydney Wade, Vince Flynn, if - L b :-Sr Mary Ellen Fulton, Ron Butler, Stan V., Katz, Tom Haffner in the Kat office. we DEADLINES inevitably appear as Mary Ellen Fulton, Tom Haifner, Stan Katz and Sydney Wade work to set up the next issue of the Kitty Kat. Bernie Sedley, Tucson Daily Citizen photo editor, was among the many well-known Arizona photogra- phers whose work appeared in the Arizona Kitty Kat during the 1957-58 school year. Here Mr. Sedley- instructs "Kitten of the Month" Dixie Crocker in a series of poses which were subsequently used in the magazines Freshman issue. Other photographers whose work attributed to the high success of the year's photographic presenta- tion were Koyo Lopez, top contributor for the year, Ray Manley of the Ray Manley studios, and the regular ASUA photography staff, Henk Moonen, Art Grasberger, Stan Oaks and Bob Broder. 61 ARIZONA From "publications alley" in the Student Union to Liberal Arts ll5, to the print shop, scurried Uni versity journalism majors. This year, under the editor ship of Gordon Evans, the Wildcat published 5 editions, ranging from four to 24 pages in length The five column tabloid paper successfuly en gineered a campaign to increase library hours, an H , H carried various student opinion letters in the "As to Whos Who' See It" column. Monday and Wednesday night lab ended near midnight, and copy was then taken t the print shop. Tuesday and Thursday the staff rea proofs, and the final editions appeared at campu distribution points each Wednesday and Friday. Columns included Ron Butler's "Front Row Cen ter," lris Cloudt's "On Other Campuses," Dan Nichols' survey of world news, "World Review," and "I Gotta Gripe" interchanged with "I Gotta Compli- ment." The society pages "Corral Fence" followed campus pinnings and engagements. The staff worked a minimum of 25 hours a week on the paper under the advisorship of Brewster P. Campbell. Journalism classes listened to lectures backed by the clatter and ringing bells of the Associated Press teletype machine. Upon graduation this May, Wildcat editor, Gordon Evans, will begin a career in journalism. Participating in UA publications for four years, Gordon is a member of the Tucson Press Club and last fall was selected Stepping into the position of Wildcat Business Manager, Bill Youngreniv major in advertising was put to prac- tical use. Classified a junior, Bill was chosen for Alpha Delta Sigma, ad- vertising honorary. He is also mem- ber of Univets, campus veterans. . i-ll? ii ,--I I i .i 1 '-1 l-I l ?a - l jf I I Ll, i 1- f :Ii 1 gn'-5 3 5, Ei 1-it Z ' 1 gif f'l -- -A ..:f"'Vii .-1-.-at --,,..:'.:ei: r A ,-,..--lF.,-,,- - 41 -fl.. gl. g fi NIGHT LABS held twice a week showed a contrasting scene of work and play for joumalism majors, who edited copy and set up finished Wildcat. 62 WILDCAT DITOR . . . . USINESS MANAGER . . . ANAGING EDITOR . . . OPY-PHOTO EDITOR . . EWS EDITOR . . SST. NEWS EDITOR . . PORTS EDITOR . . Gordon Evans Bill Youngren Bob Crawford Rosalie Robles . Iris Cloudt . Pat Gordon . Bill Birch OCIETY EDITORS . . Mary Kay Plumb, EA TURE EDITOR .... IRCULA TION MANAGER . Fran Loubet Dana Nichols Jim C. Rector 1l iw., , Q H V X. X ,WWI .,ff4 ' we TWICE A WEEK campus news breaks, and it's the job of Carolyn Roettger and Jim Rector to see that the Wildcats reach their distribution points. ,.' ' f' R one ", 5 .,'-"R 57' MANAGING EDITOR COPY-PHOTO EDITOR NEWS EDITOR Bob Crawford Rosalie Robles V din Iris qoudt 5 ' i K I -" I Fgigl J,a5MuiSiI Q I I4 1 F. Q I' 5 1 I Ii' ? H , I I I 1' O- -.-1 fl ' - -1-lt,-il.-glgrug 7 , . V f. :H A if -. ."YN. 'A ' I MEGwWfa3ff" A' 1f1E1,, Hn f5E5ILf?f3'f4 I f9afFfi ' 1" V' A v I f ,- Q I. A SPORTS EDITOR SOCIETY EDITORS FEATURE EDITOR Bill Birch Mary Kay Plumb Dana Nichols Fran Loubet 63 v. LM , . qw?- jif:eS3qL,i,I:,:P -K " ' , 'mf' f- 'Y':9'3 , 'IT fifff' 3 3.3 A f lyj -:,,a:e.Z'+.gLf 'iff' Qvi Av ,J vgzffw i.3g1"f'.- -5' t X THE RTS x - The staging of all University Drama Department plays requires the cooperation of many technical and professional abilities. The 1957-1958 season opened with a drawing room comedy entitled, "The Reluctant Debutantef' In late November the Department pro- duced Shakespeare's popular comedy, 'AAs You Like It." "Time Limit," a Korean War drama, was pre- sented in February. The final play of the season was "Ondine," the Broadway fantasy. Director of the UA Drama Department is Peter R. Marroney who came to the University in 1939. He did his undergraduate study at Oklahoma and received his master's degree at the University of Iowa. Before becoming director of drama in 1941, Marroney was art and technical director. Dr. Fairfax P. Walkup is in charge of costumes and design. She received her B.A. and M.A. at UCLA and 'her Ph.D. at the University of California at Berkeley. Bob Burroughs serves as art director, also supervising stage set construction. Gene E. Lafferty is in charge of lights and sound as technical director and Jack Murray supervises make-up and stagecraft. fx. QU V. 'il' - fi ALL the fuss about?" protests Anthony Collins at the breakfast table to his debutant daughter Judy Hughes and wife, Mimi Buterbaugh HRELUCTANT DEBUTANTEU Jimmy Broadbent .... Shella Broadbent Jane . . . Mabel Crosswaite Clarissa . . . David Bulloch . . David Hoylake- Johnston .... Mrs. Edgar .... 65 Anthony Collins Mimi Buterbaugh Marilyn Myser Judith Hughes Susan Bloom Claudia Moholy-Nagy Patricia F illmer Katherine F indley James Haire Michael Murphy Charles Cartwright Mary Rule 5 4 . xl ff :.,. Q 5 5.9 :- vi: V9 .I . :iid Q A is HA 7-sf!'44-Q Ill W. . A iq 'M' '7 4 . , x X fr' 4? o., 'P -l -l Et' 'I 'R A--U31-and I DEBATE A major division of the Fine Arts College is the Speech Department, under the supervision of Dr. George F. Sparks, Director of Forensics. Included in the Department curricula are classes in debate, oratory, discussion, extemporaneous and impromptu speaking. The program is available to all undergraduate students who wish to gain skill and poise in public speaking situations. Students are not required to have previous experience or training be- fore they enroll in the forensic activities. Competition for the fall season began in Los Angeles during November, when the Western Speech Association Tournament was held at Pepperdine Col- ll lege. Linda Sinclair won first place honors in interpre- tation and second place in oratory. The Arizona College Tournament at ASC, Flagstaff, brought more prizes to UA's Speech Department. Dan Tretiak netted a Hrst place in extemporaneous speaking and his teammate Richard Mangum won the original oratory contest. Reward for those who have proved their skill in the speech field is membership in Delta Sigma Rho, national speech honorary. Ju- A IIS PUUNDING the podium, debater Richard Mangurn drives home a point he DEBATE instructors Dr. George F. Sparks and Philip McFarland review is emphasizing for use in Southwestern Speech Tournament in March. list of spring speech tournaments in which the UA will be 68 l DEBATE TEAM. Row 1 Dr Geox Sparks, Director of Forensics t anne Engle, Patsy Burdett Linda X clair, Paulette Lindlolf ROW 2 l McFarland, debate coach Dan Tr John Vos, Mac Reynolds Jim I- ROW 3: Richard Mangum 1 Eisenwintcr and Gary Yontef ali' al it directing operating cameras, an advanced TV class stages TECHNICAL problems are discussed in the sound-proof control room by Ben d t a broadcast. mock show to demonstrate its ability in production techniques. Markland and Frank Barreca before Radio stu ents presen AUIO-TV up the cue from Dave Baldwin Anita Hand in the control room, TV students Linda Reasor, Jim r, Barbara Soell and Charles begin broadcasting a group Members of the University Radio-Television Bu- reau instruct radio and television classes, produce radio and television programs on commercial stations and furnish films for release on television. They also distribute films to schools, alumni groups, civic clubs and similar organizations. This year more than 140 students were enrolled in the Bureau classes, Films produced by these classes were released more than 300 times over TV stations across the nation. In addition the Bureau produced more than 1,000 "live" radio and television broad- casts. The Bureau also assisted in the production of Dave Garroway's "Wide, Wide World" television pro- gram presented by NBC-TV in November. A 15- minute segment of the live program originated on the University campus and featured five members of the faculty. 69 CHORAL GRGUPS John Bloom, director of all choral activities at UA, attended Cornell College and received his MA at the University of Iowa. While studying in New York, he was a member of NBC's male quartet, "The Men of Song" and sang in the Heidelberg Octette at the Chicago World's Fair. DIRECTOR John Bloom leads the Wednesday section of 200-voice Choral Society as they rehearse "Hallelujah Chorus', for Christmas program "Singing for fun" is the theme of the 200-voice Choral Society which can be joined and enjoyed by any student with or without previous training. The class meets in two sections on Tuesday and Wednes- day evenings in the Aggie Auditorium. Composed of carefully chosen vocalists, the Sym- phonic Choir is an integral part of music education at the University. The group makes annual record- ings for the nationally broadcast "Voices of Christ- mas," which features the nation's leading university choral groups. Each year the Choir tours Arizona, California and Sonora, Mexico, with its colorful and original repertoire of classic and contemporary music. Thousands of Arizonans and hundreds of thou- 70 sands of radio and TV listeners throughout the nation have thrilled to the mixed voices of the Choraliers, the University's singing ambassadors of good will. On concert tours throughout Arizona, and before many large convention meetings, these students - who are also members of the Symphonic Choir-have sung programs ranging from medieval madrigals to modern close harmony selections. Each year all of the singing groups join in a massed chorus of 380 voices to carry on the 30-year- old University tradition of presenting Handel's Mes-' siah" at Christmastime. Beneath all these activities lie the appreciation of music and time-honored thrill of performance. 115' A ' A V j af 5 st 55 V1.5 5' G Sig FEE- Qf W Vw W W V vi W V ' 3 W r rf f 35-Efgiigiiigiagiiag' i ,, X . Q V 7 ' . 'f . l . f :, ' ' ' I ' . K1 W rw LU 91' 'bn Vwmmpb! 'fl In M ' I H as 71 emo M I I i' 1 ' X1 ,. 5 U 7 I I il T 31 J l 1 ak, f ' , -f f ,re g, 'Wg V MARCHING BAND: ROW 1: Mike Simpler, Don Liston, Dick Swift, Bill Bolderjack, Nard Faig, Harry Lira, Ralph Kite, Hector Espinosa, Patsy Leonard, Mr. Jack Lee, director. ROW 2: Dick Fletcher, Sandy Stambach, Lyle Koch, Dan Flaminio, Sally Stover, Bert Enas, Jane Wine- berger. Betsy Spitler, Vonna Thompson, Charles Masters, Ben Sasnett. ROW 3: Dick Anderson, Jim Helder, Ken Reid, Delbert McDaniel, Fred Case, Ted Schmidt, Pat Braman, Fred Sink, Laurene Harding, Barbara Cleveland, Rosalie Robles, Judy Burgoon. ROW 4: Buddy Sessions, drum major, Ellen Maclay, Bill Chinworth, Janet Lyon, Jean Haughts, Terry Clark, Dewey George, Ray Johnson, Frank Fleming, Skip Trockenbrod, Colin-Pete McEachen, Anthony Eader, Frank Romero, George Pepworth. WILDCAT BAND The UA Wildcat Band's excellence is demon- strated both on the football field and in the concert hall. This year the group played at each of the six home football games in the University Stadium and made the trek to Tempe for the ASC-UA game in November, The traditional, "Bear Down, Arizona" introduced each half-time performance. Freshman Kenlynn Williams entereii UA on a baton-twirling scholarship and is the first woman twirler in the Band. Arizona's nationally famous band director, Jack Lee, was trained at Ohio State University and later became drill master and assistant conductor of the famous University of Michigan Band. The Symphonic Band performs both classical and semi-classical music at their frequent concerts. In April the group joined all other music organizations in presenting the annual Spring Concert in the Uni- versity Auditorium. i LUWERING his baton, Jack Lee gives the Marching Band and the crowd the go-ahead to begin thc school alma mater," All Hail Arizona F-' "'-TTY" "H" ' COMMERCIAL designers spend much extra time in lab to prepare layouts. 'iT'fT"f"' - - ev- .l.-:.,,jQ " 4- - 9,15 I - I , ' III . ,,f.fv.4 . ' 'r 5-4 zv.-'w-'I ,,:'t'- Q ' I I5'i5f'i1f1211I'l'IV ' IILQQQFI '."'.- LI' .ii X F fgglhlinrlk Jlv j ,. Mil! I I ,J 'I"" ' Ml all VISITURS to the modern Pine Arts Center stroll through the art gallery to view the works of renaissance and contemporary artists on display. -ff" 'fn' , E 'I - "I 2 -,V H , .1 gg-1. .. ,, ' , , , 4,.. .. V. mi' an A C I I , as . . I i ART A major division of the Fine Arts College is the Art Department which offers instruction to 200 art majors as well as many non-majors who register each semester. Two instructors have been added this year to keep pace with the increasing enrollment. Head of the Department is Andreas Andersen. The new Fine Arts Building was completed last year and contains tive galleries housing several art collections. Featured exhibit is the Samuel H. Kress Collection which contains European painting and sculpture representing the era between the 14th and 19th centuries. Alpha Rho Tau, local art honorary, sponsors several exhibits during the year. Private collections are borrowed for display as are faculty exhibits. Each year the Arizona Invitational Exhibit is held in the main gallery and Arizona artists display their cur- rent work. ,kk- arf EXHIBITS are often arranged through the University's Art Department. Students share in the planning and arrangement of their own art work. I F, REHEARSING for Music Department s Spring Concert held in May, University Symphony Orchestra plays under baton of Director Henry Johnson. With experience as a conductor, composer and violinist, Henry John- son came to Tucson in 1952 to con- duct the UA Symphony Orchestra. He did graduate work at Arizona in 1935, and earned his MA from Columbia University. He has served as a regular conductor of the Tuc- son Symphony Orchestra. 74 SYM PHONY ORCH ESTRA The University Symphony Orchestra specializes in the classics of American music and often takes part in debut performances of original compositions by students and townspeople. This year five concerts were presented in the University Auditorium. At Christmastime they joined the UA choral groups in the annual production of Handel's "Messiah" In previous years the Orchestra has presented such favorites as Bach's "Magniiicat," Verdi's "La Traviata," and Sigmund Romberg's "New Moonf' The group's membership numbers 57 and is di- rected by Professor Henry Johnson. Student oiiicers plan policies dealing with rehearsals, concert sched- ules and social activities. Members of the Orchestra select new otiicers during the spring semester. LUTE QUARTET Director of all woodwind groups at the University is Dr. Samuel S. Fain. He studied at Northwestern University and attended UA and USC for his graduate degrees, Dr. Fain has conducted band and or- chestra clinics and played in many chamber music ensembles. FLUTE GUARTET: John Bradbury, Sarah G. Hays, Kathleen Smiley and Donna Thatcher. SAXOPHCNE OUARTET and The Fine Arts College offers its student musicians the opportunity to join two quartets for wind instru- ments. Both groups, the flute and saxophone quartets are directed by Dr. Samuel S. Fain. Under Dr. Fain's leadership, the saxophone quar- tet rehearses in the new sound-proof practice rooms of the Music Building. They develop a diverse repertoire which includes selections from classical compositions and Dixieland jazz. The players join the group for the experience afforded by excellent direction and for the opportunity to perform before Tucson clubs. The ten year old woodwind quintet was replaced this year by a new group, the flute quartet. Members learn to recognize good tone quality and develop an "ear" for the blending required in playing ensemble arrangements. SAXOPHUNE IIUARTET: Phil Rehfeld, Carlos Mendoza Bob Crock Jim Helder ROW 1: Floyd Weil, assistant director, Samuel Foster, James Householder, Ronnie Welsh, Wayne Fisdale, Tony Freeman, Allyn Ronnie Howell, Betty Scott, Barbara Mason. ROW 2: Roy Campbell, Smittie Reeves, Dean Del Favero, Hattie-Nell Corana, Jim Phill Rehfeldt, Gladys Merrick, Dick Gabriel, Gaye Folkins, Mary Jones, Jean Smith, Mary Lou Bain. ROW 3: Ethel Shearer Potts, Marlan Sagar, Bill Droke, Jim Leary, Tom Pinnell, Bob Marshall, Mike Campos, Gilbert Sainz, Bob Potter, Mumford Mueller, Don Bennett, Wilson Gee, Ed Richardson, Kennlyn Williams, Drum Majorette. ROW 4: Paul Lamprecht, Terry Young, Ji Jim Nicholason, Bob Brown, Bill Pierce, Dave Utter, Marion Walton, Bill Briscoe, Dick Bartholomew, Paula Betts, Stan Rose, Bob Peggy Duff, Judy Wilhoite, Fred Merkle. 'C-5 "wif, ' 7? . 1 14" - gm-r-L-ee TWIRLER Kenlynn Williams and Drum Major "Buddy" Sessions enjoy THE CARD SECTJUN, f01'mif13 the block "A," is F0l0ffUl bilckgffflllld their break during an afternoon of rehearsals before a football game. for the Marching Band as it stands in formation during half time. 76 ERAMIC students glaze their clay pot- ery after it has been bisqued fired. l ETGHING classes are instructed in the fundamentals of the etching press. Mr. Jim Souden, a member of the faculty, answers q 77 desert esert esert sert sert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert esert l d d d d d fniieges FV? DEAN HAROLD E MYERS COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE Dean Harold E. Myers completed his second year at the University this spring. He received his B.S at Kansas State College his M.S. at the University of Illinois and was awarded his Ph.D. from the Uni versity of Missouri in 1937. From 1943-1945 he was an agricultural advisor for the U S State De art tions located throughout the state One ot the newer stations is the Cotton Research Center at Mesa It is locatcd on a 256 acre farm which was donated to the University by the Arizona Cotton Planting Seed Distributors. The Center is . . p - ment in Cairo, Egypt. During 1955 he worked with a Kansas State agricultural survey team in India. The College of Agriculture, organized under the Federal Land Grant College Program, coordinates research, resident teaching and the School of Home Economics. Incorporated under the research program of the College are the agricultural experimental sta- 80 staffed by members of the former U. S, Department of Agriculture Sacaton Field Station. Agricultural students may major in agricultural economics, agricultural education, chemistry and soils, agricultural engineering, agronomy, animal husbandry, botany and ecology, dairy husbandry, entomology, horticulture, plant pathology, poultry husbandry, or pre-forestry and pre-veterinary training. RICULTURAL EDUCATION AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS, AGRICULTURAL EMISTRY AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING FACULTIES: ROW 1: Russell . Cline, Mr. Conn, Eldon H. Wheeler, Leo J. Moran, Mr. Cotner. OW 2: Harold C, Schwalen, J. S. Hillman, John J. Burnham, raham P. Wright, David C. Aepli, John R. Williams, William T. elchert. ROW 3: Joseph H. McClelland, Henry Tucker, Robert , Doan, Harold A. Wylie, Moody D. Cannon, Ernest H. Huss- ann, Kenneth R. Frost. PARTMENT HEADS: ROW 1: W. S. Phillips, Botanyg B. Taylor, Animal ienceg W. H. Fuller, Agricultural Chemistry and Soils, H. C. Schwalen, gricultural Engineeringg D. F. McAlister, Agronomy and Range Manage- znt. ROW 2: R. B. Streets, Plant Pathology, H. R. Baker, Assistant Agri- ltural Extension Service, R. W. Cline, Agricultural Education, S. D. Resnick, vdrologist. ROW 3: M. W. Pasvogel, Poultry Science, A. R. Kemmerer, gricultural Biochemistry, E. H. Pressley, Plant Breedingg W. J. Pistor, 1 imal Pathologyg L. E. Burkhart, Horticulture. PLANT SCIENCE FACULTY: ROW 1: Robert F. Wagle, Steve Fazio Robert R. Humphrey, Leland Burkhart, Elias H. Pressley, Theo: phil F. Buehrer, Walter S. Phillips. ROW 2: Robert E. Briggs Bruce L. Branscomb, R. B. Streets, A. M. Boyle, Paul Keener, D F. McA1ister, Wallace H. Fuller. ROW 3: Keith C. Hamilton, Erwin M. Schmutz, Fred Tschirley, Arden D. Day, Robert M Harris, Robert H. Maier, T. C. Tucker. ROW 4: D. M. Anderson Robert W. Howhaw, Joseph S. Folkner, H. V. Smith, J. R. Kuy: kendall, Edwin B. Kurtz, Charles T. Mason, Raymond M. Turner COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE ITIOLIIILHI MEASURING grass density on a so Arizona desert grassland in the T 'ns are Ray Honnas and l Moses. Dr. R. R. Humphrey in of range management, demon operation of point quadrate K W - A f'-'A 4,201 - .55 I F - -'V I 1 I in vv ' ' G-:L ' ii- iii '14 I .aio I J I at tes I I L . I, ,, l A 'jfs . .- eeeee A is R , A X J I .- if ,J gf ' ,v eil I i 4 K, rf W I X ' -'V Yr, ' 'ix lc' I I Y A tv' V I I ' 4 is 13.72. A A Y I .. ,. f . fi l V, . .N . i 'ii ,fill ' . ' V I 1 I ' ' TQ' ' Af 1 I . " t... K . I jig ' Q A N Ts - I ,lp fl, ,, , ,li A -Y r I l - at I " "Y 1" ' A I I " I V' I 1 'll Z Z r , ' H 'r . " I . Q1 ' .1 - - I ' W 'e ' L HUFDHI K. AL-URFALI EDGAR ANGLIN HAIM ASSA ALVIN A. BABER BRIAN BEUN BILL C. BOND PATRICIA BRAOSHAIN Baghdad, Iraq Tucson Petah-Tikva, Israel Duncan, Arizona Preakness, N. J. Mesa, Arizona Redwood City, Agronomy Agronomy Agricultural Agronomy Plant Pathology Agric. Ed. Calif., International Club Alpha Zeta Economics Sophos, Chain Anthro. Club Scabbard 8: Blade Animal Science L.S.A. treasurer Gang, Bobcats, BBB, AZ Varsity Track Newman Club, QFA, Arnold ATQ, ATA Rodeo Club, Air Society Aggie Club HENRY M. COLEMAN TOMMY CROWE IAMES CURRIE WALLACE GREENE IAMES W. HILL FRED H. HOSKINS PAUL I. IOHNSON Glencoe, Illinois Somerton, Ariz. Tucson Phoenix Phoenix Tucson Tucson Animal Science Agr. Engr. Gen. Agriculture Agricultural Econ. Horticulture Animal Science Dairy Science Zeta Beta Tau Alpha Zeta Pershing Rifles Papago Lodge Sophos, QA9 Wm. H. Danforth Rodeo Club, AZ Traditions Arnold Air Society Scabbard 8: Blade pres., Dorm Heavy-weight Fellowship, IIKQ QPA ATA president Council treas. Wrestling Champ KAYS H. IUMA IOE L. KING NORMAN KLEPACKI IOHN R. KLIMA JOHN LAMB THEODORE LARA, lr. CARL LOCK Sadoon, Baghdad Winchester, Ken. Dragoon, Arizona Carnegie, Penn. Tucson Los Angeles, Calif. Calipatria, Calif. Animal Science Animal Husb. Agricultural Econ. Botany, AXA, Animal Science Animal Science Animal Science Intemational Club Var. Rifle Team Aggie House, BBB, AZ Band, HKQ Young Repub. Judging Team Rodeo Club pres. Letterman QA9 vice-pres. Alpha Zeta 82 I V M I H ,rm , fr. , ig 1. 'N ff' I W .H if I f il? Q' I . , A 1' I V , I X" .Q 'Am EMI Emq ..,,s4:,-A In, . in rgrafmg. I ,I Wi" H ,. gg A I I - . In 'GI' -I I SI -if I IBA -.' J H . ll,-' I 'T' ff if gl, . I I I I . ' II L- 2 f ' " E 2.. IIIIIEL'-'g' I . ' ' Itlbfif' il f ' I I. I I 1 ,L T I A t ,him I 2 Qggf. IEIISSIA ' I I ' ' I. , ., ' . If. . . ' Ap- l Iwi IIs Irv? ii ' Ji ' ' I I , K, , :'."' , , . X A A , I - v ' I Iss I if or . I. a NIIOKEY McOARTY LESLIE MASSMAN IERI MOLER I. R. MONTGOMERY IOHN MUSGRAVE KENT ORCHARD' ROY F. ROSS Cody, Wyoming Tucson Long Beach, Calif. Tucson Stilesville, Ind. Ten Sleep, Wyo. Avondale, Ariz. Animal Science Agronomy Range Manage. Range Manage. Agricultural Ed. Animal Science Ag. Engineering Rodeo Club, L.S.A. vice-pres., Aggie House, BBB, AZ 4-H Service Club Rodeo Club pres. Aggie House, Aggie Club, AZ A Club, ATA Traditions, AZ Rodeo Club, Rodeo Boss, QA9 Track Letter, AZ BBB, AZ DONALD RUSSELL W. .I. SCIIOBER PAT SIIELLY DONALD SHIELDS HERBERT SILVERMAN DAVID THORNBERRL STAN TIXIER Tucson Tucson Tempe, Arizona Coolidge, Arizona Woodland Hills, Blythe, Calif. Window Rock, Range Manage. Horticulture Agri. Economics Agronomy Calif. Entomology Ariz. GX Sophos, Animal Science AZ Range Manage. Chain Gang, Traditions, Rodeo Aggie House pres Bobcats, Club, Scabbard QKCD, BBB, AZ Traditions, 8: Blade Who's Who, AZ, EAE IOHANNA TROLLER TERENOE WHEELER Portal, Arizona Tucson Plant Pathology Range Manage. Wranglers, WAA, Sophos, Aggie AAII, BBB Club, Rodeo Club Gymnastics, QIHK LIVESTOCK .IUDGING TEAM: ROW 1: Wayne Wallace, John "Buck" Markley, Hank Coleman, Mike Thompson, Ted Lara. ROW 2: .Iohn Klingenberg, Herb Sil- verman, Robert Gates, Carl Lock. I I I Charles U. Pickrell, Director of the Agricultural Extension Services, ex- tends research findings to the farm and ranch families who can make practical use of that information. Mr. Pickrell received his B.S. from the University of Arizona. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION The job of Extension is to "extend" research lind- ings of the Experiment Station and the Department of Agriculture to the farm and ranch families in the state of Arizona. This information includes the 4-H program for youngsters, a home economics program for home- makers and an agricultural program delving into all phases of the state's agriculture. Agricultural and home agents are located in each county of the state and build their programs around local needs. Still members of the UA faculty, these agents dissiminate the latest agricultural research from the laboratories to the farms and ranches. LIVESTOCK judging teams are organized by county agricultural agents as part of the 4-H Club work sponsored by UA Extension. 551 5 Q EXTENSION State Staff members hold frequent demonstra - tions throughout state to train local agricultural leaders Extension staffs are located in every countyexcept Mohave. Here, Home Agent discusses best kitchen arrangement with a rural homemaker. ge-:Est 'Sf X x RIZE-WINNING 4-H Club members receive a trip to the CHECKING the results of cotton variety tests is the Pima County assistant JA campus to attend their yearly "4-H Club Roundup." agent. County Agents bring research findings from the UA to local farmers. 85 Director of the School of Home Economics, Dr. Ruth Hall, con- cludes her second year at the Uni- versity this Spring. Dr, Hall obtained her BS degree from Ohio State University, and her MS and Ph.D. from Purdue. Before her Arizona appointment Dr. Hall was a member of the fac- ulty at the University of Colorado. SCHOOL OF HOM The School of Home Economics, presently located in the College of Agriculture, became a separate school in 1934. This year's enrollment of 180 majors shows a 36 percent increase during the last two academic years. Foods, dietetics, child development, home man- agement, institutional management, clothing and tex- '25 ff' HOME MANAGEMENT House gives majors opportunity to put theory into practice. E ECONOMICS tiles and interior decoration are included as major subjects. New courses scheduled this year ,are regional food cookery, food preservation and an introductory study of clothing and textiles. Construction will begin this summer on a separate Home Economics building to be shared with the School of Nursing. It is to be located on the site of the Old Fine Arts Building. 86 HOME ECIJNUMICS FACULTY: ROW 1 Wilma Johnson, Frances Stromberg Catherine Adams, Ruth Allen, Wilma Brown, Elizabeth Birong. ROW 2 Alice Brooks, Ethel Thompson, Ruth Hall, Mildred Jensen, Mary Moreman Mary Adele Wood. SANDRA ADAMS Balboa, Calif. Home Economics Ski Club, Home Economics Club JULIA BONDS Red Bay, Alabama Food Sz Nutrition Home Ec. Club, AO, Baird 81 Ariz. Dietetic Scholarship MARIJANE CRAWFORD ELEANOR DIETERLE Los Angeles, Calif. Milwaukee, Wis. Home Economics Home Economics Club, W.A.A., NEA, Canterbury Club, Axn MIRIAM KUHLMAN Milwaukee, Wis. Home Ec. Ed. AO SANDRA MORRIS Geneva, Alabama Fashions, Textiles, Judiciary Council Al' social chrmn. SHARON RENEER Tucson Home Ec. Ed. AAE pres. 8: vice pres. Choraliers Textiles Home Ec. Club Wild- cat Staff, KKI' corres. sec. pledge trainer CAROL LOFTFIELD Tucson Home Ec. Ed. 4-H Natl. Award SERETA PATTON Waitsburg, Wash. Clothing, Textiles, AWS elec. comm. IHDB vice-pres. social chrmn. BARBARA WALL Mesa, Arizona Frosh council WAA sec., A club KAG house mgr. 8z corres. sec. JOY BRADSHAW Kellog, Idaho Interior Decor. Wranglers, Home Economics Club AO HELEN GOETZ Tucson Home Ec. Ed. AO, Home Economics Club BERET MASON Lakewood, Ohio Home Economics AEA MARY RANDALL Tucson Home Ec. Ed. Panhell. sec.-treas. v-pres., pres., Mortar Board, AF, Who's Who HOLLY WILLIS Milwaukee, Wis. Home Economics Home Economics Club, Varsity Hockey, X0 . '- 5 l X W 11 Ns , 9 V -at an . A-THA .1 Lryl A h , ' G ll 'Er' l l L 1 A KIM J L lf' Ce F!" N, E. .wif 4. .nj My . ' lg rj 1 A 'ir -aa " l aff l ,J , I , ,. if -1: '. .rt Q .5 ' +1 i- .l l .C -4 l ' ,f . ,Ji .y ,, A ,,' .u ya T - - if f H M . .sa T 1 , J vflijimf 'f O Q J N ll 3 Ai mv' f .V 1 '3 nldwwf URSERY school children are supervised by Home Economics majors Nancy Binns and Jan Jackson as part of their curriculum requirement. 87 4' lu , . 'QL I V . DEAN SHAW LIVERMORE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIO Dr. Shaw Livermore will conclude his first year as dean of the College of Business and Public Admin- istration on July 1. Dean Livermore succeeded Dean Elmer J. Brown, a member of the University's faculty from 1916-1957. Dr. Brown became the first BPA dean when the school became a separate college in 1944. After Dean Livermore received his bachelors de- gree from Dartmouth, he attended Harvard University for his masters and Columbia University for his doctorate degree. Dr. Livermore has taught at the University of Buffalo and at Cornell University in New York. In a civilian capacity, Dean Livermore worked on the War Production Board in Washington, World War IIg Marshall Plan, 19495 and as a member of the White House Staff on Foreign Economic Policy, 1955. Before his appointment to the University he was em- ployed by the Rockefeller Institute in New York. College activities this year included the usual schedule of workshops, seminars, and advisory job clinics. These activities are held in conjunction with such organizations as Tucson Chamber of Com- merce, Tucson Merchants Association, and Tucson and Phoenix Traffic Clubs. A conference on specialized research and ad- visory occupations in business agencies was held'in February. The agenda featured a series of talks by representatives of various business occupations and faculty members. Services of the College of Business and Public Administration include the Bureau of Business Re- search. Enrollment in the college this year was approxi- mately 17 percent of the University's regular students. This percentage compares closely to the national average of 13 percent in business colleges. 88 WILLIAM ALEXANDER Tucson Personnel Bobcats, Tradi- tions, Who's Who, D.M.S., AEI! pres., arm THOMAS BERRY Tucson General Business ELAINE BOETTCHER Tucson Accounting Chimes. Mortar Board, Desert, AE, BFE, AAA, Who's Who JAMES P. BRAGERS Tucson Personnel Newman Club HAROLD BUIDER Rock Island, Ill. Marketing Marketing Club A211 BENIAMIN L. ARNTZ Tucson Marketing GK, AZII PETER ARRIGONI ROBERT BALDRIDGE San Francisco, Tucson Calif. Personnel General Business Junior Class Honors Baseball, Football, Letterman AKWI' ROBERT ILBESHEARS VAUGHN BINZER Phoenix Business Ec. Soph. I un. Honors BFE, fblifil, fI1Afb BILL BOHLEN Warren, Ariz. Insurance Intramural sports W. F. BRINKMAN, Ir. West Palm Beach, Florida Accounting Univets, AK-If CHARLES OAGLE Tucson General Business Judicial comm., IFC vice-pres., ITKA Palm Springs, Calif. Marketing Chain Gang, Bobcats, Tra- ditions, A Club, IFC, ZBT pres. Who's Who PETER II. BOOZ Bourbon, Indiana General Business IFPC Wm. BROTHERTON Phoenix Correct. Admn. EAE G. M. OHESNIOK Milwaukee, Wis. General Business Marketing Club, Ski Club, Insurance Club, Univets, TKE GORDON R. BANGERT THOMAS O. BDTT Tucson General Business DEPARTMENT HEADS: Laurence Gray, Ec- onomicsg Ralph Ireland, Sociologyg Russell Howard, Business Administra- tiong Herbert Langen, Secretarial Studies, Lauren Casaday, Director of the Bureau of Business Research. Hawthorne Nev M arketm g Marketing Club U nivets ., F. , 't 5 ' - , x ' HT' . MJ '. ,NSI if W L.. 5 ' ' it" I J. 'f I er Y V X E A. . . ix fel -. . ' l I fl 'rt' I ' .' ' I I .' , I' I t " U ' l A 1 I I ' 'f-351' ' I I . A .. s., .. 'f-41" . f . A F, 1 ""'- , ,. ,,."i-. -r if If I In I " i E ' ul -5 I it fr ' , 'Q' 11. ,I I V , we' iw " I if I T I , A, , I ' .1 I Mt' 4, , . ' T: ' ., xT7,F.43i I. ,J ' y N 1, ' - .ta .39 I V -it A lA " 1.'Ll'1 Et' 3 :J si gd Ns . l I . , ai! I 1 rt L I1 ' . l v 'V if' - 5 'Y'. 1 I I f" ' K? I I -. . . r I in 1' tt.. y at BPA COUNCIL: ROW 1: Barbara Ehmert, Bob Dawson, Bucky Maud, Martxe Taylor. ROW 2: Don Brenteson, Gregg Seguin, R. C. Parnell. I I ' ' F 452 .1 ,AT-'vt Z 3' avant, , 7 f--Q 9 1- were Q J 9 ' .mfg I M 2 ,ff 'A" " .:L': W I ,, e Si I. iff- , r . e I , I gui' i l W a N - Q I' ' V ' if it K " . 4 . l . ' X'-sf .-.- g 1 A Q. M- . ., , A I - I " 'I. I " I .. - ,Q Q P' lf- 'I Cds. lag- N, D , N 1 ' f ' ' ' 1 -' Z, 1 Q .4 : 'V if Kai' W' I I A ES' I -I - Vg if - I Y S Ji' ' 'Tal 1 -I v 1 Eli' A 'I Z iz, f V ' il I? " ""' I, Qt- I in--QUQAF' 'I Njlf f il, LV... . ALFRED DAILY GENE DE CET WILLIAM DOWDY CARY LEE DRAYER RICHARD EARLE DWIGHT ELLER LEE ESCH Tucson Albia, Iowa Hayden, Ariz. Tucson Chicago, Ill. Tucson Tucson General Business Marketing General Business Advertising Production Mgt. Finance Accounting Marketing Club, Whois Who, Social AA2 v-pres. 8a Marketing Club ATU ATG, Alix? Newman Club Life Comm. sec., 9X Univets chmn,, Student Life Comm. HARRY FANNINC WILLIAM FAY MARY CENSZLER SUZANNE CLOVER HOWARD GOLDWYN JOSEPH GOLDY WILLIAM GRACE Riverhead, N.Y. Tucson Tucson Tucson Tucson La Jolla, Calif. Burlington Jet, General Business Production 8: Social Work Marketing Retail Adv. Advertising Missouri Univets, Polo Personnel Mgt. Lutheran Student Wranglers, Bobcats, A Club, AAE corr. sec. General Business Village council, Assoc. Worship Phrateres Varsity Swim- A1011 Young Rep., KA Comm. chmn., AE ming, Traditions Sec. ZBT DON GRADY JOHN GYORI IDE HANNON BUD HANSON HELEN HARRIS RDBLEY HEDRICK DAVE HENRICH Tucson Tucson La Jolla, Calif. Tucson El Paso, Texas Truth or Conse- Alton, Iowa General Business Marketing General Business Personnel Social Work quences, N.M. Advertising Junior Honors, KZ Orchesis, Panhel. General Business Newman Club, GAO rep., Desert Queen Arnold Air Society Janet Childs Attend., IMDB, AE AXA, AEII Memorial Adv. Scholarship, AA2, QFA JIM CIJFFEY JOHN CORMICK M. CUNNINGHAM NANCY LEE HAYDEN CHARLES W. HILL HARVARD H. HILL JAMES J. HILL Phoenix Tucson Tucson Palos Heights, Ill. Globe, Ariz. Phoenix Richmond Hill, Personnel Business Ec. Personnel Mngt. Marketing Personnel Finance New York Newman Club, Music, Delta College Board, Marketing Club, Cochise Hall sec. Sophos, Chain General Business AX Sigma Pi AXQ veep, WAA, FTA, treas., AK? vice Gang, Blue Key, Newman Club, AE, AAA president Traditions, AKII, 42K AK1I', 'PFA 90 FACULTY: ROW l: Dan Raaf, G. L. Gifford, F. A. Conrad, Robert Waugh, Florence Toland, Bernadyne, Aston, Clyde Vedder, Joseph Ham- J ack Foltz, Rex Call. ROW 2: Harold Hoflich, Thomas McCleneghan, John Leonard, Rohert Marshall, Donald Klaiss, Raymond Mulli- William Raby, F. O. Bogard. George F. Herrick. ROW 3: L. R. Gray, Tom Shupp, R. M. Howard, A. B. Schmidt, Theo Haimann, Ralph R. Andrew W. Wilson, John H. Denton, E. J. Brown, L. W. Casaday. ROW 4: Carlos Chavez, Paul McEwen, Robert Walker, Melvin Hecht, ncent Boland, P. G. I-Iudson, Elmer Thierman, R. C. Parnell, Joseph Gill, Paul Bunker, Jefferson Hooper, Hollis Martin, Nestor R. Roos, rbert Langen. HAROLD D. KAPLAN JAMES D. HILLS JACKSUN HOAGLAND E Tucson Russell, Kansas Pasadena, Calif. Accounting. Blue Accounting Advertising ' Diamonds pres., A211 Scabbard8tBlade, 5, 'N , M , . treas., soc. chrmn. BPA Stud. Coun. ,UF ' f .fi L I I Q, A-5,5 Hillel, IFC A1011 A1o1f,llxA, AAE 'l 3 " 21, A- , j I I '5. ' il NANCY B. HIJLISH LYNN HORNBRUUK GORDON HUMMEL Tucson Phoenix Tucson Retail Merchan- General Business Finance dising, Chimes, Jr. Class' treas., Kitty Kat, AE, 1"-PB MAX B. HUSS Afton, Iowa Advertising Music, Dramatics, Southwestern Speech Tourna- ment, AAE GENE KARP Tucson Accounting Sophos, Chain Gang, Blue Key, Traditions, Who's Who, AEII, EAE IACQUELINE IUBES LosAngeles,Calif. Production Mgt. Orchesis, WAA, SUAB, Adm. Com., AE, Adv treas. JOHN KEEFE Mendota, Ill. Marketing BPA Council, IFC Marketing Club Scholarship chm., pres. TAKID, AKWI' IAMES F. KNUWLES Phoenix Accounting KE RUB J. KRAUSE Bisbee, Ariz. Insurance Newman Club, Insurance Club, Intramurals DURIAN H. JONES Scottsdale, Ariz. Accounting Spurs, SUAB Bulletins 8: Rec. Com. Chm. Baird Scholar, KKI' KENDALL M. KEENE Tucson Foreign Trade International Students Club, Newman Club, Band, AKNII MARTHA KRMPOTICH Ajo, Ariz. Marketing Marketing Club, Newman Club, Pima Hall 91 1 I '-t 'al' 1 W 3 . A . . U .nl ,X fa.-:mf i L' . l Lv' X., , ,ff "1 XX , 6 Fl , . - l Q .. ,, 1 Iv Ii tb' i. I . ' A 4 ...L 8,1 ' :J Y I V -Y W li V L. U ll ,.-- , If F , . :N , S.. . 5 l W wr-' ' "" ik l .. it + -ff' l N .R . 'P It ' A l ,W :lift 1-. ,V V 'SQ1' ta 'Sz Q, QM: V Ai?Q air 4 I I I i , . , I if.: ' ' 1 'X I ' I: Ii T- xi It Q ' ill aa .. i f- . - L" ' :fi V fiat" I G, 4- ' 'L fs ' -' 1.1 I -I - 'IVE . -' ' . .f , ' J I gd HP, 9.3 . 5 5 , -'Ai' -f.. ,VJ A I li z., " 1 . it '- TJ H wifi-eq lf Q..-.av I S' j , . S .L r I Qi 1 f ' Q , '- far I . .1-L1 - 1-I I , 1 B255 'tw . N" I ii, 4, 4' -fi. I 1 - I , I I- gg e , . ' . 1+ -' -. I e .Y xbk mi, I . Vw,-1 ' I-f.--.. ..,.3 . ,tl ,. . - .-ai,,z:.9,, ' I 'TT rf! I A LJ: n A I i A! " im' :' ir' it I , .,,l l6Tf. , zz.-' ' ' f L, C I I ii T 5 1 I I MP7 , Ii: ,V P 1 w wr . ,NZM 1 l4.v. ,L I X I JOHN M. LAYNE Newport Beach, Calif. Finance, IFC KE pres., treas. EUGENE W. LASSERS Chicago, Ill. Advertising Scabbard 8: Blade, Desert Staff, ZBT Sec., AA2 C. B. LEESER, JR. Scotia, N.Y. General Business Arnold AirSoc., Scabbard 8: Blade, IFC, AEII, AXA CARL GENE LINDSEY Bloomfield, N. J. Personnel Parker Club, Univets, Young Democrats BRUCE MGCLANAHAN Tucson Accounting Univets, BPA Stu- dent Body treas., AEH,BF2 BART MARSHALL Tucson General Business ZAE DANIEL MEMBRILA Tucson Personnel Scabbard 8: Blade, DMS, ASUA Assemblies, Alix? PAUL MUSCENT Phoenix General Business EX 92 JACK H. MORGAN Tucson Foreign Service Young Republicans, AEII JOHN C. LAWRENCE Mobile, Ala. Marketing Marketing Club, AZKYI' Publicity Chrmn. STAN LERCH Phoenix Accounting Judicial Com., IFC, Greek Week, fbA9 pres., A211 ROBERT LUKACS Tucson KENNETH O. KROESE Casa Grande, Ariz. Accounting BFE, AKXP treas. ROBERT LEENEY Tucson Mechanical Engr., Newman Club ORME LEWIS, JR. Phoenix Economics Young Re- publicans, Artist Series, AKXP, EN DENNIS LYON Phoenix Business General Business Economics Crusade for Hillel, AEII Europe, EX ROBERT W. MCCUROY FREIJ MCLEMORE Rockford, Ill. Tucson Advertising Economics AA2, ZX OLIVER MAUO Casa Grande, Ariz. General Business Sophos, Ch. Gang, Blue Key, Arnold Air Society, fbI'A JOHN J. MONAHAN Warren, Ariz. Accounting Newman Club, Univets BETTY NEWMEYER Tucson Secretarial Studies Panhellenic, AE TIBQ sec. SU Activities Committee, AX ERIC O. MAYER Tucson Accounting Arnold Air Society, Scabbard gl Blade, Pershing Rifles, AKW1' CHARLES A. MOORE Tucson General Business Baseball, EAE pres. JOSEPH G. O'CONNOR Tucson Personnel A211 I ISS ends withlze ringingicitithe 9:30 bell and BPA students take a welcome break outside the Building before hurrying to another class OLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION ,nv Ml 1, 'E OE ORDZCO ucson I ' Q b 53 , , ' 1. 5 5: I rfyx v I ' I X i I . ' A tx . 'I 1 ml:t,A.- Jig! .I Fu, I I 's I I oreignTrade PUGH A Senior Day ROTHENGATTER Ariz. Yuma rep. RI F I - .N . ,.. rr ,A V: ba X. I X '15 I . I ' - -1 I , . I L fa -af my f ' I i ,, -Tj p.9,51-L-'ifif' ll.-f I ' I " . L. 2-fr "-, -fans: , V-,. . ,qu ' , ,My "j t "f, " I Nl!! A .. V g , ,A ,I 4' r It ' ff' ' f. ' ' Q- 3 , tv' X . 5 '-BE? -Sit I I ' if I I1.:g'f,, g Ai C I . 1. -I ' .,. 'S ' 'L I lg -IA I " p ,,,. A I "I ' , I II n I ,, . DAVID PAKULA JOHN PECKAM BOB PERKINS IACK PETERSON ROBERT PIERCE BOB PRESKAR Tucson Madison, Wis. Tucson Fresno, Calif. Auburn, Maine Los Angeles, Calif Accounting General Business Marketing Personnel Accounting Advertising Townsmen, Hillel Blue Key, Sophos, EN Chain Gang, SUAB Chrmn., AX BILL RAMSAY ED RICHARDSON DOUGLAS ROBERTS BOB ROBINSON ALFRED ROGERS PETER ROSS Tucson Tempe, Ariz. Glendale, Calif. Phoenix New York, N. Y. Sacramento, Calif. General Business Personnel Personnel Insurance Production Mgt. General Business Bobcats, Chain Newman Club, AX Sophos, Insurance TAQ Scabbard 8: Blade Gang, Who's Who, KKXI' Sz Club, Artist Series EX IFC Pres., Gen. Music Schlsp. Comm., QK ATU pres 8: v-pres. KKK? president MARY LOIS RUSSELL RAY SABRANSKY MARY RUTH SANDEL GREGORY SARACERO CAROL SAULSBERRY JOSEPH SCHIFANO McAlester, Okla. Tucson Houston, Texas Endicott, N. Y. Alamogordo, Tucson, Social Work Accounting Retail Advertising Area Development New Mexico Personnel BFE, fbKfb Campus Marketing Club, Marketing Club, General Business A211 Social Chrm. Democrats, College Fashion Newman Club, WAA, vice-pres., Contest Efficiency TA411 Board, AE, HB6 Intramurals sec.treas.AXQ,AE Chairman 93 CROSSING their Iingers,.Ann Hult and Anne Snoddy check DEMONSTRATING the processes of a newly-acquired business machine Dr the 'D" List posted in the BPA College mid-semester. Raaf finds BPA majors a responsive audience in an after-class discussion COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIO A I I I 5 " ,S-L1 9 +L... Af ,, r-""ve'7qt A . is . Nt I II I -' - 'i' 1140 f, I 1 I ' I' IL 'A f K gt A 1 I ' A ! X pr A I, V .jf g XLT I l I. '.'- H 'Ex z J .LL A Q A I I .II-r .. 'rn -1. ' !1 U.- 4 ' , : f l 1 T-en ' , 11 I -N A I I' I 5 II I I I A. I A I Lf' I I If I I I II- H . nf- p A I . - "w?fv Q, . A ' , I . ' I . . . -A , I T 43 3-Q . I .Q 4 1 If rl '.L x ' L ' t -' Ie 0 'I' ii .I J .em .lfllilll r ' 1 P V V A K XL l I' V Q ' . Q. M r if ,L A is p if it W lk- 56 .' I ' . l f A . wg- ' . I. if ' ' . -+I' In . 7'-"I I I l . A . 'K r lb i .Yr 9 ::4..:E,L I 'K A A. I , Y. I - my I ."V , ,I ' XXX ' Q I I RICHARD SGHRNDER GERTRUDE SGHULZE GREGORY SEOUIN GEO. SETTLEMEYER WILLIAM SHERMAN IAGK SHRDLL ROBERT K. SIMONSON Escanaba, Bisbee, Ariz. Tucson Tucson Safford, Ariz. Tucson Idaho Falls, Michigan Secretarial Studies Life Insurance Accounting Marketing General Business Idaho History Insurance Club Scabbard8aBlade, Bookstore Comm. RealEstate Univets, V.F,W. C. W. SORENSEN, Ir. MARLENE STAEHLIN Tucson Albuquerque, Advertising New Mexico Univets, Correctional A.D.S., AX Adm., WAA, Ski Club, Pistol Club GDRDDN A. TENGH PAUL LESLIE TILDEN Tucson Tucson Insurance Personnel Insurance Club vice-pres. pres. BPA Council A Club, EQIDE AKXP, Acacia ROBERT STRIGKLIIND DOUGLAS SUTTON BERNARD SWANIGK Tucson Tucson Tucson General Business Insurance Accounting ABQ Insurance Club, AZH HELEN E. TOLLESDN R. P. TRDNOLONE KAREN UTKE Phoenix Tucson Douglas, Ariz. Secretarial Studies Production Gen. Bus., Spurs Mermaids, SUAB Management Chimes, Mortar sec., bowling, Board, Desert co- diving, KKI' editor, AE. KKT' 94 CPK rush chairman IAGK TANEY Las Vegas, Nevada Accounting 'PK General Business A211 DANIEL L. TAFPERO Tucson General Business Univets, A211 THDS. R. SMALLGDMB GEORGE THEIN, III Eagle Rock, Calif. Accounting KZ Chicago, Illinois General Business IFC, 2-PE pres., BFE M. WILLIAM WALKER PATRICK WHOOLEY " 'ef Horn Lake, Miss. Phoenix , H General Business General Business a A -, Marketing Club, Scabbard 8a Blade lf., , ." ll AZH, BOII Newman Club, f fe ' -r 'Z'-TT? L . --ee, it T EX L I HERMAN WILLE KATHY WILLIAMS , ' Tucson Kansas City, Mo. V Q V V' General Business Retail Merch. g ' 7 n X V ., Newman Club, Spurs, WAA, I '1' : ff . A 1 'T' ' '1 AKNII Greek Week, A " " , A, H ' PDB pres., AE A '.iQ A I I . , , . ' 'Pi-5' i--. , . . , N , MX ' IOE H. WOLF, IR. GAIL WOOD 'H' l Buckeye, Arizona Ft. Huachuca, , - Marketing Arizona Marketing Club, Accounting . T lj Newman Club, Mermaids, 11129 L X ' A2-1: l "aft ' i I X SCOTT VALENTINE RALPH W. WALCOTT L Tucson Phoenix Government Industrial Service Administration AKWI' IOHN WILBUR Salem, Oregon General Business Sophos, Chain Gang, Blue Key, Who's Who, Tradi tions, 'DAG pres. WALTER WOIDYLA Haverhill, Mass. Finance Marketing Club Polo Village Council PETER A. YONSETTO Allentown, Pa. Marketing Marketing Club vice-pres., Univets ESQ, TKE planning features of arial economic study for the Bureau of Business and Public Research, are Tom McCIeneg,ha.n Gregg Saraceno 95 x S DEAN OLIVER K. GARRETSON COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Dr. Oliver K. Garretson, Dean of the College of Education since 1950, is completing his 28th year at the University. After receiving his bachelor or arts degree from the University of Oklahoma, Dean Garretson at- tended the University of Texas in 1926, where he earned his masters degree. He received his doctorate in graduate study at Columbia. Dr. Garretson has been honored by a position in "Who's Who in the West" and "Who's Who in America." He is an honorary member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and has served on the President's White House Conference on Education. Established in 1922, the College of Education offers courses of study which lead to five different academic degrees. The percentage. of majors in this college place it among the top three colleges on campus. Bachelor of arts, bachelor of science in education, master of education, master of arts in education, and the doctorate in education are offered by the college. Recent additions in the catalogue are special educa- tion, student personnel, and kindergarten teaching. Night extension courses are conducted through- out the state by faculty members of the College who make weekly trips to their classes by plane or car. As a state-wide service, the College offers a guidance and educational testing laboratory. The recent addition of a curriculum library gives majors a sampling of the varied texts used in the public schools from first through twelfth grade level. The student-teaching program was enlarged this year to accommodate almost 200 education seniors. Students work under the supervision of certified in- structors in the Tucson Public School system for a sixteen-week period. During the current school year, classes were tem- porarily held in the Old Fine Arts building to allow remodeling of the Education building. Work on the interior of the building will be completed this sum- mer and students in the College will return to the greatly modernized facilities in the fall. 96 T A ' -A Z' , 'C' ' '- I-f - 'I .W , 1, . ff. ,iii Av Qs F v U U iI.:" '.i" i- ,, A' A '1 . f l flfil if .1 ' I ' fzf"f'?AQi:-'ff fA Y . - F R ' Y - 1 lv VL ' E L: . " - 2 ' jj. "' " R r 'V " . f j A . V IQ. ,nh 1 U' U. '-f" U fi. V I . il ,L gl X Ei it ff, Y. U l -Ev." ' ll.: , -.-. f " 5 ' I ,mf :A , il . ....,. f xi 3 1 , xx.-if s, -, K. V3 I FPA Q L xi- 5 4'?a. Li. L 1 v,f,,gf fz.. Z f. ..V, f X, - ' ,I 5, , ISU.: , 'E dif' ' , Y N., iff! 1. N-.Eff as ,ffm f . N H 'fel ' M CHARLOTTE EDITH ANNE ADAMS RDBBY ADDISON ELLEN AGNEW NITA ALSPAGH BARBARA ANDERSON NANCY RAE ATKINSON AOKERMAN Escondido, Calif. Tucson Tucson Detroit, Mich. Minneapolis, Chandler, Ariz. Bisbee, Ariz. Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Business Educ. Music Educ. Minnesota Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Panhellenic AXQ Soph Honors, Symphony Elementary Educ. Desert, AI' counselor, NEA, Wranglers, Orchestra Mermaids, HA9, Panhellenic, NEA, WAA, AAA Phrateres, AAA v-pres. XL WAA, X9 pres. AE, IIKZH pledge trainer MARILOU BAIN KAREN BAKEN VIRGINIA BARLOW SUE BARNARD JO ANN BEEOROFT BONNIE J. BERGER NDRMA BERRELLEZ Tucson Northwood, Iowa El Cerrito, Calif. Hereford, Texas Yuma, Ariz. Elmhurst, Ill. Tucson Elementary Educ. Music Education Elementary Educ. Education Elementary Educ. Physical Educ. Elementary Educ. Campbell Club, TB27, AAA WAA, WAA Golf IIBCP Mermaids, Ski A Club, IIA9, Universitarios, Band, THE Champion, X9 Club, FTA, WAA, P. E. Majors Club Band, Wranglers, AAA rec. sec., Pres., V-pres, Capin Schlr., EQE Queen treas. TB2, IIA9 SANDRA BERRY KENNETH BLAKER SALLY BODINE JERI BORING MARIE BRAUN ED BROWN JANET BROWN Lawrenceville, Ill. St. Louis, Mo. Mill Valley, Calif. Glendale, Calif. Bensenville, Ill. Colorado Springs, Santa Ana, Calif. Social Studies Social Studies Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Colorado Spanish, Pan- KE Desert, WAA, KA6 Physical Educ. American Club, KA9 Blue Key v-pres., lntemational Club IFC, Judiciary Comm., KAWI' AEA pres. EDUCATION FACULTY: ROW 1: John A. Haberland, Genevieve Syverson, Elinor Saltus, Elizabeth Frazier, Victor Kelley. ROW 2: Wilson Wetzler William King, David Smith, Paul Danielson, James Rhodes. ROW 3: Winifred' Rucker, Milo Blecha, Robert Gorman, Jacob Hunt, Robert Let son. ROW 4: Emil Gavlak, Curtis Merritt, Emil Larson, Robert Crowell. 97 COMMUNITY studies are made by agricultural education students OISPLAYING devices designed to measure reading readiness IS Judy Pr Floyd Byrum, John Musgrave, Harold Stucki, Royal Rigby, Tom education senior, who is enrolled in the new Kindergarten Primary pr Dees and Bill Bomb. Dr. Cline supervises organizational activity. COLLEGE OF EDUCATION , , i R. O. BROWN, IR. CAROLE CARBONE A ,. A 1 g - A San Manuel, Ariz. Denver, Colorado Mig. , ' A 5 5 Music Education Education ii: 'l F3 AT. N 1- ' Band, Orchestra, F.T.A.,AAII N lr ,, ,N ' 1 ' J' KKNI1pres.,fI1MA, A 3 4 X L f , .L ' IIKCD pres., sec., A L ' H .,., E T ft e . "f . 1,1 J with-H .:' U .: 'vv' V A si. '--- , X J .er .,.. :Q - L W- .P 'E Q CHARLENE CARMODY ,IOSEPHINE Tucson CARPENTER Business Educ. Tucson N.E.A., HAS, AE Elementary Educ. treas., IIQII pres. StudentN. E. A., HAS - , BETH CLARK BEVERLY M. CLARK Williams, Ariz. Tucson . Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. A Spurs, Elections Spurs, Chimes, ' " Comm., SU NEA, Desert, 5 , Recreation Kitty Kat, SRC, " L. Comm., IWIQB Axsz ' .. f IO ANNE COCO VELMA COLCLASURE A i"' X .N I, 'T Tucson Tucson ' L ' , ' ' ' Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. ' Phrateres, P. E. International P I , .33 Major's Club, Students Club, 3 -A ,K il Newman Club N. E. A. ' 'E . -l'v 5' .b 'ff' I A ft ' "fi A X, ' V HATTIE NELL CORONA BARBARA CORR , . -'.., Yuma, Arizona Tucson -'51, ' l' ,, l ' N- Physical Educ. Elementary Educ. L , ,..! 'f. f- A Q Wranglers, Freshman treas., . JR ' 45 Newman Club, QueengCheerl'der 5 A , if g M fel' ' A PE Major's Club, Homecoming tif fe'e g Band, TB2 finalist, I'fi2B ' V XY, , 'il vice-pres. -f ' i 5 T' . . 98 WENDY CARLSON Phoenix Elementary Educ. EAI, AAA MARY LEE CARTER Tucson Elementary Educ. Student N.E.A. treas. CLAUDIA CLAWSON Tucson Elementary Educ. LAE MARY COONS Denver, Colorado Elementary Educ. F. T. A., AWS Office Staff, IIBII1 BARBARA COVARRUBIAS Los Angeles, Cal. Physical Educ. A Club, Internat'l Students, PE Majors Club, A Blanket award ' -,V. , A l 1 I, ':V il! i' ' ' 'A e - I 42.24 - ' -l aff? ' ' . l , J f A. " ' ' A, ,Q I . is l is Ref -rw, s I J A -h in ' . ' ' A - . .,.- ' A ' I . f . I ' , 2 - .ji if-.-,ry I .mf r . :Y xi w1.'L. I-.1 .V AV ' -LII' W FQ' I' J 4- ir V V Y X I: , . 1-" iq H391 3' .CTS .- Q. 'Ml' 1 A' L A I r Q' .ef I - if l i .A U Y '- -- Q ' I ' - HV l 'A N 9 I . will -iE1:1:::A -,.A,. Q tr, V 4'V' 1 -I 'H' I ' l A lA VP l l A ' ' ' M V , " . l 5 . - A - .N r, 1 . ll, W -- A-F ,Ny Li,-If Y- hr Q. viii Ix x . ,Ts 4, 'N ME V- .v,. V M, ill X E Y S - A I 5 1" T- Q'- F J 2 xl if. f l ' l F' I ,, - -Q ' I Pi- A A E ' , I ff' "f 'A start J 1 on KATHLEEN CRDCKET SUZI DALY JDYCE DENNIS ANN DERWIN Safford, Ariz. Tucson Highland Park, Tucson Elementary Music Elementary Educ. Michigan Elementary Educ. Education Sr. Class Sec., Education WranglefS, AA2 AWS, YWCA NEA PhratereS, NEA. Comm. Chrmn., Kitty Kat, FFOST1 pOm-p0n Girl, Assembly Comm. KA9 Choir PAT DDSSETT DIANE M. DOWNING JUNE IJMEGA DRAKE ALLAN EISENWINTER Magee, Miss. Denver, Colorado Clendenin, W. Va. Tucson Elementary Educ. Education Elementary Educ. Speech, Inter AAA AAII Ohingohow Collegiate Discus- Players, SCA, sion 8a Debate, WAA, KXK Dramatics, AX KENNETH D. FDUSEL SYLVIA FRAMPTUN PEG FYLER SARA GAMES Tucson Tucson Warner, N. H. 29 Palms, Calif. History Elementary Educ. Spanish Educ. Primary Educ., Spurs, Chimes, SRC Rep., Ad. Club, FTA, Dean's List, Sr. Exec. Frosh Council, Desert, HAS 114,13 Council Rep. WAA Board, corres. sec. Desert, X9 IANICE GATLIN STELLA GLENN RICHARD GRIESSER CASSIE GRIFFIN Yuma, Ariz. Tucson Phoenix Macon, Missouri Elementary Educ. Business Educ. Physical Educ. Elementary Educ. NEA, AAII AE, AEA Varsity Baseball, "A" Club, KIHAQ CARRIE E. HAMMIL LYNNE HANHILA PATSY LUE HARDT CARUL HAURY Tucson Phoenix Bisbee, Ariz. Tucson History Business Educ. Business Educ. Elementary Educ. IIA6 Spurs, U.A. Gen. Wranglers, Wild- Wranglers, Schlr., Mermaids, cat 8: Desert Staffs Drama, Newman SUAB Comm., Ariz. Alumni Club, Phrateres, AWS, IIQII, AAII Schlr., AE, AAE IIA9 HERB DIMLER Sells, Ariz. Elementary Educ. Baptist Student Union V-pres., Band, A69 IIKA v-pres. JAMES EPPLER Tucson Physical Educ. A Club, Basketball Newman Club, AX ELDA GRACE GARCIA Tucson Secondary Educ. Los Universitarios Pan American 8a Newman Clubs, WAA NANCY HADDAD Tempe, Ariz. Elementary Educ. Homecoming Queen, SU Recreation Comm. X9 . MARY JEAN HAYDDN Tucson Elementary Educ. Newman Club, FTA, Phrateres DEBBIE DUERSCHLAG Pasadena, Calif. Education AAA MARY FAGERBERG Phoenix, Elementary Educ. Education Club, WAA, AAH MARTI NA GARCIA Douglas, Ariz. Spanish Educ. Mortar Board, Spurs v-pres., AWS v-pres., Who's Who, Chimes DANNY HAM Somerton, Ariz. Social Studies SHIRLEY HEDGES Phoenix, Calif. Elementary Edu C. ASUA Bookstore 84 Public Relations Comm., AI' CAROL IEAN DDRSEY Flagstaff, Ariz. Elementary Educ. Wranglers, Newman Club, Los Universitarios Club MARY LDU FDRBES Covina, Calif. Elementary Educ. AAD' SUE GASTDN San Mateo, Calif. Elementary Educ. Kitty Kat 8: SUAB Staifs, NEA, WAA College Bd., Poster Comm., AXS2 PRISCILLA HAMILTON Benson, Ariz. Primary Educ. Racquet Club, NEA, WAA SANDRA HEMDVICH San Francisco, California Education, SUAB AWS Rules Comm. Newman Club, Pres. Mohave Hall STUDENT teaching provides Education seniors an opportunity to apply CONSTRUCTION classes display shoebox puppets theory to actual practice. Lucia Long answers questions in her 3rd grade classroom at Blenman School during 16-week training period. wg . 4 ' - f. J . '.-. . A , Q A . - x -vt 1 I ., '- ' . , 'Y'-H? 3 ig, W.. ...... L' W ! "4E A..--5 'if A .r w I J , 'x : ' I , : I ..f' , -.- ' . ' . - . V l . . ul? X 3 ::::.f tai-I--..!j . X S". . l I ' l ' xt! .X ,Q ' Wff' y l 2 T li.mfQ 'L'lA -. ' j K n ,-, L A in 'A ,l if 1 K- pgsmt i ' .4 , ' V, i i l p :iff kg T' e --5' 3' I l", - , 1 ' , 5 . . tmirrf li I tv A . A ., , . I . ' 1 I if A IF ll. ,Kg -, M XX". 4, H or -'f- - -' A x MARTY HERMAN Casa Grande,Ariz. Elementary Educ., NEA, Newman Club, Los Universitarios corres. sec., pres. EARLINE HORRELL Globe, Ariz. Elementary Educ. NEA, IVPB, Mer- maids, Future Air Force Wives, AFROTC Queen Finalist BONNIE JOHNSON Phoenix Primary Education WAA, AI' GERI KERTH Dayton, Ohio Elementary Educ. CAROL KUEHEMAN New Castle, Ind. Physical Educ. PE Majors Club, WAA Board, WAA v-pres. 8: sec., IIA9, AAA 100 AL HESSELBERG Tucson Zoology, Anthro- pology Club, Ramblers, IIKA If ANN HOLMES San Mateo, Calif. Primary Educ. WAA Board, Greek Week Finalist, KE Star- dust Queen, AAA PAULA .IONTIG HULSE MARY LEE HUTCHISON Elementary Educ. Tucson N EA LOUISE JANET IONES Phoenix Elementary Educ. Wildcat 8: Kitty Kat Staffs, Pom- pon Girl, KKI' rush chrmn. MARION P. KLEIN Great Neck, N. Y. Elementary Educ. Sports, Cerebral Palsey Work, WAA STANA KULINOVICH Phoenix Education IIB41 Tucson Elementary Educ. Spurs, Chimes, Mortar Board, Desert co-Editor, SRC pres., KA9 Who's Who, IIAG EOWYNA FAYE KERR Knoxville, Tenn. Elementary Educ. International Stu- dents 8c Baptist Students Clubs, ITA9 MARINA KRAUSE Phoenix Elementary Educ. NEA, French Club, IEA, Archery WINIFRED O. KURZ Tucson Elementary Educ. in Bookstore window .X , A A ' A 17' A . A . I x -g A -'-I . ,ii A-. A-I , I .- ., . I in 1' h ,. , is ' 'rg-" QI' A 1, .F ,A-.A, 'I 1 .-is ' In A I- -ff My .fy ...If ' I I r ' xl H-I N . 't vu' 1 4 .gh tv. I f f ' i in . Q ' If V x If ' ' 'I if .5 ffl ., f l, ,I , f ll ...A g I 3, I , I .' A- . . I L .- A- I . , If I ez A A J ' - if-A "f f --TS " -.lf ' ' " ' X" 'J 4 .4 ' V , " K J ,", 5 ' fl il gfainlg E, Az?.."....i. Az I .' -.I ' I .. E. . "" I f I IIAJ7 'J ' X . -"2 HA. T .5 f-A , A f G . I- f ,--, f law 'Jit II' T " tw - ei I I we-ef A. ff-f A A AA .: -. A I , I A 4, 'er A , A .A 1 J !fel.A,hv l H A, ,Ll ' ' A I t v f' -Q., v I, 11 A ' l'4-r J .. nb N 1 'g'-,lr-All Y. ,en ' T J. J' l NL ' it , ,, A, .A a : . . ,,,.., 54,5 A ig gf ' 1' gt' I Il it I ' ' I A AA EEAQ-1' -r li. . I- A lf? " A - 'I if" A l . iv hz -an I A -I1 L3 ' K, I I , -.,..ilxx31-jg: , Q U lid-:V I 1 H -Agp I: 1 ,.lE:5?f" eq I . f fl.-ff' - - I . I --V. E I I1 X, ,Q X,,,,.f I I I I , i , - A. Q II I A- A I A", I f I 1:1-eff - I' ' " 's.- IC il "4 . I A 7 I' 5 r A A I we I -tg A I 'Q eff .I mf A I V ' I A M' 'AAA . ...Y .IFAI V , J l,,1A.eL. , I . ' ff Mtlfiggb I I A?.3"'I In ff:i..- K 'fjflgf 1 . I , A fr' ' It....4ff"""-I M ,-,A 'A T" " Wie tw! AA.. 4. A U-.IS A 19.1, I If ' CAROL LANDSBERG BARBARA LANNING MARILYN L. LARSON KAY LEONARD PATRICIA LOCKE LUCIA LONG DIXIE McDONIEL Jamaica, N. Y. Tucson Globe, Ariz. Albuquerque, Phoenix Monroe, Mich. Bisbee, Ariz. Business Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Elementary Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Business Educ. Education Phratares, AWS N.E.A., transfer Education Rodeo Club,'Ski Spurs pres., Spurs, Chimes, Mermaids, Pi representative, from Eastern KKI' Club, Desert and Chimes, Mortar Mortar Board Omega Pi, AAA Wranglers Ariz. Jr. College Wildcat Staffs, Board vice-pres., pres., Jr. 8: Sr. KKI' AWS social chrm. councilwoman, AI' sec. BOB MUNABB DORIS MARCY NANCY I. MAGEE ALICE JANE MAHONE PAT MANKER TERRY MARGOLF MARILYN MATTS Delta, Iowa Mesa,,Ariz. Tucson Tucson Tucson Vista, Calif. Yuma, Ariz. Physical Educ. Art Education Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Scabbard 81 Blade, Wranglers, Spurs, SUAB KKI' Wranglers, WAA, Pom-pon girl, Student N.E.A., Arnold Air Soc., Art House Comm., AE, Archery Club KKI' Canterbury Club, Ski Club, IIAG, FYIIB QM A.E.A. IIBQ treas. GPMA, ICICTI' AUDREY MAYMAN CAROL MAZZARELLA MARCIA MERDIAN ELLEN MONSEES HUMBERTO MONTAND RICHARD T. MONTAND C. MONTGOMERY Tucson Lander, Wyo. Henry, Illinois La Jolla, Calif.' Douglas, Ariz. Mammoth, Ariz. Paul Spur, Ariz. Education, Hillel Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Education, Business Educ. Spanish Elementary Educ. Foundation, Student N.E.A., Newman Club, Newman Club, Newman Club, Univets Rodeo Club, NEA Student IIA9 Desert staff, NEA, AEA, Dean's List AKYP' AEA, Young N.E.A., Sigma WAA, IIBQ IIAG, KKI' Democrats, UA AlphaEta sec. 4-H Service Club CAROLYN MODRES MARGIE MORTDN EDMUNDO MOTA SANDRA MULLER MERRY MULVIHILL JOAN MURETIC IDANN MURRAY Phoenix Douglas, Wyo. Ajo, Ariz. Cleveland, Ohio Tucson Cottonwood, Ariz. El Paso, Texas Elementary Educ. Education Physical Educ. Primary Educ. Elementary Educ. Business Educ. Primary8zElem. SRC, ASUA ASUA sec., AWS Newman Club, U. of A. Sportscar Phratares, WAA, Spurs, Chimes, Educ., F.T.A., N.E.A., AI' Publicity comm., AWS, Wranglers IENNIE B. NAISH Salt Lake City, Utah Education Drama sec., WAA, Rifle Club, KKI' FRANCIE NORTON Roswell, N. M. Primary Educ. Orchesis, Cheerleader, AI' Los Universitarios Intramural Mgr. EDWIN F. NYMEYER Globe, Ariz. Physical Educ. A Club, Varsity Basketball, Golf, CPFA Club, Gila Hall pres. and treas. ALICE S. PAUL Tucson Elementary Educ. AAUW Scholarship 101 N.E.A., Mermaids PATRICIA PEARSON Tucson Business Educ. ITSTII, AE Sec. Mortar Board, NEA, AE, HHH ASUA Sec., AWS VIRGINIA PEIL Racine, Wisc. Elementary Educ. Spurs, Chimes, Soph. Class treas., Student Senate, KKI' pres. ROMA PFEIFFER Billings, Montana Elementary Educ. Newman Club, Wranglers, N.E.A. COLLEGE OF EDUCATION . ' 'QL 1 I we A I 1 I A E ' r. , 4 I ' V JI i' W . A A ,. L , , E mg. ,, A A .. Y ' P if. . " I " V '!!"1 'Z' - i "" f , Z . I , ' X . of I I I Es, A .1 . f:,.,. - 'i I .- --.. -. ' fl ' x' f -ii .,.-,,W I ,Q mm I " ' - 5' i " A. . . .VP ' mg? I' I . . 33921- f -. I I it if A -I 3 W I .P ..1 I' I 'P' 1? V A I X I O,OO J E I Ir' -1: "Hina -Y ELVIRA PIERSON Nogales, Ariz. Elementary Educ. Newman Club, NEA, EAII JAMIE R. PORTER Tucson Elementary Educ. Election Comm., Panhellenic counselor, FQB sec. IUDITH C. PRIGKETT Tucson Primary Educ. Pom pon girl, AI' SANDRA RETTKE Blue Island, Ill. Political Science French Club, Young Republicans, NIB president NOEL RUHBERG Santa Barbara, California Elementary Educ. Mermaids pres., WAA, Rodeo Club, Desert Section ed., KA9, IIA9 RAE SCHAFER Phoenix Elementary Educ. SUAB Arts 84 Music, Public Relations comm., Cheerleader AI' VONDA SOHUSTER Tucson Education Orchesis, FTA, WAA, XO, Cheerleader, SUAB Public Relations Comm. 102 BARBARA IO POLITO Phoenix Elementary Educ. Newman Club, FTA, Axn, Student NEA pres. Artist Series Chm. LEO POULIN Tucson Physical Educ. ANN-MARIE RASCOP Tucson Biology Wranglers, NEA, Phrateres, BBB, TIA9 CAROLYN ROBINSON Tucson Elementary Educ. Intervarsity Christian Fellowship MARILYN T. RYLAND Phoenix Elementary Educ. Baird Scholar, IIA6, 'IPKfIP, X9 vice-pres. .IEAN SOHELL Tucson Elementary Educ. Tennis honorary, KKI' MARY SEAL Tucson Elementary Educ. Wildcat staff, AE, 1'IBfID MIKE POLLOGK Los Angeles, Physical Educ. Sophos, baseball, Distinguished Military Student, ZAE- MARTHA PRESTON Oak Park, Ill. Primary Educ. WAA WILLIAM RAUH Tucson Physical Educ. Varsity baseball m gr., Intramural mgr., AX SUE ROTH Phoenix Elementary Educ. Wildcat 8: Desert staffs, SUAB Public Relations comm. sec., IVIJB .IUIJITH SASNETT Tucson Span. Educ. International Students Club, Dramatics, IIA6 SUZANNE SCHNEOK Tucson Elementary Educ Wranglers, Kitty Kat, Wildcat staif SYLVIA SELLS Las Vegas, Nev. Elementary Educ Wranglers, Dorm vice-president, HAS, AE had Q .N H - Al I , I 1- t r 1 A T 1 F?-is ' A Y gl .gf W ' N A . V I I - f I 1- s Ma W l Mu Ix. :I .Xmuf s I nz I N I 4, ---- - F - X, f I A . . ' I I I Q I g A I I if I Il I rf- A av-I I I f W I 'f-re fe- -'ii ff . . V . , I 'X 'L-2:-ti t klfqdkm :Q ff V. -:M Il' I . ' - ' g V, I I I V, .EN . ' -LHQ A J V 1 . V -I uv -v:l -1:31. Y L Iv: I f , -M" X A. :Qs A -. I . 4 5 fx N 'H V li' 'F am: Aa Pm, n g! Q 1 Q' I , I ll H 1-A . , ' I' Z' I GA I w X I -" V A, v : ,fl I B . . . In ' A 1. , p 1 I 'I I' I l by I 1 H I "ITA -I I I V A ,I I' .. fit 31 f . f fd' 9 ll I i I I wh I- I , A I I wg, J J , A 1 . bl, 11 ' II ' . . .. Pr---.....-fl ' ' It I Q. K A' -2 .., , Q J '. . I . , . ' ' I fl. , - ' -iw Je ., I 1 , I W: 1 A I . . in 4 -4 .My V Q A Y . Jul V Y V ' -7 rr ' I Q2 ki 1 - I I if . i It ., lg- A I W. , i .. ' 1, A I I J W ,-,I . I, . we tv. . A I I I tzatna, f MARDI SERCOMB IACOUELINE SHADLEY IUDITH SMITH JUDY SNIPES JEAN SPERLING SUZANNE SPIRER MARLENE SYLVAIN Tucson Tucson Tucson Tucson Canania, Sonora, Chicago, Ill. Las Vegas, Nev. Political Science Elementary Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Mexico Zoology Elementary Educ. Spurs, Chimes, Education Band, Presbyter- Phratares, NEA, Elementary Educ. FTA, NEA, BBB Wranglers, FTA, Soph Scholarship WAA, Student ian Student Wranglers, SRC, Mermaids, Ski Newman Club, Award, Baird NEA, IRI-B Fellowship Young Club, Desert 81 AE Scholarship, X9 T132 Republicans Wildcat staffs, HAS, AAA, n BETTY TAIIUAM SYLVIA SUE TAYLOR BARBARA M. TELLEZ JOAN TEMPLETON MARILYN TENCH VICTORIA I. TERRY LINDA THOMPSON Bowie, Ariz. Tucson Tucson Altadena, Calif. Tucson Huntington Beach, Phoenix Psychology Biology Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Education, Spurs, California History Pima Hall, NEA, Spurs, BBB, Los Universitarios Student NEA, Elections comm., Elementary Educ. Spurs, WAA Theta Mu IIA6, KKI' WAA, Newman AEA, HBQ Greek Week FTA, WAA, KA9 vice-president Club, NEA, Pan- co-chairman, Desert staff, American Club ITA9, IIBQ pres. Rodeo Club, Kitty Kat staff, YWCA, ROY TOLBY SALLY TUSSEY CHARLOTTE VANCE SANTOS C. VEGA ALMA T. VELASCO NANCY VOORHEES RUTH ALLENE WAITE Tolleson, Ariz. Phoenix Tucson Miami, Ariz. Cananea, Sonora, Los Altos, Calif. Glendale, Ariz. Elementary Educ. Primary Educ. Elementary Educ. Social Studies Mexico Education Education Student N.E.A., Dorm treasurer Religion in Life Newman Club, Newman Club, FTA, NEA, Arr HA9 track, Intramural Week Chm., SUAB Los Universitarios Los Universitarios, manager II A0, KA6 Univets International Cottey College Student Club transfer ELAINE WALWORTH KAY FRANCIS WARNER STELLA M. WASSER Tucson Kansas City, Kan. Bisbee, Ariz. Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. Elementary Educ. DONNA WALLIS Artesia, Calif. Physical Educ. Chimes, WAA Kitty Kat staff, NEA, WAA, Newman Club, pres., treas., PE SUAB Public Rel. AWS, Young AWS represent. AXQ pres., sec. Republicans Wranglers, AI' Majors Club pres., X9 SUAB com., AXQ LUCILLE B. WILLIAMS SALLY J. WILSON WALTER L. WILSON .IIM WING Ft. Collins, Colo. Chandler, Ariz. Redlands, Calif. Tucson History Physical Educ. Physical Educ. Physical Educ. QIPAZ, ITA9 PE Majors Club, A Club, Varsity Varsity basketball Intl. Students swimming, SUAB intramurals, Club, Young recreation com., AX, QPAK Republicans, A41 GFA, A419 WALTER A. WDOWIAK BARBARA WHITEHEAD Ludlow, Mass. Tucson History Elementary Newman Club, Education A E41 MERLE WOLINSKY PATRICIA E. WRENN Phoenix Coolidge, Ariz. Education Elementary Educ. Wranglers, FTA, Panhellenic, Hillel, Wildcat Desert Queen staff, AECD pres. finalist, Senior Class treas., KKJ' MAXINE WICK Globe, Ariz. Elementary Educ. FTA, College Board rep. KA6 social chrmn. LILY YEE Phoenix Education Wranglers, NEA, SUAB committees Dorm president A ,J DEAN JOHN C. PARK COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING One of the older colleges on campus, the College of Engineering includes three main departments: civil, electrical and mechanical. Established in 1890 as the College of Mines and Engineering, the College was organized as a separate unit in 1940. New supplements are constantly added to the original departments to keep up with the rapid ad- vances in the engineering field. The new Nuclear Engineering department and a recently installed nuc- lear reactor deal with atomic research. Several com- puters, one for student use, and a new applied research laboratory, benefit undergraduates as well as more advanced scholars. Plant capacity has been increased by tive new buildings and a new department of agricultural engineering has added to the scope of the College. Dean John C. Park has headed the College of Engineering since his appointment in 1950, An Ari- zona graduate in civil engineering, he earned his Masters degree in CE at Iowa State College. He is listed in "Who's Who in Engineering and Educationf, "Outstanding Men in the Southwestj, "American Men of Science" and "Who's Who in America." Dean Park is chairman of the Arizona State Board of Tech- nical Registration, a member of the National Regis- tration Committee of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and has served as chairman of the Land Surveying Committee of the National Council of State Boards of Engineering Examiners. Enrollment in the College has broken all records. There are 1521 undergraduate students, 126 graduate students on campus, 128 graduate students off cam- pus, and 78 faculty members. A total of 1776 are now studying in the College. In their search for material, industrial companies offer many scholarships to university engineering graduates. General Electric offers a fellowship to UA, for a Ph.D. in Computer Scienceg Hughes has scholarships for UA graduates as does Motorola and Goodyear. 104 ,l.... - PARTMENT HEADS: M. L. Thornburg, Mechanical Engineeringg D. J. ENGINEERING COUNCIL: ROW 1: R. J. Mercier, Duane Lmgafelter Cpres all Civil Engineering: Thomas L. Martin, Electrical Engineering. identj, H. E. Krumlauf, Jr., A. V. Humphries ROW 2 B111 Boden ' ' B b :A II I 'It V I. . I ' x . Q V . S -. is-Q iff." . ,. - I .Vi " ' J W ,fx E Jil g. ' fn if 1' .f.-.'....f-44n'.,1E.2zi.f6 " Q.-A...-1-I . - ,L puny I lx i ai f . . ..k. ix P I . X I ,- l T . , . l I A - 'T W Q! Aw.- .,, i 0' - . 1" ij, , . I, I . lr I f l I 7 f I fp I . 'li .i J I fb Il ll 1'wfi.1f . A ! A 'r i f' E5-4 gl 7 -. .-U .- P ii", ' ' 'N' P41 X - ' NIL'-I hi Apr , .rl J l 1 1 A I x im, jf flu 'ar f 'il " 1 i' 'liia waffifs i I I, i I in P, V i I .LJJI it 1 A 'I , I ! . r' 1 il LW' V , . .Flux ji.. -L u hamer, Leo Bodenhamer, Ralph Miller, Jim Simms ROW 3 o Morin, Terrill Ewbank, Richard Williams, Nick Johanessma JERRY ALLEN Tucson Electrical Eng. ROBERT L. BAKER Casa Grande, Arizona Civil Engineering A.S.C.E., Band, KKWI' ROBERT BARKSDALE Kingman, Ariz. Civil Engineering A.S.C.E. DDB BARTLETT Phoenix Mechanical Eng. A.S.M.E. W. D. BENSEMA Tucson Electrical Eng. Wesley Foundation I.R.E. 105 WILLIAM ARNITZ Napa, Calif. Mechanical Eng. A.S.M.E. BOONE BARKER Tucson Electrical Eng. Newman Club FRED II. BARNUM Tucson Civil Engineering L. B. BATTIN, IR. Phoenix Mechanical Eng. A.S.M.E. RICHARD BERG Mesa, Ariz. Mechanical Eng. TBIT, AIPQ, BAE DONALD E. BAIN Tucson Mechanical Eng. A.S.M.E. GEORGE H. BARKER Douglas, Ariz. A.S.M.E. RICHARD I. BARRETT Phoenix Mechanical Eng. A.S.M.E., QT, TBH, 'iPK1iP,ITME IDHN BELSDN Tucson, Ariz. Mechanical Eng. A.S.M.E., A.S.T.E., GT PETER N. BOGUE Tucson Electrical Eng. I.R.E.g Freshman, Junior, General Honors: TBH x. I 35, WORKING in the Asphalt Laboratory, as part of a course re- MEASURING the output impedance of a cathode follower amplifier ar quirement, are Civil Engineers Nick Johannesma, Charles Engineers I im Allinder, Alan Bean and Richard Hannah in the Martin, Albert Condes, Derek White and Glen Ludwig. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING JAMES R. BOWEN fi BILLIE BOONE A 1' X Phoenix Tucson , wx: . ' Mechanical Eng. Electrical Eng. I I Q A.S.M.E. A.I.E.E., I.R.E. Ii It. ,I ' I: .. 1 J r I, A,,k. . , CLENCE BURNS MICHAEL B. CLARK ' 7" , 4 U Phoenix Tucson 1 ' V, V' ' Electrical Eng. Mechanical Eng, i 3 , 1' - ,V I p TBH A.S.M.E., RIL 1311 if , -gif H Week,ASUA k i ,V fl "ll - Nl 'F in -I .v Publicity Comm., X VJ N ' . EN social chm. It ' I 4 g 1' u ' "' Y 4 'EY fi Ii' " " ' , I 'ffflgifii 3- .'fQ3,I??1'f.iiQI I I A 'La Re p 15, ' F r ' N 'WE MAURICE COLLINS ALBERT CONDES . Ai X ' Gallup, N. M. Nogales, Ariz. F ' . ' il X Electrical Eng. Civil Engineering N Q F., V .." f ,L I 'A ,V Newman Club, Scabbard 8fBlade, V M 49 ' I " ' , f Q, ' " ff' fig EN, TBII, IIME Papago Lodge 'EN W .M .1 'W ' pres., GT . f-if I f I . . 1 -if if 4 ' IV- 'I . I Y "5 1, a . - , ' Q' x A , 'I .. - ROBERT R. CONRND IOE E. COX Logansport, Ind. Phoenix Mechanical Eng. Mechanical Eng. A.S.M.E., GT A.S.M.E. . 1. WILLIAM DAWDY CLARENCE E. DEAN . ' ' ,.- Q 4. 'ew ' - Tucson Meadville, Pa. Mechanical Eng. E . - i Univets, Newman Club, A.S.M.E., A.S.T.E. H - ' In -"Aw, XW4' 2' ' . .. I e 'I 4, . r- . ., ill ,'I.' -.3155 'i ' JfiF., 106 Mechanical Eng. DAVID BRAUNS Brainerd, Minn. Civil Eng. A.S.C.E. JOHN S. COLLINS Tucson Civil Engineering A.S.C.E., Baird Scholarship, TBH GARY L. COOPER Phoenix Civil Engineering A.S.C.E. ROBERT B. CRIGER Tucson Mechanical A.S.M.E. BILL DON Tucson Mechanical Eng. A.S.M.E. ' Q xg. I k - Egg-. - , -,if , M A IV, ' 'fs ' nffk fi r if-'ii , .4 -' 7 xg A . 1' . 'lain' ,i -'J ." ik N aw ' it l K' ' :B - V f it l. 7""' f V' -E '. 5 , L 'SA ' Q' T ' "N i fi ' 1 , ' - V A ' ' I ' 9- Ifzi E , V vw.-f , ' fy l , 1 ,. "' 1 ' ' 1 'A ' V' :-'- ' 'pg M ' , ,iii YE vii- .,,A .lip . ,. L, Qt L . i .10 ffl . ,-qL.4l.lr2f' at ., A- 1 r -I . " ,I K , ,I i 5 1 Em 1' - W 'lv , f ii, yt, 4, A J f A . -' if-1' . 1 f . H ' 2 .. " A a. ' "3 'nf l ' V -. a x ? " 'iii 1. .'-,-r 4' .41 . . - ' - vw. fr-- . . f ' .F V X , Q, . X .11 mf. 1? f Q J .. SFRA .. .l . " i ' .D 31:5 A I1 1 H! ' l fvvf . Q . 1 , A ' Q ,fi f W F -, 7. 1 y 4 , W il, A . I l qi 'I i A 4 A 'ii ' J- 1 U an .' ., 4 . . I , ,J . , , . l -5 ,Ay 1+ - A ,L-' , rz, ' , ,t -1 za, , ,:, - if a, . nl,-r ' . ., . f 1 , . , ,3-:lf , . -' i. 175' 1- N ' ' "Z ' ii- 1 Li. ' A ,. ls- ' .. ' sirrz- EUCENE DORVAL ROBERT ENCELBARDT TERRIL EWBANK LOWELL FATHERA ERIC FESTIN JAMES FIELDEN FRANK FINDLAY Racine, Wis. Tucson Phoenix Tucson Chicago, Ill. Belleville, Mich. Flagstaif, Ariz. Mechanical Eng. Electrical Engr. Civil Engr. Mechanical Engr. Electrical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Civil Engr. Intramurals, AIEE-IRE ASCE Pres., Arnold Air Ramblers, U. A. ASCE ASME, AX Membership Engrs. Council, Society, ASME Sports Car Club, Chairman GT, Class Honors, AIEE-IRE TBTI, IIME ROBERT FISCHER EDWARD FLYNN JACK CAINES BYRON CARRETSON JOHN GEFFS JOHN OWEN GIMBEL HENRY CICLAS Tucson New Rochelle, Tucson Phoenix Tucson Tucson Flagstaff, Ariz. Electrical Engr. New York Electrical Engr. Electrical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Electrical Engr. Mechanical Engr West Coast Mfg. Mechanical Engr. AIEE-IRE, AIEE-IRE Jr. Class Honors, AIEE-IRE Canterbury Club, Assoc. Schlr., Newman Club, TBII, IIME ASME, V-pres. Band, ASME IIME pres., TBII TBYI, EIIE DELBERT CDDDARD EUGENE GOEBEL EDWARD CDETZ LEONARD COODCAME WARREN GRIECS STANLEY CRIMES CHARLES HAMMER Tempe, Ariz. Tucson Chicago, 111. Avondale, Ariz. Tucson Tucson Phoenix Electrical Engr. Mechanical Engr. ASME Mechanical Engr. Electrical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Civil Engr. AIEE-IRE, AXA ASME ASME Baird Schlr., TIME Wrestling Team, Univets, ASCE TBII, AIEE-IRE, Basketball Mgr., v-pres., ST Acacia Pres, ASME, QT L-L"'L.. .... -1 . 1 , :s..L- --.z..4.l.i-.,z,,, X . . NCINEERINC FACULTY: ROW 1: James L. Knickerbocker, E. A. Elevatorski, D. E. Milks, D. B. Hawes, P. B. Newlin, A.W. Ross, L. H. Lowe C E ones, A. W. Wymore, R. L. Walker, A, N. Perkins, A. W. Gill, M. B. Lagaard. ROW 2: Edward N. Roberts, Frank A. Linville, Robert M arnett, R. C. Neff, M. L. Anderson, H. P. Schmidt, A. G. Foster, D. C. Allais, Robert A. Manhart, A. E. Seames, Jack W. Blanchard Coraf rwin. ROW 3: L. K. Oesterling, William H. Lersch, J . Genin, James C. Clark, John S. Phelps, Harvey T. Munn, William Record, Paul E ussell, Howard L. Enloe, Phil H. Rogers, Frank J. Janza. , I It 41 It ,. ' 'Q -twig.-j'L .. . X I Al -Ire X .- it "', .Ll 1 fl 1 R 0 .. .. I' .1 5 '- I 1 .1 . 1. I N - 11 . '11 1 O4 I N P" Lim it lffqffiig' ' -1? Ii 11 1 1-ff 1 if M A L, p 1 C11 ' all V' I .P ,iv i .,. , 1- 1 ?-, Q f- 1 o - , 1 , I 'VTU 1 . il.. 1 y 1 , , - W I 1 ..,- 1,1 , I W ' .11 X I 1 1 .1 N If V E I' R' 1 ' L:-ff.. - N li 1 1 119 .,,. .1 ,,,. .,l N1iI!Q7.., Plz.. f . I 1 Q 0, ' .- . 1' ., 1 ' -' 1 ' - 1. J 1 1131 1 , - 1 -f I I" 1. -,r , A! g that I ' - ' 1 X T N - - 411 . 1. 1 K' . . . H1 x N, T - .li . 5 , . -11 , , --X - 1 1 1 ' T 1, J' '-I 1 Kyrie V l VI ii Y a ll .L Igx . .t LL! 7 . I ,. , W : A' 1 1 Lg I . 1 A 11i1'1 1- 1 151 'F - I' ' 1P' 1' fl' El . . , I 11 1. 1' 1 1 -ea' I "egg 1 I 1 ., , V F' fl ' I -I 'T ' Y HARRY HEGHT Tucson Mechanical Engr. Civil Engr.AXA Newman Club, Scabbard 81 Blade, Sports Car Club, ASCE, Hon. 7 J or ' 'I 3 N as I F1 1 , ' ' 1 7' I X -init' 1 11 11: 1- C Q If 1 In 121 'ffi?41 '1 .Q 1 11 1 9119-.?11iQi"31YT 1 11 ,J 1 . 1: V11 1 1? . 1- ' i.,.-il g- I ARNOLD HARRING DAVID L. HARVEY JAMES R. HARVEY ALLAN G. HAURY Prescott Phoenix Prescott Tucson Civil Engr. Mechanical Engr. Mechanical Engr. ASCE ASME ASME ASME FRANK HERGET, JR. JOHN M. HIGGINS RAY DEAN HILL MIKE HINGHEE Tucson Tucson Hayden, Ariz. Tucson Mechanical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Newman Club, ASME, AX ASTE, Univets, ASME, AX JAN HUNSAKER ROBERT HYMER Mesa, Ariz Tucson Mechanical Engr. Electrical Engr. Pres. Cup 8: Schlr. AIEE-IRE, TBH AGC Schlr., ASME, TBII, ITME BRYAN KENT PETER KERWIN, Jr. Somerton, Ariz. Fairlawn, N. J. Civil Engr. Civil Engr. ASCE, QT, TBII BAE WILLIAM LYNCH JOHN McANINCH Dallas, Texas Tucson Electrical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Who's Who, Blue Key, Sophos, Scabbard BL Blade, EX, TBH, IIME Mechanical Engr. TOM ILES Coolidge, Ariz. Mechanical Engr. ASME, em JOHN LARIMORE Globe, Ariz. Mechanical Engr. Engineers' Council, ASME DALE H. ROUNTREE Flagstaff, Ariz. Mechanical Engr. ASME, TBII Mention Schlr. JACK HOOK Glendale, Ariz. Mechanical Engr. Civil Engr. ASME Sophos, Chain Gang, Traditions GEORGE INSALAGO N. JOHANNESMA Tucson Oak Lawn, Ill. Electrical Engr. Civil Engr. AIEE-IRE, sec., Engineering TIME, Tucson Gas, Council, ASCE, Light 8: Power Schlr., TBII JAMES LECAIN Tucson Electrical Engr. Acacia 108 GT DUANE LINGAFELTER Tucson Electrical Engr. Engineer's Council Pres. 8: v-pres., Rep. Council, GT, TBII 1 U. 1 , 1 ,H JOHN HEDLUND Grantsburg, Wisconsin Agricultural Engineering I .HJ AI' -'ew' 1 1 , II' A I 11 f 1 1 1 1111 1611 1 1 .11 1 1 I .11 If--f!'.I15.1. ' 1 'iq 11, I H4 5 I4 lp . 1 1, J 1-.-I ,nur I 1111. ' r 1 1 !n Aww ROBERT B. HELD El Dorado: Gan. Mechanical Engr. WILLIAM B. HOUSTON R. HUDDLESTON Tucson Electrical Engr. Class Honors REINHARDT JOHNSON Tucson Mechanical Engr. ASME, QT GLEN LUDWIG Exira, Iowa Civil Engr. Flagstaff, Ariz. Electrical Engr. AIEE-IRE, U.of A. Young Repub- licans president ROBERT JONES Tucson Mechanical Engr. ASME, Rifle Team, II Kd: GERALD A. LUNT Miami, Ariz. Civil Engr. Sophos Glee Club, ASCE, U. A. Schlr., Class Honors, Track T! V X i A 'I I Fw It v il , I I .fe-J .. . ., I ' .+fE ,,""1 . X I .5 r , I I -1, I mu 1 5 ,,n .- , I I .f 'i I l vi , A 5 r -I ef' N V . I. . . . aw i k I: xg .. .. .. ,ian , qv . J . . L l , , I xl 'A I I I K I 7 tl - -1-A " nga.,- I I 1 I I is L I J? . ,- ,Hui s -U N , I V -. x - - Y , A A VM: mf lui 'Q 1 Q1 .-.. -I Ll, . I - I. fl :X lil ' . V "- I ' l n ,, , 11 . E '--f 1' -I 5- T1-r . , Y- LA- - ... ... f- . ', . "F 3 'I V' if H . ' 'll l Ali' VI. I :I " ' ll' I ' Ili I I Y' iv I I ' I - I. ,. " fl' I I Q- 4-A .- A :A . . i 4- :LJ-A ,-' . f L-JL .: .I .YY-'ff , H X- 4, it If .l, V , .Q F, X A - I l N 41" .' l A ,Q v - ,.- N A, Y n . . ,' - I 5 . ' A ul -lip' V --, I I 1 I I AI. ., . I Nl 2 . .. - . - , w -4 . ,. -.v -vi . 4. 4 ' A -. 'ax , , , 'P , , .. 1 l i ,tl rl 7 if- Z, 1 .' I 4. H h H F- de - ' 11,2 1? ,gf D 1 .. , ' x 1 , I, ,g 4,fiH4sT-if 'I A I A il - -' I til' I 'fi I V dvjlxsikv I1 i . F 'v - . , Q' lx: ,351 '. W.-i ' VN ., li l . ' A: ' "iff Q ' 3 5 I 1 It E V I A 3 .- , 'H' "Q I 'Q il' . . 5 ci" nt fp" g ' li fi ' . A sr I I J. I V I 'J' , . -,-- if' Ht, Ar' V l In A '- ll Engl: - A l.. ' I 1-2.5 . . ROBERT MCDONALD WILLIAM MUFERRIN CHARLES MCINERNEY DAN W. McKENZIE GERALD MALAKOFF GEORGE MANN CHARLES E. MARTIN Cottonwood, Modale, Iowa Globe, Ariz. Tucson Brooklyn, N. Y. Tucson Richland, Iowa Arizona Civil Engr. Mechanical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Electrical Engr. Electrical Engr. Civil Engr. Civil Engr. Engineer's Council Air Research AIEE-IRE SRC v-pres., ICF Univets, ASCE ASCE Tucson Gas, Light Schlr., ASME, v-pres., AIEE- 8z Power Schlr., IIME, TBH IRE sec. TBIT WILLIAM O. MARTIN RAUL MAROUEZ MAUNG N. MAUNG HOWARD F. MENCHE CHARLES C. MEYER GUS MICHAELS R. G. MICHELENA Prescott, Ariz. Phoenix Myingyan,Burma Tucson Marerigo,Wisc. Phoenix Nogales, Ariz. Mechanical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Electrical Engr. Civil Engr. Mechanical Engr. ASME International ASME AIEE-IRE ASCE ASME Students Club, ASME IRVING H. MILLER RALPH MILLER CHARLES A.MONAGO LARRY D. MOORE OWEN ROBERT MDRIN DAVID MOUNT JOSEPH MULLIGAN Santa Cruz, Calif. Monsey,N. Y. Kingsmill, Ont., San Diego, Calif. Tucson Saiford, Ariz. Phoenix Mechanical Engr. Band. Orchestra, ASME WILLIAM J. MURPHY Phoenix Mechanical Engr. Sophos, IFPC vice-president, ASME, ASTE THOMAS PINKSTAFF Hammond, Ind. Mechanical Engr. ASME, QA6 Electrical Engr. Who's Who, Blue Key, Sophos, TBII pres., fbliflr, :DFA JAMES NELSON Phoenix Mechanical Engr. Newman Club, Arnold Air Soc. ASME, ATO RAY PLOCK Phoenix Civil Engr. Choral Society, ASCE Newman, Debate 8a Engineer Clubs, ASME, Intra- murals, HKQ BUCKLEY OGDEN San Diego, Calif. Civil Engr. ASCE VAUGHN PLUMB Mesa, Ariz. Electrical Engr. AAE Canada Mechanical Engr. Sophos, IFPC, ASME JAMES O'MEARA Davenport, Iowa Mechanical Engr. Newman Club, ASME, Univets NEWELL S. PORTER Prescott, Ariz. Electrical Engr. Sophos, Chain Gang, Univ. 8: Prescott Schlrs., AAE, TBII 109 Mechanical Engr. Engineers' Coun. Soph. Honors, TBTI, ASME, ST SCC. MAUNG TIN OO Rangoon, Burma Mechanical Engr. Govt. Schlr., ASME, Inter. Students Club JOHN R. REES Escondido, Calif. Civil Engr. ASCE, GT, Pres. KE, IFC, Electrical Engr. Newman Club, GPK, AIEE-IRE, v-pres. Arnold Air FRANK W. PATRICK Phoenix Mechanical Engr. ASME, Univets, Polo Village Councilman EDWARD REINEMAN Tucson Mechanical Engr. Soph Honors, TBII, ASME Mechanical Engr. Newman Club, ASME, Young Republicans, AEH, pres.-v-pres. JACK PATTERSON Douglas, Ariz. Civil Engr. ASCE, TBH GEORGE RODRIGUEZ Tucson Civil Engr. Newman Club, ASCE, ACIJQ, KE gl JST H I 4 , -- f rl . I , I lt ' W ' If WJ' V B , SI ,.---V .1 , . x , A I iff .?:"L'f-"ff gl -was . Q iwf i '- .P N ' V . A' W ly . ml, A , 5 in ,,., 4 Ra ,Y . - i Ii I qw QI 3 'vi I '.?li" f I lx M I, f is F r ' if f. , --lj ' ,W 1, ,W Q 1 ' - . " H ' . A H .ii - 'I A I. I A by ,I I? VI- A ,x I tfef I I . . ia , I . It if f V X . gf I ' I I I I ,st 1 I ' f .'-.A I I' .qw .. 1 ' ' . 1 ' 1 'f , . "" 1 3 X 2 5 7' . N55-fl - - ' A I ,. tl- ft? Ill' mia. aw ' ,qt 1. N IL l ly .:' Tj "A is - 4 ig X -Q 'ly ' Y I I l l il, ' I 'E+ -I --R .... - . gl, is .M , ,' , ' . ' , - - 1 ,H 'Ii .aj l - ' Q I f Qqlggg in A ' 'I -"' L ' " In-T2 ' it I I K ' 55' - .I V fr 1 'fa '1 1 -fl Y 1 . , ,,. I E 3 'li ij .' ,,' g - fe.. V - r I - .. f-' ff ' Q . ' mi :V gl- ,- 4 - .fa t,,.3'L'w P, , 3 ' . I I ' ' I H I T3 - .' A I ids . .I , Q.. --if A -- QE ' i I , " g,ff'vh',- ,Ui . 5 ' IJ TAVVW A . uf - by j, TN' X HV' .L- f . , .I,, Q A 1 ' lui-. lm is A ' 'I . . i t A f 5 , f HARRY L. WEAVER RALPH E. SANDLER RICHARD SCHROEDER MARK SCHUMACHER .IOHN SEABREEZE IOE D.SHAMBURGER DAVID E. SHORE Lucerne Valley, Prescott, Ariz. Tucson Phoenix Baltimore, Md. Tucson Tucson Calif. Civil Engr.,ASCE Mechanical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Civil Engineering Ariz. Hall Pres., ASME, TBII ASME ASME Scabbard Sz Blade, Swiming team, ASCE, KE pres. Class Honors, ASME sec. 8a ASME publicity TBII, GT chrmn. of Dir., Aflvfl, ATU Student Section FRANK SHOWN GARY SKAGGS GERALD SKINNER CHARLEY SMOCK D. STRITTMATTER ANDREW S. SWAIN RONALD P. SYLER Bowie, Ariz. Bakersiield, Calif. Pima, Ariz. ' Prescott, Ariz. Tucson Vicksbury, Miss. Phoenix Agricultural Engr. Civil Engr. Electrical Engr. Electrical Engr. Electrical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Electrical Engr. Aggie House EN AAS, v-pres. 8: AIEE-IRE, Newman Club, Sophos, Bobcats AIEE-IRE, TBII Intramural mngr. Newman Club AIEE-IRE, TBII pres., Traditions, SUAB Comm., AX DON C. TAIT NORMAN TAKVAM IERROLD TIBBETTS GEORGE TRASKOWSKY DAVID TROUPE PETER VAN CLEVE ALAN C. VAUGHN Scottsdale, Ariz. Bowie, Ariz. Mechanical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Polo Village ASME, EQPE Council, ASME, GT EDWIN C. WALKER ROBERT G. WALLACE Tucson Mammoth, Ariz. Mechanical Engr. Mechanical Engr. Univets, IIKA Newman Club, ASME RICHARD WILLIAMS DEAN WILSON Phoenix Tucson Civil Engr., Baird Civil Engr., ASCE, Schlr., ASCE, Pershing Rifles, Engr's. Council, Scabbard 8a Blade, Class Honors,AAE IIKQ Tucson Mechanical Engr. ASME, TBIT OSCAR WARD Denver, Colo. Mechanical Engr. ASME WALLACE R. WILSON Glendale, Ariz. Mechanical Engr. Woodbine, Kan. Tucson Tucson Electrical Engr. Electric al Engr. Mechanical Engr. AIEE-IRE ASME, AXA KEITH WHARTON CHARLES WHITAKER DEREK WHITE Tucson Taylorsville, Ky. Mt. Morris, Ill. Mechanical Engr. Electrical Engr. Civil Engr. AXA Class Honors, ASCE IFC,- 41I'A pres. PASCHEL YOUNG DONALD I. ZEPP DONALD I. ZIMMER Eloy, Ariz. Lansdowne, Penn. Vienna, Ohio Mechanical Engr. AIEE-IRE, TBI! Mechanical Engr. ASME, QT ASME treas., 9T 110 Coolidge, Ariz. Mechanical Engr. JACK WILLIAMS Eloy, Ariz. Mechanical Engr. AiResearch 8i Gen. Electric Schlrps., ASME, TBII vspres. DAVID AARON ZINDER Tucson Electrical Engr. Orme Schlr., Class Honors, AGA pres. AIEE-IRE, TBII, ZBT ACTING DEAN ANDREW BUCHI-IAUSER COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS Andrew W. Buchhauser was appointed Acting can of the College of Fine Arts in October of 1957 succeed the late Dean John B. Crowder. A native f Chicago, he began his study of theory and com- osition under Arthur Olaf Andersen at the Chicago usical College. Coming to Tucson in 1934 he con- nued his studies at the University of Arizona, com- leting his Bachelor and Master of Music degrees and ining the faculty of the University in 1938. He has nee continued graduate study in composition at e Eastman School of Music and the organ with rederick Marriott at the University of Chicago. His orks include a piano concerto, a suite for piano and rchestra, Sinfonietta for Orchestra, Sonata for Two ianos and numerous songs and other instrumental orks. He has appeared as soloist with the Tucson, an Jose, 'Springfield and Northwestern University ymphony Orchestras. Establised on the University campus in 1934, the College of Fine Arts comprises the departments of art, drama, speech and the School of Music. The College has expanded rapidly. There are now over 450 majors enrolled in the College with a stall? of 53 faculty members. Undergraduate and graduate courses are offered, and a variety of curricula in each of the fields is available. In addition to standard volumes on the fine arts in the University library, the College of Fine Arts contributes collections of unusual character. These include the T. E. Hanley Fine Arts collections of 25,000 volumes, the Statler Memorial Library of music scores and books and the Thomas Wood Stevens Memorial Theater Collection of 1,500 vol- umes. In the fall of 1957 the School of Music moved into its new quarters on Olive Road at Speedway, joining the drama and art departments to create the Fine Arts Center. 111 The Art Department of the University of Arizona is offering new courses pertaining to art education and history in both graduate and undergraduate work. It is also equipped to teach ceramics, crafts, graphics, painting and sculpture. This is the second year that the Department has enjoyed its quarters in the New Fine Arts Building. An outstanding feature of the Department is the modern art gallery managed by Robert Church. The Kress Collection is one of the exhibitions shown. Enrollment is over 1000 with 170 art majors and a staff of nine faculty members. Staffed with instructors in the professional and technical fields of drama production, the UA.Drama Department is well equipped to offer the variety of courses listed in the University Catalogue. Peter Marroney serves as head of the department. Sets are designed by Robert Burroughs and John Lafferty handles all technical aspects of production. Fairfax Walkup, the only woman to have a Ph.D. in costuming, heads this section. The thespians moved into the new theatre last year from their former headquarters in Herring Hall. The modern backstage and sound equipment make pro- duction easier for the statf and students and viewing easier for the audience. Temporarily settled on the library's third iloor, the UA Speech Department awaits completion of the remodeling of its permanent quarters in the Educa- tion Building. The Department offers courses in oral interpreta- tion, debate, oratory and extemporizations and fea- tures a speech and hearing clinic and a reading theatre. In addition to thesee fields, new courses are being oifered in radio, television and forensics. En- rollment in the Speech Department includes 40 majors and a staff of ten. A speech correction and hearing center is main- tained by the Department. This enables all University students to receive personal remedial training and is also open to all residents of the state. I I SPEECH FACULTY: ROW 1: Alethea Smith, Patricia Peteler, Klonda Lyn George Sparks. ROW 2: Frank Barreaca, Ben Markland, Arthur Cabl Phil McFarland, Ken Dimmick, James D. Lambert. 112 MUSIC Twenty-four faculty members, 170 majors and approximately 1500 non-majors compose the School of Music, the largest department within the College of Fine Arts. There is great diversity in the curriculum of the school, individual instruction is available in every musical field for those students who desire special- ized work. - The University Symphony Orchestra, Marching Band, Concert Band, Symphonic Choir, Choraliers, Choral Society and Men's and Women's Glee Clubs are included in the department as extra-curricular activities. SIC FACULTY: Julia Reil. Edna Church, George Lottzenhise, Benjamin kkegard, Anna Mae Sharp, Diran Akmajian, Eugene Conley, Marguerite gh, Henry Johnson, Emilio Osta, Mike Hartsell, Andrew Buchhauser, hu Bloom, Robert McBride, Robert Emile, James Anthony, .lack Lee, m Fain, Anita Sammarko, and Elenore Altman. COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS REXENE ADAMS Dearborn, Mich. Art Education 1 A 1 ' A f V-I" l R' ' mcnnrm n. aunv Phoenix Art American Inst. 'T 'AFA , , of Architects, , V lv 1 APT X mA' Anmunv COLLINS Phoenix Drama '7 H i ui ' A i V J, l I 6 i i University Players pres., National Collegiate Players CHARLOTTE FOSTER Brawley, Calif. Speech Spurs Chimes Mortar Board AWS sec. Desert Social Life . Y , me V 'L' , ' ' ' . " A 1 3 comm., A41 pres. Z TANA HORWITZ El Paso, Texas Drama Production 0 -' I 4 Wranglers, Natl. Collegiate Players, Univ. Players, 'rf Ji f f n A-1 ZQH 113 ANDY ANDREWS Tucson Drama University players INEZ OALUSA Michigan City, Ind. Art DONNA DEE OOON Los Angeles, Calif. Commercial Art Rodeo Club, AEA TONY FREEMAN Indio, Calif. Music Education Newman Club, Univ. Band mgr. 84 pres., Iilfq' vice-pres. IENS .IOHANNSEN Yuma, Ariz. Art Education Track, cheer- leader, Senior Class v-pres., APT, KE GRACE BAUMER Tucson Music Education EAI membership chm., chaplain, vice-pres. FREO CASE Tucson Music MENC pres., Band JOSEPH A. OOMLER Tucson Applied Art Assembly Committee, err, APT pres. EDWARD HARTMAN Tucson Music Education FA College vice- pres., Band, Orchestra, ICKXP. QMA vice-pres. PATRICIA LARSON Phoenix Commercial Art Chimes, Mortar Board, Greek Week Queen, ASUA Publicity Comm., KKP, APT it . . A I I I. , 5 I I , I 2 ST I f I tl ' tall" I .rp sf . pn if A fa. - I . I- 1 - -- f Hifi' ."l I .. '4-"f ' ' I ",T.,f" ,gal I "" ' I I ' A-' -09 v If I I .I . Y ,x I X I .E I I I I ' ft I -L-ft I I 'W ,- 4 'v I U 5 , D is A I I I I FLOYD LUCIER Santa Ana, Calif. Art wr I f NP I ' If :. I I f , I, gf 1 I I f . X if H 'L 1 ,xl N i .K I L' J - ' 'te ' E A ry ty' I .' I to A af I I . j J- - " ' until' ' I 'V ' , . .I I " - if ' I :E tl?-1 ,Ct 'Y' X Q 'Z -7 QQ! , 1 CONSTANCE LAYNE H. C. THOMAS LIM L. B. LIVINGSTON JAMES LLOYD PETER K. LOMBARD Newport Beach, Seremban. Malaya Mesa, Ariz. Phoenix Phoenix Calif. Music Music Education Music Education Drama Art Education International M.E.N.C., Symphonic choir Spurs, Chimes, Students Club, M.T.N.A., 84 band. IIKfb SU, Arts 8: Music International Slrlfdv, fbMA pres., IMIA treas. Comm. Chrmn., Scholarship APT, H1542 KEITH K. MAVES MARGARET IAMES E. MUELLER RICHARD PERKINS JOHN B. RICHTARS Freeport, Ill. MERRIMAN Cleveland, Ohio Tucson Tucson Music Education Pasadena, Calif. Music Education Art Education Speech Correction EN, 'FKA Applied Art Band, orchestra, APT,fI1KXIf Newman Club, WAA, AF, APT brass choir, IEKKP, IFC rep., ZIAH 'MIA pres., treas.g treas, AX sec. IIKA 84 Social chm. MARY SHOWER GERALD M. SILVAR KAREN STEINKE KATHY THOMPSON RICHARD L. TWITO Phoenix Chicago, Ill. Kingman, Ariz. Orange, Calif. Des Moines, Iowa Commercial Art Speech Voice 8: Art Education Music Education Mortar Board, Parker Club pres., Music Ed. SU Arts 81 Music Arnold Air So., Desert, FA Col- Wildcat, French Homecoming Comm., House Band, orchestra, lege pres., APT, Club, Hillel dir., Queen Attendant, Comm., IIBQD brass ensemble, AAA, KA6 pres. ZBT vice-pres. MENC, Chora- QMA, HK42 liers, Symphonic Choir L. I. ROSENBAUM Ft. Madison, Iowa. Voice Symphonic choir pres., ZISSI director: ll' BI A LINDA WEISNER Tombstone. Ariz. Piano MTNA 8: MENC, Univ. Symphony orch, sec. XXXL EAI sec. n ' IH' . T- 1, ' 5' I I . 7 I I ,..1 -f V , ., ., , H... Ma'-. ' H .- I ' at or-. ' Ii " '1 I" fl f- ...- ' ' I.-I 'Fl gl , " , . M lm, . , A' J" if wi .I5'f'f ' 99971 5 ' r. 'surf .11 . I. ,I . . ' ff. ZUJI IS- A -1, . All ,. ,I I I - ,' Ei" " " T, ,ESI '- , I .--jk 3,3 'R VT " R. A. MCCLEVE, Sr. Holbrook. Ariz. Art Education Polo Village council, vice-mayor WINIFREO ROSENBAUM Phoenix Voice EA I pl'CS. NANCY WEYERSBERG Kansas City, Mo. Drama Univ. Players, Natl. Collegiate Players, X9 Dean of the Graduate College, Herbert D. Rhodes, is completing his first year in the office which was previously held by David L. Patrick. Dr. Rhodes received his bachelor of science de- gree with highest distinction from the University of Arizona in 1935. After receiving his master's degree from UA, he attended the University of Illinois where he obtained his doctorate in analytic chemistry in 1939. Dean Rhodes has been a member of the Univer- sity's faculty as professor of chem.istry since 1943. He served on the graduate study committee from 1949-1957. Last year, as member-at-large of the Uni- versity Senate, he was elected chairman of the fac- ulty. Dean Rhodes has also served on the Liberal Arts pre-med advisory committee, curriculum committee, and scholarship committee. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and the Arizona Acad- emy of Science. GRADUATE COLLEGE Since 1934 the Graduate College has offered urses of study to graduate students which will lead masters and doctorate degrees. Doctorate of philosophy degrees are now offered 19 different fields including those set up for the st time this year in psychology, plant breeding, ology and meteorology and Climatology. The col- e also instructs courses towards a doctor's degree education. Doctorates require strenuous study with ree or more years of residence with a final year research work. As a "final exam" the scholars must lbmit a dissertation in their field. Graduates have a choice of 18 master of arts de- grees and 33 master of science degrees. Separate mas- ters degrees are offered in business administration, education, agricultural education, electrical engin- eering, mechanical engineering, music and music ed- ucation. Aspirants for a MS. must complete 30 to 32 units of study, then present a thesis and take an oral examination before a selected board in defense of the thesis. Resident students enrolled in the college this year totaled 565. In addition, extension classes attracted a large number of graduates. Three off-campus pro- fessional engineering courses were conducted in Tuc- son with 17 students, in Phoenix with 78 students and at Fort Huachuca with 11 students. THE CONTINUITY theory of learning is tested by James King by running white rats through a Miles Elevated Maze. I, , . H . ,L l g.-21 ,FE -'. fl, ,Q W' . ff 5 P H - ' 1- fav fc, ,' ' ' 7. ' 'T ' - K-,W : , -' e.', ,,-,1w-.,-,1.",,-',- 1514. LY'-'ff' ' ,, , ,' 51 c. . 'yi-'M' V J gl," :' I' f' ,ll My ' ,J :1'32R.',7 , , X, . , fr W ,I -if vu. G :- .. .vpx ,f,. . 4- " " -'J S .Q 1 .s -. . 99 - 'l2 1 4- D E' f ' ,. ","k! ffl. 3,542 T 'Al . ' 'Mull' R I' ' ' 4 ' ' . ' -1- 1--- .-f. , T A ,- i , -L 7 1 A74 F P+ Ll.: S' A . X '-.' W" f lb?" F454 f "" " 'f' -' rf 1 V457 4 Y 13- N 1 1 .,. y 1 vw gal, y 444, 1 - 5 Q.. f " N , - " -I X .. A . lr .. .", ' .1 R, 'N-A' N'-F'-i . ' ' '1 "-4' ' . RI' Q if i - I VA . Y " i'g,.q.iix' f 1, J' if- 'X V. 55" , If-V' f" N ' M if .Q A V ' 1. .Qi K. '- VszgQ1fjJv,'?A ml - H 1, V." 1 -. - - - Q 1 A A , A. ' l ig. .gf Vu ll.. R.. I I li in - .ul , x 1, -mfr, 'I rliviju fe .s,. --F. T J in .Qi fi M121 'nf giii 9- '-7 1' 77 Ll lx " 4-?2...fV. 1 ,f 'E ' 'N--.1 R x'a', , . ' X, a Q 3' ., -. V X X v VLKA U' .' H L"' fill, ' Q -X ,. 1 M ' ,ul , sl-Y v 1 H DEAN JOHN D. LYONS CCLLEGE OF LAW John D. Lyons has held the position of Dean of e College of Law since 1947. Dean Lyons came to Tucson from New York in 927, after completing his pre-law schooling at Cor- ell University. He received his law degree from the niversity of Arizona in 1932. At the time of his appointment, Dean Lyons was residing as Judge of the Superior Court, an ollice o which he was elected in 1945. His legal experience ncludes 13 years of practice in Arizona. Dean Lyons is a member of several committees n the Association of American Law Schools of the tate Bar of Arizona. This is his seventh year as a ember of the Arizona Bar Association Committee n Continuing Legal Education. In the past, Dean yons was also a member of the Executive Commit- ee of the Pima County Bar Association. Law courses were first offered at the University in 1915 under the auspices of the College of Letters, a part of Liberal Arts. The first class graduated in 1918. After legislative action in 1925 it became a separate college and in 1927 it moved into the form- er UA library where it is still located. Housed in the law building is the law library which contains close to 30,000 bound copies of court cases, digests and legal literature. Of the 228 students enrolled in the College this year, ll are women. The senior class of 56 students includes three women students. All students of the College are members of the Student Bar Association, a reproduction of the or- ganized bar. The honor system which operates in the College encourages professional ethical standards. Any infringement of college rules is handled by the Board of Governors, a part of the Student Bar As- sociation. The board has the power to hear cases and make recommendations to the faculty for discipline. Two years ago the College initiated intemship in cooperation with the Junior Bar Conference of the State Bar of Arizona. Twenty-four students appren- ticed in Arizona law offices last summer. The College of Law is approved by the American Association of Law Schools. 117 RAMON R. ALVAREZ Douglas, Ariz. Law Sophos, Forensics, MdotCourt, Ariz. Law Survey, 4241, 44111, AEP DAVID S. ELLSWORTH Salford, Ariz. Law KIJACID HAROLO GOLDMAN Des Moines. Iowa Law IIJAA GERALD S. JOHNSON Beverly Hills. Calif. Law BAE, 41.342 GENE 1. LANE Tucson Law fbAfI?' EDWARD E. DAVIS Tucson Law 1123111 DALE FENTER Tucson Law GX JOSEPH HARPER Miami, Ariz. Law CHAS. JOHNSTON Douglas, Ariz. Law Student Bar President, CIPAKIP THOMAS D. LINTON Russellville, Kan. Law Cbifb F. E. DICKER, lr. Phoenix Law AXA, CIDAA WILLIAM H. FOX Tucson Law Ass't Ed. of 1957 Ariz. Law Survey, BAE, 'pid' pres. ROBERT N. HILLOCK Port Huron, Mich. Law AEKID MAX MARTIN KLASS Williams. Ariz. Law IPAQ' JOAN R. MURPHY Phoenix Law 'T' l . .l V ' - .Z T" ' My ,l 1 ' TH g fy ' - E -5 -- ' ri A ' I A 5iii"5l'1w . T R- . A v ' . A. 1 A ,i . Y g L VV r ' 93-5.-v ' Fill!-Q .J J , . :gf J ' -1 , ,I A .'f-f-N2 U- Y ' A -,Eg l ' . A 1: 1 g , D --AL V- T 5: i 1 A . 5 , T , 5: , ,, 3, , Hr ' W 3. .11 . "-Y ,,-,.:- h -N l R 'F' l , ' K J A H . ""fAl4' A 12 ' A J' f .. W , hal.. Q . 1 . I. h :mg-3 -- ' G-S.. '54 ii I ' ' .2l?L:1..-155. ' 'eva 'lx 1 A A , f. A,- . . X ' A pn. - - ., . ll .A-1 f' as -' A f . you Q W as ww ,af .. . .ix 1 I V Q54 V 'vig' W .I XV 1 r Q - , gi A' , -' , l N ir V ,." nr, l l ' "4 l'fl1f'1,Xi "' ' 'fm A - .. mf..-f ' -T '+ . 'V F E- . . -.ima gl . W Z:-1 f-4 ,-, L . -.-. V nz, , - gn 1 If Ei li ' li Y - feii. 9 if , . : - i ' V nk ' h l - 3 VI X xv.. r A - l . ' "L .1 -, Tgj-3-1,27 R A , i - A 5 - F ' ,' ' sl af . ,. L , I . w i.- f A ii If ' N '. U ,N ff, - E 1 118 LAW FACULTY: ROW 1: F.I. Owens, 1.1. Irwin, Jr., Thomas L. Hall, Claude H. Brown. ROW 2: John D. Lyons, J. Byron McCormick, W. S. Barnes, and James J. Lenoir. if .vf . L if 1- 4,1-2 l-- ,jy Q--fi,A.44ff'-1 A vi ...., ,.,..-.- 0 Q Q . hahah-Q - -U-: a C, ! "H-Q -, J L X. , E gg F If f - I7 , Af 'TE if -1 -W ,, Q, 'ln .455 ,A .251 .,,- wi-,-' I 1 'nj bas' .,- COLLEGE OF LAW STUDENT BAR UFFICERS: ROW l: Bob Petrie, Emojean Kerber. ROW 2: Paul Beer, Mr. John J. Irwin, Teddy War- ner, Charles R. Johnston. MOUT CUURT members present their case before Justice of the Supreme Court J. Mercer Johnson, in College courtroom DEAN FRANCIS A. ROY COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Dean of the College of Liberal Arts since 1951, r. Francis A. Roy has been a member of the Uni- ersity of Arizona's faculty since 1934. Dean Roy received his BS degree from St. Anne ollege, Nova Scotia, and his doctorate from the niversity of Wisconsin. He also earned degrees for is studies at the Sorbonne and at the University of aris. While in France, Dean Roy held the French inistry of Foreign Affairs Fellowship from 1926- 7 and from 1928-29. Before coming to Arizona, he taught French at he University of Wisconsin. Dean Roy is a member f several honoraries and of the Arts and Science di- ision of the Land Grant College Association. He is past secretary of the Arizona Board of Examiners n the Basic Sciences. Dean Roy is an advisor to the ildlife Research Unit, a member of the State Mu- ieum Committee and a member of the Bureau of Ethnic Research. Dr. Ralph Kaufman, Assistant Dean of the Col- lege, supervises the academic direction of the ap- proximately 2300 students enrolled in Liberal Arts. Departments of the college include Anthropology, Astronomy, Bacteriology and Medical Technology, Chemistry, Classics, English, German, History and Political Science, Journalism, Mathematics, Meteor- ology, Philosophy and Psychology, Physics, Romance Languages and Zoology. A program in Wildlife Man- agement and the Bureau of Ethnic Research are also a part of the curriculum. The new programs begun in 1957 were majors in actuary math, entomology and medical technology. Studies for doctorate degrees in psychology and zo- ology were also added this year. The College spon- sors summer tours to foreign countries for credit in political science and humanities. Many students enrolled in the college are pre- paring for advanced work in dentistry, law, educa- tion, medicine and pharmacy. Women can now earn a nursing degree from the new School of Nursing established this year. 121 DEPARTMENT HEADS: ROW 1: Brewster Campbell, Journalism, Emil Haury, Anthropology, G. D. Percy, Classics, Albert Mead, Zoology, Matthew Schneck, Psychology, D. S. Powell, English, Mrs. Pearl Coulter, Nursingg John Brooks, Romance Languages, Kenneth Wertman, Bacteriology. ROW 2: Russell C. Ewing, Historyg F. J. Schmitz, German, Earle H. Warner, Physics, E. R. Carpenter, Astronomyg R. F. Graesser, Mathematics, A. Rich- ard Kassandzer, Atmospheric Physics, L. E. Roberts, Chemistry, Francis Roy, Dean. BYRON ANDERSON JUDY ATKINS Mountain View, Benson, Ariz. California Mathematics History Al' Treasurer EN WARREN L. BAGBY DDNALID BERLINSKI Yale, Oklahoma Tucson Economics Wildlife Mgmt Univets, French Townsmen, Club, Sophomore QJK Honors PAULA RAE BETTS BILL BIRCH Yuma, Ariz. Douglas, Ariz. Bacteriology Journalism Frosh. Soph Wildcat Sports Honors, Yuma Editor, Alumn, AAUW A1129 8: Ariz. Women's Schlr. JAMES W. BDGINIS ERNEST BRANNEMAN Glendale, Ariz. Colton, Calif. Chemistry History Sophos, Scabbard AX 8: Blade, Mon- santo, 8z ACGA Schlrps., CPAT IEAN BRUNER BERTRAND R. BRU NS Tucson Oxnard, Calif. Astronomy Chemistry SRC, Ariz. Ar- cheological 8: Historical Soc. R. AUGHENBAUGH Canal Fulton, 1 Ohio ' I Geology 1- -N Wesley Founda- tion, Band ,W , I 1 r HARVEY BERSHADER Callicoon, N. Y. Geology " Geology Club, ' Y--' "5 SPTCXI' pres. . . Y ,Q li 1 Hx t ' 4 1.1 uf", -"'.. -. 'z'oi':. -1- -v IIM BLIJCK Milwaukee, Wis. English Traditions, SUAB 'N Publicity Comm., X ZBT Social chrmn. X ' . ,u U ., -'ll ' 4 I NANCY LU BRENNAN Lansing, Mich. Anthropology A Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow- ship i Lmut Busmuxn 4 i Ramallah, Jordan , T .. Botany , ' V' - International - ,T Schlr., BBB, A+- . Aws, tsc . 1. 1 A 122' , 3 ' fir. Y t Nb 122 'bib n 1 y 5 . ' 1 L .Q '19 5 I L is I Ins-v M' Jlxyia ' Rh I th 1 I 4 -.-17" 5 ' 'lv' F: 1 Z , vffizfu V, ..- BEVERLY OARNEVALE W. Long Beach, N. J. Psychology- Sociology French Club, Wesley, slflifb, SPX v-pres., AKA BERT CRANOALL Sudbury, Ontario, Canada History HKKIP JOHN FAGAN Tucson Political Science Newman Club RICHARD FLANOERS Elsinore, Calif. Geology Ski Club, Flying Club, A241 A ,...,.. 3. COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS I .ls il v'r .. 1 v.v -. lift? . V , It M- I S. 4 l I ix I R 59, X1 th I . I . l M xl BILL CARSON Safford, Ariz. General Studies Newman Club, EX CAROL CROSBY Topeka, Kansas SUAB Comm., Univ. Symphonic Choir. WAA, KKG GENE C. FALCK Phoenix Mathematics Baird Schlr., Amer. Chemical Society. KA SAMUEL FOSTER Duncan. Ariz. History Wesley Founda- tion, Band, KKKII pres 8: treas. I di l I . , H '13- 2- f " ln X f V' f4-t- I EDMUND L. GATES Phoenix Sociology xlxjtb FRANK R. H. DAY , . f l ." fl , J E L, I , - L4 ...LJ ' fi' I i. ii I ' fix I N' I' A YA: l l - 1 . ' 'Y g b -'fm i I iftid Q .1 I' ai . I ANTHONY B. GHING Flushing, N. Y. Geology Pres. Greenlee I-lall, Interdorm Council, U of A Scholarship SHEILA OIGKEN Anaconda, Mont. Hutchinson, Kan. Inter-Am. Studies Zoology Swimming Team, "A" Club, 4I1I'A SAMITII S. FARAJ Amman, Jordan Political Science International Students Club AEA RUTH FEHR Waterbury. Conn. Psychology Newman Club, GRI. TX SCC. OIRK FRAUENFELOER BEATRIZ Somerton, Ariz. FREYTES-TABOAOA Pre Dental Santago del Rodeo, KE Estero, Argentina ISC, Jr. Honors, Latin Am. Schlr. 123 .1 ,I if-N F1 I, , B. PHILIP CITRON Phoenix Zoology Fencing Club 8z Team, Debating Club, BBB, Young Democrats DONALD F. DOELL Tucson English Wildcat Staff JOHN FERGUSON Tucson Political Science Newman Club MARY ELLEN FULTON Florence, Ariz. Journalism Who's Who, Spurs, Chimes, Wranglers, Kitty Kat co-editor. IRIS CLOUDT Tucson J ou rn alism Pres. Women's Press Club, Wild- cat News Editor, Phrateres GORDON E. EVANS Douglas, Ariz. Journalism Who's Who, Blue Key, Chain Gang, Wildcat editor, Press Club FELIGIA FIGUEROA Douglas, Ariz. History 8: Political Science Newman Club, International Club PAUL I. GORKERY Downers Grove, Ill. English IIDFA IOAN EVANS Tucson History French Club, WAA, Anthro- pology Club, A'-IP ELOONNA FISHER Chicago, Ill. Sociology Sec.-Treas of Campus Democrats 'Vw V V ,V V .VV V V V V V VVV. K , - V V V V V 'Q Y' V L ,V 1 ' rljl" - ' H 'V V V V " WV' l J' VT i A lim- 'El PM Q 'V .V I i575 'C J Valli ' V: 'E' .V- ,Vi..u.. .-L4 . VV I V- 1 VVAJ, -VA ,1LV.3.V .AQ:VV V VVVJIVVV Vin VV Vai ' 'V VSWR 5 fall fl V- . . I ,. tV .V4?lI!- F- , A VV . Fit fV.f 't QV V lui L V V2 1 ','VV'l?X ' V' l I Vf V 'VV ' , ei-'EE' 'ff V ' - V V MV, :V VV VV VV,iVV,,VV I V VV V. ,fig V in-VIV V V :iff ,V . A VV V VV VV V- V ' '4 - V 'V I V V v - -'lf V 1 - V fi .4 A4, gf V ' , V 1 I il' A f L lflf ' V f 'V V V- V VL V ' if "PV f X V71 " "'V V ' ' ' ' VI 'Q 1 1 l VEFV ET -' .-1 V ' TP" iii- V . - . V 'El A ' 'T ' 1 - ' . 4 VUL V'-1 V V V V. ,Q , lg- V Lf I I Vt: .3-Q gil VV 'VV VM, VV . V. Vg- HV ,V V if 1 'Q ,VV , I V , WV "V'V 3' i' V - 2. ' V Q. V gy , , , ' V ' I -' 1 Vt ' 'IREM " I V V V. . V w:'1.iV -t V .' V V Q ILVVLVV -' New VVVVV, VV-fg,V V-if, VV . V gt. , V N, , .V V We - VV -, - 7 i "I -fl' K , 1 VI Q, Q ' ' """ "RW "' . V r ' V '7"FE' ' 'e' 'A' .' , ,'.M , 5 - VM -.. V V . 'V'VV x.V '71 '4" if ' ". .""i"' ' fr? I A V, 1" . PT VVi:V.V1V"Z'. JV VE, , IVV :' V ,V g i V V VV .. Y' l H . , I V' V IV " , ., ' V :.V - ,A 44 , rp' 'Ji V , 4 -V gsm, ,fs V V f+-- V1- ' I ,W '- ' 2. I I VF," ' V. V5377: inf'-A V .Q2'vf'if!'FF?'FT - V Vf' ' 4' , . VVr2f3"V, - . V- - VLVTV V I in V sV,., . , V V, .1 .V,3!Vf4V4,VV- V,frNV,, ISV V V 3 VI V ,V VV ' ' ,ir-i W XV V V V I s V F 2 J V,.V V V .V A V V V V . - VV V WP' V 1- Vs, . V V V-'Pt' VN I I Vet- 'V VV. VV:-V V V . Vase' f , V' , V, f V " .lt f f-will , M VV V V , FVIJMQFV , JOHN GERDES PHYLLIS GIBBS JIM G. GILBERT E GEORGE A. GIRARD WILLIAM GRAHAM R. P. GOLDFARB KARL AD GOSS Tucson Tucson Whiteriver, Ariz. Tucson McNary, Ariz. Phoenix Tucson Zoology History Wildlife Mgmt. Chemistry Zoology General Studies Mathematics BBB Spurs Amerind Club Newman Club, Desert editor, Arnold Air Soc., FCPB Pres., Indian ACS Student Blue Key pres., Scabbard 81 Blade Schlr. Afliliate, 41K Sophos. Chain Gang, ZBT ROBERT GREENE CARDLYN HAGUE ANNE HAWLEY DAN HEINEMAN WILLIAM HEYING LYNN E. HICKMAN MICHAEL HOFFMAN Tucson Gallup, N. M. Costa Mesa, Phoenix Kansas City, Mo, Douglas, Ariz. Holbrook, Ariz. Chemistry English Calif. Psychology Political Science Zoology Zoology President of Sociology QA9 Univ. Young BBB, A419 Bobcats, Chain AAII Parker, Ski 81 Republicans, Gang, Sophos, Philosophy Clubs, v-pres, CDK Baird Schlr., AEA fbI'A pres. BETTY HORE LEE HUBBARD VAUGHN E. HUFF DAVE HURLEY RICHARD JENSEN JOHN R. JORDAN GEORGE KAINE Neptune Beach, Yorkville, Ill. London Clayton, Mo. Lone Rock, Iowa Phoenix Douglas, Ariz. Fla. Sociology Ontario, Canada History English Chemistry J oumalism English Wesley General Studies Newman Club Symphonic Choir, Scabbard 81 Blade Foundation fbBK, fblifb pres., SUAB, MATHEMATICS, PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY FACULTIES: ROW 1: Charles Wallraff, Roy Graesser, John Scott, Gerald Jones, Angel Tellez, Ole Simley, Lewis Hertz, John Strang. ROW 2: William MacKinnon, Robert Bretall,Thomas Caldwell,John Gardner, Gene Lawler, Paul Mielke, Esther Coulter, Virginia Prebula, Arthur Steinbrenner, Joseph Foster, Richard Coan. m,...,,.,-B, DMS, Wildcat 8: Desert COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS I I,i1q- of I ' If .V . J :a mflzi ' 1 -' :Z V P if, Z 'QV-V ' N. 4 -41 if " l . - ' I ,iii " . . J . A, . , I 'L , ,f-1 y Q 'A 'Mr .V t I ig ., ...L I I . 1, It I. 'fx ' I3 . X .,, Q ' 1-A 'I ' ' V .." I , x.. e . I, " - -, 1- I, ' ' J Y: .Lbf b - ti H' in H i I -ii A 1 .1-'jf.aff?'n T' ' A , I , ' I f ' if-jf-LJQQZQX 5 , . . , 1 . V V 2 ' 'M '-'IM . I U ' , if 'KM I I f Q x 3 I W , 449 . I 4, U rg I I I 6 f I GARY KELTNER Globe, Ariz. History Jr. 81 Sr. Honors FRAN LDUBET Tucson Journalism Spurs, Women's Press Club, Wildcat, FQB ROBERT MARTIN Nogales, Ariz. Political Science Frosh. Soph. 81 Jr. Honors, Newman Club, AFROTC Award 5' N I '-. I 6 ju Z, F. it . .h - , ,, A A it I . Q ,Z PAT KDEHMSTEDT BRENDA KURN Overly, N. D. Tucson Romance General Studies Languages Hillel sec. 84 Wranglers, Pan veep, SRC, Hillel Am., Newman Key, AECID 8a Fencing Clubs, Class Honor MICHAEL J. LYNCH Missoula, Mont. Political Science sec. 8: treas. CARLOS MCCDRMICK Santa Barbara, California Economics Insurance Club, AX IUYCE MERCHANT IDHN R. MIKITA Carlsbad, N. M. Tucson Inter-American Zoology Studies Newman Club, KKI' Wildlife Mgmt. Club DDLDGY AND BACTERIDLUGY FACULTIES ROW 1: Irving Yall, Dr. Albert R. Mead, enneth F Wertman J B Slater Joseph T. Bagnara. ROW 2: F. A. Waterman, B Chaisson C H Lowe Lendell Cockrum, William J. McCauley. I I I ' .. - I , ,- if I I X I I If A 1 It . WILLIAM LARSUN Miami, Ariz. Zoology Sophos, Chain Gang, Blue Key, SUAB chrmn., QPFA HUGH MGKENZIE Montpeiler, Vt. Psychology Jr. Honors, Varsity Swim- ming, AX pres. JAMES R. MILLER Carlsbad, N. M. Economics IFC, Greek Week, Public Relations, AQ, EAE PAUL H. LEDWITH Burlingame, Calif. Political Science Swimming Team, ATS! RICHARD MANGUM Flagstaff, Ariz. English Baird Schlr., Forensics, Debate Team NEIL F. MILLER Yuma, Ariz. Mathematics EAE ASTRDNDMY AND ANTHRDPULDGY FACULTIES: ROW 1: Harry T. Getty, William H. Kelly, Clara Lee Tanner, John Yeger- lehner. ROW 2: Emil W. Haury, Robert A. Hackenberg, Raymond H. Thompson, Charles O. Hucker. ROW 3: E. H. Spicer, John C. Duncan, E. F. Carpenter, B. S. Kraus. -has OR. CHAPIN explains to advanced chemistry students Brenda Karn, Dick Dicus and Jim Howell how this apparatus depend- ably measures the charge in spin of the hydrogen atom nucleus. l if- - 1 l l 3 . I 4 If G ' 1 ll ,r ' " 'EW : w w- Ik 1 2. i i l ' 4- l 4 , . , I l , x i z i ,, . LA! . , . 1432! -1 . , iii in M ,i.. ii '- dl Q 'pn li -1 lf SHARON MILLER Winnebago, Ill. l jx Af ,S English Q ' L .V M A WAA, ski at - I 1, ' - Rodeo Clubs, g .' ' .1 fbiifb, AAA - Q , 1 Schlr. 8: pres. in I F , Er: I V-1i c, inonnum Moons , .I Whitefish Bay. ,. t f 1 Wisconsin gi t H, I gf English 1 Newman Club. . , ' A Kr: ,K .:. , I H i ANN MYRICK ' E V Morris. III. ' A TW? Psychology M' - XS? f'n f 'S f - T ' 1 Hp 'H . e I ' 'L-N , I :N CE ' V f i., ' ,Q " gnu l KAIIA I. OZOLINS Chicago, lll. V ' ., Psychology I S 'J I . z W I, A -ssl? J' - ' , -'il R as I it - I - ' Lumxme Pzrmou Phoenix Psychology Al' v-pres. 126 COLLEGE GF LIBERAL ARTS CALUOIA MOHOLY-NAGY New York. N. Y. English Nat'I. Collegiate Players, U.A. Players. Dean's List. IUOITH M. MOORE Sewickley, Pa. History X!! HELEN NAOER Mesa, Ariz. English Wranglers, Yuma Hall sec, 81 .v-pres., Canter- bury pres. BETTY I. PAGE Phoenix Psychology Spurs, Mortar Board, SUAB, Jr. Class sec., Al' pres. SANDRA PHIPPS Yuma, Ariz. Psychology 8: Sociology IAMES A. MOOOY Tucson Wildlife. Mgmt. A2111 sec. 8: parlimentarian IRWIN MOROKA Tucson Psychology Sophos, Blue Key Desert. Kitty Kat. IPPC, WX, ZBT MARCIA ORR Deming, N.M. lnter-Amer. Studies Desert Dance Chrmn., EAU sec.-treas., AAA KATHERINE PARK Augusta, Ga. Anthropolgy Chimes, Spurs, ICF. GM Nat'l. Schlr.. Mermaids, IT IMD STEPHEN POGSON El Paso, Tex. History Who's Who, Sophos, Chain Gang, Tradi- tions EN pres. ENCH, SPANISH, GERMAN FACULTIES: ROW 1: Donald Alderson, Re- to Rosaldo, Ruth Rexcroat, Frederick Schmitz. ROW 2: Charles osenberg, Jack Davis, Timothy Brown, Mario Rodriguez, Babette z ROW 3: Dwight Chambero, Arthur Beattie, Rupert Allen, yal Gryting, Erika Simmons, John Reynolds. I 1 .. 'N I 2 fr' , TAFH. . Y ," 5 'I--L.1 ,l V ' , , F . i ,V '.' I .t 'if al 1 PATRICIA PDWERS RICHARD RANDOLPH Phoenix Milwaukee, Wis. Medical Political Science Technology Music Schlr., Spurs, Desert, EN ASUA, SUAB. Gen. Women's Schlr., WAA, K KI' RAMDN R. RDBLES Pirtleville, Ariz. Chemistry Newman Club. Amer. Pharmaceutical Assoc., Univets DDB SCHERMERHDRN Dallas, Tex. Economics Scabbard 8: Blade pres., SRC. DMC, Westminister 1I1l'A RDSALIE RDBLES Yuma, Ariz. Journalism Who's Who, Chimes, Mortar Board, Band. WPC, TBE pres. JDHN D. SDDTT Brainerd, Minn. Political Science PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY FACULTIES: ROW 1: James Berry. Harold Koe- nig, Alec Kelley, Margie McCaughey, Nancy Landers, Earl Warner Leslie Forster. ROW 2: Cornelius Steellink, Edward Wise, Douglas Chapin, Lathrop Roberts, Roy Keller, Leon Blitzer. Stewart Becker John Robson. 11 if X l! V ii Q re.. fr-Q . l is , l LEW fl L. 1. ,af +4i.,,1,4 - I it I X l .li , :J -'V 'L Q I I . :X Y --T Q i AQ . . er ' I 3 ' E A ' 1' ii . V L 1 JACK REDHAIR Denver, Colo. History ASUA pres., Who's Who, Sophos, Chain Gang, Bobcats, IDHN D. REED WARREN RIDGE Park Ridge, Ill. Wichita, Kan. English Psychology ASUA veep, Bobcats, Sophos, Who's Who, Bas- ketball, EAE EX STAN RDSE KATHRYN SALMDN SYDNEY SALMDN Tucson Phoenix Tucson Inter-Amer. English Philosophy Studies Rodeo 8: French Blue Key, Music Schlr., Jr. Clubs, WAA Sophos, Tradi- Honors, Band. Sports Leader, tion, BBB, Wild- IJAII pres, Iilfxl' HBKIH pres. cat, Kitty Kat GAIL SCHULTZ CYRILLE SILBERMAN WILLIAM SLDCUM Tucson Tucson Tucson Zoology Journalism Sociology IFC, ATS? Ski Club, Wild- AX cat. Campus Democrats,WPC, 127 F l j l swf . W' .' l, 5 I N I SHERRILL RDBB Yuma, Ariz. Psychology Chimes. Wranglers, Desert, Stand. Oil Schlr. ELIZABETH SANDS Glendale, Ariz. Young Republicans, A41 DDRIS SMITH Ft. Worth, Tex. Psychology AWS pres.. Mortar Board, Spurs, Chimes, CIJKQD Al' XIIK, QBK 9 ' ' ill '-""' -15 " l ef I l , l . , :pg - D FRED D. ROBERTS Tucson Zoology fiJA9 LDU SCHAEFFER Tucson History Class Honors, ZBT MARTHA A. SMITH Tucson Sociology Polo Village Council sec.. KKI' l ln! X . Whiz,-A, i ' ' T 1 i ll' v . 1 l 1 ' li A A' l Pr - I , . x ' . A ' ' 1 'ix H, ,,jsf1:Q""'4 A ' lflliilhts ,Y 1 L JT. ' I it ' 41 K A ' - '-311 f l 1 , . . jx- J ,V Y "T l L , lux- ' Iii- A " A .aw -If r A , J 5 it f I lil IVQQ 1 - l l U.: 335 ll N . , g l A , 1 'g. , i for ff i 1 i ... JMC' , all fl PRESTON SMITH Phoenix General Studies Traditions, SUAB, Class Honors, AX ELWIN STUVDEBAKER Tucson Economics French Club DAN TRETIAK Tucson History Soph 8: J r. Class Honors, Fr. Foot- ball Mgr., Debate ARTHUR W. VANCE Cranbury, N. J. English II KCI? IOSEPH M. WELCH Tucson Wildlife Mgmt. Soph Sz Jr. Class Honors, Wild- life Mgmt. Club CAROLYN SNIDER Tucson History SHARON 1. STUMPH Indianapolis, Ind. Botany BBB CDNZALD URIAS Tucson Journalism Wildcat, AX GUY VERREES Turnhout, Belgium French French Club v-pres., Inter- national Stu- dents Club, IPAQ ANN WEYERSBERG Kansas City, Mo. Psychology SRC, RIL, Dean's List, WAA, Desert, French Club, XYZ SANDRA STRATTDN Springheld, Ill. English AWS, Desert, Rodeo, French 8: Pistol Clubs, XS! WILLIAM TULLEFSUN Sonoita, Ariz. German Scabbard 81 Blade, CITFA KENNETH UVDDICH Tucson Chemistry Scabbard Rr Blade, Arnold Air, SUAB, fb1'A PHILLIP WEEKS Grand Canyon, Ariz. Political Science Who's Who, Baird Schlr., Blue Key, Chain Gang, -PKK? RICHARD WILLETT San Luis Obispo, Calif. Anthropology Track, Cross Country ENGLISH, CLASSICS, AND IDURNALISM FACULTIES: ROW 1: Lawrence Padgett, Philip Leininger, Neal Richards, Charles Gross Vonceil McLendon Edward Best, Jane Newlin, Jean Alsworth, Hyman Dalz. ROW 2: Sydney Schiffer, William Irmscher, Brewster Campbell Michael Bauman Marie Hamilton, Don Ayers, Ruth Gaede, Florence Morgan, Lawrence Muir. ROW 3: Oliver Sigworth, Cecil Robinson Yvonne Guilbert Carl Ketcham, Gamet Percy, Arthur Ray, Robert Jevne, Frances Gillmor, Desmond Powell, James Nichols. 128 Mrs. Pearl Parvin Coulter is com- pleting her first year as director of the newly established School of rado before coming to the Univer- Nursing. She was Director of Pub- lic Health Nursing at the Univer- sity of Colorado before coming to the University of Arizona. Xi DISCUSSING the basic degree program with Miss Agnes Aamodt is Mrs. Pearl P. Coulter. Director of the new School of Nursing. SCHOOL OF NURSING The School of Nursing was established on- the University of Arizona campus this year. At present 't is staffed with two faculty members, Pearl Coulter nd Agnes Aamodt. Students of the school are enrolled in one of two ourses: the four-year plan or the graduate nursing rogram. Both courses of study lead to a bachelor of cience degree in nursing. In October a Student Nursing Organization was d. Members attended a State association meet- where they presented their constitution for ap- The group will select the uniforms and caps I I uf- - A . if-4 , . Q " a 1 'Q l .l i l. 6 31+ l All -'l 'fl , 1 rl Ll l PATIENT receives abundant attention from School of Nursing Director Coulter and students Sharon Grifiith and Pamela Dickie. to be worn by student nurses. Next year they will hold their first capping ceremony. During this year's flu epidemic student nurses cared for patients in the emergency infirmaries which were set up in the various dormitories. Student nurses travel to Tucson Medical Center, spending three hours each week gaining laboratory experience. They will work "on the floor" from 18 to 20 hours a week next year. The School of Nursing is presently located in the Biological Science Buildingg plans are being made for residence in the to-be-constructed Home Econom- ics Building. 'f Q. 1 129 1 . STERILIZING their instruments before preparing medica- tions are Aurelia Camerena, Judy Weingard and Ina Zunin. 1 . -9'-Qs, f. "V if l l i DEAN JAMES D. FORRESTBR COLLEGE OF MINES AND METALLURGY Dean James D. Forrester has presided over the College of Mines and Metallurgy since October, 1956. He came to Arizona from the University of Idaho where he was serving as Dean of the College of Mines. He has also been a member of the faculties of the University of Utah, Cornell and Missouri. As a member of numerous consulting commis- sions, Dr. Forrester has conducted research studies for the U. S. Army, U. S. Bureau of Mines and for the Sinclair Coal Company. The Dean is a member of several professional su- cieties and organizations, including the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, the Mining and Metallurgical Society of America, and the Geological Society of America. At present he is Western Regional Vice President of the Society of Mining Engineers. A renowned author, Dr. 'Forrester has written articles, books and textbooks. He received his BS degree from the University of Utah, and his MS and Ph.D. degrees from Cornell. The College of Mines and Metallurgy, formerly a part of the College of Mines and Engineering, be- came a separate college in 1940 when it moved into its present location in the Mines and Metallurgy Building. Undergraduate students enroled in the College total 302. The School of Geological Engineering, which is headed by Dr. F. W. Galbraith, is the larg- est school in the College, with an enrollment of 102. Most of the 62 graduating seniors are geology ma- jors. Three other divisions of the college are headed by graduate assistant J. B. Cunningham. Of these, the School of Mine Engineering totals 88 and the School of Metallurgy, 75. Chemical Engineering was offered for the first time this year. The new school has an enrollment of 37. The Arizona Bureau of Mines, located in the Col- lege, is working with the U. S. Geological Survey Department to produce a new map of the state. Part of this program includes issuing geological maps of each country. In addition to the facilities pf the Col- lege, a new Geology Building is being constructed on the site of old North Hall. Classes are scheduled to begin there next fall. .130 -f. -- .a ti 1 - -. -,. -.Q. . - .. - i A" -. he I1 Q. - . A. . it I " if, i ' tg 1 Q51 ' Q ' f jg. L, Zyl- l ,,' , ', , ' :egg .1 ' " Qu" I 1 yi 1 l ' 1' . It 1. ' '. .J I A I ' ' Q-.' -g g i " . -- - I- 2 Vp' . . - . , in R x P g A ici' l. ','N' -.1 'Y .. 33,3 N ' I j ,' 1 H ' 5 N, U i- ' - , .gy :If ,- t I ng -Q un ' f - . . 1 .1- ., 1. 'lv 7 1' -.X ' -.22-i'ff..Q.l. f' f f g . ..... 11 All ' ,Y L-Jil 4 ' ' .. C1 ee. H :-1-:if--.iff . nf . --L th" Vi: 5 t if h .fi i f - -.' 'I f":Iil l .3 it V . '. 1 ll it ff' J ff! f- - ' af pl V -P 4 ' NW V 1 ,n,. 2 ,A V, .i - -, 'Ib' an . , I ., I I - . X- 1 a. - 4 , I l U., . V 'I ' .A gl X' 'V - Q mggrix r .- .. sf Q. if . rf' J to 4-A l - wr 1 ' - -- . ' 1:-71 ',.f --1 A sul L .lik Q U , ,,.. X V L ft, , ? YV y af. A al . L, 'll Y .1 new - . 1 . I fa.J'P'.L.i i g '. 'F , ,K D: M .. A f 4, . 1 Y A . ,' t . .. .. 'i r lf-at , ' 5 me -' is .. ff ' F " . ' . 5' L J -" mf f i . A . ' - 'H J .I . . A, . i 1. . . A - i iz 5, -iz: , g - -V up I I 5 ' 'I l'axlfia- ' " gr-'dai .lx , . . vt . I ROBERT AMMON HOBART BAUHAN GEORGE Ai BROWN CLYDE R. CAVINESS CONRAD FRAPS DONALD R. HATCH JAMES HDLMAN Tucson New Hope, Pa. Delta, Colo. Phoenix Tucson Douglas, Ariz. Phoenix Metallurgical Mining Engr. Geological Engr. Geological Engr. Mining Engr. Metallurgical Metallurgy A.l.M.E. Engr., A.S.M., Engr. Phelps Dodge Scholarship, TBII A. V. HUMPHRYS Tucson Mining Engr. A.l.M.E. pres., Engr. Council treas., Kennecott Scholarship, fIwI'A C. P. MESSINA Westwood, N. J. Metallurgical Engr. A.I.M.M.E. JOHN C. PRESTON Sprinfield, Mo. Geological Engr. A.I.M.E., Ski Club, Geology Club JOHN J. KAMINSKY New York. N. Y. Metallurgical Engr., Newman Club, A.S.M., A.I.M.M.E. ROBERT C. MISSING Saddle River,N.J. Geological Engr. Polo Village mayor. A.l.M.E. CHARLES L. RAY Rantoul, Ill. Metallurgical Engr. JERRY KAUFMAN Los Angeles, Cal. Metallurgy A.I.M.E., A.S.M., TEKIP JOSUA MOSTERT Cap Province, Union of South Africa Metallurgical Engr. A.I.M.E., O'kiep Copper Co. Scholarship HENRY H. SHEAR Alice, Texas Geological Engr. CIHFA DONALD KELLIHER Lompoc, Calif. Mine Engr. A.I.M.E., treas.. Allen Ware Award JOHN B. MULCHAY Tucson Mining Engr. Chain Gang, SU Public Relations Comm., Traditions, QPFA LAURO SOARES Ponta Grossa, Brazil Geological Engr. Bobcats, Inter- national 'Students Club vice-pres., Pan Amer. League pres., EAE 131 A.I.M.E., Ken- necott Scholastic Scholarship, AX HARRY KRUMLAUF, Jr. JOHN LAMKIN Tucson Mining Engr. Scabbard 8a Blade, AIMEC Pershing Rifles, Rep. Council, QT PAUL MUDINGER Tucson Metallurgical Engr. GEORGE SYPHER Tucson Metallurgy A.I.M.E., HK? Yarnell, Ariz. Geological Engr. Geology Club, A.I.M.M.E., TBII JOHN PECK Phoenix Metallurgical Engr. A.S.M. 8: Phelps Dodge Scholar- ships, TBII, AXA Sec. L. J. VONBLOTTNITZ Grahamstown, S. Africa Metallurgy I.S.C., Circle K. Kiwanis, Tsumeb Corp.. Scholar- ship, EN J. D. MGLEHANEY, lr. Santa Rita, N. M. Mining Engr. Kennecot Scholar- ship, A.I.M.E., US Bureau of Mines Fellowship, TBII LEDN W. PHILLIPS Marietta, Ohio Mining Engr. CLAUVDE R. WHEELER Tucson Metallurgical Engr. A.I.M.M.E. vice- pres., Varsity baseball, captg EX pres., vice-pres. 5.,.,yf,JzxL'f I , 1 DEPARTMENT HEADS: John Cunningham, Mining and Metal- lurgical Engineering, Mr. Frederick Gailbraith, Geology. COLLEGE OF MINES AND METALLURGY ATTENTIVE mines students Don Kelliher, Ed Bunnell, Grover Perkins and Gene Krumlauf listen as Mr. Jay Dotson describes the function of an automatic drifting machine used during mining operations. MINES AND METALLURGY FACULTY: ROW 1: James D. Forrester, Elmer R. Drev- dahl, John B. Cunningham, Frederic Galbraith, Williard Pye, Thomas Chapman, Daniel Murphy. ROW 2: Sigmund Smith, Harry Krumlauf, John Lance, Halsey Miller, Jay Dotson, Paul Damon. ROW 3: John Anthony, Evans Mayo, Robert DuBois, Edgar McCullough, Spencer Titley. l ev- ,Z TEMPERATURE is checked by Larry Thomas while partner Peter lack performs experiment concerning the heat treating of steel rod 132 DEAN WILLIS R. BREWER COLLEGE OF PHARMACY Since 1952 Dean Willis R. Brewer has presided ver the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy. Dean Brewer, who came to Arizona in 1949, held he positions of Assistant and Associate Professor of harmacognosy before his appointment as dean. Dr. Brewer received his bachelors degree from ,outh Dakota State College and his doctorate from hio State University. He served in the Medical Service Corps of the avy during World War II. Before coming to Ari- ona he was Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and irector of Medical Garden, University of Utah. e has also worked on the faculty at Ohio State Uni- ersity. At present, Dean Brewer is the Consultant to the oison Control Committee of the Arizona Medical ssociation. The College of Pharmacy, established in 1949, s the newest college on campus. Facilities of the Col- ege include classrooms, laboratories, a reference li- orary, graduate study laboratory, medical garden md greenhouse, and an experimental animal colony. The college's newest project is the Arizona Poi- ion Control Network. The Arizona Poisoning Control Information Center is located at the University of Arizona. Treatment centers have been established in the major hospitals of 12 Arizona cities. College enrollment this year is 103. Twenty-seven students will graduate this spring. There are two stu- dents enrolled in graduate work. A newly inaugurated five-year program requires students to have completed one year in a liberal arts pre-pharmacy course. After four years in the Phar- macy College and 52 weeks of pharmacy internship, students are required to take a licensing examination. The license of a fully registered pharmacist is trans- ferable to other states. The UA College has been given "Class A" ac- credation by the American Council on Pharmaceuti- cal Education. Professional organizations within the college in- clude a student branch of the American Pharmaceu- tical Association and three greek-letter fraternities. Kappa Psi and Phi Delta Chi have been established for men and Kappa Epsilon for women. Students who have excelled in their studies are selected for membership in Rho Chi, national Hon- orary society. 133 xl ,IP QW USING MURTAR and pestal, students Horace DeFrancesco and John Swiremix prescriptions in advanced course with aid of instructor Dick Childs " I L'-I I A I ' I , if' 'I fi 'Q i . V f h 1 T 'E' , ne. Q i , . . 4 W I , I I ., gif.. W 111- A I A' ' 1 I SAI"-:. L 1 . :1 - 4' . ' i 4, l ,, - I , v'x', fi . . ' Irvs E 1: 4. ' I fx F I 1, -Vx, 4 w r ai.-by ti g f ' i A Q .N-.I L' - ' 3 . 4" ,.' 5 xl' .T . frfifzwlx .6 p keg - V' 1 ' RR ' 'N .za .V .fi i ' L .J , - - ' " s .Y-1 A :ps , ,K - I If I- -o E.iF'g"!Il 'A Lu . 4 w. A ...ag .V M is - ...y I..-r r- - , fy, A jig 1 EN :'I E I w . , JAMES ALDRIDGE Tempe, Ariz. Pharmacy fI2AX TIP CLEMENTS Corona, Calif. TDM ALSPACH Yuma, Ariz. Pharmacy American Pharmaceutical Assoc., Soph Honors, Choir DENNIS R. CLUFF Pima, Ariz. Pharmacy Pharmacy American American Pharmaceutical Pharmaceutical Association Assoc., AAE ROBERT L. CRUZ RICHARD DEIONG Phoenix Grandville, Mich. Pharmacy Pharmacy Amer. Pharma- ceutical Assoc., RX, KIHAX GEDRGE HENDERSON ALFRED HERNANDEZ Tolleson, Ariz. Pharmacy San Francisco, Calif. Amer. Pharma- Pharmacy ccutical Assoc., 'PAX pres. CHARLES LEAGUE Tucson Pharmacy American Pharmaceutical Association 134 Amer. Pharm. Assoc., Pre- Pharm. Class pres.. Tddl pres., fb..XX RICHARD LEWIS Ferndale, Mich. Pharmacy KKI' CARLOS BENAVENTE Mexicali, Baja California Pharmacy MYRA CUHEN Tucson Pharmacy Amer. Pharma- ceutical Assoc., KE prcs Kc v-pres PAUL GENIEC Tucson Pharmacy Ryan Evans Schlr., Amer. Pharm. Assoc., RX v-pres. KDAX EDWARD HUEBSCH Tucson Pharmacy MANUEL MACIAS Superior, Ariz. Pharmacy Newman Club, Amer, Pharma- ceutical Assoc., KPAX, KA l A 1 ' ,I A ' , A' Q, , lg A 'ei 1 ,Q ff L: 'W 1:5 i rl V I -A l V -1: is JL- 1 ,L ., 2 1 . 4K,' .. 4 .. . Ct p . Il i Y f ' K ,ez - Q ,. W ... if i f Zi!! ,l l L Q f , , l Q, - X i, . ,fill by . , i W . , an V is ii? V : W . X-HQ, ,sr . ,, lk.: V X . 3 lg 447' . i . YV., V' J . 1 Y W ., "Tal 'A L ' ' ' ' ' Q -L i 'f'- ' .2 " . Sli P li-+A'-ii1"r"s' .7 lalnl. l tel e. I si L' . DAN MASSEY DOROTHY BEN PALOS STANLEY REINHAUS MURRAY ROGOW Tucson MICHELBACH Tucson Santa Ana. Calif. Phoenix Pharmacy Flagstaff, Ariz. Pharmacy Pharmacy Pharmacy Pharmacy' Amer. Pharm. American Amer, Pharm, Spurs, Chimes, Assoc. pres. 84 Pharmaceutical Assoc., Sophos. BBB, Mvrlar sec.. mx Assoc.. me Fr. Basketball. BOlll'd, SUAB. qslxq 'PAQ Baird Schlr., lilil', lili GEORGE SERBIN SHELOON STREITER O. R. STURZENEGGER IOSEPH TEX STUART THOMPSON Tucson Tucson Brawley, Calif. San Diego, Calif. Yuba City, Calif Pharmacy Pharmacy Pharmacy Pharmacy Pharmacy American American Class Honors. Univets, Amer. Amer. Pharm. Pharmaceutical Pharmaceutical fl-.XX Pharm. Assoc., Assoc. pres, Kal' Assoc., TA42, WAX Association LDAX v-pres. Award. QPAX REPARING a Soxhlet extractor for medicinal actives are Ray Lee and George McMillan. COLLEGE GF PHARMACY 135 ACCURACY and precision learned in the senior dispensing lab become habitual practices of all pharmacy students. Marguerite Chesney, Director of Physical Education Y for Women, has initiated and supported one of the country's best physical educa- tion curricula. Her strong leader- ship is la principal reason for the Department's success at Arizona. WOM,EN'S PHYSICAL EDUCATION WOMEN'S P. E. FACULTY: ROW 1: Ruth Wynn, Marilyn Markel, Brown. ROW 2: Shirley Gorman, Mary Pilgrim, Betty Ann Dial. Betty Hileman, Agnes Garner, Barbara Green. ROW 4: Elizabeth The Women's Physical Education Department of- fers instruction to women students in softball, field hockey, tennis, volleyball, dancing, basketball, arch- ery, golf and swimming. A modified physical edu- cation program provides instruction in recreational sports, chess and bridge. Facilities of the Department include tennis courts, swimming pool, practice field, basketball courts, gym, pool tables and a dance floor. W0mCH,S intercollegiate sports are golf, tennis wood, Anne Natonek, Betty Lou Read. each year. The events rotate between institutions in Arizona and New Mexico. In conjunction with the Department, the Wo- men's Athletic Association sponsors an intramural program. Sports offered are archery, badminton, bas- ketball, bowling, co-recreational bowling and volley- ball, golf, volleyball, dance hockey- and baseball. Women students may earn athletic points through participation in practices and toumaments. Member- ship in WAA is based on 100 points earned. and badminton' Women's athletic honoraries are Putters, golf, Racquet Club, tennis, Orchesis, dance, Mermaids, swimming, and "A" Club. The University participates in two sports days WOMEN'S P.E. MIUURS' CLUB: ROW 1: Sue O'Brien, Karen Heard, Peggy Rupert, Nancy Gould, Marcel Thompson, Marilyn Post, Gail Stewart, Carol Defreeze. ROW 2: Jeanette Saviano, Carol Huckeman, Carla Baehr, Jane Harrison, Betty Howe, Helen Minson, Barbara Hancock, Roberta Sandburg, Jackie Frost, Rosemary Gala, Bonnie Burger. ROW 3: Jean Orr, Karen Buchanen, Katy Schaller, Leah Turner, Wilma Clark, Brenda Bowker, Donna Wineburg, Linda Sparling, Joanne Coco, Kathy Sharp, Virgie Manker. ROW 4: Jill Jordan, Nancy Falconer, Joan Reineke, Pauline Roberge, Julie Kranhold, Lynn Sirgiej, Barbara Wechsler, Terry Hopp, Barbara Cason, Donna Wallis, Sue Meyer. 136 The Department of Athletics and Physical Edu- ation for Men functions in an effort to give equal pportunity to all male students in athletic activity. The Department is composed of three sections. hysical Education includes courses in physical fit- ess and teacher training courses. Intercollegiate thletics and intramural athletics comprise the other wo sections of the department. Intercollegiate courses are baseball, golf, basket- all, football, tennis, track and swimming. Intramural sports include swimming, tennis, bas- etball, golf, wrestling, track, cross country, flag Joseph L. Picard has been serving in his capacity as Acting Director of Athletics since July 1, 1957. Picard has been at UA since 1930. He received his bachelor's and mas- ter's degrees from the University of Illinois, where he taught before coming to Arizona. Dick Hubbard, Pat Wilson, Dick Nixon and Ed Nymeyer in front of Women's Building. The Club is comprised of 40 men. football, table tennis, horseshoes, pocket billiards, handball, gymnastics, volleyball, softball, badminton, fencing and riflery. Department facilities include a baseball field, a quarter mile track, swimming pool, football practice field and tennis courts. Bear Down gymnasium has a seating capacity of 4,600. Varsity Stadium will seat 26,000. The University is a memberof the Intercollegiate Border Conference and the National Collegiate Ath- letic Association. The athletic honorary, Sigma Delta Psi, selects members on the basis of scholarship and competition in 13 individual sports events. EN'S P. E. FACULTY: ROW 1: Phillip McLaughlin, Charles Ott, Robert Svob, James McHale, Joseph Picard, Fred Enke, Eugene Petter Van owe. ROW 2: Carl Cooper, Frank Sancet, William Coopwood, Irving Kipnis, Frank Gibbings, Roy Tatum, John Ford ROW 3 Edward oherty, Pete Nichols, Warren Woodson, Richard Carr, Charles Tribolet, Allen Stanton. 137 MEN'S PHYSICAL if EDUCATION Colonel McKay Greeley came to UA in 1954. He had previously been a member of the faculty at the Armored School, Fort Knox. A 1929 West Point graduate, he has served in the Infantry, Cavalry, and Armor divisions. He attended CGSC in 1941. Colonel Oscar Heinlein served as Commander of Ladd Field, Alaska, before coming to UA in 1954. A graduate of Annapolis, he has de- grees from Stanford, CIT, and the University of Alaska. His awards in- cude the Legion of Merit and Air Meda. UNIFURMED R 0 T B cadets march in formation on south lawn of Old Main during weekly exercises required of all first-year students. 138 SCHOOL OF MILITA SCIENCE AND TACTI The departments of Army ROTC and Air F ROTC compose the School of Military Science Tactics. The basic training course entails two years of struction and is required of all male students ur 23 years of age. Exceptions are non-citizens, the I sically disabled and veterans. Students who pass attitude, scholastic and ph cal requirements are eligible for a two-year advar course. Advanced course cadets are qualified for c missions as second lieutenants in the Army or Force after graduation. Training in both departments is conducted by ficers and enlisted men of the regular Army and Force. Colonel McKay Greeley serves as professor military science and Colonel Oscar A. Heinlein professor of air science. MODELING the altitude pressure suits are A2!C Charles Serson and Lt. Don Choisser from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. Cadet Lt. Col. Eric Mayer explains the suit while Cadet Major Robert McNabb looks on. Col. Oscar Heinlein, Lt. Col Nevatt, Sgt. Niatt. FURCE FACULTY: ROW 1: Sgt. Loeb- Sgt. Lloyd, Sgt. Cuce, Sgt. Burk- Capt. Thompson. ROW Soular, Capt. Nielson, Capt. Koeninger, Capt. ARMY FACULTY: ROW 1: Maj. William Chisholm, Lt. Col. James McKinley, Col. McKay Greeley, Maj. Charles Harbaugh, Maj, Lawrence Cole. ROW 2: Capt. Jack Zandy, Capt. George Schappaugh, Capt. Thomas Fox, Ml Sgt. Edward Lucas. ROW 3: SFC Donald Wilkinson, M!Sgt. Robert Lowe, M!Sgt. Harry Hayden, MfSgt. Whitten Sink, SFC Raymond Howell, MlSgt. M. T. Hiatt. ARMY-AIR FURCE COLOR GUARD: Cadet SFC Will Rapp, Cadet M!Sgt. Lawrence Randallg Cadet SFC C. Wayne Rapp, Cadet Tech. Sgt. Albert Amado. s'W K , .1 ,r -' V W' V4 N u 1 LQ!! x 'V' f ..v I I .,. ug' .YJ I if N X 'Wx j 4' ,wqxl -wg' W, gg., W Qi,-, .JJ .ll -- l taxis.-'nt 55 if ,SO '30 The College of Pharmacy is currently conducting esearch dealing with the effectiveness of plant rugs in treating human sickness. Native plauts were used by witch doctors and ioneers for hundreds of years in the Southwest. Peo- le in remote geographic areas are still using herbs r treatment of organic disorders. Herb shops and any doctor's offices on both sides of our border lace a significant importance on using these native lants. Investigators believe that these plants probably ave more psychological value than true therapeutic ffect. Drugs being studied are those important in e treatment of diabetes. UA pharmacy students ichard Dudash, Stanley Reinhaus, Richard Lewis nd instructor Lloyd Burton are investigating four lants. If proven useful they could be taken orally, aking the daily hypodermic needle unnecessary. A ln the first step of the research the researchers de- -ermine the drug's effectiveness in lowering blood ugar level by administering it to rats whose adrenal glands have been removed. Further tests show wheth- vr the plant drug is poisonous or causes unfavorable eactions. Finally, observations are made of hospital- ized diabetic patients who are given the drug. L - r. 30 50' 7f 1 'if-"ff1?5i?3?'f'5 fe j546,135lE.h?'5'li"S me Q alias' '25-.?Qj'o'3e' U , O 20 bi 611,55 555 il time lg SAMPLES taken from rut by Stanley Rheinhaus, Richard Lewis ' to check effect of plant drug used in Southwest by witch doctors. PLANTS EXAM I N ED F0 R M EDI CAL POTENTIAL NW EXPERIMENTS are conducted by Mr. Childs to determine drug effects on rats 141 ff' I ,J , A SUPERNUVAE are pinpointed through the Bailey telegraphic telescope by Dr. Edwin Carpenter and Wayne Sanders,using one of ten telescopes at Arizona. LUDKING SKYWARD with aid of smaller telescope, Wayne Sanders and other visi- tors to Steward Observatory search for tiny U. S. satelite, "Explorer I." 1 i 1 142 SKY SURVEYORS AI DE BY STEWARD LENSE ln astronomy research, only four American c leges or universities in the nation operate telesco larger than the University of Arizona. The princi instrument of UAis Steward Observatory is the 3 inch reflecting telescope. Also housed at the observ tory are several other telescopes: the 12W -inch C ver reflector, the 7-inch Bailey photographic refr tor, the 5-inch Cooke photographic refractor, t 11-cm. James visual refractor and the 4-inch Br shear visual refractor. Two of these instruments a' used for student instruction. Research is the prima purpose of the seven photographic telescopes. Every year many research astronomers fro other universities come to UA as guests of Stewa Observatory to continue their studies in various fiel of astronomy. One visiting scientist, Dr. A. E. Dou lass, made detailed studies of the surface featur of the planets and was one of the first men to demo strate the existence and the properties of the atmo phere on Mars. He used the photographic telescop By studying the eclipses of revolving double sta with the photoelectric photometers on reflecting tel scopes and the automatic camera of the Bailey tel scope, members of the observatory staff have learn much about the physical conditions of these stars. Personnel in charge of Steward Observatory, wh supervise much of the research program, are Dire tor Edwin F. Carpenter, Andrew Douglass, Walt S. Fitch and Michael Criss. In an extensive progra the Astronomy Department is in the process of co ducting four major projects. Mr. Michael Criss surveying the skys for supernovae, bright explodin stars. Star clusters are objects of another study to d termine their distance from earth and their inn makeup. A. P. Linnell conducts research on eclipsin stars, while white-dwarf stars are observed by W. Luyten. The photographic telescopes help in th study of billion-star galaxies, ocated millions of light years away from our planet. MEASURING the brightness of stars in the galaxies with the photo-electric photometer on the Observatory's 36" telescope is astronomer Walter Fitch. t h ' x X h , ' Ni, x A- 1' YA. i 1 Qzgqrgy: -A A K' r f r 'M I i 5 la' 4,:,g,Y1'-F I 5 - il 1 - - I - U We J V 'N 5, , ' Y ,. xg P -7 1 . it 1 -L L :Q . ,gy , 1 ,. 1: Nxt' if in -L X - I 1 I 'K if if . if , i , 2' iffg nil W . ' ' ,Y 1:5 l , HP? .". 'f - " 1 el . l l i - E 'Eff' ., ei to ' 143 THE SCENE of Tuesday evening lectures and demonstrations by Dr. Carpenter and the Astronomy faculty, Steward observatory houses the University of Arizona's 36-inch rellecting telescope. WARM DESERT sun is an excellent fossil preserver. Excavations are made chiefly in the San Pedro Valley by staff members FOSSIL FINDINGS INDICATE ARIZONA'S AGE The College of Mines and Metallurgy participates in a wide variety of activities related to the' geological and mineral industries of the state of Arizona. One part of the program in geology deals with the study of fossils. This study is concerned with both the tracing of past life and climates and the dating of geologic events which have controlled the accumula- tion of mineral deposits and ground water deposits. Fossils from several localities in the San Pedro Valley are being studied for information about the Ice Age in Arizona. The oldest fossils found in the San Pedro Valley are giant tortoises, camels and horses from the Ben- son area. These animals lived on the margins of the Valley about a million years ago when the climate was much warmer than it is now in that area. The youngest fossils are the mammoth and bison jaws from the Lehner Ranch near Fort Huachuca. These have been taken from deposits specifically showing that man entered the Valley about ten thou- sand years ago to hunt mammoths and other animals for food. Dr. John F. Lance, Professor of Geology, has been directing the study with students Paul Wood and Steve Ryno. Richard Moors and Robert O'Haire rep- resent the Arizona Bureau of Mines, supplying added data and reference material. The Bureau is chiefly concerned with portraying the distribution and age of the deposits on a geological map. Major L. F. Brady, Research Associate in Geo- chronology and retired teacher, contributes to the project by extracting delicate fossils from the en- closing ribs and aids in the identification. Graduate students are able to ascertain the ages and environ- ments of the deposits by classifying the fossils. 144 l ..-""'s P --"""' rm! ' , ,fffrxtn .I garg- 'AMI QC: ,, 7-5' f ' ' 4fl3"ft, . A- X -Ja .Nr 5 , I K I A X- 4. , z -I A Xa- A ,Y-X Z W ion in Tucson Mountains. PEDRO Valley relics are categorized by Robert O'I-Iaire, Steve Ryno, and Paul Wood at the Mines Experiment Stat E h ' f om their extensive relic collection are PROFESSOR Lance and Major L. F. Brady, Research Associate in a mammot Jaw r ' Ryno and Professor John Lance in the new research laboratory. G60Ch1'0I10l0gY discuss HCWIY f0UI1d limb bone of 2 fossil h01'S6- 4 V? ,mug P 0 N. sniiiif- ,. I "EVE guna mmm Y in gum 3' ,. 513 211330 , im We A . X-w If ll' t desert IT desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert d d C d d . d ' d xslt desert desert d desert desert d eampus WFS CAMPUS CUSTOMS CATER TO DESERT SETTING At the University of Arizona, traditions are prob- lematical. To the student, however, they are as neces- sary as the classroom and constitute the basis of campus life. To define UA tradition is relatively impossible. To be sure, green socks and beanies are enforced during Freshman Week and Memorial Fountain is the scene of subsequent poolings. Members of the Traditions Committee regulate the more traditional "traditions" throughout the year expressly for the purpose of increasing or maintaining school spirit. But certainly, UA tradition encompasses far more. The desert setting provides a unique background for the University community. The student, new to UA tradition, is promptly introduced to one of the most popular types of social gatherings . . . the boon- docker. A campfire, a guitar and a warm desert night comprise the necessary elements. Barn-dances, hay- rides, and picnics in Sabino Canyon also utilize the desert climate. Mount Lemmon, sixty miles from the University offers picnikers towering pine trees and a cool retreat from the hot desert sun. During the winter, skiiers make use of the ski run and the popular Mount Lem- mon Lodge is the scene of many Saturday night dances. Nogales, Mexico, features Sunday afternoon bullfights and its curios are a yearly attraction at Christmas time. The "old west" is typified during Rodeo Week on the campus. Three articles of western apparel are required daily and bearded men, bowlegged girls, and cigar smokers vie for trophies at the annual contest. Blue sky, a jagged mountain range and blooming cacti provide the setting, friendly "hellos" echoing across campus indicate the personalities. These com- ponents, well blended over the years, traditionally are the University of Arizona. 148 heavy snowfalls entice students to pa x+1'9 provides a weltome relief from the hot desert Nsun. During the winter rticipate in 'popular winter sports. i r I 1 . ' r K .I r 'i9.i5it!- f",fr,f, ' if ,J - . A V. I .. , T.-'iff' , ff .i ,, . .xr ' 14.2 fb'-1, Q V . H -- 1----zum' -f. 149 5 rl 4 .silfgi RUDEO WEEK typifies the "old West". 5 IFC sponsors a Christmas party for underprivileged children. qx 5 ..,.. "A" DAY festivities begin with a traditional rally in front of the Stu- dent Union before freshmen form a car caravan to "A" Mountain. TRADITIONAL WEEK ORI ENTS FROSH Met at trains, planes and buses by Spurs and Sophos, the 2600 members of the class of 1961 de- scended upon the UA campus a week prior to registra- tion. After meeting roommates and unpacking their luggage, the freshmen began a week of orientation. They were introduced to President Harvill and student officers at the first general assembly on Mon- day morning. Then began an endless series of tests to determine aptitude and English placement followed by a physical examination. Free time was spent in getting acquainted with the campus, meeting with advisors, planning schedules and buying books. The freshmen were introduced to UA social life at the annual Freshman Mixer in the Student Union. Panhellenic "silence" was lifted for the Mixer and again at the All-University Picnic held on the Wornen's Field. I . " 5 -A-A s INTRUNJUCING Freshmen to UA social life, the Freshmen Mixer is held ally in the Student Union Ballroom as a major highlight of Freshmen W ry . I 1 ,,.L. ,,...' UA, r, f. '.L' .lag URGING freshmen Tori Strauble and Harlene Kauffman to wear green SERVICE honoraries greet incoming freshmen at trains, planes and b socks and hair ribbons are Spurs Rosina Green and Anne Snoddy. during Freshmen Week and deliver luggage to the specified dormit BUCKET BRIGADES are formed around the giant "An as freshmen ready themselves to receive lye from members of the Traditions Committee Climaxing Freshman Week on the UA campus, 1200 members of the class of 1961 made the tradi- tional trek to "A" Mountain this year. Preceeded by a rally in front of the Student Union, the car parade made its way through the city of Tucson and up the winding road to the big "A," Forming a bucket brigade, the Freshmen artistically 1 Y' J -if I? Yi V - Q - A 1 f Fiat 2 N: 4 ' ri sloshed whitewash over the faded rocks, burned the night before by Traditions members. Returning to campus, the freshmen unceremon- iously pooled members of the Traditions Committee in the Memorial Fountain, bringing Freshman Week to a glorious close. V . 'A 9.1' , D, 1, , 11 ' ' 1 4' 'lla FRADITIUNS members pooled in Memorial Fountain by enthusiastic freshmen. COLD CDKES, served by Spur members, provide a welcome break for freshmen painters on top of "A" Mountain LAST MINUTE schedule changes are contemplated before Station :,"2. GROWTH CUNTINU ES AS 11,090 ENROLL Growing pains were evident as 11,090 students enrolled in the University in the fall, setting a new record. The new high included 9300 full-time stu- dents and 1700 extension students. They came from all of the forty-eight states and forty foreign coun- tries making UA a cosmopolitan community. LUNG LINES were a familiar sight on campus as students waited pick up their registration materials in the Student Union TUITION and dorm rent are paid by a coed in the Student Meeting the greater influx of students was an enlarged campus: a new biological science and music building, two men's dormitories and two women's dorms, and a iinished Louie's Lower Level. Academi- cally, UA grew with the establishment of a nursing school and broadening of the Graduate College to include MA's in nuclear physics and 14 other fields of advanced study. Liberal Arts was the most popular college where the boys still outnumbered the girls by over two to one. The freshman class was the largest in UA's history with 2600 enrolled. GHECKERS in the Liberal Arts Building scan materials for errors. if STEWARD Observatory charts the "Sput- nik's" course across the Tucson sky. X W U lt vffim , "Cosmos", the Figi mascot, sits beside the helmet he will wear .nto outer space if Mr. Eisenhower accepts his services as a space-dog. 153 MOONWATCHERS HAIL COMING SPACE AGE The'American people's interest in space travel climbed to a new high shortly after the launching of the Soviet "Sputnik." The western world, suddenly finding itself behind in the space race, strove to meet the challenge of space travel and "moon" launching. UA students and teachers viewed the launching of "Sputnik" with mixed feelings, but all lent them- selves to the spirit of the occasion. During the early mornings, when the Soviet satellite shot briefly over Tucson, dedicated "rnoonwatchers" stood atop campus roofs to peer into the dawn. The astronomy depart- ment held a seminar to discuss the new moon, and Phi Gams offered their dog as the first passenger in the proposed U, S. satellite. ina: Ja. PARENTS FETED AT ANNUAL CELEBRATION Opening its doors November 2, the University of Arizona welcomed 2500 parents to the 26th annual Momis and Dad's Day. Mortar Board and Blue Key, senior honoraries, planned the day's program. After registering in the Student Union the parents were entertained by stu- dent talent at a welcoming assembly, A swimming and diving exhibition was given by Mermaids. A capacity crowd saw the one-act play, "Aria da Capo" in the new Fine Arts Auditorium. Tours of the campus and open houses at the dorms, sororities and fraternities, religious foundations and UA buildings highlighted the afternoon. Parents met President Harvill at a reception in Maricopa Hall. Climaxing the day's activities was the Arizona- West Texas football game which honored Mom and Dad. MA" blanket awards were presented to the parents having the greatest number of children en- rolled in the University which were Mr. and Mrs. Wade Nader of Mesa, and to the parents traveling the greatest distance for the event, Mr. and Mrs. Otto A. Sonntag, who came 9609 miles from Dandahar, Afghanistan. PRESIDENT and Mrs. Richard A. Harvill greet students and their parents at the President's Reception in Maricopa Hall. 154 REGISTERING Mom and Dad takes place in the Arcade early Saturday morning i 5 V li WEN -5 gp I-' Wal I: I: ,.,',ii :pill WV' H ull!! IH 5 iiiifiieg-5 nhiiggigl an llljjiii--:algae-3 IH 5 , ii ill ii l sireifizpggg, 'l 1 I ,A H - i - ::.:. 'fi u ii: :e"::!i!5l Tl l il,-il""iii i i I lil il ' ie! '!::j5::.:::" ' I I - All rl I ifl lhilasiitisiil ii W ilnfiu Elini. N N ll nu I W 1 5 . I 'j. i g A-1 1 I s., , WI 2: 'I xwjililgyigilliia i ,.:Eg,: at Wh xl di H H WI' fill tk ,, , Y UI, sw ' itfgrg 31 ip gf :QQ Qui lin ! 115 I Mum' In f M " i A 5:55- Y i I I , tl! LLM l t g 'El , A' 'll , 'E ' 1 I , lung I " 'Q 5 t ' "'F"ni.'2 fathers are initiated int0 the uAHCiCl'lf H0l'l0l'ablC "TWU TICKETS, please!" frequently was heard in the Arcade where foot- rder of Dependable Father Katsnat the Kappa Alpha Theta h0uSC. ball tickets were on sale for the Arizona-West Texas game that night. ,i-el 'i -u ft. PRIZEWINNERS are Mr. and Mrs. Wade Nader and the Otto Sonntags, being congratulated by Dr. Harvill and Warren Ridge. 155 ,nl Q J .E ll! 1 'i Wig l l' I , lil 32? if T lv fl fl .14 Il itll Egili Heli lass? f "f.Ifl 'lun 'li "TURN ABOUT is fair play," Jack Redhair tells Marianne Downend as she lays out coins to play the Coop jukebox. COEDS PAY DURING DOGPATCH DAYS University of Arizona's annual Twirp Week, sponsored by AWS, is the one week of the school year designed for turn-about dating. Girls are required to "twirp" their favorite beau, which can mean any- thing from a coke date in Louie's to the AWS formal at the end of the week. This year, candidates for the Lil' Abner Contest paraded before enthusiastic supporters in the Coop. Dave Thomas, sponsored by Pi Beta Phi, was crowned by this year's Daisy Mae, Donna Mae Stanford. REVERSED roles find Mimi Lapkoff opening the car door for Dave Schrieber as Twirp Week draws to a close. -53' 'X HIGH UP on a makeshift platform set up in the Coop, Jim Blair holds Petunia Pig, who was the object of the greased-pig race earlier in the "DESERT DREAM" was the theme of the AWS formal in Student Union 51. ' if xx . Lt-if 2 , fmrsaa.- -.--,Z-Q,.,,.,-1.-vm,--s " , . Y E-PM - gifmmmvig' 2"""' ' " f 'M .. I 'y v,-1 ' ' ' '5' +1':H"'z-'-':+' A f . , - 1 l' fn ' a 'Z I .I .K aim, + ,, .,,,,,-,, AM .. . ,,, ,. -7-.v, ,- s V t e--W -.V W-J'-P1 - 4 e--' LTRA-MODERN Louie's Lower Level stands almost completed as the grand opening, planned for the Birthday Party draws near. The newest addi- ion to the Student Union features a television and card playing area, as well as cafeteria, snack bar and seating area for approximately 400. LOUIEYS OPENING CHEERS CROWDED COOPGCERS Louie's Lower Level was first introduced to UA tudents at the Student Union Birthday Party in 1952 as an unfinished Rathskeller. Meeting with immediate popularity, Louie's dirt floors and uncovered beams enhanced its "atmosphere" ln successive years, it became the workplace for dance decoration com- mittees and held various displays and exhibits. Last November, the tive-year dream of Student Union administrators became a reality. Louie's opened its doors as an ultra-modern cafeteria-lounge area. The grand opening was an added attraction at the Birthday Party, presided over by President Harvill. Partygoers crammed into the spacious restaurant to view the inaugural ceremony. Costing over S100,000, Louie's makes available the third meal service area in the Union. The cafeteria line serves hot food, pizza, sandwiches, salads and complete fountain facilities. Colorfully decorated in turquoise, pink and white tile, the bronze counter equipment adds a pleasing contrast. It features a card-playing and television area and a seating capacity of over 400 people. PREVIEWING the modern facilities of the new cafeteria finds Bob Perkins Jack Redhair and Gordon Evans sampling Louie's large selection of foods. 157 REGISTERING for the day's activities are a group of visiting high school seniors. HIGH SCHOOL student council members cro Room 104 for joint meeting with ASUA ARIZONA TEENAGERS APPRAISE UNIVERSITY Opening its doors to 5,400 high school students, UA hosted the largest group ever to attend the annual Senior Day and Band Festival. Blue Key, senior men's honorary, conducted a tour of the campus following registration, The day's program included a welcoming assembly, fashion show and swimming and diving exhibitions. A joint meeting of the diiferent high school student councils BANDSMEN from twenty five high schools throughout A with ASUA was held while Girls' League representa- tives met in the Student Union. Carole Schwaemmle, a West Phoenix I-Iigh School coed was crowned queen at the Senior Day dance. After a barbecue dinner on the Women's Field, the seniors were guests at the University of Arizona-New Mexico football game. At half time the 1,700 bands- men from 25 state high' schools joined with the UA band to present, "How Junior Joins the Band." rizona participated together in the eighth annual Senior Day and Band Festival ' ' 4 f , , -1- A we 4 1 ,-- .Tw ,4 .-1 .. -4,- a dressy suit, a UA coed shows the visiting sen- SERVING high school seniors at the pre-game barbeque were members of Spurs. the type of clothes they will be wearing in college. DAY QUEEN Carole Schwaemmle of West Phoenix School is surrounded by her four attendants: Nancy Scottsdaleg Lou Craig, Camelbackg Karen Mitton, and Marcia Payette from St. Joseph's Academy. . sd 'U POTENTIAL UA FRESHMEN admire a seascape, part of the Kress Collection shown to high school visitors attending the open house at the Fine Arts College. 159 POM PON GIRLS: ROW 1: Dixina Price, Judy Bolt, Ann Cheairs, Ricki Farquhae, Jean MacGregor. ROW 2: Judy Gnatt, Judy Prickett, Ann Hult, Madilyn Buntz, Janet Lincoln, Linda Winn, Anne Collins. PEP LEADERS BUOY SPECTATOR SPIRIT School spirit, that intangible something, which is proof of a student body's loyalty to its school, is either the pride or lament of everyone concerned. Success or a challenge usually whets lagging stu- dent body spirit. This year, the acquisition of Ed Doherty as head football coach, brought renewed interest in our football team. Doherty's techniques, his use of the professional slot-T formation on the gridiron, were enthusiastically viewed by thousands of sport fans. The football season initiates the first fervor of spirit, events during the entire year carry it on. For Mom and Dad's Day, Homecoming and High School Senior Day, UA put on its Sunday best and proudly showed off its campus and colleges. Rivalry and competition with other schools aroused strong feel- ings of loyalty especially when the name 'LTempe" was mentioned. CHEERLEADERS: ROW 1: Maxine Andersonnlienkin, Carol Kelso, Vanda Schus- FRESHMEN CHEERLEADERS: Lynn Sergeais Jerri Craig Di ter, Rae Schaeffer. ROW 2: Martha Strauss, Bobbi Corr, Bill Lewis, Candy VanCe,1 and Jill Jordan, Damato, Skip Wallach, Shirley Ransom, Betty Hoe. 160 new baton-twirling majorette, Kenlynn Williams, practices GUNCERN is registered on the face of Ed Doherty as Wildcats try for a routine on the sidelines before half-time activities at Tempe. lst down. High attendance at games indicated popularity of new coach. liw ., f 1151" , 'Tl' '.fff"ij Arflxx 'lR't"zi"!74-F:f7??"i.'2x ggvggu Avay.nv4W YEQZQSCZQQC ,...,.,. 'f-if-941115. LANNING a new card stunt for half-time entertainment, Traditions Committee members plot the distribution of colored cards in the stadium. 161 DESCENIJING to Louie's Lower Level, a sightseeing coed registers astonishment as a life-sized Chinese dragon comes into view. A-V-4-ei" URIENTAL monster, propelled by members of Student Union mittees, strolled among startled students at the Birthday MYSTERIQUS GRIENT VISITS STUDENT UNION Green dragons and burning sen-sen greeted stu- dents as they stepped into "Chinatown" for the student Union's 6th annual birthday party, November 15. Special cause for celebration was the opening of the newly remodeled Louie's Lower Level. As Alex Jacome of the Board of Regents presented Louie's to President Harvill and the University, a huge fireworks display announced its dedication to the student body. For the occasion, the new dining area was converted into a swanky Chinese night club and featured Danny Shafton's Combo. The ballroom was Shangri-La while the Coop became a Chinese fishing village. Mystery prevailed as the cafeteria changed for the night into the "Forbidden Room," complete with a hypnotist. The Chinese handwriting specialist wrote customer's names in Chinese while a Chinese fortunte teller looked into students' futures. Ann McCuish was presented the "Most Valuable Student Union Employee" award by Student Union Activity Board Chairman, Bob Perkins, who was in charge of the annual event. A CHINESE fishing village provides a gay theme for the dressed up Coop. 162 4--V H- - - - - -ff - , -V V ,lt Y" - Ihr.. TP, . . .. .. .,..,... ..., , ., - ...-........,.f.-. , . V V2 .tg V, L Me., RECEIVING the "MostValuable Employee Award" from Student Union Board Chairman Bob Perkins, is Miss Ann McCuish, financial manager. I in Chinese robes for the SU Birthday Party, Gerry Silvar and Gina Futch POPULAR Sydney Wade performs her favorite number, "It's in anticipation of eating their first meal in Louie's Lower Level with chopstocks. Magic" during intermission time in Louie's Lower Level. 163 "7""E.-A WEEKS of labor went into the construction of the Homecoming floats DG's adding finishing touches to their merry-go-round. 11 ggi PARADE THEME HONORS GRADUATES GF 1932 "Come Back and Look Ahead" was designated the theme of the 40th annual Homecoming program held November 22nd and 23rd on the UA campus. More than 250,000 alumni and townspeople witnessed the popular parade Saturday morning. Joan Moore, a junior from Tucson, was crowned queen at the Homecoming Dance the previous eve- ning in Bear Down Gym. Her attendants were Martha .lo Anderson, Judy Bolt, Sara Hayes, Ann Holmes, Karen Steinke, Sandra Swindler and Kathy Williams. Eddie Grady's orchestra furnished the dance music and blond songstress Jeri Southern entertained vocally. An alumni luncheon was held at the Pioneer Hotel to honor the Class of 1932. All living groups and religious foundations featured open houses Satur- day afternoon and many sororities and fraternities entertained at pre-game banquets. Highlighting the weekend was the UA-Marquette football game Saturday evening. Half-time featured the first performance of the alumni marching band. Mr. John Ehlers of San Diego, California, received the Alumnus Service Award. DELIVERING the jackpot was the Kappa Kappa Gamma stork as it won 1957 sweepstakes with slogan "Expecting Expansion." activities at the UA-Marquette game featured the newly formed Alumni Marching Band. Wildcats pleased the alums with a 17-14 score IST PLACE MEN'S ORIGINALITY IST PLACE WOMEN'S ORIGINALITY 'LMARQUETTE CRASH" "WE'VE GOT YOUR NUMBERN SIGMA CHI PI BETA PHI IST PLACE MEN'S BEAUTY IST PLACE WOMEN'S BEAUTY HIMMOBILIZE 'EMU "GIVE 'EM THE GO-AROUND" KAPPA SIGMA DELTA GAMMA 165 -s 'fx ' 'i.I..bL!,."1'Tmj.,11 TI f' ' fmf'fE if :- - . ,- .. . . . 4, . .1 ILM ,,,.'f .ff ,. ., ,L. V -, 'v - - ' X E -v-.s 4 : '-E nf Af!!! V'f', . His' 1' Rl J fl' ' 252 G5 ,L 1 , 15 -, "LF , v .s I Kakfa. ' .Y - i i, . b -Ai! for -'pi' ' f rf! ' mf Jif- ' A' D ' 'ffm ., 1 Y, X Y gli, , 'V ,M flfialxg , . X .Q .- A ' ,'N- lg!! , 1 -1 1' Q5 ,f .L , . A-' N' J fb , if "Tx ,gy 4 I ffl E 'I ,wif-ggf. ! ' V ,Lf 52-2 vi gf' :ill -. , I if Lgjfpf - ry- f' -F ' E f ,' :Jia u ff: J i W q5Pf'U. f JI QQ 1.5, y Aj gg gg M Alf ' ' 52ilf?a Hill rl uw - f- - YQ,1,-l- ir, . -: -,1 dint'-u 1 'ii 1 . ,,- Y r . . , w , A Q 5 'J ,J gf iq ' Yi A E is :Si 5 V La - ' X ' ' 4 , Q- , 1-W -f V 4 . ff-5 79 5-1 A 5 ,f Q ,. g jiS'2i'ig,H , , riff 1 2 mg?sAg5zgQ'.g,:gj-, 1 ' ' jf fcf"fy" 2iig"T :IA f A f ,Ei-fig iif 7,-i1?p3a5QQf'i Q ,,,. E A , 1 mg- 5 wx Ui'f :i Y Q' if' M: N Aa 'Q sw-L f s- ' ,J A ,sr.ef , A . 1, 1 . 1 vi--J' I Ugllllllwjl ,E fi rw . sy . NIP' I 9 If , V 1 , 12' V 1 - I f . , X f L ' 1 A J sy 2 Q1 1 Q - If , ni? V5 5 Q E ,- F11 ,XT'? anti: ' ,gan W X wf Q - ff . -2 . +4 fi 4' ' :Lg in Q 5' Q. 1' T" ' 'A 7' ' A if, X 4? 'x 'F " xi '-L -31 xx' KY :fr ,s I ,fx A' 'N . T X A , W , A l 1 . 'U . . . 1 LEO CARILLO comedian i T 1, . .. l ' V , l ROBERT GOLDSAND JOSETTE CLAVIER O pianist Les Ballets Janine Charrat deFrance UA AUDIENCES VIEW INTERNATIONAL TALENT Offering the students an opportunity to enjoy the best in music, ballet, drama and comedy, the Artist Series brought artists of international repute to the University of Arizona. Opening the season were two piano recitals. The well-known artist, Robert Goldsand, presented the first concert featuring Beethoven, Weber and Rach- maninotf. In November the distinguished and popular Leonard Pennario executed pieces by Handel, Brahms and Chopin. The Symphony Orchestra of Florence, which is internationally known for its participation in the Florence May Festival, presented an evening of Vivaldi, Corelli, Rossini and Respighi. The audience was entertained by the graceful dancers of Les Ballets Janine Charrat De France who presented "Harlequin," "Domino" and other numbers. More of the international flavor was added as the famous Deutschmeister Band of Vienna pleased every- one with its rousing marches, lilting waltzes and stirring folk songs. Also featured were the Singing Boys and Girls of the Vienna Woods. Comedy reigned as Anna Russell presented her satire of art-song styles before a packed audience in February. Comedian Leo Carillo known to thousands of TV fans as the Cisco Kid's Pancho, made his ap- pearance in March. Concluding the season was Eileen Farrell, well- known soprano, who demonstrated her ability as one of America's outstanding concert personalities. . ,X l X iv Zjp, . I LEONARD PENNARIO ANNA RUSSELL EH-,EEN FARRELL pianist Comedienne Soprano W rr F? 1 5 Q- fn, Q , 1"f ii . L s u + Ili in 6 .ff vw n 1 , 1, X 1 . ' 1 1 Y I ,, x -H. '-4. S-Q9 5 5 5 12- I KT 1. g C ff: "2 -.11 WHL . 4 ,. ,Q A . -w ' K gr, v 1. E51 re ifigfi. --. ,-' -- f .1 1 P gr "9"f'-1 7 -,,,,ie5g,1: 'J 1- "7'JfQ1,wr1l', :U ' ' A-'ff If -shi-,Ve J-'1:.': w, - ,H .z' -izrfxrg, 4:1 -'Z3s.Q'r1 4 AQ?-4 9' -1 'iw ' aw :fs 9 3 2 L O V A, WK' Ll' I V f. .- -4 f f N 1. - N..-Q fW+mg.si'iic ' if f lbllnm H an increase in school spirit, E P E men Howard Goldwyn and Alexander confer with Homecom- Queen Joan Moore before leaving Tempe. -f Rx,- NIE fi-N X' - . ENSE moments of the game are registered on the face of Coach Ed Doherty. BIKE RIDERS ready themselves for the starting signal which will pirited supporters encouraged the Wildcats from the overflowing UA section. signify the beginning of another annual bicycle race to Tempe. 169 cf -Z E- 1. 2 fu..-1 if ' - "0UCH!" yells Jack Hoagland as a Red Cross nurse jabs his finger. All participants had to stop at test stations in the ballroom before donating. .K v' REVIEWING a case record, a nurse checks to see if Susan Slagle can safely donate a pint of blood. DONORS GIVE T CAMPUS CHARIT Free movie passes, ROTC drill exemptions an one extra 1 l :30 privilege were the enticements offere to participants in the 1957-1958 blood drive Dece ber 4th and Sth. The new Campus Community Servi Committee supervised this year's project. Although the drive took place while many of t students were still feeling the effects of the Asiati Flu epidemic, 375 pints of blood were donated. The were used to fortify the city's community blood ban The Tucson Red Cross was co-sponsor of t project and staffed the blood bank that was set u in the Student Union Ballroom. Volunteer stude workers assisted by filing cards and serving refres ments to the donors. Faculty members and university personnel wer also accepted as donors this year. CHA! CHECKING the blood flow into the pint-bottle quota is one of the many Red Cross nurses recruited to help with the two-day drive which netted 375 pints of whole blood. 170 The original dedication ceremony of the Student Building took place on November 17, 1951. is commemorated by the bronze plaque which This building is erected with enduring affection honor of the students, alumni and faculty of the of Arizona who answered their country's for service and gave their last full measure of The building is a monument, not only to the 283 dead whose names are inscribed on the plaque, also to the men who went down with the USS on December 7, 1941 at Pearl Harbor. Each year a memorial service is held to rededicate Student Union and to commemorate the sinking the USS Arizona. Hanging in the tower is the original bell from the "Arizona," The original flag and several models of the ship are on display in the Union lobby. l H b a't for the memorial service to begin in front of the Student Union. ERVICE MARKS VALOR OF WAR HEROES -' FT 1- ' .1 --ff-eff-Qwrf: --Lfzfrff , X iT,g r!31r:,Kl,L,lg-FF'-53l-:H33,!.-L,?Li:,.j7i-13251:-it 1 'LF-' '-it 'Fi - -"-J. ' , ' 'I-lit H J ' S A GORDON of Marines in dress uniform stands at ease during the invocation. 171 XENA- V ' I h Q 1-F' fiQr,..x.,,. 1 f f 575 if E 'A R 1 fyxw 3 . N ' V. x rh gi I. Y .4 f-- ' Mplflf 'T f-A H5 5. .. THREE-LEGGEIJ race turned into a seven-legged one at the rodeo when competing couples found they had to include a goat on the team. riding was one of the popular men's events in the Rodeo. Pro- were used to help meet traveling expenses of UA team. BOSS and NIRA president, Mickey McCarty, receives the All-Around Champion Cowboy trophy for 1957-58 UA Rodeo from Dr, Harvill. 1 f l l, CHRISTMAS in the city of Tucson is -characterized by brisk weather, sunny skies and an abundance of winter visitors. UA students find that Mt. Lemmon, caroling parties, roaring fireplaces and Christmas formals provide a substantial substitute for the traditional "white Christmas." CAMPUS DECORATES FOR HOLIDAY SEASON "MERRY CHRISTMAS," says Santa Claus at the SAE Christmas party. Many dorms and houses included underprivileged children in holiday festivities. 174 A round of festivities ushered in the 1957 Chris mas season on the UA campus. Hundreds of studen joined together to serenade hospitals and hom throughout the city of Tucson, Collegians dressed i Santa Claus suits distributed gifts to small guests sorority, fraternity and dorm parties for unde privileged children. Formals and tuxedos were in vogue as the whi of holiday parties got underway. Music filled th University auditorium when the combined voc groups of Choral Society, Symphonic Choir an University Singers were accompanied by the Sy phonic Orchestra to present Handelis "Messiah," Student Union Activities Board members decke the Union halls with holly and colored lights. Th main attraction was the eighty-foot evergreen whic was decorated in the patio and illuminated the Unio at night. Mortar Board members entertained foreign st dents at a Christmas party at the Theta house an Chimes spread holiday cheer at the Ryland Horn for the Aged. The "spirit of Christmas" permeated all phase of campus life and then quietly subsided as student piled luggage on trains and planes bound for hom and their own tree trimming. 0 'I- X -.rs Christmas carols are en- by Marian Tackett, Jeanne Miller Virginia Harmon as they prepare the Christmas season in Pima Hall. evergreen was temporarily planted in the patio DECORATING for their formal in the Pioneer Hotel Ballroom, Thetas busily given a holiday motif by members of the Union trim the silver tree and simultaneously discuss "who's coming with whom." 175 1 -"5--fr 5' I . ,N 1 U ,H I WI I A W . 1 i i READY to put UA on the coaxial cable, this TV tower was part of equipment erected for NBC's coverage of Arizona on their program, "Wide Wide World." TS SEMESTER SIDELIGH This was the semester that: UA mascot Donna Dog died on October 19, victim of a hit-run driver . . . The Asiatic Flu epidemic ravaged the student body and made inroads into class attendance . . . Enrollment increased to a record 11,090 . . . Head football coach, Ed Doherty, inaugurated the slot-T formation . . . The new music building opened, as did Manzanita-Mojave, women's dorms, and Apache- Santa Cruz, men's dorms . . . The School of Nursing welcomed its first class while the Engineering College hailed its new addition . . . Modern Louie's Lower Level was christened at the SU Birthday Party . . , Student leaders formed the Representative Council, and the Inter-dorm Council met for the first time . . . Joan Moore, Homecoming Queen, reigned over the 1958 Fiesta de los Vaqueros . . . The UA rodeo com- bined with the NIRA rodeo and Mickey McCarty was elected head of the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association . . . A secret electronics forum brought the Army's Vice-Chief of Staff, General Lyman Lemnitzer, and a squad of military police to the basement of the Women's Building . . . Construc- tion began on a new geology building and two more men's dorms . . . Appropriations for a solar energy laboratory on campus were allotted . . . The Educa- tion Building was completely renovated . . . 1,225 people received awards at the fall honors convocation , . . The library inaugurated Sunday study hours on a trial basis . . . AWS ruled that coeds could wear Bermuda shorts on campus after 4:30 p.m. and on the weekends . . . A new rooter's club sported blue capes at all football games . . . Representatives from six schools met at the state AWS convention . . . IQs became Alpha Lambda Delta, national freshman honorary. 1 176 after his address to the student body WEARING academic robes, Dr. Richard D. Weigle, speaker at the fall honors convocation, converses with Dr. Harvill RMITORIES became temporary infirmaries during the Asiatic Flu epidemic. Linda McHenry patiently awaits her recovery. CLASS ELECTIONS were advertised by a sack-full of stunts. Here, Duane Knudson tries to get votes for Dunipace 177 xEE3QEEEf?fwWx -k .. -vw .. .., MMHM,qk -'15 it! Q7 '43 M5 '- Q: ' ,A 55?-' X ' ma -5'-'11, R? 5 ' " 'A V A! ' f -f , xmfmff W . gf.,5.' 3 4 ' ' Kip' e ,tj-. L F - .Q . o - A. 1 r. f A U 'ffp .... ' I-j:7fTL.'.':'ff 5 ' g3g33uw7a1v.xX gg -T. 1- , 1-1-.gg -'gftgjz-54 "Wi I x 'x i ,n's.x ' ' X -fu' ,, ,. 1 4+wQ ," ,,.gmr 2 xx V vegfu-1, r-mf1'u1rffI'---1"4"" ,' .L .N YJ! . A 1-H' '-'zgahtayg . 1 - 'fliM?Qf-Ei!:':11Q223fJ.F3??!L,4195.-. - .P 'f - - .,:'-"X"X"""'A HT?" T' ,f'.,! xg ' .":,,-4,-gvfaff-T"'j LfQihiiiiw ,, if l ax. ,IE : 'i L' 'I . i . :,. fx Q 1 -.e.',m , ... fmggb U --Fianna? , .lm gag A Eh 594 991 F' ,hy ,gm ' ., 1 'Q 7 2 I . 4 J ff fl., ff I, E Q53 I 'WF' ,Is ,lb-'Q r u---int 'K L- ' -X 1 Richard A. Harvill crowns Desert Queen Kathy Lockett. KATHY LOCKETT CROWN ED QU EEN Activities centered around a huge replica of the 1958 Desert cover at the annual Desert Dance held in the Student Union Ballroom on February 14. Highpoint of the evening was the annoncement of the Desert Queen. The queen's identity was re- vealed as she broke through a replica of the year- book's cover. 1958 Desert Queen Kathy Lockett, representing Kappa Kappa Gamma, was crowned by Dr. Richard A. Harvill, president of the University. Miss Lockett's court included Jeane Forman, Chi Omegag Linda Sinclair, Delta Delta Deltag Terry Jay, Maricopa Hallg and Marilyn Reynolds, Mohave Hall. The queen and her attendants were selected by the rnale members of the Board of Publications from candidates selected by the women's dormitories and sororities. Marcia Orr served as dance chairman, and Sara Hayes was in charge of the queen contest. Music for the evening was provided by Wayne Webb and his orchestra. DESERT Queen Kathy Lockett, Kappa Kappa Gamma, breaks through huge replica of the 1958 yearbook cover at the annual Desert Dance. SWEEPSTAKES WINNER "Voodoo Ve mence" presented by Alpha Delta ALPHA DELTA PI CAPTURES SWEEPSTAKES PHI GAMMA DELTA captured the men's trophy with "The Missle Game." 180 'LWide Wide World" themed the 8th annual Va sity Show in the University Auditorium on March Twelve fraternities and sororities participated ' this year's show which was sponsored by Kapp Kappa Psi, national band honorary. Proceeds from the event were used to provid band scolarships for University students. Sweepstakes winner in the show was Alpha Delt Pi Sorority. A huge idol dominated the stage for thei' skit themed "Voodoo Vehemencef' "Manhatten was the theme of the women's division winner Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. Men's division winner wa Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity with their rendition o "The Missle Game." New to the show this year Wa. a mixed division. Taking first place honors in thi. division for "Festival of the Fig" was Pi Beta Ph Sorority and Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity. Between the acts entertainment was provided by' the Hepcats, Vocalist Danny Membria, and Maste of Ceremonies Bob Myers. Other participating organizations included Kappa Alpha Theta, Alpha Xi Delta, Sigma Alpha Epsilon Kappa Sigma, Pi Kappa Ehi, Alpha Tau Omega, and Alpha Chi Omega. 1 5 P -' MA. "" H I :51Q,3. , 1 X. X' 'W' "' P' 1 gi. J 1,79 Aw'- .1 Q 1 P '5 ' QV lv 'LL ,'flA' 1 Y-, ,, . ,ug--n-.........-...-Y., -X ...-..v . -5. ' i 1 4 ' -'ff I n lj U17 15223. is' 41- -' "jg ,1 :R " , 'r , 0 5 l ,Lx i' ff, 2677- fs, ,'1.,wd y, M 14 I - -sf.. . . Ai " ' 1 ' ' 1 , - V' H .MK .I 5 4 I ,V I, wx 14 4 . , . fe., ,,1l'5A2?.w I. ' Mk K x iqx ix 'A K ? A Q ' V .X 'UI , ., v., U , A ,X 'v.- vB' Jiffy' 'U 57 ,1.?:-Q,r,..Aji. ' 1 x - ' V. . H ,, 6 ix GREEK exchanges took place on Tuesday and Wednesday nights of RIL Week. At the Delta Gamma house, the Reverend Sam J. Lindamood, Jr. spoke on the Week's theme "Modern Rivals of Religion" and afterwards, led a question-answer period. 'GRIVALS OF RELIGION" THEMES RIL WEEK Centered around the theme "Modern Rivals of Religion," the 15th annual Religion in Life Week was held February 16-20. Featured during the week were five guest speakers: William E. Barett, vice president of Brigham Young Universityg Dr. Russell V. Delong, president of Pasadena Collegeg Rabbi Albert Plotkin of Temple Beth Israel in Phoenixg Dr. Robert C. Good, assistant professor of international relations at the University of Denverg and Father B. Ryan, assistant chaplain at the Aquinas Newman Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Events of the week included a banquet, exchanges at the fraternity and sorority houses at which speakers highlighted the evening, conferences at the religious centers and dormitories, and a "Skeptics Hour." Sponsors of the week's activities was the Univer- sity's Student Religion Council. Charlotte Vance was chairman of activities. BANIIUET tickets are sold in the Student Union lobby by Charlotte SKEPTICS Hour was featured on Wednesday afternoon in the Student U Vance and Mary Lee Hutchison. Karen Utke is the willing customer. The five guest speakers led a panel discussion followed by a question pe 'tv .ig 5' ,, ,dx y A W. .I , M HILL, auctioneer, receives bids for campus celebrities. The event raised 380 which will be distributed to various selected worthy local charities. CAM PUS CH EST NETS E380 S380 was raised at the annual UA Campus Chest Drive Auction which was held March 29. Campus celebrities were put on the block and sold to the highest bidders by Jim Hill. Those sold included Darold Shutt, assistant dean of meng Student Union Director Marvin fSwedeJ Johnsong Kenelyn Williams, UA baton twirlerg and Diane Vance, Kitten of the Month. Mike Pollack, "Most Eligible Bachelor," was sold for S10 and the DG and Pi Phi Quarters were sold for 340. Drawing the highest bid of the day was Danny Shafton's Combo which was sold to Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority for 3125. Funds collected in the drive were allocated to the Indian Student Scholarship Fund, the National Scholarship Service for Negro Students, and the World University Service. STUDENTS gather in the Coop to view Campus Chest Fund auction activities. 183 PIGGY-BACK riders near the iinish line in the annual Greek Week Olympic CLOUDS UF WHITE dust rise as gil-ls blow awe the flour l Y Games. The featured event of the busy day was the Greek chariot race. mal-5hma1l0W5,The wil-mere of the event were Kappa A1 BANQUET, DANCE HIGHLIGHTS 3RD ANNUAL GREEK WEEK The serious was mixed with the humorous as the third annual Greek Week was held March 17-22. Taking a critical look at themselves, the Greeks ex- changed ideas and suggestions at various workshops. Main speakers at the Greek Week Banquet were UA graduate Betty Jacka, now a counselor at Long Beach City College, and Dean Glen T. Nygreen of Kent State College. The Panhellenic scholarship trophy was retired by Kappa Alpha Theta. Zeta Beta Tau received the IFC trophy for having the highest grades among fra- ternities. The Phi Gamma Delta pledge class had the highest grades among fraternity pledge classes, and Theta Chi received the Sigma Chi trophy for the most improved scholarship. The Outstanding Independent Woman award was presented to Joan Muretic and Marty Garcia. Duane Lingafelter was chosen Outstanding Independent Man. Other events included a quartet contest won by the Phi Phi and ATO quartets. The Greek Olympics featured a chariot race and relay events between fraternities and sororities. Jack Reid's Orchestra and the Four Knights were featured at the dance which was highlighted by the crowning of Greek Week King, Phi Gam Mike Hoff- man and Greek Week Queen, Theta Suzi Daly. ALL IT TAKES is a little coordination to be a winner in the three-legged race. Games were held on the Women's Field. I EEK WEEK King Mike Hoffman and Queen Suzi Daly exchange iles after crowning. The dance was held at the Masonic Temple. 4 -"1 'z "7 .N '-'74 9' - S .3 ,Q Of' pu E i E 'N 5' V: WINNING the IFC Scholarship Trophy was Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity. Accepting the trophy from Lynn Hornbrook is ZBT Dave Schreiber. l i' i 1' .' 1 i SA ,'.v-- - -. BETTY IAGKA, UA graduate, was featured speaker at the Greek Week Banquet. MASS CONFUSION ruled as students tried to win votes for their favorite candidates. 2270 students cast votes in the election. MCINTOSH VOTED PREXY IN TIGHT RACE Men in kilts and Arabs in long colored robes may seem a bit strange to a newcomer on campus but to UA students it was all a part of student elections. Combining the AWS elections with general elec- tions, 11 offices were at stake. The selection of a yell king by ballot was a new feature in this yearis election. Trying to emphasize selection by qualification and minimizing stunts, the elections committee adopted a policy abolishing car parades. A general assembly at which the candidates spoke was also featured. Campaign stunts still played a big part in this year's election. Dominating the arcade was a gigantic 50 foot sign for Pence. One of the most hurnerous devices was a McIntosh machine which would spit, spatter, and rattle back the answers to questions fed into it. "20,000 Arabs Couldn't be Wrong" sur- rounded the Phi Delt Oasis as they backed their candi- date Dave Martyn. A Porter service carried girls books across campus for Shelby Porter, AWS presi- dential aspirant. Kappas wore work pants to class for their candidate carrying out the theme of "Vote for Margo, She's a Worker." Twenty-five percent of the student body voted in the final election, April 2. The closest race was be- tween the presidential candidates, Tom McIntosh and Dave Martyn. McIntosh won by 42 votes, 1156 votes to 1114. Jim Wilkes was elected vice president. Other ASUA posts were won by Danny Shafton and Gus Berry, Junior Councilmen, Margo McKenzie was chosen new Junior Counoilwoman while Gail Ottinger was elected ASUA Secretary. New AWS president is Sydney Wade who de- feated Shelby Porter 559 to 414. Elected vice presi- dent was Betty Tadano while Shirley Vanskike be- came AWS Secretary. Chosen as AWS treasurer was Carol Heiniger. Dan Mariscal defeated two other candidates for yell king with the platform of a four day week and a 4.9 grade average, A HG for Tom Mclntosh for USUA president are supporters Gene Simmons, Downend, Corrine Davis, and Dale Snailum. McIntosh won by 42 Votes. NX-N UUTGUING PRESIDENT Jack Redhair offers congrat- ulations to Tom Mclntosh on his election victory. tLT. .... . ' :Gigi ,L-J iff? - -HH . if Ji.. .-,eo Q , . . .., 1,-I E -.if-1 W, A - - ' - . . I urfwmlr E ED .K , , E ' "'l f1:.i - . . .,.-V ,I,:::,ik 1. ,.,. TZ':.Z1rQ. 187 MIXED EMUTIUNS are evidenced as com- plete election results are announced. AUTUMOBILES gave way to the "jet age" this year as the traditional jalopy was replaced by a F-87 jet plane to provide an outlet for frustrated emotions. A Gay Nineties theme welcomed students to the annual three-day Spring Siesta sponsored by the Stu- dent Union Activities Board. SUAB Chairman Bob Perkins was in charge of the event. Friday night featured a carnival atmosphere in the Union as campus organizations sponsored booths, variety shows and dances. The third-floor terrace was opened for the first time and resembled a Gay Nine- ties park complete with ice cream parlor, cotton candy vendors and balloons. An F-87 jet plane was requisitioned from Davis- Monthan to be used in the popular "airplane smash". Blue Key sponsored Tandum bike rides and the Inter- Dorm Council presented a variety show in the Coop. LDS offered students the opportunity of dunking campus celebrities and Delta Chi members sponsored a penny arcade. Street dancing was held in front of the Union and the Ballrooms offered students a more formal atmosphere for dancing. A miniature golf course was set up in the patio. Saturday evening featured the traditional Red and Blue Ball in the Ballrooms. The Four Freshmen en- tertained and new student body officers were inaug- urated by ASUA president, J ack Redhair. Sunday afternoon the annual Taco Dinner was held on the lawn in front of the Union. Members of Spurs served a large percentage of the student body a complete Mexican dinner for 301. SUAB CELEBRATES GA NINETIES WEEKEND ROULETTE wheels occupied the Student Union balcony as Delta Chi memb sponsored a Gay Nineties casino complete with costumed can can "girls ICE CREAM parlor graced the newest addition to the Union. RED AND BLUE Ball featured the inauguration of new student body ofiicers. Jack Redhair, outgoing ASUA president, administers the oath of ofHce 189 HAPPINESS PREVAILED as white clad coeds crowded around newly tapped members of Mortar Board, senior women's honorary. WOM EN'S DAY HONORS UA CO EDS Rising at 6 A.M., women students assembled in front of Old Main for the annual Woman's Day, May 1. Highlight of the morning was the tapping of the new Mortar Board members. A Woman's Day assembly was held in the audi- torium where new members of Chimes, Spurs and Wranglers were announced. Awards for scholastic achievement were also presented. Guest speaker was RECEIVING HER SPUR, emblem of sophomore women's hon- orary, is Pat Culbertson. Presenting it is Sonja Reinhardt. Mrs. Evelyn Kirmse, newly elected president of the Board of Regents. A picnic for all women students on the Library lawn was held after the assembly. Climaxing the day was the All-University sing which was held in the Greek Theater on the women's Held. Competition was divided into three classes, nien's women's, and mixed division. PICNIC is held for all women students in the olive grove south of library. -., coach Fred Enke presents the 1957 of the Year" award to Terry Coyle. ECEIVE AWARDS Excitement filled the Student Union Ballroom as e male members of the student body assembled for he annual Men's Night, May 2. Men who excelled in athletics, scholarship, and xtra-curricular activities were presented awards. Highlight of the evening was the announcement of he new members of Blue Key, national senior men's onoraryg Bobcats, local senior men's honoraryg N xg! ,, M RECEIVING congratulations from Keith Renken on his selection for Blue Key, the national senior men's honorary on campus is Gordon Evans Chain Gang, junior men's honorary, Sophos, sopho- more men's honorary and Traditions Committee, Uni- versity booster organization. Announcement of the outstanding male faculty member, the outstanding senior athlete, the outstand- ing sophomore man and those selected for Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities rounded out the program. AWARDS to the outstanding male stud ents are made at Men s Night program V534 :iii ' 'I-Nl' Q:-'fqgizfr fl" Fwy, 'SUE ...N F SEMESTER SIDELIGHTS -1, My w..,L:'w-11' ...uf T'-X-an ' -4' .Q vrffuf- 'F' ' W., ,,,45sf.."k, """"','Fyvn--na, dw any :J T? wa. LN wig We A 4 - Y H .-:' V " fn. ,g-, ff-"j.t:. . 1 T'-,..' ff '.-. l H V-UH' 2' 4' b ,. A ".- .,vi,, .1 ., .. , V. K .,,:,., ,, l. . .A Y iz. , .."-5'-.fe :J A- 9,41 ' 'sf Q99 1: hr .RWE 1 fi? Sf-Pr: ii .. ., ,Je G., Y divhsiz wg 4.3. X - -at f .V , , T 'L T' ' fi ,-1225? .- "" f E2 :f.a'.:sa3fQ.:-gr' ' .,' 1 A A I: -I fi E'1"6'2 t'-L., '. . ! 'AA' 2-E' . . .5 5. of a ln- 1 -S. " SGABBARIJ AND BLADE S 4th annual A Mountain cleanup activities netted 2300 pounds of trash SNOW IN TUCSON!!! A University coed gleefully views snow for This was the semester that Louies Lower Level became jazz city every Sunday afternoon when It played host to Lighthouse which featured well known entertainers Mortar Board sponsored a series of Coffee Breaks a discussion panel on IOPICS of current student interest Eleanor Roosevelt Margaret Mead and Senator Robert Kennedy spoke at the Sunday Evening Forum Seventeen paint ings were added to the Gallagher Collection which makes it one of the finest displays of contemporary art in the country A new S900 000 Home Eco nomlcs Building was planned Fire cause S15 000 damage to the Education Buildlng which was in the process of being remodeled a Christmas Tree took root in Student Union Patio Tom Mclntosh defeated Dave Martyn for ASUA president by 42 votes 2300 pounds of rubbish were picked up from A Mountain during the 4th annual Scabbard and Blade cleanup program the first time This atmospheric phenomenon is most unusual for 5-Q ,.Q4Ivi't?'?f' ' Q 'I Q-'iq 'Z t. 4 A xi CONFORMITY on the campus was subject discussed at Coffee B HTHDUSE at Louie's was inaugurated the ASUA Assemblies Committee. nday afternoon jazz sessions feat- ed well known artists as well as UA And also: 5B657,436.00 were accepted in private gifts to the University by President Harvill . . . IBM donated a five ton computer . . . Dr. Waterman of the National Science Foundation in Washington, D.C. gave the main address at commencement . . . Marvin "Swede" ,Johnson became Alumni Secretary . . . Barney Kessel was an added Artist Series . . . two aft- ernoon football games were announced for the 1958 season and a Yell King was selected on the ASUA ballot . . . Diane Vance was revealed as the talked- about subject in the Kitty Kat's "Date With Diane" . . . Evelyn Jones Kirmse was named president of the Board of Regents . . . A very welcome,sidewalk was added between the Pump House and the Aero Building . . . President Harvill issued diplomas to 1,060 graduating seniors on the evening of May 28th. XV. l F N LEFT: Tony Neville, Princeton graduate H assumed the editorship of the Arizona ' Alumnus this spring. RIGHT The UA Marching Band was invited to perform J at Walt Disney's famed Disneyland xfbf fl, K s, nv T s ix 's ,, , p. . x, . ' .uf '. f. 5 f -, m il 'nf . rg., 'THQ'-,L', n ... .' , .' 'L ' ' ' '. ' ' "I" ' . .f , 1, . -.!,4 Y , f'f"',,'1"'I"l:jj'1' ' 5' I ,- WW 1- l , It-L1 L a..,.....l.x...-.'...4.........' , A I V, ' vm - . L., :v -,g,...xI .-' . A.1.1.x ,4Lw1' 1 "',x 4:4-I . ' X v ' - Y '47 Hi" 1"--L' " 2 "' -. - . -'1- . - ' ,.- ,.,,., ,-.L.-.41, f.,rf -f . . , M -P A 1 F "1 , 5' . 4. 1: .. 'E V '-'Jr' jp'-.f -' , 1 ' L ' . 'fir ',' H ' 4 ' ,...., .. Q ,- .M , N- ' ,. .V f.-1'fi- 4-.- ., , W-.. .' l 4 Y ' ,,,, 2 A ' -5 '-Li-L 1f'giEFfm.N gd mr 5, , M .. . . 2, A - . A A ,Am.u.f"h u- 4. -sa .sg J-. .- ,,, .. .1 12. gf:-v - -'-. '- - "- ' " - H,-,Ir - ,. vw, . H 4 - , . ,- ', . Y -- ' - - - -.-gf' . I 'V ' wi.--"gy 4. ' . .Q , .. K , .- .. ---Q "' " -0-.....:.C4-I . 1- ' ,I f ' - , , . v - 1 - '- V , . . . Q - . - ' T V., . .. ,. 1, --, - ,..'. -1- 2- V'-B-. " - , . . ,Af "' ' ' A ' ' .' .. ' ,' 4 K' - - .-,. ..., .....,.,. . A 40 . . - . . V ,.. . A -1 -. 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I , Q 1 J' . :bv l' ,. ,V ROY LTY 3-:rv--T, -- - f . a, -. +L. . 1 -' I 1. S-+-,.. , , - 4 .QI uit. K. F-31 "' 'X .. , , 1 , , 1, j, W'- ' , '- 'Q .. '. yr' ' A,--xg. - . ,-rv '- . ' T,-'-'.7J . iff, Y .H 5. 5. I N W 1 1 L: 4,. - , r ,nr J J,- 4 'a' ,a1,,v' , k - f ji-Qrfmgi' 4 q,'1f2.i-A. i.f:Q5:. -- .,..1'gw .-1-x g, .-"' A H.-Z 1 hull! W .wx kv. 1 --XL: 'nj 'VIP Ik. 1, 'r , Jg:an, ' :L 'Pl bu A rlI:'?'4"1 has '-,HEC 5Rxu4E.'1. . 5 r' 4 ,.g ..' 1 w 'L- 3 V?T:.-.151-r, -, kr r, :mr " --Cc 3. wa? ' , .W , f Y w w .w ,VJ w w k , , ,um N X . NL. 1'i'xu If 'I ,.-.1-, .,. , fi x R1 .iufyw 51411. .g 1. ' 1 . . ' ' ' 1 ww Q- . Wig, , -VJ 'L' A ,L JK' 1 D ESERT QU EEN .KATHY LOCKETT AND ATTEN DANTS Chosen by the male members of the Board of Publications, Kappa Kathy Lockett was crowned queen at the Desert Dance, February 14. Identity of the Queen was revealed as she stepped through a giant replica of the yearbook cover. Kathy was crowned with white carnations by President Harvill. A jxmlor ill llro College ol Liberal Arts, Kathy is a native Tucsonian and majoring in foreign rela- tions. She has spent a summer as an exchange student to Italy in the Experiment in International Living. The 5' 5" brunette is social chairman of her sor- ority. She has done modeling in Tucson and is an avid sports fan. In the court of the Desert Queen were Marilyn Reynolds, Linda Sinclair, Terry Jay and Jeanne Forman. A member of Delta Delta Delta sor- ority, Marilyn Reynolds was Mo- jave Hall's queen candidate. She is a sophomore majoring in element- ary education. This year she was also a finalist for IFPC queen. Las Vegas, Nevada is her home. rl Representing Maricopa Hall was Terry Jay, a sophomore from Ca- rona del Mar, California. She is an English major and plans to teach in the secondary schools. Her hob- bies encompass all sports but she is especially fond of golf. Terry's sor- ority is Delta Delta Delta. 197 A sophomore in the College ot Lib- eral Arts, Jeanne Forman is major- ing in psychology. She is a mem- ber of Theta Mu, psychology hon- orary, and Chi Omega sorority. Other activities include Orchesis and the College Fashion Board. Jeanne hails from Playa del Rey, California. . WG it "Li-"'i'till y - I A rar- " -4. -':, - ' ' , ,Af-1 r GX jg I f 'ri f . W if ---'fill A -13231 .. f i? -. 'ffff' gifffi 'i - 1 -5 , ,fini-131' - - A -.., ae-1.-,J an , A speech major in the College of Fine Arts, Linda Sinclair represent- ed Delta Delta Delta. She is a past member of Spurs and is social chair- man of her sorority. A transfer from Redlands College, she makes her home in Riverside, California. DESERT QUEEN CANDIDATES 198 w , 6 1' 1' '- ' H l I ,, , L' , '1' V . me-.. ' .-i li nga iff , . L'3"', ' Nw- ,-,', i Q -1 ,I 'fi TCL 'Ai 3554, '-'-up ' '.. fx-R-.H 57'-'-in-. 5 li-1:-5, - 2,-T' 51 1 f I an F 1: Terry Jay, Jeanne Forman, Donna Mitchell, Diana Miter. RUW 2:Connie Neat, Carol Heineger, Marilyn McCrary, Margie Weaver, Fran Margie Leim. ROW 3: Marilyn Reynolds, Jo Clark, Linda Sinclair, Bobby Ronstadt, Linda Hart. CNot pictured: Kathy Lockett.J 199 . i J MIKE POLLOCK SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELOR The envied title of Most Eligible Bachelor was won this year by Mike Pollock, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Mike was crowned with a top hat at the annual Mor- tar Board dance, this year held in Louie's Lower Level, and entitled, "The Purple Onion". A senior in the College of Education, Mike is ma- joring in physical education. He is a past member of Sophos and is active in all the major sports. He has played on both the varsity and freshmen baseball teams and was Intramural chairman for his fratern- ity. This past year Mike served as assistant head resi- dent of East Stadium Dorm. Popular vote in all the women's dormitories and sororities was used for selection of five finalists. The "Bachelor" was chosen at the Dance by the coeds present. The four finalists, introduced at "The Purple Onion", were Mickey McCarty, Aggie Houseg Gene Simmons, Delta Chig Dave Carrington, Alpha Tau Omegag and Bob Humphrey, Phi Gamma Delta. . .i - 1'C,"5i'-I TOPPING the list of eligible bachelors on campus were the five finalists: Bob Humphrey, Mickey McCarty, Gene Simmons, Mike Pollock, Dave Carrington. 200 CUWGIRLS Jocelyn McAlpine, Martha Lehman, Linda Sparlirig and Lucy erger won positions as finalists for the '58 UA Rodeo Queen last November. RODEO QUEEN SHIRLEY ERANKS Favorite UA cowgirl, Shirley Franks, we crowned Rodeo Queen at the annual dance, November 18. The 1958 Queen, a member of Chi Omega sorority is a sophomore in the College of Agriculture, major- ing in home economics education. Shirley's home is a cattle ranch near Silver City, New Mexico. She owns a horse, Pequito, and has been riding "as long as I can remember." Shirley partici- pated in all the women's events in the UA Rodeo and was awarded third place in the girl's barrel race. The 1958 Queen participates in many campus activities. She is a member of Spurs, Sophomore Council, Mermaids, Rodeo Club and the Home Eco- nomics Club. She served as a rush counselor for Pan- hellenic last fall. Shirley was also chosen Theta Chi Dream Girl during her freshman year. Queen finalists were Martha Lehman, Kappa Kappa Gammag Jocelyn McAlpine, Alpha Phig Linda Sparling, Maricopa Hallg Lucy Yerger, Yavapai Hall. SHIRLEY FRANKS CHI OMEGA 201 .vi-"H Blond Martha Jo Anderson repre- sented Kappa Alpha Theta in the contest. A junior from Mesa, she is majoring in elementary educa- tion. Active both on campus and in her sorority, Martha Jo is a mem- ber of Chimes, Mermaids and served on the Sophomore Council. Delta Gamma's candidate for Home- coming Queen was Sara Hayes. A Junior elementary education major, Sara's home town is Phoenix. She was a member of Spurs and has been elected president of her soro- ity for the 1958-1959 school year. Sandra Swindler represented Gila Hall in the Homecoming festivities. She is a junior in the College of Liberal Arts and names Phoenix as her home town. Sandra's favorite sport is swimming although she en- joys all outdoor activities. Alpha Phi selected Judy Bolt as their choice for Homecoming Queen. She is a junior in the College of Education and hails from Tucson. Presently serving as Panhellenic president, Judy is a member of Representative Council. A nn Holmes was Delta Delta De1ta's choice for Queen. Ann is from Phoenix and is a senior in the Col- lege of Education. She was a Greek Week finalist in 1957 and Kappa Sigma Stardust Queen. An has worked on various Greek Week committees and is a Racquet Club member. HOMECOMING QUEEI JOAN MOORE AND ATTENDANTS Greeting alumni and students at the 39th annual Homecoming celebration was the 1957 Homecoming Queen, Joan Moore. Chosen by popular vote for the student body, Joan is a member of Pi Beta Phi sorority and is majoring in secretarial studies in the College of Business and Public Administration. A resident of Tucson, Joan was also selected Queen of the Fiesta de los Vaqueros, the 26th annual Tucson Rodeo. In April, Joan was married to basketball star Bob Mueller. The couple are avid sports fans, basketball and swimming topping their respective lists. The Queen's court was enlarged from four to seven this year by a decision of Bobcats, who sponsor the Homecoming activities. The Queen and her at- tendants were presented at the annual Homecoming Dance. Jack Redhair, ASUA president, crowned the Queen. The Queen's attendants were Martha Jo Ander son, Judy Bolt, Karen Steinke, Ann Holmes, Sara Hayes, Sandra Swindler and Kathy Williams. A talented brunette, Karen Steinke' was Pima Hall's choice for Queen. Majoring in music, Karen will grad- uate in May. She has been a mem- ber of the Symphonic Choir for four years and has appeared as soloist for many UA productions. Her home town is Kingman, Ari- zona. Kathy Williams represented Gam- ma Phi Beta in this year's Queen contest. Kathy is past president of her sorority and was a member of Spurs. She is a senior in the Col- lege of Business and Public Admin- istration and hails from Kansas City. 4-w 4.9-.H f 3 ROW 1: Karen Steinke, Julie Zaiser, Judy Bolt, Barbara Stevenson, Judy Weisblat, Ethel Dancho, Sara Hayes, Ann Holmes, Joan Moore. ROW 2: Anne-Marie Rascop, Kathy Williams, Dee Dee Simmons, Barbara Gale, Sharon Reneer, Janice Gatlin, Linda Lou Fiscel, Sandra Swindler, Sheila Hurley, Linda Weisner, Donna Dee Coon, Martha Jo Anderson. HOMECOMING QUEEN CANDIDATES 204 ENGINEERING QUEEN ETH EL DANCHO A new feature of Engineer's Day, March 17, was the selection of a queen to reign at the College's an- nual dance. Ethel Dancho, representing Maricopa Hall, was chosen by popular vote. The 5' blond Queen hails from New Jersey and is a junior in the College of Education. She plans to teach in the elementary schools after graduation. Engineer's Day is traditionally held each year on March 17, St. Patrick's Day. Classes are excused and students attend a picnic sponsored- by the Engineer's Council. This year's festivities were held near the Tucson Mountains and featured various contests be- tween the three divisions of the College. Compacts were presented to the four finalists. Making up the Queen's Court were Sandy McVay, Kappa Alpha Theta, Janice Hunter, Mojave Hallg Ann Steinborn, Chi Omega, Jackie Perdue, Alpha Chi Omega. LA DONNA ANDERSON KAPPA ALPHA THETA ETHEL DANCHO MARICOPA HALL IFPC QUEEN LA DONNA ANDERSON Making her debut into campus royalty, attractive LaDonna Anderson was chosen IFPC Queen at the annual pledge formal this year. A freshman in the College of Liberal Arts, La- Donna is a history major and plans to teach in the secondary schools. A native Arizonan, she hails from Phoenix where she was an honor student at West High. LaDonna is a member of Kappa Alpha Theta and was chosen "Outstanding Pledge". She is an avid swimmer and WAA member. Other activities include AWS, SUAB and the Desert Staff. Maintaining a 1.3 grade average, LaDonna was selected to Alpha Lambda Delta, national freshman women's honorary. Finalists for IFPC Queen were Chris Wright, Pi Beta Phig Marilyn Reyolds, Delta Delta Delta, Pat Warren, Gamma Phi Beta, Diane Wadsworth, Kappa Kappa Gamma. i in l l MIKE HOFFMAN PHI GAMMA DELTA Popular Mike Hoffman was crowned Greek Week King at the 3rd annual Greek Week Dance, March 22. A senior in the College of Liberal Arts, Mike is a pre-med major. He is president of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity and was chosen for "Who's Who." Mike also claims membership in Bobcats, Traditions, Chain Gang and Sophos. He plans to attend George Washington Medical School next year. Mike is from Holbrook, Arizona, and has at- tended the University for four years. I,ji,i".: ' ','. ' , ' ' 51,4 Popular Bob Mueller represented Sigma Chi in the King contest. A senior majoring in business, Bob is a varsity basketball player and is a member of Scabbard and Blade. He plans to enter the service after graduation in June. Alpha Tau Omega's choice for Greek Week King was Lee Smith. A junior from Santa Ana, Cali- fornia, Lee is a General Business major in the College of Business and Public Administration. Lee's hobbies include swimming and surf- i.ng. 206 1 GREEK WEEK KING ...rv i .. 'i . :,,i3,.,. 'TY Y., L . , . , .,q:-'-"'1"u,, A junior in the College of Business and Public Administration, Frank Armstrong was Sigma Alpha Epsi- lon's choice for Greek,Week King. An outdoorsman, Frank enjoys all sports. He is presently serving as vice president of the fraternity. i I l i i 3 l il 1 Personable Jim Wing was chosen a finalist for Greek Week King by sorority members. A member 'of Delta Chi fraternity, he is a letter- man on the varsity baseball team. A senior majoring in physical educa- tion, Jim is from Tucson. GREEK WEEK QUEEN Donna Angle, Pi Beta Phi, was chosen as a Greek Week Queen finalist. A native of Phoenix, she is majoring in elementary education and plans to specialize in the pri- mary grades. Donna has done local modeling and was featured in "Mademoiselle," :LEW SUZI DALY KAPPA ALPHA THETA Sparkling Suzi Daly of Tucson reigned this year as Queen of the Universityls third annual Greek Week. A senior majoring in elementary education, Suzi is senior class secretary and has been active in AWS. She was a Homecoming Queen finalist in her junior year. A member of Kappa Alpha Theta, Suzi has served as secretary of her sorority and was selected as a Panhellenic rush counselor last fall. Beverly Jaquith, sophomore from Newport Beach, California, is a member of Alpha Delta Pi. She was Frosh Queen last year and also a princess at the Alpha Tau Omega 1957 Christmas formal. Beverly is majoring in elementary education. .ja . Mortar Board president, Dixie Mc- Daniel, was Delta Gamma's choice for Greek Week Queen. Majoring in business education, she is from Warren, Arizona. Activities include ASUA Executive Council, Chimes, Spurs and "Who's Who." 207 . H 1. . X 3 j Better known as "Muffy," sopho- more Martha Strauss is a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma. She has been a cheerleader for two years and is enrolled in the College of Liberal Arts. From Highland Park, Illinois, "Muffy" enjoys swimming and tennis. Chosen in the group of finalists for the national Maid of Cotton contest were two UA coeds, Kay Kelly and Sandra Jean Anderson. Kay is a style selection and merchandising major in the College of Business and Public Administration. The lovely sophomore hails from Phoenix and is a member of Pi Beta Phi sorority. "Vogue" magazine's winner for their L'Search for Model" contest, Kay was featured in their issues in 1956. Her hobbies include swimming and painting. Sandra Jean is a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority where she serves as social chairman. She is also a sophomore but in the Liberal Arts College. Sandy reigned as IFPC Queen her freshman year and has done local modeling. A member of the UA women's swimming team, Sandy also is active in Mermaids. Mesa, Arizona, is her home town. KAY KELLY PI BETA PHI MAID OF COTTON F INALISTS SANDRA JEAN ANDERSON KAPPA ALPHA THETA CO EDS WI N ROYAL TITLES Chosen as Duchesses for the Sun Bowl in El Paso, Texas, were Flory Jordan and Linda Hart. Flory is a junior majoring in elementary educa- tion and is a member of Kappa Alpha Theta. She is corresponding secretary of that group. Linda is also a junior and is a secretarial studies major in the Col- lege of Business and Public Administration. She is a member of Pi Beta Phi and was nominated by that group for Desert Queen. ' Homecoming Queen Joan Moore was doubly hon- ored when she was chosen Queen of the 26th annual Fiesta de los Vaqueros, Tucson's popular rodeo cele- bration. Chosen for both her beauty and riding abil- ity, Joan reigned over all festivities of the week. JOAN MOORE PI BETA PHI ' 4 FLORY JORDAN LINDA HART KAPPA ALPHA TI-IETA PI 131-ETA PHI as SHIRLEY RANSOM Aggie Queen Martha Lehmann, sophomore transfer from the University of Alaska, reigns as Miss Alaska of 1958. An education major, Martha plans to teach English after graduation. Her sorority is Kappa Kappa Gamma. After being chosen Queen of the Winter Ice Carnival in Fairbanks, Martha entered the Miss Alaska contest last year. That crown entitled her to participate in the Miss Universe Contest in Long Beach where she placed 15th. Miss Alaska's favorite pasttime is riding as she owns two horses and has participated in many judg- ing contests. She was a linalist for UA Rodeo Queen and was awarded lst place in the girl's barrel race, one of the contests- of the Rodeo. Shirley Ranson, a sophomore majoring in ele- mentary education, reigned as this year's Aggie Queen. Active on campus, Shirley has been a cheerleader both for her freshman and sophomore years. She claims membership in the Rodeo Club, Aggie Club, Mermaids, WAA and Chi Omega sorority. Last year she was chosen a finalist for Rodeo Queen. Shirley's favorite sport is riding and she owns a horse, "Monte" She rides in the girl's quadrill team and has competed in many horse shows. Finalists for the Aggie Queen competition were Janet Colerette, Kappa Alpha Theta, Janice White, Delta Delta Delta, Janet Cooper, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Sylvia Hammond, Coconino Hall. MARTHA LEHMANN Miss Alaska .C SORORITY FAVORITES .Fda GEORGE KAINE JOHN LUNDSTROM LEE WOLFSON C. O. TINSLEY A Chi O Man A D Pi Diamond King A E Phi Dream Man Alpha Phi Man ,. YW-, VL, .NEED I ,I . , - n .- 3 , I . , , , W I. . - .'- n ' I I ', ' ' ,u WI 'I L , Fl 4 I pw ig? 'i 1' I I M4 ' , 5 gn l 4 W f Y Y I I I 1. 1 , lr 'Y 5- ,ya TATE GREENWAY BRUD AUTHOR JIM HILL DONNIE LEE Alpha Xi Delta Dream Man Chi O Southern Gentleman Tri Delt Dream Man D G Man pa ' 'T"iffF-gR"- . 1 l ,Q -- E rin 453 31" I 1 . . .. V1 if y X, 1. '-,hffijgkg M v. 4,9-, '31 .gm . -fa-Q -. i 'R iiffgf-?':i5" L is "V 1 Hifi: ' 'I : I 1 ve,-:ww '- :Lf-Q me if DAMON SI-IELBURNE JIM WILKES HENRY GICLAS JERRY MOLER Gamma Phi Man Theta Man Kappa Man Pi Phi Man 211 SONYA STRlCKLAND MARY JO SHAFFER JEAN MCLEAN Delta Sigma Phi Dream Girl Alpha Sig. Talisman Rose Queen ATO Sweetheart FRATERN ITY FAVORITES CORINNE DAVIS Delta Chi Sweetheart KAY SIMON MARKER NANCY MCKINNON BEVERLY WILSON Kappa Alpha Sweetheart Kappa Sigma Stardust Queen Lambda Chi Crescent Queen 212 NANCY SNOKE Phi Delt Dream Girl CECILIA AGUIRRE MARTHA JO ANDERSON Phi Kappa Sweetheart SAE Gold Dust Queen J! l ARLINE POSTILLION CAROL ANN SMITH JANE BRISAK Sweetheart of Sigma Chi Sigma Phi Epsilon Queen of Hearts Sigma Nu White Rose Queen JOYCE BLOCH Tau Delta Snow Queen SUSIE COLLINS JILL JORDAN Theta Chi Dream Girl Sweetheart of ZBT 213 I desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert deser desert desert desert desert desert desert desert O ll mfgatii zatfimta S "-413 - rn As president of SRC, Marylee Hutchison heads a board of repre- sentatives from campus religious groups. She holds a seat on ASUA Representative Council. Marylee is a senior in elementary education and hopes to attend Princeton Theological Seminary. STUDENT RELIGION COUNCIL . I Q. gr, ' H . : 'f lf, SRC: ROW 1: Charlotte Vance, Jim Barber, Bob Griflith, Joe Smith, Bob Posner, Madge Utay, Dick Griswold, Milo Van Voris, Mary Lee Hutchison. ROW 2: Dr. Loyal T. Gryting, Paulette Lindloff, Sandy Tims, Claire Liebenguth, Donna Mitchell, Martha Ward, Judy Snipes, Mary Smith, Paula Joumey, Cheryl Zeidler. 216 annual "Go-to-Church Month" in Shel y Porter, Janet Hmeman .L F HAIRMEN: ROW 1: Madge Utay, Jan Marshall, Paulette Lindloif, Marylee Hutchison, Charlotte Vance, Jo Clark, Sally Cherry. ROW 2 Pence, Claire Liebenguth, Ann Bogner, Dr. Loyal Gryting, Anita Hand, Sandy Kerr, Mike Defty, Gary Hyde. The Student Religion Council was headed this year by president Mary Lee Hutchison. The Council was composed of 19 representatives from campus religious organizations. An All-University Picnic was held the first Sun- day of school to acquaint students with the various religious groups. Religious preference cards were filled out at registration and distributed to the re- spective pastors. In November the Council publicized national Go-To-Church Month. A delegation from the Uni- versity attended the Arizona Intercollegiate Religious va.. ci. t L., J 1 HE" ,I , l by Student Religion Coun- live Arizona coeds, Sue b ' , and Gloria Gee attend church services together. Conference at Tempe in December. The conference, composed of religious leaders from UA, ASC Tempe and Flagstaff, Will be held next year on the University campus. February's Religion-In-Life Week highlighted the Council's activities. Five noted speakers attended RIL events, and spoke to dormitories, fraternities and sororities. Chairman was Charlotte Vance. Adviser to SRC was Dr. Loyal T. Gryting of the French department. Other officers included George Mann, vice president, Paula Journey, secretary, Mike Defty, treasurer and Madge Utay, historian. .'-'Zwh-rv . , ' . y!1':,1 .- t, . H-n.,qga- . m. -La-. Y -. --Lf.,,, M -,,,l,,, :lll1f.:5isE.E.g.s.s.fa.N-....fL. .....,k, .., , - 217 3, CZ? INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: ROW l: Eileen Galpin, Julie Wallis, Bob Griffith, Nancy Lu Brennan, Mary Kay Cartmill. ROW 2 Ann Schroder, Eileen Hagh, Marty Burch, Karen Karber. ROW 3: Chuck Morton, George Mann, Shirley Carmichael, Kenneth Dyer, lk Chang Kim, John Musgrave, Paulette Lindlolf. INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP CANTERBURY CLUB The state of Illinois was the scene of this year's fifth Student Missionary Convention for Intervarsity Fellowship. Ideas gathered from this midwestern meeting went into plans for weekly discussions. The UA group also sponsors movies in the Student Union. Canterbury Association, youth group for Epis- copal students, was headed this year by Tom Leonard. Sunday evening meetings consisted of evening prayer, a student supper and talks by faculty and, religious leaders. E CANTERBURY CLUB: ROW 1: Dorothy Barnett, Sandra Smith, Gail Mundell, Randy Owens, Siegrid Maitrejean, Nancy Furlong, Patricia Lebseh ROW 2: Fr. Dallis L. Harris, Thomas Leonard, Fred Catlin, Robert Ives, Fred Nader, Alex Thompson, Gene McFadden, John Michael Defty DAY SAINTS: ROW 1: Sharon Reneer, Ann Anderson, Kay McGovern, Marcia Claridge, Loueen Hummel, Sandi Platt, Joan John, Mari- Reynolds, Alice Lynne Powell, Carol Ronnow, Dixina Price, Patty Sanders. ROW 2: Helen Udall, lla Rae Kartchner, Elizabeth McRae, Thompson, Darla McRae, Louise Nelson, Nerita Flake, Patsy Hardt, Marilyn Post, Phyllis Clark, Martha McKay, Maurine Romney, Collerette. ROW 3: Audrey Ridgway, Pat Williams, Melvina Allen, Bonnie Guthrie, Delcie Hatch, Aleener Harring, Alice Campbell, Riggs, Anne Buckwalter, Charlotte Jackson, Pauline McCommas, Diane Roselle. ROW 4: Bonnie Baird, Colleen Porter, Kathleen C. Brent Clulf, Jay N. Hoopes, Dennis Cluff, Harold Skinner, Gerald Skinner, Thomas James Mattern, Joel McHood, N. Terryl Philips, Teddy Curtis, Arthur Brimhall. ROW 5: Michael Clement, Roy Claridge, Newell Porter, Maynard Davenport, Gary Rogers, Ted Vanga, Terry Hooper, Cloyd Carpenter, Westlyn C. Riggs, Keith Shreeve, Gordon McHood, Dudley Welker, Hugh Art Clawson, H. Clyde Davis. LDS INSTITUTE' Through 'educational and devotional classes, the students of Latter Day Saints receive instruction' in art and religion with the goal of mutual improvement. Social functions and church services are held at the LDS Institute, at the corner of Mountain and Second. WESLEY FOUNDATION Wesley Foundation members spent Easter vaca- tion repairing the Methodist Church in Magdelena, Sonora, Mexico. Rev. Bob Stewart was pastor of the foundation composed of 150 members. President was Sandy Tims. i l WESLEY: ROW 1: Ernie Leonard, Joe Parra, Charles Schneider, Keith Runion, Al Plummer, Tom Wong, Bob Henze, Sheldon Peavey, Ed Tisch, Bob Ellis, Jim Barbar. ROW 2: Dusty Davis, Sandy Tims, Mary Jones, Kay Ray, Marilyn Nothnagel, Dianne Kunkel, Ginny Smith, Deanna Jordan, Linda Rasmussen, Jacquie Schneider, Barbara Harris. ROW 32 Phil ROSCFS, Pat Barnum, Marge Baldwin, Mary Williams, Beth Col- vin Eileen Haga, Geneva Woodworth, Anne Marie Rascop, Herb Toy, Frank Fleming, Doug Dunipace. ROW 4: Hank Holland, Ron Sager, Wyla Hardin, Deanne Morgan, Pat Swanson, Sandy Lucas, Betty Jean Smith, Ted Smith, Garlie Garrett, Paul Jimenez. ROW 5: Johnny Barringer, Bill Bensema, Roberta Hatt, Jeanne Ellis, Billy Ann Ring, Jean McStr0ul. Esther Martin. Anna Mary Oswell, Sherrill Cheeseman, Jackie Stems, Al Pierce, Leroy Dickey. ROW 6: Paul Kirby, Sam Foster, Toby DOWling, Larry Darlrymple, Henry Martinod, Joan Moore, Liz Chase, Eddie Mae Fink, Earl Flint. 219 M l Str:-nhl LITTLE CHAPEL CF ALL NATIONS The non-sectarian Little Chapel of All Nation was open to. students and faculty members for th purpose of reading, meditating or praying at its sma altar. Campus religious groups take one-day retreat as a part of Chapel activities. READING at random from books of many nations, Ann Castleton, Bobbie Hes- kett and Mary Sue Anderson find Little Chapel library a haven of comfort. BAHAI YOUTH ORGANIZATICN Meetings and discussion groups were held weekly by members of Bahai to broaden their own under- standing of their religious teachings and writings. Under the leadership of president Cal E. Rollins, preparations began for World Youth Day. CAM PBELL-PLYMOUTH CLUB Candlelight desserts were held the second Sunday of each month by the members of the Campbell Plymouth Club for the purpose of discussing theolo- gical books. Special programs highlighted the weekly luncheon meetings. CAMPBELL-PLYMOUTH: ROW 1: Dr. William Irmscher, Rev. George Vance, David Smith, Jim LeCain, Mike Busailah, Lee Rombach, Rev. James Robinson. ROW 25 Linda Ward, Martha Ward, Roberta Page, Charlotte Vance, David Vance, Ed- ward Morgan, Jerry Pence, Fred Conelly, Ray Matson, Joe Green, Charles Tuell. 220 Q - - 'r 'f""' EV' ' STUDENT FELLOWSHIP: ROW l: S. Walfinger, S. Cherry, Carl Berninger, Don Caughlin, L. McLean, Dave McArther, Shirley Scott, W ' i . i c , Z c , , i ' , . , , , PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT FELLOWSHIP This year, members of the Presbyterian Student Fellowship devoted time to studying the Bible and singing in the church choir. They planned post-game social functions in addition to the regular weekly meetings. iii i ilu' L, ps ilson, Fred McNeill ROW 2 Janet Syphcrd Ch irlene Lacy Beverly Bogue Linda Frye Judy Smith Pat Lacy Carol Owen Roberta Carolyn Lorentz. ROW 3: Joanne French ,Marie Byrd, Sharon Mclntyre. Bill Carroll, Gene Yeazell, Dick Backus, Chuck Abbott, ROW 4: Edward Pinnell, Linda Merrill, Suzie Kish, Julie Wallis, Gary Hyde, Dick Griswold. ROW 5: Dexter Long, Lyle De- Browning, Buddy Sessions, Johnny Stanton, Jack Peacock, George Adams, Donnell McArther. NEWMAN CLUB The Newman Club offered four courses in re- ligious instruction each semester. Luncheon programs and once-a-month breakfasts with guest speakers both instructed and entertained Newmanites. The chapel was the site of daily masses, rosary and communion. J oe Hobart. CLUB: ROW 1: Phil Vosskuhler,, Cyril Chan, Ignacio Arana, Don Moore, Estherly Dorfman, Jan Joseph, Tony Ching, John Larson. Crocker. Barb Beery, Jim Reitz, Jim Raher, Don DeGrood, John Keane, Jack Geary. ROW 2: Mary Jones, Rosemary Ramos, Carolyn Lois Anderson, Barb Seffens. Marilyn Myser, Ann Darwin, Merry Mulvihill, Rosina Greene, Mary Apodoca. Joan Sherlock, Sue Mary Corrier, Mary Dittiger. ROW 3: Jeff Lauderdale, Father Curry, Judy Flicca, Georgiana Walsh, Naomi Hess, Evangeline Rod- Carol Baher, Dawn Apfcl, Esther Martin, Lila Wisdom, Charleen Rietz, Bob Hamlin, Jim Parker, Juan Varela, Joe Wolf. Verene Fendo, Paula Morris, Pat Smith, Sonja Reinhardt. ROW 4: Jim O'Heara, John Masunas, Miliana Rosenbloom, Manaeul Marios, Rodriguez. Eileen Hughes, Elba Sandin, Martha Elizondo, George Kalil, Joe Ackman, John Gucciardo, Martin Lowe, Al Serafini. Ehmann, Larry Brown, Mark Smith, Frank Porter, Gene Smith, Dan Killeen. ROW 5: Maurine Rosenbloom, Manual Marios, Tony Urias, Rios, Liz Wick, Marilyn Ruterman, Gino Ross, Pat Koehmstedt, Sally Green, Frances Dehlinger. Faye Folkins, Pat Gramer. Yvonne 221 BUNSERVATIVE BAPTIST FUUNDATION: ROW 1: Charlene Carmony, Paulette Lind- loff, Ann Schroeder, Henry Bartholomew. ROW 2: Mary Kay Cartmill, Eileen Galpin, Bob Griffth, Bob Marshall, Kenneth Cooper, Bill Drum. ROW 3: Margaret Perry, Karen Karber, Pat Davis. Mrs. Darling, Steward Darling, Burdette Bee, Fred Funk, Grover Miller. CONSERVATIVE BAPTIST FOUNDATION A buffet supper for Mom's and Dad's Day w one of the main functions during the year for t Conservative Baptist group. A Homecoming te Christmas party and graduation banquet were als included in their activities. PARKER CLUB The Parker Club, under the auspices of the Uni- tarian Church, held four meetings each month. An affiliate of the Liberal Religious Youth, the group entertained faculty members and outstanding men of the community as guest speakers at meetings. PARKER CLUB IJFFICEIIS: Gina Futch, secretary-treasurerg Tom Andrews, publicity, Gwen Major, social chairmang Gerry Silvar, president. BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Row 1: Marsha Rush, Ted Dickson, Linda Riddle, James Lloyd. ROW 2: Wayland Marler, Grady Woodward, Alvin Hamm, Barry Cooper, Mr. Owen Kersh. 222 BAPTIST STUDENT UNION Stressing the church's importance in the life of the collegian, Baptist Student Union planned a "Church Focus" week . Christmastime found them hosting international students at a banquet. At re- treats, the members planned coming devotional meet- ings. THEIIIIN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: ROW l: Erick Egertson, Mary Genszler, Kathy hesness, Dave Rubis. ROW 2: Paul Austin, Grant Hoecker, Ed Anglin, NIVERSITY NAZAREN ES Presiding officer for the Univesrity Nazerenes this year was junior Nancy Meyer. Under her direction, the organization held many informal get-togethers. Regular bi-monthly dinner meetings were also sched- uled. ILLEL FUUNDATION: ROW 1: Bob Axelrod, Brenda Kurn, Glorianne Engel, Joyce ocamora, Sandy Coleman, Audrey Mayman, Dolores Smiley, Elliott Konick. OW 2: Michael Gordon, Sue Levy, Joyce Bloch, Lee Wolfson, Gerald Lapin, arry Morrison, Aaron Ezrailson, George Goldmark. LUTH ERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION Sunday night supper meetings, chapel services and classes in church history were among the regular activities of the Lutheran group, guided by Reverend Kenneth Baurnhoff. Members held retreats at Mount Lemmon and Globe. UNIVERSITY NAZIIRENES: ROW 1: Wayne H. Clouser, Barbara Hamilton, Nancy Meyer, Shirley Carmichael. ROW 2: John Musgrave, Oliver Stidam, Billy Cox, Rev. T. C. Abbott. HILLEL FOUNDATION Religious, cultural and social activities are stressed in Hillel's program for Jewish students on campus. Highlighting the organization's year were Sabbath services, discussion groups, a membership barbeque and a carnival. 'S - t -., Q, F iff '. ,2 W.- -.K 215 'QQ if ,, Y .v HQQQL: ,, t. I uw 5 J r IW , f ' 1 ' E PHI BETA KAPPA National scholastic Liberal Arts honorary C91 I it I Members selected 1957-1958 Sheldon P. Alfou Jessie B. Carnevale Jerry Few Phyllis A. Gibbs Lynn E. Hickman Richard C. Jensen Richard J. Keene William M. Larson Calista V. Leonard Manuel L. Lopez ,J Sharon K. Miller Irwin Mordka Mae H. Nader Katherine Major Park Wilda Postel Kathryn 0. Salmon Sydney E. Salmon Paul L. Schnur Doris W. Smith E. Phillip Weeks ,M SELECTED to Phi Beta Kappa last fall, Doris Smith and Richard Jensen are congratulated by Dr. Wiedle, Honors Convocation speaker, and Dr. Harvill. BETA GAMMA SIGMA PHI KAPPA PHI N61ff0nUl scholastic BPA h0'10"a".V National scholastic university honorary f - 1 .o f fs tiff P L35 f fp ,Ll H' 'L .ill .fi J V. .lk C-T, ' tp l' 5,5 . gvgq..,:,,-- ,- A Members selected 1957-1958 Members selected 1957-1958 Bob G. Beshears Elaine A. Boettcher Howard Bremond James R. Bush Helen A. Harris Alice M. Holly Jacqueline J obes Dorian Henry Jones John J. Keefe David C. Knuttinen Kenneth D. Kroese James B. McClanahan Oliver H. Maud Fernando Q. Mendivil Joyce A. Orms Mary L. Russell George Thein, III Garven W. Videen Archie H. Walker Robert D. Walter Sheldon P. Alfou Eldon P. Angle Richard J. Barrett Bonnie Kain Berger David H. Bissett Elaine A. Boettcher Robert W. Browder James R. Bush Jessie B. Carnevale Gervase M. Chaplin Maurice W. Collins Tomm K. Crowe Y . Terrill C. Ewbank Robert B. Fischer Sylvia M. Frampton Helen Gee Frederick K. Gelderman Phyllis A. Gibbs 225 Helen A. Harris Thomas R. Herndon Lynn E. Hickman Beverly Hulse Jan L. Hunsaker Richard C. Jensen Richard J. Keene Kenneth D. Kroese William M. Larson, Jr. Calista V. Leonard Manuel L. Lopez James B. McClanahan Dan W. McKenzie Ralph B. Miller Sharon K. Miller Irwin Mordka Dana W. Nichols Katherine Major Park Thomas P. Philip Barbara Moran Polito Mary A. Randall Edward A. Reineman Mary L. Russell Paul Edgar Russell Marilyn T. Ryland Kathryn O. Salmon Paul L. Schnur Sylvia M. Sells Doris'W. Smith Harold R. Stucki Sylvia S. Taylor John S. Tixier Ruth A. Waite Richard O. Williams Joseph A. Zapotocky ALPHA LAMHDA DELTA: Row 1: Naomi zinder, aarssra Mecafley, Roberta Tims, Anne Snoddy, Mary Ellen Percy, Sharon Farris. ROW 2: Edna Pudas, Patsy Preciado, Sigrid Maitrejean, Eleanor Anderson, Ilze Grasis, Elizabeth McRae. ROW 3: Sue Smith, Dale Van Pelt, Joan Cooper. ALPHA LAM BDA DELTA National freshman women's scholastic honorary Members of Alpha Lambda Delta are sophomore women with a 1.5 or better grade average their freshman year. They annually sponsor a tea for freshmen women with a 1.5 average from high school who are eligible for membership. ALPHA ZETA National scholastic agriculture honorary The purpose of Alpha Zeta is to promote fellow- ship and develop leadership among the students in agriculture. Together with the Aggie Club, they spon- sor the annual Aggie Day and Aggie Mixer. Mem- bership is limited to students who have been in the college three semesters. ALPHA ZETA: ROW 1: Pat Shelly, Bob Moore, Alvin Baber, Tom Crowe, Hank Brubaker, Roy Ross. ROW 2: Norm Klepacki, Dick Schorr, Ronald Crismon, Stan Tixier, Fred W. Gelderman, Jeri Moler, R. E. Seltzer. ROW 3: Dr. Wm. J. Pistor, Don Howell, Bernie Weitsman, Don Johnson, Ervin M. Schmutz, Robert J. Humphrey, Brian D. Beun. ' ' :g.gag.c: . A V ' ll ALPHA PHI OMEGA: ROW 1: Alfred J. Miller, Richard O. Pu George L. Hamzik, John F. Vos, Edwin C. Walker, Jimmy Johnson. ROW 2: Michael G. Sherman, Max Livingston, Da Zinder, Ralph Miller, Boyd Carpenter, Herb Dimler. ROW Charles Parker, Brice E. Lining, W. R. Whidden, Merle Kruli Charles Tribolet, Darold Shutt. ALPHA PHI OM EGA National scouting service fraternity Requirements for membership in Alpha Phi Omega include former participation in the national scouting movement and a desire to advance scouting principles. This year, they celebrated the 100th birth- day of their founder. ALPHA TAU ALPHA National professional agriculture education fraternity Alpha Tau Alpha promoted the Future Farmers' of America's Field Day in the spring and gave an award to the best teacher and agriculture student in the state. These "Aggies" also visited FFA chapters in Arizona as good-will ambassadors for the University. ALPHA TAU ALPHA: ROW 1: Russell Cline, Eldon Angle, Bill Bon John Musgrave. ROW 2: Rey McRae, Floyd Bynum, Robert Sot mayor, Royal Rigby. ROW 3: Harold Stucki, Donald Cawoo Dan Gerhart, Dean Flake. OMEGA Pl: ROW 1: Patsy Hardt, R. A. Kidwell, H. J. Langen. Ruth Agnew, Charlene Carmony, Aston Bernardiue, Hanhila. ROW 3: Florence Toland. PI OM BGA PI National business education honorary Members in Pi Omega Pi, upper division business education majors with a 2.0 average, annually give an award to the outstanding senior in the BPA Col- lege. The group assisted with the AEA convention last fall and attended a state convention of business teachers in the spring. Charlene Carmony presided over the honorary this year. DELTA SIGMA PI National professional BPA fraternity nf-5 iv 1 Y 3 . L, N - ..-. - .,. -lt' .. ,- .,.e,vJ. - V ' r V vp- i -'gJ.e.,A', it - ,--. - -L . .. . . .., L -,f....,, ALPHA EPSILON: ROW 1: Marilyn Nothnagel, Kae Andreen, Betty Newmeyer, Patsy Hardt, Mary Ruth Sandel, Pat Pearson, Charlene Carmony, Lee Woods. ROW 2: Lynne Hanhila, Carol Saulsberry, Eileen Haga, Ruth Agnew, Susie Fay, Jacqueline Jobes, Elaine Boettcher, Mrs. Rachel Maynard. ALPHA E PSILON National women's business honorary Alpha Epsilon is a link between college and the business world and selects its members from above- average women students in business. The group holds a tea for dean's list honorees and faculty members at Christmas and a faculty luncheon in spring. The now-local honorary expects to become nationally afiiliated this year. Delta Sigma Pi endeavors to serve the business college, University student body, and business com- munity as a whole. Members assisted with Senior Day and registration week, and sponsored business and professional programs at which well-known business executives presented their views on timely topics. Two important forums were on the tight money situation and the industrial expansion of Tucson. At their an- nual dinner-dance, the group announced Yvonne Cun- ningham as their Rose of Delta Sig of the year. LTA SIGMA PI: ROW 1: Robert Simonson, Gerald R. Sanders, Robert Lukacs, Lloyd Colbeck, Dr. Clyde Vedder, Jeff Hooper. ROW 2: D. W. aaf D L. Tappero, CLC! Morgan- OiCoi1nor3UD. D. Sutton, Lynn Hornbrook, Joe Lumpkin. ROW 3: Joe Schifano, Bill Alexander, ,.. I-naxn' - - law-'-ar 1' f 1- ' r - 7 ALPHA DELTA SIGMA: ROW 1: Joseph Goldy, Harry Gorta, Stan Katz, Dave Henrich, Gary L. Drayer, Anthony Rogers, Mai: Huss. ROW Jay McCall, Charles Sorensen, Elwin G. Wood, Robert E. Burke, Alan J. Gould, Jack Hoagland, Donald Rice. ALPHA D E LTA SIGMA National advertising honorary ALPHA KAP PA PS I National men's business honorary The Alpha Delta Sigma honorary this year to charge of Recognition Week and distributed B Franklin plaques to the various ADS chapters in t United'States. In the national field, the UA chapt won second place in the President's Cup Award an first place in Gamma Alpha Chi, advertising leag award. The initials of this advertising honorary spe "ADS" and the members are all advertising major The purpose of Alpha Kappa Psi, the oldest n tional fraternity for business, is to encourage busine students to attain a higher scholarship. The gro annually presents awards to the outstanding studen in the BPA College and also honors a Better Busine Girl and the top senior enrolled in business. Duri the year the members sponsor the lectures on Co merce Day and assist in registration ALPHA KAPPA PSI: ROW 1: Lloyd Rabb, Tom Berresford, Gordon Alley, Michael Jerge, Dick Rubi, Don Ellis, Jon S. Legallet, Jok P. Legall Curt Ross, Howard Britt. ROW 2: Jerry O. Bange, James Souter, Robert D. Walter, Kenneth D. Kroese, Joseph Gill, Michael H. Conne Charles W. Hill, Orme Lewis, Eric D. Mayer, George B. Settlemyer. ROW 3: Earl Pigh Langord, Jr., Charles H. Longo, Harvard Hill, Dav Engelman, Robert Ruikka, Kendall Keene, John Kohl, Ben Flores, Jr., Carlos Chavez, Jack Hoagland if DELTA KAPPA ROW 1 Ted Madden Marvm Perkins Gerald Sagert Edward Murray, Victor Kelly, Robert Letson, J. Melvin Rhodes, Tellez Peter Gl0I'gl ROW 2 Milton Agte Jim Gibson Robert Sandm Larry Wilson, Kenneth Miles, Richard Rodgers, Curtis B. N S t G d Ove street, John Williams. Emil Larson Clifford Myrick Raymond Klein Robert Rowen Lee Starr orman tewar, or an r One of the main purposes of Phi Delta Kappa, the national men's education honorary, is to promote free education. Composed of men who have had professional training in the education field, the monthly meetings feature programs of speakers who bring benehcial information to the members. Members in Pi Lambda Theta encourage inter- cultural understanding and stress the need for grad- uate work in the profession. This year, the group awarded a scholarship to a senior woman in the edu- cation college and sponsored a Greek student at- tending UA. Both graduate and under-graduate students are eligible for membership. DA THETA ROW 1 Carol Ann Haury Charlene Carmony Catherine Randall Rose Anne Goodrow, Clara Barton Higgon, Genevieve Sadie H Martinez Roberta John Ann Marie Rascop Blanche J Hosack May Palmer, Martina Garcia, Norma Berrellez. ROW 2: Harris Mary Kelley Frances McCray Maman Graves Lulu Walker Bernice Erdahl, Betty Manhart, Jane Ledbetter, Alice Graybeal, :ggi J c Chl' ""tr' JHWll t Cll?'Z!"' "'l'l'Q' 'LT' I.. U JIT' v i ' ' v,.:-, :Lg i .J . Q' s-L.Q.. ..,...I.' Le liF?3.U'Ci'EffTT3i"'L'VTT'T"'Zil IT Cl' 1I'Kff. 5:3355 :in ,P-.... ,......E...-..E,,... Ti I 1,-2.1-:' 1... 1 :t 1 nmg mg ' -17 lil. j- ZEETQ .sf - gl "..wz7i:':fv .milf ' , .rgizmai . .1-rim: , 'fri - Jw.-!. ' t E i s 'N ,I -5 .X . ,. il ' ' f'eli1'!.' Iii. 1 -l 'ri Ill' il THETA TAU: ROW 1: Keith H. Williams, Ralph E. Sandler, Duane P. Lmgafelter, Philip B. Newlm, Richard J. Mercier, James W John J. Eidel, Bob Morin, Bill Bodenhamer, Paschel W. Young, Arthur H. Hammond, Stanle E. Grimes. ROW 2: Lee C y . Harry E. Krumlauf, Jr., Nick Johannesma, Don Zimmer, John Collins, John Belson, Don C. Tait, Terrill Ewbank, Wesley W. Ford J Barrett, Ray Luci. TH ETA TAU National professional engineering fraternity This professional engineering fraternity is com- posed of outstanding students from all branches of the field and the main purpose of Theta Tau is to aid in the professional development of these future engineers. The group provides a representative to the Engineer's Council and annually donates an award to a graduating engineer. AIEE-IRE National professional electrical and radio engineering association The bi-monthly meetings of AIEE-IRE feature professional men who speak on the most recent de- velopments in the field of engineering or its instruc- tion. The honorary, composed of students primarily interested in promoting electrical and radio engineer- ing, holds an annual picnic in May for its members, AIEE IRE: ROW 1: Richard Mercier, Lee Bodenhamer, John Gimbel, Eduardo da Silva, Clence Burns, Jim Ash, Gerald Malakoif, Carl Jr Rick Zahniser, Bill Bodenhamer, Newell Porter. ROW 2: Morris Blumenthal, Charles Smock, D. J. Zepp, David Zinder, Duane felter Warren Griggs, David Mount, Donnell McArthur, Anthony Coco, Eric Festin. ROW 3: Charles Meyer, Don Strittmatter, Jack George Mann, Bill Williams, Bob Engelbardt, Richard Huddleston, Robert Fisher, Wesley Ford. ROW 4: James Bowen, George Traskowsky Patrick Moss, Maurice Collins, Robert Marshall, Byron Garretson, Samuel Tomas, George Insalaco. 1 ,l 24, 1 xl H-ff: '-J .t ,x l" l ROW 1 Dean Sloan George Rodriguez, Buckley Ogden, Ralph Sandler, Yen Hee Low, Donald Chery, John Collins, Robert McDonald, H ht Dean Wilson Gary Cooper Terrill Ewbank, Jim Wilker- Williams ROW 2: Derek White, David Branns, Nick Johannesma, Harry ec , , , n F' dl Bob Rupe, Leigh Gardner, Joseph Heny Parra, Charles Hammer, Robert Barksdale, Arnold Harrmg ROW 3 David Hall, Frank in ay, ASCE National professional civil engineering association The American Society of Civil Engineers is open to all students in civil engineering. Bi-monthly meet- ings featured various speakers and films on subjects of interest to the members. This year, the programs were centered around the opportunities in the civil engineering field. 'TAU'BETA.PI National scholastic engineering honorary Top scholars in the engineering college are elected to Tau Beta Pi, their national scholastic honorary. Men from the upper 115 of the senior class and the upper 1!8 of the junior class are eligible for member- ship. The group serves the engineering college by tutoring underclassmen. Pl : . . , J k Williams, E. G. Arntzen, Jan Hunsaker. Dale H. Rountree, Warren Griggs, Bob M ROW1 J D McLehaney ac Ralph Sandler, John Collins, Donald Zepp, Robert Laser. ROW 2: Robert Fisher, Donald Strittmatter, Charles Mclnerney, Dick Jack Gaines, David Zinder, Edward Reineman, Robert Ammon, George Insalaco, Clence Burns, James Hallsted, Terrill Ewbank 3 Glen Ludwig, Joe Farabee, Jerry Tibbetts, R. D. Miller, Jerry Burns, Gernace Chaplin, Thomas Philip, Maurice Collins, Carl ' ' M'll B'll Williams, Robert Held, Eduardo da Silva, Ezra Lewis, Jack Patterson, Edward Flynn. ROW 4. Leigh Gardner, Ralph 1 er, 1 ll N ll Po ter, Richard Barrett, John Lamkin, Willard Stiver, Dean E. Sloan, Lynch Syler F. W. Sommer, J. C. Mostert, T. Parne , ewe r orin, Duane 'lqpv' AIME: ROW 1: J. Porter, Joe Terrill, T. P. Philip, J. D. McLehaney, G. A. Brown, H. E. Krumlauf, Jr., Mike Keevan, A. V. Humphrys ROW 2: John C. Balla, Charles D. Blickle, Lynn C. Harris, Dale W. Rodolff, Freeman Smith, Richard D. Bates, Joe Davis, Daniel Albrecht. ROW 3: Don Kelliher, Larry Agenbroad, John Myers, John Higbie, C. P. Messina, Donald Hatch, Jerry Kaufman, Prof. S. L. Smith. To further the students' interest in the mil AI M E industry, AIME invited speakers and procured f for its meetings. In conjunction with the natit National professional mining and metallurgical AIME, the group attends and helps sponsor . . y 1 engmeermg association sectional AIME meeting held in Tucson each For extra activities, the group made several field to nearby mines. The Mechanical Engineering Society iills in E gap between student and professional work. The monthly meetings featured experts from indust who illustrated their topics with movies and slim These programs are planned to give majors a view of employment and advancement in their field. National professional mechanical engineering association ASME: ROW 1: Donald Zimmer, Ed Arntzen, Billie Boone, Tom Henry, Bob Dawdy, Daweel George, Edward Goetz, Keith Krumwiede, Dave Shore Steve Williams John Larirnore Allan Hau . ROW 2: Joe Shambur er Avron Lewis Howard Brimmer, Bill Murphy, Ed Flynn, , , , FY S , , Robert Young, Frank Saller, Maung Nyunt Maung, Bill Williams, Robert Jones, Charles Mclnerney, Tin Oo, Lorenzo Luera. ROW 3: Larry Moore, Robert Coronado, Joe Cox, Henry Martinod, Henry Hastings, Donald Bird, John Seabreeze, Frank Herget, John Higgins, Steve Hu, Joseph Mulligan. ROW 4: Claris Donelson, Mark Schumacher, Russel Larson, Robert Taylor, Tom Iles, Joseph Green, Harry Sobon, Don Tait, Togi Snodgrass, Dale Rountree, Lee Battin, Colin McEachen, Harry Munn. ROW 5: Jack illiams James Buck James Fielden W 5 1 1 Donald Bain, Robert Held, Ken Trout, Dick Catron, Henry Giclas, John Geffs, Tom Jimerson, Rolf Murchison, Jim Nelson. 232 OM EN'S PRESS CLUB W0men's journalism honorary The Women's Press Club this year organized a mass meeting of all groups on campus to explain UA publicity and publications. They also coordinated the activities for the Journalism Day which was held on campus in spring. Members for the honorary are selected for outstanding activities in journalism. WOMEN'S PRESS CLUB: ROW 1: Pat Gordon, Iris Cloudt, Fran Lou- bet, Kitty Jo Parker. ROW 2: Liz Haas, Barbara Essel, Mary Kay Plumb, Mary Ellen Fulton, Dr. B. P. Campbell, Cyrilles Silberman. . ALPHA KAPPA DELTA National scholastic sociology honorary Sociology majors who are members of the na- tional scholastic sociology honorary, Alpha Kappa Delta, are part of a nation-wide chain of 60 chapters. High scholarship is one basis for selection of mem- bers into this honorary. To be eligible to join, a student must have 14 hours in sociology with a 2.0 grade average. LPHA KAPPA DELTA: ROW 1: Barbara Martin, Mary Jane Ellis, John W. Eeck. OW 2: F. A. Conrad, R. A. Mulligan, Donald S. Klaiss. PI M U E PS I LO N National scholastic mathematics honorary Members in Pi Mu Epsilon are selected on an honorary basis. The group annually sponsors a lecture on mathematics with two professional men from the field as guest speakers. They also hold a problem contest every two weeks open to all students and award a prize to the first person to solve the problem. PI MU EPSILUN: ROW 1: Jack Gaines, Eduardo da Silva, Irvin Yavelberg, Roberta Abrahams, R. D. Miller, Patrick Moss. ROW 2: Robert Fisher, Bill Herndon, Gene Rushton, James King, Wil- liam Fortner. ROW 3: Bill Lynch, Warren Griggs, Bob Dickerson, Maurice Collins, Bob Williamson. ROW 4: Richard Barrett, George Insalaco, Dan McKenzie. PHI MU ALPHA: ROW 1: B. M. Bakkegard, Daweel George, Lyle Koch, Frank Fleming, Julian Stinson, Walter Schmitz, Eddie Hart- man, John Byrer. ROW 2: Robert Brown, Patrick Crotty, Richard Swift, James Mueller, Dexter Long, Joe Byrd, Joseph Marcus, J an Clemmer. ROW 3: Bob McNabb, Jim Pierce, Loveless Livingston, Jim Woodward, Frank Suggs, Rene St. Julien, Thomas Turner. PHI M U ALPHA National men's music honorary The purpose of Phi Mu Alpha is to advance the cause of music in America, with emphasis on the American composers. During the year the group pre- sents recitals, sponsors a high school composition con- test and assists the School of Music with its programs. KAPPA KAPPA PSI National men's band honorary TAU BETA SIGMA: ROW 1: Sally Stover, Judy Wilhoite, Hallie Corona, Paula Betts. ROW 2: Patsy Leonard, Betty Scott, Mason. ROW 3: Rosalie Robles, Gladys Merrick, Marion Betsy Spitler. TAU B ETA S I GMA National women's band honorary Coeds of the UA Wildcat Band form Tau Beta Sigma, national band honorary for women. They share the complex preparations and production of the Varsity Show with Kappa Kappa Psi and also act as hostesses for the parties which are planned with co-members of the band. Kappa Kappa Psi sponsors the annual Varsity Show in the spring and deposits the proceeds in a band scholarship fund. Members of the honorary direct the production of the acts which are staged by competing sororities and fraternities. The numbers, centered around a theme, are judged and the best are awarded trophies. Kappa Kappa Psi also hosts high school bandsmen from all over the state at the University Band Day in the fall. KAPPA KAPPA PSI: ROW 1: Sam Foster, Charles Masters, Bud Sessions, Ted Schmidt, Jim Helder, Bill Briscoe, Hector Espinosa, Tony Freeman ROW 2: Frank Fleming, Roy Campbell, Daweel George, Robert Potter, Dick Fletcher, Bob McNabb, Dick Anderson, Ed Richardson, Cohn McEachen. ROW 3: Jim Mueller, Mike Campos, Don Bennett, Lyle Koch, Jim Leary, Floyd Weil, Bill Drake, Bob Braun. ELTA SIGMA RHO: ROW 1: Linda Sinclair, Dr. George Sparks, SIGMA ALPHA ETA: ROW l: Audrey Mayman, Glenda Parrott, Bev- onna Mitchell. ROW 2: Gary Yontef, Jim Hawk, Jim Newcomer. erly Wilson, Gwen Houser. ROW 2: Skip Wallach, Jerry Fitz- DELTA SIGMA RHO National forensics honorary Activities of this honorary speech group included representation in the Western Speech Tournament, Pacific Forensic Tournament and National Delta Sigma Rho conference. This year, the group hosted 'delegates from western colleges who attended the Southwest Speech Tournament. SIGMA ALPHA IOTA National women's music honorary Sigma Alpha Iota members are women music majors who have been recommended by the music faculty for their outstanding work. During the year they give two concerts, one at Christmas and one in the spring. They also usher for all University concerts. ALPHA IUTA: ROW 1: Lucy Thacher, Gloria Dulgov, Wynn Rosenbaum, Patsy Leonard. ROW 2: Ruth Frymire, Dorothy Goodwin, Carol Ann Wilkinson, Grace Baumer, Paula Blow. ROW 3: Patricia Van DeWalle, Pat Lebsch, Gwendolyn Houser, Anne M. Holmes, Barbara Mason. gerald, John Richtars, Dr. James Lambert. SIGMA ALPHA ETA National speech and hearing therapy honorary The purpose of Sigma Alpha Eta is to interest students in the iield of speech and hearing therapy and to provide learning experience not offered in formal education. The group is composed of speech majors and those with an outside interest in the field. ALPHA RHO TAU Local art honorary Talented art students are selected for membership in Alpha Rho Tau, whose initials by no accident spell Hart." The student artists sponsor two art exhibits where they show their own work. Another activity is decorating for the annual Tucson Mad Arts Ball. ALPHA RHU TAU: ROW l: Tina O'Neil, Mary Jean Harper, Mary Shower, Cecily Walker, Sydney Wade, Barbara Ehnert. ROW 2: Judy Mitchell, Audrey Stoll, Tootie Zimmerman, Pat Bush, Mari- lyn Ottinger, Betty Field, Charles Littler. ROW 3: Mark Voris, Floyd Lucier, Joe Domler, A. S. Andersen, J. G. Souden, R. M. Quinn, W. H. Anderson. PSI CHI: ROW 1: Alice Cobb, Edward Casavantes, Beverly Carne- vale, Ruth Fehr, Joseph Angelo, Carroll MacDorman. ROW 2 Mary Harrington, Dorothy Marquart Nancy Binns, Calista Leon ard, Ole Simley. ROW 3:Lewis Hertz: Larry Greene, Dick Clifford: Donald Lohr, George Andreas. PI DELTA PHI National scholastic French honorary The purpose of Pi Delta Phi is to stimulate good scholarship in the study of French and to honor majors and minors who have done outstanding work in the field. The group annually awards prizes to the best UA students in Hrst year, second year and ad- vanced French composition and literature classes. SIGMA DELTA Pl: ROW 1: Renato Rosaldo, Mario B. Rodriguez, John Brooks, Ruth Rexroat, A. M. Guerrero. ROW 2: John J Reynolds, Jack E. Davis, Dwight Chambers, Donald J. Alderson, Mrs. Frank Cohen, Linda Lou Fiscel, Stan Rose. ROW 3: Rupert C. Allen, Jr., Timothy Brown, Virginia Sisco, Martina Garcia Marcia Orr, Jean Sperling. THETA MU-PSI CHI Local and national psychology honorary Psi Chi members are chosen on an honorary basis from the members of the local psychology club, Theta Mu. They also must be in the upper-third standing in psychology and the upper half in overall grade average. The club and its honorary were organized to promote interest in the Held of psychology. Pl DELTA PHI: ROW 1: Guy Verrees, Gail Gaskin, Harold Wylie. ROW 2 Loyal Gryting, Arthur Beattie. SIGMA DELTA PI National scholastic Spanish honorary n Fluent conversationalists in Spanish predominate at the Sigma Delta Pi meetings. Membership is based on a 2.0 average in the romance language, nine hours credit above Spanish 3a, including a literature course, and final departmental approval. The honorary an- nually sponsors a Spring Banquet. 1 Alpha Omicron is a new local chapter of the ATIONAL COLLEGIATE PLAY ERS National drama honorary The activities of the National Collegiate Players include putting on one production a semester and entertaining visiting celebrities in the theater. Mem- bership in the honorary requires junior standing, participation in several fields of the theater and final approval by the national board. NATIONAL CULLEGIATE PLAYERS: ROW l: Peter Coulson, Caroline San- ford, Dr. Fairfax Walkup, Abby Campbell, Tana Horwitz, Kathy Leake, Lynette Kresser. .1 ,-, - .ff Robert Burroughs. ALPHA OMICRON Women's home economics honorary iational home economics honorary, Omicron Pi. Its nurpose is to promote interest and encourage research n the field of home economics. Twenty seniors and en juniors who have maintained a 2.0 grade average are accepted for membership. PLAYERS: ROW 1: Jim Hoerr, Tana Horwitz, Joyce Murphy,.Bruce audia Moholy Nagy, Pete Coulson, Abby Campbell, Alphonse Eldon Quick, Kathy Leake, Lynette Kresser, Tony Collins. UNIVERSITY PLAYERS Local drama honorary University Players, local drama honorary, is open to men and women in the drama department who have earned Hfteen points and are of sophomore standing. The organization performs varied services such as making posters and selling tickets for Uni- versity drama productions. ALPHA UMICRUN: ROW 1: Mary Randall, Joy Bradshaw, Helen Goetz, Helen Gee, Pat Lacy. ROW 2: Julia Bonds, Wilma Brown, Miriam Kuhlman, Marianna Schantz, Dr. Ruth Hall, Mary Moreman. PHI ALPHA DELTA: ROW 1: Bob Browder, Vince Odgers, Robert L. Reid, Stuart J. Shoob, John Larry McLaws, Bob Backstein, A. Lee Estep, Frank Dickey, Jr., Harold Goldman, Luke Nitti. ROW 2: Richard Day, John Amey, Ted Geyler, Bill Skousen, Dudley Wel- ker, Bob Hillock, Dale Fenter, Frank Larriva, George R. Sorenson, Steve Duke. ROW 3: James J. Lenoir, J. Bryon McCormick, W. S, Bames, Claude H. Brown, John J. Irwin, Jr. PHI ALPHA DELTA International law fraternity Phi Alpha Delta is open to second semester fresh- man students for pledging. The honorary sponsors the orientation briefing session for freshmen and an annual extemporaneous speech contest for law col- lege students. The luncheon meetings feature lawyers and outside speakers. P H I D E LTA P H I National law fraternity CD KAPPA BETA PI: ROW 1: Stirley Newell, Ellen Jane Rex Frances Bumsted, Joan Murphy. KAP PA BETA PI International law sorority Kappa Beta Pi is the only international sorority and he only law sorority in Arizona. Very active with Arizona alumni, the members hold luncheon meetings with women lawyers in the area to discuss legal mat- ters of interest and to obtain professional advice. The main activity of Phi Delta Phi law honor- ary is to sponsor a scholastic fund contest for out- standing graduating seniors in the law college. The group holds monthly luncheon meetings which feature prominent speakers in the related field. PHI DELTA PHI: ROW 1: Bill Fox, Berry Rutledge, Max Klass, Gerry Kalyna, Gerald Johnson, Robert Petrie, Edward Roper, Pete Johnson James Bialac, Lynn Laney. ROW 2: Eugene Lane, Ed Singer, Ronald McKelvey, Teddy Warner, Peter Gianas, Robert Finn, Lawrence Bret Harte, David Ellsworth. ROW 3: Jerry Angle, Herbert Williams, Robert Byrnes, Edward Davis, Powell Gillenwater, Allan Stanton, John Hobbs, Lloyd Fernandez, Dave Dietz, J. W. Moore, Charles Johnston, Bob Beshears. ROW 4: Tom Linton, Barry Crown, Ray Brown, Raoul Jacques, Myles Stewart, Sid Kain, L. Edmund Cates, Ira Broadman, Don Robinson, Ervin Johnston, Ross Anderson. T - 1 . , V' ,-1 . ':,-3.1. ,i ' OF SIGMA Xl: ROW 1: Robert Maier, Douglas Chapm, Leslie Forster, Leon Blitzer, Wallace Fuller, Ole Simley. ROW 2: Fred Turner, W. Fred Riley, Terah Smiley, Nicholas Raica, Jr., Edward Wise, John Robson, Kenneth Frost. ROW 3: Bryant Bannister, R. L. Palmer, Kurtz E M Schmutz D F McAlister Lee Stith ROW 4' Emil Haury W S Phillips Robert Forbes, C. W. Ferguson, OL F. Pahnish, B. , . . , . . , . . , . . , D. Day, F. G. Werner. ROW 5: R. J. Trautman, W. J. Pistor, W. E. Bryan, R. R. Humphrey. SOCIETY OF SIGMA XI BETA BETA BETA National scientific research honorary National biological honorary The purpose of Beta Beta Beta is to promote high scholarship in the field of natural and biological sciences. Members assist underclassmen with tutoring sessions and act as science coordinators for the Sci- ence Fair held on the campus. Research and scientific advancement is the aim of the Society of Sigma Xi. This honorary is open to graduate students with commendable records in sci- ence. This year Dr. John Lance, geology professor, was national Sigma Xi lecturer for the organization. E . Fri' A 'S .F , ,A ,, , "I 'iii t., . me it -I--- -.ga - 4 1 E 5 at 4 A ' f 'M' iii-T ETA BETA BETA: ROW l: Jane Blair, Mary Elberfeld, Connie Christensen, Mary Ellen Percy, Laila Busailah, Betty Lou Best, Betty Tadano, ary Ellen Heinz, Julia Harlan, Pat Sullivan, Dorothy Michelbach, Marion Rusnak, Ann-Marie Rascop, Johanna Troller, Ilze Grasis, Pat erry, Sylvia Sue Taylor. ROW 2: Sam Blakesley, Arturo Miramon, Kaoru Matsuda, John Bullock, Roy Cameron, Ciriaco Gonzales, David cI-laffey, Brian Beun, Charles Siroky, Harry Gruwell, Ben Tadano, John Klima, Clip Klepacki, Stan Tixier. ROW 3: Bud Ellis, W. S. Phil- ps, Kenneth Dyer, Bud Schoen, Robert Posner, Bob Goldfarb, Roy Wong, Kenneth Lange, Robert Yoder, Roger Carpenter, Donald Braun, obert Barr, Robert Moses, John Montgomery. ROW 4: Mac Homan, E. B. Kurtz, R. M. Harris, Gary Henderson, Paul Chan, Robert Whist- r, Dave Martyn, Wes Ferguson, Edward Tisch, Ronald Crismon, Roy Nelson, John Gerdes, Paul Prechel, Nick Mansour, Paul Edgerton. 239 SIGMA PI SIGMA: ROW 1: Roy Craesser, Jay Treat, Ann Sylvester, Jefferson Davis, Leon Blitzer. ROW 2: George Gibson, Bob Fisher, DeWitt Cooper, Elmo Bruner, Paul Ricci. ROW 3: Paul Patterson, Stewart Becker, Earle Warner, John Robson, Harry Shaver. SIGMA PI SIGMA National scholastic physics honorary Promoting appreciation and understanding of the principles of physics is the purpose of Sigma Pi Sigma. The group cooperates with the physics department in sponsoring seminars concerned with topics of scientific interest. Members are chosen for outstanding achieve- ment with a 2.0 average in upper-division physics. PHI LAM BDA UPSILON National scholastic men's chemistry honorary KAPPA EPSILUN: Dorothy Michelbach, Myra Cohen, Vera man, Pat Sullivan. KAPPA EPSI LON National women's pharmacy sorority Kappa Epsilon is a national professional sorority for women in pharmacy. The purpose of the honorary is to stimulate interest in this field and to form an organized group of women in the pharmacy college. Members sponsor an annual cake sale at Christmas and give the proceeds to the Arizona Children's Home. Enthusiastic interest in chemistry and scholarship attainment in the field are the requirements for mem- bership in Phi Lambda Upsilon. This year the group gave a prize to the best essay on chemistry written by a high school student and offered another reward for the top high school project in the science fair. PHI LAMBDA UPSILON: ROW l: Richard Childs, Edward Wise, Wallace H. Fuller, Saul L. Neidleman, Perry M. Forman, Nicholas Raica Milton Smith. ROW 2: Douglas S. Chapin, W. F. McCaughey, James C. Masson, J. B. Sutton, Robert C. Shepard, Roy M. Landers Stanley Greenberg. ROW 3: Harvey Hopps, James Bogints, Harold Koenig, E. B. Kurtz, Joel E. Fletcher, Kaoru Matsuda, M. Vavich fy il, I-In ROW 1: Ron Blazina, Charles Burnett. ROW 2: Richard Jong V. H. Simonian, Paul Geniec, RHO CHI National scholastic pharmacy honorary The purpose of Rho Chi is to make college stu- dents realize the importance of pharmaceutical re- search and discoveries and to make the stranger to pharmacy aware of its close association with every- day life. Contrasted with the other pharmacy or- ganizations, this honorary is open to both men and women. A pharmacy student who has successfully passed 30 units in the College of Pharmacy is eligible to be- come a member of Phi Delta Chi. Each year, the members set up an interesting window display in the Student Union Bookstore to bring National Pharmacy Week to the attention of UA students. New members are initiated at the beginning of each semester. KAPPA PSI: ROW l:Rich Lewis, Ed Mogerman, Morris Gortler V H Simonian. ROW 2: Gary Talley, Duke F ischer, J. Knox, H Mollner KAPPA PSI National pharmacy professional fraternity Kappa Psi is a fraternity for men in the College of Pharmacy. To be eligible for membership, students must complete 15 units in the pharmacy college and maintain a grade average of 3.0 or better. The meet- ings of the honorary frequently feature speakers who have gained prominence in their selected field. P H I D E LTA C H I National pharmacy professional fraternity HI DELTA CHI: ROW 1: Richard Childs, Charles Burnett, Richard Hammer, Robert Marder, Bill Knutsen, Wilson Bow Woo Ben adano Paul Geniec, Guy Alonge. ROW 2: George Henderson, Ron Blazina, Manuel Macias, Harry Gruwell, Joe Tex, Rudy Noriega eorge Serbin. ROW 3: Robert Harris, Donald R. Sturzenegger, Jim Aldridge, Stuart Thompson, Richard Delong, Wendell Witte AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSUCIATIUN: ROW 1: Charles Burnett, Jack Guttery, Ben Pulos, Tip Clements, Ola Wells, Metta Lou Wilson Bow Woo, Jaime Cusillas, Howard Yee, Rudy Noriega, Morris Gortler. Geniec, Tom Hassey, Stuart Thompson, Ron Blazina, Richard Hammer, Lee Gruwell, Willis Brewer. ROW 3: Jack Flinn, Donald zenegger, Dan Massey, James Knox, Richard Delong, Daryl Smith, Murray Rogow, Tom Alspach, Harry Gruwell, George Henderson, ley Reinhaus, Joseph Tex. AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASS O C IAT I O N National professional pharmacy association ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY National air force student honorary ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY: ROW 1: C. B. Leeser, Karl Goss, Howard Tarr, Jeff Lauderdal burne, Rodger Kitchens. ROW 2: R. Nielsen, Bruce Genthner, Joe Kent, David Mount, Robert Ruikka, O. H. Maud, W. A. Hunziker, Twito, Lowell Fathera. Bob McNabb. ROW 3: Alvin Baber, R. J. Hedrick, Robert Bill Fraser, Howie Bernstein, Nat Talpis. ROW 4: Warren Ridge, Tom Russell, Ray Weigold, John Choisser, Boyd Gibbons, Herb Selby Angle, Jim Harrington, Don Caughlin. ROW 2: Ed Mogerman, Bob Cruz, Herbert Meshel The American Pharmaceutical Association relates pharmacy on a college level to pharmacy on a na- tional level by keeping students informed on develop- ments of professional importance. Prominent scholars and researchers in this science were featured at the monthly meetings. The members also sponsored Lyman's Day in honor of the founder of the college and an award banquet for pharmacy seniors and out- standing students. The Arnold Air Society is a military honorary composed of cadets selected from the advanced Air Force ROTC corps. The objective of this group of top student officers is to better prepare themselves for tours of duty in the Air Force. This year the Of- iicer's Club at Davis-Monthan was the site of the annual fall and spring formals. e, Eric Mayer, Ken Uvodich, Tommy Crowe, Damon Brandenberger, Bill Willigrod, R. D. Miller, Greg ABBARIJ AND BLADE: ROW 1: Warren Ridge, Harvard Hill, Bill Alexander, C. B. Leeser, Jim Boginis, Bob McNabb, George Kaine, Eric Ma er, Danny Membrila, David Mount, Max Livingston, James F. Currie, Richard 0. Williams, Pat Shelly, Howard Tarr. ROW 2: Y rl Goss, Dan Harshfield, Bill Lynch, Lynn I-Iornbrook, Joe Lumpkin, Jack Hoagland, Alvin Baber, Newell Porter, Joe D. Shamburger, orge B. Settlemyer, Ken Uvodich, O. H. Maud. The purpose of Scabbard and Blade is to promote military ideals and inter-service relationships. Mem- bership is limited to seniors in advanced military. Activities of the honorary included reinauguration of N , I d d ,H h mar the annual "A" Mountain clean-up and selection of atlona a Vance ml I ary on y a queen to reign over the annual Military Ball. Pershing Rifles, a military fraternity, is composed of Army and Air Force ROTC cadets. The Military Police Detail, Drill Team and Rille Team operate as a part of the honorary. Social events included ex- P CITHUSCS with Pima Hall and H f01'mal dallfle ill DC- National underclassmenir military honorary cember at the Davis-Monthan Oflicer's Club. RSHING RIFLES: ROW 1: Gary Chapman, Joe Zimmerman, Jr., Wayland Marler, Bob Potter, David Roop, Thomas Mattern, Leonard Estrada, aptain Zandy. ROW 2: Pete Andrews, Min Mar, Dave Gross, Joe Valdez, Ron Larson, Carl Stiflier, Robert Lopez, Gerald Sanders, Severo alma, Carlos Munoz, Lance Johnson, Victor Velasquez. ROW 3: Phil Ewart, Bill Estes, Steve Hall, Jim Sawyer, Walt Bergman, Charles olbert, Robert McCuskee, Robert Sotomayer, Bob Slacks, Ruben Celaya, James Jenkins, Jim Waters. ROW 4: Don Kunkel, Evan Curtis, Jim ouer, Tom Loveday, Ronald Ledford, Andy Bowen, Jack Bedwell, Joe Mercurio, Dick Tornquist, William Warskow, John Dunlop. ROW 5: ill Nelson, Thomas Browning, John Kaur, Max Schetter, Ed Andres, C. Meyer, James Roselle, Larry Cline, Kenneth Thomas, Gordon Becker, ector Guerra, Ted Varga, James Bateman, M. H. Denniston, Michael Vasiliades. fi? N r X' -,fit f ia Xi-NX. FE, 1 X N .PBJ i ,mgifux J. ,V T 900 IIJO 1230 U30 12.40 IEJD U10 MH 41:3 All? 430 LVFU init? fem X1-n WJ4, Hy: rn mv .' 50 ' in IH! -,fm .5uf.gH,1xH0Y AM blUDk:LN'I' UNION BULLETIN BOARD THURSDAY MARCH 20, 1958 WAFS LOBBY A P H A JH BLRM PM ALPHA KAPYA F51 . LAW FACULTY LUNCHEON PUBLICITV UISTRIHUTNIN COMM CHWES CHIFLE k KIWAHIS CHESS HUM FRESHWIAN CI NSS COUNCIL SOPHDS S U A B RECREATION COMM UELYA UPSILUN CHEVHLIER CLUB 26 5. O5 on '05 J 1355 E 50 v vw v ,v l,' 1 -., . I v. 1, 1.1 .L-A., f ' ' Ji M5 I ,wry 1-1 . . -. Z5-, .1 ge gpg I . Y T' w 1. , 1. 2 . in . Y if -'- -A,..f x,--N5 V' :1 ' gn 1, . "gh, 4- Qmbf -, "- K mx- f T: ' - rv,'pfr,5, ff? e ulgff. -7 ' -xl. . ' " :wr "f'.Jf'3' L A 4 -l'l..4., ,IHY " ".,1 'v:f,. .'f"" fu, x,'. .1 --. ,aw ,, Qv"X'4lmYU: V " V . 23' ' '1"kl::'x .vii gf! U , 41'.5f" n 1-U - -Y.s.,-5' inf, Y , Y -- ,G , ,.. "h 11,7-il fg -5 .V-rj ' X .I ,-5, 4: . 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M TER 6-GO PM - x -,-i.i..f,g"A.f iid ..f -flyjziilli, Ay, ,Lv -7.1 A , N Mfg, ,--.:.u5.A -wx 'xl-:nfl-1, J fri- -iinlgggkg 1, - ,, 1 2-.fm ul,-. 11'-T 34 , U, 'in-"A3:'EH -i::'l3j,2,4Jw'5..,,Lw ir' 'iq rl 9' 1 '?fii7 1 - - 1, JH ff" A : + ff--rr 'fc ' fr ' ' , "ff f 12 .5 " ' ' , RM .261 r ' r Av f.. 1 1 n '. ' 1 ,1 .M U Je, U Y i?fllPi2?ffQUf2f:U.n12 :1v:ffK1Kw5,:m ,,JYI'4'Ufhl C ',""Pt':Q: Pj" n: ,:+.ft-Tlx" 'f ' 5 w .H-it-gs ,im -..-N ,t IQ, . , ,- ,, , , 15. Us :ill 4.5 L-bi 'tl ii ,, ,x A-5 '.1'r,-' .ix .-All , 'Q .- .V UNIVERSITARIUS: ROW 1: Diego Navarrette, Ofelia Garbony, Fidi Elder, Margie Escobedo, Norma Berrellez, Barbara Tellez, Pat Koehm Elena Preciado,- Margot Rios, Ciriaco Gonzales. ROW 2: Joe Lizardi, Lorenzo Luera, Gloria Garcia, Barbara Marshall, Margot Moore 1 Cordova, Sheila Burns, Patricia Preciado, Martha Borbon, Yolanda Almejo, Marty Herman, Mac Reynolds. ROW 3: Joe Ahuero Jr Medina, Dick Acuna, Dick Martinez, Antonio Munoz, Jr., Carlos Chavez, Gabriel Guzman, Mary Jane Burney, Rose Portillo, Flora d 1 . o Angela Casanova, Ruben Estrada INTERNATIONAL LOS UNIVERSITARIGS STUDENTS CLUB Los Universitarios, predominantly composed of Spanish-speaking students, is open to anyone inter- ested in Mexican culture. Each year the organization offers a scholarship to an Arizona high school student of Mexican extraction. Other projects of the group are participation in Tucson's Festival Society and presentation of a program on Pan-American Day. The purpose of the International Students' Club is to create better relations between peoples of all countries. Parties, movies and talks are designed to acquaint members with the varied nations represented in the group and with current international affairs. At the annual ISC dinner, costumed members cook dishes native to their country and entertain with native songs and dances. INTERNATIUNAI. STUDENTS CLUB: ROW 1: Harriet Canning, Margie Escobedo, Carolyn Elder, Georgene Goodwin, Carmen Velasco, Melinda Smith Teuku Jacob, Nicholas Lapadat, Dr. G. Sparks, Eduardo da Silva, Maung N. Maung, Reza Nazemi. ROW 2: Lida de Haan, Kathy Porter Abdul El-Khalidy, Hassan Nazami, Tibor Galovics, George Dale, Mustafa Nuseibeh, Beatriz Taboado, Samih Faraj, Sally Janda, Gene S Matatqum. ROW 3: Galen Baker, William Ebert, Azim Azime, Alex Sheydayi, Salim Shahatit, Hebe Economides, Wilda Chacur, Bettina Setem ROW 4: Jena Szabo, Bahaam Nassiri, Aboulfida Baroudi, Christina Hallberg, Samir Kawar, Gregg Swihart, Marisa de Leon Perez Hugo Duharte, Martha Elizondo. ROW 5: Luigi Leparulo, Michael Leo, Joanne French, Rusty Kothavala, Pat Baer, Sigrid Maitrejean, Mar Jorie Baker, Linda Holloman, Anita Major, Munther Baroudi. M' CIRCLE K CLUB: ROW 1: C. Zan Lesher, Mohammed Parwana, Fasiu din Ahmad, Dr. Victor Kelley. RO 2: Reza Nazemi, lsfandar Sheyda Luigi Leparulo, Alex Sheydayi, Yah Tahbaz. ROW 3: Azim Azimi, I-Iufd Alurfali, Mohamad Bahraman, L von Blottnitz, CIRCLE K CLUB LE CERCLE FRANCAIS Sponsored by the Tucson Kiwanis Club, the Circle K Club's membership consists entirely of UA foreign students. The group was organized last spring to ac- quaint these students with Arizona. Monthly meet- ings featured such topics as air travel, the agricultural cotton area at Marana, the marketing program and the banking system of Tucson. Trips were also taken to locations related to these topics. Aware of American students' dithculty in convers- ing iluently in a foreign language, student members of Le Cercle Francais prepare the programs for each meeting. All plays, skits, songs, dramatic readings and book reviews must be recited in French. Their goal is twofold: to increase student interest in French culture and literature and to give members an op- portunity to think and speak in the language. LE CERCLE FRANCAIS: ROW 1: Sandra Stratton, Glenda Richter, Dr. Loyal Gryting, Frances Loubet, Sara Hayes. ROW 2: Nicholas Lapadat Michael Costin, Dr. Arthur Beattie, John Brooks, Guy Verrees. ROW 3: Robert Hammond, Bill Blalock, John Piety, Robert Lowe, Mike Moore PLAINING the importance of a market- g principle, a guest speaker leads e members of the Marketing Club an mformal discussion session. ips ' '. f ' 1: .-3, 5-gli-ifj-V.',., .uw ay-.1 -. - .-Tl 'fr .- . p..53,.p X.,-. p ' H- 1- 'X ,'..'.', l 1. .m-,- .. I 1, V. I. W its-X 1. . . i., , .X ..,,r - .. X, V. .. .. .. -V -.,- iw... -f. '.'2sH"" . M :ggi .li A -we if e T .1 f iQ.21"'.gAi5 ' 'V H GILESM l ' Q . MARKETING CLUB Heading the Marketing Club's slate of activities was the promotion of the Second Annual Business Machine Show in April. The two day show, held in the Student Union, featured displays and demon- strations of business and computing machines. 'Field trips were also taken by the members to the local oflices and warehouses of the Arizona Hardware Company and the Associated Grocer's. INSURANCE CLUB The Insurance Club, a newly organized group on the University campus this year, held monthly meet- ings featuring speakers who explained the various problems and opportunities in the insurance business to the members. The organization also assisted with the Insurance Lecture Series held during the winter and made several field trips to Phoenix where they visited insurance iirms. 1? 'us SEAL. . . . -:I ' INSURANCE CLUB: ROW 1: Tony Ziehler, William R. Heidemann, Bob Robinson, Joseph Buckley, Rod Krause. ROW 2: Gordon Tench Lee Smith Douglas Sutton, Rudy Sopher, James McCormick. ROW 3: Gregory Seguin, Ted Sitterley, Andy Doll, Forest Barr, Nestor Roos .ive tures are featured at monthly meetings. UNIVERSITY IIAMES: ROW 1: I an Boehle, Susie Sutton, Mary Olesek, Elaine Taylor ROW 2: Pat Cain, Betty Woidyla, Betty Barbee, Jo Alice Gleckler, Bea Buder, Bobbie Phalen. UNIVETS The Univets, a club for veterans on the University campus, was formed in recognition of the need for an organization through which they could channel their views and problems. Activity-wise, the organi- zation takes part in student body politics, enters various competitions, helps with campus drives and sponsors an annual dance held each spring. UNIVERSITY DAME Open to all wives of UA students, the Universit Dames' Club takes part in many worth-while project At Christmas the members sponsor an annual part for the Indian children at Richey School and se holiday cards to raise money which is donated t charity. The "Dames" also read to children at Com stock Hospital. Fashion shows, bridge parties or lec ADVERTISING CLUB The Advertising Club specializes in helping art majors and advertising students gain a broader view of advertising in the nation and realize its importance in the American way of life. The club acquaints members with methods in the advertising field by featuring guest speakers at the meetings and by taking trips to printing companies and advertising agencies. UNIVETS ROW 1: Fred Merkel, Roger Turk, Bob Wheat. ROW 2: Nick Estrada, Pete Hobart, Tom Moore. 248 ' . . 'Ox I . K J '4 ADVERTISING CLUB: ROW 1: Mrs. Ella Breazeale, Maryellen Roden Barbara Ehnert, Cecily Walker. ROW 2: Armando Montano Keith Lovett, Jack Rein, Dr. E. G. Wood. l RAM BLERS CLUB Traveling to places of interest around Arizona the main activity of the Ramblers' Club. This year rand Canyon and Rainbow Bridge were destinations r vacation trips while excursions to Mt. Graham, iller Peak and various canyons and caves in the cinity of Tucson provided one-day traveling fun. he club, reorganized one year ago, is open to all UA udents and faculty interested in hiking. RAMBLERS: ROW 1:Murray Gardner, Donna Lee Myers, Lorna Glen- dening, Annita Schmutz, Owen Von Buskirk. ROW 2: James Gaver, Lorry Knappman, Gil Saltzman, John Bullock, John McLean. ROW 3: Fred Nader, Kenneth Dyer, Jerry Gustafson, Tom Harlan, Eber Glendening. ANTHROPOLOGY CLUB AMERIND CLUB Chief among the projects of the Anthropology Club is the Gladys Sayles Memorial Library located in the University museum. Each year the members donate several anthropology books to the growing library which is open only for the use of club mem- bers. The group also publishes a newsletter, ATLATL, twice a semester and sponsors a Christmas party and a picnic for the sixty members. The purpose of the Amerind Club is to help Indian students on campus feel at home. The organization, which is open to all University students interested in American Indian life and culture, sponsors a tutor- ing service for members and a team which participates in intramurals. The main activity this year was spon- soring a statewide conference, "Indian Education," which dealt with Indian student problems. FICERS: ROW 1: Fay Temple, Joan Evans, Beth Colvin, Geof Fox. OW 2: Alma Skinner, Anita Schmutz, Al Johnson, Tony Pomeroy. BEE. 1 s I r . 1 ,. l AMERIND CLUB: ROW 1: Emily Crow, Felicita Fernando, Marie Byrd, Beverly Manuel, Hattie Kabotie. ROW 2: Jim Gilbert, Marvin Hon- ga, Leo Watchman, Roger Davis, Harold Doka, Allen Throssell. ROW 3: Kenneth Ahmie, John Byrd, Eric Polingyowma, David McDaniel, Lee Thompson. ROW 4: Milo Kalectaka, Richard Lon- genbaugh, J. H. Denton. 249 AEGIE CLUB: ROW 1: Wayne Wallace, Harry Kruse, Virginia Ellis, Shirley Ransom, Lois Wells, Pat Mack, Paul Johnson. ROW 2: Dick Mickey McCarty, Clip Klepacki, Calvin Willis, Philip Hartman, Ray Trappman, Ken McFadden, Terry Wheeler. ROW 3: Buck Markley, R. Fossland, Jim Halberg, Larry McDonald, Jim Cuming, Bud Brown, Bill Robinson, John Sottnek. AGGIE CLUB Promoting social activities for students in the College of Agriculture is the purpose of the Aggie Club. Spotlighting the club's program this year were the Aggie Fall Festival, the Aggie Dance and the Aggie Mixer which the club co-sponsors each fall semester to acquaint new agriculture students with the faculty members of the college. Members also RODEO CLUB An organization unique to western.campuses, the Rodeo Club sponsors the annual rodeo, sends teams to compete at other schools and coordinates Western Week. Highlighting their activities was the Inter- collegiate and All-School Rodeo which was held in early December. Mickey McCarty, also president of the club, served as Rodeo Boss. This year the Women helped the Home Economics and Rodeo Clubs s on- p members interested in square dancing on horseback sor Western Week and the University Rodeo. organized a drill team which performed at the rodeo. RODEO CLUB: ROW 1: Shirley Ransom, Joc McAlpine, Bunny Cushman, Deanna Mason, Gina Sanders, Nancy Baustian, Donya Young, Patty Sanders, Harriet Carming, Dorothy Lewis. ROW 2: Dick Schorr, Philip Hartman, Harry Kruse, Jim I-Ialberg, Didi Riley, Jane Blair, Lucy Yerger, Dorothy Parke, Beulah Morton, Jo Bailey, Betty Purvis, Lois Wells. ROW 3: Hugh Weech, Paul Johnson, Wayne Wallace, Raymond Mapston, Ken McFadden, Bud Brown, Martha Lehmann, De Wright, Pat Mack, Gayle Fierce, Virginia Ellis, Clip Klepacki. ROW 4: Kent Orchard, Don Johnson, Jim Higgs, Bill Robinson, Jim Barber, Alan Hansen, Terry Wheeler, Dan Robertson, Billy Hicks, John Sottnek, Buck Markley, Bob Wicks, Mickey McCarty. 250 o , , - - ' . . Q V - CAR Cl.llBi ROW 1: William Fisher, Pete Mockler, Tom Laird, Diane Stanford, Eric Hochstadter, Roger Thomas, Tom Simmons Kurt Asser Leppanen, Richard DuBois, Paul Kershner, John Miller, Earl Brown, Margaret Throp, Hank Candler, Paul Tschampel Allan Edwin Jones, Pete Taylor, Arthur Dorner, Bob Zimmerman, John Mikell, Ted Maney, Fred Hupp, Gordon Wordal, Robert Young Zuber, Robert Cottey. SPORTS CAR CLUB Sports car enthusiasts were ofhcially represented for the first time on campus when the Sports Car Club was inaugurated this year. A genuine interest in sports cars is the only qualification for membership. During Monday afternoon meetings, the Student Union reserves the parking space in front of the building for the diminuitivc vehicles of the members. On week-ends the club holds time trials, gymkhanas and rallies in Tucson and Phoenix. SKI CLUB Though the University is located in the desert, the UA Ski Club is an active organization for both novices and experienced skiers. During the winter the members periodically trek to the snows on Mt. Lem- mon or go to Flagstaff. The club holds several dry runs for the beginners before they are allowed to try the sport on the snow. To take care of the snowless spring months, the group has expanded its interests to include water skiing. LUB ROW 1: Ken Van Poucke, Suzanne Erickson, Joc McAlpine, Didi Riley, Nancy Vaughan, Alice Holly, Terry Jay, Connie Christensen 2 Allen Roessler, Dick Weismann, Craig Kepner, Dave Goodman, Bob Wicks, Jean Neubauer, Charles Schneider, Martha Lehmann Crocker, Liz Milstead, Janet Mooney, Ruby Fulbright. ROW 3: Terry Concannon, Chuck Waggoner, John Iles, Robert Young. ROW 4 Hadley, Roland Marsh, Bob Kreiner, John Snodgrass, Bob Patchell, W. K. Moseley, James McClanahan, Norman Finton, Phebe Fran Holly, Bob Diehl, John Bradbury. HOME ECONOMICS CLUB: ROW l:. Nancy McKale, Diane Brown, Sandra Williams, Sandy Adams, Jay Ackman, Anne Snoddy, Nancy Holly Willis, Emily Crow, Miss Ruth Allen. ROW 2: LaVern Galhouse, Phyllis Folkel, Ruthella Oliver, Janice White, Joy Bradshaw, Franks Nancy Binns, Pat Lacy, Helen Gee, Nat Prussing. ROW 3: Joan Cooper, Eleanor Dieterle, Jody Biby, Corinne Davis, Pat .Ian Jackson, Kenlynn Williams, Judy Matson, Virginia Ellis, Diane Keeling, Connie Hertzog. HOME ECONOMICS CLUB STUDENT NEA Majors in home economics have an opportunity to further their interests by joining the Home Eco- nomics Club. Career possibilities in this field are investigated and discussed by the members at the monthly meetings and one or more representatives are sent by the group each year to the many state and national contests. The organization also co-spon- sors Western Week with the Aggie and Rodeo Clubs. With a membership of over 100 education stu- dents, the Student National Education Association has participated in many projects during the year. On High School Senior Day they held open house in the College of Education and set up educational dis- plays. In November the group helped at the AEA Convention at Catalina High School. A reception for members of the faculty was held during the Christmas season. .st EDUCATION majors meet to organize the University's student branch of the National Education Association. In previous years, the organization has been known as the Future Teachers of America, but the name-change was made to give the group a closer aifiliation with the NEA 252 -vt ,,. MPUS DEMOCRATS: ROW 1: J. H. Burmeister, Mable Forseth, Mary Kay Catmill, Naomi Melnick, Virginia Taylor, Margaret Crehan, Bernard ennessy. ROW 2: Frank McElrath, Joseph Sparks, Grady Woodward, Steve Pogson, Mac Reynolds, Stanley Ragston, Gary Yontef, Harry Morrison. CAMPUS DEMOCRATS BARRISTER BIDDIES Campus Democrats' monthly meetings were high- lighted with prominent speakers. State Attorney Gen- eral Robert Morrison, State Senator Harry Ackerman and world traveler and lecturer, Maude Russell, ap- peared before the group. Also, Richard K. Burke spoke on current problems dealing with segregation. Activity-wise, the Campus Democrats worked on the reception for Senator John Kennedy. Barrister Biddies, a new club on the University campus, was organized in the fall for the wives of UA law students. As a year-long welfare project, members collected old clothes and toys which were distributed to needy children at Carillo School. Besides holding many bridge parties, a Christmas dinner-dance and a picnic held in the spring were also included in their social calendar. ,YY ,. . . .., Y.YY--,Y.-....,..,fa.DT---Y:,, Tvfwy.,-,.3 ARRISTER BIIJDIES: ROW 1: Lorraine Cates, Jo Ellie Price, Bettie Gillenwater, Hilda Dickerman, Jerri Toci, Jean Warner, Marcia Grand. OW 2: Jo Marshall, Jane Cattany, Barbara Goldman, Mrs. William Bames, Betty Klass, Marilyn Holyrod, Peg Hillock. ROW 3: Jeanette cKelvey, Patty Ross. ROW 4: Margaret Lewis, Lois Shelley, Audrey Curran, Carol Amey, Diane Davis, Jeanette Russin, Marge Carlson, unny Baker. 253 EN CARDE!" exclaims Helen Vosskuhler as she demonstrates form to her opponent Shawn Brownlee, while Susie Martz and Anne Chrisman observe. PISTOL CLUB As a recognized member of the National Riile Association, the Pistol Club is open to all women attending the University. The prime objective of the organization is to teach the members how to handle and fire a pistol safely. Although organized more as a club than a sport, the members hope to gain recognition by entering intercollegiate competition against such schools as Yale and West Point. FENCING CLUB CHESS CLUB The Chess Club, organized on the University campus this year, is open to all students and faculty members with an interest in the game. Under the spon- sorship of Hector Manciet, the club held a school- wide chess tournament. As another highlight of their first year, the organization joined the Southwest Fed- eration of Chess Teams, Whose membership includes the universities and colleges in this area. PISTOL CLUB: ROW 1: Didi Riley, Linda Riddle, Elizabeth Wick, Emily Crow, Helen Erickson, Gayle Fierce, Connie Christensen, M!Sgt Hayden. ROW 2: Joc McAlpine, Terry Hopp, Dee Her- , l SU' ' lf.. C f . F lzi ql C -E' " ' - ' '1-fi' . tk, e . 1 . . ' ,EY manson Jean Neubauer, Joan Hopkins, Marlene Staehlin, Joanne CHESS CLUB: ROW l: Harvey Maslin,' Susan Martz, Stanley Volk French Katie Sghallef, ROW 2: Bruce Billings, James Massoglia, Robert Briggs, Mike Halle Members of the University's Fencing Club i eled to Palo Alto, California, to enter the Ii collegiate Fencing matches held there this sp The men's team, a part of the co-educational 1 also competed at the Air Force Academy and the National Intercollegiate tournament at Lubl: Texas. Members spend several hours each week the Women's Field practicing for these excurf which highlight the fencer's yearly activities. -Tr xx 1-A x" N! Q f S. ' 1 lxh .X l F ug i S GREEK .Il The first semester president of the Panhellenic Council was Mary Ran- dall. Mary, a senior, was also active in Mortar Boardg Alpha Omicron, home economics honorary, Pi Lambda Theta, education honorary, and was selected for "Who's Who." aff Second semester brought Judy Bolt to the presidency. In addition to her work for Panhellenic Council, edu- cation major Judy served on the Junior Class Council. She is also a pom pon girl and was a Homecom- ing Queen attendant in 1957. PANHELLENIC Panhellenic cooperates with the University's ad- ministration and fraternities to further sound scholar- ship, 'Line intellectual accomplishments and high social standards on the University campus. Each of the twelve sororities sends it rush chair- man and her assistant as representatives to Panhellenic Council. Rush, being an integral part of a panhellenic system, is the main project. This year, over 500 coeds participated in fall rush and it was the responsibility of the Council to coordinate the many parties and assemblies held during Rush Week. During second semester Panhellenic hosted dele- gates from Arizona, New Mexico and Texas colleges and universities at the Tri-State Panhellenic Conven- tion. They also took a large part in the annual Greek Week held in March. Internationally, Panhellenic supports a 12-year old Korean girl, Lee Moon Ja, through the Foster Par- ents' Plan Inc. Locally, the UA Panhellenic contrib- utes to several philanthropies. This year they donated a wheelchair to a cerebral palsy victim and helped collect funds for the "City of Hope." NOV? PANHELLENIC COUNCIL: ROW 1: Sally Switzer, Helen Harris, Janet Snow, Carol 1-Ieiniger, Judy Bolt, Mary Randall, Demi Peters, Pat Sullivan Gayle Gamble, Dodie Wilson, Jo Lemons, ROW 2: Robby Addison, Diana Miter, Pat Wrenn, Anita Pankey, Martha Jo Anderson, Madilyn Buntz Marjorie Liem, Marion Rusnak, Sue Levy, Madeline Utay, Nancy Owens, Sharon Theilkas, Linda Sinclair, Anne Hawley. I JUDICIAL COUNCIL of I . The Judicial Council acts as the judicial branch sorority and fraternity government. lt is composed the three executive officers from the Panhellenic I I and seven representatives from the Inter- 'T' Council. This group handles problems :- between the sororities and fraternities and the disciplinary measures to be imposed violators of the rules established by either of the 'i councils. This year the Council had few cases . arbitrate or to punish. IUIDICIAL COUNCIL: ROW 1: Chuck Cagle, Mary Randall, Judy Bolt, Demiris Peters Lynn Hornbrook. ROW 2: Stan Lerch, Gail Shultz, Vaughn Binzer. Because the number of new students who take part in sorority rush has increased by such large amounts, Panhellenic inaugurated a student rush counseling system last year. Candidates for counsel- ing positions are nominated by each sorority and interviewed by the Dean of Women and Panhellenic president. The following fall, those selected move into a dormitory for the duration of rush where they are available for consultation with assigned rushees. USH OOUNSELORS: ROW 1: Mary Foard, Susannah Beck, Cathy Clark, Brenda Rash, Jackie Morgan. ROW 2: Pat ordon, Helen Vosskuhler, Suzi Daly, Jamie Porter, Edie Adams. 257 l,. Robby Addison Colleen Ashley Mary Louise Butler Juanita Carroll Smitty Clark Marijane Crawford Yvonne Cunningham Beverly Danenhauer Suzie Davis Dotty Dodds Peggy Duff Heidi Ellerbeck Sue Ewald Mary Jane Foster Nancy Ford Sue Gaston Barbara Hamilton Barbara Johnson Nancy King Randy Lee Shelley Ludwig Ellen Maclay Debbie Mahr Diana Miter J acquelyn Morgan Nancy Nichols Diane Ormsby Mar Lynn Ormsby Jeanne Orr Betty Ann Peavey Jackie Perdue Demi Peters B. J. Polito Kaye Relitz Rachel Riggins Vw P Lv ' at J '-Iv.,-' ti gy I tgw, . Hi y Q I 1' fi L J K I i i xxx!! .... "i , 'mr i GLANCING through the AChiO scrap- book as they make plans for the coming year, Jackie Perdue, Elaine Walworth, Nancy Ford and Betty Pea- vey sip coffee at an executive meeting. ht' w 1 1 -.. ll- 1 I, , 'fm :uk ' r ,Ds ePauw University Beta Lambda Chapter 1885 1930 85 Chapters 43 Members 1050 North Cherry Avenue ALPH CHI OMEGA A pledge's dream -that of being an active -be- came a reality very early in the year for the new Alpha Chi Omega pledges, when they switched places with the actives at the active-pledge turnabout. An- other treat for the pledges was the Pledge Backwards party. The girls set many new fashions as they modeled clashing separates. More dreams came true in 1957. The favorite dream of boys and girls everywhere was realized for the children from the Arizona Children's Home. At the Alum Christmas party, the children were pre- sented with gifts of toys and clothes. With December, Alpha Chi's gave the "Snowflake Fantasy," their an- nual holiday dance. Members active on campus were Spurs Suzie Davis and Demiris Peters. Demiris also served on the Pan- hellenic Council as secretary-treasurer. Chime Beverly Clark was co-chairman of the ASUA skit com- mittee, and Shelley Ludwig swam with Mermaids. Elected to "Who's Who" was Barbara Jo Polito, presi- dent of NEA and chairman of Artist Series Commit- tee. Junior class secretary and chairman of Campus Activities Volunteers was Jackie Perdue. Ohicers for this year were Elaine Walworth, presidentg Carol Saulsberry, vice-presidentg Jackie Perdue, pledge trainerg Erdene Telford, recording secretaryg Nancy Ford, corresponding secretary, Betty Peavey and Marijane Crawford, treasurers. 'QI -- i ia 3 259 Carol Saulsberry Jeanette Saviano Mary Ruth Scanlon Erdene Telford Caroline Thomson Alice Vlahos Elaine Walworth Kay Warner Linda Weisner Judith Wood Ann Alexander Patricia Baer Barbara Barton Cynthia Beltran Ann Bergman Judy Bowen Janet Camp Carole Carbone Mary Carrillo Carol Carter Geri Craig Sue Ann Dobson Coralee Domler Diane Downing Vicki Evers Mary Fagerberg Joan Fisher Mary Lou Forbes Janice Gatlin Cathy Geare Loretta Goettle Rosina Greene Carolyn Hague Beverly Hamay Lynne Hanhila Jane Harrison Roberta Hayden Penny Higgins Ruth Howe Judy Hughes Lora Huntzicker Beverly Jaquith Virginia Jenkins Joan Kendall Carole Ketchum Julianne Kurtz Jo Lemons Nancy Lindstrom Carol Lynch Judy McConnell Susan McNifT 1443 East First Street ' . V , rf. -J' Xf' ." Q: . U l "isa ' . 1 Wesleyan Female College Delta Gamma Chapter 1851 1957 89 Chapters 62 Members . so , - 'N ' ix Ax, :fp J K lx,.fQ " W N i xx.: gf 1 1 ,V I l 7 XX Riga i X. K. f s r s . , 51 1 -A -.. i i 42753. ,A .--. -I , .,.! Avg I I 5 i , vi ' ga. vhs Q I XA 'X A IAQ , , 1 W rl cave l - 4 ,J N . 1 r my 4 I is' ' 55- H 1 f. x V , - at . K ',:. .. -r , ' M Q -I ' w 1 SZ ,R ,- an . -. ' ':'Y??'x' ' . s... . E. If A , 7 E. X 1 5, , Mg K ,Mv'- A N Q11 5' 1 I K C J x I X 9 4 -4 , I , ... F iq' ,R 'O A- P Mary Helen McNeil, D ' ,, , 'YQ I 1 'ix , ' . . b I X , A . ., ' 7 K Bonnie Merry Janice Montgomery Ann Moore Geneva Motter Ancella Page All '-L K V : 1 he I V I f -,. i , VV V 1 A4 . V li is' 'V J- . "' J 'T' -:-1 Y-f 1 Sandra Mowrey ' L 1 V, ' ' "" I I 1,1 1. I WL 8 if Randi Owens u fig. I YE-it d ,2 ' Q ' ii, J -.Q i' .1 . B 6 'A if r V is 260 ,QJX ""S7 "SHOW TlME!" Gathering around the frying pan to look at the results of their cooking endeavor are Lois Sned- den, Geri Craig and Carole Ketchum. LPH DELTA PI With the opening of school in September, Alpha Delta Pi moved into its new ilagstone chapter house at the corner of 1st street and Vine. ln December they held their annual formal, "Dia- monds in the Snow," and crowned ATO Jon Lund- strom as Diamond King. All during the year the sorority hosted fraternities for exchanges and pinning seranades. During Greek Week their house was the site of a workshop. Sophomores Rosina Greene and Geri Craig repre- sented ADPi in Spurs. Lynne Hanhila held member- ship in Pi Omega Pi, while Rosina Greene and Joan Fisher were afiiliated with Alpha Rho Tau. Presi- dent of Tau Beta Sigma was Sally Stover. Dramatists Jo Lemons and Judy Hughes were active in Uni- versity Players. Bringing additional honors to the house was Geri Craig, sophomore class secretary. ADPi's had a finalist for Greek Week queen when Bev Jaquith was chosen by the fraternities. Entering the Varsity Show for the first time since their colonization in 1956, the sorority won the sweep- stakes trophy in the mixed division for their produc- tion, "Voodoo Vehemencef' Leading the Alpha Delta Pi's in chapter activities was president Carolyn Hague. Carol Carter was vice- president, Sally Stover, corresponding secretary, Jo- hanna Troller, recording secretary, Lois Snedden, treasurer, Nancy Lindstrom, chaplain, Cathy Geare, guard, Diane Downing, reporter-historian and Bobbi Ronstadt, social chairman. n V I f Mary Sue Parker is E im " I , A Q X ' . . V Judy'Robinson " . b I, 'H , , ii g Q Q . 1 l 5' ,. A 15 3 Rosabel Roney - 1 It ,V , N V , Q , .4 .,, 'ff' B : -' 41 ,A N -lp, 1 NLR- fi.. , Marion Rusnak V Kiki 1 M , t' Q 3 ,' ,lj 1 ' I " 1 iq-'fi i Judy Schearer A ' g fffv i T' i if ' y ' ' i 5 W Ei? Jin? Sexton k 'fa 1 ,, -A 1, Y L W 7 v N ,I T -33.5 - Lois Snedden 't , 4 V X - K l X E f ,332-r " Barbara Soell I M , N - my p W, ' w as - f Sally Stover . .1 - v, -'J - - , 3,31 V - . .ai I. V V . l V I - A , p 1 Verlin -f 1. - f K. ' 'L .- ' X . ' -'if f "' . I Y Johanna Troller f- i ' fl-2 V ' ,-'Ti ' '33 Q j-.. , 4, 4" 'FP 1 Georgeanne Wals I' ' A' N A 1, -Us ' . ' il 'lx k u r f fi i ,' . Geraldine Walsh . .55 - X vf It , A ,." I A , I ,QR K l .5 we Dee Whitehead -ei! T: si 'ffl 1 ...i ' il T. l ell: 'la eel- . Dwmawfnebefg X,--"X J Y Ejfm W ff :-:M :iff-Q 1- -- l ' , i ' 'Y--gl., A1111 WilhiDgI0n 261 h Jeanne Abromovitz Barbara Balaban Lynn Berman Joyce Bloch Judi Boldes Dianna Chiate Sandy Coleman Nancy Dunn Dianne Fellman Judy Felsenthal Vicki Fiori Diane Friedland Linda Friedlander Sally Goldberg Diane Good Andrea Greenberg Dian Horwitz Sharon Kaplan Evelyn Kaufman Harlean Kaufman Sally Kinwald Brenda Kurn Mimi Lapkoff Carol Lattin Arlene Lehman Sue Levy Marilyn Marcus Brenda Rash Joyce Rocamora Janie Rosenblum Cyrille Silberman Phyllis Slawsky Judy Talpis Lynn Thompson Madeline Utay Nancy Wayburn Sherry Wayne Judy Weisblat Merle Wolinsky Sandee Zigmond D5 A? Eil- au 'T 'fb-H 14 in tr' 26 2 Adkiq 'CT' WORKING on a pledge proyect Janie Rosenblum Dian Horwitz and Harlean Kaufman mortar the last bricks on the A E Phi barbecue pit while Nancy Way burn Sherry Wayne and Barbie Bala ban finish back of outdoor fireplace ,-, L '-5 'N ll mv ':?' I ' J Ad E 1 iiri I A Q' L M' if B y . IN." N 'g' W ,F n,: W 'I ,mf its 'i W f' JN' A! J, , D 77 1 f' V L W A c ' 1 Aw ici' Q tx, J p fgfl 4 V9 4. , yy tw.. o i .. ' if i ., ' f ff M r A 'V -1 A " A ii L 'Y-li!! in I . 1 aj , " i gig' ' ' ' H' i 5 Y' AA ,, V' ' gn ai 1 1' . r ' . l " 'Q A L alfa X it ll Q A I 'fi r , . V A it K A ' is Y M S A i , I!! 1 P i R X l Q ,Q ui. ry' 5 Qt S 5 'J' "Q A J ' r -i ,V . ' f' -.2 K5 1 L, p J it ., Y ' J 3 ' y gf gf A at 4 Q 5223, . 33715 'Qp,.,. rnard College Alpha Lambda Chapter 1909 1952 41 Clmplers 38 Members ALPH E The highlight of the first semester for Alpha psilon Phi's was the annual Christmas formal, "Venetian Escapadesf' where Lee Wolfson was rowned A E Phi Man. Pledges and actives enjoyed hemselves at the pledge-active luncheon at the Tuc- on Inn, and the pledge-active party, "One Night in ail." A E Phi's joined with Lambda Chi's for the pring Sing. The spring formal climaxed the social ear. The sorority welcomed a new housemother, Mrs. lara Grey of Phoenix. Judy Lipschultz was tapped by Mortar Board and himes elected Cherrill Alfou. Bobbie Chernos be- onged to Alpha Rho Tau. Religion-in-Life Week kept renda Rash busy as publicity co-chairman. Sandee igmond, Sandra Coleman, Brenda Kurn, Marilyn arcus and Joyce Bloch served on Hillel Executive ouncil. Joyce reigned as Tau Delta Snow Queen. Desert co-copy editor Janie Rosenblum was a Wildcat reporter, on Freshman Council and was :hosen as secretary-treasurer of Panhellenic for next year. Jeannie Abromovitz found Assemblies Com- nittee and Choraliers kept her busy. Mermaids of A E Phi were Judi Boldes, Lynn Berman, Barbara 3alaban and Dianne Fellman. Leading the sorority were Merle Wolinsky, presi- lentg Arlene Lehman, vice-presidentg Brenda Kurn, ecretary and Sandy Coleman, treasurer. 1071 North Mountain Avenue P ILO PHI l i . i l 1 l 5 PRUMPTING Merle Wolinsky as she speaks into the tape recorder is A E Phi Jeannie Abromovitz and sorority sister Arlene Lehman. 263 , Mary Sue Anderson 1 'l Barbara Bartmess N Judy Bolt ,., Linda Boyle ' Marcia Campbell i , Norma Jean Campbell - gh , , X 1 Darlie Castleton ' ' ' Dixie Lee Crocker f Carolyn Cross - Joan Delmonte Suzanne Erickson Joan Evans . 1 Charlotte Foster Gayle Gehrke Barbara Goold , A Pat Gordon f Carol Heiniger Dee Hermanson - Bobbie Heskett " , , Joan Hopkins , .- Jacqueline J obes ' .N Barbara Kalil f' ,. ,f , ' Julie Kranhold -' ' , Barbara Lawatch ' Rae Malone Virginia Manker r Linda Martin Jocelyn McAlpine '- . , A 4 ill ' i i Doris Jordan , J' ""' .9 I ',' ' a K I Sue McCarthy A " Q Sue Meyer . . ' if-Q P . f i K i S21 T27 . -. , h CAUGHT in a sudden cloud burst, Carol Heiniger, Mary Royce, Charlotte Fos- ter and Janice Brandau seek shelter in the Alpha Phi house. . 'ilga 4 , 1' ,gif ffm K - 1 -x I .M Q . J A , 1 Xb , Q I j' ' ,I M ,' : -Q ' . l J v 4 -js'X., Ev 1 'Q , . . ye, , ' A , , i ' .V . Q , Y ,M . , H Y , . 5 na ' - - . -, N i , A it W., ir- , r .av G Q Q Q1 12 J P4452 'aaa . I 1, a ' .uv- ,--A get .V , 4 . i ll -f, I-sf' ' s ,,, '4 I 4 l l xi J 'J i l I 1 H. Sandy Mins -2 " i' all ' A Q Liz Milsfead P. Jean Neubauer Sue Pierson Bobbi Rife - A Mary Royce . Bonnie Sands '- 5 A J ., V.-t V' L L fr ,I wt F WS 'V 1 ' he 57' 'P' '5 J Didi Riley -it' ' J ' ' dy J ' , ie 'z A V -vi ly B B ML 5 ' J A ' it 5 ,F Lynn Siergiej - 264 BELLE .ffm 'WW nk 'ga -.al C A I, l r I I 'il fi, , A r 1 N .Ii gl ... .. s , "cv JK l K J- e '- N fl gn J 1 3 "K i . , J: 'H r 49. . I i V I - 'E K: I 1, V W 11 ...Y X , ffl! A N. It all L'-4 01. . P 56451 , yracuse University Bela Epsilon Chapter 1872 1926 62 Chapters 60 Members F' ii If - J ' .a .3 V ' ' ,. ..,,, 1339 East First Street ALPHA PHI Alpha Phi's won the second place trophy in omen's beauty for their float, "Butterfly Home War- iors," in the Homecoming Parade. Judy Bolt, Pan- ellenic vice-president, was selected as Homecoming ttendant. Charlotte Foster reigned as Heart Queen t the Heart Fund Ball, Alpha Phi's national philan- hropy project. Pershing Rifle Queen was Dixie rocker, while Jocelyn McAlpine was Rodeo Queen attendant. Carole Ann Smith was chosen Sigma Phi Epsilon's Queen of Hearts and Toni Szabo reigned as Sig Ep Diamond Princess. Alpha Phi's chose their Alpha Phi Man at the annual Snow Ball and entertained underprivileged children at a Christmas party, Additions to the Alpha Phi trophy case were prizes for beginning archery, Kitty Kat subscription contest and tennis singles. Charlotte Foster was honored in Mortar Board and "Who's Who." Gayle Gehrke, Ann Castleton and Carol Heiniger were tapped for Spurs. Mermaids chose Carolyn Cross, Sue McCarthy and Jane Slagle. Frosh cheerleader was Lynn Siergiej. On publications was Pat Gordon, Wildcat assistant news editor and Desert circulation manager, and Norma Jean Campbell, Kitty Kat circu- lation manager and AWS Handbook editor. Pat was also vice-president of Women's Press Club. Alpha Phi president was Charlotte Foster. She was assisted by vice-president Shannah Stanton, treas- urer Jacque Jobes and social chairman Carole Ann Smith. , .fag -l A I .. 1,7 - , tn ,JN Qui W 7- f ,lu l are i. .Q J , a vi is J J Te 1 'Q' ' 2 N' 'il' I 'L' I Y if A59 it A -1 . ' tm we iae. A J " J.. A A li! ' S J : J ' Q ' ' "' . Ati, -, x 1 -, 3- 1- A ,gt 'A Va' " l'-. 'V lift:--.8 Y U '. 'V ' l 5 '. fy- Mfg-4 Q 1 . i H J ri 'Qui it 'Fat . A F1 Y . ' 265 Jane Slagle Carole Ann Smith Janet Snow Nancy Stanford Susan Stedelin Marcia Stedman Gail Ann Stewart Toni Szabo , Nancy Vaughan Nancy Voorhees Barbara Wechsler Sally Wilson Elaine Wright ' V X Lombard College ' Gamma Gamma Chapter K' 1893 1951 69 Chapters 30 Members LPHA XI DELTA With the slogan Paint Fort Fuzzy the Alpha Xis opened their 1957-1958 year sponsoring a con- test to adorn the picket fence enclosing their new home. Fraternity men were the competing artists using the fence as their easel. Cartoons carrying out the theme UA Moon Extension were judged by the sorority and the prize was awarded to the painters of Sigma Phi Epsilon. Alpha Xis moved into their pueblo-style house last September. Its southwestern architecture and the redwood fence which encircles it and the patio have earned it the nick-name of Fort Fuzzy. Frontier flavor was abandoned in December when Alpha Xi Deltas decorated for the holiday season and held their Christmas formal Moonlight and Mistletoe, The Canadian Lobster House was the scene of Pink Rose their spring dance. Members active on campus were Mary Foard and Sheila Dicken who swam for Mermaids and Janet Brough a member of Spurs. Leading chapter activities was President Janet Brown. Her co-otlicers were Janice Newett vice-presi- dent' Mary Foard corresponding secretary' Janet Mooney recording secretary' Alice Holly treasurer. Beverly Bogue Nance Boyd Janet Brough Barbara Brown Janet Brown Susan Chambers Terry Clark Donna Coon Sheila Dicken Linda Fisher Mary Foard Carol Frey Stella Glenn s ' 1 i l f are . lu ' E ' i Q .1 1, . ' I o 1 4 re' Jean Gregory Anne Hawley Alice Holly Fran Holly Beret Mason Janet Mooney Janice Newett Sharon Parker Doris Purcell Betty-Jo Ross Sarita Shepherd Betty Stewart Lois Ann Turner 11 yi 'Fl' I' f K i ii. U- i 'n 'Q 9 'se e A J A 1 ik Q 4 ,. -vp .,,, 4-'Q Y 55 llisfj g Q23 1 bl ., 1 Jr! I , ,'--4. aw- ! M . f W 'S' s 1 J ff A ' 4' F i W ' , - H 4534 5. of water dampened faces but not spirits of coeds as they begin the iirst special event. ,1""1 digging by a team of four makes the flour clouds rise. FACES and sweatshirts covered with flour, winners race to the iinish line with the prized marshmallow in mouth. 267 Dressed in sweatshirts, levis and tennis shoes, sorority women tested their athletic talents at the Olympic Games highlighting Greek Week. The coeds ran relays and a three-legged race, threw eggs and a rubber tire, the women's makeshift discus. A special event found coeds scrambling for marshmallows hidden in a mound of flour and emerging covered with white for a final dash to the finish line. Nancy Atkinson Tilli Barlow Susannah Beck Marilyn Brand Pat Bush Mimi Buterbaugh Barbara Caifrey Ann Carlton Kay Choisser Carolyn Cole Kathleen Crockett Lynne Dailey Mary Leigh Dalton Virginia Dodge Geraldine Doran Joyce Draper Susie Fay Nancy Fechtmeyer Marie Felsenreich Jeanne lforman Shirley Franks Gayle Gamble Doanie Games Helen Gard Suzanne Greenbeck Nancy Haddad Julia Harlan Nancy Hely Cay Henson Gwendolyn I-Iouser Jo Ann Humphreys Margie Hussey Vicki Ingalls Pat Jones Bebe Klopfenstein Helen Maloof Judy Matson Carol McComber Judy McCoy Sharon McIntyre Sheila McLernon Barbara Moore Judy Moore Mimi Murray Ann Myrick Patricia Nardone Virginia Nesfy Brenda Nixon Leslie Ann Oswald Patti Perner Marcia Picha Carol Pierce Pat Prewitt Nat Prussing Cynthia Quam Shirley Ransom Glenda Richter Maryellen Roden Marilyn Ryland Charlotte Salyer Vonda Lee Schuster Barbara Seffens Mardi Sercomb Carolyn Solomon Sandy Stratton Ginnie Ann Sturm Pat Sullivan Vicki Jean Terry Shirlee Van Antwerp Donna Vana .if LW' Quo, .5-,q Huff M ' as ' l !Il. if , 4 S.: '1 ', - - ,Q J i A 1 , kb' i . ' -, I -L4 .Q , 5 ,face ' S. A qu I t Yb- -.. wt' x .. HAL Y ffl? 1 ' ,a ar- Ieel' I Jr l ,. 'I L ll-ff -f 4' ., E W XI?" r it A ' X U'un...tI.' ri K if i U l IL A-L- , ,A+ t ei' U ,. A. :Q .JL .Lf . -.A , :K . P li , i Q lf' 3, l X 'GP' J J , J ,en N ' -. I 'f A'-.t ,,,. f A -,xt .i,. 4 ' - J ' A 1 ' it W .4 1 'BPI 'K Un- na 4 - 1 wa.. in f- ff' f , N L I L 1 5 lag ,i fa 1? , .,,, ,., I T' .J ' , A f'4v:4,v-M ' V, 1 Y 1: N -t - w ff - ' J 'i A: . ,4, P ' -57u. q ,lg 5' ,Q am.: A7"F' "' EEF' . -.-, Q c ' ' I ' 54- af ' 'Y ' 'A Y l A4 4 L3 A " ...W .. . X All I lp ,, +- l so it 1: i ii if 'M E-1-, L fb 4 '- .QJ.a.. Q- 3' , gg 'r ji 'E?' 1' .1 I ,Q 9 A-Q Qi. . 'J Wiki it . A e ll LLL, ,, t T 'f 1 -t -Q f, af ...I 1, 1 3, 'P rig' 1. ,Q F75 . u I iiig C i?g I., ZQQWX NV p! 6 F . L 'fer I Q' ' gifi ' J Q1 eg A .16 IFE 'S-AR "" 1-el f -af' !I!lPi Vp ' -x -ff -JL if . n I wt 3- ui i get ra v -1. I .N NI! , f.. ie 1 i- University of Arkansas Zeta Bela Chapter 1895 1922 121 Chapters 73 Members init. ,1-, l l45GNorth Mountain Avenue CHI OMEG Among the highlights of Chi Omega's year was e annual Christmas formal at which Brudd Auther as named Chi Omega Southern Gentleman. "Around he States with Mom and Dad" was the theme for he Mom and Dad's Day open house. At Homecom- g they placed third in Women's Beauty with their oat, "Glide on to Greater Glory." Representing the house on campus were Vicki ngalls, secretary of the Artist Series Committee and ead of Wildcat secretaries, Glenda Richter, SUAB ember and chairman of the Special Events Com- itteeg and Julia Harlan, AWS Campus Activities chairman and vice-president of Chimes. Spurs in- cluded Vicki Ingalls, Nancy Hely, Gayle Gamble, Glenda Richter and Shirley Franks. Pi Lambda Theta claimed Marilyn Ryland and Bonnie Berger. Members of Theta Mu were Jeanne Forman and Candy Weyersberg, while Pat Bush was in Alpha Rho Tau. Susanna Beck, Julia Harlan and Pat Sullivan were affiliated with Beta Beta Beta. Susie Fay was in Alpha Epsilon and Micki Weyersberg be- longed to National Collegiate Players. President of Chi Omega was Nancy Atkinson. Her oflicers were Gwen Houser, vice-president, Julia Harlan, secretary and Mardi Sercomb, pledge trainer. Nell Vocale ADMIRING the efforts of a pledge project, Ann Carlton, Shirley ' , Franks, Susie Fay and Charlotte Salyer study a miniature replica 'E ' A 1: of the Chi Omega greek theater at the University of Arkansas. .U " A V - 'N ' X ' Celeste Wallis 1, H ...Q V Donna Wallis - ' ' Ann Weyersberg . - .gmt .. V .. Nancy Weyersberg Holly Willis T3 9. ' -1 -5 -li.1' . . H 4 .f A Beverly Wilson N . . Julie Zaiser ' Q ,J r as l . pf 4 R A 4 li 2- 1 269 .V :A-gil 'jj ,X I1 J. i Lf., , . '-r??:l: . , ff- -- 4 :FSL -' U L- -Q'4.U..- -1 '- V '-,, if-'H,r8,'M:f , - ' it u TLT ill ln. A. 1 1:35- , Edie Adams Barby Anderson Maxine Anderson Jo Anne Bailey Karen Baken Margie Baldwin Joyce Ann Barry JoAnn Beecroft b Elaine Boettcher Kay Bollig Nancy Buckingham Marianna Carland Wendy Carlson Lynn Conradi Susan Cornell Pat Curran , Debbie Doerschlag Paula Donatelli Pat Dossett Mary Elberfeld Barbara Essel Linda Fowler Jackie Fox Olivia Gonzales , Barbara Gradison Karen Herreid Nancy Heyden Sheila Hirschy Ann Holmes Melinda Hough Joan Humphrey Jane Jacobs , Joan John Margaret Johnson Jan Joseph Diane Kern Carol Kucheman Edith Kurtz Carol Landsberg Andrea Lott , Charlotte Lundy Carmella Mazzarino Mary Lou McClellan Linda Merrill Barb Meyer Sherry Miller Marilyn Myser Alison Newman If -sh F yi I, ' is ' 4 dj ikgarl -yi' ag,-T. ""- 'Ag - Boston University Phz Beta C Y 1 A 1888 1946 103 Chapters 77 Members 1541 East Second Street 2 ENUYING the warm Arizona sunshine, Tri Delts Alice Lynne Powell and Ann Holmes pause for a cool and refresh- ing drink brought to them by Jo Ann Beecroft. DELT DELT DELTA An apple-polishers' dinner, the Pansy Ring and e Candy Cane Ball at Christmas topped Tri Delta's of activities for the year, Their float placed second women's originality in the Homecoming Parade. entertained handicapped children with an Egg hunt. Active on campus were Olivia Gonzales, junior Linda Merrill, freshman treasurerg Wade, Chimes president and Kitty Kat pro- managerg and Elaine Boettcher, Mortar Board . Sophomore Class treasurer Sue Smith was Spur and recipient of the Arizona Women's Scholar- Lce Woods and Elaine Boettcher were members of Alpha Epsilon, Diane Kern and Linda Sinclair be- longed to Sigma Alpha Etag Pi Lambda Theta claimed Jean Sperling and Edith Adams. Marcia Orr served as secretary-treasurer for Sigma Delta Pi and as Desert Dance Chairman. Tri Delta Mermaids were Carol Landsberg, presi- dent, Jean Sperling, JoAnn Beecroft, Margie Rice, Edith Kurtz, Joan Humphrey, Karen I-Ierreid and Sue O'Bryan. Sharon Miller was president. She was assisted by Barbara Anderson, vice-president, JoAnn Beecroft, recording secretaryg Elaine Boettcher, corresponding secretaryg Jean Sperling, treasurer and Marcia Orr, social chairman. Sue O'Bryan Marcia Orr Margie Rice Sue Smith Jean Sperling Ann Stack Sally Steves Ronnie Stone Sydney Wade Janice White Janice Wiecks Lee Woods Lucy Yerger 271 Ruthella Oliver Dorothy Parke Alice Lynne Powell Marilyn Reynolds Carol Ronnow Dianne Simpson Peggy Simpson Linda Sinclair Donnamae Stanford Ann Stevenson Claudia Vassallo Carol Wassenmiller Suzanne 'Whitaker Mary Williams Cecily Woodward ' --4'-...ar L..- 4? V V X n 1 Charlotte Ackerman Peggy Allen Mattie Lou Andrews I udy Atkins Carolyn Becker Barbara Bennett Brenda Bowker Connie Brightman 1448 East First Street a iufg .1 Lewis School Alpha Pi Chapter 1873 1926 84 Chapters 81 Members DELTA GAMMA Delta Gamma's celebrated Christmas with their holiday formal where they crowned Don Lee DG Man. During Greek Week the house was the scene of a toga party. On campus Phi Beta Kappa Doris Smith was AWS president, Mary Randall was Panhellenic presi- dent and Dixie McDoniel was Mortar Board presi- dent. Mortar Boards also claimed Doris Smith, Mary Randall and Betty Page. Mary Kay Plumb, Wildcat society editor and Junior Class treasurer, Cathy Clark and Sally Switzer were in Chimes. Spurs were Char- lotte Jones, Gail Marsh and Joan Naughton. Adele Bradford was president of the Nursing College. 1 fi, .Q ,J 5 W ' .1 may , .. A A .L 9' 5' ' , z i ,. . H'- YD3'-H l bale' u L Lf. A Leading varsity yells was Rae Schafer, whi Barbara Payne was frosh cheerleader. Judy Pricket Linda Winn, Janet Lincoln, Dixina Price and An Collins were pom-pon girls. Orchesis chose Joan D and Margo Livengood, while Racquet Club memb Lynda Steger played on the tennis team, DG royalty included Sue Collins, Theta C Dream Girl, Sara Hayes, Homecoming queen linali and Dixie McDoniel, Greek Week queen attendant. President of Delta Gamma was Betty Page. S was assisted by Rae Schafer, social chairmang Shirl Hedges, corresponding secretaryg Dixie McDonie recording secretary and Gail England, vice-presiden -my I A :fs W 1, '-sig, f A X 1: ,f "'li...-J! "1 I Y K 3 W if X A . I CARPETED stairway is a convenient place for Rae Schafer, Annie Chestnut and ' " ' , , I Q i Marilyn Moller to catch up on local happenings through mail from home. 1 " ' 2 3-" 272 A 1 31 ' L A 'U' If fa Y' 70" "" 'F 'rx Nh' -1 " 1 ..' -asp t. i,.. wr ., or ' 11-4' 1, N- w ,I N xxx? 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If ',,, A I --A 4 N --- ' ' ' 1 1 1,157 ' I' 3' V' XQQ? .D . ' ff N 4, U , . ' ,A B A J A J ALA.. L L 1 ' I: Lx If VM 'SL Y . nz. 4' A 3'2" . A J ffaf ,A 4-gy'- K 2 in . I xt . an -, , J i L' it et J -f-2 r J is-J ia, T V 4' ' 2 l N Q ' ' Q I 1 , I i n ' x Q! a 'J f A L ol L J A 273 Jody Burns Jeanne Carrier Annie Chesnut DeAna Choisser Cathy Clark Sue Collins Bunny Cushman Lida de Haan Judy Dolce Gail England Sara Hayes Blanche Hedges Shirley Hedges Betsy Holden Lee Hughes Mary Jameson Bonnie Johnson Sally Johnson Judith Johnston Charlotte Jones Mary Kennedy Kathy Leake Wanda Lee Marjorie Liem Jan Lincoln Margo Livengood Marian Lyris Mary Maresh Gail Marsh Barbara Martin Nancy Martin Janet Mason Margot Mates Sara McCleary Marilyn McCrary Dixie McDoniel Corky Mencimer Margaret Merriman Ercelle Morris Sandy Morris J oannie Murray Joan Naughton Marilyn Noller Francie Norton Betty Jean Page Loraine Penrod Joan Phelps Sue Pierce Mary Kay Plumb Dixina Price Judy Prickett Mary Randall Diane Rhodes Donna Rice Sarah Rice Rae Schafer Mary Jo Shaffer Sue Slack Doris Smith Linda Smith Pam Stanley Lynda Steger Sally Switzer Lucy Thacher Peggy Thompson Lynda Turner Stella Wasser Bonnie Wasson Karen Webb Linda Winn , Gerry Abbott Nancy Addenbrooke Julie Albi Bette Jo Barber Helen Bartlett Joyce Benbow Jane Brisack Joan Byron Sonja Carlson Carol Casaday Beth Clark Bobbie Corr Jane Cunningham Dessie Dell Dancy Veeva Daniels Judy Davis Marcy Deschamps Dinah DeVry Anne DiCicco Martha Featherstone Judy Fox Sylvia Frampton Polly Gardner Shauna Gates Carolyn Gibbs Phyllis Gibbs Marty Gibson Jana Gilpin Nancy Gorrilla Susan Greer Alice Hall Virginia Hall Gail Haren Helen Harris Donna Hart Kathy Haughton Bobbie Haworth Babs Henningsen Madelyn Hickman Gloria Hicks Cheryl Hoffman Jan Hollinger Nancy Holish Candy Hopper Earline Horrell Paula Journey Diane Keeling Sandra Larsen Lucia Long Fran Loubet Helene Loubet Anita Major Gwen Major Bonnie Martin Donna Mayer Nancy McGee Jean McLean Judy Mitchell Sharon Moiola Mary Monroe Pat Morris Gracia Naujoks Jan Neal Perci Nelson Joyce Orms Gail Ottinger Marilyn Ottinger Linda Patton Sereta Patton Keiki Payne Jamie Porter Gayle Radcliffe Jayne Randall Judy Reedy Sandra Rettke Sue Roth Joanne Schumacher Jackie Shadley Sylvia Simpson Donanna Smith ,.. .... W: 5- .T ...W .' .M XA t' " i Q' ii Y i' " wi g 'QI' ' gr 1 l - Q A it to J J U ri P 4 i W x X ' .,,r J f y V j X l ,I '. Z J X' , i i X 3, ,ex -,t IN - -, - V X , D , X , in 'Ja F A -f JX' -5 i A 1 1 :Ay A I xl J X A X ' tv gi .N s ,f uf' , V 1 - Q,-7 X X X XX XX X - - f 7 X, H, A 4 X X A ' Xu! l l it 1 rf' i I ll X -y A - Q J iv. J- -, tu, - J-J A J sf N rea , S X . 'w e 1i'- i y -'T A X X 'f:A Y' N 1 IQ Aki 1 l ,AAI is J' , f vi. A ' A 1 ' 'Sf i ith ' W. I , A ., ,I J. I . 1 X li' in li " J , J A B 5- in i f ' Xxx ,, L '-VX: 'A AX i XX 4,1 Xue , X f' Q 1 X ,Q .CX KA, .- N Q J 2 A X ., X X Er y X . X X' ' XA X i- i i 3 l N xx J iQ i i ' .g 1 K 'hi f 'hi Qu' -' 1 YY " A X, Milk., 'IA X xr ,SN J - P Nfl'-1- A 'A -.3 ilk ' lily. F v 1 1- ,YV L' - - ' '41, 1 'F '-- 'Q 1 1 i ' f' I 'A f A A li X' ' ' 1- fl m y fi ' V XXfX XX x'X ' ' ' B , M Y R X f J S71 1 ff r -ef ra at X X XX X i ... 'X X ' X X v., X X ' X 'R'-l l it if i t J EAL Y x f l rv h I I. it -V- it J J' " ,J ll 1 P . f ' J , 6 TX I ..Xt X XX X , XA X ,E XA- X,.- Xi X 274 acuse University Alpha Epsilon Chapter 1874 1922 32 Chapters 98 Members GAMMA After the reception of UA's largest pledge class, e first semester for Gamma Phi Beta was iilled ith a Halloween party, a bean and steak dinner d a Christmas party for underprivileged children. andlelight and carnations set the stage for the Pink arnation Ball at the Arizona Inn, where Damon helburne was selected as Gamma Phi Man. Representing Gamma Phi in Spurs were Jean cLean, secretary, Jo Loubet, historian, Gloria ilkie and Bobbie Haworth. Bobbie was sophomore ice-president and a member of Alpha Lambda Delta nd Orchesis. Gamma Phi Chimes were Joyce Ben- ow and Gail and Marilyn Ottinger. Marilyn served s AWS treasurer, while Gail was Desert copy editor. ortar Board vice-president was Lucia Long, who as chosen for "Who's Who." Jane Brisack won iirst lace on UA tennis team. Mermaids claimed Virginia all and Nancy Addenbrooke. Three fraternities selected Gamma Phi's as sweet- earts: Jean McLean, ATOQ Jane Brisack, Sigma Nug ancy Snoke Magee, Phi Delt. Kathy Williams eigned as an attendant to the Homecoming Queen. arsity cheerleader was Bobbie Corr. Leading house activities were Kathy Williams, residentg Sereta Patton, social chairmang Sue Murfee, ledge trainer and Joyce Orrns, treasurer. . I ' , Ai! lfwqil-' A i at it 4 . jr ,g l t -J' l ,-1, .3 1, :. ' , 1 ,- ' V 'J .V - Tx.. ' 'l I 2 - . - ' ...Q t p vw-1 5 ', H , - ,i . , 127. -5-. ,. y .- if I' ' l I U . it nel. - ,,. . ...... - y Q.-W 1 ' i ., '. l , - . i -y'hf'.,,I Y -, -p., , -. qv , - J 7,9 . . Wai 4- . ' ' I , "isp" ' ll , ' 't .'-. -1 1 . W'-" qv I4 I .jg ,A V i 5 J A Qi! Q 1 C l I LV-' I Eu.-s..c.zL: gear.--ec.-.- -. - ...q...4aL44 HARMUNIZING around piano are Gamma Phi oflicers Sereta Patton Sylvia Frampton, Jamie Porter, Kathy Williams, Lucia Long, who helps on a uke Sherry Snoke Gail Spaulding Mary Taylor Gaye Titcomb Pat Topolinski Pat Warren Margaret Weaver June Webb Gwenn Whitnell Gloria Wilkie Kathy Williams Dodie Wilson Darlene Zabick Jay Ackman Abigail Adams Eleanor Anderson LaDonna Anderson Martha Jo Anderson Sandra Anderson Sue Ankeny Theodosia Barr Margie Barrie Charlene Behrns Bette Berry Sally Bodine Ann Bogner Jeri Boring Madilyn Buntz Roberta Carpenter Fran Carson Hollie Christy Janet Collerette Pat Culbertson Suzi Daly Heidi Dowell Marianne Downend Susan-Drachman Georgeanne Duffy Patsy Dupay Lynn Fitzgerald Judy Forster Carolyn Frakes Sue Fuller Gail Gaskin Gloria Gee ' pn- -S" 'CIT' A Q- fm-at six -l... yn? fx? pn' AJ' PP ALPH TAKING the final step as a pledge, Sandy McVay tests her kite before the fall pre-initiation kite race. Assisting her is Martha Jo Anderson 276 4' T 's 41' J T' 44-! x Y--v AAAJL 3 WW Yrv 'Q 42 THET Highlighting the Kappa Alpha Theta year was the retirement of Panhellenlc s scholarshlp trophy by attaxnlng the highest sororlty grade average for three consecutive semesters In December Thetas held their formal at the Pioneer Hotel and crowned Jim Wilkes Theta Man They entertained underprivileged chll dren during the holiday season Mary Shower president of the Flne Arts Student Council and Marylee Hutchison Desert co editor and SRC president were Mortar Boards Desert sectlon editors were Claire Liebenguth Ann Bogner and Noel Ruhberg Spurs tapped Cheryl Zeldler president Eleanor Anderson Claxre Lrebenguth Mary Ellen Percy Sue Lmclsley Pat Culbertson Len Mattei Roberta Carpenter and Anne Snoddy Chimes selected Ann Bogner Martha Jo Anderson and Shelby Porter Shelby also served as AWS secretary Senlor class secretary Suzi Daly was Greek Week Queen for 1958 Charlotte Vance headed Religion in Life Week Affiliated with P1 Lambda Theta were Marylee Hutchison, Noel Ruhberg, Maxine Wick and Char lotte Vance Beta Beta Beta claimed Mary Ellen Percy Members of Alpha Lambda Delta were Anne Snoddy, Sally Janda, Mary Ellen Percy and Eleanor Anderson Leading Theta activities was presldent Mary Shower Her officers were lirst vxce president, Linda Thompson, second vice president, Gall Gaskin and Ann Bogner, treasurer A 1 V ,V N , A . ' I V X f.: . ,Af t ' ,. ' 1' ff J V - -. ,bt A 'J' ' 3. 1 WL - 1' -Q . VRF jr ," -. J Q 1 , I R 'V V, ' I - , , E' ...xg 1 lg A - 6 1 Y kv, .L -1 ' - X .5 A, ,J V, A f, -0 ' ' ' . if . X 3,-,' -Va Mm, V V V V- ' , 4 'gp 1... , 4 , J ' ,, - c e A H, -J Q . -, 1 ' M, - W 'J xi -L r i ' nl ' ' , . . 'iff g. ' . X st. .A J , , . . t .4 Q.. , a r , XJ , 1 , . J WJ .' . fa .1'?-T14 , ' , 1 'K 41 A ' , 'QL .I ., qi v A . -".- V .J -QM, I Y I f '- ' 1 vw- ad Ti ' , 1 is V' ,"3- +I' f -- . ..,, ' ' ' ,- 4 f ' - -f .A g -xvtyt V, I . . . A ' - 5 ' 1 , p Y , I 5 , A U I nj ll- Q. 'R 1 , - V J "L ' ' ,' 'ftw '. ,Y 1 . - K F Ls. D, I , 'V -, Q 5 5 ,N X ' M 1 J' ,V ,Mx N 1 ,V ,N , , f -l , -Wf 5 .. U . J - . x 4 J. lv s, Il - w , - '-"Z , i , Q , 11" ,-1 . r 'ft ,, A." , - -gf," I , 4 W , 1 tw ,, . it , , ,'. 1- I y . . , . , . . . . ' 5 1 . , . , - . , , . . . . y ' Q I 3 3 Q 1 7 3 , . Marianne Gilbert Judy Gnatt Nancy Gould Jan Heineman Gayle I-Iovde Ann Hult Janice Hunter Susan Hurley Judy Hurt Mary Lee Hutchison Sally J anda Sari Jewell F lory Jordan Gail Kershner Denny Keyes Jean Knight Barbi Knopp Karen Kooistra Claire Liebenguth Susan Lindsley Marcia Marshall Linda Marston Len Mattei Millie Mazzarino Jane McClanahan Sandra McVay 'Pam Minas Carol Jean Owen Mary Ellen Percy Lee Perham Shelby Porter Shirley Powell Marietta Quinn Ilse Rambacher Judy Randall Jean Reynolds Kring Robbins Nancy Rockwell Raima Roper Isabelle Rountree Noel Ruhberg Florence Sayner Joan Schneider Mary Shower Carolyn Smith Anne Snoddy Martha Sullivan Linda Thompson Charlotte Vance Jessie Vaughan Barbara Wall Nancy Watten Maxine Wick Sally Jo Wilson Sue Wood Cheryl Zeidler 1050 North Mountain Avenue xx O' DePauw University Beta Delta Chapter 1870 82 Chapters 90 Members 1917 :al he V :all F I U 1 igxh wi f J J . E Y 1-'J'.g,"3 N , V I y A I g. X f" F' A If. 3 5: 9 wif . w-- 5 i A M A 4 H-f J if at .J 1 J -. . H' V- SA. rav i . V- A "t ix Yer !- ts 1 C J 1 e 1 r 1 J Q sl. X.. -1-- - ' ' .1 x 1 , x.,.- ' X- A .h 5-K is-.K Y ,TM ,X ,V Y - I X V I 1 J' ' Q! V aat. by A ' of f Lh 552' i f, I J af 4 be Lil ,r-it or J fu, ,,, ., X -' .1,,,,., . V V Y-P V X -' A5"'A."' W V rf X L 1 K l Vg-KVI-N X I' Ar' I J ll J T YA ag, Us 1 tvs V tv l V J -rt. I L' nt ll K, . ' ,. 1 r .I ' V' Q ",l 1 N. 5 1- V ' " ix J filing s M," 1 U ' J ' "Nth I 1 .I AJ -1 V ' " J ,, 'J W Ag ' ' EA J' U f ' 'ke ' r,,, - M- -J ,, , J 4, tx 4 M , ' it rs C. an N7 3 Q" I K MQ' f l J lk , J W 4 A 1 we 277 P P P P V P P P P P Marty Andrews Diane Austin Carla Baehr Anne Bateman Melinda Bennett Betsy Bohn Jody Bollinger Sue Boulay Cynthia Brown Donna Carlson Kae Clark Janet Cooper Joan Cooper Sally Corn Patsy Creveling Carol Crosby Sharon Day Eleanor Dieterle Anne Feichtmeir Linda Lou Fiscel Sue Forster Gayle Gordon Madeleine Griscom Liz Haas Jill Hammond Anita Hand Sandra Hartness Mary Alice Herndon Nancy Ann Hoard Karen Johnson Dorian Jones Janet Jones J ill Jordan Barbara Kasten Lynette Kresser Christie Laning Martha Lehmann Pat Larson Andree Leininger Kay Leonard Patsy Locke Kathy Lockett Sally Lohman Aline Lowman Alice Jane Mahoney Terry Margolf Sue Maxwell Marcia May Margo McKenzie Barbara Mellick Joyce Merchant Toni Merchant Dorothy Michelbach Peggy Micke Barbara Mills Ellen Monsees Margie M-orton Derith Nelson Penny Palmer Anita Pankey Virginia Peil Debbie Porritt Patsy Powers Sharon Rains Linda Reasor Carolyn Roettger Gayle Runke Edith Sayre Marianna Schantz Jean Schell Pat Schendel Bettina Setien Claudia Shortman Deedee Simmons Sue Smart Sally Steiger Martha Strauss Marlene Sutton Sylvia Sue Taylor Betty Thompson ... -K., r . ,sf- I, . 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FFP Monmouth College Gamma Zeta Chapter 1870 1920 85 Chapters 84 Members 1435 East Second Street PP KAPP AMM A huge stork, lowering a building into a scene of the University campus with the title L'Expecting Expansion," won the Kappa's the sweepstakes award for outstanding float in the 1957 Homecoming parade. Kappa had two student body officers-Pat Wrenn, senior treasurer, and Carolyn Roettger, freshman vice-president. Karen Utke was co-editor of the Desert and Pat Larson was art editor. Gayle Runke headed the Administration-Activities section of the annual. Varsity cheerleader Martha Strauss was a finalist for Greek Week Queen. Kathy Lockett reigned as 1958 Desert Queen. Before Christmas, Kappa held their annual holi- LETS GU!" Claudia Shortman and Jill Jordan get ready to take off for a ride around the block on their "bicycle built for two." day dance at El Conquistador Hotel and crowned Henry Giclas as Kappa Man. Dads of Kappa's were initiated into a special club on Mom and Dad's Day. Margo McKenzie was vice-president of Spurs and Betty Thompson was treasurer. Other Spurs were Lydia Weissenburger, Gayle Runke, Donna Carlson and Joan Cooper. Joan was also a member of Alpha Lambda Delta. Chime Linda Lou Fiscel was Pub- licity Chairman for ASUA and SUAB. Mortar Board tapped Dorothy Michelbach, secretary, Pat Larson and Karen Utke. , Ginny Peil was KKG president. Her officers were Sue Forster, vice-presidentg Sylvia Sue Taylor, re- cording secretary and Donna Carlson, treasurer. .- ug l Helen Tolleson 1" n j. I Judy Tomb in ,Q 1 H Sally Trainor , 4 'nl' l 5 M 'W f "mu -. ,f , n 1-351, ' L' Sue Tull , - Z ff- Marcia Urton ...p :ix h Karen Utke J l. WL 'ig aj -va. " - 1 ' T A u W i K si A i 1- ' ' i . -L55 ' at , i "s.tg,.., . v E Y - -.. Lf . Z, e. N Helen Vosskuhler ' - .a ' T Barbara Votaw i ld 6 " A Dianne Wadsworth suv ui A . -a A' I' ., '.- ' F Q f -uf V -iff 'y :- l, 4,1 K Wy xl U' H I 'X If -S, ' f z,.,,,, - fs, f' Anne Weinzapfel I V, Lydia Weissenburger V5 Q v A 5 . ' T ' Pat Wrenn ll if V A 'QT I ' . '- 5 Y if N. ,f all 279 ' Monmouth College A rizona Alpha Chap 1867 I 91 7 101 Chapters 94 Members 1035 North Mountain Avenue PI BETA PHI T' T' 'W ""' 'T Y' ' it M , "TU THE RIGHT," directs Ginger Hopton, as Jeanne Walsh, Mary Ruth Sandel and Joyce Murphy attempt to adjust the Pi Phi arrow. Pi Beta Phi combined talents with ZBT to win a first place in the Varsity Show for their act "Festival of the Figs." They held a barn dance in the fall and their Candy Cane Ball at Christmas, where Pi Phi Man Jerry Moller was crowned. The sorority honored the new housemother, Mrs. Florence Bond, with a tea in December. Representing Pi Phi on campus were Spurs Sharon Farris and Sharon Theilkas and Chimes Pat King and Kathy Park. Actresses Betty Hoe and Joyce Murphy belonged to University Players. Joyce, secretary of the Fine Arts College, was chosen for "Who's Who." Pi Phi's on SUAB committees were Sandy Korne- gay, Ann Cheairs, Susie Pelton, Chris Wright, Rae Kenworthy, Cathy Colbert and Sharon Farris, while Pat King headed the Administration Committee and was secretary of SUAB. Leading Wildcat fans were pom-pon girls Ricki Farquhar, Ann Cheairs and Jean MacGregor. Betty Hoe was selected head cheerleader for 1958. Home- coming Queen Joan Moore also reigned over Tucson's Fiesta de los Vaqueros. Donna Angle was a Greek Week queen finalist. Officers of Pi Beta Phi were Marilyn Tench, presi- dentg Marcia Merdian, vice-presidentg Betty New- meyer, recording secretaryg Mary Ruth Sandel, cor- responding secretaryg Merilyn Matts, treasurerg Pat King, scholarship and Anne Cheairs, social chairman. Susan Alstrin , ... D ,5.. ,, -Q , 1 - 1-M, Kae Andreen ' Q fc" b 'ig 1 gy' I q,,,,.jjfS?i .. I Donna Angle I 1 i V ' , . , t i ' A ' it Sue Barnard In awe. 51' f" t"v l ,I 'T f' 4 "f 4- A, 'V Susan Beville Q l, ...Q ' ' J '5 V ' A 1 .- 1 1 ' 'J-1 g -- Jody Biby - ' in R I up -r' - r ir! Betty Boezinger ,AJ ,fp Q . Q' -, i 1,1 5-3 X Lynda Bost B ' X 'B "x Xi? ' we r U59 2 280 fr... . r ' xi.: ' . N. - ,Q K, J ff' ' ' 4, - , 'P' y r . 1 nf l- -. fi' ' wi, LM r , P Q, pu- t .,,,-Q ,- l "'f A -I ilu K N. lj, .-1 A 459' l It -Nw, 'er' I H " J 1- i - 9 1 1 hu . xtiv 'll l 1' Q '17 . t .- -Q it -.af x H' 'Q' l X ' el W 'J E ab A is.: U H i t J V K., A " ',. W' E l L' , 1 it ' M ,f ' X 5' "7 Q IE V l . to 5 r , . . t l l If ' ,fhfixu-A f v l .- Ai Ek ' 3 , Z 'N-I. Ei' ' it t -J , A l il It L E ai. F ' 5: ,.. l i if 'Q . ,I V i 3' - xx ! za- ' ff' A f A V i 'G' 55' . ' -I U .,-A il. 5, J ,. J f-.ft il, 174' J 1' Q ' l L J H H i 'X f K' ti 1. "': 'F' 4 ' V3 Q V11 xt. 3 t. V e l l- , . - fgx' 'f , " lb ' ,J . if f X , i I 1 L . J gf -. Y f '- M A,-,, x , ' 1, ' ,Sk ' 2, J lg, Q, i HP y ' .ai ll I Ai " 4 it-gi i by V' ii -2' ' t P ,I A I J 'V J ta' -4. hi X ri ' l ' fa: fr: la- N , it . ,,, , Q, , , K. N ,Cf .,! , lt! . ld- 15 ., .,. , ,, 1 . ,. , ,J V .. l i we ' , ' W i ,- . . I- . ' t V , It W ' , f K V!! ' E l ' A Q- l J 'V' U" 4. r - Q' f , 1 'Y ' W A N Q ,. sa 4. .' ' - 4 ,gr ' ', X as l , 44' dye . k xr-V R V A XJ A U N' N Muay- 'L 4 1 P . , V A I 3, ' E ,f ng ' , if P l". 1.3, y r f ,gpm-,U Q Wai ' K H V ' Q- 2. ' ' i - ' ' - , ' r ' ' V, 1, ,JL ' . " ff X' . , A Q ' i 'B Barbara Bostwick Carol Brown J errie Butler Ann Cheairs Carolyn Cleveland Cathy Colbert Mary Coons Sandra Cotey Connie Cover Carolyn Davies Corinne Davis Jan Dedman Carole Dobhin Karen Dobson Molly Dunigan Ricki Farquhar Sharon Farris Wendy Gibbons Marlene Glad Janet Gordon Linda Hart Kathy Hinkle Pam Hoagland Betty Hoe Ginger Hopton Susan Hudson Phebe Hutchings Virginia Jones Kay Kelly Rae Kenworthy Sandy Kornegay Stana Kulinovich JoAnne Lang Carol Jean Lee Dotsy Lyon Jean MacGregor Lynne Mather Janet Matts Merilyn Matts Marcia Merdian Joan Moore Gaeel Morrison Janie Nesmith Betty Newmeyer Nancy Owens Kathy Parks Susie Pelton Marcia Perry Gail Phillips Arline Postillion Jean Royster Olivia Ryland Kay Salmon Mary Ruth Sandel Jean Savage Mary Seal Virginia Selby Sally Smith Georgia Stapleton Sherie Stark Dee Stigers Pat Sullivan Connie Szink Joan Templeton Marilyn Tench Sharon Theilkas Liz Thomas Melinda Thomas Kathy Thompson Carol Travis Judy Turben Nancy Washburn Gail Whitney Carol Wilkinson Mary Ellen Willey Carol Williams Kenlynn Williams Linda Witwer Chris Wright PHRATFRES OFFICERS: Ruth Agnew, treasurerg Jo Clark, AWS repre sentativeg Margaret Burton, vice-presidentg Judy Snipes, secretary Ruth Agnew June Albers Gloria Aros Joed Ashcraft Anne Beaudry Barbara Brean Martha Burch Harriet Canning Emily Carpenter Jo Clark Iris Cloudt J o Anne Coco Thora Cooper Nancy Dearden Anita Erdely Diane Fordney Elda Garcia Ruth Gee Gloria Gurske Mary Jean Harper Carol L. Haury Jean Hawkes Mary Jean Haydon Linda Hearn Olga Hernandez Connie Hertzog Faye Kerr Barbara D. Kessler Charlene Lacy Pat Lacy Dorothy Lewis Kathy Martin Phyllis Milstein Merry Mulvihill Margie Murphy Martha McDaniels Nancy McKale Marilyn Nothnagel Glenda Parrott Ann Marie Rascop Darlene Robart Diana Rusin AH NM 'ri iv- L Ina 158 'ER Q' UCLA N Lambda Chapter 1924 1938 pol' 1 Ge 4 12 Chapters 65 Members ll. 'nn 3 1 iyf' V 19 qv lk., 7' Cx 'tl ' .' - D A , , I Y fl ' ,254 ' 1 Y i A' J, '- A..-A 't M L ' ,l Yr? M " 1 W ,A . xl! A! J W i fy we -if Qi A li., P 4 Q t'. an J T - "3 . ,ily ff rv w J is f g , y,,,J , Q yr J 1 A I 1 ig' I Gif J 1 p 1' r .' rf ,5 ' 'J . W . ' Y xl, W ."',1 Y K stil M- 4. - p - X 51 SL --V' lx L F " 'z l K! f A ' 1 l ff! Aaay . A e - rse I - 1 ai l . eis A 71 'aff -1 1 il I. p, 1 . J ' ravi 5, A: f M .Q H X , Q ,Lg if .,,, ESP J V 4' 4 if J X , X J ' iii? fm XX' " 282 BOUND to install Eta chapter at ASC are Anne Beaudry, Parrott, Signe Kuhl, Phyllis Milstein and Emily Carpenter LUNCH TIME means an hour break from classes and time for food and chatter for Marilyn Smith, Doris Johnson and Merry Mulvihill PHI LA BDA PHRATERE As sponsors of "Hi and Smile Weekf' Phi Lambda Phrateres gave freshmen a special welcome in Sep- tember. They greeted their own pledges with a swim party, tea and kidnap picnic. Members modeled the latest fashions at the "Winter Dresscapadesf' During the holiday season, Phrateres treated 33 Yaqui Indian children to a Christmas party and crowned their Snow King as the annual Christmas formal. Naomi Zinder and Dale van Pelt, members of Alpha Lambda Delta, brought honors to this town- girl sorority. Naomi was a Spur and winner of the Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Award for a 1.0 grade aver- age. Also representing Phrateres on campus were Connie Hertzog, president of the Home Economics Club, and Ann-Marie Rascop, secretary of Pi Lambda Theta. Phrateres claimed 13 Wranglers, including secretary Mary Jean Harper. Dancing with Orchesis were Jo Clark, Mary Jean Harper, Judy Darlington and June O'Kelly. Merri Mulvihill was in Mermaids. Beverly Grigas stepped into the local spotlight when she was chosen to be Miss Pima County. Martha McDaniels was president of Phrateres. She was assisted by Margaret Burton, vice-presidentg Judy Snipes, corresponding secretaryg Diana Rusin, recording secretary and Judy Darlington, social chair- man. , i . 'g ,Al vw l ' 434 , 5 was -fii " 4 l3 "ia'J Q8 " y '31 A 1 . ,., . ' ' -"-'W ., J xp , A l yu l 4 'ea Q if 81 , l , .1-Q - H , ' " 'x ras 1 ' 1 283 Sylvia Smith Judy Snipes Linda Sutler Linda Ullman Pat Van De Walle Dale L. Van Pelt Ola Wells Anne Willis Suzanne Wright Naomi Zinder A senior in the BPA College and selected as a member of Bobcats, Bill Ramsay presided over Interfra- ternity Council and directed their projects during the year. As ad- visor to campus fraternities, Assist- ant Dean of Men Darold Shutt helped the Council coordinate its many activities. INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL Holding an introductory assembly for men going through rush, the Interfraternity Council began the school year. In the fall, the Greek representatives hosted the Southwestern Regional Interfraternity Con- ference. Joining with Panhellenic, IFC sponsored a new pledge scholastic program to reemphasize the scholar- ship program in the houses. At a Christmas party held in Carrillo School, IFC members treated underprivileged children with gifts and entertainment. Just before final exams, faculty members dined at fraternity houses as their guests at the Apple Polisher's Dinner. Greek Week, under the general chairmanship of Lynn Hornbrook, came March 17 through 22. Fea- tured during the week were the banquet, workshops, exchange dinners, alumni dinner, olympics and dance. At the annual dance, Suzi Daly and Mike Hoffman reigned as Queen and King, Bill Ramsay was IFC president. His oflicers were Lynn Hornbrook, vice-president, Hank Mollner, sec- retary and Don Robinson, treasurer. I.F.C.: ROW 1: Bert Stone, Hank Mollner, Bill Ramsay, Don Robinson, Al Hernandez, Jim LeCain. ROW 2: Jack White, John Wilbur, Gary Hyde, Clark Neuroh, Tate Greenway, Jim Riley, Dick Pesqueira, Bill Schober, Joe Michie. ROW 3: Bill Fraser, Mike Casey, Joe Martin, Jim Ford, Louis Slonaker, Darold Shutt, J. R. Willis, James Lloyd, Warren Griggs. ROW 4: Gail Shultz, Richard Moore, Bob Crawford, Gary Ellison, David Schreiber, Jim Miller, Stan Lerch, Pat Shelly, Vaughn Binzer, Michael 'Laynd ROW '5: Harry Weaver, Erick Egertson, Jon Legallet, Mike Hoffman, Steve Pogson, Ben Andre, Harold Kaplan, Rod Wood, Charlie Moore, Gene Karp, Lee Wolfson. .284 AMID the cheers of the crowd, Jerry Robinson and Todd Chilton cross the finish line of the IFPC pajama race after rounding Old Main and Bear Down gym. The Interfraternity Pledge Council began the year their annual Memorial Fountain clean-up. Fra- donated two pledges each to help scrub the landmark. Bob Mclnerney acted as general chairman for the Pajama Race in December. Each sorority two fraternity teams of ten pledges. The men ran a relay starting at Cherry Ave- and finishing in front of the Student Union. IFPC arded a traveling trophy to the winners and an- her to the sponsoring sorority. INTERFRATERNITY, PLEDGE COUNCIL During Help Week, IFPC earned S950 and pre- sented it to the Comstock Children's Hospital. Hirsh Handmaker, chairman, supervised the pledges as they washed cars, cleaned and painted houses and mowed lawns. As a climax to the week, the Council pre- sented their annual IFPC formal. Theta LaDonna Anderson reigned as queen. Serving as president of the Council was Sid Rosen. He was assisted by Ken Peterson, vice-president, Doug Dunipace, treasurerg 'Sandy Gordon, secretary and J ay Alderson, publicity chairman. G: ROW 1: Bill Ramsay, Sid Rosen, Kenneth Peterson, Sandy Gordon, Doug Dunipace. ROW 2: Gary Bruce, Mel Green, Gary Cooper J lI1'l nk, Mike Baum, Leon Costanten, Dave Murray, Jerry Martin, Jay Alderson. ROW 3: Jerry Long, Bill Watson, Larry Kay, Larry Betts Fred k Borcherdt, Emil Franzi, Larry Mason, Hirsch Handmaker. ROW 4: Bob Bene, Chris Roberts, Bill Bigler, Dave Fiscus, Dick McCall Tom bolett, Jack Collins, Rusty Baker, Butch Ehlert, Dan Spitler, Richard Ahern. ROW 5: Bon Richardson, James LaZansky Ray Dull Pete umann, Charles Davis, Chuck Becker. 285 yr- , ' K1 ' Dv. AM. gr- . . -infx inn, .- Amie! E i University of Michigan Arizona Ch 1904 I 950 44 Chapters I6 Members 819 East Third Street A C A C I A Ron Briggs Topping the Acacia's social activities for the year was their annual "Nite on the Nile." For this dance, the fraternity house took on the atmosphere of ancient Egypt. During the holiday season, the Acacia's held their Christmas formal at Demolay Hall. Acacia was well represented in campus honoraries. Active in IRE-AIEE were Warren Griggs, Ray Tyrrell and Tom Mills. Warren was also a member of Pi Mu Epsilon, math honorary, Tau Beta Pi, aug ' 9' engineering honorary, and the Sports Car Club. Mem- bers of the American Chemical Society were George Cabot and Allen Fork. Allen Fork and Circulation Manager of the Wildcat Jim Rector represented Acacia on the Rifle Team. Dick Fisher belonged to the Young Republicans Club. Leading Acacia's activities were Ron Briggs, presi- dent. His ofiicers were James Funk, vice-presidentg Allen Fork, secretaryg Dick Fisher, treasurer and Tom Mills, social chairman. George Cabat H i R 'A Richard Fisher i , ' " Allan Fork Mg , .. T . 5 r , ' --if if.-3:.g ,Arif -at. Jim Funk H A 7 X I L Warren Griggs Jim LeCain F2 I ' A 3. "'i i ' 'A ' 7 t'.'?iff,i Jerry Millett ' , R N I A Thomas Mills ' ' 1 A - George Settlemyer T' 2 'i Af? A Er' P S' ' e I ,I 'C , V, GIVING a toast to Acacia with their newly purchased mugs are ' K aff H N, 5 X these fraternity brothers Dick Fisher, Jim Funk, and Tom Mills. --ff V U. Y !1',. i VI .B . "iw Q 286 a moment, Howard Glonts, Kenny McFadden, J1m Aggies built a 24-foot cowboy in their front yard welcome visiting alumni during Homecoming. For annual Christmas dance, the yard was decorated ith Mt. Lemmon snow and snowmen. Sports-wise, the Aggies brought several honors to eir house. In the intramural program, they were hampions of the Federal League in football, basket- all and track. At the UA Intercollegiate Rodeo, they the rodeo team trophy, while Mickey McCarty, president of the National Intercollegiate Rodeo was named All-Around Cowboy. Aggies affiliated with Alpha Zeta were Stan presidentg Roy Ross, vice-presidentg Bob secretary and Clip Klepacki, treasurer. Vice- of Beta lieta Beta was Roy Ross, while Schorr was treasurer. and Mickey McCarty take break from their yard work. 819 North Euclid Avenue AGGIE HUUSE 1 fa LI Tucson Chapter Founded 1937 30 Members 'I Q nr I ' i I ,' gi' GI " if "5 I I ' I 6 f W I I ' W " : I 'I ' i' , I ' -1- - j, . i P? T, I fy 1 E , :I I I rl I Q V I .f EL -gn at ,Q . 'A ' I , I 8232- L I 'gdf' , I ,, .. A . l -N ' J, ' ,,,l ge , NL I 1 ,175 1 1 -S , R I in . I 4 W - Q " , ' if 1 I. 'I I i fi ' " -- 1.4: i .13 ' gi , :wg 'liz' y' V-' ,ii r ' :V -i,'l E ',A., ,U 'I V ' BA F M W -I AI. 'I M -we . . L4 'sh' 1. IL' ' 287 V. J. Acosta Archie Bennett Carl Benson I ohn Boynton Bud Brown Howard Clonts Ronald Crismon Jim Cuming Mike Douglas Arthur Flores Jim Halberg Jim Henness Clip Klepacki Harry Kruse Wilbur Lohman Mickey McCarty Larry McDonald Ken McFadden Jeri Moler Cliff Moore John O'Dell Roy Ross Fred Rush Dick Schorr Robert Smith Stan Tixier Ray Trappman Frank Whitlow Calvin Willis .--""'- 'f-'ag-,,.. LPHA SIGM PHI This year was a busy one for Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity. Activities for the chapter which iilled up their social calendar included the annual Black and White formal dance. The affair was held at the Baghdad Room of the Tucson Inn. It is a traditional function to celebrate Founder's Day, December 6. Members took a Washington Day hike and held a costume party in the spring. Serenades, parties and exchanges highlighted both semesters. Men of Alpha Sigma Phi who were selected to membership in honoraries during the year were Larry Angle, who was claimed by the Elections Committee Jay Alderson Larry Angle Paul Austin Chuck Becker Bob Crawford Erick Egertson Jim Emrick Donald Evans A . I' and Traditions Committeeg and Max Brawley, who was named to Sophos, sophomore men's honorary. Arnold Air Society chose Alpha Sig's Larry Angle, Ray Weigold and Bob Zimmerman. The managing editor of the Wildcat was Bob Crawford. The fraternity was also active in the intramural program during the year. The chapter elected Raymond Weigold as its presi- dent. Assisting him in the other elected offices were Garven Videen, who served as vice-president, James Graves, who acted as secretary, and Robert Strick- land, chosen as treasurer for the organization. - i '-'YET 1 A : A ly '. f Q- 4 ,I . if '4 1 ,, ,. Yale College Gamma Iota Cha 1845 1955 81 Chapters 27 Members 7 I ' 1 . fx " -1 . . . U R H an at ,gif ' 1 H., 1 I 41 AA ly I f A -1 4 Geoffrey Fox lg. ' , ' 4 Jim Graves ' - l , W c f ' - . Jerry Hagerman l , - . ' I , , A, Wally Jones 3 T? ,iq .1 V ,V , X ,.-we .NT " - -A ig' :T l '7 " Paul Long ', V . ," 'J-, 1 , if ' V " N ' .At X ' Craig Mortonl ' ,N L P. 44 . . gy J? ." A. Q ,l g , ' KZ William Mose ey 1 ' LL N M - ,jig A , ii ,-,QE , 1' ' " 4' H Jim Person p M Q' L 1 7: i fl -if i-iii? E -'I A 5 -' Q -K I William Sauter qv A vga., M - Q .P ,M John Snodgrass 'J W I , Y, , ' I. ' ' . . Morris Soroly? d .4 av A Q ' V I iii. -' ,- Robert Stric an . E11 fu lf f- .. ., ",- x ,J " 'gy V ' i' S1 I Perry Wamer l' q . V 5' ,- AL' V i i ' 'N t Ray Weigold L F 1 .IVN X is ' :EM ' ll. ' y .W . Richard Wessman V - ' ' ' I - ' . 1" ' ' 'fe ' Joseph wolf ti all , J 1 fr - .ii I LEAVING for afternoon classes, Sandy Michel hand his books to Mel Green as Dave Brod waits for a ride to campus in Sandy's new Thunderbird. it . 'l l ' '1 -if -- . 1 - . Y 'A' .'.,,,.l.trv l i i, :NL X 43 we '. 5. VL.: li-.Q vu BL E DIAMO DS One of two new fraternities, the Blue Diamonds organized on the UA campus first semester. During the holiday season, they held the Blue and Gold Ball at the Santa Rita Hotel. Other social activities' in- cluded the pledge class Crazy Hat party and Western Day at the Rancho del Jafe where Carol Lattin reigned as sweetheart. On a kidnap picnic, the Blue Diamonds initiated Alpha Epsilon Phi pledges into the Royal Order of Blue Birds, Firt Feather Rank. 1104 East Helen Street Alpha Kappa Psi Hal Kaplan served as chairman of the Beautify Campus Committee and Greek Week exchanges. Lee Wolfson represented Blue Diamond on the Interfraternity Council and served as president of Hillel. Vice-president of Greenlee Hall was Mel Green. President of the Blue Diamonds was Hal Kaplan. His oliicers were John Kalish, vice-presidentg Sandy Michel, secretary and Steve Magar, treasurer. '-'A , Lew Aaronson - - V , Everett Broder 1 ,Y V., A L f, Shelly Goodfarb ll Q 13 ' 1. "Q - c l 'ai we ' ' :R Q , X ' 1 I ,Q .1 ,Hia , ' - Mel Green . , -- Joseph Kalish L All' ' ' I . Harold Kaplan it jr l r fl N XZ: V ' 'Iv I V ll cf is H .- . , ..: - Philip Levy .f ' Q 1 T, Stephen Mazer X l Sandy Michel P H w e .P . f if J., " l , t L 4 . I1 It , ., " . X A f' , ' V .A , A 1 'EQ ' . - p Jonathan O'Hara I Arthur Solomon 1 Q X - " a' Lee Wolfson ,,. - ff il- -5 , X WS: - . er it '3 lil . m V r .1 l H -W 289 Johnny Benson Jack Bess Wm. C. Bond Ham Borland Dave Carey Bert Carrillo David Carrington Alan Coplen Leon Costanten Harry Eastlick Lee Esch Lee Ficke Darell Fisher Hap Garner Daryl Gilbreath Ken Gragson Hugh Grinnell Tim Healey Barry Herlihy Al Hershey James Kimes John King Paul Ledwith Bob Ludlow Jon Lundstrom Robert Majors Whipple Manning John Markovich Phillips Marshall Mike McEnerne John McEvoy Dave Murray Bill Neblett James Nelson I iran lid' 'D' RELAXING in ATO living room Garry Greer Bert Carrillo Ham Morland and Dick Pyeatte harmonize to the strumming of Leon Costanten s guitar 4 . A A 4 5A 5 lk. E ' tr 'K 1 A ""' 3331 7 . A ew 290 'N u X L Qeeeeb is yy y J s l L H Q l i g , I -L , l N' YI! it N E' M t l u ' it VGQI, ' RI A Q V 4 G fl' -in V ,' , , I l Q -A il li " 2, 14' 'lf N-fl l J 1 , ll r 'F J i' L fi to ' it if 'lr M tt' it Bobjohlson .4 ,J L .Fi I' L l 1" 1 l 5 " ., I , 1, ' 'li 'lil Q 'J F Y N A.: N 4 Q y , I g ,Ari Y if VA 41" NK 1 V F lg l f , l A ' " fl B54 --1' 'fl ' ' I A Y t e r , t X ,gtg lv V 1 f N -V Wim. lf ph - -ru, ,I - - Q A ' I f l 13 Adv "' ,- l , zrgmm Military Institute Epsilon Bela Chapter 1865 1930 118 Chapters 84 Members 841 North Tyndall Avenue ALPHA TAU OMEGA Highlighting social events for the Alpha Tau Omegas was their Christmas Formal where Jean McLean of Gamma Phi Beta was crowned ATO Sweetheart. The fraternity held a Mau-Mau party in the spring as well as their annual spring formal. In conjunction with the ATO chapter at Tempe the UA chapter sponsored the fourth annual Tucson- Tempe bicycle race on the Thanksgiving weekend. Blue Key Howard Tarr Chain Gang members Fred Joyner and Bob Majors and Sophos Dennis Winsten and Bob Johnson represented ATO in serv- ice honoraries. Traditions Committee claimed John Benson Jim Rolle Dennis Winsten Bob Johnson ' uc. U V . ' - ' 'E Fred Joyner Bob Steenbergen Bob Majors, Pete Kimes and Howard Tarr. Members in Arnold Air Society were Jim Nelson, Greg Kenaston and Howard Tarr. Jim Howard also belonged to Scabbard and Blade, ATOs in Alpha Kappa Psi were Bob Ludlow Bob Walter Howard Britt Lee 'Esch and Tom Quarelli. Bill Ramsay served as president of Interfraternity Council and Representative Council while Bob Majors was head of Public Relations. ASUA Com- munity Service Chairman was Fred Joyner. Gail Shultz led the ATOs as president. His of- ficers were Howard Tarr vice-president' John Ben- son scribe and Jim Rolle treasurer. . . Tom Quarelli . Barry Rabbitt 2 . Bill Ramsay i ta V3 Jim Rolle , J Robert Rouse L . Dave Shore - . 'J Gail Shultz .1 , Charles Siroky 1 1 Richard Slater 5. V Lee Smith ' ' Douglas Somers . Bob Steenbergen Q I 7 55 71 , Q 9 5 Y 1 7 s 9 7 7 3 7 7 1 1 lining if 1 N 1, , - t ' I . - -" V X- ' 1 2 ' VN- ---'ll 'X 3 "1 lil - . I if -33" 'Z ,Q s ' i'l- ,U ,Q 'I 1. l' ,-A' l If ' l l as l lx! rg 1. . 'L r. i . " : J 1 uw H., 'ij'-' '1 'Ex ' -f' e -: .1 x T W -f + - f .i -. , T l .- Y lilly, l, - .dp a L , Y- l A J -' Sit LEM 1 A I I 1 l , Q, A l ' . 1 l l -is ,P J' f 5 - ' lx Il. i :V l J" 1 1 X 4 I W 'L ' i l Ai xi ' i I c if x t I 'i xl I l W ilu 1 ' . 9 'fn 9 it f l 1 A ' J A Jr., . F ' . 1 " .: ' N 1 - .' Fr- -f., , A W ,s ...- M, . g, QI Il it J 1 If it J "xi F ff' Ill' :A I1 Q' 1' ' - -l:..f'J A ' , V L :R Vw 'LZ' V ft l 1'-Al ' 'Tl - - . Roy Stonecipher f 5, . , Gary Talley I f , 4,1 Howard Tarr , i ' T g f lx- 1-'A ' F, John Taylor bi 3. , Nick Tibshraeny . X ff' 3'3" ' t Favil West X 'l' Dennis Winsten 291 P David Bollard Lee Branneman Paul Carter Jim Coffey Edward Crutchfield James Dowdy ' i g gf Dick Edwards Allan Eisenwinter , James Eppler Richard Eskra Jim Ford Ray Foust Bartlett Fowler Kim Fox Rudy Garcia Carlyle Givens f Phillip Grace Ken Hawk Gary Henderson Frank Herget John Higgins Raymond Hughes James Huie S65 EA iii.i..,f?5l SOLVING a difficult homework problem Frank Howe explains a fundamental math principle to Dave Ballard Pres ton Smith and Horace De Francesco 6 I QW!" : .,," . Q 1 ,S ."' i J A xi A?" 'it gg P' A- -5' .ip A i p A-I V-. 4 va, if ' 1 'Q - J' i ' Y, , i '- 1. 1 A ' . A 5 1 y Vi it yr J licl iii i f i L, - -s . ' M' 'ri'a, ' J -Q " i 'Q 1' I C if p 1., ill p Q 4 it 1' ' or N i i 1 p e I H, K! ' ' I Y 1 --. I A H ,, :I -1 - if 5 do 'gf ff of f if , li: ' -44 i argl? ii . J 1 y , I i l at I i p ,J il .lbbh A V . , 'J Y - A-N 5:5 j, Z - -uf , lvl -is ' X' -nk, 5 g" I A ,x 'sk ! - V xl I- 4 3' Q, . : is X it C 5 . tt 1 'R 1 a A I . : A V - V , V ' i - ' ii 4, 'fn' A f -A ' A 4' -V - EQ "T Q K 'f. q A ' - ' - ,I iv - im - . ah as p A I if if V i J S' . 71? 4 . . , 33- if ' , 1 ' --1 'L ' -1 15 Ji' 'i i ' I ai, J 'L 5' i: ' ii 1 i , L ? A f 'Q '- i ,Y el, i ' - i 1 A '?i:1':'.j V WV NAI . 1 'Q D '4- , . rt V '.V- 5 R 1- lf, , I if ki' , Y 3 ' n , 1, L I X L' V . , ' .' . 7 Tom Jimerson , Fred Lehn Gary Leinenbach Bob Leivian Lloyd Lopez Joe Lutes Jerry Martin Joe Martin Tom Mclntosh Hugh McKenzie Fred McLemore Jay Mienema Louie Mone Kal Muller Rick Munson Ned Oswald Bob Perkins , Norman Popkin Bill Rauh John Reed Don Rice John Richtars Doug Roberts Phil Rodi Gene Simmons P 13 1 'Uk Is.: 'J' -4 'ns h fr: +L-ff 4 Mmm : 'dnl at Wil 4 11 1 292 Cornell University - -H Arizona Chapter 1890 1925 45 Chapters 82 Members 1501 East First Street DELTA CHI The Delta Chi's began the year by collecting toys for underprivileged children of Tucson, Their annual Christmas formal was held at El Rio Country Club, where they crowned Phi Phi Corrine Davis Delta Chi Sweetheart. The fraternity house became an Arab camp for a night at the Arabian Nights Dance. Tra- ditions Committee clain1edAndy Swain, Joe Martin, Dave Vance, Kent Somers and Tom Mclntosh. Bob Perkins, SUAB Chairman, was a Bobcat, while Andy Swain served as president of the honorary. Working on SUAB committees were Bob Leivian and Gary Henderson. Sophos selected Joe Martin and Dave - l . ,, A Vance. The men of Delta Chi were active again this year, in all phases of the intramural program. They took first place in handball, billards and double horseshoes. Highlighting the year for the fraternity was the approval given by the Alumni Control Board for construction of a new chapter house. The site is, in the 1700 block on East First Street. Ofhcers for the year were Hugh McKenzie, presi- dentg Jim Ford, vice-presidentg Dave Bollard, record- ing secretary and John Richtars, corresponding secre- tary. A, 'Q' ik l 1 . I 7 flfzlicilt ii ig ig l at - 'lf -C -- l 3- l , , gl, 5 l 3 - l l P l IE' 4 f .- 4 he f , t e A Q' P 'P 1 1-:Si . "5 ' ' ' 0 A J L b , 'I '-" ' i Y 1 W , - A "' T V, a ' rr'r , 1 . t N yA,.lg,.w.r: - H 1 . . .1 y Q, nz V A V lx' N A . Vg we' I -I P fy?-'ifv Pousmnn the Delta chi trophies, Eddie some and Dick 'W i1 - s A 5 it Wi Whitehouse chat a moment before finishing their task. W' '5 , I - l it Q .4 ' . 5 293 William Slocum Preston Smith Dale Snailum Eddie Soens Kent Somers Chuck Sorensen Andrew Swain Don Tolliver David Turner Gonzalo Urias David Vance Harold Waddell George Wallace B. K. Wiederhold Jim Wing J. Nathan Young ANTICIPATING affiliation with Delta Tau Delta fratemity, Crescent Club mem- bers Dick Huddleston, Chris Roberts, Steve Williams and Gary Hyde meet with William Stone and write a con- stitution for the new organization. CRESCENT CLUB Colonizing on campus this year, the members of the Crescent Club will go national as Delta Tau Delta fraternity. Members in campus honoraries were Dave Montgomery and Donnell McArthur in Pi Mu Epsi- lon and Don Caughlin in Delta Sigma Pi. Bandsman Charles Masters belonged to Kappa Kappa Psi. Af- i wig w - ? y I filiated with AIEE were Robert Scholl and Carl Foiles. AIME claimed John Zombekg Steve Williams was active in ASME. President and vice president of Pan American Club were Gary Hyde and Jim Eul- berg, respectively, and Dick Huddleston presided over the Young Repub1ican's Club. Ray Dull held membership in Sophos and was on the Sophomore Council., Officers of the Crescent Club were Gary Hyde, presidentg John Stanton, vice presidentg Dave Mont- gomery, secretary and James Eulberg, treasurer. Kent Dussair -. . i. ,. 1 is Jim Eulberg V' if U V Carl Foiles ,N f A :J V i q i 'E g 4 1 " Z . W Q 'S-j r, ' ' ,, JJ- . gl? i in ,l Gary Hyde H , K Rodolfo Jaggi ,if -'f"ftf l . . ' , Andrew Kemmerer g I' .L Dave Montgomery A K ' Clark Neuroh , A. .13 -at ' i Bill Potts N ' 1 L r 'iv '?g 5',7 "i , Chris Roberts V - A l I' A , Craig Trueblood ' ' , 1 Steve Williams . . I x -ix f . , p 3 'gi - ., 'f P .N 3 V I 3 a N J X 1,1 ,V v 3 4 Qu - - A it 4 BUYING decorations for the spring formal, Gary Hyde and Bill Potts select ones that will carry out the theme of the dance. New York City College Beta Omega Chapter 1 1 1899 1948 84 Chapters 29 Members X, 541 North Park Avenue DELTA SIGMA PHI Built around the theme Alums out of This World Delta Sigma Phis float placed third in the beauty division of the Homecoming parade. Delta Sigma Phi social life was highlighted by the Carnation Ball held at the Desert Willow Ranch. In the spring the fraternity entertained at their Sailors Ball and at a swimming party in Sabino Canyon. Completing their slate of activities were after-game parties a pajama party Mom and Dads banquet a Alums banquet at Homecoming and exchanges and .I Q 74 T V iz:-3' N if ' -A? ijt' If X ite! . A ,i ,xg dances at the housep Active in honoraries were Dick Moore, Chain Gang and Ed Mansour Sophos. Beta Beta Beta claimed Nick Mansour while Chuck Wier was aflil- iated with Theta Tau. Leading Delta Sigma Phi in their activities during the year was Bill Shride president. Assisting him were Dick Moore vice-president' Bob Morrow, treas- urer' Jim Helmig secretary and Rick Zahniser, sergeant-at-arms. Ramon R. Alvarez X- A 1- George Benedict ' ' ' Scottie Bivens llc" 1? ' Earl Dysthe Richard Flanders Ralph Gierish ' Jim Helmig - Lennis Higgins 'V 1 ' I Edward Mansour Nick Mansour James Moody Richard Moore Robert Morrow Dennis Mortensen Joseph Mulligan David Nelson Don Ren X i X J X 'Q if gi Bin Shride James Whitaker Tug Wilson Donald Wyatt J J X.-1 CX n el 3 . .X- -I XJ: i 1 li Y, 9 , 5 3 5 7 7 H , , F I , 7 3 D 9 9 Y vi ISM x- ' iX'X, X 1 1 i, I H 1 W X K ' if .na X X . XX ,. A Q A XXX X 5 W jx X W 3 fb X 1 Y X I XX, a s XX sa' ,X wr if! f' it H-.Lf i' ' "f-is Q ffl it f X I by il' t fl . t J X l NX t 1 4 ' H. --r I " ' X . X . , . 1 A be 'I X t r XX: il, f ,gg 1 I XX Xa, ,LX lu b , L, Q Q4 wi IL I H J..f'.i, if W 1 'T t I' 75 X X' 4-A 1 1 RX,,,,,4j as X ix. 'pw X H ..- l f I Y., XX X X- . -I' .f X 'I 1 v ' '11 X il! 1 S K' l X 1 WI- it X X X yu 4 l I ' L F Y N TI , V J Fir Wi r 13:31 -3 ' WX 4 X it e p : t el I i l 41 - -V 1 lx " X '-'N -1 J I JG il K 1 '. 1'--' . JX J L. .fe ' tn '22 fi - 1"X in M' .rf , X . M',IgX,4l. 1W l X X f ' 1 ' XX ni' K XX " ' 1'- Xvgl Charlie Phipps . - 91. . X .+. v-:- 5 . ,, . X Meir l . ' -e-if '-1--f if t-. u..,.X- Q-A -'11 :XX XX! X X XXt X t X -Xjlg' X' ll - g t-X VX! " -.X 11 ' X'X' X Xggff' ' as X "" ,,,,' x ' pt- '. " . X -X -" , XX' .L ' '--g ' L X .1 ,,, XX' X' .v X-XA X X -" X ' LXVTKX X ' WH ,E.'Q'xL,Q ' ,l W 1 ,.. , ..4- .V X ' H r l X be at serial t ji ?"pX-- X f lX L 1X ' ' ' X AX X X XX l X tX MEX :X J ,, X t ,if l H 5 X ,. - X X. H J if' ' V ' it ii fig? f we ll are fx M 't"i l' L51 what .-:."t l idk if me t. V M X i I .0 qs, lt 1 ,g ,X ,HX w ' X A ' as - 1 ' I A ' ' LJ 'F Qt it .D ' . 117, Wayne Youngblood 'i -. 1,-,,. V Rick Zahmser I X Pat Shipp 295 1304 East Speedway PP ALPH Washington and Lee 1' ' Gamma Epsilon Chapter University 1949 I 865 78 Chapters 22 Members Bob Bene Loyd Branin Gene Falck Harold Fanning Chuck Green Dick Heller Sidney John Jok P. Legallet Jon S.. Legallet James Lewis Manuel Macias Eddie McCoy Larry Pope Bill Potts 3 Wm: - -' 'I' wif' H' ii - ' 1 l 2 ix ,L Al . 1 .. W 1 5" in W -1 P gg , fl V' .. SEATED around the coffee table, Paul Wygant, Jerry Sanders Dick Heller spend an afternoon playing a game of mon Members of Kappa Alpha fraternity began their activities this year with a pledge-active football con- test. They continued their annual custom of holding a pig roast, and celebrated the Christmas holidays with a formal dance. ln the spring the KA's went southern at the Dixie Ball. They selected a KA sweet- heart at this yearly event. The dance was heralded to the campus by horseback riding men who announced the coming date in front of all the women's resi- dences. The Business College awarded Ronald Martin with general honors. Robert Bene received an Ari- zona Alumni Scholarship. Interfraternity Council gave a scholarship to Gene Falck. Sophos claimed two Kappa Alpha's: Paul Wygant and Jon Legallet. Serving the chapter as president for 1957-1958 was Jon Legallet. Ronald Martin assisted him as vice- president. Paul Wygant was treasurer of the fraternity. 1" I ' ' N Z P . ,.4 -L . .-.- i i t S 1 A I -- K' , ip Ujivf, Q , A 1 L lx K4 I Gerald Sanders Gary Smith Dan Spitler Jim Souter Wally White Paul Wygant .4-1 wg-.17 12 in " l l Jejferson College N Arizona Alpha Chapter 1852 1947 58 Chapters 26 Members KPP The years social functions for the Phi Psis cluded .1 fall costume pajrtma party and a spring stume party called the Streets of Paris. Formal ances were held at Christmastime rind in the spring. Phil Weeks served as chairman of the Elections ,ommittee and was '1 member of Traditions and Blue ey. Paul Schnur also on Traditions and in Blue ey belonged to the American Chemical Society Phi ambda Upsilon and Phi Kappa Phi. John Lentz was member of Traditions 'ind Delta Sigma Pi. Phi Kappa Psi oflicers were Harvey Bershader resident- John Ayers vice-president' Phil Weeks reasurer' Bill Herbert recording secretary and Tom eedy corresponding secret xry. ,L - V . Qililif 'N T 545 East Third Street AMUSED by cards and comic books Fred Borcherdt Emil Franzi Byron McBride and Gary Ellison spend a rare rainy afternoon inside the house Terry Anderson Dan Andres Tom Beedy Harvey Bershader Sam Blakesly Fred Borcherdt Gary Ellison Emil Franzi J im Henry Bill Herbert Bill Hunzeker John Lentz 7 3 ' c , us an 1 C c K. K , 1 1 s L 4 . c g 9 ' 1 1 s 1 1 n 4 : , 2 3 I l y A " X ' i -, 'gn ,Al U, rl, R S X 5 Qi :gs Y kv , 1 l , ' L W Xt: ' Xia., fl' l ' I . iii? , A W : L. .X V I V I V -. 'r ,f A T Wt'l'fl l . 'I f ' l 1 ,ilu i ' l l V' 4 l ,' 1 W A ff- Q. i , l j ' ? 1 3 " l A i l F f .' ' ' l I f ' ' 1 1 l 4' l W W l i , I 1 K X W J J as , l ' f l A L I fill 1, l y V A wg, 1 Pc? 5 is V , 'ft Q i T .5 ig 'f yf ,nf il if , lf' l l A in T , I fe if W A 297 Byron McBride John Mellen Edward Nemer Phillip Weeks Ken Wrasper ENERGETICALLY polishing and sweeping Frank Saller Skip Kent Gene Bald SITTING patiently on front seat of a Kappa Sig car Dx Wm Bill Haskell and John Metzger make the Kappa Sig fire engine shlne mascot of the fraternity warts for rrde around the b Chris Borden Chad Brucker Dave Burnham Mitch Cagali Dan Campbell Gary Carlson Jerry Cessor Terry Concannon James Dahlman John Duran Bill Fain Alcuin Fifield Dirk Fraunfelder Jerry Freeman Mike Garity Mike Halle Joe Hannon William Haskell Harry Hastain Ernie Hawes Paul Hicks Taylor Hicks Ray Hiscok Jens Johannsen Jim Johnson David Kasten Skip Kent James Knowles Dick Larriva Michael Layne Bob Lutes Dick McCall Gerald McNalley John Metzger Bert Monteverde vi fn hi P Sams ma Donald Moore Don Morrls Arthur Mulvey Dennls Nelson Gary Peterson Kenneth Peterson Hayes Redden John Rees Frank Saller Joe Scott Tom Smallcomb Rlchard Stewart SWB B111 Wallace Jed Warner Harry Weaver Andy Wrenn Duke K PPA SIGMA The Kappa Sxgs started their socxal events thts year with the annual Klondike Stomp At the Chrlst mas Formal Nancy McKinnon of Kappa Alpha Theta reigned as Stardust Queen Guests wore grass sklrts sarongs and 1e1s at the Kappa Sig Luau held each sprmg Later ln the year the Bowery Dance was held The Kappa Slgs 1n1t1ated a new custom at thelr Monday mght dmners Rotatmg among the different sorontles they lnvlted the house mother house presl dent and social chalrman of each house to dmner In varsxty sports John Duran Joe Dickson and Jack Glllespxe played football Charlle Osterman was actlve ln basketball Chad Brmker pltched for the baseball squad and Mrke Halle and Stan GFlmCS were L Uruverszly of Vzrgmza Gamma Rho Chapter 1869 1915 128 Chapters 75 Members on the wrestllng team Stan Grlmes also ran cross- country for the track team Kappa Srgs 111 campus act1v1t1es were Mike Garity, Llberal Arts College presldent and a member of Tra- d1t1ons Commrttee and Cham Gang and Jens Johann- sen Semor Class v1ce president In campus honor- arles Jens Johannsen belonged to Alpha Rho Tau whrle B111 Haskell was actlve rn Delta Slgma Pi. In mtramural sports they placed first in their league 1n football and basketball and thlrd and fourth places respectlvely ln the finals Officers of Kappa Slgma were Bob Luglan, presi- dent John Martln VICC presldent Jens Johannsen, secretary Taylor Hrcks treasurer and John Metzger, socxal charrman 1325 East Speedway E V 1 2 -5 5555! :I Ill llll 5511! llll um' I s ll y ln. I1 99 . ,,,. 'W I 1, tw . 1 A l ' 1 l"Hfff1.f . H 11 ft , 'I 7' .MTL 'J 1' 7 my 'H1 frm fx V 1 , ...WI 1 Q 1.1 mr- 1 ' MV I 'rn V l 1 1 - -qt 1 sz 4' i X E g -' , - 1 I 4 , r T , 3 X ,p 'ff I J, H 1- g-.f,. ' ' ' "ll ' f -s . t Mit, y f 1 tl y N , pi. 1 H U 1 an 1 ' 1 1' at 'M Y ' . Q Y ' rl 1 s . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . , I . . , .- . , . , L , . , . , . i . I . c , I . . . . , . . L . , . I . 9 I ' Z . 's 5, ,N V-, 1 Jr l .flaw 1 -if ' 1' , Fa Y- A Y - -I, l ' '1,-- , Y: W 4 - -'fllfprl , - -5 f ' . . . . Aa af ' J ...Y .i Y ' -V V r V A Wayne Agustus Arthur Brown Buster Brown James Brush John Choisser A. D. Cline Eric Crump Richard David Jerry Eckert Paul Farrier Bruce Genthner Dave Geyer Delbert Goddard David Harris Glenn Hay Harry Hecht Robley Hedrick Jackson Hoagland Eric Hochstadter Carl Hedges John Klima Alan Lang C. B. Leeser Bill Lewis Don Lowe Mike Lynch Larry Marts George Mason Dick May Russell Palin John Peck Ronald Peterson Jerry Pence Ken Radbill Bob Rheinegger , - g2Y""- 4- 4 .! . ' r-Qin 5 1 A I rf' :"lJ- 5 ' ' " 'PJ J 4 .A 4.0 Q 'e e' .Q j l l-X l l 1 ' J 4 " Vvf. .4 la l "'. L in 3 f K' 22255 l S X V . f I i i V l 22.1 l ,, 1 l Y' -, J ' V l , ,M l U V .f i t J A gig: y V it J 't I X 'S .W P ' V - 4: Q lzlmhvlvl I f Yi. .- : A' A F vp: 5 lixu , 5 my .J 1 SITTING around their pool, Alan Lang, Bill Goldsmith, Paul Farrier, Jerry Pence and Pete' Hendrickson plan the entertainment Lambda Chi's will feat- ure at the coming Calypso dance. DCT Q, 3 'tr - A ill. X , 5 ,Y 2. ' Q lhjjgiun . W, 7 1 4 ln l - eat tm . A . J, QE ! T ' 4 dl" , it L ' in f V 1. Y rxi,-J N , xxll A W. x ll i' l ' i Q ' -. -,:S': I 'V ua' .., Y lg, ni id, A. Ii , ilvn if ' 1,5 . I if l f J LIL - J t' oston College A Zeta Beta Chapter ff 1. Q? :Aw -,Gt 1909 1947 144 Chapters 47 Members l. J.. .f.f-arf-mer .t -ll .' 3:4 i 'Gigi V cleft , - . .-5 L . rl" A 1 Elini , '-t ' - ta- .es r f' -'EL' " ff tiff. IQ""'j l:j':-'- lzrggl' 3 55512-5 fr, '- . 5- W 'filiz-. M Qi? L . .LW I .l A Q l 1. .. I, .. if-'ijf-Q l'-TL-'g. 3 if , L. . -.,: ln, " f. . 1-. V ,A .. U' ,1 i .fi 5 i I . . 1 12 if VZ..- ..., . .. . 'Ez . ' : --162 l-.LL ' A 'J li- "Wil .. . ,- ls, JL WJ. ll fat - an .V .:1..g:.za1Si4e"1 1645 East Speedway AMBDA CHI ALPH Among the many house activities of Lambda Chi Alpha were the White Rose Formal and the Western Party. Chi Omega Bev Wilson was crowned Lambda Chi Crescent Queen at the Christmas Crescent Formal The Lambda Chi's were all represented in uni- versity activities by Sophos Jerry Pence and Chuck Morgan, Scabbard and Blade C. B. Leeser and Tradi- tion's members. Jerry Pence and Milo Van Voris. Milo was also Bookstore Committee chairman and a member of IFC and the Assemblies Committee. Phelps Dodge scholar John Peck was a Tau Beta Pi and John Vos belonged to the debate team and Alpha Phi Omega. Representing Lambda Chi in campus honoraries were John Klima in Beta Beta Betag Chuck Morgan, C. B. Leeser and Robley Hed- rick in DeltaSigma Pi and Hank Winship in American Pharmaceutical Association. 'Members of Arnold Air Society were' John Choisser, Robley Hedrick and C. B. Leeser. Sports claimed top interest for many Lambda Chi's. Bill Lewis was a gymnastics letterman and a cheerleader, Alan Lang was a member of the weight- lifting team and Eric Crump participated in varsity track. Marksmen Doug Marshall and Chuck Morgan represented the Lambda Chi's on the rifle team. Lambda Chi ollicers were Milo Van Voris, presi- dentg John Peck, recording secretary and John Chois- ser, treasurer. VT BARBECUING chicken at a poolside exchange. Dave Bingamen and John Peck are serving Kappa's Dot Michelbach and Barbie Mills. D ' I " " 'l , A J Peter Van Cleve L- . . ' J: - ' ' 1 X. , 4 ' , Milo Van Voris ,ip 1.' 9, ...L .y .Q ,, , K AJ 4. A fi . I Tom Vercellino ig. '-1 -1' A ' 1' -. .Y uf T " .l-T' may it John vess V . . 2 ,,,,, f I V 5 V- Q V ' I 'A A-'..A'5liAi', y! " Ael' ' Anthony Walstrum X " g ' ' . . ,glvfli .Mgr .- 5 'K ' Donald Webb 1 VI X ,E l M gy- 7? --.-- Henry WinshiP 301 t ll.. I i 1. . 1000 North Mountain Avenue University of Utah Gamma Alpha and 1936 Gamma Omega - 1937 20 Chapters 50 Members AMBD DELTA SIG Gamma Alpha and Gamma Omega chapters of Lambda Delta Sigma joined forces for another event ful year. The men in this coeducational organization won third place in men's originality in the Home coming parade with their entry, "From Marquette to Mars." They cycled from Tucson to Tempe to win second place in the annual Alpha Tau Omega Bicycle Race. Formal attire was in order for the Women's Christmas Formal and Men's Spring Formal. Snowy weather provided the entertainment at the Mountain Party on Mt. Lemmon. A harvest hayride, western dance and spring carnival completed their social activities. Lambda Delta Sigma was represented in Wranglers by Patsy Hardt, lla Kartchner, Darla McRae and Elizabeth McRae. Marilyn Post listed Sigma Alpha lota, Tau Beta Sigma and Student Religion Council Jane Blair Alice Campbell Claudia Clawson Virginia Ellis Patsy Lue Hardt Loueen Hummel lla Rae Kartchner xx Pauline McCommas Darla McRae Elizabeth McRae Marilyn Post Sharon Reneer Patty Sanders LaVee Thompson Sandra Williams X. C K 302 among her activities Beta Beta Beta and Rodeo Club claimed Virginia Ellis and Jane Blair who was secretary of Rodeo Club Patsy Hardt president of Alpha Epsilon was a member of P1 Lambda Theta and Pi Omega Pi Alpha Lambda Delta chose Elizabeth McRae Pershing Rifles selected Ted Curtis and Ted Varga Dudley Welker included Phi Delta Psi and Phi Alpha Delta in his activities Kappa Kappa Psi chose Dick Fletcher Marilyn Post served as president of Gamma Omega chapter Patsy Hardt was vice president Eliza beth McRae was secretary and lla Kartchner was treasurer Ofhcers of Gamma Alpha chapter were Spencer Brinkerhoff president Gerald Skinner VICC presi dent Dudley Welker secretary and Newell Porter treasurer wi 'tak' . , . Z . , . H .- Q 'k .,,. ' . ' ' ' V- , 'xi I E Al I T "- pf pi ., gs. 5 51 : I 3 1 ,',J rv ' ', I. , I -Y ,H I -j -QL ,, , ,H . . 1 ' I I --vi V V xl M Q :L 1: YN Y T! '1 izffiliv W ad A P fl '25 4 l. ' Q 'S . 'Ja' l or L Y..- T at-P fi' ff rig l ' r H53 A , .6 p 'u . Q o . . STEINFIELU CUP, awarded for excellence in extemporaneous speaking, is admir- ed by Marilyn Post, Patsy Hardt, Larry Despain, Dick Williams, Ted Varga. He ,-,ff I ' lx ' ' if 5 l V 9 7 3 .ia l 1 i , ,X .l. ' f A31 '-, S " at L r f A 1 3 l ' t if ' ii 5 l ykfyf ' . 1--l, . ,V Q, i , - ' -L l l , Q . 1 I 'X l x 1 ' 'N ,. T V ' I ' nl 'lf ' I V-V7 'F al - .l U .A - N "a rt E M g l f v A ' D ing . - , V GM 1' 44.4, Y 1 3 xi A J . 1, ..-4 i f r FQ' 1 EGDRATING the fountain for their annual spring dance, Brent Cluff, 'H ' AN5 , ' V N Ai " , floyd Carpenter and Patsy Hardt make it shine with new paint. 4,7 Q T4 ' ,, i ill 1 I ' -. 303 Arthur R. Brimhall Spencer Brinkerhoff Cloyd Carpenter C. Brent Cluff Dennis Cluff Evan Curtis Larry Despain Don Foster Terry Hoopes Newell S. Porter Terryl Rodgers Gerald Skinner Harold Skinner Hugh N. Weech Dudley Welker - Keith Adams Bill Albinson Rusty Baker Tom Beaham Jon Bechtel Mike Beck Bill Brierley Hugh Caldwell Bill Carnell John Carroll Chuck Cartwright Bill Collette Andy Cracchillo Jack Darr Dennis DeConcini John Dunlop Ken Eichenberger Loron Evans Jim Falk Roger Fellows Pat Foley Ron Finster Tony Gallo Peter Gardner Tom Gillard Duncan Goodale Don Grady Dan Heineman James Hill Terry Hoeschler Dave Hopps Joe Jenckes Rick Johns Peter Johnson Bob King Joe Kranhold Don Lauer David League Stan Lerch Bruce Linton Carl Lock Joe Magee A BRIDGE foursome, Ed Pogue, Carl Lock, Pat Foley ad Skipper Jenckes, play a quick hand before dinner. N 'r ' r ' y V 2 "', -,E y J R in 'i-H V gig. I 'il il ' ii 2 ,I i :A L MIA Y A .L CCT .- , ' 1 i V i A':1:f'igj In .T A A i K Q tif I ,V I lx fi J 1 'el' if 'if' w , r '- ' I ' ir' 'Y . ' ' ll i V N TPV1! ,L N l T-U52 l ,I -- I 4. Y : J i 0 - W 11: r 1 Y 1 . . W g , l ' 1- g A1 R . ' M429 H i t 'J , 'CTI' 1 . , , X 'J I 1 'i - L N ' mi 1 i ' lifes. ,Q i - Q ii' 'fx It fl J' sl' I , . L rg 1 fi - f -i JW ii' dl ll " ' - 44 - 4 ' ' I X P " V E R D, vi ff , 5 X l l A ttf -" y ,X 304 Miami University 1848 1922 wh, mf '- f:"'ll'n J c' N Arizona Alpha Chapter ' 121 Chapters 87 Members 638 East Third Street PHI DELT THET Among Phi Delta Theta's social functions this year were the Christmas and Spring formals, a "l920's" party and a "High Noon" party. Representing Phi Delt's on campus were Sophos Tim Tomko, Ted Wiersema, Mike Beck and Joe Kranhold. Chain Gang chose John Carroll as secre- tary. Other members of Chain Gang were Bob King, Dave Martyn and John Dunlop. Blue Key claimed Bill Margolf, Pete Johnson and Secretary John Wilbur. Pete Johnson, Bill Margolf, Tim Tomko, Ted Wiersema, Mike Beck, Joe Kranhold, Dave Martyn, Bob King, Bill Brierley, Dusty Miller, John Dunlop, 4- , e in at 9. 1:71 ' k v .. , E.-v - i John Carroll, John Wilbur and Dave Johns were all chosen by Traditions Committee. John Wilbur was honored in "Who's Who." Vice-president of Delta Sigma Rho was Stan Lerch. John Murphy and Dennis DeConcini were also members of the speech honorary. Theta Tau, engi- neering honorary, selected Bill Brierley, Joe Magee and Pat Bowman. Stan Lerch supervised rush pro- ceedings for Interfraternity Council. Rodeo Boss Mickey McCarty presided over the National Inter- collegiate Rodeo. Phi Delta Theta ofhcers were Stan Lerch, presi- dentg Carl Lock, vice-presidentg Tim Tomko, secre- tary and Dan Heineman, house manager. Dave Martyn .- fe. James McCIeary " . Bruce McDoniel xl- ,A ,-'. 1 - Dick Michela 4 f r , - ' John Moore 'T ' Richard Mower . ,D i H '- ' H F' i I2 ,ll 'J i 5 4 ' 'J 1 l . ' ' is ' ' - Ben Miller lp 3' l mga' l -are I g Ai . ' ld . V ,L ,J l . . i I, l . ,, , I . K l X rm 1 i Z , p t p i p, ,t p p. t vb '- . ., 1 .P , John Murphy . , ' - Mike Murphy ' Ed Nelson L , "- l x Larry O'I-larra z - k' - 5 T 1 - Tom Pinkstaff ix . . " ' ' , Edwin Pogue Y ,' is , H Y qi. 1 . V Fred Roberts "il ' ali" , Fred Rosenfeld K I ., , i H . laik 5-mf . t S ,il 'i -- ' ,.', -' .L :.:,XL -3' - - .sf .,.-.ai . . 3 ' Ron Rumney -'ji ' .l - - Andy Ryan ' T - - L, , Ted Sitterly f- ' "1 :N ii' .- - i Jack Smallhouse , ' , '- . " 3 ' , Bob Smith x .X '77 Solomon Smith f - 1 ' Mike Stone ' ' ' V I. Tim Tomko Jack Tribolet A . Tom Tribolet F -' A Ron Walker - , - Ted Wiersema i ' -' John C. Wilbur Q ., Lee Woods .4 ' Q f. T. Ed Woods - Bob Yount P g fl. it it V' Bill Alexander Gordon Alley Dustin Allred Bob Angell Alvin Baber Dick Banton Larry Barnhill Bill Bell Bob Berquist Dirk Broekema Hank Brubaker Brian Bulley Lee Burton Larry Cali Lee Clark Charles Cook Paul Corkery J on Counts Bill Cox George Crandall Tommy Crowe Maynard Davenport Charles Davis Frank Day Gordon Dickey Dick Dicus Robert Diehl Tom Ecker Vernon Ellis Dave Engelman William Fisher Mike Flournoy Dick Fox Boyd Gibbons Ronald Harper Tom Harris Dave Heckler Ralph Heffelman Dave Henrich David Hill Harvard Hill Jim Hill Mike Hoffman Ken Holbrook Jim Holish Richard Hubbard Bob Humphrey Tom Iles John Ingersoll Dave Johns Carl Johnson Chris Johnson Torn Kennedy Milt Laflen William Larson William Lay James Lazansky Jerry Lewis Johnny Marietti Danny Mariscal Bucky Maud George McLain Bill McLain Hamilton McRae Bill Milam Ralph Miller Ron Minson Mike Monsegur Brent Moody Tom Moore l gf I LN lv l , ,f , -EQ r if ,V J, ly 'J I' Ii 'UA 1 I ii li, 2 i t :vi nllr N Il Y .R-"Ii ,sues N , ri X! V-,L f l' J Avi M' 'nli y A, , A E 4 l 'i il J V ' it ' p gl if "' 'S ' ggi ig 1 W I ur V I, , . V i' lx , s aa u :I B. ' sa, , J,:,,. if.. --in ,. i. ,ps ' Y i if xfi 4 1 I! 'Nu .4 V"'4 V ' J' ik ., P l M 1 V lf, 1 ' 1 giiaf I ,Q -.Y I Q I' Q f'lm"!A Aylv - Q y ,J i KJ' I .N if J .' l f lli ' A lgg ZA 1 FAQ V I it C ii 'ls ' y , , ji G Y ,vvu y y, li ' K aa L lA . J it J lm' 7" A , 7' 3. 'i is -gg i J 1 1 J 'J ly f" "if Q J J , I d i H X '-2 .gh A I 1 D 3 PP' Dx X ' . - ' ' 1 ' J ,g -.A J J rs. A z ip tha liana J R a f' y 'gi y 1 J Q- i , A V , . -9 ' : ' -fi-V i F ' X ' W an 6+ Kel! Q . L. . ' . J ,A ff 1 ggi B H , if f: t i- 1 ' li J ii L f rf rf ,Q-'S i l - J - -AJ, J ,Jw J or ,iJJ 5 VJ l 306 ashmgton and Jefferson Upsilon Alpha Chapter 1848 ff A 1921 P 81 Chapters 104 Members A ..:. ,V LX, X A --XX XXX -Y-V ,,.' -.,:, .4f,..rL ,J 1 ' 1 - - A . .' ,,-,vip - , . 1 ,, . pq-A-ae 53- Xv FX: .. PHI GAMM DELT Last year the University s Upsilon Alpha chapter of Phi Gamma Delta won the Chiney Cup for the outstanding chapter in Fijiland. They collected tro- phies for winning the Tucson-Tempe bicycle race and beauty division prize at the Homecoming Parade. Sophos selected Ed Morgan secretary-treasurer Gordon Alley Tom Harris Dave Heckler John Marictti Ed Muns Jim Templin and Bill Whitler. Chain Gang members included President Larry Barn- hill Bob Berquist Dick Dicus Dave Engelman Mike Flournoy and Tom Kennedy. Bobcats claimed Bill Alexander president of Delta Sigma Pi Al Baber Mike Hoffman and Alan Polley. Harward Hill Bill Larson Bucky Maud and Ralph Miller were in Blue Key while Traditions men were Bill Alexander presi- dent Nolan Davis Jim Templin Gordon Alley Ed Muns Al Baber Larry Barnhill Bob Berquist X v '- ' QC' ,1 .1 V - -' ,BL ' . ' George Crandall Ron Harper Boyd Gibbons, Harv Hill Tom Kennedy Bucky Maud John Mulchay, Dick Thompson Dick Dicus and Mike Flournoy. Among Fiji-s in varsity sports were Bob Hum- phrey and Alan Polley football' Jerry Lewis and Dick Nixon baseball and Ed Nymeyer basketball. Leading the Phi Gams was president Mike Hoff- man. His oiiicers were Tommy Crowe house man- ager- Dick Hubbard .corresponding secretaryg Har- vard Hill recording secretary and Bill Alexander, historian. X qpp. -iXXXX,V XX , X XV X X lp i l X X p p X 1801 East First Street 1 1 9 9 if J X XXX I I al ik Xu X 1 Y 3 1 1 ! X l . 5 Q N l X X X1 1X T A X XX X Xa X jf XXX ,Li-5 X X A X F X X as- .Q l A. X 'tx FX ,XL -R A Y 'QX 3 ' Wg 1 '41 fi' ' rig L, N i 'I I 8 4' l 1 l Xf' 5 l , -,, i X h s V e 4 , M I 3' it i 7 5' 1 Y 1 J XA 4 - - X l ' Q i i T 1 J D1 'HX 5' ? LX x X iii Hifi WX i X iq W Y X 'XIX' X " rr 1' I I i A - 4 l H X XX X , X: . X , XXl 1 X lux -X X! XX, in X Xl X :X 1. 2 pa L ' .XXXX ll 1 , X, 2 X 'XX- .5 XX A - .X X4 X .X X X XV , X . , Q L XXXX - XAXXX. XE V ' Q :ji L 3 A , A I V . fre' I I- AX P1 " 1 . W-P - V XX- XX flu' X' I XX r XX , ' .. .l-X x -V Q V X' ' '-X 'X fvr X ig 'f I ' X XLM 5: wa ' , X4 X ' X X X . X . A .. X . , -V :X YV,L,v 151 . X XT' f 1 X , ,X L.. XXSX X .4 XX" X HX: XXXX ,X .F X,X,1 'Fa' -X XX X X AXX kX X we it V J is i J N 'rw 4 . f f 1 '. Xa i X X' P ' Y ly X V A I . l ,p up X XX X l RA 'I , -, i - , V l ' X Xu X V' 5- ' 'VX :X i ' K " X. ' ,. -FY 307 , Martin Moran Ed Morgan John Mulchay , Ed Muns P P Terry Muse Nick Nichols Dick Nixon Jim Norris Ed Nymeyer Kent Orchard Bill Polson Dick Procter Bon- Richardson Fred Roberson Bob Schermerhom Herb Shear Damon Shelbume Tom Swanson I im Templin Dick Thompson Bill Tollefson Doug Unruh Ken Uvodich Bill Wheeler Chuck Whitaker Lloyd Wiborg Walter Wilson L. -e,,e,L,,,- C ,ml i . l y l l . - l ww..-. ar.-..,v. - . f -' i - . "Wi . . L .' 5 4, - .. - Y fs- il Y f -,,' H - tg.--igzfix., -Y . K 4 , v '--0...-.::r.f T..-Y,, --I V-V," ' V-In " . - 1 54- - -rw-,p A . h A M r -. V' ., M., ,,,, ,L L , , ,, , V Y Y V . . V 1 Q. , 1177 East Lester Street I , ,gli I3 Brown University Alpha Iota Chapter 1889 1951 36 Chapters 37 Members HI K PPA VULLEYBALL players Ralph Rio, .lim Sawyer, Bill Heying, Joe Zimmer- man and Jack Taney play on court rigged up in Phi Kappa back yard. Formal dances during the Christmas holidays and the spring highlighted the social activities of the Phi Kappas. Reigning over the Christmas formal, held at the Arizona lnn, was Cecile Aguirre. The fratern- ity also sponsored the annual Hobo Hop, a St. Pat- rick's Day party and a "Get Killed Dayi' party to which the entire chapter went "western". Completing the fraternity's slate of activities for the year were a Found:-:r's Day dinner and their Spring Sing entry of 'The Halls of Ivy". In the spring, members traveled to California to hold the annual exchange with Loyola University's chapter of Phi Kappa. Highlighting the day were athletic events and a party. Phi Kap's Hank Mollner belonged to Blue Key and served as vice president of Kappa Psi. Traditions Committee member was Larry Leahy, who also be- longed to Pershing Rifles and Univets. Joe Zimmer- man was in Sophos and on the Artist Series Commit- tee. Secretary of IFC was Hank Mollner and IFPC treasurer was Ted Emory. Theta Tau selected J im Eidel, and Joe Domler was chosen to Alpha Rho Tau. Serving Phi Kappa as president was Hank Moll- ner. He was assisted by Phil Bleser, vice presidentg Jack Taney, treasurerg Joe Ferstl, recording secretary and Joe Zimmerman, corresponding secretary. gill Axrchuleta ' ' 5 n B5i.Bi53i ' g ete, p ., A f Qs 1 my .1 . 1 r giiiiiifm xg .A.f 1 ' A diff? 'i" li.'-Pl ' i l P ' ' ' Charles Cleland dj ' ' Vi v Q ,fy 1 "'y "Qc pg A' , 3 I ' 'I V 308 " 1 FEEDING their pet kilten a dish of milk Phi Kaps Doug Draper Bill Bigler and Mike Card watch as it licks the fi last drop in the bowl. ' ' J 1'3" 1 Q-A A l A X i ff' J L .ard I N--w - J Joseph Codomo Angie D Agostino Joe Domler Doug Draper Jim Eidel Ted Emory Dick Evans Joe Ferstl Dick Finn Peter Forrest Phil Girard William Graham J. J. ill Holly Holovachkt Dennis Jauch Larry Leahy Don Lord James Maccani Don Michonski Hank Mollner David Mount Ralph Rio Bob Robinson Richard Sainz Fred Sawata Jim Sawyer Len Scholl C , li 'P' ' 'X h ' . , . J " HH X ' J i X f ' I ,, l 1 ,Q V 1 I1 . J !. 7 ' il! 'I .,, 4. in ri , i X X Qs' 2 f W A V P M ,2 i gba ty' I X X ' X N i ap- 'V J X 1 ' i J. , R R J i 1 ' s fn W ri 1 i X I i s hh . i A il " i 71,315 i. J X N 1' , iq. ' M A - I J Eg' lx li ,, I ,K i Wlllizirln Heymg l ' i A TA in i i .,, i i lu J A i f i ' i 1 B :R , is iff' swim . ll 5- fl r I 1-an lp if K ti-Y ' 1 'J X Q X as ' i - i J s , : ei l All W -l ' i W -'vp 1 X -I ' X R Q! fn Q, V 'val i 1 X, H lg 4 ' l iv ' -are 'I w 4 I x f I ! I4 3 " 1 y -1 ,i 309 Jack Shroll Jack Taney Larry Thomas Bob Wakeman Bill Wallauer Herman Youngling Joe Zimmerman Chuck Cagle Boyd Carpenter Herb Dimler Doug Dunnipace ,i William Estes Peter Filiatrault Bill Fraser George Hamzik James Helder Al Hesselberg Clifford Holtz .-,P Philip Leabo PPW- Gordon McHood Ron Mercer James Mueller Bill Nelson Edwin Walker Jack E. White . . e at P -fri if- .-' Diff- .5 if A W' 1.5. 9 p H .1 it I rf in X iii' fi ' ii: I -"5 :fir 7 4' ' i " ' 'li -:Qi jil ,Q H' "', l -W bl. -J -H n 1 i R-if gag. it . "' f 1. X i as .V 4 w 5 , ll 4 A - ' "1:iL.,,. H A P it l J .1 J x x .. . DK sh LQ. l ,- ip Q s .1 ' i ' T Lil 'A H I ei Q. . . Af: H .. lk . -- Q1 tiff' gg' i . , fl ' i 'i QL. 2 ' in-mi i ' if N ln- -1 .L . V B R ' H ' ' ' xv Q " '1 t 1 A 1 -1-J, i-'l , ',. . i t. . gi-ff if ' . . . , .i , .al li 1 PI K PPA ALPH Social life of the Pi Kappa A1pha's rotated around frequent exchanges and formal parties. Highlights of the year included a pledge-active party, a Christmas formal held at the Sands Hotel and the Spring Dream Girl Formal. On campus, Jim Helder and Cliff Holtz were af- filiated with Alpha Kappa Psi. Kappa Kappa Psi claimed Jim Mueller, while Ron Mercer was in Delta Sigma Pi. Doug Dunipace held membership in the freshman scholastic honorary. President of Pi Kappa Alpha was Bill Fraser. His officers were Herle Ender, vice-presidentg Cliff Holtz, secretary and Bill Estes, treasurer. 1065 North Mountain Avenue . 1 in 7 fi C, University of Virginia Gamma Delta Chapter I 868 1924 109 Chapters 24 Members isfp . ' V- Q ii MIDNIGHT snackers Jack White, Bill Estes and Cliff find the shelves full of appetite-appeasers. 310 . W .-1' -,Q all incoming mail at chapter house is a daily task 631 East Second Street by Jim Lloyd, Dave Hoagland and Bert Crandall. PI K PPA PHI Last fall Pi Kappa Phi's contribution to the Home- coming parade was a trojan horse with the inscription, "Tech Will Fall Like Troy." After-game dances, exchanges, the annual Snow Ball party at Mt. Lemmon, the costume party and the Rose Ball formal were among Pi Kap social func- tions this year. Representing Pi Kappa on campus were Mumford Graham in Alpha Delta Sigma and Jim Lloyd, Dick Twito and Reg Brooks in Phi Mu Alpha. Reg Brooks and Dick Twito also belonged to Kappa Kappa Psi. exe .' 'ta v" . lima' College of Charleston M. Beta Theta Chapter 1904 1951 51 Chapters 25 Members Scabbard and Blade members were Dean Wilson and Preston Harrington. J LN N Ofiicers of Pi Kappa Phi were Charley DeLew, 'r , president, James Lloyd, secretary and Preston Har- L 1 y' 1 rington, treasurer. ' , " I X 1 . I A .,4, ' ' it vu 1 A up ', ,f l 'gp if l ga 4 p 5 p , ,Va . : e . -cee i - ff has tha n - rf.. fi He? rg? 11 4 P P Larry Anderson Bill Briscoe Robert Brooke Robert O. Brown Bert Crandall Allan Dunbar John Fahr Jack Gaines Tate Greenway David Hively Dave Hoagland Fred Hoskins Bob Jones Ray A. Jones Bill Klaus John Lamb Jim Leary James Lloyd Wayne Lovett Jan Reynolds Dennis Roberts George Sypher Richard Twito Art Vance Dean Wilson b Frank Armstrong Tony Baldwin Nick Balich Dick Berg Jim Berry Larry Betts Morris Blumenthal Bill Brotherton f Todd Chilton Bob Clements John H. Coffman Ed Coyle Gary Cropper Jerry Cullison Johnny Davidson Gene DeCet f Dwayne Dobson LeRoy Donnally Walter Ekstrom Matt Encinas Bill Farrell John Flanders William Fox Bill Fuchlow , Gene Gallegos Gordon P. Grover Edmund Harris Jim Hawk Mickey Henderson William Herrington Gene Holmes Lynn Hornbrook , Allan Hudson Herman Hudson Ralph Hunsaker J. Wesley Johnston Frank Jordan Sandy Kerr Pete Kerwin Thomas Kimble , Glenn King, Jr. Ford Knowles Dave Lewis Jay Lowry Dan Malone Bart Marshall Bill Mast Jim Mast COLOR TELEVISION program captures the interest of Sig Alphs Frank Armstrong, Jay Lowry, Pat Shelly, Dan Malone. g gi? '. gg, 1,,, rl ' , ' f -V ' , J' 'Sz . . J so .LA fu. 1 V 'fi ., t I V Y - :V i , I ,',, I V lf M 'A V ' -V I l lx -in V W X V - QA 4 . ll , fx . ...J as if J t it 1 A. J al . rflfp ,dn A ' -A .. ' . in -,, ef .t'1i:5'f Q fp f in u4, 1 J ll I J , . W xm l W 'Axis -'li R. , . ,.. f , ii L- li F Q Q1 f rr. I 1, ,l .lf ,i 1 .g 5. ,fb .1-A if-L . J ' J . r'i' , Q . x E V! V g f' B f n " -i X 312 N .fl ., -.ar 2 'A 1 X 1' ' 01 .i v 'f University ofAlabc1ma Ariz0I1f1 Alpha Chapter 1856- 1917 , 136 Chapters 89 Members 1509 East Second Street SIGMA ALPH EPSILO Sig Alphs were well represented in campus activi ties this year Dave Dunbar Frank Jordan Gus Barry Jim Rogers Dick Anderson and Ford Knowles were members of Sophos while Chain Gang claimed Jay Lowry Ralph I-lunsaker Mickey Henderson and B111 Seginskl Bobcats included Warren Ridge stu dent body vice president Pat Shelly Tag Merritt Lauro Soares and Lynn Hornbrook Lynn Semor Class president and Greek Week chairman was also a member of Blue Key Gene DeCet served as Social Life Committee chairman Arnold Air Society chose Warren Ridge Ralph Hunsaker and Gary Cropper while Pat Shelly Tag Merritt Lynn Hornbrook Joe Lumpkin Charles Moore Mike Pollock and Dan Harshiield were active in Scabbard and Blade Gene DeCet Lynn Horn- brook Warren Ridge and Pat Shelly were selected to Whos Who SAES were also outstanding in varsity football with Ralph Hunsaker Gary Cropper and Nick Balich. Warren Ridge and Mike Schleibaum played basket- ball while Mat Enc1nas Bill Farrell Gary Bouton and Mike Seheibaum circled the baseball diamond. Swimmers were Milt Pettit Bud Wakeheld and John Lawrence while Tag Merritt and Vernon Nichols were on the golf team Socially SAE held their annual Luau Christmas Formal Pajama Party Spring Formal and the 49 er E55 h wus M dm i, ap B Bob Mclnerney Jim McLeod Bob McMillan James Miller Bob Mitten Charles Moore Pete Neumann Dave Peterson Milt Pettit Mike Pollock Dennis Richmond Warren Ridge Ronnie Ross Charlie Runsvold Berry Rutledge Paul Sale Mike Schleibaum John J. Seginski Lauro Soares Tim Sullivan Tom Terry Mike Thompson Bob Williams y C S , . , . . . . - . I , y . S . . . 1 I , . , . . , . q 7 ' 3 ' 1 ' C J . I 7 Y Y Y 7 7 ' f . - p '-V. I " .- EE' , ' 4. 'eilgv' .r' E BS Q , A ' N. A t L A . ' 'yy ' ' 'll l A W: "'- ' V V , . " .fn 'W-e 7 v , l GN: V - J M T! TA: as 4 ., 4 I -A ' ' F- .1 - . ,- ., . 7 ,F l . , l ' . "- l W l fr . 1 . A a l ft l ' " fl 1 , V 'ev ' i f , 5 ' . J x A L wi mn f J J 4, y I 1 ul, J- ' .' , A ,Lf P . 1-.ij . Q r 1 ,s .N --J ' il.. . l 1 J Q f if X, , . .,. , Z? a J' V gif 1 , l H ' ,i J X l X V 7 N1 h ,A f. l I n I, . p, A J tl an ta 1 5 7 ' . ,Qc 1 rf' Q F 1510 East First Street S I G M A Beta Phi of Sigma Chi was represented on campus by Jack Redhair elected 1957-1958 ASUA president' Jim Wilkes Junior Class president and Jim Fox president of the Freshman Class. Sigma Chi Sophos were Lynn Wallace Dan Zion Jon Standlee Mike Longo Alen Hall and Jim Howell who served as the honorary s president. Chain Gang claimed both Jim Wilkes and John Colyer' Blue Key chose Bill Lynch and Busch Clark' Jack Redhair was elected as a member of Bobcats. At their annual Christmas formal, the Sigma Chi s crowned their sweetheart, Arline Postillion. The chapter house, masked by tropical decorations, was the site of the South Sea Islander. Phi Delta Theta joined the Sigs for the formal Triad Dance in April. Art Andresen Mike Baum , 1. A 1 Richard Beck Y F K 'N' i Joe Bognanno W." - A xi, , . -Q ,J , ' l I Bill Carson V. g g , Busch Clark ' -' 3 I John Colyer - f i - I . rr X ' f .4 - Q, A V ,, . . ... n..,-... Jim Corbet Leo Corbet "" -- :K X Robert Dempster -' 1 - ,. 4. 'Q .5 ' A X 3 X George Ekdahl 'I " . 5 Lloyd Elsberry . .f . .E - J im Fox . , - Butch Ehlert . J I. G, , 31-, I if ,J Nd John Franklin Bob Geist chuck Giles ' g' ' Joe Gunter H ' Ross Hadden - Terry Ginsburg ' in 1 N . . , , 'M i A y rw Dan Hale H .L !' iqiiiii'-fix, 1 J 314 I -, ... .. t Q . K X 1 Zh' ' 4 in 'V X I A tb in W P Miami University ' Beta Phi Chapter 1855 1921 130 Chapters 93 Members CHI Active in varsity sports the Sigma Chis had members in all major activities. Playing varsity foot- ball were Jack Redhair Joe Bognanno Jim Geist Dan Zion Norman Romero. and Lionel Romero. Lynn Wallace Al Hall Bob Wilson Jim Ward Jim McConnel Jim Geist John Colyer Mike Longo and Jerry Robinson were on the baseball squad. Basket- ball players representing the fraternity were Bob Mueller and Earl Lubbers while Ed Mendelson ran for the track team. The Sigs took first place in intra- mural basketball. Leo Corbet served as president. His oflicers were Jim Wilkes, vice-president and Dick Pesqueira and Todd Lawrence, secretaries. ., . . . A . . i v i 1 E w,-,. - V - Yi ..:-57, ' i ,n i I . ' I r r I u , ff :Q flii.-iff-"' i AL Q I 6 KEEPING in form for intermural com- petition Jim Wilkes Jim Howell Jack OBrien and Dick Pesqueira play a sporting game of basketball. uww' " ' - e l J l i J c all L" L 'I . 4, V N 1 I 48' 9. 5 Alan Hall Don Hardy Dennis Harman Ronald Hold James Howell Gary Johnson Bob Kenyon Leslie Long Bill Lynch Dennis Lyon Buck Markley Robert McCurd Y Rod McDougall Mike Moore Bob Mueller Paul Muscenti Jack O Brien Dick Pesqueira Jack Redhair Lionel Romero Richard Rosebrock Ted Ryden Jim Seal Larry Seal Mike Seiler w 1 y v 1 I A r , ' .1 I I Q gy W , A 9 4 j x Af gl r 2 1' i , N f l 1 ' ' 1 I W 1 I 5 1 Y ' .Iii i f 'I fp i '11 ,gif Lil Z 11 Qollfjg '1 '-N gg , - ,R 1. P "' A'e:5 N Q K X' , , - l 1 if: 9 if Ig X ' A '91 N Ray Maurer l . . W" i , l l , ,-, , b. , 1 I l I Q l .1 U Ill I , ll A x d 1- Q ' E A K, E f , i i i X ' Y, l it , V' i l gg eq f S V -" l , i K lu ' Az'-' Q4 I JJ J 4 in iii-1 y P Q M K Fi 4 6 " ff 4-'e-' , 1 L Af 4. 2 1- 1 7 'B " Jw: QI' I 1: J: t l 1,7 A' ' hi l I L " A X i I L .'.'i ff 1 R . ' . . ,N J by .,, P H .V J , 5- 1 I ' lql, ' . W 5 ' J i..4igQ iii. my A , r h. in Y ive ! 6 315 Dave Sherer Pete Smiley Jack Snyder Ron Spicer David Stowe Dick Tigner Chuck Wagner Pat Whooley Jim Wilkes Jim Wilson Robert Wilson Dick Wolf Rod Wood Daniel Zion Andy Anderson Ben Andre Ivan Barkdoll Walter Blocher Len von Blottmtz Henry Bollweg Gary Bruce Phillip Broman Frank Brooks Pete Brown Ted Buford Andy C trtel Thomas Chandler Stephen Chubbuck Michael Clark Terry Clark Jerry Cole Maurice Collins Lester Conlrsk Tim Cote Robert Douglas Frank Fish Donald Getty Sandy Gordon Dick Goreham Jim Hughes Tom Hunt Robert Jones Vincent Kemendo Ken Kenney Orme Lewis Max Livingston Keith M'1ves Alfred Miller Mike Mulholland Jim O Donnell Steve Pogson Samual Polito Bob Preskar Richard Pugh Richard Randolph Larry Ridenour L Haw sa e ialyl .Q-AML. yl 'Q' Wil A LINING UP the Number 10 ball Gary Bruce is watched by fellow pool en thus: :sts Phil Broman and Dick Ward -.J go-ai 1-up ' 3' " W , I .. -. l Nb-K. ' ' - 316 ima Military Institute Epsilon Alpha Chapter 1869 1918 123 Chapters 53 Members SIGMA N The White Rose Formal, held at the Arizona Inn in December, climaxed the social events for Sigma Nu during first semester. Gamma Phi Beta Jane Bri- sack was crowned White Rose Queen at the annual affair. ln the spring, Sigma Nu's held their two costume dances, the "Prohibition Party" and the "Beachcomber." Steve Pogson and Max Livingston were members of Traditions Committee. Steve Pogson also belonged to Chain Gang and Delta Sigma Rho, speech honorary. Scabbard and Blade chose Max Livingston, who was mf . ta' iw- +3 e 'NNN .., Qi- F? 3 , 1023 North Tyndall Avenue also elected president of Alpha Phi Omega, service honorary. Bill Collins represented his fraternity in Tau Beta Pi, engineering honorary, and the math honorary. Pi Mu Epsilon. Orme Lewis was a member of Alpha Kappa Psi, business honorary. Engineer's Council elected Harry Barkdoll, while Sandy Gordon served as Interfraternity Pledge Council secretary. Presiding officer of Sigma Nu was Steve Pogson. Phil Broman assisted him as vice-president. Max Liv- ingston served as recorder and Dick Selover was elected treasurer. A Al Rubin A Ron Russell i, ., 4 J ' SQ I John Sands, Jr. i W- t 1' -3 Q I , T 5 ' 1 if 1 ' -' ,' A, i5?7'f'f-ffz. 5. V .,- Eb. G. Schmitt i 3 1 I 3 A 4 '- b 'Michael Sherman lb X P A- t- 1 , E Gary Skaggs E L N ' ff . - -it X- - f . X N Y ' X ., 0 ' K Edward Smith Y Q , PM 5 Julius Smith ' 1 X zz R. Daniel Tripp X V . X t A-ss A TX ' i, l ,' : me T it V' j Richard Ward -- 'i . E Bill Willigrod ' X 2: ' ' Don Zachau wp., .- -3 , ,f - it l l t I-49 lt , . i ' 'vt 9'1" . ' l I 4' 1 ll t LEANING gameroom for a party are Sigma Nu's George Pobworth, ' 'tae I. t 'I ussell Possis, Russ Cushman. Sam Beecher and Wess Brookfield. - -JM! LJ' - ' 317 ll!! 1614 East First Street Prong rg, Richmond College Beta Chapter .1901 1954 141 Chapters 33 Members IGMA PHI EPSILO Entering the "Paint Fort Fuzzy Contest" in the fall, Sigma Phi Epsilon artists placed first with their painting of "Lot X Expanded to the Moon Sig Eps celebrated the puletide season by crown ing Alpha Phi Toni Szabo queen of their annual Diamond Princess Formal. In the spring, the fra ternity entertained at the Queen of Hearts formal Reigning as queen over the dance was Carol Ann Smith. Their social calendar included a Cave Party held at the house, open houses on Mom and Dad's Day and Homecoming and numerous picnic exchanges Affiliated with AIME were Ben Sims and Cal Richardson who was also a Phelps Dodge Scholar Norm Takvam was active in ASME Greg Seguin was president of the Insurance Club and Jerry Bange was secretary of Alpha Kappa Psi Kappa Psi claimed Daryl Smith Vice president of the newly organized Chess Club was Jim Massoglia while Bud Zuber was a member of the Sports Car Club Social chairman of IFPC was Dave Fiscus who also served on the Sophomore Council Sigma Phi Epsilon was led this year by C O Tinsley president His officers were Greg Seguin vice president and Jim Riley secretary Dick Basye Jerry Bange Paul Chuppa Charles A. Davis Ronald Dewey Robert Edwards Dave Fiscus Jim Fugate Tom Haney Bill Macintosh John Maier Jim Massoglia Mike Nickison Tom Pyle Cal Richardson Jim Riley Kenneth Rocker Gregory J. Seguin Daryl Smith Don Smith Bill Switzer Norm Takvam Carlos Tinsley Lamar Vaughn James Waite Bud Zuber -M E E - 4,1 if at aa a 318 awk I ' A i gf , i , 2 si' 1 1.5 iijiii 1 .fm . 5' Ji 'N ' 'Sq vii 'VI 'QXIUI pb 'pi M ji Y,fg iii., .. .i it 1 f 1 - rtrr P 1 . P 1 -J . 1 I J r-r-' 1- i , zftzr C 1 1 44 'L - . t ' Sf-uf "" ,J "1 U' 'm . r r -,Tm I H ' ,ff - , 7, E 1 'QQ , 1 f fp ' H' aff, ., Q 1 ii 1 ii il 'ai 1' '13 i HHMMMQ '7 W ai aL!Wf'WfEil3'fh' ffiibjiyiwiiiii , , , fn Y -1 H 1 I ks ' I as 1. W 5 . -Q Q. - ' Q' .EQ ., W 'I' -1,-- -, - gi W fqgfl l f 1 r-1.1 y "ji-f.g,,-J Q v ., . , ' -l .lf ' - 1? r ' ,V 1 ' ', . ' ' in f e or 5 .le " -ur, i -V ' '-U-" 'L' A Ar 'J- ' A 1 A il 1 i is J. if 1 2 'S sf 1 u" Axrlv 'as ti.- ty College of New York V' Tau Delta Chapter 1910 1949 35 Chapters 38 Members UD Highlighting Tau Delta Phi's year was their an- nual Snow Party at Mount Lemmon. Reigning as queen over the dance was Joyce Bloch. Other social functions for the fraternity were a Bohemian Mas- querade party, a pledge-active party, an awards ban- quet and their spring formal which was held at the Canadian Lobster l-louse. Tau Delts active on campus were Jack Tannen- baum and Leon Thikoll who held membership on Traditions Committee and in Sophos. Leon Thikoll was also a member of the Artist Series Committee i . S' ' 4-'Q -- Af- gf. I K 5:-iff? "" 1 f 0 Y. '-15' ' . . E , lit iq fi ' , g aa, 'h :fig-i i Q " WEB- rig - Y.ifA"4f-4-4 Swv 1 1 it 1 alt it 1 . 1 Y V, 5 7' H 'A' ' . E PEQA' ' I 1 ' ' ' ' - 1 . El r 1 14 ...Q 1 , 1 I L ' '1 , ' , 1104 East Seventh Street and served as sophomore representative on the BPA Council. Aiiiliated with Beta Beta Beta were Gene Murgolu and Shelton Epstein, while Gilbert Saltzman and Ervin Yavelberg were in Tau Beta Pi. Representing the Tau Delts in sports was Barry Edberg, who was second man on the tennis team. Otlicers of Tau Delt were Gary Yontif, presidentg Alfred Hernandez, vice-presidentg Howard Bernstein, pledge trainerg Dave Feder, treasurerg Doug Halpern, secretary and Jack Tannenbaum, house manager. h i N I vi ilui M 'l y -N . "iff fffs f X7 . - 7 H ir i 'S 1 H 4 l, E . I W 9 1 1 1 W' 1 - -- "Nui I, I 1 I ' - X l 1 4 1 ' ' .1 ' -v+x'i"v- i S ' . w e 1 - 1 I- , ,ra F.. r 1 1 1 . 1 Q V. - lt . . , 1 . Q52 ' is A1 if , -,gf 'O 1, ' Au 51. i , C i 'c' , A l 1. ,J 1 I 9 1 1 ' v- . ' . , i ' ' :ul , 't V Q' X J T"- ,5"" -. id 1 1 H 5 ? l i . i i N 4 i X U i ' if l 'i I ' i ' .. 1 l Q ,-N , 1' . . , . fp- ,. , rf , Y 4 A W t .,., we .I If v 1 ' ,1 A .1 '- Wv 1 1 r ' 5 1 Y 1 ' VA' 'V ll --. ' - X, -- lv , K , ' 41 1 ire., , . A -a 1. .. ,X M-.ffz-, 1 . 1- , 1111 1 1 i:L.,11,-,air 1.1.11 M ,J 1 1 , , M. E. Bendalin , Dave Burns Victor Cohen Stan Comfield 'yi 1 ik, David Dubin Barry Edberg Morton Edberg David Feder Steve Flaxman Bob Goldsmith Michael Gordon Mike Gusinow . . V' 1 fi at 1 9, i . -1 A ' W A UM, A vp G. i y . ,N .1 .Q i M. Qt i." , "I A - .W qi K 4 ,,.:. fra l 1, I V w X six Ai 1.1 K P? . V, f lv 1 11 1 ti fmt. 1. .,, t , ii 'B ' 1 4 ii K i 'N 5 Hapax-' .Ag 151.1-A 4 :1-- -- 319 fliii. IW, -- Doug Halpern Hirsch Handmaker Alfred Hernandez Gene Karp Bob Katzke Elliot Kenick Jerry Lederer Gary Lemel , Eugene Margolis Stan Podolsky Stanley Reinhaus Stu Rabinowitz Joel Rosenstein Murray Rogow Ray Sabransky Sydney Salmon L Gil saitzman George Serbin Jack Tannenbaum Leon Thikoll Harmon Wiener Dennis Weisbart Hank Winawer Irv Yavelberg 'fa 55? iff... Ron Barnet Barry Belman Vaughn Binzer James Block Ed Brody John Cline David Cohen Henry Coleman Sandy Danziger Steve Effron Roberto Elfant Peter Elkus Bruce Felber Stan Gardner Bob Goldfarb Howard Goldwyn Martin Halpern Richard Keene Ken Koenig Eugene Lassers Harvey Maslin Ira Mishkind Irwin Mordka Bernie Oppenheim Howard Polk Robert Posner Lawrence Pozil Dave Rabenowitz Gerald Rakita Larry Robbins Sid Rosen Sanford Roth Eugene Rowe Lou Schaeffer David Schreiber V- . W. 1: , . i 1 in' .. , -i C A "' fi ' 1 f vxfma V 320 I ., ef Xl 1 1 V 1 l ,. .1' , i i . X G. ' V3 3 v H H - e it - . 4 ' -'jiri "L Q ,Q N ,ij ' I' I ., a .' X I X I , , , i nitag' M, ,ki X F l l' sq' ji . If If i L MV 1 . i. - ' 'l il Q i . -V - , r . X 1 l ' -,I 5 ' 'ini TAKING OVER kitchen chores for an eve- ning. amateur chefs Dave Rabenowitz Ira Mishkind and Sid Rosen demon- strate culinary talents by making tacos 2 H w York University Alpha Omicron Chapter 1898 1926 48 Chapters 49 Members 1, ' 4 5, gl ,i , 75 HK., il 9 , 9 V- str 1 0 , M . Y..--ff O' .,1,,f ZET BET T U Zeta Beta Tau had many members active on cam- pus. On Traditions Committee were Dan Shafton, Robert Posner, Ronald Barnet, David Schreiber, Steve Effron, Ken Koenig, Herb Silverman, Hank Coleman, Vaughn Binzer, Jim Block, Bob Goldfarb, Marty Halpern and Howard Goldwyn, secretary of the com- mittee. Dave Schreiber represented ZBT on the Junior Class Council and IFC. ASUA Assemblies Committee was headed by Dan Shafton. Inter-Fraternity Pledge Council elected Sid Rosen as president. Sophos claimed Bob Posner, Marty Halpern, Ron- fmlmwtlmmea-fv-nf----- rf 51: from e ,, J. ' ui I ' -.i' - f..k -, l ,MM . L! ng' ' its E " if 'l . -B .A xi' V ,La , YF- ' W. . Uv .7 il'1. '. wh' i- - pry, I ,v l IJ CUNFLICTIUN with two phones, Bruce Felber laughs at il joke as iavid Cohen, Gene Rowe thumb through book for their number. ald Barnet and Dan Shafton, while Dave Schreiber belonged to Chain Gang. Four seniors, Vaughn Binzer and Howard Goldwyn of Bobcats, and Irwin Mordka and Bob Goldfarb of Blue Key, were members of senior honoraries. Bob Goldfarb presided over Blue Key. Social activities included the traditional Snow Party at Mt. Lemmon and the Little Nausau costume dance held at the chapter house. Vaughn Binzer led the ZBT's as president. His oiiicers were Gerald Silvar, vice-presidentg David Schreiber, secretary and Lou Schaeffer, treasurer. Dan Shafton f K 4 .yu Keith Shwayder . 1 i , A Mike Siegal M3 W f- N 1 Gerry Silvar l bl E l . 4 l J J . a , vi 1 X I Z: ' "', J .. 1 L gif!! ' Herb Silverman , . frail' I C H John Spear f- E " f ' 'V Herb.W1llet T-. '- . J- ' fe., Q ,. , ffl ,,-.SQ Bob Yaseen , 'L 'i- L , -nfl 7? - David Yaseen i -A Q an 1 V, , 4 -L 'C - , If Dave Zmder Hg f ' T-f A i i , ' a'g:f1'gH5f'A f A H. I.. Tam i . J , P . ,Ni ,fbi ", vi 'F lg W ' V' -fjf: ' 'f l A ' 5 -1 V, :I . Y f 1 , - 1 Q ' B .l fffsi i if M ,' 7 'V . Qin' I . 1 : V 321 .AH Y . -S-nf yu.. 122 Chapters 25 Members 906 North First Avenue THET CHI Theta Chi began the year with a barbecue at Colossal Cave to honor their new pledges. DG Susan Collins was chosen to reign over the annual Christmas formal held in December. Highlights of the spring included the Circle Bar X western dance and a formal held at the chapter house. Theta Chi s also held frequent parties during the football season exchanges with sororities and picnics Representing Theta Chi in campus honoraries were Bill Droke Kappa Kappa Psi and Beta Beta Beta while Mike Casey was a member of Alpha Delta Sigma AIEE claimed John Dories Leonard Estrada and Fred Jones as members In the athletic department George Young was a two miler on the track team while Mike Casey was on the wrestling team Joe McAdams was a member of the football squad The Sigma Chl Scholarship Cup was awarded to the Theta Chis for attaining the greatest scholastic improvement among campus fraternities During Greek Week the house won the most beautiful chariot contest Leading Theta Chl during the year was B111 Schober president His officers were Mike Casey vice president Bill Droke secretary and Jack Freethy treasurer Norwich University C Beta Iota Cha 1856 1941 Herb Angle Harold Barnes Ralph H. Berry Mike Casey Manny Cervantes Barry Cooper Dixon Cowley William Droke Lionel Estrada Dale Fenter Jack Freethy Al Haraway Rod Jones Ronald Kasulaitis Doug Larsen Joe McAdams Curtice McKa1e Jim Scahall William Schober Giff Tomkins Bill Watson Bill White 'Sf 54" '13 -+-I --.-,f A Q55 G eofge Y oung 4 C i f ' gmt - i C T ., . . . , 7 l ' b I 7 ' I . 1 1 A i Fl ' , -. "" In V ' 'Yv'2:9iZ 4 . V . ' f E ' :z ,I ' 'Eh ' .' i- t i i' ' -' 1' I i ' . - .' ' Q -V . i , .V-1 5 ' '. ' 11 .- - 1+ , ." A " L""'A' 4' " f t f . if is t t 4 f are if t it t if ' T Y' ' i . V 44 " ' gp In ,b f X A YY!! L In if L 1 X 3 X ,X ,f i t X up E a n , . rf 6 6,6 i. up .-M , X , X ., 1 - . V '--. . -K 1 Ll0yd Gieck li 'TQ' :H Ki ' , 'fl3,e,. ' " ' at , 'X Z' 1 i ni' -- F In Z 'X i Q ' lit! I -qli A 'I AfX iz 'U gf' X X rx. A X F Xu ti: I 1 - '- X l 'fri ' ' 9 ri -5 t 1 , tr. ' " -it-D - '-. I A at t T -4 ' Q L 3.-asia. . 1 - 2 K 2 we li fi- 17 Hltfffrrr get , .4 i i 11 1 4 1, i A Q3 , , .: it ' 3, v , A Vg- X -f J' i ,, A X, it X X A X F- ,LJ-.l . Q X 1 tx it X lk X5 v I ,XX I i X gi ' f i . , J X I ft I 'ici X '- ic ' it Q Mui " ,J K E W I ' x I xxx Uma ' immyzsj - ll. Anwar ' Ju Q za v E . if -f! , 'vi n ' i -...JJ 'fi A X244 fl A 5 , DOR ITGRIE 323 f ., J. ,., Walker Mike Wozny. Wallace Green. A newcomer on campus this year, MIKE WOZNY served as president of the first Interdorm Council. He was also active as Representative Council and a member of Newman Club. A junior transfer from Con- necticut, Mike is majoring in elec- trical engineering at UA. X-K at -r V INTERDORM COUNCIL Plans and a constitution were formulated last year for the lnterdormitory Council and it began operating as an official campus organization in Sep- tember. Bi-monthly meetings were attended by one representative from each dormitory and advisors Miss Dorothy Clement, Assistant Dean of Women, and Darold Shutt, Assistant Dean of Men. The Council awards a perpetual scholarship trophy in the spring to the men's and women's halls with the highest grade average during the Hrst semes- ter. Next year the Council will honor the dorm with the greatest scholastic improvement. To give them a voice on campus, the Interdorm Council sent delegates to the Representative Council and the Social Life Committee. Members on the Council encouraged inter-dormitory exchanges and helped the Social Life Committee plan after-game dances in the Student Union and the gym. Interdorm Council was led this year by president Mike Wozny. He was assisted by Della Verdugo, vice-president, Paula Blow, secretary, Wally Greene, treasurer and Carole Anne Theobald, social chairman. INTERDURM COUNCIL: ROW 1: Lily Yee, Dean Clements, Paula Blow, Della Verdugo, Darlene Emery, Allison Howard. ROW 2: Willia ner Robert Allen, Carole Theobald, Sand H 't h P N C ' ' y emovi c , at ardone, Ray Garland. ROW 3. Tony Wong, Paul Edgerton, Dan Zion. l CocoN1No When Coconino Hall was opened for occupancy in l956, it was the hrst new women's dorm to be built in several years. New students, attracted by the dorm's modern decor and its air conditioning, quickly filled up its capacity of 152 residents. At Christmastime the girls wrapped and presented gifts to the Comstock Children's Hospital. An Easter Hat contest was judged by faculty members and prizes were awarded to the girls wearing the most original, the most beautiful and the funniest toppers. A butTet dinner and senior breakfast Hlled up their social calendar. Officers were president, Lily Yee, vice-president, Sylvia Sells, secretary, Kathy Porterg treasurer, Mar- tha Featherstone and social chairman, Dorothy Culver. CUGDNINU: ROW l: Lily Yee, LaDonna Anderson, Raima Roper Sylvia Sells Martha Arm Wendlmg Sandra Adams Louise Alverson Micki Cohen, Judy Clothier, Norma Harrington. ROW 2: Susan Robinson Kitty King Rubi Iatarola Carole Botkm Carole Gay Marlene Sylvaln Phyllis Folkel, Barbara Green, Frances Trumback, Hollie Christy ROW 3 Ka'1y Handorf Kaki Southworth Diane Keelmg Jan Jackson Pat ack, Sheila Hurley, Paddy Tatum, Janice Selleh, Pat Kirkpatrick Virgmii Ellis GILA Gila Hall girls started a new tradition this year by having weekly get-acquainted parties. Two girls from each corridor joined housemother Mrs. Veda Daugherty for tea. The dorm-mates enjoyed a surprise Halloween party and planned an all-dormitory Val- entine party. Spring events included a senior break- fast and a recognition day. Both events were held at Tucson resorts and are annual affairs. During Christmastime the girls sang carols to campus resi- dences and infirmary patients. OH'icers of Gila Hall were Darlene Emery, presi- dentg Betty Tadano, vice president, Kitty Jo Parker, secretary, Gloria Garcia, treasurer and Gladys Mer- rick, social chairman. CROWDING around the desk at closing time, Gila Hall residents anxiously reach for their sign-in cards. ,-v GILA HALL: ROW 1: Pauline McCommas, Helen Nanson, Sally Trainor, Judy McClellan, Janet Matts, Sharon Howard, Gail Whitney Jean Ann Morris, Lynn Cole, Margot Love, Barbie Stelfens. ROW 2: Gertrude Schulze, Betty Harris, Lorna Johnston, Carol Jean Baher Mary Helen Apodaca, Sheila Stalk. Marty Bernatt, Geri Henley, Priscilla Hamilton, Mary Kay Barker, Helen Noreen. ROW 3: Peggy Micke Gladys Merrick, Ruth DeVore, Linda McHenry, Allene Waite, Alice Guinan, Barbara Smith, Sheila Kornfeld. ROW 4: Diane Kunkel Frances Frauenfelder, Corinne Huber. Elizabeth McRae, Darla McRae, Barbara Cason, Judith Nuther, Gloria Garcia, Flora Delgado Gerry Doran Vini Nefsy, Betty Tadano. ROW 5: Marilyn Myser, Linda Patton, Ila Rae Kartchner, Jacque Brown, Mary Ruth Conloy, Joyce Noble Wyla Hardin, Helen Barnes, Mary Jane Burney, Tana Horwitz, Betty Hore. Anne Holmes. if Y- . . -N ANZANITA-MUHAVE: ROW 1: Mary-Helen Macneil, Iona Tillery, Diane Sherman, Lydia Olszewski, Sheila Isaacson, Dorothy Millar, Linda Lan- ' G l S ' Haffman Moneta Minowitz Susan Martz, Revis Flickinger, Heidi Dowell, Ann in, Lynn Thompson, Nancy Rahan, Louise e man, usre , , ergman, Carol Ronnow. ROW 2: Alice G. Hazard, Susan Harbaugh, Evelyn Williams, Deanna Mansour, Sonja Carlson, Edith Heil, Barby ostwick, Bebe Klopfenstein, Vicki Evers, June Cordich, Ruth Livingston, Harriet Sharman, Judi Herz, Ellen Hendrix, Cathie Findley, ' ' J Davis, Lee Lender, Lynn Ratholz, Karen Stilzer, Sherry arbara Hamilton, Dixie Lee Loveless. ROW 3: Martha Elizondo, Mary Roden, oan ayne, Jane Jacobs, Nancy Furlong, Liz Fitzgerald, Gayle Fierce, Margaret Newman, Martha Preston, Pat Parsons. ROW 4: Carol Jean P S hwarz Nancy Wayburn Karen Wofford Nancy Thomason, Gail Wood, Margaret orsey, Connie Tielton, Penny Higgins. Jan Allen, eggy c , , , eery, Mary Williams, Barbara Gale, Ruth Yurkas. ROW 5: Paula Ketchum, Alice Lynne Powell, Shirley Ann Ransom, Patricia Lebsch, udi Hamaker, Lee Perham, Martha Dames, Mary Ellen Case, Peggy Leigh, Lynn Berman, Peg Fyler, Judy Everhart, Hattie-Neil Corona. Confusion prevailed at Manzanita-Mohave Halls uring the opening weeks of school in September as orkmen hastened to complete the new million-dollar ouble dormitory. This newest women's residence has odern accommodations for 368 girls. lt is located Park Avenue west of the Fine Arts Center. Manzanita-Mohave won honorable mention in the contest for Homecoming and also decor- the1r entranceway for Christmas vacation. Charter president of Manzanita hall was Allison She was assisted by vice-president, Paula secretary, Lydia Olszcwski and treasurer, Sherman. Mojave's first elected officers were Hemovich resident, Heidi Sue Dowell, vice- 7 P Barbara Balaban, secretary and Joan Coo- tfeasufef- Isaacson, and Sue a em s p "LOOK HERE!" Nancy Watten says to dorm mates Karen Hosking, Sheila D hl a she s ots an ad for a new spring fashion. --ffm-- MARICUPA HALL: ROW 1: Fran Lewis, Pinky Campbell. Margot Rios, Judy Barchas, Lois Corpe. Joyce Campbell, Katie Schaller, Carole Marlene Staehlin, Marilyn Ruterman. ROW 25 Sue Pierce, Janet Elms, Elizabeth Thick, Martina Garcia, Sheila Byrns, Sharon Deans Weinberger, Pat Clieif, Sheila Dunion, Linda Sparling, Ruby Fulbright, Emily Crow. ROW 3: Beatriz Freytes, Eldonna Fisher Ruterman. Margot Moore, Jan Joseph, Estherly Dorfman, Connie Christensen, Sheila Morris, Martha Borbon, Hattie Kabotie, Yolanda ROW 4: Nilda Chacur, Paula Blow, Jody Eads, Ethel Dancho, Dottie Barnett, Rexene Adams. ROW 5: Ofelia C. Garbony, Carmen B. Fidi Elder, Susan Woffinger, Shelley Ludwig, Jeanne Orr, Jeanette Saviano, MARICO PA "DID YUU see this?" Paula Blow asks dormmates Nilda Chacur and Lucy Chin, Christine F. Ellis. Women of Maricopa Hall enjoyed a year full of activities. In September they sponsored a picnic to welcome their freshman dorm-mates. The Maricopa patio was the site chosen for the annual President's Reception. Hall decorations for Mom and Dad's Day featured a huge space ship at the entranceway with the inscription "Welcome to Marsicopaf' Residents hosted faculty administrators and in- structors at a Christmas party. Second semester they held exchanges with rnen's dormitories to hear Re- ligion-in-Life Week speakers. Head resident of Maricopa was Mrs. Edna T. Snider. Paula Blow was presidentg Nilda Chacur, vice- presidentg Christine Ellis, secretaryg Marilyn Ruter- man, treasurer and Marlene Staehlin, social chairman. , qf,x Marty Garcia as they look through the Arizona Alumnus Magazine. 4--Y, 7 .- wiej- - , ,, .,,,, , ,. -, f- - , . - -W Y Y ,. W.. .- .Y Y PIMA: ROW 1: Della Verdugo, Judy Kennedy, Marian Tachett, Judy Kent, Rose Solomon, Loretta Lyons, Elvira Pierson, Jackie Kennedy, Dawn McBride, Nancy Cook, Barbara DeLeon. ROW 2: Mildred Creekmore, Sue Rohrbough, Cynthia Simpson, Betty Tokvam, Julia Bands, Jeanette Carrera. Karen Steinke, Jane Tair, Chris Tabusi, Jean Miller. ROW 3: Donna Mitchell, Barbara Cleveland, Charlotte Fletcher, Georgia Schnebly, Angela Casanova, Virginia Harmon, Joan Muretic, Shirley Vanskike, Kathy McAllister, Vera Schaunaman, Mary Krmpo tich, Mary Ellen Fulton. A busy social calendar and an outstanding schol- arship record highlighted the year for Pima Hallresi- dents. Members of the dorm honored visiting Moms and Dads at a banquet, held a Christmas formal, cel- ebrated their Founder's Day with a dinner and spon- MA sored a faculty tea. Bringing honors to the dorm were Mary Ellen Fulton and Joan Muretic, who were selected to "Who's Who." Karen Steinke was a homecoming queen finalist. Spurs claimed Shirley Vanskike. Della Verdugo led members of this cooperative dormitory as president. Her officers were Betty Tak- vam, vice-presidentg Jacqueline Kennedy, secretaryg Elvira Pierson, treasurer, Vera Schaunaman, house manager and Julia Bonds, business manager. TRIMMING the fireplace in Pima Hall's living room, Karen Steinke and Betty Takvam place pine needles above the mantle while Julia Bonds, Della Verdugo and Martha Krompotich hang their stockings. l l l l l 329 YAVAPAI HALL: ROW l: Marie Byrd, Alice Vlahos, Gwendolyn Rahn, Gwendolyn Masor, Jayne Randall, Dinah Devry, Anita Masor, Lille Ton Dee Spain, Cynthia Quam, Sue Ewald. ROW 2: Diane Fellman, Kenlynn Williams, Olivia Ryland, Jamie Jameson, Lynn Siergiej, Judy John ston. Connie Brightman, Joanne French, Beverly Baty, Sheila Hirschy, Peggy Simpson, Sharon Banovitz. ROW 3: Pat Nardone, Brenda Holle ran, Sigrid Maitrejean. Dian Horwitz, Nancy Balaban, Louise Tower, Naomi Hess, Lucy Yerger, Donna Thatcher, Susie Balaban Sharon Kaplan, Natalie Fish. ROW 4: Ginger Loew, Gayle Kasulaitis, Betty Glass, Dorothy Parke, Joan Kendall, Beulah Morton, Nancy Baustian Betty-Jo Ross, Anne Bateman, Phyllis Huffman, Nancy Mckale. ROW 5: Caroline Kline, Carolyn Becker, Carol Pierce, Lynne Dailey Judy McConnell, Dorothy Haught, Katherine Beck, Sharon Proctor, Nancy Washburn, Donna Wineberg. ROW 6: Marilyn Weyer, Candy Hopper Sue McCarthy, Anne Feichtmeir, Lynn McFarland, Elaine Wright, Suzanne Kish, Janice Lillibridge, Merri Ellen Lundwall, Barbara Barton ROW 7: Joan Phelps, Patsy Burdett, Carol Taylor, Judy Randall, Jean Savage, Keiki Payne, Carol Diehl, Jean Eng, Judy Hurt, Judy Dar lington, Margaret Crehan, Sharon Mclntyre, Bunny Cushman, Barbara Johnson, Mary Jo Shaffer, Brenda Bowker, Sue Pierson. YAVA PAI Ejoying the perogative of exclusive freshman occupancy, Yavapai Hall was filled almost to the 200- girl capacity with its 191 residents. Yavapai residents entered into every phase of campus life and were socially active as a unit. The girls enjoyed exchanges with Greenlee, Papago Lodge, Santa Cruz and Apache men's dormitories. The Hrst- floor lobby was the scene of the all-dorm Christmas party. In the spring the festivities were moved out into the patio for the spring picnic. Watching over their charges were head resident Mrs. Robert Lee and six members of Wranglers. The girls were led by Pat Nardone, president, Patsy Burdette, vice-president, Lynne Siergiej, treasurer, Cay Henson, secretary and Olivia Ryland, social chairman. 1 lIAll "TRY some milk," suggests Sharon Day to Pam Minas as Carol Pierson finishes a cup of coffee before classes begin. "HOW ABOUT this record?" Sue Barnett asks Andree'Leininger before putting it on the hi-fi as Nancy Thomas and Gaye Titcomb play with a cat who wandered into their dorm room. 'P' -marsh X rf fffffsl xxx-'Sf' JJ- Inez C E E YUMA Decorations centering around the theme "Grads, From Your Past Comes Our Future," won the first place award for best Homecoming slogan and decora- tions for the women of Yuma Hall. Residents also decked their front door for the benefit of visiting par- ents on Mom and Dad's Day. All-dormitory social events included a get-to-geth- er party for new students and a senior breakfast held in the spring. East Stadium and Arizona Hall men's dorms joined the Yuma women in sponsoring a party for the Tucson Boy's Choir during Christmastirne. Yuma head resident was Mrs. Margaret Caswell. The elected officers for the dorm were president, Car- ole Anne Theobaldg vice-president, Doris Maceyg sec- retary, Marilyn Burneog treasurer, Joy Bradshaw and social chairman, Connie Neat. HALL: ROW 1: Eileen Galpin, Andree Leininger, Diane Roselle, Eleanor Pendleton , Carole Theobald, Nancy Thomas, Su Bamett, Gaye M 'trilyn Burneo, Jan Hollinger, Pam Dickie, Sandy Ramsey, Carol deFreese. ROW 2: Nancy Nichols, Beth Colvin, Ilze Grasis, Anne Fran Holly, Eileen Hughes, Esther Martin, Diana Bordeaux, Kay Henderson, Margaret Zahn, Gayle Hovde, Nikki Bell. ROW 3: Melinda Hough, Karen Karber, Sandra Berry, Pat Davis, Suzanne Schneck, Lillian Larson, Anna Oswell, Roberta Hatt, Sherry Shepard, Char- Rietz Roma Pfeiffer, Ginnie Sturm, Marilyn Brand, Judy Matson. ROW 4: Marilyn Miller, Alta Ruth Hodges, Lucy Headstream, Patricia Faye Temple, Bebe Bean, Helen Keith, Jenny King, Doris Marcy, Sandi Jo Lawless, Bonnie Fate, Karen Dotson, Jennie Swer- alu'sa, Kathy Haughton. ROW 5: Patsy Dupuy, Louise Palin, Dawn Wolin, Shelly Levine, Rosemary Rayburn, Joy Bradshow, Alma Skinner Wallis Smith, Phyllis Slawsky, Judy Snipes, Ann Stevenson, Cynthia Brown, Jane McClanahan, Janet Mason. f-.4 1' ARIZONA Arizona Hall's Christmas party and an Easter pic- nic at Sabino Canyon highlighted their social calen- dar this year. The men also held exchanges with Co- conino and Yuma Hall for women. Robert McNabb, active in the band honorary Kappa Kappa Psi, and Robert McDonald, a member of ASCE, represented Arizona Hall in the honoraries. Two members of the varsity track team living in the dorm were Ray Hughes and Jim Lair. The dormitory is located adjacent to the Old Fine Arts building and can accommodate 58 residents. Hall president for 1957-1958 was William Turn- er. His officers were Jim Lair and John Bently, social chairmen and Jerry Gary, secretary-treasurer. ARIZONA HALL: ROW l: Jerry Gary, Howard Tschirhart, William Turner, Bob Wicks, Robert McDonald, Leo Gutierrez, Bennie Belew, Freeman Smith, Stanley Ralston, Hector Guerra. ROW 2: Allan Roessler, Rex Helmer, Jon Ridgway. Bob Parchell, Roger Frauenfeldf, Pehrod Turk, Nick Estrada, Leonard Estrada, Ruben Estrada. ROW 3: Karl Elers, Bob McNabb, Jim Barber, Art Brimhall, Roy Smith, Craig Brown, Don- ald Wood, John Bentley, Ken Thomas. ROW 4: Larry Baggett, Dale Hall, Tom Ewing, Daniel Robbins, Darrell Smith, Ronald McAlpin, Paul Hodges, Kenneth Pautz, Gene Lindsey. COCHISE DURMMATES Bill Hemdon, Felix Imaizumi and Don Bennett pause at desk before asking Dick Anderson for any messages. .1--W. ...G 7Jr"ffY'f'-' c ' rfffrrf W: . 1 V. it-1 is -- . .. 4 , L1 Alumni from the "Class of 472 B.C. to the Class f 2554 A.D." were welcomed back during home- oming by members of Cochise Hall. The dorm's en- ry in the dormitory decorating contest received first place award in the men's division. As well as participating in intramurals, Cochise men led an active social life. Their first party of the year was an exchange with Gila and Pima Halls held in the Student Union. This was followed by a Christ- mas party honoring their head resident, and several ex- changes during the spring semester. Dorm officers for the 1957-l958 year were Rob- ert Munoz, presidentg Bill Herndon, vice-president, Charlie Hill, treasurer and Pat Crotty, social chair- man. ,Z DGHISE HALL: ROW l: Colin McEachen, Daweel George, Candido Tellez, Gerry Mulligan, Don Belding, Lorenzo Lucia, Pat Crotty, Eddie attillo, Jack Smith, Mickey Western. ROW 2: Anthony Eader, Bruce Scott, Bill Herndon, Phil Krugen, Frank L. Porter, Jr., Wahib Wahsh, rank Leyva, Bob Turner, Dwight Lomayesva. David Weaver. ROW 3: Jeff Truxal , Carl Osterman, Alan Reynolds, Alfred Cook, Frank Housholder , James Ricca, Dale W. Rodolff, Robert Petrucciani, Boyd Carpenter, Lew Aaronson. ROW 4: Craig Trueblood, Kent Dussair, Fred Alexander, Jerry Taylor, Brad Wayland, Jerry Osborne, Frank Ruiz. ROW 5: Terry Birch, Ronald Mann, Robert Munoz, Charles Hill, Dean Place, Alan Hansen. GRAHAM HALL: ROW 1: Gordon McHood, Joel McHood, Jose Quiros, Jim Geist, Dan Zion, Ray Jones, Bill Christensen, Larry Dumelie .hm Mat tern, Steve Williams. ROW 2: Roland Schoen, Richard Beebe, Howard Gray, Curt Clarkson, Bill Cottrill, Jack Darr, Hap Garner Don Ducote, Rod Krause, Ray Dull, Roger Fellows, Dick Mower. ROW 3: Norman Glen, John Van Sciver, Jim Jordan, Ted Urness Hal Nahler Torn Henry, Jim Tate, Lee Smith. Gil Stern, Chuck Wood, Warren Livingston. GRAHAM The keynote for Graham Hall residents this year was athletics. All the football and basketball players living on campus reside here. The dorm was built two years ago at the same time as Greenlee Hall which adjoins it. The Graham Hall wing can accommodate 170 men. The men placed second in dormitory decoration competition during Homecoming. Many residents were active in campus activities as well as sports. Jack Red- hair, president of Associated Students, called Graham his home this year. Sophos selected Dan Zion and Ray Dull, and Bob Ludlow was claimed by Alpha Kappa Psi. Elected officers were Dan Zion, president, Chris Roberts, vice-president and treasurer Harold Knot- man. ADMIRING a newly won trophy, athletes Ray Jones, Dan Zion, Jim Geist and Dick Mower make plans for future dorm competition in intramural sports. gl 6 "T 'Tffqf mlfsfgvri was G4 . a' :Q N L' 1' ft 'uf A .Ziff 334 liam Hayer, Greg Archbald, Kent Turner. ENGROSSED in a game of cards, Jim Nicolson, Don Stevenson, Ed Gayewski and Hayes Redden take advantage of an hour's relaxation before classes. GREEN LEE 335 GREENLEE HALL: ROW l: Jim Price, Bruce Weston, Jerry Overton, Don Stevenson, Ed Gajewski, Nick Conaualoff, Ken Trout, Dick Rodgers, Bill Mason. ROW 2: Larry Kay. Richard Forsythe, Lloyd Jones, Charles Bessinger, Dick King, Steve Dundas, Hayes Redden, Joe Lieardi Yee, Joe Alvarez, Dan Wong, Anthony Ching. ROW 3: Nat Pendelton, John Kirby III, Don Caughlin, Jim Naire, Oscar Ferrell Chuck Tuell, John Ramsey, Dean Moch, Walt Willett, Ernesto Alvarez, Tony Munoz, Bill McFerrin. ROW 4: Don Kunkel, Bob Michelena, George Barr, Bill Olson, Jerry Bolt, Terry Hatch, Bill Collins, John Kinross, Denny Kise, Jack Buffington, Pete Boot, Tom Browning, Wil- A picnic exchange with the freshmen women of Yavapai Hall was the first event on Greenlee Hall's social calendar. They held a second picnic later on in the year and gave a Christmas party in honor of their head resident, A. R. Yappel. Residents were active in UA athletics. Ed Ny- meyer made enough baskets to become UA's top scorer for the 1958 season. Pat Wilson represented the dorm on the swimming team. The varsity golf team claimed Dick Herrington. Anthony Ching headed Greenlee activities as dorm president. His assistants were Chuck Tuell, vice- presidentg Earl Dachsleger, secretary, Dick Rodgers, treasurerg Larry Kay and Pat Wilson, social chair- men and Jack Rowe, parliamentarian. clam. it-Q -a 4,1 Q'- iesi.- K I HUPI LODGE: ROW 1: Bing Brown, Ray Mungaray, Andy Wiblemo, Ralph Walcott, Bill Rodman, Day Droth. ROW 2: Daryl Smith, Jerome Franklin, Arthur Hammond. Pete Marcus, Walter Wilson, Robert Hamlin. ROW 3: Nick Mansour, Fred Nader, Richard Ferguson, Dave Hen sley, Paul Edgerton. ROW 4: Bruce Billings, Ed Gould, George Swinney. ROW 5: Darrell Fletcher, James Sears, Herbert Meshel, Lawrence White, John Kaur. ROW 6: Jack Murphy, Bob Maxwell, Dick Alegretti, Billy Farrell. Social activities for Hopi Hall centered around parties and dances with the various dorms on campus. Highlighting the Christmas season was a caroling party with Papago Lodge and Manzanita and Mohave Halls. ln October, Hopi Hall hosted the women from Yuma Hall at a dinner-dance. The dorm was represented in honoraries by Nick Mansour, Paul Edgerton and Robert Walton, Beta Beta Beta. Arthur Hammond was in Theta Tau. H O Pl LO D G E RELAXING after a hard day, Paul Edgerton glances through a while Jerome Franklin and Fred Nader decide which record to ln the sports department Dick Allegretti and Lar- ry Cole participated in track, while Charles Osterman played varsity basketball. Spending their afternoons on the baseball diamond were Mark Clarke, Don Montgomery, Lee Hersh, Box Maxwell and Arleigh ..--f --- ' 'T-ff'-Q., r. .-4. , ' .tmgku ,vw .fl is flrtrtl 5 ' .,g. ,- rg--" , 5 Beighler. V J... ' . .'...., 336 LJ X S III L., -.-. -vA..fe ,YVV vtkr, 1- -- "H, -. , A L ROW 1: Hermando Martin, Bob Martin, Alejandro Varela Ernesto Chavez Chuck Stone Richard Oldham Jo Zmkl Robert Ashe Wh't . ROW 2: Dick Vitales, Mark Shoemacher, Claris Donelson Bill Ackerman Lee Marsh Edward Dlohe Rick Trdrick Richard ie v' Pieron. ROW 3: Luis Bachelier, Don Doehring, Jeffrey Polenytewa Jon Young Bob Encines Ellis Mascareno George Georga Niebla, Albert Sanchez, Joe Martinez. NAVAJO HALL Navajo Hall is located adjacent to the football stadium, at the southeastern corner of the campus. The dormitory has accomodations for 88 residents. This year, men in the dorm won honors in sports and in scholarship. Dick Lee was a member of Pi Mu Epsilon, Two engineers, Bob Laser and Don Dempsy, were honored with membership in professional honor- ary fraternities. In the intramural program, Navajo Hall squads were organized by intramural manager Mickey Mata. Letterman George Young and Walt Goodwin, cham- pion two-miler, were on the varsity track team. SLIDE RULES laid aside, card players Richard Lee and Jon Young enjoy a quick hand of poker before leaving for their afternoon class. " TAKING a break from their studies, a group of Papago Hall residents gather around the piano for a good songfest. PAPAGO LODGE As a unit, Papago Lodge was active in social affairs and sports this year. Highlighting the fall was a buffet exchange and dance with women residents of Mojave Hall. Also on the social calendar was a dessert dance with Pima Hall. To celebrate the holiday season, Papago men went caroling with Mohave, Manzanita and Hopi dormitories. The men were active in varsity sports. David Bingham was on the golf team. Joseph Frisella repre- sented UA in swimming meets. Baseball teammates were Matt Encinas, Jack Harmon, Herman Hudson, and Newton Monk. Residents also took part in the intramural sports program. Papago Lodge has housing facilities for 124 men. PAPAGO l.0'DGE: ROW 1: Jack Craig, Wilson Bow Woo, Joe Cole, Roy Tolley, Bill Erlenmeyer, Dick Rubi, Dick Riggs, ROW 2: Lawrence Redmond, Russ Larson, Don Stewart, Brian Beun, Wallace Greene, Lee Olsen, Don Chisholm. ROW 3: Eddy Stephens, Buel Bowlan, Nelson Greenlund, I im McCrea, Dave Bingaman, Wayne Hubble, Bill Davis. ROW 4: John DeLong, Daryl Gilbreath, Tom Raper, Gid Eschenheimer HALL: ROW 1: Alfonso Gonzales, Gene Ladomato, Ray Garland, Enrique Frontera, Harold Yeaman, Robert Easton, Bob Salido. ROW 2: Dabdoub, Fred Kramer, Jos Mostert, Cliff Cox, Warren Lehman, David Gonzalez, Horacio Mota, Fenner Hudson, Jim Whitten, W Willett. ROW 3: Montague Whiting, Byron Garretson, Bob Wallace, George Swafford, Fred Hupp, Karl Parks, Don Kirby, Donald ields, Burdette Morago, Chuck Mendivil. ' 1 Pinal Hall men were active in the intramural sports program again this year. Led by their sports manager, Byron Garretson, they competed against teams from other dormitories. They succeeded in winning the second place trophy in three sports: foot- ball, horseshoes and table tennis. In the basketball tournament the men placed third and in the swimming P I N A L H A L L meet they were fifth. Under the arrangements of social chairman Aligio Ladomato, the dorm was socially active as a unit. Residents held a picnic and a dancing-swimming party at a Tucson guest ranch. Pinal Hall was built to house 78 men. The dorm l is situated at the south end of the football stadium. UNFIRMING his eight o'clock date, Enrique Frontera beams D- Q. A hile roommate Ray Garland waits for his phone to ring. R I Z 0 N '7 451' , A W 11-121---f 1- v---1 --, T , s.i r e . . . ee FIXING his tie, Mike Wozny dresses for a date as room- mates Dale Wong and Tom Henderson offer their advice. SANTA CRUZ-APACH E Villlllll The two newest men's residences are located in the middle of "dormitory row" at the southern edge of the campus. Apache Hall and Santa Cruz Hall are joined in one building, both areas having housing facilities for 182 men. On Mom and Dad's Day, the men of both halls held open house and guided visiting parents through their living quarters. They decorated the entrance to the hall on Homecoming Weekend to welcome re- turning alums. Sabino Canyon was the site of a steak fry for the men of Santa Cruz. Second semester they co-spon- sored a dance in Apache Hall. Both dorms also par- ticipated in the intramural sports program during the year. SANTA CRUZ-APACHE: ROW 1: Jack Gilbert, Herman Sanchez, Patrick Moss, Tom Haney, Mike McEnerney, Alfred Newman, Myron Dotts T Henderson, Lynn Hickman, Dale Wong, Clifton Price. ROW 2: Frank Overton, Ted Roberts, Jim Gregg, Richard Dill, Angel Gomez Rountree, Stanley Dea, Richard Jackson, Larry Knapp, Forster Cayce, Dale Bugen, Bill Bennett. ROW 3: Al Acosta, James Kimes Walker, Tom Berresford, Frank Morris, Arnold Ridgeway, Tom Harris, Don Galloway, John Watkins, Michael Defty, Michael Wo Hunter. ROW 4: Ed Harris, Bruce McDoniel, Jack Hoagland, Grady Woodward, Ralph I-Ieffelman, Tom Tucker, Gene Mann, Lee David Reichardt, John Fahrnbruch. ii ,- POLO VILLAGE Polo Village is the name given the community of quonset huts north of the University campus which provides housing for a limited number of married veterans and their families. There is a lengthy waiting list for occupancy in these very reasonably-priced facilities. The Department of Student Housing handles all applications. UA's young married couples living in the Village play a dual role, taking part in college activities while they manage their own homes at the same time. Most of the couples have one or more children and their group activities cater to the smaller mem- bers of the family. Santa Claus came to town at Christmastime to be honored guest at the traditional Yuletide party. Peter Rabbit hid the colored eggs for the Easter egg hunt in April. Adults held social functions of their own. In October, the election dance climaxed weeks of cam- paigning for positions on the Village Council. The Christmas Ball and Spring Dance were sponsored be- fore the vets began studying for semester final exams. Charles Hoffman was chosen to lead Polo Villagers as mayor. Other elected officers were Bob McCleve, vice-mayor, Lorna Marks, secretary and David Hatch, treasurer. EXECUTIVE COUNCIL: ROW 1: Lorna Marks, Charles Hoffman, Frank Patrick, Jo Smith, David Hatch. ROW 2: Thomas McElroy, Charles Burgess, Pat Young, Bob Benedict, Harry Sobon, Jan Allen, Carl Guthrie. -:f'V' an k ,fx 'W' -'W V I",-. '. 53-A . , I, ., mzifx' ' , Ei?-,'r fit Iii it .UI I A '.Q.'. 1. . 1 ,,.j:1 . . f l . 179 . 4135 ' -: Ha. 'Q' 'z -GJ:-11 , :Ln fl 'fffhxi .1..A. l ' 'g - BESIUE their quonset homes, four Polo Village children romp on a new swing set while their mothers supervise their play and visit with each other. CI' CI' Cl' CI' CI' desert desert desert desert desert f desert desert desert desert desert desert II . t A If t ert desert desert Ii I CD ED DOHERTY brought a new brand of offensive football to Arizona, the slot- T formation, when he accepted the job of head coach for the Wildcats. He came to Tucson from Philadelphia where he was backlield coach for the Eagles. Doherty has coached for ASC Tempe and Notre Dame and worked under Frank Leahy and Hugh Devore. FOOTBALL 1957. VARSITY SQUAD: ROW 1: Jim Geist, Ralph Hunsaker, Larry Dumelie, Warren Livingston, Carl Hazlett, Ray Martin, Jack Redhair, Bill Ove Ken Holbrook, Gary Cropper. ROW 2: Dan Zion, Ken Hayes, Bill Christensen, Marty Hurd, Bill Wallace, Nick Balich, Ted Urness, Slater, Ed Brown, Lyell Metcalf, Norman Romero, Delbert Hodge. ROW 3: Willie Peete, Joe Pesci, Will Rapp, Bob Whitlow, Joe Yo Jack Davis, Terry Muse, Sam Dukes, Bill Ismay, Joe Bognanno, Pat Brown, Dan Hale. ROW 4: Tony Matz, John Duran, Jim Jor Mike Yaeger, Bob Humphrey, Wayne Rapp, Gene Bubala, Bill McCormick, Tom Dunn, Gene Leek, John Gillespie, Jim Tate. 344 , i SEASON S RECORD ARIZONA ' OPPONENT 14 Brigham Young . . . . . . .14 13 Missouri ... . . . .35 14 Colorado . . .... 34 0 New Mexico ... .. . .27 6 Texas Tech ..... .... 2 8 20 West Texas State .... .... 2 1 20 Hardin-Simmons . . . . . . .26 14 Texas Western . . . . . . .51 17 Marquette . . . . . . .14 7 ASCTempe... ....47 JACK DAVIS ALANPOLLEY co-captain co-captain 'CATS STUMBLE THROUGH WORST SEASON Although the Wildcats ended the 1957 football season with a 1-8-1 record, the worst in their football history, they gave Arizona fans interesting and at times inspiring football. Using the pro-type slot-T tactics introduced by new coach Ed Doherty, the Wildcats surprised such formidable opponents as the Colorado Buffaloes and Texas Tech Red Raiders with good aerial and ground attacks and an excellent defense. But lack of experi- ence and strength hurt the Wildcats at crucial moments. The West Texas and Hardin-Simmons games, both thrillers, were lost by the 'Cats in the closing minutes because of insufficient squad depth and experience. Undermanned and plagued by injuries, the Wild- cats were forced to turn to the freshman team to fill out their depleted squads. Freshmen "Jumbo" Jim Mason and Warren Liv- ingston were used extensively by the Wildcats. As a quarterback, Mason racked up a net gain of 628 yards through the air and scored 17 points for the 'Cats. Statistically, the Wildcats looked good in the passing department, gaining 1540 yards to 1127 rolled up by opponents. Ralph Hunsaker was leading passer for Arizona with a total of 717 yards on 73 passes. Jim Tate led in the scoring column with 24 points. HEAD COACH Ed Doherty outlines slot-T tactics to be used against Marquette to assistants John Ford, backiield coachg Van F. Howe, end coachg Carl Cooper, freshman coachg Roy Tatum, line coachg Gene Fetter, assistant coach. F LI' " 1' 15,795 345 V I N . f . SEASON HIGHLIGHTS-Eluding the outstretched arms of a West Texas State Buff, halfback Tom Dunn fat rightl scored Arizona's second touchdown in a heartbreaking 21-20 last-minute loss. Brightest spot in the otherwise drab season was the 18-yard field goal kicked by reserve center Nick Balich Qbelowj which accounted for the 'Cats' only victory of the season, a 17-14 Homecoming upset over Marquette University. 346 HEY let go my leg," says Arizona back Ray Martin as he tries to get away from Brigham Young tacklers Hal Stapley C773 and John Kapele 1621. Carroll Johnston 1101, Tom Clark 6835, Paul Eckel K65J, and Wildcat Lyell Metcalf 1651 join the melee as Ralph Hunsaker C145 looks on ARIZONA 14 BRIGHAM YOUNG 14 Before an opening-game crowd of 23,000 the University of Arizona fought the Brigham Young University Cougars to a 14-14 standstill. The Arizona Wildcats drew first blood early in the opening- quarter when Ralph Hunsaker slipped over from the one-yard line to cap a 77-yard touch- down drive. Hunsaker booted the extra point. In the second quarter, capitalizing on a Wildcat fumble, BYU drove to the Arizona 14 where Carroll Johnston lobbed a pass to Harold Ringwood in the JOE YOUNG JACK REDI-IAIR end halfback end zone. The PAT was good. Then Arizona marched 66 yards in 11 plays, scoring when Willie Peete snagged a Hunsaker pass in the end zone. Hunsaker converted and Arizona led 14-7 at the halftime. Early in the third quarter the Cougars intercepted a Wildcat pass to set up their final score. Keith Hubbs ran 16 yards for the tally, and Paul Dalebout con- verted, knotting the score at 14-14. Major action of the fourth quarter came when Hunsaker blocked a last minute BYU field goal attempt. ED BROWN guard fullback -fl' BILLY KEASLER ARIZONA 13 For their second game the flu-ridden Cats traveled to Columbia, Missouri, meeting defeat at the claws of the University of Missouri Tigers, 35-13. Arizona's highly rated passing attack failed to jell, but the 'Cats displayed a good ground game, out- rushing the Tigers 297 to 192 yards. Arizona's first score came in the initial quarter when Jim Tate broke loose for a spectacular 73-yard run on his first collegiate running play from scrim- mage. Sal Gonzalez's kick was low. The Wildcats' RALPH HUNSAKER quarterback MISSOURI 35 only other tally came in the third quarter when Gon- zalez ran up the middle from the I2 to score. Gon- zalez's try for the PAT was successful. Missouri's Hank Kulhman scored in the first three quarters on running plays from the two, four, and 30 yard lines respectively, Jerry Curtwright ran a kickoff 79 yards for a score, and a wild Arizona lateral re- covered in the Wildcat end zone by Dale Pidcock accounted for the other Tiger TD's. Charley Rash made all five of Missouri's conversions. SAL GONZALEZ fullback TOM DUNN halfback if b' guard LUWERING his head, Wildcat full Sal Gonzalez powers his way thr formidable Missouri line for good LYELL METCALF JIM MASON quarterback RAY MARTIN halfback ARIZONA 14 For the second time in the season the University of Arizona Wildcats met defeat at the hands of a Big Eight Conference team when the Colorado Buffaloes trounced the 'Cats, 34-14. Arizona hit paydirt the iirst time they got their hands on the ball. Colorado took the opening kickoff, but were forced to punt. The 'Cats then took over the ball on their own 36 and moved 64 yards to score. Two passes by Jim Geist sparked the drive for 60 of these yards. Gonzalez took the ball over from the WILLIE PEETE end CARL HAZLETT COLORADO 34 one for the score, and then kicked the extra point. Arizona's other score came in the fourth period when Tom Dunn galloped around right end from the 11. Bob Stransky led the visitors in both scoring and rushing, racking up 98 yards on the ground and the Buffs' Hrst three touchdowns. Fullback George Adams intercepted a Geist pass and ran 26 yards to score in the third quarter. With twenty seconds remaining in the game, Colorado quarterback Howard Cook passed to Jim Comer in the end zone. GAN'T CATCH ME," growls Wildcat half- 'ack Tom Dunn to two Colorado Buf- aloes hot on his heels. He proved it y carrying the ball for a gain of 14 ards around the Wildcats' left end. l i. L HAULING in a long pass from Ralph Hunsaker, halfback Gene Leek opens the throttle and pulls ahead of Lobo Gary Sloan. Leek made good yardage before finally shoved out of bounds. ARIZGNA 0 NEW MEXICO 27 Before a High School Senior Day crowd of 23,000 in Varsity Stadium, the New Mexico Lobos clobbered the Arizona Wildcats 27-0. The Wildcats got oif to a bad start when Tom Dunn fumbled the opening kickoff and New Mexico recovered on the Arizona 22. The 'Cats were able to hold, but Lobo Chuck Roberts intercepted a pass on the Arizona 39 and seven plays later connected with Boyde Long in the end zone for the score. The PAT was good. Just before the half ended, Bob Crandall ran back a Hunsaker pass 67 yards to score. ln the third quarter Roberts recovered a fumble by Sal Gon- zalez and then Don Perkins ran the ball to the Wild- cat 14. Four plays later Tony Gray plunged over for the score. The final Lobo tally came in the fourth quarter when Perkins ran 85 yards up the middle to score. Several Arizona scoring plays were broken up by fumbles and intercepted passes. The 'Cats fumbled seven times losing the ball six times, and three of their passes were intercepted. BULLING his way through a stiff Lobo line, freshman quarterback "Jumbo,' Jim Mason C101 gains yardage for the Wildcats before he is pulled down from behind by Larry Davis. Arizona halfback Billy Overall 1273 throws a bone-crunching block for Mason on Lobo Chuck Roberts D RAIDER Milton Vaughn picks up a few yards before being swarmed under by Wildcats B1llyOverall C271 Marty Hurd C507 Tom Dunn C281 ARIZQNA 6 TEXAS TECH 28 Although playing one of their best games of the season, the Wildcats were forced to bow 28-6 before superior numbers of the Texas Tech Red Raiders. Ralph Hunsaker played his finest game of the by completing 22 out of 32 passes for 178 These statistics raised him to ninth in the rankings for the number of passes completed. The Wildcats scored first in the game near the of the first period, The Red Raiders received the kickoff but were forced to punt. After an of punts Arizona took the ball on their own and marched up the field 96 yards in 12 plays to Halfback Jim Tate scampered around right end the TD. The conversion attempt was wide. Texas Tech scored twice in the second period, once on a 27-yard run by Ronnie Rice, and again on a nine-yard pass from Jerry Bell to Jimmy Knox. In the third stanza the Raiders drove 72 yards in ten plays for a TD, and with 4:15 left in the game Mickie Barron ran 60 yards for the Raiders' final score. GENE LEEK BOB WI-IITLOW halfbttck tackle J IM TATE BILLY OVERALL halfback halfback UESPITE a herd of West Texas Buffal which nearly surround him, Wild end Gary Cropper hauls in a long p up five yards, the play totaling ARIZONA 20 WEST TEXAS STATE 21 With two minutes remaining in the game, the Ari- zona Wildcats were beaten by the West Texas State Buffaloes, 21-20, on a blocked punt recovered in the Wildcat end zone for a Buff touchdown. Arizona scored first in the game on a 47-yard pass to Jim Tate from Ralph Hunsaker. Hunsaker's try for extra point was blocked. Arizona scored twice in the second half. Lyell Metcalf recovered a West Texas fumble and Jack Gillespie punched over from the one to score. Hunsaker converted. Shortly after, Tom Dunn scooted over from the seven to cap a 53-yard drive and Hunsaker converted again. Jack York accounted for two of West Texas's TD's. The first came on a pass to Tom Coffey in the end zone in the second quarter and the second came in the fourth on a six-yard run around left end. The final TD came when Eddie Meyer blocked Hunsaker's punt and Glenn Gregg scooped up the ball and car- ried it into the end zone. E from Ralph Hunsaker. Cropper pick 1 LEAPING Buffaloes claw air trying to bat down Wildcat Nick Balich's field goal attempt. A Wildcat drive reached the Buff 14 but stalled wit seven seconds remaining in the first half. Coach Ed Doherty sent in Balich to end the Buffs' 7-6 lead before halftime, but the kick was wid a Hardin-Simmons Cow- goes down under onslaught of after picking up yardage good a first down on UA's 43 yard line. ARIZONA Z0 -HARDIN-SIMMONS 26 Hard luck continued to plague the Wildcats as the Hardin-Simmons Cowboys scored a 26-20 Border Conference victory in Varsity Stadium. Arizona's first touchdown came when Gene Leek carried the ball over from the 9, climaxing a 68 yard drive. The Cats second score was set up when Cowboy Joe Allen fumbled a Hunsaker punt and Wildcat Joe Young recovered. Seven plays later Hun- saker sneaked over from the one. The PAT was good. "Jumbo" Jim Mason took a H-S punt and ran 61 GARY CROPPER JAMES JORDAN end tackle yards for the score. Mason booted the extra point. Late in the iirst quarter a brilliant 87 yard touch- down run by Tom Dunn was recalled for illegal procedure. Three plays later Hunsaker's punt was blocked and recovered in the end zone by the Cow- boys for a TD. Hardin-Simmons capitalized on an intercepted pass and a Wildcat fumble for two other touchdowns. The Cowboys then took the opening kickoff of the second half and traveled 75 yards in seven plays for their iinal tally. JOE BOGNANN O JOE PESCI guard . tackle ,, .. - ..-har ,E I g 353 SNARLING defiance, Wildcat Willie Peete bulldozes through a stiff Texas Western line for seven yards before being dragged down from behind ARIZONA 14 TEXAS WESTERN 51 The Texas Western Miners chalked up their greatest victory in the history of the series with Ari- zona by defeating the Wildcats, 51-14. Both Wildcat touchdowns came in the fourth quarter. The first was on a short pass from Jim Mason to Gary Cropper climaxing a 63 yard drive. Mason converted. Shortly afterward the Wildcats took over the ball on downs at the Miner 26, and Tate picked JIM GEIST quarterback X 1 end A . MIKE YAEGER up the TD on a 3-yard plunge. Mason converted. Star of the evening was Bob Laraba, who threw Hve touchdown passes for the Miners. Texas Western also scored on a 68 yard run by Charlie Bradshaw and an eight yard run by Bob Forrest, The visitors were handed another TD when Warren Livingston accidently deflected a Texas Westem kickoff into the end zone and Miner Jimmy Bevers fell on the ball. GARY SLATER guard wiv" end ' I I 354 BOB HUMPHREY E WUN UNE!" Jllbilafli Wildcats Celebrate SC21S0f1'S f1fSl ViCt0FY- GLEEFUL Wildcats parade Coach Doherty around on their shoulders ARIZONA 17 MARQUETTE 14 The Arizona Wildcats treated a Homecoming crowd of 15,000 to the first win of the season by upsetting favored Marquette, 17-14. Arizona's first score came on an 18-yard field goal by Nick Balich. This was Balich's first collegiate score and proved to be the margin of victory. On the first play of the second period Dunn scooted around left end from the three yard line to score. Jim Mason converted. Marquette got back into the ball game when, with five minutes left in the first half, Tom Sunderbruch threw a six yard pass to Tim Zhulkie in the end zone. Ernie Safron converted. The half ended at Arizona 10, Marquette 7. Jack Davis recovered a Marquette fumble to set up Arizona's last tally. The drive went 69 yards in eleven plays and was climaxed when Mason slipped over from the one. Mason also converted. With 8:50 minutes remaining in the game, Sunder- bruch scored Marquette's final touchdown on a QB sneak from the one. Safron converted. Statistically, the game was as close as the score. Arizona passed 20 times, completing 11 for a total of 105 aerial yards. However, Marquette out-rushed the Wildcats, 232 to 129 yards, and on total offense the visitors edged the 'Cats, 283 yards to 234. DESPITE the blocking of Jim Stracka 1831, Warrior quarterback Tom Sun- derbruch C61 is pulled down from be- hind by unidentified Wildcat. Warren Livingston assists in the tackle while Joe Young t87J rushes up to help. 355 PRANCING with the ball, guard Ed Brown picks up eight yards after inter- cepting an ASC pass. Wildcat tackle Jack Davis i787 inspects the fallen Sun Devil receiver and his defense as half back Ray Martin f29J rush up to help. ARIZONA 7 ASC TEMPE 47 CARRYING two Sun Devils with him, Wildcat end Joe Young picks up a few yards after hauling in a pass from QB Ralph Hunsaker. ln a night of contrasts Arizona wound up the worst season on record, and Arizona State College Tempe finished their best by defeating the Wil cats, 47-7. The dazzling Sun Devils, rated twelfth in t nation by Associated Press, were held to one touc down in the first quarter by a determined Wilde eleven. But the Sun Devils demonstrated the effectivene of their multiple offense by scoring three touchdow in the second quarter. Leon Burton, the Sun Devil's brilliant ball carri won the national rushing championship with 1,12 yards. Burton also topped the nation in scoring wit 96 points, and teammate Bob Mulgado finished se ond with 93 points. Quarterback John Handgartn pitched four touchdown passes to set a new AS record. Arizona scored their only touchdown in the fourt quarter on a 75 yard drive. The counter came whe Ralph Hunsaker threw a screen pass on the 19 to Ca Hazlett who twisted down the sidelines to score. Although the score was lopsided, Coach Doherg felt the Wildcats had played one of their finest gam of the season. Doherty commended the outstanding performance of the Wildcat line which forced th Sun Devils into an aerial game. Tempe defeated the Wildcats this season, however the Sun Devils have not always been so successfu Out of the thirty games played between the tw neighbors in a series that dates back to 1899, tht Sun Devils have won only eight. The biggest margin of victory for one school over the other was a 67-t trouncing given the Sun Devils by the Wildcat: in 1946. ALL ALONE, Warren Livingston carries the ball into the end zone forthe Wild- k1tten's second score of thc game. FROSH RELEGATED AS VARSITY RESERVES Because of Asian flu and injuries on the varsity squad the schedule of games for the Arizona Wild- kittens was cancelled early in the season. They played one game. The Kittens won their game by trampling the ASC Tempe Frosh with a hefty margin of 31-6. In com- plete control of the game all evening, the Wildkittens dominated both the offensive and the defensive side of the tilt. An epidemic of Asian flu cancelled the Kitten's next game against the Fort Huachuca Red Raiders, Nine of the Raiders were sick. The remaining three tilts on the freshman sched- ule were cancelled when ten Wildkittens were called directly into varsity ranks. The rest of the squad was used as a "power pool" to give added depth to the injury-ridden varsity. FRESHMAN FOOTBALL TEAM: ROW l: Terry Muse, Sam Dukes, Norman Glenn, Ken Needham, Bill Wallace. Ted Urness, Bill Cottrill, Pat Brown ROW 2 Charles Cook, Jim Clark, Bill lsmay, Tony Matz, Ken Hayes, Dan Hale, Dennis Underwood, Chuck Wood, Delbert Hodge. ROW 3 Warren Livingston, Larry Dumelie, Jerry Calvert, .lack Gillespie, Ken Holbrook. Dick Tigner. Gene Bubala, Bob McCormick, Bill Epperson - I Aj 3 lx l r , l 7 :4 4 , 357 - gi Egiigq' , ' K' 7 . .ff , A U ' .5 ,y ' ,I J . n K J ', ...J Q, x 5 ji f I r :Q - M 1 e" CUNTEMPLATING his loss to the New Mexico A8aM Aggies, basketball coach Fred Enke leads his men to the locker room. Enke has coached basketball at the University of Arizona since l925. ln that time he has compiled an en- viable record of 520 games won to played grueling schedules and have 288 lost. His teams have played gruel- ing schedulcs and have won eight un- disputed Border Championships. BASKETBALL 1957 1958 ASKETBALL-TEAM: Larry Ewald, Ernest McCx'ay Bob Mueller Duck Leakey Richard Mower Ed Nymeyer Mike Schlelbaum Robert Hopkins arren Ridge, Jon Conner, Bill Rhodes, Alan Stanton Fred Enke SEASON'S RECORD ARIZONA OPPONENT ARIZONA OPPONENT 64 ASC-Flagstaff . . ...... 59 76 San Diego State . . . . . . . 63 Iowa .,..... .... 8 0 73 Hardin - Simmons .... 52 Bradley ...... .... 9 1 62 West Texas State .... 52 Washington U. .... .... 6 1 7'O ASC-Flagstaff ...... . 82 College of Pacific. . . .... 64 68 New Mexico A8cM . . . . 66 California Poly .... .... 6 5 60 Texas Western .... 77 Loyola ......... .. . .... 67 58 Bradley .... . . . 78 Southern California .... .... 7 2 49 West Texas State. . . 63 San Jose State ..... . .77 69 Hardin - Simmons. . . . 55 Santa Clara .... .... 6 6 74 MCRD-San Diego .... 76 Michigan .... .... 8 8 66 ASC - Tempe ..... 71 Texas Western ..... .... 6 9 84 Los Angeles State . . . 51 New Mexico A8cM .... .... 7 1 76 ASC - Tempe ..... TRAVEL TROUBLES KNOCK CAGERS TO 4TH Arizona's Wildcat cagers finished out the 1957-58 basketball season with a 10 won and 16 lost record. The 'Cats were fairly strong at home, winning eight and dropping only six games, but met disaster on the road as they were defeated ten times and managed to garner only two wins. After getting off, to a slow start in Border Con- ference play, Arizona came back to win three im- portant games. Arizona knocked off New Mexico A 8: M, Texas Western and Hardin-Simmons to put the 'Cats in third place. They then needed only two wins over rival Arizona State College at Tempe to cinch a share of the conference crown. Unfortunately, they were beaten in two thrillers by margins of two and four points. The losses gave Arizona a four-won and six-lost record and a fourth place tie with Hardin- Simmons. Ed "Pudge" Nymeyer set a new University of Arizona record by scoring 1,225 points in three sea- sons of play. Nymeyer also broke the 400 mark for the third straight season as he dumped in 408 points. Ed was named to the All-Border-Conference sec- ond team. Bob Mueller, Warren Ridge and Nymeyer played their last season for the 'Cats. Sophomores Ernie McCray and Jon Connor shaped up nicely as they saw extensive first string duty. GOING HIGH, Ed "Pudge" Nymeyer buck- ets another two points against ASC Tempe. Graduating this year, Nymeyer totaled 1,225 markers during his bas- ketball career setting a new record. GANGING up on a Los Angeles Stater, Jon Conner 143 and Bob Mueller 1501 steal the ball away from the bewil- dered player. The action came late in the second period with the score standing at 70-64, Arizona's favor. In their opening game of the 1957-58 season the rizona Wildcats just managed to eke out a 64-59 win ver the Arizona State College at Flagstaff Lumber- cks. After trailing in the early part of the game he Axers came back to tie the game 51-51 at the end f regulation play. Ernest McCray with 23 and War- en Ridge with 17 were the high scorers. A rather disastrous road trip through the Mid- est saw the 'Cats suffer three straight defeats. Ari- ona's cagers fell 80-63 to Iowa, 91-52 to Bradley, nd 61-52 to Washington University at St. Louis. Arizona hit the victory trail on their return by efeating College of the Pacific 82-74 in the Hrst of our home games. With three minutes gone in the econd half, Eddie Mitchell, Ed Nymeyer and Elmer reen went on a scoring spree that broke the 'Cats hree game losing streak. Mitchell and Green hit from utside while Nymeyer drove in for repeated lay-ups. uring the attack Mitchell accounted for 17, Ny- eyer 26 and Green 11. UUTREAGHED Wildcat Dick Mower fails to stop the lay up of a high Jumping Marine Corps player The fast playing Marines sank the Arizona qulnt 83 74 ARIZONA FANS cheer wildly as the Wildcat cagers score another basket in the tense game with University of Southern Califomia. The 'Cats came out on top in the see-saw battle by a score of 78-72. Arizona's six-point spread at finale represented the biggest difference in scoring. ED NYMEYER forward BOB MUELLER ' forward WARREN RIDGE guard 362 ERN EST MCCRAY center Arizona evened its basketball record at 3-3 by efeating Cal Poly, 66-65. The favored Wildcats railed with less than a minute to be played in the ame, but a 15 foot set-shot by Bob Mueller saved he evening for the Enkemen. Ernie McCray and Eddie Mitchell sank 20 points piece to lead the Arizona Cagers to a 77-67 Win ver Loyola of Los Angeles. The Wildcats shot rilliantly from the field having almost 60 per ent accuracy. The 'Cats continued their winning ways by pulling ut a 78-72 victory against the University of Southern alifornia. The teams matched points for most of he game with neither side having over a five point ead until the final gun. On a trip to the coast Arizona had their victory tring snapped at four as they fell to the San Jose partans, 77-63. A cold second half cost the Wildcats he game as they dropped from a close 32-30 deficit t the half to the final I4 point margin. The 'Cats suffered their fifth loss of the season at the hands of the Santa Clara Broncos, 66-55. Free throws accounted for the difference in the score as the Broncos hit for 24 of 36 while Arizona made only seven of ten charity throws. Michigan University's Wolverines handed the Wildcats their first defeat of the season in Bear Down Gym as they trampled Arizona, 88-74. Previous to the game Arizona had won five straight home games. GETTING a helping hand from Cal Poly player, high-iiying Wildcat Elmer Green Hips ball through for two points. KEN RAMSEY forward J ON CONNER guard l 363 H 5 A -. L ' iuw JA f . Q2 G, ' 4 l' ,gl fix .N f 1' B' :S 'W 'g' Writ' "W 'ii wil? Q -1 " TTT' '-X w... ..r- ' 'F' H.. is zg f.. T '-7 ily. gg, U :L vc' riff?- 'fr '. ,110 .X , 34 S' N w , fl 35 , . Rf z ,r -J E -J lb I -HJ 1, . fix, V' 5. ul' -1. 4 .M K . qjfi.'l'- n.-V 1 Q' T ui? Q :V ,lt ij.. 'N l F' f Q q.h"'a:"u-Qk-,jEi'5?f- .5 . V ,W WILUCAT Ernie McCray attempts to stop a charging Lumberjack from ASC Flagstaff, but a foul for blocking was all he got for his trouble. Arizona won their first clash with the Flagstaff Lumberjack squad by a score of 64-59 ASC at Flagstalf got revenge for their season defeat, as they dumped the Wildcats, 87- The score see-sawed in the early part of the g the half ended with the Axers ahead 40-36. In second half the Lumberjacks pulled steadily at Arizona broke back into the win column by setting the New Mexico Aggies, top team in Border Conference, 68-66. The 'Cats overcame a ond half deficit of 11 points to tie them 62-62 at end of regulation play. The game was tied with seconds remaining in the overtime when Pudge meyer sank two free throws to win the game. The Arizona five then evened up their co ence record at 3-3 by squeezing out a 60-59 win the Texas Western Miners. The 'Cats again had overcome a halftime deficit as they trailed 35-29 the end of the first period. In their second meeting of the season, the N cats fared somewhat better against Bradley by l ing the Braves to a 71-58 victory. The Braves by only 37-32 at halftime, and the 'Cats for as in the second half looked as though they might an upset. Border Conference cellar-dwellers, West T State, completely routed the 'Cats with an 80-49 feat, The Arizona live had a cold night from the making only 26 per cent of their shots. l EARL LUBBERS RICHARD LEAKEY ROBERT HOPKINS forward forward 3 66 forward The Wildcats handed the Hardin-Simmons Uni- rsity Cowboys a 72-69 defeat to give Arizona a ird place tie in the Border Conference. Pudge Ny- eyer led the scorers with 23 points and came close breaking a school record of 13 consecutive free rows. Jon Connor also had a good night, racking p 18 points. The San Diego Marine Corps Recruit Depot cked Arizona 83-74 for the 'Cats fourteenth loss f the season. The Wildcats were plagued by bad asses and poor shooting all evening. The Wildcats saw their chances of sharing the Conference crown evaporate by a margin of 70 as Tempe's towering 6 ft. 10 in. Marvin West- playing on an injured foot, controlled the Arizona galloped to an 84-68 win over Los An- State College under the leadership of Ed Nymeyer, who set a new all-time Arizona record of 1,199 points. "Fudge" broke the set by Link Richmond with a 21 point per- ln their final game of the season, Arizona was by arch-rivals Arizona State College at empe in a 78-76 thriller. Ralph Youree scored the points on a one-one foul situation with three remaining. Ed Nymeyer finished his college areer by scoring 26 points to give him 408 for the eason and 1,225 for his college career. ELMER GREEN gains wide-eyedxlooks of astonishment from Michigan players and his own teammates apsihe gets set to dump the ball in for two points. The play took place in the first period of a game that saw the 'Cats fall, 88-76. EDDIE MITCHELL CHARLES OSTERMAN LARRY EWALD guard center center 3 67 Frosh basketball coach Alan Stan- ton finished his second consecutive year at the University of Arizona with a win-loss record of 1419. Stanton- graduated from the U of A in 1953 leaving behind him a bril- liant and outstanding career in bas- ketball and football. ARIZONA OPPONENTS 42 Sigma Chi .......... ....... 5 3 69 Davis Monthan AFB . . . . . . .81 48 Tucson High School .... .... 4 7 49 Eastern Arizona JC ..... .... 5 2 44 Sigma Chi ....i..... .... 4 2 69 Varsity Inn ....... .... 5 2 58 Ft. Huachuca ....... .... 4 2 52 Davis Monthan AFB .... .... 5 3 59 Ft. Huachuca ........ .... 5 7 60 Phoenix JC ........... .... 4 2 61 Eastern Arizona JC ..... ..., 5 9 74 Williams AFB ...... . . .65 56 Phoenix JC ...., ,... 5 9 68 Ft. Huachuca ..... .... 5 5 52 Ft. Huachuca ....... . . .48 89 Eastern Arizona JC ..... . . .99 51 Eastern Arizona JC ..... . . .63 64 Phoenix JC ........... . . .43 80 Davis Monthan AFB .... . . .69 88 Williams AFB ....... .. .50 73 ASC Tempe Frosh ,... . . .60 63 Phoenix JC ......... . . .66 63 ASC Tempe Frosh .... . . .72 WILDKITTENS IMPROVE SEASON'S RECORD Coach Allan Stanton's University of Arizona Wildkittens finished out their season with fourteen wins and nine losses. This was a slight improvement over last season's nine-nine mark. In the course of the season the Frosh split two game series with Sigma Chi and Arizona State at Tempe and divided a four game series with Phoenix Junior College. The Wildkittens fared slightly worse at the hands of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and FRESHMAN BASKETBALL TEAM: Andy Liech- ty, Don Montgomery, Herman Hud- son, Wayne Burk, Ron Rumney, Tony Baldwin, Julius Regese, Jim Seal, Miles Zelner, Gary Johnson, Garlic Garrett. Eastern-Arizona Junior College as the airmen won two of three and EAJC won three of four games. The little Wildcats swept four straight from Fort Huachuca and won two from Williams Air Force Base. They also took single victories in games with the Varsity Inn and Tucson High School. High scorer for the Wildkittens was Herman Hudson with 251 points for the season. Runner-up was Don Montgomery with 242. ,,,..4- 'V.. X --. - rss- , In I 'Zi VY ,N I I. Q. Q - I Q ...L-1 F. I I' -n ' f A . 31- ...1-f 1- I- - 5 ..-L' I1-.1V , V-gp -"' - -'F 4.1 - 'f-' 5, I...--' ' -V - - ,Xa "' .V 1' nb . P, I ,y 1 - IJ ' . .N- ' 'Q' 7:5 ,In .I ' , Iv . .rx . 1 . - . - - V ff? .... . . ,,I.- L if I . f I . ' M- 9' Q "." 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Vg" -' ff51p1tif3I',' . 'I ' 2.1 1' ' wif' VTHLF55' L-. - -- 1' .- 1- ' 1, - ,-,,--j-gf.' ."?gI5 'A .TA-. I ,ft--I Q.: .VIg,1b, V'I:'S'-.wkfpf ,-- --"JI,,' fl' '--P -. '.I'V' ' .ifjfff wx V-id-.. .-'.:4V.:w.,1-.-- Vw 4-9+ -- - ' . ' . yy . .','.-gl'-V' .Q ,IIQI ff: V -I ' A-I--1 . I-V I . 4:5 1 IV.. I . I- inf 5.3.1, .- qw... ' A.. " 'U ' ',, ' 'L. -3 1" 1 , . ,- xi- ., --T-If'I'-5 f-.-R, fff1,V2FV9' ' '.'J'M-392-52 ','- ' "t'g'- - ' ff' -y.- IVF.-3' " -f -- - .V gif iii -I I I-. ,I .IA x,V-V . -A PV, , .Q-,I ,.. - -:.'-.., . -.1 , : -14-1 -' 1. V -- - ' -V ., '-. - xi. :V - -1. V . S , I . --. I I. V. --Q.. a-- .- 4.1, "-1 wegx.. NV. nw. .I I., I. A -L-is .HV- BASEBALL 1958 Veteran coach Frank Sancet began his tenth year as Wildcat mentor with a win-loss record of 287-71. Sancet attended the University of Arizona and lettered in football, basketball and baseball. He took over the reins as head coach from James "Pop" MeKale. BASEBALL TEAM: ROW 1: Jerry Wamsley, Lee Hersh, Dick Nixon, Chad Brucker, Larry Hoffman, John Colyer,Jimmy Wilson, Matt Encinas, Jim McConnell, Larry Fivecoat, Jim McGuire, Gene Leek, Jim Ward, Norman Popkin, Bob Maxwell. ROW 2: Billy Farrell, Dick Griesser, 11m Nowinski,'J im Geist, Dave Baldwin, Linn Wallace, Harry Messick, Lionel Romero, Martin Hurd, Alan Hall, Kenny Coopwood, Frank Sancet Al Hovagian. 370 "SAFE" growls the umpire as an uni- , dentified Wildcat plows up the ground at home plate to score another run for Arizona. The 'Cat's lost the game against the University of Utah, 5-7. i I UA HURLERS PACE WILDCAT WINS The University of Arizona Wildcats compiled a win-loss record of 26-6, as of April 21, compared with their 25-3 mark at the same time in 1957. Wildcat slugging power failed to live up the opti- mistic predictions. The 'Cats racked up a total of 245 runs against 138 by opponents- as compared to the 347-160 record last year. Especially poor were the last 12 games in which the Arizona squad chalked up only 52 runs. Marty Hurd scored the most runs for the Wildcats with 31 to his credit. Harry Messick trailed Hurd by only one run. Hurd also tallied 29 runs batted in, but Messick took the honors in the home run departnicnt with five of UA's 21 round- trippers. Coach Frank Sancet's hurling charges had a suc- cessful season. Dave Baldwin struck out 53 men and had a 5-1 record. Jim Ward whiifed 56 batters and made a 6-2 record for himself. Arizona, following last year's trend, won 10 straight before losing its first game to the University of Utah. The Wildcats gave the New Mexico Lobos the biggest drubbing, 18-1. During the Easter recess, the Wildcats traveled to California and chalked up a 4-2 record on the road trip. The 'Cats, having trouble with their batting, swept two games from Los Angeles State and split two-game series with Pepperdine and UCLA. SEASON'S RECORD ARIZONA OPPONENT Camp Pendleton Marines ............. 2 Sul Ross ................ ........ 4 Sul Ross .............. ..... 6 NewMexico... NewMexico... Colorado ......... ..... 3 Colorado ............ ..... 1 Air Force Academy . . . . . . . .6 Air Force Academy . . . . . . . .6 Air Force Academy . . . . . . . .3 Utah .............. ..... 7 Utah ............ ..... 4 Utah ....... ..... 4 Wyoming Wyoming . . . . . .1 Wyoming ARIZONA OPPONENT 11 Iowa . . ....... . . 8 Iowa . . ...... . . 7 Iowa . . . . . 16 Iowa . . . . . 7 Iowa .... . . . 3 Iowa ......... . . . 5 Pepperdine ....... . . . 2 Los Angeles State .... . . . 4 Los Angeles State .... . . . 4 Pepperdine ...... . . . 3 UCLA ...... 3 UCLA ........ 5 Davis-Monthan . . . . . . 3 ASC Tempe 3 ASC Tempe ll Davis-Monthan . . . . . . 371 Arizona's Wildcats continued their winning ways by defeating the Camp Pendleton Marines, 8-2, in the 'Cat's 1958 season opener. Although transfer Jim Ward turned in an excellent per-fortnance by allowing the Marines only two hits, Arizona's batting power was not up to par. On the short end of a 3-0 count in the iifth inning, the 'Cat's broke lose to thump Sul Ross, 1957 national small school champs, 10-4. After giving up three hits in the first inning, hurler Dave Baldwin Went all the way, striking out 11 batters. Norm Popkin pitched WALLOPING the ball into center field Gene Leek grabs a single in the fifth inning, The Wildcats clobbered Col orado State by a margin of 17-3 in the first of a two-game series. the Wildcats to their second win over Sul Ross, 7-6, to sweep the two-game series. Paced by Harry Messick and Alan Hall, the Wildcats routed the New Mexico Lobos, 18-1. Mes- sick hit two home runs while Hall slugged a pair of triples and a double. Jim Ward whiffed 16 batters as Arizona swept the two-game series by clipping the Lobos again the next day, 9-5. Besides Ward's per- formance on the mound, the only other bright spot in a ragged game was Marty Hurd's three-run homer in the sixth. A LEAPING Utah Redskin hauls in ball and puts tag on a homeward bound Wildcat. The Utah squad broke the 'Cat's ten-game winning string by downing the Arizona nine, 7-5, in the lirst clash of a three game series. HURD roars into home plate to chalk up another run for the Wildcat's in hotly contested battle with Sul Ross. The play was set up Harry Messick came to bat in the last of the sixth, two men out, and Hurd on third. Messick had a two-nothing count against him when Sul Ross pitcher hurled a wild throw that let Hurd thunder into home plate and give the 'Cats a 6-3 lead over the visiting team In a wild game with 23 strikeouts and three hit batsmen. the Arizona nine pummeled the Colorado State Rams, l7-3. Shortstop "Chuchi" Ruiz topped Arizona's 16-hit attack with a perfect 4-for-4. A 375- foot line drive homer over right center by Marty Hurd paced the Wildcats to a I5-l victory over Colorado State for a clean sweep of the two game series. A near-capacity crowd of 1,000 saw the Wildcats come from behind to belt the U. S .Air Force Acad- emy, l0-6. The 'Cats trailed in the eighth, but back- to-back homers by Harry Messick, Gene Leek, and Alan Hall paced a five-run outburst. ln the first game of a double header with the flyboys, Gene Leek and Bill Farrell slammed out home runs to aid the 'Cats to a 10-6 win. The nightcap saw Marty Hurd, Bob Maxwell, and Matt Encinas knock out three more homers to give the 'Cats an ll-3 victory. Led by clutch-pitching Blaine Sylvester, the Utah Redskins broke the Arizona winning string by defeat- ing the 'Cats, 7-5. But Arizona snapped back to win the second contest, 14-4. Marty Hurd was the out- standing Arizona batsman with two triples that drove in three runs. Dick Griesser gave the 'Cats their second win, 5-4, over the Redskins on a two-out, two-on homer in the ninth inning. Griesser accounted for all of Arizona's runs in the game. ODGING around Bill Farrell, Wildcat catcher, a Mustang scores for the Davis-Monthan team. Farrell and third baseman Jerry Wamsley at empted to close off the runner and tag him out between third and home, but Farre1l's throw to Wamsley was high, allowing the runner to score 373 DIRT FLIES as a Davis-Monthan Mustang careens into home plate. The Wild- cats were slow on throw to home and the umpire ruled the Mustang safe. In the opener of a three-game series with th Wyoming Cowboys, the 'Cats trounced the Pokes 19-8. Gene Leek drove in six runs to spark Arizonal 17 earned runs. Next, led by Dave Baldwin's super pitching, the 'Cats defeated the Pokes, 9-1. Baldwi allowed only five hits and struck out 11. Althoug Wyoming matched the Wildcats on total hits, th Arizonans used theirs better and dumped the Cow boys, 14-7, to take the third game and the series. The Wildcats took an 11-4 win over the Iow' Hawkeyes in the opener of an annual series. Big Ji Ward whiffed the first nine men in order and gave u his first hit in the ninth. Bobby Maxwell blanked th Iowa squad, 8-0, for the 'Cat's first shut out of th season. Maxwell faced only three men in five of th nine innings of the second game. Arizona eked out 7-6 win over the Hawkeyes in the third game. Ma Encinas drove in the winning run in the eighth. Th fourth game saw the Wildcats, under the leadershi of Birdie Morago and Lionel Romero, shellac th Iowa nine, 16-6. Matt Encinas knocked a homer ove left field fence to bring in three runs in the secon inning. The 'Cats faltered in a double header as low skinned Arizona, 9-7 and 8-3. Although the Wildcat outhit them in the first game, the hits failed to com at the right time. Spotty fielding and ineffective clutc hitting caused the 'Cats to lose both games. 374 TRUTTING into home plate after slu ging ball out of the park, catcher Al Hall is welcomed at plate by 'Ca Marty Hurd and "Chuchi" Ruiz. I V , rxs A A A LUNG REACH for the ball by Utah's first baseman isn't enough to tag out Wildcat "Chuchi" Ruiz. Ruiz ham mered out an infield single and reached the first sack standing up. Arizona trounced the Redskins by a score of 14-4 On a road trip to California the Wildcats' bat- ing was not up to snuff. The 'Cats had a 4-2 record nd compiled only 21 points in the six-game tour. In their first away game, the Wildcats tumbled he Pepperdine Waves, 5-3. After being held scoreless to the ninth, the 'Cats came alive and tallied all of their runs then. Harry Messick doubled with the bases loaded to bring in three runs. Then by a score of 8-4 the Waves handed Arizona its fourth loss of the season. Arizona picked up three runs in the fifth and Gene Leek homered in the ninth. The Wildcats swept a double header against Los Angeles State, 2-0 and 4-2. The first game, Arizona's second shutout, saw Harry Messick account for both of the runs. In the nightcap, Messick also knocked a second inning home run as Burdette Morago hurled a three hitter. Paced by Dave Baldwin's four hitter, the Arizona nine ekecl. out a slim victory of 3-2 over the UCLA Bruins. Out of the five runs, only one was earned and that came when Alan Hall singled and later stole home. But UCLA retaliated by clawing the 'Cats, 7-3. The Wildcats' batting power failed to jell and the Bruins tagged Jim Ward for seven runs and 12 hits. ALL IN VAIN, shortstop Jerry Lewis slides into third base but is tagged out 375 Coach Bob Gotavac SEASON'S RECORD ARIZONA OPPOINZENT 5 Tucson High School ......,...... 2 Phoenix Junior College ........... 5 9 Amphitheater High School ........ 2 7 Davis Monthan Air Force Base .... 5 I4 Catalina High School ............ 2 9 Davis Monthan Air Force Base .... 4 ll Salpointe High School ........... 0 8 Davis Monthan Air Force Base .... 0 I6 Pueblo High School ............. 0 8 Davis Monthan Air Force Base .,.. 6 16 Davis Monthan Air Force Base .... 8 8 Tucson High School ............. 4 12 Davis Monthan Air Force Base .... 1 8 Eastern Arizona Junior College .... 4 ll Phoenix Junior College .......... 4 WILDKITTENS PROVE WINNING POTENTIAL Under newly appointed coach Bob Gotavac, the Freshman baseball team chalked up a record season of 12 wins and three losses up to April 20, Gotavac, a Tucson resident, was named in March to fill the vacancy. He is a veteran in baseball, having played the sport in high school, college and later for the pro- fessional Tucson Cowboys. Since he received his posi- tion, the team has completed an outstanding season. In the traditional Freshman-Varsity conflict, the Varsity edged out the Frosh 6-5 with a ninth inning rally. The Frosh also racked up an easy 8-0 victory over Davis Monthan Air Force Base. In two other contests with the D-M Mustangs, the Kittens trounced them by large scores. The UA men took three out of four in a series with Phoenix College. Their defeat was the first time in a two-year stretch against these opponents. By a score of 7-4, Eastern Arizona J. C. was defeated. Pitchers Mike Clark and Armando Urbina set new records in late spring games. Clark scored 26 strikeouts in two games and Urbina 25. Outstanding hitter was Gene Bubala. who slammed three home runs. Q Q Q seats QS FRESHMAN BASEBALL: ROW 1: Arleigh Biehler, Chuck Shoemaker, Les Smith, Gary Bouton, Les Fenderson Jim Mason, Armando Urbina, James Newlin. ROW 2: Ramon Bazuto, Ken Hawk, Jim Johnston, Chuck Giles Carl Bowens, Tom Kassner, Dave Hayes, Don Lauer, Bill Mott, Miles Zeller, Tom Browning, Coach Bob Gotavac ROW 3: Bill McCoy, Al Wallendorf, Jim Fox, Gene Bubala, Ray Gozik, Herman Hudson. 376 TEAM: ROW 1: Ray Hiscok, Ed Brown. Jim Lair, Emmett Smith, Eric Crump, Frank Ensign, George Young, John Piggee. ROW 2: Bill uell Garfie Garrett, Lee Olsen, Tony Buehl, Warren Livingston, Delbert Hodge, Angrls Alexander, John Piety. ROW 3: Dave Schick, Kenny Carl Morawitz, Jim Burke, Ron Rumney, Pat Brown, Bruce Bryam. ROW 4: Coach Carl Cooper, Dick Allegretti, Ray Hughes, ,, Lynn Cornett, Richard Moore. TRACK 1958 . SEASON'S RECORD ARIZONA OPPONENT 3 2 Southern California ....... 1 15 W ' ' 1416 New Mexico 51W Brigham Young . . . . .79M 53 San Jose State ,... . . .78 50 Colorado ...... . . .81 75 Mi lowa ............... . . .55 W 106 Los Angeles State .......... 24 Q5 6526 Camp Pendleton Marines .... 65W 1 'L 1- f at-4 ,,-ua.: . 1 T' K ...fwfr 3 . h .- - - ' -9 - ,QTL dil- Track coach Carl Cooper graduated from the University of Arizona after an outstanding career in foot- ball and track. Since Cooper took over the thinclad reins, his teams have been top contenders for BC crowns, winning two and iinishing second in the rest. 377 THINLIES SCORE HIGH IN WILIJIIAT high jumper Angris Alexander clears bar with inches to spare in a 6'4W" jump. Alexander's jump broke a dual meet record with San Jose State. The Arizona thinlies lost the match to the visiting Spartans, 78-53. DISPLAYING perfect form, Ray Hiscok unleashes 52'11W" toss in a dual meet with BYU Cougars. The heave set a dual meet record and gave Hiscok a Hrst in the event. WEIGHT EVENTS Continuous improvement was the keynote of 1 Arizona cindermenis 1958 season. The Wildc chalked up a win-loss record of 3-4, as of April 19, against such powerhouses as USC and San Jose State. After four straight losses, the 'Cats took two in a row during the Easter recess over Iowa and Los Angeles State College. Iowa succumbed to the Wild- cat thinlies, 55W-75W and LA State was wallop. 106-24, in the highest scoring ever made against 1 California squad. UA also edged out Camp Pend ton, 65M-65W. The Wildcats had only a few prominent runn and Held men. Among these were miler Geoi Young, who had a top time of 4:23 in the mile a 9234.7 in the two-mile, Angris Alexander, who posted a high jump height of 6' 4W"g and Emmet Smith, who turned his best time of 1157.3 in the 880. Although weak in many running events, the 'C were strong in the weight department. Coach Carl Cooper stated "Fm pleased with the showing in 1 weight events. We have the best group of weightrr in the school's history." Statistics backed Cooper up Ray Hiscok heaved the shot-put a distance of 55 to establish a new school record at the LA State meet Ed Brown set a new record for the Wildcats, also the LA State meet, in the discus with a mighty hez of 159 feet. Freshman Jim Burke ran neck and neck with Brown, having set the previous record of 157' in the San Jose meet. FLAILING his arms to gain more forward momentum, John Piggee strives for distance in broadjump against BYU. Sw slllnh the tape first again, Arizona's George Young lirst place with a time of 9:34.7 in the two-mile Sm' Jose' The Spartans sank the Wndcms' 78 53' PRESENTING a study in black and white, Jeri Meier clears the is-foot mark in pole-vaultingl event against Colorado. Moler, teammate Frank Ensign and Wedell Jennings of Colorado tied for first place and split the points. FRESHMAN Jim Burke sets school record on 157 feet in the discus: WEIGHTMAN Ed Brown heaves the discus 159 feet to set a The record was established early in the season against San Jose, new SCh00l record. The toss came in away game against but was broken later in the season at the Los Angeles State Meet Los Angeles State. The 'Cats trampled LA, 106-24, rack- by Senior Ed Brown. ing up highest score ever made against the Californians. 379 1 ff--1 Y ...i fi +2- This year for the tenth straight time, the UA Wildcats defeated the ASC Sun Devils in two meets held on October 26 and November 9. UA has man- aged to remain victor since 1952 when they defeated ASC and claimed the track crown for the first time. In other meets the University Cross Country team sprinted to fame. Wildcat George Young placed first, setting a new record of 15.32 seconds, in the Aztec Invitational. As a team, Arizona placed second and chalked up a fine set of scores. In the American Legion Invitational Cross Country Run held on October 12 at Legion Post 6, George Young ran alone and placed second. LEAPING forward at the sound of t gun, Wildcat trackmen gain an ear lead in first of a series of two mee which took place on October 26t CROSS COUNTRY SEASON'S RECORD CLOW SCORE WINSJ ARIZONA OPPONENTS 20 Arizona State College .,......... 35 23 Arizona State College .... .... 3 8 380 CROSS COUNTRY TEAM: ROW 1: Garfie Garrett, Emmett Smith, George Young. ROW 2: Coach Carl Cooper, Kenny Meenan, Ray Hughes, Tony Buehl. TENNIS Wildcat netters racked up a record of nine wins and three losses in intercollegiate competition this year. The squad had six returning varsity Iettermen: Her- man Carillo, Dick Hubbard, Ernest Schoop, Bill Hinderer, Ken Gemundt and Darell Fisher. Ernest Schoop, number one varsity man, won the trophy in the Unit Intercollegiate Tournament. Further honors were won by Ernest Schoop and Her- man Carillo in doubles competition. In the Arizona Closed Tennis Meet, the limber Arizona pair captured the doubles championship and repeated this feat in the Arizona Open Meet held in April. Representing Arizona with fine tennis style, the UA team traveled to Lamar Tech, University of Southern California and Redlands University. C. Z. Lesher, head of the tennis team for many years, once again coached the Wildcat netters. ARIZONA OPPONENTS 6 Tucson Raquet Club . . . ....... . . .2 8 Tucson Raquet Club . . . . . . .4 8 Air Force Academy .... .... 0 9 Air Force Academy .... .... 0 1 Lamar Tech ........ .... 6 8 Argoney .......... .... 1 9 Argoney... ....0 1 U S C . . . . . . .9 O U C L A . . . . . .9 9 Ca1Tech... ....0 9 Redlands . . . . . .0 VARSITY TENNIS TEAM: ROW 1: Coach C. Z. Lesher, Herman Carillo, Dick Hubbard, Ernest Schoop, Bill Hinderer and Ron Minson. ROW 2: Ken Gemundt, Barry Edberg, Darell Fisher. , - ' - -.- ' gg . 'Q I l"" If vi Q ' A . , I ui ., ': ' ,f it , . . ,.. , - ,g,, i.. . - ...nv ii- ' .A I. . ' I' ,Zf ,.,,.--..-4-.--A N I -. T.. i -, Y f ,i f - ' - 'I .ia I , ' 5 . ' Nw ,N In ff-gig, ' - ' A . " ,. ii -1" I ' i I - 4 1 ' i.".f.' . I , -V--Y - .. ,.i, . . . .. .- - L .Sur :I -z-- ,---Y. :Fred . T ,7,,,-,,,,Y,,,,,,,, SERVING a clever ball, number two varsity tennis man Herman Carillo warms up for his game in the Open Tour- nament which was held at the University late in April. GRACEFUL in movement, Wildcat Ernie Schoop smoothly retrieves a tricky serve as he practices for his coming meets in the fine University of Arizona tennis courts. 381 GULF VARSITY TEAM: ROW 1: Bob Helzer, Tag Merritt, Neil Brown. ROW 2: Coach Roy Tatum, Verne Nicholas, Roy Eitel and Dick Harrington. if V A-. -,. , ' "A 'C -:5 7-5 A i FOLLOWING through after making a shot, Ron Eitel ex- hibits some of the style which made him top man on the Wildcat golf team this year. He took top honors in the California League which was played during Easter. GOLF Competition was keen this year for positions on the UA golf team. The arrival of a skilled batch of new freshman players made elimination tryouts nec- essary. Early in the first semester, assistant coach Roy Tatum announced the opening of the tryouts, which were continued until semester break. After the team had been chosen, much time was spent in training for matches scheduled later in the spring. The Wildcat golfers hit their peak when they came out on top in the Loyola-California League which they played during Easter vacation. Arizona traveled to the coast where they scored more points than the other teams participating in the league. Returning lettermen this year were Tag Merritt, Neil Brown, Don Keller, Ron Eitel and Edward Nymeyer. l I CAREFULLY making that all important final shot, Neil Brown completes a match as Al Starr watches. fy I '- - A A ,.L,t'.' , f., ff-1?Tn' V ' A - -. , , " 1- s- 1-.-F -':'-.':' T,Lijf 'f' 'i-'.fff.'.aP ':"f7g1 tg ' H:"j " ,zu ,-f 4'-wi,-Gt a ' ' at ai,-:1.,2:'n1gt 1. 1 . , , 1 ' "'1.ftL", 1 '. . ,--:'- --..-.5 - Q ,ff - ' , -J :.- 3 NH., L lr , ' . gs, 1-4.' ',.. I . v .V , :ll . .at tiijibg 'f - - Q . r, -. 11 , t'.,' ' L' l A 1 1- 1 . ' - 1 - ,Y 'lg'-J' if .' 7 4,-Ye, , . . , , , f 7 mn., 1 :JSA Q' 71. 1 . ,...,Q A' .7 N " 'fig 1-'xii L ISMAY leaves the mat victorious after defeating Sun SUN DEVIL Bob Moore attempts to roll Wildcat Carl Morawitz but only gets a vil grappler, Al Stoner, in the heavyweight division. sore neck for his trouble. Morawitz won match and Arizona won the meet. Arizona's mat squad ended the 1958 wrestling season with tive wins and two losses. Coached by Pete Nichols, the Wildcats grapplers split a two game series with Tempe matmen. The Wildcats lost their first match to the Sun Devils 17-18, but trounced the Tempe squad 21-10 in the next meeting of the two rivals. Top Arizona wrestler was Bill Ismay, who re- mained undefeated during the season. RESTLING TEAM: ROW l: Pete Nichols, Sonny Valencia, Jerry Sanders, Stan Grimes, Al Gonzales, Ken Copwood. ROW 2: Bill Ismay, Ken eedham, Jim Corbet, Ray Mungaray, Carl Morawitz. 383 SMUUTHLY exhibiting the free gymnastic style with which he aided the Wild- cats in their outstanding win over San Diego Naval Base, team member Dick Griswold is shown practicing before leaving for the meet held on the coast. GYM NASTICS L4 --ii ,: CDMPLETING an almost perfect handstand, Cliff Shirk strates winning form at Senior Day exhibitions. The University of Arizona gymnasts with a 1 composed largely of the AAU champions of last 5 out-scored its toughest opponent, San Diego N Base, early in the season. Coach Roy Tatum, in first year as gymnastics head, led the team in a schedule of matches and exhibitions. Returning AAU champion rope climber Nor Anton led the team as number one man in matches against Tempe. The Wildcats lost the match, but in the second meeting of the two te UA came out on top. Top scorers of the year were Cliff Shirk, Turner and Sam Holland. Norman Anton, John Ji son, Sam Holland, Ernest Trujillo, Rae Romero Dave Cary were awarded varsity letters. Given blankets were Cliff Shirk and Sam Holland. irifsiil GYMNASTICS TEAM: ROW 1: Jim Tumer, Cliff Shirk, Ernie Trujillo, Jim Ford, Bethol Buckalew, Coach Roy Tatum. ROW 2: Dave Cary, Sam Holland, Jim Henry, Hank Holland, Bob Ford, Joe Johnson, Dick Griswold. 384 4 SWIMMING TEAM: ROW 1: John Mikell, Bob Ford, Ron Barnet, Lloyd Wiborg, Paul Kerschner, Frank Gill. ROW 2: Paul Ledwith, Joe Higgins, George McLain, Pat Wilson, Howie Bernstein. ROW 3: Roland Cesarini, Jim Nelson, Milt Pettit, Stan Glickman, Ray Dull, Coach Charles Ott. W zu wl- SWIMMING The 1958 varsity swimming squad scored eight wins and four losses, capturing four important meets on the coast. Breaking records that had been on the books since the forties, the tankmen set incredible records. Sprinter George McLaine, a fresman, smoothly set new records of two former Arizona stars. In back- stroke competition, Paul Ledwith swam a new time record as did Joe Higgins, Lloyd Wiborg and George McLaine. In addition to these regular men, Coach Ott has many new and promising freshmen con- tenders. SEASON'S RECORD ARIZONA OPPONENT 42 UCLA .... ...... 4 4 62 Whittier .... .... 2 4 34 Occidental .... .... 5 2 60 Forkland . . . . . . .26 37 Cal Tech ....55 61 Redlands . . . . . . .25 40 UCLA ....46 55 UCLA .... .... 3 l for breath after completing the 200 yd. Butterfly race EXHIBITING perfect form, Larry Arnold outscores his UCLA opponent 1n a spring meet with UCLA,tankman Howard Wakefield learns the spring diving competition. Arizona divers easily placed ahead of the he has placed second for the Wildcats. California men in both form and timing. RIFLE TEAM Competing in postal and shoulder-to-shoulder matches, the rifle team had an average season. The Wildcats scored 18 wins to 6 losses in postal matches with teams throughout the central and western states. The sharpshooters placed in the upper half of the annual match at UCLA. In February the Wildcats combined with the UA ROTC ride squad to participate in the George Wash- ington Day meet at Phoenix. The high powered .30 caliber riile team scored 30th in a field of 100 teams comprising some of the best military and civilian teams in the country. RIFLE TEAM: ROW 1: Craig Brown, Al- lan Fork, Phil Vosskuhler. ROW 2: M!Sgt. Edmond Lucas, Foster Cayce, Mike Sherman, Jim Rector, Capt. T. P. Fox. SOCCER TEAM Soccer has been introduced to the UA campus under the sponsorship of the International Students Club. The only team of its kind in the Southwest, team members under the leadership of Luigi Leparulo have been working to promote interest inthe unusual sport. They have visited the various high schools in the area setting up preliminary instruction on a trial basis. If the game is well liked, the high school soccer programs will be continued. Although they have played no games to date due to scarcity of competition, the team's twenty-two members hold practice games every week. -I .1 l 4 i 7 i SOCCER TEAM: ROW 1: Dick Frauenfelder, Victor Dubarte, Ernest Tibor, Jon Legallet, Carroll Dekle, and Milton Laflen. ROW 2: Bob Esch Luigi Leparulo, Walter Ekstrom, Jack Snyder and Ricardo Nelson. 4' 'U' -'iff J! INTRAMURAL MANAGERS- ROW 1' . . Bob Svob, Ed Coyle, Doug Draper, George Wallace, Jerry Millett, Steve Williams, Ed Mota, Joe Poodiack, Bill Rauh ROW 2: Ken Roenig, Larry Despain, Ron Russell, Lee Smith, Byron Garretson, Larry Pope, Bob Baughman, Ted Robens. DELTA CHI'S RECLAIM INTRAMURAL BANNER For the sixth time in the last seven years, Delta Chi compiled enough points by late April to be as- sured of the intramural banner. This was Delta Chi's third consecutive championship. The closely contested runner-up spot showed Sigma Chi ahead of Kappa Sigma by a mere eight points. Phi Gamma Delta was next with a firm hold on the fourth position. Dormitories were left far behind by Pinal Hall, which secured eighth place. The various fraternities and social clubs on campus competed vigourously this year for possession BOB SVUB, intramural supervisor, points out a change .in the intramural schedule to Arizona student managers Howard Bernstein and Bill Rauh. 388 of the intramural banner. Enthusiasm was high with over a third of the eligible students participating in the program. The intramural program was directed by Bob Svob, the University's Intramural Supervisor, with the aid of two student mangers, Bill Rauh and Howard Bernstein. The program is divided into major, minor and individual sports, with the major sports adding up to the most banner points and the individual sports the least points. This year, organiza- tions have stressed the individual sports as the decid- ing factor in winning the banner. INTRAMU RAL STANDINGS AS OF APRIL 22 l. Delta Chi ................... .... 2. Sigma Chi ...... 3. Kappa Sigma ..... 4. Phi Gamma Delta . . . 5. Tau Delta Phi ........ 6. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 7. Aggie ............. 8. Pinal .......... 9. Phi Delta Theta .. . 10. Phi Kappa ........ ll. Alpha Tau Omega . . . 12. Sigma Nu ........ 13. Wesley ............ 14. Lambda Chi Alpha .... 15. ASCE ........... 1028 982 974 916 804 804 796 741 716 658 653 593 564 562 530 UUTBALL WINNERS: ROW l: Tom Tribolet, Ron Walker, ugh Caldwell, Ed Pogue. ROW 2: Bill Brierley, Bob ount Bob King, T. Ed Woods, Pat Foley, Jim Hill. FLAG FOOTBALL 1. Phi Delta Theta 2. Phi Gamma Delta 3. Kappa Sigma SWIMMING l. Phi Gamma Delta 2. Delta Chi 3. SigmaChi BASKETBALL 1. Sigma Chi 2. SantaCruz 3. Pinal Hall -. ff:- lg II f 5,i1I.aLi'i i I . OPPONENTS fall in bone-crushing pile-up during flag football playoff. SWIMMING WINNERS: ROW 1: Nick Nichols, Vernon Ellis, Lloyd Wiborg. ROW 2: Brian Bulley, Danny Mariscal, George McLain. BASKETBALL WINNERS: Buddy Mauer, Joe Gunter, Rod Wood, Ed Moore, RACING down the court, Sigma Chi Joe Gunter steals ball Mike Moore Bob Black, Ron Spicer, Duane Hollaran. from Santa Cruz player and goes for another two points. 389 WARMING up, I oe Bagnaro and three students play a lively game of handball. HANDBALL 1. Delta Chi 2. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 3. Sigma Chi HORSESHOES 1. Kappa Sigma 2. Delta Chi 3. Phi Gamma Delta RIFLE 1. Arizona Hall 2. Aggies 3. Tau Delta Phi INTENT on his next throw, champion Tom Truman demon- strates the way to pitch a winning game of horseshoes. RIFLE WINNERS: ROW 1: Nick Astrada ,Penrod Turk. ROW 2: Jim Barber, LINING their sights with the bulls-eye, Nick Astrada and Roger Turk, Penrod Turk lie on the floor to practice shoot at the target. 390 WRESTLING WINNERS: ROW l: AI Fifield, Bob Lutes, Ernie GRAPPLERS Jon Leonard and Keith Runion fight for top in a practice match Hawes. ROW 2: Dave Burnham, Frank Saller, John Cline, John Stollar. WRESTLING l. Kappa Sigma 2. Delta Chi 3. Sigma Chi GYMNASTICS l. Wesley 2. Delta Sigma Phi 3. Phi Gamma Delta TABLE TENNIS 1. Tau Delta Phi 2. ' Pinal Hall 3. Delta Chi POCKET BILLIARDS l. Delta Chi 2. Sigma Chi 3. Tau Delta Phi I A TRICKY "dislocate" is executed by Johnny Barringer. ABLE TENNIS Winner Slams il shot toward ihe Camera- IIN INTRIIMURAL billiards player sinks a long shot into the comer pocket. 391 CROSS COUNTRY WINNERS: ROW l: Bud Wiederhold, Dick Edwards. ROW 2: GRIMACING HS he crosses the fi11iSh line, Delta Chi Bill Rauh, George Wallace. Edwards breaks the tape and wins the cross country race. CROSS COUNTRY 1. Delta Chi 2. Phi Gamma Delta 3. Kappa Sigma VOLLEYBALL l. Phi Delta Phi 2. Delta Chi 3. Kappa Sigma TRACK 1. Aggie 2. Delta Chi 3. Phi Gamma Delta VOLLEYBALL WINNERS: ROW 1: Tom Slutes, Barry Rutledge, Lynn Laney, Pete Johnson. ROW 2: Ted Roper. Ted Warner, Sid Kain, George Rountree, Jerry Angle. FAR JUMPING trackman soars through the air for a respec- GRIMACING as he leaps oyer the last hurdlettrackman Jim tible distance in the broadjump event of intramural track. Gregg pulls ahead of his competitors to wm days event. 392 ' ' 'fl-,'.f5i5Yf':'AZ-3 ' 5 lf? 'V " ww, wifdm -gin ,, , W N V 1 ll. . , . My 'I :'V'fq':vLJ':x . I W ."7li4 A -I-Hi L xv ', - a LQ3f':f , TT Wi Z5 5 .Q w, l ' Q 1" Iv F., , ,A , "' Y W 1- Lff iii' " 'ffl -f' I -', l ,fry fp ' -' ,film ' ' t - ' .VA-'ff L- vif'."' ' ,' my' " , 'w?'rZ ,- 1 7 , 'x , I , , Av f..', ,. , ,,.f I" . . ,,f f - , argl rid v - "VA J. r Y, , l L,A.:'. N A W:-Aww , I-- , , 'A .,.,- v A -if-H ruff: . f , ,W . 3, - rf .., -5-'qfii 'vw X. If 615 V 4 ' V V 'iN .1 lb' ,L.,,. K I ,. r- . 4 g-9 ' .L .YW , ' fs" ,-.gsm 254: 4 , ' ,Al Q . , 1 in ,- f ,. ,w , w'g..'fN V, Y J, ' mf . riff-iz+p, , ,wif 533351, " f- ew -' 'fit-9 ' 'Q "f,bfJi' ffm, ' 1' ff- " I - 1'1:f55?t5' ..2-vif."T',- .-,f?r,.,.,,7 N.-1,375 iij,,,Jff'g' J"QfY '?U1,,9'Vf'7EQ6f2f 'E -'F'-:ii 573 "'kZff7 .vQ1774'.i-1 L" ':'?'f'B5 'W' . ' , Q-.zwf-:wa af- f ' ' Q Li V-, "ww n5.:QAQf1,'Q 0 - f' ..j1,.'- . ,f7'fTT"'5'..-"' Q-eg .,, 'Q 05:41. eg 'cf ig? ff' ' 5,5 iff! --LE., ig J ' '1,Q5z'I:'A' 11 2 lf' ,-, f.. F "'. gif: cf '- ,. df- R, P71155 r lv ,,..-ff -1 ff' ",. 4 ri E I ff? ui- Q, Cv:- X,-fd!" sf ,, 'T Li-,.1.,A n , xx, ' V' .rv --- ugflfi, W1 p ' xx.. 1-- , . Lg . Lvl. . 1 W ws A Q r- . .sl 'f I., . v 5' lx' r Av V' My - - M -I N - 5' Q '-. ., 31, , x 'Km A V ' ,, . ' L1 was 1- fy- A fx ' .- I .-go 1-' K' X, Yu , 6 " I ' ' -mp, ' 'Q -b ., ' N, . ' -r -1-it h 'i , NM - -,.,,,. 1 President of WAA was Donna Wal- lis. She was active in WAA as presi- dent of "A" Club and as a member of the Executive Board. This year Donna was honored with the High Point Trophy. WOM EN,S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION The Women's Athletic Association is assisted by the Wo1nen's Physical Education Department and holds an extensive intramural program throughout the year. A wide variety of sports is olfered so that every University woman may participate. Membership and major awards in WAA are based on a point system. One hundred points entitle a woman to membershipg 1000 points to an "Av blazerg 1800 points to the coveted "A" blanket. By playing in the various intramural events, a member earns Day. Points are also given to women on Executive Board, captains, sports leaders and assistants. Some major sports which WAA schedules are archery, badminton, softball, swimming and volley- ball. Minor sports include table tennis and billiards. Co-recreational teams compete in volleyball and bowling. Sports honoraries sponsored by WAA are "A" Club, Racquet Club ftennisj, Orchesis fmodern dancej, Putters Cgolfl and Mermaids Cswimmingl. points toward these awards, presented on Women's President of the women's organization was Donna Wallis. Miss Hileman was the WAA advisor. i 1 , .f WM BDARD: ROW I: Sue O'Brien, Charlotte Salyer, Nancy Gould, Ann Holmes. ROW 2: Tilli Barlow, Mary Leigh Dalton, Carol Kucheman, Donna Wallis, Macel Thompson, Allison Newman. ROW 3: Barbara Hancock, Virgie Manker, Kae Andreen, Peggy Rupert, Barbie Wall, Barbara Caffery. 394 CAROL KUCHEMAN, 1958 SPORTSWGMAN Carol Kucheman was chosen Outstanding Sports- oman of 1958. This honor is given to a graduating enior on the basis of her sportsmanship, organiza- ion, leadership and participation in WAA. Selection s made by the underclass members of the WAA oard. Miss Kucheman has been in "A" Club for two ears and served as WAA vice-president this year. Although Miss Kucheman is active in many ports, her favorite ones are basketball, golf and ockey. She is a member of Delta Delta Delta sorority nd is graduating with a major in physical education. IIUICKLY passing' basketball, Carol warms up before game. CAROL KUCHEMAN, chosen outstanding WAA sportswoman, shoots for basket. PRACTIGING on front lawn of WAA building, Carol improves her stroke and driving swing. Golf is one of Carol's favorite sports. 395 I I 1 BATTER UP! Softball players practice for the spring intramural tournament. SWIMMING WINNERS: ROW 1: Theo Barr, Jan Heinemen, Gloria Gee, Sarah Jew- ell. Carolyn Frakes. ROW 2: Barbie Wall, Martha Jo Anderson, Lin Fitz- gerald, Marianne Downend, Sandy Anderson. ROW 3: Noel Ruhberg, Sandy McVay, Sue Wood, Nancy Gould, Len Mattei, Pat Culbertson, Abbey Adams. SWIMMING Kappa Alpha Theta SOFTBALL Incomplete TENNIS SINGLES: Sandra Veenboer, Jane Brlsack DOUBLES: Kappa Kappa Gamma - L n ll It I ,I ' o t: INTERGRUUP DOUBLES WINNERS: ROW 1: Susie Maxwell, Sally Steiger. ROW 2: TENNIS SINGLES WINNERS: Sandra Veenboer, Jane Bnsack Cynthia Brown, Janet Cooper, Elizabeth Haas, Joan Cooper. 396 BASKETBALL WINNERS: ROW 1: Bonnie Berger, Pat Sullivan, Holly Willis. ROW 2: Charlotte Salyer, Donna Wallis. Lynne Dailey, Pat Nardone. BASKETBALL Chi Omega VOLLEYBALL Kappa Alpha Theta CO-REC VOLLEYBALL Kappa Alpha Theta - Kappa Sigma C0-REC VULLEYBALL WINNERS: ROW 1: Margie Barrie, Noel Ruhberg, Nancy Gould, Barbie Wall. ROW 2: Len Mattei, Harry Boone, Gene Baldwin, Tom Smallcomb, Bob Lutes, Linda Marston. e I AS ONE OPPONENT falls to the floor in an effort to spike volley ball, team- mates Nancy Gould and Noel Ruhberg watch alertly as ball is finally netted 397 WATCH that ball! Chris Laning singles winner ofthe table tennis tourna- ment, practices for the Fall Sports Day which was held this year at Tempe. 398 AIMING cue stick at billiard ball, Sue Lindsley challenges Flory Jordan to a game of pool. Since billiards has be- come popular as a women's sport, Uni- versity coeds enter the National Inter- collegiate Pool Tournament each year. BILLIARDS Kappa Alpha Theta TABLE TENNIS Christie Laning HOCKEY Independents MAKE that goal! Members of a hockey team playing in WAA tournament race with ball down field toward the goal. WINNERS for 1957-1958 were Gail Gaskin, Gwen Whitnell. BOWLING WINNERS: Jean Donaldson, Nancy Dearden, Barbara Ehnert. ,I JV '- ARCHERY 25 ADVANCED - Gwen Whitnell INTERMEDIATE - Gail Gaskin BEGINNING - Barbara Cason X BOWLING Phrateres GOLF Susan Alstrin BADMINTON SINGLES: Helen Nenson, Donna Wallis DOUBLES: Nancy Gould and Helen Nenson TERRY HOPP follows through on her swing as Barbara Hancock waits to tee off FRACTICING for women's spring singles contest, Pauline Roberge stretches to hit birdie back over net to opponent. I 399 J Ji. HA" CLUB MERMAIDS Once a WAA member earns 1000 sports points, she automatically receives an "A" blazer and be- comes a member of the "A" Club. "A" Club sponsored a sports tournament among the faculty and students of the Physical Education Department. Members served on Mom and Dad's Day. Mermaids is a national swimming honorary. Members are selected on the basis of swimming ability at tryouts held at the beginning of each se- mester. Besides performing on Mom and Dad's Day, Mermaids presented an Aquacade in the spring. This year's theme for their show was "Splashes in Color? MERMAIDS: ROW 1: Andree Leininger, Jan Heineman Judi Dovale Lynn Fitzgerald Sandra McVay Terry Ho Gini Dod e Vir mi H ll , , , , PP, 8 1 8 3 3 Dianne Fellman, Shirley Ann Ransom. ROW 2: Nat Prussing, Lila Wisdom, Linda Merrill, Sue O'Bryan, Karen Herreid, Patsy Burdett Sue Lauderback, Linda Hynes, Betty Best, Sue Ankeny, Sue Smart, Carol Landsberg, Barbara Caffrey, Cynthia Griffin, Anne Feichtmeir Shelley Ludwig Joan Humphrey. ROW 3: Louise Tower, Noel Ruhberg, Barby Balaban, Judi Boldes, Betty Hoe. 0 "A" CLUB: ROW 1: Carol Kucheman Bonnie Berger. ROW 2: Virgie Man ker, Katie Schaller, Donna Wallis RACQUET CLUB: ROW 1: Miss Barbara Green, Sandra Veenboer, Mary Acton, Jane Harrison, Carol Carter. ROW 2: Nicki Fish, Susan Maxwell, Nancy Stanford, Pat Sullivan, Susan Cornell, Priscilla Hamilton. ROW 3: Virginia Manker, Georgeanne DuHy, Peggy Ruppert, Lynda Steger, Ann Holmes. RACQUET CLUB ORCHESIS Orchesis, the national dance honorary, presented a winter studio performance and a final dance con- cert. Each semester tryouts were held where hopefuls danced before Orchesis members. Presiding over the group was Sharon Blakely. Mrs. Anne Natonek was Orchesis advisor. Members for Racquet Club, the tennis honorary for women, were chosen at a tennis tournament spon- sored by the organization each semester. Members received Racquet Club jackets. President of the group was Georgeanne Duffy and secretary-treasurer was Nancy Stanford. RCHESIS: Ann Castleton. Margaret Livengood, Gail Stewart, Anne Weinzapfel, Sharon Blakely, Barbara Mel- lick. Norma Veliz. 401 desert desert desert desert desert desert desert desert esert desert esert desert esert desert esert CS d de desert desert de : d U W advczftisimgd For the yery latest in fashionable footwear - lt's Lewis Design Shoes. LEWIS SALON SHOES 55 EAST PENNINGTON You will find the shoes and matching handbag for every occasion in Lewis' Collegeset Room. 4 Margie Baldwin selects a gift from the beautiful selection ojiered by UNIVERSITY IEWELEPIS 939 EAST THIRD AT PARK "On the Square" Sherry Snoke and Ed Morgan '1 Pictured is the new HOW- ARD 81 STOFFT-PBSW branch at 75 North Park Avenue in Tucson. HOW- ARD 8z STOFFT is also located downtown at 40 E. Pennington. The Park Avenue Branch features School Supplies Sc Equip- ment, Office Furniture, Business Machines and Service. The Pennington store specializes in Sta- tionery and Oflice Supply items. 530 W. Washington Phoenix Phone AL 8-6661 - Prescott ' Flagstaff ' Mesa ' Safford 0 Bisbee Q- LJ 5 HOWARD 8- STOFFT lTucsonl YUMA STATIONERS lYumal B 94 Y Q 5 I sunptvesounomeuvco, ALSO AT 75 N. PARK AVENUE IN TUCSON --,twig-i M. J gi' --... 1 l .-HIV. OYWTJ 5 lil' lluil llmn'-' X ,.,- are alway sure to please that special date. - . . ...... ,..,.- ..---.-.. V :L-l Janie Rosenblum and Fred Kay are looking over one of the bold new Pontiac Bonneville Converiibles in the showroom of the Your flowers . . by Hal Burns . . . 1 Hackett Mom' CO' llol B A Um Poms Hackett Motor Go E. speedway 1 0' H A' "Heller lo Serve You . Q fest--ii-L...L vi U-U" on nal: Phone EA 5-2634 405 1430 North Oracle Road KAREN UTKE - C0-Editor MARY LEE HUTCHISON - C0-Editor DOUEIHS, AfiZ0I1H Tucson, Arizona majoring in Business Elementary Education Kappa Kappa Gamma Kappa Alpha Theta travel in Europe Cwants toj plans to attend Princeton Theological Seminary. for Masters in Christian Education Featuring the Four young ladies responsible for publishing the 1958 desert 406 PAT LARSON - Art Editor Phoenix Commercial Art next year: will go to California. Husband, Bill Larson has been accepted at UCLA Medical School Kappa Kappa Gamma ANDREA LOTT - Business Manager Tucson, Arizona Elementary Education Delta Delta Delta ambition: to teach in elementary grades ARIZONA TRADE BINDERY PHOENIX We too are proud of the work we did in producing the Covers and Binding the 1958 Desert I Bound to Please 1 407 nfmmmq leaf' Open 9:30-5:30 - Fri. 9:30 81 N. 6th Avenue - Ph. 3-4751 Tucson "JUNIOR BUSINESSMI-EN" 'ga . . . the final, vital link in the p daily production and distribu- tion of Southern Arizona's lead- ing print media. N nfulscggvlfli A Y ST AP' ID 3746 f mu :wi A Elie ,Arianna Bail!! Sian' Eucsnn Duilp Uitizien Morning and Sunday Evening Two independently owned and operated newspapers published in the same plant by IIC' 0N Il WSPAP R INC. M 408 Greetings from JOHNSON'S DRUG STORE 945 EAST SPEEDWAY The distinctive architecture of 1. Knox Corbett's Speedway branch is the object of study by Neil Ward and Curtis Jennings. KNDX ,Y-.1-. V 'Gt'la"lv?v'f4:- ..- L J I'-, J. KNOX CORBETT LUMBER CO. Main Yard 210 E. 7th Branch Yard 4545 E. Speedway Phone MA 2-8881 Phone EA 7-3441 1 l MARCIA Orr admires the wave that Linda Sinclair has iusl received at THELMAS' . . . conveniently located on the square . For appointments call MA. 3-9282 Bert Wirbes from ST EI N F ELD'S ' X 1 XX 1151 Stone and Pennington Inspiration's operations over the past 43 years have contributed in a major way to the economic welfare of Arizona. In 1957 its employees in the Globe-Miami area were paid 556,191,725 in wages and salaries. Supplies consumed and equipment purchased totaled S6,76O,942, a large portion of which benefitted suppliers in Arizona. Power pur- chased from the Salt River and San Carlos Irrigation Projects amounted to S834,273. Arizona taxes paid also represent a large share of Inspiration's beneficial effect on the State and Gila County econ- omy. ln 1957 the total of property, income, sales and use, and miscellaneous taxes paid amounted to S1,447,354. Inspiration, Gila County, Arizona INSPIRATION CCDNSOLIDATED COPPER COMPANY Westem hospitality - that's the Pioneer. It's a favorite with stu- dents and townspeople alike. It's always fun to go to the Pioneer for pleasant atmosphere. f,,-If-n-' PvV,,...i" . if Anthony Gallo and Claudia Vassallo STONE AND PENNINGTON J. M. Proctor, Manager r r Stuart Thompson 1 l Open 24 hours a day - automatic pinsetters - no pin-boy to tip - pool and snooker room - fountain snacks - ladies always welcome. Properly main- tained facilities and good service are your assurance to better bowling. KE GLERS LANE S PH. EA 5-2523 1240 N. Stone Phone MA 3-2632 NIE LSEN DRUG SPEEDWAY AT COUNTRY CLUB 411 ARIZONA FIOIIR MIIIS Mills and warehouses at: TUCSON PHOENIX MESA TEMPE CASA GRANDE GLENDALE SAFFORD Preston Smith and Beverly Hamay discover that even Manuel likes Arizona Star Dog Pellets. .Q f ke I 'LAdvertising income helps pay printing n d in costs so your school can put out an an- g 3 nual, and we're glad to help. "You young people are going to be the f' Arizona citizens of tomorrow who run I O I . . things, so we'd like to have your good will - and your business. l "Many of your top-llight classmates will 1:2 A wind up making a career in banking, and Ifffw , u W W!- the Valley Bank is always on the lookout N ,ii ,- f for promising young men and women who 2 .5 'L M555 have an eye on the future. 45 ,fl p .... Q,mgvj-,-g-1j-3532323 1 1-1.3.53 ,'-' ' . , " I' ' ' E u 5:5:5:', ,"I.I'22:?:f:2g1g:g:g:, .' ,.3g:2:q-1 ,' lf y - , I Q ,UQ :wg ,-':-:-ez-:-za-1-1, N .g:-:iz-1.5 9 I , 16,5010 3 ..::E:gf?2:i:E:?:ib, N 8. .et 4 1 'I 1 so -f-1-EN-M OFF-cfs 5153353 X 6 f A 1-I" '. fgigigtgzgtgjglgtitfglg.igZg!'!'!y 31435323-I ' ,V Q' 4 , . 7 f. -2.4.2:51522zfzizgzgrg-g:g:g5g:g.x13222232SS:S:55fq:3" 'ea I , 7 'IX -1 -' R . -- N v".'v'.'v'v4n'!.','9- '4'.'.'.' "'v'.':""nx'2'f'I"-'-'I'-"1'Y'l"9'v' NR"-':'3'-'l' - .--' ' ,jwfb , Lgizftlz'-it'--FIIIQIQIQ'lgftzofgx1512551151255-211121"" Atiwjigilljiflfl-Tig.. 'Q ,Al I' . ' ' ' Il. f . X x tt ., 33, UW ' 'e,-31:11-g.g.g,A '.f.- A-:.gt3s,.3gq.5.g.3,-" , - , I . . K- v. " f:f:1".:' .- Aff. ".'2-rlrfr' " 'S .f '- At 4 1' f- . I .. -.. , ,-. i2:L:Z?:.Sg-S237 dw . fl . lf I E -, . -. -1 X - , - ' 'I - B " ' IW 1' -A I ug I ut - - A' ""' - X l. sse.. ... . A slrr Largest Bank fn fne Rocky Mountain .Qfafee - zu. g MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 412 er I.. Bob Posner and lus guest Jerry Pollack cry over their spilled SUNSET milk. MINERAL-FORTIFIED MILK - SUNSET HI-VIT MILK. "For YOUR good healih" R ' 1' Dairy Products "At your Store . . . of your Door" The finest in machinery from . . RONSTA DTS' 70 N. 6th Ave. MA 3-3691 Cheryl Zcidler Andrea Lott For fast courteous routeman Pick-up Service at your door CALL MA 3-7511 I dw" Sti'Nu 'rucso SANIT Nl LAIIIIIIRY 1 f DRY CLEIIIIEIIS Tucsorfs Oldest and Largest Laundry and Dry Cleaners GHOST RANCH LODGE AND DINING Room Casa Grande Highway Ph0ne MA 48261 MOTOR COMPANY 2121 EAST BROADWAY . f 'Tlfi' TT 2 4 .' ll0 B00 l S10 5 J I -ngtiiei ei .i i ARIZONA BOOK STORE 815-817 North Park Tucson, Arizona College Texts and Supplies Complete Self Service No Lines - No Waiting 1896 - 1958 62 Years of Service t 1 . , v ' COME'S Stone at Pennington on's family - owned store of dliness and courtesy . . . which today uses as a measure of ss the philosophy expressed by founder, Carlos J. Jacome. ke your store a friendly one, you will live forever." ,'f lil l A i 1 I li. Ht' it I fi! Alan Polley J. M. Sakrison "lt does make a difference where .you save," J. M. Sakrison, President of Pima Savings and Loan and Wildcat booster tells Alon Polley. All accounts are .insured up to 510,000 by an agency of the U. S. Government, and earn 3V2'Kv per annum-the highest rote commensurate with safety. U of A students are urged to save with Insured Safety at Pima Savings and Loan X Association, Stone Ave. ot Alameda. c4r.Z5q.g.s 11? L I'-l' -'Q' T P Nl tix , . Q, snwmes E V0 9 dl ' sew 8 l0AIt Assnmmmi QS same um 415 xx MW l ,VI Y -r lt 'lll fl tlil , gr CREATING A NEW ,,- - '- 1-Xxx -f It .-JN 'jfxxl ,WORLD wm-I I I if xi- El'X',,A,Xil - .' I 1: I ,I .X X tl is ,1 1 rr- 11 N1 QELECTRONICS llllir Q X W ' 1 1' 1 1 .35 1 111115. 7.1 N X f lf""- A ff. h 'ke-a gf?-"'NXYf If Hughes' key position in electronics li H.: - , .sz A l I 1' V 1 k 1 ff - - -X 1, 11 research, development and manufacture ".'1,S-lu' -Q., - ha hy on behalf of national defense, ill I will have great impact on the nacion's A 1 'M' ' li?" 2 economic and social life. For, as , T ' A 7 quickly as possible, the basic principles Jssxxxxfvh ' I 'M fx used in military systems already L! ' p' l 2 K ' I , are being adapted to commercial use. l l f f ' , J V 1 The future of this new world 1 1 I I ' 1 -' of electronics is assured by I 1 I 4 'E N ' f" ll the people' who make Hughes. 1 ' I i ' x ' Q ' . it - f V U me X532 It 1 Dk More than 25,000 of chem! .fl , 1 f . 1 111 1 1 s 1 ,f a ,f ,ff 1 u ------ Q----' 1 I , 9 ' ' - l HUGHES l 1 1 J- 10' 1 rrrrrrr. rrrrrr-rr r or l l tx A I Nj . X 1 HUGHES AIRCRAFT COMPANY l ' . CULVER crrv sl. sEGuN o cA1.lFonNlA l l N - 5 J li ' TUCSON A IZONA 1 v -1 Q s , 'I I ' .ua I I . . 15+-f H 5, 1- 1 f I ' 2-.a ' 41: " . - X 1 "'kLm1l a 1 XX as 1 ago-. 1 Q f 1 - , A , i -"Vi gn l lx i 5 " 1 iw N Q 'Xe-X.r. X vu Q . V r X3 ' x K Xi . ' . . . i i . r-NW rv-- N 2 . girfhglli' l ' i ' i 0 ' ' gli: 2' , - ..1' J. V X If . EK. , C f' va Q X Q n 2" ,4"'f" ' ' ' ' o 416 9 X 1 X N. 1 ,. 1, f GREETINGS From MAGMA COPPER COMPANY Superior, Arizona and its wholly-owned Subsidiary SAN MANUEL COPPER CORPORATION San Manuel, Arizona 24 AUTOMATIC PINSPOTTERS 65 TONS OF REFRIGERATION "BOWL Where BOWLING is BEST" AX 8-3344 Craycroft at 29th St GREATER SELECTION IN University fashions Western wear Men's clothing Women's accessories Lingerie Children's wear Girl Scout needs Infant's wear Work clothes FOR THE DORM . . . Curtains and drapes Floor covering Bedding Pictures and lamps Furniture Piece goods FAMOUS FOR QUAZITV AND SAVINGS' the store that has grown with Tucson . . . SHOP PENNEY'S YOU'LL LIVE BETTER YOU'Ll. SAVE 418 FOR THE BEST IN REAL ESTATE l. A. ROMINE REAL ESTATE, INC. THE SANTA RITA HOTEL C. C. ROMINE President HOMES ACREAGE Industrial Ranches F AROUND THE WORLD IN EIGHTY HOURS arms BUT ALWAYS BACK TO THE Commercial Mortgages SANTA RITA A150 Gene,-al Insurance FOR a pleasant stay in a luxurious room or suite . . FOR a quick, good meal in the Coffee Shop . . . 201 N, Smne Avg. Ph, MA 3-8609 FOR a leisurely lunch or dinner in the Calico Room . . . Garden Plaza Bldg. Tucson, Arizona FOR a private party, large or small, in one of the ive Banquet Rooms . . . CBridal consultant to help plan your wedding receptionj MA 3-0551 Scott at Broadway Daisy and Ben Williams relax in their favorite Western ensembles from Porters Through years of constant research and expert de- signing, your Weste1'u, casual and sportswear Ward- robe can be accentuated with colorful ensembles and accessories from Porters. For 83 Years "The West's Most Western Store" 'IFRS' 120 N. STONE .ws ,I ,411 .rrp-'fu -i .-.-.,,.---an-:.Y,n-Y ,, -WAY Y-V-Y .. .. f.f5wstt.1,n-It It f5""""'mtt's - .I I? .v.1I, I-sm 2 1. " ml--nf .r ll' 1' I., 1-I .as V-..,4,4Iv,,,,15,A-' .-'j-1,-r ',- ly. H' ' -,X mul., , . .R LZ 1 N4 tj.-1 ' ,gm Q.-L. .1 1 fmt " 9 r 1 E1 ll ix' Q:-.,L,:y, A,x,g5:,2H3A ,vL:..,:3-.Nl Yun I In .I I, 24.1. will tr I ., i f-- , -.: s ' ' , '- '.': - - -1 If - I .VL , . ,, I , I-' - I' ',u Y- Y- I 'I ' ' Y ' ., ..,wl . nt.. . -.,-- , 'z' ' .f,,l,,f,,1iff'f -- .t,t+:t:., vs., 1 - I ' f Q., :1 'f 4415235ffl!-?:l?l'LIEIg'xI.2S'fmwaJLf'::f,.P'afa.-:ms .R . An' I I -C0ngraflllafi0nS to :A if X "A Lgtfx xf, wg --,' , V " I V 1 X ' X ' - ,Q , xx . Graduating Class Of '58 fl Ci' V ICITIZA .V 'V , .III I I ,T ,.- I 7 I' I ffl.f':1 ' I M Ii, 'XV , M". 1 Y lwillf 4, , , ' FY -fi: - I I University Tennis Courts DAMRCN CONCRETE CONTRACTING COMPANY 'I225 Alvernon Way SERVING ARIZONA SINCE 1925 with Fresh Wholesale Fruits ond Vegetables Arizona's Iargesf and most modern W' H ' 8K S UNIVERSITY BARBER sHoP PRODUCE COMPANY O n 1 h e S q U U r e 119 E.Toole Phone MA. 2-4605 Cooled by Refrigeration 420 s I I I' I I I I I Ex F5 sf" .. f' Jia 'zo' gg, ff , 1. fd!! 'wr 1' 1 'QQ rv If ' , , .94 4. afwxff- 1+-,mi 1: SHAIVI ROCK DAIRY Serving Greater Arizona for 36 Years 421 v I I, Dick Jensen and Jim Malmberg select two of the many pipes , offered by Mr. Danzskey. DAMSKEYS 125 EAST BROADWAY "Pleasing pipe smokers for 44 years" 1 ,U J 0 rw .X , A E rr agp f I I Karen Utke Carol Thomson EL RANCHO MARKET 3360 East Speedway W rf.-.I ' f . . 4 -'fl E Thi?" H X N '- , E X A3 Xxx? X Xu ,Hx si 1 .. A my 'wxxxb N AA V r ,,fix',Q,5N.- V -., - r f, I .xj,f.x-if ,- A it . . ' - -- V: , 4 1 I 1 If 'ax E' Us , , D -are-:'?fbf W-iL'nhgK-,gli ."'i?f:? E Zi 2 pppp Dirk Frauenfelder and Taylor Hicks 422 The home of over 97,000 satished customers u 17.008 . In wssv :oneness 4 ann' - BIALMAJ-ISI! 4 webbing ggifztfzofay Qatty Anniuvrnarg cakes made to your order ofthe finest ingredients, clecoraterl just the way you want them . . . F rg 412 North Sixth Ave. 1219 S. SIXTH AVENUE Phone MA 4-2561 . 4 1 ,I . I --.' - A ,df 'gg , N " 'A.5ilh'.', xx 722172 - x1g"--'W'V"'- , Marylee Hutchison and John F. Dulles select records from NILES RADIO AND TELEVISION CENTER Phone MA 3-2537 400 N. 4th Ave. Wilma Clark FRANK DAWSON MOTOR CO. A Candy Damato M 7 - models a Mindy Ross Frock, one V of many nationally advertised brands A . at . . . ' i h Q V Quiet and Attractive MY E R S O N S l The place to stay for students, as well as for M dDd.J tt bl kf th . Wilmot Plaza ....................... White House Downtown om an G Us wo oc S rom B campus 1219 s. sixfh Avenue GERONIMO HOTEL ,lm s, , - Q t , l F N Q. T '. ' f T-ff""Ig,a' ' , -?,,-1t,:,iI5.c, - A W Mo Y ,, , ef- Q9 ff, Dana smith N S A lvardily Cleaners ARIZONA and laundry BANK at University Square - Since 1926 Maman 424 , nl I L., Take it easy! 4 N1 Lei' QQ GUS and X l PAULINE'S e X do your Laundry nf: l am? my ,g 42 M. M. SUNDT Construction Company On the Campus... past achievements Administration Bldg. Hopi Lodge Aeronautical Bldg. Infirmary Auditorium Liberal Arts East Stadium Addition Library Addition Mines and Metallurgy Manzanita and Mohave P Papago Lodge Science Bldg. CChem.- Stuclent Union Art Bldg. Music Bldg. present accomplishments Physicsb Apache and Santa Cruz future aspirations Geology Building 426 Cloudt and Bob Keppel YOUNG BUICK Inc. 640 N. STONE 0 MA 4-4481 THE Arn BORBQQ B-58 Buick J ERRVS M ING HOUSE BROADWAY AT CAMPBELL orders to take out Ernie Leonard and Tom Cojiman receive service at Jerry's Ming House. 427 0 ,Mx .am - mvki' ' .'-AW' ' .M-1 ,pf ' J.. Tb. .w f-1 :. WW:r.' uf- 11 51,1 ,g N' ,L V - ..v I 'dh J" 644' ,Af M , ' W. my jf. VA.. A f ,. ,.,4 H , :' :J JA' kg.-A Q1 -, N- ' 1 ij , -,f r 1. , , 1 A XG. 1. 1 .af jk ,lv " " ' 'w,,jv IX, f " -1' 'o7" J, il X. 1, ,. ,W .19 .x .. L' . g -M: J 31' 4,-,V 1. W -fl QA 9, -'J 4 , V ,Q ' R-1 1' rx pf fu f' LJ .-!' Lx- ' 7 C' . gf , lf' '+L L L, Q' I4 'F 5 if .-wx. 'fy 'I 9 51 ,r A -Q 1 A 1 ,Q X w r, , x -1 - 1 4 : . Q , 1: L, - 4 -, .- jx 'L 'Y ?f. Yi ' L f 'Y ,Q .1 X1 Ly. q. 'r Lf: uf , ff r 5, INC 1' ' H- fr 1- 1 . ff A 41 11 -, JA 6, . up , , . A. . . fw Y ff, ,P-. f-H' .35 I ! fi 3 A P ' .0 A- f-1 :h :- - 1 -1 fy, , M .N Q .Ek ,A jd L, x f, H. ' '4 'v - . A - . :vm ,mx sg if ' '51 fs' ,nn ' 'f .' ' -1 5 Ta 'E.. ' 'k "'-Y' .f .Yu-1, fam- .- .J .11 Va' fx, 'E-V I ' wif gs' fy' ' ' 1. ,,, "L 'Y'-f . . .,- A ,, .wffw H ,- f : X ., ' R ,JL -1 13 ff. X LR 7., 'L-fl: J' nf- -ww '.fW2rf:' 1 'pk , nd., . ,F wx Y v .4432 mf uk., . 0-1376 --ml ,Mus-1. 1 3--.119-, - . .-W,-f:-1-92 428 1 F ounlain-Bar Special Dining Room Service Famous Complete Sunday Dinner! Elva Robles Joyce Smith BROADWAY DRIVE -IN Compliments Of LUCKY STRIKE BOWL "The House That Friendly Service Built" Bill Rauh and Tom Mclmosh test their cookies from 4015 E. SPEEDWAY EA 7-4926 29 935 E. SPEEDWAY , . ,. , ... 1 ,, X , lr 1 , N I T V " 1' If ' "- ' Y' W .MY , Y A, V, - V , . , V ' .- 1- . A""!'n4f. l.... 1 . .,.-..- , . , J, , , Sue and Dick Bryant take time out for a movie at the Fox Tucson theatre - The Bank of ouglas F MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION "rr-1: PLACE ro ao" As Kathy Lockett, Debbie Porritt, Sally Markley, Sue Forster, Sylvia Taylor, and Marlene Sutton ail agree, the best thing on a hot Tucson afternoon is a soft drink cooled by ice from . . . ARIZONA ICE AND COLD STORAGE COMPANY mmy DeFrancesco Jane McGar1y, Bob rklns and Susan Chiles discover that deli- us foods are a specialty of . . . HAMPTON-STCNE CAFETERIA 536 N 4th Ave. Barbara Garney cmd Cecily Woodward enloy the friendly service of BLAKELY'S East Speedway North Oracle Road Souih 61h Avenue Soufh 'l2fh Avenue i RIDE THE BUS Cheaper - Safer N 0 parking fan TUCSON RAPID TRANSIT CO. Congratulations to the Class of '58 from ROY DRACHMAN REALTY CO. Sanfa Rifa Hofel Mezzanine Phone MA 3-0501 Y -amig a if?-4"? ,J , Congrafulafions B T. Graduates I I J gi, Z I I J s X QC-:J Q Besi wishes and success fo all sfudenis of the University of Arizona THE TUCSON GAS, ELECTRIC I Suzi D Let us feather your nest with fine furnzt f LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY DORSON FURNITURE CO "Providing Greater Tucson with Luxury Living at Modest Cost" 2205 E. Broadway ROW 1: John Higbie, Darrell Fisher, Bill Larson, Dick Dicus, Joe Caid, Alan Polley. ROW 2: Robert Scott, Joe Farabee, Bob Dickerson, David Bissett, George Barr, John Peck, Robert Taylor. PHELPS DODGE SCHOLARSHIPS Recipients of Phelps Dodge Scholarships, presently attending the University of Arizona, are pictured above. George W. Drach, one of the holders of the two Phelps Dodge post-graduate scholarships, is attending Western Reserve University Medical School and thus is not included in this picture. The Phelps Dodge Foundation scholarship program at the University of Arizona provides annually for a total of eight undergraduate scholarships and two scholarships for graduate study. The undergraduate Phelps Dodge Scholarship awards are each valued at 331,000 per year and are available only to graduates of Arizona High Schools. Two post-graduate scholarships at 31,200 each, plus tuition, are available to students having grad- uated from the University and who are bona fide residents of the State of Arizona. Phelps Dodge Corporation offers four engineering scholarships annually for juniors and seniors studying Min- ing and Metallurgy at the University of Arizona, each valued at 31,000 per year. The choice of the recipients of the above scholarships is made by the Scholarship Committee of the University of Arizona from competing applicants on the basis of high scholarship, high promise of ability, personality, char- acter, and leadership. Following are the Phelps Dodge Scholarship recipients, including engineering scholarships, at the University of Arizona for the second semester of 1958: Phelps Dodge Scholarships: Name Class Name Class Robert P. Taylor .... .... F reshman Richard B. Dicus ..... .... J unior Darrell R. Fisher .... .... F reshman Robert H. Dickerson . . .... Junior George E. Barr .................. Sophomore Alan K. Polley ...... .... S enior Robert B. Scott .................. Sophomore William M. Larson ........ .... S enior David H. Bissett - Post-graduate at University of Arizona George W. Drach - Post-graduate at Western Reserve University Phelps Dodge Corporation Engineering Scholarships: John J. Higbie ...... . .... Junior Joseph E. Farabee .... .... S enior Joseph A. Caid ..... .... J unior John F. Peck ....... .... S enior PHELPS DODGE CORPORATION AJO BISBEE DOUGLAS MORENCI 433 Na! Fuldner and Marfy Garcia pp :late ihe fastesf drive-in laundry and dry cleaning in Tucson . . . N M THIS IS THE END!! : E? lS,peegl1l11Zyal1e1ZfaEllllnlgl1cho AS-UA PHOTO DIVISIQN Marvene Jones making Cl seleciian as she sfopp d between classes at the UNIVERSITY DRUG . . . on fhe square 434 l l '1 X 'I w. Learn Io frequent your 1,95 l ASSOCIATED STUDENT BCJOKSTORE Owned by fhe A.S.U.A. Offering cz complete line of school supplies 435 all QaQutQ to tllcz 1958 HCUQ9Qnt" Qtagg The production of the nDesert" involved the talents ot many people onol we, as your Typoqrophers, Wish to compliment you on a job Well done. Jlflonmau QTQPOQKGPMQRQ 617 East Washington Phoen1x, Ar1zona rizona Bookstore ........ rizona Flour Mills ........ rizona Ice and Cold Storage . rizona Trade Bindery ...... ssociated Student's Bookstore SUA Photo Division ..,... ank of Douglas . . . lakely's ......... roadway Drive In . opa.... ..,.. orbett Lumber Co. ox and Sons ..... amron Concrete Co. . . amskey's ....... awson Motor Co. . orson Furniture Co rachman Realty .. l Rancho Market . ox Tucson Theater rampton Stone Cafeteria eronimo Hotel ..... host Ranch Lodge .... us and Pauline's ....... ackett Motor Co. . . . al Burn's Florist .... ughes Aircraft Co. . . . . . . ADVERTISING., INDEX .....415 ..,..412 .....430 .....406 .....435 .....434 .....430 .....431 .....429 .....418 .....409 .....420 .....420 .....422 .....423 .....432 .....432 .....422 . . . . .430 ., .... 431 .....424 .....414 .....425 .....405 .....405 ...,.416 nspiration Consolidated Copper Co. . . .... 410 3 acome s ........... . . erry's Ming House . . . ohnson's Drug .... Keglers Lanes .... LeCave's Bakery . . . lLevy's ........... ewis Salon Shoes ucky Strike Bowl .... ....415 .....427 ....409 .....411 ....423 .....404 ....404 ....429 - M - Magma Copper Co. ......... . Morneau Typographers ................ .... Myerson's White House Department Store - N - Nielson Drug Co. . . . . Niles Television . . . . . -p- Paulin Motor Co. ........... . PBSW Supply and Equipment .... Penny's .................. Phelps Dodge Copper Co. . . . Pima Savings ......,.... Pioneer Hotel .... Porter's . ...... . . -R- Reuben's Furniture Store . . . Romine Real Estate ..... Ronstadt's ........ . . -5- Santa Rita Hotel ....... . . Sears, Roebuck and Co. . . Shamrock Dairy ........ Shandling Lithographers .... Southern Arizona Bank . . Steinfeld's ............ Sundt Construction Co. . . . Sunset Dairy ............... - T - Thelma's Beauty Shop ..... Tucson Gas and Electric .......... Tucson Laundry and Dry Cleaning .... Tucson Newspapers, Inc. ......... . Tucson Rapid Transit Co. .... . -U- University Barber Shop .... University Drug ....,.. University Jewelers . . . . . . -V- Valley National Bank ...... Varsity Cleaners ..... . . . - W - Washwell ....... . . . Wilson's Bakery .... . . . - Y - Young Buick . . . . . . 417 436 424 411 423 414 405 418 433 415 411 419 422 419 413 419 408 421 428 424 409 426 413 409 432 413 408 432 420 434 404 412 424 434 429 427 -A- Aamodt, Agnes M. Adams, Ruth R. ..... . Aepli, David C. ...... . Alderson, Donald J.. . . . Allais, David C. ..... . ....129 ..86 81 ....l27 .....107 Allen. F. W. ....... .... 2 5, 26 Allen, James Dean .... ...... 2 7 Allen, Rupert ,,... .... 1 27 Allen, Ruth .......... .. 86 Alsworth, Jean ............. 128 Altman, Mme. Elenore ....... 112 Andersen, Andrea S. ..... 111, 235 Anderson, Marshall L. ...... 107 235 1 13 Anderson. Warren H. .... 111, Anthony, James R. .... f. 112, Anthony, John ...... ...... 1 31 Anthony. John ....... .... 1 31 Aston, Bernardyne K. . . . . 91 Atwood. Harry W. .... '. . 26 Ayers. Donald M. .... .... 1 28 -B- 390 .27 Baker. Howard R. ........... 81 234 239 Bagnara, Joseph T. ...... 125, Bailey, Stewart C. .......... . Bakkegard, Benjamin M.. . 112, Bannister, Bryant .......,... Barnes, William S. ...... 117, 238 Barnett, Robert M. .......... 107 Barreca, Frank .... 26, 69, 111, 114 Baumann, Michael L. ....... 128 Beattie, Arthur H. ..... 246, 206 Becher, Stewart ............. 127 Bennett, Fleming .... .... 2 6 Berry, James W. .. . .. ..127 Best, Edward E. .... .... 1 28 Birong, Elizabeth M. . . . . . . 86 Blanchard, Jack W. ......... 107 Blecha, Milo K. ............ 97 Blitzer, Leon ....... 127 235, 239 Bloom, John H. ............ 112 Bogart, Fred O. ............. 91 Books, Alice B. .... .. 86 Boyle, Alice M. ....... . . 81 Bradley, Joseph A. .... .. 27 Branscomb. Bruce L. ........ 81 Bretall, Robert W. ........... 122 Brewer, Willis R. ...... 133, 134 Briggs, Robert E.. .. .... ... 81 Broder. Bob ..... ...... 2 5 Brooks. John ...... .... 1 22 Brown. Claude H. ... ....117 Brown. Elmer J. ............ 91 Brown, Margaret M. . . . .54, 136 Brown. Timothy ............ 127 Brown, Wilma A. ...... .81, 237 Bryan. Walker E. ........... 239 Buchhauser, Andrew W.. . 110, 112 Buehrer, Theophil F. ........ 81 Bunker, F. Paul ....... .... 9 1 Burke, Sarah ...... .. 39 Burkhart, Leland .... .. 81 Burkholder, Sgt. .... . Burnham, John J. .... .......139 81 Burroughs, Robert C. . ..111, 237 Butler. Geo. D. ............ 81 -C- Caldwell, Thomas Edward. . . 122 Call, Rex V. ............... 91 Campbell, Abby A. ......... 111 Campbell, Brewster P. . . .40, 122, 128, 233 Cannon, Moody D. .......... 81 Carlson,' Karen L. ........ 24, 32 Carpenter, Edwin F. .... 122, 125, 142, 143 Carr, Richard E. ...... ,.... 1 37 Casaday, Lauren W. ....... 91, 89 Chaisson, R. B. .... .... 1 25 Faculty 81 Staff Index Chapin, Douglas S.. . 126, 127, 239 Chapman. Thomas G. ........ 131 Chappel, Merwin, ........... 27 Chavez, Carlos ....... . . . 91 Chesney, Marguerite . . . . . . 36 Childs, Richard F. ........... 134 Chisholm, William G. ....... 139 Church. Edna E. ............ 112 Clark, James Cameron ....... 107 Clement, Dorothy Lee. .24, 40, 324 Cline, Russell W. ....... 81, 98 Coan, Richard W. ........... 122 Cockrum, E. Lendell ......... 125 Cole, Lawrence ...... ..... 1 39 Conn, R. N. ............... 81 233 Conrad, Frederick A. ..... 91, Cook. Francis V. ............ 27 Cooper, Carl W. 137, 345, 377, 380 Coopwood, William K. ....... 137 Cotler. Rose S. CMrs.J ....... 81 Coutler, Esther B. ........... 122 Coutler, Pearl P. .... . . . 122, 129 Crowell, Robert A. .......... 97 Cubley, Mary E. .... ..... 2 7 Cuce, Sgt. ................. 139 Cunningham, John B.. . . 131, 130 -D- Damon, Paul E. ..... . . .131 Danielson, Paul J.. . . .. . .. 97 Datz, Hyman H. .... ..... 1 28 Davis, Jack Emery .......... 127 239 25 Denton, John Henry ......... 91 Deutschman, Archie J. ....... 81 Dewhirst, Leonard W. ....... 81 Dial, Betty Ann ....... ..... 1 36 Day, Arden D. .......... 81, Deal, Ralph E. .......,..... . Dick, Sgt. ................. 139 Doan. Robert W. ............ 81 Doherty. Edward A. .... 137, 344, 345, 356, 355 Dotson, Jay C. .......... 131, Douglass, Andrew E. ......... 142 Drevdahl, Elmer R. .... ..... 1 31 132 DuBois, Robert .... ..... 1 31 Duncan, John C. ............ 125 Eminger, Carl F. ............ 139 Enke, Fred ........ 137, 191, 359 Enloe, Howard ............. 107 Ewing. Russell C. ........... 122 -F- Fain, Samuel S. .......... 112,75 Ferguson, Charles W. ........ 239 Fetter, Eugene F. ....... 137, 345 Fitch, Walter S. ......... 142, Flaumn, David T. ......... . Fleming, Winifred S. ........ 81 25 Folkner, Joseph S... . ... .. 81 Foltz,Jack O.... ......91 143 27 Fogle, John .......... . . . Forbes, Robert ............. 239 Ford, John T. .......... 137, 345 Forrester, 'James D. ......... 131 Forster, Leslie S. ........ 127, 239 Fossland, Robert .... ...... 8 1 Foster, Arland G.. . . . . . . . 107 Foster, Joseph F. .... . . . 122 Fox, Thomas J.. . . Frazier, Elizabeth ........... 97 Frost, Kenneth R. ....... 81, Fuller, Wallace H. ......... . .....l39 239 81 -G- Gaede, Ruth B. ....... . ...... 128 Galbraith, Frederic W. ...... 131 Gardner, John K. ...... . . . 122 Garner, Agnes ....... . . . 136 438 Garretson. Oliver K. Gatewood, Elizabeth R.. Gazik, Alice G. ....... . Genin, Joseph ......... Getty, Harry T. Gibbings, Frank ..... Gifford, Gilbert L. . . . 96 .....136 25 ....lO7 ....125 ....l37 91 Jensen, Mildred .. . Jevne, Robert L.. . . Johnson, Henry P. . Johnson, Marvin D. Johnson, Wesley T. Johnson, Wilma L. . Johnston, Thadeus C. . Gill, Arthur W. Gillmor, Frances .. ....107 ....128 Glaesser, Ingrid ..... .... 2 7 Gorman, Robert E.. . . . . . . 97 Gorman, Shirley A. . . .... 136 Graesser, Roy F. ...... .... 1 22 Grasberger, Arthur R. . . Gray, Laurence R. .... . 25 ...89, 91 Greeley, B. McKay ..... 138, 139 Green, Barbara ........ . 136,399 Gross, Charles J. ...... . Grossman, Maurice .....128 .....l11 Gryting, Loyal A. T. ........ 127, 217, Guilbert, Yvonne L. . . . . Guiney, Adline R. .... . Gunter, Joe ....... Gyger, Dorothy S. . . . -H- Haberland, John A.. . . . Hackenberg, Robert A. . Haimann, Theo. ...... . Hall, David ........... 236.246 .....l28 27 ....389 27 97 .....l25 91 .....105 10 Hall. Irving .... .... Hall, Ruth C. .... 81, 86, 235 Hall, Thomas .............. 117 Hambenne, Joseph R. ....... 91 Hamilton, Keith C. ..... Hamilton, Marie P. .. . . 81 ....128 Harbaugh, Charles W. ....... 139 Harris, Patricia A. .... . Harris, Robert M.. . . . 27 ....239 Hartsell, Onnie M. .......... 112 Harvill. Richard A. ........ . 154, 155, 21, 176 Hatch, Delcie ........... 25, 219 Haury, Emil Walter. .122, 125,239 Hayden, Harry L. ......... . . 139 Hawes, Donald B. ........... 107 Hawkins, Ralph S. .......... 81 Hecht, Melvin E. ........... 91 Heinlein, Oscar A. . . Herrick, George F. Hertz, Lewis ..,... Hiatt, M. T. ...... . Hileman, Betty J. .... . Hillman. Jimmye S. . . Hinds, Hubert B. .. . Hoflich, Harold J. ....l38,139 91 .....l22 ...139 ...136 81 81 91 Hollaran, Duane ............ Hooper, Jefferson M. 389 .....9l, 227 Hoshaw, Robert W. . . .... . 81 Houston, Robert L. .. .... . 25 Howard, Russell M. ...... 89, 91 Howe, Van F. .......... 137, 345 Howell, Raymond N. ........ 139 Hucker, Charles O. .. ..... 125 Hudson, Philip ............. 91 Hull, Norman S. ........... 22 Humphrey, Robert R..8l, 235, 239 Hunt, Jacob T. ............. 97 Hussmann, Ernest H. -1- 81 Ireland, Ralph R. ......... 89, 91 Irmscher, William F. ........128 Irwin, Cora T. ............. 107 Irwin, John J. .......... 117, 119 -J- Janza. Frank J. .. . ....107 James, Charles E. ..... . . . Jones, Gerald M. .... . . . -K- Kassander, Arno R. . . . . . . Kauffman, Ralph C. . . . .. . Keener, Paul D. ..... . . . Keller, Roy A. ............ . Kelley, Alec .............. Kelley, Victor H. .... 97, 229, Kelly, William H. ......... . Kemmerer, Arthur R. ...... . Ketcham, Carl H. .... . . . Kidwell, Richard A. King, William H. .... . . . Kipnis, Irving ............. Klaiss, Donald S. ........ 91 Klein, Raymond L. Knickerbocker, James L. . . . . Koenig, Harold P. ........ . Koeninger, Charles E. ..... . Krumlauf, Harry E. .....131 Kraus, B. S. ......... .... . Kurnick, Allen A. ........ . Kurtz, Edwin B. ........ 81, Kuykendall, J. Richard ...... -L- Lafferty, John E. .......... . Lagaard, Maurice B. ...... . Lambert, James D. ...... 111 Lance, John ...... ....... Landers, Nancy S. ........ . Langen, Herbert ...... 89, 91 Larson, Emil L. ......... 97 Lawler, Gene ..... ....... Lee, Jack K. ............ 72 Leininger, Phillip W. ...... . Lenoir, James J. ........ 117 Leonard, John W. .. Lersch, William H. ........ . Lesher, C, Zaner ........ 25 , Letson, Robert J. ........ 97 Lindsay, Venice M. .... . . . Linville, Frank A. .. Littler, Charles A. . . Livermore, Shaw .. . . Lloyd, Sgt. .......... . . . Loebbaka, Sgt. ........... . Lotzenhiser, George W. .... . Lowe, Charles H. ......... . Lowe, Lucius H. ...... . . . Lowe, Robert E. . . . Lundquist, Avli E. .. Luz, Babette ...... Lynn, Klonda ..... Lyons, John D. . . . -M- MacKinnon, William J. ..... . Magness, Charles L. ....... . Maier, Robert H. ....... 81, Manhart, Robert A. ....... . Market, Marilyn R. ....... . Markland, Ben C..26, 69, 111 Marks. Lorna ............. Marroney, Peter R. ........ . Marshall, Robert H. .. .. Martin, Betty Jo .... Martin, Hollis ...... . Martin, Thomas L. .... . . . Mason, Charles T.. . . . s ...116. Smiley, Terah L.. . . asson, James C. ...... .... 8 1 asterson, Gertrude . . . . . . . 26 ayard, Rachel H.. . . . . . .227 ayo, Evans B. ..... ..... 1 31 cAllister, Dean F. ...... 81, 239 cBride, Robert G. ......... 112 cCaughey, Margie ........ 127 cCaughey, William F. ...... 81 cCauley William J. ........ 125 cClelland, Joseph H. ....... 81 cCleneghan, Thomas J. ..... 91 cCormick, J. Byron .... 117, 238 cCullough, Edgar J. ....... 131 cDougall, Fanny .......... 27 cEwen, Paul C. ...... .... 9 I cKale, James F. ........... 137 cKinley, James F. ......... 139 cLaughlin, Philip B.. .25, 27. 137 cNeill, Laura ............. 26 ead, Albert R. ....... 122, 125 erritt, Curtis B. ....... 97, 229 ielke, Paul W. .... ..... 1 22 ilks, Donald E. . . 107 iller, Halsey W. . . .... 131 oonen, Henk .... .... 2 5 oran, Leo J. ....... .... 8 1 oreman, Mary E. ..... .... 8 6 organ, Florence H. ........ 128 uir, A. Laurence .......... 128 ulligan, Raymond ...... 91, 233 unn, Harvey T. ........ 107, 232 urphy, Daniel J. .... ..... 1 31 urphy, Kenneth R. .... .... 2 5 urray, Jack A. ..... .... 1 11 -N- atoneck, Anne .... ....l36 107 eff, Richmond ...... .... evatt, Donald E. .... .... l 39 ewlin, Jane Ellen .... .... 1 28 107 ewlin, Philip ..... ian, Sgr. ....... . fffI139 128 ichols, James W. .... . . . . ichols, Peter W. .... .... 1 37 ielson, James R. .... .... 1 39 ordyke, James I. .... .... , 111 ugent, Robert L. .... .... 2 2 -0- aks, Stan. ..... . esterling, Lewis. . . ld, Marion ...... 26, 58 107 ..1i::i.27 sta, Emilio .............. . . 112 tt, Charles H. .... , ....l37, 385 112 ugh, Marguerite E. ........ . wens. Francis J.. . . .....1l7 Faculty 35 Staff Index fC07zfi72uea'j -p- Padgett, Lawrence E. ........ 128 Pahnish. Otto F... . .....8l, 239 239 Palmer, R. L. ....... ..... . Park, John C. .... . Parnell, Robert C.. . . 104 90, 91 Pasvogel. Myron W. .......... 81 Patrick, David L. ............. 22 Percy, Garnet D. ........ 122, 128 Perkins, Aladdin N.. Petcler, Patricia M.. Phelps, John S.. . .. Phnnps,vvauers. ....... . Picard, Joseph L... . Pichrell, Chas. .... . Pierce, Robert F.. . . Pilgrim, Mary ...... .........107 .... .111 .........l07 81, 239 137 81, 84 . . ..... 26 .........l36 239 Pistor, William J. ......... 81, Powell, Desmond S.. Prebula, E. Virginia Presslcy. Elias H.. . . Prince, Merlyn R... Pye, Willard D.. . . -Q- .....122,128 .........l22 81 . ...... 26 .....131 Quinn, Robert M. ....... 111, 23.5 -R- Raby, William L.. . . Raica, Nicholas, Jr. ...... . Ray, Arthur ....... Read, Bettylew .... Record, William. . . Reil, Julia ......... Resnick, Sol D.. . . . Rexroat, Ruth .... Reynolds, John J.. ...... . Rhodes, Herbert D. ..... . Rhodes, James M. .... . Richards, Robert N.. Riley, William F.. . . . Roberts, Edward N. ..... . Roberts, Lathrop E. ..... . Robinette, Grace C. .... . Robinson, Cecil ......... Robinson, Priscilla G.. . . . Robson, John W. ....... . Rodriquez, Mario B. .... . Rogers, Phil H. ........ . Roos, Nestor R. ........ . Rosaldo, Renato I. ...... . Rosenberg, Charles I Ross, Andrew W. .... . . Rountree, Janet ......... Roy, Francis A. ........ . Rucker, Winfred R. ..... . Russell, Paul E. .... . 127, ..........91 81,239 . ...... 128 .....l36 ....1o7 ....112 .....s1 ....127 127,236 ....114 .....97 ....12s ....239 ....1o7 122,127 .....27 ....12s ....127 239 236 107 .91,247 127,236 ....127 ....1o7 .....25 120,122 .97 107 -5- Saltus, Elinor C.. . . Sammarco, Anita K. ......... 112 Sancet, Frank ...... Schappaugh, George Schiffer, Sydney .... Schmidt, Andrew. . . Schmidt, Harry P... Schmitz, Frederick. Schmutz, Erv1n M. ...... . Schneck, Matthew .... . Schwalen, Harold C. .. . Scott, James P. ...... . Scott, John B.. . . . .. Seames. Albert E.. . . . Sellars, Laura E.. . . Sharp, Anna Mae .... . Shupp, Tom ....... Shutt, Darold L.. . , Sigworth, Alice G. ...... . Sigworth, Oliver F. ..... . .....137, 370 H. ...... 139 ....128 .....9l ....l07 122,127 ....239 ....l22 81 ....11l ....122 ....l07 .....27 ....ll2 .....9l ..24,40 .....27 ....128 Simley, Ole A.. . 122, 235, 236, 239 Simmons, Erika ............. 127 Simonian, V. H. ............. 241 Sink, Whitten E.. . . .....139 Slonaker, A. Louis ........ 24, 40 Smith , Althea ...... .....239 ....l1l Smith David W.. .. .....97 Smith, Howard V. .... ...... 8 1 Smith, Sigmund L. ....... 131, 232 Smith, Smith Vearl R. .............. 81 Wllllam H. ............ 27 Souden, James G.' ....... 111, 235 Soular, Sgt. .... . Sparks, George F ............139 ....68, 111, 233, 235 245 Spicer, E. H. ............... 125 Stanberry, Chauncy O. ........ 81 Stanfield, Alice B. ............ 81 Stanley, Ernest B. ............ 81 Stanton, Alan .......... 137, 368 Steelink, Cornelius ........... 127 Steinbrenner, Arthur ......... 122 ....239 Stith, Lee S. ........ . Strang, John E. ....... . Streets, Rubert B. ............ 81 Stromberg, Frances I. ......... 86 ....122 Stull, J. Warren ............. Svob, Robert S. ......... 137, Syverson, Benevieve B. .... 97, 229 -T- .81 388 Tanner, Clara Lee ........... 125 Tatum, Roy A.. . . Taylor, Bruce R.. Tellez, Angel H.. . . 439 . . .137, 345, 382 ........122 Thierman, Elmer M. .......... 91 Thompson, Raymond H. ..... 125 Thompson, Walter W. ........ 139 Thornburg, Martin .......... 105 Titley, Spencer T.. . . . ......l31 Toland, Florence W. ...... 91, 227 . . . .81, 239 .26, 40, 239 Tschampel, Paul, Jr.. . . Tucker, Thomas C.. . . . Turner, Fred, Jr. ..... . Turner, Raymond M... Trautman, Robert. . . Tribolet, Charles S.. . . -V- Van Sant, William R Vavich, Mitchell G.. . . . Vedder ,Clyde B. ..... . Voris, Mark ...... -W- C. .. .25, 40 Wagle, Robert F. ..... . Walkup, Fairfax P. ...... 111. 237 Wallraff, Charles F.. . . . Walter, Robert D. ........ 91, 107 Warner, Earle H. ...... 127 Waterman, Frederick A. ...... 125 Waugh, Robert E. .... . Weatherly, Betty J.. . . . Weichert, William T... Waggener, Catherine .....8l,239 . 10,122,125 Wetzler, Wilson F. .... . Wheeler, Eldon H. .... . Werner, Floyd G.. . . Wertman, Kenneth F.. Wilkinson, Donald O Williams, John R. .... . Wilson, Andrew W.. . . . Windsor, David L.. . . Wise, Edward N.. . . Wood, Edwin G.. . . . .......8l .......8l ....239 .. .... 81 . ...... 81 .......8l . . .91, 227 ......1l0 .......8l ......122 ..122, .......91 ......39 .......8l .......97 .......8l ......139 ....81 .....9l .......25 ....127, 239 Wood, Mary A. ...... . Woodson, Warren B.. . . Wright, Graham P... Wylie, Harold A.. . . . Wymore, Albert W. . Wynn. Ruth E. ..... . -Y- Yall, Irving ....... Yegerlehner, John. . . ..Z- Zandy, Deno Jack. . . ......248 .....86 ....137 .......8l .....8l,236 107 1:22136 ....l0. 125 ....125 ....139 Anderson, Terry. -A- Aaronson. Lewis. . . .... . Abbott. Chuck ...... . . Abbott, Gerry ......... Abrahams, Roberta ..... Abromovitz. Merle. . .7l. Agnew. Ackerman. Charlotte .... Ackman. Joe ........... Ackman. Jay ...... Ackerman. Bill .... . . Acosta. Al ......... . . Acosta, Salvador ....... Acton. Mary ...... Acuna, Richard ..... .. Adams, Abigail... . . . . Adams, Edie ....... .. Adams, George ..... Adams. Keith ..... . . . Adams, Adams, Rexene ....... . . Sandy ....... 87, Addenbrooke. Nancy .... Addison. Robby ..... 97, Agenbroad, Larry D.. . . . Ruth .... 97, 227, Agate, Milton .......... Aguirre, Cecilia ..... Ahern, Richard ..... Ahmad, Fasiuddin .... Ahmie, Kenneth ..... Ahuero, Joe ........ Aimejo, Tolando ..... Albers, June Nancy ..... Albi, Julie .......... 333 289, .. . .221 .....274 . .... 233 262,263 .97,272 .....221 252,276 ....337 ....34o ....2s7 399,401 , .... 245 276,396 .97,27o ....221 ....304 328 325 113, 252, . . . .274 252, 258 . . . .232 277, 282 .. . .229 ...213 ...285 ...246 ...249 ...245 ...328 ...282 .....274 Albinson, Bill ....... .... 3 5, 304 Albrecht. Alderson. Donald J. .... . Dan ....... . . .....232 .....236 288 Alderson. Jay ......... . . 285, Aldridge, Jim ....... . . Alexander, Alexander, Annie ....... . . . . . 134 Angris ....... 377, 378 ' ..... 260 Alexander, Bill ..... 42, 49, 52, 89, 306 228, 306 Alexander, Fred. ..... . . 336, 327 Alexander, Louise ...... Allegretti, Dick ......... Allen J an ........ . . . Allen Jerry L. .... . . Allen Melvina .... Allen Peggy .... Allen, Rupert ..... Allen Robert ..... . . . Allen, Ruth ..... Alley, Gordon ..... Baker, Allinder, Jim ..... ..... Allred, Almejo, Dustin ...... Yolanda ,... Alspach, Nita ..... Alspach, Tom ..... 227, ....333 ....125 377 ,341 ...,105 ....219 ...273 ...236 ....324 ....252 .....106 ...306 ...245 ....97 .....134 Alurfali, Hufdhi .... .. .82, 246 Alvarez, Ernie .... ..... 3 35 Alvarez, Joe ...... . . .335 Alvarez, Ramon ..... . . .118 Alverson, Louise .... . . .325 Amado, Albert .... ..... 1 39 Amey, Carol ...... ....... 2 50 Amey, John T. .... ........ 2 38 Ammon, Bob ..... .... 1 31, 231 .....316 Anderson, Andy ..... . . Anderson, Ann .... . . . . Anderson, Barby .... .... 9 7, 270 Anderson, Byron .... . . .....219 .....122 ..72, 234 Anderson, Dick ........ Anderson, Eleanor .... 36, 54, 226, Anderson Anderson, Larry ....... Anderson, Lois ......... Anderson, Martha Jo .... , LaDonna. .205, 204, 213, 252, 268, 276 276, 325 ....311 ....221 .5l, 202, 276, 396 Anderson, Anderson, STUDENT INDEX Mary Sue ......... Maxine .... 51, 160, Anderson, Aobert ............ Anderson Anderson Ross ............. Sandra Jean. . .208, 220 270 .71 238 276, 396 .71 Balaban, Nancy .... Balaban, Susie .... Baldridge, Bob .... .....330,400 ......330 89 Baldwin, Dave ............ 69,370 Baldwin, Gene .......... 298,398 Baldwin, Margie. . .35,57,221,270, 404 Belew, Bennie C.. Bell, Nikki ...... Bell, Bill ...,.... Belman, A. Barry. . .... 33 ....33 ....3 .. ...... .3 Belson, John H. .... ...105,23 Beltram, Cynthia. Benavente, Carlos. . ..... 2 .....13 Andre, Ben ........ .. .284, 316 Andreas, George ..... ...... 2 36 Andreen, Kae .... ...227,394 Baldwin, Tony .............. 368 Balich, Nick ..... 344,346,349,352 Balla, John C. .............. 232 Ballard, David A. ........... 292 Bands, Julia ...... ...... 3 29 Bange, Jerry O. .......... 228,318 Bannister, Bryant ............ 239 Benbow, Joyce ..... Bendalin, M. E.. . . . ....51,2 .......31 Bene, Bob ....... . . .285,2 Benedict, Bob ...... ..... 3 Benn, Brian ............. 226,23 Bennett, Archie Roy ......... 2 Bennett Barbara. .......... .2 Andresen, Art ..... ...... 3 14 Andrews, Andy .... .... 1 13 Andrews, Chickie ..... .... 2 72 Andrews. Marty .... .... 2 78 Andrews, Pete ....... .... 2 43 Andrews, Phoebe ...... .... 1 14 Andrews, Thomas C.. . . . . . .222 Angell, Bob ......... .... 3 O6 Angelo, JosephA.. . . . . . .236 Angle, Donna ...... .... 2 07 Angle, Eldon P. .... ...... 2 26 Angle, Herb ..... ......... 3 22 Angle, Jerry L. ......... 119, 238 Angle, Larry ........ 49, 242, 288 Anglin, Ed .............. 82, 223 Banovitz, Sharon Joyce. .35,36,330 Banton, Dick ............... 306 Barbee, Betty ............... 248 Barber, Bette Jo ............. 274 Barber, Jim ...... 22l,250,332,390 Barkdoll, Ivan Harry ......... 316 Barker, Boone .............. 105 Barker, Mary Kay ........... 326 Barksdale, Robert ..... 71,105,231 Barlow, Tili .......... 97,268,394 Barnard, Sue ............... 97 Ankeny, Sue ....... 276, 398, Apalategui, Alphonse ........ 237 400 Apfel, Dawn. .- .............. 221 Apodaca, Mary Helen. . .221, 326 Arana, Ignacio ............. 221 Aras, Gloria ..........,..... 35 Archbald, Gregory ........... Archuleta, William Max ...... 335 308 Armstrong, Frank ........... 206 Arntzen, Edward .... .... 2 31,232 Arnitz, William ..... .... 1 05,108 Arnold, Larry .... ...... 3 85 Arntz, Ben ..... 90 Aros, Gloria ..... .... 2 82 Arrigoni, Pete .... .... 8 9 Ash, Jim ....... .... 2 30 Ash, Robert ..... ....337 Ashcraft, Joed ..... ...... 2 82 Ashley, Colleen I. ........ 34,258 Assa, Haim ...... . . 82 Astrada, Nick ............... 390 Atkins, Judy ............ 122,272 Atkinson, Nancy Rae ...... 97,268 Aughenbaugh, Byron ......... 122 Austin, Diane ............... 278 Austin, E. Paul ..... Author, Brud ........ . . . .223,288 ......211 Axelrod, Robert N. .......... 223 Azimi, Azim I. .... . . . . .245,246 Barnes, Harold F... . .... . .322 Barnes, Helen ..... ...... 3 26 Barnes, Mrs. Wm. ........... 250 Barnet, Ron ...,...... 53,320,385 Barnett, Dottie .... .... 2 18,328 Barnett, Helen .... ...... 2 74 Barnhill, Larry ......... 49,50,306 Barnum, Fred C.. .i .......... 105 Barnum, Pat ..............., 221 Baroudi, Abulfida A. ......... 245 Baroudi, Munther M. ........ 245 Barr, Forest ....... Barr, George E.. . . . Barr, Robert ....... Barr, Theodosia E... Barrett, Richard J.. . .105,230,231, .....247 .....335 ... 239 .. . . .276,396 -B- Baber, Alvin A.. .42,49,52,82,226, 242,243 Bachelier, Luis .............. 337 Backstein, Robert J. .... .... 2 38 Backus, Dick ...... ....... 2 21 Badger, David .............. 223 Baehr, Carlalan ......... 136,278 Baer, Patricia ......... 36,245,260 Bagby, Warren L. ........... 122 Baggett, Larry B. ..... . Baher, Carol Jean ...... Bahraman, Mohamad ........ 246 Bailey, Jo Anne .......... 250,270 Bain, Donalo E. Bain, Marilou ............ 73, 97 Baird, Baken, .. . . . .332 ..221,326 .........l05,232 Bonnie R. ............ 219 Karen ......... 97,172,270 Baker, Bunny .... ......... 2 50 Baker, Galen R. .... ....... 2 45 Marjorie .... ......245 Baker, Baker, Robert G.. . . ..... . . 105 Rusty ..... .... 2 85,304 Balaban, Barby .... . . . .262,398 440 233 Barrie, Marjorie ......... 276,398 Barringer, Johnny ........ 221,391 270 Barry, Joyce ................ Bartholomew, Dick .... ..... 7 3 Bartholomew, Gerald. ....... 223 Bartholomew, Henry ......... 222 Bartlett, Bob ............. . . . 105 Barton, Barbara ......... 260,330 Basye, Dick ...... Bateman, Anne .... Bates, Richard .... Battin, Lee ...... Baty, Beverly ..... Baughman, Bob. . . Bauhan, Jobe .... Baum, Mike. ...... ......31s ....278,330 ........232 ....105232 ......33o .....3ss ......131 ... .285,3l4 Baumer, Grace .......... 113,235 Baustian, Nancy ......... 250,330 Bazurto, Ramon. . . Beaham, Tom. . . . Bean, Alan ...... ......376 .....304 ........106 Bean, Bebe ................ 331 Beaudry, Anne ........ 48,282,283 Bechtel, Jon ..... Beck, Kathy ..... Beck, Mike ...... Beck, Richard ..... Beck, Susannah. . . ........304 ........330 .....4950504 ........314 ........268 Becker, Carolyn ......... 272,330 Becker, Chuck ..... Becker, Stewart. . . Beery, Barbara .... Burdette, Bee ..... Beebe, Richard .... . . . .285,288 .....240 .....221 .....222 .....334 Beecroft, Jo Ann .... .... 9 7,270 Beer, Paul .......... Bchrns, Charlene. . . . Belding, Donald K.. . . . .....119 .....276 .....333 Bennett, Bill. .... . Bennett, Bennett, Don ......... 73,234,33 Melinda Lee ........ 27 Bensema, William ........ l05,2 Benson, Carl E.. . . . Benson, Johnny ..... Bentley, John E.. . . Berg, Dick ....... .......28 ....49,2 Berger, Bonnie .... 97,396,'398,4 Bergman, Ann ........... 260,3 Berlinski, Donald R. ......... 1 Berman, Lynn ........... 262,3 Bernardine, Aston .... ..... 2 Bernatt, Marty. . . Berninger, Carl J. Bernstein, Howie. ....2423853 Berquist, Bob ............ 49,3 Berrellez, Norma. . Berresford, Tom. Berry, Bette ..... Berry, Jim.. .... Berry, Ralph H.. . .48,97,229,2 ....53,228,3 . ..... 35,49, . ....... 3 Berry, Sandra ............ 97,3 Berry, Thomas D. Bershader, Harvey A. ........ 1 Beshears, Bob G. ......... 89,2 Bessenger, Charles ........... 3 Best, Betty Lou.. ....239,398,4 Betts, Larry .............. 35,2 Betts, Paula R.. . . Beun, Brian ...... Bialac, James T.. Biby, Jody ....... Biehler, Arleigh.. Bigler, Bill ...... Billings, Bruce .... . . . . .73,122,2 ......82,3 . ....... 2 ...zssnosa .....2545 Bingaman, Dave ......... 30l,3 Binns, Nancy Ruth ....... 236,2 Binzer, Vaughn. . .42,49,52,89,25 284,32 Birch, Terry ................ 33 Birch, William .... .... 6 2,63,1 Bird, Donald ..... ..... 2 3 Bizik,Lynn E.... Black, Bob. . . ..... . .38 Blair, Jane ...... . . .239,25 Blair, Jim ........ .... 3 7,15 Blakely, Sharon .... .... 4 O Blaker, Ken ...... Blalock, Bill .... Blazina, Ron .... Bleser, Philip ..... 9 .......24 ...241,24 .....30 Blickle, Charles ............. 23 Blitzer, Leon ............ 239,24 Bloch, Joyce ......... 213,223,36 Block, Jim ........... 49,l22,32 Blow, Paula ...... .71,235,324,32 Blumenthal, Morris .......... 23 Bodenhamer, Bill ........ 105,23 Bodenhamer, Lee C. ........ 22 Bodine, Sally ............. 97,27 Boehle, Jan ................. 24 Boettcher, Elaine.42,46,89,227,27 Boginis, Jim ......... 122,240,241 Bognonno, Joe ....... 314,344,35 Bogner, Ann.. f .... 5l,57,217,27 Booz, Pete ............... 89,335 Borcherdt, Frederick. . Campbell, Joyce .... Beverly ...,.. 123,236 Breazeale, Ella .... ........ 2 48 Burton, Lee ................ 306 Brody, Ed ......... Bogue, Beverly .... .... 2 21,266 Bogue, Peter ..... Bohlen, Bill... . Bohn, Betsy. . . . . ......105 89 .......278 Boldes, Judi ......... 262,398,400 Bolerjack, Bill ...., . Bolkin, Carole ..... Bollig, Kay ...... Bollinger, Jody ....... Bolt Jerry. . . 72 71 ....270 .......278 , .............. 335 Bolt, Judy. . .160,202,2l2,252,253, 256,264 Bond, Wm. C. ......... 82,98,226 Bonds, Julia ..... .... 8 7,237,329 Boone, Billie D... . .... 106,232 Boone, Harry ........ .......398 Borbon, Martha Helen ....... 328 Bordeaux, Diana. . . . . .......285 . ..... 331 Boring, Jeri .............. 97,276 Bostwick, Barbara ..,. Boulay, Sue ........ Bouton, Gary. . Bowen, James ..... Bowen, Judy ..... . . . . ..... 327 .....278 ..... .376 . . . . 106,230 .......260 Bowers, Carl ........ . ...... 376 . 136 373 330 Bowker, Brenda ..... 9 1 Bowlan, Buel .... . ......... 338 Boyd, Nancy ..... Boyner, Arnold. . . .....266 60 Boynton, John .............. 287 Bradbury, John ........... 75,251 Bradshaw, Joy. .48,87,227,252,33l Braeleshan, Patricia ......... 331 Bradman, Pat ....... 72 Bragers, James .... ........ 8 9 Brand Maril n 268 331 , y .......... , Brandau, Janice. ....... ..... 2 64 Brandenberger, Robert .... 122,242 Branin, Loyal ............... 296 Braun, Bob ........... ..... 2 34 Braun, Donald .... Braun, Marie .... Brauns, David ..... Brean, Barbara .... .....239 97 ....l86,231 ......282 Brennan,Nancy .......... 122,218 Brenteson, Don ........ ..... 9 8 Bret Harte, Lawrence ........ 238 Brierley, William ..... .49,304,389 Briggs, Robert .......,...... 254 Briggs, Ron. ....... ......286 Brightman, Connie ...... 272,330 Brimhall, Arthur ......... 219,332 Brimmer, Howard ........... 232 Brinkman, William .......... 89 Brisack, Jane ........ Briscoe, Bill ..... . . . Britt, Howard .... . Broadman, Ira ..... Brod, David ..... Broder, Everett .... Broekema, Dirk .... Broman, Phillip .... Brooke, Bob ....... 213,274,396 .73,234,3l1 .......228 ......238 ....289 ....289 ....320 ....306 ....316 ....311 Brookfield, Wes .... .... 3 5 Brooks, Frank ..... ...... 3 16 Brooks, John .... .... 2 36,246 Brotherton, Bill .... ...... 8 9 Brough, Janet. . . .... 54,266 Browder, Bob. . . .... 31,238 Brown Art ........ Brown, Barbara. . . . Brown, Bing ..... Brown Brown Brown v Bob ..... Bud ......... Carol Ann.. . ....300 ....266 ....336 73 ...250,287 71 STUDENT INDEX - I C ontinued J Brown, Claude .... Brown, Brown, Brown, Brown, Brown, George. . . Brown, Jacque.. . . Brown, Janet. . .. Brown Brow, Brown , Larry ..... Neil ..... , Pat ..... . Brown, Ray .... Brown, Robert .... Brown, Bob ...... Brown, Timothy. . . Browning, Thomas. . Brownlee, Shon .... Brubaker, Hank .... Bruce, Gary .,... Brucker, Chad .... Bruder, Harold .... Bruner, Elmo ..... Bruner, Jean .... Bruns, B. R. ..... . Brush, James ..... Bryan, W. E. .... . Bubala, Gene ...... Buchanan, Karen .. Buck, James ....... . . . . . . . .238 Craig ........... 332,386 Cynthia ...... 278,331,396 Diane ............... 252 Ed. .42,47,97,253,344,347, 356,377,379 . . . . 131,232 .......326 ....97,266 .......221 .........3sz . 144,357,377 .........23s .......234 ....31l, 98 .........236 .221,243,335, 376 .........253 . . .226,306 . . .285,316 370 89 ....240 ....122 ....l22 .......300 239 I 1fzl12.,3'5'7',376 .........136 ....232 Buckingham, Nancy .... .... 2 70 247 Buckley, Joe ....... Buckwalter, Anne.. Buder, Bea ...... Buehl, Tony ........ Buffington, Jack . . . Buford. Ted ...... Bugen, Dale .... ii 1:11219 .......248 ....377,380 .....335 ....3l6 .....340 Byron, Joan. . . Byrum, Floyd .... ..C- Cabat, George ........ ....274 98 ......286 Caffery, Barbara. .268,394,398,400 Cagle, Chuck ........ 89,253,310 ' 248 Cam, Pat .......... Caldwell, Hugh . . . Calhoun, Priscilla . . . Cali, Larry ..... . Calusa, Inez ...... Calvert Jerry ....... Camarena, Aurelia . . Cameron, Roy Eugene. . Camp, Janet ....... Campbell, Abby Anne. . .. . 304,389 71 ......306 ....113,331 ......357 ....l29 ......239 .....260 ......237 Campbell, Alice ......... 219,328 ......328 Bulley, Brian ..... . . .306,389 Bullock, John ...... .... 2 39,249 Bumsted, Frances ........... 238 Bunnell, Ed ................ 132 Buntz, Madilyn. 34,l60,252,276 Burch, Marty... .. . .218,282 Burdett, Patsy.. 68,330,398,400 Burger, Bonnie .............. 136 Campbell, Campbell, Marcia .......... 264 Norma Jean .... 36,264 Campbell, Roy ........... 73,234 Campos, Mike ........... 73,234 Canary, Martha ............. 71 Canning, Harriet ..... 245,250,282 Carbone, Carole Lee ...... 98,260 Card, Mike ............. 308,309 Carhon, Ann ........... 268,269 Carillo, Herman .... ...... 3 81 Carland, Marianna .... ..... 2 70 Carlson, Donna ..... .... 5 4,278 Carlson, Gary .... ..... 2 98 Carlson, Marge . . . ..... .250 Carlson, Sonja .......... 327,274 Carlson, Wendy .......... 98,270 Carmichael, Shirley Ruth. .218,223 Carmony, Charlene Kay. ..... 98, 222,227,229 Carnall, Bill ............... 304 Carnevale, Carpenter a Boyd ..... 226,310,333 Cesarini, Roland .... . . .385 Cessor, Jerry ..... Chacur, Milda ..... . . .245,328 Chambers, Dwight Chapin, Douglas . . . . . .239,240 Chambers, Susan . . . .... .266 Chaplin, Gernace .... .... 2 31 Chan, Paul ......... .... 2 39 .....298 ..........236 Chan, Cyril ................ 243 Chandler, Thomas C. ........ 316 Chapman, Gary A. ..... . .243 Chase, Liz .......... ..... 2 21 Chavez, Carlos ..... . . .228,245 Chavez, Ernesto A.. . . . . . . .337 Cheairs, Ann ...... ...... . 160 Cherry, Sally ...... . , .217,22l Chery, Donald L. ........... 231 Cheeseman, Sherrill ......... 221 Chesness, Kathryn Elaine ..... 223 Chesnick, Gordon M. ........ 89 Chesnut, Annie ............. 273 '262 Chiate, Dianna ...... Childs, Richard ......... ...240 285 Chilton, Todd .............. Chin, Lucy Kam-Kiew ....... 328 Ching, Anthony ..... 122,335,221 Chinworth, Wm. C. ......... 72 Chisholm, Donald . . . . . . .338 Choisser, De Ana .... .... 2 73 Choisser, John ..... .... 2 42 Choisser, Kay . . . . . .268 Chrisman, Anne .. .... 253 Chrisman, Bill ............. 308 Christensen, Connie ....... 35,48 239,25l,254,328 Christensen, Bill ..,..... 334,344 Christy, Hollie ....... 60,276,325 Chuppa, Paul A. ............ 318 Citron, B. Philip ............ 123 Claridge, Marcia . . . . . . .219 Claridge, Roy M. ........... 219 Burgess, C. R. .... . Burgoon, Judy .... Burk, Wayne ..... Burke, Bob ..... Burke, Gordon ..., Burke, Jim ....... Burmeister, J. H.. . . Burneo, Marilyn .... Burnes, Jody ...... Burnett, Charles .... .........341 72 .......368 ...223,228 .....308 ...377,379 .....253 ....71,331 .......273 . . .242,241 Burney, Mary Jane ....... 245,326 Burnham, Dave ............. 391 Burns, Clence ...... Burns, David. . . Burns, Jerry .... Burns, Sheila ..... . 106,230,231 . . . . . . 246 .......231 ....245 Burton, Margaret ........ 277,282 Bury, Richard ............... 113 Busailah, Laila Yaseen. . . . 122,239 Busailah, Mike .............. 220 Bush, Pat ........... 233,235,268 Buterbaugh, Mimi ......... 65,268 Butler, Mary Louise ......... 258 Butler, Ron ............ 40,60,61 234 Byer, Johnny ...... Bynum, Floyd .... . . .226 Byran, Bruce ..... . . .377 Byrd, Joe ...... ........ 2 34 Byrd, John ..... .......... 2 49 Byrd, L. Marie ....... 221,249,328 Byrnes, Bob ...... Byrnes, Sheila .... ........238 .....328 441 Carpenter, Cloyd M. ..... 219,303 Carpenter, Emily ........ 282,283 Carpenter, Josephine ...... 98 Carpenter, Roberta . .... 54,276 Carpenter, Roger .. ...... 239 Carrera, Jeanette ...... 48,71,329 Carrier, Jeanne ....... Carrillo, Mary Helen. . . Carrington, David .... Carroll, John ........ Carroll, Juanita .... Carroll, William Carson, Bill ...... Carson, Fran . . . Carter, Carol ..... Cartmill, Mary Kay.. Cartwright, Chuck .... Casladay, Carol Sue. . . Casanova, Angela ..... Casavantes, Edward J.. . ......273 ......260 ......200 .49,50,304 ......258 71 . . . . 123,314 . . . . 194,276 . . . .260,399 Carter, Mary Lee ...... ...... 98 222,218 ......304 ,....274 48,245,329 ......236 Case, Fred .............. 72,113 Case, Mary Ellen ...... Casey, Mike ......... ......327 ......322 Cason, Barbara Lee. . . 136,326,399 Castleton, Darlie Ann. . 54,220,401 Cates, Lee .............. 123,238 250 Cates, Lorraine ..... Catlany, Jane ..... Catlin, Fred ....... Catmill, Mary Kay.. Catron Dick ....... Hfffizso ....21s ......253 Clark Clark Clark: , Beth .............. 98,274 Beverly ...... 51,57,98,253 Busch ............ 47,314 Clark, James L. ............. 347 Clark J oe Frances ........ 36,48 194,217,277,282 Clark, Kae ................. 278 Clark, Cathy . . ........ 51,273 Clark, Lee ..... ..... 3 06 Clark, Michael . . . . . . . 106 Clark, Phyllis .... ......... 2 19 Clark, Smitty .............. 258 Clark, Terry . . . .... 72,266,316 Clark, Wilma .... ..... 1 36,423 Clarkson, Curt ...... .... 3 34 Clawson, Claudia . . .. . . .. 98 Cleleand, Charles .... .... 3 08 Clements, Bob . . . ...... .312 Clements, Tip ..... . . . 134,242 Clemmer, Jan ....... .,... 2 34 Cleveland, Barbara ...... 72,329 Clieff, Pat .......... ..... 3 28 Clifford, Richard .. .... 236 Cline, A. D. .... ....... 3 00 Cline, John ..... . . .320,391 Cline, Lawrence . . . .... .243 Cline, Russell ...... .... 2 26 , ........ 232 Cavghlin, Don . . .22l,227,242,335 Caviness, Clyde ............ 131 Cawood, Donald ............ 226 Cayce, Foster .... .... 3 40,386 Celaya, Ruben ...... .... 2 43 Cervantes, Manny . . . . . . .322 'Clonts, Howard ............287 Chothier, Judy .............. 325 Cloudt, Iris .... 62,63,123,233,282 Cloudt, Nadine Clouser, Wayne Clutf, C. Brent . . . Cobb, Alice .... . . ........223 .....219,303 ........236 Coco, Jo Anne ........ 98,136,282 Coco, Tony, ....... ....... 2 30 Codono, Joseph .... . . .309 Coflfey, Jim .... ..89 ....312 Coffman, John .. Coffman, Tom .... Cohen, David ........... 320,321 Cohen, Mrs. Frank. . Cohen, Micki ..... Cohen, Myra J. .... . Cohen, Victor ..,.. Colbeck, Lloyd .... Colbertson, Pat .... Colclasure, Velma. Cole, Cole, Carolyn. . . . . Evelyn .... Cole, Henry .... Cole, Jerry ..... Cole, Joe ...,... Coleman, Henry ......... 83,320 Coleman, Sandra ........ 223,262 Collerette, Janet .... Collette, Bill ....... .......427 .......236 ......325 ... . 134,240 319 ....227 .. 54 .. 98 ....268 ....326 82 ....3l6 ......338 ....219,276 ......304 Anthony ........ 113,237 Collins, Collins, Anne ...... Collins, Bill ..... .. Collins, Jack ......... ..35,160 .......335 .......285 Collins, John S ...... . 106,230,231 Collins, Maurice ..... l06,230,231, Collins, Colvin, Colyer, 233,316 Sue ............. 213,273 Beth ...... 36,221,249,33l John .......... 50,314,370 Conaualoff, Nick ..... 335 Concannon, Terry .... .Uiii:251 ...,106 .......31e ... . . . .326 Jon. .359,360,361,363,367 Condes, Albert ..... Conlisk, Lester ....... Conlsy, Mary Ruth.. . Conner, Conner, Michael .......278 .......220 Conolly, Fred ........ Conrad,Robert R. ........ 106,108 Conradi, Lynn ..... Cook, Alfred W.. . . , Cook, Charles E. ........ 306,357 Cook, Nancy ............. 48,329 Coon, Donna Dee. . . Coons, Cooper, Cooper, . 113,204,266 Mary ........ Barry ..... Carole ....... ......270 .......333 98 .......322 .......328 .......240 106,231,285 . .... . . 222 Janet ........... 278,396 Joan. .54,226,252,278,396 Cooper, De Witt ..... Cooper, Gary ........ Cooper, Ken ......... Cooper, Cooper, Cooper, Thora ....... Coopwood, Ken .... Copper, Barry. . . Corbet, Corbet, Jim .... Leo ..... Cordich, June ....... Cordova, Adriana .... Corkery, Paul James ..... 123,306 Cormick, Pat ........ Corn, Sally ,......... . ...... 282 . . . . . 370,383 ......222 ....314,383 ......314 ....327 .......245 89 .......278 Cornell, Susan ....... 270,399,401 Cornett, Lynn ....... .......377 Corona, Hattie-Nell. . .98,234,327 Coronado, Robert J... .......232 Corpe, Lois ................ 328 Corr, Bobbie ........ Corrier, Mary ...... Costanten, Leon ..... Costin, Michael J.. . . Cote, Tim ......... Cottrill, Bill ,.... Coulson, Peter ..... Coulter, Rufus C.. .. Counts, Jon ........ .98,160,274 .......221 ....285 ......246 .......3l6 ....334,357 237 119 .. .... 306 98 Covarrubias, Barbara .... . . Cowley, Dixon ...... Cox, Cliff ...... Cox, Joe .... . . .... 322 .......339 . . . . 106,232 STUDENT INDEX - I C orztinued j Cox, Bill .... Coyle, Ed ....... ....223.306 ........388 Coyle, Terry ............ 191,390 Cracchiolo, Andy ............ 304 Craesser, Roy ............... 240 Craig, Geri ........ 35,54,260,261 Craig, Jack .......... . ...... 338 Crandall, Bert ......,.... 123,311 Crandall, George ......... 49,306 Crawford, Bob ..... 62,63,284,288 Crawford, Marijane . . .87,253,258 Creekmore, Mildred ......... 329 Crehan, Margaret ..... 48,253,330 Creveling, Pat .............. 278 Criger, Robert .... ........106 Crismon, Anne ............. 331 Crismgn, Ronald ..... 226,287,239 Crock, Bob ................. 75 Crocker, Dixie ........ 61,251,221 Crockett, Kathleen .... 99,219,268 Crockett, Keith ............. 71 Crosby, Carol ........ 71,123,378 Cross, Carolyn .............. 264 Crotty, Patrick ........ 71,234,333 Crow, Emily ..... 249,252,254,328 Crowe, Tommy .... 82,226,242,306 Crown, Barry ,... ........... 2 38 Crump, Eric .... Cruse, Harry .... Cruz, Robert ...... ......300,377 .........250 ......134,242 Culbertson, Pat. . .35,190,276,396 Cullison, Jerry ...........,.. 312 Cuming, Jim ............ 250,287 Cunningham, Jane ........... 274 Cunningham, Yvonne .... .89,258 Curran, Audrey ....... .... 2 50 Curran, Pat ....... ...... 2 70 Currie, James F.. . . Curtis, Teddy .... . .....82,243 ...2l9,243 Cushman, Bunny ..... 250,273,330 Cusillas, Jaime ..... ........ 2 42 -D Dabdovb, Emesto ..... .... 3 39 D'Agostino, Angie ..... ..... 3 09 Dahlem, Susie ...... .... 3 27 Dahlman, James ............ 298 Daily, Alfred ......,........ 90 Dailey, Lynne ....... 268,330,396 Daily, Susie ................ 34 Dale, George ...... . ...,. 245,246 Dalrymple, Larry ........... 221 Dalton, Mary Leigh ...... 268,394 Daly, Suzi .... 99,185,207,276,432 Damato, Candy .......... 160,172 Dameron, Stan .............. 71 Dames, Martha ............. 327 Dancho, Ethel . . .204,205,208,328 Dancy, Dessie Dell .......... 274 Danehauer, Beverly .......... 258 Daniels, Veeva ...... ..... 2 74 .....326 Davis, Judy .... Davis, Pat ...... . . Davis, Roger ...... Davis, Suzie ....... Dawdy, Bob ....,. Dawdy, William. . . Dawson, Robert.. Day, A. D. ...... . Day, Frank ...... Day, Richard ..... Day, Sharon .... Dea, Stanley ...... Dean, Clarence. . . Deans, Sharon .... Deardon, Nancy.. .....274 .....222,33l ..........249 71,54.253,258 ..........232 ..........l06 90 .......239 ...l23,306 . . . . .238 ...278,330 . . ..... 340 .......l06 ..........328 .. . .48,282,399 Decet, Gene ...... 33,39,40,42,90 De Concini, Dennis ..... .... 3 04 Dees, Thomas E.. . 1 98 DeFrancesco, Horace ..... 134,292 DeFreese, Carol ......... 136,331 DeGrood Don .... , ......... 221 Defty, Michael ...... 217,218,340 Del-laan, Lida ........... 245,273 Dehlinger, Frances .......... 221 Delong, Richard.. .71,l34,24l,337 Dekle, Carroll .... DeLeon, Barbara. . Delgado, Flora. . . Delmonte, Joan. . . DeLonge, John. . . DeLong, Lyle ..... Dempster, Robert. Dennis, Joyce ..... Denton, J. H. .... . Derwin, Ann.. . . . .. ..........386 .. ....... 329 . . .245,326 264 ...338 ...221 ...314 99 249 ......99,22l Deschamps, Marcy .......... 274 Despain, Larry ..... DeVore, Ruth ...... DeVry, Dinah .... Dewey, Ronald. . . DiCicco, Anne .... Dicken, Sheila .... Dicker, Francis. . . Dickerson, Bob. . . Dickey, Frank .... Dickey, Gordon. . . Dickey, Leroy .... Dickie, Pamela. . . Dickman, Hilda. . . Dickson, Ted ..... .....3o3,38s ...221,326 ...274,330 .. ..... 318 .......274 ...122,266 118 ...233 238 .. ..... 306 221 ..'.-..1.2.9.,331 ..........250 ..........222 Dicus, Dick ........ 49,50,126,306 Diehl, Carol ...... Dieterle, Eleanor.. Dietz, Dave ...... Dill, Richard ..... Dimler, Herb ..... Dittinger, Mary. . . Dlohe, Edward. . . Dobson, Sue Ann. Dobson, Dwayne. . Dodds, Dotty ..... Dodge, Gini ..... ..........330 ..251,306 Diehl, Robert ...... .. . .87,252,278 ........238 ..........340 ....99,226,310 ..........22l .......337 ...260 ..........312 258 . . .26s,39s,4oo Danziger, Sandy. . . Darlington, Judy .......... 48,330 Darr, Jack .............. 304,334 Dasilva, Eduardo. .42,230,233,245 Davenport, Maynard ..... 219,306 David, Richard ............. 300 Davidson, Johnny ........... 312 Davis, Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis, Davis, Davis, Davis, 1 B111 .................. 338 Charles A. ........ 285,318 Charles W. ........... 306 Corinne ....... 187,212,252 Diane ............... 250 Edward E. ........ 118,238 Jack O.. . .236,344,349,356 Jefferson ............. 240 Joan ................. 327 Joe ........ ..... 2 32 John S. .... . . . 71 442 Doehrine, Don ............. 337 Doell, Don ................. 123 Doerschlag, Debbie ....... 99,270 Doka, Harold ..... ..... 2 49 Doke, Judy ...... .... 2 73 Doll, Andy ................ 247 Domler, Coralee ........... 260 Domler, Joe ..... 113,233,235,309 Don, Bill .................. 106 Donaldson, Jean ............ 399 Donatelli, Paula . . . .... .270 Donelson, Claris . . . . . .232,337 Donnally, LeRoy .. ..... 312 Dora, Joey ......... ..... 3 6 Doran, Geraldine A. ..... 268,326 Dorfman, Estherly .......... 328 Dorsey, Coral Jean ....... 99,327 Dorval, Eugene .... Dossett, Pat ..... Dotson, Karen Dotts, Myron . . . Douglas, Mike .... Douglas, Robert . . . ....1 ...99,2 ....3 ....3 ....3 Dovahe, Judy ........... 398, Dowdy, William J.. Dowell, Heidi Sue Dowling, Toby .... Downend, Marianne.. Downing, Diane . Drachman, Susan . . Drake, Bill ....... June Doug Drake, Draper, Draper, Joyce ..... Drayer, Charles . . . Drayer, Gary Lee Droke, Wiliam . . . Droth, Ray ....... Drum, William . . . . Dubarte, Victor . . . Dubin, David .. . Ducote, on .... . . . Duff, Peggy ..... Duffy, Georglanne Duharte, Hugo ...... Duke, Steve ...... f i6,'2'1'6',s 15e,276,3 ........99,2 ....2 ....2 ....309,3 ........90,2 ...72,3 ....3 ....2 ....3 ....3 ........73,2 276,399.4 . ..... .2 Dukes, Samuel .......... 344,3 Dulgov, Gloria ...... Dull, Ray. .35,53,235,285,294,3 3 Dumelie, Lawrence ..334,344,3 Dunbar, Dunbar, Dave ..... Dundas, Stephen . . . Dunion, Sheila .... Dunlap, Allan ...... :ffi3 Norman ...... . . . . . Dunlop, John ......... 49,50,3 Dunipace, Doug ..... 221,285,3 Dunn, Joe E. ........... 347,3 Dunn, Nancy .............. 2 Dunn, Tom . .344,346,348,349,3 Duran, John G. .... . Dussair, Kent . . . . Dyer, Kenneth ...... -E Eader, Anthony . . Eads, Jody ...... Eager, Jim .... Earle, Dick ....... Easton, Robert .... Ebert, William .... Ecker, Tom ......... Economides, 1-lebe Edberg, Barry .. . Edberg, Morton ..... Edgerton, Paul ..... Edwards, Richard .... Edwards, Robert . . . Eeck, John ..... Effron, Steve .... Egerton, Erick ..... Ehlert, Butch .... Ehmann, Tony ...... Ehnert, Barbara A. .. Eichenberger, Ken Eidel, J im ....... Eisenwinter, Allan Eitel, Ron ........ Ekdahl, George .. Ekstrom, Walter . Elberfeld, Mary . Elder, Carolyn . . . Elder, Fidi .... .... Elers, Karl .... .......294,3 218,239,2 ....72,3 ....36,3 ....3 ....2 ....3 .......319,3 .239,324,3 ........49,3 .223,284,2 .......285,3 ....96,23 248.3 . .... 230,3 '...68, . ..... 49,3 . .... 312,3 . .... 239,2 .......245,3 .48,245,3 .......33 ...l18,238 .........,.320 lfant, Roberto . lizondo, Martha .... 221,245,327 El-Khalidy Abulkader Elkus, Peter ..., Eller, Dwight .. Ellerbeck, Heidi Ellis Ellis Ellis v v Bob ....... Chris . . . . . Don ...... Ahmed, 245 320 90 .....258 ......22l ....48,328 .....228 .....22l Ellis Jeanne ........ Ellis, Mary Jane Ellis, Vernon ...... virginia ...... '.'2s'd,2521s25 Ellison, Cary . . . Ellsworth, David Ellis, Elms, Janet ...... Elsberry, Lloyd . . . Emery, Darlene Emrick, Jim ..... Encinas, Matt .. Encinas, Robert Eng, Jean ....... Engals, Vickie .. . Engel, Glorianne ............233 306 389 . ....... 284,297 .....328 ...3l4 .....324 .......288 312370 .......,337 .....3so .....54 .........68,223 Engelbardt, Robert ...... 107,230 Engelman, Dave ...3l,39,50,228, 306 England, Gail .... Enke, Fred .... Enos, Bert ....... ........273 . ..... 40 72 Ensign, Frank ..,....... 377,379 Ep erson, William p .......... 357 Eppler, James ...... ..... 9 9 Erdahl, Bernice . . . .......229 Erdely, Anita ..... .... 3 9,282 Erickson, Helen ,......,.... 254 Erickson, Suzanne ....... 251,264 Esch, Lee ...........,..... 90 Eschenheimer, Gideon ...... 338 Escher, Bob ............... 386 Escobedo, Margie ........ 48,245 Espinosa, Hector ......... 72,234 Essel, Barbara ...... 114,233,270 Estep, A. Lee .... ........238 Estes, William ........ 35,49,310 Estrada, Estrada, Lionel . . . Estrada, Nick .. Estrada, Ruben . Eulberg, ' Leonard ....... 243,332 .......322 . . . . .249,332 . . . . .245,332 Jim ............... 294 Evans, Donald ............ '. 288 Evans, Gordon . 40,42,47,62,63, 123,157,187 Evans, Joan . ........ 123,249,264 Evans, Loron . . . . . Evans, Richard . . . .........304 ........309 Everhart, Judy ..... ....... 3 27 Evers, Vicki Jean Ewald, Larry . . . Ewald, Sue . . . . . .......260,327 ......359,367 ......230,258 Ewart, Phil ................ 71 Eubank, Terrill . . 105,107,230,231 Ewing, Tom ............... 332 Ezrailson, Aaron .... .223 .. F - Fagan, Jack ........ ...... 1 23 Fagerberg, Mary .. . .... 99,260 Fahr-, John ........ ..... 3 11 Fahrnbruch, John Faig, Naid ...... Fain, Norman . . . Falck, Gene ...... Falconer, Nancy . Falk, Jim ....... Fanning, Harold .. Farabee, J. E. .. . .... .340 72 ........298 ......122,296 ..... .136 . . . . .304 . . .... 90,296 ...........231 Faraj, Samih ........... 123,345 Farquhar Ricki , ............ 160 Farrell, Billy .... 3 l2,336,370,373 STUDENT INDEX + fC0ntinued1 .......300 Farrier, Paul ..... Farris, Sharon .... ......... 2 26 Fate, Bonnie .............., 331 Fathera, Lowell ..... 107,240,242 Favers, Dean .... ......... 7 3 Fay, Susie .......... 227,268,269 Fay, William ............... 80 Featherstone, Martha ........ 274 Fechtmeyer, Nancy . . . . . . .268 Feder, David ............... 319 Fehr, Ruth ............. 123,236 Feichtmeir, Anne .. .278,330,398, 400 Felber, Bruce ........... 320,321 Fellman, Dianne. .262,330,398,400 Fellows, Roger ......... 304,334 Felsenreich, Marie ....... 67,268 Felsenthal, Judy . . . Fenderson, Francis . Fendo, Verene ,... Fenter, Dale ...... Ferguson, John .... Ferguson, Richard . Ferguson, Wes .... Fernandez, Lloyd . . Fernando, Felicita . Ferrell, Oscar ..... Ferris, Sharon . . . Ferstl, Joe ..... Festin, Eric Ficca, Judy .,.. Field, Betty .... .. .... 262 .........376 .........221 ,.l18,238,322 .........123 .........336 239 .. .... 238 .. .... 249 ......335 ...36, 54 ......309 ....107,230 ......221 .......235 107232 Fielden, James... ...... Fierce, Gayle ..... Fifield, Al ........ Figueroa, Felicia .. Findley, Cathie .... Findlay, Frank . . . Fink, Eddie Mae Finn, Richard . . . Finn, Robert . . . Finster, Ron .... Fiori Vicki .... . .250,254:327 .........39l .. ...... 123 .......327 ....107,231 ......221 ....309 ....238 .........304 , .........,.. 262 Fiscel, Linda Lou ..39,32,51,204, 236,278 Fischer, Robert . . 107,230,231,233, 240 Fiscus, Dave ......... 35,285,318 Fisdale, Wayne .... 73 Fish, Nickie ........ 330,399,401 Fisher, Darell . . . Eldonna .... Fisher, Fisher, Joan .... Linda ..... Fisher, Fisher, Richard E. . Fisher, William J. . . Fitzgerald, Elizabeth .........38l ....123,328 ......260 .. .... 266 .. .... 286 ....306 ...,....327 Fitzgerald, Jerry ........ 235,236 Fitzgerald, Lynn. . 276,396,398,400 370 Fivecoat, Larry .... Flake, Dean ...... Flaminio, Don .. Flanders, John .... Flanders, Richard .. Flaxman, Steve .... Fleck, Harold . . . Fleming, Frank . . . 122111112226 .. 72 ....312 .. .... 123 .......319 227 f f 122,221,234 Fletcher, Charlotte .......... 329 Fletcher, Darrell . . . Dick Fletcher, Fletcher, Joel .... Flickinger, Revis . . . Flint, Earl ....... . Flores, Arthur ...... .......336 .....72,234 .....240 ....327 .....221 .......287 228 Flores, Ben . ............. .. Flournoy, Mike .... .39,49,50,306 Flyer, Peg .......... Flynn, Ed ..... Flynn, Vince .. . Foard, Mary .. . ..... .. 99 107,231,232 .. . . . .60,61 .. . .260,266 Foiles, 'Carl . . . Foley, Pat .... Folkel, Pat Folkins, Faye . . . Forbes, Robert . . . Forbes, Robert .... Forbes, Mary Lou . Ford, Jim ....... Ford, Nancy ..... Ford, Wesley Fordney, Diane .. Forester, Judy . . . Fork, Allan ...... ....116,294 ....304,389 ......325 ....73,221 ......239 ......239,385 .......99,260 ..........284 .....253,258 ......230 .....282 ..........276 ......286,386 Forman, Jeanne . .... 194,197,268 Forman, Perry ............. 240 Forrest , Peter ........... A -309 Forster, Sue ............. 36,278 'Gardner, Forsythe, Richard .... .335 Fortner, Bill ........... .... 2 33 Fossland, R. G. ............ 250 Foster, Charlotte . . .36,43,46,113, 264 Foster, Leslie .............. 239 Foster, Mary Jane .......... 258 Foster, Sam ...... 73,123,221,234 Fousel, Kenneth ............ 99 Fowler, Bartlett .... . . .292 Fowler, Linda .... .....270 Fox, Dick .,... ....... 3 06 Fox, Geoffrey .......... 249,288 Fox, Jackie ................ 270 Fox, Jim .......... 31,35,3l4,376 Fox, Judy .... Fox, Kim ...... ............274 ,.........292 Fox, William ........ 118,238,312 Frakes, Carolyn .. . . . . . .276,396 Frampton, Sylvia' ..... 99,274,275 Franklin, Jerome ........... 336 Franklin, John .......... 114,314 Franks, Shirley . . .54,201,252,268, 269 Franzi, Emil ........... 285,297 Fraps, Conrad ............. 131 Fraser, Bill ......... 242,284,310 Frauenfelder, Dirk . . . 123,386,422 Frauenfelder, Frances ....... 326 Frauenfelder, Roger ......... 332 Freeman, Jerry ............. 298 Freeman, Tony ....... 73,113,234 Freethy, Jack .............. 322 French, Joanne ..221,245,254,330 Frey, Carol ................ 266 Freytes, Beatriz ..... 123,245,328 262 Friedland, Diane Friedlander, Linda .... ..... 2 62 Frontera, Enrique Frost, Jacqulyn ..... Frost, Kenneth .. . Frye, Linda ...... Frymire, Ruth Fugate, Jim ..... Fukuchi, Rae Fulbright, Ruby . . . Fuller, Sue ....... Fuller, Wallace . . . Fulton, Mary Ellen Funk, Fred ..... Funk, Jim : ....... Furlong, Nancy . . . Futch, Gina .... Fyler, Peg ....... ...339 ...136 .....239 .....221 .....235 .....318 35 . .... 251,328 .......35,276 .. . . . .239,240 . .40,43,60,81, 123,233,329 . . . . . . . .222 ....285,286 ....21s,327 ....163,222 ......327 -G- Gabriel, Dick ..... L ........ 73 Gaines, Jack. .107,230,231,233,311 Gajewski, Edward .......... 335 Gala, Rosemay ..... ........ 1 36 Gale, Barbara .... 443 . . . .204,327 Gallo, Tony ....... Galloway, Donald Galovics, Tibor ...... Galpin, Eileen .... Gamble, Gayle .... Games, Doanie ..... Garbony, Ofelia .... Garcia, Elda ....... Garcia, Gloria . . . . .......252 Galhouse, LaVerne .. .....304,411 .......340 .......245 218,222,331 .54,252,268 . . . . .99,268 . . . .2-45,328 . . . . .99,282 .48,245,326 Garcia, Martina ..23,36,39,43,46, Garcia, Rudy .. . Gard, Helen ...... Gardner, Leigh .... Gardner, Murray .. Peter .... Gardner, Polly .... Gardner, Stan . . . Garity, Mike Garland, Ray .... Garner, Hap ..,... Garretson, Byron .. 48,99,236,328 .........292 ....268 ....231 . . .... 249 ....304 .......274 .........320 ....31,49,124 ....324,338 .........334 .:1.07,230,339, 388 Garrett, Garfie ..221,368,377,380 G ary, Jerry ....... .........332 Gaskin, Gail .. ,... 236,276,398 Gaston, Sue . . . ...... .99,258 Gates, Bob .... 83 Gates, Shauna . . . ....... 36,274 Gatlin, Janice ....,... 99,204,260 249 Gaver, James . . . Gay, Carole .,.. Gayewski, Ed . . . Geare, Cathy ...... Geary, Jack ....... mifiszs ....335 .........260 221 Gee, Gloria . . .43,l72,217,276,396 Gee, Helen ............. 235,252 Gee, Ruth ........ Gee, Wilson . . . .........282 73 Geffs, John ............ 107,232 Gehrke, Gayle .... .........264 Geist, Jim ...314,334,344,35-4,370 Gelderman, Fred .. Gelman, Louise .. . Gemundt, Ken .... .....,...226 .........327 .........38l Geniec, Paul ........ 134,241,242 Genszler, Mary .......... 90,223 Genthner, Bruce . ..... , .242,300 Georgacakis, George George, Daweel . . . George, Delvey .... Gerdes, John .... Gerhart, Daniel . . . Geyler, Ted ..... Gianas, Peter ..... Gibbons, Boyd .... Gibbs, Carolyn .... Gibbs, Phyllis .. . Gibson, George . .. Gibson, Jim .... Gibson, Marty .... Giclas, Henry ....... Gieck, Lloyd .... Gilbert, Jack .... Gilbert, Jim ....... Gilbert, Marianne Gilbreath, Daryl . . . Giles, Chuck ...... Gill, Frank .... Gill, Joe ........ Gillard, Tom .,.... Gillespie, Jack ..... Gilpin, Jana ...... Gimbel, John .... Ginsburg, Terry . . . Giorgi, Donald . . . Girard, George . . . ........337 232,234,333 72 ....124,239 ......226 .......238 .......238 .49,242,306 .......274 ....124,374 .......240 .......229 .......274 107,211,232 .......322 .......340 ....124,249 ......277 ......338 ....3l5,376 385 iiiilzzs ....3o4 ....25o Gillenwater, Bettie . . . Gillenwater, Powell .. .....344,357 .......238 .......274 . . . . 107,230 .....315 ....229 ....l24 Girard, Phil ..... ..... 3 09 Givens, Carlyle . . . .... .292 Glass, Betty J. ... . . . . .330 Glecker, Jo Alice ...... .248 Glen, Norman .......... 334,357 Glendening, Eber ...........249 Glendening, Lorna .......... 249 Glenn, Stella ...... Glickman, Stan . . . Glonts, Howard .... Glover, Suzanne .... Gnatt, Judy ...... Goddard, Delbert .. Goebel, Gene .... Goettl, Loretta .. . Goetz, Edward ....99,266 .....385 ,....287 80 .. . 110,277 .. . 107,300 , .... 107 ........26o .....107,232 Goetz, Helen ............ 87,237 Goldberg, Sally . ...262 Goldfarb, Bob. .43,'47',239,'320,423 Goldman, Barbara . .........250 Goldman, Harold .... . . .ll8,238 Goldmark, George . Goldsmith, Bill .... Goldsmith, Bob .. . Goldwyn, Howard . . ........ 223 .........300 .........319 .49,52,9o,3o0 Goldy, Joseph ........... 90,228 Gomez, Angel Gonzales, Al ...... ........340 .....383 Gonzales, Alfonso .......... 339 Gonzales, Ciriaco ....... 239,245 Gonzales, David . . . ..... .339 Gonzales, Olivia .,.. 34,270 Gonzalez, Salvador .. . .... .348 Good, Diane Lynn . Goodale, Duncan .. .... .262 ......304 Goodfarb, Shelly ........ 123,287 Goodgame, Leonard Goodman, Dave . . . Goodrow, Rose Ann Goodwin, Dorothy . Goodwin, Georgene Goold, Barbara Gordon, Gayle .... ........107 .........251 ........227 .........235 ......48,245 .... .264 .........278 Gordon, Michael ........ 223,319 Gordon, Pat ....... 57,63,233,264 285 Gordon, Sandy Goreham, Dick ............. 316 Gortler, Morris .. . ......242 Gorta, Harry ....... .228 Goss, Karl .... ..... 2 42,243 Gould Al .... ...... 2 28 Gould Ed ...... ...... 3 36 Gould Nancy .... ..... 1 36,277 Gozik, Ray ..... ...... 3 76 Grace, John ..... ..... 2 92 Grace, William ..... . . . 90 Gradison, Barbara .......... 270 Grady, Don ............. 90,304 Hay, Glenn ................ 300 Graves, Marian Hamilton, Barbara Graham, Mumford .. . .... . 73 Graham, William . . . Gramer, Patricia Grand, Marcia .....309 ........22l Grasis, llze ....... 48,226,239,331 Graves, Jim . .... . . . ........288 ............229 Gray, Howard .....334 Graybeal, Alice .... ...... 2 29 Green, Barbara . . . . . . 125,401 Green, Carolyn ............ 221 Green Chuck ........... 25 296 Green: Elmer .... 361,363,365Z367 Green, Joseph .......... 220,232 Green, Mel ............ 285,289 Green, Sally ............... 221 Green, Wally ........ 82,324,338 Greenbeck, Suzanne ......... 268 Greenberg, Andrea . . . . .262 Greenberg, Stanley .......... 240 Greene, Robert ....... ...... 1 24 Greene, Rosina .. .54,l50,221,260 STUDENT INDEX - I C ontinued J Greenland, Nelson . . . Greenway, Tate Greer, Jerry Greer, Susan ..... Gregory, Jean .... Gregg, Jim ...... Griesser, Dick . . . Griffen, Cassie .... .......338 211,284,311 .......290 ......274 .......266 . . . .340,392 .... .99,370 99 Griffen, Cynthia ........ 398,400 Griffith, Bob ....... .2l6,218,222 Griffith, Sharon ............ 129 Griggs, Warren . . l07,230,231,233, 284,286 Grimes, Stan ........ 107,230,383 Griscom, Madeleine .. .......278 Griswold, Richard ....... 216,221 243 Gross, Dave ...... Grover, Gordon Gruwell, Harry Gucciardo, John . . . Guerkley, Gayle . . . Guerra, Hector Guerrero, A. M. Guinan, Alice .... Guinn, lna .... Gunter, Joe .... Guske, Gloria .... Gusinow, Mike Gustafson, Jerald .... Gutherie, Bonnie . . . . Gutherie, Carl .... Gutierrez, Leo .. . Guttery, Jack ..,.... Guzman, Gabriel .... Gyori, John ......... -1-1- ....3l2 ....239 ....221 54 ....332 ....236 ....326 ...,129 ....3l6 ...,282 ....319 ....249 ...,219 ....34l ....332 ....242 ....245 90 Haas, Liz ........... 233,278,396 Haddad, Nancy .......... 99,268 Hadden, Ross . . . Hadley, Charles . . . Haffmen, Susie ...... .......315 ....251 .......327 Haffner, Tom .........., 61,233 Haga, Eileen Lucille Hagerman, Jerry T. . . . . . . .221,227 . . . . .35,288 Hague, Carolyn Ann .... 124,260 Haigh, Eileen ....... Halberg, Jim ........ Hale, Alan .... . . .3l5,344,357 Hale, Danny ... . . Halkell, Bill ... Hall, Alan .... Hall, Alice .... Hall, Dale P. .. Hall, David ...... . . . 274,398,400 Hallberg, Christina . . . Halle, Mike ......... Hallsted, Jim ....... Halpern, Doug ...... Hall, Virginia ...... Halpern, Martin Brent Ham, Danny ........ Hamaker, Judi ...... .... . . .218 172,250,287 53 .......298 .. . .370,374 ......274 .......332 .......23l .......245 123,254,298 .......23l .......319 ..35,53,320 99 .......327 Hamay, Beverly Ann .... 260,412 Hamilton, Priscilla .. 223,258,327 .99,326,399, 401 Hamlin, Robert .... .... 2 21,336 Hamm, Alvin ..... Hammer, Richard ......222 ......242 Hammil, Carrie .......... 99,229 Hammond, Arthur ......230,336 Hammond, Jill ...... Hammond, Robert .. ......278 .......246 Hamzik, George . ....... 226,310 Hancock, Barbara Hand, Anita ........ Handorf, Kaay ...... Haney, John .... Haney, Tom . . . 136,394,398 .69,217,278 .......325 .......114 . . . .3l8,340 444 Hanhila, Lynne .... 39,99,227,260 Hannah, Richard ........... 106 Hannon, Joe ............... 90 Hansen, Alan .. . .... 250,333 Hanson, Bud .... ...... 9 0 Haraway, Al .... Harbaugh,,Sue .... Harbour, Gladys Hardgrove, Mike .....322 .....322 .....229 .... .114 Hardin, Wyla .............. 221 Harding, Laurene ............ 72 Hardt, Patsy ..... 99,2l9,227,303 Hardy, Donald ....... ...... 3 15 Haren, Gail ................ 274 Harlan, Julia .... 34,36,5l,239,268 249 Harlan, Tom ...... Harman, Dennis ............ 315 Harmon, Jack ...... ...... 3 5 Harmon, Virginia .. .........329 Harper, Lavell ....... . . . . . . Harper, Mary Jean . Harper, Ronald .... Harring, Aleener .. Harring, Arnold Harrington, Dick .. Harrington, Jim .. Harrington, Mary .. Harrington, Norma 118 . . .48,235,282 .........206 . ........ 219 .....l08,231 . ...... 382 .....242 . ..... 236 .. . .... .325 Harris, Barbara .... ...... 2 21 Harris, Betty ..... .... 4 8,326 Harris, David . . . ..... .300 Harris, Ed .... .... 3 12,340 Harris, Helen . . . .... 90,252,274 Harris, Lynn .... . .........232 Harris, Tom .... .... 5 3,306,340 Harrison, Jane .... Harrison, Jane C. .. Harshfield, Dan .. Hart, Donna ...... Hart, Linda ....... Hart, Mary Elizabeth Hartman, Philip . . . Hartman, Virgil Hartness, Sandra .. Harvey, David .. . Harvey, Jim ...,. Haskell, William . . . Hassey, Tom ..... Hastings, Henry .. Hatch, David . . . Hatch, Donald .... Hatch, Terry ..... Hatt, Roberta .. . Haught, Dorothy Haughton, Kathy ........274,331 Haughts, Jean .... Haury, Allan .. . Haury, Carol . .. Hawes, Ernest .... ....136,399 .....260,40l ......243 .........274 .....l94,208 ........250 .........250 ... ..l13,234 278 .....l08 .....l08 298 .....242 .....232 341 ....l31,232 .........335 .....7l,22l,33l ...........330 72 . . . . . . 108,232 . . . . .99,229,282 ....298,39l Hawk, Jim . .... .... 6 8,235,312 Hawk, Ken ...... . . . .292,376 Hawkes, Virginia ........... 282 Hawley, Anne ....... 124,252,266 Haworth, Bobbie . . . 35,54,269,274 Hayden, Mary Jean ....... 99,282 Hayden, Roberta Hayer, W. T. Hayes, Dave .... .... .260 .....335 ...........376 Hayes, Ken ............ 344,357 Hayes, Sara ..... 202,204,246,273 Hays, Sarah Hazard, Alice .............. 327 Hazlett, Carl ........ 344,349,356 Headstream, Lucy ..........33l Hearn, Linda .............. 282 Hecht, Harry R. .. ....... 108,231 Heckler, Dave .... .... 5 3,306 Hedges, Blanche . Hedges, Carl .... .... .273 .....300 Hedges, Shirley .... .... 9 9,27 Hedlund John . , ....... 10 Hedrick, Robley ...... 90,242,30 Heffelman, Ralph ....... 306,34 Heidelmann, Bill Heil, Edith ......... .......24 .......32 Heineman, Dan ......... 124,30 Heineman, Jan . . .277,396,398,40 Heiniger. Carol ...36,54,194,25 26 Heinz, Mary Ellen .......23 Held, Robert ........ l08,23l,23 Helder, James ..... 72,75,234,3l Helmer, Rex . . . Hely, Nancy .... Helzer, Bob ....... Hemovich, Sandra . . . Henderson, Gary Henderson, George .. Henderson, Kay .... Henderson, Henderson, Peter Henderson, Thomas . Hendrix, Ellen ..... Henley, Geraldine Henness, Jim ....... Henningsen, Babs . . . Henrich, Dave ..... Henry, Tom ..... Hensley, Dave Henson, Cay .. . Heny Parra, Joe Henze, Bob ...... Herbert, Bill . . . Herget, Frank ...... Herlihy, Barry Herman, Marty Hermanson, Dee 1-Iernandez, Al Hernandez, Olga .,.. Herndon, Bill ...... Herreid, Karen Hersh, Lee .... . Hertz, Lewis ..... I-Iertzog, Connie Heskett, Bobbie Henderson, Larry . . . Henderson, Metta Lou Mickey . Hess, Naomi ..... Hesselberg, Al .... Heyden, Nancy Heying, William Hickman, Lynn ..... Hickman, Madelyn . Hicks, Billy ........ Hicks, Gloria ..... Hicks, Paul .... Hicks, Taylor .... Hiester, Vernon . . . Higbie, John ..... . Higgins, Joan ...... Higgins, Joe ..... . Higgins, Penny .. Higgon, Clara .... . Higgs, Jim ........ Hill Charles D. . . . . Hill Charles W. . . . . Hill David ........ Hill Hill Hill 9 .......33 ....54,26 .....38 ....99,32 . . . .239,29 ...l34,24 .....33 .. ...3 .......24 .. ...5 ...30 .. ...34 ....32 .....32 .......28 27 . .90,228,30 ...232,33 ....33 ....2s ...23 .......22 29 . 108,232,29 ...100,24 .....25 ....13 .......28 .......23 .136,398,4o .....35,37 23 ....28 ....22 ....22 ....10 9 12 . . . . 124,34 .......27 ....25 ....27 .......29 ...298,42 .......23 . 108,232,29 .......38 ...260,32 .......22 . l72,250,28 .......33 .91,224,22 ...,...30 Harvard . .47,91,22s,243,3o James J. ...... . James M. Hill, James w. .. Hill s Ray ...... Hillock, Bob .... Hillock, Peg Hills, Jimmie .... Hinchee, Mike Hinderer, Bill .... Hineman, Janet . . . Hirschy, Sheila .91,211,30 183,306,39 ....82,30 .......10 ...ll8,23 .....25 9 ....10 ....38 .....21 .. .270,33 iscok, Ray .... ., . .377,378 ively, Dave ........... 311,377 Hoagland, Dave ............ 311 oagland, Jack . . .91,l70,228,243, Hoard, Nancy . . . Hobart, Peter . . . Hobbs, John .... Hochstader, Eric 300,340 .....278 .....248 . ........ 238 ...........300 odge, Delbert ...... 344,357,377 odges, Alta ............... 331 Hoe, Betty ...... Hoecker, E. Grant Hoerr, Jim ..... Hoeschler, Terry Hoffman, Charles Hoffman, Cheryl Hoffman, Larry . Hoffman, Mike . Holbert, Charles . Holbrook, Ken .. Hold, Ronald .. Holden, Betsy . . . Holish, Jim ..... Holish, Nancy .... Holland, Hank .. Holleran, Brenda Hollinger, Jan . . . Holloman, Linda Holly, Alice ..... .66,l60,398,400 ..........223 ...........237 ...304 ..........341 ...........274 370 ..43,52,124,185, 206,284,306 ...........243 ....306,344,357 ..........3l5 . ........ 273 . .,... 306 .. . .91,274 .... .221 ...330 ...........274 ...........245 .34,260,266,251 Holly, Fran ............ 251,266 Holman, Jim .... Holmes, Ann B. . Holmes, Anne M.. Holmes, Gene . . . Holroyd, Marilyn Holtz, Clifford .. Honga, Marvin .. Hook, Jack ..... Hooper, Terry .. Hoopes, Jay .... ...........131 . 48,100,202,204, 270,394,401 .71,235,326,399 312 250 310 . ..... 249 108 219 219 Hopkins, Joan .......... 254,264 Hopkins, Robert ........ 366,359 Hopp, Terry ..... 136,254,398,400 Hopper, Candy ......,.. 274,330 Hopps, Dave .... Hopps, Harvey .. Hopton, Ginger . ...........314 . ..... 240 ...........280 Hore Betty ............. 124,326 Hornbrook, Lynn Horrell, Earline . . Horsom, Connie . Horwitz, Dian . . . Horwitz, Tana .. Hosack, Blanche J. Hosking, Karen . Hoskins, Fred . . . Hough, Melinda . . . . .3l,34,43,49, 91,185,227 . ..... 100,274 71 .......262,330 ....113,237,326 . ......... 229 ...........327 ........82,311 .......270,331 Householder, James ......... 73 Householder, R. Frank ...... 333 Houser, Gwendolyn Elaine ..235, 268 Houston, Blain .. Hovagian, Al .. . . .......... 108 ......370 Hovde, Gayle .......... 277,3 31 324 Howard, Allison Howard, Sharon Kirk ....... 326 Howe, Betty ...,........... 13 6 292 Howe, Frank . ..... .. Howe, Ruth .... .fffffzss 226 Howell, Don ............... Howell, James H. . .... 53,126,315 Howell, Ronnie Hu, Steve Hubbard, Lee .... Hubbard, Richard Hubble, Wayne . . .. ........ 73 ......232 ......124 .......306,381 ......338 STUDENT INDEX - I C ontinued 1 Huber, Corinne ....... .... 3 26 1-Iuckeman, Carol ........... 136 Huddleston, Richards R. .... 108, 230,294 Hudson, Allan Charles ....,. 312 Hudson, C. Fenner .......... 339 Hudson, Herman Henley .... 312, 368,376 Huebsch, Edward H. . ....,. 134 Huff, Vaughn E. Huffman, Phyllis ....l24 ......330 Hughes, Eileen ......... 221,331 Hughes, James R. .... ..... 3 16 260 Hughes, Judith .... Hughes, Lee .... Hughes, Ray . . . I-Iuie, James E. . . Hulse, Paula ..,. ......34,273 ....292,377,380 .........292 .......100 Hult, Ann ......... .... 1 60,277 Hummel, Gordon Hummel, Loueen Humphrey, Bob ..... 91 ...........219 200,226,306, 344,354 Humphrey, Joan ..36,270,398,400 Humphreys, Jo Ann ......... 268 Humphreys, A. V. ...105,131,232 Hune, Tom .........,...... 316 Hunsaker, Bill .. 49 Hunsaker, Jan L. ........ 108,231 Hunsaker, Ralph ..... 50,312,347, Hunter, Don .... Hunter, Janice . . . . 348,350,356 340 .......277 260 Huntzicker, Lora .... .... Hunzeker, Bill ....., .... 2 97 242 I-Iunzicker, William Hupp, Fred ................ 339 Hurd, Marty .... 351,370,373,374 Hurley, Dave ........... . . . 124 Hurley, Sheila . . . Hurley, Susie . . . Hurt, Judy .... Huss, Max B. . . . . ....204,325 .......277 ....277,330 . . . . .91,228 Hussey, Marge ...... ...... 2 68 Hutchings, Phebe ........... 251 Hutchison, Mary Lee . . .23,3l,40, 43,46,58,100,216,217, 277,406,423 Hyde, Gary ..... 217,221,2s4,294 Hymer, Robert L. ..........108 Hynes, Linda ........... 398,400 -1- Iatarola, Rubi .... .........325 nes, 'rom .......... 108,232,306 Imaizumi, Felix D. ..........333 Ingalls, Vicki ....... ...... 2 68 Ingersoll, John ..,.. . ....... 306 Insalaco, George S. Irwin, John ...... Ismay, Bill ........ Ives, Robert L. ..... . -J- Jackson, Charlotte J ackson, Jan ....... Jackson, Vik ..... Jacob, T. .... Jacobs, Jane . . . Jacques, Raoul .. . Jaggi, Rodolffo . . . Jameson, Jami . . . .... .108,230, 231,233 .......238 .......327 Isaacson, Sheila ..... . 344,357,383 .......2l8 .......219 ....252,325 . .340 . . . . .245 .. . .270,327 ....238 ....294 .330 Jameson, Mary Clare ........ 273 Janda, Sally ............ 245,277 J aquith, Beverly Jean .... 207,260 Jauch, Jennie .............. 309 Jay, Terry ....... 48,194,197,251 Jenckes, Joe ............. 67,304 Jenkins, Virginia Bernice ..... 260 Jensen, Richard ...... 71,124,422 Jerge, Michael ............. 228 Jewell, Sarah Ellen ...... 277,396 Jiminez, Paul ,..... ...... J imerson, Tom .......... 232,292 Jobes, Jacqueline ... . .91,227,264 Johannesma, Nick . . .105,l06,230, 108,231 Johannsen, Jens . . . ...... 34,113 John, Joan Maria .......219,270 John, Roberta .... ...... 2 29 John, Sidney .... ...... 2 96 Johns, Dave .... .... 4 9,306 Johns, Rick . . . .... .304 Johnson, Al ...... ........ 2 49 Johnson, Barb .......... 259,330 Johnson, Bob ....... ..... 3 5, 53 Johnson, Bonnie O. ...... 100,273 Johnson, Don .......... 226,250 Johnson, Doris ............. 283 Johnson, Gary Dale ......... 369 Johnson, Gary ............. 315 Johnson, Gerald S. ...... 118,238 Johnson, Jimmy ............ 226 Johnson, Karen .......... 3 5,278 Johnson, Margaret Marie .... 270 Johnson, Paul .............. 250 Johnson Peter .......... 238,304 Johnson, Ray H. .... ..... 7 2 Johnson Rye ..... ....... 1 08 Johnson, Sally .... ........ 2 73 Johnston, Judy .......... 273,330 Johnston, J. Wesley ...... 312,376 Johnston, Ervin Frederic ..... 238 Johnston, Robert C. . . 118,119,238 Johnston, Lorna . ........... 326 Jones, Bob ....... ..... 3 11,316 Jones, Charlotte ....... 36,54,273 Jones, Dorian .... . . .39,91,278 Jones, Lloyd B. ..... ....... 3 35 Jones, Janet Louise ...... 100,278 Jones, Mary Lenorah ..... 73,221 Jones, Pat ................. 268 J ones, Ray A. .... ..... 3 11,334 316 Jones, Robert H. .... ...... . Jones, Robert M. .... .108 Jones, Rod ...... . . .322 Jones, Virginia . . . .... .281 Jones, Walter I. .. ..... 288 Jordan, Deanna ............ 221 Jordan, Doris Pete ..........264 Jordan, Flory ....... 209,277,398 Jordan, Frank . . . Jordan, Jill ...... 53 136,213,278,279 Jordan, Jim , ........ 334,344,353 Jordan, John R. ............ 124 Joseph, Jan ......... 221,270,328 Journey, Paula ............. -274 Kasner, Tom ..... Kasten, Barbara . . . Kasten, David L. .. Kasulaitis, Gayle .... Kasulaitis, Ronald J . ....376 ....278 ....298 .......330 .......322 Katz, stan ........ 60,61,125,22s Katzke, Bob ........ Kaufman, Evelyn .... Kaufman, Harlean . Kaufman, Jerry .... Kaur, John James . . Kawar, Samir ..... Kay, Fred ......... Kay, Larry ........ Keane, John Michael Keasler, Billy ....... Keefe, John A. . . . . .. Keeling, Diane .... .......319 ........262 150262 .::::131i232 ......336 ......245 ......35,405 .....285,335 ........221 .......347 91 252,274,325 Keene, Kendal M. ........ 91,228 Keene, Richard .... Keevar, Mike Keith, Helen Kelley, Mary Kelliher, Don ... . 125,320 ......232 .......331 ...... .229 131,132,232 Kelly, Kay .... ...... 2 08,281 Kelson, Carol . . . Keltner, Gary ..... Kernendo, Vincent . Kemmerer, Andrew Kenaston, Greg .. . Kendall, Joan ......... Kennedy, Jacqueline Kennedy, Judith . . . .......160 ....125 . .... 316 . .... 294 ......242 .260,330 .......329 .......329 Kennedy, Mary Munds ...... 273 Kennedy, Tom .... Kenney, Ken ..... Kent, Bryan .... Kent, Joe ......... . . Kent, Judith A. .. . Kent, Skip ...... Kenyon, Bob .... Kenworthy, Rae . . . Kepner, Craig . . . Keppel, Bob ...... Kerber, Emojean .. Kern, Diane ...... Kerr, Sandy ...... Kerr, Faye ....... Kershner, Gail .... Kershner, Paul .... Kerth, Geri ......... Kerwin, Peter F. Jr. Kessler, Barbara D. Ketchum, Carole .. Ketchum, Paula . . . Keyes, Denny . . . Kirlleen, D. J. . . . Kim, Ik Chang .... Kimes, James E. . .. Kirnpatich, Marty .... Joyner, Fred ........ 33,37,49,50 Jumaa, Kays H. .. 82 -K.. Kabotie, Hattie Lou ..... 249,324 Kain, Sidney L. ............. 238 Kaine, George ...... 124,211,243 Kalectaca, Milo ............ 249 Kalil, Barbara Ann .......... 264 Kalil, George ...... Kalish, Joseph R. ........ , Kalyna, Gerry ........... 119,238 Kaminsky, John James ....... 131 Kaplan, Harold David. .90,284,289 Kaplan, Sharon ......... 262,330 Karber, Karen Sue . . .218,222,331 Karn, Brenda ............,. 126 Karp, Gene .......... 91,284,319 Kartchner, Ila Rae .... 48,219,326 . .... 221 35 289 445 King, Bob ....... King, Christine . . . King, Ed ....... King, James . . . King, Jenny .... King, Jim ..... King, Joe L. . . . King, Nancy . . King, Pat ...... King, Richard .... Kinross, John .... Kinwald, Sally . . . Kirby, Don ....... Kirby, John H. III . . . Kirby, P8111 ...... Kish, Suz1e....... Kitchens, Rodger .... Kite, Ralph ....... Kitts, Klass, William .... Betty .... . .49,50,306 .......316 .......108 ...242,332 ..35,4s,329 .......298 . ..... 315 ....2s1 ....251 ....427 ....119 .......270 ,......217 100,229,282 .......277 .......3s5 .......100 108312 .... ' 282 . . .... 260 ....327 ....277 ......221 .......2l8 .....49,340 .......329 .50,304,389 .......325 .......312 ....115 ....331 .....233 82 .. . . .35,258 51 H::i:335 335 ....262 ...,339 ....335 .......221 221,330 .....242 72 ....1l4 ....250 Lutes, Robert ....... 298,391,398 Malmberg, Jim . . . Lord, Klass, Martin ....,. Klaus, B111 .......... . . . 118,238 . ...... 311 Klein, Marion Phyllis ........ 100 Klepacki, Clip .... 82,226,239,250, Klima, John R. ........ . 287 . 82,239 Kline, Caroline . . . . . .48,54,330 Kline, John ........ 35 K1 in genberg, John .......... 8 3 Klo fenstein Bebe 268 327 p , ...... , Knapman, Larry N. ......... 249 Knapp, Lawrence W. III ..... 340 Knight, Jean . . . Knopp, Barbi .. Knotman, Harold . . . Knowles, Ford . . Knowles, James . Knox, James O. Knudson, Duane Koch, Lyle ..... Koehmstedt, Pat Koenig, Harold . Koenig, Ken ...... Koerner, Henry Kohl, John F. ..... . Konick, Elliott . Kooistra, Karen . Kornegay, Sandy Kornfeld, Sheila .... Kothavala, Rusty Kraise, Ken ...... Kramer, Fred .. Kranhold, Joe .. Kranhold, Julie . ............277 ...277 .....235 ....53,312 ....90,298 .....242 .......177 . ...... 72,234 . 125,221,245 . . . . , . . .240 ....49,320 .....116 .....228 .......223 ...172,277 .....281 ...326 ...245 .....224 339 .........49, 53 136,264 Krause, Marina Caroline .... 100 Krause, Rod .... .... Kresser, Lynette ..... Kriner, Bob ..,. Kriss, Michael ...., Krmpotich, Martha ...... Kroese, Kenneth D. .... . Krugen, Phil ....... .92,247,334 .67,237,278 .. ........ 251 .......143 . 92,329 . 92,228 .......333 Krulish, Merle . . . ....... .226 Krumlauf, Gene .... .31,105,131, 229,230 Krumwiede, Keith A. ........ 232 Kruse, Harry ..... . . . . . .250,287 Kubishke, Allyn M. ......... 73 Kucheman, Carol . . . Kuhl, Signe .... Kuhlman, Miriam . . . Kulinovich, Stana Kunkel, Dianne . Kunkel, Don .... Kurn, Brenda . . . Kurtz, E. B. .... . . Kurtz, Edithh . . . Kurtz, Julianne . . Kurz, Winifred Cherry -L- Lacy, Charlene ........ 10o,270,394, 395,398,400 .....39,2s3 .....s7,235 ....2s1,100 ....221,326 .......3a5 125,223,262 . . . .239,240 .......270 .......260 .......100 . 221,282 Lacy, Pat ..... 48,221,237,252,282 Ladomato, Gene ........... 339 Laflen, Milt ......... 49,306,386 ' ' 377 Lair, J 1m ........ Lamb, John W. .. .. Lamkin, John L. ...... . U...-....62.,311 . 131,231 Lamprecht, Paul Jr. ......... 73 Landers, Roy M. Jr. .....,... 240 Landsberg, Carol .101,270,398,400 Lane, Gene ........... .l18,238 238 Laney, Lynn M, Jr. ........ . Lang, Alan ........ ...300 Lang, Jo Anne ...... ..... 2 81 Lange, Kenneth I. ........,. 239 Langord, Earl .............. 228 Laning, Christie ........ .278,398 STUDENT INDEX - I Continued 1 ......101 Lanning, Barbara .... Lantin, Linda ..... . ......327 Lapadat, Nicky .... .... 2 45,246 Lapin, Gerald . . . ..... .223 Lapkoff, Mimi . . . .... 156,262 Lara, Ted ........ ..... 8 2, 83 Larimore, Jack .. . .... 108,232 Larriva, Frank .... ...... 2 38 Larsen, Doug . . . . . . .322 Larsen, Sandra .... .... 2 74 Larson, Carl F. Jr. . . . .... . .230 Larson, John ............... 221 Larson, Russ ........... 232,338 Larson, Lillian Marilyn ,.l01,331 Larson, Pat . . .39,43,46,56,58,113, 278,407 Larson, Ron ............... 243 Larson, Wiliam Jr. . . 39,43,47,125, 306 Laser, Robert Jerome Lassers, Eugene W. . . Lattin, Carol .,..... Louderback, Sue .... Lauderdale, Jeff .. Lawatch, Barbara . . . Lawless, Sandi Jo . . . Lawrence, John Lester Lay, William H. .... . Layne, Connie ...... Layne, J . Michael . . . Leabo, J. Philip League, Chuck ...... League, David ...... .......231 .92,320 .....262 ....398,400 ....221,242 264 ..,....331 92 . .... 306 ......114 .90,284 ......310 ....l34 .......304 Leahy, Lawrence Lee ..... 49,309 Leake, Kathy ............ 67,237 Leakey, Richard ........ 359,366 Leary, Jim ............. 234,311 Lebsch, Patricia . . .7l,2l8,235,327 LeCain, Jim ........ 108,284,286 Ledbetter, Jane .... Lederer, Jerry . . . Ledford, Ronnie .......229 ......319 .......243 Levy, Philip ............... 289 Levy, Sue ........ 34,223,252,262 Lewis, Avrom .............. 232 Lewis, Bill .... ...... 1 60,300 Lewis, Dave .... ...... 3 12 Lewis, Dorothy .. . ..... 250,282 Lewis, Ezra ..... ...... 2 31 Lewis, Fran .... ..... 3 28 Lewis, James .... ..... 2 96 Lewis, Jerry .... ..... 3 75 Lewis, John ................ 251 Lewis, Margaret ............ 250 Lewis, Orme ......... 92,228,316 Lewis, Rich ..... ........ 1 34 Lewis, Roberta . . . ..... .221 Leyva, Frank .............. 333 Lieaidi, Joe ................ 335 Liebenguth, CClaire ...54,57,216, 217,277 Liechty, Andy .............. 368 Liem, Margie ....... 194,252,273 Lillibridge, Janice . . Lincoln, Jan . ...... Lindloff, Paulette .... Lindsey, Gene ....... Lindsley, Sue ....... Lindstrom, Nancy .......330 . ...... 114 Lim, Tom .......... . 100,160,273 68,216,217, 218,222 . . . 92,332 .54,277,398 .......260 Lingafelter, Duane .... 31,43, 108, 205,228,230,231 Lining, Brice Link, Martin Linton, Tom . . . Lira, Harry ..... 118,238 ..... 72 Liston, Don Littler, Charles ............. 235 Livengood, Margaret .... 273,401 Livingston, Loveless ..... 114,234 Livingston, Max ......,. 226,243 Livingston Ruth ,........... 327 Livingston, Warren ..334,348,355, 357,377 ....49,50,312 Lowry, Jay .. Lubbers, Earl Lucas, Sandy . Luci, Ray Lorenzo, Lucia . . . .... .333 .114,235 .......366 .. ..... 221 .. .... 230 Lucier, Floyd .......... Ludlow, Bob . Ludwig, Glen ....... 106,108,231 Ludwig, Shelly ..253,258,328,398, 400 Luera, Lorenzo . . . . . .232,245 Lukacs, Robert .... .... 9 2,227 Lumakin, Joe ..... ..... 2 43 Lundstrom, John .... .... 2 11 Lundwall, MerriEllen . . . . . . .330 Lundy, Charlotte ........... 270 Lunt, Gerald ............... 108 Lutes, Joe ........,........ 292 Lynch, Bill .... 44,47,233,243,315 Lynch, Carol ............... 260 Lynch Michael . . . . . . . . 125 Lynch, Mike ..... .... 3 00 Lynch, William . . . .... .108 Lyon, Dennis .... .... 9 2,315 Lyon, Dotsy .... .... 3 2,281 Lyon, Janet ...... ..... 7 2 Lyons, Loretta . . . . . . .329 Lyris, Marian .... .... 2 73 ..M.. Maccani, James R. ..... .... 3 09 MacDorman, Carroll F. ...... 236 MacGregor, Jean ...... .... 1 60 Macias, Manvel M. ........ . MacIntosh, William H. ...... 318 Mack, Pat .......... 250,252,325 MacKinnon, Alistair Maclay, Ellen ..... Macneil, Mary-Helen Madden, Milt ...... 134 ........227 ......72,258 ........327 71 Ledwith, Paul Jr. . . . .... 125,385 Lee, Carol Jean . . . ..... .281 Lee, Donnie .... .... 2 ll Lee, Randy ..... .... 2 58 Lee, Raymond .. .... 135 Lee, Richard ............... 337 Lee Wanda ............... 273 Leek, Gene ..344,347,350,351,370 372 Leeney, Robert E. .......... 92 Leeser, C. B. ..... 92,242,243,300 Legallet, Legallet, Lehman, Jok P. ..... . Jon S. .53,228,296 . .228,284,296,386 Arlene ...... 35,262,263 Lehman, Warren C. ......... 339 Lehman, Martha Louise. .201,208, Lehn, F 210,250,25l,278 red ................ 292 Lehne, Carl W. .,........... 231 Leigh, Peggy . . Leinenbach, Gary Mitchell .. .292 Leininger, Andree, 278,33l,398,400 Leivian, Bob ............ 34,292 Lemel, Gary ............... 319 Lemons, Jo .... .... 2 52,260 Lender, Lee .... ...... 3 27 Lentz, John ............. 49,297 Leo, Michael ............... 245 Leonard, Calista V. ......... 236 Leonard, Ernie J . ..... 57,221,427 Leonard, Kay ........... 101,278 Leonard, Jon ............... 391 Leonard, ,Patsy .... 54,72,234,235 Leonard, Tom .............. 218 Leparulo, Luigi ...... 245,246,386 Lerch, Stan .. Lesher, Levine, Shelly Zaner ..92,23l,253 ......... 246 ...... .331 446 Lizardi, Joe ................ 240 Lloyd, James .... 114,222,284,3 11 Lock, Carl .............. 83,304 Locke, Carl ................ 82 Locke, Patricia ......... 101,278 Lockett, Kathy ...... 179,196,278 Loew, Ginger .... ........ 3 30 Loftfield, Carol .. ...... 87 Lohman, Sally . . . .... .278 Lohman, Wilbur .... .287 Lohr, Donald ...... ..... 2 36 Lomayesva, Dwight ......... 333 Lombard, Peter .......... 67,114 Madden, Theodore M. ....... 229 M aFore, Kathy ..... 51 Magee, Joe ........ .... 4 9,304 Magee, Nancy .............. 101 Mahoney, Alice Jane ..... 101,278 Mahr, Demmie ...... Maier, John S. ...... Maitrejean, Sigrid . . . .......258 .......318 .42,2 l8,227, 245,330 Major, Anita ....... 245,274,330 Major, Gwen ....... 222,274,330 Majors, Robert .......... 33, 50 Malakoff, Jerry .... . . . 109,230 .....422 Long, Dexter ..... .... 7 1,221,234 Long, Jerry ................ 285 Long, Leslie ............... 315 Long, Lucia, 23,46,54,10l,274,275 Long, Paul ............. 123,288 Longenbaugh, Richard ....... 249 Longo, Charles ............. 228 Lopez, Koyo .......... 40,60,125 Lopez, Lopez, Lloyd ..... ..... ..... 2 9 2 Robert L. . . . .... . .243 Donald .............. 309 ....312 Malone, Dan .... Malone, Rae ..... Maloof, Helen ...... Mangum, Richard ..... Manhart, Betty ...... Manker, Pat ........ Manker, Virginia .... 264,394,398, 399,400,401 Mann, Gene ............... 340 Mann, George A. .... 109,218,230 Mansour, Deanna Francis .... 327 ....264 .......268 ...68,125 .......229 .......101 Lorentz, Carolyn ........... 221 Lott, Andrea . . .56,59,270,407,4l3 ....63,125,233,246, 269,274 .........54,62,274 327 Loubet, Fran . Loubet, Jo . . . Loveless, Dixie Lovett, Keith Low, Gary .. Lowe, Don .. Lowe, Martin Lowe, Robert Lovett, Wayne Lowman, Aline . . . ,.. . .278 .... .248 . ..... 231 . ..... 35 .... .221 .....246 .... .311 Mansour, Edward ........... 53 Mansour, Nick ...34,239,295,336 Manuel, Beverly .... Mapston, Raymond . ........249 . ....... 250 Mar, Min ........... .... 2 43 Marcus, Joe ...... ..... 2 34 Marcus, Marilyn . . . . . .212,262 Marcus, Pete ..... ....... 3 36 Marcy, Doris .... .. . 101,331 Margolf, Terry .......... 101,278 Margolis, Eugene ........ 35,319 Meresh, Mary Frances ....... 273 Margolf, Bill . ...... 47 Marietti, Johnny . . . ....306 Marios, Manuel . . . ...... .221 Mariscal, Danny ........ 306,389 Mark, Albyn ..... .... ,..... 1 2 5 .....83,250,315 Markley, Buck .. Marks, Lorna ............ 27,341 Marler, Wayland ........ 222,243 Marquart, Dorothy .... Marquez, Raul .. Marquez, Raul N. .. Marsh, Gail ...... Marsh, Lee ....... Marsh, Roland .... Marshall, Barbara .. Marshall, ......236 ....l09 ....109 ...54,273 ....337 ....25l 54 Bart .... ..... 9 2,312 STUDENT INDEX - K Continued J Mayer, Eric D. . . .92,138,228,242, 243 Mayman, Au-drey .... 101,223,235 Mazer, Stephen ............. 289 Mazzarella, Carol ....... 101,229 Mazzarino, Millie C. ........ 277 Mazzarino, Carmella . . . . . .270 McAdams, Joe ...... . . .322 McAllister, D. F. ........... 239 McAllister, Kathleen ........ 329 McAlpine Joe .. .201,250,251,254, 264 McAlpin, Ronald .... . . .332 McAninch, John M. . . .. .108 McArthur, David ........... 221 McKale, Nancy Sue . .252,282,330 McKay, Martha ............ 219 McKelvey, Jeanette McKelvey, Ronald McKenzie, Dan ......... 109,233 McKenzie, Hugh . . McKenzie, Margo . .54,35,151,278 McKinnon, Nancy .......... 212 .........250 ..........238 .. . . . . 125,292 McLain, B111 ...,........... 306 McLain, George ..... 306,385,389 McLaws, John Larry ........ 238 McLean, Jean .... 35,212,269,274 McLean, L. ..... , ......... ,221 W. John ........... 249 McLean, McLehancy, J. D. Jr., 131,231,232 McLemore, Fred ......... 92,292 McLeneghan, Tom .......... 95 McLeod, Jim ............... 313 McLemon, Sheila ........... 268 McMillan, Bob ......... 135,313 McNabb, Bob .... 73,101,138,232, Milam, Bill ........ ..... 3 06 Miles, Kenneth J. . . . . . . . .229 Millar, Dorothy .... ...... 3 27 Mliler, Alfred .......... 226,316 Miller, Ben ........ .... 4 9,305 Miller, Grover F. ........... 222 Miller, Irving H. Jr. ......... 109 Miller, James R. ..... 125,313,284 Miller, -Jeanne .............. 329 Miller, Marilyn ............ .331 Miller, Neil F. ............. 125 Miller, Ralph . .44,47,105,109,226, 231,306 Miller, Royal D. ..... 231,233,242 Miller, Sharon .......... 126,270 Millett, Jerry ..... 286,388 Mills, Barbara . .. . . .278,301 .....264 Mills, Sandy ..... Mills, Thomas B. . . . ..... . .286 Milstead, Liz .... ...251,264 .. 282,283 William 0, ,,,,,, 108,109 Moch, Dean ............... 235 Marshall, Bob ........ 73,222,230 Marshall, Charles E. ........ 119 Marshall, Jan ...... ...... 2 17 Marshall, Jo ...... .... 2 50 Marshall, Marcia ........... 277 Marston, Linda ....,.... 277,397 Martin, Barbara ..... 125,232,272 Martin, Bonnie ............. 274 Martin, Charles . . . .... 106,109 Martin, Esther .... .... 2 21,331 Martin, Hermand ........... 337 Martin, Jerry ........... 285,292 Martin, Martin, McArthur, R. Donnell ...221,230 McBride, Byron ..... ...... 2 97 McBride, Dawn .... . . .329 McCaig, Bill ..... .. .318 McCall, Jay ..... ..... 2 28 McCall, Daick ..... . . .285,298 McCarley, Barbara .......... 226 McCarthy, Mike ............ 250 McCarthy, Sue .......... 230,264 ....92,173,200, 250,287 ...........240 McCarty, Mickey McCauhey, W. F. Joe ....... 35,49,284,292 Kathy ............. 282 Martin, Linda . ............. 264 Martin, Nancy .......... 252,273 Martin, Martin, Ray ..... 344,347.349,356 Robert .... . ........ 337 Martin, Robert W. .......... 125 Martin, Martinez, Joe F. ............ 337 Martinez, Richard L. ........ 245 Martinez, Sadie H. .......... 229 Martinod, Henry G. ..... 221,232 Marts, Larry ............... 71 Martyn, Dave, 31,32,37,50,305,339 Martz, Susan ....... 253,254,327 Mascareno, Ellis B. ......... 337 Maslin, Harvey Lawrence, 320,254 McClanahan, Bruce ...... 92,227 McClanahan, James M. ...... 251 McClanahan, Jane ....... 277,331 McCleary, James B. . . A ..... 305 McCleary, Sara ...... . . .273 McClellan, Judy ....... . . .326 McClellan, Mary Lou ....... 270 McClcve, Robert ........... 1 14 McCommas, Pauline McComber, Carol .... ...... 2 68 ..219,35,326 McConnell, Jim ............ 370 McConnell, Judy ........ 260,330 McCormick, Carlos ..... 125,247 McCormick, Bill . . . . . .344 McCormick, Bob . . . . . .357 McCoy, Billie .... ...376 McCoy, Judy .............. 264 242,243 McNally, Gerald Francis ..... 298 McNeil, Fred .............. 221 McNeil, Mary Helen ........ 260 McNiff, Susan ............. 260 McRae, Darla ........ 48,219,326 McRae, Elizabeth. .48,219,226,326 McRae, Hamilton .......... 306 McRae, Rey ............... 226 McStrou1, Jean ............. 221 McTedden, Ken ............ 250 McVay, Medina, Sandra . .276,277,396,398, 400 Roy ............... 245 Meehan, Kenny . . . .... 377,380 Mellen, John ......... Mellick, . . . . . .297 Barbara ........ 278,401 Melnick, Naomi ............ 253 Membrila, Daniel ........ 92,243 Menche, Howard F. Jr. 109 Mencimer, Corky ........... 273 Mendivil, Fernando Q. Mendoza, Carlos Acosta ..... ......339 75 Ron ............... 310 Mason, Barbara ...... 72,234,235 Mason, Beret Rita ........ 87,266 Mason, Bill ....... ...... 3 55 Mason, Deanna ............ 250 Mason, George ............. 300 Mason, Jim . .347,348,349,350,376 Mason, Mason, Massey, Massman, Leslie . . . . Larry .............. 285 Muffin ......... 273,331 . . . . 135,242 83 DanB. Massoglia, Jim ............. 318 Masson, James Carter ....... 240 Mast, Bill ........... .... 3 12 McCrary, Marilyn ....... 194,273 McCray, Ernest C. ..359,360,36l, 363,364,365,366 McCray, Frances ........... 229 McCrea, Jim ............... 338 McCurdy, Robert ........ 92,315 McDaniel, David ........ 50,249 McDaniel, Delbert H. ....... 72 McDaniels, Martha ......... 282 McDonald, Larry ....... 250,287 McDonald, Robert .. . 109,231,332 McDoniel, Bruce ........ 305,340 McDoniel, Dixie Ann . . .31,37,44, Mercer, Merchant, Toni ...... Merchant, Joyce ........ 125,278 Mercier, Dick .... . . 105,230 Mercurio, Joe ..... ...... 2 43 Merdian, Marcia ........... 101 Merkel, O. Fred ........, 73,248 Merrick, Gladys .. .48,73,234,326 Merrill, Linda, 35,221,270,398,400 Merriman, Margaret Anne . . .273 . . . . . .278 Merritt, Tag ............... 382 Merry, Bonnie .... ...... 2 60 Milstein, Phyllis .... Minas, Pam ....... . . .277,330 Minowitz, Monetta . . . .... .327 Minson, Helen ..... ....... 1 36 Minson, Ron ........... 306,381 Miramon, Artura L. . . ..... 239 Mishkind, Ira ........... 326,320 Missing, C. Robert .......... 131 Mitchell, Donna. 7-I94,216,235,329 Mitchell, Eddie "Deacon1' ..361, 363,364,367 Mitchell, Judy ....... 233,235,274 Miter, Diana ...... 1 . . 194,252,258 Mitten, Bob . ............... 313 Moholy-Nagy, Claudia .... 61,126 Moiola, Sharon ............. 274 Moler, Jerry . .83,226,279,287,211 Moller, Marilyn ............ 272 Mollner, Hank ....... 47,284,309 Monaco, Charles Anthony .... 109 Monahan, John J. ............ 92 Mone, Louie ..... ....... 2 92 Monroe, Mary . . . .,.. 34,274 Monsees, Elen ..... . . . 101,278 Monsegur, Michael . . . .... .306 Montano, Armando .... .... 2 48 Montano, Humberto . . . . . . . 101 Montano, Richard T. ........ 101 Monteverde, Bert ........... 298 Cornelia Paul. . . Montgomery, 101 Montgomery, David N. ...... 294 Montgomery, Don ..... . . .368 ' 260 Montgomery, J aruce ......... Montgomery, Johnny R. ...... 83 Moody, James A. ..... '. . . . . .126 Mooney, Janet ...... 251,260,266 Matsuda, Daoru Mast, Jim ......... Masters, Charles Masunas, John F. . . . Matatquin, Gene Mates, Margot ..... Matson, Ray ...:... S.. Matson, Judith A. . . . . ....312 ...72,234 . .... 221 . .... 245 .......273 .. .22o 252,268,331 .......240 Mattei, Len ......... 277,396,397 Mattern, Thomas J. ..219,243,334 Matts, Janet ............... 326 Matts, Merilyn Jean ......... 101 Matz, Tony ............ 344,357 Maud, Oliver I-I. .... 31,44,47,92, 242,243,306 109,232,245 Maurer, Ray ........... 315,389 Maves, Keith ............ 71,114 Maxwell, Bob .......... 370,336 Maxwell, Susan . .278,396,399,401 May, Marcia ............... 278 Mayer, Donna .. .... 273 Maung, Maung Nyunt, 46,101,207,273 McDougall, Rod .... ........315 McEachen, Colin Pete .... 72,232, McElrath, Frank . . . McElroy, Margo .... McElroy, Thomas O. McEnerney, Michael McFadden, Gene . . . McFadden, Ken, .... 234, 333 ........253 . ..... 66 ...341 ........340 ........218 . . . .250,287 McFarland, Lynn ........... 330 McFerrin, William A. McGovern, Kay ..... . . ..l09,335 .....219 McGuire, Jim ........ . ..... 370 McHaffey, David G. ........ 239 McHenry, Linda ........ 175,326 McHood, Gordon .... 310,334,219 McHood, Joel B. ........ 219,334 Mclnerney, Bob ..... Mclnerney, Charles .. .......313 109,231,232 McIntosh, Tom ......... 184,429 Mclntyre, Sharon .... 221,268,330 McKale, Curtice David . ..... 322 Meshel, Herbert . . . ....... .336 .370 373 Messick, Harry . . . . . . Messina,C.P. .131i232 Metcalf, Lyell ....... 344,347,348 Metzger, John ..... . . ......298 Meyer, Barbara . .. .... . . . .270 Meyer, Charles ....... 109,230 Meyer, Nancy Lee .......... 223 Meyer, Sue ........ . . . Mezger, John ....... 136,264 ....298 Michaels, Gus R. .... .... 1 09 Michel, Sandy .............. 289 Michela, Dick .............. 305 Michelback, Dorothy . . 46,135,240, 278,301,239 Michie, Joe ................ 284 Michelena, Robert .......... 109 Micholason, Jim ..... . . .73 Michelena, Robert G. ........ 335 Michonski, Don ............ 309 Micke, Peggy ...... .... 2 78,326 Mienema, Jay . . . ..... .292 Mikell, John .. . . . . .385 Mikita,John ....125 447 Moore, Anne ............... 266 Moore, Barbara ............ 268 Moore, Bob ................ 226 Moore, Charles Arthur 92,284,313 Moore, Cliff ............... 287 Moore, D. Larry ......... 50,232 Moore, Donald ...... 126,221,298 Moore, Edwin R. ........ 246,389 Moore, Joan .... 203,204,208,221 Moore, John W .......... 238,305 Moore, Judy ............ 126,268 Moore, Larry D. . . ...... 109 Moore, Margot . . . ..... 245,328 Moore, Mike ........... 315,389 Moore, Richard ...... 50,284,377 Moore, Thomas ............ 248 Moores, Carolyn .... Morago, Burdette . . . ......101 .....339 Moran, Martin . . . ....... .306 Morawitz, Carl ......... 377,383 Mordka, Irwin ........ 47,126,320 Moreman, Mary ............ 237 Morgan, Chuck . . . .... 53,227 Nanson, Helen ............. 326 Moris Ercelle ..... Morgan, Deanne ............ 221 Morgan, Ed .... 35,53,220,306,405 Morgan, Jack H. ......... 92,227 Morgan, Jacquelyn ....... 36,258 Morin, Bob ..... 105,109,230,231 Morland, Ham ............. 290 Morris, Don .... . .......... Morris, Frank X. . . Morris, Jean Ann . . . Morris, Pat ....... Morris, Paula . . . Morris, Sandy .... Morris, ' 298 ....273 ....340 ....326 ....274 ....221 . . . .87,273 Sheila .......... .... 3 28 Moses, Robert E. . . ' ' -238,240 Morrison, Harry L. Morton, Beulah . . . Morton, Chuck .... ......223,253 ......250,330 ......2l8 Morton, Craig .............. 288 Morton, Margie . . . ......10l,278 Moseley, William K. ....... .288 .......239 STUDENT INDEX - fcanfmuedp -N Nader, Fred ........ 218,249,336 Nader, Helen .............. 126 Nagy, Claudia Moholy ...... 237 Nahler, Harold ............. 334 Nalsh, Jennie .............. 101 Nardone, Patricia ..268,324,330, 397 Nassiri, Bahaam . . Naughton, Joan .. Naujoks, Gracia .. Navarre, Diego . . . Nave, Jim ....... Nazemi, Reza .... Neal, Jan ........ Neat, Connie ..... Needham, Kenneth ..........245 .....35,54,273 .. ....... 274 .....245 ........335 .....245,246 .......274 . . ..... 194 . . . . . .357,383 Nefsy, Virginia ......... 268,326 Neidleman, Saul .. . Moss, Patrick .. Mostert, Jos. . . . Mota, Edmundo .. . . .230,233,340 . . . . . 131,231,339 ........101,388 Mota, Horacio E. ........... 339 Mott, Bill J. Motter, Muffy . Mouer, Jim .... ....376 ............260 ............243 Mount, David l09,230,242,243,309 Mower, Dick .... 334,359,361,365 Mower, Richard G. ......... 305 Nelson, Dennis . . . Nelson, Derith . . . Nelson, Ed ,..... Nelson, James R. Nelson, Louise . . . Nelson Perci .... Nelson Ricardo Nelson Roy ..... Nelson, William Nemer, Edward Neubauer, Jeanie . Mowrey, Sandra ............ 260 233,273 Mueller, James E.. .73,232,234,310 Mueller, Bob ...206,3l5,359,360, 361,362,363,364 Mulchay, John B. ....... 131,306 Muldonado, Amelia .........229 Mulholland, Mike .......... 316 Muller, Kal ............ 292,390 Muller, Sandy ..... ......101 Mulligan, Gerry ............ 333 Mulligan, Joseph J. ...... 109,232 Mulvey, Arthur C., Jr. .......298 Mulvihill, Merry. . 10l,221,282,283 Mundell, Gail W. ........... 218 Mungaray,Raymond ..... 336,383 Munn, Ronald D. ........... 333 Munoz, Antonio ........ 245,335 Munoz, Carlos ............. 243 Munoz, Robert Q. .......... 333 Muns, Ed .......... 31,35,53,306 Munson, Rick .............. 292 Murchison, Rolf K. .........232 Patterson, J ack .... 109,231 Muretic, Joan ..30,31,36,37,40,44, Murfee, Sue ...... Murphy, Jack L. . . . Murphy, Joan R. .. . 46,101,329 269 ......336 ....238 Murphy, John .............. 305 Murphy, John J., Jr. ......... 119 Murphy, Joyce ....... 44,237,280 Murphy, Margie ............ 282 Murphy, Mike ............. 305 Murphy, William J . ...... 109,232 Murray, Dave ...... ...... 2 85 Murray, Edward .... ...... 2 29 -Murray, Joannie ........ 101,273 Murray, Mimi ..... ....... 2 68 Muscenti, Paul .... Musgrave, John R Myers, Bob ....... Myers, Donna Lee . Myers, John H. . . . . Myrick, Ann ..... Myrick, Clifford ..... Myser, Marilyn ..... .......92,3l5 306,344,357 Muse, Terry ........ . ..83,98,218, 223,226 .......67 ....48,249 .......232 126,268 . . . . . . .229 . 221,270,326 Neumann, Pete . . . Neuroh, Clark . . . Newcomer, Jim . . . Newcomer, John . . Newell, Stirley W. . Newett, Janice .... Newlin, James .. . Newlin, Philip .... Newman, Alison .. Newman, Peggy .. Newmann, Alfred . Newmeyer, Betty . . Nichols, Dana . . . Nichols, Nancy .. . Nichols, Nick .... Nichols, Pete ..... Nicholas, Vernon . Nickison, Mike . . . Nicolson, Jim .... Niebla, J . Fernando Nielsen, Robert . . . Nitti, Luke ...... Nixon, Brenda . . . Nixon, Richard .. . Norris, Jim ...... Northington, Mary Norton, Francie . . . Nothnagel, Marilyn Nowonski, Jim . . . -0- O'Brien, M. Jack . . .... 298 .......278 ........305 109,232,385 ........219 . ..... .274 386 ...239 310 297 250,254,264 ......285,3l3 ..284,294 .. .235,233 ......119,238 . . . 260,266 .....376 .......230 . . .270,394 .. ..... 327 .... .340 ....92,227 ..62,63 ...258,331 ...306,389 .383 ...382 .. .318 ...335 ...337 .. ...242 .....238 .. ........ 36 . . . 137,370 .. ..... 306 ..........282 ...l0l,273 ...48,22l,227 .....,....370 ..........315 0'Bryan, Sue 136,271,394,398,400 O'Connor, Joe ........... 92,227 O'Del1, John ..... Odgers, Vince .. . 0'Donnell, Jim . . . ..........287 . . .234,238 . .... 316 Ogden, B. L. ............ 109,231 O'Hara, Jonathan . Oldham, Richard . Olesek, Mary .... Oliver, Ruthella .... Olson, Bill ..... Olson, Lee ....... Olszewski, Lydia . . O'Meara, James .... O'Nei1, Tina ..... Oo, Maung, Tin .... .... .289 ...337 .....248 ...252,271 ...335 .377 . . ....... 327 ...109,221 . . .. .235 . . . 109,232 448 Oppenheim, Rernie ......... 320 Orchard, Kent ........ 83,250,306 Orms, Joyce ............ 269,274 Ormsby, Diane ............. 258 Ormsby, Mar Lynn ......... 258 Orozco, Joe ................. 93 Orr, Jeanne ......... 136,258,328 Orr, Marcia . . l26,23l,236,27l,409 Osborne, Jerry ............. 333 Osterman, Carl .... . . .... 333 Osterman, Chuck .... ...... 3 67 Oswald, Leslie Ann ....... 36,268 Oswell, Anna ............ 48,331 Ottinger, Gail ...... 5l,56,269,274 Percy, Mary Ellen .... 54,226,27 Perdue, Jackie ........ 34,253,25 Perez, Marisa .... ........ 2 4 Perham, Lee ..... .... 3 27,27 Perkins, Grover .... ....., 1 3 Perkins, Marvin ............ 22 Perkins, Richard ............ 11 Perkins, Robert ..37,38,39,40,4 Ottinger, Marilyn ..36,37,51,235, Overall, Bill ..... Overstreet, Gordon Overton, Frank . . . Overton, Jerry Owen, Carol ..... Owens, Carole Owens, Nancy Owens, Randi Ozolins, Kaija Page, Ancella 269,274 . . .34-4,350,351 .........229 .. ...... 340 .......335 ....22l,277 .......35 ....252,28l ....2l8,260 ......126 .........260 45,47,49,93,29 26 Perner, Patti ............... Perry, Margaret Perry, Marcia .... . .... 28 Perry, Patricia . . . Person, Jim ..... .....23 28 Pesci, Joe .............. 344,35 Pesqueira, Dick Peters, Demiris Peterson, Dave Peterson, Gary .........284,31 ...54,252,253,25 ......29 Peterson, J ack ............... 9 Peterson, Kenneth Petrie, Robert .. . .......285,29 .......119,23 Petrucciani, Robert . ,- ........ 33 Pettit, Milt ...... Pfeiffer, Roma . . . Phalen, Bobbie . . . Phelps, Joan .... Phelps, Lewis . . . Philips, Lewis .... Phillips, Gail ....... Phillips, L. Wade .. . Philop, Thomas . . Page, Betty Jean .... 46,126,273 Page, Roberta . . . ........ .220 Pakula, David . . . ...... . .93 Palin, Louise .... .... 3 31 ....300 Palin, Russel .... Palmer, May .... Palmer, Penny Palmer, Severo .... Palos, Ben ...... Pankey, Anita Parchell, Bob Park, Kathy .... Parke, Dorothy ...... 250,271,330 Parker, Charles ............. 226 Parker, James ....229 ....27s ......243 .....,.135 ....252,27s .......332 ......... 126 ...... .221 Parker, Kitty .... . . .48,233 Parker, Margie .... ..... 3 6 Parker, Sharon .... . . .35,266 Parks, Karl ..... .... 3 39 Parnell, Thomas . . . ...... .231 Parra, Joe ...... Parrott, Glenda ..... 235,282,283 Parsons, Pat ...... .........22l .......327 Phipps, Sandra . . . Picha, Marcia . . . Pierce, Al .... Pierce, Bill .. . Pierce, Carol . . . Pierce, James . . . .......313,38 . .... 101,33 ......24 ....273,33 .....2l .....28 ......13 . .... 231,23 .....12 .....26 .....22 ...'.268,33 .......73,23 Robert ............... 93 Sue . . . ..,. 221,328,273 Pierson, Elvin . . . Pierson, Elvira .... ..., l 02.32 Pierson, Sue .... Piety, John . . . Piggee, John ..... ..... 3 77.378 Pilgrim, Mary .... Pinkstaff, Thomas ....... 109,305 Pierce, Pierce, Pinnell, Place, Dean ...... Platt, Gary .. . Platt, Sandi ...... Plock Tom ....... ....264,33 .....24e,377 .. ....... 40 ....73,221 .....333 .....219 ........219 , Ray ................ 109 Plumb, Mary Kay ..34,41,62,63, Parwana, Hakin . . . . . . .246 Patchell, Bob .. . ..... .251 Patricks, Frank .. .... 109,341 Patterson, Paul Pattillo, Eddie .... Patton, Linda ..... ......240 ..........333 ......274,326 8l,269,274,275 Plumb, Vaughn .. Plummer, Al ..... ........109 .....221 Podiack, Joseph ....,....... 388 Podolsky, Stan ............. 319 Pogson, Steve ..44,49,50,126,253, 284,316 Patton, Sereta Paul, Alice ................ 101 Pautz, Kenneth .... Payne, Keike .... Peacock, Jack . . . Pearson, Bruce .... Pearson, Pat ............ 101,227 Peavey, Betty Ann ....... 253,258 Peavey, Sheldon . . . Pebworth, George ........... 72 Peck, John .......... 131,300,301 Peckham, J . Richaro ......... 93 Peery, Margaret ............ 327 Peete, Willie ........ 344,349,354 Peil, Virginia .... ...... 1 01,278 Pierson, Carol .... ...... .... 3 3 0 .......332 ....274,330 ......221 ......237 . ...... 221 Pelton, Susie .............., 281 Pence, Jerry 45,49,53,2l7,222,300 Pendleton, Eleanor .......... 331 Pendleton, Nat ............. 335 Penrod, Loraine . . . .... 126,273 Pogue, Edwin ....... 304,305,389 Polewytewa, Jeffery ......... 337 Polingyowma, Eric .......... 249 Polito, B. J.. .33,37,44,103,253,258 Polito, Samual Polk, Howard ..........l02,316 Polley, Alan ............. 44,375 Pollock, Mike 102,l78,200,313 Pomeroy, Tony ............. 249 Pope, Larry . . ....292,310 ......278 Frank ........... 221,333 102,269,274,275 John ............,.. 232 Popkin, Norm Porritt, Debbie . . . Porter, Colleen Porter, Porter, Jamie .... Porter, Porter, Porter, Porter, Kathleen ............ 245 Newell . . . 109,219,231,243 Shelby ..... 36,51.217,277 Portillo, Rose .............. 245 oulin, Leo ., osner, Robert .. .49,53,216,239, 320, 413 ost, Marilyn ....... 136,219,303 ostillion, Arline .. otter, Robert .... otter, Robert . . . otts, Bill .... otts, Richard . . . ......213,281 ....234,243 .......73 .....294 ....73 otts, William .............. 294 ..... . .102 Alice Lynne . .2l9,27l,327 owell, owell, Shirley ............. 277 owers, Patsy ........... 127,278 ozil, Lawrence .... ..... 3 20 rechel, Paul ..... ...,. 2 39 reciado, Elena ,... ...... 2 45 reciado, Patricia ....... 226,245 reskar, Bob ..... .... 9 3,316 reston, John .....,........ 131 reston, Martha ........ 102,327 reston, W. Ross ..... .119 rewitt, Pat ...... ......,. 2 68 rice, rice, J rice Clifton .............. 339 rice, Dixina ........ 160,219,273 lm .... . ......... 335 , Jo ..... ........... 2 50 rickett, Judy ..... 93,102,160,273 rocter, Dick .............. 307 roctor, Sharon ............ 330 russing, Natalie. .252,268,398,400 udas, Edna .......,....... 226 ugh, Richard .... ..... 2 26,316 ugh, Sanford .... ........ 9 3 ulos, Ben . . .31, 242 266 urcell, Doris .... ..... urvis, Betty .... ...., 2 50 yle, Tom ....... ..... 3 18 -Q- uam, Cynthia .. . ..... 268,330 uick, Eldon . .... .... 6 6,237 uinn, Marietta .... ..... 2 77 uiros, Jose ..... ..... 3 34 .. R - aaf, D. W. ..... ..... 2 Z7 abb, Lloyd ....... ..... 2 28 abenowitz, Dave .....320 319 abinowitz, Stuart .... ..,.. adbil, adcliffe, Gayle .... ..... Ken ........ .... 3 00 274 agston, Stanley .... ..... 2 53 327 ahan, Nancy .... ..... aher, Jim ........ ..... 2 21 ahn, Gwendolyn . . . .... .330 aica, Nicholas .. ..... 240 ains, Sharon . . . .... 35,278 Rakita, Gerald . . . .... .320 Ralston, Stanley .... ..... 3 32 Rambacher, Ilse ............ 277 Ramos, Rosemary .......... 221 Ramsey, Bill ..3l,37,39,52,93,284, 295 Ramsey, John .... ..... 3 35 Ramsey, Ken ....... ..... 3 63 Randall, Catherine .... ..... 2 29 Randall, Jayne ..... ...... 2 74 andall, Judy ........... 277,330 Randall, Larry ............. 139 Randall, Mary .. .31,37,44,46,87, 237,252,253,256,273,330 Randolph, Richard . ..... 127,316 Ranson, Shirley. .210,250,268,327, 398,400 Raper, Tom .........,...... 3 3 8 Rapp, Charles .... .... 1 39,344 Rapp, Wiu ..... .... 1 39,344 STUDENT INDEX - I C ontinued 2 Rascop, Ann Marie ..48,102,204, 221,229,239,282 Rash, Brenda .............. 262 Rasmussen, Linda .......... 221 Ratholz, Lynn .............. 327 Rauh, Bill ....... 102,393,388,392 Ray, Charles ............... 131 Rayburn, Rosemary ......... 331 Reason, Linda ........... 69,278 Rector, Jim ............. 63,386 Redden, Hayes .......... 299,335 Redhair, .lack. .31,37,40,45,52,127, l56,l84,l89,235, Rios, Margot' ....... .221,245,328 Robart, Darlene ..... ..... 7 1,282 Robb, Sherrill .... Robbins, Daniel .. Robbins, Kring . . . Robbins, Larry ...... ... . 125,127 ......332 .....277 .......320 Roberge, Pauline ........ 136,399 Roberts, Roberson, Bob ...... Roberts, Chris. ....... Dennis ..... Roberts, Doug .... Roberts, Fred . . Roberts, Theodore Robertson, Dan .... . . . . . . .307 235,285,294 . .311 .93,292 .......l27,305 .......339,388 ......250 .......250 .93,247,309 Carolyn .......... 102 Don ........ .. .238,284 Robinson, Bill .... . Robinson, Bob ...... Robinson, Robinson, Robinson, Jerry .. Robinson, ......285 Susan ............ 325 315,347 Redmond, Lawrence ........ 338 Reed, J. ............... 127,292 Reed, Mary ....... ...... 3 25 Reedy, Judy .. . ..... .274 Rees, John .... .... 1 09,299 Reeves, Smith ..... ..... 7 3 Regeser, Julius ...... ...... 3 68 Rehfeldt, Phil ............. 73,75 Reichardt, B. David . . . . . . .339 Reid, Ken .......... . . .72 Reid, Robert . . . Reidy, Dan .... Reil, Julia Rein, J ack ....,... Reineke, Joan ....... Reineman, Edward Reinhaus, Stanley . . . Reinhardt, Sonja . Reitz, Jim ...... Relitz, Kay .. . 'Reneer, Sharon Renken, Keith . . . Reos, Margo . . . Rerch, Stan .... Rettke, Sandra Rex, Ellen Jane .. Rexroat, Ruth . . . ....238 ....119 ....l12 ....248 .......136 109231 ' ...1.3.5.,242:319 . . . 190,221 .......221 .......258 .87,204,219 .......191 ........48 ......233 ...102,274 ...119,238 ......236 Reynolds, Alan .... .... 3 33 Reynolds, Jan .... ....... 3 11 Reynolds, Jean ............. 277 Reynolds, Mac ....... 68,245,253 Reynolds, Marilyn 197,219,271 Rhodes, Diane ............. 273 Rhodes, J. Melvin .... .... 2 29 Rhodes, William . . . . . . .359 Ricca, James ..... .... 3 33 Ricci, Paul .... ...... 2 40 Rice, Don .... . . .228,292 Rice, Margie ..... Rice, Sarah ...... Richardson, Bon . .....271 .......273 . . .285,307 Richardson, Cal . . . ...... .318 Richardson, Ed ........ 73,93,234 Richmond, Dennis .......... 313 Richtars, John ..... . Richter, Gary .... Richter, Glenda ..... Riddle, Linda ........ Ridenour, Larry .. . . .235,292 . . . . . . . .39 .54,246,268 . . .222,254 ..........316 Ridge, Warren . .30,31,37,40,45,52, l27,242,243,359,360, Robles, Elva ............... 429 Robles, Rosalind ..45,46,62,63,72, 127,234 Robles, Yvonne ............ 221 Robson, John .............. 240 Rocamora, Joyce ..... 36,223,262 Roden, Mary ....... Roden, Maryellen . . . Rodgers, Richard .... Rodi, Phil ....... Rodman, Bill ...... Rodolff, Dale ....... ........268 ....248,327 ....229,335 ......292 ........336 ....232,333 Rodriguez, Evangeline ....... 221 Rodriguez, George .. Roenig, Ken ....... Roesler, Allan . . . , . . Roettger, Carolyn .... Rogers, Al ....... Rogers, Anthony . . . Rogers, Dick ........ Rogow, Rohrbough, Susan Rolle, Jim ......... Rollins, Cal ...... Rollins, Fritz .... Rogers, J im ......... Murray ..... Rogers, N. Terry .... Rornbach, Lee . . . Romero, Frank ... . . . . . 109,231 ... . . . .388 ....251,332 ..35,63,278 ........93 ......228 .......2l9 ........52 135,242,319 .......2l9 .......329 .....,45,-49 .....220 ....35 .....220 ........72 315370 Romero, Lionel . . . . . . , . Romero, Norman . . . . Romney, Maurine .......,344 .......219 Ronnow, Carol ...... 219,271,327 Bobbi Ronstadt, .... . Rooker, Kenneth . . . Roper, Edward . . . .......194 ......318 ......238 Roper, Raima .......... 277,325 Rosaverte, George Rose, Stan .......... . . . . . . .132 .73,127,236 Rosebrock, Richard ......... 3 15 Roselle, Diane ...... ....219,331 Roselle, James ............. 243 361,362,364,313 Ridgeway, Arnold .......... 339 Ridgway, Audrey .... . . . . .219 Ridgway, Jon ..... ....... 3 32 Rietz, Charlene .... .... 2 21,331 Rife, Bobbie ..... ..... 2 64 Rigby, Royal .... ..... 9 8,226 Riggins, Rachel . . . .... .258 Riggs, Dick .... .... 3 38 Riggs, Marlene ............. 219 Riggs, Westlyn ............. 219 Riley, Didi ...... 250,251,254,264 Riley, Ji ............... 284,318 Ring, Billy Ann ............ 221 Rio, Ralph ....... .... 3 09 Rosen, Sid ......... Rosenbaum, Lawrence Rosenbaum, Wynn .. Rosenblum, Janie .... Rosenblum, Rosenblum, ' ' Rosenblum, Rosenfeld, Fred ...... Rosenstein, Joel .... Ross, Betty Jo .... . . . .285,320 .. . .71,113 ... . 114,235 .35,202,405 221 Maurene ........ Mrliana ......... 221 Winifred . ........ 7 1 .....305 ......319 . . . .266,330 Ross, Curtis .... ..... 2 28 Ross, Gino ....221 Ross, Patty . . . . . . .250 Ross, Peter . . . ..... . .93 Ross, Ronnie .... ........ 3 13 Ross, Roy ...... . . .83,226,287 Roth, Sanford . . . ....... .320 Roth, Sue ..... 449 . . . . 102,274 Rothengatter, Louise ........93 Rountree, Dale ..110,231,232,339 Rountree, Isabelle .... Rowan, Bob ........ Rowe, Eugene . . . Royce, Mary . . . Royster, Jean ....... .......277 .......229 ...320,321 .....264 .......281 .2zs,33s Rubi, Richard ......... Rubis, Dave ........ .......223 Ruhberg, Noel .. .57,102,277,396, 397,398,400 728 242 Ruikka, Robert ......... 2 , Ruiz, Chuchi .... ..... 3 74,375 Ruiz, Frank .... .......... 3 33 Rurnney, Ron ....... 305,368,377 Runion, Keith .......... 221,391 Runsvold, Charlie ........... 313 Rupe, Bob ................. 231 Ruppert, Peggy ..136,394,399,401 Rush, Fred ................ 287 48 222 Rush, Marsha ........... , Rushtor, Gene .. . Rusin, Diana ..... .....233 .......282 239,252 Rusnak, Marion . . . . . . . . Don ...... Russell, Russell, Mary Lois ......83 ........93 317388 Russell, Ron ....... .... , Russell, Tom ...... Russin, Jeanette . . . . . Ruterman, Marilyn . . . Ruterman, Mary ..... .......242 .......250 48,221,328 . . . . . . .328 238,313 Rutledge, Berry .... .... Ryan, Andy ..... Ryden, Ted ..... Ryland, Olivia . . . ..S- ......305 ......315 102,268 Ryland, Marilyn . . . . . . . . . . .281,330 Sabransky, Ray .... ..... 9 3,319 Sagar, Marlan E. .. Sagar, Ron ..... Sagert, Gerald . . . Sainz, Gilbert R. Sainz, Richard ...... Saller, Frank . . . . . . Salmon, Kay .... Salmon, Sydney ..... .......73 ...,221 ....229 ........73 . . . . . . .309 232,298,391 . .... 127,281 .47,127,319 Saltzman, Gil ...... .... 2 49,319 Salyer, Charlotte ........ 394,397 Sanchez, Alberto . . . . Sanchez, Herman Z. . . Sandburg, Sandy ..... .......337 . .... 339 .......136 Sandel, Mary Ruth ....... 93,227 Sanders, Gerald ..... 227,243,296 Sanders, Jerry .......... 296,383 Sanders, Patty ..... Sanders, Wayne E. Sandin, Elbamer ..... Sandin, Robert ...... Sandler, Ralph E. . . . . .......2l9 ....142 .......221 .......229 110,230,231 Sands, Bonnie .......... 127,264 Sands, John, Jr. ..... . . ...... 317 Sanford, Caroline E. ........ 237 Saraceno, Gregory J. ....... 93,95 Sasnett, Ben .... 1 ........... 72 Sasnett, Judith ............. 102 Saulsberry, Carol . .93,227,253,259 Sauter, William ............. 288 Savage, Jean ............ 281,330 Saviano, Jeanette .... 136,259,328 309 Sawata, Fred ....... .... 1 . . . Sawyer, James Alan Sayner, Florence B. Sayre, Edith Ann .... .... 2 78 Scahall, Jim ........ .... 3 22 Scanlon, Mary Ruth ......... 259 Schaefer, Lou ........... 127,320 Schafer, Rae ........ 102,272,273 ....243 .. ....277 Strauss, Martha . . . . . . Schaller, Katie ..136,254,328,398, 400 Schantz, Marianna ....... 237,278 Schaunaman, Vera ..... .240,329 Schell, Jean ............ 102,278 Schendel, Pat ..... Schermerhorn, Bob Schetter, Max A. .. Schick, Dave ...... . ...... 278 ......127,307 .........243 .........377 Schifano, Joe ............ 93,227 Schleibaum, Mike . . Schmidt, Ted ........ Schmidt, Walter . . . Schmitt, Eb. G. . . . . Schmitz, Walter .. . Schmutz, Annita . . . Schmutz, Ervin M. . Schnebly, Georgia . Schnebly, Gloria . . . ..313,359,365 . . . .72,234 .71 ....317 ....234 . .... 249 . .... 226 ....329 Schneck, Suzanne ........ 48,102 Schneider, Charles J., Jr. . .221,251 Schneider, Jacquie . Schneider, Joan E. . Schnur, Paul ...... Schober, Wm. J. . . . Schoen, Bud .... Scholl, Len ....... Schoop, Ernest R. . . Schorr, Dick ...... Schreiber, David .. Schroder, Ann .... Schroeder, Dick . . . Schulze, Gertrude T Schumacher, Joanne Schumacher, Mark Schuster, Vonda Lee Schwarz, Peg ..,... Scott, Betty ...... Scott, Bruce C. . . . . Scott, James A. . . . . Scott, John O. . . . Scott, Joe ...... Scott, Bruce ....... Scott, Shirley R. . . . Schwaemmle, Carole ..,..... 158 Seabreeze, John C. Seal, Larry ....... Seal, Mary ....... Sears, James N. .. . Seffens, Barb . . . Seginski, John J. . . . .........325 Seginski, Bill ...... Seguin, Gregory J. . Seiler, Mike ....... Selby, Herb ....... Selby, Virginia .... Selleh, Janice Faye . Sells, Sylvia ....... Seltzer, R. E. ..... . .........22l .........277 . . . . .33,45,47 . . . 83,284,322 .. . 239,334 ........309 .........381 . 226,250,287 .34,49,50,156. 185,284,320 . .218,220,222 ......110,231 . ........ 326 .........274 ......l10,232 .....102,268 .........327 .73,234 .....53 .....71 ........127 ....1l9,299 . ...... 333 ....221 ......1l0,232 .........315 . . . . 102,281 ....308,336 ....221,268 ........313 ...90,247,318 ........315 ....242 .........281 .....l02,325 ........226 Serafini, Attilio ............. 221 Serbin, George ...... 135,242,319 Sercomb, Mardi .... . . . . . 103,268 Sessions, Buddy .... 72,73,221,234 Setien, Bettina .......... 245,278 Settlemyer, George B. .. .94,228, 243,286 Shackelford, Lee ............ 339 Shadley, Jackie ........ . 103,274 Shaffer, Mary Jo .... 212,273,330 Shafton, Dan ..31,32,39,45,49,53, 157,178 Shamburger, Joe D.. . 110,228,232, 243 Shauman, Harriet Sharp, Katherine Shaver, Harry N. Shear, Herb ...... .......327 ......136 ......,240 . . . . 131,307 Shearer, Ethel ............... 73 Shelburne ,Damon .... 21 1,242,307 STUDENT INDEX - I C ontinued I Shelley, Lois ............... 250 Shelly, Pat ..45,52,83,226,243,284 Shepard, Bob ...... ........240 Shepard, Sherry ....... 3 6,48,3 31 266 Shepherd, Sarita .... Sherer, Dave ..... Sherlock, Sherman, Sherman, Sherman, Joan Bill ...... Michael G. 'fflfsis . . .221 Diane ............ 327 226,317,386 Sheydayi, Alex .......... 245,246 Sheydayi, Esfandiar Yury .... 246 Shields, Donald .......... 83,339 Shoemacher, Mark . . Shoemaker, Chuck Shoob, Stuart J. . . . . ........337 ...376 .....238 Shore, Dave ............ 110,232 Shortman, Claudia ...... 278,279 Shower, Mary .... 31,45,113,114, Shown, Frank S. . . . . Shreeve, Keith . . . . 235,277 .......110 .......219 Shroll, Jack ............. 94,309 Shultz, Gail N. .... . Shutler, Dick, Jr. Shwayder, Keith .... Siegel, Mike .... Siergiej, Lynn ...... Silberman, Cyrille .. . 127,253,284 .......116 .......321 .......321 136,264,330 127,233,262 Silvar, Gerry .... 163,222,321 Silverman, Herb ......... 83,321 Simmons, Deedee ....... 204,278 Simmons, Gene .. Simms, Jim ......,..... 105,230 Simonson, Bob .... ...... 9 4,227 187,200,292 Simpler, Michael ...... 72 Simpson, Cindy .......... 48,329 Simposn, Dianne ....... 271 Simpson, Peggy .. .35,271,336 Simpson, Sylvia H. .......... 274 Sinclair, Linda .. .68,194,l97,235, 252,271,409 Singer, Ed .. . Sink, Fred ..... Siroky, Charles . . Sisco, Virginia .. .......l19,238 ........72 ...239 ...236 Smith, Gene . . . Smith Ginny . . Smith Jack .... Smith, Jean .... Smith Joe .. . Smith, Joyce . . . Smith, Judy .... Smith, Julius J. . Smith, ...,221 ...,221 ....333 .....73 ......216 ....341,429 ............103 ............317 Lee .. .206,247,317,334,388 . ........... 376 ............273 Marilyn Sue ....... 48,283 127 Martha A. .... ..... . ....216 ....245 ....221 ............240 221 Preston . . . 128,292,293,412 Smith, Les ..... Smith, Linda . . . Smith Smith Smith, Mary . . . Smith, Melinda . Smith Mark Smith, Milton .. Smith, Pat ..... Smith, Smith, Robert .. Smith, Roy .... Smith, ............287 ............332 Sandra .lean .......... 218 Smith, Sue ........ Smith, Sylvia . . . Smith, Ted .... Smith, Wallis .. Smitt, Judy .... Smock, Charley . . . . . . . Snailum, Dale Sitterley, Ted, Jr. ....... 247 Skaggs, Gary S. ... ..... 110,317 Skinner, Alma .... ..... 2 49,331 Skinner, Gerald .... . . . 110,219 Skinner, Harold L. . . . . . .219 Skousen, Bill .... . . .238 Slack, Sue ....... . . .272 Slacks, Bob . . . .... .243 Slagle, Janie .... .... 3 4,265 Slagle, Susan .... ....... 1 70 Slater, Gary ............ 334,344 Slawsky, Phyllis . Sloan, Dean E. . . Slocum, William ........262,331 ........231 ........127,293 Smallcomb, Thomas R. 90,299,397 Smart, Susan .... 278,398,400 223 Smiley, Dolores ............ Smiley, Kathleen Snedden, Lois ........ Snider, Carolyn L. . 35,54,226,271 ............283 .........22l ....331 .......221 .ll0,230 . . . . 187,293 ......26l .........128 Snipes, Judy .... -103,216,221,277, 282,283,331 Snoddy, Anne. . 37,54,150,226,252, 277 Snodgrass, John Snodgrass, Togi . . . Snoke, Nancy .... Snoke, Sherry . . . Snow, Janet . . . Snyder, Jack . . . Soares, Lauro Sobon, Harry .... Soell, Barbi ..... Soens, Eddie ...... Solomon, Arthur .. Solomon, Carolyn . Solomon, Rose Marie Somers, Kent ..... Sommer, F. W. . . . . Sopher, Rudolph .. Sorensen, Chuck . . . Sorensen, George R. Soroya, John ...... .251,288 .......232 ....213,274 ......27s ....252,26s ....315,386 ....131,313 ....232,341 .69 293 ....289 .........268 ........329 ....293 .. .... 231 .........247 .....228,293 ........238 .........288 Sotomayor, Robert R. .... 226,243 Sottnek, John A. . . . Souter, James ...... Southworth, Kaki . . Spain, Dee ..... Sparks, Joseph F. ........... 253 Sparling, Linda ..136,194,201,328 Spaulding, Gail . Spear, John .... Sperling, Jean .. Spicer, Ron ..... Smiley, Pete ..... . . .315 Smith, Barbara ...... ..... 3 26 Smith, Betty Jean ........... 221 Smith, Carol Ann ...... 213,265 Smith, Carolyn ..... ..... 2 77 Smith, Dana ..... . . .424 Smith, Dandy .............. 281 Smith, Darrell E. ........... 332 Smith, Daryl D. ..... 242,318,336 Smith, David ................ 71 Smith, Don ................ 318 Smith, Donanna ............ 275 Smith, Smith, Smith, Doris . . .31,36,37,40,45,46, 127,273 Emmett .......... 377,380 Freeman .... . . .232,332 450 Spirer, Suzanne .... Spitler, Betsy .... Spitler, Dan ..... Stack, Ann ....... Stambach, Sandra . . Stanford Donnamae Stanford, Nancy . . . Stanley, Pam ...... Stanton, Allan ..... Stanton, John W. . . Starr, Melvin ...... Steenbergen, Bob .. Steffens, Barbie .. . Steger, Lynda .... Steiger, Sally .... .........250 .. . . .228,296 .. ...... 325 .........330 ..........275 ..........321 .. .103,236,271 .....3l5,389 .......103 .....72,234 ....285,296 .......27l ...37,156,271 ..265,399,401 .........273 ..238,359,390 .........221 .. .... 229 .. ....... 49 .......326 ....399,401 ....278,396 Steinke, Karen .. Steinwachs, Don . .71,l14,202,20 32 . . . . . . . . .22 Steinwachs, Emma .... .... 2 2 Stephens, Eddy . . Sterns, Jacqueline .... ..33 .......113,22 Stevenson, Barbara .......... 20 Stevenson, Donald Steves, Sally .... Stewart, Don .... Stewart, Gail Ann Stewart, Myles C. Stewart, Norman Stidam, Oliver . . . Stilzer, Karen . . . Stinson, Julian M. Stiver, Willard .. E. ........ 33 ....27 .... ..33 .......136,40 ....23 ....22 .. .... 22 .. .... 32 ....23 .. .... 23 St. Julien, Rene .... .... 2 3 Stoll, Audrey .... Stollar, John .... Stone, Chuck . . . Stone, Ronnie .. . Stone, William .. ....23 ......39 ....220,33 .. .... .3 .. ...... 29 Stover, Sally ...... .... 7 2,23 Stowe, DuWayne Stratton, Jocelyn . Stratton, Sandy . . Straubel, Tori . . . .....71 ....71 .. ...... 12 . . ........ 15 .207,27 Streiter, Sheldon ......l35 Strickland, Robert .......... 288 Strickland, Sonya ........... 212 Strittmatter, Don .... 110,230,231 Stucki, Harold ........... 98,226 Studebaker, Elwin O. ........ 128 Studebaker, Irv ....... .... 2 53 Stumph, Sharon ............ 128 Sturzenegger, Donald ........ 242 Suggs, Frank ............ 71,234 Sullivan, Martha ............ 277 Sullivan, Otis .............. 119 Sullivan, Pat .... 240,252,268,397, 399, 401 Sullivan, Tim .............. 313 Sutler, Linda Sue ........... 283 Sutton, Doug . . . . . .94,227,247 Sutton, J. B .... .... ........ 2 4 0 Sutton, Marlene .. . ..... .278 Sutton, Susie ...... .... 2 48 ....339 Swafford, George Swain, Andy ........ .... 5 2,110 Swanick, Bernard . . . . . . . .94 Swanson, Tom .. Swift, Richard S. ..... .307 . . . .... 72,234 Swindler, Sandy ......... 202,204 Swinney, George M. ......... 336 Swine, Jack ................ 134 Switzer, Sally ..... 51,170,252,273 Switzer, Bill ..... Syler, Ronald P. ...........318 .........110,231 Sylvain, Marlene ........ 103,325 Sylvester, Ann . . . . . ........ 240 Sypher, George .. . .... 131,311 Sypherd, Janet .... ...... 2 21 Szabo, Jeno ..... .... 2 45 Szabo, Toni ..... .... 2 65 Szink, Connie ..... .... 2 81 - T - Tadano, Ben ............... 239 Tadano, Betty ..... 48,51,239,326 Tahbaz, Yahya ......... - .... 2 46 Tair, Jane ...... ......... 3 29 Tait, Don C. . . .. . . . . 110,230,232 Takvam, Betty .......... 103,329 Takvam, Norm . . . .... 110,318 Talpia, Mat ..... ...... 2 42 Talpis, Judy .... .... 2 62 Taney, Jack . . . .... 94,309 annenbaum, Jack ....... 53,319 anney, J ack .- .... .......... 3 08 appero, Daniel .......... 94,227 arr, Howard ........ 47,243,291 arrx, Howard ............. 242 ate, James ..,.. 334,344,348,351 atum, Paddy .............. 325 aylor, Carol E. ............ 330 Elaine .... aylor, . . .248 aylor, Jerry . . . aylor, John ..... ...333 .......29l ellez, A. H. .............. . aylor, Mary P. .... ,... 9 0,275 aylor, Robert P. ........... 232 aylor, Sylvia Sue . . . 103,239,278 aylor, Virginia Rea ........ 253 elford, Erdene ...... 37,253,259 229 . . ...... 333 ellez, Barbara M. ...... 103,245 ellez, Candido A. emple, Faye ...... ..... 333 ...249,33l empleton, Joan .. . . . . 103,281 emplin, Jim ........... Weaver, Margaret . .49,307 247 ench, Gordon A. .......,. . ench, Marilyn ....,.. 45,103,281 errill, Joe D. ..... .... 3 1,232 313 erry, Thomas F. . . .... . . . erry, Vicki Jean .. . . . . 103,268 STUDENT INDEX - I C ontinuecl 1 Tomb, Judith A. .. . ..... 71,279 Tomko, Tim ....... ..... 5 3,305 322 Tompkins, Giff .... Ton, Lille .......... Topolinski, Pat ...... Tornquist, Richard F. .-1:12330 .......275 .......243 Tower, Louise Woodruff .... 330, 399,400 Toy, Herb ................. 221 Trainor, Sally .... .... 2 79,326 Trappman, Ray E. ....... 250,287 Traskowsky, George ..... 110,230 Travis, Carol . ....... Treat, Jay ........ Tretiak, Dan .... Tribolet, Tom ...... ......281 ....240 .....6s,12s .......305 Tribolet, Jack ....... .285,305,389 Tripp, R. Daniel ..... Troekenbrod, Skip . . . Troller, Johanna .... .......3l7 ........72 ...83,239 Tronolone, Robert P. ......... 94 Troupe, David C. ........... 110 Trout, Kenneth J. ..... 34,232,335 Trueblood, Craig . . . Truman, Thomas C. . Trumback, Frances A. Truxal, Jeff ........ ex, Joseph H. .. ...135,242 hatcher, Donna ......... 75,330 hacher, Lucy ....... 71,235,273 heilkas, Sharon Kay . .54,252,281 heobald, Carole . . .48,7l,324,33l hein, George ............... 90 hick, Elizabeth ....,....... 328 hikoll, Leon ....... 31,49,53,319 homas, Dave ........... 37,156 Tschirhart, Howard . .....294,333 ........390 .......325 .. .... 333 .. .... 332 Tucker, Tom ....... ...... 3 39 Tuell, Chuck ..... ..... 2 20,335 Tuell, William R. . . . .... . .377 Tull, Sue .......... .... 2 79 Turben, Judith E. . . . .... . .281 Turk, Penrod A. .. .... 332,390 Turk, A. Roger .... 248,390 Turner, Bob .... ...... 3 33 Turner, David . . . .. . .293 Turner, Kent .... .... 3 35 Turner, Leah ...... .... 1 36 Turner Lois Ann . . . ..... .266 Turner, Lynda .... ........ 2 73 Turner, Thomas .......... 71,234 Turner, William ...... 35,324,332 Thomas, Kenneth E. ........ 332 Thomas, Larry E. ....... 132,309 Thomas, Liz ...... ..... 2 81 homas, Melinda . . . .... 36,281 Thomas, Nancy . . . .... .331 Thomason, Nancy . . . . . . .327 Thompson, Alex . . . .... .218 Thompson Betty . . . .... 54,278 Thompson, Dick ......... 49,307 Thompson, Kathy .... ..... 2 81 Thompson Thompson, Thompson, Thompson Thompson, Lavee .... ..... 219 Lynn .. . ...262,327 Lee ............. 249 Linda ..... 71,103,277 Macel Jean . . .136 ,394 Thompson Mike ......... 83,313 Thompson, Peggy ........... 273 Thompson, Stuart G.. . 135,242,411 Thompson Vonna Jean ....... 72 Thomson, ,Caroline ...... 259,422 Thomson. Q. R. ............ 108 Thornberry, David ....83 Throssell, Allen .... ....... 2 49 Tibbetts, Jerry . . . . . . 110,231 386 Txbor, Ernest ..... .... ..... Tibshraeny, Nick ........... 291 Tidrick, Redman fRickJ ..... 337 Tielton, Connie ............, 327 Tigner, Dick ............ 315,357 ' 327 Tilery, Dona ............... Tims, Sandy ...... 54,2l6,22l,226 Tinsley, C. O. Jr. ........ 211,318 Tiseh, Ed .................. 221 Titcomb, Gaye .......... 275,331 Tixier, Stan ...... 83,226,239,287 Toci, Jerri ................. 250 Tokvam, Betty ............. 329 Tolby, Roy ..... Tollefson, William ...........103 Richard 128,307 Tolleson, Helen E. .......... 279 Tolley, Roy ........ . . .338 Tolliver, Don L. ..... . . .293 Tomas, Samuel M. ...230 Tussey, Sally ...... ........l03 Twito, Richard L. ....... 242,311 -U.. Udall, Helen ......... ....219 Ullman, Linda Alene ........ 283 Underwood, Dennis . . . . . . .357 Unruh, Doug ...... Urbina, Armando . . . ....307 ......376 Urias, Gonzalo ......... 128,293 Urias, Tony ................ 221 Urness, Ted ......... 334,344,357 Urton, Marcia Elaine ........ 279 Utay, Madeline E. 216,217,252,262 Utke, Karen .... 45,46,56,58,279, 406,422 Utter, David . . . .......... . .73 Uvodich, Ken ....... 242,243,307 Uvodich, Frank ............ 128 - V - Valdez. Joe V. . . . . ....243 Valencia, Sonny ...... .... 3 83 Valentine, Scott W. Valesco, Alma ...... ...94 .....36 Vana, Donna ........ .... 2 68 VanAntwerp, Shirlee ........ 268 Vane, David ............... 220 Vance, Art ................ 311 Vance, Charlotte .... 217,103,2l6, 222,277 Vance, Dave ........ .......128 Van Cleve, Peter M. ..... 110,301 Van Do Walle, Patricia ..48,283, 235 variga, Ted ................ 219 Van Pelt, Dale L. ....... 226,283 Van Poucke, Kenneth J. ...... 251 Van Sciver, John B. ......... 334 Vanskike, Shirley .... 36,48,54,329 Van Voris, Milo ...... 33,216,301 Varela, Juan ..... 221 Varga, Ted ........ . . .303 Vasallo, Claudia ..... . . .271 Vaughan, Jessie Lee .... . . .277 Vaughn, Alan C. .... ..... 1 10 Vaughn, Lamar ............ Ward, Jim ..... Ward, Martha . . . Ward, Oscar ...... Ward, Richard L. ..... . Warner, Earle ..... Warner, Jean ...... Warner, Warner, ....370 ....216 .......110 .316,317 ......240 ......250 Jed ............ 123,299 Kay Francis ..... 103,259 Warner, Perry .............. 288 Warner, Teddy F. ....... 119,238 Warren, Pat ......... ...... 2 75 Warskow, William L . ........ 243 Vaughn, Nancy S. . Vavich, M. ..... . Vatela, Alejandro 318 ......251,265 ..........240 ..........337 Veenboer, Sandra Jeanne .... 396, 399,401 Vega, Santos C. ............ 103 Velasco, Alma Teresa ....... 103 Velasco, Carmen Beatriz ..... 245 Velasco, Carmen B. ......... 328 Veliz, Norma Sarah ......... 401 Verdugo, Della ...... Verrees, Guy ...... Vitales, Dick ....... Vlahos, Alice Ann .... Vocale, Nell ....... Volk, Stanley .... Volkel, Phyllis ...... Von Blottnitz Len ...324,329 ...128,236 .....337 ...259,330 .....269 .......254 . . . .252 131246 316 Voorhees, Nalmcy Jake.. . . fioslzes Voris, Mark ............... 235 Vos, John ........... 68,226,301 Vosskuhler, Helen ....... 253,279 -W Waddell, Harold ..... .... . . .293 Wade, Sydney . . .36,5l,60,61,162, 235,271 Wadsworth, Dianne ......... 279 Waggoner, Chuck ...........25l Wagner, Chuck .... .... 4 9,315 Wahsh, Wahib T. ..... 333 Waite, Allene . . . . . .103,326 Waite, James ..... ..... 3 18 Wakefield, Bud . . . . . .385 Wakeman, Bob ..... ..... 3 09 Walcott, Ralph W .... ..... 9 4,336 Walfinger, S. ............... 221 Walker, Cecily .......... 235,248 Washburn, Nancy ....... 281,330 Wassenmiller, Carol Wasser, Stella Marie Wasson, Bonnie . . . Watchman, Leo .. . Watkins, John . . . Watson, Bill ..... Watten, Nancy .... Wayburn, Nancy . . Wayland, Brad .... Wayne, Sherry .... Wdowiak, Walt .... Weaver, David .... .........27l .....l03,273 .. ...... 27,3 ....249 .......339 . . . .322,285 . . . .237,277 . . . . . .262,327 . . . .262,327 . ...... 103 .........333 Weaver, Harry ...... 108,284,299 . . . . . .194,275 Webb, Donald Loomis J r. .... 301 Webb, J une ................ 275 Webb, Karen ............... 273 Webb, Sally ....... ....... 7 1 Wechsler, Barbara ....... 136,265 Weedmark, Virginia ......... 209 Weeks, Philip ...37,82,45,47,128, 297 Weigold, Ray ........... 242,288 Wiel, Floyd E. ....... 73,113,234 Weinberger, Jane ......... 72,328 Weingart, Judi .... Weinzapfel, Anne ....... 279,401 . . . . 204,262 .......l29 Weisblat, Judy ..... Weishart, Dennis .... ...... 3 19 Weismann, Dick ............ 251 Walker, Edwin C. 110,226,310 Walker, Lulu ............... 229 Walker, Ron ............ 305,389 Walker, William ...... 95,324,339 Wall, Barbara .... 87,277,394,396, 397 Wallace, Bill . . . ......... .299 Wallace, Bill ..... ..... 3 44,357 Wallace, Bob .............. 339 Wallace, George E. . .293,388,390, 392 Wallace Linn .... ...... 5 3,370 Weisner, Linda .... . . . . .204,259 Weissenburger, Lydia ...... 35,54 Weitsman, Bernie . . Welch, J. M., ...... Welker, Dudley Wells, Lois Ann Wells, Ola . ....... Welsh, Ronnie .... Wendling, Martha .........226 .........128 ..l19,2l9,238 .........250 ...48,242,283 Ann ...... 325 Wereh, Hugh ........... 219,250 288 Wessman, Dick . . . . West, Favil ..... Western, Mickey Weston, Bruce .. Weyer, Marilyn Weyersberg, Ann -.U.l::i291 ...333 ....335 330 ........128,269 Weyersberg, Nancy Gay ..... 269 Wharton, Keith A. Wheat, Robert .. . Wheeler, Bill .... Wheeler, Claude . . ......l08,1l0 .........248 ....307 ......l3l Wallace, R. G. ............. 110 Wallace, Wayne G. ....... 83,250 Wallach, Skip ...... ..... 2 35 Wallaher, Bill .... . . .309 Wallendorf, Al . . . ....... .376 Wallis, Celeste ............. 269 Wallis, Donna M. . . .103,136,269, 394,397,398,400 Wallis, Julie ............ 218,221 Walsh, Georgeanne ...... 113,221 Walsh, Jeanne ........ ..... 2 80 Walstrum, Anthony .. ..... 301 Walter, Robert ............. 228 Wheeler, Terry .... ..... 8 3,250 Whidden, W. R. . . . .... . .226 Whistler, Bob .............. 239 Whitaker, Chuck .... ' .... 110,307 Whitaker, James C. ......... 295 Whitaker, Suzanne .......... 271 White, Bill ................. 322 White, Derek H. .... . White, Jack E. ... .. White, Janice ...... White, Kenneth L. . . . White, Lawrence .... White, Wally ........ 106,110,231 . . . 284,310 ...252,271 ......337 ....336 ....296 Walton, Marion .......... 73,234 Walworth, Elaine . . . l03,253,258, 259 Wamsley, Jerry . . . ..... 370,373 451 Whitehead, Barbara ....103 Whitehouse, Dick ..... .... 2 93 Whiting, Montague ....339 Whitlow, Bob ...... . . .344,351 Whitlow, Frank . . . ...... .287 Whitnell, Gwen .... . . .275,399 Whitney, Gail . . . . . .281,326 Whitten, Jim . . . .... .339 Whooley, Pat ............ 95,315 Wiblemo Andy ......, , ..... 336 Wiborg, Lloyd .... 35,307,385,389 Wick, Elizabeth ......... 221,254 Wick, Maxine Tankersley 103,277 Wicks, Bob ......... 250,251,332 Wiecks, J an ........... .....271 Wiederhold, B. K. ....... 392,293 Wiener, Harmon . . . . . .....319 Wiersema, Ted . . . ...... 49,305 Wilbur, Beverly . .- . . . . ......71 Wilbur, John C. .... 45,47,95,284 305 Wilhoite, Judy ........,.. 73,234 Wilkerson, James L. . . . . .....231 Wilkes, Jim ..... 34,49,50,211,315 STUDENT INDEX - I Continued J Williams, Richard O. ...l05,110, 228,243 Williams, Sandra ........... 252 Williams Steve ..232,294,334,388 wiuiamsf William J. ..... 230,231 Williamson, Robert W. Jr. .... 233 Wollack, Peter . . . Wong, Dale .... Wong, Dan ......,.... Wong, Roy ........... .....l32 ....339,340 .....335 49,53,239 Wong, Thomas John ..... 221,324 Woo, Wilson ........... 242,338 .........250 Wilkie, Gloria ........ 54,269,275 Wilkinson, Carol Ann. .71,235,281 Wille, Herman M. Jr. ......... 95 Willet, Herbert ............. 221 Willett, Dick ........... 128,339 Willett, Walter Davidson .... 335 Willigrod, Bill .......... 232,242 Willis, Willis, Calvin ........... 250,287 Willis, Holly ...... 87,252,269,397 Willis, J. R. ............. 35,284 Wilson, Beverly ..212,221,235,269 Wilson, Dean William . . .1l0,231, 311 Anne ............... 283 Wilson, Wilson, Jim .... Dodie .......... 252,275 . . . . 35,315,370 Wilson, Larry .............. 229 Wilson, Pat ......... 103,137,385 Wilson, Robert E. Wilson, Sally Jean ....... 103,265 Wilson, Sally Jo .... ...... 2 77 Wilson, Wallace R. .... ..... 1 10 Wilson, Walter F. Winawer, Hank ............. 319 Wineberg, Donna Wing, Jim .......... 103,206,293 Winn, Linda ............ 160,273 ...........3l5 ..... .336 .......l36,330 Wood, Chuck ........... 334,357 Wood, Donald D. . . ..... 332 Wood, Edwin ..... ..,. 2 28 Wood, Gail .... ..... 9 5,327 Wood, Judith .. . .... .259 Wood, Sue .......... 217,277,396 Wood, William ...... 284,315,389 Woods, Lee ............ 227,271 Woods, Ted ............ 305,389 Woodward, Cecily .......... 271 Woodward, Jr., Grady . . .222,253, 339 Woodward, Jim .......... 71,234 Woodworth, Geneva ........ 221 Wozny, Michael J. ...31,324,339, 340 Wrasper, John Wrenn, Andy Wrenn, Pat ....... 34, 103,252,279 Wright, Wright, Chris Dee .... Yerger, Lucy ...194,201,250,2 3 Yoakam, LeRoy ............ 3 Yoder, Robert G. ..... .... 2 Yoengling, Herman F. ....... 3 Yonsetto, Peter A. .......... . Yontef, Gary ......... 68,235,2 Young , Donya ..........,.. 2 Young, George ...... 322,379,3 Young, Jerry A. ............ . Young, J. Nathan ....... 293,3 Young, Joe ..337,344,347,355,3. Young, Paschel Wallace ..110,2 Young, Pat ................ 3 Young, Robert ....... .... 2 Young, Theresa F. . . . . . . . . Youngren, Bill .... ...... 6 2, Yount, Robert . . . .... 305,3 Yurkas,Ruth - Z - Zabik, Darlene .... .... 2 Zachau, Don .... .... 3 Zahn, Margaret .... .... 3 Zahniser, Rick .... ....... Willey, Mary Ellen ..... Williams, Bob ......... .....281 .....3l3 Winship, Henry W. ......... 301 Wright, Elaine Wright, Sue ..... .... 2 83 . . . .265,330 Zaiser, Julie ...... 2 ......204,2 Williams, Williams Williams Williams J : Carol .......... 71,281 Dick .......... 231,303 Evelyn Faye ....... 327 Herbert E. ........ 238 Williams Jack ...... 110,232,234 Williams, Kathy ..95,194,202,204, 269,275 Williams, Keith H. .......... 230 Williams, Kenlynn .... 35,73,252, 281,330 Williams, Lucille B. ......... 103 Williams, Mary W. . . .221,271,327 Williams, Pat .............. 219 Winsten, Dennis ....... 49,53,291 Wisdom, Lila Josephine . .221,398, 400 Wise, Edward .... ..... 2 40 Witwer, Linda . . ..... 281 Woedyla, Betty . . . .... .248 Woffinger, Susan . . . .... .328 Wofford, Karen .... .... 6 7,321 Woidyla, Walter . . ........ 95 Wolf, Dick ................ 315 Wolf, Joe H. ......... 95,288,221 Wolfson, Lee .... 211,223,284,289 Wolin, Dawn ............... 331 Wolinsky, Merle ..... 103,262,263 Wygant, Paul Wylie, Harold ....296 ....236 -Y- Yaseen, Bob . Yaseen, David Yavelberg, Irv Yeager, Mike . . . Yeazell, Gene ....321 ....... .321 ....233,3l9 ....344,354 ......221 AIME .......... ...... 2 32 "A" Day.. . Acacia ............ Administrative officials Advertising Club .... Aggie Club ........ Aggie House ....... Agricultural Extension AIEE-IRE . ......... -A GENERAL INDEX 151 286 ....18-23 248 250 287 . . . .84,85 230 Alpha Chi Omega . .. Alpha Delta Pi ....... . . . .258,259 . . . .,260,261 Alpha Delta Sigma .... ..... 2 28 Alpha Epsilon ...... ..... 2 27 Alpha Epsilon Phi . . . .... 262,263 Alpha Kappa Delta .... ..... 2 33 Alpha Kappa Psi ..... . .. 228 Alpha Lambda Delta . . . .... . 226 Alpha Phi .......... .... 2 64,265 Alpha Phi Omega . . . .... . 226 Alpha Omicron .... . . . 237 Alpha Rho Tau . . . . . . 235 Alpha Sigma Phi . . . . . . 288 Alpha Tau Alpha . . . . . . 226 Alpha Tau Omega .... . .. 290 Alpha Xi Delta ..... . . . . . . 266 Alpha Zeta ....................... . .. 226 American Pharmaceutical Association . . . . . . 242 452 Zeidler, Cheryl Ann ..54,216,27 4 Zeller, Miles ............ 368,3 Zepp, Don .......... 110,230,2 Ziehler, Tony .............. 2 Zigmond, Sandee ........... 2 Zimmer, Don .... 110,228,230,2 Zimmerman, Tootie ......... 2 Zimmerman. Jr., Joe ..35,243,3 Zinder, Dave . . . 110,226,230,23 3 Zinder, Naomi .......... 226,2 Yee, Albert .- -.-...--- 335 Zmkl, Joe ................ .3 Yee, Howard ............... 242 Zion, Daniel, ,235,315,324,334,3 Yee, Lily ........... 103,324,325 Zuber, Bud ................ 31 Amerind Club ....... . . 249 Anthropology' Club . . . . . 249 Arizona Hall ....... .. -332 Arnold Air Society . . . . . . . 242 Art .............. .... 7 6,77 Artist Series .. .... 166,167 ASCE .......... ..... 2 31 ASME ........... .... .... 2 3 2 Associated Students ......... . . .28-30 Associated Women Students . . . . . .36,37 - B - Band ................ . . .72,73 Baptist Student Union Barrister Biddies ....... Baseball ........... Basketball ......... Beta Beta Beta ...... Beta Gamma Sigma ....... .. Bahai Youth Organization . .. Blood Drive ............ Blue Diamonds . . . Blue Key ........ Board of Control .... Board of Publications . . . Board of Regents . . Bobcats ......... BPA Council . . . 222 253 . . . .370,375 . . . .358-367 239 225 .. 220 . . 170 .. 289 . . 47 . . 40 .. 40 .. 21 .. 50 .. 90 Campbell-Plymouth Club A .... . . . 220 Campus Chest ..... Campus Democrats . anterbury Club . . . hain Gang ...... heerleaders . . . Chess Club .. Chimes .... Chi Omega . . . Choraliers ..... Choral Society .... ...183 .. ...253 .. 218 52 .. 160 254 51 268,269 71 70 Circle K Club .... . . . 246 Cochise Hall ........ . . . 333 Coconino Hall ........... .... . . . . . . 325 College of Agriculture ...................... .... 8 0-S3 College of Business and Public Administration ....... 88-95 College of Education .96-103 College of Engineering . . . . . . 104-110 College of Fine Arts .... . . . 111-114 College of Law ........... . . . 117-120 College of Liberal Arts ......... .. .121-128 College of Mines and Metallurgy . . . . . . 130-132 College of Pharmacy 133-135 Concert Orchestra .............. . . . 74 Conservative Baptist Foundation . . . . . . 222 Crescent Club ..... . . . 294 Cross Country . . . . . . 380 Deans .... . . . 22 Dedication ...... . . . 2 Delta Chi .......... .... 2 92,293 Delta Delta Delta .... .... 2 70,271 Delta Gamma ...... .... 2 92,293 Delta Sigma Phi . . . . . . 295 Delta Sigma Pi .... 227 Delta Sigma Rho ,. 235 Desert Dance .... . . . 179 Drama ...... . .65-67 Elections . . . 186,187 Fencing Club . .. Flute Quartet . . . Football ........ Forensics . . . . . . . .... Freshman baseball . Freshman basketball Freshman Class ..... Freshman 'football .... . Freshman Week .... . . . . . . . GammaPhiBeta... Gila Hall ...... Golf .........,. Graduate College . . . . . . . Graduation .... Graham Hall . . . Greek Week . . . Greenlee Hall . . . Gymnastics .... ...254 75 344-356 68 ...376 ...368 35 357 150,151 274,275 326 382 115,116 194 334 184,185 335 384 - H - High School Senior Day ....... . . Hillel Foundation ....... Homecoming ......... Home Economics Club . . . Honoraries ........... Hopi Lodge .... . . -1- In Memoriam ..... .... Insurance Club ....... Inter-Dorm Council ........ Interfraternity Council ....... Interfraternity Pledge Council . International Students Club Intervarsity Christian Fellowship Intramurals ................ -J- Judicial Council . Junior Class ..... .. -K- Kappa Alpha ........ . . Kappa Alpha Theta .... Kappa Beta Pi ....... Kappa Epsilon ....... Kappa Kappa Gamma .... Kappa Kappa Psi ....... Kappa Psi .......... KappaSigma... -L- Lambda Chi Alpha ..... . . Lambda Delta Sigma . . . Lariat Theater ....... LDS Institute ............ Le Cercle Francais .......... Little Chapel of All Nations . . . Los Universitarios ........... Louie's Lower Level ......... Lutheran Student Foundation ..... .. M - Maricopa Hall .... ..... Marketing Club . . . Men's Night .... Mermaids ............ Military ................ Mohave-Manzanita Hall .... Mom and Dad's Day ..... Mortar Board ....... Mortar Board Dance .... .... -N- National Collegiate Players .... Navajo Hall ............. Newman Club .... .... -0- Orchesis .................. . Outstanding Sportswoman .... 453 .158,l59 .... 223 164,165 252 224-243 336 455 247 324 284 285 245 218 387-392 257 34 . .... 296 276,277 238 . . . 240 278,279 234 241 298,299 300,301 302,303 67 219 .. 246 .. 220 .. 245 . 157 .. 223 .. 328 .. 247 .. 191 400 138,139 .....327 154,155 .. 46 .. 178 .. 237 .. 337 .. 221 .. 401 .. 395 Panhellenic Council . Papago Lodge .... Parker Club .... Pershing Rifles Phi Alpha Delta .... Phi Beta Kappa .... Phi Delta Chi .... Phi Delta Kappa .... Phi Delta Theta . . . Phi Delta Phi ....... . . . . . 238 Phi Gamma Delta .... .... Phi Kappa ........ Phi Kappa Phi Phi Kappa Psi ...... Phi Lambda Phrateres Phi Lambda Upsilon Phi Mu Alpha ...... . ....256 338 222 243 238 225 241 249 304,305 306,307 308,309 225 . ....... 297 282,283 .... .240 ....234 Physical Education, Men ..... .... 1 37 Physical Education, Women .... ..... 1 36 Pi Beta Phi ............ . . . . .... 280,281 Pi Delta Phi ........ Pi Kappa Alpha . . Pi Kappa Phi ..... Pi Lambda Theta . .. Pima Hall ....... Pi Mu Epsilon . . . Pinal Hall .... Pi Omega Pi .... Pistol Club .... Polo Village ..,.... Pom Pon Girls ...... .....236 310 311 229 329 233 339 227 254 ....341 ....l60 Presbysterian Student Fellowship .... .... 2 21 Publications .................. . ..... 56-63 Racquet Club Radio and TV . . . Ramblers Club . . . Registration ........ Religious Groups .... Religion In Life Week Research .............. .... Rho Chi ........... Rifle Team . .. Rodeo Club . . . Rodeo ...... Royalty ......... Rush Counselors .... ....40l .. 69 249 .. ..... 152 216-223 .......182 140-145 .. ..... 241 386 250 172-173 195-213 .... .257 Santa Cruz-Apache Hall ...... .... 3 40 Saxaphone Quartet . . .. 75 Scabbard and Blade .......... . . . 243 School of Home Economics .. .......... 86,87 School of Nursing ......... ............ 1 29 Semester Sidelights .... .... 1 76,l77,192,193 Senior Class ........ Sigma Alpha Epsilon .... ....... Sigma Alpha Eta .... Sigma Alpha Iota . . . Sigma Chi ........ Sigma Delta Pi ..... Sigma Phi Epsilon . . . Sigma Pi Sigma . . . Sigma Nu .... . ............ 34 .312,313 ... . 235 ... . . 235 314,315 236 318 340 316,317 454 Ski Club .... . . Soccer ............. Society of Sigma Xi .... Sophomore Class ..... Sophos ........... Sports Car Club .... Spring Sports ,... Spring Siesta .......... Spurs ................. Student Life Committee ..... Student NEA ..............,... . . . . . . . 39 SU Birthday Party ............ . . . Student Union Activities Board Swimming Team . . . Symhonic Choir -T Tau Beta Pi .... Tau Beta Sigma . . . Tau Delta Phi .,.. Tempe Weekend . .. Tennis . . ........ Theta Chi ........ Theta Mu-Psi Chi .... Theta Tau ........ Track .......... Traditions ..... Twirp Week - U University Nazarenes . . . . . . University Dames .... University Players .... University Services . . . ..251 386 ..239 .. 35 .. 53 251 369-386 188,189 54 .. 40 .. 252 162,163 385 .. 71 .. 231 .. 234 319 168,169 381 .. 322 .....236 230 377-379 49 .. 156 .. 223 .. 248 237 . .24,25 Univets .......... . . . . . 248 - V Varsity Show . . . . 180,181 - W Wesley Foundation . . . . . . . . . . 219 Who's Who ............... . .42-45 Women's "A" Club .......... . . . 400 Womenis Athletic Association .... . . . 394 Women's Day ............... .. . 190 Women's Press Club . . . . . . . 233 Women's Sports ..... . . .393,401 Wranglers ......,. .... 4 8 Wrestling . . . ....... . . . 383 - Y Yavapai Hall . . . ... . . . 330 Yuma Hall ....... 331 - Z Zeta Beta Tau .... ....... . . 320,321 IN MEMORIAM FACULTY Arthur Olaf Anderson W. Arthur Cable William Cromartie Currie John B. Crowder Allegra Frazier Edward Schulman Frederick A. Waterman STUDENTS Harold R. Fleck Robert J. Friedman Larry Greene Jacob R. Kagan Charles LaViska George A. Snell William C. Torres Robert J. Trainor SWAN SONG It's all over and the 1958 Desert can take its place on the shelf along with its predecessors. Also at an end is our ex- periment in "co-editorshippingj' which was innovated fourteen months ago by the Board of Publications. If nothing else, it provided the needed "shoulder to -cry on" when things seemed blackest, but more than that, it has enabled us both to spend extra time on the finer points of yearbook editing. Publishing a book this size' is an education in itselfg learning to work cooperatively with over a hundred people is an even bigger lesson. ' Many times in the past couple weeks we have been asked if we'd accept the job if it were all to be done over again. First reactions were definitely in the negative. There are more workhours tied up in these 456 pages than we care to remem- ber, more failing grades and warped nerves than the casual reader will ever be aware of. But thanks to a wonderful group of staff members, understanding professors, sympathetic sorority sisters and helpful advisors, this l958 Desert is finally in print. We hope it meets with your approval. Our job would have been impossible without the splendid cooperation of so many, many people. Our deepest apprecia- tion goes to: Bill Smith, advisor to the Desert, for his loyal support and never ending encouragement throughout the entire year. And his staff in the Press Bureau for their excellent cooperation. Mark Voris, art advisor, who so capeably suggested color schemes and type sizes. Pat Larson, art editor, for her splendid job with the art work and many patient hours with the paste-up crew. Pat was also responsible for much of the decorations for the Desert Dance. Gail Oltinger, copy editor, who could be called on a moment's notice to write a misplaced headline or stubborn caption. Gail is undoubtedly one of the most dependable per- sons it has ever been our pleasure to work withiand deserves a very sincere vote of thanks for editing the rheams of copy in the book. Gayle Runke, administration and activities editor, for her efficient manner in turning our four signatures in record time, and to Geri Craig who was such a tremendous help to Gail. Ann Bogner, colleges editor, for doing such a fine job with a diliicult section and to Pete Johnson for spending so many afternoons tracking down lost senior pictures. Also to Corrine Davis, Marianne Gilbert and John Spear for assisting Ann in such a fine manner. Noel Rulzberg, campus life editor, who deftly handled practice teaching, Mermaids and her section simultaneously with "ease" and ability. Also to Sue Ankeny and Susie O'Brien who carried a great deal of the load. C1aire,Leibenguth, organizations editor, who did such a fine job with the largest section of the book and for organiz- ing the thousands of Greek individual pictures appearing in this edition. This job turned out to be far more time consum- ing than any of us imagined last September. 456 Ernie Leonard, sports editor for an outstanding sports section. Thanks also to Jon Leonard and Tom Kennedy who worked with Ernie duirng the year and to Pele Brown for diligently plunging into the chaos a few days before the final deadline. Andrea Lott, business manager, for her enthusiasm and efficiently in organizing the technical end of the book and for being such a tremendous morale booster. Margie Baldwin, secretarial manager, who stepped in at the last minute to complete the overwhelmingly large job of indexing during Easter vacation. Beverly Clark, index man- ager, for her line job in organizing the index before illness forced her to resign. Pal Gordon, circulation manager, who did such a very efficient job that the editors never had to worry about sales or promotion. Marcia Orr, Desert Dance chairman, and her committee, for doing such a splendid job with much en- thusiasm. Stan Fabe and Irv Shandling, of Shandling Lithographing Company for being such fine people to work with. A special thanks to them for all the over-time spent to correct the editors' mistakes and for their eagerness to turn out a superior printing job. The Photo Division Staff, Henk Moonen, Art Grasberger, Starz Oaks, Bob Broder and Janet Rounrree for their never ending efforts to print superior pictures in the face of threaten- ing deadlines. Cy Morneau and staff, of Morneau Typographers in Phoe- nix, for the excellent job of typesetting. Howard Weclel, of Arizona Trade-Bindery, for doing such a superior job with the covers. Bumps Tribolet, Graduate Manager, and his entire staff for managing the finances for the Desert. And finally, our very sincerest thanks to those who took time from their own work to lend a hand when the going was roughest. Bob Golalfarb, 1957 editor, who spent his Easter vacation editing a signature in Phoenix. And for his frequent goodwill visits to the oliice alias John Foster Dulles. To Ron Butler for his superior job on the Photographic Essay and Gordon Evans, who spent many of his spare moments away from the Wildcat to help check names, edit copy and advise layouts. And to Jim Malmberg for lending a helping hand with the index. Also to the many individuals who frequently dropped in to "see if we needed any help" which inevitably we did. Our heartfelt thanks to you all. Before we say our final adieu, we would like to wish Ann Bogner, editor of the '59 Desert, the best of everything. With her own excellent backgorund and the patient concern of a certain law student, we're sure her book will be a superior one. We have tried our best to please you, the student body, with this '58 Desert. But we are not infallible and mistakes are certain to be found. Forgive us for the grave onesg the less important just forget, as we are trying to do. Thanks again, to a tremendous staff. Best of luck next year. Sincerely, Mary Lee Hutchison Karen Utke, co-editors mm1--i- ' ' I "Q" K 1 H' 1"'! 1"'1I' v'u1I"1p"+ f"n A .1 -cwhxxf rl 4, ,Hex


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